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TIMES 


FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


Fall in jobless 
is the biggest 
for 7% years 


. Unwnptoymem has started 
J? «N as a result of the 
Government’s special mea- 
sures, according to figures 
relrased yesterday. The jobless 
total recorded its largest 
underlying fall for seven and a 
hair years. 

The adult unemployment 
total, adjusted for seasonal 
factors, fell by 22.000 to 
3.197,000 last month. That 
was the sharpest monthly fall 
since Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
j979 Came 10 P ° wer ' m May 

"This month's figures ... can 
only give encouragement to all 
concerned about the level of 
unemployment in the 
country," Lord Young of 
(jraflham, the Secretary of 
State for Employment, said. 

“This is the greatest 
monthly Tail since April 1979 
and part of the credit must be 
given to the Restart pro- 
gramme which endeavours to 
help the long-term un- 
employed find a route back to 
work,” he added. 

But Opposition politicians 
accused the Government of 
presenting misleading figures 
and of failing to create real 
jobs in the economy. 

Mr John Prescott, Labour 
spokesman on employment, 
said: “While we welcome any 
reduction in unemployment. 


this is a false dawn. We are 
now seeing the evidence of 17 
h dales of the unemployment 
figures since this government 
came into office." 

Mr Ian Wriggleswonh. the 
Social Democratic Party 
spokesman on economics »nH 
industry, said: “The Govern- 
ment now feces a yawning 
cavern of credibility. The 3J 



— ^old— 


• The £4,000 prize in 
The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition was 


four readers - 1 
David R. Frost, of - 
Bromley Common, 

Kent; MrsQ4-. Evans, of 
Loxwood, West 
Sussex; Mrs D. 
Halesworth, of 
Sheringham, Norfolk; 
and Mr Ramen 
Bhattacharya, of Merton 
Park, London: 

Details, pageS. 

• There is another 
£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list, page 25; 
how to play, information 
service, page 20. 

Two awarded 
Nobel prizes 

The Nobel Prize for Literature 
has been awarded to Wole 
Soyinka, the Nigerian play- 
wright, poet, and novelist Mr 
James McGill Buchanan, of 
George Mason University in 
Virginia, has been awarded 
the Nobel Prize for 
Economics Pages 9, 21 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Group boost 

Mr James Sherwood, presi- 
dent of Sea Containers, the 
owners of Sealink British Fer- 
ries. said he had no doubt 
about the “financial integrity" 
of his group Page 21 

Granada buy 

Granada Group is to pay the 
Ladbroke Group £30.25 mil- 
lion for Laskys. the consumer 
electronics retail chain which 
lost £645,000 pretax in the 
year to the end of JunePage 21 

Black money 

Britain’s black economy is 
equivalent to between 3 and 5 
per cent of gross domestic 
broduct - lower than previous 
estimates, according w ™ 
Institute for Fiscal 
Studies Pa » e zi 


TIMES SPORT 


Olympic lift 

Indiscreet lobbying on behalf 
of Barcelona could strengthen 
Birmingham’s chance of suc- 
cess in this morning’s voting 
in Lausanne for the 199- 
Olympic Games city Page 34 

Race cancelled 

The long-awaited match race 
between America's Cup chal- 
lengers Stars and Snipes and 
New Zealand IV, off Fre- 
mantle. was cancelled due to 
bad weather Page 32 


Home News 3-5 
Overseas 7-1# 

ApptS 1&22 

Arts 12,13 

Births, deaths. 

marriages 19 
Basittss 21-2# 
Court 18 

Oosmwrds 14J0 
Diary 16 
Features 14-1# 
Law Report 10 


<r ■& ft £ * * 




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million jobless have never had 
it so bad. The Government 
should now switch its effort to 
creating real jobs instead of 
Lord Young’s inadequate 
palliatives." 

Mr Norman Willis, the 
TUC general secretary, said: 
“There is no sign of any real 
change in the unacceptably 
high level of unemployment, 
which still stands at 74.000 
higher than this time last 
year." 


The unadjusted unemploy- 
ment total rose by 52.791 to 
3,332,897 last month. That 
was equivalent to 12.1 per 
cent of the working popula- 
tion or. on the old definition, 
13.5 per cent of employees 
plus the unemployed. 

Normally, there is a rise of 
more than 100,000 in un- 
employment in September, as 
summer school leavers reach 
the register. Last month's rise 
was half the increase a year 
earlier. 

That was both because of a 
smaller number of un- 
employed school leavers, 
140.731 last month, and be- 
cause of improved prospects 
for adults in the labour 
market. 

The 22,000 foil in the 
adjusted unemployment total 
for adults last month came 
aftera decline of 4,200 in 
August In the past six 
months, it has declined by an 
average of 300 a month. 

That suggests a marked 
turnaround in the labour mar- 
ket But officials at the Depart- 
ment of Employment were 
cautious about trends m un- 
employment beyond pointing 
to the flatness of the total over 
the past six months. 

Last autumn, unemploy- 
ment levelled off before rising 
sharply over the winter. This 
winter, however, the jobless 
total will benefit from a 
significant expansion of the 
Government's special 
measures. 

Already, there are signs that 
Continued on page 20, eol 7 


Tory right 
holds grip 
on Whips 

By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

The march of the Tory right 
through Mrs Margaret That- 
cher’s administration contin- 
ued yesterday with the 
appointment of three new 
Whips m the Commons. 

They are Mr Michael 
Portillo, aged 33, MP for 
Enfield Southgate, Mr Rich- 
ard Ryder, aged 37, MP for 
Norfolk Mid, and Mr David 
Lightbown. aged 53, MP for 
Staffordshire South East 
Mr Portillo, a former min- 
isterial special adviser and ofl 
industry consultant, is a 
member of the 92 Group and 
the robustly Thatcherite No 
Turning Back faction of 
Conservative MPs. 

He was due- to become 
second Parliamentary private 
secretary to the Prime Min- 
ister in the September re- 
shuffle. a move that was called 
off after protests by Mr Mi- 
chael Alison, MP for Selby, 
the incumbent PPS. 

Mr Ryder, who worked in 
Mrs Thatcher’s private office 
for six years up to 1981. is also 
seen as being on the right of 
the party. 

The appointment of Mr 
Lightbown. director of an 
engineering company, main- 
tains the regional balance m 
the 1 4-strong whips office. 


Speech by 
Lawson to 


disai 


mi 


By Rooney Lord 
Economics Editor 


It 


Mr Nigel Lawson, Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer, in a 
low-key speech at the Man- 
sion House last night, de- 
fended his decision to raise 
interest rates by 1 per cent on 
Tuesday. 

The speech was expected to 
disappoint foreign exchange 
markets where the pound was 
trading in anticipation of his 
remarks. 

Sterling ended the day in 
London at 67.7 per cent of its 
1975 value, up 0.1 on the 
previous close. It closed at 
$1.4402 and at DM2.8434. 

Mr Lawson emphasized 
that Government borrowing 
was firmly under controL 

To support his remarks the 
latest figures for the public 
sector borrowing requirement 
showed borrowing of £22 
trillion in September — lower 
than the financial markets 
expected. 

The Chencellor said that he 
was not concerned at the rate 
of growth in bank credit or the 
broad measure of the money 
supply. 

His decision to raise interest 
rates by ! per cent earlier this 
week was prompted by an 
acceleration in the narrow 
measure of the money supply 
and by the pressure on the 
pound. 



Mrs Thatcher and President Mitterrand in harmony outside No 10 yesterday. 

Mitterrand 


m arms 
accord 

By Philip Webster 
Britain and France agreed 
yesterday that a nuclear deter- 
rent should be maintained as 
the basis of the defence of the 
West 

During a two-hour 
Downing Street meeting Mrs 
Thatcher and President 
Mitterrand were united in the 
view that the Geneva arms 
control negotiations should 
proceed against the back- 
ground of a nuclear deterrent 
remaining the cornerstone of 


the strategy pursued by the 
United States, Britain and 
France. 

After the - meeting M 
Mitterrand told reporters 
there woold be up cha^erin 
the French noefear policy. It 
would only ever be reconsid- 
ered if the Russians and 
Americans made “drastic” 
reductions in their nuclear 
arsenals. 

M Mitterrand had re- 
quested yesterday’s meeting to 
prepare for the European 
heads of government meeting 
in London in December and 
the Franco-British summit in 
Paris in November. 

More than three-quarters of 
the discussions centred on the 
Reagan-Gorbacfaov summit 
in Iceland. Mrs Thatcher and 
M Mitterrand agreed that 
had been made 
Mitterrand apparently 
repeated his own opposition 
to the Strategic Defence Initia- 
tive, but was dearly anxious in 
the discussions and afterwards 
nrttomakeitastidting-pomL 
He said difficulties would 
remain if the Americans made 
absolutely no move on SDI 
but felt that in negotiations a 
compromise could be reached. 

M Mitterrand said that 
Britain and France were in 
agreement on arms control 
and hoped there would soon 
be another East-West snznmiL 
The two leaders agreed that 
the priorities for December's 
summit would be jobs, the 
completion of the European 
internal market and efforts to 
■combat terrorism. 


Patten asks for extra £40m in aid 


The Cabinet is 
demand from senior ministers 
for the first substantial in- 
crease in the overseas aid 
programme since the Conser- 
vatives took office in 1979. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, and Mr 
Christopher Patten, the re- 
cently appointed Minister for 
Overseas Development, are 
believed to be pressing for a 
£40 million increase on the 
sum which had already been 


Mr Patten foiled last week 
to reach an agreement with Mr 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 

feeing a John Macgregor, Chief Sec- Whiteiaw, 
rotary to the Treasury, who is 
in charge of the Treasury's 
efforts to keep the 1987-88 
spending total to the target of 
£144 billion and has been 
bolding discussions through 
the summer with tire spending 
ministers. 

Now Sir Geoffrey, who has 
overall responsibility for the 
budget, and possibly Mr Pat- 
ten, wiD be among the first 
ministers to be summoned 
before the Star Chamber, the 
Whitehall public spending 
“court" chaired by Lord 


which began its 
attempts this week to settle 
disputes between the Treasury 
ana the spending 
departments. 

The aid budget for 1987-88 
was provisionally set last year 
at £1230 million — £r00 mil- 
lion more than the 1985-86 
figure 

That agreement . was re- 
garded as somethin of a 
victory for Sr Geoffrey and 
Mr Timothy Raison, Mr Pat- 
ten’S predecessor, who lost his 
job in the September reshuffle. 


Russians let sick 
scientist out 


From Michael Binyon, Washing ton 

Dr David Goldforb, the News & World Report corres- 
pondent, to his flat where the 
KGB would be waiting. When 
his flat 


ailing Soviet geneticist who 
refused to help the KGB com- 
promise Mr Nicholas Dani- 
loff. was yesterday allowed to 
leave Moscow with his wife, 
Cecilia. They flew to the 
United States on a private 
plane owned by Dr Anmand 
Hammer, the US industrialist. 

DrGoldferb’s son, who is in 
the US, said last month that he 
feared for his father's life, and 
appealed to President Reagan 
to take up the case with the 
Soviet authorities. It is under- 


A serious rift between Nato 
military commanders and 
Vashn|laD.]HB;left its- most 
senior officers angry and Pros- 
trated at the lack of consulta- 
tion over arms reduction 
proposals (Peter Davenport 
writes from Brussels). 


stood that the issue was raised 
by Mr George Shultz, the US 
Secretary of State, during hu- 
man rights talks in Reykjavik. 

The State Department said 
it bad been watching his case 
closely for a number of years, 
but it had no further details 
about his departure, which 
was arranged by the personal 
intervention of Dr Hammer, 
aged 88, the chairman of 
Occidental Petroleum and a 
long-time confident of the 
Soviet leaders. 

Mr Alex Goldforb said his 
father was asked by the KGB 
to invite Mr Danfloffi The US 


he refused, his flat was 
searched, research materials 
confiscated and his exit visa, 
granted in 1984. was taken 
away. 

Mr Goldforb said his father 
was critically ill with diabetes 
in a Soviet hospital and Soviet 
doctors were considering am- 
putating his leg because of 
gangrene. He said his father, 
whom he thought Mr Daniloff 
might call asa defence witness 
if he had been tried, could 
have been killed by the Rus- 
sians to silence him. 

• MOSCOW: The Kremlin’S 
chief spokesman, Mr Gen- 
nady Gerasimov, yesterday 
removed the ambiguity sur- 
rounding Moscow's stand on 
arms control by flatly ruling 
out any chance of a deal on 
European missile reduction 
separate from the issue of Star 
Wars, on which there are deep 
disagreements with the US 
(Christopher Walker writes). 

Pressed by western report- 
ers at the first briefing here 
since the breakdown of the 
Reykjavik summit, Mr Gera- 
simov ended the confusion 
caused by earlier remarks 
made in London and Bonn by 
Mr Viktor Karpov, the chief 
Soviet arms negotiator that an 
unrelated agreement on elimi- 
nating super power missiles in 
Europe was still feasible. 

Continued page 20, col 7 


Queen 

inspects 

ghostly 

guard 

From Alan Hamilton 

K miming 

The Queen continued her 
state visit to China yesterday 
by reviewing the stiffest guard 
or honour she has ever shot a 
glance at while the Duke of 
Edinburgh loosed off one of 
his celebrated sharp remarks, 
teetering between truth and 
levity, which indicated that he 
found Peking boring. 

The royal couple flew from 
Shanghai to the north-western 
city of Xian to inspect one of 
the greatest archaeological 
discoveries of the century, the 
buried army of terracotta war- 
riors that guard the tomb of 
Qin Shi Huang, who in the 3rd 
century BC was the first 
emperor to unify China. 

In a huge excavated pit 
under a vast arch-roofed han- 
gar almost as big as St Pancras 
station, 1,087 lifesize figures 
of baked clay, every one 
slightly different and each the 
colour of the surrounding pale 
brown earth, stand in silent 
and spectacular testimony to 
the determination of one man 
to be remembered 2,000 years 
after his death. 

The Queen descended the 
30ft pit and inspected this 
ghostly guard with a greater 
intimacy than she would ac- 
cord to, say, the Brigade of 
Guards. She touched them 
and felt their fine detail and 
showed great interest in their 
footwear. 

At times, all that could be 
seen as she walked the deep 
and narrow excavated tren- 
ches was an aquamarine hat 
bobbing among a rank of tall 
and unblinking warriors. 

The Emperor Qin. who 
made his capital city of Xian 
flourish to three times the size 
of its imperial contemporary, 
Rome, built this bizarre cata- 
comb in his own lifetime for 
his own immortality. There 
are about 6,000 warriors, most 
Contmued on page 20, col 5 


23 hurt in 
rush-hour 
rail crash 

Twenty-three people were 
taken to hospital after a 
British Rail train crashed into 
the back of a London Under- 
ground train in north-west 
London yesterday evening. 

As rescue workers arrived 
on the scene one person was 
reported trapped, but British 
Transport police later said 
jihat he had been released. 

A London Ambulance 
spokesman reported that the 
injured had been taken to St 
Mary’s Hospital Paddington. 
All had been able to walk to 
the ambulances. 

The accident happened dur- 
g the rush-hour on a stretch 
of line used by both British 
Rail and London Under- 
ground between Wiltesden 
Junction and Kensal Green. 


Exclusive 
next week 



The 

Fleet Street 
revolution 

A revolution that 
began when Rupert 
Murdoch moved 
The Times and three 
other newspapers 
to a hi-tech plant 
in east London led 
to one of this 
century's most 
controversial 
disputes. But so 
far there has 
been no attempt at 
an objective account 
of its origins 

• On Monday, 
we begin the 
serialization of 
The End of the 
Street by Linda 
Melvem, which is a 
revealing and 
controversial 
account of events 
which changed 
newspaper history 

• Secret talks at 
which Murdoch 
laid the plans 
for a new London 
newspaper using 
high technology 
at a site away 
from the ravages 
of Fleet Street 

• The full story 
of Project X, 
under which 
an abandoned 
warehouse was 
used to test 
sophisticated 
equipment brought 
to Britain in 
unmarked crates 

• How the 
workforce who 
defied the 
traditional unions 
were recruited 

The union spies 
who breached the 
Wapping security, 
only to have their 
reports ignored 
by the unions 

Order The 
Times today 


Stoppage 
halts new 
Jaguar 

Nearly 1,000 Jaguar assem- 
bly workers at Coventry 
halted production of the XJ40 
yesterday, only two days after 
it went on show at the 
International Motor Show 
The men walked out in 
protest at a time and motion 
study intended to increase 
production of the new model 
which already has a six month 
waiting list in Britain. 

A Jaguar spokesman said: 
“When a new car is under 
production, there are pro- 
ductivity improvements that 
can be made to meet orders, 
but objections have been 
raised over the setting of new 
work standards." 

Mr Ron Newcombe, local 
convenor for the Transport 
and General Workers Union, 
said no meetings with the 
company were planned. 

Shop floor and spare parts 
workers at Ley fond Trucks, 
part of the Rover group, near 
Preston, Lancashire, rejected a 
3 per cent pay rise yesterday. 


Israeli jet 
shot down 
over Sidon 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Israel had a jet shot down in 
a raid on a Palestinian camp 
outside the Lebanese port of 
Sidon yesterday. It was the 
13lh raid this year but the first 
warplane lost in such an 
attack. 

The two crewmen were 
apparently captured by Amal 
Shia Muslim militiamen after 
parachuting when the aircraft 
was hit by a missile above 
Mieh Mieh camp. 

The raid appears to have 
been retaliation for the gre- 
nade attack on soldiers in 
Jerusalem on Wednesday, in 
which a civilian was killed and 
69 people injured. 

Before the jets left Mr 
Yitzhak Rabin, the Defence 
Minister. sai± “We must 
make an effort to strike at 
terrorist elements ... per- 
petrated this attack and those 
who are located for from us." 

Row over security, page 7 


Champagne producers expect a bumper year 



17 

Letters 

17 

Motoring 

28 

Otimaiy 

18 

Par foment 

4 

Sale Room 

18 

Science 

19 

Sport 29-3234 1 

Theatres, etc 

12 

TV £ Radio 


Weather 

2tt 

WOb 

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From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

As the last of the grapes are 
gathered under what have 
been quite exceptional har- 
vesting conditions, the pro- 
ducers of Fiance's quality 
Appellation d’Origine Con- 
trols <AOO wines are 


and 


in some cases 
quality in all 


The champagne producers 


to produce nearig 


two million hectolitres, or . 


million bottles, of good qual- 
ity champagne this year, 
marking a 70 per cent increase 
over last year. Prices are 
expected to remain stable 
until at least the end of the 
year. 

Britain recently overtook 
the United States to become 
France’s No 1 client for chip- . 
pagne, buying 15 J million 
bottles last year. That never- 
theless remains a drop in the 
ocean compared with the 122 
million bottles drunk in 
France kself. A recent poll 
showed that 93 per cent ofthe 
French consider champagne 
“indispensable" for special 
occasions, while 41 per cent 
consider it indispensable sim- 
ply for a dinner with friends. 


In the Bandeaux area, wine 
producers are jubilant in the 
expectation of a harvest of six 
million hectolitres, 13 percent 
up on last year, of excellent 
quality for both red and white 
wines, comparable to 1982, 
1983 and 1985 vintages. It is 
quite exceptional to have such 
a succession of good vintages. 

In Burgundy, there will be 
virtually no increase in the 
quantity of this year's harvest, 
but producers are nevertheless 
happy with what is expected to 
be a good year for both red and 
white wines. 

The quality Cotes du 
Rhone, Languedoc-Rossfllon, 
Alsatian and Loire wines are 
all expected to be substantially 


up in quantity and of good 
quality. However, this year’s 
vins ordinaires are expected to 
be of much more unequal 
quality, due to the difficult 
harvesting conditions in many 
areas of the south where most 
of the poorer quality wines 
originate. A total of 72 million 
hectolitres of wine is expected 
to be produced in France this 
year, compared with an av- 
erage of 68 million hectolitres 
over the previous five years. 

Britain is France's second 
most important client after the 
US for AOC wines, with 
imports totalling around £300 
million last year. Although on 
the increase, wine consump- 
tion in Britain remains low. 
however, averaging 10 litres 


per person per year, compared 
with 80 Hires in Fiance - the 
world’s record holders. 

Average wine consumption 
in France nevertheless has 
Men dramatically since 25 
years ago when it was 140 
litres per person per year, or 
more than, half a bottle a day. 
As living standards increase, 
the average Frenchman is 
drinking less wine, but of 
better quality. 

Beaujolais Nouveau, goes 
on sale on November 20. 
Yesterday, another new young 
wine named Le Divio 
Primeur, was launched in 
Paris jn the hope of climbing 
onto the Beaujolais Nouveau 
bandwagon. 



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NEWS SUMMARY 


Youths clue in 
double killing 


Detectives hunting the kUkr of two Brighton schoolgirls 
were given a vital lead yesterday by a woman who saw two 
youths running away from the park where the girls were 
found murdered (Michael McCarthy writes). 

- The youths, in their late teens or early twenties, were 
seen only a 100 yards from where Nicola Fellows, aged 10, 
and Karen Hadaway, aged nine, were found, about the time 
they went missing last Thursday evening. Both were 
sexitally assaulted before betas strangled. 

A woman walking her dog saw them hurrying down a set 
of steps known as Jacob's Steps, at W3d Park and then ran 
across the busy A27 Brighton to Lewes main road into the 
Moulsecoomb Estate, where the girls lived. The youths, 
Mo were casually dressed in sweatshirts and jeans, ran off 
to different directions. 

The police, who want them to come forward, have always 
considered that there might be more than one kilter, as 
there was no explanation why one girl had not attempted to 
.pan away while her friend was being attacked. Both bodies 
were found next to each other with nO Signs of a struggle. 


Ruskin ban attacked 


' Lord Annan, former vice-chancellor of London Univer- 
sity, has called on the Government to withhold farther 
funds to Rnskra College, Oxford, in protest at its treatment 
of Mr David Sel bourne, a lecturer in politics. 

He said in the Lords yesterday that Mr SeBwurne “bp 
been deprived of his lectureship’’ for writing an arfide in 
'The Times. 

He described Mr Setbomme as a man of impeccable La- 
bour views and claimed that the Association of University 
Teachers has made no representations on behalf of the lee- 
. tnrer, who Is being oppressed by the authorities of his 
college. 


Yard sees 
solicitor 


, Scotland Yard detectives 
searching for the missing 
gold from die £26 million 
Srinks Mat bullion rob- 
bery were last night 
questioning a senior 
LTondou solicitor spedaliz- 
' ing in criminal cases (our 
Z Crime Reporter writes). 

Police are still trying to 
ftrace the routes used to 
. remove the gold after the 
raid on die high-security 
warehouse near Heathrow 
'in November 1983. 

J The solicitor was ex- 
pected to appear in comt 
* today as part of develop- 
ments said to be very 
significant. 


Asian to 
fight poll 


An Asian shopkeeper 
has been chosen by the 
Conservatives to contest 
Bir mingham, Sparkbrook, 
the seat held by Mr Roy 
Hatterstey, Labour’s dep- 
uty leader. 

He is Mr Nazir Ahmed 
Khan, aged 30, who owns a 
supermarket and a garage. 

The Tories’ choice is 
likely to embarrass 
Sparkbrook Labour party, 
which has expelled two 
members, including a 
prominent Asian, in a dis- 
pute over special sections. 


BtmM ■n ata n. - 
Hatnmv ana. is 
bfr-Osbara 



P 

!SS?8Z 


£lm for PC’s appeal 


Doctors at King’s College Hospital. London, announced 
^‘yesterday that a vital body scanner has been ordered 
following the remarkable success of a £1 million appeal 
< (Thomas Prentice, Science Correspondent, writes). 

-v The equipment, which will be installed early next year, 
will allow patients, indadtog those snflering from cancer, 
to be diagnosed quickly and without the need for 
.exploratory surgery. 

The appeal was launched last year after the stabbbmg of 
PC George Hammond in south London. During his six 
^ months in intensive care at the hospital, he was twice taken 
across London by ambulance toanother hospital which had 
a scanner. 


Geldof in 
food plan 


Bob Geldof and Band 
Aid have joined negotia- 
tions for a world food 
conference next year to 
tackle a “topsy tarry” 
international forming crisis 
where some countries have 
huge food surpluses and 
others have shortages. 

The proposal, fey Sir 
Henry Plumb, the Conser- 
vative Euro-MP, wff] be 
put to Euro-MPs in Stras- 
bourg next week. 

Mr Geldof was in Dublin 
yesterday to receive a 
medal from the United 
Nations Food and Agri- 
cultural Organization, pre- 
sented by Dr Garret 
FitzGerald. 



Unit for drug babies 


A hospital is to set up the first special unit in Britain to 
cater for drug-addicted pregnant woman and their babies 
(Craig Seton writes).The unit is to be established at All 
Saints Hospital in Birmingham for mothers whose babies 
are likely to be addicted when they are bora. 

The unit financed by the West Midlands Health 
Authority and government grant *iH carry out research 
and give psychiatric counselling for pregnant woman who 
are thug addicts. 


Amis is Booker tip 


Kingsley Amis and Kazoo Ishigmo are the bookmakers’ 
favourites to win the £15,000 Booker Prize next week for 
the year’s best English language novel (Gavin Bell writes). 

According to Ladbroke, Amis is leading the field of six 
finalists at odds of 2-1 with his novel set in Wales, 71* Old 
Devils. William Hill, however, favours Ishiguro at 3-1 with 
his assessment of Japan after the Second World War, An 
Artist of the Floating World. 


I HE llMfcS TKlUM-l utiwav n 

Legislative decks clear for summer poll 

.i — t li will haw rh* wTnmcnn (he ulfiv fbud CISC’ 


By Richard Evans 
Political Correspondent 


The Cabinet yesterday 
agreed on the legislative pack- 
age for the forthcoming par- 
liamentary session and 
thereby left the way dear for 
the Prime Minister to call a 
general election next summer. 

Next month’s Queen's 
Speech is expected, with the 
exception of the Criminal 
Justice Bill to contain few 
proposals for controversial 
and time-consuming pieces of 
legislation. 


That will enable govern- 
ment business managers to 
clear the parliamentary decks 
by the end of July and to leave 
open all the options on elec- 
tion timing to Mrs Thatcher. 

The one surprise measure 
will be a coal Bill to be 
introduced by Mr * >e J cr 
Walker. Secretary of sane for 
Energy, which will give the 
Union of Democratic 
Mineworkere the right to sit 
on national industrial 
committees dealing with wel- 
fare, conciliation and charity 


matters in the coal industry. 

Until now the UDM has 
been excluded from the 
committees by the rival Na- 
tional Union of.Mineworkers. 

Bui the lightness of the 
parliamentary timetable is re- 
flected by the absence of 
legislative proposals from 
leading Whitehall depart- 
ments. including agriculture, 
education and science, 
employment, the DH5S. For- * 
eign Office and defence. 

Mr Douglas Hurd and his 
ministerial colleagues at the 


Home Office will have the 
busiest time in the next ses- 
sion. Apart from the wide- 
ranging criminal justice 
proposals, they will also bring 
in a Fire Safety and Safety at 
Sports Ground Bill. U will 
implement key proposals of 
the Popplcwdl inquiry into 
sports venues and amend fire 
safety regulations for indus- 
trial premises. 

The Criminal Justice Bill 


reforms on the way fraud cases 
are investigated and 
prosecuted. 


rors will be abolished and the 
age limit for jurors will be 
increased. 


The criminal injuries 
compensation scheme will be 
placed on a statutory basis and 

there will be some redistribu- 
tion of court business, with 


ine umninai v ~ — : — j . ■ 

which will run to well over 100 minor offences such as driving 
clauses, will indude changes while disqualfied being heard 

only in magistrates courts. 


clauses, will include changes 
to the extradition law and 


Labour fight 

bar on MPs’ 


role over 
immigration 


By Robin Oakley, Political Editor 
Mr Gerald Kaufman, the determined in his country of 


shadow Home Secretary, yes- 
terday promised a furious 
dispute over ■ the 
Government's plans to restrict 
MPs' rights to intervene in 
immigration cases. 

MPs can now secure the 
temporary admission to Brit- 
ain of passengers refused entry 
at air terminals and ports. 
Yesterday The Times reported 
that Mr Douglas Hunt the 
Home Secretary, will next 
week announce restrictions in 
relation to admissions from 
India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, 
Ghana and Nigeria, whose 
nationals now require visas 
for entry to Bri tain. 

Mr Kaufman saidrl give 
notice to the Government that 
any proposal of theirs to 
remove or reduce the rights of 
Members of Parliament to 
intervene on behalf of their 
constituents in cases involv- 
ing problems at ports of entry 
into Britain will be unaccept- 
able to the Labour Party. 

“The Home Secretary him- 
self has said recently: 'There 
was, and is, no suggestion at 
all that a member should be 
denied the right to make 
representations either to me or 
to the Minister of State’. He 
described this right as: 'a 
facility valued by the House’. 
MPs insist that the Home 
Secretary keeps his promise to 
Parliament.” 

Mr Kaufman said it was not 
merely an issue of the right to 
make representations in im- 
migration cases, but a 
constitutional matter affecting 
the rights of MPS to make 
effective representations to 
ministers. 

The Home Office would say 
nothing yesterday on the 
Home Secretary’s plans, save 
to confirm that any changes 
would affect MPs* rights only 
in respect of passengers from 
countries now requiring visas. 

Ministers say that MPs’ 
traditional rights are no longer 
required in these cases be- 
cause the grounds for refuting 
entry to a passenger will no 
longer be a matter of an 
immigration officer's judg- 
ment — he will either have a 
visa or he will not. His 
eligibility will have been 


origin. 

Airlines are to be strenu- 
ously reminded that they will 
have to foot the biff for 
returning would-be visitors to 
Britain who have been al- 
lowed to embark on flights 
here without the necessary 
visa. 

As well as Mr Hurd's state- 
ment next week on the 
Government's introduction of 
visas, it is expected that there 
will be a full Commons debate 


Asian arrivals 
face police cells 

Several hundred Asians 
waiting at Heathrow Airport 
to discover whether they will 
be allowed into Britain or sent 
home may be put into police 
cells to ease overcrowding at 
the terminal (David Cross 
writes). 

The Horae Office said yes- 
terday that various options for 
housing the Asians were being 
considered, “including the in- 
creased use of police mis”. 

Most of the Asians have 
been kept in an area normally 
used for departing passengers 
or in hotels near by, and cells 
have been used sparingly since 
the latest rush sparked by the 
Government's controversial 
new visa system. 

Lady Young, Minister of 
State at the Foreign Office, 
yesterday strenuously rejected 
Indian claims that the visas 
were racist At Heathrow, 
airport officials held urgent 
consultations with health and 
immigration staff about the 
plight of 300 Bengalis 
crammed into a tingle room. 


• Long queues have formed 
at the British Embassy in 
Islamabad and at a consulate 
in Karachi, causing resent- 
ment (Michael Hamlyn 
writes). 

A British visa now costs 320 
Pakistani rupees (£12.80) for a 
tingle entry. In retaliation for 
the move, the Pakistanis are 
planning to introduce a visa 
regime for British visitors. 
Bangladesh also retaliated 
with an announcement yes- 
terday that Britons would 
soon require visas to visit the 
country. 


Bomb hoaxes 
lead to chaos 
in Belfast 


A series of bomb hoaxes in 
Belfast yesterday produced 
some of the worst traffic jams 
the centre of the city has seen. 

The situation was made 
worse by the additional chaos 
created by traffic lights being 
out of action through Ulster's 
three-day-old power workers’ 
strike. 

Most disruption resulted 
from a suspect van being left 
outside British Telecom's 
provincial headquarters in 
Upper Queen Street while Mr 
Ian Vallance. BTs new chief 
executive, was on a vivit from 
London. 

The van had been hijacked 
and its driver forced to drive it 
to Dial House. 

The suspect van was blown 
up by the Army but contained 
no bomb. 


Oxford rent 
strike in 
grant dispute 


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By Mark Dowd 
Education Reporter 

Term is off to an un- 
promising start at Oxford 
where one of the university’s 
colleges is on rent strike. 

Students at Hertford are 
refuting to pay their battels 
because they believe college 
authorities have reneged on 
agreements to make the next 
rise in accommodation costs 
proportional to the grant rise. 

Mr Jeremy Thwaftes, presi- 
dent of the Hertford Junior 
Common Room, said yes- 
terday that accommodation 
charges for this year had been 
increased by 3.8 per cent, 
almost double the 2 per cent 
grant award. 

Sir Geoffrey Warnock, prin- 
cipal of the college, said he 
thought the students' action 

was “understandable but 
regrettable". 

He defended the college’s 
decision to impose the 3.8 pea* 

cent increase. 

The difficulties appear to be 
rooted in the feet that al- 
though Sir Keith Joseph, the 
former Secretary of State for 
Education, initially an- 
nounced a 2 per cent rise Iasi 
December, his successor, Mr 
Kenneth Baker, increased the 
figure to almost 4 per cent in 
June for those students living 
away from home. 



Mr John Watson, a colliery overman, checks his lamp before going down the new mine. 

£57m pit UDM chief- proud 

and bitter at end 


opens m 
Scotland 


By Tun Jones 


By Keith Hindley 


British Cod yesterday of- 
ficially opened Scotland's first 
new pit for more yfran twenty 
years; 

The Gasdefaiff colliery, 
three miles east of Alloa, cost 
£57 millio n and taps into the 
rich seams of coal underlying 
40 square miles of the Forth 
Basin. 

The new .pit will provide a 
much more effective way for 
the British Coal workforce to 
reach their coalfaces. Pre- 
viously they had to travel 
several miles underground 
from die Sobgnth and 
Castlehffl shafts. 

Now, by using modern 
underground trains from the 
new shaft, the men can work 
productively for two hours 
longer on every shift. 

This mining complex is die 
largest in Scotland and one of 
the most productive in Britain. 
The miners have already 
reached 5.7 tonnes of coal per 
man shift and have occa- 
sionally peaked at 7 tonnes. 
The UK average is 3.7 tonnes. 

The new complex wjQS yield 
Z2 million tonnes of low 
sulphur coal aatmally, which 
will go direct to the furnaces of 
the huge Longannet power 
station. 

This massive new invest- 
ment in die area has been 
welcomed by the onions. 

The complex employs 500 
men bat that will rise to 900 as 
underground working reaches 
its peak. 


The man who came from 
nowhere and broke Arthur 
Scargill's hold on union power 
in the coalfields is today both 
proud and bitter as be pre- 
pares to relinquish his po- 
sition as general secretary of 
the Union of Democratic 
Mincworkers. 

A year ago, Mr Scargill. who 
inherited a mighty brother- 
hood which bad brought a 
Conservative government to 
its knees. learnt that his 
strategems had divided the 
union as never before. 

Mr Roy Lynk, who had 
been a little-known official in 
the National Union of 
Mineworkers, had master- 
minded a campaign which 
culminated in a three-to-one 
vote for establishing another 
union for mincworkers. 

The issue was simple, min- 
ers in the Nottinghamshire 
coalfield had refused to join 
the bitter pit strike because Mr 
ScatgiU and the rest of the 
NUM leadership would not 
allow their members to vote 
on the issue. 

They were joined by 3,000 
south Derbyshire miners and 
2,000 Durham mechanics who 
also voted at pit-head ballots 
to reject what they believed 
was an undemocratic strike. 

For Mr Lynk, the die had 
been cast six months before 
the ballot when he confronted 
Mr Scargill at the NUM area 
headquarters in Mansfield. 

Mr Scargill offered to with- 
draw his flying pickets from 


the besieged Nottinghamshire 
coalfield tfthc union agreed to 
join the strike without holding 
a ballot Mr Lvnk refused the 
offer. 

Now, the UDM bas .estab- 
lished its own headquarters at 
the village of Bcstwood, Not- 
tinghamshire, and in August 
was recognized in law when it 
was granted a certificate of 
independence as a trade 
union. 

But in spite of that it is 
ostracized within trade union 
circles and has been snubbed 
by the Labour Party. 

For its part, the UDM has 
said there is no hope of a 
reconciliation while Mr 
Scargill and other militants 
remain in control of the 
NUM's hierarchy. 

In spite of its success in 
getting British Coal to grant it 
conciliation rights, thereby 
acknowledging the reality of 
two unions. Mr Lynk is bitter 
with the way his union is 
treated by the employers. 

In particular, he accuses Sir 
Robert Has lam. the new chair- 
man. of shielding Mr Scargill 
by preventing the UDM from 
negotiating pay and con- 
ditions in coalfield areas 
where it is in a minority. 

Mr Lynk said: ”1 think what 
we have done is to achieve the 
impossible. We have proved 
that if you deny democracy to 
the members then you will not 
survive. 

“But I am bitter at the 
attitude of British Coal.” 


Health posts are being 
paid by teaching funds 


Overstretched teaching 
authorities are having to pay 
for acade m ic medical posts in 
order to avoid cuts in patient 
services, health authorities 
said yesterday. 

A report published by the 
National ' Association of 
Health Authorities says that 
teaching authorities, already 
feting cuts in health service 
resources, now fece the double 


The report, based on a 
survey of designated teaching 
authorities and London spe- 
cial health authorities, shows 
that the loss of medical aca- 
demic posts and the freezing 
of posts as they come up is 
now jeopardizing patient care. 


The association says that 
both experience and expertise 
have been lost to the NHS, 


penalty of University Grants J oge ^ ier ahtffty to 

Committee cuts resulting in esS£ ^J^ ^ to future 
the loss of 317 clinical posts, doctors. ^The unpredictable 


the equivalent of a whole 
medical school, between 1981 
and 1984. 

Unless medical posts are 
protected, further planned 
cuts of 2 per cent a year will 
[Mil teaching authorities under 
unacceptable strains and will 
threaten the future quality of 
medical education and re- 
search, the report says. 


nature of policies to freeze 
medical academic posts as 
they fell vacant is affecting 
teaching authorities' ability to 
gear their services to patient 
needs.” 


It has called for concerted 
action between the Depart- 
ment of Education and Sci- 
ence and the Department of 
Health and Social Security 


Homeopathy testing time 


By Pearce Wright, Sconce Editor 


The closest demonstration 
to a scientific proof Car homeo- 
pathic medicine conies with 
the results of an experiment 
published In today's issue of 
The Lancet. 

It comes in the wake of a 
trial inrolring 144 people who 
suffered from hay fever, and 
were treated at dinics of the 
Glasgow ami Royal London 
Homeopathic hospitals and by 
26 National Health Service 
Lamfly doctors. 


The purpose was to examine 
assertions that the beneficial 
effects of homeopathic treat- 
ments were induced by sugges- 
tion, Or a case of mind over 
matter, rather than by the 
action of the microdose of the 
agent that the medicine is 
intended to combat. 


those given sabtoxk levels of 
the pollen mixture was re- 
flected in the reduced need for 
their normal antihistamine 
therapy to alleviate their hay 
fever. 


Patients were given either a 
homeopathic preparation of 
mixed grass pollens or a 
placebo. The improvement of 


The doctors report that 
there are few well-controlled 
human trials for establishing 
the effectiveness of homeo- 
pathic substances by compar- 
ing treatments against a 
placebo. 


Some feiry 
crews still 
protesting 


The crews of strike-hit 
Channel Island ferries were 
continuing their protest sit-ins 
last night in spite of the 
settlement of the fortnight-old 
dispute. 

The 60 crew of the 4,000- 
ton ferry, Earl Godwin, at 
Weymouth, were standing 
firm against Sealink's latest 
offer. 

They say it does not save 
enough of their jobs. 

And the crew on board the 
Earl William, immobilized in 
Guernsey, are continuing their 
action until further notice. 

The crews of the Earl God- 
win and the Eari William, as 
well as seamen from Ports- 
mouth and Cherbourg are due 
to attend a mass meeting at 
Southampton today. 

A spokesman for the men 
occupying the Earl William at 
Si Peter’s Port, Guernsey, said 
that moving the ship would be 
impossible without the agree- 
ment of officers who are also 
in dispute with Seaiink. 

Two thirds of the 316 
National Union of Seamen 
jobs threatened by the 
Scalink-Channel Island Fer- 
ries merger scheme which 
started the dispute have been 
saved under the new terms 
agreed. 

For those who will lose their 
jobs the redundancy terms 
are; up to one year employed 
£4.3 1 1 : one-two years. £5,037: 
more than two years £1.200 
for each year to a maximum 
£30.000. 


I 




Steel’s 
do-or-die 
battle on 
defence 

By Martin Fletcher 
political Reporter 


Mr David Steel, the Liberal 
leader, is to lay his authority 
on the line next week in a do- 
or-dic attempt to rally his 
patty behind him on defence. 

He is gambling on bringing 
into line those rebel MPs who 
refused at the Eastbourne 
Assembly to back his quest for 
a European minimum nuclear 
deterrent, by downgrading the 
nature of that deterrent, by 
playing on the Alliance's 
disastrous post-Asscmbly 
performance in local etections. 
and the opinion polls, and by 
emphasizing the anger of the 
wider party outside the 
Assembly at what has hap- 
pened. 

But the high-risk nature of 

- : 'ii i-- k .. 


his strategy will become ev- 
ident today 


iy when Liberal 

.tows publishes a totally un- 
repentant article by Mr Mi- 
chael McadowcrofL MP for 
Leeds West, explaining why 
he voted against Mr Steel at 
Eastbourne. 

The article makes dear Mr 
Mcadowcroft's resentment at 
having a policy foisted upon 
him by the party leadership 
without consultation. "All of 
us want a united party and 
Alliance. We arc all prepared 
to go to great lengths to 
achieve unity. But if unify is 

S ined by imposition rather 
an consent it is unlikely to 
survive scrutiny by opp- 
onents”, he writes. 

At his Ettrick Bridge home 
this weekend Mr Steel will 


meet Mr Simon Hughes, the 
rebel Liberal MP: Mr. 


Des 

Wilson, the party president 
who abstained in (he East- 
bourne vote: and Mr Jim 
Wallace, tire Libera) defence 
spokesman, in the hope of 
finding a mutually acceptable 
position. 

Mr Steel will on Tuesday 
present a paper outlining his 
views to the party's policy 
committee, and the next day 
he will meet the Liberal 
parliamentary party. 

His position - discussed 
with Dr David Owen, the 
Social Democratic Party lead- 
er — is that the party must- 
have a firm commitment to 
retaining some sort of mini- 
mum nuclear deterrent as a 
fell-back should there be no 
breakthrough in world 
disarmament talks, and that 
European collaboration on de- 
fence is desirable. 


Court bid 
for Taylor 
file fails 


Mr Kevin Taylor, the 
businessman at the centre of 
the John Stalker affair, foiled 
in his High Court attempt 
yesterday to force the police to 
hand over internal documents 
which he hoped would clear 
his name. 

Mr Justice Scon said: “It 
would be absurd to order 
handing over of documents at 
a time when a definitive 
decision as to a prosecution is 
imminent.” 

MrTaylor, aged 54, who has 
launched a private prosecu- 
tion against Mr James 
Anderton, Chief Constable of 
Greater Manchester, alleging 
conspiracy to pervert the 
course of justice, must also 
pay the costs of the two-day 
hearing. 

He wanted access to the 
documents used to obtain a 
search warrant against him 
and claimed the 21-month 
investigation into his affairs 
has had a "devastating” effect 
on his business and turned 
him into a "pariah and leper" 
in local society. 

His counset Mr Robin de 
Wilde, said: "The search war- 
rants obtained by the police 
were used as a smoke screen 
for the Stalker inquiry. Un- 
attractive as it is. bad folth and 
malice were used in the 
obtaining of these warrants.” 

The judge agreed with the 
Greater Manchester Police 
Authority, however, that the 
infonnation was covered by 
public interest immunity. He 
could not find that there had 
been such excessive delay that 
the immunity had been lost. 

He had been informed that 
papers had now been put 
before the Director of Public 
Prosecutions and a decision as 
to whether to prosecute would 
be forthcoming quite soon. 

Mr Taylor, who was not in 
court for the verdict, claimed 
he needed the documents to 
see whether there was a case 
against the police for abuse of 
power, trespass to land and 
property, and abuse of the 
process of law. 

In a separate, but parallel 
action. Mr Taylor has ob- 
tained summonses against Mr 
Anderton and two senior po- 
lice officers, alleging conspir- 
acy to pervert the course of 
justice by causing felse 
information to be laid before 
magistrates on May 7 wheat 
the search warrants . were 
obtained. 


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THF. TIMES FRTT>AV OCTOBER 17 1986 


HOME NEWS 


n l>„. e 

- • . ''ft 


Couni ^ 
for Ta'loi 
file fails 


j ister was locked in a ‘curtain of evil’ and wanted to be with God* 

M yH’imwrder family, insists Bamber 


Jeremy Bamber yesterday his parents, foou5^e P add£d she though ! die whole thing 

^e ap ^ joke - : „ 

and sad he had a “loving” understanding between him- *J£ dcmed saying,** 
relationship with his parent “ lf and his mother. ,^ hl ®8S were going well”, as 

, ^ told a bushed courtroom Sometimes it had not been eSSSPS^ te 

at Chelmsford Crown Court ?asy to cope .with his mother's ™i2L lsld r 1>,s P? 1 *?? homc » 
*at hj S step-sister Sheila merest in religion. where pobce waited for more 

CaflfeH was a paranoid schizo- .Describing his relations 15? ^t hour l bef 2 rc b !® ak " 

phrenic who wanted to go to wthl his girl friend Miss Julie 

heaven and take people with Mugford. aged 22 . a teacher g £ r 1 S ? 1 D J* 2 ^ 

her. he said that for a year ihm« “rmhouse, he told officers 

Mrs Sheila “Bambi” CaffeD went well and that marriaS aboul his s,stCT ^ s menial ill- 


the < former London model tieen discussed but that 
originally suspected by police * eir relationship deteriorated 
of the White House Rum after Christinas 1984. 
massacre in Essex, was the , Bamber told the jury on the 
subject of numerous accusa- eleventh day of his trial that 

lions as the defence opened its “^relationship with Miss 


case. ' 

Mr Bamber, aged 25, denies 
murdering his adoptive par- 
ents NevUJ and June Bamber 
both aged 61, Mrs CafTeU and 
her twin sons Nicholas and 
DameL 


Mugford was “completely 
finished” early in September 
*985 — four weeks after the 
murders — and that be knew 
she had gone to the police to 
make allegations against him. 

He agreed that on Seplem- 


He said his sister contem- ber 8, after his initial arrest, he 


plated suicide several times 

6 Sheila wanted to 

take people with her 
to heaven and she 
wanted to save the 
world 9 

and was physically violent to 
the twins. 

He added: “She wanted to 
be with God. She wanted to go 
to heaven. She wanted to take 
people with her and she 
wanted to save the world.” 

He said there was no 
animosity between him and 
bis- sister but he found it 
difficult to cope with her 
bizarre behaviour in which 
she allegedly said alternately 
that she was Joan of Arc, God 
and the Virgin Mary and that 
die wanted to lead the cam- 
paign for nuclear 
disarmament. 

Under cross-examination 
he denied the suggestion that 
he used as a cover for his own 
crime Sheila's mental illness 
and the credibility attached to 
the theory that she could have 
carried out the murders and 
kill herself. 

When Mr Bamber was 
called to the witness box he 
answered “No” as Mr Rivlin 
asked if be had murdered the 
five members of his family. 

Sipping water frequently 
and speaking so quietly that he 
had often to be asked to raise 
his voice so the jury could 
hear, he denied he had ever 
told his uncle, as the prosecu- 
tion has alleged, that be could 
easily kill his parents. 

He told the jury that he had 

Sotheby’s 
clock in 
fake claim 

By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 

One of the fust pendulum 
clocks was said to be a fake 
after it was bought for the 
nation at Sotheby's yesterday. 

Mr Terence Camerer Cuss, 
a London clock dealer, 
jumped to his feet and cried, 
“Fake” when it was sold for 
£121,000 to R A Lee, the.old- 
established clock dealer, for 
the Science Museum, South 
Kensington, west London. 

However, Dr D Vaughn, 
the- museum’s curator of 
docks, dismissed the allega- 
tion. He said mystery 
surrounding the origins of the 
hitherto unknown clock had 
made dealers suspicious. 

Sotheby's said it had come 
from the Continent and was in 
a family collection for at least 
two generations. While it was 
surprising for a dock of this 
importance to turn up un- 
expectedly, it was too unusual 
to be a copy. 

Christopher Huygens, .the 
Dutch inventor, is credited 
with building the first wot* - 
able pendulum dock in l oio. 
The Sotheby's dock, signed by 
Huygens as inventor and Jan 
van Call of Nijmegen, as 
maker, is dated 1 657. 

The spring-driven clocks of 
Salomon Coster were pre- 
viously thought to be the 
earliest pendulum docks in 
existence. Sotheby’s dock is 
weight-driven. 

Sale room, page 18 


nevertheless sent her a love 
note in which he expressed 
regret for their par ting 

He told the court “I had 
been told by the police about 
the allegations Julie was mak- 
ing against me and I believed 
she was doing that out of spite 
because of splitting up. I wrote 
the note believing she would 
take everything hack.” 

He accused her of lying 
constantly to the police in 
making allegations against 
him. 

On the night of the massacre 
be said he watched television 
and telephoned Miss Mugford 
though be denied saying to 
her, as the prosecution has 
alleged, “tonight is the night” 


Outside his parents' home, 
where police waited for more 
than three hours before break- 
ing in because they thought an 
intruder might still be m the 
farmhouse, he told officers 
about his sister’s menial ill- 
ness. 

Mr Bamber. who drew up 
plans of the farmhouse to help 
the police, said “Within my 
own self I was frightened. I 
wanted to know what bad 
gone on." 

He said: “1 don't think they 
understood the extent of 
Sheila's illness and 1 was 
trying to convince them that 
she was very unpredictable. 
They asked me if she had used 
guns. I was trying to tell them 
there were lots of guns in foe 
house and that she could have 
used any of them.” 

He recalled drinking a 
whisky offered to him by a 
doctor and of wretching after 
being told later' of foe ma« 
murders. 

Mr Bamber said that White 
House Farm was insecure and 
that often when a key bad not 
been left in its proper place be 
had entered through various 
windows after using blades 
and other implements to slip 
the catch, though he denied 
knowing that foe catch would 
automatically shut from the 
outside. 

Bamber described his 
sister's propensity to violence 
and told the jury of one 
instance in which Sheila had 



for killing his parents. instance in which Sheila had 

In foe early hours he said. during a car journey, 

he was awoken by a tdeohone P unched one of the twins in 
call from his father savin e the face with her full fist. 

-mmA m ■■ Up raiH- “U/l»ar cK» in 


come quickly, Sheila has 
gone crazy. She’s got a gun” 

Mr Bamber, who said he 
had no chance to speak him- 
self, tried to phone his lather 
back when the line went dead 
but got an engaged tone. He 
telephoned foe police at 
Chelmsford to report the call 
-before telephoning his 
girlfriend. 

Asked why he did not ring 
999 Bamber said: “It never 
entered my head.” 

Asked why he telephoned 
his girl friend Mr Bamber said: 
“1 was very worried. The' 
police didn't seem very in- 
terested. I telephoned her 
because I needed a friendly 
ear. 

“I told her that there was 
trouble at the farm and I 


He said: “What she did to 
the children was over and 
above severe reprimand when 
I was present but we in the 
family never told anybody 
about it.” 

He also recounted an occa- 
sion when his father had been 
kept on foe telephone all night 

6 Sometimes I 
believed what had 
gone on and 
sometimes I didn't 9 


Mr Jeremy Bam ben spent five hours in the witness box. 


He also told foe jury foal at foe prosecution has alleged, he 
bis home hours after foe chuckled and said he should 
murders Detective Sergeant have been an actor. 

Stanley Jones had asked for a He ag reed font he ha d 
Z collected valuable items from 


drink and then with other 
officers swallowed half a bot- 


the farmhouse including sal- 


Ue^braSy beforedriviii g g£ 


by Sheila who was claiming to . n “‘“ lde ^ j° d^roy 


_ . . . money to pay death duties. 

Mf ^ m &* aid: Iwasm * Mr Bamber said that when 
slate of shock, sometimes I Miss Mugford overheard a 
believed what had gone on telephoned from a woman 
and sometimes I didn't” friend, Virginia Greaves, she 
He agreed that he had given became jealous and violent, 
permission to foe police hours and onmhuri a mirror. 


remember she was talking as if girlfriend. 


be the Virgin Mary. 

Mr Bamber agreed that the 
morning after the murders he 
had bought copies of several 
newspapers, when he went to 
buy some milk with his 


blood-stained soft furnishings 
but said it was at the sugges- 
tion of the police. 

Mr Bamber denied telling 
his girl friend when foe ar- 
rived from London the morn- 
ing after the murders that, as 


He admitted having seen 
drafts of lus parents* wills 
some years ago in which their 
estate was to be shared be- 
tween himself and his sister. 

But he told Mr Anthony 
Ariidge, QC, under cross- 
examination that be did not 


know his father's win tied him 
to work on the farm until his 
father's death. 

Earlier Mr Geoffrey Rivlin, 
QC, for the defence, went on 
to describe the evidence given 
by Miss Mugford, who alleg- 
edly betrayed Mr Bamber to 
police four weeks after the 
murders, as “demonstrably 
unreliable and unacceptable". 

He said he would produce 
witnesses who would paint a 
picture of Mr Bamber dif- 
ferent to the one which had 

6 Sheila thought her 
sons wanted to seduce 
her and were capable 
of murdering her 9 

been presented by the 
prosecution and that he would 
be calling Sheila's psychiatrist. 
Dr Ferguson. 

He said that Sheila, aged 27, 
had spoken to a friend about 
killing herself on more than 1 
one occasion and was sen- : 
ously mentally ill with overt I 
“psychotic symptoms”. 

Mr Rivlin said that the 
former London model suf- 
fered from delusions and 
hallucinations including mor- 
bid ideas about the deviL 

He said: “In particular I'm 
talking about her thinking of 
sex with the children, or doing 
violence to them or suffering 
violence at their hands.” 

Mr Rivlin said that Sheila 
thought her sons wanted to 
seduce her and were capable of 
murdering her. 

Locked in wbal Mr Rivlin 
called her “curtain of evil” foe 
developed delusions of gran- 
deur and persecution and by 
March 1985 — only four 
months before the murders — 
she was suffering bizarre re- 
ligious and paranoid* ideas. 

Mr Freddie Fahad 
Hamami, her boy friend, was 
by this stage frightened for his 
safety and hers. 

Mr Rivlin said that Miss 
Helen Grimstead. a cousin of 
Sheila's, would recall a 
conversation in which Sheila 
asked if foe had ever thought 
of killing herself and then 
saying that she had ‘ herself 
contemplated suicide. 

Mr Rivlin said that near the 
end of her life. Sheila regarded 
herself as a white witch whose 
task in life was to rid the world 
of evil. 

The trial continues today. 


Customs 
team set 
to seize 
drug gains 

Michael Evans 
Whitehall Correspondent 

A team of 35 customs 
officers has been set up to 
track down foe assets of 
convicted drug traffickers to 
enable courts to make 
confiscation orders when a 
new law is implemented in the 
next few months, it was 
disclosed yesterday. 

The customs men, who are 
being trained as financial 
intelligence officers, have al- 
ready carded out several 
dummy runs. All of them have 
had experience of value-added 
tax investigations and are 
experts in banking and 
accounting procedures. 

the customs asset-strippers 
will have sweeping powers of 
investigation when all the 
clauses in the Drug Traffick- 
ing Offences Act are enforced 
by January 1. They will be able 
io gain access to bank ac- 
counts and Inland Revenue 
files as well as seek seizure 
orders on possessions. 

Customs sources admit that 
the powers are Draconian, but 
there is some concern that foe 
drug barons will still be able to 
launder their assets via coun- 
tries with corrupt systems, 
where the authorities might 
not be helpful. 

But in this country, banks 
for the first time will be 
required to give information 
on customers they suspect of 
moving funds connected with 
drug smuggling. 

It is hoped that eventually 
there will be an international 
link-up to help trace laun- 
dered assets from one country 
to another, but customs 
sources yesterday said it was 
unlikely to come into effect for 
at least five years. 

As part of the 
Government’s campaign on 
drugs, new efforts are also 
being made to encourage the 
Armed Forces to play their 
pan in keeping a look-out for 
possible drag trafficking. 

Sources said that RAF pi- 
lots and crews engaged in 
training flights over the Chan- 
nel. particularly in the south- 
west, have been asked to pass 
on any information about 
large yachts seen far from the 
coast 

It was also disclosed yes- 
terday that since April when 
customs introduced a 
Freefone drugs service for 
members of the public to ring 
up aboul suspicious incidents, 
more than 1,000 calls have 
been received. 


Holidays 
boost for 
winners 

A retired company director, 
a housewife, an electrical en- 
gineer and a deaner claimed 
the £4,000 Portfolio Gold 
prize yesterday. 

Mr David Frost, aged 75, of 
Bromley Common, Kent has 
played Portfolio Gold since it 
started in The Times. 

He will spend his prize 
share on “a little holiday” and 
repairs to the family home. 

Mrs Olive Evans, aged 41, a 
mother of three, of Lovwood, 
West Sussex, has played Port- 
folio Gold for six months. “1 
still can't believe my tack.” 

She too intends spending 
some of the money on a 
holiday. Mr Ramen 
B&attacfearya, aged 50, an 
electrical engineer, or south- 
west London, will put his prize 
towards taking his family to 
visit his parents in India. 

Mrs Dorothy Halesworth, 
aged 43. of Sheringham, Nor- 
folk, who works as a deaner in 
a club, said she also was 
excited about her win. 

Portfolio Gold cards are 
available by sending a stam- 
ped addressed envelope to: 
Portfolio Gold, 

The runes, 

PO Box 40, 

Black born, 

BB1 6AJ. 

m 



Mrs Olive Evans, surprised • 
at “unbelievable luck”. 

*■> % 

. , # dv i . . 



Mr David Frost, looking - 
forward to a break. } 


Human bomb trial 


Jordanian names ‘enemies’ 


By Stewart Tendkr, Crime Reporter. 


A Jordanian accused of 
ttyipg to blow up an El A1 
airliner with 375 people on 
board told the Central Crim- 
inal Court yesterday the Israe- 
lis were his enemies but not 
their civilians, women or- 
children. 

Nezar Hindawi, aged 34, a 
journalist, of no fixed address, 
is alleged to have tried to use 
his pregnant girl friend as a 
human timebomb on a Boeing 
747 bound for Tel Aviv from 
Heathrow Airport last April 

After five hours of giving 
evidence in his defence, Mr 
Hindawi faced cross-examina- 
tion by foe crown. He denied 
visiting Tripoli, the Libyan 
capital last year with three 
other Arabs, including a 
brother. 

He agreed with Mr Roy 
j Am lot, for the prosecution, 
that the Israelis were his 
enemies. Mr Amlot said: 
“Does that mean civilians as 
well as soldiers?” Mr Hindawi 
said it did not Nor did it 
j mean women and children. 
Only soldiers were his 
enemies. 

Earlier in the case, Mr 
Hindawi was accused of giv- 
ing his girl friend. Miss Ann 
Murphy, aged 32, a bag which 
was found to have explosives 
in a secret compartment. It 
was alleged a calculator he put 
in the bag on the- way to 
Heathrow contained a tuner 
and detonator. 

Earlier this week, Mr 
Hindawi told the court be 
thought be had been recruited 

TV exhibition 


for drug smuggling and Miss 
Murphy was an unwitting 
courier. He knew nothing of 
any bomb. 

Yesterday Mr Amlot asked 
why Mr Hindawi put a battery 
in the calculator, which armed 
it, on the way to the airport 
Mr Hindawi said be did not 
know anything about aiming a 
bomb, and believed the cal- 
culator would fool X-ray ma- 
chines used for finding drugs. 

He told the court there was 
no reason why he had not put 
the battery in the calculator 
earlier. 

Mr Hindawi said he was 
given the calculator and the 
bag containing drugs through 
a man called Khalid Dandesh 
whom he had met in Syria. He 
believed the calculator would 
neutralize an X-ray machine 
and dismissed Mr Amlot's 
suggestion that this was 
nonsense. 

The Jordanian told foe 
court he understood “the cal- 
culator will produce rays itself 
from the top part and * the 
same time it is going through 
the X-ray machines”. 

The rays from the calculator 
would prevent the man watch- 
ing the X-ray machine reading 
anything. A green light show- 
ing the luggage was all right 
would appear on the X-ray 
machine. 

Mr Amlot questioned Mr 
Hindawi about the use ofH AI 
for carrying drugs when the 
airline was noted for its se- 
curity arrangements. He said 
he did not ask his drug 


Rare example of Baird set 


Sixty years of television, 
from the flickering images of 
John Logie Baird s early 
prototypes to the space-age 
Sr^satellitebr^^- 
mg, went on display yesterday 
at the Lyre Room of the 
Festival Hall in London- 
The exhibition includes 
mere than 50 vintage tele- 
vision sets. Some ve drj 


foe Rodin Times. 

Organized by the. British 
Vintage Wireless Soaegrand 
theMnseam 

imaec, the exhibition was 
opened test night by Mr Bra 

cSpp, aged 91. whowas hiwi 

by Mr Sabrd in 1926 as his 

first assistant. 

Mr Clapp* who was paw » 

, week. sSfc “I to not tiuiJt 

anybody ever dreamt tete- 
yjsion would become what it s 


By Jonathan MiDer 

The exhibits include a rare 
example of Mr Baird's first 
mechanical television set, 
which used a revolving drum to 
project a three-inch image 
made ap of 30 scanning fines. 

When it was new the ret sold 
for £26. 5s Earlier this year, a 
rfmflar receiver sold at 
Christie's for £2^00- 

After Mr Baird dem- 
onstrated his invention to 
members of the Royal Institu- 
tion in January * 1926, The 
7u»eycaiitiodsly reported that 
“it remains to be seen to what 
extent further developments 
will cany Mr Safari's system 

to practical use”. 

The scepticism was de- 
served in one respect: by 1936 
Mr Baird's technical approach 
to television had been made 
obsolete. An all-electronic sys- 
tem developed by Marconi and 


EMI had been introduced 
which offered much greater 
clarity of reception. 

By (he end of 1936 400 
homes in the London area had 
fete vision sets. 

By the time Queen Eliza- 
beth was crowned in 1953, 
almost three million sets had 
been sold. 

Television technology 
changed again in the 1960s 
when 405-une black and white 
began to be phased out and 
was replaced by 625-fine col- 
our transmission. 

Mr Jonathan Hall, who 
or ganized the exhibition, said 
old television sets were grow- 
ing in raise to collectors. He 
said that the exhibition was 
likely to farther increase 
interest. 

The exhibition runs imtil 
November 2. 


recruiter about the arrange- 
ments which they suggested. 

Mr Amlot asked him why 
he had chosen Miss Murphy. 
Mr Hindawi said’ “She trusted 
me and I trust her.” 

During cross-examination 
Mr Hindawi was shown the 
bag in which the bomb was 
found He told Mr Amlot h 
was foe same design as the one 
he gave Miss Murphy but he 
said it was a different colour. 

Asked if he had looked in 
the bottom of the bag where he 
said ' be thought drugs were 
hidden before he gave it to his 
girl friend be said he did not. 
He looked in the bag but 
nothing else. He said: “Ifl bad 
done so I would have dis- 
turbed the secure storage.” 

Earlier in the day towards 
the end of his evidence, Mr 
Hindawi tokl foe court the 
police had threatened him and 
his fiunily. One night in his , 
cell be was told his mother and , 
father had been arrested and 
brought to the police station. 

Mr Hindawi said he was 
told by a detective that 
Mossad, foe Israeli secret 
service, bad been asking for 
him, and so bad foe Israeli 
government 

He told the court be bad 
never admitted any * knowl- 
edge of a bomb nor did he ever 
know anything about a bomb. 
He had never beard any • 
statements read out by the 
police during his interviews j 
with them in which be admit- 
ted knowledge of a bomb. 

The hearing continues 
today. 

BBC in talks" 
on European 
cable network 

The BBC hopes ns two 
television channels will be- 
come available to millions of 
cable television subscribers 
and hotel rooms in Scandina- 
via, Germany and Italy (Our 
Media Correspondent writes). 

If talks are successful the 
BBC would gain significant 
revenues at a time when it is 
under pressure to wean itself 
from licence fee income 

BBC-1 and BBC-2 are al- 
ready available to cable 
subscribers in Belgium, Hol- 
land and Paris, but they are 
transmitted using a micro- 
wave link that limits the 
number of areas able to .re- 
ceive signals. 

The BBC has just conducted 
tests of satellite transmission 
that would make it possible to 
distribute its channels across 
Europe to an unlimited num- 
ber of cable systems. 


The bigger 


Everyone is R. J 
talking about the Big Bang 
which hits the City this month. 
But does it really explain the 
huge expansion of Londons 
financial wealth? 

What, in reality, is the one 
area of economic activity in 
which Britain leads the world? 

In this weeks Spectator, 
Tim Congdon explains the 
nature of the Bigger Bang- the 
explosion of the Euromarkets 
in which London is. pre- 
eminent. With a turnover 
more than twice that of the 
Stock Exchange, they make 
the Big Bang sound like a 
whimper. 

At present, there are 399 
foreign banks in London, 
254 in New York and only 76 


in Tokyo. How did London ’• 
win this lead? And can it keep - 
it? Or will a Labour govern- i 
ment send the City the way of ; 
Lancashire textiles and 
Midland cars? 

I 

As usual, this weeks 

Spectator explodes with talent ; 

Alastair Forbes reviews : 

Patrick Leigh Fermors : 

• 

leisurely progress to Byzan- \ 

r 

tium. The Bishop of London j 
looks at the crisis in his own ^ 
Church. Jeffrey Bernard gives | 
his weekly cri de coeiir from ? 
the public bar of the Coach "i 
and Horses. 

And in a contrite Diary, > 
Peregrine Worsthorne tries to £ 
make peace with Princess [j 
Michael of Kent 

All this is yours for just a »: 


sovereign. 


THE 


Jk 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 




Ports fear big 
job losses and 
closures from 


Missing 
file holds 


no secrets 


says MoD 


Channel tunnel 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 
The Channel tunnel would projects and seeking to gaina 
v 'have a devastating impact on larger share of container traf- 
5'ports throughout Britain, fic by favouring the tunnel. 

causing huge jobs losses and in • Measures to ensure roads to 
ri some cases complete closures, ports are no worse than those 
■ ! '4he British Ports Association wthetunneL 
said yesterday. •Safety regulations for die 

•*•>10 evidence to the select tunnel as ara^ent as those for 
^committee examining the ports and femes. 

^'Channel Tunnel Bill, the • No public subsidies for the 

“dissociation, which represents tunnel 

vail Britain's big ports, de- Mr Finney claimed that if 

M ^ i ■ « J «ha tiiflflfll Anil/ 


By Nicholas Beeston 
The Ministry of Defence 
yesterday denied that security 
had been breached at a top 
secret American air base in 
Cambridgeshire, after the loss 
and publication of a blueprint 
for construction- work at the 



7 - 






12 the tunnel attracted only 30 

^ . r* _ nor /wit rtf" ovichtio trsfnr. 


ensure competition be- per cent of existing traffic 
T tween the ports and the tunnel from the ports of London, 
«->xvas fair Kent, Sussex and Hampshire 

. Mr Nicholas Finney, the that would equal the entire 
association's director, called 1985 traffic through the ports 
•- ‘for: of Medway, Ramsgate, FoDce- 

Protection against preda- stone, Newhaven, Portsmouth 
-‘ .tpry pricing by the tunnel and Southampton, 
-operators to drive ferries out That would threaten4,000 
ofbusiness before raising their direct jobs and 40,000 an- 
■- ?, own feres again. ciliary jobs, be said. 

5'# The abolition of “light He added that the tunnel 
dues”, the lax amounting to as would have an equally severe 
touch as £20,000 which ships effect on the pons of the North 
-•pay when docking to British and West, attracting their deep 
ports to finance navigational sea container traffic. 

* 1 ''hids, including lighthouses. Pons would undoubtedly 
-'"■m Upgrading of the “com- close, with serious defence 
^"pletely inadequate” customs implications and dangers of 
^'services at British ports severe disruption given the 
- ! q Independent intervention tunnel's vulnerability to 
**; :to stop British Rail curtailing industrial action and terrorist 
“'‘port rail infrastructure attack, he darned. 



sue. 

The file was found hi March 
by two CND supported in 
woodland outside RAF 
Alconbury, which is believed 
to house a squadron of high 
altitude TR-1 spy planes. 

The document, which is 
three-feet long, shows plans 
for construction work at the 
north-east section, inducting 
the position of aircraft han- 
gars, taxi-ways and parking 
aprons. 

Although it does not iden- 
tify the type of aircraft stored- 
in the hangars all buildings 
and runway^ are dearly 
marked to scale. - 

RAF Alconbury is also in- 
tended as a support base for 
the cruise missile installation 
at Molesworth. 

The plan was published in 
the Cambridge Evening News 
on Wednesday, but a spokes- 
man for the Ministry of 
Defence said the blueprint was 
unclassified 

“There is no information, 
that could not be gained by 
looking through the fence,” 
the spokesman, who described 
the disclosure as a “storm in a 
tea cup”, said. 




The Rev Albert Humphrey, 
aged 100, who thinks he nay 
be Britain's oldest driver, with 
the Mini he still uses regu- 
larly. Mr Humphrey of 
Stretcholt, near Bridgwater, 
Somerset, recently completed 
a six-hour 24(Mnite round trip 
to Chichester, Sussex. 

He uses life car mainly for 
short jovueys. “But if it was a 
matter of Me or death, I would 
drive it from here to 
Scotland,” he said. 

As a pioneering moto ris t, 
Mr Humphrey was exempted 
when tests woe introduced. In 
60 years of driving, he says he 
has had only two minor “paint 

scrapers”. 

According to the Guinness 

Book of Records, Britain's 
only recorded centenarian 
driver was Mr Herbert War- 
ren, of.Whatfetfni, Norfolk, 
who died in 1975. 


Prosecution withdraws 
‘sex for job’ charge 


The man accused of duping 
Miss Sarah Lambert, a sec- 
retary, bad a cfaaige against 
tom of procuring sexual inter- 
coms® dropped yesterday. 

The prosecution withdrew 
the allegation when Joseph 
Hanson, aged 41, appeared at 
Ea Kn g Magistrates’ Court in 
west London. The charge 
alleged that Mr Hanson “pro- 
cured Sarah Lambert to have 
sexual intercourse with him by 
falsely pretending to be Rob- 


ert Simmons, the managing 

director of a property develop- Mr Hanson was committed 


ment agency offering employ- 
ment to Miss Lambert at a 
salary of £12,000 phis a car 
and clothing allowance". 


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Currie’s [ Retailers 


warning 
to victims 
of Aids 


By JiQSbers»B 


use young 
‘as cheap 
labour’ 

By AaRiBft Johnson 


Mr Hanson, of Garretts 
Lane, Wandsworth, south- 
west London, still feces three 
charges of obtaining money by 
deception from Miss Lambert 
and three of obtaining money 
and services by deception 
from hotels and a car-hire 
firm. 


Three of the charges relate 
to four days in August when a 
nationwide police hunt was 
launched for Miss Lambert, 


in custody to Isleworth Crown 
Court in west London for trial 
on the remaining chaiges on a 
date to be fixed. 


People infected with the 

Aids rims shotod nhstnin fcom 

sexual intercourse, J Mis Ed- 
win Carrie. the junior health 
minis ter. says. 

“This is a life sentence, not 
a death sentence w Mrv Pane 
said yesterday on the 
Young programme on BBC 

Radio 2. . 

Present advice from me 
Department of Health warns 
people at high risk of getting 
the disuse to adopt safer 
sexnal practices such as using 
condoms. 

Mrs Carrie amfinned that 
ministers were discussing a 
new advertising campaign, 
mdo dfog proposals to send 

lea^wnii^ofAedanvro 

of contracting Aids and going 
advice OR how to prevent the 
spread of the disease, to every 
home in the country. 

She emphasized that it was 
important to give people the 
(acts about Aids (acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome) 
even if it meant giving offence. 
■ Her remarks came after 
reports that the Prime Min- 
ister has been reluctant to 
endorse the leaflet becanse of 
its explicit language about 
sexual praetkes- 
The leaflets are expected to 
be aNnptenumCed by_a tele- 
vision campaign warning peo- 
ple what to expect 
Mrs Currie said that sepa- 
rate information should ic 
directed at high risk groups 
such as homosexnals and dreg 
addicts, who represented a 
more immediate problem. 

She also emphasized that 
people should Is aware that 
Aids was a heterosexual dis- 
ease and that a pregant women 
with the virus could pass it on 
to her child. 


School leaven are being 
used as cheap labour by many 
retailers and wholesalers, who 
do not provide proper train- 
ing. a report published yes- 
terday claims. 

The Distributive Trades 
Economic Development 
Committee is calling for wide- 
spread support of the two-year 
Youth Training Scheme and 
greater in-house training. 

Its report says fob little 
provision is made for formal 
or systematic training of the 
70,000 youngsters entering foe 
industry each year. 

“What training there is fens 
short of lire young person’s 
wider needs because n is 
focused on teaching very nar- 
| row skills specific to a particu- 
lar section of the distribution 
industry or an individual 
business,” Mr Mike Grmdvod, 
chairman of die committee's 
Youth Training Group, said. 

“For many young people 
the distributive trades are a 
first job opportunity, therefore 
we nave a responsibility to 
ensure they receive a much 
more broadly based training 
to move from one section to 
another." 

Mr Grindrod praised the 
training carried out in banking 
and the travel trade industry, 
where he said the level of 
expertise for sales staff and 
managers means they can 
provide a much better service 
than many retailing firms. 

He said more retailers 
should use the YTS pro- 
gramme to put added empha- 
sis on foundation skills 


“1 know some employers 
regard YTS as a kind of cheap 
labour, but it is time our 
industry got its act together 

> .j r. M 


Services for pregnant 
women are going to be part of 
the junior minister's new 
responsiblities, together with 
services for breast cancer and 
cervical cancer. 


and used it effectively. 

The report also calls for big 
changes in the way schools 


and colleges prepare young- 
sters for work in the distrib- 
utive trades. 

It says educational 
estabtisheroents should aim to 
improve the level of practical 
experience students receive 
bdbre going out to work. 

The report also recom- 
mends that national co- 
ordinating bodies be set up for 
the four main sections fo the 
I industry - retailing, mail or- 
der, wholesaling and physical 
distribution. These would in- 
clude representatives of trace 
unions, education establish- 
ments, employers and the 
Government and would de- 
cide how to afautge training. 


Pre-empting the official 
amoucement of her portfolio 
yesterday afternoon* Mis Cur- 
rie said that for the first time 
ah aspects of women's health 
would be co-ordinated under 
one minister. She emphasized 
the importance of puffing to- 
gether different aspects of 
both preventive and acute care 
to improve services for woven. 
“For breast nmrer 

screening can be done at the 
same time as cervical cancer 
screening,” she Said. 


PARLIAMENT OCTOBER 16 1936 



Minis ter promises 
necessary action 
on library ban 


WAPPING DISPUTE 


The Government promised in 
the House of Lords that any 
necessary action against local 
authorities over the banning of 
News International newspapers 


would be taken quickly, 
depending on the outcome of a 


depending on the outcome of a 
case in the High Court. 

Lord Bdstead, Deputy Leader 
of the Lords, told Lord Harris of 
Greenwich (SDP): “It after the 
judgment of the High Court, it is 
thought to be necessary fry the 
Minister for the Arts (Mr 
Richard Luce) to act, be will act 
quickly." 

Lord Harris had asked what 
further action the Government 
proposed to take against local 
-authorities which had with- 
drawn the newspapers, 
including The Times, from 
libraries following the com- 


pany's dispute with printing 
trade unions. 


The case, on which judgment 
was reserved in the High Court 
last Friday, involves a challenge 
by .News International to toe 
ban imposed by three Labour- 
controlled London authorities, 
Camden. Ealing, and Ham- 
mersmith and Fulham councils 
after 5.500 News International 
employees went on strike in 
January and were dismissed. It 
is likely to be a test case for other 
councils which have barred 
News International 

publications. 

Lord Belstead said the arts 
minister considered it totally 
unacceptable for library auth- 
orities to withdraw these 
newspapers and had written to 
the authorities to ten them they 
might be contravening the 
Public Libraries and Museums 
.Act 1964 and should review 
their decisions. 

Lord Harris said that the answer 
was noi altogether satisfactory. 
What Lord Belstead had said 
about the arts minister's view 


represented the overwhelming 
opinion in the House. 

The Government had said on 
July 31 that the minister was 
taking his first step in the formal 
exercise of his default powers 
under the 1964 Act and give 
local authorities until Sep- 
tember I to reply. What was 
theiranswei? There was - no 
outstanding litigation in Scot- 
land. Some Scottish local 
authorities were also banning 
The Times and its supplements 
from libraries. Under the Local 
Government Act the Secretary 
of State for Scotland had power 
to aa. Was he preparedtodoso? 
Lord Belstead said that the arts 
minister, m his letter in July, 
made clear his view thai a local 
authority banning newspapers 
to make a political or industrial 
point would almost certainly be 
acting ultra vires to the 1964 
Act. After tire letter, out of 26 
local authorities complained of, 
six had lifted their ban and three 
appeared not to have imposed a 
ban at all. Fifteen of the rest had 
sent replies which were by no 
means altogether clear and two 
had not answered. - 

The situation in Scotland was 
statutorily slightly different, The 
Secretary of State was already 
-watching the position closely. 
Lord Harris asked Lord 
Bdstead to discuss tire Scottish 
situation urgently with tire 
Secretary of State because it 
appeared from the Local 
Government (Scotland) Act that 
the Secretary of State had power 
to act against local authorities 
which behaved with the degree 
of gross impropriety of some of 
them. There was no case before 
the courts in Scotland so foe 
matter was not sub iudke. 

Lord Bdstead said he would 
inform the Secretary of State of 
what peers had said today. 

Lord Mackie of Benshee (L) 
said amid laughter: “Cusiomefs 
of Scottish libraries may not 
want to read these English 
newspapers." 


Airports bus Next week 


link working 


The Government was prepared 
to look again at tire need for a 
scheduled helicopter service 
between Gatwick and Heathrow 
airports if the matter came 
before it. Viscount Davidson, a 
Government spokesman, said 


during question time in the 
House of Lords. He added that 
the present coach links seemed 
to provide a satisfactory service. 

Lord Boyd-Carpenter (C) sug- 
gested that a helicopter service 
should fly at a higher altitude. 

Viscount Davidson said that 
since the helicopter service 
ended 98.5 per cent of surface 
links arrived ax their des- 
tinations within 10 minutes of 
their scheduled time. 


The main business in the House 
of Commons next week wifl be 
Tuesday: Education Bill* 
conclusion of remaining stages. 
Wednesday: Sex Discrimination 
Bin, progress on remaining 
stages. 

Thursday; Sex Discrimination 
Bill completion- or 'remaining 
stages. Salmon BUL remaining 

Friday (9.30); PuMie Trustee 
and Administration of Funds 
Bill, remaining stages. 

The main business in- ore 
House of Lords wflVbc: .. < 
Monday: Financial Services 
Bill, report stage. ' 
Tuesday: Public Order folk 
report stage. . 

Wednesday: Housing an® 
Pfenning Bill, report stags--, 
Thursday: Pub&c-Onfer Bill. 


report stage. 


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Solicitors are angry at 
plan to transfer free 
legal advice scheme 

R-j- . ^ ^ raDces Gibb, Legal Affaire Correspondent 

- ^ Proposals being 


THE TIMES FRIDAYOCTOBERJ7 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Pttxas 

s*™*. Mr JohnWiSS 

^«ident of the Law sSS’ 
said yesterday. y ’ 

an!?,? i t0ld ^°nciiors at their 

%Z m i C0 » r ™ D(X in Torqoay 
^ he officials wfao hai4 

^mv ha2 Such proposal 

&*£ fe^WSE 

itny team of officials is that 
™SI? re U P tbe job of 

proving free legal to 

«* puMie in almost all but 
criminal cases. 

Instead that advice should 


would “be able to tell his story 
all over again to the so&citoi**. 
. Mr wickerson gave a wanv 
mg that the new scheme at the 
end of the day would cost 
more money and forfeit the 
good win of the profession 
which was geared to providing 
that advice. 

The proposal 'had been 
widely criticized, be said, even 
by the advice agencies where it 
was seen for what it was: “an 
attempt to save money with 
no regard to the public good.” 

The profession may in fu- 
ture be “less inclined or 
unable to provide the unpaid 
assistance that ft now gives,” 
be said. 

The scrutiny team is also 


said he hoped the officials did 
not intend to reduce the help 
that a large part of the 
profession gave to the 
disadvantaged. 

Lack of proper fending and 
failure to take on the 
profession's proposal for re- 
form had reduced the service 
and “caused fee public and 
practitioners much ang er", 

It was intolerable feat those 
who needed uigem help 
should have to wail months 
for legal aid certificates and 
feat solicitors should have to 
wait months for their 
“inadequate” fees, he said. 

Mr Wickerson tackled two 
other controversial issues: feat 

*™.wiu Inal aavice snould “ ■*** *-> of mixed partnerships be- 

oe provided by advice aeen- P^Ppsfeg drat only specialist tween solicitors and other 
pes such as citizens’* advice ichors be allowed to pro- professionals which has re- 
bureaux and’ * — » - — ... •- 

say. 

iMSSSKs ssMSirts 

•i a chemist or chemists feme to be paid as a GP?” 

There is already a “broadly 
satisfactory” network of gen- 
eral practitioners providing 
legal advice in the commu- 
nity; obtaining expert advice 
elsewhere when they need h, 
he said. 

Mr Wickerson, the first 



chemist or chemist's 
assistant thought it appro- 
priate for them to do so?" 

Would-be clients might 
nave to travel 25 miles to the 
nearest bureau with no easy 
public transport and no help 
with feres, Mr Wickerson said. 

If the advice worker then 
thought it necessary for a 
solicitor to help the client, he 


Trading; and feat of fesion 
between fee profession's two 
branches. 

On fee latter he made a 
conciliatory and conservative 
statement: “1 believe feat fee 
public interest is feat we 
should have a strong and 
independent Bar." 

Proposals “for changes in 
training, rights of audience or 
direct access which might of 
themselves seem attractive, 
but which seriously endanger 


Accident victims 
‘put off by courts 


Lawyers and fee courts 
must change to meet fee needs 
of thousands of consumers 
who feel cut off from legal 
services, solicitors at their 
annual conference at Torquay 
were told yesterday. 

Miss Elizabeth Filkiu, direc- 
tor of the National Associ- 
ation of Citizens’ Advice 
Bureaux, said millions of peo- 
ple were failing to seek 
compensation through the 
courts and found it ofl-putring 
to go to lawyers. 

In accident cases, fee said 
that “only about 10 per cent of 
injured persons seek 
compensation”, which means 
that 2.7 milli on accident vic- 
tims do noL 

From experience within fee 
bureaux, many people also 
found litigation “too for- 
midable to -contemplate. We 
have a long way. to gp before 
our courts promote equality 
before fee law.” 

Lord Devlin had described 
the legal system as one wife 
waiter service rather than a 
self-service cafeteria, she said. 

“If the self-service cafeteria 
can provide more food for 
more people and also give 
them greater power to choose 


“high street" solicitor to be- the independent Bar will not 
come president of the society, get my vote." 

Attack on 
exclusive 
Bar rights 

Sir Gordon Borne, director 
general of the Office of Fair 
Trading, last night attacked 
ibe Bar's exclusive rights of 
audience in crown courts. 

There are strong arguments 
for maintaining the Bar as a 
specialist profession, be said 
at fee annual dinner of the Bar 
Association for Commerce 
Finance and Industry, which 
represents barristers em- 
ployed in fee private sector. 

Those include fee benefit to 
the administration of justice, 
and to the public of having a 
pool of practitioners whose 
advocacy or specialist skills 
were available to aiL 

But, he said: “I doubt 
whether it is essential to fee 
continued existence of fee Bar 
for it to retain such exclusive 
rights of audience as it has at 
present. 

Sir Gordon said tint where 
barristers did not have exclu- 
sive rights of audience, such as 
in tribunals or p lanning in- 
quiries. they maintained “a 
pre-eminence through merit" 
and because the parties 
wanted it even though clients 
were free to choose a solicitor. 


what it Is they want, there is 
much to be said for ft.” 

She added that there had 
been a healthy trend towards 
do-it-yourself litigation. “But 
to achieve justice it requires 
profound adaptation in the 
habits of the courts” and 
“access to good quality advice 
and suppon". 

Defending the job done by 
solid tors, Mr Michael How- 
ells, chairman of the society’s 
steering group on the 
Government’s civil justice re- 
view, said the sodety was. 
looking at ways of promoting 
litigation and advice services. 

Next year it was launching a 
national scheme for a free 
intitial interview with a solic- 
itor in accident cases. 

“We shall also be encourag- 
ing firms to offer advice 
clinics whether free or at a 
modest charge and also to 
offer telephone advice .for a 
fixed amount fee." 

Mr Richard White, an of- 
ficial in fee Lord Chancellor’s 
Department, said officials 
looking at ways to cut delays 
in the cjvil courts have con- 
cluded that procedural 
changes nill not save litigation 
costs. 


Prosecutor 

service 

criticized 

The new crown prosecution 
service was criticized by a 
solicitor and a magistrate 
when two cases were thrown 
out of court without a hearing 
yesterday. 

The defendants had an 
charges against them dis- 
missed by magistrates at 
Tamworth, Staffordshire, be- 
cause the service, set up to 
deal wife cases “vigorously 
and without delay", was not 
ready to proceed. 

One man accused of theft 
and obtaining property by 
deception, which he denied, 
had travelled from Yorkshire: 
The other, accused of driving 
without due care, had come 
from South Wales. 

Id both cases the prosecu- 
tion sought further 
adjournments. 

After objections from the 
defence, the court ruled that 
fee cases should be beard as 
planned, and then dismissed 
fee charges when told they 
could not go ahead this week. 

One defence solicitor, Mr 
Jan Jellema. said the way the 
crown service had gone about 
fee matter in this case was 
“somewhat discourteous aim 
high-handed", and fee presid- 
ing magistrate, Mr m Anthony 
RammeU said criticism could 
be levelled at the service. 

The chief crown prosecutor 
for the area. Mr Douglas 
Dickenson, said he could not 
comment on the two cases. _ 

He added: "I have no 
reason to think that the plans 
we have laid and the systems 
we are developing are bad 
ones.” 


MP impersonates 
Hitler for judge 


There was laughter in court 
yesterday as Mr Neil Hamil- 
ton, a Conservative MP, 
treated a High Court judge 
and jury to his witness box 
impersonation of Adolf 
Hitler. 

But tiie MP for Tatton in 
Cheshire still denied claims 
made in a BBC Panorama 
programme that he had goose- 
stewed and given the Nazi 
salute outside a Berlin hotel 
after his election in 1983. 

He said that although he 
had no dear recollection of 
having done so, it was con- 
ceivable he had done a 
“furtive” imitation of Hitler, 
which bad earned him his. 
reputation as a mimic. 

Raising two fingers of his 
left hand to his top lip in 
imitation of a moustache, and 
raising his right hand to 
shoulder height* Mr Hamilton 
told Mr Justice Simon Brown 
and the jury: “I might very 
possibly have done something 
like this." 

Continuing his evidence on 
the fourth day of his libel 
action against the BBC he 
added: “I have no recollec- 
tion, but 1 conceive il is the 
sortof thing I might have done 
in those circumstances in that 
limited way." 

But when asked by Mr 
Richard Hartley, QC, his 
counsel, whether he would 
have done .it with his aim 
outstretched in a fuD Nazi 
salute he said: “I would not 
have done it in any circum- 
stances where it might have 
been calculated to hurt.” 

He and the other MPs on 
the trip were winding down 
during the parliamentary re- 


cess and there was “a little 
larking about, but nothing 
which in any way could have 
been regarded as excessive,” 
Mr Hamilton said. 

The January 1984 pro- 
gramme “Maggie's Militant 
Tendency” alleged his Ger- 
man hosts in Berlin were 
“embarrassed and shocked" 
by his actions. 

But Mr Hamilton said: “I 
would be staggered if anybody 
could possibly be upset by h. 
It would be like being upset by 
Charlie Chaplin’s 

moustache." 

The MP, aged 37, claims 
that the programme, which 
alleged that a small but politi- 
cally significant group of right- 
wingers had infiltrated the 
Conservative Party, made 
him out to bea virulent racist. 

He was faced with the 
collapse of aH his hopes and 
ambitions and had not re- 
ceived an apology from fee 
BBC which sought to justify 
fee allegations. He had been 
•forced through “mental 
anguish " wife the slain on his 
good name and pushed to fee 
point of bankruptcy to bring 
the case to court. 

He described it as a “charac- 
ter assassination” which had 
horrified his constituents and 
reduced his wife, Christine, to 
a “stole of hysteria”. 

The BBC; Mr Peter 
Ibbotson. the programme edi- 
tor, Mr James Hogan, fee 
producer; Mr Fred Emery, the J 
presenter, and Mr Michael 
Cockerell, a reporter, all deny 
libel and claim the allegations 
were true: 

The hearing continues 
today. 


Probation policies ‘appalling 9 

Miss Jfl Cove; probation prison population or the num- cruel, inhumane and mostly 
officers' leader, yesterday ber on remand reaching unnecessary practice of using 
accused the Government of record levels. custody in a cavalier and 

Irvdne its way on law and The effects on prisoners and unwarranted .fashion." 
orrier probation staff alike were Miss Cove also criticized the 

She told the annual con- appalling. Government’s criminal jus- 

fere nee of the National Defendants were not pro- tice proposals outlined -last 

Association of Probation Offi- duced for .ball applications, week at the Conservative 
cers in Bournemouth that Mis time was wasted on tracing Party conference. 

Margaret Thatcher's admin- prisoners and there were long She deplored fee high num- 

istranon was “floundering in a delays before trials. ber of black people in prisons, 

A. 0 f repression and “This government will not and called on probation offi- 

omiression-” grasp the nettle and issue cere to make positive recom- 

Miss Cove said Mr Douglas instructions to semencers in mendations when writing 
Hurd, fee Home Secretory, general, and magistrates in court reports on black 
had failed to prevent the particular, to stop this callous, defendants. 



' t 

An historic Comet aircraft rednung home to RAF Lyneham, Wiltshire, yesterday after a last-minute reprieve from the 
scrapyard. It was saved by the base s co mmand o 1 . Group Captain David Edwards, who has arranged for it to be refurbished 
as a gate guard. The airliner was taken out of service in 1967 and sent to the RAF museum at Hendon. 


Parents lose case 
over danger track 


A couple who refused to 
allow their teenage daughter to 
walk to school along an iso- 
lated and dangerous track 
yesterday lost fee final round 
of a three-year legal battle to 
force their local education 
authority to provide her wife 
free transport. 

In a test case ruling, the 
House of Lords unanimously 
upheld fee convictions of 
Peter and Violet Rogers, of 
Hall Cottages. Church Road, 
Copford, Essex, for foiling to 
send their daughter Shirley, 
then aged 13. to scbooL 
Lord Ackner said that the 
shortest route from Shirley's 
home to Stan way Comprehen- 
sive School was 106 yards 
short of the qualifying three- 


mile minimum for a free bus 
pass from Essex County 
Council. 

The route involved crossing 
Copford Plains by the unlit 
and partly unmade track. 

Lord Ackner said fee par- 
ents had contended that the 
“nearest available" route for 
the walking distance from a 
child's home to school under 
fee Education Act, 1944, must 
be. not merely the nearest 
route a child could lawfully 
walk, but one which a respon- 
sible parent would allow a 
child to use unaccompanied. 

“It does not foil to qualify as 
'available' because of dangers 
which would arise if the child 
is unaccompanied.” 

Law Report, page 10 


Turning to the 
weather for power 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 

The son. wind, tides and 
geothermal beat could provide 
a fifth of Britain's energy 
needs if a relatively cautious 
policy is adopted of developing 
renewable resources over 40 to 
50 years. 

The proposal comes in fee 
latest Friends of the Earth 
study of alternative forms of 
power, amounting today to 
2 per cent of supplies. 

In addition to power for 
electricity generation and liq- 
uid feel derived from biomass 
wastes from the motori n g and 
chemical industry', the report 
proposes a 1 pm cent a year 
redaction in primary energy 
Bse over the next 20 years 
through conservation potides- 


Dr Michael Flood, anchor of 
Energy Without End, recom- 
mends a new energy efficiency 
agency and the lifting of 
borrowing restrictions for lo- 
cal authorities on cost-effec- 
tive schemes for efficient 
energy use in buildings, ve- 
hicles, appliances and for 
district heating by combined 
heat and power schemes. 

He says the market is 
distorted against energy 
conservation by taxation and 
subsidies which favour invest- 
ment in bulk supply over 
improved efficiency. 

Encrg i* Without End, by Mi- 
chael Flood (Friends of the 
Eanh Trust. 377 City Road, 
London EC1 IN A). 


JPs reject 
the short, 
sharp 
shock idea 

By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

Magistrates are rejecting 
“short, sharp shocks” Tfor 
young people in favour of 
“tost chance” alternatives that 
keep them at home. 

Basingstoke juvenile mag- 
istrates have not used custody 
for more than 15 months: 
there were reductions of: 70 
per cent and 32 per cent in 
Southend and Lewisham 
respectively. '! 

The figures were given yes- 
terday by fee Rainer Founda- 
tion, fee national young 
people's charity. An open day 
at Well Hall. Greenwich, yes- 
terday, disclosed there -has 
been a 50 per cent drop in 
young people from the bor- 
ough sentenced to custody 
since it opened. 

Well Hall has worked with 
more than SO young people, 
aged 14-17. during the bast 
three years. They face a four- 
oionth intensive programme 
of up to 12 hours a week. 

The foundation says that 
before Well Hall opened, mag- 
istrates hod little option bin to 
incarcerate young people such 
as those wife records of; re- 
peated petty theft. 

"But such sentencing had 
no beneficial effect whatso- 
ever. severing any remaining 
family and community lies 
and confirming inmates in a 
life of crime. Home Office 
figures show re-oflending rates 
as high as 85 per cent” 

Well Hall's practical adcice 
enables some young people, 
for instance, to manage their 
finances better, and to avoid 
running short of money. ; 

The offences committed- by- 
young people on the Raiiter 
programmes also include -re- 
peated taking and driving 
away motor vehicles, burglary 
and occasionally mugging/But 
violence is not involved io*88 
per cent of juvenile crime,- Ihc 
foundation says. •* 


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Attoagb tkesr wra* «» br jnbUr hw. thr> carat 

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Even in the days when America was known as the New 
World, it was a country with a reputation for its spirit of enterprise 
and the ability of its people to make a good deal 

When the settlers started negotiating, the natives hardly knew 
what had hit them — and in the summer of 1626, probably the 
. most spectacular real estate coup in history took place. 

Governor Peter Minuit of the Dutch West India Company 
. had the job of buying Manhattan bland from the Indians. 

After some haggling with Chief Manhasset; the price was 
agreed at 24 dollars’ word] of kettles, axes and doth. 

Today $24 would not buy one square foot of office space in 
New York City and an office block in central Manhattan changes 
hands for around $80 million. Even allowing for inflation, Minuit 
got himself a real bargain. 


You would think that the Manha ttan deal would remain a 
one-off for ever After all the Americans would surely never find ,, 
anyone as naive as ffie.Indian chief again. . ' 

But less than two centuries later; they did — 
and this time the loser was Napoleon, Emperor 
of France and (in his eariy years, at least) 
a brilliant military tactician. 

In 1805, Napoleon had his mind on 
European affairs (in particular, an invasion 
of Britain), so he decided to dispense with 
France’s American possessions. fj 

He sold the entire Mississippi valley \ Jj 
an area of 828,000 square miles extending ^ 

from Canada down to the Gulf of Mexico S N 

and westwards to the Rockies, for just over / 

27 million dollars. 

' Through this deal known as the Louisiana 
purchase. President Thomas Jefferson doubled the Bf§|Sf 
size of the United States for only around 5 cents per VA 


The judgement of the Emperor, on the other 
hand, never seemed to be quite the same again. 


5. Nice ice at a reasonable price. 

Napoleon did just manage to reach Moscow in his ill-fated 
invasion of 1812 — but it would seem that news of his poor 
American deal did not. 

For; astonishingly the Russians went on to become the third 
victims of major land deals with America. 

On March 30th 1867, the US. Secretary of State, William 
Seward, bought Alaska from Tsar Alexander II for a mere $7.2 
million — thereby acquiring another 586,000 square miles of 
territory for less than 2 cents per acre. . 

The Tsar presumably thought that this remote, frozen and 
virtually uninhabited piece of land had nothing at all to commend 
it — and at first, the American people agreed with him, for Alaska 
was known as ‘Seward’s folly' and 'Seward’s ice box’ for years. 

In 18%, however, gold was struck at Klondike in the Yukon, 
and since then, over 750 million dollars' worth has been mined. 

In 1968, black gold was discovered — and an estimated 100 
billion tons of coal are also lying underground, just waiting to be 
dug up. 


4. More frozen assets. 


The frozen wastes of North America again proved to be a 
bargain basement in 1933. 

A young Greek entrepreneur; who had already made money 
importing tobacco into Argentina, had been trying to break into 
the shipping business for well over a yean 

At the time, there was a world slump in the trade. No one 
was making any money — but the young man realised that such a 
situation could not go on for ever and that if he could pick up ' 
some cheap second-hand vessels now, he would be perfectly placed 
to make a killing when things did change. 

Eventually he found just the ships he had been looking for — 
frozen solid into the ice-packed St Lawrence River in Canada |i£ 
They had been rusting there for two years, and were so full 
of ice and snow that when he walked on the upper ^ 
deck of one of them, he disappeared into a 
snowdrift and ended up on the deck below. 

Not surprisingly no one else wanted the ten 
vessels “least of all their owners, tfie 1 
Canadian National Steamship Company 
who were prepared to let them go for 
their scrap value of $30,000 each, even 
though they had cost a total of 

$2 million to build ten years previously %^^^ ^^^^^K^^ 
Yet despite his scare in the 
snowdrift, the young Greek kept his 
wits about him and 
managed to determine 
that the ships were still ^ 

structurally sound. He offered a paltry $20,000 ^*®'*” e * ' 
for each of six ships — and the Canadians accepted almost at once. 

His fleef remained at anchor in the frozen St Lawrence for 
several months — but just as he had foreseen, both the river and 
the world depression finally thawed As the Thirties progressed and 
the likelihood of worid war increased, so the world shipping 
business boomed. . .and in a few years, Aristotle Onassis was one 
of the richest men in the world 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


Publishers are notorious for turning down lucrative business 
deals. (For example, Tonafhan Livingston Seagull’ was rejected by 
eighteen, while twenty-two gave foe thumbs-down to James Joyce’s 
The DubHnesi) 

However; in 1938, one publisher got it brilliantly right 
On June 1st of that year; Action Comics’ appeared, featuring 
a character by the name of Superman (and, by turns, Clark Kent). 

The character seemed to go down quite well so the 
publisher offered to buy all rights to him from his creators, 

Joe Shuster and Jeny Siegel 

They needed mon^ badly — so they settled for — 
the sum of $130, or $65 each. Jftgfiip 

...• Today of course. Superman is such big business feggggjr 
that Marlon Brando was able to command $3 mflKonS BB MBr j 
for his ten-minute role m the first Superman movie. 

If you had seen Shuster and Siegel when they realised! 
vyhat they had done, you would believe a man can ay 


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Just occasionally however; the seller does come 
out of a clever business deal on top — as in this 
example of a man who sold an idea to a 
■ manufacturing company - 
i The particular beauty of this deal lies in the 

A fact that the idea was not one which he. could put 
9 into practice himself. 

9 He simply approached a leading match 

' company and offered to tell them how they could 
{ save thousands of pounds by means of one 

I change to their manufacturing procedures. The 

B - change would cost absolutely nothing to cany 
B out — but he would require a substantial 
B percentage of the savings in return for the idea. 

■ Not surprisingly tire match company 

■ were more than a little suspicious, and turned 
|B him down. After all if this idea was so 

IB obvious to an outsider; surely they could work 
it out for themselves. 


They duly went through the whole factory with 
a fine tooth-comb — but found nothing. By this 


time, they were so intrigued by the man’s offer \ 
that they went back to him and agreed that if he i 

could save them money he could have the cut he 
wanted. j 

"Just put one striking surface on each j 

matchbox instead of two," he advised them. "You’D . 
cut the money you spend on abrasives by 50%T N 

They did — and they did. And over the next i 
few years, the man who sold them the idea made I 
a small fortune. 



Arthur Furguson went a stage further; 
however He made money by selling tilings _ 
which weren’t even his in the first place. Mbjg* '$.'ajBA& 
One morning in 1923, he spotted a 
rich American in Trafalgar Square and B|| 

had a brainwave. ^B 

Introducing himself as the official B 

guide to the square, Furguson explained 9 

all about Nelson’s Column, the Dons and ' 

the fountains — and just happened to 
mention what a shame it was that Britain was 
having to sell them off to meet soaring debts. 

The American asked the price. “£6,000 ^HB 
to the right buyer;" replied Furguson, adding 
that as guide, he had been entrusted with the 
job of making the sale. 

The American begged him to seD the square to him. At 
length, Furguson consented and went off to ‘agree the deal with 
his superiors’. On his return, he announced that Britain 
was prepared to accept a cheque on the spot 


k The delighted tourist wrote one at once. 

iguson gave him a receipt — and even the 
name and address of a firm who would 
dismantle the square ready for shipping 
— and promptly inarched off to cash the 

Later that summer, Furguson went on to 
ill Big Ben for £1,000 and accepted a down 
payment of £2,000 on Buckingham Palace. 

In 1925, he went to Washington D.G, where 
he leased the White House to a cattle-rancher for 
1 yeans at $100,000 p a — with the first year 
ible in advance. 

his type of business deal has a special name, of 
course; fraud. Furguson was eventually caught trying to ■ 
sell the Statue of Liberty for another $100,000 and 
y was given five years in prison. 


In the unstable and unpredictable 
worid of popular music, there have been 


i 


many astonishing business deals (both good and bad) — but 
perhaps the greatest of them aD occurred in 1955. 

In that year; RCA Records paid Sam Phillips, the owner Of a 

tiny Memphis recording company called Sun Records, the sum of 
$35,000 for the exclusive contract he had with an 
unconventional young singer with a grossly exaggerated hip 


action. 


Phillips was happy with the deal at the time. After aU, it 

seemed like a lot of money and in any case, the young man had 

only wandered into his studio one day to cut a record on spec as a 
present for his mother; 

But RCA knew what they were doing. In the years that 
foDowed, Elvis Presley went on to sell over a billion records — and 
is stifi selling today. 


In 1978, the American bicycle importer Sam Rubin bought a 
3-year-old racehorse for $25,000. 



ime. 


; inch to 

Vilnifil R { 

1 a !‘ nt> ;i| 


•• ■ i.' 


I if There didn’t seem to be anything 

f J remarkable about John Heniy at the ... 

A j time, and his previous owner was 

J certainly satisfied with the amount, as 
bought the horse for only 
^ $1,100 as a yearling. 

tg f In 1980, however, John Henry suddenly 
.§ blossomed and won $925,000 in prize money. 

Jr Then in 1981, he won the inaugural Arlington 
j# Million and became America’s Horse of the Year. By 
§ the time he picked up the title for a second time in 1984, 
/ he had won the MiUion again, the Santa Anita Handicap 
twice, the Jockey Gold Cup, the BaUantine's Scotch 
Classic and a staggering $6,591,860 — almost twice as 
much as any other horse in worid racing history. 

Sam Rubin can have only one regret about his 
horse, and that is that he has no stud value at all 
Unfortunately for him, John Henry, is a gelding. 


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10. PC Tips. 

The example of John Henty proves that 
IgllB outstanding opportunities do stUl exist — and without 
^SpB. doubt, the best deal in office computers at the 
moment is the Epson PC+. 

The PC+ is every bit as powerful as the 
industry standard computer, and just as 
flexible. 

^ WKf ft wifl run aD of the huge amount of 

software designed for IBM PCs (plus, of 
Wmag course, Epson’s own famous Taxi system) and 
A9 wiD fit happily into any existing IBM network. 

However, it can run the software over 
three times faster — and it takes an even greater range of printers 

and peripherals. 

Furthermore, it is only three-quarters the size, is 

considerably easier to use and is absolutely packed with extra 
features. In fact, it has more built in as standard than any other 
PC on the market 

As you would expect of an Epson, the PC+ is also 
exceptionally reliable. ‘ 

Yet for aD this, it costs an astonishing 25% less than the 
industry standard 

To find out more about this extraordinary deal, either 
write to Epson (U.K.) Limited, 


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Freepost, Birmingham B37 5BR; 
call up Prestel *280#; or dal 100 
and ask for Freefone Epson. 

It may differ from the 
previous nine deals in that more 
than one party can benefit from 
it — but that doesn't mean you 
should waste any time in taking 
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EPSON 


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Sliamir set to act against terror 

Row over security lapse 

after Jerusalem’s 
worst night of violence 


THE TIMES F R IDAY OCTOBER 17 198 6 

as Peres gives way on handover 


ham laa Murray, Jerusalem 

vifeS l S' , iJS? sSfi! fn £ uId no doubt 

wh,ch one person d2d\nd Sl 1 ^ ^ alesliDe . Liberation 
more than 60 were iniurM S* °^ aa,zaU0Q saw it as an ideal 
poade attack near the Old gPP°™ nit y for propaganda: 
City wails, became a nolitirai F ” >m 1301,51 of view. a 
issue here yesteidav MlUS; ?° u P ofIsrael » soldiers from a 
politicians and security frSS! distinguished brigade had 
sought to apptmfon bteinL'w 5®?. an * ush «l in a military 
what had happened. 6 * 0r fo^hion inside what is consid- 

PrevenUng^milar attack CT ^ upied !erril0 ^- 
is certain to be a main Drioritv ^ There 00 doubt 

of the new IsrSS oS S 81 «n^ "as not what it 
mem, which is now Ukeiv to sho H^ ^ ^ “ sucb a 
be formed on Monday Yes- P^bvearraatatimewhena 
icrday evening Labour Partv £ 8e P i un 2* r °f P**^ ««« 
negotiators mid £LH2 bound to be presenL 


pftssrsssfas 

.. Sw^re v ^?!l! e 3 political 

poliUdaiBS^m^fo^i 

- ?2^^ nt5n | a similar attack 
lscertam to be a main priority 
of the new Israeli Goveni- 
menu which is now likely to 
be formed on Monday Yes- 
terday evening Labour' Party 
negotiators told President 
Herajg that they would at last 
be able 10 support a Govern- 
ment headed by Mr Yitzhak 
Shamir, the Likud leader. 

This followed reluctant 
ugiwment from Mr Shimon 
reres. the out-going Prime 

m Minister, that he would allow 
"is arch critic, Mr Yitzhak 
Modau back into the Cabinet 
in return for being able to 
nominate the next Ambas- 
sador to the United States. 

Mr Peres appears to have 
raven way after a threat from 
President Herzog to form a 
government without him if be 


One official action was to 
call _ in Mr Mohammed 
Bassiouny, the new Egyptian 
Ambassador, and hand him a 
stiff note of protest that the 
claim for responsibility was 
issued through the PLO office 
in Cairo. 

A rival claim by the Syrian- 
backed Democratic Front for 
the Liberation of Palestine, 
which said its men had with- 
drawn safely after their attack, 
was largely discounted here. 

Mr Shamir said: “It is dear 
the PLO is the main terrorist 
organization and that it 


weapons stolen or bought 
from the Israeli armed forces. 
The use of imported grenades 
points eleariy to outside 
organization. 

The Army and police, who 
were accusing each other yes- 
terday of security lapses, are 
launching their own investiga- 
tions. The Army has ap- 
pointed an officer to be in 
charge of finding out what 
went wrong. 

Yesterday 34 of those in- 
jured were still in hospital. 
Two were said to be severely 
wounded. 

Eighteen people were being 
interrogated about the in- 
cident, although the signs were 
that the attackers had made 
good their escape through the 
warren of houses outside the 
Dung Gale, which tumbled 
down the hillside where the 
original City of David stood, 
but which is now a Palestinian 
stronghold. 






mmm 


original City of David stood, 
but which is now a Pales tinian 

su-uuguu Mr Shimon Peres at a Jerusalem hospital chatting to a young soiHiPr wpmd«** in rh» 

Israeli aircraft bomb Palestinian bases 


delayed the agreed rotation of continues to mount terrorist 


:est 

ne 


power much longer. 

Mr Shamir is bound to want 
to te seen acting swiftly to 
minimize the danger of fur- 
ther attacks. Clearly a lot of 
questions need answering. 

There could be no doubt 
that the attack was well 
planned, and that the two or 
three who carried it out es- 
caped easily in the chaos on 
Wednesday evening, when 
three grenades exploded 
among young soldiers of the 
Givatr Brigade and* the fam- 
ilies who bad come to watch 
them swear an oath to their 
country in a ceremony by the 
Western WalL 

French to 
face Unifil 
discipline 

From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

More than 20 French para- 
troopers of the United Nations 
peacekeeping force in south- 
ern Lebanon are facing disci- 
plinary proceedings after 
French troops at the UN’s 
headquarters in Naqqenra 
fired tracer ballets across the 
Mediterranean hay .in. the 
direction of Israel after a fade 
night party last week. 

At one point during the 
firing, the Israelis sent a 
ganboat north towards 
Naqqoura, fearing a gaerriUa 
attack. And when UN military 
policemen approached the 
French, several of them 
pointed weapons at the MP5- 

The deeply embarrassing 
incident — which the_ UN 
Imped would not be publicized 
— occurred less than 24 hours 
before Major General Gustav 
Haggtand, the UN force com- 
mander, made his unprece- 
dented request to the Israelis 
to let UN troops move into the 
western half of the Israeli 
occupation zone and thus fulfil 
part of then original 1978 
mandate. 

According to civilians in 
Naqqoara, the shooting - in 
which at least five French 
soldiers with automatic weap- 
ons were involved — continued 
for almost half an hour, light- 
ing np the night sky. 

UN military poticemen from 
Ghana and Ireland were sent 
to hkt control but after the 
French pointed guns at the 
IUPS, the UN deputy force 
c ommand er— who is French— 

was asked to restore order. All 

the French troops involved are 
likely to face a farther military 
inquiry into their behaviour 
when they return to Paris. 

Officers in a number of UN 
contingents have voiced theft 
«xn ha ppiness at the French 
contingent in recent weeks, 
suggesting that the para- 
troopers were too aggressive 
and unsuited to a peacekeep- 
ing role in Lebanon. 


attacks on us .. . 

“I don’t think there is any 
difference between soldiers 
and civilians. What they want 
to do is kill Jewish people." 

Mr Peres was more defen- 
sive. “We cannot dose every- 
thing hermetically " be said, 
almost apologetically, when 
asked bow the grenade throw- 
ers had got within range of the 
soldiers. “But I do think this is 
a local incident."" 

Blit the fact that Soviet- 
made grenades were used 
suggests otherwise. It has been 
a considerable time since any 
attack in Israd involved the 
use of anything but knives or 


From Our Own 
Correspondent 
Cairo 

Just about every shade of 
mutually hostile Palestinian 
extremist yesterday claimed 
responsibility for the grenade 
attack in Jerusalem on Tues- 
day. giving the Israelis a wide 
variety of targets for any reta- 
liation raid. 


Sam 7 missile, and had seen 
its two* man crew bale out by 
parachute. 

If Palestinian groups are 
loathe to admit responsibility 
for attacks outride Israel, there 
could be no doubting yester- 
day's enthusiasm with which 
at least five organizations 
claimed to be behind the 
attack near the Wailing Wall 


assault. 


movement has now become. 


They were followed in quick The DFLP in Damascus ang- 


succession by the Marxist De» 


denounced the 


They chose a series of in Jerusalem, which left one 
Palestinian bases in the hills Israeli dead and 69 wounded. 
resr of the Lebanese dty of Mr Yassir Arafat’s Palestine 
Si don, -sending their jets in Liberation Organization and 
bombing and strafing sorties Abu Nidal's radical Palestin- 
agai nst positions near the ten faction — which have in 
Mieh Mieh Palestinian camp, the past both ordered the 
Local militiamen said they liquidation of each other’s 
had shot down one of the leadership — were among the 
Israeli aircraft, armed with a first to say they carried out the 


raocrat-ic Front for the Liber- statement in Cairo, which said 
ation of Palestine (DFLP), “a special group from the unit 
Abu Moussa's anti-Arafat of Martyr Kamal Odwan 
PLO faction and a previously operating inside the occupied 
unknown organization which homeland was responsible for 
sent a “communique" to the the heroic (sic) operation car- 
Agence France-Prcsse news ried out ... in occupied Jeru- 
agency in Amman, referring to salem". 


itself as the Islamic Front for The PLO claim, said the 
the Liberation of Palestine. DFLP, was a lie. It was their 
Several of the spokesmen men. the spokesman said, who 
insisted that they would soon had “infiltrated all the security 
provide details of the attack to measures of the enemy to car- 
prove their authorship. ty out this heroic attack", 
coming months. On the basis of previous 

If nothing else, the conflict- attacks of this kind in Israel 
ing claims showed how broken the DFLP was probably to 
and divided the Palestinian blame: 4 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Police in Seoul 
storm parliament 

Seoul (Renter) — Police yesterday stormed the Sooth 
Korean Parliament to allow the ruling Democratic Justice 
Party to approve a government plan to arrest an opposition 
deputy, witnesses said. 

The Speaker, Mr Lee Chu-hyung. called in about 500 
policemen to prevent opposition members from entering a 
room at the National Assembly where the ruling party 
forced the plan through. 

The order was given after about 60 members of the New 
Korea Democratic Party (NKDP) ringed the podium in the 
main chamber and stopped the Speaker from opening a 
session for a vote on the government plan. Witnesses said 
NKDP members wrestled with policemen but could not 
break a police cordon. 

Members of the majority Democratic Justice Party then 
gathered at another room in the Parliament and 
miSateraHy passed the vote allowing the Government to ar- 
rest the deputy, Mr Yoo Sung- b wan, for eri dozing the 
country’s anti-communist polities. 

Aquino faces breach 

Manila - A serious breach in President Aquino’s 
co ali ti on Government has occnred with the anno uncement 
by the Vice President, Mr Salvador? Land, iim hk party 
wiD field its own candidates in local and congressional elec- 
tions next year (Keith Dalton writes). 

Mr Laurel said he had not been told of a planned alliance 
to allow Mrs Aquino to select candidates for the joint May 
ejections, but this would not stop his political party Uoido 
from fielding its own candidates even if they competed 
against Mrs Aquino’s nominees. 

Mr Laurel also said he did not agree with “a lot of 
provirions" in the new draft constitution presented on 
Wednesday to Mrs Aquino, and he had not yet decided 
whether to join her and campaign for its ratification in a 
plebiscite in January. 

K a thman d u (AFP) — 

Reinhold Messuer (right), 

the renowned Italian 

climber, yesterday became -c 

the first European to scale r BBT J 

all 14 of the world's mom- Bm i §d| 

tains higher than 26,000ft HHh . Jt HM 

when he reached the top of 

The Nepalese To urism 

Ministry said that Mess- TP 

oer, aged 42, and his 1 \ 

compatriot Johann Kamm- \L \ / , zjjr. 

erlander, aged 36, reached y, / ‘, t 

the 27,936ft summit of Mt K 7 * 'Jn. j 

Lhotse, the world’s fourth « f i' ' i 

highest peak, via the y'A / V j| 

treacherous west face and L . .** £ '.{] V \-2 

without using oxygen. y,.Jm 


Superpower arms control talks 


Reagan gets big 
approval rating 

From Michael Binyan, Washington 


Soviet-Polish initiative seen 
as ‘carrot’ to West Europe 


President Reagan has won 
overwhelming approval from 
the American public for his 
handling of relations with the 
Soviet Union, with more than 
twice as many blaming Mr 
Gorbachov rather than him 
for the breakdown of the 
Reykjavik summiL 

This was shown by a series 
of polls conducted by the three 
television networks and three 
leading newspapers. 

The CBS tetevirion peril 
indicated that Mr Reagan’s 
refusal to restrict development 
of the Strategic Defence Initia- 
tive was correct by a 68 to 20 
per cent margin. 

An ABC poll showed 52 per 
cent against stopping space 
weapons development as the 
price of an arms agreement, 
although 41 per cent were in 
favour. 

The poll conducted on 
Tuesday, showed that the 
failure of Mr Reagan and Mr 
Gorbachov to reach agree- 
ment would not significantly 
alter the congressional dec- 


Tbe public seemed to share 
Mr Reagan's belief in SDL 
Half of those asked said the 
US should build space weap- 
ons, 15 per cent said they 
should not be built and 27 per 
cent said they should be used 
as a bargaining chip. 

Asked by CBS who was 
more to blame for the break- 


American acceptance of 
Moscow's proposals on the 
Star Wars programme would 
lead to superpower agreement 
on a broad range of arms 
control issues, including limits 
on nuclear weapons in Eu- 
rope, according to a joint 
Soviet-Polish communique 
published yesterday after a 


tions on November 4. Of cent saying it would not 
those questioned, 78 per cent Public reaction may change 
said the summit would make as the issue is debated, but it I 
no difference in how they appears that Mr Reagan has 
vote, while 10 per cent said managed to put his stamp on 
they were more likely to vote’ the first impressions in the 
Democrat and 9 per cent said minds of an American public 
the result would prompt them that rarely focuses intently 00 


nZSn w£ni visit to Warsaw by Mr Nikolai 

MrTe4l ci m ^^th «- W'. the Soviet Prime 
per cem Warning Mr Gorfca- Minister, 
chov 1 1 per cem saying both The phrasing left room for 
mid 4 per cent sayuig neither, interpretation, but diplomats 
This was reflected in almost said that there seeded to be a 
^ population groups, al- -positive rather than neg- 
though blacks were about ative" linkage of the issues of 
evenly divided. Of the Demo- Star Waralnd intermeSato 
crats, 39 per cent blamed the nu dear forces. 

Soviet leader and 22 per cent 

Mamed Mr Reagan. As one diplomat coro- 

The President's optimism mented: “The Russians see- 
about the outcome of the talks med to be saying that a great 
appears to be justified by the incentive to solve the Star 
polls. Some 57 per cent said Wars problem is the package 
that despite the breakdown at of accords that would follow. 
Reykjavik the meeting would In other words, a carrot, 
eventually lead to real arms — . 
control agreements. f j 

This contrasts with 31 per I ~\T O ff 


From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 

especially to the West Eu- 
ropeans.” 

But Moscow does not 
appear to be threatening the 
collapse of other arms control 
talks if there is no progress on 
Star Wars, the US Strategic 
Defence Initiative. 

“The acceptance of these 
(Soviet) proposals by the US 
Administration would mean a 


and such projects as the 
“European defence initiative" 
be stopped. It was “indis- 
pensable" to conclude agree- 
ments on eliminating Soviet 
and American missiles in 
Europe. 

The declaration recognized 
that small states — Moscow's 
and Washington’s European 
allies — had a rote to play m 


agnifirant turn in the direc- ending the Star Wars pro- 
non of achieving agreements gramme. 


on strategic weapons, nuclear 
medium range and outer space 
weapons," the communique 
said. 

A long declaration by War- 
saw Pact foreign ministers, 
who have just completed two 
days of consultations in Bu- 
charest left open the question 
of linkage between the issues 
of outer space defence and 
medium range weapons in 
Europe. 

“It is imperative," said the 
declaration, that Star Wars 


Ozal 

ponders 

Ankara (Reuter) - The 
Tarlush Prime Minister, 
Mr Turgut Ozal, beset by 
political and economic 
problems, worked yes- 
terday oa a new Cabinet list 
for his first bq government 
reshafDe after three years 
in power. 

AD 21 ministers and the 
executive board of his rul- 
ing conservative Mother- 
land Party have resigned to 
make way for sweeping 
changes. 

Party officials say seven 
or eight of the less success- 
ful ministers might lose 
their jobs. The Prime Min- 
ister said he expected to 
announce his new Cabinet 
team today. 


Kinnock 

warning 

Bonn — European gov- 
ernments should have a 
direct say in arms control 
talks between the super- 
powers because Europe 
would be the killing- 
grounds in a nuclear ex- 
change, Mr Neil Kinnock, 
the Labour Party leader, 
said here yesterday (John 
England writes) 

If Western Europeans 
did not make their collec- 
tive voice heard there 
would a danger that they 
would be seen to be in a 
“mood of neutralism", be 
said during a two-day meet- 
ing of the Socialist inter- 
national council attended 
by leading socialist poli- 
ticians from 30 countries. 


That is a green light for East 
European leaders preparing to 
step westwards, but also a 
reminder that they should put 
Star Wars at the top of their 
agenda. 

The foreign ministers also 
said they were ready to co- 
operate with other countries 
in eliminating terrorism. This 
reflects an increasing willing- 
ness in the Soviet bloc to co- 
operate with the West on 
terrorism. 


Taiwan caution 

Taipei (Reuter) — Opposition politicians yesterday 
welcomed moves by Taiwan’s ruling party to end martial 
law, but warned that democratic change might be only 
cosmetic. 

The Kuomintang (Nationalist) Party has approved a 
proposal for a new national security law to replace martial 
law which has been in force since 1949 and which prohibits 
new political parties. 

It said legislation would be drafted that would allow par- 
ties to be fonned if they respected the constitution, opposed 
communism and did not advocate independence for 
Taiwan, which Taipei regards as part of China. 


Salvador victim alive after six days in rubble 


to vote Republican. 


foreign policy issues. 


Royal art theft by boat 


Stockholm — Swedish Po- and escaped by boat, 
lice have asked Interpol for “The operation 1 
help in tracing five priceless folly planned. It ’ 
paintings stolen from a royal three minutes," said Mrs 
pleasure island yesterday in Zachau, a superintt 
the country’s fastest ait theft the Walderaare U< 
-(Christopher Mosey- writes). seum on Djuigarden 
Thieves used a motor boat The &ng bypass 
to land at one of Stockholm’s ings by Prince Eugt 
least accessible museums, 1947) to steal five 
smashed a door, stole the most collected by conti 
valuable works on display. French artists. 


From Pari Vallely 
San Salvador 

Six days after the earth- 
quake in El Salvador and 
more than 24 hours after 
engineers directing the rescue 
had given up hope of finding 
any more survivors, they de- 
tected someone alive in the 
wreck of a collapsed depart- 
ment store. 

The feint cries ofthe person. 


locating bodies buried beneath 
debris. 

“The person was trapped on 
what was probably the first 
floor which had sunk down 
into the basement We or- 
dered complete silence on the 
site and tried to communicate 
by knocking. We used a highly 
sensitive Sonde microphone 


building in the heart of the 


seum on Djuigarden island. 


r UUal wreck of a collapsed depart- sensitive Sonde microphone 
ment store. • device which can detect 

boat The feint cries ofthe person, sounds from through 20 feet of 

“The operation was care- who has not yet been identi- solid concrete,” the team lead- 

folly planned. It took just fi«L were heard from the er, Mr Michael White, a 

" said Mrs Inga building in the heart of the fireman from Exmouth, Dev- 

erintendent at capital's business district on on, said, 

s Udde mu- Tuesday afternoon. “It was difficult because 

uden Local people, who were there bad been rain the day 

massed paint- digging amid the wreckage of before and the building was 

Eugen (1865- Ate six-storey building, sent still settling. But amid all the 

five he bad for the International Rescue other noises we thought we 

contemporary corps, a team of British fire- could hear something.- We 
men with special expertise in used the stereo system on the 


Zachau, a superintendent at capital’s business district on 
the Walderaare Udde mu- Tuesday afternoon. 


Local people, who were 


The &ng bypassed paint- digging amid the wreckage of 
ings by Prince Eugen (1865- tb® six-storey building sent 
1947) to steal five he bad for the International Rescue 


device to pinpoint the sound." The night before, another 

The 14-man British team, section of the British team 
which is equipped with high- discovered near Los Planes in 
lech equipment and sniffer the hills just outside the city a 
dogs for detection of en- community of 48 families 
tombed bodies, is not equ- which had been cut off from 
ipped for large-scale ex- the outside world by a landslip 
cava tion work. during Friday's earthquake. 

“We found a group of "Local people suggested 10 
Guatemalans working on a us that there might be survi- 
nearby building and they vors there, so we went to took 
shifted across to work on the for them," said Mr White, 
noise we heard," Mr White Five of the International Res- 
said. cue learn took two snifter dogs 

The rescue workers, who 

were members of the Guate- a ^i e 

mala fire service, dug all daay S21, ^ 

on Wednesday without sue- JUJJJ 
cess. Yesterday morning they 

called the British team lode to ^ 

the site for further attempts to deh y draUon and hunger. 


used the stereo system on the : pinpoint the knocking sound “We- treated them for 


variety of things including 
compound fractures, convul- 
sions and hysteria. There was 
a lot of gasiro-enieritis among 
the children," said the team’s 
physican. Dr Terry Glanville 
of Honiton. Devon. 

International Rescue was 
formed five years ago in 
response to the last big Italian 
earthquake. Its first operation 
was in Mexico during the 
earthquake there in 1985 and 
later during a massive Colom- 
bian earthslip. 

The group, which is staffed 
by volunteers mainly from 
British fire brigades along with 
dog handlers from the Welsh 
and Lake District mountain 
rescue teams, is financed by 
charitable donations. 


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Fears grow that Mafia 
is moving into richest 
region in Italian south 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


ItS 


i \ \ s \ 


asfiaar? 

Apulia, which bSK:° f 

Mo/ssnsfi 

commission made a 

E»skssS 

^ Apulia had 
finally fallen to the south’* 
tradjuona] criminal "* 
is by &r the most 
prosperous of the southern 
"Swns, coming sixth SrS? 
national scale of per caoS 
while its Calabria? 
^bour B in the Jast piace 

The reason for this dif- 
ference has invariably been 
ascnbed in part to the feet that 
Calabria is sfomerged raider 

the weghtof ,is own form ^ 

Mafia while Apulia had noth- 
ing similar. 

Senior police officere who 
have served in both regions 
say that if they came to Apulia 
it meant that they could 
expect to sleep at night 
Obviously the region was 
not free of crime, but much of 
!* was robbery, carried out by 
individuals rather than mem- 
pere of an all-powerful crim- 
inai org an i z ation trying to 
exploit the economy in all 
possible ways. 

The first serious shock came 
test Saturday when Signor 
Francesco Guadalupt, aged 
61, the chairman of the associ- 
ation of industrialists in Brin- 
disi, was shot and seriously 
injured m a crime committed 
in the centre of the dty. 

The incident had some 


- * m -i wn, Auwe 

characteristics of a Mafia 
snooting, including the use of 
shotgun which one 
Of the would-be assassins 
Pfesswi into Signor Gua- 
aalupi’s stomach before puD- 
uiE file trigger. 

The Bari newspaper La 
Gosaetta del Mezzogiomo, 
published a bitter Wiing 
^ficle on Sunday, a cry from 
the heart recalling to its read- 
er “We have often shouted 
to the four winds that we are 
fife south without the Mafia, 
without the Camorra.” 



But even before the Brindisi 
crime, certain signs “alien 
until yesterday to our society 
were becoming rooted in the 
beautiful farmsteads of 
Apulia”. Then came the am- 
bush in broad daylight which 
prompted the title of the 
leading articled In Apulia as in 
Palermo.” 

So far (he members of the 
anti- Mafia commission have 
said little about their viat, but 
no doubt they will have heard 
of such cases as the allegedly 
extensive swindling of the 
health service in Apulia which 
in Calabria, Sicily and Campa- 
nia is said to be organized by 
the Mafia or the Camorra. 

There is also the effect on 
Apulia of the 200 or so 
accused members of the Mafia 


Mozambique crisis . 


Harare considers 
boosting troops 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Zimbabwean defence and 
intelligence chiefs were re- 
ported to be in Maputo, the 
Mozambique capital, yes- 
terday for talks on reinforcing 
. Zimbabwe’s military presence 
> in Mozambique to try to stem 
an offensive by anti-govern- 
ment guerrillas there. 

The Defence Minister, Mr 
Ernest Kadungure, the Army 
commander, Lieutenant-Gen- 
eral Rex Nhongo, and the 
Security Chiefs Mr Em mason 
Munangagwa, were reported 
by the South African Press 
Association to be in the 
Zimbabwe delegation. 

Diplomatic sources here 
said insurgents of the Mozam- 
bique National Resistance 
(MNR) appeared to be in 
control of a swathe of territory 
on either side of the Iowa 
.Zambezi River, which cuts 
Mozambique m half 

MNR activity has not been 
limited to the northern and 
I central parts of the country. In 

Lhe south this week a bridge 
was blown up on the railway 
line linking Maputo with Zim- 
babwe. and a landmine de- 
railed a goods train travelling 
from Maputo to South Africa. 

There are at least 6,000 
Zimbabwean troops already in 
Mozambique guarding the vi- 
tal road, rail and oilpipe links 
between Zimbabwe and the 
port of Beira. 

The Beira corridor is the 
shortest route to the sea for 
Zimbabwe and Zambia, but h 
carries only a fraction of their 
trade because of sabotage and 
the port's limited capacity. 

Up to 90 per cent of 
Zimbabwe’s trade, and about 
50 per cent of Zambia’s, 
passes through South Africa. 
If Pretoria were to refuse to 
handle this traffic, in response 
.to international economic 
sanctions, the routes through 
Mozambique would assume 
crucial importance. 

On Wednesday the South 
African Broadcasting Corpor- 
ation gave prominence to an 


interview with the MNR’s 
European Director, Mr Paulo 
D'OIiveira. in which he 
warned the United States and 
Britain that they would be 
wasting time and money in 
helping Mozambique to repair 
its road and rail links while the 
war continued. . 

Mozambique and other 
frontline states have accused 
Pretoria of aiding an MNR 
invasion of Mozambique 
from Malawi, the only African 
state with full diplomatic rela- 
tions with South Africa. 

Mr Robert Mugabe, the 
Zimbabwe Prime Minister, 
and President Kaunda of 
Zambia met at Victoria Falls 
on Wednesday to discuss pu- 
nitive action against President 
Banda of Malawi, but decided 
against it for the time being. 

- Malawi, which has repeat- 
edly denied harbouring the 
MNR insurgents, would be in 
dire economic straits if Zim- 
babwe closed its border, since 
much of its imports and 
exports are carried by road 
through Zimbabwe to South 
African ports. 

South Africa, whose Min- 
ister of Defence, General Mag- 
nus M alan, claimed on 

Wednesday that Mozambique 
was “hovering on the brink of 
collapse”, insists that it is not 
providing aid to the MNR and 
that the plight of President 
Machel is of his own making. 

General Malan has dis- 
missed as “laughable” and 
“propaganda hysteria” claims 
by Maputo that Sooth African 
troops are massing on Mo- 
zambique's borders, preparing 
to invade. 

• HARARE: Mr Munangag- 
wa and Lieutenant-General 
Nhongo returned from the 
Maputo talks yesterday (A 
Correspondent writes). 

Mr Munangagwa led the 
Zimbabwe delegation at the 
talks, which followed up the 
summit meeting in Maputo 
last weekend of leaders of the 
six frontline state. 


Ershad denies charges 
of blatant poll fraud 


l ...* 

i a . 


The military Government of 
Bangladesh, with its image 
byaltegatkmsuf btet- 
ant fraud at the presidential 
' poll, yesterday tried to dear 
some of the charges as police 
dashed with opposition pro- 
testers calling for an end to 
martial law. 

President Ershad, the mili- 
tary ruler who scored a “fand- 
diA> victory” in Wednesday s 
election which was boycotted 
by the leading opposition par- 
ties, said the opposition would 
call any election they last 
rigged. He ptayed doira .tte 
extent of the taDot-tOTtS 
and its import on UK crediW- 
ity of the election, which he 
said was the final step to re- 
-storing civilian rale* 

- u i have not heard of irregu- 
"tenties,” be said, “except m a 
polling * 

i^en the most peacefid poUm 
Bangladesh's 15-year histo- 
ry.” About 50 people were 
wounded as police and A warn 

w . .... * 1 p rlKRM at- 


From Ahmed Fazl, Dhaka 


ter a protest rally m central 
Dhaka. Five people were de- 
tained 

President Ershad ’s main 
opponent, Sheikh Hasina 
Wased, leader of the Awami 
League, said ha party had 
information that less than one 
per cent of voters turned np at 
potting booths. 

“My achievement is that I 
have held the election despite 
the strike and boycott threats 
by the opposition,” President 
Ershad said, “And why should 
X rite an election when X am 
contesting iacefess” candid- 
ates.” President Ershad told 
journalists, most of whom had 
seen the deserted .Dhaka 
streets and the nearly empty 
polling centres, that he expect- 
ed between 52 to 55 pa cent 
turnout when the. official 
counting of votes finished. 

“You might have some poll- 
jog centres where the turnout 
was poor, but there are. over 
23,000 other polling centres.” 
President Ershad said. 


and of the Camorra who are in 
Apulian prisons or have been 
sent to live in Apulia under 
supervision by the authorities, i 

This measure is used as a 
form of exile which is sup- 
posed to cut than off from 
their criminal contacts. 

Other parts of the country 
which have been used in this 
way have found that having 
Mafia and Camorra exiles in 
their midst meant that their 
own immunity from such 
forms of crime was threatened 
or destroyed. 

Last autumn, police in Apu- 
lia arrested what they took to 
be the first groups of people 
involved in the international 
drugs traffic who were trying 
to use Apulian beaches to land 
their cargoes. 

Signor Abdon Alinovj, the 
commission's chairman, said 
before he left fori for Rome: 
“Particularly in the provinces 
of Brindisi, Taranto and Fog- 
gia there have been episodes 
which resemble, naturally at a 
different level in terms of" 
quantity and quality, what 
happens in flampamw, Cala- 
bria and ScOy. . 

The admitted threat to Apu- 
lia is accompanied by a fresh 
growth of Mafia violence in 
Sicily where Signor Renato 
NicolosL head of the regional 
administration, has called on 
the central Government to 
adopt adequate measures or 
send the Army to the island. 

There is a similar agg- 
ressiveness in Calabria and 
commentators increasingly 
maintain that, despite the 
mass trial of Mafia leaders in 
Palermo, organized crime Is 
spreading geographically and 
m terms of power. 


/Ms? 





% 

V 




Workers from two rival fo n gkok charities fighting for fee body of a road accident victim. Police arrested 12 of the workers, 
whose charities compete for corpses so that they can appear more efficient and thereby attract bigger public donations. 

Nigerian wins Nobel literature prize 


By Philip Howard 
Literary Editor 

The Nobel Prize for lit- 
erature was awarded yesterday 
to Wole Soyinka, the Nigerian 
playwright, poet, novelist and 
Professor of Literature. He is 
the first African and the first 
Mack to be awarded the prize, 
worth $290,000 (£193300). 

The Swedish Academy, 
which this year celebrates its 
200th adversary, describes 
Soyinka as “a writer who in a 
wide catosral perspective and 
with poetic overtones fashions 
the drama of existence” — 
wtucb may sound more perspi- 
cuous in Swedish. 

Soyinka, aged 52, has pub- 
lished 20 books of plays 
poetry and fiction. He writes in 
English with a rich mix of his 
native Yornba imagery and 
idiom. He was educated in Iba- 


dan and at Leeds University, 
where he read Engifoit He 
then worked as a teacher and a 
reader and script-writer at the 
Royal Court theatre in 
London, where his first dra- 
matic sketches and - poems 
ware performed. When be 
returned to Nigeria he formed 
a theatrical company. 

He was imprisoned for two 
years doing the Nigerian 
CSvfl War, and then spent six 
years in exile in Europe and 
Ghana. In 1976 he went home 
to Nigeria and became Profes- 
sor ®f Comparative Literature 
at Ife University, periodically 
returning to Europe and the 
United States as a vis i t in g 
professor. 

HBs first plays, written in 
London, were The . Swamp 
Dwellers and The Jewel. Later 
satirical comedies were The 
Trial of Brother Jero and its 


sequel, Jew’s Metamorphosis. 
He rewrote The Bacckae of 
Euripides in an African set- 
ting; and his opera Woayosi is 
based on The Beggar's Opera 
and The Threepenny Opera. 

He is a man of two worlds. 





Wole Soyinka: first African 
to win literature prize. 


obsessed with the theme of the 
oppressive boot, whether worn 
by whites or blacks. In his 
account of life as a political 
prisoner. The Man Died, be 
gave his political credo: “The 
man dies in all who keep silent 
in the face of tyranny.” 

He a radical who wants to 
change the world, and de- 
claims passionately against 
apartheid and cokmfeEsin. At 
the same time he writes power- 
fully against the corruption of 
Nigeria by Ml money, ami the 
abuse of fanman rights 
throughout Africa. He is a 
wordsmith, a punomane in- 
dulging to complex word- 
plays, and often scatological: a 
Yornba James Joyce. He is a 
true writer, obsessed by lan- 
guage and by his tragic vision 
of his native land. 

Economics prize, page 21 ■, 


MEP says 
true cost 
of surplus 
concealed 

From Richard Owen 
Brussels 

A British MEP is claiming 
the real cost of getting rid of 
European Economic Commu- 
nity (EEC) food surpluses is 
being covered up and that they 
are worth only a quarter of 
their published value. 

Mr Peter Price. Conser- 
vative MEP for London 
South-East and budget spokes- 
man for the Conservatives in 
the European Parliament, said 
yesterday that EEC budget 
estimates concealed the true 
cost of surplus disposal which 
be put at more than £5 billion. 

EEC states were paid £2.3 
billion a year for storage, he 
said, bur depreciation of the 
stocks’ true value was less 
than £1.86 billion. 

Mr Price made the claim 
after EEC farm ministers 
foiled to agree on emergency 
measures proposed by the 
EEC Commission to reduce 
dairy sector surpluses. • 

His remarks also coincided 
with rumours that M Jacques 
Delors. the Commission 
President, would propose re- 
forms of the Common Agri- 
cultural Policy and a shifting 
of the burden of form sub- 
sidies onto those EEC govern- 
ments which benefit from 
them. 

Mr Michael Elliott, Labour 
MEP for West London, said 
that protesters in London 
tomorrow would march be- 
tween Acton and Southall — 
two centres where he said 
nearly 5,000 tonnes of EEC 
b uner was stored. 

Sir Henry Plumb, leader of 
the Conservative MEPs. yes- 
terday called fora World Food 
Conference next year to find a 
way of getting European food 
surpluses to Third World 
nations which have food 
shortages. Letters, page 17 



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OVERSEAS NEWS / LAW 


THE TIMES FRIDAY 


Opposition sees end to Anzus I US admits W : 

New Zealand’s ggg 

anti-nuclear rebels 


Bill clears the 


From Michael Haailyn 

bfaptaliail 


first hurdle 


From Richard Long, Wellington 


Royal Navy ships will be 
banned from New Zealan d , 
pons and New Zealand 
servicemen prevented from 
training with Briiish nuclear 
forces under Wellington's 
anti-nuclear legislation, which 
was reported back to Par- 
liament yesterday after select 
committee consideration. 

The Nuclear Free Zone, 
Disarmament and Arms Con- 
trol Bill, which bans nuclear- 
armed and nuclear-powered 
ships from’ New Zealand har- 
bours. was immediately 
dubbed “the Anzus termina- 
tion Bill” by Sir Robert 
Muldoon, the former National 
Party Prime Minisier. 

The Labour Government's 
anli-nudcar policy has led to 
New Zealand's suspension 
from the Anzus alliance with 
the United States and Austra- 
lia. and Sir Robert said the 
Bill, if passed in its present 
form, would mean the end of 
Anzus as far as New Zealand 
was concerned. 

He said the Bill would make 
it impossible for either the 
Royal Navy or the US Navy to 
send any of its ships to New 
Zealand without breaching 
their policies of neither 
confirming nor denying the 
presence of nuclear weapons. 

The Bill easily survived the 
vote, by 44 to 26, and will now 
be debated in depth. Mr 
David Lange, the Prime Min- 
ister. does not expect it to be 
passed into law till next year. 

The Deputy Prime Min- 
ister. Mr Geoffrey Palmer, 
said the Bill would enshrine in 
law the Government's anti- 
nuclear policies. Without it 
there was no guarantee that 
the nuclear warships ban 
would remain in force. 

The Opposition expressed 
dismay that the Bill's pro- 
visions remained unchanged. 


but Government MPs saw it 
as the first step down the long 
road to nuclear disarmament: 
They said it set an example for 
other countries in being a law 
that could be enforced. 

An attempt by peace groups 
to have the ban on harbour 
visits by foreign nuclear war- 
ships extended to the 12-mile 
territorial limit was rejected 
on the grounds that it would 
conflict with international free 

transit agreements. 

• The Bill prevents any New 
Zealander from assisting a 
person who has control Over 
any nuclear device — a clause 
which the Opposition main- 
tains will prevent New Zea- 
land servicemen from training 
with British or US forces. 

It requires the Prime Min- 
ister. in approving the entry of 
foreign warships, to be 
“satisfied” that they are not 
carrying nuclear weapons. 

An attempt to have the 
wording strengthened to “sat- 
isfied - beyond reasonable 
doubt” was rejected by the 
select committee. 

The committee chairman, 
Ms Helen Clark, said it had 
decided against strengthening 
the Bill in any major way “in 
the belief that in their present 
form those clauses will pre- 
vent the entry of nuclear 
weapons into New Zealand, 
which, after all, is the key 
objective of the Bill”. 

Sir Robert, the Opposition 
spokesman on foreign affairs, 
said the National Party would 
repeal the provisions of the 
Bill that were “unworkable or 
repugnant”. 

These included clauses ban- 
ning nuclear ship visits and 
the clause which be said 
appeared to make it impos- 
sible for New Zealand service- 
men to co-operate with British 
or US forces. 


Mr Casper Weinberger, the 
US Defence Secretary, admit- 
ted yesterday that his Govern- 
ment was supplying sophisti- 
cated anti-aircraft missiles to 
the Afghanistan Mujahidin 
guerrillas. 

jhe admission, an apparent 
fan g* of awareness of what is 
and is not admissible to help 
the guerrillas, was later 
withdrawn. 

Mr Weinberger was asked 
whether Pakistan was holding 
up the supply of Stinger 
missiles to the Muhajidin 
guerrillas. He replied they 
were not, although, be said: 
“We have had a few problems 
with Stingers due to lack of 
training in the beginning. It is 
not an easy weapon to use." 
Then be added as a clincher 
“The effect of its presence 
there is demonstrating the 
need for it". 

Though it is not a closely- 
guarded secret that the rebels 
receive US arms, it is not 
generally admitted openly 
since the only way that it 
could be supplied is through 
Pakistan, and that would 
make Pakistan itself vulner- 
able to direct Russian attacks. 





New breed urban guerrillas 
worry Bonn security forces 


A week ago West German left- 
wing urban guerrillas struck 
for the first time in Bonn, the 
nation S capital- In the first qf 
a two-part series. Philip 
Jacobson reports on the "sec- 


virtually all the origforifcjri 

core of the Biader-Mwnhof 
Gang were dead « serving 
innc tail sentences. There was 
a widespread feeling **** JJ* 

security crisis was oxer, the 
battle against internal terror 


group. EM “underground" 
leaders have dearly, learned 
invainabte lessons from fo* 
long p«btk trials of Ihrir 
predecessors. 

The most graphic exutpfe 


ond generation terrorists, parw 
Stax Jon lo the Red Amy 

Faction, as they prepare for a per* 23? tadkated Hud * 
There are no more than 30 

®f them, supported by perhaps alarm bells started 

another 50 active sympatha- ft, mid-1984, when 12 

ers. They haveio finance opw- Gennaas under occa- 

atioas with risky bank raids * ^ — — 

and steal their weapons from » 


of this con c en ts fi ng e rprin t s , 
which hare previously provid- 
ed crucial evidence to courier 
faction terrorist*. 

To the dismay of the se- 
curity authorities, the new 
ware of attacks has yielded 
just one set of prints. stQ) 
unidentified. At a tttesd.adA 
oa a gun shop the terrori s ts 
laid Qngkrred hands afi dm \ 

r i cornier, bet left no tracts 
the forensic techaitius, 
“We befiere theynre coating 
their hands wire something 
like the con pound boxers use 
for staling up cuts," says Herr 
Fttchtol 

The same met kotow; atten- 
tion to detail is apparent to 
their explosives technology, 
One of their first bombs fritod 
to go off because cold weather 
had drained a timing battery. 
The remote control device that 
blew up Karl Heinz Beckons, 
research director of the Sie- 
mens Electronics group, rod 
his driver last July contained 
an extra battery, just hi case. 

Most worrying of all for 
those hunting them, the new 
inner core of faction leaders is 
fanatically security conscious. 

Although the terrorists ban 
struck all over West Germany 
in the past 18 months, the 
murder of Herr Von Brttoi- 
mfihl was their first k fflfo g hi 
the federal capital. 

“We were braced for an 
operation in Bono, bid we 
couldn't prevent 1C observes 
Herr PrechteL “It's adtyfoH 
of soft targets, and these mw 
kilters seen perfectly happy ta 
go after secondary people if 
they can't get at the most 
important figures." 

West Germany faces a gen- 
eral election in January. For 
the security authorities, this 
raises the prospect of trying to 
keep the Red Army Faction's 
hit teams away from the coun- 
try's most prominent politi- 
cians when the cunpaigniBg 
begins. 

Tomorrow: Hi-tech fight 
against terror. 



At the prompting of one of 
his staff, therefore, he cor- 
rected himself at the end of his 
press conference by saying 
that though he agreed Paki- 
stan was not holding up the 
supply of Stinger missiles, “I 
am not saying that they have 
been delivered.” 

Mr Weinberger also made a 
much more detailed attack on 
the good intentions of the 
Russians as evidenced by the 
announcement of troop with- 
drawals from Afghanistan 
which are now proceeding. 

He said in China last week 
that the withdrawal was “a 
ruse”. Yesterday he explained 
that of the regiments due to be 
pulled out, two mechanized 



Mr Caspar W 


at stomach upset ashe 


bows to a guard of honour with die Pakistan Foreign 
Minister, Mr Sahebzarfa Yaqnb Khan, m Islamabad. 


infan try 

sent to 


sr, Mr Sahebzada Yaqnb Khan, m Islamabad, 
pments were only Weinberger added. “In any 
Sbanistan “for the case there are these who say 


puipose of withdrawal”, that a that the military capability is 
tank regiment has had diffi- increased because they have 


cullies of supply and has never fewer inactive units in the 
been up to full strength, and in country.” 


any case “this is not tank • Hospital bombed: An incen- 


country”, and that the anti- diary bomb exploded yes- 
aircraft units were useless terday in the Lady Reading 
against a rebellion that pos- Hospital in central Peshawar, 


sessed no aircraft. 


west Pakistan, wounding three 


“Their military capability is people including a doctor, 
not changed by any minor hospital officials said (AFP 


change in personneL” Mr reports). 


Colombo claims victory Americans aid 


Colombo (Reuter) - Sri 
Lankan forces killed 65 Tamil 


Soldier dies after tank chase 


guerrillas and lost 14 troops 
during a “successful" onera- 


Sydney — (AP) A soldier 
who stole a troop carrier died 
yesterday, a day after he led 
police on an hour-long chase 
before shooting himself on the 
Sydney Harbour Bridge. 

In an apparently motiveless 
act, the soldier, Lance Cor- 


poral Ross Edwards, aged 30, 
look the machine from a 
Sydney army base and. using a 
periscope to navigate, drove 
the tracked machine, hatches 
closed, across SydneyJDuring 
the chase, Edwards was shot 
and wounded. 


during a “successful” opera- 
tion which ended on Wednes- 
day night, leaving 3,000 
homeless, the government 
media centre said yesterday. 

The centre said the four-day 
battle, in tbe northern Mannar 
and Vavuzuya districts, ended 
when three rebels died in a 
clash yesterday. 


But residents in the north- 
ern rebel stronghold of Jaffna 
said the rebels deposited there 
the bodies of nine soldiers 
who died in the battle at tbe 
from gate of the main military 
camp in the city. 

The centre revised upward 
to 3,000 the number of vil- 
lagers who sought refuge at a 
church after the battle which 
was triggered by the ambush, 
of a security force -patrol 


air security 

Colombo — The United 
States is to provide security 
for Colombo's international 
airport, the US Embassy here 
said yesterday (A Correspon- 
dent writes). 

The assistance, which might 
indude training in bomb 
detection and managing hos- 
tage crises, would would be 
confined to the civilian in- , 
stailation only. 


odarfy well educated, nor, ap- 
parently. are they motivated 
by burning political ideology. 

Yet one of West Germany's 
top security officials confesses 
tint today's terrorists in the 
Red Army Faction scare him 
rigid. “These people are stroib 
grr than at any time in the 
past, and the new ones seem to 
be only interested in kflling," 
says Herr Alexander PrechteL 
of the Federal Prosecutor's 
office. 

Take last week's murder of 
Herr Gerald von BraunmfiM, a 
senior figure in the German 
Foreign Office. Immaculate^ 
planned, mercilessly executed, 
it was dearly intended to 
convey a deliberate challenge 
to West Germany's huge and 
sophisticated security 
apparatus. 

The murder weapon turned 
oat to be the same Smith and 
Wesson 38 revolver used al- 
most a decade earlier to kill 
Hans-Martm Schley er, leader 
of tbe industrialists' organiza- 
tion- A six-page tester the hit 
team left nearby was written 
on the same typewriter that 
has been used to chum 
responsibility for two other 
Inllrnp early this year. The 
getaway car was dumped not 
Ear away with the dead man's 
briefcase — ballet-holed and 
smeared with Mood — in foil 
view on the back seat. 

“They're taunting ns, telling 
ns we can't stop mem,” says 
Herr PrechteL 

It is hardy two years since 
the West German authorities 
became aware of the emerg- 
ence of a second generation 
faction. By the end of the 1982 


Terror in 

Germany 

Parti 


sional police sarseiltenct sud- 
denly dropped oat of sight. 
“They just vanished. leaving 
everything behind, and wc 
knew then that we were in for 
big trouble," Herr Prechtel 
recalls in the heavily-guarded 
Federal Prosecutor's bead of- 
fice at Karterabe. 

A spate of bombing attacks 
Agains t targets broadly asso- 
ciated with Nato and the 
“military-industrial complex” 
was followed by the first 
faction assassinations for 
seven years, the victims se- 
lected for their association 
with “imperialistic*' pro- 
grammes sack as the Star 
Wars project. 

It was soon dear that the 
revived Red Army Faction is a 
much more formidable enemy 
than the often haphazard and 
disorganized Baader-M einbof 



immiihi: merci- 
lessly executed 


4 


Basque industrialist kidnapped 


Vitoria (Reuter) - A Basque 
industrialist has been kid- 
napped here in the first abduc- 
tion in the region in 10 
months. ETA separatist guer- 
rillas are suspected. 


he returned home from watch- explosion that killed a police- 


Senor Luao Aguinagalde 
Aizpurua, aged 70, was ab- 
ducted on Wednesday night as 


ing pelota. a racket game. 

Police sources said he had 
twice rejected ETA's demands 
to pay “revolutionary taxes”, 
extortion money levied by 
guerrillas on Basque business- 
men and professionals. 

Meanwhile, ETA claimed 
responsibility for the car 


man and injured 18 people in 
Barcelona on Tuesday. 

ETA has rarely operated in 
Catalonia in its 18-year-okl 
war tor Basque independence, 
but officials said it was prob- 
ably capitalizing on foe pub- 
licity surrounding Barcelona’s 4 
bid to host the 1992 Olympics. 


House of Lords 


Law Report October 17 1986 


House of Lords 


School route available Minister obliged to organize smallholders’ marketing 


for accompanied child 


Rogers and Another v Essex 

County Council 

Before Lord Bridge of Harwich, 

Lord Brandon of Oak brook. 

Lord Mackay of Gash fern. Lord 

Oliver of Ayimenon and Lord 

Ackner 

{Speeches October 16] 

For the purposes of determin- 
ing whether a school was within 
walking distance of a child's 
home within the meaning of 
section 34 of the Education Act 
1944. an “available route” was 
one along which a child 
accompanied as necessary could 
walk with reasonable safety to 
school. 

The House of Lords so held in 


allowing an appeal by Essex 
County Council from a decision 
of the Divisional Court (Lord 
Justice Parker and Mr Justice 
Tudor Evans) {.The Times 
March 2 1985: (1985] I WLR 
700) allowing appeals by the 
parents of Shiriey Rogers, then 
aged 12, Peter Albert Rogers and 
Violet Rogers against their 
convictions by the Colchester 
Justices on May 23. 1984, 
affirmed on appeal by Chelms- 
ford Crown Court on July 13, 
1984. of offences against section 
39 of the Education Act 1944. 

Section 39 provides: “(1) If 
any child of compulsory school 
age who is a registered pupil at a 
school fails to ottend regularly 
thereat, the parent of the child 
shall be guilty of an offence 
against this section. 

“(2) In any proceedings for an 
offence against this section . . . 
the child shall not be deemed to 
have tailed to attend regularly at 
the school by reason of his 
absence therefrom with leave or 
. . . ft-) if the parent proves that 
the school at which the child is a 
registered pupil is not within 
walking distance of the child's 
home, and foal no suitable 
arrangements have been made 
by the local education authority 
. ’ . for his transport to and from 
the school . . . 

"(5) In this section foe ex- 
pression . . . ‘walking distance’ 
means, in relation to a child who 
has noi-attaincd foe age of eight 
rears two miles, and in the case 1 
of any other child three miles, 
measured by the nearest avail- 
able route.” 

Mr Conrad Dehn. QC and Mr 
David Mcllor for foe council; 
Mr Gavin Lightman. QC and 
Mr Edward Irving for foe par- 
ents. ‘ 


for use by their daughter, if 
unaccompanied. Since the local 
education authority were only 
prepared to make the school bus 
available on payment of foe 
concessionary fare, which the 
parents were not willing to pay, 
the child stayed away from 
school. 

The crown court had con- 
cluded that they were bound by 
foe Divisional Court decision in 
Farrier v W’a/tar ((1954] 1 WLR 
306). That derision was not 
binding on foe House of Lords, 
and whether or not the Di- 
visional Court were entitled to 
distinguish it, as they purported 
to da was not an issue which 
needed to concern their Lord- 
ships. 

Nevertheless, it was a de- 
rision of a strong court which 
had stood unchallenged for 
more than 30 years and had- 
been relied on. It had been urged 
that Lord Goddard, Lord Giief 
Justice, when considering, in his 
judgment in that case, whether a 
route was available, was 
discounting all safety consid- 
erations. 

His Lordship could not accept 
that. In foe context in which his 
observations were made. Lord 
Goddard was concerned with a 
route which was said to be 
dangerous only if foe children 
walked along it unescorted. 

It was dear that foe word 
“available” qualified the word 
“route”. That it had to be 
reasonably practicable for a 
child to walk along it to school 
did not admit of any argument. 
It had to be free from obstruc- 
tions or obstacles which would 
make its use impracticable. 

Dangers inherent in a particular 
route were (actors that had to be 
taken into account when consid- 


Williams v Minister of Agri- 
culture, Fisheries and Food 
Before Lord Bridge of Harwich, 
Lord Brandon of Oakbrook, 
Lord Griffiths, Lord Mackay of 
Gashfern and Lord Ackner 
{Speeches October 16] 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Fisheries and Food was obliged 


1984, granted tbe plaintiff a 
declaration that on foe true 


construction of his tenancy 
agreement of an agricultural 


to provide an organization or 
make other arrangements for 


make other arrangements tor 
foe disposal by him of foe 
marketable produce of 
smallholdings let on his behalf 
by foe Lana Settlement Associ- 
ation Ltd. and. although he was 
not required to provide cen- 
tralized services to the tenants if 
be did not consider it necessary 
or expedient in the common 
interests of tbe tenants to do so, 
foe minister remained under an 
obligation to keep under review 
the question whether it was at 


agreement of an agricultural 
holding on foe Chawston Estate 
the minister was bound 10 
provide schemes for (I) foe 
disposal of foe plain tiffs pro- 
duce, and (2) foe provision of 
centralized services to the plain- 
tiff among other tenants on foe 
estate, in accordance with the 
agreement 


Mr T. Scott Baker, QC and 
r Duncan Mafoeson for foe 


Mr Duncan Mafoeson for 
plaintiff; Mr Derek Wood, 1 
and Mr Christopher Priday, < 
for foe minister. 


any time so expedient 
The House of Lords so held in 
allowing an appeal by the plain- 
tiff in a test case, John Warwick 
Williams, from a decision of foe 
Court of Appeal (Lord Justice 
May and Lord Justice Slade, 
Loitl Justice Lloyd dissenting in 
part) (The Times. July f 1, 1985) 
whereby they allowed an appeal 
by foe defendant foe Minister 
of Agriculture. Fisheries and 
Food, from an order of Mr 
Justice Beldam who on July 31, 


LORD BRIDGE said that in 
1934 foe , Land Settlement 
Association was established as a 
friendly society to provide 
opportunities for the un- 
employed to earn a living as 
tenants of smallholdings. 

In 1 948 the association's vari- 
ous estates of smallholdings 
were acquired by foe minister, 
but foe association continued to 
manage them as bis agent 

A smallholding on the 
Chawston Estate was let to foe 
plaintiff by an agreement dated 
May l, 1979. There were some 
hundreds of other tenants of 
smallholdings held on the same 
terms. 

The tenancy agreement con- 


tained provisions concerning 
tbe disposal of the produce of 
the holding to the minister and 
■foe provision of centralized 
services. A scheme fin* foe 
disposal of the produce of such 
holdings had been approved by 
foe minister in 1951. 

Until 1982 tenants disposed 
of their produce to the minister 
who maintained a suitable 
marketing organization and also 
provided certain other cen- 
tralized services. In December 
1982 the minister announced 
that those arrangements were to 
be terminated. 

At tbe heart of foe present 
dispute was Pan III of the 
agreement, entitled “Provisions 
for Disposal Of Produce”. 

Clause 7 provided: “The min- 
ister hereby agrees with the 
tenant to maintain such 
organization or organizations 
and/or 10 make such other 
arrangements as be may from 
time to time consider necessary 
or expedient for the disposal by 
the minister whether as a whole- 
sale or retail merchant or as a 
selling agent of the marketable 
produce of the smallholdings 
situate on the estate or of tbe 
Land Settlement Smallholdings 
generally.” 

The primary issue was 
whether the minister had as- 
sumed any obligation at all 


under PSut UI of the agreement 
It was submitted on his behalf 
that he had not If he did not 
consider it “necessary or 
expedient” to do so. he was 
under no obligation to under- 
take the disposal of foe tenant's 
produce either as principal or 
agent 

If the minister was right Part 
HI of the agreement and indeed 
foe 1951 scheme itself operated 
entirely at his discretion. When- 
ever he chose he could render 


The second issue was foe 
provision of centralized ser- 
vices. The important clauses 
were 10 and i 1: 


them nugatory. His Lordship 
would only accept that if cora- 


would only accept that if com- 
pelled by dear language. 

But the operative language 


“10 With a view to further 
promoting foe common interest 
of the tenants of foe Land 
Settlement Smallholdings gen- 
erally and foe common interests 
of foe tenants ... on the estate 
in particular the minister shall 
maintain such organizations 

and make such arrangements as 
are hereinafter mentioned . . . 

“1 1 Tbe minisier hereby 


agrees ... to provide for the use 
of tbe tenanUs) such centralized 


was tolerably clear. Stripped of 
inessential words, the minister's 
obligation was “10 maintain 
such organization or make such 
arrangements as he may con- 
sider necessary or expedient for 
the disposal by foe minister of 
the produce, etc” The words “if 
any” were conspicuously absent 
and were certainly not to be 
implied. 


As foe judge had put it, foe 
obligation on the minister was 
to provide an organization or 
make such other arrangements, 
and It was the type of organiza- 
tion or arrangement which was 
subject to the minister's dis- 
cretion and not tbe obligation 
itself! 


of the tenantfs) such centralized 
.services as the minister may 
from time to time after such 
consultation as is provided for 
. . . consider necessary or 
expedient in foe common in- 
terest aforesaid and in particular 
— , to maintain during such 
periods as he may consider 
expedient . . .”. 

Clause 1! then set out six 
specific types of centralized 
service. It was clear from the 


phrase “during such periods as 
he may consider expedient” in 


he may consider expedient” in 
clause II and from clause 12 
that there was no continuing' 
obligation to provide anv one of 
the specific services. 


of the specified services unless 
at any particular time he consid- 
ered it expedient. 

The criterion of expediency in 
relation to foe provision of the 
specified services had to be the 
same in relation 10 the immedi- 
ately preceding obligation to 
provide centralized services 
generally. The plaintiff con- 
tended dial foe minister had 
always to be under an obligation 
to provide some centralized 
services. 

His Lordship could nol agree: 
The question the minister had 
to ask himself was: What cen- 
tralized services is it expedient 
in the common interest of the 
tenants that I should provide? 
The answer at any particular 
time might be some or none. 

It was now rightly conceded, 
however, that the minister re- 
mained under an obligation 
throughout foe continuance of 
the tenancy to keep under 
review the question whether it 
was at any time expedient in the 
common interest of the tenants 
to provide any and, if so whaL 
centralized services. 


Allowance payable in 
fostering scheme 


It followed that the minister 
was not obliged to -provide any 


Lord Brandon, Lord Griffiths. 
Lord Mackay and Lord Ackner 
agreed. 

Solicitors: niffcs for Winter 
Wilkinson. Sl Neots: Solicitor, 
MAFF. 


Description in rating list not binding 

t . -- u tu _ .... . ...... 


ering its availability. 

The short issue in the appeal 
was whether “availability” was 
to be measured by what was 
reasonable for an unaccom- 
panied child to use. It was 
submitted foal once a child was 
of sufficient age 10 go out on the ■ 
street alone, then if foe route 
was not- reasonably safe for foe 
child to walk along unaccom- 
panied foe route was not 
■“available”. 

Quite apart from foe feet that 
there were no words in- the 
section 10 support such a sub- 
mission, the test suggested was 
hopelessly vague, and the com- 
plete impracticability of such a 
test in itself persuaded his 
Lordship that it was never in the 
contemplation of Parliament. 

A rente to be “available” 
within the meaning of section 
39[5) had to be a route along 
which a child accompanied as 
necessary -could walk with 
reasonable safety to school It 
did not foil to qualify 1 as 
“available” because of dangers 
which would arise if foe child 
was unaccompanied. 

ord Bridge. Lord Brandon. 
Loitl Mackay and Lord Oliver 
agreed. 

Solicitors: Mr R. W. Adcock, 
Chelmsford: Ellison & Co. Col- 
chester. 


LORD ACKNER said that 
foe distance from foe child^s 
home 10 the school at which she.- 
was registered was 2.94 miles by 
the shortest route? - 
That route involved crossing' 
Oopford Plains by an isolated 
and partlv unmade track which 


duu ------ . 

was entirely unlighted. In winter 
jt was one of considerable 
danger for a young girl. Copford 
Plains were also extremely diffi- 
cult to cross in winter and might 
be passable on foot in the 
morning but impassable by foe 
evening. 


The parents quite reasonably 
regarded foe route as unsuitable 


Kiuin month v Chief Adjudica- 
tion Officer 

A child in the care of the local 
authority who at their request 
was then placed in foe care of a 
foster parent selected under a 
scheme arranged by an 
organization such as Dr 
Bamardo’s had still been 
“boarded out” by the local • 
authority wifoin foe meaning of 
section 2J(lXb) of the Child 
Care Act 1980. 


Social Security Act 1975. 

The Court of Appeal (Sir John 
Donaldson. Master of foe Rolls, 
Lord Justice Dillon and Lord 
Justice Oroom-Johnson) so 
stated on October 15 after 
counsel for the Chief Adjudica- 
tion Officer of the DHSS had 
conceded that the Social Se- 


HaQbery Investments Ltd v 
Westminster City Council 


Before Lord Bridge of Harwich, 


Lord. Brandon of Oakbrook, 
Lord Griffiths, Lord Mackay of 
Clash fern and Lord Ackner 
(Speeches October 16] 

Unoccupied buildings entered 
in the valuation list as “offices” 
but prevented from befog so 
used by planning conditions 
were still foe same heredita- 
ments as those in the list and the 
unoccupied rate was payable in 
respect of them. 

The House ■ of Lords dis- 
missed an appeal by Hailbury 
Investments Ltd from foe Court 
of Appeal (Lord Justice 
Evdeigh, Lord Justice Stephen 
Brown and Sir David Gums) 
{The Times December 24. 1984: 
(1984) 83 LGR 383) who had 
allowed the rating authority's 
appeal from Mr Justice Woolfrn 
foe Divisional Court {The 
7]^ July 18, 1983; (1983) 82 

LajK 331 ). 

,,The judge had allowed 
Hailbury s appeal by case stated 
from foe metropolitan stipen- 
diary ’magistrate. Mr Edmond 
Ge offrey MacDennou. at 
Horseferry Road Magistrates' 
Court , who had issued distress 
warrants for the unpaid rates. 

Mr Charles Fay for Hailbury; 


curity Commissioner bad erred 
in law m his decision on 


It followed that regulation 4 of 


the Social Security (Attendance 
Allowance) (No 2) Regulations 
(SI 1975 No 598) did not apply 
10 disentitle foe claimant from 
payment of attendance allow- 
ance under section 35 of the 


in law m his decision on 
November 14, 1984. in decid- 
ing. inter alia, that foe child had 
not been boarded out by foe 
local authority under section 
2I( 1 Ho) of the 1980 Act when at 
the request of Lancashire 
County Council she was fos- 
tered under Dr Barnardo's Pro- 
fessional Fostering Scheme with 
foe claimant. 


Proving burglar’s 
intent to harm 


Regina v O'Neill 
Regina v McMullen 
Regina v Kelly 
Charges under section 9(1 Xo) 
of the Theft Act 1968. of 
burglary by entering premises as 
a trespasser with intent to cause 
grievous bodily harm, should 
not have been left to foe jury 
where there was no specific, 
express evidence of such intent; 
no weapons had been carried by 
foe defendants when they had 
entered foe _ premises and no 
grievous bodily harm had in fact 
been committed, even though 
two persons on the premises bad 
t- 


been assaulted- 
The Court of Appeal (Crim- 
inal Division) (Lord Justice 
Stocker, Mr Justice Jupp and 
Mr Justice Otion) so stated on 
October 10, allowing appeals by 
foe defendants. Mr Robert 
O'Neill, Mr John Patrick 
McMullen and Mr Thomas 
Kelly, from their convictions at 
Exeter Crown Court (Judge 
Jonathan Clark and a jury) of 
burglary, contrary to section 
9(IHo) of the 1968 AcL The 
convictions were quashed, and 
their sentences for assault 
occasioning actual bodily harm 

were reduced. 


“(a) foe owner is prohibited 
by law from occupying foe 
hereditament — ; (b) the her- 
editament is kept vacant by 
reason of action taken by . . . 
any local . . . authority with a 
view la prohibiting the occupa- 
tion of foe hereditament . . 


His Lordship would assume 
in Hail bury 's favour that the 
planning conditions enabled 
them to claim that they bad 
been so prohibited or that such 
action had been taken, though 
those aspects of foe case gave 
rise to difficult issues of 
construction and planning few. 


foal the hereditament to which 
any entry in foe valuation list 
related was, in the case of a 
corporeal hereditament, simply 
the physical entity comprised in 
any unit of property identified 
by the description and other 
particulars appearing in that 
entry. 


hereditaments in question, nor 
had the hereditaments been kept 


vacant by reason of action taken 
by any local authority with a 


view to prohibiting ; their 
occupation. Hailbury were li- 
able for the disputed rates. 


Hailbury contended that the 
description of a hereditament 
shown in the valuation list was 
an essential dement in the 
identity 6f that hereditament; ft 
followed that occupation of foe 


physical entity described as 
offices in the list for any purpose 
other than as offices was the 
occupation of a different her- 
editament from that to which 
foe entry in foe list related. 


It mattered not, the council 
said, that the description in the 
list was no longer appropriate 
accurately to describe the use for 
which that unit of property was 
or might lawfully be occupied. If 
it was the same physical entity, 
it remained Ihc same heredita- 
ment.. If it might lawfully be 
occupied for any purpose, there 
was no prohibition of occupa- 
tion of the hereditament to 
which paragraph 2(a) or (b) of 
Schedule I was capable of 
applying. 

The resolution of the issue 
depended on the true -construc- 
tion of the Act and was to be 
found, in his Lordship's opin- 
ion. in provisions of foe Act 


His Lordship reached that . 
conclusion without regret. Prob- 
lems of enforcement in plamM?®- 
law * had shown how easily 
material changes of use might 
escape tbe attention of local . .■ 
authorities - 


If Hailbury were right, wp ^ 
change of use of premises ' 

aicmI* i— iWa 1 aT a 


result in the creation of a new 
ffcrcdiramcm in respect w 
which the occupier could only 
be made liable for rates ty a* : 
alteration of the valuation list- 
Thai would introduce a bo«4 , 


to the precise : degree -- 
correspondence between foe 
description of foe hereditament 
and foe purpose for which if w* 4 
in feet occupied that was ^Kc- 
essaiyioanelfectiveeBtryifttof- 
valuation list 

Hfe Lordship could not see 
that any legiiimaie interest'd'.. 
ratepayers required the protec- 
tion ot such adoctnne. It wouW. 
on the other hand, create ob- 
vious difficulties for rail®! 
authorities. 


Mr Michael Burke-Gaffney. QC 
and Mr Give Newberry for 
Westminster. 


■ They contended that before 
any liability to pay rates in 

respect of that new anddifferwit 

hereditament could arise, it was 
for the rating authority to take 
steps to secure an alteration of 
the entry in foe list, or, more 
accurately, foe deletion of the 


relating to the preparation and 
alteration of valuation lists. 


existing entry and the substitu- 
tion ot a new entrv nnni^ 


LORD BRIDGE said that by 
paragraph 2 of Schedule I to foe 
General Rate Act 1967 no rates 
were payable in respect of an 
unoccupied hereditament 
where: 


non of a new entry applying 
words of description to foe new 
hereditament that were apt to 


His Lordship concluded that, 
on the true construction of foe 
AcL “the hereditament'* re- 
ferred to in paragraph 2(a) and 
(b) applied to a unit of property 
that was sufficiently identified 
by an entry in the valuation list 
whether or not ilie description 
of the hereditament in that entry 


apply to foe use for which the 
new hereditament was or mi»h> 


appropriately described foe pur- 
pose for which foe hereditament 
might lawfutly be occupied. 


new hereditament was or might 
lawfully be occupied. 


The rating authority replied 


It followed that Hailbury had 
not ai the material time been 
prohibited from occupying the 


Lord Brandon, LonJCfriffifoL 
Lord Mackay and Lord Acw«* 
agreed. 

Solicitors: .Asher Fi3frm*£* 
Co; Mr.-G. M. Ives* West 
minster, . ... 




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We want as many people as possible to be able 
jto afford British Gas shares, so wdre making the 
ypi nimnm investment level as low as possible. 

It won’t be more than £150, and you worft have 

e that all at once, because payment will be by 
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orth of shares, you can, of course. 

The important thing is to make sure yoifre 


ready when it’s time to apply in late November. 

If yoifre interested in a share of the shares, 
simply fill in the coupon on this page or phone 
0272272272. 

In return, you will be sent an information pack 
and updated information when it becomes available 

This won’t commit you in any way but it 
will ensure that you are sent a prospectus and an 


application form when they’re published Which 
could save you a lot of bother later on. 


Everyone can apply for a share of the shares. 

ISSUED BY N M ROTHSCHILD & SONS LIMITED ON BEHAl-F OF H M GOVERNMENT. 


Please send me, without obligation, information about the British Gas share 


offer (PLEASE COMPLETE IN BLOCK CAPITALS) 

(Tick) m[J MRS □ MSQ or TITLE (Specify). 
FORENAMES) 


SURNAME. 


ADDRESS fin lull). 



J0STC0DE. 


AreyouaBritishGasciiston}er?(Tick)YESPl NOPI 
When complete send to: British Gas Share 
Information Office, P.O. Bo* 1, Bristol BS99 1BG. 


British Gas 




O K 















WSESSBSMm 


Many thousands of feet of film 
have passed before my eyes this 
year. But none has left a more 
vivid memory than a movie 
from France called ‘Shoah’ 

. -A REVELATION” 


iifeil 




Alenater ttMfcw. Sttndard 


!‘A SHEER MASTERPIECE” 

Shame deBcsraOr. le iterate 


wmm 

a;:",'-* 


SHOAH 

' . ARUWIBYCWUDPIJWZJ^^ . .. A 


THE ARTS 


Hard times and grim humour 


raras 

AH Seats Bookable blS£ per pan 

ffP*m I and 2 booked at the suae tone, csabiiwJ sett 


PftHTI " 

;T Oaa at 1st Choice 


BAKT2 ■ 

I Diioot 1 st CtWicel 


■Tb« iNaott 


Fit*»N<r7 
SmkAvKokS 
SutvIteS 
MondqrKbt 10 
Iteahy.Nwe 11 
KifaeaivNBR 12 
Tbasbr Nk 13 


s*vm.v 

rant* Not 15 

_and*y Nor. 16 


AMtap Ftar2 

Pm 
Part 
Part 


Parti S-tBpa 1 ! 1 _i — . 

Patti 11.30 an 5-45 pa . Me of 2nd Choice UMoftadOnce 

Pin I IIJObm 5.45pm 1 

Parti 5.45 p» 1 : r 

Parti 5- 45 P"Im»«. 

Pm! &.45paI ^wn ■ — 

Pml 5:45pm , Addram 

Pan ! 5.45 pm I 

tell 11.302m 

Pan2 1 1.30 am 5.45pm j . TM.(Otta 

taCbmn MnyMr.-Corzon St, InrataiWCT 6EY 







'lean Duff. 

Vur de UArc 
-duGccrmusA 
euxlialervs, 
signed, 
watercolour 
2 nd 

gouache, 

4 ? by 
655cm. 
Lcrtno.61 * 
Estimate: 
£5JB00- 

moo- 



Sj$fg» ^ : : - 

^gaagg-a^aiajii^ IzLlI 



why not own one? 


16 not an-impossible dream. 

The 380 paintings, drawings, watercolours and sculpture in 
Sotheby’s next sale of Impressionist, Modem and Contempor- 
ary art are estimated to sell for between £500 and £I5,00Q. 

The sale is on Wednesday 22nd October, 1986 "at 10am and 
2.3 0pm, at 34-35 New Bond Street Viewing today Monday 
20th and Tuesday 21st (9am to 4.30pm) and a -special view 
on Sunday 19th October (12 noon to 4pm). For further 
information telephone Melanie Clone or Nathalie Angles, in' 
the Impressionist Department on (01) 499 .0264.. 

S4-35 New Bond Sam, London WIA 2AA, Telephone: (Of}4SS8O80.Tete!C W54 SPBLONC. 

SOTHEBYS 


FOUNDED 1744 


CINEMA 


Blood Red Roses 
(15) 

Metro 


A Nightmare on 
Elm Street Part n 
— Freddy’s 
Revenge (18) 
Leicester Square 
Theatre 

Oxford Blues (15) 

Cannons Charing 

CrossRoad, 

Panton Street 

Shanghai Surprise 
(15) 

Warner Leicester 
Square, 

Camion Haymarket 

Cinderella (n) 

Odeon Marble Arch, 
Cann on Haymarket 

J ohn McGrath’s 
“domestic epic” Blood 
Red Roses began as a 
stage production by the 
7.84 Theatre Company, 
was filmed as a Channel 4 
mini-series, and now appears 
at the Metro in a version 
which at 1 56 minutes appears 
to be 16 minutes longer than 
the cut shown at the Edin- 
burgh Festival 

It is the saga of a fierce, 
bright Scottish girl who starts 
off punching mean school- 
teachers and grows up to 
become a communist, labour 
militant and selfless battier for 
justice. The film begins in 
1952 when Bessie Gordon is 
19 and her father returns, 
minus a leg, from Korea; and 
follows her through sweated 
labour in a. factory, growing 
political awareness, marriage, 
motherhood and, ultimately, a 
role as a militant union leader. 

When we last see her, in the' 
present, she has suffered de- 
feat, bereavements, a broken 
marriage and sideness, but is 
still fighting. 

Ragged and schematic, the 
film is held together by the 
kind of authentic heroic sense 
of the fight for workers' rights 
that still survives in Scotland 
(it is an Ediburgh-based 
production) where the tough 
times are much closer; and by 
the solidity of characters who 
have the conviction of 
documentary. 

Bessie is played successively 
by Louise Beattie and Eliza- 
beth Macl.cn nan, both bdfev- 
able enough to nearly 
overcome the awkwardness of 
this rash mid-stream change- 
over. Ms Beattie's pugnacity 
m beating up gym mistresses 



Nightmare m an Elm Street show®: Mark Patton discovers a handy appendage, the first sign of diabolic possession 


and the fike gives the film 
some of hs lighter moments. 

They are supported by 
James Grant and Gregor 
Fisher’s well-shaded perfor- 
mances as Bessie's father and 
husband, both touching in 
their efforts to keep up with 
this runaway steamroller of a 
woman. 

It is hard to know how 
posterity will view the teenage 
horror pictures which have 
held the screens for more than 
a decade and still keep coming 
(, Friday the Thirteenth Part VI 
is due here at any moment). 

W ill they see it as 
an effort to 
transfer and ex- 
orcise nuclear 
terrors? Or a 
yearning to rediscover the 
primitive folk myths of earlier 
ages? Or shock treatment to 
toughen brains softened by the 
soap-opera pap of the parents? 
Or merely a cynical and 
prolonged Grand Guignol 
joke? All supposing, that is, 
that there can be a posterity to 
the nuclear age and the teen- 
age horror picture. 

A Nightmare on Elm Street 
Part n — Freddy's Revenge 
seems to favour the mythol- 
ogy notion. It is full of 
reminiscences of primitive re- 
ligion, rituals or witchcraft 
and ancient fairy tale. The 
monster, charred and oozing 
from former incineration, al- 
ways appears attended by 
fearful heat and sudden 
spontaneous blazes ofhell fire. 

Like Sazan he conceals him- 
self in the body of an innocent, 
bursting inopportunely (fine, 
if gruesome, special effects) 
out of his belly; or appears as 
an incubus. The innocent is 
saved and the demon de- 


stroyed by a kiss from the 
fearless heroine (Kim Myers, 
the Junior League Meryl 
Streep). 

Whether dramatically or 
mythologically, such films are 
doomed to be unsatisfactory 
of course: the denouement, 
the destruction of evil can 
never be complete, since the 
threat must always remain at 
the end, to prepare the way for 
the sequel 

The original Nightmare on 
Elm Street was written and 
directed by Wes Craven: this 
one is scripted by David 
Chaskin and directed by Jack 
Sholder. As such films so they 
are slightly superior in treat- 
ment and conception, with 
their notion that the evil 
power makes its entry through 
the victims’ dreams. 

There is a real danger that 
the profusion of the Holly- 
wood brat stars will rouse a 
Masculist movement in pro- 
test at the concomitant 
exploitation of the young mate 
as sex object 

Eighties Hollywood (mainly 
since Travolta) has made the 
male bottom a focus of erotic 
attention, displayed, petted 
and otherwise cherished. The 
hero of Nightmare on Elm 
Street. Mark Patton, spends a 
lot of the film getting in and 
out of bed in his briefs, and 
Rob Lowe, the prettiest of the 
pack, is particularly 
vulnerable. 

In Oxford Bines his but- 
tocks are sensuously patted by 
an older woman, while an- 
other lady lovingly and lan- 
guorously peels , off his kilt 
only to disillusion fans with 
the revelation that he is no 
real Scot, but has fetching pink 
boxer mini-shorts underneath. 


Oxford Blues is a free 
reinterpretation of A Yank at 
Oxford (not to speak of A 
Chump at Oxford), with Lowe 
as a brash young American 
whose manners, dress and 
sexual opportunism outrage 
the stiff-lipped Brits. 

With understandable shy- 
ness, the film has been kept 
from British screens for two 
years. This is a quaintly old- 
world view of on Oxford 
where practical jokes and 
horseplay abound, everyone 
still wears dinner jackets and 
gowns after tea. people are 
apoplectic at the sight of jeans 
and sneakers, and dons ha- 
rangue undergraduates on 
Character. No-one seems to 
read books, and the Union is 
reduced to a bickering society. 

In the end. naturally. Lowe 
learns Character, wins 
everyone's love with his row- 
ing prowess, and discovers 
that true love is with the girl 
from bock home rather than 
with Oxford's beautiful but 
capricious Lady Victoria. 

S ean Penn and Ma- 
donna stand some- 
what apart from die 
general ran of the new 
Hollywood stars. He is 
a prematurely elderly little 
man of savage manner; she, 
adorned with a blonde wig for 
Shanghai Surprise, reveals a 
modest line in straight-faced 
comedy. 

This vehicle, directed by 
Jim Goddard and adapted 
from a novel by Tony 
Kenrick. starts promisingly 
with titles by the old master of 
that craft, Maurice Binder, 
and fast-moving adventure in 
war-torn China of the late 
Thirties. 


It quickly loses pace, how- 
ever and meanders into a 
confusion of muliipted triple-/ 
crosses and irrelevance, wav- 
ing Penn and Madonna 
struggling to make sense of 
their .■tfriraw tfueen-styte 
relationship as akohoHc bum 
and dubious lady misstonary. 

Disney are currently re- 
releasing their 37-year-old 
Cinderella (directed by 
Wilfred Jacksor* Hamilton 
Luske and Clvdt Gertmomi). 
which has survived the years 
remarkably wet. The studio 
was more successful than in 
earlier films n animating 
human characttis — only Cin- 
derella herself s a bit sickly- 
sweet and 1950-ish. The 
Wicked Stepnbther is also 
very much of the period — 
there is a lot of the meaner 
Bette Davis rdes in her - but . 
she is frneb characterized, 
sliding with tristocratic grace 
from odious charm to the 
basest evil 

The scensrio is one of the 
most mteRSting dramatur- 
gical approaches to Perraulu 
This is the only version that 
grapples w th the problem of 
how the glass slinper survived 
the midnisht switch-off of the 
magic, aneevrii derives a new 
dramatic twist from the logical 
assumption' that if one slipper 
survived, (he other must also 
have beci around somewhere. 

A subplot designed to bring 
in a ckcrus of Disney animals 
- including the magnificantly 
villainous cat, Lucifer — is 
deveriy integrated into the 
dema without ever betraying 
uIl 




David Robinson 


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THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 






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THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


13 


THE ARTS 



Young 

and 

foolish 


23? tfl,s 2 *>om 70 3-OTng 
people a year;' alcohol? 

baps 1,000. In M 

report 

contradictions of official doI 

"“"Jr is allegedly hang- 

gjy V he ^despreafrftl 
fj* “difference to health 

sz: ,ht — ^ 

rS? n -.Pu® 0,1 a Friday night, 
David Hens haw, the reporter 

only as sober as some jndges 
a™ that none of them was old 
enough to vote. 

This was a fascinating 
glimpse into the brash new 
world of "alcohol arcades**, 
where the under-age law 
seems to have suffered a de 
Facto deregulation - where, 
indeed, 16- year-olds decline to 
enter certain pubs because 
these hare been given over to 
14-year-olds. 

i Drinks commercials 
increasingly iloef the guide- 
fines on appealing to the youth 
market do the breweries re- 
alize that a substantial and 
growing proportion of their 
revenue derives from illegal 
transactions? 



TELEVISION 


Meanwhile, the bodies - 
voluntary and official - which 
are concerned with research 
and education have been effec- 
tively thwarted . by Gov- 
ernmental neglect. 

Mr Hens haw proved him- 
self a dab hand at skewering 
the shifts and evasions of the 
DHSS. bat it was hardly 
surprising that a Tory Govern- 
ment, with its traditional links 
with the brewing dynasties, 
might wish to soft-pedal the 
issue. 

• No opposition party has 
dared to suggest decriminaliz- 
ing cannabis as an alternative 
to drink. It has been argued 
that tbe drug would be a safer 
means to oblivion for the 
dispirited youth— in Liverpool 
and elsewhere — and it has 
also been suggested that if its 
possession were no. longer an 
offence an epjpce^ field of 
conflict between young blacks 
and . the' police would 
disappear.' • 

• Would Opfn Space (BBC2) 
entertain this idea — or, 
indeed, any idea? This witless, 
muddling affair, made by the 
Mangrove Community Associ- 
ation, cast a dull eye over the 
history of police harassment in 
Notring Hill without mention- 
ing that it is impossible to 
walk along AH Saints Road 
(home of the Mangrove' res- 
taurant) without being urged 
to purchase cannabis. 

Black leaders naturally 
wish to appear respectable, 
but one would respect them 
more if they addressed them- 
selves to the real issues. 

Martin Cropper 


‘Why do orchestras exclude the music of our age?’ 


If I seem lo be playing an did tune, 
my excuse is thai this is what the 
London orchestras continue to do: 
i return to the matter of the severe 
imbalance in -orchestral program- 
m| ngai the Festival Hall and, now 
no less at the Bartncan. 

To take just the first three 
months of this season, from 
September to November, the num- 
ber of works by living composers 
being played by the non-BBC 
orchestras in their own promoted 
concerts is four — or, on average, 
one per orchestra. As it happens, 
the Royal Philharmonic is doing 
no contemporary music at all, 
while the London Symphony 
makes up the deficit by offering 
two works: the ubiquitous Con- 
cerfo de Aranjuez by Rodrigo and 
r-P a ? ce ky tite clarinettist 
Eo<he Darnels, who is playing with 
the orchestra. 

"Die London Philharmonic is 


daringly performing Malcolm 
Amofd’s Tam O'Shamer Overture 
on the composer's birthday. Only 
the Philharmonia is presenting a 
recent work of substantial propor- 
tions. Berio's Stnjbrua. 

Now, one could argue that the 
present age is not as propitious for 
orchestral composition as. say, the 
1880s were: I am not sure that is 
right, or even meaningful, but it 
could be argued. Yet if one widens 
the net and looks at what part of the 
orchestras* repertory was written 
during the past 70 years, an entire 
lifetime, the score is even more 
dismaying. 

There is a decent amount of 
Russian music, including six works 
by Shostakovich. There is some 
representation of English music 
(perhaps there would have been 
more if these had not been the 
months also of the Britten/Tippett 
Festival put on by the London 


Paul Griffiths deplores the way in which 
modern composers are virtually ignored, 
while the 19th century ‘Greats’ flourish 


Smtoiuena -and the BBC Sym- 
phony Orchestra). Bui otherwise, 
of music composed since 1916, 
audiences will hear only odd works 
by Ravel Barber. Strauss and 
Respighi. 

It would be naive simply to state 
that this is wrong, and yet the 
situation is certainly a curious one. 
Why is it that Beethoven, Men- 
delssohn. Brahms and Mahler 
command orchestral programmes 
to (be virtual or actual exclusion Of 
Stravinsky. Berg, Bantik and 
BotdeZ? 

One begs the question if one 
suggests that orchestral music in 
the 1 9th century was in some way 


noticeably better Why is there no 
one since the First World War. 
with the possible exception of 
Shostakovich, whose music is 
entering the repertory? Why does it 
seem that concert audiences are not 
only content with almost exclu- 
sively historical programming, but 
actually prefer h? Can one imagine 
a widespread literary sensibility 
incurious about anything outside 
the period from Jane Austen to 
Henry James? 

But the present constriction of 
the orchestral 


orchestras to play anything earlier 
than Haydn, and there are signs 
that this erosion from the past will 
continue: that the demand will be 
for "authentic'’ Mozart, then 
“authentic" Beethoven, then 
“authentic” Schumann. 

The big orchestras may therefore 
find themselves hemmed into an 
ever-smailer corner if they con- 
tinue to ignore most of the 20th 
century. 

What is most wonying in this 
advancing specialization, however, 
is the notion that works may be 
chosen as representatives of a 
particular period or style. One has 
seen this happening with "early 
music” specif svt hew one group 
will dig- out third-rate French 


pie orchestral repertory raises other. ... -baroque cantatas — simply because 
issues-Jnie advance or “authenlrc” that is their area or su p p os ed 


performance styles now makes it 
-difficult 


regrettably- 


for symphony’ 


competence 

Bach. 


— rather than play 


It would be distressing to think: 
the day may be approaching when! 
an orchestra will play Brahm$5 
merely' because he folk within their 
period, rather than for some mot? 
aniaic imperative. •* 

The pressures towards th$ 
orchestras’ retreat into their hinter- 
land are, though, at least as much; 
economic as artistic, and the. 
argument that will always be used 
against more adventurous 
programming is the one drawn’ 
from box-office figures. 

But that is not the only criterion’ 
lo which orchestral managers are 
sensitive: if it were, their pro- 
grammes would be even closer to 
those of the commercial operators.' 
and Festival Hall patrons would be 
hooked on elastics every night of 

the week, . 

There are, then, other values, 
'Why do they so conspicuously 
exclude the music of our own age? 


Full marks for enterprise, 
but must try harder 

|| CONCERTS | 


Parke Ensemble 
October Gallery 


There are some good in- 
tentions among the doings of 
the new Parke. But something 
is missing in the way of 
efficiency and practicality. On 
Wednesday night, for in- 
stance. a brass group was 
assembled to play in just one 
short Birtwistle piece, bis 
Prologue. 

More seriously, the perfor- 
mances sounded under-re- 
hearsed. and the choice of 
venue was unfortunate. The 
upper room at the October 
Gallery is appealingly infor- 
mal but its acoustic is a lot 
less inviting, and part of this 


concert was practically de- 
stroyed by the noise from neat 
door. 

However, silence happily 
prevailed for the two Grange 
pieces. On This Bleak Hut nod 
As // Was. both of them 
settings of poems by Edward 
Thomas, and both of them 
scored for solo voice with an 
ensemble that brought echoes 
of Pierrot Lunaire and of that 
work's progeny in the music of 
Webern and Maxwell Davies. 

This was a little surprising, 
given that Grange's Vari- 
ations. written for the Pierrot- 
based ensemble of the Fires of 
London and played last week, 
is a score of such inc 
sound. 

But I suspect the words in 
these two vocal pieces led the 
composer towards a more 
ovenly expression ist style, 
perhaps particularly in As it 


independent 


Was. where the slow 
interweavings of • two b 
clarinets and low piano sug- 
gest a darkness that the so- 
prano tries to suppress in her 
even-toned declamation. 

Mary Wiegokl both here 
and in Birtwistle's Cantata, 
was too score-bound and care- 
ful: this was more a prelimi- 
nary reading than a 
performance. 

David Aid red had worked 
both composers more com- 
pletely into his voice, though 
there was inrain in some of 
Grange's passion. 

One hates to dampen enter- 
prise, but it rather looks as 
though the Parke Ensemble 
Wight to be giving fewer 
concerts with more thorough 
preparation. Then they might 
be usefiiL 

Panl Griffiths 


LPO/Litton 

Festival Hall 


Eric Mason's programme note 
for Saint-Saens's Third Sym- 
phony, with its references to 
Liszt's deep admiration for 
the composer, got me thinking 
guiltily before this perfor- 
mance that perhaps this work 
often suffers from an unjust 
Press, probably largely be- 
cause of its popularity. And it 
is easy to deride the work for 
the vulgarity of its finale, its 
appeal to audiences through 
sheer volume. 

Vet are not Liszt, Berlioz, 
Wagner, or Messiaen loud and 
vulgar in places? Were they 
not also capable of writing 
sweetly memorable music 
with apparent facility? To 
both questions the answer is 
yes, but we tend to accept such 
things in the face of the whole 
achievement. So it should be 
with Saint-Saens. 

His symphonic ingenuity 
was well served by the London 
Philharmonic Orchestra, 
mercifully restored to some- 
thing approaching' its best 
form after Friday night's 
disastrous episode with Carl 


Davis. For that, much credit 
must go to the conductor here, 
Andrew Litton, whose recent 
work in this country can have 
done his career prospects no 
harm at all 

He secured a thoroughly 
dashing performance, with 
characterful — though always 
impeccably judged — solo 
contributions, as wefl as en- 
semble work that was often' 
simply thrilling. He also man- 
aged to avoid excessive senti- 
ment in the slow movements, 
and rin the three fester ones 
stowed impressive control - 

Seldom can those piano 
scales in the scherzo, . for 
instance, have twinkled quite 
so brightly. Meanwhile, at the 
organ. Thomas Trotter nego- 
tiated his prominent role with 
conspicuous dash, eliciting 
some distinctly 19th century 
French sounds from the 
mighty instrument at his com- 
mand. 

• What had come before was 
rather different to say the 
least though Mozart was also 
capable of writing an easily 
memorable tune or two now 
and then. But few oboeists 
could have matched the play- 
ing of the LPO's principal. 


Gordon Hunt in his perfor- 
mance of the Oboe Concerto. 

His sound is neither too 
thin nor too fet felling in the 
middle ground between tra- 
ditionally French and Germad 
schools: it suited this work 
perfectly. 

He phrased with subtle 
sensitivity too, and rose coolly 
to the outragBoos demands of 
the cadenzas, composed by 
the Philharmonia Orchestra's 
principal trumpet John Wal- 
lace. " 

Not even HoUiger, 1 fancy, 
could have bettered Hunt's 
extraordinarily controlled pi- 
anissimo high notes in.'these. ' 

Stephen Pettitt 


THEATRE 


The Secret Life of 

Cartoons 

Aldwych 

The Idea «f a picture stepping 
oat ef its frame and taking 
’ possession of Its creator is one 
of the archetypes of the horror 
industry: and. as a weH-fcoowa 
(mler in that Held. Clive 
Barker cook! well have turned 
it to grisly account. 

However* as the picture in 
question is an animated car- 
toon, Mr Barker has chosen to 
porsoe the idea into comedy 
with dire and theatrically illit- 
erate results. ' ' 

On Che day that Dick 
Capita is ffred by the stndios, 
Ms creation, a sexually invin- 
cible six-foot rabbit called 
Rosea, bounces into Dick’s 
New York apartment and sets 

about sedacing bis wife. 

The feet that we never learn 
why Dick was fired, nor why 
Romo moves in on him (loy- 
alty, rivalry, or a studio purge 
•a rabbits?) gives yon seme 
idea ef what this play lacks ia 
the way of basic rats and bolts. 

The first scene suggests 
various fines on which n 
comedy, might develop: as an 
actment of the couple's 
fantasies; as a satire an the 
rtosn business; as a stage 
equivalent of fHms combining 
human and ■ cartoon 
characters. 

One by one these alter- 
natives expire, leaving .yon 
with a play whose only 
discernible parpmt feto have 
a lot of funny . thihgs 
happeamg. 

To that end, Mr Barker 
surrenders all dans to nar- 
rative consistency. For the 
sake of a passing giggle, the 
cartoon figures are given a free 


This rabbit is 
no laughing 
matter 



Drawing attention: Geoffrey Hughes and Derek Griffiths 


range of touche winks and 
nndges in defiance of animated 
film etiquette (which means 
that their awful showbiz gags 
also have to be taken at face 
mine). 


The studio is ran by a > 
tycoon, bat with no attempt to 
follow up the idea ef a whole- 
sale Disneyland takeover. And 


no lute is drawn between 
cartoon behaviour and h«n— ■» 
behaviour. 

- The humans either respond 
with an obligatory double-take 
•and give in, or they start 
themselves acting like tape- 
dancing ducks and vaudeville 


Enter a duck -hunter in por- 
swt of a sharp-witted duck 


who arranges for his enemy to 
be yanked out of the window 
and spattered on the sidewalk. 
Being a cartoon, ef course, he 
Is back in no tune with his gab 
still cocked. 

Dick then discovers Ms wife, 
Lorraine, In bed with tfe 
rabbit ami responds by follow- 
ing the hunter out of Che 
window. Jealousy can lead 
almost anywhere, but hardly 
back into the apartment with 
no more than a few bruises. 

Plot. In any case, has virtu- 
ally disappeared by this time; 
aad the production has moved 
into n zone of unmotivated 
comic tarns, with Dexter the 
duck (Graham James) coo- 
verting the bathroom into a 
star dressing room from which 
he ridges mincing little dance 
numbers, -Rosco (Derek Grif- 
fiths) in fell flight rigged up as 
Scarlett O'Hara. And the 
landlady Mrs Steinberg going 
berserk with * machine gun. 

f not usbam«f to waste yom 
time in detail] ngthis rubbish. 

There is one glimpse of real 
comedy when Sergeant 
Beethoven of the police 
department arrives on the 
scene, stimulating Lorraine 
(Una Stubbs) to remark: “You 
area pig, Beethoven and T hate 
year music", whereupon, once 
atone. Beethoven whips off his 
block shades revealing that be 
is indeed a pig in the pay of 
Mighty Moose. 

Tudor Davies's production 
proceeds over the desert of 
thin ice with manic speed aad 
energy, supported by frequent 
honks and gfissaados on the 
Swan nee flute.. 

The evening has the virtue 
of precision: particularly in 
Mr Griffiths's split-second 
physical and vocal tinting, and 
in the dance numbers involv- 
ing Paul Robinson as a stage- 
struck delivery boy. In other 
respects tills stow is a 


Irving YVardle 


JAZZ 


McCoy Tyner 

Ronnie Scott’s 

Loose Tubes 

Logan Hall 



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No one who ventured abroad j 
in London on Wednesday j 
night could have been in much [ 
doubt about the current health 
of the jazz scene. At Ronnie | 
Scott’s, absorbed for the week i 
into the Soho Jazz Festival, a 
full house turned out tol 
welcome McCoy Tyner, aj 
pianist revered for his work 
with John Colirane in the 
early 1960s. 

Nor were there seats going 
begging a mile or so away in 
Bloomsbury, where Loose 
Tubes, a 21-piece orchestra of 
British jazz musicians, ap- 
peared for the second date of a ; 
national tour under the aus- 
pices of the Art CounriTs 
adventurous Contemporary: 
Music Network. 

Few jazz pianists of the last 
25 years can tyve remained 
untouched by the incamaiory 
two-chord vamps and rest- 
lessly voluble upper-register 
lines which Tyner devised to 
support Col Irenes' celebrated 
spiritual quest, and all the 
elements of that style are rat 
display during his current two- 
week season, for which he is 
accompanied by a sound.bass- 
ist, Avery Sharpe, and a 
mercurial ly brilliant drum- 
mer. Louis Hayes. 

After an tour in Tyner's 
company, the residual image 
is of his right hand dissolving 
into a dancing blur while his 
left bounced shoulder-high off j 
the ivory trampoline. In- 
evitably. though, the intensity 
of his younger days has 
proved difficult to sustain and 
what was once an attempt to 
reach some sort of musical 
catharsis now seems, when 
applied to the well-worn con- 
tours of Neal Hefti's **Li1 
Dartin'", merely the product 
of an automatic reflex. 

Loose Tubes have appeared 
so often in London this year 
that over-fern itiarity may be a 
danger for the critic, but it 
must be said that ihis-was not 
one of their more memorable 
performances. ■ - 

Apart from a thunderous 
ovation for Django Bates' 
varied and often hilarious 
’Accepting Suites from 
Strangers - , lifted by fain 
Ballamy's alto saxophone 
solo, the atmosphere seemed 
Slightly tepid. 

Richard Williams I 



Deep in the jungles of South America two men 
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WHHWf’ 


SPECTRUM 


Scarred by the lost generation 

cnrbGraoa'y 


Twenty years ago a 
slag heap made by 
man descended on 
a school full of 
children and wiped 
out a generation. 
Michael Watkins 
returned to Aberfan, 
where more than the 
landscape is seared 


On October 21. 1966 face-workers 
on the morning shift at Merthyr 
Vale colliery were summarily or- 
dered to the surface. No reason was 
given, but they were told to bring 
their shovels. It was shortly after 
nine o'clock, following two days of 
heavy rain; mist obscured the 
mountains and tips above the 
valley. 

Gwyn Davies was on that shift. 
Twenty years later, he.is a training 
officer: “When we got out or the 
cage, we were told that number 7 
tip had slipped, but we couldn't see 
much through the mist so we didn't 
know it was serious. When we got 
almost to the school, we realized 
we were walking on roof tops. 
Houses were buried under slurry 
and people said there'd been a 
terrible bang and they went down 
like a pack of cards. 

"They split us into groups and 
we siarted • digging. The women 
were already there, like stone they 
were, clawing at the filth — it was 
like a black river — some had no 
skin left on their hands. Miners are 
a tough breed, we don't show our 
feelings, but some of the lads broke 
down. I was lucky, my boy was 
only two and hadn't been to school 
yeL It buried the school, you see: 

“There'd be a shout fora blanket 
and you might be passed an arm or 
a leg. We found three kiddies 
clinging to a teacher's dress — all 
four were dead. If I could paint. I'd 


‘Miners are a tough 
breed, but some of 
the lads broke down 9 


paint it just as it was. it's that clear 
to me. I’d just about had a belJyfuL 
Some of those tips were 70 years of 
muck, the sun set behind them. I 
played on them as a kid." 

When the dead were counted, 
there were 144. including 116 
children aged between seven and 
1 1 years. The cause of death given 
by the coroner was asphyxia and 
multiple injuries. Volunteers 
poured into Aberfan. 2.000 or so, 
to clear the sludge: occasionally 
they were hindered by sightseers, 
necessitating Territorial Army 
supervision to keep spectators 
from the disaster area. On October 
27 on the hillside cemetery there 
were two hymns, three short 
prayers and four readings from the 
Bible: and the dead were buried in 
two 80ft trenches. The pithead 
wheels of the colliery stood idle; a 
police sergeant was seen to burst 
into tears as a relative threw a 
teddy bear into one of the graves. 
So Aberfan and Merthyr Vale, their 


the streets of 


above, may look normal 
but a generation is missing 


public sorrow and private grief. 

1 have never held a dead child in 
my arms, so I do not know the 
truest meaning of grief. I cannot 
from experience, assess the bitter- 
ness or the anger. Surely there must 
be anger, one needs to apportion 
blame? When battles turn into 
carnage, the field commanders are 
blamed; in earthquake or famine, 
God is held responsible. But you 
cannot blame God for the tragedy 
of Aberfan; or. if so, only obliquely, 
for the black monster above 
Pamglas school was unleashed by 
man. The Aberfan tribunal made 
that quite dean “A terrifying tale of 
bungling ineptitude by many men 
charged with tasks for which they 
were totally unfitted, of failure to 
heed clear warnings ..." It was 
known that tips, like foul icebergs, 
inched down mountainsides; what 
was not known was that number 7 
had been built on foundations of 
water, on a spring. 


Twenty years on, the valley is 
remarkable only for its ordinari- 
ness; you could pass through on 
-our way to Cardiff and never 


-now. You cannot say that its 
streets are mean, they are no 
meaner than thousands of others; 
indeed the mountains lend distinc- 
tion and power to the landscape, 
the pithead wheel applies a prime- 
val touch. It would have been 
beautiful before the Industrial 
Revolution. There are Silk Cut and 
Walls Ice Cream signs, a video 
dub, a turf accountant and. upon a 
wail. Ian Cuddy has scrawled a 
note to the effect that be was here. 
It is no Hampstead or Highgate, it 
is not a soft place; there is a 
calloused feel, for this is a working 
village. 620 men are down the pit 
Things get done the hard way, the 
dirty way. There is a veneer of coal 
dust; the very smell of coal is in 
one's nostrils. But you would never 


Yesterday's nightmare: a river 
of mud, left, buried the school and 


stunned the world 


suspect that a generation is 
missing. 

If you paused, for a pint perhaps 
at the pub they call The Mack; if 
you parked your car and looked up. 
then you would see two rows of 
white arches in the cemetery on the 
hill. The arches seem to go on for 
ever and ever, each one 
commemorating the brief life of a 
child smothered by the slurry. 


They bad pretty names: Gwyneth, 
Antony. Glenys, Tydfil, Lynda, 
Peter. They'd be 27 or so had they 
lived; they might have gone down 
the pit, become solicitors or pris- 
oners of conscience, who knows? It 
is a stiff haul up from the village, 
yet I could see fresh flowers on each 
grave. 

Someone was arranging a posy 
for Cheryl who came from Moy 


Road and was eight when she was 
killed “You won't use my name, 
will you?" she asked “We've learnt 
to be silent, some of us. I was 
helping to dig the children out 
when I heard a photographer leH a 
kiddie to cry for her dead friends, 
so thar he could get a good picture 
— that taught me silence. It's high 
up here, flowers don't last She was 
a lovely little girl, but she's safe 
now. she can't be struck again." 

A man at the cemetry gates also 
asked me not to give his name: 
“The wife said the birds were very 
busy, which was a funny thing to 
say — next minute it happened just 
like volcanic larva flows on tele- 
vision. You should see the sight- 
seers in summer, they come on 
outings from Butlinj. We're on the 
tourist map." 

It has been said that Aberfan was 
the victim of two disasters: first the 
landslide, then an avalanche of 
money. It poured in from all over . 
the world reaching £1-75 million; 
and curiously, box-loads of toys. 
Toys for a village which had lost its 
children. There was comment that 
the money was a curse, that it 
generated greed among contesiors 
for compensation. I am not sure 
how you price a child's life but the 
cash, thoughtfully given, must 
have helped ft built a community 
centre, with squash courts, a 
swimming pool; it provided a 
Garden of Remembrance on the 


site of the demolished school. The 
plaque which reads “To those we 
love and miss so very much" is 
constantly vandalised: no one 
understands why. 

There were also stories of after- 
effects: a mother dying of barbitu- 
rate poisoning, found clutching a 
photograph of her daughter killed 
in the slide. A distinguished Ameri- 
can psychologist quoted that some 
children had told her “We are not 


going to school, if you 80 l J 
School you die" One press photo- 
graph of the tragedy showed a 
policeman earning ninc-vcar-oM 
Susan Maybanks w safer ty* 
vears she was terrified ot me oar*. 
Susan is now married: she sent a 
message, via the Rev Kenneth 
Haves, who lost his cider son in 
1966, that she would prefer not to 
talk about it. that shed had 
enough. 

There was a notice in the village 
newsletter Headway announcing 
that the radio station Swansea 
Sound and BBC Wales TV were 
preparing items for the -0th 
anniversary of the disaster; it 
sought contributors wiling to oc 
interviewed. No one had come 
forward. 

AX Ynysowcn infants’ school 
Miss Mair Jones is head teacher, a 
teaching head icacber, she re- 
minded. In 1966 she was at the 
nursery school, about a quarter of a 
mile from Pantgjas. “With luck 
these children won't know about it. 
the village is a family, protecting its 
own. I simply know that in three 
years my school dropped three 
classes, there arc 98 children here 
today — by rights there should be 
150 or more. 

“My father was a miner, tips 
were a feet of life so we knew the 
danger. No. not many families left 
the valley, a few couldn't cope; but 
most parents sent their children 
back to school — that’s what I 
admire most. I lost a lot of children 
— when you’re a teacher they're all 
your children. 

“Forget? How can wc forget 
when people like you keep picking 
off the scabs?" 

Did any good come from this 
slaughter of the innocents? “Yes," 
said Mr Moss, manager of Merthyr 
Vale colliery. “There’s legislation 
about where we tip rubbish now, 
• it's science-controlled, inspected 
regularly. HI tell you this much: it 
could never happen again, not in 
this valley nor anywhere in South 
Wales." 

The Rev Kenneth Hayes said; 
“We learnt to set a pattern for land- 
reclamation. Wc found a way to 
demonstrate effectively, without 


‘We have learnt 
to be silent — 
some of us 9 


Pitching 

for 


ponches 

Nicaragua goes wild , 
as the Worid Series . 
brings the American - 
baseball season to 
an exciting climax 


violence — we got experts to put 
our case. The tips have gone, but ; 
there's still a story to tell." 

• Whatever we may believe about 
national unity, the Welsh are a race 
apart; they are not like the rest of 
us, they were here before the Anglo- 
Saxons. They are separate and they 
are used to sorrow; it has branded 
them with a strength and it has 
bound them together as a clan. For 
more than 100 years many of them 
have worked underground, iso- 
lated from safety, deprived of 
sunlight. News of disaster came 
regularly from these valleys: 
entombment by a fell: the silent, 
choking death by gas. 

We have always known that 
miners died: it was part of the price 
of coal and. in our heartlessness, we : 
accepted it. It was the miners* i 
choice. But the children up in the 
schoolroom, saying their morning 
prayers, had no such choice. 


It is a Mr taf that Denis 
Martinez has more fens la 
Nicaragua than nay of the 
SandinbU cotarntfuerSL lie 
was born there, in the town of 
Granada, but found feme m t 
fortune as a baseball player fat 
the United States. 

Such is the postal of 
Nicaraguans for the game flat 
was bequeathed to them by fee 
US Marines, who occapfcd 
their country between 1912 
and 1933. (hat they happSy 
skip the vitriolic denunciation* 
of Yankee wickedness fa the 

government-controlled press 
to check for news of their here. 

Both the country's main 
newspapers fill columns daily 
wife the heisM scores fro® 
the IIS. and the excitement 
will be high tomorrow night as 
the New York Mets meet fee 
Boston Red Sox fa the Worid 
Series flush The Spanish 

translations of essential terms 

add to the pleasure of trying to 
follow things from Manag es . 
Seder Martinez, for instance, 
is celebrated as a Itotzodor 
(pitcher) with the Montreal 
Expos, and though some say 
his throwing arm Is not what (t 
used to be he still gets Us fair 
share of pooches (strike-outs). 

There is scarcely a corner of 
Nicaragua where you wBl not . 
find some sort of a baseball 
field. I once came across a 
soldier from a counter -fas ur- 
gency battalion patrolling with 
a bat and a fielder's glove 
hanging from bis equip ment . 

It is not surprising feat an 
attempt to emulate fee “ping 
pong diplomacy", which 
helped draw the US and Chfaa 
together, has begun, using this 
stared lore of oasebaiL The 
Nicaraguan national team is fa 
California for a series of 
exhibition games. “Bats not 
bombs" is the organizers' 
slogan. 

Nicaragua is also helping to 
establish the sport fa the 
Soviet Union. A team of 
students recently triumphed 3- 
0 fa the first organized match 
ever staged in Moscow. “I 
might like It if ! understood 
it. said Nikolai, a professor of 
agriculture, oue of a handful of 
spectators. 

In his younger days Fidel 
Castro was a self-confessed 
fanatic and, one gathers, not a 
bad player. The game is 
extremely popular in Cuba, 
but it seems that tire army 
team always dominates the 
competition. In Nicaragua 
fans also complain that the 
armed forces get first pick of 
the talent 

Denis, meanwhile, has 
pitched his fast game of the 
season for Montreal. He was 
doing well against Los FMt 
until he gave up three rims and 
was replaced by a substitute. 
Something more to grumble 
about down in Managua. 


Hoi 


lUS 


10 3 1 


■*>*•*•_ 



A skate to the sunny side of the street 


The brief demonstration is. 
over. Robin Cousins bows to 
his audience of one and moves 
away from the piano where 
sits his friend and voice- 
trainer. New York composer 
Paul Katz. "A year ago the 
only singing 1 was doing was 
in the showers," he admits. 

Times have changed, how- 
ever, for the former Olympic 
champion, who trades skates 
for sneakers this Sunday eve- 
ning to perform a song-and- 
dance act in the Adelphi 
Theatre's showbiz benefit 
against drugs, The Just Say No 
Show. 

His is no flash-in-the-pan 
musical talent. Cousins sur- 
prised audiences with his stage 
debut, a novelty turn in the 
Shaftesbury Avenue Night Of 
.-I Hundred Stars spectacular 
earlier this year. AX feat point, 
his training had only just 


begun — something to do 
while a leg injury kept him off 
the ice. 


Since then he has been 
turning down musicals in New 
York and fee West End. fee- 
surprisingly powerful voice 
meanwhile becoming “more 
controlled" under the guid- 
ance of his tutor. "This could 
be. another Gene Kelly - and 
he thinks so too: don't let him 
make you think he doesn’t," 
Katz says, glancing at his 
demurring protege. 



■ It's an interesting prospect 
for the athlete who had us up 
at all hours, hearts in mouths, 
wife the giant leaps and triple 
toe-loops of his amateur days. 
This winter's professional 
world championships will see 
fee end of another era. “I’m 
retiring from professional 
competition on December 


Robin Cousins: betting it out 

20." he says, adding conspira- 
toriaily. “and that's something 
even my mother doesn't know 
I'm doing yet." 

The announcement is sure 
to bring more theatrical agents 
knocking at his- door, but 
Cousins is steadfastly loyal to 
bis first calling: “It's not 
another- career, fm not going 
to give up skating for singing." 


Having lived in the Big 
Apple for nearly four years, be 
looks comfortable.' in the 
American “uniform" of blue- 
jeans-and-bomber-jacket, and. 
in the words of Paul Katz, is 
becoming quite good at “belt- 
ing ft out like a New Yorker". 

It’s a big leap from choir 
practice at the age of 12. but 
Cousins finds he has fee 
discipline to apply himself, 
whatever the field: “Given 
time and training, you can do 
anything. You try and equate 
it with something you know. 
This is still a question of 
placement, your physical pres- 
ence on stage, only you are 
conscious of what your mouth 
is doing as well as your feet 

"You're in front of an 
audience whether you're skat- 
ing or noL Of course, anyone 
who says they’re not scared 
before they go on stage has to 


be either a liar or no good." 
But it's exhilaration more 
than fear. “Once a ham, 
always a ham." he says with * 
shrug. 

And when the ice finally 
cracks, it's likely to be ait easy 
transition to the sunny side of. 
the street. “My only concern is 
that I be chosen because of 
what I can da rather than who 
I am." he says. “I'm just lucky 
to have been in one of those 
sports feat happens to have an 
after-life — and I think the 
after-life has actually been 
better." 


[lac 


Stephanie Billen 

©TtaaNiwiMpinudiw; 

The Just Say No Show is at the 
Add phi Theatre. London, on 
Sunday' at Tickets, are 

£75. £ 35 and £50. indushr cf 
donation to Scoda (Standing 
Cimfirencv on Drug Ahusei front 
First Catl (til- 24Q ?200) 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1082 


ITHE&l 


xTTMESl 


ACROSS 

1 Tents 16) 

S Projected (6) 

8 Automobile (3) 

9 Superficial appear- 
ance (6) 

10 Physical damagr (6) 

11 Knock unconscious 
14) 

12 Gold-bearing Ma- 
guslS) 

14 Serenely (6) 

17 Prairie wolf (6) 

19 Table Bay port (4.4) 
22 Scrutinize (4) 

24 Make secure (6) 

25 Prisoner (6) 

26 Tin (3) 

77 Eight note interval 
(b) 

28 Mini facing car (14) 
down 

2 Attentive £5) 

3 French Indo-Oilna 
17) 

4 Rough cider (7) 

5 Test (5) 


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BBB BBBBBB 

B B fl 
BflBBB JBJB 



SATURDAY 

Putting on 

The Red Shoes 


•iv \ 

"•.a**. ’ -.t*r 


Film-maker Michael Powell tells 
of his stormy relationship with 
ballet star Moira Shearer 


'‘"''’SI :4 

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6 Indian ruler (S) 17 Sly (7) 

7 Exhausted (4.3) 18 Muslim veil ft) 

13 Murmur lovingly (3) 20 Crowi scene actor 

15 Old Persian language (5) 

_ 21 I/I6ih pound (5) 

16 DcsiinyfJ) 23 Communion table (5) 


— &hi(fr)lw ^jold — 

£12,000 to be 

Stormy: Moira Shaarer (left) jn ihe fled Shoos wo n tomorrow 

Can you always get your copy of The Times? 


* * Tif t I 

ii’jj .. . 


** - l »l 


SOLUTIONS TO NO 1081 

ACROSS: 8 Daughter-in-law 9 Lee 10 Neighbour 11 Droll I3Ha- 

34 Mob 25 Schadenfreude 

DOWN. 1 Addled 2 Tuxedo 3 Chandler 4Zetiuh SHikh 6AH- 
gul 7 Swerve 12 Rue 14 Brochure 15UHT 16 Dess !7 
Soothe 18 Spawns 20 Armour 21 Emblem 23 Cads 


Dear Newsagent, please deliver/save me a copy ofThe Times 


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ADDRESS. 


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ic street 




When junior health minister 
tdwina Currie castigated 
non hern ers for drinking too 
much beer and smoking too 
many cigarettes, she foiled to 
mention that she is married to 
a perfect example of just such 
a person. “I like a few pints of 
Mst bitter and a smoke," 
admits Ray Currie, her mild- 
mannered Yorkshire hus- 
band. “When I’m on my own I 
live on cup-a-50up. baked 
beans on toast, and take- 
aways." 

Mr Currie’s lifestyle often 
contradicts his wife’s political 
image, though he claims to 
know what he was letting 
hjmself in for when she 
popped the question. “She’s 
bright," says Ray. "she’s ener- 
getic, and I knew what life 
would be like when I married 
her." 

What he didn’t anticipate, 
however, was what his life 
would be perceived to be like. 
Ever since Mrs Thatcher ar- 
rived at number 10. it has 
become impossible for the 
husbands of Westminster’s 
leading ladies to withstand the 
obvious comparison to dear 
Denis; 

When the BBC asked the 
Curries if they would appear 
in an episode of The Other 
Huff, the couple saw it as a 
good opportunity to dispel 
Ray’s image as one of 
Westminster's hen-pecked 
husbands. “Ray had got fed up 
with people assuming he 
wasn't his own man just 
because T happened to be in ’ 
politics, and he was quite keen 
to do it,” Edwina said at the 
time. / 

Unfortunately, the plan 
misfired. Ray was shown 
carrying Edwina’s handbag at 
an election victory pasty. The 
Times s television critic com- 
mented: "Despite their joint 
protestations to the contrary, 
he appeared to be the kind of 
mild and introverted husband 
who is content to stay firmly 
in the background." 

Alexander Ward Lyon suf- 
fered a similar experience 
when his wife. Clare Short, 
became the Labour MP for 
Birmingham Ladywood in 
1983. The day Clare won her 
place in Westminster was the 
day he lost the seat in York 
that he had held for 16 years. 
Since he wouldn’t agree to 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 

FRIDAY PAGE 


House 
husbands 
to a man 

Since the Denis Thatcher lampoons 
h^gnt he spouses of woman MPs have 
— ^g raawary look. As Parliament 
Toby Young reports on the 
pressures of having a wife in the House 







’M" •>. -a 1. 



forsake his parliamentary am- 
bitions. Alexander had great 
difficulties finding another 
job. 

“He was enormously gen- 
erous in not resenting my 
being in the House,” says 
Clare, "but there were some 
very cruel press reports which 
did hurt." He became bis 
wife’s secretary in the Com- 
mons. and the tabloid press 
went to town. Such are the 
consequences of being mar- 
ried to a woman who tried to 
introduce a private member's 
Bill aimed at banning Page 
Three girls. 

Even when their husbands 
have full-time jobs, however, 
Westminster women have to 
be particularly sensitive about 
their husbands. Angela 
Rumbold, the education min- 
ister. must now be rueing the 
day she announced that her 
idea of Mr Right was Clint 
Eastwood. This inevitably in- 
vited comparisons between 
John Rumbold, a Home 
Counties solicitor, and the 
gun-slinging star of spaghetti 
westerns. 

Lyndh Chalker, the Min- 
ister for Foreign and 
Commonwealth Amirs, has 
an altogether more tactful 
approach. Despite being the 
first woman to become leader 
of the Greater London Young 
Conservatives, Mrs Chalker 
did not run for the chairman- 
ship of the National Young 
Conservatives because her 
then husband. Eric Chalker, 
had done so and had twice 
foiled. She. thought it would 
undermine his self-esteem if 
she succeeded where he bad 
not. 

Her tact, however, didn't 
extend to taking the name of 
her current husband, Clive 
Landa, whom she married in 
1981. She felt Lynda Landa to 
be a bit too much of a . 
mouthful. But, unlike Messrs 
Ward and Rumbold, Clive 
Landa at. least knew what he 
was taking oh when he mar- 
ried Lynda, since she was 
already die MP for Wallasey 
when he carried her across the 
threshold. 

The same applies to John 
Barnes, who became Mr Sally 
Oppenheim in 1984. After her 
husband Henry died in 1980. 
Mrs Oppenheim found herself 
the centre of a good deal of 





MEDICAL BRIEFING 


Edwina and Ray Curries she offers nutritional advice to the North while he drinks best bitter and carries her handbag 







Harriet Harman, Jack Dromey: 
now he’s left holding the baby 






Clire Landa, Lynda Chalker: not Lynda Landa 



Angela and John Rumbold: can he ever compete irith Clint Eastwood? 


male attention. Most of them, 
however, had little dr no kteq 
of what being a Westminster 
husband involved. “1 went but 
with a lot of moaning, 
whingeing widowers who were 
only looking for housekeepers 
and nurses,” she revealed 
later. 

John Barnes, though, was 
different Though not exactly 
Clint Eastwood, he did have 
some grasp of her political 
responsibilities. They met at a 
Conservative Association din- 
ner in the spring of 1984. 

"It wasn’t quite love at first 
sight" be observed. "It took 
me at least an hour to become 
totally besotted.” He was so 
impressed with Sally that he 
invited her to open his new 


missile components factory in 
Gloucestershire. The" romance 
progressed from missiles to 
mistletoe, and they were mar- 
ried a few months later. 

Sally Oppenheim, like 
Linda Chalker, wasn’t pre- 
pared to forsake the name by 
which she had become politi- 
cally known. She derided on 
the double-barrelled solution, 
though instead of Barnes- 
Oppenheim she opted for 
Oppenheim-Bames. 

One of the problems John 
Barnes experiences in being a 
House Husband is that the 
grinding Westminster agenda 
leaves him veiy little time 
with his new wife during the 
parliamentary session. Sally 
leaves her Gloucestershire es- 
tate on Mondays and rarely 


gels back before Thursday 
evening.’ They both suffer 
from what Barnes calls 
“Wednesday-i tis". 

His problems are nothing, 
however, compared to those 
of Jack Dromey. the husband 
of the Labour member for 
Peckham. Harriet Hannan. 
For unlike any of the other 
women MPS, Harriet has a 
small baby, Harry. Because 
Ms Hannan's responsibilities 
sometimes keep her late in the 
House, Mr Dromey is left with 
the job of changing Harry’s 
nappies and feeding him while 
mum's away. 

Of course, in this respect, 
the problems of being married 
to a woman MP may be little 
different from those of any 
man hitched to a career 


woman. John Barnes admits 
to a liking for career women in 
general - and is noted for 
promoting bright young ladies 
in his company. 

However, it is inevitable 
that the stereotyping of West- 
minster husbands as being in 
the Denis Thatcher mould will 
place an additional strain on 
marriages already fraught with 
career competition. It is all the 
more remarkable, therefore, 
that 22 of the 27 women MPs 
are happily married, and of 
these only two — Linda 
Chalker and Gwyneth 
Dun woody — have been di- 
vorced. Perhaps Henry Kiss- 
inger was on to something 
when he made his famous 
remark about power being the 
greatest aphrodisiac. 



The penalty of mercy 


lor in novation and inspirations . . 

Hie rising stars of Reach cuisine 

Apple and pear surprises 

Colin Spencer’s 
gourmet vegetarian menu , 

Derek Cooper vistts Chateau Laffte 

Entertaining Betty Jackson fashion 


A! 


la carte 


November issue on sal e now 
at all good newsagents 


The Chief Justice of 
California tells why 
she faces a poll defeat 

I j I wear a low-cut gown I 
can get on the front page of 
the newspapers. If I want 
to talk about state funding for 
the’ trial courts. 1 can't get on 
the obit page." 

Rose Bird. Chief Justice of 
the Supreme Court of Calif- 
ornia. is a 'tall, extremely 
handsome woman. She 
dresses with panache, a flair 
that foils on the tasteful side of 
Krystle Carrington. She talks 
in a rich, mellow, sexy voice- 
and when she laughs — which 
she does quite often — -it’s as 
though sunshine has burst 
through into a smoky jpom. 

She likes films, exercise, 
good food, books; people, her 
country (though she is con- 
cerned about it), her work and 
her job. She may or may not 
like brinkmanship for she has 
come perilously close to losing 
her life through breast cancer 
(she had a modified radical 
mastectomy in 1976) and she 
is now perilously dose io 
losing her job.' 

'? The' Honourable Rose Eliz- 
abeth Bird, Chief J ustice of the 
Supreme .Court of California, 
is, barring a miracle, about to 
be booted out-of office by the 
voters of that state on Tues- 
day. November 4, after nine 
yean in office. Ostensibly, the 
reason is simple: in that time; 
she has foiled to execute 
anyone. 

Fifty-six death penalty cases 
have, come before, this Chief 
Justice and she has reversed 
them alt. Each of those con- 
victed murderers is alive and 
in a cell today. Their contin- 
ued existence on earth causes 
dismay and rage among Rose 
Bird’s critics and political 
opponents in California; they 
say that she is deliberately 
flouting the expressed will of 
the people who voted for the 
restoration of capital punish- 
ment in 1978. 



and managed by a former 
Deukmejian campaign man- 
ager, Bill Roberts; and Califor- j 
mans to Defeat Rose Bird, I 
based in Orange County. Slo- 
gans abound: “Bye bye 
Birdie" and "Bump her" 
bumper stickers indicate the 
level of the attack. ! 

The Chief Justice’s self de- 
fence has been all too dignified 
and will surely cost her the 
case. “Tve always been critical 
of the whole process of selling 
people and personality that j 
seems now to be so much a 
part of our political process. 


Hope for 
anorexics 

3* A "substantial" 
number of peo- 
ple diagnosed 
as haring an- 
orexia nervosa 
SHSkmay. in feet, 
““'taw a physical 
disorder which can be treated 
relatively simply. A study by 
doctors in Vienna of 30 so- 
called anorexics found that 
nearly a third had an 
oesophageal problem which 
could be treated by surgery or 
drags. When this was done 
they all pot on weight. 

Most commonly these pa- 
tients had dual problems; the 
sphincter at the lower end of 
the oesophagus did not relax 
properly in response to food 
and patients had abnormal 

oesophageal contractions. In 


retrospect this fitted in well 
with the types of symptoms the 
patients had — vomiting and 
difficulty in swallowing, for 
example. This problem was 
probably the primary cause of 
their “anorexia**, the doctors 
conclude in the medical jour- 
nal GUT. It is essential, they 
say, that the possibility of 
oesophageal problems . be 
ruled out before anyone is 
diagnosed as having anorexia 
nervosa. 

The study also found that in 
the ns* majority of other 
“anorexics** investigated, food 
did not pass through the 
stomach into the intestine as 
quickly as it would normally, 
and that drugs could help 
correct this. It was am pos- 
sible to say whether (his 
“delayed gastric emptying** 
was the cause of the patients' 
anorexia or caused by it. Even 
so, (be findings should aid the 
management of the condition. 


Oily cure for heart disease? 

J A regular dietary supplement of fish oil could 
..l eventually prove an effective way of preventing 

heart disease. Just last year, doctors in the 
Netherlands showed that eating as little as two 
^ .( fish dishes a week could cut the risk of a fatal 

^ heart attack by half. Now new research by 

doctors at the University of Massachusetts has 

come a step closer to understanding why a regular dietary 
supplement of fish oH could prevent heart disease. In tests on 
pigs, used because their pattern of heart disease is similar to 
mat in humans, the doctors found thatadiet rich in fish oils wiU 
block the narrowing of arteries caused by atherosclerosis. In- 
terestingly, this benefit of fish oils was seen even when the 
pigs continued to eat a lot of saturated fat and had high levels 
of fat in their blood. 

The researchers use used cod Kver oil because it is high in 
the polyunsaturated fatty acid eJcosapentaenoic acid, which is 
thought to be the active ingredient. The levels of cod liver oil 
which were protective in the pigs would be toxic to man, but if 
a purified preparation of the required fatty acid could be pre- 
pared it would be possible to start trials in humans. 



Acne: a bar to 
jobhunters 

OM prejudices 
run deep. A 
two-year study 
by dermatolo- 
gists at Leeds 
General In- 
firmary has 
found that acne sufferers are 
for less likely to get a job than 
tbeir clear-skinned 
contemporaries. 

In the Leeds area HL2 per 
cent ofyonng men and 143 per 
cent of young women with acne 
are unemployed compared 
with 9.2 per cent of non-acne 
suffering focal young males 

Check at your 
fingertips 


% 


Having your 
blood pressure 
measured 
could soon be 
as simple as 
pointing a fin- 
ger. Family 
doctors and nurses at the St 
John's Health Centre in 
Woking have found that a 
sphygmomanometer which Is 
attached to a tiny finger cuff 
will measure blood pressure 
just as accurately as those 
conventional blood pressure 
gauges where the cuff is put 
round the arm. 

The finger sphygmo- 


and 8.7 per cent yoang women. 

Yet acne can be treated. The 
latest drags and therapies 
won’t cure everyone with the 
condition but they will bring 
about an improvement. Sadly 
many {offerers don’t have the 
help they need. 

Leading acne expert Dr Bill 
Cardiff e, who works at Leeds, 
says the unemployment study 
provides yet another reason 
why all acne sufferers should 
be given ’"prompt and 
adequate" treatment. 

Writing in the British Jour- 
nal of Dermatology ; he says: 
“There is no reason why, in- 
1986, all acne patients should 
not respond well to available 
therapy." 

manometer will work on any ' 
finger; a cuff squeezes the 
arteries and a pulse detector 
provides the blood pressure, 
reading on a digital read out 
In tests on nearly 900 patients 
it was quicker to use, more 
comfortable and just as ac- 
curate as other methods — . 
and patients preferred it 

Dr Alan Close and his 
colleagues, whose work is 
published in the British Medi- 
cal Journal, say it will do away 
with the need to undress ana 
with sometimes painful blood 
pressure measurements. The 
finger sphygmomanometer 
could also easily be used to 
check people’s blood pres- 
sure at home 

Lorraine Fraser 




WHY WE GIVE 
EVERY NEW BABY 
A BEAR HUG 


M y own view is that, 
rather than talk in 
terms of marketing 
and making slick ads or 
making counter-charges 
against other people, we have 
something of value here: we 
have a remarkable institution 
here, an independent judiciary 
we must protect. We have the 
Bill of Rights, the Constitu- 
tion. the California Constitu- 
tion: these mean something." 

Two other justices stand for I 
re-election alongside Bird but 
neither of them has drawn 
anything like the flak she has 
attracted. "I happen to be a 
younger woman although I am 
middle-aged,” says the Chief 
Justice, who is 49 but looks 
more like 40. 

Rose BinJ believes in keep- 
ing her private life private, she 
says. If the press want to 
interview her in her chambers, 
that's fine. If. they want to 
photograph her working out. 
baking bread, that's not. “I 
think you dehumanize your- 
self if you exploit your family, 
your dogs, your. self, simply 
for an image." 

“It's not that I think I have a 
messianic role in history or a 
comer on the truth. I’ve often 
said that anyone who has 
power within our democratic 
society has to use it with grace 
and understand that your 
view of life is simply that — a 
perception and not the truth," 

Deirdre Macdonald 

© Times Nampapan Ud ISM 


Rose Bird: bye bye? 

These are intensely conser- 
vative times, even in Califor- 
nia. “The problem is that you 
have a society that is in 
transition,” says the Chief 
Justice in her own defence, “a 
society where people do not 
feel safe, and therefore it does 
not make any difference how 
many people you . have in 
prison. If you had half of our 
population in prison and peo- 
ple still felt unsafe it would not 
be enough." 


R ose Bird was appointed 
lo the lofty office of 
Chief Justice by 
California's Democratic Gov- 
ernor Jeny Brown in 1977. It 
will almost certainly be the 
privilege and pleasure of the 
present Republican' Governor. 
George Deukmejian, to ap- 
point her successor after the 
■November 4 elections for, 
although the office of the 
Chief Justice is technically 
non-partisan, this is a highly 
politicized poll. 

The campaign against her 
has been a rouiti-miliion dol- 
lar marathon, masterminded 
by two key groups rooted in 
professional political con- 
sultancy firms: the Crime 
Victims for Court Reform 
based on the chic, affluent 
Westwood area of Los Angeles 


^ oicouraged to discuss your 

iv */**?■“- ideas and experience wdthy 

_ A. midwife and! obstetric 

physiotherapist. 


PI? 


^ 

Here at the Wellington 
hospital in St John’s wood, we 
nuke the whole experience of 
having a baby safe and enjoyable, 
so that your child will have the 
best possible start in life. 

Our care is geared to the very 
special need ofyou and your 
baby from the moment you make 
your booking. For some of our 
maternity patients this care starts 
even earlier; in our specialist 
fertility centre 

As an automatic member of 
our Cradle Club you will receive 
a full range of mrormation and 
advice. You will be invited to 
attend ante-natal classes where 
you can learn all about 
pregnancy, parent aaft, exercises 
andrelaxation. 

There are special 
evenings for fathers, 
and you will be J 


mcouraged to discuss your own 
ideas ana experience with your 
midwife and! obstetric 
physiotherapist. 

Xv AiaAJi In our maternity unit you 
■ will receive round the dock 
- y, V * •'* attention from trained mid- 
{ wives, nursery nurses and 
consultant paediatricians. 

7,-0 ^ ^ There are conventional 

1 ’\ deliveiy and natural 

v :« ’/ v 5 ?t\ n ‘ x '- v. ** birthing rooms with the foil 

vjp*. back-up of 3enerai Hospital 

facilities if required- 

Wellington Like all our mothers, you will 

ohn’s wood, we have your own air-conditioned 

te experience of room to relax and recover in. 
;afeand enjoyable. Here you can watch colour TV, 
tild will have the receive family and friends, or 

art in life. better still, get ro know the new 

geared to the very member ofyour family 

you and your Our staff will do all they can 

moment you make to make your stay a happy one. 

For some of our including providing a compli- 
cate this care starts mentary botde of champagne 

our specialist and a cuddly WrflingtDn bear for 
your baby. 

natic member of If this is the care and comfort 

b you will receive you require during and after your 

affirmation and pregnancy, come and see for 

11 be invited co yourself, now we can care for 

cal classes where you and your baby 
11 about For details contacts- 

ant craft, exercises The Executive Director 

Humana HosttiiaL Wellington, 


London NW89LE. 
Telephone: 01-586 5959. 


^Humana Hospital Wellington 

FOR CARE IN A CLASS OF ITS OWN 










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16 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Rose growers 
association 

So sure are Labour's PR men that 
everything is coming up roses for 
them that they are about to start 
lecturing others on the art of 
image-massaging. Next month 
Labour's director of communica- 
tions. Peter Mandelson. and Ken 
Livingstone are to speak at a 
seminar at the British Academy of 
Film and Television Arts in 
Piccadilly. The union-sponsored 
presentation, on trade unions’ and 
campaigning oiganizatioos' use of 
video and TV, is organized by 
Smith Bundy Videos, one of a low- 
profile group of media pro- 
fessionals now advising Labour. 
Tickets are going for £172.50. 
Although no agency has yet been 
named to handle Labour's general 
election account, other members 
of the “shadow communications 
agency” - such as Boase Massimi 
Poilitt who handled the GLC 
account, and Yellowhammer. who 
work for Greenpeace — are being 
canvassed. 

Heal thyself 

The Legionnaires' disease bac- 
terium has breached the portals of 
its leading enemy. The organism 
was discovered last week in the 
hot water system of the London 
headquarters of the Department of 
Health and Social Security. “Dur- 
ing a routine check it was found 
that a thermostat in one of the four 
tanks had failed and the tem- 
perature had dropped, which en- 
couraged the bacteria,” admitted a 
spokesman. But he said: “There 
was never any danger." The 
temperature was immediately 
boosted and. as a “double 
precaution”, the water was chlori- 
nated over the weekend 

• One dish that the Queen was 
not offered in her mammoth meal j 
with the Chinese president was an 
exclusive Chinese caviar called 
Keloga- The pearl-grey eggs from 
the giant sturgeon caught in the 
Amnr river are for export only. ; 
And no exceptions. 

Differential 

For his 60th birthday party tomor- 
row night Lord Montagu of 
Beaulieu is Insisting that the 
thousand or so guests wear fancy 
dress. Gorilla suits and Superman 
tights are banned however, for the 
theme -Montagu being a motor 
fanatic — is “100 years of the 
motor car”. The invitations even 
look like driving licence applica- 
tions. Tory MP Robert Key has ! 
borrowed some overalls from his 
local garage and is going as a 
mechanic, with his Wife as fitter’s 
mate, “i expect lots of traffic 
wardens and beleisha beacons,” 
Montagu told me from - where 
else? - the Motor Show. 



Scaled down 


The American scifi series V, about 
a technologically advanced race of 
lizards from another planet who 
take control of the earth, has 
proved popular with South Af- 
rican television viewers. Five of 
its (8 episodes were screened at 

• the prime time 9 pm slot on 
Saturdays until, with little warn- 
ing. the state-controlled South 
African Broadcasting Corporation 
switched V to a latcvnight slot with 
the episodes running on consec- 
utive nights, as if to get it over 
with. There is speculation that the 
SABC was worried about the 
subversive influence of the series, 
in which the heroes are resistance 
fighters struggling against the 
tyrannical minority rule of an 
alien race. 

Ads-Lib 

In a display of party purity. 
Liberal Men's apparatchiks have 
launched a version of Yellow 
Pages. Liberal-minded businesses 
can advertise their services in the 
Mens with the aim of creating the 
political equivalent of The Good 
Food Guide. This, says a News 
spokesman, gets round that ter- 
rible worry of doing business with 
someone whose politics one does 
not know. 

• Matthew Parris, the new host of 
Weekend World, is beginning to 
understand the position he now 
holds in public life. Children at a 
Putney primary school have writ- 
ten asking him to forward their 
birthday card to Roald Dahl. 

Great Wen 

More from the inimitable Guide to 
Great Britain, the Chinese volume 
on life in this country, whose 
contents I first brought to your 
notice yesterday. The Guide has 
London as a city beset by pollu- 
tion problems. These are due. it 
says, to a combination of marsh 
mists sweeping in from the east 
and “the citizen's love of open 
smoke fires". .the combination of 
which means that he can seldom 
see a yard in from of him. PHS 


In the I9ih century the shape and 
size of cities was profoundly 
influenced by the railways. In our 
time cars and motorways are 
working further changes. But what 
will the 21 st-century city be like? 
What powerful new technologies 
or shills in values are over the 
horizon, promising to reform once 
again where and how we live? 

The answers to these questions 
are being actively sought by the 
Urban Affairs Group of the 
Organization for Economic Co- 
operation and 

DevelopmentPreliminary studies 
have .been made and will be 
reported to the Paris-based group 
today, when ministers from 20 
countries, including our own John 
.Patten, Minister for Housing and 
Urban Affairs, will meet 

For countries such as Britain, 
Japan and The ■ Netherlands, 
where people are thick on the 
ground and predominantly town- 
living, failure to recognize im- 
portant trends could be both 
uncomfortable and costly of scarce 
resources. Even in the United 
States, despite the vaslness of the 
plains, the people of the great wens 
stretching from Boston to Wash- 
ington in the east and from San 
Francisco to San Diego in the 
west face conditions comparable 
with those in Europe or Japan. 

Having identified dominant 
economic, social and technologi- 
cal changes, the Urban Affairs 
Group will ask what effects they 
are likely to have on buildings. 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


Shaping up 
to the city of 


the future 

by Terence Bendixson 


transport and land use — the 
“props” of urban life 

Changes in human values, such 
as the present shift to healthier 
eating and taking exercise, or the 
deregulation ushered in by Mrs 
Thatcher, are the hardest to 
forecast but according to John 
Zener, head of the OECD urban 
division, the forces that have been 
causing the populations of old 
cities to fall and that of towns up 
to 100 miksaway to expand are by 
no means exhausted. 

The replacement of satanic 
milk by small hi-tech factories 
(and even working from home by 
computer) are one factor in this 
shift. The new firms do not have 
to locate themselves within a bus 
ride of thousands of workers. 
Their managers can choose to 
settle in peaceful country towns, 
or even mansions set in parkland, 
and rely on at least some of their 


colleagues to drive perhaps 40 or 
50 miles to work. 

Growth in Cirencester, Cam- 
bridge or Kidderminster, and 
decline m London or Bir- 
mingham. tend to follow. Urban 
geographers describe this type of 
regrouping as "deconcentration”. 
Its results are not suburban sprawl 
of the kind that spread across 
Middlesex m the 1930s but the 
evolution of the city into a 
constellation of free-standing 
towns in open country. 

Zener points to the growing 
numbers of elderly people in 
Europe and Japan as another 
factor in shaping the dry of the 
future. He sees them creating 
pressure for cities that are greener, 
quieter and prettier. More parks, 
planting of trees in streets, mea- 
sures to reduce traffic dangers, 
sport and social dubs will all be in 
demand. 


No one disputes that the future 
of the city and the future of the car 
are intertwined The continued 
dominance of the personal capsule 
seems assured, though rush horns 
are likely to be subsumed by 
continuous heavy traffic, while the 
Japanese, who foresee worsening 
competition for parking space, are 
dreamingofa James Bond vehicle 
that at journey's end would shrink 
to the size of a suitcase at the flick 
of a switch. (Bicyde riders will say 
that this transport has already 
been invented.) 

The OECD sutdy is unlikely to * 
venture into such flights of fancy 
and is almost certain to put weight 
on the revival going on in urban 
railways and the prospects for 
bases ss they shrink and become 
more comfortable. 

The winding up of the metro- 
politan county councils in Britain 
and the push given by the Conser- 
vatives to deregulation in town 
planning has brought a great 
decline m tire effort going into 
long-term urban planning. Work 
of this kind is now largely con- 
fined to about four universities 
and the Transport and Road 
Research Laboratory. 

The OECD study should thus be 
of considerable interest to Britons, 
the most urban of all Western 
peoples. At the last count, seven 
out often of us lived in towns with 
50,000 or more inhabitants. 
Terence Bendixson is the author qf 
Instead of Cars (Penguin). 


George Gilder on the new impetus for a British hi-tech brain drain 


Silicon Valley’s tax allure 


The Reagan administration is 
about to sign a tax reform bringing 
the top rate to 28 per cent on 
individuals and small businesses 
and 34 per cent on corporations. 
Rather than increasing tax bene- 
fits for conventional capital 
formation, it removes the invest- 
ment tax credit. Major benefits gp 
to poor families. 6 million of 
which will be removed from tire 
tax rolls entirely. 

As a result, many Americans 
expect the US economy to become 
less competitive. Echoing the 
1970s message of Jean-Jacques 
Servan-Scbreiber's Le Deft 
Americain , they say the new 
technologies demand more gov- 
ernment guidance and aid rather 
than less. They point to similar 
European programmes of state 
aid; they rite the current slump in 
Silicon Valley and predict a steady 
decline in America's international 
hi-tech position. 

These prophecies drastically 
misread the prospects of the new 
information age- The pace of 
progress in computers is on the 
- verge of a vast acceleration. In the 
last few years, scores of firms in 
the US have introduced computer 
products that manipulate sym- 
bols, deal with uncertainty, use 
rules and inferences to solve 
practical problems, and simulate 
human intelligence. 

To understand the significance 
of this, imagine that you had to 
solve all your daily problems by 
mathematics, using a calculator or 
slide rule. Essentially, the com- 
puter industry has long been 
limited to similarly inflexible 
tools. Now computers can address 
the real world directly, using 
common sense or expert lore to 
solve problems. 

A second major breakthrough is 
the silicon compiler. Here, imag- 
ine that all the books in the world 
had to be written by printers. This 
has been the situation in the 
computer industry: to author a 
chip, you essentially had to own a 
semiconductor manufacturing 
plant. Today any computer-lit- 
erate person with a S50,Q00 
workstation can author a major 
new integrated circuit precisely 
adapted to his needs. 

The third key breakthrough is 
the widespread replacement of the 
long-cherished Von Neumann 
computer architecture with its 
separate memory and central 
processing unit by the parallel 
multiprocessor. To comprehend 
this change, imagine that all the 
operations of a giant firm like 
General Motors took place in one 
room. Workers queued up end- 


Fiye years ago 1 began writing that 
China was no longer a communist 
country. The repressive, puritani- 
cal. isolationist yet messianic 
People's Republic created by Mao 
Tse-tung was giving way to an- 
other a neo-Con furian, quasi- 
capitalist and semi-free market, 
but still authoritarian. 

My contention that the Chinese 
had virtually renounced Marxism 
was greeted with extreme scep- 
ticism. But it has happened. The 
Queen is now seeing enormous 
outward changes: the rising office 
blocks, the emerging stock mar- 
kets. the rapid privatization of 
large sections of both industry and 
agriculture. But the British 
businessmen hoping to capitalize 
on the royal lour will be deluding 
themselves if they hope for easy 
pickings - even in a nation so vast 
that, as the Earl of Amherst told 
Hong Kang merchants last cen- 
tury. “if every inhabitant should 
purchase one pair of stockings, it 
would keep the mills of Lan- 
cashire going forever.” 

The Chinese are very hand 
bargainers, determined to import 
as liule as possible and to make as 
much as possible at home, copying 
unashamedly when necessary. 

Sadly. China has been a vastly 
profitable market for Britain only 
once. The opium trade brought 
enormous returns — and led 
directly to the wars and revolu- 
tions on which Mao founded his 
perverse people's paradise. 

The shift away from Marxism 
does not mean that China's 1.000 
million people will soon, if ever, 
find themselves living under 
liberal democratic rule. Despite 
the present leadership's commit- 
ment to political reform - as it is 
reforming the economic structure 
- the natural Chinese inclination 



Retiring Old Gent (who had been evading the Income-tax for years, and been 
"brought to hook" at last. “WELL. I CAN JUST MANAGE XT THIS TIME; 
BUT LOOK HERE. YOU MUST INFORM HER MAJESTY THAT IN 
FUTURE 'PO' MY WORD, SHE REALLY MUSTN'T COUNT ON ME 
AS A SOURCE OF INCOME!" 


lessly carrying various compo- 
nents — from carburettors to 
hubcaps - and bearing detailed 
instructions on bow to assemble 
them. Most of the time the rest of 
the company would lie completely 
inert. Parallel processing allows a 
computer to operate like a real 
General Motors, with various 
operations occurring simulta- 
neously throughout the company. 

The chief effect of these 
converging technologies can be 
summed up in a hoary cliche: 
Knowledge is power. The things 
that no longer confer power — or 
radically less than before — in- 
clude control over natural re- 
sources. territory, military 
manpower, national taxes, trade 
surpluses and national currencies. 

The most important immediate 
effect, already evident, is a drastic 
dedine in the value of natural 
resources. A computer chip is 
made of sand, the most common 
substance on the face of the earth. 
While pots and pans are 80 per 
cent raw materials and auto- 
mobiles 40 per cent raw materials, 
an integrated circuit is less than 2 


percent raw materials. Within five 
years, a few pounds of fiber optic 
cable, also made essentially of 
sand, will carry as much informa- 
tion as a ton of copper. 

In the past, the domination of 
particular regions also imparted 
great political and economic 
power. Today not only are the 
natural resources under the 
ground rapidly dedining in value, 
but the companies and capital 
above the ground can rapidly 
leave. Capital markets are now 
global; funds can move around the 
world, rush down fiber optic 
cables and bounce off satellites, at 
near the speed of light. People — 
scientists and entrepreneurs — can 
leave at the speed of a 747, or even 
a Concorde. Companies can move 
in weeks. The balance of power in 
the world has shifted massively 
against the state and in favour of 
the individual 

So the new American challenge 
is the tax reform lowering the top 
federal rate to 28 percent on all in- 
dividuals and small businesses. 
Unless other countries lower their 
own rates, this reform will lure 


Robert Elegant looks beyond Deng’s reforms 
to the challenge to the nation's pride 


China: now for 
the real leap 


is towards authoritarianism. How- 
ever. authority is being dispersed, 
and is less intrusive, as it was in 
the days of the imperial dynasties 
which based their role on the 
moral teachings of Confucius. 
Then, it was said. “Heaven is high, 

and the Emperor is for away.” And 
so. increasingly, it- can be said 
today. 

Despite those caveats. China's 
transformation is the most im- 
portant event that has occurred in 
Asia — perhaps the wortd - in the 
latter pan of the 20ih century. 
Maoism rested upon two pillars of 
belief: that China could become a 
Marxist paradise through self- 
abnegating mass labour and could 
inspire and incite victorious anti- 
capitalist revolutions throughout 
the world- 

The first illusion shattered 
against intractable economic re- 
ality and against human nature, 
whose existence the Chinese lead- 
ers now acknowledge- The failure 
of North Vietnam to conquer the 
South through revolutionary guer- 
rilla action did for the second. 
When Mao preached worldwide 
people's revolution, he did not 
have in mind the conventional 
armoured invasion that finally 


destroyed the Saigon regime. 
Rejection of Maoism manifests 
itself in many, varied, forms.- 

• Foreign investment and foreign 
instruction are so ardently desired 
that earlier this month the 
authorities made “opening to the 
outside world” a cardinal tenet of 
their policies. 

• Apparently.minor, but a signifi- 
cant symbol of the break with the 
past is the recent order to halt the 
simplification of the traditional 
Chinese writing. That simplifica- 
tion. it is now acknowledged, led 
to errors and confusion. 

• Despite the Communist Party's 
continued primacy, the resolution 
that crowned the recent plenary 
session of the central committee 
again emphasized that the country 
must be ruled by law, not by the 
whims of its leaden. 

• Egalitarianism, meaning equal 
pay for unequal work, is now 
denounced as economically and 
morally counter-productive. In- 
stead, higher wages and bonuses 
are offered for superior perfor- 
mance. Agriculture — its basic unit 
again the old family village - and 
now much of industry operate on 
a “responsibility system” mean- 
ing that individual enterprises 


workers and capital entrepreneurs 
and engineers, scientists and tech- 
nicians from around the world to 
America. 

For the last 50 years, most of the 
world's more ambitious workers 
and entrepreneurs faced marginal 
tax rates well over 50 per cent. But 
we are now discovering that high 
tax rates do not redistribute 
income: they redistribute tax- 
payers: from taxable activities to 
umaxed leisure and work in the 
underground economy, from fac- 
tories and offices to foreign 
beaches and golf courses, from 
productive investments to hoards 
of gold and land and collectibles. 
Most of all high tax rates have 
redistributed entrepreneurs from 
around the world to the United 
States and other relatively open 
and low tax environments. 

All over the world, with the 
exception of some parts of capital- 
ist Asia, high tax rates are now in 
effect. Everywhere people have a 
greater incentive to hide income 
than to earn n_ The only new 
exception is the United States. In 
the US, when the new tax law goes 
into effect in 1988. leading work- 
ers and entrepreneurs will have 
double the incentive to work as to 
shirk; double the incentive to earn 
money as to avoid taxation. This 
is a radical and dramatic break- 
through and it will force a re- 
sponse from all the other countries 
in the world. 

The price of government is 
summed up in its tax rates. 
Governments compete for a share 
of the global tax base. They have 
to compete gainst non-taxabie 
forms of income, from leisure to 
barter. They have to compete for 
that elite of productive and in- 
ventive men and women who 
contribute most to the global 
economy and tax base. 

These key producers are dis- 
proportionately British, and Brit- 
ish accents ring out all over Silicon 
Valley today. But entrepreneurs 
from all high- tax countries are 
increasingly willing to shop 
around the world for the most 
favourable places to make their 
taxable contributions. With the 
747 and Apex feres they do not 
even have to leave their homes 
and families for long periods. 

Entrepreneurs, scientists and 
workers from around the globe are 
already coming to America in 
huge numbers. Immigrants are 
already absolutely critical to the 
success of American high technol- 
ogy. Investors from around the 



But you haven't seen anything yet. 


must look to their own losses and, 
above all their own profits. 

Behind these changes, there fin- 
all to see, lies the likelihood of the 
most sweeping intellectual change 
in the 2,000 years since China 
became a unitary empire. Deng 
Xiaoping, the paramount leader, 
. has not only cast aside most of the 
paraphernalia of the oppressive 
Marxist- Leninist state but is en- 
couraging the people to re-exam- 
ine their essential nature and 
China's place in the world. He 
wants the Chinese to see them- 
selves not as a uniquely superior 
civilization and race, as they have 
for centuries, but as one nation, 
however populous and great, 
among many other equal nations. 

The argument was recently 
stated by. Yan JiaqL director of 
China's offical think tank. He said 
that only when the people had 
shaken off Mao's view of the 
country as the world's cultural 
centre and powerhouse of revolu- 
tion would it truly progress. But 
when they did free their minds 
and energies from the bonds of 
chauvinistic arrogance, the pros- 
pect could be breathtaking. 

Japan, which was unhampered 
by such a rigid habit of mind, has 
built the world's most dynamic 
economy within 40 years. And 
China's natural and human re- 
sourcesdwarf Japan’s many limes. 

Excessive optimism is out of 
place because of China's enor- 
mous size, its complex hetero- 
geneity and. above all its poverty. 
Nonetheless. I wonder what it can 
accomplish when it concentrates 
its talents and its strength on 
attaining pragmatic goals. 

Robert Elegant's latest novel. 
White Sun. Red Star, urn 
published earlier this month hv 
Hamish Hamilton. 


David Watt 


1 

Don’t write off 
the Alliance 


At the end of the party conference 
season, the consensus of comment 
appears to proclaim something 
like this: Conservatives and La- 
bour had “good” conferences, the 
SDP a moderate one and the 
i i yrak a disaster; Kinnock has 
established himself as a credible 
leader but may well have lost the 
election on the defence issue; Mrs 

Thatcher's unpopularity is a draw- 
back to the Conservatives but 
Saatchi and Saaxchi can probably 
write her personality out of the 
election script as easily as they 
wrote it in: the Alliance has once 
again been “marginalized”, which 
helps the Tories: the economy 
looks healthy and Mrs Thatcher 
intends to call an election in 1987. 

Each of these propositions looks 
superficially plausible by iudfbui 
the total picture that emerges feels 
wrong. We are invited to believe 
what both Labour and Conser- 
vatives would like us to believe 
(and, to do them justice, probably 
believe themselves): namely that 
the election will effectively be a 
two-horse race again. Further- 
more, because the Tories had the 
last word, they have left behind 
the most enduring impression of 
confidence. The odds are therefore 
supposed to be slightly in favour 
of a Thatcher third term. 

I do not believe it is nearly as 
straightforward as that - and a 
closer look at the component pans 
of the jigsaw will reveal why. 

Lei us take the conferences 
themselves as our starting point 
Nobody need waste any time 
arguing that the Alliance is in very 
good shape after Eastbourne. It 
isn't Whatever may become of 
arms control after Reykjavik, the 
impression of shambolic disunity 
within the Alliance win endure. 
But if Eastbourne was calamitous, 
that does not necessarily make 
Blackpool and Bournemouth suc- 
cesses. It was salutary to be forced 
to watch Labour on television 
(because of its ban on The Times'^. 
the ban itself was a constant 
reminder of just how subservient 
to the unions Labour still remains, 
and detachment from foe artificial 
mood of the hall enabled one to 
appreciate how incredibly wooden 
and antediluvian the whole circus 
appears from the outside. 

There are no new ideas to speak 
of, no fresh revelation of the 
modern significance of socialism. 
In most respects the party is 
simply crawling its way painfully 
upwards from a pit of factional 
chaos to where it was in the 1960s; 
its preposterous anti-nuclear pol- 
icy which everyone, including Mrs 
Thatcher, regards as such a radical 
novelty, really goes back in spirit 
even further - to George 
Lansbury and the pacifist mor- 
al ism of the early 1930s. 

The Conservatives' "good" con- 
ference seemed equally arid on 
dose inspection. Unity, yes; the 
Tories are always good at that. But 
what is there to vote for? Apart 
from a few minor embellishments, 
the “Next Move Forward" turns 
out to be very much like the last: 
more privatization, still less infla- 
tion, possibly more trade union 
legislation. Yet it is the failure of 


this same prospectus that has left' * 
the government trailing in the 
opinion polls. 

The floating voter does not 
necessarily have jfoe same criteria 
of success as the Prime Minister/* 
the Chancellor and their col- 
leagues. Where they see a trittnt- . 
phant revolution, he secs* 
horrendous unemployment, 
ing pound and high interest rates; 
he gnashes his teeth over hospital ; 
waiting lists and rundown state ; 
schools and poor public services. \ 
When they reassure him that they ’ t 
are now trying toatfond fotheae as^ 
well be is inclined to say: “What " 
on eanh have you been doing 
these last seven yews, then?” 

This is where the Thatcher > 
factor comes in. for foe hones' 
answer to the question is; “Wc • 
have been busy giving the things^ 
you are concerned about a Iowa., 
priority than issues, such 
inflation and the control of public : 
expenditure, that we have re- 
garded as central, believing that if • 
we got those right everything d* 
would come right as wefi." Mrs * 
Thatcher is (he embodiment- of-: 
this reply and her “uncaring"* 
image reflects people's impatience' 
with iL I 

If she were removed, foe;- . 
admen’s plan for convincing us-' » 
that everything will now get better^ ? 
might have a chance. Thai is wfty.i . 
there was such an obvious attempt ' 
at Bournemouth to do the next/ 
best thing, namely tobring often ' 
forward into the limelight and td : - 
soften her image. But it is a? 
hopeless task. So long as she ki 
leader, Mrs Thatcher is foe/ 
Conservative Party: and while, 
that is the case the Conservative,, 
task of winning the election, is an", 
uphill one. ! 

If 1 am right about aB this, the 
impressions given by the two' 
major parties in the last month are ' 
flawed in a complementary fash-, j 
ion. Labour addresses the ques- 
tions that are worrying people foa, . 
offers jejune and implausible an- . 
swers to them; the Conservatives 
daim to have solved all the 
problems, except the ones most of 
us are actually interested in and. 
worried about. Of these two 
postures the Labour one looks 
marginally less offeutting, but not 
much. Hence my own belief that it 
is for too early to write off the*' 
Alliance parties. If they can.' 
achieve some spectacular act of * 
reconciliation on the nuclear front fc,. 
so much the better, but even., 
without it the logic that has/ 
brought the Alliance into being 
and kept it going in feiriy ua*j 
promising times still applies: the-' 
more violently the Labour and/ 
Conservative parties attack each \ 
other, the more unattractive to the { 
uncommitted voter they and their .» 
mutual obsession becomes. 

There may still be more time for . 
this process to work than it is 
fashionable to suppose. I do not- 
believe that Mrs Thatcher or Lord - 
Whitelaw. both cautious in such,, 
matters, will feel happy about an:' 
election unless they are well ahead . 
in the opinion polls, and it is by no~ 
means certain that this condition ; 
win be fulfilled in 1987. - ■ -* 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


Cycle clips from 
a royal progress 


The state visit of Sir Alastair 
Burnet to China entered its fifth 
day yesterday. He arrived in the 
ancient city of Chung Peng in time 
to take the salute at the customary 
rush hour ridepast of 150,000 
cyclists; later he inspected the 
crack cyclists of the Golden Blos- 
som Commuters, who can do 
speeds of up to 30mph to get to the 
office on time. 

Sir Alastair, looking resplendent 
in the ceremonial grey suit which 
is his uniform as Interviewer 
Royal, appeared visibly moved as 
officials told him of the historic 
Great Pedal across China. Thirty- 
five years ago. the small army of 
bicyclists had fought their way 
across the country to topple the 
corrupt regime of Chiang Kai- 
shek. Yesterday Sir Alastair laid a 
wreath at the Tomb of the 
Unknown Puncture, and easily 
fought back a tear as he was told 
that he was the first ITN com- 
mentator who had ever done so. 

One hundredjoumalists from 
the Moreover office have followed 
Sir Alastair on this historic jour- 
ney to a nation which believes that 
he is the heir to the British throne, 
a belief shared by many of the 
British public. It has been a 
triumphant journey. At every 
stop, vast crowds have turned out 
to see the man they have chris- 
tened Lord of the News, and to 
greet him with cries of: "Welcome, 
SI 1 S J r Where's Princess 
a then? See you again after the 
break. Radiant splendiferous, 
Ijmcely. as stately as a chrysan- 
themum - these are just some of 
the adjectives that have been 
showered on him by troops of 
schoolchildren dressed . up as 
characters from Coronation Street 
which, the Chinese believe, de- 
picts the Royal Family at home. 

Last night, at a state dinner in 
his honour. Sir Alastair provided a 
moment of light relief from proto- 
col As the clock struck the hour, 
he instinctively grasped the state 
microphone and ■ announced: 
Here is the news at ten. The 
Americans blame the summit 
raj lure on the Russians. A British 
fire engine is flown out to El 
Salvador. And the fox in Bristol 
who has learned to drive a bus. 
But first, exclusive pictures of me 
live from China.” 

A rustle of amusement spread 


through the 30.000 diners - all- 
had pedalled to the haU - as Sir; 
Alastair’s words were translated.-? 
They had already gasped to see’ 
him wield chopsticks with nesur^ 
accuracy. They had listened ia> 
awed silence to his views on-, 
architecture and the inner city, 
and they had fought back their,, 
laughter as he told several safe, 
anecdotes about Prince Charles, ■. 

But the visit has not been all^ 
junketing and fun. It is .about - 
doing business for Britain as wriL :* 
And after the dinner many lucky- 
diners queued to buy a signed, 
copy of Sir Alastair's new. boot I 
Later he held secret talks with/ 
officials at which he discussed bo« ;; 
his books might be put on safe' 
throughout China. The officials- 
are said to have smiled and looked ~ 
inscrutable.' 

Sir Alastair has also become the 
first Interviewer Royal ever to set 
foot on the Great Wall of China. - 
which is said, though erroneously; i 
to be the only man-made object on , 
earth visible from the moon. The "; 

Chinese, as usual have a proverb / 
on the subject; "Whatever foe.' 
troth of this, you can see the moon i 
from the Great Wall of China* and,.' 
from everywhere else in China * 
too. And the sun, come to that" J m ‘ 
Here Sir Alastair signed an-.htK-;. 
toric agreement tinder which &*-/- 
promises, when he returns » *' 
Britain, to interview Prince” 
Charles and Princess Diana in,? 
Chinese, and to find out how they 
justify having two children which.,? 
of course, is illegal in China. \ 

Soon the royal tour will draw to . 
a close and the Chinese wfll" 
reluctantly say ferewdl to the talk ; 
silver-haired figure whom they* 
have taken to their beans as half ; . 
man, half god and half comma* r 
nicator supreme. By Chinese hbb* 
dands Sir Alastair is immensely £ 
fell, and they have christened bun,:, 
The-man-for-whom-no- btcyrio- I 
saddle-goes-high-enough. TI* *. 
huge state bicyde specially created "* 
for his visit will be wheeled out for *} 
him to take the final ride across* •* 
the tarmac to his private planed . 
and then he'll be airbomt. ifLfot- 
three million spectators keep .off.*,, 
foe runway, en route back nr; 
Britain. But one thing is certain; v-; 
the Chinese have their way. the-;* 
nian they have christened Old ; 
vertop will be back. 


S? NSE AND SENSITIVITY 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


based bn the widespread abuse 
,u„ **_ ca ® ra,n Clown of the system hv MPe _ 


No refuge for addict on the loose 

From the Reverend Fronds Pole could offer me absolutely nod 


‘be Home Secretary ii 
tfr® Commons next unMt 

“&*j« hi ? decision to res 
stnct the nght of MPs to 

intervene on behalf of visitor 


of the system by MPs - some 
of whom have been pleading 
the cases of visitors whom they 
have never met and of whom 
they know practically nothing. 


But the country has been 
facing grave difficulties in 
stemming the tide of im- 
migrants. The abrupt rise in 
numbers when the visa 
requirement was announced 


.. refused entry to BritaS^m £?J 98 5 , f ?Li n ^ ance ’ ^ ***** tast monlh sug- 

Siis action reflects a in ! e f vene <i 1,000 times which gests that the status of 

public consensus. anrM 0 * 1 ”® enough. But ‘Visitor” has often been less 

Md ,n one by 1985 the figure had chmbed than nenuine The. ^ for 


rKpect at least it is overdue. 

- SP* right of ^ to inter- 
cole was based on the imper- 
. , /. ativesoftimeand place. By the- 
J*”J e a case had been brought 
. r before the immigration ao- 

V P^s ajiidicator, the person 

V ™scd entry would be some- 
where, else - on an aircraft 

J?* back to India or wherever. By 
. : contacting a sympathetic MP, 
he might at least ensure staying 
> ; ; here until his argument had 
been heard. 

•* That is no longer appropiate 
most cases. Since this 
week's introduction of a visa 
Jj requirement for visitors from 
v‘‘ Nigeria, Ghana and the Indian 
sub-continent (the sources of 
- mass immigration in recent 
years), the claims of those who 
; -• are seeking a home as well as a 
; holiday will be settled in their 
'// country of origin before they 
even set foot on the plane. Any 
■ “ v appeal will be lodged there too, 
and the opportunity for a 
, >/. British MPs intervention has 
been largely eliminated. An 
'o;‘ occasional would-be visitor 
j will undoubtedly turn up at 
fc?.: Heathrow without the nec- 
'• v 'g essary documents. But he or 
'fv she would clearly be in breach 
; - ' of regulations. 

.V- The argument that Mr 
•« '' Hurd's decision is overdue is 


by 1985 the figure had climbed 
to nearly 6,000 and last month 
alone, as would-be entrants 
scrambled to beat the visa 
deadline, MPs acted on behalf 
of an estimated 1,000 - a rate 
of around 12,000 a year. The 
private office of Mr David 
Waddington, the Home. Office 
minister responsible, is said to 
be larger than those of all the 
other departmental ministers 
combined, as officials have 
struggled through the paper- 
work. This represents a block- 
age in the system which cannot 
be justified. 

MPs will still be able to 
intercede on behalf of those 
would-be visitors from coun- 
tries where the visa system 
does not apply. In addition 
they retain the right to do so in 
respect of all visitors feeing 
deportation at the end of their 
permitted stay in Britain. Jus- 
tice, indeed, must be seen to be 
done. Those who have a 
genuine grievance should (and 
will) have their right of appeal 
At present there are no plans to 
augment the immigration ap- 
peals machinery if only be- 
cause it is thought unlikely 
that the number of appeals will 
grow significantly. This judge- 
ment could turn out to be 
wrong, in which case White- 
hall would certainly need to 
respond. 


than genuine. The need for 
Government action is un- 
questionable if only in the 
interests of those with a genu- 
ine right to settle in this 
country and those who have 
already settled here. 

It follows that the charge of 
racism by Mr Rajiv Gandhi 
(who demands visas himself 
for visitors to India) can be 
promptly dismissed. Visas are 
not required for most African 
countries or for visitors from 
the West Indies. They have 
been imposed for visitors from 
the Indian subcontinent be- 
cause experience suggests that 
it is from among them that 
most illegal immigrants are 
drawn. For Mr Gandhi to 
draw parallels with South Af- 
rica is outrageous. 

It follows too that Mr Ger- 
ald Kaufman, the Shadow . 
Home Secretary, is extremely 
ill-advised in promising that a 
future Labour Government 
would repeal the visa legisla- 
tion. There is a danger that 
people wil] remember what he 
said. So far the present Gov- 
ernment has reacted respon- 
sibly and humanely to 
problems of great sensitivity 
which are likely to get worse 
before they get better. Those 
who try to put the boot in now 1 
will earn — and deserve — the i 
thanks of no-one. 


RIPPLES FROM REYKJAVIK 


ip 


. > Kip.c'un 

s from 

osires 


When US and Soviet arms 
/ negotiators met in Geneva for 
f their first session since the 
\ v deadlocked Reykjavik sum- 
:: mit, the mood was less sombre 
\: than might have been' ex- 
: peeled, llie failure in Iceland, 

- far from stalling further East- 

~ West discussion on arms con- 
~ trol. seemed, temporarily at 
"i* Ifeast to have given it new 
“■ impetus. • ‘ * 

■ ^ Both President Reagan and 
Vj Mr Gorbachov deserve some 
credit for this. They each set 
i. out their position dearly and 

- in detail when they returned 

• : home; they analysed the feflr 
“ ure without undue acrimony; 

and while each predictably 
blamed the other for the 

— eventual breakdown, they in- 

— sisted that the door to further 
talks was not closed. 

That the Soviet side, in 
particular, has chosen to stress 
its receptiveness to further 
fl discussion — and dispatched 
[1 its chief arms negotiator, 
Viktor Karpov, to West Euro- 
, * pean capitals to demonstrate it 
V — is a signal departure from 
L previous Soviet practice. 
When the first US cruise and 
Pershing missiles arrived in 
Britain and West Germany in 
November 1983, the Soviet 
side walked out of the Geneva 
talks on intermediate-range 
nuclear forces in Europe. 

There followed a period in 
which public communication 

• between the superpowers was 
suspended. In the spring of 
1985, under its new leader, the 
Soviet Union returned to a 
revamped set of Geneva talks 
in which the question of 

? intermediate-range nuclear 
missiles in Europe was one of 
three areas of negotiation: the 
others being strategic nuclear 
missiles and weapons in space 


(the forum for discussing 
President Reagan's Strategic 
Defence Initiative.) 

By their action the Soviet 
side conceded that the suspen- 
sion of dialogue had not served 
their interests. Moscow’s con- 
duct after Reykjavik shows 
that this was a lesson the 
Soviet Union took to heart: no 
agreement no longer means no 
dialogue. ■ ■“ 1 

Precisely what rt does mean, . 
however, is open to question. 
In London on Tuesday, and in 
Bonn the following day, Mr 
Karpov implied that the pro- 
visional agreement readied at 
Reykjavik on the eventual 
elimination of intermediate- 
range nuclear missiles from 
Europe was still on the table. 
He implied further that the 
agreement was not dependent 
on US agreement to postpone 
or cancel its strategic defence 
programme. In other words, 
the sort of agreement that was 
rejected by die Soviet side at 
Geneva three years ago was 
now a real possibility. If that is 
so, it is a perhaps a minor 
success to be retrieved from 
the failure at Reykjavik. 

But is the Soviet Union 
really prepared to negotiate the 
elimination of all intermedi- 
ate-range missiles in Europe 
without obtaining a US under- 
taking on the Strategic Defence 
Initiative in return? When 
they have tackled the specifics, 
both the Soviet leader and Mr 
Karpov have appeared non- 
committal and made gnomic 
statements about linking the 
three areas of arms talks at 
Geneva but not ruling out an 
agreement on mi sales in 
Europe. 

This • leaves open the 
possibility that apparent 
Soviet interest in a European 


agreement is just a consolation 
prize for disappointed West 
Europeans, intended to exploit 
yet again President Reagan’s 
warmongering image and 
widen the perceived gap be- 
tween European and American 
opinion. It might, on the other 
hand, be the genuine Soviet 
fell back position post-Reyk- 
javik. If so, the nature of the 
East-West bargaining has 
changed and West European 
governments face a new di- 
lemma. 

The cruise and Pershing 
missiles sited in Western 
Europe have both strategic and 
political value. They are at 
once a deterrent to Soviet 
aggression and a guarantee of 
alliance unity and US protec- 
tion for Western Europe in the 
future. Their complete with- 
drawal — across the Atlantic — 
could prove more difficult to 
reverse in an emergency than 
the withdrawal of the equiva- 
lent Soviet missiles beyond the 
Ural mountains. 

Despite early protests, the 
West Europeans and then- 
governments have ,now be- 
come • accustomed to tfre 
protection afforded by cruise 
and Pershing with the result 
that the “‘zero option” pro- 
posed by the United States 
before their deployment is no 
longer as attractive as it was. 
The numbers of intermediate- 
range missiles in Europe might 
be reduced, on a strictly venfi- , 
able and reciprocal basis, but 
their total elimination could 
prove just as contentious an 
issue in Western Europe as the 
initial deployments were two 
years ago. From now on, the 
Geneva talks will assume 
particular interest for the West 
Europeans until the Soviet 
position is clarified. 


HELPING THE MAHDI 


The intention of Sadeq El 
Mahdi, the Sudanese Prime 
Minister, to reopen negotia- 
tions over the civil war in the 
South is welcome news for 
both the Sudanese and the 
WesL The three-year civil war 
is.' simultaneously draining 
Africa’s biggest country of 
funds, causing widespread 
famine and threatening the 
survival of the moderately 
pro-Western government. 

If the leaders of the rebel 
Sudan People’s Liberation 
Army can be brought to the 
negotiating table, will the re- 
sult be more fruitful than the 
last : round in Addis Ababa? 
There is much talk in the 
Sudanese government about 
devising a new “multiple tier” 
legal system, which would 
distinquish between Muslims 
and Christians and remove a 
major obstacle to an accom- 
modation with the nominally 
Christian rebels. By the Prime 
Minister's own account, a 
settlement had been almost 
achieved Iasi August before 
the rebels shot down a civilian 
airliner. Tempers in Khaij 
loum have now cooled enough 
for negotiations again to be 
possible. 


It must be assumed that the 
Prime Minister’s pre-con- 
dition, stated during his 
London visit this week, that 
the SPLA leaders must aban- 
don guerrilla activity before 
talks begin, is intended mainly 
to placate those in Khartoum 
who favour a hard line. Sadeq 
El Mahdi himself desperately 
needs a negotiated settlement 
He cannot win the current war 
of attrition, in which the rebels 
hold the countryside and . the 
army keeps garrisons in the 
main towns. Nor can he afford 
the expense of continuing a 
war which is estimated to cost 
Si million a day -exactly 
equal to Sudan’s export rev- 
enue. 

If he cannot end the war, his 
regime is likely to go the way of 
the last attempt at democracy 
in Sudan, during the 1960s, 
which ended when Ja’afir 
Numeiry installed a dictator- 
ship. This is particularly so 
because, on coming to power 
in May, the government 
pledged itself to solving the 
Southern problem before seri- 
ously turning to the country’s 
other problems, in particular 
to its economic plight 

Nevertheless, if the West 


. wishes to support Sadeq El 
Mahdi — and, in the absence of 
any obvious pro-Western 
successor, it makes sense to do 
so — it is in the economic 
sphere that assistance must 
come. There is little that the 
West can do to persuade 
Ethiopia to stop funding the 
rebels, or to sort out Sudan’s 
■ internal, differences. But the 
Sudanese debt is of direct 
concern to the West. 

Sudan has. in qualitative 
terms, one of the worst debt 
problems in the world- Multi- 
lateral and bilateral creditors 
are reluctant to make a special 
case for Sudan, for fear of 
setting a precedent which the 
big South American debtors 
would be quick to exploit Yet 
some sort of special accom- 
modation for the £12 billion 
debt would give breathing 
space to the regime. 

Sudan is strategically im- 
portant. and the allegiance ofa 
. future regime, should the cur- 
rent government collapse, is 
uncertain. .While Sadeq El 
• Mahdi’s government retains 
some measure of authority, it 
would be in the interest of the 
West to lend him a sympa- 
thetic ear. 


Sir, I wish I could believe Govera- 
i ment Ministers when they say that 

, the nation's health is sale in their 
hands. 

" Last Sunday afternoon a 26- 
year-oid parishioner, not a church- 
goer but someone I knew slightly, 
a heroin addict, came to the door. 
He had been kicked out of his 
home by his father because ofhis 
addiction, and after some soul- 
searching realised feat be needed 
help to get off drugs. 

His request; that I take him to 
’ the local psychiatric hospital, 

■ where he had previously been a 
• patient, to ensure that they took 
him in; he fell he might be turned 
away if he went by hunsdf and he 
did not warn to risk losing ont 
when he was motivated to help 
himself. 

After carefully questioning him 
I agreed to take him to the local 
general hospital which has a direct 
fink wife fee psychiatric hospital, 
so that he could be medically 
assessed. He was seen at out- 
patients, and the duty doctor 
made the referral to the psyclu- 
auric hospital. 

But despite the doctor’s view 
that now was the “psychological” 
moment when the man might 
respond to treatment, his request 
was turned down. A second doctor 
who, like the first, felt that the 
- man should be admitted was 
angry bat not surprised at the 
hospital's refesaL 
I asked for advice as to where I 
coukl take the young man. They 

Schools guide 

From Mr T. Y. Benyon 
Sir, Would that Dr Tomlinson 
(October 1 1 ) was right — “remarks 
offensive and inaccurate . . . class 

and snobbery midgading as 

indicators of independent school 
attitudes in the 1980s.” However, 
my children attend both private 
ami Stale schools and fee dif- 
ference in the attitudes of fee 
children, parents and teachers in 
each system indicates that 
Amanda Afea and Sarah Drum- 
mond are absolutely correct 
Our class system may have 
become more mobile, but that 
does not alter fee feet that it is 
charging on unchecked in the 
independent schools, who largely 
reflect fee prejudices, and dass 
bias, and the demands of the 
parents who pay the bills; it would, 
surely, be extraordinary if feat 
were not the case. 

Now to colour: one excellent 
head, who figured in your top 
schools list has told me that too 
many coloured children in the 
school would worry' the other 
parents and lead to a drop in his 
waiting lists. I have no reason to 
suppose that comment is not 
representative of attitudes gen- 
erally. 

Pm ca change, etc. 

Yours faithfully, 

TOM BENYON, 

The Old Rectory, 

Adstock, 

Nr Winslow, Buckinghamshire. 
October 12. 

From the Right Reverend M. Green 
Sir, In your first extract (October 
6) from “The Good Schools 
Guide” the point was made that 
“even fee best schools lacked any 
spiritual dement, for fee most 
part”. Religious instruction, yes. 
But the compilers assert that few 
schools are capable o£ or even 
interested in, giving any genuine 
spiritual guidance. 

X noticed, however, that the 

A rash of visitors 

From the Director qf the United 
Kingdom Immigrants Advisory 
Service 

Sir, On page 24 of today’s Times 
(October IS) you have a large 
photograph of a group of mainly 
middle-aged Asian men and 
women who, fee caption tells us, 
are “immigrants at Heathrow’s 
crowded .terminal 3 yesterday” 
Most of them were more likely to 
have been visitors. 

Below, your reporter tells us 
feat Mr COle (fee immigration 
officers' union leader) “pointed to 
fee .. .cubicles where would-be 
immig rants . . A little later your 
reporter refers to 
“Unprecedented numbers of 
would-be visitors . . 

It is sad to see The Times using 
the words “immigrant” and 
“viator" apparently interchange- 
ably, thereby contributing to the 

Mechanical aid 

From Mr Alfred Black 
Sir, Some time ago I 
lost/mislaid/destroyed my Ameri- 
can Express card. I immediately 
reported this to them with a 
request for a new card. They 
assured me by telephone that this 
would be dealt wife. , 

Some weeks passed ... no card. 

I wrote again , and again. Still 
nothing happened. So I penned a 
letter to their computer. 

Dear Computer, Coukl you possibly 
communicate with the lesser mortals 
who work (?) with you and ask them 
to send me a new card as las been 
promised as 1 may get more sense 
(and an answer) out of you! ... 

Result, a new card by return of ; 

post! 

Yours sincerely, 1 

ALFRED BLACK, ! 

14 Warwick Drive. 

Upper Richmond Road, SW15. \ 

October 10. 

i 

Listing procedure \ 

From Dr G. P. Blade j 

Sir, Now feat fee Government i 

have accepted fee need to re- i 

consider fee listing procedures for I 

historic buildings (Parliamentary 1 

Report. October 14) and have 1 

been pressed to introduce a legal ( 


could offer me absolutely nothing 
anywhere nearby. The National 
Health Service, they told me, had 
no special unit available for such 
self-referraL Knowing feat we 
have no appropriate hostel accom- 
modation available in Croydon, I 
had no alternative but to put fee 
young man on fee bus to London 
in fee hopes feat he would go to a 
DHSS hostel where he once stayed 
some time ago, and feat he would 
seek help fee following day. 

Sir, this Government tells us 
that we are safe in its care. I 
question this claim. We are told, 
too, feat it is vigorous in its fight 

a gaiiHS drugs and drug aHHirfinn 

As regards searching for drugs and 
rooting-out “drug pushers”, this 
daim may be able to be substan- 
tiated, although fee shortage of 

customs and police officers would 
seem to discredit this. 

But unless and until proper 
detoxification units are matte 
available to men and women in all 
parts of the country, so as to assist 
them to “kick fee habit” on a 24- 
hour basis — sadly, motivation 
does not work to a timetable! — I 
shall have my doubts about this 
claim too. 

The Government Ministers 
made their case verbally at 
Bournemouth. But at the end of 
the day it win be actions which 
will speak louder than words. 
Yours faithfully, 

FRANCIS POLE, 

St Stephen's Vicarage, 

Warwick Road, 

Thornton Heath, Surrey. 

“top twenty” lists had no mention 
of the Woodard Schools as such: a 
group of some 25 independent 
schools, spread out between 
Tyneside and Penzance, which are 
pledged by their foundation to 
attempt this very thing. 

I have no intention of entering 
into a “holier-than-thou” contest, 
or of timing feat schools of fee 
Woodard Corporation turn out 
boys and girls who are more 
“religious” than others. But feat 
they attempt this spiritual min- 
istry, and offer it to all who want 
it, is beyond doubt. 

Yours sincerely, 

tMARK GREEN (Provost, 
Woodard Schools Southern 
Division), 

13 Archery Court, 

St Leonards-on-Sea, 

East Sussex. 

October 13. 

From Mr P. C. Thompson 
Sir, Mr Paul Farmer’s spirited 
defence of the pupils of fee Dick 
Sheppard School at Tulse Hill 
(letter, October 9) is agratifying 
apologia for their standards and 
bis, but I feel I must take issue 
wife him on a single point He 
writes, “And all this is achieved in 
spite of their lade of privilege (65 
per cent are on free meals)”. 

This seems a wilfully perverted 
use of fee word “privilege”. One 
hundred per cent of Mr Fanner’s 
pupils are privileged to enjoy a 
total remission of school fees, 
while 65 per cent of them are 
doubly privileged in enjoying 
remission of the price of then- 
meals. It is the 35 percent who pay 
for their meals who endure a “lack 
of privilege”. 

It would be helpful if those who 
wrote on educational matters were 
to use words in their ordinary 

sens es. 

Yours faithfully, 

P. C THOMPSON. 

16 Edgar Street, 

Worcester. 

October 9. 


wholly misleading impression that 
Britain was in some way being 
“swamped” by immigrants trying 
to beat fee deadline for visas. 

For many years now would-be 
immigrants have required prior 
entry clearance in their country of 
origin before they can come to the 
UK. The new visa requirement 
applies to people coming from the 
five countries in question as 
visitors. 

h is a great pity that the Home 
Office and the Immigration Ser- 
vice did not do more in recent 
days to make h dear to the Press 
and public that visitors are not 
immigrants, amply because they 
may be black or Asian. 

Yonrs faithfully, 

MICHAEL BARNES, 

Director, UKJAS, 

POBox 132, 

7 th Floor, Bremen ham House, 
Savoy Street, Strand, WC2. 


right to a fair hearing on appeal 
should they not broaden their 
review to include all other types of 
preserved site (e.g^ sites of spatial 
scientific interest), where' the ab- 
sence of any legal right to an 
impartial hearing on appeal is just 
as much a denial of natural 
justice? 

Youts faithfully, 

GEORGE P. BLACK, 

George Black Associates, 
Conservation analysis and asses- 
sors, 

107 Andover Road, 

Newbury, Berkshire. 

Dealing with peijnry 

From Mr Ernie Money 
Sir, The problem of dealing with 
fee perjured police witness, 
considered in your account of Mr 
Tom. Sargam and Mr Peter Hill's 
Fabian pamphlet (report, October 
13), has been found a solution 
under various continental crim- 
inal systems, where a police officer 
convicted of perjury is liable to 
serve up to the maximum sen- 
tence for the offence in relation to 
which his peijurywas committed. 

I am. Sir, your obedient servant, 

ERNLE MONEY, 

1 Gray's lun Square, 

Gray’s Inn, WCl. 


Cost of EEC to 
UK taxpayer 

From Lord Bruce of Donington 
and Lord Stoddan of Swindon 
Sir. Mr Jopling. in his speech to 
the Tory Party Conference, as 
reported in The Times on October 
10. told delegates that “the cost of 
EEC support nationally was a 
mere lOp a head per day”. 

Put in these terms the cost of fee 
EEC to the British taxpayer is 
made to appear nominal and 
trifling. However, lOp a day is 70p 
a week or £36.40 a year. Thus, for 
a family of four, fee cost on the 
Jopling basis is no less than £180 
a week or £145.60 per annum — 
hardly a trifling amount, particu- 
larly for those on average or below 
average incomes. 

If we go further and translate 
lOp a bead per day into the total 
contribution in money terras that 
Britain pays to the EEC annually, 
we find feat fee enormous total of 
£2,038 million results — equiva- 
lent to 2p off income tax or over 
£2 billion for measures to reduce 
mass unemployment much of 
which has, in any event, resulted 
from Britain's manufacturing defi- 
cit wife fee EEC which is now 
running at some £9 billion a year. 
Yours faithfully. 

BRUCE of DONINGTON, 
STODDART of SWINDON, 
House of Lords. 

October 10. 

Cruelty to animals 

From the Executive Director of the 
Royal Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals 
Sir, Lord Houghton of Sowerby 
(October 2) assumes that fee 
RSPCA is seeking powers of direct 
entry for its inspectors. He also 
suggests that the police should 
enforce the law more vigorously 
and have the powers to do so. 

The law in this case is the 
Protection of Animals Act 191 1. It 
is a valuable Act, but one which 
does not, unfortunately, provide 
power for magistrates to grant 
search warrants to enable the 
police to effect entry. Therefore, 
even wife excellent co-operation 
between the police and RSPCA 
inspectors, animals may often 
suffer because the law is inad- 
equate. 

The second Animal Squad pro- 
gramme (on BBC 1) highlighted 
fee deficiency of the present law. 
There was strong evidence of 
severe suffering by a dog kept in 
private premises but no means by 
which the police could gain access 
to the dog without fee owner’s 
consent 

The RSPCA believes that seo- 
tion 12 of fee 1911 Act should be 
updated as quickly as possible to 
include power for a magistrate to 
grant the police a search warrant 
to enable entry to be effected by 
the police when fee magistrate is 
satisfied there are proper grounds 
for the issue of a warrant. This 
would only bring fee 191 1 Act into 
line with fee Wildlife and 
Countryside Act and Agriculture 
(Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 
1968, which already contain such 
a power. 

I am. Sir. yours faithfully, 

F. DIXON WARD, 

Executive Director, 

Royal Society for the Prevention 
of Cruelty to Animals, 

Causeway, 

Horsham, West Sussex. 

October 9. 

Incident in Verona 

From Mr Peter Wood 
Sir, Mr McCall’s account (October 
6) of the theft of his wife's handbag 
outside fee cathedral in Verona 
induces him to call in question his 
30-year-old “love of Italy" and 
underline fee contradiction be- 
tween the theft and “the glorious 
cultural image of that city”. 

Reading tus letter, one's mind is 
cast bade to Cellini in Florence 
and Rome, always in danger, wife 
friends watching his back and 
murderers lurking in the shadows 
and mugging as much a feature of 
daily life as it was in Johnson's 
London. What sort of glorious 
cultural image of medieval and 
renaissance Verona is it that 
excludes such raw experience of 
fife? 

One feels sorry that the McCalls 
were robbed and sorry they were j 
upset, but to speak of deep 
spiritual wounds, betrayal, suffer- 
ing and debasement suggests that 
the culture of. Italy which many 
English middle-class visitors have 
beat earnestly pursuing down the 
years is a piece of mere veneer. 

Yours faithfully, 

PETER WOOD, 

Newbofd Farm, 

Duntisbourne Abbots, 

Cirencester, Gloucester. i 

October 7. 


ON THIS DAY 


OCTOBER 17 1834 

The Times teas danger of 

exaggerating the ih-effectsof the 
destruction by fire of the Howies of 

Parliament There should be 
grateful rejoicing, it noted, at the 
sparing of Westminster Abbey and 
the Great Hid, but as to the rest, 
“Tiro Houses of Parliament much 
less adapted to their purpose could 
hardly be imagined \ The 
Commons made temporary use 
ofthe Court of Requests in the old 
White Hall, while the Peers used 
the partially damaged Painted 
Chamber 


DESTRUCTION OF BOTH 
HOUSES OF 
PARLIAMENT BY FIRE. 

Shortly before 7 o’clock last 
night the inhabitants of Westmin- 
ster, and of the districts on the 
opposite bank of the river, were 
thrown into the utmost confusion 
«nH alarm by the breaking 
out of one of the most terrific 
conflagrations that has been wit- 
nessed for many yean past. Those 
in the immediate vicinity of the 
scene of this calamity mere quickly 
convinced of the truth of the ary. 
feat fee House of Lords and 
Commons and the adjacent build- 
ings were on fire; the ill news 
spread rapidly through the town, 
and fee flames increasing, and 
mounting higher and higher wife 
fearful rapidity, attracted the at- 
tention not only of fee passengers 
in fee streets, but if we may judge 
from the thousands of persons who 
in a few minutes were seen 
hurrying to Westminster, of the 
vast majority of the inhabitants of 
fee metropolis. We scarcely ever 
recollect to have seen the large 
thoroughfares of the town so 
thronged before. 

Within less than half an hour 
after the fire broke out, it became 
impossible to approach nearer to 
fee scene of the disaster than the 
foot of Westminster- bridge on the 
Surrey side of fee river, or the end 
of Parliament.- street on the other, 
except tv means of ■ boat, or with 
fee assistance of a guide, who, trail 
acquainted wife the localities, was 
enabled to avoid the crowd and 
reach Abingdon -street by the 
streets at fee back of the Abbey. 
This locality, however, was in a 
very short space of time as densely 
thronged with spectators as any 
other. There was, however, nothing 
surprising in the multitude that 
flocked to the spot — in the 
crowded boats that floated on the 
river immediately in the front of 
the blazing pile — or in the 
countless numbers that swarmed 
upon the bridges, the wharfs, and 
even upon the housetops; for the 
spectacle was one of surpassing 
though terrific splendour, and the 
stately appearance of the Abbey, 
whose architectural beauties were 
never seen to greater advantage 
than when lighted by the flames of 
this unfortunate fire, would of 
themselves have attracted as many 
thousands to the spot ... It was 
currently reported through the 
town that Westminster-haU, and 
even the Abbey itself, were in 

flames. 

How and where the fire originat- 
ed are stiD matters of doubt The 
general belief, however, appears to 
be that it broke out in some part of 
the buildings attached to the 
House of Lords, from whence it 
spread to the House itself with 
such vast celerity, that before 8 
o'clock the whole range of struc- 
ture, from the portico by which the 
Peers enter, to the corner where it 
communicates with the commit- 
tee-rooms of the House of Com- 
mons, was in flames. 

As rapidly did the devouring 
elements extend its ravages to the 
ancient chapel of St Stephen’s, 
where the work of destruction was 
sooner over than in the other 
House of Parliament. The greater 
quantity of timber which the fabric 
of the House of Commons con- 
tained will readily account for this; 
and it is further to be observed, 
that from the situation of the 
building, and the unlucky circum- 
stance of fe* tide being unusually 
low, a very scanty supply of water, 
and the application of only one or 
two. engines, not very advanta- 
geously placed, were all that the 
most strenuous and the most 
zealous exertions could bring to 
bear in the vain attempt to save 
that interesting edifice from abso- 
lute destruction. 

The conflagration, viewed from 
the river, was peculiarly grand and 
impressive. On the first view of it 
from the water, it appeared as if 
j nothing could save Westnunster- 
haD from the fury of the flames. 
There was an immense pillar of 
bright dear fire springing up 
behind it, and a cloud of white, yet 
dazzl i ng smoke careering above it, 
through which, as it parted by the 
wind, you could occasionally per- 
ceive the lantern and pmacles. by 
which the building is ornament- 
ed .. . 


Pension complaint 

From Mr R- Cooper 
Sir, I am currently in protracted 
negotiations wife a former em- 
ployer over fee transfer of my 
portion of the firm's pension fund 

It seems to me feat there is 
clearly a serious potential conflict 
of interests when, as I believe is 
often the case, fee company 
finance director is also a pension 
fund trustee. 

Should not this conflict be 
prevented by legislation to ensure 
that executives with responsibil- 
ities for fee financial performance 
of a company may not also act as a 
trustee of feat company’s pension 
fund? There would then be no 
reason to suspect that the trustees 
may act in a way other than in fee 
best interests of the beneficiaries 
of the fund 
Yours faithfully 
R. COOPER, 

Durham Lodge, 

167 Goulsdon Road 
Old Coulsdon, Surrey. 

October 9- 


Ont of sight 

From Mr Michael Reilly 
Sir, 1 had a surgical friend who 
used to wear ms name badge 
(letters. October 4,9) in fee middle 
ofhis back. He said that it made it 
easier for acquaintances at con- 
ferences who had forgotten his 
name to take their lime peering at 
it from behind and then to greet 
him warmly and correctly from in 
front. 

Yours presbyopicaRy, 

MICHAEL REiLLY, 

Magnolia Cottage, 

Harrowbeer Lane, 

Yelverton, Devon. 

From Mr Gordon Burrows 
Sir. There are moments when it is 
irrelevant whether one wears a ■ 
name label on the right or left lapel 
'or on fee back (letter. October 14). 

1 once had the humiliating experi- 
ence of being accosted by a 
delegate ai a conference wife fee- 
words: “I know your name; but I 
can’t remember your face” 

Yours faithfully. 

GORDON BURROWS, 

Lanka. 

17 Marcum Road 

Famham, Surrey. 




TOE TIMES FRIDAY 


"OBER 17 V 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


Forthcoming marriages 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


Her Majesty's Lond-Uemenaoi 
for Bedfordshire {Ueutenant- 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
October 16: The Princess Anne. 
-Mrs Mark Phillips visited Ban- 
bury this rooming. 

Having been received by Her 
Majesty’s Lord- Lieutenant for 
Oxfordshire (Sir Ashley 
Pbnsonby. Bt) Her Royal High- 
ness visited the workshops of 
Banbury Young Industries. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips then drove to Lesme 
Limited. Manufacturers of 
Chocolates, and afterwards vis- 
ited Midland Marts Stockyard. 

Her Royal Highness later 
opened the Frank Wise School 
and was subsequently enter- 


for Bedfordshire (Lkwienant- 
Colonel Hanmer HanburyX 
Mrs Malcolm Wallace was in 
attendance. 


Westfield College; University of 
London. Kidderpore Avenue. 
London NW3. 


KENSINGTON PALAC1* 
October 16: Princess Alice. 
Duchess of Gloucester this after- 
noon opened the College Street 


complex of the Baptist Church 
in Northampton and later 


lained to luncheon fay members 
of Cherwdl District CoundL 


of Cherwdl District CoundL 
The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips this afternoon opened 

the new Sports Centre at 
Bloxham School. 

Mrs Andrew Feiklen was in 

attendance. 

Her Royal Highness. Patron 
of The Home Harm Trust, this 


evening attended a reception at 
Luton Hoo to launch an appeal 


Luton Hoo to launch an appeal 
for a new home for mentally 
handicapped adults. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips, having travelled in an 
aircraft of The Queen’s Flight, 
was received upon arrival by 


m Northampton and later 
opened the Frontier Lodge at 
the Harry Wbinaker Centre in 
Inhlitigborotigh to mark the 
Silver Jubilee of the North- 
amptonshire Association of 
Youth Clubs. 

Dame Jean Maxwell-Scon 
was in attendance. 

The Duke of Gloucester, as 
President, was present today at 
the British Consultants Bureau 
21st Anniversary Conference, 
“World Development” at The 
Hihon Hold. London, WI. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was m attendance. 

In the evening His Royal 
Highness, accompanied by The 
Duchess of Gloucester, was 
present at a banquet to mark the 
21st anniversary of the British 
Consultants Bureau at 
Guildhall. London, EC2. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland and Mrs Euan 
McCorquodale were in 
attendance. 

The Duchess of Gloucester, as 
Patron, this afternoon visited 


YORK HOUSE 

ST JAMES’S PALACE 
October 16; The Duchess of 
Kent. Patroness, this evening 
attended the Yorkshire County 
Cricket Club Dinner at the Old 
Swan Hotel, Harrogate. 
Yorkshire. 

Her Royal Highness, who 
unveiled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Mrs David Napier. 


Mr MA. Barren! 
and Miss CLP. Brimfle 
The engagement is announced 
between Alex, elder son of the 
late Dr V.M. BorreUi and Mrs 
J.R.B, BorreUi. of Chisddon. 
Wiltshire, and Grace, younger 
daughter of Mr J.A. BrnidJe and 
die late Mrs M. BnndJe and 
stepdaughter of Mrs K. Brindle, 
of Toronto, Canada. 


Mr UN. Farmer 
and Miss MX- Hu t c hin g s 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard Njgri. fourth 
son of the late Major JA. 
Farmar and Mrs D.M. Farmar, 
of Henley-on-Thames, and 
Madeline Kate, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs VJ. Hatchings, of 
Harpsden Close. Henley-on- 
Thames. Oxfordshire. 


Mr A.W. KenoeUy 

and Miss N J- Blandy 

The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, youngest son 
of Mr and Mrs P. KenneBy. of i 
Bow. and Nicola, third daughter j 
of Professor and Mrs J.P - 1 
Blandy. of Loughion, Essex. 


OBITUARY 

MR R. V. TOOLEY 

Creator of appetite for old maps 


,> '!>■ 

,nP 1 - 


Mr N. St C. Cameron . 
and Miss PJCJH. Moorhonse Mr D. I 

The engagement is announced and Mis 
between NetL eldest son of Mr The eng 
and Mrs Donald Cameron, of between 
Dallington. East Sussex, and Mis B. 
Phoebe, daughter of Mr James NewZe* 
Moorhouse, MEP. and Mrs ter of 
Moorhottsc, of Battersea, Verdonc 
London. 


Mr D. HenshaH 
and Miss A. Verdoock 
The engagement is announced 
between DonakL son of Mr and 
Mis EL HenshalL of Auckland, 
New Zealand, and Anne, daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mis LP. 
Verdondc. of BridfoitL. Devon. 


Mr AJ. Porves 
and Miss LX. Hardy 
The engagement is announced 
between Anthony, son of Dr and 
Mrs Michael J. Purves. of 
Clifton. BristoL and Louise, 
daughter of Mr and MisCharies 
A. Hardy, of Wiimslow. 
Cheshire. 


Mr R. V. Tooley, who died 
on October 1 2 at the age of 88. 
was the author of Mops ana 
.Map-Makers, and the effective 
founder or ihe antiquarian 
map trade, of which he was for 
several decades a leading light 
Maps and Map-Makers be- 
came a best-selling work, go- 
ing through six editions since 
it fiist appeared in 1949, and 
providing a popular introduo- 
tion to the subject of early 


Mr AjC Qnimwy 
and Miss SJE. C® 


Princess Anne mil attend the 
Association of Livery Masters 
1985 ladies night dinner at the 
Chiswell Street Brewery- on 
October 30, 

The Duke of Gloucester will 
attend the Royal Conan at the 
Festival Hall on November 19 
as part of the Festival of St 

Cecilia celebrations in aid of the 
Musicians’ Benevolent Fund 
and allied charities. The Royal ; 
Philharmonic Orchestra win be 
conducted by Mr Antal Dorati 
and the soloists win be Sir 
Yehudi Menuhin and Mr Le- 
land Chen. 


Mr N.V. Chaste! de BoimtiDe 
and Mbs AX Raynor 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, son of Mr 
Gerund N.P.C de Boinville and 
the late Mrs Aline de Boinville, 
and stepson of Mrs H.M.C de 
Boinville, of Walkera Hall, 
Hertfordshire, and Louise, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs John 
M. Rayoer, of Formby, 
LiverpooL 


Mr MJL Hogan 
and MbsCXFisfeer 


The engagement is announced 
between Michael, second son of 
Mr and Mrs Patrick C. Hogan, 

ofGenards Cross, Buckingham- 
shire, and Catherine, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mis JA. 
Fisher, of St Helens. 


and Miss SX Coldwefl 
The engagement is announced 
between Adam, son of Mr 
David Quinncy. of Reins Farm, 
Sam bourne. Warwickshire, and 
the late Mrs Katherine Quinncy, 
and Sarah, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Dennis CokJwcIL of 
Minsterwonh, Gloucestershire. 


Mr N. Cook 

and Miss J. Moflat 

The engagement is announced 

between Nicholas, younger son 

of Mr R.CM. Cook. FRCS. and 

Mrs A.V. Cook, of Grassendale 


Mr SX. Hot 
and Mbs CJ 
The engager 
between Step 
Mrs GJL H 
Dorset, and 


Gordon Clark 
is announced 
son of Mr and 
ove, of Foote, 
therine, elder 


Mr DXA. SiMey 

and Mbs EA. Matttngley 

The engagement is announced 


between Angus, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs David Sibley, of 
Fochabers, Moray, and Ann. 
elder daughter of the late Mr 
Eric Mattingiey and of Mrs Enc 
Maitingley, of Winchelsca, 
Sussex. 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Mr Gordon 
Fopbam will be held at Si 
Lawrence Jewry-nexi-G uildhall 
at 1130 today. 


Park, LiverpooL and Jane, elder 
daughter of Dr and Mrs W.M.U. 


daughter of Mr and Mrs G.L. 
Gordon Clark, of IrchrngfiekL 
West Sussex. 


Dinners 


man of the association, also 
spoke. The other guests in- 
Lnd Mayor eluded Lord Mishoon, Lord 

The Lord Mayor and Lady justice Woolf Mr Justice Hof£ 
Mayoress last night entertained man and Sir Patrick Mayhew, 
at dinner at the Mansion House QC, MP. Solicitor GeneraL 
the Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, lie . Governor . apd 


Hmpswad. Lord Tbom son or Mord- 
nem. Lord Todd- OM. Lord wolfWn. 
Dane Elizabeth Ackrayd. Sir W»11 b- 
BOdmcr. Sir Chrtsloptwr Booth. Sir 
Zriman Cowrl QC. Sir Frank 
Hartley. Sir Denys Lasdun. Sir Mer 
and Lady Modawar. Lhntenanl-Cen- 
«fW Sir Cameron Monw. sir Claus 
Moser. Sir Rex Richards- Sri Gordon 


Chartered Surveyors’ Company 


S of foe Bankof En- Jhe Mast^cJ die Charter^ 
gland, bankers and merchants of 

the ritv of London, members of Taylor, assisted by Ihe Wardens. 


_ . , -'uhbro. ur j r i. 

AMrtdae. Mr IT C Ashton. Mr J 
Bishop- Mr E C Bousnetd. Mr 
Ktnynan Brewster. Pro f essor R R A 
Coombs. Dr P M Daniel. Dr V W M 
Drury. Mr C J Driver. Dr J O Forfar. 
Professor R w K Honeycora&e. Mr M 
H Meacher. MP. Dr w T j Morgan. 
Mr L M Payne. Dr D A Rees. Dr E 
Rhys-Davies. Dr G A Rose. Dr E 
Rosemary Rue. MrKBA Scott. Mrs 
Ranee Short. MP. Mis Laonand 
Simpson. Mr A Starks. MrPLB 
StoddarL Mr M Summers. Dr V 
Thuratetayhara. Mr G M C 
P Todd. Dr D A J TVneiJ. 

A O W Whimeid. Mr J W 
Dr Gwooeth WMOaidte. 


the City of London, members of 
the Conn of Aldermen, the 
Sheriffs, the Chief Commoner 


Mr S. K. Knowles and Mr 
Robert SteeL presided at the 


and mem hers of the Couriof “ 


Common Council. 

The speakers were the Lord 
Mayor. Mr Nigel Lawson. 
Chancellor of ihe Exchequer, Sir 
Nicholas Goodison, Chairman 
of the Stock Exchange, Mr 
Robin Leigb-Femberton, Gov- 
ernor of the Bank of England, 
and Mr P.N. Miller, Chairman 
of Lloyd's. The other guests 
included: 


Cutlers' Hall yesterday. Judge 
Blennerhassett, QG and Mr T. 
D. Morris also spoke. The 
Remembrancer, the Honorary 
Auditor, the Chairman of the 
International Assets Valuation 
Standards Committee and the 
President of the American In- 
stitute of Real Estate Appraisers 
wane among those present. 


oonan. r*ir 

lurafcJnghara. Mr G M C 
Todd. DrD A J TVrreil. 
G w wiutncKL Mr J WI 


daughter of Dr and Mrs W.M.U. 
Moffat, of Edinburgh. 

Mr WA. Davies 
and Miss CJL Blandy 
The engagement is announced 
between Alan, younger son of 
Mf and Mrs AW. Davies, of 
Vancouver, Canada, and Kitty, 
youngest daughter of Professor 
and Mis J.P. Blandy, of 
Loughton, Essex. 

Lieutenant AJXS. Ellin, RN 
aad Mbs FX Kent 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander, son of Cap- 
tain DJ. Ellin. RN, and Mrs 
Ellin, of Kirkmichacl, Perth- 
shire, and Fiona, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs MX Kent, of Kirby 
Cross, Essex. 


Mr A-M.W. Jackson 
and Mbs CD. Sampling 
The eng ag e me nt is announced 
between Andrew, son of Sur- 
geon Captain ami Mrs M-C.HL 


Rampling, both of Alverstobe, 
Hampshire. 


Mr A- Sossunui 
and Mbs A3. WooHsoo 
The marriage will take place on 
Wednesday, November 26. 
1986, in Jerusalem. IsraeL of 
Amir, son of the late Judge Joel 
and Mrs Rena Sussman, of 
Jerusalem, and Amelia Judith, 
daughter of Dr and Mrs Harold 
Woolfson. of London. 


MrEJX.Kayfl 
and Mbs CJ. Richardson 
The engagement is announced 
between Joseph, elder son of Mr 
and Mra Joseph KayD, of 
Sunderland, and Cary, youngest 
daughter of Mr George Richard- 
son, of Glasgow and the late Mis 
Marie! Richardson. 


Mr CM. Taylor 
and Mbs SX Boris 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher Mark, 
younger son of Mr T. Taylor and 
Mrs E.M. Taylor, both of Brom- 
ley. Kent, and Stephanie Bar- 
bara. daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J.H. Burts, of Eltham Heights. 
London. 


maps. . . 

Tooley's name is also insep- 
arably linked with the book- 
selling firm of Francis 
Edwards Limited - m whose 
Dickensian premises in Mary 
lebone High Street he worked 
for half a century - and with 
the Map Collectors’ Circle. 

Ronald Vere Tooley was 
bom in 1898 and educated « 
the City of London SchooL He 
saw service during the Fim 
World War. and then, in 1919. 
joined Francis Edwards where 
he worked as a consultant on 
maps and atlases until, his 
belated retirement as a direc- 
tor ten years ago. He then gave 
his name to a new map-sell mg 
business, Tooley's. 

After the last ofl 10 mono- 
graphs had appeared in the 
Map Collectors' Series, found- 
ed and partly written by. 
himscIC he became involved 
(initially as editor) in the still- 
flourishing Map Collector, the 
only English-language quar- 
terly on the subject. 

His publications include 
Some English Books with 
Coloured Plates (1935). Maps 
in Italian Atlases ctf the Six- 
teenth Century (1939), 
Toolev's Dictionary of Map- 
Makers (1979) and numerous 


now in the National Library of * 
Australis. 

The oiTeetion he Inspired 
found expression imt %. \ 

u hnh for his 75th birthday,- ' 
emitted My Head is a Arfton 
edited fay Helen Wallis ^ •; 

Sarah Tyacke. map hbra&n 
and deputy map tibra&g, 
respectively, of the British / 
Library. ■' 

Among the colkctora hc 
nurtured was A. G. H. Hb * 
pherson, whose maritime 
atlases later formed partofifae 
founding colteclion of ttg' i- 
National Maritime Msdcgfe / 
Successive curators ar ihe *+ f 
British Library and Royal 
Geographical Society .were : 
beneficiaries of his fneadilq} 
and knowledge. * 

For well over fifty years 
Tooley was a fomOiar^ait 
around the salerooms of ^ 
London. He had been in at the 
birth of map study and he j 
could recall days when exam- * 
pics of 1 7th Speed attests, xm 
fetching around £14.060, & 
would change hands for £1 
10s. 

He always declared foe. r 


study of maps mb as anufoi 
to him as breathing, and 


cartobibliographies, particu- 
larly of Africa. America and 


Colonel Lord Mats. Mrs Nigel Lawson. 
Sir Bernard Waley-Cohen. Sir Ralph 
Perrins. Sir Edward Howard. Lady 
Goodtocm. Sir Denis TtnscoO. Mis 
Peter Miller. Or Waither Zimmer 
maim. Mr P J C Kershaw and- Mr 
Paul Davts 


Association of Clinical 

Pathologists 

Dr AC. Hunt, President of the 
Association of Clinical Patholo- 
gists, presided at a dinner held at 
the Barbican Centre yesterday 
evening. Among those present 
were: 


Durbar Clab 

The Autumn dinner of the 
Durbar Club was held last night 
in the Oriental Gallery of the 
Royal Armouries, Tower of 
London. The Hon Doulgas 
Hurd. Secretary of State for 
Home Affaire, was the principal 
guest and the chairman. Mr 
Narindar Saroop. presided. 
Other guests included: 

Mr F.ILM. CratoGoorer. Mr J. 
Gorman. Mr Gyan Main. High 


United Oxford and Cambridge ; 
University Club 
Lord Hailsham of St Maryte- 
bone, CH, was the guest of 
honour at a discussion dinner 
held on Monday, October 13, at 
die United Oxford and Cam- 
bride University Gob, Pall 
Mali. The chairman of the club, 
Mr Christopher Bosiock. pre- 
sided. The subject of the 
evening's discussion was "Lib- 
erty and the Law". 


Mr P.Cnccn 

and Miss KXSntch 

The marriage took place on 

Sunday, September 21. in San 

Vito. Sardinia, between Mr 

Pietro Cuccu and Miss Kay 

Sutefa. 


Marriages 


Australia. The collection he 
formed of Australian maps is 


to him as breaming, and 
considered himself lucky to 
have been able to . mate j 
living out at his fovouritc 
hobby. 

A convivial man, he was 
known in his younger days as 
an enthusiastic dance*, often 
the last to leave tbe bsuroom 
floor. This energy seemed, to 
his friends, scarcely to draw*, 
ish as he grew older. He cotrid 
never accept retirement and 
only a few days before Ids 
death was paying visits aad 
planning new books for foe 
next five years. 

Twice married, be is sun 
vived by two children and 
four stepchildren. 


Professor Sir Donald Adwmn (chief 
medical officer. Department of Health 
and Soda) Security). Professor B 
Gaytan (presidenL Royal CbOege of 
..... _ H Lonunel (presi- 
denL World Association of societies of 


Gorman. Mr (Wan Nath. High 
Commissioner (or Mauritius, sir Peter 
Gaia. Major-General P. MacLeOan. 
Nawabzada Metiboob AH Khan. Mr 


A.V.B. Norman. Mr N- Sen. the Hon 
James Stounon. Mr J. Surtees, and 
Mr J. Swire. 


Pathology). Dr J w G Smith (director. 
Public Health Laboratory Service) and 
Dr H Dermaii. 


Foundation for Science and 
Technology 

The Earl of Shannon was in the 


Gordonstoon Association 
King Constantine and Queen 
Anne Marie of The Hellenes 
were the guests of honour at the 
annual dinner of the 
Gordonstoun Association held 


Mme JL-P. Ddamnraz 
The Swiss Minister of Defence 
and Mme Delamuraz, on the 
occasion of their official visit to 
London gave a dinner yesterday 
in honour of the Secretary of! 
State of Defence and the Hon 
Mre Younger at the Swiss 
Ambassador’s residence. 
Among those present were: 


General Sir Nigel and Lady Bagnan 
Lady ChaifonL Mr and Mrs DJ-M. 
Data. U«utenanlrColo*MH Tobta Duke. 
Admiral sir Raymond and Lady JLyoo. 
Mr and Mrs John PowcDUancs. Air 
vicr-Martaal and Mm MJ.O. Shear 
and Viscount and vucounless Weir. 


Mr PJH. Kendall 
and Mbs FX Conant 
The marriage took place on 
October 4, at the Church of St 
Luke the Evangalist, Gaddesby, 
Leicestershire, of Mr Philip 
Kendall, third son of Mrs M.H. 
Kendal] and the late Mr H. 
Kendall, and Miss Francesca- 
Louise Conant, younger daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mre Charles 
Conant, of Gaddesby, Leicester- 
shire. The Rev David L. Priston 
officiated, assisted by Father 
Anthony D. Meredith, Rector of 
Raidifte College Community, 
Leicestershire. 


Mr M- Mackenzie 
and Miss X Sanchez 
The marriage took place on 
Satu rday. Oc tober I !, in Manila 
Cathedral, Intram uros, Metro 
Manila, between Mr Michael 
Mackenzie, younger son of ihe 
tale Mr J.Y. Mackenzie and of 
Mrs E. Mackenzie, of Munidi, 
West Germany, and Miss 
Karina Sanchez, third daughter 
of Mr and Mrs A.R. Sanchez, of 
Quezon Chy, Philippines. Fa- 
ther Antonio Formenti 
officiated. 


The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Ariene Sanchez. 


rence G reenough, of Boston. 
Massachusetts. United States, 
and of Mis Peter Han bury, of 
Hill Ash Farm. West Karting. 
PetersfiekL Canon Percrval 
Haymann officiated, assisted by 
the Rev Kenneth Masters. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her stepfather, was i 
attended by Emily Shaw and ; 
Emily Dale. Mr Michael J 
Conley-White was best man. j 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride, and the ; 
honeymoon is being spent j 
abroad. i 


JUDGE P. INGRESS BELL 


MrAXR. Ward 
and Miss LG. Longley 


tally Paredes. Michelle Frias, ‘P* mamage took place on 
Ruth Sison. Judy Uy and Nancy September 27, at Lanang Col- 
Isaac. Mr Robin Harefie was ** Chapd of Mr Andrew 


best man. 


'' M„Zr Zr at the Cafi Royal last night. Mr 

Graham NeiLchairman of the 


Luncheons 


the Foundation for Science and 
Technology held in the bouse of 
the Royal Society last night. 
Professor K. L R. Pavitt and 
Professor A. W. Thomson were 
the speakers. Lord Bel off. Lord 
G region. Baroness Platt of 
Writtle. Lord Shackleton, Sir 
Raymond Appleyard and Sir 
Kenneth Cornekl were among 
those present 


association, presided. 

Hay Management Consultants 


Mr Denis Healey, CH, MP, was 
the guest speaker at a dinner 
raven by Hay Management 
Consultants at the Marriott 
Hold, Grosvenor Square, last 
night on the occasion of the Hay 
European Client Conference. 


Bar Association for Commerce, 
Finance and Industry 
Lord Griffiths, president, pre- 
sided at the annual dinner of the 
Bar Association for Commerce. 
Finance and Industry held last 
night at the Caffe Royal. Sir 


Trinity House 

The Lord Mayor and the Sher- 
iffs were entertained at lun- 
cheon yesterday by the Elder 
Brethem ofTrinity House. Cap- 
Lain Sir Miles Wingate, Deputy 
Master, presided. Others 
present Included: 

Lord Brandon of Oakbrook. Lord 
Brabazoo of Tara, the Hon W G 
Rundman. Sir Alan Bailey. Mr Justice 
Sheoy Admiral Sir wnaam SUvelcy. 
Mr Owen Kelly and Malor -General A 
p w MacLeUan. 


The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her father, and was 
attended by Elizabeth Montego 
and Rosbnara Corby, Hamel 
Henniker-Major and Gillian 
Wrathafl. Mr Richard Ortoii 
was best man. 


A reception was hdd at the 
Manila Hold and the honey- 
moon is being spent abroad. 


A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon is being spent in the 
West Indies. 


Mr RJL Mailings 
and Miss E.T. Greenonah 
The mamage took place on 
Saturday, ax St Mary and St 
Gabriel Church. South Haning, 
of Mr Richard M idlings, son of 


lege Chape! of Mr Andrew 
Ward, younger son of Mr and 
Mrs Noel Ward, of London, and 
Miss Isabella Longley. daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Oliver Lonriey. 
of Lower Seeding. Sussex. The 
Rev Roger Thacker and the Rev 
Philip Clements offidaud. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Mrs Graeme 
Winship. Miss Jane Mullins. 
Miss Charlotte Ward and Thea 


His Honour P. Ingress Bell. 
TD, QC, variously soldier, 
sailor, boxer. MP and judge, 
died recently at the age of 86. 

Philip Ingress Bell was bom 
at Worthing on January 10. 
1900, and educated at 
Stonyhursi. Blackburn. He 
went to the Royal Naval 
College. Keyhant, in 1918. 
subsequently serving fra 1 a 
year-and-a-half as a midship- 
man in the battleship Iron 
Duke and other ships. 

He left the Navy ia 1920 
and went up to Queen's 
College. Oxford, where he 
read law and commerce and 
graduated BA and BCL. He 


represented Oxford at boxing 
for three years and captained 


Mr and Mrs John Mullmgs. of and Alix Longley. Mr Chris- 
Pinbury Park. Cirencester, and toptaer Ward was best man. 


Miss Elizabeth Gieenough, 
daughter of the late Mr Law- 


A reception was held at the 
home of the bride. 


Sale room 


Royal College of Pl ysidus MrOwtow and Maor-Genera! A 

The Harveian Oration was p w Mac *- eUan - 

given to the Royal College of Royal College of Surgeons of 


Birthdays today 


Gordon Borne. QC Director 
General of Fair Trading, and 


General of Fair Trading, and 
Mrs Katherine Holmes, chair- 


Physidans yesterday by Dr 
A.G.W. Whitfield- Afterwards, 
the president. Sir Raymond 
Hoffenberg, Lady Hoffenbeig 
and the Fellows entertained the 
following guests at dinner 

The Caul and Counlaw of Umcrkk. 
FWd Marshal Lord Carver. Lord 
DaiMon. Lorrl Gfbeon. Lord RW Of 


England 

Mr Ian Todd, President of the 
Royal College of Surgeons of 
England, yesterday entertained 
at luncheon at ihe college Mr 
Ronald Baird. Mr Percy R. Levy 
and Mr Richard Turner- 
Warwick. 


Time of revival for 
English clocks 


Mr George Mackay Brown. 63; 
Mr Hairy Carpenter, 61; Dr 


for three years and captained 
the university boxing chib in 
1922-23.' 

He then studied law for two 
years in London, was called to 
the Bar by the Inner Temple, 
and then went to Manchester 
to begin practice at the Pala- 
tine Bar, and on the Northern 
Circuit. 

With the outbreak of war he 
was commissioned in the East 
Lancashire Regiment (TA) 
and served in France and 
Belgium. In 1941 he was 
transferred to the military 
department of the Judge Ad- 


A^dCTCcyke. 87| ^ Eari pf I vocale GeneraTs Department 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


Cream tip Na 43 


the pasta 
for a mouth- 
watering 
change. 

Pasta Cheese. 


TO PLACE 
YOUR 

TRAVEL 

ADVERTISEMENT 

IN 


Pasta is a quick and filling change 
that's so easy to prepare. 

Take 225 g (Sad of cooked taglia telle, 
or other pasta Melt 25g 0 oz) butter in a 
large pan. Add one chopped onion with a 
little crushed garbe. Cook until onion is soft. 

Stir in 50g (2oz) chopped ham and 
50g (2oz) sliced mushrooms. 

Cook for 3 minutes. Mix in the pasta 
and heat thoroughly 

Beat 3 eggs into 150ml C*pt) ofSlngle 
Cream. Add to the pasta mixture and heat 
until eggs start to seL 

Sprinkle with 75 g (3ozl English 
Cheese, serve immediately This will serve 2. 
Simply delicious. 


THE 

SUNDAY 

TIMES 


TRADE 

ADVERTISERS 

TEL 

01-481 1989 


Get fresh with 
the cream, f 


ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 
01-481 9313 
TELEX 
925088 


The golden era of English 
dodumking in the late seven- 
teenth and early eighteenth 
century was back in fashion with 
a vengeance yesterday. 

A small, ebony-veneered, 
quarter-repeating bracket dock 
by Tampion and Banger sold for 
£79,200 (estimate £30,000- 
£35,000) to (LAEee, the London 
dealer, while an early Tampion 
ebony-veneered timepiece, dated 
to the 1680s. sold for £41800 
(estimate £22,000^28,000). 

Joseph Knibb was repre- 
sented by a walnat month 
loagcase dock at £66,000 (es- 
timate £35,000-£45,000). The 
movement was in for from 
perfect condition bat it had a 
romantic provenance, having 
been seat Cor sale by the Dake of 
Hamilton and Brandon. 

It had graced the duke’s 
hereditary apartments in 
Hoi yrood boose, the royal palace 
in Edinbmgk The first duke 
was created Hereditary Keeper 
of the Palace of Holyroodboase 
by Cbaries I in 1646 and the 
dock may have been made for 
the third dake. Knibb is known 
to have had Scottish connections 
aad a matter of days ago the 
family discovered documenta- 
tion to prove that they bad 
booght a number of clocks 
directly from him. 

Another romantic item was 
the walnnt alarm loagcase 
dock made by Charles C s ald. of 
London, for the Italian market 
which made £52£00 (estimte 
£8,000412,000). It was sold 
from the Palazzo G inert in 
Florence earlier this center y. 


The Ginoris, an ancient and 
distinguished family, could well 
have been the original 
purchasers. 

The top price of the sale was 
£121.000 (estimate £100,000- 
£120.000) for one of the earliest 
pendulum docks, as reported 
elsewhere. The sate totalled 
£644£0l with four per cent left 
unsold. 

Sotheby’s also held one of its 
most successful Victorian 
watercoknr sates. The morning 
session totalled £436,898 with 
11 per cent left imsoUL A view of 
“•Venice” by Albert Goodwin 
soared to £18,700 where 
Sotheby's had estimated only 
£4.O0O4E6.OOO. A gay view of 
“Marlow Lock” by Henry 
Caffieri with boats and elegant 
ladles on the bank, afl bathed in 

summer sunlight, reached 
£14,850 (estimate £5,000- 
£ 7,000). 

It was also a good day for 
Myles Birfcet Foster. His 
""Spring Morning" made 
£14,080 (estimate £4,000- 
£6,000) while “The Market 
Cart” reached £14350 (estimate 
£10JM0-£ 15,000). 

Christie's sale of Russian 
works of art made a total of 
£169307 with 14 per cent 
unsold, with a top price of 
£16.500 (estimate £7,000- 
£8J00) for a jewelled shaded 
enamel silver casket by Pavel 1 
Ochmnihov, dated 1912, which 
formerly graced the collection of 
Sir Charles Clore. Sotheby's 
morning silver sale made 
£1*M#78 with eight per cent 
unsold. 


Dalhousie. 72; Sir Denis Dob- 
son. QC 78: Mr Alan Garner, 
52; Lord Justice Ralph Gibson, 
64; the Right Rev R. C. O. 
Goodchild. 76; Mis Anne Jones. 
48; Lord Kilbracken, 66; Sir 
Harry Livermore, 78; Sir Robert 
Macintosh. 89; Mr Arthur 
Miller, 71; Mr Rodrigo Moyni- 
ban. 76; Sir Peter Noble. 87; Sir 
Mel ford Stevenson, 84; Mr 
Donald Stewart, MP, 66; Mr G. 
H. Turnbull, 60. 


before again going overseas to 
serve m the Netherlands. 
France and Germany. He did 
useful work in investigating 
war crimes at Belsen, was 
mentioned in despatches and 
awarded the TD. 

Demobilized with the rank 
of major, he resumed his 


practice at the Bar, taking S& * 
in 'April 1952. and moving 
from Lancashire to the Tern- ' 
pie. He also turned his atteo- 
tion to politics, but was 
unsuccessful as Conservative 
candidate for Bolton East at 1 
the general election of Febru- 
ary 1950. He won the seat 
however, the following year. 

In his first session he pro- „ 
moted and secured the pantni « 
of the Chancery of Palatine 
Act He remained an MF until 
i960, when he was appointed 
a Judge ofCounty Courts. He . 
sat, first in courts in London 
and the south-east and then in „ 
Lancashire. In 1972 he be- 
came a Circuit Judge but * 
never sat in the Crown Court * 
retiring in 19?S. { 

Bell had -The reputation of t 
being a sound and pleasant ’ 
judge. He was a genial man, 
whose sense of fun was irre- 
pressible and could take the 
form of practical jokes. An 
officer under whom he was . 
serving at York once found 
pinned on the wall behind his 
desk a notice reading; M t seQ i. 
dirty postcards very cheap". 

As a devout Roman Catho- 
lic he found divorce cases very 
distasteful and sometimes ad- 
journed them in die hope that • 
the parties might become 


reconciled. His solitary book. 
Idols and Idylls, was published 
in 1918. 

He married, in 1933. Agnes 
Mary Eastwood, who died in 
1983. There were two sons 
and a daughter of the 
marriage. 


MRS WILMA SOSS 


Meeting 

institution of Electronic and 

Radio Engineers 

Mr Keith R. Thrower, gave his 


presidential address on “Mobile 
Radio Possibilities” after his 


Mrs Wilma Soss, one of 
America's best-known gad- 
flies, died in Manhattan on 
October 10. She was 86. 

Her proclaimed mission 
was to remind corporate exeo- 


election as President of Institu- utives that they were not 
lion of Electronic and Radio working either for themselves 


Engineers at their annual meet- or the company, but for the 
mg, held at the Royal Society, shareholders, many of whom 


on Tuesday, October 14. 


Reception 

HM Government 
Mr Malcolm Rifkind, QC MP, 
and Mrs Rifkind were hosts at a 
reception held by Her Majesty's 
Government in Edinburgh Cas- 


were women. 

Wilma Porter Soss was bom 
in San Francisco on March 13, 
1900, and spent most of her 
childhood with her grand- 
mother in Brooklyn. 

She married Joseph Soss, 


tie last night on the occasion of who ran a advertising 
tite Commonwealth Broadcast- agency (and who died several 


mg Association biennial con- 
ference. 


Service dinners 

The King's Royal Rifle Corps 


years ago). She turned her 
hand to public relations, rep- 
resenting department stores, 
film studios and the silk 
industry. Her training as a 


Field Marshal Sir Edwin publicist later served her welL 

Bramall presided at the annual Her vocation. She decided, 
dinner of the W : 


dinner of the Celer el Audax 
Club held last night at the 
Cavalry and Guards Club. 


Inner Temple 

Major scholarships of £8.000 
each, payable over two years, 
have been awarded to the 
following: 


Appointments 


The following to be deputy 
lieutenants for Norfolk: 

Mrs Jill Audrey Scott, Captain 


52nd Lowland Division Officers 
Club 

Colonel Charles Corsar, Chair- 
man of the 52nd Lo wland 
Division Officers’ Club, pre- 
sided at the annual dinner held 
last night at the Western Club. 
Glasgow. Sir William Fraser, 
Permanent Under-Secretary of 
State at ihe Scottish Office.' was 
the principal guest and others 


Henry Birkbeck, Lord Edward included the Very Rev 

Anthony Charles FHzroy. Mr ,P rRo “ I ! Selby Wright. Briga- 
Rfehard Gordon Lombe Taylor. “1^. Michael Thomson and 




PRIVATE 

ADVERTISERS 

TEL 

01-481 4000 


Dyers’ Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Dyers’ Company 
for the ensuing year: Prime 
Warden. Mr R.S. Skilbeck: and 
Renter Warden, Mr R.M_$. 
GoodsalL 


Mr David Mawson, Mr Bryan 
Coburn Read, and Mr Leonard 

Arthur Stevenson. 


Major-General 

Somerville. 


Ronnie 


USE YOUR 

ACCESS 

OR 

BARCLAY 

CARD 


White Knights Ball 

Tickers (£28 JO to include din- 
ner and dancing and £18.00 
excluding dinner) are now avail- Rflckpfmsilr 
able for the White Knights Ball 5~* KeramKerS 
which is being held on Friday, XOlUpaiiy 
January 2, 1987. at Grosvenor The following have been elected 
House. Park Lane. London Wj. officers of foe Basketmaker? 
Please apply to: Mr Andrew Company for foe ensuing yean 
Murray. 14 Radley Mews, Prime Warden. Mr Alec OM. 
torKlon. ws. telephone; 01-937 . Sorrell; Junior Warden. Sir 

Colin Cole. 


Royal Institute 
of Navigation 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Royal Institute of 
Navigation: President. Mr 
J.ED. Williams: Vice-Presi- 
dents, Sir John Cliamley and Mr 
D.W. Newsom Honorary Trea- 
surer. Mr GAB. King. 


Honourable Artillery Company 
Viscount Tonypandy arid 
Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Chappie. Deputy Chief of foe 
Defence Staff: were foe guest 
speakers at a dinner given by the 
Honourable Artillery Company 


lay m another direction, and 
she was to pursue it with relish 
for a lifetime. Among her 
holdings was one share of US 
Steel, and in 1946 she attend- 
ed her first stockholders' 
meeting. Her crusade began 
the following year, but it was 
at the US Steel stockholders' 
meeting of 1949 that the 
legend of Wilma Soss was 
born. 

ft was there, in Hoboken, 
New Jersey, that she broke 
with the world of business and 
became its self-appointed tor- 
mentor. She stepped foward to 
read a resolution, wearing a 
Victorian outfit grey two- 
piece suit lace blouse and 
voluminous purple hat. The 
costume represents 
management's thinking on 
stockholder relations” $hede- 


ma was formidable enough on 
her own. 

She founded the Federation 
of Women Shareholders in 
American Business and sensi- 
bly acquired shares in various 
companies. Armed with these, 
as well as the proxies of her 
fellow federation members, 
she flew from one corporate 
meeting to another, vigorous- 
ly prodding their manage- 
ments. Four decades later, her 
zest for battle was undimiu* 
ished. 

She was persistent, direct 
and unflinching - qualities 
that made her unpopular ia 
board rooms. Yet idle earned 
the quiet respect of many of 
the executives she challenged. 

She again dressed for the 
pan at a i960 shareholders' 
meeting of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System; As a 
cleaning woman, armed' with 
mop aad. pail, she arrived 
announcing that she had come 
to “clean up everything.” 

Beneath the histrionics, 
Wilma Soss genuinely wanted 
to eliminate among- women 
what she called financial illit- 
eracy. “1 didn't choose to be- 
head of the women's econom- 
ic suffrage movement”, she 
said. “The women’s economic 
suffrage movement chose 
me” 


Mess Club last night at Armoury dared. '™ Q *~ 

She called on la™ corpora- 

i /> > . ... ■_ (VK in CimnliHr cknmhAM ^ 1 


chair and Captain W. G. Hunt 
also spoke. 


Gray’s Inn 

Mr Justice Kenneth Jones has 
been elected Treasurer of Gray's 
Inn for 1987. in succession to 
Lord Hooson. QC. Sir Gordon 
Slynn has been elected vice- 
treasurer for the same period. 


lions to simplify shareholders' 
statements; to hold regional 
meetings to allow more share- 
holders to attend; and to 
admit women to their boards. 

She formed a friendship and 
working partnership with two 
other corporate gadflies, the 
Gilbert brothers (Lewis D. 
and John J,L They made a 
formidable trio, though Wii- 


Jacqueline Picasso (ate 
Roque), the second wife 
Pablo Picasso, was found dead 
on October IS at Mougins on 
the French Riviera with a 
bullet in her head. She was- 59. 

Picasso, who died in 1973. 
married her in 1961, when he 
was 79 years old and she was 
35. She was a Paris-born 
divorcee and farmer dance 
teacher when she met Pfcssft 
becoming his companion and. 
the model for som? fine 
portraits. 


Mr Ted Sa&r, goalkeeper, 
who won Fa Cup and league 
championship medals with 
Evcnon in the 1930s, died 
yesterday at the age of 76. . 

Capped te 1 England in 193<t - 
Sagar made a record 465 
appearances- for Evenoa*te*- ; - 
signing for theta in 


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births, marriages, 

A tvTT> DEATHS 

^ IN MEMORIAM 


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££5®5B-SS 

■U«m.*sw,. Dnid C«>q£ JOn * 

oS,’ On October nth 1986 at 
Elizabeth iZZZlJ? 
Bpny.TOham to Jlu mw 

23i aawSJVauSLRS: 

D «s- F rs™H 

san ” 

' 0° 15Ul i'Wober to 
■ ■ f 7?" a ’ Fe ** Jan*®, a son. 
r ‘V“ ‘On October loth 1986. to 
LJ0WW “* RWwfl ' * 

v *®**®-®J • On October 7Ui. at Harm- 
Kos PnEd. lo Lady Emma 
»n«? Thompson) and Sir Thofnas. a 
Rlcnard Rytandt. a broth- 
er -lor James. 

■**®KSOH - On October loth 1986. lo 
SJT Btrtcfctand) and DaVttL a 
son. Gebrge Edward. 

KACHAY -JAMES . On October 13th 
*~®£* *o Wranda and Max. a son. 
ArM». a brother for Thomas. 
MAC KENZIE . On October lith 1966. 
in Aberdeen, to Enuna and Ruw. a 
daughter. 

***K ■ On I4lh October, a! the 
Henltree: m Exeter, to Sadly utte 
Edqecorobe) and Chrtstopher. a 
dau gh ter. 

NOS WORTHY - On 6th October 1966. 
to Janet (nee WestcotO and George, a 
son. Harry Edward, a brother Tor Si- 
mon. Jonathan and Andrew. 
PATTERSON - On October 10th. to 
Anne (nee MUterahuM.and Tony, a 
daughter. Sophte RacfteL 

RAMSAY - On ldth October, to Fudge 
'nee Sioddart) and Patrick, a 
daughter. 

9TANNMG - On Sunday 1 2tn October, 
to Lots and Ric ha itL a itugmif 
Frances Elizabeth. 

WATERFKUD > On X4 October, at the 
John Radditfe. Oxford to Josephine 
tnte WlBmotO and James - a daugh- 
ter. Katharine. a sister for Thomas. 

WMTILWRfGHT . On October 15th 
1986. to Anne (n^e AH) a ho lyugiM 
a son. Edmund lam Alasdalr. 


' ■•/ 


MARRIAGES 


MRENN - On Saturday nth Oc- 
lober 1986, at the Parish Church of 
Si. Swithun. Woodborougti. Timo- 
thy Nicholas, elder son of Mr and 
Mrs CJ3. Me*, of Woodborough. to 
Hilary Jane, only daughter of the 
late John Arthur Wrenjn. and of Mrs. 
E.C. wreiui. of Nottingham. 


DEATHS 


V 


r-ssi 

; „• pr 
>*(L 
. J:C 


CRAWFORD - On Wednesday lSIh Oc- 
tober 1966. peacefully ai ftoxhughe 
Use. Dundee. Etopetfl McKIiuay. (nee 
-.Service} aged- 61- yeses -of Ptlchmx. 
Abernethy. Beloved wife of Donald 
and much loved mother of Ann. Ar- 
chie. Ian and Elspeth Mary. A very 
dear - mother-in- Law and granny. 
Service In SI' Brides Church. 
Abernethy. on Monday October. 
ZOUi. at 11 am. lo which . til mends, 
are invited, and thereafter to Perth 
Crematorium, at I2.16wn. FUnfly 
. flowers only please. If desired jtona- 
uons may be sent lo. Roxburffw 
House. Dundee, for Cancer Rebef. 






soy* 


-On 13th October 1966. 
suddenly, at home. Lennox Ptews. 
belov ed father of Jennifer. Davw and 
Mark. Funeral Tuesday 2ist Octo- 
ber. 2J0 p m. St Margaret's Church. 
Ridge. Herts. Enquires ' to 
NeUiertrotO. Potters Bar Tel -5228a 

EDWARDS - On 15th October, very 

. peacefully ti home. Catherine Ed- 
wards. deeply loved mother of 
Jeremy and Jane and beloved grand- 
mother of Toby and Lucy. For many 
years Storyteller on BBC's ‘Listen 
with Mother'. Cremation at 2.15 
pjn. at Downs Crematorium. Bear 
Road. Brighton, on Monday 20Ui Oc- 
tober. No flowers please. Donations If 
desired to Save the Children Fund 
c/o Hanningtous F/D LUL 4/6 
Mon t eflon? Ro ad. Hove. Sussex. TeL 
0273 778733. 

EMGLEBERT - On October X3th 1986. 
suddenly. Reginald (Renny) In Vic- 
toria B.C. Canada. Husband of 
Winifred and father of Susan and 
Michael. 


^ 0ct0tltT I9B6 l ai 
Uie home ofta daughter in wnmure 
by has loving famuy. 
J< * nsten D.F.C. of 
France. 

* ^ mtcrtn * ««* ftiher of 
C mu 1 - peua. Jesaca and Alexander, 
wremmion private. 

^ARO-On 16th October. peacefifflV at 

Mane, after a short Uiuess. Catholne 
prte Court 9q. SW6. 9a Dear* 

■^ _ > °! tP d j P 00 ** - .- smnny and great- 
onunty. FuneraL Putney Vflie cr#- 
mwortum Monday 20th October. 

1- 3 ?- (Sheath) to Kenyons. 

* 9 Mart oes Rd. W8_ by lZnoon. 

- On October usth 

1986. peacefully a home. Wilfred 
4??- CO * DO «- Herd. For- 
merly of Montreal. Beloved husband, 
miner and grandfather. Funeral on 
Tuesday 2lsl Octooer. ti Sacred 
Hian Church. Sheroorne. at 10.45 
am. No Dowers please, but donshoHs 
to. Marie Curie Memorial Founda- 
Itoa 28 Bewrave square. London 
swtx bog. would be most 
welcome. 

■***5 1 ' ' On October 15th 1986. 
William weyiand. MA FEng. peace- 
fully. bMortd husband of Eugente. 
Arrangemctits to be announced ai a 
later date. 

■eJWiJMi . On ism October 1986 . 

ti the Royal Victoria HgepdaL EUta- 
w yotL fa MS 8fflh yew, Robert 
ANxamfer. of 6 Raveistoa Garden. 
Edinburgh: For meaty years with 

Bank of London and South Amenta. 

Husband of Bess and father of 
Sandy. Service at Warrtaton uema- 
tortura. Ctobief Chape). Edinburgb. 
do Saturday I 8 U 1 October ti 
ii.46am. No Rowers please. 
MEURATH . on lath October 1986. 
after an flincn bravely borne. Mane 

•nee ReuKmetsten aged 88 . widow of 

Otto Neurtih. loved By mart? 
friends. A memo ria l meeting wo be 
announced. 

PARK - On October 15. peactiuHy. 
Nora, after an Illness bravely Dome, 
beloved Mother of GOtten. Fiona and 
Alison and dearly loved Graadniofh- 
er. Funeral Service Arundel 
Cathedral. Monday October 2a ti 

2- 30 pm. followed by private crema- 
tion- Family flowers only. 
Donations, if 'desttnJ. lo Cancer 
Research. 

RAMSDCN-On I lth October, sudden- 
ly at home to Burford. Nancy, 
dearest stster of Harney and EnmL 
Fun eral has already token place. 
tOMANO • On October ism. In 
Ca reo roo h e Nursing Home, walton- 
on-Thatnes. peacefully In her steep. 
Gtoele Romano, aged 82 years, for- 
merly of Alexandria. Egypt- Funeral 
private. 

WILSWW • On September 2isL John 
Edgar, lab- of The Haven. South 
Cape. Mam Road. Laxey. Ede of Man. 
MOORE- Ort October' 15th. ti home. 
Philip Moore M. A. Cantab.. Bxomnu 
Earn. F8& Beloved husband- of 
Kaihien. 48 The Vineyard. . Rich- 
mond. Surrey. Dear father of 
Marianne. Bobby and Adnenne. 
Grandfather of Oliver. MMU and 
Ttiten. Cremation ai MorUak* on 
Monday October 20th at 1pm. Fam- 
ily rtowetsonly please, but donations 
If desmrd lo. I he Macmillan Care 
Team. Kingston Hospital. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


There am be a M ertio rt - 
ti Service for Richard Bti berme on 
Wednesday 22nd October ti 12.00 
noon at drencetier Parnh Church. 
The Market Place. Ctrencesler. Gtos- 
DOWLRY- A Sendee of Thanksgiving 
for the Ufe of Mbs Angela BowBy. 
C.V.O.. MAE., win be held ti boon, 
on Friday. 14th November 1965. at 
St. Michaels Church. Chester 
Sauart. London SW1. 

BURNEY - A Memorial Service for 
SytjH Maty Obra of 14 West Green. 
Slokestey. North Yorks- to be hekl ti 
SI. Peter's Church, stokestey. Finlay 
24th October at 2^0 pjn. 

FULTON - A Service of Thanksgivfng 
for the Ufe of Baron FUton of Fatfner 
will be held « the Meeting House. 
University of Sussex on 24thOctooer 
1986 ti 3 mm.. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


GAM - Duncan PtiHio. with all our 
love on yftur 10th birthday. Mum- 
my- Daddy. Melanie. Graham and 

NaoraL 

MACHAY - wuuam. remembered and 
eery mudi mused, not only today. 
but ever y nay. Myra. 

TRkGWElL In loving memory of WU- 
Uara Percy TrlgwefL farmer and 
countryman on the cenlexary of hB 
brrth- 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


Dt AtaurrADLERCRON - On October 
lTtti 1936 u Hey dour Church. 
Chnstopber BtocXre to Pauline 
Adlercroh. now iMng In 
HeBnIngham. ElncolnsMre- 
LLOYD-BAM9TER ■ On 17th October 
1936. ti SL Mary's. WIBesden. Mar- 
ry lo Barbara, now Hvlng ti 4&Sea 
Road. BexiuiL 

MnOGHT HOLMS VIZETEU.Y - On 

17th Ociooer. 1936. at Chris! 
Church. New Malden. Oliver and 
Renee MyneUe. Te Deum laudamus. 
Still ti Mtoklefiam. Overdaie. 

Ash lead. 

NBGHT HQUKLVRnDXT - On 
17 October 1936. ti Christ Church. 
New Malden. Oliver and Renee 
MyrteUe. Te Deum Uudamus. SOU at 
Mlcueham. Overdaie. Ash lead. 
Surrey. 


Science report 


A mini power station 
in the basement 


By Keith HimDey 


A tractor engine in a Manchester 
basement is going to cut the 
crippling cost of lighting ana 
heating for many of Bniaui s 
hospitals, schools and factories. 
Savings of around £ 1 0,000 a 
vear wn come from installing a 
self-contained power station 
developed at the University of 
Manchester Institute crfScienee 
and Technology fUMIST).. 

With an estimated market ot 
315.000 units in tije United 
Kingdom alone, thai could 
mean savings of £3 billions a 
vear. Eventually, all house- 
holders bencfii with a ony 
generator designed to power a 

single home. . 

■This revolutionary compinea 
heat and power engine is tw 
first reliable genem^smaB 
enough to meet the needs of a 
single building. It runs 
natural gas and generatra 

kilowaits (kw) of electricity Mid 

60 kw of heat with an overall 
efficiency of 86 porcemt- 
That compares with 51 per 
cent for a building using mains 
electricity and .a convoitjorau 
boiler. This gain m efficiency 
stems largely frwn , J*! ' ££ 
thirds of fuel energy 
during normal electncny 

^nd power engines in the 
past have suffered Trotn P0£ 
reliability b ut a new computer 

Latest wills 

professor Thomas Bunwr. of 

Kidlington, Oxfonlshire- 8®*™ 

professor of Sans^ 1 
University 1944-76, left estate 
valued at £236.115 net. 

Mrs Eva Errington. of Bedford 

Park. London, left estetc valued 

at £139.960 ncL She made 
personal bequests totalling 
£15.000 and left the residue “u> 
be divided among the docioraat 
MoorGelds Eye Hospital. 
London”. ■ . 

Mr John Laver, of Sandiacre. 
■Derbyshire, left estate ^t 
£276.430 net. .He left personal 


system should en- 
: UM1ST units never 


monitoring 

sure that ibe . 

foil during normal working 
hours. Should the unthinkable 
occur, then the building would 
not lose power as the generators 
will be connected- in parallel 
with the normal electricity sup- 
plies. The Energy Act 1983 
requires all local deanary 
suppliers re establish,- check and 
approve such connections. - 

The new power units are, in 
effect, sophisticated gas boilers 
that also produce. electricity and 
life 35 kw model unveiled 
yesterday in Manchester is the 
first of a range that will stretch 
up re 1 00 kw and down to a 5-10 
kw engine that could heat and 
light a single home. 

A business, hospital or school 
could install one for as little as 
£25,000 and could expert energy 
savings to cover this cost witbtn 
two or three years. The units 
should operate for five years 
before major overhaul becomes 
necessary and the computer 
monitoring system will select 
the best time for this to be done. 

The new model has been 
jointly developed by UM1ST 
engineer Dr Julian Packer and 
Mr Sam Almozaffar, a Man- 
chester businessman, and the 
project is backed by £650.000 
worth of research 'and .develop* 

ment funds. ' 


legacies totalling £37,000 and 
seven tenths of the residue to 
Draycott Hospice, Derby,, and 
one tenth each to the National 
Trust. Imperial Cancer Re- 
search Fund and the Convent 
Hospital, Nottingham. 

Mr Alan Kirk, former chairman 
of Stock pon County Football 
Club, who kept the dub afloat 
with laigp injections of his own 
mono’, left estate valued at 
£1.223,970 net.' 

Mrs Catherine- Winifred Wes- 
ton, of Lcigh-on-Sca. Essex, left 
' estate valued at £448JK)7 ncL 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


19 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUNDAY 31 ST AubuO torrid MrtrtUnfl 
firauri.i WnumMU < 12DSJ I dMTl 
t-iir*. vnur Mm-. Tin llul Mty IMun 
•Mil Von mii> j shttl uim .1 Mrk 3nr* 
priM.Irtwmm,. RrrUurfc toon Ionian 
ti the 1,1 rioe ft nod In t» Mw Uh> 
lIMn linn Uuj. AS59. Fi-rmapoKJ 
Pmhb Uv 


HELP FIGHT MoiMOr ttclnivd. INK CtwW 
iiu, Hrjiiiuui nidi, ouk and 
tiidnnumv Ml Ui I nr lire Mifflin*- Sro- 
inm Um MUM- (JU low. AidtaUr 
mw Imn MuOu*- SrUVnh SOCMr. 25 
tun- R om. IniMton 8wn art. , 


WUWOt LIVES For UfHHy OW PtonN 
ran br nroiMnd bv laar will. Ptoare 
hHUadr a muni far TDr ISMianti Br 
iwidirM Fund tor Um- Ag M. N*w Broad 
snrrt houm>. 36 ww snud Strefl. Loo- 
COM INH. 

HSOLL: Thry toraat Ihc an 
60 yean, ago txd wr 
tun mi Hamor BotncUy a toanto lor 
Icimi a woMXTful I titer A tnrdo. Lo\c 
Sux. ChraiMUtor. Andrea & Riciurd 
SAVE THE OBLOREN Mini' rsMe draw 
winniug nuffltmn 1021. 7961. «8M. 
SWI. 2E39. 7800. 9666. 6782. 1846. 
J99 9. 9130 
WERE V6u wdh ihn BUrUMMt can* Choir 
i9SB/eo 7 We are planning a 30 yr re- 
union Julv/Auousl 1967 ConUKI A 
Bnrritf gr D1 363 8686 Mince) 
HXCMY: Plm> gn U touch as soon as 
roil (an Donai 


SERVICES 


niDIDW.linf or Manu* AH ogre, 
areas. Dumuw. Dew 1016)23 AMngaon 
ROM. London wg Tel: Ol 958 1011. 
CAIRUIC CVS Ud orofmionti ruiMu- 
lurd litre tfanunenb. DriaHs: 01-651 
3388 

5 STAR Heuremrni Home In toe Cols 

wolds, uie uHimtie in com tort end 24 

hour rare Bnfroontsrn suMn PaMtnorr 

HL Tnl 0386 853073 tooted on HtHae. 

Braadwai. worcnUT WR12 7TKL 
FHOTOCOMOB ti whalnMp DrKe*. Lai 
e- 4 hgB iw * tr am Ihc aurndwr wtu, 
vnKr Ol 27B 4177 

ASCOT BOX lo let RcnlJ' Bn CTO 


BBIOCC . London School or Bodpr and 
CUM. 38 Km* Read. SWJ. 01-689 
7701 

CONVEYANCING bv (nay auaDflM SoHd 
ion. CIBO * VAT and standard 
■ksMnnwnB ring 0349 319598. 


WANTED 


URGENT Grniun iludm rraium Eni Wh 
■wuptvdion iwd or Ihrre linm per 
•M-rb with Britrih sludmJ m London 
lj>rMlrn) LndMi dirlion ■* of tor om- 
vnre Goad rate of pew. BOX G37 

C23 per or up to oafd for sUier arUcm 
£260 per or lor 4Md. All diamond 
tnreltorv bcmqhl Ml Hart Ol 060 8030 
nr Wmr 361 Harrow Road. London. 
W9. AH Cntiaoa ccncred 

TWO TICKETS ■ Rpmwnbranre Service 
Atom Hall. Saiurday Msra. Ltfrume 
amoriion Anvthuig paid. Tel i0953) 
331009 day lime. 

JEWELLERY. COM. SO vet. (MmotMti ur 
genus' wan led. top pnw wiBiams. 43 
LaniClt condldl SI WC1 . O! 406 8538. 

MASOMC ItiiUAU and til retain] artt- 
rtn wanted. Tel 01 239 9bl& 

WANTED EOwanttui Victo rian and til 
panned furmlure. Mr AUNon Ol W 
5946. 667-669 CarraU Lane. EdMML 
SW17 

WANTED Old low Dough! for catn. 
nmnr John Janes. 0343 674233. 


FOR SALE 


F IE I W WAT Median Grand Patent oner- 
slnnw. NO 81243. about 1906. 
Rosewood case Good condition £5.760 
wtui nano siool and raunr rack. Tel 
0293 22278. 


V STEMWAY GRAND Aim. CfJOO. 
Berfwwi bpngnt im need of wiiail at- 
IntUbnl £500. Tel^U-674 3468 


— B iro OF WTTUKD CJitpoericiaie 

aha Sheraton style dung fundhifa 

made to order, over SO dtomb suttefi ai- 

wavr aiailaMr fpr mantdiaie dettvery. 

NHUebed. near Henfey on Thames 

■CM91I 641H5. Bdumetoouin roecat 

295880. Toortiam. Devon <0592871 
7443. BtfKrfe*-. Oto 104637610952. : 

WraoroiXST Mohr hdre/doer/ wine 
wiih oof Iradlmnjil Ouobty pr wa ea and 
nwnm. from £69 dMhnrd. Details 
1 1 on i vmo m. 40 Conrtiioa Rd. BW2 
OTA. Ol 737 6388. 

FINEST aualitv wool carpets AI bade 
prices and under, also available 100 ‘s 
raira. Lame room sne rennanu under 
naif normal price. aiancen> carpets oi 
405 0463. 

FITTED Mreltitina feather ! rimmed nunn 
root bv WiUnOf London. Sae lO. leoote 
45 tnrbrv Pnrtert rondluon. £Uti 
■06321 6929p2 

nun FOR ANT EVENT, Cats. Star- 
bedn tun. Chrw. LnMn. AH UieMreand 


Tel- 821 6616/8280496. 

Ml / Visa / Dinrrv 

■m—AV DUE 7 Olve someone til ortgf- 
nti Tunes Newspaper dated the very 
day they were born. £12-90. 0492- 
31303. 

SEAIFWOCRS Besi uckets tor aU aoW- 
oul events. Our rl reiris include most 
nsuor compomes. Credll cams accepted. 
Ol 828 167a 


Refuitosnrd / Ln refurnished. Orttoe nr 
/ Shipping arranoed. Tel 0932 2297 42 
or DOW. 

HE TERES .1790-1986. Other UOes 
avaD. Hand bound ready for presenta- 
tion ■ also “Sundays". £12-50, 
Remember When. 01-688 6323. 
WORLD HOCHEY Cup Final 2 beu ttbnd 
bcKete for vHr Between 6 and 8 pm 
tonignt TeL0086 40000 Proceeds to 
chamy. 

CATS, CHESS, Lm MB. All theatre and 
spun. Trt «39 1763. AU major credit 

(dv flWElERS. ele. ri m 

you buy cheaper? BAS Lid. 01 229 
1947/0468. 


announcements 


^ How near 
CV) we a re to 
^ thecure... 
...depends on you. 


LEUKAEMIA 

RESARCB FUND 


VCUI3)J M*40501M 

■Jiii agiisgfciti filtihi 


Thousands 
of people need 
your help to 
ease the pain 
of cancer. 

Tap ran help m. lo icpbo: tot aad do- 
sjav «ilh calm and thfuil) «» w mao>. 
I*v makiapa Ickm-v. cmcsmi or ilonauoo. 

Flcrw rnoiaci nv lor ddah «T lutmta 
n*hi mu si at 

f be. Ntiiiieul Sdcidv far Cancer KrlkC 
Rihmi 74 V \nrtMc Hook 15-19 Bnucn 
Su Ionian SW1 3TT. 

lctelWiure H1-.1M 7811. 


MftnwiTbm fnnd 
ftwumd ti itiMtaui SciariyMf Boca ftrid 
BehUto 361017 



FOR SALE 


With 8S0 fdenutt*. ' 

I duftun and IcriniEiUB in 
our own bhotaiurie*. owe 
BLI'V nT ywr dmUM or 
Iqscy new dirndly lo 
mnuck. 

Send UcPO Bus 123. 
RiMaTl. Lioeato* Iw Fiflck 
L*di«i Wr-iURX 

F”C tyis tut H 


SEND FG« YOUR 
FREE CHRISTMAS 
CARD CATALOGUE 
to-RMn-K.Ep.Bdx-W. 
BanDn-oa-lremJDEH 3LQ« 
KkphcaiL- ttZB 30M4 


SAVE A PILE! 
RESIST A “CARPETS 

Mermurion veil m pOr cprpeHng )4 
plain mom Bom in mgrriay 12* 
wide Intel stork. 7 year Wear guafK. 
Rri>toi hocncoroinre. ca 76 per «ayd. 
CSarkoptas cork iiIh Natural: 275 X 
276 OW toll PC toT anywhere E8-96 
pw mi. yd Perfect gmtfv. 

Plus trie Laigrtl aeimian of More rar- 
peflna in London. All prices mcHaiw 
m VAT 

ids Wpnftwanti Brugr Rd 
Parsons Green SU6 

. Td: 01-731-3368/9 

Free EsUmatirt-t-toM nuins 


SAY IT WITH MUStC 
Say IT WITH MARKSONS 

tod rhoofc from htiwircdi of itec&fH and 
pMd pon» far tale or ten Awn ooljr 
£16 pm. 

MARKSON PIANOS . 

Albany SL NW1 

01 935 8682 

Artillery Place. s£l8 

01 854 4517 


CHAPPELL PIANOS 

EX! 1811 <M BdiMSlrM 

SPECIAL OfTERS ON EXISTING 
8En.RSISIIMENT5TOCK 
AVAILABLE UNTIL OCT I8H1 

9.7% TYPICAL APR 

co 25A, dremfl balanre repayable w 
2d equal toonthly louaitonKs al 3°» 
fral inlemt rate pa. 
CHAPPELL OF BONO STRECt 
so new bono srnttr loncxjn. wi 

01-491 2777 


the piano ■vomtsHor race emu 

over I year iAPR qv.i low inireoi 
ralnoirt 2 rears (APR 9 5“»l& 3 ran 
■APR 12 2*»i Wruieti auMauom. Free 
CaUMMiur 30a Hlghgale Road. NWS 
Ol 267 7671 


Z BEAUTIFUL. I lc chale io Grands. muH- 
rtona instrumeniv. good anre fof qutoH 
sale 586 d9Bl.iT) 

8ROADWOOD Mini UprltiU OoRagc PI 
and. Euiwn ptaymg onKi.luned. 
Mini rondUion . Ol 463 0148. 

HARPSWtiORD. doUMr manual alter 
Tosaui uy John Rawwn. 2 v 8*. btdf: 
E4 J00. iBexntUi 0424 316616. 

OBAMprATHEH CLOCK. Early lSIh a 
Obh_ braes fflti. 30 hr. Htaghi en 2*. 
Very flood rood £660. Ol 3732916. 

YORK CRAZY PAVING tor oaten and 
driveways. Spare needed, hence low 
Ditccs 061 223 0881. 061 231 6786. 

YORK FUUTOHO for polios 6 drtvo- 
wn>n Uowdation sate. Tel 061 223 
0881/061 231 8785. 


SHORT LETS 


WIDLIY, BarnfiBi 2 mi ai l imi Hs . 3 
bed. I reception, during, intctten. baov 

nwm eshBreiaitN garden. £166 ow in 
noor. £175 pw peuM Door Company 
let or ramlthes preferred. 34 1 0146. 


HMWnmNE. Luxury serviced mo. 
From £326 pw Tefewpnone Staane 
Pronet Ues U d 673 ogGOJTi. 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, central Lon- 
don from £326 pw. Rmg Town Use Apts 
373 3433 

SERVICED APARTMENTS In tfentinoton. 
Col T V 24 hr Sw Telex. CoUmonato 
Apartment*. 01 373 6306. 


FLATSHARE 


HtCIOURT Prof M/F2Se to share house 
with gaMen. O/R 6 O/Balh. £80 pw * 
Mils. Tel. 01 364 2508 


S*fl 1 Nr BR. Piw/r. rt/fc to Share lux Oti 
wrth owner. 6/r. £40 par act Tri Ol 
228 4803 irves). 


FLATMATES firtrctive tearing. Wefl 
hm unrodurury s e rvice. PKo let tor 
MML 01-669 6491. 313 BNtoPfoa 
• Road. SW3 


TOOTRS B KCi nr titie * comtoon. m/r. 
lo snare super ftoi wtui prof fa, 27. 
wash/mactv video eic. CiTO pan mcl 
Tel: 01-767 8884 toner 81 


>WU Prof F share large now* with F 
owner * son (31. All Camuna. Ow BR 
A Bmen1IK9. £A3pwexcL 01-8767334. 

CHISWICK: Prof pemn. n/s 2333 yre. 
Sharp nai. own room. cti. £196 PCm Inc. 
TW994-2798 itiler 7pm A w/ondsl 

HUM we Prof f 20 + lo share lux nw 
Wtoi rote. CM. AH macMnoft. Nr. tube. 
£178 .PCM DM. 01 067 6203 

FMMOIIY PARK O/R. SB*. £«0pW bKI 
ncreot weohone. 01-281 0323 eves. 

HARWELL / Dittrn border Prof person lo 
share lm flat. WE £oopw. TriOi mo 
7682. 

uru VEMCCE. Prof M/r 2636. Lge 
O/R HI aegkffl Oat with gdAL Nr luoe, 
OTOpwlnrl 38803381012868284(H) 
RMMMME WLL Sbiqto prof m/f. o/r to 
share roimortaMe llti with I other. 
Owe tub*. £80 pw ok. Tel 686 3880. 

SW2 large Horn room. 4oM house, sull 
grad. M. 26 +. Cl 70 px.rn.Tei: 01-671 
3241. 

WIMBLEDOH, prof I. n/s. to share 3 bed 
house, o/r. ctore LT. £165 pen esKL 
Tel: 01-040 2131 (after 630) 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


IT’S ALL AT 
TRAELFINDERS 
Worldwide low con nights 
The hest - and w* can- prove It 
190.000 cherts since 1970 

AROLND THE WOULD FROM £781 
SYDNEY 6374 6660 

PERTH 1374 ffiOO 

AUCKLAND J3W £748 

BANGKOK 009 £ 36 

SINCAPORE E209 £41B 

HONG KONC C2«8 £496 

DELHI/ BOMBAY C231 £385 

GOLLMBO £237 £418 

NAIROBI 042 £369 

JOteLRC £286 £4» 

LIMA C363 £496 

LOS 4N0ELLH Cl 96 £296 

NEW VDflK C 99 U98 

WASHINGTON £180 £360 

BOSTON £149 £298 

HONOLLLL £281 £457 

CENC\ A L 75 £ 94 

TRAILFINDERS 

4248 EARLS COCRT ROAD 
LONDON W8 6EJ 
CunmP/l-SA ruohtt 01-937 6400 
Loag Haul FNgMs 01 603 1815 
aad Ol 937 9631 
-IM/BushlMS Oass 01 938 3444 
Goirtmnenl LKmsed/Banded 
ABTA WTA ATOL/14BB 


TRAVEL' UJfIRE. Worldwide flights 

speeiaunng m lit Club Class, economy 

to Australia. South Africa. USA. Lemon. 

Faro. Geneva. Aho accomodation Swm 

Alas. Laban Coasts. Alpane Apt* A pn- 

v«e villas. Ol 666 7026 ABTA 73196 


1MFARE SPECIALISTS Sydmy d/w 
£420 rm E764. Auctdand O/W £420 rui 

£776. Jo'Barg o/w £246 rtn £A8Q: Las 

Angeles o/w £178 rto £390. London 
Fhtot Centre 01^570 6332. 


ONE CALL for same of toe best deals In 
nitftts. ap a rtmen ts- holds and rar lure. 
Td London Ol 636 5000. Mancnester 
061 832 2000. Air -Travel Advisory 
Bureau 


V ALEXANDER European Sun. FUgtds. 
01-402 4262/0062 

vamcander CnmnnlUve worldwide 
lares. 01-723 2277. Aba Atoi lata 
Acres&ATsa. 


CORFU BareuMRs. Beau toil del Milas nr 
brarh. 2 prs Cl 99 1 wit. £229 2 whs. 
Aha Malta A Cyprus. Gat/HTow. Pan 
World Holidays 01 734 2862. 

LAIN AMERICA. Low rod nights r.g 
Rio £48b. Lm C49S nn. Also SmaH 
Group Holiday Jounmisjeg Peru from 
£3501 JLA 01-747-3106 
LOW FARES TO America. Australia * 
Nrw 2 mmikL Trt; 01 -930 2866. Hern us 
Travel 3S Wihimi&u. LandUn. swi. 
ABTA 3483X. 

LOW FARES WORUWnOE ■ USA. s. 
Amenra. MM and Far EasL S Africa. 
Trayvalr. 48 Margaret Street. WI. 01 
S90 2928 (Visa Aeremedl 
MtAML JAMAICA, N.YORM, Worldwide 
enunimnD For tor ctieapeH farm, try 
us JM RKnmond TraieL 1 Duke Street. 
Rimmond Surrey ABTA 01 9404073. 
M FFO rt UR Seel vale to CSA-Cartbbean- 
Far Lati- Australia call me 
profdAMiMb ABTA 1ATA cr csceyted. 
Trt Ol 254 5788. 

AUCAMTE, Faro. Mataga dr Onend 
Train ATOL 1783 01-581 4MI. 
. Hormam 68641 

ATHENS. Malaga.* Faro. Palm*, mm 
inns a Xmas, also Italy Germany a, 
SSwds lr £59 Piter Pen OI 491 2749 
BAHRAIN Return Fam Banqhok. MtexU- 
M. Hum Kong- lodia. AwlrabriSM. Ring. 
GIMnrt-revi 01 737 2163/2212 ABTA 
EUROPE 'WORLD HU Idwm tareg on 
nunn/wnemunf fits. Pimm FUgm oi 
631 0167. Agl AMM 1893. 

HOLLAND. Daily fboilto. CSS O/W £65 
Pin New >mL. Cl 29 O/w C2S6 Rm. 
Miratur .Irt. Ol 379 3372 
H0trt> KONC HU, IahBKoh. W. 
btetoipprr L4S7 CHHrt Ft oln-,. 01 584 
6514 A BTA 

KITLHUCC TRAVEL Arrrinon sour 1MI 
Will «fflfl4rnrr Pplm * fll* 

wide 01 584 3964/01225 0221 AB1 X 
ROME Lisbon £99 Frankfurt Bans £60. 
LTD 01 328 3Wo/0l 651 4513. 
ABTA 

SPAIN PwtiMrt Cananm Greere Italy ir 
LM - Sunwnert 01-434 4397/8 

ATOL 1776 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SUPER HOLIDAY 
SALE 

Crete, Corfb. Rhodes. Kgs. 
Scffll 1 W Greet Wands. The Algarve, 
MeiWfrt, Tenenfe. 


U 13 if n> IgXUtf/ ■ 

74J&2&27JOawiD 
M.BMVE Zirt. 

23 Si'll 


Iwfc 

2i*ki 

£13 

ties 

Etffl 

£179 

£1S 

£13 

£95 

ESS 

£189 

t&B 


DECfJti.roe Bti 

TtNEWt 

nHOR {fept fan. 

VHi » and ntil MW hsWqs a® AoM 
bomGiMiA.Litt'ieMUanMstHlueitttib 
wsoskIwMI Bmnuns. tmwifi Q4ii» 
kntdH CBS BMMog oMy 

tied bom 

VENTURA HOUDAYS 

W London 014251 5*56 
Tel SMMd 07*2 331100 
W MtitneUtr 081 034 5033 
ATOL 2034 


BARBADOS 

My bon owns a fabulous may 
staffed villa wim pool on me West 
Cttett. Doe to recent cancrBaDon 
we Bow nave vacancies tor me 
month of November. Normal rental 
N £2500 per week excluding 
airfares far 6 people. WB do far 
CX700. Also avaUaWe honeymoon 
cottage sleeps 2. Rent £400 P.w. 
excluding airfares. 

For farther details A brochures 
CtiC- 

Sawtra Yeuowtey 
d thing Office bows cm 
021-233 1200 or write to:- 
87 Camden Street Hockley. 
Btraringham B1 3DE. 


SICILY 

AUTUMN BARGAINS 
Treat youm-H to Item mcrepUonal op- 
portunity of a wnal end of rnemon 
offer Hi TAORMRriA. one of toe 
world’s most elegant mortm. 

21 Ortooer 10 note* £249 

23 October 13 Plate, C22U 

28 Orioper 8 mgtes £179 

30 OnotoFr a Mgbis £169 

2 NMenlber 3 n kg tin £139 

FUUV Inrf M dnvtlmc Gatwick nWUK 
BVB acrote. land iranefere A atrport 
Udu* NO HIDDEN EXTRAS. 

ISLAND SUN. ^ 

B2 BprMffliltom Gato. London SW1 1 uPO 

01-222 7452 

ABTA/ATOL 1907 , 

tf kWh bland toon pK &(M> 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Return Hrflrn 

JtFburWHar £A(to Douato £*2 0 
MlroM £390 Sydney £760 

Cara £230 Auckland C78S 

Lagoa £360 - Hong Kong £590 

Drt/SoMuy £350 MEand £330 
Bangkoli C3GO And Many More 
AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 
162/108 Regent St. WI 
TtL 01-437 82S6/6/7/B 
Late A Group Bookings welcome 
AMLX/VISA ACCESS/ DINERS 


LOWEST FARES 

Part* £69 N YORK £276 

Frankfurt £60 LA/SF £355 

Lagto £520 Mia ml £320 

Nairobi £326 Singapore £420 

Jo ‘burg £460 Bangkok £336 

Cairo £206 Katmandu £440 

Ort/Bom C336 Rangoon £350 

Horn Kong C5I0 Crtrutto £428 

Hngt- Omnnanls A,Hl on IN A Cteb Clan 

SUN & SAND 

21 SwoHow st. London Wi 
01-439 2100/437 0557 


NEW LOW FARES 
WORLDWIDE 

AMMAN ‘ £280 fLARACW E27D 

BOMBAY - £325 LAODS E330 

CAIRO £21 D MIAMI- E283 

OBJ* £3«6 ROME £105 

FRA RJPT £65 SEOUL £605 

HONG KONG £*95 SVD/MEL £765 

ISTANBUL CIBO TOKYO £500 

SKYLORD TRAVEL LTD 

S DENMAN STREET. LONDON WI 
T*f 01-439 3521/0007 
AIRLINE BONDED 


4 . 

.Snood advin; and rtudmcc oo irdacms l 
tool iQirlroov 
Iri & dsbifeM 037T 4M» 

Sou, tofteuda. ISA 8 eroap Mqamx. 
orn? 4315ft 
Any /NX A Far Elsl cic 
ofiS-uvn 

Comrorfral ScnHuii ipccialot 
OlriJ.TOTII 

TOAVa WORLD. 

ABTA 72W2- Montw ti UR Inawe Of 
Trawl & Twnsm. 


UP UP & AWAY 

NairoU. Jo 'Burg. Cairo. Dubti. 
MantHd. Singapore. K.L DetoL 
Bangkok. Hgng Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. * The Americas. 


76 Shofttfbury Avenue 
London WIV7IX2. 

01-439 0IQ2/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


ABtlKMETS SneclalM) New Vork £259. 
LA C345. Toronto £119. NatTOM £329. 
Sydney £759 Auckland £749. Dartafr 
130 Jcrmyn Sraun 830 7144 


UUSIUUIIEM CM fughu/hoto to Eu- 
rope. USA A ma%t deai to aiioiia. 
Dlptomal Travel: 01730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


1ST A CLUB CLASS FUOMTS: H uge Pia- 
rouno Sun world Travel. (03727) 
26097/271 09/27538. 


CHCAP FUtam Worldwide. Haymarkrt 
01-930 1366. 


PM COURT FARC* Worldwide- 01-434 
0734 Jupilrr Travel. 


FLmTROOHRS Dticounl Fare* world- 
wide. 01-487 9100 


LOW CM rare* to LSA Malar Travel. 
Ol 486 9237. IATA. 


01 734 5307. ABTA/AIOl. 


Repent SL WI. 
-A/AUri. 


S. AFRICA From £466. 01-384 7371 
ABTA. 


SPAM. Portugal. Owapea Ibm. Biggies. 
01 735 8191 ATOL 


1ST. Club & Economy GUns. Speturi 
tares. HTT TdC 01930 1366. 


WEEKEND or week*. Honeyrooom or 
2nd Honeymoons ... Dtscovei tor Maw 
of tody's ramanur due* In Aiaumn or 
Winior. Call 01-749 7d49 Mr your 
FREE colour brochure Maw of Italy 
Drof T. 47 Shepherds Bush Orem. Lon- 
don. W12 BPS. 


TAKE TME OFF to Pad*. Amsterdam. 
Brussels. Bruges. Cenma. Berne. Lau- 
sanne. The Hague. Dtddta. Rouen. 
Boulogne & Item. Time QfT 2a. Ches- 
m Close. London. SW1X.7SQ. 01-236 
8070 


Laranrote. Puerto del 

Carmen Huh standard acta with pool 
toWtide from 30/10. Trnertfe 28/10 
nOdoyd- S/C pnm from C249. <0923i 
778344 Timswav Hotxays. ABTA 
ATOHL 1107 


SPAM PORTUGAL CMXCCt FllghB 
roidor Ol 471 0047 ATOL 1640. 
Arrru/ISL 

1ST/CLDB Eronomv ftigiiu worldwide. 
Cornel Trairt. 01 434 1091. ABTA 
IAI 4 

SYD/MGL C635 Perth C86S. All m»or 
ramrrs lo Aus/NZ. Oi 584 7371 

ABTA 

TUNISIA For vour holiday where Ha *dU 
mj ramrr Call f Of oui brochure now Tu- 
iihue Traiel Bureau. Ol 373 4411. 

ALL US ernes Lowest tarn on motor 
wnca u led rarrnr*. 01 584 7371. ADI A 

AUUUIVE. Lire illkr, wito Boots On 6 
I mu vmHn Crtlcrs wrlfome. Ol 409 

nun \iiuwono 

ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE __ 
Tnr mini hooves for rental - 73 Si 
Jriim- Si. SU 1 01 491 0802 

ALMEIDA Quiet winter warm valley 
Bou-L non. uoll Apt *U> 4/5. Bearn 
Manra 10 . mm* FNI* t80 pw. 0604 
887313. 


WINTER SPORTS 


IE SKI 

BEST VALUE IN COURCHEVEL 
Wri4il-sf'«s(l0ttefl h «aMC''l‘*n toW 
Ltan.<rrYBOiM'-uqBiintoaiu nj-mpr 
« Kbc-Y-n rw^efasi ita* ataw i mu re 
‘ipeb i*n & wre e* »st pew» sawa 

U TO tiCnQ i 6X1 » W Djpl ♦ SO m 
iranssw pas mstes to 4 BIA 1 WJUfWV 
ftpir a <-.ks & m Wi Mete* pa, mi i ti 

D<WIM«R 

LE SKI 
0484 548996 


SKI WEST • NEW! Sperial Offer* on 
•paupv RING TOR A DLALI ADooton 
amuimh' taw mm Motuno ti £59. 
aw lor a rnn ol our Dwnprr nrothure. 
•011786 9999 Abta 6926b AM IMS 


TMHES flfniil rlmtrt. 7/10. 

linn h i not, . <i*n I nod. new riopn. Ol 

one 6414 


Fffif.1 Rli. mil rree Ltfl Pawn Fieri 
Mvaamr. lire diMnn'iMUmiiiin , 
<tn loi nn many dales I k rirt , A aprt 
lioiuUtiwiri.4 Maurhevter from C119 
m I imMII Ol 741 4686 A ODl 236| 
0019 >\rUL432. 


SKI BEACH Villas. Switzerland. 
France. Andorra A the Itfehan {Mo- 
rn lies at unbeatable prices A 
generous group dbcounb. Ring us oft 
(0223) 311113 ABTA 141BX ATOL 
301 B. 


UU Wtaxz ■ LX CITING OFFERS' Jwl 
fUhnq a rhalrt tor lO mirikra you to a 
rREXMWday any date- mows oi oth- 
er dwounb foe catered chateb, prices 
from C1999 S/c £59. tong in now Ol 
370 0999 


■HI BONNE HKICE - CmHUiw wecioh In 

Court he, u only £239* rm a ctvairt and 
go rRELI Ring w for UrCtils Ol 244 
7333 


IllMM Only £197 
nw plus Free 
Itonl mm lias opoorli 
Ol 370 0999 


cnaMalnri 
for Crew* 
many Shi Wmre 


CHEAT Ski mo Holiday*. 7th Person free. 
January aiatiMIv. Nnt John Morgan 
now 10730) 68621 124 nn) 


Menbette. VIBarv Mearnr Com fori *rt 
lire, great, ikung Phone Ol KH 97e6 
SKI THACCRi Sttierb 6/C to Tlgnes La 
Pi none Dm, Atom A M r*r*e Pncm 
from only £69! Ol 244 7861 
SKIWOftLD TOP SM Resort*. Lowest 
Pnre* from £69. ABTA. Brochure. 01 
602 4826. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


SCOUT AMES Mr Alinuma A Dnrign 
ns rnnunral s U mu o ao rv poulton* 
AMSA hpmahu Rer Cm OI 734 
0632 


DOM ESTI C/C ATE RING 
SITUATIONS 


NANNY irgulred by POfraknal rmJari 
with one Ho re year om bov. eduraied. 
taiino iwiinv lo Use m. Must be able to 
lime. <to some Bfflil home keeptog. 
ioof.mii end primarily rhMd rare duties. 

Hoorn. bomiL and 

pt m tried Please if 


men! reronL reawans lor Inirreu In 
posiiion. stiarv reuiatemenla and photo 
l espraises Jnulf be senl to Dr and Mrs. 
krsut Kirsons. 26 PrtM ewo od Dr. 
Irslne. M. ISA. 92714. 


LEITH'S goad load realdre an mmos 
look, regular and Nh Hoe. walling and 
tension lor on ranting nrw tentinr m 
hlmtioii Couuri DuW ot Karen on Ol 
261 0216 


0VHHCAS au pair agency 87 Rearm 
f»rm. London WI Trt 439 6964. 
LK /Overseas. Also miirtp*/aanw 

(emp/prfrn 


UVE gu Nanny/ cnod mho- nrMrd tar 
SIMP baby in W2. Trt: 01-362 9433 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


E XPORT MARHETRW WOCtLDWRNE. 

Too female Marketing LxcrnUse fGer- 
man ongtnL 5 language*, leading gos- 
Ittom in sartom European cwNna. 
OxrtMi novels, looking mi chattrnguig 
poHlum. Reply lo BOX C36. 


1*0 rapnrtenred CIO often* tmrvrtl 
lame I rumen/ exemplary randurf 
mordsi wtshing lo lease the Carre In 
mrt to further ihetr'rareers seek re- 
sponsiMe wen paid peUMra South can 
I.iwkum preferred. Reply to BOX C14 


LONDON PROPERTY 


MEWS flat mural, near Harley a reel, s 
sppnmis rooms k/b. CM. igrK up ga 
iw. «mng wuh tel. rurUtos furnttore 
etr. 7 vem kw Niairti OHer C34000. 
Trt Ol 631 3603. 


Houses/ Fiats 
■n Chelsea. KiughMondge, aripavu. 
Kensington Comofeie erteruon from 
£300.000 to C2 imthon. Barrtoglon 
Sjimdrrs LM Ol 68* 2561. 


IW1L Larger llun aseraoe Irrr house. 
■Hue mept. kil/breakfsl rm. mtin bed 
will itarss ui q rm and Mb. 3 further 
beds. 2nd both, cellar, mature gdn. 
£163.000. Trt Ol 238 1296 


^SjjOMERSET&AVOT^^J 


SOMERSET 

Luge bungalow. Lovety 
munleirupt wi new, 
r.irmhouse Mlrnen. Dmtno room, 
lounge. Three bed, Dreuung room 
Bathroom Ceniraov healed Large 
tendril Ten munlrs Writ* or 
CLnltmbury. C66JOOO. 

TeL- ( 0458 : 33050 


FRANCE 


Fayrtire. 6 berth. IBS 
bdr home Peoredd sHr. NO low 
lanipHn. riH lanoues CS.OOO. Tel 
Oo3H 715296. 


RENTALS 


FULHAM s/c fiiPy lurntshed garden rial 2 
bedrooms utlmg roam, kitrhrn. bath- 
room. co Irt. C476 p.c.ivi. Trt. Mom 
736 7133 £xt 32HTI 


HYDE PK W2 Sunny mew* Me. 3 tm 
beds 2 bilts master rn note * wnim 
Roof gdn Is sep Terr Huge oorn-plan lge 
Exert I urn. C6S0 ow. oi 723 4133 


MOCWTSpmCL Smnii) 3 bedim 
fully furn A rhukm) In llti in antit 
wrtl lorated block Poner. 3 mnms + Co 
Id. C390 Pw 673 5950 m 


LANCASTER CATE. 5C IU1 now latanl. 
I bed. 1 rerep. btih. krtch. CH. lilt 
Cl 20pw Co lei pref Tel 262 897b or 
S29 2242 


PARSONS CREEK Charming 4 bed house. 
2 btihs due recto, fully coupon! 
kitmcn/dimra room ransmtiorv 
£275 pw CO lei Trt.Ol-870 1964 
PRIMROSE WLL NWI BcauiUui I bed 
room tax hum redmgs W rerp room, 
rams from tube shoo, A pork C145 PW. 
TO. 01 722 9513 «H» 01 B» 9184 lOi 
937 MSI The number to remember 
uneti seeking best remti nropenies in 
moral and prune Lonnon area* 
£150/£2.000ew 

vnMBLSDOH P /Furnished 2 bed nurten- 
rtie. 24fl rereo. kurtini. namroom. 
•mi den Co Let prrf . o monm non 

CISC PM- Of 795 7338 or 10702163241 

TORN ESTATES. Are yeti ronlufrd loci 
s hrrti oi looking lor a name lo mu in 
Lanaon ^ Don't nr. Mepnone the ntpcTls 
on 01 724 0336 

A WEST END I iti and House* Lnl lo Fof 
Sab-/IH Drills WfNHIe Ol 402 7381. 

CENTRAL LONDON ? warned. Prof i 
seeks ll/s romioruote flat O/R. nr lube. 
Trt 01 22o 1909 / 377 7176- 
CHELSEA liohl tu\ bah- ony Hat. rrrrp. 
diM,- bniioom lift, porter. Long in Trt. 
01 62? S82S 


ILiK .md houses to Irt 
lliiiiindmiii tlw ItorktaiHh .UN TrtrOl 

7tei ufxj 

OCKLAMW | U* 2 bed Hilly furnished 
nieisule inlLH|i'.9ritdrtl. GlSOpw TeL 
Ol 515 9157 

FULHAM Loi eft- in floor dal. rerpL dM 
bnl. din/bed. M< 4 balh CR Nr lube 
£160 pw Trt. 01 386 7S94 


RENTALS 


For the nest 
irtHti -rtniHM of 
OLALITV 
FLATS, A HOLSE3, 
in pfMr London MW 

QURA1SHI 

CONSTANTINE 

270 Earls Court Rood. Kws 
01 244 7333 


12 HERTFORD STREET. 

MAYFAIR.WI 

We are ore rtrewd to a nn o u ncr iheoorn 
tog of Hertford* <f.hftr we con offer a 
srternon ol Hikiirv Wild hi i a. ; (ted 
tiuiimnKs imKVd B dan pw 24 hour 
ootlefrige 

We mw you to come 
along A siew 

HERTFORDS 

01 093 088? 


ATE Luxury modern detached 
imsn hduse nrai uffle Newly furnniM. 
4 bra. 2 MUi. l shower, lounge, 

f/knrnen. unttsfapea garden, garage 

uso ms A«au Mnnnen 86 Ijhhu- 

nr* Ol 556 0270 ilrom 12th Onober 

eti 


’ W 8APP lUtirteiUHil KeriKesi Lid le 
Hour pcopetnes m Chiliiil. South and 
bid london lie. is nr watltnu BUM 
triads ha 01 221 8835 


SW1 MM for entertaining rtegant a 
b» wlu H4 P i w Ua) newly der hoattous 
DbleihHPprel original (ctiures 3Bedv 
2 Baths, i r hd. casepw unfurn Uoo*ca 
.828 8251 


BUNni 581 5138 Kir Good giMiifv 
■Hooerurs osalltirir now tn Clwnra. 
ftiiMiNnMr* KrmhKMOfi HMD £190- 
LI.OOOpss- 


DULWICfL 3/4 lied mod house on pniale 
rsLale large rereo. oarage Unr slanon 
andvhocri* Long lei EtSOpw Tel. Ol 
761 0444 124 hrsl 


> near heath Luxury fui. I 
duuMe 1 sinffle bed large Munae. din 
inaarea. rouiHrv kurhen Mini mum M 
1 yrw £250 pw 794 2789 


SUPERMM FLATS A HOUSES aid! 6 
read lor Mhmuis rwiniin Lung A 
Mini lets ui all areas Upfriena A CO 
an. Atoemartr Si wi oi 499 5334. 


SWnS Srtt roplomeu fully equipped flan 
aiaMtiHe in preOtgiotB Mock 1/2 dm. 
rnnm. Cl 20 CIBO pw Trt:OI 878 
7766 


AVAR f«r NOW Luiturv fiat* A nrnnes 
C20O - Cl CWO pw Tel Bui on, 581 
6136 


LONDON LETS Sfud/1 bed iron £120 
pw 2/3/4 bM rtn non a homes from 
£200 pw Phone 01-491 7645 ITI 


MAYFAIR Lux 5/C flat 2 Bearm* LOT 
Lounge Ktl Balh & WC n £200pw. 
Tel: 493 7830 Burford A CD 


SHILLANDPAim superb Itm HM sUhOIng 
■n Bsr in own ornds mm. 2 Me. 
\ etegant irrecn iptiieHed dtoingrm). I 
dMe/ 2 sntq hem. 2 balhs 1 1 en ouiei FF 
kil. garage 8/ alami. of I si Dkg- CH tort 
£500 pw. Go let only 603 7749 Ot 0296 
74JOI14 


AMEMCAM EXECUTIVE Seek* lux 
flai/houerf iu> lo CBOOpw. Usual fen 
reg pin Hi pi Kay A Lawn. South of the 
Park Chet*ea off ire. 01 352 Bill or 
North at the ran. Regent"* Park office. 
01 886 9882. 


. Regerm park. Luxury 
efeoaiu apartment. douMe bMfoom. re- 
repuan. mutroom. uura modern 
Lnctien, reraen alorv/dtoutg room, pa- 
bo. £200 pw. Company let. Mr Phdltp* 
Ol 935 6868 


M1UE51IMU A ronsiantty changing se- 
leruon of tormlwd Ml A house*. 
£i50ow c&OOOow BetuiamA Reeve*. 
Kenungton A sureounaing ureas. Oi- 
938 3522 


I Superb fukury 

2 bed*. 2 balh*. FF kitchen, wash/ancr. 
Spanoas raaenumed mature from / 
rear garden*. Oge. Close to common / 
uUage. Irt 01 879 0801 etenmp*. 


Morgan* Walk. New. tally 

equipped rial. 2 dMe DrtH. 1 angle. 2 
barm. Carage. pertly garden. £250pw 
for hnniedple Irt Trt 985 1997. 


CHELSEA. Newly roniened maisonette. 
OirnOMungmer 2 dM bed*. 2 balh*. 2 
receps £260pw. Co- trt 060882 338. 
FULHAM mats. Sail 3/4 2Sql beds. 1 dM 
wtlhensuur washroom Bath. kit. laigc 
In inp room. CH. Newly carprted. £196 
pw TrtDI 892 3140 
OVENLOOHINS Montague bg Gdns W 1. 
Simhous 1 bed llti. CI75&.W. Trt. Ol 
035 3393 

PUTNEY. LUX 1 bed flti. Co Lrt. CIIO 
p w Dus M«fM. Ol 942 9883. 

% HEN. Superb 1 dMe dm flti. Cooker, 
fridge. TV. phone. CH. oge. £120 pw. 
Rental Guide 01 686 6662. 6 day* 

CT JOHNS WOOD i bed flat Lux Mock. 
Newly decorated. Porters Shop Nr Ha- 
lion. £1-46 pw. Trt. Ol 452 6890 
SW. Own new der dMe rm. Sun couple. 
CH. Phone C47 pw. Many omen loo. 
Rwilti Guar 01686 6562 UI 7pm 

WI In, I bed Al in a b h 'Cl 30 p.w. On 
let unlv Newman Dr VereOI 936 0746 
until twm 

WEST KEN A srter no n of rharmhig fr.l 
bed wurliHtols from Cl 20 pw mr Ol 
675 UNbiTI 

CAM ACCESS TO all type* jKonunnU 
lion in all areas Coll Sue on Ol 68b 
6652 Denial Ciude open 6 day* IN 7pm 
HAMPTON. Drligniful C bed. 2 reccp CH 
hse. Phone, washer, gge. Siril family 
C92 pw Rental Guide Ol 686 6562 
HHHOATC MG Super refurbished 2 bed 
lux flti. oarages available. CiaO pw. oi 
340 7408. 

KEMCMCTON. WB. Brand new ill fir lux 
mac . | dwe bed. large rer . kli/diner. 1 
mm High Si C1BS pw met. 938 3395. 
MAYFAIR HYDE PARK. The mod luxuri- 
ous long/ short XT* 1/6 beds nest price* 
Ol 936 9612 it) 

MUSWELL (DLL. DrUgMfui HP I bed dal 
with gdn in Edwardian Me for prof nA 
couple Ret*. £120 PW. Ol 583 9008 
NR KARROOS Superb oewty done apart- 
ment. tarar reception. dM norm. k&B. 
patio. £200 pw. Trt ^89 1789 
ONSLOW HARDENS LosrtV flat' 1 DMe 
Bed Rereo. Kil Batorm Oulrt £I80pw 
me CH&HW 828 0040 m. 


RENTALS 


HARLEY 

STREET 


inp floor ipgaraM nai. 
l MunHsttort 3 iwdtoam uUmanH. 
kiiinrn. iMUum. w-tMfoip wr Ldl 
Hurt intev, Rem V3d0pw iwliruse 
t nnHMHi Irt / temnexs r o ute. 

Irt 01 935 2181 


COMPANY NOTICES 


Nl W Bi'LOH K ASAP 
I4IMP.WY LtMTI LD 

NurKj of mlotinu 

MIIKL Oi III RT.BY 0*73*1 Ihti Ihe 
uviHkii turn OidiHti v Giwiti MrMHM or 
llk> inuHuni will hr new ti IO Lit rtn re 
K.eri. Goesnse* an I rtdkv 31 Ocluher 
lUHteti II OOit.ni . tin IBelPttowlHBPur 
puws 

1 1* ifihif He ftenlMV tertd to> 
\i retails (in the seat ended 31 De 
irmhet 19115 

2 In Deii a thinkoi 

3 In auderiil Audiluas tn) Ifi Its ttlrtc 
t it mine, at inn 

4 IMitiiwtti «i,- other UsnWrminr Ihe 
« mi tunny 

4 SIAKTO 

_ NtCHTlAHV 


LEGAL NOTICES 


PS I HI IIKPI COL-RT OF 
fl STX1 NU 007239 of 198b 
I'll.INU RY OttlSlUN 
in tiii M.\m.n or itsor 
. HOI IANUN I K UMITLO 
and 


»t 


Nurtca is in nr nv Civtn iiw a pen 
I ton was on Ihe 3td Orumer 1986 
pipsniml lu I lei tlMMl s HeiTi l' owl nl 
bislne un the l XJNI Ilf M.\ DON of M. 
IM t'lKMui Ihe 1^119 1 Al ot Ihe , inner 
MWI CumiMin Intel LIOO.OOOUOO UI 
LArsOfll (UI 


.\NtSNUIMb IN I I'RTHf J) IASI N that 
tin- said Pentmn n ihminl lo be heaid 
nrtmr me Itnoutu-aMe Mr Jusbre 
Metsiiilbnies ti me Rniti rosins of Jus 
tin- Nfi ami l nmuiit WCVi* .'ll on 
btotukai the 27lh nay Of or loner 1986. 
Vm lire Urn ,u Steurbrtdri oi I hr said 

< 'tinman, itrsu ntg m ofteow tor Inti, to* id 
att miln no Ihe l nntn iHalton ut ihe wd 
Bril le I him of f'riPtlai shown dMN-iU ti the 
tone nl heating m nmut or Ov Coumet 
tot Ihti pm tMeo- 

* ion tri I ne saw NMUn will he I ur 
iusiusi hi .ms stun petstm reginniiq uir 
same ns Hie n n uei rnmiHined s>6 lines no 
Isiiiwnf at Iftf irifUkKetl riwuw* lor Ihe 
same 

tkjtv.1 Ihe Idih i Lll of October I486 

snMHLNMtal HARWOOD 
Narirtters' Halt 
Culler Lane 
nvanah- 
L om ton EC7V 6Wi 
hula Hois icn Hie ahose named Conuum 


IN TIII HIGH CUt'RT Ok 
JIS1K.1 NU 007094 CM I “DO 
OI-1NCI MV DIVISION 
IN Till M.MTLR OT T1PMOOK PIC 
and 

IN THI MAHER OF THC 
(6MP4M3 ACT 1985 ' 

Minn ISIU Rfl BV GIVEN Itial nPeu 
Inn w.ls On Ihe Mh Seplemoer 1986 
pirsenml to llrt Maaeslv's HNI Court ol 
■ uslue lm the t.UKrtlallan of Ihe Shtie 
Piranum AlttUMlI of Ihe CamptiiV al 
L5 3II i>46 33 

AND NOTH] Pt ITUTTHCR GIVEN Ihti 
[IM- soul Prtiinu is iht riled lo br heaid 
before the HdnauitiMe Mr Jadire 
Mn i vn rim les ti me Dovti Courts at Jus- 
Ixr sfiantl. Lmltton WC2A 2LL On 
Mnndai- Ihe 27lh dov of Ortobei 1986. 
-\m UnliM ot SIwurnoMer M Ihe said 
Comwiv desMinu to mnv the nwikinu ol 
an Mitet Nn ihe rontiimtiion 04 the said 
i an. rlttiuMi ot Share Premium Areounl 
should appeal ti the lm of Deanna in 
prison of bv (UuuispI for Ihti ourpaM. 

V toot- ot ihe said, Petition writ be fur 
lushrel to anv surd ponou reginrinq the 
unv- nv the widernkmliourtl Sobnlor* on 
pmntrnl ot Ihe tegwaled rtiame (m the 

IMMsI nn 15th Day of Onober 1986 

Alien 6 Olerv 
9 Cnnapswe 
London CC2V 6AD 
RM JC/CGR 
SoNrHors tor Ihe said Company 


Rcnuro TRADING CO 
LIMITED 

Norm, is iiLREBY given that me 
CiedriCMs ol the tinse.nnmrd Company 
air fisjuai rd. on or before Uie fifteenth 
dal oi Nmrtnbrt 198ft, to send Ihetr 
names afkl adm esses. wMh ooflirutar* of 
um debts Of rtaun*. and Ihe.namm and 
nddtesses ot then Soltritorstlf anyk lo ihe 
unde. Mimed I Gregg ol Gregg Be others & 
CO . 2 Mount Sheet. Albert Souare. Man 
rheslrr M2 5NX, the Liquaulonsi ol Ufe 
sa*d (brnwiiv. and. II so reotured bv no 
imp in wnlimi bv Ihe ud tafunBWnil. 
die by IheM Nohritore or nentmaUv. to 
tome in ami uoir iheir saw dens* or 
i law ir. al surn time and otare a* mail be 
spniiusi in MMb not ire. or in tlfiaull 
Iheirof Ihev wiH be Mu-tooed horn me 
brnrtd 01 anv dMHMihon made before 
stuhdegls aie ptoied T7n* notire ta pure 
Is IQIlua) and all known CiMMi* have 
been, n will be. pud In lull 
Dated Hlh Ol M6M 1986 

F. GREGG 
UOLtDATOR 


L Rl OMAN LIMITED 
NUriCl IN HLRCBV GIVEN Uul the 
Canbtois of ihe atm e named Contpaov 
ale fraud elk on ar before Ihe lllleenlh 
dav ol has ember 1986. lo vnd llmr 
names and add i esses, with parhrulnm of 
thru Aran or rtaun*. and Ihc names and 
addi esses ot men SabrHors hi wtvl. to Ihe 
umlri saacied > Gregg ot Greag Brothers & 
Co . 2 Mould Si reel. Albert Square. Man 
tbeslet M3 6NX. Ihe LtoUKtaton*) of Ihe 
sawl (tern nan, and. If *0 reqimro bv no 
Ixe m wniinu bv the maul VimMlatonM. 
tie. b, IheM Sol n* lots Or personalty. 10 
come in and prose their sad detris or 
t Uans al soi h Vxne and plare a* ■ajti be 
spmln*l m surn tulirfi or ui drtaan 
mereoi lliev will be rxrtudrd tram Ihe 
benefit ol anv chslnbulioii made befoie 
surf, debts ne pros rd. Tim notire IS pure 
tv lot nial and til known Creditors hale 
been, n wdl tie. p.ud in full. 

Hah*! Wh October 1956 


UOt'tOATOR 


BCJ-LMAY LIMITED 

NOTKT IN HEREBY CtVCN pursuanl lo 
trillion 5B8 ol the Companies Ail 1985. 
that a MUTING ol Ihe rreduor* Of 
BE LEM AY LIMITED wHI be held M the 
DllNes of LEONARD CL'RI -S A CO . Sllu 
.lied M 30 LASTBOLiRNE TERRACE 
<2IS01 ILUORl LONDON W2 6LT On 
niursfta, the 23rd day ol Onober idCtoti 
3 30 o'rtorfc m me auemoorufor me pur 
poses provided for in Sertion 589 mn) 

Doted the Bfh day of OrtODcw |98o 

MJ W. MCKINLEY 
DIRECTOR 


Confine* im page 26 


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dt 





■ • 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


Loyalist 
claim in 


Queen inspects ghostly warrior guard 


double 


murder 


The “loyalist" Ulster Free- 
dom Fighters admitted 
responsibility for shooting 
dead a Catholic woman aged 
76 and her adopted son early 
yesterday at their country 
farmhouse near BaBynahinch, 
16 miles from Belfast 

Mr Tommy Mullan, aged 
75. a fanner and the woman’s 
husband was getting up as his 
wife and son were shot dead in 
their from had He was unhurt 
but was very deeply shocked 
and unable to be interviewed 
by police. 

A caller for the Ulster 
Freedom Fighters, a murder- 
ous offshoot of the still legal 
Ulster Defence Association, 
told the BBC in Belfast that 
Mr Terence Mullan. aged 31, 
was a “field officer of the 
Provisional IRA. 

Claiming responsibility for 
the double killing, the caller 
said Mr Mullan, together with 
two other men, had planted 
the booby trap bomb which, 
last July, killed Mr Robert 
Hill, aged 22, a part time UDR 
soldier at Druroaness, seven 
miles away. 

Mrs Kathleen Mullan and , 
her son, a mechanic and 1 
secondhand car dealer, wens 
were shot in the hallway when 
one of them answered a ring at 
the from door shortly after 
8.0am. It is thought they died 
instantly. Mr Mullan Snr 
raised the alarm by telephone 
before collapsing. 

The RUC was unable to say 
whether one toiler or several 
were involved and were await- 
ing the results of post mortem 
examinations before 
commenting on the weapon or 
weapons used. 

House to house inquiries 
began over a wide rural area in 
the hope that someone may 
have seen the killer or killers 
arriving or leaving the 
Muilans' form and traveOing 
on the neighbouring road. 

Provisional Sinn Fein is- 
sued a statement for the IRA 
denying that Mr Mullen had 
any connection with the 
Republic movement 

Yesterday's double murder 
raises to 31 the number of 
civilians killed by terrorists 
Northern Ireland so for this 
year, compared with 25 for the 
whole of 1985. 

There is no doubt in the 
mind of informed observers 
that the relative resurgence of 
sectarian killings, common 
enough around 1972-74 but 
steadily on the wane during 
the last 1970s and early 1980s, 
is linked to bitter Protestant 
anger and frustration over the 
Anglo-Irish Agreement 




Jmi:; 


ML* 

Ip% ; *p. *“■ Jk- '**’• 

I.,r> :w.: ;! ■ 

Jt 





Canfioned front page 1 
offiMmstai uncovered, stand- 
tag. sentinel for 2,000 years. 
They were stambled upon only 
12 years ago by two peasants 
rft pg fa g 2 well daring a 
partkzdsrl; dry summer. 

Afterwards the Queen and 
the Duke met a parly of 18 
Chinese-tan gnage students 
from Edmbnrgb University. 
Xian is the Scottish capital's 
twin dty, and the Duke is 
Cfcancdbr of the university. 

When the meeting had 
ended the students expressed 
their surprise at the Duke's 
outspokenness. He and the 
Queen had been “absolutely 
fascinated” by the terracotta 
army, the students reported. 
But the Duke had said that bis 
visit to Peking had been 
“deathly boring”, according to 
one of the students, Mr Simon 


The royal couple have been 
genuinely astonished at the 
huge crowds that have turned 
out to meet them wherever 
they have shown thnsdvcs. 
It was notable that the small" 
est crowds were m Peking, 
partly because they were kept 
well away from some of the 
events and partly because the 
programme there was essen- 
tially formal. 

The curiosity of a people 
who did away with hereditary 
mo n ar chy in 1911 was re- 
peated when the royal party 
arrived hi Knrnwmg, the so* 


Kirby, aged 2L, from Leaming- 
ton Spa, Warwickshire. 




ton Spa, Warwickshire. 

During the Peking stage of 
the tour the Duke made two 
visits on his own more worthy 
than gbmorans, and, almost 
ignored by dm press and 
television, one to a dump-truck 
factory and one to a tr aining 
centra for economic cadres. 

Told by tiie students that 
they were in Xian for one year 
as part of then- language 
course, the Duke made one of 
his ^Bgfatly rad quips: “if you 
stay here much longer you’ll 
all besGtty-eyed. 1 ' 

The Queen, according to Mr 
Kirby, kept breaking in to say 
how fascinating the entire tom: 
really was. Mr Michael Shea, 
her press secretary, angered 
by what he saw as a deter- 
mined press torch towards 
triviality, said afterwards: “1 
absolutely deny that the Duke 
has been critical of China. He 
has great admiration for 
ffiSne. He WUS fa tiring about 
the welcome in Pelting, which 
was very formal compared 
with the marvellous welcome 
in other Chinese rities.” 

At Xian airport they were 
greeted by a great phalanx of 
red flags paraded by children, 
many dressed in the ancient 
costume of classical China, 
firing tor a dty that was die 
coon try's capital for 1,100 
years. 


called City of Eternal Spring 
in the soath-west, well off the 
normal tourist rente and dose 
to the borders of Vietnam, 
Laos and Burma. 

About half a million people 
were on the street to watch the 
Queen aid Duke drive from 
the airport, and p ablic budd- 
ings were alive with fairy 
lights. 

Knuning, terminus of the 
Burma road and point of entry 
for many allied troops in 
wartime Osina, is said to have 
been the personal choice of the 
Duke because of its associ- 
ations with the war and, 
indirectly, with Earl Mount- 
batten. 


Certainly die local authori- 
ties were caught unawares 
when it was first included in 
the schedule. They discovered 
that then- state guest house 
was a ramshackle Victorian 
pile unfit for a Queen, and no 
toss a person man Mr Hn 
Yaobang, the Communist 
Party general secretary, flew 
down Peking to inspect it. 

There was no choice, said 
Mr Ha. It would have to be 
restored, and expense should 
not be spared. 




• +- r - •• 


Inspecting the troops: The Queen paying dose attention yesterday to the ranks of tenacotta warriors that guard the tomb of Qin Shi Hoang m Xian. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 

Princess Anne, President of 
the Royal School for Daughters 
of Officers of the Royal Navy 
and Royal Marines (Hasle- 
mere). opens their new gymna- 
sium, Hastemere. Surrey, 1 1 JO. 

The Duke of Gloucester, 
President, Britsh Consultants 
Bureau, attends the twenty-first 
anniversary conference, the Hil- 
ton hotel, I 1.45. 


The Duchess of Gloucester 
attends a fashion show in aid of 
SENSE, the National Deaf- 
Blind and Rubdla Association, 
Bdvoir Castle, 7.40. 

The Duchess of Kent opens a 
new plant for Rowntree Mac- 
intosh, York. II; and later, as 
patron, visits St Leonard's Hos- 
pice, 230. 


New exhibitions • 

Looking into Paintings land- 
scape; Castle Museum, Notting- 


ham; Mon to Sun 10 to 4.45 j 
(ends Nov 16). 

tog Paintings; Colin Jdlicoe 
Gallery, 82 Portland St, Man- 
chester Mon to Fri 10 to 6. Sat 1 { 
to 5 (ends Nov 8). . i 

Exhibitions in progress 
1966 and all that!: design and 
the consumer in Britain; Whit- 
worth Art Gallery, Whitworth 
Park, Manchester Mon to Sat 
10 to 5, Thurs 10 to 9 (ends Dec 
6). 

Recent paintings by Edgar 
Holloway; Burst ow Gallery, 


Food prices 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,179 


Brighton College, Eastern Rd; 
Mon to Sat 1 1 JO to 5, Sun 2 to 5 
(ends Oct 25). 

Last chance to see 
Charles Hamilton Sqriey: first | 
World War memorabilia; Ccn- ; 
traJ Library, George IV Bridge, 
Edinburgh, 9 to 9. 

Degree '86; Link Gallery, 



National Centre of Photog- 
raphy. The Octagon, Milsom St, 
Bath, 10 to 4.40. 

Music 

Canterbury Festival: Concert 
by the London Oboe Band; 
Gulbenkian Theatre, Canter- 
bury. 7 JO. 

Organ recital by John Scott; St 
Alban and St Patrick, Cory here 
St, B irming ham, 1.10. 

Recital by Christoph Hora- 
betger (tenor) and Ulrich KoeUa 


Autumn gales at sea have had 
little effect on fish supp- 
Iies-Prices are generally lower 
than last week, especially in 
London and the South-east. 
Wales and the West Country. 
Best buys include haddock at an 
average of £1.78 a lb, plaice at 
£1.91 and coley 94p. but there 
are inevitably regional dif- 
ferences. Boned fresh herring is ! 
down to an average of 86p, and 
mackerel 63p. 

The continuing mild weather 
inland has meant an ample 
supply of seasonal home-grown 
vegetables. The pick include 
green cabbage at 12-20p a lb, 
broccoli 40-60p. cauliflowers 
20-40p each depending on size, 
carrots 1 2-20p a lb, and parsnips 
24-35p a lb. English white 
potatoes are excellent at 10-12p 
a lb, and good value salad 
ingredients include round let- 
tuces at 18-20p each and Ice- 


^ 25Mnkopens | Weather 


The penultimate stretch of the 
M25 between junctions 19 and 
2IA (A4Q5 at Mickleford Green 
and MI at Brocket Wood, 
Hertfordshire) opens today in 


time for evening peak traffic, the 
Department of Transport an- 
nounced yesterday. 

The final stretch between 
Bricket Wood and the A1(M) at 
South Mimms (junction 21A- 
23) which will complete the 1 17 
mile London orbital motorway, 
will be officially opened on 
October 29. 


A ridge of high pressme will 
cover southern districts white 
frontal troughs move SE into 
Scotland. 


6am to midnight 


uSm_S Walts: Dry. sunny oTcfea? 
panottR, tog pstenea dewing in momma 
wW Wit and vanaMe: max temp i5c 
tap- 


Roads 


<**»»•» IMt Rather cloudy. per- 
hap* a Sttta ram at tanas: wind NE, sow or 
moderate; max temp 15C JSSB. 

N WMas, NW England, lit District, 
Wa of Kmc Dry veto sunny intonate, 
becoming douctior with a me drizzle to 
pjwMtoecwnd aw. sgta. tocnwww 
moderate, locally (resit; max temp 14C 
(57F). 

Bowtom^Miriitmfc Dante SWSeoc- 
land. Otoa gow, Northern toeton* Pond 

gtodanm rata apeadtog from NWtvtad 

SW.frean. rereaang strong, perhaps 
tooaBy gale tores tour; max temp 14C 
<5m. . 


Wain and West: Kc Only one ten 
southocMtd between Inactions 25 and 2S 


atom for delays. Ml: Lana raaWctima E 
and wesaxxxxJ in Western Avs. Cardiff; 


congestion at peak times. 
The North: Ml: Lane n 


bergs S5-70p, celery 30-4Sp a 
head, radishes 2Q-30p a pack 
and watercress 25-35p a bunch. 

There is not such a wide 
selection of fruit, but Cox's 
apples at 30-45p a lb. Golden 
Delicious 2 5-3 5 p. Conference 
pears 25-40p, Cornice 40-60p 
and Williams 45-55p are all at or 
near their best. There are plenty 
of grapes at between 50-8Qp a lb. 
kiwi fruit !8-30p each, Spanish 
Honeydew melons 60-90p each 
and Large black plums from the 
United States 80-£l-20 a lb. 

There is generally little dif- 
ference in price between home 
produced and New Zealand 
lamb. Special offers include: 
Salisbury's: New Zealand iamb 
at £1.28 for whole l^» and £1.12 
for cutlets; fine Fare: British 
lamb shoulder joints at 69p a lb; 
Tesco: braising steak £1J4 a lb, 
and grade A chilled whole ducks 
and com- fed chickens 79p and 
82p a lb respectively; Dewhursfc 


(piano): St George's, Brandon 
Hill Bristol, 7 JO. 

Concert by PhUharmonia; 
Brangwyn HaU, Swansea, 7 JO. 1 

Concert by the Halte Or- 
chestra; Royal Concert Hall, 1 
Nottingham, 7 JO. 

*Wi a cog o’ gude swats and an 
auld Scotish sang': celebration 
of the Scotish Muse by various 
artists; Herny Wood HalL SNO 
Centre, Garemont Si. Glasgow, 

Recital by Christopher Mar- 
wood (cello) and Rebecca Holt 
(piano); Constable HaU, East 

The (nano in the age of 
Beethovempiano redial by Ian 
Brown; Fermoy Centre. IGns's 
Lynn. 7.30. 

General 

Book fair Hay dock Park 
Racecourse, Haydock, today 2 
to 8. tomorrow 10 to 5. 

Tauon Park Craft and Design 
Show; Tenants HalL Tattoo 
Park. Knntsford. Cheshire, to- 
day, 1 1 to 6. tomorrow and Sun 
10 to 6.30. 


ACROSS 

1 Sovereign remedy for 
constitutional ills (5,5). 

9 One meeting a Boojum “will 

softly and suddenly — 
away" (6L . 

10 Its choir could be redolent 
of times past (8). 

11 Hill in which the mountain 
nymph finds Escamillo (8). 

12 Egyptian to choose to foQow 
Christian leader (4). 

13 Circulation booster from a 
doctor way back in the East 
( 10 ). ^ . 

IS In the dub we find the new- 
style weapon (7). 

17 Admission of dishonesty 
one put in. describing one’s 
surroundings (7). 

20 Irish housewife's aide makes 
us reel with a punch (10). 

21 Beat includes nver water m 

the Highlands (4). 

23 Painfully sharp point dam- 
aged nag mternaAy (8). 

25 Rural deity m a Roman 
road? That’s for the birds! 
( 8 ). „ , 

26 Ring. Free choice? Not en- 
tirely (2-4). 

27 Guiding principle of 
Midas's reign? (6,4). 


4 So wild a dance makes 
band-leader cry “action"! 
(10). 

5 Priest’s address gjifs taken 
from die phone book . . . 
(7). 


a turn-up tor him, we j 
have to state (4). | 

7 Dramatist takes in wood 
that burns quickly (8). 

8 Boy’s overweight to dance 
( 10 ). 

12 Giraffe — a beastly old hy- 
brid? (10). 

14 The case of Brutus for in- 
stance (10). 

16 Turns over measures of cap- 
ital development (8). 

18 Current is so uncertain 
(13.3). 

19 Bird’s Medley in A Hat (7). 

22 Heat risi ng before end of fell 

of the rain, say (6). 

24 Eager to behead the old gi- 
ant (4). 

Sotutiou to Puzzle No 17.178 


The Nortlc Mi: Lane res t rictions be- 
tween junctions 35 end 36 (A629 and 
Barnsley). IK: RoadwaKs between 
Sendbeai service ansa and Junction 18 
(Homes Chapel): delays Beefy and care 

"^attend: M74; Contraflow ax Botfrwefl, 
Lunerenre: tong delays: avoid If possible. 
M73: Restrictions at Mawffle (M74 inter- 
change) on southbound ink to A74 and 
Qasgow. EtSabugh: Roadworks in I 
Lasswads Rd at junction wftti GBmerton j 
Station Rd; congestion May. 




ran soon spreading front NW: wind sw 
strong, locally gale force: max temp 13C 
par). 

O^o^ or rein; becoming 


The pound 


Austria Scb 
Belgium Fir 





Fall in jobless sets 
record for Tories 



Continued fro® * 
the Restart programme foj^be 

long-term unemployed slav- 
ing an effect. About 260.000 
people haw been interviewed 
since the scheme became a 
national one in thf 
Aboui5percenthawf™«d 
work or uammg as a result of 
these interviews. 

The expansion oi inc 
Community Programme « 
inM nnemolov- 


only 19JXJ0 i« the second t 

.l. r* 1 > 


quarter, the smaM risesnee 
the first quarter of 198X 

The rise .was dne-'w-u 
assumed increase of 30,000 fo 
self-emptoymeu. and h^icv 
service sector emptoym^ 
ofl&et by declining 

by 4^000 ^thc second mw? 
ter. and by 26.000 in juK. 
August. 

Vacancies last month, how- 
ever, were at their hnbest 
level since the end of Bn* 
The seasonally adjusted tow 
rose by 6,700 fasr mo»h to 
208.000. 


V.OW11UUM11? * ■''O* , 

also eating into unemptoy- 
At ihp hicst count, the 


Hong Kong authorities de- 
clared a storm alert last night 
as a typhoon moved towards 
south China, the next stop on 
the Queen’s tour (Reuter re- 
ports). She is due In Canton 
tomorrow and was scheduled 
to cruise on the royal yacht 
Britannia on Sunday and 
Monday before arriving in 
Hong Kong on Tuesday. 


menL At the blest count, the 
Government’s special mea- 
sures were *! ne »iar 


sures were reducing un- The seas 
employment by -JjO'OOO' rosgty 

compared with 220.000 a year 208.000. 




Vt 1 •' 


to r 




ea rSt does not include the 
Youth Training Scheme, on 
which there were 330,000 

■ .. .v. . 1 nf A iitmcf 


wno uitiw . m ^ 

people at the end of Annff. 
Without the expansion of the 

J Mudmimrot 


wunwi ws ~ . 

training and employment 
measures, it is c !“ r .,“g* 
unemployment would still ne 
on the way up. 

The latest employment fig- 
ures were disappointing. The 
employed labour force rose by 


Average ctmw to*. by 
8.1 per cent in the 12 mouhs 
to August, co m pared wmh&2 
per cent in July. Thu com. 
pared with an inflation me of 
2.4 per ccdl After allowing for 
hack pay. the un d erlyi a g r»e 
of average earoir^s t&cnaise 
was 7.5 percent. 


Strikes, partly because of 

the gcneroaiy of pay rises, irr 

running at low toots. 




i BRITAIN’S 
i JOBLESS 

SeasonaRy w^ustod 


s •!!•* 




JFMA? 


1979 1S80 1981 1982 1983 198* 198S T968 


Russians allow sick 
scientist to leave 


Coutmued from page 1 

The briefing was seen as a 
form of-rebuke for Mr Karpov 
and an attempt by the Soviet 
Union to set the record 
straight. 

"We have followed the bod 
example of the US Admin- 
istration in not speaking in the 
same voice, but it seems that 
what is allowed for the Ameri- 
cans is not allowed for us,* 1 Mr 
Gerasimov said. 

Il was not immediately dear 
whether the differences in the 
interpretation of the Soviet 
position voiced by Mr Karpov 
and by Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader, 
reflected any genuine di- 
visions inside the Soviet arms 
negotiating team about how to 
precede. 

Most of tire hundreds of 
newsmen packing the Moscow 
Press Centre appeared un- 
convinced when he claimed 
not to have beard the sub- 
stance of Mr Karpov's com- 


ments. Most of the questions 1 
concentrated on the European 
missile issue and Mr 
Gerasimov eventually refined - 
to answer any more questions 
on the subject. 


The Soviet tactics in Unking 
its offers of sweeping cots in 
the field of medium and long- 
range missiles was seen as a 
method of trying to build up 
international pressure os 
President Reagan to modify 
his stance over Star Wars, 
which Mr Gerasimov 
rrsively referred to as a 
“fontasy”. 




During the Iceland talks, Hat 
Soviet and US teams reached 
the outline of an agreement 
which would bave elimmaied,. 
all memtttrwange weapons 1 • 
from Europe and left them ’ 
with only 100 medium-range m ri-ph 
warheads on either side, situ- f 

ated in the US and Soviet : 


NOON TODAr rmw* f* tliown to miQlmts ttQNYS Worn 


iPomir.u' 






••iinij tu? 


beef and kidney £1-28 a lb and 
pork fillet end leg £1.15. 


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S^nttonr SonaatK 
729 am 634pm 


Around Britain 


654am 

FUI moon 832 pm 


Moanriaas 
556 pm 


Lighting-up time 


Cramer 
Lowestoft 
Clacton 


London 634 pm to 659 am 
Bristol 644 pm to 759 am 
EOntotfi 638 pm to 7.19 am 


Tbe top box-office films in 
London: 

1(1) Top Gun 
2(4) About Last Night 


Ratos tor 8nati ttenonun ati on banknotes 
onto as suppted by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Oiffarem rates apply to travellers’ 
cheques and other foreign currency 
busness. 


MancbiHter 639 pm to 7.11 am 

Penzance S58 pm to 7.18 em 


EMtbaonw 


Yesterday 


Sun Rein 
(as In 

7.1 .01 
15 52 
03 .34 
02 .76 
x 47 
0.7 38 
1.0 30 
15 .17 
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Ira in 
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C F 

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RetaB Price (odes 3855 


The 66lh International Motor 
Show opens today; Birmingham 
Exhibition Centre, 9J0 to 7 
daily (until Oct 26). 


Anniversaries 


DOWN 

2 Sailor captures O’Hara 
round this army position? 

< 6) - ^ r to 

3 Crazy type brood -of this 
bircK (8). 


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Concise Crossword page 


Births: John Wilkes, journal- 
ist and politician, London, 
1727: Henri de Saint-Simon, 
social reformer. Paris. 1760: 
George Buchner, dramatist. 
Goddelau. Germany. 1813. 

Deaths; Sir Philip Sidney, 
poet, soldier and courtier. Arn- 
hem, Netherlands. 1386; Fred- 
eric Chopin. Paris. 1849; Gustav 
Kirehhoff. physicist. Berlin, 
1887: Pi trice Mac-Mahon. due 
dc Magenta, marshal of France, 
president 1873-79. Lo'met 1893. 

Republic of Yugoslavia estab- 
lished 1919. 


3(3) Mona Lisa 
4(2) Aliens 

5 ( -) Basil. The Great Mouse De- 
tective 

fi(5) A Room vwtn a View 
7(7) Hannah and her Sisters 
8(6) Betty Blue 

F/X- Murder by unman 
10(9) Highlander 
The top nbns in the provinces: 

1 Mona Usa 

2 Aliens 

3 Top Gun 

4 Poltergeist 11: The Other Skte 

5 Highlander 

Swptod by Screen m-masoraf 


t^hdni: The FT Index closed up 13 at 
12775. 


wans at midday yesterday: c, 

: f. fair; r. rain; s. sun. 


Sotithsaa 

Shmfctoi 

Bounwmth 

Poole 


Cloudy . 
etoudy M 


1 1050 Guernsey f 1355 
S 1254 bmraess f 1457 
11355 Jersey M559 


Exmouth 

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3 1254 tfnehate s 1254 


Edinburgh M559 Nswc ai tte 


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15 59 
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15 59 

14 57. MW 

it 91 soonr 

15 fiS lUMfy 
15 flB. wMfy 
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14 57 surety 

14 57 surey 

15 &S sunny 
14 57 sunojr 
13 55 sunny 
13 55 

13 55 
U 57 

14 57 .surety 




— — 


«— BOW 11457 rrmclsway s 1254 


Abroad 


Porttotio - inw w pfrqr 

-loamsr ****** 


Edipse of the moon 


ihareo 1 the pnae money 
stfoira for itut week, and must claim 1 
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NOAimc on M napua OBBtda aan 

>'ou nu« have your card with you 
when you telephone. 


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1(22) Death Wish 3 

2(1 ) No Retreat. No Surrender 


3g) Legend 
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6(3) Return of the Living Dead 
7(4 1 Black Moon Rising 
8(6) TheGoomes 
9(34) King David 
10(B) Gotcbal 
Su^ifiedby MwameM 


The edipse of the moon will 
begin this evening at 6.29 pm. 
not long after the moon rises. It 
will be total from 7.41 pm until 
8J5 pm. and will end at 10.07 
pm. 


AtortMa 

Algiers 


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Parliament today 


If you are unable to telephone 1 
someone etw* can claim on your Behan . 
hut IlKV mutt have your c ar d am] call 
The TUtuh Poniolio Claims Une 
Between the stlputetnl Umcs. 

too rcsonnsiBiTiCy can Be accepted 
far failure lo coutan me claim* otrice 
for any reason within the stated 
hours 

The above ImirurUom are up- 


Lords (I LOO): European Co- 
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committee stage. 


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Losses cat 

The computer software pro- 
ducer, Micro Foe os, cut its 
interim losses to £480 million 
for the six months to July 31 
from £2.81 million last year. 
Turnover remained unchan- 
ged at '£5.65 million. The 
company does not. pay a 
dividend.- Tempo, page 22 

Strong reply 

Strong & Fisher, the leather 
manufacturer, replied to Gar- 
nar Booth's defence docu- 

• nm The board of Strong & 
Fisher noted the continued 
deterioration of Garnar 
Booth's business and the lack 
of a strategic plan to reverse 
the trend. Tempos, page 22 

W&P contract 

- Watson and Philip has en- 

• tered into a conditional con- 

■ tract to acquire J W Smalley 

• (Holdings), a cash and cany 
and property investment busi- 

- ness, for £6.86 million through 
; a share issue. 

Holding cut 

" Sime Darby has sold 47 
1 .million shares in Consoli- 
-dated Plantations, 10 percent 
. of its holding, for MS131 
. million, reducing its control- 

> ling interest to 52.5 per cent. 

; Baker popular 

- The tender offer of 25 per 
cent of Baker Harris Saunders 
Group, the first commercial 

. ■ estate agents to go public, has 
: been oversubscribed 4.4 
times. The striking price is set 
at 170p per share, a 20p 
v premium 

■ Mecca sale 

. The offer for 34 per cent of | 
•; Mecca Leisure Group, subject 

- of a £95 million buyout from 
Grand Metropolitan is 

> oversubscribed- Share allot- 
ment details of the £32.9 net 
flotation will be announced 
soon. 



TIMES 


2! 

SPORT 29 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 33 


FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


Share 
1277.6 (+1J2) 

FT-SE100 
1605.0 (-2.5) 

sswasr 

THE POUND 




Tempos 22 

Stock Market 22 
C® News 2 2. 26 
Comment 23 

Unit Trusts 24 
USM Prices 24 


CowinJltto 24 
Share Prices 25 
Money Mrkts 26 
Foreign Excfe 26 
Traded Opts 26 
Wan Street 26 


Low-key Lawson 
defends rise 
in interest rates 


By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 


US Dollar 

1.4370 (-0.0025) 

W Goman mark 

2.8338 (-0.0063) 

Trade-wei 

67.7 (+0.1 j 

I ■. Christies 
: says ‘no’ 

; Christies InternationaL the 
■ fine art auctioneer, has given 
1 the cold shoulder to a pro- 
- posed merger with its smaller 
j rival Phillips. 

There has been mounting 

S tation in the City that 
ps might be preparing to 
* bid for Christies. 

, But Mr John Floyd, 
* Christies' chairman, last night 
- said he had met Mr Chris- 
topher Weston, the head of 
Phillips, who made it dear he 
had no intention of bidding. 

However, Mr Weston was 
keen on taking a sake in 
Christies, “for investment 
purposes". 

Mr Floyd said: *T see no 
strategic or commercial logic 
- in a link between the two 
. companies. Our recent results 
- show we continue to enjoy our 
position as one of the two 
leading auction houses in 
: Britain and international mar- 
- kets. This underlines the suc- 
cess of the group's overall 
* strategy" 

Christies shares fell 20p to 

••• 280p. 


Mr Nigel Lawson, the Chan- 
cellar, yesterday denied that 
the broad measures of the 
money supply were growing 
too fen. 

He defended his decision to 
raise interest rales by 1 
percentage point on Tuesday 
by reference to the pressure on 

sterling and the acceleration in 
growth of the narrow measure 
of money. But he offered 
markets no changes in the 
framework of monetary 
controL 

His low-key speech at the 
annual dinner for bankers and 
merchants at the Mansion 
House iu London is expected 
to disappoint markets. Ster- 
ling was drilling yesterday in 
anticipation of what the Chan- 
cellor might say to increase 
confidence in the currency. It 
dosed in London before the 
speech at 51.437, down 0.1a 
Its effective rate was 67.7, up 
0.1. 

Mr Lawson emphasized 
that the Government's fiscal 
policy was fully under control 
and he referred to the latest 
figures for the public sector 
borrowing requirment which, 
at £2.2 billion for September, 
were lower than markets had 
been expecting. 


Monetary conditions, he 
said, were not properly repre- 
sented by the current growth 
in sterling M3. He referred to 
his speech on the same occa- 
sion last year and when he 
predicted that the ratio of M3 
to total spending in the econ- 
omy would grow, as it had, 
because of changes in financial 
institutions. 

Monetary strategy re- 
mained as before with short 
term interest rates the key 
instrument. These would be 
held at whatever level was 
necessary to bear down on 
inflation. 

In reviewing progress in the 
economy the Chancellor said 
that a slow down in world 
trade had hit Britain's exports 
this year but that this was 
likely to be replaced by faster 
growth next year. As a result, 
overall growth in the economy 
would be both fester and 
better balanced. 

Exaggerated fears about the 
current account of the balance 
of payments needed to be seen 
in perspective. British exports 
in recent years had main- 
tained their share of world 
trade after a long period in 
which they had dedmed. 


Mr Lawson welcomed the 
approaching Big Bang in the 
City but he gave a warning 
that there were bound to be 
some casualties. 

In the new global market 
there was a risk of bad 
sujiervision driving out good. 
This had to be avoided by 
international co-ordination of 
regulation which was 
increasing. 

Speaking on the same occa- 
sion, the Governor of the 
Bank of England, Mr Robin 
Leigb-Pemberton, indicated 
that the fell in the pound had 
now gone fir enough to offset 
the impact of lower oil prices 
on the balance of payments. 

The threat to 'Britain's 
competitive position was now 
high pay settlements. 
Productivity growth came no- 
where near warranting the 4-5 
per cent annual growth in real 
incomes. Although there was 
room for some increase in 
living standards too rapid a 
rise in consumption could all 
too easily lead back to growing 
trade deficits. Current settle- 
ments were still no lower than 
in 1973 when inflation was 
twice hs present level 


Low PSBR rise 
surprises City 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

PSBR was £1-2 


The public sector borrowing 
requirement was £22 billion 
last month, well below average 
City expectations, but higher 
than the August figure of £1.8 
billion. 

In the first half of the fiscal 
year the cumulative PSBR was 
£6 billion. This compares with 
the Government’s forecast of 
£7 . 1 billion for the full year. - 
But borrowing is expected 
to bo significantly lower in the 
second half with the proceeds 
of the British Gas privati- 
zation. 

The September borrowing 
figures were the first to be 
significantly affected by the 
collapse in oil prices. The 
Government repaid £1 billion 
in advanced petroleum rev- 
enue tax to the oil companies. 
Id September last year, the oil 
companies paid £1J5 billion in 
PRT. 

The underlying PSBR is 
probably running at a lower 
level than last year, given the 
size of the turnaround in oiT 
revenues. In September last 


year, the 
billion. 

Non-oil tax revenues are 
strongly ahead, in line with 
buoyant consumer spending. 
In the first half of the fiscal 
year. Customs and Excise 
receipts were 10 percent no bn 
the corresponding period of 
last year. 

' Supply expenditure in the 
first half was 3.5 per cent 
higher than last year, but 
officials said this did not 
indicate a loss in control over 
spending. 

The central government 
borrowing requirement was 
£2.5 billion last month and 
£103 billion in the April to 
September period. Local 
authorities and public cor- 
porations both made small 
debt repayments last montit. 

• Final figures from the Bank 
of England showed a 1.6 per 
cent rise in sterling M3 last 
month to 183 per cent above 
its level a year earlier. Narrow 
money, M0, rose by 0.8 per 
cent and its 12-month growth 
rale was 43 per cent. 


Coalite raises bid for 
Hargreaves by 28% 


By Richard Lander 


The Coalite energy distribu- 
tion group yesterday stented 
up its bid for the Hargreaves 
Group by about 28 per cent to 
value Hargreaves at about 
£100 million. 

The offer was given im- 
mediate serious consideration 
by Hargreaves, whose in- 
terests include energy, trans- 
port and building materials. 

Having dismissed the orig- 
inal bid out of hand, the 
Hargreaves board last night 
told shareholders that they 
would be “extremely ill- 
advised" to take any action 
while it examined the options. 

These were thought to in- 
clude issuing a valuation of 
the company, and the possibil- 
ity of enticing a white knight 
to enter the battle. Most City 
analysts, however, concurred 
with Mr Eric Variey, chair- 
man of Coalite, who said he 
would be “very surprised" if a 


rival bidder emerged at the 
new bid level. 

Coalite is offering one share 
and 565p in cash for every 
three Hargreaves shares, com- 
pared with the previous bid of 
one share and 600p for every 
four shares. 

With Coalite shares easing 
2p to 260p yesterday, the offer 
raised Coalite's valuation of 
Hargreaves’ shares from 21 5p 
to 27 5p. Hargreaves ended 
I5p higher at 27 lp. 

Coalite has also introduced 
a full cash alternative of 270p 

Coalite, which bolds a 4.6 
per cent stake in Hargreaves, 
has deemed the new bid to be 
its final offer, expiring on 
November 2. 

Tempos, page 23 



Professor James 


Nobel Prize for 
US professor 

The Nobel Prize for 
economics has been won by 
Professor James Buchanan, 
an Americas who helped to 
develop a new branch of 
economics known as the the- 
ory of pibfic choice. 

The theory holds that gov- 
ernment derisions are best 
explained by the interests of 
public officials and other in- 
terest groups most closely 
involved in them. 

“According to Buchanan, it 
is often futile to advise poli- 
tirians or influence the oat- 
come of specific issues," says 
the Swedish Academy. 

Mr Buchanan, aged 67, 
holds a chair at George Mason 
University, Virginia. 


* : i ■■ 



James Sherwood: “all the excitement is over" 

We’ll weather it, 
Sherwood says 

By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 

Mr James Sherwood, prest- Speaking in Nassau, Mr 

Sherwood said provisions for 


dent of Sea Containers, the 
owners of Sealink, said yes- 
terday that he had no donbts 
about the “financial integrity" 
of the group and that profits in 
the third quarter of 1986 
would be between $15 million 
(£10.7 million) and $20 million 
(£143 mfflionl 

But the costs of the recent 
Sealink strike, heavy redun- 
dancy payments and the col- 
lapse of three customers 
earlier this year will mean a 
net loss for the full year, 
compared with profits of $393 
million in 1985. 

The Bermuda-based com- 
pany announced last week that 
it was sus pending payment of 
dividends on common shares 
in order to conserve cash. 

After lenghty negotiations 
Sealink appears to have set- 
tied the strike by withdrawing 
plans to make 492 staff redun- 
dant on the Sealink Channel 
Islands services. But the 
fourth quarter will bear the 
brant of the £3 million strike 
costs and about £8 million in 
redundancy payments. This 
’s first half losses were 
million. 


farther redundancy costs 
might be made at die end of 
the year as part of a “dean 
out." He added: “We will set 
the stage for a return to future 
profitability." That is likely to 
mean also “significant" write- 
downs on a couple of ships and 
on older containers. 

“All the excitement is over. 
From now on the situation 
should be calm. We will have a 
bad year this year bat we have 
no doubt about the fiiwmrial 
integrity of the group and will 
bounce back to previous profit 
levels." 

Mr Sherwood also feces 
difficulties at SeaCo Inc, now 
renamed Orient Express Ho- 
tels, the financially troubled 
New York company which 
owns the Orient Express and a 
number of hotels, including 
the Cipriani in Venice. 

Earlier this week he agreed 
to step down as president to 
make room for a full-time chief 
executive officer as part of a 
refinancing package which 
wifl raise up to $20 million 
through the fesue of new 
shares and op to $25 million 
through tiie sale of two hotels. 


Fun money prospects 


In tomorrow’s 12-page Fa 
fly Money, The Junes reports 
on a chang in g mortgage mar- 
ket What will your next 
mortgage re p ayment be ? 


In its own irrepressibly 
capitalist way, Hong Kong 
prepared for the Queen's ar- 
rival with a record stock 


market singe. We analyse 
Hong Kong as a market for 
UK investors' fun money. 

After Big Bang will small 
investors be play ing the “me 
and satellite" game ? We look 
at index funds. And, we pose 
the chilling question “Is your 
insurance company going bust 
y* 


Adamson goes 
in Renold 
board shake-up 


Renold, the engineering 
group, yesterday announced a 
big boardroom shake-up with 
both the chairman. Sir Camp- 
bell Adamson, and the group 
managing director, Mr Nigel 
Blakstad. leaving the 
company. 

The two men have been 
widely credited with the 
revitalization of Renold's for- 
tunes since 1982. Yesterday's 
announcement made it clear 
that the Renold board had 
effectively dismissed Mr 
Blakstad, who has been with 
the company for 30 years. 

Sir Campbell — who has 
resigned — said later he had 
done so because he disagreed 
with the decision to oust Mr 
Blakstad. 

Yesterday's announcement 
was made on the back of a 
forecast of interim profits 
around the break-even level — 
as opposed to £2.5 million last 
year. The downturn, but not 
the extent of it, had been 
announced by Sir Campbell at* 
the company's August annual 
meeting. 

Sources close to the com- 
pany said yesterday one of the 
main factors behind the 
shake-up had been a fun- 
damental disagreement over 
policy — a view which Mr 
Blakstad later confirmed. 

The sources said that while 
Mr Blakstad had been anxious 
to invest more in research and 
development — notably in 
robotics — the board had been 
very concerned about the low 
level of the share price and the 
possibility of a hostile take- 
over. 

Mr Blakstad said yesterday 
his departure resulted from “a 
difference in view over 
policy". 


By Lawrence L ever 

"I iook the company from a 
£5 million loss to profits of 
£63 million last year. 1 am 
totally confident about the 
future of ihe company." 

“I was building the com- 
pany for the future. I had a 
policy and belief but the board 
had a different one. It is 
simply a question of emphasis 
and maybe also style. One of 
the problems was the rate at 
which things had to be done. 
We disagreed, but I think you 
cannot do everything at once. 

"! am certainly not deeply 
bitter. Everyone is entitled to 
iheir opinion. When there has 
been a substantial profita 
hiccup, then I am responsible 
and you can't get beyond 
thai". 

He refused to discuss the 
question of compensation al- 
though Mr Brian Thompson. 
Renold's finance director, said 
yesterday a payment would be 
made. Mr Biaksiad's depar- 
ture. he added, resulted from 
“the board's lack of con- 
fidence in the overall group 
direction". He also blamed the 
disappointing first-half results 
expected this year. 

He added that “the board 
did not desire the going of the 
chairman". 

Sir Campbell said yesterday 
he had resigned over “quite 
honest differences of 
opinion". 

“A few weeks ago. members 
of the board suggested that 
they did not nave much 
confidence in Mr Blakstad. I 
told my colleagues that I 
profoundly disagreed. He was 
the right man for the job. If 
you like, 1 lost. 1 didn’t 
manage to persuade my col- 
leagues on the board of my 
point of view. " 


Ladbroke sells Laskys 
to Granada for £30m 

By Alison Eadtis 

The Ladbroke and Granada Granada is keen to build up 


groups, which earlier this year 
called off plans for a full-scale 
merger, yesterday announced 
that Granada was acquiring 
Laskys, the consumer elec- 
tronics retail chain, from 
Ladbroke for £30.25 million. 

Ladbroke bought Laskys in 
1979, but did not make any 
money on it because the 53 
outlets never provided suf- 
ficient economies of scale to 
cover overheads and market- 
ing costs. In the 12 months to 
the end of June, Laskys lost 
£645,000 pretax on sales of 
£80 million. 

Granada believes it can 
achieve profitability through 
putting the buying, marketing, 
distribution, service and con- 
sumer credit muscle of its 550 
television rental outlets at 
Laskys' disposal It plans to 
double the size of the chain in 
the next two years at a cost of 
about £25 million. 


an electrical retail presence. It 
would have bought Comet, 
the electrical retailer owned by 
Woolwonh Holdings, if the 
Dixons bid for Woolworlh 
had succeeded. It has started 
selling televisions and video 
recorders through its rental 
outlets, spurred by the decline 
in the rental market 

Dixons was also interested 
in Laskys, but only to take 
over a competitor and close 
down some of its shops. Its 
offer was well under that made 
by Granada. 

The financing of the deal 
breaks new ground, as the 
vendor placing of 10.6 million 
new Granada shares was won 
in a bought deal contest 
Salomon Brothers Interna- 
tional, the American invest- 
ment bank, won the contest by 
8am yesterday morning after a 
7.30am start in competition 
with two British banks. 

Comment, page 23 


Maxwell saves Stothert 
with £4m injection 


By CHET Feltham 

The Daily Mirror publisher, agreed 
Mr Robert Maxwell has come 
to the rescue of the troubled 
crane manufacturers Stothert 
and Pitt 

Through his privately con- 
trolled Pexgamon Holdings, 
be is pumping £4 million into 
Stothert and Pitt, in exchange 
for a 77 per cent stake of the 
enlarged capitaL 
Mr George King, chairman 
and chief executive of the 
company, said : " We were in a 
bad way and could not raise 
money from existing 
shareholders, but Mr Maxwell 


to act as our white 
knighL He told us he was 
intent on getting manufac- 
turing industry in this country 
going again." 

Stothert and Pitt made first- 
half losses of£I.4 million, and 
is expected to finish the year in 
the red. Despite a full order 
book, it has been hit by cash 
flow problems. 

Pergamon already owns a 
clutch of industrial businesses, 
through the Hollis group, and 
is likely to merge with Stothert 
and Pitt at some stage. 


MARKET SUMMARY 




1 


; . . 
■$r 

^ r 


i ■ ’ 


f • V*' 


B*= ' 

w* r r 


r 

■ft 

.if* 

•V. 


■*4 

. H j 


STOCK MARKETS 

eSIjSSs 1834.36 (+2.67)* 

BSSdow ...... 16871.89 (-9&2S) 

Hong Kong: 

Tea 

Commerzbank ... — 1S74L2 f— 1SS) 
fjg^narai 532.70 (same) 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

l^miSnMBitank 11 3 ie-11 6 »8% 

.USSSSSSSmm i6 '- n ia% 

buying rate 

CURRENCIES 

£: DM2.8338 §■ 

ErSwFTZAMS »|Wg1|18p* 

C FFr9.2758 

P- YftnPPI 44 S: Ysnl 54^23' 

| J3SB7.7 $= HtttoclOBJ 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


(USES: 

BfCG 


2SSp'(+7p] 


453pl 

315p(+7 


Hawker SUdeley 
Morgan Crucfofe 

MKBeWfc 

Stothert & Pitt 
Renold 

Marks & Spencer 

Amstrad 132p(+Bpl 

Dwek Group 1Z8p (+12p| 

J. Woodhead ?1p(+7p) 

HIBands 1 

Dixons — 3*8PC 



201p (+4p) 


Wootaorth 
GUS ’A' __ 
Atkins 


625p 

985p 


Pets. 


Conroy F 
Nu-Swift 

FALLS: 
Downlebrae, 

Brewmaker 


. 253p 


286p 


I86p(+13p; 


+20p) 

+1 & 

+10p) 

+20pl 


GOLD 


London Ftadng: 

AM $426.00 pm-$425.50 
dose $425^426.00 (£21 
298.00) 

Nfc wYOrfC 

Comex $425.70-426^0- 


L 50- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Dec) pm $14.l5bW(Sl 
* Denotes latest trading price 


A55) 


New study plays down size 
of Britain’s black economy 

n-‘A i? • j ^ 


By Our Economics Correspondent 


Britain’s Mack economy is 
not as large as is commonly 
thought, according to new 
estimates by the Institute for 
fiscal Studies. 

It is equivalent to between 3 
and 5 per cent of gross 
domestic product, the BPS 
calculates, in a newly pub- 
lished book* and not the 7-5 
per cent estimate by a former 
fbfljrnma of the TiiImmI Rev- 
enue — quite apart from other 
estimates which are as high as 
15 or 20 per cent 

The black economy includes 
all activities which would nor- 
mally be subject to tax — and 
which escape the tax net 
Services for households, 
including decorating, plumb- 
ing and window cleaning, are 
typical black economy 
occupations. 

But there is. says Mr Ste- 
phen South, senior research 
officer with the IFS, a wider 
dfcadow economy, including 
do-it-yourself work, the work 
done housewives and so on. 
This shadow economy does not 
Involve normally taxable activ- 


ities but it may mean that the 
size of the economy, as me»- 
snred by the official statistics, 
is understated. 

This is the familiar problem 
of national accounts. If a man 
employs a housekeeper, her 
work is xndoded in gross 
domestic product If be mar- 
ries his housekeeper. Iter work 
is not offidally recognized. 

Although it is impossible to 
put a value on the shadow 
economy, the amount of hours 
that people work in it is 
probably similar to the total 
boars worked in paid employ- 
ment, according to Mr Smith. 

The difficalty arises if there 
are-shifts in and out of the 
shadow economy, Cor example 
if people decorate their own 
houses where they used to 
employ someone to do it This 
could affect measured growth 
in die economy, although the 
evidence; the IFS says, is that 
such shifts are not large 
enough to cause major 
distortions. 

The shadow economy. Eke 
tiie recorded economy, is prob- 



ably most prosperous in the 
south of England. Do-it-your- 
self is not a poor man's mkhod 
of household improvement and 
maintenance but one asso- 
ciated with affluence. 

The shadow economy booms 
where people are buying and 
improving bosses. 

The IFS says of the pure 
tax-evading Mack economy 
that there are dangers In 
overstating the scale of the 
problem. It could, for example, 
encourage other people to try 
and escape the tax neL 

“The evidence does not 
suggest (hat the Mad: econ- 
omy is particularly large or 
that the tax system is dose to 
break-down," Mr Smith says. 
“Undoubtedly problems of 
enforcement do exisr in some 
areas but their solution will 
rarely be made any easier by 

continuing misapprehension 
of the actual scale of the black 

economy." 

*The Shadow Economy by 
Stephen Smith, Oxford 
IJpiversity Press, £1930. 

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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THF. TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 




STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Holmes a Court could be the 


mystery buyer of Sears shares 


US defence compromise 
saves $560 billion Bill 


From Bailey Moms, Washington 

. when the were unable to resolve the 

An important compromise Adminisiration * s o^ikma 

by the United States House ne ^‘® t ? re J?K5? S29li8 to foreign subsidies atn- 
« MNMvl ^MSSwhlno^ «^_S«SSF! SSr^ 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 

Sears, the Selfridges, Holdings, the investi 


Sears, the Seltndges, 
Saxone and Mappin & Webb 


stores group, was the big 
talking point among dealers 
after hours last night, amid 
suggestions that the Austra- 
lian entrepreneur. Mr Robert 
Holmes a Court, had .taken a 


fancy to the shares. 

The price responded with a 
rise of 6 p to 120 V 2 p, amid 
unconfirmed reports that the 
brokers, Rowe & Pitman, and 
rival T C Coombes had picked 
up a total of about 10 million 
shares on his behalf between 
them. That would give him 
about 5 per cent of the total 
shares in issue. 

Sears has often been lipped 
as a possible takeover can- 
didate, but has seen its sham 
price drift from the I48p it 
stood at earlier this year. 
However, Sears is still one of 
Britain's biggest stores groups 
with a price lag of£1.7 billion. 

Anyone wishing to make an 
agressive bid would require an 
awful lot of financial muscle. 
Dealers have decided that Mr 
Holmes a Court may well 
have decided to buy a stake in 


Holdings, the investment 
company formed by the 
meiger of the Charterhouse 
Group and RIT Northern a 
few years ago, has again been 
trying to buy back some of its 
shares. 

Cazenove, the broker, was 
sent into the market and 
instructed to pick up a total of 
10 million shares at 132p. But 
the broker appears to have 
met with little success and is 
reckoned to have acquired less 
than 2 million. 

Rothschild has been using 
its spare cadi to buy back its 
own shares for some time. 
Analysts d aim the effect is to 
reduce the group's capital base 
and boost its earnings a share. 

Takeover speculau'on about 
Pflkington Brothers. the glass 
manufacturer, reached fever 


AMSTRAD’S FUTURE 
STILL LOOKING / 
BRIGHTMm 


AMSTRAD 


FTA ALL SHARE 


1 

■■■■ -■ 

FEB MAR APR MAY JUN 


JUL AUG SB 3 OCT 


with most stocks finishing at 
least a couple of pence lower. 
Shell slipped 7p to 906p, BP 


5p to 668 p and I C Gas 5p to 
51 Ip. 


51 Ip. 
Partly-paid 


smcuI firmed a halfpenny to 84>Ap 
PJJS, hiUat ^ touching 85tep mid 

a x. 3,? morning. The rest of the 


^ nkteT tadav it « morning. The rest ot . me 
fluted topline of 2 ~ L"2S- 


■ • Retailers could receive a 
boost after a visit today by 30 
, fund managers to 
; Newcastle's Metro Centre. 
Scrimgeoar Vickers is fly- 
ing the party there. Than will 
.be presentations by Boots, 
:BHS, Burton, Dixons and 
-M & S. Dixons and Store- 
; boose gained 6 p to348pand 
.316p respectively. 


'Sears as an investment, but it 
-still a little premature to talk 
'about a bid. 

- His name is already linked 
;with a number of leading 
’ British companies, where he is 
^reputed to have bought size- 

■ able holdings and is quickly 
^building up a reputation as a 
.-trader. 

; Scars is thought by many 
Imarkctmcn to be an idem 
‘trading stock. Other traders 
1 like Heron Corporation's, Mr 
; Gerald Ronson, have traded 
in the shares in the past and 
.'thought to have made a 
. handsome profit 

■ Despite this. Mr Geoffrey 
| Maitland Smith, chairman 
j and chief executive of Sears, 
l will no doubt be keeping a 
! dose eye on the share register 
I over the next few weeks. 

' Meanwhile, J Rothschild 


fuelled by talk that a line of 2 
million Pilkington shares had 
been put through (he market 
at 462p a share. 

Pilkington climbed a further 
20 p to touch a new high at 
503p with several stock- 
broking firms heavy buyers of 
the Slock. 

Rio Tinto-Zinc, the 
favourite to bid. firmed 5p to 
684p. Hanson, another pos- 
sible predator, hardened a 
couple of pence to I95p. 
Easgiisfe China Clay, another 
bid rumour stock put on 5p to 
321p and Steetley, which is 
thought to be interested in 
bidding for Ibstock Johnson, 
gained lOp to 446 p. Ibstock 
finned a couple to l84p. 

The rest of the equity 
market had a quiet day with 
most traders loo preoccupied 
with theur plans for Big Bang 
to swop gossip on share tips. 

The FT-30 share index 
dosed oft* its best level of the 
day at 1277.6. up 1.2. The 
broader-based FT-SE share 
100 index was down 2.5 at 
1605.0. 

Blue chips were mixed, with 
most moving no more than a 
couple of pence in either 
direction. Allied Lyons dipped 
8 p io 305p. British Telecom 
4p to I 86 p and Lucas 5p to 
498p. while BICC improved 
8 p to 255p, Havrker Siddeley a 
further 6 p to 453p and THF 
and Blue Circle both 3p to 
1 55p and 583p respectively. 

Oils had an uneasy day on 
the back of the Opec meeting 


South leads boom 
in real coffee sales 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 
Real coffee, rather than the for coffee and grocery at Lyons 


. instant variety, is proving so 
; popular that it now accounts 
for a fifth of all coffee sales — 
l establishing a sector worth £50 
! million a year. 

I In London and the south of 
. England. 68 per cent of con- 

• sumens drink real coffee fre- 
> qucntly but it is least popular 
; in the north even though 40 
. per of factory workers con- 

• sider it an aphrodisiac (only 7 

• per cent have any faith in its 
[ effectiveness for dealing with 
.hangovers). 

, This emerged yesterday 

• when a campaign to promote 
! more drinking of real coffee 
« was launched by Lyons Tetley, 

I market leader in the sector 
- and part of the food division 
I of Allied Lyons. 

• Real coffee consumption 
I per head rose 30 per cent 
’between 1980 and 1985 while 
! coffee drinking overall has 
1 doubled in the past ten years. 

! said Lyons Tetley. Two cups 
■ of tea are still being drunk to 
\ every one of coffee but the gap 

has been closing because in 


* 1966 tea was ahead by 6.5 cups 

\ to I. „ _ 

* The gradual decline of tea 

* had now halted and that 
I market seemed stable, said Mr 
■ John Attree. general manager 


! Siebe approval 


Tetley. 

Instant coffee sales have 
been growing by a few percent- 
age points a year but the 
growth in real colTee 
consumption could double in 
five to ten years, Mr Attree 
added. Real coffee consump- 
tion was increasing at up to 
four times the rate of instant 
coffee. 

This is despite a price 
differential which means real 
coffee costs about 4p a cup 
against 2.5p to 3p for a cup of 
premium instant like a freeze 
dried variety. 

A crucial stimulant to real 
coffee safes was the popularity 
of the new generation of filter 
machines for making such 
coffee. 

About 1.5 million of the 
machines are now being sold 
annually and last year they 
were at the top of the wedding 
present lists. 

About 9 million cups of real 
coffee are drunk daily, men 
consuming slightly more at 
2.56 cups than women (22b 
cups). Most real coffee is 
drunk in the evening while 
breakfast time is next most 
popular. 

The biggest growth in the 
real coffee sector is in de- 
caffeinated varieties the sales 
of which are doubling each 


Siebe shareholders have ap- 
proved the proposed ac- 
quisition through a subsidiary 
of Robenshaw Controls. The 
tender offer will close on 


year. 

Mr Attree believes that this 1 


1 October 21. 


is part of the health boom. In 
the United -States de- 
caffeinated coffee accounts for ; 
up a fifth of the market, he j 
said. I 


Commercial Bank of Wales 
announces that its Base Rate has 
been increased from 10% to 11% on 
15 October 1986 


Interest payable on demand 
Deposit Accounts will be at the 
net rate of 6% per annum - 
equivalent to a gross rate of 
8.45% per annum to basic rate 
taxpayers 



Commercial 
Bank of Wales 


PLC 


BANC MASNACHOL CYMRU 

Office; 114-118 St Mary Streat, Cartfff CF1 1XJ 


Lloyds put on 3p to 417p, 
while Royal Bank of Scotland 
slipped 2p to 328p and Stan- 


• Consolidated GoM 
Fields, the mining finance 
group, kept op a cracking 
pace, advancing 7p to 674p — 
5p short of the year's high- 
Fiske & Co, the broker was a 
big buyer of call options 
for the January series and 
was joined by Alexanders 
Laing & C trucks bank. Deal- 
ers claim Cons Gold's UK 


Matthews, the turkey group, 
3p to 23lp. 

Manders, the Wolver- 
hampton-based paint, prim- 
ing inks and property 
company, went up a further 8 p 
in busy trading to 32 Ip. on 
talk that Mr Ron Brier! ey, the 
New Zealand businessman 
may have stepped up his 
holding — some say to as. 
much as 7 per cent. 

Beecham firmed 3p to 413p 
as Goldman Sachs, the New 
York investment house con- 
firmed that it has appointed 
an analyst to follow the com- 
pany but added that it will not, 
be publishing any recom- 
mendations before the end of 
the month. 

Cable & Wireless, which 
started the week in such high 
spirits, came in for further 
profit-taking. despite 
confirmation this week of a 


prospects for the new com- 
puter and say it will maintain 
the group's astonishing growth 
record over the next few years. 

Excitement increased on re- 
ports from the United States 
that rBM has deckled to 
withdraw from the personal 
computer market. This would 
effectively leave the way open 
for companies like Arastrad. 

IBM was a firm market, 
climbing £150 to £85 £, after 
weakness in the US following 
disappointing trading news. In 
London, N M Rothschild is 
thought to have joined the 
growing fist of sellers and is 
urging diems to sell the 
shares. 


and Senate negotiators was SSSlISiiShite White House culture spending levels and a 
reached >«SMTdav on a record and a figure controversial provision 

MM’ govcmii® off-jhore ail rigL 


33S3M* 

1 {appeared to assure passage programmes. • 

oftheffill before the raidnirtit President Reagan ££”49*^ °L J* 

deadline when the threatened to wro ll* Aimnican t manerf wmbm 
G overnment's spending Sending Bill if the defeyce law prepared fff » 
authority expired. munberc, which included to resjprc 1 JjL. SS!?^ 

Working round the dock, 53 53 billion .for the spending «n 
the House and Senate nego- president's strategic defence fore tlfe stw ofM oecto 
liaiors laboured to resolve in ju 3 tivc - the -star wars team knur this week. .. .. 
their few remaining , dif- programme - werc Sponsors of the Gramm- 
ferenccs with the Admimstra- unaccc piable. Rudman-HoHings law .Ta\c 

tion over the omnibus » ~ 


Sponsors of the "Gramm- 
Rudman-Hollings law.Jtcve 
warned weary Congressmen 


nara-eaves soared lip to 
271p after a higher offer from 
Coalite, the chemicals group. 
Coalite is now bidding, what it 
hopes will be the knockout 
blow, of £103 million. The 
terras are one Coalite for every 
three Hargreaves. 

There is a cash alternative 
of 270p. Coalite, down 2p at 1 
360p, already owns 4.99 per j 
cent of Hargreaves. British ! 
Aerospace, the defence en ~ 1 
gineering group. lost Sp to ; 
touch 46Sp despite news of a 


sr.ts; 

syfrr 


Pause in 
lawsuit 
by- Tinco 


Sol gronp expands 

in self-catering 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

Announcing in London a risen between 8 ar«J 10 pci 


r S20 milfion contractor tele- 


own, with the South Af- _ 
rican and Australian busi- 
nesses thrown in for 
nothing. In Angus! the shares 
stood at 450p. 


dard Chartered lost 5p on 
profit-taking to 772p. 

Life insurance companies 
had another good day with 
Sun Life going up 8 p to 882p, 
Britannic 7p to 809p, Refuge 
5p to 398p and Pearl Sp to 
1473p. 

Unigafe led the way up 
among food manufacturers, 
climbing 7p to 295p, as word 
went round that blue-blooded 
broker Cazenove were buying 
the stock. 

John J Lees, the Scottish 
manufacturer of coconut 
snowballs and other confec- 
tions. surged ! 6 p to a new high 
of I31p, Tate & Lyle 5p to 
670p. Rowntree Mackintosh 
5p to 408p and Bernard 


phone exchanges in China. 

The price slipped a further 
lOp 10 324p having hit 343p 
on Monday. Cape 1-Cure My- 
ers, the broker, is reckoned to 
have been big buyers of the 
shares and dealers have re- 
ported heavy options 
business. 

But the market is dis- 
appointed with the news from 
Cliina and clearly set its sights 
too high. 

Lad broke was unchanged at 
348p after confirmation that 
Granada was paying £30 mil- 
lion for its Laskys. hi-fi retail- 
ing chain. 

The deal had been hinted at 
for sometime with Dixons 
originally lipped as a possible 
buyer. Granada finished the 
day 2 p down at 282p. 

Mr Alan Sugar's Amstrad 
hardened 8 p to I32p. . on 
growing hopes of its new IBM- 
compatible personal com- 
puter. Analysts are excited bv 


• An attempt by Glaxo to 
recover from its post-results 
fell ended after word fil- 
tered through that Merck had 
won approval from the US 
Food and Drag Administra- 
tion to market Pepsid and 
Famotidine, two anti-ulcer 
drugs, to rival Glaxo's 
Zantac. The shares fell to 
948p. 


flOmillion order to supply ; 
Swiss Air Ambulance with 
two of their twin engined jez ' 
transporters. 

Renold, the chain makers, 
put on another 5p to 54p, on 
rumours of a bid at between 
80p and 90p a share — valuing 
the company at £57 million. 

The gossip seems to have 
prompted the group to 1 
strengthen its board — with 
both the chairman. Sir Camp- 1 
bell Adamson, and the raanag- 1 
ing director resigning to make ; 
way for fresh blood. j 

News of the board reshuffle ! 
accompanied a profits forecast 
of break even or a little more 
for the six months to end 
September, compared with 
£2.5miltion last time: The 
company blames a fall in 
demand for its products. 


Tinco Realisations, the 
group of 11 metal brokers 
timing losses of op to £400 
m illion suffered in the tin 
crisis, is delaying its legal 
action against the Inter- 
national Tin ConndL. 

Tinco, which last month 
announ ced plans to petition 
the High Court to wind up the 
ITC, mil not now be present- 
ing its petition until 
"Christmas at the earliest”, 
Mr Michael Arnold, bead of 
the Tinco campaign, said 
yesterday. 

He refused to give a precise 
reason for the delay but he 
made it dear that there were 
no indications from the 22 
member governments of the 
ITC that they were prepared 
to consider a settlement. 

“The reason for the delay is 
entirely tactical,” he said. 
“This does not represent a 
weakness on our part. Rather 
it is a strengthening 
manonevre since it has the 
potential to Improve our 

position." 

The ITC members are likely i 
to oppose the Tinco petition on 
the grounds that the High 
Court is not the correct forum | 
for such a legal action. 

Moreover they are expected 1 
to claim that in any event the 
ITC is not a body capable of 
being wound up hi such a 
manner. 


.Announcing in London a 
series of hotel deals, Spain's 
leading hotel group. Sot. dis- 
closed expansion in self-cater- 
ing apartments to provide for 
what is seen as the big growth 
area in package holidays. 

Sol - nearly half its cus- 
tomers are Britons - sees self- 
catcring accommodation as an 
especially attractive invest- 
ment. The finance needed for 
apartments is less than for 
hotels and there is a lower cost 
in operating them, said Mr 
Juan Caldentey, Sol's manag- 
ing director. 

The group, which has more 
than 100 hotels and is the 
third biggest hotel group in 
Europe, is launching Apart 
Sol. a division to promote self- 
catering apartments. Among 
blocks planned is one in 
Cyprus. 

Self-catering is clearly likely 


risen between 8 and 10 per 
cent for next summer, in line 
with the rate of inflation in 
Spain, according to Mr 
Caldentey. 


It raises the question of how 
for there will be a bookings 
swing towards the cheaper 
self-catering deals to the detri- 
ment of hotel-based holidays. 

Self-catering now accounts 
for 15 percent of the market in 
holiday areas in and around 
the Mediterranean served by 
Sol. Mr Caldentey forecasts an 
average rise of about 10 per 
cent in self-catering with 
Spanish resorts likely io see 
more growih than thaL 

Sunmcd. one of the biggest 
tour operators for holidays in 
Greece, has forecast a shift 
away from Spain to Greece 
where Sunmed claims prices 
next summer are felling com- 
pared with the past season. 

Sunmed is reducing its 
prices by about £i 5 a holiday 
or 6 to 7 per cent. 

But some hotel prices in 
Greece have risen substan- 
tially. according lo ‘ Mr 
Caldentey. 

*$ 0 ^ which unsuccessfully 
entered the bidding for one of 
the most recent soles of a 
prime central London hotel, 
has bought five hotels - in 
Lanza rote, Cadiz, Majorca. 
Barcelona and Las Palmas in 
the Canaries. 


to expand, judging from the 
first of the brochure launches 


first of the brochure launches 
by British tour operators, with 
big companies like Thomson 
Holidavs and Intasun increas- 
ing substantially their self- 
catering holiday offerings to 
keep average prices to the 
bargain levels of this past 
summer. 

But brochure prices of ho- 
tel-based holidays are in some 
cases up at feast 10 per cent 
with some rises well above 
that Spanish hotel prices to 
the British tour operators have 


Buildings 

flotation 


Harris Queensway Japan ‘must aid neighbours’ 


planned 

"By Judith Huntley 


acquires Harveys 


From David Watts, Tokyo 


By Cliff Feltham 


Investors could soon have 
the chance to buy a piece of a 
£20 million plus office block, 
shopping centre or a business 
park if County, the iraerchant 
bank, and Richard Ellis, the 
surveyor, have their way. 

They have set up an associ- 
ation to promote their vehicle 
for selling shares in single 
commercial properties on tie 
stock market after agreemeiit 
by the Stock Exchange in 
August to list their single asset 
property vehicle. 

Mr Danid Sheridan, of the 
Stock Exchange markets 
department, is to become a 
director of the association, 
which is to be known as the 
Pines Association. The name 
derives from the EUis-County 
Bank vehicle called Property 
Income Certificates. 

Mr Paul Orchard-Lisle, a 
former president of the Royal 
Institution of Chartered 
Surveyors and a partner of 
Healey & Baker, the surveyor, 
will join Mr Sheridan as a 
director of the association. 

Pines are a new form of 
security allowing investors to 
deal in tradeable equity in a 
single commercial bail ding, 
benefiting from rental income 
flow and capital appreciation, 
if any. Its promoters aim to 
float the first three or four 
buildings in the new market at 
the ; ginning of next year. 

Mr John Barks hire, of Mer- 
cantile House Holdings, is 
developing a rival vehicle — a 
new type of trust in a single 
commercial property. 


A former market trader has 
become a multi-millionaire 
after selling his chain of 
curtain and linen shops to 
Harris Queensway. the large 
furniture and carpets group. 

Mr Harvey Gilbert aged 40. 
who used £ 2,000 of capital to 
set up a market stall in east 
London 20 years ago. is 
collecting £9.5 million for 
selling a 75 per cent slake in 
his chain of 33 Harveys high 
street shops situated in the 
South-east of England. 

He has the option to sell the 
rest of the business for a 
further £2.5 million, depend- 
ing on future profits. Last year 


the business earned about 
£550.000. 


A Harris Queensway exec- 
utive said: “Mr Gilbert built 
his business up in a similar 
way to the way our chairman. 
Sir Philip Harris, created his 
group — from small begin- 
nings and by a lot of hard 
work". 


Harveys will continue to 
operate from its base in Bark- 
ing. east London. Mr Gilbert ; 
said: “The tie-up with Harris 
Queensway enables me to 
make the business grow even 
faster. 1 certainly have no 
intention of retiring.” 


Bell fails to lift stake 
in Crucible above 20% 


Mr Lee Kuan Yew. prime 
minister of Singapore, be- 
lieves Japan should take 
“affirmative action’* to help 
less fortunate nations reduce 
their trade imbalances. 

Singapore's prime minister 
is the most prominent of a 
number of visitors from 
South-east Asia this autumn. 

So far they have included 
Dr Mahathir bin Mohamed. 
the prime minister of Malay- 
sia. who sought easier terms 
on Japanese loans, and Air 
Chief Marshal Siddhi 
Savetsila, the Thai foreign 
minister who wanted more 
trade and investment 
Next month President 
Corazon Aquino of the Phil- 
ippines visits Japan. She will 
try to convince hesitant Japa- 
nese investors that her coun- 
try is stable enough to make a 
good home for their money. 

With the exception of Singa- 
pore. Japanese industry has 
been moving away from 


investments in neighbouring 
Asian countries in preference 
to Europe and the United 
States as the prospect of 
protectionist measures looms 
larger. 

Mr Lee ranks high among 
Asian leaders. It fells to him to 
tell his hosts how they should 
develop the long-term eco- 
nomic relationship with 
South-east .Asia if it is not to 
become "irksome”. The 
continued import of natural 
resources from the area and 
export of finished products 
frequently results in a lop- 
sided trade balance. 

No longer arc Japan's ex- 
ternal policies of interest only 
to foreign countries, said Mr 
Lee. Internal dynamics affect 
external policies more and 
more. 

Asked what “affirmative 
action” should be taken, he 
said: “I think first Japan 
should make as much of its 4 
per cent targeted growth as 


possible. Never mind about 
restructuring, just achieve that 
goal so that external demand 
does not fall down. . . 

“In the long term. Japan 
will have to help these coun- 
tries to understand it. If you 
case the way it will lessen the 
frustrations. Otherwise we will 
have to learn the hard 


way. 

Mr Lee had some words of 
support for the prime min- 
ister. Mr Yasuhiro 
Nakasone’s. opinion that Ja- 
pan is strengthened by its 
outwardly mono-racial 
society. 

“We can never achieve the 
same sense of heightened 
solidarity you have, where 
everybody is prepared to sac- 
rifice for everybody else be- 
cause you arc all one 
family. . . My guess is wc can 
achieve 70-80 per cent of what 
we would have achieved if wc 
were all one ethnic, cultural 
group.” be said. 


By Our City Staff 


Mr Robert Holmes & Court, 
the Australian entrepreneur, 
met with only a limited suc- 
cess in his efforts to raise his 
stake in Morgan Crucible to 
29.9 per cent. 


His tender offer for up to 

14.8 million shares at up to 
320p per share was accepted 
by holders of just more than 

5.8 million shares. This raises 
the total holding of Mr 
Holmes A Court’s Bell Re- 
sources to just short of 20 per 
cent of Morgan Cricible's 
equity. 


A spokesman for LazareL 
Bell's merchant bank, said: 
“We are deligred with the 
result. We would have liked 
more, but we have increased 
our holding in a very fine 
company” He declined to 
comment on Mr Holmes a 
Court's long-term intentions. 


Booming pawnbroker seeks listing 


Mr Bruce Farmer. Morgan 
Crucible's managing director, 
said yesterday he was in- 
terested that acceptances were 
very fer short of the levels Mr 
Holmes & Court was looking 
for. 


A booming pawnbroker is 
to be floated on the Stock 
Exchange — thanks to the 
spread of plastic money. 

Mr Pbil Murphy, managing 
director of Albemarle Pawn- 
brokers, says people are 
increasingly in debt with their 
credit cards or store charge 
cards, and so turn to his 
ancient profession for help. 


£ 2.10 each, despite a promise 
of no return for three years. 

But although the traditional 
three balls still hang outside 


own fault. There’s no reason 
why other pawnbrokers' busi- 
nesses ought not to do as well 
as mine. 


Mr Murphy'S three shops in 
Bristol. Oxford and Cardiff be 


Bristol. Oxford and Cardiff be 
sees himself in a crusade to 
update the trade's seedy 
image. 


“They just don’t have the 
right attitude towards the 
market Our offices took just 
like any building society." 


His 18-month-old company 
is about to double in size with 
a £400,000, fully-subscribed 
share offer. Investors have 
snapped up shares offered at 


Mr Murphy, aged 48. ad- 
mits the trade as a whole is in 
the decline — the National 
Pawnbrokers Association has 
just 131 members. 


But, he said: “Thai’s their 


Loans range from £5 to 
£ 1 5,000. but he says very. little 
of the business can be laid at 
the door of unemployment, 
while a great deal can be 
blamed on the growih in 
consumer credit ana debt. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• TRANWOOD GROUP: Re- 
sults for six months to July 31. 
Figures in £000. Turnover 
3.OTI.I (2,743.8). Oasts of over- 
heads less other income 2,993.2 
(2,685.1). Interest 17.5 (51.6). 
Exceptional items payment to 
former chairman 25.0 (nil). 
Insurance recovery and salvage 
credit nil 41.6). Pretax profit 
43.4 (48.7). Tax 13.0 (12.2). 
Extraordinary items 248 (nil). 
Earnings per share 0.u76p 


interest £11,917 (£13,000). 
Administration £48,814 
(£38J94). Net revenue before 
tax £306 J99 (£249210). Tax 


£89,812 (£76^69). Earnings per 
share 5. JOp ( 4 JJ 4 p). Net asset 
value per ordi nary share 31 3.7p. 
Dividend payable December 5. 

• MINTY: Results for the 27 
weeks to August 2 (26 weeks to 
July 27 1985). Turnover 
£1.698.979 (£1.387.614). Loss 
beofore tax £108,825 (£157.244 
loss). No tax (nil). Extraordinary 
credit — profit on sale of land 
and buildings nil (£128,951). 
Loss after tax and extraordinary 
crediL £108.825 (£28.293 loss). 
Loss per share 27p <39p). 

• SVENSKA CELLULOSAr 
Period to August 31. Figures in 
SkrOOOs. Net sales 9,549 (7.896)- 
Gross trading profit 1 306 
(1,087). Depreciation according 
to plan 407 (295). Operating 
profit 899 (792). Dividends, 


tamings per snare u.U76p 

• EL^VICK-HOPPER: Half- 
year to July 31 in £000. Sales 
14,297 (14,501). Operating 
profit on continuing activities 
1 12 (76). Interest payable on 


continuing activities 248 (233). 
Operating loss on activities to be 
discontinued II. (profit 136). 
Interest payable on activities to 


be discontinued 205 (173). Pre- 
tax loss 352 (194 loss). No tax 


tax loss 352 (194 loss). No tax 
(nil). Loss per ordinary share 
1.08p (0.73). 

• CITY OF OXFORD 
INVESTMENT TRUST; In- 


Skr!3.3 (12.9) after taxes pay- 
able. Fully diluted earnings per 
share were Skrfi.l ( 8 ) on a 
theoretical full tax charge and 
Skrlll ( 12 ) on taxes pa^ble. 

• BREWMAKER: Figures in 
£000. Turnover 3.280 (3,426) 
for six months to July 31. Pretax 
profit 68 (175). Tax 29 (73.5). 
Earnings per share 0.2p (0.6p). 
Profits for fell year will be 
substantially lower than those 
earned last year. Interim divi- 
dend 0.3p (same), payable 
Decembers. 

• JOHN KENT: Results for the 
6 1 weeks to July 26 (52 weeks to 


appointments 


profit). Extraordinary credit 124 
(nil). Loss per share S.09p (3J5p 
earnings). 

• DOWNIEBRAE HOLD- 
INGS: Results for the six 
months to June 30 in £000s. 
Interim 0.5p (same) pavable 
December 5. Group turnover 
1,312 (1,477). Trading profit 


British . Car Auctions: Mr 
Tom Madden becomes direc- 
tor, safes and marketing. 

Thomson Regional News- 
papers: Mr R J R Tyldestey, 
Mr A A Scott and Mr J K T 


121 (144). Depreciation 24 (20). 
Interest nil (9). Pretax profit 97 
(115). Tax 14 (nil). Extraor- 
dinary items credit 21 (nil). 
Earnings per share 1.16p 


Bryers join the board. 

Mechanical & Metal Trade 
Associations: Mr Eddie Addi- 
son is elected chairman and 
Mr Leonard Ashworth be- 
comes vice-chairman. 

DBI Holdings Inc: Mr 
Roderick M Collins (UK) 
joins the board. Mr Cenud 
Trondn becomes chairman 
and director, and Mr Chris- 
topher Browne a director of 
Discount Brokers Inter- 
national (UK) 

Walker Green bank: Mr 
John D Landelis joins the 
boards of F Atkinson (Not- 
tingham) and Varicol. 

Paul Steiger Mr Reg Pear- 
son and Mr Chris Rune have 
been made joint managing 
directors. Mr Leg Birch joins 
the board as production direc- 
tor, and Mr Ian Dunn as sales 
director. 


May 25 1985k Final dividend 
l-25p. makuiR I.75n fl.5nV. 


l-25p. making 1.75p (1.5p). 
Figures in £0008. Turnover 
17^221 (12,373). Operating 
profit I.I63 ( 8 S 8 ). Interest in- 


come 25 (23), Interest payable 
86 ( 6 ). Pretax profit 1,102(870). 
Tax 407 (355). Earnings per 
share 6.38p (5.0 Ip). 

• TDS CIRCUITS: Results tor 
the six months August 31. No 
interim dividend (nil). Figures 
m jCGOOs. Turnover 3,564 
(5,204). Operating loss 339 (562 
profit). Interest payable 207 
(158). Pretax loss 546 (404 


tcrim dividend 3p (2_5p). Divi 
dead £279,688 (£229,180) for 
six months » September 30. 
Bank interest £64,952 (£53,338). 
Underwriting commission 
£22*310 (£18^6). Debenture 


interest income and expenses 
and other items 64 (30). Share of 
earnings before tax in associated 
companies 27 (61). Earnings 
before extraordinary items, 
appropriations and income 
taxes 862 (823). Primary earn- 
ings per share Skf 8.8 ( 8 . 6 ) after a 
theoretical full tax charge 


• NU-SWIFT INDUSTRIES: 
Results for the six months to 
June 30. Interim dividend I.75p 
(l_25p). Figures in fiOOOs. Turn- 
over 57,168 (15,376). Profit 
before lax 6.027 (Z785). Tax 
1,681 (1.276). Minorities debit 
400 (nil). Extraordinary debit 
2.114 (nil). Earnings per share 
9.43p (3.43p). 


• PORTLAND HOLDINGS: 
Dividend 7.04c (nil) for year to 
August 31. 


profit). Tax credit 190 (157 
charge) making loss 3§6 (247 


More company news 
on page 26 


Tunstall Group: Mr Stanky 
Harris becomes managing 
director, Tunstall Security, 
and Mr Martin DowthwaHe 
becomes director of business 
development, Tunstall 
Telecom. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN._ 
Atom b 
BCCI 


C. Howe & Co ........ 

Hong Kpng S Shanghai.. 
Lloyds Bank 


Bank of SoctiSand. 11.00% 


CBbankNA 

t Mortgkg* flat Rata. 




/ 


rue 


cm 



Uio^ 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 






feteti* 


if 


noijihbours' 


f siTh 


ii'us ir 


Women’s place in the boardroom 


The Magnificent Seven 


^tnE2$* y ' *** Institute 
of^rectors will host a 
oneway conference on 
Women on the Board”, 

wm£n ng 8uidance to 

women executives who 

want to reach the top® 

Busing 

Correspondent, reports, 

£ l J”? Institute of Direc- 

nul one has been replaced bv a 
so that leaves seven. 
They include a duchess, a 
rareness, the wife of a former 
Conservative Cabinet min- 
nacr, and the boss’s daughter, 
Theyare the only women on 
Ute boards of direaors of the 
100 leading British 
companies. 

Only seven? Can those 100 
companies between them 
really only find a need for just 
■ 86 women direaors? 

It is a curious little team 
irom the highly successful 
career woman to the 
aristocrat. There are two exec- 
utive direaors, Mrs Sara Mor- 
nson at General Electric 
Company and Mrs Olga 
Polizzi, daughter of Lord 
Forte, at Trusthouse Forte, 
both of whom work full-time 
at their companies. 

Then there are the non- 
executive directors, who are 
traditionally expected to bring 
with them a breadth of experi- 
ence and a fresh outlook, a 
presence which could be pro- 
vided readily by the woman in 
her fifties or sixties who, 
denied a full choice of careers, 
has instead busied herself in 
the voluntary sector or local 
government. 

There is the Duchess of 
Devonshire at Tarmac: Lady 
Gramchester, daughter of the 
founder, at Littlewoods: Mrs 
Jane Prior, wife of James, at 
Tate & Lyle; Mrs Diana 
Eccles, married to the heir of a 
viscount, at Sainsbury; and 
Ms Delta O’Cathain, who 
qualifies for the team because 
of her non-executive position 
at Tesco but is better known as 
managing director of the Milk 
MarkeUng Board. 

So is it in part at least, just 
titles and nepotism after all? 
Are even these seven not all 
real directors, merely the bau- 
bles of the boardroom, paying 
cosmetic lipservice to a chang- 
ing world, the token female 
presence, bringing political or 
class clout? Would they, with- j 
out the titles, the fathers, and < 
the husbands, all really be t 
directors of top companies? i 

Make no mistake, they \ 
would, or rather, could; they i 
seem as competent and dedi- i 
caled to their jobs as any male 
equivalent (many of whom, i 
remember, are also blood \ 
relations or titled). But, if the l 
top 100 companies are any- j 
thing to go by, a woman has i 
extremely little chance of be- 
ing chosen if she does not have i 
the right connections. Thai is * 
the scandal. ■ 

There are still relatively few « 
senior women who have spent | 
the requisite number of years i 
in industry or commerce oeo < 
essary to be candidates for a i 
directorship of a large com- z 
pany but even further down t 
the rankings women directors 
are scarce. r 

Sara Morrison became one I 
of five executive directors ■ c 
based at GECs bead office in i 
1980, some five years after c 






«*<•£ 



Lady Grantchester 


Sara Morrison 


Jane Prior 







Detta O’Cathain 

joining the company. She 
arrived via local government, 
the Conservative Party Cen- 
tral Office, and in her time has 
held a dutch of public 
appointments including po- 
sitions on the Annan Commit- 
tee, the National Consumer 
Council and the chairman- 
ship of the National Council 
for Voluntary Organisations. 

She devotes considerable 
time and energy to visiting 
schools, preaching to both 
girls and boys ^ about the 
importance of engineering. “If 
women get the qualifications 
that tomorrow’s world needs, 
then the world is her oyster.” 

With one voice, these 
women reject suggestions that 
they' might have had particu- 
lar problems because they are 
female or have had difficulties 
with male colleagues. 

Mis Morrison says that 
while she wants women to 
“get a fair crack at the 
satisfying jobs” much empha- 
sis in her thinking supports 
the right to choose. “There are 
all sorts of women who are 
doing a lot more important 
things than the women in this 
article, but they have made 
different choices.” 

As the director broadly 
responsible for “people”, Mrs 
Morrison admits to GECs ' 
gentle approach to encourag- 
ing female appointments.- “In 
certain units women are inter- 


viewed for jobs and promo- 
tion who conceivably might 
not be if they were boys. It is 
partly to encourage women.” 
The problem most commonly 
cited by the seven is still the 
conflict of family and career. 
Lady Grantchester, elder 
daughter of Sir John Moores, 
the founder and president of 
Littlewoods, has been a non- 
executive director of the com- 
pany for nine years. Both her 
brothers have at some time 
held executive posts, but. in 
her case, six children meant 
she never had that option. 

Fifteen years ago, when 
children became less time- 
consuming, she enrolled her- 
self on business courses and 
was later invited to join the 
board. Nowadays she pro- 
vides considerable financial 
support for the Lucy Cav- 
endish College in Cambridge 
which gives undergraduate 
places for mature women 
students. 

“People are only going to 
get skilful by doing business or 
with a certain amount of 
training,” she says, suggesting 
that the lack of top women 
direaors is a “historical 
thing” because there are just 
not that many women avail- 
able who have had the career 
experience. 

Even among children who, 
have grown up in a family - 
business, it remains far more 


Olga Polizzi 

common for sons rather than 
daughters to follow in the 
father's footsteps. Olga Polizzi 
started working full-time for 
Trust House Forte six years 
ago after her husband was 
killed in a car crash. In 1983 
she was made an executive 
director, in charge of design 
and decor and responsible for 
the refurbishment of more 
than 800 hotels worldwide. 
But her brother is chief 
executive: 

The shortage of successful 
top female businesswomen 
means that the novelty value 
is even now very high. Detta 
O’Cathain, who has worked at 
Tarmac, Carrington Viyefta, 
and British Leyiand (to name 
but some past employers) is 
the constant choke of tele- 
vision^ radio, and women's 
magazines when a successful 
female industrialist is needed. 

Women, she agrees, have 
not had the breaks. “1 know in 
my heart of hearts that 1 am 
doing my job as well as any 
other man with my capabili- 
ties can da But if you make a 
mistake as a woman, you are 
remembered for it." Since her 
arrival at the Milk Marketing 
Board she has tacitly en- 
couraged women who now 
hold more senior posts. 

According to the Institute of 
Directors, government figures 
reveal' a drop over the past 
decade of women in man- 


TEMPUS 


Micro Focus over the worst 


When the computer manu- 
facturers caught a cold two 
years ago, the software pro- 
ducer. Micro Focus, caught 
pneumonia, a nasty illness 
but, fortunately for the com- 
pany. not necessarily a fatal 
one. 

Interim results fdr the six 
months to July 31 show how 
much careful nursing can 
contribute to halting the 
progress of the disease. 

Turnover was virtually 
static at £5.65 million, but 
pretax losses were reduced 
from £18 million in the first 
half of last year to £480 
million. 

The key to reduang losses 
has been to cut costs. This tes 
meant cutting staff, a painful 
exercise, but the headcount is 
down 22 per cent from 316 in 
January last year to 247. 

The group is concentrating 
on maintaining and improv- 
ing its cash flow while further 
developing its product range. 

A big growth area has been 
VS COBOL Workbench soft- • 
ware, which allows customere 
to use microprocessors as 
programmer workstations. 
Workbench now represents 
27 per cent of Micro Focus s 
business, compared with 10 
per cent last year. 

The company is also 
reorientating its marketing 
and sales strategy to cope 
with changes in the market 
place. It is now making more 
sales direct to usere, rather 
than to the manufacturers or 

,h !nT‘SdS U u 5 ,byfar 

its most important market 
comprising 47 per cent of 
sales, direct sales were 68 per 
cent of US turnover, com- 
pared with 56 per cent in the 
same period last year. 

To make a full recovery to 
profitability, however, there 
needs to be a change m the 
climate for computer sales. 


MICRO FOCUS 
Share price 


uoo ■ 

400- 


FT A 500 
SHARE INDEX 


MICRO FOCUS GROUP 


JFMAMJ JASONDJFMA M JJASO 


While there is some ev- 
idence of improvement, as 
netwo-rking catches on and 
microprocessors filter down 
the, heirarchy, the - weak 
investment climate in the US 
is a big negative! 

The cash haemorrhage at 
Micro' Focus has stopped, 
and the debt/equity ratio has 
improved to 44 per cent. 

When the recovery coroes, 
the company should do well 


Strong & Fisher/ 
Garnar Booth 

Saks, Fifth Avenue is crying 
out for clothes made from 
Strong* Fisher’s high quality 
leathers. 

The identification of this 
growth sector has been an 
important factor in the 
group's recovery since . the 
beginning of the decade. 

Others in the industry have 
not fared sb welL Although 
Garnar Booth has made a 
virtue of the fad that it serves 
a wide range of customers, 
the fragmentation of the mar- 
ket has placed considerable 
pressure on its management. 

Profits have fallen from a 
1984-1985 peak of £4.8 mil- 


lion to a current year forecast 
of £909,000. Although it has 
recognized the need to 
rationalize, action has not 
been taken fast enough to 
prevent an opportunistic bid 
from Strong & Fisher. 

Uncured skins do not 
travel well. At present. Strong 
& Fisher buys high quality 
skins in the south of England 
and Wales. The acquisition of 
Garnar Booth would give' it 
access to raw material in 
Scotland and the North. 

Strong & Fisher’s plans for 
Garnar Booth may involve 
. the disposal of some smaller 
-businesses. This would re- 
duce the high debt levels (at 
least 120 per cent) which will 
ensue if the bid suceeds. 

Good . husbandry could 
bring this down to nearer 50 
per cent in the year to June 
1988. Even so, a rights issue 
may be around the corner. 

A better year from both 
businesses could mean that 
dilution. in 1986-1987 coujd 
be kept comfortably within 
single figure?. 

Strong & Fisher is paying 
an exit p/e ratio which is 
more than four times the nor- 
mal rating for shares in the 
sector,. However, Garnar 
Booth's profits are expecially 
depressed and Strong and 


Fisher has dealt the ultimate 
insult of bidding below asset 
value. (Garnar Booth's prop- 
erties are in the books at very 
modest levels) 

Leaving aside the wild 
cards of the Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission and a 
white knight (perhaps in the 
shape of Hillsdown Holdings) 
Strong & Fisher will probably 
have to pay a bit more to 
secure its pnze. 

Hargreaves/ 

Coalite 

Whether or not the new 
£100 million bid from Coalite 
is enough to win over Har- 
greaves Group, it has at least 
cleared- the air for sharehold- 
ers in the energy, materials 
and vehicle distribution firm. 

The new offer, decisively 
higher than Coalite's opening 
shot and, at 18 times 
Hargreaves' 1986 earnings, is 
likely to have deterred the 
white knights. 

Institutions weighing up 
■ the bid of 275p a share have 
also - a full cash 
a!teraaiive.Tbey might well 
go for the cash offer riven the 
City’s general unflattering 
view or Coalite’s manage- 
ment. Although . Coalite 
shares held up yesterday, they 
might start to ease soon as 
shareholders question' the 
wisdom of a 13.7 per cent 
scrip dilution to buy a similar 
company. If that happens, 
selling will become an attrac- 
tive option. 

The Hargreaves board has 
a difficult task to wring 
loyalty out of its sharehold* 
ers. Its shares have out- 
performed the general market 
for almost two ^years even 
before Coalite triggered fur- 
ther sharp advances at a time 
when the short-term profit 
outlook looked dull. 


agerial positions, down from 
9.7 per cent to 62 per cent in 
1985. “That could be a direct 
correlation with unemploy- 
ment. If there is competition 
between a man and a woman 
there is still a latent feeling 
that a man should have the 
job, that is his ’tradilionaT 
role,” Ms O’Cathain says. 
There is also the expecta- 
tion that women, at least of a 
y certain age, should fit into the 

f supporting wife role. Jane 
prior says that it was only 
i£ when her husband left North- 
ern Ireland in 1984 that she 
was able to consider another 
career. 

First came an opportunity 
at Trustcard, the TSB's credit 
card company, and then in 
1985 she was invited on to the 
board at Tate & Lyle where 
she knew the chairman. “I do 
not think it was because of 
him (her husband), but it 
might have been in spite of 
him,” she says. Women are 
’ often thought unsuitable be- 
cause of possible conflicts 
arising from their husband's 
job. 

Non-executive director- 
ships at most companies in- 
volve attending monthly 
board meetings, pulling an 
effort into visiting factories 
and offices, and providng 
impartial advice. Most of 
these women stressed the 
importance of meeting the 
people on the ground 
“The lessons learnt in poli- 
tics have been useful,” says 
Mrs Prior. 

Similarly, Diana Eccles, at 
Sainsbury, was chosen for 
wide-ranging outside interests 
which these days indude the 
vice-chairmanship of the Na- 
tional Coundl for Voluntary 
Organisations, a directorship ■ 
at Tyn e-Tees Television, and 
chairman of Durham Univer- 
sity Council. 

The Duchess of Devon- 
shire. the youngest of the 
Milford sisters, spent three 
years on Tarmac's housing 
i division board before being 
: promoted to join the main 
i company board. “It was an 
r -apprenticeship.” she says. 

| She is widely credited with 
’ being the driving force behind 
j turning the Chatsworth estate 
into a profitable concent, 

[ managing 70,000 acres of la 
houses aad farms and 
supervising the renovation. 

: Recently she picked a 23- 

year old woman against seven 
male candidates to run a 
Chatsworth business which 
has a turnover of £750,000. 

Delta O’Cathain, who was 
group economist at Tarmac in 
the late Sixties, was delib- 
erately appointed by the com- 
pany for her “surprise value,” 
says the duchess. 

How long will top women 
directors remain surprising? A ' 
similar survey of the top 100 
US companies last year, 
showed more than 60 baa at 
least one woman on the board. 
The need fora title or a family 
connection was not apparent 

• Last night the Institute of 
Directors convened the • 
Magnificent Seven into the 
Magnificent Nine, with the 
discovery that Mrs Sally 
Oppenheim is a non-executive 
director of Boots and Miss 
Eileen Cole is a non-executive 
member of the Post Office 
board. ^ 

TSB pulls 
lower paid 
investors 

By Richard Thomson 
Banking Correspondent 

More investors from lower 
income groups bought Trustee 
Savings Bank shares than 
British Telecom shares, 
according to research carried 
out when the TSB share offer 
dosed last mouth. There were 
also more TSB applicants in 
dm youngest age group, 18 to 
34, than there were on the BT 
issue. 

The TSB share register is 
still being compiled and no 
anaylsis has yet been carried 
oat on the soda! composition 
of the shareholders. But sur- 
veys by Dewe Rogerson, the 
public relations firm, generate 
an accurate picture of .who 
applied for shares, the firm 
chinas. 

The data are taken from a 
sample of 2,000 people who 
had applied already — or who 
said they were certain to apply 
- for TSB shares. 

Thirty-eightper cent of ap- 
plicants were from the C2 and 
DE categories, 2 percentage 
points more than the same 
categories applying for BT 
shares. SligMIy fewer Os 
applied for TSB shares than 
did for BT shares but exactly 
the same proportion, 38 per 
cent, of ABs were applicants in 
both issues. 

A Dewe Rogerson spokes- 
man said attitudes to investing 
in the stock market as a whole 
had not changed mnch so far, 
but that there was a growing 
trend among lower income 
groups for investing in .pri- 
vatized companies. 

The best represented age 
group among TSB applicants 
were the 35 to 54 year olds, at 
38 per ceot43 per cent from 
this age group bought BT 


[COMMENT Kenneth Fleet"! 


Governor wants players 
to be gentlemen 


Even the Bank of England seems to be 
suffering from a little eleventh-hour 
angst as the fateful Big Bang ap- 
proaches. In the last part of his 
Mansion House speech, Robin Leigh- 
Pemberton. the Governor, issued a 
series of broad and probably futile 
warnings about the risks of the new 
competition unleashed by the City 
revolution. 

His mam concern on this baccha- 
nalian occasion was the commission 
structure of the new, deregulated 
markets. Market-makers and broker- 
dealers would be pushing for market 
share as soon as the rules changed, 
and this could lead to an excessive and 
destructive bout of margin-cutting. 
“Some firms may overreach 
themselves,” the Governor said. At 
worst this could lead to collapses or 
withdrawals of players 

Mr Leigh-Pemberton reiterated the 
Bank’s often-made point that regu- 
lators are not there to prevent all 
wrong-headed market participants 
committing hara-kiri if that is what 
they are bent on doing. The purpose of 
regulators is to ensure the health of the 
markets as a whole, and if that 
involves allowing some players to go 
under, if only as a warning to others, 
then so be it If market-makers find 
they have to withdraw from the 
market, that does not necessarily 
prove that the new system itself has 
failed. 

But the Governor’s words seem to 
suggest less-than-iotal confidence. His 
recipe for avoiding disasters in the 
new, fiercely competitive era is to 
limit competition by self-restraint. 
Since the regulators cannot do it all by 
themselves, "it will be vital for all 
market participants to excercise a 
degree of restraint,” he said. 

He is not just talking about market- 
makers and brokers. "I should like to 
see institutional investors recognize 
their interest in being able to deal with 
a wide array of soundly based 
intermediaries, and I hope Lhai they 
will excercise restraint on their use of 
their bargaining power. I hope that we 
will continue to avoid levels of gearing 
in the corporate sector as a whole 
which, although perhaps acceptable in 
favourable conditions, could prove to 
be seriously destabilizing when times 
become harder.” 

This sounds strikingly like the 
classic Bank of England plea for a 
gentlemanly and orderly market 
maintained by the far-sightedness of 
the players themselves. That, how- 
ever, is precisely the kind of world 
away from which the City is moving 
with increasing rapidity. More than 
ever, it is “the system” which will 
have to take the strain as the demands 
of competition turns gentlemen into 
hustlers. If the new system itself 
cannot cope, self-restraint will not be 
enough and ultimately the system will 
have to be improved. 

The most important event by far of 
the past few years, according to the 
Stock Exchange chairman. Sir Nicho- 
las Goodison, is not Big Bang, but the 
merger between the Stock Exchange 
and members of the International 
Securities Regulatory Organisation. 

"It will be seen as the culmination 
of many years of effort to strengthen 
the position of London in the inter- 
national market-place.” he told the 
guests. Throughout the late 1970s and 
the early years of this decade. Sir 
Nicholas has fought for the over- 


riding principle that the integrity of 
securities trading in one market 
should be maintained. 

The risks were spotted a long time 
ago. The loss of London's leading role 
in the trading of South African gold 
shares some years ago highlighted the 
dangers in a fragmentation of trading 
in London. 

The removal of exchange controls 
in the autumn of 1979 was both a 
boon and a threat. It opened the doors 
to greater foreign involvement in 
London, but allowed everyone to deal 
wherever they were able to find the 
best terms and the best service. 

The Stock Exchange-Isro merger, j 
said Sir Nicholas, “will enable the j 
many issuers of securities and dealers | 
in securities in London to come 
together to develop the securities j 
markets, to share the costs of the ; 
neccessary technological systems and 
to ensure the consistent and high i 
standards which will attract business 
to London.” 

Together, the two bodies have a j 
chance to thrive. Apart, London as a 
key financial centre would have 
struggled. 

Granada scores a first 

The bought deal is clearly gaining 
ground as a financing device in the 
City of London. Just 10 days before 
Big Bang, Granada has scored a first 
by inviting tenders for a vendor 
placing to finance its acquisition of 
Laskys. And as an interesting Toreuisie 
of competition to come from overseas 
institutions in the bracing new world 
after October 27, the winner was the 
American investment bank, Saloman 
Brothers International. 

The race was a three-horse affair 
between Saloman and two British 
runners. Saloman is as pleased as 
punch. It tendered on a tight margin 
of 282p per share, against a closing 
price for Granada the previous day of 
284p. It has placed the shares and 
made a profit. Granada shares were 
firm yesterday at 28 2p. 

Granada is also happy. The normal 
discount on a vendor placing is 6 per 
cent to 9 per cent, but in this case the 
discount was under 1 per cent 

The fact that the new shares for 
which Saloman tendered represent 
only 4.2 per cent of Granada's present 
equity was a big factor in the tight 
pricing. The bought deal clearly comes 
into its own for deals on the scale of 
Laskys. It is quick, cheap and loo 
small to upset institutions who cham- 
pion the cause of shareholder democ- 
racy. . 

Institutional pressure has grown for 
a clawback facility to enable all 
shareholders to take part in large 
vendor platings. The institutional 
lobby had a powerful effect on Dee 
Corporation's plating for Herman 
Sporting Goods and Boots' plating for 
Flint Laboratories. The discounts in 
both cases therefore widened to nearer 
those of conventional rights issues at 
15 percent plus. 

The British have yet to make their 
mark in the bought deal field. 
Saloman, in conjunction with Hoare 
Govett won the tender to place 
Guinness's £108 million holding in 
BP. Goldman Sachs won the Philip 
Hill Investment Trust portfolio after 
Robert Maxwell's successful bid. 

It will be a question of watch this 
space after October 27. 


Properly 

Holding 

& Investment Trust PLC 


To the Ordinary shareholders of PHTT 

YOUR BOARD STRONGLY 
ADVISES YOU NOT TO 
TENDER YOUR SHARES TO 
APEX GROUP LIMITED 


O The offer represents an unsatisfactory 
attempt to obtain a measure of back door 
control over PHIT. 

O Your Board -will write shortly to explain in 
detail why this offer should be ignored. 




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25 

£5189 

HO 


54 

86 '6.1 

68 

-3 


235 

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39 126 

458 

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1 4 Z£6 

17 

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46 M> 

54 


25 

124 

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£5 215 

31 

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13 211 

256 

+3 

13 

3.6 152 

22 

-1 

■ a 

. 550 

3M 


ss 


123 

• .. 

49 

49 IE 1 

78 


23 

£9 114 

a* 



117 54 

« 


14 

133 

-S 

M 

S3 11.1 

MS 

•1 

84 

61 119 , 

310 

»l 

+w 

36 

15 ifl - 


F 0 H Group MS 

r—Hirli 76 

FanMtoce n I9'i 

FWH(Mrs) 12B 

Fhadier Dennys 67 

Bexudi 60 

Fog# 220 

Royd 06 38 

FM 0 MasKB 84 

Ftandi Conn 17D 

rvww mra im 

ftfor foan -a- 331 

QtoJbrcd ISO 

Gee each 91 

Gae/noeen *0 

esaon Lyraw 85 

out Ms* I5S 


GtaM On 54 

GoOdn Wraran 76 

GoorS— d PilM 115 

OodU {Usjrancs) 113 

Oanyra Sedan HD 

Graai Southern lLO 

Grew (EmesQ 138 

O— axco Cram a 

Groenenra Sq 68 

Coarmay A fl ame IBS 


286 196 
46 36 
*80 383*1 
390 283'i 
160 i*a*> 
415 185 
205 45 

91 86 

30-j 7 

132 105 

133 IDS 

ISO 111 
27 22 

14 6*1 

169 115 
255 188 


ManeyOitaap 960 
Henetodc Eucpa 235 
foam Cara 41 

Hanttsa aao 

Oo “A" LV 370 

H eed— in Prime ISO 
MphPOhl 165 

rarawd p#i 87 

Hfo Erarame 90 

Hotraon 23 

Hodoaon 132 


+1 43 

+4 75 

+9 27 

S3 

• .. 43 

37 

£4 

.. 80 
S.1 

■8 

*0 02 
11 

r .. 43 

S3 
30 

-5 74 

• .. 49 

+2 

-2 95 

16 

• .. 11 

• .. 85 

07 


Hohra* riura c a u n 112 
fopMS food 2E'i 

Hranbnd Bee 6 

Huomt SOT IBS 

HuntoktfiTaai 195 

mstST IBS 

(mac 12 


10 23220 
45 17 188 


07 25 191 

04 50 80 

36 22 215 
2.1 1.1 215 

16 19 155 

90 280 15 
. .. 103 


hmaurapa Tscn 230 
hr— (JsckLj 22': 


Jara— VSR iso 

jSnaan 6 Jrag 118 

Jefnama Pram ice 
J— UMr 62 

KLP 295 

iramuom) _«? 


KmSummb 

lOMO-Taknik 


LNdto* Thomson 1D8 
Utam hv 5* 

L a— 101 

Loch Lon So 215 
Lodge Cars 85 

Lon 8 dydeawa 110 
Lortn Bad 173 

Lyraide Per 21 
8® Ca#l 6 Carry 90 
MMT Comp 283 

McLram— a h# no 


83 36115 
07 11 174 

33 09325 
75 44 155 

.. a .. 03 
80 81 114 

810 56 110 
25 AO 103 
A7 IB MB 
23 26 175 
149 47 115 
17 11 81 

(4b 13 137 
19 43 73 
4.1 83 11 
S3 82 110 
05 09 182 
36 16 125 

60 23 2+ 3 

29 1* 17.7 

BO 73 89 
16b IT 152 


46 M 
75 33 

37 22 

293 180 
35*. 23 
1*3 65 

255 ISO 
79 50 

138 130 
71B'i 82 
62 10 
53 17 

MB 80 
140 63 

19 S3 
110 103 
300 128 
27 -12 
3* art 
116 a* 
78 31 
36 25 
ITS 115 
245 80 
156 79 

M3 93 
BU 7 
Pi 2 
308 158 
91 30 

*3 18 

S3 33 
123 85 
40 IE 
103 66 

62 22 
78 40 
42 W 
190 70 

87 30 

105 63 
139 112 
126 73 
48 10 

135 10* 
178 106 
195 120 
133 71 

2E 7 
350 171 
355 253’.- 
98 a 1 ? 
260 188 
ISO 145 

101 so 
173 12B 
220 136 
175 155 
131 96 

-SI 33 
1C 113 
31 11 


45 15 275 

11 80 ill 

*5 95115 


50 • 

148 

178 +6 

SS 

19 +2 

153 
119 


A3 85106 
13 18135 


105 

188 

18 

2B'i 

31 -1 

73 

59 

133 -7 

KB +5 

80 • .. 
WO 


16 19 85 
44 13 85 
54 14 143 

29 35 107 

18 35115 


..O.. 5J 
46 87175 
14 16 132 
.. ■ .. 25 
77 11 86 
04 07 .. 
25 45 175 






MCLAwnn 4 I 
M e y e r Mara 


11 17 . . 

86 26235 
KLO 83 89 
27 42 85 

1* 14313 


118 101 
306 195 
220 123 
98 75 

19 9 

75 13 

178 135 
3*7 311 
138 85 
ME 71 
05 SB 
780 360 
220 85 
47 22 

m 231 
158 M2 
193 168 
220 130 
47 13 

158 109 
124 92 
158 118 
50 25 
23'. IS*.- 
115 S3 
192 125 
367 237 
21 6 
bh O'i 

20 14 

B5 75 
77 73 

21 10 
ISO 91 
180 45 
MS .83 


I4erfln ffotraMg 185 

Ma£nm 18 

May— City 115 


Marta Then 133 

MiOm — re 82 

Memory Coop 18 

Memcsm era (Hpa 28 
M en—r-8— w 178 


sarssri 


Mx ura nmer hm 420 

aaavA emmum use 

M # —d Brown IBS 
ifln Wpdd 200 


Monks & Crane 114 


45 17 244 

54 19 245 

40 10 102 
44 54 182 
232 .. 10 

10 199 1.7 
16 £0 186 
76 £6 201 
81 SO 166 
17 45117 
17 24 170 
26 06 82.5 
57 13 86 
16 46 17.1 
16 Q9 312 
32 ZB as 
16 £2 356 
75 45 108 
. I .. .. 
25 15 196 
35 14 144 


Money 1 am 
UanuMBam) 


Moss ArMresxig 73 


Mramntn <71 

NOlur Comp 2«3 

Nan Cl NH Res ?. 

Down# 1*t 

Now England Props 18 
£80 

Ns rage Tram 75 

tomato IS 

Norn* 143 


21 46219 

. 74 

15 46 88 
43 ZS 146 
IB 15 132 
.. .26 


IT 16 
48 19 

29 26 

24 £1 

25 £2 

76 46 

77 88 

46 15 
£1 1.1 
II 1* 

7.1 16 

18 15 

16 17 

4.1 81 

47 12 

1.B 46 

82 35 
7.8 16 
14 22 

106 85 
54 74 

280 46 

48 44 

200 10 

64 85 
14 47 
£3 19 
31 3 1 
04 26 

870 80 
35 19 




. 9.1 

0 125 .. 

56 87 85 


■ 1 3 72 

#-5 £7 0.7 

• +J II 18 

• . 79 34 

06 22 
17 54 


A3 15 185 
*2 14 14 SO, 
+2 34 23 180 



IM 

+1 

MB 

• +J 

131 

+1 

380 

+a 

99 

•+1 


+1 

232 


S7'i 

+1 

3**f 


4*6 


98 


no 


319 


152 


134 


343 

+a 

in 


718 


198 

+1 

B9 


148 


368 


16b 


88 

• .. 

72 



146 A3 317 
1-6 06 .. 
14e 02 .. 
10b 40 3S2 
09 09 773 

55b 36 415 
84 17 814 

65 33 401 
25 25584 

25 £9805 

24 22 814 
14 81.1 
09 .. 
46 312 
97 74 
14 836 
AO 384 
42 3*4 



24 

06 .. 

-M 

69 

23 323 

+3 

64 

36 433 


High Low -'Company 


HE M TRA— M 


<*r TVS 

Cb’gepanee % P/E 


61 47*1 QR Cfly « Lon DM BB 

219 196 TR fad 4 Ban Id 
147 MOh TH MM foe H7 
HI 98 TR North America 99 

187 na TRPecfltoBaah 177 

mz 140 TR Property wz 
118 90*i TR TmSi 108 

188 MB TR TUMliia 178 

188 196 Tampto Bra ■ 182 


370 300 Tfeag Sealed . Cl# 9K> 
214 197*1 Tret* OceraXc 203 

148 112 Ttoxn* M2 

BE 79 THptoHMt he 85 

302 217 usDeben ro ro 28 S 
SI 35 Vrdue lac Tto 41 

s s sar-r- s 

100 30*i Nflrat too 


13 13345 
I .. 11 b 55 272 

+8 87 £6 474 

55 45316 
+2 £ 6' 27 487 

» .. 14 06 .. 

44 57 10 425 

26 24814 
*2 85 35 384 

+3 lib 54216 

+6 114b 4.1 944 


IS 27695 
.. 45 24 407 

I 17.1 185 85 

-a as 12 601 


26b 74 197 
£3 17 315 

24 22602 
167b 4.1994 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


267 


124 

46306 

an 

-4 

- ■ 


25* 




380 

*a 

7.1 

16 662 

£15*1 




MU 


' 46b Ol 619 





Bl 


26b 12 919 

Ml 

63 

643 

•*« 

£9 

24 034 

*5 

111 

£2 568 

313 

*7 

72 

zaai 


• +2 

384 

363*6 

79 


39 

£0 

42 336 
26 5AS 


COMMODITIES 




G W Joynaoa and Co icport 
SUGAR (Ftam C. CzMiAmet 


tool 1350 

Tons — Steady 

SEVER LARGE 

Canto 385JD0-38TA0 

TtofMMonita.395JDO-3U7.00 

Vol Mi 

Tow Idte 


rcTT 


mm 






Gash 

Time Montbs . 

VOJ 

Tone 


385 JXJ -38750 

395 JD 0 - 307 j 00 


ALUMINIUM 

Cash. i 

Three Months . 

Vbl 

Tow 


81050-81050 
81960-82000 
— 3300 


UnoBBdalpricM 
OIBctot T im oura r llguee x 
Price In £ par— ulrginw 
M— f In pane# pm troy —to# 
RorioK WMT A Co Ltd. report 


Cash 

Uvea Months - 

Vd 

Tow 


Ll—ng Contract p. per klo 

Month 

Open Ctaw 

Oci 

10290 1(7150 

Nov 

10390 10320 

Fab 

9 B 20 .9720 

A (M 

BBjOO BttOO 

Jun 

3750 97 J 50 

*ua . 

8760 87. 30 . 

.— • 

— votio 


Pig Mam vat 28 , 


Cash 91000 - 617.00 

Three Worths . 94 aJKW 5 O 50 

Vd 8500 

Tow Staadter 




Average tatmodi pricas at 


SOYABEAN 


Oct 

1346 - 32.0 

Dec „ 

131 . 94 IJ 

A(V 

135 . 0-34 0 

Jun ... 

133 S- 32-5 

Aug 

1330-322 

Oa 

135 . 5 - 32.5 


international 

PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 
Suppled raa Commodity 
Marirrt Services Ltd 
HEAVY FUEL OB. 

NO* - 89 5 - 71.75 

Jan — 7300*95.0 


Osh ... 

, BS3b00-92TAD 

, TTureaMortte. 

91900421.00 

VOI • - - - — fffl 

LEAD 


Cash 

3015030800 

Three Monihs . 

304.00405 00 

VOI — 

.3000 


Steadier 

SNC STANDARD 

Cash. __ 

S80.0fr590.00' 

voi 

m : 




08 : Cattle, 9 £ 58 p par kg br 


Bp 12 S. 13 pp«rlcg* 

, 7605 ppwlrglw 


(- 1 . 18 T 

* art. dead careasa wtoght 
England and WeleK 
Catito nos. up 21 A 9 a. on- 


Jonth 

Qpan 

CtaB# : 

Set 

9860 

9660 

10 * • 

97 X 0 

97 X 0 

6 b 

' 10000 

100 X 0 

O' 

10290 - 

102 X 0 

ton . 

. 99-50 

9080 

- • 


veto 

LONDON GRiMN FUTURES ‘ 


*■ rtWUw CRM# 

CM 89 796 JO-757 J) Tffin 



a^p tiB i ri t m eoMnwwtery: 

Ttetarfajdiuc: 

TBOsaowfiascxi vSftam 




77 '.. 










































FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 



AND FINANCE 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Equities mark time 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end October 24. §Contango day October 27. Settlement day November 3. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business da vs. 


^Scld — 


© Tint Nn w pipm LMUd 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+35 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


Nb. Ctmnm r 



ua to notaora aw 

•3^aS£^ 




S A 07 

328 

-e 

MS 

44 95 

SKfi! gS°« 

77«. 43-. «M> Fargo 

773 

078 

cm. 

-6 

*6 

iz 

89 95 

79 889 

320 220 VMnrat 

260 

-5 

1 j 

39126 






370 235 BICC tS6 

13S B4 B3R BO 

w 111 H T32 

180 133 BDrtM T3S 

589 279 Bgtdagt 5*5 

280 177V Br TBhb 186 

112 78 Brawn BONrf KM 08 

»B 11V Batata (AT) 'A' 18 

152 a CASE 77 

389 377 CtotaS Wlrata M 32* 

218 193 CwUlBEta 218. 

243 178 CAP Gp 183 

57 37 CDtariOB 48 

22S 14 CD Vi% CPF 206 
OO 21 CtfntM 187 

3S2 283 Ctxncap 3l8 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


in to 

» SSS J5™*" 

287 2T3 Ante 


171 

MS • 
284 *1 


Please be sure to take account 
of any minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily loials 
for (he weekly dividend of £8j000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


<15 26( Baggwuoa m* <15 

TO 114 Snn Dm* 138 

B* 1 

JO’.BTB BIOCUM MS 

73 S2B BOI C& £33 

m 2* EfcMOon&CIOud « 2M 
91 61 Br Draaotaa 82 

» 18 BrewnTScfcaoD 19V 

78 37 BfOMrtM 71 

12| 61 't Bryn 101 

27 7 OumML 6 Halraa 9 

TO TO Cnumi Bcbay TO 
rae as Camwit^kwmxw icm 
131 80 cmk Qip 13® 

690 «9 COKM1 488 

185 T24 CraSlISwIi) TO 

S S ft 

« s ts 's 

71 « Do W G2 

172 51 Ftata ro tad (tag 104 
70 64 FU»Sp 73 

« B0 Gatabml 89 

136 100 Buts a Dandy Qrd MS 
385 25* BtMMOnlUir 348 
MS as HAT - 142 

315 » Haled Bar 315 

258 IBB HandMOA 211 

78 42 Hmtoto-Stoart 64 
2*4 M4 HMODAWtaa 184 
843 428 Mum (HI 575 
44 2BV Hound Staff 43 

198 128 Brack Jotama 184 

460 285 Jwvto (I) & Saa 430 

488 288 Lung LA 388 

484 286 DD-A' 388 

119 76 iMfimB OMMlO 84 
91 80 LMVfHJCj 3 

<29 290 UnaBIY* 376 

198 126 MBM > SoMtl 190 
326 T7B MMM 321 

135 101 Uartay 1M 

210 161 MWShalB {KaBax) 188 
151 88 Mwl Hush 141 

448 304 UcMMsfAIbi ^ 371 

304 226 MCantiytS 2ES 
272 171 Mnartat 23S 

40 23 UtarCMf} m 

154 TO Monk (Aj 182 

444 SOS tMlUM 302 
920 798 (tawaroW ■ 810 

213 103 Nattta0Mi Brick 198 
240 Its p&rstaion 218 

110 76 PnonOT Ttataer 80 

395 285 PocMra- 350 

SBS 440 MAC 626 ■ 


323 188 
191 1»V 
142 87 

84 7t 
510 342 
.348 238b 
175 188* 
436 320 
101 75 

185 138 

381 IBS 
2S3 246 
98 88 
204 172 
88 87 
-155 41 

290 167 
225 im 


Ruonrald , * 288 

ftatfS? CM 154 
Swpg a Rmt 122 
Smart (JJ SO 

Tannic 418 

rtMorwbotto* m 
Hbn Oraup 165 
TaklM 416 
M 07 

Turriff 173 

Mbroptant 320 

Wild 28® 

WmnMm (T) 83 

WMaBtaira M4 
won Bum B3 
ms TO 

w35i (Conniy) 243 
Wkipay IGaorga) 181 


11B & 192 
1&4 62 M2 

0.1 B 02 0.7 
7.1 32 M5 

US 22 122 
102 25152 
t!S 84 US 
.. • .. 541 

107 02 64 

3* 1.4 232 

44 7 A 177 
30 B 42 122 
300 5.1 62 

MS 52 242 
42 12112 
. . . 602 
as E438.0 
520 52 101 

. . . . ta 

4.7 3.1 .. 
eji 36 . . 

as 22 182 

ISO 5 0 82 
05 22 112 
82 52 112 
AS 7.7 152 

jtt. 2J 232 

5.0 42 20.1 

£5 20 11® 
22 42 84 
SdO 42 102 
54 71 02 

62 72142 
22 12 377 
72 23 122 

54 62 115 
.. .. 002 

TOO 47 1*2 
25 25112 

10.1 55 124 

20.1 as 157 

22 47 172 

7.1 32 122 
145 32 362 
TOT 3010.1 
107 32 10.1 

57 62 62 

55 11 2 &5 

102 27TO3 

74 39 222 
122 39 104 
64 47 212 

75 4S157 
0.1 0.1 . . 

161 42122 

4.1 12102 

62 35 *22 
14 35 .. 
92 5.1 205 

207 57102 
167 12162 
92 47142 
620 41 82 
.. .. 30 

202 57 62 
202 32 139 
16S 42 12.1 

122 44102 
94 6117.1 
35 25 187 
62b 65 182 
US 33 172 
127 -42122 
64b 61 125 
125 32 163 
12 12 604 

109 .52 307 
152 42112 
104 82 164 
14 17 as 
62 37 131 
12 12 M* 
07 02 17.1 
32 12192 
52 61 175 


MS 2E0 Cray Sad 3 S3 

298 140 Qrntlbaa 200 

79 49 DM Baet GO 

TO 1*7 Dunn TO 

55 3 DMM 29 

52 28 Do A 28 

866 283 Otntao 315 

50 37 DOK>t 6 Ml 42 

212 120 Dubtaar HO 

445 380 Badraccmponm «B 

85 4fl ^cvvriEMK* 58 

S2 42 aeWNwnMUt-Sl 
337 237 Buss LtfabiD 279 

3SD 255 EmMm ZTO 

253 147 FkrnalSKt IBS 

188 52 Fanramt TOZ 

51 34 r n—rd Ta* 48 

22ft 150 OEC 170 

180 90 Gracuanor . 125 
114 90 (MtaadSad B2 

IBS 45 IBE 65 

358 235 M Buwl 0 CtHTOlMO 
255 175 Jonas SUM 223 

290 be Ko* are 

328 228 Lae R ak ton ro dao 288 

229 134 Luca 207 

433 270 uHTSta 360 

185 1U Macro 4 188 

433 203 llamac 220 

82 El V 14*30 BE 70 

250 80 MKZO Focut 120 

420 305 Wngai 388 

S’. 2V M8ai^ o 1 - 

56 33 UMoa) Bad 40 

65 39 Uunwaact <3 

313 2X HnwM f<eoiai 2S3 

100V 74 NS 79 

48 13 Ocaonfca TO 


TOO TOO 
82 IB 
164<*114 
17V 13 
200 TO 
190 120 
848 182 
24V 15 V 

to lie 

50 22 

25* 148 
815 445 
54 30V 

188 96 
216 142 
134 79 
17V tt'i 
233 17D 
125 36 

52S 374 
2 55 170 


• +7 157 62 744 

25 11 S3 

+8 

*2 

.. KL5 15165 
-4 «7 68 109 

608 62 95 
♦V 61 68265 

*3 85 61 64 

-10 69 61 177 

• .. IDS 49 111 

3.1 1.1262 
115 

re u inu 

.24 OS 148 
•-5 55 IS 239 

• ... 750 37 11.1 * 

45 75 IM 

• 10 67 .. 

IS 68 65 
IS 67 63 
25 09219 

■ . . 23 55 109 


it 


+S 

4.1 

32 U 

as 

£2196 


19 

1.7795 


49 

£7 146 

•+2 

09b U 165 


69 

25 145 

♦2 

39 

22163 


24 

24 179 

+2 

19 

£2 112 

■2 

61 

36 106 

+7 

SB 

44 105 

+2 

1.7 

26 99 




-Ti 

1£1 

54 84 


17.1b 62 574 

■ . a 

179 

75 9£ 


• . . 14 07 206 

417 164 45 U.I 

• .. 14 07 294 

• 42 43 29 170 

678 05-129- 


Ptaasay 
Do ADR i 


<3 

•+1 

09 

0.7 872 

sits 

• +10 

200 

76 08 

76 

• +1 

75D 95 115 

u 



.. 36 

830 


28 

05226 

Wfi 

• .. 

49 

24 .. 

25 

• .. 


£120 


575 

49 .. 

n*v 

-V 



237 

• .. 

62 

35122 

152 

• .. 

82 

54 76 

HO 


72 

49 139 

ns 




HU 

+5 

51 

£3194 

no 



.. as 

182 


49 

27 17.1 

815 


329 

59129 

37 

+V 

07 

19 99 

15* 


2.1 

14 149 

HD 

w m 

99 

49 207 

80 

• .. 

OJ 

09 199 


Thom EMI 
ThorpaffW) 


350 £00 lia 

273 -J70 Unfea 

205 12S IM Laaataa . 

too no iMScwnUc 

515 320 WtaWNM 

32S 225 Vtolax 

TO 50 WaawnCakMn 


TO 98 WtaMfHany) 


190 


104 

64 152 


-2 

25 


454 

+3 

250 

.4**19 

255 

• .. 

66 

29 99 

295 


25 

09119 

330 

-8 

60 

24 227 

180 

+5 

99 

62 135 

TO 


57 

42 46 

140 


61 


437 


49 


2*8 

+3 

129 

52 62 

70 

+1 

49t 

£1 176 

80 



.. 122 

286 


120 

46116 

TO 

*10 

39 

19 - 


RNANCE AND LAND 


CMIN1 
ByAyASan 
Uoty A Stow 
Matada 

Nat ifeaa Uaa 
DO 8* 
Nownukkat 
TtaniMnn OM 

Hnaocial Trusts 


213 

• .. 

IS 

06 .. 


-2 

9? 

23 59 

T37 

• .. 

09 

GO .. 

215 

r .. 



ao 

• .. 


09 803 

390 

•-3 

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25 389 



is 


80V 

+V 

49 260 

13a 


06 

49 189 

TO 


Mb 47 209 

75 

19 

25 .. 

£89 

*2 

000 

94 .. 


+3 



Hi 



ran a. 


■ppawroaPagnZA 


FOODS 





162 TOO 
37 21 
981 301 
3BB 236 
129 96 
807 S» 
400 240 
18V 12 
300 230 
2DI MS 
108 81 
TO MS 
267 229 
15 ®' TO 
BO 31 
130* 54 
196 1*2 
183 MS 
270 HO 
841 142 
280 100 
290 218 
201 151 
SIB 238 

187 120 
263 188 
H8 128 
250 105 
242M85V 
112 .76 

188 115 

SS7 <84 
282 220 
131 05 

100 , SO 
620 505 
760 124 
135 93 
236 150 
257 210 
62V SI V 
900 258 
HO 152 
105 T27 
270 157 
.532 385 
426 344 
1S3 122 
Mfl 154 
056 500 
Tft 40 
420 298 
313 218 
289 2H 
181 US 


ABOA-MR 182 

Mpkw snrtw 24 

Ami xm 

AHFbOd 384 ■ 

.Amc FHWIn 110 . 

'Aim - 834- 

Bakks (SUna* O 5*5 
Oirtwr A Pram 44V 
Ban’ (ag> 

BaaaaO Fooda 185 

Btotaya 85 

Bitaa 1B8 

BwMoroeaW) 288 

BMBkd CHf 111 

BurtMfek 67 

Br Wananp (Bwq BO 

Cam Mahg 175 

CHonta Dina 246 

Do 'A* 205 

cm no 

Daa 218 

FMiar (AtaarQ IBS 

Fhch Low! 268 

(hriMi 126 

Gtan GKM 22fl 

WawDod Foods 156 
MMt 100 

MMown Hugs 220 

Nona Farm 88 

Himar BapNr 1S3 

Iceland Frown e® 

Kwk Saw 260 

Loss (Jctm J| U1 

LoMUfQF) 93 

Lo-CHit 5*0 

M a llh a n ii (BamaxO TSt 
Mat Trada Swp 130 
Uontaui (W) 222 

itfctwmr- 


Naraftxxta 202 

Nwtfn & Fsaeocfc UB 

Park Foods 15S 

IWU 281 

Rramm Mac sob 


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KCA Drang 
LASMO 
OotWS 
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Hmr London Ol 
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RMU Duran 
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107 61 115 
99 37 MS 
27 7.1 172 
790 59 163 

45 58 187 

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90 04 .. 

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65 55 67 

7.1 51 

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126 71 139 

4.1 EJD .. 

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179 07 99 

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TOO £1 175 

125 46 M3 

165 63 11.1 

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139 59 129 
TO7 45 100 
£7 35 85 

54 33 295 

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Ol 27 193 
47 26161 
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62 69 M3 
07 07 116 

55 62 75 
114 07 95 
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158 127 CMMUQIt 
107 75 Fawyuamae 

396 325 Hamaa l CTOTOa 
488 303 tacneaoa 
37 28V Jacks (HIM 

283 US Lorra 
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258 TO Paaraon Zo* 
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213 126 POO, Pack 
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224 81 Towr Kamatoy 
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bpcc 

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293 178 Anglo IV 'A' 
52 27 Gnmtaa 

240 17ft HTVW 
415 2B3 UWrWOB 
950 TOO Scol TV 
273 149 TVS N/V 

<8 si raw 

284 223 Tbanai TV 
U8 156V 1VAM 
148 104 (MV TV 
153 144 VUWDl TV 


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169 47 119 
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2B6 206 Kmattr BmOrao 220 
301 312 LadbRM 348 

565 447 Lot Park HUM 823 
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LEISURE 


Ban- 6 WA -A- TO •- 

Bwaa* 6 Hkwhaa 175 
Bran hwaar MS 

Canyon 63 •' 

Dayaata MM 

FM Laws JP5 •- 

GRA 54 

Hvio w ov Breoka 05 
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jwana-a Mrigs 49 a 

La* na HB 

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PUOTIBW 311 

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463 

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83 70 Apak 

TO 155 ArUnpcn Sac* 

355 218 Aid* 

TO 85 Bniiym 

4M 307 BTOtal? 

188 144 Br Lmd 
178 U8 Bnxkm 
46 36 C*M (A) ASon* 

10 TO Cab 
238 218 Cap 6 Combs 
308 200 CMRt Prop 
IM 168 Canmandll 
485 4H Chanaikakt 
171 131 CWW NCkSW 
268 164 ComaBa 
23 M OwntaSa* 

MO Bfl Country ft NW 
TO 117 Corny Y 
200 175 Coam 
755 470 -Daaian 
19 8 Darn 

178 135 Essatas 6 Agancy 
TO <7 Egaran TVuai 
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164 MO &HB®» PTBII 
112 83 Erans Ol Laada 
70 36 Fk+ Oaks 
209 170 Fragmoro 

182 M6 Or Portand 
274 202 Ginn*! 

16V IT Hkfcxnd Gp 
400 20* HwbreCoiawywU 
495 410 Hammaraon 
485 360 Do 'A* 

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24B to HanowOMW 
370 233 Ha rdwiuw 

70 «v Hong ttng Land 
425 zrn knry 
300 is Jamyn 
320 2S4V loan Prop 
348 278 Loti Ssorttaa 
895 358 Lcn & Edn T* 

286 147 Do BW 
2M 218 Lon 6 Pnw Shop 
177 151 Lon Sbop Pup 
353 268 (AM 
3S® 27S MEPC 
mo 90 Mummy 
115 TOV McKay Ssas 
56 44 MrakboMi 
225 125 MarwMa Mura 
103 BD I V t uu i U l 
555 1B7 uratar&f 
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TO 304 Mo OTW aw 
108 82 ktackto>(AU) 

20V 1BV MkUaaat 
to 73 NsarSwndbb 

93 43 PwtoHW 
282 255 P nenay 

260 72i» Pnaar Manana 

23* 178 Prop 6 Ra* 

105 107 Prop HUgi 
13J 100 Pico Saciany 
UV BV Ragbn 
355 TO Hcgsism 
045 313 HoaanauOh 
297 215 Rirah 6 Tmpaka 

103 TO Sen MSI 
198 MS SMaUQ) 

183 M2 Skm» a»E 
445 260 Soaynawk 

173 M4 Stand Boca 

94 66 Stodday 

IM B5 Soutnand «M*aa 
58 Ci Town Carers 
260 HB Traftort Park 
146 96 UK Lano 

10 525 IWM 


31 17V Wane (JOD 

175 142 IMm 6 Couity 


•-1 03b 1*062 

£0 26 17.1 

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43 £7 135 

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300 

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SHIPPING 


312V1B7 Anoc Br Porta 
390 213 Br C o m mo n ,.*** 
368 IBB Catodtma 
430 305 Church 
94 51 FWwr (Janas) 

603 480 Grata 

79 54V Jamba (5) 

12V 4V Lata 
41 26 Ikn Oacfcs 

340 TO Qram Transport 
576 420 PIODM 
iG5 H nmaman (uram) 
334 127 Tpnook 
390 380 traiiai Scott 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


380 290 FB _ 295 95 33115 

206 145 Gamar Boota 182 M3 74 119 

45 32 Haatta m Stow V 17 is .. 

218 160 Lantaan Koaranh TO ■ .. 69 49 go 

02 54', MMHM 4 bran 58 a *2 44 70 175 

lie 82 Hoard 112 55 * J 7J 

157 118 Strong 0 Fkhtr M2 ta-2 1£6 9.1 85 

273 158 Srytl 203 +5 84 U 25.1 


TEXTILES 



Aanpcu 

Aron Enrogy 
Atteac RasouR 
AtbOhA On 
» htatara 
Snoot 01 
Br Soman 


479 tSB 
103 48 
150 84 

MV 10 
71 30 

152 93 
66 23 

BB 2* 

120 39 
11V 6V 
152 .98 


flumiBh 

Canaas Capw 

Canary 

Chananwl 

CMa 

Enrarprtan 

rbilonif 

1 PJiWM.1 KJ 

Garoar Swniy 
OoWNRu 
Goal Pa 
a wattam Da 
HWP 


128 +24 

15 

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84 

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410 

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351 -1 

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127 

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140 «-2 

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48 
325 

37 

58 

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133 • .. 

£08 -a 


573 208V 
300 135 
183 97 

ITS 80 

31 16 

144 123 
127 00 

78V 53V 
315 190 
IE 74 
278 198 
57 42 
M® 87 

m s 
110 88 
113 18 
57 33 
137 87 
218 90 
97 47 
ISO 132 
206 136 
194 84 
101 72 

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Babb {Jong 

BackmnW 


Mmar 0 Lumb 

Corah 

CtwaoblB 

OH*HI 

Damon 
CMran 
Diunewna 
On TO 

Fosor (John) 

Ckttmi Bnwaoca i 

Htatang Pawocoa 


Taxfend Jsraoy 


270 46, 

253 +10 

187 

100 • .. 

28 

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100 

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280 4 

170 • .. 

244 

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79 

113 

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203 

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138 <6 

105 • ... 

143 (M4 


B5 71 35 

162 12 IDS 

18 SS 11.0 
7.1 58 13 
. . . 12.1 
£1 45 55 

111 66 54 


US'; 7SV Trail 
350 235 VortJyd* 


107 4JI1U - 
KLO 40 ISO - 
69 4.1 67 
U 76 11 J .. 
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B6n 65 10 
7.1 7.1 229 * 

17 OS .. 

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49 27 118 : 

09 IS 111 , 

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29 55 76 
SJ> 63 69 
74 79 12 . 

56 42 11 JD 
44 10 274 
as 54 £0 * 

69 39 114 
60 IB 132 \ 

'4 1J 99 
62 66 109 , 
17 65149 ! 

.. 0 .. 14 * 

69 5.116* ' 

29 59 Via 
79 56 74 . 

3.6 14 64 , 

7.4 52 IQS , r 
39 59 60 

66 36 1* - 

96 5*118 ' 
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TOBACCOS 


483 308 BAT 

160 10B Carrol 
TO TO Canal 
187 127 RHhmm V 


443 ta-2 WA 42 116 

113 

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153 -2 96 84 54 


14 3*14* 
29 5* .. 


136 102 59 
239 4.7 132 


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26 


THE TIMES FRTDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


? 


WALL STREET 


Shares in early drive 


New York (Renter) - Wall 
Street shares poshed ahead in 
early trading yesterday, 
extending the gains made the 
previous day. Transport 
shares continued to provide 
steady support and ntilifies 
saw mild gains. 

The Dow Jones indnstrial 


average was up 6.05 points to 
1.837.74. Advancing issues led 
declining issues by a margin of 
fear to one. The volrane rose to 
15 minion shams. 

AT&T led the active 
shares, rising VI to 25. R J 
Nabisco jmnped Hi to 52%. 



Pfeer 
PhedpsOga 



20 

32th 


SET 

cmzeaor 
Dan&Knrtt 
Deere 
Delta A* 
Detroit Ed 
DWMJEq 
Disney 
OowChwn 
Dresser M 
Duke Power 
Du Pont 
Eastern Air 
Essn Kodak 
Eaton Core 
Emerson El 
Exxon CDrp 
Fed Dpt SB 


31ft 

32ft 

45ft 

30ft 

13 

2d% 

50ft 

70ft 

30 

Sift 

56ft 

22ft 

49ft 

16ft 

92ft 

42ft 

56ft 

18ft 

44ft 

soft 

9 

57 

70ft 

80ft 

67 

88ft 


31H 

32 

44ft 

30 

13 

24ft 

50ft 

71ft 

29ft 

50ft 

55ft 

22ft 

49ft 

16ft 

91ft 

41ft 

55 

18 

44U 

80ft 

8ft 

56ft 

70ft 

79ft 

66ft 

88 % 


Oct 

14 

"57* 
21ft 
71 
10ft 
70ft 
66ft 
72ft 
38ft 
62 
44K 
39ft 
89 
60% 
62ft 
29% 
32ft 
62ft 

59% 
42 
52% 
51ft 

_ _ iBk 

Sony 
SthCUEd 

issss's. %> 

45ft 44ft 
StnwfiJF 36ft 36ft 
Sun Comp 54ft 54 
Tewtrna 311ft 309ft 
Tenneco 41 ft 41ft 
Texaco 34% 33ft 
Texas E Cor 29ft 28% 
Texes Inst 112 112 ft 

Texasuns 33 33 

Textron 57% sen 
Tnwtrs Cor 45ft 45 
TRW Inc 88 67ft 
UAL Inc 59 58ft 
UnOevarNV 214% 212ft 
UnCartXde 20% 20ft 
UnPacCor 58ft 58% 
UU Brands 36% 36ft 
USGOoro 40ft 40 
u« record 42% m% 
USX Corp 26ft 26% 
Unocal 23ft 22% 
JmWMtor 46ft 44ft 
Winer Lots 54% 53% 
__ 103ft 102% 
WS&seto 54ft 55 
— Tser 37 37% 

68ft 56ft 
43% 42% 

Xerox Corp 56 54% 

Zedtn 20% 20% 


Wfiyedi'se 

Whfripool 


WnstaMnp 107ft 
MoUCM 37ft 

G» 

Morgan JJ». 84 
Motorola 35% 
NCRCorp 43 
NLtndstrs 6% 
Nat Oners 44 
NatMedEnt 24% 
NatSmcndt 9ft 
Norton SOi 85ft 
NWSancrp 34% 
OcodrePet 30 

41ft 
41% 

41% 

PacGasB 24 
Pan Am 5ft 
Penney J.C. 75% 
PanrooH 68% 
Paprsco 27% 


CANADIAN PRICES 


Ogden 

OtnGorp 

Owens-fl 



. I Co 
ThmsnN'A* 

WCT 


STTkiSh tUaSSSSSi »u 165353 51655 psuanu TTS53 yunSl 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


COMPANY NEWS 


• HOUSE OF LEROSE: Half- 
year 10 June 30 (figures in £000). 
Interim dividend 3p (same). 
T u mover 8.995 (8.774 restated), 
pretax profit 733 (312) and eps- 
8.3p (2.9p). 

• GARNER BOOTH: The 
company has rejected the bid 
firom Strong and Fisher. Half- 
year results show pretax loss of 
£624,000 on turnover of £37 
million. The board is to declare 
an interim dividend of 3.35pi 

• DELYN PACKAGING: In- 
terim dividend Ip (same), pay- 
able on- December 5. Six months 
to August 3 (figures in £000). 
Turnover 2.693 (2J267\ operat- 
ing profit 81 (11). profit before 
lax 43 (70 loss) and eps 2.16p 
(3.52p loss). 

• SINGAPORE PARA RUB- 
BER ESTATES: Six months to 
June 30. Turnover £285,675 
(£403,888), gross profit £76,771 
(£144,768), pretax profit 
£47,414 (£130,747) and eps 
(L29p (0.88p). 

• HUNTERPRINT GROUP: 
The company has been awarded 
the contract for the printing of 
the weekly colour sections of the 
News on Sunday to be launched 
next spring. 

• UNITED CERAMIC 
DISTRIBUTORS: Half-year to 
June 30. Interim dividend Ip 
(same), payable on December 
15. Turnover £4,189,069 
(£3,726,908). profit before lax 
£127.865 (£116,062) and eps 
3.3p (3. Ip). 

• DY DAVIES: The chairman, 
Mr David Davies, said at the 
annual meeting that prospects 
for the coming year were very 
exciting. The company has been 
commissioned to design a new 
£23 million ice rink, library and 
office development for Tarmac 
Properties in Brighton. 


• CONRAD HOLDINGS: Six 
months to June 30 (period to 
August 31). Interim dividend 
(nil). Figures in £00 0. Turnover 
3.622 (3.894). group profit 170 
(146), pretax profit 101 (146) 
and eps 1.06p(0.98p). 

• HELENE OF LONDON: Six 
months to June 30. Interim 
dividend 0-5p{sarne). Figures in 
£000. Turnover 12390(10,254), 
profit before tax 480 (624). 
profit attributable to sharehold- 
ers 290 (349) and eps Q.8p 
(Up). 

• ELECO HOLDINGS: Final 
dividend 3-lp making 4.6p.| 
(3.7p) for year to June 30-6-86. | 
Figures in £000. Turnover 
27,739 (25.644), pretax profit 
2,716 (2^03) and eps Tl.ip 
<9.9p). 

• ALUMASC The chairman 
says in his annual statement that 
sales and profits for the first 
quarter are ahead of last year . 
Order books are satisfactory. 

• LOWE HOWAKD-SP1NK 
& BELL: Agreement has been 
reached for the acquisition of 
Richard Publications, which 
trades as Wight Company. 

• UNITED SPRING A 
STEEL GROUP: Acceptances 
have been received for a total of 
2.480336 shares (91.5 per cent 
of the offer). The remainder of 
230,0 1 4 shares have been sold in 
the market at 68a. 

• AGB RESEARCH: The 
chairman reported that action 
bad been taken and progress 
achieved in dealing with those 
areas of the business which had 
performed below expectations 
fast year, it was expected that 
Australian results would show 
improvement in spite of trading 
conditions which were weaker 
than in previous year. 




YOUR OWN BUSINESS 




A new loan-while-you-learn scheme 


By Derek Harris 

Changes are being planned to two of the 
Department of Employment's Action for 
Jobs schemes, which could mean greater 
help for those with small businesses. 

The initiatives are being considered by 
David Trippier, minis ter for small 
businesses, who has just started talks 
with the high-street banks on a variation 
of the career-development loans scheme. 
He also wants to widen the training for 
enterprise programmes. 

Career-development loans exist 
experimentally in four areas, around 
Aberdeen, Bristol/Bath, Reading/SIougb 
and Greater Manchester. The scheme 
was launched last April with Barclays 


Bank and the Co-operative Bank mostly 
the main partners, with the Clydesdale 
Bank going in with Barclays in Aberdeen. 

Hie idea is to provide loans of up to 
£3,000 for vocational training to im- 
prove career and job prospects. Courses 
selected can last up to a year. 

Anybody getting a loon pays no 
interest during the training, nor for np to 
three months afterwards. Minimum for 
loans has been pitched at £500 but Mr 
Trippier believes this should be brought 
down to £300 and his talks with the 
banks are aimed at introducing this 
greater flexibility. Some existing courses 
cost less than £500. 

The enterprise programme provides 


management training for business own- 
ers and managers, including those about 
to start up. Mr Trippier is considering a 
pilot scheme to get - more to take these 
courses, possibly involving local enter- 
prise -agencies, which could give a hand- 
holding service for small businesses for a 

year. 

Distance-learning courses would be 
another way to widen the schemes 
appeal, one aim beingjo encourage more 
women to take part. The courses, which 
teach finance and marketing skills and 
indude the use of “action learning 
groups to sort out common problems, 
are funded by the Manpower Services 
Commission. - 


er 




t. 


Why the oak 
smoke makes 
a difference 


Mfchael Charily 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 
Anglia Sacs 
Appieyard (l25p) 
Beaverco (I45p) 
Bread St (43p) 
Chetsaa Man (125p) 


Jhjon Labs (1300) 
Euro Home (i6(Jp/ 

Em ConsBucbon It 
Great Southern (135 
Guthrie Corp (I50p) 
Harrison (19k ' 

Hughes Food 
Local Lon Gp 
MG Casn A C (IOQd) 
Marina Dev (tlOp) 
Marfaorough Teen mop) 
Muter A Santhoum (l05p) 
Newage Trans (75 
Returnee Gp (SOpj 
SantteV Perions (i: 

Scot Mtge 100% 


193+6 
20 
148 
50 
125 
102-3 
198 +3 
143 
105 -1 
160-5 

ire -2 
160 
26‘i - 

215+7 
SO 
80 
127 +3 
158+1 
75+1 
90 
IBS +2 
£19’a 


#97 


Leisure 

Thames Vi* $9 
Tress sH%i/i “ 

Undock (630) 

y?""** ****** (1*W 

YgJmrron (380) 
Yoricshro TV (125p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Bryant N/P 
Bums-Andarson N/P 
ComTech Fin N/P 
Goodhead Print N/P 
Lawrence (WfaKer N/P 
L eau re te ne N/ 

Norfofc Cap 
Parrish 


140-2 
84’i +«» 
278 
£93'a 
69 
175 
3S-1 
153+5 




Taoury N/P 
(Issue price in brackets). 


3-1 

£*b 

9 

1 

2'«-JW 

1'2 

50 

1 

25 -3 


Two years ago, Hugh Fbrestier- W alker, 
married and with three young children, 
found himself out of a job, having kwt in 
a takeover his slake and a directorship in 
a Wiltshire fish form, writes Derek 
Harris. 

He knew a lot about fish-farming bui 
also enough to realize that too many 
were moving into it for comfort. 

Now, at 32, he is worrying about the 
dangers of 100 -rapid expansion in his 
own new business, dealing only partly in 
fish, which is expected to reach a 
turnover this year of £250,000. 

In the Thames Valley on the eastern 
border of Gloucestershire, Minola 
Smoked Products is one of a handful of 
businesses in Britain, which by entirely 
traditional methods smokes with oak. 
egl logs a variety of food, from quails eggs to 
re I wild Scottish salmon. Other fish, includ- 
ing shellfish, most game buds, meats 
ranging from venison 10 gammons and 
salami and even some cheeses are 
smoked. 

He is scorn fol of more mass-produc- 
tion methods of preparing smoked foods 
by using sawdust, sometimes indiscrimi- 



MR FRIDAY 


S2&2T 

N York 1.4355-1.4435 
Montreal 1S981-2JM44 
Ams'dam3.2025-3-2200 
Bnnsofc 5&S5-5A34 
Cphgen 10.6875-10.7357 
Duttm 10444-10504 
Frankfurt2B32&£8494 
Lsbon 207J35-210.Q2 
Msond 18825-18926 
Mian 1962.40-1977.70 
Oslo 10.4450-10.4891 
Pans 9.2900-9.3398 
SrkNm 9.78309:8193 ' ' 
Tokyo 221.2522225 
Vienna 19342008 
Zurich 2320023310 


Market atm 


1.4385-1.4375 

1-9990-10000 

32025-32125 

5835-59.05 

10.6875-106875 

1.0460-1.0470 

283252842$ 

207.65-20650 

18825-188.73 

196325-196425 

104450-10.4550 

9290093000 

9.7850-9.7950 

22125-221.72 

19195-19198 

2320023240 


0.66-0.64pram 

OS4-0.44prem 

1%-1Kpram 

20-15pnm 

1%-1jxem 

19-4/us 

1%-iftprem 

47-10708 


2%-1%pram 

2 ft-2prem 

1%-lftptem 

10ft-9ftprem 

1%-fftprem 


3 

123-1 SOprani 

1.40-1. 26prem 

4%-4ftprem 

58-49prem 

4-3ftnrem 

TEMZrtfs 

4%-4%prem 

185-331 dte 

7-60dte 

3pram-1tSs 

®«t8s 

6-Sftprani 

6%-8ftoran 

3%-3%prem 

27ft-24ftprem 

4%4ftprem 


Storing Mex compared vrtti 1975 mi up M 672 (tteyte «®98 VM* 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



New Zeawid tJoflar 2M>8-2PS3 

S auk Arena nyal 5.3895-5.4295 

Singapore defer $1 SI 21288 

South Alnca rand . 


Japan 

MgtumtConim)- 


Hong Kong 


UAEdaham 

Uoyd&Banfc 


32131-32299 Portugal 
52775-53175 Span 


Austria . 


15435-154 15 
1365.0-13664) 

— 4095-4100 
,. 7.7978-7 8093 
.. 145.00-14530 
. 1314B-131.15 

— 1336-1338 


RPM mapped by Bvctays Bank HOFEX aori ExtaL 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Storing 
DacBB - 

35 

Mgh 

Low 

88.69 

89.10 

8935 

8920 

Ctoae 

Ba72 

89.12 

8928 

89.17 

MarR7 

8923 

89.45 

8920 

B923 

89.45 

8820 


Sep 87 

MV 88. 

«u£ 

88^ 

8838 

8820 

8832 


Three Men* Ewod 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

JunS7 

Sap 87 

USIYeaaoiyBond 

Dec 86 ......I 

Mar 87 

JunB7 


Dec 86. 
Mar 07. 
JunB7. 


GBt 


LongG 
Dec» 

Mar 87 — 
Jim 87 — 
Sep 87 — 
FT-SE100 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


94.11 

9431 

6331 

9331 

95-06 

N/T 

N/T 


9505 


111-03 

110-22 

SI 

16430 

N/T 


Previous da£s total of^nrtoresr 25482 1 


94.12 

9432 9339 

S3. 81 93.78 

9331 93u47 

Previous day's total opanlntarest 6154 
95-09 94-19 94-30 3427 

— — 94-01 0 

— — 93-01 0 


9439 

9430 

93.79 

93X7 



Prwrious 
96-05 


IS? 


tot al gna t totewai 1174 
96-05 10 

9505 0 

— 0 


Previous daj^s total open interest 15685 
111-14 110-10 110-15 11737 

11022 11021 110-15 5 

— — 110-15 0 

Previous day's total opan tetoraat 2832 
16430 16220 1E» 240 

— — IffiSO 0 


)&nfyuL. 

‘It’s always the same — there's never 
one around when you need one 


natdy mixed, with gas burners to speed 
processing. His moderately sized oak 
logs, cut locally, ensure the use of a high 
proportion of the outer 1 inch of living 
wood, which contains the elements that 
impart the almost-forgotten traditional 
flavours that bring the customers back 
for more. 

His wife, Jane, learnt about traditional 
smoking, each of them in the first year 
benefiting from the Enterprise Allow- 
ance Scheme's £40 a week. But buildings 
at the edge of a disused airfield had to be 
converted, equipment bought, stock — 
none of it as frozen supplies — financed 
and as the trade developed, a computer 
installed. 

He was lucky with his bank manager 


BRIEFING 


■ A new grant scheme, _ 

Company Expansion (MACE) -which has 
been highly successful in pact 
experiments — is now available nationally 
through area training offices of the 
Manpower Services Comtiission. 

For smaller businesses of SO to 200 
employers, the MSC win share the cost of 
a management consultant to produoe - 
a business plan a nda sta ff -development 
programme concentrating on 
management skffls. 

In one triad a firm boosted turnover by 
half in four months. By next .March it is 
expected to help about 120 
businesses at an average cost of 
£ 10 , 000 . 

MSC payments have a £15,000 ceffing. 


Fishy business: Hugh and Jane 
Forestier- Walker at their 
Gloucestershire premises, with, 
some of their smoked products, which 
range from fish to venison 

because he has largely, financed the 
business on a £23,000 overdraft. The 
nearby, farmhouse fs befog modernized. 
His parents have helped in the business, 
which now employs a further six people. 
Guidance on accounting and securing 
planning permissions came from the 
Council for Small Industries in Rural 
Areas (CoSIRA). 

Minola relies mostly on selling to « 
hotels and restaurants. But Trusthouse ' 
Forte, Britain's largest hotel chain, has 
made it a recommended supplier. And a 
mail-order business is growing so fast 
that the couple are worrying over 
production capacity, although at the 
same time they are negotiating for a by- 
air export contract to firm up the base of 
the business. 

Hugh said: “AH my advice now is to 
consolidate. So the aim is increased 
turnover at a gentler and more stable 
pace. That overdraft has to be got 
down." Bui be is planning the next 
move. “If," he said, “there was some- 
body working, through the night, there 
could be a dramatic increase in 
throughput"- 

H could be earlier than he is bargaining 
for the latest caller at remote Kencot I 
HiH has been a buyer from one of the big- 
gest national supermarket chains. 

One thing he is sure about The only 
way to find the smokery, lying in 
woodland offa minor rind, is by looking 
for a blue plastic bag wrapped around a 
fenccpost by a rough track. ^ThatT 
said, “stays where it is. We can’t < 


if - 

|n 

fh 

In • 

c? ■ 

SL-; 

111 . 


O- 


i y 

i fj'’ 


he 
cope 


with anybody and everybody beating a 
. path to this doorstep. Not yet" 

• Success note: Original Norfolk Punch, 
the small company which produces a 
non-alcoholic punch to an old monks' 
recipe' (Your Own Business, August 8) 
has had a trial order from Mitsubishi, the 
Japanese - engineering group, for its 
expanding health-foods subsidiary. The 
Norfolk-rased punch producer, which 
has negotiated an option for Mitsubishi 
to distribute the- drink in the Far East 
hopes the trial could lead eventually to.- 
- . its doubling production. . , • 


BUSINESS TO BUSINESS 


GENERAL 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


RrU to—n g B UatDnfagi LatfOactMtan FbrSatBament 

Oct 6 Oct 17 Jan 8 Jan 19 

Oo 20 Od 31 Jan 22 F BO 2 

N»3 Nov 14 Jan 5 Jan 16 

Cri biMms arara tefcan on or 16/1Q/86 TSB. Pariton feM. Ratnan. Hughes Ponte. 

Canny Pots. HB SanxieL Pennine. Johnson Ftoh Brawn. Rmkl Ooup, Brwsn Car 
Aucaon. Grand Central k wasa na w Hoangs. Amstraa Consumer BacVoacs. Po8* 
Pack. Radtoam Naaonal Glass. Prastanne Foods, CASE Group. Chill 04 
Pi* Conroy Pbol. Jessups. MHoni Docks. TSB. 



1 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


to await the Cha 
speech. Local aut 
rarely showed interes 
dollar deposits re 
largely unaffected by t 
US economic data. 


Baseftates% 

Cteonng Banks II 
Prance House 10 
Dlscounl Marttai Loam % 
OvenHgntHOr IILowS 
Week Seed: 10% 

Tioaswy B«« (Qtacotrt %) 


2irimfi 10 ,J « 

Smmh 10ft 


2im6r 10®>4 

3 mntti 10% 


Prime Bank Btts (Dttcotml %» 

irantn iift-ioft 2 mm n-ioft 

Smntfi 10 n M-10"ia6mnd) lOft-IOft 

Trade BM» (Dtsaxmrft) 

1 mntti 11* 2mnm 11% 

3imth 11*>> 6mnih 11% 

inkffaenk(%) 

Overnight open lift dose 7 
iweai>M-mb emnm n%-ift 

1 mmh 11%-11K 9mmh 11%-llft 
3mmh 11'w-ll% 12mth 11%-11K 

Local Authority Deposits {%) 

2 days 11 7oays 11 . 

1 mntti lift 3 mntti lift 

6 mmh 11 12mtfi lift 

Local 

1i 

3 mntti 11-IOft 
9 mntti 11-IOft 
Sterling CDs (%) 

I mntti 

6 mnm ii>.^-ii*i* 

DoBar CDs (%) 

1 mntti 5 90-585 
6 mnth 5.BS-5.80 


Authority 
fi 11-IOft 


2rrSi 11-IOft 
6 mnth 11-IOft 
12mth 11-IOft 

3mntn n'- 0 -n’» 
12mth IIIio-II’m 

3 nfMh 505-5.80 
T2mtti 6.00-5 S5 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 5 rt i*-5ft 
3 mntti 5’ s ^-5 r ’i« 


7 days 4»M% 

3 mmh 4 *m-4’i, 
Franck Franc 
7 days 

3 mntti Bft-8% 
Swiss Franc 
7 days IX-i 
3 mntti 4-3% 

Ton 

7 days 4ft-4ft 
3 mntti 5 , w4 ,i Hi 


can 6V.-5K 
1 mntti 5 ,i »*- ,1 i» 
Gnatth 
cal 5-4 
1 mntti 4*i*-4'tt 
Bimn 4%-4» 
call 8V7ft 
i mmn 8ft-8ft 
Gmnoi 8 % 2 % 
cat 2-1 
1 mntti 3’ia2*M 
6 mnth 4-3ft 
caa Sft-4ft 
1 mntti 4ft-4ft 
6 mnth 5-4 v. 


GOLD 


GCAXS4253042630 


3.75-295.75) 

^ 5* {newt 

$ lOOOff-lOI-OO (£8930-7025 ) 

Ptabriuffl 

S 574.00 (£398.45) 

■gxctedBSVAT 

ECGD 

Fixed Bata Sterling Exoon Finance 
Scheme tv Average reference rare lor 


r od Septemoar 3. 1986 to 
1986 ndusnre 10355 oer 





Cate 



Pitta 






Cate 



Pots 



Sarin 

Oct 

Jan 

te 

Oct 

Jan 

_*EL 



leries 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

Dec 

Mar 

Jan 

Alted Lyons 
(■305) 

300 

330 

360 

6 

1 

K 

23 

9 

4 

35 

18 

11 

5 

28 

58 

16 

33 

63 

20 

35 

65 

m 


500 

550 

600 

40 

20 

9 

5B 

34 

IB 

75 

48 

20 

48 

68 

33 

53 

90 

37 

57 

BP 

(*666) 

GOO 

650 

700 

73 

25 

3 

100 

60 

29 

115 

7B 

43 

1 

3ft 

35 

7 

20 

47 

14 

37 

65 

Thorn BA 
(MM) 


420 

460 

500 

47 

23 

10 

60 

35 

20 

75 

52 

32 

3 

22 

55 

13 

27 

57 

20 

32 

82 

Cons Odd 
(•*74) 

550 

600 

650 

125 

73 

30 


162 

12S 

90 



12 

25 

45 



550 

3 

10 

“ 

102 

102 

— 

105 

72 

1ft 

e 

15 

35 

Tesco 

(M03) 


330 

360 

87 

57 

70 


1 

3 

7 



Caurtaulds 

C292) 

260 

280 

30 

12 

43 

28 

49 

36 

T 

4 

7 



390 

420 

32 

15 

48 

25 

60 

35 

8 

18 

15 

25 

20 

30 

300 

3 

ft 

18 

10 

25 

13 

42 

20 

44 

24 


Series 

Nov 

Vfeb 

"a. 

Nov 

Feb May 





Bnt Aero 
(*485) 


420 

460 

500 


70 

45 

28 

S3 

GO 

43 


13 

22 

47 

17 

30 

60 

ComUncm 

r292) 

260 

280 

300 

33 

13 

43 

30 

17 

52 

49 

24 

2 

2 

11 

4 

9 

17 

7 

13 

21 


23 

8 

17 

43 



BAT kids 
("443) 


360 

390 

420 

460 

» 

60 

35 

13 

103 

75 

50 

25 



1ft 

6 

15 

35 


Cable & Wire 
C324) 

300 

325 

350 

375 

28 

8 

1 

50 

30 

18 

8 

60 

42 

28 

1ft 

9 

25 

50 

15 

25 

37 

57 

20 

32 

45 


83 

60 

35 

It 

1ft 

5 

25 

*1 

20 

37 





Barclays 

(MW) 


460 

500 

550 

18 

6 

2 

45 

25 

10 

55 

35 

17 

12 

42 

S2 

20 

45 

92 


Dstteare 

r*95) 

BOO 

650 

700 

110 

60 

17 

— 

— 

1 

4 

10 

_ 

— 


47 

95 






Bit Telecom 
C"1*6) 


180 

200 

220 

14 

4 

1ft 

23 

11 

4ft 

29 

16 

11 


10 

23 

35 

13 

24 

37 

GEC 

(*170) 

160 

160 

200 

13 

1ft 

ft 

24 

10 

3ft 

30 

18 

8 

1 

12 

30 

6 

14 

30 

10 

IB 

32 


18 

34 




160 

160 

200 


47 

32 

20 

50 

37 

25 



6 

14 

22 

Grand Met 

C«48) 

382 

390 

420 

460 

70 

75 

88 

67 

43 


~3 

13 

27 

~7 

17 

35 

(■194) 

24 

12 

5 

IB 

9 

18 


6 

30 

18 

Guinness 

(*316) 


300 

330 

360 

25 

8 

3 

33 

45 

4 

10 

30 

50 

17 

32 

52 

K3 

C1106) 

950 

1000 

1050 

1100 

160 

108 

60 

15 

190 

145 

105 

65 

205 

160 

120 

65 

2 

G 

12 

20 

42 

10 

18 

28 

50 


18 

7 

12 

48 

2 

12 

Imperial Gr 
(-390) 


300 

330 

360 

92 

62 

33 




1 

1ft 


_ 

Lam Sec 

1*321) 

300 

330 

360 

20 

1» 

ft 

33 

14 

7 

39 

22 

12 

1 

13 

43 





— 

— 


— 

— 

16 

43 

19 

43 

Lattorake 

P348) 


330 

360 

390 

25 

10 

40 

18 

50 

30 

6 

22 

10 

23 

13 

28 

Mams* Span 

ranj 

180 

200 

220 

22 

3 

ft 

28 

16 

7 

35 

24 

15 






3 



42 



4 

20 

10 

23 

14 

25 

LASMO 

(•123) 


110 

120 

130 

18 

7 

25 

19 

14 

30 

23 

17 

4 

7 

9 

15 

20 

12 

18 

She* Tran 

nwD 

850 

900 

SO 

60 

20 

3 

95 

58 

30 

110 

78 

45 


15 

30 

63 

27 

45 

80 






11 

45 

MtdandBank 

{■5391 


500 

550 

GOO 

50 

20 

6 

70 

40 

80 

50 

6 

23 

11 

30 

17 

37 

Trafalgar House 
(*289) 

260 

280 

300 

30 

11 

2 


46 

31 

21 



if 

16 

28 




25 

65 

65 

07 

22 

12 

2 

13 

12 

22 

P 40 
(-510) 


460 

500 

550 

BOO 

55 

27 

73 

43 

62 

1ft 

10 

5 

18 

2S 

TSB 

ras> 

80 

90 

100 

6 

1ft 

ft 

13 

8 

4 

16 

lift 

7 

1 

5 

7ft 

2ft 

20 



1 

18 

33 

42 

92 



16 

7ft 

Ratal 

n62) 


160 

180 

200 

13 

22 

28 

7 

14 

IB 










IS 

4ft 

10 

36 

36 

40 


uunvs 

Dec 

■Ur 

Jun Dec 

Her 

Jut 

fitz 

C684) 


600 

650 

700 

750 

87 

48 

27 

12 

105 

70 

45 

120 

90 

60 

6 

17 

40 

77 

15 

40 

67 

27 

47 

70 

Beecham 

T413) 

360 

390 

60 

37 

67 

47 

58 

4 

9 

8 

17 

23 



460 

8 

T8 


58 

58 


vaal Reels 
(■82) 


70 

15ft 

18ft 

24 

17ft 

11 

2ft 

5ft 

Hft 

lift 

18 

Boots 

200 

37 

51 

56 

1 

4 

7 


90- 

JraL 

JJ* 

I 12 * 

■ 16 -l 


240 

11 

22 

27 

17 

17 

22 


Senes 

Nev 

Her 

Jun 

NOV 

Mar 

Jon 

BTR 

f293) 

280 

300 

307 

28 

13 

40 

28 

45 

35 

7 

20 

12 

22 

17 

26 

LonffiD 

1-Z33J 


200 

216 

236 

40 

24 

13 

46 

50 

2 

4ft 

13 

3 

8ft 

Bass 

660 

700 

78 

83 

100 

8 

25 

17 

40 

23 

45 



255 

■SlL 

20 

24 

27 

21 

27 


750 

17 

30 

45 

60 

65 

75 


Series 

Nov 

Feb 

May 

Nov 

Feb Mav 

Bkie Cmde 
rS8i) 

550 

600 

650 

55 

25 

10 

68 

43 

25 

77 

52 

10 

33 

73 

17 

40 

73 

22 

SO 

Tr 11V *.1991 
■EJDZ) 


100 

102 

104 

2*.* 

1't* 

** 

■'te 

».r 

3'.» 

2% 

1% 

% 

T’H 

2% 

1 

3, i« 

1ft 

2'n 

3ft 

Oe Beers 
(*768) 

650 

700 

750 

600 

125 

too 

75 

48 

165 

135 

120 

90 

155 

130 

10 

23 

45 

75 

22 

38 

BO 

90 

60 

85 

Tr 11 V. 03/07 
ft 108) 


108 

108 

110 

112 

2'., 

I 9 * 

■*■>» 

5*-* 

4% 

3ft 

2ft 

6ft 

5ft 

A 3 !* 

3’'« 

2ft 

2% 

Pw 

3 

4’x. 

8 

7ft 

2% 

3ft 

4% 

5ft 

7ft 

9 

4% 

5ft 

5ft 

6ft 

10 

Duons 

(-348) 

300 

330 

56 

32 

66 

38 

54 

2 

8 

8 

11 

14 



114 

116 


■"lit 


360 

1b 

ia 

3b 

22 

24 

28 

Oct Nov Dec Jan Oct no* Dec Jan 









('267) 

260 

280 

300 

20 

12 

4 

31 

20 

13 

44 

30 

11 

23 

41 

18 

30 

43 

22 

34 

FT-SE 1525 
Index 1550 
("16051 1575 

87 

67 

45 

95 

77 

60 

90 

73 

1T3 

95 

3 

7 

14 

6 

13 

20 

18 

28 

27 

43 

52 

Glaxo 

f9«8) 

900 

950 

1000 

1(60 

83 

50 

30 

17 

120 

90 

68 

47 

150 

120 

95 

23 

45 

80 

15 

42 

55 

92 

12S 

55 

75 

00 

1625 

1550 

1675 

1700 

14 

6 

3 

2 

% 

23 

15 

8 

52 

38 

25 

15 


32 

52 

75 

100 

40 

56 

77 

103 

50 

56 

82 

107 


If values 
matter as 
much as value 
send for this 
catalogue 

VCtarmesupai’ unAer 
hampers for people who 
tnsaian lhebai,yti 
wMmepaoadndue 
for money: 
Swrqvuousfbods, 
experdysdectai wines 
andsptnts, alfthasenfo 
please the people ivu tart 
about 

Cher 160 marvellous gfi 
ukasjmm the anuiaah 
luxurious to the 
outnuyousty opulent. 
So, mi are searching 
for idols that nflatyour 
values, amt your poda. 
Jo send for our latulogue 
andaytn'theapenemx. 

Fmmjmitnpl 

IHir Jflujapd 

'dnftniiiJ/ 
/wuru/jetfll. 
fmtitum- 
fVffiraaJ 
hmJi ma 



HAMFfiR lrJ 
FKOPLEll 

Z2 Namich Bd. fea ratt— 
MM NRIJ JAG 
Tel (DM31 7I.WJ7/7ISI2J 


SUPERIOR 
I PACKAGE 

FULL COLOUK 
PROMOTIONAL LEAFLETS 


TELESALES 

MARKETING 

COMPANY 

currently handSng 
contracts for several 
rational companies seek 
additional contracts. 
Experienced oi 
publisning, coU caKng. 
appointment maxing, 
follow-up calls and market 

analyses. AH tetosotes 
personnel recruttd and 
trained by ex-nanonal 
Sates Training Manager 
of major publishing 
company. Write to Patricia 
M. Aten, Director, MCP 
Telemarketing, 
Kensington House, 
Suffolk Street 
Queensway. ftm u ntih a rn 
Hi 1LN or Telephone 

021 643 4744. 


£160 

INTERESTED? 

Par a tiJPEMOR DEAL 


aad oar prtca fretta on 

022S 704311 



re uw i 


1 HOUR PHOTO 
SERVICE MINI 
LAB FOR SALE 

1985 Itepe Ufanty as dm, can 
pmt 3h net). 4 'tedi a m 5 
Inch paper, can process and 
pmt (tec 1 10. >26. 35mm aid 
120 mm, ait tone assamOnes 
lunaad afonfl mjfi his 
teawig syswm and Wtio ma- 
ss ptes many extras. New 
cost £40.000. £29300 or 
nearest offer. 3 months 
guarantee. 

ALSO 

1986 Hope 232 20 inch taper 
p roc e ss or never used. £4350 
new. accept £4,000 s f unde r 
guannae. Tet 0534 7676B. 


TELEX AND 
FACSIMILE 

WHAT IS YOUB TELEX NUMBER? 
WHAT IS YOUR FA* NUMBER* 
How often are these 
Questions ashed by your 
events or auopbers. 
These systems are now 
financiaay wxtnri your reach 
mrOV^hTote-Syntra 
Immediate dekvery on ail stoex 
with naoonwoe service. 

FOr further aiformatoi. please 
Dhonaus. 

T 



01-5822959 
OR 01 -587 1628 [ 
• DniraOMOr 90NIOA R.C 


BUSINESS FOR SALE 


C0TSW0LDS 

RETIRBUENT SALE 

High class LfU gift 
shop in txisy tourist 
town. New (ease 7 
years £2,500 p.3- 350 
sq. ft. sales area, 
store room, kitchen, 
toilet. £20.000 + 
stock and F & F. 

Tet D451 20760 


OLD 

ESTABLISHED 
ICE CREAM 
BUSINESS 

RetaB wnti nt»y wfioiesale ootteo. 

23 vandes. excaaem tranaa 
piopeny. f^ arnwg.jio og pnrt- 

Reply to BOX C36. 


October 16. 1968 Total contracts 21729 Caftt 15=^5 PuttE134 


"Underlying aecurity price. 


retounc mvomm 

wr*' nuiknn TrlOKS 
(>5HS5 ittarrnulimi 


PRINT 

SHOP 

Wtf i street print shop 
t/o £80.000. owner to 
concentrate on photo* 
setting, reluctant sale. 

01-690 1989 


| WEST LANCS Rural VUb* Post 

OM«rp NnnauGmn-jlSnrr. 
Tou-nirr wiin auimni m 
rwtAHi«urv- home a warms, a 
■miik. mm norm. bmaMrin 
Idui*4>' mIH Mum iwnny 
GCH DWaM 1rtJCMOaO+ 
POuun pa> USO 0 Sttuv irxte 
hill) pMMMhil rrumoH' 
1110.000 |rLOO°5+W3al 
UMC HunhUM rom'ian^m 
nimum u, iwiiwm Cuv Law 
uinlvN' l u nruT arewttl pn 
InHuil Good olfuri With 
mrMmoin. mam Dttam 
tram CMM SM 


ROTHESAY 

Old esUtehEd Latts. Gants 
and Datu ra's attfim re business 
and aett- maanafl guy any 
PmnH sue mosta wesw 
Pier. TTadnfl on muni am As 
ftoor. stoaga. Wet on 2ne. atttc 
tor nm taatl arcane wadw re. 
Pninah as a hctoq concern or 
vaam botbus utoxaw to > 
•Me vaneqr d uses. Pmm. 
2J00 so ft. Owns ndmg. Bmp- 
mss and propany 
E46JDOO. 




fete oMJuto. 

T«t . ..... 

bustnwx haras, the ma ffr 


SPECIALITY 
FOOD SHOP 

Excellent Kings Road lo- 
cation. Web equipped. 
650 sq ft (pound floor 
sales area including 
walk-in ctifllw. Large 
kitchen/ preparation/ 
basement storage area. 
Oft street parking/ load- 
ing. Favourable rent 
Tremendous potential for 
expansion. . 

Principals only Reply 
to BOX 043. 


PEST CMTROL 
AID FDMUiATKM 
COMPANY 

S. Wales area. Lots 
of potentiaL. 

Reply to 
BOX D49. 


BUSINESSES W, 


EXPANDING UK 

TRAINING 

ORGANISATION 

wishes to acquire, 
other training 
companies. 
Residential training 
centres are of aiterest 
Reply to 80X608. 


MORTGAGE 
BROKERAGE 
WANTED CASH 
PURCHASE 

Private company wishes 
to purchase a brokerage in 
London/Hams Counties. 

H staff can remain it 
The prospective 
purchaser can immedi- 
ately inject profitable 
Dusiness and is seeking 
early expansion; All offers 
with lull details (in strict 
confidence) to: 

Managtog Director, 
Reply to BOX G2& 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


J 


IF TOS HAVE A GOOD 

There's halo to get you off 
the grouno wttn_. 

a Ijinnrrato 

rmancuB oaciandj 


menrelmg ~ business 
buttong. 

No toe.raoulred. No aky 
testes please. Writs gmg 
your phone no 6 product 
service. We wW taft tiut we 
won't waste your ttma. 
Booth. Soot. & Sharks. 
Reply to BOX Gttt^ 


MAKE 
MONEY 

with your rmcra corr®uter 
Pan/fuB ome 
OPP-* " 


No 6 

Wtote 
SG12 OXH. 


_ iwummiw- 

inoufori mwW Oof at mr 
nwmrvltimMM 


um miwHk The nw DUG 
H 


Hvbnq K«rMwnne. with hw 
nwnrfW>9 and worn praHMiw 
tuoru hcMbna conmwmew a 
mnuntai. kwa ttnwratMX> wuiM 
U you w 
on um 
■ nq AfhL 
nouad DLC 
□31 oat tOT7 now. or writo to 
□UQ EhpMtn* Ltd. 89 TOresI 
Road. Owaurv. Wort rtr. Wort 







OoSiiw-U nunasnaenr. Reply to 

HOW# WM W C LWlf - Excel 
nwiMMdnwMM for uk, 
Europe*. Aim. Mkkut CM for 
uowtw - nrM/uorauon own 
wfurh mtam XraV . Um 
wnqnt kw/banv. naw. 
PrmnpaH ronton Mr WMinlar 
m Siuunnr Bn SUifc LA. 

CM 90073 USA Trt 171 3884 

wambi omufty xomu. Sac 

maim nutirtM. rotmuoy 
ohm 90MH1 oppornMiyKi or- 
forno ononeo m rwiumj $, 
mwjnnnp m umm property 
nurutt OomuiH) lull or. sari 
hair 1 with a romrmtmmi Monty. 
U-SOQ+VAi- For iiirtMr oc- 
iMh r tr Trt OTi m 871 992 - , 

tan I hoc up-nnir .10 hi? * 
month no vama no rontUHi- 
IMit rppnul ihialrrd. CttSOO . 
fiUlKV" nutaw Rjnf Nr 
Breen OJ SOS SSI 1 or writ* 
OfOWt-nalrtl Lkl . Dept ST J35. 
HAjenl Wei iMWOfl Vll - - 



It# fel 
vote ’ 

at tl . , 
ooKrataty rewwoing texts 
rewttnkng txxn ttnaricMy and] 
0 1 


te right for you. l 
i wtelnMufaxMd 
the wy hff^rest 


I !' 


The next cotrse steris ini 
Noremmr ■ youwoutofiM to] 
Okscusa «, please Mephone: f 
Of -622 7512 
I intervtawd are curaotty taking I 
I place n London. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITY 

Become part of one of 
Britan s fasted growing 
industrial newspapers. A 
comgistB package of 
etwthem. ommg and 
orvgoeig support is 
sujsSafe. fcmm needed 
fulWS. Sim Luton 
(8582) 452020 far farther 
Details. ... . 




START YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 
FROM HOME 

« wi w e 2 doo to mow 

1 8 MWng ot» own 


67Q6S or 


TKAVn. (or tale Tlrat rt TOur OD- 
rtOOT . Lonoon ' ttaseq All 
town -Sneeretra ra Wo nsKs. 

bnh- maiuont 1987 HoMav 

Wprtttwe* Turnover 

CSLMWuqn Op»o rofli nunwi 

SO“« ioral OBoartuMy Att m- 

autfes Rewy to BOX COS 


far «eea- 
r*i- raany EwtUmt 
DWM BKMrana. 
Tnr tno urt r uil Ea We. Bounon- 
on-oie water. Owm. guh2En. 
Tel: loasir mice. 


1 

v 

« 

t. 


Kumrties 

Deueri w» earn VOW- on Lac 
wry rate* A few areas nm 
aidUMHe Ot 874 9Q3b (Day) 
Ol M 1WO iw/«na*Ev«) 

ram. ecr you started in a 
Wmr Cow: eert uni u umnrm Bui 
cant tad For tun smnq o> 
• {rats era SAC to Otdteke 
PoMMuttO- PO aoK II. LjMnHn- 
tier HHo 9VN . 
we%L oar you icartrd m a 
name twok wwnq aiBuieoB that 

<a* i fad For lull twnn of- 
•4 SAC to CNdtakr 

SKrt telwid. tD era.STX PO Box 
i t tnptmrmer HAS wm 

Wii tie Ometer advertlrtnn 
Weet^MaUanas errtun* 
"W I* detewo ranen nu l 
FnmtMs tmhr Rents to box 
MPI ‘ 

ctBcnto enroll 40. rvoutrr- 




Pnorwatt ontir Prion-. 

ftg're OiMnl Ol 405 B9D& 
UBMTEDCa. For sale Rn’cecoo 
m4M)Fv tell » > OFT Ueeocf 
UOOSAC OaJiZ 6 BarnSST 
U» %«Vrw» Dorset BH20SBX 
I I WI Nalurai rmrarUrv. 
Oler ISO lain MrataWe ~ No 

oSi^^nco 1 ^ a, “ nuly T ** : 

FASTA H2XA Mirilgr rff m nya 
W near camm untwc tn 
Lontian ora-ninq rttmtmas tKi 
Trt OLTCU- anas 
teHmr MVELDPMrMT.%- 
■m«rtttnr« erm ;Trie Prop 

W«TI'* J *ri' rwll)/ mm 
■na .naranaamn . m nut 
tendte rt. Pwi tb BOX Da? 


(X 











f 







JLi 


CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


Brighton Boat 
Showrooms Limited 


* tS ndlCTy busiae * s situated in 

SESf pram,M8 * 

* charter business based in 
Gdwahar wdndinga 'Moody' 34 foot 
™ 2 Moody' 31 foot- yachts. 

Enquiries to: Mr Nick Lyle (Special 
J^er) or Peter Bern*, g£ C 

BNL^H 0 ^ ^^^Brighton 


•"'v. 


I, 

i '' ** i * 


-ZGP- Tefc0273 778955. 
8779 <>G. Far0273 739585: 


\ tont Thornton 

1^ .chartered accountants 


Teles 



UNIQUE QPPORTUNITY 


to establish a new public house, wine 
bati restaurant or retail unit in unusual 
premises within the city of London. 

★ Superb location 

★ Outline Planning Consent for 
conversion 

★ 6.855 sq. ft of accommodation 

★ To Let on long lease by tender - 
closing date 9 December 1986 

For further details please contact: 

Property Board 

79/81 Easton Bond 
Umta NW1 2RT 
Tet 81-837 3442 (24 to 
01-837 4206 Set 
Ret PS/82 



W W 

LEISURE MARKETING 
CONSULTANTS 


LEISURE B.E.S. 
OPPORTUNITY 

UK based consultancy has 
Florida USA investment 
opportunity. 50% of equity 
available. Consultancy al- 
ready owns B.E.S. 
approved company, frnar- 
natwnai accountants, 
advising. 


INTERESTED. LEISURE/TRAVEL? 
INTERESTED . 60% TAX SAVING? 
INTERESTED. 20% RTN AFTER OP.? ; 
INVESTING. E25K/250K? 

Ask your Accountant/Solicitor to write ter 
C. KENT. W.W. Leion Ctwsnttaots. 

7 The Arcade, Cwndma. GmaL Tat 498124. 









imu I new I in' MB i m W 

wmmm e**^**#*^ 

°" E D .' l L r ^“* £3£J7 nsr/HBimmsoF etsve lofts m rue south 
nw> tm, Roots, Dana. 8MTE 1AU TEL: W3D21 6848B3 
^ m awfatomlaiMi fnanbib a GUO pw T/M 

- - - IfcVimFIC APVEWTtSXftf: WU 


VACATIONS INTERNATIONAL 

Are piesemty seeking ana (Ssnibaion ihroagbow tbe Country 
tar a unique holiday pramounn concept Appointed distrflxiton 
»ill enjoy immcdiaic profits & (juicily be earning £500 weekly. 
Our product is low cost and creates volume sales. A minimum 
investment of £2.000 ptai VAT secures your own exclusive area. 
Wrnc endosing iriepbone no w: 

Vacations lntemational 
34 Victoria Read, Fnfwood, Preston PR2 4NE 
or telephone 
(6772) 712312/7I200S 
OFFICE HOURS 


•‘1. 


2 STAR HOTEL 

PnimeM amm a Mona CMMIB wn re becH d a pur IWMI Me {in 
paracu&rrratnjpBnsI A»0 mwwral fanriynwbolH rarajat^ftmeos 
■ ■ ■ - ‘ "Tcrs ns s i~" 

Freehold 


mam 3Z team; moms (Z won enswe at*Ms| oongs ns ganHaccoTno- 


(Won Bs.iesmrran ere & cvjmW). EZ 
Re! S2439 

BAR AND BISTRO 

Wirt tutor HsSl bee A Mhr Kasai ocopm otme peston on Dmucatal 
16 mka Exeter Cnsaacr ceto to. astro rail anas) anoercai bum esc. 
S»cnw (mm flat perttaue IN £ 4 furfur fetor feta. V« road trade* 
ur PSUQ. Cum T.D EMOjQOD. £2204)00 F ieofcoM At LOSS 

ELECTRICIANS, TV A RADIO ENGINEERS 

1st ebu roeson n re Sosa West nmdwai* same tor tarn «h»o> 
fob* San owsm nrchops (Sms 1400 sq ft) 3 ma u n m eo ram 
kraqaaeamtotoa. suden. p agu A or primp £851100 Frct*o« Ret 

CHERRY & CHERRY 


VOLKSWAGEN 
PANEL VANS 
- PATLOAD 2530 Kg. 

Due to a change in operations a major 
UJC. Transport Company offers for 
immediate delivery a number of 

V.W. LT#5 TURBO DIESEL 
HIGH ROOF PANEL VANS. 

Additional extras include roller shutter 
doors, van and floor lining, with rear 
frame protection. 

Initially purchased during the latter part 
of 1985 these vehicles have delivery 
mileage only and are unused. They are 
still covered by manufacturer's warranty 
for a limited period and are for sale at 
well below manufacturer's list price. 

Interested parties should contact either - 

NORMAN DUCKWORTH 
JACK KNAPTON 

on (070682) 76tl 


13)14 . 


*1 IPJ 


t*-, 


» 1 v. 


COMPLETE TELEX SYSTEM - 

£899 + VAT 

a portaWe/desk top telex system com- 

ris?*s oard "* ****** tor 

B.C.S. LIMITED 

01-735 8171 


LOOK NORTH 

For Ota ust vatae a Comacal property 
Stop* - Holds * B uitotnes * Pahs * 
fmfcOM hum £25.000 
Mrte V phone Ur toots. 

KAYS COHERCUL ESTATE AGHfTS 
Hem 0 Ske 225/229 Chmfe Street Backport, FT1 3PB. 

„ T8K8253 23486 

Manchester restart office in Wrtrenv Road, Sale. Cbestoe. 
TefcOBI 973 4444 


CALLING ALL 
ENTREPRENEURS 

An mveameai oT£9950 seamed by a new vehicle and equipment 
opens the door lo an exerting and locmnc linure with NEW 
AGAIN. A snvKc that can be of benefit 10 millions of car 
ownen. Comprehensive nhininoi to yow staff with con- 
unuing suppoti and guidance. Ernanec available iq suitable 
applicants. Wmc enclosing tckphooc number ux 

NEW AGAIN, 

34 Vfctoria Road, FnKreod, Preston, PR2 4NE 
or telephone (0772) 712379/712001. 
(OFFICE HOURS) 


~6%A 


SPECIAL DEALS OH CARLTONS 
WHILE STOCKS LAST7 
FOR THE BEST DEALS RING US 
STATION GAUGE 
LOWER IHSSfflUD 
8HUMHKTED ;sT M| 5 
Td (84427) 2232 Iflg 




- -'V, 

• u. .. 

■ 'J«; 


ENGLISH LAKE DISTRICT 
Keswick on Berweu t w a t e r, 
CuBhria, Berrawdade Valley 

R. J. Smeaton 

Estate Agents, 

30 Station Street, 
Keswick Cumbria. 

Tel: (07687) 7227B 


COMPLETE TELEX SYSTEM - 

£899 + VAT 

PORTEX is a pqrtabte/desk top telex system com- 
plete with ful sized keyboard and printer ready tor 
use. Cal us for details: 

B.C.S. LIMITED 

01-735 8171 


FRUSTRATED ORDER 

Mua be deaied direct from mann ftct m cr. 2 new relocaublc bufld- 
ws 700 sq ft each. Boih 10 a bkb 9andanl with Stone anrexue 
finish. Fully insulated with das O phu a criio ar d interior. 

Already wired op with electric heathy, toilets, shower and 3 tun 
rooms. Available for unmedme delivery. 

Suable far sports changing rooms, tenure amenities, donnnories. 
offices, conference rooms training centres. All offers cooskkmL 

Telephone Mr. Nkfaoils. 0430 40673. 



*» 


i.; 




NKSS 


- \ 

w ^ 


DO YOU WANT THE 
BEST DEAL? 


It isn’t always the cheapest .although it might 
appear so at first 
PROMISES, PROBLEMS ETC. , 
DON’T TRADE DISCOUNT FOR SERVICE 

Customers spend more time trying to get 
discount than prelecting their resichial investment! 
Wang PC & IBM PC’s start from only £8SS. 

WSfli excellent range of software packages. 

Huge ringe of Wang OIS, VS Feophenls also Wang 
zefubished equipment in Sbodk. wflh. fufl,^ Wang warranty 
&consideraNe savings, 

SOPOR THE BEST DEAL IN IBM & WANG 

caB^^^ofessionals today. 


713 tWr> 








Authorised Wang Dealer. 

41-42 DOVER ST. LONDON W1 TEL: 01-408 1516 


V- 

V - 

% 

■■ f. 

% ■- 

*1~ 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


* : - 






SYSTEM-TEXT 

A business opportunity to en- 
ter tbe growth market in 
window graphics, vsbete and 
boat livery, exhibition and de- 
swn fields sumoited by one 
of the largest' international 
producers m the world market 
place. Wd offer a fufl profes- 
sional package for both 
individual and management 
concepts. Total cwmal re- 
quired 1mm £12,000. 

For details please phone or 
write to: 

Text (UK) Ltd, 
Text Hesse, 
Beaver Lass. 

Hammersmith, 
| ninimi W6 9BL 
Tel: 01-741 7461 



■ r'V 1 





WORKING 

PARTNERS 

with capital required by 
established retail tine 

art gallery, wish to ex- 

pand nationwide - write 
for further details to: 

Tbe Quay Baiery. 
Tbe Quay, 
Poole, Dorset 


INVESTMENT 
OPPORTUNITY 
TELBCOMPIHlMCATlOttS 

Dynamic company in«rt*4 
pi deskm and manufacture or 


pn^ucts seeks expansion 
capital lor approved 
products. Experienced 
prmapais. good contacts 

ami sales. 

Nrunns* 


-W''* 


CHEAP POSTAGE 
STAMPS 

qecent British stamps 3ur-^ 

piusiotrepwiatge'^gj 
avatatnc ■,py i8 S l T > Jfff 
value less 8V Lmea sow 

»pnon0«W < or more 


DAvtD soiemLiD 
6 CHAN DOS PLACE, 
LONDON WC2 

01-379 3594 


LOANS & 
INVESTMENT 


? — | 

NT | 


CAPITAL W» IB*"***. 10 “*■? 

- AWtrtV 

awmtwrrd Rertl lo BOX «3B5 
'VUITUtt CAPtYA^ jivalLa'^W 


FRANCHISES 


PRINT AND 
COPY SHOP 
WEST LONDON 

Rent £3,500 per annum, 
new 10 year lease, Vo 
£81.000+ under 
management L/u shop. 
Pncer £80,000. 

Bepty te BOX S21. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Looking for 

accounting 

SOFTWARE? 

Call Clare 
on 

01-582 9982 


Like an up-date 
'on 

COMMUNICATIONS 
TECHNOLOGY? 
Call Clare 
on 

01-582 9982 



Mb 

■onto and mi ■ enwy tools te a 

fcvb QDBUr BB»ew Wkr ease: 

Even dost as** doranl rmW 

re OKTOpim Will raeraaM atao- 

mx Sol eat* on n retort 


aented. re m*ig Mon 


Mil i 


cMmleMr, 

ii i d M MBrtramwcuo 

^bSsSS 



XHBHG TO WY OH BUSMESS? 

Top mi l mug Co wDI plan vour 

LiwUnw/wrW vietits In New 

York. Indlt u3J or «roiipi Exert 

reft On lari' Brtsky As«m. 

1585 York A» WW. Nnw York. 

Nnv York 10031. USA 


COMPUTERS & 
COMPUTING 
SERVICE! 


BUSINESS 

DEVELOPMENT 

want to expand, need 
increased sales? 

Phone Ken Smith 
MBIM on . 
(0273) 563510 


PMAMCe (opsuuam ud Broker.. 
PioipmiUI export*** nation- 
uHb> irora a fluiirmf 
arrouManl #iKl «fpmrnc«l 
njjikor tv in* anangrencrt H 
t uunt t* tor Buwirss purrhare. 

rMwmlon <u*s rmnanniw. 

0303-8*11377 

WISWESUUM trmrtHlW W 
rtofKW in NOirmtxT oktoipt 
oilmtitv *entr» fa cnniMnm 
swum • rrorrsMUanon ui 
l S.A TM! 10537) 403798 
HEW YORK BUMimsman v hmn9 
IS***. *i nrk 30 OrloBw. 5 NO- 
\rtiuirr »in moildc courttj A 
HiiraltMlten *»vli. 01-509 
UP2t> Mr Barn.**. 

0—WiTElt Pax rek> miakp. lau 
rtfririii and monwr Amr Vro 
ruimNUi> T*+ Ol 580 1363 
PHESTW **A YTAWADOMM 
Bunmomn pnonr. irtt^anofor 
tvardinx m r*tr<-» Ol AM 2560 
« VtSA MATTERS E S dudron 


WANTED DRS KH- 1C1- ME29 
pmunn’dlt also 2900 »rrlr» 
Maroiramr purehroed. Tel. 
07*s 307388 

WANTED IBM dlnktair wnlws. 
■ 6580 AO* 6360 033. 7997. 

Ptwrn- *0742) 307388/. 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 


FREEHOLD 

1500 sq. ft renovated 
vacant 

Office/Showroom 

Only 3 miles from Oty 

and West End. 
Stockwefl Road. SW9. 
£75,000 sut^ect to 
- contract 

vauu uuevs & co. 
01-278 8011 


ilHHQUC Propertr nnnopmert 

oppcrtunlU (Ma del Sol. SO 

inOiUdual *• jrtt* plan. 
cS35.ooo .Fiwnom Com rati 

tedtam mB* rtn l«in avail 

L.-'U*! iLtiuiBBsi -4yg*v m PT - 1 -L 



K C fan* m ZX Tate 
moBftc Ma blue, v am. 
erase. 8 too Dries. 02295 
D Mom 3M U TM* 
meialbc bnM sdrer. a* cart. 
. itoO Dries . OUOO 


SWISS CHEMICAL COMPANY 

is looking for (flslTflMitore for its amsumer-mdustrial products to 
be marketed in Gnat Britan. 

The products are to be sold in Restauants. Hotels. Hospitals, 
Bakeries etc. 

Very high earning potential for the right company or irafividuaL 
Please send detailed application In Engfisii. German or French 
staling your pre vious sate record to: Ctfflre A 189, ” 

AG, Ltomtqai 


Amrecen 


94, CH-8825 Zurich. 


PA SECRETARIAL SERVICES 

Offer quality typing/WP to any 
profession. Low Welsb Prices^ High 
London Standards, yet fast delivery. 

Tel: Cardigan (0239) 614051 


0UT5ANDING 

LEISURE 

OPPORTUNITY 

Prrt>feaefcoU4 acre silt center et 
SbcHekL ngm to hrtw dmtup- 
ment EaaUebal Uure/Sqarti 
carta Pranas canon uonoad 
on nmrirta ol sft to conv- 
enes/ oancjjEtrog tacfifflBS. mb 

FULL ON ucafcE pronaoasW 
grued hfeaUarconpanyirinro- 
trad mrorests. proinUy ol PLC 
sou Enqms pnic«ln ort» 
Rcrtr to BOX C41 . 


F/m SHOT, and 3 bM mail In 
pfalnuoik N. London subrrtran 
riwoolnq para**. Bom In men- 
Itonol contL Exte Una valur at 
£130.000 TH.04&2 731111 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 

TO RENT 


REGENT STREET 
OFFICES 
From £90 jw 

Business address: 
From £20 
per month 

Phone: 01 437 6900 
HELEN LYNCH 

peter wunur 

DRAKE 

INTERNATIONAL 
BUSSINES CENTRE 

CHESHAM HOUSE 
136 REGENT STREET 
LONDON W1R 5FA 


AIR/CON OFFICES 
TO LET 

CLOSE TO CITY 
Rent under £9.00 psf 

GODDARD & 
SMITH 

01 930 7321 


DISTRIBUTORS 
& AGENTS 


FURNITURE 

DISTRIBUTORS 

WANTED 

major Scanrtinavian fur- 
niture manufacturer 
wishes to appoint UK efis- 
triOutors for an upmarket 
range of upholstarod 
suits which compete on 
price and quality with 
P+F. This product range 
is most surtaote far sale 
through superior nanture 
showrooms specialising 
in sales to owners ol 
isti^ous homes, 
lass reply with brief 
company profile. 

Reply to BOX D38. 


SPECIALIST Team N dynmlr. 
Mirrnriid mw cwnilhw 
a* ailaMo London and Southern 

Ohidiw. lo pronmir. nurlut 

and «ll vour prartum la the 

Motor (MtmtTv Ptm« wrtto 


DISTRIBUTION 

AGENTS 

required in the UK (mam 
land only). The product 
is in the home entertain- 
ment area. Part/fuBbrna 
from home. 

* No tired sdteg 

* High pralB narpi 
ffimwtead 

* Naratal tabediMa 
Mfl p o sH neqpoDB ur 


Appficants must have a 
car and telephone. 

Please send Petals to: 
BOX D53 


m HAVE a bPtamc nrw mail 
product Br are* sertdna IndlvM' 
ilU wtriiknq to start UiMr own 
burinew. re coRUMMes wtstung 
to dUcrrify. Our product hUs 
tt&vtf. ibs no corapruuoo. A wr 
mndrr matn AWiMiw who 
ww need to ratal DBTB * VAT 
for a trey ntMUr slock. 
Sotw* areas stffl wrritebir. Ex 

Hdri w i ri wiwgwiBW 

■ of SAOO p.w. Phonr CT«) 
674756 between S. A 7pm 
Mooday or Tnertay. 


for i 

modidar dboMy syslrens. 
(Jnw tn Ha ne«L Mari para 
U.K. atauaNr. Keen prices A 
pood dbrouois. For drtMs let- 
Snap Ptsniay Systrens at Norm- 
ern Ollier (092SI 33088 

Sombern OfOcr 01468 7140. 




EXPORT 

OPPORTUNITY 

HO nan npafllsavM RBOQO 
Rotors. US. Export Spec. «NH 
nr con.. (Med glass. UwcoxBo 
repie. 3 A 5 oore. manual and 
■utonaoenwrare 
MMHbWkMPnces 

and ex stock. 

LEAVE5UEY 
NTBMATHWAL 
Tet 0883)791071 
iLeavexG 


COMMERCIAL 

PRINTERS 


HOIWIHH Basra Qrpr wttfflt). au- 
too usuifl Scaaled roulptnirni 
srak tnertasra work load and. 
or. inrryrr. . tonnr prewnUy 
1 10k pa For further lnforma- 
twn ptcaK ring 0293 S40l 17 



JUST DESKS , 

Period ml repitduaiore fell 
csal doLs. Pannm ifcskil 
Wtiung (abteL. Dmnponj 
«d Dak chain 
Write far detail, or 

nraml Trilm Wdoare 

-Most Desks' DPI 9i* 

28 Cbarett Street LaaduNWl) 
Tdephaac ©1-723 7976 


BEANSTALK Shotfillteqt for 

sale OM oxer C2.0OO Offers 

PWtof Tel. 0708 7*3371 
FTOC PARTmOMNC 

/rrrannrrnMsauon ronirarts 
wanted. 01-992 2188. 


murdrmts 10 r^u Hnrps. Wrm tPS^xx tl^EC/rAX/TtXtCOktS 


OFFICE 
A 


CE EQUIPMENT I 
FURmSHERS | 


UrtHhere 


NISSAN KurtSTO - l«MO D rron 
iranon. Whin* Radio rasw-u* 
and alarm irtira. 3.500 imlra. 
Only irown (or sate, company 
rat supMml. £7^00 Trt : 01 
6» 21 18 iH> or 251 3900 tO) 


1 VOLVO 7*0 OLE Auk* saloon. 
April *86. 3.500 notes only. Dk 
ort-j mrttMc. red trainer Ultra, 
somr alarm. Volio 
Meror/radlo. As new. £12.990. 
Trt I02T7) 276555. 



ALFA ROMEO Y rep wttlK* CtoiW 
leal sprint I.E. EsRlimt condi- 
tion body and rapine. 21300 
miles. Stereo. £3^400 01350 
OI1L 


I TOYOTA MR2. Eire- Hue. C rca 
11250 miles. Superb condition, 
rutra Pioneer aote resene 
qraphtr rewawer. Burn alarm. 
£8.950. TO 01 959 9225- 


FAX UPDATE 

Portable lax machines. 
Cheapest prices in Eu- 
rope. Limited 
quantities available 
now. Please phone 
Fax International. 

Tel: (0243) 880662 [ 


ALFA 2-5 GTV. B3 Modrt, 
29.000 rata. RedwHh Wag* 

Doth 1 owner. FSH £4000. 

Tet. 0442 d4l41 T. 


ADM BO OuaUro 83 rw <84 Modi 
Dork Bur mrt/pey trim. s/R. 
Rri/cra. I 1 owner Only 
30.000 C7 .350. 0732 88224 1 T 


U C VotlO 760 CLE T ratio & 
me auto, dark Mur met. 6.000 
rata. Ex MD*s Car £15-325. Tel 
Mlrttarl lies 0708 42242. 

GRAHAM 281 Ghta 4*4 
sHsrr/Mue Inlenor. 2 weeks 
old. Misery mileage. £14.760 
0800 361341 Anytime. 

SHOGUN Diesel Turbo So. Ora 
morn) pack. 9.000 rota 
£11.950. let: Ol 767 1422 T. 


__ 9.000 m 

Rrd/Biark. klanuaL As new 
C6.450 Ol 942 Till. 



UK SUPPLIED 
(NOT IMPORT'S) 

ASX FOR RICHARD ON 
(BUB) 816155 

IB mb - 7 pm 
7 DAYS A WEEK 
FOR YOUR QUOTATION 


RENAULT 


The most compeunie pnee 
in toe U K. Forquotenons 
and delivay detads 
telephone: 

METROPOLIS 
01-876 2530 
MONDAY - SATURDAY 
9- 6 pa. 


PEUGEOT 
205 GTI/CTI 

Immediate Delivery 
Wheelers 
Tel: 0608 2014 or 
08875 71236 
(Eves/Wends) 


nreum Mondial ■ -Y*. 24.000 
mdes. Service htatoo'. Red / 
Mark tnlrrtor ExcrUrnt condl 
non. C21AOO or part m. Tel 
0222 2 8277 tQl or 512132 IHI 


RAMGE ROVE* LH. drive. 4 
door, metal Hr Muc. 25.000 
miles. Tow tiKCfi. stereo Mansi 
(artured 1982. fun rra- Dx 
1983. Phone 060£ 470I8S. 


JEEP GENEBAOC CJ7. ibtortO 
1986 ID* Soil too. L/H/D 
3300 miles. £7.996 or sensurie 
oKrrs 0462 770407. 


MONZA XO OSE O R*9 Steel 
Grey. Qtm-wrr alloys. ABS 5 
ipd. Only 3.000 rota £14500 
0842 810804 T open Sun 


KHKMS DIESEL Range Rover P 1 
rep- bine, full sun roof, wool & 
L drives suprrti, v'gc. £2.760 
0977 4996S Anytime 

GAUGE ROVER 79. 46.000 rata 
t owner. CA.7S0. Stefan Law 
\Ofurle Sales 0608 68961 ol 
Aldermlmlre 269 Homr. 


LT 25 GTS. 84. Nmfm 
Her. 8 reo. 15.000 m. PSH. elec 
S/R. man 6 sp Utoon Mue. 
£5*496 Tel Ol -597 6485. T 

RENAULT S CT Tutho ♦ part. 
8b Met Blue 4.000 IMS 
£7.250. Tel. 01 236 6926 or 
Sun O! 874 5791 T. 


ROGER HEAP 
MOTORS 

GLOUCESTER 
8452 36908/31822 

ALWAYS 50 QUALITY 
CARS INSTOCK 


I9M KS » Znt Buck M0w 
NttOmto _ . HUM 

«B iW, Qranpwne. gori.m 

24 0J3 Dtiti H5A95 

ISC 911 Tiiba, Cooper Mfi W*i. 
4?to0 Dries . .. E2U95 

MERCEDES 
IW MB SL Sfan.-to teritar 
«■ BUM. «BS. a*®, 

82000 own HUB 

I3 2USE. s *8/n» wteur. «s. 

cncc £SR PH. 38000 
rates . _nZ9B 

BiatUiMl Cnr» jBtae turn. 

ESA 25000 rate . . .BUSS 

ROLLS-ROYCE 

SHADOW A WMc ‘Stack k*Sn. 
BtariM note loot mm condom 

91 QUO cries HUBS 

shadow t saa Red tomer. 

57000 rate. 




«W snaiM GTE CONVtnilBLE 
LVU^: fa.*? it villas . Q8M 
MW TlMO SSI Rca. El nockUB 
\m SBWIM SSI Mart & Salt ripv 

ri'n.tc 200 Ml- 3 only CUM 

me STMtt eore. .na 
te l NftttM 4 wan v»w^ tag 

nit SIMM ownouT ' n ooc 

iw. . 11301 

W HDR6M ♦ I 4£W nriei 
nxsa 

WlUUnXSTIIBM Wtwo. I 0«M> 

Mir. . . CUM 

STB MGS CT U Ea*99. _ CUM 
umuu drtmmi on mhi 
UKudciu mnseta 

DEMO CABS HMUBU 

JOHN DANGERFKD 
RARACES LTD 

IB: BRISTOL 0272 566373 



THEMA LX TORBO 

»S BH> 862 raph 7? sees 
ML OTHER MODELS IWNLABLE 
fMAra LEASE CONTRACT MS 

TELEPHONE 

MICHAEL WES 

0708 42242 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS 


NO WE DON’T HAVE 
THE NEW CARLTON 
YET BUT WE DO HAVE 
OVER 300 NEW 
VAUXHALLS IN STOCK 
AT THE MOST 
COMPETITIVE PRICES 
0480 62952 
MANN EGE8T0N 


Vogue 1984. 
mooniakrr M-ur mruibr. 
38.000 miles, an rcmdOmunfl. 
beautiful vrtutfe. Cl l.OOO. Tel 
0946 801486 


RANGE (OVOI Vogue Cfl 1986 
<J irpwrM. n>H. 13.000 
miles, manual, very flood rpndi- 
lioti dark met blue. £16^00 
Tei-0327 830909 office hours. 


suziiNi nr sj4ioq sou ton 
vvilh hard MU kU and every ex 
tta inr bulwar ec I. id rrg. taOOO 
roues, as new. £6400. lei 0836 
503523 


FERRARI MOMOIAL Q/V. 
16.000 mdes. ‘86 c. Red. Tan 
rude ESN History. Uke new. 
£26-600. Tel 091 984 8001. 


IHNAIILT 25 Y6 84 8. Auto 
Electric roof 15.000 mta l 
owner Fun service nntory 
£7.760. Tel: Ol 767 1420 T 
ROVER 3S \itme 1984 8 R«r 
Block. Crev velour 37.000 rata 
PX A I mar re posslblr. KTAOD. 
Tel. Ol 969 8970 T. 

SUZUKI EAST LONDON Main 
aomtv burned vale dehvrey. aB 
models Salev. service A pans. 
Trt- 01 SS8 7903 T 
TOYOTA Ortki Supra Auto. 
Blark Sunroof. AU qoodm. 
25.000 mb A MUU. £7.996 
PXAtP Trt- QMS 413760 T 
VOLVO 760 CLE AUIO 86 tO 
Cold metal Hr. Mark Mde. 
r/raaa. 2.600 mues. £15.995 
CioirtVaf Cars 0266 463282 
WrtME R Al C O Brave 2«l Amrel 
ran Motor name. lufiv 
equipped. 35 ooo rata. CIS.99S 
ooo Trt. 0732 864849 Sun 




BS 

VOLVO* 

nSOEKir GoHMS. Stack 

Mb. Mo + 0/dme. LancL 
stereo. II JUS mis — fl£<Si 
70 GLE ® t’ Goto Ucl Bbck 
Me. «a» * 0/dmre. ra coo. s» 

rso. tDDOO rets CMJB 

7B UE 0S C* Star Met. i* 
Mb. Auto + 0/dme, Ar. S/R 
Stan. 15.000 me_....tOS9S 
70 TURBO 85 C hllo 5MT 
HO. BM rtJ'tte.S* 
wmdS/Mris. iflOO MtlLteS 
ZB Q£ K IT U GaniW, 
Stack MU Ada rt. Jteja 

I3to0 mta W*» 

74 6tT 8S D BM Grri MIL 

5.000 mis __n2Jte 

7M 6U M T U Grew MA 
Stack MB Ario + o/omc S»R 

Air. #jQ00 mta BJ* 

7*5 SIT 88 ?GM MO, 0*7 
«ri. Mm 0/dmv- nwass 

lOJue iris tote* 

Tab 04867 4567 
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


HENLYS 


OF ESHEP 


KiNGSTOM SV.PASS 
H!\ChLE v WOOD 
ES-ER S’JRSE v 
To!: C i 3?3 01 22 




Fart GftenNa Scarote 
1985 / C 

Auto. 5 door saloon m Straff) 
sdrar. Crime Control. Graprac 
equahzer Rear entartatwmnt 
centre. Rear seat belts. 1 
owner UJWOmtos. E13J300- 

Tel: 0704 43563(0) or 
07048 70693 (H) 




Horion W^Uotore 
0462 678191 


14/4 OiaMneu Lvecv 
rvtra pnwblr AHa vrtkik 
Cntame wwe wnertv. 1113.600 
lei do^tt 64074 


IVOWOP 1985 iCI 
Manual 12.000 mta Mam «**■ 
has Immoi ulofe tamUien 
LI 3.500 ono Tart t0349l 6k 145 


NSW 205 CT i CobTHrirt WhUe 
Movuie Savina on Irvl C9.10O 
an I he toad 036787 066 T 


RANGE ROVER. EFt 19ft, Auto 
vcwue Blue 6.000 miles As 
new. Cl a. 750 068 283 3694 


90 November 

1986. ML Cl. OOO worm of ex - 
Iras. 12-000 train. £7.400 ono. 
Plume 0442 B3342S. 


PEUGEOT 28S CRD N A very 
low nirtrape. rrsnomra) dmti 
hJlrn. £4,475 0733 882241 T. 


MOTORS WANTED 


ALWAYS 

REQUIRED 

Executives. Saloons and 
Spore, low nteage. dun 
cats with hstory. Top 
pnees. finance settled. 

CaB Tonics; 

021 427 3235 


PROMOTION, 

PUB LICITY & 

MARKETING 


ctitna era wtih 
your own rolours/ro logo. Ideal 
Oirotmas fldl. Send for ouoto- 
uom from £ 1 99 to The 
Potlnry. Trenl Walk. Hanley. 
Stoktaon Trent or letenhooe 
(0782) 641018. 


WHOLESALERS 


STOCK MOWTJUI 

TO CLEAR 

Fufl Ista of toys, sports 
goods. VKJ80 eoulpiTianL 
dbtteng. In fact toousands 
of fines to ckNU. British 
owned Taman 


also oftora souring and 

Htty In Taiwan. 


icofrtpany 
vdngend 

buying tadfily In' 

Contact us now tar stock 

bonanza or regulpr 
merchandise, telex 14S23 
AISTOK, or write tR 

4stn Steddsts, 


Ceatre, 6U Hi 

MKllNfiH 




IARY 
OF 

THE «®BS# TIM ICS 

CLASSIFIED 



The Tines Classified 
columns are read by U 
BuUkM of the most affluent 
people in tbe country. The 
following categories 
appear regaiarfy each 
week and are generally 
accompanied by relevant 
editorial articles. Use the 
coupon (right), and find 
onf bow easy, fast and 
economical it is to 
advertise ia The Times 
Classified. 


MONDAY 


THURSDAY 


Edncafion; University Appomtments, Prep& 
Public School Araoiimnenls, Edocatkxtal 
curses, Scbofarsl^ps and Fellowships. 

La Creme de la Ckeme and other secretarial 

.app oint mraits. 


Genend Appointments: Management and 
PTfprTTtTw * ap p ow itmen is with edi torial. 

La Gnome de la Quae and other secretarial 
appointments. 


HOTELS & LICENSED 
PREMISES 


TUESDAY' 


FRIDAY 


EXETER 
CITY CENTRE 

50covarBcanaMlot*-up MM 
turnover £1 14.413. gross pmflt 
65° ». none Mr ramriwre Rent 
CS2S0 on secure eottned Mfie. 
Pnot E7SJOOO GAV. 

TebPtyratfee 
088 47 207 


400 YEAR OLD 
VILLAGE INN 

intteheaitofCMRetn 

between Henfeyon-Thames 
and Marlow. Reaairart, 3 
bars, car park, nawfti 
owners 6 roomed 
accommodation. 

T/o £200,000. 

Offers over £320,000. 
Tel: 0491 63247 


Conqmter Horizons: Computer Appoint- 
ments with editorial. 

egal Appointments: So&dtots, Com- 
madal Lawyei5, Legal Officers, Private & 
PublicTPractice,' 

egai La Creine for top legal secretaries. 
Public Sector Appointments. 


WEDNESDAY^ 


Motors: A complete car buyer’s eniA* with 
editorial. 


franchises etc. with editorial. 

Re s ta urant Guide. 


— SATURDAY 

Overseas and UKHoidays: Wlas/Cottages, 

Hotels, Ffigfats etc. 


La Creme de la Creme and other secretarial 

ap po in t m ents. 

Property: Residential, Town & Country, 
Ovmseas, Rentals, with editariaL 
Antiques and CoQectabfes. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL 
COLUMN, INCLUDING ' 
RENTALS, APPEARS EVERY DAY. 


RENTALS 



Coatiaaed fraai page 15> 

^houenstreeT^ 

W1 

A beeubMhr top toor fM m a 

prealgiau& brand new Mbrii 

erase « Sons Squwe. 2 dale 

arts, bath cSo. ik. ff U. 

£300 p w 

Mayfair Office: 

— :C — ^ 


fin in ihc coupon and attach it lo your advertisement, written on a separate 
poet of paper, allowing 28 tellers and spaces per line. 

Rales arc Linage £4.00 per l me (min. 3 lines); Boxed Display £23 per single 
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W tocSWi^Mrag^Creupaastfkd Advert israwrt Manet. Times 
Neinpapcrs LttL, PO Box 484. Ynginii Street Lcradaa El 
Name 


Address. 


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Use your Access, Visa, Amex or Diners cards. 


r* 















































Mercedes offers glimpse into future 


The dominance of the 
Mercedes S-dass saloon in 
Europe's luxury car market is 
coming under increasing pres- 
sure from two rivals — one 
British and one German. 

Within minutes of the Brit- 
ish Motor Show opening its 
doors at the NEC Birmingham 
this week visitors quickly, 
established a favourite tour. It 
began on the Jaguar stand to 
see the new XJ6, moved to 
BMW for the equally new 7- 
Serie*} and ended with a visit 
to Mercedes for the recently 
face-lifted S-cIass. 

Mercedes, which sells about 
108.000 S-dass cars a year, 
compared with 30.000 XJ6s 
and about 25.000 7-Series, has 
been quietly preparing for the 
latest attack on its market 
leadership by making massive 
investment in advanced en- . 
gineering technology, which 
will progressively appear on 
its cars from next year. The 
aim is to make them safer by 
taking more and more de- 
cisions away from the driver. 

The Birmingham show is 
the first opportunity British 
motorists have had to see 
exactly what is in the pipeline. 

An audio-visual display and 
a foil size cut-away model 
demonstrate next generation 
electronically controlled auto- 
matic traction systems. They 
include 4-Matic - a “thinking 
four-wheel drive" which only 
comes into play when needed. 
If sensors detea dip at the 
rear-driven wheels foe front 
pair automatically become 
driving wheels as well. 

The 4-Maiic system is foe 
pinnacle of Mercedes's new 
technology. It will not be on 
sale here until next summer 
and will be extremely expen- 
sive, adding up to £5.000 to 
the cost of a standard car. 

Before then we shall see foe 
much cheaper Automatic 
Locking Differential, costing 
about £700. It also works 
through wheel sensors, but in 
this application they activate 
hydraulically a differential 
lock. The locking varies from 
minimal to 100 per cent. 

This will be followed in a 
few months by Acceleration 
Skid Control, costing some 
£1,600 and available as an 
optional extra on all V-8 
models. If one rear wheel 
begins to slip because of over- 
zealous acceleration or poor 
road conditions two things 
happen: the automatic control 
eases foe accelerator pressure 
while simultaneously breaking 
foe spinning wheel. 

• I reported at length last 
week on Jaguar's rapturously 
received new XJ6, but space 
prevented me from doing foe 




Something new, something old at the Motor Show: 
Above, the new BMW 7351. Below, this 1928 Ctyno 
Royal four-seater tonrer made an appearance on one of 
the stands. 


~<L&er* 



same for foe BMW 7-Series. 
Let me remedy that now. The 
old 7-Series was an adequate 
but rather bland car. it never 
succeeded in offering real 
competition to foe handsome 
S-class and its ride was notice- 
ably inferior to the Jaguar’s. 

My assessment of its 
replacement's capabilities will 
have to wait until I have tested 
a right-hand drive model in 
British conditions, but it is 
already apparent that this is a 
much more attractive con- 
tender. with its aggressive, 
squat appearance enhanced by 
sharply defined contours. 

BMW is determined not to 




be left behind in the technol- 
ogy race with its old German 
nvaL The new 7-Series fea- 
tures a self diagnosis system 
which finds faults and memo- 
rizes them for future servicing; 
an automatic transmission 
that selfadjusts for wear and 
road conditions; electronic 
circuits that select an alter- 
native channel if one fails; seat 
belts that automatically adjust 
for height, and headlamps 
giving 30 per cent more light 
with reduced dazzle to other 
drivers. All . versions are 
equipped with AfiS anti-lock 
braking, power-steering and 
central locking. 


The first models to reach 
foe UK. in January will be foe 
,3.4 litre six cylinder 735i. 
costing £24.850. and the 735i 
SE (Special Equipment) ver- 
sion at £31.750. They will be 
followed in the spring by foe 3 
litre 730i at £19.850 and foe 
730i SE at £23. 100. 

The expectation of new 
models from foe three leading 
contenders has depressed lux- 
ury car sales, which are down 
by 13 percent this year. 
Production of foe newcomers 
will not approach demand . 
until next year, but when they 
do start to Dow in numbers all 
foe signs point to 1 987 being a 
vintage year for luxury car 
makers. 

• For those of us with a much 
more limited budget there is 
welcome news from Austin 
Rover. 1987 versions of the 
Rover 200 series based on the 
Honda Ballade have been 
revised to meet a number of : 
minor criticisms of One of the i 
company's best selling lines. 

The most significant is a 
redesigned boot lid, which 
now opens down to bumper 
leveL Many 200 owners 
bought them because of their 
large boots and then found 
that lifting heavy loads over 
foe high rear sill was severe on 
back muscles. 

The interior has also been 
restyled to give foe 200 more 
of a family likeness with foe 
new Rover 800 executive 
saloon. 

Road noise was intrusive on 
foe old model - foe suspen- 
sion always seemed to be over- 
busy on even moderately flat 
roads. To refine the ride foe 
from damper rates have been 
revised on all models and new 
damper mounts fitted. 


On the upmarket trail again 


The General Motftrs 
Carlton enabled Vanxhall to 
extend its appeal upmarket 
from the limited base estab- 
lished by the Cavalier in the 
medium sector into the lower 
readies of foe more profitable 
executive sector. It was soon 
taking 20 per cent of its class. 
More recently, with a flood of 
new arrivals making it look 
dated, it has fallen bark to 
around 12 pa- cent 
That setback wOl not con- 
tinue for much longer with the 
arrival in British showrooms 
next month of an elegantly 
Styled new Carlton irith a class 
leading drag factor of only 0- 
28; new suspension giving, 
better handling and ride com- 
fort; new li and 2 litre 
engines with fuel injection 


options; a 23 Otre diesel and 
keen prices ranging from 
£9,250 to £12339 for saloon 
versions and £9,970 to £13304 
for exceptionally roomy es- 
tates. 

All Carltons are bnilt in 
Germany, where it is called 
'the Opel Omega. 1 recently 
drove some of the first models 
to be shipped here and was 
impressed by foe high stan- 
dard of finish and the airy 
opulence of their interiors. 
Drivers and passengers wfl] be 
delighted by the car’s roomy 
comfort and quiet ride. 

Much play has been made of 
its new ACT (Advanced Chas- 
sis Technology) suspension. 
The live rear axle on the old 
model is replaced by a fully 
independent system which 


breaks new ground by in- 
troducing a small amount of 
rear wheel steer to improve 
stability In extreme con- 
ditions. It is most noticeable in 


countering the dangerous over- 
steer which sets in when an 
eme iycy forces yon to “lift 
off” m the middle of a fast 
corner. 

My preference would be for 
the 2 litre injected GL saloon, 
costing £10,790 for the manual 
version and an extra £500 with 
the new GM four-speed auto- 
matic. It a claimed top 
speed of over I24mpb and wiD 
reach 60mph from standstill in 
10 seconds. Even more impres- 
sive is its miserly fuel 
consumption. Drivers with a 
moderately Ggbt touch should 
return 30 mpg. 


MERCEDES 


DICKSONS OF 
PERTH 


.» SB. SSfO Cume mi 
■oatan Rh maw. Sura, *- 
Ecy in cm. sec sen Lo» 


«S a Sots 85 |0J 8 toe 
QtffH um, sin m 
nr. (toy 1.500 Rifes. 

DJJ95 

580 SB. T906 fin tenant 
irf* mm W Mtw gST 
stay- by 40 safes. Oh 
Santas c v. 

O CMS 

Contact Boh Straw, 
Tat (0738) 39993 


MERCEDES Z07D 


B JJipwep"’* JSSfflflttrC 5 

Bur: SfescmcdCaw* 
Hcsncaer cccm fr* 4 ** - 5 * 9f « c 
etc l owb* OneSWOtnta 

tuaa 

TeL-FriMK 
(02816) 3402 T 


190 E 

B Rag. Nov 84. Rod. 
Black Interior. E/W. 
Stereo System. 
Immaculate Condition. 
24.000 Mies. 
CtaOOOono _ 
Tel: 0983-845908 
After 6p* Weekdays 


280 SE. 

Aagnst 85 (Q- 

toau c Au t Maatar Owaon 
ve aod or -OO niaorf*. Da- 
nwad Hoe sxnflic. Ekm rest 
tllei aiwfc. taho uMBm. 

I t q felti Heavdfaro 

ratv Ctme metraL Renos tor 
ult-K*aiamA.euni 
Td Mr Ha0eSe MPOM, 
taw *7*379*. 



500 SL 

December !9ft. Diamond 
Vac. %000 ante. Lcuter. 
pioneer stereo. ABS. nude 
control >!lop. 
Immaculate. Ne* nr 
am«*0»£25.?50for 
imm e di ate 

Td. Down 
(082585)250 


500 SEC 

Ftfi 4MG 

uMKCewt tasted mCWK 

ana mt* t*i wr. 
satpifiKJs tsre® 3 * 

Pmaa BEpanatua KHUrt 
Pal yrwjr 0«i«: SWStfe 
otters o»-y eatsc id 

0266 63333 
Davison Car Safa* 



SMCEiBiSiMMtihr. Mrftn- 
Ucmd bV MWMK EJec 
S/rooL window*. ASdp wUhh. 
sjprro nd/tav 24.000 nom. 
tiajoo oiu th. Ot no r 


E3QE 1984. A r«9. bgfK It pry. 
ms. il win c s rsd sw 4 Min- 
raw. B umwbU nmoAMOi 
PSH. 37 000 antra, x owner. 
C8 bSO T« OX 004 S»U I44VL 
Ol 506 6036 iw wKmt !■ eves) 


DO I CO O BEN? 230TE. 1966 
■Bt. rang root 19.000 mart, 
one owner. oreen/Mtoe taten- 
or. atnotub-ty mnnaruUM. 
Cl 1.960 TO 02«4 6X3731. 
ibomef 0344 339694 


am. C reg. One owner. Low 
outrage Orr window,. Bool. 
AUoyv Etc raw sa 1.650 
Phene (0022) 62208 



zatet4 i9> RM Rnraarulate 
Sun toe t 4tne. raw 3&O0O 
ad*. C65QO TefcOl -464-0216. 


500*0.85. ESH AyC. A/W. ete. 
29.000 rate £26.780 0606 
861093 l HI 416666 rWI T 








83 Auto, flntamd in Black 
wttti Extra Seats. ATOMS. 
Sena 46.000 mBes with 
FSH E8J97S 

Teh 09592 *466 T 


—crap zsoc Amo. -a- Re* 
e ration. tmrmt with brown 
Inwner. wnnr umtoos. aver- 
aw mttraw toe mar. excMeM 
randUuan. C7.7SO TM: LdM 
<06821 22606 I* 


HO SC. - 84 . Srfver. Mart, velour. 
Sunroof. ABS Air ran Cronr. 
Cor vnv run wr. 47.000 
nulra CsmNM maintaaned 
mmarautr £15.800 TH 
0789-720473 or 0789 - 720370 . 


188 SO. 1982 TTmd* Blee p 
wdhcrramvrtour. everyextm. 
am v 34.000 mm wta> PSH to 
Mmmn ran smv or dr 
vnOrO as praline CJ 7 . 080 . 
T«t 0682 36401 


ASOSLC. 1980 SiKer rulOKl- 
bration BrauWul ear 
Pmatrly owned. CXO.OOO. Tel 
0992 64236 (daytime) Ol S24 
4647 (everanRU. 


208 85 C in Red wtm Cream 
Oow Sunroof. 5 Sod. 20000 
murv. rSH Superb conmiMa. 
£9600 TH: 042129 2845 T 


280 E Rey 78 45000 m. AuMl 
C ream. (4.000 abo 450 SLC. 
Rtxj 79. 70000 ra. aum. Breen. 
£9 600 fUrmcn Car, TH 
0922-839564 or 0632 54178 


00-119 K ceo. Auto Evnlml 
Coadman Brawn Ga ra ge in- 
wruon earned oui. report 
available C3.400 ono. TH 
07048 Total 


300 E AMO. April 86 *C*. Navy . 
15.000 Min. EMrtnc vunroof. 
BUupunkl Radio Cawene. 
mstur randUMn. £ 21 . 500 . OX- 
486 7866 . omce hours. 


908 SL V Re«. 21.000 Mfel 
ABS. truer. Nested leather 
teals. £ 19 . 996 . 0784 

25020 B.T. 

he 190 C AidbS. Three 1 9 a C 
2 816 Two 600 SEC. Avad- 
aHr DtdeQld 0702 5274 T 7 . 
tBBS MB 190 . (Men Mur. cream 
lev alloys. ESR. 14000 miles. 
£ 10.230 0628 36478 . 
M 8 BCP 88 280 BEN?. C rey. 
Amranir. 19.500 raUev aura, 
extras. £ 16.000 01-444 S 670 . 
450 SEL 1980 52.000 mti. TSH. 
Das Blue Mel. Tan leather. 
£6 990 TH; 01 624 0884 iTL 
580 SEL S 3 Champagne. Brazil 
trim FSH. Full spec Mmf Can 
drtMn £ 16.780 0908 70286 . 
380 SL 81 . ThMIe 39.000 mrtra 
from pew. fmmar. FSH. 
£ 16.950 TH 0626 S 3 1818 - 
800 SL A rao. I owenr. lapH 
Mue. 62.000 mSM. FSH. e«- 
tn&. £L 9 JOO. OL 242 0012 T 


380 SL 

85. C. signal red, cream 
Mtarwoi. ifjOOQntfes. 
I wnw. ASS breaking, 

pBoys. cnxta coniroL w/m 
tataa, Coora at&rm. 
GMonstarao 
£27350 

TEL 01 989 2036 


388 SO. 1982- Cha mpa en r iw- 
Ulltr ESR A Hoyt Radio 

rawed* 50006 «m te FSH. 
Exrvlleal 1 owner MOT car 
£11.990 Trl ibuv) 091 372 
8191 irarai 091 488 7866. 


508 SL Sport RoxtUcr 81 bNver 
Blue. EBUT mm ALkn- Haro A 
Son tom Prtv Reo N 6 Only 
42.000 IPh FullMBluvi Beau 
MM example bsream only 
£16500 0522 40766 T 


ISO CC 85 <B 1 many et lij v 
11 OOOmxevaniv lhnllearrm. 
Bnx mtftwr. ornate owr 

CIO 7 SO.IH 09274 28809 

any brae 


290 C. 1986 A refl Darfc green 
MSR Radm/caoNte FSH. MB 
mernanrai uMuranre until Aug 
*86 UnmaruUde EBjOOO Tel 
02406 6352 


ISO b bnmandaw Blarfc 1984. 
6 Hired, manual 1 owner from 
new 23000 mto. FSH Cairo* 
£10280 ono TH. 10777! 
tlhOl 


see SEC C reo 1985 Fun body 
Hylma. roMHir room in ivory. 
BBS wheetv. pn. FSH. 15.000 
(Wlei. CS4.600 Tel home 0277 
229060 OHMre 01 818 OoOh 


458 SEX. Ore 1979 id Mewl* 
blue wdli (Hour MSenor twrl 
lent randlllon. 84.000 mUev 
Rerenlty vrvKed. £ 6996 . Tel 
Ol 741 9036 c we eh dapv onhr) 


380 SL. 1983 . Red ABors Rear 

INK. MUMT 16.000 nwra 

FSH. i lady owner £ 19.500 
RIM outer 061 447 8888 or 
none 0968 00440 . 


380 SE AMO. 1984 A M Petrol 
Blue. 21.000 Mt FSH. lAoill. 
oUow leather. ABS- rad/ caw 
AOvaiunv arwul. £ 18 . 995 . 
05 o& 896354 diner hn. 

SCO 730 C \,rlo Nie dlaraood 
rsfl. r h.r . Canon r/c 
DH raOav Lttl £16250 TH 
0255 882267 

230 C Aura. 1986 (OX On Pilar 
Mrt CS roof, tiered Mr. SawR 
V 4 VHM) H Cl 7.990 IOTSSi 
858329 . 01 8*3 2442 . T 
300 » Am. 1983 5 door. 

LWfl. Orangr/Bnge uil. 

Rad/eaw. oo.ooo ml VCC 
£6500 TH. 0279 T 22888 
508 SL 81 X^CtHQipaane met. 
3 o .000 recorded mdes. FSH. 
extras bnmacnMr condition 
Cl 7600 OnO 0906 820976 
380 SL Soortv 72 MM Silver 
Rial wiieeB. Hard C Son lout. 
Pm Reg on Very (Mb. 
£ 6,996 0522 40736 T 




LONDON ROAD 
GARAGE 
(ROMFORD) LTD 

Mmedra RraMCtia 
drains. L'ndrmrnMT* for 

toe and low m*re » 
Mccetdm. 

CONTACT 




ON 0708 23511. 
AFTER 7PM 
0245 442172 


I 6 K THOMAS NOItmdMn *** 
are caoec to puirMa* l*». low 
irah-aue .Merredm lor faHi lm- 
mntuh MIMS PtWH 
nvbxhon ConlaCl Our 
TIWkwhbw) >06071 832663 

Tvr/Vk r«Ma «Oo02> 720M7 


MERCEDES 

AITHORISED 

DEALERS 


280 C 1*W.X Hnrv tiectnr root 
tlw linvtiot. L owner. FuH 
vervue hnimy ULMJ TH 
UralntdsOI 767 1423 
380 SE 83 command taut Wue 
(Hour An eon ABS nrt rani, 
dtnrt OUI SWW ftH 
C21 uSOCevlotmOl 767 1423 
380 SL 86 Smoke Stiver. VreHl 
Ham Craw, rear Ml Only 
970 m IK (M* £28980 
TH Ceyierda Ol 787 1432 


COLLECTORS CARS: 


280 SE 

ftwiHCoim. IMS. AM. 
auto. a«ay *** 

Sut metsuc. sene mi 
roe*. 19,000 tom. 

£17,975 

TEL: (0708) 20437 


280 TE I »Wir 1**8-* •V t . 

mjltt Vvhrtr »»Mh 0 # ** 

IUB MWUHOltWH’ 

ilulr, au IPWIIIWH AOM; 

itaM wash, ion iMt v/inM tni 
JSut£" ClttSOO TH 
HH-’l-'l* MM 


Mnu iV Re*i I in mrt «eni/V*n 

Mir ini mn«ifr *RRiii> 

KTb/tw m r* tic.. 

71000 IN* 3 <*"****£* 

cum ml owner J-rrt Old 

KiaiHlrau examrte £7 500*no 
01-870 V'nJjOor *07761 T2S143 





jaouM c ttvc via 2 , 2 . j* 
1973 rmrpvdWKrpm. 29000 
inlninh iTn iiumt turn m 
KUUMT RlteriM. rtHMIM 
Ik-o Taxed DH MerCh Hr 
ClPflOO Tc 1 10*9461 n&rn 


U HP M* Coupe fnnnwi 
19VV Datk MW Mw PmS 
Udod to wd B dP wRh — id rv 
Ultrex mvilMI w e ed £6008 
Trl 103221 642041 . 


VOLVO R1MOO IS. 19 >4 Chmc 

r.rr. fed tvilh bhnh IrdBue Hilf 
ikh (U-,19 meiSnt. HU 
Mwcimn new wnn. «nWd 


MMKimn new whk exrwftr 
HI 1 mind rapdMon £6288 
Oiku Ol 874 8266 Mt 4T 61- 
761 WW vvinmm 








inoo ie win. e 6000 nnv» 
C2oaBT«rOI 852 2017 • 

M08 ttt 1970 59.000 mtt Bluer 
pnaune idndwon. C6.49S one. 
P\ pea 0062 730629 iWOroH 
YR4L 190? Red Overdme- 
Hedged In heauMul rnoddon. 
£*.700 own BvtHrt 49770^ 






ifissa si 






tf * 



<r£fi * * 3 ** x 3 « f 


h 31* & ;•? •: t a 



•; '• f:£ « . i 5|| 

r , 


v r 1 


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I 




































































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MHi ft 3 ft ? 1 
MftCj " 
f«0' -12 







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■M W m ■ i » 

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•••■•.■ > . . 1 r**ita 

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’ ».»=•!»•» a ,-j;. , 


. “»l W 5 




THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 



LAW/SPORT 


29 


NATIONAL ■ CONTRACT • HIRE 


***"»*“ « wr cwn rom-ve Wk Indlide: 

EscortXR3i 


BMW3l8i4dr_ 

Sierra 16001 

Caritonl.8GL_ 

Volvo740GL_ 

Astra GT E 


-from£46pw 

-from£63pw 

Jrom£44pw 

-from£56pw 

_from£60pw 


-from£47pw 



Wt wffl buy your Hosting cars. 


on MV no* new* carwwo 

Jh— tag 614814 Tata 335BCB m OBI 32S8271.Tata 665726 


CAR ACCESSORIES & 
SERVICES 


WAKEY’S 



CAR SPARES AND REPAIRS 
<MBUMS OUR SPECIALITY othhi spares available ; 

PORTSMOUTH (0700) 830412 



BMW 333i 

wr onp MO mob 6' sett lao 
indtototd on Mtitlr Mil 
’a) uadi tamu am co-rons 
otai peart bn* tadv Ldno <n- 
rtiflf jtsUll Faonc Ms? mm 
avlsKmqrtMi Mn wnttM 

mmudoi flkmaanw aMels ska 

many m 

f20,5P0 i 
Tri Egan 7TM 


728i AUTO 

84 finished in Otve Groan 
wtt) PAS, BbcMc Sunroof & 
Windows. CrUsa Control. 
Radio Cassette Me. 51.000 
Dries. Unrepeatable vetufl at 

£8,500 

Tat 021 632 6756 T 


BMW 3231 (Ci ra»imi win ruHv 

• -colour coons Mar*uns09 and 

. >0pttcrv IMS WftOMs met. 5- 
aum nunupL air rand, e/ro of. 
window, and tntrto 
b/MlKf DPMHRy. rrcaro'a 

' with Mr Mad rests, simo 

rad/ramriie. aland, c/lorfcino. 
' »*. tlS.VSOTrt 0B(W 375227 


BMCRo»4inpr suser.Mao-. 
ual Sun roof Alloy wtweto. 
Power <neen n®. span* watt. 
Slnra ] 0.000 nrthn. Minarii- 
lair cl 04230. Tel. 0200 
oisooo idayti qaos 7*3309 
wsesi 


63SCSM. Apnl 1982 SappMrr 
. unili Mur tudr AU extras <rx 
mu aari TBXs. FSH wtlh main 
joml CIO. BOO No ofttrs No 
dealer. Tel 107061 B277I I Of 
Her 1070 m 750081 Home 


ALPINA 635B9 

8 isjfeWM. Ful tpuciftaifcn. 
34500 mite, rad, me oamn 
company tflncsor, fatty fitted 
ta Btaptane. Gem reason 
for sale. £10500 ono. 

Tet 061 439 4873 waakaods 
& Mat. 141:0895 446961 ■ 


as CM Alrtna, ln» gaudy 
sinnn W red- 10.000 WUea 
mew NCT ores. Power Lrain- 
n CJceinreterylhmo. HtMe's 
C/lorks St bmc-Poiana silver 
M .«60nno 0703 9EM 696 


«3S CSI A «** Auto. MtWBf 
Baux MW MWiter mierwr 
*8u000 mdrs ExreUenl randl 
non Cl 2.300 ono. Tel. 01 948 
1818 leinungs A w/masi Ol 
036 7382 mnice Itaursi 


i On 83 Sapnite Mw. Sun 

row jtloy wlteett. eter mirrors. 
He Cvrrllenl rondilion. FSH 
Power, teralon and economy 
SO mpg at over 60 mult 
CtxSOO TWI0B43) 004596 


SZ3I 1684 iBI •> Door DmUgrMn 
mcurtHr will! preen mierwr 
33.000 mile* A/C. All elertrK*. 
ran iw Oo dper a. On b oard 
rmnpmer Etnflnn c onditio n 
Cl 0.000 Tel 01 949 7727 


-V rep. ArrlK blue 
Superb rondUMn 88.000 mb 
New TRX-v mot JW Com- 
panv car form sale £5-950 
06063 3683 >w/e 6 even 


SZOl A Rep. Mewl Me Burgundy 
DS«74Bir lsd. Central Lock 
SST MDS Car twlieni 
rand man J'iiJJl'jS? 

82B2 (Ol or 01 348-8893 (HI 


BMW 

AUTHORISED 

DEALERS 


BJVLW. WANTED 


MWiI imlanl valiauom Na- 
nonwtde Cau Joftn Bmim 
now. On 104621 23466 


PORSCHE 


IU 2*2 sport OuMMMHng .... 
diUon irttrH be viewed lo be 
appreclaird. ppee £8600 ovno 
TW. 1 0022) 684459 

Cvn/WkemN 


MI Targa Sport* 1984. W 
melailir/nvalrnino mierior- 
new ivreN 47.000 mHes. ftiu 
C2O.3O0 Tel i Hens) 076389 
226. Office 0223 69237 


-- Aupu&l 8S Wtule will* 
burl. Mainer 11.000 lull 

soer uk am remd i Ptoneec 

1W> filfl 

CTgMB 061 oTO 5404 T 


BMW tm 1986. ABS. Tun path, 
rsif rrrarro seat*. B la u pi m dl 
vim-c. ->o- 

tl O.S75 Tel- 0276 29377 


ynw a rra. Metalbr oainl. Hr 
reo. kinrod. VCC. -Car Phone 
optional Exrel^nl vrfue 

CcxSOO Tei (08271 B73220 


7 is! sc 1 982. absoluwtor wpjrt. 
inc romouler. AB&. 
rietattt on enuum' C8.8O0 ™ 
olferv Maldon 785S81 T 


GZS CS*» 1983 A red. 40.000 
rndtS-rSM ^l r 7 

nor CI0.900 Tel OS9273-2B' 


S 23 I; ] 083 40.000 mb- only 8U 
ver bn maru laic Man* ‘E*"* 
C3.306 0733 Over) 683072 


323 l Cabnolri 1982 X Henna 
Rrd will) AninracitP rioin 5 
vpeed .PAS Elef vv'nclows. slf 

ren Altov* HWW !•««« 
unn nM Foil BMW tUM 
LoivoMOT Exrenenl rwxbwwi 

17W1 0428 712833 Sun T 

83S CSIA MW rood C™glg 

Brtw< ml Pei no 98- Bl* 
T/WMBd saanic wr»*«» *•} 

rter C7.6S0 MW Trt. 01 2« 
Jl >6 day 4 01 M2a 

BMW BIB lertrt. v rea ww n 

mime ux. 1 awyr. in e«cliefB 

. SS!”&iSS 0 tS lfc S.’^« 

7482 

MfviCAIUUOLETmv 1985 A1 

Pine While. Awmaole InHetj* 

omr h 4Mb. TRX •INTO- Jo 

rSSi? 15vOpO 

mum tl O.MO 0084 6C104 

CJ.995 Tel 01 349 SOW • 

waigtftg 

5^30 th'STSSwoTt 

n« I umlal NUtmol 198* 

^.'irSSJSw" 

Rare 3 Spvl >14" AJI llte [VlW 

?sii Biw »«= •*»; it 

mu «20 whik* y?.UQp 

r.4 SCO 0900 667442 

mmm ml |W flUlMS. M*C Up to 

cTwa- no* (MwvyjM 

bKWIvwre bderear 0978 380909 

73SWS/C 1984 FlOl spenNM 

vile TW 09574 53888 
n> unrt - Ail mooeb to or 

■— ^ • •• 



Ml Turbo 1986 (Apnli. 
WhUe/red leal hot FSH. LSD. 
1,300 imUv. Olltn over 
C43.760. Tel >04841 642205 
(hi or (0484) 54 S 


Ml Carrera Soon Couor. See- 
lember 85. 9.900 mtv Meieor 
mmalHr orev. POM. saTJM. 
Obi 941 3868 ar 01969 9955. 


911 Carrera Sport Targa. bUrk 
1986 (Ci SSOO -miles LSD. 
PDM. FSH. dr Mint Orar val- 
ue CS6.4SO Tel Ol 361 6461 


MM Manual 86. Red. JL600 
miles A* new Many extra* 
C2O.500 MW TH. 0730 87536 


229 5 M D MtlEL Auto CP- 

wwie. Blue D Kb-, wtule ptptnO- 

run ton inusea C37.998.Td 

01 903 4448 


TUmHHDCD CabrtoWI ID 
Ouarar, ned/Red Lramcr ad- 
tohneh w»«it 8.000 mile* 
CM, 750 043 1 29 0348 Hants T 


OMMiraUMMClK, We 

maim veurts wiib biwerv. To 
veil or buy Tel OL 3S8 0685- 


I2SS 944 crvsial. 8J00 mnrv 
all evlra* Cl 5.950 TH Ol 894 
5769 mriudiiM Sunday) 


44 LUX MOV 83. Guards, nto. 

Genuine 25 j 000 mue* Sunroof 
rra. stereo Porvrhe dealer 

maui lamed Supern rondiuon , 

CIBJ60 Tff ObCO 860377 t0> 
or 01 948 0168 (HI 
224 TURBO 1982 V reg. metallic 
btarh/nm rherl liuenor 
33.000 nuks (Tor moI bem 
AFN wort'. I mnwrmaie. 
C9 BOO TH Ol 577 0988/670 
3811 

(Ml X on Turbo. Hflhf nH 
Mue. Mue/masnoha leamef. 
low nuiriMr immandaie 
IhretKifioul. rt"»iyrM rlulrtt. 
C31.W5 0749 73656 T 
PORSCHE 944 Reasierrd 6/83 
Metallic burgundy 39.000 
mites WilhaUetlro* Cll.SOO 
TH 0706 857196 
21 1 SC caoooiw 83 While « jin 

Blurt Learner Intmor 31.000 

mrtev approx Semw Hw*v 

1 18 500 Tff 0536 813016 T 

911 SC soon Targa A Rett OoW 

Mel/Pa-dw SSMOidv S»«ee 

pdm Tri 

wnerlttoine 0o05 705556 
9288 II B Reg- dhn Mue. 

bwtbeiAelour uuenor Rom- 

luvmrv . air. i ouuer C25.9BO 
Tel 061 633 3901 T 
244 Guards ***■• *£**9 jPAS 
Mu 84 un roof. C14.500 
0784 260500 T 

224 LUX 81 Sunroof FSH Red 
wtlh Tan ftoin^Jlnmartsfl.. 


WHOARE 
CARFIjOW? 

W* have boon edatrilfhad since 1969 And arc a very 
ewmciMd company, wtlh a turnover m ehecfc of £4 
rouUon. numbortng among a our clients uig have 
major companies and local a uth entic # 

RELEASE THE CAPITAL TIED UP 
IN MOTOR VEHICLES . 

With one of the foQourfng schemes 

★ Leasing ■ * Contract Hire 

* LeaBe-Pusehue * Asset B erfhatfao 

Uni Jot any bimlnmn torgr or tmtdL 
Any mufcr-any modcf 


„ 0722/241 36 

Me coin be flroirif to hetp 





FORD 

CONTRACT 

MOTORING 


XR3K Nbw nodal 
UHdtr £42* pm amk 

Rbbbb ring far 
further MonwUon 

01-441 7089 


RUGBY UMION: THE MEN WHO ARE PLAYING JASON JUST FOR THE KICKS 

Argonauts not out to fleece 




B)' Chris Thau 

Rugby players arejhe mod- the rules by signing for Gre- 
noble before be was capped. 





PORSCHE 


GRANGE SERVICES 
PORSCHE 944 

Manai 1385 Cfffi Setts) &YS- 
lai Green wnb Srouti turn, 
sumaol. etetnc moodcs. Power 
asssnd MCHg^ i ai in. inter 

Undo Mandieiinn mmnty 

te w 

auaMfle 

Offared ct P18^35 
0744 25010 
074459726 


TURBO BODIED 
911 CARRERA 
1986 

Pius5tan blue, full leather. 

£36.500 ono. 

Tal Day SI 743 5434, 
Eves 948 7432. 
Finance can be arranged. 


DICKSONS OF 
PERTH 


911 1984 Monel Sport Targe 

Carrara Red. fenmxuMe. 

£23.745 

944 1385 (C) RfKC sunroof, PAS. 
Aloys. 

£17,995 

CootBCt Bob Shaw, 
0738 39993 


•2SCSU AUW. 1986 C AMne | 
wltUc. 17.000 nlto Dec roof 
Seoifen A bnuiiirui tar 
£18.250. 0S8 S8S 3694 


12* i a rm 83 Manual, white. 
ABS. maiWvunniof- aBoys. 

vfrrro. C6.78a Trt. Ol 289 

23u4 WvfH Ol 636 7385 iday' 


911. TURBO'S 

1986, deUvery mfleage 
Guards Red/Hack teanar 
GP. WMe/Bwgundy leather 
BJack/Blat* leather 
List Price. No dealers.- - 
- Private safe. 

Tet 0388 88203 H* 
0388 802703 Off Hrs 


■44 nix. manual. 1966. C. guards 
rrd. II grey ml. 14.000 mi Ian. 1 
dwiwr. c/umroar. loglampa. 
nwiK. 04m. alarm. aauiUwfl 
vrtwrh. r/wtndowv ' Cl 7.300 
TW. 0932 -45022 


[ Ml TARGA 1978. Private IW28- 
trabon number. Guards RnL 
Rnarfla 76000 itoln. FUH Brr- 
Mro HWOrv- New lyres. 
£8.750 TW 0S57 46625 (Of- 
IUXJ A 0386 792238 (honri 


1983 BBS CM Hernia red. peon 
Iraiher ufHwtsfrry. Full 6®ec mr 
air con. ABS. FSH. £13880. 
MurkWI Bros. 0480 69651 


% 1980 W. silver, full Ian 
leather Him. mam. 60.000 
OTdes New (lulrta. tyre* * 
MOT Csr rand. 2nd owner 
1961 £13.950 0209 22386. 


944 lux. manual- 1 986. C. guards 
red. li grry hil 14.000 miles. 1 
owner, r/vunroof. foglainm. 
nmnir. gam. Warm, jniitntfl 
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Woodward: still serving in the game's ^Foreign Legion” 

Whitewash stars 
stay evergreen 


By George Ace 


ROLLS ROYCE & 
BENTLEY 
AUTHORISED 
DEALERS 


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The composition of the Irish 
teams who will spend iwo days 
training ai Lansdowne Road 
this weekend for the inter- 
national against Romania in 
Dublin on November l - the 
team will be selected tonight — 
suggests that the side will be 
much on the lines of that which 
achieved a whitewash in last 
season's championship. 

Leinster’s 18-18 draw with 
Llanelli at Stradey Park on 
Wednesday did little to alter 
that opinion, though it may 
have forced the selectors to 
shelve the idea of playing 
Anderson at No. 8 — a move 
much favoured by the coach, 
Mick Doyle — and keep him in 
the second row as Lenihan's 
partner. 

Francis, of Blackrock College, 
did not look an international 
lock when playing for the Ire- 
land Under-25 side against the 
Canadian XV recently and 
Leinster’s most apparent weak- 
ness on Wednesday was their 
inability to win consistent 
lineout possession for which 
Francis must be held partly 
responsible. 

Much, however, win depend 
on the two Munster selectors’ 
f views on the form and fitness of 


Spillanc. for whom a bright 
future seemed assured when he 
made his debut two seasons ago. 
only for his form to taper off to 
such an extent that he was 
dropped for the final match of 
last term against Scotland. 

Ciarin Fitzgerald will captain 
the side and Philip Orr. the 
veteran loose-head prop, will set 
a world record for the position 
by winning his Slsi cap. 
Whether both win survive the 
rigours of a tough provincial 
season, which starts a week 
tomorrow, is a moot point. Orr 
may because of the dearth of 
experienced front-row men but 
Fitzgerald will be fortunate if he 
repels the challenge of Leinster's 
Hartnson. 

Dean and Bradley win be the 
half bocks; > Ringland and 
Cnossan the wings; and MuDin 
one of the centres. The other 
centre choice rests between Ir- 
win, the Ulster captain, and 
Ward. Kiernan would be an 
automatic choice but be has 
been missing from his dub side 
for the past month with a leg 
injury and though he is in the 
squad he hardly merits consid- 
eration. MacNeill has no real 
challenger for the full-back 
position. 


ern-day Argonauts. They tra- 
vel the world over in search of 
new lands, people, friendship, 
new challenges and sometimes 
that elusive spirit of the game. 
Players from New 
Australia, die United States 
and South Africa cone to 
Europe while French, English. 
Scottish aid Irish players 
travel Dowd Under fm- one or 
two seasons to experience 
unique emotions and environ- 
ment. 

Rob Andrew has just come 
back from Australia while 
Clive Woodward is still play- 
ing in Sydney. Eric Bonneva! 
of France has spent a few 
months in Buenos Aires play- 
ing for Praia's Banco Nation 
and his compatriot, Pierre 
Chadebeque. enjoyed the 
Californian son when playing 
fora dab in Santa Monica last 
summer. There are New Zea- 
landers playing for West 
Hartlepool, Newbridge. 
Pontypool and even Asbeans 
and two glorious All Blacks, 
Dave Loveridge and Stn Wil- 
son, bare joined Harlequins. 

In Italy each club have their 
own token foreigner, from 
Rovigo’s Gerd Smal and Rudy 
Visagie in Aqniia to Kieran 
Crowley in Palma and Paul 
Bhmdford in Catania. David 
Campesi left Padua after two 
seasons with the Italian cham- 
pions but he has been already 
replaced by a 24-year-old 
South African, Tynan Marais. 

The largest contingent of 
the "Foreign Legion” are in 
France. Players from countries 
as far apart as Romania. Sri 
tanka, the United States, 
Poland, Tunisia, Australia, 
Ivory Coast, New Zealand, 
Morocco and Argentina have 
found the French champion- 
ship a welcoming and some- 
times (iterative host. Many of 
them have settled in France 
permanently, like the former 
Romanian stars, Constantin 
Dina. Viorel Onntn, Eugenio 
Stefan and Mihai Boros, or 
the Polish captain, Krawcznk, 
who bad applied for political 
asylran. Others, like the for- 
mer Moroccan foil back, 
Jamal Benlahmar, study full- 
time in French universities. 


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Warwickshire, the cham- 
pions, are now the only county 
side in the Midlands group of 
the Thom EMI championship 
able to call ou a first-class dub — 
and Coventry might be regret- 
ting iL Coventry, already beset 
with injuries, have additional 
problems after Andy Farr- 
ington, their hooker, aggravated 
a knee injury during War- 
wickshire's match against Notts, 
Lines and Derby this week. 

Farrington was at last assured 
of a Tegular Coventry place 
when Sieve Brain, the England 
hooker, surprisingly left to join 
Rugby last month. Bui if 


Farrington is unfit to play for 
the county against North Mid- 
lands at Coventry on Tuesday it 
is possible that Brain may be 
persuaded to resume county 
fooibalL 

Since he went to Rugby, 
matches against Esher, Dixott- 
ians (in the John Player Copy, 
Nuneaton and Sheffield have 
hardly been the type to sharpen 
an international hooker, and 
Brain needs more testing oppo- 
sition. He may find it on 
Saturday when Fylde, complete 
with his England team-mates, 
Steve Bain bridge and Wade 
Dooley, visit Webb Ellis Road. 


Reasons as mixed 
as nationalities 

The reasons for playing in 
France vary as much as the 
nationality of the travellers; 
Donal Spring of Ireland 
played for Bagntres until re- 
cently; two West German 
internationals, Thomas Kurth 
ami Klaus Himmei, have 
joined a second division dab, 
Rives-Renage; Willie Jeffer- 
son, the former Harlequin, left 
American shores for a second 
season with Perpignan; and 
Australia's Peter Fitzsimmons 
has won the admiration of the 
French for an impressive sea- 
son for Brive last year. He has 
recently returned for a second 
spell with Joiners dub to play 
alongside another foreigner, 
the American lock forward. 
Van linden. 

Wellington's Michael 
Clamp, a New Zealand Cava- 
lier, has just been given the 
“green light” by the French 
federation to play in the 
second stage of the league next 
year, although the rales state 
that a capped player has to 
spend a season in the second 
team of the dob. While a few 
years ago Robbie Deans, the 
All Black, managed to flout 


Oamp's case seems to have 
broken every transfer rule. 

According to French of- 
ficials. Clamp, who won his 
First cap against Australia in 
1964, was technically rat- 
capped because, they said. 
The recent New Zealand 
Cavaliers versos South Africa 
series was anoffitial." 

Corrupt club officials in 
France would try anything in 
order to increase the gate and 
improve the flatting fortunes 
of their teams. Recent state- 
ments by the former New 
Zealand No 8. Murray 
Mexted. revealed the extent of 
the rot. But it appears that 
New Zealand players have 
over-stepped the mail. Their 
financial demands have forced 
French talent scoots to look 
elsewhere. South .Africa, iso- 
lated by politically inspired 
boycotts, seemed the ideal 
recruiting ground. 

A trickle turns 
into a flood 

With the French unable to 
lour the Republic. South Af- 
rican players have been 
particularly keen to measure 
their strength against the 
Latin players within the 
highly competitive French set- 
up. Yet an operation based 
more or less on (be initiative of 
the personal contact of some 
French club official has taken 
suddenly epidemic propor- 
tions, (hanks to the initiathe 
of Hughes Henry, the Franco- 
South African coach of the 
French dub, Plaisir. 

Last season there were only 
nine South African players in 
France. Since the beginning of 
this season the trickle has 
turned into a flood. There are 
now 34 Sooth African players 
in France in the first, second 
and third divisions. They have 
become the largest single 
battalion of the "Foreign 
Legion" in French rugby. 

Giant lock forwards and 
No. 8s are the most sought 
after but beefy South African 
props and high-scoring kick- 
ers are also welcome. Bob 
Bolus, the stand-off half of 
Western Province, who has 
joined Nice, and Philip Kilroe. 
the 6ft Sin Transvaal lock 
forward, who has arrived in 
Aurillac, are the newest 
recruits. 

The South Africans arrive 
in Luxemburg on a cheap 
flight reserved for youngsters 
under 25 and are picked up by 
a representative of Hughes 
Henry's travel agency. 
Stemark. “French players are 
too greedy," the entrepreneur 
said in a letter addressed to 
South African dubs. u Recrait- 
ing from abroad is therefore 
regarded as providential by 
some dobs." 

Despite all evidence, there is 
nothing sinister in the whole 
operation. What South Af- 
rican players want Is just a 
workplace and a club to play 
rugby. They are not demand- 
ing money. 

“They are not mercenaries," 
Mr Henry said in a recent 
interview. “We offer them a 
chance to come and enrich 
their playing experience. Two 
of my players, Symmonds and 
Coetzer, work on a farm for 
about 5,000 French francs 
(less than £500) a month. 
“There are not many New 
Zealanders willing to come 
and play in these conditions " 


Gray aims to break Welsh mould 


By Gerald Davies 

It is a temptation, with the 
World Cup so prominent a 
beacon in the distance, to 
consider all the scattered de- 
ments of the season in the light 
of what is to come in May and 
June. 

Each game of a representative 
kind assumes a significance, 
often ponderously so, for the 
player, which it otherwise might 
not have: it is too early to allow 
a momentary slip by the estab- 
lished player to raise questions 
as to bis suitability for that 
competition. There is an ur- 
gency. largely superficial, to 
establish the credentials of a 
national squad for a tournament 
which is still seven months 
away. 

Players will emerge naturally 
during the season. That Tukak) 
should score all those tries 
against Japan simply confirms 
the high opinion that was al- 
ready held of him. 

Conversely. Underwood 
barely saw the ball at Twick- 
enham. He was allowed to stroll 


the live-long sun-kissed turf all 
afternoon, but everyone knew 
from other days, not in an 
English jersey especially, wbai 
he can so brilliantly do. By the 
end. straining at the leash, he 
was finally let loose to score the 
kind of try ihaL because of his 
exceptional gift, is expected of 
him. To score the try mattered 
to him: that the ball took so long 
coming mattered more. 

Glen Webbe. of Bridgend, 
who is in such devastating form 
as to make old stagers dewy- 
eyed and star-struck, is in a 
similar category and suffers the 
same ills as does. say. leuan 
Evans of Llanelli No, the 
debate in any of the countries 
should not be about the players. 

To highlight the wing three- 
quarters is no sentimental prej- 
udice of the dreamer. It is 
simply the furthest point away 
from the narrow, confined cor- 
ridors down which so much 
rugby is currently being played, 
with its obsession with 
scrumaging and the ugly dumps 
of mauls. 

Rucking as such, where the 


ball " emerges swiftly, hardly 
exists. Robin Chilcott. after last 
Saturday, is unlikdy to recom- 
mend, despite what might 
appear to be the shortcomings of 
the Japanese, to presume that 
they can be scrumaged off the 
park. They will soon come to a 
dead end- 

There must, of necessity, be 
other aces kept up the sleeves. 
Wales in 1984. when Australia 
scored a push-over try against 
them, found that not only their 
pride was dented but that then- 
whole uciical approach col- 
lapsed. In the intervening cou- 
ple of years the lesson, or so it 
would appear, has yet to be 
absorbed. 

The point is not lost on Tony 
Gray, the Welsh national coach. 
He said recently that the style of 
rugby he sees at club level is out 
of joint with what he would like 
to see from his team perfor- 
mance at international level. 

Is it possible, however, for a 
national coach, in the few 
sessions at his disposal in a 
season, to exert such influence 
as to unravel the knots and lo 


get rid of the bad habits which 
are so much the custom in club 
rugby? 

So. although the World Cup 
will be firmly lodged at the back 
of Gray's mind, each game must 
be taken in turn. The first of 
these will be the Wales B match 
against France B a week tomor- 
row- for which the team will be 
announced later today. This 
game and the trial match in 
December will be the first 
indications as to whether Tony 
Gray can break the mould o'f 
Wales' limited approach ai club 
level. 

MERIT TABLE A 


Betti 

P W 
2 2 

0 

0 

L 

0 

F 

42 

A 

3 


Wasps 

On*i 

1 

1 

0 

0 

2li 

to 

1CM 

2 

2 

0 

u 

29 

IB 

too 

HuriecjuTO 

1 

1 

u 

0 

IB 

19 

100 


3 

2 

1 

0 

43 

13 KL33 

Lecastor 

2 

1 

0 

t 

1b 

18 

50 

Bristol 

2 

1 

0 

1 

?? 

29 

50 

Mosatoy 

4 

1 

1 

2 

21 

65 

37.5 

Sate 

3 

1 

0 


?fi 

28 3133 

Coventry 

4 

1 

0 

3 

38 

61 

25 

Lon. Scot 

1 

0 

0 

1 

9 

to 

0 

Gtouaratur 

3 

0 

0 

a 

24 

47 

0 


MERIT TABLE B 


Davies lifts siege on Millfield pack 


An intriguing encounter be- 
tween the Laadovery pack and 
the MOlfield backs resulted in 
victory for Midfield' (29*24). 
' rough Uandovery missed two 
penalty chances near the posts 
in the dosing stages. The 
match, refereed by Clive 
Noriing, was watched by a crowd 
of around $00- 

Uandovery opened the scor- 
ing with a fine try by Rogers, 
their hooker, which Wiliams 
converted and it was during a 

period of intense pressure on the 
Millfield line that after they 
had conceded a strike against 
the bead, Davies intercepted to 
score a spectacular try for 
Millfield. It was 12-12 at the 
interval, though Millfield'* doss 
outside the scran proved de- 
cisive in the second half. 

Sedbergb with only two old 
colours back, lost to a strong Old 
Boy's side, before beating St 
Bees ( 1 8-4), Newcastle RGS 
(I4-3L and drawing creditably 


Schools Rugby by 
Michael Stevenson 

through some immensely brave 
and dedicated tackling. They did 
not fair so well against Lan- 
caster RGS. Sedbergb lost (16- 
3), thanks to some excellent 
forward play and enterprising 
running from Lancaster's backs- 

Sedbergh were the first side to 
extend Bradford, whose latest 
victims were Cowley (41-7). 
They scored eight tries to one, 
ind mting a penalty try and four 
pushover tries. Boagaad Mitch- 
ell, in the Bradford hark row. 
were outstanding. 

Dulwich registered an impres- 
sive KM win on Wednesday 
against Seven oaks, though it 
was only 4-1 at half-time, 
through tries by Watts for 
bevenoaks and Pearson, like 
winners however earned a 
convincing victory wfth second- 
half tries from Pearson, Lee and 
Trams. Ponfcdonalos kicked one 


The four tourists with Lan- 
cashire Schools in Australia 
during the summer were the 
outstanding players m ttossaii’s 
3-0 victory over S ^iylnirsL The 
Smith twins and Merrick in 
Rossall pack and Mahan, the 
Stony hurst scrum half, were all 
most impressive. Victory came 
through a second-half penalty 
from Paget, but Sconyhurst 
pressed towards the end and a 
crucial penalty was misted. 

CoHe's have made a splendid 
start to the season, winning their 
first five matches and amassim; 
180 points in the process. Their 
enterprise is reflected in their 
wide margin of victory against 
Dartford GS (51-4), ami St 

Ohve's. Warpington (46-0). Ev- 
ans. a flanker, is their top scorer 
with 40, while Dennard, their 
centre and captain, has 26. 

Led by .Griffiths, the England 
Uoder-16 No. 8 who scored 
against Italy last season. Lat- 
ymer hare taken their unbeaten 
record this season to . five 


North’pttn 

P W 
1. 1 

D 

0 

L 

0 

F 

49 

A 

9 

% 

USt Helen 

1 

1 

0 

0 

to 

3 

100 

Waterloo 

2 

2 

0 

0 

55 

21 

100 

Seracens 

2 

2 

0 

0 

20 

10 

TOO 

Gosforth 

3 

2 

n 

1 

55 

25 6GJ57 

Bedford 

2 

1 

0 

1 

21 

21 

50 

Ricrunonct 

4 

2 

D 

2 

68 105 

50 

ftasslynPk 

2 

1 

D 

t 

20 

42 

50 

wSa 

Loa Ween 

1 

2 

D 

0 

0 

D 

1 

2 

12 

21 

iy 

40 

0 

0 

Lorn Iran 

3 

0 

0 

3 

18 

38 

0 

Blackneath 

1 

0 

0 

1 

/ 

22 

0 


MERIT TABLE C 


VafeoUne 

MetPOflce 

Nuneaton 

FvUe 

w Hart pool 
Wakefield 
Sheffield 
Bffmmgiarn 
Plymouth A! 
Ml ' 


P W 
3 3 


1 1 
2 1 


Exeter 


A Ptne 
12 100 
29 100 

24 100 
12 100 

25 75 

39 50 

19 50 

54 3333 
3! 0 

15 0 

43 0 

90 0 


• Dean Richards and Ror\ 
Underwood. England jnief- 
nationals. return to the Leicester 
^ /<>[, their home match 
against Nonhampton on Sai- 
urday. The only other change to 
he team that beat Richmond 
last weekend is at flank wK 
Rob. Tebbuu renlaccs .the for- 





















































































T6 

ofl 


i 


ofE 

can 

that 

grec 

mai- 

lt 

wen 

but 

pati 

slov 

thir. 

alw 

agai 
So - 
unc 
rap 

hat 
con 
mu 
virt 
boc 
the 
me- 
jusi 
can 
. ma 

i b “ 
( woi 

» A 

4 « n 
nov 

* be 
i ob’ 


J sen 
! cuf 


. by 
ofi 
Stii 

4 get 
J car 
I Th 
* “U- 
wh 
frc 


Ajdal to confirm his Classic claim 


By Mandarin 


(Michael Phillips) 

ifident selection 


Ajdal is a confident _ 
to win the William Hill 
Dewhurst Stakes at Newmarket 
today and become even more 
entrenched as winter favourite 
for next year’s 2,000 Guineas. 

So far, his r^pntation owes as 
much to what he has accom- 
plished on Newmarket Heath, 
where his homework is said tc 
compare favourably with 
Shergar and Shadeed, as it doe 
to those bloodless victories ai 
Doncaster and Ascot 

But all that will change this 
afternoon when he will be 
opposed by four colts of real 
calibre for the first time; Mister 
Majestic and Genghis, who 
finished first and third respec- 
tively in the Middle Park Stakes 
13 days ago, and Shady Heights 
and Rum boogie, who finished 
second and third behind that 


flying filly. Forest Flower, m the 
Mill Reef Stakes at Newbury 
last month. 

If Ajdal can brush them aside 


in much the same way that he 
won at Ascot, where be never 


appeared to be even out of a 
canter, we will know once and 
for all that Mi chad Stoule, his 
trainer, has another very high 
d«w colt in his care. 

A half-brother to the 1977 
Middle Park Stakes winner, 
Formidibte, by the legendary 
American stallion. Northern 
Dancer, Ajdal already sports a 
peerless pedigree. The way that 
be worked up the Limekilns trial 
ground last Friday left George 
Robinson, our .experienced 
Newmarket Correspondent, in 
no doubt that he also possesses 
the ability to match. 

Rightly or wrongly, I was not 
greatly impressed by the overall 
standard of this year's Middle 
Park Slakes so I am looking to 


Shady Heights to try to make a 
race of it with Ajdal when the 
battle is finally joined raring 
down the bill and into the dip. 
Shady Heights certainly man- 
aged to make Forest Flower pull 
out all the stops at Newbury 
where he was five lengths ahead 
.of Rumboogie at the end. But, 
unless 1 am much mistaken. 
'Ajdal could even be in a 

different class. 

Stable companion Sarshara 
can initiate a doable for Statue 
and his jockey. Walter 
Swinbom. by winning the 
Snail wd I Maiden Stakes, a race 
they won twelve months ago 
with Dolka, also on her debut. 
Their repres e nta ti ve this time is 
a half-sister to that high-class 
four-year-old, Shardari, by the 
consistently successful stallion. 
Habitat 

Jade Hunter, who showed 
some promise on his debut in 
the race that Ajdal won at 


Doncaster, looks the obvious 


word in Newmarket is 
that At Risk has been burning 
up the gallops of late; SO much 
so that her trainer. Henry Cecd 
fancies her greatly to win the 
Chevjngton Stud Rockfcl 
Stakes. But, in this instance. I 
am happy to oppose her with the 
recent Ascot winner White Mis- 
chief, who appears to have 
rather more scope. 

High Knowl. a progressive 
three-year-old who has not been 

penalized for winning a race 
confined to apprentices at York 
eight days ago. appeals to me as 
the likely winner of the 
Fakenham Handicap now that it 
is so hard to split Island Set and 
Verardi on the book. 

Ambassador’s good last run 
against Cap Del Mond was over 
two miles as opposed to today's 
shorter distance of a mile and a 
halt Pat Eddery, who rides 


Ambassador, looks to have a 
greater dance of winning the 
EBF Nursery on NoMe Min- 
strel. who beat the subsequent 
Bath winner Bataltfon far more 
easily at Leicester than even the 
judge’s verdict of a length and a 
half might suggest. 

The presence of Tartaffc, 
Lucayan Knight, Able Saint. 
King Balladeer and 1 Try in the 
field should help to ensure a 
pretty lively market with Noble 
Minstrel starting at appealing 
odds. 


Finally. Usfim is taken to 
follow his recent York win with 
another in the Melbourne 

Handicap, even though he has 
been penalized for his pains. 


Blinkered first time 

NEWMARKET: 2.0 4J0 


Mrf-Y 


NEWMARKET 


Selections 


By Mandarin 


2.00 Sarshara. 

2.35 High KnowL 

3.10 AJDAL (nap). 
3.40 White Mischief! 

4.10 Noble MrattreL 
4.45 Usfan. 

5.10 Alpenhom. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 
ZOO Jade Hunter. 
Z3S Island Set! 


3.10 AjdaL 
I White 


3.40 White MiscfueC 

4.10 NoMe Mischief. 
4.45 Night Out Perhaps. 

5.10 AJpenbom. 


By Michael Seely 

ZOO Sarshara. 4.10 Tartufie. 4.45 l/SFAN (nap). 


Guide to onr in-line racecard 


103 PZJ (MM32 TMESRMM(CDJBF)(Mra> JRyfoy] BHM9-103 
Racecard number. 


B Watt (4) 8S 7-2 


Draw in brackets. Sbc-fioura 
U-uHMUed rider. 8- 

.. Hass's 

name (B-bBntars. V-wbor. R-hocxJ- E-eyesWetd- C~ 
corsa winner. D-tSatanoo winner. CD-course and 


torm (F-taB. P-pufled up. U-roseated ri 
brought dawn, s-sfipped up. R-refcised). 
ram (B-Mntears. V-wsor. H-tiobd- E-eves 


distance winner. BF-beaten favourite In latest 
rural). Owner in brackets. Trailer. Age and 
wagW. Rider plus any aflow a nc a . The Tanas 
Private Hnntficappw's rating. Approudmatn starting 

price. 


Going: good Draw: no advantage 

Z0 SNAIL WEU. MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £5,293: 69 (24 runners) 

. MtfUa 


1W (3) 

103 (41 

104 0) 
IDS (23) 
107 (2) 
109 (13) 

111 CD 

112 (24) 
116 (8) 
117 (18) 

122 (IQ 

123 (S) 

125 (8) 

126 (141 

127 (11) 
129 (16) 

131 (20) 

132 (12) 

133 (22} 
138 (17) 

137 (19) 

138 (10) 

141 ffl 

142 (21) 


0 ABU MUSLAS (M Satan) B HanDury 93- 
. 0 CALAPAEZ (R Raoves) P Hasbun 90. 


CROSS-BENCHER (Mrs M watson-Symth)G Harwood SO, 
0 DOOOUN(CVWakarni)R .Armstrong S3 


00 FOX PATH (Mrs D MacG«ycud<ly) W Musson 53 


0 JADE HWfTSt (Shea* Mohammad HCBcfl 94 


0 KMSTA1. ROCK (BF) (Mrs V Hus-WHamS) H Ceci 94) 
LOTUS ISLAND (Str P Oppenhafcner) G Wraflg 93 
00 HLAN RABI (A Richards) C teMteki 9-0 


34 MOMENT'S OF SB.VB) (M Fustok) 14 Alans 9-0 
PRMCE BOCA (J Moons) A Stewart 94, 


PUPPET SHOW (The OuaenJW Hastings-Bass W) 
RAISE A FLYER 9 Allan) M Jarvis 90 
0 RUMAD (E Parted G Lawrs 9-0 


8AL0PARD(J Lamote) M Janus 90 . 


SHAHDJ1 (Aga Khan) R Johnson HougMon 90, 
03231 TAtRJSt (Mrs C RBad) Pat MBcheO 90 


2D YOUNG JUDGE (B^F) (Sk K Butt) J W Watts 93 
0 AGLASM(KAbchJaa)F Durr 8-11 


DOnERINQ (CaptU lamos)C Brittain 8-11 


JA R RET1BRE (3lr P Oppanheimar) G VWnagg B-11 

0 PENELOPE STRAWBSIY (D Johnson J L Gurnard 8-11 


SAFFRON UGKT (Ms H McGabirant) P Wahvjm 8-11 
SARSHARA (H H Aga Khan) M StouJe 8-11 
1985: DOLKA 8-11 W R Surinbun (9-4 jMm) M State 20 ran 



uriuM JADt riUNTtflm-/) an nor nenm cause Dy tmrxnq m bm srsjswnen tun otato 
runm Doncaster («, £2550. good, Sept 12). KRtSTAL ROCK (8TI)cxkte-<» whan 13HI5tft 
0)aiGoo(hvood(6f. £4143, good totem. Am2,7ran).IWLANFAnn-11) bannered vriien 111 Iasi 
The Groom (8-1 1)mSandownC7f. E3S1S, good toftm. Sept 24L MOMENTS OF S8.VER S3)35W 
MUSLAB (9-0) OTi to Trofcn Song (8-0) afYannoutfi (7T£96< good. Sept 18, 14ran).TAUBBt 
I mull mill liiiiiiil In Ini IiiiImiiIM 


3K0 4th and ABU 


JUDGE. 7tti last time (7().on York dehut was 
ranT®«L0PE stha&bbiryHM 


YOUNG. 


21i 


at 

2nd. 

(8-11) out of first 11 


I (71. £964. good. Sept 18, 14 rant TAUBBt (9-0) beaten 
GoodwoodtSt. £205. good. Sect 29. 18 iH. YOUNG 


£5363. good to firm. Aug21, 14 
‘ Fee (8-11) here (H. £4881. 


Z35 FAKENHAM HANDICAP (£6,108: 1m 41) (17 runners) 


201 (14) 

202 ( 1 ) 

203 (8) 

204 (5) 

205 (IQ 
207 (12) 

209 (3) 

210 (13) 

211 m 

212 W) 

213 (15) 

214 (11) 

215 (IQ) 
218 (2) 
219 (7) 

221 (17) 

222 ff) 


1-40011 
310331 
221021 
130400 
420141 
30204 
231 til 
0 0-1110 
99909 
DOOOQO 

aouno 

301142 

02123 

213403 

33023 

002198 

0-10000 


BACNCHAT <K AtxUIa) 6 Harwood 48-10 . 


CONVINCED (D) (J Thompson) <3 Harwood 4-9-7 (Sex)- 
ISLAND SET (CD) (P Moncreme) LCumani 4-94 (5ex)_ 
PLAID (A Otdfey) P Wahvyn 3-92 . 


GStekte 
— ACM 


RANA PRATAP (Mrs G Them bony) G Lewis 6-8-1 


R Cochrane 
P Eddery 


ROBBAMA (B) (9wHd> A AI MaMouri) J Dunlap 38-12. 
HIGH KNOWL (□) (K flbdUte) B HUs 3-8-7.. 


P Waldrite 
SCM4MB 


FIRST DMSKM(D)(W[ki Font HQ GPritCbteUGortfon 3-8-6 . 
AMBASSADOR (B) (Mrs P Yang) WO*Garman 3-8-4. 


— WRftt 

Pat Eddery 
. W Carson 


VOUCHSAFE (D) (Dowager Lady Beavertxoofc) W Ham 4-8-3 

TABARDAR (V) (Aga Khan) R Johnson Houghton 4-8-3 MWte 

VERAROI (D) (F QrMQ W Hastings-Bass 33-2 


9010-1 
S3 6-1 
9411-2 
S3 — 
9310-1 
9512-1 
94F4-1 
96 — 

94 — 

95 — 


TAMATOUR (BF)(H H Aga Khan) M Stoute 3-7-12 

TENDER TYPE (D) (G Tutra) M Tompkins 3-7-8 

SLANG! VAH (F Salman) H Candy 3-7-7_ 


LOBKOW1EZ (D) (A Richards) C Austin 7-7-7- 


T1VIAN (V J>) (Lady Matthews) I Madhevm 6-7-7 _ 


_ M Robert* 

• 99F&-2 

PRatakMon 

84 8-1 

-AAtedate 

95 — 

-TWft— IIH 

97 14-1 

- HMm 

95 — 

_ G Dickie 

SB — 


1885: ROSTOVA 4-8-13 S Caudien (10-1) C Brttten 8 ran 



FORM 6H. £3331, good to firm, Sept 24,14 rarrt. TAMATOUR (8-11) waTSf SS in 3rd; nattier looks 
Nwiytobe suited by the shorter trip.CONVMCeDvwfl suited by prwraBna tost mound but ia panalaad lor (9- 
10) Kl beaftng of Osric (8-4) at Haydodi (im 41. £4195, firm. 0«3, 7 ran). BLAND SET is another penttsed 
after (93)ftis we! supported II succsss over cocase and d tebm ee horn strong finisher VERARDI (8-5). 

TENDER TYPE (7-1 1) liSlbac* 3rd (£5689. mod to firm. Oct 3, 15 ran). RANA PRATAP ' 

Iasi two starts, most recently baaing Hagfv Tension (8-3) Ml at Ayr (1m 2 f. £7431. an 

ROBBAMA (8-5) dM not look too resolute vita 71 cowee and dttanca 4te behind Vet&Anilque (8-1 1) 
ood to Ann, Oct 2. 7 ran). MGH KNOWL (88) completed a tour-ttner when beatng Fote Dance (We JW h a 
ork Apprentice event (1m 41, £2549. good to firm, Oct 8, 7 ran). 

Selection: VERARDI 


improved ( 

1 20. 8 rei 


3.10 WILLIAM HILL DEWHUHST STAKES (Group 1: 2-Y-O: £39,165: 7f) 
(5 runners) 


11 AJDAL (D) (Shekh Mohamrood) M Stoute 8-0- 
1103 OENGHIZ (CD) (P Wetzel) L PSggott 98 . 


. WR 


W Carson 


114401 MISTER MAJESTIC (C) (D Johnson) R J WMams 98 . 
men RUMBOOGK (A Rfcharris) C Brittain 88 . 


12 SHADY HEIGHTS (G Ton^ R Armstrong 9-0- 


9BF5-6 
85 7-1 
ROoctoane 87 G-1 
PM Eddery 82 20-1 

. S entered «99 94 


1885: MJNnNGOALE 94) M HMb (12-1) J Hintey 8 ran 


FORM have been more anprassive in betrtp g 

on wal to win tee MidtSe Park Stake* fiw»(H(. Grtxw1?£33184. good to Arm. Oct 4. 7 ran*. GBH0MZI98) had 

final furfong and *os on* beaten a neck aid head in 3rd. SHADY HEIGHTS (8-11) ran on 

back m Sid there, inon nn zsh am of 12 to Holst (0*7) 31 


wSn&S'A^d id Forest 

71. 

« 


1-11) vats 51 further t 

.good. Oct 2). 


Z40 CHEV1NGTON STUD ROCKFEL STAKES (Group lih 2-Y-O lilies: 
£13.320: 7Q (13 runners) 


401 (2) 

402 (11 

403 (13) 

404 (5) 

405 (11) 

406 (12) 
407- (4) 

408 (9) 

409 (6) 

410 (3) 
412 (7) 
415 (8) 
418 (10) 


31 AT RtSX (Mrs J Hems) H Cadi && 


4 BAY BOULEVARD (Oceanic Lid) R Armstrong 841 


0130 COLOR AflTBT (D Mcaigre) J Winter B-& 


032 DBMCHDEUG)frfJMNer)M Toraptins 84) 
01412 8ARNET (A FOuBDfc) R BOSS 8-8 


14 GENTLE POUI U AO ION (The Queatfl I Bahfing 
O GLINT OF VICnnY (K AfGakQ J Kndtoy 8-8. 


LORA’S GUEST (J Ronrtes) R Johnson Hooghton M 
2 BBSS STORM BOD (BF) (J Mabee) M Stoute B-8 
121 HONTBIANA (D) (H Morrtss) Q Wragg 8-8 


01 SUKERTA(iq(K Abdula) W Hem 8-8. 
1 WMIE MISUHKP (J BodMi) L Cli 
00 ZU2A (Hoktato Ltd) P Kbfeney 88 



IM&TRALTHEE 8-8 L Piggott p-1) L Curnani 9 ran 


criDM AT RISK (8-1 1)odds-on when hd Yarmouth winner over Ripe Christina (8-11) (K £1580, good, 
runm Sm i IB. 19 r»n- COLOR ARTIST, 8th m Group 3 avent 1^ nrne . prewt xafy ^8 } IW^D 



WWTEMSCMBF 

4.10 EBP NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £1 1359: 71) (15 runners) 


502 (IS) 

503 (2) 

504 (1) 

505 (14) 

508 (11) 
507 (8) 

509 (5) 

511 (4) 
514 (7) 

518 (6) 
518 (9) 
521 (10) 

523 (12) 

524 (3) 

525 (13) 


0111 TARTUFFE (P) (D 3asby) G Harwood 9-10 (7ai) 


211 LUCAYANKWGHT (Lady Hayward) M Stoute 9-7 
221 VEVRA (W De Burgh) L Cunam 9-7 


41 NOBLE MMSTREL (D) (A PaUtaon) O Doiaab 9-6 

00210 PSALMODY (D) (Lord Darby) W Hastings-Base 0- 


100 MACfOBIAN |Q (Mss E Rtac^egor] J Sha 
2132 ABLE SAINT (PrC Li) RAmsmng 9-3. 



SCattban 


312332 KMC BALLADEB) (D) (A Anderson) G PritcftartMSordon 8-13 W Ryan 

31 1 THY <P)(DrM Sofia) LCurani 8-8 RGodmwe 

010004 UICUNAGA |B) pure R HambR^ P WSIwyn 8-5 PaMEddtty 

000401 SPBDB1RD (□] (M Baxter) M Ryan 8-4 PRaM n aon 

334130 BATTLEAXE(R)(CGoM) JToOer 83 WCareon 

330 BECHEMAL(R Sangatef) B HBs 8-0. M Ma 


0030 LYHX3U. LOVEB (R MiquaQ C Benstead 7-13 . 


0020 BRIGGS BUBXIERS 8DF) (F Briggs) WJarvte 7-7- 



1885: SYLVAN EXPRESS 7-13 G Carter (4-1 lay) P Mttttefi 17 ran 


FORM ar.wn«i 

LUCAYANKNUHT(94)}ft 
MtNSTRB.(9 <Bea3V IVtlO 
Wm, 6lh to useful j 


11) n at Ascot (71) an tana 
L £7644. good. Sept 30. 


.firm.! 


r winner over BattaBon (94)). wirnwr steca^7f, £2794. 


i test time. | 


^01^firm?^ 5 l? , fe ranuSl^SkGA (StSdU ostium ttarac^fdalengB 
ffl-3) at Hamilton (Sf. £2007. good. Sept 30. 9 ran). 8PBBDHHD (8-1®’ want 31 duraf I 


. D07.godd.f 

(71. £2371, firm. Seri 26, 11 

Selection: I TRY 


ran). 


Rose Reef 

L5ranL 
NOBLE 
I5mg. 

baa" ' ‘ ----- 

Wat 

_ whon 2!48ite 
went 31 dear of Pharaoh Blue (84) at 


4j 45 MBEOURN HANDICAP (3-Y-a £6^72: tin) (12 Turners) 

008800 PRINCE reCADHJjQ (Dr C Emmereon) W Hsigh 9-7 

401330 MGKT OUT PERHAPS (CD) (E Motet) GWkagg 92 

000004 sn* TIBS OtC OUT (P Goutandrls) □ Lakig 9-1. 


602 (1) 
604 (12) 
606 (8) 
809 (11) 
610 (7) 


611 
812 (3) 

618 (9) 
817 (Q 
618 

619 (10) 
621 (2) 


012-000 NATIVE WIZARD (B)(BA>-Maktoua) H Thomson Jones 8-13. 

22840 POP THE CORK (MreMCaUhsn) Ml Rands 8-11 

112230 TURFAH (P) (H At-Maktoun^ P Wdwyn 8-10 


.RCectamm 

Pat *•-*-* 

>• luupj 

. BT h omae n 
-Atemr 
- SCaodasn 


022121 USFAN OB (Mice A Rusal) J Dunlap 8-10. 


C Ratter (fl 

22310 STANFORD VA1E (DMT (Anglo Enterprises SA)CNatoon 88 — ACM 


300041 SUPBtnBK(jMeinmQMFN)areft»GodleyB-l- 


01-4430 CENTREPOWT(|LD}(MmP YonflJJ Bberington 8-0 . 
120000 GREATLEIGHS(D|(ABooi4Btflto88. 


0212 DOCK 3P B)(DJF)(A VBarl AStewst17-12. 


IT — 

97 4-1 
« — 
93 — 

98 — 
86 6-1 
97F72 
98 9-1 
90 8-1 
X — 
8610-1 

■Roberta •» 5-1 


Pad Eddery 
_ WCareon 


MHNa 


1X5: INDIAN HAL 8-4 Pat Eddery (132) P WUwyn 9 ran 


Jury 101 POP THE 

■taaer Wonderful ( 


Mister 

fanny's Bank 


Seteetkac POP 


somet hteg of h is old sob when 5IM8Bioll1 tyarAri Then Again (92j| 

IPTIgCOW f showed nothing hi 2 aarty season oitfngs. however 

■■■■MMcot (8f mdnT £B930l good to firm. Sept 28. 9 nfl 

^M Tha dis «j poln li ngCgHTHEPQIWT(M-Ol3!»H back Slh of than i8L£4689.0QOd 

, ■islronfllytwt too tetetocatch AHdi WBee{8-9) at Goodwood 

HfJ8r. £3317. Seri 2d. 8 

THE CORK ^ 


i at York. 1 


5L10 NEWMARKET CHALLENGE CUP (2-Y-O: 71) (6) 


1 J6) 

2 H 

4 (S) 

5 (4) 
7 (3) 
9 (1) 


03002 ALPEMIORN (Lord Darby) G Prttctad-Goidan 9-0- 
HAATIF (H AWUakteuro) H Thomson Jones 98. 


00 MARBLE ROCK (Lord H<toWdden)PMMw]ffl 9-0. 
NESHAD (Aga Khan) M Stoute 9-0- 


0 GLOBE DEDUON (lord FaWaven) John RtzGerald 8-11. 
0 PIFFLE (Lord HtttodJ Dunlap 8-11 


- WRyon «99 7-2 

A Murray — 4-1 

— Pad Eddery — 12-1 
.WRSaUus — F64 
M MBs — 14-1 


WCareon — — 


198S: SECRET WEDDMB 8-11 W Carson (9-2) W Hem 5 ran 


Course sperialists 

TRAINERS JOCKEYS 




Rimers 

PWCera 

SCauthen 

«« ** 


FWCant 

H Ceci 

92 

354 

, 28.0 

60 

SE0 

14.3 

M Stoute 

O Douleb 

56 

7 

352 

45 

15-9 

153 

Pat Eddery 
WRSuteioum 

68 

53 

481 

385 

14.1 

13JB 

GHarwood 

55 

374 

14.7 

ACM 

10 

77 

133 


17 

129 

13 A 

WCwson 

55 

472 

11J 

W Hem 

31 

237 

13.1 

Q Starkey 

44 

378 

113 


CATTERICK BRIDGE 


Selections 


By Mandarin 


Z1S Shining Skin. 
Z45 Mix Acacia- 

3.20 Peggy's Treasure. 

3.50 Kenooz. 

4.20 YaquL 

4.50 Bushido. 

5.15 Four Star ThrusL. 


By Our Newmarket 
Cwrespondem 
ZJ5 Crowley. 

2.45 Lady Sunday Sport. 
3.20 — 

3 JO Kenooz. 

420 YaquL 
4.50 Master Vince. 

5.00 Turmeric. 


The Times Private Handi capper’s top rating: Z15 CROWLEY. 


Going: firm Draw: low numbers best up to 71 

2.15 CRAVEN APPRENTICE STAKES (£1^79: 1m 4f 40yd) (11 runners) 


320200 HYOKIN(V) (Mrs O Motley) O 


ROSE'S MEMBER (G Famdon) R Woodhouse 5 
20831 STORM HOUSE (Mrs N MyeraJK Brassey 48 
000004 JALOME (WIkaiS A WBUnson Ltd) R WhBaker 4-8-11 _ 


26 (10) 
27 (1) 


034000 RAMILE (Mas A Sykes) J 6themgton 43-11 
010330 OMENTAL EXPRESS (DH4F Carr 883 
010200 PBIUAND HAWK (S HIQR Hottasheed 388 
833140 BANOUE PRIVEE (A Ckme) B Htts 3-88 
002133 CROWLEY (N HMQ L Cumad 38-3 


4491-8 SHBMNA (F Sakran) P Cole 3-83 


080013 SHR8NG SUN (Maktoum AI MakKXHn) P YYBhiyn 38-3 


7 (10) 

8 ( 11 ) 
17 (9) 
Z 7 (7) 
28 (2) 

29 (12) 

30 (8) 

31 (1) 

32 (13) 

33 (IS) 

34 & 
38 W 
38 (5) 
43 P.4) 
51 (6) 


0000 ^ HIGHLAND LAH) (B) JD Humisan) D Motley 8-11 


OOP SCAHNMG SPARKLBt (jMss D Haflsworth) P Bevan 8-11 
000000 GAHJBWA LADY W(WSpir*)T Barron 83 


400300 GLORY GOLD (M eritton) M Brittain 83 


00 afTBXBCT (P HalsaB) A Srntti 8-8 


0000 JOYCE'S PET (N RcWwon) C Thomion 84 


230004 LADY SUHSAY SPORT (T Brady) NCafaghen 8-8 
00 UTTLE LAW (Mrs S Laroymar) B ftoimond 8-8 


322020 MSS ACACIA (B)(C Armstrong) R Stubbs 8-8 
000000 MSS BOLERO (R Tindall) D Chapman 88 


00 MITRAL MAGIC (B Bal) C Gray 84 


040000 MraCDBJGHTffHMbOwanflK Ivory 8-6 
000000 PBiBREASY (4 Good) R Hottnshaad 8-8 


000 YWNNIES LUCK (GN0rthogfl)RWhftstor 8-8 


(«8 


2 

4 

5 (13) 
14 (5 
19 (5) 

22 (9) 

23 (14) 

24 (15. 
26 (4) 
37 (7) 


8100 QUITE SO (D)r0 Ward) D LWBans B-12 
00 


O40000 


2000 

4000 

0000 


I DUBLIN BBJLE(M Brittain) M I 
EASTBW PROWESS (A Hays) 




« (1) 
42 pi) 
*45 (3) 


000 

000 

040 

034433 

020200 


M UfharS-8 

FRIVOLOUS LADY(V) (R Revnokls) B 
MULTI SPIRAL (D AtWnson) 

OAK RSJ3 (J KaWane) J Ha«ane B-8 (Sex) 


OUR QMGEH (BOP Thompson) Ron Thompsw 88 
PEGGTS TREASUre (M BrWlW M aftteln 841 
PRBMMR VIDEO (K Laverick) /Bony 8-8 



3*50 MOULTON HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2206: 71) (17 rumens) 

2 (14) 019024 BOLD SEA ROVER (M Cd R Wtettar^ M H Easnrby 9-7. 
1-00000 WOHY DULL (SheBdi Mobarnnod) J Dunlop 9-1 


030000 OUt TULY (Mrs F Alan] W Jarvla 9-2 


010000 MANTOM MARK (MTS M Rati) MCamacfKI 9-1 


493000 SECUNTT PACIFIC (A Dutfiald) O Cahwrt 8-12 


OW300 MNL-V-PBtSE (iy5,V) (Lord McAlpme) D Martoy 8-12 
MWO KBlOOZ (M SMwR A Stewart 8-12 


laorao MBWBt MARCH (T BtakQ R HkdcMnson 8-7 
00200 FODETOP (C Barfoer-Lxntax) W Baey S3 


000130 ROYAL HOUSER CC)(F Lea) RHoHna t wad 83 
<” 0«0 8EflUESIRATPH D (G ftaafi W Musaon 83 


020301 OPMIM. SUNMSE (B) (A DldanBri) M W Easterby 83 
000104 HAYWAU 0LV) (D Deer) B Ms 8-1 (7sx) 
oooma OWL'S WHY (a Ormyiw BMtey 73 


003100 JUST THE TICKET (F May) C Boodi 7-7 


004 NOMAD BOXai(PSoiah)M Chapman 7-7 (Sex) 
000080 MSS BLAKE (M BritUto) M BrftUn 7-7 



398& lOBEGSFfEL (8-4) E Johnson 10-1 G Lewie 20 ran 


4^0 EBF 8JKLEY STAKES (2-Y-O fflbs: £1,736: 7fl(6 rumers) 

7 (4) 

12 PI 

13 (3) 

29 

31 (1) 

33 ($) 


O C U SHMA (Mm A Chapman) M Prescott 6-8. 

oo hclyrood (M Steele) H wtianon 83 

0 KASHAFOUHfMreP Haifa) LCunwi 83. 


.NON-RUMER 


000 TBJL M E NOW (Prwriar Racehoree Ownera) D Thom I 
ooa TRY DANCSt pi Mctetyre) J Vffinter 8-8. 


22 YACXfT (BP) (H AI M aWo unO H Thomson Jonaa 83, 


95 — 

— 25-1 

H Guest 91 6-4 
IS 18-1 
JLnre 88 8-1 


19W6 HAL-Y-IWQE 83 M Birch (94 fay) D Moray W ran 


■ RHMa • 99 F5-4 


1985: CADMIUM JWH5 M Lynch (4*7 lav) P Cota 7 ran 

2.45 MHRNBY CASTLE SELLING STAKES (Div 1 2-Y-O: £1,082: 5Q (15 runners) 

0000 GOLD STATE (J Marlin) W Wharton 8-11 — 9010-1 


4*50 ZETLAND STAKES (£684: 1m 7f 180yd) (7 runners) 


0 MASTBt VMCE (S ScyAres) M TampMns 8-9-5. 
0IV00 SAGAX (G RWanar^ Mss S Hal 4-9-5. 


oo t PADYKM (J Chancey) M Chapman 63-2 . 


322212 SHAITS CHOICE (CLO)(LORlGrananl)J Dunlop 33-0. 
248 BUSHIDO (K Abdula) G Harwood 38-10- 


030034 BATHE FLEET (Mrs M Simpson) M Uahar 3-8-7 _ 
03400 STAMMIB) ROSE (H Oppenhekner) H Candy 3-B-7 


Q DofMd 
- GSfdoa 
»G Baxter 


. Mvngham 
. RCurant 


— 8*1 
— 10-1 
— 12-1 
94 3-1 
■ 99F2-1 
74 6-1 
88 5-1 


tt85s MSHRF 33*10 A Clark (3-1) G Harwood 8 ran 


* 7 ± 5.15 8RETTAN8Y HANDICAP (£1,576: 1m 5f 180yd) (11 runners) 


232112 FOUt STAR THRUST (BF) (MIS J TtaiW)R WMiaker 4-93 (4ex) DMcKamm 

002430 PARSOtfS CHILD (R Siokes) L Cumani 337 R Guest 

204231 TUmmCiC Spence) DMoriey 33-4 (4ex) S Paries 

002210 MR COmY (Mrs B Stead) S Norton 3-8-13 Jl 


00)0214 UENMTS 7ROVE (B CeUnaon) H CeNngridge 5-8-13 
040 RaJEStWE(B Farr) MW Eaatartoy 8-8-7 


M 


B5F4-1 
97 93 
87 5-1 
9310-1 
>98 6-1 


198& HWALA LASS (8-8) GDuMeid 7-4 tav 8 McMahon 2Q ran 

flpn HORNBY CASTLE SELLING STAKES (Div II: 2-Y-O: £1^)75: Sf) (14 runners) 


10000-3 TDQMEHQS (CJD) (Mrs J Park) Denys Smith 5-8-7 
300008 T1IMM0N(CABF)(R Dawson) K Stone 4-83 
030000 MBBSTS MAN (q(DHtMaaqw Pearce 4«0 
322000 PERFECT DOUBLE (P Tafiadc) W Pearce 5-7-12 


March — — 


CHUMCY SUPREME (C fitohoney) M W Eastarty 8-11 

COO® MESSAGE (T Ramadan) RSimpien 8-11 

P®TAINUJ)(C Duke) WVWwrlOri 8-11 
TAHARD (J Goorfl H HoBnshead 8-11 
DEAR GLENDA (H GfBin) M Pip* 


004000 PBITWVCCHM(RazzeDOlDiata)Elndsa 3-7-11 (5ex). 


LCbamocfc 
■ C Dwyer 
. NCariWa 
_ A Proud 
_ JQtrinn 


88 8-1 
9510-1 


9212-1 
95 — 


1965: JACK'S ISLAND 3-8-5 M Bkch (4-1) C Brittain 10 ran 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 

Wham Runnsrs Par Cent 

9 17 529 G DutfWd 

5 17 47.1 S Perks 

8 23 348 DNidraCs 

19 67 28.4 E Guest J 

12 _47 ... .25,5. . M Birnh 


JOCKEYS 


Wsmm 

Runners 

Percent 

42 

242 

17.4 

18 

144 

12L5 

19 

172 

11.0 

7 

65 




— . 

— jn*.. 




****** SL 



Lucky Ring (right) bolds off tbe late attack of Then Again ia the Rfcard ChaHettge Stefas 
at Newmarket (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 


Starkey collects seven day 
ban in Then Again inquiry 


By Michael Seely 


GrcviUc Starkey was yes- 
terday banned for seven days for 
bis careless riding of Then Again 
in the Ricard Challenge Stakes 
at Newmarket. After the 11-4 
favourite bad come home 
strongly 10 finish second to 
Lucky Ring, there was a 
steward's inquiry and an 


objecLion Steve Cauibcn. the 


jockey on Homo Sapten, to both 
Then Again and Sarab. who 
finished third. 

Cauthcn’s protest to Sarab 
was overruled but the jockeys 
objection to Then Again was 
sustained. The favourite was 
disqualified and placed lasL 
Starkey's sentence will ran from 
October 25 to 3! inclusive. 

Britain's senior rider can have 
few complaints about his sen- 
tence. Tbe camera patrol film 
showed every detail of tbe 
incidcnL After restraining Then 
Again at the rear of the field. 
Starkey moved up quickly at 
half way. He started to ride his 
mount with his whip in his right 
hand. Then Again veered 
sharply to the left, badly 
hampering Homo Sapien and 
also causing interference to 
Anon Laser and Sarab. 

Inside the final forking 
Starkey put down his whip, but 
tbe damag e had already been 
done. In a driving finish Lucky 
Ring won by a neck. Sarab 
finished 1% lengths away in 
third place with Homo Sapien 
fourth. 

Although this was Starkey’s 
first suspension of the year it has 
certainly not been his lucky 
season, with yesterday's dis- 
qualification following hard on 
the heels of the decision to 
replace Guy Harwood’s stable 
jodcey with Pat Eddery on 
Dancing Brave in the Pnx de 
PArc de Triomphe. Starkey has 
been one of the most skilful and 
strongest jockeys in the country 
for many years, but his cardinal 
weakness has always been his 
inability to use his whip effec- 
tively in his left hand, and that 
was the principal cause of 
yesterday's trouble. 

Luca Curnani, Then Again's 
trainer did not consider that 
Starkey had been to blame for 
the three-year-old's defeat “It 
was not Grevilte’s fault that he 
got beat,” he said. “The horse 
needs to be covered up and he 
was badly drawn on tbe outside 
at eleven. He took a pull after 
the start and tried to track 
Caothen, but when he was not 


going well enough he had no 
alternative but to go after the 
winner. Then Again had seen 
daylight too soon. 

“I think that Then Again has 
run the finest race of his life, but 
wH have to see how he comes 
out of it before deciding whether 
to send him for the Breeden' 
Cup Mile in Santa Anita.” 

Whether Then Again was 
unlucky or not. Lucky Ring still 
deserves every credit for a 

plucky, and wclLdcserved, vic- 
tory. Dick Hearn's four-year-old 
has now found the form that saw 
him win four races last season; 
including the Kiveton Park 
Slakes at Doncaster. 

Carson was in sparkling form 
throughout the afternoon, as the 
dynamic Scotsman landed a 
787-1 treble on Print, Lucky 
Ring and Prelude, who com- 
pleted a personal double for 


training outer and has now 
saddled Jl 


Results page 32 


Hem when carrying the Queen's 
colours to victory in the Park 
Paddock Stakes. 


Lord Porehester. the Queen’s 
racing manager, was also 
pleased after Print had justified 
6-4 favouritism in die A R 
Dennis Stakes. William Has- 
tings-Bass has now placed Print 
skilfully to win three races in 
succession. “We might send him 
to Rome for the Premio Umbria 
on November 16, if he takes this 
race well,” said the Newmarket 
trainer, who added that Cyrano 
De Bergerac has now recovered 
from his injury to his knee and 
that the colt win now be trained 
for the top sprint races in 1987. 

Earlier in the afternoon Lester 
Piggon had caused one of the 
major surprises of the day when 
Bryn Crossley had ridden Lady 
Bentley to a narrow victory over 
Zaizoom in the first division of 
the Chesterton Maiden Stakes. 
Tbe 50-year-old maestro has 
made a magnificent start to his. 


winners, 28 m Brit- 
ain and three in. Ostend. "She 
won pretty comfortably and 
could make a decent RBy next 
year” he said: 

The latest news on Saturday's 
Dubai Champion Stakes, , for 
which Sure Blade remains 
favourite at 2-1. is that Tony 
Cruz, champion jockey in Hot* 
Kong, is to ride Triptych, Pat- 
rick Biancone's filly, who fin- 
ished so strongly when thud to 
Dancing Brave in the Arc. ■ 

Yesterday the Jockey Oub 
issued its reply to the Herman* 
Betting Levy pleas that the 
punters interests should be 
considered paramount if the 
proposed five-day entry system 
is adopted. Louis Fre ed ma n, die 
chairman of the working party, 
said at Newmarket: "The only- 
way that the punter may k«e out 
slightly is that he will not know 
so much about the following ■: 
weekend's racing when be reads 
the Sunday paper. But aft the big 
races, mdudiag most of the 
major handicaps, will srifl dose 
early. And well also took, at the 
problem of Saturday handicaps • 
at the big meetings, pankularly 
during the jumping season.” 

The Levy Board also called 
for the ovcmyht declaration of 
jockeys. Christopher Foster, sec- 
retary to the Jockey Club said, 
There was nothing in the terms 
of re f ere n ce of the Freedman 
working party about this sub- 
ject However, broadly speak- 
ing. the Jockey Club are in 
favour of the idea and are going 
to study it dosdy. But there are 
a great many problems which 
would have to be ironed out 
first.” 


Trainer Clive Holmes has 


decided to appeal against the 
tis Hot Twist in the 


defeat of his 
Hove Three-Year-Old Novices 
Hurdle at Plumpton on 
Wednesday. 


All weather discussion 


The Stewards of the Jockey 
CW> and the Horserace Betting 
Levy Board have agreed ftar 
discussions should be initiated 
wit h intere sted parties wishing 
to construct and Invest in aU 
weather tracks. 

In particular tbe discussions 
w iu fo cus on the applicants' 
fixture requirements, arrange- 


ments for both internal and 
external financing, and the type 
of racing to be staged and the 
services to be used. 

The decision cooks as a rente 
of encouraging responses from 
the racing and beokmakfag 
industries to General BlackerV 
Working Party report oa afi 
weather tracks. 


MARKET RASEN 


Selections 

By Mandarin 
Z0 Eternal Dancer. Z30 Hamloul. 3.0 Doroni- 
cirm. 3.30 Mossy Cones. 4.0 La Rose Grise. 4.30 
J-J-Henry. 5.0 Rapier Thrust. 


Going: good to firm 


2J> NORKMG GARAGES SELLING HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£930: 2m) (18 runners) 

3 0-10 FWALE SEPT fCJI) H Rnmtin B-yi.g Mltenxr 

7 TWO GOLD FLOOR InjMIfracley 9-10-12 

« euam Amm * hCWtt — jmS ££ 

10 243- PEBBBi WWCE C Bnwwy S-IO-i Q . ... HPHw 
12 PBB- HISHG aOVat BON BP J Retell 8-103 


12 S SBBg^ ^*T - 

I r 

21 OQO- JARALL3RJ RtecM 6-10-4 

22 P43 LEPENCiBJ Carden 9-10-3 „ _ 

24 AGP MESA KBffijp Bern 7-1(W ZTtWM 

28 30U rLLTMEAMBODYKMoraan 4-10-2 KRyn<7) 


28 .030 CM14te 3MRtJUS C Hwte^£l03. 

30 02-4 SMEET BOSS Rex CMN4-1M 

31 OOPO DEMON KHGJTTma 7-103. 

32 OOP) FLORENCE (CJ0) K Wtegrove 10-103. 

3-1 Ftnak) Sept 9-2 Eternal Dancer, 5-1 Goto Hoar 

6-1 Debbies Prince. 7-1 II Take A Melody. 9-1 GdSSioIt ' 


196S: CALMACUTTEH 8-9-1 2 P Holey (3-1 tav)C James 13 ran 


PTock 


Z30 FOGA SHOPRTTB4G SYSTBM JUVENILE 
NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £2£26: 2m) (12) 

2 2121 UPTOWN RAN0B*S(D)G Moore 1M_ 

3 1 MASTER LAMB OR Uss S Ha0 10-13- 

4 11 QUARHATALAMMHEflaBrtwin.il n n^w— 

5 DANCING TOM TFaHustlD-fO CFMm 

HAMLOUL KBsBm 10-10 tfrTDnaon Jam 

MAX CLOWN F S Jackson 10-10 SJCfflS 

DUIQ?S CHOICE H wung 108 KStote 

KLAXO N HOH M Ran Cana 103 p Baton 

NffrAPBOgai Denys Smith 105 CGnal 

SCMTUATOR C Boon 1M M Dwyer 

KASUJL Harris 10-1 jahK* 


PATCHOULI'S PET W Items 10-1 . 


W Monte 


9-4 Master LMrtb. 75 Quarrat AI Am, 4-1 Harriott 
5-1 Upto wn Randb s, 8-1 Ftetotna‘8 Pm. 10-1 SOnttbtor. 
198S: BLL1D0R 103 C Hawkins (20-1) N Cnmp 17 ran 


3-0 N0RK1NG ALUMINIUM HANDICAP CHASE 

(£3,017: 3mX4) 

3 i3t Late might extra (q k Batey ummj 


5 Pill DOROte CUM G R etards 7-ll-4aH).. v P Tuck 

8 ^ Tb^ViLTriia^S: 

10 4W* SALDATDRE (t^ 8 ^tard 5-103 r , T , Hr T Mow* 

33-1 SMcfiore?^ WLateNt 8 ht &».*■! Master TeraeL 

1S8& No cormpondteg race 


130 VIKING NOVICE CHASE (£1,831: 3m)(9) 

1 2121 BOSSY CQIteS ff»W A Stephenson 7-1B-7 RUab 

HrSAndms 

HD««te4 


8 PP3- MUXLOW Mrs R WBtame 6-11-9... 

9 /02- NOBLE F LYER C Bravery frll-9 numM 

11 U SEA LHIO ffth P Baawnoru s-li-9 PAFenBie 

13 433 TBE ROBBS R Tate 

14 0M THESEUS JBwIafl 9-1 1-oL, DDuS 

15 343 W8E W1LLMM J U BratSov iSST’ Q 


17 22-4 SANDYLA (B) D Thom S-ri-6 


’St® ™* am ' "3 Stetoyta. 7-1 
P^seus. t#i others! 


« TOGA INTERNATIONAL NOVICE HURDLE 

(£1.854: 3mX17) 

3 «W1 GALAWOOO^JItoton 5-71-4 D 


-214 UTTLE KATwSal (BF1 W KaMp 5.1 u a * B SMte— 
9 am 8-11-2- MteaCJ 


Jl ^ Hm j -BBSC£=5 fES 

!2 31 Finjorato 5-1 V2 Hhqw 

l i BSisassagBa. — «i=' 

8 £ EaSMse^aaiTfiaa 


NARMBJUMAUrsSBraSTlfil 

^ 5-10-11 I 


02- OLD MEQ C J Bel 4-t 


Mr R Monte 
- MrTNoei 
SEMtW 


1S65: VINO FESTA 6-11-4 0 Wla i u (5-1) R Peritim 17 «■ 


NOVICE CHASE 

(Amatetfs: £1^40; 2mXlO) 

I 311 •M-NBMRY (0} P Bmanont 7-12-9 

I I ■aaEmmagysw 

1 SS aSBIS'j&iir- 

a LM ~— — — — MtesCJ 


8 043 SWEET STREAM V7ftot5psan7-n 3** CS *™ tl,n ^ 

MTHeewoonM 



raa. no rnmopunluu race. 


awlf NATI0NAL HUHT "" *** (E1.W* 

Snasttlftn-ra- Mtea S YMtey Q) 


8 

9 

15 

18 

20 

22 

24 

25 
27 
29 


30 


0- 


31 

32 

33 
36 


"MSHAW wood p 

Si^-"r r 

sssassstar — 


198& OUJ FORD TAVERN 4-103 ltS3unt(S. 

10 ran 

Course snecislisk 


s \ 





it- • 


V" 

rti'll » 



•a? . 

li 







;> -Ci 




.So\ 


--v.ra 



Oonys Sntito. 10 hdnr4CMC* 

^ wrrrorsirom 16% 78 lSrirteei GQri&^ 


) 







THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 





• " i h i. 

V ‘ * 




» SO VO 



lux I 


inquit, 






• , VV-. 


K*r discuss® 




r: 

. » ■ T 1 " 1 **' 

1 

. .,1.V 
• r :.. wfv - - 
f-i* 
9 1 


r V. » — * 


t •; • • - 


j^gt Butcher cetehr ^tes the centenarian given a new lease of life by artificial resuscitation 

sticks have never been jollier 


SPORT 


31 


M any people would be 
mcbned to scoff at 
"Jen s hockey if the 
players did net wield 
sticks. Km •*? ho S5 ItthaMooking 

S2S«*S t J e knees" 

image and the notion that it was a 

SSL&F*. womeT^ii^to 

the OK^S? 0 ®!^ 01 Brilain wo® 
IBe Olympic bronze medal two 

JSR 3* Art it has bento r&t 
Aarciurf this £**5 

^ !ij® bnd have had 
weir , best-ever Worid Cup by 

reaching the last four. P W 

They have an even chance of 
, w est Germany in 
tomorrows semi-final and qualify- 
-mg to meet either the super-m 

W?n (S?Un ^ ^ the 

22? V IU e n m Sunday’s final A 
England there would be 
tne perfect centenary present 
™* m common with many of the 
i®* Britain has passed on to 
JJ^orid fand then seen the world 
pass it by), the Hockey Association 
were founded 100 yeans ago. There 
weresix London teams, plus Trinity 
College, Cambridge represented at 
the inaugural meeting in a res- 
taurant in Holbom, and although 
the preponderance is not so weighty 
these days, the South can still boast 
over a third of the clubs and players 


in the country, which is split into 
four areas. 

Eight hundred dubs, with 50,000 
players (there are about the same 
number of women who play) dis- 
pute their network of league 
matches in the North, South, Mid- 
lands and East every Saturday.The 
eventual winners go into an inter- 
league competition in spring, al- 
though, as with football the hockey 
season, which used to finish in 
March, has crept into early May. 

I he dub who finished on 
1 top of the pile earlier this 
was East Grinstead, 
Sussex, which just 
ms to be the dub 
graced by theEngland goalkeeper, 
Ian Taylor, and theforward, Rich- 
ard Leman. But that southern 
domination is even more evident in 
the current England squad Only 
three of the l£ Imran Sherwani, 
Paul Bofiand and Norman Hughes, 
are from teams outside London and 
the South. 

One hundred years ago it was, of 
course, a “gentlemen’s" game: and 
the considered opinion around 
Willesden this week was that hockey 
is still played by “a bunch of decent 
chaps". It isaiways nice to get a 
profuse apology altera crack on the 
shin. The element of “class” still 


roarcn, n 

T 


remains when you have a colonel as 
secretary-general of the association 
but, weighing the balance, Dennis 
Eagui takes his orders from a 
president (Phil Appleyard) who is a 
fish merchant from Grimsby. 

The British Army, which has been 
blamed for many things, is held 
responsible for “giving the game 
away. "Du ring the Raj the Indians 
were introduced to hockey, with the 
result that when the game was first 
contested at the Olympics in 1928 
India promptly won the gold medaL 

in recent years it has been the 
neighbouring Pakistanis who have 
dominated. Bui the Army retrieves 
a little favour by being responsible 
for the democratization of the sport 
when many of the “other ranks” 
started playing it during and after 
the war. And the influx of Asians 
into Britain has done a son of“Rjtj 
in return”, with Sherwani and 
Kulbir Sbauxa being two of the 
eventual products playing for 
England. 

But there is still reliance on a high 
percentage of players coming 
through the public school system, as 
the profiles below indicate. And 
Phil Appleyard admits that one of 
the problems of capitalizing on the 
enormous publicity being generated 
by England’s success is how to make 


the game even more democratic. 

“There has been movement into 
the comprebensives, which has 
been helped by the introduction of 
synthetic pitches, which makes all 
the difference between sharing a 
bumpy soccewaim-rugby pitch. But 
it depends so much on individual 
teachers being hockey players, and 
often they’re not very good, so they 
can only take the kids up to a certain 
leveL 

“We’ve appointed a development 
officer for the London boroughs and 
we would hope to extend it around 
die country. 

The introduction of the synthetic 
pitch (Montreal in 1976 was the first 
Olympics and Willesden the first 
World Cup not on grass) seems to 
have marked the turning point for 
Asian dominance although, despite 
the pom* showing by India and 
Pakistan last week — “a national 
disaster for them,” Appleyard says 
- the Pakistanis are still Olympic 
champions. 

ppleyard continues: 
“Partly through a lack of 
artificial surfaces in their 
countries, the Asians 
• haven’t adapted to the 
new game. Artificial turf has meant 
a whole new breed of player. They 
still look to individual flair, whereas 


cnampioni 

A! 


we've dragooned the game and 
become very organized, which is the 
perfect answer to individual flair.” 

That dragooning sounds a bit 
suspicious, if you think of how that 
well-organized England football 
team won the 1966 World Cup and 
did a lot to kfll off entertaining 
football m the process. But the 
beauty of hockey is that h is 
accessible to football enthusiasts. 

Despite the cynicism of one like 
myself.involved in supposed 
“amateur" sport elsewhere, where 
the practitioners make a pile, these 
players really are amateur, fitting 
their three and four games a week, 
plus training, in around their spon. 
If the game does take offi as the 
administrators hope — and tele- 
vision and sponsors’ interest is 
threatening— it could get as mucky 
as rugby "boot money.” 

But while we watched the largely 
tedious England football victory 
over Northers Ireland at Wembley 
two nights ago those football writers 
who were tempted down the road to 
Willesden last week were still 
enthusing about the “family game”, 
lack of hooliganism and that good 
old amateur enthusiasm from the 
hockey playere. And there is ev- 
idently a large catchment of dis- 
gruntled football supporters. 


Sydney Friskin takes a look at England’s World Cup squad 



lan Taylor 


John Hurst 



: Quean Elizabeth 
Grammar School. Harttebury, and 
Borough Road College. Lives at 
Ashurst Wood, Sussex. 

Married with two sons. 
Profession: Teacher. 

Special interest s: Antiques, 
woodtuming. pho.jgraphy, 

Chita East Grinstead. 

England caps: 78. Great Britain 
caps: 49. Bronze medal winner, 
1984 Olympic Games. 


Bom: December 28, 1951 ;'St 
Albans. 

Education: St AJbans Grammar 
School (now Verutam School) and 
Furzactown Coflege, London 
University. Lives at St 
AJbans. Married with two 


: Teacher. 

Special i nterest s : Music, 
reading, DIY. 
dob: St Albans. 

England caps: 37. Great Britain 
caps:0. 


Panl Barber 

Playing position: FuB back. 

Bone May 21, 1955; Peter- 
borough. 

Education: King's School, 
Peterborough. Lives at That c ham. 
Berkshire. Married with two 
sons. 

Profe s s i on: Quantity surveyor. 
Special interests: Golf , musk, 
travelling. 

CM* Slough.. 

England caps: 85. Great Britain 
caps: 38. Bronze medal winner, 
19B4 Olympic Games. 


David Fa ulkn er 

Playing portion: Fufl back or 
centre na It. 

Bone September 10, 1962; 
Portsmouth. 

Education: Brune Park School. 
Gosport Lives at Fareham, 
Hampshire. Married. 
Profession: Sates executive. 
Special interests: Cricket 
reading, squash. 

Club: Havant 

England caps: 37. Great Brilain 
caps: 23. 


Paul Bolland 


Jonathan Potter 


Bom March 13, 1964; Wsstow. 
Education: EasmgwokJ School 
and Loughborough College. Lives 
at Easkigwold. Yoric Single. 
Profession Electronics tech- 
nician. 

I Interests: Squash. 


Bom: November 19. 

London. 

E du c a ti on: Burnham Grammar 
School and Sou tha mp t on llni- 
versfty. Lives at Staugh. Single. 
Pr ofess i o n: SfaKfent- 

: Music, 


Chris York. - 

England caps: 2. Great Britain 
caps: 6. 


England caps: 27. Great Britain 
caps: 41. Bronze medal winner. 
1984 Olympic Games. 



Richard Dodds 

Playing position: Centre half. 
Bom February 23.1959; York. 
Education: Kingston Grammar 
School, St Catharine's College. 
Cambridge, and St Thomas's 
Hospital Medkal School, London. 
Lives in London. Married. 
Profession: Doctor. 

Special interests: Cricket, golf, 
squash. 

Outa Southgate. 

England caps: 63. Great Britain 
caps: 28. Bronze medal winner, 
1984 Olympic Games. 


Martyn Grhnley 


Playing position: Forward. 

Bom January 24, 1963; Haitax. 
Education: Crewe School and 
Aisager Colege of Higher Educ- 
ation. Lives at Sale. Smgte. 
Profession: Teacher. 

Special intere s t s: Temb. . 

volleyball 

Chita BrooWands. 

England caps: 19. Great Britain 
caps: 5. 


Stephen Batdielor 

Playing position: Outside right 
Bom June 22,1961 ; Bears 
Green. 

Education: MDffieid School. 
Lives at Hortey, Surrey. Single. 
Profession: Sports admin- 
istrator. 

Special interests: Tennis, 


Richard Leman 


SeanKerly 


Pta 

Bom 


Forward- 
13, 1959; East 


: Southgate. 

Eng la n d caps: 14. (heat Britain 
caps: 35. Bronze medal winner, 
1984 Olympic Games. 


Education: Gresham’s SchooL 
Lives at East Grinstead. Smgte. 
Profession: Contracts manager 
in computer search and selection. 
Special interests: Flying. 

Club: East Grinstead. 

England caps: 67. Great Brilain 
caps: 34. Bronze medal winner, 
1984 Olympic Games. 


: Centre 


^"BPO 

fonvard. 

Bom: January 29. I960; Heme 


: Chatham House 
SchooL Ramsgate. Lives at Hortey. 
Surrey. Single. Profe ssi on: 
Transj^ manager 
" "" * : Ffrns, golf. 


Chita! 

England cape 21. Great I 
cape 37. Bronze medal winner. 
19B4 Olympic Games. 


Norman Hughes 

Playing position: Forward. 

Bom September 30, 1952; 
Crewe. 

Ed u c a tion: Crowm County 
Grammar School and Leeds 
University. Lives at Dewsbury. 
West Yorkshire. Married with a 
daughter and a son. 

Profession: Marketing manager. 
SpecM interests: Coaching 
hockey, cricket, DIY. gardening, 
Chita Wakefield. 

England caps: 103. (feast 
mam rtpy a, Bronze moofli 
winner, 1984 Olympic Games. 



Kulbir Singh Bhaura Robert Gift 


Bom October 15. 1955; 
JuBundur. India. 

Frin caHotc Featherstone 
Secondary School and isteworBi 
Polytechnic Cottage. Uveyt 
Oatertey. Middlesex. Smgte. 
ptatesslOfE Computer systems 

Soeciai Interests: Badminton, 
cfate Indian Gymktana. 
Finland caps: 70. Great Bnun 
caps: 27. Bronze medal winner. 
1984 Olympic Games. 


Playing position: Inside for- 
ward. 

Bom August 1. 1962; Newport 
Gwent 

Education: Bablake School and 
Nottingham University. Lives at 


John Shaw 

Playing position inside right. 
BoncAprf 24. 1962: Penang, 


(Clerk. 

Special Interests: Cricket golf, 
the stock market 
Chita Hounslow. 

England caps: 39. Great Britain 
caps: 12. 


: Bishop Wordsworth 
School and Famborough Cottage 
Lives at King's Lynn. SSngte. 
Profe ssi on: sports trade. 
.Special inter e sts: Films, golf, 
squash, tennis. 

Cue Southgate. 

England caps: 20. Great Britain 


Imran Sherwani 


. ; Forward. 

Bom April 9. 1962; Stoke-on- 
Trent 

Ed u c a tion; Stoke Sixth FOrm 
Coflege. Lives at Stoke-on-Trent 


Colin Whalley 


Special interests: J 
Club: Stone. 

England caps: 34. Great Britain 


Bom March 8. 1941; Heswafl, 
Cheshire. Lives at St Peter Port 
Guernsey. Education: Waterloo 
Grammar School. Married with a 
son and a daughter. 

Profe ssi on: Bank manager. 
Special inters ter. Cricket ( 
reading, beer- and i 1 
Chib: Hkjhtown. 

Eng Lana caps: 49. Great Britain 

: 20 . 


David Whitaker 


Coach 

Bom August 16, 1948; 
Harpatoen, Herts. 
Education: Kitchen Boys 
Grammar School and 


I with two sons. 
Pratosskm: Director of coach- 
ing to the Hockey Association. 


, music, squash. 

Club: Southgate. 

England caps: 54. Great Britabi 
caps: 23. 


CRICKET 


Umpiring dispute 
overshadows 
Kapil Dev’s injury 

From Richard Streeton, Bombay 


Australia were unable to mus- 
ter as large a total as they might 
have wished in the second Test 
match here yesterday, though, 
with the pitch likely to deteri- 
orate. it suited their purpose 
that their innings was prolonged 
until tea-time. Australia reached 
345 after some tedious cricket 
which, sadly, win be remem- 
bered more for another um- 
piring controversy, and for die 
confirmation that Kapil Dev 
has an injured back. 

Australia, who captured 
Srikkanth’s wicket before the 
dose, rather lost their way after 
Marsh was out as soon as be 
reached his hundred and Border 
was slumped trying to increase 
the run rate. Over four hours 
Australia successively scored 
35. 38. 28 and 27. while the 
Indians' predominantly-spin at- 
tack bowled 15 overs an hour. 

Umpire Jibu Ghosh, who is 
returning lo Test duty in this 
match after a seven-year gap. 
was again the official involved 
in a disputed catch, and once 
again my own sympathies were 
with him. The Indians let 
themselves down badly as they 
argued for four minutes, with 
Snastri, the captain in K^pifs 
absence, as guilty as anyone. 

In the third over after lunch 
Ritchie's left leg was dearly 
struck by a ball from Shastri and 
lobbed to Pandit, one of three 
substitute fieldsmen at the time, 
who was at silly poinL Pandit. 
Shastri and More, the wicket- 
keeper. were the leaders in a 
joyous appeal which was rapidly 
followed by enthusiastic rejoic- 
ing from all the Indian team. 
Suddenly they noticed that 
Ghosh was shaking his head. 

Shastri and Pandit led the 
arguments with the umpire. 
More buried the baH on the 
ground m anger, and several 
Indians remonstrated with Rit- 
chie. who turned to the dressing 
room as if appealing for help. In 
the end, Ghosh walked slowly to 
consult his colleague before 
reaffirming his decision. Two 
balls later Ritchie survived a leg- 
before appeal in the same over 
and again the Indians behaved 
badly. 

The Indian team manager for 
this series is Era pall i Prasanna, 
the former Test off-spinner, who 
spent most ofhis day fending ofT 
inquiries about Kapil, who was 
missing from the start. By mid- 
afternoon Gavaskar and 
Amamath were also off the field 
and all three officially were said 
to have upset stomachs. 

India had taken the new ball 
ten minutes from the dose on 


Wednesday and Shastri shared 

it with Kufkami when Australia 
resumed at 217 for two. Marsh 
survived some anxious mo- 
ments against Kulkami, who 
again bowled with plenty of 
hostility, before he reached his 
second Test hundred. He 
snicked a catch to Grsi slip in 
Kulkami*s next over to end 310 

minutes defiance, which must 

have been harder graft that any 
he has ever done on his father's 
wheat farm near Perth. 

Border was always trying to 
keep ihe score moving but was 
undone by a beautifully 1 
ball from Maninder 
though More only managed 
stumping at his second attempt. 
Yadav was the best Indian 
spinner and shortly after lunch 
took two wickets in 19 bails. 
Matthews, playing back, got a 
ball that spun more shandy than 
any other during the day. and 
Waugh played on. 

Ritchie, the last of the 
recognised batsmen, found him- 
self tied down by the spinners 
and eventually ran himself out. 

Zorhrer made some 
forceful strokes before he fell to 
a marvellous return catch by 
Maninder Singh. 

When India tailed. Srikkanth 
look 1 2 from Gilbert's first over, 
including a hook for six. These 
runs took the batsman, ploying 
his twentieth Test, past 1.000 
runs for India. He made several 
ambitious sweeps against the 
spinners and finally paid the 
penalty when Marsh at back- 
ward square jeg clung to a low 
chance off Bright. 

AUSTRAUA:Fni Mings 
Q R Marsh e Gavaskar b Kuicanv ... 101 
0 C Boon c Gavaskar b KuSoHm — 47 

pMJonoaesubbVMav 35 

*AR Border at Mare UManMar — 46 

GM Radas ran out 31 

GRJMatttwwsbYaoav 20 

SRwaupnbVsdav 6 

+T J Zoemsr e and b Mamndsr 21 

R J Bngro Rnv b Kuftanv 8 

O R G&st c sU> b Yadav 1 

B A Raid not out 2 

Extras (b 5, Bi 12. nb 10) 27 

Total 345 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-76. 2-151. 3441.4- 
2S2. 5-295.6-304. 7-308. 8-340. 9-340. 10- 
345. 

BOWLING: Kuflum) 23-2-854; Kapd Off* 
6-1-16-0; Stantn 42-18480: YMav 41.4- 
8-84-4; Mmtadar 33-10-72-2: Snkkanm 2- 
0*0. 

INDIA: First kmings 

K Snkkanm c Marsh b Bright 24 

SM Gavaskar not out 30 

fK S Mora not out 0 

Extras (lb 1.nl>6) -i — 7 


total (1 wM) . 


_1sT 


'FALL OF WICKET; 1-53 
0 B Vangsarkar. M Amamath. u 
AzrienxJdta. KapB oev, R J Snastri. s n 
Yadav. R R KdkanV and Manlndar Smoti 
to bat 

BOWLING (to dMrt Rtid 60-18-0; GNbwt 
3-1-17-0; Matfww* 8-2-20-0; Bnrt 53- 
5-1. 


BADMINTON 

Indonesian 
stars to 
compete 

By Richard Eaton 

England’s protest to the Inter- 
national Badminton Federation 
brought remarkable results yes- 
terday when five of the leading 
13 Indonesians who had with- 
drawn from next week’s British 
Airways Masters at tire Royal 
Albert Hall were allowed by 
their country to compete after 
alL 

They are Icuk Sugiarto, the 
world cup winner who is top 
seed in the men’s singles, Bobby 
Ertanto and Rudy Heryamo. tire 
second seeds in the men’s 
doubles, and ImeJda Kurniawan 
and Rosiana Tendean, the sec- 
ond seeds in tire women's 
doubles. 

The outcome b a tribute to 
the negotiating skills of Ian 
Palmer, the IBF president It has 
recreated the likelihood of five 
outstanding finals, especially the 
projected men’s singles contest 
between Sugiarto and Martin 
Frost, the world Nal. 

Eight leading players are how- 
ever still being prevented from 
coming by the Indonesian 
authorities. They are Verawaty 
Fajrin and lvana Lei. the top 
seeds in the women’s doubles. 
Luis Pongoh and Eddie 
Kurniawan, two world class 
men's singles players both of 
whom were seeded. Sarwendah 
and Elizabeth Latief, two Uber 
Cup singles players and Suianio 
Hadibowo and Eddie Hartono, 
the seeded men's doubles 
combination. 

The re-shuffled draw has 
proved tough on tire Scots. Alex 
White in the men’s single! and 
Elinor and Jennifer Allen in the 
women’s doubles bad been pro- 
moted and now have to return 
to the qualifying rounds. 


BASKETBALL 

Brandon i 
is now 
a coach 

By Nicholas Hurling 

Jim Brandon, the popular 
American who has been suffer- 
ing with a back problem ever 
since he returned to Red Vardy 
Sunderland in the dose season, 
has been appointed coach of the 
struggling first division dub. 

Sunderland bad signed the 27- 
year-old forward from Brixton. 
tire second division club, strictly 
as a player but when a doctor 
said on Wednesday that he was 
not, up to the rigoure of a first 
division programme. Brandon, 
who comes from Newark, New 
Jersey, immediately found hinn 
self in a different capadiy, 
starting with last night's bottom^ 
of- the- table home fixture with 
HomeSpare Bolton. ' 

Brandon's appointment is 
welcomed by Dave Elderkin, his 
predecessor, who steps down af 
coach to concentrate on the 
administrative side of tire dub. 
“It frees me to get on with other 
things,” Ekferidn said. “I am 
delighted that Jim will be able to 
do tire coaching. He regards it as 
an honour. He has only been 
able to play a few minutes this 
season and they have not beerf 
very effective minutes.” 

Elderkin originally tried to 
give up the coaching job m the 
summer, but no sooner had 
Sunderland announced that 
they had lined up a successor in 
Duane Grooms than the 
American's French club. 
Gravelines, said they were hold- 
ing him 10 his contract. 

While Brandon attempts to 
lift Sunderland from the foot of 
the Cartsberg League, Elderkin 
will try to persuade Falkfric. the 
Scottish club, to part with Russ 
Saunders, formerly with Bir- 
mingham. who is wanted as the 
replacement- American. 


BASEBALL 


Sox sock it to them 


Boston (Reuter) - Boaon 
Red Sox. who won their first 
American League champion- 
ship in 1 1 years when titey beat 
California Angels 8-1 on 

Wednesday, will meet New 
York Mets. who won the Na- 
tional League title by beating 
Houston Astros 7-6. in tire final 
of the World Senes, which 
begins tomorrow in New York. 

“This ha* been a long lime 
coming." Dwight Evans, the 
veteran right fielder, said of the 
victory ofRed Sox, who have a 
history of losing tire final game 
of a series, whether it be tire 
play-offs or the Worid Series. 


“It was destiny," Dave 
Henderson, the centre fielder, 
said. It was his home run in 
game five that saved the series 
lor Sox, who were then down 
three games 10 one m the best- 
ofseven series. 

Meu. who took a lough senes 
in six games from Astros with a 
dramatic 16-inning, 7-6 victory 
in Houston only an hour before 
the American League g*me 
started in Boston, have the best 
record in baseball this year. 

Mets reached the World Se- 
ries "for the first time in 13 years 
after the longest post-season 
game in baseball history, lasting 
four hours and 42 minutes. 


FOOTBALL: DUTCHMAN REWARDED FOR HIS PERSEVERANCE 


Rangers grant Fenwick wish Smith admits to ignorance 



Queen’s Park Rangers have 
‘reTuctandy agreed" to place 
Terry Fenwick on the transfer 
list for a month at his own 1 
request 

The England defender, aged 
26, has been troubled by injury 
since relaming from the World 
Cup and was unhappy at being 
asked to play in midfield. 

While Fenwick Ires run out of 
patience, Brian Gough restores 
Hans Segers, the Dutchman, to 
Nottingham Forest's goal for 
Rangers’ visit to the City 
Ground tomorrow as a second 
reward for his patience. 

“I was so impressed with his 
attitude that ! put him on first 
team bonus although be not 
getting a whiff of the action," 
said Gough. , “He was rewarded 
for never compliining, getting 
on with the job and awaiting his 
chance." , . . 

Seger’s second warn vigil 
lasted 41 matches after a knee 
ligament injury in October 1985 
until Steve Suuon. his replace^ 
mem. ‘was struck by a copycat 
injury at Leicester last Saturday. 

The Forest manager is also 
planning a new contract for 
Franz &rr. his dynamic wmg. 
a gfd 20. whose pine pace has 
attracted the attention of major 
dubs. Can's current term . does 


not end until next summer, but 
Gough said: “I’D not vjSh until 
the last momenL I shall have 
contract talks with him shortiy.** 

• Trevor Christie has been 
transferred to WalsaU for 
£30.000 — less titan two months 
after joining Manchester City 
from Derby County. 

Christie, aged 27, who arrived 
at Maine Road as pan .of the 
£100,000 package that took 
Mark - Lillis to Derby, scored 
three goals in bis first four 
matches for City, but has failed 
in the last six games. Now 
Jimmy Frizzell, the CHy man- 
ager, has his sights on Imre 
Varadi, West Bromwich Alb- 
ion’s unsettled forward and had 
him watched in the Central 
League this week. 

• Tony Galvin, Tottenham’s 
Republic of Ireland winger, had 
a cartilage operation this week 
and is likely to be out of action 
for at least six weeks. Raul Allen 
is likely to replace Galvin , for 
tomorrow’s home game against 
Sheffield Wednesday. 

• Frank McAvennie. seems 
likely to be ruled out with 
hamstring trouble from West 
Ham's match ax Norwich, the 
first division leaders, opening 
the jay for Foul Goddard lo 


join the starting line-up for the 
first time this season. 

• John FashanUi the Wimble- 
don forward who has missed the 
last two games because of a 
blood riot m the kidney area, 
has been given the all dear to 
resume training and Dave 
Bassetu the manager, hopes he 
might be fit to return for 
Sunday's match at Coventry. 

Glyn Hodges (rib injury). 
Brian Gayle (knee) ami Lawrie 
Sanchez {virus infection) are all 
doubtful — which could mean a 
a surprise return for Gerry 
Francis, the former England 
captain who signed for Wimble- 
don on a non-contract basis 
from Bristol Rovers and played 
for their reserves at Wycombe 
on Wednesday. 

• Neale Cooper, out with a 
groin injury since Aston Villa’s 
£350.000 summer signing from 
Aberdeen, -emerged untroubled 
from a midweek reserve game 
and is lined up for his first 
division debut against New- 
castle at Villa Park tomorrow 
week. 

• Paul Franklin, aged 23. the 
Watford central defender, has 
joined Shrewsbury on a month's 
loan and will make bis debut 
against . Derby at Gay Meadow 
loinorrow. 


Non-League football by Pan! Newman 


Smith, the new man- 
ager. or Gateshead, makes no 
secret of the feet that be knows 
litxJe about the standard of 
football in the GM Vauxhall 
Conference. 

“1 haven't seen a single game 
in the league this season," be 
admitted. “When I was told my 
first game -was at home to 
Maidstone United I had no idea 
they were at the top of the 
table," Smith, who made nearly 
500 appearances for Barrow, 
Portsmouth. Midi" 


Birmingham City, Cardiff _ 
Swansea City and Hartlepool in 
a playing career that spanned IS 
years, has been given his first 
taste of management following 
the resignation test week of 
Terry Hibbiti- 

HibbitL the former Newcastle 
United midfield player, left 
because of increasing business 
commitments outside the game 
and frustration at the club's 
poor stan to the season: Gates- 
head are second to bottom of the 
Conference table with only 12 
points from 15 games and have 
the worst defensive record in the 


league: 

Hibbi 


Eibbitt hod been in the Job 
only seven^ months, having 


taken charge after the resigna- 
tion of Ray Willtie, who moved 
to Barrow. Wilkie left with 
Gateshead leading tin Multipart 
League and it came as a surprise 
to many when the job of 
manager was not offered to 
Smith, his highly respected coa- 
ch, who promptly left the club. 

Gateshead, who had been 
relegated a year earlier, went on 
to win promotion bade to the 
Conference at the first attempt, 
but this season their p ro gress 
has been hampered by a succes- 
sion of injuries. Derek Bell and 
Steve HimnsAave yet to play, 
Paddy O DonndJ is out for the 
rest of the season with a knee 
ligament' iqjury, and Dave 
Pamaby. Bob Hulse and Ian 
Donaldson have all missed sev- 
eral games. 

Hibbm’s resignation was ac- 
cepted last Friday and on the 
following day Gateshead lost 6- 
0, away to Boston United. With 
Maidstone tomorrow's visitors. 
Smith knows his start is likely to 
be difficult."Wc have a moun- 
tain to climb, but wc do have 
time to get things right." he said. 
“I will give the present players 
an opportunity to prove them- 
selves. I’m sore most of ‘them 


are good enough because the 
squad hasn’t changed much 
since I left earlier in the year." 

• Dave Needham, the former 
England international, became 
the seoondConference manager 
to resign his post in seven days^ 
He left Kettering after their 8-0 
defeat at Sutton United on 
Tuesday, which means the dub 
have picked up only one point 
from their last five matches. 
Attendances have fallen to be- 
low 1,000 and Kettering now 
find themselves in the bottom 
three. Arthur Mann, who fed 
Boston to the FA Trophy final 
two seasons ago, assumes a 
caretaker role for Saturday's 
visit from Wefling United, the 
bottom club. 

Needham’s departure was 
preceded by that of Larry Prilch-* 
ard. Sutton’s first team man-' 
ager. His resignation, for 
personal reasons, ended a 20- 
year association with the Con- 
ference club. Barrie Williams, 
the general football manager, 
has -resumed direct control of 
the. first team for whom Paul 
McKinnon, in bis second game 
since his return from Sweden, 
scored four times in the rout of 
Kettering. 


■J 


V. 



32 


SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


J 

I 



YACHTING 


< • fcAhLL'.V. 1 . 5- v .^k-w> . ■ .i"r . 


Bad weather 
postpones 


;-awaited 
grudge match 


long 


From Barry PSckthaU, Fremantle 

The promised grudge match terday that !0 
between 


■halt to the day's proceedings 
moments before the 10- 


Den ms Conners 
America's Cup challenger. 
Stars and Stripes, and the New 
Zealand “plastic fantastic” 
came to naught yesterday, 
when winds of 35 knots and 
high seas forced the Louis 
Vuitlon committee to cancel 
racing for the second lime 
during this first round-robin 
series. 

The race committee called a 

A* the 
minute warning signal should 
have been fired, thwarting 
Conner's threatened move to 
hoist a protest flag and seek a 
ruling from the International 
Jury on whether core samples 
can be taken to check that the 
glassfibre-moulded New Zea- 
land yacht complies with the 
scantling rules laid down by 
Lloyds. 

Yesterday’s programme of 
races is now scheduled for 
today when winds are ex- 
pected to moderate to between 
13 and 18 knots. 

The threatened protest by 
the Americans may now be 
put on ice after an announce- 
ment last night from the Yacht 
Club Costa Smeralda, org- 
anizer of these challenge trials, 
that they plan to hold a 
meeting for Syndicate mem- 
bers during the next few days 
in an attempt to resolve the 
dispute. 

A spokeswoman for 
Conner’s camp claimed yes- 


of the 13 
challenging syndicates now 
shared their view that tests 
should be made to check New 
Zealand I Vs weight, and 
weight distribution against the 


Lloyds surveyor's 


the seperate question of 
keels, it became dear yes- 
terday that the Royal Perth 
Yacht Club remain adamant 
that replacement keels for 
challenging yachts must be 
cast in the country of origin. 

The British Syndicate who 
is laced with airfreight charges 
of £70.000 to fly out their 
latest keel development in 
time for the final trials in 
December, have submitted 
that as keels form part of the 
bull, then a change of keel 
amounts to no more than a 
modification of the hall, and 
under the terms of the Deed of 
Gift controlling the Cup se- 
ries, can be carried out in 
Australia. 

Yesterday. Noel Robbies, 
spokesman for the Royal 
Penh Yacih Gub said that as 
trustees of the Deed of Gift, 
his Gub interpreted a change 
of keel as being more than a 
modification and would not 
be seeking a judicial ruling 
from the Supreme Court 

He did add however, that 
the British Syndicate was free 
to seek an official ruling from 
the court themselves and the 
While Horse Challenge are 
now expected -to take up this 
option. 





■•■V *?;• 




V /W 



.‘WL.Ir/'.v.f, 




• £* V. . 


. -V ’.■rfU" . • 




High roller: Dennis Conner pots “Stars and Stripes” to the test in the choppy seas which 
forced the cancellation of yesterday's showdown with “New Zealand IV” 


HORSE TRIALS 


Haagensen leads 


Nils Haagensen. who won the 
1979 European horse trials 
championships 18 months after 
commencing in the sport and 
won the - alternate Olympic 
event at Fontainbieau in France 
a year later, took the lead in the 
dressage arena at the Dutch 
championships three-day event 
at Boekdo yesterday. Starting 
first, with Skoldraans Unik, he 
set up a score of 46.2 penalties, 
which was unsurpassed all day. 

This perhaps was as it should 
have been, for Haagensen was a 
member of the Danish team at 
the world dressage champion- 
ships held in Ontario in August. 
He look over the ride on 
Sk old mans Unik, after former 
owner. Anna Hermann, fell and 
broke her shoulder in a three- 
day event which ran concur- 
rently with the Ontario 
championships. Since then be 


From a Special Correspondent 

has won the Danish national 
championship on this horse. 

Rodney Powell, on General St 
Majors, was the highest placed 
British rider. 4.8 penalties be- 
hind Haargensen in fifth place. 
Karen Slraker, who followed 
Haargensen into the arena, was 


eighth on The Wishful Thinker, 
a fin 


irther 7.6 penalties in arrears. 

Because of a number of 
incidents at recent international 
events, certain modifications to 
the rules arc undergoing a trial 
here. One of the most controver- 
sial is that a fence judge may 
eliminate a rider if he feds that 
neither horse nor rider is ca- 
pable of continuing the course 
after a fall. 


STANOMGS (alter diessagrt 1. N 
jtogeosen (Dan) acMmans 


48.6. 3. E SttJfta (ttetti) Autumn Breeze. 
48i 4. P PlaseqU (PoO vansm. 50 J; 5. R 
Powel (G B). General St Mains. 51.0; 6. 
i P Boutet 


Mfesl 


l (Ft) Mfcado (to Poes, 51 .4. 


POWER BOATING 


Good wins for novice 


It was a record day on 
Windermere yesterday with no 
fewer than eight national 
records broken in the annual 
power boat record attempts 

week. 

Andrea Chesman, aged 16, of 
Coventry, who only became 
eligible for records two weeks 
ago. continued her winning 
ways by breaking her own new 
OB Stock 3S0cc hydroplane 
record with a speed of 56.25mph 
and then setting a record of 
41.60mph in the Stock 250cc 


Stock Monohulls of250cc with a 
speed of 38.25mph. Chris 
Applebee of Rayleigh. Essex, 
became the Ernest record 
breaker of the week with a speed 
of I09.39mph in the OE 850cc 
racing outboards. 


Another 16-year-old. Michael 
Heaton, of Ecdeston, St Helens, 
broke the record for National 


Len Moore, of Sutton Cold- 
field. broke the record for R2000 
racing inboaids with a speed of 
100.01 mph; Stan Ford, of 
Bournemouth, the Offshore 
Sports Cruiser 500cc record 
with 66.76mph; Adrian Lang, of 
Blackburn, the record for Sport 
Outboards of 2000cc with 
76.8Smph; and Philip Warner, 
of Devizes, the National Cruiser 
B record with 65.93mph. 


BOWLS 


Crawshaw 
in the 
last eight 


Bob Crawshaw, aged 27, from 
WQmslow, continued his sur- 
prise surge towards the Liver- 
pool Victoria Insnrancc 
Superbowl tide at Manchester 
yesterday. The unknown crown 
green bowler from Cheshire, 
who started the tournament at 
66-1, beat the odds-on favourite 
Jim Mate, from lrrine, 7-6, 6-7, 
7-1. 

Mnir. the 34-year-old British 
Isles indoor champion, admit- 
ted: “He outclassed me. There’s 
no donbt about it. the crown 
green bowlers are now equal to 
any of us flat green men. He is 
going to be bard to beat.” 

Crawshaw came up with the 
biggest smprise on Monday, 
when be eliminated the world 
No. 1, David Bryant. 7-6, 7-6, 
and yesterday proved it was no 
flash in the pan. 

A former England schoolboy 
basketball player, he displayed 
resilient qualities throughout 
the three-set match that went to 
20 ends. 

He nipped in with a doable to 
take the first when 6-5 down. He 
came near to a repeat in the 
second, climbing from 6-1 to 
square the match but then lost 
the set on the deciding shot. 

It was all one-way traffic in 
the last set and Mnir looked 
demoralized when Crawshaw 
took a 5-0 lead. Mnir managed 
to score a single, but Crawshaw 
then moved smoothly into the 
quarter-finals. 


RESULTS: O RawSns (Coventry) at N 
Fletcher (La^h), 3-7. 7-5. 7-5: B 
Crawsnaw (Eng) bt J Mint (SCO). 7-6. 6-7, 
7-1; W Wood (Sco) M T Stdnvan (Wat). 7-6, 
7-5: i Hocson (Eng) M K Gataft (Eng), 7-4. 
7-0. 


YESTERDAY’S RACING RESULTS 


Newmarket 

iMuy good 
26 (fit) 1 -GOOD POINT (MHSb, 4-1 £2, 
toU in te ntion (R Curart, 7-2 few* 3. 


Wbbtflng Wonder (A Mun. 14-11. ALSO 

RAN: 6 Gran Jester, 9 Unselfish. 10 


Bustrate (4thk 12 Mendel's Law. 14 Rair 

4. Machess Not To. : 


Parts (6(h). 

(Sin), 16 Canebrake 


ALSO RAN: 7-2 fav Daartom (6(h). 7 

Bentea Ryder. 15-2 Norpdia MM. 8 

Mghty Flash (5m). 9 Apply. 14-1 Wfassl 
Reel. 16 Badertx*. 20 Past Gkxies. 33 

Truly Bity. Sprowson Boy, Basfuur, 

AtMttvsL Happy Breed. 16 ran. XL IViJ.U 
in, nk. W Hem at West Bstey. Tote: 

£1970: £3.70. £1.30. £3.60, £2.10. DF: 

£45.10. CSF: £78.14. TriCBSC E1.034J0. 

3min 10,92sec. 


Lyniay. Survival Kit. 20 Beatty's Lad. 

Nertso. 25 George Many, 33 Maureen's 


5.15 ( tm) 1 . NINTH SAGA (C Rutter. 6Mjs 


Csvafier, NeJ^nay, Spirting Judy. 19 
~ Madam BBta. VsL hd.2tol.1u.4LJ 


ran. NR: Madam I 

Htndtey at Newmarket Tote: £3.90; £1.80, 

£Z BO. £380. OF: £21.90- CSF: £2082. 

Inw i6^7sec-SoW 11 , 50071 s C Trader 

snr. 

Z3S (im) 1. LADY BENTLEY (B 


2. S hauleiuwi (W R Swmfium, 14-1); 

Overdrive (S Cauthen. 12-1). ALSO RAN: 

6-4 lav Vestris. 9-2 


. .. 9-2 Maocal Lace, 11-2 

Knockando. 7 Sir Jamestown. 20 


Ardasftjr t Island IOtkj («h). 33 Our Base 
Highland 


gw- 

Atance, 


50 Highland Bounty, Northern 
66 Coup de hxkJtb. Fa, 


M. 31. 51. a. M Steu» al NewmarkeL Tote; 

£130; £1.10. £360. £1.10. DF: £33.70. 

CSF: £3553 tow 17.l7sec. 

4J0(1m 40 yd) 1. FORWARD RALLY (G 
Duffiekt 13-2): 2. KnMns Secret (MBffch, 
6-1): 3. Long Bay (M Rornner. 25-1) ALSO 
RAN: 4 av Heno Gypsy (wh), 8 
tteafttaress. 9 Court lOwn. 10 Sir 

VWmore. Sharon's RoyaJe (4th). 1 1 Fancy 

Pan. 14 Zx> Pepptno. 16 Beta Banus. 

- - Try Harder. 25 Su- 

1th). Welsh Meotey. 

IR: Cottthwj. 3L 1*1. 
sh hd. %l. iUl Sr M Prescott at 
Newmarket. Tote: £650: ei-90, £1.90. 

£7.90. £1.90. OF: £10.10. CSF: £4550. 

Tncast £84655. Imn 44.03sec. 


(Im) 

y. 33- 


Cmssley. 33-1): 2. Zatzoon(T Oimn. 2-1 
tavt 3. water B oa tma n (R Street 6-11. 
ALSO RAN: 6 Dudungton. 13-2 Song Of 


Banners. Blue Grass Raid MtiL 16 ran. 

1L IKL2KL M E 


5J3 {2m 28yd] 1. AUTUMN S PORT (S 

i uf-ir.z ~ ' 


J Dudungton. 13-2 Song CM 
Sixpence (5th). 11 Gennaro. 14 Southern 
Cmntart («n). 20 Sun Fteoce. Wuiud (6th). 
251 Plpsted, Omen, 33 Arrowkmght Burly 

Native. Carpet Capers, Jane M£pie. Uy 

Mab. 16 ran. NR: Legal Bid. nk, 2L no. KL 
1W. L PogcrtJ at NewmaiML Tote: 
£27.10: £630. £1.40. £270. DF: £65 3G 
CSF: £91.43. Imn 44.45&OC. 

35(60 1. PRMT (W Carson, 6-4 favK 2 
JeteteuMr JW R Swinbum. 14-tt 3, 
Gfratondo (R Cochrane. 3-1). ALSO RAN: 

15-2 Roc* Madm. l2Kyyerda»(6th). 14 

Victory Batard. 25 Bom To Race. Green- 
sward. 33 Authentic. Peter Moan (4tfiL 
Lard wesigate. Tina's Melody (5 »il 12 
ran. KL *1. 2KI. v,l. a. w Haswws-Bass 
at NewmarhaL Tote: E220: £130. £2.40, 

£150. DF: £1530. CSF: £2053- Tncast 

£5052 1mm I260sec. 

140 RICARO CHALLENGE STAKES 
(Group Pt £23506: 71) 

LUCKY RING P C Oy_AuC»on^g - La 


NR Crested. 254L 1KL 
Francis at Lamboum. Tcte£1 29.70: 
£17.80. £350. £280 DF: £1 308.70 CSF: 
£705.75. Imn 43.36sec. 

Jacfcpot : not won. Piacepoe £13935 


McCrystaL ltf-1 

(Mr Thomson Janes. 1-3 tevfc 3. French 
HsMst (G Landau 10-1). ALSO RAN: 9 

Canassaan t5Bi). 12 Master ot Lynefoth). 

16 Country Seat. 20 Brave Mtfler. GtfOen 


Ffcjtter. Sriappa (6thj. Andy's Secret 10 
1: PatWoSow. 5l.7Lm.2l.shhd. JA 


Haydock Park 


Going: straght course, good: remaeider. 
gooa to firm 


ran. NR 

C Edwards at Ross-on-Wye. Tow. £1050; 

£220. £1.10. £270. Dual forecast £530. 

CSF- £15.07. No ofbcal Bnw. 

Ptacepot £2850 


HOCKEY 


Poor Indian finish 


By Sydney Frisian 


India, winners 
of the 1975 
World Cup in 
Kuala Lum- 
pur, were 
beaten 2-1 at 
WiUesden yesterday by New 
Zealand in the first of the play- 
off series. It now means that the 
former champions can finish 
only eleventh, which will be 
their lowest place since the 
series began in 1971, New 
Zealand can now finish ninth if 
they win their next match. 

Three penalty strokes were 
saved yesterday, two by the 
Indian goalkeeper Rajinder 


Singh RawaL He cleverly antici- 
Lions of 


paled the intentions of Robin 
Wilson in the 25th and 26th 
minutes of the first half. 

Earlier, in the 18th minute, 
the New Zealand goalkeeper 
Woodley saved a penalty stroke 
from Carvalho. All three strokes 
were awarded for obstruction 
inside the circle. 

New Zealand went into the 
lead in. the eleventh minute 
from a short comer convened 
by McLeod. Three minutes later 
the Indian forward line stepped 
into high gear and Mohammed 
Shahid, combining well with 
Thoiba Singh, levelled the score. 

In the sixteen lb minute of the 


second half New Zealand con- 
verted their fourth short corner 
of the match, Daii finishing off 
some clever work by McLeod. 
India tried their best to save the 
match but lost their last chance 
when Shahid's shot was saved 
on the line by Brown. 

Pakistan, the World Cup win- 
ners in 1971, 1978 and 198i 
will play off against India for 
llthand 12th places today after 
being beaten 2-1 by Canaria. 
This was the first time that 
Canada had beaten Pakistan. 

In yesterday’s match Rutledge 
scored twice in the first half for 
the Canadians. His first goal was 
obtained in the 18th minute 
after the goalkeeper bad saved 
his own shot be rushed in to 
score off the rebound. Two 
minutes later be controlled a 
free hit by Grimmer from the 
left and scored from the top of 
the cirie. Nine minutes after the 
interval Pakistan reduced the 
lead when Nasir Ali scored from 
a short comer. In the last minute 
Pakistan had a chance of draw- 
ing level from a short comer but 
the hit from the top of the cirie 
by Nasir Ali went wide of the 
mark. 


State of English hockey and 
semi-final countdown, page 31 


WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


EUROPEAN CHAMPKM5MP: Group 
Ireland 0. 


Fow: England 2 Normern 


Group Five: Au*ma 3. Ateania 0: Hungary 
reeca f. 


a Naneriands 1: Poland 2. Greece 
Groip See Czachostovafoa 3. Finland 0. 
Group Seven: RepuSte of Ireland 0. 
Scotland 0. 


A Pte 

0 2 
1 1 
4 1 
0 0 


Group Six table 
p w 

Czech 1 1 

Wales t 0 

Finland 2 0 

Denmark 0 0 

TWRD MVtSteN: Chester 1. Gflmgham 1. 
EUROPEAN UNDEfl-21 CHAMPIONSHIP: 
HneL drat tag: Itely 2 Spate 1. 
INTERNATIONAL MATCH: West Ger- 
many 2 Spain Z 

VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Second di- 
vision souOc Horsnam 2 Eastbourne 
United 1. Second (Svisaon north: Tmg 0. 
WotvertonO. 

FA -CUP: Third qttaifying roonct 
Workington 0. Newcastle Sue Star 1; 


Wimeome 1 Totten 0. 

GREAT MILLS WESTERN LEAGUE: Cop: 
weimgion 0 Buteterd 2 
CAPITAL LEAGUE: Pre si dent s Cup; 
First round Wycombe wanderers 5. 
Wimbledon 4 

ESSEX SENIOR LEAGUE: Cup: Eastte^ 
0. Hornsey i. 


GM VAUXHAU. CONFERENCE: Chelten- 
ham 2. Stafford 1; wedng 1. Barnet 1. 
MULTIPART LEAGUE: Burton 0. 
Oswestry 1; Rhyl 0. Marine 2 South 
Liverpool 0. Caernarvon 1; Worksop 4 
Horvftdi2 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: B* Dsflow Cup: 
First round: Cambridge City l.OunstatM 
1 ; Fareham 4. Watertoowlle 0; King's Lynn 
l.WNhngbotouBhO: VS Rugby 0.UK8S- 
ter United 0. Postponed; Poole v 
Trowbndge. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: FfeSI dhrtstao: Aston 
Vita 7. Newcastle 1: Manchester City B, 
Blackburn 1. Second tfvtsion: Bolton 6. 
Blackpool 1; Oartmaton 3. West Bromwich 
A«>on 3: Grimsby f, Wigan 1; Port Vale 3, 
Stoke i. 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Brighten 1. 
Swindon 6: Crystal Patace 1. Norwich 2 
Oxford United 4, Fulham 4. 

RUGBY UNION 

THORN EMI COUNTY CHAMPIONSHP! 
Cumbna 12, Durham 38; Hampshve 12 
Hertfordshire 26. Kent 9. Eastern Coun- 
ties 9; Lancashire 17, Chester* 12 
Northumberland 2 Yorkshire 22 Surrey 6, 
MukSesex 22 

CLUB MATCHES: AbertBery 12. Newport 
15. Bndgend 22. Swansea 22 Cambridge 
Unrverwy 15. Bedford 21: GtouceeterT. 
Bnw Vale 9: UaneM 16. Lenster IS, 
Plymouth 26. Exeter University 12 


GOLF 


Nicklaus junior’s dream 
debut vanishes at ninth 


From Mitchell Platts, Versailles 


Jack Nicklaus jun. went one 
over the eight in the Lan crime 
Trophy here Yesterday and lost 
the chance of putting one over 
Severiano Ballesteros. Nicklaus, 
hard on the heels of Ballesteros 
at the time, had reached the 
ninth hole on the St-Nom-la- 
Breteehe course at three under 
par. He walked off the green at 
Three over, after registering a 
nine, and the prospect of a 
glorious European debut had 
evaporated during a few min-, 
utes of insanity. 

There was not too much 
wrong wiib Nicklaus's four-iron .. 
tee shot at the downhill ninth 
that a little slice of good fortune 
would not have cured- The ball 
suayed in the left-to-right breeze 
and. on colliding with terra 
firma only one yard from the 
putting surface, it opted to 
bounce at right angles and 
agonizingly trickled into the tiny 
mas-made lake on the right side 
of the green. 

Nicklaus was compelled to 
take a penalty drop on a 
miniscule grassy island which 
separates the water between foe 
ninth and 18th greens, and he 
then made foe error of trying to 
execute a smart recovery. He 
had precisely 1 1 feet of grass in 
front of him, 1 then the lake, 


measuring 22 feet across, then a 
grassy bank arid then the green 
with the pin only 14 feet onto 
foe- putting surface. 

He attempted to get the ball 
dose to the hole and it proved to 
be his down&lL The ball, in- 
evitably. bit the bank and, 
splosh, it was back in the water. 
He tried again, with the same 
result, and then, two shots too 
late, took the more, conservative 
route by making sure of gening 
the ball on foe green even if it 
did finish a long way from foe 
hole. “I tried to get it dose 
instead of taking my medicine.*’ 
admitted Niddaus.“Golf is such 
a humbling game, and if was 
kind of embarrassing for mei” 


Ballesteros subsequently 
moved clear, to lead fry two 
strokes on 67, although 
Nicklaus has no reason to feel 
too despondent after eventually 
signing for a creditable 74. He 
bad showed no signs whatsoever 
of being intimidated, gathering-, 
three birdies in his first seven 
holes, and foe nine will have 
it him not to be so fool- 
iy in foe fixture. ' 


Ballesteros, too, made a fine 
start. He struck his approach to - 
foe fiisi with a sand wedge' to 
within four feet from where he 


Dashing Dowling 
earns high praise 


The Laing Classic women's 
tournament produced another 
outstanding round, indeed two 
outstanding rounds at Stoke 
Poges yesterday. They came 
from Corinne Dibnah, of 
Australia, whose 65 was a course 
record and Debbie Dowling, 
whose 66 has put her into foe 
lead on 135. II under par. 

Miss Dibnah ties one stroke 
behind, together* with Beverly 
Huke. the overnight leader (70). 
Laura Davies (69) is two shots 
farther back in fourth place: 

The leader's round evoked 
unstinting praise from Miss 
Davies, her playing partner. “It 
was one of the best rounds Tve 
seen ali season," the women's 
Open champion said of her 
Surrey colleague: Miss Davies's 
caddie, in more earthy jargon, 
added: "Debbie hit it straight 
down the slide all day." 

If that was a slight exaggera- 
tion. for Miss Dowling con- 
fessed to a slice of luck at the 
sixth, it fairly characterized her 
play. There was nothing more 
than a four on her card and she 
□ever exceeded par. 

At that sixth she played a poor 
six iron and had a generous kick 
that narrowly avoided a bunker 
and ran up to three feet. A birdie 
there was an unexpected gift. 
Otherwise she p ro sp e re d on tire 


By John Harness? 

solid virtues of accurate hitting 
and dependable putting. - 
Miss Dibnah had one fell 
from grace, a par five at the 
inviting 418-yard 12th. She hit 
the green in the approved 
professional manner with a four 
iron, but the remaining 20ft 
required three more sonokes. 

Otherwise her putter served 
her well, though a round of 64 
and a share of the lead went 
begging at tire 18th. She hit a 
superlative three iron from 187 


Britain let 
France 
slip past 


Caracas (Reuter) — Britain 
lost their overnight lead of four 
strokes to trail France by one in 
the Espiritu Santo biannual 
women's world amateur 
championship as Gill .Thornhill 


Ml a poor 77 after her first 
of 71 had. given her the 


yards to five feet. But the putt, 
dowuhil 


lilt needed only a tickle 
and h dipped past. 

Miss Davies mtot have 
hoped for a stronger finish. The 
downhill 280-yard J5fo is 
within her driving range and, 
given a generous pin position 
yesterday, she still took four. 
Thai tire short' 16th demanded a 
third putt. All the same, there is 
no hint of reaction to her 
pulsating victory at Birkdale last 
Sunday. 

LEADING scores: (G& urtais stated): 
135: B Dowang. 69. 56. 13* B HutaTeft 
70; C Dfcnaft UuM. 71.05. 13* L Davies, 
69. 89. 139: MGteiier. 69, 70. 14fcT> 


Conley (US) 6B. 71. N McCormack 70. 71; 
G Stewart 71. 70; M ! 


Scotring, 73. 08: A 


Sheard (SAL 71 . 70; H Comstock (US). 71. 
Wd. 7289. 142 PGnce-MMMkar. 


7ttDRew, . 

74. 68. C Panton, 70, 72 143: M Burton. 
73. 7tt A Mcholes. 70.73; E Gtess. 71. 72 
14* S 0i*4 72. 73; S YOung. 71. 74: J 
Soitaby. 73. 72: L Neumann (&e). 72. 73; 
S Strudwick TO, 75: 0 Hericta f 
71; M Marsttafl (US) 70.75. 


74, 


round 

individual lead. 

Instead, Britain had to rely on 
foe. scores of Patricia Johnson 
(73) and Claire Hourihane (75) 
at La Lagunita Country Quit for 
their total of 148, Johnson 
staying bard on the heels of 
Marie-La ure de Loren tzi, of 
France, the individual leader, 
who scoredher second 72. 

The highlights of the day 
belonged to Vaierie Pamard, of 
France, Michiko Hatori, foe 
Japanese champion, aged 18, 
and Kay Cockerifl, the United 
States champion, who each 
scored 70, while Yeh Wei-Fung. 
of China, had a hole in one at 
the 182-yard eighth hole. 

- PamanFs round brought 
France the best score of-tbe i 
with 142 and an overall total 
290, while Japan and the United 
States moved up on Britain on 
145 and Spain stayed in foe hunt 
with 146. 

LEAmG SCORES: Ssoond ranb 299: 
Franca. 148, 142 291: Gnat Britain. 143, 
148. 293: Japan. 148. 145. 294: Spain. 
148. 146. afetMtod States, 151. 145. 
MMdnala: 144: M-l da Loiteto (R), 72 
72 145e P Jamson (GO. 72 72 


JUDO 


Adams is wooed and won 


In what appears to be a dasac 
case of the brain drain Nefl 
Adams, Britain's Olympic silver 
medallist, says be is hoping to 
take up a job with the top dub in 
France alter bis services had 
been rejected in his own country. 

The decision has been re- 
ceived with dismay by his former 
colleagues in the British squad. 
“1 think it is a disaster." Kerrith 
Brown, foe European light- 
weight silver ■edalllst.said- 
“ Although | know that be has to 
think of his financial situation, 
there is no one In this coimtry to 
equal his technical understand- 
ing- I don't quite know who I can 
tn to now in the preparation 
for the next Olympics.” 

Adams'S decuioo is the r esu l t 
of a disagreement between him 
1 foe British Jndo Associ- 
ation. Acknowledged as the most 
accomplished judo tighter Brit- 
ain has produced, Adams is 
widely recognized as one of the 
world’s tending technicians. 
This is why, since he won his 
silver medal in Los Angeles, foe 
French have costed him in an 
effort to woo him across the 
Channel. 

Indecision over his fu ture — 
Adams retired temporarily in 
198S and made an abortive 
comeback in 1986 — delayed 
events bat it looks as if he will go 
to Paris to teach at foe Racing 


borne of 


By Nicolas Sonnes 

dub — once foe 
Britain's other judo 
Angelo Parisi — in J: 
also means that be wonU 
with foe French team and arid 
end op conch mg the top French 
players to beat his old 


It 


“Frankly, that is foe lastl 
1 wasted to do,** Adams said. *] 
pnf in proposals for involvement 
with an elite British Olympic 
sqnad and I was told I coaid 
coach foe Under-21 sqnad on a 
sessional basis. l am afraid that 
is jnst .not good enough.*' 

Bat Syd Hoare, chairma n of 
foe BJ A, retorted that foe naier 
sqnad have a team manag er to 
Arthur Mapp, the 1980 Olympic 
bronze- medallist,' and he conld 
not be sacked because Adams 

decided to retire and was looking 

for a job. “In any case, whHe no 
owe doubts Adams's personal 
ability, being a team m a n ager 
involves other skills — man- 
agerial and executant — - which 
be has not shown that be 
possesses," Mr Hoare 
commented. 

He also challenge d Adams to 
produce more details of the 
£600,000 sponsorship deal that 
the star claimed to have, or- 
ganized with a Japanese -com- 
pany. “in foeead, however much 
we. would have liked Adams to 
help with the sqnad, we simply 


did not have the sort id money 
that he was asking,” Mr Hoare 
said. 

There is no danbt that behind 
the disagreement between the 
two is a fundamental difference 
m attitude. Adams is the arche- 
typal modem sportsman wffo 
the emphasis on medal achieve- 
ment while Honre is a product of 
the oU school, where jado . was as 
orach a character training as a 
competitive sport. 

The British men's sqnad are 
going through a rough patch, as 
Brown, jnst back from the 
European team championships, 
admits. “We did not win a medal 
when we should hare and I am 
not nr why,” he said. “There is 


to train raider six specialist 
coaches,- i nt ro du ced had year, 
hasn't worked. 

.. “It hasn't really been the 
same since Colin Mclver kit 
after the 1984 Olympics. Some- 
thing. most be done or we are 
going to have the worst Olym- 
pics we win have ever had." 

Adams is to Dy to Paris next 
week t» sign a two-year contract 
with an option for u extension. 
It b i shaw that, bring 
British, I hare to go abroad but I 
cannot live on fresh air," Ad- 
ams, whose son, Ashley, was 
bora six days ago, added. 


FOR THE RECORD 


BADMINTON 


GOLF 


TENNIS 


AALBORG. Demme Omsk Open chanpi- 


nl a ngle*. Brat name (Dane* 

or o SSmt 


20 (61) 1. GRANGE FARM LADY (A 

Mackay. 8-1); 2 Low Ai Law (R ijnes. 5- 

1): 3. Tour's Ale ic Dwyer, *14-1 
RAN: 11-4 fav Madam 1 


Wincanton 


U ALSO 
Bntwydd 


(*m). 6 Avalon. _J2 _Jacqu. Joy. '16 

nObOtfPftS I 


I Kam (5thL 20 Spanish Infanta 
(Smj. 25 Kan Stodaff. 33 Hopeh* Dancer. 


Ever So Sharp. La Mans. Cats Symiriony. 

“ " ' .1>il.i*.2KI.KI. 


r Mistress. 15 ran. no. : 

M Tampions at Newmarket. Tote: £2290. 

£350. £1.70. £6.10. DF: £24.70. CSF: 

£47.00. Iran 16.63sec. Winner sold A 

Balding tor 2900gns. 


Go ing: firm 

215 (2m htSe) 1. A dam st ow n (P 
Scudamore. 4-9 lav): 2. Cuckoo In The 

Nest (9-U: 3. Klosiererauil 1-U 4 ran. 20, 

71. M Pipe. Tote: £1.30. DF: £1.30. CSF: 

£1.84. 

245 (2m 51 eh) 1. Welali Oak IS Smite 

Ecdes. 1 1-8 lav): 2 Tudor Roadm -i>.3. 

Scots Nogqer (&-2J. 4 ran 3L 15L D 

GandoitoTrote: £1.70. DF: £4.50. CSF: 
£10.60. 


Fonuna 


i (Sir M 

Carson [20- 1| i 

Sarab b h by Prince Tenderfoot - 

Carnival Dance (F Salman) 5-9-0 T 

Gum (12-1) 2 

Homo Septan b e by Lord Gayle — Beta 
Caress (Mrs M Natrons) 4-9-0 S 
Cauthen (5-1) 3 

ALSO RAN: 1 1-4 fav Then Again (dsq). 3 

Erisio. 8 Pas&cao. 12 Haoeer. 14 Tiuefy 

Nureyev (5Uil. 20 Prasadum. 33 Argon 

Laser (4te). Grey Desire. 50 Pool JeL 12 

ran nk. iftl. V*A. nk. u. W Hern at West 

Bsley. Ton war £2250. Places: £520, 

£3.20. £3.00. OF: £12820. CSF: £21051. 

imn 26. 31 sec After a Stewards inqiwy 

man objection. ThmAgain who finished 


Sotw«) 


W 


230 (71 40yd) 1. SCOUT ARRA (W Ryan. 3.15 (2m hdie) 1. Pip IR Dunwoody. 2-1 

4 fjvfc 2. Ikons (R Guest. 7-lj: 2 Mrs f3v):2Cow«an<isQ(tt9-4>.3.Zaccto(i3- 
SM (J Reid, 33-1). ALSO RAN 2S 2). 5 ran 2 ) 2^1 S Woodman. Tote £230. 


1-4 

Pistol 


Mount Holyoke (Stei. 33 Bald Duchess 

Dark He 


(fte). 


Hosaan. Panenka (6m j, 
. . , j. 100 Via Vends. 

Westpark Process. 11 ran. NR: Royal 

Fever m 81. 1%l. 5*1. 2KL H Cecil at 

NewmarkeL Tow: £1.40: £1 10. £1 30. 

£3.70. DF: £1.50. CSF: £287. Imn 
33 3B w. 

3Jt(1m 41) 1 . SAROMCD8 (M Bech. 1 1- 
2). 2 Regal Steel (A Griteuw. 16-1): 3. 


2). 5 ran 21. 2V.-1 S Woodman. Tore £220. 
£1 30. £1.60 DF- £220. CSF: £621. 

3A5 (2m ch) 1 . FVgM Sheet (T Batee. &- 
4 favf. 2. Spawsh God (7-2l: 3. 
Tunsenberg (10-1). 6 ran NR Hooetul 
Ctemes 4L cJtet P J Jones. Tote: £230. 
£1.10. £120 DF. £230. CSF: £6.78. 


4.15 Cm 61 Mta^l. Mzena Sprtng (P 


First Kin (R Fen. M) ALSO RAN- 2 lav 

Hanool (5te). H-2 NaSdiya (4th). 6 

Ensigne. Newquay (6th). 12 Diva Encore. 
20 Tfie Lodge Phnoe 9rw.lW.4l 
iv, i. c Britten at New mate aL Tote: 


second, was UequaiifM 


£6.80. £200. £200. £1.90. OF £3370. 
CSF £7821 2mm 3263sec. 


Leach. 7-1p 2. The Ttersty Farmer |2- 

Kutans Bate (1-2 favj. 6 ran NR. The 

Baxewei Boy. Coinndge. ID. « L 
CottreH. Tow £8 70. EZIO. £1.50 DF. 
£860 CSF £21.52 
420 (3m II ch) Golden Fnend (G 
McCourt) waBied aver. Mrs M RirneJI. 
P t a c epo t £2270 


4.10 fjf) 1. MEET THE GREEK (B 
Thomson. IQ-I). 2. H«on Brawn (P Coo*. 

14-11: 3. Satofs Song (S Dawson. 12-1). 

ALSO RAN- 4 lav Saner. 11-2 Gold 

Prospect (4tni. 6 Hnnesi Praise (Stfij. 12 

Come On The Bues. Entranong. 14 


230 IM 1. FATHER TfflK |A Mackay. 
2 SamtaB Park (L Chanwek. 2-1 


13-21: 2. 

fav). 3. Fickle Young Kan (R HOs. 10-1). 

ALSO RAN: 9-6 Days Like These. 13-2 

totter (4(h). 10 Bastilta (6th). 16 Motor 


Ambroani. Mr Jay-Zee. 16 The MazaH. 20 

view. 33 Deadbolt, Abutamnwm 


Broker (5ih), 33 Domy Baby. 8 ran. NR: 

a ,a.«rr 


□ownsvew. __ __ 

ffih), Lync Way. 15 ran nk. nk. nk. U 2VH 
D Laing at Lamboum. Tote: £ 1080 : £290. 

£4.60. £4-40. OF: £72-70 CSF: £216 45. 

Tncaar £1.52370 imBi27.74sec. 

AM (1m 6f 171yd) 1. PRELUDE (W 

Caraon. 14-1): 2BucWey(R Cocnrane. 5- 

Ik 3. Ftertng AfWr (G Starkey. 16-11- 


FtflOf Pnoe. ho. 6i. 4f nK vil. D Thom at 

Newmarket. Tote: E8.1(k £210. £1.10. 

£240. DF; £9.60. CSF. £19.47. 1mm 
02.30MC. 

44J dm 21 l3lyd) 1. NADEED (G 
Outfield. 21-20 tavj: 2 Rief i a r ds Folly |N 
Acams. 50- it 3. Belem Ma^c (W Ryan. 
6-5). ALSO RAfi: 12 Pea Marsn. 20 
Mw&ons. 33 Career Bay (5m), 50 Para- 

vane (6tn). 100 Roarer (4th). 8 ran. 6L sh 


• Wcifaerbv racecourse yes- 
terday outlined improvements, 
totalling £30.000. which have 
been carried oui during the 

National Hum dose season.The 

drainage system has been up- 

graded. and the course has been 
made wider. 

• Michael Stoute's record- 
breaking season has resulted in 
him being voted Rat trainer of 
the year in ihe poll for the Derby 
-Awards. 


unites sjatBdr 0 (Engl hr U 

|N«nj. 15-6. T5-6 T Careen to T incus 

iJauam. 156. 15-1. A Sahagt (Eng) bt G 

StorvAiHoy. 15-4. 15-3. H Suunroiindofht J 
Tuvesscn iSwei 15-5. 15-3. F K Keong (Mafl 
WCOrvitwt*. 12-15. 15-9. 15-5.4 Brooerawi 

H J dssen (SweL 15-6. 15-1. J P Nwitioff M 

M Builei iCjni. 15-8 15-1. L PBtvraen at F 

PBrmadillrdM. IM 15-9. X Guooac (Owra) 

ot E Omsiensen. 15-6. i$-8. S riatsuua 

WapanitM M GanOuh. 15-9. 15-2 H Svsrrar M 

j nengaa»dh 15»Wf. 15-7. IS-10. 


KDK7S NORTON: 

w» « rl i pl n > chamtta nalwc Sacond raund: J 


Mttand prafe w o M i SYDNEY: Aottatan Moor 


Higgm (Ouvy Para) hi C HoiniM (unattL one 
" — mes (South 


hole. T Bennett (NeoarK) w J Ftoooes I 

StsftsL two holes. D Bakeman (Trenmam) bt 


(Austrian unless stated): Sec o nd round: i 

Cash! - ‘ * 


P Bson (Scattard-upon-Axorr). 3 and 2 O 

“ ’ ►«) Di P Fie*: (artev Wood). 2 ana 


Oura(GayfM) 

1. G Mercer (Rasa HA) t» S WMtamson 

(C a rawd c Pai^i. Sand 4, P Weaver (Coentry) 

H T Rastas (iraltt. 6 and 5. U Catagher 

(Weoctandsi ot M Paswuore il>ayit)n Part). 

Coiateitfi fit D 


BASKETBALL 


CARLSBERG NATKMae LEAGUE: First 

CnnacreTeam PoiyceU Kxwgw n 101 (Oanes 

251 Hamel ano Wanord Royals 9i (hnuckias 
33|. Leicesier floors 97 rvowig 28). 
Caidetaaie Expuam 96 (Shini 44). Solent 
Sara 102. Bracuiea Pirates 98. 


I9iti D Thorp (Sutton 

teissdl [Ednouroh Wooten Ute) one tate. 

O uar tor - tou ts: M Bennett. 6 and 5 l 

Bhcheman ot Oixhi. 2 ana i; Weaver bt 

Mercer, e ana 3; Thorp t» Galaqner 2 and I. 

fl a m i toi s n: w Ow fce m an. 2 ana 1: 

weaver a Thorp, at 20m. Fmafc Htoons a 

Weaver. 4 ana 3 

DAILY MAS. FOURSO M ES (Women s ante. 

tetr?: Nortfunberiand GC Feel round: 

Branccoeth Cast* <E Heron ano O Cray) M 

Wesi Sussei g Godfrey ana S Oonaxl) S end 


i a 8 Dmaa. 8-4.64. l Land! i 

P Caner. 64. 64; B Bedwr (WGl M J 
FrtJgwaU. 64. 7-5. 8 Oy*s a M Lcurii (US). 
6-3. M: C StarotJixy (US) W P MtNesm, 7- 
6, 7-6 Ooufeto K firat ro u n d. G LayendeAsr 

and T Wlrmto (US) a D Maasdoip (SA) end 

CUter. 63.63. Cteh ana MWoodtotea MB 

Cuswr ana D MaqMraon. 8-1. 62 8 Becker 

S end J Fkzgaraki a M Freeman and T 

ri(US). 54 . 61 Second mmtoDewett 

ana K Warwick ta O Can* sia M Kratzmenn, 

64.7-6. 


Thfca 

K Joneo to O 

7-6. 7-6: J Career a S Daw. 7- 


3 Woodenondge (M Cnmvny and S Hansen) 

AFrthLi 


and A I 


SPEEDWAY 


RADIO TRENT TROPHY: Second lege Long 

Eaton 42. e*«aesot«ign 36 Eaton amt on 


Senv-finat fast leg: Craday 
Hearn 50 &advrj23 


Di Dosiand Hoatn (R I 

and 3. Coventry Fvmam fC 3 nor B and and K 

Peich) a Loutn |J uuey ana M Mies), bt ?lsc 

□ownpamcti |D Keenan and 8 McCann) a 

Bvcnefood IM tenets and C WEkens). one 

Me. Oooer (M Myers and E Young) a 

Danwen (P F«ung and M Conway). 3 and 1. 

Anon (D Srevens and J Stevens) a Waney 

Part IJ Cook and A Spencer). 4 and 2 

a-naenne iL MacDonald and E Meer) a 

Sariion Walden (V Tuemon and J Koakesi 

vMtkmer West Cornwall U Ryder end S 

w Wes 


TOKY&I 

roundE^S 

Keraoc] 

4. j Yaga (Peru) WMbevis. 6-2 6-2. D Pare 
WJOrabb.64 6-#. M Depaima a M Anger, I 
7-5 8-3 PCtun«>artnbiPMorara{VrG).fr 4 . 

64. j Cart8Son (3we) in D rksagna 7-C 74. 

wjhwT'j stogies, dBettenRtwta MMMrari 
(Japan) a G Fernandez. 7-S. 44 64. fll 


Knshnen gne^dt j Sadrt.63. 6- 


(Arg) H E Inoue (Japan! 74. 64. B Herr M K 

OkirnototJapM 74^64. H Keitel (Can) to N 


Dias (Brea). 4-6. 64. 64. 


RUGBY UNION 


UCARLA Item League AroaJe CcU 54 

BraotonJ Unv 12. De u Sale 50. Eaten* 20: 

Leeov PWy «D Steifceia Poh i6. Sheffield 

22 Leeds univ <0. LougnDCVDudn Univ 

32 Lwcesiw Prn 0 unavue Poly 6. 

Lmerxioai Unn 54 Trent Pot, 18 HuddersfM 

Fof 32. SflancneKW Ur»v 39. Manchester 
Pchfl 

Scottah Unmerertee ct a wp — N »' Dix>- 
OBD unr-erwy 3a. H«-C« Watt University 16. 

Oder mutoh: Stramcryds fve Bngabe 26. 

CiW~ 3 e a Tecnnokjgy 9 


Harveyi a Lyttoey |P Fry and W Weston). 2 

am I. Quarter-totals: wooderaym e a 

Btanceoem CasOe 3 and 2 Covemrv Fmim 

a DmnpaincK. 3ano 2. Alton n Oober. 6 and 

4 wesiComiaBcn Gtenoeme at 19m. Send- 

•mars: Woooentwda e a Coventry Rrmam 4 
anc 3. Wesi Comwa* a Abxi. Sand 4 nnab 

West Cornwall a Woaoenondge. 2 and 1 

SYDNEY: New Smite Wales Qpmc Hot 

■mind: lAustoWan urseu swedl Oflc Q 

Nomian 6& V Saner* C neuter P Soto 

6ft S Ghnoicn F Nook IN Zl D Graham M 

MarwiM o Moae. p Jones. 7a w Casa 

Iltsi j Woomno. m Cam. C Henoaun, r 

“acnav. C Pany 71: M Caanao (US). C 

Tayia. J S*«a. R Swonens. J Otssao. J 

Rxon T PneB 72 D Memman. B Shearer. D 

Mugn« c W.wren L Pewrscn w Smen. G 


BASLE: Setts Moor tuwiinwq. Men' s 
■ moi s t- Second roidi P 

--1.74L6. 

1.7-EA 

.... . . . . J 2-8. 6-1. 

7-S. S ZwqanovK: (Yugo) a w FSHh im 64. 
7-6 YNaen(Fr]KJ5tenuai(Sfw6-3.84 


FtLDCRSTADT. HM Oman: Wome n 's 

" ' wt .U Navratteve (US) 


a n Tauaat jFr) 63.6-2. Cj-mtgviM ^weioj 


L Dressier (Svctt) 6-2. 4-6, 


U A NOOOS (GB) 64. 64. 


SNOOKER 


ICE HOCKEY 


4fc-*naer. C Hull. C Joyner U Bemondge 

G S-rman. L Sreorwn. K Dt*es. R 


STOCKPORT: HetnwtSKr world dnabtas: 

second twic M Hafloii (Engj and S Henoy 

fScsd n J,Osmg (Engl and B Dem arco . 
{SctrrS-1 SNewDsyrwsiarMR Bates (&g) 
ml Dodd and M Bradley (&g)M 


NORTH AlffibCA: NHL: Budau SaoiPS 0. 
Montreal 0 'oeli Los Ancarerj 

nmgs 4 Deiicoi ewi nmg>, 3 iwii Cncaoo 

Sucfinewns 5 Ne« tan Rangera 5 toe'll 

Ne* Jerscr Dev* 3. Vansouwi Canu*s i. 
EcnoRUn Q4PI5 5 OuSwc Natbquns Z 


tuB) G 5erran. L awmen. K 

McNaugtxwi v B»nn«is B Gnttnhs |NZ) A 
Cdbcan l Inner 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


TABLE TENNIS 


EUROPEAN LEAGUE: Juorace rugosiana 

7 Nsnanir.asO Nassje: Swaoen 6 Ranee 1 


TOUR MATCH: Hud Kingston Roms 10, 

Australians 45 

STONES BITTER CHAMPfONSHIP: 
Wianea 29. Castteltsd 20 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


730 


Second division 

Oldham Ath v MBwaS 

Fourth division 


C a mbridge UM v Northam p ton ( 7 ^^ 

Cotahesrir Utd v Cardiff City 

Halfax Town.v Tranmere Rvra 

Scunthorpe Utd y Torquay Utd ■ 

. OTHER SPORT ; . 

BABKETBAlii PraJetatat N Mtam t Cue 
S econd isor* Ptomouh Rtidera vSotant 

Slsrs (7.0). 

GOLF!: Women's Laing Ctanc (« Stoke 

RU§fv LEAGUE-- Stone* Bitter 
St Helens vSMiord. 
of Wight Festival (at 


operno wnam ent(atPra*ivwch.l 


»). North of England women's 



Date in Florence 


Florence. (AP) — Ivan Lendl 
will play John McEnroe in ap 
exhibition tennis match at foe 
indoor sports palace bere on 
November 3, 'the organizers 

announced yesterday A capacity 
crowd of 6JQ00 Is expected tot 
foe match, pitting foe Czecho- 
slovak player, foe number one 
in foe world, and the American: 
star, who is climbing back toxop 
places in . world ranking after 
several months away from 
courts. The day after their exr 
hibilion Lendl and McEnroe 
will- play charity matches in 
Bologna . for foe. benefit , of 
Gian Luca RmaldinL an Italian 


tennis player, left paralysed after 
a car accident ’ . r ‘ ~ 


MOTOR RALLYING 


Biasion steals 
lead from 
Kankkunen 


San Remo (AP) — Massimo 
Biasion, tbe Italian driver, in a 
Lancia Delta S-4. bad taken 
over foe lead . from Juba 
Kankkunen, the Finnish driver, 
by the end of foe thinl . stage of 
the San Remo Auto RaDy on 
Wednesday night With one 
stage to- go, . Biasion led 
Kankkunen by 1 1 seconds and 
Dario Cerrato, his Lancia team- 
mate, by 54 seconds. 

Kankkunen. who drives, a. 
Peugeot 20S T-J6 racer, had 
been.hokling first place since tbe 
first stage on Monday. . . 

The final stage, on unpaved, 
mountainous roads near this 
Riviera resort, ends bere this 
rooming. Competitors will have 
u> cover. 179 kilometres, mostly 

overnight, for a total of 2200. 

OVERALL STANDMQS {Attar tfatt 

p¥^SJ£5StE&SSS5 

angnnm- 

WK A Aanrerand R AmatJ rm, 

anSasaganaK- 

f.-as4 mb) behind. 


CYCLING 


, , NUIIMaBK(l2@ai Ai*- 

Bttan untaK statatt lTTSotifSSw.sE 
1«» 3l*C 2 B RABWitteoa S memS 

TCordK^SL*KMArBww5!fe 

_ - - w . 



r 


w. 


confidently holed for tbe fust of 
his six birdies. He dropped only 
one shot, at the eighth, where he 
drove left and into trees. There 
can - be little -doubt that 
Ballesteros is in need of a rest. 
He is still capable of producing a 
good score, and capable, too, of 
winning this championship, but 
he has not been at his best now 
for tbe last month: Tm looking 
forward to the winter and a 
couple of months when I can 
forget that J am a goUer,” be 
sakL 


$' 


The Spaniard stressed that, 
even if he was offered SI 
million, he has no intention of 
playing in foe Portuguese Open 
next week. He does, however, 
still lave three engagements in 
Japan and he will make a late 
decision on whether or not to 
compete in foe. MiHion Dollar 
Challenge at Sun Gty in 
December. . 


HAST ROUND SCORES (GB unless 
state# 87: S Baflesaros (Sp). 89: H 
Bakxcfn (SA): G J Brand; C Strange (US)- 
70: J Thorpe (US): M McNulty (Zto* I 
Woosnarrc' M Jamas; A Lyta. 71: S 
Torrance: A Garribo (Spk J M Otazabal 
(Sp). 72 O SoBxrg (5we^; G Brand Jnr J 
Bland; D anyth firet E DussarL A 
Forsbrand (Sm); H OerV. 73: R Rafferty 
J M Canizares (SpL W Humphreys; 
Lanaor (WG). 74rM MoulsndL J Morgan; J 
Nic»BusJun OS SL 7& N Price (S& D 
' Feherty. ra M Tapia (Fi). 78: R Lea. 


JS 


iL 


* 


A 


% 




v 

V 

a 

t 

i 


i -'if; 


U 


\ t. ►> 


















THE TIMES FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


33 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Christopher Davalle 


■ a mt r t 
t :* \.: t 

" J • 


• ■. . 

•' . -J;.. 

• ■ - O '!' 


X, r 



Roland’s Mission accomplished 


Julia McKenzie and Googie Withess in Hotel do Lac (BBC2 9.00pm) 




»e 


■ -■ *» . • 
’• ♦ i-',. 

\ r 3ilCf! 

S * ! P past 


* ,1 “ 'xt.-' 




6 00 ***- Nswb headlines, 

weather, travel and sports 
_ „ bulletins. 

6-50 Breakfast Time with Sally 

H iusson and Guy 

elmore in London and 
Frank Bough In Kunming 
where the Queen tours nie 
Western Mills and Lake 
DwnchL Weather at 635, 7.25, 
8 - 2s and 835; regional news, 
weather and traffic at 637, 
7.27 , 7 ST and 8 37; national 
and international news at 7JXL 
7-M, a.00, 830 and 9.00; sport 
at 7.20 and 830; and a review 
of the morning newspapers at 
8.37. 

9.05 Win to Win presented by 
Harold Williamson. The story 
of Evelyn Glennie, one of the 
Royal Academy of Music's 600 
pupils, who has overcome the 
handicap of being profoundly 
deaf since she was 12 years of 
age. to carve herself a career 
in music, (r) 

9.45 Ceefax 1030 Play School 
presented by Sheets gh Giibey 
with guests Don Spencer and 
Brian Cant (r) 10.50 Ceefax. 
1.00 News After Noon with Richard 
Whitmore and Moke Stuart, 
includes news headlines with 
subtitles 1-25 Regional news. 
The weather details come from 
John Kettiey 1.30 Bertha. A 
See-Saw programme tor the 
very young, (r) 1.45 Ceefax 
3.52 Regional news. 

3.55 Whizz. (r) 4.10 SupeiTed. (r) 
430 Beet the Teacher. Paul 
Jones presents anotner round 
of the teachers versus pupils 
quiz game 4.35 Cheggers 
Ptays Pop. Games, quizzes 
and the latest pop music 
presented by Keith Chegwin. 
Michels Kennedy and Sue 
Wayman. 

5.00 John Craven's Newsround 
5.10 Orange ML Episode four 
and with me Upper School 
dosed the classes are 
transferred to tne. Lower 
School where crowded 
conditions make for short 
tempers, (r) (Ceefax) 


5-35 The Knmkles Elefctr* Komic 
with guests, The Great 
Soprendo, Alvin Stardust and 
Steve Nalion. (r) 

6.00 News with Nicholas WftcheU 
end Frances Cover dale. 
Weather. 

835 London Plus presented by 
John Stapleton, Linda MrtcheH 
and Caroline Righton. 

7.00 Wogan. Esther Rantzen's 
guests Indude Elton John, 

Cyril Fletcher and Bonme 
Langford. Plus a song from 
Bruce Hornsby. 

7-30 Blankety Stank. Las Dawson 
introduces his celebrity panel 
of Cheryl Baker, Lynda Baron, 
Joe Brown, Norman Colter, 
Belinda Lang and Chris Seile. 
(Ceefax) 

8.10 Dynasty. Alexis, for once 
feeling pangs of remorse, is 
upset at the way she has 
treated her daughter; Caress 
charges a high price to keep 
Ben's secret, but Ben himself 
has a trick up his sleeve. 
(Ceefax) 

9.00 News with John Humphrys and 
Philip Hayton. Regional news 
and weather. 

9.35 Call Me Mister. Jack 

Bartholomew is hired by a 
television personality to find 
his son who has been 
kidnapped by the boy's mother 
who lost custody of the child 
because she was on drugs. 

The trail leads to the West 
. Country and murder. Starring 
Steve Bisley. (Ceefax) 

1025 Omnibus: The Mission. A 
documentary covering two 
months of the filming of 
Roland Jaffa's epic about an 
1 8th Century tribe of 
persecuted Paraguayan 
Indians, (see Choice) 

1120 Fim: The Abdication (1974) 
starring Pear Finch and Liv 
. Ullmann. Drama aboutthe 17th 
Century Queen Christina of 
Sweden who renounces her 
throne and religion and turns 
' to Rome. Directed by Anthony 
Harvey. 

14)0 Weather. 


d and won 


t . 

i 


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u-t""' 

:• 

...tv M? 

. i * 1 

• .... 

!.• . 

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... . . ri ‘ 

" ' r ‘ r ‘ 



i and Robert De Niro 


Behind the scenes: Roland Joffe (left) 

daring filming of The Mission, (RBC1, 10-25pm) 


• Omnibus (BBC!, 10.25pm). 
Robin Lough took a camera crew 
into tbc Colombian jungle for two 
months, to watch Roland Joffe 
making his epic movie The Mis- 
sion, which opens in London next 
"niursday. It is about the persecu- 
tion of South American Indians by 
the I8th<entury Conquistadors. 
The Indians in the cast are 
genuine, from the Waupaca tribe, 
with a bizarre set of belieft. The 
Wauimna live in the Choco dis- 
trict of Colombia, eight hours 
from the nearest town, yet enjoy 
the dubious pleasures of tele- 
vision, powered by generators, 
and belieye that everything they 
see on the screen is true. "They 
think the bows, arows and bullets 
are real and that people who die on 
screen die for reals' says Lough. 
For Joffe. it was almost a mission 
impossible to convince them 


BBC 2 


9.00 Ceefax. 

9.30 Daythne on Two: how 

universities help the first year 
undergraduate 932 The story 
of a gtrl who befriends a 


iring 

1038 Mathematical 
Investigations. 114)0 ' 
Wondermaths 11.17 How the 
textile industry came to 
dominate Blackburn. 11.40 A 
walk in a forest and along a 
seashore. 

124)0 The use ofpropaganda and the 
suffering of civilians in war 
1232 Huw gives up his 
bedroom for two hofidaying 
girls and is relegated to a 
decrepit caravan 1.05 Learning 
English from popular television 
programmes 1.33 How 
effective is at to moulding 
opinion? 2.00 For four- and • 
five-year olds. 2.15 Ceefax. 

3.55 Flm: Le CapfMne Friuasee* 
(1942) starring Fernand Gravey 
and Assia Norris. Drama, set in 
toe I7tn century, about an 
- impoversihed nobleman who 
joins a troupe of traveling 
players. Directed by Abel 
Gance. 

530 News summary with subtitles. 
Weather. 

535 Harold Lloyd* Excerpts from 
the comedian's High and 
Dizzy, made In 1920, and The 
Flat, produced in 1917. 

630 FBm: How To Steal the World 
(1968) starring Robert Vaughn 
and David McCalium as toe 
men from UNCLE, this time on 
the hunt tor a missing fellow 
agent Directed by Sutton 
Roley. 

7J3Q Micro Live. The first of a new 
senes of the information 
technology magazine. 

Tonight's programme fochfdes 
an investigation of the home 
computer Industry with 
interviews with Sir Clive 
Sinclair. Alan Sugar of 
Amstrad, and Bryan Long of 
Acorn. . 

8.00 Wild Dobvogee. The 
spectacular wiidfife of this 
region in south east Romania. 

S3 __ 

8.30 Gard en er s’ World. Geoff 
Hamilton and Clay Jones visit 
Cape! Manor in Hertfordshire, 
an educational centre tor 
professional gardeners, where 
they pick up ideas for disabled 
gardeners. 

9.00 Screen Two: Hotel du Lac. 
Christopher Hampton's 
adaptation of Anita Brookner’s 
Booker Prize-winning novel 
about a writer who escapes 
from a marriage on toe re- 
bound by taking shelter in a 
lakeside hotel in Switzerland. 
Starring Anna Massey. (r)(see 
Choice) (Ceefax) 

10.15 Sounds New. Michael 
Berekely previews a new 
season of music on BBC 2 

10.25 Newsnfght 11.10 Weather. 

11.15 The Rockford files. Jim plays 
a knight in armour when 
summond to the assistance of 
his friend. Beth, (r) Ends 12.10. 


c 


CHOICE 


J 


otherwise buL- as the documentary 
shows, he succeeded. 

• Although Identification of a 
Woman (Ch4 1 1.20pm) carries 
Channel 4’s cautionary warning 
triangle, it was greeted by great 
acclaim at the Cannes and London 
film festivals in 1982. It was 
Michelangelo Antonioni's first 
film after The Passenger, made in 
1975. The leading character,- 
played by Tomas Milain. is a 
successful film-maker searching 
for a subject for his new picture 
and an actress to take the leading 
role. He forms a relationship with 
his first choice, who then vanishes 
in mysterious circumstances. The 
powerful part of the film concents 
his hunt for her and his attempt to 



reconstruct the relationship with a 
near look-alike. 

• There is a repeat showing for 
Christopher Hampton's beautiful, 
languid adaptation of Hotel do 
Lac (BBC2. 9pm). the Booker 
Prize-winning novel by Anita 
Brook ner. With Anna Massey as 
an author among the elegantly 
discontented guests at a Swiss 
lakeside hotel, the distinguished 
cast also includes Googie Withers. 

Patricia Hodge. Denholm Elliott, 

Julia McKenzie, and Irene HandL 

• Another welcome repeat is 
David Pownall's play. Master 
Class (Radio 3. 7.30pm) in which 
Timothy West as Stalin summons 
the composers Prokofiev and 
Shostakovich, in order to tell what 
kind of music he wants. 

Anne Campbell Dixon On the slime trail: David Bellamy and friends (ITV, <LOOpm) 


ITV/LONDON 


925 Thames news headlines. 

9.30 For Schools: Children describe 
Injustice 9.47 How We Used to 
Live: illness and 
unemployment 104)9 Junior 
Maths: mirrors 10-26 Science-, 
gravity 1CL48 The life of a 14- 
year old in a Somali refugee 
camp 11.16 What to look tor in 
toe autumn 1127 Sign 
language and songs 11.44 
Shops and shopping. 

12.00 FScfcs.(r) 12.10 Rainbow. 
Learning with puppets. 

1230 Pennywise. Muriel Clark and 
Anne Brand with more money- 
saving advice. 

1.00 News at One with John Suchet 
1.20 Thames news presented 
by Tricta Ingrams. 

1 JO SuperbowL Elton Weisby 
presents quarterfinal action in 
the Liverpool Victoria 
Insurance Superbowl 3-00 


Take the High Road. 
Invenfarrocn le 


i to the 

defence of the honour of his 
family name 325 Thames 
. news headlines 330 Sons and 
Daughters. 

44)0 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 12.10 
4.15 The Trap Door. Animated 
series set in a spooky castle 
430 Woridtarise. Geography 
quiz presented by David 
Jensen. (Oracle) 4.45 Alias the 
Jester, (r) 5.00 Bellamy’s 
Bugle. David Bellamy's 
conservation series. 

5.15 In the Land of the Empe r ors. 
Leonard Parkin describes the 
Queen's tour of the Western 
Hills and Lake Dianchi; and the 


5.45 News with Alastair Stewart 
64)0 The 6 O'clock Show 

presented by Michael AspeL 
74)0 Bruce ForsyWa Play Your 
Cards Right Game show. 

730 New Faces of 86. Talent show* 
presented by Marti Caine. The 
non-voting judges are Nina 
Miskow, Danny La Rue, and 
' Stephanie Lawrence. 

830 Home to Roost Comedy 
series starring John Thaw as 


the divorced lather living with 
tits son. Last in the series. 
(Oracle) 

94)0 To Have and To Hold. The final 
episode of the drama serial 
about a woman having a 
surrogate baby for her sister. 
Viv is in me maternity ward 
surrounded by nappy mothers 
and their babies. Knowing she 
has to hand over her baby sne 
is deeply distressed. When 
Ken ana Ann arrive to see 
‘their’ baby she refuses to 
meet them, and when it is time 
to leave the hospital she 
catches a taxi before the 
others arrive to collect her. 
StaningAmanda Redman, 
ManonBatey, Brian Protheroe 
and Eamon Boland. (Oracle) 

10.00 News at Ten with Sandy Gall 
and Alastair Stewart. 

1030 Tomorrow! and. presented by 
Brian Walden and John Taylor. 
How can the south-east cope 
with the environmental 
problems caused by economic 
growth? With a contribution 
from the Environment 
Secretary. Nicholas Rfefiey. 
Followed by LWT News 
headlines. 

12.00 SuperbowL The first semifinal 
of the Liverpool Victoria 
Insurance Superbowl, 
introduced by EHon Weisby at 
Granada's Stage One Arena, 
Manchester. 

135 Night Thoughts. 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 

presented by Anna Diamond 
and Richard Keys. Geoff 
Meade reports on the Queen's 
tour of the Western HNls and 
Lake DianchL News with 
Gordon Honeycombs at 630, 
7.00, 730, 84)0, 830 and 9-00; 
financial news at 635; sport at 
640 and 7.40; exercises at 
635 and 9.17; cartoon at 735; 
pop music at 735;.and Jimmy 
Greaves's television highlights 
at 835. The After Nine guests 
include Russell Grant 



Not so happy families: trouble brewing with tbe return of long-lost 
daughter Julie (right), in Home to Roost (ITV, 830pm) 


CHANNEL 4 


230 Channel 4 Racing from 
Newmarket. Brough Scott 
introduces coverage of the 
Fakenham Handicap (235); toe 
WiNiam Hill Dewhurst Stakes 
(3.10); the Chevmgton Stud 
Rockfei Stakes (3.40k and the 
EBF Nursery Handicap (4.1 0). 

430 Countdown. The reigning 
champion is challenged by 
Steven Leven from Harrow. 

5.00 Car 54, Where Are You?* 
Vintage American comedy 
senes starring Joe E Ross and 
Fred Gwyrme as hopeless New 
York policemen, this afternoon 
on the trad of an armchair they 
sold for an ok) lady unaware 
that it contained her 
considerable Me savings. 

530 Revid. A review of the week's 
film and video releases. 

5.45 Solid Soul. The guests are 
Cnaka Khan, Gwen Guthrie, 
Five Star, The Real Thing. 
Haywoode. and The SOS 
Band. 

6.15 The Chart Show. The top pop 
music charts from this country 
and abroad. 

7.00 Channel 4 News with Trevor 
McDonald and Nicholas Owen. 
Weatner. 

730 Book Choice. Historian and 
biographer, John Gngg, 
reviews Robert Rhodes 
James's authorised biography 
ol Anthony Eden. 

8.00 What the Papers Say. 
Freelance journalist David 
Chipp reviews how the Press 
has treated tne week's news. 

8.15 A Week in Potties. The first of 
a new senes. Introduced by 
Nick Ross. The future of the 
Conservative Party is the 
subject this week, including 8 
prediction of the date of the 
next General Election, and 
contributions from Norman 
Tebbit and Lord Carrington. 

94)0 The Coaby Show. American 
domestic comedy series. 

930 Gardeners’ Calendar 

introduced by Hannah Gordon. 
The Royal Horticultural 
Society s experts examine the 
autumn fruits of hard work 
in earlier in the year, include 
a colourful flower border; and a 
harvest of unusual vegetables 
such as kohl-rabi and 
aoorzonera. (Oracle) 

104)0 The Golden Girts. Award- 
winning comedy series from 
the United States about tour 
middle-aged women snaring a 
house on the Florida coast 
(Oracle) 

1030 Living WHh Schizophrenia. 

The seconder three 
documentary programmes 
about schizophrenia, from the 
int of view of sufferers, 
iracie) 

1130 film: Identification of a 

Woman (1982) starring Tomas 
Milian, Dameia Silveno. and 
Christine Botsson. A Special 
Discretion Required story of a 
film director, whose wife has 
left him, looking for a woman 
to star in his next film. Directed 
by Michelangelo Antonioni. 
Ends at 1.40. 


S ir 

re 


VARIATIONS 


BBC1 

Spontoao. u 


Toaw.U5.7JBO 

n-lJBNwswd 


MUW SCOTLAND USam-riXI R»- 
Ppmng scoaart i0£S-tass L*n 
HJgru ana Carara 10.SS-11.60 OmnOus; 

TTw Mmmmi 11 J»-1 Jlnnt. QUr 
noncsBy vours |1967) i Alain Pionj 1ZO- 
L3SWUHW NORTHERN 
nmjiND SJSfvn-SAO TtxSay'a Sport 
L4MM made LKmr US-TW A 
Taswo>umari.oqpm-lJl5Naw9 EN- 

GLANC HkfanOt: IZAfifMi-l.oa and 

1.3Q-2.0D Olympic Dacswn ZJOOBWtttt 
115441 CHO> USpm-7.00 Ro- 

gtonai news magazinu. 

BBC? WALES: leiSm-kUS Hants 
Ground MM»nWilM.SCOT- 
LANO B.OOpovUO Top GMT. NORTH- 
EftH mBLAHDr LOOpn^UO Lmny Hwvy 
Ton» ENOLAN&UiDpii^UOEaM: 

East on Two MMtaMteTogmtmr Nome 
OawanarB Draci urn on in* Rcmkl 
M ontHCaat: Coast to CouL Nortt»-W««e 
teounowodc Enpan i naniioFounaaoon. 

84WOI! South an Two One* a V*ar m Lawn. 
South- Waac Nozzan. Waat Tha Zoo 

TVC|MLondon«captiaii»1J0 
4X3 Nows MB-UM Cotanry GP 0.00 Coast 
tc Coast BJ0-7M Counvy Ways iQJO 
Facing South 11 JO Bowls TZJ&M FBm: Ran- 
a ^Rifea flom 1JZ6 Company, 

border tSfeKSSSffisrote, 


otats UO-aJO Voung Doctors SJIO 
Lookarouno BJO-7.00 Taka tha High Road 
10J0 Thirty Critical YaarslIteO Bowls 
1ZZ5— i Cbsadown. 

HTVWE^«jgSCT&, TJB 

Haws KL30 vow Say HU5 Facing wan 

11.15 Scana 86 HAS Supatbowl tiJOaa 
Closedown. 

HTVWAI pfi AsHTVWastax- 
nJ.V.WAkE.?. capr. UOwb-IZOO 
ScnooB U»pai-7ao waias at So 10JD- 
1UD0 SnowSs nao-UJO Suparfiowl. 
cap n.ioam CaH a cnratfi li JS 
=== Cipoiwg Ar Fframc 1145 Intaryal tUO 
PamswaPMca IZSS Puppat Men 1 JO 
Enarytxxiy Here 2J0 Studio SO ZJO Racing 
4J0 Smn Son 146 Gwaad Ar Y Daarau 

5.15 ChwanarCaBSJORavNl 645 SoBd Soul 

6.15 Cnan Show 7.80 Nawyddion SaUt 

730 CythraWCanu 800 Oaa Y Dorian EJOY 
Byd Ar Booww 030 Goman Oats 1IL00 
AntAa 1130 Wanner 1.00am Closedown. 
AMril lAAaLandonawootilJOpm- 

1 JO News 630^30 About An- 
oka WJO Superiiowl 1235am John Pamy 
at Parson, Closedown. 

Ill CSTFR As London axcaotrlJOpa^ 
M.hPJJ-J IJOLuncflWitallW Good Ev 
nmg Ulsw 630 Sptraom 640-730 
Advice with Aiwa Hates 10J0 Witness 1035 
Bfes in Concert 1130 Superoowl 1235am 
Closedown. 

GRANADA na- 

pcns3J0-430 Young Doctors 630 Gre- 
nada Rapons63S StuerooiMi 1030 
Supwtxiwl IZJSam Fare Savages 130 
CtoseoBwn. 

2J0-330 Bowls 630-730 News 1035 
Central Weekend lt30Bowts1J5am 
Jotiflnder2J5Ct08aoown. 

TYNE TEES As London except 
» tree 1 iJOgn-i-M Haws 630- 
730 Spomna Chance 10J2 Extra Tima 
1130 Suparfiowl 1235am Thraa's Company. 
Closedown. 

Yorkshire asaags^ 


dar 630-730 Who'S Ttio Boss? WJO 
SupertxNd 1225w430 Muse Box. 

TS YV As^ london except: UOpm-AJO 
1 Young Ooaore630-730Fniay Show 

WJ2 Bowta IzJZSam Postscript 12J0 
MBia Hammar 136 Qosaoowa 

GRAMPI AN tSgSgiSS 630- 


7.00 Norm Tenant 1030 Crossfire 1130 
SuperiXMri 1235am Hows 12J0 Soriey 
Madaan ai 75 1236 CknodowR 

SCOTTISH 

On®- Thirty 230 Bowts 3JXKL30 FVaa 


Uuaat 
rv aevri n - 
630-730 

_ Ouasdono 

11.15 Bowts 12.10am Lon CM 12.15 Soriay 
Madaan at 75 1230 Ctosaoawn. 


Ona-mmy 230 Bowls 330-3JO 

rare 630 Sconaro Today 630-7 

EmmenMi Farm 10JO Sconsii 




• “ '• " 

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On medhxn ware. News on the 
half-hour from SJOam until aJOpm 
then UUJO and 124)0 midnight 
5t30am Adrian John. 74)0 Mika 
Smith's Breakfast Show. 830 
Simon Bates, ind an interview 
with Bob GeJdof.l 


Nawsbeat 12.45 Gay Dg 
3JD0 Stave Wright 530 News beat 
5.45 Singled Out Gary Davies 
on some of the week's new single 
releases. 74)0 Bf For Leathr. 

Andy Peebles meets Elton John in 
New York. LOO Andy Peebles. 
10.00-1230 The Friday Rock Show. 


On medum wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on the hour (except 

553*11,830, 


arapm^Heaifinesi 


730,1 

430am Cofin Berry. 530 Ray 
Moore. 730 Derek Jameson. 930 
Ken Bruce. 1130 Jimmy Young 
135pm David Jacobs. 230 Gloria 
HumBford, ind Racing from 
Newmarket 330 Daind Hamfltoa 
535 John Dunn. 730 Hubert 

730 Friday Ntaht is Music 
_ 835 Keith Swallow at the 

Peno. 94)0 The Organist Entertains 
with Nigel Ogden. &55 Sports 
Desk. 104)0 Moira Anderson 
Sings ... 1030 The Press 
Gang news quiz 114)0 Peter 
Dickson's Nightcap. 130am 
NigmrWe. &QQ-43Q A UdtoMght 
Music. 


WORLD SERVICE 


630 Nawadask 730 Nam 736 Twenty- 
Four Hours 730 Juke Bax Dury7.45 
Merchant Navy Programme 830 News 
639 Reflections 6.15 EUc Costas 830 
Music Now MO News 939 Renew ol the 
British Press 9.15 The Worm Today 930 
FnsncM mews 640 Look Aneaa 646 
Lake Wobegon Days nun Nam 1031 
Folk h me Modem Worm mis Merchant 
Navy Progr a mme 1030 Business Matters 
1130 Maws 1139 News Aoout Britan 
11.15 In tha Maanana 1135 A Laoar 
Rom Northern Mona 1230 Rado Nsw»- 
reel 12.15 Jazz For Tha Asking 1246 
Sports Roundup 13B Naws 136 
tow Horn 13® John Pa a! 230 
245 Nature NoiBflaok 330 Radio News- 
real LIS I Ciaudiua 430 News 430 
Comment ar y 4.13 SoancO m Acaon 4US 
WOria Today 530 Nmm 539 Laznr from 
Northern ka«ro 630 News 839 Twenty- 
Four Hours 930 Soanes in Action 930 
News 931 Network UK 9-15 Muse Now 
945 For Whom Tha Bal Tofls 1030 News 
1039 The Work) Today 1028 A Lecw 
From Northern Ireland KUO Financial 
News 1040 Spans Reflections 1045 
Sports Roundup 1130 Naws 1139 Com- 
mentary 11.15 Rrom The Weeklies 1130 
Muknrack 3 1230 News 1209 News 
Aooui Britain 12.15 Remo Newsreel 1230 
Aoout Bruin 1245 Rscontng at tha 
Weak 130 Naas 131 Outlook 1 JO Folk in 
the Moaam Work) 145 hwnn Noieoocfc 
230 News LOO Rttvww Of The British 
Press 2.15 Nfltworit UK 2J0 Paopkt and 
Pottra 200 News 239 News About 
Britain 3.15 Tha World Today 330 Aim 
Beatbex 430 Newsoask 4J0 Hve's 
HumpM AD times n GMT. 


5S5 Weather 74)0 News 

74)5 Mormng Concert 
Rameau. Air pour las 
enclaves africants; Los 
sauvages: Tambounns I 
and il (Las bides getantes) 
with Kenneth Gilbert 
(harpsichord); Debussy, onto 
Ravel. Sarabande (Basle 
SO under Arm in Jordan); 
Poulenc, La courts paUto, 
with Felicity Palmer 
(soprano) John 
Constable (piano); Lalo. 

Cato Concerto in D 
minor. 

830 News 

835 Mozart. Symphony No 
39. in E flat (K 543). 
Amsterdam Concertgebouw 
Orchestra under Kan 
Bfihm; Mendelssohn, Songs 
without words. Op 67 
Nos 1-6, whh Victoria 
Postnikova (piano); 
Tchaikovsky, Andante 
cantabila.Cjpii.wnh 
Raphael WaBflseh (piano). 

9.00 News 

94)5 This Week's Composer 
Handel. Music tor 
Hamburg and Rome Trio- 
Sonata m G minor. Op 2 
No 2; State No 6. in F sharp 
minor; Cantata: 0 come 
chtaree befle. 

10.00 Northern Sinfonia under 
Wittned Boettcher. 

Overture; LlnfedsM 

isa; Johann Stamttz. 

Slntoma in D major, Op 3 No 
2 ; Dvorak, Nocturne in B 
major; Vorisek, Symphony in 
D major. 

1135 Mozart and Medtner, 
with Bernard Roberts 
(prarwi. Mozart Sonata in C 
(K 330); Medtner, NovaHa 
rnG, Op 17No1. 

1140 Songs with Horn 

OttoSgato. Juian Pite 
|ianw).Jo)ml 
(ham). Timothy! 

(piano). Heinrich Proch, Das 
Aipenhom; Conradtn 
Kreutzer, Das Miihtrad; 
Timothy Salter, Three 
g ongs; Otto Nicolai. Die 
Thrane. 

12.15 Mkkiay Prom. BBC 

PWtoarmonic Orchestra, 
under Gitoert Amy. with 
YuzukoHongome 
(violtn). Part one: Debussy, 
Poeme danse: Jeux: 
Stravinsky. Violin Concerto 

inD. 

130 News 

14)5 Mkkiay Prom: part two. 
Debussy. Preluded 
I'apres-midi d'un fauna; 
Messiaen, L’Ascension: 
quartre medhanons 
symphomques. 


135 The Scholar and the 
Peasant Music of 
ancient China. 

2.10 Urewsiiy of Wales 
Recital, with Alexander 
Bailie (cello), Piers Lane 
(piano). Gneg, Sonata in 
A minor, Op 36; Beethoven, 
Sonata in A mater. Op 
69; Casssado. Requtebros; 
Granados, arr Cassado, 
Intermezzo from Goyescas; 
Tchaikovsky, Pezzo 
capnccteso. Op 62; Chopin, 
Introduction and 
Pokmaree briflante. Op 3. 

345 Ladies Lost and Found. 
Chaucer in a modem 
English translation by 
Terence Titter. With 
Martin Jarvis as Chaucer. 

430 Choral Evensong. Live 
from the Chapel of Jesus 
College, Cambridge. 

435 News 

530 Mamty tar Pleasure, 
presented by Richard 
Baker. 

630 BBC Scottish Symphony 
Orchestra, under Andrew 
Litton. Verdi, Overture: I 
vespri sictllani; 

Christopher Steel. Six Turner 
Paintings (first 
broadcast); Ttihaikovsky, 
Suite No 4 (Mozarbana). 

730 Master Class. Play by 
David Pownail.wati 

t Stalin, 

and Davii^Bamber as 
Shostakovich. 

94)0 Trevor PiiWOCk 

(harpsichord). Part one: 

J. C. F. Fischer, PassacaiBa 
in D minor; Scarlatti. 

Sonatas: to F minor (Kk 519); 

in F major (Kk 518); 

Coupenn, Suite in D minor; 
Seartatti, Sonatas to G 
major (Kk 201); in C major 
(Mt 513). 

9.45 The Most Popular Man in 
England. Lora haasham 
reviews a recent biography 
of Henry Brougham, Lord 
Chancetor 150 years ago. 

1030 Trevor Ptnnock. Part 
two: Couperin, 

PassacaUe in B minor (Ordre 
8); Rameau, Suite in E 
. minor, Balbastre, La LugOac 
Duphiy. Lade Chamiay; 
Balbastre, La Suzanne. 

10.45 Romeo and Juliet Musk) 
from Prakovrev's bafiot 
performed by the BBC 
Symphony Cfrchestra 
under Gennadi 
Rozhdestvent 
1135 Silwus Leopold 
lbyNKh 


Timothy H 

Peter Kelly as Prokoviev 


1137 


North 




i^om^wave. (s) Stereo on VHF. 


On I 

535 Shipping. 6.00 News Briefing; 
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Today. 635 Prayer For The 
Day (s). 

630 Today, tod 630, 730, 

830 News Summary. 

6.45 Business News. 635, 
735 Weather. 730, 830 
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935 (Desert Island Discs. Sir 
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945 Further Up Tha Tyne to a 
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10.00 News; International 
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correspondents report from 
around the world. 

1030 Morning Story: What'S to 
Become ol toe Pussies? 



by Celia Date. 
Daily Service (s). 


1045 

114)0 News; Trevei; You The 
Jury. Dick Tavern QC. 
chairs the senes In which 
controversial issues are 
put on trial. This week's 
motion: The Church Must 
Adapt or Die (s) 

11.48 Natural Selection. Mate 
Stoddari considers the 
rapta spread throughout 
northern Australia of the 
large and dangerous cane 
toad, v 

12.00 News: The Food 
Programme. Derek 
Cower investigates a new 
technique which claims 

to keep produce at its peak. 

1237 The MSI ion Pound Radio 
Show. The money finally 
runs out (8). 1235 Weatner. 

1.00 The World at One: News. 

140 The Archers. 135 

Shipping. 

230 News; Woman's Hour, 
mductes the problems 
and pittaibol adopting a 
chiJd from the Third 
World. 

330 News; Goodbye. Mr 
Chips, by Jenany Hilton. 
Dramatized m two parts by 
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430 News. 

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Chris Emmett and The 
HuddHners (s). 

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630 The Six O'Cldck News; 
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Desert Island castaway: Sir 
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630 Going Places. Clive 
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73S The Archers. 

7.20 Pick of the Week. 

Margaret Howard with 

WghhghTS of the past week's 
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830 Law to Action. Topical 
weekte magazine (si 
845 Any Questions? The Rt 
Rev Stanley Booth 
Clibbom, John Butcher MP, 
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Wilson from Sale, Cheshire. 
930 Letter From America, by 
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945 Kaleidoscope, on the 
arts and artiste from the 
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10.15 A Book at Bedtime: 
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1039 weatner. 

1030 The world Tonight 

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FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kH 

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34 * * * * * *sl FRIDAY OCTOBER 17 1986 


Olympic poker 


players show 


Spanish hand 


From David Miller, Chief Sports Correspondent, Lausanne 


The indiscreet lobbying of 
Joao Havelange, the most 
autocratic figure in world 
sport, on behalf of Barcelona 
could cost the Spanish city 
success in this morning’s vot- 
ing to decide the host cities for 
the 1992 Olympic Games. 

An anti-Latin mood was 
evident here yesterday as the 
summer candidates made 
their final technical presenta- 
tions. Havelange’s allegiance 
could be counter-productive 
and persuade uncommitted 
International Olympic 
Committee members to sup- 
port Amsterdam, Brisbane or 
Birmingham 

“Havelange may be a dic- 
tator in football bin he must 
be shown he cannot behave in 
the same undemocratic (ash- 
ion in the Olympic 
Movement," an IOC member 
(a while non-Latin) said. 
There has for several years 
been an increasing feeling 
against the dominance of 
Latin power in several sports 
and this could potentially 
produce one of the big upsets 
in one of the most important 
of all sports decisions involv- 
ing hundreds of milli ons of 
pounds. 

Havelange. one of Brazil's 
two IOC members and also 
president of FIFA, had inter- 
rupted the presentation of 
Falun in Sweden on Wednes- 
day in the Winter Games 
presentation to say that the 
travelling distance between 
events — lengthy in Falun's 
case — was not a relevant 
factor. 

This offended many. It is 
believed that agreement be- 
tween Latin Americans and 
Scandinavians for mutual 
support of Barcelona and 
Falun is one of the many 
clandestine deals in this mil- 
lion-dollar game of poker. 

Yesterday Havelange 
walked out during the 
presentation by Barcelona, the 
favourites, as if to dem- 
onstrate his indifference to the 
outcome. Yet there is an acute 
nervousness in the Catalonian 


Howell and Sebastian Coe for 
Birmingham. These two cities 
vie with Amsterdam as the 
choice of the neutrals. 

Regrettably, it is likely that 
fewer than 30 per cent of the 
expected 85 members present 
will follow the objective 
course of Kevan Gosper, a 400 
metres sprinter for Australia 
in the Olympic Games of 1956 
and 1960. “I will not make up 
my mind until I have heard 
the presentations of all 13 
candidates and then I'll sleep 
on iL” he told me on Wednes- 
day evening. 

“This is the only way the 
IOC can operate with any 
credibility, choosing the host 


sen 


Birmingham 
gets skating 

Bir mingham been cho- 
to stage the 1989 Enro- 
ll fici 


pean figure skating 


cba^pkmsMps. They will be 
staged at the National Ex- 
hibition Centre from January 
16-21. This is the first time 
Britain has hosted an event of 
this stature since the 1950 
world championships in 
London in 1950. 

It is 56 years since die 
European championships were 
last held in Britain. 

Courtney Jones, the presi- 
dent of the National Skating 
Association, said: “With the 
great tradition of British skat- 
ing and die number of Euro- 
pean champions we have 
produced ova - the years, it is 
very fitting we should host the 
again." 


camp as they fed the ground 
iirfeeL 


moving beneath their i 
This mood was intensified 
by the outstanding perfor- 
mances with words and video 
given first by Sally-Anne 
Atkinson and Herb Elliott for 
Brisbane and then Denis 


tides on their suitability for 
sport and for the competitors. 
Of course, I shall be loyal to 
Brisbane so long as they stay 
in the race but after that I've 
stil! not made up my mind 
who deserves my vote." 

There is the opportunity, 
after this morning’s voting, for 
the IOC to take an important 
step towards giving their 
organization a younger and 
more relevant sporting image. 
Gosper, aged 52, is one of 
three candidates nominated 
for two places on the executive 
board, together with Gunnar 
Ericsson, aged 67, of Sweden, 
and Vitaly Smirnov, aged 51, 
of the Soviet Union. 


Yet someone away from the 
European epicentre of Olym- 
pic affairs always has consid- 
erable difficulty in winning 
the support of members. One 
of those campaigning for 
Gosper is Zhenliang He, of 
China, himself a member of 
the executive board and a 
potential candidate over the 
next 15 years to become 
president of the IOG An 
electrical engineer and a man 
of substantial cultural anri 
diplomatic standing, be was 
an official of China's delega- 
tion when they competed in 
the Helsinki Olympic Games 
of 1952 and his support for 
Gosper could be decisive. 

A further opportunity to 
reduce the average age of the 
membership, which stands at 
more than 60, will come with 
the replacement this after- 
noon for Julian Roosevelt, the 
United States representative, 
who died earlier this year. The 
candidates are Peter 
Ueberroth, the organizing in- 
ition of the Los Angeles 
Donna de Verona, the 
former swimming gold medal- 
list, and Anita de Frantz. 

With many IOC members 
likely to be afraid of 
Ueberroth's influence and 
power - he would become an 
immediate candidate to suc- 
ceed Samaranch — they may 
well opt for de Verona, an 
outstanding campaigner for 
women's interests, including 
sports competition, over the 
past 15 years. 

A woman conspicuous by 
her absence this past week has 
been Monique Beriioux, the 
former IOC director who was 
deposed in 1985 by an exec- 
utive board coup. Such was 
her dominating manner that 
Paris were obliged to keep her 
out of the front rank of their 
bid for fear of antagonizing 
voters. Her controversial 
memoirs are due to be pub- 
lished next month. 


Birmingham state their case 


From John Goodbody, Lausanne 


Birmingham yesterday gave 
to the International Olympic 
Committee its allocated one- 
hour presentation on why it 
should stage the 1992 Olym- 
pic Games. 

The result of the voting by 
the 84 members on the six 
candidates, Barcelona, the 
odds-on favourites, Belgrade, 
Brisbane, Amsterdam, Paris 
and Birmingham, wiD be an- 
nounced at larch-time today. 

Mr Denis Howell, MP, 


chairman of the Birmingham 
Olympic Committee, was eflh- 
sive after the presentation, 
smoking a cigar and declaring 
in deliberately Charrhillian 
terms that he felt “quiet, 
satisfied cootemplatioa lead- 
ing on to the Qoodtide of 
victory”. Mr Charles Palmer, 
chairman of the British Olym- 
pic Association, said: “Every 
IOC membra- said it was the 
best presentation they had 
seen so far, not that that 


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opinion necessarily means 
anything." 

* The voting is difficult to 
predict because there are 
successive roands of ballotting 
with the least success f ul can- 
didate dropping out until one 
city gets an absolute majority. 
The Mock voting arrange- 
ments by such groupings as 
the Communist and Spanish- 
speaking blocks can break up 
if their favoured city is elimi- 
nated. The voting on the six 
candidates -for the Winter 
Olympics is also infineatial 
because of a trade-off of 


support. 

Oaly the IOC members 
know how they wifl react to 
this week’s bombing hi Barce- 
lona or the noisy demonstra- 
tion yesterday against 
Amsterdam by about 60 peo- 
ple protesting against the 
Games betnd held in The 
Netherlands. 

The Birmingham 
tion, which included Sebastian 
Coe and Judy Simpson, 
emphasized through film and 
statements their policy of giv- 
ing the Games back to the 
athletes, stressing the conve- 
nience of using the National 
Exhibition Centre. 

Like the other five delega- 
tions they were questioned 
about facilities and lemslation 
against drags. But unlike rival 
cities, they were not ques- 
tioned about finance. The one 
hitch in the presentation was 
that for part of die film, the 
English commentary was 
slightly out of synchronization 
with the action. 

Williams Hills and 
Ladbrokes have Barcelona as 
odds-on favourites at 1-3. aid! 
Birmingham at 2-1. 


SPORT 



Smirnov is certain, as repre- 
sentative of Eastern Europe, 
to get one of the places, for all 
the embarrassment of his 
stupidly critical letter of the 
IOC's decision to stage the 
1 984 Gaines in Los Angdes. It 
will be a setback if Gosper 
does not join him, whatever 
the merits of Ericsson. 



Hopeful handshake: Sebastian Coe with Juan Samaranch in Lausa n ne yesterday 


CYCLING 


Italians shut 
out Anderson 

Novara — Phil Anderson, 
of Australia, wanning up for 


tomorrow’s final classic of the 
season, the Giro di Lom- 
bardia, found the sprint of the 
combined Italians just too 
much for him in yesterday’s 
curtain-raiser, die 128-mile 
Giro di Piemonte. 

Gianni Bugno snatched vic- 
tory from Enrico Grimani. 

Racing at an average 2Smph 
over the Piedmont hills, a 
group of 10, including Ander- 
son. escaped and just kept 
clear of the pack before the 
finish in Novara. 


RESULT: 1. G Bugno ®.4ftr 35rrtn 36wc 
2, 6 Grtmart (5*3. J F ! 


Bernard (Fr£ 4. P 

Anderson (Ausj: 5. C Lang JFoQ: 8. Q 
Dudos-Lassate|Frt:7,Ffk»signdl(®;a 
W Dele Casa^Q: 9. A Actarmam 


10. J Kuurn{ 


f aB same time. 


CRICKET 


DeFreitas earns his place 
in squad ahead of Foster 


England have main tain ed 
the positive theme of their 
first few days in Australia by 


naming the strongest available 
squad for; 


tomorrow’s opening 
three-day fixture against a 
Queensland Country XI at 
Bundabeig. Only Allan Lamb, 
whose left knee is still recover- 
ing from the effects of an 
operation last month, pre- 
vents England from selecting 
the likely Test 12. 

Perhaps the most significant 
selection is that of Philip 
DeFreitas, the 20-year-old 
Leicestershire all-rounder, 
who has pushed his way into 
the squad ahead of Neil 
Foster. But the impressive 
way DeFreitas has performed 
in the nets so far makes the 
decision hardly surprising. 

Lamb’s absence at least 
gives BUI Athey a chance to 
build on his encouraging start 
The Gloucestershire opener 
will bat at No. 4. 

The good news for England 
is thattbe captain, Mike 
Gatling, and Ian Botham are 
both almost certain to play. 


despite minor scares earlier 
this week. 

Getting, who has had a 
throat infection, will stay on 
antibiotics until the match 
starts. He had a solo net 
practice yesterday at The 
Gabba, Brisbane's Test 
ground, and declared himself 
happy enough. Botham, 
meanwhile, has responded to 
treatment on an infected big 
toe. 

“We want to win all the 
games we play," Gatling said, 
who agreed that the squad was 
near to Test strength. “Lamb 
wasn't considered because be 
needs a little more rehabilita- 
tion on his knee. He is not for 
away from match fitness, but 
it is a long tour and there is no 
point taking any chances." 

If the pitch at Bundabergis 
as bare as locals expect, En- 
gland will probably play two 
spinners in John Emburey and 
Phil Edmonds and omit a pace 
bowler. The opposition is 
likely to be about minor 
county standard. 

England's players were 
given yesterday off after then- 


efforts earlier in the week, and 
most of them spent the time 
playing golf or sightseeing. 

But for Botham it was 
business before leisure. He 
was given permission by Peter 
Lush, the England manager, to 
take part in two promotional 
events set up by his Australian 
agent First he presented 
awards to junior players of a 
Brisbane dub, then visited a 
shopping centre. 

All such activities — and 
there are more being planned 
for Botham — have to be 
cleared tv Lush, who said: 
“Provided the project is fair 
and reasonable and does not 
interfere with cricket then 
am happy to accept it" 

The England management 
are trying hard to keep the 
pressure off Botham. But like 
it or not be is the man 
everyone wants to meet. As 
yet there have been no official 
approaches for any of tire 
other 15 players to make paid 
public appearances. 

ENGLAND: WN Slack, B C Brood. D 
Gam. C W J Atiwy. *M W Gating. I T 
Botham. J E Emtiuray. P H Edmonds. tB 
N French. G R Dfltoy. G C Sawfl. p a J 
DaFrattu 




Brave resistance by Croft 


From a Special Correspondent Stuttgart 

Annabel Croft put up brave service game to love and the when 1 hit the next three into 


but ultimately fruitless resis- 
tance to the power of Martina 
Navratilova, losing 6-2, 6-0 in 
the second round of the 
Porsche Tennis Grand Pxix 
here yesterday. 

The match lasted 49 min- 
utes, and if anything could be 
singled out from die world 
champion's array of weapons, 
it was her speed that left Miss 
Croft standing. 

“She was so test across the 
net She gets to it about three 
seconds fester than anyone 
else," the British No. 1 said. “I 
felt like I just wanted to go out 
there and have a go and I 
actually played quite well." 

Miss Croft served first and 
was able to hold the five- 
minute opening game. That 
helped ease any tension she 
might have felt, but then Miss 
Navratilova won ha own 


pressure was on. 

Miss Navratilova took a 4-1 
lead, but then struggled to 
hold serve in the sixth game, 
eventually succeeding after 
three deuces. Miss Croft then 
held ha own serve before 
Miss Navratilova took the 
first set 

Miss Croft, who earlier this 
week ousted Jo Dune, found 
ha resistance slipping in the 
second set but was still able to 
laugh when she hit blistering 
service returns that left ha 
opponent flat-footed. 

“I might make two great 
shots in a game, but you have 
to work so much harder to 
make those points then you 
would have to do against any 
other player." explained Miss 
Croft. “I was laughing at those 
service returns because they 
were lucky. I proved that 


the bottom of the net' 

All in all Miss Croft enjoyed 
ha first encounter with Miss 
Navratilova and “the match 
was played in a good spirit and 
I enjoyed myself I didn’t 
really have a chance to get 
nervous. 

• SYDNEY: Ivan Lendl and 
Boris Becker fell foul of 
officialdom hoe yesterday 
during their second round 
matches in the Australian 
indoor tennis championship 
Lendl, the world No. 1, was 
warned after receiving a code 
violation for time wasting in 
the opening set of his 6-4. 6-4 
win ova the Australian quali- 
fier Beta Carta. Becker, the 
Wimbledon champion, fared 
even worse. He collected 
AS500 fine for racquet abuse 
during his 6-4, 7-5 victory 
gainst Australian John 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Gloves on 
for Bruno 


Frank Bruno put on his 
gloves for the first time since 
July 20 when his heavyweight 
world championshop pros- 
pects were crushed by Time 
Witherspoon at the Canning 
Town gymnasium yesterday 
as unpaid sparring partner to 
Gary Mason, his heavyweight 
staUemate, who is preparing 
to fight Donny Long at Wem- 
bley on November 4. 

“1 am returning a favour. 
Gary has helped me and Fra 
helping him” said Bruno, 
although Terry Lawless, his 
manager does not want him 
training before Christmas. 
Bruno may then resume his 
career in March. 



TV tradition 


The Embassy world indoor 
angles championship at Coat- 
bridge from February 7 to 15 
will be played in sets for the 
first time, instead of the 
traditional 21 up. It follows 
the example of the oiha 
televised bowls events, the 
Superbowl in Manchester and 
the United Kingdom champ- 
ionship at Preston. 


Troubled tie 


Adams: France-bound 

Adams wooed 


Doncaster duo 


Doncaster rugby league dub 
Tony Ken 


have signed Tony Kemp, a 
un da-21 international centre 
and Teimadge Sharrock, a 
second row forward hum 
Waitara, a top New Zealand 
dub. 


Day in charge 


Paul Day, a forma inter- 
national. aged 27. has been 
appointed chairman of 
England’s table tennis selec- 
tors, taking from Peter Char- 
ters, while Jill Parka, the 1 976 
European champion, joins the 
selection committee. 


Neil Adams. Britain’s judo 
Olympic silver medal winner, 
is to leave the country to take 
up ajob.in France. Adams’s 
decision is the result of a row 
between him and the British 
Judo Association. His former 
colleagues in the British team 
see it as a disaster as there is 
no one with the same tech- 
nical expertise as Adams. 

Report page 32 

LeMond faith 

Greg LeMond, the first 
American winner of the Tour 
de France in July, has renewed 
his contract in Paris with his 
La Vie Claire cycling team, 
until the end of 1988. LeMond 
said he would only consider 
changing teams if an Ameri- 
can corporation offered to 
sponsor a top-ranking Ameri- 
can squad. 


The Cyprus government 
have advised the APOEL 
football dub not to go to 
Istanbul for a European Cup 
second round tie with Bes- 
itkas, the Turkish team be- 
cause of strained relations 
between the two countries. 


Cannons fined 


InterCity-Cannons, the 
defending champions of the 
American Express premia 
league, have been fined £300 
for foiling to display the 
correct promotional material 
on their new all-transparent 
court at their home 
uure last week. 


Fudge back 


Paula Fudge, the national 
ten-mile road running cham- 
pion, leads the Hounslow to 
defend the Southern women’s 
road relay championship at 
Aldershot tomorrow with 
Jackie Cooper and Annette 
Roberts. 


Hoddle makes 


Robson gasp 
in admiration 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


Glenn Hoddle has. at last, 
walked out of the shadows of 
uncertainty. Since ii has taken 
him six years to collect 40 
England caps, his journey 
towards international recog- 
nition has been long, slow and 
often disrupted His arrival, 
timed to within a fortnight of 
his 29th birthday, is therefore 
an the more reason for 
celebration. 

He started it m 1930 at the 
invitation of Ron Greenwood, 
Bobby Robson's predecessor. 
There has since never been 
any question about Hoddle s 
technical ability, which has 
been compared justifiably to 
that of the golden Brazilians, 
but doubts about his mental 
and physical commitment 
have always hung over the 
wisdom of bis selection. 

At home, that is. Foreign 
opponents have been be- 
mused, and equally relieved. 


do that and stitt time his mns 
into the dfiager area. Wefcada 
long dial about it on Tuesfey 
night and it worked wed 


“Hoddle made a couple of 
an Rxgef 


REHAMNG FIXTURES: Nove mb er 1£ 
England * Yugoslavia. Turkey * Nonnem 
Ireland. Anfl 1: Nonnem Inland * 
England. April 2& Northern Ireland v 
Yugoslavia. Turkey v England. October 
i* Yugoslavia « Norflwm Ireland. En- 
gland vTuSiw. November TV. YugosUwa 
v Enrtiand. Norttam Ireland v Turkay 
December IS; Turicay v Yugoslav* 


whenever Hoddle has been 
omitted from the side. He may 
not run around like a dervish 
or tackle like a steam hammer 
but they regarded the quality 
of his passing and the width of 
his imagination as potentially 
for more fearsome weapons. 

Bobby Robson once stated 
tha t he planned to build 
England's future around 
Hoddlc's talent. Sub- 
sequently. like Greenwood, he 
felt that it was an expensive 
and unreliable luxury that was 
too often hidden from view. 
Both recognized that he could 
change the destiny of a game, 
but they were never convinced 
that be would 

Tottenham Hotspur solved 
the same problem by lifting 
the burden of responsibility 
on to someone else's shoul- 
ders. Ardiles was bought to 
assume the role of an attentive 
prompter, constantly provid- 


miwakes but you can , 
that over 90 minutes. I fold 
him that he couktaT afford to 
wave goodbye to pteyeta « 
they went past him and- he 
responded. He was in there 
tackling. He also moved for- 
ward more than he has done 
for two years and wc need torn 
to do that. 

"He can do anything m 
training, you know, and his 
shooting..." Robson mo- 
mentarily lost in admiration. 

“He was unlucky with that 
lob that just cleared the far 
and with that header that hit 
the post as welt His ft oiti u x a 
can be lethal He scored 18 

r !s three years ago but then 
went through a stage of 
stopping 25 yards out. Yes, he 
did well. I was as pleased with 
him as I have ever bees" 
Though his namesake was 
less prominent, Robson is 
convinced that his captain wifl 
be “suited to his new rote. He 
has so much to contribute and 
his presence alone is worth 
half a player. He has bad more., 
than his fair share of injuries 
and I hope he now has five 
dear years ahead of torn." 

.As long as the others remain 
fit, Robson is unlikely to alter, 
his line-up for the tie against 
Yugoslavia next m onth, ex- 
cept in the middle of his 
defence. Although Butcher 
was once more a solid pillar, 
Watson was shaky. His dis- 
tribution in particular was » 
wild as one of his chattmgei 
li looked as though he had 
mistaken Stewart for the baU. 
Robson, sitting a couple of 
yards away from the incident 
thought that Watson “was 
going to give Billy Bingham a 
wedding present by kicking his 
left winger into his lap. I was 
surprised that Stewart got up 
and carried on”. 







ing him with possession, and 
thus season Roberts is actir 


Scholar’s no 


• :»r 


is acting as 

his protective shield. 

On Tuesday morning Rob- 
son selected a new assistant 
for Hoddle, a player who 
could provide “the necessary 
defensive reassurance". The 
chosen man was Bryan Rob- 
son. Although they were able 
to put the plan into practice 
for no more than half an hour, 
their partnership flourished at 
Wembley on Wednesday 

The Mend, one of the most’ 
encouraging features of the 3-0 
victory ova Northern Ireland 
in the opening European 
championship qualifying tie 
in group four, will be bene- 
ficial for all but Wilkins. His 
chances of reaching a century 
of caps would seem to rest cm 
the availability of Hoddle. 

“I had to get more out of 
Hoddle as an attacking 
player", Robson reflected yes- 
terday. “That is where bis gifts 
lie. I decided to try Bryan in a 
holding position since he can 


The Tottenham chairman 
Irving Scholar, will not be 
saassdfefg for the place on the 
Football League management 
committee vacated by Luton’s 
John Smith. Smith resigned 
from fa committee earlier this 
week in fa wake of fa Luton 
Littfewoods Cap affair and 
Scholar had been widely 
tipped to replace trim. 


’’ 

V- 


M-! *? - • - ■ 


■ji •» .: 


frircsi- ■... 
•tV': :* 


Waddle, who answered his 
audible critics in the audience 
by daiming England’s second; 
goal, will be allowed “to win 
the crowd ova". Lineker, the 
scorer of the other two, al- 
ready has. Appropriately, 
Adidas yesterday gave him his 
reward, a golden boot, fir 
finishing as the League's top 
marksman. 

Lineker also stole the in- 
dividual honours against a 
young Irish side being devel- 
oped realistically for fa 
World Cup finals in 1990. •. 


5C 


1 ibis 


Gough’s colleague 
worries Scotland 



J UnU>r : • j 1 j 

- - i.iin 


By Clive White 


I 


Richard Gough's attitude 
towards his new Tottenham 
team-mate, Nice Claessen, is 
likely to become somewhat 
co nissed over fa next couple 
of years. There will be times 
when he will want him to 
succeed, other times fail. But 
Claessen’s goal-scoring ap- 
titude, as illustrated by bis 
three goals on Tuesday for 
Belgium, will be a constant 
reminder for Gough of what 
his other team, Scotland, pa- 
tently lack. 

Unless this gaping dif- 
ference between these two 
opposing countries is closed 
very qnickly — tike next month 
when Scotland receive Luxem- 
bourg — then fa Scots might 
as well call it a day in group 
seven of thh European 
championship. 

Their tfeird consecutive 
„jaUe$s draw against fa 
Republic of Ireland in Dublin 
on Wednesday, though sat- 
isfied their needs of the mo- 
ment, did nothing for those of 
(he future. In a five-team 
group with four fairly evenly 
matched sides, as reflected by 
An* drawn games among 
them, fa overall winner is 
goiog to be fa side who most 
effectively pnmmel the 
punchbag, namely Luxem- 
bourg. Belgium hit the mark 
six times in midweek. 

Unlike Scotland, who can 
fantasize that things will get 
better just by the 

names np front fa Irish have 
no such recourse to dream. 
They have no one better than 
Stapleton or Aldridge who 
both sweated blood and tears 
in the Irish cause on Wednes- 
day yet still barely managed a 
shot mi target between them. 

Scotland have scored just 
twice in their last seven games 
and fa rot goes even deeper 
than that — 12 goals in fa fat 
19 games. Indeed, not count- 
ing McAvennie's goal against 
Australia last November, you 


have to go bade to November, 
1984, to find fa last time a 
Scottish forward scored. John- 
ston and Dalglish shared fare 
goals then against Spain and 
are just one of fa variety of 
permutations that Jock Stein, 
Alex Ferguson and Roxburgh 
have tried since. 

Just about all of them have 
been exhausted, though «bat 
appears to be fa most obvious 
one, Dalglish and McAvenme, 
has only been tried once in the 
match against Australia in 
Glasgow. This combination 
has the right ingredients of 


Efcihiy*?? 



Group Sevan table 

_ P W 0 

Belgium 
Repot irafand 

Scotland 
Btfgana 
Luxembourg 


F A 9* 
* a 3 
2 2 • 2. 
O' o * 
0 0 1 
DO 0 


2 11 
2 0 2 
2 0 2 
1 0 1 

„ 10 0,... - 

Kwaitt nxtlRE& nuuto «t 

Scotland * Luxamboura. UuwW r* 
Bettum v Butpna. February 7't*ȣ 
Scotland v Republic of tretaod. Aw»± 
Bwiranav Republic ol tretentt r 
Seodand. aim 2th RapuMe of 





^wiJuxambowgvButaarm.mmwj* 
b*r * RapuMe ol Ireland v Uvtmtxxti. 
September 23: Bulga ;: v Salgtom. OC»“ 
ber 14: Scotland v QalgW. R«| 

Ireland v Mgarti. NMwtdMr 11: 

1 Luxemb ourg; Bulgaria v 

* Luxembourg v Beodand. 


canning and pace hat 
Dalglish’s form for Liverpool 
this season has yet to scale the 
peaks offat. 

The Sharp-Johnston ndx 
looked right for Wednesday's 
fob hot they never seridwdy 
troubled the Irish centre- 
backs 

Defence reroafa Scotland's 
surviving virtue even if fay 
have succeeded in overlook^ 
the obvious daints of. .fair, 
most distinguished defender.' 
Hansen. TSsa Liverpool cap- 
tain was ran a close race for 
matt of fa match by. appro* 
Primely, his centre-back part- 
ner, Gough. That, at least, d 
one association fay hate' 
finally got right. They are 
wbody’s fool, as 

may discover whet., 

visit Brussels nut April ! 


■^tl! 


/