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TIMES 


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after inflation 
fuels new fear 


By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 
Efi-om by ,he Chance., or f rom 14 percent *3^ 

— the first increase this year. 

The retail price index rose 
0 per cent on the month 
mainly as a result of higjier 
petrol prices, combined with 




Mr N^e. Lawson 
WB J™ B . in the pound ap- 
have had linJe effect 
yesterday^ The three-week old 
tussle between the Govern- 
mem view of the economic 
outlook and that of thc-finan- 
aa ‘ markets continued with 
another fail in sterling. 

The failure of the foreign 
exchange markets to respond 
• to Mr Lawson’s ( per ceniage 
point rise in interest rates and 
n»s explanation at the Man- 
sion House dinner on Thurs- 
day makes another rise In 
interest rates more likely. 
Rates in money markets yes- 
terday indicated a rise of V>J 
percentage point 

The Halifax Building Soci- 
ety. Britain's biggest said that 
it had delayed a decision on 
putting up mortgage rates 
until next week when general 
trends in interest rates are 
clearer. The societies do not 
want the administrative ex- 
pense of increasing rates until 
they know more clearly at 
what level they are likely to 
settle. 

The main concern in the 
markets is the prospect of a 
rise in the rate of inflation. If 
the (all in the pound is not 
checked prices will rise. 

Last month the rale of 
inflation accelerated slightly 


an increase in the price of 
clothing and footwear, 
draught beer and a range of 
other goods and services. 

A rise in morigage raies will 
push up the inflation rate 

fester. An increase of 1 per ch - „ 

cent which is expected by the' ^ s c J^ Earopean M °ne- 


In the gilt-edged market 
prices dropped by % of a point 
in longer dated stocks and by 
*A of a point in shorter dated. 
The equity market, however, 
remained calm with the 
Financial Times index dosing 
3.9 higher at 1281-5. 

The ' disappointment in 
markets centred on Mr 
Lawson's failure to offer any 
firm commitment to member- 



• There is £12,000 to 
be won tocbqr jn The ' 
rimes Portfolio Gold 
competition— the 
Of: 


Leading article 17 
Inflation figures 21 
Pound at record low 21 

building societies to be the 
minimum increase would 
push up inflation by a further . 
Vz percent. 

If rates- have to go up by 2 
per cent then inflation will be 
headed back towards 4 per 
cenL 

Higher inflation is likely' to 
damage the Government’s 
chances of re-election. But 
there is stiH plenty of time for 
mortgage rates to come down 
again well before an election is 
called — and this would trim 
back the retail price index 
once more. 

Financial markets were 
expecting the increase. Bat the 
pound fell because of dis- 
appointment with the Man- 
sion House speech by Mr 
Lawson. 

Sterling closed at 673 per 
cent of its 1975 value com- - 
pared with the previous close 
of 67.7. Against the dollar it 
was a cest weaker at S 1 .4302. 


Mr Stephen Lewis, econom- 
ics director of Phillips and 
Drew, the stockbroker, said: 
“The feeling is that sterling 
will probably fell further un- 
less there is positive news 
about joining the EMS. 
Manypeople were dismayed 
about what the Chancellor 
said about credit and the 
broad measure of the money 
supply. They feel he has too 
laid back an approach to thwt 
problem." 

Markets are now hoping 
that something may come out 
of the meeting between the 
Bundesbank President Herr 
Kari Otto Poehl and Mrs 


Powell 
faces 
campus 
riot 

By Mark Dowd 
Education Reporter 

Mr Enoch Powell had to 
abandon a speed) at Bristol 
University yesterday . after a 
group of anarchists calling 
themselves "Effective Action" 
stormed the platform. 

He escaped unhurt from ibe 
back of the building and was 
quickly driven away to the 
Bristol West Conservative 
headquarters. 

The university’s Conser- 
vative Association had in- 
vited the Ulster Unionist MP 
for South Down to speak on 
law reform. 

Mr Powell faced about 100 
jeering demonstrators in the 
foyer of the student union 
building near Clifton. Bristol. 


Photograph 


Ttetcheronmonday. b5 

informed sources have in- I Edinburgh rahs his eye at Krammg yesterday, 

dicaled that there is no change 
in the Government attitude to 
the EMS. This remains one of 
being willing to join m prin- 
ciple but feeling that the time 
is not yet ripe. 


the Dolce of 


Figures next week on retail 
sales and on the trade balance 
may also have an impact on 
markets. 


Typhoon threat 
to royal cruise 



lesloss 


* £4,600 r - V.' 1- V •• - *- . - 


From Alan HaiHlw n, IT imm i ng 

otherwise majestic accompanying the royal party 
have been asking for a precise 
definition of the word Sval- 
ly", following the widely re- 
potted crassness of the Duke 
ofEdinbtugbtn telling a group 
of Scottish students that he 
found Peking boring, and all 
Chinese dit-eyed. Explana- 


•T< 

was shared by two 
readers — Mrs Hazel 
Talbot, of St Albans, 
Herts, and Sir Derek 
Mitchell, of Putney, 
London. Details, 
pages. 

• Portfolio fists, 
pages 20 and 25; rules 
and how to play, 
page 39. 


On This Day 

Ten VCs were won at the Lone 
Pine trenches in the Gallipoli 
pcnsinsula by the heroic 
Australian Fust Brigade in the 
Dardenelles in 1 9 1 5 Page 17 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Takeover talk 

There was speculation in the 
City that Turner & Newall, the 
asbreios group, has been given 
the go-ahead to bid again for 
AE, the engineers Page 21 

Saudi threat 

Sheikh Ahmcd-Zaki Yamani. 
the Saudi Arabian Oil Min- 
ister. said his country would 
stop limiting oil production if 
Opec did not agree on a new 


quota system 


Page 21 


TIMES MONEY 


Your loan 

How much more will your 
mortgage cost you? The ques- 
tion is asked in today’s 12- 
page Familv Money section 
Paiges 26 to 37 


Hockey climax 

The semi-finals of the hockey 
World Cup take Place ax 
Willesdcii. north London^ this 
afternoon. England play West 
Germany, while Australia 
meet the Soviet Union in the 
other match to decide the 
teams for tomorrow s final 

Page 44 

Gatting fit 

Mike Galling, the England 
cricket captain, has recovered 
from a chest infection m time 
to take part in the first match 
of the Australian tour today 
Page 41 


Home News 2-4 
Overseas a.® 
APPi* JS 
Arts *2 

Birtbs, deaths. 

marriages 
BridK* ,, y 

ftouotfa: 21-25 
Chws H 

Cutnt „ 1; 

CrouiMnh 13.20 
t)iar>- |J 

Pea hi res 7-!o 


La« Report 
Leaders 
Letters 

Obitmx> 

PSiriiaioMt 
ReUslofl 
Safe Room 
Science 

Theatres, etc 15 

TV & Rad® 43 

Weather 20 


****** 


Barcelona will stage the 
1992 Olympic Games. 

Birmingham, who had been - 
hoping to hold the first Games 
in Bntain since 1948, yes- 
terday finished fifth out of the 
six contenders in the ballot of 
the 18-member international 
Olympic Committee, polling 
only eight votes. 

Sebastian Coe, who had 
featured in Birmingham's 
campaign of giving the Games 
back to the athletes, said: 
'‘There was nothing to be 
ashamed of Given a late start 
it was as good a bid as 
possible." 

The extravaganza of bid- 
ding cost the rival cities £80 
million, enough to stage all the 
summer Gaines op to and 
including Tokyo in. 1964. 

But yesterday Barcelona 
and Albertville, France, who 
will host the winter Games in 
ihe centenary of Baron de 
Coubertin's speech that re- 
vived the Olympic Move- 
ment, were not regretting their 
expenditure as the delegations 
began celebrations. 

But Senor Pasqual Mara- 
gall. the Mayor of Barcelona, 
admitted that he expected the 
danger of political interference 
in the Games to increase over 
the next six years, although he 
hoped they would be insulated 
from politics. The last three 
Olympics had been damaged 
by boycotts. 


Amsterdam were the first of 
The six cities to be eliminated, 
polling five votes on the first 
round for the summer Games. 
Birmingham did not pick up 
any of Amsterdam's votes and 
were eliminated in the second 
round. Barcelona collected the 
necessary absolute majority 
with 47 votes in the third 
round. 

Mr Denis Howell Labour 
MP for Small Heath and 


David Miller 


44 


chairman of the Birmingham 
bid, said: “Barcelona had i 
three years .and a £6 million 
start over us. That is a trig 
advantage." 

Mr Howell said he had 
complained to Senor Juan 
Antonio Samaranch. Presi- 
dent of the IOC who was bom 
in Barcelona, about activiles 
here: “There has been loo 
much heckling of delegates, 
too much political pressure, | 
and too many extraneous | 
factors.” 

But Birmingham had estab- 
lished itself as an Olympic 
venue for the future. 

• BIRMINGHAM: Civic 
leaders here were furious yes- 
terday that their Olympic bid 
had received only eight votes 
in Lausanne, but they pledged 
to bid again to stage the 

Continued on page 20 col 7 


The 

royal tour of China is ap- 
proaching its finale clouded 
only by the nnpredictability of 
the Duke of Edinburgh's off* 
the-cuff remarks and the 
of typhoons in the 
linaSea. 

Typhoon Ellen, now roam- 
ing off the southern coast, 
threatens to scupperi.iSe rojnt 
party’s pteas for a {leisurely 
two-day cruise abdaid ibe 
Royal Yacht Britannia from 
Canton to Hong Kong. 

Britannia was yest e rd a y 
steaming south of Shanghai to 
collect the Queen and her en- 
tourage from Canton and de- 
liver them to the start of the 
State visit to Hong Kong an 
Tuesday. Bad weather in the 
area threatens to dampen 
todays Canton programme 
and if storms prevent the 
cruise the Royal party phns to 
leave Canton by air today and 
stay privately m the Crown 
Colony until the scheduled 
start of the public 
Chinese o 


tipss that a wiaiy & tie fctfr | 
pickled cucumber in : 

the chip shop counter fehw j 
tritfy added to Ch i n es e mys- ~ 
tificatioa at the way of pale 
Europeans and their florid 
tabloid newspapers. 

The Chinese Foreign Min- 
istry, in its first official com- 
ment on the Duke’s remark, 
yesterday dismissed the in- 
cident as of no consequence. 

British diplomatic sources 
in China feu- that the Chinese 
will retaliat e in some subtle 

some 

talks over « n p k f | i T"i WM , n of 
the treaty on 
where some residents 

Continued on page 20, col 8 


Police body refuses to 
pay for Stalker costs 


Greater Manchester Police 
Authority yesterday refused to 
pay Mr John Stalker's £21,000 
legal costs and instead de- 
manded changes in the Police 
and Criminal Evidence Act. 

Members of the autbority: 
said because payment of the 
Deputy Chief Constabkfs bill 
was not covered by the Act by 
settling it they would be 
setting a dangerous precedent" 
and exposing other local 
authorities to claims. 

The authority’s decision is 
another Wow to the 47-year- 


old senior police officer who 
was suspended from duty for 
three months while his friend- 
ship with Mr Kerin Taylor, a 
businessman, and alleged 
association with known crim- 
inals was investigated by the 
West Yorkshire Chief Con- 
stable, Mr Colin Sampson. 

During yesterday’s meeting 
the authority recommended 
that Mr Stalker now apply to 
his own union, the Associ- 
ation of Chief Police Officers, 
for help in paying the bill. 


Wapping 

violence 

attacked 

By Sheila Gann 
Lord Harris of Greenwich, a 
former Labour Home office 
Minister, condemned the vi- 
olence outside the News Inter- 
nationa] plant at Wapping, 
east London, as bearing no 
relation _ to “peaceful 
persuasion". 

“This vicious hooliganism 
has gone on for many months 
and is beginning to have a 
profound effect on the quality 
of policing through tbe Metro- 
politan Police district because 
of the call on resources." 

This was the second lime in 
two days that Lord Harris, 
who sits on tbe Social Demo- 
cratic Party . benches, has 
raised the Wapping dispute in 
the Lords. 

Lord Caithness, a Home 
Office Minister, told peers 393 
policemen had been injured in 
the dispute 

“In this country there is a 
long tradition of peaceful pro- 
test within the law. But it is 
clear that some of those taking 
part in these demonstrations 
have attended with the inten- 
tion of committing and 
provoking violence.” ne said. 

“The wa> forward lies in 
sensible co-operation between 
the police, and responsible 
Trade unionists. " .. 

- Pnrfiaiof.nr, Page 4 


Israel continues hunt for navigator 


From Iau Murray 
Jerusalem 

Israeli helicopters yesterday 
continued to scour the hills 
south of Sydon in an attempt 
to find the missing navigator 
from a Phantom _ which 
crashed on a bombing raid 
there on Thursday afternoon. 

Other Israeli aircraft carried 
out mock bombing runs over 
the area through the day. 

The pilot of the crashed 
aircraft was rescued by heli- 
copter on Thursday, strapped 
to the undercarriage as he was 
flow tp safety because there 
was no room for him aboard. 

Amal Shia Militia in Sidon 


claimed ytstertby to be hold- 
ing the missing airman -as a 
prisoner, safe apart from a 
broken arm. Journalists were 
shown Israeli equipment and 
a parachute- to jonrriatisis-buf- 
military sources here' re- 
mained unconvinced by the 
story. 

On Thursday, Amal issued- 
a. series of conflicting claims, 
saying it had captured -both * 
men, then denying h, theii 
saying it bad captured one., 
while the other .was dead. 
Israeli silence about the rescue 
of the pilot over a six hour - 
period prompted the stories. • . 

Details of the two crewmen 
have been withheld so that: 


any group daiming to have 
taken the navigator prisoner 
would only know his name 
and description if h was telling 
tbe troth. With five or six rival 
armed militia in the area 
Israel will need conclusive 
proof before h calls off the 
search. 

• BEERITT: An Israeli air 
force navigator, who para- 
chuted from his burning jet 
bomber during an air raid m 
southern Lebanon on Thurs- 
day, was reported yesterday u> 
be a prisoner-of-war of the 
Shia Muslim Amal Militia 
(Juan Carlos Gumucio 
writes). 

Helicopter snatch, page 5 


when he arrived shortly before 
1 pm. Some displayed posters 
saying: “Mr Powell - we don’t 
like you.” 

The speech, before an audi- 
ence of about 700 people, had 
been expected to last an hour 
and a half, but after 10 
minutes of barracking, mainly 
from a small group of youths 
at the front of the balL Mr 
Powell interrupted his address 
and said: “I intend to stay here 
until I make myself beard. 
You are not arguing with me. 
You are trying to intimidate 
me.” 

Then about 10 youths 
surged forward and attacked 
the barrier between speaker 
and audience, pulled over 
microphones, and threw ta- 
bles and glasses into tbe 
crowd. 

Mr Powell was ushered 
away by Rugby Club security 
offiials and the student union 
executive abandoned the 
meeting and evacuated the 
haK 

Mr Andrew McAulifee, 
aged 21. a Rugby Club mem- 
ber, said: “It was absolutely 
terrifying. People went ab- 
solutely beserk.” 

Bristol was the scene of 
vHfent disruption to another 
tedurro delivered by ftwe&or 
Joan Vincent, after which die 
univeraty this year began 
disciplinary proceedings 
against several students. The 
protesters objected to Profes- 
sor Vincent’s allegedly “racist 
and sexist” writings for The 
Sim newspaper. 

Mr David Gottlieb, presi- 
dent of the student union, said 
after yesterday’s incident that 
all the trouble had been caused 
by outsiders who infiltrated a 
peaceful demonstration by 
about 40 students in the foyer. 

He dismissed rumours that 
about 200 union -cards and a 
stamp had gone missing be- 
fore the event. 

Mr Philip Malcolm, chair- 
man of the Bristol University 
Conservative Association, 
said he was appalled and 
disgusted but not surprised. 

Mr Powell declined to 
comment 


Row costs 
Jaguar 
200 cars 

By Craig Seton 

Production of the new Jag- 
uar saloon car remained at a 
standstill yesterday because of 
a dispute over an efficiency 
study at the company's Cov- 
entry plant. 

About 800 assembly work- 
ers who struck on Thursday 
returned to work yesterday, 
but walked out almost im- 
mediately, when talks failed to 
settle the dispute. 

By last night nearly two 
days' production of the new 
car had been lost and an 
estimated 200 models in totaL 
The new saloon range went on 
display this week at the Inter- 
national Motor Show in Bir- 
mingham 

A Jaguar spokesman said 
that the company was deter- 
mined to press on with the 
study being undertaken on the 
assembly line in an attempt to 
improve productivity. 

The majority of the assem- 
bly workers involved belong 
to the Transport and General 
Workers Union. • 


City yuppies swing into Saturday 


By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

The Stock Exchange is open 
for “dealing" today, the first 
time in its 250-year history 
that ft has opened on a 
■weekend. . 

The normally deserted 
streets of tbe City will roar to 
the sound of Porsdws as the 
hew “yuppies" and the City 
establishment rehearse what 
life will be like after Big Bang 
on October 27. 

Getting to arid from work is 
the first but not the least of the 
problems. Saturday early- 
morning trains are less 


crowded but less frequent than 
on weekdays, and ‘The 
Drain.” the underground rail- 
way from Waterloo to die 
Bank, stops running at 1:30. 
But it is the exercise itself 
which will be causing most- 
worries, •• 

Today's dealing, however. ! 
is not the real thing but a trial 
to see if the new system will 
work. 

Market-makers in; shares 
and government stocks will 
spend tbe day furiously trad- 
ing fictitious shareholdings 
worth hundreds of millions of 
fictitious pounds. 


To add to the realism the 
City’s most frequented 
“watering holes” will be open 
to refresh the stock market 
men and women at lunchtime. 

A Stock Exchange spokes- 
man said last night *‘We have 
warned the (oral wine bars 
and eateries of what is going 
on. Many are breaking tra- 
dition and opening on 
Saturday.” Normally, the bars 
and restaurants of the Square 
Mile are closed from Friday 
night until Monday morning 
because of the lack of custom. 

The stock market firms are 
not all creating this as a dress 
rehearsal in the full sense of 



the term. Phillips & Drew, the 
long-established broker (now 
owned by the Union Bank of 
Switzerland), is requiring its 
staff to arrive in suits and ties. 
In a more relaxed vein, Salo- 
mon Brothers - the big 
American securities house — is 
allowing casual dress. 

• By the end of the rehearsal, 
firms will know whether the 
effort, the massive investment 
in equipment and the "golden 
hello” transfer fees, some- 
times running into seven fig- 
ures. have given them a team 
ready for the real battle. 

Big Bang rehearsal,- page 21 


1 


Karpov 

papers 

Kremlin 

cracks 

From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

A subdued-looking Mr Vik- 
tor Karpov, the Soviet Un- 
ion's chief arms negotiator, 
yesterday returned to Moscow 
from Western Europe and 
swiftly called a press con- 
ference to deny all suggestions 
that he had been guilty of 
voicing a different interpreta- 
tion of the Soviet position 
than Mr Mikhail Gorbachov. 

Mr Karpov underlined that 
the Kremlin is not now pre- 
pared to sign a separate agree- 
ment on reducing medium- 
range nuclear weapons in 
Europe and vigorously denied 
Western news reports that he 
had suggested anything to the 
contrary during his visits to 
London and Bonn. 

“1 want to refute these 
allegations most emphatically. 

I never wanted to disprove Mr 
Gorbachov." Mr Karpov 
added in a hastily-delivered 
statement which bore all (he 
hallmarks of having been 
ordered by senior Politburo 
figures anxious to avoid 
accusations of a split 

“An agreement must cover 
all the main areas of the 
disarmament problem.” Mr 
Karpov said. “This is the 
substance of our initiative." 
But he re-affirmed that sepa- 
rate negotiations on medium- 
range missiles, strategic weap- 
ons and space arms would 
continue in Geneva 

In an effort to explain what 
he alleged was widespread 
misintepretation of his re- 
marks in London and Bonn, 
Mr Karpov said: “What I was 
saying is that we do not rule 
out the possibility of using the 
same machinery of negotia- 
tion that we used before.” 

He said that although agree- 
ments could be reached sepa- 
rately. they could not be 
signed until an agreement as a 
whole — including the limita- 
tion of Star Wars to the 
laboratory— was approved. 

Mr Karpov left tittle room 
.for misiQierpretaticai during 
his visits 10 London arid Boritf ; 
earlier this week (Nicholas 
Beesion writes). 

His statement yesterday dif- 
fered significantly front bis 
comment after meeting Mrs 
Margmct Thatcher, when he 
said in English: “We do not 
deny the possibility of finding 
a solution on medium-range 
nuclear weapons in Europe 
separately from space and 
nuclear offensive arms." 

Both publicly and privately, 
Mr Karpov made it clear that 
the Star Wars stumbling block 
could be by-passed 
Similarly in Bonn on 
Wednesday, Mr Karpov re- 
marked: “It has always been 
our position that INF can be 
dealt with and agreed upon as 
a separate issue. We are ready 
to discuss and solve this 
question separately if there is 
willingness on the part of the 
United Stales.” 


Exclusive 
next week 



The 

Fleet Street 
revolution 

A revolution that 
began when Rupert 
Murdoch moved 
The Times and 
three other 
newspapers to a 
new plant in east 
London led to one 
of this century’s 
most controversial 
disputes. But so 
far there has been 
no attempt at an 
objective account of 
its origins 

• On Monday, 

The Times begins 
the serialization 
of The End of the 
Street by Linda 
Melvem, an 
independent 
investigation into 
the events that 
changed 
newspaper 
history. The*book . 
highlights: 

• Secret talks at 
which Murdoch 
outlined his plans 
for a new London 
newspaper using 
high technology at a 
site r aw^y from 
the ravage of “ 
Fleet Street 

• The full story of 
Project X, during 
which an 
abandoned 
warehouse was 
used to test 
sophisticated 
computer 
equipment 
broughttoBritain in 
unmarked crates 

Next week 
only in 
The Times 


Pont 

shoot 

THE 

PIANIST. 


He's probably doing his best, of coura, he just isn't 
pktyng a Yamaha grand piano. 

If he were, you’d be hearing something quite 
different. Because fomoho craftsmen have been making 
superb grand pianos for nearly a ternary, using only the 
finest seasoned woods, and giving meticulous attention 


So that when you sit down to play a Yamaha 
grand piano, you will have o responsive, even touch 
(rod a pure, rich sound at your commmnL 

ft is on oddevement which is being noticed more 
and. more os Yamaha grand pianos continue to faid 
tbs way into the world’s tap concert hok and more 


An onfetary piona is sfriqry a means to on onfinary 
end. But if the piono is o Ynmoho grand, ttie end reserfr 
is always sheer (tefight - in ploying ... and listening. 


YAMAHA 


iff hitthsr information contact tomato Rams, Mount fume, 
Bfetchley, AUtoa Keynes MK1 It or phone 0908-71771. 


i 

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. * . 








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NEWS SUMMARY 


Engineering claim 


Britain's 1-5 million gn ghmprtng industry workers are 
seeking a pay increase of at least 7 per cent — more than 
twice the rate of inflation. 

Mr Bill Jordan, president of the Amalgamated 
Engineering Union, said yesterday that mooes expected 
national munmimi time rates to keep ap with the level of 
domestic settlements. 

“Those settlements are from 7 to 8 per cent and we 
should not want to see dm national rates drift from that sort 
of fever 1 , he sahLThe claim wonld not be inflationary or job 
destroying. 

National rates - now £101 .90 a week for skilled workers 
and £73.10 for the nnskiDed - apply only to shift, overtime 
and guaranteed week payments for most engineering 
workers 


Fans face 
drink test 


An electronic device to 
measure alcohol in the 
bread of football fans as 
they pass through turn- 
stiles may help to reduce 


Bullion 
charge 


The Akosentry, which 
costs £700 and measures 
about 1ft by 9in, was 
developed by Lion Lab- 
oratories, of Barry, Sooth 
Glamorgan. 

It will be able to tell a 
real vote fora a recording, 
and will provide a reading 
even if fans turn to (me side 
or speak through a scarf 
Dr Paul Wufiams, the 
company's marketing di- 
rector, said the device 
would appeal to dobs. 


A London solicitor was 
at Horseferry 
Magistrates' Court 
with handling 
cash proceeds of 
the £24$ million Brinks- 
Mat gold ba&kw nod. 

Mkhaei Relion, aged 48, 
of Carlisle Place, Victoria, 
was remanded in police 
custody for three days. 


He and Stephen Dono- 
van, a property dealer, aged 
34, of Elf Bow, Stepney, 
east London, who was re- 
manded in custody for a 
week, are charged with 
assisting in the realization 
of £250,000 cash proceeds 
of stolen gold 


Level crossings study 


The safety record of automatic open level crossings is to 
be studied alter the accident on an mummed level crossing 
at Lockjngfon, north of Hall, Humberside, in which nine 
people were killed. 

Thirty seven people were injured is the accident, on Jidy 
26, when a passenger train hit a van on the crossing. 

The study vriO be conducted by Professor Peter Stott, 
who is expected to report in six months. Mr David 
Mitchell; Minister of State for Tr an sport, raid yesterd ay 
no further automatic level crossings weald be approved 
until then. 

A public inquiry into the Lodrington accident was held 
last week. 


Irish pact 
protest 


-■.J. 


A case brought against a 
member of the European 
Parliament for non-pay- 
ment of rates was ad- 
journed yesterday after it 
was argued that he was 
entitled to imramrity. 

The Official Unionist 
Mr John Taylor, one of 
Ulster's three MEPs who 
is also MP at Westminster 
for Strangford, has pub- 
licly withheld payment of 
£920 rates in protest at the 
* Anglo-Irish agreement 


His counsel told a stipen- 
diary magistrate at Ar- 
magh yesterday that Mr 
'Taylor was entitled to 
immunity while the Earo- 
pean Pa rliament W85 in 
session. 



Police get riot film 


• The police won a fight yesterday to obtam ■taMished 
photographs and film of foe recent rioting in St Part's, 
Bristol. 

South-West News Service, foe Bristol-based news 
agency, consented to an order by Mr Justice Stout-Smith, 
during a bearing in camera at the High Court in Bristol, to 
hand over the material. A High Court action against two 
Bristol-based newspapers and a news agency wl m» refined 
to hand over photographs, taken during the riots was 
adjourned. 

• Mr Tom Torvey, foe Labour chairman of Avon and 
Somerset Police Airtfr rity, is resigning in protest at the po- 
lk* operation which is said to have led to foe riots. 


'• • ■ 1 t 

Manual workers walk out as electricity threat mounts 

Engineers act inUlster crisis 


White-collar engineers 
moved into Northern 
Ireland's strike-closed 
Ballylumfbrd power station 
yesterday, took over manual 
workers' duties and began 
“steaming up" the plant for a 
resumption of supply. 

In protest at the engineers' 
action, manual workers at one 
of Ulster's two other power 
stations, who had been work- 
ing normally, walked out in 
late afternoon and there were 
fears (hat their colleagues at 
the third station would join in. 

The move to break the 
electricity strike, which has 


crippled commerce and in- 
dustry in the province, came 
on the fourth day of the strike. 

The action angered the 400 
manual workers on strike at 
what is Northern Ireland's 
largest operational power sta- 
tion since the- even larger 
■KUroot was shut down some 
months ago for a two-year 
conversion to mixed coal-oil 
firing. 

Delegations of strikers were 
sent to the two smaller power 
stations, Belfast West and 
Cootkeragb, near London- 
derry, which together, working 
foil blast, supply little more 


than 60 per cent of the uormal 
weekday peak flow. 

Talks were renewed be- 
tween foe management and 
union officials over foe <&- 
pute whicb concerns five men 
suspended for ref using 10 
work with equipment which 
they deemed to be unsafe. 

The woihetsat Beffest West 
gave foe management four 


hours before they too, “puSed 


foe 


This^ey did at 530 pm, 
having extended their dead- 
line by more than two hours as 
the negotiators at NI Electric- 
ity headquarters talked on. 


The deadline, due to expire 
at 3 pm. was extended as the 
negotiators at the Northern 
Ireland Electricity Service's 
Belfast headquarters talked 
on. 

The chief union negotiator. 
Mr Tom Douglas, said the 
Ballyl um ford men were angry 
at the management’s action in 
sending in the power en- 
gineers. 

As a result Mr Douglas said 
he was recommending to na- 
tional officers that the un- 
official strike be given official 
union backing. 


ir the strike became official. 
Mr Keith Jones, of the Elec- 
trical Power Engine ers Assoo- 
ation. said, his members, 
currently working to restart 
Ballylumfbrd would have id 
think again. 

The situation last night was 
heading towards that which 
prevailed during foe 1974 
Protestant workers’ we 
strike, which toppled North- 
ern Ireland's only attempt at a 
power-sharing government 
when the solidly Protestant 
electricity workers supplied 
the strike with its crucial 
muscle. 


BP set for 
massive 
expansion 
at oilfield' 


By David Sapsted 


British Petroleum was given 
approval yesterday for 
£265 million development 
which will increase produc- 
tion tenfold at Wytch Farm 
oilfield in Dorset 
Approval by Dorset County 
Council of the development 
marks an important victory 
for BP after a two-and-a-half 
year battle to increase produc- 
tion at Wytch Farm, already 
Europe's largest onshore 
oilfield, from 6,000 to 60,000 
barrels a day. The move will 
rank Wytch Farm alongside a 
medium-size North Sea field. 

At foe same time, BP yes- 
terday increased its forecast of 
recoverable reserves .from the 
field from 200 million to 
230 million barrels. 

Mr Kneale Johnson, field 
manager, said last night that 
he was delighted the company 
had been able to satisfy local 
environmentalists and get 
council planning permission. 

Development at foe field 
wifl include expanding the 
existing 10-acre gathering 
centre to cover 33 acres of 
woodland; increasing the 
number of “nodding donkey” 
wells by 46, and using the 34- 
acre Furzey Island, in Poole 
Harbour , as a centre for 
developing foe field, with a 
pipeline buried beneath foe 
seabed feeding the central 


gathering centre. 

Plans for the development 
will not be complete, however, 
until foe Department of En- 
ergy decides whether BP 
should be allowed to buSd a 
Jokpetre pipeline from' 
Wytch Tarm to a terminal as 
Southampton Water. 

At present, all a9 from the 
field is taken out by rail, but 
the company believes tint the 
pipeline — approved by Dor- 
set and Hampshire county, 
councils but opposed by New 
Forest district council — is 
essential to such a massive 
expansion of production. 

If die pipeline does get the 
Hohead, BP expects to be in 
H production by the end of 
1989. In addition to the oil, an 
estimated 10 million cubic 
feet of domestic gas and 
185,000 tonnes of butane and 
propane LPG win be pro- 
duced annually. 

BP has SO per cent of foe 
Wytch Farm field, as well as 
being its operator. Partners in 
the project are Triceotrol, 
Premier, Carless, Clyde and 
GoaL 


Election fever in Dublin 


No-confidence test for FitzGerald 


By Richard Ford 


A parliamentary crisis feces 
the Irish Republic's prime 
minister when the Dail re- 
opens next week with a mo- 
tion of no confidence in his 
beleaguered coalition 
administration. 

■The uncertainty about the 
survival of the Fine Gael- 
Labour government has led to 
a general election atmosphere 
throughout tite country, with 
both main parties preparing 
for the possibility of a snap 
poll. 

- Although a number of dis- 
sident government back- 
benchers have threatened to 
withhold support from foe 
government. Dr Garret 
FitzGerald's advisers expect 
him to win the crucial vote by 
a margin of 83 to 81. He has a 


majority in the Dail only on 
the casting vote of the speaker. 

During the past few weeks 
Dr FitzGerald has been tour- 
ing constituencies announcing 
government plans. His oppo- 
nent, Mr Charles Haughey. 
leader of Fianna Fail, has also 
been campaigning, preparing 
his fellow parliamentarians 
and reviewing electioneering 
material under the slogan, 
“There is a better way”. 

The annual conference of 
Dr FitzGerald's Fine Gael 
party opened in Dublin last 
night with the prime minister 
outlining his vision of the 
friiurc. 

The conference will con- 
centrate on domestic issues 
and is aimed at heightening 
foe separate identity of Fme 


Gael and improving the image 
of Dr FitzGerald: the party is 
trailing in the opinion polls 
and the prime minister wants 
to delay an election until next 
year. 

The divisions within the 
party between the conser- 
vatives and those backing Dr 
FitzGerald's Liberal/Social 
Democratic image indicate 
that there are many who 
envisage Dr FitzGerald no 
longer being leader after foe 
election. 

• Mr Peter Barry, the Irish 
Republic’s Foreign Affairs 
Minister, last night claimed 
credit for the British Govern- , 
mem decision to launch an' 
inquiry into an alleged “shoot- 
to-kilP policy in Northern 
Ireland. 



to students at Bristol University which had to 
Herbert). 


NUM pensions deal 


Miners are offered f 25 m back pay 


British Goal is offering £25 
million in bade pay to 65,000 
members of the National 
Union of Mineworicers in an 
attempt to settle the last 
outstanding issue . of foe 
miners' strike, that of pension 
contributions. * 

In return, they are seeking 
agreement from foe NUM to 
amend foe rales of foe 
mineworkers’ pensions 
scheme. 

The scheme, of which Brit- 
ish Coal and the NUM me 
joint trustees, suffered a loss of 
£1 20 million during foe strike, 
made up of £60 minion in lost 
contributions from striking 
miners, and an equivalent 


By Michad McCarthy 

sum from the former National The rise, 

Coal Board as foe employer. 

Last autumn, when British 
Coal entered foe first pay 
negotiations with the NUM 
since foe aid of the strike, foe 
board sought to link any pay 
increase with recovery of the 
£60 million lost in employees’ 
coztoibuiibns to foe scheme. 

The union refused and, 
although foe breakriay Union 
of Democratic Mineworicers 
received a pay increase, pay 
negotiations with the NUM 
were frozen until Sr Robert 
Haslam awarded the NUM 
their £8 per week rise as one of 
his first acts after taking office 
in September. 


intended by Sir 
Robert as a gesture of wiping 
foe slate dean, was to take 
effect from September 1 this 
year. 

But now Sir Robert and his 
board have offered to back- 
date the rise to the original 
date of November I last year — 
if the NUM executive will 
agree to settle the pension 
contributions question when 
it meets next month. 

The back paywouki amount 
to about £350 for each miner. 

In return British Coal wants 
foe NUM to agree to a change 
in the pension scheme 
ratebook to make it absolutely 
dear that future strike absence 


from work lasting more than 
one week will not count as 
contributing service for the 
pension scheme 

They also want foe union to 
be bound by the results of two 
forthcoming legal actions 
about whether foe previous 
strike action did or did not 
count as contributing service. 

Sir Robert said: “Our 
propoposition makes it ab- 
solutely clear that the pension 
problems arising from the 
HUM’S year-long strike action 
cannot arise in future. The 
mineworkers' pension scheme 
must be amended to ensure 
that.” 


Kinnock in 
attack on 
colleges 


By Ov Political 
Reporter 

Mr Neil Knutock yesterday 
attacked the Government 
plans for twenty City Technol- 
ogy Colleges as a “withdrawal 
from both reality and 
responsibility”. 

The Labour leader claimed 
they would exacerbate di- 
visions in society and increase 
dependence on private 


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Plam for the colleges, which 
will mainly be in inner city’ 
areas, were announced by Mr 
Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
Stale for Education and Sci- 
ence, at the Conservative con- 
ference in Bournemouth 
Mr Kinnock said ministers 
were labouring under the delu- 
sion that the state education 
service was a desert and the 
solution was to create a num- 
ber of oases - hence foe tech- 
nology colleges. 

But the scheme was fun- 
damentally wrong because it 
would reinforce the mis- 
conceived idea that it was 
possible to have separate but 
equal provision - the philos- 
ophy that underpinned the 
creation of grammar and 
secondary modern schools 
“What the education sys- 
tem needs is not further 
fragmentation or funding or 
control, not sporadic compet- 
itive imiaiives, not further 
attempts at creaming off or 
dividing the technical from, 
the academic...bui wholesale 
irrigation to resource properly 
the whole curriculum." 

Mr Kinnock, speaking at 
the Royal Society of Arts in 
London, said this would give 
all children the means to 
develop their frill potential. 


Heathrow ‘sordid 
refugee camp’ 


By Pete 1 Evans, Horae Affairs Correspondent 


Two hundred would-be en- 
trants to Britain from the 
Indian sub-continent were 
taken by coach last night to foe 
Fire Service College at More- 
ton-in-Marsh. Gloucester- 
shire, while further inquiries 
were befog made into their 
immigration status, the Home 
Office said. 

The Government was ac- 
cused in the Lords yesterday 
of creating a “sordid refugee 
camp” at Heathrow Airport 
because of the introduction of 
the new visa requirements. 

Lord Mishcon, for the 
Opposition, said that the 
Government's action had left 
many visitors the victims of 
“cruel travel agent rackets." 

To cope with the rush of 
entrants yesterday, a further 
70 were. held in prisons white 
1 17 more immigration officers 
were drafted into Heathrow 
from the South-east and other 
portsJSome officers have been 
switched for a month while 
others are travelling on a day 
today basis. 

Who pays for the stay of the 


would-be entrants depends on 
foe outcome of their cases. If 
an arrival is found to have 
inadequate documentation 
and is sent bade on foe next 
available flight, foe carrier has 
to pay. 

If some form of temporary 
admission is granted while the 
entrant's immigration status is 
examined, -the Government 
pays. Bui if the eventual 
decision is removal from the 
country, foe carrier again has 
to pay. 

However, if as a result of 
representations from an MP 
or consideration of the case by 
foe Home Office more than 
two months elapse, the Gov- 
ernment pays. 

In the Lords, Lord Caith- 
ness, a Home Office minister, 
defended the conditions at 
Heathrow's Terminal 3. 

He said that of the 2.000 
Asians trying to beat the 
deadline 768 were detained by 
immigration officers. Of those 
about 260 were granted tem- 
porary admission. 


Collins sells Pan share 


William Collins is to sell its 
one-third stake in Pan Books, 
Britain's second-largest paper- 
tack publisher after Penguin, 
in. a transaction expected to 
lead to intensified com- 
petition in the paperback mar- 
ket (Our Media 
Correspondent writes). 


for a 


Heinemann and Mac- 
millan. who have been equal 
partners in Pan with Coffins, 
are believed to be paying 
about £8.5 million to gain 
control of Pan. The new 


owners are preparing 
laige expansion for it. 

A. Penguin spokesman said: 
“Obviously this will give Pan 
greater coherence. Pan are our 
major rivals." 

The relationship between 
the three owners of Pan has 
been gentlemanly but not frilly 
satisfactory, industry sources 
raid last nighL Because Col- 
lins owns two large paperback 
imprints, Grafton and Fon- 
tana, there has been a conflict 
between its interests and those 
of Pan, the sources said. 


MPhits 
at mean 
husbands 


By Our Pofitical Reporter 

A C on serva ti ve MP yes- 
terday criticized husbands 
who do not allow their wives to 
know how much they earn and 
give them foe same house- 
keeping allowance every year. 

Mr Hugh Dykes, MP for 
Harrow East, wants to in- 
troduce a private member’s 
Bill to help strengthen the 
housewife's case. 

Mr Dykes, aged 57, yes- 
today attacked male chaavin- 
ism in the home, saying^My 
BUI would aim at the hapless 
wives who do not know what 
their husbands earn, and 
whose housekeeping money 
may not have increased for 
years." 

He said it would also apply 
to women who work while their 
husbands stay at home. His 
wife, Susan, aged 44, con- 
firmed that he practises what 
he preaches, bat she would not 

disclose the details of their 
d iscu s s i on s about the house- 
hold budget. - 

She said that sharing the 
burden helped minimize fam- 
ily friction. “I think if you 
know bow much he earns, you 
can share the burden and be 
responsible for bills together. 

But boasekeeping is not a 
point of dispute in the Dykes* 
household. Mrs Dykes, a pub- 
lic affairs consultant, pays for 
the shopping and her husband 
meets the bills. 

The chances of Mr Dykes* 
measures becoming law are 
slim. Apart from having to win 
ova the massed ranks of the 
old fashioned Tory 
backbenches, he will have to 
straggle to get the Bill 
debated. 


Navy fears* 
defence 
policies, 
Owen says 


defence pohcitSv 
TheSDPteadc 



tesder accused Mr 
George Yoooaer.Spcrototyof 
State for Defence, of sedefog -- 
to “camouflHfce" the matic*- j 
lions ofa 7 per cent feBfoifeal - 
terms in military SfttfSis ‘ 
during the next two 
He raid! in bj* 
constituency that 
Ministry of Defence 

published in foe press 
month proved foal foe Tri- ' 
dent nuclear mtnote ; m - 
gramme would hrre aienoos 
effect on foe .Navy’s ten* 
ventioort capability. *" 

Over the next deader foe w 
surfecc fleet wopkJ average 48 - 
ships, not ilw stated tana of 

50. and there would be ctau in 
the building of new vettd* for 
amphibious forces. No new 
hunter submarines wpph} be ■■ 
built white the Trakitt pro* 
gramme was under way.' 

Dr Owen said:."“ute foe - 
cuckoo in foe nest, Trident a ‘ 
on course to take more and ~ 
more from other parts of our 
conventional defence effort - 
We arc pretending to lave a ' 
larger surface fleet iWm we., 
have. 


cut tack on our . . 

class nudear submarine) fleet 
and risk not having an 
amphibious lift capability, Hfl 
to preserve the Trident nmute 
system." 

Dr Owen said it wasbeeott* 
ins increasingly obvious that 
Britain could not afford foe 
ideal option of a ballistic 
nuclear deterrent and a tape 
fleet of hunter-killer 
submarines. 

The answer lay in a mini- 
mum European deterrent 
involving French nudear 
forces and embracing other 
Eurpoean nations. nouN 
West Germany., throe 
political co-ope ra t io n m 
deterrent strategy. 

Collaboration with the L 
French over submarine refit- * 


ting cycles and joint targeting - 
strategies would ma* 


mate a easier 

for Britain to cut its ballistic . 
missile submarines from four * 
to three. 


Tory 
MP speaks 
oncaning 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter . - 

A right wing Conservative - 
MP last night gave his local 
party officials his account of . 
newspaper allegations that he j 
has taken pvt in canfog 
sessions with young men at fos 
London flat. , 

The claims centre on Mr ■ 
Harvey Proctor, MP' for 
Billericay. Essex, who is a 
member of foe Monday Club ; 
and an outspoken cntic" of 
current policies on race and ‘ 
immigration. . 

Mr Proctor was attending a 
routine meeting of foe 40- . 
strong executive committee of 
the Billericay Conservative 
Association, which was being 
held in secret to evade 
journalists. 

Before the meeting Mr 
Proctor, who has denounced 
the allegations as a “tissue of 
lies” and has spoken of a plot - 
to hound him out of his seat 
because of bis views on race, 
denied that he had beat 
"hauled" before •' the 
committee. 

Mr Bob BritneU, vice-chair- 
man of the association, said 
that the meeting was foe 
normal bi-monthly gathering 
of the executive and there was 
“nothing explosive" on foe 
agenda. 

“Mr Proctor normally -at- ? 
tends and speaks on ctsrenu 
issues and answers questions. ' 
The allegations are a current • 
issue ana I would expect him " 
to speak about them and ' 
answer questions on them." T 
Mr Proctor has already met 
constituency officials infor- 
mally to discuss the altega- ■ 
tions and some members of' 
foe association believe , he * 
should either take kjal-Sfcttaa 1 
to dear his name or resign.' 

Mr BritneU said foe-venue 
o ' the meeting was befog kopt 
secret to prevent . reporters 
“badgering.” ■committee-, 
members. 



as«ii5si _ 

Norway Kr 900 ; Pantiliin ™. 

WOoTu* s *l ,ra? TfwSSvS 


Hitch for BT car telephone users 


Car telephone users have 
found recently that not all the 
advertised services on their 
British Telecom equipment 
work, as they should, if they 
switch to the rival Vodaphone 
network. The problems affect 
BUs Bronze and Pearl models 
and involve special features 
such as number recall. 

The Office of Telecommuni- 
cations (Oft el), the industry's 
watchdog, .thinks the BT car 
telephones breach licensing 
regulations which require that 
both networks are mter- 


foat 


telephones are “at the 
very least against the spirit of 
the licence". 


Oftel has asked foe British 
Approvals Board for Tete- 
eommtmicatioas “to decline to 
approve any more BT car 
telephones that are not 
transferable to Vodaphone". 

The derision means that 
Topaz, BTs latest car tele- 
phone, will be shelved just 
three months before its public 
launch, as it offers the same 
special services that win not 


i 


work on Vodaphone. 

The difficulties have been 
caused by different internal 
codes id use by foe rival 
telephone systems. Oftel 
claims that BT has not con- 
formed to agreed standards 
but BT says that Bronze and 
Pearl handsets are already 
licensed and ft expects to 
negotiate approval for Topaz 

According to OfteL those 
negotiations have for foe mo- 
ment broken down ,-«ny need 
to adapt the Danish-made 
Topaz sets would be cost l y. 


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By OwPtfttcat Reporter 

Dr David Own efirimed 
yesterday that there i* deep ‘ 
concern among senior Royal 
Navy officers over the for®* 
tion of the GovenauenTs * 




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Suspended school head 
‘was known for her 


'OBER 18 1986 


HOME NEWS 


views against racism’ 

P niwil< t . *JOldnck, Of the 380 Tamils in th* rWomM»*r nnfh h^r 




Jordanian 
talks of 
Israeli 
deception 


the north Lo* 3 Sr£Sp <*<** pnpib in the 
mistress^J^S^L- four-fifths were Mack. 


mistress suspended for aiw rour-nip were wack. 

•S -JSTs.'iySE ^S erofaies,aff ' ras 

reco^T^nfZiS^ 161 ^ .A J?84, be said. Miss 


«=on! of antt-rac bSTTS 

SHL“^*S?fch5 

yes ? l S? y * „ M,SS MeGoMrick. 

“OyS. Scotch Common, west 

S , ^ rt was f"S lSM from 
her post as head of the 380- 

pupjT ^Kibury Infants School; 
in the Labour-controlled bor- 
Otiph of Brent, on July 18. 

move came after an 
allegation by Mrs Shdagh 
bznic, an administration assis- 
tant in the borough’s educa- 
*l®a oWce. that Miss 
McGoldnck had told her on 
the telephone that she did not 
want any more black teachers 
at her school. 

Mr James Goudie, QC, told 
Mr Justice Rocfa that the 
headmistress was still sus- 
pended, in spite of her im- 
mediate denial of the 
acoisation and the support of 
stafl, parents and the school 
governors, who rejected the 
complaint and calterl for her 
reinstatement 

Miss MeGoldrick is seeking 
a court declaration that the 
governors' findings are bind- 
ing on die borough council; an 
injunction to restrain the 
council from continuing with 
disciplinary " proceedings 
against her and continuing her 
suspension; and an order 
directing them to reinstate her 
as head teacher. She is also 
asking for damages. 

-Mr Goudie said Miss 
MeGoldrick moved to Sud- 
bury as bead in September 
1981 


MeGoldrick attended a multi- 
cultural course provided by 
the borough. “She is fully 
aware of, and personally 


whole-heartedly supports, the 
anti-racist policies of the local 


anti-racist policies of the local 
education authority," Mr 
Goudie said. 

She was instrumental in the 
appointment of five black 
teachers. 

By. mid-July, Mr Goudie 
said. Miss MeGoldrick was 
facing something of a crisis 
over ■ staffing levels. Two 
experienced teachers bad left 
after promotion and she was 
four short 

"Miss MeGoldrick has been 
most concerned to have the 
best teachers for the young 
children at the school and to 
ensure their number is kept 
up. 

“On occasions, over the 
telephone, she may have been 
a little cross," Mr Goudie s a id . 


j a die said. 


character whh her beliefs and 1 
commitments. She imraedi- j 
ately disputed it and has : 
consistently disputed it ever | 
since.” 

MrsSzulc's version was that 
Miss MeGoldrick said her 
governors had complained be- 
fore about black teachers on 
the staff and she did not want 
to take on any more as she was 
concerned about their 
opinion. 

Miss McGotdrick's side of 
the story was supported by her 
deputy head, -Mrs Patricia 
Thomas, who was married to 
a black man and had three 
black sons, Mr Goudie said 

Mis Thomas overheard the 
phone conversation and -said 
in a sworn statement that at 
no time did Miss MeGoldrick 
make the alleged remark. 

Mr Goudie said the 
governors' unanimous de- 
cision was that there was no 
evidence to substantiate the 
allegation and called for her 
immediate reinstatement. 

He added: “Onr case is that 
once the governors had made 








RMi 



Princess Anne the centre of attention ye 
School for Daughters of Officers of the 


J ' -Jfci W 

for happy and excited girls of the Royal 
Navy and Royal Marines at Haslemere, 


On July 17, Miss . a decision, the authority had 
MeGoldrick spoke to Mrs no power to pursue Miss 


Szulc and pleaded her case. 
She was told that a Miss Khan 
was available and she agreed 
to see her. Miss Khan had 
smeejoined the staff. 

"That should have been the 
end of the story. But Mis Szulc 
seems somehow or other to 
have got hold of the im- 
pression that Miss 
MeGoldrick didn't want any 
more black teachers," the 
court was told. 

“For her to have said any- 
thing remotely of the sort 


would have been wildly out of until Monday. 


no power to pursue Miss 
MeGoldrick further." 

Mr Goudie said since the 
governors made their decision 
Brent council had taken steps 
to change the school rules with 
a view to give the authority 
more of a whip hand. 

Opening Brent's case, Mr ! 
David Turner Samuels, QC, 
said: “There is no allegation 
against the local authority that 
it has shut its mind or that h is 
acting, or wfll act. in bad faith. 

The case was adjourned 


Surrey, when she opened the school's new gymnasium (Photograph: James Gray). 

: Massacre trial 


Bamber denies plan change 
‘to fake sister’s suicide’ 


By Michael Horsnell 


Banks watch for 
drug deal profits 


By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 
Scotland Yard is to appeal eties and finance institutions 


Senility 
danger 
from Aids 


to all banks, building societies 
and finance institutions to 
keep a dose check on the 
accounts of diems who make 
large deposits that may have 
some connection with drugs 
deals: 

A letter will be sent in the 
next few days from Mr Brian 
Worth, deputy assistant 
commissioner of the Yard’s 
specialist operations branch 
who -is. acting on behalf ofafl 
chief constables. 

The unprecedented request 
to batiks breaches the 
confidentiafity rules and has 
been made posable by the 
recent implementation of sec- 
tion 24 of the Drug Trafficking 
Offences Act 1986. 

Under the Act which will 


are requested to pass on their 
suspicions to Scotland Yard's 
drugs squad which will act as 
the central information point 
for all police forces in the 
country 

Customs and excise, which 
is responsible for investiga- 


By Ian Smith 

The spectre of thousands of 
young people wandering the 
streets suffering from ad- 
vanced senile dementia was 
suggested by a medical re-* 
searcher into Aids yesterday. 

Dr Jonathan Weber said 
information was beginning to 


tions into the illegal importing filter tfarongh Grom the United 
of drugs into Bn tain, will be States that anyone contracting 


kept dosely informed of all 
tip-offs from the banks. 

The main banks have, al- 
ready 'instnicted their 


the Aids virus risked becoming 
little more than a mindless 
automaton. 

“I am talking about people 


been made possible by the pereonnel have been giyen the 
recent implementation of sec- responsibility of monitoring 
tion 24 of the Drug Trafficking accounts and passmgontheir 
Offences Act 1986. suspicions to head office. 

Under the Act, which wffl Yeste^y a spokowoman 
be folly implemented by Janu- “ £°r Lloyds Mid that staff had 
ary Lbanks and other finance b«n advised to be particu- 
houses are protected from 


branches to watdi out for" in their 20s and 30s who areno 
suspect clients and certain longer aMe to take care of 

“ mm « ... .. thnaneoliMie ma ■ ■■ aaand) mtam 


legal action by diems whose 
private accounts are handed 
to the police. 

In his appeal for co-opera- 
tion, Mr Worth emphasizes 


Midland has ordered each 
branch to appoint a senior r Vj” ~ 
member of staff to make daily JJJjJ 
checks on unexplained or 
unusual deposits paid in by ^ 

clients. They have been 


themselves or carry eat even 
die simplest task,” Dr Weber 
told delegates at a seminar in 
Manchester on the controver- 
sies abort treatment of the 
disease. 

“The prospects are terrify- 
ing. At the moment there is no • 
hard evidence that the threat 
of presenile dementia wQl turn 
into grim fact, but we must , 
realize that the possibility is 


Jeremy Bamber yesterday 
denied that after shooting 
dead four members of his 
femily he was forced to change 
his plans to fake his sister’s 
suicide and plant the guilt on 
her. 

At the end of nearly two 
days in the witness box Mr 
Bamber, aged 25, a farmer’s 
son, fared vital questions at 
Chelmsford Crown Court 
from Mr Anthony Arlidge, 
QC. for the prosecution. 

After denying that he had 
used his sister's madness as a 
cover for the .White House 
Farm massacres last year Mr 
Bamber was referred to a 
blood-stained gun silencer. 

That the prosecution has 
alleged, was found in the 
downstairs gun cupboard de- 
tached from the murder 
weapon three days later after 
Mr Bamber had realized ft 
made the .22 rifle too longfor 
his sister. Miss Sheila CanelL. 
to have been able to shoot 
herself. 

Mr Ariidge suggested: “You 
did shoot the first four- people 
wfthjhesileuceri didn't you?^- 

Mr Bamber replied: “That 
js not true." 

Mr Ariidge: “You then shot 
Sheila with the silencer on?” 


Mr Bamber “That is 
untrue." 

Mr Ariidge: “When you 
came to fake her suicide you 
realized it was not possible for 
her to shoot herself with the 
silencer on?" 

Mr Bamber “Thai is 
untrue.” 

Mr Ariidge: “That is when 
you changed your plans and 
took the silencer downstairs?" 

Mr Bamber “That is not 

Mr Ariidge: “You killed 
them all. didn't you?" 

Mr Bamber “No, I did 
not." 

Mr Bamber denies murder- 
ing his adoptive parents 
Nevfll and June Bamber, both 
aged 61. his half-sister, the 
London model Bambi, aged 
27. who was originally sus- 
pected of the killings, and her 
twin sons. Nicholas and Dan- 
iel aged six. 

Earlier Mr Bamber clashed 
twice with Mr Ariidge, once 
when Mr Bamber accused him 
of .pressurizing, him dttri’hg 
cross-examination, and once 
: over questions about his han- 
dling of the rifle the night 
before the murders. 

Mr Ariidge suggested he was 
lying when be claimed that he 


had left the rifle lying in the 
kitchen with a loaded maga- 
zine after going out to shoot 
rabbits on his parents' farm. 

• Mr Ariidge asked: “Why did 
you leave it lying around?” 

Mr Bamber “Because 1 was 
in a hurry to get back to the 
combine harvester.” 

Mr Ariidge: “You are not 
telling the truth, are you?" 

Mr Bamber "That is what 
you have got to try 1 and 
establish." 

On the twelfth day of his 
trial Mr Bamber agreed it was 
“unfortunate" that he should 
have left the weapon with a 
loaded magazine beside it the 
very night he claimed his 
sister decided to kill his 
femily. 

He agreed under cross- 
examination that he had spent 
freely after his parents' fo- 
neral eating in restaurants 
and staying in expensive 
hotels. 


He also agreed that.the night 
ter the funerals, on which he 


after the funerals, on which he 
had spent £22&on clothing, he 
enjoyed a champagne evening 
at the Caribbean Cottage at 
Burnham on Crouch in Essex. 


The trial 
Monday. 


continues 


Husband wins home tussle 


A divorced mother of two 
must order her lover out ofher 


interest in their home in 
Riddtesden, West Yorkshire, 


home or lose it, the Court of where she still lives. 


the importance of protecting warne< i to approach the 
Londons “J: clients and so risk giving away 


centre of world banking and 
requests any information on 
clients suspetfed of abusing 
the system with profits from 
drugs. 


is attacking the fabric of 
society and is inextricably 
linked to other forms of 
organized crime. 

The banks, building sod- 


their suspicions. 

Both Barclays and National 
Westminster also confirmed 
that guidelines had been is- 
sued to branch managers. 

Under the Drug Trafficking 
Offences Act, courts are able 
to make confiscation orders 
against convicted drug traf- 
fickers and to seize all their 


fickers and to seize 
assets. 


“What we do know already, 
because of medical research, is 
that the virus infects the brain 
and it is estimated there are 
abort three million earners in 
the US and up to half a million 
in Europe." 

Dr Weber, who spent four 
years at St Mary's Hospital in 
Paddington studying the ef- 
fects iff Aids and aow works at. 
foe Institute of Cancer Re- 
search, Chester Beattie Lab- 
oratories, has witnessed the 
progression of Aids to near 
epidemic proportions. 

Earlier, delegates were told 
of foe dilemma facing doctors. 
Does the doctor protect the 


Appeal ruled yesterday. 

If he does not go. the bouse 
must be sold with 40 per cent 
of the proceeds going to her 
former husband, the court 
said. 


He also asked foe court to 
impose a condition that if his 
former wife set up a perma- 
nent home with another man 
the house should be sold. 

Sir John Arnold, president 


Lund were living together, but 
she had claimed it was a 
temporary arrangement 
The relationship justified 
imposing a condition that the 
house be sold if she “assumed 
a slate of permanent cohabita- 
tion with another man". 


By Stewart Tendler 

The Jordanian accused of 
trying to use his giri friend to 
blow up an El A1 jet with 375 
on board told the Central 
Criminal Court yesterday he 
might have been duped by 
Israeli intelligence operating 
' in Syria. 

Nczar Hindawi. aged 32. a 
journalist, of no fixed address, 
told thecoun he believed he 
and his girl friend. Miss Ann 
Murphy, also aged 32. had 
been "trapped" last April. 

A bomb was found in Miss 
Murphy’s luggage at 
Heathrow Airport. Mr 
Hindawi said the bomb, found 
in a bag he gave to Miss 
Murphy, might have been put 
there by El Al security staff or 
Khalid Dandesh, the man he 
claimed had recruited him in 
Damascus to arrange drug 
smuggling. 

Yesterday, the second day 
of his cross-examination by 
the crown, Mr Hindawi told 
Mr Roy Am lot. for the 
prosecution: “Maybe Khalid 
Dandesh is a Mossad agent. I 
do not know. I understand 
that me and Ann Murphy, wc 
have been trapped.” He said 
drugs had become a bomb, 
and Mr Hindawi said perhaps 
Mr Dandesh had done that for 
some political reason. 

Asked by Mr Amlot why 
Mossad should choose him. 
Mr Hindawi said: “I now ask 
myself this question.” 

He tokl the court: “I do not 
know it is a bomb. If 1 know. I 
would not carry' it. I would not 
agree with it.” 

Asked about interview's 
with the police. Mr Hindawi 
denied telling them he had 
formed a political party, but 
said he was a member of an 
organization called the Jor- , 
danian Revolutionary Move- 
ment for National Salvation. 

Mr Amlot asked him if he 
was the organization's leader, 
and he said he was not. He 
refused to say who was. 

Mr Amlot said: “Basically 
do you want a free Palestine?" 
Mr Hindawi said he did. Mr 
Amlot asked him if violence 
could be used to achieve that 
aim. and Mr Hindawi said: 
“In the organization, there is 
no interest about any problem 
outside Jordan.” 

Mr Amlot said: “It is a very 
simple question. Are you pre- 
pared to use violence to 
achieve your aim?" 

Mr Hmdawi said “no”. 

■ Mr Gilbert Gray, QC. for 
the defence, in his re-examina- : 
tion, asked Mr Hindawi why 
Mossad could tiav<r been in- ■ 
volved rather; than the Syrian 
secret service. 

He replied: “Syria is a very 
strong country in the Middle 
East and will not do such 
operations because it will be 
against Syria and lose its 
support and relations with the 
rest of the world over such an 
operation." 

The hearing continues on 
Monday. 


- ( 8M- 

Two share 
daily 

prize pool 


Two readers shared the 
Portfolio Gold prize of £4,000 
yesterday. 

Mrs Hazel Talbot, aged 63, 
of St Albans, Hertfordshire, 
has played Portfolio a Gold 
since it started in The Times. 

“I am surprised and de- 
lighted.” she said. 

Asked what she intended 
doing with the prize money, 
Mrs Talbot said: “111 save 
some, spend some, and give 
some away." 

The other winner is Sir 
Derek Mitchell, a company 
director aged 64, of Putney, 
south-west London. 

Portfolio Gold cards are 
available by sending a stam- 
ped addressed envelope to; 

Portfolio Gold. 

The Times, 

PO Bov 40, 

Blackburn, 

BBl 6AJ. 



Mrs Hazel Talbot is “Sur- 
prised and delighted". 


Wife stabbed 
20 times 


Mushrooms 
caused death 


Safety fine 


NUM offices 
to be sold 


An Enfield company was fined 
£1.500 at Tottenham court 


Mr John Gallagher, a mar- of the Family Division, sitting 
ket trader, had appealed with Lord Justice Nourse, 


The judges also ruled that yesterday after the death in 
the county court had not given * April of Mrs Irene Basire, aged 


against a Keighley County 
Court order that his former 
wife,. Mis Patricia Gallagher, 
was entitled to a 75 per cent 


agreed that condition was not 
unreasonable. 

He said Mrs Gallagher 
admitted she and Mr Stuart 


Mr Gallagher, of North Park 
Road. Bradford, a large 
enough share m the £29,000 
home, and increased his 25 
per cent share to 40 per cent. 


60. an employee crushed be- 
neath a lorry trailer in a 
loading bay. Belling and Com- 
pany Ltd were found guilty of 
foiling to ensure her safety. 


The National Union of 
Mineworkers is to sell its 
Midlands headquarters as 
part of an economy drive. 

The three-storey Edwardian 
building in Lichfield Road, 
Stafford, where the onion has 
been based for 30 years, is 
expected to fetch about 
£40.000. 


Tube lines Dismissed of foe Jikma^^g doctors. 

A j -m a . c Does the doctor protect the 

disrupted doctors on 

by crash full pay’ sgattW 

” J v MT J mImiHv the ntaent ami risk 


Multi-million deal 
was won by fraud 


FACTORY SALE 


ONE DAY ONLY 


By Rodney Cowton 

Transput Correspondent 

British Rail yesterday re- 
sumed normal services on the 
stretch of line between Kensa! 
Green and Willesden Junc- 
tion: north-west London, 
where a train ran into foe back 
of a stationary Underground 
train on Thursday evening. 

London Underground, 
which shares this stretch with 
British Rafl. still had not 
received clearance last night to 
resume its services, but hopes 
to do so by Monday. 

The accident, in which 24 
people were injured, though 
none seriously, oarurred 
shortly after 5pm on Thursday 
afternoon. London Under- 
ground said that their train 
had been standing at a red 
light just outside Kensai 
Green station. 

The impact of foe 16-24 
Watford to Euston train run- 
ning into foe back of foe 
UiSetground tram cri^hed 
the last carriage, and lifted two 
others off the track. 

Yesterday foe driver of foe 
Underground train, Mr Eddie 
Cotcher, credited his guard Mr 
Dovmnnd Wilds with saving 


Two pathologists dismissed 


risk the disease being spread 
among people kept ignorant of 
his condition — or does he 
identify foe patient and risk 
other sadfferers shunning medi- 


by foe West Midlands Re- ^ ^ip their secret? 
gional Health Authority 15 John Harris, senior 

months ago after an mvesbga- fectnrer in philosophy at Man- 
tion into the use of Natronal chests University, told deie- 
Health Service facilities are ntis: “In Aids we are deafing 
still receiving full pay, it was ^ a lethal illness where a 


A group of businessmen 
who took part in a conspiracy 
to win contracts worth several 
million pounds with the Ford 
and Freight Rover companies 
were jailed yesterday. ■ 
Warwick Crown Court was 
told last month that repre- 
sentatives of Durr Ltd, a paint 


Chester University, told dele- pfefl* ma n ufacturer and in- 
gales: “In Aids we are deafing staller, of Wanwck, were al- 

° . _ l _ _ _ ■ 1/VnlOfl 1 a rtnAtAAAIMl THA 


disclosed yesterday. 


— - _ - . . .- „ , patient’s confidentiality is for 

Dr Teny MarshalL ofOay- ^tweighed by foe right of 
ton Roatk N^vaistie-under- 1 coatactsnot to have then 7 fives 


Lyme, Staffordshire, and Dr put at risk. 

Peter Fletcher, vfoo has taken ^n.mg Aids pa- 

up a new post in Saudi Arabia, (hots is (mine to discourage 

KamkAorh hm> rprprvnur fnfHl _■ l- £ — . 


have each been receiving £600 f rfhw front coming 

a week after appealing to Mr forward for treatment, then the 


lowed to photocopy the 
lenders of two rival com- 
panies to enable them to win a 
£6 million contract with 
Freight Rover. 

The company then paid 
£30,000 to Eric Dingley, a 


senior engineer with Freight 
Rover in Birmingham, for 


Norman Fowler, Secretary of wtofe thing becomes setf- 
State for Social Services, defeating. 


against their dismissals. 

The two were dismissed 
after it was found that they 


“I do not know what the 
answer is — nor does anyone." 
Dr Harris said urgent medi- 


owed £10,000 for the use of cal research mast fee carried 
NHS facilities at tire Hartshill ^ to discover whether 


Pathology Laboratory. Stoke, 
for private work al the 
Nuffield Hospital. Newcastle- 
under-Lyme. 


maintaining patient 
confidentiality overrides foe 


Rover in Birmingham, for 
services rendered. 

Similar methods were used 
to clinch a £5 million contract 
with Ford Halewood. A Ford 
engineer, Donald Th waites. 
was paid £20,000 for his help. 

AH the defendants pleaded 
guilty to conspiring to cor- 
ruptly exchange gifts for fa- 
vours. 

The company sales man- 


ager. Leslie Taylor, aged 50, of 
Seaside, Eastbourne, was jai- 
led for 18 months after Judge 
Clark described him as “the 
main instigator". The manag- 
ing director, Reginald Walker, 
aged 58, of Weston Close, 
Dorridge. Solihull, was jailed 
for nine months. 

Dingley, aged 55, of Foster 
Green Road, Droitwich. Wor- 
cestershire, and Th waites, 
aged 41. of Rushley Close, 
Grays, Essex, were each jafted 
for one year. 

Two other Durr employees, 
Michael Maguire, aged 41, of 
Frobisher Road, Styvechale, 
Coventry, and Graham Cook, 

r 40. foe financial director, 
Dariey Green Road, 




Knowle, Solihull, were given 
suspended jail sentences. Ma- 
guire, who was also fined 
£2,500, had a six month-term 
suspended for one year. A 
three-month sentence on 
Cook was suspended. 

The company, which is 
owned by a west German 
firm, was fined £100,000. 


fyljt 9c 80%® 


EXAMPLE: tteyP 

Full Length Mink Coats ssensase 

^ Dnp to Cyril Kuw’t inff B M ri h” y hy euMriw-i 

oareARLp 01 FACTORY sfeiSSSlSi 


Holiday week in Spain offered at £29 


SSSPiMK MS 


By Derek Harris 


Raymond Wilds with saving 
the life of a passenger. 

He said that after the 
Underground train had 
stopped at the red signal Mr 
Wilds “followed proced ures , 
going to the bade of the tram 
to check that the tafl lights 

were on- He saw that another 

train was coming directly 
towards him. 

Mr Wilds ran back through 

the last carriage and draggwl a 

passenger out with him. They 
reached the second to last 
carriage before foe impact-. 


Thomson, Britain's bfegest 
tour operator,, yesterday of- 
fered a week’s Holiday next 
summer in Spain at £29 and 
the same in Greece for £39. 

The offers s« the scene for a 
rash of bargain hunting la 


star and two-star categories. 

Skytonrs this summer car- 
ried abbot 151,000 holiday- 
makers but next year the 
programme is being expanded 
to a million. 

That is a direct attack on 


package holidays to rival those Intasnn holidays from the best 
of a year ago when holiday known subsidiary of Mr Harry 


■companies rushed to top each 
other’s deals. 

Travel agencies were then 
besieged by those seeking 
holidays priced at £25. 

Thomson has thrown down 
the gauntlet through its one- 
year-old subsidiary, Skytonrs, 


Goodman's International Lei- 
sure Group (ILG), whose main 
brochures are to be launched 
next week. 

Thomson’s aims to posh 
Skytonrs sales above those for 
Intasnn with a promise that 
where it shares bolds or 


which specializes in budget- apartments with any of 12 
priced holidays based.oo self- named operators ft will be 


catering and- hotels in foe one- cheaper. 


Next Thursday, Skytonrs 
will hare on sale about 500 of 
the cheapest holidays but 
there will be about 120,000 
altogether, with reductions of 
between 10 per cent and 50 per 
cent on this summer’s prices. 

Several thousand free 
children’s holidays are b ring 
offered and other child prices 
Start at £7. It a family 
of four could hare a week in 
Bemdonn. the Costa Brava or 
Ibiza for £87 in May. 

Average price of foe full 
Skytours programme is 
cfamied to be £195 against just 
Over £200 this summer. In its 
main brochures Thomson 
Hobdays, foe market leader. 


claims to have pegged its 
average price at £250. 

Sales oo the brochures al- 
ready out are well ahead of last 
year! The half million mark 
was passed this week. 

Mounting its expanded at- 
tack on the family market 
through Skytonrs, Thomson is 
hoping to push its- share of the 
summer market from 30 per 
cent this year to 40 per cent 
next summer. 

Mr Peter Smith, m a n ag i ng 
director of ILG, said that the 
Skytours announcement was 
uo surprise. “It is a reaction to ; 
the offers we have made. We 
have already sold 268,000 
holidays in six days." 


RED FOX JACKETS- 

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MUSQUASH JACKETS 

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£495 £99 

£695 £129 

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An American airman who 
slabbed bis wife 20 times with 
a kitchen knife, after finding 
her with another man. was 
jailed for 19 years yesterday 
bv a court martial at foe 
USAF base at Upper Heyford, 
Oxfordshire. 

.After the three-day hearing, 
Mrs Sharon Johnson, aged 22, 
said she still loved her hus- 
band, Rowae. aged 24, and 
wanted to spend the rest of her 
life with him. 


. An Italian boy who was 
flown to England on October 4 
for a liver transplant after 
•becoming ill after eating 
poisonous mushrooms, was too 
ill to be operated on and died 
foe next day. 

A verdict of accidental death 
was recorded at yesterday's 
inquest on Paulo Sambugaro, 
aged four, from Padua, by Sir 
Montague Levine, the South- 
wark coroner. 


' J 





HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


Solicitors told they 
must lead the way in 
mixing of professions 




High pay 
lure cuts 
specialist 
applicants 


Solicitors were deeply di- 
vided yesterday over the issue 
of partnerships with other 
professionals as called for by 
the- Director General of Fair 
Trading at their annual con- 
ference in Torquay. 

Sir Max Williams, a past 
president of the Law Society, 
toid: solicitors that mixed 
partnerships were inevitable 
andvthev should lead the way. 

Solicitors must “get their 
act together” and “get up front 
to lead the way” in setting 
standards which were accept- 
able/for such partnerships. 

Tlvere were already pro- 
posals: he believed, from the 
Institute of Chartered 
Accountants to allow solic- 
itors to hold 30 per cent of ihe 
shares of chartered accoun- 
tants. excluding audit work. 

Two years ago. Sir John 
Donaldson. Master of the 
RoHs. had put forward the 
idea, of mixed partnerships m 
die public interest and now it 
bad Come up again. 

“There are the staled objec- 
tives -of this Government that 
in the public interest there 
should be conglomerates.'' he 
said. 

He added that some solic- 
itors might want to remain 
independent, but said; “They 
will not be able to prevent the 
law from permitting mixed 
partnerships.” 

Some of the dangers of such 
partnerships, in particular the 
possible threat to legal aid 
work, were put by Mr Derek 
Bradbeer. the Law Society's 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

ply di- vice-president, who said that member, said; “There is a 
ie issue the arguments for such serious and identifiable threat 
other partnerships were commer- to a major sector of the 
for by dally oriented. profession's work which in no 

of Fair Once in a mixed partner- way should be under 
a! con- ship with other professionals estimated.” 


there was a risk that the other 
partners would say: “You 
cannot go on dealing with 
l eg al aid and unmet need. We 
are not making any money on 
in in fact we are tnakinga loss 
on ft.” 

He added: “Is it not going to 
result in that section (of work) 
being done by an embryo legal 
servicer 

Solicitors were speaking at 
one of the key sessions of the 
conference, on the future of 
the profession. 

Mustering their forces in the 
lace of the threat of losing 
work to banks, building soci- 
eties and advice bureaux, they 
called for the Law Society to 
launch a national advertising 
campaign to promote the ser- 
vices of the independent 
lawyer. 

Under government pro- 
posals financial institutions 
will soon be able to employ 
solicitors to do conveyancing 
and possibly other legal work 


However he said there was a 
majority view that it would be 
impracticable and undesirable 
to try to stop solicitors being 
employed by financial 
institutions. 


There was also strong sup- j 
ort among solicitors to be : 


port among solicitors to be 
allowed to do work under the 
American-styie system of 
“payment by results”, or 
contingency fees. 

Mr Eugene Thomas, presi- 
dent of the American Bar 
Association, said that such a 
scheme did enable cases to be 
taken up which otherwise 
lawyers would not have been 
prepared to handle: But there 
had to be safeguards. 

He described the “ruthless- 
ness and hustling” when law- 
yers descended on Kansas 
City seeking work after the 
collapse of a hotel, behaviour 
that had resembled scenes 
after the recent Bhopal 
disaster in India. 

Their offers had become 




where there is no conflict of “more and more ou 


interest. 

Proposals are also being 
considered by the Govern- 
ment to stop solicitors giving 
free legal advice under the 
legal aid scheme and to give 
that job to Citizens’ Advice 
Bureaux and other advice 
centres. 

Mr Philip Ely, a council 


until they woe finally offering 
to pay clients to be allowed to ; 
take on their cases. 


wm 


Adverts for the 
legal eagles 


Solicitors will soon be able 
to advertise their services on 
television, t-shirts or by 
sk yw ri ting , provided it is in 
good taste. They win also be 
allowed to name their clients, 
with their consent, in 
advertisements. 

The new freedom, outlined 
in a draft publicity code re- 
leased yesterday, permits 
than to set up mobile offices, 
have stands at exhibitions or 
shows and use direct mail to 
publicize their work. 

The changes will come into 
effect in the New Year if 
passed, as expected, by the 
Law Society council. 


Hie society is in lavowr of a 
substantial relaxation of 
solicitors' rules ou advertising, 
which until now have confmed 
than to the press and to radio. 

Yesterday's draft code 
incorporates those proposals 
and ooes further. 


Legal aid fees 
‘should go up 9 

A tougher stance m the fight 
for the legal aid budget was 
needed from the Lord 
Chancellor’s Department, the 
chairman of the Bar said 
yesterday. 

Mr Robert Alexander, QC, 
tokl solicitors at Torquay: 
“We are often told that legal 
aid is the fastest growing soaal 
service." 

There were, however, less 




Constable’s “The Hay wain” is wheeled into the Dome Room (Photograph: Bill Warhnrst). 


Gallery’s grandeur restored 


frequent reminders that legal 
aid was still less than “one 


quarter of 1 per cent of the 
total of public expenditure.” 

Legal aid was crucially 
dependent on the “Lord ' 
Chancellor’s Department 


Patrons of art will soon be 
able to appreciate the original 
graodem of what a correspon- 
dent of Tuner described as 
a “brilliant vista” more than a 
century ago, after a big 
restoration project at the Na- 
tional Gallery. 

Workmen have been putting 
the fimshing touches to a two- 
year refurbishment of the 


Almost any form of fighting for a budget with the 
advertismg or pubfirity except skill and determination that is 


gallery's finest suite, the 
Dome Room and its four 


unsolicited telephone cafes, 
known as “add calling” and 
knocking on doors w31 now be 

allowed. Solicitors will be abk 
to put inserts in free news- 
papers and to join with other 
solicitors for “flag” advertis- 
ing nnder one logo or name. 

But while they vriD he able 
to use adjectives such as “a 


shown by 
ministries”. 


other spending 


The guidelines of the draft speedier service” their Aimw 
aufe are fused on proposals mist: not compare the quality 


Referring to the new round 
of talks on legal aid fees 
starting between the pro- 
fession and the Government, 
Mr Alexander said he hoped 
the . Government . would be 
“genuinely Committed to the 
principle of fair 
remuneration”. . 


vestibules, designed by E M 
Barry in 1876. 

Roofs and plasterwork 
which had seriously deteri- 
orated have been entirely re- 
placed, and an mdnmatic stm- 


By Gavin BeB, Arts Correspondent 

e screening device has been 
I incorporated in what is de- j 
P scribed as one of die most i 
s sophisticated lighting systems i 
i in the world- f 

g The vast ceilings have been < 
_ decorated with oils and more ( 
than 3500 books of gold hut s 
and Suffolk wea ve r s have 

* produced more than 1,000 

' metres of cotton damask for e 

* the rich wail-hangings. s 

l Tbe rooms, to be opened to 1 
I the public on October 30, will l 
1 house a new display of the t 

gallery's finest eighteenth and v 
k nineteenth century painting * c 
by British artists including g 
i- Constable. Tomer, Reynolds c 
>- and Gainsborough. P 


Tbe collection includes a 
group of important works 
returned by the Tate Gallery, 
including Hogarth’s large 
group portrait, “The Graham 
Children”, and one of 
Gainsborough’s last land- 
scapes, “The Market Cart”. 


The gallery says the overall 
effect will be to recreate the 
splendour which inspired The 
Tones reviewer to laud “the 
brilliant vista opening out 
through green marble columns 
with richly gilt Corinthian 
capitals, supporting the gor- 
geous dome and lantern of die 
central octagonal hall with its 
pavement of marble inlay”. 


saafe earlier this year and of service iritis that of any 
hafe been studied by die other sofidtor or stdidtots. 


profession. They do not allow 
advertisements to breach pro- 
fessional practice rales or 
advertising standards. 


of service with that of any Fees were still too low to 
ofoer solicitor or solicitors. ensure the preservation and 
However, if a third party improvement of the standard 
carries out a bona fide survey of service. “People of quality 


‘Spy’ will 
take EEC 
cash offer 


Park murders 


Witnesses describe youths 


By Michael McCarthy 


comparing solicitors’ services, roust be attracted to and given 
die results could be publicised, the incentive to stay in enra- 


jnal practice.’ 


Remand 
prisoner 
loses leg 


Help line to assist 
heads under stress 


A fbrmer Gambian attorney 
general had his leg amputated 1 
after contracting gangrene 
while on remand in Worm- 
wood Scrubs Prison, west 
London, a court was tokl 
yesterday. 

Muhamadu Sabo was to 
have appeared before Bow 
Street magistrates for commit- 
taKproceedings on charges of 
obtaining £20,000 by decep- 
tion; but the case had to be 
adjourned to October 23. 

Mr Michael Sayers, for the 
defence, told the court that Mr 
Saho, aged 55, an MP in 
Gambia's ruling People’s 
Progressive Party, was taken 
to Hammersmith Hospital on 
Thursday night where the 
operation was done to prevent 
the' spread of gangrene. 

Aldermaston 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 
Headteachers in north Mr David Hart, general 


Headteachers in norm Mr David Hart, general 
London are setting up a secretary of the National 
telephone support scheme to Association of Head Teachers, 


cope with increasing stress said yesterday that the need 
and isolation at work. for such a scheme was an 


Mr Stanley Adams, the 
Briton who exposed illegal 
price-fixing by the Swiss drugs 
firm, Hoffman La Roche, but 
was then jailed, yesterday 
•‘reluctantly" accepted a 
£200,000 compensation offer 
from the EEC 

Last month he had rejected 
the offer, describing it as 
"miserable and foolish” 
considering his financial 
losses, his imprisonment and 
his wife’s suicide. 

He has since received a 
letter from M Jacques Delors, 
the EEC president, telling him 


A leaflet is being circulated indi< 
in the London Borough of run. 
Islington, giving details of the H 
new “Headline" service, sayii 
which urges head teachers to lems 


for stich a scheme was an offer or face 

indictment of the way Hea is court ' which 

could take even more years to 


He said: “What heads are resolve raattcr 


saying is that there are prob-l Mr Adams, aged 59, said 


pick up the telephone and day basis which can’t be taken 
contact a colleague. up with their professional 


lems cropping up on a (fey to th® 1 the compensation - 
day basis which can’t be taken £100,000 for mental a n gui sh 


The resort to collective self- association. They simply 
help is the product of a don't get the support and 


combination of factors: the guidance from local education 
alarming turnover in the num- officers and other admin- 


up with their pro fess i onal end £100,000 for economic 
association. They simply l®s ■ would hardly cover his 
don't get the support and debts. He had hoped for £3 


Five more witnesses have 
come forward to help police 
investigating the murders of 
two Brighton schoolgirls, as a 
result of the reconstruction of 
the girls’ last movements 
staged on Thursday. 

AO are helping to build 
descriptions of two youths 
who were seen running from 
the park where Nicola Fel- 
lows, aged 10. and Karen 
Hadaway, aged nine, were 
sexually assaulted and stran- 
gled. Detectives believe that 
finding the youths is vital. 

Sussex police used two 
school friends of the murdered 
girls to retrace their last 
known steps around the 
Moulsecoomb estate where 
they lived and Wild Park, near 
by. where they met their 
deaths. 

As the reconstruction took 
place on the main A27 Brigh- 
ton to Lewes road, 300 officers 


stopped almost 5,000 cars and 
interviewed 18,000 people, 
including car occupants and 
passengers on buses. . 

Later on Thursday evening 
the BBC's Crimewatch pro- 
gramme showed a dramatized 
version of the girls’ final 
movements. 

It was believed to be one of 
the most comprehensive 
efforts ever made by a police 
force to jog the public's mem- 
ory about the circumstances of 
a crime and yesterday it began 
to bear fruit. 

Five more people were in 
contact with the murder squad 
to say they too had seen the 
youths running from Wild 
Park on the night of the 
killing, first reported by a 
woman out walking her dog. 

Their information was be- 
ing added to the file on the 
young men. who were casually 
dressed in jeans and 


ber of head teachers, a feeling 
of lack of support from the 
Inner London Education Aut- 
hority (Ilea), and strained 
relations between staff and 
heads after tbe 18-month 
teachers' pay dispute. 


million. 

“I remain convinced that on 
both legal and moral grounds I 


isirators to which they are both legal and moral grounds I 
entitled.” was entitled to much higher 

Pressure from local poli- compensation,” he said. 


ticians and “the shambles” of i 


1973 Mr Adams dis- 


Girl seen after murder High cost 
charge, jury is told of farms 


dosed to It* EEC illegal price 

<i»ng at Hofitnan La Rid*, 
era ole lor some head teachers. .23 


at standstill 


Work stopped at the Atomic 
Weapons Research Establish- 
ment at .Aldermaston in Berk- 
shire yesterday when 150 
safety officers were sent home 
after withdrawing safety cover 
at the base. 

Their spokesman said: “It’s 
not something our members 
did- lightly. But we have been 
pressing since 1983 for extra 
pay, on environmental 
grounds for going into 
Aldermaston.” 


Teacher is jailed for 
assaults on pupils 


where he had worked. That led 
to the firm being fined 
£215.000 for breaking 
Community trade laws. 


Two witnesses told ajary at lived dose to the girTs home in 
tbe Central Criminal Court} 'Sebert Road, and knew that 
yesterday that they believed the chM was missing and that 


protection 


they saw Keighley Barton, . Mr Barton had beea'chaiged- 
aged 14, who is missfog, three “I was shocked when I saw 


months apo accompanied by a the girl in the market. I had a 


woman with red hair. 


libel action 
adjourned 


The libel action brought by 
Mr Neil Hamilton, Conser- 
vative MP for Tatton. Chesh- 
ire,- against the BBC over 
allegations that he was 
branded as Fascist racist and 
anti-Semitic was adjourned 
yesterday until Monday to 
allow out-of-court talks to 
continue. 

The development came on 
the fifth day of the action 
brought by Mr Hamilton over 
a panorama edition in Janu- 
ary. 1984 which finked him 
with an extreme right-wing 
group. 


A deputy headmaster who 
took teenage boys from his 
school away for nights at 
hotels and then indecently 
assaulted them was jailed for 
1 8 months by Warwick Crown 
Court yesterday. 

John Fox. who has resigned 
from his post at Higham Lane 
secondary school in Nunea- 
ton. Warwickshire, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Harrison- 
Hali. 

Fox. aged 45. of Burton 
Hastings, near Nuneaton, 
admitted nine charges of in- 
decent assault on rive boys 
aged between 13 and 16 
during the past five years. 


Mr Christopher Metcalfe, 
for the prosecution, said that 
in each case Fox got per- 
mission from the boys' par- 
ents to take them away by 
falsely claiming he was doing 

historic research for the BBC. 

The offences came to light 
in May when a boy aged 15, 
terrified by what happened, 
left a hotel room in Yorkshire 
and phoned his parents, who 
collected him and told the 
police. ‘ 

Mr Trevor Faber, for the 
defence, said: “He feels shame 
and regret. He was a school- 
master in a position of trust 
abusing that trust.” 


But he was exposed as the 
“mole” and arrested in 
Switzerland for industrial 
espionage. 

His wife, aged 31. killed 
herself after a Swiss police 
officer told her that her hus- 
band could face 20 years in 
prison. 

Mr Adams was released on 
bail after three months and 
later given a one-year sus- 
pended sentence. 

Last . November he won an 
historic victory in the Euro- 
pean Court of Justice m 
Luxembourg - the first time 
tbe court had supported an 
individual's case against the 
EEC executive for breach of 
confidence. 


at her face for several 


By John Young 
Agriculture 
Correspondent 


The girl vanished in August seconds. She was with a 
test year witOe taking her pet woman of about 40 who had 


abatian dog for a morning shoukler-fength reddish hair, 
walk. Her stepfether, Ronald The likeness to Keighley was 


Barfea, age d 46, denies there but there was something 
abducting and murdering her. I wasn't sure about That's 


Yesterday Mr Justice why I didn't approach her.” 


Turner took the an usual step 


Barton, a mini-cab 


of calling witnesses, a mother driver, of MOdenhall Road, 
wd son, 1‘imself to help the Chip too, north-east London, is 


jury of six men and six women, alleged to have the 

IVbs Linda J ac ks on , a gjrf from near his estranged 

teacher at the nrN imimr arX>v k flM . au i i-sii.j u.f 


teacher at the girl's junior wife's home and killed her to 
sdwol for three years, told the stop her giving evidence 
jury: ”1 think I saw her in artaijast him of sexual ahm* 


(ary: T flunk i saw ber m 
Walthamstow market at the 
end of Jaly. She was shopping, 
looking at dothrag raid 


against him of sexual abuse. 

Mrs Jackson's son, Lee, 
aged 13, told the jury that he 
also saw the girl and the 


jewellery stalls and appeared woman in the market 


to be quite happy.' 


Mr Barton is due to give 

1 it. j-.v t 


Mrs Jackson, of Ridley evidence when the trial contin- 
Road, Forest Gate, said she oes on Monday. 


Agricultural protection 
costs consumers and tax- 
payers in industrialized coun- 
tries more than 5100,000 
million (£70 biflion) a year, 
according to a study by the 
World Bank. 

The distortions mentioned 
in the report are by no means j 
confined to EEC countries.! 
Japanese farmers, for exam- 
ple. are said to be paid three 
limes as much as the world 
price for their rice; as a result 
so much is grown that some 
has to be sold as animal feed at 
half the world price. 

.The United Slates sub- 
sidizes land clearance and 
irrigation projects and then 
pays farmers not to grow crops 
on the land. 


Rare icon paintings gain muted response 


By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 


Painting find 


An oil painting, which had 
been used to wallpaper the 
ceiling of a farmhouse, was 
sold for £36.000 yesterday. 
The' 180-year-old painting of 
exotic birds was discovered by 
Mr.Amhony Marriott, an an 
deafer 


The icon paintings of 
Greece and Russia have a 
narrow following, with few 
museums showing an interest, 
and yesterday's sale of rare 
early icons at Sotheby’s had a 
muted response. 

The monumental mid-six- 
teenth century Madonna 
Hodigiiria from” Novgorod, a 
big. serious image with her 
robed son balancing on one 


and had been exhibited at a 
wide range of United Sates 
museums when he owned it. 

A deliciously eccentric eigh- 
teenth-century icon of “The 

Mountain trodden upon by 
GocT depicts three barley- 
sugar mountains with saintly 
events taking place on each 
while the central mountain is 
linked by smoky clouds with 
God. 


Saleroom 


The sale totalled £376.057 
with 23 per cent left unsold. 


It is attributed to the work- 
shop of the Monastery of St 


arm. "sold for £26.400 (es- Catherine on Mount Sinai and 


limatc £20.000 to £30.000). sold for £25.300 (estimate 


It was formerly in .the £3.000 to £4.000). The sheer 
George R. Hann collection decorative effect was perhaps 


underestimated by Sotheby's: 
the mountains are etched 
against the sea. which is foil of 
ships and fishes. 

A rondo painted with the 
“Agony in the Garden" by 
Viktor, a seventeenth-century 
Cretan artist who is believed 
also to have worked in Venice, 
sold for £21000 (estimate 
£25.000 to £40.000) while a 
sixteenth-century Cretan 
“Mother -of God of 
Tenderness” made £17.050 
fesiimaic£l0.000 to £1 5.000). 


Christie's sale of English 
pictures saw strong prices for 
sporting pictures but there was 
little interest in lesser por- 
traits: some expensive works 
which had been left unsold in 
grander sales again foiled to 
arouse interest. 


The sale made a total of 
£189.310 with 29 per cent left 
unsold. An attractive picture 
by George Armfirid. entitled “ 
A Dandfe Dinmom and two 
Cairns rabbiting", had been 
reproduced on the from of the 


catalogue and attracted enthu- 
siastic attention, selling for 
£11100 (estimate £3.000 to 
£4.000). 

An important Scottish his- 
tory painting. “John Knox 
admonishing Mary Queen of : 
Scots", by Sir Wifiiam Allan, ; 
sold for £8.800 (estimate i 
£3.000 to £5,000). A small 
replica of the picture is in- 
cluded in the “Golden Age" 
exhibition of Scottish painting ' 
at ihe Tate, which no doubt ! 
helped the price. 

The painting at Christie's 
*as the prime version (26 in 
by 3$ in) and dates from 1829. 


Last year EEC farmers re- 
ceived 18 cents a pound for 
sugar which was then sold sold 
on world markets for as little 
as five cents, while the EEC 
continued to import cane 
sugar at 18 cents, 

. The report, in the latest 
issue of the Economic 
Prowess Report published by 
the Treasury, draws attention 
to the recent agreement on 
trade and tariffs to include 
agriculture in future rounds of 
talks aimed at reducing trade 
barriers. 


Liberalization of agri- 
cultural protection would gen- 
erate a marked shift of 
agricultural output away from 
industrialized countries and 
towards developing countries, 
tne report concedes. 


HOUSE OF LORDS 


October 17 TM 


By Jill Sherman 

The financial rewards of 
private medicine are causing 
an acute shortage of applicants 
for medical posts in certain 
specialties. Sir Raymond 
Hoffcnberg. president of tne 
Royal College of Physicians, 
said yesterday. 

Many consultants com- 
bining National Health Ser- 
vice and private practice 
could command salaries of up 
to £250.000 a year, while their 
counterparts in academic 
medicine were earning an 
average of £26,000 and a 
maximum of £50.000, he said. 

Consultants wen; particu- 
larly attracted to lucrative 
specialities such as ophth- 
almology. gy naecology and 
obstetrics, some types of sur- 
gery and cardiology. 

“There are professor of 
surgery posts going in the UK 
which are not attracting peo- 
ple of adequate academic 
calibre. We are asking people 
to make a tremendous finan- 
cial sacrifice." Sir Raymond 
said. 

The disillusionment with 
academic research was exacer- 
bated by the lack of parity in 
salaries between NHS and 
university-funded posts. “Be- 
tween 30* and 40 per cent of 
patient care is carried out by 
academic units, and tire 
majority of NHS consultants 
also contribute to teaching." 

In the past few years, nearly 
25 per cent of academic posts 
had been cut because of 
financial restraints on both the 
NHS and universities. “Junior 
doctors are spending most of 
i their time picking up the 
1 clinical load and there is no 
time for research.” 

Sir Raymond said present 
policies ‘of reducing junior 
doctors and increasing the 
j throughput in NHS beds were 
leading to a breakdown in the 
partnership between academic 
medicine and the NHS. 

“Wc are now reducing ju- 
nior doctors in university and 
research posts, not because of 
financial constraints but be- 
cause there are too many 
doctors in training and too few 
consultant posts, he said. 

Increased throughput, more 
emphasis on outpatient care, 
rather than expensive hospital 
beds, and immediate dis- 
charge were critical for medi- 
cal students. 


Appeal for 
curb on 
‘vicious’ 
protests 


WAPPtNG 


Tbe sooner big demOastrMioni 
at Wappmg ended, the sooner 
Londoners wouW frt the stan- 
dard of policing they deserved, 
the House of Lords was tokl 
There was no rdfiiofump be- 
tween what was going os at 
Wappiog ami peacdul pww a- 
smn, the twh of the rakt to 
picket. Lord Harris of Cnw 
Mich. (SDPI said during ex- 
changes about foe dispute 
between News International and 
pnnt trade tmkms. 

Lord MbhcM. for the Op- 
position. said that Labour 
would always support the right 
tn lawful peaceful picketing and 
would always oppose violence 
and hooliganism. * - 

The EorlofChWwew, Minster 
of Stare. Home Office: “Ho and 
the Govern men l are on com* 

The 8 Bur| W of Caithness said 
earlier that 393 police officers 
had been injured in (he dispute 
and 900 people had been cosh 
vtcicd of offences connected . 
wilh it . • ; 

“In this country i here* along 
tradition of peaceful protest 
within the law. but it is very 
dear that some of those taking 
pan in these demonstrations 
have attended with the in- 
tention of committing and 


provoking violence. The way 
forward lies in sensible co- 
operation between the pout 
and responsible trade umomss* 
organizing such demon st r a t io n s 
to reduce disorder and prevent 
violence, which only the trou- 
ble-makers want** 

Lord Karris of Crertwl cte 
"This vicious boohgamwn has 
gone on for many months and is 


beginning to have a profound 
effect on the quality of policing 


throughout the Metropolitan 
Police district because of thecaB 
on resources. The sooner 
responsible trade unionists 
cease calling for large-scale 
demonstrations., the sooner the 
citizens of this city will have foe 
quality of policing they- de- 
serve." _ 

The Earl of Caithness “The 
level of violence has been 


cooperate to keep violence to 
ihe absolute minimum, pref- 
erably to none at alL” 

Lord Paget «T Northampton 
(Lab): “The person responsible 
and the cause of all this trouble 
is a tycoon who has set out to 
upset the established customs of 
an industry and to disrupt the 
working lives of many, hundreds 


of people. The Government 
should he trying to find means 
to curb ivcoons of the Murdoch 
type.” The Ear) of Caithness 
disagreed. 


sweatshirts and believed to be i 
in their late teens or early | 
twenties. They ran from the 
park across the A27 and 
separated as they entered the 
Moulsecoomb estate. 

Dct Chief Supl John 
McConnell, head of Sussex 
CID, said yesterday that the 
public response to the 
reconstruction had been 
“overwhelming''. 

The main police effort is to 
find the two youths. If they 
live on tbe Moulsecoomb 
estate it is highly likely they 
have already been interviewed 
during the house-to-house in- 
quiries detectives have been 
making. 

One theory still being ac- 
tively considered is that the 
girls knew their killer or 
killers, may have threatened 
to tell their parents after being 
indecently assaulted, and were 
killed to keep them quiet 


Firm refuses 
to reply to 
Government 


J E Hanger, the company in- 
volved in the dispute m which 
300 workers at Rochampton 
who make artificial limbs have 
been dismissed, have refused to 
give the Government sub- 
stantive replies to inquiries 
about what arrangements they 
arc making to maintain sup- 
plies. Lady TrampiGRton, Under 
Secretary of State for Health and 
Social Security, said in the 
House of Lords. The Govern- 
ment did not envisage that any 
amputee would be left immobile 
as a result of the dispute, in 
which her depan ment was not 
involved. 

Lord Cledwyn of Pewhos, Lead- 
er of the Labour peers, said that 
for the minister to say that the 
dispute was a matter for com- 
pany and employees was a 
philosophy of despair. 

Lady Tnimpingtoo said that the 
.company had initiated legal 
proceedings against the Govern- ~ 
mem to compel it to give a 
further contract. The Govern- 
ment could not intervene in 
those circumstances. 


More Bills 


to start in 
the Lords 


By Sheila Gann 

More Government Bills wtQ 
be started in the House of 
Lords in the next session of 
Parliament to stave off a 
repetition of this summer's 
logjam. 

Small committees of peers 
are also likely to be set up to. 
look at Bills in detail. 

These two tactics are ex- • 
pecied to be used to defuse tbe 
unrest among peers in tbe 
wake of two weeks of late 
sittings - with another ardu- 
ous two weeks to come. 

Looking back on the ses- 
sion. the Government made 
an unfortunate choice in the 
Bills it started off in the Lords. 
The Shops Bill to legalize 
Sunday trading, was debated 
fully in the Lords only lo fen 
in the Commons. The Educa- 
tion Bill, which began as a 
modest measure to alter the ■ 
com position of school govern- 


ing bodies, was turned, by the 
moral right, into a vehicle to 
erase political indoctrination . 
and to legislate on how sex is 
taught. 

Government sources now ' 
recognize it might have been 
better to give peers a first look 
at the Financial Services BiU, 
which is being virtually rewrit- 
ten in the Lords. 

Bills of a sharply political 
nature will not be started 
there, but those concerned 
with banking or legal affairs 
would be a natural choice. 

Lord Whitelaw. Leader of 
Lords, consoled peers 
yesterday by atguing that their 
hard work confirmed their ; 
rote as a revising chamber. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


US and France 
in terrorism deal 

tiavino ® ecn ? 1 ^ Mfoister, M Robert Pandracd, 

for talks with US 

uonK a !?ZlF ian, ? er rf De * KItMS ® expected soon to 

TO»« e t??i Wi 2 l,neM ^ *** was agreed by 372 

GmdbILSc*^ proposals by Christian Democrats and 
t4 gram{«s and two smaller parties of die left. 

ex* 1 ?** overnight on tire French 
B ^ an ^ Gwsfca, damaging property and 

snglitly mjnniig a caretaker. 

South Pole hunt 

the stat ”* n whidl ^sSsappeared near 

„ Jh “Friendly 1" was reported earlier lias 

month to hare disappeared after the ice-floe on which it 
w«S Standing in the Davis Sea spBt apart, leaving a channel 
or water some nine miles wide. It was rniiMmwi at die 
ante. 

^oSS* 4 *? 5 are ^ tI 7«g to locate the station using 
gtellite photographs. If found, vessels led by the Mikhail 
gotoov. which last year went adrift in the ice-bound g*>« 

■2S» ' r?l ^ *° sa l ya g e the geologka] research station's 
valua ble equipment. 

Alfonsin 
award 

Strasbourg (AFP) — 
President Alfonsin of 
Argentina (left) was pre- 
sented with die Council of 
Europe's human rights 
prize in a ceremony here 
yesterday — the first time 
the award had been made 
to an Individ naL 
President Atfonsfn was 
awarded the prize for his 
efforts to restore normalcy 
in Argentina on becoming 
the first ci vilian president 
after the reign of the mili- 
tary junta between 1976 
and 1983, when 
arotmd 10,000 people are 
said to have been killed or 
to have disappeared. 

Sanctuary 
destroyed 

Delhi — Bharatpur, nor- 
thern India's famous grass- 
land and forest bird 
.sanctuary 106 ™il«» from 
/Delhi, has been reduced to 
ashes by irate vQIageis who 
bad been stopped from 
grazing their rating in the 
area (Knldip Nayar writes). 

Flocks of pelicans and 
storks are new roaming the 
c ou ntr y side, and most birds 
have taken shelter on trees 
some' distance from the 
sanctuary. 



Afghan 

appeal 

Washington — Five def- 
ectors from the Soviet 
Army in Afghanistan ap- 
pealed to President Reagan 
forasyhun in the West five 
months ago but have not / 
; yet bad a reply, according 
: to ^Democrat lobby ponp 
(Michael Bmyon writes). 

. The. State. Department 
confirmed that the. White. . 
House had received their -, 
letters, but said that the ■ 
men were stiD in die hands 
of Afghan guerrillas. 


Ex-minister accused 

Delhi (Renter) — The riding Congress Party has 
suspended a former Cabinet minister, Mr Prakash 
Chandra Sethi; for what it called anti-party activities. 

Mr Sethi, aged 66, who served as Home Minister under 
Mrs Indira Gandhi, has been asked to explain why he 
shook! not bo expelled from the party, a spokesman said. 



Buffalo braves: Young Thai jockeys gaHoping neck and neck in the sprint to the finishing line in the annual buffalo races at Chon Bari 50 miles east of 
Bangkok. Ram on the fall-moon day of tbe eleventh lunar month, they draw enthusiastic thro n gs to the festival. 


Shamir 

forms 

Cabinet 

From Our Own 
Correspondent 
Jerusalem 

Mr Yitzhak Shamir wrote 
formally to President Henrog 
of Israel yesterday telling him 
he has formed a new Govern- 
ment. The notification was 
sent after be signed a pact with 
Mr Shimon Peres settling 
differences which have held 
up the transfer of power for a 
week. 

Mr Shamir should have 
taken over as Prime Minister 
last week. It will now be 
Tuesday before be moves into 
the office Mr Peres has occu- 
pied for the past 25 months. 

Thai exua week has cost Mr 
Peres dearly. The pact he 
signed shows that he lost out 
on all the issues over which he 
i delayed tbe handover of 
power. He must sit in Cabinet 
with a Minister he dismissed 
and he will not have final say 
on the choice of an ambas- 
sador to the US. 

He has been assured that his 
Cabinet agenda proposals will 
have priority and that be or a 
party Cabinet colleague will 
approve all economic meas- 
ures J3ut overall Mr Peres lost 
his first trial of strength since 
his resignation and be has lost 
some of the credibility he has 
laboriously bail! up during his 
25 months in power. - • 

Mr Yitzhak Rabin, the De- 
fence Minister and former 
Labour Prime Minister, has 
made it plain that be is 
prepared to challenge him for 
the party leadership before the 
next election. 

Mr Peres had to give up 
power as 63 Knesset members 
said they would support Mr 
Shamir as Prime Minister this 
was more than enough to meet 
the minimal number needed 
ip form a government 


Israelis tell how they resened downed airman 

Pilot clung to skids as helicopter 
dodged gunfire from militias 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

It was tbe 13th in this year's 
series of what Israel describes 
as w routine raids on terrorist 
bases in Lebanon". The four 
Phantom jet crews taking part 
probably never gave a second 
thought to the feet that 13 is 
an unlucky number. 

They came in low on their 
bombing run over the Chris- 
tian village of Maghdoucbe, 
just on the edge of the coastal 
plain below Sidon. Ahead was 
the refugee camp of Midi 
Mieh, a well-defended stron g - 
hold of the Palestinian Libera- 
tion Organization (PLO) loyal 
to Mr Yassir Arafat. 

His spokesman in Cairo 
claimed credit for tbe grenade 
attack on a group of soldiers 
and civilians outside the Old 
Chy walls of Jerusalem. That 
attack caused more casualties 
than the Israeli Army suffered 
during tbe Six Day War in 
1967, when the Old City was 
captured from Jordan. 

The raid on the PLO strong- 
hold may have been what 
official spokesmen call 
"routine" and part of an 
ongoing policy, but tbe pilots 
must have been aware that 
their country was looking for 
swift vengeance. 

As has .become, more" add 
more usual as tbe raids have 
become more and more “rou- 
tine”, the pilots bad to go in 
against a huge barrage of anti- 
aircraft fire. On tbe ground the 
militia was prepared for a 
retaliatory raid and artillery 
handguns and shoulder- 
launched Sam 7 missiles were 
ready as tbe Phantoms 
screamed in. 

On this 13lh raid one pilot’s 
luck ran out. A missile, a shelL 


or perhaps even a single bullet 
smashed into his Phantom. “I 
just don’t know what hit me," 
he later said at his debriefing. 

He fired his ejector seat, 
automatically doing the same 
for his navigator who was 
sitting above and behind him. 

A television crew filmed the 
moment that tbe two seats 
Masted out of the stricken air- 
craft — the pilot buried nearly 
100 yards forward and up- 
ward, tbe navigator shot back- 


save for the bruise caused by 
tbe explosive thrust of his 
ejector seal. Although the 
militia were within easy range 
of his landing point they were 
out of sight in the wild coun- 
tryside. He rapidly pulled off 
his parachute and bid among 
the rocks and bushes. It was 
4.30 and there was another 
hour of daylight left before be 
could hope for darkness and 
rescue. 

The signal from bis “Sara" 


The pilot was saved by a sophisticated piece of equipment 
on his beft. Known as Sara (Search and Rescue Apparatus), 
it is an Israeli improvement on an American design. Its sig- 
nal was picked up by receivers, possibly mouated on Israeli 
gmtboals. 

Another signal, probably from the navigator's Sara, was 
picked up intermittently before it faded completely. 


wards for a similar distance. 
As the parachutes billowed the 
camera crew’s microphones 
picked up sounds of the 
militia blasting rapid fire up- 
wards as the crewmen swung 
helplessly back and forth in 
their harness. 

The film caused deep anger 
among tbe military here, (hie 
senior officer sat watching tbe 
picture of the men drifting 
down ipto the gunfire. “And 
they talk to us about Geneva 
Conventions and • &B- tfiat 
stuff.'’ he said angrily. 

A copy of the film was “cap- 
tured” by Israel as it was 
beamed by a satellite out of 
Damascus. Yesterday it was 
being studied by military in- 
telligence officers here for any 
dues as to what had happened 
to tbe aircraft and, more im- 
mediately important, what 
had happened to tbe aircraft’s 
navigator. 

The pilot landed unharmed 


homing device stayed loud 
and clear, although it was 
obvious that its location was 
changing. This was because he 
had to keep moving from 
cover to cover before darkness 
fell as rival militias in the area 
combed the hillsides for the 
prize of an Israeli pilot 
prisoner. 

. It is unlikely that be heard 
or saw his rescuers until sec- 
onds before they aimeared 
overhead. ■ The tiny Cobra 
helicopter had flown in .from 
the sea, only afew yards above, 
pound level. Fixing on the 
signal from the pilot's Sara it 
clawed up tbe wadis into the 
hills. More than once a star- 
tled militiaman loosed of a 
round or two at it as it sud- 
denly appeared and disappear- 
ed as quickly into the Mack- 
hills. 

In tbe same way the pilot 
would have been suddenly 
aware of it hoveringjust above 


his head. By now he was in 
dangerous rocky countryside 
and there was no way the little 
machine on its two runners 
could land safely. Its two man 
crew delicately brought it 
down to within a yard of the 
ground and the pilot hauled 
himself on to the under- 
carriage and hung on grimly. 
Still hugging the ground and 
dodging the militia the Cobra 
swung back down the hillside 
and out to the sea shore. It 
landed in a safe spot and the 
pilot thankfully released his 
muscle-breaking hold. 

But there was no room for 
him in the Cobra. There was 
no alternative but for the pilot 
to make the rest of the journey 
outside on the runners. This 
time, at least, there was time 
to strap him on so he would 
not have to hang on for grim 
death. 

Then, 'with gunfire still be- 
ing exchanged between the off- 
shore gunboat and land-based 
militia positions, the Cobra 
made out to sea again and 
turned south, skimming tbe 
waves for the 35-mile journey 
back to the Israeli border at 
Rosh Hanikra. 

For six hours after the 
rescue the Israeli military 
censor refused to confirm 
anything- about the dramatic 
story. For all that time other 
helicopters were combing tbe 
hillside for any sign of the 
navigator. Only when the 
search was called off was the 
story released. 

“We will do anything to get 
our men back," a military 
spokesman said. “Our men 
are very precious to us and 
that is our weakness." 


Egypt 
rebukes 
Arafat ; 
mission 

From Robert Ffek 
Cairo 

The Egyptians have ddiv-jir 
crcd a formal if not verjr-7 
convincing rap over the*'- 
knuckles to the PLO‘s mission' 
in Cairo for claiming in the-:* 
Egyptian capital that its forces, o* 
had carried out the grenades 
attack at the Western Wall ror-.".* 
Jerusalem which killed 
Israeli and injured 69 others n*. 
on Monday. - -E 

Mr Osama aV-Boz. the Egyjf; 
lian First Foreign Unoef- : ‘ 
Secretary, has made a mikL._ 
complaint to Mr Said Kamat/2 
of the PLO office in 
adding that his Government'-, 
disapproved of such state* 
ments being made in Egypt. 

At a time when Egypt is-* _ 
trying to restore good relations:^ 
with Israel after its territorial.: S 
dispute over Taba. Mr ab'S 
Baz’s reprimand was inevfo-t'i. 
able. However, the PLO/-* 
which telephoned news agen- 
cies on Monday to publicize.'- ' 
its “heroic" attack on soldiers 
and civilians in Jerusalem, has:-*.-' 
not taken it seriously. '< 

The Egyptians have let it b«t - .. 
known that they do not op-V „ 
pose such actions inside Israel ■ 
or the occupied West Bank ;/' 
and Gaza — only when they ., 
are directed against Western 
targets elsewhere in the world. ,, 

Such apparent coniradic-, - 
lions in Egyptian policy are * 
not difficult to understand.; ^ 

Egypt has spent eight yeai%—~ 
trying to rc-csiaMish itself at 
the epicentre of the Arab 
world and to convince its 
Arab neighbours that it re- 
mains at the vanguard of the 
struggle for Palestinian rights 
despite the Camp David 
agreement with Israel. .. 

While they cannot disguis? 
their diplomatic ties with,?- 
Israel. Egyptian officials s 
no harm in demonstrating. 
their support for the PLO.’g-- 
"armed struggle’*, however;.-, 
tacitly this may be done. 

Nor is there any criticism 6T 
the PLO in the Egyptian press, i-i 
Not only did the daily papers: » 
here report Mr H-Baz.'s-.'r 
“routine" meeting with Mr:* 
Kama! — without giving any .*■: 
details of their conversation 
but at least one. the semi? 
official Al Gomhouriya, aur #i 
templed to justify the Jerusa-r 
lem killing and woundings. 

• "This escalation, although if 4 ^ 
gives die Israeli troops gr; 
reason to assault and arrest a v j 
large number of Arab mhab-‘~* 
itants. once again brings baclf;; 
to our minds that there isa'; 
homeless people, dreaming of-' ; 
peace ana stability on iis ~ 
land," the paper's editoriaT ~ 
said. “Peace will remain an 
impossible dream without a 
resolution of the Palestinian 
issue." 


Superpower arms control talks 


Carrington moves to soothe 
Nato generals’ tempers 

From Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent, Brussels 


Kohl to offer Reagan 
Europe’s INF ideas 


From John Fjtgfand, Boon 


The Secretary-General of 
Nato yesterday moved to 
defuse the row over arms 
control between its senior 
military commanders and the 
US Administration. 

Lord Carrington, speaking 
at Nato headquarters, denied 
that officers had been kept in 
the dark about proposals to 
the Soviet. Union and said he 
was “surprised and puzzled” 
at the claims. He said that the 
military concentrated on mili- 
tary matters, and politicians 
had other issues to consider. 

He was commenting on 
remarks by General Hans- 
Joach im Mack, a deputy to the 
Supreme Allied Commander 
in Europe, General Bernard 
Rogers, that Nato military 
head were not being consulted 
adequately about arms pro- 
posals and had not been 
informed of the details of the 


Reykjavik summit meeting. 

General Rogers sent an 
angry protest to Mr Caspar 
Weinberger, the US Defence 
Secretary, but Lord Carr- 
ington said that the General 
had not raised his complaints 
with him. General Mack’s 
remarks, made at Shape head- 
quarters on Thursday, caused 
anger and puzzlement within 
Nato yesterday. 

Lora Carrington, anxious to 
concentrate on more substan- 
tial issues of the arms control 
movement, said that the mili- 
tary was folly represented in 
all Nato structures and had 
been at the post-summit brief- 
ing given by Mr George 
Shultz, tbe US Secretary of 
State, earlier this week. 

General Mack had ex- 
pressed concern about the 
proposed zero-zero option on 
longer-range INF missiles in 


Europe. He felt that measures 
should be considered to re- 
duce Soviet stockpiles of 
sborter-range missiles as well 
as to reduce their superiority 
in conventional forces. 

Lord Carrington said that 
Soviet superiority in sborter- 
range INF missiles should be 
considered; the Soviet Union 
should be prepared to with- 
draw them from Eastern 
Europe, but tbe Allies would 
have to be careful about 
linking the two issues. 

They had been critical of 
Soviet insis tence on linking 
arms reductions with aban- 
donment of the US Strategic 
Defence Initiative. 

• ROME: Mr Weinberger be- 
gan talks here with Signor 
Giovanni Spadofini, the Ital- 
ian Defence Minister, im- 
mediately on his arrival from 
l damn had via Cairo yesterday 


Chancellor Kohl of West 
Germany will fly to Wash- 
ington on Monday prepare d to 
congratulate President Reagan 
on his performance at the 
Reykjavik summit. 

Despite the collapse of tbe 
talks over Mr Reagan's Strate- 
gic Defence Initiative pro- 
gramme, Herr Kohl says tbe 
two leaders achieved progress. 

Herr Hans-Dietricb Gen- 
seber, the West German For- 
eign Minister, who will 
accompany the Chancellor, 
told the Bonn Parliament on 
Thursday that tbe summit bad 
shown that both sides were 
able to “jump over their own 
shadows". It was now im- 
portant to hold to the course 
that had been seL 

Herr KohL, who will be the 
first Western leader to meet 
Mr Reagan after tbe summit, 
will pursue this line in their 
talks on Tuesday. He will also 


present Mr Reagan with Ger- 
man and European ideas for a 
separate agreement on' me- 
dium-range missiles (INF) in 
Europe. 

There is confusion in Bonn 
over differing statements this 
week by Mr Victor Karpov, 
the chief Soviet negotiator, 
and Mr Gorbachov, on an 
INF deal with or without 
linkage to an agreement on 
SDI. But government circles 
are said to believe an INF ac- 
cord next year is quite 
possible. 

Herr Kohl will encourage 
Mr Reagan to press tbe Soviet 
Union Tor a world ban on 
chemical weapons and for 
progress in talks on con- 
ventional ' arms controls. 
Other subjects on the agenda 
include the fight against inter- 
national terrorism, develop- 
ments in the Middle East, and 
South Africa. 


The Icelandic saga: good thing or a disaster? 


What if ... ? This is the 
recurrent theme in the endless 
post mortem examinatwiis 

now being conducted from the 
briefing platforms, in print, on 
the screens and in the seminar 
rooms' where A dmi ni s tration 
officials bare become so press- 
ing available. 

Reykjavik? What if Mr 
Gorbachov had accepted Pre- 
sident Reagan’s 1 B-year delay 

What if the two sides had 
clinched the “breathtaktag 


tUBVHV- 

sweep of anas _ 

The first reaction ^K 
wfctfWIong^for^”^ 
have been: Mr George Shul- 
tz’s bitter disappointment 
etched on his drained face, 
that there was to be no deal on 
medium-range nrissfles, no 
cuts iu strategic arms, wrthmg 
of what the negotiators w 
Geneva had spent so long 
striving for. 

But after steep and reflec- 
rklv renamed tooting, i ne 



aab.ag a.tas 


ing a Soviet bap, was cause foe 

prideand congratulation. 

of tha^final HofoFIftonse 
session were swept aside in the 
upbeat message that Reyk- 
javik was almost a triumph, 
that talks had taken a leap 
forward and could now con- 
tinue where they broke off. 

The right wing was com- 
forted that no one had given 
away the. Star Wars store. 
Liberals were persuaded that 
in a spirit of conciliation the 
Administration would now go 
right back to the negotiating 
table. 

Bet in the tortuous process 
of interp ret ing Reykjavik a 
new reaction has set in. What 
if the US really had stripped 
itself of all ballistic erissfies? 
Would this not have been a 
disaster? Did not President 
Reagan come dose to destroy-, 
ing not only unclear weapons 
but the whole concept of 
deterrence on which Western 
defence policy has rested? 

The arms experts here cer- 
tainly think so. Senator Sam 
Nmhi, the Democratic military 
insiststhat 
Mr Reagan bad not properly 


thought through the impfica- 
tions. He challenged him 
bluntly to “pull our zero 
ballistic missile proposal off 
the table before tbe Soviets 
accept it" Otherwise “every 
general in the Army and Air 
Force, and probably some 

Washington 

View 

By Michael Binyon 

.admirals too, would have a 
heart attack." 

Snch a move would leave the 
Western alliance vulnerable to 
a highly-developed Soviet air 
defence network and the vastly 
superior Sonet and Warsaw 
Pact conventional forces. 

Senator Nmm is a conser- 
vative, almost hawkish, Demo- 
crat who keeps in dose touch 
with military thinking. But 
Congressman Les Aspin, cha- 
irman of the House armed 
services committee and a 
liberal, is equally perturbed, 
aid raised (he same obje- 
ctions. 

Like Senator Nunn, he 


thought Mr Reagan coeld not 
have been serious. “What 
about the other nadear pow- 
ers? Are the three nuclear 
superpowers going to be the 
British, Frenai and Chinese? 
What about verification?" 

And. retired U$ generals — 
those allowed to voice public 
concern — have whether 
the US can afford, financially 
as wefl as militarily, to rely on 
conventional forces alone. 
They insist that the US would 
continue to need a nadear 
deterrent of some size to offset 
the conventional imbalance." 

Conservative commentators, 
while praising Mr Reagan's 
final decision on SDL have, 
called the manner in which tite 
two .sides negotiated hair- 
raising — “the wizards of 
Armageddon flin ging about, 
like tennis lobs, the most 
profound changes in nuclear 
strategy in a generation." 

if all seemed more ina» 
poker than negoti at ing. They 
also insist that scrapping 
unclear arms undercuts the 
US insistence on developing 
SDL With no nuclear threat, 
SDI is of little nse apart from 


as a very expensive insurance 
policy. 

Those canght in tbe middle, 
nnaMe to decide whether tbe 
Icelandic saga was a. good 
thing or a disaster, indnde 
most of America at the mo- 
ment. Opponents of SDI were 
thrown off balance by the 
coacesshHis it wrong oat of Mr 
Gorbachov, and the result has 
been a greater acceptance here 
of the President’s visionary 
shield than ever before. 

SDI supporters, however, 
seem unable to decide whether 
the programme should be nsed 
to enforce bnge ballistic mis- 
sile cats or should go ahead 
regardless. 

How is the gap between SDI 
as die arms redaction enforcer 
and SDI as the rabafancer to 
be bridged? At the moment, 
while perceptions are in Dux 
and both Washington and 
Moscow seem unsure of the 
next moves, foe Administra- 
tion has been trying, with 
some success, to tarn “what if 
r into “what now . . ; T" 

The answer is for from 
dear, and an extraordinary 
delicate balancing act is going 
on to control the debate. 


Baghdad 
hit by Iran 
missiles 

By Onr Foreign Staff 

Iran confirmed yesterday 
that it had attacked the Bagh- 
dad telecommunications 
centre with ground-to-ground 
missiles. 

Tbe attack, on Thursday 
night, was in retaliation for 
earlier Iraqi attacks on riviljan 
residential areas. 

Iran said it would step up 
missile attacks and air raids 
on Iraqi towns and cities to 
make Baghdad pay for its 
“inhuman acts". 

An Iranian missile killed sax 
people and injured 64 when it 
exploded in a residential area 
of Baghdad on Thursday 
night. 

Tbe missile, the third to hit 
the Iraqi capital in three 
months, destroyed or severely 
damaged 28 bouses around a 
crater 16ft deep and 30ft 
across. 

A large hospital 400 yards 
from tbe impact site also 
suffered extensive damage; 
along with a mosque, school 
and kindergarten. 

A large number of the 
injured were Egyptian and 
Sudanese workers who lived 
in the area. One child was also 
killed and eight children 
injured. 

The crew of a Panamanian 
(anker abandoned ship in the 
Gulf on Thursday night after 
it was hit by two shells or 
bombs. 

The 12,804-lonne Five 
Brooks, on charter to Kuwait, 
was passing through the Strait 
of Hormuz at the mouth of the 
Gulf, on its way to Kuwait 
when it was attacked. 


Ankara reshuffles 
in bid for stability 

From Rasit Gmdilek, Ankara 


Mr Turgut Ozal, the Turk- 
ish Prime Minister, reshuffled 
his Government as well as the 
hierarchy of his Motherland 
Party (Anap) yesterday in an 
apparent effort to contain the 
upheavals that followed the 
setbacks in last month's by- 
elections. 

Of the resignations submit- 
ted by all Ministers on 
Wednesday, Mr Ozal accepted 
those of Mr Mehmet Aydin. 
the Health Minister, and Mr 
Necat Eldem, tbe Justice 
Minister. 

Mr Hasan Celal Guzel a 
favourite aide, is now a State 
Minister, replacing Mr Mesut 
Yilmaz. a former protege, as 
Government spokesman. 

Mr Yilmaz. accused of 
alienating the press, takes over 
the Tourism Ministry from 
Mr Mukerrem Tascioglu, who 
becomes Labour Minister in 
place of Mr Mustafa Kalemli. 
now Health Minister. 

Mr Mahmut Oltan Sungur- 
lu, an Anap deputy and a 
former jurist, is the new 
Justice Minister, while Mr Ali 
Bozer, a recruited deputy, gels 
one of the state ministries, 
whose number has been in- 
creased from seven to 10. 

Earlier, Mr Ozal strove to 
put an end to the in-fighting 
between parly factions. The 
existence of foe factions are 
officially denied Mr Yilmaz 
and Mr Sadi Pehlivanoglu had 
to yield their posts as deputy 
party chairmen to relatively 
obscure successors; 

But Mr Mehmet Keceriler, 
reputed leader of foe domi- 


nant fundamentalist faciiov. j 
stayed on as one of the five- - 
deputy chairmen, despite htg 
humiliating loss in foe by*v. 
elections. 

Anap saw its share of ttie-« 
vote depleted by almost one^ - 
foird in the September 28" 1 -' 
election, but it won six of the-’* 
! 1 seats to increase its major- 
ity to 237 in the 400-mcmber ■ ^ 
legislature. - ~ 

The fufi Cabinet 1st is: Prim^ .I 
Minister Turaut Ozal. Deputy Prime ~ 
Minister and NBnister 0* State Kay£ " ■ 
Erdem, Ministers o 1 State Kazim^C 
Oksay, Vehbi Dinceifer, AMuHah.., t 
Tenetceci. Ahmet Kaiaevli. Mustafa”.*' 
Tmaz Titiz. AH Bozer. Hasan Cefel **, 
Guzel. .Justice Mahmut Ottao-T- 
Sunauriu, Defence Zeki Yavuzturk, 
Interior Yddirim Akbukit. Foreran -i 
Affairs vahit Hate fog fu. F&ianS'*' 
and Customs Ahmet Kuneebe- 
Alptemodn. Transport and Cook- 
munications Veysel Atasov. 
culture. Forestry and Rural Affairs' ' 1 ' 
Husnu Dogan, Industry and Coon--' - 
meree Can It Aral, Energy arid': -c 
Natural Resoiices Sudi Turaf, 
Education, Youth and Sports Metm * : 7 
Emrrogtu. PubCc Works and Hou*v ° 
ing Safa Giray. Health and Social 
Assistance Mustafa Kalemli. Ctd-.c.-? 
hire and Tourism Mesut Yrtmaz. 1 - .- 
Labour and Social Security 

errem Tascioglu. iU ^ 

The True Path Party, 7 - * 
backed by Mr Suleyman V 
Demire], a former right-win^ i. 
prime minister, emerged, as a 
dangerous challenger. : 1- *3 

• Ecerit trial: Mr Bulen't 
Ecevit. a former left-wing; L-. 
Prime Minister, is being tried-" 
on charges of taking part in j i 
active politics by addressing^;- 
campaign meeting of ihe-^ 
Democratic Left Party led byr.t. 
his wife (AP reports). ■ . •; 


Pretoria abolishes black townshipr 


.. ^ 


From Midrad Hornsby 
Johannesburg 
South Africa announced 
yesterday that it had “abol- 
ished" a black township in lire 
western Transvaal to enable 
its I0.Q00 inhabitants to move 
to better conditions elsewhere. 

At a press conference in 
Johannesburg, however, res- 
idents of foe -township said 
they were adamantly opposed 
to tbe move, and accused the 
Government of going back on 
a pledge to refrain from forced ’ 
resettlement of blacks. 


1 


The township, known sim- 
ply as the Old Location, is 
adjacent to the “white" town 
of Brits. 30 miles north-west of 
Pretoria. Most of its inhab- 
itants work in Brits. 

The Government intends to 
resettle all of them at 
Lethabile, about 12 miles 
away on the border of foe 
Bophuthatswana tribal 
"homeland". It is feared that 
eventually Lethabile will be 
incorporated into Bophu- 
thatswana. 

"We are not going ioj take 


this lying down We are nope 

moving to Lethabile. even if ft 3 
means violence". Mr SeUa'i 
Ramakobye. secretary of dfe* 
Brils Location Action Corbet 
miuee. declared. .jg~ 

A lawyer representing tife «- 
committee. Mr Geoff Bu dr 
lender, said the Brits constifo.^ 
uency had become a marginal ^ 
one for the Government, and,.-,* 
that pressure from right-wing^ 
whiles who did not like having ' 
blacks living on their doarau»£« 
was suspected of being 
mam reason for the move . 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


_u Martens pulls 


back Belgian 
coalition from 
edge of collapse 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 


a solution 


after despairing of 

differences on the 


Dr Wiifried Martens, the 
Belgian Prime Minister, yes- 
terday again proved his mettle 
as a political tightrope walker 
by-apparently pulling bis four- 
party Centre Right coalition 
back from the brink of col- 
lapse over the aggravation of 
tensions between Belgium's, 
Dutch- and French-speaking 
communities. 

The crisis arose on Tuesday 
when, after a dispute over a 
dismissed French-speaking 
mayor. Dr Martens, a Flemish 
Christian Democrat widely 
seen as a symbol of Belgian 
unity and stability, offered his 
resignation to Kjnp Baudouin 

to'cbalition 
issue. But the King delayed his 
reaction to the resignation to 
give Dr Martens more time. 

Yesterday the Palace an- 
nounced that Dr Martens' 
resignation was being refused 
because a coalition collapse 
had been averted at the elev- 
enth hour. 

The Martens coalition of 
Liberals and Christian Demo- 
crats, which was reelected a 
year ago. has run into oppo- 
sition from trade unions to its 
economic austerity progr- 
amme. Dr Martens has also 
survived controverey over the 
deployment of cruise missiles 
itf Belgium. 

In the end it was the 
language issue which brought 
his Government so near to 
disaster this week, to the 
surprise of those who bad 
thought that outright hostility 
between Dutch speakers in 
Flanders in the north of the 
country and French speakers 
in Wallonia in the south was a 
thing of the past 

The origins of the crisis lie 
in die dismissal of Mr Josi 
Happart as mayor of the 
Fourons. a French-speaking 
enclave in a Dutch-speaking 
region near the border with 
the Netherlands. Mr Happart 
reTused to speak Dutch and 
campaigned for the Fourons 
lo’Jje administered from Li€ge 
in Wallonia. 


After intensive talks during 
the night. Dr Martens an- 
nounced a special commission 
to find a long-term solution to 
the Fourons problem. As a 
short-term measure, Mr Hap- 
part has been replaced by Mr 
Roger Wynants. a bilingual 
Walloon, who wiD be acting 
mayor. 

This outcome, however, 
could still be undermined by 
coalition disagreements and 
by violence on- the part of 
extremists from both sides of 
the language divide. Yes- 
terday feelings were still run- 
ning high and Dr Martens 
despatched police and par- 
amilitary gendarmes to the 

Fourons region. 

Most Belgians are hoping 
that Dr Martens' manoeu- 
vring will succeed. They ap- 
plaud the skill of a man who 
has maintained that the 
Happart dispute is not im- 
portant enough to threaten an 
otherwise successful coalition. 

Since first becoming Prime 
Minister seven years ago. Dr 
Martens has made Belgian 
unity a top priority, presiding 
over the devolution of some 
powers to the regions. How- 
ever. the transfer of economic 
and technical resources to 
Flanders has tended to re- 
bound on Dr Martens, since it 
arouses resentment in 


Wallonia. 


a®** 



Dr Wiifried Martens: Made 
Belgian unity a priority 


Danes to limit refugees 


Copenhagen (AFP) — A law 
aimed at reducing Denmark's 
intake of refugees by at least 
half was adopted by Par- 
liament yesterday. 

-Under the new legislation, 
asylum-seekers from countries 
deemed safe, such as Western 
Europe, will no longer be 
admitted, but those arriving 


directly from countries where 
their life could be at risk mil 
be granted temporary resi- 
dence while the authorities 
look into their cases. 

It is believed the BID could 
cut the Intake by between 50 to 
80 per cent Denmark accepted 
7,948 refugees in the Gist nine 
months of this year. 


Shultz inspects Salvador earthquake damage 


Disaster 
wreaks 
new havoc 


on poor 


from Paul VaBely 

San Salvador 


It seemed a classic image. 
Between the two massive gir- 
ders a whitened body was 
pinioned, its head turned out 
from the debris of the flat- 
tened shopping complex, its 
arm and opened hand reach- 
ing towards the air: The res- 
cuers could not free the body, 
so they painted it with lime. 

International workers clam- 
bered on the roof of the 
crushed building, in front of 
which the US Secretary . of 
State, Mr George Shultz, was 
giving a press conference. The 
air was heavy with the sweet 
and sickly smell of human 
putrefaction. 

Yet this is not the reality of 
the earthquake. International 
attention has focused on dra- 
matic scenes of shattered con- 
crete and lurching buildings, 
but the true tragedy lies else- 


The man detected beneath the 
wreckage of a six-storey de- 
partment store by a British 
rescue team using a high-tech- 
nology sonic device has been 
rescued and takes to hospital, 
where he was said to be in a 
serious condition. 


where, with the 305,000 in- 
dividuals who have been 
turned on to the streets or 
economically crippled. 

The figure, which represents 
almost a quarter of the popu- 
lation, seems astonishingly 
high, h was released yesterday 
by the most reputable of the 
nation's charities. Fundesa 
(the Foundation for Mini- 
mum Housing and Develop- 
ment), a body so substantial 
that it can secure loans direct 
from the World Bank and to 
which, the Salvadorean Gov- 
ernment turned for data. 

Its statistics shows that h is 
the poor who are hardest hit. 
About 61,000 families have 
been made destitute; 29,600 of 
them once shared rooms in 
sub-standard tenements, 
19,000 were squatters, 5.100 
lived in shanty towns, 5,000 
had already been displaced by 
war, and 1.500 lived in camps 
which they had occupied since 
the last serious earthquake 
destroyed their original homes 
in 1965. 

Today they are living on the 
streets. . They have erected 
shelters made of sticks, card- 
board boxes and old plastic 
tablecloths. 

Wherever you turn they 
occupy pavements, gaps be- 
tween buildings and parks. 
They live on traffic round- 
abouts and in some cases have 



_ to Mr George 

Shultz, the US Secretary of State, who visited the disas ter area and promised US aid. 

used rubble to cordon off a The children queue for the few pointed a way as most people 

food handouts or for water 


section of highway for their 
fragile unprovtsations. 

Ax night they light tiny fires, 
around which adults huddle 
and sleepless children wander, 
dressed incongruously in frilly 
frocks and other garments 
never intended for life on the 
street. Old people sit, in bewil- 
derment or resignation, on 
chairs or beds salvaged from 
the ruins. 

Those women who have 
rescued a few pots and pans 
use them to warm tortillas 
donated by rural communities 
and ferried into town by char- 
ity workers. 1 

By day the women wash 
clothes in potholes Much have 
filled with water from broken 
pipes. They make pathetic im- 
provements to their shelters 
with whatever materials the 
men dig from their homes. 


handouts 
from whichever pipe seems 
least contaminated. 

It is the rainy season here, 
and the city's damaged hos- 
pitals are filling with babies 
with pneumonia, bronchitis 
and other respiratory illnesses 
and children suffering from 
severe gastro-enieriris and 
other serious diarrhoreal dis- 
eases. They are also taking in 
increased numbers of children 
who have been injured by cars 
on the streets which are now 
their home. 

The leaders of these dev- 
astated communities have be- 
gun to complain that they are 
being neglected by the authori- 
ties, whose attention seems 
concentrated on the spectacu- 
lar rescue scenes in the city 
centre. 

They have protested, in as 


dare in a society as repressed 
as democratic El Salvador, 
about the Government's deci- 
sion to hand over the official 
administration of the relief 
and reconstruction effort to 
private sector committees 
which, they feel, will regard 
the poor as a low priority. 

“There has been no food 
handed out. The water is three 
days late, and when it conies 
we will have to pay for it. The 
Mayor's office has produced 
nothing except a few blankets 
and a few pieces of nylon 
sheeting.” said the leader of 
one of the groups of shanty- 
town dwellers. 

Fundesa estimates that al- 
most half of the population of 
San Salvador is caught iu this 
marginal existence. For people 
like them, an earthquake is 
only the latest emergency. 


Bangladesh presidential election 


Political triumph for Ershad 


< ■ .; From Ahmed FazI 
D haka 


President Ershad scored an- 
other political triumph yes- 
terday as planned protests 
from the opposition against a 
one-sided election turned out 
to’be a whimper of dissent, 
When counting ended in 
Wednesday's presidential poll 
President Ershad. aged 56, was 
credited with 21,717,774 
vbies. His nearest contender 
received 1 .478.930, with an of- 
ficial turnout of 54 per cent. - 
rThe opposition groups, 
Miich doubt the announced 
idrnout at the polling centres, 
find themselves in a quan- 
dary. Despite their resistance, 
Ppesident Ershad has held the 
election and the country, 
wjiich has been under military 
regimes for more than half the 
period since independence in 
December 1971, has an elect- 
ed president and a parliament. 
'President Ershad has estab- 
lished democratic credentials 
vfliile whittling away much of 
the strength of his two main 
political challengers. Sheikh 
Fjasina Wazed. chief of the 
Awami League, and Begum 
KJialeda Zia. leader of the 
Bangladesh Nationalist Party. 
l“The presidential poll has 


been another monumental 
fraud,” Sheikh Hasina, daugh- 
ter and political heir of Sheikh 
Mujibur Rahman, the coun- 
try's founder President, who 
was overthrown and killed in 
an 1975 coup, said. 

“We are not going to take it 
lying down," she lokl The 
Times at her house in west 
Dhaka, which was attacked by 
supporters of the official 
Jatiyo Party during Wednes- 
day's poll. 

A senior league official said 
yesterday that they now face 
the challenge of keeping the al- 
liance of eight parties alive. 

The Communist Party, 
which provides cadres for 
league rallies and has six 
members in the Parliament, is 
disappointed that the alliance 
did not take pan in the elec- 
tion, as it is eager to see the 
legislature fimetion. 

They can only do this by ac- 
cepting President Ershad as 
the country's third directly-el- 
ected President 

President Ershad said he 
would summon the Parlia- 
ment within the next two 
weeks and ask for a Bill ap- 
proving his four and a half- 
year-old military regime. It 
seems certain that the Gov- 
ernment which controls 210 


seats in the 330-meraber Par- 
liament wiU, with support 
from smaller opposition 
groups, get the needed two- 
thirds majority. 

The Awami League, which 
boycotted the first par- 
liamentary session last June to 
protest against martial law, is 
discussing how it can join the 
House without damaging the 
league's credibility. 

“They have no alternative 
but to get inside the Parlia- 
ment,'' President Ershad said. 

The league is constantly 
under a threat that the Presi- 
dent could dissolve Par- 
liament, taking away all 76 
seats it holds. 

But President Ershad's str- 
ength stems not only from the 
failure of the two main oppo- 
sition groups to unite and stir 
up protests. 

The Army, a much more 
disciplined force than before, 
is apparently behind him and 
he has assured it of a role. 

The former army chief en- 
ticed away leading figures 
from both the league and the 
Nationalist Party. 

• Leaders freed: Four oppo- 
sition leaders, who were taken 
into custody before the 
presidential election, have 
been freed (AP) reports. 


Athens Socialists 
left in the lurch 


From Mario Modiano, Athens 
The Greek Socialists, still of Mr Andreas Papandreou to 


dismayed by their heavy 
losses in the first round of the 
local elections, free the pros- 
pect of a rout in Athens, where 
the Communist Party is urg- 
ing its followers not to back 
the government candidate in 
Sunday's run-off. 

In 220 of the 303 municipal- 
ities — including the three 
biggest cities, Athens, Sa- 
lonika and Piraeus— where no 
candidate for mayor secured 
more than 50. per cent of the 
vote, the two leading contend- 
ers free a second round. 

In most cities, the Socialists 
are unable to beat the conser- 
vatives without enormous 


reform the electoral law to 
increase the KIKE'S chances of 
sharing power. 

Mr Papandreou rejected the 
offer, but appealed to the 
Communist voters to rally 
behind his candidates. 

The KKFs central commit- 
tee on Wednesday night de- 
cided to throw its weight 
behind Socialist candidates 
simply to deny the conser- 
vatives an easy victory, but 
invited its followers to show 
their opposition to the Gov- 
ernment in Athens, which was 
politically more important, 
“in any way they deem fit”. 

It did not specify whether 


Communist backing. This is - they should vote for Mr Evert, 
especial! yso in Athens, where cast a blank vote, or abstain 


the Socialist Mayor, Mr Dimi- 
tris Beis, polled only 29.17 per 
cent against the 44.57 per cent 
of Mr Milto5 Evert of New 
Democracy. 

The Communists polled 
17.62 per cent and the Euro- 
communists, who are inclined 
to help the Socialists, only 
3.88 per cent 

The Moscow-line Com- 
munist Party (KKE) tried to 
trade off this support against a 
pledge from the Government 


(which is illegal). 

Significantly, however, a 
passage of this resolution 
which condemned equally 
Mayor Beis and Mr Evert, was 
later withdrawn. 

In Athens on Thursday, as 
the first autumn rain washed 
the dusty streets after a pro- 
longed summer, s oggy leaflets 
littered the pavements urging 
left-wing voters to defy the 
KKE and side with the Social- 
ists to protea their conquests. 


Ambush 

guard 



A young Sandmista soldier 
guarding an agricultraal co- 
operative after a Contra 
ambush killed three people. 


Politicians sidestep backwaters of Old Alabama 


firom Christopher Thomas 
m Eutaw, Alabama 


•Eafawis a country town of a 
f£n hundred black people, 
poor to a fault and the heart 
add soul of Old Alabama. 

■‘The parents are the cotton 
pickers and farmhands, the 
children are the general 
labourers, the tractor mechan- 
ics and the casual workers. 
Ejection Day on November 4 
mil not stir this slumberous 
Hjtle place; far from it. 

. '‘Governor George Wallace, 
wtfto is finally relinquishing 
domination of Alabama poli- 
tics after 25 amazing years, is 
Well known here- and quite 
lijced. But Eutaw is not about 
to- grab its pencils to vote for 
His Democratic successor. 
♦•Nor, indeed. Is it much 
bothered by Alabama's mo- 
ntentons Senate battle, the 
outcome of which will help to 
determine whether President 
Reagsia gets his way on Cap- 
itol Hill for the next two years. 
-The busiest thing about 
E&itaw’ is tibe railway track, 
vCJuch cuts across the main 
street Not a single election 
poster is to be found here, 


despite the feverish pitch of 
campaigning and untold mil- 
lions of dollars being ex- 
pended. Old Alabama is 
simply not party to the quest 
for a new economic and politi- 
cal beginning. 

.Mrs Rosy Grice, who thinks 
she is about 73, lives near the 
railway track in a tin-topped 
wooden shack, and she is as 
far from the efaftiwi campaign 
as she b from the Moon. 

For ail the emancipation, 
there are hundreds of places 


tike Eutaw where it is tempt- 
ing to dunk that the vote is 
meaningless. Mrs Grice is 
typical of her generation in 
rural black Alabama because 
she can write her name and 
nothing more. She votes 
Republican but doesn't seem 
to knew why, and is unaware 
that more than 90 per cent of 
Mack people vote Democrat 
If she could read she would 
discover that the Republicans 
are paying virtually no heed to 
her or anybody like her in the 



Senator Jeremiah Denton, left, and his Democratic 
opponent, Mr Richard Shelby, in Alabama's Senate race. 


current elections. And the 
Democrats are courting her 
vote from a discreet distance 
for fear of alienating th ei r 
traditional white base 

Eutaw i$ in the middle of the 
“black belt”, an area to the 
west of Montgomery ranw>d as 
much for the composition of its 
population as for the odour of 
its rich soil. Today, many of 
the ancient cotton ftdds are 
growing soy-beans. 

Rather than here, the poli- 
tidaos are to be fraud 
campaigning in the New 
Sooth, with its shiny apart- 
ment blocks alongside the big 
commuter highways, and in 
the gritty, itdfaingold factory 
towns like Bir mingham 

Alaba m a is low-skil] and 
low-wage, persistently over- 
shadowed by the new tech- 
nological and service eco- 
nomies of the Cantinas to the 
east and Texas to the west. Its 
image is all wrong, smeared 
initially by police dogs in the 
1960s and by the racial poli- 
tics of Governor Wallace in 
the 1970s. The latter's multi- 
racial conversion came too 
late; Alabama has a bad name 
among entrepreneurs. 



The state's new Governor 
will almost certainly be Mr 
Bill Baxley, a Democrat and a 
conservative who is seen as a 

S ’st in the Wallace tra- 
He tells people to back 
Alabama insteadof “attackin', 
cuffin', fussm' and pussy- 
footin' arena' all the time”. 

In the Senate battle the 
Republican incumbent. Sen- 
ator Jeremiah Denton, faces a 
vulnerable re-election battle 
against Mr Richard Shelby, a 
Democrat in the House of 
Representatives. Senator Den- 
ton is a romantic figure, a real 
war hero who spent eight years 
as a prisoner in North Viet- 
nam, the first POW to come 
home in 1973. 

Not that Mrs Grice, who 
can afford neither television 
nor radio, has heard of him. 
But if he was a Republican, 
she said, be would get her vote- 


Poles bar 
plea on 
sanctions 


Warsaw (Reuter) - Polish 
government censors have re- 
fused to allow a Catholic 
newspaper to publish an ap- 
peal to the United States by 
Mr Lech Walesa, the Solidar- 
ity leader, for the lifting of all 
US sanctions, informed 
sources said yesterday. 

A Cracow weekly intended 
to print the text of the appeal 
with a list of its signatories. 

Death blaze 

Moscow (Reuter) — A stew- 
ard on a Soviet train has teen 
jailed for 10 years for acciden- 
tally causing a fetal fire with a 
cigarette while he was drunk, 
the trade union daily Trud 
reported. 


Chess title 


Moscow (Reuter) - Maya 
Chiburdanidze of the Soviet 
Union won the world wo- 
men's chess title for the fourth 
time when her adjourned 1 3th 
game with compatriot Yelena 
Akhmylovskaya was drawn 
without a "play-off, Tass 
reported. 


Low-key guerrillas 
pose a dilemma 
for high-tech Bonn 


In the second oftw 0 articles they caw from, wh o rewa ited 
from Bonn. BhUip .faca&Kw ESSfi* 

examines the police use of high •"fgwg* **” **£! tET*! 

***** rajk 


am - generation 
terrorists. 

It seemed at the tune tike a 
stunning breakthrough in 
West Germany's war against 
urban terrorism. In the laic 
1970s, a vast computer net- 
work at the Wiesbaden head- 
quarters of the _ federal 
criminal police (BKA) was 
being programmed to maintain 
open files on each and every 
person suspected of havisi 
connections with . the Red 
Army Faction. 

Every scrap of information 
known about them would be 
fed into data banks for use by 
“target teams" assigned to 
hunt down one terrorist. 

The touch of a key would 
summon up an astonishingly 
detailed profile. Everythiag 
from childhood pictures atsl 
the names of friends at school 
and university to dental 
records, fingerprints, some- 
times even “voice prints" 
taken from tapped telephone 
calls. Did the suspect always 
phone mother on her birthday, 
eat regularly in certain res- 
taurants. prefer a revolver to 
an automatic pistol? The an- 
swers were all in the BKA 
computer, that went by the 
metanme “the Kommissar'. 

To this day, security 
specialists argue about the 
effectiveness of West Ger- 


tracks on tbf factiou s essen- 
tial back-ap system - the 200 
or so sympatUtti* who pro- 
vide safe houses, rent «r Meal 
cars, and spy do potential 
victims. 

He added: “We suspect 
such people haw steady jobs 
and live qtoctiy hi anoflyttous 
Mock* of flats fa tin Mg titic*. 
They don't drive flashy care or 
chuck their money around Uke 
some of the oM pari. It's 
realty only by chaw* that they 
gel caught” 

Even » most experts fa 
West Germany agree {hat 


Terror In 
Germany 

Part 2 


-many's high-tech approach to 
combating terrorism. 

Supporters maintain that 
the Kommissar's 10 million 
pages of information were 
worth an untold number of 
police man-hours as the orig- 
al Red Army Faction 
guerrillas were slowly but 
surely tracked down, often 
abroad, and taken. 

Critics point out that all the 
computers in the world can 
never replace classic detective 
work — pavement pounding, 
patient observation, the pro- 
fessional “nose” — and note 
that carelessness, arrogance 
and sheer luck still accounted 
for the capture of the majority 
of wanted terrorists. 

Faced now «nth the threat of 
the “second generation” Red 
Army Faction, West German- 
y's security authorities find 
themselves in s omething of a 
dilemma. These new terror- 
ists. explains Herr Alexander 
Prechtri, of the. federal 
prosecutor's office, are anally 
mnd) harder to pin downthun 
their’ high-profile 
predecessors. . 

“We keep stumbling across 
people who have never been 
under surveillance before, 
never appeared in any file.” he 
said. 

One such group was discov- 
ered recently with detailed 
plans of a key government 
ministry in Bonn. “Where 


computers hare a vital role to 
play fa counter-terrorist op- 
erations, espedaUy at an inter- 
national level. 

It is almost 10 years store 
the Kommissar was put at the 
disposal of the Italian authori- 
ties hunting the Red Brigade'll 
gang which kidnapped and 
executed Stour Akfa Mom, 
the former mow Minister. 

That turned out to be a 
notably fruitless exercise, but 
there is now a dear need for 
swift exchanges of the sort rf 
data which can trap w ante d 
terrorists - advance notice of 
movements, the numbers of 
phony passports or forged 
driving licences, recent 
changes in appearance. 

A recent example of prac- 


tical co-operation along such 
lex hotline 


lines is the telex 
linking key offices fa Bonn ami 
Paris, the result of a growing 
conviction in both countries 
that the faction is co-operating 
with the terrorists of France's 
Action Directe group. 

There is, however, an im- 
portant factor inhibiting the 
spread of computerized potiee 
work fa West Germany, For 
obvious historical reasons, the 
courts, political parties and 
the civil liberties lobby art 
exceptionally alert to any 
extension of the state's already 
substantial involvement. fa or- 
dinary citizens 4 everyday Ufa. 

Herr Precteel acknowled g es 
such concern, but warns. that, 
legal limitations already -to 
force are affecting West 
Germany's afatity to deni with 
the renewed faction threats. 

He said: “The enemy is 
always one step ahead of us, 
always improving its capacity 
for tenor. The state most try 
to keep up. Better a little loss 
of fiberty now than a great deal 
in the future” 

Concluded 


Red Army Faction 


First operation 1971, killing three US servicemen in bomb 
attack on Heidelberg army base. 

Peak of terrorism 1977, “year of the big hit”, with the 
murder of federal prosecutor and police escort, prominent 
banker and leading industrialist. 

Since revival of operations in 1985, more than 50 
bombing attacks on public buildings, factories, power lines 
and the like. At least six assassinations claimed. 

Estimated hard core membership now 25 to 30. with 50 
“active” supporters and approximately 200 other 
sympathizers. 


Aquino has 
talks on 
local truce 


From Keith Dalton 

Manila 

President Aquino of the 
Philippines met secretly with 
Communist rebel leaders on 
the central island of Panay 
yesterday to discuss a local 
ceasefire while talks on a 
national mice remain stalled. 

“It's a breakthrough.” a 
presidential aide said after he 
confirmed the meeting. It was 
the President's first face-to- 
fece contact with rebel leaders 
who have been waging war for 
17 years. The unannounced 
meeting in a Roman Catholic 
convent in Iloilo, 290 miles 
south of Manila, caught mili- 
tary officials by surprise. 

Mrs Aquino met a rebel 
priest, Father Jose Torre, of 
the Communist-dominated 
National Democratic Front, 
and Miss Concha Araneta 
Bocala. a Communist Party 
official in Panay where sev- 
eral hundred New People's 
Anny guerrillas operate. 

The next step is for the 
rebels to form a negotiating 
panel which will meet Gov- 
ernment negotiators "in the 
shortest time possible," the 
Information Minister, Mr 
Teodoro Benigno. said at a 
press conference. 

Mrs Aquino announced a 
20 per cent increase in combat 
pay after meeting soldiers on 
the island before she met the 
rebel leaders. 


Thai Army 
denies 
coup plan 


From Neil Kelly : 

Bangkok 

Assurances that the Thai. 
Army is not not planning' a 
coup against the Government 
are being made privately by 
senior military officers after 
public speculation about 
warnings General Chavalit 
Yongchaiyudh. .the. Anny 
Com mander-in -Chief. has 
been giving ihe_G.ovemment. 

According to authoritative 
military sources. General Cha- 
valit's statements, which in- 
ckid-ed a warning that- the 
Government was risking the 
loss of army support, were not 
threats, but reminders that the 
Government did have duties 
to the people and country- • 

Genera! Chavalit said the 
Government ■ would have 
army support only when it 

“took the right stand”. 

Military leaders and other 
groups have become -increas- 
ingly dissatisfied with the 
performance of the Govern- 
ment since it took office two 
months ago. ft appears para- 
lysed* with ; Ministers unable 
to mitiate urgent measures. 

The army commander has 
blamed "political conflict” for 
most of Thailand's problems. 
An indication of his .dissatis- 
faction with the Govern- 
ment's performance was his 
request to the Prime Minister 
for a bigger role for the Army 
m economic management. 


Chinese food shortage 

Pekine fReurerV— China ™ 


Peking (Reuter) - China is 
still short of food despite 
becoming a net grain exporter 
last year, a top United Nations 
official said yesterday. 


I 


Mr Idriss Jazairy. president 
ot ihe International Fund for 
i Development 

.. (ir-VB). said China's nriorilv. 


was now to ensure enoi 
ns one billion people. 

“China is still a food-deficit 
country, he said. “Uke manv 
developing countries, it has 
problcmsof infrastructure and 
transport which make, it 
cheaper to import for the 
inland regions and export 

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THE 



TIMES 


October 18-24 


SATURDAY 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


A film that danced into history 


* J? , 5j ulel p< ^ eU «*» permit himself a wry smile 

J3J2i ™ ®aker has he epjoyed soch critical 

ever doubted his talent 
the films seemed perverse and 
geentne and often tasteless. 

■ 5 y “ re w 550 PowcIFs repntation 

“ p,wds - Vetoes iflteTfcZ^h 

Md ^Rlart aT C3 ® foa ^ lw& ^» ^ Canterbury Tale 
a^cl»hS Na * ci5s * s *a^e been rediscovwed and 
““^Pieces. He has become the 
inspirahon for a new generafioo of directors, from 

r^nijy ne £ Can “™ ovie brats**, Scorsese and 
v^oppola, to young British film makers like Jnfien 

Hitchcock as Bn tain s greatest director. 

n extract from his forthco ming auto- 
biography, he describes the genesis of Ms most 
celebrated picture. The Red Shoes, and how he 
chose and wooed his leading lady. 

* 


I n 1946 we had the world 
at our feet. J. Arthur 
J*ank and his right-band 
man. John Davis, im- 
pressed by hair a dozen 
Academy Award nominations 
for Black Narcissus and by the 
success of Matter of Life and 
Death in the Slates, were 
anxiously waiting to knoty our 
next subject — and what it 
would cost. 

John and Arthur had cre- 
ated an empire with nothing 
in the treasury. Until they 
could go to the public and sell 
shares, they had to go to the 
banks, so it was with more 
than ordinary trepidation that 
they asked the formidable 
Archers (the production com- 
pany formed by Powell and 
his partner. Emeric 
Pressburger) what was to be 
their target. They must have 
paled and looked at each other 
with a wild surmise when we 
answered them — “a film 
about ballei". 

1 can't describe the plot 
better than Lermontov does in 
the film. 

Lermontov: TheBailetofthe 
Red Shoes is from a story by 
Hans Christian Andersen. It is 
about a young giri who is 
devoured hr an ambition to 
attend a dance-in a pair of red 
shoes. She gets the shoes and 
goes to the ball. For a lime alt 
goes well, and she is happy. 
But at the end of the evening 
she is tired anti wants to go 
home. But the red shoes are 
not tired. They dance her out 
into the street, they dance her 
over the mountains and vat- 
levs. through fields and forests, 
through night and day. Time 
rushes by. love rushes by. life 
rushes by. hut the red shoes 
dance on. 

Crosier What happens in 
the end? 

Lermontov: Oh! In the end 
she dies. 

On and around this beauti- 
ful tale. Emeric had spun a 
full-length screenplay for 
Alexander Korda's London 
Films in 1936 or 1937. Fbr 
some time Alex had been 
looking for a script about a 


ballerina for Merle Oberon 
and I think it may have been 
G. B. Stern who suggested the 
Hans Andersen story as a 
basis. Alex had known Emeric 
and his work since the days in 
Berlin, and once he had 
brought this brilliant 
combination together, the 
script made p ro gre s s. But it 
was never produced. 

Time passes by. life passes 
by. a war passes by and we are 
no longer an ambitious film 
director and an emigre 
Hungarian writer — we are the 
Archers. 

Emeric said to me: “You 
know that script of mine that 
Alex has got?” It bad all 
Emeric' s usual Charm and 
ingenuity and rather stronger 
character drawing than usual. 
But it was 10 years old. and 
the pre-war conventions of 
this kind of star vehicle 
showed up very plainly. 

I said to Emeric *T11 do it if 
a dancer plays the part and if 
we create an original ballet of 
The Red Shoes instead of 
talking about it". 

We figured on about four 
months' preparation before 
we started shooting on loca- 
tion m France in June 1947. 
We allowed four weeks for 
that, followed by the studio 
scenes of the principals. Last 
of all came the ballet of The 
Red Shoes itself. 

First we had to buy back 
Enteric's script from Alex, and 
we took infinite pains to avoid 
alerting that foxy gentleman, 
who would have upped the 
price if he knew how much we 
wanted it. or might even have 
refused to sell at all We need 
not have worried. When a 
price of £18.000 was quoted, 
we were in no mood to argue. 
Alex bought another Monet 
and we got on with the rewrite. 

1 reminded myself that the 
part of Vicky Page had to be 
played by a dancer, and a 
dancer of exceptional quality. 
A score had now been 
commissioned and it was lime' 
to look for the giri. 

Fate took me by the arm in 
the shape of Jimmy (Stewart) 



If you were deaf 
you would understand... 

RNID . 

THE ROVAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE FORTHE DEAF.Sy 
The RNID has been caring for the needs of the deaf and 

hard of hearing for more than 75 years. During this time 

we have constantly been extending our services to 
include: 

• Residential facilities for the rehabilitation and care of 
deaf including deaf/blind children and adults. 

• Counselling services on communication, education 
and employment. 

• Scientific, technical and medical research on deafness 
and tinnitus (noises in the ears). 

• Regional development services to assist the deaf to 
find suitable employment. 

• A telephone exchange for the deaf. 

However, in order to carry out this work we desperately 
need a great deal of financial support and tilts can be 
given in the following ways: 

1 Bv sending a donation or. even better, by making a 
0eed of Covenant. This greatly increases the value of 
vour gift without costing any more. A simple standing 
older with the bank will ensure that RNID receives 
your regular support. 

-j jf you are able to make a single large donation then by 
•" , taring the gift as a special kind of Covenant, RNID 
can also recover tax paid on it and that means the gift 
could be worth half as much again, but you must tell 
us that their gift ifrto be treated as a Deposited 
Covenant. 

3 By remembering us in your will. Legaciesaccountfor 
almost one third of our total income. 

4 The 1 986 Budget provides for new tax relief which 
will enable individuals to give up to £100 p.a. before 
deduction of tax to charity from April 1987. at a cost 
of only £71 or less - assuming basic rate of Income 
Tax at 29%. Encourage your employer to participate 

in a Payroll Deduction Scheme when it starts. 

5 Companies can make a substantial one-off rax 
deductible donation to charity without the need for 
entering into a Deed of Covenant. If you own or 
manage a company we would like to hear from you. 

The Royal National Institute for the Deaf 

Room T, 105 Gower Street, London WC1E 6AH 
Tel: 01-387 8033 



• • * '«* < M 






Granger, in the noisy Pine- 
wood Studios canteen. He had 
become a big star by now. and 
he aped the handsome brute, 
although his friends knew him 
for an innocent idealist. . . 

He look me by the arm. 
“Micky! You’re looking for a 
ballerina, aren't you?" 

J immy always knew ah 
the new girls as soon as 
they hit town, so I said: 
"Yes. Jimmy." and 
waited. 

“Well, there's a new giri at 
Sadler's Wells. She’s in Bobby 
Helpmann's new ballet. Go 
and see her. She's got it. 
whatever it is." 

The ballet was Miracle in 
the Gorbals. 1 spoke to Bobby. 

“Oh — Moira — ye-e-es. 
You could do worse, I sup- 
pose. She's very spectacular- 
looking." Bobby had read The 
Red Snoes script He would be 
my choreographer on the film, 
and play a leading role. 

“What son of voice has she 

goir 


•’Well she has a voice. 
She’s Scottish, you know." 

I saw Miracle in the 
Gorbals. The giri was sensa- 
tional. I asked fora meeting. A 
month went by.; then .she 
finally managed to fit me in 
between a hairdresser’s 
appointment and a perfor- 
mance. 1 was attending one of 
the vast Rank get-togethers in 
the Dorchester ballroom. 
"She's a corker. Mr Powell," 
the page-boy whispered to me. 
She certainly was. And is. 

She was tall, with the most 
glorious head of Titian red 
hair that I had ever seen on a 
woman. She had a cheeky 
face, well-bred and full of 
spirit. She had a magnificent 
body. She wasn’t slim, she just 
didn't have one ounce of 
superfluous flesh. Her eyes 
were blue. 

After a few minutes 
conversation I offered her the 
part. 1 would have offered it to. 
her the moment we met, but I 
didn't want to seem frivolous. 
As it was she looked startled. 


“Are you serious. Mr 
Powell?" 

“Quite serious. The part is 
yours. We don't start shooting 
until June next year. But you 
understand, you have iq pre- 
pare a long way ahead."' 

.“You loo. I suppose." Si- 
lence. Then: “What are you 
going to pay me. Mr Powell?” 

I grinned. She was Scottish 
all right. 

“Oh. a thousand pounds or 
so. and a retainer and ex- 
penses during the running-up 
period." 

“I see. I would have to get 
Miss de Valois's permission, 
of course." 

“Are you under contract to 
the Wells?” 

“We have no contracts.” 

I remembered that this was 
true. It was one of Ninette de 
Valois's proudest boasts: “Our 
dancers come to us. We don’t 
go to them." 

“Do you think she will be 
sticky about it?" 

"I beg your pardon. Mr 
Powell?" 



The manhandling of Moira 



Doing it my way: Powell directs Shearer and Marius Goring J. Arthur Rank and Shearer: be walked out without speaking 


T he lag Faust-like scene 
in which Lermontov and 
Julian fight for Vicky’s 
body and soul was her last 
scene in the shooting as well as 
the film. Moira had been so 
feted and adored by the crew 
and so gratified, although 
puzzled by my tacit approval 
that she had concluded that 
acting was a piece of cake. 

Then she found herself be- 
tween heavyweights like An- 
ton Walbrook and Marios 
Goring, neither of whom was 
particularly inclined to let the 
other steal the scene, and she 
lost her nerve. 

We rehearsed it through a 
long day with tempers frayed 
and tears and both these good 
actors trying to coach an 
hysterical'Moira. I was grimly 
determined to get a perfor- 
mance out of her, bnt as tiie 
day wore on 1 began to realize 
that it couldn’t be done. 

“It's five o'clock. Michael," 
1 was reminded. 

“Send everyone home," was 
my answer. “We"l! shoot h in 
the morning." 

At 9 JO we kicked off. The 
selfishness and cruelty of the 
two men who lored and killed 
Vicky Rage suddenly Oared 
into reality . They mishandled 
Moira as if she were a 
beautiful thoroochbred. poll- 


ing her bead savagely this way 
and that Because the two men 
were both refined and cul- 
tivated artists, the brutality of 
the scene was all the more 
disturbing. This was no longer 
acting. Moira, the centre of 
this savage combat, got fright- 
ened, missed her cues and 
started to cry. In the middle of 
the second take the make-up 
started to smear. 

Take three came up on the 
number board. We were all 
jammed into this little dress- 
ing room seL It was abomi- 
nably hot. 

“Action!" I said with an 
intensity that surprised me. 
This was it The men were 
terrific, and Moira turned 
blindly from one man to 
another like a broken doll 
between them. It was at last 
very moving. The mascara ^was 
running. She snatched at her 
lines wildly, and after Marins 
made hi$ exit she seemed 
neither to see or to bear as 
Lermontov raised her to her 
feet and led her towards the 
door, saying: “Vicky, little 
Vicky! Now you will dance as 
you have never danced 
before." 

As Moira staggered out, 
weeping, the whole stage burst 
into a roar of applause and 
symnathv. 


W hen J. Arthur Rank 
aim John Davis saw 
the Shu for the first 
time, they thought they had 
lost their shirts, collective and 
individnaL The tragic and gory 
end to which their star had 
crane by the end of (be film 
most have bees the last straw. 
When the lights came on. they 
stood op and without a word to 
Emeric. who was sitting with 
them, they walked out 
The Red Shoes was not even 
given a premiere. Instead of 
playing the Odeon Leicester 
Square, ’ which had always 
been onr showcase, it was 
booked into the GanmOnt 
Haymarket. it opened cold 
and was yanked oat'of the 
West End after about 10 days 
to go on general release. There 
had been very little advance 
publicity, and by the time the 
public realized what sort of 
film this was, it was gone. 

I loved The Red Shoes so 
much, and was so sure of its 
success with the public, that I 
couldn't imagine that Arthur 
and John literally didn't 
understand a word of the film 
and consequently hated it. It 
was to be my first experience 
of the stupid vknousness of the 
people whom Bill Wall, our 
chief electrician, used to refer 

to as “chair polishers". 

‘ ‘ 


They were not alone m their 
opinion. The film was shown 
in. I think, the projection room 
of Universal Pictures, and 
some big boss or other stood 
up when the film was over and 
announced in the tone of one 
who deems it self-evident: 
“This film will not take a 
penny in America." 

Our partners in America, 
Bob Benjamin and Arthur 
Krim, had seen The Red Shoes 
and were scared stiff. Most of 
their board shared Krim's 
opinion that it was an art 
movie and would require tough 
selling. 

One member of the board 
disagreed. He was Bill 
Heineman. He had a wife and 
eight children, all mad about 
the ballet, and they thought 
they knew what the public 
wanted. 

He found the Bijou Cinema 
on 45th Street off Broadway 
and he guaranteed them a run 
of six months. After it had run 
a year. Bill Heineman and his 
family were crowing. “I told 
yon so", and the theatre 
booked the film for another 
year. At the end of an un- 
broken run of two years and 
seven weeks. The Red Shoes 
had arrived. Everybody 
wanted it. Everybody still 
wants ft*:. 

’ ’ l 



On the set: Robert Helpmann, Moira Shearer and Michael 
Powell (inset, Powell at 81). Above, Shearer’s newspaper dance 


“It cuts both ways, doesn’t 
it? No contract. I mean. She 
can hardly stop you doing 
what you want to do. so long 
as you give her plenty of 
notice." 

“The ballet is my career, not 
the cinema. Mr Powell. I must 
go now. Goodbye." 

B obby Helpmann was 
pessimistic: “Ninette 
will kill it stone dead. 
She will think you 
should have offered 
the part to Margot (Fonteyn)." 

“I adore MaigoL but she 
would not be right for the 
pan." 

A week later an agent rang 
up. He said that he repre- 
sented Miss Moira Shearer. 
He understood that Powell 
and Pressburger had offered 
the leading pan in a dance 
film called The Red Shoes. 


Miss Shearer would want a 
retainer of £1.000. to be paid 
immediately, expenses to be 
agreed, and a fee of £5.000 for 
a 12-week film, half of it to be 
paid at the end of the first 
day's shooting. 

To myself. I nodded ap- 
proval. She was Scottish all 
right. To the agent I said, who 
did he think Miss Shearer was 
— Deborah Ken? 

Moira never made any se- 
cret of the fact that she played 
in The Red Shoes for money. 
She was punctual obedient, 
respectful cooperative, ef- 
ficient inventive — for 
money. She was a dancer, not 
an actress. Film making did 


not interest Miss Shearer — 
except for money. 

I never let love interfere’, 
with business, or I would have 
made love to her. It would, 
have improved her period,; 
mancc. A dancer is rather like- 
a nun. Not a nun like we hatf " 
in Black Narcissus but -a- 
devotee. Perhaps Moira was 
waiting to be insulted and had" 
her answer ready. We wefel’ 
very much alike. It was a.“ 
curious relationship. I sonie-_ 
times wondered whether she - 
had a heart to break 
A Life in Movies, by Michael 
Powell. #v published on October 
2~' (I hi nemo nn. £ 15.151. ; 

©Tirol Wwpapara Ud IMS 


ISATURDAYI 


Immense variety: 
after 20 years, the 
big TV treatment 
for Priestley’s Lost 
Empires- page 14 


Arts Diary 

13 

Gardening 

10 

Bridge 

If 

Oni and Abort 9 

Chess 

11 

Radio 

14 

Conceits 

14 

Retie* 

.13-. 

Crossword 

13 

Rurli&Jur 

14 - 

Dance 

14 

Shopping 

10 

Drink 

II 

Television 

14 

Earing On* 

11 

Times Cook 

11 . 

Filins 

14 

Trod 

8 

Galleries 

14 

TV & Radio 

14 



VAN/O-t-MER classic 


GRAHAM’S 

LATE BOTTLED 
VINTAGE 


/VT(7 /W 

OCC>A 5 /dA/ 



•V.' 






"OBER 18 1986 


Unwind somewhere warm 

THIS WINTER. 


Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 1 





From Cruises down the 
Nile, to Crete or the S. 
Canaries, from October 
to April, on a Sovereign . 

Holiday you can soak 
up the sun this winter, S 

instead of die rain. 


On the trail of the General jaz 

.aao-ivvi'.*-" '• 


Pick upa brochure today r 

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rrs THE ONLY WAY TO TRAVEL 




Martyr or mere womanizer? Panama’s 
General Torrijos has been called both. 




SPOTS 


Michael Watkins 
sought the truth in 
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if you have a curiosity about the worlds 
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postcode 


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u I 
I 


R eading Graham. 
Greene's Getting to 
Know the General 
(Genera! Omar 
Torrijos of Pan- 
ama) made me want to know 
him as welL ft was too late, of 
course. In 1981, the plane be 
was flying crashed: there were 
no survivors. Sergeant 
Chuctiu, the General's se- 
curity guard, swore: 'There 
was a bomb on the plane. 1 
know there was a bomb.*’ 
Tornijos ruled Panama from 
1968. his example inspiring 
the freedom fighters of Nica- 
ragua and E Salvador he was 
cast in an heroic mould. Or 
was he merely an alcoholic 
womanizer? Was be drunk 
when he flew his plane into a 
mountain, or was he assas- 
sinated? These were the ques- 
tions I asked in Panama Gty, 
receiving contradictory an- 
swers: he was a martyr, he was 
a whoremonger. 

Like Graham Greene before 
me, I was a guest of the 
government Like Greene, 
they'd staked me to a suite at 
E Panama Hilton from where 
1 looked out over the Pacific, 
counting ships as they were 
ingested into the Republic’s 
alimentary canal They'd said, 
the government people, that I 
could go anywhere, talk to 
anyone. I thought what's the 
catch? There was no catch. 
Dining with a Panamanian 
shipper be told me — looking 
coolly and carefully over his 
shoulder — that he’d at last 
been forced to join the dub to 
endorse bribery and corrup- 
tion in order to survive. 

“There’s no thought for 
tomorrow. Take, take, take 
and take some more, that's the 
creed. They're killing the 
goose that lays the diamante 
eggs. Torrijos was what this 
country needs. He'd drink 
himself legless, but he was 
strong and be was fair.” 

But a businessman, sleek as 
a seat reassured roe that 
Panama was the land of 
! opportunity: Torrijos was a 


pathetic drunk. The bomb 
theory is rubbish.” 

It is said that Panama Gty 
is three cities in one: city of the 
Conquistadors, colonial Pan- 
ama. and the skyscraper 
metropolis of the future. They 
do not talk about that fourth 
and potent dimension, the 
Canal Zone, because officially 
h was disestablished in 1979; 
it's just that one can’t quite 
help noticing the 183rd US 
Infantry Brigade barracks and 
this and mat Muted, low- 
profile. heavily under wraps; 
but all there and ready to go. 
Go where? 

Greene bad written that the 
General liked islands. He had 
favoured Contadora, so I flew 
there to arrive on a palm- 
fringed patch steaming like 
tapioca pudding, a posb-ish 
hotel and casino^ a folkloric 
show in the evening. The Shah 
of Iran holed up there for a 
while: longer than 1 did, for I 
tired after 24 hours, scooting 
back to E Hilton. 

But at five o'clock next 
morning. I presented myself at 
Paitilla Airport along with a 
toad of Indians, chickens and 
cardboard boxes for the wob- 
bly flight over the jimgle- 
infested Darien coast to the 
San Bias Islands, one for each 
day of the year. 

T he Indians were of 
the Cuna tribe, 
largely untouched by 
the 20th century, a 
short sturdy breed. 
The men wore T-shirts and 
baseball caps: the women 
dressed in tribal molas and 
sarongs, intricately decorating 
their wrists and ankles with 
row upon row of beads. Single 
women wore long hair, ma- 
trons wore urchin-cuts, with a 
Mack painted line running 
from the hairline to the tip of 
the nose, pierced by a heavy 
gold ring. 

The six-seater bounced to a 
standstill on the island of 
Porvenir, from where an In- 
dian called Israel carried me 
over the water by dugout 




in t 


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COSTA 
V RICA | 


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Pwa;"'. 

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panam/ 




^pacific Q, 
r; OCEA\ • ••• 


COLOMBIA 


Pri t f t af pMUM life Oim IimHm g trtj left, and a young water boatman 


TRAVEL NOTES 


canoe to Wkfrubhuaia. He 
showed me to a bamboo- 
walled room with* palm-leaf 
roof containing a sort of bed 
and a sort of tap flam which, 
as I brushed my teeth, T could 
spit into the sea. When it 
rained, water was fanned into 
my room by the wind. There 
were no other visitors on the 
island. Rice and beans were on 
the menu, and lobster dug 
from a rock pool minuses 
before the pot. I have rarely 
been more uncomfortable and 
rarely more happy. 


they bad heard of Halley’s 
Comet, CM Guevara or Nor- 
man St John Sieves. My 
impression was that they were 
not hugely impressed by 
dever modem men. When I 
asked Israel if he had met the 
General and the famous En- 
glish writer, he said yes and 
continued sucking on his ciga- 
rette without elaborating. 


me it seemed a defeated place, 
its back broken by unemploy- 
ment. poverty and despair. 
Kids played improvised ping- 
pong on pavements; half a 
man wheeled himself about 


selling lottery tickets. No one 
was knifing anyone. But I 
didn’t get out. 

An hour or so later I was in 
Fonobek). reciting Newbokfs 
Drake's Drum to myself: 

Drake is in his hammock 
an' a thousand mites away. 

Capten. art tha steepin' 
there below? 

Slung atween the round shat 
in Nombre Dios Bay . . . 

WeU. Newbold got it wrong, 
but only by a few miles. Drake 
died at Ponobelo. still lovely 
and still guarded by stubby 
Spanish cannons. The Black 
Christ is in the church there, 
making Portobelo a holy place 
as well as easy on the eye. 

I thought I'd be dever in 
avoiding the canal But you 
simply cannot; you are stuck 
with it, stuck with the $387m 
and the 25.000 lives it cost, 
and the fact that the equiva- 
lent amount of stone would 
build 28 Giza pyramids. 


I could walk from one side 
ofWichubhuala to the other in 
five minutes, about the time h 
also took to walk from end to 
end. The Cuna lived in one- 
room huts with din floors and 
hammocks serving as bed, 
chair, cradle and coffin. They 
offered colourful applique 
work for sale and wens neither 
offended when I did not buy, 
nor ecstatic when I did. They 
were lordly in the way of 
Harrods assistants, glancing 
down long straight noses. 


B ack to the Hilton. 
Panama Gty was 
vivacious and jolly, 
voluptuous as a 
bursting melon, fash- 
ion-conscious in a tarty way 
and utterly amoral 1 escaped, 
briefly, to Chiriqui, Panama's 
westernmost province, ranch 
country, coffee too, beautiful 
in a Swiss way, high and fresh 
as edelweiss towards the Costa 
Rican border. Then 1 scuttled 
back to Panama Gty because I 
had heard terrible things 
about Col6n. Which was 
irresistible. 


I had no idea what these 
people thought about, whether 


Coton was a stunner. 
“Don't get out of your car, 
don't even roll down the 
window," they warned me. 
“It's a dangerous place.” To 


Michael Watkins flew to 
Panama City via Madrid by 
Iberia LineasAereas do 
Esaana. Fares range from 
£621 return excursion fare to 
£2,250 return first daw, A 
standard double room at B 
Panama Hilton is £76 plus £20 
for half board plus 10 par cant 
service charge. 

Internal foams In Panama am 
inexpensive, if unreliable: on 
Aero Pertss from Contadora 


(bookable through Iberia in 
Bream) there weren't enough 


passengers so the pitot 

refused® take off. 

British passport hoklere do not 
require visas. Yeflow fever jeba 
necessary. 

Further information from 
Instituto Panameno de 
Turtsmo, Apartado 4421 , 
Panama 5. Telex: 3359. 


WEATHER EYE 


Daytime temperature mkS to 
high 80's. High humidity too 


high BO'S. High humidity too 
so air condmoning essential 
tor sleeping. The rainy season 
draws® a dose In 
December. Until then sunny ■ 
mornings give way to heavy 
afternoon rein. January to 
March to drier. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


TRAVEL 2 

San Francisco to Alaska, Philippa Toomey finds cold and comfort 


OUT AND ABOUT 


on a cruise 


■J'JMJl'VW 


travel notes 




in the 


cruses to Alaska in 1987 
variations in port of call, 
from dune to trie end of 


glaciers 


Die penthouse. Add ©49 
return air fare, and H79 for 
overnight hotel in San 
Francisco and car 
transportation tor return 
trip, 14 day tour from Heathrow 
to San Francisco and bade 


Information from Royal Viking 
line- 3 Vera Street (Oxford 


line. 3 Vera Street (Oxford 
Street) London W1M 9HQ, 
Telephone 01-734 0773. 


Please don't drip on the 

i ^ notice in the 
bookshop We were in Sitke, 
Alaska, where ii rains a lot 

^“Slish July a cruise 
to Alaska sounds impossibly 
exotic. 


dollars. The Indian craft shops 
are purely Canadian: some sell 
expensive “museum" pieces, 
others ethnic tat. but it's worth 
looking out for something you 
like. The people are friendly. 


The beautiful R oya i Viking 
Siar begins its 1 1-day round 

tnp in San Francisco. Board- 
ing was suitably festive, with 
champagne and a jazzband to 
welcome a large number of 
people and their luggags. The 
first stop was Vancouver, built 
on the water, and like other 
cities with run-down dock 
areas, rehabilition and re- 
building has produced Gas 
Town, with paved streets, 
shops and restaurants, and 
only the occasional wino to 
represent the old inhabitants. 

You are in Canada, so there 
is a currency change from a 
cruise conducted in American 



HOTEL 

METROPOLE 

GENEVA 


This elegant and 
luxurious hotel has the 
pri vil ege to be located 
in the heart of the city 
just next to the commer- 
cial center, facing the 
lake with its fountain 
and the “Jardtn Anglais” 
ISO rooms and states. 
Restaurant *1 ‘slrfeguin* 
The «CaJt Grand Quai*. 
Banquet and conjerence 
rooms. 


like. The people are friendly, 
the waterside restaurants 
attractive, and the sea food 
delicious. 

To me, lazy days at sea are a 
pleasure. For those who like to 
be up and doing. Royal Viking 
Star has a programme of 
entertainment which would 
fell, any passenger talcing part 
in all of it. On the passive side 
were excellent first-run films, 
a show in the theatre each 
evening, music to drink by, a 
casino, bridge, needlepoint 
classes, a good library and, of 
course, food. You could eat 
for nearly 18 hours at a 
stretch, from the jogger’s 
breakfast to the midnight 
buffet 

Going north the weather 
was grey, but not excep- 
tionally cold. The next stop 
was Juneau, inaccessible ex- 
cept by water or air, and the 
Alaskan slate capital, though 
why it should be was a 
mystery to those who dis- 
embarked and roamed the 
one-horse town. Crammed 
with souvenirs, it did have the 
bonus of three excellent 
bookshops and a large video 
store: 

From the side of the ship 
those who felt sufficiently 
adventurous embarked on a 
tiny sea plane and flew off 
over the mountains and the 
ice, its crevices showing deep 
turquoise shadows, to alight 
on. a lake by a lodge in the 



250 miles 






Judean 

Canada 


f '.PACIFIC ■. 'Vabeoro 


A: 


GREAT 
OUSE 

™ VALLEY 

Sr Rucks 

'Distance: 12K miles 


ftitcamt. 


Westoa 

UAfentood 


The Great Ouse river 
wfeds lazily through the 
_orth Beckingbamshire 
-countryside with villages of 
great charm poised above the 
flood-prone valley floor. 
Park in the market place at 
North Crawley, a dis- 
appointing brick village re- 
deemed by a church of great 
quality. Walk west down die 
High Street and right on to 
the Chichdey road, the foot- 
path being best avoided. 
After a mile and a half ton 
right np the avenne to 
Chkhdey Hall, a baroque 
mansion by Francis Smith of 
Warwick. Bear left to die 

church. 

Cross the Bedford road, 
then on to the footpath to 
Sberington. a large stone 
village. West from the village 



Sn*r*3» 

ICaWuctM 


Ci) bon 


1 Ty rtURhMi 


.Sberinjfton' 


North Crawlo 


down Water Lane, die road 
eventually becomes a foot- 
path along the river bank. 
Tyringham church has Tyr- 
ingham Hall by Sir John 
Soane to the north, bot it is 
private. Cross the river by 
Soane's elegant bridge, 
through his lodge screen and 
turn right on to the rood. At 
the Sir Francis Drake pub 
mm left along the drive to 
Gnyhnrst church. 

Cross the park by the 


footpath north then walk 
along the read to Stoke 
Goldingiott. another stone 
village with a choke of two 
pubs for lunch. East out of 
the village follow the lane to 
Ravenstooe, a stone village 
whose church has the snperb 
17th-century Finch monu- 
ment. Take the road sooth to 
Weston Underwood, another 
showpiece stone village. 


Martin Andrew 


OUTINGS 


S3ent running: Glacier Bay between the shifting ice cliffs 


Across the lake from the 
lodge isa large glacier, advanc- 
ing at the tale of 100 feet a 
year. One day it may dam the 
river, so they may try dyna- 
mite. In the winter, mean- 
while, the owners of the lodge 
move into Juneau, first secur- 
ing the place against brers, 
which make a dreadful mess, 
like the worst kind of burglar. 

Two American Forest 
Rangers joined the cruise for 
the long trip up the pine coast 
to Sitke. and pointed out the 
small, moving black dots 
which were brers or eagles, 
and named the sea birds. 

Sitke was originally a Rus- 
sian settlement (the Russians 
sold Alaska to the United 
Stales) and in the middle of 
the town is an Orthodox 
Russian church, a replica of 
the burnt original. Sitke is 
pretty — flowers from an 
English country garden 
bloom, and with the souvenir 
sellers comes an enterprising 
troupe of young women, per- 


34. qua/ General- Guisan 
1211 Geneva 3 
Tel. 022 21 1344. 
Telex 42 1550 met. 


wilderness. There, a meal of haps to be commended for 


honey-baked salmon, sour- 
i dough and beans (like the 
i pioneers made it) was served, 
rather oddly, with white wine. 


enthusiasm rather than 
authenticity, who perform tra- 
ditional Russian dances. 
Authenticity certainly rules at 



How about an exotic holiday- 
in Glasgow? 



Swaying palm trees, shimmeri ng sands and exotic 

scenery don’t spring Instantly no mind when you think of 
Glasgow. Bui ny [hbiklng of Glasgow, Jamaica instead. 

The Glasgow we've goi in mmd is a far ay from the 
one in ScodandliV alvays warm, sunny and welcoming 
with a rather more rrapteaJ fed- For the Jamaica Infor- 
mation Pack, write me Jamaica Tbrnia Board, 50 St 


CHATEAUX- 

courtm house - hoiels- 


Dream days ai hideaway hods with 
gaunna food ad ' luxurious 
surroundings. 2 rogta (3 days) a more 
widin easy reach id Channel pons in your 
cm cat from €79 m £191 pec pasern. 
md ferry, accommodation and 
memorable meals. Unique choice of 
thaeeux and luxury counoy house hauls 
wh Mictefei Rossne resrauraras. 


Phone 01-549 2116 (24 hra) or send for 
i tfugnmri h n^nfr Hampton H 0 US 8 

fore! Ltd. Dept o 2 . 49 Fife Boad, 
Kingston upon Thames. Surrey KTIlKi 



Cultural journeys along the Danube 


Enjoy and discover the heart of Europe 
with Serenissima, on one of a collection 
of Danube river journeys aboard a com- 
fortable, specially designed vessel. 


The Danube has influenced the course 
of European history and it is this intrigu- 
ing and colourful past that is brought to 
life by our knowtedgeable guest lectur- 
ers- Depending on the itinerary you 
choose, you can travel the Danube from 
Passau in the west to the Blacks Sea in 
the east, passing through Austria, 
Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia. 
Bulgaria and Rumania. AH journeys in- 
clude a visit to the beautiful Wachau 
Valley, and sightseeing in many historic 
towns and cities. On certain departures, 

an add-on tour is available to the monas- 
teries of Northern Moldavia, and the 
Danube Delta. 


Our parties are limited to 36, and each 
departure will be accompanied by a 
guest lecturer - who witt be on hand 
during sightseeing excursions and give a 
series of talks on board, and a 
Serenissima tour manager. Itineraries 
are for one or two weeks, from April to 
mid-October. 


The MS Rousse has well-appointed, air- 
conditioned cabins with private 
facilities. On board is a heated swim- 
ming pool, sauna, sundeck, hairdresser, 
duty-free shop, and a resident doctor. 


For details of our fully inclusive 
Danube Journeys, please ring us on (01) 
730 9841, or complete and send the 
coupon. 


1 21 Dortri Satan?. London NW1 bOG. Trli n)h 730*1841. I 



lb Miami when you enjoy a fabulous 
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See your local travel agent for details or 
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ROYAL CARIBBEAN ^ CRUISES 

A Bishops Faface House, 1A Riverside Walk, Kingston-Upon-Thames. KT1 1QN. 


the museum, showing a num- 
ber of Indian and Inuii arts 
and crafts. My fancy fell on an 
early plastic anorak, which 
turned out to be made of 
flattened strips of seal's intes- 
tines. sewn together into a 
tremendously waterproof and 
utterly horrible garment If 
you area totem pole freak, this 
is the place to make you 
happy. 

Every now and then, as we 
sailed round Glacier Bay in 
the silence, a huge lump fell off 
the grey, brown and whhe 
cliffs of ice. The glaciers 
advance and retreat through 
the years, and 100 years ago 
the bay's conformation was 
quite different From the cold 
cliffs we sailed on to Victoria, 


British Columbia, a pretty and 
welcoming city, friendly and 
sunny with flowers and trees; 
we were bad: in Canada. 

At each stop there were 
excursions arranged, includ- 
ing some intrepid rafting, but 
the short stay in each port 
allowed for little exploration. 
The voyage is the thing. Those 
accustomed to cruising will 
know that tbe majority of the 
passengers are not young. 

Sailing back into San Fran- 
cisco harbour in the early 
morning is a pleasure in itself 
but a word of caution — it 
lakes some time to disembark. 
$o connecting flights should 
not be arranged to provide one 
of those shall-we-shan't-we 
catch the plane dashes. 


FELTHAM TRAM WEEKEND: 
Rare chance to operate a real 
tram, as well as to explore me 
museum’s other attractions- 
London Transport Museum. 
Covent Garden, London WC2 
(01-379 6344). Today, 
tomorrow, 10am-6pm. Adult 
E 2 JJ 0 , child £ 1 . 

CRAFTS AT TATTON: Craft 
fair with 58 exhibitors and 
demonstrations of creftwork. 
Tatton Park, Knutsford. 
Cheshire. Today, tomorrow, 
10am-6J30pm. Adult £1, child 
70p. car park £ 1 . 

TAUNTON ANNUAL 
ILLUMINATED CARNIVAL 
AND CIDER BARREL RACE: 
Carnival with a IK ride long 
procession. 

Taunton, Somerset Today 
from 7pm. Free. 


ESCORTED 


{JOURNEYS 

| Experience the mystique nflndia. ! 
j wirii us ever-dunging cultures, ; 
i superb art and beautiful scenery, i 

I Marvel at the exotic temples of i 
the For East, the ancient r uins o f * 
Mexico and * 111^117^%: 
_ Peru, or perhaps 

f journey coast i 

: to coast across Canada. For our 1 


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ris Poster 


For a free copy of an 


ina c tive potter delight- 
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I range of hilly escorted holidays 

: 1 phone 01-629 09W and 


TRAFALGAR DAY PARADE: 
Sea Cadets Corps 
commemor a tes the Battle of 
Trafalgar and death of Lord 
Nelson cm October 21, 1805. 
Trafalgar Square, London 
SW1. Tomorrow from 11am. 



well send you our nr» 
A*. Exoned Journeys 
ter brochure, or visk 
any Thomas Cook 
E or Frames Travel 
branch. 



2> October SniqhtiCtn 
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CE 


A CRUISE SHIP LIKE NO OTHER 



THE ‘BLACK PRINCE' lias been 
designed to provide the most in 
satisfaction and enjoyment for all ages. 

Experienced cruise buyers will 
find traditional ’ cruise features 
presented with the expertise of years of 
experience. 

Younger passengers, new to 
cruising will benefit from the new style 
attractions normally associated with 
an activity resort holiday: 

THE ROMANCE of the sound of 
wind on the canvas sails, of water 
lapping against the ships side. The 
silvery moon reflecting across the calm 
sea. Dancing on deck in the moonlight 
by the fountain. ■ 

The balmy tranquil air of the 
Greek Islands and the Aegean. Taking 
a dinghy or sail boat lo a secluded, sun 
drenched beach. 

)^fTHE EXCITEMENT of seeing 
some of the most wondrous sights in 
the world on lop. quality excursions. 

The excitement of shopping for 
furs, jewellery, carpets and . leather 
goods at advantageous prices. 
Discovering, some, of the best cruise 
spots on the Asia Minor coast 
Vty THI: ADVENTURE of the unique 
Marina Park which turns Lhe ocean 
into a safe, private playground. 
Choose between swimming, sailing 
snorkelling (or oven scuba diving for 
the experts.!, water skiing or wind 
surfing for the really adventurous Or 


just laze around cither the ocean pool 
or die deck pool and soak up the sun. 

W A DA ) IN THE f./EE OX BOARD. 
If you are an early riser start with 
breakfast on the lop deck at 7am in 
the Mediterranean sun. or take a dip in 


one of the pools lo sharpen you up for 
the trip ashore in the ship's lenders 


the trip ashore in the ship's lenders 
for historic sightseeing or diverst' 
shopping 

Lunch on board offers an 
amazing choice 



A show a turn at the casino and 
dancing into the small hours. 

.1 he perfect end to the perfect day. 
But the beginning of a love affair with 
the "Black Prince*. A ship like no other. 

\l TERN ATI \ h ITINERARIES. 
Special Mediterranean and Aegean 
itineraries are available from ISth July 
lo 2-1 th October I9S7. 

And there is a- wide choice of 
other itineraries and c mists lo suit ail 
tastes and preferences, lhe Canary 
Islands. T he Western Mediterranean, 
calling at the French Riviera. Exotic 
islands. Italy, taking sou all the wav to 
Venice. These commence on 2Sth 
l ebruarv and run until the Hth Juiv: 
I9S7. 


lo: I rt*d Olsen t inis FO Box 15. Abingdon. I 
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j BrochurtTineon 025 > J > J >orvH* vour i 
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f \dim-. 


I n the afternoon enjoy some deck i 
games or a beach party via the ship's 

tenders, or have a glimpse at exotic J 

underwater life from a glass bouomed J 

Watch a video and be ready fora ! BLACK SB PRINCE 

five star dinner in one of the I — — 

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BLACK 39 PRINCE 




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SHOPPING 


By Beryl Downing 


Cnanas M*gan 


= Jewels in the 


crown of 


modem design 


Commissioning modern jew- 
'Cilery is a field planted with 
diamond-studied mines, if 
vou have a good route map 
'you will come through un- 
scathed. If not. aN your hopes 
.could be shattered. 

Courage and knowledge are 
your best allies, but as most 
people make their first at- 
tempt at commissioning be- 
cause they have some loose 
-stones or an unloved piece of 
jewellery to be reset, knowl- 
edge is likely to be lacking. So 
your choice of adviser is more 
-important first time round 
than your choice of designer. 

I speak from sad experience. 
In 1972 I had an Edwardian 
ring which did not suit my 
■band. It contained several 
small diamonds of different 
shapes and I admired the then 
up and coming Wendy 
Ramshaw and wanted her to 
make them into one of her 
jewds-on-stalks rings. 

An “expert", however, per- 
suaded me to commission 
another designer and because 
I thought he must know best, I 
. agreed. 

Apart from die feet lhat my 
Wendy Ramshaw ring would 
now be worth a fortune and 
my sun k- wi th o ut-trace de- 
signer ring is not, I would have 
had such pleasure from wear- 
ing, on every possible occa- 
sion. the style I still admire. I 
doubt if I have worn my 
commission more than ten 
times in 14 years. 

“That is something some 
.so-called experts don't 
understand", says Barbara 
Canlidge of Electrum in 
London, regarded as one of 
Europe's leading jewellery gal- 
leries. “There is a bond be- 
tween the possessor and a 
'piece of jewellery which tran- 
scends its material value. It 
has to be very close to the 
person who wears it both 
physically and emotionally." 

So where do you start? At 


Commissioning 
and choosing 


gems with a ring 


of confidence 



The cat's whiskers: Clare 
Murray's ring can be made in 
silver, sold or mixed metals and 
is set m an African Mackwood 
box whiii with a silver star by 
Mathew Warwick. From £195 
throogh David Jewell 


Electrum h is relatively easy 
because it is a showcase for 
many leading international 
jewellers. There is a large 
range of styles, materials and 
prices (from £70 to more than 
£1,000) and you will be asked 
first to look round and select 
one or two artists whose work 
particularly appeals. 

After that Barbara Cartlidge 
likes to talk to clients at length 
about their lifestyles. As a 
designer herself and author of 
Twentieth Century Jewelry 
(Abrams £45) she realizes that. 


even with preliminary 
sketches, it is difficult for 
people to visualize the final 
result, so she always gives 
clients the right of refusal if 
the finished piece is not what 
they want. 

David Jewell is another 
adviser who goes to great 
lengths to understand his cli- 
ents before recommending a 
designer. From more than 10 
years' experience of selling 
jewellery in a gallery, he 
believes the best way of 
matching client with designer 
is by “relaxed personal 
contact" rather than in a 
formal shop where the at- 
mosphere can be intimidating. 

He lakes samples of work or 
slides with him to customers' 
homes and has contact with 
more than 30 jewellers of 
varying styles. Among thorn is 
Care Murray, whose speci- 
ality is double rings in various 
shades of gold and silver. 
Often these nave a figurative 
motif — rabbits, trees and 
houses, or a train puffing 
smoke under a rainbow. They 
are accompanied by beauti- 
fully crafted boxes made by 
Mathew Warwick to echo the 
theme and to display the 
jewels when they are not being 
worn. 

The Crafts Council has a 
crafts map showing recom- 
mended galleries throughout 
the country. Their shop ra the 
Victoria & Albert museum has 
a good range of new and 
established designers, all se- 
lected from artists on the 
council's index. 

These include Gerda 
Flockinger, who was the first 
modem artist jeweller to have 
a one-man exhibition at the 
museum in 1971. Her pioneer- 
ing work in textured precious 
metals has been a creative 
influence on many of today's 
leading young jewellers. An 
exhibition of her work opened 
at the V&A this week and 



» ’ " . 
► . b*; > 

■ //. .» 


. . . • 

V 


: 


Hats off to the new jewellers; On the crown, rock 
heart earrings with diamond studded sold bows £450 
McDonough at Nigel Milne. Round the crown, neckpiece of 
silver beads on springy nylon thread £488.75 by Flora Book 
at Electrom. 


brim, one of a pair of herring-bone 
~ laminated wood £4485 by Peter 
Martin; below, yellow. Mack and red 


al um in mm arrow brooch £51.75 by Clarissa at Electrum. 
Centre, circular wood and perspex brooch inlaid with silver 
£207 by Paul Godfrey at Lesley Craze; right, fan-shape dsil - 
ver ami titanium brooch £164 by Brian Ebnrah in the Pea- 
cock Colours exhibition at Lesley Craze from November 6; 
and engraved perpsex brooch £37.65 by Cathy Harris, both 
at the V&A crafts shop. Velvet hat by David Shilling 


continues until November 30. 

Not everyone 1ms the cour- 
age to wear bold, artistic 
statements. For those whose 
theme is elegant simplicity, 
wearability is the keynote of 
Kiki McDonough's designs 
for Nigel Milne. She special- 
izes in polished onyx and lapiz 
beads, rock crystal heart pen- 
dants and diamond studded 
bow earrings. The fact that 
they do not look out of place 
in the same showroom as the 
Edwardian diamonds and 
pearls for which Milne is well 
known is proof that those with 
£200 to £800 to spend will be 
buying fashion classics. 

Anyone with a rather small- 
er budget has good reason to 
thank young jewellers for their 
imaginative and witty use of 
modern materials. Most 
graduates starting their own 
workshops cannot afford to 



A brooch designed by Louise 
Slater, whose work is on show 
in Formica’s touting exhibition. 
It would cost aromd £20 


invest in precious materials to 
make large, impressive pieces, 
so instead they use wood, 
slate, wire mesh and plastic. 

The result is a great fillip for 


design and an antidote to 
those who buy jewellery as 
investment, as the value is in 
the creative idea and not in 
the material. 

So watch out for Louise 
Slater, one of the most cre- 
ative young British jewellers 
.of the moment, who has made 
‘striking pieces with wood, 
sealing wax and wafer thin 
plastic and is now using 
Formica's laminated Color- 
core for chunky earrings, 
brooches and neckpieces. Her 
designs are on show in 
Formica's touring exhibition 
now at the New Jewellery 
Gallery in Birmingham City 
Museum until November 22. 

“There is a huge variety of 
attractive materials which 
give you the opportunity to 
put a bit of humour into 
jewellery and not make it too 
expensive", she says. 


ADDRESS BOOK 


Crafts Council: 12 Waterloo 
Place, London SW1 (01-930 
481 1) for crafts galleries 
map. 


Lesley Craze: 5 Essex 
Road, London N1 (01-226 
3200).Closed Mondays and 
Tuesdays. 


David Jewell: 78 
Canon bury Road, London N1. 
(01-226 9909). Appoint- 
ments only. 


Electrum Gallery: 21 South 
Motton Street, London wi (01- 
6296325). 


Kiki McDonough; at Nigel 
Milne. 1 6c Grafton Street. 
London WI (01-4939646). 


Louise Slater; 167 Brick 
Lane, London E2 (01-739 
3929). 


Giving the 
home a 
new image 


Havif' 

the 


One of the qitiektu ways of 
giving an interior a ftce-Hft is 
through a looking gtass and 
some of the wan* hnytitog 
mirrors art made from <M 
pictures frames, 

Sharon Tardy of 17 GiriRm 
Road. London WI4 (01403 
8625) has ft collection of mote 
than 200 plain a ad caned 
picture frames which she has 
found at pictne dealers or 
auctions. Hv craftsmen strip 


the gilding, replace any M las-. 
'carriaaMdi 


I fit the 


Sizes are from 2 ft sdoare to 
10ft \ 6ft and prices from 
£200-£2,060. Ovale are more 
difficult to find* so w pt a da c- 
(ions are available in Umewood 
from £295 to £395. 

Customers within reach of 
London are offered the 
opportunity of trying oat sev- 
eral mirrors Brora we reflec- 
tion in theft awn boom before 
deciding on (he size and shape 
which is most appropriate. 



Touch of glass: a reproduction . 
IromS 


mirror irom Sharon Yardy 


Robert and CoUeen Bery 
also specialize in decorative 
mirrors. They have three stan- 
dard sizes. 14in x 18m, I8n \ 
22 in and 22in x 26 in. with 
4»/ita deep frames which can 
be stippled and decorated in 
colours and designs to match 
your funds kings. 

Mirrors hand painted in. 
standard designs cost from: 
£55J20, one-offs - fori tiding 



overmantels and triptych mir- 
'* .70 to £500 


row - are from £66. 
or so. Examples of these and of 
their hand-painted hnfon 
can be seen at 8 RosehOl Road, 
London SW18 (01-474 5542). 


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THE CHB. SE* PHY SIC 6NWEH 
THE BEVaOnMT OF GAHDH 
KsaNASAMMT 

MOH DAYS 3.I0.I7.Z4 NOVEMBER 
103 0am - 3-3 0ofn 

putsen 

M CONJUNCTION WITH 
THE GARDEN HST0RV SOCIETY 
A SHOTS OF LECTURES ON ASPECTS 
OF GARDEN DESIGN AS A HNE ART 


THURS 4TH DECEMBER 
11 DOsn - 3 00pm 

speakers - amw u uara 

WUMITHKT 

FOR 0CIHU - K ROYAL HOSPITAL MAD 
LONDON SW3 4HS 
TELEPHONE KB 4M7 


IN THE GARDEN By Francesca Greenoak 


Why I love autumn’s late, late show 


I dislike most of the popular 
chrysanthemums: the gaudy 
mop-headed exhibition types, 
the pot and garden spray kinds 
with pleasant enough blooms 
but spoiled by the ugly forest 
of bamboos required to keep 
them straight And so much 
fiddly horticulture. 

So how does it come about 
that I now grow four kinds of 
chrysanthemum in my 
garden, all of them favourites? 
When I was given some seeds 
of the pretty little arable weed, 
corn marigold, my mind shot 
back to the Suffolk road verge 
where I saw it for the first 


Free catalogue 
with big plans 
for small gard 



The new Suttons catalogue features 
nearly 1200 varieties of flowers and 
vegetables, as well as a special section on 
how to make the most of small gardens. 

Win a holiday in the Swiss Alps. 

Enter the competition and win a botanical 
interest holiday arranged by Cox &_ Kings. 
® RING (0272) 2172 

If you ordered Suttons Seeds in ’84, '85, or ’86, 
you’ll receive the *87 catalogue and competition 
details automaticallv. 




POST FOR FREE CATALOGUE NOW. 

To; Suttons Seeds limited. Dept 242 . I 

2 Cater Road, Bristol BSl 3 7T W. | 


NAME. 


ADDRESS . 


POSTCODE , 


NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIKE SUTTONS SEEDS. 



time, rather than to its scien- 
tific name Chrysanthemum 
segetum. 1 started growing this 
annual five years ago and find 
it self-seeds without becoming 
overwhelming, giving golden 
bright knee-high daisies from 
late summer and continuing 
to bloom even now. 

The double white daisy-like 
White Bonnet and Snowball, 
which we always called double 
feverfew, was called Matri- 
caria eximia when I first grew 
it and not as now. Chrysan- 
themum panhenium. Seed 
packets and books tell you to 
grow them as an annual so I 
was most surprised when old 
plants continued to flower 
strongly year after year. 

They also produce seedlings 
which come truly double and 
look wonderful cropping up 
between the bricks of a court- 
yard or by the side ofa path. In 
my garden they do equally 
well in sun and semi-shade. 
These small plants have a dark 
feathery leaf against which 
the white blooms show to 
perfection, and a shapely com- 
pact form. Snowball is a dense 
ivory buuon with a creamy 
yellow centre: White Bonnet is 
pure white and greenish at the 
centre; both have a dainty 
skirt of white single petals. 

I shall always be grateful to 
Beth Chatto of the famous 
Essex nursery, not only for 
introducing me to two tall late 
chrysanthemums but for giv- 
ing me cuttings. The last 
months of the year are now 
enhanced with the pleasure 
that these, now full-grown, 
perennially give me. They 
would be beautiful at any time 
of the year, but lit by late 
November misty sunshine or 
sparkling with frost, they are 
especially to be treasured. 
What’s more, they need very 
little attention. I give them 
some liquid feed when I 


Oars Robvns 



A mom for all seasons: a display of "Snowball' and (top left) a detail of "Anastasia' 


remember io late summer and 
autumn but they don't need 
staking nor do they seem to 
require disbudding. 

Emperor of China is a 
glorious old hybrid, pinky- 
man ve with a crimson centre, 
turning colour as it opens fully 


"J y 

)f p 


to a silvery blush, as Lady's 


Smock does in spring, 
petals are a most delicate quill 
like no other variety I have 
ever seen. The flowers last for 
ages both on the plant and as 
cut flowers in the bowl. An- 
other agreeable feature is that 
from October the large leaves 
take on a rich crimson. 

I had never seen anything 
written about my other winter 
variety until I was rummaging 
in some writings by Eleanour 
Sinclair Rohde. She describes 
“the most valuable of all 
autumn flowers, the sturdy old 
button chrysanthemums" and 
extols the vinues of her 
favourite - and mine - 


tonan gives masses of perfect 
tight fluffy pink-purple flow- 
ers which are just coming into 
good bloom now and wiU 
continue for several weeks. I 
grow them in a border just by 
the window. 

These hardy perennials are 
easy to propagate with cut- 
tings taken in the spring from 
the new basal growth spring- 
ing from the stool. If placed in 
a loam-based compost mixed 
with sharp sand, they will root 
readily in about three weeks. 

The cuttings should be wa- 
tered when they are put into 
their pots but not again until 
they are well rooted. A light 
dip into rooting powder and a 
covering of polythene helps 
the process. 

I've planted them individ- 
ually in tiny pots and as three 
or four to a 4 inch pot and they 
do well both ways. Some 
cuttings which take longer to 


root and appear to be wilting, 
pick up even after five or six 
weeks and go on to produce 
robust plants. 


WEEKEND TIPS 


• After the Last mowing. 


yoer machine and store it 
carefully far whiter. 


• Divide overcrowded 
damps of herbaceous 

perennials, adding manure 
or garden compost and bone 
meal (aboat a handful to the 
square yard) when replanting. 


• Don't leave planting out 
bulbs for natarafiziiig a \ 
mad) later than this tree! 

• Cat and store marrows 

and pumpkins: they can be kept 
in nets in any cool bat frost- 
free greenhouse, shed or room. 

• Fit up Christmas roses to 
flower in the late winter months. 

• Take cuttings of scented 
and pot geraniums 
(pelargoniums) if yon don't 
heat your green ho use and 1 
them inside for the winter. 


OXLTPS 


Primula TElatior* 

He offer the erne British .form, 
grawtt fmiH ttei 
Ftowm ■» primrose yeflow. swertjy 
fiagunl aad *>iD tkimr Spring 1987. 

£0-90 I (fawn, £10410 85 
£18-60 1 doon. £36.00 100 plant* 
CsrriajM paid far amneduteiy ddiwrs. 
Cimmq gf a ame to cotkci wflj find they 
can purchase ran rearanUy. 
CJL HENDERSON 4c SON 
LEYDENS NUBSKHY 
SUdc HUT, HnrtftoM Sawf. 

K*nLTN8 SNH 

~~ 863318 



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TOE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


bridge 


Having fun on 
the defensive 


THE TIMES COOK 


Bringing home the flavour 


International trials ; 


“idisare usually Chaatu iwu lecnngHjgy mvanaor 

,n an atmosphere timS? n * con- benefit food manufacturers a 

solemn concentration. Oniv wlh *** w hich I the expense of consumers i 


The notion that advances in 
food technology invariably 
at 


concentration. Onlv 
oreagonallv does the sun peej 

This^raP beh,nd ** -dm2 
BfiF t ne such m °menL 
oBL Team* Trials. 1986 

fcSowicr. Love alL 


Rose v 
Dealer 


♦ A JS3 
i KQ52 
0 842 

+ K8 



♦ 0 10 9 8 
? AJ97 
£ KQ97 

♦ Q 


♦ K42 
5 1043 

e JB3 

♦ A 10 5 3 


ruffed. 

„ **Bope you know what 
>ou re doing." Sheehan said 
as I played a club, drivir** — 
“ e King. By this 
everyone at the table 
wiwi was happening. 

Sowter cashed the *A 
oeiore playing dummy’s last 
"ean. on which he discarded 
a , diamond from his hand, 
while I also discarded a 
diamond. 

This was now the position: 


C 842 


w 


Ffim 

No 

No (21 


Lodge 

OoutUo 

No 


Sheohan 

TO 

NO 

NO 


Sowter 

No 

» (i) 


♦ - 

5 ?- 

0 A 10 
♦ J87 


N 

W E 
S 


40 

- 

O K097 

4 - 


Opening fart 46 
S * 1 001 **** w«»i Lodge's 

SES&! M ^ »» * 

aouWe ¥roiid **«• 
there was too great a 
™ that Ngnh-aoeBi would Bnd a 
happier huntaig ground. 

Whenever you are lucky 
enough to hold six trumps, 
you should lead one. When 
bneehan produced the 40. I 
could see that the defence 
would be enjoyable. Sowter 
tried a heart to dummy’s 
King, which Sheehan ducked. 
Sowter returned to his hand 
with the 4K to play another 
heart, losing the VQ to 


4 4 

V - 
C- J6 
♦ 105 


Sheehan 


. . . , . the *Q 

which I ruffed, amid general 
merriment, before playing the 
ace and ten of diamonds. 
Despite his expert wriggling, 
Sowter's clubs were trapped 
in ihe vice of my +J9. 

A double defensive grand 
coup is the grandiloquent 
title given to that play, which 
is as meaningful as the gold 
brass on a doorman's uni- 
form. Anyway it was fun. 

Jeremy Flint 


CHESS 


Kasparov’s coup 


Kasparov's sudden attack in 
the beautiful 22nd game of the 
Leningrad half of the work! 
championship has aroused 
tremendous interest. 

Kasparov used 17 minutes to 
calculate the main variations, 
while those Grandmasters — 
such as Mark Taimanov — 
who found the win at all took* 
around five hours. 

I have had letters from 
readers who still cannot com- 
prehend why Karpov resigned 
in the final position. Ip view of 47 Ne6+!f 
this, and the extreme beauty of (or 48 
the finish, it is justified to lake 
a second look at the brilliant 
conclusion of this game. 


White: Kasparov; Black: 
Karpov 

22nd Game. Leningrad 

I join the position after 
White* s stunning sealed move 
— 41 Nd7! 

*1 -- RmM 42 M8+ KM 
49 HM Rc4 


incrcasingly taken for granted. 
It is an assumption which is 
often, but not always, true — 
take, for example, the case of 
modem bacon. 

Is it shelf-life in a plastic 
vacuum pack that causes the 
modern rasher to weep so 
copiously over our grill pans? 
This often repeated claim is 
refuted by the simplest 
demonstration. Bacon which 
has never been wrapped may 
weep as freely. It is the cure 
that counts. 

The farmer's technique for 

curing pork is to mb the meat 
all ov«- with a dry mixture of 
salt, saltpetre and sugar. After 
about two weeks of ibis treat- 
ment. the side is hung up to 
dry in a cool airy place, or 
smoked. In either case the 
[‘ finished bacon will keep with- 
out refrigeration for as long as 
a year. 

Factory made bacon, wet- 
cured by soaking in brine 
when it is not injected with it, 
is much more lightly cured 
than the traditional, often 
very salty, farm product. And 
for some purposes it is a more 
agreeable commodity. 

Given the choice, we may 
enjoy old-fashioned rashers, 
but most of as will prefer 
bacon joints produced by 
contemporary methods. We 
seem to have traded the 
characteristic ooze of today's 
breakfast rasher for increased 
succulence in the supper 
gammon. 

In many cases ft is no longer 
necessary to soak bacon joints 
before cooking them. If any- 
thing we want to add flavour, 
not diminish it. ' In 
winemaking areas like Bur- 
gundy. hams are simmered in 
the lees, or sediment-loaded 
residues, of red wine. A small 
bacon joint cooked slowly in 
red wine becomes gamier and 


Modem factory methods of curing bacon give us weepy rashers but produce 
more succulent joints — a fair enough trade, says Shona Crawford Poole 


Di*n> LmkMMt 



altogether more interesting. If 
the piece of bacon and the pan 
in which it cooks are well 
matched. I.Skgof meat can be 
cooked in less than a litre of 
wine. Use some of the cooking 
liquid to sauce the ham and. 
reserve the remainder to sea- 
son a variety of other dishes; it 
is particularly good in terrines. 
The recipe calls for gammon, 
but a piece of smoko! loin of 
pork or any other bacon cut 
can be cooked this way. 


Gammon poached m red 


Serves six 


1 .5kg (3fc«b) piece smoked 
gammon 

About 1 litre (1% pints) red 
wine 

Bouquet gami of bay, 
parsley and orange peel 


Pepper 


EATING OUT 



Further lovely variations have 
emerged should Black play 
43 ... Rd3 viz: 44 Qel Bh7 
45 Rb6+ g6 46 Qd+ Kg7 
;e6 48 Rb7+ KfB 
Kh8 49 Qh6) 
49.Qb6.Ke5 50 Qg7+ Qf6 
51 Ki5 52 Rf7. H* 43-«- 
Rxb4 44 axb4 d4 45 Qc7 is 
perhaps stronger, if less 
spectacular, than 45 b5. 

225* 4BQ * 


Black resigns ■ 

After 46 ... Bh7 47 Qxc3 ft 
(47 ... Qf4+ 48 g3! wins) 
48 Qe3+ g5 49 hxg5+ fxg5 
50 Nxh7 Kxh7 51 Qe4 or 
50 ... Qxh7 51 Qe6+ White 
obtains an easily won King 
and Pawn ending. • 

Raymond Keene 



The chandelier factor 


Cudefc, (WmeOaude. ferment 

cuvefe foes gaetag 

EnTOY A REAL TASTE OF FRANCE 
FOR ARO UND £2,50 A BOTTLE 

r CZ — ~Tr r 


There’s every reason to mis- 
trust restaurants that are dec- 
ora lively opulent — chand- 
eliers are Micbelin-bait hung 
to impress that guide's im- 
pressionable inspectors; every 
swa&adds £x to the bill; .fancy 
piaster distracts the senses. 

But one of the effects of the 
1980s taste for the past is that 
sites which only five years ago 
would have spelled death to a 
restaurant enterprise are now 
not merely acceptable, but 
positively fashionable. It's OK 
to be grand again: hence- the 
rehabilitation of the res- 
taurant of the old Piccadilly 
Hoiel as Hie Oak Room, all 
showy Edwardian baroque 
(with massive chandeliers). 

The hotel has been sold 
twice since it reopened (as the 
New Piccadilly) a year ago. 
This month’s proprietor is a 
French company called Le 
Meridien- With regrettable 
chauvinism Messrs Meridien 
have introduced the Burgun- 
dian Michel Lorain (Michelin 
3 stars, Gault Miltau 4 
toques), as “consultant" chef. 
He will presumably turn up 
every few -weeks with a ruck- 
sack full of produce and see 
that all is in order with “his" 


Opulence used to 
deter diners, but 
Jonathan Meades 
finds grandeur 
back in fashion 

dishes and with the employees 
he has (eft behind. 

This son of consultancy 
begs the question of whether a 
major chef is- anything more 
than an ideas man whose 
recipes and researches can be 
exeaued as well by robotic 
minions. Further, Lorain’s 
appointment is odd consid- 
ering that the Oak Room 
already had a very fine chef 
David Chambers, who was 
awarded two Gault Millau 
toques within a few months of 
opening and whose menu has 
now been largely dismantled 
in favour of three by Lorain. 

Chambers's current menu 
includes a feuillefe of turbot 
and salmon with a potent 
lobster sauce, and a beef fillet 
with a “cake" of lactarius 
mushrooms bound in spinach 
and sauced; with a beefy glaze 
that is essential without recall- 


r Qne of my interests is tra n sla tin g EngllA poetry; into 

Another is intitxiucing E-enck poetry to England 
lor this I use bottles. 


Baron PHnjmsraRprHscHiLD 


! MM: 




BLium 


$ 


■ Rothschild is legendary, his under- 

P OEX an MotTON* Cadet is particularly close to his heart. The rouge is vintage : _ 

sanding of W** c^with-THe blanc sei, also vintage appellation Bordeaux comxotee , is Ay. light aaj , t . 

dam -frill, round worthy to bear die Barons name. Th- theni>buTl enjov the poem: 1 

fi«h. Both have been judged wonn> '- . ■- - ■ 




" 'fcoSQfrG* 

— *•»*»■ 
A—iZi*. -j 

90 


ing Bovril. From the dishes on 
Lorain's menus we ate a 
striated terrine of foie gras and 
chicken set in delicious aspic 
with an entirely resistible 
accompaniment of onions in a 
wine jelly; also, a miserly 
portion of excellent fresh foie 
gras de canard with spinach 
and Mack and red currants. 

We drank an overpriced 
Cote Rotie from a poor year 
( 1 978. £22) and a half-bottle of 
acceptable Sautemes. The bill 
was £120 including service, 
which is very good and gets 
better when the place fills up. 

The Oak Room is certainly 
a treat and, for all my misgiv- 
ings. ft must be admitted that 
the wares of two first division 
chefs probably give it the 
edge over many of its compet- 
itors in this slice of the market 
Quire what market the Cri- 
terion Brasserie is aimed at is 
undear. This vast and spec- 
tacular room was restored by 
Trustiiouse Forte a couple of 
years ago and even the im- 
position of pseudo art deco 
neon has not mitigated the 
brilliance of the tesselated 
ceiling, the “Wind" Ro- 
manesque arches, the overall 
Ottoman theatricality. 

In the early part of THFs 
regime the cooking was like 
one of that organization's 
motorway caffs (but with 
French names on the menu). 
Now. however, the cooking is 
done with some care. 

The choucroute with 
smoked pork, salt pork and 
Frankfurter-type sausage is as 
good as you'll find in many 
vaunted Parisian brasseries 
and no more than twice the 
price. There's a filling dish of 
Toulouse sausage with pureed 
potatoes and buttery cabbage. 
Cold starters such as rillettes 
and bresaola with mozzarella 
have come not only' straight 
from the ehareuterie but 
straight and stiff from the 
refrigerator. With a 1985 
Morgon from the Paul Bocuse 
label (another form of chefs 
franchising) the bill was £34. 


The Oak Room, Le Meridian, 
Piccadilly wi (01-734 8000). 
Open daily rtoon-2J0pm and 
7-1 1pm. 

The Criterion Brasserie. 222 
Piccadilly. London WI (01-839 
7133). Open Mon-Sat noon- 
3pm and &-1 1pm. . 

i... : .. . 


Take the supplier's advice on 
whether to soak the gammon. 

Pul the bacon in a pan 
which fits it fairly snugly and 
pour in wine to cover it 
completely. Bring slowly to 
the boil, 'skim and add the 
bouquet garni. Cover and 
simmer the gammon until it is 
tender and easily pierced with 
a skewer — about two hours. 

The gentlest simmering re- 
sults in the most succulent 
meaL Hurrying the cooking at 



a faster boil only results in 
drier, rougher gammon. 

Lift the gammon from the 
wine and allow it to rest for a 
few minutes before carving it. 
A little of the strained cooking 
liquid heated with double 
cream makes an instant sauce. 
Proportions of cream and 
stock will depend on the 
saltiness of the gammon. 

Alternatively, the skin can 
be removed from the gammon 
and a mixture of equal propor- 


DRINK 


lions of chopped paisley and 
dry breadcrumbs seasoned 
well with dry mustard can be 
pressed into the fat. Brown the 
coated gammon in a pre- 
heated hot oven 
(230°C/450*F. gas mailt 8) for 
about 10 minutes. 

Baking whole hams in a 
fatless pastry crust which is 
later discarded is another 
traditional method of preserv- 
ing flavour and succulence. 

Gammon Mkad in a crust 

Serves six _ 

1.3kg C3tb) piece smoked 
gammon 

4 tablespoons schnapps or 
gin (optional) 

For the crust 

600g (1 !4 lbs) Hour 

About 300ml (^pt) warm 
water 

Take ihe supplier's advice on 
whether to soak the gammon. 
If you plan to marinate ft in 
the schnapps or gin. turn the 
gammon in the marinade for 
about one hour. 

To make the crust, add 
enough warm water to the 
flour to make a pliable dough 
and knead it until it is smooth 
and not sticky. Roll it out on a 
floured surface. Dry ihe gam- 
mon and wrap ft in the dough, 
sealing the edges carefully 
with cold water. 

Transfer the gammon to a 
floured baking tin and bake it 
in a preheated moderate oven 
(18°C/3SO’F. gas mark 4) for 
three to four hours. 

To serve, transfer the gam- 
mon to a carving board. Break 
the crust and slice the hoi, 
succulent bacon. 

Boiled or mashed potatoes 
are essential accompaniments 
to bacon. Small whole beet- 
root. lightly buttered and lav- 
ishly peppered are excellent 
too — their sweetness com- 
pliments the salty meat 
perfectly. 


Termites, death-watch beetle 
and damp rot are not the 
problems anyone today' would 
expea a leading deuxi'eme 
grand cru Bordeaux propri- 
etor to be struggling with. But 
tali dashing Anthony Barton, 
the eighth generation of the 
Ahglo- Irish Barton family to 
live and work at third-growth 
Langoa and the neighbouring 
second-growth Leo vide Bar- 
ton. is currently doing just 
that. 

The charmingly propor- 
tioned Langoa house is under- 
going a major interior face-lift 
and the chat, or first-year 
cellars, have already been 
restored to their former tra- 
ditional glory. 

Not since the 18th century 
perhaps has Langoa been so 
neatly groomed. In the old 
days, chateau-owners never 
lived at their grand-looking 
but spartan Medoc properties, 
but instead spent their time in 
Bordeaux, the intrepid Occa- 
sionally venturing into the 
Medoc for the vintage. 

Today, just as the interior of 
Langoa is being taken in hand, 
considerable changes have 
also taken place in the 


Vintage 
des res 
in the 
Medoc 


Leoville and Langoa vine- 
yards and cellar. The 45 
hectares of Lfovjlle and 15 
hectares of Langoa vineyards 
now have vines 20 years old 
on average, and two or three 
hectares of the older vines are 
usually replanted every year. 

As Anthony Barton puts it 
“People’s attitudes to okl 
vines are changing. I am not 
100 per cent convinced that a 
30-year-old vine makes a bet- 
ter wine than a 20-year-old. 

In the chai, greater quanti- 
ties of new wood are being 
used in which to mature the 
young wine. The 1982 vintage 
saw a third of the wine 
maturing in new oak barrels; 
today, roughly half goes into 


new wood. The cellar also 
boasts two new wooden cures, 
or fermenting vats, plus the 
latest Vaslin press and a new 
hi-tech heat exchanger first 
used in 1985. 

The latest vintages from 
both Langoa and Ltoville — 
now. happily, emirriv the 
property of the Barton jamily* 
— certainly reflect these? 
changes. Anyone who has 
bought either the glorious? 
intense multi-layered '82; 
Leoville (Adnams. The' 
Crown, High Street/ 
South wold. Suffolk. £17.83;. 
Berry Bros and Rudd. 3 Si 
James Street London SW 1 ,' 
£1835) or the delicious full-' 
bodied fruity '82 Langoa wifi 
not be disappointed. 

The '80 vintage of both- 
properties and their second, 
wine, sold simply as appefta- ■ 
lion coniro/ee St Julien. is also, 
highly successful. If you see 
any of these spicy scented tea-, 
rose-like wines on sale, snaffle 
them up (Russdl and Mclver. 
The Rectory. St Mary at HilL 
London EC3 slock the *8C 
Langoa for£!0.35). 

Jane MacQnitty 


THE TIMES GARDENING KIT 


T his Gardening Kit consisting of a 
stainless steel Weeding Fork and 
Trowel with Gardener's Companion 
Bag would make an ideal Christmas 
Gift. 

T he Fork and Trowel are made by 
the renowned Spear and Jackson 
Company and each have 5" wooden 
handles which are stained to a rose- 
wood hue and deeply waxed for 
protection to satisfy any gardener who 
expects value for money combined 
with durability. 

T he Gardener's Companion Bag in 
dark green, is a practical idea for 
the keen gardener, allotment grower, 
or flower arranger. The bag measures 
approximately II V5" high. 13 Vs" wide 
and 9" deep and wifi comfortably hold 
small tools in the three pockets on die 
front and back with elasticated 
retaining straps and two large pockets 
at either end. The main compartment 
will hold plants, pots or weedkiller, 
and the rigid base, strong webbing 
handles and heavy weave material add 
to its robustness. 

Whether ordered separately or as a 
set, these practical items will be 
appreciated by any keen gardener and 
would make a most appropriate 
Christmas gift. 

Price: 

Stainless Seel Trowel and Fork set 
@ £39.95 per set 
Gardening Companions Bag 
@£12.75 each 

Set of Tools and Bag @ £31^0 per set 



A0 prices are mehahv of post end packing. Please 
aUow up id 21 fays for deb iw. If you arc not 
satisfied we vail refund yaur money without question. 

In addition to our guarantee you have the benefit of 

your full statutory lighe which are not affected. This 

offer am only be despatched to addresses in the U.K. 

The Times Ganlening Kit OBer, Bourne Read, 

Bexley, Kent DAS IBL 

Teb Cmyford 53316 tor enquiries only. 


Please send roe 


THE TIMES 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

RA P)D ORDER} SC S£R VICE MM 

by telephone on r\ 1 

ACCESS OR VISA 
(noaecdtoamplot coupe*/ 

<Crajfoid> 0322-58011 
24 boon a day— 7 days a week 


Stainlca Sled Trowel and Fork (a £19.95 per sei 

Caideru^Convankxi Bag @£12.75 each 

Sei of Toob and Bag ly £31 50 per sei 

1 enclose chequdPO for L made payable toThe Tunes 

Gardening Kit Offer. 

Or debl my Access ; . . 

Visa No. i : > 


Signature 

Send to: The Times Gardening Kit Offer. Bourne Road 
Bodey. Kent DAS IBL 

Mr/Mis/Mos — 

Address — 


(‘ivfairi ?J)!» lot ca^ma sm. 








12 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


U 


THE ARTS 


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fre 




Roll on the 
Cultural 
Revolution 


Plans were unfolded this week 
for a new upmarket Breakfast 
Time (BBC I) which woald 
compete for seriousness with 
the Today programme rather 
than, as present, the 
newspaper. 

News that it will be hosted 
by Frank Bough, Jeremy 
Paxman and Sally Magnusson 
prompts a reaction of SpOt- 
tbe-Pm-up, for the sexual 
chemistry promised by this 
trio would seem to have its 
origins in a test-tube. 

Because of the ever-chang- 
ing start date of BBC's Day- 
rime Schedule (now October 
27. but don't hold your 
breath), only bits of the Cul- 
tural Revolution were on offer 
this week. On Monday, for 
instance, on the old set, we 
were treated to the sight of 
Jeremy Paxman straining to 
be Mr Ordinary in the weeks 
before he becomes Mr 
Hardnose. Descending un- 
comfortably to the level of 
Francis the weatherman, 
Paxman leered into the cam- 
era with little sense of 
- inflection. 

Meanwhile, Debbie Green- 
wood continued to give the last 
of her in-depth political inter- 
views (to David Steel, “bow 
long has South Africa got?"), 
Guy Mkhelmore continued to 
be a naff post on which men 
like Lord Young paused few a 



tickle and, in a programme of 
overkill which wonld have 
distinguished Chairman Mao, 
we watched the Qneen's visit 
to China. 

“I should never question the 
vaine of diche". Sue Lawiey 
remarked In a voiceover cover- 
ing an interminable shot of the 
Great WaO. It rather summed 
up her job — a job she did 
admirably compared to her 


TV -am counterpart. 


Thai it was OO to Shanghai 
for tea, and Frank Bough's 
reminder that it may be &23 in 
London, but in “the Paris of 


the Orient" (Debbie Green- 
wood) It was 123. Lik e a 
Chinese take-away, one rose 
Moated from this feast only to 
have the sensation soon after 
that one bad digested precisely 
nothing. 

In a location report more 
suitable to Film 86, Omnibus 
(BBCl) examined die story of 
The Mission — about the 
genocide of the Guarani — and 
mirrored it in the way director 
Roland Jofle had used the 
Wannana tribe. While there 
was something undeniably fas- 
cinating about the mechanics 
of teaching them (o act, it was 
a meretricious exercise 
concentrating toe much on 
Joffe's slippery, even Jesuit- 
ical, evasion of responsibility. 


Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Caroline Moorehead tracks down writer, traveller Jonathan Raban in the Essex Marshes 

The youngish old salt and the sea 


C oasted? — through yet 
another term?" Jonathan 
Raban's father remarked, 
disbelieving, reading 
from a school report. 
Though that was 25 years ago, the 
word, the stain, stuck. 

ft was inevitable, perhaps, that at 
some point in bis life Raban would 
carry the image to its logical end. 
take the word literally and coast, in 
a boat along a seashore, then return 
to write about it In its original 
form, the account of his journeys 
alone in a 30 ft ketch around the 
British Isles, very nearly did not 
materialize at all. The book that was 
intended was abandoned after six 
baleful, fidgeting months; a novel. 
Foreign Land, came instead. But 
there was enough still left and still 
waiting. 

Coasting has just been published, 
an account of Rahan's travels by 
sea. his dipping into coastal life and 
indeed his own life. I found Raban 
in the house that came with and in a 
sense out of all his coasting, four 
miles from where be berths his boat, 
the Gosfield Maid, in a marina in 
the marshy River Blackwater in 
Essex, at the mouth of the Thames 
estuary. He calls it his bolt-hole, to 
do with not seeing people. Just as 
Raban himself is something of a 
caricature of a youngish and gan- 
gling old salt, deliberate and watch- 
ful in manner, given to much 
lighting and relighting of pipes, so 
the cottage is boat-like, small, neat, 
timbered rooms with low ceilings 
looking out over complete flatness 
and enormous blowy skies. 

“First buy a map", Raban said 
over the phone, giving directions. In 
feet you need not so much a map — 
his directions are flawless — but a 
helicopter. East London being at an 
almost permanent traffic standstill. 
Sensibly. Raban himself does the 
journey between Knightsbridge flat 
and cottage only in the middle of the 
nighL Being a practical man. he 
owns two identical typewriters, so 
that a sheet of paper can be moved 
from one and inserted smoothly 
into the next in mid-paragraph. 



Navigation and solitude: Joanathan Raban aboard Gosfield Maid, *a voyage of territorial conquest' 


Until Foreign Land came out last 
year — to much publishers' hyper- 
bole which might have prevented 
extremely enthusiastic reviews, but 
rightly did not — Raban was talked 
of mainly as a travel writer. What he 
describes as a series of “mistaken 
terms" — several years as a univer- 
sity lecturer in English, a great deal 
of literary criticism and some 
television plays — were well behind 
him and public success bad come 
from Arabia, a journey through 
Bahrain, Abu Dhabi. Yemen. Egypt 
and Jordan, and Old Glory, a voyage 
down the Mississippi River which 
won him the Royal Society of 
Literature's Heinemann Award. 


The description “travel writer” is 
not one he cares for be thinks of the 


term rather as one of literary abuse, 
smacking of stunts and the 
Guinness Book of Records. Before 
the question can even properly be 
phrased he says, firmly: “I'm a 
writer, not a traveller. Books of 
travel are intermissions in my 
writing life. Thesiger is a traveller, 
with bouts of writing as inter- 
missions in his travelling life." The 
good travel-book and the good 
novel, furthermore, are not geneti- 
cally different. “The best non- 
fiction is very dose to being a novel: 
the -world recreated on every page." 
Foreign Land and Coasting, a novel 
and a book of travel grown oat of 
one single impetus: no one better 
than Raban perhaps proves his own 
words, the travel book written as 


autobiography, exploration on two 
levels, inner through memory and 
evocation, outer through scenes and 
events, and the novel as journey. 

W ith two long books 
written about travel- 
ling on water it be- 
comes hard not to see 
Raban as a man at 
feast mildly obsessed by sea. That, 
he concedes, is partly correct. As a 
boy. son of an Army officer turned 
priest m the Church of England and 
constantly moving, be lived always 
near but not on water Norfolk, 
Merseyside. Hampshire: later came 
university at Hull. 

Where the nautical image is 
wrong, says Raban. is that he never 
has been in any obvious, sporting 


sense of the word a sailor. Not until 
1979, when he was in America and 
someone lent him a boat to go down 
the Mississippi, did he first really 
travel on water and he did so then 
largclv because he was intrigued by 
the idea of letting the river write the 
book, the narrative growing out of 
the water's flow. Even so. no instant 
love-affair with boats sprang up. “It 
was made of aluminium, a non- 
stick saucepan of a boat- I gave it 
back to the owners with loathing, j 
hated banging into things; I hated 
trying to start its outboard motor 
and being so inept." Three weeks 
back on shore, however, and I tell 
widowed without if*. 

T he Gosfield Maid — it is 
famouslv unlucky to 
change a boat's name, so 
Raban kept her former 
owner's even if in his own 
mind he prefers to juggle the tellers 
to "Die. Dismal Fog" - was a 
natural next step. And there art 
things he knows he likes about the 
sea: navigation, and the solitude, 
equilibrium and privacy of boat life, 
not feeling lonely, for as every writer 
knows it is far lonlier at home, and 
what he calls in Coasting a trip seen 
as a “test, a reckoning, a voyage of 
territorial conquest. a 
homecoming". 

“ Arabia ", says Raban. “was a 
straight travel book; Old Glory less 
straight: Coasting decidedly 
crookeden but each has been getting 
nearer to home." The coaster's itch 
has. he claims, been soothed. He 
contemplates divorce from the 
Gosfield Maid most weeks. There 
are to be no more travel books. Is 
one to believe him? Even now. he is 
at work on what he insists is just a 
40.000-word article for the Atlantic 
Monthly — 40.000 words an article? 
— about a four-month trip he made 
to Sweden recently on the boat with 
his wife. And there those rivers on 
the East coast of England enticingly 
near. 


Coasting bv Jonathan Raban is 
by Collins HarriU at 


published 
£10.95. 


Time for celebration 


NLCC/Wood 
Queen Elizabeth 
Hail 


r 


CONCERTS 




The New London Chamber 
Choir will be exactly five years 
old next month, an occasion 
which we have ample cause to 
celebrate. Its best characteris- 
tics were prominently dis- 
played in this anniversary 
concert; a good blend, a 
purposeful attack, and an 
ebullient sense of rhythm. 
That last quality is, of course, 
just what one expects from a 
choir directed try James 
Wood, whose pedigree as a 
virtuoso percussionist was 
also reflected in his own 
composition, Phaedrus, com- 
pleted early this year. 

One only wishes that it were 


possible to warm more readily 
to this undeniably assertive 
work, but its ritualistic in- 
cantations of Platonic philos- 
ophy (in. Greek) probably had 
greater appeal to minds more 
mystic than mine. 

The demanding central 
pans, a duo of solo baritone 
and solo percussion, were 
delivered with admirable 
stamina by David Wilson- 
Johnson and Robyn. 
Schulkowsky, and there was 
certainly plenty of variety in 
both the choral and in- 
strumental scoring, the latter 
requiring six more percussion- 
ists and the 11 wind in- 
struments of the Ensemble. 


Stravinsky's Les Noces 
could likewise be described as 
a ritualistic piece, but fe r from 
celebrating* noble philosophy 
h tells an earthy, common- 
place tale, and consequently 
Stravinsky’s sane is more a 
whirligig than solemn pro- 
cession. Wood directed a spar- 


kling, if not ideally h afe nc ed, 
perfo 


performance, with stoic 
contributions from the solo 
singers, Jane Ginsborg, Linda 
Hirst, John Potter, and the 
indefatigable Wilson-John- 
son. But this was essentially 
the choir's occasion, and their 
singing was. as carefully pre- 
pared but as musically sponta- 
neous as it had been earlier in 
Bach’s Motet Singet dan 
Herm. 


Stephen Petti tt 


Eastern feast with a 
taste of promise 


TV PREVIEW 


Whatever the Arts Council 
decides to do about the sugges- 
tion of extra funding for the 
City of Birmingham Sym- 
phony Orchestra, neither the 
CBSO nor Simon Rattle have 
cause to grumble about lack of 
support from the televirion 


companies. More prime-time 
front cover 


exposure, and the 
of Radio Times, comes with a 
series of four Saturday-eve- 
ning programmes on BBC2, 
starting tonight (8.25). 

The series title. From East 
io West (I don't think it is a co- 
vert reference to Maestro 
Rattle's possible emigration) 
summarizes the programmes’ 
main theme: the impart of 
eastern cultures on western 
composers from Mozart (It 
Seraglio ) to Boulez. So in the 
first programme. The Magic 
Carpel, the briefest of spoken 
introductions precedes an un- 
interrupted span of music. 

The CBSO plays an imagi- 
native choice of oriental-in- 
fluenced compositions (it 
includes, besides the in- 
evitable Ravel and Debussy, 
iome rarely-heard Holst, 
Koechlin. David Matthews 
md Steve Reich, as well as 
Ketclbey’s ludicrous but 
Imny Persian Market Place, 
,'omplete with lusty singing 
rom the CBSO players) which 
s juxtaposed with the “real 
hing": a well-recorded mix- 
ure of gamelans, sitars, nose- 
lutes and many other 
nscru table sounds. 

Neither orchestra nor 
■onductor appears much, 
hough there is one clever use 
>f a four-way split screen to 
llustrate the metrical 



Simon Rattle: TV tone exposure 


1987 National Art 
Competition 
Total Prize Money £15,000 


ExtiKtiM Tour Sub: 
Hall Gattario, London SWI. 
• 14 th Fafaraanr 


WtHcanlt FWv". Newosta ugMTtf M. 


19th Fdran -IW 
ArtmathArtWjjy.flrtiiwh. ■ 
19th Mach - Tift April 

Entry fonns & deads ot tending in 

Centres (Post cants only) From; 


Thai... - 

Tt* MriSI 

rtWftnHwgfTamw. 
LmdiM SW1Y SO. 


complexity ofa Nielsen piece. 
The bulk of the pictures, 
however, comes in the form of 
location footage of dancers, 
religious ceremonies and vari- 
ous tropical paradises — all of 
it pre-existing in the archives. 
Dedicated viewers .of The 
Spirit of Asia may recognize 
quite a few feces. 

This wordless matching of 
music to pictures has its 
dangers. Film of sampans 
sailing into the sunset, albeit 
with an upmarket soundtrack, 
do tend to evoke commercials 
for Asiatic airlines. And it is 
debatable whether some of the 
subtler connections between 
the cultures depicted and the 
musk heard will be made by 
those without prior knowl- 
edge. Moreover, there are 
greater questions which, of 
course, cannot be answered — 
or even asked — in a pro- 
gramme without much 
speech. 

To be fair to Rattle and the 
series' co-deviser, the director 
Barrie Gavin, this opening 
programme was meant to 
entertain as much as to in- 
form. and it does that with 
considerable style. Later pro- 
grammes have more depth: 
next week's examines the 
unmistakable sound-world of 
the Japanese composer Toni 
Takemitsu: the final two are 
devoted to discussion and 
performance of perhaps the 
most celebrated eastern-in- 
fluenced composition, 
Mahler's Das Lied von da 
Erde. Fruits of recent research 
are promised. 

Richard Morrison 


LSO/Simonov 

Barbican 


For a man who spent 15 years 
as chief conductor of 
Moscow's Bolshoi Theatre 
and is still in his mid-40s, Yuri 
Simonov kept the London 
Symphony Orchestra on a 
deciddy tight leash for their 
Barbican concert. 

Divided between Men- 
delssohn and Tchaikovsky, it 
was marked by a 
deliberateness of pacing and 
accent that over-rode any 
qualities of charm or gaiety, 
even in the exuberance of 
Tchaikovsky’s Italian Caprice 
at the end. 

Applying this to Men- 
delssohn at the outset meant 
that the Overture to A Mid- 
summer Nighfs Dream ac- 
quired a heavy-footed rhythm 
and force of string tone that 
put it closer to Verdi, which 
the Soviet visitor is indeed 
due to conduct when the 
Royal Opera returns to 
Covent Garden with La 
traviaia in 10 days’ time. A 
sense of drama will be wel- 


come enough then, more than 
in the weighty inflection im- 
parted to the Noctum and 
Scherzo that followed the 
Overture. 

The "Italian" Symphony 
likewise developed larger than 
life proportions as the conduc- 
tor urged it trenchantly for- 
ward, his phrasing having a 
matter of feet character and 
little charm to modify the 
squareness of presentation. 
There was some spirited 
woodwind playing, which was 
duly acknowledged by bring- 
ing the principals separately to 
their feet at the end, but I 
wished this had been heard in 
a more buoyant context. 

Ralph Kirshbaum was able 
to take wing effectively in his 
ardent cello playing for the 
Rococo Variations of 
Tchaikovsky. He did rather 
gulp the triplets of the first 
variation, and be made less of 
the opportunities for rubato 
than I would have expected, 
but his musical sensibility 
provided enjoyable contrasts 
of tone and character on the 
way to a brilliant finale. 

Noel Goodwin 


Boldness of the braves 


YMSO/Blair 


Festival Hall 


“Who dares wins" is not an 
invariably successful formula 
for choosing orchestral rep- 
ertoire. The Young Musicians 
Symphony Orchestra has both 
dared and won many times in 
the past 14 years, enriching 
London's concert life with 
works which their elders dared 
not programme. 

This time, with the Everest 
of Mahler’s Fifth Symphony 
to surmount and what 
seemed like a more inexperi- 
enced crew than usual in front 
of him, the conductor James 
Blair perhaps dared a bit too 
much. 

An organization which re- 
lies on the goodwill of stu- 
dents and colleges is always 
vulnerable to the sudden 
shrinkage- of its available pool 
of latent That is especially 
true at a time when each 
music college appears increas- 
ingly concerned to assert its 
own high public profile, as it 
jockeys for position in this 
mysterious race called "the 
pursuit of excellence". 

Yet the YMSO’s role is still 
a crucial one. not least because 


tween breezing through a 
demanding Mahler solo pas- 
sage in a college practice 
room, and having to Nay it in 
the Festival HalL Moreover, 
this performance had many 
brave aspects to offset its 
insecurities, which, in any 
case, could probably have 
been resolved by a few tough 
sectional rehearsals. 

For instance, the brass prin- 
cipals made creditable work of 
their tortuous parts, especially 
in the first and third move- 
ments. (To hear the trumpet's 
notorious descent from top D 
flat go slightly wonky is noth- 
ing new. even in this illus- 
trious venue). The strings 
certainly lacked weight, and 
fatigue led to mistakes in the 
finale, but the Adagietto re- 
vealed some pleasant tone. 

Blair naturally had to sac- 
rifice some long-term vision 
in favour of bar-by-bar safety; 
the second movement sagged 
particularly. Apart from some 
occasional rushing in the fid- 
dles. however, the ensemble 
held together welL 

Earlier, in Richard Strauss's 
Four Last Songs, the young 
soprano Susan McCulloch 
gave evidence of considerable 
potemiaL 


d i-I UVMil IIVL lOUi UVU1UX n* L I # 

there is a big difference be- KlCuftTu IMomsOn 



From Czechoslovakia: the 1926 print Electric Tramcar, by Sflovsky (detail) 


Prints ancient and modem 


•The British Mnsenm is ev- 
idently never one to look a gift 
horse in the mouth, or indeed 
to fight shy of engineering 
gifts of the right sort — and 
which sort is not? 

The present exhibition in 
the Prints and Drawings gal- 
lery (until January II) brings 
to our attention two recent 
accessions to the museum's 
collections: a group of Czecho- 
slovak Prints from 1900 to 
1970 and a group of prints by 
Jean Morin (c. 1590-1650), 
both of which arrived in 1985. 

For good measure, these two 
shows are allied with a selec- 
tion of Contemporary Japa- 
nese Prints (until October 26), 
chosen by an international 


r 


GALLERY 


1 


Czechoslovak 

Prints 

1900 to 1970 

British Museum 




e Czech collection is the 
result of an intoesting ex- 
change, whereby the National 
Gallery in Prague put together 
a representative selection of 
modem Czech print-making 
for London, and the British 
Mnsenm did a corresponding 
service with British prints for 
Prague. Every important 
phase in 20th-century Czech 
art seems to be represented, 
from the Art Nouvean and 
Symbolist turn-of-foe-century 
nearly up to the present. 
Probably the most immedi- 
ately striking work comes 
from the earlier phases. The 
most familiar Czech print- 


maker of all during these 
years, Mucha, is not included, 
presumably because foe BM is 
already well supplied and in 
any case most of his graphic 
work was done in Paris. 

But it is good to meet such 
other syraboUstkaDy-indined 
artists as Frantisek Kobtiha, 
with his striking series of 
oblique illustrations to foe 
Tristan stray, and Josef 
VachaL, who made intricate 
colour wood-engravings on 
legendary themes. 

The heyday of Czech Cub- 
ism around foe First World 
War is also commandingly 
displayed in foe works of the 
aptly-named Bohumfl Kubista 
and of Vaclav Spala, and we 
discover, ff we did not know it 
before, that during the Twen- 
ties in Czechoslovakia there 
were also powerful realists like 
Vladimir Sflovsky, who con- 
veyed his vision of the dty 
both in woodcuts like Electric 
Tramcar and in more at- 


mospheric drypoints, and un- 
dassifiabie “neo-classical" 
artists like Rudolf Kremlicka, 
whose bold stylization is en- 
tirely his o wn. 

The catarogue-book 
accompanying the exhibition, 
by Irena Goldschneider 
(£9.95), is an invaluable source 
of hard-to-come- by informa- 
tion in itself. 

The Japanese usefully 
supplement foe knowledge we 
have gleaned from earlier 
shows at foe British Museum 
covering foe classic print- 
makers and the early moderns 
who showed the first re- 
sponses to Impressionist and 
Past-Irapressioiiist art from 
the West There are 80 artists 
with 80 prints, and it is 
difficult to reach any gen- 
eralization abont the present 
state of things on foe basis of 
so little and conflicting 
evidence. 

One thing is unmistakable: 
there is a tremendous amount 
of creative energy being un- 
leashed in Japan 

No single artist separates 
himself from the throng: obvi- 
ously we need to see more 
one print by each in order to 
make that kind of discrimina- 
tion. 


John Russell 
Taylor 


Following family footsteps 


George Benson and Diana 
Ross are two artistes who have 
previously performed in the 
round at Wembley, and it was 
a measure of her extraor- 
dinary status after only one 
solo album that Whitney 
Houston should elect to do the 
same without suffering in 
comparison. 

With her immaculately 
dressed seven-piece band and 
four backing vocalists set 
lower at one end. the sizeable, 
circular stage was occupied by 
just the one slim figure, wear- 
ing a sleek turquoise dress and 
Clasping a cordless micro- 
phone. She looked like a 
shimmering hologram, but her 
command of such an 
intimidating area of space was 
real enough throughout a set 
which included nearly all the 
songs on her eponymous 
album. 


[ 


ROCK 




Whitney Houston 

Wembley Arena 


As the daughter of Cissy 
Houston, niece of Dionne 
Warwick and family friend of 
Aretha Franklin, Houston has 
had ample opportunity to 
inherit and absorb the finest 
gospel and soul singing tra- 
ditions. and time and again 
she demonstrated the fluency 
and sheer prowess of her vocal 
technique: a quasi-gospel 
arrangement of the Frankie 
Laine hit "I Believe” pro- 
duced a climax that swept 
towards the very highest reg- 
isters in waves qf mounting 
vigour. The duets “Hold Me" 


and "Nobody Loves Me Like 
You Do", sung with her 
brother, Gary Garland, were 
impeccably smooth and 
smooch y. 

But she lacks the depth of 
expression of a Warwick or a 
Franklin. She is only 23, so 
this may come with Ume. and 
she may also learn to resist the 
temptation to parade her skills 
m such an overbearing way as 
at the end of "1 Am 
Changing**, where her 
bombastic ad-libs, punctuated 
by wolf whistles from the 
crowd, reminded me of the 
extended guitar finales that 
sometimes close over-heavv 
blues songs. 

In other respects though, the 
older generation could benefit 
by adopting her youthful ap- 
proach. 


I 


David Sinclair 


Chinese 
prophecies 
come true 


Nine wars ago ! had the luck 
to work an a school audio- 
> isuaf programme about 
China with the then Times 
deputy foreign editor, Richard 
Harris. I turned it up this *wk 
ami listened to the prophecies 
he ventured at iw end. 

Mao was recently dead, foe 
Gang of Four disgraced and 
the new leadership, thought 
Mr Harris, would turn tittir 
attention to raising living 
standards, improving contacts 
with the West and - an 
attitude notable for its absence 
in the preceding 30 yew* - 
making the best of the world 
as it is. 

He was right on all three 
counts and the point was 
firmlv driven home by China 
(Radio 4. test two Saturdays 
and Wednesdays), a pair of 
vivid documentaries com- 
piled by Mike She i Is on a 
recent visit to that country. 
The fan foal he was working, 
mostly through interpreters — 
familiar as the kiss of death to 
raanv a promising interview ~ 
did Utile to reduce the charge 
of energy which ran through 
both these programmes and 
which left the strong im- 
pression that the only thing 
wrong with Richard Harris 
prophetic gifts was that they 
had not taken him far enough. 
The contrast over the year* 
was extraordinary. 


I 


RADIO 


1 


Incomes have on average 
more than doubled, contacts 
with westerners, which in 
1 977 were matters or difficulty 
and suspicion, are now 
increasingly unfettered, tra- 
ditional Chinese pragmatism 
is reasserting iuelf — and alt 
with that much more dan 
perhaps for having so ruth- 
lessly been kept under. Even 
Christianity, that nonpareil of 
capitalist opiates, now seems 
to enjoy relative free ex- 
pression: “What a friend I 
have in Jesus", sang a swelling 
congregation visited by Mr 
Shells. 

Of course relaxation has 
brought its problems: fraud 
and corruption flourish along 
with more constructive hu- 
man activities but all in all this 
sounded like a portrait of a 
society rapidly readjusting to 
ideas of give and take as well 
a scorn promise which. 1 
remember Mr Harris insist- 
ing, are pan of the weave of 
Chinese history. It seems he 
was right again. 

If China succeeded as a sort 
of full-face photographic like- 
ness of a society, then William 
Trevor's The News From Ire- 
land (Radio 4. Monday, 
repeating today) achieved its 
effect by means that were 
shadowy and indirect In the 
potato famine of the late 
1840s. Anna Maria Heddoe 
(Moir Leslie), governess to an 
English family newly come 
into an opulent Irish inher- 
itance. gradually absorbs the 
true nature of what is happen- 
ing outside the comfortable 
life of the estate. It is the 
butler. Fogarty (a sinister and 
spelling-binding performance 
by Cyril Cusack) who is her 
chief instructor — hinting and 
sometimes, as when she finds 
that he has read her diary, 
shocking her into realization. 
This unappealing old man was 
the dominating figure of the 
play, the very emblem of a 
place and time "where people, 
are driven back to savagery". 
It all left a deep and horrible 
impression on the memory. 

So in a very different sense 
did Kane's Tales from Shake- 
speare (Radio 4. Tuesdays). 
Vincent Kane has been retell- 
ing five Shakespeare plots, 
matching the characters more 
or less to living public figures: 
David Steele appeared as 
Hamlet. David Owen as Clau- 
dius; lan McGregor was 
Othello. Scargili his lago. And 
so on. The parallels were often 
heavy-handed. Likewise the 
delivery. If you believe the 
wortd has reached a pitch of 
madness never before known.- - 
then half an hour with Bugs 
and Beasts Before foe Law 
(Radio 3. Monday) should 
have put you right. Dr Nicho- 
las Humphrey, an ethologist 
from Cambridge, has been 
exploring the fantastic history 
of the criminal prosecution of 
animals from the Middle Ages, 
into the 1 9th century. A SOW. 
was maimed and executive*! 
m 1386 for injuring a child: a. 
bishop commanded hosts of ' 
marauding beetles to depart 
on pam of prosecution which 
was solemnly if ineffectively 
carried oul Dr Humphrey • 
ascribed « all to man's efforts 
to deny the messy and the 
inexplicable and to assert the 
universal rule oflaw. divine or 
otherwise. 


David Wade 


Sicily-^, 

ART AND* I 


„ ARCHAEOLOGY 

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I*.* i kic.utno m* 

hi t.miiAiii ain 

*■ 

Sk* JrfCAVfjmtlSa 

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1 iinarrauw. l.tft 


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/ 








THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER IS 1986 


1 


3 










ROCK Records 


Growing 
old with 

confidence 


James Brown 


rranknGoesto.^ 
Ljvaf Poot(ZTTtQffl 


5711 


a hit makes. 

AiIiinW® ld rf **£ “Living^ 

Han* n8WnUng tfiam of 
J Hanman and Charlie 

Jamcs Brown tas 
JS^bted an album that 

V) JL2! ec<lve, y on both his 
30 yrars experience and the 
benefits of the latest technol- 
ogy. Gravin', produced by 
Hanman. categorically on 
instates the old troubadour as 

3 .f 0 . ntem P°ra r y force with 
winch to be reckoned. From 

? vocals of 

Let s Get Personal”, where 

ne trades lines with an in- 
distinct Alison Moyet. to the 
Drealcneclc impetus of “Turn 
Me Loose. I'm Dr. Feelgood” 
with os loose-wrisied rhythm 
guitar counterpointing the 
Wasting horn crescendos. 
Brown exudes a new con- 
ndCTice in every nuance of his 
performance. 

, X h 5 re . are eve n a couple of 
teMads in die “Man's World" 
idiom where Brown rediscov- 
ers his talent for singing as 
opposed to his more familiar 
grunt and stab vocal style; 
“How Do You Stop", with 
Stevie Win wood guesting on 
synthesizer and “Return to 
Me", replete with huge fan- 
lares from the vibrant Up- 
town Homs, are classic 
Godfather of Sou! material 
for the mid 80s, and “G-R- 
A-V-I-T-Y" scans, appro- 



JAZZ RECORDS 


Thinking 

man’s 

piano 

Paul Bley Fragments (ECM 
1320) 

Jon Hassell Power Spot 
(ECM 1327) 

Paul Bley's contemplative pi- 
ano style may have provided 
the initial inspiration for the 
chamber-jazz idiom asso- 
ciated with the ECM label, but 
he at least need not be blamed 
for the vacuous smugness of 
the “New Age" music that in 
turn sprang from EOTs un- 
expected international ■ suc- 
cess. Fragments, with which 
Bley returns to the label after 
an absence of some years, 
shows him still to be operating 
with an intellectual curiosity 
utterly alien to the New Agers. 

True enough, those un- 
familiar with the pianist's 
career might find it hard to 
believe, on this evidence, that 
his first recordings as a leader 
were accomplished with the 
assistance of such no-non- 
sense partners as Charles 
Mingus and Art B Lakey. That 
was more than 30 years ago, 
though, and the blues-and- 
booze school of jazz apprecia- 
tion will find little to detain 
them as Bley, John Surman 
(reeds). Bill Friseil (guitar) and 
Paul Motian (drums) converse 


Janes Brown: trouhadoar 
priately enough, just like "R- 
E-S-P-&C-T". 

Frankie Goes to Hollywood 
have hit their mid-life crisis 
with only their second album. 
Liverpool, with its cumber- 
some heavy pop rode sound, 
betrays both a poverty of 
imagination and a fumbling 
lack of direction and mo- 
mentum. Ponderous introduc- 
tions give way to clanging 
guitars and galumphing bass 
patterns m “Kill The Pain" 
and “Warriors of the 
Wasteland”, while Holly 
Johnson sounds like David 
Bowie one minute on “Rage 
Hard" and then like Jim Kerr 
the next on “Lunar Bay”. 

The most depressing aspect 
of Liverpool is the way in 
which it denotes such a swift 
decline from the initial jaunty, 
vaguely shocking approach 
that made them a minor 
phenomenon of their day to 
the set-piece routines of a 
group firmly cast in the new- 
estabiishment mould. Perhaps 
they should try living in 
America. 

David Sinclair 

with all the boisterous aban- 
don of a bunch of Zen 
masters. 

Constructed in cadences 
rather than bars, the music 
hovers and drifts like thin 
mist, at its heart the contrast 
between FriselPs marvellous 
repertoire of timbral effects 
and Motian's ability to suggest 
momentum without defining 
a pulse. Surman makes a 
considerable contribution, 
and Bley's crystalline touch 
and refined sense of balance 
are the music's keel and 
rudder. 

To those for whom Bley’s 
austere meditations represents 
the antithesis of flesh-and- 
blood jazz, I must add this 
caveat slay away from Jon 
Hassell, too. That might be 
more difficult, though, .since 
the commercially potent aunt 
of ECM surrounding Power 
Spot could be just what is 
needed to bring the outstand- 
ingly original music of this 
American trumpeter to a 
wider audience. 

Hassell plays his trumpet 
through an electronic device 
which sandblasts his tone,, 
smoothes away his attack and 
permits him to make bis lines 
ululate like the voice of an 
Indian classical singer. Pro- 
duced by Brian Eno and 
Daniel Lanois, the album 
pares away some of the back- 
ground effects heard on 
Hassell's earlier recordings, 
leaving only echoing percus- 
sion and almost subliminal 
electronics. Sympathetic ears 
will find it spellbinding. 

Richard Williams 


St Bob the unmockable 


PAPERBACKS 


Is That ft? by Bob Gettof 
(Penguin, £3195) • 

“Ah. Mr GeWof.” said the 
Prime Minister in gracious 
tones. “I think it's wonderful 
what you've been doing with 
the Band Aid record." 
Geldofs response was to the 
point. “Thank you Prime 
Minister, but I was reading in 
The Times the other day that 
you were planning to spend 
£!0m disposing of surplus 
EEC butter. Don't you think 
that's ridiculous?" The gra- 
cious exchange became less 
gracious. "Mr Geldof" said 
Mrs Thatcher idly, . of the 
starving Ethiopians, "they 
can't eat butter.” “They can 
eat butter oiL” retorted Bob., 
“I was saying the 
unsayabte!” he thinks after- 
wards. amazed at the st'mplio- 
ityofsucfa a confrontation. An 
obstinate realist, Geldof 
discovered a way of getting- 
things done: cut aside red tape 
and etiquette; state a truth and 
gamble on it against a hundred 
bureaucratic obstacles. Is That 
Iff is his autobiography, told 
with intelligence and wit,, and 
without self-aggrandisement. 
"I'm not bfoodyM Teresa." he 
snaps as people begin to 
address him in tones of 
gloomy reverence, on the 
point of trying to kiss the hem 
of his jeans. 

Geldof begins at the earliest 
memory. A Davy Crockett 
suit, a girL and a kiss. Ufa is 
fme until his mother dies and 
his father beats him. His 
school work deteriorates. It is 
still bad in his teens. In the 
holidays he helps at the Simon 
Community, a place for the 
homeless and drunk in Dub- 





lin. He feels ugly until the 
Rolling Stones arrive: scruffi- 
ness is suddenly de rigueur 
and J agger's lips a gorgeous 
norm. As Geldof has a similar 
mouth, he is in luck. 

In Canada things look up: 
Geldof becomes a music 

C nalist, then back in Ire- 
he forms a band called 
the Night Life Thugs. Fortu- 
nately they changed the name 
to Boom town Rats and the 
rest is more or las history. 
The moment he was famous — 
shades of the future — be 
seized the opportunity to say 


what he thought: as on The 
Late. Late Show (the biggest 
television show in Ireland). 
Ireland "suppurates in a sea of 
self-pity and hypocrisy", he 
declared: the first and least of 
many inflammable state- 
ments. 

Uproar is succeeded by 
greater uproar, and be is 
denounced in pulpits. "Let us 
pray for the soul of this poor, 
demented boy . . 

Is That Itl* is a marvellous 
autobiography. Geldof writes 
about his childhood in finely 
sensitive detail and gives the 


ins J 

mospnere of places. Towards 
the end the pace changes; it is 
impossible to put down, and 
to my surprise h becomes very 
moving — the visits to Ethio- 
pia, the response that gathered 
momentum, and the battle 
(with individuals and institu- 
tions) Geldof fought for Live 
Aid. By the end ofthe book he 
is writing wonderfully. 

Miraculously his tone is 
never sanctimonious. It is 
always too dry, too caustic. It 
is as if he has one eye cocked 
for an imaginary audience. 


waiting to deride an image of 
Geldof with halo. This highly 
articulate “awkward bugger", 
as he calls himself, pre-empts 
mockery with sell-mockery. 

It all began with a news item 
on the famine. An idea is 
sparked, and it is fascinating 
to see it grow - culminating in 
Live Aid. “that peerless day in 
July 1985". h That Iff (the 
question Bob is pondering 
now) is mandatory reading for 
cynics. 

Kathy 

O'Shaughnessy 


Hark the heralds 


How Lord Birkenhead Saved 
the Heralds 
Wagner i 
£2-50) 


t S&iZB* 


VYMpr ' ' I 





‘Sheer Geldof.*. 
loud-mouthed, honest, 
button-holing, obscene, 
compassionate, 
compelling’* 

— BOB— 
GELDOF 



if 


I 


And now, it’s in pa 

£3.95 



'Hunter Dimes. in the SundW 


The Horae Office 
once looked at 
Her Majesty's 
College of Anns' 
in a distinctly 
I jaundiced way, 
believing that it 
should become a 
department of the Home Of- 
fice. However, even before it 
began to manifest its malevo- 
lent interest in the college, it 
was advocated in an article in 
The Times in 1869 that the 
activities of the college should 
be investigated by a Par- 
liamentary Commission. 

It was not until 1902 that 
the Home Office secured the 
appointment of a Parlia- 
mentary Committee to look 
into the Fees of Honour paid 
to the heralds by recipients of 
honours, and also into the 
running of the college 
generally. 

Although the committee did 
not upset the status quo, it 
removed a source of income 
from the officers and they 
sought other ways of making 
ends meet: ways that some- 
times occasioned considerable 
criticism. This enabled the 
Home Secretary in 1927, Sir 
William Joynson-Hicks, to set 
up a secret Cabinet Commit- 
tee to inquire once again into 
the activities of the heralds. 
He made no bones about his 
own views, as witness this 
excerpt from a minute of his: 
“Consider if we can smash the 
College ourselves fry an Act of 


' • • ' ” 5' y\ t •• R " -fe ft* 


Coats of arms: the author (left) and fellow heralds on the 
defensive in the secretive Fifties 


Parliament or whether a 
Royal Commission is needed 
first It cannot go on much 
longer as a money-making 
scandal" 

It is at this point that 
Wagner (Sir Anthony. Cla- 
im ceux. and formerly Garter 
King of Arms) takes up the 
story in this booklet. When he 
wrote Heralds of England 
(HMSO. 1967) the Cabinet 
papers were still secret so he 
was then unable to relate the 
story of the 1927 committee. 
Now that the papers have 
been released, be divulges 
what happened and how ft was 
that at the conclusion of the 
inquiry, thanks to the able 
chairmanship of Lord Birkea- 
head, the committee was able 
to report that the objections to 
putting the Officers of Arms 
on fixed salaries outweighed 
any advantages that might 
result from such an action. 

Although I could have 


wished for more verbatim 
quotations from the Cabinet 
papers. Wagner does, as might 
be expected, a competent job 
in unveiling yet another fas- 
cinating episode in the turbu- 
lent history of the Latest effort 
at bashing the heralds, at- 
tempted by Lord Teviot when 
he introduced a bill into the 
House of Lords in 1975. 
designed to impose upon the 
college what we considered 
impossible obligations; The 
bill was defeated by 49 votes 
io28. 

I hope bashers as well as 
supporters will read this book- 
let, as ft may persuade then. 
thaL the time has come, es- 
pecially now that the Home 
Office and the college are 
almost on - David/Jopathan 
terms, to lay down their arms 
and surrender to ours. 

John Brooke-Little 

Norroy & Ulster King of Arms 


Taken by surprise 
in dreamland 


BOOKS IN BRIEF 


! by I 

Murdoch (Penguin, £3.95) 

Nothing is obvious in an Iris 
Murdoch noveL Coincidences 
and surprising choices govern 
events, and as readers we are 
often required to consider 
those choices in surprising 
ways. In-this novel the main 
characters are two young men 
who have been brought up as 
brothers but have very dif- 
ferent holds on- life. One of 
them. Edward Bahrain. is 
suffering agonies of guilt since 
his best friend jumped out of a 
top floor window. The other, 
Stuart Cuno. is a man ob- 
sessed with the need to be and 
do good. Edward escapes to a 
fantasy house by the sea, but 
Stuart rescues him from it and 
returns him to life. 

The Elected Member by 
Bernice Rubens (Abacus, 
£3.50) 

"If patients are disturbed”, 
says R.D. Laing. “their fam- 
ilies are often very 
disturbing". Bernice Rubens 
lakes this for her text and 
elaborates the theme. Norman 
Zweck is the victim of a 
claustrophobic Jewish family. 
As a child he is clever, 
charming and handsome, 
becoming a successful bar- 
rister. But a nervous break- 
down turns his life into a daily 
see-saw between terrifying 
hallucination and powerful 
drugs. His illness is described 
with a blend of sympathy and 
exasperation through the 


thoughts 

sister. 


of his father and 


The Taking of Agnes by 
Jennifer Potter (Abacus, 

£3.50) 

Agnes is young and beautiful 
She goes to stay with her aunt 
in Martinique and disappears. 
Is she a victim of terrorism or 
colonialism? Or is she just a 
casualty of the sort of sexual 
and moral decadence that may 
be-tfae product of an insecure 
society? This novel is both a 
thriller and a satire, with a 
skilfully constructed story. 

The Swimming Pool Season 
by Rose T remain (Sceptre, 
£2.95) 

It is one thing to build 
swimming pools for people 
living in the suburbs of south- 
ern England, but quite another 
to build them up against the 
cowsheds and hedges of rural 
France. Yet Larry Kendal 
does not see this. He goes to 
live in a French village and 
sian a new life after the 
collapse of "Aquazure”. his 
pool construction business, 
and the one thing he longs to 
do there is to design and build 
the best pool yet Conve- 
niently at this point his wife 
has to return to Oxford to 
nurse her sick mother, to 
readjust to her home town, 
and to deride where she really 
belongs; Although the various 
antics and intrigues are clearly 
and sometimes comically de- 
scribed. it is all rather in- 
conclusive. Even the new 
swimming pobl gets filled in. 

Anne Barnes 


THE TIMES 
ARTS DIARY 


Operatic 

fireworks 

An unusual performance of 
Rossini's Otelfo will take place 
next month to mark the 150th 
anniversary of the death of 
Maria MaJibran. the distin- 
guished and controversial so- 
prano of the bel canto era. The 
concert in St John's Smith 
Square celebrates the occasion 
in Paris in 1831 when 
Malibran sang the title role, 
challenging her great rival 
Whilhelmine Schroder- 
Devriem who sang Desdc- 
mona. The two were said to 
have struck sparks off each 
other, adding competing trills 
and ornaments to their roles. 
T wo modern-day sopranos 
will attempt to recreate the 
fireworks. 

Crazy gang 

The Goon Show is attracting a 
new wave of intellectual inter- 
est among bright young things. 
Ex-Goon Michael Be mine re- 
cently informed an earnest 
student that its effervescent 
humour was inspired merely 
by the delight of a group of 
crazy guys at having survived 
the war. Actually, he had been 
asked to identify “the leitmo- 
tif or the Goons' iconoclastic 
undercurrent". 

• Organisers of the Peking 
Opera lonr of Britain are 
urgently seeking sponsors to 
meet the orientals* apparently 
insatiable appetite for choc- 
olate. Their contract stipulates 
that to maintain sugar levels 
during Ibeir exhausting 
performances, each member of 
the 7 2 -strong company re- 
ceives fear bars a day, which 
works out at 172 pounds of 
chocolate a week. 

Finding funds 

English National Opera is the 
latest prestigious company to 
feel the pinch of constraints on 
government support. A first 
annual fund-raising drive is 
planned for next month with a 
target of £200.000. Managing 
director Peter Jonas, com- 
plaining that the opera's subsi- 
dy is falling far short of 
inflation, says the public ap- 
peal is vital to ensure a wide- 
ranging repertory at accessible 
ticket prices. 

Jonas is likely to evoke 
sympathy from the Royal 
Opera House, where chairman 



Moser and Jonas 

Sir Claus Moser is maintain- 
ing his campaign for more 
public spending on the arts. 
No government in Europe, he 
says, should try to pass the 
responsibility to the private 
sector. 

Final curtain 

My invitation for ideas for Sir 
Peter Hairs farewell produc- 
tion at the National Theatre is 
eliciting an assortment of 
serious and irreverent sugges- 
tions. A bottle of bubbly to the 
Canterbury reader who ex- 
presses appreciation for Sir 
Peter’s imaginative interpreta- 
tion of Shakespeare and, with 
no apparent irony, proposes 
The Tempest. More winners 
next week. 

Gavin Bell 


Stockhausen family affair 


CLASSICAL 

RECORDS 


Mozart: Flute Concerto In 
Q, Haydn: Trumpet Concarto, 
Stockn&UME 
Oberflppemanz KatWnka 
Pasveer. Markus 
Stockhausen, Berlin Radio 
SO/Stockhausan Acanta 
4023543 

Gavin Bryans Three 
Viennese Dancers Pascal 
Pongy, Charles Fid brook, 
Gmnn Bryars, Ardhti Quartet 
ECM 1! 


Stockhausen conducting Mo- 
zart? Perhaps ft is more a case 
of Mozart conducting 
Stockhausen, leading him 
Papageno-like into strange 
airs. There would seem to 
have been two distinct reasons 
why the grandfather of the 
avant-garde should suddenly 
be presenting himself in the 
unlikely role of classical 
conductor and even cadenza 
writer, since all the embellish- 
ments in these new recordings 
of Mozart and Haydn are by 
him. 


The bounder is back on top! 

IN GEORGE MACDONALD FRASER’S 

FliRSHPlRn 

HID THE ^ 
DRH 60 H qM ■ ■ 

19 | 


%Maroellaus...the 
bestFlashmanyet 9 
PUNCH 


£2.95 


Banana 

Paperbacks 



In the first place, there is the 
fact that his extended family 
includes a. number of pro- 
ficient. if not in this repertory 
altogether remarkable, solo- 
ists: the trumpeter in the 
Haydn is his elder son 
Markus, the Michael of his 
operas Donnerstag and 
Samstag. while the Mozart 
flautist is Kathinka Pasveer, a 
young Dutch musician who 
joined bis entourage quite 
recently and gained important 
parts in Samstag. 

Their performances here 
lack fluency and interesting 
phrasing, though they may be 
put off bv the ponderousness 
of the accompaniments as' 
conducted by Stockhausen se- 
nior. As it is. the most 
extraordinary moments by far 
are the cadenzas: which im- 
mediately reveal the second 
reason for Stockhausen's con- 
cern with this music the fact 
that his method of com- 
position with melodic 
“formulae”, used in all his 
works since 1970. gives him 
the means to enter into a 
dialogue with the 1 8ih cen- 
tury. It is simply unfortunate 
that the terms of that dialogue 
are overwhelmingly those of 
Stockhausen's humour at its 
most heavy-handed, though 
there is one nice moment in 
the first movement of the 
Mozart concerto where he 
twists a theme into the rising 
scale of Papageno's pipes. 

There is a scrap of original 
Stockhausen as filler on the 
trumpet side, and her& able to 
use mutes and a greater vari- 
ety of colour. Markus 



'Stnckiuflseo reprise Markus, 
left, and Karlheinz 

Stockhausen seems a more 
considerable anisL The piece 
is Oherlippentanz. about 
which the -sleeve note gives no 
information at all In Fact it is 
a moment from Samsrag 
where Michael enters to pro- 
test insmimemally against 
one of Lucifer's ceremonials. 

The Gavin Bryars record is 
thoroughly enjoyable: min- 
imalism with a human dimen-' 
sion of whimsy, and with 
ravishing -beauty of sound. 
The title has very little to do 
with the music (when is that 
not true?), which includes 
pieces for horn and chiming 
percussion, and for siring 
quartet, all bathed in the glow 
ofthe harmonic series. 

Paul Griffiths 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1083 

Prizes of ihe New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
correct solutions opened on Thursday. October 23. 1986. Entries 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Com- 
petition. I Pennington Street. London. EIX9. The winners and 
solution wilt be announced on Saturday. October 25. 1986. 


ACROSS 

1 Movement id music 

(ID 

9 Opposite word (7) 

10 Indistinctly (S) 

11 Female sheep (3) 

13 Twenty quires (4) 

16 Deer tail (4) 

17 Loyal5ong(6) 

18 Filth (4) 

20 Failure (4) 

21 Stick (6) 

22 Fine powder (4) 

23 Extinct ground bird 
(4) 

25 Female elephant (3) 

28 Siagger(5) 

29 Jrwish state citizen 
iT) 

30 Rubaiyat poet (4.7) 

DOWN 

2 Extreme (5) 

3 Skein (4) 

4 Insipid (4) 

5 Created (4) 

6 Laughabtei7) 

7 Twaddled I) 

8 Night fctrlll) 

12 Venomous fish (6) 

14 Small carpet (3) 

15 Artist's workroom 

(bl 

19 Speaker's dais (7) 

20 Cave food (3) 

24 Last Creek letter (5) 

25 Scorch (4) 

26 Desire (4) 

27 Squirrel's nest (4) 



SOLUTION TO NO 1082 
ACROSS: I Canvas 5 Thrown 8 Car 9 Ve- 
neer 10 Injury II Stun 12 Melchior 14 
Calmly l/Coyoie 19 Cape Town 22 
Scan 24 Fasten 25 Inmate 2b Can 27 Oc- 
tave 28Go-knn 

DOWN: 2 AJen 3 Vietnam 4 Scrumpy 5 
Trial OR^ah 7Wom-otn 13 Coo 15 Ara- 
maic 16 Lot 17 Cunning iSVashmak 3) 
Extra 21 Ounce 23 Altar 


flu? winners of prize com isr Ho 10*7 ara 

the Mrs ,»/. 7tii*' v. LvfieyDmv. H'rW Ella. Hull 
and Mr Kettn Hennqwx Ambassador Court . Cm- 
ren Terrace, mwt Uiwhui. 


SOLUTION TO NO 1077 (Iasi Saturday's prize concise) 

ACROSS: 1 Four Hundred 9 Infidel 10 Noise 11 Yet 13 Lira 16 
Nazi 17 Squirm 1 8. Amah 20 Shoe 21 Quince 22 Prow 23 
Taps 25SAS 28 Thigh 29Primero 38 Netherlands 
DOWN: 2 Offer 3 Ride 4 Ugly 5 Deni 6 Epitaph 
Pitt 8 Dcmi-pension 12 Errand 14 Ash 15 Lunula 
Set 24 Ahead 25 Shah 26 Spar 27 Viva 


7 Winiam 
19 Agonise 


20 


Name 

Address, 


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- »*s 









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ob' 

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cus 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 





THE WEEK AHEAD 



GALLERIES 


LATE CANVAS: Walter Sickert 

: his studio in 
9, Kent, fn his 79th 
year. An irascible man but a sensitive 
artist, he made his reputation as 
the leading British exponent of 
Impressionism. This exhibition of 
late portraits and theatrical paintings 
has been mounted in celebration 
of a series of lectures he gave to the 
Thanet School of Art and 
demonstrates his change of style in 


old.age. Ramsgate Library 
(ent(Q 


, Ramsgate, Kent (0843 
l), from today. 



DANCE 


OPERA 


CALIFORNIA SPLITS: Cynthia 
Harvey dances the Fonteyn role in 
the Royal Ballet's revival of 
Fredenck Ashton’s Symphonic 
Variations . Bom in California, 
Harvey is tali, bold and strong. She 
Pained at Balanchine's school in 
New York and danced for 12 years 
with American Ballet Theatre, 
where Baryshnikov, Bujones and 
Dowell were among her partners. 
Ashton's lyrical style will be the 
crucial test of how she matches 
her new company. Covent Garden 
(01-240 1066) tonight 


LOOPY LUCY: Suzanne Murphy 
liam Gaski 


kill's 


sings the title role in William 
production of Luda di 
Lammermoortonhe Welsh National 
Opera. The Limerick-bom 
soprano now has her home in Cardiff 
"because of her long-term 
association with the WNO. She made 
her debut in 1976 with Constanze 


in Entfurvngand more recently she 
' adiesofthe 


has taken to the mad ladies < 
bei canto repertoire: deranged Lucy 
follows a highly successful^lvira 
in PuritanL New Theatre Cardiff 
(0222 32446), tonight 


ANT A 


W f ... :*- m 

-x 


DELOC£ XI 



BOOKS 

FUTURE SHOOC& Brian Aldiss, 

genre, ^ 

Year Spree a history of science 
fiction that is empnessrvety 
comprehensive. He covers not only 
the literature, from Mary SheBey's 
Frankenstein to Frank Herbert but 

sd-fi’s contribution to the enema 
and the work of artists such as Alex 
Schomburg, whose cover for the 
American magazine, Fantastic, is 
reproduced above. The book is 


published on Monday by GoBancz 
(£15 hardback, £9.95 pap 


paperback). 




ROCK 

HIGH TEX: Billy Gibbons guides 
ZZ Top on the British leg of a tour 
which started in Louisiana last 
January, and which kept them in the 
American top ten of box office ^ gQ6 

TheTexans are continuing to 
enjoy the first flush of international 
popular acclaim after 1 6 years 
together, and this show draws on 
their considerable experience and 


surrealist wit. Tonight, Bing lev Hall, 
Ml); Mon, Tues, 


Stafford (0785 471 
Wed and Th 


9021234). 


iurs, Wembiey Arena (01 - 


FILMS 

MISSION TRIUMPHANT: AojMft 

Jotfe came to the dnww tow 
television and had an '•*** 
success with The Ktik 
new film. The Mission^Q ^m 
the surprise winner of the Gann f 
Palm at the Cannes Film Festal ; , 
Robert De Niro and Jeremy from 
star in Robert Bott? scrlgtof . ... 
Jesuits and colonials fighting for . 

supremacy in Scxjth America w . . . 

1750. Joffe directs with a fine eye for 
spectacle. Warner West End (Of- : ' 
439 0791), Screen on the Green (91- 
226 3520). From Friday. , . 


CONCERTS 


DEL MAR/LPO: .Norman del 
Mar conducts the LPO in 
Mendelssohn's Hebrides 
Overture, Handel's Royal 
Fireworks Music, Mozart's 
Symphony K 550, and Pascal 
Roge (piano) solos in 
Beethoven's "Emperor" 
Concerto. 

Barbican Centre, Silk Street 


London EC2^01 -628 8795. 


credit cards 01-638 8891). 
Tomorrow, 730pm. 

KirmENfnPPETT: The 
former's Spring Symphony 
and the latter's Symphony No 
4. David Atherton conducts. 
Royal Festival Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191, credit cards 01-928 
8800). Tomorrow, 730pm. 


BJANCHPS BEETHOVEN: 

Luigi Alberto Blanch! solos in 
Beethoven's Violin Concerto, 
James Lough ran conducts the 
LPO in Malcolm Arnold's Tam 
CfSfjantor Overture and 
Dvorak's Symphony No 6. 
Royal Festival Hall. Tues, 
7.30pm. 

PR ITC HARD/BBC SO: The 
BBC SO are conducted by Sir 
John Pritchard in Berlioz’s 
Les Francs- juges Overture, 
Tchaikovsky's "Manrifred" 
Symphony, and Hanna 
Schwarz sings in Henze's 
orche s tr a t i on of the Wagner 
WesendonckSeder. 

Royal Festival HaR. Wed, 

7.31 



• Anne-Sophie Mutter, the 
talented young violinist, plays 
the Bruch Concerto No 1 with 
die London Symphony Or- 
chestra under the baton of Sir 
Yehudi Menuhin. The pro- 
gramme also includes 
Vaughan WOfiams's TaUSs 
Fantasia and the **Enigni 
Variations by Elgar. 
Barbican Centre. Mon, 
7.45pm. 


THEATRE 


IN PREVIEW 


DAVE ALLEN LIVE: First West 
End appearance for five years 
by tiie popular comedian in a 
strictly one-man show. 

"Limited season" of 14 weeks. 
Albery (01-836 3878). Previews 
from Mon. Opens Oct 30. 


ULUAN: Frances de la Tour in 
William. Luce’s play, based on 
the autobiographical writings 
of Uflian Henman. Directed by 
Gorin Redgrave, this 
monodrama is having a series 
of previews "prior to a full 
West End run . 


OPENINGS 


BANGED UP: Comedy double 
bill by Tundelkoli, presented 
by Foco Novo. Roland Rees 
directs Trevor Laird and Tilly 
Vosburgh in Sou/ Night as 
childhood lovers who meet 
againyears later, and in Please 
and Thank You as a new social 
worker and his first suicidal, 
client 

Young Vic Studio (01 -928 
6363). From Mon. Press night 
wed. 


BREAKING THE CODE: Derek 
Jacobi as World War Two 
code-breaker Alan Turing, in a 
newi 


play by Hugh White more, 
id on a book by Andrew 
Hodges. Michael Gough, 
Joanna David, Isabel Dean and 


Dave Hill are the other 
principals: Clifford Williams 
directs. 


Theatre Royal, Haymarket (01- 
12). Previews today 


930 9832). I 

(matinee and evening), Mon. 
Opens Tues. 

GLORIOUS THINGS: Newly 
commissioned "Victorian" play 
try David Allen. Jeffery 
Ktssoon. John Moreno. 

Carolyn Jones and Sid 
Livingstone, directed by Ted 
Craig. 

Croydon Warehouse (01-680 
4060). Preview Thurs. Opens 
Fri. 


of the Dylan Thomas classic. 
Anthony Cornish directs a cast 
including Rachel Bell, Jeremy 
Blake. 

Greenwich (01-858 7755). 
Previews today (matinde and 
evening). Opens Mon. 


SELECTED 


ROOKERY NOOK: Tom 
Courtenay oddly though 
effectively cast in Ben 
Travers's classic farce. Ian 
Ogilvy, Peggy Mount and 
Lionel Jeffries pile on toe 
mayhem. 

Shaftesbury (01-379 5399). 

THE PETITION: Brian Clark s 
routine nuclear-debate script is 
enhanced by fine acting from 
John Mills and Rosemary 


Harris. Directed by Peter Hall. 
-8363028). 


Wyndhams (01 

THE HOSTAGE: Brendan 
Behan's burlesque of low-life 
Dublin in a robustly boisterous 
revivaL 

Tricycle (01-328 8626). 


OUT OF TOWN 


BOLTON: Operation Bad 
Apple: G. F. Newman's thriHer 
is a fictional account of an 
investigation into corruption in 
the Metropolitan Police, 


conducted b^a provincial 


force. John Adams directs. 
Octagon (0204 20661). Until 
Novi. 


KIRKCALDY: What Every 
Woman Knows: Tom Fleming 
directs Una McLean, Maureen 
Beattie, Benny Young in the 
Scottish Theatre Company's 
first ever J. M. Barrie play. 

First stop on tour. 

Adam Smith Theatre (0592 
260498). Opens Tues. Until Oct 
25. 


UNDER MILK WOOD; First 
London revival formany years 


LIVERPOOL: Gangster 
Show: Bertolt Brecht's The 
Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui. 

feorqe Tabori, 
directed tty Han Duijvendak, 
with Fidelis Morgan as Ui and 
music by Paddy Cunneen. 
Everyman (051-709 4776). Until 
Nov 15. 

MANCHESTER: Edward II: Ian 
McDiarmid m the title role of 
Christopher Marlowe's play. 


directed by Nicholas H 
Exch 


lange (061 -i 
l). Preview Wed. Opens 
Thurs. 


FILMS 


OPENINGS 


LEGAL EAGLES (PG): 
Sophisticated comedy with 
slapstick trimmings from the 
director of Ghosmusters, Ivan 
Reitman, with Robert Redtord 
and Debra Winger as two 


ng i 

case involving New York's 


Mng n 

smart art world. 

Plaza (01-437 1234). From Fri. 


girl, married to toe local 
vicar, is seduced by the 
squire. Powell and 
Pressburger’s 1950 film draws 
out the tosh in Mary Webb's 
novel, but bathes the action in 
visual splendour — accurately 
caught in this new print. 


restored by the National Rm 
ive. VWi 


Archive. With Jennifer Jones, 
David Farrar, Cyril Cusack. 
Electric Screen (01-229 3694). 
From Fri. 


PARTING GLANCES (15): 24 
hours in the lives of New 
York's gay yuppies: written, 
edited and (Erected with 
realism, ease and skill by 
debuting director Oil : 
Sherwood. With Richard 
Ganoung, John Bolger, Steve 
Buscemi. 

Screen on the Hid (01-435 
3366). From Fri. 

LATINO (18): Cameraman- 
director HaskeH Wexler’s first 
fictional feature since Medium 
Cool in 1970 - a pro- 
Sandinista drama following 
the fortunes of an American 
adviser to the Nicaraguan 
Contras, shot in Nicaragua 
during 1984. 

ICA Qnema (01-930 3647). 
Fran Fri. 


SELECTED 


MEN (15): Ebullient and 
perceptive comedy from the 
young German film-maker 
Doris Dbrrte, with Heiner 
Lauterbach as the macho 
husband who takes up 
residence with his wife's new 
lover. 


JAZZ 


McCOY TYNER: His work 
with John Cottrane’s classic 
quartet of toe early 1 960s 
influenced countless pianists. 
Next week he shares the 
bill with a group representing 
the young generation of 
British jazz musicians. 
Tonight and Mon-Sat, 

Ronnie Scott's Club, 47 Frith 
Street, London W1 (01-439 
0747). 


LOOSE TUBES: Django 
erry, Dav 


Bates, Steve Berry, Dave 
DeFries. lain Ballamy, and 
17 other young Turks make up 
an orchestra bursting with 
ideas. Unmissable. 

Tonight Gardner Arts 


Centre, Brighton (0273 68586); 
iw. Triangle Arts 


tomorrow. 

Centre, Birmingham (021 359 
3979); Wed, Octagon, 

Sheffield (9742 24076); Thurs, 
Trades Club, Leeds (0532 
620629); Fri. Dunelm Ballroom, 
Durham (0385 43720). 


LESTER BOWIE: Best 
known as the trumpeter with 
the Art Ensemble of 
Chicago. Bowie leads an 
ensemble featuring eight 
brass players and one 
drummer, specializing in 
ironic versions of suer early 
rock ’n' roll favourites as 
Fats Domino's "Blueberry Hill' 
Thurs, Town and Country 
Club, 9-17 Highgate Road, 
London NW5 (01-267 3334). 


FILMS ON TV 


WAY DOWN EAST (1920): 

D. W. Griffith's classic 
marker with Lillian Gish 
as the hapless country girt 
saved from a fete worse 
than death (BBC2, today, 2.10- 
4.15pm). 


I MARRIED A WITCH 

(1942): Fredric March and 
Veronica Lake in Rene 
Clair’s dazzling comic fantasy 
(Channel 4, Wed, 2.30- 4pm). 

THE TALL T (1957): Fine, 


spare Western uniting the 
>h Scott 


talents of Randolph: 
and director Budd Boettcher 
(BBC2. Wed, 6-7.15pm). 


IT ALWAYS RAINS ON 
SUNDAY (1947): Googie 
Withers sheltering old flame 
John McCallum from the law in 
Robert Hamer's slice of 
East End life (Channel 4, 
tomorrow, 10.20pm- 
12JJ5am). 


LOOKING FOR MR 
GOOOBAR (1977): The double 
life of Diane Keaton, 


teaching deaf children by day 
and seek 


mg casual pick- 
ups by night (BBC2, tomorrow, 
10.25pm-12J35am). 



KAREL APPEL: Major show 
by important post war artist 


Amottni GaBery, Narrow 
Quay, Bristol (0272 


Fran today. 


299191). 


SUSAN HILLER: 
Con te mporary artist 
investigating the theme of self 
portrait to powerful effect 
ICA. The Mall. London SW1 
(01-930 3647). From Mon. 

IAN MCKEEVER: Dramatic 
landscape pictures combining 
photography with caIBgraphy. 
Nigel Greenwood GaBery. 4 
New Burfington Street . 
London W1 (01-434 3795). 
From today. 


• Freddie Jones in Federico 
Fellini's 1983 film. And tie 
Ship Soils On (BBC2, today, 
9.25-1 1.30pm), a symbolic 
fantasy built round a disparate 
group of passengers on a 
loxnry liner. It shares a double 
bill with Lights of Variety 
(ll.30pm-l.lOam), a mordant 
look at the world of vaudeville 
which marked Fellini's direct- 
ing debut in 1950. The films 
launch a BBC2 Fellini season. 


GALLERIES 


OPENINGS 


VERUSCHKA: Exhibition by 
1960s modeRumed-artist 
consisting of photographs of 
he- own body, skilfully painted 
to blend in with backgrounds 
like greenery and brick walls. 
Anne Berthoud Gallery, 10 
Clifford Street, London W1 
(01-437 1645). Fran Wed. 


HENRI GOETZ: Fifty years of 
paintings and prints by the 
renowned French artist who, 
.at 75, has progre s sed through 
numerous stages of 
development inducting 
Surreafism. 

Crawshaw Gaflery, 229 
Westboume Grow, London 
W11 (01-229 6606). From 
Mon. 


FIGURATION TO 
ABSTRACTION: Show 
representing taring (Riley; 
Caro), but mostly dead artists 
of the 20th century (Mondrian, 


Annety Jbda Fine Art 11 
Tottenham Mews. London W1 
(01-637 5517). From today. 

PJ CROOK: Subtitled The 
Grand Illusion", fantasy 


Portal Gallery, 16a i 
Street London W1 (01-493 
0706). From Tues. 


SELECTED 


PAINTING IN SCOTLAND: 
Painters of the Scottish 


Enlighte nm e nt including 
Ramsay, Raeburn and Wflkie. 


Tate GaBery, MiHbank, London 
(01-821 " “ 


SW1 (01-821 1313). 

NEW ARCHITECTURE: A 
world where the British 
architects Foster, Rogers and 
Stilling's dreams come true, 
mainly in miniature but 
so me tim e s fun scale. 

Royal i 

London W1 (01-734 i 


DANCE 


NORTHERN BALLET 
THEATRE: A coup this week: 
the first baKA company to 


appear at Gtyndeboume. The 
occasion is toe opening of a 


opening 
new Swan Lake, produced by 
Andrd Prokovsky. Princess 
Margaret attends the gala 
premiere Tues; further 
evening performances until 
Oct 25, with matindes Oct 2S. 
26. 

Festival Opera Theatre. 
Gtyndeboume (0273 812411). 

GULBENKIAN BALLET: From 
Lisbon, returning to London 
tor one week, from Tues. with 
two pro gr am m es of works by 
Christopher Bruce. Louis 
Falco and Hans van Manen. 
SaJder's Weis (01-278 8916). 


DANCE UMBRELLA: 

Highlights.tois week are a 
French company, CTO-Ange, 
Wed. Thurs at Riverside (01- 
748 3354); American solists 
Tun Miller (Mon-Wed) and 
Dana Reitz (Wed, Thurs at 
Amotfini, Bnstofc Fri. Oct 25 at 
ICA). Full season details on 
01-7414040. 


Michael Ignanett . Helena 
Kennedy, Jutiet MitcheU, 
Michael Neve and Roger 
Scruton discuss sexual 
morality. BBC2, tomorrow, 
5-50-6.30pm. 

GOOD AS GOLD: Brian 
Finch's play about the agonies 
of a 14-year-old swimmer 
(played by a TV newcomer. 
Jane Morris) as she is 
pushed to the timit by an 
ambitious coach (David 
CakJer). BBC2, tomorrow. 
9.05-1 0.25pm. 

EXECUTIVE STRESS: 
Geoffrey Palmer and Penelope 
Keith lead George Layton's 
new sitcom about a successful 
publisher whose wife wants 
to make her own career. ITV, 
Mon, 8-8.30pm. 

CRY HUNGARY: The 
abortive revolution of October 
1956 recaBed by those in 
toe thick of it BBC1. Wed, 
9.35-1 0.50pm. 


RADIO 


ON TOUR: S atfierfe We&S 
Royal BaDet opens its autumn 
tour at the Empire, 

Sunderland (0783-42517) with 
Swan Lake. London Festival 
Batiet is at the New Theatre, 
HuB (0482 23638) today and 
the Palace. Manchester (061 
236 9922) Mon-Oct 25 with 
VpeSa. Progra mme s of 
xiem works are given ' 
Buffet Rambert at 


Oxford (0865 244544) today. 

ith (0(752 


and the Royal, Plymouth 
669595) Tues-Oct 25. 


RADIO TIMES COMEDY 
PARADE: The best entries 
from a competition to find 
new comedy writers. You Start 
-ra Join fn, about two dub 
musicians, is by David Bond 
and Paul Hawksbee. Radio 
4, today. 11 .30pm-midnighL 

ABERFAN: Vincent Kane, 
who reported the Welsh coaitip 
disaster 20 years ago, 
returns to the area and 
discovers that the 
psychological wounds have 
stilt not healed. Radio 4, 
Tues.8.30-9pm. 


TELEVISION 


FROM EAST TO WEST: 
Four-part series on the impact 
of the Orient on European 
music, presented by Simon 
Rattle and the City of 
Birmingham Symphony . 
Orc h estra. BBC2, today. 
8.25-9-25pm. 



* 





THINKING ALOUD: Return 
of the cerebral chat show 
under new chairman. 


imrTitMleNtiM 






• Phil Edmonds, articulate, 
intelligent and outspoken, has 
often been a dissenting voice in 
modern cricket In a pro- 
gramme recorded before be set 
off with the England team for 
Australia, he talks to Michael 
Parkinson about a controver- 
sial career os and off the field 
and chooses favourite music. 
Desert Island Dues, Radio 4, 
tomorrow, 12.15-12J55pm. 

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS 
WELL: Shakespeare's teasing 
comedy, in a new 
production by Martin Jenkins. 
Impressive cast includes 
Barbara Jefford, Bernard 
Hepton, Maureen O’Brien 
and Alfred Burke. Radio 3, Fri, 
7.30-9 .45pm. 


OPERA 


A funny thing happened on the way to the music-hall: Laurence Olivier, left, and Brian Glover in Lost Empires 


Variety behind the scenes 


Chelsea (01-351 3742). Renoir 
■8402). 


(01-837 


ALPINE FIRE C18): The 
bizarre, intense story of an 
isolated Alpine family, directed 
by Fredi Murer - a key figure 
in Swiss cinema's 


renaissance. 

Everyman (01-435 1525), until 
Thurs. 

i 


T hat novel of the pre-1914 
variety stage. Losi Empires by 
J. B. Priestley, was a certainty 
for screen adaptation the mo- 
ment the final word was penned. The 
only surprise is that it has taken 20 
years. The rights were bought originally 
by the producer. Victor Savjlle. and a 
movie starring Tom Courtenay was 
announced in the late 1960s. Saviile 
died and the rights passed to another 
producer. John Woolf, but still no film. 

Then the late Cecil Bernstein, whose 
own family was steeped in the variety 
theatre, took a shine to the novel and 
bought it for Granada Television. That 
was some seven years ago. The delay 
now was partly because a rival com- 
pany, Yorkshire, had lined up its own 
Priestley adaptation. The Good 
Companions. 


The other consideration was cost. 
Occupying eight hours of screen time 
and with a huge cast Lost Empires was 
going to be an undertaking on the scale 
of Granada's previous excursions into 
the prestige series. Bridcshead Revisited 
and The Jewel in the Crown. In the 


evenL Priestley's saga will see very little 
change from £4 million. 

In bringing it to the screen, the writer 
Ian Curteis (he of the shelved BBC 
Falklands play) made one significant 
alteration. Priestley's prologue takes 
place in the present day. Curteis has set 
his in the trenches of the First World 
War. It is a valid switch, emphasizing 
that more than just the empires of 
variety were lost when battle was joined 
in 1914. 

“The golden age has gone. lad," Uncle 
Nick, the illusionist, tells his young 
nephew. Richard Hemcaslie. “We're 
slithering into a bog. slithering fast and 
no one's stopping us.” 

The producer. June Howson. calls 
Lost Empires “sheer entertainment”. 
Out goes the gritty realism of cobbled 
streets and men in vests. This is a gaudy, 
flamboyant, romantic world, even if it is 
built on make-believe. Much of the 
pleasure of the series is derived from the 
recreation of period not least through 
the halls that do survive, like the Grand 
in Blackpool and the Palace in 
Manchester. 

The task of glueing ihe show together. 


since he is rarely offscreen, fails to 
Colin Firth whose best-known tele- 
vision role to date was in William 
Boyd's Dutch Giris. He plays 
Hemcastle. the aspiring painter who 
joins his uncle's act and has his 
innocence shattered by back-stage jeal- 
ousies and a trio of pretty women. 

Tommy Beamish, billed "the funniest 
man in England”, is splendidly por- 
trayed by Brian Glover. Since Priestley 
does not describe Beamish's routine. 
Glover had to invent one. His mentors 
were chums from the Water Rats and a 


ENGUSH NATIONAL OPERA: 
Jonathan Miller's stylish 1920s 
fentasw Mikado (tonight and 
Fn at 7 -30pm). On Thurs at 
7.30pm. Graham Vick's 
handsome and thoughtful 
Madam Butterfly; Wed and 
Oa 25 at 7pm, Copley's kitsch 
Aura. 

Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 
GLYNDEBOURNE TOURING 
OPERA: The company's tour 
reaches Oxford this week. On 
Tues and Thurs at 7.30pm 
Peter Hall's Simon 
Boccanegra; on Wed and Fri 
at 7pm. Oon Giovanni: and on 
Oct25 at 7pm a single 
performance of Britten's 
ABjert Herring. 

ApoHoTheatre, Oxford (0865 


leading stand-up comic of today, the ///- 
De-Hi! star. Paul Shane. 


While Beamish is at his bill-topping 
peak, another comic is on the skids, 
each pathetic performance greeted by 
boos and missiles. The tragic Harry 
G. Bunard. “eccentric comedian”, in- 

S ires a brilliant cameo from Laurence 
livier that recalls his previous study of 
a music-hall failure. Archie Rice. 


Peter Waymark 


Lost Empires starts on FTV on Friday 
(830-1 0.30pm) y 



First stop on 
the autumn tour is 
Nottingham: their new 
production of Berlioz's The 
Capture of Troy is conducted 
by David Uoyd-Jones on 
Thurs and Oct 25 with Knstme 
Ci^insw and Ronald Hamilton 
leading the cast. A angle 
performance of Madam 
Butterfly on Tues: and the 
rumbustious Giles Havemel 
production of The Barberof 
SeveiHe oh Wed and Fn. All 
Peftormances start at 7.15pm. 

NotSnsham 

KpfT OPERA: At 
Northampton this week, with 
their new Carmen on Tues 
and Oct 25; Marriage of 
ngaro on Thurs and Fri; and 
Monteverdi's The Corona Iran 
of Poppea on Wed. All 
performances start at 7pm 
gemmate. Northampton (0604 


ROCK 


THE ROBERT CftAYBANBc 
.Two years ago huwm ;■£' 
struggling to tifl Dtogwuflaj? 
now mis exception* Uuift 


guitarist embarks on ffo . .« J 

first major British tour, •/*'. 


..... major British tour, * 
Tomorrow, Unwerstty cl r 
East Anglia. NorWfch fOdBS 
505401): Mon, The Studio, 
Bristol (027227619$; Ttws 
and Thurs. Ha mm tosmgt ■ 
Palais. London W&SH-TM 
2812); Wed. Rock C% - : 
Nottingham (0602412644k Fri. 


(060241264 
Burning ham Qdaon (021 



6101). 


HUEY LEWIS AND THE 
NEWS: Though his vtiacu 
have become increasingly 
banal. Lewis is no siouat when 
it comes to ptoyfeg good 
time rock ‘n roi. 

Tomorrow. Mon, Tues end 
Wed. Hammersmfili i 
London W6 (01 -748< 

Fri. Manchester Apollo 1 
2736921). 

UB40: Laundered regga* 
and a polite skank from the . 
Birmingham octet 
Tues and Wad. Edinburgh 
Playhouse (031 557 259&fc Fri. 
Bmwtamk Glasgow (041 
55224601). 






IjOPl'l AK 



I 


P 


I’iiil if AIL’ 

oiu in sr 


THE STRANGLERS: Their 
reputation bates the 
mefiifiuous soft-rock now 
favoured by the men m black. 
Thurs. The CapitoL 
Aberdeen (0224 563141); Fri, 
Edinburgh Playhouse (031 
557 2590). 


: >V:\ H * i n \f 


BOOKINGS 


r ! rl 1 
• ■•••••• f'JtU) 


FIRST CHANCE 


ROYAL OPERA: Postal 
booking open for December . 
performances of Da 
Zauberftote, Samson, end 
Lucia di Lammermoor. 
Phone/personal booking from 
Nov 4. 

Royal Opera House. Covent 
Garden, PO Box 6. London 
WC2 (01-240 1066, 01-240 
1911). 


v J A 




'•••• ' ■ i. i 


ROYAL BALLET: Postal 
booking open for The 
Nutcracker and triple bill 
including David Bintley's 
Young Apollo, and world 
premiere of new Wayne 
Eagling bafiet Dec 2-Jan 3. 
Phone/personal booking from 
Nov 4. 

Royal Opera House, Covent 
Garden. PO Box 6. London 
WC2 (01-240 1066, 01-240 
1911). 

AVON POETRY FESTIVAL: 


* *-£ 


I;.,-'. ... 

V \ . . 

• ' : ' •' ^ ' 




• cjoniu (WWlUfllOOl . . 

poetry reading with surprise 
celebrities in aid of chantyt 
Nov 1-30. 

Festival Office, Clifton Library, 
Pnnasss Victoria Street. Brisk 
(0272 744888). 

GWYL LLANELLI FESTIVAL: 
Booking open for 8th festival. 
wto performances by Roth - 
String Quartet Humphrey •••' 
Lyttelton Band, and piano : 
recital by John Bingham. Nov 
&-15. . . 

Theatr EBi. Station Road, 
Uanelti (0564 774057). 


%“■■■<• • 

I. 

V V .... 


* v » 

v ■ »m\ 


^ Hi 


LAST CHANCE 


CANTERBtWYRESTIVAL' - 
Ends today with Motfere'a The 
Miser ax Marlowe Theatre with 
Warren Mitehefl and FeoeBa., 

Flawing; concert by 

Reims and 

Beat ' - 


'*■ \\ ... ” 1 •=-- ’nr.- 


Forwood Bboklngs.S? 

^wt, Canterbury (0227 

455600). 

SWANSEA FESTIVAL: finds 
ton Wit with concert of Haydn 
and Sibehus tty PMhafmQRle 
under conductor Esa-Pekka. 
Salonen. 

BrangwyriHaa. Civic V 
information Centre, Singleton 
Street. Swansea (0792 : - 
4 6832n: * ... 


. ^ .. , 

V T .f, :| l \ lKO 

C -• , ;; ■ 


• ; : v *; 
— 1 ^ 


' U ..s 

-r. - 


For ticket aiailttbiL., 
performance and epee 
times, telephone the - 
numbers listed. Bookings 
Aoue WhitebMSfc 
Concerts: Max Hantac. 

Dance: John Perdvak 
Films: Geoff BrawK Fites 
on TV: Peter Waymark: 
Galleries: Sarah Jaoe v 
Chackland: Jazz Rkterd 
Williams: Opera: Ifltey 
Find; Radio: Peter ' 
Way mark; Rode Duvid 
Shtclain Teicnsfoa: 
Waymark; TiicaireTony 
Patrick and Marti® . - 

Oower ' 

— ' v 

' ■ • - -'isS, 


/ 


R 




\ t 


. 1 4 

v .4 




TOE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1 986 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


BANK CENTRE 


ifoifemeaf from «r overside wefe 1®J V aa 


A .(. fit,'.. 



J|S2 BARBICAN HALL 

B 3arbican Centre, Silk St, EC2Y 80S 
01-638 8691 / 628 8795 
Telephone Bookings luarn-8pm 7 days a week 







* * 


KAYMUIND tiUBBAY presents 
at (be BARBICAN 

© TOMORROW at 130 p.m. 

Mendelssohn ..HEBRIDES OVERTURE 
Handel — ROYAL FIREWORKS MUSIC 
Beethoven ...PLANO CONCERTO No. 5 
(EMPEROR) 

- Mo*art~...~.. SYMPHONY No. 40 

LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Coodmor NORMAN DEL MAS PASCAL ROGE puao 
1150. £6. SO. A. £9 .SO. £13 W. rJIsO 


TUESDAY NEXT 21 OCTOBER ai 145 p.m. 

GERSHWIN EVENING 

An America*! in Paris, Rhapsody in Bloc, 

I Go< Rhythm Variations. 

Pore? and Bcv Symphonic Picture 


mm 


it' v i>!itnn 


mm. 











PWcFfanewd) 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

RAYMO ND CR JK&CT {wean 

TONIGHT at 130 p jo. 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

P*“ fai ~= BARBER OF SEVILLE OVERTURE 

•Ifik j; Snmw II BLUE DA NUBE W ALTZ 

I/M i Tdaawifcy -. PIANO CONCERTO No. I 

ij^SO e^^pompandotcum^a^x^^ct^i 

*** cl BOLERO 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
Coodonor MICHAEL LLOYD PHILIP FOWKE pans I 
t£5,itt-5(L£lL £9-50, £10.50,01 JO Hill 01928 3191 CC. DI-92K 8800 




P PSS3±SS^55 1ZZZ5ZZ ESZ 


LONDON SYMPHONY 




Sunday 26 October 7 JO pm 

JOSE FEGHALI 

piano 

Winner Van CUbumlraematiormlPiamCompednon 1985 
WEBER Overture ‘Der Ftetschutz' 

MOZART Piano Concerto No 23, K488 

BEETHOVEN ttti Symphony No 5 

CLAUS PETER FLOR Conductor 
£1150, £10 JO, £8 JO, £6-50, £5. £3 JO 


, toj n -yyTnRpM i _ 


ppp35SS252a 

la r^g 

i. .i i B . 

KL 




3S *"3M0*£ STRUCT »••*•: 

vj « iv.'i ; i.-.v iv.vf 
=0.1 or.-ice O! sjs mhuso t;sr i j 


WICMORE HALL 


ISO 


s ys B iiM 

■■SilSi H ,£ ifflt it \ ILjLg jg 


cf 


PHILHARMONIA 

ORCHESTRA 



Sonata m F Uurp minor Oix 2 

Soraa m A iwur idO; Choate BhckoW m F jimp Op. CD 
£4. EL 13 Crmim Mcl finen 




Principal Conductor: Giuseppe Smopoli 
Principal Guest Coed: Esa-Pekka Salonen 

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN 

- conducts ’■ • • ~ - 

Thursday Next '23 October at 7 30 

JOHN LILL 
ELECTRIC PHOENIX 

Berio: Smfaoia 
Grieg: Piano Concerto 
. Debussy: La Mer 

Sunday Next 26 October at 730 

JOHN WALLACE 

Haydn: Symphony No. 99 
Haydn Trumpet Concerto 
Sibelius: Four Lemnuokfimen Legends 

Sponsored by NISSAN UK LIMITED 


IjooSEw 


RAYMOND GOBBAY presents 

MONDAY 27 OCTOBER at 230 pjn. 

® H jw»rL ARRIVAL OTtHEQPEEN OF SHEBA 

Beeh.— BRANDENBURG CONCERTO No. 3 
Moam. PIANO CONCERTO No. 21, K«7 

Vivaldi .. THE FOUR SEASONS 
ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 

Coadmor PHDUDP LEDGER 

JOSE LUIS GARCIA violin STEVHNUBGROOTEjwoo 1 

rL«,ij.Jo.iB.o.so.tio.«».£»» M moi-rasw ccpi-wwng 1 



Thasday 30 October 745 pn 

EVGHENI KRUCTIEVSKI 

phoo 

Winner Geneva Imemanonal ferformen Competition 1986 

VERDI — Oyerture ‘1 Vespri Sicflianf 

RACHMANINOV Piano Concern} No 2 

SHOSTAKOVICH .... Symphony No 5 

MARISS YANSONS conductor 
Sponsored by Patek Philippe 
£10 JO, £830. £630. £5, £330 ONLY 


FRIDAY 7 NOVEMBER ai 245 p.m. 

MUSIC FROM THE MOVIES 

Them from the Screen me. There Eagles Dux; E-Li 
Ramdiops Keep falhnt on My Heal; Wjnan Gmctftn, 
Those MapuAon Men m Thor FIrmp Machines: Slat 
Vm; 613 Squadron: Zorta'i Dance; Colonel Bogey limn 
Bndge on Use Rirer Kwm Mwmlirtn Serenade fawn The 
Glenn Miller Store. The Danshuiien' March. 


\ * < J v> *T>T vf ♦‘.Oil * 1 ' J : f 40 » i 


Rl»*VlCTOR HOCHHAUSER presents at (he RFH 
r# ®“ SATURDAY hn NOVEMBER at 7.30 

GRAND OPERA NIGHT 

ftopiaramc indudev Widnni TcH ChTnuic.Cham nl I he Hctm M»a 
itum Nabuciaa. Duel from ibe Pearl Faibm. buermeaze inn Cnallmi 
RiiMnanj. firiad Cbona from Ault. Winiua Dan;ei anJ 
ARIAS A CHORUSES Irani Don (umnm, Li Tm on, Bartm ul Senile, 
M a rtam Buuerflv. Fuol.et. 

NKTIONALSYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CnaduciaNr GRAHAM S.SSH 
FANFARE TRUMPETERS HUSH GUARDS 
John Bale a GraJuna Noh Qnbi 
Snpnnn MARILYN HSU SMITH 
Tbhh ADRIAN MARTIN Baritone STEWART BUCHANAN 
fl. H <h.sn. in. •« Sl«. £10 AdlmmHallOl 0» M'llV^omV 


VICTOR HOTtlH AUhER in avsur. nuh ANGUl-AI STKl.W 
NIK Im PRLSENTw lhpRO\ALFKSTI\.VLH VU. 

SL'N DW AF TERNOON 9th NOV ai 3. IS 

VIENNA BOYS m | 
CHOIR *3* 

Sacred and KraUrmink UwL wrh h> MOZART. 
SCHUBERT. ELGAR. 

JOHANN STRAUSS; VIENNESE L1EDER. 

Waltzes and Polhai and ihc Oar-Act comic Opera 
‘TALES FROM THE VIENNA WOODS' 
performed in foD ceumt. 

Li iR>.i:4.Ml.£S Nl. t7.l». ID.IHJ. £l 00 tratb Hall OJh .»M-0iS S.H.W 
NEXT CONCERT SdGMl' M NOVEMBER uLU MRAL FtSTOALKAU. 


VICTOR HUCHHM'SEliKaviar. «uh1heNMIprr>na luhr 
BARBICAN 

FRIDAY 14th NOVEMBER at 7.45 

BACH - HAYDN - 
VIVALDI 

BACH: Brandenburg Concerto, No 3 , 

Air on the G Soring ■ Solaui john Wallace i 
HAYDN: Trumpet Concerto 
VIVALDI: THE FOUR SEASONS 
NATIONAL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Dimtor/nohn MANOIIG PARJXIAN 
L\ t»«. L~. US, W. tV.so.Illl <41 imm HiUUl^W Wl. nil e;«r. 




Satnnbry 1 November 745 pm 

IDAHAENDEL 


MOZART ^Overture The Marriageof Figaro' 

BEETHOVEN. Violin Concerto inD 

TCHAIKOVSKY ^..^mphony No4 

YURI AHRONOVTTCH 

ronrtnraor 

£12JO,X10 30, £8J0,£6 30. £5, £330 


Box Office TO. 10-8 every d 
01-638 8891/628 


FAIRFIELD HALL CROYDON 

BOX OFF1CB01488 9291 CREDITPHONE 01-660 5955 

Wednesday 29 October 8d00 pm 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

SIR CHARLES GROVES 
BARBARA GORZYNSKA Viotin 



ROSSINI 

BEETHOVEN 

STRAUSS 

DVORAK 

MUSSORGSKY 


Oienure. •TbeBartwofSevad’ 
Vafin CoDxnoin D 
Don Juan 

Noanroe for Staap 
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CONCERT | | 

CLASSICS 

BarMcan Centre - next Friday 

.Mendelssohn : Hebrides Overture 
Fa are Pavane 

Chopin : -Piano Coocerto No. 2 

with CECDLE OUSSET 

Mozart : Symphony No. 41 ‘Jupiter 1 

City of London Sonfooia, 
conducted by Richard Hickox 

S yon aoi ul by Jphp Lalng Co niiruc l i an Limned 

Rill death m Bnowap pmcl 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


VAN WALSUM MANAGEMENT paem 

TOMORROW at 7.15 pm 

STOCKH OLM SI NFONIETTA 
GRANT LLEWELLYN conductor 
^^BERNARD EFASCOU piano 

MOZART: Piaiio Concerto In F K459 
ul HAYDN: Symphony No. S3 ‘The Hen' 
worin by COPLAND and WIREN, ter panel lordetaih 


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MONDAY NEXT 30 OCTOBER ai 7.45 (un. 

A PROGRAMME OF LISZT AND SAINT-5AENS 



BRODSKY STRING QUARTET ) **** gai. CARTER LARSEN 


msrnareBaa . Wnkeaday 2W» October k 7J0 pan. 

MOZAKn Qunn n D ROT; BRITTEN: Qum No 2 op 3h( 
_____ SCHUMANN: Quartet m A op 41 

£4X,£Un,£M)0,£ZaQ . B« Offim 01^935 2MI 


RAYMOND GUBBAYpraenn 
FRIDAY 31 OCTOBER at 230 pj n. 

— Mendelssohn ^HEBRIDES OVERTURE 

sSSSt!^ SYMPHONY No. 8 

(l. M (UNFINISHED) 

I Tchaikovsky PIANO CONCERTO No. 1 ?Mm 

TUSP SSKSou:. SYMPHONY No. 5 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

r«^mr IAMBS fUPO HOWARD SHELLEY pte» 

rt ,n.IE 5O .a.ffl30.m50.DIJIl MOIWIW GCm-MSBW 

MO PR 

SUNDAY 2 NOVEMBER ac 7 JO pJn- 

f'MI The Bach Choir _ «•- 

iHflfSvtnphonyof Psalms. - - - Stravinsky 

Excerpts from ‘Boris Godimo^ Mussorgsky 7J0pm 

SIR DAVID WILLCOCKS conductor 

^^{ar^T H H 


Saturday 1 November 8J)0 pm 

ROYAL PHILHA RMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

' SIR YEHUDI MENUHIN 
JUSTUS FRANTZ Piano 

HANSEL Mmk for the Bojrf Ftawotta 

GRIEG P*no Ctaoecnn n A Minor 

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS A London Symphony 


RAYMOND GUBBAYpraeatii 


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Marche Slave; Swan Lake Sui te; 

|f«BI Kano Concerto No. 1; Nwtcracker Suite; 

l£Sf I8t2 Overture 

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Wbl«n Hall. London i» J ^- 

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Ma nagrrnm c HELEN JENNINGS CONCERT AGENCY 


Tooday Non 31 Ociubcr at 7.15 pm 

To celebrate the 65th birthday of 

MALCOLM ARNOLD 

JULIAN BREAM gahar RICHARD ADENEY flute 
RAYMOND LEPPARDand MALCOLM ARNOLDcouds 
The Fanfare Trumpeters of The Ri^al Military 
School of Music, KndDer Hall 
(conducted bv Lx-Col Duncan Beat) 
ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Malcolm Arnold 

Guitar Concerto (conducted by the composer) 

Flute Concerto No- 2 Stnfonietxa No. ) 
Pro emni ig also i nd nd e t ftnfar c 'Royal OccNtaa' ukl 
RnlrifK F tnfttfia pan. on pndDinabit 
Tjctco. £330. £4 JO. £530, /bid. iTSO 
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OLD VK 9?H 7olb ii M.I IKM - 

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THE WOMEN 


ST. JOHN’S, Smith Square 
. FRIDAY 31 October at 7 JO pm 

MAURICE GENDRON 

J.S. Bach Suites for solo cello 

No.2-ixi D nunot; No. 1 in G; No. 3 is C 

fih DM, & Sc Iofan\ Smith Squte. SKIP ]HA01'222-H»1 

(jPPffP ^M^^vnrjaiif^ray 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

TUESDAY NEXT. 21ST OCTOBER AT 739 pan. 

LUIGI ALBERTO BIANCHI 

The rebdcn of Ytn ami _ wrin p »■ inatr eang bom tfcc nmaje." 
S. PETTIT T The Tiari IK2 

Umm PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

JAMES LOUGHRAN, Conductor 
BEETHOVEN; eweem fa D 

ARNOLD: Onmet, Tam 0 'Stouter 
DVORAK: Symphony No. i 

hw md In Smd> A SaMda Campmy PLC 

Tdica iLsaTZue, hue. use, lux ba bw ooSh w* u»D 

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1 




THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 



SPORTS 

DIARY 


Simon Barnes 

Maiden in 
distress 

Could the end of the maiden over 
be in sight? Indeed, is the over 
itself under statistical threat? Bill 
Frindall. the indefatigable re- 
corder of profit and loss in the 
game, has suggested that the 
maiden be run-out of the cricket 
averages. One reason is that 
accurate figures for maidens are 
notoriously difficult to achieve; 
another that the maiden itself was 
redefined a couple of years back, 
when wides and no balls were set 
against the bowler's account. Be- 
fore. if was possible to bowl six no- 
balls in an over, and still have a 
maiden provided your six legiti- 
mate deliveries were all scoreless. 
Figures for maiden overs are no 
longer comparable over any length 
of times. 

By logical extension. Frindall 
argues that the statistic for overs is 
also misleading so far as averages 
are concerned. The eight-ball over 
makes any historic comparison 
problematic; Australia had the 
eight-bail over from 1918 to 1979 
but in Britain it was adopted for 
one year only — 1939 — and was 
not reintroduced. Going further 
back, in 1744 the over was four 
balls and five from 1889, giving 
way to six in 1 900. Furthermore, 
with wides and no-balls, the 
number of deliveries in an over 
regularly tops six — Gladstone 
Small once bowled an 18-bali 
over, with 1 1 no-balls and a wide. 
Frindall suggests that the only 
sensible reckoning of a bowler's 
output is the number of balls. 

Tie break 

Geoff Brown, president of the 
Lawn Tennis Association, used to 
have 32 ties, but now has only 14. 
Not unusual, except that all 14 are 
identical. Brown has such fond 
memories of University College 
School. Hampstead, that he 
refuses to wear anything about his 
neck but his okl school tie. When 
his relatives buy him ties fbr 
Christmas, as relatives will, they 
always buy him yet another school 
tie. Brown was once persuaded to 
put on an -All England Club tie for 
a special occasion. But it was only 
a temporary aberration. All in all. 
Brown's ties are unquestionably 
the most consistent thing in 
British tennis. 


BARRY FANTONI 



■I see they’re still kept the 
Bir mingham road map' 


Bow wave 

Harold Cud mo re, skipper of the 
British effort in the America’s 
Cup. is becoming famous for his 
rants. The other day, appalled by 
sloppy crew-work in White 
Crusader’s bow at a moment of 
crisis, he turned on the man 
nearest to him at the blunt end of 
the boat, and kicked him vig- 
orously up the backside. "What 
was that for?" “Pass it on — just 
pass it on," Cadmore said. 

Bounder 

The Italian effort in the America's 
Cup has not been without colour. 
Two of the Italia's crew recently 
ran down a kangaroo in the 
outback. Having a somewhat odd 
sense of humour, they decided to 
dress the dead animal in one of 
their Gucci-style blazers and pose 
alongside the corpse for photo- 
graphs. But as they pointed their 
camera, the kangaroo came to life, 
having been merely stunned by 
the collision, and hopped off. The 
two yachimen have asked wardens 
to look out for a rather well 
dressed kangaroo carrying in its 
pockets $200, a passport and a 
membership card to an exclusive 
Italian nightclub. 

Stock-in-trade 

The England cricket team's 
physio. Laurie Brown, began his 
stay in Australia by testinga rather 
natty new item of medical equip- 
ment on himself. He had “got up 
to turn off the television, some-, 
how managed to turn my ankle 
and fell in a heap on the floor"; 
since then he has been wiring 
himself up to his magnetic field 
therapy equipment, and cheerily 
reports that it seems to work. 

Peak district 

This column loves to be up with 
the latest jargon. “Becker's in the 
zone." they say. Zone? The term 
refers to a state of euphoric 
concentration, when a player is in 
the perfect mental state for com- 
petition and nothing can go 
wrong. Sports psychologists say 
“being in the zone" involves a 
powerful sense of happiness, a 
distorted and elongated sense of 
lime, effortless achievement, ab- 
sence of negative thoughts and a 
powerful sense of impending vic- 
tory. Let's hope Our Boys can get 
in the zone in Australia. 


I f crime writing is your 
business, young authors 
used to be told, keep politics 
as a hobby: if politics is your 
busmess. keep crime writing 
as a hobby. And this injunction 
was. on the whole, obeyed. Even 
those vociferous and prolific 
socialists, G.O.H. and Margaret 
Cole, wrote conventional English 
detective stories which were dull 
but almost entirely free from 
politics. 

Sometimes, of course, an 
author's inclination peeped 
through. At the beginning of 
Dennis Wheatley’s first written, 
though not first published, book. 
Three Inquisitive People, the Duke 
de Richleau invites nis American 
guest to dine at a club where “the 
word socialism has never pene- 
trated and women do not come"; 
and in The Forbidden Territory. 
the first of his novels to appear, 
the Soviet Union is undoubtedly 
an Evil Empire. Wheatley was 
always a Right-minded man, as 
befitted the grandson of a success- 
ful Mayfair grocer known as 
“Ready-Money" Wheatley. 

John Dickson Carr, on the other 
hand, although by every instinct a 
romantic Tory, originally and 
implausibly made his detective. 
Sir Henry Merrivale, “a fanatical 
socialist", presumably because in 
the early 1930s — and to a young 
American, who didn't really 
understand — this seemed an 
amusing eccentricity. But in the 
post-war period. Merrivale 
loathed the Labour government as 
ferociously as his creator. 

Today everything is politicized; 
even authors who don't believe 
themselves to be conveying any 
messages are liable to be accused 
of doing so subconsciously. And 
since television has occupied 
much of the territory once filled by 
written tales, those who look for 
political bias on the screen might 
be well advised to glance away, 
occasionally from current affairs 
programmes and from the notori- 
ously Left-inclined single plays to 
the unmonitored and ostensibly 
non-political field of light fiction. 
They could count on one hand, for 
example, the number of times 
when sympathy goes to employers 
rather than strikers, to the authori- 
ties more than to rebels, and they 
would notice how, in recent years, 
the intelligence services of Britain 
and America have been shifted 
from the heroic to the villainous 
category — except when the 
departmental chief is black. 

Thrillers, particularly spy sto- 
ries. have a special relationship 
with contemporary affairs, with 
the stuff* of newspaper headlines. 
It also renders them intensely 
nostalgic. Nothing conjures up the 
1920s arid 1930s more vividly 
than the detective stories of the 
time. 

Because the heroes were almost 
invariably gentlemen, and, worse 
still, clubmen, and the heroines 
were Sloane Rangerish ladies 
C there was even Lady Molly of 
Scotland Yard), some politically 
minded critics regard the whole 
genre as having been poisoned by 
middle-class values. “Snobbery 
with violence,” they say. The two- 
shilling edition of Berkeley Gray’s 
first Norman Conquest novel Mr 
Mortimer Gets the Jitters , would 
confirm their suspicions; the 
jacket shows Norman, automatic 
in hand, clad in full evening 
dress — for no reason except that 
it makes him look dashing. 

Twenty years later James Bond, 
having sprung from lan Fleming's 
imagination into an era of aggres- 
sive egalitarianism, was accused of 
representing everything snobbish. 
But Bond was a most inaccurately 
chosen target Unlike his prede- 
cessor. he neither owned a tail- 
coat nor belonged to a London 
club. He ate and drank well simply 
because it relieved the boredom of 
solitary missions. And he used 
consumer goods with brand 
names because Fleming liked to 
help craftsmen of whom he ap- 
proved in a world where 
craftsmanship was becoming rare. 

Fleming differed in sophistica- 
tion rather than intent from John 
Creasey. who allegedly made his 
hero, the Toff, go into the Savoy 
and say to the barman: “Jules, 
bring me a bottle of ihe special 
Moussec you keep for me alone." 
Wheatley. Fleming. Creasey and 
their colleagues felt that luxurious 
settings are more agreeable to read 
about than squalor and that 
educated characters are more 
stimulating than the inarticulate. 

Today's fashion is for the slob as 
hero; slobbery with violence. The 
lamentable television series 


Sheringham Hall has been bought 
by the National Trust and never 
again will it be altered by an owner 
with a bright idea. Its theatrical 
furniture, mostly Regency, bought 
by Tom Upcher. the last owner, is 
to be auctioned by Christie's next 
week. It goes on view to the public 
in the house today. 

The clutter accumulated over 
150 years of occupancy is to be 
cleared out to accommodate Na- 
tional Trust tenants, who will be 
required to open only part of the 
house to the public, since the trust 
bought the property mainly for the 
sake of the park, landscaped by 
Repion. and a stretch of Norfolk 
coastline, rather than the house. 

Humphrey Repton succeeded 
Capability Brown as landscaper in 
chief to the British aristocracy at 
the end of the 18th century and 
Sheringham was his “favourite 
and most darling child in 
Norfolk". He designed both the 
house and the park, a small 
gentleman's residence in a perfect 
picture setting. 

Houses are built to be lived in 
and the eccentricities of their 
owners grow into them, layer 
upon layer. When the National 
Trust lakes over they become 
frozen showpieces of the once 
lively past. It is often the best fete 
available, especially for houses of 
unmanageable size filled with 
spectacular but fragile art trea- 
sures. Very likely it is the best fate 
for Sheringham. though, even 
today, the little house and park 
would be a dream to live in. 

For a small house Sheringham 
Hall is a lour dc force. The 
theatrical use of tall picture win- 


Anthony Lejeime charts the changing image 
of thriller heroes and villains with the 
. swing in (he political and social pendulum 


From saintly 
snob to 
savage slob 



Moonlighting has been pro- 
claimed the modern equivalent of 
The Thin Man-, but anyone who 
really cannot see a difference 
between its charmless hero and 
the elegant William Powell must 
need his eyes, ears or head 
examining. Similarly, Clint 
Eastwood and Sylvester Stallone 
are not the first thriller-heroes to 
execute lawbreakers personally, 
but rtithlessness used to have 
more style. (“If it isn’t money, 
what do you want? Damn you. 
what is your racket?" “Death." 
said the Saint in a voice of terrible 
softness. “Death is my racket") 

Villains too have traditionally 
been gentlemen; the butler hardly 
ever did do it. For the hero to duel 
with persons of inferior status 
would have seemed unsporting. 
Nowadays, the hero may be 
proletarian but most villains are 
still ostentatiously upper-class. 
The reason, though, is different A 
political message is often intended 
oral least implied. 

E ven Dr Fu Manchu, 
although an oriental 
was a very superior per- 
son indeed. World con- 
quest at which he 
aimed, was always a favourite 
motive, because, although politi- 
cal in one sense, it was non- 
political, and therefore safe, in 
another. Less extravagant tales of 
international intrigue constitute 
an archaeological inspection-pit of 
changing popular concern or, per- 
haps more accurately, convention. 
Anarchist villains gave way to 
German spies, then to Bolsheviks,, 
then to arms dealers, who were a 
convenient scapegoat: and then, as 
the shadow of war crept nearer, a 
few books pointed the finger at 
self-interested, purblind or treach- 
erous politicians who were 
obstructing Britain's rearmament. 

Mussolini, lightly disguised as 
“Caflareli" in Francis Beeding's 
spy stories, had originally been 
treated as a great statesman. But 
gradually he and Hitler (called 
“Hagen" by BeedingL their agents 
and their secret police became the 
enemy. The Spanish Civil War 
helped to sanctify Left-wing ideal- 
ists. although Dennis Wheatley, in 
The Golden Spaniard, took a' less 
roseate view of the Republican 
cause. One of the greatest of all 
thrillers. Rogue Male, begins with 
an attempt by the hero to assas- 


sinate an unnamed Hitler. Anti- 
fascist themes became overt, in 
Britain and in Hollywood. 

The war made evaything sim- 
ple. Heroes and villains were, at 
least metaphorically, the uniforms 
of their country. Politics hardily 
entered into it. The Russians 
changed sides and the gallant 
Chetniks in Yugoslavia were re- 
placed. in stories about occupied 
Europe, by Tito's communist 
partisans without provoking so 
much as a blink of surprise from 
the thriller writers. There was no 
discussion about the ideology, or 
about the moral ambiguities, in- 
volved. Current propaganda was 
taken at face-value; indeed thriller 
writing formed part of it 

After the war, for a brief period, 
Russian agents continued to. co- 
operate with British heroes, and 
the UN, rather than one’s own 
country, became the symbol of 
good. Escaped war criminals and 
revenge-seeking neo-Nazis were 
the easiest and politically safest, 
villains to use. Forty years later 
they still are. 

Much earlier, Somerset • 
Maugham in Ashenden had taken 
a wry look at the spy business: but 
regular thriller writers between the 
war, even those like Buchan and 
Beeding. with much personal 
experience of the ways of govern- 
ment. preferred to make their 
spies, whether professional or 
accidental, behave as gentlemen- 
amateurs. Verisimilitude was not 
the point Such authors, like their 
colleagues in the field of domestic 
detection, were playing a game 
with its own rules; realism would 
have spoiled the mood. 

The most notable exception was 
Eric Ambler. The introduction to 
an American omnibus of pre-war 
Ambler novels by (or at least 
attributed to) Alfred Hitchcock, 
asserts: “The villains are not only 
real people, they are actually the 
kinds of people who have’ gen- 
erated violence and evil in Lbe 
Europe of our time. And the wise 
men — the clever ones who solve 
or help to solve the riddles in these 
stories — they are not the tra- 
ditional old-school-tie officers of 
British Military intelligence. In 
two of these novels they are Soviet 
agents operating in Italy and 
Austria just before the outbreak of 
the wan in the other two they are 
Turkish military police. Again, 
people you can believe in — above 


Geraldine Norman previews the Sheringham sale 


But the stuffed 
birds stay. . . 


dows. domed skylights, sweeping 
steps, arches and high ceilings 
gives an airy magnificence to the 
interior. The views from each big 
window are literally pictures, de- 
signed by Repton himself. 

Tom Upcher. who died last year 
aged 79. was unmarried. The son 
of a cousin who inherits has 
decided to sell. Tom was the great 
great grandson of Abbot Upcher. 
who commissioned Repton. After 
receiving the designs. Abbot wrote 
to Repton: “1 am like the pos- 
sessor of some gem of inestimable 
value and beauty, concealed in a 
caskcL You have presented me 
with the key. and I now perceive 
all of its hitherto latent beauties." 

The estate was acquired by 
Abbot Upcher in 1811 and he 
dreamed of bringing up his young 
family there. “What a spot to 
educate them and leach them, to 
the best of my humble and weak 
abilities, their duty towards God 
and their fellow creatures", he 
wrote in his diary. 

The diary, along with a largely 
unsoaed miscellany of family 
papers, has been sent to Stickling, 
the local National Trust head- 
quarters. Among them are the 
invoices for the furniture acquired 


in 1839 by Abbot’s son. Henry 
Ramey Upcher. as well as those 
for the Regency furniture acquired 
by Tom Upcher from Mallett's of 
Bond Sl and Blairman's in the 
post-war years. The trunks should 
provide material for PhD students 
for years to come. 

Abbot Upcher died in 1819 and 
his widow could not bring herself 
to move into their dream house 
without him. She stayed in the 
cramped Queen Anne house on 
the other side of the park which 
fell into disuse before the last war. 
It was demolished last year be- 
cause of the danger to children 
playing among the mins. 

The Repton house was thus not 
inhabited until Henry Ramey 
Upcher moved into it in 1 839. 
Repton'sliving room, pan draw- 
ing room, part library and part 
music room, with deep bay win- 
dows. remains almost exactly as 
he furnished it. The National 
Trust has bought the contents. It 
still has the original wallpaper, 
together with handsome curved 
bookcases filled with leather 
bound volumes, tables, and sofas 
supplied by T. Phillips. Up- 
holsterer. Appraiser. Cabinet 


all the kinds of people who really 
were clever in the corrupt and 
stupid years of the past decade." 

Ambler's villains were capital- 
ists. his political philosophy was 
that of the Popular Front. After 
1945. disillusioned by what was 
happening in eastern Europe fro- 
flecied in Judgement on Dchchev) 
but uninspired by the Cold War. 
he sought more personal themes 
elsewhere. The leftish tinge of 
those early books and their seedi- 
ness (highbrows love seediness) 
has helped to ensure continued 
critical success: but what Hitch- 
cock wrote in that introduction 
was hardly fair. The old-school- tie 
officers of British Military Intelli- 
gence had not done at all badly. 
They scooped up all the German 
spies in Britain during the war. 

Ian Fleming, himself entitled to 
an Old Etonian tie. knew the 
reality of secret intelligence, but 
James Bond, as he said, was an 
updated version of Bulldog Drum- 
mond. Bond's opponents, to begin 
with, were agents of Smensh, an all 
too real organization for killing 
enemies of the Soviet Union: but 
later, on the rather Odd grounds 
that “one can't go on teasing the 
Russians" Fleming changed his 
villains to Spectre, a fantastical 
body of worldwide criminals. This 
suited the film-makers, who es- 
chew political villains unless de- 
funct like the Nazis, or manually 
right-wing. 

F leming, despite, his super- 
ficial modernity, was a 
throwback to the prewar 
style. The new mood, the 
Ambler mood, was 
picked up by Len heighten and 
fully developed by John le Carrf, 
both of whom appealed to those 
who disliked Fleming’s gloss. Af- 
ter a pretentiously, idiosyncratic 
start, Deighton moved bade to- 
wards the mainstream while te 
Carre has built ever more com- 
plicated labyrinths; complicated 
morally no' less than structurally. 
Meanwhile, in the real world, the 
Burgess-Maqtean-Philby affair re- 
stored the dubtand background of 
espionage and reinforced the idea 
of Establishment villainy and 
betrayal — very welcome to the 
new breed of thriller writers. 

Simultaneously, across the At- 
lantic the fashion in heroes and 
villains had changed too. Partly 
because of the Vietnam war, 
which turned liberals, the oon- 
scriptable. young and a high 
proportion of media folk against 
the government, agencies such as 
the CIA and the. FBI (admired 
when hunting Nazis, not so ad- 
mirable when hunting conn 
munists) became bad and whistle- 
blowing rebels good. The newtype 
of thriller was epitomized in Three 
Days of the Condor, in which the 
hero, a CIA agent fleeing from his 
own bosses, finally tells all to The 
New York Times. 

These tendencies converged so 
that even when the direct political 
roots had withered, there was a 
flowering of cynicism, an assump- 
tion of moral or immoral — 
equivalence between the agents of 
East and West with, on the 
western side, some extra villainy 
from the upper classes and from 
multinational companies, which 
have assumed the scapegoat role, 
once occupied by arms makers. _ . 

Political thrillers today, far re- 
moved from Buchan and the 
Great Game, have a distinctly 
leftish tilt Detective stories, on 
the other hand, especially Ameri- 
can, have tipped back a little in the 
other direction. Some fictional 
detectives, a stream derived per- 
haps from Maigret, are notably 
more compassionate than then- 
predecessors. but others - in lit- 
erature as in life — are apt to 
think, as Bulldog Drummond 
once thought that criminals are 
allowed by the law and the courts 
to get away with too much. 

The qualities which were once 
common but are now most con- 
spicuously missing from thrillers 
of every kind are high spirits and 
moral simplicity. It would be nice 
to meet again an occasional 
Faceless Fiend unencumbered by 
any social or political baggage at 
all and there was surely much to 
be said for a detective who. unlike 
today's fashionably sordid and 
cynical protagonists, could greet a 
diem in the grand style once used 
by Sexton Blake: “1 would rather 
work for nothing for a naval man 
like yourself, one of the best 
protectors of our precious flag, 
than rake banknotes from those 
who are careless of the honour of 
old Britain." 

© Timaa Nawapapm, 19B*. 


Maker and Undertaker of 18 
Finsbury Place, London- 

Torn Upcher's father and grand- 
father. Sir Henry and Henry 
Morris Upcher. were very keen on 
stuffing birds. In their “stuffing 
room" in the attic they gutted and 
preserved lqpal warblers and 
feathered corpses from distant 
shores, arranging them elegantly 
with grasses, rocks, branches and 
silk flowers; they then collected 
them in cases in two upstairs 
rooms. The National Trust has 
bought the birds and will show 
them in these two rooms. 

When a tenant moves into the 
house, he will thus be required to 
curate the living room and two 
salons of stuffed birds, showing 
them off to visitors by appoint- 
ment and seeing that they are not 
damaged. From the windows he 
will look out over the park with its 
incomparable banks of rhodeden- 
drons, azaleas and specimen .trees 
filled with hikers and holiday- 
makers. The beautiful gardens are 
overlooked by the park and can- 
not be enjoyed in privacy, as the 
trust promises that the park mil be 
open daily to the public through- 
out the year. 

Tom Upcher was a passionate 
gardener. Besides collecting and 
cherishing rare plants, be extended 
the garden with lawns and flower 
beds, dug a lake and, to celebrate 
his 70th birthday, erected a classi- 
cal temple, deigned by Repton 
but never built, on a wooded 
knolL With his passing the cre- 
ative era of Shenngham’s history 
is over. The National Trust will 
preserve what the Upchers made 
of it. 



f 

'i 


Woodrow Wyatt 

Keep SDI — and 
the bomb 


There is an illusion that dramatic 
cuts in nuclear weapons and a halt 
to their manufacture and develop- 
ment would make the world safer, 
ft is an illusion which has a 
powerful effect oo leaders of 
democratic countries but none on 
the Kremlin, which is not both- 
ered any manifestation, of 
public opinion. Encouraged by 
this knowledge; Mr Gorbachov 
successfully plays on our confused 
thinking. 

The Soviet economy is in . a 
dreadful mess; unable to supply 
consumers with what they would 
like. The manufacture of nuclear 
weapons, and keeping up with the 
Joneses in America -in Their 
development, has, with the crip- 
pling bureaucratic control of in- 
dustry. made it . impossible to 
achieve a standard of life for 
Russians comparable with, say, 
that of Hungarians. 

' Naturally Gorbachov would 
like an agreement for large or total ' 
nuclear disarmament But an 
arrangement by which America 
was allowed to bring the Strategic 
Defence Initiative (SDI) to a 
workable state would not suit Mm. 
Soviet nuclear weapons would 
then be almost, useless. What 
Gorbachov wants isan agreement 
on nudear weapons which the 
West would honour and Moscow 
would not. So eager are the cattle 
of the West to accept- the blandish- 
ments of the slaughterer there is 
almost no restraining them from 
hurtling eagerly into foe abattoir. 

The Soviet leaders have 
changed the look on their feces but 
not their purpose. Quickly we 
forget the trampled promises of 
free elections in Eastern Europe; 
the crushing of the national popu- 
lar will in Hungary, Czecho- 
slovakia and Poland; the invasion 
of Afghanistan; foe armed support 
for regimes in Cuba and South - 
America; the takeover of Angola 
by Cuban troops; arms for foe 
communist-infiltrated African 
National Congress; the disregard 
of foe^Helsinki agreement on rivil 
liberties. - 

We yearn to believe in the good 
faith of the Kremlin despite the 
unbroken flow of contrary ev- 
idence. Moscow attacks SDI as a 
breach of the Anti-Ballistic Missile 
Treaty, but the Russians have 
broken it all along with numerous 
tests (at least 19) and - according 
to one’s interpretation of the 
treaty — with its ABM Galosh 
system encircling Moscow which 
can fire small nudear .warheads 
into space. . . 

You have to be a real imig to 
believe that, whatever agreements 
were, made, r the Soviet * Unioff 
would ' cease to- .develop nudear 
weapons; underground in its vast 
land mass and .stop work on the 
equivalent of SDL The game is 
ctearr persuade foe West to neu- 
tralize its nuclear weapons and to 
abandon the effort to protea itself 
against the relatively small num- 
ber which would -be aD the 
Kremlin would then need to 
blackmail us.'Thal would bade up 
their overwhelming prepon- 


Michael Kinsley 



course 


Washington 

Conservatives everywhere have 
long suspected that foe media are 
“politically liberal and- alienated 
from traditional norms and 
institutions;" but until now they 
lacked scientific proof American 
sociologists S. Robert Lichter, 
Stanley Rothman and Linda S. . 
Lichter (henceforth, collectively, 
LRL) address this lack in a new 
book, The Media Elite. 

This tendentious piece of 
pseudo sddentific rubbish begins 
with a poll comparing the views of 
supposed members of this elite' 
with those of business executives 
on a series of typically unanswer- 
able pollster-type questions. For 
exaraple. the journalists and the 
business types both chose “eco- - 
nomic stability" as “die most 
important value" for the coming 
de c a de . “However." LRL caution, 
“almost half the media elite .. . 
pick post-bourgeois values as their 
second choice." They continue, 
“Forty percent of these leading 
journalists select a humane society - 
as either their ' first or second 
priority" How awfuL 
Among other bits of lunatic 
scientific “proof" journalists were 
shown fake news stories and asked 
to summarize them. In summariz- 
ing a story about a report from a 
dvfi rights organization on the 
widening gap between Mack and 
white incomes. 52 per cent failed 
to note references to earlier studies 
reaching the opposite conclusion. 

Well, there is this concept in 
journalism known as “news." A 
new study is news: an old study is 
not. Forced to summarize a story 
that is only three para grap hs to 
begin with, leaving am the non- 
news part is not proof of ideologi- . 
cal predisposition. 

In analyzing alleged press bias 
four questions should be asked: 
Do individual journalists have 
opinions about foe subjects they 
cover? Do journalists as a rfags 
share a particular set of opinions? 
Does this' affect their ability to ’ 
portray the work! fairly? And ifso, 
what should be done aboutil? 

Yes. journalists do have opin- 
ions. They are intelligent, curious 
people with an .interest in public 
affairs. The idea that they should, 
or even could, spend them lives 
inquiring into the important is- 
sues of the day without reaching 1 
conclusions about them is ateurd. . 
LRL detect shared psychologi- 


cal predispositions among jour- 
nalists that they characterize as 
tiberaL An ’‘inner ambivalence 
toward power may be displaced 
outward as antagonism toward 
seekers and holders of poweL’f 
they , write. And then there’* 1 
narcissism, which creates a ten- , 
dency toward “knocking other: 
people down." 

h is typical of LRL’s cloddish- 
unsubtiety that they identify seep-' 
ticism toward authority and a 
tendency toward dyspepsia as 
politically liberal traits. And it fa- 
typical of their complete inife: 
understanding of journalism tbaf : 
they suppose these traits are a" 
disadvantage in covering the newss 
accurately.. . ■ 

, Although most of : LRLV 
“research" is nonsense. 1 do ooC 
quarrel, with foe straightforward 
polls showing that journalists vote: 
liberal more than the genefof- 
population. The important- ques- 
tion is: So what? Here, LRL are at_ 
their most disingenuous, insisting: 
ibarthey are not accusing anyone' 
of Mas. Their ' concern fa 

finitely more subtle." In fact. “Ooi; - 

effort is aimed at eliminating the£ 
false dichotomy between a ‘true’? 
and a ‘biased* story." ■ 

' Bui if The Media Elite is not a:: 
criticism of the press and an c 
implicit demand for change, what 
fa it? This is. exactly how it -fa 
regarded, of coarse^ by the people^ 
who -have embraced LRL’s 
mgs. Asfaras 1 know, LRL have- 
not renounced such supporcers-or'. 
declined their lecturefees. • -..'/J 

The dear message is that there is ? 
something improper about a-situa^ ' 
tidn where most journalists hohf J 
liberal political views.- SO what? 
should be .done? Must in dividual^ 
journalists change their opinions - 
to keep up with the times? Qf=, 
should media institutions prarfrre 
affirmative action by pdtiticaf ' 
views, hi .order to represent tin 
accurate - cross section of- .the 
general population?. ;J 

Qf course journalists . have” 
political. opinions and sodal attf- ■ 
hides, and of course these some- ': 
times affect foe way they write, r. 
But most reporters have no ideo- • 
logical -agenda when they write a'; 
story. And they fry to be objective. - 
The same , cannot -jbe. said of ' 
Lichter,. Rothman and Lichter r " : 

Midtael .Kinsley is. editor of The. 

New ReptiWe;*- ■. . 


*■ 


derance in conventional weapons 
which would be roughly all that 
the West was left with. • 

" If they were not- mesmerized, by 

- ill-informed public opinion. Am- 

- erica and her allies would have no 
nudear arms control agreements. 
.They will always be broken in 
secret by Russia, to the irremedi- 
able disadvantage of the West. As 
it is the West can far more, easily 
bear die cost of n udear weapons. 
How many each- side has is 
irrelevant so . long . as ' Moscow 
remains convinced that the West 
retains a continuing capacity to 
deliver enough on the Soviet 
Union to wipe it out. 

That is what has kept tire peace 
in Europe for 40 years. MAD 
(Mutual Assured Destruction) tyas 
worked and continues to work. 
That fa the system which Moscow 
wishes to dismantle; provided that 
it can con the Americans into 
dropping SDL Despite the critics, 
SDI is moving along very nicely, ft 
may never reaejb 100 per cent 
effectiveness tret it win get near 
enough within the next : 10 yetirebr 
so to Trail"* the Russians fearful 
that any pre-emptive nuclear 
strike would not so damage tire 
West that they would, be secure 
from retaliatory annihilation, , . 

The Soviet technological base is 
sot strong enough to emulate SDL, 
which would harmlessly destroy 
all Soviet missiles within .seconds* 
of launch or in fright to Europe or 
the US. Fbr world hegemony.- fob 
Russians must nullify our nudear 
defence and enjoy a continue^ 

. superiority of con ventioaalibrces 
plus a tidy armoury of foul 
chemical weapons mid tire nudear 
weapons they would continue td 
make in secret. * : ; ; 

It is surprising that Presidetit 
Reagan, usually full of common 
sense, allowed himself to be 

- t ra ppe d into a world public rela- 
tions defeat by not realizing that 
his airily agreeing to a wholesale 
nuclear arms reduction would lead 
to the propaganda tripwire of no 
deal unless there is no SDI (the 
Russians are. not among the 
doubters of its eventual efficacy).' 
Hasty summits- will always & 
disastrous when dealing with a fly 
operator like Gorbachov. _ r . 

The fact that there are thou-' 
sands of idle, irevdi-rto-be-used 
nudear weapons fa no threat tqF 
peace. It is a guarantee of.it The 
true threat to democracy is.ti* 
Soviet determination to subvert,- 
with liberal supplies of military, 
support, any country which can be 
won by force’ for communism. 
Thai is what summits should be 
about, not pamferihg- ~to tire 
extraordinary suicidal desire i; of 
many in the West to be dupedinto 
believing that the Russians can be. 
pacified by,- and their danger, 
removed by, . our becoming 
nuclear defenceless- . • ; : 

Gorbachov doubtless has 
charm. Winston Churchill once' 
told me that he found Stalin “ah- 
amiable fellow, in a rough sort of 
way". But', .te - murdered amt 
starved to death millions ofkufaks 
and their children in foe Ukraine 




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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Jia 

IW!.. . - • ‘V f V« 
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na P c ' al markets were 
cusappoi riled bv til! 

^®^£ Uo r’ s annual oration at 
^Mansion House. Having 
,,a 5?* ^ meai on Tuesday 
inierest rat «rfi 
were ™ no mood 

.^Umuhat of theftS 
^traders in the Square Mile, Mr 
i-awon s speech did not lack 
■#“5 h®* 8 on the economy. 

aso^ Ch Q f h lZ 0st cheeri “g 
g®? of Went economic 

!1> 0pm i ents has t>een fall 

SomS^ P i 0yment even if ' one 
.month s figures are a notori- 

^ h w le S“ ide 10 w hat is 
going on. Most of the improve- 
rs? 10 come from the 
Spwnal employment measures, 
and m particular from the Re- 
f 2 ^ scheme for the longer 
term unemployed which was 
extended through the whole 
““"“y at the beginning of 

" °he effect of this has, of 
purse, been to shake off the 
register those who, because 
they already have some form 
Of employment, should not 
nave been on the register in the 
first 'place. This reduces the 
pst of social security pay- 
ments. It reduces the extent of 
misinformation about the real 
£vel of unemployment and it 
helps to stop the dangerous 
process by which tbe welfare 
Safety-net is being brought into 
disrepute. 


IN THE CITY 


Removing people from the 
unemployment register who 
should not have been on it in 
the first place is not the same 
thing as finding jobs for the 
much larger number who 
really are looking for a job. 
The Government’s special 
employment measures may 
help some of those, too, tart 
the most important require- 
ment is a revival in growth in 
the economy Mowing the 
pause arising from the drop in 
oil prices. 

Mr Lawson reiterated at the 
Mansion House his view that 
output growth next year would 
be fester than this year. It 
should also be better balanced. 
Domestic demand is expected 
to continue at about this year’s 
level, but exports should re- 
cover along with the level of 
world trade. 

In recent years Britain has 
retained its share of the vol- 
ume of world trade in manu- 
factured goods, in contrast to 
the decline for many, years 
previously. Despite what Mr 
Lawson called the “freak” 
trade figures last month there 
are signs that exports have ' 
resumed a vigorous rate of 
growth. 

If .the economy is gathering 
pace there is also some slight 
evidence that a little more of 
the benefit will accrue to the 
unemployed. Pay increases 
appear to be slowing down to 
something a bit closer to die 


THE TESTIMONY OF A POET 


On October 10, reported the 
BBC Russian . Service this 
week, the London-based In- 
stitute for the Study of Re- 
ligion in Communist Lands, 
Kestoii College, received an 
unexpected telephone call 
from the Russian poet, Irina 
Ratushinskaya. It was un- 
expected because Miss 
Ratushinskaya was serving a 
long prison sentence. She had 
telephoned to announce her 
release. 

' From Miss Ratushinskaya’s 
experiences, both as a dis- 
sident poet and as a .political 
prisoner, we can learn a great 
deal. At- theage of24, she first, 
read the poems of* the re- 
nowned Russian poets 
Mandelstam, Akhmatova and 
Tsvetaeva and these made a 
great impression on per. She 
began to write her own poetry 
which- was published in 
samizdat and in Russian jour- 
nals abroad. In December 
1981. she was sentenced to ten 
days’ detention for her part in 
a human rights demonstration 
in Moscow on behalf of Andrei 
Sakharov. 

For this she was sentenced 
to 10 days’ detention. Two 
years later, she stood trial 
again under Article 70 of the 
Russian Republic’s Penal 
Code (anti-Soviet agitation 
and propoganda) and was 
sentenced to seven years in a 
strici-regime labour camp, fol- 
lowed by five years’ internal 
exile. 

, Her prison experiences were 
dreadful by any standards. 
Between December 1983 and 
February 1984, she spent 39 
days in the punishment celL In 
August 1983 she went on 
hanger strike in protest against 


the refusal of the prison 
authorities to allow her hus- 
band to visit her. A month 
later she was force-fed. Her 
health deteriorated and she 
developed serious illnesses 
needing urgent medical treat- 
ment It is difficult to recall at 
times that this punishment 
was meted out to a young 
woman whose sole crimes 
were writing poetry and dem- 
onstrating for the human 
rights guaranteed under -the 
Helsinki agreement 

Her plight .became known in 
the West and groups for her 
defence were established, in 
both England and foeTJnited 
States! Demonstrations calling 
for her release on health 
grounds were organised in 
New York and Chicago and, 
earlier this year, a reading of 
her poetry was held outride tbe 
Soviet Embassy in London, to 
coincide with the publication 
of a volume of her poems. On 
the fourth anniversary of her 
arrest this year, an all-night 
vigil was held in a London 
church and her poems read. 

How futile such campaigns 
must often seem even to those 
who devote such time and 
energy in organising them? 
Meetings are booked, leaflets 
printed, celebrities persuaded 
to lend their name or presence, 
journalists solicited to take an 
interest — and with what 
results? It is a minor triumph if 
a newspaper diary carries a 
paragraph about tbe case or a 
radio news programme grants 
the campaigners a 10 minute 
interview. In dark moments, 
they must wonder if the Soviet 
embassy even bothers to re- 
port home on their Lilliputian 
efforts. 


Yet the campaign on behalf 
of Irina Ratushinskaya suc- 
ceeded — and succeeded in 
more ways than one. Not only 
did Miss Ratushinskaya ob- 
tain her freedom, but shortly 
after her release, in an inter- 
view with Nikolai Kojevnikov 
of the BBC Russian Service, 
she expressed her gratitude for 
the comfort which such cam- 
paigns had brought ber in 
prison; 

“Even at the worst times, 
even when I had no news from 
outside and even when 1 could 
not communicate with people 
outride at alLi sensed rr we all 
did — .almost .physically, the 
love and- concern of other. 
people. We were convinced 
that we were being looked 
after, we sensed that we were 
being supported from outride, 
even when, there was no actual 
proof. It’s hard to explain, hut 
if people are thinking about 
you, even from very fir away, 
you sense it and feel better for 
it — even if they are only 
thinking—” It would be easy to 
dismiss this as a mixture of 
overflowing gratitude and the 
mysticism to which the Rus- 
sians are allegedly prone. But 
Miss Ratushinskaya has good 
concrete, even cynical,- reasons 
for her belief • 

“When letters. did not come, 
you knew something was going 
cm. When I was singled out for 
special treatment, I knew there 
was extra interest in my case.” 

. It could not have been said 
more clearly. The campaigns 
waged to help imprisoned 
dissidents hearten the pris- 
oners and, even though it may 
take time, move the Soviet 
authorities, even, those in the 
Gulag. 


FOURTH LEADER 


It is to be. hoped that the 
Foreign Office has lost no time 
ip reassuring the Chinese gov- 
ernment that when the Duke 
of Edinburgh said, or did not 
say, that he thought Peking 
was ghastly, he was in no way 

referring to the Chinese capital 

Beijing. On the contrary, he 
had found Beijing an ab- 
solutely splendid place. The 
imaginative use of dripping 
concrete in its new shopping 
malls and high-rise flats was 
something he meant to ten the 
Prince of Wales about, while 
the dumper truck factory he 
had visited while there was 
easily the best he had ever seen 

: No, no, it was Peking be had 
been referring to (or was it 
Pekin?), the place they had 
taught him about ,n 
Gdrdonstoun, full ofdrtgwjj 
and junks, of funny-shaped 
buildings with roofs like gon- 
dolas and slitty-eyed men in 
pigtails running over hump- 
backed bridges . He bad found 
all that very boring indeed 
and, of course, nothing like the 
real thing.' 

It had been much the same 
in Sri Lanka, where .be had 
derived inmense enjoyment 
from the traditional dance* 
performed by lie Colombo 
massed schools, as well ■ “J 
tours he had undertaken ot 
that industrial 

outskirts of the city w herethey 
had perfected a ^ new ngjofl 
for making cardboard boxes. 


He had found Ibis quite a. 
revelation after Ceylon which, 
as he remembered well from 
those old Wills cigarette cards 
had been full of temples and 
elderly coolies in broad- 
brimmed bats picking Typhoo 
tea. - -• 

One day he hoped to gb to 
Moskva which he was sore 
would be a fir more congenial 
place than Moscow. The latter 
he knew to be quite dire, with 
its grey-feced men in off-the- 
peg suits, its superpowered 
women driving cranes and the 
queues for consumer durables. 
Moskva on the other hand was 
always white with snow, over 
which pretty young Czarinas 
in furry hats cracked whips 
over horse-drawn sleighs, 
while tall young men gazed 
through French windows into 
a Chekovian twilight and 
dreamed out loud of St Peters-' 
burg. 

Then there was Munich, 
with its men in lederhosen 
drinking Loewenbrau out of 
jugs with lids and slapping 
their thighs in time to a brass 
band. Mflnchen by contrast 
looked almost mundane with 
its housing estates and traffic 
jams. And whatever had hap- 
pened to Rhodesia? 

The Duke of Edinburgh is 
not the first to feel that 
something has gone out of 
travel since the days when the 
world was as flat and as pink as 
Mercator’s projection. Then. 1 
geas were uncharted and lands 


unexplored* and the people 
who lived there dressed dif- 
ferently. 

In those days the Amazon 
was - full of anacondas, not 
lumberjacks felling trees. Cow- 
boys rode horses, eskimos 
canoes and Indians elephants 
while Arabs on dromedaries 
swayed past pale dunes under 
starry skies and would never 
have been seen dead in a 
lounge-suit. Now one suspects 
they all navel by Land Rover 
- or the Japanese equiva- 
lent — and buy vests on Ox- 
ford Street 

No girl in the South Seas 
would have worn anything 
other than a grass skirt, or a 
Japanese woman a kimono. 
Ail Frenchmen sported berets, 
and blue and. white hooped 
shirts. Italians sang, instead of 
making motor cars, white aQ 
Spaniards rapped eastinets 
and Mexicans dozed in ten- 
gallon sombreros. As for 
China, nobody would have 
thought of eating anything but 
chop suey, riding by rickshaw 
or pronouncing his “R’s” tike 
his“LY\ We were all so 
amazing ly different 

Alas, it is thus no more, in 
the age of the Datsun and 
jumbo jet Except in Beijing 
that is. Beijing was absolutely 
terrific, as the Duke would 
now like to make clear. It is to 
be ' hoped . that the Foreign 
Office has explained how the 
coniiision arose. 


Nuclear limits to the arts of war 


current rate of inflation. 

The worries in financial 
markets understandably have 
much more to do with the 
future value of money — their 
staple commodity — than with 
the real economy. Yesterday's 
inflation figures showed a 
small rise from 14 per cent to 
3 per cent annually. Tbe 
increase owes a good deal to 
the somewhat capridous effect 
of mortgage rates which fell a 
tittle over a year ago so 
reducing the year on year rate 
of inflation until sow. 

More worrying is the impact 
of -the fell in sterling on 
inflation in the months to 
come. This is at the heart of 
the market’s fears and is why 
money markets yesterday were 
signalling another rise in in- 
terest rates. 

The Government, at least in 
its rhetoric, has accepted a 
greater degree of volatility in 
inierest rates than in the past 
as the price of ensuring that 
financial conditions continue 
to' bear down on inflation. 
That was the explanation for 
abandoning the system of 
fixing an official Minimum 
Lending Rate, though in prac- 
tice interest rates have contin- 
ued to be managed. Should a 
further rise in interest rates be 
necessary it must be presumed 
that the Government will ac- 
cept it as readily, if with less 
enthusiasm, as the subsequent 
reductions. r . 



From Air Marshal Sir Leslie 
Afavor 

Sir, As Monsignor Bruce Kent 
(October 6) has reminded us, 
some of the great and wise have 
constantly sought to persuade us 
that should hostilities ever break 
out between East and Westthe use 
of nuclear weapons wfll follow as 
surely as night follows day, and 
that once into the nuclear battle, 
tbe process of escalation will be 
uncontrolled and uncontrollable. 

Such .a view not only ignores 
historical precedent and the rea- 
sons why wars are fought but 
overlooks the novel factor that 
both sides in any such conflict will 
know that, should escalation go all 
the way, each will be destroyed in 
the end by submarine weapon 
systems that cannot be knocked 
oul And to this seemingly in- 
escapable prospect of .assured 
mutual destruction is now added 
for better measure the life- 

extinguishing “nuclear winter” 
visited impartially on all for many 
long months after the event 

Assured mutual destruction 
plus “nuclear winter'* is an un- 
attractive — indeed incredible — 
war aim for any aggressor, and the 
Tssibilhy of inviting these twin 
!es must surely add to the 
unlikelihood of war between East 
and West, though h does not 
entirely remove tbe risk: but 
should war ever come can one 
conceive of two more powerful 
factors acting together to constrain 
the expansion of nuclear opera- 
tions, to ensure that these opera- 
tions are matched, stage by stage, 
to the attainment of the immedi- 
ate objective, offensive or defen- 
sive. and no more? 

To imply that nuclear war 
would be waged m a manner 
unrelated to the achievement of 
rational war aims (whatever these 
might be and however deplorable) 
is to credit nuclear weapons with 
even more influence over mind 
than they have over matter, which 
is why our thinking on tire subject 
is generally in such disarray. 

If an aggressor meets resi stance, 
hostilities are prosecuted with 
mounting severity and pressure 
is increased until he achieves a 
submission, or until he is effec- 
tively repulsed, or until be 
recognises that his aims are un- 
attainable at tolerable cost, or 
until both sides accept the futility 
of further conflict. To this extent, 
and having in mind much curious 
talk about “limited nuclear war”, 
one may say that all wars are 
limited, in that they are not 
pursued until all weapons on all 
sides are exhausted. 

.So, unless mw-Var weapons — 
for reasons that a g ain no one has 
yet expkioed. —. represent some 
sort of behavioural watershed, the 
probability most be that nuclear 
war, should it ever come, will 
follow the classic course and win, 
in retrospect, be seen as “limited". 

No one can say at what point in 
any hostilities between East and 


West operations would be halted 
and mutual accommodation 
sought, whether in the early stages 
under threat of nuclear escalation 
or at some time thereafter much 
would depend on the extent to 
which miscalculation or mistake 
had precipitated the aggressor's 
action in the first place. 

Nor can we entirely discount the 
possibility — particularly where a 
totalitarian regime is involved — 
that at some later stage all rational 
war aims might indeed be aban- 
doned and “all out” midear war 
unleashed; but with nothing await- 
ing in the end tail assured destruc- 
tion and the “nudear winter” 
man's instinct for survival is 
surely more likely to prevail. 
Yours faithfully. 

LESLIE MAYOR, 

Baiiaston House, Alne, York 

From Mr John Weatherill 
Sir, Sir Give Rose (October 9) 
accuses Monsignor Brace Kent 
(October 6) of “resorting to the 
well-worn device of selective 
quotation”. He th«i goes on to 
quote selectively from the famous 
speech of Lord Mountbatten on 
the occasion of tbe Weisse 
Foundation Peace Prize Presenta- 
tion to the Stockholm Inter- 
national Peace Research Institute 
at Strasbourg in 1979. 

In these circumstances. Sir. it is 
fair that the major pan of what 
Mountbatten said in the same 
context should also be quoted in 
your columns: 

I regret enormously the delays 
which the Americans and Russians 
have experienced in reaching a Salt 
U agreement for tbe limitation of 
even one major class of nudear 
weapons with which it deals. I regret 
even more tbe feet that opposition to 
reaching any agreement which win 
bring about a restraint in the 
production and deployment of 
nod ear weapons is Becoming so 
powerful in the United States. What 
can their motives be? 

As a military man who has given 
half a century of active service I say 
in all sincerity that the nudear arms 
race has no military purpose. Wars 
cannot be fought with nudear 
weapons. Their existence only adds 
to our perils because of the Hustons 
which they have generated. 

He says more in like vein but 
this I think will suffice to correct 
the imbalance and put Monsignor 
Kent’s argument on somewhat 
better ground. 

Yours sincerely 
JOHN WEATHERILL, 

Wytye Head, Kilmingion, 
Warminster. Wiltshire. 

Reykjavik breakdown 

From Professor . Robert L. 
Schuettinger 

Sir. The Munich “summit” ended 
in an agreement, with much hand- 
shaking all aro und the table. I 
gather it must have been a success. 
Yours fiithfolly, 

ROBERT SCHUETTINGER, 
Reform Chib, Pall MaU, SW1. 
October 16. 


Wrangle at Raskin 

From MrL. J. Norcrass 
Sir. One of my marc salutary 
educational experiences was being 
asked to justify my literary and 
political pi^udices by a Ruslan 
College tutor, who dearly felt that 
my fist essay for him was more 
remarkable for hs rhetoric than its 
substance. I don't think I suc- 
ceeded, but the exercise did me no 
harm and did not undermine my 
faith in socialism. (Subsequent 
experience, observation and other 
socialists brought about that fell 
from grace). 

Thirty-four years later I take 
vicarious pride in the achieve- 
ments of many of my Ruskm 
contemporaries who. benefiting 
from the intellectual rigour of that 
establishment, have distinguished 
themselves in both Houses of 
Parliament the trade union move- 
ment and many other areas of 
public service. 

I trust they will share my 
dismay at the treatment meted out 
to Mr David Selboume by both 
the students and the college 
authorities, for what appear — at 
this distance — to be the relatively 
venial sins of writing for the 
“wrong” newspaper and expecting 


his students to think, rather than 
take refuge behind sloganised 
bigotry and intolerance. 

An academic institution (even 
one with such dose links with the 
trade union and Labour move- 
ment) should be primarily con- 
cerned to preserve and support 
intellectual integrity and academic 
freedom. Unless there arc relevant 
factors not mentioned in your 
admirable leader and news cover- 
age of the affair (October 16), it 
would seem that Ruskin College 
has been signally and sadly remiss 
in this respect 

One of my Ruskin contem- 
poraries, David Kitson, spent 20 
years in a South African prison 
because be elected to be a dis- 
senter. Mr Selboume’s punish- 
ment is less extreme; but do the 
Ruskin- students and authorities 
see no similarities at all between 
their efforts to censor and circum- 
scribe his activities and tbe ideo- 
logical intolerance of a 
government they so roundly con- 
demn? 

Yours faithfully, 

LAWRENCE NORCROSS, 
Highbury Grove School, 

Highbury New Park, N5. 

October 16. 


Aids and care 

From Mr Derek Austen 
Sir. It was reassuring to read the 
forceful denial by Dr Norman 
(feature, October 13) of moral 
injunction or spiritual vengeance 
in the incidence' of disease and, 
one might go on to infer, natural 
disasters in general. 

Things go wrong as part of the 
natural order: they are only wrong 
because we do not favour the 
results. We approve of conception 
but noL of Aids. 

Dr Newman proposes that the 
Church should filly represent 
Christ as present-day disciples and 
should show caring concern for 
those afflicted by this terrible 
disease. Surely no one could argue 
with that; it applies to all of us. 


whether or not we espouse a 
particular faith. 

It seems to me unfortunate, 
however, that Dr Norman does 
not lake bis opportunity to bind 
tbe Church to a programme of 
education and condemnation of 
the practices believed to be largely 
responsible for the spread of the 
Aids virus. To do so would not be 
taking a high moral tone, nor need 
it introduce the idea of spiritual 
vengeance. 

Quite simply, the authority of 
tbe Church, used to prevent 
deviation and excess when other- 
wise illness results, seems to me an 
essential use of its privilege. 

Yours faithfully. 

DEREK AUSTEN. . 

41 Strand on the Green. 

Chiswick. W4. 


Mosley marches 

From Miss Helen Corkery 

Sir. It was interesting to note how 
the use of the word “admitted” 
gave a false slant to the words of 
the late Edith Ramsay, as pre- 
sented in today’s letter (October 5) 
from Mosley's former secretary, 
viz, Edith Ramsay “admitted” 
that much- of the opposition to 
Mosley’s marches in the East End 
was from communists imported 
from Glasgow and elsewhere: 

Edith Ramsay hated all 
organisations that required war or 
violence as part of their political 
programme. She had friends of all 
races and religions in the East End 
and was not taking an alternative 
political stance when she pro- 
tested against Mosley's marches in 
the thirties, or recorded her 


observation of them for the BBC 
in 1969. 

Thus she had no “admitting” to 
do. it should be remembered that 
as a borough councillor for Step- 
ney Miss Ramsay stood as a true 
independent 
Yours faithfully. 

HELEN CORKERY. 

52 Harrison Gose. 

Woodlands, 

Reigate. Surrey. 

Shell-Mex House 

From Mr Stephen Joseph 
Sir, The letter in your edition of 
October 14 about the threat to 
Shell-Mex House should have 
attributed its design to Messrs 
Joseph. Architects. 

Yours faithfully. 

STEPHEN JOSEPH. 

25 Perrins Walk, NW3. 


Concern at art 
school merger 

From the President of the Ravai 
Academy of Am and inkers 
Sir. In 1987. the National Ad- 
visory Body in Higher Education 
is to merge Wimbledon School of 
An into Kingston Polytechnic. We 
believe that such a merger will do 
irreparable harm to a school of 
international renown; and to a 
very specific contribution on 
which the professions and in- 
dustry' have come to rely. 

The proposal has been opposed 
by every sought opinion in an and 
design education, including the 
Council for National Academic 
Awards, and significantly, the 
NAB’s own an and design work- 
ing group. 

The CNAA report to NAB 
speaks of the school’s “distinctive 
and significant contribution to 
higher education”, of the fine an 
courses as “excellent and with a 
high degree of professionalism”, 
postgraduate courses as “the only 
ones of their kind” and the design 
courses as unique. 

Some of us write as specialists 
and employers in film, theatre and 
television, design industries of 
ever-growing economic and inter- 
national importance. In this field. 
Wimbledon makes an invaluable 
contribution. Its ex-students form 
a remarkably high proportion of 
our design teams and arc also 
found in the major theatres and 
opera houses of the world. Its 
highly professional resources arc 
unique in western Europe and 
have won international admira- 
tion. 

The quality of Wimbledon is 
very much to do with the size and 
character of its institutional 
organisation — a close-knit, very 
intensive community, excep- 
tionally cost-effective and with a 
breadth of highly specialised re- 
sources. This structure is not 
transferable. 

May we urge, through your 
columns, that these destructive 
proposals be rejected. 

Yours faithfullv. 

ROGER de GREY (President. 
Roval Academv of Arts). 

PETER BLAKE 

PATRICK GEORGE (Slade 
Professo r of Fine Art), 

PETER HALL (Director, The 
National Theatre). 

PATRICK HERON, 

PHILLIP KING (Professor of 
Sculpture. Roya l College of Art), 
DAVID PUTTNAM. 

JOCELYN STEVENS (Director. 
Royal College of Art). 

ROY STRONG (Director. Vic- 
toria & Albert Museum). 

JOHN TOOLEY (General Direc- 
tor. Royal Opera House), 

Royal Academy of Arts, 

Piccadilly, Wl. 

A flag nn waved 

From Mr J. Dolt is 
Sir, Isn't it unfortunate that her 
Majesty the Queen is ferried 
around in a Mercedes rather than 
a Rolls Royce or Jaguar? 

We ought to be sufficiently 
proud of our industries to make 
sure on such public occasions that 
the Royal Family is seen to have 
access to British products. 

Yours faithfully. 

J. DOLT1S. 

13 Dowuage, 

Hendon. NW4. 

October 15. 

Sizewell issues 

From Mr A. C. Hall 
Sir. Many key issues today are of 
such a specialised nature or are so 
complex that there is no way that 
the general public can come to a 
meaningful conclusion in isola- 
tion. Sizewell raises a number of 
such issues. Is nuclear power 
needed in Britain? Is the 
pressurised water reactor the cor- 
rect design choice? Will it be safe? 

To whom should the public turn 
for advice? The nuclear industry 
understands the problems, but has 
a vested interest and on the other 
side Arthur Scargjl! has only a 
vested interest. The answer, of 
course, is the forthcoming report 
of Sir Frank Layfield’s public 
inquiry' on SizewelL 
This inquiry has cost the tax- 
payer millions of pounds and has 
lasted from conception to report 
for over eight years, during which 
time the French, just across the 
Channel, have built and commis- 
sioned a number of nuclear power 
plants. 

The inspector's report will be 
submitted to the Ministry of 
Energy within the next few weeks 
although the public is not expected 
to see it then. The public has the fi- 
nal responsibility, for making up its 
own mind on the merits or 
otherwise of civil nuclear policies 
of the various political parties. It 
would be well advised to pay 
attention to Sir Frank Layfield's 
advice. 

Yours faithfully. 

A. C HALL 
2 Beech Gose. ■ 

Ollenon, 

Nr Knutsford, 

Cheshire. 

In common currency 

From Dr J. B. Post 
Sir. Whenever tbe earliest use of 
the modern sign for the pound 
sterling may have been, the Course 
of the Exchange &c provides a 
good indicator of common use in 
financial circles. The issue for 
August 4, 1795. was the last for 
which the form “3 1 17s 6d” was 
the editorial standard, although 
this was used occasionally for 
many years after. The new stan- 
dard was “3 1 7 6". which was itself 
superseded by the modem “£3 1 7 
6”on September 2. 1800. 

Yoitrs faithfully. 

J. B. POST. 

2 Worcester Gardens. SWI 1. 
October 13. 



OCTOBER 18 1915 

Ten VCs, seven 
and men engaged in the 
Lone Pine trenches in the 
Gallipoli peninsula, had been 

announced Pro days before this 

account of the action, mitten fir 
Captain C. E. W. Beon, official 
Piv&s representative witk the 
Imperial Forces in the 
Dardenelles 


THE STORMING OP 
LONE PINE. 

HEROISM OF AUSTRALIAN 
FIRST BRIGADE . 

FIGHTING UNDERGROUND. 

About the beginning of August ft 
was decided to send the Pint 
Australian Infantry Brigade 
against Lone Pine. The attack was 
timed for 5^0 in the afternoon, and 
from half-past 2 onwards the 
battalions were inarching into 
place. By 5 o’clock the last infan- 
tryman except for a few belated 
messengers was at his place behind 
the parapet of our twaachea oppo- 
site the Lone Pine . . . Now when 
they were to go out into it within 
five minutes in the brilliant light of 
a summer’s afternoon, not one of 
those wonderful infantrymen 
showed the least trace of 
excitement . . . 

In the front trench of all, bidden 
from us, was the brigade major. He 
had a carefully checked watch and 
a whistle. Suddenly there sounded 
a whistle, taken up from a score of 
different points. Tbe officer in our 
recess had sounded his and was 
clambering out over the dusty 
sandbags. The whole population of 
that recess was scrambling up on to 
the step and over the top, knod 
down showers of earth . . . 

RACE FOR THE TRENCHES. 
The khaki figures were racing 
towards that long low mole-hill in 
the scrub with the ugly. dark, half- 
concealed shadows of the loopholea 
low down on the earthls surface. 
Every Australian wore white bands 
on his sleeves and a square white 
patch on his back, and the whole 
heathland seemed full of white 
patches hurrying towards the sand 
mounds opposite . . . 

As a matter of fact they had 
found themselves looking down not 
into a trench but upon a very solid 
roof, made of logs with withered 
boughs and earth quoad over 
them. Some of those timbers were 
nine by six. and there was no more 
chance of pushing down thaw 
of pushing in the roof of a church. 
The first two tines were stopped 
there, puzzled what to do. ShrqMod 
had begun to rain fay this time, 
machine-guns were spitting from 
the trenches to right »wd left, the 
Turks at their feet were firing 
through the loopholes — but the 
one thing that no man seemed even 
to dream of doing was to come 
back. Some fired down into the 
holes— some who happened to 
small gaps in the line of head- 
cover in front of them, jumped 
down there and began to work into 
the dark shelters under the 
headcover where the Turks were — 
others went on over the first trench 
and even over the second trench 
and into communication trenches 
which had no headcover over them 
but through which the Turks were 
fleeing — for prisoners say, and 
there is no doubt of it, that the 
Turks are afraid of the Australians. 
Others noticed that in the solid 
roof in front of them, near the edge 
where the loopholes are, there were 
manholes left at intervals, appar- 
ently to allow the listening patrols 
to creep at night. They were just 
large enough to allow a man to 
wriggle through, and that was 
enough for the First Brigade. They 
wriggled down into them, feet 
foremost, as a burglar might wrig- 
gle into a skylight. 

If was a deed for which, if it were 
solitary instance, any man might 
get a Victoria Cross. What could 
the Turks do with a brigade tike 
that? Once they gP* into tbe 
trench, the thing was a foregone 
conclusion. 

THE TRENCHES WON. 

So it was that Lone Pine was 
won . . . Within a few seconds of! 
the first rush the Turkish aitifleiy 
had marked down tbe section ofl 
trench from which they were 
issuing and were pouring shell after 
shell into it The noise was 
dea fen ing. Showers of stones and, 
earth fell over everyone tike the 
spray of the sea when the bflknre 
tumble home . . . 

I have visions of two signallers 
racing through that dead with a 
reel followed by everyone with his 
heart in his mouth, until they 
dropped suddenly into a bomb 
hole. One could not tell whether 
they had been hit or bad got home 
until one heard tint the line was 
safe across — but those lines had to 
be carried five times, and, narrow 
little threads though they are. they 
were cut through by shrapnel 
pellets in 30 places before the 
communication trench w 
through and they could be carried 
below the surface . . . 


Hard limes 

From Mr Richard W. Beales 
Sir. Several years ago. I recall 
while laying a trail of paper in the 
rain forest of Borneo to mark a 
course for hare-and-hounds, I 
came across by chance a double- 
page spread from an airmail 
edition of The Times that exactly 
1 2 months previously I had 
draped over the branch of a small 
tree for a similar purpose. 

Notwithstanding over 200 
inches of precipitation in the 
intervening period, it was still 
complete and perfectly readable. 
While something softer might 
have been more appropriate 
environmentally, it was a dear 
demonstration that yours is a 
journal of quality and durability, 
respected even by termites. 

Yours faithfully,' 

R. W. BEALES. 

16 Nasagavoki Road. 

Suva. Fyi. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
October 17: The Pr in cess. Anne. 
Mrs Mark Phillips, Presklent of 
the Royal School for Daughters 
of Officers of the Royal Navy 
and Royal Marines (Haslemere) 
this morning opened The Royal 
Naval School's new Gymna- 
sium to be called “Princess 
Anne Hall”, at Haslemere, 
Surrey. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived upon arrival by Her 
Majesty's Lord- Lieutenant for 
Surrey (Mr Richard Thornton) 
and the Chairman of the Board 
of Governors of The Royal 
Naval School (Vice-Admiral Sir 
Patrick Bayly). 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips, attended by Mrs An- 
drew Feilden, travelled in an 
aircraft of The Queen’s Flight 


Development”, at the Hilton 
Hold, London Wl. 

Lieu tenan t-CoIonel Sir Sim o n 
Bland was in attendance: 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
was present this evening at a 

fashion show in aid of the 
Manor House Appeal for 
SENSE, The National Deaf- 
Blind and Rubella Association, 
at Bel voir Castle. Leicestershire. 

Mrs Euan McCoiquodate was 
in attendance. 


YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
October 17: The Duchess of 
Kent this morning opened a new 
plant at Rowntree Macintosh 
and later, as Patron, visited St 
Leonard’s Hospice, York. 

Her Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended fry 
Mis David Napier. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 17: The Duke of 
Gloucester, as President, was 

present today at the British 
Consultants Bureau 21st Anni- 
versary Conference, “World 


Princess- Anne will attend a 
reception in aid of TS Royalist, 
given by the Sea Cadets, at 
Trinity House on October 30. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Hugh Hvet 
Francis. QC. will be held in 
Gray's Inn Chapel on Monday, 
October 20, at 4.45 pm. 


Forthcoming marriages 


The Hon AJL Leslie Melville 
and Miss JJVI.G. Fox 
The engagement is announced 
between Archibald Ronald, 
younger son of the Earl and 
Countess of Leven. of Glen- 
feraess House, Nairn. Scotland, 
and Julia Mary GreviOe, youn- 
ger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Basil Fox. of 32 Pembroke 
Gardens.- Kensington. London. 


Mr J.G. Perkin 
and Miss D-M- Dewes 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs F.S. Perkin, of 
East Meoiu Hampshire, and 
Debbie, eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs J.G. Dewes, of Dul- 
wich. London. 


Mr RS. Wfflbourn 
and Miss CLP. Best 
The engagement is announced 
between Roger, second son of 
Dr and Mrs A.H. Will bourn, of 
Aston, Hertfordshire, and Clare 
daughter of the Hon Patrick and 
Mrs Best of Monk's House. 
Durford Wood, Petersfidd. 

Hampshire. 


Mr M.T.G. Voice 
and Miss PX Bragg 
The engagement is announced 
between MichaeL son of the late 
Mr T.B. Voice. OBE, and Mrs 
J.M. Tolha. of Otiery St Mary, 
Devon, and Pamela, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs AG. Bragg, of 
Tilbury-jumOare. Essex. 


DrTJBJH. Beresfbrd West 
and Dr PJT.W. Bagley 
The forthcoming marriage is 
announced between Terence, 
son of Mr Michael C. West, QC 
and Mrs PjE. Bere s ford West. 
London, and Patricia, only 
daughter of Dr and Mrs K.Q. 
Bagley, Appleton. Cheshire 


Mr R.N. Whitehead 
and Miss BJ. Matthews 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, eldest son of 
Dr and Mrs RG. Whitehead, of 
Cambridge, and Belinda, second 
daughter of -Mr and Mrs L.V. 
Matthews, of West Bretton. 
Wakefield. 


Mr J.D. Brice 
and Miss PJ. Kemp 
The engagement is announced 
between Jeremy David, son of 
Mr and Mis D. Brice, of 
Kensington. London, and Pam- 
ela Jane, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs P.D.P. Kemp, of Warsash, 
Hampshire 


Mr A-J. Butler 
and Miss DJVL Wragg 
The engagement is announced 
between Adam John, elder son 
of Mr and Mrs John Albert 
Butler, of Lenham. Kent, and 
Delia Marie, younger daughter 
of Mr and Mrs George Dennis 
Wragg. of Bakewefl. Derbyshire 


Mr AW. Woodbonse 
and Miss AJ. Emmkt 
The engagement is announced 
between Anthony, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs G.ES. Wood- 
house. of BlandfonL Dorset, 
and Alison, second daughter of 
Mr and Mrs R. Em mitt, of 
Tatters hall, Lincolnshire 


Marriages 


Mr J.D. Church 
and Mbs EX. Gilbert 
The engagement is announced 
between John, youngest son of 
the late Colonel J.C. Church. 
MC. and the late Mrs EM. 
Hambro, and Erica, youngest 
daughter of Mr D.R. Gilbert, of 
Pul boro ugh. Sussex, and the late 
Mrs F.P. Gilbert. 


Mr D. Hamilton 
and Miss E&. Mackenzie 
The marriage took place on 
October 10. 1986. in Tapiow, of 
Mr David Hamilton, eldest son 
of Mr and Mrs Allen Hamilton, 
of Cape Town, and Miss Sandy 
Mackenzie, only, da ugh ter of Mr 
and Mrs Graham Mackenzie, of 
Doocot Lodge. St Andrews. 


Mr J. Fktt 
and Miss K. Thomas 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, youngest son 
ofMrand Mrs Malcolm Fletuof 
Hill Brow, Bickley, Kent, and 
Katie, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs James Thomas, of 
Lower Camden. Chisleburst, 
Kent. 


Mr ELM. James 
and Miss LA. Morley 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. October II, at St 
Charles’ Church. Moorside, be- 
tween Mr Edward - Morgan 
James, eldest son ofMrand Mrs 
Hywd James, of Chislehurn, 
Kent, and Miss Laura Ann 
Moriey. youngest daughter of 
Mrs Frances Morley and the late 
Mr Herbert Morley, of Swimon, 
Manchester. 


Mr LJJD. Hardy 
and Miss S-Bs Barnes 
The engagement is announced 
between Ian. son ofMrand Mrs 
John Hardy, of The Thatches, 
Longthorpe. Peterborough, and 
Susanna, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs William Barnes, of 21 Rona 
Road. London. NW3. 


Dr RJNLS- Heard 
and Dr A PrendWHe 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, elder son of Dr 
and Mrs C.R. Heard. ofTalinga. 
Banstead. Surrey, and Anne, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.B. 
Prendiville, of Easton Lodge, 
Monkstown. Co Dublin. 


The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her brother, Mr 
Damian Moriey. and was at- 
tended by- Ruth Gallagher, 
Charlotte James. Emma Fieldr- 
house and Nathalie Duddle. Mr 
Martin Matthews was best man. 

A reception was held at The 
Court House. Worsley. and the 
honeymoon is being spent 
abroad. 


Mr RJJR. Legge 
and Miss M J. Parfces 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, son of the late 
Mr R.C. Legge, QC. ami of Mrs 
WE Stavert. of Montreal, Can- 
ada. and Melanie, daughter of 
Mr MJ. Parfces. of Ratley. 
Warwickshire and of Mrs P. 
Morris, ofClevcdon. Avon. 


Mr W.R. Todd 
and Miss JJL Beverton 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. October II, in the. 
Crypt of St Paul's Cathedral, off 
Mr William Todd and Mi** 
Julia Beverton. Canon Edwyn 
Young officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Valerie Hodgson, 
Charlotte Griffiths, Katy Hun- 
getford and Andrew Beverton. 
Lieutenant Mark Chichester. 
RN. was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
Chancery Club. 


Mark Rudall 


Scattering seeds of repentance 


Harvest Sunday is still almost as popular 
as Easter. It throws up more questions 
than any other festival in the Christian 
year, yet the services attract larger than 
usual congregations. 

All kinds of people who never normally 
go near a church will be there, because the 
-harvest tradition is deeply ingrained even 
in our post-agrarian British culture In the 
dewy-eyed season of M melk>w fruitfulness” 
this is the opportunity for the Christian 

church u> do its best to recognize 
something that the rest of the world may 
fuive forgotten. 

However, what that “something” might 
be has changed down the years. The 
church has always taken seriously its 
educative rdle. Nevertheless it is probably 
true that the contradictions latent in 
harvest festivals have forced her into a 
corner. It is. quite simply, easier to bow to 
the pressure of an enjoyable tradition. 

We are a long way from Thomas 
Hardy’s bucolic harvest festival scenes 
with their folksy atmosphere and heaped 
tables stretched across farm stackyards. It 
is observable, though, that harvest celebra- 
tions are in danger of becoming locked 
into that kind of tradition, as surdy as the 
ethos of Christmas has become de- 
Christ ianized and ossified for many in an 
uncritical. Dickensian bonhomie. 


We are all aware that our services are 
held against the backdrop of Third World 
starvation. This is perhaps a moral 
dilemma almost too big to contemplate, 
and so it is that on harvest festival Sunday 
we all find ourselves able to sing “Come ye 
thankful people, come. Raise the song of 
harvest home!”. 

Maybe clergy find it hard to flay their 
congregations with words like “avarice”, 
“inequality" or “conscience” when hoards 
of innocent little children have just 
presented baskets of harvest produce for 


the elderly. To do so would seem bleak and 
mouldy, and would generate considerable 
flak from c o ngregations who prefer to 

forat about those in need abroad. 

There are. though, other more subtle 
considerations. Something that the ser- 
vices fail to acknowledge is a tacit 
suggestion which lurks m Our sophis- 
ticated eating habits. It is the suggestion 
that God’s provision of foodstuffs lacks a 
certain finesse. 

Trends in the food industry make it look 
as if the Father Creator dismissed his 
research and development team before it 
ironed out all the problems of food 
production for human consumption. 

Asa result it has been up to us to team 
bow to pasteurize our milk. We have had 
to teach ourselves to manufacture those E- 
n umbered synthetic additives which can 
send our children on to a chemically- 
induced “high” after a glass or two of 
orange squash. It has been our prerogative 
to find out how to inject water into our 
meat produce in order to boost its weight 
and volume. And. of course, mankind has 
had to teach himself bow to package and 
present foods in attractive ways. 

Indeed, although this could never be 
said from a pulpit, to scan a contemporary 
church harvest display is to behold a 
celebration of man's ingenuity with God's 
inadequacy. 

What then should harvest festivals be 
saying? A historical perspective would 
suggest that they have more to do with our . 
ancient agrarian roots than with religion. 
Indeed, religions like Judaism or 
Christianity brought the excessive 
-revelries of these festivals under their 
wings and gave a perspective which 
pointed away from man the grower to God 
the creator and provider. 

There is certainly scope for greater 
honesty about what we have done to God’s 
good creation and its delicate natural 


eco nom y. We may celebrate “harvest 
home" in thecoumiyside by all means, tor 
that is where it all happens: but agri- 
cultural life is not. and never has been, an 
idyll. It is a hard world of cm-throat 
economics. Suburban man sees harvests 
only in terms of supermarket shelves or 
commodities in which he can de ai- 
Harvests and crops have no human woes 
for him. Traditional harvest festivals will 
therefore be substantially meaningless *of 
him and his family. 

There is more to it than that,. Maybe the 
modem festival is an opportunity to thank 
God that there are still a few people .who 
are enthusiastic enough, or hard-bitten 
. enough, to do the farming for us. Since we 
can praise God for his provision on any 

other Sunday, it would seem reasonable, 
therefore, to temper the celebratory side 
and make this day a positive educative 
festival centred on a theology of nature 
and God’s gift of growth. Christ after all, 
while speaking to the countryfolk of 
Galilee, thought fit to use a number of 
agricultural parables to do with seeds, 
sowers, and the land. 

We cannot seek a theodicy for harvest 
because our celebration of God’s good 

provision has been distorted by ourselves. 
There is ample world-wide evidence for a 
tottering ecology helped along by the quest 
for bigger and better harvests. There are 

the haunting exam pies in Africa and South 
America of what stock-market inspired 
cash-cropping can help to do. 

Future harvest festivals, if they are to 
acknowledge God’s work! as it really is, 
should be steered towards becoming 
carefully prepared acts of corporate repen- 
tance. Only then will they make, once 
again, a realistic and upbuilding contribu- 
tion to the church calendar. 


The Rev Mark Rudall is Associate Minister 
of Enfield Baptist Church, north London . 


Science report 


X-ray test on transplant rejection 

By Andrew Wiseman 


A new method of monitoring 
for early warning of heart trans- 
plant rejections, replacing cur- 
rent techniques, which involve 
die complications of sargicil 
biopsies, is undergoing tests by 
an American research imm 

Doctors at Stanford Univer- 
sity and ether American medical 
research centres, muler Dr Ran- 
dall Morris, have been carrying 
oat successful tests on animals 
using a monoclonal antibody 
called anti-myosin. 

Myosin is a natural protein 
which, in conjunction with actio, 
makes it possible An- the heart 
muscles to contract In healthy 
tissues they are covered by a 
membrane which deflects the 
monockmals. But in hearts 
where the process of rejection 
Imk began, the damaged mem- 
brane is vulnerable to tbem. 

Progr amm ed to identify such 


tissues, the anti-myosin is in- 
jected Into the bloodstream, 
where it ignores undamaged 
muscles and bypasses than, 
attaching itself only to the 
damaged tissues of the heart. 

Because these protein mol- 
ecules, refined in a laboratory 
and purified by a new technique, 
were bound to a small amount of 
radio-activity, the antibodies of 
the r e j e cting heart tissue could 
subsequently be clearly Identi- 
fied under the microscope. 

The next step would be to 
photograph the radio-active 
monodoiiais within the rejecting 
heart using X-ray technology, 
thos rendering biopsy 
unnecessary. 

The doctors say that major 
obstacles will have to be over- 
come before the procedure they 
have pioneered, and which has 
proven itself with rats, could be 


used to diagnose human heart 
transplant rejection. Before this 
can happen answers must be 
found . to three important 
questions: 

• will the test be sensitive 
enough to pick up low terete of 
rejection? 

• How long will it take for the 
monodonab to reach the dam- 
aged tissues? 

• Will the body produce anti- 
bodies against the monockmals? 
In which case the patient wfll 
effectively bnfld op an hnnnmi ty 
against the test. 

If the answers are satisfac- 
tory. Dr Morris hopes that one 
day the monedsaal test could be 
refined, becoming a serum, 
which would need nothing more 
invasive than a simple blood 
analysis to delect the onset of 
rejection. 


Luncheons 


American Women’s Chib 
Baroness Phillips, President of 
the National Association of 
Women’s Cubs, was the guest 
of honour ai a luncheon given 
by the American Women’s Club 
of London at the Connaught 
Rooms yesterday. 


was the guest of honour at the 
annual Trafalgar dinner of the 
South Wales Division. RNR, 
held on HMS Cambria yes- 
terday. Commander P.W. 
James. Commanding Officer, 
HMS" Cambria, received the 
guests and Commander J.M.D. 
Curteis, Executive Officer, 
presided. 


Transport entertained past and 
present Colonels Commandant 
at a dinner held at RCT Head- 
quarters Mess, Aldershot, yes- 
terday. Major-General D. B. H. 
Colley. Director-General of 
Transport and Movements, pre- 
sided. 


Birthdays 


TODAY: Lord Kimball. 58; 
Miss Melina. Mercouri. 61: Miss 
Martina Navratilova. 30: Sir 
Joseph Pope, 71; Lady Saltonn, 
56; Air Chief Marshal Sir Peter 
Terry, 60: M Pierre Trudeau, 
CH. 67: Dame Janet Vaughan. 
87: Major-General J. C. Walkey. 
83; Vice-Admiral Sir James 
Willis, 63. 


TOMORROW: Mr Justice 
Boreham. 67; Professor Sir Rob- 
ert Boyd. 64; Mr John Graham, 
59: Mr Bernard Hepton. 61; Sir 
Robert Jennings; 73: Mr John 
Le Cant, 55: Admiral of the 
Fleet Sir Michael Pollock. 70; 
Air Marshal Sir Anthony 
Skingsley. 53; Air Chief Marsha! 
Sir Neville Stack. 67; Sir 
Kenneth Sioby. 83; Sir Patrick 
Wall. MP. 70: Mr Peter 
Whiston. 74. 


King Mahendra UK 
Trust for Nature 
Conservation 


Shrievalty of Cumbria 
Former High Sheriffs living in 
the County of Cumbria held a 
luncheon at the Blue Bell, 
Heversham. yesterday. Major 
Nigjri Clarkson Webb was in the 
chair and among those present 
were the High Sheriff of 
Merseyside. Sheriffs in nomina- 
tion and Under Sheriffs. 


Sendee luncheon 


RN Hospital, Plymouth 
The annual dinner to' com- 
memorate the Immortal Mem- 
ory of Admiral Lord Nelson and 
tire Battle of Trafalgar was held 
last night at the Royal Naval 
Hospital, Plymouth. Surgeon 
Commander Brian Adams pre- 
sided and Dr David Owen, MP. 
was the guest of honour. 


19th Indian (Dagger) Division 
Brigadier B.T.V. Cowry pre- 
sided at the anneal officers' 
reunion and dinner of the 1 9th 
Indian (Dagger) Divison held 
last night ax the Oriental Club. 


Dinners 


Blake Term 1936-40 
Members of the Blake Term 
1936-40 who joined the Britan- 
nia Royal Naval College in 
September 1936 held a reunion 
luncheon on board the Lady 
Gwynfred. St Katharine Docks, 
yesterday. Rear-Admiral Sir 
Ronald Forrest presided and 
Captain A. K_ Dodds was the 
guest of honour. 


Service reception 

Royal Army Ordnance Carps 
Major-General G. B. Berragan, 
Director General of Ordnance 
Services, and officers of the 
Royal Army Ordnance Corps 
held a reception at their Head- 
quarters Officers’ Mess. Deep- 
cut. yesterday to mark the 
affiliation between the Corps 
and the Company of Gold and 
Silver Wyre Drawers. General 
Sir Richard and Lady Tram and 
the Master of the Company of 
Gold and Silver Wyre Drawers 
were among others present 


Royal Naval Reserve 
The Lord Mayor and the Sher- 
iffs attended the annual Trafal- 
gar night dinner given by the 
London Division Of the Royal 
Naval Reserve on board HMS 
President last night. Com- 
mander T. C. Haile presided 
and the toast to the Immortal 
Memory was proposed by Ad- 
miral of the Fleet Sir Henry 
Leach. The guests were received 
by Captain G. R. Lines and 
included the Master of the 
Company of Master Mariners, 
the Prime Warden of the 
Shipwrights' Company and the 
Master of the Coopers’ 
Company. 


Society of Merchant V entur er s 
The Lord Mayor of Bristol 
attended the annual dinner of 
the Society of Merchant Ventur- 
ers held last night at Merchants' 
Hall, Clifton, Bristol. Sir John 
Wills. Master, presided and the 
other speakers were Mr George 
McWatters. Senior Warden, 
Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Akehurst and the Bishop of 
Bristol. 


Service dinners 


HMS Cambria 

Vice-Admiral Sir Robert 
Gerken. Flag Officer, Plymouth, 


The Royal Scots (The Royal 
Regiment) 

The Lord Provost of Edinburgh 
attended a regimental dinner of 
The Royal Scots (The Royal 
Raiment) held yesterday in the 
Officers Mess, Glencorse Bar- 
racks. Milton Bridge, Midlo- 
thian. Lieutenant-General Sir 
Robert Richardson. Colonel of 
the Regiment, presided. 


Company of Weavers, Fullers 
and Shearmen 

The Mayor of Exeter and the 
Upper Bailiff . of the Weavers’ 
Company were the guests of 
honour at a dinner given by the 
Master, Mr W. H. Rees, the 
Wardens and Court- of Assis- 
tants of the Company of 
Weavers, Fullers and Shearmen 
at Tuckers’ HalL Exeter, yes- 
terday. 


Royal Corps of Transport 
Officers of the Royal Corps of 


Wales and Chester Circuit 
The Wales and Chester Circuit 
gave a dinner on Saturday. 
October ! 1. in Cardiff in honour 
of the appointment of Mr 
Justice Roch to the High Court 
Bench. The Leader. Mr John 
Prosser. QC. presided. Among 
those present were: Lord Justice 
Watkins. VC. Mr Justice 
Waterhouse; Mr Justice Leon- 
ard and Mr Justice Evans. 


The Nepalese Ambassador and 
Sir Arthur Norman, Chairman 
of the King Mahendra UK Trust 
for Nature Conservation, re- 
ceived the gnests at “Mete 
Nepal”, a Nepali festival of 
music and dance, held at Ken- 
sington Town Hall yesterday 
evening, in aid of the trust. 

. Among those present were 


Tn« Mayor and Mayoress of Keasme- 
ton and C~ 


CMw, the Hon Anns 

r John 


Otflvy. Ueutananl-Omeni] SSrBi 

abattoir and Lady Chaoohr (cbatnnan 


of dm conunmee of i— iiuiiiin 

■launnui of m* 


Mbs Amici Pauley 

festival), 


Service of 
Thanksgiving 

MrG-POpham 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Mr Gordon 
Popham was held yesterday at 
St Lawrence Je wry-oexi-G uild- 
hall. The Rev L.E M. Ctexton 
officiated, assisted by Father 
Richard Incledon. Mr Stephen 
Popham and Mr Matthew 
Popham. sons, read the lessons 
and Mr Michael Verey gave an 
address. 


Appointments 


Mr Richard Graham Hamilton 
to be a circuit judge on the 
Northern Circuit. 

Air Commodore T.H. Stoner to 
be Deputy Controller of Na- 
tional Air T raffic Services in the 
rank of Air Vice-Marshal in 
December, in succession to Air 
Vice-Marshal B. Huxley. 


Cheltenham College 

Sir Hugh Casson, CH. Provost 
of the Royal College of Art, 
formally opened Cheltenham 
College's new £250.000 art com- 
plex in Thirlestaine Road, 
Cheltenham, on Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 14. The development, which 
comprises a new pottery, a new 
50-seai lecture theatre, an art 
library with 1.000 books and 
4.000 coloured an slides, two 
dark rooms and a refurbished L- 
sbaped gallery, will strengthen 
the college's growing commit- 
ment to fine art education. 


OBITUARY 

DR NIGEL COMPSTON 

Outstanding physician 
and administrator 






Dr Nigel Compston. CBE, 
FRCP, who died yesterday. at 
the age of 68. was a phyaciaft 
of exceptional talent who also 
had a gift for administration 
that would ha v- e ensure d his 
success in many other weere. 
His work for the Royal rite 
Hospital and for ihe Royal 
College of Physicians win. m 
particular. be long 
.remembered. 

Nigel Dean Compston was 
born on April 21, 1918. the 
son of a Leeds general practi- 
tioner. He was educated at the 
Royal Masonic School. Trin- 
ity Hall. Cambridge, and the 
Middlesex Hospital. 

From 1942 to 1947 he 
served in the RAMC. landing 
with the British forces m 
Normandy and eventually, as 
a lieutenant-coloneL being re- 
sponsible for the health of the 
British garrison in Berlin. In 
1948 he returned to the Mid- 
dlesex Hospital as a research 
feHow. _ 

In 1951 he was E G. 
Feamsides Scholar at Cam- 
bridge and Mackenzie 
Mackinnon Research Fellow 
at the Royal College of Physi- 
cians. From 1952 to 1954 he 
was assistant professor of 
medicine at the Middlesex. 

In the latter year he began 
his long association with the 
Royal Free, where he was 
consultant physician until his 
retirement in 1983. He was 
nisn fora lime vice-dean of the 
School of Medicine there, a 
member of the board of 
governors from 1963 to 1974. 


and a special trustee since 
1979. He played a nugor role 
m planning tbe haspttaTs new. 
building in Hampstead. 

At the Royal Coitegebc was 
assistant registrar before be- 
coming treasurer in )97& a 
post that he held for 15 years* 
During that time he directed 
two appeals wfcicfa trans- 
formed the eoHcgrt finances, 
raising nearly £8 mitfioiv - 

He was chiefly res poaaMe 
for creating its new medical 
precinct, which was opened by 
the Queen m June of this year, 
when he had the satisfaction 
of seeing h» grantkhaitfrte* 
present the bouquet 

As welt as his consultancy at 
tbe Royal Free, and his work 
for the Royal College. 
Compston was a consttifm 
for much of the same umc at 
the Royal Masonic Hospital, 
St Marv Abbot's Hospital and 
King Edward VUV Hospital 
for Officers. . ' 

He was also joiffi author of a 
work on multiple sclerosis and 
of five volumes in the series 
Recent Advances in Medicine. 

A large and impressive 
man. whose arrival in -any 
room was instantly noticed, he 
was, however, entirely free 
from pomposity and extreme- 
\y well liked by those who 
worked with him and under 
him. He enjoyed social oo»- 
sions and could make; if 
required, a very good speech. 

He married, in 1942, Diana 
Mary Stsndi&h, who survives 
him with their daughter and 
two sons. 









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MR W. W. MAXWELL 


Mr W. W. (Bill) Maxwell, 
who died on October 1 5 at the 
age of 61. distinguished him- 
self in the international rail- 
way world as both an engineer 
and an operator. 

William Wayland Maxwell 
was bom on March 10. 192S, 
and educated at Bedales 
School and Trinity Hall. Cam- 
bridge. graduating in the me- 
chanical sciences tripos. He 
then worked a two-year ap- 
prenticeship with Crompton 
Parkinson Ltd. Chelmsford, 
before joining London Trans- 
port as a trainee in 1947. 

He was based at the Central 
Railway Overhaul Works. Ac- 
ton. until 1958 when he 
became line engineer for the 
Metropolitan and Bakertoo 
Lines. The following year he 
was appointed divisional engi- 
neer for rolling stock mainte- 
nance on the Bakertoo, 
Central. Northern and Picca- 
dilly Lines. 

With the start of tunnelling 
for the Victoria Line in 1965, 
Maxwell, with his extensive 
experience, was given the post 
of development engineer. He 
played a leading role in the 
design of the new line’s rolling 
stock, the first automatically- 
driven trains used in large- 
scale passenger operation. 

The first stretch of the IFne 
was opened in 1968. and the 
new trains - with the driver, 
pushing a button rather than 
turning a handle - proved their 
worth. Maxwell became chief 
operating manager of the Un- 
derground in 1970. overseeing 
all engineering works, and 
joined the executive board 
three years later. 

Over the next eight years he 
also served as managing direc- 
tor of the Underground and 
chairman of LT International, 
a post which involved fre- 
quent iravel overseas. He was 
chairman of the railway divi- 
sion of the Institution of 
Mechanical Engineers from 


1977-78. The interest he took M 
in the careers of the young was 
shown in his establishing of a 
young members* section, with : 
its own committee. 

In 1980 he was elected to ' 
the Fellowship of Engineering. 
adding a fourth to his three 
existing fellowships in me- 
chanical engineering,.. ekcirv . . 
cal engineering and transport. 

He served as president of the 
Institution of Technician En- 
gineers in Mechanical Engh 
nccring from 1981-83. when w 
he strengthened links with its 
siMCT organization, ihe Engi- \ 
neering Council, . .* 

He retired the following 
year but maintained his life- . 
long interest in railways - 
through consultancy work. Hc * 
was an enthusiastic sailor and 
gardener, and did much work 
ter the St John Ambulance 
Association of which he was 
madeanOSU. 

He was also for many years 
adirector.ofWhelpdale.Max- . 
we& St Codd Ltd, piano and 
harpsicord makers, founded 
as Bfothner Ptanosin 1876 by 
hisgrandfaiher. William Max- . 
well Yandcll Maxwell ' 




K 




«4> 


l:‘ ' 


. , 1 

.. ■ill* 




,v m 


{■ 




Maxwell was a sociable man 
with a lively and open mind. 
He was always approachable 
and often astounded friends 
and colleagues with his instant 
recall of facts and figures, a 
facility which undoubtedly, 
helped him in his career. : . 

He married, in 1963, Euge- 
nie Pamela Crump, the actress 
Eugenie Cavanagh. who sur- 
vives him. There were - no 
children of the marriage. : . 


unices (mu 


■HSa* 


-n;-. 




Princess Jotenda of Savoy, - 
the eldest and last surviving 
child of Italy's King Victor 
Emmanuel III. died m Rome, 
on October 16. She was 8S. 

A big game hunter and 
breeder of dachshunds, she 
lived quietly and out of the. 
public eye. 


tr . 


Uppingham School 


A second boarding house few 40 
sixth-form girls, named 
Johnson's, in honour of the 
school’s founder in 1584. Arch- 
deacon Robert Johnson, was 
formally opened on Saturday, 
October 11. by Mr William 
Blois Johnson, the senior mem- 
ber of the founder’s famihr. in 
September 1985 the school 
launched an appeal “Towards 
2000 with an initial target of 
£750.000 for the improvement 
ofboys’ boarding houses and the 
construction of a new lecture 
room. On the first anniversary 


of the launch a sum in excess of 
£1.170.000 has been raised to- 
wards a revised target of 


J. 1 1 - , 


£1.250.000 with the additional 


objective of establishing- aa-TJ 
industrial fellowship at the A 
school. v 


Plumbers’ Company J- 

The following have been elected . - 
officers of the Plumbers' Com- * 
pany for the ensuing yean < 
Master. Mr G. J. W. Marsh: v 
Upper Warden. Mr Leon HUE 
Renter Warden. Vice-Admiral 'j 
Sir John Lea. >. 


Law Report October 18 1986 Court of Appeal 


Existing facts previously unknown to adjudicator can be used on appeal 


Regina ▼ Immigration Appeal 
Tribunal Ex parte Hassanin 
Regina v Immigration Appeal 
Tribunal, Ex parte Kantemir 
Regina v I mmigra tion Appeal 
TrStanaL Ex parte Mohamed 
Farooq 


Before Sir John Donaldson, 
Master of the Rolls. Lord Justice 
Dillon and Lord Justice Croom- 
Johnson 


£v parte El Nashoukv. The 
Times. October 17. 1985). 

The court allowed appeals by 
Ekrem Kandemir against a'simi- 
ter refusal by Mr Justice Mann 
on March 6. 1986 and by 
Mohamed Farooq against a 
refusal of relief by Mr Justice 
Kennedy on October 16. 1985 
{The Times. October 25. 1985). 
and granted an order of certio- 
rari in both cases. 


(Judgments October 16] 

On an appeal io an adjudi- 
cator from a decision made in 
the exercise of a discretion in a- 
deportation case, evidence of 
facts unknown to the decision- 
maker but in existence at the 
time of his decision is admis- 
sible. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
when considering three appeals 
against refusals of judicial re- 
view of decisions of the .Im- 
migration Appeal Tribunal. In 
each case the tribunal had 
dismissed an appeal from an 
adjudicator affirming a decision 
of the Secretary of State for the 

Home Department to deport the 
applicant 

The Court of Appeal dis- 
missed an appeal by the ap- 
plicant in the first case. Abed El 
Naby Mohamed El Nashoukv El 
Hassanin. against Mr Justice 
Mann's refusal of his applica- 
tion on October 16. 1985 (/? r 
Immigration Appeal Tribunal. 


Mr Louis Blom-Cooper. <^C 


and Mr Nicholas Blake 
Hassanin: Mr Alper Riza for 
Kandemin Miss Mya Mya Aye 
for Mohamed Farooq: Mr John 
Laws for the tribunal. 

Hassanin 


LORD JUSTICE DILLON 
said that the appeals all raised 
the point whether in a deporta- 
tion case an appellant could, in 
an appeal to an adjudicator or to 
the Immigration Appeal Tri- 
bunal against a decision of the 
secretary of state to make a 
deportation order against him. 
rely on facts or circumstances 
which existed at the time of the 
secretary of state's decision but 
were not then known to the 

secretary of siate. 

The applicant was an Egyp- 
tian citizen. The secretary of 
siate had decided on February 2. 
1983 (o deport him under 
section 3(5) of the Immigration 
Art 1971 as air overstayer. 

The main caw for the ap- 


plicant before the adjudicator 
and the appeal tribunal was that 
he was a political refugee who 
had a well-founded fear of the 
consequences if he were to be 
deported to Egypt. That had 
been rejected on the facts both 
by the adjudicator and the 
appeal tribunal. Their conclu- 
sion on that point was not 
challenged. 

However, in his notice of 
appeal to the adjudicator the 
applicant bad put nisgrounds of 
appeal more widely and had 
referred also to ihe condition of 
his wife. The question of law 
was whether he was entitled io 

g it evidence of compassionate 
mily circumstances before the 
appeal tribunal. 

The case was put entirely 
under section I90KaKii)inihai 
the secretary of stale exercised a 
discretion in deciding to deport 
the applicant and it was said 
that if should have been ex- 
ercised differently. 

it had been held in R v 
Immigration Appeal Tribunal. 
Ex parte Weerasuriva (J1982] 
Imm A R 23) that facts coming 
into existence after a decision of 
the secretary of state under the 
1971 Art were not admissible in 
evidence, or to be considered, 
on an appeal before an adjudi- 
cator or the appeal tribunal. 
Thai case had been approved by 
ihe Court of Appeal in R v 
Immigration Appeal Tribunal. 


Ev pane Kotocha ([19831 1 
WLR 487). 1 1 

The basis of that reasoning, 
which it was not sought to 
challenge, was that the decision 
appealed against was an admin- 
istrative decision, and the appel- 
late structure under ihe Act was 
not an extension of the original 
administrative decision-making 
function but simply a process 
for enabling the decision of the 
secretary of naie to be reviewed. 
TTierefore facts which happened 
after the secretary of state's 
decision were outside the scope 
of the appellate structure. 

That had been taken a stage 
further in the present case and in 
the parallel case of Kandemir 
and Mohamed Farooq in that it 
had been held below that it was 
equally outside tioe scope of the 
appellate authorities to consider 
circumstances which existed at 
the time of the secretary of 
state’s decision but had not been 
known to him. 

His Lordship accepted Mr 
Blom-Cooper's general $ub- 
mission that on any appeal loan 
adjudicator where the quesriCfi 
was whether a discretion of the 
s E cre , , ? r y °F stale or an officer 
should have been exercised 
differently, evidence of any facts 
which existed at the time the 
decision in exercise of the 
discretion was made was admis- 
sible. even though those facts 
were not known to the decision- 


maker ai ihe umc of the 

decision. 

The credibility of such ev- 
idence and ihe weight to be 
attached to it were different 
matters. It might well be that if 
an appellant sought to put 
forward a wholly new case 
which was different from and 
even inconsistent with the case 
which he had been urging on the 
Secretary of State the adjudi- 
cator would readily conclude 
that the new case was spurious 
and untrue. In the present case 
there was no question of 
credibility. 

The appeal tribunal had 
stated in its decision that even if 
the compassionate factors had 
been before it it would not have 
been inclined to say that they 
constituted compassionate 
circumstances that outweighed 
the public interest served by 
enforcing the proposed order. 

Accordingly, notwithstanding 
that his Lordship differed from 
the judge and the appeal tri- 
bunal on the law. the appeal 
should be dismissed on the 
facts. 

The Master of the Rolls 
delivered a concurring judg- 
ment and Lord Justice Croom- 
Johnson agreed. 

Kandemir 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON 
said that the applicant, a Turk-- 
ish subject, had entered the 
United' Kingdom on December 


29, 1978 as a visitor with leave 
to enter for six months. 

He had overstayed without 
authorization and nothing more 
had been heard of him until 
August 1983. After he had been 
• interviewed by immigration 
oficers on August 13 dhe sec- 
retary of state bad derided on or 
just before October 7. 1983 to 
deport him. 

The applicant had given no- 
tice of appeal against the de- 
cision to deport him. claiming 
to be considered for political 
asylum. He had also stated that 
he objected to being removed to 
Turkey, but he had not sug- 
gested an alternative destination 
if he was to be deponed. 

No hint of his claim for 
political asylum or or the facts 
on which it was based had 
emerged in the course of the 
interview of August 13. and 
consequently those facts had not 
been known to the secretary of 
state when he had made the 
decision to deport. 

The applicant had appealed 
against that decision, and the 
appeal had been dismissed. The 
applicant had appealed to the 
appeal tribunal. 

The appeal tribunal had held 
that as a matter of law it was 
open (o ihe adjudicator and the 
appeal tribunal to consider onlv 
circumstances known to the 
secretary of state at October 7. 
and that on the facts other than 
those relating to asylum there 


was no basis for interfering with 
the secretary of state’s decision. 
Mr Justice Mann had upheld 
that v»w of the law. 

In the judgments in 
Hassanin s case that view of the 
Jaw had been held to be wrong. 
It. followed that the appeal 
tribunal should have considered 
the evidence ip so far as it 
consisted of facts which existed 
at the lime of the secretary of 
states decision to make the 
deportation order. The appeal 
should be allowed. “hps™ 

Mr Rfaa had put forward an 
alternative argument based on 
section 19(1 HuHi) of the 1971 
Act, that the decision was “not 
in accordance with the law or 
with any immigration rules 
applicable to the case". 

It was submitted that if the 
applicant was a refugee within 
the meaning or the Convention 
Relaung to the Status of Refu- 
(UK Treaty Scries. No 
<Cmd 9I7J > and the 
1967 Protocol (UK Treaty Se- 
nes. No 15(1 969) (Cmnd 3906). 
even though the secretary of 
Stale did not know iu then the 
decision to make a deportation 
order was contrary to law and to 
the immigration rules. 

Since the appeal was allowed 
on the first ground, it was not 
necessary to express any view on 
inai alternui tve argument, and it 
was preterabk not to. since the 
argument might trench on mat- 
ters to be considered bv the 


House of Lords in R r Secretary: 
of State far the Home Deport? 
menu Ex pane Musisr. \Tkt 
Times June 8. 1985) which «« 
fixed for hearing in November. 

A person in the position ofthc 
applicant was not prevented^ 
from saying on appeal, without 
suggesting an alternative 
destination, that it was not 
appropriate to betake any, 
deportation order against 
because be was a refugee trader ; 
the Convention and the Proto- 
col. 


The Master of the Roils and 
Lord Justice Croom-Johnson ~ 
agreed. 

Mohamed Farooq „ ' 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON.^, 
said that it followed froth the. 1 ' 
judgments in . ffetssmun and r 

AwK&’jjwthai theapplicanihad^ 

been entitled to have bis claim * 
to be a refug«tt»sklercd by Ute *i 
adjudicator on the basis of the.- ^ 
facts at the time of the acoetary 
of state’s (keisiOhiO deport blW:^ 
even though those facts tuaeiM * 
known to the secretary hf state 
at that time. The appeal bqd~b$. ... 
be allowed. 




The Master of the RoHs and 
Lord Justice. CrOQflfelQbnSQtt a';C 
agreed. ... 

Solicitors: Eaton 

Muswcll Hill: J Win*tenley*!ltt£* 

S raw Richard - J. . Stevens, -/j, *•. 

■ alt ham stow; ; TreaWtOI.*.* . 

Solicitor. • * S .. 


£ 


i 




/ 


'2 



* COM**. 

tr vitrw HP A TTIC 


Vi 

* (i 

•:»«i 

r ■■-.•. 


a U*r 

' ,5, '•■ 1 '< " 


. xm DEATHS 

and in memoriam 


. . . Witch thou tn iu nu^_ _ . 
■nucatta. d* Hit 



AGVti October ai I r _. _ 1. 
Mawmity Unit 

WtlMO) and Nfgri aw^n..*.^ 
Mart, a broom- fa'-nfSSv?** 11 


ta'i. 

'V 


St a 

rtouoMPr. stater for Evmu Jamie aw, 


Course HowttM.^wJJ^" n£? 
art. a son. Harry HwSS T£5££. 
for MaUhrw and a br “ her 

On l«h October, at ■ 

' r mS Davld!*^ Jenny <n ®*‘ Nftbsi 
and uMidi a daugtupr. JuUpi ftnm 

n^DoooU.T^VjSlnSSS: 

LYONS ■ On QttObpr ia t ppr 
Olfan tw o ArSSm ail M^. ‘® 
bauBbtw. Emu 3oy. . “**■ ■ 


.1 .•; 
v -. A 


sor. to r»n n a-J ""nd- 

S& a '«■ k4 S 

rtlKS - On 2sib Augusi iwa ■> — 

sA:aa.^«£5 


■ • '•% 


^«r’S^ Ih " “*■ » 

■ October loth, al the 
wmtotfnstrr Hosoual to Henfoon* 

l. n0 S^S5 I i. wlft 01 Mttes Stanford . a 
daughter Harriet, a sister for Emma. 

TOtajl** - On October lan. al in* 
Prince* Anne Hospital, m loX 
jtaa mWoo. to Peter -and Martha me* 

hS2*S‘V2?^SJJL2 on - ‘ Tm *o**Wia 

woOkt for Rrtxfca. 


deaths 


2 


w 'iU\V|;[ L 


On 14th October 1986. 
prare runy. PatHcts Mary Munw. 
formerly Ooidacne. inee Holmes). Fu. 
neral al South London Crematorium. 
Rowan Road. StrcaUianr Vale. Lon- 
ttm SW16 al 2pm on Thursday 23 
October 1986. Florals before mu* 
day. lo C.W.S.. Carratt Ump. SW17. 
Donation to Wandsworth Ataocta- 
Uon for Mental Health. 

MOWMNQ . on t7lh October 1986. 
peacefully In hospital Gertrude 
Grace, dearly Moved Nanny of the 
Norfolk family. Funeral at SI PhcF* 
Church. St Peter's Road. Marlow. 
Buckinghamshire on Monday 20th 
October at 2.30 pm.. Flowers to be 
sent direct lo Church or Kenyons. 49 
Marlowes Road. London W8 

, - CMMTU. - On October I6th. peace- 
fully at Araesb ut y Abbey Nursing 
Home. Ian George Halliburton Camp- 
bell. Q.C- much loved husband of 
Betty and father of James aita Camil- 
la. Private funeral, memorial service 
robe arranged, no flowers please, do- 
nations U desired, to The Barrister 
Benevolent Association. 3 Raymond 
Buddings. Grays Inn. London wciR 
SOS. 

CftADOCK - On October 16th. peace- 
fully - Felicity, widow of Maior Guy 
Cradock ai. Hariforih. Yorkshire 
aged 83 years. Funeral private. 

ELLIS • On October 14th. peacefuBy at 
Johannesburg. Dr. Cecil Philip EBb 
of Maud Avenue PMermaritaburg. 
m Ms 83rd year. Enquires to RF. 
Ohs. Tel: 082 345 264. 

OOOOCHU - On October 16th. peace- 
fully al home. Frank Douglas, aged 
84. ot South Petherton. Funeral ser- 
vice at ■ YcovM Crematorium. 
Tuesday October 21. al 2.pm. No 
flowers please, but donaUoos IT de- 
sired. for the Royal National 
Institute, for the Deaf. C/o. Irish And 
Denman Funeral Direc to rs. South 
PMherion. Sometset. Teh South 
Priherion 4t»4a 

, .HOC On 16th October 1986. peace- 

• j fully al home. Jocosr- Prudence 
Mayuni Koc fnCc Waliersj-aged 66. . 
She is laved and missed by tier tom- 
Uy and many friends. Requiem Mass 
a LSI. Peter's Cathedral. -Lancaster al 
2 pjn. Wednesday' 22nd October. 
Flowers or donations lo Oxfam or 
Amnesty InlernpUonaL AH enquiries 
(06241 63612. 


1 ® B * October 1986. 

Dm JSSFZL? {Mkt <* 

"j^jn aramhooe. im i*. aged 

l a!S^2i 3 2®5^ cr - ****** y «t 

r2* w, '® n v Daphne Margaret. (Or 

pwiy of West wittering, '■tiiiiti * 
JSEJ- CheSS# Cnmt 
rnday 24ih October « 
Family flowers only, dona- 
rhj^ n >f for ‘ n, ° Nathmat 

*«* Onmanage e/a 

»»«.a«S?Oo?^ camsenw 

MACDONALD ■ On 16th October 
1986. Peacefully at Ntnewcfb Hasp! 

*“»*»** MacdooakL 
TheC3rbe. Dunam*. Dearly beloved 
■ I MI ? ana •* **05cmaiy. much tovrd 

father of Ewan. Peter asnd Neal and 
adored grandad, also special friend 
and father to Pamela. Ann. Richard 
amlHeniy. Fbneros Service al Perth 
crematorium, on Monday October 
20th. at 1.45pm. . Family (lowm 
only please. 

* £ 5^* *^ - 00 ***»» Goober. 
Jrttme. wife of Nonnan and mother 
Adb. Peacefully at 
name m Lcwea. after loq »*"— no 
gawtfc Private cremation. Memori- 
at M U niversity of Sussex Meeting 
Moose 230 31 October. 

*«»•• - On 13th October 1986. 
peacefully alter a long Illness. Helen 
Mahon of Brown Heart Gardens. 
London Wl. Dearly beloved wife of 
IbelMe Arthur a A. Mahon IPad and 
dear staler of Nigel and AUsa. Funer- 
a service at Ootdera Green 
Crematorium on Wednesday 22 Oc- 
tober at 10.45 am. Family Dowers 
only, donation s If desired to the Brit- 
ish Homeopathic Association. 27a 
Devonshire Street London Wl. 

MAMR- On October 14th Frederica 
Joyce, beloved stster of May 
Swanson & dear Auntie Joyce - loved 

and admired by Ml her family. 

Ot rtMHi HAW - On October lfttb 
1 986. Colonel Robert George Watson 
OBercn sua w kjSLJ- E.RD. TJX. 
D-L. F.R.G&. RM. J.P- aged 74 

years, of Pine Road. DUbbury. Man- 
chester. Beloved husband of 
Kathleen and father of Charles and 
the late Florence. Funeral service al 
St James's Church. Dktatwry on 
Wednesday October 22nd at 12 
noon. No flowers. Donations to 
Brooghton House Home tor Disabled 
Ex Servicemen. Salford or St John 
Ambulance in Greater Manchester. 
Enquiries Messrs John G Ashton and 
Company. Tei 061 928 7816. 

HUM - On October 15th 1986. peace- 
fully al the CrantiHI Nursing Home. 
Bath. Lady Nora Price. Betoved wife 
of the late Sir Roy Price, former High 
Comrafaaooer of New Zealand. Fu- 
neral Service at Taunton Deane 
Crematorium on Wednesday Octo- 
ber 22nd at 230 pm. Any enauntes 
lo Hatchers of Taunton. M fe p taon e 
Taunton 72277. 

REES - On 16th October 1986. pes 
fufly at The Htodhead Nursing 
Home. EUeen Jane Rees (N£e Spear) 
In her 90th year, widow of Grtf. be- 
loved mother of Ronald and David, 
and much loved grand mother. For- 
merly of OtuHDe and Cranbrook. 
Funeral Service al SL 
Bartholomew's Church. H aate me r e. 
at 11 -30am on Friday 2am October 
1986. followed by private cremation. 
Fhndty flowers only. Donation in her 
memory, if desired. ID Dr. 
Bernardo's. 


On Oct teth. peacefully, 
at home in Spain. Brigadier Francis 
Wyld Sandam IXS.O- Durham Light 
Infancy: beloved btnbend of Kate 
and father of Hugh and Philip. A FU- 
neral Service has been held In Spain. 


IN MEMORIAM -PRIVATE 


SORRELL • Christine Mary MurreU. 
M.Dl. B-Sl. (LoodJ Member of. the 
COunriL British Medical Assodatton. 
Born Oct TSth. 1874. died Oct 18th 
1935. bi .pNUU re me mb ran ce .of a 
loyal friend and gay companion ■ 
ml; 

PMRSOR . On October 18th: 1981. 
Pamela {nee LovtbomO very dearly 
loved who of David Pawson. 


Services tomorrow 

21st Sunday 
after Trinity 

CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL: BHC 
9.30 Sung Euch and M: XI Sung 
Euch. CanTerbury Mass (Moore). Jou. 

(Leighton). Second Servtoa (TamHtos). 

YORK MINSTER: 8. 8A6 HC: 10.16 
Sung Euch. Ktose for four .voices 
(fomOX Ven Ronald Woodley: 1 1 .30 M 
(Jackson to Gt 4 E. Second Servic e 
-,t\ actghunX Exuiuie lusu In.Dpraino 


/. Mrs Jean Mayu 

w cathedralTs. HC. 
(Aytewart): iojo M. Ju- 

jvaiStiM fc ^BanS! 7% 7? -fS 

s^jaTysaarts *3 

an mortal flesh (BatrMow). me D^m: 
3 E (Purcell to B flca x Oga. Tri o u 

auSiFft "tt-zss 

s'sotmr wa&F' cathtoraju 

HO V 1 Euch. Three Pa riMjas 
O Lord, give thy Hotv Spirit 
Ave verum (RyrdX V 

riSori^. Reiolce ln ~~llit Lort 

warlc B. lO. lZ-t S. 6 l*C ll.HM. 
Octavi Tom (Lassos). Loci* 


How lovely are thy _ ... _ 
(Brahms). R*v M Braday: 630 E. I 

fff* ^SSniSS^TS- Westo dny r. 
SWl: 813. 12.15 HC 11 Choral M 
and Sermon. Rev Ronald Wagers. 

ST 

lijo ._. 

(1662): 2.46 ChfoeM R wfcr 4.XB 
Choral E: 6JJO EP. Rev Ptuup Cbestre. 
ST MARY ABBOTS. K fiw l n g ron . W8: 
« torn hc- axn Sam Euch. Sister 
Cent 11.16 M (1662). Rev FM 
Arnold: 630 E. the VfCBT. „ _ 

ST MARY'S. BQOTMa ml-SWl; 9. 

Service tpHdsa). o5 ^fthe/SSip 
(MorleyL O sacrum convlvlum 

SWl: 8.15 HC: 11 HC. Wev_3 Q L 
Prior 7 JO Inform al Ev ening jjgvfca. 
ST MICHAEL'S. OornhUL H3: 11 
Choral -Eurti (1662). O mm to 
(Tanta). Hereford Cooununton Sri-vfoe 
(Michael BCTkekeyX Ave vreum CMo- 
zam. Rev DOW Burton Evans. 

ST PAUL'S. Robert Adam Street. Wl: 
11 HC. Jtey George Caiaftdy: 6^0- 
ST PAUL'S. Wilton Pta re. s wi : 8. 9 
HC: 11 Solemn Euch. Mtssa O qnam 
gtortownn esi wgnum (y ktorta). An d! 
saw another anpel .( C v. Sb^rtLO 
quant (ViaoriaX Rev MUF 

ot" PCT raS' Eason Square, swi: 
a. is HC: lO Family MJSK XX — 
Commuaui service in C 


(S^ckner). Rev Anthony ChorrtmL 

CHAPO. BOYAL S JmmX ^BCe 

8 30 HC: 11-18 MP. Hymn (d the 
Cherubim (Rachmaninov). Rev JRW 
StOM 



i 


ra YM?NA\ AL COLLE^ <»AP^. 
Greenwich. 

Lead me Lord (Westesi Ju™«r 




11.30 



UNCOUTS JNN^OtAP&j^ 

i^SS'oHURaff^ StreeL EC4: 
H.30 HCL 11-lS MF- 


s-s zrr'a JPssJig -s 

earth Vs the tonriH 

STT STEPHEN'S- 
svj^a ^LM ; 

suirexfi Pastor sons u uasov. Ke » 
Perry Butter: 6 solemn Evensong and 
Benediction. Rev Graham Mwgm. 
THE ANNUNCIATIO N. Bryanaton 
Street. Wl: llSLMSoAMd 
gtortosion I 
Clhavtt eod 
BenetMctson-l 


un 


SeraartRowX' Te De mit. Lauamain 
and Jubilate Deo 


„ ) (Stanford in B flatX 

Rev-P-C Moore. 


S Thomas. 


CHAPEL ROYAL., 


piiacet^.3b w HC: 


Ml i ipP 1 


1UC« antet ermtoum 
keep him iWesteyX 

ALL HALLOWS BY THE TO WBfo « 1 
Sung Euch. Rev Gualterde Meflo^ 
all SAINTS, (jtowjd Street- WiTb. 
6.16 LM: II HM. M 
Arnold). Be SUU. my 


E&AgSSSm 



ST COLUMBA'S CHURCH OF SCOT- 

Confirmation and A itod ss f o n dBm 
idcante. Rev Kenneth G 

63 a Rav K enneth G Hi 

ASSUMPTION. Wowtt | 

Wl: a lO. 12. 4. 6. LM: 11SM. ___ 
to Me tempore (Monnwerda Bone 
pastor (EslavaX Salve Regina 

SSSd^TTtEET. Wl: 7-30. 8.30. IOl 
lZTS: 0.16 613 LM: 11 KM. Mm 
for five voices (Byrd). Venll*. 

THE*c5*AT0PY» 

SW7: 7. a 9. lO- 1230. 4, 


(Vale, to 




CHELSEA St OLD CHURCH. Old 

EXSfisSESfc 



StriST CHURCH. CHELSEA. SW3: 
Bile 11 MWi C. Sev J Barton: 6E- 

r C uL A hcSi B sIw 

Audley. StrreC fJk, 


SwSwmas: 




Marks- 

HOLY 

SW7 

Rev - . 

Perkin. 

HOLY 

Road. 


i-REET^ ' METHOD 1ST 
./l: u. Rev Jol» Staoay: 

^i W IW^UHC. Allen .. SBveL 

P^^WTERlAN 
ScTTbvSodTPtoce. WC1: 1L ftev 
KWto Swtaiw; 6.»iReo JohnMiUen 

^ URC- NWS! 930. 


TRINITY. Prince priori 


unaa. SW7: 8.00. 12.05 

H 30. 12-10 HO 10^0 EMCh. Canon 
,r>TS Brooke St. EC1: V30 

Bartholomew the great 
O bbiihhetd ECO: 9 HC: 11 M and HC. 

S tSffifKas 


In&ANa 

^locarti- -•sr l a 
SRii 



ST pS^ach Curd«2 

its-icM HGJJ *S»e£i l 2jZ' 1 ' ° 


Rev 

Heating Ser- 


450 

CT JAMES^. Sussw Gariten*- Wg B 
St ; J ,0.3OSiuifl E«h- M«« O ram 

sssarwref*- 6 «^- 


Church news 

The Rev J D Sav Ute. R eaqr. 
Beckenham: Soaso of RoctunJer. to 
. be also Runs Dean of Beckenham. 

■flMK’fc J SMppon. curate. St 

fciisaSh?”^|^sj!5 

and Si MichaefN Smethwick, same 
dlOCflW- 

"H 1 * «ocw ImciiStr' » 

Rev 1 J R Stone. Tea m Vic ar. 

.„..vs?vW ikS5S“w,a 

M &??S ^bnbpiton. R«ra| 
Navy, lo be Rertor. Mundfont with 
Lynford. Cranwicn and idtburgh with 

fe^sss^as^sssar , “^ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 1 8. 1 5R6_ 


19 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


NEXT SUMMER 
IN 

AMERICA 

CAMP AMERICA offers teach- 
ers- nurses and students over 18 
years of age ihe oppormn«y to 
be a camp counsellor for 9 
weeks to teach sports, rats and 
crafts In an American summ er 
camp. Benefits iodude FREE re- 
turn Sight. FREE board, pocket 
money and up to 6 weeks free 
Ume. Please send postcard with 
name and addrts Ur. CAMP 
AMERICA. DepL TT. 37 Queens 
Gate. London SWT or call 
01-581 2378. 


TO JOUR AHTMOHY MCTOR your future 
(L u u n i re in taw would Bke to give poor 
Wi RKWrd n unMiPfl newlBnnnv 
foreri YOU i Ra-hard lavra you vny 
murti. PmrmiMaN TbewMriinp 
date i% Ntnnnarr 22ad 1986 In T«nm- 
■o CdlroilmOltH 416 977674a 16. 
Urn SMrrri. TgmM MSG 1C7 
Mara- santorrib. 


-would Hkc lo 
heai front AdMK 8 you have written 
ft uoe* uw onmn piairamv write 
M. DrM: 7M1 1/22 THE BOOK GUILD 
1TD. 26 HMI StreeL Lewes, swam 
BM7 2LU 


nf canrcr fund *or 


Cfaddten. Send sae tor Xmb cart Wo- 
nume. bOe««l» BUB of 6.8SP - Cl.TO 
r i|i m mi Duty, to la amihm Road, 
wa 6AT pmand SMgpcn Mon-Fn 
930430. 


deveMpMJHaoari norearemai 
Vftitti S.A£ Cbnsbnu Card 
cautegiie. Oum rw a Test ror can 
m. woedburv. Harlow Road. RssMion. 
(m. CM 19 8HF.tOZ7979 2233> 
qjutth Oirrat They largoi Hie an 

Mumtinl 60 years ago but we 
Haven't. Ham Birthday 6 Uiamu far 
ImNu wonderful father St Inend Love 
bun. (Tu Minin i Andrea -A RnsianL 
WKnC von wiih tor BUrnpool Giro CMir 
1956/607 we are Hanning a 30 yr re 
i m a m Jotv/Auawbl 19BT -Coniaet A 
Bevendge Ol 366 8626 laHkvl 


WORLD MOCKEV Cw Final 2 best stand 
tar Vets (or vale b etween 9 and tO Dm 
lo mnm Treason 840359 Proceeds lo 
etiarttv 


BIRTHDAYS 


Marion 

birthday 


our love and Orel 
neM 


SERVOS 


boos for the 

Street. London Wl. 
9937 


. totroour 
88 Maddox 
01-495 


Contact 

the team with the best 
experience World-wide 
ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT TT, 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CT1 1BA 
TEL: 0227 462618 


ANCESTRY 

Contact 

the iram-wtth the beat 
experience Worid-wkte 

ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT TT, 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
‘CT11BA 
TEL* 0227 462618 
HERALDRY 


R BI PI LONDON rent a TV or video by 
wk or iboMIl TOPS TV 01-730 


S&6 V 


U OU now 
b efo r e the festh-e season al S7 bed 
tpecuUred lunsutg home for addictive 
rtoeme set m area of ou wt a nrll gg natu- 
ral beauty. Saffnd by nines, 
counselors. osychotogM. Btarsioihera- 
rto «<d reside n t medical atnar. For 
Illustrated prospectus contact the direc- 
tor. Clouds Horae. EM Kooyle. Win 
8P3 ABC or telephone 074783 655. 


esi tagb-tech 
service. Ot 278 61?7 


WANTED 


|2S per ra op » paid for aDver arllcMs. 


irweOery bougM. Mr Haft 01-900 0030 
or Wrtir 361 Harrow Road. London. 


JEWELLERY. Gold. Silver- amends ur- 
qenay wanted. Top prices, wuaams. 43 
Lambs Conduit SI WCL Ol 405 8838. 


FOR SALE 


EC 1795-19U. Other Mies 
nd bound ready for orasania- 
abo -Sunday*- £1230 
tr When. 01-688 6323. 


860039 vW«*V 


SMALL. Very pretty uitoM walnut rarigbl 
piano. ExreHent pny tog order, tuned. 
£645 Mm Condition. 01-453 0148. 


fODKITII BUS Pure wool ha nd made, 
yx 5*. £200 Tel 01 584 990E»»ve 
message tor Mb* Jacques Room 51 li 


VIDEO SENSATION Latest 8 hr remote 

control modetoniv £329. Tons. 9i Low- 
er SkUnr SI . SWl. 01-730 0933. 


rtoveways. Spare needed, hence low 
prices. 061 223 0881. 061 2S1 6786. 


ftmnnwra for *■*»*«**£ 
ways. Laamdabon sale. Tel 061 223 
0881/061 231 6785. 


toe Green, onouial Interior, mroa 
Stereo, netted worlung order. CLIOO 
Trt Ol 240 8422 (day) 


Cancer 

Together we -can beat h. 

Wc fund over one third of all 
research into the prevention aod 
cure of oncer in the UR. 

-Help is by sending a donation 
or mike a legacy to; 

Cancer 
Research ■ 
Campaign 


1 Carbon Home Terrace. 

(Dept n 18/10 London SW1Y SAK. 



FOR SALE 


SAVE A PILE 
RESIST A "CARPETS 

Mnakaioii veh-M see carertog. 14 
pUm Cpfawv Budl In BKtertay 1 2" 
wtde tram sUrk. 7 year wear puaras 
kt for uomr or ofltce. £4 TS penaya. 
Cbrimptaw «rk nm. Natural. 275 a 
275 only. Brel pnre anywhere £8.96 
grr n. rt- Pcrirri goods. 

Phil UW larorei Wtecbon Of p*atn car- 
JrtM to Londoc All prices rertusire 

148 Wandsworth Bridge Rfl 
Pboorv Green sw 

Ti± 01-731-3368/9 

Rw CahmstM-Dtpcri FWfog 


■JW P Grand piaiw. No. 47963. 
Rosewood. 6 n £3.000 ojva Til. 
Otfort 1098921 2835 (w/eods « after 
7ptUI 


PEBSUN CARPETS ISsgm tkk and S 
I2sa» wont. Htm quality. Tabriz, very 
reaaOTBBte Drier. Pm aw to priv ate. Tel 
01-602 8004 anytime 


r STONWAY BRAND Piano. £1300 
Beetawm Upngai no need of nnail at 
teotawi £500 TefOl-674 3468 


CMAPPSL uertBht Plano. Very good con 
dlllan. £730. TM. Ot 506 38LS 


CANCELLED Furniture Pnwa>taital> 
cm) Regmcy state ramng fotaa In ntu 

mah oga n y- tadrviduoUy naufondl. Sol- 
id brass ntuogs- unmed. Stored. Seen 

Leodon. (PrefeaslonN exammabon 

raaedL Seatmg us to lO - £475. MBttog 
UP 10 12 £750, aenoag 14/16 £1900. 
Huge co pte reoce/b a ngasBaa/ board- 
room tabte I2bc 4' £2X100 n emy). 
MaKMno ctaos. MHd mahog an y land 

fmracd £60 each, wheatsacsf pfolem 
chairs ctscoth. Prmce of waire iband 
carved) with SMMd backs £120. 01-203 
6027 


Hi Angela ThtfhrtL 

Jane's Fightmg Shiea. Vidor Canotsg. a 

Hraory of ’Psnny Bloods'. Conectmg toe 

Tburtmib EdlUona - Mus thousanra oi 

banta tor sate and wanted, are aU m tor 

Novrmerr mur of Book and Magnate 

CDdrctor. price £1 20 - an rate to vow 

local news a ae m on Friday. October 

i TDi. h you are uaawr lo oMafo a copy 

from yoor newaageaL then unite in 

Book and Maoanae Codraer. dDftto. SL 

MaryN Road. Esilna. London WS 6RQ. 


MMOPAftUiT Make Mdre/ndte/ wine 

with our iradUmaal ouakiy Pfrme s and 

mnhrrv From CM driterred. Detain 

from v>go (Ti. ao Conranon ltd. SW3 

STA. 01 737 5388. 



Ugnt EXP. Chess. Les Mis. Ail meotre 


Tot 821 6616/8280496. 

A.EX / Visa 7 Diners. 


— UekMs for M mM 

ool events. Our.cttmis toctudr man 
maior comparer s . Credil 
01-828 1678. 


WANTED Edwardian. Victorian and all 
printed itenaure. Mr Asnson oi 947 
5946. 607669 Grant! Lane. EartriMd. 
SWl 7 

ROYAL BOULTON Toby Jnas. FfoBrin 
animate, etc., wanted. 01083 0024 


1C 


INC PIANO WORKSHOP FREE credit 
over t year iapr QHi Low toteren 
rMes over 2 years (APR 9.^^) & 3 years 
IAPR 12-2**l Written suolsbora. Free 
Caiaioour. 30a Higbrate Road. NWS. 
01-267 7671. 

(nm- 


sale. 586 4981 -ID 


ThskwteyJohdRawMn. 2x8*. 4‘.lma: 
£4.700. (BeaiHO 0424 216516. 

RIME fin nisnnpini grand nm Vinr 
good coreBUon. £1960. TM: 0403 


ILATSHASE 


J 


/cut PRAM prof girl to 
snare luxury flaL ount room, to ra ire HI 
facoi lies £170 pan.- Tetot600--a»o 
n/Prae) 

rantr* Large Single bed sk. use of 
kitchen A bathroom. £50 PW tori. 01 
352 5322. 

HIRB WS Prof I 20 ♦ lo share hoc flat 
wtui cpte. CH. AU nachmes. Nr tube- 
£175 PCM Exci. 01 067 6243 

RMR— W Lie ns ad toih/i 
sharers in nud ML CH + afl ament, 
door tube. N/B. £62 PW. 740 8836 
liUM VALE 2nd prof. F. 26*-. N/S to 
sbr. OaL AO rood- «ns. O/R. nr Tube. 
£42 pw ewL Tel: 01 289 0639 
■ CLAPNAH North tubei O/R. hi Ige RM 
share with 1 other. £40 PW * MBs. ox 
720 030 7. Viewing Sun-Wed eves . 

■MDfl* PARK. Spacious room to tor- 
rare house: separate kttchen. £A8pw 
toe. Ol 722 0889. 


RENTALS 


c anif A Knightebodge. Belgravia. Pirn 
uco. - Westnunster. Lu xur y houses and 
Date available for long or short lets. 
Please rag for rorrml IteL Oooxs. 69 
Burianoham P alac e Rd. SWl. 01-820 
8261. 


DMJflCN. 3/4 bed mod home on private 


and schoote. Long lei. £i50nw. Tet Ol 
761 0444 (24 hrsL 


ueatJUEi t£ 

We offer a protesoioari 5 reilaaieari- 
vire. QuraOTu Consnnttoe 01-244 7363 


reaiaa plat* a rouses avail . a 
read, fartoptaniats. executives. Long & 
Short Ms re all areas. Lax Trend A Co, 
4a Atoemarie SI Wl. 01-499 6334. 


MO. a beooUfoi brand raw 2 bed maV- 
sonrtir. Large doub le be d, d 
forirahtogs. pener. rsoo pw. 
co m pa n y toL Ol 938 7622 (TL 


nmuB PARK. Luxury 
bed 2nd floor ItaL All new klL £160 pw 
Long company lei. Ol 938 7622 (TL 


AMERICA N EXECUTIVE Seeks tax 
Rai/horar up lo £800pw Usual fees 
reo. PtaUlns Kay A Lewis. South of the 
Park. Chrtsre ofnee. 01-362 8111 or 
North of toe Par*. Regem's Part office. 
01-586 9882. • 


Herron 200 yds. 

next lo Hyde Porfc. V. quiet newly dec * 
furn fiat to wen nm Mock. 2 dbte beds. 2 


n. igereoep nn. kk -e an 
tori Ch/Chw. un * porter- 
age. £560 pw. Ten (06381 56752. 


... . w. fatty 

rowpped flaL 2 (tote-beds, l VW. 2 
baths. Carage. tretty garden. £ 260pw 
for immrdmir tei. Tet 886 1997 


MTBC PK W2. Sunny raeuo hse. 5 dM 
beds. 2 Mbs. master en suite +■ ttcuza. 
poof gdn * sep (err. Huge opeonfoa (ge. 
Excel (urn £650 pw. Ol 723 4135. 


1 bed. t rerep. 
£l20ow. Co M 
S29 2042. 


.- SC Rto now vacant, 
bath, krtch. CH. Ufl. 
PRf. Tet 262 8976 OT 


PARSON* 8REEN Charmnrg 4 bed hoosc . 
2 baths, dbte rerep. tnHy eg — p m 
U tchen/dtotog room, conservatory 
£278 dw Co. Lei Td^>l-870 1964 


PRUMtOSC WLL NWl BrauUltd- 1 bed- 
room Rat. toon ceilings, ige reep room, 
mnetrom lufr shops ft-porti. £148 PW> 
Trt Ol 722 9813 (HI Ol 839 9184 (Ol 


93 7 -Ml The number to reraember. 
when w riting bust rental properties In 
central and pr u ne London areas 
£1EO/C2 jOOOpw. 


W.Ibx. 
dbte bedroMti. Ufl. 
01-622 582S. 


. Hat. recep. 
■- Long WL Tri: 


UntUNY SERVICED PLAT0, centra) Lon 
don Iran C326 pw Ring Town Hse Apts 
373 3033 


If you’ve ever called 
The Samaritans, please 
make just one more call. 


tf we've ever helped you, 
now you can help us to 
help others. 

' Please remember us in 

your WTO. 


Please cal! Slough 

•write to: 


753)32713 Of 
David Evans. The 
Samaritans. 17 Uxbridge 
Road. Slough SL1 1SN ft 
further d 


for 


The Samaritans. 


FDR SALE 


LONDON ROAD 
GARAGE 
(ROMFORD) LTD 

Marries Bra/ man deafen 
U wl erwrii cn for bra? and to* mileage 
Mcitxdo. 

CONTACT 
MIKEDUNFORD 
ON 0708 2351 1. 
AFTER 7PM 
0245 442172 


FULHAM flat.. Absolutely sup n. Dommc 
brtroren CH. w/tnach Co Lrt £i2S 
pw Tri. Ol 736 8766 
MHMBATC N6 Super refuthtsbM ? bed 
hre naL garages bvaflahte. £140 PW. 01 
340 7408. 

KEN H teCTOH. W8. Brand new iaiteiux 
mafo. l due bed. forge rer- hu/diasr. i 
mu High SI. £186 P*- fori- 938-2398. 
ST JOHN* WOOD i bed flat. Lux Mock. 
NrwtadKonud. Rortm. Shoo Nr.su- 
U6CL £146 pw. Tri. Ol 492 6890 
DOCKLAND* FINE and bouses to lrt 
inroranoui me Ogrkfonds am th.-oi 
790 9660. 



Au Pa 

Oibvv m/hrips. don. ja bvnftn stUf 
Iff Overwnv Au Pran X gc n i a Ud 87 
ftrrrxi 6t London W.l Ot 439 6534 


* CtKf buikr INURI N* 
lion With pmbte Anmno fonty in 
Lnoiaad or aaroML Phone tor rv 688 


LONDON PROPERTY 


LV tlUMM HoowVFUb 
' tope. BNgrasia. 

. srtNtlon from 

UOOOOO to a mdlion Bsrrfaglon 
Tnindm Ltd Ol 064 2561 


- rrretd. Ut/bnoUll rm. master test 

with d re raw w rm and hath. 3 lurthrr 
tetov. 2nd hath, rebar, mature gdn. 
£16X000- Trt 01-228 1296 


SOMERSET* AVON 


SOMERSET 

Large bungalow. Lovely 
iwiniernqNpd views. Farmhouse 
kiKfrcn. Drains room. Lounge. 

Three beds. Dossing room. 

Bathroom. Centrally hosed. Lmge 
garden. Tea mantes Wdb or 
Giaaoabtuy. £66dOOQ. 

Tet (0458) 33050 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


IUEXL 8ET TOO started In a home book 
u-turn taism that ran'! fan. For full 
ncniino itetadm wad SAC lo OtdbUte 
MMUg lltopt STL PO BOB II. 
rnsirr HR6 9YN. 


MOBal runtw natio n ww te from a 
ettartrred arrouhtawt and c ap ert w red 
Miter for I hr atiangtiauil OS flnonre 
for burtntm prartiBH-. rraaramn and re- 
final KOre 0202-041577 


I meat reptaremrid cmranodrvfor Mrr 

■ rurv OMC and von o. SmsK avadabte 


Barry Allan. Ztorart Produrt tar. Unk 

6- >1151 l i a re mhor Way. Rirhmomi. 

BrHteh Conmuna. Canada. Tel: Old 

bOB 272 (88a 




CHARITY COMMC6KM 
Chanty: City Parocfurt Fomfobon (City 
Church Fund) CKy of London 
Scheme for the ameudrand of a prevtots 
Scheme 

Rtf: 205529-A90-L2 
he Charav fanmman lor Erxrand 
and waits proposr in matte an Order es- 
ti Mie n m g a Scheme lor tfus and other 
purpose*. Any oowcOen to the nrapeoed 
scheme or suggestions for rmxOfVmg K 
should be s eat tn wraing witbto one 
m ont h from the dale of (la n mt e e to the 
Secretary. Charity Co mm bet on . a Atoona 
Hotac. 87-80 Haym a rttcL London SWiV 
4QX quoting the reference above 
Copiea ot the proposed Scheme wm be sup- 
plied an wiinen request to the Charity 


atom ol and nay atoo be seen al the taKow- 
h>0 address:- CuUdhaD Library. London 


Die ISM day of October 1988. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
No. 007090 Of 1986 
CHANCERY OtVTSWN 
COMP ANIES COURT 
M THE MATTER OF PORT ON 
INTERNATIONAL PLC 
and 

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES* 
ACT 1986 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tins a Peti- 
tion was an toe 26tf> September 1986 
protrated lo Her Majesty's High Court at 
Junior tor tor renlKmaboa ol toe rm ur- 
ban at me Share Premium Aiyoooi of the 
aomr named Comoany from 
£71.026.96181 to £66.623^02^1 
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that 
toe raid Prttoon » drrenrd lo be brand- 
bet ore toe Honouraoic Mr .htetree 
Mrrvyn Daitesal the Royal Courts of Jw 
bre. Strand. London WC2A 2LL on 
Monday toe 27th day of October 1986. . 
Am- Cr nta lor or Shareholder of the said 
Company desirmp loooooie the making o< 
an Oran- for fhr-ronAmialion of the tad 
reduction oi Share Premium Account 
should appear at toe tone of hramg la 
person or by Counsel for that purpose. 

A roov of uw> said Prtwon wtH be fur- 
lusnrd to any «urb person req foria g toe 
same by tor under-inunHoni il Sokrttore 
onpaymrnlof toe r e q iJ at ed Charge for tor 

Dated ton Itflti day <H October 1986 

Norton Rose BottereH 8 Roche 
Kempson House 
Ca ra o ne U- Strrrl 
London EC3A 7 AN 
Rrt- DBA/63/KI062Oa 
Tot. Ol 283-2434 
fotofoy lor I he raid Company 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE . 

NO. 0071 74 of 1986 
CHANCERY OIVSION 
Ov THE MATTER OF WESTLAND PLC 

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES 
ACT 1986 

NOTICE E> HEREBY GIVEN that 8 Peti- 
tion was an tor IN October 1966 
prewMed to Hn- Matestw High court of 
Juslirr for tor roonmuuon of toe redur 
bon at >1< Ihe Capital of the above-named 
Connam from £61.926^00 - to 
C58^69609-22S and >2) toe Share Pre- 
mium Arrouol of toe raid Company by 
CllLS07-58t> _ 

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER G1V%N toll 
toe void petition b d keeled to be heard 
before Ihr Ho n o u r a ble Mr. Jtsbce 
Mervvn Dev tm ai toe Royal Courts of Ji»- 
Irre. Strand London -WC2A SU on 
Mondai toe 27tn day of Ortofter 1986. 
Ain Crmiloi or Shareholder of toe vad 
cohuum drvuing to oppo s e the making of 
an order lor tne rortirmahon of the vart 
reduction of Caatai ana Snare premium 
Acrounl should appear al the bipeot hear 
mg in person or by Counsel (or that 
putpove 

A COM 01 me Mid Prtmon win or for. 
ntshnl to am *ufh person requtting Hie 
vanM-hv IhninKtermreilionraSobritorsdn 
pavmeiM of toe repute ted charge for Ihe 

DATED (hr 16th day H October 1986’ 
Slaughter mi May 
36 Basnghao Sheri 
London -EC2X SOB 
Rrt: GWF/LIT/R1R/JGWO 
sohrttors for ihr wd Company 


IK THE HIGH COLRT OF JUSTICE 
NO 00548 7 of 19 86 
to THE MATTER OF 
PLMViVNT ■ FOODS! LIMITED 
Bv Older pi (he High Court of Jurim-. 
Bnaii MilhM Bnotn. While and Company 
2 Netson Sliert. SOtobrnd On Sra. Dm 
SSI Iff has been appointed to eel to 
LkiiikMot ol Ihe above ft lamed Company 
D\n D toe. 2nd uax to Ortooer 198b 
BRIAN MILLS 
upl IPATPB 


LEGAL NOTICES 


TROJAN ENTERPRSCS LIMITED 
■IN L)QI IDATTONi 
THi COMPANIES ACT 1948 
I Nm riant Cowan. FJLA. of 96 High 
Stirct Barnet. HerK. give noure thai I 
was appcniitett UanMMor m Ihe above 
niuiin on ZJin Frtwiian 1983 All drtH* 
ami .jainw should be tenl lo me al me 


abme .idillrt-v 


N COWAN 
LIQUIDATOR 


Hi MOSCUI HI l IMITLD 
m ORJil R Ol THE IlfCH COLRT 
11 V CLP 2ND MAX 1986 
Ni-vilte 1 < kill F CA oi 332 Brm Won 
HiMd •soum (Ten non. has been appointed 

' muniuini oi thi- above iwttkvI ronipam 
■I bout a i nmnnllee o(Irrvprtli*Mi 
rxn □ 2nd ocieiiei 1986 


IN THt HIGH COL RT OT JUSTICE 
NO 007236 Of i486 

TMANCIRV DIVISION 

to THL MATTER or DAILY M ML AND 
GENERAL TBISI PLC ■ 
ana 

IN TUT MATTER OT T»< COMPANIES 
ACT 1086 

NOTICE S HEREB) Grt EN UWI 4 PrD 
inn wav oo toe 3rq October 1986 
forvmjrd 10 tor MaywUY HOT Court Of 
Juvine lor Ihr confirmation Of the reduc- 
tion ol me raptui of me MiMifoM 
Cnmparn from to. 500.000 to 
LSJOOOOO 

AND NOTICE b FURTHER GnTN that 
ihe vni Prtrttoii IS draft'd to or hraid 
before Uv- Honourable Mr JuOtre 
MenvnDavindl the Royal Coortv nl Jin 
hie. SI iftnd. London WC2A 2LL Ori 
MOncLM the 27th day Ol October 1086 
Am CinMOT v Sturehafaser at the Mid 
COmpam dnniqtoetMR'IlicdftUfM 
an order lor ihe renhrmaMNi to the Rd 
inturtma oi ropiui vn o wn aggear at Ihe 
lime ot heannq m pcfMh PC By Coreart 
lor toai pnroove 

A ram ot toe uni Mum wta oe ire 

mvhed in any vurn person rnzuanng toe 

same hr u>e undermen doom Sonnion on 
Hvmrni M me rrqDtateo rnarge lor me 
same 

DATED me 15th October 198» 

FmfifirkD 
GrmdaM Hovre 
2S NewqMe Street 
London ECXA 7LH 
solnitofv for the abme-namM Coropany 


IN THE HIGH COLRT OF JLSTlCE 

CHAMCtHV DIVISION 
MR REGISTRAR BRAD8LRN 
to THE MA ITER OT HORTON 
INTERNATIONAL PLC 
and 

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES 
ACT 1985 

NOTICE t§ HEREBY Qien that a Pen 
tion wav cm Ihe 2bOt Se pte mber 1986 
prevented lo Her M anlr v High Corel to 
J ustere lor me rowinrubon of the red nr 
boa ot the shore Premium Arrow to tor 
abote-uamed comoany from 
C7 1.026.9ft! 91 to Eoft 623.2C0.31 
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that 
toe ud petition a formed lo nr nemo 
brine Ihe Hoaouraote Mr JuMKp 
M mni Davtnal tor Royal Court to Jnv 
lire. «MraiHL London wCS nn Umbv. 
Ihe 27th day ol On core 1980 
Am Creditor or Sharenotaer to toe red 
Company deurmg to oppoie the rnatong nf 
an Order lor toe conurmadon ot tor tad 
reduction to Slurr Premium AccoutM 
vhawa appear to toe lime to hear mo m 
prnon or by Uoumrt tor mat purpose 
A roov to the raid Pewo n win be (re 
nnlipd to any null person reouettmg tor 
same bv Ihe unorr menboned Sotmtora 
on NvmnMM mrrequfoied rturerw tor 
same 

Dated IMS IBlh day to Ortobrt 198b 

Norton Rose BottrreU A Roche. 

Ncmpsoo Home. 

Camomdp Sirert 
LONDON EC5A7AN 


WAYDR1VC L1MTTCD 
I Gynl GoM to CoM 4 Co 2nd Floor. 
Central Home 33/36 Oxford Siiert. Lon- 
don Vs IN ufl. hereby give you Nonce 
mat. Oi an Order to toe High Court dated 
ja Mann ion. t nave been a p poi n ted 
Lreindator to Wavarne Landed 
Dalrtt the 23th day to Sep te mber 1986 
C COLD 
UOLIDArOR 


LEGAL NOTICES 


1 DIVORCE PTTmON HAS BEEN 
FILED AGAINST THE 
l NDCRNILKTIONED 
OGDEN Jams Mai late Of Trt Wafook- 
Rna<L LftMM E18 

Vs no nun upph to tor Dnoire Rronln 
Somerset Haute London hOA 1LP. fol 
amm m thepmbon <t wtihin one month 
she has not i ctmnum r aira with ihr 
RNyshv thi- Corel may here Die caw in 
nei jinnee 

Rrtaotrai 

Mrwsi-. Mgrttem Langlnn 4 PayvmOre 
68 KMI SUM 
Saffron Walden 
Enct 


TRUSTEE ACTS 


NOTKU ts hereby gnen pursuant lo *27 
to tor TRUSTEE Art. 1928 into any 
prmonj haviM a CLAIM agaura or an 
INTI -REST in tne ESTATE to any to (be 
dei e a sed person’s whoae luunev ad 

di esses and drsrntoJOOt are tel out 
below k hMrtw iniwm lo w-nd 
Mhinfos in wntuw to ha claim or hi 

terrsl |o Use person or persom 
me n t i o n ed m Malian lo toe dMerara 
prison ronrnned before Ihe date tprei- 
ned alter wtarh date the estate oi the 
dethased will be dnlnbuM by the per 
sonati rptese o ta utrahmodtthe b f wura 
rnMMsf Uaereto basmo re pant only lo 
tor rip e ns and mtemb to wtucti they 
have hot note*- 


AHERN Andrew of 6 Meechani Court. 
NhuiUeworth Road Uxvaon SWis ams 
on I5u> -Vonl. 1086 Parhrulai* lo Bryan 
O'Coenr* & Co Sonotomi of SI. 
MAXtairiN Home. 18/20 SoUMreh 
NUrrt Londnu SWI ITS Wltor 2Rto 
Drremhet 1086 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SWW Costa Maura, near mi 
with bpaidilul un*. Cray 

shoeoi n * but ra — * 4 

bed • dormitory ivieep* 12*1. 3 
twins, tennis iourt Vsmter 
■pun/ short lers Driprences Tel 
Ol 007 AJ64 


88R8211A MU New vUa In 

Ihr nut*, own DOM 4 doable 
beds, manwlir vipw* ejiyan 
enspw Horn 23 ra on Der 
4 Trt 0283 68829 IwrrUwU 


A LC AJtVC ALTERNATIVE. 

Thr Imrsl houvev lor irnUtL 
J. rises SI. NWl Ol 491 080? 


ALSAJtVC. Lvjs villa* wnii pooh 
Mu winter Crtters wrtromr 
2838 Vrttn World 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


COSTA on. ML Luxury VHt 

Mnr weeks siiH iivad Nn> 

I Vs Aximi Inr IS protde Hi n 

■Hue OMiim lenvipip rsslhrmsi 
poos, rams rt. Cars aaianoed. 
I tu iWtn Monev Coopre Prod 
rt lies un 07375 5711 1 




ne varannesUdo- 


Vbjjvn V miles Noun (arms 

■iMlnral S te eps 6/0. Asad 
able lot sVtllUi ana U1 surrmn 
« 1 1 400 550 IMS Tet OCT? 
337J30 


AUDPBA Qinrt winter warm 
i.Ufay Bowt. i do. «nai am sip 
4/6 Bereti Moirftftr to iMm 
Ham EBOpw 0604 587313 


MDUkf M3UU WO I WOT apt 3 
ol | bedroom osetlouUiW 
faviih *090661 2469 


WINTER SPORTS 


POWDER BYRNE Pms4m.dnrtt 
Wi Humlavs in dinar iw mm a 
I bins Chalet, mum IVwiirt 
•twite -ski sal an Vs/ruu 
Ihwlrs Umai Ol .'-.*3 drill 


UU WEST - tall Soma! nllns 

Ml mows RINli I HR A tn AL* 
Uuinun ftnsMnb H*w ITiftis 
sLn imu at i-5-i. isl lor a I dll' 
ui mu bianpr* iHerhiui- lOl i 
7N6 -IWI AMa mr*ei AIM 
I IHI 


ski men vures swiunyuw 


Um-MiNks .a unbraldWr purrs 
A vwiuft gf non dm muds 
Rmu ns 4HI 102231 VI I 1 13 

vii i. y taiuh viuL um 


AUSTRIA s/« j. ■ mm ■■■ ns sin 
lane. lovHv Hem steeps r/4 
msu SMMMdu (II MV 7M.VV 


Ness SJC aou IS r 
sotuU se* v m e li L'ilpis C‘I0 2 
Mks srHiliili- DUWHJ.M': 


Mftllrri pnv.de ins 
i Intel Sips IO Nnw (iftili-h 
A Vnsn week O.W4 IMJ415 


THEATRES 


*PV 15 

... j Ol 734 1106/7/ 

0261/0130 24hr rr 240 7200/ 
176 6455 are Sates 630 6123 


-A WONDERFUL STAR - Hdl 

MAURg mPMANi re 

WONdSSlTOWN! 

-to l u m t i -s wdh nfonnmr 
b Tune* “Jird MMnfuT D.Cxo 
Mon Sal 8 Maty H ed'2.30 Sal 8 

ROYAL COURT SOC 730 1745/ 
1BS7 OC 24hr 7 day 200 7200 
iDkv fee) Eves 8pm. Sat Mats 

4pm KAFKA’S DICK by Alan 
OiiraatL Dir Rnhaid Evre 

SAVOY Ol 836 8888 OC Ol 579 
6219. 836 0479 Evnrnn 7.48. 
MaK Wed 5. Sal S A 850 
LAST S W 1IIV S DOTS NOV t 
CHRISTOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

COLE PADDtCK 

SrtCHAO. COCHRANE 
COLETTE TIMOTHY 

CLEESON CARLTON 

MICHAEL FDAVhTS 
AWAROWNMNC FARCE 

NOISES OFF 

Dir by MICHAEL BLAKEMORC 
LIRE Ol 836 8888 


. KHJJNG JESSICA? 

at the Savoy 11 

NON n 


12. 


HUFTOWOT TMEAYHK OP 
COraCPY.Ol 5t9S399cr01 579 
6453/74) 999. FteVi CaB 2-1 hr 
240 7200 Ibkg (rr) Ore Sain 930 
6125 

Mon m m. Wed Mat 3. Sal 500* 
830 


“The hnni rarer trtrnts to mod- 
ern tonrs-TO-Mmll 
in 

-AHapuvnVhU toe brat I ireve 
eser sernTTlmesl 

ROOKERY NOOK 

“ ihe meat c i te Pr a ted to Ben 
Travers' larmTSoerUtori 


ST MAimirS 01-836 1443. She- 
real CC No 579 6353 Ev«v 80 
Tups 2 45l Sal C J> and B O 

Mb yr to AOATMA CfolMA . 

THE MOUSETRAP 

STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/5190. 741 9999. FITS! Cab 
24 Hr 7 Day tr 240 7200 Grp 
Sates 930 6133 

CABARET 


• —■IP S lo rao Wart End" Sid 

starting 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Darned a. Choreographed bv 

FK— fore 

Ma* Ftl 7.46. Mat Wed 500 
Sal 450 A 8.10 

MATS. 

NOW UP TO JAN ’■7 

THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

“The \ny fail ol Britain's ramie 
tatenT* Daily Mad 
Ser veparate rn trees uodm 


VAUDEVILLE Box Ottke A CC 

836 9087/8646 rrat nac&» 

hrs 240 7200 ibM (Wl Ere B.Ol 

Mtos Wed 2 30. S4I &a 8.50. 



TgNWtb 

WOMAN IN MIND 

“TM* MUST BE THE PUNNKST 

PLAY M LONDON. IT t» ALSO 

IHE Sion- DtS7U»MB“ S-Trt 

“ALAN AYCAbOURN B WWY- 

MC AT IRS Nil" S Times 

“JULIA .McKENZBE OVD A 

FO F O b MWI Cl TO TAKE THt 

AREATA AWAY** D.Trt 

VICTORIA PALACE 01-034 1*17 

CHARLIE GIRL 

Eves 7 30 Mate Wed A Sat 2 48 

One Otfire* open dady 9a m- P p m . 

Bookin g atvo nvrHlahle to NO 

EXTRA COST ttyrough PHUT 

CALL special 2«hr 7 day rrrdll 

rard npokiire 01-240 7200. 

TICKCTMASTCR 01-379 6*33 or 

any W H Smtlh Travel Branch 


ART GALLERIES 


Anthony rgrrur 9 a 23 
DetftuoSI Wl RKMAROLONO 
New Wart*. 499 4100 

BARBICAN ART OALLERV. Bar 

ha an Ortir London tC2 Ol 
6.VH 4141 
W. OWt 
mounliini ol UW gieol 
photow-fatier's Own irtmoN 
Ine. mill over 500 
is. "amir pnalNV 


maw show ever mounted " 
.Xdm. Cl and SOp Open Today 
10.UH 6 4Spm. Tomor 12 

6 46pm 

BRITISH LIBRAR Y. Cl. RuwrtJ 
wen Thr ■nimuUKmai'nic 
CITY R MAP*. MO n Sat IDS 
S*n» 2 306 All m Free. 


17 

Moteomb sum. swi . 236 
0800 JAMES U N Utll W 

FAITH WRITE R SCULPTURE 
OF BEAUTY AT THE ONAMOO 
RY. Holland Home. Holland 
Park. Kruungfon. W8 117 
Ilailv fart Sal/Sun to MOn 
27 Orl 


108 New Bond StreeL Wl 01-629 
SI Ire 

MMTOK M SCOTLAND 1000 - 
ISM 

ALUMSONA WBfTZ 


AT BLAH- 

rxbdwtion ol 
fdl*a r DanUng In rviropr. 1860- 
1930 lo Ortooer Wh 
November, at Bfonrtiaras. 

178 Stamp SI. SWl Trt: 

Ol 236 6612. 


BS . UMII 2S 


on. CCA Oiliriit (flfolii 
Canfomparani Art) 17 ttemeey 
.lieade. Wl 01499 6701. 


ham si . si James's Bet 930 
9392 TREVOR BOYER Paul 

■nuv to wdoiowi iimu as on. 


m Marlin'S Flare. 
London WC? TWOI 9301552 
STAOBNt TNE SCLFi SrU nor 

trait DOOUNaaifaV 1840s l9BO» 

I nld 1 1 Jan Adtn bOp Mon- - 

i n ios sal 106 svm are. 


PJCCAMLLT Cbil FRY 16 Cort. 
» - Wl 6292875 MCNAEL 
MlIRFBi prteM Pal nlfags Until 
25Ui Onober Mon-Frl 10650 
SaK ID 1250 - 


Ol 734 9067 
rip en Dalle lOOim Suniredurrd 

rale Sint l nil! 1.4$| 




Cl 50 Cl 00 COnr rare 


Ltalll JOth 
Orlober MmFn 9.30550 
TATE GALLENV. MIM han h SWI 
P eta l *"* frnW pni. The yoM 

en awe 1707 IB 43 t aW 4 Jan 
«"t C2 50 STEPHEN COX 
SouHi Indian SruMniae (New 
-Ml Smrvi L iUd 19 Orl. SOL 
LaWtRSelrrled Pro ih 197086. 
i Mil 30 Nov Adm free. Wk 
Oats 10550 Sims ? 5 SO. Re 
voided ndo Ql 871 7128 


•in -Vdtnn -illy Arrtu Tel 

9SO 6844 Now EngHlh Art 
Utah Open 16 87 October. *L*t 
Iv. ex* rm 2Mh IDfan Works 
MM sale 


UM rite NalKHkU Mlnetun nr 
lil .<nd Hera V henviiuitan 

CoeamHo. <ta*8n 

—r — .. Rr* 01*1 

rd *mIb Ol SHI 4804 Wkdayx 
IO 6 50 Sum 7 30 S SO 
dosed llidavx 


CINEMAS 


1: Ol 638 8891 
likls 1.3 Sliuteul 1 imu s L 1 .*11 
nn lx rule* houkaitte 
OTXLLOil * 6 16 S.Vi lnday 
h nix *’in6 ilnxlanl M emte i xiwpi 


II on ? IO 

CAMDEN PLAZA 486 7445 THE 

LEGEND OP THE BURAMPOR- 

THEAS t i l plus *'— * 1 OP 

700416 6 JO 8 SO 


CURZOM MAYFAIR Cumm SI 
496 3737 Maorer Smun. 

Drnhalm I.Hmsu. Judi Oenrn in 
A ROOM WITH A VIEW |K) 
Film al 1.30 iNM Sum 3 46. 
6 ID A 8 40 ■■ 

ALSO AT CURZON W ES T EN D. 


DShaflrvburv 
>1 venue Wl 439 4805 MMto 
smun. Dentmtai UHotl. judi 
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MEW (FOL ■ nm al I 30 mot 
San 3 45. 6 IO A a 40 

CATE CEM EA NotUng HNI Ctoe 
777 4043 Brtnmc-v BETTY 
BLUE 1 181.2.00 into bunt 4 16. 
6 36 8 55 AM teats bnoltoHr 


930 5252 iLnol/930 7615 1 24 
tn Arrow/ Vna/ AmE* Booh 
mtei “A HMRTMA RE ON ELM 
2 FREDDY** ' 
REVENUE** ||8I Sep mom daa 
Il 1 40 4 06 6 30 9 00. Late 
NmM Show TrL Sol A Trt 
Ii4!fam All pragy hoasabte* in 

advance 


379 3014/ 
836 0691 ROSA L U X E M BURG 
• PCI rum 41 1 DO 3 30 6 00 
MAS 


118) Dufon 3J> 5J* 


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7e97l MORA USA H81 Sep 
Pltite DaHv ?I5 600 8 40 
tale NmM Show Til- A Sal 
1 1 4 5pm AU xeaK Miakatoe in 
ad value Arrow and Visa Mr 
phone Itoateiwte ngtegme 


1773 

7011 1 lx. ill Drenev s CB 0 PE8 - 
ELLA <1 i Sep mote doors npen 
Da.lv I SO 3 45 6 OO 8 ID Re 
ilmnl praex In OAPx 1.D40 
holders. Sludriu-ranl hotetefi. 
I inter ires 


*181 ritai al 
7 16 4 70 6 30 8 45 
Mike Nt-MHIS. THE COOO PA- 
THEN HSi Film to 2 SO 4 35 
6 45 900 SLATS nOOhiVBt L 
I -VST I VL PLRf 


EXHIBITIONS 


_ Guild An 

■‘“al I vbiMion. ImlUai 
llcnixr. Holland Pars nn. 

I wfttoo. W14 Orl 11 76 Men 
Ml 11 6 Sal 115 


CHARUE GIRL 

B*r>wo»vrfc»J 

felL NIC HOL AS 


MARK WYNIER lb 

CHARUE GIRL 

FABULOUS PARTY RATES NOW 

AVARANLE OOOKJNB TO JANU- 

ARY lb. CROUP SALES Baa 
OtBOT OS MB HP 

W E5TMBUTEB 01-834 0283/4 
rr 834.0048. rirvi raU rr 240 

7200 A *t 741 9099/379 6435 

Crpx 930 6123 Evev-7 45. Wed 

Mats 3. Sat 5 A 8-16 

mm bawn port™ 


WALBN 


DEADLY NIGHTCAP' 

SitfSaiiBSSiroTO 
iBrfni hum 

AOATHA CNIUIE Wtafo-On 

WNTTEMALL SWX 01 9307765/ 
859 44S& CC Ol 579 6365/6453 
741 9999 Cite Ol 836 3962 
Mon I rt 8 00. Wed Mai 3 00. San 
500 A 850 * ■ 

THEATRE OF folEW pmetos 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

■nr JB Pnmttey 
lhrerted by Ronald Eyre 
-YOU WILL NOT PMD A MORE 
PLEASURABLE EVEMNO ANY 
WHERE |H LONDON . ON THE 
WONUT* S LAPrm* 

WYHOHADTSs 836 3028 rr 579 
6565/6 ASV1VI Call 24 tire 7 days 
240 7200/74] 9999 Orte 836 

3902/851 7771 Cm 8. sat 
mats 3 

JOHN - ROSEMARY 
MILLS HARRIS 

la Rto H.T. pei—ctfia ol 

THE PETITION 

■n BRIA N CLAR K 
(Mark'd bv PETER HALL 
“_WITTR.Y EXPRESSED, WON- 
DERFULLY ACTED" TtS 

YOUNG VIC WH 6363 CC. 37ft 
hiu I vex 7 30 I or 3 wha ontv 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

M* GHOST* bv Bran Now Dkg 

YOUNG VIC SIUMO 928 6363. 
in n «Hv Hi ir in j vemrrb- 
TNCBn A LOT OP IT ABOUT. 

7 46 


/jf 

'-X 

-'Ti 


To Place . Your 
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PIcsc telephone the appropriate number listed below 
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20 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


Digging in for the final push to finish the M25 


By David Cross 

The last but one section of 
the M25. London's orbital 
motorway, opened without 
fanfare and nearly two weeks 
late yesterday as the first 
traffic moved gingerly on to 
the pristine blacktop at Junc- 
tion 19 outside Watford, stfll 
swathed by the remnants of 
morning fog. 

Twelve miles east, in his site 
office at Soath Minnas, Mr 
Richard Mailer, project man- 
ager for the final five-lakMne-- 
ter section, pointed at the 
drawings on his wall with the 
quiet confidence of an e n g in eer 
who can finally see 27 months 
of work becoming a reality. 

The foul stretch of the 117- 
mile motorway — junction 
21Ato23 — between Bricketts 
Wood nnd the AlfM) at Sooth 
Minims, is to be offic ially 
opened on October 29. Mr 
Haller said he was sure it 
would be complete for when 
the Prime Minister sweeps np 
in her Umoosine, as predicted 
by virtually everyone on the 
site, to preside over the cere- 
mony. 

Outside the site office, on 
the viaduct over the Al(M), 
Mr Tony Reegan, aged 30, a 
tractor brash driver, said he 
would be glad when it was all 
over. He had worked 12-hoar 
shifts from Monday to Friday, 
six-boor shifts on Saturdays 
and nine-hour shifts on Sun- 
days with a king weekend off 
six weeks. 

to the other 250 workers 
on the she he picks np a good 
wage — between £150 and 
£230 a week after deduc- 
tions — bat the £22 million 
contract has been one of the 
most, difficult he has worked 
on. 

Mr Jimmy Scott aged 31, a 
foreman- from Haddington, 
near jMnthmg H, mM that the 
mam problem was keeping the 
workers aw are of the constant 
danger presented by the 
40,000 to 50,000 cars and 
lorries which have been roar- 
ing past each day, within 
inches of the men. 

Unlike normal motorway 
contracts, the priority far 



Spadework: Labourers busy yesterday on the final stretch of the London orbital route. (Photographs: ChrisHarris) 
workers on the Bell to Sooth way opens. Last year he spent 


every ; 



Minnas section had been to 
keep the traffic nmninqg 
smoothly along an existi n g 
dual carriageway, while at toe 
same tone building the new 
motorway surface mi top of a 
large part of it. 

Yesterday, when the first, 
workers trudged throng!) the 
mod to dock on at 7am, they 
were rerouted to safe pails of 
the new motorway to keep 
them away from toe traffic. 
When toe mist finally lifted, 
two workmen climbed np 
scaffolding antler one of toe 
bridges, in their green fluores- 
cent jackets and with cement 
trowels to pat the finishing 
touches to a wall as toe 
thundered past 
Scott is married with 
four children, and Janie, his 
eldest dughter aged 14, and 
Wendy, aged 12, took part in a 
ran along the new section last 
month to raise funds far a local 
hospice. 

Mr Scott admitted that toe 
long separations from his 
family were difficult. His last 
long weekend was six weeks 
ago and there will not be 
another until after the moAor- 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,180 

Solution to Puzzle No 17.174 Solution to Puzzle No 17,179 



A prize o/The Times Allas ofWorid History will be given for the 
first three correal solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition, PO Box 486. Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday’s competition are: T R Burch. 
Ballard's Green, Burgh Heath. Surrey, Mrs H M Leslie, Rigault 
Road. London SW6; Mrs A M O’Dea. Seven Sisters Close. St 
Lawrence, Isle of Wight. 


Address 



ACROSS 

1 Nothing on it is calm — ab- 
solute farce, it turns out 
(8.5). 

9 Lichfield is such a city — see 

• round it (9). 

10 Swim length on stomach (5). 

11 Honourable — and here in 
Rome <5). 

12 Char in highland stream (4). 

13 Disputes in banks (4). 

15 Involving single action on 
those disturbed (3-4;. 

17 In Japan its skill is increas- 
ing. we hear (7). 

18 Our mild version of a 
Kingston town band in- 
strument (3. 4). 

20 Newton — way-out name for 
a dark lady ( /). 

21 Endless gas in old recovery 
vessel (4). 

22 Old money for a royal 
governess (4). 

23 First signs of overs seeming 
inferior, expect runs from 
this willow (5). 

26 One very large or very small 
bind - and tailless (5). 


27 Seaboard churning up ocean 
silt 19). 

28 Bat expected to hang in 
there at dusk? (5-8). 

DOWN 

1 Single-minded aesthete? 
(8X4). 

2 Mahler's third in its en- 
tirety? (5). 

3 Cor. Mow me! (0.4). 

4 Underdone morsel in snack 
(71. 

5 Port of New Orleans (7). 

6 Principal bones of the foot 
(4). 

7 Fancy garnish 19). 

8 Theatre-designer of new fea- 

tures? (7.7). 

14 Distinguishing symptoms in 
dogs, fact with licence (10). 

16 Instruct England's opening 
pair before and after the 
match (9). 

19 Douglas's pet? (4.3). 

20 A nver once more rises and 
Tails (7). 

24 Hip part ofTroy? (5), 

25 Here's a catch — tin coders 
sihcr(4). 


Concise Crossword page 13 


a month in Scotland over the 
Christmas period and be has 
his sights set on the saute 
: this year. 

four Beatty, toe con- 
tractors, had provided site 
caravans for workers, with 
toilets, showers and all the 
necessary amenities, because ~ 
of toe difficulty of finding 
suitable temporary accom- 
modation for people working 
all hours. 

According to Mr Haller, toe 
last few weeks of fine weather 
after two long, cold winters 
have come as a godsend. “The 
two bad winters delayed ns but 
we have now cangftf up,” he 
said. 

“IPs been a tight pro- 
gramme because we have not 
had the ability to doable up the 
areas we have been working cm 
because each bit of the job has 
been dependent on the pre- 
vious section being 
completed," he said. 

His main concern now must 
be that, when the final checks 
are made, no fealty welding of 
the kind which held np the 
penultimate section interferes 
with Mrs Thatcher’s plans. 



Bridge work: The sandwich jractom linking the M25 and Ml, showing, from the top, a slip 
road, a footbridge, the Ml flyover, a second slip road and the M25 itself 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 
The Princess of Wales dines 
with the Ministers of the In- 
terior of the European 
Community at Lancaster 
House. 7.30. 

New exhibitions 
Paintings by Dennis Roxby 
Bolt R.W.S.: Bourne Gallery, 
31-33 Lesbourae Road, Reiga 
Surrey: Mon to Sat 10 to 5.30 
Cosed 1 to 2. and Wed pm. 
(ends Nov I). 

Paintings by 1986 Fine Arts 
Honours Degree finalists; Vic- 
toria Art Gallery. Bridge Street, 
Bath: (ends Nov 15). 

Ait and craft by Henry 
Moore. Barbara Hcpworth. 
Hans Coper and Lucie Rie; 
Cleveland Gallery, Victoria 
Road, Middlesbrough. Cleve- 
land; Tues to Sat, 12 to 7, (ends 
Nov 15). 

Sicken and Thanet, pointings 
by Waller Sickert, Ramsgate 
Library Gallery. Guildford 
Lawn. Ramsgate. Kent: Mon to 
Wed 9.30 to 6. Thur 9.30 to 5. 

■ Fri 9.30 to 8. Sat 9.30 10 5. 

Works by Bruce McLean: 
Southampton An Gallery. Civic 
Centre. Southampton; Tue to 
Fri 10to5Sai 10 to 4. Sun 2 to 5. 

Music 

Concert by SNO; Glasgow 
City Hall. Glasgow; 7.30. 

Talk 

The novel today - Bel Moo- 
ney. John Braine. William Coo- 
per. Maureen Duffy, Stanley 
Middleton. Cheltenham Festi- 
val: Everyman Theatre, 
Cheltenham: 2 to 4. 

TOMORROW 
Last chance to see 
Exhibition of rare breeds or 
horse, cattle, sheep, pigs, goats: 
East of England Showground. 
Peterborough; 10 to 4.30. 

Paintings by French im- 
pressionists: National Gallery of 
Scotland. The Mound, Princes 
Street. Edinburgh; Mon to Slat 
10 to 5. Sun 2 to 5. 

German Woodcut in the 20th 
Century; City of Bristol Mu- 
seum & Art Gallery. Queen's 
Road. Bristol: 10.30 to 5.30. 
Music 

Concert by New London 
Chamber Choir. The Assembly 
Halls. Tonbridge Wells; 3. 

Concert by Welsh Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra Chamber 
Ensemble: Taliesin .Arts Centre. 
University College. Swansea; 8. 
General 

Antique market Hampton Wick 
Flea Market 10 to 4. 
Exhibitions in progress 
1966 and all that!: Whitworth 
Art Gallery. The University of 
Manchester. Whitworth Park: 
Mon to Sat 10 to 5. Thurs 10 to 9 
(ends Dec 61 

Recent paintings by Edgar 
Holloway: Burstow "Gallery. 
Brighton College. Eastern Rd: 
Mon to Sal 1 i .30 to 5 (ends Oct 
25) 

Looking into Paintings: land- 
scape: Castle Museum. .Notting- 
ham: Mon to Sun 10 to 4.45 
(ends Nov 16) 

Works by various artists, 
including Clive Raymond. Ken 

LammingCoiin lelhcoe Gal- 
lery. 82 Portland St Manches- 
ter. Mon to Fri 10 to 6. Sat 1 to 5 
(ends Nov 8) 

Process, change and product 
dronings, paintings, photo- 
graphs and notes by Robert 
Sutherland: Robson Gallery. 
HalliwcH's House Museum, Sel- 
kirk: Mon to Sat 10 to 12.30. 2 
to 5. Sun 2 to 5 (ends Oct 31) 


Gardens open 


P=ntM> tar tale 

TODAY AND OTHER DAYS 
Kane Emmas Guntan. kto Mt 5m SW of 
SevenoafcMKmSaf A25onSundrtdge- 
Me Hi road. 1 Hm N of He Hffl on safe 
5 acre hiteide garden, one oftte 
in Kant, fins trees and state, 
autumn colour: am open Sundays. 
Tuesdays. Wectaesdays, Thursdays ml 
Fridays wta October 31; 2 to & 
Skathdyda: Achamore House Garden, 
tele o) GSgha: ft) acres at woodand 
garden, many sptondki shrubs: waHod 
garden; P, dady. 10 to dusk. 

Argyll: Ardanaseig, KHchrenan by 
- 1m E ot TaynuR on A85, S onto 
tar ftn. than E to Kachrenare tarns, 
wooded garden, waled garden; P; duty 
until end of October, lOtot 
NotBngtimahba: Newstaad Abbey; 4m S 
at Mansfield near Rammhaad; takes. 
Japanese garden, rose garden, knot 
■ to dusk. 

_ i Hal. an NW ol Toms 
on A384; taiga garden, good coOactlon al 
ptantejP^daSy dawn to dusk. 

Hamp a M ra t Ha c k wood Park. 1m S ol 
B asi ng st ok e off Tunwortt Road from 
A339 AKon-BaslngstokB road; 80 acres, 
ornamental pools. semHOrmai wood, 
autumn colour; 1-30 to 5 JO. 

H er tfo rd ml Worcester Narine Nursery. 
Brookend House, WsRand. Km towards 
Upton-orvSevem from Wetond cross 
roads (A41IMxB4208): international ref- 
erence colsctian of nertnes, 30 species. 
800 named varieties; wafied garden: lOto 

O x ford sh ire; Brac k enwood. Bladon. 8m 
tC ot Witney on A409S, 2m SW at 
Woodstock; IK acre garden, tadudmg 
wootf a nd. many varieties of trees, shrubs 
and herbaceous: good autumn colour; 2 to 
6 - 


The pound 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: Luis Giordano, 
painter. Naples. 1632: Antonio 
Canaletto, topographical 
painter. Venice. 1697; Thomas 
Love Peacock, writer, Wey- 
mouth. Dorset, 1785: Henri 1 
Bergson, philosopher. Paris. 
1859. Deaths; Jacob Jordaeas. 
painter. Antwerp. 1678; Henry 
John Temple. 3rd Viscount 
Palmerston, prime minister, 
1 855-58, 1859-65, Bracket Hall 
Hertfordshire. 1865; Charles 
Babbage, pioneer of computers, 
London. 1 87 1; Charles Gounod, 
Saint-Cloud, 1893; Thomas 
Alva Edison. West Orange, New 
Jersey. 1931. 

TOMORROW 

Births: Sir Thomas Browne, 
physician and writer, London 
1605 (he died on this day at 
Norwich. 1682): Leigh Hunt, 
writer. Southgate. Middlesex. 
I7S4: Adam Lindsay Gordon, 
poet. FaiaL .Azores. 1833. 

Deaths; John, kiire of En- 
gland. reigned 1 199-1216. New- 
ark. Notts. 1216; Jacobus 
Arminius. theologian. Leiden. 
Netherlands. 1609: Jonathan 
Swift. Dublin. 1745; Sir Charles 
Wheatstone, physicist Paris. 
1875: Ernest Rutherford. Baron 
Rutherford of Nelson, physicist 
Nobel laureate 1908. Cam- 
bridge. 1937. Napoleon's retreat 
from Moscow began. 1812. The 
People's Republic of China was 
proclaimed. 1949. 


Roads 


Wales and Wwt M4: Contraflow at 
junctions 16 and 17 |Swntan and 
Cwicastw). delays WMHy.A3fc Repairs at 
Menymeet roundabout on Exextor id 
Uuneasten Road. A48£ Roadworks m 
Faaan Way. Swansea, delays hkety 

Midland! Ml; Contraflow between 
junctions 27 and zfl (Heanor and Mara- 
trekfi. Setays kkeiy. A45& Repairs at 
Sewtiiey. Hereford. ASX Roadworks at 
Lamenage Bank, near LBflk. 

Tba North: M6l: Cons&uCMn work at 
Btaww Bnoge (M6 interchsnqa); ferae 
lestncnons. avorn it poreiMe. Aw Road- 
works at MuKSewtcti. Cnesmre. as* 
Bypass work at Copmantherpe. lane 
restrictions. 

ficottamt Mb Outside lane closed both 

ways between KmuntiSoch and Towmrtd 
Road foottmdae. ttXfc Roadworks near 
junctor 3 JHststsasw). «anouS mtmbOM 
and closures A74: Ftoacwnrks tn London 
Read, Glasgow, lane resmetions and 
dPrarsioRS signed. 

m f ocr ca bon seppted by AA 


Bank Bank 

Buys Sefls 

AustnBaS 23S 2205 

Austria Seh 2D.S5 1065 

Belgium Fr 6170 58.10 

CaaadaS 236 137 

Denmark Kr 1110 mfiO 

Rotandklkk 735 635 

Franca Fr &61 S.11 

OaraanrOn 2355 2785 

Greece Dr 21000 19000 

HongKongS 1140 1090 

IraluidPt 1.068 1328 

Italy Lira 205000 1S3C« 

JapmYen 232JEQ 2100; 

NefiMlanteGM 334 3-15 

Norway Kr 1030 1030 

Portugal Esc 21000 20430 

South Africa Rd 375 3.15 

SpetnPta W075 «J5 

Sweden Kr 1018 063 

OwteoiteidR- 243 229 

USAS 1495 1425 

Yugoslavia Dm 70030 80030 

rtatea tor small denomnauon banknotes 
orty as suppSed by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and otter foreign currency 
business. 

Betel Price index: 3873 

London: The FT Index dosed t*> 39 al 
12813. 

MOMo 

- ( SM- 

For readers who may have 
missed a copy of The Times this 
week, we repeat below the 
week's Portfolio price changes 
(today's are on page 25). 

An ttaUr 

1 

+5 

+6 

+5 

+6 

+3 



2 

+3 

+4 

+5 

+2 

+4 



3 

+3 

+4 

+4 

44 

+4 



4 

+5 

+7 

+6 

46 

+3 



5 

+3 

+5 

+6 

46 

42 



6 

+4 

+8 

+1C 

+5 

42 



7 

+3 

+3 

+4 

43 

+6 



8 

+2 

+5 

+3 

+4 

46 



9 

+2 

+5 

+3 

+3 

43 



10 

+4 

+7 

+5 

+5 

43 



11 

+5 

+5 

+4 

+4 

+3 



12 

+4 

+6 

+5 

+7 

+1 



13 

+5 

4-8 

+8 

45 

43 



14 

+4 

44 

+5 

+4 

+5 



T5 

+2 

+4 

+3 

+2 

+3 



16 

+5 

+8 

+8 

46 

44 



17 

+4 

+6 

+6 

+5 

+2 



18 

+3 

+4 

+5 

44 

43 



19 

+4 

4-3 

+3 

+5 

44 



20 

+1 

44 

+3 

42 

43 



21 

+3 

+7 

44 

+7 

+2 



22 

+6 

4-7 

47 

+5 

+2 



23 

+3 

44 

+3 

+2 

44 



24 

+3 

4-5 

45 

+7 

41 



| 25 

+6 

4-6 

41( 

44 

44 



26 

+5 

44 

43 

45 

+3 



27 

+4 

+6 

44 

+5 

43 



28 

+4 

+3 

43 

41 

+5 



29 

+5 

44 

44 

44 

43 



30 

+6 

+7 

47 

+5 

+3 



31 

+1 

4-3 

+3 

41 

+3 



32 

+2 

44 

43 

+3 

43 



33 

+4 

+8 

47 

+4 

44 



34 

+3 

+5 

+6 

+5 

+2 



35 

44 

4-5 

43 

42 

43 



36 

+4 

+5 

+5 

44 

44 



37 

+5 

4-7 

49 

46 

43 



38 

+2 

44 

43 

+2 

44 



39 

+5 

+6 

43 

45 

+2 



40 

+4 

+5 

47 

+6 

+3 



41 

+S 

+7 

+5 

+5 

41 



42 

+3 

44 

45 

+1 

43 



1 1 43 1 +5/ +7}+iq +5J+2 



|| 44 1+31 +4I+31 +51+51 




Ratos and haw to play, page 39 


/ 


clearing in morning, ctoud L — 

soon apraedng from NW, fokmed by 
sunny or dear periods end showers, wind 
SW frit, kwreeatag trash or strong end 
veering westerly; max temp 15C (5ft). 

SW tegbma, WWea: Cloudy wMi 
outbreaks al rtan, then sunny or deer 
periods and showers; wind SW modems 
or fresh, veering westerly end increasing 
jtrtng: max temp ISC (SSL 
NwiNE England, Lex* District; late of 

Men. Boaters. Edtabregh. Dreidee. Aber- 

deete Cloudy with outbreaks of ran. than 

sunny or char periods and s h ow er s . 

heavy at times; «M SW mode m s or 

trash, increasing s tr ong, max temp J4C 

(57 F). 

SW ScaUiDd, Glasgow, Northern be- 
taneb Sunny or dear inter vals and stiow- - 
ere. heavy and pr o longed at ttaaa: wind 
southwesterly strong, occasionally gate 
force , veering westerly; max tamp T3C 
155F* 
own 

NW SL . 

Sonny or dear intervals arid s howers, 
heavy and protonged at Hntsa, widi snow 
wind southwesterly 
mp 12CI54F). 


tmpl2Cpr 
ha to notiow and Mon da y: 

Showers or longer outbreaks of rain, 
tsflrtg as snow owr Scottfsfi mountains. 
Generally windy. Temperatures near or a 
Bttfe bntow nomtaL 


Anger in 
city at 
loss of 
Olympics 

Continued from page 1 
Games in the year 2,000 
(Craig Seton writes). 

They watched the IOC _ de- 
cision beamed on to giant 
screens at a Bir m i n g h a m 
discotheque, convinced until 
the Iasi minute that even if the 
city did not succeed it would 
corner dose second. 

- But the officials tried to put 
a brave -face on their dis- 
appointment, and al though 
they protested that Birming- 
ham’s bid had not received the 
national support it deserved 
they claimed it had put toe 
city on the world map. 

Mr Dick Knowles, chair- 
man of the Labour-controlled 
dty council, said as jhe news 
came in from Switzerland: “I 
think we coukl have got more 
support from south of Milton 
Keynes, but we have proved 
we are one of the most vibrant 
cities in Britain, and that we 
shall eventually come out on 
top. Binninghiam is toe only 
dty in Britain which can put 
on the Olympic Games.” 

• BARCELONA: This c as- 
tbmarily sober Mediterranean 
city exploded with joy at 
lunchtime yesterday when k 
learnt that a dream of more 
than 60 years will come true in 
1992 (Richard W«g writes). 

A I O-minute deafening fire- 
works display surmounted the 
IOC’s choice of Barcelona as 
soon as toe news came 
through from Seftor Samar- 
anch, once Barcelona’s mayor, 
on television screens In the 
Plaza de Catalunya. The 
square was overflowing. 


Red and gold 
and banners with the Olympic 
rings were waved, people 
shneked with happiness, or 
applauded when it was re- 
alized that Paris had been 
passed over this time and 
Barcelona’s fourth attempt 
bad finally been sportingly 
recognized. 

“This is a fiesta for the 
dty,” a Barcelona business 
man who had left his office to 
come into the square told me. 
“It’s recognition of a different 
Spain,** be said, referring to 

1936, the year of his birth. 

• PARIS; M Jacques 
Chirac, the French Prime 
Minister, yesterday welcomed 
the choice of the French Alps 
fin: the next Winter Games.- 


Typhoon 
threatens 
Britannia ' 
cruise 

Coa tinned from page I 

fed toe royal tour is merely 
toe uhimate.coofirmation that 
they have been sold up toe 
Pearl River. 

The ' Queen remains un- 
tainted by criticism and yes- 
terday received an exception- 
ally warm welcome in the 
south-western " province of 
Yunnan.. In Kunming, the 
provincial capital, thousand^’ 
turned out to see Elizabeth, 
toe England King. 

Yesterday morning the 
Queen visited the Dragon 
Gate, a Taoist shrine high on a 
diff above a lake, where it is 
said a visitor’s destiny is set 
the moment he walks in. The 
Queen did not take the 
chance, .but stopped at a 
pavilion halfway up to take 
jasmine tea after climbing 119 


by the heavy 
scent of sandalwood incense 
and saffron robed Bhuddist 
monks, toe Queen walked 
through the shady courtyards 
to the Huatiag Bhuddist tern- 

S le, the innermost shrine of: 
uddita, accompanied by a 
tattoo played on a temple 
drum and a huge belL 
Then toe went on a. cruise 
across a lake. The Qneeh does 
not really like boats, especially 
when they are engaged in a 
race with a press launch close 
to tinning turtle with the 
weight of television equip-, 
meat on its upper deck, and 
most especially when she is 
left toting alone and ignored 
on the promenade deck while 
ter retinue, inducting her hus- 
band and her Foreign Secret- 
ary, desert her to gaze at toe 
curious spectacle of. being 
overtaken by a Chinese replica /■ 
of a Mississipi tfverboat 
Her next call was to toe 
Institute of Nationalities, a 
further education college for 
ethnic minority groups, where 
she received one of those “col- 
ourful’’ welcomes she experi- 
ences all over her. own Com- 
monwealth, except that this 
one was>particuiarly rich. 

Sitting beneath a striped 
umbrella which advertise 
beer, toe watched a display of 
ringing and dancing by the 
ethnic minorities of Indo- 
china, mud) of winch sound- 
ed remarkably Idee Scottish 
country dance music. 


t- 


4 


Weather 

forecast 

A frontal trough oyer die 
British hies will move 
slowly SE followed from 
tile W by a strong, show- 
ery airstream. 

6 am to mkhright 

London, SE England, EntAagfia: Met 
and tog patches clearing, becoming 
doudtar with outbreaks ofri&rwrtxJ Bghi 

and variable, b ac ai fifig aouBNmsuity 

moderate or fresh: max tamp 15C{58F). 

Cental S. E, central N Bogtand, 



7W- 


High Tides 


TODAY 
London Bridjga 


JIM HT M .NT 
am ia- an - 12 

243 A3 23* 42 

823 133 3.40 135 
12j06 33 

838 122 825 124 


TOMORROW All 
336 
237 
836 
1219 
8.40 


HT PM 

72 3.43 
43 3.5® 
134 9.12 
33 1240 
123 857 


Demoport 

668 

5.6 

73 

53 

Demnpoit 

738 

5.6 

736 

Dow 


“ 

1208 

83 

-Dow. 

1237 

6.6 1240 

Fatam* 

&2S 

5.4 


54 

Uaoidh 

636 

5.4 

7.06 

QfMpm* 

HnntZrh 

1.48 

1251 

44) 

4.1 

202 

100 

43 

4.1 

sas 

226 
: 137 

43 

43 

235 

138 

iST“ 

1123 

7.10 

5.4 1134 
745 7.42 

SJ 

73 

jwypflifl 

1135 
. 7.45 

5.4 

7.7 

8.13 


7M 

94) 

7.18 

83 

fifnconlw 

732 

93 

730 

Lam 

99ft 

Si i 

44M 

S3 

UK 

4.02 

S3 

431 

UVtspEOl 

12.02 

94$ 1222 

93 

Uratpoal 

1236 

-93 1254 

Lowestoft 

10.19 

2JB 114)3 

24 

LOMStOft 


261135 

■mate 

112 

4.8 

137 

43 

Mtraali 

141 

4.7 

13ft 

MHttdHOTM 

7.18 

74) 

734 

7.1 

MfiMdHawa 

1A9 

73 

838 


' 6JMT 

74) 

834 

7.1 

-llawysaj 

639 

73 

636 

Oban 

. 844 

341 

638 

4.1 

Oran 

7.09 

43 

727 

Pwmsac* 

5.53 

5.7 

BJK 

53 


non 

-5.7 

633 


8.16 

23 

834 

23 


240 

23 

932 

Pun nuttai . 

1213 

43 1236 

43 

Fnrtsmoutt 

1230 

47 

1.11 


. 726 
432 

WHon-on-Nz» 1242 


Tide 



43 1233 
9.6 0.14 
5.8.531 
42 122 


HT 

12 

4.1 

135 If 
33 . 
124 i 

53 ? 
6.8 
5.4 
45 

42 

73 

9.1 

5.4 
93 

2.4 

43 

7.0 
73 

4.1 
5.7 
23 

42 
83 

43 

as 

54 
43 




a 


Around Britain 


b-Dta sky: oe-tdue sfcy an d doo d: c- 
douay: ^overcaoc Moo: d -Urtn iKji- 

h4k mUl-misr. r-raUK mmw: b- 

■nunderfeorm: 

Arrows tfiow wind diookn. wind 
■ impb) cuvM. T uB pe aw s 


Yesterday 




‘18 61 $uonr 

13 55 sumy 

14 57 surmy 
14 57 sudny 

14 57 brigbi 

15 99 auwiy 

16 61 sunny 

14 57 brm 

13 55 stray 

15 SB sunny . 

16 61 sunny 

14 57 stray. 

15 57 stray 
13 55 stray 
is 59 sunny 
15 m 'stray- 

15 59 stray 
15 -59 sunny 
is 59 





$ ’ 


Abroad 


EdMbutMi S' 1366 Ikwc^ita s 1659 
GtamoSr s 1355 (rtadaway 11355 


Oghting-ap time 


TODAY 

London 632 pm to 7.01 am 
Bristol 642 om to 7.10 am 
EtSftbunAi S38pm to 732 am 
MaPctastor 637 pm fo 7.13am 
PatKaoee 658 pm to 730 am 

tom o rrow 

London 630 pm to 7.03 am 
Bristol 639 pm to 7.12 am 
EtSotacrfi 6« pm to 724 am 
Ma ne fta ator 634 pm to 7.15 am . 
PkraaKfi 634 pm to 732 am 


MODAY: c, doudf d. drizsto: f, fair; (g. tag# r.'rakt; s, sen; so, skm; t, 

C F C F G F 

s 24 75 Cotagae , c 13.55 taaforea t 23 73 Bora* 

t»7SC|tap l 14 57 IMaga ( 23 73tetats 

f ') 73 Corfu ,s 22 72 Mafia Bt m 72' < 

C 22 72 Quote ■s 14 ST —I’rhe f 23 T3 

» 13 SSDdbnaatt a 20 68 MttieoCT c 


A t a o cta 

Afcodri 

JUnUa 


Autfdm 


Bakst 


CIS 64 Fan - s 22 72 
s 33 91 FloranM . .a. 217D 
' S 29. 84 Franktat . .C 17TB3 
I 21 70 " ‘ ‘ 


s 17 63 Gibraltar 
s 14.57 BalahM 
f 28 82 HcttgK 
miwn rcK 


NEWSPAPERS UMTTtD. 

Pruned Qy London Post (Prim 

«n) Umited of i- vtratnn arset 
London. El 9XN ami 7 tar New 
SroUand Lta.. 124 potman straet, 

weted as a bcwsubt at ttw Post. 

omw. 



Kmumg Pi^k. 

Soiurday. 


c 18.64 LMmaa 
~C2 8 St lMSoZ ■■■ 

"*■ 31: IQ Iteanw 

1/23 73. L Angela*. 

* irssiJfiKSr 

CtYdbocb.s 18.8TJ6*T 




-•vV.-i'. 


c 22 72 

{ 17 §8 
t 22 72 
a 9 48 NnlH- 
e 27 -81 NOtoM 
s 17 83 N Tortf 

c M 57 Hc« 

s 3& B6 Oak) 

. r 14 57 Pari* 

• 














21 


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it ; 3> 

'ics ; 8f ‘V 

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-- .-V 


0 


business and finance 


THE 


•••• . "I- 
•’ *• • ^ 


•i ..., * «•■ 

•■•‘S' 

V.-; l -4K: 

■ a;' 

. •• ' 1 $• 

. .. 1 \'L. 

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Wap* 

THE PQUMn 

US Dollar 

1.4320 (-0.0050) 

W German mark 

2.8268 (-0.0070) 

Jtede-weighted 

67.3 (-0.4) 




• . .... -s... 

’’ ■‘‘'I 


■ i.'.. . 


Yamani to 

stay firm 

Sheikh Ahmed-Zakj Ya- 
maiu, the Saudi Arabian oil 
minister and still Opec’s most 
dominant ■ figure, yesterday 
made it clear that he will insist 
that the cartel’s meeting will 
end with a radical new quota 
agreement, David Young re- 
ports from Geneva. 

The alternative, he said, 
would be that his country, 
which sits on the world's 
largest proven oil reserves, 
would refuse to continue 
limiting its oil production to 
support the poorer Opec 
nations. 

The Opec ministers are 
believed to be dose to agree- 
ing on a quota system which 
sets an overall production 
ceiling and allocates each 
member country with a 
percentage of the total accord- 
ing to a formula which is 
based on oil reserves and 
social and economic criteria. 

However, some members 
are suggesting that the present 
agreement which limits out- 
put to 16.8 million barrels a 
day could be rolled over until 
the end of this year — it is due 
to expire on October 31 — 
while details of the new sys- 
tem are agreed. 

Sheikh Yamani has said 
that a firm decision must be 
made at Geneva otherwise the 
world . oil market would no 
longer take Opec seriously and 
.drive the price riown. 

-During negotiations yes- 
terday he is understood to 
havesaid that bis country, and 
possibly' Kuwait, could' 
weather such a price storm, 
but other countries could not. 

Arlington up 

Arlington Securities, the 
property company, reports 
pretax profits of £762,000 for 
the half year to June 30, 
compared with losses of 
£188.000 for the same period 
last year. Turnover fell 46 per 
cent to £5.09 million. The first 
interim dividend will beU7p. 
Earnings per share are 1.16p 
before an extraordinary gain 
of £196,000. 

Tempos, page 23 

Losses cut 

Davies & Newman Hold- 
ings. operators of Dan-Air, 
yesterday announced half- 
year results to June 30, with 
pretax losses down from £3.58 
million to £3.48 million, and 
turnover up from £123.3 mil- 
lion to £131.8 million. 

Tempos, page 23 

Bell stake up 

Bell Resources acquired a 
further 275,000 ordinary 
shares in Morgan Crucible 
yesterday, increasing its total 
holding to 18,121,223 shares, 
or about 20.3 per cent 

Mecca ballot 

The offer for sale of Mecca 
Leisure was 11 times over- 
subscribed. 


Wail Street 22 
Traded Opts 22 
Co New* 22 

Money Mrkts 22 
Foreign E*ch 22 
Tempos 23 


23 

Stock Market 23 
Unit Trasts 24 
Commodities 24 
USM Prices 24 
Share Prices 25 



TIMES 


SPORT 39 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 43 



Rate of inflation 
rises for first 


time this year 


By David Smith 


The rate of inflation rose to 
3 percent last month, from 2.4 
per cent in August. This was 
the first rise in the inflation 
rate this year, and the sharpest 
underlying increase for more 
than a year. 

A big rise in petrol prices, 
dearer clothing and footwear, 
and higher prices for dra ugh t 
beer and a range of other 
products, pushed the retail' 
price index up by 0J per cent 
last month. 

It rose from 385.9 (January 
1974=100) in August to 387.8 
last month. The 0.5 per cent 
rise in the index was the 
biggest since April, when there 
was a I per cent increase. 

Excluding Budget price in- 
creases. Department of 
Employment officials said, 
last month’s rise was the 
biggest underlying increase 
since May last year. 

Mr Kenneth Clarke, the 



Paymaster General, said: “It 
was widely expected that infla- 
tion would rise a little again in 
the autumn- Half the increase 
this month is the result of the 
sharp increase in petrol prices 
imposed by the oil companies 
in. August." 

But Mr Roy Hattersley. 
Labour’s Chancellor-des- 
ignate. said: “These figures are 


Pound at a record low 

By Rodney Lord, Ecommiks Editor 


The pound dipped to record 
lows in foreign exchange mar- 
kets yesterday on ifisappoint- 
ment with the speech by the 
Chancellor, Mr Nigel Lawson, 
at (he Mansion House. Bat by 
the dose of trading in London 
it had recovered some ground 
as dealers squared their po- 
sitions ahead of die weekend. 

Some traders hesitated to 
sell sterling in front of 
Monday’s visit to London by 
the president of the 
Bundesbank, Hera Karl Otto 
POehL 

Expectations of a farther 
rise in interest rates hardened 
in money -markets. Three- 
money in the inter- 


bank market rose to more than 
Vz a point above base rates, 
generafiy regarded as a trigger 
for a rise. At 11 9/16 per cent 
die inter-bank rate was 3/16 
per higher rhan Hm> 

previous dose. 

In the gilt-edged market 
prices fell by np to a point 
before recovering to dose 
about % point off in the longer- 
dated stocks and % point fewer 
in the shorts. 

The pound dosed at 673 
per cent of its 1975 value 
compared with 67.7 per cent at 
the previous dose. Sterling 
was a cent lower at $1.4302 
and 1% pfennigs weaker at 
DM23255. 


bad news for Mr Lawson and 
inflation will undoubtedly get 
worse when mortgage pay- 
ments go up as a direct result 
of his decision to increase 
interest rates". 

A 1 percentage point rise in 
the mortgage rate would add 
03 per cent to the retail. price 
index. Anything larger than 
this would threaten to push 
the inflation rate back up to 4 
percent. 

In his speech at the Man- 
sion House, on Thursday eve- 
ning, the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer said the inflation 
rate, excluding the mortgage 
rate, would run at a little 
above 3 percent in the coming 
months. 

The inflation rate excluding 
mortgages was 3-4 per cent last 
month, compared with 3.3 per 
cent in August. 

Yesterday, the Halifax 
Building Society, Britain's big- 
gest, said it had deferred a 
decision on mortgage rates 
until next week, when general 
interest rate trends are dearer. 

Britain's inflation rate of 3 
per cent last month compared 
with latest rates of 2 per cent 
.in France, 1.6 per cent in the 
United States. -02 per cent in 
Japan and -0.4 per cent in 
WestGermany. 

The main price rises last 
month were in petroL np by an 
averse of 9.2p to 167.9p a 
gallon. This alone added 037 
per cent to the retail price 
index. 

Apples, potatoes and bread 
went up but cauliflowers, car- 
rots, margarines and cooking 
fets foil in price. 

There were higher prices for 
clothing and footwear with the 
introduction of autumn lin es 
but television sets and video 
recorders were marked down. 


AE centre of new 



By Cliff Feftham 


There was strong specula-, 
lion in the City last night that 
the Takeover Panel has told 
Tunier & NewalL the asbestos 
group, that it can bid again for 
AE, the engineering group. 

It was thought also to be 
critical of the condnct of AFs 
financial advisera — Hill Sam- 
uel the merchant bankers, 
and Caznove, the stockbroker 
in their handling of its 
defence during the previous 
bid. 

The Takeover Panel which 
has been engaged in a lengthy 
enquiry into the affair, refused 
to comment and there was no 
one available for comment at 
Cazenove or Hill Samuel But 


there were strong signs that 
the Panel had told the parties 
concerned and allowed 48 
hours in which to lodge an 
appeaL 

Earlier in the day the stock 
market quotes of both com- 
panies were suspended at then- 
own request, indicating that 
an outcome had been reached. 

The inquiry by the Take- 
over Panel was initiated after 
a toige block of shares in AE 
was bought by its supporters 
during the closing days of the 
£260 million bid, leaving 
Turner & Newall one per cent 
from victory. These shares 
were sold immediately after- 
wards at a loss. 


Hillsdown set to raise 
£154m from placing 


Hillsdown Holdings, the 
expanding fbod-to-furxriture 
manufacturer, is raising £154 
million net through a con- 
ditional institutional placing 
of 79.1 million new stores at 
200peach. 

The issue, with a 100 per 
cent clawback -facility, is the 
first placing not tied to a 
specific acquisition. 

Mr Harry Solomon, joint 
chairman, said the money 
co old be used for a very large 
acquisition or to add on 
complementary businesses to 
existing operations. 

Hillsdown accompanied the 


By Alison Eadie 

placing news with a bullish 
pretax profits forecast of not 
less than £50 mfllion this year 
— a near 50 per cent rise over 
1985. 

The market immediately 
began speculating on likely bid 
targets in the food sector. 
Dalgety shares rose 17p to 
285p„ Bernard Matthews 
jumped 10p to 241 p, and 
Bassett Foods gained 15p to 
20 Op. 

Hillsdown has purchased 40 
companies at a cost of £150 
million since coming to the 
stock market early last year. 

Tempos, page 23 


SE paves 
way to 
Isro-link 

By Lawrence Lever 

Radical reforms of the 
structure and constitution of 
the Stock Exchange were an- 
nounced yesterday by Sir 
Nicholas Goodison, the 
chairman. 

The changes, which include 
converting the Exchange to a 
limited company and transfer- 
ring voting power from in- 
dividual members to member 
firms, pave the way for the 
intended link up with the 
International Securities Regu- 
latory Organisation. 

“These are fer and away the 
most important of all the 
changes we have been, pa- 
tiently implementing over the 
years". Sir Nicholas said. 

The changes are encap- 
sulated in two Stock Exchange 
resolutions to be put to an 
extraordinary general meeting 
of the Exchange on November 
11 with a poll of members the 
following day. They require a 
75 per cent majority of afl the 
members who vote. Sir Nicho- 
las was confident yesterday 
that both would succeed. 

Apart from the Exchange 
converting to a limited com- 
pany and the change of voting 
rights the resolutions propose 
also that individual members' 
shares are reclassified as “A" 
shares which will be redeem- 
able when they are 60 years 
old or postponed until retire- - 
ment — if that comes later— to 
reduce the tax burden. 

Sir Nicholas said that he 
was “available if they want 
me" to become the bead of the 
new International Stock Ex- 
change. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


1828.88 (-7.31)* 


New York 
Dow Jones . 

Tokyo 

Nikkei DOW ... 1670039 (-171.50) 

13603 (+14# 

Commerzbank — 1950.0 (-24^) 
Brussels: 

General 

Paris: CAC - 
Zuri ch: 

SKA General 53070 (same) 

London dosing prices Page 25 


3754.68(-5JJ2) 

370 J (-7.1) 


INTEREST RATES 


London: 

Bank Base: 11% 
a^nontfi Interbank 11K-11 9 i«% 
SnonmdigitteMte:li!«-ii% 
buying rale 

t&ssas&r*" 


CURRENCIES 


London: 

E: $1.4320 
£ : DM2.6268 
£: SwR2.30S5 
E; FFr9.2607 

£: Yen220J4 
£ lndex:67.3 
ECU £0-737422 


NawYoric 
$.■ 61.4320- 
& DM1.9745- 
S: SwFfl.6200* 
& FFr6.4685* 

Si Yen154.1T" 
aindacm? 
SDR £0849340 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


awes- 
Beecham 
Blue Cade 

Glaxo 





Acatos Hutcheson 
Nu-Swttt 
ABas Converting 
Consolidated GoU 
British &Comm. _ 
1C Gas 

Refuge Group 

FALiS: 

GKN 

Lucas 

HHtedown 

Exco bit 


IW 

413p (+1J 


260p(-7 



GOLD 


London raina: 

AM S420qQjpn-$419.25 
dose $420.00-420.75 (£293-50- 
294.00) 

NawYoric 

Comex 5421.10-421.60* 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent {Dec.) pm $14.10 bbrtl 4.15) 
* Denotes latest hwHng price 



Salomon Bros International's trading floor, possibly the biggest In London (Photograph: Bill Warhorst) 

Rehearsal for Big Bang 

3,000 shares will be ‘traded’ 


By Richard Lander 

It will be people testing 
today rather than systems 
testing, according to the deal- 
ing room manager of one of 
the City's leading securities 
houses, talking about the foil 
dress rehearsal for Big Bang. 

That may be true as far as 
individual companies are con- 
cerned but the Stock Exchange 
takes a different view. It wants 
to make sure that its new 
electronic market-place - 
SEAQ (Stock Exchange Auto- 
mated Quotations) — works 
without a hitch and that all the 
market-makers' dealing room 
systems can cope with it 
The Stock Exchange floor 
will continue to exist after 
October 27 but, with the 
ending of single capacity for 
brokers and market-makers 
(formerly known as jobbers), 
afl the work done there at 


present can be carried out with 
SEAQ and 3 telephone. 

Eventually, even the tele- 
phone may become redundant 
as the Stock Exchange devel- 
ops its SEAQ screen-dealing 
system. This will be in- 
troduced next year as an 
automatic execution facility 
for small orders. 

The present SEAQ system, 
which will be distributed to 
investors, broker-dealers and 
market-makers through al- 
most 10.000 Topic vidcotext 
screens, will display a range of 
price information on about 
3.500 securities traded on the 
Stock Exchange. The amount 
of data displayed on the screen 
will vary according to the type 
of service and stock.' 

SEAQ level two — the more 
sophisticated service on offer 
— is designed for Stock Ex- 
change members and the big- 
gest institutional investors. 


These pages will show which 
market-makers are registered 
for a particular stock as well as 
their latest bid and offer prices 
and the largest blocks they arc 
prepared to deal in at those 
prices. 

For securities designated as 
alphas - the 62 most-activdy 
traded stocks — SEAQ will 
show the Iasi five trades and 
the running volume of shares 
traded during the day. and it 
will highlight the three mar- 
ket-makers displaying the 
keenest bid and offer prices. 

Alpha stocks will be tracked 
also by the SEAQ ticker, a 
series ' of electronic pages 
showing each share deal, ex- 
actly when it happened, with 
size and price. 

The next rung of stocks are 
the 517 betas, which will be 
shown in the same detail as 
alphas- except that traded 
prices and volumes are not 


displayed. Finally, there arc 
more than 2.000 gammas. 

Today's rehearsal is de- 
signed to resemble a normal 
trading day as closely as 
possible. Institutional inves- 
tors and brokers will be in 
their offices to telephone their 
orders to market-makers, each 
of whom has been given an 
equity “book" averaging £14 
million to begin the day. 

Business will accelerate in 
the afternoon so that total 
volume should be around 
50,000 bargains in 3.000 eq- 
uities — a fairly typical day. 

What the Stock Exchange 
will be watching particularly 
closely is the performance of 
those market-makers who arc 
inputting quotes and trades to 
SEAQ from their own dealing 
room computer systems 
ralhcr than using me 
exchange's own SEAQ 
work stations. 


A revolution in the gilt-edged sector 


By Richard Thomson 
Banking Correspondent 

The new gflt-edged market 
structure being given its sec- 
ond trial run today is truly a 
revolution compared with the 
old system. 

Instead of the traditional 
broker-jobber split, wiih a 
market dominated by two 
main jobbers, the new market 
has four types of participants. 

The trial is designed to test 
the dealing abilities of these 
participants and the effective- 
ness of their information and 
settlements systems. 

• The 27 market-makers are 
the most important They will 
provide the liquidity in the 
secondary market and win be 
the market's point of contact 
with the Bank of England 
when new stock is issued. 
They will act as both jobbers 
and brokers, taking positions 
and distributing slock to end 
investors. 

• The six inter-dealer brokers 
are new in the gilts market 
Market-makers can use them 
to deal anonymously and 
disguise their market opera- 
tions. The JDBs will not act as 
principals and nil] not distrib- 
ute stock outside the market 
They will simply match deals 
and help efficient pricing in 
the market by posting current 
prices on screens used by the 
market-makers. 

The nine money brokers 
will provide slock lending and 
borrowing facilities. Market- 
makers short of a stock may, 
for example, borrow it from a 
money broker. The money 
brokers will get the stock from 


other market-makers or even 
big investors who hold a long 
position and are willing to 
lend. 

• The broker-dealers will be 
able to act as principals but 
unlike the market- makers, 
they will not be obliged to 
make continuous two-way 
prices. Otherwise they will act 
as ordinary brokers, selling to 
clients. They will not have 
access to the Bank of England. 

In today's trial the market- 
makers will be given imagi- 
nary gilt positions by the 
Bank, which is coordinating 
the exercise. As the market- 
makers begin to deal the Bank 
will push out invented 
information likely to affect gilt 
prices, to which market-mak- 
ers will have to respond. 


This will probably include 
practice in the new system of 
"impromptu" tenders and 
taps. Market- makers will also 
be allowed to practise borrow- 
ing stock for the fust time. 

The settlement system in 
the new market also becomes 
more complex. .All deals 
within the market will be for 
next day settlement. 

Deals involving only mar- 
ket-makers and IDBs will be 
cleared through the new cen- 
tral gilts office, where stock 
and cash are exchanged 
simultaneously to minimize 
the risk of default by the 
buyer. 

Through a complex agree- 
ment between the clearing 
banks responsible for making 
payments on behalf of their 


customers, payments in the 
CGO system are guaranteed. 

Settlement between any 
market participant and an 
outside investor is the 
responsibility of the market- 
maker or broker dealer 
concerned. 

Finally, all market-makers 
must report their positions at 
the end of each day to the 
Bank for regulatory- purposes. 

With such a radical change 
in the market structure, it 
would be astonishing if every- 
thing worked completely 
smoothly from the start. In the 
last rehearsal two weeks ago, 
one of the main problems was 
found to be simply the 
familiarity of dealers and 
settlements clerks with their 
computer equipment 


IMF ‘happy to 
consider 
the Russians’ 

From Bailey Morris, 

Washington 

Mr Barber Conable, the new 
head of the World Bank, said 
here that he is willing, indeed 
happy, to explore a member- 
ship attempt from the Soviet 
Urnon if it decides to act 
formally on hints that it would 
like to join the Bank and the 
International Monetary Fond. 

“I think we should be 
willing to explore Russian 
membership. I think we 
should seek a more co-op- 
erative environment ” 

Mr Conable was replying to 
questions at a private, meeting 
on Thursday. A transcript was 
made available yesterday. 

The former United Slates 
Congressman, who assumed 
office in June, stressed that 
there . had been no formal 
approach by the Soviet Union. 

The US strongly resisted an 
attempt last month by the 
Soviet Union to participate in 
the round of negotiations 
under the auspices of The 
General Agreement of Tariffs 
and Trade. 


Third-tier market put 
off until new year 


Our 

Preparations for BigBang 
have forced the Stock Ex- 
change to postpone plans to 
set up a sew third tier in rite 
stock market 

The market - aimed at 
attracting companies pres- 
ently traded on the over-the- 
counter market - is now flkefy 
to be Janached in the new year. 

The delay, announced yes- 
terday at a conference called to 
mark the admission of the 
500th company to the success- 
ful Unlisted Securities Mar- 
ket, was caused by work 
involved in the bmld-np to Kg 
Bang on October 27. 

So for the Stock Exchange 
has no idea how many com- 
panies wifl apply to jom the 
new market, which will be 
open to start-op companies 
anxious to attract foods from 
outside investors, unlike the 
more established USM which 
requires a three-year trading 
record. 

Sr Nicholas ' Goodison, 
chairman of the Stock Ex- 
change, y est e rd ay welcomed 
Interlink, the parrels delivery 


City Staff 
company, as the 500th com- 
pany to join die USM. 

The USM, he said, had 
done a great deal towards 
changing the attitude on risk 
taking so that investors bad 
become prepared to buy shares 
in small companies. 

But Mr Brian Winterflood, 
of stockjobbers County 
Bisgood, disputed a claim by 
the Stock Exchange that the 
USM would not be affected by 
Big Bang. 

He said be could no longer 
stand by a commitment to deal 
in every stock on the USM if 
conditions were not right — 
and in particular if liquidity 
remained tight in certain 
stocks. 

“The sorting-oat period 
might be a little difficult. 
There is also the problem that 
the cost of coming to the USM 
might start to discourage com- 
panies which will prefer to 
wait until they meet the entry, 

requirements for a foil listing 

and go straight to the main 
market" 


Look at our past to 
see how your investments 
could look 
in the future. 


GTs position out of the top 30 largest Unit Trust Groups 
over the last ten years. 

one 

year 

two 

years 

three 

years 

lour 

years 

live 

years 

six 

years 

seven 

years 

e»!*hi 

years 

nine 

years 

ten 

wars 

1st 

5th 

4th 

1st 

5th 

2nd 

1st 

2nd 

1st 

6th 


Over the last decade one particu- 
lar Unit Trust Management group 
has stolen the limelight from many 
of its competitors. 

Not by relying on a run ofluck. 

But by drawing on experience and 
expertise that over die years has been 
amassed from various subsidiaries 
around the world. 

The group is called GT And were 
now one of the largest independent 
investment management groups in the 
UK. With around £425 m invested in 
a wide range of international Unit 
Trusts on behalf of 
our private and 
institutional clients. 

Over the last 
ten years GTs per- 
formance within 
the thirty 
largest Unit 

NAME 
ADDRESS 



Trust groups has consistendv assured 
us of a place amongst the top six. 
Indeed we have been top of the pile 
no fewer than four times within dial 
period. And that is where we have 
Been over the last twelve months. 
(Source: Planned Savings, weighted 
performance statistics.) 

We’ve set out all the details of our 
Unit Trusts and how they work, in a 
free guide to investing with GT. 

It includes the story of our past and 
our present 

And we think it will show you, 
quite clearly, just how rosy your ^ 
investments could look in 
the future. (AH infor- 
mation as at the ^^I’leasesendav. 

1st October ^ ^ GT l nit Managers Ltd. 
. / Freepost, London. EC2R2DL 
(No sump required! 

** Please vend, me a copy ul your free hroch - 
ure *A Guide to Investing with f f I* Unit Trusts!" 


1986.) 


T B 


The Unit Trust Managers of the Future 




P 


1 * 

\ 

a 







BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


(i e rch* m 

fun* 



Early fall for shares 


JVew York (Renter) — Wall 
Street 'Shares eased in early 
trading yesterday, hi reaction 
lo'worse-than-expedted hous- 
ing: figures for last reootV 
Investors were also concerned 
about ’the sluggish US econ- 
omy and tropes fell over fur- ' 
tUer interest rate cats. : 

jDa shares. feB- after reports - 
frpn Geneva Oat that Opec is ■ 
far from an accord on-quotas. 

{The Dow Jones industrial 
aijenge was down 33 7 points 


to U&Z82. Declining issue 
led advancing issues by a 
margin of more than three to 
two, on a volume of 12 million 
shares. 

USX led the active issues, 
.down. % tp 25%. Goodyear 
jumped 1% to 40 and Idaho 
' Power.fefl Vt to 28% 

- The txansportathm average 
was down 3.38 points to 
825.50, utilities fell 0-98 to 
200.83 and stocks were down i 
2.13 to 724.89. ! 


• INTERNATIONAL 
THOMSON 

ORGANISATION: The com- 
pany has agreed in principle to 
acquire South-Western Publish- 


ing Co from SFN Co. South- 
Western will join inter- nati/mal 


Oct Oct 

16 15 


R • . • -60 - 
\ 37 

M Start .40%- 
WSP*. ; . 6624. 

iCKmrs 3% 
n • 35% 
axlric 13% 

28% 


Bream ■ 25* 

FCCtncago 30 % 


1 PstimBncp 5456 
FstPennC . 9 % 
tad- 5656 

FT Wachra 39* 

GAFCdrp 3556 

BTECorp 57 * 

Gen carp 75% 

QanDyVncs 7355 
■GmfflWric 77% 
Gen Inst 19* 

Gen MBs - 83% 
GenMoton -67% 
GnPbUtny 22 % 
Gencicc 3% 

Georgia Pic 38% 
GMs- 40% 

Goodrich- 42% 

Goodyear 38% 

Gotftfae 19% 

•Grace- ■ 50% 
GrAUATac 22% 


Am Brands 45 
Ain Can 87 % 

Ar> Express ' 58 % 
AnyHcrao - - 77% 
Any Motors ' 356 
AntStiftd 42 %' 
AnfeTotoph 24 % 
Amoco- -• 67 % 
AnscoSteri- 6 % 
AsSrco"' 15 

AsttandOa . 59 % 
ARteteld 56 % 
AvgnPfotte 33 % 
BUS Tel NT 45 % 
Battemer . 14 % 
Bktrf BGtorr 40 % 
Bank at NY- ■ 5856 
Betti Steel 7 % 
Boeing 54 % 
Bsi Cased* 59 % 
Brdan 48 

BefWamer 34 % 
BiM Myers 78 % 
BPS 3956 

BJrtooM 3656 
Buflon Nil- 59 % 


Pfizer 

I Phelps Oga 

PlSpMrs 

PMflpsPBt 

Polaroid 

PPGtnd 

PrOrGmtjt 

poseaq 

Raytheon 

RyrtdsMrt 


Western will join inter- national 
Thomson's book group, and 
retain hi own name and 
identity. 

• RATNERS (JEWELLERS): 
Mr Gerald Ratner, chairman, 
told shareholders at die annual 
meeting: “The application of 
Ratnens’ formula to . the H 
Samuel group has already pro- 
duced extreme l y positive re- 
sults. Trading throughout the 
group has been buoyant.” 

• POCHIN’S: Final dividend 
lOp making 14p (12.9p) fo r the 
year to May 31. Figures in £000. 
Turnover 21,740 (22J30), 
profit before tax 835 (843) and 
eps 58.16p (5Z29pX 

• RAND MINES-' Figures in 
rand millions. Pretax profits for 


• AGRICULTURAL MORT- 
GAGE CORPORATION: For 
the half year to September 30 
£29,459,494 (£24,772.998) of 
mortgage loans were completed. 
A further £30,353.000 
(£14.584.000) had been ap- 
proved and awaited completion- 


The total of loans outstanding 
was £591.292.376 

(£575.22! .508). 

• MUN ICIPAL PROP- 
ERTIES: Half-year to June 30. 
Interim dividend 7p (nil), rents 
received £319,718 (020.792). 

■ net rental income £221.157 
(£122^267), net revnue before 
tax £25631 4 (£1 89.560) and eps 
33 33p (23.67p). 

• GBC CAPITAL: Total assets 
at September 30- CanS2I5J 
milfion. Net asset value a com- 
mon share Can$2.S2 (fully di- 
luted Can$2.65) before 
adjustment for taxes on un- 
realized appreciaxioa of invest- 
ments of 36 cents per share 

• BRISTOL STADIUM: Divi- 
dend 1.2p for 1986, payable 
November 26. 


the gold division for the quarter 
to September 30 were 133.00 
(111.19). Tax was 3633 (27.81). 


• ASSOCIATED BRITISH 
PORTS HOLDINGS: ABPH 
and Miller Developments are 
setting up a joint venture com- 
pany to develop a prime mixed 
high technology property, to be 
known as Riverside Park, at 
Poyle near Heathrow. 

• COWELLS: Half year to 
June 30. Interim dividend Ip 
(nil). Figures m£000s. Turnover 
4,15! (3.913). Profit before ax 
293 (290). Tax 1 14 (l ! 1). Earn- 
ings per share 2.4p (2.4p)_ 

• NINETEEN TWENTY- 
EIGHT INVESTMENT 
TRUST: The board is coond- 
ering proposals for possible 
unitization. A further 
annooncemem win be made. 

• A CEC (IRELAND): National 
Industri of Norway, a huge 
manufacturer of tau&fon&ers, 
has acquired ACECs majority 
shareholding in ACEC 


EQUITIES 




Saararco (I45p) 
CBygmwe flOOp) 
Creighton Latej 
Earn Home (itifl 
Be GoasMctfon 
Great S outftamB 
Guihrie m 

lU^aaJ I 

nKnaoni 
Hughes! 
mterihucB 
Local Lcnl 


190-0 
24 «4 
148 

na 

198 

143 

105 

157-3 

175 

180 

28+1’j 

198 

240+25 


Mg Cash 4 C HOOP) 
Newags Tjw PSp) 

fladanwc Gp |9Qp) 

g&K&na? 

Sswt 

Tress sWWl »i« *97 
Unilock (53p) 

Wlwney Mackay (180p) 


90 

80 

T 27 

180+2 

75 

90 

104 

186 

£19>« 

140 

$*•: 

280+2 

297*8 


Y SM rt O n flW 

verkswre tv (isspl 
RIGHTS issues 

Bryant W* ■ - 

Bores-Anderson H/P 

Osmeh ta «y iin 
Gnoiihsmi Mm HIP 

LedHiWm* N/P. 

ear 

Tilbury N/P 

fittU* PW* * brachauO. 


■ nk «- li 


daK 1 ” 




AMd Lyons 

f305) 


ConsGoW 


(ItelandJJ^rs group turn ov er in 
1 985 was NJcr770 million (about 
Ir£77 million) and profit was 
Nki4l million (about Ic£4 
miTIion). 


tarira Oct Jan 

300 10 a 

330 t ? 

380 » 4 , 

800 67 « 

650 20 55 

700 3 g 

560 154 170 
BOO W 
650 54 100 


110 1 
75 3 

40 38 


iron am 

1 * 447 ) 


185 1 

147 1 % 
117 2 


CourtauUs 

r2M) 


Smut 

SFESopac 
SchTbarger 
Scot Paper 
Seagram 
SaaraRbcfc 
She! Trans 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


MONEY MARKET! 


Com Unco 

CM) 


SMtafl tadte compaiwl uni 1975 wasdoan aURU ( 4 w*a naga P.i«4 

OTHER STERLING RATS DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


. AND GOLD m 


CatjIs&VHra 

rsaq 


Gftmd - - 32 
GremanCcr 2 S 
GuffXWftst 63% 
KctozKJ. . .42% 
Harcuter - 55% 
HTen-PtatJ 38% 



mm 

Si 


HorwywaS 69% 
1 C Ira 25 % 


tevscja - 52 % 
ImandStael 18 % 
IBM - 121 % 

IMCO . 12 % 
tntPBpor 71 % 
I htToTU 52 
I tteg Bank 49 % 
Jtansn&Jtan * 69 % 
KaterAban 17 % 
Kerr McGee 28 % 
KmbiyCtlX 82 % 
KMait 47 % 


CnjpboUSp 

CappSffld 


CeWraiSW 

Ctwnpam 

Chase Man 

Ct^tnBk-NY 

Chevron 

ChcyetBr 


Kroger 31 % 

LtvToore 2 


Litton 78 % 

Lockheed 45 % 


Lucky Sirs 35 % 
Man H'nver 44 % 
MamAeCp 2 % 
Mapoo . 51 % 
itarineMU 48 % 
MrtManetta 42 %. 
! Masco 26 % 
McDonalds 61 % 
McOomefl 81 % 
Mead 59 % 

I Merck . 108 % 


CMiMaGas 
CnartnGng 
Cojnwkha 
Cons Bfes 
Cn+taGaa 
Core Power 
CrSrl Data 

saEs*?- 

mo 

Crane ' 
CrjIZefcr 
Daft & Kraft 
Deere 
Data Air 
Detroit Ed 
DtealEq 


Sun Comp 

Teledyne 

Temeco 

Texaco 

Texas ECor 

Texas Inst 

Texas Utis 

Textron 

TrarirsGor 

TRWfnc 

UAL Inc 

UnBeverNV : 

Un Carbide 

linPacCor 

Utd Brands 

USGCocp 

(JtriTschnol 

USX Carp 

Unocal 

Jim Walter 

WrnarLnAt 

VWbFaim 

WstsTOeB 


WaarOerownr , 
Swttzsrtsnd 


Ho^jKdng , 
POdugriZ. 

Sprtl- 

Aiteii - 


. 1 A 750 - 1 J 3780 
. 2 . 1715 - 2.1725 
. 25185^5205 

- 0 J 837 WL 8377 
. 13888 -L 3881 
.85150418200 
.7275072800 

- 7^350-7^400 
- 12737-12747 
. 12185-12195 
■ 22300-22310 
.8482044670 
. 154 . 15-15425 
. 13862-13882 

— 4097-4122 
. 77970 - 7.7975 
. 14520-14520 
. 13140-13120 

— 1325-1328 


Base Rate % 
Clearing Barton 
Fi na nce Ho we io 


m.na—% 

TIlow 10 


DsHere 

reaa 


Week need: lb% ■ 
Tiaaiuj IhpinaMllll 


2 nsn£ft 11 % 

3mA 11% 


260 30 42 

280 10 28 

300 2 W 

330 a 9 

280 33 43 

280 13 31 

300 2 19 

300 25 C 

325 5 28 

350 1 18 

375 » 5 

EDO HO — 

650 60 — 

700 17 — 

160 ita ai 

180 * 10 

200 Yi 3 


500 35 a n K M 

550 » 30 J g 

800 ■ 17 — w m 

« a 1 I i I 

ts 1 % S.A:-A 

So 58 72 — 3 7 

3M 33 «0 « § 15 

m 1 ? 27 » li p 


4 7 

9 13 

15 21 

IS 32 

23 35 

37 47 

60 — 


BrttAaro 

P<8B 


BAT MM 
P4431 


Bardeya 

r4S8) 


BrirTWecarn 

nao 


2 swath 11 

Srentti 11 


Grand Met 

r 


MwBMkte(piniHW 
1 rndh 1 l%-ll 2 mn 8 i 11 %-lt 


3anm rt%-u 
Trade BAs (Dts 
Iran* 10 % 

3 ran* 1 Q% 


Bma* 1 l.l 0 11 ia 


2 mn 8 > 10 % 
6 ran* io% 


70 — 
— 75 
33 52 
S 30 

152 192 
112 147 
62 107 
17 72 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Ovemgtc open 10 % dose 10 
1 week 11-10% 6 ran* ll%-ll» 

1 ran* 11%-11% 9 ran* IPw-11% 
3 nra* 1l%-li*i» 12m* llta-ll’ia 


Land Sec 
C328) 


30 39 
3% 20 

% 8 


— » 

87 — 

87 ia 

43 17 

207 a 
182 2 
122 2 
87 10 

46 1 

26 6 
14 33 


Cadbury Srtwrppe 

PW) 


Maries 8 Span 

rao 2 ) 


Xerox Corp 
I Zent* 


DrihchAm 

Drfissertnd 



NWBancrp 35 % 
OccxtnPet 29 % 


38% 

37% 

CANADIAN PRICES 

83% 

84 

About 

25% 

25% 

35 

35% 

AJcnAJurn 

44 

43% 

44 

43 

AtgomSfl 

14% 

14% 

6 % 

6 % 

Can Pacific 

16 

16% 

43% 

44 

Cominco 

13% 

13% 

M 

24% 

Con Battiest 

2 S 

24% 

8 % 

9% 

HaTSdCsn 26% 

28% 

66 % 

88 % 

HdsnBMbi 

■24% 

24% 



LacatX inh o rt t y Pep aal la (%j 
2 days 1D% 7riays 10% 

Iran* TI 3mA tIK 

6 ran* 11 % 12 m* 11 % 


23 30 
4% 16 

^ % 7 


SMfl Trans 

raoaj 


1 rontrTlvJO* 1 Ta 11-10% 

3 ran* 11-tOS 6 ran* 11-10% 
9 ran* 11-10% 12m* 11-10% 


Tcteg ar House 
r283) 


1 ms* H'is-IPm Son* 11 'h-11'w 
6 ran* 11 VII Vi 12 in* 11«w-ll3u 


GO 95 
18 58 
3 30 

35 40 
14 24 

2 14 

6 12 % 
% 7 % 

K 4 


36 % 

24 3 

15 19 

110 3 

78 10 
45 45 


5 10 

12 18 
20 28 
37 47 

4 G 
12 15 

34 35 

4 6 

10 12 
22 24 

17 28 

35 48 
83 80 

4 9 
K> 16 
20 26 

5 7 

10% llii 

17 16 % 


Guinness 

1*31 B} 


11 

11 

’1 2 
2 10 
14 22 

4% n 

1 4 

42 47 
24 31 
11 » 
22 36 
8 « 

3 7 


88 17 & 


£ iv " 
8 i 3 


M 40 

V y.-y. 

a * » 
« is M 
SL * 

50 8 f 

37 ft ■ 


45 4 10 

so ® m 

13 47 55 


tnraansIGr 

P 390 J 


~ 1% ~ 

— 5 — 


Lwftnft* 

f 3 S 5 ) 


32 47 

12 28 
3 W_ 


58 4 J 

33 15 a 

20 38 3 


30 4 B 

33 7 

17 13 20 


MufiandBank 

P 537 ) 


17 13 20 

77 8 II 

47 » 32 

23 87 47 

— i%-. S 


■•IS 

32 jg -40 83 




1 ran* 59 S 6 SS 3 ran* SSS^JSO 
Bran* 59 S &90 12 m* 6.10605 


Oe ec ha m 

r«3) 


EURO MONEY D90S1TS % 


[•»■!•] 


7 days 5V5»ta 
3 ran* 8-5% 


Ogden 43 

OGraCorp 42 % 

Owens-fi 41 

PacGosB 24 

PanAm S% 
Penney XC. 76 % 

Pe nn zni 67 % 

PeoiSCQ 28 

n IHtMMCM |M 


Tima Month Staffing 

Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 i 

Mar 68 ! 

Previous day's toW op 


_ as 

_ 89.05 

— B925 

— 89.10 

— NT 

_ NT 

n interest 13262 


KSrti Low 

B&Sr 88.45 

89.09 8853 

89-32 8922 

88.12 89 J 05 


8850 7162 

6895 435 

8925 109 

89.12 27 

8835 0 

8855 0 


7 days 4 >« 4 »m 
3 ran* 4*Mr4 , M 


7 days 7 %- 7 % 
3 ran* 8 %- 8 % 


StadCU 
TtwranNA* 
’■ferity Corp 
VHamni 
1 WCT 


Dects 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 

US Treasury Bond 

Dec 86 

Mat 87 

Jun 87 


... 94-08 

NT 

__ NT 


Previous day's total open merest 2 S 278 
9424 9359 94.01 4158 

9194 mm 93.91 62 S 

9371 9359 93.71 179 

93.40 93 J 7 9340 92 

PraMOus da/s total open interest 60 BB 
94-19 9442 94-16 4731 

— — 9552 O 

— — 92-21 0 


7 days WC 
3 ran* 4 i w 4 *m 
Y en 

7 days 4 %- 4 % 

3 ran* 5 'w- 4 «h* 


caa 6 *- 5 % 
1 ran* 6 - 6 % 
Gran* 9 - 5 % 
cal 4 % - 3 % 

1 ran* PiH'n 
Brarth 4 %- 4 % 
cal B%- 7 % 
Iran* 8 V 8 % 

6 ran* 8 V 8 % 
cal 2-1 
1 nt* 3 Va% 

6 ran* 4 >n- 4 »m 
art 5 %- 4 % 
1 mn* 4 a»->'w 
6 mo* 5 - 4 % 


BkuCkde 

rsni 


Dee Mar Jen 

70 78 — 

45 55 65 

25 38 47 

10 25 — 

39 . 51 56 

23 35 41 

TO 22 27 

24 37 43 

— 26 33 

11 — — 

80 90 100 

40 80 G 5 

20 33 35 
67 80 57 

35 SO 62 
17 30 — 


Due Mar Jun 


2 5 — 

6 U 20 

23 23 35 

50 55 - 


125 165 — 
100 135 155 
Hi 120 130 
48 95 — 


Gokfct« 2 0 jOtM 2 0 . 7 5 
Knjgarrancr (par oote 
$4fr(S~«ato{E29tro-Z93£0] 


Brat Peering! UatDarttea 

Oct 6 Cfct 17 

Oc »20 Oct 31 

Nov 3 . Nov 14 

Cari opfiom we n t ahan out am 17 


List Declaration For Sett 
Jan 8 Jan 19 

Jan 22 Feb 2 

Feb 5 Feb IB 


ShortG« 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 


Previous 
95-56 8 


95-52 35 

9552 0 

— 0 


$992510025 CB 6950-7 

Rahman 

$56025 (£ 38150 ) 
“Excludes VAT 


Holdings’. Ecotxfc, AG Slwley. 

Lfidbrokes. BOMS, PUngton Brosjftmstraa Renoifii. Bockvntre. FoM, Lysanderi- 
Gefrtetner. Beraarain meat, Greenwich Resou r ces. Benoori. London & Manctwraar, 

I XJ BOOI 1 MIWM-. J. Wuuifipau. * s • 

FuS Laura Artday. - 

Pu$& Sears, Equity AGUndraL - . . . , 


(98 tsb. Sears.- British Car Auctions, Peek 
■ General, Hughes taxi RMn, WWr Group. 


Long G 3 S 

DecBS 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 — 
Sep 87 _ 
FT-SE 100 
Dec 86 
Mar 87 : — 


Previous day^ total open interest 15943 
109-29 110-04 10947 109-18 13617 

109-11 10980 109-11 109-18 15 

NT — — 109-18 0 


Previous day's totel open htterut 2840 
16240 J 64.00 . 161.70 1 U 248 

NT — -r - 166 . 10 . 0 


Fixed Rate Sterfing Expon Finance 
Scheme IV Average refe ren ce me tor 


58 68 — 
34 42 54 

IS 24 38 

32 42 53 

18 29 41 

10 17 29 

1 11 — 

85 125 156 
52 95 12 S 

33 70 100 

15 50 — 

37 44 — 

19 27 33 
9 15 % 22 


interest period SaptwAar 3 . 1388 to 
Oeobers, 1986 -acfcxMec 10255 -per 


1 4 7 

4 10 14 

18 17 22 

8 13 18 

— 23 30 
21 — — 

8 IS 20 
25 38 43 

55 60 70 

6 13 20 

23 27 35 
55 56 — 

10 22 - 

23 38 60 

45 60 85 

70 90 — 

2 8 - 

8 10 13 

22 24 28 

2 9 14 

13 19 24 

25 30 35 

42 44 — 

21 40 53 

45 62 73 

75 90 98 

110 120 — 

15- 

4 8 12 

13 17 21 


Vart Reels 

r*g 


13 22 
4 12 

IS 4 % 

67 105 
48 70 

28 45 
12 — 
13 % 17 

8% 11 

2 7 % 


SB 7 13 % 
17 21 Zt 
10 36 38 

122 6 tS 

90 19 .39 

60 « «6 

— 80 • — ~ 


22 3 8 

18 7 10 % 

10 12 % 18 % 


Bailee Heir Her Mat Wee Mra Jwu 

200 40 46 50 2 9 9 % 

210 2* — — 4% — -~ 

236 13 % — — 11 — — 

So - 20 24 - £1 27 


1711 %% 1991 

■C102J 


100 2 % 
102 

104 >m 


7 M 1 W* 0?/07 
WOT) 


106 

108 

110 1 
112 

114 % 

115 


3 * iv H 1 % 1 H 

>*m 2ha 1*>« 1% 2% 

1 % 2 % 3 % **W 

4 % 5 % 1 % 2 % .“™ 

»»™ 2 % 3 % 4 % 

*1* u v **■» «>M 5% 

3 % 5 5 % 7 

1% 2% 6% 7% 6% 


Oat Nee Dec Jes Oot Nov Pee Jew 


FT-SE 

152 S 

SO 

67 

„ 

_ 

2 

6 

_ 

— 

tnOsx 

1550 

w 

80 

96 

113 

S 

13 

17 

27 

n 60 B» 

187 S 

45 

83 

77 

98 

11 

20 

27 

as 

1 BOO 

27 

50 

63 

80 

16 

30 

37 

4 


182 S 

M 

37 

50 

63 

38 

40 

50 

OD 


1660 

7 

26 

36 


48 

5 G 

62 



1875 

3 

16 

28 

■■ 

70 

re 

00 



1700 

2 

9 

18 

_ 

86 

100 

KB 

H. 


inquire 
at CBS 


T J - •' 


October 17 , 1986 ; Total caMnctadTOll. CeH 230 n. Pol* 007 . 


pAfo 1 


UNIT LINKED INSURANCE INVESTMENTS 


Bid Otter Ceng yio. 


Bid Otter CUng YW 


Od Oder Ong YW 


Bd Otter Cnng YW 


Ad Otter cang YW 


Ad Otter t 3 ng YM 


. M Otter Ong YW 


Ad Otter Owo YW 


MwwceuMm 

40 i=s« John Aaxa. London ECiv 4 QE 

mswtmn 


2 - 8 . Han 3 «. ram Be. Hart* 
P Bnr 51122 


WJS 1126 

ton ii.il 

1144 12 JJ 5 
tar? lair 
12 J 8 1846 
1034 
942 


P Bnr 51122 
Bpty Gmndl 
I 4 WHQKI 

aTPUdM 

Mn-lMad 

&°*7 


I DBS Mnnagad 
OrawA Accm 


175 lS IBM 
20 M 2 ULB 


Spvctel AteWkM 2*41 2972 
Nordi Aowdca Ant 2326 ats* 


Cnaii 

IMM Bk Ur 
MkfandBkba 


ms 

171 -S 1 *j 0 
1186 1333 
1 ZU 135.7 
IOSlS 115.7 
18 B .1 1959 
1988 M *0 
1 S 2 B 1925 
217 JI 2295 


Won Sunvy RH 2 8 BL 
07372 4 HM 



11.80 1222 
1144 1255 
1232 1297 
1495 1594 
14.40 1 S .18 
1052 
to* 

1*9 13*3 


C M M0N59SM W M CI: 

Jl^glfcWtey. tester, ukkte HMONB 


AB 9 CYLV 8 
N.tM«nni Hd, 
amp 28237 3 
Pnopwtr Rod tec 
Do Acorn 
Enqr Rnd kXXMn 
qp Accom 
SgU« find 
WHS Hmd 
Prob Fd Sar* 

as%r* 4 

&Sr% 4 « 

S 3 d na Pd S» 4 
AnSrtcei Sar 4 


Boivnaroomn Bhb BAL 


Mon Wc Sar* 
tw a n ad Wv Sar * 
japan Sar* 





902 1 mj 
9 M 1039 
9 SJ 1*9 
825 875 
1079 1139 
9*9 IBM 
9 U 10*3 
1354 1504 
SSJ ions 

905 959 
SS 5 1*9 
232J 300.1 


terantM 
Stempad Rnd 
dmxmc raw 
Pite n aafcte ra al 
Piapany raw 


3*2 3*3 
2984 3129 
1409 1479 
-1772 158.8 
1272 1349 


Managad Ctarancy 112 2 MC 5 
GHbWHaaMi Can* 11*4 1201 


aaaraaXonal Cap 10 S 9 

Do Mom *02 

On DvpnvK Cm MSS 

Do Mena 17 M 

RaxUa Cap 2402 

Do Aram 2 B 22 

taaonymai m raw 2259 

Capital Qomtfi fijod 7129 


Propvly Accum 
Monty Accom 
SpacM MW ACCOM 
Japan Grawtn apc 
n Anar Aeon 
PacMc Accum 


I Tactmoiom Auaan I 
MartMMun 
Japan GnWi Accom 


OOU 9 TWI MANMMCe 

Bati Bond. awHa nna w. Qtencaaay I 

0242 521811 

Sonora Fund 1024 1079 

Bkw Crtp raw 1229 129.1 
Adwanaa w Fond 1407 1954 
Partne na nca Fond M 89 19 M 


rau.iuauu.L 9 t 
tOA Towar. ACd h cc nOa 
OVOW 4385 
Sacutr raw 
AWairaW 
a— IMhj iM raw 
Doaarraw 
enpw raw 
mom raw 
Prnpara sartaa 'A' 
Propany 1 Mb 

nrawwraw 

Managao Sanaa 'A' 


Read, Croydon 


Tonw Hte H 3 R 88 Q 


OU 1679 
009 949 

1 M 9 1209 
1007 T 14.7 
85.1 IBM 
703 009 
10*4 1102 
929 909 
1774 1072 
MJ BOS 


150 St Items*. O tetSBi r 
OH -2492325 

Btaar 2 M 9 *47 

Raw Maiaal 1714 HS .7 

>— mllnaal 2330 »U 

PropaiJy 1297 1309 

caaft osj 159 

Mtnaatq 2339 »u 


mi raw MM* mt mi 
M ona* raw nocara no 11 
aapnUMd ta *ac iiiailfi 
ten tea Manna nu 
Pana Maoo MM 38*7 3 M .4 
PMaOMMBM 1119 117.4 


EAOLESTAWMtXiHO 
1 Unaewnoa St. London EC 2 
01-588 1*2 

EastePWdWW IMS 1824 1880 


EOWTVaLAW 

I Amat anam B ond. HM Wycontta 
IMM 33377 

4299 4479 


CmrOPIMBIfiAMIMt AfiAMHHCC 


ALBANY UP! 

1 Pn ma Lana, I 
0707 42311 


Sanary Houia. 800 . Aaataay BM 
O « Mteon Kdyaaa MB SLA 


B*hy Fd Acc 
Emtpaan Fd Aocom 
FtaHHMC 
GWMonw fid Acn 
baUMan Fd Acc 
Wfad teat Fd Acc 

MnGtawtoinFdMC 

Prab Fd Acc 


0974 73*0 
2139 225-1 
2913 3063 
2*9 2123 
333.1 350-0 
1824 1929 
2 E 74 2709 
180-2 1019 
2039 21*4 
*29 5804 


00064061 * 

Pronely raw ii 5 J 1219 

Ifenayraw 223.7 2339 

Uvnagad Food 4009 4220 

rautte raw 248.1 2823 

FbMd hand raw 137 .B 14*9 

Far East raw 2137 2250 

Nth Amar raw 1719 Utt .0 

Nat Raanacai raw M*s ifle .8 

SUN rag raw 128.1 1329 

pan raw 1207 1334 





-07 .. 
♦19 .. 
-83 .. 
-07 .. 
-09 .. 
+02 .. 
+29 .. 
-19 .. 
-09 .. 
-19 .. 
-23 -. 
-40 . . 
*0-2 094 
+04 .. 
-43 .. 


pwmonrwniiM. 

25 / 31 . Ilnnrata London EC 2 R I 

*970 3232 

*79 
1909 
2 M 9 
2939 
1000 


aco riAM B Qwraeu 

2 B. 9 AlHMar Sg. EMufil DO ' 

031 586 ** 


ms M09 

ttOJ IM.I 
1104 1229 
1304 1 X 72 
1129 11 M 
10.4 KM.R 


Catn 

awaa-LMwd 
raw MtrM 



2J22L 

■rnmnona 

Amartcan 


1022 1074 
929 97.7 
1020 106.1 
0*1 M 19 
120.1 1245 
ISOS 1809 
1217 1242 
1747 1841 
1824 1709 
1609 100.1 
1273 13*1 
UU M 09 


Sa Edhowp EH 2 1 YE 


r ~ f J . % 

r _ T^-ThBrarr: 


hnparttl Uta I 
0483 571255 




0413 571255 

Qnain raw ( 4 ) 2534 2754 +09 

Una Utead Man 2 TO 3 2509 +04 

UHt uaMW Hand M 2 D <9 2160 -10 

UU UnRKlSK cap 1800 1740 . 

Unit LrtoM Eq FU 5539 6820 +*5 

link Ontead Prop Fd 1749 18*7 +41 


wwa rn End. DorWng RH 4 104 


AU 0 OUBMI 


INTERNATIONAL 

Narrow mate. BrtaM 882 094 
0272 290508 


Utedfelb Accom 1179 1 X 2 
UK Eq Aonan 17*0 iS 52 

S ln wa nteW p Accwn 1619 1705 
Uteftad H Acaan 1209 1270 
LXndndn-Lnfed Acc nu 102.1 
UNtMhad Accom 1520 1000 


Longbow Horan. 24 P 4 —a S* Lcnctan BCV 
01-638 17 * 



|^ |r4j 

II 



1139 1109 +41 

1840 174 M +07 
1420 1499 * -09 
1745 HUM* -47 
2359 WS 0 -03 
1719 1 B 04 -27 

1104 1109 -19 

1039 1004 +42 

104 1144 + 0.1 

151-1 13*7 -19 


0272 * 20*1 

Managao Acaan - 4*9 

teopanv Aocam 2 i*t 

ApA Acaan 9010 

MM fen Accum 1034 

Mda a W ad Aocom 1103 
Caaft Acaan 1*2 

Amar EodV Acaan 1914 
US Soo 5 Acaan T 307 

Japan Accum 2*9 

Paate: Aonan 1324 

Btr o t ra n Accum *209 
maana e onal Aocum 3*1 
US Dora Accwn 990 

Y «0 AGOan 1320 

Euro Car Accum 1147 

□WrttuOcn PwW 17*1 


4439 -19 

2242 +41 

5000 *29 

3350 -23 

1187 +01 

1908 +41 

2015 

137.0 -19 

344.1 —110 

HB .4 -43 
4441 - 17.7 

3846 -«9 

10*3 -48 

099 +02 

1250 +45 

1833 -41 J 


SCOTTISH IKinuU. ArifitMINGB 


Managed Pond MU 1919 -41 

nppwqrrano 1143 im .7 

raw Manat raw 1*3 1240 -14 

Money. Flaw 1173 1233 +41 

Eqrtyraw 1045 1964 -45 


1790 MU +44 .. 


Fhad Inmap ACCUM 2227 23*5 +43 

raSy Accum MU 8773 +49 

Prafanny Accom 3170 3357 +43 

rafraat Accm 1604 1033 -SL 8 
Mafegad Ctertal 3 iz 3 rae +14 
Dowun 6072 S 359 +30 

Overran Acxun 4141 4341 +79 

G*f Edovd Acaan 2541 2717 +03 

a&srsass ^ 

Anir Prop Acaan 1341 1 S 70 


oatRuoM 
tndand Sort 
Cam 


UBL 7 t 907 
1500 1574 
1097 1159 
1004 1123 
900 1032 
1040 1147 
1009 11*4 
1243 135-1 
1241 1324 
1420 1509 
1442 1479 

1*3 ms 


1 16 FMxn 

*420 8131 


Ctecw. London 8 C 2 M ' 


orr ran oww raw 1973 107.1 
CT Plan Mgh YMW 1844 T 94 * 
OT ran Fw EM 2159 227.0 
OT Pten Nordi ABNr 1300 14*2 
OT Pten UK A GE 24*2 257.1 
I GT Plan VtertMda 282.1 2970 



Si Gray way. 
0*38 35*01 


nOYAL H B AI T A Oai 
24 Catin Sami. 
*•920 0202 0733 l 
IUB GRMh MS 
audaranh'A'Tis 


ficornsH hoiual. Mngtnaans 

109 . St Vtecard St Oteagow 
0 * 1-348 0321 

1141 1242 
1227 1232 
1341 13*9 
1039 lOBjt 


TAwamLw: 

AmarianEagla inu 1141 --<9 


Salary Fund 
awnn raw 

Bnropara FiaW 2 A 5 .B 2167 
OtetfWW Raw 103.1 10 B 9 
tndra-LHiaa fiuW 972 1 DU 
Mamaional Raw 1512 1592 


Managed RaW 
Prapady Raw 


DapoaaRaW 
tova a tmanr raw 


3746 3 S 45 
■Mr 3424 
1900 2000 
1007 1889 
3845 4037 


iliSk-, 


ops US (Mar 


OmwaWBy 
Em he 


Laon Ho*. 333 Ifegn SI QflOydDn 
01-686 8 T 71 


London WX 4 AD 


SOp* acMkomm Bona Croydon CR 9 BBS 
01-080 0(11 




2444 2 S 7.4 - 42 S 

1179 1237 +191 


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7274 7589 -389 

£19914 <047 


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9889 4044 
305.1 321.1 
3829 3*9 
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4047 4*4 
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3724 3*9 
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Deport Fund (2} 220.7 2339 +02 

m new 2747 2507 -24 

OoM Srariy raw 1287 13*1 -14 

PropanyRml ( 40 ) 5*7 574 a +0.1 

AO Bond Rod 509 989 <01 


3409 3589 
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340.1 3885 

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LOW 8 MAMP O n W OHOUP 
JJJJtee Pa*. Exeter EX 5 106 
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2 * teowv Snare. Londro EC 3 A IDA 
*938 5737 


*938 5737 

hhi tkamae Rmd 2 S 59 2700 
mi Edged PwW 879 929 
CmteGreweime 2369 9497 


■*< Me 2369 9497 
Raw 100.1 150.1 
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Property Ob uao -10 

Do Accra 14*0 • 

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+34 .. 
-107 . . 
+09 .. 
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temte^^Hcrara.firara, 

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Won W W Fund 149.1 1574 
Proparty Fono zra .8 2849 

S&SS? 

Far Era 1 raw me.* 17 S 3 

DapM Rind 17*4 I 8 S 7 

0*347 

519 549 


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SUN UH OP CANADA 


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MmageO Account 4024 

ta^^^AKUBi 18 ^ 4*3619 
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Rooted Accra 1*02 U 84 
ted M Fd Acc 15*9 1527 


V**— POULWASt 

gprawa tera. tap fett» Wckxw «W 88* 
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The price* In th» . T , G ' 
section refer to' - 
Thnndny*gtv«4fi^ 


I 


/ 




ESJ 


OBER18 1986 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 





' V. V 

«■ 

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W _ •" . s, ' i 

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r. 


® a °^“ , ^CoiTespffl^nt 

^ merchant 
yesterday an- 
“Jtmced ti was scaling down 
{“ “ vo ^«nen t iiHte mafoj! 
ity-owned South African 
subsidiary, leaving it 

^Hill'S a ®, ,n 5 r «y interest. 

Hdl Samuel Group (SA) is 

P^mnS a large rights ran? 
and at capital reorganization, 
thereb y reducing the patent 
company’s voting rights from 
iJ Ef 1 to about 20 per 
cent Hill Samuel in London is 
renouncing its rights in the 
and is negotiating to 

EH* 10 ■ group of 
aouth African investors, 
including a number of frnan- 
aalservices organizations. 

The issue is Kkety to 
gmrnmt to more than half the 
South African company's total 
R20 million (£63 million) 
capital 

The deal, which will be 
completed in the next- month, 
® By. 9* more general move 
by British banks to reduce 
■their presence in South Africa. 
Barclays Bank has already 
reduced its involvement in 
Barclays National Bank (SA) 
by not taking up its portion of 
a recent rights issue. 

. Mr Dolf Mootham, finan- 
cial director of HiU Sam uel 
said the rights issue was frit to 
be necessary at this stage for 


African subsidiary. But he v 
added: ‘’Naturally, having a 
small presence in the com- 
pany will be less embarrassing 
i torus.” Hill Samuel has been a 
frequent target for anti-South 
Africa lobbyists. 

A reshuffle of senior person- 
nel in the South African 
company last month paved 
the way for die deal. Mr 
Laurie Korsten, a South Af- 
rican banker, became chief 
executive, replacing Mr 
Hamish Donaldson who re- 
turns to London at the end of 
■this year. Mr Bob Aldworth, 
previously bead of Baroat, is 
taking over as chair man of 
HiU Samuel Group (SA). • 

‘Insider’ 
inquiry 
at CBS 

• From Bailey Moms 
Washington 

The US Securities and Ex- 
change Commissi on m its 
campaign .agains&JUega! in- 1 
sider. trading activities has 
launched an investigation of 
erratic trading patterns in CBS ' 
shares and options over die < 
-past 13 months. 

-Yesterday, First Boston < 
Corporation issued a state-' 1 
meat explaining its role in one < 
of many unsuccessful take-, 
over bids for CBS. 

In response to a wave of 
speculation. First Boston said' 
an internal inquiry had shown 
“absolutely no misuse of 
confidential information and 
that no improper trading 
occurred”. Officials coo- 
•firined the investigation fo- 
cused mainly on . the trading 
during the unsuccessful take- 
over bid by Mr Marvin Davis, 
die Colorado billionaire, who 
was advised by First Boston. 

Bui the scope of the in- 
vestigation is modi broader, 
involving more than nine 
potential merger partners, 
more than 12 brokerage ac- 
counts that traded CBS 
sharesover the past year, doz- 
ens of high-level and low-level 
officials, in addition to the 

market surveillance officials 

at the Chicago Board Options 
Exchange. , . 

SEC officials have placed a 
high priority on insider trad- 
ing investigations after the 
spectacular $12.8 billion 
(£8.95 billion) case this year 
against Mr Dennis B Levine, a 
managing director of Drcxd 
Burnham Lambert, followed 
by indictments against five 
other officials. 


New satellite 
technique can 
save money 

By Jonathan Miller 
Media Correspondent 
A new technique for operat- 
ing communications satellites 

will enable than to remain in 
service much longer, before 
they run out of foei, and create 
big savings for users of 
communications services, 
according to an American 

company. 

The technique may have 
limited application, however, 
because ii will need more 
costly ground stations. 

The Communications Sat- 
ellite Corporation (Comsat), 
the biggest shareholder in the 
Intelsat global satellite con- ; 
sortium. said the technique 
would allow satellites to re- 
main competitive with fibre 
optic cables. 

By allowing satellites to , 
drift within an arc of space, 
fuel normally used to keep 
theoi’Stationaiy relative toihe 
earth can be conserved. This 
will permit the cost of sat- 
ellites to be amortized oyer a 
longer period, providing 
significant savings. 

Use of the system is likely to 
be restricted to those satellites 
which are used to provide 
links between sophisticated 
ground stations serving large 
population centres. 


Beecham poised to sell 
soft drinks division 



BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


COMMENT 



By Michael Clark 

and Carol Leonard . A BEAR' 

' Beecfaam, the pharmaceuti- HI . I »BID H 1 
cal and consumer products BF mi V 

group, is on the brink of ' If L a 

d inching a deal to sell its L jMd [ 

combined Corona and Bee- I 

chain Soft Drinks division. . 

.Hie deal, which could net 
Beecham as much as £150 j I 
million, is expected to be ' - AJ 
concluded next week. - / 

The buyer is thought to be A l£& all SHARE 
Britannia Soft Drinks, a com- INDEX 

wny based in Chelmsford, 

Essex, created seven, months | jan |f£B [mar I APR (nwH JUN Ijul'I 
ago to take care of Allied- * 

® r ’ lv * c brinks }Q0 index followed a similar 
25£5 y -' ■ « pattern and ended 43 higher 

* 50 per cent- at 16093. 

JUJ*: fe Bass.^25 per cent- Inflation figures were much 
, aiK * 25 per as expected and had little 
ce ^*^. Wfwar ^f effect on the market, but 

. Another possible purchaser disappointment at the 
is said to be Calory Chancellor’s Mansion House 
benweppes, but it is being speech tipped gQis onto The 
msmssed as less likely be- slippery downward slope, with 


SEARS: 

BID HOPES GROW 


cause it would almost cer- 
tainly face a reference to the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission. 


longs ending the day £% lower 
and shorts £% down. 

Mr Stephen Lewis of Phil- 
lips & Drew, the broker. 


The sale of Corona win be sakfc“The fell’ would have 
Beecham’s fust large deal been even sharper if h had not 
ance Mr Bob Bauman, an been the weekend which had 
American, took over as chair- j|g usual dampening effect.** 
man last month and it will Blue Cirde led the way, 
come as a surprise to the City climbing I8p to 60 Ip. Vickers 
because it is not one of the 7p to 395p, Royal 

divisions that had been pub- insurance 5p to 8J7p, B1CC 
' . 6p to 261 p and Glaxo a couple 

• Tbe bid rumours at 950p. 

rakingtoii Brothers refuse to 9 11 ? . were cautiously 
goaway.Tbe price, 2p optimuti^waitmg for news 

tower at SO Ip yesterday, has 

risen 41 p this week adding ^ ? 3ed 3 g to 908p and 

nearly £90 ntillioa tothe P* 8 ® ? p !? 

groups capitalization. Rio- fetors, hoping for a bid for I C 

Tmto-Zinc, the mming fi- Gas next week, put the price 

nance group, was tipped as at cm* tim#* 

a Ekeiy suitor earlier this 
week hot now dealeisfiuicy 

BTR to make tiie bid. ^ i 75 ^ “J”? 

boosted by talk that its subsid- 

" iaiy Automated Products may 
tidy earmarked fix* sale by the- be about to clinch a deal to 
company. supply Flat with anti-lock 

Beecham is known to have brakes, 
put “for sale” signs up on Tbe newly-developed 
three other divisions — home brakes will rival those pro- 
improvements, wines and duced by Lucas, which saw its 
Spirits and Germaine Monteil, shares dip lOp to 488p as a 
an American cosmetics resuIt-BSG, the car distribu- 
business. tion group mid atrime seat 

The soft drinks division’s manufacturer, gained 6p to 
interests include the distribn- 56p- 
tion of bottled Coca-Cola, a Bid hopes continued to 
franchise to produce. Seven- push' Sears Holdings, the 
Up in Britain, and brand Selfridges, Saxone and 
names such as Tango. C-Vrt, Mappin & Webb stores group 
Fanta and Lilt. It' has an sharply higher. The price 
annual turnover of about £200 closed 7p higher at 128p last 
million. night — a two-day gain of I4p 

Beecham ’s shares closed at — adding about £120 million 


423p, lQp higher, on the day,. . to .(he. groups stock market 


after busy trading. 

- -The rest of the equity 
market had a rather lack-lustre 
day. The FT-30 share index 
opened 33 lower, but man- 
aged to struggle a little higher 
daring the course of the day to 
close up 3.9 at 12813. 

The broader-based FT-SE 


96! 

SEP OCT 


to suggest that Mr Holmes a 
Court can muster the financial 
muscle to launch a full bid for 
Sears with is currently capital- 
ized at £2 billion. 

This latest flurry of activity 
in Sears was prompted by 
rumours that another large 
buyer was bidding 140pfor20 
million. Dealers are now link- 
ing the name of Heron 
Corporation’s Mr Gerald 
Reason to tbe list of predators 
and are suggesting that be is 
putting together a consortium 
bid. 

Sears has often been tipped 
as a takeover target and 
analysts daim it is the idol 
break-up situation. The price 
ran-up to a peak of 14$p this 
summer as dealers braced 
themselves for a bid. Last 
night the shares were reckoned 
to be changing hands outside 
the market at 140p. 

Mr Geoffrey Maitland 
Smith, chairman of Sears, says 
he is continuing to keep a 
dose eye on the share register. 
Speculation that Hilhdown 
Holdings, the food manufac- 
turing to furniture group, was 
about to hit the acquisition 
trail increased after the group 
announced plans to raise an 
extra £154 million by way of 
an open placing. 

The group is issuing 79.1 
million new shares at 200p 
through Kleonwort Benson, 
the merchant bank, to its 
shareholders. 

Dealers immediately began 
to speculate about 
Hillsdown's next target. 
Dalgety, up 17p at 285p, and 
Bernard Matthews, the Nor- 
folk turkey producer, lOp 
dearer at 24lp, were both 
tipped as possible targets. 

But the most likely target is 
Bassett Foods, the liquorice 
all-sorts confectionery group, 
where Hillsdown has already 
built up near 6 per cent stake. 
Bassett-climbed ISpjo equal 
its high for the year of 200p. 
while Hillsdown finished 15p 
lower at 20Sp. 

Albert Fisher, the fruit and 
vegetable distributor, firmed 


value its high for the year of 200p, 

This week, the market place while Hillsdown finished 15p 
was .buzzing with reports that lower at 205 p. ' 

Australian entrepreneur Mr Albert Fisher, the fruit and 
Robert Holmes i Court had vegetable distributor, firmed 
bid for 10 million, or 5 per another Jp to equal its peak of 
cent of the share capital, as tbe 196p following a bum her set 
prelude to a full bid. offigures this week. Tbe group 

But there is tittle evidence met a party of analysts to 


TEMPUS 


Cash-rich Hillsdown ready 
to land the big one 


The City’s confidence in 
Hillsdown Holdings was 
demonstrated yesterday, 
when the shares Tost only 9p 
to 21 Ip on news of a very 
large placing not geared to a 
spwnnc acquisition. 

The placing — with the now 
customary 100 per cent 
clawback facility — represents 
3fL5 per cent of Hiilsdown’s 
existing equity. The market 
usually likes to know a bit 
more about a company’s 
intentions, when being asked 
to swallow issues of such a 
size. 

The placing route, rather 
Than a rights issue; had the 
double attraction of . being 
cheaper and safer. Tbe direc- 
tors, who command 48 per 
cent of Hillsdown’s shares, 
will not participate in the 
placing, so allowing their 
stake to fell to just under 35 
per cent. 

A rights issue would .have 
left a ferae chunk of un- 
wanted directors' rights 
slushing around the market, 
which might have feUeninto 
tbe wrong hands. 

Tbe discount oh the plac- 
ing route at 9 per cent is also 
very tight, given the total . 
clawback facility. Some com- 
panies are required to offer a 
9 per cent discount on con- 
ventional vendor pfeemgs. 

The new money will put 
HHlsdown in a position to 
make a single large ac- 
quisition. Shareholders funds 
will be boosted to £353.1 
minion from £1643 million 
at the end of last year and . 
gearing ■will be eliminated. 

Hillsdown could spend 
£500 million in a mixture of 
cash and shares, before its 
balance sheet would start to 
creak. And given new Ameri- 
can notions of acceptable 
gearing levels and Hfils- 
d own’s record for rapidly 
turning round acquisitions 
and making them generate 
ash, the balance sheet could 
possibly stand a bit more. 

Even after yesterday’s 
share price slippage, Hills- 
down stands at a 20 per cent 
premium to the food manu- 
facturing sector, giving it 
ample opportunity to acquire 
less weH-raied companies. 

The company could of 
course carry on its policy of 
lots of tittle acquisitions, but 
the market ts .convinced that 


the dearing-the-decks ex- 
ercise is in preparation for the 
big one. After the disappoint- 
ment of the bid for SAW 
Berisford — itself worth 
nearly £500 million — 
Hillsdown is seen to be 
hungry. 

Arlington Secs 

Arlington Securities went 
public in May this year, 
becoming one of the property 
sector’s glamour stocks on a 
p/e of 15.8 times. 

Arlington attracted inves- 
tors because it is a trading 
company specializing in a 
particular sector of the mar- 
ket — the development of 
low-density business parks 
for growth industries. 

The company's first set of 
interim results since the flota- 
tion show that it made pretax 
profits of £762,000 to June 
30, 1986, compared with 
losses of £188.000 for the 
same period of the previous 
year. Juicy profits are prom- 
ised in the second half with 
the foil year put at £5.15 
million or more 

Arlington will not be 
drawn on how that will be 
achieved. But it now has 
consent for six business parks 
with various partners, two of 
whom are bring bought out 
for 43 million shares on 
Arlington's Birmingham 
development. 

Intriguing prospects are 
raised by Mr Robert Max- 
well’s 11 per cent stake in 
Arlington, acquired through 
bis purchase of the Philip Hill 
Investment Trust. Arlington 
(Hans a £60 million office 
scheme in Holborn. London, 
just across thestreet from Mr 
Maxwell's growing property 
interests in the area, includ- 
ing his big Mirror Group 
headquarters. The possibility 
of a joint development is 
being explored. Arlington's 
shares stood at 190p last 
night 

Paries & Newman 

Davies & Newman, best 
known for its ownership of 
Dan-Air, is conservative with 
a small “c." Therefore, the 
the chairman's interim report 
which says in effect that, 
barring unforseen circum- 
stances, the results for the 
year will be satisfactory. 


should not be dismissed -out 
of band. 

The market, however, did 
not get the message and the 
shares fell on yesterday’s 
results from 281p to 275p. 

Heavy overheads are usu- 
ally taken in the fust half of 
’ the year when the chartered I 
aircraft business is seasonalh 
flat. However, losses at £3.4{ 
million were marginally less 
than those incurred last year. 

This was encouraging 
given that interest, depreci- 
ation and tearing charges 
were higher after the addi- 
tions to the fleet of an Airbus 
and a Boeing 747 200. 

Demand began to pick up 
in the middle of the sefcond 
quarter. This has carried 
through into the second half 

Although the number' of 
. hours which the group will fly 
this year is unlikely to be 
much more than year’s 
130,000. the extra capacity 
obtained with the additional 
aircraft will lead to an in- 
crease in profits. 

Margins are still undo- 
pressure although there has 
been a slight widening since 
last year. 

Scheduled routes provide a 
' higher margin and are less 
seasonal, than charter busi- 
ness. However, uncertainties 
on load factors make this a 
difficult area. 

The group is continuing its 
..-drive to increase the quality 
of its scheduled routes. If and 
when this is achieved, some 

• of the less profitable routes 
may be dropped. At present, 

: turn over from this type of 
business accounts for about 

• 20 per cent of total airline 
business. 

Shipbroking, tank charter- 
ing and ship agency busi- 
nesses are ticking over. Low 
freight rates are not helping. 

Of the associated com- 
panies. Gatwick Handling 
did well. However, the fell off 
in North Sea activity has had 
a detrimental effect on-results 
from Dan-Smedvig which 
has been cut back. 

For the year as a whole, 
profits should easily exceed 
the depressed £1,1 million 
reported last year. It may be 
early days, however, for prof- 
its to recover to . the £3 
million to £4 million levels 
achieved in 15S3.and .1984- 


discuss the tbe figures and 
they came away confident that 
Fisher can repeat the perfor- 
mance this time around. 

Omsotidaied Gold Fields 
continued its record breaking 
run bursting through the £7 
level, before dosing 25p up on 
the day at 699p. 

There were whispers that 
Mr Harry Oppenheimer’s An- 
glo American Gold Corpora- 
tibn which owns a 28 per cent 
stake in Cons Gold, was 
prepared to launch a bid of 
900p a share on Monday 
valuing Cons Gold at £1.7 
'billion. 

But there was certainly no 
evidence of this at the group's 
headquarters in London 
Where Mr Rudolph Agnew, 
chairman and chief executive, 
met a number of leading 
analysts. Apparently, he was 
in confident and very bullish 
about prospects for the current 
year. The possibility of a bid 
wasn't even mentioned. 

British Car Auctions flew 
into top gear with an 8p rise to 
153p following news of record 
sales at its new Blackbusfa 
auction centre in 
Hertfordshire. 

Turnover of used cars test 
week reached a best ever £43 
million with a sale ofVauxhafl 
motors netting over £1 million 
in oen day alone. 

•BSR lntmtttionaTs Mr 
“DoUar” Bill Wyliie and a 
fellow director, Mr Brian 
Christopher, fly to Loudon 
this weekend. Meetings 
with brokers at Chase Man- 
hattan Securities start on 
Monday — they may be ready 
to sell BSR*s remaining 40 
per cent stake in Tenby In- 
dustries. 

Simon Engineering recov- 
ered from an early 3p fell to 
dose unchanged at 243p as 
stories began circulating that a 
predator is running its slide 
rule over the group. Talk is 
that a bid will emerge within a 
month. 

Ryntans, the office sta- 
tionery chain ran by Mrs 
Jennifer d* Abo, began dealings 
on the USM yesterday at 
108p, a 2p discount to the 
.1 lOp striking price and dosed 
lower stifl at I04p. 

Exco, tbe financial services 
conglomerate dropped 12p to 
248p on news that Mr Bill 
Matthews, the chief executive, 
and three other directors have 
sold a total of 950,000 shares 
in thfr company, which repre- 
sents less than ^percent of the 
share capital. 

B anks were all down on the 
day with the exception of 
partly-paid TSB which dosed 
unchanged at 84ftp after 
touching 85%p mid-day. 
Barclays, Lloyds and National. 
Westminster all dipped 5p- 


Big Bang jitters knock 
the merchant bankers 


A year ago, investors were looking 
forward to Big Bang as a window of 
opportunity. The old City, which had 
more job demarcation lines than a 
Clydeside shipyard, would go. The 
brightest and the best in London's 
financial community would take 
advantage of de-regulation to form 
new and wondrous conglomerates 
with the expertise and financial 
muscle to conquer all before them. 

Curiously, the same fund managers 
who ran up shares of all the financial 
companies most likely to succeed, 
seem to have had cold feet lately. The 
summertime flotation of Morgan 
Grenfell was the high water mark for 
the sector. Since then there has been 
something approaching a shakeout. 

Nine of the 12 stocks on 
DataStream's list of merchant banks 
have shown folk relative to the 
market generally, with two of the 
biggest, Morgan Grenfell and Mer- 
cury, losing ground substantially. 

From tbe launch price of 500p back 
in June, Morgan's shares have &pped 
and slithered and buyers at the time of 
the issue are now nursing losses of just 
over 20 per cent. That underlines 
what every schoolboy economist 
knows about de-regulation — it means 
more competition and lower prices. 
And those are the inescapable realities 
of Big Bang. 

Until recently. Mercury looked a 
winner in the race for Big Bang laurels 
with names like bankers SG Warburg, 
brokers Rowe & Pitman and gilt 
specialists Mullens, alongside jobbers 
Alroyd & Smithers in the same stable. 
Yet Mercury shares have fared little 
better than Morgan Grenfell's, show- 
ing an 18 per cent loss against the 
broad market indeces. Part of the 
slippage may be due to the feet that 
the combination which looked so 
good to the City also took the fancy of 
American financier Mr Saul Steinberg 
and there was some profit taking when 
he did not follow through his initial 
buying of Mercury shares. 

Hill Samuel has also suffered from 
the market's pre-Big Bang jitters 
despite being one of the market's 
favourite takeover stocks. Its shares 
have dropped almost 12 per cent 
against the market since July. 

As always though, there are limits to 
the market's disenchantment with any 
group of shares and there are now 
grounds for accepting that the worst of 
the Big Bang shake-out may be over. 
First some of the quality stocks in the 
sector are now looking distinctly 
cheap on asset considerations. Sec- 
ondly, the elevation of the shrewd and 
aggressive Mr John Gunn to the seat 
of power at British and Common- 
wealth gives rise to the prospect of 
further acquisitions or mergers. 

Mr Gunn has been telling analysts 
that he is not interested in anything so 
grand as a clearing bank, nor does the 


idea of composite insurance appeaL 
That suggests he has eyes for invest- 
ment banking and broader financial 
services companies. 

A third consideration is that of 
disclosure. It is surely now just a 
question of time before those mem- 
bers of the charmed circle of the 
merchant banking world withdraw tbe 
veil that still partly conceals some of 


their true profitability. True earnings 
may well be as much as 20 per cent 
higher than those currently disclosed 
certainly in the case of Mercury and 
perhaps others too. 

It may be too soon to put Morgan 
Grenfell back on the buying list as its 
rating is still rather high and more 
dependent than most on a continuing 
high level of bids and deals. But 
quality stocks like Klein won Benson, 
Schroders and Hill Samuel, whose 
exposure to Big Bang is rather less 
than most people seem to think, ait 
surely due for better days when the 
City gets over ihe novelties of October 

Winds of change 

After years of raising equity finance 
on terms largely dictated by a none 
too competitive City, Britain's finance 
directors are starting to fight back. 
Two deals this week have shown that 
in future Britain's companies will 
increasingly have* access to cheaper, 
fester and more flexible ways of 
raising money. 

Granada's auction of just over £30 
million worth of new paper lasted just 
more than half an hour. At the end of 
it. Salomon Brothers, the US finance 
house, had agreed to place the new 
equity at a discount of just under 1 per 
cent on the share price ruling at the 
time. Compared to the traditional 
rights issue route, that is fast and 
cheap, with no deep discount to dilute 
the interests of shareholders in 
general. 

The highly acquisitive food group, 
Hillsdown Holdings, followed suit the 
next day with an institutional placing 
to raise £154 million on a tight 
discount Unusually, the funds were 
not earmarked to pay for any specific 
acquisition, and will simply beef up 
Hillsdown's balance sheet after it has 
become temporarily, though by no 
means uncomfortably, cluttered up 
with debt 

There were no cozy underwriting 
fees involved in either transaction. 
The good news for shareholders is not 
so good for the City, except those 
investment bankers with enough cap- 
ital and placing power to take the risk 
of bought deals such as Granada's. 
The winds of change are blowing fast 
indeed. 

John Bell 

City Editor 


Make 


money on 


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Every Friday Investors Chronicle gives you the 
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What to buy What to sell. Stocks to watch. Trends to 
note. 

Whether the market is your job or your 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


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68 48188 
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40 2840.7 

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• .. 23 27 310 

+2 23 21 81.4 

+3 . 127b 41 357 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


147 nhv 2 Me 

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207 Roboca 

!£! ?<*«> 

237 Bwnw 
ii’i nor»S 
rt» a u n ftw 
» Scottah 

K SCO! AONrfCBI 
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06 44 978 
17.1 48 495 

88 b 52 306 
124 48 305 


48b 21 816 
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ZSD 02 01.0 
98 24*98 

121 22335 
72 28 851 
904 23948 


47b Mb Ameri ca n eqnat 

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47 78 103 

08 U 251 
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15 75145 
27 08 677 
1.1 15 527 

78 2*341 
38 23175 
27 54 124 


an 20 .. 

07 18 45 


2190-170 

2190-170 


1 Si-3243 
13SLS320 
1333034) 
1 355-35. □ 
1345-335 
I344M22 
1364M3J) 


INTBWATVMU. 
PETHOLEUM EXCHANGE 
SuppOso vfe GOnmodtor 
Msrfcst Sarvtcas Ltd 
HEAVY RJB.OL 

NOV 71.0-725 

056 70,0-804) 


IkMWcWprfcM . 

OWcitf itoHOvar flpHM 
Pile* bi C par m*Me Mr 
S 5wr in panea par «dj ounea 
Ftetotf Waif A Col Ul npot 
C O PP EH GBADEA 

Cob 321.00-822.00 

Tnree Months- 9404)044250 

Vat 9250 

Tow : Stsooiar 


CSSb 9004)0-902,00 

Tnrw Months. 924.0082S.00 

vol .100 

TOM ant 

LEAD 

Cash 307.00-3064)0 

Threa Months. 30450-30S4X) 

Vol — — ^.—.3000 

Torn » — Sttedy Quiet 

ZMC STANDARD 


COMMODITIES 


¥f* r— —3500 

TOW Stwaar 

SILVER LARGE 

Cnah 38450-385^0 

Thaw Months. 395^0-336^0 

Va m i 1 1 1 p 

Tow — — Quiet 

35.VHI SMALL 

Cash 38450-38550 

Tjroe Martha. 39550^50 

Vol N3 

Tow — Mia 

AUMWUM 

CMh 81&0A8I44X) 

ThnM Months. 8245082550 

3SLr ~2o5o 

Tow Sandy 

NICKEL 

Cash 25104515 

ThrasMorths 2570-2571 

Vol — ,._.744 

TOW BBWyStMdf 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 

A»*»«Sa f if i lu uk priwa *t 
tirn il rtW iaiwifcation 

October 17 


Swap no*, down 13.0 %,av2 

grips. 124i40(+iSl) 
hyn os.n/a%,«vq. 
price, n/a 

London 8BAT futures 

EXCHANGE 

u*a «s Cortnot p. pmr tto 
Mown Open Ctosa 

go Unq. 1^,70 

p2k [55- 

Unq. 97,80 

thq, 97.00 

Unq. 97.00 
Unq. 96.00 


ns Man vat 10 


u -?sar tt 

Optn Cteo 


-5 18 

+3 . .. • 

9.. 55.-, 

.. 708... 

.. 708 

+1 S3-.. 

45 

• -« 7.1 

• +9 U 

S:: V. 

+90 i » ' 

+« K8 i 

49 ’ 

.. 105 1 


LONDON POTATO 
FUTURES 

epa r tow 

i - Open Ooaa 

107.00 10600 

118.00 11M0 

168.00 1W.60 
18350 Ml. 00 
8SJ» «5W 


OjkShiepl&lffippariifl- 

be,&.74J? P(Mr ^K, 

* ssL^ad cecm wo^tK 
Eaofend and Wales: 

CNEI5 «0|. u p 2.1 %, ns. 




n-Tv 


Cash 617JO-6 16,00 

Hm Months . 616JQ-617.QD 


Unq. 3580 
Unq. 97.00 
Unq- 100.00 
Unq. IteOO 
Unq. 93.50 


VOL'4 

LONDON ORAM FUTURES 

£ par nan* 


Ctosa Oom 

JS-80 106.40 

10930 110-26 

111.90 11SS3 

!1«0 113,40 


top- 1015Q 10140 


OJU.FKWPMan 

mLM 

report t10p«r Me 

pan 





HWto* 

CMa 

Oct 86 

78&0-791O 


Jin 67 

761.0-776,0 

• 77V, 0 

Apr 87 

816J0-81S.0 

815.0 

JU87 

725.0-72U 

M 

Oct 87 

jxnU 
Apr 08 

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8200 

812.6 

840.0 

Julffi 

8300436.0 

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VotSSkX* 


Open Mtawc 3636- 



HtgtVLow OMft 

Oct 86 — 7*8.0 

Novae — vers 

0*C88 — HM 

Mar 67 S4SM4Sil 
Jun87 M&MMJ gW 

Sep 87 - — -8500 

Vofc 19 tot* 

OpaantawMSO ■ 

Spot martial couBw qgy- . 

Tankar tndax; .. 

764.01^3300 



























































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


25 


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yow .wrafl to^ fSrek 

■ia^fcgA’ggLie? 

proOK ^ on ^ 

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iNo. Cotajaay 

Gtap ^ll 

1 1 1 Allwpods 


— 




^ ut\l 

indureals A-D 

' 


Drapay^uw 

~ mr ~ 

A . Ramos, Uewfltrai 

DtaperyJSiares 

— 

.7 Crcmail Whitfev " 

Breweries 

_ 


BnfWrng.Rnaris 



V Haztewood F<«ds 

Foods 

— 

10 Empoc stores 

Dt*pexy5wres 


! 1 DanhiD 


“ “ 

|_iq Marshall (Uttky) Iudnstrials L-R 


1^-^ 

Rmrirak 


|_1* Adwest 

Industrials A-D 



" 




— 

iv Boddtogums 

Breweries 


2(S im Signal & Connol 

Bcarieals 

' 

21 Morruon (WJ 

Foods 


^ Vicfcos 

Industrials S-Z 


23 Bran Cbems 

ChrmiralsJtei 


24 Low * Bonar 

ladugriats L-R 


23 Renold 

lodnstrials L-R 


2 p Nea 

Dnipery^tores 


27 Mandcrs 

HmhHngJtnads 

__ 

28 ASOA-MH 

Foods 


20 Oagdoi 

Cfeontcalsjtas 


30 Halna 

hidastrals &K 


31 BlKfi 




IndnariaJs S-Z 

' 

14 ui 

Mouxs^kntrxft 


■ 341 Swalcy 

ladnonb S-Z 

' 


lodustrials S-Z 


36 Unigroup 

Industrials S-Z 


37 BSG 

Motorsj^ireraft 


38 BSR 

Dear kata 


y> gr 

Industrials E-K 


40 Ladbrokr 

HBK&Caterers 


41 Redtaod 



42 Tanitac 

BniMim IliBite 


43 Wdr 

Industrials S-Z 


44 Ford Motor 

MounAittrafl 


©Tims Newspapers Ltd. 

Udb Total || 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Investors remain cautious 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings 


_ on Monday. Dealings end October 24. §Coniango day October 27. Settlement day November 3. 
toward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


Please be ssre to take account 
of any munis signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £&O0O in 
today’s newspaper. 


MON 


IUE 


WED 


THU 


BRITISH FUNDS 


Hgaux £ttk 


Price CH1» 


& 


n«t 


SHORTS (Under Five 
ao% 94 '«ek 1 i 2w urn 
ns 95*3 Exd> raws ner 
wav revitam crow tot 

90 gS^Bett 2%% 1987 
101% BBVBtai 10%*1807 
9BV nSRnd IMtMHT 
101V 95Vnm> . c WK. 4997 - 

an anrmo. m imaa 
IMS ass Each 1DW 1906 
loss MVTims CM i960 
MS BBVTima 3% 197648 

mas bzsttmb s%% torn 
io7s ossTran ns* im 
idss assitws io%% ram 

IMS 93% Exch m 1MB 

- 111 S MSEnA 1 D<.% ism 
107S M Em* 11% ism 
9S>. MSIYm M 199648 

vm bzs-dmb cas* ism 

92 B2S-nw 9* 1999 
114 <.103 ‘.Tract 13% 1900 
MS 7BSExch 2S* 1990 
1W* M'.EMfc 11* 1900 
113S 100 Each J2V)t laao 
OBS 79STrccc 3* 1890 
I00S ms Dam as* 1967-90 
106 s aevitaM 10 * 1 B 00 
lias BB ItWK IIS* 1991 
MS' MS Fund 5V* 196701 
810*4 «7'.E«D 11* 1991 

90S 7BS Trace 3% 1901 


RVE TO HFTEEN YEARS 
11 BSHB Tree* 12 S* 19S2 « 6 , -S 

107S BISTratt 10* 1992 BBS -S 

11 »S 92S Trace CIOS* 1B92 ?7’.»-S 

117S100SEttfi 12S* 1992 IM -S 

123'jl02SEn* 13S* 1992 IMS -S 

106 98ST»w 10* 1893 MS -S 

121 >i 103S Tram 1 #v* 1993 «SS — S 

BIS TBS RM 8 * TOB3 M -S 

12B IKJSTrma 18** 1993 111S#44S 

133S IQS'. Trees 14 <i% 1994 11 BS 

I22>. BTSEneh t2S* 189* IKS -J* 
1Z7S lOSS Ezdi 13']* IBM 
nav ossTrccc ntw aM**^ 

120 lOOSTTtm 12*1996 
TBS 6 BSOM ^ 

11 OS ffISEkcb 10'A 
126 1021 . Tract 12V* 1986 
133S ittSTram M* 1896 
wss 87 Tract I* 1 ! 

142% 114 Trace 15'4* 1996 

Moviola** ms* am 

84S 74'iMnpt 3* 1986 
(OSS SSSConv 10 * 1B96 
131 110 HM 8 18S* 1997 
112S BSS&tJi 10S* 1997 
IBIS 70S Time BS% 1 987 
UZSlUSBaf 19*1997 ' 
aa’j 71 new OS* 1985-08 
- MTS 8 BSBKH 9V* 1996 

ueciaB'iTma iss* tarn 

124'. 101 '• Been 12* 1996 
107S ne’e Tram 9S* 1998 
12BS103SExcb 12S* 1999 
IM MS Time IDS* 1999 
' 112 *. BIS Com 10 '** 1999 
nasiijSTjmc wjaooo 
BB B7SC0W 9* 2000 
111S 91S Time 10* 2001 
109S flJgrOM. Wk »1 
137S llOSTtaCS 14*199601 



ioas*J. 
ins -s 


I21S0-J. 
111S0-S 
78S -S 
93SW-S 

ms -i 

• BSV _S 
80S -s 
122S6-1 
7SS6-S 
MS -IS 
127 -1 

lOSS »-1 
MS -1 
TOTS -T 
97S0-1 
B5S«-1 
Ills -1 
37S -1 
MS -1 

an -i 

117 *-i 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 
ms mscdw io* 2002 an -i 

124S,03SBrt 12*1»9WK -IS 

108S 90 Time 9S% 2DM 82S -IS 
112 'r 93. Tran 10*2003 -1 

138 S IlfiS Time 13S* 200603 UBS -1 
123'. my* Tram 1is* MOMM wn -J 
112S KSTImt ID* 2004 94SM-1 

60S 4*SF6m 3S*1986M MS -S 

106S SOS Com BS* 2004 WS»-1S 

1O0S BO’.COTO 9S% 20 05 2E** - ] 

1I7S MSEw* IQS* 2006 BBS -1 

»^» , S:3iS 1z 2525S25 

SGS TBS Tim e «*»M6 1ft - 
1D7's OB’* C0n» 9*** 2008 93'. 0-1 

94 ■« BS'vTrav SOOT W 7 “J, 
i 43 siiP.Tram«s*ao«i ms -is 
«■> 78 Tleeu 8 * 2009 Jft -J 
72S S7SHm» 5S* 2006-12 MS -S 
D3S 70'< Tlm> 7V* 2 C 12 - 1 B ITS -1 
138 IlSsMdl 12*200-17 114S -IS 


UNDATED 
46S 30S COnaOll 4% 
48 34 s war L» 3S* . 

62S 44SCOT 3‘j* 

34% 29S Trace 3* 
29S 24'* Contrail 2’i% 
gs 24% Tims as* 


120 

UVfi 

lOB 

110 

H4 

103 

110 

7.1 
123 
123 
116 
122 
100 
110 

4.1 
MLB 
110 
T2JZ 
iai 
123 
110 

80 

KL7 

110 

110 

iai 

183 

80 

TOJ 

f22 

110 

H1.4 

110 

100 

HL8 

UJJ 

100 

TCL3 

120 


100 

110 

MLS 

700 

110 

110 

100 

60 

100 

103 

MLB 

110 

TOO 

106 

109 

102 

11.1 

100 

90 

TOO 

100 


110 

110 

110 

113 

113 

110 

110 

-8.1 

11.4 

113 

113 

110 

110 

113 
71 
110 
110 
110 
100 

114 
110 

iTi 

110 

110 

103 

110 

103 

no 

110 
110 
103 

11 1 
no 

109 
I1 1 
10.7 
100 
100 
114 


108 

110 

10.7 

107 

110 

100 

107 
90 

10.7 

me 

106 

IOfl 

104 

106 

108 
100 
IOfl 
104 
100 
100 
100 


INDEX'UNKED 
m H*S Three B. Sj* Igjjj 
io7s assTram O a* too 

122 10BST1BW .0 2* TOB 
107S 3S>p6«ia0S*MO1 
107'. 93S?mi*2S*mm 
n°s 96^4 Tram o a* aoo 
infl'j 32S TTcce 80S* 2009 
Ills 97 Time 60S* gpn 
MS 70S Tram 80S* 2013 
1B2S B7S Tram 02*5% 201 6 
ms 92StlBa9 80S* OTA 
iSE aes Tram 80S* ago 


39S — % 

34% -S 


Si ^ 

’res ^ 

BBS6-S 

’res n 

BIS 0 


iai 



7 * 



102 

■ 

102 



102 

— 

£1 

23 

20 • 

*0 

2* 

a* 

*1 

4.0 

*1 

30 

£3 

aa 

82 

37 

82 

36 

32 

3* 

30 

35 

20 

X5 

X2 

£5 


r 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


231 180 8d80 Ml 

re » " 


yH*"S9 


are ire 

12 <■ 7S B cii cc M 
2 m 169 grefcpnraiem 
iji, e Bam Laura met 

3Si2 

*5^ SSSU 

740 410 aw* HW 


res 38 
32S 

42% 33S 
80 40 
110 80S 
2B1S21BS 
30% 17 

212 we 

37B 242 

ire re 
*£ S 

430 326 
74 66 

S20 318 
IBB IM 
S70 377 
484 293 
88 58 

428S276 
1S3 I 06 
- 417 


Can Bra* WM 

nm?cc 
(ferrard Net 
Oumncm PM 


206 

75 

2E0 

EM) 

176 
tllS 
an i 

S« ’ 

459 
37 I 
536 
298 
47 

£25% 

El 10% 



£0 

40 80 



.. 380 

-* 

1X0 

£0 .. 



90 


170 



07110 


10 

-9 

207 

40 9* 

-5 

28.1 

£1 &* 

.. 

23 

ms 

8212* 

£&2*1 


280 

8.7 37 J 

-% 

29 

821X0 

-% 

139 

&6 .. 

-% 

209 

60 .. 

-1 

34 

&0YI.1 

♦1 . 

80 

Ol .. 

-2% 

200 

A* .. 


13 

43 28* 


80 

33 102 

a. 

22.1 

70 10 




20 30153 
MUn 47 90 
180 &4 70 
33 40 .. 
170 35 010 
-120 80-110 
190 30107 
9U M U 
30 60 120 


36 70 .. 
30.1 03 190 

.. i 2 .i ai .. 
*a 

-5 27.6 50 53 

. are as as 

42 136b 8.1 107 


1986 

Iwr . Corapanr 


Gram 
*r vw 
Pro Cbgcm 1 — ^ Pff 


^ «a 131 

*“ =“ Scat 320 

BIB 613 IMOB 

jrs warn p*go 

320 220 WMwt 


1988 

Hgi La» Oacpaav 


Grass 
Cm Yld 

Pro Ctiga pence % WE 


7.1 50 137 
-2 143 40 90 

«7S • .. 180 u as 

772 .. 460 80 35 

678 .. 590 7J980 

E7SS 6+1S 

280 70 30133 


BREWERIES 



40 


133 

010 

10 

40 

2000 

4.1 

iS 
110 
• 37 
70 
5J) 

103 

» 

- 32 

9.1 


45120 
31100 
10228 
30150 
35200 
30260 
40 mi 
20 201 
25 ion 

22 250 
45 120 
30145 
3212.1 
40102 
SI MS 

S“ 

23 lb 
30140 


SO 236 HCC. 

126 04 BSn 
147 IM B(h 
160 OS Boom 

res zn Bovtopc 

280 177% Br TcUepa 
112 75 BamBomrlKM 

zss § s^sr 

243 179 CAP 
8T 37. Cr*Xtt 
225 U9 OoTS* CPF 
138 21 
352 203 
348 250 

236 cmami 

76 48 OMSea 
160 M7 Oramsnr 


52 


3 


281 6-V6 

83 43 

TO 3 

£ * 
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324 

215 *-S 

188 
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TO *B 

316 

34S *14 

200 • .. 
57 -3 

148 6-2 


Do vi- 


sa 37 DomMo 6 

212 m 0u3Sr 

445 380 
re 45 
92 42 


WaknMB 60 
Young -A' 


1DJJ 52 110 
180 43150 
fl.1 43 110 
11.1 -40101 
06 43 260 
127 20 190 
104 30180 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS | 


2 S 3 147 neroem 

TO 32 Fenert 

si at Fexcmibcb 

22B 158 BBC 

114 80 ^^Eleci 
183 46 tt 

H SM 4 r 


72a tat u»fc» 
423 Z70 Sea 
185 126 wen 


IM 

47 

176 

T2S 

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+3 

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TO TO 


.171 


» M -• 

74 52 Arncebi S3 

210 123 MtmodS 20 

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Trams appear on Pag* 24 


LEISURE 



TO iS'.-Zmra 


MINING 



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251 138 AE 
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Credit cards accepted here. 


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ShareCall cards accepted here. 


Buying Shanes mack as* easy as fifing 
vour tank? 


Easier in fact 


With a ShareCall account all you do 
is pick up the telephone, ring the free 
Linkline number on your card, and issue 
instructions. 


For small deals there will be a mini- 
mum charge of £12 pi i is \ AT. On the otlieT 
hand; however high, tlie value of shares 
you're dealing In you’ll never pay more 
than our ceiling charge of £100 plus \AT. 


Buy these shares, sell -those. Well 
c-oinjiletc the deal at once, at the best price- 
available. 


It's the most direct system Oust exists 
for buying and selling shares. Which lets 
us keep fees to a minimum. 



businesses you see around you has never 
been more straightforward. We have even 
made applying simple. 

Just send us the coupon, and well 
get a Kleinwort Grieveson ShareCall 
application form to you right away 


Pleae wnrl roe a SbarvCiD 
over edilmnvran of twill hr 
dpph fora rotenroo? fnKn im bank. 


fur in. I am 
KjjDcnl- vtn to 


NAME. 


ADDRESS, 


POSTCODE. 



can 


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We charge 1.63% plus \AT as low as 
you'll find anywhere. That'll go down to 
1.00% plus VAT afierOctnber 27th. 


\ou can invest as little (or. of course, 
as much) as von like. 


Send Ur. Kkditwnrt Crmeson ShmCJIHlfeidiiiidiSt. 
London EG JM 1LB. 


Getting a piece of those thriving 


J.iJO 

A KLEINWORT GRIEVESOX SERVICE 


FAMILY MONEY/1 



The vital 
wait for 


Birch; aiming tO be competitive 

( MORTGAGES ) 


your home 
loan rate 



SpaMiiqp Hofifox attistba* 


The money marketeers are 
interfering with our budgets. 
Young, chain-smoking foreign 
exchange dealers haw soW 
sterling so determinedly that 
the Bank of England was 
forced to raise base rates by 1 
percent this week. A mortgage 
rate rise now looks inevitable. 
The questions are bow much 
and when. 

The amount by which mort- 
gage costs will rise depends 
principally on the level at 
which base rates settle. Al- 
though mortgage rates are by 
no means the same thing as 
base rates, the two are closely 
related, with mortgage rates 
trailing behind and following 
the trend set by their more 
volatile cousins. 

Base rates are a key to the 
price of money generally, 
whereas mortgage rales simply 
idl you the cost of a home 
loan. Mortgage costs are often 
described as being I or 2 
points above base rate. For 
investors the base rate move is 
good news. Peter Birch. Abbey 
National's chief executive, is 
concerned to maintain a 
competitive profile on deposit 
rates, especially with British 
Gas coming up for sale. The 
obverse of that coin is more 
expensive credit. 

But for the moment bor- 
rowers have a breather. The 
building societies are holding 
off anti! the dost settles on the 
base rate changes. The money 
markets are not convinced 
that a 1 per cent rise in base 
rates will be enough to lure 
foreign money back to the 


do is announce one rate now 
and then have to adjust it 
later." says au Abbey National 
Building Society spokesman. 
The Abbey National is natu- 
rally concerned to get it right, 
especially as the cost of 
informing borrowers of two 
changes is prohibitive. 

The Halifax, for example; 
has roughly one and a half 
million borrowers. Every 
change in the mortgage rate 
carries with it an admin- 
istrative cost of almost half a 
million pounds. The Halifax, 
whose deliberations will be 
presided over by the chief 
executive John Spalding, is 
"looking at the question of 
interest rates as a whole” and 
requires “time to see whether 
the 11 per cent (base) rate is 
Jflcdv to last". Both societies 
should be letting us know next 
week whether we can expect I 


mortgage would cost is .now 
fast disappearing. 

In early ' summer Lloyds 
Bank offered a loan with a rate 
fixed for three years at 9.9 per 
cent {annual percentage raw 
10.4). with an option to revert 
to the normal floating rate 
loan at the end of that ume or 
to take a new fixed rate loan, 
probablv at a different rate, for 
a further three years. The £200 
million available went in a 
matter of weeks. "It looks like 
an interest rate gamble which 
the customers are winning, 
says a Lloyds spokesman. 

Both. Bank of Scotland and 
Cannon Assurance scrapped 
fixed interest home loans in 
the middle of last month. The 
Bank of Scotland scheme ran 
on similar lines to the Lloyds 
Bank mortgage at a nominal 
rate of 10.25 per cent, while 
Cannon's loans were fixed at a 


Beardslev takes* simitar view: 
"Wc couW put wa a fixed twe 
loan now . but we wwWn\ be 
doing our borrowers any 
favours. 1 * Chemical withdrew 
its 10.5 percent fixed rase ten 
this week, . 

Eagle Star Insorenct Com- 
pany withdrew its 10 per cem 
nominal fixed rate endow, 
ment mortgage yesterttay. A 
company spokesman says Ea- 
gle Star hopes to make more 
offers at a different, higher rate 
■next week. 

"The object of the exercise 
is to budget accurately,** says 
Mr Beardsley. Chemical 
Bank's loan reverted to a 
floating rate and floating 


repayments after the fim year, 
after which the 


‘We could pot out a fixed rate loan now, but 
we wouldn't be doing borrowers any favours* 


per cent or more to be added 
to our mortgage payments. 

The cost of a 1 per cent rise 
for a mortgage of £30.000 
would amount to roughly £14 
a month after tax relief for a 
basic rate taxpayer. Those 
with bigger mortgages tan 
expect more substantial in- 
creases. as relief is given on 
only the first £30.000 worth of 
home loan. 


Given the erratic gyrations 
of currencies on the foreign 
exchanges and the interest 
adjustments which sometimes 

have to be made, it would not 

pound and bolster its strength. >be unreasonable for the 
A useful weather vane for would-be borrower to seek an 


base rates is the three-month 
interbank rate — this means 
the rate at which banks are 
prepared to lend one another 
money during the next quar- 
ter. This rate has been creep- 
ing up all week, signalling a 
further possible rise in base 
rates. 

"The last thing we want to 


alternative. This summer the 
options were all there — fixed 
interest rate mortgages were 
available from a variety of 
lenders. Unfortunately, the 
budgeting boon of knowing 
for certain 1 how much the 


nominal 10.5 per cent for 12 
months before the loan re- 
verted to a floating rate. 

These interest levels look 
most attractive when set 
against the 12 per cent and 
more which most borrowers 
will be paying shortly. The 
tenders will still make money 
on the loans because they wiu 
have obtained funds from 
elsewhere while it looked as 
though interest rates were set 
to continue on the downward 
path. Any fixed rate loan now 
would be for more expensive 
to fond. 

If the trend reverses we can 
expect some more fixed rate 
schemes at attractive interest 
rate levels. "We will re-market 
the schemes as and when we 
can get the right son of 
funding from the banks.** says 
a Cannon spokesman. 

Chemical Bank's Derrick 


which the budgeting 

becomes more difficult. . 

There are some loans ob the 
market, however, whew the 
interest level vanes, but the 
payments are fixed. The York- 
shire Building Society op- 
erates such a scheme x fixed, 
monthly payment with an 
adjustment at the end of the 
scar. If interest rates have 
ftllcn during the year the 
borrower will receive a rebate.* 
If interest rates have climbed 
steadily there will be a capital 
sum to find. 

It would be wrong: lo as- 
sume that fixed interest rate 
mortgages are always a good 
thing. They are undoubtedly a 
significant aid to financial 
planning and budgeting, and 
right now they look attractive 
compared with the normal 
mortgage whose cost is float- 
ing upwards. But remember 
that the lenders were prepared 
to offer us a fixed rate mort- 
gage only when it looked as 
though interest rates were set 
to foil steadily. 

Despite the recent rise in 
interest rates there can be no 
guarantee that the fixed in- 
terest borrower will be better 
off in three years' time. 

Martin Baker 


• EFM* EFM • EFM# EFM •EFM# EFM# EFM# EFM# EFM# EFM# EFM# EFM# EFM# EFM#EFM# EFM# EFM# 

Sr — T 1 ,ffl 




! by 
of’ 
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1 861 
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{ “li 

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£ 

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r 0 EFM Unit Trust Managers Ltd"* 

.Marketing Department, 4 Melville Crescent, Edinburgh EH3 7JB 
Please send me your leaflet on the range of EFM Unit T rusts 


im 


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Name. 




FfX4 't'W Trust* 


Address. 


m 

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Pjease tick the box it you are 
an existing EFM Unit Trust holder 


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Times 18.11.86 fj 

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Something to smile 
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m 


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For the investor in search of the 
perfect portfolio EFM Unit Trust 


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a life of its own. but taken together 
prox iding a full national and 
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The funds are aimed at pren iding 
specific objectives fur the discerning 
investor: Capital appreciation, 
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The EFM Group has more than 
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its clients and is one of the largest 


Scottish-based unit trust managers. 

With nine authorised unit trusts 
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get lucky — just wise. We have a 
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AKSff 


FINANCE LIMITED 


HIGH INTEREST 
CHEQUE ACCOUNT 


£250 Minimum Deposit— No Chaiges— No Cheque limit 
up to £2500 earns 6*73% net £2500 upwards earns 8-22% net 


Service that you can bust 
When you keep your current 
account in credit you lose interest 
every day money sfe there idle. 

ANZ Finance has an answer: 
With our High Interest Cheque 
Account you can earn high interest- 
more Bum most ordinary deposit 
accounts-and also have immediate 
use of money, simply by writing 
a cheque 


ANZ Finance is a mender of the 
Australia and New Zealand Banking 
Group. With worldwide assets of 
about £23 billioa and branches and 
offices in 46 countries. ANZ is a 
major Force in international banking, 
so your money will be safe with us. 

To find out more, telephone ANZ 
Finance on 01-378 2576 and ask for 
John Jones, Or complete and post the 
coupon, today. 


To-. ANZ Finance Limited. FREEPOST London SEl 9UU. 

I would like to learn more about the High Interest Cheque Account from ANZ Finance. 
Please send me FREE information and no-obligation Application. 

Name 1 — 


Addiess. 


„ Postcode. 




FINANCE LIMITED 


Afnemberofthr 


Croup 


Reg. address: Minerva House, Montague Close, London SEl 9DH. 


f WitH 


THE 


FELLOWSHIP 

TRUST 


A promising new investment opportunity 
that won ’t compromise your principles 



The Fellowship Trust is a new inter- 
nationally orientated authorised unit 
mist specifically designed for the 
growing number of people seeking . 
a broadly-based Investment 
which, not only offers them a £&£$£ v 
decent return but also puts their \ ( 

money to work in ways which l ^ f - 

are compatible with their ethical '>* 
ideals. '*■■■ . . . 

The Fellowship Trust does not }•*:*£ 

invest in companies known to be ' - : -?- 

involved in the arms trade or gambling. ’ ' •' 

Neither does it in vest in the tobacco industry, 
nor in companies involved in theakoholic drinks 


s & ; rJra«teVlfcalsoavoktollt-..,. 

£v •$&,. have connections with South Africa 
■ ' 5 . ' [■ ■ * and the aparthe id regime. 

’ a Instead, the Trust aims tf. ‘ 

. ,f *. achieve long term capital 
appreciation and a growing 
...t income by investing in a wide-. 
. range of ethically sound 

. . • companies vrith strong manage- 


nwnti. excellent track records 
yXr • and attractive prospects. 
:'v*;f*V U this appeals to you and you 

> V' would like further information ’ 
regarding the Trust, please complete the 
coupon below. 


To: Buckmaster Management Company Limited, The Stock Exchange. London EC2P2JT. 

I d like to know more about The Fellowship Trust and how it can help me put toy money to good 
use in the world. Please send me full details. ■ . - 


Name, 


Address. 


■ Postcode. 


„■* 


THE FELLOWSHIP TRUST 


.. Mana § ed fa y Buckmaster Management Company Limited 
| : - $g..r ' <A subsidiary of Credit Suisse Buckmaster & Moore LtdJ 


/ 




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27 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


A high-tech high from 
the Hong Kong market 


&BPHC O mni—1 1 


.INVESTMENT 

As-tf to roll out the red 
fafpet in its own 
“anitable way for the 
Qween s visit to Hong 
Kong next week, the 
, local Hang Seng Index 
! Jut an all-tune high on 
! Wednesday. The pundits 

PETER GARTLAND 

aM J-ses the prospects 
lor UK investors 

When the royal yacht Britan- 
nia berths in the spectacular 
setting orHong Kong Harbour 
next Tuesday the Queen win 
set foot in an irrepressible 
rapi tali st oasis facing out into 
the South China Sea. 

What she will find is a 
Bnirsh colony oozing with 
brassy self<onfidence which 
exists despite the -sure knowl- 
edge that in just over a decade 
from now the sovereignty and 
administration of Hong Kong 
will revert to the People’s 
Republic of China. 

The optimism and con- 
fidence of today's local mood 
is a far cry from just three 
snort years ago when the 
currency was plummeiting. 
and the Hang Seng seemed to 
be in free fall. 

Back in the dark days of 
October 1 983 Hong Kong was 
still suffering from the cloud 
of gloom which had appeared 
following Mrs Thatcher’s visit 
to Peking the previous au- 
tumn. Her talks with Chinese 
officials had not gone well and 
the Chinese were beginning to 
make threatening noises about 
imposing their own unilateral 
solution on Hong Kong . 

Locally at that time even the 
British expatriates were hav- 
ing nightmares in -which they 
saw themselves pleading with 
taxi drivers to accept kruger- 
rands as payment for a last 

The nightmares 
were shortlived 

frantic drive to Kai Tak 
airport just as the chairman of 
i he Central Committee of the 
Chinese Communist. Party 
was appointing himself chief, 
executive of Jardine Fleming. 

Happily the nightmares 
were shortlived. The colony's 
then Financial Secretary, Sir 
Jobp; Breraridge, - 

self a neat InsuranCepacfcage 
by linking the local currency 
to the US dollar. 

Subsequently the political 
negotiations took a turn for 
the- better and after lots of 
initial hesitation the stock 
market followed suit. 

And not before time, 
according to Jill Smith, whose 
Hong Kong fund at Hender- 
son has pulled in £4 million . 
from UK investors in the past 
month alone. 

She says the signs of a 
massive re-rating in Hong 
Kong have been building for 
the last year. Trade with China 
has' regained much of its 
former momentum. The dif- 
ference this lime around is 
that there is a bias towards 
high-technology industrial 
goods rather than the video 
tape recorders on which the 
Communists previously 



Jill Smith: Volatile market 1 

frittered away their precious 
currency reserves. 

According to Jill Smith, the 
market has also been spurred 
by the “phenomenal results 
ibis year" of the four major 
utilities — China light and 
Power. Hoqg Kong Electric, 
Hong Kong Gas and Hong 
Kong Telephone. 

But is it now too fan* to 
stake a claim to Hong Kong’s 
raging bull? Jill Smith thinks 
not, even though her own 
fund's performance has risen 
by more than 20 per cent in 
the past month alone. Her 
view is that the market is stiO 
.under-rated, so she is predict- 
ing a rise to 3.000 on the Hang 
Seng Index (from its close 
yesterday of 1235). by next 
June at the latest. 

She also says there is more 
scope for Hong Kong’s in- 
terest rates to come down. 
Prime rate is currently 6.5 per 
cent, which is modest by UK 
standards. There are currency 
gain possibilities as well, she 
adds. 

Can .making money be that 
easy? Hong Kong seems to be 
offering nearly as much as the 
TSB share lottery , but without 
the frustrations of investors 
having their money turned 
away. Jill Smith concedes that 
Hong Kong is a volatile 
market and should be consid- 
ered only for a small pan of an 
investors international port- 
folio. “Put in a maximum of 
10 per cent unless you're a 
very aggressive investor," she 
says. * . 

Nevertheless, the rosy view j 
of market prospects is fully 
shared by Gartra ore’s man in 
Hong Kong. James Filmer- 
Wilson. who says that increas- 
ingly Hong Kong looks like 
the gateway to China. 

The market 'is currently 
rated at just under 15 times 
earnings and Mr Filmer-Wil- 
son sees scope for a re-rating. 
He too goes for an index level 
of 3.000 some time during the 
next 12 months. 

David Gould, of MIM 
Britannia, is also an optimist 
on Hong Kong. He is looking 
foY an index level of around 
3.000 within the next year, but 
cautions that a characteristic 
of the Hang Seng Index is that, 
when it starts, to go down, it 
keeps on going down ■ at 
remarkable speed. 

; With so many experts tak- 
ing a similarly smiling view, it 







a -wrs i. 





The Hong Kong stock exchange; the boon goes on 


INCREASED 

INTEREST 


EXTRA-ORDINARY SHARES 

IMMEDIATE WITHDRAWAL 

with no loss of interest or penalty 

•Plus interest paid hatf yaarty 

Net % p a.* . Gross Equtv. % p-a_t 


BALANCES £10,030 AND OVER 

9 . 60 %= 13 . 84 '% 


BALANCES £500 (minimum) - £9 999 

9 . 15 %= 13 . 18 % 


Effective 1 NOYfliDDer 1985 t6ft^EQUtv8fenltotas«TaiE Taxpayers, 
[merest a»gp ou nd e t l iatf-yegy(C. A R .) fates are variable 

BOLTON BUILDING SOCIETY 

235/237 BAKER STREET. LONDON NW1 TEL: 01-035 0138 
24 Hour Answering service . 

Members ol Ihe Striding Societies Association. 
Trustee Status. Established" 1864 




is tempting to conclude that 
the Hong Kong market is 
about to collapse. . 

Wanfley Unit Trust Man- 
agers warn that there could be 
a short-term correction but 
that the positive factors- out- 
weigh the negative ones by a 
very large edge. Even so. Hong 
Kong is in the third and final 
phase of a rampant bull 
markeL This is the phase, says 
Ward ley. that is “always the 
most explosive". 

So. something to go for or 
not? Our view is that Hong 
Kong is well worth a small 
amount of fun money. The 
graphs on this page show just 
Bow well the Hang Seng Index 
has performed nr isolation 
during the past three years as 
well as its strong relative 
performance in just the last six 
months against the tired-look- 
ing FTA All-Share and Dow 
Jones industrial indices. 

While these major markets 
are drifting sideways amid 
fears of a headlong dive, the 
Hang Seng continues to power 
ahead. 

The caveats on small and 
volatile markets such as Hong 
Kong cannot be over-stated. 
So long as they are under- 
stood. the most practicable 
route into Hong Kong for 
individual UK investors is 
through authorized unit 



trusts, of which there are 
currently five (watch out for 
more launches), all aiming for 
out-and-out capital growth. 

The five are Arbutbnot 
Hong Kong Portfolio (01-628 
9876), Garun ore Hong Kong 
(01-623 1212), Henderson 


Hong Kong (01-638 5757). 
MIM Britannia Hong Kong 
(01-588 2777). and Wardley 
Hong Kong (01-626 441 1 V 
Several other Far Eastern 
investing unit trusts will give 
you a partial exposure to Hong 
Kong. 


Move in fast. 

As South East Asia 

moves up fast. 

This is your opportunity to enjoy big investment gains 

in the sunrise economies of South East Asia. 

By buying in on a rising market Now. 

Since Apnl thisyear Fidelity’s South East Asia Trust has 
jumped 47.9%. 

These markets move fast — they won’t wait for you. 

So act now. 

Call us today to discuss the growth prospects for South 
East Asia. 

The lines are open every weekend from 9a.m. to 5 p.m. 
and Monday to Friday from 9a.m. to 9p.m. 

Call&ee 

0800434161 , 
now 



Fidelity 


MAKING MONEY MAKE MONEY 




• *, 


• i 


>1 




u* 

i* i 


Up to now you needed £1000. 
to invest in the Mercury ran^^ 
of top performing unit trusts: 


' 

I », 








l Hf 


« 






«! 


u< 


1 1 


i. 




LU 


•• 


Now we've lowered 
the bottom rung to 
£35. 


Mercury have brought their 
unit trusts down to earth with 
the introduction of the Mercury 
Savings Plan. 

Until now, the Mercury 
unit trusts required a substantial 
initial investment of £1,000 — 
so they stayed out of the reach of 
many investors. 

Now, however, savers can 
invest in the Mercury unit trusts 
through a simple and flexible 
monthly scheme. The level of the 
monthly investment can be varied 
to suit individual requirements (with 
a minimum of £35) and there is a 
bonus to encourage long term savers. 

Through the ten Mercury 
unit trusts available, savers gain 
access to the skills and experience 
of Mercury Asset Management — 
one of the UK’s leading investment 
houses, with over £14,000 million 
under management and a long and 
successful investment record 
worldwide. 

For more details, complete 
the coupon and return it to us. 

Mercury 

Mercury Fond Managers Ltd. 

— part of Mercury Asset Management Ltd. 

(Mercury Fund Managers is a member of dte Unit Trust Association) 

n; 


Tr. Mercury Rmd Managers Ltd, Freepost. London EC4B 4DQ. 
1 am interested in further details of die Mercury Savings Plan. 

Name 


TMBHQ 


Address 


Fbstcode 


THE MERCURY SAVINGS PLAN 

I A step by step approach to capital growth 








Up 


in- 2 % 


in 


our 


first 


year 



Eagle Star's Far Eastern Unit 
Trust has more than just its first 
birthday to celebrate. 

In the last year it has grown by 
111.2%. An outstanding 
performance by any yardstick. 

£1,000 invested on October7th, 
1985 would now be worth £2;112. 


Can your investments 
hold a candle to this 
performance? 

The Far Eastern is just one of 
the 7 Eagle Star Authorised Unit 
Trusts which are Rainbow Rated. 
They're ail based on the 
investment principle that levels of 
reward reflect levels of risk. 

Here's how they've done. 

Higher Risk-Orange 


Far Eastern 

European 

North American 

Medium Risk-Yeltow 

up 111.2% 
up 79.0% 
up 30.6% 

UK Growth 

up 69.6% 

UK High Income 

up 29.2% 

Modest Risk-Green 


UK Balanced 

up 38.0% 

Minimal Risk— Indigo 



UKGilt& Fixed Interest up5.6% 


Although each of these has 
performed well beyond its risk 
rating you should remember the 
price of units can go down as well 
as up. 


Freefone Eagle Star 

We’re not asking for money 
now. First, you should find out 
more about our simple “more risk, 
more reward" investment 
approach. 

Dial 100 (during normal office 
hours Monday— Friday) and ask for 
Freefone Eagle Star. Or if you prefer 
simply use the coupon. 


{All figures represent growth on an offer 
to bid price basis over the 12 months since 
launch to 7th October 1986). 



To: Eagle Star Unit Managers Ltd., 
FREEPOST, Bath Road, 

Cheltenham, Glos. GL53 3BR. 

Please send me details of the 
Rainbow Rated Unit Trusts \ have ticked: 


□ Far Eastern 

□ European 

□ North American 

□ UK Growth * 


□ UK High Income^ 

□ UK Balanced 

□ UK Gilt and.. 
Fixed Interest 


Name _ 
Address 



^EagleStar Unit Managers Ltd. j 


j Registered in London No 1921082 Registered Address, l Thread needle Street London EC2R 8BE 


. — 


litiautJi: 


FAMILY MONEY/3 





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fil l 


mmm 



as on MMevtmml of MftND* 
to naocttM with a a& o fefywWfl fc 




I anq pnaymap. 


Jungle (ore 

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Exodus from the school fees broker 


Leading school fees broker C 
Howard, at present reported 
to be undergoing 
“restructuring" has experi- 
enced a number of difficulties 
in the past few years. A 
haemorrhage of staff during 
this year has culminated in the 
resi gnati on of Gilbert McNeill 
Moss, 21 years with the com- 
pany. He is due to take early 
retirement at the end of this 


commuted from bis Cheshire 
borne to London to fulfil this 
role untfl he. along with two 
colleagues, was dismissed 
without w a r ning in January. 
The three took tbeir case to an 
industrial tribunal but a 
settlement was agreed on be- 
fore the tribunal hearing. 


year. 

The first major problem 
experienced by Howard in 
recent years was the abrupt 
resignation of the managing 
director Joe Collins in 198J. 
Mr Collins and another senior 
colleague left to set up a rival 
business. Invest for School 
Fees. Howard sued Mr Collins 
following his departure, 
though the action was settled 
out of court. 

Stephen Whitehead, head of 
Howard's Manchester office, 
took over as managing direc- 
tor after Mr Collins, and 


Seven more 
resignations 


the whole sales team at 
Howard's Welwyn office, in 
Se p tember. 

In addition, the associate 
director Tony Murrell left at 
the end of September, and the 
company secretary Bridget 
Hogan also resigned. Mr 
Smith and Mr Riding left to 
join former managing direc- 
tor, Stephen Whitehead, who 
has himself started a school 
fees and investment advisory 
service in the past few weeks. 


Mr McNeill Moss and Mrs 
Hogan were cases of expected 
early retirement, unconnected 


with the industrial findings in 
the Whitehead case. Of Mr 


the Whitehead case. Of Mr 
Murrell who is in hsl tote 
twenties. Mr Williams sakt 
“He wanted to broaden his 
experience. Why does one 


‘Not an abnormal 
amount of turnover 9 


Under the agreement the three 
received compensation. Mr 
McNeill Moss's resignation 
was reported at about the 
same time. 


In the interim, Howard has 
experienced at feast seven 
other resignations. The 
following sales consultants 
have deported: Brian Smith in 
April Derek Riding in June, 
Christopher Wicfcstead in 
July, and Alan Godard and 
Glen Smith, who represented 


Howard's new managing 
director is Geoff Williams, 
who has been with the com- 
pany for six weeks. Though he 
has not yet undertaken a 
recruiting campaign, he denies 
that the large Stan losses will 
adversely affect the firm's 
“quality bank of blue-chip 
clients, numbering about 
1 5,000". at what is one of the 
busiest times of the year for 
school fees brokers. 


Mr Williams says that both 


move on at that age? I would 
be surprised if wc lost another 
single person. Morale a 
superb." 

Following the toss of the 
eight people who hare left in 
the wake of Mr Whitehead, he 
said: "! wouldn't say we hare 
had an abnormal amount of 
turnover since then." 

Howard is now wholly 
owned by Lloyd's broken 
Edward Lumfey. which has 
bought the 22 per cent bolding 


befogging to Mr 

John^Saa^nSS^wliS 

very dramatic faarlu nma 
with atefffWtbe 

industrial tribunal omMmm 
he sakt “It was abh oflliftK** 
m* teacup, it teemed #wpcr 
to settle." 

Howard waa » 
supporting brokm ofllKJFC 
the umiraoce oorapti$wfuch 
found itself in dtfficutnearii# 
this year, and this tktit m m 
bare given rise to g co&stt-. 
crable volume of foquiriec 
from anxious dtente . 

Asked whether Howard's 
depleted staff can ote with 
servicing the considcwdctt- 
ent list Mr Jervis dented there 
was any difficulty,, as the 
administrative ftaagwo f k is. 
suit in place. "At present we 
are missing salesmen, not 
technicians, he said. 



Rachel Day J 


J 

i 



Cffl 


Ilf 


FINANCIAL 





\ TV 


FUND 


A New Unit Trnst Investing for Growth 
in Financial Services Companies 


F RAMLINGTON Financial Fund will aim 
for maximum capital growth through 
investment in the most interesting sector 
of the moment: financial services com- 
panies throughout the world. 

Financial services are going through a period 
of rapid growth and change, thus creating an 
important investment opportunity. In this country, 
the securities industry is changing dramatically', 
and new legislation is rapidly enlarging the scope of 
profitable operation for banks, insurance companies 
and fund management companies. 

More generally, international de-regulation and 
the decline in world-wide inflation significantly 
improves the prospects for financial services opera- 
tions everywhere. Framlington Financial Fima will 
aim to mate the most of these opportunities, whether 
in the UK., the LLSA^ Europe, or the Far East. 


and life insurance interests, we are expanding into 
investment trusts, pension funds and private 
portfolio management through acquisitions which 
will bring our funds under management up from 
£420 million to over £1300 million. 


TWO KINDS OF UNITS 
Units are available in both income form (with 
distributions twice a year) or accumulation form 
(in which net income is reinvested). Since the aim 
of the fund is out-and-out capital growth, investors 
are recommended to choose accumulation units. 
The estimated gross initial yield is one per cent. 


T5B SHARES 

Yon may use a T5B fcttwef acceptance at part of yom iwrittaoar. 
Your shares will be soW tree ol comretsaop at d»t price ro lu mg 
when the renounced letter is teamed and (he procee ds axd m 
buy tmio. rounded up in your finoor to the sons whole unit. 
\bu should complete (he application form loving (far amouMTO 
be invested Wank and send it together with your tigMd,T$S 
bnet crfac fe p unc eandany ebroafc B etae nt bertbMdtc tni nrowan 
investment in ftanlingtoa Financial Fundi* £500. 


The 
by Si 


SAVINGS PLAN 

There are faciKriegfef investing by monthly direct deb i t, ■tgfa the 
first allocation of units on 3i October Fur an application torn, 
telephone 01-628 5181 before 24 October 


THE FRAMLINGTON APPROACH 
Our special style is to concentrate on smaller 
companies, dying to identify those with really good 
growth prospects before the rest of the market 
recognises tiveir promise, aiming for good long-term 
capital growth performance. "Ine results speak for 
themselves. 


OUR RECORD 

Framlington has an outstanding long-term growth 
record. The average annual compound rase of 
growth in the price of units (on an offer-to-bid basis) 
of each of our capital growth funds between launch 
and 1st October 1986 was as follows: 


HOW TO INVEST 

U ntil 31 October units are available at the 
initial price of 50p each. To invest, 
complete the application form and send 
it to us with your cheque to arrive by 
3 pm on 31 October. Applications of £10,000 or 
over will receive a bonus of one per cent additional 
units at the expense of the managers. 

From 3 November units will be available at the 
ruling offer price. 

Investors should regard all unit trust investment 
as long term. They are reminded that the price of 
□nits and the income from them can go down as 
well as up. 


GENERAL INFORMATION 
Applications wiO be acknowledged: ceruficKts vU be seat by 
tbcKjtmrara, UojNb Bank Ptc. normally within 4£dvjfc . 

The mini mom initial investment is £300. Aram 3rd Not- 
ember units mav be bought and sold drip Price* and yfcldi 
be published daily in leading newapapeu. When unto an sold 
back to the managers payneac is normally mack wfcfeta Ttfajudf 
recap* of the reno u nced certificate. 

Income net of basic me cm is distributed to holden of 
income units on 1$ June and IS December each seat The fine 
distribution will be on IS June 1087.. -* 

The annual charge is 1% (+WT) of the value of the land. 
The initial charge, which 2s jndudedta the offer price, 1*5%. 

Commotion of IM per am t+YAT} is paid n qialilM 
iruermeiiinrs. Commission is tkk paid on rariogsptatt. 

The iron is si authorised unit trojr constituted far Hus ' 
Deed. It ranks as a wider nsige neeurtev under the Thun* 
Investments Act, 1961. The Thuoe is Lkwdf Bask Be. 

The managers are framiragton Unit Manamnnai LintitoO 

London wwiBulbtaw. London 6C2M 5NQ. %fcplnMQl-62* 
5181. Thkx 8812594, fegtaered 2d Stftnri No 895241.- 
Member of the Unit Trust Association. 

This offer is not open to letidem of the Republic of trafamL . 



EiFimnmam: 


THl 


Fuad launched Growth ! 

Capital Jan 69 +15.1% p.a. 

- International Growth Oct 76 +25.3% p.a. i 

American &Ga«ral Apr 78 +19.0% p.a. J 

American Turnaround Cfet 79 +22.4% pjL | 

Recoweiy i^»r82 +24.7% p^. j 

Japan & General Feb 84 +26.1% pjL 

European Feb 86 +45.6% p.a. I 

Every one of these Framlington funds has out- | 
performed the FT All-Share Index, the Dow-Jones j 
Industrial Average and the Standard and Stars i 
Composite Index. J 


Of Units In Framlington financial Fund 
At The iNttiAL Fixed Price Of sop Each Until 3lsr October 1986- 


To FR AMUNCTON UNIT M A NAG EM ENT LIMITED. ^ LONDON WALL BUILDINGS, LONDON LC2M ?plQ 
IrWTW'lSH TO INVEST THE SUM OF £ \ | (MINIMUM tfOOl IN FR AMUNCTON FINANCIAL FUND 

A.XD ENCLOSE A CHEQUE PAYABLE TO FRAMLINGTON UmT MANAGEMENT LlMTITD. I AM. Wp AREQVER 18. 

For ACCUMULATION UNITS IN WHICH NET INCOME IS REINVESTED. PLEASE TICK HERE p " 1 


f S; 


ad 


SURNAME (MR/MRS/MISSL 
FULL FORENAME SI 


CUR INSIGHT - 1 

Framlington Group pic is itself a financial services [ 
company. This gives us invaluable insight into the j 
sector. Apart from our unit trusts, off-shore funds { 


SIGNATURES). 






} 













*• 4 :« ^ s *x. 

' ■-" i. 

n^flore 

._' . 1 ;■ Vi n , .* 



THE TIMES SAT! TRDAY OCTOBER 1 8 .1 986 


™f THIS SUNDAYi 


Jr S» • r 4 V 
**w »- : * : v » :■’?-•! ^ 

■f* ; • .K» „ 

?=• »%.. _ a * > A?»yi 


act!»£R«^ 


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THE SI N 


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• • • .- ,i ,s ' 

'. v . 1 . 1 "'■'***& 

■ ■ ---^j 

• * “tv:; 

Rachel D» 











V. £ 



WIN A 

£ 14,000 

VOLVO 

ESTATE 




tS 


7 -sflS^ 





^ 3 S 8 t 



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PLUS YOUR 
OWN CAR 
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FREE CALLS 
WORTH £1,000 



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A ! : : 



vjv-SMSa: a 'i- : . -•• 



magazine 


SWEET & SOUR 

The Queen in China 
by Simon Winchester 


GOING 

GOING 

HONG 

KONG 

WHO'LL BE LEFT IN 1997? 


Lidaia stamp oofedion 
into a sound nvestment 




SPORT 



LINEKER: ON THE 
WAY UP =5^ 


ROBSON: ON THE 
WAYDOWN?^ 


BROUGH 
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i the suNDAYTiMEs magazine 

^ JITTERY CITY 



5 SECTIONS . 96 PAGES . A COLOUR MAGAZINE . ALL FOR 50p 


THE 

SUNDAY 

TIMES 

Better than a month 
of other Sundays. 























» 1 1 Jm J l « «> :* fr J : i a 1U t: 1 EH 

FAMILY MONEY/4 



Suitable case for cover 


Deatefcall is the biggest and most efficient share dealing service in 
the United Kfrgdom. Here’s why. 


How It works 


• You apply for an investment limit to suit 

vourdealfng'reciuirements. . 


What it offers = 

• Ahigh interest daily deposit facility. 


•We send 
numbered I 


•A free nominee facility to reduce 
paperwork. 


Account Card. 


instructions. 


jucall , 
with your 


• Umitsare accepted for transactions 
over£S000. _ 


•A pre-recorded commentary on 
market movements. 


• Hoare Govett Dealercall negotiates 
the best price available and reports 
back to you. Simple! ■ 


' • From 27th October, our standard 
commission rate will be reduced from 
165% to 1.25% (plus VAT). Our 
minimum commission will be £12.50 
■ plus VAT 


Jumping the hospital queue try 
paying to get a operation or 
treatment is appealing to more 
patients than ever. 

Prolonged pain, immobil- 
ity, deteriorating eyesight and 
time tost from work — particu- 
larly costly if you are self- 
employed — are often the 
consequences of a delayed 
operation. . . 

In many areas of Britain 
there is a Nuffield, AMI or 
other private hospital where 
you can. get speedy, first-class 
treatment — at a price. 

If you are not a member of a 

health insurance scheme such 
as BUPA, you may think that 
charges at private hospitals are 
beyond your means. Certainly 
they are not cheap, but private 
health insurance could be a 
good investment to get that 
hernia or cataract attended to 
before ft gets any worse. 

You tan also choose your 
own tune for joing into a 
hospital fairly near home. . 

The alternative is to wait 
painfully for your turn in the 
NHS queue, which is getting 
longer all the time. 

Private hospitals also offer 
facilities for a regular health 
check and this too could prove 
a wise investment An early 
diagnosis of illness could well 
save you a great deal of pain 
and even considerably pro- 
long your life. 

Nuffield Hospitals, a rtg- 


This includes hospital 
charges and specialists' fees, 
and even the extra expense 
arising from unforeseen 
complications. 

At different Nuffield hos- 
pitals there is a variation in 
the fixed cost according to 
axes. Some typical examples 
of approximate costs are given 
in the table. 

■Many Nuffield hospitals 
have developed particular 
specialities Such as the in-vitro 
fertilization unit at the 
McAlpine Clime in Glasgow, 
which bdps couples who have 
been unable to conceive. 
There b also a comprehensive 
range of out-patient facilities 
indnding same-day surgery. 


Preventive screening 
and fell checks 



For furthennJormatxjn and an application form send in the coupon below. 


HOARE: 

GOVETT 


u !fl i 


istered charity with more than 
30 hospitals for acute cases, is 
the biggest British-owned pri- 
vate hospital in the UK. Every 
one of its hospitals has been 
tailored to local needs. 

And now the Nuffield has 
introduced a scheme of fixed- 
cost surgery for those without 
private health insurance 
cover. Under this, you can go 
into a hospital of your choice 
and have an operation at a 
time most convenient to you, 
for a guaranteed set price. 




a 

70 BUY AMD S&I. YOUR SHARES * 

1 

8555 

3a... .• . 


physiotherapy, pathology, and 

X-ray. 

Specialized out-patient ser- 
vices such as health screening 
are offered by as increasing 
number of Nuffield hospitals. 

AMI; the UK subsidiary of 
American Medical Inter- 
national, with 13 hospitals, is 
foe largest independent group 
in Britain. Open-heart surgery 
is performed at various hos- 
pitals. AMTs Park Hospital in 
Nottingham offers an in-vitro 
fertilization service and 
dawns to have the highest 
overall pregnancy success rate 
of any other similar unit 

The Portland Hospital for 
Women and Children in cen- 
tral London is geared to meet 
special needs and has neo- 
natal intensive and baby-care 
units. 

The AMI Harley Street 
Medical Advisory Service 
(HSMAS) provides a free 24- 
hour information service to 
deal with medical inquiries, 
laqe or small, from the UK 
and overseas. 


HSMAS can also help get an 
appointment with a consul* 
tank immediate hospital ad- 
mission, and finding a dentist* 
It will arrange flights, visas, 
and hotel accommodation for 
family or friends. 

Some examples or approxi- 
mate charges at AMI hospitals 
outride London are given in 
the table. „ . . 

Other foci hues offered by 
AMI include preventive 
screening and comprehensive 
health checks. Particular 
emphasis is placed o novan an 
and cervical cancer screening, 
mammography, and executive 
medical checks. 

Grafton Manor, between 
Milton Keynes and North- 
ampton. was recently opened 
by AMI 10 treat and rehabili- 
tate victims with severe head 
injuries, estimated to increase 
by at least 1,500 cases a year ra 
England and Wales. 

fitter Earner, general man- 
ager of AMI'S psychiatric di- 
vision, said the company had 
opened foe centre .because 
there were too few facilities in 



Treatment can come sooner thrtngh *» foaroije rehtme 
NUFFiao coMWMunvB com ft 
Stooflh Ch-foriWd 


England and Wales. 

He added: “At present, a 
number of cases, after a long 
spell in hospital, end up in 
psychiatric wards because 
their injuries have caused 
behavioural changes as weB as 
functional disorders. 

“Sometimes they are sent 
home if their parents or 
partners believe they can look 
after them, only to become 
disruptive and a heavy burden 
on even the most loving and 
caring families. 

“Most patients are young 
men injured in motor-cycle or 
car accidents.” 

Rehabilitation at Grafton 
Manor costs just over £10 a 
day, inclusive of therapy, 
medicine and doctors* fees. 

Residents may be covered 
by insurance schemes, but 
many will receive damages 


Cataract 

1,255 

1.020 

1.330, 

Cataract with implant 

1,570 

1.31S 

1jS36 

Honda (unilateral) 

1.024 

075 


Hernia (bflater&Q 

1,459 

1,310 

m 

Varicose veins 
(unilateral) 

737 

720 

7» : 

Hip replacement 

3,378 . 

3.240 

3,320 


AMI HOSPITALS GUT8DE LONDON 


Cataract extraction (two-night stay) 
Hernia (throe-night stay) 

Varicose veins, unilateral 
(two-rogffi-stay) 

Hip repl a ceme n t, exc lu ding cost of 
imptent/prosthesb {10-day stay) 


which will pay for their treat- 
ment. Occasionally those not 
covered by insurance or en- 
titled to compensation win be 
paid for by the local health 
authority. 

Should you decide to get 
treatment at any private hos- 


pital or clinic, first consul 
your own doctor for advkr 
and the necessary referral. . 

Arthur Nkklk 

SufffebJ ffnspitah. 0137* 


3234: AML 01-466 1266 
HSMAS. 01-935 0619. - • 


Investing in the USA!^ 


Property’s pull as 
the poll nears 


you earn your stripes by 


Property agents Healey and 
Baker believe that because 


America has always been regarded 

as the home of capitalism. - 

In recent years the spirit, of . free 
enterprise that has become such a major 
part of the American philosophy, has 
allowed many companies to achieve a 
level of success that seems more likely 
in fiction than in &ct 

Think of the computer companies 
which . have emerged to become inter- 
national organisations, . ...... 

The toy nmufecturers .whoVe en- 
joyed phenomenal success 
around the world 

Or the re-structuring of 
many major American com- 
panies that has turned their ~ 
fortunes back from the brink 
of bankruptcy. " - 

Then there’s a whole new • 
field of industries like bio- 
technology, which promises . 
great things for the fiitoe. 

GT Unit Managers are offering the 
GT American Special Situations Fund to 
give the investor a chance to capitalise on 
American companies with the same kind 
of potential in the future. An opportunity 
that allows them to invest in a. wide port- 
folio of American companies developing 
new markets, hew products or other, new 
.sources of growth and profits together with 
others- which may appear undervalued on 
a shorter term basis. 

Naturally, as with axiy investment of 
this nature there is an element of risk, life 
shorter term movements in the overall 
stock market may not be reflected in the 
immediate performance of the fund 

The price of units and the income 
from them can go down as wellas up. 

But we bdievetharin the long term 


the prospect of higher returns should 
balance die risk. 


GT A STAR IN ITS 
OWNRIGHT 

Of all investment management 
groups, the GT Group has some of the 
best qualifications to make a success of 
a Special. Situations -Fund An essential 
combination of experience, knowledge 
and in-depth research. 

Twelve years ago we established an 


the GT US & General Fund, which outper- 
formed all but one of its competitors in its 
sector over the last ten years to September 
1st 1986 (source: Money Management). 

This together with die outstanding 
performance of many of our other funds 
throughout the world has twice led to us 
being voted as *Unit Trust Managers of die 
"fear’ by the Observer 



THE BEGINNING OF 
THE ROAD TO SUCCESS. 

This is the first opportu- 
nity weVe given you to buy the 
GT American Special Situa- 
tions Fund in its current form. 

So don’t wait until you 
hear you’ve missed out on yet 
another American success 
story, when you could well be 
a part of it. 


Baker believe that because 
equity end money markets 
could be volatile in the nra-up 
to the next election, “this 
should encourage Investors to 
nurture and widen their prop- 
erty investment portfolios 
which, although slow-moving 
.in performance terms, repre- 
sent stable and secure 
income”. \ 

Yet Abbey Life's Ray Mil- 
ton. manager of a huge £387 
million life and pension prop- 
erty fund, is cautions. He 
suggests the underlying mar- 
ket psychology is not good 
after fire years of poor perfor- 
mance. He predicts: “It wffl 
take some time for die wounds 
to heal, although £ lot wffl 
depend on the performance of 
other investment media.* 

Small investors sharing a 
pessimistic outlook of other 
investment media can tap into 
the property martlet via pooled 
fends linked to life and pen- 
sions policies. Unit trusts will 
also be allowed to offer prop- 
erty funds under the 
Government's recent 
proposals. 

However, past performance 
is not on foe side of the funds. 
Although property retmns 
hare kept pace with their 
traditional benchmark, infla- 
tion, recently published fig- 
ures from performance 
measurers WJM. Com pu t er 


Cornhill Insurance has a 7 
small property Ufc fend of 
£780.880 which has bees able 


to take advantage of growth 
situations, But John Hodgson. 
efCornhW. says that oocc the 


fend gets bigger it will invest 
direct in property. 


direct in property. 

Continental life's proper!? 
fund Invests- in property , 
shares, but Gary DWton says: * 
“One of our -bat perfonnftfe 
shares has been the PtirkfieM 
Group, an engineering 
company.** A farther 15 per 
cent of foe fend » placed ip 
Japan, invested fa utilities 
such as railways because 
“they own a lot of buuT. ^ 

The stars of the directly 
invested prop ert y fends apt 
the residential funds. Them 
are four ran by Henderseg, 
Schroder, Cannon and Target 
Target demonstrated foe at 1 
peal of such fends by pdHtanjfa. 
more than £100 nufflon dunn| 


its recent launch. Such feafa 
aim to buy properties fa 


Industrial sector 
In the doldrums 


American subsidiary, GT Capital Manage- 
ment Inc. in San Francisco, and later on a 
further office in Silicon Valley to deal with 
investments in technology ■ 

Our American managers are able to 
draw bn the vast reservoir of expertise 
collected by our international operation 
(now managing >C3.5 billion worldwide), 
and gain insights into the overall market 
prospect from our economics and currency 
departments in Europe and the Far East 
* Tb date the GT Group invests some 
■ $750^00,000 in the USA. We also manage 
pension fund money for some of America^ 
largest corporations as well as Mutual 
Funds for American citizens. 

Our experience and expertise is 
already reflected in the performance of our 
established mainstream American Fund; 


THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW. 

GT American Special Situations Fund is based on a 
reconstruction of the GT Technology and Growth Fund. 

A contract note will be issued on receipt of your 
application and a certificate will normally be sent within six 
weeks from settlement. Not applicable to Eire or US citizens or 
their agents. 

An initial charge of 5.26% (equivalent to 5% of the offer 
price) is included in the price of thermits and an annual charge 
of 1*0% (plus VAT) of the value of the 1 Fund is deducted from the 
income/capita] of the Fund. 

The otgecrrve of the Fond ts capital gro w th. 

__ The offer price of units at 14/10/86 was 58Jp and the 
estimated gross current yield 10%. Managers reports on die Fund 
will be issued on 2Lst May and 21st November each yean Income 
will be distributed a> -madly net ofbasic rate tax on 21st May. 

Units may be sold bade on any business day ax not less 
than the ruling bid price. P ro c ee ds will normally be forwarded 
by cheque within seven working days from receipt by the 
managers of the renounced certificate. Prices and yields are 
quoted in die national press. 

Remuneration is paid to qualified intermediaries. Rates 
are available on request 

GTUnit Managers Limited is a wholly owned subsidiary 

of GT Manag em ent PLC and is a member of the Unit Trust 
g^waarioa. Registered in England No. 903827. Trustees: Lloyds 

Friday ^ 01-626 9431 Monda y 


r: 


To:CTUnii Manager* -Lti FREEPOST LondoirT£C2BlDL. ('At? stamp required). 

I At. niichrn I. £ C;..— 


I l/W: wish to invest L_~ in the GT American Special Silintions Rind (minimum 

1 £500) at the price ruling on the day you receive thi* application. 

IamAV’carcovrr 18. Cheques should be mack payable to GTUnit Managers Ltd. 

1/We enclose a cheque for die amount to be invested. Tick box if dividends are to be reinvested. □ 
If you would like details of how to invest by regular monthly saving please tick the box. Q 


.Full Forenames 

BLOCX LETTERS Please imeMr/MrvMiHorTitlc. 


Address. 


Iln the case of joint applications all Thust sign and provide names and addreosca on a separate sheet.) 


If you normally use an investment adviser please state name here. 



Fund 



Services show font in the year 
to March 1986 the market still 
lags behind equities. 

Broken down into sectors, 
the property market's 
brightest spot is foe retail 
sector, fuelled by the consumer 
boom. Retail produced a 13 
per cent return - 5.1 per cent 
from income and 13 per cent 
from capital growth. 

Despite the City boom, of- 
fices recorded a lowly S.4 pm 1 ■ 
cent return and capital values 
dropped by 1 per cent The 
industrial sector remained in 
the doldrums with a total 
return of 2 per emit. 

Given these figures, it is not 
surprising that many large 
investing institutions have 
been net sellers of property, 
thus dampening the market 
farther. The life and pensions 
fends have suffered redemp- 
tions too. 

Adrian Herring, of pensions 
consultants Martin Paterson 
Associates, explains this has 
hit the fends because property 
has been hard 10 sell and 
“some fends have had to sell 
the best, or the most liquid, 
properties to meet redemp- 
tions and so are left with 
poorer quality portfolios”. 

Most life and pensions 
funds invest in the fell range tf 
property. Some specialize, 
such as Providence Capitol, 

I which invests mainly in retail 
but also bolds property shares 
and a high cash element. 

Not all property fends have 
been dull. But those which 
have performed well invest in 
property shares rather than 
the real bricks and mortar. 

Not that tbe stock market's 
property section has excelled 
recently. It is dominated by 
large companies such as Land 
Securities bat opportunities 
for growth have cook from 
smaller, development com- 
panies such as Rosehaugh.- 


abn to bay properties fa 
fashionable parts of Landkp 
and then lease them out 
year at a time to overseas 
companies* executives. ‘ 

Henderson has omits fends 
since December 1981. M 
despite all foe gMkSqg 
surrounding rocketing London 
house prices, foe fen^ 
performance fas stawe&JdM- 
ing the past year; The -ma# 
agers expect the sfewdotni to 
continue as election Ufrvfo 
increase, yet returns sboug 
remain in double figures.': _ » 

Henderson ronsj** «jr 
shore fuids, one linked to m 
policies worth £90m Uou aai 
a recently introduced;, nen&ft 
fund valued at less nan S 
million. Performance ftp 
pension fend has .htinr tmg 
above that af tle Hfc tHl 
because it is so small fo*rit!| 
inverted fa a biab-flvfeg prop- 
erty owned fcyfc wnM.-* 

Schroder's fend,: 

£20 rail Sou; Is inverted' fa 
places such as Ifeuafegfon, 
Chelsea and WiosMedgp. '2 


fiiis Sc) 
WPl; 
slash 

educati 


i< 


Rod Morrisort 


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FAMILY MONEY/5 


The banks-of-all-trades campaign 

ikirtw >«i .. ^ 


Oiw rules 3 

■ The Rnandal Services Bill — 
-which aims to set uo » 

v- hearing on Monday y 
£ More than $d0 amend- 

pnenistoihe Bill wereiobe 
l^nsjdered fey Lords. 

r 2rf?«*r45 f « hem being on, y 

{^tectmioL However, there are 

was the mm of 

’ mLJ 8 ?* and t b . ui ! din B soci- 
eties 1o publicize their 
grievances. 

L . They have put forward an 
[.uncmlRient to clause 119 of 

r whic !? woulcl maice h 
easier for them to sell to 

customers, through their 
, branches, a mixture of their 
M*wn «Kl other companies’ life 
assurance and unit mist 
products. 

It has been put forward by 
Lord Ezra, the Alliance peer 
and former National Coal 
Board chairman, and has the 
endorsement of Lord Bruce- 
Gardyne. the former Conser- 
\- vauve MP. 

H is highly unlikely that the 
amendment will succeed. In 
any event h. is only an attempt 
to counter, from a different 
angle, a fundamental threat to 
the banks’ highly profitable 
insurance and unit trust 
business. 

The threat comes from the 
Securities and Investments 
::Boarxi (SIB), the overall 
watchdog for investor protec- 
,.tion. and its draft rules on life 
^assurance and unit trusts. If 
'the banks and building soci- 
neties cannot change the Bill, 
then they want an exception to 
the rales to be made for them. 

The SIB’s roles have rightly 
fastened on the' concept of 
^polarization” for people who 



Faee in the 
front line 

.As the party political con- 
-ference season slips mercifully 
into the backgrooid for an- 
other 12 months, one burning 
■ question remains. 

While Mrs Thatcher was 
promoting English roses and 
[.popularizing sprained ankles 
I whose was the familiar face 
ffrom the unit trust world 
tting oa the* platform in 
mrnemonth and supporting 
.gray Kin-knock? 

Step forward Bill- 
Stuttaford, OBE, chairman of 
one of Britain’s major yuppy 
financial services groups, 
Framlington. 

In the interests of fearless, 
ihvestigative journalism, a 
i telephone call to Mr 
Stuttaford, whose number is 
known only to those with 
access to a telephone direc- 
tory, seemed appropriate. 

- “What were you doing in 

Bournemouth hob-nobbing 

with the tikes of N. Lawson, K. 
Baker and N. Tebbft? What 
are your political ambitions 
|and why were you seated on 
Mrs Ts left as she laced the 
|TV cameras?” 



The man whose unit trust 
group manages £420 miffioa 
on behalf of 70,000 unit- 
holders was his usual forth- 
coming self- As chairman of 
die Eastern Area of the 
Conservative Party, he gets to 
sit on tiie platform along with 
the other 11 regional 
chairmen. 

Mr Stuttaford demes per- 
sonal political ambition, say- 
ing that at 57 be is toe old and 
bis ambition is for the party as 
a whole. With that said, it 

should be remembered that his 
brother was an MP in the 
eariy 1970s. As for the seating 
plan, ‘‘no significance” is the 
unsurprising response from a 
man who dearly stiD wants to 
be on the platform this time 
next year. 

■ Peter Gartknd 


This School Fee 
Trust Plan could 
slash your 
education costs. 


School fee plans are not all the same 
as so many parents might suppose. 

Our new School Fee 'frust Han, 
linked to a trust with charitable 
status, will provide a head start in 
providing for school fees in he years 
ahead. * 

That trust basis, combined with 
our first-class investment track re- 
cord, is the answer to your problem. 

And, whafs more it is fully 
recommended by the National 
Independent Schools Information 
Service. 


ToiTbeL-, , 

rd wdcoTC farther on 1 

□ Ac^»wmOSp«aAng^^^ a P«« jd - 


ftKiadcmtodr) 




Addtoa 




# 

foamUITC 






BKAfiB 


The Equitable Life 

— You gain because we’re differene- 


Weinberg; two points 

**11 IHe assurance and unit 
trusts. 

What this means is that 
people selling these products 
either must be independent 

intermediaries who offer a 
choice of products from vari- 
*ous companies and are the 
agent of the customer — or 
they must be company repre- 
sentatives who sell only the 
products of one company gnrt 
are, in effect, the agents of that 
company. 

The reason for the SIB 
insisting on such a distinction 
is eminently sensible. Ba- 
sically, it is that customers 
should be able to know with 
certainty and without confu- 
sion exactly with whom they 
are dealing. 

Are they dealing with some- 
one who represents them and 
tries to choose the most 
appropriate product for them 
— and is independent of any 
one particular life insurance or 
unit trust company? 

Alternatively, are they deal- 
ing with someone who repre- 
sents a company — not them — 
has no duty to give them 
objective advice and is push- 
ing that one company’s prod- 
ucts only? 


The SIB is very attached to 
polarization as an essential 
aspect of investor protection. 
All too often hi the past 
customers have been confused 
by the status of the people 
with whom they dealt, think- 
ing they were getting indepen- 
dent advice when, in fact, they 
were being sold the parry line. 

The problem for the banks 
in particular is that the SIB 
rules will fundamentally affect 
the advisory role of their 
branch manager. 

Up to now if, like many 
people, you turned to your 
branch manager for financial 
advice on investments such as 
life assurance or uim trusts, he 
could either put you into the 
bank's in-house products, or 
else recommend those of an- 
other company. 

The SIB proposals win re- 
quire the branch manager to 
act either as a company repre- 
sentative selling only the 


house products only if be was 
certain and could prove that 
no other products on the 
market would be as suitable or 
advantageous for the 
customer. 

In practical terms this 
would be very bard to prove, 
given the wide rang: of life 
assurance and unit trust prod- 
ucts on the market; There 
would be a reduction in sales 
of m-house products, if the 
independent intermediary 
stance was adopted. 

Moreover, even if a branch 
manager refers the customer 
to the bank's in-house inter- 
mediary company the same 
additional burden would ap- 
ply . And he would not be able 
to confuse his position in the 
eyes of the customer by 
suggesting that bis referral of 
the customer to the in-house 
intermediary means that he is 
independent too. 

The banks are not happy 

about any of this. They con- 


XGWrsJW... 




Ezra: proposing amendment 

products ofthe bank, or else as 
a fully independent 
intermediary. 

In the latter case the SIB is 
proposing an additional bur- 
den On the branch manager 
intermediary. He would be 
able to offer the bank’s in- 


Brace-Gardyne: hacking 

sider that the branch manager 
is an excellent point of ref- 
erence for their customers. He 
is likely to know a great deal of 
financial information relevant 
to any investment decision he 
makes on the customer’s 
behalf 


They argue that so long as 
he discloses his interest in any 
particular product, puts his 
customers' interests first and 
chooses the most suitable 
•product available, then inves- 
tor protection concents are 
met. 

Peter Leslie, ofthe Commit- 
tee of London and Scottish 
Clearing Banks, says: **SIB's 
proposals appear to have been 
drawn up with commission- 
driven insurance and unit 
trust salesmen in mind. They 
are not appropriate for the 
branch operations of the ma- 
jor banks, in which insurance 
and unit trust activities are 
incidental to the main banking 
relationship. 

“If implemented, the pro- 
posals would inevitably re- 
strict the way m which the 
bank staff could respond to 
the needs of their customers 
who very often look to banks 
for the broadest possible ser- 
vice. This is especially so m 
provincial areas where cus- 
tomers rely very largely on 
their banks.” 

It is the broad service that 
banks provide which gives rise 
to one of SIB’s very valid 
investor protection concerns. 
Because banks provide a mix- 
ture of general financial ad- 
vice, which is objective, and 


investment advice, which of- 
ten leads to recommendation 
. of in-house products cus- 
tomers may be misled over the 
basis on which they are receiv- 
ing investment advice. 

Mark Weinberg, joint SIB 
deputy chairman, points out 
that on the one hand, “many 
people look to bank brandies 
for what they take to be 
disinterested advice”. On the 
other, they “are major setters 
through their b ran ches of their 
own unit trust and fife assur- 
ance products". 

Moreover, the banks' objec- 
tions to the SIB demand for 
polarization must be viewed 
in the context of ihe enormous 
revenues they derive at 
present from life insurance 
and unit trust safes. 

The prospectus for the 
Trustee Savings Bank, for 
instance, shows that just 
under one quarter of the 
bank's profits before tax in its 
previous six months came 
from its life assurance and 
unit trusts activities. In 
numerical terms £16.5 million 
of its £70 million profit came 
from this source: The TSB. 
needless to say. has been one 
of the loudest voices in the 
banks’ campaign. 

The SIB’s rules would bit 
the banks' profits. This is 
because, if the bank manager 
were forced to wear a single 
company hat. selling only the 
bank's products, customers 
might well want a broader 
choice. 

If they choose the inter- 
mediary route, banks are go- 
ing to nave a hard job proving 
their own products better and 
more suitable. It is no bad 
thing. The extra burden that 
the SIB requires should help 
to ensure that consumers do 
’get genuinely independent, 
disinterested advice when 
they seek iL 

Lawrence Lever 


I 


Are you leaving 
your heirs more tax 

than capital? Naturally you-want 

to leave all of your estate to your family or dependants 
oral feast to someone of your choosing. 

But the truth is tliat without some Forward plan- 
ning your heirs will receive only what is left after 
the Inland Revenue take their share in the form of 
the new Inheritance Tax when you die. 

And that share can be quite dramatic 
For example, on an estate of £300,000 (including 
house, content s, personal effects, stocks and shares, 
bonds, trusts, cash, life assurance and any inheritances) 
the Exchequer stands to be the largest beneficiary If 
there were two children they would each get £99,425 
but the Exchequer 

‘ Ttdkto ' 
TbwryLaw 

for impartial 
financial advice. 

TouryLawd; Co. Ltd., 
FREEPOST. Windsor, 

Bales SL418T 
Telephone: 0791 8fiS3- W. 
Outside office hours 
01-956 9057. Or OH-2262344 
(Edinburgh) or 0552 4459ft 
(Leeds). 

Please send me your new 
guide to Inheritance Tax and 
how to avoid it. 

/ am/am not an cr isting 
Town- Law client. 


would take £101450. 

And it gets worse; 
above £517,000 the rate 
is a staggering ti0*b. 

At Tbwry Law we can 
help you make plans 
to reduce your liability 
and 'pass on your 
accumulated wealth to 
your chosen 
beneficiaries. 

Now think for a 
moment I.HI does 
not just apply to the 
very rich, it applies to 
everybody with assets 
above £71,000. 

Think what your 
house and investments 
are worth. And then 
think: I must get in 
touch with lowry Law 
today 

ASK TOR OUR FREE GUIDE, j Po&tCodc. J 

OUT NOW AUTUMN 1986. I IiaP'Sffls/ilJ 


A ’ante. 


Address ■ 


A FIXED PRICE OFFER OF A NEW UNIT TRUST 


( )fkr Price fixed until \< >v 'ember th 1 986 


Allied Dunbar announce 

THE LAUNCH OF THE 


W) ridwide Asset Value T rust 

«A unique new trust- building on a proven formula?? 


A strong investment must bebuilton 
. j\ a bioad base. The Worldwide 
-*■ AssetA^luelhistisbuiltaaossan 
extremely broad base of investment- 
company assets around die whole world. 
It is a new unit trust which sets outto 
combine the growth potential ofa 
conventionalunit trust- with thesecurity 
ofan asset base. 


. the share markets - simply, the value of 
their assets exceeds their quoted value, 
due often to downturns in profitability. 

By investing in these companies 
remarkabtegrowihispossibleassuch 
downturns can be reversed by new 
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safetynet 


UK invested Asset\fclueTrustshows a wef 
growth of 100% bom launch in January 



based situations throughout tfae^ worid 
ourfund managers aim to provide a very 
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When appropriate, they will seek to 
enhance that growth by investing in 
secondary markets (such as our own 


USM) and in recovery or take-over stocks. 
>u have the 


And now’ 


e opportunity to 


invest in the very beginning of this new 


fund at a fixed price of25p per unit- if 
youact before November ^ 7th 1986. 


ABOUT ALUEDDUNBAR 
Established in 1934, Allied Dunbar 
UnitThsts hasatrack record of over 
50 years ofsuccessful investment 
management As one ofthe founding 
companies oftheunltnust 
movement (and today oneof the 
very biggest in the field) weean 
demonstrate an impressive record of 
solid and consistentgrowth. 

Vfe are pan ofthe Allied Dunbar 
i which, with over£4 billion in 
>, managed on behalf of overa 
million clients can nowdaim to be 
oneof the most substantial financial 
services groups in the UK. 


YOUR INVESTMENT IN WORLDWIDE 
COMPANY ASSETS 
The WDridwide Asset X^lue Trust is a 


through managed investment in 
international markets. Suitable for the 
investor with a minimum of£l,000 to 
invest, the new fond isan ideal core 
holding for the international content of 
any portfolio. 

Remember; the price ofi units and the 
incom e from them can go down as well 

Also, ^performance isnot 
necessarilya guide to thefoturc In view 
of this, your investmentshould be 


ed as a medium to long term 


Tb make your investment, complete 


ofbusiness on November 7th 1986 for 
your units to be allocated at the initial 
offerpriceof25peach-after that date 
units will be allocated at theprevafling 
offer price. Fbryourinformatioa the 
gross estimated starting yield ofthe trust is 
l%per annum. 

IMPORTANT INFOTMATICX'J 

1 . Unil prices aod udds are quoted daily in the nabonal 
press. 

2. ThemisiisauihoriscdbyiheSCcrciaiyofSciicforTrade 
and is constituted by alhist Deed, h isa"widcr-range" 
investment under dieTrustee Investments Act 1961 

3- TbeTrust Deed permits the managers to indudean initial 
savirc charge of yic imhcofferprice,outofwhidi 
remuneration is paid toqualified intermediaries-, cues are 
arai (able on request- 

4. Net income will bedisiribmtd ytariv on lOthOcsobec 
with thefitst distribution taking place on 10th October 1987 
An annual feeofl^o (plus VaT) ofthe value of tbc hind is 
deducted half-yeniy from gross income 10 meet 
management expenses (indudir^thelhisiees for) The 
Trust Deed allows fora maximum annual feeof2ftn (plus 
VaT) but an>- charge is subject to 3 months notice in writing 
to unitholders 

5. Applications willbe acknowledged and certihcHes will 
bepo<Medapprox immJy 6wedc btec 

6. On am- business da>- you may sdl ail or part of your 
unitholding bade to die managers at not less than the bid 
price, calculated using a formula approved by the 
OqxmmemofTrade. ruling on receipt of^ur instructions. 
You win besent a cheque insetdemera normally within 

7 business days orreceipt, by the managas,ofybur 
renounced unit certificate 

7 -Managers: Allied Dunbar Urm Trusts pic (a member of 
ihe f th r Trust Association ) . Allied Dunbar Centre. 

Swindon. SN1 1 EL. “telephone: (0793) 28291 
Trustee- The Royal BankofScodand pic. 

8. The offer is notopen toreskkntsoftheRepuWicof 
Ireland or to nationals, citizens, residents, or companies of 
iheUnfced Senes of America. 



WORLDWIDE ASSET 
VALUE TRUST 

A fixed price offer open 
riorii Nrwem her7th 1986. 

Please post with your cheque to: 

Allied DunbarUnftThJStDeales, FREEPOST 

Swindon, SN11XZ. 

Jewish to invest I, in the Allied 

Dunbar Worldwide Asset 'N^lue'Diist at the 
toed price of25p per unit (minimum £1,000) 
and endosea remittance payable to Allied 
Dunbar Unit Trusts pic 

If you wish to have net income re-invested 
please tick box. _ 

ThisofferwiiJ doseon November 7th 1986. 
After ihe dose of this offia; units will be 
available at the daily quoted price. 


FWfeconfirra that I/we are aged over 18. 

Joint applicants must complete details and sign 
separately bloqc capitals phase 


Are you an existing client of 
Allied Dunbar? 


n 


•~UUWU ■ /»m f «fli - ■Yesi ) NoD | 

Name. 'address of your existing financial advisor I 


Mr/Mrs/Miss (Surname). 

Fust name(s) 

Address 


i 


TA IX (O 


.Postcode. 



Sign 


ature_ 


JOINT HOLDER 
Mr 'Mrs Miss (Surname) . 


~Dare. 


Firscname(s) 
Signatur 


Dare. 


ALLIED 

DUNBAR 

Allied Dunbar Unit Hust5plc ■ 
Registered iii England No-. 285988 
Registered Office: Allied Dunbar Centre. 
Swindon. SN1 1EL 









THE TIMES SATURDAY 



JLfiJ 



UNIT TRUST SELECTION 


Get a 

wealth of experience 
concentrating on your 
individual needs. 


Jiiese days, the vast range of unit trusts is 
almost as bewildering as the stock market 
itself. 

Saracen, launched last year by Peter 
Potts and Corinne Carter who. between 
them have more than 30 years of unit trust 
management experience at the very highest 
level is a totally independent company. We 
offer a personal highly experienced asset 
management service which helps you 
through the snags and pitfalls and is tailored 
to meet your own individual needs. Our sole 
aim is to improve the return of your invest- 
ments by professional selection and con- 
stant monitoring. ^ w* 


Our original clients have now enjoyed a 
capital , growth in excess of 50% in just 
eleven months as a direct result of our 
policy to take a global view of investment 
opportunities as they occur. 

If you have £20,000 or more to invest 
post the coupon now. Or phone 01 -631 2882. 
No salesman will call. ^ 




s 

AJ 

RA! 


E 

4 . 

N 

ASSET MANAGEMENT LIMITED 


Sardinia House. Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LZ. Telephone 01-831 2882 



M&G SECOND GENERAL 

30 TH BIRTHDAY 


Over the last thirty years you probably could not 
have held a unit trust with a better performance than 
M&G SECOND GENERAL 

£1,000 invested at As launch in June 1956 would 
now be worth £67,208 with all income reinvested, 
compared with £84.04 from a similar investment in a 
building society. To have maintained its purchasing 
power over the period, £1,000 would need to have 
grown to £8,748. 

The British Stockmarket has been strong for a 
number of years, which is why many investors are 
now looking at overseas markets for new investment 
opportunities. But concentration in one particular 
area can produce very volatile investment results, 
and this year's highflier can often be next year’s poor 
performer. You should be wary of short-term per- 
formance claims, such as the <i Over 50% growth in 
just five months” quoted recently for a European 
unit trust 

M&G has two International Funds which solve the 
problem by spreading your investment effectively among 
the major stockmarkets of the world. 

The M&G International Income Fund aims to 
provide a high .income, and one that 'can be expected to 
increase over the years, from an international portfolio of 
equities. 

The M&G International Growth Fund aimsforaltout 
capital growth by investing in the major stockmarkets of 
the world. 

ff you remain optimistic about the British Stockmarket 
and want a balanced portfolio, look at M&G SECOND 
GENERAL which aims for consistent growth of income 
and capital fromajMde spread of shares mainly in British 
companies. 


Vabe of LL000 (nested or 5th June 1S56. 

'Date ““ FXOr^narv 

SECOND Index 


5 June *56 
31 Dec '66 
31 Dec 76 
5 June '86 


£1300 

£2396 

£7,812 

£67,208 


£1,000 

£2,472 

£3359 

£21342 


Budding 

Society 

£ 1,000 

£1.699 

£3.437 

£8,104 


NOTES; M figures inchaJe ranvested income net of bBShxeie tax. 

The BuftftrgSooety figures are based on an catfta interest account offering 
above the average yearly rate (source; BufcfngSoaeKs 
Assooaxionl . M&G 5ETOND GENERAL figixes are reaftsaBonvatueS 

To celebrate M&G SECOND’S thirty-year performance 
record weareofferingan extral% unitallocation if you invest 
£1000 or moreand 2% if you invest £10,000 or moreinany 
of these three unit trusts before 31st October 1986. 

The price of units and the income from them may 
go down as well as up. This means that unit trusts are a 
long-term investment and not suitable for money you 
may need at short notice. 

INTERNATIONAL PERFORMANCE TABLE. Uaftje on is October lS86of 
£LOOOnvestalat me bunch of MSCs MwlKemaDo na lRjntfs. 


M&G 
Unit Trust 


Budding 

Society 


International 

Income 

International 

Growth 


Mgy’85 


£1344 £1,132 


Dec *67 £12300 £4,696 


NOTES: Alifej^hduderetfivesi^rncorne net of basx: -rate lax. 
TheBuMngSodety figureaare based on an extra interest account offering 
above tfteaverags yearly rate {Source: Bukfing Societies 
Affirmation) .M&G figures are reateaOonvaiue&. 


FURTHER INFORMATION On 15th October 1986 Ofte«l 
poces and estimated gross current yields were 

bn come ' Accumulation Yield 
I nt e rnati o na l Income 64-4pxd 67-Gp- 5-43% 

International Growth 822-9p 1324-ip 1-55% 

SECOND GBERAL 750-6p 1481-Gp 3-76% 

Pnces and yields appear daily m the Fmanaal Times. The 
dflerence between the 'offerer price fat when you buy arts) 
and the turf pnce (at which you sell) is normally 6%. An initial 
charge of 5% *5 mduded m the offered pnce and an annual 
chaise of up toRirfeach Fund'S value-eunertBy fcftfexcetf 
Intentional Income, winch ts 1%J - piuslKT is deducted from 
gross mcome. income for Acairmlatjon units is ranvested to 

mcraasetharwaU«aTVjldrliicomei^ni5iJsmbiificlr)«of 

base-rate tax on the fodowing dates: 

international Intern a tional 

Income Growth SECOND 


20 

20 




I AUapptfcationsfor£l,000 or more received by 3 1st October. 1986 wifl be ©ven an extra 
1% allocation of units, increasing to 2% for aptdieationsol £1(1000 or more per Fund. 

I To: M&G SECURITIES LIMITED. THREE QUAYS. TOWER HILL. LONDON EC3R6BQ 
Please invest the sumis) indicated betowm the Fundls) of my choice {ntirinmm Investment in 

I each Fund: £ 1 , 000 ) m ACCUMULATTON/WCOME unts (delete as applicable or Atxumulation 
unts will be issued ror International Growth and SECOND and Incomeunrts-wd be issued lor 

I International Income} at the price ruling on recent of this application. 

ix> sbtd any money. A contract note wih be sent to you stabng exactly hciw much you owe 

and tf« settlement data YburcfirbfxatewiB . 1 

■ follow shortly. 


murOKflAMEPI 

(Kr:Mrv H>u| . 


FAMILY MONEY/6 


Will your insurers go bust? 


[ INSURANCE ) 

The United Kingdom 
Provident company 
shocked not only its 
po&cyheklexs, tat also 
the rest of the life 

insurance industry, when 
it ran into financial 
problems this year in the 
aggressi v e witi^profits 
pondesBEtrket BILL 
HARRINGTON 
looks at the market 

United Kingdom Provident 
wets no fly-bjHBighi company, 
bat a mutual office of ven- 
erable vintage by industry 
standards, with a £350 minion 
premium inflow. 

The question left hanging in 
the air by UKFs disappear- 
ance into the embrace of the 
Friends’ Provident group is 
whether the event is a one-off 
or the tip of an iceberg. How 
sound are Britain's life insur- 
ers? 

The life industry prays that 
it is a one-off By UKFs own 
admission, its strategic policy 
of investing 10 per cent of 
assets in unquoted situations 

- a third in US oil and gas 
exploration — was unsuccess- 
ful No other with-profits 
company is likely to be so 
exposed. In expanding fast, 
UKP says it was caught hi the 
fin an ci al str ain* of new poli- 
cies with their front-end costs. 

As a result UKP would, in 
its own words, have been 
“unable to maint ain its past 
high level of bonuses”. For a 
life company in a world of 
bonus hype, the consequence 
was a fete just less than death 

— UKP has become virtually a 
dosed fund. 

In ways UKP was a victim 
of the instability of the current 
with-profits market, which 
pushes companies to declaring 
high bonus raxes often to 

Instability of the 
market to blame 


maintain their market po- 
sition and secure new busi- 
ness. But h is a roller-coaster 
that is hard to get off — as the 
company that admits it is no 
longer in the first league by 
reducing its bonus projections 
win be shunned for new 
policies, as intermediaries 
take their diems' business 
elsewhere. .... 

The life industry’s persis- 
tent question as to wmat would 
happen to the company that 
first reduced bonus rates has 
been given a dramatically 
uncomfortable answer by 
events at UKP. 

The UKP is more a victim 
of the instability of the with- 
profits market than of its own 





financial problems, as there 
was never any danger of it 
becoming in solvent ft has 
answered, too. a persistent 

3 uestion within the life iit- 
ustry as to what happens to 
the first major company that 
cuts its bonus rate. Now they 
know. 

The other shock the UKP 
gave the industry was that 
apparently no one saw it 
coming. Some actuaries are 
now saying smugly that they 
saw UKFs problems coming 
as far back as 1978. Why did 
they not say something at the 
time? But with hindsight, h is 
argued. UKP's problems 
could be gleaned- from an 
analysis of the detailed returns 
every insurance company 
makes annually to the Depart- 
ment of Tradeand Industry. 

For 1984 and 1985. the 
UKP. on the basis of figures as 
to how comfortably its assets 
exceeded the minimum set 
down as solvency margins, 
and the amount of disclosed 
reserves, showed up well be- 
low those of comparable com- 
panies. There were straws in 
the wind. 

This year is likely to see 
intermediaries, as never be- 
fore. scuttling to check the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry figures of the life 
companies they are 
recommending for with-prof- 
its policies. What will they 
find? 

Predictably, it will be a 
mixed bag of results. A num- 
ber of companies will be 


showing immense strength, 
some will be in a more 
moderate position and others 
will seemingly be nearer the 
“margins". The difficulty is 
what conclusions can be 
drawn from this data. 

If a company has a low 
excess of assets over tire 
minimum or is without a high 
proportion of reserves, does it 
mean it is hard up? ft may. but 
not necessarily so. 

Life companies have dis- 
cretion as to how they assess 
their liabilities and by being 
more stringent in the exercise 
they build in “hidden” re- 
serves that will not show up m 
these figures. Some companies 

Further inquiries 
before deasloas 


use a system of arriving at 
thdr bonuses, which jus* 
keeps their figures above tire 
margin, but have still a wealth 
of assets. 

For mainly unit-linked 
companies, there is Httie treed 
for big reserves as the invest- 
ment risk is down to tire 
policyholder. Then there will 
be those companies that look 
as If they are stretched. 

But the figures on their own 
will not be enough. These will 
need to be fleshed out Jw 
further inquiries to the life 
companies ami about them 
before conclusions are reached 
and the intermediary takes a 
decision on recommending 


the policies of any of them. 
These inquiries should in- 
clude the sue of a company's 
reserves, details of its arrest- 
ments. tire level of returns 
obtained and expected and the 
predicted new business 
growth. 

The Department of Trade 
and Industry win analyse the 
figures too. Additionally, ev- 
en four years on a revolving 
basis every company’s figures 
are gone through with a fine 
tooihcomb by the 
department’s actuaries. If a# is 
not found to be weft* the 
department can monitor the 
company on a six-monthly 
basis, as well as ask for 
remedial action to be taken. 

Some companies are cur- 
rently on this basis, but tire 
department would not be 
more specific, even "as to 
whether they were fife or 
general insurance companies. 

Should a company flip 
through tire net and go into 
liquidation, the Policyholders 
Protection Board, established 
by law and operated by tire 
insurance industry, is there to 
protect the guaranteed 
benefits. 

In tire case of wiitprofm 
policies these win include 
reversionary, but not termi- 
nal bonuses. But there is a 
sting in the tail All benefits 
are reduced by. 10 per cent, 
just to rap policyholders on 
tire knuckles fire not being 
careful enough about chooring 
their insurer. 



THE M&G GROUP 


c 



B 

te 



NO NOTICE. NO PENALTIES. 


°/ 

/o 


ON £10,000 OR MORE 


NO NOTICE. NO PENALTIES. 



i°/ 

I/O 


NET 

ON £5,000 OR MORE 


NO NOTICE. NO PENALTIES. 


7 

/o 


/ • V/ \_S NET 

ON £500 OR MORE 


TOP rates.no strings 

If the bank that likes to say yes has had to say 
no, consider the virtues of Cheltenham Gold, the 

perfect balance of instant, penalty-free access and 

a top rate of interest You can payinor withdraw as 
you wish without giving notice or incurring airy 
penalties whatsoever and earn up to 8.05% net* 
on £10,000 ormore. 

MOMMY INTEREST 


k 0-4 v. it? ry. rr ' a i 


monthly. In a Cheltenham Gold Monthly Interest 
Account amounts of £10,000 or more earn 7.77% 
net 8.05% Compounded Annual Rate* and on ' . 
£5,000 or more, 7.53% net 7.80% Compounded . 
Annual Rate*, still with no strings. 

You can also have the added convenience of 
running your account from the comfort of your 
home or office, post free, with our Gold By Post 

service. For an investment that’s easy togetat and 

hard to beat, you can bank on Cheltenham Gold. ’ 


: CHELTENHAM GOLD 

j To: Cheltenha m & G loucester Building Society ' 

I TO Box 124. FREEPOST, Cheltenham, (3osGL53lBR, 

| I/We encloses toopen a Gold By Rost Account 

I (Minimum £500 Maximum £250,000) 

I IAVe encloses to open a Gold Monthly Interest 

j Account Post (Minimum SSJ)00Maxffnum£2S(l00fll 

| □ Please send more details. BLOCK CAPtiais ^ 

I Full Name(s) Mr/Mrs/Miss , 


.Postcode 



Chettenham&Gloucester 

BukbngSodety 


CHIEF OFFICE: CHELTENHAM HOUSE, CLARENCE STREET, CHELTENHAM, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, GL50 3JR.TEL: 0242 3SH3 
Member of the Building Societies Association and Investors’ Protection Scheme. Assets exceed &3J00 million. ; : - ’ 

Branches throughout tire UK. See Yellow Pages. mum. • . . 

"Interest paid annually; cunwu ran?* which nwy varj- J Whm mm added io &xount. • T 




















THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER IS 1986 


0 bu 


FAMILY MONEY/7 


rw, 


$f) 










^v>> 
■ :.**S* 
' r rS» 

?3-5t 

'> lk 

■.< rx:*u* 

.. ; /• vi k 

• ' ??* 
tsia 


• $ 

'."r* 
’ . *" ••' 

" •••-•; S fc 
• ---Ji 


Gold 


5 siw:v> s 


,. - i 

V v i 
•• v Y ,l ---_ I 






Speculation on a satellite ADVICE & IDEAS 


C JNVESTTWENT") 

A useful pointer to the state of 
ff* of , th ^ financial world is 
of : graphs on the 
City pagesu Jf they move 

left to 

L*®? 1, mos * people are usuaHv 
JJJjopjniiBit If the fines 

bo«^i a ^ l L down 10 1116 
“"S 1 «nw of 
tne graph there will’ be a chill 
in the air, unless the inflation 
or mortgage rate is depicted. 

Une graph which would 
£5 ,n & b ? ^“8 now is the 
ol indeasion among 
investment advisers. Verv few 
dare claim to know whence 
urenexi swift capital gain will 
come, uncertainty is vying for 
supremacy with outright 
pessimism. 

■ ^ there is a solution of a 
sort that we can expect to see 
some time in the new year — 
index funds. 

Index funds are a - finatydp f 
version of the Man on the 


known as “stratified-^; ■ — = 

sampling" or again by an- i Cihf g b&lk ij “== 
other method which- places ' - 
less stress on sectors, known f 8 

as “nsk analysis". 8 

But there is more than one s\ ^>4L • fl J? 

way to sldu a rabbit, and index = I SMB ^ 

. fund managers tend to favour i B Ml J 

their own special way of f= {n2§§ MIO n 

packing an index. Most do so | 

“At the end of the day the '"*>#,* Satellite 

differences between the three giejMlgUivg 

main methods of managing an 

index fund ai-e pretty ^ — 

irrelevant," says James JM^Z 

Woodlock, of Barclays De 

Inv ” lmenl were set up because too many 
Managers. actively managed funds * 

««^^S ag ^ de ^ ls,on i na l* 10 * i**rc *e managers 
Stock wall affect its perfor- bade, their hunches and jrfay 

JESS Jf °- 5 , m cenf for profit - failed to beat the 
^mnsi the index In an ac- market average. 

S One ffeWfcai tended to 

percent" d ° lose 10 depress performance figures 
__ . was the dealing costs incurred 

thminno^r^th* 1 ’ ^9“ ^ in constant buying and selling. 

A share would have to gain a 

ESShSa d ^L 5 ^ y m few points before the nmd 

something which fay definition man £Z 


the Cm 



OaphamOmnifaus. The index 
fund is deliberately managed 
to produce no better, and 
above all no- worse,’ remits 
than the market indices. 

- Market indices measure 
how' wen a market is doing by 
taking the mean or aggregate 

. In London' the best known 
is probably the FT 30-Share 


Index, which (surprise!) is 
made up of 30 leading shares. 
If the member shares do well 
the index , goes op, and, of 
course, it wDl fell if the shares 
Jose.value. So, for example; if 
British Telecom gains several 
pence it will push up the value 
of the market averages of 
which it is a member — such as 
the.FT30. 

The index fund sets out to 
be^-Mr Average by- purchasing 
sbnie of each and every share 
ip an index,- known as "fell 
replication", or purchasing 
shares from 'certain repre- 
sentative sectors of the index. 


is not going to outperform the 
market average? 

Vivian Gould, of River & 
Mercantile, believes there is a 
good reason for the .funds, is 
that they “provide an 
opportunity to invest the core 
of your portfolio in an index 
vehicle at low cost. The rest of 
your money can be actively 
managed, and you know what 
your risk is." 

Here we have half of a 
favourite piece of Cityspeak — 
the core and the satellite. The 
satellite is the volatile part of 
your money, with which you 
can take risks, while the core 
will always be solidly there. 


the forfetiite 



were set up because too many 
actively managed fends - 
those where the managers 
bade, their hunches and play 
for profit - failed to beat the 
market average. 

One feet or that tended to 
depress performance figures 
was the dealing costs incurred 
in constant buying and selling. 
A share would have to gain a 
few prams before the fund 
manager broke even. 

There are, therefore, two 
important features of the in- 
dex fund. It must track the 

index closely, and the costs 
must be low, with minimal 
charges and few share trans- 
actions, as they cost money. 
Mr Woodlock says bis fend, 
which deals in hundreds of 
millions of pounds, charges 
just 0.1 percent initially. “Bu t 
that pays my salary." he 
points out 

Index funds are low-risk 
investments in that they are 
guaranteed to do no worse 
than the average. 

If you bad a holding in a 
unit trust specializing in elec- 
trical companies' shares,* yon 
would have done very badly 
through the early summer of 
last year, while ofl and energy 
shares have plummeted since 
last winter. In each case the 
indexed investment would 
have either softened the blow 
or turned in a small profit. 

If you think shares are a 
gpod bet but you are not sure 
where the money is to be 
made, an index fend is ideaL 
A further benefit is that the 
index fund virtually eiimi- 
nates the possibility of choos- 
ing a poor fund manager. It 
requires high octane stupidity 
to be unable to follow a stock 
index. 

Several management groups 
are looking closely at indexed 



doggedly tracking the perfor- - fends. Barclays. Legal & Gen- 


mance of the market. ■ • ■ 

- The. first index funds woe 
stanedjn theJJnited States in 
the eariy 1970s and -have 
proved immensely popular. 
Analysts say $150 million to 
$160 million are invested in 
index fends, which is roughly 
twice last year’s figure. They 


eral and River & Mercantile 
are all deliberating, although 
nothing is expected to emerge 
before next year. 

If they choose to launch unit 
Trusts they will encounter 
some serious problems. The 
front-end charge on the 
investment will have to be 


low. otherwise the managers 
will build in a 5 per cent gap 
between the redemption value 
of the investment and the 
performance of the index. 

Again, as Chris Robinson, 
of Legal & General, points 
out. the managers must keep a 
balance of shares to represent 
the index. If they were sud- 
denly faced with a large num- 
ber of redemptions they might 
be forced to sell, thus incur- 
ring dealing charges. 

Some managers have been 
talking to the Department of 
Trade, which authorizes unit 
trusts, and ray they have had 
difficulty persuading it that an 
index fund which does not 
invest in each and every share 
in an index really is what h 
claims to be. 

At the moment nearly all 
index fends are available only 
to the- big institutional inves- 
tors. Many pension fund man- 
agers use an index fond as 
their core and, according to 
Ms Gould, “do what invest- 
ment fund managers should 
be good at - they invest the 

‘Cash balance can be 
actively managed’ 

extra 40 per cent to get the 
cream”. 

Foreign & Colonial has an 
ofisbore fund which is avail- 
able to the small investor with 
a minimum ofSS.000 to spare. 
The fund trades the indices 
using futures contracts, and 
the balance of its money, 95 
per cent, is invested in money 
market instruments. 

F&Cs inves tm ent director, 
Adam Parian, Haims this 
allows the cash balance of the 
fund to be actively managed, 
while providing full index 
cover. 

- And what of the investment 
managers? If index funds with 
their more, or less set'mvc£t- 
ment formulae really do level 
off the differences between the 
good and the bad, what do the 
managers do for their money? 


OVER 260 LEADING ORGANISATIONS OFFER 4 DAYS OF EXPERT 

YOU CAN’T 

ADVICE AND FREE SEMINARS TO THE SAVER, PRIVATE INVESTOR, 

AFFORD TO MISS. 

FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARY & EVERYONE RUNNING A GROWING BUSINESS. 

□ How to invest a lump sum. □ Are Off-Shore Investments for you? □ Do you need Life Insurance? 

D Selecting the best Mortgage. Z3 Retirement Planning- when to start, how to do it. □ How to 
invest in Unit Trusts, o How to avoid Capital Gains Tax. □ Pensions for the Self-Employed, o How 
to pay School Fees, o What are Investment Trusts? o Alternative Investment ideas -Property. 

Wine, Antiques, Precious Metals. □ Is Investing in commodities worth considering? □ Wilis- do you 
have one-is it financially sound? □ Using new technology to make more profits. □ Is PEP Management 
a business to be in? □ How to raise working capital. □ Equipment Financing- how to do it? □ Stock 
market Flotations -full listing/USM/third market. □ Business and Personal Insurance -whose is best. 

□ How Employee Share Option Schemes work? □ Management Buyouts/Partnership Break-ups - what to do. 
□The Financial Services Bill and its impact. aCan you improve your cash management. 

□How to choose your Stockbroker. ^ k n. □ Finance and the married woman. 


it 

PE 

US£ll 

a 

ill 




Martin Baker 


Invest In A French Masterpiece 



The New EBC Amro French Growth Trust 

■Thae'sbctri j toi oi s»od neuv rpceotfv jbou mv«hne«oppOrtuniT>es tit V^beHewiheni^fcpiBwpwwttilleTuttedie’EBCAjw 


JlVC r*. n« hard Knw*hv. The FfcrtsSkxk Exchange Index h* rwn h> »er 
liin- rvk-cn^ued kx -JcrimRi in th? L*l twelve moncte. and there are very good 

rcv»on»whyN4heuMsoofl«>»ng, ' 

Economic growth rs jntiofMted M 1% a wear. but. more rmportamh-. co»- 
porjtc‘{K^asarew?«w5Mpowai30 , fclh»ve»andti«t. • 

'And the nnv government under UcqutsOiiuc e, comnwcd to wider shaie 

tmnerabp lhroush airegramme d pnwbsiwin » *e «w mtheUKrtwib*. 

had such a eframatfc efleetupon the Lomfcn Mod* market 
So the woe i» njtfrt to inwesl m France 

THE BEST WAY TO INVEST 

hlhe pail rthawi'l been easy for iheUh pm ate eiv«»r» know hovv loirotsi 
mchttiwhr m the french stock matte*. 

But now there's the E0C Amro French Cwth Tn*l. 

EBC Amro fv& cmw&rabfe experience a rtw French nwtet through to 

Iuraf ^ ian EvavS'v^d'd wtut any *Wbfe investor would do, ^Talked to the Froft3i 
interment everts at the highly respected BOTH* Rnvfe de Gestion Fmancwre 

iBPCfimftns. • 

Invbsiment Connoisseurs , ■ 

Therwe went ore better - we appwmed BPCF irweMmaititBiiagHsiortw 
7rutf because they have such a remarkable record »r managing wvp&nenK ■ 

For example, rtwr own ifrhaose taro, mvesied excIiBhav m French 
qxunMs. has men bv over 2tiD% wnce December (not werghjed for acting), 
brail flrev are responsible JwewrXabQmUloi mower JO m-bewe runds olvann® 
kinch; thev are Wremrfy flOlue Inihe bond markets, m.finante lot French tndwtrv 
and m the priva salon programme 


Vfebeiievpihm urdepih wpettiw will enablolhe’EBC Amro French Growth 
Innuoachtpveaboie average capital growth bum a portfolio ot French securities. 
RJSD PRICE OFFSt 

Unto will be orteied at a 1% discount dn-j fluid pric* a 50p per utM wild 
3rd November, inab. 

.How to Invest 

Gcmpfete the appbcjnon torn and send ifc (Ogether with vour chequ.* 
matte payable » EBC Amro Una Tnat Management Limteil, co Mancheaer Unii Tn>i 
AdmujjjtahonCDrTwny United. FREEPOST. Manchester M 2 081 mo stampieouriHli 
U >ou dom have- 1300 immedia(et>- available, send, tor details oi EBC 
AmroV\1Qndi(v Savings Plan bv Ftckmfl the appropriate box m the> coupon, 

Ifvou already have shares vou would lie to e*£ hange ter onus m [he. TftN, 
ptea*trdtiheappropraeboxinihecouponbekiw. ■ • 

ttanemberlha the price a unto and the inettnetom them can f» doivn 
jsweOasup, , 

CENUWL INFORMATION 

Contract notes will usually be sern tv return oi post. You rvill receive a linn 
CemiK^te witfan sm n«ks a receipt a vnur cheque. 

An initial charge tt 3% *> included In die price at the imts and an annual 
charge a \J3% (+ VATi ot itw value or the tend cdeduCkd from the tund"s incora* 
Pncesjre quoted dailv in The Finvrrial Timex. 

Eshmaed gross cunem vwW N 1.5% at toe March pnceot 50p per unb. 
Managers' reports on the fund will be isscwi bv I si November each veer Income 
will ako bit dtstnbuted amwlly net erf basic rate ux bv 1st Nowmber. Trustee; 
Midlsid Bank Trust Company Limited. (Not open to mtdenn hi the RepuMc ot 
tdand.1 A member of the Unit Trust Association. Ranniratidn rspavatfetequaliied 

intermedianp.aodthe'ralesarFavaiJaWeoniuqued. • ' 


appucaiion Form — 1U . , mpm 

to EBC Amo LW. TnW Mggg™ 1 ™ MwcheJe* Lta TnN 
Admnntradon &mpanv Lmirtcd. FREB\5ST. Manch^Mr M* Kl hiqK 

mi^indwtBLAiwQFieorhGiawdi Tnatatthepncv 
receipt « >hr. wdiejncn imranum mestmem £ 5 tOc Fn«»|W otet k» Addw 

pt^siiiickrricvanih>«arr«^l*" n - ,| ™ f Ww*s , H^i ^ __ 

Mortvtecosi'iwntaiKnicrfilBtiS.vaxsns « ■■■ 

= tunher a it em u Mn about dwEBC Amo FnmchGruwti Iran f EBC? 

— Od#toot the EBC Anno Mend* SayHito 11 * 1 ...... AMRO 

DetitoolihoEBC ^nro SKo-txciytfBr Sdvrmc- - V 


MrX4vNbss< 

histNanwisb, 


m 


3 PERSONAL INVESTMENT 
^ & BUSINESS FINANCE 


M ONEY 86 opens at London’s Olympia on the 
30th October until 2nd November. Four days 
of expert advice and ideas in a relaxed and informal 
atmosphere, from over 260 leading financial 
and investment organisations and personalities. 
• FREE Show Catalogue and Investment Guide. 


Big Bang explained in one easy lesson. 

FREE Daily Seminars to all visitors (seats 
allocated on a first come first served basis). 
Specialist Advice Centres on Unit Trusts, 
Financial Management Services, Futures and 
Options and Off-shore Investments. 


OPENING TIMES 

THURSDAY TO SATURDAY UA3f. TO 7-30RM. 
SUNDAY 11A.M. TO 5EM. 

£4.00 ENTRANCE FEE- OJLP.S £2.00. 


MONEY 86 SHOW MANAGEMENT: RE FINANCE & INVESTMENT EVENTS LTD.. 243-53 LOWER MORTLAKE ROAD. RICHMOND. SURSET'TW 2LL 




»• 


■■ .4 








CU\8»« 


-©jr 4 

{*#•:*«* #£20* 





:• v; atf’. . i '■ . .Lt * 1 kiw 







IT SEEMS THEY’RE TALKING 
OUR LANGUAGE. 


Simwe — Cuie 

i]unttd|^u«lN«iWMKn«idAachn>fX'.««ldddm«.'«TuuMv) 5 lS'10 


Thwe’s one word that's common to most 
of Europe at the moment. 

Profits. 

Because all the signs in Europe are adding 
up to excellent long-term growth prospects. 

• Underdeveloped stock markets that are 
now attracting more and more investors, 
and are still cheap compared with other 
major markets. 

• Improving economies with inflation and 
interest rates under control. 

• Increasing productivity. 

• And company profits on their way up — 
an cT now helped by lower oil prices. 

There's every chance of excellent returns. 

But these stock markets are relatively 
small. (Even Germany, the largest economy in 
Europe, has a stock market only one third the 
size of Britain.) And small markets can be vol- 
atile-*- which is why our experts are now recom- 
mending a new investment mix. 

THE VOICE OF EXPERIENCE . 

Our new Fund will invest primarily in the 
major markets of Continental Europe in high- 
yielding equities (mainly of larger companies), 
bonds and convertibles. 

A mix that’s different from most other 
European funds. Because it still aims for high 
growth. But also includes the high-yielding 
equities and fixed interest content for income - 


and for a degree of safety which we believe is 
sensible in these smaller markets. 

IT’S DEFINITELY GOOD NEWS. 

(BELLE . . BIEN . . WUNDERBAR . , . ) 

You can invest in the new European 
Income & Growth Fund from £250 or from £20 
a month. 

Just complete the coupon for more inform- 
ation. 

Because we believe with this new Euro- 
pean investment mix, the signs are all good. In 
anyone's language. 


^|CA^QU^ FREE MONEYLIN^^W028^0lJ"i 

EUROPEAN INCOME 
& GROWTH FUND 

To: Save & Prosper, FREEPOST, Romford RMI ]BR, 

Please semi me detalk on the European Income & Growth Fund, 

Name tMrjMgJjjfasl 


Address 

Telephone No. f Home) 
(Business) 




Postcode 


SAVE & 
PROSPER 


THE INVESTMENT HOUSE 












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{ CtfS 

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Earn high interest and 
enjoy a more secure return with 
AngliaV High Income Bond. 


Invest £1,000 or more 
and we pay an impressive: 


which compounds 
annually to ■ 



8 - 50 % 


And we guarantee our competitive rate will be at least 2% above 
ordinary share rate for five years - no matter how much this fluctuates. 

90 days’ notice for withdrawal or money instantly accessible with 
90 days' loss of interest Monthly income option available. Call at your 
local Anglia branch office for more details. 



ANGLIA 


BUILDING SOCIETY 


Try Anglia. 

The building society that cares about what you want. 


HEAD OFFICE:- MOULTON PARK, NORTHAMPTON NN3 1NL. TEL:- (0604) 495353. 
•WHEN HALF-YEARLY INTEREST IS LEFT TO ACCUMULATE. RATES SUB)ECTTO VARIATION. 


FAMILY MONEY/8 


Worth your Interest 


Following this week’s 
hike in interest rates 
PAULINE SKYPAJLA 
turns the spotlight on 
National Savings 

Labour’s threat to turn British 
Telecom into some form of 
National Savings product 
sounds dreary. Who wants a 
dull, if risk-free, interest-pay- 
ing investment in exchange 
for the excitement of the stoat 
market? 

Higher rate taxpayers might 
- if the return is anything like 
as good as the current 3 1st 
issue of National Savings 
certificates. They pay a guar- 
anteed 7.85 per cent a year, 
tax-free if held for five years. 
To equal that return else- 
where, a 60 per cent taxpayer 
would have to earn 20 per cent 
before tax. 

The 31st issue is not so 
attractive for basic rate tax- 
payers, but sdH worth having 
despite this week's interest 
rate rise. 

But a question mark still 
hangs over the index-linked 
certificates. In a bid to stem 
the Sow of cash from this 
investment, the Government 
has increased the bonus pay- 
able oh certificates held for a 
year to 4 per cent 
A guaranteed teal rate of 
return of five percent tax-free 
is, once again, good news for 
higher rate taxpayers. But 
basic rate taxpayers should be 
able to earn more with a 
building society or bank ac- 
count and non-taxpayers 
should definitely steer dear. 

Top rate taxpayers can also 
do quite well out of the 
National Savings Ordinary 
Account A 60 per cent tax- 
payer and spouse could each 
invest £1 ,Um 5 to benefit from 
the £70 a year tax-free interest 

The Ordinary Account 


Tuesday 28th October is your last chance for a big bonus! 

Don’t miss out! 


Now, Legal & General 
introduce their exciting 
new Japanese Trust. 



I still time to benefit 
from Legal & General's 
"Early Investor’ Bonuses — but 
only if you act now! 

The Japanese Trust is die 
latest in our range of Unit 
Trusts - and will be managed 
by the same team responsible 
for the tremendous success of 
our Far Eastern Trust - 

One of the most remarkable 
features of post-war jeans has 
been the rapid expansion of the 
Japanese economy With a Gross 
National Product totalling around 
S1.282 billion in 1985, Japan has 
become the second largest economy 
in die world after the PS. 

The capitalisation of thejapanese 
equity market now represents more 
than one quarter of me world’s total 
share value. 

In addition, it is widely’ expected 
that steps will be taken to stimulate 
the domestic economy. This may 
bring about an improvement- in the 
country's infrastructure and help 
reduce the nation's reliance on 
exports. 


See how you benefit 


Dote 

of payment 


JVM 

October 


SUMUMJ99 


AMOUNT INVESTED 


1 % 


S5.OOOi9.999 I SHMM0+ 


1.5% 


2 % 


An extra IN. 1 wifl br given on thetmeeuaf money 
imested orer SMjOOU. The. aflocallon b In 
aOdtaon to ihost- outliool abow. 


Eartv Imestqrt wffl abo benefit from a Dxcd price of oaly Wp per unit 


I 28tb October 19M&. 


Objective 

oftheHrust 


Proven performance 
from our 

management team; 


Op portunities 

Ahead 


Our Far Eastern Trust was 
t ^September 198*5. 






The aim of die Trust is to 
maximise capital growth from 
securities quoted on the 
Japanese stock market It is anti- 
cipated that the initial portfolio 
distribution will favour 
domestic-related stocks. 

Up to 25% of the Fund may 
be invested in the Tokyo Over the 
Counter Market 

The estimated gross starting yield 
is expected to be less than 1%/The 
minimum investment in the Trust is 
£1,000. 

You should remember that the 
price of units and the- income from 
them can go down as well as up. 

But when you look at the track 
record ofour Fund Managers to date, 
you can certainly view the future 


with confidence. 


INVEST NOWAND BENEFIT 
FROM VOUR'EAROT INVESTOR* 
BONUS ALLOCATION. 


All this could mean exciting times 
ahead for those experienced in the 
workings of the Japanese markets. 

Legal & General's Fund 
Managers have the experience! And 
they’ve proved it handsomely already 
- with their astonishingly successful 


management of the Legal & General 
Far Eastern Trust. 


Now the same team will 
the new Japanese Trust on 
of Legal & General's investors, 
bringing to it the same committed, 
experienced professionalism. 


Complete the application form 
straight away and return it with a 
cheque for jour investment - 
minimum £1,000 - to Legal & 
General to receive your “Early 
Investor’ Bonus Allocation and the 
fixed price of 5 Op per unit. 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


fT MimnMD£l.raW.Mjb*i**a« 

must he tor a Daiumini trt AWVfltf 


prices fublcibcdtUh'm The Tnne> and ihc 
Branco] 


. Tunes. Ciniixi note. bmkiL ccnilicacs 

fbnunled within >c\ web itf pavmcru The 
Tatw Deed aboptundc. far tairttmcm in trailed 
upturn sub|txt wcenain conditions. 

C HARGfS The pf ri i n Uf u rv chantr buih mm the 
u*fcx price b 5‘t. Amwari imrapemctil durar. I", 
of ibe value of the Fund. pfcr> VAT dnfcicuxl inxa 
the incumc ut the Fund, with a prwfewn to 
tocrcj>c this iu.r..oa giving tiarc morrtfr,' notice 
The Managers any take a rt*indtng sUjustrm™ ft. 
Md and tier prior of up tt# 1“ or USp. nfiMtner 
jstbck'o. Remuneration e> payable id qualified 
inrermedorics. Rates unmpiaL 
1XITV Investor* bin ins units tnira das i<fcr will 
receiw their TifM Ufcarmutinnuri 3tHh December 
K»T and each Jlkh December thereafter 
tin 8th OctnfxT iwfi the iftr price nf unit* was 
50 pence Applications far unite teemed after 
ihc do-c date of Itfth October wffl be dealt at (be 
current nfler price. 

A dbcuunt tf 2“.. b pwnitn the nifiT price m 
unjis bought with reiiKotcvl hwotne- 

•emnlf end nr yuir certificate and 
xml u hi thewanaprr. Payment ... taedtm the 
ndny; bid pri<* . . wiD nunnalH be madr withal 
u/Wngdav 


sewn'*** 


SHAKE-EXCHANUt SCHEME: VtcwiD exchange 

most quoted UK. Vtiro Hu - 


quoted l "K shares ft it turrits in the Japanese 
ThBtPtoe tide the boMtn the AppHeaUun 
Rjrm and lull tkud» mil be sou iu nu 

Bar* 

J«l nit 

Terek: 


4j|ij p rs> 

tiun. 1 1 Quern \fctnrnJ>WccL London EC(N 
■iTP. Rqdstoetl hi Enjjand No. HWV-i IK 
Member uf the t nit ThM AMuctathffl. 
ttETt XX AOORE*S. Lraal & (kmccil il'nii Trust 
LUiBted Drpt DM. FREEAWt (jnndua. 
.Surrey < Tty VEB. 



lb: Legal & General (Unit Trust Managers) limited. 
Dept, DM, FREEPOSi; Croydon, Surrey GR9 9EB. 
1/We wish to invest in Legil & GeneraTs 
.Japanese Tom. ( Minimum £1.000) £ 


A cheque made payable to Legal & General (Unit Trust Managers) limited iseni 

I 1 lACe diura my/ I j I/We would like income j [ I/YGe would like further de- 
1 — 'our Early 1 — 1 lobe reinvested in further ! — 1 talk about Legal & GeneraTs 

Investor Bonus. units automatically ' 


Share Exchar^e Scheme. 


Please write in BWCK CAPITALS. 

Surname ( Mr/Mrs/ Miss) 

First Namefs) in full 

Address 


l 


.Postcode. 


Stgnaiurt(s) . 


■ Date. 


(In the case of a joint investment. aU must sign.) 

Name of Usual Financial Adviser (if any) 


I 


& 


This offer is not available to residents of The Republic of 
Ireland nor to applicants under age 18. 


'Smikc- .Money Manqxnmr sntpJio 1 9Af» 
•IVrt a m u nccnte«l on ofltr wi hid prteemteruy 


penuf rVi septartm- l‘/H4 in HthJuU 


L^al& 

General The confidence of proven success. 

Unit Trust Managers ycj 


Fbst (Office 


wtrw msxasr 

iWAMatf- 

-mmz - 




could also be used as an 
alternative to a bank account 
for people on low pay or 
peasioBS who draw benefits 
from the Post Office. Anyone 
else should gh« it a miss. 
National Savings is not an 
jam for higher rate taxpayers. 
You get a look in, too. if you 
are oa a low rate of tax or do 
not pay tax at &HL 
In fact, if you are a non- 
taxpayer, the National Sav- 
ings products are the first 
investment or sayings options 
you should consider. All in- 
terest on National Savings 
investments is paid without 
any tax deducted at source, 

nnltlrg h wiMmg society 80d 

bank deposit accounts which 
have to pay interest after 
deducting a special composite 


competitive with budding 
society and bank rates, but 
you tee out on flexibili ty. T he 
Investment Account currently 
pays 10.75 percent gross. 

If you want an income from 
your investment, you have a 
choice between the ordinary 
income bonds (nummam 
£2,000) and the indexed one 
( minim um £5,000), which 
pays a monthly income ifr- 

creased every year in fine i with 
inflation. But tire capital is not 
index-linked, mid the finfl 
year’s interest rate is only 8 
per cent before tax. 

On the minimum £5,000 
investment on the indexed 
hand, that works out to an 
after-tax income of £24 a 
month for basic rate 


Competitive but 
less flexible 


rate of tax. Non-laxpayers 
cannot redaim the tax. 

So National Savknss prod- 
ucts are tailor-made for non- 
taxpayers — being the only 
in vestments that now pay 
interest without tax deducted, 
unless you are prepared to 
move your money offshore, to 
the fhwnd Tskwwt*. for 
example. 

The interest on some Na- 
tional Savings products is 
exempt from lax — National 
Savings certificates, for exam- 
ple. But with the Investment 
Account, Income Bond and 
Deposit Bond, the interest 
paid is taxable. 

None of these is as flexible 
as a budding society instant 
access account. You have to 
give a month's notice to 
withdraw money from the 
Investment Account, and 
three months' notice to take 
money out of either the in- 
come or depoat bonds, and if 
yon withdraw money from 
either bond in the first year, 
you tee half the interest doe: 

The income bond pays in- 
terest monthly, while the d^ 
posit bonds add interest yearly 
to your account. You cur- 
rently earn 11.25 per cent 
interest, which works out to 
7.99 per cent for base rate 
taxpayers. This is quite 


/on would be better ofi 
with a building society 
monthly income account. 
With an instant access ac- 
count from one of the big 
societies you can earn 7 3 per 
cent after tax, equal to £30 a 
month if the society pays a 
monthly income. 

Non-taxpayers would get 
£33 a month from the indexed 
bond, and would be belter ofl 
in the ordinary income bond, 
which at the current rate 
would pay out £47 a month on 
■a £5,000 investment. 

If you just want to save 
money regularly. National 
Savings offers a very good buy 
in the shape of the yeartyjflan, 
which has yet to take off in a 
big way. 

Every year’s payments to 
the plan buy you a certificate 
which goes on to earn interest 
for another four years. The 
rate for every certificate is 
fixed mid guaranteed from the 
time you begin your pay- 
ments. The plan currently 
pays 8.19 per cent a year tax- 
free over a five-year period. 

It Is certainly a lot better 
than hanging on to any old 
index-linked Save-As-You- 
Earn plans, although you 
should wait until the fifth or 
seventh anniversary before 
cashing in. 

On the other hand, do not 
be too hasty in cashing in 
National Savings certificates 
that have now matured. The 
general extension rate, which 
is the rate of interest paid on 
matured certificates, is cur- 
rently 8.01 per cent tax-free, 
which compares well with 
building society rates. 

Last on the list, but prob- 
ably best known of die Na- 
tional Savings products, are 
Premium Bonds. In any one 
month there is an 1 1,000-tt^ 
one chance of a Premium 
Bond unit winning a prize, so 
do not bold your breath. A 
pure gamble, this one. 



Insurers scorn 
screen fears 


What are the health hazards of 
new technology? Are any 
precautions necessary? , 

The hazards suggested in an 
official booklet are radiation 
emissions, cataracts, photo- 
sensitive epilepsy, facial 
dermatitis and bodily frtiguc 
They sound scary but only the 
last appears, at present, to give 
cause for concern. 

VDUs marketed and manu- 
factured in the UK. have a 
lower radiation emission rate 
— when it can be detected I at an 
— than nationally and inter- 
nationally agreed limits. 
There is no clinical evidence 
to suggest cataract formation, 
but complaints of eye strain 
have been lessened by im- 
proved lighting and avoidance 
of glare. 

Facial dermatitis is only 
coincidental with VDUs. It 
appears to be confined to 
operators sensitive to a dry 
atmosphere in the workplace 
and static electricity near die 
VDU. Higher humidity and 
anti-static carpets should hdpt. 

Botfly fatigue appears sim- 
pler, but is perhaps the real 
danger because it cannot be 
readily identified. Muscle 
tiredness can be relieved by 
good seats and sitting po- 
sition. Posture needs to be 
dimmed often and a build-up 
of fatigue avoided by a change 
of activity. Small businesses 

should try to rotate or 

workers* activities ai least . 
short periods and allow for 
odd rest breaks rather than a 
fixed schedule. 

Pregnant women worry 
about the possibility of a 
m iscar riage when wonting for 
long spells in from of a screen. 
Though the National Radio- 
logical Protection Board does 
not think VDU radiation 
emissions are harmful to 
mother or foetus, some 


women still worry about Otf 
possibility. particularJy if they 
have already had a 
miscarriage. 

The moss frequent bedtfa 
hazard appears, to be rep- 
etition strain TUala 

the collective nan» for i 
group of serious pra fl e a ri t 
illnesses affecting p era 


making rapid" finger andtoad 
lor long pe ri od*. 


m ovements for 


Associated wMr 
ducken plnckers 


It used to be associated w«i 
occupations such as thicken 
pluckers, electronic a Mttnfcfe 
workers and packets 
Its incidence has increased 
dramatically since 
microprocessor teefrm 


and is now commonly 
in keyboard operates. In 
1980 repetition strain injury 
caused 2,957 claims for indus- 
trial iqjury benefit in the UK. 

New technology health fetes 
aids may be overstaiod, bw 
some exist. Employees are, hi 
general, protected by Hea&h 
and Safety Ada. Setfem- 
ployed people. smaH busi- 
nesses and operators at hoaae 
using micros should be aware 
of possible hazards and insure 
against any loss of income 
arising from them. Life cover 
should be a minimum. 

Meanwhile, these possible 
health hazards - haw made 
little impact on (he insuran ce 
industry. Eagfc Star, which 
claims to be the largest UK 
employers* Kabtiity insurer, 
and other offices such as 
Allied Dunbar, Stm AUianco 
and the Prudential, do not 
make special provision for the 
high-tech worker, and have no 
plans to do so. 


Jeimfe Hawthorne 


PEGASUS GLOBAL TRUST 


CO 

£ 


Co 

o 


o 

Q 


What the wise stag 


a: 

CO 


K. 

K. 

O 

o 

«o 


will be doing 


Co 


$ 


with his dough. 


35 


CO 


o 

o 


3: 

CO 


o 


o 

Co 


Sadly the number of new issues that let you make 
a kffling on the market overnight are few and far 
between. 

So what do wise investors do when they’ve 
realised their profit? What they don’t do is risk a 
azeable proportion of their savings in a single stock. 

All stocks can go down in value as well as up. 
That's why thousands of inwstars already spread their 
investments by buying units in the Ptegasus Global 
Trust. This means that they enjoy active management 
of their assets throughout the world’s stockmarkets 
in hue with changing investment conditions. 

It must be remembered, the price of units and 
the income from them may go down as wdl as up. 

But thanks to the proven expertise of Scottish 
Widows’ professional investment managers, Pegasus 
Global Trust provides an excellent opportunity for long 
term capita] growth through its aim of investing in the 
best performing companies in the world mdnrBng thr» 5 f» 

of the UK whoi and whae they offer the best value. 


Lower energy costs are reinforcing the prospect 
of economic growth for industrialised and developing 
nations alike and we befieve substantia! real growth 
will be achieved by many companies. 

While this is partly anticipated in Stock Market 
prices, most markets have scope to move higher as 


M: 


Ftom its launch on February 14th this year till 
October 15th, the value of accumulation units in 

Pegasus Global Trust has grown by 24.7% on an 

offer-to-bid basis. That’s 32.7% on the ofier-to-offer 
basis winch many unit trusts use. 

There ‘are two ways to invest in our Trust. 
Income units provide a half-yearly income paid 
directly to you, while with accumulation units your 
income is automatically reinvested to increase the 
value of your units. 

To make the most of rising investment 

: in as early as possible. 


Co 

c* 

O 


Co 




CO 

£ 


GENERAL INFORMATION 

This F ond posaess policy of atticefrl 

s^djangBRfflwstaesttcoajSboos. A«J _ 

or vafaoaf oservas h»nsuents. the Manj^mmay (tom tiroc tn 

doe consider mahofe at tamtiagaiy undue currency risk. TfaeTnsi Deed abo 
FwtoforinveaineMinTra^ 

Mato, the French Second Madwaid U»ThkjoOn:Marte*5. 

Agptotoaft^beadnwirtedgriaDrecaiaofiwtnamiakKajndnnii 
cotifical^i^imTiiuifr be rtr s p3t rti rt wiifa6o«Mtat/thf ptmtoiedaie. Urns 
mj ybeso idh^ji^tinicatthehidffrieft al ingCTirH^piofyo u ru Bt rti a wos. 
aadpayro^wtf aonraSybenadewftirinTdajPsofrecdpiQfyoorrBiounad 


^ = lb: Sc 

EREEPOST. 15 Dafaeith Road, EH1GQNE. 


* 

Co 


itap&sed on fead pa*? •JM 81443 # . 

An natul doa^eaf 3i. b indaded in tbeofler price od of which the 

pjycNimnasito lo qoafc6eda8a>tsfaies«a»atobh: on request). 
TteIVnH Deed porous a mnamamnaictaiBfof VKOof »h* 


K 


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wine of lie Fond btn flw dais? is «rtentlys<tai<Mly?>- (ptas VAX) peranum 
aad any change osubjea m 3 raornhsooike. 

Tit aeceontnigdM is 31 fiugasL mA m *l iooBBie is pa$afeletc>baxne 
uatbiddasan 1 5 April an 15 Oc to ber odiyegacd earnest tax geiteai titebask 
ratf of Ux. For AxiuuutjDon mmboktets. net inemne is Anuraaiicafly nMiiwste^ 
haK-jadj. 

The oflb price ofaocnniubdoo nrits on BOaoter 1986 « 
ami. and tbeestjtn^smxal gross. y*eM 

Manages: Smoish Aidns Fond Maraganau Lmubd. 
HtmbmoftJteUnnTmsiAssoesBwii. 

Trustee The Ikwal Bank ofScDiLndpJc, 

TbtoBaris noi ^ajiaNe m resWorts of ibe RepdWicof Irefaud. 


.B2.7pper 


boxl in Persia CBobaiTnist m the 


Managcmat Limited. 


he^t leas t aged 18 . 
filOGK LETTERS Please, (Fkase state Mr/MrsA&w tjUes) 


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Name and address of financial advfew Of anyl 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

FUND MANAGEMENT UMI ! 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


35 


FAMILY MONEY/9 



the Lawson tax axe 


UFE COVER J) 


When Nigej Lawson abolished 
to relief for new life assur- 
ance policy premiums two 

•EPiHM* E ", ded a tradition 

that had lasted continuously 
Tor 131 years. 

The relief was introduced 
originally i Q 1799, sub- 
secjuentiy phased out. then 

ta« ro 2“^ d Gladstone in 
1 $33,. chiefly as an incentive to 
save for oldage. The relief was 
[hen . continuous until Mr 
Lawson s action in 1984. 

■ Though always pop ular 
wryi insurance companies — 
and their customers - h was 
already drawing political criti- 
J>y the time of the Fust 
World War. This led to it 
being cut to a level of half the 
basic tax rate, and there h 
remained until its eventual 
demise.' ' 

However, there is one dass 
of life assurance policy which 
does still qualify for tax relief 
What is more, the reliefm this 
■case is given in full, at the 
policyholder's highest rate. 
These policies are known by 
the general name of “Section 
-26A contracts'**, as they are 
governed by that particular 
section of the ' Income and 
Corporation Taxes Act, WO. 

Fittingly, in view of Mr 
Gladstone's original in- 
tentions, they are essentially 
■adjuncts to personal pension 
plans and carry the same rules 
on. eligibility. Thai is. you 
must be self-employed or in 
non-pensionable employ- 
men L If you have' earnings in 
either of these categories, you 
may contribute up to 5 per 
cenL.a year and gel full tax 
relief. ■ 

Tfie 5 per cent. incidentally, 
counts' towards the total 
contribution- you may rrtaketo 
3 personal pension plan. The 
Kmitfor thafis 1 7.5 per cent of 
relevant earnings, so if you put 
the full 5 per cent into a S226A 
1 contract, yon may put only 
12.5 jper cent into, your 
pension. 

-The. main purpose of S226A 
policies is to provide benefits 
in the event of death -before 
ceiiretnepL An. occupational 
pension., scheme. may include 
provision for a lump stun to 


be paid on an employee's 
death, and a widow’s or 
widower’s pension. 

In the same way, S226A 
allows you to take out a term 
assurance policy, which 'pro- 
vides a cash sum on rf«»b 
within the specified term, or a 
family income benefits plan, 
which provides an annuity. 

Term assurance is usually 
for a fixed amount of cover, 
but it is also, possible for the 
sum- assured (sum payable on 
death) to decrease or increase 
over the term to fit. in with 
changing circumstances. Smti- 
Iafly.'a few companies offer 
increasing family income 
benefits plans, under which 
the annual payments rise by a 
set amount every year, to keep 
pace with inflation. 

. Either type of policy may be 
taken out for any* number of 
years, provided the cover 
ceases by the age of 75 . 
Usually, the benefits will be 
payable for -the same period, 
but this does not have to be 
the case. 

Last autumn Equitable Life 
brought out a plan that will 
provide an income to a spouse 
or dependant from the time of 
the policyholder's death right 
up to the beneficiary's 100th 
birthday. Moreover, should he 

The benefits can he 
obtained immediately 

or she . die before notching jup a 
century, the balance of the 
payments due would go to his 
or her estate. 

A contract may be written 
for the benefit of any named 
person, but if it is not a spouse, 
the proceeds couJd fell subject 
to the new inheritance tax. 
Fortunately, since 1930 it has 
been possible to write these 
’ plans, in tnisL This avoids a 
tax liability and has the added 
advantage that the benefits 
can be obtained immediately, 
without the usual delay of 
waiting for a grant of probate. 

Most insurance companies 
can advise on setting up a 
trust, and help with the 
paperwork. 

A pension policy itself can- 
not be assigned to anyone else: 
This means that if you take 
out a mortgage against it — an 
increasingly popular proce- 



* irv'.V 7 - /IT-?* ar- 

Mr Gladstone reintroduced tax relief to encourage people to save, Mr Lawson abolished it 


dure — you will have to 
provide some form of collat- 
eral. A term assurance policy 
can be very useful in this 
respect, since if the policy- 
holder should die before 
retirement, it will provide 
instant cash to repay the loan 
— a feature not shared by other 
acceptable assets, such as 
stocks and shares. 

Although an S226A policy is 
an accessory io*a pension plan, 
you do not have to buy one 
from, the company that is 
providing your pension. Most 
life offices now write “stand- 
alone*' contracts, which are 
sold independently. As there is 
no inherent advantage in hav- 
ing both policies issued by the 
same office, it is definitely 
worthwhile shopping around 
for the cheapest premium 
rates. 

You should ensure, how- 
ever, 'that the policy is 
convertible in case yon change 
your employment status and 
become ineligible for S226A. 
Most companies will allow 
you to convert to an ordinary 
(taxable) policy of the same 
type: Further medical ev- 
idence of yocr state of health 
should not be needed, pro- 
vided that you were originally 
accepted on standard terms, 
and that the sum assured 
under the new policy is the 



OK-yoirve done well 

Your profits have soared. But ran* perhaps ytwinvest^^ begun to lose 

their thrust as the market nears the top. •• • 

Once, you’d have had no choice but to hang on grimly, and put on a brave fece 
when your profits started' to fizzle. It used to-be the way of things, an accepted 

natural law — that what goes up must come down. • ■ 

Now there are International Eagle Bonds, a special investment issued by the 
offshore company aT the Eagle Star Group, one of the world’s leading insurance 

companies. • * " 

You can buy International Eagle Bonds in a unique currency mix — the Eagle, 
which over the past year has appreciated against Sterling by'more than 20%. " 

Or you can buy International Eagle Bonds in Deutschemarks, Japanese Yen car 
: US. Dollars — if you prefer a angle currency band. 

With International Eagie Bonds younot only 
get a guaranteed return in fee currency of your 
choice but the prospectof currency appreciation 
as weB. They, are a Safe simple way. to inter* 
nationalise your investments. 

With stock markets on the blink aH round the - 
world you need a new investment strategy — m. am ■■ am am ma wm am am 
Take your profits out of the stock market . . W ] post coupon TCEW 10 : Tam Naskret, - 



International Eagle Bends are issued by: ^ T • - j | Befi»vnwinvestmei^^e,'j^eaaeTi^im | 

Eagle Starflnternatioiial Life) Limited | details of intanatincil Eagle Bonds. ** 

--^...^^rriffratKwhkhdowrKitQndisiiQt authorised u» ■ I 


XjaB*V v- — — 

an ■ 

carrvtn in anypanoftbe United KinplombusinMs rf thedass I Name. 

10 which ihiiadwtsenmiirelaas. This means that the- - 

, jnarenjHTi and solvency of ihecwnponyae not supervised by a | Address. 

. . , v- 1 .. . . .Ma .Hwattwiaffl HntdPKm MUlCKfi 


I niieo iMJjaaoni uovHmi*™ «i»* ■ . 

issued bv the compam' will notbeprotBaedbyibePcfcytoiden | 

Proimi'm ActlSTS if die company shouTd becone unable lo meet 
i I, linbiliue. tothom • EagleSiarllnienuiriaial Lifa liniico is I 
iHiatered and ha* us principal office Sfl House, pT«pea. ■ 

Hill, Doiutfas, lde of Man ^ The company a UK A^era for H 

enouin»i»Ea^eSiaririerTMiiciidUfeServices^iwdE3^ 

SiarHoufi&, 217 Kings Road, Readinf! RGr 4LX. • Asa member ■ ^ . 

oflht vorid-wkTeB^feStar GroujCEaideSiar nnwmaanfcal « ■ — — 

t h^ik^fiilinnAndalbafkaEOfifspaTeni compare ■ *. 


Star House. 37 Kings R»«i, HewUiig rfVT „■ ' TpI- I 

ofiht v®Hd*wkfeEafifeStar GroujCEaEleSiar fintamaanSial ■ . _ i ' .. Tm^lX/lO/Sfi . 

Lbe.fnU tmanciaf hagkxngof it? ^rergpqpipar^_j^_ ^ ^ ^ Tmie^l8/10/e»Oj 



same as before or smaller. 

The premium rate, how- 
ever, will be set at the current 
level for your age at the lime 
of conversion. 

Another item to look out for 
is the policy charge. Where an 
S226A policy is issued in 
conjunction with a pension 

Some companies will 
offer a subsidy 

plan, this may be on special 
terms, or even waived al- 
together. For a “stand-alone*' 
contract, the charge can be 
quite hefty. ' 

In feet, if it were not for the 
tax relief S226A contracts 
would generally be more 
expensive than their taxable 
counterparts. The costs to a 
life company of putting term 
assurance on its books are 
high, but some companies will 
subsidize ordinary policies as 
a sort of loss-leader to attract 
new custom. 


In addition, with taxable 
contracts, the expenses can be 
offset against the tax paid on 
the investment fund. For 
S226A policies, the fund is 
tax-exempt in any case, so this 
is not possible. 

With tax relief, the pre- 
miums for an S226A plan 
should work out cheaper, 
especially for higher rate tax- 
payers. However, bearing in 
mind that it uses up pan of 
your pension contribution 
allowance, you should not 
automatically opt for the 
S226A route. 

For younger lives, on which 
the premium will be small 
anyway, the contribution limit 
should not pose a problem. 
But for those nearing retire- 
ment and wishing to maxi- 
mize their pension provision, 
it may be worth choosing a 
taxable policy, if the difference 
in premiums is not too great. 

Liz Walkington 


Is your will 
made out to your 
children or the 
taxman? 


It’s taken you a lifetime to build an 
estate you fed proud to leave your children. 

Unfortunate!}; inheritance tax can rob 
them of as much as 50% of your hard- 
earned assets in one feD swoop. 

However. London Life's Capital 
Safeguard Scheme can save you and your 
dependants the distress of breaking up 
your estate by paying the tax for you. 

Well calculate the value of your estate 
and how much inheritance tax wfll have to 
be paid on il 

Then «e*tt set up a special trust for you, 
taking into account your persona] require- 


ments, that win meet the taxman's demands. 

As a part of our financial planning 
service we will even look at your overall 
situation, and show you how to divert 
money into the trust without drastically 
affecting your current finances. 

And because London Life pays no 
commission, you can rest assured that 
every available penny is being invested on 
your behaK 

For further details, fill in our coupon 
or phone Sally Mawfe on Freephone 0800 
717UL After all you can't avoid inheritance 
tax by ignoring it 


CAPITAL SAFEGUARD SCHEME 


To: New Business Department. 

The London Life Association Limited, 
FREEPOST. 100 Tempi* Street. 
Bristol BS1 6YJ- 
(No Stamp Required) 


Please send me details of 


Nuii' 


AiMirv*. 


HiMilirir 




lijlr el Rinh 


Wrpbonr Nu 


| London Life's Capital Safeguard Scheme. London Life 


HuMfir»*'Mi-phwM-Nu 


' Bill 


Henderson European Income Trust 

The Land of Opportunity. 

• WITH NO ONE BETTER TO TAKE 

YOUTHERE. 

. . Europe, in terras of tool return, promises some of 
die most rewarding investment opportunities. 

Henderson with probably London’s most 
experienced European investment team, now launches 
its European Income Trust. 

With falling inflation, European governments 
boosting local industry and, generally, a much broader 
participation in European stockmarkets by domestic and 
international investors, we believe now is the 
ideal time to create an income orientated fund. 

Henderson European Income Trust will be 
invested to provide an estimated initial gross annual 
income yield of 4.5% (11.10.86) 
plus an excellent expectation of 
capital growth. 

This trust complements 
Henderson’s existing 
European portfolio, from 
which the Henderson 
European Trust, measured 
over the last ten years comes 
first for performance in comparison 
to other European trusts. (Planned Savings 1.10.86.) 

The experience that has produced this unrivalled 
record has determined the mix between high yielding 
equities, bonds and cash which will comprise the portfolio 
of this new Trust. 

Minimum holding is £500 or £25 per month 
through the Henderson Investment Builder 
Account. 

And of course, with no one better than Henderson 
to manage your European investment, there’s no better 
time to start than the present. 



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Disribuiion of income u-fli be paid un 31st March md 3Qdi September. ^ ’ihc first pavmem 
bring on 3&h September I9S7. The initial estimated gross annual vidd is ■!.« (1 1. 10.86). 

Co n t ra ct notes will be issued and unit cenil uares will be provided n ithin eight weeks 
of payment. To «U units endorse your cerufrcatc and send it to the managers; pavmem 
based on the ruling bid price will normally be made within seven working day s. 

Unit Trust* are not subject to capital gains tax; moreover a unit holder will not pay 
tfii* tax on a disposal of units unless his total realised gains from all sources in die tax year 
amount to moru than £6,500 (1986^7). Prices and yiimsean be found daily in die national 
press. 

An initial charge of 5' the assets ti.quiv.ilem of of the issue price) i» made 
by die managers and is included in the price of the units when issued. Out of die initial 
charge, managers pav remuneration to qualified intermediaries, rates available on request. 

An animal charge of I s : {plus VAT) on the value of the Trust will be deducted tram 
' the gross income to cover administration costs. * iih a provision in the Trust Deed to 
' increase this to a of on pvm" three months written notice tn the unit holders. 

Trustees; Midland Bank Trust Company LlJ.. II OH Jewry. London EC2R SDL' • 

Managers: Henderson Unit Trust Management Lid.. 2b Finsbury Square. 

London LCJA IDA. jRegiytered Office). Registration Number: SablbJ England. 

A mernkwr of \h* Unit Trust Aaoriaunn. 


LAUNCH PRICE OFFER OF 50p PER 
UNIT UNTIL 31st OCTOBER 1986 
To mark the launch of the Henderson European 
Income Trust, we are making a launch price offer of 50 
pence per unit until 31st October. 1986. After the initial 
fixed price offer closes, units may be bought at the current 
daily price. 

You. should remember that the price of units and 
the income from them can go down as well as up and 
you should regard any investment as long term. 

I T«: HmdrrMxi L'nu Trun Mana^erm-m Lid., DcalingDcpinmcm. 5 Ravkigh Road. Hun on, Bmttwood, | 

I fcwaOlttiA-Vl'krv.tvhiinntNt. 1 minimum iM»)ihthrH»dmt»EuibpeanlmJMnc | 

Tnivi at the launch wur ul nOp per uitil andnuWa chrqurpayaNcto Hcndervun Unii Trust Ntmagrmcin | 

I Limned, lit qu « i'h iu have im income mimmed pka< tick. □ ■ 

I t£c »i%h io im cm S per month i minimum DM in rhcHmdamn European Income Trun | 

I ndim.'luteachequehiriliiMirvtmunihvimnnnrmpiiaUeiiiHnidrrvonUnnTnKiManapnnemUlnitnL i 
DcuiL on h"» to make vulnequmi pa t menu will hi- vent i<* vou .m receipt ol lht> coupon. Please send | 

I tcparaic ehrquo it > uu »ivh minim bi«h j lump »i.m and a munihlt sufecnmiiin. This uMer will due at i 
5.50pm i'rt Iridjt LKiuhrr 51 l‘*Stv. Aim lhciduHr»lihiM>llrr un u% tv ill hv at ailihle at the daily quoted price. | 

| Jumi applicami muu sign and attach loll names and addresses vcpaiatelt. . 

I 

^1 1 

This uficr i' not available to itiadentsm tlu- Republic i,| Ircbnd. > 

I 

Henderson European Income Trust 


Mr- Mrs Tiile. 
5nnunr ' — 


Address. 


-hwenameiM in lull. 


.F'oucode. 


.Date. 


biaututc 


Mt ftuteisinBa] AJviht is. 


L_. 




Henderson. The Investment Managers. 

M— - ■ : ■ ■ . - - -r ... ■ V 





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*1 have been your member for 

the past nine months and — 


I turned £1,800 
into £11.725!” 


So wrote Mr. S.C.T. of Wolverhampton to us in 
April All of that was accomplished by closely 
following The Penny Share Guide’s advice, month 
after month, week after week, proving once more 
(hat investment in ‘penny'shares is not fust luck, it’s 
investment in a serious service, investment 
moreover that the small private investor with 
limited capital can take full advantage of. If you too 
would like to make that sort of return from ‘penny’ 
shares, why not send for absolutely free details 
today? There's no further obligation on you at all - 
fust fill in the coupon and find out for yourself! 


1 To: The Penny Share Guide Ltd, 3 Fleet Street, > 
I London EG4Y 1AU I 

I YES; please do send me free details of the PENNY . 

i SHARE GUIDE, without cost or obligation. 

S\ 18/10 I 


Name 


| Address 


H1.UCK I 

1 


LETTERS 


& Post Code PLEASE . 

I J 


t 


d 


REGENCY 

I Irani 

INTEREST 
BONDS A 


9.80 


% 


net 


p*. 


13.801 

I income tax is paid attha besic rate of 29% 


%* 


Invest from as Tittle as £500 and you can enjoy this 
fixed and guaranteed rate for a full year. 


REGENCY 


BfiLDING SOCIETY 



ACADEMY 

INSURANCE BROKERS 


Private Managed Funds 

a Qt&U team* 


ACADEMY AND NORWICH UNION 


Mam of you HU already be aware of Academy a eueilein retail in Prime Find 
ManaRemea. i Those wfm are of wff&crfpeHorinana) 

A New Opportunity 

Asafcmy are pfend in anmunoe the tasmeb of their -iih Maraud Fund in 
crniturenm nib NORWICH IN ION ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Tbts fcaest ftmd offers investors an anllera opportunity (nr pmenual capital growth 
and moome Ptus Special Bonuses on all apidrcararB remued by Nov. 1st 19tK>. 
IBM valuation day of ms* fandl 

Important: U must be remanlknd den una pres can till aswtll as i 

M*&aiTnpkbthfa>up<wiutidJuribrrtb&ak.inUbe[iaslBlk\- 


| ntum 



Iacademy 

5J- j“ Wausfioe Ro*. 
Cheur. • 

/ w 

■ insurance brokers 

Chester CHI 2LE . 

— 

| iwisruf \r uivisiox i in 

Tet02-W4ll2i5 / 





■aiUmk.- .DT! 

V- 


\ TT2 


THF TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


How the fund 
billions will fare 
after Big Bang 


Thanks to heavy 
inflows and favourable 
returns, occupational 
pension funds have seen 
explosive gro wth I n 
recent years. STEPHEN 
SPURDON assesses 
how they will handle 
members" money in the 
post-Big Bang era 


Stockbrokers Phillips & Drew* 
estimate that by the end of 
1985 the value of total assets 
held by UK pension funds had 
risen above £150 billion. This 
compares with a 1971 value of 
£10.6 billion — a fourteen-fold 
increase in 14 years. 

Part of the explanation lies 
in the continued high amounts 
flowing in, running at between 
£6 billion and £7 billion a 
year, though it now appears to 
be slackening slightly. The 
bigger element, however, is 
capital appreciation, following 
a phenomena] run of good 
years in the securities markets. 

Last year, according to 
P&D, the average pension 
fund achieved an annual rate 


of return of just over 15 per 
cent, comfoi 


comfortably beating 
inflation by more than 10 
points and still ahead of wage 
inflat ion which stood at 8.9 
per cent for 1985. It is this 
relative, not absolute, return 
that is crucial for pension 
schemes, which normally 
have liabilities linked to final 
salaries. 

The inflationary nightmare 
of the mid-1970s is now 
rapidly receding from mem- 
ory and being diluted in its 
statistical impact. The single 
most disastrous year was 
1 974. when the average rate of 
return was minus 31 per cent, 
while wages rose by 29 per 
cent. 

The obviously crucial de- 
cision that trustees and their 
fund managers have to make 
is in asset allocation. Last 
year, for instance, the cash 
flow allocation was thus: prop- 
erty 7 percent. UK equities 37 
per cent, fixed interest 21 per 
cent, index-linked 9 per cent, 
and overseas equities 28 per 
cent, while there was a net 
disinvestment of minus 2 per 
cent in cash and other invest- 
ments, according to the Wood 
Mackenzie Company Pension 
Fund Service. 

In' recent years trustees have 
placed a much higher empha- 
sis on high returns and active 
management of the funds in 
their charge, injecting a sharp 
note of competition into a 
market that hitherto had been 
dominated by the insurance 
company managed funds. 


According to the most re- 
cent survey carried out 1%' the 
National Association of Pen- 
sion Funds. 18 per cent of 
occupational schemes had 
their own in-house fund man- 
ager, while 64 per cent were 
managed externally. Eight per 
cent had a mixture of the two, 
and 10 per cent used other 
means such as an insurance 
contract. 

During this year so for, 
however, it appears that a 
number of those funds that are 
managed internally have been 
undertaking reviews of. their 
current investment policy. 
This has led to two of the 
laraest pension funds, British 
Rail (more than £5 billion) 
and Unilever (£1.6 billion), 
deciding to seek external 
management. 

Coopers & Lybrand, advis- 
ers to the BR fond, bad 
pointed out that there was an 
increasing need for technical 
support in fund management, 
as well as a number of the 
consequences of the forthcom- 
ing City revolution, the Big 
Bang. No matter how large 
may be the assets under their 
management, internal man- 
agers may find themselves at a 
disadvantage compared with 


One ‘contestant 9 
with a surprise 


the big boys such as Hill 
Samuel and Warburg when 
deregulation comes into force. 

Already, the major benefi- 
ciaries of the growth in pen- 
sion fund portfolios' in recent 
years have been the big City of 
London merchant banks, with 
names such as Warburg. 
Schroder and Morgan Gren- 
fell leading the field. Over the 
years they have tended to gain 
at the expense of the insurance 
companies, whose clients 
have withdrawn from their 
insured contracts as the 
schemes have become bigger 
and switched to other types of 
investment manager. 

Insurance companies have 
managed to retain a good slice 
of this money in their man- 
aged funds, however— around 
£9 billion — and the major life 
offices are now offering, 
management services for seg- 
regated funds, putting them 
into direct competition with 
the merchant banks and 
others. 

However, the big shock to 
emerge from the “beauty 
parade" of fund managers 
competing for the BR funds 
was a small and rather un- 
assuming contestant. 

The final choice of the BR 


NO PENALTIES ■ INSTANT ACCESS • NO PENALTIES • 


Ui 


in 


ui 


UNBEATABLE! 


Ui 


Ui 


Ui 

UI 


111 

CL 



o 

o 

m 

Ui 

Ui 


■ v 

HI 


THE BEST 


Ui 


Ui 

Ui 

UI 

O 

U 

< 


‘NO STRINGS’ RATE. 


</> 


Skipton Sovereign Shares have con- 
sistently been the best ‘no-strings’ investment 
available from a major building society. 

At 8.60% net on investments of £10,000 
or more, (gross equivalent 12.11% *)f 
they are out in front again. 


Ui 

Z 


u> 

uj 


Sovereign ‘no-strings’ means you can take your 
money out without any notice and absolutely no loss 
of interest-not a penny of it 

If you’re looking for an exceptional investment 
with total accessibility (for that money returned from 
the TSB for example), then here it is. 


ONE OFTOETOPTVWiTY UK BWLWW SOCIETIES 


OWE SOWW.;*. ... 

.-TOVERWaWWIE 

1 JftJF ■■ 

. CUD8S.- 


£10.000 OR MORE 

8.60% 

12.11% 


£5.000 ORMORE 

8J5% 

1148% 


£500 Oft MORE 

7.75% 

10.92% 



£5.000 OR MORE 

8.15% 

1148% 


£2500 ORMORE 

TMcm mes rflccavc 6di Oaotm 

7.75% 

1092% 


FREE POSTAL SERVICE 

Tb open an account. Freepost your cheque with the 
coupon below o- call at your local Skipton Branch. After that you 
may use the Sovereign First Class Service to pay in or withdraw by 
oast, as and when you wish, and we pay the postage. 

1 

1 

SKIPTON SdVetHGN SHARES: 

1 

1 


o 

n 

pi 


i 


UI 

a. 


Skipton 

Building Society 


i 


Please use block capitali Tick where ap 
I/We wish lo open a Sovereign Account and enclose a cheque for 
£ (Max £250.000 peraccouni}. 


I/Ufc wish io open a Sovereign Monthly Interest Account and 
enclose a cheque for £. 


(Min. £Z500-Max. £250000 peraccouni). 


"O 

PI 


TreDfFEREVCEETre 



sOTffiCTormEKjfiSNC soamnf Assocwnopi 

aMWJMItBMHWtlf FnrboScnUr 


.POSTCODE 


SKIPTON Bl'ILDING SOCIETY FKEHWSISKIFTON NORTH YORKS BDZJ1BK 
WwNCHtSAND /CENaESTHROUCHOUTTHt U K 


INSTANT ACCESS • NO PENALTIES ; INSTANT ACCESS 


7 


FAMILY MONEY/10 



Hambros: fixe 1985 leader with 20-2 per cent growth 


pension fund trustees in- 
cluded three merchant banks 
(Mercury Warburg, which was 
one of the existing external 
managers. Robert Fleming 
and Morgan Grenfell), one 
insurance company (Pruden- 
tial). one stockbroker (Phillips 
& Drew), and one indepen- 
dent (Martin Currie). It was 
the choice of Martin Currie 
that created a stir. 

The conjecture is that Mar- 
tin Currie was brought in so 
that its performance could be 
used to measure how well big 
investment houses operate in 
the post-Big Bang City. Less 
charitable observers have said 
of the conglomerates that, 
despite much talk of Chinese 
walls, they may find it difficult 
to keep their various dealing 
and market making arms 
separate from their fund 
management operations. 

What the BR fond trustees 
have done is to ensure that 
they have not only a diversi- 
fication of investments, but 
also a range of different fund 
management styles working 
on their assets. 

This may well lead to an 
upsurge of interest in the 
small, independent, boutique- 
type of fond management 
operation, which indeed did 
happen in the United States 
after its markets underwent 
deregulation m 1975. But note 
should also be taken of tfae 
way that management houses 
such as Henderson. Ivory and 
Sime and GT Management, 
better known for their activ- 
ities in investment trusts and 


unit trusts, are seeking to 
expand in pension funds. 

They realize, however, that 
a lot of catching-up has to be 
done to achieve the position of 
such as Warbuig, which now 
manages the assets of nearly 
300 foods, totalling £5 billion 
in value. 

However, it is interesting to 
note that even Warbuig was 
beaten into second place by 
Hambros Bank in terms of 
performance in 1985. Accord- 
ing to the Sedgwick Actuarial 
Services' survey Hambros. 
with less than £1 billion under 
management and 25 clients, 
achieved 20.2 per cent growth 
in 1985, compared with 
Warburg's 18.5 per cent. 

The overall message may 
not be as trite as “small is 
beautiful”, but it is certain 
that pension funds and their 
advisers are acquiring an ever- 
critica] attitude to those who 
would manage their funds. 
Certainly, if the merchant 
banks have to raise their direct 
fees as a result of deregulation, 
that win be something the 
independent management 
houses and the insurance 
companies will look forward 
to with satisfaction. 


Diamonds with a 
deceiving sparkle 



. , s vi> 


Diamond prices are on the 
upward ntmeasain. Botuwc*' 
tors should think twice 
jumping back into the market 

The 7 per cent price rise 
announced in Johannesburg 

on Tuesday by the all-pj*«; 

ful Central Selling 
Organisation (CSO) which 
boasts control 
marketing of 85 per cent of the 
world's rough diamonds and 
therefore has an effective 
monopoly on the price « 
which dealers buy diamonds. 

What sent the diamond 
dealers running for tfaew 
pocket calculators was the 
thought that tins J* 
second CSC price rise this 
year, but only the third since 
1983. 


mJofa m\ 

ihene.'m-j 


Could the halcyon times of 
the late 1970s be about to 
mak e a comeback? Diamond 
investors with deep pockets 
and long memories will recall 
that in those days douWe- 
ftgure price rises were fre- 
quent. There was even a price 
rise of 30 per cent in August 
1978. Such spectacular in- 
creases caused an explosion of 
interest in diamonds, with 
investors keen to learn the 
jargon of the so-called four Cs 
— carat, cot, colour and clarity. 

But all that was in the days 
of inflation and low- 

confidence in western 
governments' ability to deal 
with SL Alter the drag on of 
inflation was slain, and equity 
mar kets started to boom. the 
fashion went out of non- 
mcome producing assets. So 
down tumbled the price of 
investment dramonds, along 
with sapphires and gold coins, 
leaving many investors with 
badly burned fingers. 

Suddenly the prized D flaw- 
less diamond was regarded as 
a deeply flawed investment 

But even though investment 
diamonds have spent the first 
half of the 1980s in the 
doldrums, the prospect of a 
return to profits should not be 
read into price rises which are 
essentially of a catching-op 
nature. Even if equity markets 
have run their course for tile 
time being, the low inflation- 
high interest rate conditions 
are just not conducive to a 
renewed surge in the value of 
investment diamonds. 



If you are tempted to drink 
otherwise, you shorid heed tim 
views of De Been* film h im u , 
Julian Ogflvie H— Mri* 
who maintains tint for Aram 
encouraging the mark** for 
investment d iamond* . Do 
Beers did all it corid u> 


discourage It. ^brikrbag that 


diamonds are best _ 
enduring store of beauty In the 
fora of jeweflery. What hap- 
pened in the late I97&, 
according to Mr Ogflvft 
Thompson, was a date te. 
example of speculation footing 
on itself, followed by «w- 
reaction at the top of the cycle, 

Speaking at tfae World Dfc 
amend Congress hi Tel Aviv 
recently, Mr Ogfivie Thomp- 
son said: “It is not necessary 
to indulge In a post mortem at 
to who, if anyone, was to 
blame. It is more important 
that we should afl tear* from 
the experience.” 


Put another way, i 
may he for lovers nut they are 


certainly not for fararioM. 


Peter Gartland 


BASE 
LENDING 
RATES 


ABN. 


Adam & Company. 
BCCL 


Citibank Saringst- 
ated ud$„ 


Consolidated 


Hong Kong & Shanghai. 
LLoyds Bank. 


NS West mi nster. 


Bank of Scotland. 


.11.00% 

.10.00% 

. 11 . 00 % 

. 10 . 95 % 

.iom% 

.111)0% 

. 11 . 00 % 

. 11 . 00 % 

. 11 . 00 % 

. 11 . 00 % 

.11.00% 


Qtfcank NA 

t Mortgage Base Rue. 


- 11 - 00 % 

. 11 . 00 % 


This advertisement is issued in compliance with the Regulations of The Stock Exchange. 


A’ 


Nationwide 


Building Society 

(Incorporated in England under the Building Societies Act 1874) 


Placing of £20,000,000 11% per cent Bonds 
due 26th October 1087 


Listing for the bonds has been granted by the Council of The Stock Exchange. Listing 
Particulars in relation to The Nationwide Building Society arc available b the Extd 
Statistical Services. Copies may be collected from Companies Announcements Office. 
P-O. Box No. 119. The Stock Exchange, London EC2P 2BT until 21st October 198h 
and until 3rd November 198b from:- 


Fulton Prebon 
Sterling Ltd., 


34-40 Ludgate Hill, 
on EC4M 


London EC4M 7JT 


Chase Manhattan 
Securities, 

Portland House. 

72/73 Basinghall Street, 
London EC2V5DP 


Rowe & Pitman Ltd., 
I Finsbury Avenue, 
London EC2M2PA 


ISth October 1986 




* * 


i ■* 

X 1 : 


k". '■* 


r • 


or 


■ EBC A 




HIGHER 
INTEREST RATES 


30 DAT SHARE 

I8-30H 


Unman bMeaman £500 


k 11*93 £ 


Gross 
&r*uteQi 


90 DAY SHARE 


= 8-98^12-23^ 


Mmnuan tavromcn CSOO 


3 TEAR SHARE 

8*7925= 8-89*= 12*52 ^ 



178 Loatfaa Kowt Uarili Bad, J 


Tcfcpbw 10705) 0S93U. 

BuMbigSoctety 



FRIENDLY 

SOCIETIES 


Financial journalists often recommend Friendly Societies ns ideal 
for savers because BUILDING SOCIETY SAVINGS EARN 3U"o MORE 
WHEN INVESTED THROUGH A FRIENDLY SOCIETY. Hom&iwners. 
the largest, invests £130 million on behalf of 190.000 savers. 

There are tax free monthly and annual savings plansand attractive 
lump sum schemes (£500 or £10001 to choose from. 

Ybur savings could be earning 10-04° u p-a. tax 
free ( 14 J4"u gross equivalent ).* dip the ad and 
send for details TODAY { without obligation ) 
to: Homeowners Friendly Society. FREEPOST. 

Harrogate. M Yorks. HG15BR. BRADFORD 

( We promise no salesman will call). &BEMGLEY 


s plansand attract 


PHONE MOW TOR BROCHURE 
Tel: (0(23) 522070(21 hr*} 

HMWWWrrt: TSISIOP 


• FREEPOST • 

:NO STAMP NEEDED • 


MK MRS MC* 


■ ih-’ ini vim* 
ADORED 


itwroihL 


^ -at--. rliMr-'i! Nl«i »«;,■ All Ihu n TSISIQP J 


H 


LEAMINGTON SPA BUILDING SOCIETY 
I PO BOX 1. LEAMINGTON HOUSE, 
ocl OVERTON- HI1X, LEAMINGTON SP*. CVfct SFE, 
XJ-J 


"The 

Posi G 


TEL: 10926)5-920. 


Anscts exceed £M mil) kin. Member oflhc H y Urt fa y 
sodette. Avioctaion and invewoiV Protection Scheme. 


Authorised for Investment by Tru*«ev 


AXE VALLEY INSURANCE 
AND INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS 


fi V I. « 

PLUS PLAN 93 


\/0 

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Axe Valley (nsuarKsetxi Investment Consultants offer an 
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1 YEAR GUARANTEED BUILDING SL' ; 


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potential of prime residentul 
propemr 


CAUL (0297)22756 OR : 
21992 NOW FOR DETAILS AfW 
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# Balance ol yew rMfSimom placed 

m ttw> Girmpn Heniagt' Rc-wdfntotf 
Ptopcrtv Funa. an exounq nrw 
«watmw)t.^iponiirw\' ' 

* MowtXim eT.t75tment £4,000 


■\m: tnsur ante •' | ; 

.«) Irvi-itmm ' i 

'■* Owen S,.»itor. Pi-^m Hst f -J 
FSeaw wnd rrn- o! lhi« AVI J,- 

Vw*, ■- 

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t986-arat£3rmWon. 










37 


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, 4 -«i *b till!* 


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family MONEY/11 


Natpro builds up the stocks business 

( SAVINGS ~) 


The building society move- 
ment is gathering pace. This 
week the Leeds Permanent 
annou nc ed the purchase of a 
chain of estate agents and the 
National & Provincial an- 
nounced its investment plans 
lor IV87. 

A new service, desi greH to 
provide > full reaLtime 
stockbrotang service for pri- 
vate clients by 1989" was 
announced on Wednesday by 
the Natpro. 

This is, to say the least, 
something of a departure for a 
building society. Stocks and 
shares are, .after all, an alter- 
native home for investors' 
money. No other big building 
society has yet said ft will be 
marketing shares so aggres- 
sively; lor the simple reason 
that most societies would 
prefer to keep your money on 
deposit rather than take a 
commission on a share 
transaction. 

But true to building society 
font!, the Natpro's senior 


general manager, Terry Car- 
roll, says the service “win be 
developed in a logical, care- 
*huy planned way". Of the 
society's 331 branches “up to 
a d ?“P' 4 prime Sto will have 
a base transaction service 
next January 1. 

No one could accuse the 
bunding societies of behaving 
like children in a sweet shop 
when it comes to exploiting 
the financial freedoms con- 
tained m the new Bmtdjne 
Societies Act. 

The Natpro, however, has 
taken a step that most of hs 
competitors seem to regard as 
something of a leap. Most big 
societies have not yet revealed 
their plans for next year. 
Those who have are looking 
more to banking, insurance 
and estate agency as sources of 
profit. 

The Halifax and Nation- 
wide societies; for exam ple, 
have concentrated on these 
areas, which they consider 
more instantly and obviously 
profitable as well as being a 

better ‘Tit" with their existing 

business. 



Teny Carroll: ‘CarrfnT 

The Natpro is on worried by 
the possibility of the Personal 
Equity Plans and shares it sells 
turning out to be unprofitable 
for investors (a distinct 
possibility when one considers 
the gloomy prognostications 
of many investment analysts). 

When the time comes to 
stop a loss or take a profit, the 
money has to find a worth- 
while borne — and where will 


be more convenient than the 
coffers of the Natpro? AH 
should be well so long as 
unsuccessful investors do not 
blame a fall in share values on 
the building society. 

The Natpro's stockbroker® 
partners will be Allied Provin- 
cial Securities, which will 
provide research on prospect 
companies. Customers will be 
able to take reports away from 
the branch, read them and 
make their investment de- 
cisions. The brokers James 
Cape! will proride most of the 
research on bigger foreign 
companies. 

The new service will, of 
course, arrive on the scene 
after Big Bang, one element of 
which is the abolition of fixed 
commissions. No charging 
structure for share dealing has 
yet been revealed, but it looks 
as though the «man investor 
will benefit Mr Carroll says 
the charges will be 
“competitive” with more than 
the banks and the stock- 
brokers. The financial markets 
are widening all the time. 

Martin Baker 


INTEREST RATES ROUND-UP 


Banks 

Current account — no Interest i 
Deposit accounts — seven 
notice required for wnhdn 
Barclays S per cent. Uoyds 5 per 
cent. Midland 5 per cent, fatwest S 


per pent. National Girobank 5 per 
— - ■ ■ - 10 .OOO 


cent Fixed 'term deposits £1U«~ 
to £24 J09B : 1 month 7.75 per cent. 3 
mouths 7.75 per cent, 6 months 7J» 
per cent (National Westminster); 1 
month 7.288 per cart, 3 months 
7.382 per Pent, 6 months 7.382 per 
cent (Midland). Otter banks may 
differ.. ’ 


National Savings Bank 
Ordinary Accowns - if a minimum 
balance of Cl 00 maintained for 
whole of 1986. 6 per cent interest 
px for each complete month where 
balance is over £500. otherwise 3 
per cent Investment Accounts — 
10.75 per cent interest paid witnout 
deduction of tax. one month's 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
investment £ 100 . 000 . 


MONEY FUNDS 

Find .Mbs CHAR Tatophone 

Moon Hum 

mommy inc. • 7.66 7.9* 

B 01 Samd 7.85 8.13 

SHQMrRaa 
Account 

6.63 6.79 
7.00 7 10 
7.56 7.63 


016386070 
01628 8060 


E1.00M9J99 
El 0.000 A Mgr 
Can Annan 
CkbMi - 
Monty MM Plus 
HFC frost 7-day 

■ ■ A - 

nOnOflOUff JmJOBy 

Manet 

Cnaque Account 765 8.13 

L&GM 


01626156 7 
016261567 
015882777 


7.00 723 
7.75 730 


01 681 1422 

012363391 


5Hgnmt.Oap.7 25 738 
Lloyds MCA 720 7 «0 
M6QMCA 1 7.75 &04 

Mtitand HICA 

£2,000-£9-999 7.45 766 

£10000 ana war 7.70 763 
Nai West rtqpl 
bB&aehttane 

eitaeasw 763 7 66 
£100006 war 7.75 766 


OI6385757 
013663211 
01 626 1500 
01626 4586 


074220099 

074220896 


National Savings Income Bond 
Minimum investment £2.000. maxi- 
mum £100.000. Interest 11.25 per 
cert variable at sot weeks* notice 
paid monthly without deduction of 
tax. Repayment at 3 months* notice. 
Penalties in first year. 

Na tio na l Savings Indexed Income 

Bwitf 

Start rate monthly income for first 
year, 8 per cent , increased at end of 
each year to match increase in 
prices as measured oy Retail Prices 
index. Cash value r e m ains tne 
same. Income taxable, pent gross. 
Three montns' nonce of withdrawal. 
Minimum investment Of £5.000 th 
multiples of £1,000. Maximum 
£100,000. 

Na tion al Savings 4th Index-Linked 
Certi fica tes 

Maximum Investment - £5,000 
exdudng hofdxigs of other issues. 


51 


to w 

A mer-n&'&v 6 — . 

is 


of tax. Repayment at three months' 
notice. Hail interest only pad on 
bonds repaid durmg first year. 



Local Authority Yearling Bonds 
42 momns fixed rate Investments 
interest 10 >Vw per cent basic rata 
tax deducted at source (can be 
reclaimed by non-taxpayer), mni- 
mum investment £1 . 000 . purchased 
through siocxorofcer or bank. 


Guaranteed Income Bonds 
Return paid net of basic rate tax; 
Npnar rate taxpayers may have a 
further BaDtity on maturity. 1.2 & 
Syrs New Direction Rnance/Cretflt 
& Commer c e. 9 per cent: 4 & 5yrs 
Plenum Life 9.1 per oent . 


Return 


tax-free end Baked to 
changes in the Retad Prices Index. 
Supplement of 3.00 per cent in the 
first year. 625 per cent in the 
second. &50 per cert in the third, 
4.50 per cent In the fourth and 5.00 
per cert in the fifth. Value of 
Retirement issue Certificates pur- 
chased in Octooer 1981. £146.78 , 
I bonus and supplement 
• RP? 387.8. (The new RP1 
is not announced until the 
I week of the foflowmg (north). 


figure 
third w 


Local authority town hafi bonds 
Flxeo term, fixed rate « v est men ts , 
interest quoted net (baste me tax 
deducted at source norwectaim- 
•Dte) tyr No rt ham p t o n 7.1 per cent, 
mn mv £500; 2&3yrs Bristol &2S 
per cent 4-7yrs Hereford & Worces- 
ter? per cert, mn inw £1.000; Syrs 
Vale of Gtamoman 6.13 per cant 
mm inv £500; 98i0yrs T&tf By 6.21 
per cent nan Inv £1,000 

Further details avatabto from Char- 
tered institute of Puoec Finance 6 
Accountancy. Loans Btxeau (638 
638i between 10am and 2.30pm) 
see also Prestal no 24608. 


017261000 

0)7261000 


.10600 704 6.18 

om fioooo ? are aaa 

Rc»4B0rScaB*na 
Pmun Accocn 7.75 766 
S£ PCa*- .750 7.78 
Sciraaarmg 
£2^00 »Ea9 
owrDiUXX) 

1 UM 8 Hleyi 

m ia 

_l 7-day 
rr-ds* 

Ham Trust 
lisornh 


012389362 

012369382 


031 5570201 
070866966 


729 7.48 
75* 7.75 
8L06 626 
7JS9 726 
728 622 
720 7-71 
672 826 


0705 627783 

0705627733 

012360982 

012380952 

02227822*1 

0272 732241* 

01 S6 4681 


7.99 829 0752261161 


CNAR — ConxxxmM Nat Anaua! Rata. 
Rgurea ■» 6 w laws! natmm K tna tiros ol 
gomglopnnc. 

Research; Deborah Bern 


y&smj-MHGiMD 

MWCKf.'ftlS f 


National Savings Certificate 
31 st issue. Return totally free of 
mcomeandcatxtalgamstax.eQi4v- 
atent to an armuaMmerest rate over 


Bidding Ba M w 
Onsnary snere accounts - 555 per 
cent Extra interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cent over ortSnary 
share rate. Rates quoted above are 



the five-year tarn of 725^ cent, 


maximum investment £10.1 

General extension rate for holdere 
of earlier issues whch have 
reached maturity is 8.01 per cent 


those most commonly ottered. Indi- 
ting societies 


vioua) txokting societies may quote 
dtiterem rates, in terest on al ac- 
counts pax) net of bask rate tax. 
Not redatmabie by non-taxpeyere. 


National Savk^s Yearty Plan 


maximum £200. Return over five 
years 8.19 per cent tax-free. 


National Savings Deposit Bond 

Mtnenum investment £100, maxi- 
mum £100.000. I merest 1 1.25 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
credtted annuatiy without ded u ctio n 


Foreign currency deposits 
Rates quoted by Rotti9cnfld*s Old 
Coral hne me tio na l R e se rv es 0481 
26741. Seven days* notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made ‘far swftchmg crare nci as. “ 
Stedtng 921 percent 

USdofler 526 per cent 

Yen 4.05 per cent 

D Mark 328 per cent 

French Franc 721 percent 

Swiss Franc 226 per cent 


EBC 
AMRO 


EBC AMRO ASSET MANAGEMENT 


Invites 


FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES 

TO 

A SEMINAR 

On 

"THE DUTCH EQUITY MARKETS, 

POST GENERAL ELECTION - WHAT NEXT? 


n 


IN 


AMSTERDAM 

On 

13 th/ 14 th NOVEMBER 1986 


Only 100 places available and tickets will therefore be issued to attendees 
on a first come, first served basis. 


The cost of £100 per ticket 

includes a return flight and one night's stay at the. Grand Hotel Krasnapolsky. 


Speakers will include representatives of appropriate 
Dutch professional institutions. 


Chairman of the Seminar Peter Gartland, 
Editor of The Times' Family Money. 


For further information please telephone the Marketing Department 
and ask for Mrs Jane Swinglehurst or Miss Katharine Dean on 01-621 0101 


4 WI 


CONVERTIBLE 


and General Unit Trust 


A rare opportunity for more income than an 
equity income trust, and more growth 
than a gilt trust from Baillie Gifiord.% new fund 


ith an csrimared 8 % initial cress yield Ac new 


W un an esnmateo trfc initial gross 

BG Convertible and General Unit Trust aims to 
provide investors with a high and reliable income. 
It offers a substantially better return than nearly all UK eqinrv 
income trusts (source: Planned Savings). But wbat makes this 
new trust so unusual is that it combines girh a high m ew ne 
with growth potential, of a kind which a gib trust cannot offer. 


CONVERTEBLES-AN ideal combination 
OF INCOME WITH PROSPECTS OF GROWTH 


Convertibles arc issued by all sorts of companies; from 


. om panics; fa 

Luge, blue-chip groups like Hanson Trust to smaller bur fast 


growing groups like Television South. 

They start our life as fired interest securities and air usually, 
at a later stage, converted into ordinary shares A convertible is 
traded in much tbe same way as any other security and its price 
usually reflects that of the ordinary share. However, its likely to 
be less volatile than an ordinary share price, a valuable measure 
of protection in weak markets. 

Under currenr market conditions we believe convertibles 
represent very good value for money. Many appear cheap because 
they haven't caught up with die ordinary share price- Many are 
offering gpod yields in relation to gilts. And because die past 
year or so has seen more companies issuing such stock, there is 
now a wide variety from which to choose. 

In our opinion convertibles have been overlooked for far 
too long Baillie Gifford expects at least 85% of the Convertible 
and General fund will be invested in them. The Inland will be 
invested in high yielding equity shares. 


Baillie Gifford -best small trust group* 


Baillie Gifford, with total funds under uumgemem 
of around >fl,450 million*, haw a long established reputation 
for worldwide immiuenr expertise. Our first unir trusts were 
Lunched in October 1984. We now have six trusts, lour of which 
are among the rap ten in their respective sectors over the past 
vea z, including two firsts (source: Planned Savings). 

This kind of success brought Bailhc Gifford four top 
honours in 1985. our first full year in the unit crust market; 
honours which included* Money Magazine^ ‘Best Snul) Trust 
Group* and the Observer’s ‘Best Newcomer.* 

We appreciate such accolades but after more than 75 
years of managing people’s money we tend to led we’ve 
earned them. 


WITH A QUARTERLY INCOME TOO -IT'S A BUY 


If you need a dependable, high income with a prospect 
of capital growth then you should consider the BG Convertible 
and General Unit Trust for pan of your portfolio. Dividends will 
be paid quarterly and. don't forget, you can rrcLum am tax if 
you're a non-tax payer 


At the same time, we would like to remind investors that 
die price of units and the income from them may go down as 
well as i 


up- 


*Io invest, simply complete the application and return ir. 
with a cheque, to Baillie Gifford & Co. LinuivJ, 3 GlcnfinLi* 
Street, Edinburgh EHJ 6YY. 


Important information 


The trust is a UK authorised 
unit trust and a "wide range 1 invesr- 
ment under thcTruxee Investments 
ActI96L 

The minimum investment is 
£500 and units may be bought or 
sold oamiaDy on any normal work- 
day at ruling prices. Prices and 
yield air published daily in the 
Financial Times. 

There ban initial charge of 5% 
and an annul charge of (plus 
VAT), calculated monthly, of the 
value of the oust. Both dunes arc 
wtwi into »frqnnf when calculat- 
[ unit prices. The trust deed 
ms the latter to be raised to a 
mwtimimi of L5% (plus VAT) pro- 
viding the Managers give 3 months’ 
written notice co tuumokieis. 

The Royal Bank of Scotland 
pk is trustee and bolds all invest- 
ments and cash on behalf of unit- 
holders. The trust deed may be 

jnspern-d tn normal Inwinfw hnun 


artheofficeoftbc 
Gifford & Co. LjmitqT It allows 
the Managers and Trnsrcr to write 
or purchase Ttaded CaQOpooos or 
purchase Traded Pur Options on 
behalf of the trust, 

Connaa notes will be sent on 
receipt of any application- Certifi- 
cates arc normally issued within 6 
weeks and when selling a cheque 
will normally be sent within 7 
working days of receipt of your 
renounced certificate^). 

Income, net of basic rare tax. 
is distributed quarterly to unit- 
holders in March June, September 
and December: 

h is estimated that the gross 
yield wiD beat least 8%pj. based on 
the ofler price of 50p per unit on die 
15th October 1986. 

Commission is paid to inrer- 
mediaries- ra ra sa v a ibpl 
This offer is not 
residents of Eire. 


!<??. jbsi r.**; 

| CONVERTIBLE 

g wUMtuLvi l«-i 

« To: Bailhc Gifford & Co. LimueiL^GlrnfinLnSiR'et. Edinburgh t( 1.1 
•5 (131026 6066 u the telepbone number for the dealers. 


I/We wish to invest £. 


. in units ofHG Convertible ar.J 




General Unit TruM (minimum /!30U and in muln pies uf /'ll M) ilnTi-il ter) 
! jm/Wc are over the jpe of 18, 

I/Wr enclose a cheque payable to bail be Gifford & Cu Limited fur limes 
at the offer price applicable on the date ol ynur rcvcipi ol'this applu juvil 
T ick box for reinvestment of income | 1 


'j£ Surname (Mi/Mrs/Miss). 




ti Forrzumrs m full. 


5 Address- 


% 


Postcode. 


-Date. 


Signature(s)- 


to 


(joinr applicants should all sign and give details separately) 


WHATEVER UN IT TRUSTS 


MAT SAY, THEIR WORDS SELDOM 
MATCH OUR FIGURES. 


Performance. It's the most 
important word in the mind of ary 
shrewd investor 

But while unit trusts are quick 
to tell you how they perform in 
relation to other unit trusts, they 
never mention how they 
measure up to Investment 
Trusts. 


THE FIGURES 


Over the years Investment 
Trusts have performed extremely 
well. And many of those managed 
by Flemings have consistently 
beaten the industry 
average 

According to \Afood 
Mackenzie & Co. Ltd., 

£100 in the average unit 
trust would have grown to a 
healthy £232 over the five years 
to December 1985. 

But that same £100 invested 
in the average Investment Trust 
would have risen to £256. And 
don't forget that's just the average. 
Many Investment Trusts have per- 
formed substantially better 


You can make investments by buying shares 
through your usual financial advisor or take advantage 
. of our Dividend Reinvestment and Savings Scheme. 
In this way you can invest in lump sums of 
£250 or more, or by regular savings- 
from as little as £25 a month. 

To find out more about this 
Scheme and the 10 Investment Trusts 
managed by Flemings send 
us the coupon now. 

V\fe are a leader in our 
field, after all. 

Oh dear Now we sound 
' like a unit trust advertisement. 


FLEMINGS INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Another important difference is the cost of 
investing. Investment Trusts have a fixed capital. This 
means you buy shares in the trust rather than units. 

And that means you only pay 
. . , normal Stock Exchange 

costs, not the more expen- 
sive unit trust charges. 
There are of course, 
some similarities. You can 
still opt for capital growth 
or income or a combination 
of the two. 


| it lajio - ] 

To: Robert Fleming Services Ltd. . j 

25 Copthall Avenue, London EC2R 7DR. j 

Please send me details of yaur Dividend Reinvestment j 
and Savings Scheme and the 10 Flemings Investment 
Trusts. 



Name: 


| Address: 



Postcode _ 


FLEMINGS 


Ll^TMENTjrRUSTSj 


c • 

•r 

i'J 





J 


j: 


M.T 

•4 


j;* 


& 


m t 

% 


i 








''Sfcr7. '[■ ■ ' • 


THE TIMFS SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


HORIZONS 


A guide to 
independent education 


The young music masters 


Specialist schools that concentrate on 
making pupils highly proficient in one 
subject, such as science or music are a 
feature of education in the Soviet Union 
and the US. 

But they tend to be frowned on in 
Britain on the grounds that they cream 
off the best pupils and deprive local 
schools of the full range of talenL 

This week Kenneth Baker. Secretary of 
State for Education, confirmed the 
Government's plans to set up a number 
of specialized schools to concentrate on 
leaching technology to bright inner-city 
children. 

The thinking is unashamedly elitist in 
its educational aims, concerned with 
training the young in a subject which has 
traditionally been downgraded, even 
neglected, in English and Welsh 
education. 

There are undoubtedly some good 
reasons for bringing talented young 
people together for specialized teaching 
and they are particularly apparent in 
music education. 

Government ministers need look no 
further than Chetham's School in Mart- 
Chester for an example ofhow this works. 

Chetham’s (pronounced Cheetfaam’s 
in correct parlance, but Chatham's try 
Mancunians) has 268 pupils between the 
ages of eight and 18 and specializes in 
educating musicians. 

It is independent and mainly a 
boarding school, but most children - 
more than 90 per cent — are state-aided 
and come to Chetham’s from the 
maintained sector. 

With fees at an exorbitant £7.356 a 
year, it might seem out of reach of the or- 
dinary parent. But it is not because of the 


Lucy Hodges looks 
at a school for 
talented children 
where parents 
need not worry 
about fees 


Entry standards have risen dramati- 
cally since Chetham’s became a special- 
ist music school in 1968 and children are 
now accepted on the basis of a tough 
musical audition. 

The school receives 1,000 inquiries for 
its 55 places and candidates are assessed 
on musical improvisation, creative work 
and their technique with an instrument 
They are also given ear and sight-reading 
tests. Those who get through the first 
round are screened a second time. 

Once at the school pupils receive an 
intensive musical education on top of 



levels and they are all barred from taking 
musk O-Ievef on the ground that it is a 
waste of time. 

This year upper sixth pupils have done 
particularly welL Fifteen out of 50 have 
gained entry to Oxford and Cambridge, 
of whom nine want to read music, three 
to read maths and three to read English. 
“That is extraordinarily good in a school 
of this size.** said Mr Vafiios- “And it just 
happened that way. We did not push 
than. 

“The son of children who have rare 
musical talent and drive tend to be very 
nuelfectuaHy able and not as narrow in 
their focus as many people expect them 
to be. They don't just want to play the 
fiddle ail the time, as people expect." 

Even so. the majority - about two- 
thirds — go to schools of music in the 
hope of becoming performers and the 
remaining one-third go to university. 

The two pupils who showed me 
around. Ruth Butler, 28. and Simon 
Turner. 17, were planning to go to 
schools of music 

Simon, who had been offered a place at 
Cambridge and a scholarship at the 
Royal Academy of Music was turning 
down both these places to go to the Royal 
Northern College of Music Ruth had 
won a scholarship to Trinity College of 
Music in London. 

Both were doing general studies and 
music at A-leveL Ruth was also studying 
English A-level and Simon was ta k i n g 
physics. Both commented on the friendly 
atmosphere of the school and hoped it 
was different from most independent 
schools. 

In fact, the sixth-formers argue about 
whether or not Chetham’s is an indepen- 


Successful conservatoire 
giving a pool of 
top expertise 


Government's aided pupil scheme which 
covers the performing arts. 

Introduced by the current Conser- 
vative Government when Mark Carlisle 
was Secretary of State for Education and 
Science, the scheme has made it possible 
for musical young people to go to the 
Yehudi Menuhin School, the Purcell and 
Welts Cathedral School at the state's 
expense. 

But the largest number of state-aided 
places are at Chetham’s — 55 a year. 

The aided pupil scheme is generous 
and operates on a sliding .scale so that 
parents begin to contribute at a gross 
income of £7.000 a year. (Thirty-six 
families with children at Chetham's pay 
nothing.) 

Even those on an income of £30,000 a 
year get generous help and pay less than 
half the fees. 

John Vallins. the school's headmaster, 
said Chetham's takes children from all 
social classes as a result although most 
are middle class. “You tend to get 
northern, working class brass players and 
southern, middle class violinists." he 
explains. 



-fKflUGftUaP 

the STATE 
WWHTMEFEES 


JiortRjjUi 



their normal academic work. Each child 
receives two-and-a-half hours individual 
tuition in their instruments each week 
from a highly specialized teacher who 
may travel from as far as Edinburgh or 
London. 

This explains the high fees. Pupils are 
also required to spend not less than two 
hours a day practising on their own and 
under supervision. 

Music is a constant extra-curricular 
theme. Children take part m three or four 
lunchtime recitals a week plus chamber 
group rehearsals and musical activities at 
weekends. As a result, they spend less 
lime on academic work than in an 
ordinary school, but their examination 
results do not appear to suffer. 

No pupil may take more than seven O- 



STD 

TE 

S 

a 


i ran 


mu 


Senior School 


Street, Somerset RA160YD 
Telephone 0458) 42291 

Scholarships and 
Bursaries for 
September 1987 


Co-educational, 1200+ pupils and CO teachers. 
Age range: 13 to 19yeas. Average number of 
pupils per class: 12. Boardine ana Day Fees (per 

20 SCHOLARSHIPS (Academic and Musical), in 
addition to a much greater number of bursaries, 
will be awarded on the results of an examination 
taken in Spring 1987. 

Candidates (boys and girls) should be over D and 
under M on September 1st of the year of the 
examination [Musk scholars under 17 in 


Academic BURS ARIES also awaflaMe far Sixth 
Rjnnenby. 

All Scholarships and Bursaries eve a percentage 
reduction on standam fees. 

Academic entries (other than for Sixth Rmn) 
dose an January 26th 1987. 


Music entries dose on bnuaxy 1st 1987. 
further particulars ana prospectus, pte 2 


For further particulars and prospec 
write to theTutor for Admissions. 


iiniriTrci-iriit; 


HBflrfd. Street 
Somerset BA 16 OYD 


TR Street 42201 


BdgariQHafl. 
Gfastenfecn. 
Somerset BA68LD 
IfefcGJastoaban 32446 


tppKrathms for entry in September. 1087 
to the Thter for Artasteskms (Ref 27 \) 


aM.irsh.MA_ Cm.td. 

450 + 
710 13*2 
62 

\round 10 

C.E.and Scholarship 


Span ZJ spnnc 

Mask OrriieMraSL. choirs, suing 

and. wind, chamber ensrtnWrs 
Hob&iestfaubsfSecfetia 20+ available 

Farther Education 90*!o to Senior School 



B. Giskril. RSc_ Cm Ed. Headmaster a Marsh. M.\ 

1200+ Roll 

13 to 19 Xgr range 

170 IfeacMag Staff 

Around 12 OassSar 

Choice of 49 subteas lor Subjects available C.ELandSi 

ft level. 39 for ‘V level 
Mote than 40 sports Sport 

Orchestras, choirs, string .Mask OrrheMras. choi 

wind and bras? ensemble* and. wind, chamber er 

70+ available Habb iciVC I ubo/ SocIrtte 20+ a 

Over 100 U> untUTSilifti' Farther BdacaUoa 90*!o toSntoi 
i polytechnics anrwafly 

k Both srtvxils are coeducational. situated ft delightful Somerset 

% ctmurydOr. * Wife an boor's car Journey from Bath. 

Flexible policy over aee of entry 
Enquiries ftricoined and p reflmrary l/mre arranged. 

BI RSARIES available for aB+ound latent 
Academic aod Music SCHOLARSHIP examinations a 

beWarawafly. A 

Farther SCHOLARSHIPS available for 

Sixth Rum entry for pupils 
of outstanding 
academic a tri ft y. 


independent schools 
feature 



THE LEYS 
SCHOOL 


CAMBRIDGE 


Sixth Form Places 

1987 


Applications are invited on behalf of 
boys and girls wishing to enter the 
Sixth form at The Leys in September 
1987 


* Awards and Assisted Places are 
available 

Examination and interviews will 
take place during November 

ftwped w and farther details from: 
The Headmaster, The Leys School, 
Cambridge CB2 2AD 

TeL 0223 355327 



deni schooL 

Mr Vallins said the school was 
different from a traditional boarding 
schooL “I think our junior boarders are 
the happiest lot of boarders I have ever 
seen." he said. “If I am ever feeling 
miserable in the evening I go up to see 
the junior schooL" 

Chetham's has some famous former 
pupils. There is Peter Do nohoe. the 
pianist who won the Moscow Tchaikov- 
sky competition: Anna Markland. BBC 
Young Musician ofthe Year in I982;and 
Mike Lindup, founder ofthe progressive 
rock group. Level 42. 

This year Chetham's has 31 regional 
finalists in the BBC Young Musician 
Competition. 

Mr Vallins denies that Manchester is 
an awkward place to have a music 
schooL although he said it explains why 
there is so little public awareness of 
Chetham's. He maintains that the school 
could be nowhere else but Manchester. 

This is because there is a big and 
successful conservatoire m the Royal 
College of Music, he said, giving a pool 
of top quality expertise. 



ST. MARY’S HALL 


/W HOEPBtOBfT CHURCH OF ENGLAND 
SCHOOL FOR GffiLS FtRWDED N 1836 


Turners Hiii,near Crawley, Sussex RH1®4SD 

Roman Catholic, Benedictine. independenvM^C 
boarding school. 440 boys aged 9/10 » .18. 
Gatwick 15 minutes, Heathrow 45 mimHC$j, ihc- 
toria 45 minutes. A young and enterprisin g ^fcfj ooj 
with an excellent academic and games 
Levels 1986: 91% pass rate, 38% A and B grades). 


ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

The Entrance Examinations for September 
1987 w* be held on Saturday 24 January 1987. 
On the results of these examinations Assisted 
Places and Scholarships wffl be awarded to 
children aged 11+. 124- or 12+ by 1 September 
1987. A Music Scholarship is also offered and 
there are bursaries reserved for Clergy 
daughters. 

SIXTH FORM 

Five Assisted Places and two Scholarships are 
also offered for entry to the Sixth Form in 
September 1987. 

OPEN DAY 

There wHbean Open Day on Friday 
12 December from 2 pm when all interested 
parents are welcome to come and view 
St Mary’s HaO and talk with the Heatenistress 
and members of her staff. 

For further detads please write to the 
H— dteteteeea, St Mary’s HaH, Fastem Road, 
Brighton, BN2 5JF. 

Tab Brighton (0273) 606061/2 


DOLRHYD 

SCHOOL 


CHETHAM’S 


Old Barmouth Rd, 
Dogdlau Gwvnedd. 

DYSLEXICS 
DESERVE BETTER 

Downgraded, disillusioned, 
demotivated ? Dolrhyd school (for- 
mally Ynys Fcchan Hall) offers 
structured teaching in a caring and 
encouraging environment, plus as 
from 1987 vocational courses at 
I4+. For further details ring Head 
Teacher John Wilkinson on 0341 
423450 or 0341 423075 or write to 
the Principal. G T Bryan* a * 
Dolrhyd School, Old Barmouth 
Rd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd. 


Co BtotionaL Boarding and Day.rew 7-18 
Tcaun a *B ordttitral instrument*, keyboard, gaitar, voice 

atv? rranpnpfxif i 

Based on anal unman tKimiep^ed with foO academic 
prognxno* 

and reenter «9fk is orchestra. ebon and emembfes. 

All Brittek Entreats at dMk ter Covenant Fee 
ROHillSckMt. 

Entry at way op between 7 nnd IS. 

Apply amr for pfrinninaiy wditkms far cstqr in 1387 
Ctehjn&MtTMiiic.LiteW^MiKleKi, Ml IS 


ST 

CHRISTOPHER 
SCHOOL 

LETCHWOHTH, HERTS. 

LCTCHwomM (500 pupils, boarding and day) 


H 

m 


MillfMd 
Junior School 


EdgadeyHall 


Otters a c o mplet e scheme of education lor bows and pits 
between 2b rod 19 mu (boaters from age 7) wrib: . 


Glastonbury, Somerset BA68LD. 
■Wepbcne (0458) 32446 


Co-EducationaL 450+ pupils and 62 teachers. Ace 
range: 7 to 13‘: years. Averse number of pupils 
per doss: Wl Boarding and Oav. Fees (per term): 
Boarding £1570, Day (10-13)*B8a 0%) £780. 

Scholarships and 
Bursaries for 
September 1987 


Giving a percentage reduction on standard fees 
which will normally continue when a ptipfl 
transfers to me Senior School. 
Candidates should be over eight years and under 
eleven years on January 1st 1987, but 
consideration will be given to those a four months 
outside these limits. 

Entries dose on February 2nd, 1967. Open Day 
February 28th. Assessment takes plxe on * 
March 7th. 



between 2b and 19 yam (boaters from age 7i with . 

* An emptess on the needs of the mdmdud cMd will 
education seen in a Malang peraDoettm 

■ft SmaB classes, specsfistsbitt and a wide range of courses m 
languages, arts, science and (rascal subjects 

* An excebent record of entry a anmnibes (ndudmg 
regubrty to (kbndge) and u vocatenal frwmg. 

<t Exceptional Hobbes for drma, music and creative ans 
(new fteaue opened recently). 

■ft A friendly. etomS. canng a tmosphere m ctv educational 
boarding houses. 

4 Reafcsbc invotvement of pupils in school government. 
comrauMty service and chaden^ng outdoor activities 

* Vegetarian whole food dal and ait emphasis on humane 
values rod an international outlook. 

* Long expenence vrtb chddren of parents living overseas 

* An attractive camous an the edge or (be first Garden Cfly 
one mtfe from the A1 and 38 mins, from Kings Cross 
Mmssm may be considered at any sap 19 to me age at 13 

and for dreef entry to Om soft Farm 


Prospectus from the Heed, Colin Reid, MJL 
Te le phone: Letdnrorth (0462) 679301 


WELLINGTON SCHOOL 

Carle ton Turrets. AYR. KA7 2XH 

InkpMkoi Hnerdimc Dbv School fur &<n prti. :i- 1H Vnn 


)**’■ eril wnliRed slafT Irachins to unjvprsrtv rnlnm. All 
hvoTK rartnuw*. Annum s Krannmm. SIbI»ikk. 4 Mrrl- 
f fn t'omrutrr Scimk+- lUt Computer).). 

1 MBpiUKihiw farms i^udunrc and vnrii njamon. 

Stfiwp UMl. urn 
la nimiiiti r 
artivnin. Ihikr nT Kd- 
infcufsh Award. 

(wwm a pl Atwlvd 


llarr, Schrrar Vor 
Fwpcrop. ptntw 
»nl» k> ihr Htwbaas- 
Ww tehplvw fltSL'l 
J6KCJI tJUmtl. 


'ELLINGTON SCHOflf A VI? 


FOUNDED 1849 


German day intensive 
courses at eto mer vn y 
and m tem wc ha ts 
I levels starting 27th 
October, 4 weeks. 3 
hours dally, tee £75 
Also courses it 
Germany. 


Goethe Institute, 
SO Princes Gats, 
London SW7 


Tel; 01-581 3344/7. 


TAUNTON 

SCHOOL 


TUTORIAL COLLEGE 


TAUNTON SCHOOL OFFERS 
INDEPENDENT BOARDING 
AND DAY EDUCATION FOR 
BOYS AND GIRLS FROM 3-18. 


A widely based curriculum leads to 
GCSE and GCE ‘O’ and ‘A’ level 
examinations and preparation for 
University entrance. 


Indhridualty planned tuition in Cambridge 
for GCE at O and A Levels. 

One and two-year courses and one-term 
intensive re-take revision. 

Write to 
The Principal, 

3 Brookside, 

Cambridge CB2 1JE 
or telephone 0223 64639 . 


St. Philip’s School 

(Established 1934) 

6 Wetherby Place, London S.W.7 
TeL* 01-373 3944 




SCHOLARSHIPS 


A Roman Catholic day preparatory school conve- 
niently situated in Kensington (close to Gloucester 
Road Underground Station). Boys from 7-13 years 
are prepared for Commmon Entrance and Scholar- 
ship level entrance to public schools. Size of 
classes is smalL 


Excellent facilities for games. 

Please apply to the Headmaster for further details 
ami prospectus. 


Independent day and boarding prep school for 
boys and girts with kindergarten and pre prep, 
age range 3-13. Good academic record with top 
scholarships to Winchester College and 
Sherborne Girls School in 1986 and 2 other Win- 
chester Scholarships. Good playing fields, in- 
door swimming pooi etc. Caring stable staff, 
discipline based on Christian values: For further 
details apply to: 

Headmaster, West Downs SchooL 
Winchester SQ22 5D2 


Wycombe Abbey School 


SCHOLARSHIPS 


te offering the following scholarships in 1987; TTW 
Wycombe Abbey Open Scholarship, The W»w 
Johnston Yapp Scholarship and The WWtetew Scbotah 
slap (for Music) each valued at two-thws of the enauri 
tees; The Crosthwatte Scholarship and the WMpoto 
Scholarship, each valued at one-sixth of the annual 
tees aid five exhibitions, valued at one-twelfm ofW 
annual tees, awarded to girts who do not qua* reed* 
scholarship standard. - 


For copy of prospectus and further 
details, please apply to: CoL D.N. Lowe. 
QBE, Ad minis tr a ti v e Bursar, Room 31, 
Taunton School, Taunton, Somerset 
Tefc (0823) 76081. 


HENDON 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL 


Boys 7-13 prepared for the Common Entrance 
Examinations to independent secondary 
schools. Founded 1873. Fees £760 per term, 
inclusive of all extras except text books. 
Headmaster is a member of the 1APS. 


“Tomorrow’s war will not be 
won on the playing fields of 
Eton, but rather in the 
computer rooms of 
Cheltenham...” 


QUEENSW00D 

SCHOLARSHIPS* 


qUEENSWOOV 


in laddition > the school i« offariho two full tea Soft Form 
Scholarships and one half fee sixth Form Schoterahirt 
Examinations are held m January and tfetafoMdenvy 
forms are avatebto from The School Sacrfltery l 'tito r , 
ombe Abbey School High Wycombe. Buek&HPll IK : 



A School with traditional 
values and forward 
thinking... 

PRINCETHORPE COLLEGE 


For details of entry please 
telephone the Headmaster 


01 203 3465 


Extract— The Times. 7th October 1986 
Te find out why contact the headmasters of 

CHELTENHAM COLLEGE and 
CHELTENHAM COLLEGE 
JUNIOR SCHOOL 
On (0242) 513540 and (0242) 522697 


OoKASMOd « » Mdepemtont grte boating school in Hentordshn 
Mb etceBent fufetes fw pris m the 11-18 year age grot?. 

SIX SCHOAESUPS la kt the nbe ol 50% ot fees wM be amniediD 
gets otMnng Years L U. ■ and VI. on Uie nsiAs ol axamnatnns and 
mtovwB to be beM n Janary and February 1987. A Muse Scholar, 
sbp may be award ed to a anm n fte atew cateroiv mho tel also 
hate an a u d ffl on. An OLD QUKfiSWOOlAti? fflJRSARY win be 

aoeahle for me fesi ome. d He daughter or graMfdaughier al an 0M 
Qu ea w oo dn n 


Westminster School 

Sixth Form Scholarships 1987 


/^ftTHBQUI 

1 s chool 


i 

,J ; - A wy 

, . tesi. ,i W'i 


’ --***:* *o 

1 ^ * 


I **«"« pnw«u. «> mind aMy aM tiwocatnete . 


' V I" * « 


noness than haft me kbs. and may m tacteuN atetetf 



RUGBY CV23 9PX 

Telephone Damn (0926) 632147 

Boys 11+ to 18+- Orts 16+ » 16+ 

Fid boanftng. weekly boonllng and day 

* a modem. suooessM and wd+wptd Catnoie school 
iwd eom m hi g members of ad faiths 

* Wide range Ol subjects to G.C.SLE. A and University Schotar- 
step level 

* nation for Dyslexic students 

* Generous awards and schoiarahiin (Academic. Music rod 
Art) 

- Lame range ol extra cintcUv activities 

' UntM rural setting amidst 200 acres of parWaraL 60 
acres of pteytng WOs and modem spans complex w«i 
squash courts 

* Assistance with t ransport given to oversees students and 
those fcving long dbtBncas from the coMge 

Prospectus and Ul delate of entry . from 
The Reverend Headmaster. (IN) 


RUSHMOOR SCHOOL 


58/60 Shakespeare Road 
Bedford MK40 2DL 
Telephone; Bedford 52031 

INDEPENDENT BOYS SCHOOL 

Day and boarding 4 Y, to 16 years. 

Boys are prepared for 
entry to other schools 
and for G.C5.E. 

Boarding in a small group fnafntaning 
ferrety atmosphere and intfividual care. 

For further information please telephone the 
Headmasters secretary. 



Gieeleswick 


WORCESTER CATHEDRAL 
CHOIR 


W the. 

■Sprarfemstfetawn m tx> mm to cattan ta texxntb 
***** m tfw rnoent n SUN nMutendlMi 
The ciosxio Date <s JO Nnentta isk 

Ful1 Otowl lrorn The feast?, 

Lildc Deans Vjra. London SWtTW 


BOARDING B DAT 

“ Boys & Girls 8-18 

• F«st gass mdependeni Bhutan m sxcap&onal 
Dates sumondmgs 

• Easy access to M6/Leeds/MaflC he st ar /Lates 

• Generous Academe 8 Music Sdioiarshrps & Buoanes aoifabte 
Fa Prospectus & latter delate cortart. 

The l laa d moBtu r, Gt^feswlck School, Settle, 
North Yorkshire. B024 ODE. Tet 027923546 


Boys who win be cttbi or niaem September IPS? aw iRvticd 
to attend a Voice Trial on 5th and OUi December 1086 for 
CTtonswriJrips in V/wceserCattudral Choir. Boys arc 
educated ai The Kiss's School, an indrpendrm Public School. 

aod Scholarships ItottctuK loa muimum of £2170 pA) 
enter more than heir their ices. The County of Hereford and 
ttuiusci' and a number of LEAs pvt financial HSisaiKc 

towards <« and txttrdmB in case of ncnL 


■Applications 

(IS beretmed hr Friday I4tb Namqbcr 1986L - 
and briber details from the Headmaster's secretary. 
The Kings School. Worcester. 


GORDONSTOUN SCHOOL 

s,x ™ FORM SCHOLAR SHITS 
FOR BOYS ARB 6TOU 

,1? qg « 

years rod are awarded for acatfome a^i«LnimlMin 

ssssSS 


.W- i 






t 


/ 


V I , R; . 

V. " ‘ . ■ >il* 














a 


cm 


INDEPENDENT 
SCHOOLS 
FEATT jrf 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


SPORT 


SCHOLARSHIPS 


m 


OUNDLE 
SCHOOL 

Scholarship 
Examinations 1987 

ii+ JUNIOR ENTRY 

^®°w?faips of up 10 two thirds fees are offered 

h? V ** Junior Housc ' Candidates must 
K under 12 years of age on 31a Augnsr, 19 87. 

Jam»^ imnation ^ 18,56 ft*** 31 Oundle in 

MUSIC - 3 Major Music Scholarships of up u 
will take place at 

SIXTH FORM ENTRY : 

Scbobnbips varying in value from half to two- 

Jgds of the fees are available for September 
IW - i hey are for entrance into the Sixth Form, 
are tenable for two years and are awarded for 
academic achievement and. all-round promise. 
The examination will take at Oundle in 
February. 

Full details of these Scholarships and ordinary 
13+ ernty are available from The Secretary, 
Sdmol, Ojmdk, Peterborough, FES 
<EN. Telephone: 0832 73536. 


MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND 
EXHIBITIONS 1987 

The Coflege has 890 boarders aged 13 to 18, 
with 420 boys and girls in the Sixth Form, his 
proud of its outsxancSng academic record, 
first-class extra-curricular opportunities and 
the friencffiness -and energy of the school 
commuraty. 

The Mowing awards ere offered in 1987: 
Up to 15 SchoJarsf^aixi Exhibitions for boys 
now aged 12 or 13, from both independent 
and maintained schools, who show mgh aca- 
demic achievement or potential. 

Up to 6 Scholarships and Exhibitions for boys 
and girts now egad 15 or 16 and of high aca- 
demic ability, who wish to enter the Sixth 
Form in September 1987. 

Awards, at 13+ or at Sixth Form Level, are 
also given for outstanding achievement or po- 
tential in Music or Art. 

Scholarships range in value from a maximum 
of 100% to a minimum of 20% of the fees, 
depending chiefly on merit but also on need. 

Fut details of the awards, application forms 
and a Coflege prospectus are available from 
the Registrar. Marlborough Coflege, Wiltshire 
SN8 1PA (telephone 0672 52664). 


QUEEN’S 

COLLEGE 

LONDON' 

SCHOLARSHIP AND 
ENTRANCE 
EXAMINATIONS 
for 1988 

Scholarship and entrance examinations will 
be hdd in January and February. Entry is 
at 11+, 14+ and 16+. The College offers 10 
Assisted Places at 11+ and 5 at 16+. 

There are 2 entrance scholarships <!6 of die 
fees) at 11+ and 14+ and 6 scholarships up 
to the value of full foes for girls intending 
to follow Advanced Level courses. Music 
and Art scholarships are also available at 
16+. 

For further details please apply to Mis J. M. 
Pearce, Queen’s College, 43/49 Harley 
Street, London WIN 2BT. 

Telephone number: 01-580 1533 


ST MARYS 
SCHOOL 

WANTAGE, OXON OX12 *BZ 

• Independent Church of England boarding school 
for 300 girts aged 11-18 

Four Scholarships 

One junior, one sixlb-fonn and two Music scholar- 
ships available each year. 

Prospectus from the 
Admissions Secretary 
(02357-3571) 


NORTHBOURNE PARK 
SCHOOL (I.A.P;SJ 

A preparatory school for boarders 
and day children aged 3 - 13. 

1c Easy access to Loudon and Chanod ports 

It Beautiful grounds and attractive country bouse. 

* Scholarships aid Bursaries avatabie. 

* ExcaMaut academic record. 

It ■ Many modem facilities 

For further details and protpaaBs apply to. - 

Mr. T- F. Fanar, 

. . Jtontta amt Park S«fe4 . 

Kant CTUONW 


Sf^DRlCS COLLEGE 1 

Secretarial, Businas and 
Language Couraes ■ 

Word Preeewr 
Training 

English for Overseas 

Students 

Resident & Day 
Students , 

The Registrar (T1) 

2 Arkwright road, 
LONDON NW3 6AD 
Telephone 01 435 9831 




THE MOYSES STEVENS 
FLOWER SCHOOL 

Three week courses ■ in Flower Arranging and 
Florisiry held throughout the year. 

Two day courses also available. . 


01-493 8171 tor father details. 

6 Bruton Street London WfX 7AG. 


RUGBY UNION 


Selectors given 
headache by 
scram halves in 
abundance 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

This weekend aO but one of with Saracens, may opt for 
England's divisions will take a London, but the North are not 
long lanl look at their squads, short of lock forwards, 
with a view to trimming them Bui whither the tikes of Rob 
back before deciding, m a Andrew, Kevin Simms and 
month's time, winch players Francis Gough? Simms, a 
wiD represent them in the medical student at St Mary's 
divisional championship dur- Hospital misses Wasps' match 
ing December. The exception with Cardiff today, but may 
is the Midlands, who will opt for the North; Andrew, 
ponder the results of today's who does play at Sudbury, is 
club games and hold their in a different situation in that 


meeting on Tbmsday. 


he is now living and working 


It is a curiosity, but one of in London for an indefinite 
some concern to the national period. 


selectors, that three of the four 
divisions may be undecided 
about the sameijorition; that 


“I have played for the North 
for the last couple of seasons, 
travelling bade from Cam- 


of scrum half where, even if bridge and from Notting- 
one candidate- does spring to ham," Andrew said. “But 


mind, the cover for him is not 
so obvious. The south-west, at 
least, have .Richard HiR 


now. for a change. Tin in a 
long-term situation and I have 
to make a decision which is 


England’s captain, . as their right for me and my employ- 
first choke; with Richard ers. as wdl as rugby con- 
Harding (Bristol) and Marcos sideraiions.” 

Hannaford (Gloucester) as Should Bates return to form 
back-up. All three are mem- and fitness, Andrew would 
bers of the England squad form a dub partnership with a 
which goes to Portugal at the strong divisional contender, 
end of this month. . . but he must establish himself 

What of the rest? London as front runner ahead of 
played Steve Bates last season, Simon Smith (Richmond) be- 
but the Wasps player has not fore thinking of teaming up in 
yet resumed after breaking his the divisional side with Jamie 
arm in the John Player Special Salmon (Harlequins), another 
Cup final last ApriL He hopes strong England candidate, 
toj* back within the next There should, however, be 
fortnight but, m the mean- no lack of quality in two of the 
tune, John Cul len (Rich- major dub games today, that 
mood), Floyd Steadman (Sar- between Wasps and Cardiff 
acms) and Alex Woodhpuse and the ancient battle between 
(Harlequins) are afl working Bristol and Bath, the only 
hard to stake their darn. John Smith's merit table 
In the Midlands Sieve match. 

"SSi^SS^LX bring nine imer- 

playMlthis season because of a national ^ London, among 

STE them Alan Phillips at hooker® 

vZ , ^r‘^S ,)andNick 

Youngs (Leicester). Wasps have half a dozen caps 

The virtues of both are of their own and the contest 
known and they appear to between the rival back rows 
have been by-passed on the should be one for the con- 
representative trail by others noisseor. 

— a situation which, I imagine, .. nil ... , . 

neither is prepared to accept Hanbng wpJ lari Bristol in 

Now thafNfcd MM, 

prate of the north, has d* VEfaftS 

parted Jhropgfa injur y, there a ^ ChrS^Martin has a 
no outstanding heir-apparent. 

a«™Knfa, R (Dmta m a« SlS 

BrawL a ft5rW«nd Nick 
M ^ en ** flanker in the* 
JJS rSZU rvSiS* ahsence of John Hall who win 

SjSXSXS attend sister's weeding 
instead. There will be interest 
too in Bath's second team 
where John Morrison (ns 
England colt of recent vintage, ^ om Austra iia) ' md 

The refinement of their David Egerton are due to play, 
squad is made more difficult Egerton hoping that the bade 
for the North because so many iqjury which has plagued him 
of their players are stationed for the best part of a year is 
in the south. John Howe, now cured. 



By Ian McLauchlan 


Back home John Gallagher, the English-born member of the New Zealand tour party who 
start a visit to France next week, practices at Roehampton yesterday with his colleagues. 
Gallagher has yet to play for h£s adopted country. (Photograph by Hugh Ron tied ge) 

Hawick enjoy the McKibbin 
benefit of success T ba f k ? or 

By Ian McLauchlan XUSiODliUlS 

Possibly the only team in and centre respectively, for the By George Ace 

Scotland able to afford the injured Blair and Fyfe. This will. _ , . . , . 

luxury of changing a winning as always, be an intriguing game v 1 * ,re “ n< * squad training 
team is Hawick, who reinstate which will largely depend on sessions, today and tomorrow m 
Hogarth and McGaugbey in how much possession the home Du ^l ,n : have disrupted. Ulster 
their familiar luck row po- pack can win for their dangerous senior league fixtures this after-- 
si lions. Their opponents. Mel- back division. noon 10 such an e * wnt , ^ al 0 . y 

rase, are forced again to ring the ___ , n ! f c,,on !"°8 !,mes . l J n,a l l"- 

changes with Karotewsky mov- i° Bul Ihcft - W,I L be / !5 

ing to lock. Weatherly to wing £SF mlcreS1 L" lhc C i l , bs ? Jn ***$ 

forward, and Todd to pro®. international No8. John Beat- raeeung between Malone and 

Selkirk, who have tost both Tllf Instomans. even though points 

their McEwan's National at Stake ' Bn f 1 

League games so &r. bring the SS5. affJSSt “ d McKibbm returns to the 
experienced Jeffrey, Brothwson Amos in the centre. Instonian from row alter the 

and Tomlinson into their pack In the Edinburgh local derby knee injury which had sidelined 
and move Pow lo full back in between Edinbergh Academi- h, m for three weeki 
order to accommodate John- cab and Huiots FP. the home McKibbin had a fine game at 
ston. Ayr also make changes, side recall Lutton and Brown to loose-head prop for Ulster 
Gilmour moving from centre to front row duty while the visitors *g? ,BSl the South ot scouana 
full back ‘to the exclusion of bring in Livingstone to prop for pnor to his injury and may wdl 
McLean. Alan Brown comes the injured lain Milne. Hamit- emerge, before the season is 
into the centre. ton resumes at lock with Bryce ? v « r - .** a . “° ar J c *l? rs ?„ '?T 

In the top game in the league, on the flank. . . inclusion in Ireland^ World 

Boroaghnnur face an unbeaten: Cup plans - as almost certainly 

8^™p.'.‘/M.i,iH n . ch Fp* e !; Devereanx returns S^toSS. I 1oSf' T S= 

Meggetland. The home side The Welsh centre John capable of playing on either side 

return Hall to scrum half white Devereaux hopes to have his °f toescrum. . 

Me Master replaces their figured first outing of the season today 

No S. Wilson. The loss of for South Glamorgan Institute unnmSy v^tcadenry. au2*Bmcrv 
Wilson is a sad blow to at home to Tredegar in a oyms. C arriadwgu* * p*i o< Oegy. 
Boroughmuir’s plans to play a Schweppes Cup preliminary Baiy,rBn * * N,FC - 

tight driving game to tie in the round tie. Devereaux. aged 20. 

Calder twins. Finlay and Jim. capped seven rimes fry Wales. RUGBY FIXTURES 


Possibly the only team in 
Scotland able to afford the 
luxury of changing a winning 
team is Hawick, who reinstate 
Hogarth and McGaugbey in 
(heir familiar hack row po- 
sitions. Their opponents. Md- 
1 rase, are forced again to ring the 
changes with Karolewsky mov- 
ing to lock. Weatherly to wing 
forward, and Todd to prop. 

Selkirk, who have tost both 
their McEwan's National 
League games so far. bring the 
experienced Jeffrey, Brotherson 
ami Tomlinson into their pack 
and move Pow to foil hade in 
order to accommodate John- 
ston. Ayr also make changes. 
Gilmour moving from centre lo 
full back ‘to the exduaon of 
McLean. Alan Brown comes 
into the centre. 

In the top game in the league, 
Borooghnmir 'free an unbeaten: 
and an unchanged, 
Stewart's/Melville FP at 
Meggetland. The home side 
return Hall to scrum half white 
McMaster replaces their injured 
No & Wilson. The loss of 
Wilson is a sad blow to 
Boroughmuir’s plans to play a 
tight (hiving game to tie in the 
Calder twins. Finlay and Jim. 

Stuart Johnston, the scrum 
halt returns to the Watsonians 
team to face WestoTScaduul at 
Myreside. West bring in Living- 
ston and Robertson, at hooker 


and centre respectively, for the 
injured Blair and Fyfe. This will, 
as always, be an intriguing game 
which will largely depend on 
how much possession the home 
pack can win for their dangerous 
back division. 

Gala are at home to Glasgow 
Academicals, who have their 
international No 8. John Beat- 
tie. returning from injury to 
replace bis brother Duncan. 
Gala field Mania at prop and 
Amos in the centre: 

In the Edinburgh local derby 
between Edinbergh Academi- 
cals and Heriots FP. the home 
side recall Lutton and Brown to 
front row duty while the visitors 
bring in Livingstone to prop for 
the injured Iain Milne. Hamil- 
ton resumes at lock with Bryce 
an the flank. . „ 

Devereaux returns 

The Welsh centre John 
Devereaux hopes to have his 
first outing of the season today 
for South Glamorgan- Institute 
at home to Tredegar in a 
Schweppes Cup preliminary 
round tie. Devereaux. aged 20. 
capped seven rimes fry Wales, 
has not played since damaging 
knee ligaments in the pre-season 
Snell ing Sevens Tournament. 
He trained with the Welsh 
squad last weekend. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Awesome 
Aussies 
divide fan 
loyalty 

By Keith Macklin 

For lhc second consecutive 
week then: is a clash of top 
games, with the Lancashire Cup 
final between Oldham and 
Wigan competing fur interest 
with the third game of the 
Australian tour at Leeds. Many 
people might wish lo see both 
games, but west of the Pennine* 
they will settle for the county 
cup final at Si Helens, and in the 
east they .will go to Headinglcy 

Thc Australians have proved 
in their big opening victories at 
Wjgan and Craven Park. Hull, 
that they are as mobile, ruthless 
and skillful as ever. Hull Kings- 
ton Rovers had a weakened 
team on Wednesday, but even 
the full side would have had 
severe problems against a tour- 
ing team which fired on aft 
cylinders from the beginning o! 
the nuich. 

Leeds, who haw bv their own 
high standards made a poor 
start to the season, must fear the 
worst as they take their turn m 
being jolied and oui-paced by 
the Kangaroos, who are warm- 
ing up ominously lor the first 
international at Ok) Trafford on 
Saturday week. 

I meres i has been aroused to 
such an extent that nearly 
20.000 tickets have been sold for 
Old Trafiord. and League of- 
ficials expect an attendance 
nearing 45.000. which would 
establish a record for a Great 
Britain v Australia international 
in this country. 

At St Helens a crowd of more 
than 20,000 is anticipated for 
the Lancashire Cup final be- 
tween Oldham, the underdogs 
who last won the trophy in ! 958. 
and Wigan, the holders who 
have won the cup a record 17 
times and are appestring in their 
32nd final. 

Few people outside Oldham 
gi\e the outsiders a chance, but 
the odds have been reduced 
considerably by troublesome 
injuries to two key Wigan 
players. Ellery Hanley, who 
missed the tour game against 
Australia, is still bothered by his 
knee injury, and is unlikely io be 
fit. though Graham Lowe, the 
coach, would be tempted to 
throw him into the fray if there 
was a borderline chance of 
fitness. 

Also hurt is Ian Roberts, the 
tall Australian forward, who has 
made a big impact with his 
powerful tackling and running. 
Without these two. even the 
star-studded Wigan may be 
reduced to a team of ordinary 
mortals, and Oldham are full of 
confidence after their excellent 
semi-final win against Widnes. 

Ticket rash 

The Australian tourists have 
sparked a ticket rush for the first 
international match agniiw 
Great Britain at Old Trafford on 
October 2S. More than 15,000 
tickets have already been sold. 


CYCUNG 



Wmkfield Place 
Cordon Bleu Cookery 
Certificate k Diploma Courses 

Iran to become a nmfcssiMdfti^ 

sunwMfiogs wfth the best tratotao wribWa-aD conesm 

GflRlon filru. Ois ijyaHtoaliins as ncognM mnowidB. 
CnnawAMe . 

12 ■-> fuf* m fant enfryJan. Rq md Sect 



Middlesex the 
favourites 
for south title 

By Peter Tallow 

The men's South of England 
'county tournament at Orping- 
ton today is looking more and 
more like a territorial 
championship as newcomers. 
Western Counties and London, 
join the regulars. Kent, Surrey. 
Middlesex and Essex. 

Middlesex remain favourites, 
drawing as they do from the 
league champions, Hampstead, 
and Kenton, but the, other 
placings will depend on the 
tussle between the super-fit 
university freshmen and the 
established players. 

Surrey, the holders, have lost 
Hillcroft to the new conglom- 
erate. London, so they will draw 
from Croydon. .Otipstead and 
PurJey while London have the 
support of London University. 

The tournament has extended 
to Bath where the club is joined 
by players from Reading. 
Southampton and Oxford 
universities to produce the 
Western Counties. There could 
be upsets from that quarter but 
it looks as though the experience 
of Middlesex. Surrey and 
London will capture the first 
.ih.rfK; pfaces.___ : — _ 



FENCING 


Leicester the 
venue for 
leading event 

Britain's leading fencers con- 
verge on the Granby Halls. 
Leicester, today for a weekend 
of top competition in the most 
prestigious event of the year, the 
Leicester City Open. 

Over 300 fencers have entered 
to challenge last year's cham- 
pions. among them the British 
modern pentathlon squad, 
members of the British men’s 
and women's foil and epee 
teams — who will be competing 
for international travel grants 
which go with the leading places 
and contenders for the Chal- 
lenge Martini International. 
Epee in March. Leicester being 
one or the qualifying 
tournaments. 

Defending champions at 
Leicester include Pierre Harper 
I Salk' Goodnll. London) at 
men's foil: Fiona McIntosh 
(Salle Paul, London) at women's 
. foil:. Quentin Bern man (Salle 
Boston, London) at men's epee: 
Catherine Longman (Salic Bos- 
ton. London) at women's epee; 
and Mark Slade (Hcmel Hemp- 

.stead ).ak$abTVv 




















SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


RACING: MISRULE LOOKS PICK OF THE WEIGHTS IN CESAREWITCH 


Hills has Sure Blade 
honed to perfection 


Twelve months ago Sheikh 
Mohammed saw his maroon 
and white racing silks carried 
lo victory by Pebbles in 
Newmarket's Dubai Cham- 
pion Slakes. Today I expect 
the same colours, this time 
worn by Brent Thomson on 
Sore Blade, to be first past the 
post again. 

Barry Hills, the coil’s 
trainer, is adamant that Sure 
Blade has improved since he 
won the Queen Elizabeth II 
Stakesovera mile at Ascot last 
month and that he is better 
now thian at any time in his 
life. “Right on the button." 
were his last words to me on 
the subject yesterday. 

If that, is the .case. Sure 
Blade will be a very tough nut 
to crack this afternoon. He is 
also a comparatively fresh 
horse following that lengthy 
mid-summer, rest and that 
counts for a lot at this late 
stage of the season. 

The .only area of doubt 
concerns Sure Blade's ability 
to last JO furlongs. However. 1 
know that both Hills and 
Thomson are convinced that 
he win get the trip; and my 
lasting impression of both his 
wins at Ascot this year is that 
he is crying out for this new 
distance, a view strengthened 
by an analysis of his pedigree. 

Fillies have an excellent 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 

recent record in this race with 
six victories in the last 10 
years. Now. Triptych. Park 
Express and Untold will all be 
out to improve that record. 

And it is possible to make 
out a case for all three: 

T riptych on how she ran in the 
Arc: Park Express in light of 
the way that she beat Double 
Bed and Triptych at Phoenix 
Park: and Untold because she 
beat Park Express in the 
Yorkshire Oaks. But I still 
prefer Sure Blade. 

Today’s race has often 
proved a graveyard for horses 
who ran in the Arc while both 
Park Express and Untold have 
been beaten on their latest 
starts.- Like Untold. Celestial 
Storm contested the St Leger 
over much further at Don- 
caster where they both failed 
to cope with Moon Madness. 
To me that suggests that they 
should not now beat Sure 
Blade. 

- With Ore and Brightner 
both dropping out of the Tote 
Cesarewitch yesterday, the 

■■ weights have gone up 61b, 
leaving Sneak Preview with 
the dubious honour of 
shouldering top weight and 
thus carrying 301b more than 

- last year when he finished a 
dose fourth. 

With four wins in a row to 
his credit this season. Sneak 


Preview's improvement in the 
last 12 months is self-evident 
It is also in his favour that he 
is a fresh horse. But SO loo is 
Misrule, who receives 211b 
from Sneak Preview and who 
has made a miraculous recov- 
ery from an injury which 
necessitated a metal plate 
being inserted in his leg. 

It was not until September 5 
that Misrule made his sea- 
sonal debut at Haydock where 
he made light of carrying 9st 
71b and won a handicap by 
two lengths. Then he went to 
Ascot where he was beaten 
only a short head in the 
Gordon Carter Stakes by that 
smart stayer. Sarfraz. with the 
useful Kudz just behind. 

At much shorter odds, 
Gwydioa appeals as a sound 
bet in the Bentinck Stakes 
following a series of praise- 
worthy performances in better 
company. 

Today’s programme begins 
with the Mace- Worth Appren- 
tice Handicap which should 
enable the much improved 
four-year-old. Power Bender, 
to resume winning ways. 

Finally. Everett is taken to 
win the Charisma Gold Cup 
again at Kerapton where Jeff 
King's versatile four-year-old. 
Blenders Choice, looks a good 
bet in the Captain Quist 
Hurdle. 


Ajdal a 
colt of 
highest 
class 

By Michael Seely 

Ajdal hwaunp the shortest- 
priced winter favourite for the 
2,000 Guineas sines Storm Bird 
in 1900 when prodncnig an 
exhilarating burst of fin i sh ing 
speed to gm Michael Stoate 
ami Walter Swinfaon their fust 
triumph in the William HEB 
Dewhnrst Stakes at Newmarket 
yesterday. This win also gave 
Sheikh Mohammed his fcst 
group one victory with a celt in 
Britain. 

A fin lo n g and a half from 
home Ajdal looked in a different 
league to his toiling rivals as the 
Northern Dancer colt went three 
lengths dear with breathtaking 
ease. However the 9-4 on 
fa vo ■rite’s stride shortened in 
the final 100 yards and Shady 
Heights rallied gamely to be 
only three-quarters of a length 
hr h ind at di» iw> Gengbiz 
finished lift lengths away in 
third place, followed by Master 
Majestic, the Middle Park 
Stakes winner, and Rnmboogje. 

“Of coarse I woald have liked 
to see him go right away,** said 
Stoate, “hot don't forget that 
this was a big step op in class. 
These colts are the best 
aronndL*'Swinbani confirmed 
this opinion. “He's by far and 
away the best two-year-old I've 
sat on. He's get real class but 
was doing ""drff in front." 

Stones golden season is 



ii) 

'• ’ C { " 

v V . • . 

<* . * 


.»</> • 





Ajdal and Walter Swinburn stride dear to win the Dewhnrst Stakes at Newmarket yesterday (Photograph: tan Stewart) 

showing no signs of coming to an we'll be getting Sib from the Flower and Invited Guest re- Tfi yjjll 

end and the record breaking cohs next May. main joint-favourites at 8-1, bat I VI III |\vvl vUll 

Barb adian -ben trainer has new Robert Armstrong was At Risk was iutrodaced into the , j 

addled 11 group one winners at thrilled with the performance of betting at 25-1 after Caathen hrpo |rc rfiCOffl 

b nw and ILmiI rt.Se .. rt.. Rlh, te UlViUVJ IVVVIW 


showing do signs of coming to an 
end and the record breaking 
Barbadian-born trainer has new 

saddled 11 {poop one winners at 

home and abroad this year, as 
many as did Vincent O'Brien h 
1977. 

Judged strictly on a line 
through Shady Ajdal 

can only be rated lib superior to 
Forest Flower. Bat the colt looks 
Ekely to make the greater 
improvement. He has arresting 
speed and, whatever his pros- 
pects m the Derby, he is going to 
take aD the beating in tbe first of 
the celts' classics. 

“That certainly makes ft 
worthwhile entering Forest 
Flower for the 2,000 Gumeas,** 

said lan BnlHing, tbe tw it Iran * 

filly’s trainer. “Don't forget 


NEWMARKET 


By Mandarin 


Selections 


1.45 Power Bender. 

2.20 SURE BLADE (nap). 
3.05 Misrule. 

3.40 Bashayer. 

4. lOGwydion. 

4.40 Young Jason. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 
1.4S Power Bender. 

2J>0 Untold. 

3.05 The Prudent Prince. 

3.40 Bashayer. 

4. lOGwydion. 

4.40 Merdon Melody. 


Going: good 


Draw: no advantage 


145- MACE-WORTH APPRENTICE HANDICAP (£4.597: 1m 2f) (16 
rentiers) 

101 (T6) 281000 DORSET COTTAGE (Mrs S Randal) W Janris 40-10 SOuaac 

102 (2) 011T12 POWEH B0IDEI1 (CD) (Addson Tool) G PrteMd-Gonlon 4-0-6 SCM6s(5) 

103 (12> 4-01000 quiet RIOT (R AreuM) R Armstrong 44t F Shotas P) 

105 (11) - 00132 STRAW BOATER (Britsti Thoroughbred Pic) LCunani3«4 CHUB (5) 

10? (41 040000 (HCORDGE (G WmgglG Wragg 4-013 0 Sumy €51 

109 CIO)' 441230 VAGUE MELODY (D) (A Simmons) L Piggou 4-6-12 H Roberts (5) 

111 (6) 034004 REINDEER WALK (A AfdhaQ G Mutter 4-8-1 1 RCwtat 

112 it) 14-1200 BEN ADHEW (G Kidd) H Candy 4-8-8 R Teague (5) 

1M P3) 043113 NO RESTRARfT (D) (G Strawtoridge) W Hastings-Bass 34-8 _ Dale Gttecn 

117 (3J 0-00000 RUSTY LAW (C) (M Banks] G Harwood 4-8-7 SH*(S) 

118 (8) 10 DHALSM-fShoMi Mohammed) M Stoute 3-8-7 MAGta(5) 

119 m 030010 FARM CLUB (G Ssngstar) J Toler 3-8-7 Jacqol Hooton (5) 

120 (S) 004001 MOUNT TUMBLEDOWN (Mrs J Coflns) R Hannon Stf7 ges) LJoeee 

123 (7) 030020 PARIS TRADER (N Ylasoumi) J Payne 4-7-T2 C Bata— (ft 

124 (14) 044230 TOM FORRESTER (P JuberQP Mitch— 5-7-10 —: — LRiggio(5) 

126 (153 002030 FLfcfcl P00TED(J LamtotonjG Pntchard-Gordon 87-7 — _ RH— owey(5) 

T965: DOLKA (8-11) W R Swinburn (9-4 Jt-tav) M Stoute 20 fan 


94 — 

• 99F2-1 
0914-1 
' 87 5-1 


PfTDM tidRSET COTTAGE has been below lorm since a ®-1ft neck victory aver Annum (8-13) at 
rvrruvi Yorfc(Bf. £4979. good to fem.Juty 12. 13ran).POWBl BB«B1(8S) was a fc 1 2nd to Dates (9^ 

6) m meVWfamJ® CambrKtoesnire. a Newmarket (851. E37281, good to fin". Oct 4. 31 fan) — we PAWS 
TRADER (7-7) Rth$M a 7^1 VAGUE MELODY (8-13) laa won in flitt country when beating test otTm (9- 

7) 25H at Warwick (im 2.8*. £2629. good to firm. June 21. 8 ran). He has been piacad a number ot times sines 


TRADER (7-7) fiqqhed a 7fcl6fli. VAGUE MELODY 

7} 2YA atWarwrck (1m ZBt. £2629. 
and won a 3 mat race in Osttnd. “ 
wtwn (list over ft 4th lo Boot PoMSh at Yorii (71. 

5tti in handicap cempniy last tlme-pnnnously(8-8l 

Aug 11. IB ran). FLEET FOOTED washed mid dwisicr last time, p 
Cowitry (9 -3) at Kempron (81. £2616. firm. July 16. 10 ran). Ha has 
SatnchOK POWER BENDER 


iriart (45f. £37281. goad to firm. Oct 4. 31 ran) where PARIS 
asi won n tors country when bearing test of Time (9- 
8 ran). He has bean placed a number ot times since 
showed Ms first form ot the se a s on last rime out 
to firm. Oct 11. 12 raft. DHALEBft wasadbtant 
star (8-8) YA m Newcastle (81 rata. £2303. good, 
cfivisicm last hme. previously (B-i) ran just over 21 3rd to Fab 
16. 10 ran). He has been on tha come for TO weeks. 


220 DUBAI CHAMPION STAKES (Group I: £86,750: 1m 2f) (11 runners) MM* 

201 (10) 0-31100 BJULLAMONT (S Martens) F Bata (Fr) 4-43 FHeed 90 33-1 

202 (2) 3-30432 HAMSTER (D) Ot Abdula) J Tree 4-9-3 Pal Eddery 88 12-1 

203 (3) 200322 SIYAN KALEM (Dana Stud Ltd) 4 Dunlop 4-0-3 W Carson 8133-1 

204 pi) 003344 TREMBLANT(C3F)(KAba— a) R anyth S«G SCuDm 18 — 

205 (5) 123233 TWPTYCH (A Oore) P Biancone (Fr) 4-941 A Cruz *99 5-1 

205 (7) 13212 CELESTIAL STORM (CO) (RDuchO830W)LCuma»ii8B-10 R Cochrane 91 8-1 

207 P) 344412 DOUBLE BED (0)(R Reeves) FOoumen(Fr) 34-10 Pate Eddery 93 10-1 

208 (ft 13-1011 SURE BLADE (Srieith Mohammed) B HRs 3-8-7 B Thomson 94 F2-1 

210 (6) 010 MONA USA (RoWvale Ud) P Keteway 34-7 M Wte 68 50-1 

211 (ft -411212 PARK EXPRESS (DBF) (P Bums) J Bteger (irel 84-7 J ReM 9B4-I 

212 (4) 11-2313 UNTOLD (Bft (Sheikh Mohammed) M Sxue 34-7 WR Swinburn 94 6-1 

1985; PEBBLES 444 Pat Eddery (9-2) tJ Brittain 10 ran 




FORM PARK EXPRESS (84) beet the 
rwnm on Slakes (1m 21. £261504 gc 
and BAILLAMONT (9-6) 4%l away mGth.Ein 
1 PTwdTspahan at Longcftamp(1m tf 50yds. £52162. firm 

nose b y one ot the bast American Ml horse3.-Man(Ha (8-7). at O e ii i m itl as t tim e (1m 41. £205909. fine. Sen 20. 
9 ran], TRIPTYCH (9-t) ran tne race other Mam the Arc when a 3rd to DANC1MG BRAVE (8-1 11 at Lraw ta ra) 
pm4f, £367965, firm. Oa 5. 15 ran). CELESTIAL STORM [9-0) reverts to 1m 21 after finishing 41 2nd to Moon 
Madness 19-01 m the Si Lenar Mm 61 127v*fe¥HfKI» «ml Sore 13. Bran) with UNTOLD (8-1 1)21 further 


Madness (9-0) m the St Leger (1rn6t 127yds. E11CS92, 
back in an E&ter untold (9-0) beat PARK EXPRESS i 
SURE BLADE T8-li)beaiTalepnitr ip rer (9-7) ftlat Ascot 
tackles 1 m 2f tor t he first bme tfas afternoon. 
Selection: TRIPTYCH 


d. Sept 13. 8 ran) with UNT0L£T(8-11) 21 hether 
*1 at York (tm 41. £42672. good. Aim 19. 1 1 ran). 
Ome (ft. £31280. good to firm, Sepr 27. 7 ran) and 


3 JS TOTE CESAREWITCH HANDICAP (£31 .128: 2m If) (25 runners) 

303 (18) 43-1111 SNEAK PREVEW (D) (Mrs C Gross) H Candy 6-9-7 WNewnes 

304 (1ft - 211123 THE PftWENT PRINCE (Q (J Greetham) W JanrtS 44-7 WRSwfabura 

305 (22) 123111 PACTOLUS (Ifl(R Do Usser) G Kmdersfey 344 J ReM 

306 (1ft 304000 AYRES ROCK (D Myers) M Haynes 5-9-2 BRoose 

307 PD 633042 SPECIAL VltfTAQE (ft (J Murdoch) J FitzGerald 640 SCMhai 

308 (7) 130020 WITHY BANK (L Smith) MHEastarby 4-6-11 MBkcb 

309 (24) 101000 ACCURACY (Mss B Bwtre) G Baking 5-64 J WKama 

310 (13) 202221 EL CONOUtSTADOR (J Ganaa-Fkady) G Honvood 3-6-7 GStawy 


CATTERICK BRIDGE 


Selections 


By Mandarin 


riO Balkan Leader. 

2.45 Dais. 

3.20 Restless Rhapsody. 

3.50 War Brave. 

4.20 Mazilier. 

4.50 Mariners Dream. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 
2. 10 Olive Leaf. 
2.45 Davallia. 

3.20 Stan bo. 

3.50 Beau Nash. 

4.20 Blazing High. 

4.50 — 


Going: 

2.10 EBF 

i fsi 

8 P) 

12 (3) 

13 (4) 
18 (2) 
27. (7) 
28 (61 


firm Draw: low numbers best up to 7f 

NORTH RIDING MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £2.078: 51) (7 runners) 

0234 BALKAN LEADER (BP) (A F Budge LM) J FtaGeraM 9-0 □ Mehta 94 9-2 

0 MTTTTE RULER (KDrke)T Barron 94 K Dailey — 10-1 

0 LAST CHORD (Lady Matthew*) I Matthews 94 — C Dwyer 80 7-1 

00040D MOTOR BROKER 06 (A Sydenham) D Lang 94 GDuMekJ 87 S-l 

420 0 3 3 STELBY IV Sassw) O Brennan 94 B C roaaW y W99 F7-d 

. 0 OUVE LEAF ( J OrbeB) W Hotai 6-11 D McKay — 14-1 

00 PATENT DREAMER (Mia S Palmer) H CoBngncfga 8-11 G Sextan 20-1 

1985: AFRICAN REX 8-11 E Guest (134 fav) W Jams IS ran 


2.45 BATLEY SELLING HANDICAP (3- Y-O: £1.089: 1m 4f 40yd) (8 runners) 

1 (S) .. 3400 DAVALUA (Lord Faetwren) D Money 9-7 GDuffleu 

4 (3) 0-p00400 HIYA BUD (P Dunn) WBenttey 811 - O Caaay (7) 

8 (6) 00400 DAIS (V) [A OWreyl P Wtayn 84 . . R Curanc 

11 (4| 040404 SOLENT EXPRESS (Mrs M Saunders) B Sievans B-I PBtanKMd 

12 ID 000040 DOON VBfTUffi IP D Brum) J Emermgion B-1 — 

14 (ft 0400 EXPEHTWITIIES$(T NaMham) B Morgan 7-12 BCrwtay 

15 Ift 004000 STORM LORIRW McKeovMi) C Thornton 7-11 ICtwraoch 

19 (7) 000000 TIBER GATE (R HoMnsfteadj R Habnshead 7-7 P Baton (7) 

1B85: ARCUD QfRL 9-7 McnoRs (7-2) J WV»n 6 ran 

120 FAVERDALE HANDICAP (£1.875: 5f) (13 runners) 

1 111) 002040 SUILA RIDGE (D)U Medier) A Hide 4-9-10_- ...J Leech (7) 

5 (4) 04031 P RESTLESS RHAPSODY (&CD) (M Hoggas) K Brassey 3-9-5 A Wthtehal (7) 

8 (1) IQ3003 MAM1RAKE MADAM (OBF) (D KmghB) Denys Snwft 3-9-2 LCtomeck 

11 15) 402040 STANBOlMrs A Dale) □ Dale 344._ G DuffteU 

12 (ft 141000 CAPTAJIfS BfflO (S) (R Whtxgl H Vttwmg 64-4 G Sexton 


By Michael Seely 

1.45 Power Bender. 2.20 SURE BLADE (nap). 3.05 Sneak Preview. 

The Times Private Handicapper's top rating: 3.05 PATH'S SISTER. 

Guide to our in-line racecard 

103 (12) 04432 TWESFCRMfCILBF) (Ms JRyley)BHefl 9-KMl B West (4) 817-2 

Racecard number. Draw m brackets. Six-flgufe dtstanca winner. BF-beaten favourite in blast 
tom! (Rea: P-puied up. U-iinseated rider. B- race). Owner in brackets. Trainer. Age and 
brought down. S-siippad up. R-reiusad). Horn s waigM. Rider phis any afcmance. The Times 
name (B-biinkers. V-vteor. H-tood. E-eyestveld. C- Private Ha ndicapper's rating. Appronmta start ing 
course winner. D-distance whiner. CD-course and pnee. 


311 (4) 142343 MEADOWBBOOK (BF) (Mrs J McOougaM) I Batfng 5-8-7 POook 

312 (2) 124414 ACTMUM (C) (F Salman) P Cole 3-8-7 Tfata 

313 (3) 042004 FLOYD (M Welsh) DEIsworih 84-7 — 

314 {ft 003303 PEGGY CAROLYN (8) (A OTteOtf M Ryan 4-8-6 PRofatasen 

315 (ft 230000 MILTON BURN (A Renata) H O'Neil 5-84 S Whitworth 

316 (ft 303113 SHWBOUmC(BF)(KAMUla)G Harwood 344 PM Eddery 

317 (25) 140113 HARLESTOfC LAKE ULBF) (J CXrtfop) J Durtap 446 WCaraaa 

318 (17) 013/000 CONTEST» ptatafl PCundMI 64-4 N Adame 

319 (ft 214314 FEDRA (Mrs H Cambarn) John FtaGenad 344 RHMs 

320 (14) 303414 DUMSTON (K Abduia) F Durr 344 SOawsea 

321 (1ft 0120-12 HRSRULE (T HoOanMlaran) D ArbMhnot 4-84 A Me dra y 

322 (21) 241331 MAIBJ0M (Ms M Gram) IMssS Ha8 5-7-10 NCartsle 

323 (20) 042204 ORANGE I0U.(B)(R McCreary) J Tree 4-74 RFex 

324 (12) 0-20003 FBHPOM) (A Simpson) PJ Jones 5-74 G French 

325 (1) 000001 PATtVS SBTER (Itoe B Ouxtxvy) C Thornton 5-74 TWtams 

327 (15) 000000 BN MAJS) (P ODonnefl) C Spares 4-7-7 A Praad 

331 (23) 431120 SWGET ALEXANDRA (BF) p MacGregor) J Shaw 3-7-7 R SUB 

• Royd wM mi only if then is rain 
19C: KAVUDEE 54-1 A Murray (7-1) Jkrany Btzgeraid 21 ran 



3M HOUGHTON STAKES (2-Y-a £8.974: 71) (13 runners) 

402 (10) 2 BASHAYER (MtesHAlMaktoaiftM Stoute 8-11 

403 (7) 0 BWWAZ (F Safcnan) P Coie 8-11 

404 (8) DOWSMO(K Abdula) J Tree 411 

405 (ft RjOOD MARK (H Joel) HCeca 411 

406 (11) ICARUS (T Hotand-Martn) D ArtJUthnot 411 

407 (ft 0 PICK OF THE PACK (Lord McAJpow) J Hndtoy 41 1 

408 (12) PONDERS) BD(WOu Font M)GPritchVd-Gordon 411 

409 (4) SCARLET BLADE (Sheich Monammed) H Ced 411 

411 (19 SHOOTMG PARTY (L Freedman) H Cad 411 

412 (ft 0 TRAPEZE DANCER (J ABxitton) J W Wads 411 

414 (1) 0 WING PARK (Mss C Morris) J Payne 411 

415 (9) INEAMY (G Lek^i) L Cianeni 84 i — 

417 (3) MY BEST LADY (BshaHokSngjM Jarvis 84 

NH Laugfiaei 46 W Carson (42) W Ham 7 ran 


4.10 BENTINCK STAKES (£9,115: 51) (10 rummers) 


WB B w ktaa 

TQntan 

_ Psi Eddery 
- Paul Eddery 

G Starkey 

MHBs 

JReM 

„ S CwMnn 

N Day 

_ B Thomson 

DGbeoa 

„ R Coc hran e 
T Lucas 


• 99F9-4 
81 12-1 
— 41 


5C2 

<ft 

313032 GWYDtCN{B4))(S Martens) HCeca 34-12. 

— SCuAen 

• 99F7-4 

504 (IQ 

OtOOOO BRQMMVATBI UUSV (D)(PH Betts) II Tompldns W0 — 

w-RCodMiv 

79 — 

506 





507 

(8) 

200000 MUSK: taCWK (P) (A Piter) P Haatam 54-10 


61 — 

509 

511 

w 

f5) 

200140 GLBOAA MOU (D) (lire A Mwnos) R Boss 3*7 

000303 PETROteCH (CD) (J Morgan) R Hannon 4-88 

- tal Eddery 
B Rosso 

64 — 
87 8-1 

513 

514 

(h 

H) 

334422 8UISOVA (W Gradtey) R Armstrong 3-84 

4-44020 WB4H NOTE mSheHi Mohammad) I BafcSng 3-8-3 

WCmon 

PCook 

80 — 

94 12-1 


1965: No corresponding race 


4.40 PHANTOM HOUSE HANDICAP (£6.591: 6f) (24 runnere) 


602 (11) 321021 PERFECT TURNS (D) (R Vtnes) O Bsworth 44-11 (7ex| 

603 (17) 211000 MAMM5TAR (CO) (S Brewer) PMak*i4M 

604 (22) 001000 DAWN'S DELIGHT (D) (K Ivory) K Ivory 844 

606 (4) 410420 OW JOCK D (Lord McAfpine) R Smyth 4-M 

607 (1ft 001000 MATOU (CD) (**s T Pick) G Prachard-Gordon 644 

608 (10) 3Q/0000 ALL IS FORGIVBI (BjCD) (Mrs I Normanj D Thom 644 

609 (ft 102004 ZALAUAfR Waugh) W Jarvis 342 

611 (ft 041240 RESPECT (BF) (H R K h m onOMMsori) 0 Lamg 3-9-2 

613 (14) 142024 7ELWAAH (BJ)JBF) (H At-Maktoum) A Sewer! 4-94 

614 (23) 004103 MERDON MELODY <BJ))(J SfflRh) R Sheata 3410 

616 (1) 000000 0ORKMG LAD (0) (J Freedman) M TonySdns 4-47 

618 (1ft 140000 FERRYMAN (D)(WPfcjn*Tter)D Bsworth 1464 

619 (ft 300011 BOYSJA BOY (D)(P Martin) GP-GOrton 445 (7ex) — AMgei 

620 (31 241101 CAS8AHGSB. (CD) (M Hughes) MSmyly 34-2 (7ex) 

621 (1ft 323000 LOFT BOY BQ (Mrs BA8wrt0it)N Vigors 34-1 

623 (8) 340000 JOHN PATRICK (O) (P Bowes) P MKChafi 54-1 

624 (16) 014001 1EIAWE (BA) (A Finn) J Winter 340 

625 (21) 003404 STS. CYGNET (R Cooota) Pat kMetoi 440 

626 (7) 021220 ZULU KMGHT(D) (Mrs L Wigram) P Wahvyn 47- 13 

628 (ft 124203 ALMAROSE (D) (Mrs M Sonmonds) J SMCkfte 47-12 

629 [2ft 122330 YOUNG JASON (BJ)) (J Swift) G Lewis 47-12 

631 (13) 040443 BATON BOY (A Wragg) M amain 474 

632 (24) 240000 CORNCHARM (D) (Camchemt Lid) H CoSngridge 47-7 

633 (1ft 0 00000 PUCCM (D) (A Donaldson) R Armstrong 4-7-7 

1985: NORTH QUEEN 4-45 J Mercer (13-2 (av) G Lewis 18 1 


616 (1) 

618 (1ft 

619 (ft 


W Woods (3) 
. S Whitworth 
W Carson 

— GStarfcOy 

- PM Eddery 
,. B Thomson 
_ M Roberts 
_ M Warmer 
. RCocteane 
_ AMcGtone 
I Richards (7) 
_ TMBaoa 

S Dawson 

MHBs 

__ AMacfcay 
. P Ro b ins on 

N Howe 

RHMsS 

RFo* 

GHws* 
RS» 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS JOCKEYS 

Winners Runners Percent Winners Runners Percent 

HCeca 92 357 254 S Whitworth 8 56 143 

M Stouia 56 354 15 8 SCauUWi 80 565 U .2 

JSutdrfle 17 113 ISO Per Eddery 68 485 14 C 

G Hawood 55 377 14.8 W R Swmbum S3 388 13.7 

M Haynes 9 64 i 4 .i S Dawson 10 75 13.3 

W Ham 33 239 138 WCareon 58 476 12^ 

13 (7) 020000 KAREN’S STAR (O) (J Chapman) O Chapman 94-3 KOortey 97 10-1 

14(13) 000040 V ELO CCAO (P) (A BMW) J Gtover 640 SWHems(7) 93 — 

15 (10) 021240 JACOU1 JOY OR (Mrs I RachieOK Ivory 341 A Shota <S) 95 5-1 

16 ( 6 ) oooooo fiEGADYie (W Hotani w Haiaan 3-7-13 o McKay 88 — 

20 (2) 000000 TRADESMAN (D) (Mrs M Rutherford) H Haldane 6-7-7 M Fry 91 — 

21(12) 00/D-0 LADY SONGE (5 faner) M Chapman 4-7-7 J Outon (S) 

22 (3) 000300 LAST SECRET (BCD) (W Chapman) O Chapman 5-7-7 J Lowe 09 1 1-2 

23 (B) 000000 VIA VTTAE (Mrs A Mutch) R Hcflmsneafl 4-7-7 ACuMw(7) — 16-1 

1905: KARTS PAL 348 J Reid (2D- 1) Sheather 21 ran 

3J50 OGDEN SPACBMAKER STAKES (2-Y-O: £2.840: 7 f) (5 runners) 

2 (»> 2411 WAR BRAVE (ShwMi Mohammed) J Durtop 9-2 G Sedan ■99F1-2 

7 ra 3 BEAU NASH (Fand Salman) M Prescott 8-11 G DuffieM 85 7-2 

11 13) 0000 FREDDIE ASTHON (E) (Lord Hartngton) D Motley 8-11 Shorten — 8-1 

21 (5) ooo OH DANNY BOV (Mrs N Napwri E WSymes 8-11 E Quest (3) 90 10-1 

24 («) SAINTS ABOVE (R Came) J Parties 411 SWebater — 16-1 

1985: PRIORY PLACE 42 K Hodgson (44 lav) Miss S HaH 10 ran 

4^0 OTLEY STAKES (2-Y-O: £1 ,469: 51) (9 runners) 

2 (3) 2010 MAZ1UER(D)(K AbdtajG Harwood 41 GDufMd w 99 F 7-4 

6 (7) ASH-OEE ROVALE (Miss J Voce) H Whftmg 411 GSeztoa 

8 (5) C34U0 BLAZING HIGH iDensiey Wood Raong Ltd)L P^gon 411 BCrestay 95 5-2 

9 Ift CAROL'S HEIGHTS (T Hammond) J Parfces 41 1 S Webster 

18 ( 6 ) 004 OUASSM (A Start) F Dutt 41 1 G Baxter 80 41 

19 ift 00000 SEND IT DOWN (R Scom J Haldane 41 1 LChrenoch 

20 (1) 00 SKI CAPTAIN (B) fJ Ertienngun) J Emenngton 411 M Wood 65 41 

24 Ift 2300 GOOO GAME |H Peroral) K Stone 48 KOariey S3 42 

2 B (4) 000000 MUSIC DEUGKT(V)(M Howard] K ivory 48 A Shooltt (5) 75 

1985: AU-DESSUS 41 J Reto [«4 tav) J Winter 10 ran 

450 RIPLEY HANDICAP (£1,490: 1m 7f 180yd) (5 runners) 

I ID 30-4000 TREASURE HUNTER {Mrs A Robson) W Pearce 7-410 O WChta 98 41 

7 (4) O-IOOII MARINERS DREAM (CD) ID Neman) R Hoonsheao 5-413 „ A CMhane (7) 94 F44 

12 (3) 004020 KEY ROYAL (A Outfield) GCahrert 5-49 A Mercer 9S1I -2 

2D I?) 400004 LOST OPPORTUNITY (V) (Sheikh Al Sabah) J Bethel 3-7-13 J Lowe e» 2-1 

26 (5) 003000 JBKJAPA (V) (Dun 6 tncaa) E taosa 5-7-7.._. M Fry — 141 

1985: BUCKLOW HIU. 449 M HmdMy (7-ft j F^zGeraid 10 ran 


Course specialists 


J Fitzgerald 
J Duruo 
MPreseoa 
T Barron 
D Money 
R Hodmshead 
t 


TRAINERS 

Winners Runnere Per cent 

10 25 40.0 G Dunma 

8 23 34 J S Perks 

19 67 28.4 D NichoUs 

12 63 19J0 E Quest 

13 74 17.6 C Dwyer 

13 129 10.1 s Webster 


JOCKEYS 

Winners Runners 
42 242 

18 144 

IS 172 

7 65 

fi 91 

12 151 


we'll be getting Sib from tbe 
cohs next May. 

Robert Armstrong was 
thrilled with the performance of 
tbe runner-up. He was caught 
flat-footed when Ajdal qnkk- 
ened bat came back well at him- 
np tbe hilL “It aright be tbe same 
story over a mile, bat I've got to 
rate him as a good Derby 
prospect," Armstrong said. 
Caotben concurred. “He'll be 
something for tbe stable to 
dream amt daring tbe winter.” 

The top prices now on offer for 
the Gomeas are 4-1 Ajdal, 12-1 
Shady Heights, 14-1 BeUotte 
and 16-1 Imperial Frontier. 
Ajdal is also favourite Cor tbe 
Derby at 10-1 witb Shady 
Heights secnod choice at 12-1. 

In the 1,000 Gmneas. Forest 


Flower and Invited Gnest re- 
main joint-fa v our it e s at 8-1, bat 
At Risk was mtredaced into tbe 
betting at 25-1 after Caotben 
had driven Henry Cedi's fUJy to 
a narrow victory over White 
Mischief in the Chevingtea Stnd 
Rockfei Stakes. 

“This is a far better fifiy on 
tbe gallops," Cedi said. “She’s 
very good but I've got to leach 
her to race properly.** CecO then 
added that both Sabaflie and 
Re fere nc e Point vronld represent 
Warren Place in the WDlhun 
Hfli Futurity at Doncaster. 

After this race the stewards 
betdan inquiry Into tbe riding of 
Glint Of Victory, who finished 
third. They disqualified 1 tbe filly 
and suspended Michael Hills 
for four days for careless riding. 


White A. bay colt by Mill Reef out of ^ 

sn Stnd Calandra set a record price for 
the Newmarket .October year- 
filly oa ling sales yesterday, fetching ; 2 
“She’s 220.000 mineas to the bid of - 

0 leach Anthony Stroud. " 

cflthen Stroud, racing manager to s. 
lie and Sheikh Mohammed, bought this * 
preseat aih (eiic coll for Sheikh Mah wan 1 

iVilHam Al Makloum, a dose relative of 

er. Sheikh Mohammed, 

rewards The previous record price at 
hfingof this auction was 175.000 guin- 
Imsbed eas for -the' Tymavos - -filly. ± 
tbe filly Hclieua, a winner for LBca l 

1 Hills Cumani at Redcar earlier this ■- 
, riding, week. 


KEMPTON PARK 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

1.30 Butlers Pet. 2.0 Blenders Choice. 2.40 
Everett. 3.20 Itsgotiabealright. 3J0 fib. 4^0 
Prasina Matia. • - 


Going: good 

1.30 STEEL PLATE & SECTIONS fXm 
CHASE (£2^13: 2m) <6 runners) ' 

1 2112 BUTLERS PET (D) T Hatett 7-11-8 PHctmdi 

3 6/U- SLVERSEBtBGHTJBaker 7-11-4 BPOta 

4 U42- TBONBOSnrwoao 411-4 SShetwood 

7 304 KUTINGEfl A Time# 5-11-3 SMveKMgM 

8 P-22 UFE GUARD (BftSHvrn 5-11-3 . Cfliewe 

10 024 SASSANDOO DOtgraon 5-11-3 : RRowe 

2-1 Tenzkig. 42 BuOera PW, 7-2 Lite Guard. 11-2 
Sessanoca 12-f rattmger. 16-1 Silver Sebrignt. 

1985: CHARCOAL WALLY 411-4 RLtntejr (41) R Hodges 6ran. 


CADM BEAU RANGER (11-10) d tap polnted ori feral 
rurim ouang at last season wtran 241 4bi to BudfHouse 
(11-10) M Gowrari nek (2m 41 dt, £20700. heavy. May 4. 5 ran), - 
praraously had Brawn tar superior (dtm whm (11-S) beaten : 
Wayward Lao pi-iftlB l at Liverpooi Qm 1 1 ch. £9204. good. 
Apr 3. 4 ram EVBCTTgoeswaBeaiy season and (11-10) watt 
this evert las* year Oy UJL trotn DukeCB MKMi (TO-lft: best effort 
latarra ttw campann was (I1-9)a 1 1U ftid 10 Von Trappa (10-1 1) 
here (2m 4t ch. £2560. firm. Vbwfi. 7 ran). CASIlfw ARDEN 
111-10) suDsetarantiy dsquefified after baaftig Flay The Kriave " 
-<10-Q) a sxw mao at Heretort (3ro It cti.£2545.-sofL.Mar 31. 8. 
ran). RUNMNG COMMBfT (11-0) show^iire tom that mate 
turn an 11 terns wraner in Amtetoa wtten baafing ALLIED 
NEWCASTLE (1 1-7) ft « Devon Bm 61 cbX3798. ftm. Ott 7, 5 : 
ran). Prewousty ALLS) NEWCASTLE (12-6) had ruian wafito 
beat Mnar Tom (18-2) 21 n »dowty nm event at vMncsntan (3m 


ran). PrewOusty ALLIED 


beat Maior Tom (18-2) 21 ra» atom. 

II Ch. £1663. firm. Sen 16.5 raft. BtCKUaGHBRDGEfll-10)- 7 

has a kfl more on ha plate today then when beating St Aiezan _ j 

1,9 ° 00tPft0 ^° Ct ' , ^’ Srar> ^ 

320 FSWY BOAT HANDICAP CHASE (£2,970: 4 

2m)<5) ■ ■ . • • 

1 303- CTWiiAMtqRHodgn 9-1140 — SSnteii Etxks 

2 «2- ITBQOTTABgALRtGWTOMraWSylMsS-Vbfl ^ ^ 

5 POP- THE FODQBROKBI (CO) P Haynes 141413- A Webb 

6 1411 FACT BJMT J f&flfrteyoe 1 1-lO-lQ (78 k) 

T 012- DOCBLETON (Bjqlltennard -3 

13-8 hsgpttabeehg«. B-« CT WSam. 4-1 Fast Fight. 7-1 > 
Oaubision, 1D-1 The Foodbraken 

1965: PETER ANTHONY 7-10-8 J Bryan (7-4 tar) A Hfa^unan - . 
Aran ’ 


a Worcester (2m Nov Oi, £123. firm. Aug 18. 8 reft. 7ENZMG 
mehes h* orasura deiwi toaay - on feral outog testseason fl 1 - 8 ) 
was M 2nd 10 Troop LaadBrliO-ift at W o ree a m Qm Nov H. 
£917. firm. May 8. 18 ran). KlTTMSBt ( 11 -ftcoted newer onto a 
UowbehinaiBinZaKlDon(l1-OiatLiverpoo>(2mNo*H).haoeM'- 
■er been succeestte wtran (1 i-ft beedng BaBytmra ( 1 1-ft « m r 
Puncnestmm bomra avere (2m. £966. heavy. Ocras, 16 ran). 
UF£ GUARD (11-0) coukl not cope wet) the washing v w m of 
Sator Miss (10-9) when oeaian 51 at Worcester (2m Ch. £1304, 
good to fern. Oa 11. 8 ran). SASSAnocO p0-9) was out ot las 
dass betvnd Reartyman (1 1-13) at Amree On Ctrl previously (10- 

10 ) tl 2nd k> Rowiosione (11-4) at fa^e»|2mcli. £ 1681 . good 
to soft Mar 15. 13 ranL 
SetocMoK BUTLERS PET 

2.0 CAPTAIN QUIST HURDLE (£3.681: 

.Tr* 

1 302- HWCYStQVE 8AMCER KJ) D McCain5-11-4 K Dooten 

2 OP-1 SB SHOT (DjLKenrrara 6-1 M BPowel 

3 10F- TANCRED WALK (DlCJadisan 7-1 1-4 RHyad 

4 1 BLENDERS CHOlCt HR J Kjno 4-10-9 SMcNWl 

7 204- FOLLY WLL (D) G Thomef 6-iD-lfl MROMMa 

7-4 She Shot 9-4 Honevgreue Banker. 7-2 Benders 

etwee. 6-1 Fofer UR. 12-1 Tancrec wftk. „ ^ 

1985: WING AIO A PRAYER 4-11-3 S Sherwood (7-ft 
J Jaws 6 ran 

CADM HOICYGROVE BANKS) won three minor novkra 
rvsrovi turtles last season as wed as fii-0) firestvng a 
very cretMebte 2i4r3ra «o I Bm Zaoocn ni-fflat Uvwpool Czm- 
Nov H. £5837. good. Apr a 17 ran). SD( SHOT (12-0) made asuo- 
cesstui rempeerence vtai traesna Anraoe (I4i0) 3 at 
Chepstow pm H'cap H, CTtSI. firm. Oct 4,-4 ran). TMWRED 
WALK (141) s best judged on ha ort* viewy of test season 
when beakng Penr Maran (140) 4i « Wathartv (2m h’cap H, 
£81 03. good to soft. Dec 7. 14 ran). BLENDERS CHOICE (10-SJ 
mads a successful lurdfem debut when rented out to bam Jack 
Ramsey (1 l-ft Kl at Warwick (2m h. £1825. firm. Sept 20. 8 raft- 


5 POP- TNE FOaOBROKBI 

6 1411 FACTBJQHT (D)J 


3^0 PARK HANDICAP HURDLE (£2,826: 2m 41) 
(16) 

4 430 USUWLViAD(RBn«AsMRfinel>5-11-7-SlleteiMaA 

5 321- MOUNT BOLUS (COlD Outfaon 6-H-6 RBgm, 

7 F330 AMANTnS G SatagfrllftlL. AOwWp). 

8 423- HAL'S BBHCE aGmeal 5:11-2 GMoare 

11- 0M-Ba«LAS LAD JJenluni 5-11-2 (6e*)— SStrarwood 

12 4122 CAPA (BftR HoldW 511-1 

14 408 DUSKY BROWN (DtGGiROBy 41410 

’I SS flMIHKSbssatok 

17 3M KOm D recnoBon 4-«M 

18 OH WWGHSPWWnore 5-143 i — N0N4 —O ~ 

19 P030 ARBITRAGE (OGThomer 5-141 P Baton 

- 20 -131 R8 N Hemmon 4-147 (Bex)—. StaftEcdaa 

21 033- MR.PEAPOC K.T Ha» stt 14140. Sttata DrawteM7).. 

23 3D30 DUCT CDnOUERER IlmB Sanders 5-1BQ 

.. CandyMoorefft 

24 434 SWIFT BICOIM1ER N Thomson 7-11MU-. — — — . 

• 18-BBetfatas Lad, 7-3 RtL-li-Stistary lad. 7-1 Crisp. -14-1 

Capa. 12-1 Moom Bolus, 14-1 Hafts Pnnce. 16-1 others. 
i8RcM>oortmpo«ta.iace. - 


Ramsey(11-ftKlatWWwS*(anh.£182S.flnn.Sept2a8ran). 
RXJ.YMLL was twice successtuimtoeeariv pvt at test season 
but has not bean out since (i 413) flnratwig iSlH 4th to Hypnosu 
(11-4) hsre Qm H eap H. E1719. good, nov 21. 9 ran). 
Selecberr HONEYGROVE BANKB1 

2.40 CHARISMA HANDICAP CHASE 

(£5.993: 3m) (7) 

1 21 *- BEAU RANCHI jo Mos JThterraS-140„. JMmt|7) 

2 OP- EVERETT {QE»FWatrr«n 11-1 1-4 S Staten 

4 224 CASTLE WARDEN (C»J Edwata 4147 P Barton 

5 IFT? ALLIED tewCASTLEO Bsworth 6-147 C Brown 

7 -401 RUNNING COMMENT R Hooges 12-14gjter)^ ^ 

8 041 BtCtaaOH BRIDGE (D) J RoberlS 12-140 (4qx) 

10 1120 BRfTANMCUS N Thomson 14140 0 Mom^ 

114 EvemL 7-2 Beeu Ranger. Riming Comment. 9-2 
AS ed Newcastle. 141 Bcwe^r Bnage. 12-1 others. 

198& EVERETT 1411-10 S SMston (114) F Wahvyn 4 can 


4.20 R1VERDALE NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: 
£1,833: 2m) (9) 

2 11 PRASNA MATIATp) N Gasstas 1 1-9 — S Smith Ecries 

3 CLOUD CHASER P Arthur 149 RRowe 

4 2222 CUCKOO IN THE NEST 0 Bnror® 148 NON-WNNER 

6 S2 KBMY HAY SENS M Ann 10-9 JMcLaotf«n 

7 MCMAR J-Jfirtons 149 . — h 9 Straqnmt : J 

- 8 ■ GAMMON 8 Stevens 149 — ; — ; R Stonge.-; 

9 SPEED SUCK PHBytm 149 A Weft 1 , 

10 STORMGUABD A TianeA 149 : — SteMKaWB^ 

11 • THE LEQSTTT L Kannard 149_ — : -BPowel *» 

154 fhasina Maha. 3-1 Storinguard, 42 Rkmar. 6-1 Kerry _ 

May Sow. 41 The LeqgetL 12-1 -Speed Suck. 14-1 adtera. - $ 

' T08S: STATE OPLOMACY 10-8 R Untey(5-1) J Jflftans 6ren 3 

Course specialists . r ^ 

TRAINBl& J Edvrards S wtenara from' 14 rimrara. 3SJ%; F 
Wawyn 15 trom 73. 205%; Mrs M FfeUal 6 fiwn 33, 162%; N 
Henderson 12 bora 67. 17G%: LKannwd 6 from 43. A. 

TtetwaOlhmOB. 108%. '• • 

JOCKEYS: R Rowe 17 winners bora .90 rides. 184%: S 
Morahead 6 from 4ft 15.0%: S Smith Ecctes lOfrom 83. 121)%c 
C Brawn 7 from 68. 103%; Stew Knght'5 bom 52. 9.6% M 
Parrott 4 from 48.8.3%: _ 


Newmarket results 

Going: good 

28 (60 1. AQLAStNWPat Eddery. 11-2L 
2. Sarshara (W R araoemm, 41 1. Jt Kitetei 
Rock (W Ryan. 241) ALSO RAN; 114 tav 
jade Humor. 10 Penetope Strewbery 
(5tft. 12 Cross-Bencher. Young Judge. 14 
Moments Ot S*ver. Puppet Show. 16 
Tauoer. 20 Aou Mutab. Oootftn. 
jarrateeretfehL Prrace Boca (400, Runted. 
Shahdk 25 Raise A Flyer. Saffron Light 
SatoDwd. Dommeenng. 33 Catepaaz. Fox 
Path, Lotus island. Mflan Far w raa nk. 
1 Vil. hd. 3. II. F Durr at NewmarkeL Tote: 
£6.60; £190. £2.60. HD. 64 OF; £2294 
CSF: £3441. Imn 1 6 -2 9300 . 

X3S (im 4ft 1, SELAKGt VAH (T 
Wisams. 14-1): 2. Mtend SetiR Cocnrane. 
13-2): 3. Arabaesader (ftei Edoery. 12-it 
4. Tsnxtocr ( P Rootnsoa 15-2). ALSO 
RAN: 1 1 -2 fav Veran*. 7 Backchal (pu). 10 
rtgh Know). 12 Voutaata (fi*). 14 
Convinced, Rana fhatao, 16Rrs1 Ovraran, 
Roooaira. Terater Type (5th), 33 PtaxJ. 
Tanenrar. 50 LooKotaz. Tfirten. 17 ran. 
nk. iv,|. nk. 3. 3L H Candy at wantage. 
Tote: £12-94 £3 14 £1.60. £2.10, £250. 
DP: £53.70. CSF: £9491. Tncast 
£1,03464 2mm 3404S8C. 

3 . 10 WILLIAM HILL OEWHURST STAKES 
(Group 1 2-Y-O: £39.165: 70 

KJDhi. to c by Nortan Dancer - Native 
Panner (She*n Mohammed) 9-0 WR 
Swmoum (4-9 fav) 1 

Shady UeWfita b C toy SWrtey Hetehtt - 
Vagusry(GTong)40SCautnen(4ft 2 
Gennhb ch c by So Ivor - Roysd Capnce 
(Ptazefl 40 W Carton (16-1) S 

ALSO RAN: 20 Msmr Majestic Mi). SO 
Rumooogra (5th). 5 ran. m. J w. 1 hi. 41. m 
S toute at NewmarkeL Tote win: EY 44 
Places: £1 10. £1.50. OF: £120. CSF: 
£1.88. Irrwi 2889sec. 

340 CHEVMGTON STUD ROCKFB. 
STAKES (Group Ut: 2-Y-O fitkes: 
£14324 7r) 

AT Rise gr I by Mr Prospector - 
Magre ngS ^Mts J Hanes) 8-9 S ^ 

White fitochier ch f tar Dance In Time - 
Nyen (J Bechet) 8-8 R Cochrane (9-4 
W) 2 

Bay B oul e var d b 1 1* Wftmra - Bay 
Street (Ocearac Ltd) 4-8 e Thonaon 
(33-1) 3 

ALSO RAN: 9-2 fiCteS Storm BM. 8 
Monwrana. Glint Of Vcta (draq). 14 
Gwta Persuasion M4 16 Sunerta 33 
Cow Arts* (Stnt Dterach Oetat Garnet 
Lora's Guest Zdda. 13 ran. W. 3L 11 W. 
Bl. H Ceor al NewmartiBL TOle wnc £4.40. 
ftaces: £1 54 £1.44 £15.50 OF: £730. 
CSF: £1228. 1m29L«76ec. AfteraStew- 
aids notary Gfiflt ot VKov ftvnsrrad Dind) 
was draquabhad and placed tefit 

4.10 m 1. I TRY (R Cocnrane. 8-11; 2. 
Nonte Mtestrel (Pal Eddery. 2-t Favt 4 
Tartufte (G Sartrey. 11-2). ALSO RnN: 8 
aw Sant 10 totayan Knot*. 1£ 
Speedterd (460. 18 Bettetem iStft. 20 
King Bafiadaer. Luconags. Vevaa. 25 
BelSramte. Psaimoftt. 33 Maerotal. Lyri- 
cw Lover. Bnggs Busoara (Sm). is ran. H 
31. rat 31 41- L Cunant at Newma r KaL 
TOE £5 84 £1-80. n.34 £404 DF: 
£480. CSF: £17.84 Tncast SffiS. im 
29.19s. 

Giwft Ltea» F *'^ art°3 tateOot 

2*DoKmKt; 8 Super IT Turiah 
(6thL 12 Cenftepon (4tn). Stt Ttes On» 
Out 20 Pop The Cork, 25 Stanford Vale. 
33 PmcB PacBdfBo (5th). Native Wizard. 
12 ran. hd. 1?A 3. nk, W. J Dufflcp at 


Arundel. Tote: £474 £1.60. £484 *1.70. 
DF. £99.54 CSF: E5423. TricasU E262E0. 
Im 4490s. 

410(71) 1. IfeSHAD (W R SwMaim. 7-ft; 

2. Pmte (W Carson, 12-lt 3, hssdI (A 
Murray (8-13 lav). ALSO RAN: 8 Aum- 
horn (4 th). 14 Martrie Rock (5th). 20 qSoth 
da Dfori (Bdi). 6 Raa 3. 11. 2L KX. 6L M 
Steute at Newmarket Tote: £3.4ft £140, 
£450. DF; £940. CCT: £3442. Im 3048E. 
Jackpot not woa Ptecepot: C2544 . 

Catterick Bridge 

Gotogrhrm 0 

2.15 {?m 4t 40yd) 1. CROWLEY (S ttrane.- 
7-4 fav); 2, Banque Pmma (P'HjU, 5-1*3. 
Shebana (G Thompson. 4-1). ALSO RAN: 

7 Shnmg Skin (0m). 9 Storm House (SthL 
11 Pentfend Hawk. 20 Hyokra («n), 33 
Ja fc y ne, 50 Rosra's Member. RamMe. 
OnentalEspraos.il rrau Nk.3LM.KL3L 
L Cumani at New ma rket Tote: £244 
ei.HL £2-30. £140. OP £420. CSP 
£1047. Altera stewards inqtery 0» result 
stood. 

245 (Sfl 1. GARDENIA LABU 
NtchoOs. 5-2 tav): 2. Mtac DetoU 
Shoutts. (12-1): 4 P B nfa ta s y(S Parke 
i) ALSO RAN: 4 Lady 5unday 
Mtes Acacia. 7 ' 

&or/ Goto. Gold a a» (601); 20 

Pet (4th>. Weaves Luck. 25 

MratrM ttnc, 33 Scarmng Sparkler, LMa 
Lee*. Mas Batons. 15 ran. sh hd. 3L 21. XL 
KL T D Barron at Mauntoy. Tote: £370; 
£244 £244 £1.50. OFi £25.40. CSF: 
£3440. No bid. 

340 (50 1. OUR GINOBR (R P EROft. 4- . 
Ik 2. Planter Video IJ Carrot, 9-a 3, 
Tefaero (S Pteka. 8- 1 ). M40 RAN: 5-2 tav 
Dear Gtenda, 13-2 Fnvoious 

Eastern Panoess. Penaau 10 

Treasure (4BiL 12 Ota So, 20 Diijin 
Beto. 33 Chunky Supreme |Mi). Oak 
Field. 12 ran. NR: Coded Message, Mutt 
Spate. 4L 1L 2L *L ifeL R Thompeon at 
Doncaster. Tote: £410: £1:74 £440, 
£424 DF: £414 CSP £2421. Noted. 
340(71) 1. MEMOOZ (W Hayes, 9-2 
9-2 jt 

3. segnesnaaor M Wtaham, 9-1). 

RAN: l3-2tvaryfan(5d47Hayvraint40iL 
10 hnpariai Sunns*. 14 Mamon Mato 16 
Foretop. Just The Ticket (Sth), Mai-Y 
Penso, Royal Houser. 25 Security Pa- 
cttc33 Owl's way. Nomad sonar. Mss 
Blake. 15 ran. NR Bold See Rover. Our 
-nay. IfeL 1L i»L II. W. A Stewart at 
NewmaraaL Tok £544 £194 £404 
£2.14 DF: £7.14 CSF: £2346. T toast 
£15446. . 

430(71)1, YAQUrmHMe. 18-11 to* 2. 
mt Dancer (J Lowe. 20-1 1 3, KaaMpoor 
(R Guest 5-4L ALSO RANr2D TeB Me 
Now (Otft. 100 Hoiyrood {504 5 ran. NR: . 
Ctoshna. 1 »L 31. 8LW.H Thomson Jones 
at NewmarkeL Tote: £1.74 £1.14 £740. 
OR £12.74 CSR £12.74 - 

440 (im 7f 180yd) 1, SHAH'S CHOKE 
Seoon.il-10 fe-JR 2. Sagas (M Bren. ■ 

1 6-1). 3. Bushteo (G Baxter. “ 

RAM 5 Saroro Ross (5th). 50 Bam 
Fteat ES Master vneattm. Padwn 1604 
7 tan. 1W| 41. t*. a, S. J fainnp at 
Afundte. Tote: £1 94 £140. £3*0. DF: 
£10.80. CSR £1422. 

5.1511m fit 180yd) 1. FOUR STAR 
THRUST (D McKOOwn, 5-2 % 2, Parted - 
Doune (A Proud. 11-iV. 3. Tranranc (S 
Pants, 8-1 f. ALSO RAN: 3 OteMUS Trthte- 
(801). STromertMtSdi), 10 Tfenmnort(4e4 . 
12 Rareons Odd, 14 Mr CQftW, 18 • 
Rtasna. 33 Pmturttctu. 50 MPders . 
Man. 1 1 ran. SL 1 W. lit nit. a. RWbtaar 
at Wtetatoy. Tote: £3.60: £120, £1.90, 
££50. DF: Q454 CSF; £2424. Ytoast 
£183.66. 

Ptacepoh £4244 


Market Rasen 


Going: good to firm 


Dancer. Le Paan. Rorance. 2S, 2M. J. 
Pansh. Tote: £22244570. £140. £344 
DF: £29644 CSF: £11524. Trtca^t 
£1,17434. - 
240 (2m 

Hammond. B- 1 L 2 . Ouarrat Al Ate{5-1): 
Master. Lamb Q-\y 7-4 tev HateouL _ 
ran. Nk,4t..G Moore. Tote: £13.50: £240,. . 
£1.40, £1.40. DF: £1340. CSF: £49.12. ' * 
After a stewards inquiry, rastet stands: 

34 0m ch) 1. Darotanw (P Tuck, 
t Extra (15-8); 3, 

. ran. 41. disL G , 
Rxtads. TtotK win £144 DF: CT.64 CSF: 1 
£249. 

3L30.(3m ch) 1 . Wee WSSamiG Davtes. 

1 1-1fc3. Ntoia FJyerj 
B- 9 ran: 201. 2 ffl. J . 
£2.10, £244 £3.00: 

44 CSF: £11347. 

.44 flm tote) 1 . Old Meg (S Earkv7-ft; 

2. La Fteso ©fee (2-1 lav): 3, Gatawood _ 

a 17 ran. a, 7LC J M. Tore: TS.60; 
£150. £1.60. £240: DF: £744 CSF: 
£11.45.. — <r 

440 ( 2 m CM 1. J J H e n ry OJHaa A - 
Beaumont. 54 tail): 2. Bwiramxta House *?L 
(7-4ta Mtrefvouous J«*{9-1L 8 mi. NR: >2 
Higft Ctoddy.Tmbah. to in. PBeaumorit: 
-Tow £44 4 £ 1.14 £144 £1.70. DF: 
£244 CSF: £344 

54 (2m fl041. Rwite Ttenat B Taykv. 
11-2): 2. Hassle Money J5-1); 3. Hng's 
Advocated 1 - 2 ). 1 1-4 lav Punch Drunk. 13 
czaraoa. VUgans. 5L 5f. Jbnmv 


I,.;" 

l kjm-Eii ttT 

mm 




Pl a capot £2335- . :!J 

White Water ' 
Lady fancied 1 

Paddy Dams, whose filly park * 
.Express is strongly fancied to ’ 
win the-Dubai Champion Stakes? 
at Newmarket, is ibe sponsor of-- 
today's Red SdRset Birdcaicher; ' 
Nursery ax Naas (Our Irish. , 
Racing Correspondent writes). .- 

This listed face is the most. .* 
valuable two-year-old 'handicap 
run itv Ireland and it 'seem&^e 
appropriate that The ' 1 
Birdcatcher, tbe greatest of all ! 
19th ' century Iridi horses j 
should be the ancestor in the’ 
.-direct .male Boe of . the ton 
weight Golden Dome. ---SP 

TTiis. .gekied son of Golden 
Reece is trained by Vincent 
Q Bnen for his wife. Jacqueline.. 2 
and iasi ume out Sieve Cauthen fi 
won on him by a neck in the *1 
Goff's Slakes-at theCnrtagh. 

Thar wffi ;over five liirlongs * 

and the extra furlong Will & e Tp ,J 
GoWbh Dome who may. how- 
ever, fail to give two stone Id the--' 
bqnoftr weight 'Whitt Wafer ^ 
Lady.. ;• -.i ■ 


i 

J * 




OVERSEAS RACING 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


SPORT 


41 


Shardari can swell the 
British haul in Canada 




'uucouy 

nri» « - -- in Over- kJJ “f-®* Mashkour has to (£568^62) and John Dunlop 

and. S * hl * season ** (£518,523) and all three haw 

Canada jfarckd ninpers in k: s 0 nier SUH ^' runnersin the groupone Gran 

and Italy, £j«» fcE3i Partner, Yves Prem io dd JocSey-CIub at San 
uwy sewns sure to add Samt - M * r " n - — ' - - * - 

substonti^ly to this haul to- 

. (Walter Swinbom) 

JPfijg JK^ 018 of boding 
Ac £209,000 added Rothmans 


m 




-ef 


H 




col 




Jntenuitional~arv/S^ 

Ontano over 13 fiiriot^S 

, ir B sc ,,rh —s?s 

mJPS* d «J Yves Saint-Mar- 
tin), Ihe Prix de Luteoe win- 
is a usefiU challenger from 
™ce but Shardari and Sirk 
P™wy have more to fear 
from the North American 
Golden Choice and 

Mashkour (Steve Canthen) 

* A l ^hird ia the 

Bfan<Uoid [Stakes last time out 
and the Henry Cecil-irained 
colt should at least reach a 
place m the Prix du Consefl de 
Longchamp 


brat is Altaian, who win be 

Of- *— • ■ — - - 

Jis 

Saim-Martin, is on 
gnada. Ahayan won the ir,« 
Maurice de Nieuil bade in July 
and looked a useful horse that 
day. 

Cauthen rides Sharp Ro- 
mance for James Bethdl in the 
rrix au Petit Couvert a nd Is 
joined in toe frve-firrioijg 
5*““ fy G*™ Pritchanl- 
Spraon s filleor (Geonse 
puffield). This is a tough test 
for the British pair and they 
may find the local opposition 
too good. 

Parioli (Maurice 
Phihpperon) ran a fine race 
behind Double Schwartz in 
the Prix de TAbbaye de 
Longchamp on Arc day and 
she appeals as toe pnSbaWe 
winner. Premiere Cuvee and 
Baiser Vole may follow her 
home. 


• j 


Paris at 

tomorrow. 


Michael 
overseas e 


heads toe 
list with 


STRATFORD 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


2J° Mr Mouse. 3.0 St Atom. 
3-30_Aonoch. 4.0 Mr Frisk. 4J0 Little Sloop. 


S-0 Buck And Doe Run. 




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1 on- AONOCH Mrs S 0*m 7-11-12 JDhm 

2 00-1 nOMKKOlJJniiin 5-11-5 jVS 


Sire, Milan tomorrow. 

Dihistan (Pat Eddery) 
represents Stoute; St HUarion 
(Grerville Starkey) carries toe 
Harwood hopes and Tommy 
Way (Willie Carson), who has 
earned well over £200,000 in 
Italy and Germany this year, 
flies the flag for Dtmiopi 

Today, Stoute nms toe 
Cambridgeshire third, 
Kabiyla (Tony Kimberley), in 
Milan's Premio Vittorio di 
Capua and she will be 
accompanied by Henry CedTs 
Star Cutter (Wfllie Ryan). The 
Newmarket pair have toe 
French-trained Splendid Mo- 
ment to beaL 

• Glory Forever (Jorge Velas- 
quez) gave Steve Norton his 
most important win of toe 
season with a game display in 
the £19,985 Prix Thomas 
Bryon at Saint-Cloud yes- 
terday. He paid over 1 2-1 fora 
win on the Pari-MutoeL 

8 1342 

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8 3J0- KAIMES LAD A Jams 9-10-12 TJmM 

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5JJ0 EDGEH1LL NOVICE HURDLE (EB92: 2m) (14) 

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8 8- P0H0W3 PBPT1 0 BtfChM S-3&-13 

7 SALMON BUN DMchOtexi 5-10-12 ajhJnS 

ID MB- WHOCW Morri, 7-1B-12 VMoRte 

13 IMHVnCOMTT A Janls 4-10-11 TJanls 

15 MOUNTAIN SECRET J Bradsy 4-10-11 — 

17 SB2LIAN MSSAOE D MtfiOhcn 4-10-11 BDmmito 

DN URL J Partth 5-10-7. HA<Nm 

Jltaoiw 7-107- 



CRICKET 


Gatting rekindles 
spirit with his 
victory first policy 

From A Special Correspondent, Bonds berg 


Gavaskar Fireworks and a tnmultnoos ovation 
marked his eighth hundred a phtf Aust ralis 


England, after six days in 
Australia, were as well prepared 
as could reasonably be hoped for 
with today's opening game 
against a Queensland Country 
XI. Mike Gatling, the captain, 
has been troubled by a chest 
infection and Fosser a fighting 
ofTa cold. Yet only Lamb, whose 
damaged knee is all but mended, 
was left out of the game on 
grounds of fitness. 

It is loo eariv to conjecture 
about what the next four 
months may hold for England. 
Losing sequences such as the 
one they have been immersed in 
since their tour of the West 
Indies are notoriously hard io 
hall in any sport Bui there 
seems lo be a good spirit in the 
side and Gatling has made whai 

can only be a good decision by 
giving victory priority over 
practice in the early matches. 

The relemtessiKSS and dev- 
astating pace of the &si bowling 
ai Richards's command, com- 
bined with a sbaip decline ia the 
standard of Caribbean pitches, 
made England's defeat und er 
David Gower inevitable earlier 
ibis year. But ibe lesson of ibe 
first fixture there, against the 
Windward Islands in Si Vin- 
cent was one Galling took to 
heart 

Having omitted Emburnr 
from the side before they left 
Barbados for St Vincent and 
foiling io change it when they 
saw that the conditions were 
unsuitable. England went into 
the game with an attack ill 
equipped fora slow pitch taking 


Gavaskar’s masterful 100 



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04 Book MM Doe Bun. 74 ChMMtan OH. *4 IMbn, 
8-1 Ok! Focd Tavern, 8-1 Salmon Run. 10-1 oOwol 
181ft QEMStAL MUT 7-10-12 C Smith (33-1) M Tm 13 mn 

Course specialists 

TNANBOfc D Burehai 8 wirmara from M fumanL 33J%: F 
e?5 ar 2221teT Fantw 7 hwn 47. 14^%; j Jartfes 

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from 89. 10Ll%(0nl)r lour quaiSer^. 


BANGOR 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

1.45 Adamstown. 2.15 Severn Sound. 2.45 River 
Warrior. 3.15 Crisp And Keen. 3.4S Misty 
SunseL 4.15 Tharaleos. 


Going: fbm, chase course; good to firm, hudla 




1.45 COCK BANK NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m) (7 
runners) 

1 mi ADAMSTOWN can M Ptaan -7 PSeadM 

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18 JSLLOATE LADT M Scudaoam 187 — 

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AHstenlransflald. 14-1 Dim And A Datfar, 16-1 odian. 
19KBa!cQMBE 10-12 S Monfraed (134J Mrs M RfrnsH 12 


2.15 HOLLYBUSH NOVICE CHASE £1,607: 2m 4f) 


( 6 ) 


4 -SO CA R WA MOR t 


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12 PM SEVERN 80UHP J ftWOT MW. 


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14 -4TO SPARTAN NATIVE (BF) A W 


18-108- SJOWaN 

94 canemra Outlaw, 3-1 44 Sound. IV 


ID l 


2.45 WILLIS FABER HANDICAP CHASE (£2,465: 
3m)(5) 

2 1228 BA3HRA. LADffl) M Wwr TM14 0 

1 Kauer J JanUn >10-11 


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10 21-1 RWE* WARRXJRJ MMI^H 

12 -an snoifAiSH ms s Dampen 


3.15 SOTHOnrS HANDICAP CHASE (£2,481: 2m) 
(7) 

2 -0M PrmAMTHCMrra)Ri«ek<aanS-11-7 JSryaa 

3 100- OEMMIAUMItnJIBnancb 8-1011 CCoWj^g 


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8-1 Hapa End, 10-1 Dannia Auburn 20-1 odiam. 
laaftLanMa Baaed 7-105 RSfronga (2-1) P Hanla firm 

IAS FENN8 BANK NOVICE HURDLE (£748: 2m 41) 
(13) 

3 061 WOMO ERMOT D MotftMfi-1V7 KTaatan 

5 236 ABC 8UPBI8TARRB Ranch 01W1- 

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» ■»* MBIT MA fET M ui MRhwa 6104 JBqe 

20 VfO IWOPM B IM— OWNS MnJEma 8-10 8 ' 

AMemrtol 

- 94 Wondamot 1T4 Richard Ltanhaart, 61 Ifiaty Sweat. 

114 Goldan Bawd, 161 ABC Supantar, 161 YMakarL 
1 5-107 K Burks (2-1) A Janla 14 ran 


A tumultuous ovation given 
lo Sunii Gavaskar held up play 
for five minutes in. ibe third Test 
match here yesterday as be 
completed a masterful hundred. 
Gavaskar made certain that 
India did not falter on a slightly 
suspect pitch, though it has not 
yet deteriorated as much as 
predicted. With two days left, 
India were 291 for five wickets 
at the dose in reply to 
Australia's first innings 345. 

This was Gavaskar's 33rd 
Test match century, and the 
eighth in 20 matches a gamo 
Australia, and had seemed in- 
evitable from the moment 
India's innings be^n after tea 
on Thursday. 

Gavaskar, in front of his 
home crowd, gave the Austra- 
lian attack no hope. Not only 
did he keep the score moving 
but, in particular, he regularly 
punished the off-spinner, Mat- 
thews, the chief danger to India. 

The 35,000 crowd rose to 
their feel, cheered and let off 
fire-crackers in a remarkably 
emotional crescendo of sound as ^ 
Gavaskar on-drove Bright for 
four to reach three figures. For 
intensity and fervour, it 
matched the reception given to 
GeoffBoycottaf Leeds in 1977, 
when be readied his one hun- 
dredth century in the fourth 
Test a^inst Australia. 

Five youths somehow pene- 
trated the lo-ft high, grid wire 
fence, topped by barbed wire, 
which encircles the ground and 
embraced Gavaskar and gar- 
landed him with flowers. The 
Australians, having applauded 
Gavaskar warmly, sat down and 
rested as the ovation continued. 


From Ririmrd Streeton, Bombay 


Gavaskar pul his floppy sunhat 
on the end of his bat and raised 
it above his head several times. 

Gavaskar readied 101 out of 
186 in tire 64th over, with 1 1 
fours. Three of these boundaries 
came from successive balls as he 
first went after Matthews who, 
overall, served Australia nobly 
on a gruelling day. 

Most of Gavaskar’s runs 
came from strokes off his legs, 
which emphasized bow the rest 
of the Australian bowters tended 
to be variable in direction. As 
always, anything short from the 
fast bowlers was played down 
with complete certainty and his 
square cutting was also a 
feature. 

This was the stroke that 
brought his downfall four overs 
after he had reached his hun- 
dred. Gavaskar launched into a 
fierce square cut against Mat- 
thews but lifted the ball and 
Ritchie took a good catch at 
bead height at deep backward 
point. Amarnath and 
Azharuddin, either side of tea, 
both turned catches to shoo-leg 
during the next 45 minutes. 

The fieldsman was Veletta. a 
substitute for Waugh, who bad 
fallen ill with gastroenteritis 
overnight. Waugh fielded for 25 
minutes in mia-aflernoon but 
had to retire and as a result 
Australia were always a bowler 
short. 

Any question that India 
would struggle after 
Azharuddin’s failure was 
quickly settled when Vengsarkar 
and Shastri scored freely in the 
final 100 minutes together. 
Vengsarkar made a patchy start 
but gradually took charge 


against the spinners. Australia 
took the new ball at 260 fix five 
from 89 overs, but the pitch was 
too slow for Reid and Gilbert. 

In retrospect, Australia's foil- 
tire to get rid of the night 
watchman, Morcjor 95 minutes 
first thing was significant. More 
finally fell to a splendid tum- 
bling catch at midwicket by 
Jones. Gavaskar by then was in 
charge and Amaranath gave him 
tire support he required. 

By comparison with the first 
two days, there were few conten- 
tious scenes between ibe palyers 
and umpires. Early on, Mat- 
thews was pointed back to his 
mark sternly by Ram Babu 
Gupta when the Australians 
were convinced More bad been 
held low down at silly point by 
Border. 

Matthews was also the bowler 
when Veletta thought he had 
caught Veng sar ka r when the 
batsman had scored seven. 
Zoehrer, the wicketkeeper, had 
to be restrained by Boon as he 
and Vengsarkar exchanged 
words. 

AUSTRALIA: Ffcstira*ws 345 (OR Marsh 
101. D C Boon 47. A RBontor 48. S N 
Vadav 4 for 84). 

MDIA: Fnt Innings 

SMGavaafcarcRtttMbMaUmn 103 

KSffrtkvxhcMareht) Bright 24 

IKS Morn c Jon— b Min ftew* — _ IS 

MAramuhcsubbMuMws 35 

D 8 vangawfcar notout - . 41 

MAzhanjdrfnc sub b Matthews 10 

RJShasfrinotOUt — - — — 37 

Boras (54, fc6. nbIG} — — — — 26 

Total(5wkts} 291 

*Kapi Dm. N S Yadav. R ft Kukami and 

MmMar Skigh to (ml 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-53.2-119.3-193.6 

205.5219. 

BOWUNG (10 AM Raid 190530. 
(Mbort 161460. MaDhM 39-7-1054, 
Bright 25-5-63-1, Border 8-3-160. 


spin and were demoralizingly 
beaten by the team who were 
then bottom of the Shell Shield 
table. 

Herein Queensland yesterday 
Gatling waited until the 
groundsman had given the pitch 
its final mow before deciding 
which bowler to leave out. 

To build morale, his avowed 
aim is io pick his sides to win as 
many games as possible even it 
by definition, that policy may 
restrict the opportunities of 
those outside what he looks on 
as bis likely Test team. 

Micky Stewart, the assistant 
manager, was happy enough 
with leant preparedness to de- 
mand no more than a 
loosener after a morni 
from Brisbane. “We 
them a little biiai the start ofthe 
week, with three and a half hard 
sessions to get them used to 
conditions as quickly as possible 
after fending, and at this stage all 

they need is the day-to-day 
routine and a couple of compet- 
itive matches." he said. 

“They are not at the same 
stage of readiness as they would 
be for an English season, where 
training starts about April I for 
a first game at the end of the 
month: but the three-week rest 
at the end of the season was 
essential, especially for those 
who had been to the West 
Indies. It will take another 10 
days or a fortnight to gel them 
where 1 warn them but the first 
week has been good. Everbody 
has put his back imo the 
practices and I am well 
sausifted." 

One-day 
victory to 
W Indies 

Peshawar (Reuter) — Police 
used tear gas re disperse a group 
of political protesters outside 
the Shahi Bagh stadium here 
while, inside. West Indies were 
beating Pakistan by four wickets 
in the first of thetr five-match 
one-day international series. 

After Pakistan had been re- 
stricted to 167 for seven in their 
49 overs. Greenidge scored 67 
for West Indies before Harper 
saw his side home with an 
unbeaten 34. 

PAKISTAN 
Mudnur Nizar town Bwiiamin _ — 15 

Moran Khm bw bManriM — 4 

JovodMlandadC DufonDOrsy 2 

Ramaz Raja b Gray 31 

SaUm MMk c Dujon b Gray 30 

Imran Khan not out 23 

Wasim Akramrunout — S 


Abdul QartrbPan sra on . 
AnHtMpnnotoot . 
Extras ___ 


Total (7 mMs, 49 overs) 
inert Ahmad and SaSm 


34 
3 

_ 17 

_ 184 

SaSm JrtMr dM not 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-20. 324. 327. 6 
84. 5-93. 6-141. 7-158. 

BOWUNG.- Gray 161-202. Marshal 61- 
261. Beryamin 102-27-1. Harper 166 
420. Patterson 102061. 

WEST MIXES 

C G Graertdge c Tsusaef b AJcrsm _ 67 
RBtMchamnihlmmn , , n „^_ 10 

H A Gomes bTmneaf .. ..... 16 

A L Logie runout ..... ——■■■■ 0 

iVAfficharascMMndidb.iaMr.~_ 7 
tp J Onion St MMndNt bQ*9r . 5 

R A Harper oct out ..... — 34 

M D Marshas noi out 0 

Extras — 24 

Total (8 wfcts. 452 ovars) 165 

A H Gray- W K R Benjamin and B P 

Patterson dd not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-24. 2-89. 326, 6 

117.6118.615a 

BOWUNG: Qwflr 166461. Imran 762- 
22-1. Taosert 162261, Akram 10226 
I.Jaltsr 60261 . 


SNOOKER 

Davis and 
Taylor 
in line for 
meeting 

By Sydney Friskin 

Steve Davis begins the de- 
fence of his Rothmans Grand 
Prix title when he plays Tony 
Drago. of Malta, in the fourth 
round at the Hexagon Theatre 
Reading today. A total of 
£275.000 is on offer as prize 
money for the event, which win 
end on October 26. 

Davis beat Dennis Taylor 10- 
9 in last year's thrilling final, 
which took 10 hours 2 1 minutes 
to complete, and they could 
meet again in the semi-finals. 
Davis also has a possible fifth 
round meeting with Terry Grit 
fiths and a win there could set 
up a meeting with Alex Higgins 
in the quancr-finab. 

There have been a few sur- 
prise results in the earlier 
rounds to upset the seedings. 
Cliff Thorburn. of Canada, is 
out or the tournament having 
been beaten by Joe O’ Boye. who 
will be seen in action this 
evening against Steve Newbury. 
Joe Johnson, the world cham- 
pion and second seed, has also 
not survived the earlier rounds 
as he was beaten by Paddy 
Browne. 

Neal Foulds. the recent win- 
ner of the BCE international 
tournament at Stoke-on-Trent, 
should have an interesting 
match with Cliff Wilson 041 
Monday evening. Matches will 
be played over nine frames, the 
semi-finals over 17. and the 
final over 19. The winner will 
receive £50.000. 

FOURTH ROUND OKAWt B On* v T 
OrapwTOrtMONvJCMBpbaftRMl— w » 
v M Hlflnan; A Magma v □ MwHn: W 
Thoma v w Nog; NFDWUa v C WMon; T 
Mao » J Pwrafi; D Tamr v J Virgo; J 
O Boy* v S NBMbory; S Francisco v W 
Jonw; D Mounts* * J Wycb; A KnortM * 
P FrancHoo: JMrt v J McLaugMM; P 
Dodd v M HaHatt BChspanm vS Harnfry; 
PBrawna vM BmMt 
TOOAY1 MATCHES: Onto v Draoo; 3 
Francises v Jonas (UJOpoO. CMwa v 
CsmpOrtt 0*Boy« v fKwbury (7.00). 
Ttana n oii : Hrafra w MsrtS i; Momgoy * 
Wych (200pmT W — ns v WMdSw: 
KhowIm v p Frandsoo (7.00). 


NETBALL 

Scots given 
cash for 
tournament 

An English bank has given a 
£45.000 boost to Scottish 
netbalL 

The National Westminster 
Bank's north west regional 
marketing ma na g er. Mr Trevor 
Fielding, handea over a cheque 
to Moira OnL the president of 
the International Federation of 
Netball Associations, after a 
display in Glasgow's George 
Square yesterday. 

The money win be mainly 
used to fond the seventh inter- 
national netball tournament at 
Crown Point Sports Centre, 
Glasgow next August- However, 
the 1FNA are soil looking for 
sponsors lor several other areas 
such as ininspan and catering. 

During the display Glasgow's 
Lord Provost. Robert Gray, 
made the draw for the 16 
country line-up, which includes 
the existing world champions, 
Australia, and last year’s run- 
ners-up, New Zealand. Scot- 
land, Wales and England were 
listed as Section II teams. 

England played hosts to the 
first world netball tournament 
in 1963 and only now has the 
event returned to the United 
Kingdom. 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL AND OTHER FIXTURES 


First division 

Chariton y Leicester 

Chelsea v Manchester C 
Liverpool v Oxford — _ 
Manchester Utd v Luton . 

Newcastle v Arsenal 

Norwich v West Ham 

Nottingham Fv OPR 


Second dhrisfon 
Birmingham v C Palace 
Bradford v Ipswich — 
Brighton v Barnsley — 

HuB v Reacting 

Leeds v Portsmouth 


Southampton v Everton 

Tottenham v Sheffield Wed 
Wadoixf v A Vila 


Plymouth v Sunderland 

Sheffield Utd v Huddersfield 

Shrewsbury v Derby 

Stoka v Blackburn 

WBAv Grimsby 


Third division 

Blackpool v Nous Co. 

Brantford v York 

Bristol RvPVate — 

Buy v Bournemouth — 
Chester v Mansfield — . 
Doncaster v Darlington - 

GBBngham v Caifrste 

hfiddtesbrough v Watsal 

Newport v Bristol Cp 

Rotherham v Bolton 


Fourth division Scottish first division 

Burnley v Stockport Brechin v Queen of Sth 

Hartlepool v Peterborough — 

Hereford v Exeter 


Lincoln v Rochdale 
Orient v Wrexham „ 


Dumbarton v Airdrie ~ 
Dwriermflne v Morton . 
E Fife v Clyde . 


Preston v Aldershot 


4.15 WELSHAMPTQN 

(£1,836: 2m) (6) 


HANDICAP 


8 3211 IHMWBWmFWten 611-7 

9 006 HARUYIQfrWJ Eaton 61611 
10S3F-0 MOONrAM RUN (DlRDIcMn ID-1 


.. .... TOR Dfcttn 1D-114[7«) C. 

11 1/61 CAMNIB BOV tows JftnNMn 6104 — 

18 -112 LE SO* m H B Fraod* 6164 COaMMyfg 

17 848 9HADY IBuiCY |D) H Mante 6161 Maa L Wlacn (7) 
Tharartoa, 94 u» Soir, 72 Campw Boy, 61 
Man. 16fhwtay. 261 Study Lagan 
LATCH 6161 Pbsvar {61 faxfy R V 


Mou4rtnMan.S 
108ft OALATCH 


HoBrahaad 14 


Course specialists 

IMMltt J Jsrtdns 9 wfrmara from 26 nmars. 349%; M 
Scudamore 5 from 21. 234%; G Richards 10 from 48. 208%; 
Mrs M ffimaO 13 from 78. 17.1%; Mrs w D Syfcss 7 tram 41, 
17.1% (only flmquaBieral. 

JOCievSb N OougMy 7 wfcnare from 20 ridta. 35n%; P Wrtnar 
10 from 43, 232%(JBrMn6 from 29, 207%; P Scudamore 13 
from 64, 202%; R Craik 13 from 131. 92% (orty fire quafifiar^. 


FA VASE ri rrt i o wd: Shorten Onrmmra 
* West AOrtmant CMOc: Sarton Datew 
gortpn Terrare y ShU don; WhUdm v 

BStSOSSJ&JJSSSZ 

OaMcPoitoiWcterte a Aahten; bMm t 

aass.'aaaaijaae 

^umdato « Waterloo Do« St HMv 

wren Rovers. 

Dnwtedan v B aaniare F ort and W a aton; 
Alharton Gols v Lancaatw Ote; Spakftn 

v Stapanh *: Erniay « awflWd; 

Cottle v Grimottiorpa MMn WaHara; 
Garlorth v Amrtioipa WsHttnK Louth « 
narsWairaKBradloyr 


KELSO 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Northern River. 2.45 CtonsharaglL 
Moantgeorge. 3.45 By The Way. 

Creek. 4.45 Gods Law. . 


4.15 


3.15 

Biras 




tnSuMr J rmnway W 

BR wtss- mwmm 


Going: firm 

2.15 snCMLL NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m) (7 
runners) 

i * SoSSS?S^wto%«o:i3 Tea. 

s « r-BOttrey 

H 9S t JSiS 4 SEB ffiy 18 *• 

2JS ECKFORD NOVICE CHASE (£1.139: 2»n 8f) (3) 

a 201 CL0«3HAl«AaHAMrttaggirt161M D|tec ^^ 

ioK aBWHWSfcr^*^ 


. TGDun 


fa MJMBiC tt 


ISMfeSUPMW 


3.15 wjojneu 

[Amateurs: £1,752: 2m 61) 


HANDICAP -HURDLE 


81 


TRattd 


IS 2£ CPOuan 

Ilk ss&SjSmsLss 


,.4022 rtunTBWOBTTnoorenWf^- 
Hm HHB8£V Mtea K Thompaon 6107. 


RLscfr 


94 MoumpMraa. 61 Lam HK 11-2 CMra. 61 Hasty 
Impart. 10-1 wStah Spirtt CNprfwre. 261 MAmey. 

W: PnCNUME 6104 Mr J Quinn f61) G Rfctards 11 ran 


3.45 ANTHONY MARSHALL HANDICAP CHASE 

(£1^59: 3m) (4) 

1 1PW- BV THE WAV MnMDttitaon 6124 HDwyar 

2 MM *888 MATOJOTC Partor 610-1 (8 «»U— BSteny 

3 -331 GU8WaNATW(WQnehanfc16lMf4a4 


v capsuna Watfare; Arnold K^gnrtl « 
Rowntreu Macfcintoah: HaUnm v 
Frecfrmtea CDmnuwy: Borromat) Mc- 
toria » H u w o rth CL Bonma v Mnttwhay; 
Coangham v H anognte ; Oaaatt AMon v 
Oatenm: WMkmfiBte SocM v WWrenon. 

Eastwood Hamm-. Rocaster v Htndday 
Town CM Laakfc Hbuktey AUdate v 
MteatfuS; Northflold » Anatay Nomada; 
Tamwonti v .OkteaAnrtORt; Oorandy 
Sporttig v Blnon; RuahaB OtapJc v 
Chaaatown: Paget Rangare v Bottnare St 
tUcftaias; SoSai Town Rangara v 

RaMnat; BrirtnttigaM v Stewmwkafc at 

Iwa « Woomoid; Whwdioo v Saltan 
WteUan; Backton v HawM Rows. 

Qoriesmn v tfradord; LoweaM v 
WMten; G>«at YannouA v MSthwn; 
Hatetaad v Buy; Tlptraa v Stamaa: 
Downham v Eynasbury Rovara; 
Anwrtiam v Rackwal Haattc Hanks 


oaa VAUXHALL 
trinc h wn v CMtertam Baro t v Scar- 
borauUi: Iteartiam v Fricfclay; BjlWd * 
NunaatenfGMasMad v Maktstona; Kafa 
.taring « Wanton: Ktedarm toata r v Trtterd: 
Nortfiwk* » WSymoute; Runcorn vSutlon 
UnttBd; Staffard v Boattn Wartdstem v 
Bath. 

MULTVAHT LEAOUKr Barrow v Mattock; 
Gainsborough « Southport; Honwtoh v 
Gooto; Hyda v South Uwpoot; Marina v 
Chortay; Moracantoe v Maoctoafirtd; 
Moaatoy v Wbrtoop; WMton v Bunon; 
War ri ngton a Buxton. 

VAUXHALL-OPQ. LEAGUE; PriWlir A-' 
nfrricw Barring v raort; Bognor v 
Bishop's storttord; Carahanon v 
FamtxSrouglttXiiwtchHamMvWlslihani- 
stew Awanua; HantM « Windsor anad 
Bon: Hayes ¥ Stough; Hendon v Wx- 
ttewg; Httchto v Croydon; Mng a tan la ti ¥ a 
. AtMna;WB M nnra n » Monkey: WycomEe 
v Toodng and Mttctiam. FW (Svtatoiic 
BBtortcay « Laatlwmaad: Borahwn Wood 
v Grays Atntatic Bracfcna> v Ha mpton . 
Epsom and E ¥ B tt frdbn; KtogNacy v 
Lewas: Leytonstorw/Motd ¥ Statoae; Os- 
tord Ctty v Layton Wtega&s; Soudiwtck ¥ 
HnchteyiTBtniry vllxtxUgK wartonandH 
¥ Matdantiaad; Wtemb to y y S Wa naa a 
Boro. Second diw ti itein north; Avrtey ¥ 
Hotnchutcli; Heytxldge Swtta ¥ Qapun; 
Lotcraonh GC v Royaten; Mtea v Collar 
Row. Secsnd cW aton nrtc Frtteam ¥ 


Swindon v ChestBrilekl . 
Wigan v FuRutm - 



8 Bt3- TA8AK m WAStephmon 6UH> KJanae 

1141 By TM UMy. 94 Mtel Mayo. 10630 Glory Snatotiar. 


61 

ISIS: ALLERLEA 7-1 1-10 C Grant (10630) Maa I 


4-15 FBWEYHHJ. SELUNG HURDLE (£531: 2m) 

( 6 ) 

21 600 BIUSCUBt AgnJSWIson611-1&_ KilBagma 

.23 494 NBAErnwimj'nntiiA 611-12 — 

24 2U0P WHAT A LME m Mn G Rnalm 611-12. PMmhM 
ZS 6 1)01 OF BOLDRon Thompson 611-7 _ 

28 80 OEE-IHCFWBr 61610 

29 FANNY MMN Danya Smith 61&5 C Chant 

64 Blru Creak, 94 What A Lira, 61 Fanny Robin, 61 

MkSkay Fan, 161 DM Of Odd, 261 Dee-Tae. 

ISIS: mHPUR 3-103 Mr PNtvan (161) MraGRayeley 10 ran 


4.45 STWmJ. NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m) (3) 


SMDnatenvE 

xtenCo!n«y;l 


Haringey! 

VMwyn Garden 
Houtttow vtijndon Cdney; Barton Rom 
y Hammlfr BaUocfc ¥ Hanrt HampcMtefc 
a Maraanuabuv v HortfanL 


Brirodowo Rowan 
HospM; Seby v Ram 


1 411 0003 LAW 
5 MPKNOWEf R 

10 622 SnUCTLY 


611 Gods Lm. 11-10 
mSt PRINCE LAHTE 6166 C 


61M^._. 

RWAalar 61612. 


u -FMnn( 
Rl 


HrSWUtehrt(7) 

161 Nlpknoms 
• Danya SmHii 


Course specialists 

TRABIER& Mrs M DJcUnstm 18 wfcmrs from 43 runnara. 
419%: Mrs G Rewrtey 6 from 32. 188%; Denys Smith 12 from 
87. 169%; W A SteptoWJn 36 from 232. 152%; J S When 7 
from 72. 87%; GRSiard* 8 mm 88, 63%. 

JOCKEYS: H Lamb 21 wimwa from 138 rides, 162%: T Q Dial 
14 from 101, 138%; C Grant 17 tram 129, 102% forty Brea 
quanta#. 


v LsawEdan 
n la* Eaton 
Mtsre v Marlow; 

F» raral « m (at Motoeayt 
CrocfcenhUt v Eastbourne United: 
Horsham v P e ta r s frel d. Banatead v 
Famftam; Eastbourne Town v Buroass 
HttCortwnanvArtL 
Three Brrigas ¥ Portsmouth; ffinumar y 
Mount Grace Potters gar; FortMd v 
UUehampton; Whhrtnwk ¥ Certniw 

Makwi vale v Met Pofloe; Hungertoid v 
anxkenmtrre Totten ¥ Wtxxtan fk»MK 
Lymtoaton v Road Sea (Sourainom: 
Newbury ¥ Sroarnwine; Wantage v 
Thatctiam; Eaetlelgti v Caine; ' 
Chippenham v Moreton; Fafrnoum v 
Bristol Manor Fame Partway Bristol v 
Cfrencemar; Qevedon v Rofrlnsont Dm 
Dawfeh v Yflta; MamoteflaU v DwtaeS 
Fatrford v Paulton tlo rer s. Clara v St 

FOOTBALL COMBMATNM: Arsenal y 
Chebea; Luton v Brisnl Rovers OJit 
Readjnfl v Southampton West lamv 
Ctmton(10V 

ailWOFF RUSH LEAGUE: Ante V 
Otoitoran; BaBymem v Lame; Cmridt v 


SOUTHERN LEAGUE: 

Banbury v vs ffifiihR Fdreai Green 
• Rovara v6w*in^«m: Grantham vlaam- 

togton; Hedneslod V RusMan; Latoastsr 
United v I tatoa owen; Moor Green eSurton 
CoiritiattStourbridgny Mia Oak Rovara; 
-weangboraygh v GkMcesttr. t aa Bi a ie 
dMatocc Art&ar v Huttoo* AahfWd v 
Chamam Burnham Jftd H * Sheppey: 
Dovor ¥ DocCht s«r Duostahle v Canter- 
bury City: Poole ¥§rtth and B: RnWtoY 
Gravesend and N; Ttaiat ¥ Trowbridge: 
Waia rtoovUavTonbridga. 

BASS NORTH WEST COUNTTES 
LEAGUE: Iffiai datatoa: Curzon Ashton v 
winrtonfc Haetwoqd v SMytKldga Celtic: 
Gtoasop v BootfR KirtTOy Town v [ 
ton Stanley; Leek y Raddffla " 

Leytend Moavs v Ctanstaon; f- 
Penrim. 

NORTHERN COUNTIES EAST LEAGUE: 
Premier dMato* Brtper v Penefraet 
CoMfiries; BrkflMtM Town v 1 
Trmtty; Brtgg « Sutmn Tpwn; 

Atfraton; Eastwood vBenay;La»g Eaton y 
B oson; Norm Frtxtoy v Thedday. 

DRYBRQUGH8 NORTHERN LEAGUE: 
Fkst ttivtofoK Bedtapon v Patariem 
Bialtop Aueriand v Corwetc Brandon v 
Norm SNeria; Chester-to^traetvHarte- 
poot Eastogion v South Bank: Gretna v 
mtby-, Newcastle Brie Sor v Fetvyhtt 
RytnpeCA « Osok: Spannymeor v Blyth 
Sparttns: Tow Law v whvay Bay. 

GREAT HELLS WESTBIN LEAGUE: Pre- 
mter (MateR Btdrtbrti ¥ Torrtngton; 
Bristol Oty * Fromo; Oenriown w Taunton; 
Maftstwn v Plymouth Argrie; Radstocfc * 
EHnoudt Saiteah v Mtoehend; Wasun- 
super-Mare » Bamstapte- rirat dMakxc 
Bmora v WMuaW: Haavitrge' V 6 
fraeomfae: Keynatan v Ottery St Hftry. 
LaritKsa * waattury; end H v 

Oestonbwy; rwerton v waiwon; wey^ 
moum y Bactcweii; vetwfl iFBaftCSiy. 


Marion; CWmM ¥ Stanstsd; Em 
Thurrock » Brentwood; Bon Manor v East 
Ham: Fora v Burnham: Sawdridgeworthv 
PtarfBaat Woodford v Carney bland. 
Trophy: nratrauMk CoggeshaB v Hariow. 
LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: 

CljE Rret_ round: Redhtt w T 
Premier dMafauc Oanson ¥ 

Crown and Manor v 
reran y Nonnwoon. nm mmun: 
BHOB Barnet v Sonrtey; BncnUay * 
CMngford; Ctogwea Polce v Wattham- 
mow. North Gtaertord v Wtenosworitc 
PanMI Standard v Soutnaark; Royal 
Arsenal v Phoenix Sparta. 

SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: Hrat <6 
Ybfan: Aiundal ¥ HaBstom: CNchestar y 
H aywards Heath: Mrihorrt and E v 
Landng; Shorehem v VHCk. Second 
rta trt ew BnMl * Em Grinatnd: Kae- 
aocks V Farting; Oakwood ¥ Franriand* 
VBm; Serterfl v Sateay; Sritay v 
Paonm. RUR Ctefa Oak h 
teidar . Stontogton v Boahaan. 

NBNE GROUP UMTED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Prefriar dMatote Aitoew ¥ 
Raunda; Brecklay ¥ Amptnin; 

Destxxdugh; Long 
V Hotoeactt: Rodiwel v Staortfr 
. y Rotten; Woonon v St Meets. 
Ffari ti Mrio tr Burton Pw ¥ Rams e y: 
Coganhoe v Tome ea ter , Cntfng ha m ¥ 
Ford Sports; Stacmona v Shamorooh; 
On Chanecfcs y Newport Pagneft Otaey y 
W hdworais. Laagna Cum rater Perrins v 
KempeurnSandLC 
Spencer. Tfenksn AtWttc v 
Thrspeton v TJmken Dutton. 


Southend v Craws 
Swansea ¥ Wotver ha mpton 

Southern premier division 

Ahechurch v Cambridge C 

Aylesbury v Salisbury 

Basingstoke v Bedworth — . 

Darttord v Reddteh 

Dudley v Corby 


Kttmamock y Forfar 
Partck w Montrose 

DjkjfaMltele tenruriirl iCuIratnei 

ocomsn sveona amsion 

Albion v Stranraer __________ 

AloavRakh 


Fareham v Shopehed 
Rsher y Bromsgrowo — 
Gosport v Kings Lynn _ 
WBenhall v Chelmsford 
Witney v Crawley 


Arbroath v Stating 

Cowdenbeath v Ayr 

Meadowbank w E Stirling — „ 
Quean's Path v Stenhsmuir 
St Johnstone v Berwick 


Scottish premier (fivision 

Celtic v Motherwell 

Dundee Utd v Clydebank 

Falkirk v Rangers 

Hamtton v Hearts — 

Hibernian v Aberdeen 

& Mkren v Dundee 


HOCKEY 

CLUB MATCHES: B rentwood v Chatme- 
forat Broxtxxjme v Let c twrortti . Coh 
chasnr • Soudwod fr m; Fmham ¥ 


EASTERN LEAGUE: 
March Town; By Oty v 
Ctscton; Ffixstowe v Chatteris; Harwich 
and P v Nawmart a t: Sudbury v Co*- 
cttoSter Wisbech vBratotrea. 

OTH» MATCH: CamMdga Urirereity v 
RAF(Fennor's,iO). 

SOUTH EAST COUNTCS LEAGUE: First 
rttaton: Chate ea v Oriant; FUham v 
Portsmouth; Ipswich v Sotahend; M BwN I 
v Tot ten ha m . Norwich v Charlton; QPR v 
GHtoghem; Wotlora v Araenafr WMt Ham 
v Cantorriga United. Saoond MsIok 
B rantford v Reedtag; Norihanatan v 
Bristol Rovers; Oxford United v Bourna- 
mouth; Southampton v BrtaMon; Srtndon 
w COtohesw; Tottenham YCrystal Palace; 
Wfanbtodonv Luton 

ARTHURIAN LEAGUE: Premier dMtioa: 
Old CantuaiaM • Od ChowrtSantOW 
Etonian* v OU Ardfruns; Lenang OB v 
Old Mahwnians; OU Ragtonan v OU 
Brenhvooda. Ftf rt iKialgn: Old Camera v 
OU Harrovians; Ofd Wa8ngburta» y OW 
Foresters; OU Westminsters v OU 
BradfWdtons; OU Wykehamists v OU 
AUsnhamuns. 

BASKETBALL 

PRUDENTIAL NATIONAL CUP: aaoond 

round (SjQfc BPCC Rams Demy v 8CP 

n To» " 


Murray totemedonN _ 

pone* PundM Kkttxi v 


London: 
Wadordl 
TF 
CaH 
born ' 

Leicester RUsnc. 


Hattial and 

,... iv 
. Csncs v 
*; Portsmouth vUro- 
iManchostar United y 


WOW Brs NATIO NAL CUffi Second 
roiyt Brmta gftamBjtottvBCP London 
(S1» H emal and Wttfort) Rebels ¥ 

SSS. SS **“»«** 


Crare e l tf tana; Nawtxay v Andover; OW 
Ktogumans ¥ TUsa HBfr St AtotS ¥ 
Norwtch union: Wiitrt f f v BedtordsMre 
Eagtos. 

VOLLEYBALL 

ROTALBAMt OP SCOTLAND NATIONAL 
LEAGUE: Mao’S teal dMetam Mrtoty 
Croton LC * Speedwea Rucanor (7.C& 
NewcaattotaafM I y Drroonan Leads 
(730); OBC Ftooft y Cole 

Portsmouth llea w aal v Potonla 
Redwood Lodge v Canttrt Oty 
Womarta BratabWmSaU v ~ 7 
T Coflew. ’i301. 

SCO mtiH ILB WU fc Matfs IlM Wltt 
Team Scottsft Farm y BeOrtiB Canltoate; 
Pristey * KWaUi Plant; Falcon Boctheal 
Jets v East KKrids: Team KaypianfaDVv 
1 ' L PDtt- 

jpear. .W emart Wret MUm ^a!m 
Scottish F amivFinrtfts Sport hGfraoow 
tonnwman w PrawneU bnuranca: 
toverdydav Urban Ladtas. 

OTHER SPORT 

BOWUfci Unrpool Victoria fnsoranoe 
Suprtbori(at Manchester). 

FENCING! Lecasiff City Open (94Q. 
GOLft Woman’s Latog rawtri^ (at Stoke 
PegwL 

LACROSSE: South of England men’s 
county to urnament (at Orpington. 1045). 
gfrDtiMcwGs BMcw sMwurcalylal 
Samsung). 

NOWMO: wayfaridge Scufls (at Curlew 
Hang. 

SNOOKER: Rothman's Grand Rrtx (at the 
Hentgon. Reatfng): Wa o( Wight Festival 
(at Puckpool Hotfiy vBage) 
squash RACKETS: Nonh of England 
(at Prestwich, 

North ol Engtand women's 

CJen championship (at Heaton, Bradford, 

SWMMNG: Sun LWeUASA nstlonal M«S- 
tere competitions (at Scutoraupi). 
TEHNK: National Paries chamolonshto 
&Mls (a Royal Vtauria ftork. Brt* 



TOMORROW 

First <Svision 

Coventry v Wrmbietion (11-30) 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

GffiMHMJfLAGE^LMKASHMEGUP: 

5SSM35«gSasU 

Hateta; L»y y 

^SiS2 i,, p30); FUham D v'*^2Ljp 

HuCtorallejO y Hro etet fiat* Ru£5?5 
s yy*. a !*gg 1 y.Brwrtjy; Whtta ha re n 
yg«WriBg-90fc7«fcv Doncaster. 
LONDON AMATfeuin UMBE Erik 
London CokmWs 0-0 rt Friham 
Mian Amateurs v Pachham fll-OU 
^sCoa ^yFUtoamTravaaararrij 
StraamarnC&lc ¥ South London (11J 

fsesoa^Su 'fits*' 

basketball 

CAMLaam, NATIONAL LEAGUE: Mm 
SjMBd dbWMtt Just Rentete Rhondda v 
Plymouth Rauara (4.0). 

NATKJNAL CUP: 


Ttatoo Shrttad Hrttera v Not- 

ttogtam MateMjqt Tam Stocks 
Ipstocn ¥ Team PDtycM Knoston (2.1% 
Irtrion VMCA ¥ London JeaCLOk Avon 
JjKttampwn y Lambeth Lady Topees 
CUR- 

VOLLEYBALL 

ROVALBAMK OF SCOTLAIO NATIONAL 
LEAGUE; Hrti feat dtetakw Ports- 
mouth Hsatasal y Colctiaster (MO). 

Wtnan*a flat dhrMon: Ananrt Britannte 
v Southsee Scorpions (1 Ms Bndfrvd 
Mythbraakera v Southgate 7G (1 38). 

OTHER SPORT 

PBtcwft Leicester CSty Open (WJ). 
HANDBALL: Britirti Laegm Bkiartiaad 
v WNiefMd (&0). 

KARATE: Frae Fight "87 (at Ateart HNQ. 
HOAD RtffHtNQi Samata/BtaUmo ha6 
marathon (« Welwyn Garden Qty). 
MOTOR CYCLING; Brands Hatch (2.Q). 
MOTOR RAONtt Lyddsn Htt (Oft 

issrsisjar ■“ 

SHOOKBt Rothmans Grand Prix tet the 

SQUASH RACKETS: North Of England 
Open tow nament (at Prestwich, 
Manchester). 

SWIMMMQ: Sun Ute/ASA ratonM Mas- 
tera compatuons (at ScartMrogghL 
TENNIS. Nattanri Parka champtonshto 
touts (at Royal VJctorii Park, 
W LtOH TLIUlHO: British under-18 
Oi^lonsWps (at Qvto Caws. Bremtay. 


42- 


SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 18 1986 


YACHTING 




Stars and Stripes wins 
race but loses appeal 
Over ‘plastic fantastic’ 


mMm 



From Barry PScktball, Fremantle 


Dennis Con- 
ner. the master 
strategist at the 
helm of San 
Diego's chal- 
lenger for the 
t America’s Cup, 

Stan <and Stripes, gained a 
memorable victory over New 
' Zealand ,1V,' Tie . plastic 
fantastic", on the water yes- 
teraayL. But then he lost the 
Ifaibfc. to persuade. other chal- 
lengers to joni his syndicate’s 
can for Lloyds to carry out 
core- tests on the previously 
unbeaten glassfibre New Zea- 

night’s meeting. at- 
tended by 12 . of the 13 
ebaUengers, . the proposed 
antmeMsient. to the regatta 
conditions^ calling for core 
samples to be taken from the 
gfessfibre 1 New Zealand yacht 
tty . check ■ thkt ir had been 
incwlded according to plans, 
foiled .to gain a majority. 

.The -delegates were un- 
dasbtufly influenced by the 
uncotUpromis ing stand taken 
oh the matter by Lloyds. 
Lfajrds sent a. letter to the 
meeting restating their view 
that 'New 'Zealand IV passes 
their . . scantling rales, and 
suggestihg.that tins forum was 
hoi the place to discuss mon- 
itoring- -procedures. Lloyds 
want afl information on the 
subject to be. withheld pending 
receipt of aii official protest 
from the San Diego group. 
Conner still has the opportu- 
irity-tofile an official protest 
against New Zealand, but this 
bowiaeems unlikely. . . 

However, .Conner and his 
crew could not be robbed of 
the satisfaction of being the 
first to defeat the New Zea- 
landers since the challenge 
trials began on October S. 
Tfreirvi ctory means that three 
its -now lead the pack — 
rand Stripes *87, America 
UondNew Zealand IV -- each 
counting nine wins each. 
Yesterday's racing, sailed in 


France suffered a main hal- 
yard failure. 

Britain's crew aboard White 
Crusader also came perilously 
close to returning early when 
their mainsail split eight min- 
utes before the start. Harold 
Cud more hurriedly called for 
their tender to come alongside 
with a spare sail, which was 
hauled aboard moments be- 
fore the five-minute deadline. 

Then it became a race 
against time to get the sail 
hoisted before the start against 
Ragle, skippered by Rod Da- 
vis. They managed with two 
minutes to spare, despite the 
harrassing tactics of their 
opponent, and went on to 
trounce die American boat by 
a 4min 43sec margin. 

All eyes, however, were 
ranged on that needle match 
between Conner and Chris 
Dickson. On their way out to 
the course, both had sailed 
past USS Missouri, on a 
courtesy visit to Fremantle 
from Conner’s borne town. 
Were the New Zealanders 
intimidated by the sight of the 
American battleship's 16-inch 
guns? “No, but it did seem a 
somewhat extreme way of 
taking core samples," Dickson 
said later. 

The New Zealanders won 
foe start by a whisker, heading 
out towards the port hand ride 
after forcing Conner to take 
foe opposite tack. When the 
two crossed a few minutes 
later, the “plastic fantastic" 
Held a three-length lead. When 
they crossed %ain. the New 
Zealanders had pulled out an 
even greater lead, but after 
tacking right in Stars and 
Stripes' wind, the Americans 
went about just asa shift in the 
wind swung to their favour. 

It was just foe break Dinner 
required, and when the two 
12-metre yachts next crossed 
paths, the New Zealanders 
were forced to tack under the 
Americans. A lesser skipper 
would have instinctively 


That manoeuvre broke the 
American cover, but tire New 
Zealanders almost stopped in 
the process, giving Conner a 
67-second lead at the weather 
mark. Dickson and his crew 
lost a further 10 seconds with 
a ragged gybe-set spinnaker 
hoist and gai ned precious little 
back on the seco 

nd beat. * 

The race only came alive 
again after the two reaching 
legs, when the New Zealand- 
ers da wed back to within 18 
seconds of Stars and Stripes’ 
transom at the third weather 
mark, but then dropped bock 
on the run and finished 49 
seconds adrift on the final 
beat. 

In other races yesterday, 
America n finished Gmin 
34sec ahead of Azzurra. while 
Italia and USA both cruised 
round the course after their 
opponents (Courageous Chal- 
lenge and France respectively) 
dropped out. French Kiss 
gained an easy 3min 40sec win 
over Heart of America. 



Ahead at last: Stars and Stripes rounds a mark ahead of the previously .unbeaten New Zealand IV wf yesterday's' race 


Admiral fires 
a broadside 


a'wickM chop left over from tacked away, but not Conner. 


the previous day’s gale and 
steady 20 to 22-knot winds, 
prayided the first hard lest for 
the challengers in conditions 
they : can expect most days 
during the final races next 
year^ Two .crews were over- 
whelmed even before the start, 
after the boom broke for the 
second time in -this series on 
Courageous,- and Challenge 


Using the waves to full 
advantage, the San Diego 
skipper edged his boat out to 
weather until abreast his rival. 
He would have been content 
to have sailed on that parallel 
course right oul to foe lay line 
had foe New Zealanders not 
performed two tacks in quick 
succession in an effort to 
wriggle dear. 


Admiral Sir Ian Easton, 
president of Britain's White 
Horse challenge for the 
America's Cup said yesterday 
that dgfiwding syndicates 
would have an unfair advan- 
tage if replacement keels had 
to be cast in foe country of 
origin (Barry Pickthali 
writes). 

He called on die Italian race 
conunjttee from the Yacht 
Club Costa Smeralda, the 
organizers of the challenge 
trials, to reply immediately to 
a request he made six days 9 
seeking the Supreme Coart in 
New York to rale on whether 
replacement 12 metre keels 
can or cannot he cast in 
Australia. 

“We understand that the 
Kookaburra Syndicate have 
cast 10 keels to date," Sir Ian 
said. “If we wanted to watch 
that it would cost as £700,000 
in air-freigbt charges alone. 


RESULTS 

Hast 1: America II US*6 (US). 3* 14nwt 
Z7swc bt Azzurra no (HJ. &21JD1. Wtantag 


mrata: 6Mn 34«c. 
Hnafei 


Mate Crusader K24J3B). £13.13 


Reality dawns 


From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 


the four Australian 
hare spot 10 years 
SS2 mdKoa prepar- 


bt Eagle US60 (US). &17, 
margin: 4:43. 

Hret 3: Stan and Stripes US55 
3:10.19 bt New Zealand KZ7 , 
3:11-08. WMng margin: 49 sec 
HMt 4: kata 17 (h)- 3:17^3 M Courageous 
USZBftJSLdkJ not start 
Hast Sc USA USe I (US), 3:1X08 bt 
Craienge France (A), da mi start. 

Hast & French Wss F7 (Frt. 313. 
Heart of America US51 (US), 

Winning margin: £40. 


3:16*4. 


ink to defend Ike America's Cop- 


Tdd^thdr dreams hit the wa- 
ter. For. the 


the Beta! syndicate, it 
... ill seem, a -little topsy- 
tifcriy.'Here tbryare hi their own 
badcy^d'haviag to. work harder 
la reran the cap than to win it. 
v H o w ever , less th— finer weeks 
afla m inning is -1983, the team 
wqs .fate its stride. “Chink 
Leagfey,' Bca Lexcen and I 
would (aft 12-metres every day 
of fer lives, if not face to face, 
fbea-on foe phene," explained 
tbe syndicate director, Warren 
Jones: '"The product of that 
fabnir "dT lint is two heats — 
AnstrnKa lU, foe current cham- 
pion, and Australia IV. m- 
pre*eo hat with the Lexcen 
pedigree' behind her - and a 
af^wiDed crew of saBors. 

'la ^foe-eyes -of most fore ig n 
foAtngnssftw awtbe team to 
heeb -They are- notable for -foe 
reKanee wo high-level British 


sailers. Derek Clarke, the far- 
mer navigator on Victory *83, 
joined long enough ago to be 
dipUe to sa3 oa foe yachts. 
La»me Smith is foe coarhteg 
and tone-up skipper. 

lain Marray. the 
director/designer/skipiier with 
Kookaburra, has chosen Rooka- 
borTa □ and III for the defender 
series. The more radical, but 
possibly more temperamental, 
Kookaburra I will be used as a 
trial horse far safls and heels. 

Farther down the budgetary 
(adder are the e ne bo at cam- 
paigns of South Australia and 
StcakVKidncy. Bat haring a 
single 12-metre and tight-knit 
team is bo disadvantage, accord- 
ing to the Sonfo Australia 
director, Graham FerretL 
Steak VKidney, designed by 
Peter Cole, is a small boat and 
everybody who has sailed on her 
says her chairman, Syd Fischer, 


TABLE 


Men* Zulaml(NZ) 


Stars ancjSjrijM$<US) 


America U (U . 

While Crusader (GB) 
iHiam 
USAflJS) 

SSuaj W 

Heart o) America (ua 
Chatenge Franca (IV) 

Azzurra (K) 

Courageous (US) 

TODAY 

Write Ousader v Rato: USA v Azzurra: 
Eagle v America ft French Ktes v Stars 
and Stipes; Courageous IV vChaienge 
Franca: Canada H v New Zealand IV. 


TODAY'S 


Kookaburra SI v 


Stoafc'nKldnm. Austrato HI v Kookaburra 
strata iVv 


ft Australia IVv South Australia. 


SCHEDULE 

Cfi—e n ge r et i rn mtkwr Unfit October 20: 
PreHranwy senes, fast round-room. 
November 2-13: Second round^oom. 
□scomber 2-19: Thvd round-room. 
December 2S-Jansaty 7: Semi-finals 
(best of seven)- Jammy 13-23: rtnats 
(best ol seven). 

Defender stan toH o n: October 18-30: 
Pretawnry senes, first nxmd-robm; 
Hovemn er 9-21: Second round-robm. 
December 2-20: Thkti round-robm. 
Ospwntaer 27-Urnnwy ft Sen-finals. 
January 14-2& Final (best ol img). 
Amerind Cope Jammry 31 -«*! February 


GOLF 


Main placed Dowling prospers but 
Steatite Davies is possessed 


‘Caracas, ,(AP) T Spain re- 
corded a three-day score of 433 
to jump from fourth place ami 
tege the' lead. from' France in the 
Espirito' Santo women's work! 
arilaieur goif tournament at La 


By John Hennessy 

Detibie Dowling strengthened Australian, and a chtg-in birdie 


Country pub. 


! two Spaniards shot 2 and 
iriderpar.' respectively, to take 
foe /lead. France dropped to 
Mcond.with 43S while foe Great 
Britain and Ireland team, placed* 
second oh Wednesday, fell back 
tpifoitd position with 437. 

: japan was fourth with 438 
and foe . United Slates, the 
defending champions, were fifth 
w$th 440. 

.-Sweden came in sixth with 
44fr and the hosts. Venezuela, 
fettto seventh with 4S0. 
/Founding oul the first 10 
places were Pern with 454. 
China. 1 -456 and Switzerland. 
457: 

DcJunOTALft 43ft Spain: 435: Frame 
» Great Britain and (retard: 438: Japan; 
4tt US: 44ft Sweden: 450: vananaria: 
454; Pm* 45ft China; 457; Switzerland. 


ISJorman leads 
one stroke 


by 


-Sydney {AP) - Greg Norman, 
off. Australia, scored a one- 
unger-par 70 yesterday to hold 
onto the lead after two rounds of 
foe'. New Sooth Wales open golf 
Championship. Norman's 
seven-under-par total of 13S put 


i pu 

him fee stroke ahead of his 


com patriot. Peter Senior, who 
had* Second successive 68. 

Norman, foe British open 
champion, looked drained and 
arinovedafter his round. He was 
surprised, by how cold it had 
turned and had been caught 
without a sweater. Norman is 

bidding for his fifth successive 
triumph after winning the Euro- 
pean open. Dunhill cup. World 
match play championship and 
jastweek'sQueenslaitd open. 


her position at foe head of the 
£25X100 Laing Classic women's 
tournament at Stoke Pones, 
yesterday. With a third round of 
69. four under par. she stands on 
204. two strokes ahead of Bev- 
erly Hukr (70 yesterday) and 
Corinne Dilmah, of Australia 
f70X and three ahead of Dale 
Reid (66). 

Bui while one Surrey player 
was prospering another was 
languishing, for Laura Davies, 
the new Open champion, took 
77 and had declined from fourth 
place to joint 13th. 

She is now only three strokes 
ahead of Lona Neumann and 
has probably surrendered what 
slim chance she had of 
overhauling, the young Swede 
for the £5.000 first prize in the 
Ring & Brymer order of merit. 

I yield to no one in my 
devotion to Miss Davies, a 
smiling crowd-pleaser for most 
of . the lime she is on a golf 
course but every so often Dr 
Jekyll becomes Mr Hyde and 
she in turn becomes a severe 
trial to her admirers and her 
caddy. 

So it was at the first hole 
yesterday, where she ran up an 
eight- But it was not so much the 
arithmetic that caused deep 
consternation as the attitude. 
She could not. it seemed, have 
cared less and played the second 
and third puns from IS feet 
almost on foe walk. 

With her newly acquired emi- 
nence it is more than ever in her 
own interest that foe demon 

which occasionally takes hold 

should be exorcized. 

Meanwhile, up at the front 
end Miss Dowling and Miss 
Dibnah had an electrifying first 
five holes which included three 
eagles, two of them to the 


for Miss Dowling at foe fourth. 

Miss Dibnah, though, bad 
dropped shots at two holes and 


when Miss Dowling holed a long 
corkscrewed 


swinging putt that 
in to bole at the seventh as 
though caught in a whirlpool, 
she opened up a lead of three 
strokes. 

It was not so much plain 
sailing for either coming home, 
so that Miss Huke. the third 
playing partner, came strongly 
into, foe picture with four 
birdies. 

Miss Dibnah stood on the last 
tee four shots behind but this 
must be her favourite hole for 
she again took only three there, 
with a five iron to eight feel, 
while Miss Dowling needed a 
third puiL A two-shot swing 
improves the Australian's 
chance of her third win of the 
season. 

LEAOMG SCORES (GB unless stated): 
204: D Dowhng. 68. 66. 69. 206: C Dibnah 
(Austrato). 71. 65. 7D-. B Huka. 68. 7ft 70. 
207: O Rftd. 72. 69. 66. 210: P Conley 
JUS). 69. 71. 70. 211: C Ramon. 70. 72. 69 
212: P Gnce-Whittakor. 74. 68. 7th G 


Stewart. 71. 70. 71: R Comstock (US). 71 , 
70. 71 218: S Struftmck. 70. 75. w A 


Nchqtas. 7tL 73. 70..214: S Van WjrfUSA); 


73. 73. 6ft 21& L Danes. 89. . _ 

W*». 74. 74, 67; A Sbeafd ISA). 71. 70. 
74;M Marshal (US). 70. 75. 70: M Gamer. 
69. 70. 76; N McCormack. 70. 71. 74. 

LAKE BUENA VISTA: LvMVh Koran: Rm 
round: (US muses 5W»» Kfc P Stewart M 
Sufwan eGcGKOOi 07:J S*nonv Blinmr J 
Inman. P Baounar. O Hammond. □ Paowa. 
B ueoke. D Ffiriman. L h*WM. T Sanoion . R 
Cocnrw. l Thomson. C Boom BatHc 71: 
NPaidO 73: K Blown 


Move irks WPG A 


Members of the Women's 
Professional Golf Association 
have asked their committee to 
reconsider the derision to in- 
troduce pro-qualifying next 
year. They believe it is pre- 
mature and should not be 
implemented until (here are 
more professionals on foe 
cireuiL 


TENNIS: LENDL HEADS ANTWERP’S GLITTERING^OMMUNITY CHAMPIONSHIP 


Carat dangles for McEnroe Top gear 


Ivan Lendl and John Mc- 
Enroe will be the main attrac- 
tions in the fifth European 
Community championships to 
be played in Antwerp from 
November 3-9. Lendl has won 
the event three times in four 
attempts, earning more than 
£450.000 in prize money, plus a 
golden, diamond-studded racket 
valued at almost £500,000. 
which was on offer to anybody 
who could win foe title three 
times in five years. 

In three previous appearances 
McEnroe has won foe champ- 
ionship once — after Gene 
Mayer had disposed of Lendl — 
and has twice been runner-up to 
Lendl. McEnroe has won more 
than £300.000 in Antwerp. This 
year he will be less concerned 
about the prize money than the 
chance to confirm that, having 
won three consecutive tour- 
naments after a break of more 
than six months from com- 
petition. he is now back in 
Lendl's class. 

The three most obvious 
changes in this year’s ECC 
concern the title, foe prize 
money, and the entry. The title 
of the former European 
champions' championship has 
been amended because foe tour- 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspopdent 

(n this case : Antwerp and Stods- 
bobn are'boih suffe rin g, though 
the presence of Lendl and 
McEnroe in 
that Stockholm is 
most.... . ' 


□ament is now under foe official 
patronage of the European 
Community. The prize money 
for this 24-man singles event has 
been raised by more than 
£33,000, as it has been every 


progress 
in Porsche 


Dg 


year, and now stands . at 
£600.000. of which foe winner 
will take £140.000. 

For the first time, no Swedes 
will compete. This is because 
Antwerp dashes with the distin- 
guished annual tennis festival in' 
Stockholm. That dash is as 
irritating for foe Swedes and 
other players as it is for the ECC 
and Stockholm organizers. 

Stockholm isoneof the upp er 
tier of grand prix tournaments 
and players are committed to 
compete in a fixed nnmber of 
such events. Antwerp, on the 
other band, stands apart from 
the grand prix treadmill and can 
never be sure that the fixture- 
makers will give the ECC the 
special treatment its status 
deserves. 

The fixture-makers are con- 
cerned almost exclusively with 
grand prix tournaments and 
there is a strong case to he made 
for a neutral fixture bureau to 
ensure a fair deal -for Antwerp 
and the host of lesser tour- 
naments outside the grand prix. 


Mandlikova joins field 


Hana Mandlikova, a former 
champion of France, the United 
States and Australia, has joined 
foe field for the Pretty Polly 
tournament at Brighton next 
week (Rex Bellamy writes). Sara. 
Gomer. who reached the semi- 
finals of the recent Refuge 
Assurance National Champion- 
ships, has also been included in 
the 32-strong main draw. 

Miss Mandlikova's inclusion 
means foal five of the world’s 


top eight players will compete at 
Brighton — foe others are Steffi 
Graf. Helena Sukova. Claudia 
Kohde-Kilsch and Manuela 
Maleeva. 


In many ways — not 
crowd figures, prize money, 
foe daZzht^ gunnuck of that 
gold and diamond racket —.foe 
ECC stands supreme among 
indoor tournaments- mid -may 
reasonably advance the more 
comroversial'ctaim to be one of 
the game's four- man distin- 
guished events. It dda much for 
the status of European tennis, 
not least because men who win 
Europe's leading t o urnam e n ts 
are given priority in ihequalify- 
ing system. , 

Pierre Daraton. the shrewd, 
charming and tactful tour- 
nament director of the ECC, k 

aware that even the better grand 
prix. tournaments often have to 
compete with each other fin- foe 
. services of the leading men. 
Commenting on the Antwerp- 
Stockhdbir dash, he said yes- 
terday: “The -players were very 
frustrated • that they had to 
choose. Bui next year we will 
have an open week and Stock- 
holm will double up with the 
indoor tournament in Paris.” 

Evidently grand prix tour- 
naments would rather compete 
with each Other than info the 
even strongerallure of foeECC. 
But what a pity it is that there 
are* only 52 smb in die 
calendar. Tennis couiddo with 


From a Correspondent 
. - Stuttgart. 

Hana Mandlikova, who is a 
last-minute entry into foe Pretty 
Putty Classic that begins in 
Brighiori.on Monday, eased ber 
way intq the senu-nhais of the 
Porsche gTarid prix yesterday 
with a; 6-2, t>-4‘ victory over 
Zina Garrison. 

Playing: her' first tournament 
after ho- surprise exit to Wendy 
Turnbull at the US Open* Miss 
Mandlikova had begun tbeweek 
sluggishly. .ieqiiiruig_ three -sets 
to defeat Rosalyn nurbaitk and 
Bettina' Bunge.' 

But agginsta frustratedGairi- 
son the -Osedtodovak- ap- 
proached her best'form, helped 
by a devastating serve that 
produced seven aoes. ’ 

“We've. had some really dose 


matches and she was out to net 
to- her 


more. 


The tournament - director, 
George Hendon, suggested yes- 
terday that the tournament 
could be considered an un- 
official European championship 
as every European ranked in the 
top 40 is taking part 


r wwiMiftiri, _____ 

zw*w«c (Vuaj. W. ftft 6-3: 
■ (0w9j*r 


Pwaz 


Kutonan 


&4; D Vboer ( 

(UU. 6-2. 6-4; G . Mttfer (9 
nan (US) 7-6. ajc, 6-3; Y Noah { 


me Mezrasri rn.6-1 . 6-4; AKnctawi f 
K Evumoerr (NZt 


. . 7-6_6i,l .. 

Sm»bt Vfeaar. £3. S4& Edborg brEnknon. 
63.3fl.63. 


me -and I couldn't jget 
serve," said Garrison. “That 
kept me imbalance fed pnra fot 
or mentalpressureon me." ' 

.Once she knew berserve was 
there, Mandlikova was con- 
fident of victory “irrm seirving 
well the rest of. my game fatts 
imoptace.”she said. 

Pun -Shriver was uninspired 
in defeatingAsm Henridkssonj6- 
V. 6-2.“! didn't have quite the 
same. fire that I've had recently. 
It wasn't that grcat a match bul l 
gave up very ; ft* games arid 
didn’t' lose •seryps,'" she 
explained. 

RC80LTS; Q— ter-ftwte' H Bwctooro 
(C4M Z.Ganjson (U^ 63, 6-4;P£bch«r 
(U^teAMannolwsiQn (US)6V, 62. ' 
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lAunraton.uitoB sttaodf: towtokfi 

Uramtactorira MM FWn™!tiUSLS3(WI 
(Lendl (Cac^br WMbht. 6£-62^P Ctei 
btC Itow h u r^^gLflO. 63:BBMh^(W6| 


HOHSE TRIALS 


Green on 


on top 
in l>utcli 


FnaaSreriil 


■Luanda Green on*! 
produced one offe fe* 

She had-, ewer uUnfec d-, ra ; foe - 
druag arena to go w® fl* ; 
lead at the Dutch 
ihree-day event af BjJdo, 
alihough shcwasmdy a fi fth of a i 
penalty dear o f Ka«'fa* r * • 
title American oa ArooW nm. f 
- Shaonagh. nor nauuaBynfife ■ 
moving horse, was made tt> 8ow f 
ihrough this test ^ Mrs Owra. ‘ 
who won tiris" event "with Wide- 
Awake back ip 1975- Hywevet 
had Arbour KUL a fatter « , 
Burgh ley (ast mem*. stood , 
squarely at alt foe hafts, the. 
American would have led the 
52-Strong field from- JOnagops. 

.As Mrs-Green. fa sliHsrffafe®, 
from the effects of a M at 
Weston Park fafijSssida^she 
was noLiodnded 'm the Ebrtfah 
ream. They missed her and 


3 . ' 


£ 


\ 

i • 


boukl o ri^m gragc fotrrth jmDb 


behind for host natron 
The Bntnfo team far Karan 
Straker {The Wishfal Thinfcert. 
Elachel - Brookes .(BudldewobdV 
Rodney- Powell (General St 
Majors) and Clarissa- Strachan 
(DetpliyDazzle) —.tot interest- 
ing mixture which augurs wefl 
fbr foe stresses oTtoday^ -crass 
country course. 

" One of the mfee 
fences fa-ibe-20tik an' 
obstacle, with - concrete ■ lined 
ponds in the mukl fe of each 
loop.' ’ 


7C 


■Ml Tte Nafta rtu ta. uSJk 2. 
Fraca. ISM attest Gantety. ISM: 4. 
Brttkt;'T732;6rUntod Stems. 1B3A ft 

Potent)., 1872. teMHMta-l, t ONtart 

tSHtainatXi.GB). 4lJfe£ KFtetor (Amour 

IP^ai BsaaE s- 

<Cmwd£!to4^4^Pj Stnadta (UMta 
doS Rl, Frt,'4ft6. ■ • 


NBUfta 


A 

T 

i 

4 > 


BASEBALL 


WorWSeries 
opens tonight 


New Yack - The 
Serin between ihe New Yack 
Mels and foe Beetofa Bed Sen 
opens here to ri gfat- fa r Sfcen 
StnfitoiL 

Ihe Mets earned their tfcfcd 
World Series appedrenee by 
foe Honstoa Astras hra 
16-imdag none on 
Wednesday; the Red Saw, nne 
pitch away Anna e Mwlna tfaa try 
foe Criifarafa Angds on San- 
day, r e top l cto d foeir -d rani e rtr 
comeback with fwa easy ric- 
to ric s o rer foeCa ttfan lia A—rls 

in -Boston. 

la 196* tfc Mete emerged 
frina thr nhmlam hj drindag 
foe Mfofere Orioles in lire 
ffuaes; Is WJ they lost la foe 
ftakht W AlM etlce in., anon 
gdtoes^iorion _won foe -title hi 
1903. 19X2, 19X5,19ll|vand / 
1918, bte foa* fora foey fare -- 
lesttotheWeridSeriesia 1946 
(to foe St Loris Carittnrii), in 
1967 (agate to foe Caidhiab) 
and te 1975 (la. foe . Chirhtoari 
RefoX onelof-foe'.uwst exriting 
«riea'erer ptayed. 


vT' 


Heroes or 
villains 

It was Brian Gough’s tun 
foam Forest 


FOOTBALL 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


turn to 

pat his Nottingham Forest side 
ck this v 


on foe back this week (Give 
White writes). According to the 
latest result he either knocks 
them down or picks them up. 
Last week, when they were top 
of the table, it was "a joke" to 
consider them for the 
championship. Today they are 
“the most exciting and enter- 
taining team by a mile'*. 

Clough is as predictable as he 
fa contrary. But few would argue 
with his verdict of this captivat- 
ing young Forest team. “One 
bad result doesn't take anything 
away from the standard we have 
been achieving. We arc certainly 
not perfect, we need to harden 
up. trot foe fact remains we have 
been a breath of fresh air to the 
game this season." he said. 

There is every chance that he 
will be hurling insults at them 
again today. Should they beat 
Queen's Park Rangers at the 
City Ground and Norwich man- 
age anything other than victonr 
against West Ham. Forest will 
be back on top. 

Should that happen, C lough 
may have one of foe forces 
behind Norwich's advance to 
thank fbr ft. Butterworth. whose 
loan spell at Norwich ended this 
week, could be recalled to the 
Forest side because of an Achil- 
les tendon injury suffered by 
Webb. 


Just the ticket 


Watford football club have 
made their Urdewoods Cup 
third-round tie with West Ham. 
at Vicarage Road on October 29. 
an all-ticket match. 


Chariton Athletic (17) ▼ 
Leicester City (9) 

Stuart is Skate to return for 
Charlton in piaca at MacDonald; 
Peake and taros* wffl be 
faraig a former dub. Leicester wff 
be wWiout Moran because of 
an ankle injury so Seafy comes in. 

Chelsea (19) v Manches- 
ter City (22) 

Chelsea can find no ptese for 
Speed* and Spademen, who hath 
pray m the reserves. WWi 
Wicks iB..McLaugh»n returns after 
misang last week's 5-3 defeat 
Varadi. signed from West 
Bromwich Albion, has been 
cleared m time to play for City, who 
may recall Baker. 

Liverpool (5) v Oxford 
United (15) 

Lawrenson and Whelan, both 
absent from the Dublin i nt e rn at ional 
because of injury, are included 
in a Liverpool squad of 15. • 
Whitehurst makes Ks debut tor 
Oxford, who were beaten 6-0 at 
Airfield last season, but Shotton 
rnsses his fourth consecutive 
match. 

Manchester United (20) v 
Luton Town (II) 

UmTBd. boosted by two recent 
good results, w« be unchanged. 
Seeley has recovered hum an 
ankle lrtuty fbr Luton who welcome 
back Brian Stein after 
a^»nsjon^osslbly alongside his 

Newcastle United (21) v 
Arsenal (8) 

Newcastle recall Andy Thomas 
in place of MeCreery after injury but 
not Martin Thomas, their 
goafceeper; KeBy continues to 
deputize. O'Leary, who twisted 
an ankle last week, and Adams, a 
virus victim, are fit to resume 
for Arsenal, who wifl have Nicholas 
and Robson back in light 
framing next week. 


Norwich Oty <I) t West 


Ham United (< 

Goddard returns to tfie West 
Haiti stde for the flrst Mme in t4 
months in place of the injured.. . 
McAvenme. Wiliams IsunSkefyto 
play, because of an Actfates . 

BtoHrep^esButterwo^ 50620 ^ 


Nottingham Forest (2) v 
Queen's Park ° — : — 
( 12 ) 


and I 


m 

stands bylo replace Webb, who 
has inured an Achies tendon. 
Fenwick may ratom fcr . 

Rangers after missing three games 
with a grain strain. Byrne has. 
recovered from ahamsfring injury. 


(13) 


Southampton 
Everton (7) 

Sheedy is the latest EVerton 
casualty with a groin strain. 
Steven s amde wd need a test 
Sout ham p to n recafl Awnsbong 
after Trussing two games with a 
calf strain. 


Tottenham Hotspur (3)- v 
Sheffield Wednesday(6) 
Paid Aten repteces, Gahrirrwho 
has had a carnage operation. 


makes las homai 
Wednesday, looking fqrtfter 

win in Londoriln four 
be unchanged. 


v Aston 


Watford (16) 

Villa (18) 

Bames. who miseed die 
England game in midweek because 
of afe# 3 injuty,to*«t»*ane 5 w.. • 
his partnershto with Fteco far 
Watford. Gray faces a - ■ 

strenuous test on his knee and . - 
VBteaidudB Keown and 
Stainrod in their squad. 

» fguB-ptaHtanafn pwenBw na - 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


CRICKET 


SNOOKER 


OMGDAOl Ctenc Notional woman*! wata 
cftaoworatNfK ftOOOoE 1. Guan Pino. 21 ran 
2655« imrto rectnl). 


BADMINTON 



GOLF 


A ALBOr >S._Oa n matfci Darngh Opt champt- 
onaM» rOansn unless stated)- Men's 
aa«l«KSeeond nmmt m Fnw ot K footer 


(Aust). Ib-Z 16». Lni ZMang KTwu) bt K 
Koea (Jaoani. 160. 166. P-E H Larsen bt < 


.. A 

•tusuma (moot. 61S. 161. 169; M 
CjuaMmsen n P Show (SweK 615. 1612. 
15-8 S» TulAus) brDHaB lEngl. 14-ift 16 


SVOHEV: New South WWea Open Fh« 
roan# lAusraton unless stated): ia& Q 
Norman . 65.70 IK: P Senor. 68. 68. 1* F 
NobriO (NZL 69 69: O Uoom. 69.50.139:1. 


^■■1’. FfaraeaconMUl 

mi »fl1- 41-te. 7627. 5 657. 68-1^1 
46^-71. 1663. asm 72-4i mmmmi 

USSKSSS: 




Staoran. 72. 57. W Case iuSl 70. 68. 148; U 
Han-ood. 68 71; V SomiS'eft 72. 1*fc R 


J3-l61tH Carfsen u « Satmoge (Eng). 15-4. 

-1(3*01.16 


15-5. F K Keong (Man bt N SuSMVO ( 

2 t? 00 * 0 !PS"4I « L PBttasen. 

15-ID. I-Ki. H ; 


to raj «« i C Tidiner. 6ft 74; □ 

71 7ft B SteObens. 71. 71; S 
EBungton. ES. 7ft- R Maacay. TO. 72. 


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HMfe (Best d 21 trami# Mtfnd 7. Jones 7. 
IMrtsud trsxf. 1610ft iW-lftZMB. 124-16. 
7632. 107-4. 27-74. 5644. 46«J. 2T-7S.26 
75. 48-53. 6615. 862ft _ . 

STOCKPORT: l lttane ta ler andd doobtao: 
S e c ond itwnaj L M Gbson (Soa) mi D 
Oiafeoen && W E Hugnea ana S 


]f"i° m s Waouura ( Jaoani. 

rs-s .1613. 1 Fimen^aenotKUevn. 165. 16 
Wdwnt » P Amsson (Smb). 
rf-iS^.'S-J^.M.KlciiasBn p> a mean. 1612 . 

15-n “ 


FOOTBALL 




•V. M 


CENTRAL LEAGUE: Second dMMOR Hud- 

oorstiMaa. Scumnorpe 1. 


17-15. 161. A Mranaa tano) M J 
IZ-15 J67 15-8. — — 


naond: S fUaaa i Jaoani ot A M Lessen. 1 1 -A. 
1-13.11-2 MHennrtgiShwitjtVRouisen.c- 


ICE HOCKEY 


Cnm l&fflvoc IG WPB«aoo|Pte 

StEnfflW&Kfl%arWJfV*(N tret. 6 


n. il-fl. n-ft Gu 'jawin' rcrwui m J 

(Cam 11 - 1 . 11 - 2 -^: Namne » , 


Patameau i „ 

Fryier (Engl, n-4 I3fl- k Larsen ot E Van 
Dnt* i Nairn u-i 1 1 . 3 . g Hpeefl (Engl bt 0 


Leon. 11-4 . 114 P Nwiergaars Bt fa 
(E«L 15-11 611 16ionT Owen b« 

AntferaomSwa). 11 -3. 1 1 -S. K Jnrar (Jan 


NORTH AMERICA: MC: Harttarfl Whatete 4. 
Wtrooeq Mn 4 (OBtt: PiNaoetaraa By« 6. 
Uancouvar CaruAe Z. New VtPk Islanders 7. 
wasmngmn CaonaK 4: Boston Boms 5. 
MinnesoB Nonh Stars 3: OueOK Nomsuos 
dCatqaryFUmesZ 


SPEEDWAY 


c 

. . (Japan) 

, G Cun. lEngi 11 - 8 . 11-6 Zheng Vuh 
(China) Ol E^Coene iNoBu 11-1. U-& C 
Megmiwi (S**ei w M Hcavama (Japan). 1 1 - 
2 < 1 - 4 .HTrtM 1 e 16 ng 1 nOJ 1 aon 1 Cant. 110 . 
n-3 


GYMNASTICS 


TOKW. f 


l^lJKTra 


BASKETBALL 


CAB^BERS NATIONAL LEA<3tE:Fhw*w- 

vorcRgj Vaidy SumrUmi 90. Homespne 


Rbyitawc wonoCm ma moual. 1 . l 

a (Bun. SOOOpe (tope 10.00. baa 
)00) £ B,Pa«0« (Buty. 19,075. (9875. 
10 001 J. T Orocnmna (USSR). 13.850. 

22&.52 Z S I -/.. M Looaeh iy®S5- >8 wo. 

(9.90. 9.90k 5. d Befc&asm (USSR). (9.775. 

9950); 6. Hana Vpfta Ran (M Kart. 
19660 (SJ75. 9875? Tew 1. Qulgana. 
19 975. 2. Sonet Unan. 19325. Iftortb 
Korea. 19^0: 4, Spam. 19.725. 5. Japan. 
19550-8 0*113.19425. 


BRUTISH LEAGUE: Swnoon 42. BradhM 06 . 
MBUWD CUP! StCOM MS CtMrny 4ft 

Brtenoa SB. (Word 45 iOatail wn 9046 on- 

cSfjujLENGE MATCH: Second 
48; Newcma 38 
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txcydni 

9673W 


Jtadefcs- 
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TENNIS 


rota* u 3on» w p 
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6. 6-3, &4- J CariSBonJ&nifl M PCtanmartn. 
64 . 7ft, 4 Yiega (Porui toJ Depakoe^. 67.6 

4.. 69 


f. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Contihued jrom facing page 


SATURDAY 


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1 





THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 1 8 1 986 



TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Edited by Peter Dear and Christopher DavaUe 


43 


SUNDAY 


• From East to West 
8.3pm) is .be ffra 'ffaj 
pro^ammes which explored 

Jndf^S.S^ ic * ££ 




3 

I -^85?Sy MGTnfimijhjetnoriiMt 

■:£ 


— o — ■ tins impact of the* ^’SOumcy Weaver, 

spies- culture and atmosSiSS hS 6 * Tium won «* Oscar for 
of ihe- Orient on ‘HtaSS J / J£P? 0r l? f18 Performance as 

music. The .oresenw i.?!? 1 ? ? Photographer. Made 


«n 1982.. 


% 


1 SSZ C ° ndUtl0r :Si-S 

gwustas 

- Sf„^ tes - t Hu 8^ Stoddart’s 
i V rT«}' .-^- lOpm] p ,a y npm the book by George 

? s ; 1920. Slei. {«• about 1 3lh-cen?2i7H^ 

-■-■ ! ; charismatic figure who 

Wrf rwS - Pe- ' 2sp ht ** power of toe Pope 

tEK£^ te,nwt l Political SSL*®"*' near » madness. 




• ‘“-if ...V's-.rw^nJi fKSiiffr cM Political «“ wmaoness. 

■: 3&S5*p •* - 4 - 

: ^ aSa " A “» Ann Campbell Dixon j 



V'fo * 



■ .:. .. I0J 


^ i <is5 




ar 

is 

he 


••" »:,. . '"‘•*11 
V 7.^ 1 1 


BBC 1 


h - managed Mike Rto 

4* r u^l .©diliup 

fcSsr 98 ' 

i,.:.. Ghwten s Palace in 

-«sar ai, - ft - 

* i!* SStfSH? ST 85 ®"^ by 


C CHOICE ) 

• Good as Gold (BBC2. 
9.5pm) is a quietly satisfying 
drama about a 1 4-y ear-old 
swimmer (played by new- 
comer Jane Morris) with 
championship potential She 
has the speed, but has she the 
necessary ■“magic’'? Even her 
coach. David CaJder. is doubt- 
ful and her mother is coldly 
discouraging. 

• The Sooth Bank Show - 
Fe-Fi-Fo-Fum (ITV, 

1 0.30pm) is a curious -film 
fantasy based on some of 
Roald Dahl's books, including 
his Revolting Rhymes. The 
thingabout the Rhymes is that 
they really are Revolting* and 


'ormance' 


f >r ( 




dr-ftf 


. -i 


i -,C 

c ^ 
• * ; *---S5.v 



55SEBJU 

"orld Serb 


vT 

: 4f s 

*^.^5 

:: • 

'* ira JJ 
ȣ 

. ir - *?■ '* '5* _ 
tj '"* rbr 

mkl ikahi I? 

?»»"* ia >^Ante l4 
‘ WklMd UbOS j, ” 

■ ? *l- W, W««% 

; " s - 

-si fht nmlSmatu 
15“ **l i«3 i mhq^ i 
’ .afssa |» itn CoM 

“» r . v ‘‘ ;i: :btOns 

JT V-.. nu *■' ifc DM EUH| 

“ •«- r-n pai|«. 


i: Wils ° n : 12^40, i.^f 1 

hitemabonal Hockmntha 
r- ■ - two semifinals of the 
.•...-.■Men’e-WoridCup , 

^ competition. ' 
tiJO -News summary and 
If . , weather. 2.00 Motor 
r racmg; the seven hour . 
./ < xBaftiuret saioonxar race; 
and Snooker (also at 3 3 5 
and 4^0) the Rothmans 
GrantfPrfx. Stev&-Dav/s 
IL - ‘P“jVfsTbtiy Drago, and 
-•'- Francisca meets - ■ 

• VtoyneJones; 3^0 Half- 
ciJr Roal score. • ' 

£4STW<»fWhorftart seven of 
TheTnal.of a Time Lord. 
(Ceefax)'. 

. 6.10 The NoeLEdmonds Late 
late Breakfast Show 

'■ 'Includes a daring whirfy 
r... wheeler performance at 
the Seam&b open air 


.njo&eum; end rr^isic from 



7.35 The Russ 

•- “ '’tomedysftetehes arid 
.-•• music: (Ceefax) • 

K05 Casually. A mother, with 
'• her sot Js brought into the 
: night casualty department 
having been badly beaten- 
upand raped. When her 
v husband arrives to taka 
“ their littie boy home he *• 
i . teams that the child has 
some important 
mformation about the 
/ 1‘ attocMGeetax) - 
835 NewsirndSport. With Jan 



fynU Drarha, J set jn 
1 hi tiie ma- 
.aboukan : 

' AostreBan journalist, on his 
first oversees assignment 
who findS himself ft fire 
middle of a revokifiOn 'and 


BBC 2 


RMCsete. 

105 Open University: The 
1J0 ^g^Coumryside. 

^^■W^DwmEasr 

P 920) starring Lffiian Gish 

■ and Richard Rarthelmess. 
A alent me lodrama about 

a headstrong woman who 

mames a rake in haste, 
a -m CT.W.Grlffith. “ 

«-10 The Sty at Night Pamcfc 
Moore explains what to 
took out for to the autumn 

4-« International Snooker. 

The Ro thman's Grand Prix 
matches between Steve 
Davis .and Tony Drago: 
and Sitvmo Francisco and 
_ Wayne Jones. 

545 *”*9 Chess Report The 
firs of two programmes in 
which Jeremy James 
traces the roots of the ‘ 
game from its beginnings 
m the East to the 19th 

century. 

6.15 The Secret Life of 

Paintings. Lady . . . . 
Wedgwood explains the 
hidden meanings in 
Sandro Botficefifs 
* R airrti !?9 i la Primairara. 

*55 News View and weather. 
7^5 Saturday Review 
presented by Russell 
. Davies. Theatre; a review 
of Bristol New Vic’s 
Performance of Vaclav •- 
■Havel's Largo Desolate, 
translated by Tom ' • 
Stoppard,- Art Pam 
• Hogarth's lustrations of 

■ the fictional world of ' 

Graham Greene; and 
Biography: Robyn 
Archer's biography of 
tragic femaio singers, A 
Star is Tom. ■ - 

B-25 From East to West The 
first of four programmes 
exploring the impact of the 
Easton European music. 
Simon Rattle conducts the 
City of Birmingham ■ . 

.with 

Use Ross 


1125 FBnc Arid'lhe SblpiSaBs 
- Oh (1963) starring Freddie 
Jones and Barbara 
. . Jefford. Naples, 19H and 
friends ana admirers of a - 
4 dead soprano board a 
luxuiy liner to. attend.)^ 
r :‘funeralSwviceatssa.- 
Also do ttoard are a-Grand 
Duke, an English 
: -journalist, aria a love-side 

: Jtiinoceros. Dlrected by 
'• '•FerferiedEefflni.- ' 

11 JO FBhc L^hts of Variety* 


TV- AM 


Mike 


B-55 TV-am introduced 
Morris. Weather at 

news at 7.00 
7 JO The Wide Awake Ck* 

. includes a report on the 
• Queen's visit to the 

Children's Palace. 


ITV/LONDON 


9.25 no 73. Enterta in ment for 
the young 11-00 Knight . 
Rider. Michael Knight 
investigates a plot to 
sabotage a heads of state 
meeting, (rt 

12.00 News with Nicholas Owen 
15L05 Saint and Greavsie. Ian 
. end Jimmy reflect on the 
. week's football news. 
1230 WrestEng. Two 
bouts from The Pavaion, 
Kernel Hempstead. 

1-20 Alfwolf. Hawke and 

Dominic are with a group 
of parapaiegics climbing fn 
the b3te'wh&i they attract 
the attention of a softary 
scientist who begins to 
stalk tfwgarty 2.15 The 


■ Comedy 


. Kt3'»">»».tl ■»!*» . 

4 *-■ ' • 1 .js i ,« , » ■ *w 

■ i — . - 

rH^KELjyBS, 


ontyone person on whom I (1950) starring Peppino de 


he can treat Directed by 
- Peter Weir. (CeeCax) - 
11 40 International Snooker. 

. . TwoRothman's Grand. 
Prfec matches - Teny 
^..Griffiths against John ‘ 

' Caropbelband'JoeO’Boye 


Filippo and Carto del 
Poggio. The stoixof a 


versus Steve Newbury . 

r David Vir 


Introduced by David 
1.00 weather. 


me. 


«V« 




Ksr'BF 


T'}iisss^ 

. :ra ^L 

v wSItSfi 


On medium wave. Stereo on 
VRF (seebaWw) .«-••• ■ ■ 
NewsOn the.hatf-hour from . . 

',330,530, 


H V 


-- 

■ ...v:v-^r 

.•VI* - 




.. . Peter. 

Powea-i&oaoave Lee Trews . 
Ontemationd -Motor Show) " 
IDOprfi Adrian Jaste 2J»Ctty to 
City. Page lours ' 

Birmingham wtih Bev BeVan of ELO 
3JOO T&Amerk^i Chart Show 
530 Sattkda^Liver'Dnn Alert ; 
Music SpedaL Cbailie Faskett 
talks about Ms anti-drug album, 
Smack-630 In Concert (Latin 
Quarter) 730 Mike Read 930-1230 
The MianfahrRan tiers Show . 
(Drxte Pea$»>;VHF BtsseuRadtoel 
A 2: 4.008m As Radto.2^ : . . 

I.OOpmAs Radio 1. r30-430am 
AsRacBb2.'-l. - . 1 - 




r? 


On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHFfsefrRadtel): 


. % »-iT tF£S *' ti*** News curthe hour untB 1,00pm; 

• --'i'jVi, , then 330, 630; 730 and hourty . 

. . • ■ ^ uV *5 > from 1030. HeaJSneseJOmn, 


* r 

. 1 -lT» ■ 

*■<-' v f* 

■> ' . ,j«i . rtT 

4 * *:. 


from 1030.Headttie5630acD, 

730 Sports Desks 1 132am, _ 
10.02pm. .< ■ 

430w»Devid.YamBllG30 - 
Steve Truetove 835 David Jacobs " 
1030 Sodnds of Die 60s.1130 . 
Album Time IHQm The News > 
Huddknes. 130Spo»?on Z . % 
includes football; racing from ; - 
Newmarket hockey (worlds- - 
Cup) ant* cricket (England v 
GueansiandCounty Xl).v530 
Sports Report B3fr Braid of Sport 
1986. 630 TDftPresSGa' 

News qiBz 730 JBeaL the 
Keith FOrcMce-wfth musical 
teasere-L.73fl The Massed Bands of 
the Royal Air Force. a20-e^40 ' 

Upintne»..JdtTO : nfrtosonbn 
things eerbraoticaL a^) string 
Sound 1035 Martin Ketner 
1235am Night Owls (Dave 
Geliy) 130 Chaitis'33pT4-00 
Northing Rendezvous 


V WORLD SERVICE 




-s*» 


. * fjJ' 1 

& 


630 NewstfMk 730 NBws-7J»JB««itt 
RW Heucv 7J30 Rofri tin WwWwMS 
Network 4JK630 NewsWa 
8.15 A Jofly-Goofl Show WO *£**£ 
Review otamwi Pwes^is tm www 
Today 930 'financial NbW» *M .Lot* 
Ahead 848 About. BrtBiff'IOLOO * N wa 
1031 Here's Himow lai OLettw Rom 
America lOflOrPerolfrand 
World News TIXf NewS-AXJUt. Srttttn 


Y t .„- "i*- 

. -c£ -fj 
' v” / 

* : 


litis sum ««»e-BSS 






*** .. 




Uff .riy 






- T 2 - 0 * 

hadkiNewnad IMS MuWwacfc-3 1245 

B 339 EW 

News 831 Httottna B.1S Sounds of me 
& JJO^Sopb ****** 

SESfflsa 

Sffi 3 ®gjg 8 

2.15 cnesiertort ,430 ^5? 330. 


*■ * 


turns m GOT.' 


- ’ .i 8 y f 




ttcgionaTTV ■ m(adngpQge : l 


... whojotos a second-rate 
touring vaudeville. Tire film 
charts tbe rise of tiie girt •* 
and sGde of the company. 
Directed by Federico 
Fellini and Afcerto . 
Lattuada. Ends at I.IOr 


635 Weather 730 News 
7.05 Aubada. Frantlsek 
Kllmar, Polkas; Old 

Bohemian,- Esmereida 
(Czech PO under Vadav - . 
Neumann); Heinrich Ernst. 
• Etude: The test Rose 
iKremer.vioHn); 

Ml 


Cuckoo 
eeries.(r) 

235 SuperbowL The second 
semifinal of the Liverpool 
Victoria insurance 
Superbowl. 

445 Results. 

5.00 News. 

535 Blockbusters. 

535 The A-Team. Hannibal 
and his. men are mistaken 
for Insane Wayne and his 
gang of mercenaries who 
nave been hired to move a 
squatter from a plot of 
'land. When the real Wayne 
arrives, battle 
commences. (Oracle) 

630 Blind Date presented by 
Cilia Black. 

7.T5 Saturday Gang. A mixture 
of comedy ana music- from 
Gary Wrlmot, Hale and 
Pace, and Kate Robbins. 
735 3-2-1. Game show with a 
Mediterranean flavour 
by Ted • 

_ {Oracle) 

845 News and sport 
930 Dempsey and 

Makepeace. The two SI 
10 operatives are on the 
trail of a gang of drug 
dealers from Cotombte 
. after they kill a poSceman 
. j. who challenged them, at 
; -the docks. • 

1030 LWT News headlines 
followed by Tales of the. 
Unexpecterfc'The Stinker. . 
A life-long loser meets a - . 
successful man who made' 
his life hell when they 
were atschool together. _ . 
Starring Denhobn BBott 
and Joss Ackland. (r) 

1030 SuperbowL The ffrial of 
the Liverpool Victoria 
Insurance SuperbowL 
1230 Special Squad. Pofice 
• drama series. 

130' Bliss In Conceit King 
Kurt 

135 Night Thoughts. " 


CHANNEL 4 


9.25 A Question Of Economics. 
A plain man’s guide to 
economic Jargon, (rt 930 4 
Whatir**ortts, 
Consumer affairs, (r) 10.20 
The Heart of the Oregon. 
Part one of the 12- 
programme, award- 
winning series on China. 
(r)1 1.15 Treasure Hunt 
Anneka Rice scours 
Rochester, (rt 1230 Isaura 
the Slave GhL Part one of 
the 30-episode Brazilian 
soap opera M 1-00 World 
of Animation. Les 
Miroides. 

1.15 Channel 4 Racing from 
New ma rket and Kempton 
Park. The 130, 230 and 
2.40 races from Kempton; 
the 1/45, 230 and 3.05 
races from Newmarket 

330 Ftec Crossroads* (1942) 
starring WBfiam Powell 
and Hedy Lamarr, a 
romantic thriller about a 
French diplomat who 
loses Ns memory and Is 
blackmailed after being 
accused of being a 
criminal. Directed by Jack 
Conway. 

535 BrooknUe. (rt (Oracle) 

630 Right to Reply. Lawrence 
McGirrty defends his 
report for Channel 4 news 
on Aids and the wonder 
drug, AZT. 

630 The Great Australian Boat 
- Race. The latest news on 

• the America's Cup - 
preliminary races. 

730 News summary and 
weather followed by 7 
. Days. How much say 
should parents have in 
their children's education? 

730 Strangers Abroad. The 
work of German 
geographer and scientist 
Franz Boas who. in 1883. 
arrived in the Canacfian 
Arctic to map the coastline 
' and to study the lives of 
Eskimos. 

830 Redbrick. Part three of the 
series on a year in the fife 
of Newcastle University. 
(Oracle) 

930 Paradise Postponed. Part 

r five and although the 
Coroner accepts that Tom 

* Nowt'S death was 

* accidental, some have * 
their doubts, (r) (Oracle) ' 

1030 M&Stzeet Blues. Beiker is 
given the run-around by a . 

. wheeichak-boond 
vandaL(Oracle) • 

1130 Saturday Almost Live 
introduced by Lenny 
Henry. Among those 
appearing this week are 
- -Helen Leoerer, The 
Damned, Rita Rudner and 
The Obivion Boys, (r) 

1230 Madonna in Concert. 

Filmed on lastyearis tour 
of the United States 

1.00 FHircPorkfips Now (I960) 


BBC 1 


BBC 2 


835 


Now with a 
endings. Directed by 
Fosseftus. Ends at 1. 


three 

Ernie 

30. 


'School 9.15 Aiticfes. 
of ratth-Creettein 
Community 930 This is 
the Day. A simple retotous 
service. 

1030 Asian Magazine. 1030 

ToBong Business. For 

business peoptewhose 
second language is 
English. 

1035 Buongiomo Italia! Part ' 
two of the Italian 
conversation course, (r) 
11-22 France Actuefle. 

The news in French from 
RTL Luxembourg, (r) 

12.10 Sign Extra. A Great 

Experiments programme 
adapted for the hearing 
impaired 1235 Fanning. 
An examination of 
schemes to turn back the 
tide of cereal surpluses 
that are threatening to 
bankrupt the Common 
■ Market 1238 Weather. 

1.00 This Week Next Week. 
David Dimbleby talks to 
Lord Young about 
unemployment. 230 
EastEnctera. (r) (Ceefax) 

330 FUm: The Lost World 
(1960) starring Michael 
Rennie and Ctaude Rains. 
Adventure based on 
Conan Doyle's story about 
a land that time forgot 

435 Motor Show 86. A review 
of the next generation of 
cars. 

5.15 Six Days io China. Michael 
Cole reviews the Queen's 
historic visit to China. 

530 David CopparflsM. 

Episode one of a new ten- 

Sickerers novel. (Ceefaxf 

630 Save a Life. Dr Alan 
Maryon Davis continues 
Ns series on emergency 
first aid. (Ceefax) 

630 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather. 

6.40 Songs of Pratee from the 
Collegiate Church of St 
Mary, Haddington, East 
Lothian. (Ceefax) 

7.15 Twenty Years of the Two 
Ronnies. Highlights from 
the comedy duas two 
decade partnership. 
(CoqIbx) 

830 Howards 1 Way. Episode 
eight (Ceefax) 

830 News with Jan Leemirw. ’ 
Weather. - ■ . 

935 Sunday Premiere: .Good v l : 
as Gold. Drama about a • ' 
young girl swimmer who is 
being groomed for 
stardom at any price. 
Starring Jane Morris. 
(Ceefax) 

1035 Everyman; The True Story 
of Frankensteai. -The - 

story of the Frankenstein 
myth's progress through 
modem culture. 

1130 Discovering Animals. The 
mammals of Britain, (r) 

1135 In tern a tio nal Snooker. 

Tony Knowles v Peter 
Francisco; and Rex 
Wiliams v MarkWildman. 

12.40 Weather. 


, 930 Ceefax. 

[1230 No Limits from 
Winchester, (ri 

130 

. of the match played in 
Edinburgh yesterday 
• between Boroughmuir and 
Stewart's Melville FP. 

230 International Snooker. 

The Rothman's Grand Prix 
matches between Alex 
Higgins and Dave Martin; 
and Doug Mountjoy and 
JimWycn.- 

235 Internatio na l Hockey. The 
final of the Men's World 
Cup from WBIesden 
Stadium. 

430 approximately 

Inte rna tional Snooker. 
Further coverage of the 
Rothman’s Grand Prix 
from the Hexagon, 
Reading. 

535 Musk in Camera. Barry 
Douglas, winner of this 
year s Tchaikovsky Piano 
Competition plays 
Tchaikovsky’s Autumn 
Song; and Mussorgsky's 
Pictures at an Exhibition. 

5.50 Thinking Aloud. A new 
series presented by 
Michael Ignatieff begins 
with Helena Kennedy, 

Juhet Mrtchefl, Michael 
Neve and Roger Scruton 
discussing 'sexual 
morality; a question of 
mind over matter?' 

630 The Money Prog ram me. 
With eight days to go Mark 
Rogerson reports on the ' 
changes that win come 
into effect with the arrival 
in the City of the Big 
Bang' 

7.15 Did You See™? 

introduced by Ludovic 
Kennedy. Inside Story, 

The Story of English, and 
The Secret Life of 
Paintings, are discussed 
by Peter McKay, Gus 
Macdonald, and Muriel 
Gray. 

830 The Natural World: The 
Mystery of Laguna Baja. 

A documentary about 
remarkable wrtdfrfe that 
. congregates at a lagoon in 
the Mexican desert ' 

830 Lovelaw. This third of 
seven frfimsatxxjt the iova- 
Irves of people around tiia 
world scfls out to discover . 
*tf marriage works beneflT' 
each partner has a ctearfy 
defined rote. (Ceefax) ’ ■ 

9.40 ht tem attonar Snooker. 

Tony Knowles v Peter - 
Francisco. 

1035 Him: Looking for Mr 
Goodbar(l977) starring 
Diane Keaton, Tuesday 
Weld and Richard Gere. A 
drama about a woman . 
with a split personality^By 
day, a dedicated teecner 
of deaf children; by night 
a promiscuous frequwiter 
of singles bars. Directed -. 
rd Brooks.; 

Ends at 1230. ; 


byRfcna 

(Ceefax) 


TV-AM 


635 TV-emhegms with Sunday 
C om ment; 7.00 Are You 
Awake Yet? 735 The Wide 
Awake Club. 

930 Datrid Frost mi Sunday. 
The guests include Robert 
Kee. Annie McGuire,' 
Antony Jay, and Dr Yang 
Cheng. 


ITV/LONDON 


935 Wake Up London. 9.30 
Film: The Sheriff and the 
Satellite Kid (1980) Is a 
Imie boy who claims he is 
from another planet the 
cause of a town's chaos? 
Directed by Michele Lupo. 
11.00 Morning Worship from the 
Parish Church of St 
Mary's. Bide ford. 

1230 Weekend World. Matthew 
Paros talks to Denzif 
Davies about Labour's 
anti nutear defence policy. 
1.00 Police Five. 1.15 
European Folk Teles. The 
Mask of the Devil. 

130 Getting On. Three lady 
pilots of the Air Transport 
AuxtiiaryZOO The Human 
Factor: The Loneliest Men 
in the World. A year in the 
hfe of Jim Smith who Is 

. blind and deaf. 

230 LWT News headlines 
followed by Hart to Hart 
Jennifer poses as a 
romantic nove&st 
330 A People's Welcome: The 

Queen in CNna. Highlights 
of the Queen’s historic 
visit to China. 

430 The Campbefls. James's 
life is in danger. 

530 BuBseye. Darts and 
general knowledge game. 
530 Sunday Sunday. The 
include 

r Reeve and 

Dave 

630 News with Nicholas Owen. 
6.40 Appeal ty. Frank Muir and 
Denis Norden on behalf of 
- the Royal Air Forces 
Association. 

6.45 Highway; Sir Harry 
. Secombe returns to 

Cornwall. 

7.15 Child's Play with Michael 
AspeJ, Ross Davidson and 
Liza Goddard. 

7.45 Live from the Piccadilly. 
Among Jimmy Tarbuck'-s 
quests are Bob -- — _ .- 
Monkhouse and Randy 
Crawford. 

8.45 News. 

930 Inside Story. Part four of 
the drama serial about the 
battle for control,of a Fleet 
.Street Sunday newspaper. 
1030 -Spitting Image. - 
1030 The Sou th Bank Show. A 

day in • 

. Dahl: 

1135 LWT News headlines - 
• followed by End of 
. Empire. Tftedacfineof the 
British Empire, (r) 

1235 Cafifomta Highways. 

130 Night Thoughts. 


Ian McKellen — as a wart- 
encrusted witch who vomits 
blue bile into a handbag - 
provides the most repulsive 
sight on television since Mag- 
nus Pjkc ate locusts some 
vears ago. 

• A new Dickens serialization 
begins; David CopperfteM 
(BBC!. 5.50pm) with David 
Dexter aa inspired piece oi 
casting as young David. 

• The Britten/Tipprtt Festi- 
val (Radio 3. ?.30pm) comes 
direct form the Royal Festival 
Hall where David Atherton 
conducts Tippett's. 4ih . Sym- ; 
phony and the Spring Sym-. 
phony bv Britten. • 

A, CD- 


CHANNEL 4 


935 Sunday East A new series 
tor Asian viewers, 
followed by Dewmrato. « 
drama senes set m . 

. . Pakistan. tracing tnqdm 
of several families from . ... 
the same village. 

10.00 The World IT* We6k. A- 

new news and discusetoo - 
series presented by 
Chamal Cuar„The guests . 
are Sudanese Prime . 
Mtiustor Sediq ai Matidi. 
and the former Austrian " 
Prime Minister. Maicokn 
Fraser. - 
1130 Wofzel Gummkige 

starring Jon Pertwee.(r) 
1130 The WeitoM. . 

1230 Woifd Series BaMbetL 


2.30 


American and National 
Leagues.,200 Pob's 
Programme. For. the.. 

iS£%ic®aw?*n94i) ' 
starring Deanna Durbin * 
and Francha Tone. 
Romantic musical about a 
smalHpwn girl who sets . < 

■ her sights on a visiting . . 
New York scientist . 
Directed by WiHfcm A . 
Setter.* * 

4.15 Film: A' Home of Your- 
Own* (1964) Diaiogtw^ns ■ 
comedyfoflowmfl foe ■ 
progress of the . ■ 
construction of a young 
couple's dream home. • - 
Starting Richard Briers 
and Bridget Armstrong. 
Directed by Jay Lewis. 

5.00 World of Aointatkm 
includes Jungle Jiva, 

5.15 News summary and 
weatlw followed by The 
Business Progr a mme.' 
Dermot Mumagtian joins 
Australian John. Elliott as 
he meets top Courage 
executives for the first 
time'since buying the* .' 
company from- Lord 
Hanson.- • . 

630 American Footfael. ; 

Seattle Seahawks against 
Los Angeles Raid errand 
Washington Redskins . 
versus- me Dallas Cowboys. 

7.15 Chasing Rainbows. Music ' 
and talent are the topics ’ 
tor this documentary -in the 
series on popular music -- 
andenteitalnnientin . 


Erigtand. 

PObrofF 


8.15- Pfl&rof Fire. The • 
Holocaust 1939 - 1945. 

■9.10 The Languageof theNew 
Music. Tne influence of 
Wittgenstein and 
Schoenberg. With Vladimir 
' AShkhnaiy and the Allegri 
. StrinaQuartBL 
1030 PHnc It Always Rainioti . 

•'.^SK&saS’jSn 

. McCalkiirn. Drama about a ^ 
- disenchanted wife whose " 
drab fife takes an ' - 
exdting hue wftenher . v> 

' former lover turns up, 6 
the run from the police 
• Directadby Rof ' 

.. Ends at 123&. 


on-'* 

4--. ; 


1130 


Ax (piano); Mozart 
OintetinEflat 
Murray ParaNa 


E flat (K 45a 
na (piano). 



in. Concerto in D. 
tor oboe d'amore and 
strings; Grieg, Two Lyric 
Pieces. Op Nos 4 and 5; 
Jorge Rodriguez. 

Toccata No 2 (Nlcanor 
Zabaieta. harp); Bach: . 

- Aria: Erbarme cfich, main 
Gott (St Matthew 
Passion), with Christa 
Ludwig ( 

'soprano); Faurti, Barcaroles: 
No 4. in A flat Op 44; No 
5, in F shfflp minor, Op 66, 
with Paul f 
(piano); Mozart ! 

No 40. in G minor j 
• 550). 

930 News 

9.05 Record Review. wWr 
Patti Vaughan. Buikting a 
• Library: Wagner's Ring (4) 
.Gdtterdamir 
Christopher 



10.1S Stereo I 

Schubert Quartet bE 
Uat(D8^HabSnStrWg 
Quartet Beethoven. 12 
Variations-on See, the .. 
canqu'ring hem comes, . 
trom Handers Judas . . 
Maccabaeus(Wo045):- 

Yo Yo Ma(ceto). Emanuel 


sndOrchMtra, 

• under Christoph von 
Dohnanyi. Dvorak, Scherzo 
cappricctoso. Op 66; 

Pntzher. Violin concerto in B 
minor; Op 34, with Edith 
Peinemann. '1235 Interval 
nsadtog. 12.10 BraNris. 
Symphony No 2, in D.’Op 73. 

130 News 

135 FtiurO and Ravel Bboux r 
Arts Trio plays Fauna's 
Trio in D minor, Op 120; 
RaveTs Trio in A minor. 

230 Equate Brass. Esa-Pekka 
Salonen. Sets; Edward 
Gregson, Equate Dances. 

230 Musca antique, Cologne. 
Bteer, Partita No 7. in C 
minor; Vivakfi, Concerto in D 
m^or (RV 93); for kite . 
and strings. 

330 Mengefberg's 

Beethoven. Records 
made duringpuWrc concwrts 
givea in 1940. Symphony . 

No 2. in D; Symphony No 6, 
in F (Pastoral). Indudmg 
335 Interval reading, 

430 Geroges Enesco.- Sonata 
in F sharp minor, Op 24 ' 

No 1. Peter WaOflsch (piano). 

5-00 Jazz Record Requetits. 
vnBi Peter Clayton. 

5.45 Critics' Forum. Includes 

comment on the Monday 
- - Pfay; The News From 
Ireland; MBcs Newefl's 
film The'Good Father; the ' 
RSCs production of Les 
liaisons dangereuses and 
The (fokterr Age. arthe 


635 Louis Spohr. Quartet No 
11,inE.Op43(Quatour 
britorit); Quintet No 4. in A 
minor.OpOl.Gabriefi 
Strina Quartet. 

730 BBC Weteri Symphony 
Orchestra, tinder Jukka- ' 
Pekka Saraste, with John LI 
(piano), five trom St 
David’s Hafl, Carcfiff.Part - 
• one: Wagner. Overture: 

The Flying Dutchman; 
Beethoven, Piano 
Concerto No 1, In C. 

B3D A Waft Through Wales, 
by Michael Petharam. (1) 
From Bath to Caerteon. • 
8.40 BBC Welsh SO (part 
two). Brahms, Symphony 
No 4, in E minor. 

930 (mo the Night Two 
settings of poems by 
W. a Yates. Tippett. Lullaby 
(Timothy WHson, 
counter-tenor); Malcolm 
Into the Night 


On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on the half-hour untfl 
1130am, then 23fltom, 330, 430* 
730, 9.30, 12JJ0 mnrtight 
6.00am Mark Page 830 Peter 
Powefl 1030 Mike Read 1230pm 
Jimmy Sawfle 1 ® OW Record Cbb 
(74 and '68) 230 The return of Bob 
Gekfof- Musician. Part 1. 330 
Radio 1 more time 430 
Chartbusters, with Bruno 
Brookes 530 Top 40 with Brulo 
Brookes 730 The Anne - 
Nightingale Request Show 930 
Robbie Vincent 1130-1230 
-The rankin' Miss P with Culture 
■RoOk 


1030 Budapest Wind 
Bisembte. Mozart 
Serenade in E flat (K -375); 

HummeL Partite in E flat 
Brahms. Hungarian Dances.. 
10.46 The Six Senses. 

Anthology of prose, 
verse and musk: on the 
theme of sound, 


the Barrow Poets. 

11.00 Gordon Fergus- 

■ Thompson (pipno) plays 
works by Beethoven. 
Schumann and 
Rachmaninov. . 

11.57 “News 

VHForiy 635435am Open 
University: Organic Chemistry 


* 4 v */ '"l * a- 1 ' ’ ' 1 ' 


On medium wave. Stereo on . 
VHF. 

News on the hour (except ■ 
830pm) Headlines 730am Sports 
Desks 12L02poi, 632 and 
1032. 

430am David YarrtaH 630 
Steve Truetove 730 Roger Royte 
says Good Morning Sunday 
935 Melodies for You. 1100 Teddy 
Johnson wrthyour Radio 2 Afl- 
Time Greats 2-00pm Barmy Green 
330 Alan Deli wim Sounds 
Easy.430 Moira Anderson sings 
■ with the Langham Orchestra - 
430 You Can Sing The Next'Song: 
.530 Charfe Chester with your 
Sunday Soapbox (teh 061-228 - - 
1884) 730 ITs A Funny 
Business. Mike Crate talks to ' 
Deryck Guyter 730 Come To . 
-The Batet with Cormac Rigby. B30 
Sunday Half-Hour from the 
Centra Methodist Church, ' 
Launceston. Cornwall 930 
"Your Hundred Best Tunes. 1035 


On 

535 


long wave. (s). Stereo oc vhF. 
55 Shfobteg. 630 News briefing; 
wesSfor. fi-lO.pretede (s) 


630 News Famting. 6^0 
Prayw. 635 weather. 
Travel 

730 News 7.10-Today'S 
-Papers. 7.15 Dn tout 
Fanh,73S In Perspective, 
with Rosemary HartSl 
. .. 730 Down tD'Eartti- 735 . 

Weathac Travel 
830 News 8.10 Today's- • 
.8.15 Sport on 4. 
Yesterday ta 
PariiamsrrC' - ■■ - 
837 Weather; Tray^ 

930 News 

935 Breakaway. Travel arid 
teisurel - 

930 Newsstand. With David 
Bradbury. 

1035 

Howard talks to the 
Opposition Grief Whip. 
Derek Foster MP, at Ws 
home in Tyne and Wear. 

1030 Looser Ends, with Ned 
Sherrin, 

1130 From Our Own- 

Correspondent Life and 
pptwm: abroad. 

1230 News; Money Box (the 
1986-7 Unit frost 
Investor of the Year). 

1237 Racfio Active. The Fit and 

Fat Show; Anna Daptor 


130. News. . 

. 1.10 Any Questions? With the 

Right Rev Stanley Booth- - - 
‘ Cwbarn, John Butcher MP. 
s -Anna Maftatieu and Des 

Wilson, totfte chair: John 
Tlmpson. From Sale. - 
Cheshire. 155 Shipping 
230 News; The Afternoon 
. Ptey. The News from ' ■ 

.. iratand,by WIHiani Travor ' 
with Cyril Cusack aa the * 

butler and Mok Leslie as tiie 

lIsK'SS&sen*]. 

• John Sxfon.reflecte on 
fife in the Grade islands 
330 Hews; Travel; 

International 
Assignment. BBC 


6-25 Stop the WMk with 
Robert Robinson. With 
Jeremy Nicholas's musteaL 
.' item 

730 Saturday-Night Theatre. ' 
Between the Gates, by ' 

Hugh Stoddart; With 

Ni cholas Farrell and 

Edward de Souza. Drama, 
set in the 13th. centurv. - 

830 Baker's dozen. Richard ' 
Baker with records. 

930 Thrfflerf Peter 

1(4). 

:i030 News . 

10,15 

'1030 Opinions. 


: Elms at the Piano-1130' 
Sounds of Jazz 130am 
Nightride 3.0CM30 A Little Night 
Music. 


world Service 


4.0qrihP Saturday 1 
Gfilslo Bh>e. A - 
* celebration of the LctorrGirts 
Choir. 

435 Memoftsofa Fox- 
hunting Man. Siegfried ' 
Sassooifs novel, read by 
Stephen MacDonald (4). 

530 Ttw Living WOrld. On the 
' prograrnme's2Bth . 
bathday, presented Derek 
Jones confronts the 



880 Nawsdesk 730 Nek.r 7.09 Twenty- 
Four Hours' 730 Trom Ow Own Corra 
spondent 750 Wauegufae M0 News 8J» 
Reflections B.T5 Hie Plessura's ’Yours 
9LOO News 909" Review Of The British 
Praeo 8.15 Sctonce irr Action 945 Histori- 
ans flU» Nees 1001 Short Stoty.ia.15 
Classical Record Review 1030 Sunday 
Santo- 1UD0 News 1UB News Anil 
Britain 11.15 FfomOur Own Correspoo- 
xtheweek; 


-dent 12JS5 News 1201 Play oHhe 

Atirgal's Parry 130 News 439 Twenty- 
Four Hours 130 Sports Roundup 1v4S 
Sandf Jofios Roquust snow {including at 
230 News Summary) 230 The Bwofted 
330 Radio Newsreel 3ri5 Concert Hal 
430 News 4.09 CotnmentHPy 4i15 Craft 
.ter Cash AM Lenar trom America 530 

— * - -u .--.Jtewa S3S Reflections 830 News 830 

1130 Radio Times Comedy f Twenty-four Hours 830 Sunoey half 

Parade [new series! The — ..|_Hourfl30 Naws93i Short smry B.15 the 
flvBbest entries folastyearV I Pteaswas Yours jjm» mom. «m» 


t and hsalftiy. 12.55 
Weather * ‘ 


! battle of ChltHnaham. 
535 WBek Ending. SatSfcal' 
sketches basedm the 
: week's news. 530 Shipping. 
. .? 5^ WaaHier. Travel 
630 News; SportB Round-up 


Rattio Times 

writing competition fl) Yo; . 
Start - i'll Jom In, • 

Written by David Bond and ' ° 
PauiHewksbee.is) 

1230 New® Weather. 1233' 

-■ Shipping 

VHF (available In England an S ' 
Wales omy) as abov^ 
except: 535 : 6JKtani Weather, 
-Travel 13S-230pm - ■ 

Programme News. 430-630 
Options: 430 Rambles in 
Ireland. 430 Domesday- 
FamWes. 530 Loca" 

Speaking. 530 Por 


Chesterton 102S Book Chcace 1030 
Financtal Revtaw Kuo RbAkdoos iol 4$ 
Spans RcvteuP U30 News 11.18 Letter 
FromAmencs 1130 Big Bang at tne Stock 
Btetoge 1230 nows 123T News Atxut 

Britem 12.15 Radto Newneel 1230 
Raagnus Savlca 130 News un 1 
Ctfflxtol^s Enc Coates 230 News 23S 
Rariew of the Brttsri Pntn 2.15 Peetites' 
Choce 230 Serenes In Action 330 News 
3JM News Atxxrt Britain 3.15 Good Books 
330 Anytitefl Goes 430 News Desk <30 
FU- Whom tne Bea Toss. Aiwaesln qmt. 


■■ :• ‘ y ■ 


635 Weather 7.00 News 
735 Beecham Conducts. 

Haydn, Symphony No 
•1D2.iftBflat(RoyaL- . . 
Philharmonic Orchestra); . 
Delius-. Paris: The song of a . 
great city (London 
' PhBhamionltf Orchestra): 
Mendelssohn, Violin 
Concerto (RPO, soloist 
Jascha Heifetz^ Strauss.:- ■ 
Tone Poem: Em Hetdenieben 
930 News 

. 935 Your Concert. Choice.' 

Britten. Canadian 
Carnival. Op 19 (CBSO under 
Rattle): Schubert. The 
~ Shepherd on (he Rock p " 
965); Rebecca Cterk. 

Viola Sonata, with Josef 
Kodousek (viola); 

Poulenc. L'embarquement 
pourCyth^re. with 
Jacques FOvrier and Gabriel 
Tacchino (pianos); 

LutoslawsKi. Symphony No 1 
(Polish RSO). 

1030 Music Weekly. 

Introduced by Michael 
Oliver. Includes an 00th •- 
. birthday conversation 
with viotinist Alfredo - 
. . Campoli. 

11.^5 ShureCherkassky 
- ' (piano). Chopm, Ballade ' 

No 3; in A flat Op 47; 

. f Rachmaninov. Variations 
on atheme by Corelfi. Op 42; 

. : Franck. Prelude, Chorale 
>.- etFuguft.- 
12.15 feraef Philharmonic 
Orchestra, under Zubin 


; Mehta, with Daniel 
Barenboim (piano). Barg. 
TTireepiecas for orchestra,' • 
Op 6: Schumann, • 

Symphony No 2, In C major. 
Brahms, Piano Concerto- 
. No 1. in D minor. 

2.15 Not What You Think. 

Other versions of faumiUar 
operas. Busoni's Turaodot 
Sung m German iri a 
recorded performance by the 
Frankfurt Radio 
Symphony Orchestra, 

.. conducted by Etiahu ' 

IribaL with Sabrne Hass in '• 
the tide role 

"3JC Letter from Palo Altto. ' 

With Profesor David 
Marquand. 

335 Not What You Think. 

Manfred Gurittrs 
Wozzeck. first performed 
only five months after 
Berg's death in 1926. Heinz- 
Jurgen Demitz sings the 
titfe role in a recording, sung 
te German. 

530 The Harlequin Years. 

Last in senes about 
Parisian musical We-in the 
. decade after the First 
Work! War. 

5.15 Alfredo CampolL The - 
. viofinstin recorded 

performances of 
Wieniawski's Polonaise ■ 

-da concert. Op 4. and Saint 
; Sains Vtotin Concerto- 
. No3. teBmmor. Op6l 
7.00 Liszt and the Piano. ' 
Hungarian Rhapsodies: ' 


. ~ No 3. in B flat: NO 4.inE flat 
Fwq Hungarian folk' 

. _ songs; Hungarian Rhapsody' 
No 5, inDflatKun Wqo' - 
• PaUt (piano).' ' 

730 Britten/Tippett Festival, •. • V 
five trom the Royal 
Festival HaJL BBC S y mphony ^ 
Chorus and Singers. ....... 

BBC Symphoqy Orchestra, .'. 
with Margaret Marshall 
(soprano), Falcity Palmer ■ 
fmezzo-sopremoiand - 
PtulfoLangridge (tenor). Pactv, 


one: Tippett, 

No 4. . 

.830. A Walk Through Wafes. .' 
From a 1 799 account'by 
Rev Richard Warner. 

830 Britten/Tippett Festival. 

Part two: Britten, Spring 
Symphony. 

9.15 The American Philip 
. Roth. The writer's novels 
and stories explored by 
Stephen Fender. 

10.15 Crossover Saxophone. - 

- John Haile (soprano/alto - 
. saxopnone) and John 

Lenenan (piano). Works 
by David Heath. Hank'. . 
. Alkema, RyoNoda and 
K«ke Wescjrook. 

10.45 Letter from Wales.-with : 

- John Davies. 

1130 Lekeu and RaveLLekeu. - 
Sorato(l89l) and- Ravel, 
Sonata m 6. played by ■ - 

Dong-Suk Kang (violin) . . 

■ apd Pascal Devoyon (piano). 
1137 News 








9- 


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55 Shipping 6.00 News Briefirx 
Weather tlO Prelude (A 

630- 


selection of music (sg 1 
News; Momlna Has 
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730 News 7.10 Sunday 
'Papers 7.15 Apna Hi 
Ghar Samaftiye 735 Befls ' 
ori Sunday'730 Turning - 
Over New Leaves 735 
- Weather; Travel 
830 News 8.1O Sunday 


8.15 Sunday. Religious news 
andr views, ' 

830 Derek Nimo talks, for the 
Week's ?oo0 Causa 
■ about tbe Hereford 
Cathedral Appeal-Fund 
. 835 weather; Travel 

930 News ftio Sunday 
Papers : . ■ 

9.15 Letter from America, by ' 
Aijstter Cooke. 

930 Morning Service fromSt. 
Marjir'sSter of the Sea. 

! POitstewwtCd, 
Londoooorryfs) 

10.15 The Archers, r 
edition. 

11.15 "Pick of the week. 

Highlights of recent 
programmes (sr 

12*15 Desert island Discs. 
Cricketer Phil Edmonds 
- in conversation with Mtehael 
.. Parkinson (s) 1235 
_Weather 


130 Ths World This 

Weekend: News 135 - 

230 News 'harden srs’ 

■ Question-Time visits the • 
British Forces based at 
Munster. West Germany. 

230 The Afternoon Play: . 

221B.byMJRead.WiA . 
NigBl Stock 'm a Sherlock 
' Holmes tale(s) 

330 A Charabanc to Russia. *' 

■ Judith Efflott presents an 
account of the Belfast ■ ^ ' 
Charabanc Theatre' 
Company's tour of the Soviet 

. Union m 1984. • 

4.00 News; The Pood " 
Programme. 

430 The RadBo Programme. 

■ 530 News Travel 
535 Down Your Way.'Brian 
. Johnston visits 

Hartlepool in Cleveland. 530 
_ Shipping 535 Weather 
630 News 

S.15 Weekend Woman's 

- -Hour.Hlghligtesofthe 

- past wetec's programmes. 
730 How An Umbrella 

■ , Changed Everything. 

Story ny SWrfev Cooklin (s) 

7.45 The Song of Ae Swan. 
'Musks, poetry and' 
legend, (a) 

830 Bookshelf. Susan Hill 

- presents Radioes good 
books programme. 

830 Museum Choice. The. 


Royal Pavttion at 
Brighton. " 

930 News: Father Brown 
Stories.- Five stones 
. dramatized by John • 
Scotneyfs). 

938 Lawin Action. Presented 
■by Joshua RozenMrg ■ 

■ 935 Weather; Travel 

1030 News 

.10.15 You The Jury: '/The 

» Parfjampntary tabby* '• - 

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1130 The Latter That KiHs. Sue-' 
Talbot explores the pain 
of marriage breakdowr^and 
divorce, in me context Of 
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II. 15 ; Muse from the People. 

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20th-century revival of . 
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11,45 Kane’s-TaleaFrom ' *• \ 
Shakespeare. Vtacem ’ 

, Kane rteeus the stones of. 
five of.the Bard's best- ., 
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■ 1230- News; Wearier 1233 
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630am Weather: Travel 135- 
230pm Programme News 430- - 

6.00dptions: 4.ffl> China Forum " 
■4.45 A State of ConfuaoA. Da^rw. . . 
■wfAsemfe dementia 530 ' 

Buongiomo Katte! Beginners' 

Kalian. ..." 


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★ ir.fr.it 


Barcelona leads Olympic parade | Engiandpm 


From David Miner 
Chief Sports Correspondent 
Lausanne 

The hurtful realities of 
world sporting politics all too 
predictably swamped 
Birmingham's Olympic bid 
here yesterday when Barce- 
lona was awarded the 1992 
Summer Games on an 
overwhelming vote. Only six 
members of the International 
Olympic Committee, besides 
Britain's two. supported the 
Birmingham complex of facil- 
ities that was best suited of all 
the six candidates to the 
competitors. 

This is not to say that 
Barcelona — who gained a 
majority of 47 votes out of 85 
on the third round after the 

How the votes 
were cast 

Stunner Games 


Round 

Amsterdam — 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Btmwigham 

Bnsbara 

Pans 


1 st 2nd 
5 


Winter Games 


Round l«2nG 

A aenviBe 19 26 

Sl^L- 7 6 

Falun 10 11 

LUehammer 10 11 


1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th fill 
IS 26 29 42 - 51 

7 5---- 

6 

7 6 7 --- 

10 11 11 9 41 9 


9 40 - 


Sofia 25 25 28 24 - 2S 

elimination of Amsterdam, 
which was destroyed by an 
anti-Olympic demonstration 
on Thursday night, and then 
Birmingham — will not be a 
fine host city. Its credentials 
are excellent. 

What Birmingham lacked 
was not the technical facilities 
but knowlege of in-fighting in 
the myriad corridors of power 
— where, sadly, Britain is 
currently insignificant. 

“The voting is a sad reflec- 
tion on the IOC” Charles 
Palmer, chairman of the Brit- 
ish Olympic Association, said 
afterwards. “Birmingham had 
a much better bid than Barce- 
lona in sporting terms.” 

Clare FancutL a Tory mem- 
ber of Birmingham’s commit- 
tee. said forlornly while 
Barcelona’s representatives 
were pouring the champagne 
and preparing to fly home by 
charter jet for a midnight city 


Q99 


parade: “I'm shattered that 
people can be so deceitful”. 
Birmingham had believed it 
would get, on personal trust, 
the support of at least a dozen 
or more neutral members. 
Such are the false promises 
which abound within the IOC 

Accountable voting must be 
introduced instead of the se- 
cret ballot and East Germany 
will suggest that a preliminary 
reduction to three candidates 
should in fiiture be achieved 
by technical commissions of 
the International Sports 
Federations and the National 
Olympic Committees working 
on an objective points system. 

The forces behind Barce- 
lona held firm in spite of this 
week's terrorist activities. 
How much the Latin-Ameri- 
can support guaranteed by 
Joao Havelange. the FIFA 
president, or the clandestine 
influence of Adidas, which 
was said to be at work, 
affected the vote will never be 
known. 

I had forecast that Barce- 
lona would get 28 votes on the 
first round: it received 29. 
Increase that to 37 with the 
elimination of Amsterdam, 
and to 47 with the removal of 
Birmingham, and the sudden 
collapse of half Belgrade’s 
vote. 

Hie backing of Paris and 
Brisbane remained stable. 
Brisbane got the 10 votes I 
expected. Add a breathtaking 
performance by the Prime 
Minister. Jacques Chirac, at 
Thursday afternoon’s final 
presentation, which was ap- 
plauded for two minutes and 
rescued Paris from disaster. 
“We were killed by the sup- 
port given to Albertville,” 
Guy Drut, the hurdles gold 
medallist and Paris cam- 
paigner. admitted. 

What the pattern of voting 
for the summer hosts did 
reveal, with a minority of 
votes for Barcelona in the first 
two rounds, was that the 
influence of Juan Antonio 
Samaranch, the IOC president 
and a Barcelona man, was not 
a factor. 


RUGBY UNION 





hopes on Kerly 
and Sherwani 


fb 


By Sydney Frfefcte 


Blast-off: the Montjnic stadium under re-constrnctioa 
and (right), Juan Samaranch congratulates Pascal Maragal 


Sofia, loyally supported by 
25 objective members and 
leading on the first round, 
discovered, like Birmingham, 
that a compact bid ideal for 
competitors was not enough. 
The personality, Olympic 
reputation and manage ment 
experience of Jean-Claude 
Killy, and some slick commer- 
cial campaigning, reaped for 
Albertville the spare, suddenly 
uncommitted votes of elimi- 
nated cities round by round. 

It is a sad disappointment 
for Ivan Slavkov, Sofia’s lead- 
er and one of the most 
energetic and altruistic men in 
sport. 

Contrary to expectation, Mr 


Chirac announced that Paris 
will challenge Athens for the 
centenary games of 1996. 
Sail y- Anne Atkinson says she 
wants to rest her feet, go back 
to being mayor of Brisbane 
and maybe bid again if her 
financial backers are willing. 
Within minutes of 
Samaranch's announcement 
of the winner in front of the 
television cameras, Belgrade 
had switched to new lapel 
badges proclaiming “Belgrade 
for ’96”. 

Birmingham lick their 
wounds but go home nonefoe- 
less proud or a commendable 
effort to put Britain m the 
forefront of contention. If the 



New blood on IOC 


Lausanne (AP) - Anita de 
Frantz of the United States, a 
leading opponent of the 
American-instigated boycott 
of tbe 1 980 Olympic Games in 
Moscow, was one of four new 
members elected to the Inter- 
national Olympic Committee 
yesterday. Also chosen on the 
dosing day of the IOC’s 91st 
session were Kim Un Yong of 


South Korea, Charalambos 
Nikolaou of Greece and Jean- 
Claude Ganga of the Congo. 

Ms de Frantz was chosen over 
other American candidates. 
Peter Ueberroth, tbe head of 
the 1984 Los Angeles Olym- 
pics and Donna De Varona, ■ 
an former Olympic swimming 
gold medallist. 


A utility man for All Blacks 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


A week ago Jamie Salmon 
was training at the Bank of 
England ground in prepara- 
tion for England's gaum 
against Japan. Yesterday an- 
other young man who is 
treading closely in Salmon’s 
studmarks was doing the same 
but with foe New Zealand tour 
party who will next week begin 
their eight-match visit to 
France. 

Salmon emigrated to New 
Zealand, played for Welling- 
ton and was capped three 
times for the Ail Macks in 
1981. John Gallagher emi- 
grated to New Zealand in 
1984, played for Wellington 
and will be looking for caps in 

the for thcoming inter national^ 

in Toulouse and Nantes next 
month. 


Gallagher, aged 22, was 
born in Lewisham and edu- 
cated at St Joseph’s Academy, 
Bbckheath. His parents are 
both Irish and Gallagher made 
one senior appearance for 
London Irish while still at 
school where he played 
centre. The decision to emi- 
grate was assisted by Tony 
O'Malley, the former 
Blarkheath wing, who in- 
troduced Gallagher to Ori- 
ental Rongotai, tbe Wellington 

dob for whom he had played. 

The youngster arrived in 
New Zealand in March 1984 
and by Jidy his potential had 
been spotted by Ian Upston, 
tiie Wellington coach who 
picked him on the wing. 

When Wellington’s two 
international wings, Mike 


‘After 20 years 
here my family can 
recommend it” 


El Botanico. The most sought after 
residential area in Ifenerife. 

My family and business have been associated with the 
Canary Islands since 1894 and over 20 years ago we decided 
to crease a residential area which has now become the most 
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FarqueAwcetais thefinal phase ofluxiiiy apartment homes 




Clamp and Borne Fraser, 
returned home from the All 
Blacks tour of Australia, 
Gallagher moved to centre 
fliwl, when' Alan Hewson re- 
tired, he fatted the vacancy at 
foil back. 

It is 'sack versatility that 
helped him to a place in the All 
Blacks tour party, aided by 
Weflugton's outstanding 1986 
season which has seen them 
win the national championship. 

It may be, however, that the 
style of open rugby which 
Earle Kirton, the former 
Harlequins and Middlesex 
coach, has encouraged at 
Wellington coincides with the 
style Brian Locfaore, the AO 
Blacks coach, seeks to create. 

Photograph, page 39 

Long wait by 
May rewarded 

Peter Francis, the Maesteg 
prop, will captain Wales in tbe 
B international against France 
at Pontypridd next Saturday, 
but the Welsh selectors have 
derided not to include any 
senior internationals, despite 
the agreement between the 
two countries that up to four 
could be chosen (David 
Hands writes). 

There are five newcomers to 
the team, Roger Bidgood and 
Jonathan Griffiths among the 
backs David Fox, Phil May, 
and Phil Pugh in the forwards. 
There are seven Uanelli play- 
ers in the team though it 
conies as a surprise to find 
that May has not played at this 
level in his long career. 


Norwich face their 
first true test 


By Clive White 


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Wood set for 
semi-finals 

Willie Wood, or Scotland, 
set up a semi-final match with 
Irishman Jim Baker yesterday 
in the Liverpool Victoria 
Insurance £34,000 Indoor 
Superbowl in Manchester 
with a 7-4, 7-5 win over 
Robert Crawsbaw. 

Tony Allcock, the -world 
indoor champion, also ad- 
vanced to the semi-finals with 
a 7-4, 7-0 triumph over tbe 
unknown qualifier. Jack 
Hodson. 

Meanwhile. David Coridll, 
of Ireland, had a convincing 
win over Dave Rawlins, of 
Coventry. 7-0, 7-5 to claim his 
semi-final berth. 

RHSU.TS: Quarter -finals; J Mm (N Ire) 


The first division will take 
the “country bumpkins” Nor- 
wich City, more seriously if 
they defeat West Ham United 
at Carrow Road today. But if 
Norwich are still leading the 
way four weeks from now we 
could have the most unlikely 
championship contenders on 
our hands since another East 
Anglian side, Ipswich Town, 
also came straight up from the 
second division to catch 
everyone offguard in 1961-6Z 

If Norwich’s league pro- 
gramme has been less than 
demanding, the next month 
should change all that Their 
appointment list toughens up 
considerably, starting with 
today's visit by fourth-placed 
West Ham. In the next month 
they have to play Wimbledon, 
Liverpool (both away). 
Tottenham Hotspur and Man- 
chester United. 

Brown refutes the sugges- 
tion that they have had a soft 
reintroduction to the first 
division after bouncing 
straight back from the second 
division in style last season. 
“Often the matches that you 
think are going to be hard are 
easy and vice-versa,” be said. 
Nevertheless the computer 
that works out the season’s 
fixtures at the Football League 
headquarters in Lytham St 
Aimes has shown itself to be 
remarkably sympathetic to the 
cause of the Norfolk under- 
dogs; not one of their 10 
opponents so for have been 
placed higher than 10th. 

But such is the popularity of 
the Norwich manager that 
nobody would begrudge him 
his moment of supremacy. 
Certainly not John LyaH the 
West Ham manager. Lyafl and 
Brown were “classmates” to- 
gether at the West Ham 
academy 30 years ago and 


The stable 
door shuts 

Peter Walwyn, the 
Lambourn trainer, and his 
owners have decided not to 
retain Paul Eddery as stable 
jockey in 1987. They’ have 
come to an arrangement with 
Brent Thomson to ride their 
horses whenever possible. 
Eddery was appointed Seven 
Barrows stable jockey for this 
season, following the retire- 
ment of Joe Mercer. 

In the swim 

Nicole Bates (Norwich Pen- 
guins) and Ian McKenzie 
(Braintree and Bocking) have 
been included in England’s 
Esso youth squad for 1987 
after * winning outstanding 
swimmer awards at the na- 
tional age group 
championships. 


while they have drifted apart 
geographically they still share 
the same beliefs about bow the 
game should be played. 

’’Something of Ron 
Greenwood's principles 
rubbed off on all of us,” J.yall 
said. “Ken's done a terrific job 
at Norwich and bought very 
sensibly. He has taken a 1 
chance with players on the 
fringe of the first division and 
they’ve done wdL The club is 
well organized and there’s a 
good spirit about the place. He 
must be very satisfied.” 

Brown admits to bring sur- 
prised at seeing the Canaries 
rule the roost but not to being 
among the leaders. “The play- 
ers have worked hard and 
deserve to be where they are. 
We aquitted ourselves well 
enough in cup matches last 
season against first division 
sides not to be in awe of them 
now.” 

Brown, who sold his best 
defender. Watson, and his 
goalkeeper. Woods, must take 
particular satisfaction from 
Norwich's defensive record; 
they have not conceded a goal 
in their last five games and are 
unbeaten in their last seven 
league and cup games. 

Brown completed what he 
hopes to be another prudent 
buy in Gunn, tbe young 
Aberdeeen goalkeeper, in mid- 
week but retains Benstead 
♦against West Ham. There will 
be no McAvennie to test foe 
Norwich shell but Goddard 
returns to a West Ham side for 
the first lime in 14 months. 

Goddard, who cost West 
Ham a record sum of 
£800,000 when bought from 
Queen’s Park Rangers six 
years ago. has been unable to 
dislodge McAvennie since lin- 
ing up with him on the first 
day oflast season. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



Hughes: in reserve side 

Hughes back 

Emlyn Hughes, aged 39.