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'll 


No 62,594 


THE 



TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


MES 



25p 


Botha tribute to Mozam bique’s Marxist iig^der 

Machel death 

throws region 
into turmoil 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

«»?iLHi hcrn was no °n when President PW 

plunged imp political turmoil Botha issued a Sterne* 


yesterday by the death of 
President Samora Machel of 
Mozambique and 26 of his 
senior government officials in 
a plane crash on Sunday night 
on the border with South 
Africa. 

The crash, the precise cause 
of which is not yet known, 
occurred as President Machel, 
who was 53. was returning 
from a meeting on the Ango- 
lan situation in Lusaka, with 
President Kaunda of Zambia, 
President Mobutu of Zaire 
and President Dos Santos of 
Angola. 

The South African Foreign 
Minister. Mr R F “Pik” Bo- 
tha. said last night the plane 
appeared to have lost its way 
and strayed into South Africa 
by mistake as it was tryin g to 
land at Maputo airport. It hit 
the Lcbombo Mountains 
straddling the border. 

South Africa's Bureau for 
Information said that 10 of the 
37 people on the plane had 
survived. One was in a critical 
condition and 16 of 27 bodies 
recovered had been identified. 

The first official confirma- 
tion of President Mechel's 
death came shortly before 


Inside 


The 

Fleet Street 
revolution 



Project X and 
Smylie’s People: 

In the second 
extract from her 
book The End of 
the Street, 

Linda Melvem 
tells how Rupert 
Murdoch's print 
plant was equipped 
in secrecy 

Pages 16, 17 





• The daily £4,000 
prize in The Times Port- 
folio Gold competi- 
tion was won by Mrs 
Lynne DeH of Folke- 
stone, Kent 

Details, page 3. 

• There is another 
£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list, page 30; 
how to play, page 29. 


TIMES FOCUS 


Royal visit 

The Queen and Prince Philip 
today begin a state visit to 
Hong Kong, the first since the 
signing ol the Sino- British 
Joint Declaration on its fu- 
ture. A Special Report looks at 
the political, economic and 
social state of the colony 
Pages 33-38 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Shop records 

Retail sales rose to record 
levels last month. Sales were 
up bv 6.2 per cent in volume 
and *10 per cent in wlue 
compared with a year earlier 
Pa*e25. 


TIMES SPORT 


Sea surprise 

Alan Bond's Australia III. the 
favourite to win the America's 
Cup Defender series, went to a 
surpnsedefau by Koota !U in 
Fremantle P*k* *5 


tHww 2*5.7 
Ohtmk 
A p|»tatWs223 
Artt 15 

Birth*, drxthv 

mirriaau - 2-1 

Bwtavu 25-28 
Owrt 22 
CnwiMfa 24 
Okrj » 

ianmn,!?.!! 


****** 


expressing South Africa’s 
"deep and profound shock”. 

In a message of condolence 
to the Mozambique govern- 
ment he said Africa had lost 
“an outstanding leader” with 
whom be bad always had 
cordial relations. 

He immediately sent bis 
Foreign Minister to the scene 
or the crash, in mountainous 
country about 30 miles south 


The Mozambique state ra- 
dio played solemn music 
interspersed with a repeated 
announcement by the Perma- 
nent Secretary of the People’s 
Assembly (parliament), Mr 
Marcetino Dos Santos, that 
the President had not returned 
from Zambia on Sunday and 
was “missing”. 

In South Africa, the United 
Democratic Front (UDF), the 
biggest and most radical of the 
anti-apartheid organisations , 
declared that President Botha 
wpuld “have to do better than 
pretend that he is shocked and 
« . aggrieved at this terrible mis- 

[CRASH HERE? fortune that has befallen one 

' \ /' "m °f the staunchest opponents of 

I A. apartheid”, 

r \ « anything, it added, what 

swaziland-a South Africa had been saying 

about and doing in Mozam- 
20 ihbm "W J&i bique through its Renamo 
surrogates “gives us reason- 
able grounds to suspect South 
African involvement in this 
plane crash”. 

This was a reference to the 
Mozambique National Resis- 
tance (MNR), also known as 
Renamo, who have been fight- 
ing the Maputo government 
since. Mozambique’s indepen- 
dence from Portugal in 1975 
and have recently made gains 
in the central part of the 
country. 

Maputo accuses Pretoria of 
giving aid to the MNR and 
last Thursday a lengthy article 
appeared in the official 
Mozambique news agency, 
AIM, claiming that “the 
assassination of the Mozambi- 




President Machel whose death plunged southern Africa into a state of political tHrmofl. 


of the border town of 
Komatipoort, which lies on 
the main road and rail line 
from South Africa to the 
Mozambique capital, Maputo. 

President Botha said 
Mozambique government of- 
ficials and international civil 
aviation experts had been 
invited to inspect the crash 
site. 

At a press conference in 
Komatipoort. Mr“Pik" Botha 
said it would be inappropriate 
to speculate on the cause of 
the accident at this stage. 
President Machel had been “a 
great leader of Africa” and his 
death was “in nobody's 
inleresr. 


Continued on page 24, col 4 


Crash caused by 
‘human error’ 


La* Report 

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By Christina Steyn 

South African government 
sources said yesterday that the 
air crash which claimed the 
lives of Mozambique's Presi- 
dent Samora Machel and 28 
others, was caused by “human 
error”. 

They blamed the accident, 
which happened minutes be- 
fore the plane was due to land 
in Maputo, on bad weather 
and pilot error. 

Sources said that the pilot 
appeared to have deviated 
from the flight plan during a 
severe storm. 

The>' dismissed allegations 
by the pilot, a Russian, and 
another survivor that the 
plane had been shot down. But 
they stressed that only an 
official inquiry could establish 
the exact cause of the accidenL 

The aircraft was tracked on 
South African radar shortly 
before the crash, but operators 
lost sight of it because of 
interference caused by the 
storm. 


“The pilot seemed lost He 
went west into South Africa 
when he should have gone east 
towards Maputo “one source 
said. 

“He was flying very 
low ... the aircraft skimmed 
a hilltop and somersaulted.” 


ANC lays blame 8 

Search for successor 8 
Pretoria's tribute 8 

David Owen 20 

Photographs 24 


The crash happened shortly 
after the pilot told his pas- 
sengers: “Please fasten your 
seatbelts. We will land in 
Maputo in three minutes." 

• By late yesterday 27 bodies 
bad been retrieved from the 
aircraft. 

A South African Foreign 
Office spokesman said two 
more bodies u-ere believed to 
be trapped in the wreckage. 


Tory file 
on ‘bias’ 
is ready 

By Philip Webster 

Relations between the BBC 
and the Conservative Party 
appear likely to deteriorate 
further, despite a possible out- 
of-court settlement of a libel 
action brought by two MPs, 
Mr Neil Hamilton and Mr 
Gerald Howarth. 

Staff at Conservative Cen- 
tral Office are dose to 
completing a detailed sub- 
mission, to be made to the 
BBC by Mr Norman Tebbft. 
the party chairman, about 
alleged - political- bias hi its 
coverage of the United States 
bombing raid on Libya. 

Senior ministers and 
Conservative MPs are accus- 
ing the BBC of mishandling 
the libel case. 

The view of senior Conser- 
vatives is that the BBC would 
have been better advised not 
to defend the action but to 
have settled in June when the 
MPs proposed a settlement 
involving an apology and 
damages. 

Mr Hamilton and Mr 
Howarth were branded as 
having Links with extreme 
groups in a Panorama pro- 
gramme in 1984. 

Having derided, however, 
to go ahead and fight the case 
it was felt to be illogical to pull 
out at this stage, and damag- 
ing to the BBGs reputation. 

There was anger at the way 
repons of an imminent settle- 
ment leaked out. It was be- 
lieved to have been an attempt 
to make any riimbdown look 
as if ft had been prompted by 
political expediency. 


Car giant 
to quit 
S Africa 

Detroit (.AFP) - General 
Motors, the world's leading 
car maker, has decided to 
withdraw from South Africa 
in the face of financial losses 
and in the absence of progress 
toward the elimination of 
apartheid, the company’s 
chief executive, Mr Roger 
Smith, announced yesterday. 

Mr. Smith, citing both the 
recession affecting South Af- 
rica and government slowness 
in attacking apartheid, said it 
had become increasingly diffi- 
cult to do business there. 

He said Genera! Motors 
would seD its assets to local 
interests. 

General Motors, after Coca 
Cola and Rank Xerox, is the 
third big US company to 
announce its withdrawal 


BBC lawyers in race 
to settle libel case 

By Jonathan MBBer, Media Correspondent 

Negotiators worked under will seek a new triaL Legal 
intensified pressure yesterday experts said it would be 
to forge a settlement in the almost inconceivable that the 
libel case brought by two judge could continue the trial 
Conservative MPs against the with the existing jury. 

BBC If they do not come to 
court with an agreement to- 
day, the judge may discharge 
the jury and order a new trial. 

Mr Justice Simon Brown 
said reports in newspapers on 
Sunday and yesterday that a 
settlement had been agreed 
had been deplorable and mis- 
chievous. It was inevitable 
that the articles had been seen 
by the jurors. 

He adjourned the court 
until today when a settlement 
will be announced or the trial 
will resume, “subject to any 
submissions by counsel.” 

The reference was inter- 
preted to mean that lawyers 


Mr Richard Hartley, QC, 
acting for Mr Neil Hamilton, 
MP for Tatton m Cheshire, 
told the judge that settlement 
negotiations had reached an 
advanced stage but the agree- 
ment of certain matters had 
not been helped by the pub- 
licity. 

The BBC governors have 
authorized the corporation's 
lawyers to see if they can settle 
the action 

If a new trial is ordered, the 
newspapers that printed the 
details of the settlement pro- 
posal could be brought before 
the court to explain their 
actions. 


Baker pressed on 
teachers’ pay deal 


. By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 
Government came between the NAS/UWT and 
National Union of. Teachers. 


The (ioverament came 
Under renewed pressure last 
night to intervene in the 
wrangle over teachers' pay, 
after the second largest union 
instructed its members to 
begin nationwide industrial 
action in two weeks time. 

The National Association of 
School masters/Un ion of 
Women Teachers announced 
plans to launch a series ofhalf- 
day strikes from November 3. 

Mr Nigel de Gruchy. the 
deputy general secretary, said 
that the move was designed to 
force a change of mindainong 
local authority employers be- 
fore the critical meeting on 
pay and conditions in Not- 
tingham on November 8. 

The NAS/UWT, which has 
129,000 members, was the 
only union not to sign the 
Coventry deal on pay and 
conditions negotiated last 
July. 

Its principal objection is 
that the £14,500 figure at the 
top of the Main Professional 
Grade is inadequate, and al- 
though the deal offers an 
increase of 1 1 percent for this 
year, Mr De Gruchy empha- 
sized yesterday that teachers' 
pay was still 34 percent below 
levels recommended in the 
Houghton Report of 1974. 

The smaller teacher unions 
are afraid that the hope which 
flowed from Coventry will be 
buried in inter-union rivalry 


There was a feeling among 
the other unions yesterday 
that one motive for the strike 
move was to sow dissent 
about Coventry among dis- 
satisfied members of the Na- 
tional Union ofTeachers, thus 
undermining the working 
relationship it has with the 
Labour-led employers. 

The situation is so serious 
that the Professional Associ- 
ation of Teachers, the only 
union with a no-strike agree- 
ment, has written to the 
Secretary of State, urging him 
to intervene: Mr Peter Daw- 
son, the general secretary, said 
it bad become clear that none 
of the unions would be going 
to Nottingham with any hope 
of concluding a final deal. 

Although Mr Kenneth 
Baker has played a low- 
key role so far, he is under 
pressure to inject new life into 
the fragile pay and conditions 
talks. 

Mr John Pearman, leader of 
the local authority employers, 
yesterday described the strike 
move as “the worst example 
of political posturing”. Con- 
demning the NAS/UWT 
move as immoral, he said it 
was unbelievable that the 
union should engage in cheap 
propaganda regardless of the 
interests of the eduaction 
service. 


Euro ministers 
seek ‘common’ 
frontier policy 

By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 
Interior Ministers from the together on immigration poli- 


EEC decided for the first time 
yesterday to examine ways of 
finding a common policy on 
immigration to prevent terror- 
ists and drugs traffickers from 
breaching exterior frontier 
controls. 

Mr Douglas- Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, 'admitted ' 
that this did not mean that a 
community visa system was 
“round the comer" because 
there were many problems 
stiD to be resolved. 

But following a meeting of 
the 12 Interior Ministers in 
London. Mr Hurd said that 
the agreement to work to- 
wards a system acceptable to 
all EEC countries was “a 
major new area of European 
co-operation.” 

The major problem facing 
the ministers was the apparent 
contradiction of seeking a 
system which eased and ul- 
timately abolished frontier 
formalities for Community 
citizens, while ensuring that it 
was not abused by criminals, 
drugs traffickers and 
terrorists. 

The meeting of Interior 
Ministers, chaired by Mr 
Hurd, agreed to set up a 
working party that would 
meet for the first time next 
month and it win be expected 
to come up with a programme 
of action as soon as possible. 

The special group: consist- 
ing of the ministers’ closest 
advisors on immigration, has 
been told to consider urgently: 
stronger checks at external 
community frontiers, the 
effectiveness of controls at 
internal frontiere and the pos- 
sible harmonization of visa 
policies. 

Mr Hurd said that there 
needed to be steady pressure 
on all EEC countries to join 


cies, because of the threat 
from terrorists and organized 
crime. It could no longer be 
left to individual countries to 
act on their own. 

Mr Hurd said: “Up until 
now the questions of immigra- 
tion controls have not been 
co-ordinated or even to any 
extent discussed by ministers 
who met today or indeed by 
any other ministers. 

“We’re now moving into 
that area. We see the increas- 
ing pressures on the external 
frontiers of the community. 
We see the increasing need to 
make sure that the external 
frontiers of the community 
and the controls exercised 
there are adequate to keep out 
the terrorists, criminals and 
drug traffickers.” 

He said that as barriers 
came down it should not make 
it easier for criminals to 
operate. 

Mr Hurd and the other 
ministers also focussed at 
some length on the question of 
drugs and once again it was 
agreed that much closer co- 
operation between the coun- 
tries was essential. 

It was suggested that coun- 
tries which had limited re- 
sources but which were 
showing determination to 
stamp out the production of 
drugs should receive EEC 
help. 

. To ensure that information 
on drugs traffickers is shared 
effectively, the Interior Min- 
isters agreed that a world-wide 
directory should be estab- 
lished 

In practice this means that 
the special drug liaison offi- 
cers who are posted to individ- 
ual EEC countries will now set 
up a coordinated network to 
monitor all developments in 
drug producing countries. 


Israeli nuclear 
mole ‘kidnapped’ 


JSy Nicholas Beeston 


An Israeli nuclear tech- 
nician, who revealed details of 
his country's nuclear capabil- 
ity , has been snared in a trap 
by Israeli intelligence officers 
and taken back to Israel, an 
American magazine claimed 
yesterday. 

The allegation, made in this 
week's Newsweek which 
quotes two sources dose to 
Israeli intelligence, said that 
Mr Mordechai Vanunu, aged 
31, has been captured by 
Mossad agents after he was 
lured into a trap set by a 
woman friend. 

Mr Vanunu, who disclosed 
to The Sunday Times that 
Israel was stockpiling nuclear 
weapons, disappeared after 
the arlide was published and 
has not been heard of since. 

Yesterday’s claim suggests 
be was returning to London 


from a secret location in 
Australia when the woman 
persuaded him to meet her in 
Europe. He was then lured on 
to a yacht in the Mediterra- 
nean and captured, by Israeli 
agents in international waters. 

His revelations, after work- 
ing at the top secret Dimona 
atomic plant for 10 years, 
have been described as the 
most serious breach of se- 
curity in Israel’s history. 

The magazine report co- 
incided with allegations made 
by a friend of Mr Vanunu’s 
that he “knew his life would be 
m danger wherever he was in 
the world”. 

In London yesterday Mr 
John McKnight, an Australian 
vicar and friend of Mr 
Vanunu's said “I Have 
sources in Israel working to 
find out the truth. 


Poehl help 
lifts 

the pound 

By Rodney Lord 
Economics Editnr 

A speech in London by the 
West German Bundesbank 
president, Herr Karl Otto 
Poehl, helped to lift the pound 
and the dollar yesterday. 

Herr Poehl told the German 
Chamber of Commerce that 
the dollar's fall had gone far 
enough and that any further 
depreciation would put eco- 
nomic growth in Europe at 
risk. Markets interpreted this 
to mean that the Bundesbank 
might intervene more actively 
to support the dollar. 

Sterling rose against the 
currency in line with the 
dollar. It dosed up nearly two 
pfennigs at DM2.8434, raising 
its effective international 
value from 67.3 to 67.5. 

Herr Poehl said it was 
“regrettable" that Britain had 
so far felt unable to join the 
exchange rate mechanism of 
the European Monetary Sys- 
tem. _ 

Pressure eased, page 25 


£133,000 
bribe must 
be repaid 

Mr Jonathan Den by. the 
solicitor sought by Scotland 
Yard after a firearms incident, 
was ordered by a High Court 
judge yesterday to pay almost 
£250,000 to a former client 
company for a bribe he bad 
accepted from their opponents 
in a court case. 

Mr Denby, missing since 
the incident in London last 
June, was ordered to repay to 
the Iranian state shipping line 
the £1 33,300 he had accepted 
in a 1 983 legal action, and in 
addition was ordered to pay 
£55,054 in interest and costs 
estimated at £60,000. 

Mr Denby. a former aii 
Mr Enoch Powell, facet 
other bill for a similar sum 
from his former legal partners. 


lions against him became 
known and sued for the costs. 
His homes in London and 
Kent are to be sold to realise 
the money. 

Court bearing, page 2 


i lasgow proclaimed European capital of culture 



By Philip Jacobson 

While Birmingham contin- 
ues to mourn the loss of the 
1992 Olympic Games. Glas- 
gow yesterday landed the title 
of European City of Culture 
for the year 1990. 

As true Glaswegians will 
readily inform outsiders, often 
at inordinate length, the city 
has striven hard and success- 
fully to get rid of the ugly 
labels it has been obliged to 
wear in the past 

But in the words of Mr 
Richard Luce. Minister for the 
Arts, who announced the 
city's triumph over eight other 
Bntish challengers, including 
Edinburgh. “Glasgow had the 
edge on every one else." 


Mr Luce said that the title of 
Europe's capital of culture 
would confirm Glasgow's new 
international standing. It had 
been Britain's turn to nomi- 
nate the title holder, and he 
had no doubt that his fellow 
EEC ministers would “en- 
dorse and confirm" the choice 
when they meet next month. 

He said that Glasgow was 
ready to spend about £22 
minion a year on the arts, and. 
perhaps by a happy coin- 
cidence. its £30 million con- 
cert hall complex should be 
ready for opening in 1990. 

However Mr Luce ruled out 
any government support for 
the 12-month festival. The 
estimated cost of £4 million is 


to be met by the city council 
and private sponsorship. 

It will, of course, be readily 
remembered that this was the 
formula which landed Edin- 
burgh in deep financial trou- 
ble over the Commonwealth 
Games. In Glasgow, which 
can be an intensely political 
son of place, there wflj doubt- 
less be those who will argue 
that with unemployment run- 
ning at more than 20 per cent 
of the adult population, the 
money could be better spent 
elsewhere. 

For all that, the cultural 
accolade should help sink the 
city's misleading but persis- 
tent image to the uninitiated 
as a dark and violent place 


where the incautious run the 
risk of being accosted by 
diminutive toughs in a spit- 
and-sawdust pub. 

It is, after all, the home of 
the recently-opened Burrell 
House Museum, already Scot- 
land's biggest tourist att- 
raction. 

Glasgow, also the home of 
Rangers and Celtic, can 
proudly state that more people 
now sample its cultural attrac- 
tions than pass' through the 
turnstiles at its two great 
football siadiums. 

For the record, the other 
cities beaten in the capital of 
culture race were Liverpool 
Leeds. Bristol. Bath, Cardiff 
Swansea and Cambridge. 


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NEWS SUMMARY 


Gales end long 
Indian summer 

More gale-force winds and squally showers across most 
of Britain today will signal the definitive end of the long In- 
dian summer, the London Weather Centre said last night 
(David Cross writes). 

After a month or so of nnseasonaHy diy and still weather, 
the first autumnal gales; gnsting op to 60 mph, struck the 
south yesterday, bringing flooding and a spate of road 
accidents. On the M2 near Rochester, Kent, a lorry was 
blown on its side as it tried to cross the River Medway, and 
the Severn Bridge on the M4 was dosed to high-sided 
vehicles. 

'Trees were nprooted and bafldings damaged in the 
Chatham area, while flood alerts were in force hi die 
Rhondda Valley in South Wales. The Penalties, North 
Wales and Highlands had their first snow dustings. 

The centre said the unsettled weather was likely to 
continue into nridrweek* 

Games 
appeal 

Birmingham is likely to 
lower its sights and hhl for 
the Commonwealth Games 
after the fafinre of its bid to 
stage the 1992 Olympics 
(Craig Seton writes). 

Mr Denis HoweH, the 
president of Birmingham's 
Olympic bid committee, 
said yesterday that the city 
needed a ‘‘period of 
reflection" before deciding 
whether to bid for the 1996 
or 2000 games. 

Civic leaders now believe 

that Bir mingham might do 
better bidding for the 1994 
Commonwealth Ganns and 
other international sport- 
ing events. 

Revolver pair fined 

The two men charged with unlawfully possessing a 
firearm during the Conservative Party conference thought 
it was a replica weapon, Bournemouth magistrates were 
told yesterday. 

Simon John Manns and Anthony Joseph Hassid, both 
aged 21, pleaded gnilty to the charge that in Bonraemoatb 
ami elsewhere between September 1 and October 7 they 
had in their possession without authority a firearm, namely 
a .22 calibre revolver designed to discharge a noxious liquid 
or gas. They were each fined £250 and ordered to pay 
£37.50 costs. The corn! was told they have since been dis- 
missed as trainee managers at the Highdiff Hotel, 

Ear PC is Alarms 
dismissed for Ml 


Saga of 
car thief 

A compulsive car thief 
has spent 11 months on 
remand in prison because a 
health authority cannot de- 
cide whether to pay an 
estimated £38,000 a year 
for special hospital treat- 
ment to core him. 

Worcester Crown Court 
heard yesterday that 
Trafford Area Health 
Authority in Manchester 
has not made a decision on 
Kenneth Lowndes, aged 34, 
of Hales Borns, Al- 
trincham, Cheshire, who 
has taken semes of vehicles 
since suffering severe head 
injuries. 

The bearing was ad- 
journed until Friday. 


The policeman who bit 
off part of another officer’s 
ear during a rugby wtafrrh 
was dismissed at a Sooth 
Wales police disciplinary 
hearing yesterday. 

Police Constable Rich- 
ard Johnson, aged 31, is 
serving a six-month jail 
sentence after being con- 
victed of wounding another 
policeman, Keith Jones, 
with intent t» cause griev- 
ous bodily harm. 

Johnson, of Hnrfoid 
Street, Pontypridd, Mid 
Glamorgan had his appeal 
against the prison sentence 
rejected last week. 


The Department of 
Transport is to install an 
experimental antomatic 
wanting system to prevent 
multiple pile-ups on part of 
the M l (Rodney Cowton 
writes). 

The £3J1 million system , 
expected to be in operation 
fay next summer, is de- 
signed to detect stow mov- 
ing or stationary traffic, 
and to alert - die police 
control cadres of hazards 

Electronic devices are to 
be installed nnder the road 
on a 50-mile stretch of the 
Ml between junctions 10 
and 19. 


Synod confirms ban 

The ban on the Movement for the Ordination of Women 
using Church House, Westminster, imposed after a woman 
priest used a room there to celebrate Holy Co mmunioo, will 
remain in force at least until -next spring, it was disclosed 
yesterday. 

The service in question was taken by the Reverend Joyce 
Bennett, aged 63, who was ordained in Hong Kong, before 
the movement’s annnal meeting on October 4. 


‘Secret’ report paints grim jobs picture 


Bread price to 
rise despite 
large harvest 

The price of bread is ex- 
pected io rise next month by 
2p for a standard white loaf, in 
spite of what is estimated to 
have been the second largest 
harvest ever (John Young 
writes). 

The increase comes at a 
' time when British grain ex- 
ports are booming, a paradox 
that can be explained by the 
fact that farmers are wowing 
the wrong product tor the 
domestic market. It is certain 
to reinforce the view that the 
intervention system is distort- 
ing the laws of supply and 
demand and working against 
the interests of consumers. 

The Ministry of Agriculture 
has estimated that this year’s 
cereal harvest win reach 24.6 
million tonnes, which is dose 
to the prediction of 24.5 
million tonnes made by The 
Times in its latest crop survey 
published a month ago. But 
the quality of milling wheat is 
below average throughout 
Europe, and the consequent 
shortage has pushed prices up. 

Unable to obtain adequate 
domestic supplies. British 
bakers have been forced to 
buy breadmaking wheat from 
abroad, wbile export ship- 
ments from Britain of feed 
wheat and barley are at their 
highest level for months, if not 
years. 


Stalker may 
sue to recover 
legal costs 

Mr John Stalker, the deputy 
chief constable of Greater 
Manchester, may sue his po- 
lice authority to recover the 
£21,000 he spent dealing his 
name after its refusal to 
volunteer the money (Ian 
Smith writes). 

Mr Stalker who was re- 
instated after a three-month 
investigation into his alleged 
association with known crim- 
inals. yesterday met with law- 
yers to discuss his next move. 

The refusal by Mr Stalker’s 
employers last Friday to foot 
the legal bill means he may be 
forced to re-mortgage his 
home. 


By Nicholas Wood, 


The Labour Party claimed 
yesterday that it bad uncov- 
ered an unpublished Govern- 
ment report revealing that 
unemployment will sill be 
more than three million by 
1990. 

It akn said that the report 
painted a "grim** picture of 
job prospects to Britain’s 
worst affected regions. 

The disdosures came from 
Mr Gordon Brown, Labour’s 
regional affairs spokesman, 
and are based on UK Regional 
Development Programme 
1986-90, which was prepared 
for the Department of Trade 
and Industry and sent to the 


European Commission during 
the summer. 

But the Department insist 
the figures are "assumptions 
not predictions" and denied 
that ministers had sought to 
keep them secret. A spokes- 
man said it had been compiled 
to substantiate Britain’s 
application for aid from the 
European Regional Develop- 
ment Fund. 

The report says the predic- 
tions are taken from the 1986 
Public Expenditure White Ri- 
per. a public document, which 
forms the basis of future 
Government spending plans. 

Mr Giles Shaw. MP for 
Pudsey, had sent Mr Broun a 
copy of the 1.120 page. 17 
volume report after he had 


asked questions about it in the 
Commons. 

But Mr Brown accused the 
Government of “disguising’' 
the UK's jobless outlook at 
home while “pleading guilty 
to mistaken potides" in the 
report. 

The report, which projects 
uncmptojinem of 3,1 17,000 
by die end of the decade, 
slightly less than today's 
3.197.000, summarizes the 
economic prospects for the 
country's II regions. 

Mr Brown said: “The re- 
gional proje c t ions are a grim 
admission that the country is 
divided into two separate 
economies. Prospects for 
reducing unemployment 
range from ‘gloomy 1 and 


■frighteningly Weak* to impos- North West and die 
KiSe until ‘fundamental Midlands were h»8hli*hted« 


sible until 

problems' requiring more 
public spending are resolved. 

"Region by region sum- 
maries on the state of the local 
economics refer to 
‘collapsing’, ‘derelict . 
.‘decaying' and 'obsolescent 
services and infrastructure, to 
jobs lost through public 
spending restraints and to a 
private sector failure to 
invest." 

The report amounted to 
private confessions by «u«d 
monetarists that their policies 
have created abandoned 
industrial hinterlands, Mr 
Brown, MP for Dunfermline 
East. said. 

He said the North East, the 


areas with the gloomiest pro*' 
peels. Greater Manchester was 
feeing a "serious situation m 
which some sspeeis « Uw 
infrastructure are m a state of 
collapse". , 

He added: "It * ■« • 
document that the Govern' 
meni wanted to pass over w 
die European Commission 

"The report reveals that UK 
Government has been 
destroying the means W 
which a recovery can take 
place. 

-The private sector has not 
been encouraged sufficiently 
to invest and public service* 
are in such disrepair they 
cannot attract industry 



Nato worries 
over US role 
in nuclear 
strategy 

By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 
Mr Caspar Weinberger, the then, with the .Americans 


US Defence Secretary, win 
come under pressure from 
Nato allies today to provide 
reassurance that President 
is not planning to 
bargain away the West's care- 
fully nurtured nuclear deter- 
rent strategy. 

Al the Nato Nuclear Plan- 
ning Group meeting at 
Gleneagles Hotel to Scotland, 
defence ministers from West- 
ern Europe will be anxious to 
hear first hand exactly how for 
the US Administration is 
prepared to go in negotiations 
with the Soviet Union. 

Mr Weinberger, a hard-liner 
on arms control issues, was 
not with the American team 
that went to the Reykjavik 
summit 

Some Nato military sources 
suggested yesterday that he 
also may have been taken 
aback by the proposals finally 
put on the table to Iceland by 
President Rea g an, relating to 
the elimination of intermedi- 
ate-range missiles based in 
Europe and the dismantling of 
all ballistic missies within 10 
years. 

Nato governments have 
gone from one confusing 
analysis to another since the 
ending of the Reykjavik sum- 
mit 

First, it was talk of failure. 


putting a bold face on it there 
‘ was surprise and encourage- 
ment that so much was 
achieved between President 
Reagan and Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader, 
even though no agreement 
was reached: 

Finally, there was alarm, 
even panic, in certain quar- 
ters. especially among the 
military, that President 
Reagan had outlined to Mr 
Gorbachov such a ’com- 
prehensive proposal to dis- 
mantle the Easi-West nuclear 
arsenals. 

Mr George Younger, the 
Secretary* of State for Defence, 
was said last night to be keenly 
interested to hear Mr 
Weinberger's judgement of 
the summit. 

That was not the case with 
the West Germans, who are 
worried that the removal of all 
intermediate-range missiles 
from Europe would leave the 
Warsaw Pact with a monopoly 
in short-range nuclear 
missiles. 

In London yesterday Mr 
Richard Perle. the American 
Assistant Defence Secretary, 
said he believed it was still 
possible to come to an agree- 
ment with the Soviet Union 
on reducing the intermediate 
nuclear missiles. 


US Navy 
to stay at 
Holy Loch 

By Our Whitehall 
Correspondent 
American Navy officials 
tried to dampen reports yes- 
terday drat they plan to move 
out of the nuclear submarine 
base at Hedy Loch in Scotland 
by the mid 1990s. 

Holy Loch is used by the US 
Navy as a forward mainte- 
nance base for the Poseidon 
ballistic missile submarine 
fleet. 

But by the mid 1990s the 
Poseidon submarines will be 
replaced ' by Trident 

A report in an American 
magazine. Defense Week, 
claims that negotiations are in 
progress between the British 
Government and the United 
States administration on 
whether to leave the base. 

However US Navy sources 
said yesterday.“It has already 
been acknowledged that when 
we shift to an all-Trident fleet, 
some decision will have to be 
made on the facilities that 
currently support Poseidon. 
But there are no plans to 
abandon Holy Loch." 

The Ministry of Defence 
yesterday denied negotiations 
were going on. 


Printers 
push on 
Wapping 

By Tim Jones 
Print unions in dispute with 
News International are to. pm 
fresh pressure on the TUC to 
demand that the electricians' 
union be disciplined for not 
ordering members to cease 
working for the company. 

Mr Norman Willis. ’TUC 
general secretary, agreed yes- 
terday that the finance and 
general purposes committee 
should meet the unions collec- 
tively after he had discussed 
the situation individually. 

Sogat '82 and the National 
Graphical Association are 
increasingly bitter over the 
TUCs reluctance to im- 
plement the congress decision 
in September to censure its 
general council for not direct- 
ing the Electrical. Electronic 
Telecommunication and 
Plumbing Union to instruct 
members to stop working at 
Wapping. 

News International's final 
offer, which involved 
compensation of £58 million, 
was rejected. However, many 
former employees have ap- 
proached the company to seek 
individual settlements. 

End <4 the Street, page 16 



bribe most 
be repaid 
by fugitive 

Mr fc&s&n Dnby. the 
City whctinr sought by Scot- 
land Yard Stott an modem to 
June ui wtaefc tm pcticemeB 
were beM * motou was 
ordered by fMraSctart 

The runaway tttiefor row 

fac« ggWA.bwil bills 

Mr ** ten 

onoc or u9,u»-nB at costs 
of the «nk». ttfenttod « 
about £60000. brags by fcts 
former chestt* tito-hanas 
state shipping hoc*. 

At the momew Mi former 


hii elegant -London home, ro 
realize money med ia foe m. 
The hearing, wfefc& fof&cd 
nterday, had been told (ton 
Ir Denby. whUeaeto*forfoc 
Inmans in a dtopste with 
Greek shipowner* in B»W, had 
accepted a payment of 
£133. W0 from the Greek to- 
tcrests to ensure a 
settlement to their favour < 
had paid the sum into h» 
Swiss bank account. . 
Immediately after die hear- 
: softeners for the ton 


The dog handlers, Mr David Jones (left) and Mr David Rfley, who returned from £1 

welcomed 


Salvador yesterday and were 


by the Salvadorean ambassador to Britain. 


British dog rescue team is praised 


Sefror Maarido Rosales, the 
Salvadorean ambassador In 
Britain, yesterday praised the 
efforts of a 14-man British 
rescue team and their two 
Bonier collies, Meg and Loch, 
in searching for surv i vor s 
beneath the rubble of the 
earthquake-torn capital, San 
Salvador. 

“They faced a very difficult 
task hot their resilience and 
hard work is a sample of the 
generosity of Britain", Sefror 
Rosales said as he welcomed 
the men at Heathrow airport 


The British team, members 
of the International Rescue 
Corps were part of a rescue 
operation by more than 17 
nations after a series of earth- 
quakes shook foe capital and 
otolying areas 10 ds^ft ago. 

The amhassadoreaid he had 
received a telex from the El 
Salvador gover nm ent on Sun- 
day requestmg more inter- 
national aid and he would be 
asking the British government 
for food supplies, especially 
powdered milk, and medical 
suppfies to treat hundreds of 


who had suffered 


The dogs flew home with the 
team from San Salvador via 
Miami but they wffi have to 
spend she months ha quar- 
antine at M a n c h es te r before 
they are reunited with their 
hasdkrs, Mr David Jones, of 
Penmaenmawr, north Wales, 
and Mr David Rfley, of 
Whitehaven, Cumbria* who 
are also members of the 
Search and Dog Rescue 
Association. 

* Reconstruction beg in s, Ih 


‘Moral obligation’ 
to save coal jobs 


By Ian Smith 
British Coal has a moral 
obligation to keep open a big 
loss-making pit to prevent the 
social and economic death ofa 
South Yorkshire mining 
community, a coal board 
hearing has been tokL 
An independent review 
body said that instead of 
closing Cadeby colliery, which 
in the past three yearn has lost 
£19 million, the board could 
save 500 jobs by investing 
£8.5 million to develop un- 
worked seams where eight 
million tonnes of coal win 
otherwise never be mined. 


Mr Anthony Diamond, QC, 
who chaired a three-day hear- 
ing on the proposed closure 
last month under colliery 
review procedure, agreed in a 
76-page report to British Coal 
that Cadeby would never 
make money. 


"On pure finan cial grounds 
I have no reason to regard as 
unreasonable the decision to 
close the pit But the board 
does in my view owe a moral 
obligation to consider the 
detriment to "the local 
community", he said _ 

The report will be presented 
at a meeting of British Coal 
directors on November 7. A 
spokesman said yesterday that 
the board was not bound by 
the recommendations. 

^More than 500 men defied a 


hour strike call at 
Wearmouih colliery, Sunder- 
land one of North-east 
England's biggest collieries, 
yesterday .The strike was 
called by the Durham 
mechanics section of the 
NUM, as pan of a series of 
one-day stoppages. 


Judge offers £100 reward after mugging of court usher 


Frances Gibb 
_ Affairs • 

Correspondent 

A senior judge startled the 
court yesterday by potting his 
hand in his pocket to offer 
£100 as a reward to help catch 
two men who attacked a court 
official. 

Judge Argyle, QC, as fam- 
ous for his "off-the-bench" 
idiosyncratic gestures as much 
as for tongh and sometimes 
controversial sentences, said 
also that he was organ bang a 
collection and hoped everyone 
In court would contribute. 


He told the court it was not 
enough that the woman official 
was recompensed with money. 
"These men must be cangisi 
and I am putting up the 
reward" 

Miss Rosena Jones, aged 
69, a court nsher, was badly 
injured last Thursday when 
she was attacked near her 
home in MBe End, east 
London, after work. 

She was leaving Mile End 
Underground station when two 
young men ambushed her and 
dragged her to the ground 
stealing her handbag with 


cheque book, keys, credit 
cards and £90. 

■ The judge, a former Army 
major, said that it was a 
"particularly revolting attack" 
on. an elderly defenceless 
woman. She had received 
black eyes, a swollen nose and 
injuries to her throat but still 
managed to bite one assailant 
as she bravely fought back. 

"In this banding, the staff 
and all of ns at every level have 
a very strong bond of comrade- 
ship. In matters of this kind, 
wbo touches one. touches alL" 

The judge, aged 71, has a 


colourful history of gestures 
from the bench. In 1981 he told 
defendants they had caught 

him "on a good day"; be had 
become a grandfather and was 
disposing light justice to suit 
his mood. 

A year later he hit the 
headlines by offering to use his 
contacts to help an un- 
employed West Indian find 
work. 

Two years later, he was 
dubbed the "rapist’s friend" 
by angry demonstrators after 
imposing an 18 months' sus- 
pended sentence on a north 



London barman for attempted 
rape. "Yon come from Derby, 
which is my part of tBe world. 
Off yon go and don't come 
back," he told the defendant 

Bat he to 'known for stiff 
sentences. It was Judge Argyle 
who sentenced a football hooli- 
gan to life in November last 
year. 

The Lord Chancellor’s 
Department declined to com- 
ment on Judge Argyle's re- 
marks, except to confirm that 
the days of such incidents are 
numbered - the judge is due to 
retire at the end of next year. 


PROPOSITION- 


Lawson to 
link pay 
and profit 

By Richard Evans 
Political Correspondent 

Mr Nigel Lawson hopes to 
push ahead with profit-related 
pay schemes in spite of a less 
than enthusiastic response 
from industry. 

The Chancellor believes a 
closer link between pay and 
profits would give employees 
a more direct interest in their 
company’s success, improve 
industrial relations, and en- 
able firms to reduce pay rather 
than make workers redundant 
in a slump. 

As an incentive aimed at 
encouraging more companies 
to adopt profit-sharing agree- 
ments, he has suggested some 
tax relief for employees. 

After outlining his pro- 
posals in the Budget, the 
Chancellor published a Green 
Paper inviting comments 
from both sides of industry. 
Most submissions have 
reached the Treasury, and 
with the exception of the 
Institute of Directors, they are 
far from favourable. 

Th* . - Engineering 
Employers Federation and 
TUC have 


mg 

lines indicated they w 
actively seek to enforce Uk 
judgement through dtttramt 
upon Mr Denby's assets. 

However, much of his prop* 
erty is already foe sublet of 
duties by bis six former 
partners in the firm of Uayd 
Denby Neal, who "dtsmtssetT 
Mr Denby on teaming of the 
bribe sflegarions by dissolving 
the partnership, and sued him 
for the reem cry of their costs. 

A report on yesterday's 
court proceedings wiH be go- 
ing to the atfeudiotum 
committee of foe ncw‘ Solic- 
itors Complaints Bureau. 

Labour In 
split over 
candidate 

By Philip Webater, Chief 
nlftkal Correspondent 

The labour party is ex- 
pected to deckle tomorrow 
whether to impose a par- 
liamentary' candidate on 
Knowaiey North and prevent 
Mr Leslie Huckfield. a left- 
winger, from Band ing m foe 
imminent by-elpttiorr. • 
Although die move would 
be unprecedented, senior 
members of foe national exec- 
utive committee are giving 
notice that they wiH fight Mr 
Hnc k fi e h fs candidature for a 
contest regarded as crucial m 
foe run-up to the next election. 

The Alliance is hoping to 
nse the by-elect ion. which 
could be next month, as a 
launching pad for a comeback 
after its disappointing con- , 
ference season. Neither the 
Labour leadership nor the 
huge centre-right grouping on 
the national executive want. 
Mr Huckfield to be foe party's 
standard bearer. 

But if the selection process 
had been allowed to go ahead 
as planned. Mr Huckfield, foe' 
Euro MP for Merseyside East, 
would almost certainly have 
been chosen, having gained far 
more nominations than any 
other candidate in the field. ; 

An NEC inquiry into 
whether Mr Huckfield broke - 
an undertaking not to. .stond • 
fora Westminster seat whiles 1 
Euro MP is almost complete 
and a report is to be given to 
the NEC tomorrow. 

The Affiance is dearly hop- 
mg that Mr Huckfidkl wifi be- 
cted. He is backed by the. 
Miliiam Tendency and would • 
give the Alliance a target. 

There were signs of relief in 
the Alliance camp yesterday at 
a reported move which ap- 
peared to have switched the 
balance towards Mr 
Huckfield. The Transport and - 
General Workers's Union, on 
whose partumenULry panel 
Mr Huckfield appears, in- 
formed the party that he has : 
been given the overwhelming' 
backing of the union's north- 
west region- 

Strike ends at 


scheme mm! foe Confederation I JsigUHT faCtOlT 
of British Industry is expected * • -- 

to submit a lukewarm re- 
sponse this week. 


But Mr Lawson has wide- 
spread support on the Conser- 
vative backbenches for the 
principle of profit-related pay 
and close colleagues believe he 
is so committal to the idea 
that he will announce legisla- 
tion in next year’s Budget. 


Eight hundred assembly 
workers at Jaguar's plant in 
Coventry ended a two day 
strike yesterday when the 
company agreed to suspend a ' 
tunc and motion "efficiency" 
study. 

The strike caused tost' : 
production of more than ItiO 
worth more than £2 
million in the showrooms. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Doctors say the next seven days will be critical 

Comatose woman’s 
baby girl has 
‘fair’ chance of life 


Britain's first baby bom to a 
comatose mother who was 
kept breathing by a life- 
support machine, was in an 
incubator last night, being 
monitored by a team of 
paediatricians in a special- 
baby unit at Middlesbrough. 

Nicola Bell was delivered by 
caesarean section at 9.45pm 
on Sunday evening, two 
months premature and weigh- 
ing lib 14 oz. She was im- 
mediately placed in an 
incubator and taken by am* 
bulancc from the town's hos- 
pital fo Middlesbrough 
Maternity Hospital half a mile 
away. 

Doctors said yesterday that 
the 40-minute caesarean was 
routine and the baby's con- 
dition was stable. The next 
seven days will be critical to 
her chances of survival. 

“She has a fair chance of 
survival but she is very pre- 
mature and very small. If the 
baby comes through the first 
week without problems she 
will have a good chance of 
coming through.” Dr John 
Drurv. Middlesbrough Hos- 
pitals general manager, said. 

A ventilator is being used to 
blow air into the baby's lungs 
and other equipment is keep- 
ing her body temperature 
stable and monitoring her 
bean and blood oxygen levels. 

Senior medical siaflfface the 
decision of whether xo swatch 
off the life support equipment 
which has kept alive the 
mother. Deborah Bell since 
she suffered, a brain 
haemorrhage at her home in 
Darlington 37 days ago. 

A receptionist, aged 24, she 
was 24 weeks pregnant with 
her first child when she col- 
lapsed on September 13 and 

Three face 
racehorse 
charges 

By David Cross 
The trainer of Flockton 
Grey, the two-year-old gelding 
which was involved in an 
alleged horse racing switch, is 
to appear before the Jockey 
Club today on xhree disci- 
plinary charges. 

Mr Stephen Wiles, his wife, 
Mrs Elaine Wiles, and his 
father. Mr Frederick Wiles, 
arc accused of entering an 
unqualified horse for a race 
and deliberately misleading 
Jockey Club officials. 

It is alleged that the three 
substituted Good Hand, a 
similar looking thrce-ycar-old, 
for Flockton Grey at the last 
minute in the Knighton Auc- 
tion Stakes at Leicester on 
March 29. 1981 Good Hand 
won by 20 lengths at odds of 
10-1. 

A Jockey Club spokes- 
woman said yesterday that the 
case against the accused was 
based on three breaches of the 
rules. Penalties range from a 
fine of uj> to £3.250 or 
disqualification, which would 
bar them from attending race 
meetings as spectators. The 
hearing will be at the Jockey 
Gub headquarters in Portman 
Square, central London. 

In June 1984. two business- 
men. Mr Kenneth Richardson 
and Mr Colin Mathison. and 
Mr Peter Boddy, a horse-box 
driver, ail of Driffield, 
Humberside, were fined and 
given suspended sentences at 
York Crown Court for con- 
spiring to defraud book- 
makers . 

A High Court appeal was 
rejected. The three men will 
face a Jockey Gub disci- 
plinary hearing next month. 

The two horses involved in 
the alleged race switch arc 
being held at Beverley*. 
Humberside. 

Murders quiz 
for 12,000 

The two Brighton school- 
girls sexually assaulted and 
strangled almost a fortnight 
ago might have been “larking 
about” with two youths 
shortly before they were' mur- 
dered. Sussex police said last 
night. 

Officers involved in the case 
yesterdav completed their 
llOOOlti interview of people 
living locally. 


By Ian Smith and Pearce Wright 

she has been on life-support there are no problems. There 
equipment in Middlesbrough is no way of knowing at this 


General Hospital's intensive 
care unit ever since. 

Two senior doctors working 
independently will conduct 
tests within the next seven 
days to determine whether 
brain stem function has 
ceased and Mrs Bell is legally 
and medically dead. 

Her husband, Ian, aged 32. a 
maintenance fitter, will not be 
allowed to play any part in 
deciding the outcome of the 
tests, which will take no more 
than 30 minutes to perform. 

A doctor emphasized that 
their derision will rest solely 
on medical grounds and that 
Mr Bell and other relatives 
will be kept fully informed. 

During the past five weeks 
paediatricians at the general 
hospital* have consulted col- 
leagues in the United States 
and Sweden where two other 
babies have been born in 
similar circumstances. 

What hospital admin- 
istrators described as a “young 
team of doctors” carried out 
Sunday night’s historic opera- 
tion. Mr Stewart Hutchinson, 
a consultant gynaecologist, 
worked alongside Dr Peter 
Morel], a paediatrician, and 
Dr Ian Riddle, an anaesthetist. 

The baby is now in the care 
of a team of three 
paediatricians and 35 nurses, 
10 of them sisters, who each 


is no way of knowing at this 
stage what will be the 
outcome.” 

In California last July, a 
baby. Michelle Henderson, 
was born after her mother had 
been diagnosed brain-dead al- 
most two months earlier. 

The pregnancy of Marie 
Odette Henderson, aged 34, 
who suffered a brain tumour, 
was allowed to continue after 
her boy friend went to court to 
stop her being disconnected 
from a life-support system. 

The baby was 4b 5oz at 
birth. 

The Jib 14oz baby born to 
Mrs Bell is in a more delicate 
state. Nevertheless, doctors 
woe optimistic about her 
future because of advances in 
intensive care of premature 
babies. 

A consultant paediatrician 
m London said a baby of that 
weight could have an 80 per 
cent chance today of.thriving. 

Premature babies of lib 
3oz, born at Queen Charlotte's 
Hospital were now flourish- 
ing infants. A generation ago 
there was little prospect of a 
baby under 21b 8oz surviving. 

The most important ad- 
vance singled out in the rapid 
progress during the past five 
years was the improvement in 
the equipment and methods 
for- good ventilation from 
birth. But it was combined 



"W 





T=af-' if*, 

■ '.".V 


Ips 

.SEV.*. 




Five members of the Middlesbrough hospital team which is looking after Nicola Bell roimd the dock (from left): Sister 
Anne Lampstm, Staff Nurse Julie Carr, Dr Mamood Saed, Staff Nurse Mary Rose Fealey and Sister Jeanne Leech. 

‘Bomb in The Bamber trial 

bag’ poser Model possessed ‘deep and 
for terror intense’ hatred for mother 


tlK5p ' v better undmtandin* of no- 


cial-care baby unit 
Mrs Heather Harding a 


trilional balance and ways of 
feeding premature babies. 


hospital spokeswoman, said of development of micro-dec- 
Ntcola: “It is very early days tronic monitors for constant 
yet and we are having to take surveillance, and intensive 
each-day as it comes, and hope nursing . 


Unified family 
court demanded 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 
> unified family court involving almost two million 


which also offers a range of a 
welfare, conciliation and 
counselling services must be 
set up urgently, the Family 
Courts Campaign said yes- 
terday. 

The campaign, a con- 
sortium of more than 100 
individuals and groups, says 
that the consensus of its 


people every year. 

Mr Tony du Sautoy. cam- 
paign co-ordinator, said yes- 
terday: “A family court is a 
realistic reform that could be 
implemented without extra 
c os* ” 

The key features of a family 
court system should be: 

• Wide jurisdiction embrao 


lUdi uk tuiowiaua ui ua ■ n¥nin t 

members is that a femily court j!,V- maltcrs cepl 

system is more than a judicial ffnS2S52?L. ^ 


lorum. 

“It is the heart ofa network 
of agencies and services avail- 
able to families in trouble,” it 
says in its response to the 
Government's femily court 
consultation paper. . 

The campaign says there is 
an “overwhelming” need for a 
family court to improve the 
way the legal system handles 
domestic and family issues 


• Three tiers for the distribu- mvofeen 

tion of work with a single would h 
point of entry for all cases, to others a 
be allocated by the femily been wx 
court registrar; a main work- part in i 
ing tier where registrars or Syrians, 
judges could sit alone or with “If Miss Morphy was 
lay members; and a higher tier fnwght at He athro w, as she 
for appeals and complex cases; was, on the evidence that conld 
and come from her there conld be 

• A bench which involves no Syrian involvement. To her 

experienced and trained lay be was a Jordanian and not a 
men Syrian.” 

But Mr Gilbert Gray, QC, 

C4*AmTnfl%aw ™ bis dosing speech for the 
dlCDIalllCr defence, told the jury: 

. “Mossad (the Israeli intern- 

al 01114*6 genre service) is in this case. 
U.dJJlV'k3 Have no doubt about that. The 

. . spectre cannot be talked 

threats 

The stepfather of the miss- had no firm evidence “you 
ing schoolgirl Keighley Bar- would not expect if if these 
ton, denied at the Central agencies are doing their work. 
Criminal Court yesterday that “There is a Machiavellian 
he used threats to make her dement among those people 
withdraw alle gations that he who deal in such things. The 


bag’ poser 
for terror 
case j‘ury 

Nezar Hmdawi, a Jor- 
danian, betrayed the love of an 
unsophisticated Irish woman 
in a Syrian-backed attempt to 
blow op an El A1 jet with 375 
on band, the Centra! Criminal 
Court was told yesterday. 

“Was ever a woman worse 
used by a man?” Mr Roy 
Amlot, for the prosecatien, 
asked in t««* Hiding speech to 
tiie jury. 

Miss Ann Morphy, “a sim- 
ple Irish lass and a Catholic, 
lies at tiie heart” of the case 
against Mr Hindawi, he 

atfHpH 

It is alleged that Mr 
Hindaw i used Miss Murphy, 
aged 32, to carry a bomb on to 
an Israeli jet at Heathrow 
Airport. Mr Hindawi also 
aged 32, a journalist of no 
fixed address, denies attempt- 
ing to blow up the jet on April 

Mr Amlot told the jury that 
the single issue they must 
decide was whether Mr 
Hindawi knew there was a 
bomb in the bag he gave Miss 
Murphy. 

His motives were irrelevant, 
although “no doubt you will 
come to the conclusion on the 
evidence that there was some 
perverted political motive for 
doing something as horrific as 
was contemplated”. 

Another irrelevance was j 
whether anyone else was in- 
volved. “He alone a on trial.” 

Mr Amlot said two things 
were crystal dear. 

“If that plane had been 
destroyed there would be no 
evidence whatsoever of Syrian 
involvement Miss Morphy 
would have gone up with the 
others and no one would have 
been wiser to Mr Hindawf s 
part in it or to the part of the 


Newsman Stepfather 
‘died from denies 

riot blows’ threats 

A freelance photographer The stepfather of the miss- 
working for The Sunday Tele- ing schoolgirl Keighley Bar- 
graph died from bead injuries ton, denied at the Central 
received while photographing Criminal Court yesterday that 
looters at a Jeweller's shop he used threats to make her 
during the Brixtoa riots last withdraw allegations that he 
year, the Central Criminal sexually abused her. Ronald 
Court was told yesterday. Barton, aged 46, a mini-cab 
Mrs Barbara Mills, QC, for driver, of Mildenhall Road, 
the prosecution, said at first it Gapton, east London, denies 
seemed Mr David Hodge had abducting and murdering 
not been badly injured after Keighley, aged 1 4, whose body 
being punched and kicked by has not been found, 
up to 12 youths. Bui he went Mr Michael Worsley. QC 
into a coma on October 10 for the prosecution, has al- 
and died nine days later. leged that Mr Barton's 
Pathologists found that Mr motives for getting rid of the 
Hodge bad been suffering an girl were to stop her accusing 
aneurysm in the head, pos- him in court of sexually 
sibly since birth, which can interfering with her, and also 
cause sudden death as a result to get revenge on his wife 
ofa burst blood vessel. because she was living with 

“It is the view of patholo- another roan, 
gists that the bursting of the In court, Mr Barton agreed 
blood vessels was caused di- that in 1 980, when the girl was 
reedy or indirectly by the aged nine, he admitted two 
various blows to the held he charges of indecency with her 
received.” Mrs Mills said. and was given a suspended 
Elroy Palmer, aged 18. a sentence. Similar allegations 
security guard, of Effra Pa- were made on two subsequent 
radc. Brixton. south London, occasions and later 
dcni« the manslaughter of Mr withdrawn. 

Hodge, aged 29, of Mile End Mr Robin Grey. QC. for Mr 

Road, east London, and rob- Barton, earlier said there was 
bing him of a Nikon camera, no evidence that Keighley was 
The trial continues today. dead. 


aid justified the means.” 

Mr Gray dainted that the 
hag given to Miss Murphy by 


Clapton, east London, denies Mr Hindawi was reddish 
abducting and murdering brown and sot the blue one 


prodneed in court as the bag 
which contained the bomb. 

He also asked why, if Mr 


for the prosecution, has al- Hindawi had frequently 
leged that Mr Barton’s touched the bag before giving 
motives for getting rid of the it to Miss Murph y, there wa s 
girl were to stop her accusing no evidence of his fingerprints 


court of sexually j on rt. 


interfering with her, and also 
to get revenge on his wife 
because she was living with 
another roan. 

In court, Mr Barton agreed 
that in 1980, when the girl was 
aged nine, he admitted two 
charges of indecency with her 
and was given a suspended : 
sentence. Similar allegations 
were made on two subsequent 
occasions and later 
withdrawn. 

Mr Robin Grey. QC. for Mr 
Barton, earlier said there was 
no evidence that Keighley was 
dead. 


hearing continues. 


£29 for week’s holiday in Greece 



era 1 20 


Britain's second largest op- 
erator in holidays abroad yes- 
terday leapt into the escalating 
price war on next summer s 
packages with offers ol £-9 
sunshine breaks in Greece. 

International Leisure 
Group (ILGL best known lor 
ii&.lnta&un subsidiary, admit- 
ted that it was a limited 
“gimmick" offer as a riposte 
to a similar promotion by 
Thomson, the biggest tour 
operator. 

Thomson's Sky tours 
subsidiary at the end of last 
wfcek offered a week in Spwn 
for £29. but for Greece iht 

offering 500 of 
these -bwgain* on Thursday. 


By Derek Harris 

the holidays being a week on a Christmas and prices could 
siandbv basis although cus- then rise, be said. The Intasun 
tomers can choose specific special offers mostly are avail- 
dates for travelling. Skytours able only until December 20. 
is offering specific hoUdays. Somc ILG brochures. 

The bargains arc expected induding thox 0 f Global 
to be sold within minutes Holidays, are already out and 
when travel agents open their bookings arc claimed to be in 
doors. excess of 400.000. double the 

But Intasun has_ also m ,mhpr at ihe same rime last 


boosted the number of other 
special offers to encourage 
early booking including lowcr- 
thJii-nonnal £40 deposits and 
10.000 free places for children. 

Mr Ham Goodman, chair- 
man of ILG, said: “There is a 
price war and we shall be 
leading the way." 

But the early-booking bar- 
gains would be running out by 


Some ILG brochures, tnmc officers who kept watch 
including those of Global four Saturdays between 
Holidays, are already out and j tmp and September, 
hockings arc cteimtd to be in The officers posed so realis- 
excesof 400.000. douMe the tfcaBy as regular pantos that 
number at the same ume last ^ won £12 from Bonanl on 


Writer fined 
after Customs 
win their bet 

The magazine columnist 
Jeffrey Bernard was fined 
£200 at Bow Street 
Magistrates' Court yesterday 
after paying £12 winnings on 
an illegal bet to Cnstoms 
officers in a public house. 

Bernard, who writes the 
Low Life column in Tie Spec- 
tator, admitted acting as an 
mpgal hnnlrmatrgr and e nding 

tax for fire months at the 
Coach and Horses, Greek 
Street, Soho, London. 

He had told readers iff the 
magazine aO about the fun he 
*nA Ifis friends had ■ 

bets oo TV Taring. 

The article tipped off Cus- 
toms officers who kept watch 
on four Saturdays between 
June and September. 

The officers posed so realis- 


year. 

Average Intasun prices, 
which last year were between 
£200 and £210. are probably 
(town because a bigger propor- 
tion of self-catering holidays 
arc part or the programme, 
said Mr Roger Heape, mask- 
ing director of intasun Holi- 
days. 


a £2 bet on tire 1.40 at Ayr with 
a horse caDed Irish Passage 
and had arrested him after 
placmg another bet on one 
calked Aid and Abet, the court 
was told. 

When Bernard was told the 
punters were Cnstoms officers 
be said: “ Did they win? I hope 
they got expenses if they lost.” 


A dose friend of former 
London model Sheila Caffril 
feared that she would “do 
something nasty” months be- 
fore she and her family were 
massacred, a jury was told 
yesterday. 

Mr Freddie Emaml a res- 
taurant manager, said that 
Mrs Caffeil, known as 
“Bambi”, bad a “quick and 
violent temper". 

His evidence was read to the 
jury on the thirteenth day of 
the trial of Jeremy Bamber at 
Chelmsford Crown Court. 

Mr Bamber, denies killing 
his adoptive parents Nevill 
and Jane Bamber, both aged 
61, his step-sister, Mrs Caffeil, 
and her twin sons, Nicholas 
and Daniel aged six, at the 
femily farmhouse in Essex so 
be could inherit the £436,000 
estate. 

Police at first believed that 
Mrs Caffeil carried out the 
killings before committing 
suicide. 

Mr Emami described how, 
shortly before the murders, be 
called at Mrs CaffelTs flat in 
London and she appeared 
“jumpy, uptight and 
panicky”. 

“I felt she might do some- 
thing nasty and I was ex- 
tremely concerned for 
everyone's safety. It even- 
tually got to the stage where I 
conld no longer handle it 
Sheila was talking like a 
person possessed and mum- 
bling about God.” 

Mr Emaml who decribed 
himself as “more of a con- 
fidant than a boy friend”, said 
Sheila had a “deep and intense 
dislike” for Mrs J une Bamber. 

“She said her mother was 


and telling her it was wrong to 
make love to her boy friends 
and that she should remember 
God,” he said. 

After the killings Mr Emami 
was extremely shocked. “If it 
had just been her stepmother 
who had been killed I could 
have accepted that but not 
her whole femily,” he said. 

Mrs Barbara Mavidt a 
social worker, said Mrs Caffeil 


became “more manageable” 
but she then suffered a “natu- 
ral relapse” and was taken 
back to hospital at her father's 
request in March last year, 
five months before the 
killings. * 

Dr Ferguson said: “She 
wanted to be in touch with 
God and she wanted to be by 
Jesus's side, but she was very 
demented and incoherent I 


Housewife 
finds cold 
comfort. 

A housewife is the sole 
winner of yesterday's Portfolio 
Gold prize of £4,000. 

Mrs Lynne DeU, aged 27, 
from Folkestone to Kent, has 
played the Portfolio Gold 
game since it started In The 
Tunes. 

“But 1 am suffering from a 
cold and I thought that I was 
wrong when my numbers 
matched yesterday. So I got 
out my calculator aid did it 
again. 

“I just conld not believe my 
lack when I finally realized 
that I had won.” 

Mrs Dell said she intended 
spending the prize money on 
her children. “I have two little 
boys who wonld love bicycles.” 

Readers who wish to play 
the game, can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


first came to the attention of did not regard her as actively 


Camden social services in 

6 At 17 Sheila’s 
mother found her in a 
rather sexually 
provoking incident 
and called her the 
devil’s child 9 

north London in December 


seeking to die or as suiddaL” 

He told the court he had 
warned Mrs Caffeil against 
using cannabis because it 
would increase the risk of 
relapse. The jury has been tokl 
that traces of the drug were 
found in her urine after the 
massacre and that in the past 
she was known to have used 
cocaine. 

He said that Mrs CaffelTs 



UUI L 11 JUUXIUUU ^ , j 

1979 because she was having °^, eviJ . had enmnated 

problems with her marriage 


and was worried about the 
children. 

Her biggest stress, however, 
was her need to find and meet 
her natural mother, which she 
did in 1982. 

Mrs Mavick said that on 
one occasion Sheila asked to 
be referred to a plastic surgeon 
because she wanted silicone 
implants to give her bigger 
breasts. 

Dr Hugh Ferguson, a 


“At the age of 1 7 her mother 
found her in a rather sexually 
provoking incident and called 
her the devil's child. This 
concept of the deviTs child 
had lingered to some extent” 
Asked by Mr Geoffrey 
Rivlin, QC for the defence, 
what his reaction had been to 
newsof the killings, he replied: 
“I felt shock and horror. I did 
not fed she was someone who 
could be violent to her chil- 
dren or to her father, but I was 


consultant psychiatrist, said aware that she was a badly- 
that when Mrs Caffeil was disturbed woman and had 
admitted to St Andrew’s Hos- highly-disturbed feelings to- 
pital Northampton, in August wards her mother ” 

1983, she mentioned suicide. The judge then adjourned 
“She said she had to have the court to a police rifle range 
some kind of exorcism and in Chichester, Essex, for the 
that if there was no hope of jury to hear the murder 


that she would want to die.” 
After treatment with drugs 


always quoting religion at her her paranoid schizophrenia 


weapon being fired without a 
silencer fined. 

The trial continues today. 


Mrs Lynne Dell will spend 
cash on sons. 

Boy burglar’s 
pet dog led 
police to him 

A boy burglar was betrayed 
to the police by his pet dog, a 
juvenile court in Teesside was 
told yesterday. The boy aged 
13 left his Dobennann tied up 
in a warehouse at Middles- 
brough before escaping with 
computer cassettes, radios and 
first aid kits. 

When detectives put a rope 
halter aronnd the dog's neck, it 
led them half a mile to its 
owner's house. Mr John Tate, 
the boy's sofidtor, told the 
court it was the most bizarre 
arrest he had heard about. 

The boy, who admitted bur- 
glary and theft, was con- 
ditionally discharged for a 
year and ordered to pay £20 
compensation. His mother 
said later: “His dad gave him 
six of the best when the police 
turned up. But the lad was so 
happy to see his dog again he 
patted him on the back.” 


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Parliament October 20 1986 


Financial services 


Compensation for fraud 
against investors agreed 


HOUSE OF LORDS 

A central compensation fund to 
provide a fallback for investors 
in the C'trni of the failure of 
investment organizations was 
agreed by the House of Lords. 
The system, for compensating 
investors when claims cannot be 
satisfied, was established by a 
Government new clause, agreed 
without division, during the 
third day of the report store in 
the House of Lords of the 
Financial Services BilL 
Lord Lccas cf CbOworth, Under 
Secretary of State for Trade and 
Industry, moving the clause, 
said the Government believed 
an industry-wide compensation 


scheme represented the best 
possible arrangement. 

The new clause allows the 
Secretary of State to provide 
rules to establish a scheme for 
compensating investors in cases 
where authorized persons are 
unable or are likely to be unable 
10 satisfy claims in respect of 
any civil liability incurred by 
them in connection with their 
investment business. 

Lord McIntosh of Haringey 
(Lab) moved an amendment to 
the new clause, providing that 
the maximum compensation 
payable to any single investor 
should be not less than 
£1 00,000, which was rejected by 
i!0 votes to 45 

There had been suggestions 
that a maximum limit of 


£45.000 or even £30.000 would 
be applied, but the Stock 
Exchange, the strongest of the 
self-regulatory bodies, already 
had a scheme with a far large r 
maximum than he was propos- 
ing. 

It was important that as few 
claims as possible should be 
yalprf down on the grounds that 
the scheme was not adequate 10 
meet the risk that had been 
incurred and the shortfall 
incurred by the failure — by 
fraud or otherwise — of the 
investment organization con- 
cerned. 

ft was important for public 
confidence that it was widely 
known that there was a 
reasonably high limit for 
payment to anyone claiming. 


Cost of 
counting 
jobless 

The cost of counting the 
unemployed, paying unem- 
ployment benefit $nd mam- 
uir.ing records is expe c ted to be 
some £277 million in 19S6-S7. 
Lord Young of GraTThanx, 
Secretary of Stats for 
Employment, said in reply to a 
question in the House of Lords. 
About 2S.5GQ sfalT are engaged 
in this work. 

These figures include the cost 
of paving supplementary al- 
lowances to the unemployed. 
Only a small proportion of the 
resources is devoted to counting 
the unemployed and main- 
taining records. 


Complete List of Government 


As the House of Commons 
ressmes today, the Govern- 
ment is faced with a political 
dilemma which it can hardly 
have foreseen at the beginning 
of the summer recess. Should 
it allow an election at- 
mosphere to build op in the 
next few months? 

It has always seemed to me 
that Mrs Margaret Thatcher's 
itstureJ inclination will be to 
allow this Parliament to run 
its fail course until 1988, 
or.iess she sees good reason to 
believe that she could win 
earlier. She is more cautious 
rhgn i$ often appreciated. Zt 
would be out of character for 
her to plunge before that on a 
speculative gamble. 

Some people believe that to 
hold on to the end would in fact 
be the biggest gamble of alL 
They point to Mr Callaghan's 
disastrous postponement in 
October 1978. 

Btt Mr Callaghan is not the 
only relevant precedent. Sir 
Alec Douglas-Home stayed on 
to the end in October 1964 arid 
failed by only a narrow margin 
to pull off an unexpected 
Conservative victory. He, how- 
ever, had made his intentions 
public well in advance. 


COMMENTARY 



That to my mind was the 
critical factor in Mr Cal- 
laghan's case. He gave die 
impression of dithering. He 
encouraged expectations of an 
election and then dashed 
them. That is the example that 
Mrs Thatcher must want to 
avoid. 

This cannot have been too 
much of a problem for her 
before the party conference 
season. She would hardly have 
been tempted to encourage 


thoughts of an early election 
with the Conservatives trailing 
Labour in the polls and die 
Alliance doing quite «eIL But 
the success of this year's party 
conferences from the Conser- 
vative standpoint must have 
presented her with a new 

dilemma. 

Now there is the possibiBty 
of an electoral weather window 
for the Government The first 
signs came with the Liberal 
fracas over defence. This had 
the double effect of exposing 
die disunity of die Alliance 
and nf highlighting » potential 
winning issne for the 
Conservatives. 

The Labour conference dis- 
played a more mated party 
than for years, bat it also 
focused still more attention on 
defence by presenting Labour 
policy In a more unequivocal 
light than ever before. 

To cap it alL the Conser- 
vative conference seemed to be 
almost an extended pre-elec- 
tion rally, raising party morale 
and parading their policies for 
a third term. 

With unemployment at last 
showing a more encouraging 
trend, and inflation still at a 
moderate level, in spite of last 


month's increase, these may 
seem just the drounstanees 
for an early election, provided 
that sterling does sot eanse 
any further embarrassment. 

Conservative fortunes next 
time will depend critically 
upon squeezing the Alliance 
vole. So what could be better 
than to go into the campaign 
with the AHiance in disarray 
and moderate voters liable to 
be frightened by Labour's 
defence policy? 

The earliest acceptable time 
would be early summer, and 
the best way to make a 
summer contest acceptable 
would be to let an election 
atmosphere develop in the 
meantime. But what if there is 
a sterling crisis by then? What 
if the Alliance has got its act 
together? What if, far any 
reason, the polls were to torn 
really sour? 

Might not Mrs Thatcher 
then be in just the same 
predicament as Mr Callaghan, 
having to puncture an electoral 
balloon which she had allowed 
to soar oat of control? Yet if 
she stifles election speculation 
in the meantime, as she raw, 
she would find it harder to 
justify a summer election. 


THE CABINET 

Prime Munster. First Lord 
cf the Treasury and Minister 
for the Civil Service 
Lord President of the 
Council and Leader of the 
House of Lords 
Lord Chancellor 

Secretary of State for 
Foreign and Com moo wrath Affairs 
Chancellor of the Exchequer 
Home Secretary 
Secretary of Slate for Energy 
Secretary of State for Defence 
Secretary of State for Wales 
Lord Privy Seal and Leader 
of the Home of Commons 
Secretary of State for Social 
Services 

Chancellor of the Duchy of 
Lancaster (and chairman of 
the Conservative Party) 

Secretary of State for 
Northern Ireland 
Minister of Agriculture, 

Fisheries and Food 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment 
Secretary of State for 
Employment 
Secretary of State for 
Education and Science 
Paymaster General and 
Minister for Employment 
Chief Secretary to the 
Treasury 

Secretary of State for Scotland 
Secretary of State for Trade 
and Industry 

Secretary of State for Transport 


Mrs Margaret Thatcher 

Viscount WTiltelaw 

Lord Hailsham of St 

Mmytebone 

Sr Geoffrey Howe 

Mr Nigel Lawson 
Mr DoogUs Hurd 
Mr Peter Walker 
Mr George Younger 
Mr Nicholas Edwards 
Mr John Biffen 

Mr Norman Fowler 

Mr Norman Tebblt 

Mr Tan King 

Mr Michael Jopling 

Mr Nicholas Ridley 

Lord Young of 

Graffham 

Mr Kenneth Baker 

Mr Kenneth Clarke 

Mr John MacGregor 

Mr Malcolm Kifkind 
Mr Pan! Channon 

Mr John Moore 


DEPABTMENTS OF STATE AND MINISTERS 
Agricnltnre, Fisheries and Food 
Minister Mr Michael Joplmg 

Ministers of State 

Parliamentary Secretary 


Lord Bedstead 
Mr John Gammer 
Mr Donald Thompson 


\rts and Libraries, Office of 
Minister for the Aits Mr Richard Lace 

Defence 

Secretary of State 
Minister of State for the 
Armed Forces 

Minister of State for Defence 
Procurement 

Under Secretary of State for 
Defence Procurement 
Under Secretary of State 
for the Armed Forces 


Mr George Younger 
Mr John Stanley 

Lord Trefganse 

Mr Archibald Hamilton 

Mr Roger freeman 



Express Food’s North Devon factory produces over 12,000 
tonnes of Cheddar a year (that’s enough for about 80 million 
Ploughman's Lunches). 

It was the first of the company’s cheesemaking plants to 
switch from ofl to British Coal for its energy needs. Tbday Express 
Fbods have five more plants on coal-firing and another two 
under evaluation. 

Asked why his company is turning more and more to British 
Coal, Hugh Vinson, Director of Engineering at Express Foods, had 
this to say: “The major criteria for conversion were economics, 
good payback, cleanliness and automatic operation. But it was 
the long-term considerations like price * 

stability and security of supply that made & A 

coal the outstanding fuel to build our future 
on. And the quicker we move the more we 
can take advantage of the Government’s 
Grant Scheme which is due to end in mid- ’87”. 

Express Fbods, like many other forward- 
thinking companies have turned to British Coal 
when it comes to an important investment 
in thefuturei 

Act now for real help with 
conversion costs 

A Government Grant Scheme 
.currently supports conversion to 
coal by providing up to 25 % of 
the eligible capital costs. Loans 
at favourable terms (including 
deferred repayments) are also 
available from the European Coal and 
Steel Community. 

The plant and the technology 

Industrial requirements can be met from a comprehensive 
range of packaged or purpose designed units with a variety of boiler 
and furnace types and ratings Modem coal plant is fully automatic 
with completely enclosed handling - a concept that meets both the 
economic and aesthetic needs of the UK’s leading industrial 
companies. 

A final word from Malcolm Edwards, British Coal’s Commercial 
Director: “No other source of energy can match British Coal’s supply 
and pricing profile The Government Grant Scheme which isn’t due 
to end until mid-1987, can make converting to coal one of the 
soundest investments your company has ever made The time to 
talk is now” 



For further information please fill in the coupon and send t to die 
Industrial Branch. Marketing Department Bnrish Coal Hobart House 
GrosvBTor Plac^ London swix 7AE. ■ 


Name. 


Company. 

Adriress__ 



NOW IS THE TINE TO 
CONVERT TO BRITISH COAL 


D^vflfUawW 

Chancrilpr 


Mr Norman Tcbfelt 


Education and Science 
Secretary of Sole 
Minister of Slate 
Under Secretaries of Mate 


Mr Kenneth BUwf 

M»A agrfaBnrabtft 

Mr Robert Dm 
M r Cmcje* WnSdti - - 


Employment 

Secretary of State 

Paymaster General and 

Minister 

for Employment 

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Graffham 

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Government 

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Countryside and Planning 
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Affairs and Consmictson 
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MrNkbfttittRMky 

Dr Rhodes Boym* 

Mr WiHtaw Wsttvitvt 

Mr John Patten 

Lard SkeBnentela 
Mr Christopher Chop* 
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(Minister for Sport) 


Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs 
Secretary of State Sir Geoffrey Howe 

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Mr Timothy Ronton 
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Development — „ 

Under Secretary of State Mr Timothy Egpar 


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Scotland 


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Loch broom 
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MaiyMame 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Teachers dealing with 
wave of unruly pupils 
in primary schools 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 

°f unprccedemed Ten years ago there was a about their perceptions of how 
consensus among teachers 


disruption and disobedience 
among primary school chil- 
dren emerges from evidence 
recently given by head teach- 
ers to two London University 
researchers. 

Violent behaviour such as 
attacking teachers and fellow 
pupils, throwing books and 
Chairs, as well as spiuing and 
swearing in the classroom are 
all to be found in children at 
earlier ages than ever before 
according to the survey pub- 
lished in the latest edition of 
Educational Studies. 


that such action would begin 
to emerge in difficult pupils 
only at the age of IQl 

Now, the heads say. the 
average age has Jallen to six 
and a half, and in some cases, 
five years. 

The research by Dr Jean 
Lawrence and Mr David 
Steed, of Goldsmiths* College, 
covered 85 primary school 
heads in 38 local education 
authorities. 

Apart from generally 
questioning bead teachers 


Heads oppose parents’ 
veto on sex lessons 


Head teachers have cone 
out strongly against moves to 
give parents a legal right to 
withdraw their children Grom 
sex education lessons (Our 
Ed oca don Reporter writes). 

Later today the Commons 
will debate a dause sponsored 
by Mr Peter Brttinvels, 
Conservative MP for Leicester 
East, which, if passed, would 
give parents the power to 
remove their children from 
such instruction. 

However, Mr David Hart, 
general secretary of the Na- 
tional Association of Head 
Teachers, has written to MPs 


to warn them that such a move 
would be “fraught with 
difficulty”. 

He says: “There can be bo 
justification for imposing such 
a policy on 2&*>00 schools 
because of the activities of a 
very small number of local 
education authorities who are 
seeking to pursue extreme 
measures.” 

The union, which represents 
more than 70 per cent of heads 
in England and Wales, argues 
that the change would be 
impractical because many 
schools do not derate specific 
classes to sex education. 


Parties open drive 
to halt cash crisis 


By Christopher Wannan, Property Correspondent 


Britain faced its worst hous- 
ing crisis since the Second 
World War, Dr John 
Cunningham. Labour spokes- 
man on the environment, said 
yesterday. 

it was a crisis brought about: 
by annual and substantial cuts 
in public investment, he said. 
“Since 1979 the housing pro- 
gramme has been devastated 
by a 70 per cent cut in 
resources, damaging private 
and public housing alike.” 

Dr Cunningham was 
launching an afl-pariv cam- 
paign calling on the (Severn- 



X 



MP for Cheltenham, and Lord 
Ezra. Liberal housing spokes- 
man in the Lends, for the 
Alliance. 

All condemned the restrio- 
tion on funds available from 
the sale of council houses. 

Mr Irving, chairman of a 
large housing association, said 
that with the present depriva- 
tion and urgency of the situa- : 
tion it was “totally obscene” 
for the Government to sit on 
about £5 billion to £6 billion 
in capital receipts from the 
sale of council houses. 

He criticized local authori- 
ties who had “filched” money 
from sales, taking it from the 
tenants who paid the rents, to 
use h for other proposes. 

“There is a mountain of I 


FRONT 


money available for housing. 
The Government should tu- 


rn ent to increase the financing 
of housing associations by lu 


per cent from its present 
funding of £660 million next 
year. 

The politicians* grou prom- 
ised its support for a drive by 
the National Federation of 
Housing Associations to raise 
support for associations work- 
ing particularly outside the 
inner cities. 

The federation acknowl- 
edges the inner city demands, 
but its research has shown that 
the so called “comfortable” 
areas are also suffering from 
lack of resources. 

The all-party campaign is 
led by Dr Cunningham. Mr 
Charles Irving, Conservative 


low it to be used." 

The cost of catching up with 
the worsening crisis had been 
assessed by the English local 
authority associatons to be 
£75 billion, equivalent to 
£1.500 for every person in the 
country, be said. 

For the Alliance, Lord Ezra 
described the present system 
of housing finance as indefen- 
sible. The Alliance would be 
launching its own housing 
campaign on November 28. 

The federation, through its 
all-party political support win 
urge the Government to in- 
crease money to bousing 
associations, and is to write; to 
Mr Nicholas Ridley, Secretary 
of State for the Environment 
seeking a meeting to press its 
case. 


House price boom is 
over, survey shows 


By Oar Property Correspondent 
The dramatic nse in house and a small number - 1 per 


prices over recent months has 
finally stopped . the Royal 
Institution of Chartered 
Surveyors states in its survey 
for the third quarter of the 
year. . , 

Reporting a more rational 
housing market the institu- 
tion say's the latest prices 
continue the downward spiral 
of price increases first seen in 
August. Almost half the 213 
estate agents polled in Eng- 
land and Wales reported that 
house prices had stood still in 
the quarter ending on Septem- 
ber 30. Increases still being 
recorded are nearly all up to 2 
per cent, with few any higher. 


cent - has reported lowering 
prices, the first drop noted this 
year. 

The market remains busy, 
however, with an average of 
60 properties sold per agent, 

Mr John Thomas, the 
institution's housing spokes- 
man. said be expected the 
same pattern to continue for 
the rest of 1986. "The Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer’s 
announcement on interest 
rates and probable rise in 
mortgage rates is unlikely to 
affect demand for residential 
property, particularly for 
cheaper* and middle range 
homes." 


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infant behaviour had changed 
over the years, more than 500 
primary teachers were re- 
quested to register all disrup- 
tive incidents in a single 
school day. 

. These totalled 312, includ- 
ing a boy who tried to tear up 
his music book because the 
teacher had not chosen his 
favourite hvmn. 


inte hym 

Mr Steed said yesterday that 


the problems were particulary 
acute in children who came 
from council estates in the 
inner cities. He said that 
television was a central factor. 

“Children are becoming 
more and more sensitized to 
the visual image, in particular, 
direct modelling of violent 
incidents. Consequently, they 
are increasingly unable to 
follow verbal arguments and 
develop the sort of skills they 
will need later on in their 
school careers," he said. 

He thought the unruly 
behaviour offered a window 
into what h might be like to 
live among some of the over- 
pressured parents in the inner 
dries. 

“If you look at some of the 
statements, for example by 
Mrs Edwina Currie, that pov- 
erty doesn’t afreet behaviour, 
then this is clearly evidence to 
the contrary," he said. 



Odette Hallowes (right), the 
Second World War French 
Resistance heroine, and Mr 
John Profinno and his wife. 
Miss Valerie Hobson, at 
Westminster Abbey yesterday 
for a service of thanksgiving 
for Dame Anne Neagle. 

More than 1,600 people, 
including many leading 
entertainment figures, at- 
tended the memorial service- 
for the stage and film actress, 
who died in June, aged 81. 

Dame Anna, wbo was bora 
Marjorie Robertson in London 
in 1904, the daughter of a 
Merchant Navy captain, was 
created Dame in 1970. 

Mme Hallowes became a 
dose friend after befog por- 


trayed by Dame Anna in the 
(3m, Odette, in the 1950s. She 
was at the actress's bedside 
when she died after a long 
fight against Parkinson's 
disease. 

“Anna will always be 
remembered for her great 
kindness and generosity. She 
would have loved today's 
service," she said. 

Other guests included Sir 
John Mills, Danny La Rue, 
Derek Nimmo, Ann Todd, 
Katie Boyle, who read tire 
lesson, Cameron Macintosh, 
the producer, and Ned 
Sherriii. Tony Britton, one of 
her closest friends, read the 
address. 

(Photograph: Leslie Lee). 


BMA study on care of 
nuclear war survivors 


The British Medical Associ- 
ation is to investigate how 
injured survivors of a nuclear 
attack on Britain would be 
treated. Hie inquiry will start 
at the end of this month 
(writes Pearce WrightMt will 
be carried out by a working 
party of doctors and comes 
after an earlier study con- 
cluded that only a fraction of 
the casualties could receive 
any treatment. 

The decision to examine 
how the remnants of the 


National Health Service 
would cope in a nuclear war 
was taken earlier this year at 
the BMA's annual meeting. 
This recommended a public 
scrutiny of the basis on which 
doctors were likely to select 
survivors for treatment. 

Dr John Dawson, head of 
the BMA's science division, 
gave details to the European 
symposium of the Inter- 
national Physicians for the 
Prevention of Nuclear War at 
the weekend. 


Group to 
encourage 
equality 
at work 


By Mark Ellis 


A new organization to pro- 
mote equal opportunities for 
women at work will be set up 
in the new year in response to 
employers' demands, the 
Equal Opportunities Commis- 
sion announced yesterday. 

The Equality Exchange will 
enable companies, training 
bodies and consultants to 
swap ideas on recruitment and 
personnel matters and to learn 
of the latest developments in 
employment legislation. 

Lady Platt of Writtle. chair- 
man of the Equal Opportu- 
nities Commission, said: “The 
more employers and employ- 
ees are aware of the legislation 
the less litigation there will be. 

“In the first five years of the 
commission's life there were 
very few inquiries from 
employers, now we get several 
hundred a year. We believe it 
is something being set up in 
response to demand.” 

The only conditions of 
membership are an “active 
interest” in the development 
of equal opportunities and the 
nomination of a member of 
staff to work with the 
commission. 

Last year the Advisory. 
Conciliation and Arbitration 
Service received 42.887 com- 
plaints about alleged infringe- 
ments of employment rights, 
which was a 0.4 per cent 
increase since 1984. 


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Lord King is to 
stay at helm of 
BA and go for 
the hard sell 

By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


Lord King of Wartnaby. 
chairman of British Airways, 
is to remain at the helm after 
-the airline is sold to private 
investors. v 

“I have no intention of 
leaving.- he said in Hong 
Kong yesterday on the eve of 
the Government announcing 
details of the £1 billion share 
sale of the state-owned airline. 
It is dear that under Lord 
leadership the airline 
could become one of the most 
aggressive and feared in the 
world. He will be grabbing 
every opportunity to expand 
the airline even at the expense 
of its less powerful and less 
successful nvals. 

Top of the list of priorities 
for the airline once it is free of 
government interference will 
be to increase still further its 
huge route network. Applica- 
tions are certain for a large 
number of routes not so far 
operated. 

A privatized British Air- 
ways will also attempt to put 
money into some of the most 
successful airlines in the 
United States as well as 
investing directly in its own 
British competitors. 

So far the airline has been 
constrained by' the Govern- 
ment from exp anding to its 
fall potential and that has 
irritated Lord King. 

"in a business such as ours 
we cannot serve two masters, 
the market and the Govern- 
ment. Their two requirements 
are too different. 

“On the one hand the 
customer base needs quick 
reaction in the service of 
demand and on the other the 
state wants time to measure 
out the conflicting pressures 
on available resources. But 
now we have to grow." 

His determination to make 
the airline dominant in the 
world has not only worried his 


rivals but excited British Air- 
ways staff 

For 8,000 employees have 
set aside from their salaries 
money into a trust fund ready 
to buy shares in the airline. 
“Our staff have already poten- 
tially invested some £6 mil- 
lion in the airline," Lord King 
said. 

Their confidence will, it is 
hoped, be matched by inves- 
tors around the world. Later 
today the Government will 
announce that up to 25 per 
cent of the shares will be sold 
abroad mainly in the United 
States and Europe. 

Although everyone who 
flies British Airways in the 
next few months leading up to 
privatization at the end of 
January will be given details 
of the share scheme, they win 
not be offered any special 
incentive to buy, such as 
cheap air tickets. 

But all staff will be given 
about £100 of shares free plus 
another free issue if they 
remain loyal by not seizing 
their shares for three years. 

The campaign to sell the 
airline's shares will be con- 
centrated on a brief £10 
million, six-week campaign. 

Road shows, often en- 
hanced by the appearance of 
Concorde, will spread the 
word throughout Britain. 

In the first quarter of this* 
year the airline lost abdut £50 
million and although it is said 
to be heading for an overall 
profit of £125 million in the 
full financial year it is clearly 
subject to the ups and downs 
of the world's air transport 
industry. 

Lord King believes that 
only he, together with his 
managing director, Mr Colin 
Marshall, can successfully 
steer the airline to increased 
profits. 


Afrs Chris Ellis, the first woman assistant governor to he appointed at Dartmoor Prison. 

Woman in senior job at Dartmoor 


Mrs Chris Ellis has been 
appointed 1 as Dartmoor 
Prison's first woman assistant 
governor — 10 years' after 
starting her career as a prison 
officer. 

Mrs Ellis, who has worked 
at Styal in Cheshire and 
Strangeways’ in Manchester, 
said yesterday that her new 


lent was a “great 


appointment 
challenge' 1 

“I shall endeavoar to do 
exactly as well as the col- 
leagues who came here before 
me, whatever their sex." 

. Mrs Ellis, aged 40, said that 
Ttartmoor Prison in 
Princetown, Devon, was 
“different" from the local 


prisons where she worked 
before. 

“It is a training prison 
where ‘lifers’, including 
murderers and rapists, serve 
their sentences. 

“Yon get to know these 
long-term prisoners better 
than those in local prisons, but 
yon treat them exactly the 
same," she said. 


Local buses: 2 


Doubts on whether small 
firms can be competitive 


Sceptics argue that the 
Government's introduction of 
competition into Britain's lo- 
cal bus services, outside 
London, will be of little long- 
term benefit to the travelling 
public. 

It is pointed out that al- 
though there may be up to 200 
newcomers offering services, 
most are small, and that it is 
doubtful whether they will 
have the muscle to compete 
seriously with established 
operators. 

In any case, the amount of 
head-on competition they are 
offering on individual routes 
is limited. 

Although deregulation, and 
the introduction of com- 
petition comes into effect next 
Sunday, many argue that the 
true level of effective com- 
petition will not be seen until 
after the end of January. 

It is said that many op- 
erators have registered routes, 
or in some cases refrained 
from doing so, to allow them- 
selves time to assess the 
situation over the first three 
months. 

Mr Robert Brook, a former 
chairman of the National Bus 
Company, is expected to inter- 
vene in a big way in the 
Manchester area in the new 
year, with a new fleet of about 
200 minibuses, and it would 
not require many interven- 
tions on that scale to begin to 
make competition really bile. 

To ensure that competition 


Whether or not the Government is successful in its at- 
tempt to introduce competition huo local bus services, 
significant changes are taking place. Rodney Cowton, 
Transport Correspondent, looks at the position in the 
second of two articles 


can take place on a reasonably 
even footing, the Department 
of Transport has demanded a 
considerable amount of 
restructuring of the industry. 

Passenger transport exec- 
utives and local authorities 
which ran their own bus 
operations have had to trans- 
fer them into free-standing 
companies. 

The state-owned National 
Bus Company, which is the 
largest operator of local bus 
services, has had to break up 
four of its largest operating 
companies. 


One important develop- 
ment is in the increasing use of 
mini or midibuses, seating up 
to 25 passengers. The Na- 
tional Bus Company has been 
a leader in the introduction of 
these sen-ices, and NBC com- 
panies now operate about 
3,000 of them. 

The company says that in 
almost every case where the 
smaller buses have been in- 
troduced it has led to a 
substantial increase in pas- 
sengers carried. 

Concluded 


Labour to repeal Act 


The Labour Party yesterday 
committed itself to repeal the 
Transport Act 1985, under 
which competition is being 
introduced to local bus ser- 
vices outside the London area 
(Rodney Cowton writes). 

At a press conference in 
London, organized by the 
Association of Metropolitan 
Authorities, Mr Robert 
Hughes, Labour’s shadow 
spokesman on transport, said 
that a Labour government 
would return to a “sensible 
system" of licensing services 


and cross-subsidization of 
routes. 

Mr Michael Simmons, 
chairman of the association's 
highways and transportation 
committee, said that early 
morning and Sunday services 
and special services would be 
badly hit by the Act. 

About 9^100 jobs had been 
lost or were going, in the 
metropolitan areas, and there 
would be heavy redundancies 
in the National Bns 
Company's operations, Mr 
Simmons said. 


£500m river 
power 

study begins 

A plan to buikl a £500 
million tidal power barrage 
across the Mersey moved a 
step nearer reality yesterday. 

Mr David Hunt, Under 
Secretary at the Department 
of Energy, signed a contract in 
Liverpool to guarantee 
£400.000 from the Govern- 
ment for a feasibility study 

Mr Hum, Conservative MP 
for Wirral West, said the 
project offered tremendous 
potential for -economic 
regeneration. 

"It could pro ve itself to be a 
major national power station 
and a great catalyst for jobs, 
tourism and increased activity 
in the area," he said. 

The 30-monih feasibility 
study will cost about £1 
million. Besides the govern- 
ment cash. £100.000 has been 
promised by the Central 
Electricity Generating Board 
with a farther £500,000 from 
the private sector. 

The barrage is intended to 
generate 0,5 percent of United 
Kingdom's electrical power 


Brain damage 
wife awarded 

£200,000 

A trainee accountant who 
had been married for just 
three months when she suf- 
fered permanent brain dam- 
age in a road accident, was 
awarded £200,000 damages in 
the High Court yesterday. 

The court was told that Mrs 
Maria Constantmou, aged 35 
had been cared for by her 
husband, Andrew, ever since 
she was knocked down by a 
motor-cycle while crossing the 
road in Palmers Green, north 
London, in January 1982. 

She has been left with brain 
damage and intellecutal 
impairment. 

Mr Justice Jupp, who ap- 
proved the award, was told 
that Mrs Constaminou was in 
hospital for 18 months, 

The agreed damages and 
costs of the action are to be 
paid by Mr David Cable, the 
motor-cyclist, of Potters Bar, 
Hertfordshire. It was agreed 
that Mrs Constantinou was 50 
per cent to blame for the 
accident 


DAKS Simpson 

®1-KM 2002 IiCCAOII.lv 



















WORLD SUMMARY 


New Zealand on 
earthquake alert 

Wellington (AFP) — New Zealand dtfl defence 
authorities went on alert yesterday after confirmation of a 
powerful earthquake which rocked the seat-floor near the 
Eermadec Islands 600 m«W north-east rtf the country. 

Gvfl defence authorities gave a general warning rtf 
possible tidal waves resulting from the earthquake, which 
registered eight on the Richter scale. 

Japanese meteorological agency officials in Tokyo said 
that the underwater earthquake bad been confirmed by the 
pacific Tsunami ( tidal wave) Warning Centro in Hawaii. 

Attack re-enacted 

Jerusalem (Renter) - Three Palestinians held for a 
grenade attack tint killed one Israeli and wounded 69 near 
Jerusalem's Western Wall last week have re-enacted the 
ossa nit in front of investigators, police sources said. 

Under heavy guard, the three residents of Arab east 
Jerusalem were taken to the parking lot where three 
grenades exploded on Wednesday in a crowd rtf army 
recruits and their fomiifay after a militar y s w earing -in 
ceremony. 

Spanish 
TV chief 

Madrid — Senora Pilar 
Mir6 (left), aged 46, a 
tough and successful film 
directin' and dose friend of 
Seiior Felipe Gonz&iez, the 
Prime Minister, has taken 
over as director-general of 
Spain's state teteriaonand 
radio network for the next 
four years (Richard Wigg 
writes). 

Sefrora Mir6 has said 
she favours commercial 
television being introduced 
in Spain. 

More Chinese 


Spotlight falls on two 
minis ters in Frelimo 
search for new leader 



More 


Leading members of the 
governing Frelimo party met 
in Maputo yesterday to ar- 
range the appointment of a 
new leader, soon after news of 
the death of President Samara. 
Machel reached the capital. 

The two most likely succes- 
sors, according to Western 
sources in the capital, are the 
current Foreign Minister. Mr 
Joaquim Alberto Chissano, 
and thus Prime Minister, Mr 
Mario Machungo. 

Both were close colleagues 
of President Machel when 
Frelimo was engaged m hs 
guerrilla war against Portugal 
from 1964 to 1974. 

Eighteen hours after bis 
plane crashed in the eastern 
Transvaal, the state-run radio 
had still not announced the 
death of Mr Machel and his 
senior aides. 

A Western source is 
Maputo said the Politburo, 
the Central Committee 
Secretariat and the Cabinet of 
the Marxist Government were 
meeting to discuss who should 
take over until a new leader 
could be appointed. 

It is expected that Mr 
Machungo will assume the 
new role until a full meeting of 
the Central Committee elects 
a new head It will take at least 
a week for all members of the 
125-member body to reach the 


By Nicholas Beestoa 

capital from provincial posts. 

Analysts befeve the new 
leadership will not dramati- 
cally alter the policies of the 

as t^archltect of posrario^ : 
trial Mozambique and ms 
known to govern by party 
consensus. 

The loss to Mozambique of 
Mr Machel was compounded 
by the death of the Transport 
and Communications Min- 
ister, Mr Alcantara Santos, 
and fears that the Defence 
Minister. Mr Alberto 
Chipandc, was also in the 
doomed aircraft. . 

Both have been involved in 
a new policy inaugurated by 
Mr Machel this year, which set 
counter-insurgency as 
Maputo's chief priority. 

The activities of the South 
African-backed right-wing 
guerrillas of the Mozambique 
National Resistance Move- 
ment (Renarao) have threat- 
ened Maputo's hold over 
centra! and northern areas of 
the country. 

Earlier this year Mr Machel 
created the post of prime 
minister to nee himself of 
some presidential duties, and 
to allow him to co-ordinate a 

ngw milrt aryram paign agains t 

the rebels. 

Mr Chipande has been cen- 
tral to this strategy, and Mr 


Santos had a vital role In 
keeping open the strategic 
Beira comdor, which links 
Zimbabwe with the Indian 
Ocean by rail: its operation is 
seen as essential if frontline 
states are to reduce their 
dependence on South African 
transport facilities. 

Diplomats said Moz- 
ambique's new leader would 
inherit rate of the most un- 
stable countries on the 

continent. 

Because of the dv3 war fijur 
million people now foce fem- 
me, and there is not thought to 

be a way of averting the 
country's imminent economic 
collapse until a settlement is 
found to the security problem. 

Earlier this month Pretoria 
a dded to Ma puto's woes when 

It rw'wiim^ tKi» gf 

58.000 miners working in 
South Africa, meaning a loss 
of S90 million (£62 minion) in 
foreign currency earnings to 
Mozambique. 

Even though it maintain?; 
dose ties with the Soviet 
Union and Eastern Bloc coun- 
tries, Mozambique has not 
been able to rely on Moscow 
for support in its fight. 

It is expected that the new 
leader will extend Mr 
Machefs policy of improved 
ties with Europe and the US. 


deaths Bibles Mozambique: the land and people 


Luxembourg (Reuter) — 
Britain the highest 
mortality rate in the Euro- 
pean Community, largely 
became of a higher than 
average proportion of old 
people, die ECs Eurostat 
statistics office said. 

Peonle died in Britain at 
the rate of 1 L8 per 1,000 in 
1985 against 8i> per 1,000 
in The Netherlands, the 
lowest 


Hong Kong (Renter) — 
China's Army printing 
home, the People's Libera- 
tion Army Press, is produc- 
ing 200,000 copies of the 
Bible a year for Chinese 
Christians, a Protestant 
church group said. 

The United Bible Society 
said that the FLA Press 
printed the Chinese version 
of the Bible parely on a 
commercial basis. 


President taken ill 

Tunis (Renta 1 ) — President Bo&rgaiba of Tunisia frilled 
to make a scheduled appearance at a major election rally 
and himdreds of chanting supporters woe told that the 83- 
y ear-old head of state was recovering from an illness. 


Population: 1 3.2m, 90% 
Mack, the rest mixed race, 
whites, Asians. Main religion 

animism, atm Mamin, Chris- 
tian, Hindu minorities. Lan- 
guaae Portuguese. 

Area: 300,760 sq miles, bor- 
ders: north Tanzania, west 
Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, 
T ransv aal, S wazilan d, south 
Natal province. 1,540-mile In- 
dian Ocean coastline. 
Capital: Maputo, pop 

850.000. 

Armed forces: 15.800. Army 

14.000. Navy 800. Air force 

1.000. Also 9,500 paramilitary 
Border Guard, provincial, 
people's, local militias. 
Economy: GNP S2.9bn (*82). 

Majority peasants, per cap- 


ita income $1,200. Industries 
sugar, cashew nuts, textiles, 
cement, oil, brewi ng, soft 
drinks, cigarettes, tyres, car 
batteries. 

Modern history: Former 
Portuguese colony, indepen- 
dence June 25, 1975, after 10- 
year struggle by Mozambican 
Liberation Rom (Frelimo), 
formed 1962. 


Frehmo president/niiliiazy 
commander. Sam ora Machel, 
first president. Re-elected 
Frelimo president 1977. 1983. 
Frelimo only political party. 
Constitutionally, party presi- 
dent also head of country. 
Frelimo became Marxist- 


Lemnist at third congress, 
1977. 


Central power organs t-re- 
&mo poliiburo (11), secretar- 
iat (6), standing commission 
of People’s Assembly (15) and 
Council of Minsters. 

Government fi ghting war 
against right-wing Mozambi- 
can National Resistance rebels 
since independence. Hopes of 
ending conflict raised March 
1984 when non-aggression 
pact signed with Sth Africa. 
Pretoria still supporting 
rebels. 

Began to restore links with 
US govts mid-1980s, joined 
World Bank and IMF. 


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ANC accuses Pretoria 


Copenhagen (Reuter) - The 
African National Congress 
General Secretary, Mr Anted 
Nzo (above), accused the 
South African Government of 
being involved in the death of 
President Samoa MncbeL 
“Either the Sooth Africans 
directly have committed this 
crime or their proxies, the 
MNR," (Mozambican Na- 
tional Resistance, also known 
as Renamo) he said. 

“We are saying ft is a 
deliberately committed crime 
until ft is rawed otherwise. 


because of the threats the 
apartheid regime has been 
making against Moz- 
ambique.** 

Mr Nzo made the accusa- 
tion alter attending a world 
peace c o n fe rence in the Dan- 
ish capital. 

He said Sooth Africa had 
threatened Mozambique, all- 
eging that the ANC had hosts 
there, "despite the feet that we 
have repeatedly stated that 
there are no bases to 
neighbouring territories”. 


Botha pays 
Be tribute 
w to ‘great 

leader* 

By OtffedwSteyp 

President P.W.jto&a of 
South Africa >e**«toy«Bed 
President Samoa Machel a* 
"outstanding tester 
in a personal mem* ta w 
Government of the mete* 
*s> - Republic of Ma»mbi«fe Mr 

r W Botha k^JSSSf- 
shocked” bv Mr Mactefi 
death, which was «t "wept* 
mNehwC'tolwcfiWhmf.- 
"Whatever the Afferent** 
that there might be hew** 

our two governments, my - 
gov ernment and 1 had great - 
respect for him as a leader and 
as a person.” Mr Botha raid. 

**Mv personal (rtononiWp 
with him was atom cordial 
and wts characwnzcd by mu- 
tual respect. Africa has foot an 
outstanding tender.** 

Mr Robert Mwbc. <*■ Zim- 
babwe Prime Mhdstet Mm 
bad dose petMori tits with 

private visit (o Br ham and flew 
back to Harare test eight, the 
Zimbabwe High Ca^ibmfai- 
siM (Reuter reports). 

In another personal me* 
sage. Mr R. F. “Fik" Botha, 
the Foreign Minister, said that 
he bad the “highest respect 
and regard for Mr Madid as a 
leader and as a man". 

"I personally came to know 
President Machel as one of the 
great leaders of Africa/* fee 
said. “He was someone with 
whom I could d&cutt * ttr 
many problems that con- 
fronted our two countries, war 
region and our continent ” ; _ 

• Mrs Bite Botha, the wife of 
ria the President. and Mrs Hefena 
llw Botha, wife of the Foreign' 
. Minister, also sent a messages 
*** of condolence to Mr MacbcTa 
& iJlJJ 1 Uf «to w * Mrs Grata Machel:.. . 

• Inquiry aef up The South 
African Munster of Transport, 
***“- Mr Hendrik Schocmtn. has 
a world appointed a commission of 
inquiry to invntteate the 
crash. And Mr P, W Botba has 
tat had invited a representative from 
(ue, all- the Mozambique Govern- 
id hoses ment to visit the accident sire.' 
tthatwe Experts from the South -AT* 
ed that rican Civil Aviation Oigtoriro 
set ib* tian have also been invited to 
participate in the inquiry. 


‘Heroic freedom fighter 9 saluted 


By Oar Foreign Staff Mozamtoqoc. 

' 6 The South African church 

Officials at the EEC in leader. Dr Allan Boesak, said 
Brussels yesterday expressed j n xhe Dutch city of Utrecht 
concern over die stability of yesterday that he was numbed 


Mozambique. been the architect of b» 

The South African church country's independence hut 
leader, Dr Allan Boesak, said had striven to bring peace to 
in the Dutch city of Utrecht the whole region of southern 


southern Africa following 
President Machefs death, but 
indicated that European pol- 
icy toward the region would 
not be immediately affected. 


The Italian Prime Minister, X? aSLt 1 *, 

Signor Bettino Craxi, said in [£L aI 5?L2l 
Rome that President Machel’s ff ., . 

S had robbedfoe world of 

an heroic freedom fighter and ***** 1 ^ 100 

a great political leader, while eany t0 WL 


and shattered by the news, and 
predicted that his death would 
help Mozambique rebels to 
seize power soon. 

Asked to comment on re- 
ports that the African Na- 
tional Congress had accused 
Pretoria of facing involved in 


in St Denis, Reunion, the 
French Prime ‘Minister, M 


The Foreign Office in 
London expressed sympathy. 


Jacques Chirac, expressed his and a spokesman said Prea- 
condolences to the people of dent Machel had not only 


Africa. r - .. 

The Swedish Foreign Min- 
ister, MrSten Andereson, said 
in a Stockholm radio inter- 
view that President Machefs 
death was agree! loss for all of 
southern Africa, 

Asked ifhe believed South 
Africa might have been be- 
hind the crash, Mr Andersson 
said he had no proof whatso- 
ever to. support that theory. 
“But what is clear is that 
Machel was a political leader 
who was most uncomfortable 
to South Africa." he added 


EEC budget difficulties 


Move to split off 
farm spending 

From Richard Owen, Brussels 
With the crisis over run- or disposing of EEC form 
ray form spending in the surpluses is being disguised, 
1C increasingly dominating and that the Common Agri- 
scussjohs in the Commis- cultural Policy (CAP) system 
m and in the European of form subsidies encourages 
Lriiament, a Brussels think wasteful over-production, 
ok has put forward a The report says the two pro- 
rolutionary proposal for posed halves of the budget — 


With the crisis over run- 
away form spending in the 
EEC increasingly do minating 
discussions in the Commis- 
sion and in the European 
Parliament, a Brussels think 
tank has put forward a 
revolutionary proposal for 
hiving off agricultural spend- 
ing from the rest of the EEC 
budget 

The proposal, published 
yesterday in a paper by the 
Centre for European Policy 
Studies would protect threat- 
ened regional, social, research 
and technology programmes 
from the ever-expanding fora 
budget, which accounts for 
more than two-thirds of EEC 
spending and shows no sign of 
shrinking. 

Senior members of the 
Commission, including Mr 
Henning Christ ophersen. the 
Budget Commissioner, have 
shown interest in the report's 
idea of budget “fig- 
mentation”. The report is ex- 
pected to figure in mowing de- 
bate among EEC officials and 
Euro MPs over bow to bead 
off a financial disaster. 

.The European Parliament, 
which is meeting in Stras- 
bourg this week, has a say in 
the annual EEC budget, and 
during the next month has to 
confront the problem of 
overspending in the draft 
budget for 1987. 

British Conservative MEPs 
say that the true cost of storing 


one for form spending, 1 the 
other for the rest — would each 
have its own sources of re- 
venue, with each having to 
"live within its means". 
Under this policy the prin- 
ciples underlying the CAP 
could be revised without 
affecting other spending. 

This would open the way for 
“renationalisation” of the 
CAP, with member states 
bearing the cost of subsidies to 
their own formers. The report 
says that three emergency 
sources of finance should be 
considered to maintain price 
stability and income support 
for EEC formers: a general 
agricultural levy, tax sur- 
charges, and direct transfers 
from national governments. 

The plan, drawn up by 
experts from Britain, Italy, 
Holland and West Germany, 
may well appear attractive in 
the current climate, with the 
.1987 budget already set to 
burst through the 1.4 per cent 
VaT ceiling of national 
contributions to EEC coffers. 
The report criticises the built- 
in imbalance wherebv some 
siates pay in more than they 
get back 


Ministers 
hang on 
to quotas 

Brussels — To the dis- 
appointment but not surprise, 
of the EEC Commission; 
European industry ministers 
meeting in Luxembourg yes- 
terday moved towards a pro- 
visional system of voluntary - 
output constraints by Euro- 
pean steel companies, rather, 
than abolition of the produc- 
tion quotas which protect the 
EEC steel industry at present, 
(Our Own Correspondent 
writes). 

Herr Karl Heinz Naijcs, the 
Commissioner for Industry, 
wants to see the reduction, 
and eventual abolition, of the. 
quota system introduced to 
support loss-making Euro- 
pean steel companies. 

Under the Naijes plan all 
quotas would be abolished by 
the end of next year,- with the 
proportion of steel output 
covered by quotes reduced 
from 65 per ccmio 45 per cent . 
as a first step. 

But EEC sied companies, 
represented by the producers* 
organization Eurofer, argue 
that liberalization of the sted 
market would lead to a foil in 
prices and worsening un- 
employment Several states, 
including West Germany, 
France and Belgium; opposed 
the Naijes proporeL 
Under the oavignbn Pfon 
adopted in 1980, the Euro- 
pean steel industry -has shed 
nearly a quarter of a million 
jobs 


Expulsions not a setback to talks 

From Christopher Walker Sunday's five expulsion orders 

Mkmw and pnvwnmimr rnn..,, L- 


i l-vcwton nuuie, .l-cca, julu j I 


DON’T INVESTA PENNY UNTIL YOU’VE CHECKED WITH US 

BRITANNIA BUILDING SOCIETY, NEWTON HOUSE, LEEK, STAFFS. ST13 5RG.TEL-Q538 385131. ESTABLISHED 1856. A MEMBER OF THE 
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Moscow 

Although American dip- 
lomats here were braced yes- 
terday for fhrthcr tit-for-tat 
retaliation after Washington's 
threat to respond to the five 
expulsion orders against US 
diplomats, senior officials 
from both superpowers in- 
dicated that the affair was not 
expected to prove a major 
setback to relations. 

The official Soviet media 
accorded low-key treatment to 


« * * — r vtuvij 

and government sources hint- 
ed that the Kremlin was now 
looking towards an end to the 
dispute as both sides contin- 
ued efforts to discover what 
could be salvaged from the 
collapse of the Reykjavik 
summit. 

"To make a big thing of this 
at this rather delicate stage in 
our bilateral relations and the 
search for disarmament agree- 
ments would not be very 
helpful .. one Soviet source 
said. 


. ~We trust foqt ffie Amer- 
icans feci the same way.” 

Western diplomats said (hat 
the affoir had been com* 
rauaxed because the Soviet 
Union had responded to die 
expulsion of 25 employees 
tram its United Nations ni^ ' 
son in New York sgam*t 
American ffi'pfomatitrsbuE- ~ 

The length which ti# ffis- v 
pate would continue, titer 
added, depended vdjy.«qgfe 
on the nature eff the next qwve . 

by Washington. • " 


T 





•S t 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 




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way. What it will do is make sure that you are 
sent a prospectus and an application form when 
they’re published, which could save you a lot 
of bother later on. 

r ■ 

I Please send me, without obligation, information about the British Gas share 

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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


i: I 


El Salvador landlords take advantage of devastation to evict tenants 

Reconstruction work 
begins as agencies 
identify priority areas 


From Pan! Vallely, San Salvador 


Rescue workers in HI Sal- 
vador. where the earthquake 
death toO is 1200. have 
abandoned delicate work on 
devastated city centre sites 
and are moving in machinery 
to move the precarious rubble. 

Agencies dealing with long- 
term problems of the disaster 
which, in a matter of seconds 
caused more damage to the 
countyry’s economy than its 
civil war has done in seven 
years, have begun the labori- 
ous task of reconstruction. 

For many, like Unicef. 
which is launching a three- 
stage development pro- 
gramme. the earthquake has 
proved an opportunity as well 
as an added responsibility. “It 
gives us the excuse to set up 
schemes unhindered by gov- 
ernment bureaucracy which 
would beset us in normal 
times." Mr Agop Kayayan. the 
Unicef representative in Cen- 
tral America said. 


“We work by drawing on 
local knowledge of which were 
the poorest areas before the 
disaster. Then we look at 
which areas were most badly 
damaged. Where the two over- 
lap is the ansa of greatest 
need," Miss Nancy Andrade, 
Unicef s programme officer 
for El Salvador, said. 

The agency has decided on 
three of the city’s shanty 
towns for a programme which 
begins with a campaign of 
health education and proceeds 
with construction of tem- 
porary shelters by methods 
including advising the home- 
less on which materials can 
safely be salvaged. 

Its ultimate aim, in collab- 
oration with other agencies, is 
the building of between 5.000 
and 10,000 permanent homes, 
at a cost of around $ 3,000 


meni was on the brink of com- 
pleting negotiations with the 
World Bank for a soft loan of 
SI 20 million. The city bad 
existing services and well 
established community 
groups. And the Government 
had a policy of expropriating 
land at low cost for rebuilding. 

“Here the Government is 
less involved. These commu- 
nities have few existing ser- 
vices and only one has a com- 
munity organization. The 
funds do noi yet exist and the 
land is privately owned.” 

There is already evidence 
that some landlords are trying 
to take advantage of the de- 
vastation. The homeless in La 
Vega, for example, have com- 
plained that their landlords 
have refused to talk about 
rebuilding, while some have 
giveo eight days' notice to quit 


at a luji ui aiv/uiiu « f “ - , ■ 

(£2,000) each, in La Vega^ ^e groups of homeless 
Delgado and Mexicanos. people camped in the road 

“This is goiiig to be more lhe * r former homes - 

difficult." Unicefs architect, A further legal complication 

Senor Gerardo Vargas, said, is that many of the homeless 
comparing it with the Mexi- were formeriv squatters. More 
can earthquake. than 300.000 people are es- 

“In Mexico there was fund- timaied to be without shelter 
ing available — the Govern- in the citv. 



; who Is in El Salvador wkfa a relief agency, inspecting earthquake damage at 
i Jacinto, one of the worst-affected areas, with two local children. 






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THE ELECTRONIC POWER SHIFT , 
NOWTHE MERCEDES DRIVER HAS E.P.S. GIVING 
HIM ABSOLUTE CONTROL OF HIS GEARS . 
E.P.S. IS POWER OPERATION OF A MANUAL 


Country of crime 
divorce and 
record suicides 




eugme Q wucT&usncs ommu GEAR BOX, AND WITH PNEUMATICS SUPPLY- 
3 1^ ING THE MUSCLE.- SHIFTING IS ACHIEVED 

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THEIR IOB. AND ' IMPROVED COMBUSTION TOGETHER WITH MANY SUBSEQUENT OVER-REVVING. 


In this MumJartidt'i'fJt* 1 *- 
niri sertn wt modern 

W. 5**- *2 

E*wp* Cerrm*A»t* 
wt* w»m‘ »»f the ***» 
sequences pf *htfl 
petted m the SO \*w* «»£ 
Ruviiiift tank*, rtdhnx mnrngf 
the streets of Budapest. meM- 
lessiy crushed the uprising 

Mi w Haw* <*“*“*!* 

childhood wMy b«r. kWcd 
herself tut swmaer. The girl 
was fttw a small township « 
Lake Balaton, the cherished 
daughter of an inkeeper. 

After her etoettow she trev- 
eBed to rite West, wen urn 
modelling contracts* fW ui 

lore, became preitBam and was 

deserted by ber tom. 

At home again, enable to 
cone with the dual bor den of 
pregnancy and desertion, She 
connafcwd sukidt. 

Altboogb the act shocked 
the Hungarians it fell into a 
long central European tra- 
dition of escaping from 
problems. 

In Habsburg days the 
housemaid would drink potoao 
if she longed for h owe or had 
an arg— a rt withher employ- 
ers; bankrapCArtamped from 
tall buildfaigR officers blew 
their brains otoJht Haagary 
is now top os the world's 
suicide table, and tradition 


answer. 

More than 43 people in 
every UHMKXMeBI themselves, 
compared with about 25 in 
Austria - the nearest con- 
tender -23 in Denmark, 19 in 
Sweden and 1? la Japan. 

The ftoore has been increas- 
ing rapidly. So, too, have other 
social problems. 

Divorces amount to 2.7 per 
1,06ft oT poputoktoo - ftritota. 
the Soviet Union and East; 


Germany are higher, ftm only, 
tost — Hfo expeatitocy Is 
dodih&g (a Ifa ot ar to n maft 
can expect to five to 66.1 
years) nd the atortality rate to 
the worst in Eurane. 

Crime to on the mcrease and 


other coaumram countries. 

Statistics, of course, tore 
unduly depressing. Bat many 
sfefatogfoto awF tryiag to 
imdtotofc* why, 3ft years after 
the Y954 Upheaval and almost 
2ft years after e conomic re- 
forms -were introduced, w 
many social tendons me com* 
famto the fore. 

The most tempthm answer 
is that there to a ftmiwnmut* 1 
coflislon between the “mar- 
ket** — the consumer expedi- 


te a *to»\fofW| tetifi 
afteritoOtochnapatoftristhfi 
ft!p**rv and the* wash* mutt 
eight attack hi dto mate* 
a arftttt car toMfowerhakw, 
H» sfttoi iBMNijiil 
an artswtoBf. They m*« a 
video aod ard year they *m 
get a MfsdMl computer, [ 
Reform by mratog «p 
powiWfcy loppriraft 
entHyrfcfctaotone C-imn 
nr Im c— iptowry for th«4 
ntae wait to ftra r mwa abh 
«rU, Those who candot towg 

Hungary: A i 
generation ! 
after 1658 i 

- 

not mowH g to ptongc nri 
enough toco the poverty man 4 
more than 6ft per . eeot ef 
retired Mm<rM workers, fof 
evunpto, have i Upp e d Mm 
the rtMc-calcntotod stM| 
leocrfereL j 

Eten tithe gap between ridt 
and peer to M mu rimm emg* 
aeraiedL hy both Western and 
Hungarian obse rvers. It fa tid 
perceived ralhcv than actznu 
social i iMQu nHf y that M 
qnm tiy blp m off crime and 




believe that the **I m here -4 
do nor touch me" effect ef fell 
shops and expensive price ta&j 
stimulates juvenlUf 
detisquracy. * 

But goulash oommuaisqf 
does not by toarif expfakht 
rrerything. Social pnUeuM 
srtoo when a country emborkd 
on rapid m sd e w hati on, when 
■ tht toanrtbeir fiuriHrt 
to and Dtf 

raoftopy ou Tfos Wages 
driest ; 

Tht h fiasfoetod t tou haoce^ 
rab^M tocreaw 

proporttou of tocohdki, » 
tun, co mmit or af t e my 
suiddu. 

This has Httlt to do with Mi 
Radar's reform course, modi 
to do whh the magnetic peU of* 
or hantoatton. Akohtohm aa£. 
the extnardiuary suicide rate* 
may thus be the Huagsrisaj 
equivalent of the drug} 
addfcttMi pcablam to the W«st3 

Sodal teusfomdo, however.; 
play Into the hands of the} 
o pp o n tw ft of ec o no mi c reform.! 


wSoamnrgue that totting thri 


wmaowsnae expense ormy- 
day life — and .*tooctelisn , 

exwmacfcft good, bee UUn 
care, educstioo. and 1 40-boiir 
working toeek. , 

-This is ceriafafly a foeftm 
■Hoagary ton str essful 
both for those who want to 
succeed and those who want to 
survive. A couple I know to not 
untypical: toe husband works 
toe early shift as a supervisor 


last yuu-fpgeo* kmrespon-' 
sb* hwfo. i jdf n noi i ‘ 

under pressure from those who! 
argue for a less profU-ori-* 
entated, more conventionally, 
socialist society. . ; 

Concluded 


Howe asks Russia to ease tension 

Common market 
oh Asean agenda 


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. Jakarta (Renter) — Britain 
challenged the Soviet Union 
to help ease tension in Asia 
yesterday, and called for a 
fresh political impetus to 
North-South trade and eco- 
nomic co-operation. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, told foreign 
ministers of the European 
Community anti, the Associ- 
ation of South-East Asian 
Nations (.Asean) that Moscow 
should match with deeds its 
offer of improved relations 
with Asia. 

He also said the EEC and 
Asean should redouble the 
struggle against drug traffick- 
ing and terrorism and work 
closely to stamp out protec- 
tionism and promote mutual 
investment. 

Speaking in his capacity as 
president of the EEC Council 
of Ministers, Sir Geoffrey said 
Moscow's alleged flexible ap- 
proach to the problems of Asia 
had yet to take shape where 
Cambodia and Afghanistan 
were concerned. 

Asean, which groups ln- 
( | on « , l Malaysia, Thailand 
the Philippines. Singapore and 
considers the presence 
□^Vietnamese troops in Cam- 
twJia and Soviet troops in 
Afghanistan as the main ob- 
stacles to better ties with 
Moscow. 

Conference officials said 
discussions on economic is- 
su« centred on a studv of an 
ttC-Asean working ’ group 
which identified some of the 
problems m promoting invest- 
ments. 


The study proposed the 
creation of an Asian common 
market to facilitate and pro- 
mote European investment in 
the region, but this proposal 
looks like a non-starter be- 
cause of Indonesian 
opposition. 

■ Indonesia fears' its vast 
domestic market of 165 mil- 
lion people would be 
swamped with goods from the 
more competitive industries 
of neighbouring countries. 

Sir Geoffrey toW the open- 
ing session that trade between 
the two groups had doubled 
since 1980. and that the EEC 
and Asean together account 
for almost 25 per cent of world 
trade. 

The working paper under 
discussion recommends the 
dismantling of non-tariff bar- 
riers. easing of foreign invest- 
ment restrictions and better 
copyright protection to attract 

European mvestoR. 

"'Thai Asean is not a single 
market, but for all intents and 
purposes sik separate, national 
markets is often cited by EEC 
representatives as the single ; 

most important” disincentive 
to investment” the working 
paper Says. “One country in : 
the region cannot easily be ! 
used as a base to export to the 
others, because of tariff and 
non-tariff barriers, " 

Indonesia's President Su- 
harto. in a speech opening the 
meeting, called for increased 
foreign investment and eco- 
nomic co-operation in south- 
east Asia to help maintain 
political stability and thwart 
outside intervention. 


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: ■ ’ *■•••■ ' -^'udcVfien-iVini^Kia&QmiLmiit^ j ^ _ 

































Defence minister faces 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


)waown over attacks 
Aquino peace nolicv 


AAttwd From Keith Dalton, Manila 

Cibmet nSiS ^moreow fe“ nihePresidentand Mr resumption on Sunday of 
ioukl decide the fete of Mr “l .k- , peace vaiks wIdfc Com- 

Joall Ponce Enrile. the defiant m J n H! ,nk musl ^ a munist rebels. 

Dftoioc Minister. S 252 L» ESC •?“ JS At the Cabinet session one 

wuned President Aquino that before^mrvw^^T^ fi ?, sa ! d week earlier Mr Enrile re- 
.her government should be out on MspRotk new * WacIc ’ mained “unusually silent" 
<fe*ofv«j if he is made S TiftE _ w during a two-hour teiefing on 
resign. 10 aureL^i? themsui^cy, which^Sted 

jWtawfourministereha^ M&; eMfcdSt teg! 

ffiged Mr Enrile to resign if he moment his visit to Indonesia Sromr^ie^rfiiS"!5?&ri? 
ttn n? S5W wPPWt the fcr talks with foreign miSsS S?jy5^35J2S£ft 
President's handling of the 17- of the European Community S?ufESJ^ y ’ dcnoanced “ 
jmr-old Communist and the AssStion tfSn£ T. " 
insurgency. East Asian Nations. On the eve of that Cabinet 



East Asian NaiioiS: 

Mr Augusto Sanchez, the .The official explanation 
labour Minister, described as thal Mr Laurel -had im- 
a “Communist sympathizer" PPp 3111 matters to attend to" 
ftjf Mr Enrile. has announced , not . ^OP media spec- 
tral be will raise in Cabinet i4? t, 9 n t b fll be is needed in 
fee issue of Mr Enrile’s con tin- "Sf 11 * 8 10 patch up widening 
«ed membership of the eight- ° lttereD ^es between the Presi- 


ufid membership of the tight- 
inonth-old government. 

. Mr Hehcrson Alvarez, the 
Agrarian Reform Minister, 
yesterday joined Mr Aquilrao 
Piroentei, fee Local Govern- 
ment Minister, and Mr 
Neptali Gonzales, the Justice 
Munster, in urging Mr Enrile 
to stop his outspoken criti- 
dsms or resign. 

. IfMrs Aquino decides to act 
against her outspoken Do- 
fence Minister then -the en- 
tire Cabinet will support her," 
Mr Alvarez told reporters. 

Vice-President Salvador 
Laurel has been mediating 


dent and Mr Enrile. 

Mr Emile's disaffection 
with the Aquino government 
burst into the open a week ago 
when, for the first time, he did 
not attend the regular Cabinet 
session but instead chose to 
address a dentists' convention 
to criticize once again the 
Aquin o governments “soft" 
approach to the Comm unist 
insurgency. 

A day earlier Mr Enrile’s 
objections to the release of the 
wife and bodyguard of the 
captured Communist leader, 
Mr Rodolfo Salas, were over- 
ruled. Their release led to the 



t 


Lange awaits UK 
nuclear backlash 

From Richard Long, Wellington 



s 


The nuclear debate in Brit- changes might end for a time, 
.am would force the Govern- but this would not be the end 
ment of Mrs Margaret of the world. 

Thatcher to take a hard line The British Labour Party's 
with Wellington over its anti- anti-nuclear line made it un- 
■ -nuclear legislation, the New likely that Mrs Thatcher's 
Zealand Prime Minister, Mr Government would move to 
David Lange, said yesterday, accommodate the New Zea- 
Mr Lange said this could land position “lest that be 
include a temporary break in portrayed as somehow render- 
defence training exchange ing it likely to wave in the 
schemes with Britain, but this breeze of dissent from the 
would be because of the British Labour Party". 

British Government's com- U I have no criticism of the 
mitment to the nuclear deter- British Government They 
rent rather than the provisions have their carefully worfced- 
of the New Zealand anti- out policy and they have been 
nuclear legislation. consistent with that What I 

He rejected as absurd am saying is that I think the 
suggestions that the con- changing climate of political 
troversial clause five of the stances in the United King- 
Nuclear-Free Zone, Disarms- dom is such that the British 
merit and Arms Control Bill, Government will find itself in 
reported bade to Parliament a very difficult position not to 
lak week, would prevent New be anything other than overtly 
Zealand servicemen from critical of the New Zealand 
continuing with the British Government line." 
exchange schemes. About 50 New Zealand 

BSt' Mr Lange agreed that servicemen are training with 
fee British Government and British forces this year under 
Admiral of the Fleet Sir John the job-swap exchange 
tfekfesosc. had warned about schemes known as Long Look 
the effect of the clause, which (Arm y). Sea Surge (Navy) and 
mafcotit an offence for a New Air Wave (Air Force). They 
Zealand serviceman to assist arc regarded as the country’s 
an officer who may be in most valuable external train- 
control ofa midear device. ing schemes now that Ameri- 

Mr Lange said the clause can training and exchanges 
related to "the evil we are have been cancelled, 
dying to combat" and not the The American cancellations 
.rionptiaic and utterly «o- followed the Lange Govem- 
dgous interpretation being meal's ban on visits by 
ptaced on it by some people”, nuclear-armed or powered 
New Zealand servicemen warships, a policy which is 
would still be able to under' being ratified under the anti- 
take exchanges wife those nuclear legislation, 
sections of fee British forces Washington has also with- 
which did not have nuclear drawn its defence commit- 
weapons. ment to New Zealand under 

Mr Lange said defence ex- the Anzus alliance. 

Plight of retaining students 

Hard road for Chinese 
motorcycle tripper 

From Robert Grieves, Picking 



The story of Mr Z han g 
Doting, a young Chinese who 
xccmvuM the Peking bu- 
reau chief of Tke New York 
Times m an ill-feted motor- 
cycle trip through prohibited 
areas of China last sunnier, 
exemplifies the problems fac- 
ed by some Chinese students 
who return to their homeland 
after extensive exposure (o the 
West. 

Western interest hi fee epi- 
sode waned after fee cxgrabion 
from China of Mr John Bums, 
The Nen t York Times reporter 
whom Chinese authorities ac- 
cused of engaging in intelli- 
gcnce-gathering activities 
while travelling through re- 
stricted zones fn Shanxi and 
Rfc««ny| provinces. 

Batfor Mr Zhang, the stray 

dM not end until September 
29, when he was reportedly 
released from detention. Since 
then be has not been seen in 
public, nor have efforts to 
contact him been successful 

Before then, Mr Zhang bad 
net been seen by anyone since 


security officers escorted him 
famhts fiudb home. 

Information about Mr 
Zhatap. aged 29, forms the 
retort of a young mu caught 
between turns and perhaps 
berate* identities. 

An estimated 1,400 Chinese 
•nlYctsftv students are study- 
ing in Britain and 15,000 are 
studying in the US. 

Ou their return to China 
many of them may Cud that 
thdr work units are not flex- 
ible enough to use their talents 
pr op e rly , and feat they aiedfe- 
oMmted against for having 
Bred in the tf’est. 

Mr Zhang spent four yrara 
fare at Mfddfebmry Col- 
fee United States, re- 


turning to Peking only once 
during that time. He came 
home an a more or less perma- 
nent basis last October, and 
began fee search for a job. 

“He returned very Western 
ie his mannerisms and oat- 
look," said a friend. “He 
would come np and pita his aim 
around your shoulder when 
talking to you. And, for a Chi- 
nese, be could be openly flirta- 
tions wife young women." 

Mr Zhang wanted to make 
money ami involve himself in a 
fob that had some meaning. 
He worked briefly in fee Pe- 
king office of fee National 
Council for US-Chioa trade, 
but was forced to abandon fee 
position because he was not 
formally registered as an em- 
ployee of fee Foreign Enter- 
prise Service Corporation 
(Fesco), which controls the 
hiring and firing oflocab by 
foreigners in Peking. 

Finally, be accepted Mr 
Burns's offer to accompany 
him and an American lawyer, 
Mr Ed McNally, on a trip 


T74i »r } WiTTT; 


At present 244 cities in 
China are open to foreign and 
Chinese visitors. In order to 
reach some of those ettte, 
however, authorities expressly 
sanction travel by plane or 
train bat forbid unsupervised 
travel by car or motorcycle. 

“Zhang knew the trip coaid 
be dangerous, hot he wanted 
the money," said a friend. 

Before Mr Zhang's release, 
some of his friends had be- 
lieved that he would be sent 
away to a labour camp in the 
north-west of the country. “I 
don't think he wQl be execut- 
cd. M ooe firiend had said earficr 
this year, “1 think the authori- 
ties just want to use him as a 
warning mothers." 


programme which Mr Entile, 
fee next day, denounced as 
insufficient. 

On fee eve of feat Cabinet 
Session Mr Enrile delivered 
possibly his most stinging 
rebuke to Mrs Aquino, when 
he told a business forum feat 
fee President forfeited her 
popular mandate to rule when 
she abolished the Marcos 
constitution. 

He said if fee people de- 
manded it, Mrs Aquino 
should again run for election. 

Although Mr Enrile claims 
to speak for fee entire armed 
forces, diplomats and observ- 
ers believe Mis Aquino's 
prompt promotion of officers 
and a top-to-bottom re- 
organization of fee armed 
forces has minimiz ed fee 
likelihood of coup d'etat 
• MANILA (Reuter) — Presi- 
dent Aquino has accepted an 
invitation to visit China next 
year, Tian Jiyun, the Vice- 
Premier ofChina, said. 



Seoul opposition 
heeds warnings of 
crackdown on left 


From David Watts, Tokyo 


,J||§ 

aw 



Death penalty for Khmer guerrilla 


Bangkok (AFP) — A Cam- 
bodian provincial court has 
sentenced a Khmer Rouge 
guerrilla chief to death and 
seven of his nine soldiers to 
prison terms, fee official 
Phnom Penh news agency. 


SPK, said yesterday. 

Ten reactionaries from the 
Peking-backed Khmer Rouge 
were tried in Kampong Speu, 
30 miles west of Phnom Penh, 
at fee weekend, SPK said in a 
broadcast monitored here. 


Chea Saran, fee leader of a 
group, was sentenced to death, 
the agency sakL His band was 
arrested carrying rifles, gre- 
nades and other Chinese- 
made military equipment in 
an attack on a sugar mill. 


When Mr Yoo Sung Hwan 
got up in the South Korean 
National Assembly and de- 
manded a switch in national 
priorities from anti-com- 
munism to the reunification 
of the two Koreas it surprised 
his own supporters as much as 
fee Government 

Even though this verbal 
parliamentary assault was in 
the plans of neither Mr Kim 
'Dae Jung nor Mr Kim Young 
Sara, the two populist extra- 
parliamentary leaders of fee 
opposition, it touched a raw 
nerve with the Government, 
which is well aware of fee 
potential popular backing for 
Mr Yoo’ s stance. 

Now held under the Na- 
tional Security Law for mak- 
ing “pro-communist" re- 
marks, Mr Yoo faces the 
prospect of either a death 
sentence or a long period in 
jaiL 

Mr Yoo’s detention was 
followed by warnings and 
rumours of a government 
crackdown on so-called “left- 
leaning" groups and activities. 

At a recent meeting of fee 
ruling Democratic Justice 
Party, the chairman, Mr Rob 
Tae Woo, said fee most urgent 
task was to “set people at ease 
by uprooting fee left-leaning 
forces in politics, in fee econ- 
omy and on campus". 

Tlte opposition New Korea 
Democratic Party (NKDP) 


appears to have taken fee 
Government’s warnings seri- 
ously and has backed off from 
its earlier threats to boycott 
the National Assembly. It 
seems likely to resume the 
committee debate on revision 
of the country's constitution 
this week. 

The Government is propos- 
ing a Cabinet system, but the 
opposition wants fee direct 
election of the president, fear* 
ing a Cabinet system would be 
manipulated to maintain in 
power President Chun Dob 
Hwan. whose popularity has 
never been folly tested. 

The opposition knows feat 
the time For getting constitu- 
tional modifications through 
is running out 

Mr Kim Dae Jung told The 
Times that it was the duty of 
National Assembly deputies 
to report for work. But be 
warned the Government 
against any new crackdown. “I 
think suppression is not use- 
ful. Punishment is effective 
only when people are afraid of 
it but our people are not 
afraid.'* 

• SEOUL: A senior South 
Korean government official 
revealed yesterday that 10,000 
people in about 30 religious, 
student and other dissident 
organizations were being in- 
vestigated for anti-govern- 
ment activities (Reuter 
reports). 




. :>»>VXV 





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Greek local elections 


= Socialists lose control 
L of three main cities 
as voters switch parties 


. The ruling Socialist Party. 
Pasok, suffered a huge setback 
In the Greek local elections, 
which ended on Sunday; they 
lost control of the country's 
three’ bluest cities — Athens, 
Salonika and Piraeus — to 
their conservative rivals, and 
they were forced to lean 
heavily on Communist sup- 
port to get their own can- 
didates elected elsewhere. 

.. Pasok's increasing depen- 
dence on Communist backing 
was nowhere more evident 
than in Athens, where the 
Socialist mayor. Mr Dimitris 
Qeis, might have been com- 
fortably re-elected if the Com- 
munists had not decided to 
jjull the rug out from under his 

Mr Beis became the victim 
of a feud between the Socialist 
Government of Mr Andreas 
Papandreou, the Prime Min- 
ister, and the Moscow-line 




From Mario Modmno, Athens 

Communist Party (KKE), 
which sought to trade its 
support in Athens against a 
pledge for an electoral law 
reform which Mr Papandreou 
refused to give. 

Some 35,000 Communist 
voters, heeding party orders, 
cast blank or spoilt ballots. A 
few even voted for Mr Miltos 
Evert as Mayor of Athens. In 
the event he swept into power 
with 54.8 per cent of the total 
vote. 

If the Socialist defeat in 
Athens was a foregone conclu- 
sion, the conservative vic- 
tories in Salonika and Piraeus 
were significant because they 
were won against the odds of a 
Socialist-Communist front. 

Elsewhere in the country's 
300-odd towns, the Socialist 
candidates succeeded only 
where the Communists lent 
them A tend, bat not where 
the Communists and Social- 




Mr Constantine Mitsotakis, the New Democracy leader, 
left, and Mr Miltos Evert, newly-elected Mayor of Athens. 


ists confronted each other. 

Pasok's executive bureau 
alleged that there had been 
collusion between New Dem- 
ocracy. the conservative main 
opposition party, and KKE in 
many places. 

Pasok has definitely lost 
voters heavily, both to New 
Democracy and to KKE. Mr 
Constantine Mitsotakis, the 
New Democracy leader, in a 
victory statement early yes- 
terday, called the Papandreou 
administration “a minority 
government". 

Later, however, he ex- 
plained that he was not asking 
for early national elections, 
which are not due until 1989. 
“All we are asking now is that 
democratic order should be 
folly restored, that the Gov- 
ernment should abandon its 
authoritarianism and abject 
partisanship, so that we may 
eventually head towards elec- 
tions in conditions of norm- 
ality." 

Mr Papandreou, in a state- 
ment, admitted that his Gov- 
ernment had received the 
political message from the 
electorate and was determined 
to respond by speeding up the 
pace towards social change. 

Analysts say that the elec- 
torate mainly expressed its 
displeasure with the Gov- 
ernment's austerity progra- 
mme, the life style and 
“arrogance” of the ruling 
Socialist castes, and. from the 
left, the Government’s efforts 
to come to terms with the 
United States. 



Protesters 
greet King 
in Bilbao 

‘ From Richard Wigg, 
Madrid 

Police in Bilbao ted to 
make repealed charges to 
break up a demonstation 
against the one-day visit yes- 
terday by King Juan Carlos 
and Queen Sofia to the Basque 
country. 

Young people, including 
workers and students, or- 
ganized by the left-wing 
nationalist Herri Batasuna 
party, the political wing of the 
separatist organization. Eta, 
were protesting at the visit by 
the Spanish head of state to 
mark the 100th anniversary of 
the founding of Bilbao's Jesuit 
university. 

Police stopped a crowd of 
about 500 demonstrators from 
gening near to the university 
buildings as the royal couple 
arrived, accompanied by Se- 
ctor Jose Ardanza. 

• MADRID: Nine officers 
expelled from t be Army for 
belonging to an organization 
that opposed the former dic- 
tator. General Franco, are to 
be reinstated, according to the 
Madrid newspaper, Ei Pais 
(AFP reports). 


French strike threatens 
widespread disruption 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


More than five million pub- 
lic sector workers have been 
called out on strike today in 
what is expected to be the 
biggest onion action for nine 
years. 

Schools, railways, air trans- 
port, televirion, the post and 
hospitals are all expected to be 
severely disrupted. 

Usually lacking in brotherly 
solidarity, the three main 
French trade union federa- 
tions — the Co mmun ist-led 
CGT, the Socialist CFDT, and 
the middle-of-the-road Force 
Ouvriere — together with the 
main teachers’ union, the 
FEN, have, for once, agreed to 
co-ordinate actions and pro- 
tests on the same day. 

They are acting against, 
government plans to cut 
19,000 civil service jobs next 
year, without compulsory 
redundancies, and to hold 
down wage increases to the 
level of inflation after, accord- 
ing to the unions, a steady 
erosion in real wages over the 
past four years. 

It is the first nationwide 
industrial action since the 
right was returned to power 
seven months ago. 

Although the new Govern- 


ment has lifted restrictions on 
redundancies, introduced a 
huge privatization pro- 
gramme, raised social security 
contributions and cut jobs, 
private sector workers have 
been largely unwilling to strike 
for fear of losing their jobs. 

But today the French rail- 
ways are expecting to be able 
to run only one train in four, 
while the airlines hope at best 
for 80 take-offs and landings 
compared with 1,500 on a 
normal day. 

The main teachers’ union 
has advised parents to keep 
their children at home in the 
expectation of dosing three- 
quarters of the schools, and 
the three public television 
channels will maintain only a 
“minimum service", as re-j 
quired by law, while the two 
private channels will restrict 
viewing time to a total of two 
and a half hours. 

Public buildings and offices 
wifi remain closed and cuts are 
expected in gas and electricity 
services, while motorists will 
be able to drive through many 
unmanned motorway toll 
booths and postal deliveries 
will be virtually non-existent. 


Shamir promises 
more settlements 

From Ian Murray, Jmsafem 


The “supreme value" of 
settlement throughout the 
land of Israel iwJnrfmg the 
occupied territories, was emp- 
hasized by Mr Yitzhak Shamir 
yesterday when he made his 
first speech in the Knesset as 
the new Prime Minister and 
introduced ids Government. 

“We will not discriminate 
between one part of the coun- 
try and another;” he said. 
“Just as there is one people of 
Israel so is there one land of 
Israel." 

Only two of the five or six 
settlements which were meant 
to have been set up under the 
terms of the agreement which 
brought Mr Shamir to power 
this week, in place of Mr 
Shimon Peres, have been 
established. 

There is strong pressure 
from the Likud faction to 
expand the settlement policy 
and Mr Shamir respected this 
in his speech. The Gov- 
ernment's shortage of money, 
however, seems certain to pul 
a brake to much devdopment- 

The Government has only 
three real changes from that 
presented try Mr Peres 25 


The fun Cabinet list is: Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Shamir (Lfcud- 
Herufi. Vice Prime Mnister and 
Foreign Affafcs Shimon Peres (La- 
bour). Deputy Prime M in i st e r and 
Con struct ion and Housing David 
Livy (Lflc/HerJ, Deputy Prime iito- 
istar and Education Yitzhak Navon 


F ina n c e Masha Nissan (Ljfc/Ub), 
Trade and industry Anei Sharon 
(Uk/Heri, E cono m ic Co-ordination 
tea Yaacobi (Lab). ArafcuMia* 
Ary eh Nahamkbi (Lab), Transport 
Chaim Corfu (Lik/Her), Justice ft 
Tourism Avranam Shark (Lik/Ub). 


months ago. Mrs Shoshona 
Aibdi-AImoslino has come in 
as Health Minister in place of 
Mr Mordechai Gar, who re- 
fused to serve under Mr 
Shamir; Mr Zevulum Ham- 
mer tes replaced the Religious 
Affairs Minister, Dr Yosef 
Burg, who has retired, and Mr 
Yitzhak Motel who was da- 
missed for rudeness by Mr 
Peres, is back as Minister 
without Portfolio. 

Mr Shamir said his first 
priority was to bring down 
inflation from its present level 
of around 20 percent 

He said Israel “will con- 
tinue to initiate and seek ways 
to peace ... but k is good that 
those both far and near should 
know that we do not pursue 
peace out of weakness.” 

He showed be was aware 
that he and Mr Peres have a 
profound disagreement on 
whether Israel should hand 
back port of the occupied 
territories to obtain peace. But 
there was no point in quarrel- 
ling “so long as the Arab side 
has not presented a proposal 
that is acceptable to even part 
of the Government". 


Dw gy ft I n trael ni clura Moshe 
Stahtf (Lab), CO Hm«n t rrtnn« Am- 
non Rubinstein (9xriui). Interior 
Yitzhak Peretc (Sephardi Torah). 
PubSc Secraity Chaim Bar-Lev 
(Lab). HeaMh Shostana Arbeft- 
AftnosSno (Lab), taadgratan Yaa- 
cov Tsur (Lab). Labour ft Sodal 
Attain Moshe Katzav (Uk/Her). 
Science ft Technology Gideon Patl 
(Uk/UbL fUUakMH Attain ZevuUm 
Hammer (Nat fiaig Party). Without 
Port fo fio Moshe Arens (Uk/Hof). 
Ytoae! Hurvrtz fOmetzL Yosef 


Yigael Hurvrtz (Ometz). Yo: 
Shapira (MorashaL Ezer Waizm 
(Yahad), Yitzhak Modal (Uk/Lifa). 


Colony prepares to 
welcome Queen 

From Alan Hamilton. Hong Kong 

When the Queen begins a are no hmger netted. A bgg- 
three-day visit to Hong Kong fen of 600 men rfjhe 7th Peke 
today she wffl be the last of Edinburgh^ OwnGwkhft 
Briti s h monarch to walk Rifles is to be d i sb ande d 
on Asian sofl and date it as It is an early and dgsfflcant 

her own. There is banting in indication that the British 
the streets, but not a lot garrison is being ran down to 

A visit to Hoag Kong is an preparation for handover fat 
essential follow-up to the 1997. There will be more. 
Queen's tear of China last 4 kj. wtoae k being 
week, width despite the bek*- prep J5i for the Qoeen’iSt 

J£S visit to the former Crown 
Dnke of Edmborgh’s reported sfece 1975 , U* many 

remarks to a g^p of Scottish residents see it as essentially 
Stodents. » ba ng seen by both an irrelevance. Hong Kong's 
- teve. they say, is in real 
The JJv twins no longer the concern of 

Peking and the Qneerts a* British Government; it is a 
spokes man, M r Mich ael of negotiation b et we e n 

Shea, yesterday dismissed re- ^ CH*» Gnrenmw* in 

UJSifLlSS Peking and British and Amcri- 
Royal household had been left cubosiiiess interests in fibe 
behind to proffer apsfepes to territIirw 
Peking for the D»krt Uhx- Cttw. 

T T dipta»flc dnta. die 

Sasgiven Hong Kong hade to KoogpassportyveS no 
SeSSestmJlSfeSt automatic right of residence to 
p 3 ^thTi*£ 1 £»- ^ United 
cnnt!»^em^Ttbe^i 
tour of Hon* Kong takes place **2: . na* 

jw th* Im*m on There is Brae animosity 

SNttSSiSS 

SSSSH 

° Tb££S7,090 GnrkhM in ** 

rob to stop the flow of Illegal Q** *. ^ 

temlgranb from China. Bat street theatre. ... 

the flow has declined, and they Lending article, page 21 


US pilot faces ‘political’ tribunal in Managua 

From Alan Tomlinson 45, was to appear before an Defendants are judged by a that there is no judicial review 

Managua Anti-Somocisa People's Tri- tribunal consisting of a lawyer to the regular courts or the 

. .. bunal on charges as yet and two members of San- Supreme Court afNicaragua” 

. unknown. dmisa organizations. Mr Juan Mendez, one of the 


From Alan Tomlinson 
Managua 

An American pilot captured 
in Nicaragua after his plane 
was shot down during a supply 
drop to US-backed rebels two 
week's ago was due to free a 
special revolutionary court 
yesterday. 

Mr Eugene Hasenfus, aged 


45, was to appear before an 
Anti-Somocista People’s Tri- 
bunal on charges as yet 
unknown. 

The term Somodsta de- 
scribes not only supporters of 
the former dictator Anastasio 
Someza but virtually anybody 
suspected of opposing the 
Sandinisia revolution which 
toppled him. 


Defendants are judged by a 
tribunal consisting of a lawyer 
and two members of San- 
dinista organizations. 

This creates “a potential for 
undue political influence” 
according to a report by 
Americas Watch, an indepen- 
dent US human rights group. 

“Out greatest ‘ concern is 


group’s investigators, said. 

“They tend to have a very 
high ratio of convictions, 
which demonstrates that they 
do tiufe else but rubber stamp 
state security investigations.” 


Arms check 


Miami (Reuter) - Onto of 
weapons bearing Rwrian apA 
Spanish marknwt washed 
ashore on Florida bea ches 
have bom given to mtitay 
experts for examination. 

Mali denial 

Si-Deiris, Reunion (Rffflw) 

- The French Interior Mo- 
oter. M Charles Fuqua, re- 
jected accusation* that 101 
expelled MaHaas had bom 
dragged on to ft flight home, 
andsaid expulsions of for- 
eigners would recur "whom- 
ever necessary". - 

Fishing deal 

Tonga {API - The United 
States has agreed after tafoa. 
with the South Pacific Foma 
Fisheries Agency to pay £40 
million over five year* for 
fishing right* in 16 Pacific 
isiana naaons. the Australian 
Associated Press reported. 

Campus blaze 

Ulm, We« Germany (AFP) 

— A fire hftt£descttyed a . 
thrcc-storty hospital lab- 
oratory at Ulm University, 
Sixty patient* were evacuated. 

River escape 

Hanover (Reuter) - A 20* 
year-old East German crossed 
to the West by swimming the 
River Elbe, border police said. 

Aids alert 

Peking (Reuter) — China 

leam'aftBr foorChtotte were 
found carrying the vims. 

Iran deaths 

Ahvsz* Iran (AFP 1 ) — Five 
civilians were kitted tod 15 
injured when a stattomry 
frerght train was attached by • 
Iraqi figfaters north of Ahvag, 
ill Khuzcstan province Ae 
Islamic Republic Newt- 
Agency reported. • 

Heroin haul 

Amsterdam (Reuter) r” 
Dutch police said they bid. 
smashed an interaatiaBat - 
dnigs ring, arresting 28 pcopteT 
and recovering 22 lb of berotov 
after an undercover invcstigft^-. 
tion that lasted two month* - ■ 


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[E TIMF-S TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 

THE ARTS 


Nuggets 
of gold 

“I tend to pet a little people- 

*SIT? * ^ an Amerf can 

jtold prospector in this week’s 
Mage of (hat gentle etymologi- 
t !, 0ur ^ of tlw Anglo-Saxon 

°f £*81*1* 

VBBCiX thus proving there’s 
riches m those hills. linguistic 
as »ell as metallic. Starved of 
a Side-order of humankind be 
irtay have been, but this moun- 
tain of a mountain man, cer- 
tainly did not look deprived of 
his grub. chow, chuck, foke, 
eats, belly-umber - or what- 
ever yon care to call it. He also 
showed ns his nuggets. Smali- 
ffy« or a flash in the pan, 1 do 
not know, but they certainly 
were not chicken. 

| TELEVISION | 

This elemental glistering of 
gold was a welcome contrast to 
the more elusive money-mak- 
injc of Abdnl Shaiqp which 
wnsthe subject of the first part 
of the World in Action pro- 
gramme A Most Unsatisfac- 
tory Customer (Granada). Mr 
Shamji, who owed Johnsoo 
Matthey bankers a mere £22 
million when they collapsed 
two years ago. seems to know' 
only too well the meaning of 
that fine. Swiftian word, which 
The Story of English described 
as an Americanism “cham- 
pioned" by Benjamin Frank- 
lin, “bamboozle”. 

The programme was also, 
no doubt, welcome to the BBC 
in that it temporarily relieved 
them of the burden of baiting 
the Conservative Party. Not 
only was Mr ShamjTs use of 
his cabinet connection care- 
folly described, but one Tory 
MP was dearly shown to be 
speaking with a forked tongue. 

It could be argued that in 
Thames's new intermittently 
amusing publishing sit-com. 
Executive Stress, which stars 
Penelope Keith and Geoffrey 
Palmer, there was another dig 
at (he Tories. It fc debatable, 
however, . whether someone 
who admits that he turned 
down Jeffrey Archer is 
confessing to being a good or a 
bad pnbffsher — especially 
when his definition of a good 
author is **a dead one". Mr 
Shamji. however, should per- 
haps take a leaf out of Mr 
Archer's book. He too seems 
to have an aptitude for fiction. 

Andrew Hislop 


An enjoyable 



ipgsfc v*. 


WBmnTi 

nKBEKHk 

WTBBTlmtor. 


Surrealism in Britain 
in the Thirties 
Leeds City Art Galleries 

Surrealism in 
England 1936 and 
After 

Laing Gallery, Newcastle 

Contrariwise: 
Surrealism and 
Britain 1930-1986 
Glynn Vivian Art 
Gallery, Swansea 

Edward Burra: 
Designs for the Stage 
Marina Henderson 


A rt and Alchemy was the 
theme of the central 
pavilion at this year's 
Venice Biennale, and 
naturally a lot of Sur- 
realism was to be seen there. One 
thing which quite surprised me was 
the number and strength of the 
British contributions. British Sur- 
realism seemed, after all. like such a 
backwater, belated and provincial 
but here were works by the likes of 
Grace Pailihorpe and lthell Col- 
quhoun - hardly household names, 
even in Britain — which well 
withstood comparison with the 
greatest international figures of the 
movement. AH very well of course, 
when you are dealing with single 
canvases. But the response of a 
friend when I observed that there 
were now no fewer than three shows 
of British Surrealism on at the same 
time outside London — “Good lord, 
will there be enough to go round?' 
— is very understandable. 

The good news is that there is 
more than enough to go round, and 
extraordinarily impressive* lot of it 
is. The bad news is that none of 
these shows is scheduled to visit. 
London. Surrealism in Britain in 
the Thirties (subtitled Angels of 
Anarchy and Machines for Making 


GALLERIES 


Clouds) is at Leeds until December 
7. Surrealism in England 1936 and 
After is at Newcastle until Novcm- 
' ber 23 and Contrariwise: Surrealism 
and Britain 1930-1986 is at Swansea 
until November IS. after which it 
goes to Bath. Newcastle (the Poly- 
technic this time) and Llandudno. 
All of them are well worth seeing 
and are actually complementary. 

This is achieved by varying 
slightly but sufficiently the terms of 
reference. , The Newcastle show, 
which started at Canterbury College 
of Art. is very strict and particular 
about whom it lets in: only artists 
who were in some way officially 
allied with the movement, ana 
preferably people who showed in 
■the famous/notorious 1 936 London 
exhibition of international Sur- 

- realism — the fiftieth anniversary of 
which is the occasion of all these 
shows. The Leeds show seeks to 
place these same people, and a few 
.more, in their 1936 international 
context by including as well key 
works — often splendidly unfamiliar 

- by such luminaries as Dali. Ernst. 
Magritte and Tanguy (unfortunately 
no suitable De Chirico was avail- 
able). And the Swansea show uses 
Surrealism as a generic term for a 
certain kind of fantastic art — or. 
more precisely, vision of die world 

- from 1930 right up to date. 

No doubt the survivor^ of the 
British Surrealist movement — and - 
they are surprisingly numerous — 
would object to the looseness of 
Swansea's definition, for the really 
odd thing about the situation in 
immediately pre-war Britain was 
the degree of authoritarianism 
manifested by a movement which 
one might expect to stand for total 
liberation: its history is scattered 
with definitions and redefinitions of 
the faith, groupings and regroupings 
and. strangest of all very dramatic 
and bureaucratically executed ex- 
pulsions of people who would not in 
some (usually infinitesimal) fashion 
toe the official line; However. 
Swansea is evidently right in seeing 
Surrealism proper as just a phase in 
a long British tradition of nonsense 
and comfortable excursions into the 
irrational As such it started well 
before 1930. let alone 1936, and it 



Taking no mine than he wanted from Surrealism: Edward Barra's Revolver Dream No 3 (1931) 


continues happily today, not only in 
the work of such as Glen Baxter, 
who make a point of disorientating 
leaps between ideas, but also, largely 
unnoticed, in the commercial art o'f 
the billboards and the record 
covers. 

Certainly most of these are as 
they arc because Surrealism existed 
and theorized about itself and 
created scandals: insensibly we have 
become acclimatized. But it is 
intriguing to see artists such as 
Malcolm Poynter. whom it might 
never occur to one to think of as 
Surrealists, related to this particular 
tradition — and indeed Poynter’s 
life-size figures made out of tiny 
plastic toy soldiers, or the more 
recent works like the Ninth Horse- 
man of the Apocalypse, put together 
out of large and small plastic fish, do 
undoubtedly achieve the ripht sort 
of surreal dislocation, which was 
supposed to shock spectators into 
free association. 

T here are also at Swansea, 
thought-provoking exam-' 
pies of British docu- 
mentary photography 
which, just by the pho- 
tographers* gift of capturing the 
weird moment or selecting in such a 
way as to make the intensely 
familiar suddenly look strange, 
dearly belong to some other world 
than our own. 

In general, it seems to me. 
Swansea’s contemporary easel- 
painters who favour the surrealistic 


come off much less well than the 
commercial artists: there lends to be 
something a little cute and self- 
conscious about them. They mostly 
also mean to be funny, in the most 
basic sense of the terra, whereas 
your classic Surrealist look himself 
with extraordinary seriousness: if 
they were funny at aJL it was with 
that blistering humour which is 
intended to start revolutions. There 
,arc enough of those in Leeds and 
'Newcastle, both of which conve- 
niently break down their contents 
into sections representing the vari- 
ous thrusts of Surrealism: the 
Ocdipai nexus rubs shoulders (if 
indeed a nexus can be said, any- 
where but in a Surrealist context to 
rub shoulders with anything) with 
anguished reactions to the Spanish 
Civil War.’ automatism co-exists 
with, extremes of controlled tech- 
nical proficiency, and the un- 
conscious is evoked or provoked 
sometimes with shaky hand and 
smudged palette, sometimes with 
an hallucinatory pseudo-photo- 
graphic darity. 

However authoritarian and con- 
cerned with orthodoxy the Sur- 
realists were, there is certainly no 
lack of variety in their work. At 
Leeds we get again the Biennale 
effect: the Brits can well stand 
comparison with the rest A paint- 
ing like lthell Colquhoun's Rivieres 
Ticdes . for example, has exactly the" 
right ambiguity: its cleanly repre- 
sented church disturbingly dripping 
with undefinable but sinister 


streams of liquid. John Armstrong's 
Analysis of Easter, with flowers and 
flying machines springing out of an 
egg or out of the soil itself in a 
transfigured lunar landscape, does 
not look absurdly outclassed in the 
dose company of Magritte and 
Ernst. The question still remains: 
how many of the British, if accorded 
a major retrospective, would prove 
to possess the staying power and 
ability to develop which distin- 
guishes the great figures of the 
international movement? 

My suspicion is that probably 
only those we know from other 
contexts, like Paul Nash and Ed- 
ward Burra, could stand up to that 
particular test: those for whom 
Surrealism was -a fertilizing in- 
fluence. but only one among many, 
which helped to genninale their 
own unmistakable individuality. 
Burra, for instance, was more 
naturally like-minded than organ- 
izationally Surrealist, and the delec- 
table show of his theatrical designs 
at Marina Henderson (that, at least, 
in London) until October 31 shows 
vividly just how important and just 
how unimportant Surrealism was 
to him. But this is only a suspidon: 
what we need is a number of 
practical, demonstrations. Mean- 
while. Leeds or Newcastle or Swan- 
sea. espedaHy the three together, 
give us ample ground for specu- 
lation. 

.. John Russell Taylor 




Poetic perfection | thea™- 


<• • •• ,1,A 

.w 1 


A gift to posterity: Hfidegard Behrens with Simon Estes is Act H 


Die Walkure 
Metropolitan, New 
York 

The .V t *i»! York Tima -Maga- 
zine recently published an 
ewclhmr essay entitled “Vocal 
Burnout at the Opera", which 
cited the Mct's ncwSicgmund. 
Poor ! Hofmann, as a prime 
exhibit. Alas, as the opening 
performance demonstrated, 
this seems too true. Attacks 
scented u> catch Hofmann in 
mid- wobble; tone was thin 
ami precarious except at full- 
out fortes, which did ring with 
some of die former hod> and 
lustre. . 

In a newspaper interview 
w«h the Woian. Simon Estes, 
the singer hinted darkly that 
Deutsche Gntmmophon has 
excluded him from next 

spring’s studio recording of 
this production. Estes's ‘read- 
ing wax surel> no disgrace by 
ukLix's standards land far 
better than his recent Am- 


W If you tike 
music, 

▼ you’ll love 

Qcnifcpcap£^- 

A* (kmilcpeiipb-, xtKi meet 
the kind of intelligent 
cultured Mtigkf protcv4onai> 
t hat wu vwuld expect to 
meet ftt die home of a 
bnwritc friend. VW- cake 
the utmost care to introduce 
xmi to people whom « 
feel >xvu win value as 
frittuSsandposii'ibk 
lifetime panwrv. 
Callus fora coenphraeraarv 
consututkin: 

IH-SM49H 01 -2450935 

- . (in A iwpI c tnl 
- IIKmabrbndlv.tiivrii 

i. tw*4rwt>WiX tQL - 


I Apcp a I launching whaL when it 

v/TU-IY/a | comes to fruition in the 1 988- 

">^* 1 89 season, will be the Mel's 

fortos): vcl underpowered and j* 131 . ^'08 
do- Of ione. h revealed _Ii«le 


that need concern posterity. 

Indeed, on present plans, 
only one of the current leads 
will" appear in the recording — 
the Brunnhilde. Hildcgard 
Behrens — and her contribu- 
tion should be a gift to 
posterity. Her sheer vocal 


potenliary artistic director. In 
launching whaL when it 
comes to fruition in the 1988- 
89 season, will be the Mel's 
first Ring cycle in 15 years. 
Levine is expanding on one of 
his finest achievements to 
date, a Parsifal exquisitely 
honed at the Mel and else- 
where over the last few years. 
Despite the predictable scrap- 
pincss in the playing on 
opening night the warmth of 
the strings, the strength of the 


postemy. tier ; sneer \ocai ensemble and the searing 
beauty and agility would, of emj. of the climaxes left 
fviurci* onciir^ lhai in anv j _ .« . 


course. cnsu J’ e ^ al ,n an y doubt that these operas, too. 
case: yet the legacy may ^ well served in the piL 
become even more significant and lhal roums ft* 
if. as one fears, the voice. . . - . . . 

which now sounds unforced _ Assisting Lexine and 


wnicn TO* wunua n,„ n 

but all too fragile, cannot long 

stand up to such strenuous producuonis the desjgner 
demands. Of the other charac- P“^her_ SchncrdenSiemssen. 

tors (including Jeanninc Alt- ™ 5 i2m£S5 

mover’s Sieglindc and Aage 5015 and Langentesss 

Haugland's HundingL only rammed agumes. while 
Brigitte Fassbacnder’s heart- attractive as far as they go. 
foil Fricka will be missed. cou * c f perhaps have offered 


ssrtsMis 

^aSfe&hc N nl r S-ffdtaST kT5 

the comnanv’s basically naturalistic, though 


_ --- nglll sjiuncss. umonunaieiy. 

^ Quirks mesh badly with 
disease Jha* * nl ihoseof Behrens: one of the 

,hk as utSriv moa dcclric » 

cycle, ana inis is as uucnx ^ <4,.- rhp 

ireinnwirf a conc^Mon m 

one could imagim. Sc wjds with the stage direction. 
neo-Romaniic P c ^nal sm Hqw Qntf wisbcs lhal she m 

shows all and tUIs nmhmg. ^ |cft w ^ 0UT} for _ 

k-ax ing the • midablc expressive devices. 

itsownconduMons.Nomagi- 

cal heights arc scaled in the The Met audiciKt which 
staging: none is attempted but demands little in the way of 
fur the balls hooed fire, which interpretation, seemed liter- 
al least on opening night oughK pleased, ll max- just be 
proved disappointing - far that - with the addition of 


lev* convincing that the i 
hermitage scene in last .* 
season’s Kiunamhihina. \ 
No. this is elearix a * 
conductor's production, a ve- * 
hick* to mark, the ascendancy 
of James Levine from music 
director of the Met to P^rti’js. 


the RhcuiQiihl and Sicglrial next 
last season and (imii’rdanwicnmg 
the following - Levine will 
a achieve his wish, a Met Ring 
v.s ior the decades. ' 


James R- 
Oestreich 


Like Barry Douglas. Victor 
Sangior^o was recently in 
Moscow for the Tchaikovsky 
competition. He reached the 
semifinal stage, but you do not 
get much publicity for that. 
On this showing, though. 
Sangiorgio is evidently fer 
more than an also-ran of a 
pianisL 

His programme here was 
ambitious by any standards, 
but the principal characteris- 
tics of his playing were already 
evident in Mozart's D major 
Sonata. K576. with which he 
began. His firm, clean touch 
ana technical facility, and an 
innate and elegant sense of 
.shape, served this by no 
means slight piece well the 
balance between the hands in 
its contrapuntal passages al- 
ways a model of darity. 
Tchaikovsky's Theme ana 
Variations. Op 19, fun- 
damentally possessed the 
same qualities, though of 
course its contrasts needed to 
be. and were, painted with 
greater vividness. 

If the Tchaikovsky as a 
work sounds a little predict- 
able: Busoni's Hegie No 2. 
“AIT Italia", is even more so in 
its very waywardness. Often 
Busoni seems to be composing 
a sequence of connecting sec- 
tions. and his use of single 
pivot-notes to change the 
tonal course of the work is an 
irritating diche. Nevertheless 
wc could not discover such 
things were it not for the kind 
of bold programming policy 
shown here, and Sangiorgio 
certainly played the piece, and 
the same composer's Famasie 
on ‘’Carmen", with utter 
conviction. 

But the best' thing of the 
evening was his superlative 
performance of both books of 
Debussy's Images. Here San- 
giorgio's poetic playing con- 
jured a sense of timelessness, 
aspiring to a Michdangeli-like 
perfection. Impossible to- 
achieve that, of course, but his 
poise and his delicate but 
crystalline tone-colours tes- 
tified to his already abundant 
interpretative gifts.' 

Stephen Pettitt 

Problems of tonal incom- 
patibility often mar a two- 
piano recital, but the husband- 
and-wife team of Christopher 
Black and Yoke Katayama 
dispelled any reservations one 
might have hod from the very 
fim chord of their recnaf. 
They arc unostentatious, sty- 
listically mature and ade- 
quately competent in matters 
of ensemble. Whether it was in 
the brooding triumph of 
Brahms's Haydn Variations 
or the balmy summer colours 
of Raid's Hulwicrj from 
Site* attnivfaira, the team 
was adept at producing both 
instrumental colour and care- 
fully d^ineated textures. 


LONDON 

DEBUTS 


Seunghee. Ki. a soprano 
from South Korea, for all her 
powerful high notes has yet to 
discover an effective genre for 
lieder. There appears to be a 
conflict with her operatic per- 
sona. Strauss's “Morgen" and 
“Standchen” hinted at re- 
serves of charm, but it was 
only in an aria from Mozart's 
Cost fan tut/c. in which recita- 
tive sections came off with 
imperious authority, that she 
could have been counted as 
successful 

The American piano duel- 
lists Tony and Mary' Ann 
Lenti impressed me most in 
music that I did not know. 
One could almost visualize 
Casella standing gaping at the 
rums of Rheims Cathedral in 
his Pagtne di guerra (1915). 
but in contrast to this insight 
we were given an over-fast 
Schubert F minor Fantasy in 
which most of the “fantasy" 
dissolved into chaos. Nor was 
their ensemble playing up to 
much. 

A viola recital may be 
something of a rarity, but 
Edward Vanderspar is so in- 
nately musical that one be- 
came oblivious as to which 
string instrument he was play- 
ing. The Schubert “Arpeg- 
gione" Sonata was tailor- 
made for him: I cannot 
remember hearing a more 
eloquent and unaffected per- 
formance. Altogether it was a 
slightly over-ambitious pro- 
gramme. the more so since 
Bloch’s substantial Suite 
( 1919) was the sole work after 
the interval. But with Van- 
derspar’s advocacy one tended 
to make allowance for the 
repetitive harmonic language 
— the sheer purity of his 
melodic line always held the 
attention. 

The London-based pianist 
Mareo Lnzzato. for ail his 
engaging modesty, does not 
really possess the sweep to be 
effective in the bigger works of 
the instrument's repertoire. 
One cannot reconcile Bcei- 
hoxen’s inspirational Sonata 
in A. Op 101. with a style that 
is so concerned with mellow- 
ness of tonal production. A 
hotchpotch of a piece by 
Jeffrey Joseph was given ns 
first performance, but in 
providing something for 
every body its impact was little 
more than pleasant. Luzzato 
ended with the Liszt “Dame" 
Sonata, in which the sinister 
elements were given full rein, 
hut technique was too sketchy 
at times and a cut towards the 
dose justified my suspicions. 

James Methuen- 
Campbell 


Body Cell 

Soho Poly 

Melissa Murray is the Soho 
Poly’s Writer in Residence 
(courtesy of the Thames Tele- 
vision Playwright Scheme), 
and, like many others in 
similar positions, her work 
bears close resemblance to the 
effusion of a creative writing 
class. Here a “concerned" 
theme: there a programmatic 
procedure; nowhere, unfortu- 
nately, much of a play. 

. The central figure of Body 
Celt is a sullenly aggressive 
young woman enjoying soli- 
tary confinement in Durham 
Gaol. Denied books or ciga- 
rettes or human company, 
Jane paces up and down her 
padded cell, keeping her mind 
alert with childhood reminis- 
cences of alphabet games, and 
striving above all not to think 
of the three forbidden topics of 
food, sex and the future. 

Meandering through this 
zone of deprivation, her mono- 
logue conveys all too perti- 
nently the unsensatioaal bore- 
dom of prison life. Jane's 
problem as a character is that, 
Ear from being an unique 
person with specific attributes, 
she has to stand for Every- 
woman in a prison cell or 
(though the snb-text implied 
by the title never really gets 
under way) every’ wqman 
locked inside her own biologi- 
cal prison. 

This is large-minded of the 
author but tough oh the audi- 
ence. and by the time we learn' 
that Jane is in fact a sort of lat- 
ter-day Angry 1 Brigade terror- 
ist serving time for the 
attempted mnrder of a soldier 



Carolyn Pickles: persuasive 

as a dehumanized victim 

— that her situation is in some 
perverse way elective — we 
have substantially lost in- 
terest. 

Three rather idealized char- 
acters do their bit to mitigate 
Jane's self-imposed hell. An 
humane though unbelievably 
articulate and well-spoken 
Chief Officer (Heather Can- 
ning) supervises the harsh 
regime: the prisoner’s journal- 
ist lover (Angela Bruce) is 
allowed infrequent visits in a 
glass booth; and a politically 
naive bank robber (Natasha 
.Williams) is introduced into 
the cell for “association". 

It is In her tense exchanges 
with Miss Williams that Caro- 
lyn Piddes's Jane achieves 
most credibility, although she 
is also persuasive as a progres- 
sively dehumanized victim of 
sedative drugs. Sue Dimder- 
dale's production, as one 
would expect, is neatly direct 
and unfussy. 

Martin Cropper 


j CONCERTS j 

BBCSO/Athertoa 

Festival Hall/ z 
Radio 3 

Briltcn referred to the finale of 
h is Spring Symphony 'as a 
Day festival but Sunday 
night's teasing, tense and exu- 
berant performance reminded 
us that the description rcafiy 
applies to the whole work, at 
least after the first two songsll 

Right ai the start the moc& 
is less certain. The musjc 
suggests that it could go vi 
either of two directions: into 
the promised choral anthol- 
ogy. or. as the purely ifl* 
sirumcnial passages seem to 
want, into an anguishes’ 
orchestral symphony along- 
thc lines of the Sinfonia aa. 
requiem. The tenor's invoca* 
tion from Spenser, splendidly.' 
delivered here by Philitg 
Langridgc. settles the maiicfr' 
and the ensuing Nashc lyric, 
in its broadly swinging syn-. 
eopated setting, suddenly 
opens the curtains on the 
eternal springtime of the Eiu= 
glish pastoral imagination.' 
where Morrismen are dancing 
to tunes by Herrick. ^ 

‘ ' The one sour note, struck fff 
the Auden poem, seems i» 
have entered on account o I 
Britten’s identification witlr 
the feeling of being out at 
doors, for this is very much an> 
open-air symphony, and i£ 
parading, celebratory qualifier 
were well caught by the BBC* 
choirs and the boys of TiffiS* 
School, who whistled as? 
strongly as they sang. The£ 
were .radiantly partnered byf 
Margaret Marshall. 

Thc other soloist was Felic- 
ity Palmer, who perhaps 
sounded like Madame Sosos^- 
tris in The Midsummer Mar^ 
riage only because we had just 
been hearing echoes of that 
world ringing through Tip- 
pen’s Fourth Symphony. BiiJ 
the connection was strongly 
and aptly made, and I doubt 
whether any other programme 
in the Britten/Tippeti Festival 
will so clearly show their 
common grounding in a vi- 
sion of England. The problem 
with the Tippett symphony is?; 
that it is also a vision of; 
America, and (he violins o£ 
the BBC Symphony Or^r 
chcsira. under David Ath~* 
erton. were not at all at ease iii; 
its leaping rhythms. 

Paul Griffiths" 


Stockholm 
Sinfonietta/ r, 
Llewellyn ;;; 

Elizabeth Hall 

Chamber orchestras depenef- 
on collective personality, anif-- 
thc Swedish visitors who- 
ended their British' tour offf 
Sunday night have developed- 
theirs in tonal features. Their' 
strings arc fine-drawn and^ 
homogeneous, with splcnv 
didly deep sonority from only : 
three cellos and, two basses- 
and the wind instrument^ 
were’ for the most part soft-" 
grained and flexible, so that' 
the overall effect was disci- 
plined and poised. It brought 
lyrical charm and rhythmic^ 
vivacity to Haydn's Sym4 
phony No 83. of which the! 
clucking and pecking phrases- 
that gave it “The Hen" for a! 
nickname were accorded tbeip 
proper musical function. 

Grant Llewellyn, who won - 
the Leeds Conductors Com-iJ 
petition early this year, took a_ 
genial view of the work., with 
considerable felicities of phra- 
sing and tempo. He also 
matched subtle support tq ihe" 
blind pianist Bernard d*Ascoli_'- 
in Mozart’s F major Concerto. 
K.459. 

Strings alone introduced-' 
each half of the programme— 
the second having the advan - 
tage of the engaging Serenaded 
by Dag WIren. This perfor-' 
mance was distinguished by 
its slow movement and the. 
shading of the pizzicato tex- 
ture through which the lyrical" 
line is drawn. Other music by» 
Alfven. who provided an en-i* 
core, would have supplied a 
more attractive calling card-? 
than the nondescript Two-; 
Pieces by Aaron Copland 
played at the outset. 

Noel Goodwin-' 


8 ifllBI Koval 

Opera 

KENNETH HOUSe 
MACMILLANS 

MAYERUNG 

****** « With Mayer ling , . . 

we see The Royal Ballet 
- at full and tremendous stretch . 

fir ... a portrait of a company of 

dance actors without peer ...” 

dement Crisp, Financial Tunes Oct 86 




THE TTMTC TT TRSDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 

SPECTRUM 


Project X: how they 


THEENB fiFfHE 
STREETeca 









- 

■3 .• 



• Once Rupert Murdoch had decided to launch the 
London Post as a greenfield site project at 
Wap ping, events moved fast. In this second extract 
from The End of the Street, an independent account 
which has been written without the cooperation of 
News International, Linda Melvern describes 
“Project X” — and reveals how some of Wapping’s 
secrets were uncovered by two “moles” working for 
the Fleet Street print onions. 

• Neither News International nor Times News- 
papers has cooperated with the author, as she 
makes dear in a foreword, and we do not 
necessarily associate onrselves with any of the 
statements presented as fact In the book nor any of 
the condusions reached 




Part 2: Smylie’s People 


J ohn Keating had come a 
long way since his days as 
a compositor in Liver- 
pool Quietly spoken and 
shrewd. Keating had gone 
to the United Slates in the 1960s, 
eventually settling at the Wash- 
ington Post and rising through the 
ranks to become assistant produc- 
tion manager. 

The Post's labour relations at 
that time were a shambles. Kay 
Graham, its owner, acquired near- 
legendary status for the Post's 
Watergate expose, but she was 
indecisive in business matters and 
was losing control to the prim 
unions. Regaining that control 
was to be a long, bloody and 
clandestine battle involving, 
among other things, a secret 
project to fe-train staff for new 
technology. It was called “Project 
X." 

In 1974, just before the final 
confrontation with the unions, 
Keating had shown two of Rupert 
Murdoch's executives around the 
Washington Post. Keating was 
immediately hired by Murdoch 
and later became his technical 
director. So Keating missed out on 
the climax of Project X — but, 1 1 
years later, he was to get a second 
chance. 

Murdoch told Keating that he 
needed a computer system for a 
UK operation and he needed it 
fast. Keating called Atex, die 
Boston-based computer company, 
and two days after the meeting at 
which Murdoch had outlined the 
Post project to his executives, 
Ronald A. Brumback and Hariand 
K. LaVigne got out ofa Yellow cab 
at the door of Murdoch’s apart- 
ment on Fifth Avenue in New 
York. They were late and very 
nervous. They were there to meet 
potentially the biggest client in the 
industry. A deal with Murdoch 
would give Atex the edge in what 


was fast becoming a fierce battle to 
supply Fleet Street 

When Murdoch asked if Atex 
could deliver, within four months, 
the biggest-ever one-off direct 
input system in the industry's 
history, Brumback did not hesi- 
tate. Murdoch told him the target 
date for installation was June 1. A 
secrecy clause would be written 
into the contract The deal was 
worth $10 million. 

Ben Barton Smylie, a tough, 
stocky Texan with an infectious 
sense of humour, was chosen to 
head an Atex team of 12. each of 
whom would be bound by the 
secrecy clause. They became 
known, inevitably, as Smylie’s 
People. The operation, by an 
ironic coincidence, was called 
“Project X”. The disappearance of 
the team from their various offices 
was explained under the cover 
that they were working on a 
government contract overseas. 

The first thing Sraylie’s people 
needed was a London hide-out 
where they could test equipment 
and build a plywood mock-up of 
the Wapping computer room. 
Bruce Matthews, managing direc- 
tor of News International and 
Ken Taylor, the project manager, 
found the ideal spot — a corru- 
gated iron and brick warehouse on 
a run-down site in Woolwich, part 
of which was used by vegetable 
merchants. One of the team said: 
“It was scummy. There were holes 
in the roof and no heat It was 
filthy, dark and dingy. There were 
hundreds of pigeons in there." 

But by the time Smylie’s team 
set to work a few weeks later, the 
warehouse — dubbed Bunker Hill 
after the 1775 battle at Boston in 
which the American militia laid 
siege to the British — had been 
transformed: gutted, sandblasted 
and painted and new lighting 
installed. It was thanks to Taylor. 
One of the Atex team said: “He 





n 


.. 

X' 





rjljf 



The bunker's unpreposesstog exterior hwdty dre* * second gbUKc 


iJi 


Bunker Hill comes to London: inside the warehouse which became a full-scale computer room mock-up 


worked his butt oft All England is 
f— up mentally but they can move 
last and perfect if you kick ass.” 

The first shipment of equip- 
ment left Boston on Tuesday 
March 1Z The company logo on 
the boxes had been painted over 
and the load was routed through 
Paris. It arrived at the bunker on 
March 30 and after welcoming it 
in. Smylie’s people went to watch 
the Grand National at the home of 
Charles Wilson, then deputy edi- 
tor of The Times and editorial 
director of the Post Wilson 
backed the winner. Last Suspect, 
at 50-1; Smylie’s choice, 
Rupertino at 33-1. was unplaced. 

Throughout April Smylie’s 
people worked as fas: as they 
could. The hours were long. The 
warehouse was only 500 yards 
from the Thames and it was often 
damp and cold, mist rising from 
the river. On a few sunny after- 
noons. the team would take 
sandwiches to the end of Warspite 
Pier, where steps led down to boat 
moorings. 


A run-down 
docklands 
warehouse 
transformed 
overnight 


Each morning a fleet of cars, 
organized by Smylie, would pick 
them up from their rented houses 
in Belgravia and Chelsea and late 
at night would take them back. 
Initially. 17 Chesham Place, 
Belgravia, was the team’s head- 
quarters; they installed an Apple 
computer and a photocopier to 
cope with administration. 

On Saturday. April 20, a Sat- 
urday, Murdoch visited the bun- 


ker. He found the team m the 
midst of frantic activity. He was 
shown the mock-up of the com- 
puter room and “fell in love with 
it all”, according to one Atex 
employee. Murdoch wowed them 
with his enthusiasm. “When a guy 
bigger than Time Inc calls you by 
your first name." an engineer said, 
“you will do anything~.he is a 
kinsman.” The visit was a boost 
for them all 

Twenty-three computers — cen- 
tral p races ing units, or CPUs — 
were eventually shipped from 
Boston, three at a time. The team 
worked long hours. The software, 
which would normally take two 
months to devise, had been made 
ready in two weeks. The whole 
system was ready for a test run in 
from of News Internationa] exec- 
utives on May 1 . “These guys had 
laid out a lot of money and wanted 
to see it work," an engineer said. 
“They wanted it up and running.” 

Six people came to the test and 
for two hours copy was fed 
through terminals. The only hitch 





55% OF THE 
BLACK FOREST 
RAVAGED. 


w > v 

BROWN TROUT 
EXTINCT IN 1,750 
NORWEGIAN LAKES. 



Blasts from the past 


OSPREY PAIRS 
ENDANGERED IN 
SWEDEN. 








ft 5m 

DAMAGE TO 
COLOGNE CATHEDRAL 
EVERY YEAR. 


r 

SCOTTISH LOCHS 
a ■ ; ACIDIFIED.: 









Y LINCOLN 
CATHEDRAL 
SERIOUSLY DAMAGED. 


IT’S RANNG DEATH 
IN EUROPE. 


Add rain is pouring down all 
over Western Europe 

Much of it comes from Britain 
From our factories, power stations 
and car exhausts: (In fad, we're the 
biggest polluter ofScandinaviaX 
Where add rain tails, trees, birds, 
fish, lakes, rivers, flowers and insects 
die And historic buildings crumble 
Tonight on ITVat 10.30pm, 


Central's documentary The Add Test ' 
reveals the extent of the damage, and 
interrogates the poUbdans 
responsible lor our current emission 
control laws 

The programme will be broadcast 
not only in Britain, but /#\ 

throughout Europe fe J 

Watch it The doud 
is hanging aver your head central 


VIEWPOinT 86 

THE ACID TEST 

[Ty,^NIGHTAr 10.3.QBM,--, 


Here is a little known but 
warming feet for the jingoistic 
heart: every time the American 
national anthem is sang, trib- 
ute is paid to Britain’s pioneer- 
ing rocket technology. It goes 
back to an emergent nation's 
k struggle against the diabolical 

" boffinry of a superpower 170 

years ago (for emergent nation 
read the United States, for 
superpower read Britain). 

It was the spirited defence of 
Fort McHenry against the 
British bombardment by Con- 
greve rackets in 1814 which 
inspired Frauds Scott Key to 
k write “The Star Spangled 

u Banner”, with its fines: “And 

the rockets' red glare, the 
bombs bursting in air/Gave 
proof thro' the ought that our 
flagwas still there.” 

Sir William Congreve's 
rocket, which could reach six 
miles into the sky, heralded 
the start of modern space 
science, and introduces the 
| Science Museum's new Space 

r Gallery, opening tomorrow 

I (die official opening, by the 

Duke of Kent, is today). 

British contributions to the 
Earth's extra-terrestrial 
strivings have not had the 
recognition they deserve, 
according to Dr John 
Becklake, curator of space 
technology at the museum. 
5t* “Throughout the 19th century 

r^j the British were supreme — 

until the rifled gnn bore matte 
military rockets obsolete for 
rj the time,” said Dr Becklake. 

“And we were significantly 
ahead of the game at certain 
1st points in this century too.” 

) It was not until 1926, when 
Robert Goddard flew the 
world's first liquid-fnd rocket, 
that the Americans entered 
the space race. Dr Becklake 
al wanted a model of the rocket 
for the gallery and borrowed a 
photograph from the Smithso- 
nian. Mike Ball the Science 
Museum's head model-maker, 

. brought it back to Dr Becklake 
and said: “This rocket wool# 1 

. . ..«• nu. j 

1 


There was a time 
when Britain ruled 
the sky. A new 
exhibition highlights 
our contribution to 
rocket technology 

Much flurry and backtrack- 
ing through the Smithsonian's 
files revealed that this sole 
photo of Goddard with his 
creation had been snapped in a 
hurry, with Goddard sticking 
the components together mlly- 
nflly, and assembling it prop- 
erly for flight a week later. No 
one noticed, and the' Science 
Museum's model is the only 
accurate rep rod action God- 
dard in the world. 

Between 1946 and 1958 
British rocketry was as 
sophisticated as any. The 


research rocket Black Knight 
was launched 22 times with no 
failures and the associated 
wizardry contributed to 
patting a man on the moon. 

On display for a month is a 
model of the satellite launcher 
of the future. HOTOL — the 
Horizontal Take-Off and 
Landing Launcher. Fuelled by 
oxygen from the atmosphere, 
this extraordinary craft will 
get passengers to Australia in 
two and a half boms. 

Another exhibit will be the 
UK Scanner, the brainchild of 
astronomy curator Dr Jon 
Darios. From a "spy” satellite 
140 miles up, 5,000 images of 
the country have been taken 
and recorded on laserdisc 

Simon Tait 

© tta«i Hmnpapani Ltd 19M 

Tomorrow: how HOTOL 
took wing 


came when Jack Charboncau. a 
systems engineer from San Fran- 
cisco. npped the seal of his 
trousers and had to sidle out with 
his back to the walL He rushed to 
Woolwich and bought another 
pair. 

The main computer was moved 
into the Wapping plant on the 
night of May 31. At 11pm. three 
40-foot lomes drew up outside the 
bunker. The system was not 
packed up or crated; it was moved 
to Wapping "naked". There was 
only one moment of apprehension 
during the night, when a heli- 
copter flew tow over the Wapping 
plant. The operation took a team 
of nine men only four hours. 

A few people from Gray's Inn 
Road (home of The Tunes and 
The Sunday Times) had been 
recruited to’ team the system but 
there were thousands of opera- 
tional problems and many arose 
because N! people felt Smytie's 
team mas determined to set up the 
system in the same way they 
would for a American papers, 
which are much less heavily sub- 
edited than British ones and 
therefore have different 
requirements. 

V arious meetings were 
held to discuss progress. 
The minutes, which 
identified people by ini- 
tials only and which 
were usually collected up and 
destroyed m one of the plant's 
three shredders, tell a fascinating 
story of how Wapping was 
transformed. 

By May 21 the plaieraaking area 
was ready, the four editorial areas 
were on schedule for the end of 
June and the press room for the 
end of July. Only the preparation 
of the composing room was a 
problem; space was right. 

Charles Wilson, editorial direc- 
tor of the Post, reported to one 
meeting that he had “identified 
the people he wants to undertake 
training and is holding them in 
readiness, but their names cannot 
be released at the present time". 


j * .) " . ,, 


Security was* priority. Thu v>a\ 
under the charge of I hrisUiphet 
Fwte-Carew. then a cnn&uUani to 
Murdoch and bane cti the pnni 
unions ever tutor he. bad token 
them on over nrw technohyv *\ 
the Evening P»«f. Nottingham. 
Everyone at tapping was. issued 
with a numbered scvimiy pm 
(Pnlc'Carew's was 007 L a steel 
timer was put up and igjiit' wire, 
known as "Barrier TT, was im- 
ported from t iermany. 

In August, Bob O'Hagan. a 
security consultant, produced a 
report which started: ’’Thu di«u>- 
mem contains some items ob- 
tained from on untuihunred 
classified source." The report, 
concerning security tor kevrsec- 
wives, said thes should '’inform 
the local police of who you are and 
of the protect in which you are 
involved”. O'Hagan constricted 
“there are those among us who 
may be regarded as targets for 
terrorism" and he advised those at 
risk not to maintain regular 
patterns of behaviour, to lit locks 
and charm to doors and windows. 

As work progressed, there was 
some argument about when in- 
dividual computer termmaU 
could be installed. On September 
19. Wilson told a meeting: “to 
siew of the current level of 
knowledge known by the NUJ 
(joumafis&s' union L. the terminals 
should not be put m yet" 

Bv mid-September there were 
59 staff in the press room.: four 
more were expected from Austra- 
lia and two from America, the 
plant was full of newsprint and ink 
and there had been successful test 
runs on the presses. 

They were now preparing for a 
Murdoch visit due to start on 
September 29. The next dav he 
was scheduled to meet the five 
main unions. It was to be, al last 
in retrospect, a fateful occasion. 

© Unite Matewnim 

Extracted fmm The End of the 
Street, hr Linda Mehent. to he 
published by Methuen on October 
27al£V.V5 



CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1085 


ACROSS 
1 Trifles (6) 

S Secure (4) 

8 Concur (5) 

9 Striking (7) 

11 Liberation (8) 

13 Slide over (4) 

15 Re-supply U3) 

17 Scallion (4) 

18 Pleasure seeker 18) 

21 Greed (7) 

22 Greeting expression 
(51 

23 Cinder (4) 

24 Ridicule play (6) 


piiini an 

■ ■ ■ a ■ 

[□■□■■■■■■■■a 


■ ■ a ■ ■ 

3BBBBBB 3BBB 


3BBB 3BBBBB 


DOWN 
. 2 Rustic (5) 

3 Contend (3) 

4 Boldness of demand 

5 Stock clearance trade 10 inviution 16 Gain mastery { 7) 

(4) HO) 19 Lazy type (5) 

6 Lentigo (7) « Swing round (4J 20 Hn ger haiuU4| 

7 Bullfighter's dan { 10) 14 Go a«av! (•*) 22 Shepherd’s she tier 1 3) 


REACH 

CANADA QUICKER 
THAN US. 

If you’re travelling First or Execu- 
tive Class with us during the autumn, 
you II qualify for a free BT phonccard. 

Before you fly, just pop your 
business card into one of the recep- 
tacles provided at the airporr and 
you 11 receive your phonecard bv 
return of post. 

You could use it next time to let 
someone know you’re on your way 
Its the only way you’ll reach yuur 
destination ahead of us. 


SOLUTION TO NO 1084 

ACROSS: 1 Musk 4 Struck] 8 Relic 9 Poussin 10-Corddia u 
Fume 13 Opportunity 17 Onus 1$ Acrimony 21 Compact 22 Of- 
ten 23 Retired 34 &t«i 

DOWN; l Mama 2 Solar ) 3 Caehcpoi 4 Sophisticated 5 Rqu\ a 
Disgust 7 Linger 12 Amidm * 14 Plummet 15 Soccer 16 Cygnet 19 


a* 


& 




.1 BREATH OFjr*ESttAuf e ~ AIR CANADA^ 


/ 







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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1 986. 

SPECTRUM 



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Getting it right: John Keating, right. Nows International's technical director, outputs s story during a computer test at the bunker 

‘Moles’ the unions ignored 


Although M apping had heavy 
security from the start, it was soon 
"breached" by mo resourceful, if 
scarcely high-po^vred, men from 
print unions) 


had heavy 


T he two print workers 
spent a year studying the 
inside of the plant and 
they had produced' the 
only serious assessment 
the unions ever made of the plant 
They were receiving information 
from a high-level source inside the 
company. They compiled a dossier 
and built up a network of spies who 
leaked them dozens of documents. 
Lists smuggled from the security 
gate revealed the names, of all die 
Atex personneL The pair had been 
tipped -off to pay paitkolar atten- 
tion to a company called 
“Cadriload". They never traced it 
— because the name they wee 


g 'ven was wrong; it was in fact 
iprOord, an off-the-shelf com- 
pany used for die Atex undercover 
operation. . . 

At first they met their contacts 
in dockland pubs. “We had about 
five regular moles, 4 ' one of them 
said. “Some were high up in die 
company. Others were contractors 
on the she." Eventually they 
became nervous about meeting 
near foe plant — so foe meetings 
moved to Fleet Street 

The investigators were Tony 
Cappi, from. the Bonverie Street 
engineers assistants' chapel, and 
Terry EUis, a rotary press en- 
gineer. Neither was political, nei- 
ther held high chapel office. 
Indeed, there was suspirio, even 
resentment, about the absence 
from normal work of Cappi and 
EUis; both had been allowed into 


Wapping by the management to 
assess foe presses ami other 
machinery there. 

By June of 1984, they produced 
their report for the unions; it ran to 
102 pages. - It included ' the 
specifications of every single piece 
of machinery in foe plant A short 
conclusion on the last page de- 
scribed the plant as “a hold, wett- 
phumed step into the future and a 
fine technical achievement". 

The report was the only serious 
investigation of Wapping the 
unions carried out. yet it was not 
widely welcomed in Fleet Street 
chapels. “Trade unionists said it 
was wrong. They thought we had 
sold ourselves short," EDis said, 
referring to the manning levels in 
the report. 

With their accumulated ev- 
idence on how Wapping was being 
prepared, Cappi and foe Father of 


his Chapel, Harry Stauswick, 
mounted an exhibition of foe 
evidence at the Strand Palace 
Hotel 

They invited all foe general 
secretaries and other senior of- 
ficials, but only one turned up — 
Paul Frizzell, assistant branch 
secretary for RIRMA, a branch of 
Sogatand one of the lowest in the 
Fleet Street ranks. 

The exhibition showed pictures 
of Wapping, inducting equipment 
which News International had 
installed. There was a complete set 
of building plans and a typed list of 
people who were employed on the 
installation work. 

By late afternoon, when no one 
else had arrived, they were dis- 
heartened. They packed up the 
exhibition and left. “It appeared 
we were taken tightly" EUis said 
later. 


Realities of the Post 


Writing oh die wall: inside story of the bid to find a settlement 


Much of foe speculation about 
Wapping concerned ' whether 
plans for the London Post were 
Teal’ or, as some anion sources 
said, merely a stalking horse 
behind which Murdoch intended 
all along to more the entire group 
to Wapping 

A fter a meeting with 
Rupert Murdoch on 
September 30 the print 
union general sec- 
retaries believed that 
the London Post was a reality. 
Murdoch's senior executives in 
Britain and America knew tibw 
deverly he had kept all his 
options open. He was now ready 
for any eventuality. Whatever 
happened, it seemed he could not 
lose. “We could now respond to 
any threat" an executive ex- 
plained. “They (the unions) had 
always had the ultimate weapon 
— now we had ft." 

Some executives thought from 
the start that the unions would go 
on strike over Wapping, but what 
would have happened if they did 
not stop work? One executive 
said: “The Times and The Sun- 
day Times would have stayed in 
Gray's Inn Road and we would 
have ended up with the Post (at 
Wapping). Murdoch would have 
ended up with too much com- 
puter equipment but that would 
have been small change to him. 
There are plenty of other Mur- 
doch companies throughout the 
world who could use the 
equipment." 

Bruce Matthews always talked 
of producing the Post “From 
February and March 1985 
onwards,” be said, “the priorities 
so for as the Post was concerned 
were the editorial and physical 
preparation of the Wapping 
plant" 

Charles Wilson said that most 
of bis time in 1985 had been 
taken up as editorial director of 
the Post until his appointment as 
editor of The Times in November 
that year. “From the beginning 
the plan was to produce the 
newspaper on an editorial direct- 
inpui system s imilar to the Atex 
system Thai I had used in 
Chicago." Wilson, who planned 



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The Post: A ‘dummy’ front page of the planned 24-hour paper 


the character and the market 
targeting of the Post, said it had 
been “a fascinating exercise". 

He had drawn up a stafFIist and 
appointed three assistants. Wil- 
son said the first projected launch 
date of the Post had been the 
autumn of '85 but by the summer 
it was dear the plant would not be 
ready, so the company had 
announced a postponement. 

Work on the paper continued, 
Wilson said “We began work on 
preparing ‘dummies', first single 
pages then sections and on to 
whole editions. I have to say that 
I never had any doubt that it was 
the group's intention to produce 
the Post as I have outlined. It was 
real to me in every sense." 

S ome middle-managers 
thought Murdoch did 
have a “master plan” 
under which there was 
no intention to produce 
the PosL One executive claims to 
have beard Murdoch refer to 
Wapping as “the bear trap”; this 
executive believed Murdoch’s 
foil-back position had become his 
prime purpose and that be had 
always intended moving the four 
papers to Wapping. 

But a senior executive, who 
was involved from the be ginning , 
said “I think Murdoch made up 
his mind as be went along. He 


just saw it developing. I don't 
believe there was a master plan." 

The most revealing interview 
Murdoch had ever given about 
Wapping appeared in a special 
section, printed at Wapping and 
carried in the Sunday Times on 
January 19 — only a week before 
the strike was called. 

Asked why a legally binding 
no-strike agreement was so im- 
portant to him. Murdoch said: 
“Newspapers are under threat all 
over the world from eletronic 
competition, and in many coun- 
tries there is a decline in reader- 
ship. The greatest asset 
newspapers have is foe habit 
factor. We cannot afford to go on 
interrupting that" 

Then he was asked whether he 
had the capacity to print bis four 
existing titles at Wapping He 
replied: “We don't want to do 
that because of course we don't 
have sufficient presses to do that 
satisfactorily. We want to start 
the Post there and we want to put 
work there as we grow out of our 
existing two plants. But if we are 
struck in the manng r in which the 
unions are now threatening then 
we will have no choice but to try 
and keep producing as best we 
can. It is both our duty to do that 
as publishers and our obligation 
as business people." 


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(Q; as they’ll call it, tell you the terms on which * 
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BARCLAYS 










THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 2i 1986 

PARIS FASHION by Suzy Menkes 



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French designers 
are unveiling 
escapist clothes — 
big bubble skirts 
in frothy chiffon 
and floaty dresses 
which emerge 
from tailored 
jackets. And 
although the 
bosom is back 
from exile, the 
mood is innocent 








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m ^ / the Big Bad 
\f\f World? The 
W V mood of this 
▼ ▼ week's Paris 

• shows, held under rigid se- 
curity in the wake of the 

’ terrorist bombings, is whim- 

■ seal and escapist. Against the 
odds, the clothes are young, 
pretty and up-beat. 

The skin is the fashion issue 
! of the season — not its length, 
! but its width. Flares and 

- drapes of fabric arc loosening 
‘ up the tight slim line. The 

• puflbaH .skirt, made in light- 
. weight chiffon, voile, or taf- 
feta. is the dear winner. But 
there are many other vari- 

. ations on the theme, from 
high-uaisted A-line trapezes 
.' to slender tubes flaring out at 

• the hem. The new line looks 
most convincing when the 

' skirt breaks out exuberantly 
from under a tailored jacket 
The girlish skins are 

■ matched by a womanty focus 
above the waist, where breasts 

; are emerging from their 

- androgynous exile. Thinly 
veiled in wisps of chiffon — 

• which is the runaway fabric 

• star of the season - or draped 
in silky jersey and lacy knits, 
the bosom is back in fashion- 

It sounds sexy, and there is a 

1 flirty feel to all the young 
Parisian collections. But the 
overall impression is surpris- 
ingly innocent. Colours are 
, Dwrwvland - jwsiels. toail- 

- wool redandjunglebook green 
, with black and white stnpes 
: and spins. 

The Chanel show yesterday 
: morning said it all. The mod- 
els whirled down the runway 
in frou-frous of black net, 
cheeky flared dresses in white 
' demm or bold horizontallv- 
stnped knits with matching 
1 boms. 

The result was a madcap 
show, filled with infectious 
gaiety and a multitude of ideas 
, from the Chanel’s irrepress- 
ible des^pner Karl Lagerfeld; 

’ These included a bold print of 
_ Chanel’s signature camellia. 
r the conventional suit braiding 
m graphic checker Kurd and 
plastic aceevuincs to take the 
; gilt otii of Chanri jewellery. 

1 he line was mainly short. 

‘ tight and vuivy. Newest were 
' the lull skins, tor trapeze-line 
white suits, and the raised 
; empire waist. That looked 

■ sensational in chiffon, sus- 
’ pended f rom a bodice made of 

Uw famous quilted Chanel bug 
i$ a funky evening dress. 

his own • label. Kan* 









Lagerfeld played -music from 
The Wizard of 0=, and some 
of ns magic touched bis 
collection. For the first time, 
he interpreted current fashion 
trends in a light, fluid and 
sophisticated way. 

Lagerfeld's skins come to 
life at the hem. which was 
mostly well above the knee. 
Lightweight silks, fine linens, 
poplin and chiffon were all 
expressed in movement, and 
panels opened out at the hips 
or fanned into a peacock tail of 
fabric at the back of a skinny 
skirl. 

Claude Montana softened 
bis strong lines by draping 
fabric gcnilv across the bust - 
but not by dropping the wide 
shoulder* he launched 10 
years ago and which arc 
waning in other collections. 
Trousers outnumbered skins, 
bui they were cut wide and 
loose or softened with sheer 
chiffon blouses in sugared 
almond shades. 

His happiest mix was the 
wide stnped pyjama lopped 
with a matetot sweater in 
transparent organdie. Mon- 
tana also bad a sweet bubble 
>kin and bloomers to crapha- 
m re the new volume below the 
waist. 

J coif Paul Gaultier's show 


was a louche parade of Pa- 
risian low life, and his clothes 
were a cartoon strip of all the 
current fashion messages, es- 
pecially the emphasis on the 
bosom and the wide skirt. 
Gaultier's bubble and crin- 
oline skirts break out just 
above the knee from under a 
short-sleeved jacket. His use 
of stretch fabrics . for both 
sexes is innovative and the 
most insistent sound track for 
this irreverent show with its 
strong sexual charge was a 
song called “No.Shame" 

M arline Sitbon — 
one of France's 
new-wave de- 
signers - played 
Walt Disney's 
Bambi. It expressed ihe mood 
of her pretty dresses, cut high 
in the waist and low in the 
bust. Mini crinolines, A-linc 
trapezes, and short pleats 
swung out below fitted jackets 
and her colours were as ador- 
able as her fresh-faced models 
- marshmallow pink, fondant 
green, and meringue white. 

The same liitk^irl silhou- 
ette. with a raised waist and 
wide or ruffle skirt, was the 
theme of the y oung collections 
grouped at the Beaux Arts, 
[These included the" perky' 





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Far left Chanel's camellia 
print swingy skirt with 
denim bolero jacket 

Above left Martlne 
Sitbon’s fresh pkik short 
dress with bold stnped 
petticoat 

Above: Jean Paul Gaultier's 
bubble skirt with black and 
white striped jacket 

Below: ThieiTy Mugler's fun 
skirted Heidi dress and 
headscarf 

Below left Claude 
Montana's high waisted 
striped pyjama trousers 
and thin transparent white 
chiffon top 


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tailoring and mixed spots and 
stripes of Premonville and 
Dewavrin. 

The Japanese have also 
caught the new mood. Rei 
Kawakubo. of Comme des 
Garcons. sent out her models 
with rosy cheeks, crimped-up 
curls, twirling in swingy short 
skins. 

The Une is girlish, with a 
tight shoulder line above a 
slightly raised waist. Stretchy 
jersey in school-blazer stripes 
and white over-the-knee socks 
emphasized the youthful ef- 
fect of ' a pretty collection 
which included T-shirt dresses 
in a delectable ribbon lace 
fabric. 

The same fitted silhouette 
breaking out in a riot of 
movement below the waist 
came from Yohji Yamamoto, 
who bad pufly bloomers and 
net skirts looped into a bustle 
at the back. 

Yohji's soft and hard line 
bloomed again in mid-calf 
skirts splashed with a single 
bright flower. 

Issey Miyake's striped and 
spotted knits and more 
sophisticated pattern dresses 
in greenery yallery colours 
looked young and commer- 
ce), rather than creative. 

• Tire i^odeis in Paris seem to 


be growing into the more 
womanly clothes. Thierry 
Mugler's Brunnhildes were 
laced into tender chiffon eve- 
ning dresses in sweet mauves 
and blues. Mugler's show 
started well with Tyrolean 
cross-lacing on short dirndl 
skirted dresses. The inspira- 
tion might charitably be called 
Heidi Grows Breasts. The rest 
of his show, with German 
choral songs, beige suede 
lederhosen and while Hiller 
Youth uniforms, plumbed the 
depths of bad taste. 

Nino Cerruti shone this 
season in a showroom 
presentation at which his own 
stylish but mature wife was 
the star. 

Cerruti's elegant separates 
were laced with the new looks, 
including sheer chiffon peep- 
ing under the hem of a long 
full skin, filling in a side slit or 
lapping the breasts above a 
flirty taffeta skirl 

For Sonia Rykiel, the show 
is still the thing. Her relent- 
lessly up-beat music in- 
troduced a fine presentation of 
Rykiel classics, up-dated this 
season with quilting and with 
ruffles and bows. Skins and 
jackets were both cither short, 
sharp . and . cropped, or 
elongated. 


The show season continues 
this week with the ready-to- 
wear collections of the 
establishment 
couiuriere.Tbere is a general 
sense that — terrorist threats 
apart — the big Paris spectacu- 
lars are breaking up into 
smaller groups and that fash- 
ion spectaculars may be com- 
ing to an end. 

Photographs by 
Harry Kerr 


.tenants tom E2&2S. 
AnofakstoraTaasa mmtm 
Sizes (a all the fam- — 

Uy including sxtra ta* 

4 taros (Branfrabfe JKTTSw, 

and runner -backed 

fabrics, also avaiWilei^W^O%| 

THREE JAY 4 

GO 03 S) 

3. Um rmri—t 
Bnanmt, Herts 
(MK) 442974 or 483M7 

WALK, cycle; fish, sail? 

Send 2 x I7p stamps lor colour 
brochure and samples. 

(Preps J4J. -Jonnam) 


PARIS PEOPLE 


his camera along with his 
retrospective exhibition to 
■ 1MIWU Pekiiig’s Palace of Fine 

|g_ Arts in the spring of 1985. 

'IB H Sk E 1^ The show, currently pulling 

wl I HI BJr in the crowds in Paris, takes 

. ^ ■ to the road again in Decem- 

Whfle the Queen was climb- ber, when YSL. a favourite 
ing the Great Wall of China, with Raisa Gorbachov, hits 
I was leafing through Yves Moscow's Art Museum. 
St Laurent's Chinese travel Next March, the king of 
snaps. St Lament, whose Paris couture pulls on the 
Rive Ganche collection is 20 coup myulc by opening at 
years young tomorrow, took Leningrad's Hermitage. 

Cardin’s China dolls 

Memo Cnrtfln French fashion's export mega-star, was 
the first to penetrate the bamboo curtain. He opened a 
showroom in Peking in 1981, founded a fashion school 
and brought a bevy of Chinese models, including the 
Internationally-known Chukie, over for his Paris couture 
show last year. 

Rykiel’s show stoppers 

Sonia Rykiel toils me that the enchanting little girts who 
showed off the new Rykiel children's wear — and stole 
Sunday night's show - were plucked from the ballet 
school run by Sonia’s sister. 

Alaia’s tight fit 

I hear that Azzedine Alai’a, the pint-sized Tunisian-born 
designer who brought back female curves, is going to 
tempt us with clingy combinations when he unveils his 
new show today. 

Star Trek HM|H| 

A terrified black cat and a H&-. ' 

babe in arms were among Buyj . . 'TMinf 

the hundred-odd models M Bir 

lined up for Jean Paul -W , 

Gaultier's homage to Star ■ . % 1 A 

Trek parade at the Porte de ■ -'. LmL 

la ViUette last week. A 

blinding spotlight beamed 

up each individual Gaultier HhP <:> ' 

clone from curvaceous, 

busty lady shoe-designer f ® 

Marlhe Lagache. to gaunt ^ 
model Leslie Winer with * 

her three-month-old baby, • The lissom film actress 
clothed in black nylon. Carole Bouquet (above), last 
Vampish girls were pulled seen in Bturael's Thai Ob- 
from the seedier side of sc ure Object of Desire, was 
Paris night-life. Clad in star guest at yesterday's 
cling-on dresses and Chanel show. Carole, 
catsuits that looked like France's brunette answer to 
spray ed-on gold paint, each blonde Catherine Deneuve, 
model marched, skipped has been signed up to 
and sashayed from a revolv- promote Chanel No 5, the 
ing platform down a never- perfume that Marilyn Mon- 
ending runway. roe used to wear in bed. 


• The lissom film actress 
Carole Bouquet (above), last 
seen in Bturael's Thai Ob- 
scure Object of Desire, was 
star guest at yesterday's 
Chanel show. Carole, 
France's brunette answer to 
blonde Catherine Deneuve, 
has been signed up to 
promote Chanel No 5, the 
perfume that Marilyn Mon- 
roe nsed to wear in bed. 


Cashmere, 
a natural luxury 




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The new ERM EN EG I LDO ZEG N A 

Aiftumn/Wirrter Collection. 
Sophisticated styling in finest, 
award-winning cashmere. 

Spun, woven and tailored by Zegna 
for the ultimate in masculine elegance. 

A representative of Zegna 
will be in the Man’s Shop, Ground Floor, 
until 1st November to offer sartorial advice. 
Shown here, bold jacket with Black Glen check 
on Ecru £525 
Personal shoppers only. 


• IkNiGHTSBRIDGS^ 

Larries SWW^XLOl 730 me 









-T 


20 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Not quite 
Big Bang 

It was not the happiest of after- 
noons for the Labour MP Clare 
Short when she visited Panniters 
comprehensive school in Watford 
last week. 1 was told that she had 
become riled by sixth-formers' 
questions during a talk on social- 
ism and drove off afterwards in 
such a fury that she had an 
unfortunately close encounter 
with a parked car belonging to a 
teacher. When 1 called her home. 
Alex Lyon, her husband, assured 
me that my informant must have 
been “just a silly teacher” humili- 
ated by his wife's skilful and 
articulate replies to her questions. 
Now. however. Short confesses, “f 
did touch a car”, but promises she 
neither lost her temper nor dam- 
aged it Michael Heseftine 
and Shirley Williams, currently 
protesting at being “banned” from 
addressing schoolchildren, should 
stan thanking their lucky stars. 

Out-classed 

When Lord King, chairman of 
British Airways, flew to Hong 
Kong to meet the Queen this 
week, so many fere-paying pas- 
sengers had paid for first class and 
business class tickets that he was 
asked to “help out” by travelling 
economy class. With knees tucked 
further into chest than he is used 
to. he found himself in the rear 
compartment for the 15-hour 
fljght embroiled in a lengthy 
discussion about heart surgery. 

• The last thing the BBC needs is 
a compliment from the Soviet 
Union. But that is what it gets in 
the latest issue of Soviet Sport. It 
praises the Beeb for “attempting 
to draw back the curtain of silence 
with which Britain is covering up 
football hooliganism predomi- 
nantly carried oat by National 
Front members*’. 

Fiat lux 

The lighting of candles in Roman 
Catholic churches for saints* days 
and remembering the dead could 
become a thing of the pasL At 
Venice's ISth-century Church of 
the Sacred Heart worshippers 
now put money into a slot 
machine that lights up an electric 
plastic candle, whose filament 
flickers for about five minutes . 

Backlash 

After the anti-public school speech 
by a Sherborne theology master, 
Chris Danes, at the Labour Party 
conference (Diary. Oct 6), I asked 
the head. Robin Macnagtaten. if 
public expression of such views 
was compatible with Danes's 
continued employment Mac- 
naghten replied that he did not 
wish to comment on the political 
views of his staff. He added one 
thing yesterday, however. Danes 
has now resigned. 

Font of wisdom 

The Church of England is not 
often ahead of the times, but on 
the question of illegitimacy the 
priests are streets ahead. While 
changes in the state law of 
legitimacy are only now coming 
up for scrutiny and debate, the 
church changed its own rules 17 
years ago. Until 1969, under canon 
iaw dating from pre-Refonnaiion 
times, candidates for ordination 
had to produce written evidence 
of legitimacy. Since then, they 
have needed only a baptism 
certificate. A case, perhaps, of God 
standing up for . . 


BARRY FANTONI 



Tfs a step, comrade. We give up six 
medium-range diplomats for six of 
theirs.* 

Image rummage 

Not to be outdone by Labour's red 
rose symbol, ihe Liberals have 
decided to ditch their mish-mash 
of logos in favour of a standard 
design. They note that the SDP 
already has an underscored blue- 
and-red logo incorporated, when 
appropriate, into the joint Alli- 
ance diamond. Trouble is, the sug- 
gestions for a Liberal counterpart 
so far have failed to fire the 
imagination. The national exec- 
utive is looking at about a dozen 
possibilities, some containing the 
already well-used orange sunburst. 
None actually symbolizes any- 
thing, a head office spokesman 
admits. 

Lost comrade 

A touching reminder of wartime 
has reached Marmaduke Hussey 
in a letter from a man who was 
under bis command at Anzio. On 
February 8. 1944. Guardsman 
D. J- Caines, wailing in Lhc slit 
trenches, heard Hussey give the 
order “Follow me”. Caines obeyed 
— and for the next 42 years, he 
wrote, heard nothing of his com- 
mander. Only when he heard the 
announcement of the new chair- 
man of the BBC did he discover 
that Hussey (chief executive of 
Times Newspapers 1971-80) had 

“made it”. PH,S 


Machel: Africa loses a realist 


The death of President Machel 
deprives Mozambique of its most 
charismatic political leader and 
southern Africa of a key figure 
outstanding for his realism. The 
man who fought the Portuguese 
colonial government from the 
bush, who emerged to wield the 
crucial influence during the period 
leading to independence, and then 
became Mozambique's first presi- 
dent. was a fascinating figure. 

His background was as a medi- 
cal orderly in the Portuguese-led 
army. He could not speak a word 
of English and yet became a 
crucial influence on the politics 
and leaders of the surrounding 
English-speaking countries — Ma- 
lawi. Zambia. Zimbabwe. South 
Africa and Swaziland. 

A Marxist, who had been sup- 
ported in the fight against the 
Portuguese mainly by Communist 
countries, he quickly established 
himself as a nationalist first and 
foremost Rarely can any libera- 
tion leader have taken over a 
.country lacing worse difficulties. 
The mass exodus of the Portu- 
guese managers left Mozambique 
without a working civil service 
structure. And from the outset be 
faced a hostile South Africa, ever 
ready to destabilize his country. 


by David Owen 


One of the most extraordinary 
features of Africa has been the 
readiness of those who have 
fought for and won their freedom 
to continue to pay a massive 
domestic price for supporting the 
freedom fight of their African 
neighbours. Machel came to 
power with Ian Smith still in 
control of Southern Rhodesia and 
immediately agreed to offer sup- 
port and sustenance to the Rhode- 
sian freedom fighters. 

If Mozambique had stood aside 
from the Rhodesian struggle, it 
might have been possible for it to 
establish a relationship with South 
Africa. A purely “Mozambique 
first” line must have seemed very 
tempting. Just as Kenneth 
Kaunda in Zambia and Seretse 
Khama in Botswana have done; 
Samora Machel never hesitated io 
support the Zimbabwe 
struggle.Mozambique became the 
home for Robert Mugabe and 
ZANU.lt was this relationship 
between Machel and Mugabe that 
became the anvil for Zimbabwe's 
independence. Machel was un- 
stinting in his support, experienc- 


ing constant raids from Ian 
Smith's forces and infiltration 
from the Selous Scouts. A crucial 
element in this early disruption 
was the support of the Rhodesian 
secret service for the Mozambique 
guerrilla movement. Rename (the 
MNR). After Zimbabwe's in- 
dependence, Renamo continued 
with the support of South Africa 
and became a real threat. 

Machel's friendship for Mugabe 
and his commitment to his cause 
was always thoughtful, realistic 
and hard-headed. He was one of 
the first of the African leaders to 
see the merit of the 1977 Anglo- 
American proposals. He wanted to 
tie the power of the United States 
into Zimbabwe's freedom struggle 
and was fiilly aware that neither 
the Soviet Union, East Germany 
nor Cube had the clout that would 
be necessary to topple Ian Smith 
and establish an independent 
Zimbabwe. 

So it was not surprising that at a 
critical stage in the Lancaster 
House talks, it was Machel who 
took Mugabe to task and forced 
him to compromise. He made it 


clear to Mugabe that if he was not 
prepared to accept fair and free 
elections on the terms available. 
Mugabe would not be welcome 
back in Mozambique to continue 
the aimed struggle. Mugabe to bis 
credit realized that that was the 
moment when be had to make a 
deal. 

We do not know, perhaps we 
will never know, whether the crash 
that killed Machel was just an 
accident. What we do know is that 
the while minority government in 
South Africa will do anything to 
keep itself in power. If it can best 
do that by destabilizing Angola 
and Mozambique, holding on to 
Namibia, squeezing Botswana and 
screwing down on Zimbabwe, it 
will do so. 

President Machel's loss is not 
just a loss for Mozambique, but 
for the whole of Africa. There will 
be many Western politicians who, 
like myself, grew to admire and 
respect this man and who will fed 
personally the gap that his death 
leaves. Perhaps his death will 
serve to remind us all of how 
ruthless and relentless racialism is, 
and how repugnant its continu- 
ation in South Africa remains. 

The author is leader of die Social 
Democratic Party. 


Anthony Kenny alerts MPs to the dangers of a double-edged proposal 



Last June the Government asked 
the House of Lords to approve a 
clause, tacked on to the Education 
Bill entitled “Freedom of Speech 
in the Universities, &c.” The 
clause prohibited governors, staff 
and students of establishments of 
further education from preventing 
people expressing their views on 
the establishment’s premises. It 
imposed a duty upon senior 
administrators to take reasonable 
steps to ensure that duly invited 
speakers were not so prevented. 
The clause was criticized as exces- 
sively broad in scope; peers com- 
plained it had been insufficiently 
discussed. The Government bow- 
ed to pressure and dropped it. 

Today the Commons win be 
asked to approve a new and 
different freedom-of-speech 
clause. This lays a duty “on every 
individual and body of persons 
concerned in the government" of 
any university, college or institu- 
tion of further and higher educa- 
tion to take reasonable steps to 

ensure that freedom of speech 
within the law is secured for 
members, students and employees 
of the establishment and for 
visiting speakers”. 

This duty includes “the duty to 
ensure, so far as is reasonably 
practicable; that the use of any 
premises of the establishment is 
not denied to any individual or 
body of persons on any ground 
connected with the belief or views 
of that individual or of any 
member of that body, or the policy 
or objectives of that body”. 

The evils that the new clause is 
meant to prevent are real and 
serious evils. Recent reports of 
events at Ruskin College in Ox- 
ford and at Bristol University give 
grounds for urgent concern among 
all who care about academic 
freedom and political debate. In 
the face of these reports no 
individual and no institution can 
afford to be complacent 

However, last week's events 
highlight two different mischiefs 
and it is not dear that a single 
remedy is appropriate to both. 
When we talk of freedom of 
speech on campus we may mean 
academic freedom, or we may 
mean the right to a political 
platform. The two things need to 
be carefully distinguished. 

Academic freedom is the right 
to conduct the teaching, research 
and administration of an aca- 
demic institution free from force 
or fear, external or internal. 
Academic freedom is violated 
when lectures and seminars are 


Find another 
way to enforce 
free speech 


disrupted, when unpopular teach- 
ers and administrators are per- 
secuted, when force or threats are 
used to determine academic de- 
cisions. Such things undermine 
the whole purpose of academic 
institutions and bring the aca- 
demic community into disrepute 
if they are allowed to go un- 
punished. 

No responsible institution of 
higher education can reasonably 
question this principle. For many' 
years the statutes of Oxford 
University have made it an of- 
fence. punishable by expulsion, to 
“disrupt or attempt to disrupt 
leaching or study or research or 
the administration of the uni- 
versity”. Most institutions of 
higher education have similar 
provisions. 

Of course, it is one thing to have 
a rule and another to secure the 
punishment of violators. By 
Parliament's decision, universities 
have long ceased to be in loco 
parentis. Students are adults, and 
if they offend they must be 
disciplined by due process in 
accord with natural justice. When 
an offence has been committed it 
is not always easy to secure a 
conviction, if evidence of identi- 
fication is conflicting, or if tech- 
nical requirements have not been 
complied with by the prosecution. 
This is not a problem peculiar to 
university courts: the Director of 
Public Prosecutions has had simi- 
lar troubles in getting convictions 
for offences on picket lines and in 
extraditing IRA suspects. 

The difficulties here, however, 
are practical and procedural. 
There can be no doubt about the 
principle. Universities have a 
clear duty to enforce the right of 
lecturers duly appointed, and 
students duly enrolled, to give or 
take their courses. There is no 
equally clear principle governing 
the rights and duties of institutes 
of higher education concerning 
speakers who wish to address 
meetings of social, religious, or 
political clubs on campus. 


The Government’s new clause 
seeks to impose sweeping and 
unparallelled duties on univer- 
sities and polytechnics in the 
name of “freedom of speech”. 
Now freedom of speech is a most 
precious civil liberty. As en- 
shrined in the First Amendment 
to the American constitution, and 
in bills of rights, it is the right of 
citizens to say what they like 
without interference from govern- 
ment. What the new clause seeks 
to defend, under this venerable 
title, is something rather different: 
it is the right of members of 
government, and other politicians, 
to say what they like without 
interruption by citizens. This 
change of meaning is not some- 
thing that should be allowed to 
pass unnoticed. 

To say that is not to deny that 
what the Government wishes to 
safeguard is indeed something 
worth preserving. It is desirable 
that there should be platforms 
from which political speakers, 
however unpopular, may address 
meetings in peace. No one who 
cares for our democratic traditions 
can read without disgust the 
reports of the outrageous treat- 
ment of Mr Powell last Friday. 

But two questions remain. First, 
is it appropriate that the duty of 
providing specially secure politi- 
cal platforms should be placed 
uniquely on institutes of educa- 
tion? It might be thought that local 
authorities were in a better po- 
sition to call upon the police forces 
necessary in these dark times to 
protect unpopular speakers. Uni- 
versities commonly have only 
token security forces, and can ill 
afford to provide patrols for 
political gatherings. 

The second question is this. 
What is the exact nature of the 
duty imposed? The clause is full of 
dangerous ambiguity. In this re- 
spect it is much more objec- 
Portable than the clause throws 
out in June. 

The June clause made it clear 
who were the persons to be 


protected by universities; namely, 
members and duly invited speak- 
ers. The June clause made it dear 
from whom these persons were to 
be protected; namely, delinquent 
members, students or employees 
of the universities. Today’s pro- 
posed clause leaves both these 
issues wide open. Instead of “duly 
invited” speakers, “visiting 
speakers” of all kinds are to be 
protected. Universities must pro- 
tect them, not only against those 
subject to. their discipline, but 
against all comers. 

Moreover, what the universities 
must ensure is that “the use of any 
premises of the establishment is 
not denied” to the persons and 
bodies protected. “Denial of the 
use of premises” is a catch-all 
phrase which would cover any- 
thing from violent picketing by 
total outsiders to courteous refusal 
by the appropriate authority of 
permission for the use of a 
particular room. 

Consider what this would mean 
in practice. Suppose the Moonies 
ask a college chaplain for per- 
mission to hold a missionary 
service in a college chapel The 
chaplain refuses, because he re- 
gards the Moonies' beliefs as false 
and unchristian. He would be in 
breach of his duty, because he has 
denied the use of college premises 
to a body of persons on grounds 
connected with their beliefs. 

Or suppose that a college head 
receives a letter from Mr Gerry 
Adams MP asking permission to 
use a seminar room for a meeting 
of Provisional Sinn Fein. If the 
head declines because the room is 
booked, be is untouched by the 
proposed legislation. If however, 
he refuses permission because he 
dislikes the aims and methods of 
the Provisionals, then he violates 
the duty laid on him by the new 
clause. He has denied the use of 
“premises of the establishment” 
to a body on grounds connected 
with its policy and objectives. 

Does Parliament rally wish to 
deprive university and college 
authorities of all discretion over 
the use of their premises for 
political purposes? 

Academic freedom is something 
universities must protect if they 
are to fulfil their essential purpose. 
The protection of political plat- 
forms is a different matter, which 
should be secured by an overall 
national plan, not- by an iU- 
thought-out clause tacked on loan 
Education BilL 

The author is Master of BaUiol 
College. Oxford. 


Farewell to the gentle giant of Congress 


Washington 
The rumpled, shaggy, enormous 
Thomas O’Neill, the poker-play- 
ing. florid, silver-thatched Speaker 
of the House of Representatives, 
has gone home to Massachusetts 
to retire. Most of Congress has 
never known any other Speaker. 

This plain and simple man. 
whose rambling, passionate di- 
alogue is usually totally in- 
comprehensible. reshaped" the 
Speakership by his own enormous 
personality and a devilish sense of 
parliamentary riming. 

“Tip", as everyone knows him, 
could not bear the final hours of 
the House session before it went 
into recess on Saturday, so he 
handed over the chair to a stand- 
in. shook numerous hands, posed 
with several Congressmen who 
had brought Lheir children to meet 
this much-satirized legend, said 
goodbye lo the television crews 
who had hounded him for the past 
fortnight, and went off lo see 
Millie, his wife of 44 years. 

The next Congress will be the 
first in 34 years to be without Tip 
O’Neill. The tributes have carried 
one common theme - that the 
powerful position of Speaker has 


not made him forget his roots. He 
is not a rich man. By the standards 
of most members of Congress he is 
positively poor. He has fought to 
preserve the bedrock principles of 
the Democratic Party, a fiercely 
partisan man battling for the 
underdog. 

in the past five years, while 
President Reagan has preached a 
gospel of optimism. O'Neill has 
protested that millions of Ameri- 
cans do not share in the bounty. 
He believes the Reagan years have 
produced a period of hatred 
between the well-off and the poor. 
Such talk has sounded out of tune 
with America's new-found sense 
of buoyancy, and it has seemed 
more and more that his time had 
passed, that the Democrats did 
not want to be led into the next de- 
cade b> a cigar-chomping old-style 
liberal who talked romantically 
about the working class. 

Although he operates best in 
what he himself called “smoke- 
filled. backroom politics", tele- 
vision — which he introduced into 
the chamber -thrust him into the 
heart of Congressional battles with 
the .White House. More than anv 


time in American politics the 
Speaker has been drawn into 
deeply personal battles with the 
president, bringing both humili- 
ation and triumph. It is no secret 
in Washington that O'Neill cannot 
abide Reagan, whom he regards as 
the worst-informed president 
among the eight he has known. 
“But.” he says, “he's great with the 
media." 

Rule changes in the 1970s gave 
O'Neill, who succeeded Carl Al- 
bert as Speaker in 1977. more 
institiulional power than any 
Speaker this century. At limes the 
power seemed io frighten him. He 
could, had he chosen, have greatly 
influenced policy through his 
power to hand out committee 
assignments. Rather than institu- 
tional authority, he sought to use 
personal authority in those smoky 
back rooms. 

Before becoming Speaker he 
was instrumental in breaking the 
gri p of powerful chairmen through 
a series ofdeft procedural changes. 
He broke with Lyndon Johnson as 
early as 1967 on Vietnam but 
throughout the war he fought to 
bridge the cultural and generation 
divide am-’-ng many House Demo* 


cJ&y\ cM 


crats and helped heal the wounds 
afterwards. 

As Speaker he introduced an 
ethics code that sharply restricted 
outside earnings by members — 
knowing, of course, that the job of 
Speaker commands fabulous out- 
side speaking fees and that he 
could have become rich. 

He is the grandson of Irish 
immigrants and wears his Irish- 
ness like epaulets. Despite the 
“deep green" image people have of 
him in Belfast and Dublin, he has 
consistently and vehemently op- 
posed violence. His closest politi- 
cal friend in Ireland is John 
Hume, leader of the Social Demo- 
cratic and Labour Party, whose 
advice he readily accepts on any 
Irish questions. 

Above everything else, O’Neill 
is enormously liked cm Capitol 
Hill. His own rivals waxed lyrical 
about him this past week. Silvio 
Conte, the lone Republican in the 
Massachusetts delegation, raid 
simply: “Old pal. we love you, 
we'll miss you, and youwill always 
be the Speaker of this House as or 
as I am concerned.” 

Christopher Thomas 


/ 


Roger Scrnton 


Guilt that begets 
misdirected aid 


Now that the Church has become, 
-in-iis official capacity, a vehicle for 
left-wing politics, the Tory Party 
might be described as the Anglican 
Church at prayer. It provides the 
crucial sense of unity and dutiful- 
ness which, in a better age, is the 
gift of a national church. This was 
particularly evident at the party 
conference, where a spirit of quiet 
cordiality prevailed over the 
passions of politics. 

In such an atmosphere, it is 
difficult to mention failure. The 
faithful were assembled to renew 
their trusL The Conservative 
Party did not congratulate itself 
but merely' reaffirmed what is 
theologically necessary: that its 
deeds are virtuous and its doctrine 
sound. It reminded the congrega- 
tion that it was as authoritative in 
foreign policy as in economic 
doctrine — despite the feet that, for 
several years now, the Conser- 
vative Party has had no foreign 
policy at alL 

' Of course, it does have a policy 
on defence, the sine qua non of 
national independence. Neverthe- 
less, there is Little evidence that the 

party has thought very seriously 
about our interests abroad. And 
the faithful, in then- gentle way, 
ypmpri to realize this. 

One item was particularly hard 
for the Tory conscience to swal- 
low. Delegates learned that, during 
1985, their party had thrown away 
£13 billion • of the taxpayers’ 


paused fen* the liturgical dapping. 
But the only sound was of 
swallowing throats and shifting 
folds of crinoline. 

The average Tory is a passably 
charitable creature, anxious to 
help those who can be truly helped 
in ways that would truly help 
them. But he also believes that 
money! will improve the con- 
ditions of the impoverished only if 
conveyed to them by someone 
who is answerable for their welfare 
and anxious to improve it He 
supports the party’s economic 
policy because he knows that 
“state subsidy” and' “public 
ownership” are euphemisms for 
the habit of investing in bankrupt 
industries. 

Nor is it only Tory voters who 
are suspicious of what the Labour 
Party now chooses to call “social 
ownership”. Whatever dse Mrs 
Thatcher may have done, die has 
at least revitalized the perception 

that public money must be respon- 
sibly used, by those answerable ibr 
its expenditure, and that it is never 
so innocently used as in the 
pursuit of profit 

' When jt comes to foreign aid, 
however, the Tory instincts seem 
to desert the Tory leadership.' The 
point has been arguedover many 
years by Professors- Bauer and 
Yamey, that (in their own words) 
“to give money to governments on 
the basis of the poverty of their 
subjects is to reward the policies 
which cause impoverishment". 
The Tory Party, which accepts the 


economic premises from which 
that conclusion follows, nevertn^ 
less continues to give money to the 
regimes of the Third World, so 
firm tinning the oppression ana 
poverty of the people who are 
subject to them. 

Two arguments are given in 
support offoreign aid. in addition 
to the demonstrably false cuum 
ihflij it helps those who need it. The 
first is prudential. It is in our 
interest, the . Foreign Office tens 
us, to pour money uto the fragile 
economies of the Third World, for 
by doing so we retain the goodwill 
of their governments, and prevent 
them from becoming communist. 
But where is the.evidence for this 
claim? Where is the evidence that 
Mr Mugabe, for instance, wilL out 
of gratitude for our continual help 
in his post-colonial teething trou- 
bles, not use his teeth on us? 

Leaders of post-colonial Africa 
have remained entirely, unmoved 
by the bribes that -we have offered 
them.' Many;, like Colonel Men- 
gistu of Ethiopia, have cynically 
appropria te d foreign aid supplies 
and presented them to their 
starving as proof of their 

own munificence. . Others, "like 
Presidents Nyerere of Tanzania 
and Kaunda of Zambia, have used 
our gifts to establish, totalitarian 
systems which are com m u ni st in 
all but name. Others have re- 
sponded to foreign aid as India has 
done — by joining the movement 
of “non-aligned” states: in other 
words, by joining Cuba and Libya 
in what is,, in effect, a massive 
exercise in anti-western propa- 
ganda, financed by Western aid. 

The other reason offered for 
giving money to Third World 
governments is that we owe it to 
them: The colonization of Africa 
and India, it is argued, involved a 
vast transfer of wealth from the 
-colonies to the metropolitan pow- 
ers. But theoigument is credible 
only because we forget that our 
principal exports to the colonies 
-were invisible: laws, skills, educa- 
tion, adminis trative institutions 
and the fund of “human capital” 
that was necessary to operate 
them. In many places those things 
were wantonly destroyed. Where 
they were not, in Hong Kong, for 
example, in Singapore or South 
Africa, growth has been continual, 
and foreign aid recently has not 
been required 

People accept the sub-Marxist 
theories of development not be- 
cause they are true, but because 
they minister to guilt irrational 
guilt is as disastrous a foundation 
for public policy as ft is for private 
life. If the Tray Party is one day to 
acquire a vision of Britain's place 
hr the world, it must surcly do to 
such emotions what it has done to 
the sentimentalities of the welfare 
state: it must repudiate them, and 
begin again, from -a help that is 
genuine, and a compassion that is 
sincere. 

The author is editor of The 
Salisbury Review. . 


i /? 


i 


■» 





moreover . . . Miles Kington 

My own global 


f 



Have you been watching the rip- 
roaring Monday night programme 
about the store of the English 
language? No? well, don't worry— 
here is our special compilation of 
the story so far. 

Long shot of England. Medium 
shot of part of England. Close-up of 
a grocer’s shop. Enter, a customer. 
Customer: Pint of milk, packet of 
kedgeree, pot of yoghurt and a bit 
of pito and taramasalata, please: 
Cut to McNeiL 

McNeiL An English sentence but 
containing words of Indian, Ger- 
man. French and Greek origin, 
plus . wherever yoghurt comes 
from.! Had Britain remained a cut- 
off island over the years, that ., 
customer would have spoken very 
differently. 

We see the customer enter again. 
This time he is wearing animal 
skins and carrying a stone dub. 
Customer: Mum dug ug. YuguL 
He beats the grocer over the head 
with the club and takes all the 
groceries he needs. Cut to Robert 
McNeil at Buckingham Palace. 
McNeil: They call it the Queen's 
English, and certainly the Queen 
speaks a form of English. 

Cut to newsreel of the Queen. 

Queen: My husband and I 

Cut to McNeiL 

McNeil: But there are many ways 
of saying the same thing. 

Cut to various people saying the 
something. 

Australian: Me and my sheila ... 
Sultry female Mack American: 

Mah man and I 

Lawyer: I. the aforesaid, being 
duly and legally married to her 
who hereinafter shall be called the 
wedded partner. . . . 

McNeiL All those forms of En- 
glish can be understood readily, 
except when spoken by English 
lawyers. If pidgin Englishwere the 
accepted language, instead of the 
Queen's English, the news head- 
lines might now sound like this. 
Cut to pidgin newsreader. 
Newsreader:' Big welcome him 
news at 10. Big fellow. White 
House, him say veHy sofly about 
Icelantt Next time: OK, maybe; 
maybe trot And .after him fellow 
short break.- we see budgerigar 
who drive bus, chop chop. 

McNeil (outside Sydney Opera 
House): Budgerigar, of course, is 
an Australian word. Yet 300 years 
ago nobody in Australia spoke 
English. They . still • don’t • today. • 
Cut, to stage of Opera Hoiac. where 
a soprano is sinking in Italian. ■ . . • 
McNfff: WeE. nn sure yoil get the 


£ »int. Australians still 'speak' a 
rm of language derived from 
Scottish ancestors who were 
driven here by the clearances. 

Citf to the Scottish Highlands, 
where a man in a kilt is being 
dearedouL 

Highlander: Yer flaming pom, 
-just wait till ah hit ye wi’ ma 
billabong. Hoots! 

McNeil (at gate of Anne 
Hathaway’s cottage): Perhaps the 
picture becomes clearer - if we 
imagine what Shakespeare would 
sound like if he had been an Asian 
immigrant, speaking English as a 
second language. 

- Sr Laurence Otivier: To be or not 
to be, oh (fear, that, is the question 
ail right, whether I am feeing the 
dings of outrageous fortune, my 
goodness, yes, not to mention the 
arrows ... 

Cut to the playing fields qf Eton. 
McNeffc You know-what they say 
-' about the Battle of Waterloo. 

. Cut lo scene cf Waterloo. 

McNeil: But, of coarse, most of 
fee troops under Wellington's 
command had not only not been 
to Eton, they didn't understand 
English either. 

Wellington: Charge! 

1st German saiUer: Was sagt er 
eigentlich? 

2nd German soldier: Ich weiss gar 
nicht. • - : 

McNeiL Er sagt, vorwfirts! - 
German soldiers: Oh, thanlrc 
mate. 

They charge and win the Battle of 
Waterloo. 

McNeiL And so the general pic- 
ture begins to emerge. Not only 
was Napoleon defeated by the 
chance intervention ofa Canadian 
TV commentator, but the English 
fe^iuige spread throughout the 
world m the wake of the British 
Empire, until a man from India 

^^^ derstand a man from 
-New York. 

Cut jo shop in New York. Enter a 

S ? cfc A pot of yoghurt and a pint 
of milk, please. * 

ShoptaepEKNo comprendo ham- 

^M^0L. a ^ nSayingSe 
McNeiL* So there you have ft. If 
you ve followed what I've been 
English 

■ 0Q ly t h a t , but you've sot an 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


21 



Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


M R M ACH EL 


Following the sudden death of 
President Samora Maehel of 
Mozambique in an aircrash on 
South .African territory, ru- 
mour and uncertainty will 
flourish not only in the coun- 
try he never quite ruled, but in 
the whole of an extremely 
• febrile sub-continent Conspir- 
-acy theorists wilt find no 
shortage of possible suspects — 
from South Africa to the KGB, 
from Rename guerrillas to the 
African National Congress. 

None had cause to love the 
Marxist leader who in ten 
years had embraced Moscow, 
then half turned his back on it, 
who had begun to court the 
West, who had signed the 
Nkomaii Accord with South 
Africa, and then denounced 
Pretoria for reneging on the 
agreement, and who had fi- 
nally called in Zimbabwean 
troops to shore up his tottering 
■ regime. 

They failed to rescue 
Mozambique from the cu- 
mulative effects of Portugal’s 
precipitate flight of the 
jmproverishing hand of Marx- 
ist rule, of internal repression 
and widespread violations of 
human rights, and of a brutal 
civil war which, in the last 
days of Machel’s reign, saw 
much of the country under the 
control of the Renamo guerril- 
las: But it was the failure of the 
1984 Nkomati Accord which 
set the seal on Mozambique's 
headlong tumble into famine 
and lawlessness. 

The Accord between Pre- 
toria and its Marxist neigh- 
bour, took both the world and 
some of South Africa's own 


top generals by surprise. For 
President Botha it was the 
crowning achievement Of his 
“thump and talk" stragegy. 
For President Maehel, in ex- 
change for his swift dismissal 
of ANC cadres from Maputo, 
it promised security from 
South African counter-insur- 
gency strikes, economic assis- 
tance to his already failed 
economy and the taming of 
Renamo either in the field or 
at the conference table. 

In the event it achieved 
little. South Africa managed to 
keep trains running to Maputo 
harbour, but Renamo guerril- 
las. well supplied with weap- 
ons by foreign sponsors, 
continued to lay waste the 
country, to disrupt supply 
tines and to threaten the 
security of any foreign invest- 
ment And Pretoria was reluc- 
tant to send in South African 
troops to prop up a Marxist 
president 

Yet the Accord survived 
until the discovery last year of 1 
documents which showed that 
elements within the South 
African defence force had 
continued to drop supplies to 
their erstwhile allies after the. 
Accord was signed. Even then, 
Maehel remained one of the 
few Front Line leaders to 
oppose sanctions against 
South Africa even as he sought 
Zimbabwean help against 
Renamo. 

Which inevitably raises the 
question whether Pretoria 
stands to gain or lose by 
Machel's death. There is little 
doubt that Pretoria's attitude 
to its Eastern neighbour is a 


great deal more complex than 
its support for Jonas Savimbf s 
Unita movement in Angola. 
The pro-Western Savimbi 
heads a large and disciplined 
army which controls vast areas 
of the country and which is 
supported by a major section 
of the Angolan population. 

Renamo’s warlords, how- 
ever, seem not to eqjoy great 
popular support- They appear 
to lack both a coherent politi- 
cal ph ilosophy and strategy for 
government It is equally 
doubtful whether the people of 
Mozambique who have fled in 
their thousands to South Af- 
rica to escape famine and the 
brutality of both sides would 
today support Frelimo with 
their original post-colonial 
enthusiasm. 

Until his death Maehel suc- 
ceeded in keeping his govern- 
ment together. In the vaccuum 
be leaves, Renamo could seize 
power, thus saddling Pretoria 
with a war-torn client state. Or 
Marxists more dedicated than 
Maehel to the Moscow line 
could invite back the Kremlin 
— an invitation which, given 
the mounting instability in 
southern Africa, it might ac- 
cept with a great deal more 
military enthusiasm than ten 
years ago. 

The first scenario spells 
even greater chaos in Mozam- 
bique. The second would be a 
disaster for the whole sub- 
continent. President Botha's 
expressions of condolence on 
the death of the pragmatic 
Marxist he tried to turn into an 
ally do not necessarily ring 
hollow. 


EXPLOITING RACE 


It is a common and dangerous 
fallacy to suppose that what is 
funny must be harmless — a 
way of thinking which is to the 
advantage of the destructive 
left. Everyone has heard that 
the London Borough of Harin- 
gey is combatting racism in its 
nursery" education by turning 
the sheep in Baa-Baa-Black- 
Sheep green, while Camden 
has been advertising for a 
Black Lesbian Worker to join a 
collective of three in a long- 
siay hostel for 16-19 year old 
girls. But is it all to be taken 
seriously? 

We are tempted to smile all 
this off as the kind of lunacy 
which appointed the “nuclear- 
free zone co-ordinator” in the 
London Borough of Brent 
whose job was felicitously 
described by on Brent MP, Dr 
Rhodes Boyson. the other day 
as being “presumably to daily 
point the nuclear-free sign 
outside the Town Hall away 
from the direction in which the 
wind is blowing ” 

But. of course, it is not funny 
at all. especially in Brent. For 
that leftist borough is in many 
senses a pathfinder in the use 
of public funds for political 
purposes and malign political 
causes, and nowhere more 
conspicuously than by its 
proliferation of advisory jobs 
in the area of race relations. 
Unproductive in any ordinary 
sense, they are highly produc- 
tive of what the hard left 
wants: social discord. 

It is hardly supprising. there- 
fore, that the latest news from 
Brent has caused concern. 


From the beginning of Janu- 
ary. the Home . Office has 
agreed to fund 169 new teach- 
ing posts, and 8 management 
posts, under Section 1 1 of the 
Local Government Act, .1966, 
each of which will be respon- 
sible not to the headteacher of 
any school but to the 
borough's chief race relations 
adviser. Mr Russell Profitt 

The Act enables the govern- 
ment to fund up to 75 per cent 
of the cost of agreed purposes 
where the presence of substan- 
tial numbers of people of New 
Commonwealth origin sug- 
gests there is need for special 
provision. This has generally 
deemed to mean teaching En- 
glish to those who lack it 
adequately. But in practice it is 
too often often used to teach 
what is miscalled anti-racism, 
and even to promote the idea 
that leaching English is a sign 
of colonialism. 

The new Brent appoint- 
ments. therefore, are under 
suspicion of amounting to 
planting in schools the agents 
of the local authority who will 
have power to intervene any- 
where in the curriculum or 
with discipline, and whose job 
will be to see that head 
teachers and all teachers are 
obeying anti-racist orthodoxy. 
Moreover, education in Brent 
is already riddled with conflict 
with schools suffering the loss 
of teachers unwilling to live 
with political interference and 
the fear of being accused of 
racism. .All this breeds the very 
thing, racialism, which it pur- 
ports to prevent Anger is 


stirred up among decent white 
people who resent the accusa- 
tion of racism and the demand 
that racial disadvantage 
should be overcome not by 
teaching English to those who 
need it but by teaching “anti- 
racism.” 

The Home Office, however, 
insists that the jobs it has 
agreed to finance are genuine 
leaching jobs. The point is 
stressed that the Home Office 
refused to continue funding 
the teaching generalists pre- 
viously paid for in Brent under 
the Act. and has negotiated the 
new arrangements on the basis 
of proper job descriptions with 
each post and its work specifi- 
cally identified. 

But the Horae Office cannot 
assume that this will necessar- 
ily be so. It is said that the jobs 
will be monitored. How this 
can be done effectively is 
anyone's guess, though mon- 
itored they certainly must be. 
But there is a deeper question 
to be asked, which is whether 
funding under Section II* 
should continue at all given 
the available evidence of the 
kind of people into whose 
hands h falls, and who dis- 
burse it to their own ends. 
Whether the Brent authority 
genuinely intends to use the 
money to assist children of 
New Commonwealth to settle 
into British society, or whether 
it will be used to foment 
discontent under the guise of 
anti-colonialist multi- 
culturalism is the key point. It 
is not for the Government to 
fund the second activity. 


POWER POLITICS IN HONG KONG 




The royal yacht Britannia may 
have evaded Typhoon Ellen, 
but in Hong Kong today it sails 
into a political storm of rather 
more consequence. The liming 
is particularly unfortunate be- 
cause it reflects the unease 
which many of those in Hong 
Kong still feel about the pros- 
pect of life under Chinese 
sovereignty after 1 997. 

The immediate issue is the 
as. yet unbuilt Daya Bay 
nuclear generatinj: plant just 
across the border in 
Guangdong province, which is 
due to start proriding 40 per 
cent of Hong Kong’s electricity 
in ■ 1992. Three weeks ago 
contracts were signed in Pe- 
king by the Chinese. GEC and 
French Framatome which 
have formed a joint venture to 
construct the plant. 

One million residents of 
Hong Kong had signed a 
petition demanding that the 
Daya Bay project be cancelled 
or reconsidered. To many in 
Hong Kong it appears that 
despite Chernobyl their safety 
has been subordinated to 
commercial considerations — 
and to Britain’s determination 
not to offend Peking. 

While the Queen was tour- 
ing Shanghai tost week. Hong 
Kong's normally sedate leg- 
islative chamber witnessed 
five hours of table-thumping 
including onslaughts on the 
Governor, Sir Edward Youde. 
serious was the disorder 


that the Financial Secretary, 
Mr Piers Jacobs, was com- 
pelled to make a long speech 
promising to disclose secret 
industrial and safety informa- 
tion relating to Daya Bay. 

The need for what Whitehall 
terms “convergence” between 
the Chinese and British sides 
during the run-up to 1997 lay 
behind the remarks of Foreign 
Secretary' Sir Geoffrey Howe 
in Hong Kong on October 12 
as he prepared to fly to Peking 
to join the Queen. Divergent 
views on the future of Hong 
Kong would not be helpful, he 
said. A few days before, Sir 
Edward Youde warned the 
legislature that “the dramatic 
progress which Hong Kong has 
made over the last two decades 
was not built on conflict and 
turbulence. U was built on a 
constant search for 
consensus.” 

This has been true enough 
for decades. But it is no longer 
certain. Respectable voices are 
being raised in Hong Kong 
demanding direct elections to 
the legislative council, together 
with guarantees that the post- 
1097 governor for chief exec- 
utive as he is to be known) will 
be responsive to the needs of 
Hong Kong and not the com- 
mands of Peking. 

This is why the Daya Bay 
issue is worth watching, why 
the Financial Secretary gave 
way on disclosure, and why an 
unexpected coalition is form- 


ing — far more effective than 
the one million signature pe- 
tition. 

China could still score a 
public relations triumph by 
postponing the project for a 
respectable period while fur- 
ther safety checks are made in 
the wake of the Soviet nuclear 
disaster at Chernobyl The 
plant at Daya Bay will be of a 
different design from the Rus- 
sian one. But it is not so much 
the plant itself as its manage- 
ment under the Chinese which 
causes concern in Hong Kong. 

Residents in the colony, 
though not opposed to nuclear 
power in principle, have little 
confidence in Chinese safety’ 
standards. They are also aware 
of the Chinese inclination to 
cover up man-made disasters. 
If something went wrong at 
Daya Bay, would anyone find 
out before it was too late? Even 
those normally sympathetic to 
Peking have admitted that the 
project has been pushed 
through too quickly. 

While the Queen was in 
China, the country's leaders 
never missed a chance to voice 
their satisfaction that Britain 
was not strewing obstacles in 
the path towards a peaeceful 
transition in 1997. But the 
need “to converge" on Daya 
Bay may prove to be a much 
bigger mistake than any reck- 
less remarks by the Duke of 
Edinburgh. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Some rights and wrongs at R askin 


From Dr Stephen Howe and Mr 
Raphael Samuel 

.Sir. May we, as colleagues of 
David Sei bourne at Ruskra Col- 
lege, respond to your leading 
article of October 16? 

An unwary reader, of your 
editorial would assume that David 
Selbourne had been sacked from 
our college for writing ah artide in 
The Times. This is not so, as the 
chronology ' itself shows. The arti- 
cle was written on March 6. Ten 
days ago, on October 6, David 
Selbourne was seeing his first-year 
students and advising them that 
be would be available if they had 
any problems. He hpd been allo- 
cated bis normal teaching load. 

We bitterly regret David 
Selbourne’s departure from the 
college because he is a colleague 
we both like and respect, but it is 
of his doing, not ours. So far as the 
tutors were concerned, the issue 
bad been resolved through com- 
promise last May. 

You allege tbat in Mr 
Selbourne's dispute with - the 
students’ union his academic col- 
leagues “refused him support” 
This is untrue. The start of the 
whole dispute was a demand by 
the students that David apologise 
for writing in The Times The 
unacceptable demand was rejected 
- though it was a measure of the 
passions engaged. 

The students then attempted to 
impose a boycott of David's 
tutorials and lectures. They de- 
manded that the college transfer 
all David's students to other 
tutors. The college refused to do 
this. After a tense few days we 
persuaded them to rescind the 
boycott of tutorials and to leave 
matters to the individual judge- 
ment of students. 

Some of David's students, 
though disagreeing strongly with 
David’s action in relation to The 
Times chose to stay with him. 
Others concluded that they could 
not “in conscience” work with 
David, despite their personal re- 
gard far him. Other tutors, mainly 
one of the signatories to this letter 
[Stephen Howe], look than on: 
but only on the express under- 
standing that this was with 
David's approval and would in no 


way undermine his position in 
college. 

We were not successful in 
getting the boycott of David's 
lectures rescinded, though we sent 
a member of staff to offer him 
symbolic support. (The action was 
superogatory, since there were no 
pickets, no banners, and no stu- 
dent 5 in the haH) Our principal 
concern throughout was to mam- 
tain college teaching, prevent a 
student strike, and safeguard the 
students' examination prospects. 

We believed then, and believe 
now, that it was possible .to 
safeguard, on the one hand, David 
Selbourne's right to speak and 
write where and what he chose 
and, on the other, the right of 
individual students to dissent. As 
one of ns [Raphael Samuel] wrote 
at the time: 

British radicalism was born in the 

movement for free speech and it 

is a disaster when the Left appears in 
two minds about it. . . A member of 
staff must have the liberty to speak 
his or her mind, especially if it is to 
express unpopular opinions. . . . 

Deep and apparently irreconcil- 
able loyalties were involved in this 
dispute: on the one hand, Ruskin's 
organic relationship to the Labour 
and trade union movement; on 
the other, our no less dear 
commitment to the prindples of a 
liberal, non-partisan education. 
Ruskin has worked with these 
tensions over many years, in ways 
that have demonstrably contrib- 
uted to adult education and 
British intellectual life — 
Selbourne's own recent work 
would be a case in point. 

It was our belief that the dispute 
could be settled in a spirit of give 
and take, recognising the rights 
and privileges ofboth sides. We do 
not believe that matters of con- 
science can be settled try disci- 
plinary procedures, nor yet by 
apologies and oaths but, as in any 
other educational institution, by 
tolerance, persuasion and tact. 
Yours. 

STEPHEN HOWE (Tutor in Poli- 
tics and Development Studies), 
RAPHAEL SAMUEL (Tutor in 
History and Sodology), 

Ruskin College, Oxford. 

October 17. 


Debate on Ulster 

From Sir Adam Butler, MP for 
Bosworth (Conservative) 

Sir, Mr John D. Taylor writes 
(October 1 1) that Ulster Unionists 
feel let down by the Conservatives 
over their amtude to the Anglo- 
Irish Agreement and their failure 
to debate: the Northern Ireland 
situation ■ at the Bournemouth 
conference. 

I must tell my friend John 
Taylor that many Tories feel just 
as let down by Unionist MPs who 
have signally failed to use existing 
democratic machinery to argue 
their case by refusing to partici- 
pate fully in the parliamentary 
process. Instead they have pre- 
ferred the platforms afforded by 
tallies and demonstrations on the 
streets of Northern Ireland. 

Not only does this mean a 
denial of proper parliamentary 
representation to their constit- 
uents. but such behaviour also 
imposes an unnecessarily heavy 
burden on the RUG who have 
expended enormous energies and 
resources on protecting all the 


people of Northern Ireland from 
terrorist violence. 

The Anglo-Irish Agreement was 
endorsed by the House of Com- 
mons by one of the largest 
majorities this century. John Tay- 
lor and his colleagues can scarcely 
ignore the expressed will of the 
elected Parliament of the United 
Kingdom. 

The Agreement is not. and was 
never likely to be, a panacea for all 
Northern Ireland's many and 
varied ills, but it is a genuine 
attempt by the Government to 
provide yet another opportunity 
to make lasting political progress 
in the province. 

I would urge the Unionist MPs, 
as I have done before, to play their 
pan in that process by resuming 
full participation in the business of 
Parliament and opening dis- 
cussions with the Government 
and with other constitutional 
political parties in Northern Ire- 
land on a sensible way forward. 
Yours faithfully, 

ADAM BUTLER, 

House of Commons. 

October 16. 


GPs’ productivity 

From Mrs J.M. Williams 
Sir, In private medical practice 
there is a work-related element in 
the remuneration of both consul- 
tants and GPs. It has always 
surprised me, therefore, that in the 
NHS the remuneration of GPs 
alone is related to the number of 
patients they care for. 

Both as taxpayer and patient I 
would be reassured that waiting 
lists were as short as consultants 
could achieve if their remunera- 
tion too was linked to. e.£, the 


number of new patients seen per 
contracted session (with vari- 
ations. of course, between speci- 
alities). 

At present financial motivation 
is in the opposite direction, for the 
longer the waiting list the greater 
the pressure to seek private care. 
And surely those who work hard- 
est and most effectively for the 
NHS should benefit most? 

Yours faithfully, 

J.M. WILLIAMS, 

Sharston Lodge,. % 

Fortyfoot Road, 

Leatberbead, Surrey. 


Fine-art cutbacks 

From Mrs S. Coode-Adams 
Sir, So far the defence for the 
retention of fine-art courses has 
been ted by artists, lecturers and 
principals of art colleges. I would 
like to put forward a purely 
commercial reason for their sur- 
vival. 

We are a new firm, buying 
works of an for offices. In our first 
18 months we have been asked to 
buy over £200.000 worth of 
contemporary painting for clients. 
Obviously this is only a tiny 
p r o p o r ti on of the total market. 1 
do not see demand lessening for 
the present. 

As fine an is relegated to the 
lowest place m art college prior- 
ities. numbers of students are cut 
and fewer artists produced, it 
might be remembered that there is 
a huge and increasing demand for 
the products of these courses, 
namely paintings and sculptures. 
Yours sincerely. 

SONIA COODE-ADAMS, 
Coode-Adams Martin Associates. 
An Consultants. 

In worth Hall. 

Inwonh. 

Colchester. Essex. 

October 13. 


A bishop’s choice 

From Sir Frank Pearson 
Sir. I find the apologia of the 
Bishop of Kingston upon Thames 
in your issue of October II 
somewhat disturbing. 

Anyone who holds a position of 
authority in any organisation, 
whether it be lay or clerical, is 
often faced with the very problems 
of conscience which the bishop 
gives as his Justification for his 
behaviour at Church House when 
attending the meeting of the 
Movement for the Ordination of 
Women. Normally the individual 
would stand by accepted rules and 
practice, or if finding himself 
unable to do so would resign his 
position of authority. 

A bishop has a spiritual and 
pastoral function - within which 
much latitude can be exercised: 
also however he has an admin- 
istrative and quasi-judical func- 
tion and surely here there can be 
no latitude in the application or 
observance of accepted practice 
and law. This the bishop does not 
apparently accept. 

Yours. 

FRANK PEARSON. 

Beech Cottage, 

Berwick. 

Camforih. Lancashire. 



Turn of the tide 

From Lard Howie of Troon 
Sir. Last Saturday's ietter (October 
II) from RIBA president, Larry 
Roitand. extolled the striking Fos- 
ter Rogers Stirling show, as he 
called ft. at the Royal Academy, 
and concluded that contemporary 
architecture is in good shape — as 
far as these three are concerned.- 
Bui has he missed the point? 

There is. in fact, not much 
architecture to be seen at Burling- 
ton House: nearly everything on 
view is actually engineering, and 
virtually all of the engineering, I. 


think, is by one firm, Ove Arup. 

Two thoughts emerge. Should 
Roiland in fairness really be 
speaking about the Foster Rogers 
Stirling Arup show? And more 
important now that the Royal 
Academy has put architecture on 
display for the first time for very 
many years, has the time come for 
another exhibition, called perhaps 
Engineering: the reality behind the 
architecture ? 

Yours sincerely. 

WILL HOWIE 
House of Lords. 

October 13. 


Cause of Soviet 
fears on SDI 

From Professor R. V. Jones FRS 
Sir. Russian objections to the 
strategic defense initiative have 
several possible’ explanations. 

The Russians may fear that they 
will find it hard to match, tech- 
nologically or economically, 
American advances in military 
space technology: they may also 
fear that a faith, sound or not, in 
SDI might make the Americans 
less likely to refrain from nuclear 
war. and it is not quite inconceiv- 
able that the Russians might hope, 
by feigning a fear of SDL to 
stimulate the Americans to waste 
much of their defence effort in it. 

All these explanations, though, 
are hypothetical. What is less 
uncertain is that a fully developed 

- system based ■ on SDI would 
involve the deployment of the 
order of 100 satellites continu- 
ously patrolling Russian territory 
and armed to destroy rising boost- 
ers. 

Moreover, such satellites, if 
aimed with high-power lasers, 
might also be capable of igniting 
targets on the ground. While the 
power might be diffused by irregu- 
larities in the atmospheric 
propagation, some studies in 
America, notably by Latter and 
Martineili, of R & D Associates, 
suggest that the possibility of 
starting fires on ground targets 
with lasers is hardly more remote 
than that of destroying rising 
boosters. 

Moreover, for all that the 
Russians would know (unless they 
are granted wide powers of pre- 
launch inspection), the patrolling 
satellites could carry other weap- 
ons for use against pound targets. 
They could therefore reasonably 
object, just as the Americans could 
if SDI had been proposed from the 
other side. 

Such an objection would not 
hold against that part of SDI 
which is directed to defence 
against the terminal phase, which 
would be ground-based and op- 
erated only over or near American 
territory; and both the Americans 
and the Russians are to varying 
degrees developing, or have devel- 
oped, such a defence. 

What is not so far clear from 
Press reports is whether the Rus- 
sians object to the SDI package in 
entirety, or whether they would 
withdraw objections to those parts 
of the initiative which are free 
from suspicion of being adaptable 
to immediately offensive pur- 
poses. 

If they would be so prepared, 
some compromise might be 
reached that would enable the 
Reykjavik arms limitation pro- 
posals to be fruitfully pursued, and 
the world would have a better 
understanding of both the Ameri- 
can and the Russian positions. 
Yours faithfully, 

R.V. JONES, 

8 Queen’s Terrace, 

Aberdeen. Scotland. 

Sale of vicarages 

From the Reverend Canon J. D. 
Beckwith 

Sir, Whilst sympathising with the 
Archdeacon of Exeter’s dilemma 
(October 7) in assessing and 
coping with the problems of 
“large” vicarages, the approach he 
suggests to their resolution seems 
sadly myopic. Tangible assets, 
once realised, become irredeem- 
able. 

For about 1 .000 yearn the 
parson's bouse in England has 
been not only his home but also 
his study. Now, and in the future, 
it needs to be a composite also of 
workshop, library, office manage- 
ment and facility, reception area, 
information/conference centre, 
Christian classroom, community 
resource point, welfare warehouse 
and- a centre for parochial hos- 
pitality. 

Thau are still some clergy who, 
knowing the problems associated 
with larger houses and small 
incomes, are still willing to cope 
with them, not only to facilitate 
their working conditions but also 
m order to respond to the 
yearnings of their multi-parish 
cures who now have to share one 
incumbent 

With books in every room 
(including the smallest), furniture 
in store or given away, office 

- equipment scattered through bed- 
rooms. study and vestry, what 
wouldn't I give (or be prepared to 
give up if necessary) in order to 
adequately facilitate my work and 
ministry with more space. Arch- 
deacons with “unmanageable 
houses" please note. 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHN D. BECKWITH, 

St Anne’s Vicarage. 

106 Highgate West Hill N6. 


OCTOBER 21 1881 

The steamship. Clan Macduff, left 
Liverpool corning a valuable 
cargo, mostly Manchester goods, 
and 19 passengers bound for 
Bombay In the Irish Sea wind 
and sea increased and the vessel 
was swept by tremendous waves. 
Bilge pumps choked and a leak 
tats discovered m the engine- 
room. A bucket-chain of balers 
made little impression 


DISASTERS AT SEA 

Our Plymouth Correspondent 
telegraphed last night- 

... At 1 o’clock there were six 
feet of water in the engine-room 
and stokehole, the captain recog- 
nized that the vessel was doomed 
to founder, gave the order to 
get out the six boats. The leeskte 
boats were first prepared, the larger 
lifeboat was launched alongside, 
but was dashed to pieces against 
the Bide of the ship. The scene was 
agonizing, the women and 

to heartrending terror, 
while fixe shouts of the officers 
could barely be heard above the 
roar of the gate. After an interval 
an effort to launch the gig was 
safely accomplished . . . Sbe soon 
dropped astern and hel d on by the 
rope until the third officer gave 
orders for the painter to be cut. 
The painter was cut accordingly 
and she drifted out of sight, being 
lost to view in a few minutes in the 
appalling breakers. The next boat 
to be launched was the cutter . . 
After she had safely dropped 
alongside Mr. and Mis. Merer, 
Miss. Hayes, Mr. Akhurst and 
Mrs. Jacobs were equipped with 
lifebuoys and jumped from the 
deck into the water alongside, each 
one being also secured by a line 
from the ship. And by these nwawn 
they were secured and safely pulled 
into the boat. Then one of Mrs. 
Jacobs’s children, a little girl of 
four years, was thrown to hen but a 
sodden roll severed the ship from 
the boat, and the little one, falling 
into the water, was drawn out of 
sight by the suction. In another 
moment the boat rose to the side of 
the ship, and instantly the captain 
threw her -second child, a boy, 
safely into the arms of the frantic 
mother. The boat then dropped 
astern and was cut away in a 
minute. This boat was also soon 
lost to view . . . The remaining 


boat, the small lifeboat, would but 
hold % at the utmost The second 
officer and two of the men got into 
the boat and were lowered with her. 
Then the remainder of the passen- 
gers, the chief epok, five stewards, 
and the stewardess were drawn 
into the boat in the same way as 
before. Down to this time P-a ptain 
Webster had preserved the man- 
agement but now, having, it is true 
seen all the passengers into the 
boat, he placed a lifebuoy on 
himyplf ana jumped, bang hwnlpd 
board the boat. The chief 
engineer and one of the crew 
followed his example, and the boat 
was at once cut away. Previous to 
jumping the captain, addressing 
the chief steward, said, ‘Get on 
this handing him a lifebuoy. Mr. 
S idler refused, and the captain 
thereupon rejoined, ‘If you won’t, I 
wifi,’ and immediately did so. Tfte 
crew remaining on board were 
startled at his desertion, and when 
the captain reached the brat they 
could see that the passengers there 
were upbraiding him for leaving so 
many of h is men to their fete in a 
-Cfrnlrfng ship ... Immediately the 
last boat had disappeared, the chief 
officer took charge of the Clan 
Macduff, which was labouring in 
the trough of the sea. Lights, 
rockets and cannon were prepared 
for signal purposes, and as soon as 
the night came on the various 
illuminations were burnt and fog- 
horns sounded. During the night 
the vessel lay completely at the 
mercy of the storm As morning 
broke the Clan Macduff began to 
settle down aft the water pouring 
in from the 'tween decks throu^i 
the saloon. The men once more 
betook themselves to baling. The 
officers bravely cheered them on, 
but the water still gained and was 
forcing its way into ’the store- 
room . . . Affaire had reached this 
desperate pass when the carpenter 
sighted a steamer to leeward. A 
cheer went up, and then once more 
the crew hurried below to resume 
the baling. Two of the crew 
ascended the main rigging and 


hoisted sheets and to attract 
attention. Even when the steamer 
got within four miles, however, no 
notice was taken of these fii gnala 
Suddenly the steamer put about. 
And in two hours the Cork finer. 
Upupa, had reached within hailing 
distance of them end had launched 
two boats . . .The 19 survivors 
were picked up and kindly received 
on board. 

LATER. 

“A telegram just received, 10.30, 
at Plymouth, from Liverpool of- 
fice, Clan Line, directed to officer 
in charge of survivors, announces 
that gig in charge of captain and 
the gmall lifeboat have been picked 
UP - ■ 


Legal difficulty 

From Mr J. J. O’Donnell 
Sir. Much has been reported in 
your pages about the Crown 
Prosecution Service and included 
in the voices raised are those 
complaining about the level of 
remuneration enjoyed by entrants 
to the service. My heart bleeds. 

For the last two months we have 
been attempting to secure the 
services of an assistant solicitor 
without a single response. It may 
be thatxjualified persons do not 
wish to work in Preston, but 
another answer might be the 
salaries which a private practice 
engaged mainly in criminal legal- 
aid work are able to pay. They are 
substantially less than the starting 
rates for prosecutors. 

By its very nature criminal work 
is usually legally aided work. 
Presumably, if the Government 
can find the resources to fund the . 
prosecution process then it will 
also be able to find the resources to 
properly fund those defending 

■ 

w . • 


individuals appearing before the 
courts. 

Alternatively the Government 
might continue to expea other 
areas of a legal practice to sub- 
sidize the criminal work, where- 
upon one wonders when we might 
expea the prosecution service to 
commence offering other services 
to subsidize its criminal ad- 
vocates. 

Yours faithfully. 

J.J. O'DONNELL 

Lee, Brailsford & Co. Solicitors. 

1 Cross .Street, Preston. Lancashire. 

Collision course 

From Mr John Coates and Mr 
John Momson 

Sir. Your correspondent, Rupert 
D. H- Bursell (October 17). has 
missed a point. In our trireme 
' mathematicians and classicists are 
literally (as well as metaphori- 
cally) m the same boat. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN COATES. 

JOHN MORRISON. 

Granhams. 

Great Shelford. Cambridge. 


,?■ ; 



COURT 

CIRCULAR 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 20: The Duke of 
Gloucester, President, Oncer 
Research Campaign, this morn- 
ing presented a Milestone 
Certificate to the Aberdeen Lo- 
cal Coomrinee at the Town 
House, Aberdeen to mark their 
achievement in raising £1 mil- 
lion for the Campaign, 

His Royal Highness later 
visited the Department of Bio- 
Medical Physics and Bio-En- 
gineering at Aberdeen Univ- 
ersity. Forester Hill and in the 
afternoon visited the Beatson 
Institute, Bearsden, Glasgow. 
The Duke of Gloucester, who 


COURT 
AND 
SOCIAL 


travelled .in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Lieuienant-ColOnel Sir Simon 


THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
October 20: Princess Alexandra 
this morning opened the new 
hail and classrooms, which have 
been provided by the Founda- 
tion, and a t tended a Service of 
Thanksgiving at The Blue 
School, Islewonh, Middlesex. 

Lady Mary Mumford was in 
attendance. 


Mr Michael Thornton regrets 
that illness prevented his pres- 
ence in Westminster Abbey 
yesterday at the service of 
thanksgiving for the life and 
work of Dame Anna Neagle. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr CE/L Ashton 
and Miss HJL Bnkefield 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles, son of Mr and 
Mrs Anthony Ashton, of 
Albourne, Sussex, and Helen, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs John 
Brakefield, of Loose, Kent. 

Mr MJ. de la Haye 
and Miss T. Brown 
The engagement is announced 
between Matthew, son of Mr J. 
de la Haye, of Turners Hill, 
Sussex, and Mrs B. de la Haye. 
of Brighton, Sussex, and Thea, 
eldest daughter of Mrs A. 
Brawn, of BLanefietd, Scotland. 

MrJjLE. Foard 
and Miss GS. Rogers 
The engagement is announced 
between James, only son of Mr 
’ and Mrs James Fooid, of 
Hazelmere, Surrey, and Caro- 
line. eider daughter of Mr MJ. 
Rogers, of Aylsbam, Norfolk, 
and Mrs W. Bashford, Old 
Basing. Hampshire. 

Mr A.C Jennens 
and Mbs SJL Garrick Smith 
The engagement is announced 
between Anthony Castl em an. 
son of Mr ana Mrs Pad 
Jennens, of London, and Su- 
sanna Jane, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Alastair Carrick Smith, of 
Stockland, Devon. 

. Mr G.C Stewart 
..and Miss FA. Gatcbfield 
The engagement is announced 
between Gordon, only son ofMr 
and Mrs AAF. Stewart, of 
Newton M earns, Scotland, and 
Fiona Annabel, only daughter of 
Mr and Mrs J.V. Gatchfield. of 
Welwyn Garden 4 City, 
Hertfordshire- „ 


Birthdays today 

Mr Malcolm Arnold, 65; Mr 
Geoffrey Boycott. 46; Mr Nor- 
man Clarke, 70; Dr W. L. Ferrar, 
93; Mr Simon Gray. 50, Lord 
Grieve, 69: Sir Maurice Hodg- 
son, 67; Mr J. F. C Hull, 61; 
Professor Sir Roy Marshall. 66; 
Miss Nadia Nerina, 59; Mr 
Ernest Saunders. 51; Sir Geoig 
Solti, -74; Lord Thomas or 
Swynnerton, 55; Mr Francis 
Warner. 49. 


Gumnakers’ 

Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Gumnakers* 
Company for the ensuing yean 
. Master. Mr LP-D. Salter; Upper 
Warden, the Hon Sir Peter 
Vanneck; Renter Warden, Ma- 
jor D.H.L Back. 


Painter-Stamers 

Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Paimer-Stainers’ 
Company for the ensuing yean 
Master, Mr G. A. Luton; upper 
Warden, Mr J. G. Lightowler; 
Renter Warden. Mr A. H. 
Stevenson. 


Mr EJD. Waoehope 
and Mbs CJf. WBb 
The engage mem is announced 
between Ewan, younger son of 
Mrand Mrs Duncan Waoehope, 
Finns Farm, Wdk>w, Hamp- 
shire, and Charlotte, daughter of 
Mr Peter Wills, Plantagenet 
House. Tunbridge Weils, and 
Mrs John Dudley, The Lodge. 
Drinkstone, Suffolk. 

Mr LR- Wilkie 
and Mbs LA Laarenti 
The engagement is announced 
between lain, younger son of Mr 
K.M. Wilkie, of SpeWhnrst, 
Kent, and the late Mrs B. 
Wilkie, and stepson of Mrs R. 
Wilkie, and Lynn ette, daughter 
of Mr J.B. Lauren li and Mrs 
P.MJL Lauren ti, of Weybridge, 
Surrey. 



Mr John Lumley, director of the Ira 
street scene 


department at Christie's, with the Manet 
h; Chris Harris). 


Saleroom 


Galleries reject £3m Manet 


Marriages 


Mr WJL Young 
and Lady Stomtou 
The marriage took place on 
October 16, at the Church of St 
John the Baptist, Andover, of 
Mr Hilary Young and Lady 
(Virginia) Stourton, widow of 
Sir Ivo Stourton. 

Mr JJD. Goodwin 
and Mbs JJML Befl 
The marriage took place on 
October 20, quietly in London, 
between Mr John Goodwin, son 
of the late Mr and Mrs Robert 
Goodwin, and Miss Joanna 
Befl, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
William Bell, of Cottisfbnd 
House, Brackley, 

Northamptonshire. 


A Parisian street scene by the 
Impressionist Edouard Ma- 
net, which » e xp ected to sefl 
for more than £3 milli on at 
Christie's on December 1, has 
been turned down by the 
National Gallery and the 
Fitzwilliazn Museum, 
Cambridge. 

Both galleries regret baring 
to refuse the opportunity to 
buy by private treaty but their 
funds will not allow iL 

The painting, which is bring 
sold by a descendant of the 
first wife of the brie Lord 
Butler of Saffron Walden, had 
bed on loan to tile FitzwBfiam 
for some years. Mrs Butler, 
who died in 1954, was a 
dau g hter of the great collector 
Samuel ConrtanldL, who 


By Hnon MaHafiea 

founded the Gnrtuld In- 
stitute of Art m Londoo- 

The first owner of the 
painting was Victor 
Cboooqnet, one of tbe early 
patrons of the Impressionists, 
and it was soM from his 
collection in 1899 for about 
£500. 

The view is from Manet's 
studio in the 1870s and it 
shows die Rne Mosnier (brier; 
la Roe de Berne) with road- 
works in the foreground. It 
was painted in tbe eariy part of 
1878 and represents Manet at 
his most impressionistic. 

The December sale will also 
include a major p aintin g by 
Toulouse-Lautrec. showing 
the crowd at the Moulin de la 
. Galette, which is expected tn 
sell for between £1 nflfion and 
£1.5 nriHioa. 


A morning session of a sale 
of British ceramics at 
Christie'S yesterday produced 
£284,031 with 7 per cent 
bow^tt in. A private bidder 
paid £194900 for a Bristol 
white figure of tbe Chinese 
Immortal, La Tong-Pin, made 
by Boyann Load's factory in 
1750. Only nine ocher marked 
» * n nip l*Hi of thk particular 
figure are known (estimate 
£12-18|000.) 

The London dealer Wini- 
fred Wflfiams paid £14300 for 
a Chei&ea salt cellar modelled 
as a cr ayfish by a shell and 
r*wwp«i in the workshop of 
VVHfiam Doesfcory in the late 
1740s. It was copied from a 
silver original by Nicholas 
Sprimoat (estimate £3400- 
4400). 



IMAGES^ 


OBITUARY 

PRESIDENT SAMORA MACHEL 
African leader whose shifts did not win security 

— — . iL. M1.U Kill" lHBlInh 



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Mr Samora Machd. Prea* «: 
dent of Mozambique since the 
conn try became independent 
of Portugal in 1975, died on 
October 19 when the plane in 
which he was travelling home 
from Zambia to his capital. 

Maputo, crashed in eastern 
Natal He was 53. . 

Unlike most of his content 
notaries who led movements 
lor independence from colo- 
nial rale in Africa. Machd was 
trained in guerrilla warfare 
and took an active pan m the 
fight against the Portuguese m 
Mozambique. He was at that 

time a lean, bearded figmvzn 

the image and tradition of Che 

Guevara and Fidel Castro. .u_r.fi- nat nniHriv 

and was we« versed in the 
political and military precepts 
^General Giap and Mao Tst- 

made use of his suems 

in the field to take over, at an impendent rcpuwic m June 

eariy age, tbe leadership of - mraA . 

Frctimo, the main nationalist Mnchel became 
movemcnL In his fater years President ofa cwre-pajT> 
as Dteadent he was best ist state, the capital, Lourcnco 



as president he was best 
known as one of the first Marques, was rc-named 
African leaders to have deal- Maputo, and that was a new 
mgs with South Africa and to flag m .red, green *"P LPS 
seek a modus vivendi with P. adorned with the dcvrccs o* 
W. Botha; though this was rifle, hoc, book and cog-whcd. 
forced on him by a disastrous In his first year as president, 

drought, famine and his Machd committed his regime 
county’s increasing economic to fighting for freedom in all 
dependence on its powerful pans of Africa, side by side 
neighbour. with other socialist states, in 

Samora Menses Machel was what he termed “the liberated 
born on Se p tember 29. 1933, zones of humanity”. He went 
in southern Mozambique. His on in this vein to identity 
father was a minor chief of the capitalism, multi-national 
Sbona but MacheTs education companies and the Roman 
at a local Roman Catholic Catholic Church as the chief 
mission school was cut short causes of his country's ills and 
by the need to go out to work the feudal and colonialist 
when a wage-earning elder mentality of its inhabitants, 
brother was foiled in a mining He announced plans to 
accident in South Africa. change the entire social struc- 
He started as a hospital } Urc< with public ownership of 
orderly and ra the course of 41 and buildings, and 
the next ten years rose by hard government control of the 

.J, ..J tn n 0 • ■ _ nt i 


Sir Timothy Creasey 

A thanlc^iving service for the 
'life of General Sir Timothy 
Creasey will rake place at St 

Edmundsbury Cathedral. Bury 
St Edmunds. Suffolk, at 3 pm on 
November 6 , 1986. Applica- 
tions for tickets, by October 29, 
should be made to R HQ, Tbe 
Royal Anglian Regiment, 
Gibraltar Barracks, Bury St 

St Bartholomew’s 
Hospital 

The annual St Luke's-tide ser- 
vice of St Bartholomew's Hos- 
pital. West Smith field, will be 
held on Friday, October 31. 
1986, at 5.30 pm at the Priory 
Church of St Bartholomew-the- 
Greax in West SmithfiekL 

Edmunds, Suffolk, IP33 3RN, 
(Telephone: 0284-2394). 

Service luncheon 

Polytechnic 

news 

Middlesex 

The following mature entrants 
gained first-dass honours de- 
grees (names omitted from main 
fist): 

BA Contemporary Cultural Studies: S 

W Johnston#. M King. J Lftr and S A 

Royal Regiment of Fnaltew 

The Lord Mayor was tbe prin- 
cipal guest at a luncheon given 
by the Royal Regiment of 
Fusiliers at HM Tower of 
London yesterday in honour of 
friends of the regiment in 
London. Mqjor-General B.C. 
Webster, Deputy Colonel, City 
of London, presided. 

BA^Sobal Sdcncv. E J Wynne. 

Luncheon 

Lord Plant 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
Hfoof Lord Plant, will be held at 
St Margaret's. Westminster, cm 
Tuesday, October 28, 1986, at 
noon. 

JLJUUv ulvvu 

HM Government 

Mrs Lynda Chalker, MP, was 
host at a luncheon held yes- 
icrday at > Carbon Gardens in 
honour of the High Commis- 
sioner for Zambia and Mrs 
Phiri. 


work and application to a 
number of more responsible 
positions. During this time he 
came under the influence of 
Eduardo Mondlane. an Amer- 
ican-educated political leader 
who in 1962 founded Frenir 
de Libertacao de Mocambi- 
que, or Frelimo, as it was 
generally known. 

This was not the only 
nationalist movement, bat 
while its main rivals were 
based in Cairo and Accra it 
bad the advantage of being 
close at hand at Dor es 
Salaam, and of eqfryingtbe 
patronag: and support ofrres- 
idcnt Nyerere who allowed it 
to establish training camps for 
its guerrillas in southern Tan- 
zania. Having thrown in his 
lot with Freluno and crossed 
the border into Tanzania. 
Machel was one of the first 10 
be sent to Algeria for mining 
in guerrilla warfare. 

Whcn Mondlane launched 
his armed stn^gle against the 
Portuguese in Mozambique in 
1964. Machel already had 250 
trained men under his com- 
mand near the border. In the 
course of the next two years 
the hit-and-run tactics of his 
mobile band became a serious 
embarrassment to the Portu- 
guese authorities. 

In 1966 he was made 
Frelimo's secretary for . de- 
fence. and two years later 
became its commander-in- 
chief. In 1969, when 
Mondlane was mysteriously 
assassinated in Par es Salaam. 
Machel was one of three men 
appointed to assume collec- 
tive leadership. It was a short- 
lived arrangement and in the 
following year Machel 
emerged as sole leader and 
president of Frelimo. 

By 1974 Madid was said to 
have twenty thousand men in 
the field, and to have taken 
control of more than a third of 
Mozambique. Although he re- 
ceived quantities of commu- 
nist arms and advice, be owed 
his success quite as much to 
mili tary and financial support 
from the Oiganisation for 
African Unity, and from Pres- 
ident Nyerere in particular. 

In the end, however, it was 
not so much pressure from 
Frelimo which - brought the 
struggle for independence to a 
bead as the revolution in 
Portugal itself, when in 1974 
the dictatorship of Gaetano 
was overthrown by the left- 
wing Armed Forces Move- 


press, radio, films and books, spread to the suburbs of 
He admitted that the benefits Maputo, which were rocked 
of this well-regulated society by explosions, 
might take some time to be Machel became ineftastatfr 
apparent to everyone, that suspicious of South African 
meanwhile some might have good frith. In 1985 he secured 
to work without pay, and that Mugabc ‘5 ftffrvctnem to coop, 
those who were paid would be erete with him in military 

expected to contribute part of action against the guetriRiL 
their earning to a Solidarity 7 ^ fim practical come* 
Bank to help the oppressed quenoe of this waa the capture 
peoples of the Third world. 0 f the “Casa Banana”, the 
Although this new regime largest MNR hare m the 
was far from welcome to the country. It also provided 
long-cstabhshcd settlers of proof of South African Com- 
Portuguese descent, pheity m MNR activity, from 
successive governments in incriminating documents 
Portugal offered a helping found there, 
hand to Machel providing south African embarrass- 
technical expertise and train- mcni at these disclosures had 
mg in exchange for coramoy no effect on the MNR. howew 
rial advantages. er. and the Frdintor govern* 

In 1976 Machel attended a meat was dismayed when the. 
meeting with Nyerere and guerrillas subsequently retook 
Kenneth Kaunda to discuss ihe~Cast Banana*', encounter* 
assistance to the various ir« little opposition from 
movements engaged in the demoralised and underaour- 

— * - V- VuKit» WL Srhavl iU M lU l Wl lUWlt i . 


the trade and- agncrilura) 
agreements which he contf nd- 
cd with Scandinavian court, 
trees. But he renamed chary of 
dotf involvement with the 
United Sum. and in fflgt 
expefled ffr VS Aptomtts 
suspected of bring CIA agents. 

Machete mtittm most 
marked in to* refotions wifr 
South Africa. Despite to* rife* 
usnmt oppotiifoa K> the re* 

g ime there, roo frettn fed 
im to eater into nefobatwag- 
with Mr One was hfe 
country's constderibfe eco- 
nomic dri xtid ca cc on Soath 
Africa, partwtiwiy as* ptace - 
ofempfonnent Tneothenni 
the gaemBa nctivmes ofthe 
Movimeata Nacional da' 
Resistencia de Mocamhkrac 
(MNR). a rival body of Afri- 
can naooaahsts whkh since 
independence bad tried to 
overthrow - Machel and 
Freltmo. 

With arms and trautiog 
frcflities provided by South 
Afina Uk MNR hadbcoomti 
serious embarrassment ta 
Machel in the same way aa to 
a lesser dcnxe, tbe frcihticj 
given by Mornnbtqne bad 
allowed the Afhcao Natioftal 

Wrtpfit ww^ South Africa. 
Beginning with ustobmurte 
discussions os neutral ground 
in Swaziland and Portugal the 
two sides moved cautiously 
towards a pact called the 
Nkomati Accord in the spring 
of 1984. Under this both 
parties agreed to deny facili- 
ties to the MNR and the ANC 
respectively, and 10 pm a stop 
to cross-border activities. 

Yei thc atmosphere of sup. 
posed cooperation brought no 
respite in the MNR attacks. 
Power lines were desiroyrd. 
factories were blown up. and 
the goerrUU offensive even 
spread to the suburbs of 
Maputo, which were rocked 
by explosions. 

Machel became increasiotty 
suspicious of South African 
good frith. In 1985 he sewed 
Mugabe's agreement to coop- 
erate with him in mihtKy 
action against the guettillu. 
The first pradicaf conse- 
quence of this was the capture 
of tbe "Cara Banana", the 
largest MNR hare ra the 
country. It also provided 
proof of South African Cow- 
plirity m MNR activity, from 
incriminating documents 
found there. 

South African embarrass- 
ment at these dudastues had 
no effect on the MNR. howev- 
er. and the Frdint* govern, 
tnest was dismayed when the 
guerrillas subsequently retook 
the M Cssa Banana", encounter- 


struggle against roe white re- 
gime in Rhode s ia . Madid 
would not at first support 
Robert Mugabe or his party, 
but was eventually persuaded 
by Nyerere to do so. There- 
after he provided Mugabe 
with impenrtant facilities ra 
Mozambique. 

In 1980 Machel began to 
make drastic changes in his 
economy in order to combat 
“inefficiency, bureaucracy 
and corruption**. He attribut- 
ed the failure of wholesale 
nationalization partly to what 
he called M uUra4eftist policies 
of excessive state 


ish(4 government force*. 

Though the base was again 
recaptured with Zimbabwean 
help, the recent loss of a 
number of small towns, in 
spite of a substantial build-up 
of Zimbabwean forces in the 
country, illustrated the securi- 
ty problem that continually 
afflicted Madid. 

Even in middle age he 
retained many of the Chirac* 
teristics of the wiry, gueniUa 
leader he had once been. 
Though a Marxist he was no 
intellectual, and carty tenden- 
cies towards theorizing soon 
gave way to the rule of 


or excessive siaie gave way to the rule ol 
involvement' 1 , and partly to common sense. .As a man he 
lack of effort and a sense of was cheerful, and liked a ioke. 
mission on the part of his However in his personal life 
countrymen. be tended to the austere; 

In 1983 he announcol the eschewing tobacco and ateo- 
end of what he had hoped hoi, rising eariy and keeping 
would be a period. 01 ctevnen- fit by swimming, jorang and 
cy and reeducation", and pedalling an exercise cycle, 
brought back foe death penal- By colleagues and subordi- 
ty and public flogging for nates be was considered sorae- 
poiitical .and economic thing of a moralist. On one 
sabotage. occasion he ordered the wives 

Experience made him no of his guerrilla officers to 
less nuhlessly pragmatic in his lower the hems of their skirts, 
relations with other countries, and one of his earliest acts in 
Although he paid several vis- government was a drive 
its to Russia and other eastern against prostitution, 
bloc stares, he had no wish to He was three limes married, 
become a communist satellite His first wife left him when he 
or to ris* forgoing the wider became a guerrilla fighter. His 
economic and technical ad- second. Josina, died during 
vantages of association with the guerrilla campaign ana 
the West. was revered as a heroine- His 

He made a number erf third, Grace Simbinc, whom 
profitable visits to Portugal, he married in 1973. was 
Britain, France and Holland. Mozambique's minister of 
and he particularly welcomed education and culture, 


PROFESSOR ALAN LITTLE 


Professor Alan Little, JP, 
died on October 18 from a 
heart attack. He was 52. 

An action-orientated intel- 
lectual. he devoted his knowl- 
edge in the social sciences as 
much to practical as to aca- 

dci 


this post was notable above all 
for the longitudinal study that 
he instituted of children right 
through their school careers, 
Which was the first study of its 
kind and remains a vital 
source of information on the 


of the BBCs consultative 
committee on the social et 
fists of television', chairman- 
ship of 2 committee of the 
SSkO, and -membership of the - 
council of NACRO. He w«» 
magistrate in Bromley for 20. 



other ways. His later concern 
for the plight of those living in 
urban ghettoes reflected his 
own sense of good fortune in 
having escaped from one. 


TUWre td 8° slow; Ctofo&y- 
Cnilteu OY himself, he nm_ bud k* uvib 


--7 — — — - If 

cruited by himself, he pro- 
duccd a series of excellent 


t* l • * luuure w m smiw. ruuwj- 

iu he pro- &ced and ebullient, bo 
if wtcellcm life at a gallop. 

»sedofany Paiiticafly he moved fa® 
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btrths, marriages, 
deaths 

AND IN MEMORIAM 

T *2»i uv?Mtofs! < !ir nl biw kno| *iMw» 


WUKaD ■ On 16th OcioOcr. to Jack- 
tftCUTKfJ ana John, a m Thomas 
ChkTte. IT emu. a brother (or Ed- 
word and 0)h <r, 

PONHAM CHRISTIE On October 
1701. to Clare irw Bays) and Robert. 
A mi. Charles, a brothrr tor John. 

MOMAOC On October 9th, to Eliza* 
been tnfr Raikn> and David, a 
mono daughter. Isabelle Georgina 
Rouen. * shut (or Julia. 

nCLDHOOSE- On October !7Ui.atSt. 
MaWS Paddington, lo Torimn and 
Bui. k mi 

i.sHDOH-FIRLA TSON ■ On 15th Octo- 
ber L986. to CaUy ,nee Lc HardylSui 
JohitLa bw. Robert Henry, a brother 
for Chartte. 

HATOMRD On 3W October 1986 at 
SWhburv lo Diana inre McGJU) and 
John, a son Edward John. r 

LYU -On October 16th. (oSarahinee 
Carter) and Tonotny. a«on 'Nicholas 
Claude MaxweU). a brother for 
■ Victoria. 

fpwnx- TUCK ■ On October 16m. at 
west London Hospital, to Dinah 
(Hath and Julian, a son. Frederick 
George, a brother (or Jonah. 
SHOTTUR - On 16ih October, at Si. 
Thomas's Hospital. To Melanie and 
Roger, a son. Charles Edward, a 
bro the r for Archie. 

STRAYHORN ■ On the 17th of Septem- 
ber at Wilmington. North Carolina. 
. to Clara iikc wtsdomi and Ken. a 
dau g hter. Alexan dra Julia. 

WELD FORESTER - On October 19th. 
to Joanna (nee wnetey) and Antho- 
ny. o daugnicr. Jocelyn Victoria. 
YOtMBhlAMCSOM - On October 1st 
to Sarah tnee Larwood) and Timothy, 
.of Hradboame Worthy House. Win- 
chester. a son. Harry Oswln. 

LEE - On I6lh October 1986. to Lesley 
inee Rumfordl and Julian, a son. 
Marne, a brother for Simon. Char 
- Uite. Georgina and Arabella. 


MARRIAGES 


MATHlESateCHRtSTOPHERSON On 

October isth 1 986. Robert, son of Dr 
* and. Mrs JRM Mathteson of East- 
' bourne, lo Helen, daughter of Mr HF 
OHlstwherson CJH.G. and the late 
Mrs JW Chmtopherson of Sutton. 
Surrey. 


RUBY ANNIVERSARIES 


RAWLINS - On Or HUNT 3L« 1946. iTra 
MW Davi at SI MarvX Mmli Onnrti. 
(WHlow. Unit. ArlhuT r H R.N.V.R.. 
to Bruv fbrvMl hv GoOS am. of Jane 
anti Jetemv and Many hnni ones, in 
IWINH lelHnnem al uie Tbairneti 
(SIMM* 


DEATHS 


aucr ■ On October 19m 1986. Jean 
Man' (Bartxlej aged 89. wife of (he 
. Uie Cecil Bury of Creaton. North- 
amptonshire. Funeral at SL Michael 
■ and AD Angels. Creator) on Thursday 
October 23rd at 3 n.m.. Family flow- 
ers only, donations If desired In 
Creaton Church. 

da RAT - On October 17th. suddenly at 
home. Anne, aged 72 years, widow 
or Xavier Soruyt ue BAY and dearly 
kned mother of Maty and PhUtp. Re- 
quiem Mass al St John the 
Lvangcltefs Church. Bath on Thurs- 
day. October 23rd al 12 noon. R.l P. 
donations In lieu of Ooweis to the 
Priest's Retirement Fond. C/o The 
Presbytery. South parade. Bath. 

DE GRASS! M MAMURA ■ On 18th 
October, suddenly In MUan. Garde 
Corrado. Moved husband of Benita. 
.RIP 

CLVERSftH MIHCKil I ■ On October 
I6tn. peocefolly m London. Wiaiam 
Marsden aged B», .betoved husband 
of Pom and much loved samfUher 
and siepgrandlathtr. Service and 
cremation at Putney Vale Crtmatacf- 
um on Thursday 23W October at 
* 3.00 p m. 

FOOTER - on October 18 m 1986 tn 
haspual. Jack of Caterham. Surrey, 
dear husband of Betty and father of 
Margaret. EHabeth . Michael and 
Hilary. Maths Master at Catcrtum 
School for mer 40 years. Cremation 
service at Worth Crematorium on 
Friday 24th October at 12.50pm. No 
flowers please, donations to the Unti- 
ed muons. 

CAYE - On 19lh October, peaceftdly. 
al her home in southwold. Freda, be- 
hned shier of Phoebe and Fell* 
ORSON - On October 2Wh 1966. Hil- 
da. Stsur Elizabeth SX.G- at Uw 
Convent of the Incanuialon. 
Farncm. Oxford. Beloved aunt and 
friend RMUiem on Monday October 
27]h at 11 a m. al Faincns. fol- 
lowed by lntamenl al 12 noon M 
Rosvtuil OMnwery. 

GOODMAN - On October 18th 1986. 
Mary Jane aged 85 years, at Goring- 
on Thames, formerly of Caversham. 
Berkshire, wmow of Robert Good- 
nun. much loved mother of Margot. 
John. Anthony and Bruce. Funeral 
Service al Henley Road Oemetery. 
Caversham. Reading. Berkshire, on 
Wednesday October 22nd ax 2-30 
p m Rowers may be sent to AB 
Waiver & Son. 3b Otton Rd. 
Reading. 

HAUUCrr - On 1 8th October 1986- 
suddenK and peacefully in hn home. 
.Insroh Thomas Pauli Halkii. dear 
husband of Kay and brother of Joan 
Close Funeral M SI. Mari' ^ Church 
AddtTtnmr. Os on. on Thursdsy 23 
October at 2J0pm. Family flowm 
only Dwuikms if desired, lor BrttWj 
Heart FoumUhrm. C/o. J * M 
HumohTB. Albert SL Banbury. 
Own 

WUEY-ntEKE ■ On Oclober 19th. 
suddenly. Ambrose Frederick, aged 
76. of HanningUm Hall. Hiph worth, 
dram loved husband of Mary Fu- 
neral. fcjnufj ofTfy. oo (hums. 
Memorial service at HanmngMnl Par- 
ah Church, at 2J0pm on Friday 
. October 3lsl 

JACOBSON - On October I9th. peace- 
' lull)- in Harrogale. Sydney. 
JOHNSTON - On October i«Hi. MWr a 
vm short Ulnns. Kathleen Johnston 
. M-A., of rarfngdon. wjj K- F« 
manv Secratao' of U* Brimsh 
redcraUtut of University Women. 
Private CremaDon has iaKen place. 


ttY - On Uie 18th of October, peace- 
» a her home. Dorothea 
Gertr ude, w idow of sir Cordon Ley. 
™ Greatly towed by family and 
friends. Funeral ai st. Paul's. 
Knjghlsbrwge at 2 50 p.m. on the 
29th of October followed by crana- 
Uon. Flowers lor donations if 
preferred for Cancer Research at me 
Marsden Hospital) to Kenyons. 74 
Rochester Row. London SWi. Tef. 
834 2978. 

- On Octtdier 17th. sud- 
denly. Charles Kenneth McConnan 
of Henllys Cottage. Newnuilcel SL. 
U5k. Gwent dearly loved husband 
and father to. Shirley. James, fsobel 
and Miranda. Funeral Thursday 
23rd October, service of St. Mary's 
Church. Usk at 1130 am. floral 

ubum may be scan to the Chureh. 

McEUIEN - cm October 19th. peaceful- 
ly al Sir Michael Sofaefl House. 
Oxford. John Finlay very dearly 
loved husband of Ann and father of 
Diana. Mary and Alastalr. Funeral 
Private, no flowers Donations if de- 
sired lo. Sh- Michael SobeU House. 
C hurchi ll Hospital. Oxford. 
McMDCC ■ On the I8U) October 1986. 
peacefully, at his home Coontbe 
House. Axminstcr. Devon. The Rev- 
erend Patrick. The funeral service 
will lake place al St Mary Magdalen. 
Holm wood. Near Dorking, Surrey on 
Saturday 25th October al 3 pun. Me- 
morial Service at St Mary's Parish 
Church. Ammeter on Friday 519 
October at 2 duty. Family flowers 
only please but if desired, donations 
in ltea to: The Reverend Barrie 
Swift The Rectory. Axmlnster - to- 
wards buying a new chance ror the 
Ch urch. 

MOUDAU - On October 17th. Crete 
Moldau. (Nee Brunn) of 12 The 
Grange. Wimbledon, aged 90. Be- 
loved wffeof the late Max Moldau. of. 
Wimbledon and formerly of Vienna, 
and mother of HWnz and Trudy. Fu- 
neral service and cremation, at 
Randalls Park Crematorium. Ran- 
dalls Road. Leatherhend. Friday 
October 24th 3.30pm. Family flow- 
ers only. dohaUons If desired, to 
Marie Curie Memorial Foundation. 
NAIM - On 18th October 1966. peace- 
fully In hospital. Jean Mary Naish 
uife WesRopp) widow of Rear Adml - 
ral George Nafati CJL and much 
loved mother of Jeremy 

and Patrick. Family funeral at Staf- 
ford on 23rd October. 

NORRIS • On 19th October, at home In 
Woodbrfdge. William Edwin Her- 
schel. at Uie age of 24. Dearly loved 
son of Jin and Harry Norris, and 
loved brother of Lucy and Charles, 
after tong Hineses bravely borne. Fu- 
neral service. Ipswich Crematorium. 
Thursday 23rd October 12.15 pm. 
Col flowers, family only. Donation If 
desired, lo Home Farm Trust. 35 
-High Rd East. Felixstowe. 
PONSONBY - On 17th October, peace- 
fully In Brighton. David Bratwzoa 
aged 84 yean. Betoved unde, sadly 
missed by all his family. Funeral al 
Downs Crematorium. Bear Read. 
Brighton, on Thursday 23rd October 
at 1pm. Memorial Service wDr be 
held al Stansted Park Chapel. Row- 
lands Castle, Hampshire, on Friday 
28th November, at 3pm. Flowers If 
desired. C/o Hanningtons (F/O) Ltd. 
4-6 Monteflorie Rd.- Have. Sussex. 
Tel: 10273) 778733. 

QUARRELL - On October 18th 1986. 
at home. Phyllis Edna widow of 
Charles QuanriL darling Mother of 
Pamela Marta Fuller, and betoved 
Grandmother of Qaudia. Funeral 
pnvate by request. No Dowers 
please. Donations If wished to 
RSPCA. Ctaiertoo Down. Bath. 
SHELLEY -On 1 9th October, peaceful- 
ly in hospttaL Rosemary EveUne. 
sister of Iris Tanner, aunt of Nicholas 
and C2ara Tanner and for 40 years 
the beloved friend of Nora I'Bunty*) 
Allen. Funeral private, family Dow- 
ers only but donations If desired to 
ihe Institute of Cancer Research. 17A 
Onslow Gardens. London SW7 3AL. 
SINGH • On October 17th. aged 65. 
JugharSfngh.ee RAF wartime POW 
Changl Jan and Burma Railway: de- 
voted husband of Joan, father of 
John. Peter and Rosemary, alter a 
long illness, stoically borne. No flow- 
ers. if desired donations to the Renal 
Research Fund. Royal Free HospflaL 
NWS Funeral 23rd October, enqui- 
ries Cooksey A Son. 883.4844. . 
STAPLES - October 18 1986. peaceful- 
ly. al the Angus Nursing Home after 
a long Wness. Theresa Jane Margaret 
of 15 Grand Avenue. Hove. Mother 
of Christopher and Dinah. Reotoem 
Mass at Uie Church of the Sacred 
Heart. Norton Road Hove on Friday 
October 24 at 12 noon rotlowed by 
cremation. No flowers ptease. Dona- 
dons IT desired to RNU c/o Aftree 
and Kent Limited. Funeral Directors. 
108 Church Road Hove. 

SWENSON - On October 18th 1986. 
Alan of 'JttvmdeU*. Bell. 4406 Aus- 
tralia. LW e of e>0 Green way Gardens. 
Graenford. Middlesex. Dearly loved 
husband of Pauline (n*e Spencer) re- 
leased peacefully Dura .prolonged 
earthly pain. 

THAPNELL- On 18lh October, peace- 
fully at St- Mark's HospttaL London 
ECl. Hte Honour. Alan Stewart 
Trapneti; aged 73. Funeral private. 
No flowers please, but donations 
would be welcomed for Masonic 
Foundation tor the Aged and the 
Sick. 1967 Festival (Sent C/o L.W. 
WUson 29 Si. Peter's Rd. St. 
Margarervon-Thames. Middlesex 
TWl iqy) and/or. All Souls Church 
Restoration Fund. 2 All Souls Place. 
London WIN 3DB. Arrangements 
for a memorial service, will be an- 
nounced later. 

TURNER - On October X7th 1986. 
Humphrey James, loved husband of 
Stephanie. Loved father of Jennifer. 
Frances. Lorraine and Nicholas, and 
devoted grandfather. Funeral at All 
Saints. Branksome Park. Poole, on 
Wednesday October 22nd at 2pm. 
WELLS - On October I9th 1986. Har- 
ry Robert (Roy) peacefully at home 
aged 84 years. Funeral service at All 
Saints Church. Wokingham at 12J0 
on Thursday October 23rd. Family 
Dowers only, donations if desired to 
The Royal British Legion. 
Wokingham. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIV ATE~| 


d*ABRANYLFNASER. Joyce Valerie 
briot ed wife of Melchior died a year 
ago eve In my thoughts. a Je 
rev tens’ J'auendrai. 

RONALD POPPEHWELL 21st October 
1914- 22nd December 1983. Loving- 
ly remembered Rene, 

MeDEKMOTT ■ Geoffrey Lyster J91Z 
197B dwtomat and author. Beloved 
husband and lariher. 'Ouwi consum- 
mation tovf. 


Science report 


Threat to the new era 
of faster chips 


By Gerry Woolf 


» 


m 


Silicon has dominated ibe 
electronics industry lor more 
than 3U years as the material for 
the manufacture of individual 
transistors and. l3ler. 
microchips . and computer 
processors. 

Bui the demand for quicker 
computers and their associated 
data hiorajee needs means inai 
the reign or sUicitn is drawing to 
a close. _ t . 

The pooflrihiy of making 
cien faster chips has been 
demon-timed already using 
VO Mills of gallium arsenide, 
because this material works 
belief al high frequencies than 

itlium arsenide is only 
»«* a vast array of new 
materials under investigation m 
the laboraion. ereaiing c\aie- 
mciit m tbcspenaleifd worW of 
solid sune physics and material 
sckmce. 

\ The vmhuswsm comes from 
•* the hin ihai these new mawoals 
are mn formed in nature; they 
are created to order, mom by 
atom, by a icchniqiw known a> 
molecular beam epuasy. 

Tire process H similar to ur 
was a cathode ray lube buiWs up 
a leles »K»n picture. \ moleeular 
beani fpiasy machine operates 
by forming la>en of atoms m a 
ciyttal form. 


silicon. 

But 
one 



Nobody is certain what will 
come from investigating exouc 
new materials, including gal- 
lium antimonidesand cadmium 

telluride. Bui ihe work is b«ng 

vigorously supported both in 
Bntain and abroad because in 
ihe past al hfasi three quarters of 
all ihe speculative research into 
semiconducting materials has 
jed to commercial 
developments. ... 

The ansa of science, described 
as tow dimensional studies, is 
one of the largest research fields 
being supported by the Science 
and Engineering Research 
Council. Growing the new 
materials « being done at three 
universities, and the latest appa- 
ratus began work last week at 
the Cavendish Laboratory m 
Cambndgr. The other centres 
are at Oxford and Nottingham. 

But the scientists are worried 
about restrictions on their in- 
vestigations because of cuts m 
spending on research. When uie 
programme of molecular ream 
epitaxy studies was conceived 
two vears ago. the plan to 
Spend W million a year. It is 
currently operating on halt that 
■ 

Incv iiabJy. this will result m 
Britain Hilling behind in the race 
to develop the nc\t generation 
of computer chips. 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


announcements 


will siman Jatnev mum-. M known 
* Ilium ui IlS Oariton Road. C-alinq. 
Loudon VV13 or anvotw knowing hK 
wnrr'<iiDaui>. Mw ronuri frannsom. 
Solinlof. DovOs Court. b83 Simurv Boo- 
kn jid. wrklqw OJli-wm. Cmlrnl Miuon 
Knm Mh’i 3LH iftef; NJAi in Conner 
non with muwruni lamily nuUm lo Mt 

MldllMr 


SROANMNe MUBUOMRS would Ukr lo 
htvu uoni Ainnon- n vou tune wrlllrn 
* lujok Ui4it ilnmn ouMiralion Wnlc 
U. llrtM TM 11/03 THE BOOK CL'ILD 
I ID 25 Hum Lrwpv. SUm-x 

RN7 211 


! you with Hit- Blacuool Girt, Choir 
1155/00 7 We are ntanninq a 30 it nr- 
itmon July/AumM 1W7 Cbniari A 
Brvendge 01 333 B6Bt> ioHmi 


■WTISH Hunwumi Aw < R*g Quruyi 
Non rrtwrous tuneral nook ss from 
BHA 13 Prince of Wain Terr.. W8. 


BIRTHDAYS 


DAVIES: Barbara Stadium Franmra 
. Born Orlotm. 1050. Orra 30 To 
du> . -HARBiLT 


PAUL FLNumCH b 21 today. 


SERVICES 


FMEND9WP. Love or Minim Aliases, 
arras. Oairtine . Depi iQi6i 23 ADmodon 
Road. London wa. Tel: 01-938 lOli. 

CALIBRE CVS Lid predewoiUH lurrlfu- 
Iuri vitap doeufucnU. Details. 01-031 
3388 

DRUBUMS PROBLEM - sort II out now 
nrtorr ihe Mine nason al 57 oca 
sseru/Krt nuruno home for addictive 
dww Mi h area oi oubUndlnt natu- 
ral beauty Staffed by nurses, 
counsellors, psychotooisi. Mty*M>UUTS- 
B«t and iduuent medtcoi otnetr. For 
Ulus ral rd prospectus contact the dirvc- 
lor. Caouds House.. East Knoyle. wins 
,SP3 6BE or Mepflow 074783 655. 

CAPITAL CVi prepare hMh qualUy curric- 
ulum vHaes 01-607 790S. 

A LOAN WUTV a mono- hack uuaranira 
C2.000 lo C30.000 with mortgage secu- 
rity. APR IS-Son variable. Free 
redundancy cover offer Free life cover. 
Dial 100 freefone Portfolio until 
8.00pm Premier Portfolio. Freepost. 
Reading. PCI 1BR. 

PHOTOCOPIERS al wholesale prices. Lai- 
esT high-lech from me supplier with 
service Oi 278 6127. 

HEART !• HEART. Todays wav of meet 
mg Conltdrnlial introduction* 
throughout LK ter Friendship and Mar- 
rtage. Heart lo Heart, s? London Rd. 
Twickenham. Middx 01-892 2051. 


i by fully a notified SolkT- 
locs CIPO ♦ VAT and standard 
msouraements ring 0244 319398. 


WANTED 


MANTEZL Lock-tip garage for large Sized 
car Lease 1 or rental- Portland 
Place/Harley Sum area. Tel: 01-493 
1412 or OI 636 2990. 


WE BUY BOOHS Anuauanan and mod- 
ern drat editions. Libraries and small 
coDecoons purchased Best prices paid 
bi cash, will csUect anvwbere. Write to 
Mr Ronald daily. Fortes. 119 Charing 
Cron Road, vvez 

C2S per or up lo paid for stiver articles. 
£260 per or /or gold. AB diamond 
lewHiery boughL Mr Han 01-960 8030 
or Write 361 Harrow Road. London. 
W9. All Emuanq covered. 

LUX' RENTAL home ' n-q*d. San 
Franroro/Bay area Mid/tong term, for 
prof person in children! Exc ref*. 060 
881 0685 

TWO TICKETS - Remembrance Service 
Albert Hall. Saturday Mglu Ufeume 
amMuon. Amitung paid. Tel 1 09331 
312049 daytime. 

JEWELLERY. GoM. Silver. Dtmonds ur- 
gently warned Ton prices. WiUams. 43 
Lambs Conduit SI WCl. OI 405 8538 

WANTED Edwardian. Victorian and an 
panned fumuure Mr AHMon 01 947 
5946. 667-069 GarraU Lane. EarlsfieM. 
SW17 

ROYAL BOULTON Tony Jug*. Figurine*, 
animals, etr ■ wanted 01 883 0024. 


FOR SALE 


BECHSVZUi Grand Piano- Mahogany 6 ft 
80 s 1413 in ntdlnl condlUon. 
£4300 OBO. T« . 0484 531467 ie\«) 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP FREE cntM 
over I year tAPR O-ci Low uuerest 
rami ov er 2 vegi s i APR 9 JS"n i A 3 years 
l APR 122'S) Written nuDUMm Free 
Catalogue 30a Hlghoate Road. NWS. 
01 '267 7671. 

2 BEAUTIFUL Berhslrln Grands, rural- 
clans uwiruments. good price for wade 
sale 606 4981. . 

■ROADWOOO Boudoir Grand. Rose- 
wood 1870 very good rood Oner*. 
leU06U5i 2992 

SI UK WAY O Gram] Rosewood no 
162170 interior reouto 196S. CAJOOO. 
Tel 733-9060 

CAYS. CHESS. L-s Mh AB meane ana 
spoil Trl 439 1763 All maior OWU 
ids. 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES, cobble sells 
etr Nationwide detnene* Tet. >0380) 
850039 iWinvl 

YORK CRAZY PftVMC for patios and 
driveways Spare needed, hence tow 
Prices 061 223 0881. 061 231 6786. 

YORK FLAGSTONES lor palms & drive- 
ways LuHUdanon uie. Tel 061 223 
0881/061 231 6785 

BIRTHDAY DUE T Give someone an origi- 
nal Tunes KewsMper dated the very 
day Ihev were born £12 50. 0492- 
31303 . 

SCATFMDERS Best IlcSets for an wAI- 
oul events. Our clients include most 
maior ramMiue*. Credit cards accffted. 
01 828 1678 

THE TRUES tm-INC. Other tales 
avail Hand bound ready tor present*- 
inn - also -Sundays" £1230 
R emember When. OI 688 6323. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


1 Cancer 

Together we am hem it. 

We find! ow one dmd of all 
Mini eh duo the prevention and. 
erne of cancer fax the UK. 

Hdp os by sending a dentnoo 
ear make a legacy to: 

Cancer. 

Research 
Campaign 


2 Horae Trance, 

(Dcpi TT/;i/IOL London SW1Y SAIL 



THE MIND 
CAN TAKE ONLY 
SO MUCH 


Major C. altar years in Bomb DeposaL 
now sobs an aptos»n ai ewty uctong 
dock. AH Senneeman nsfc menial 
breaWown m peace or w afite. Wc 
drvo» ourselves a the wtihre of 
these man and woman. We must go on 
helping them. We mosi have fuods. 
Phase send us a Donation, a Covenant 
or remember us with a Legacy. 
EX-SERVICES MENTAL 
WELFARE SOCIETY 

BnaMf Mot lie arauf _ 
BUM sum lit lb 01 M3 US 


FOR SALE 


' SAVE A PILE 

al 

Resisia Orpets 

Mmkaion ichct pile cupcunj. 14 pDm 
adoori. Bcili in undcrtn I? wide from 
Hock. 7 vear wear pnmmce for home gr 
office. £4.73 per Kjvd. Corkopiast rork 
hies. Natural. 275 v 275 oni). Sea price 
am Where 18.95 per sq><L Pnfici poods. 
Plus the buses sdccinm of pbin carpet- 
ing ID LoadOHAU pnttS ftCUBHYOf v*L 
548 . Fulham Road 
Parsons Green SW6 

Td: 01-736 7551 

Frw> EstHiuiKfxpert Fftuna 


WEDDING SUITS 

Dinner Suits 
Evriimg Tail Sons 
Surplus to- lure 

BARGAINS FROM £30 

LIPMANS HIRE' DEPT 

22 Charing Cn» Rd 
London WC2 
Nr Lncestor So lube 
Oi 240 2310 


SM W RUSSELL Flint RA. Dnua Mon- 
tana ugnrd Inilrd million print tn 
praline rendlWM. C2JSOOono. Reply to 
• BOX C5S 


BLtmfHER- Grand puna Na 47953. 
Row-wood 6 IL £3-000 o.n.o. TeL 
Otlord «»S92j 2836 & after 

7pnu 


OCTOBER SKOAL* ai Tops. Ooi TVs 
from £49. Vidros from £99. 01 Lower 
SJoanr St- SWi. 730 0933. 


6* STEINWAY GRAND piano. £4.500. 
Bkmuui LpncfU tbi need of small at- 
tnUtoni £500. Trt.Ol -674 3458 


BM0 H T 5 OF HETTLEBED The ultimate 
replica fumllurr wmaub. One of En- 
gtands unto Qos lays of 17th and ISUi 
century period style furniture, 
rvrutroeo. near Henley on Thames 
104911 641115. Bournemouth tOSOZt 
29358a Topvham (0392871 7443. 

Berkel ey. Ora >0463) 810962. 

FINEST Quality woof carpets. Al trade 
prices and under, also available IOC's 
extra. Large room Un remnants under 
naif normal price. Chancery Carpets OI 
405 0483 

PERSIAN CARPETS MagnUMcot Ziegler 
carpel 28ftxl7fl in excellent condJItoo. 
also smaller carpets and roraJnr sOk 
aim and annoue Kazaks. All offers ctm- 
HdemL Tel 01 629 6827. 

IKMm FOR ANY EVENT, Qtfa. Star 
UgM inn. Onv Lee Mb AH Ihratrr 
and loortv Tel: 821 66I6/B2D049S. 

- JVLs / Visa / Dlnera. 

HARPSICMORD Dobneurh single efrfng 
in ang u ta r wamui and saiinwood rase. 
Boxwood and ebony keys Easily trans- 
norUbto Bed oflei over £1.780 secures. 
Tet 0747 840007. 


FLATSHASE 


ORSWICK W4 Nr lube. LgrO/R In v ana- 
rtous Nueed Hal AH lartttues. £220 
prm Trt. OI 994 7928 


IXYTOH S TOWE Young Prof M/F N/S to 
snare fUL IS mtos CRy. S mins MSI. 
Own room. £165 Dan + imps. TcL 0263 
740863 


FRANCHE COURT RD Ctose to CartsfMid ‘ 
station SWI 7 Room to Victorian col- 
lage overiooklug ptaytog fields. Would 
sin! prof person, share facilities. £40 
n w. iDctnsne of rtre. CH and CHW.OI 
■ 937 9684 or mobile phone 0836 
209120 


FLATMATES Selective Sharing. Wen 
rslab mnodiKiaiv service. Phr in for 
APM. 01-589 5491. 313 Srompioo 
R0UKLSW3 

HAMMERSMITH: dean a/%, prof 2630 
its to share immaculate flat. Own 
room. CH. washing machine. Nr tube 
£220 me orm. Tet 748-6067 lEveSJ- 

EALJME: Prof person, n/s 24 * to share 
ILS. Own room. CH. nr. rube. £170 pent 
ex cl TK847-1240 after 6-30 pm. 

KEMSMCTOM wb Small own nun to 
spacious CH fbl £42 pw. Tet OT 937 
4504 

PUTNEY Female to share wist couple. 
N/S. o/R. tarary gdn flat. Nr brae. CSB 
pw. ret- OI 874 9848 HON- 600pm. 

SOUTHFIELD* Prof ra/f. N/S. lo snare 
tarty flat Mon-Frt. o/R. £150 om me- 
Tet 01 388 6188 

SWI 5. Prof F. own igedM nn to lux 3 bed 
house with garden. £48pw. Tel Ciatre 
Oi 629 5*48 day. 788 0197 after 70m. 

ws M/r Own room in house, snare kit. 
oath 6 garden. £32 pw met ch & hot 
water. Tri Ol 748 8862 feveal 

WI Prof M. N/S to share house. O/R. 
gdn. an ameuues £40pwe«t. TrL- Ol- 
99® 3571. 

WIMBLEDON PARKStne. girl share 
House, garage, tmm. KlSOpcm. le< Al- 
dershot 10252)850424. 


RENTALS 


EXECU T IV E Seeks lux 
flat/ ho use- op to £ 800 pw. Usual fees 
rea Ptuttps Kay 6 Lesrts. South Of the 
Park Chelsea office. 01-352 8111 or 
North of me Park. Regent's rtarfc office. 
01-586 9882. 


HAMPSTEAD super flat ifurm to Mytkc 
country setung. o/tooktng H eath 6 golf 
course 30 11 L shaped studio, balcony. 
laL Mhrm/wc CH. pboae Avail now 
for I yr £95 D» Owner OI 586 4559 
W 883 2321 

KTDCmORPC ROAD SW12. Attractive 
lerrarr d muse tn mart resMeatni uca- 
■ Uon. 3 bedrooms 12 DbleL dMe recep no. 
summng ft tat/btrakfasi rm wiih ma- 
chines. Funmbto and decorated tohign 
standard. £170 pw. *44 7353 
KENSINGTON W8. Bngn! and spacious 2 
bed flat on one of London’s most pnsU 
gam addresses. Minutes walk from the 


iacdtbes of Kensington High SL Lang oo 
M £200 pw Buchanans; 351 7767. 
KWOfTWBUDCr: Harnxrs 200 yds. 
■ next to Hyde Parte. V. quiet newly dec A 
farn flat in weOTun btock. 2 dMe beds. 2 
baths >1 erauueL ige reap nit. Uttali 
machines. Incl CM/CHW. uft 6 porier- 
aor. £350 pw TeL (06281 35752. 
AMERICAN BANK urgently regidm lux- 
ury Oafe/mum. Chefsra. knghis 
bridge. BtoraiB areas, £200 - £ 2-000 
pw Burgew Estate Agnus 581 6136 
CLAPKAM COMHHOM. SoaclouS 4 bed. 2 
batn notae tn pertly sheet on Common. 
Soiartb- decor aird wah an mod costs. 
Sod 5 snarer* at W5 pw each tSSSS 
pw t Bu rb a n ans. 351 7767 
MIERE5TMG & constantly changing se- 
lection of tumshed flats & houses. 
£i50ow -C&500nw. Beottam A Reeves. 
lienmKdon A surrounding areas. OI- 
938 3522 

y g n g T SWIS. Faouloa* 3 bed nutson. 
me with i eranda Light ana s paoo wi ft 
hii/bnaUis. loungr wun anginal Ore- 
ptace. bath. 2 wc. garden. Co let £160 
pw 244 7353 

WL Spacious ground door flat ura PB 

Dtoru. rime nae. 2 double beds, lo un ge 

with original orep a ce, owing room. 

Ldchen. bath and second wc. Avail 

unified. Os WL £180 pw 244 7353 

EMI 8> 8xmCHOFF tor luxury properties 
tn Si Johns Wood. Re 
enh Park. Mania Vale. Sms Con A 
Hampstead 01-586 7561 
FULHAM, imnandate funusned A deco 
rated toe 3 beds, dbte recep. ML bam. 
rlk. gdn 6 ■ 9 nrthv Go let. £225 pw. 
Suita an Thomas 731 1333. 

HAMPTON In 2 bed house Gonvrpleal 
■or London A Heathrow Bull nrdf per- 
wane .1 L96 ow tort OI 373 0805. 

HYDE PK wa Sunny mews nse. 3 dW 
beds 2 tabs, master en suite + lacruzi 
Roof gdn6 seoteir Huge apendMan Ige- 
Esrri turn 1650 pw. OI 725 4133. 
HEMSHH1YON Ootouy atari tn period 
cotH 2 dtt BMt. ferep. dm rm. bain A 
iu u Canvethem posthoo. £350 pw 
Brnham 5 Reeves OI 938 3532 
HMMuersamMXC.- ugm MigM garden 
tlal S brdnes. brgr rereo. K 6 ft, newly 
dec . CH & CHW me. £195 pw. TeL Oi- 
581 0985 or I093S881 641 
MLLBAIK TERRACES SWi. Newly dec 
stum* Dai in ho dev el o p m e nl DMe bed. 
raep/dmer. kti oTooung ganj. bath. 
£200 pw Cbolev 828 8251. 
PORTLAND PLACE. Vs I. SttaCJOBS fOTU 
IUI 3heov Z bant* LwrpocKBfy nrau- 
bhd high ClarttSl d £530 per week. 
Long let Harm EiUM. OI 501 1163. 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


102 Gloucester Place, 
London W 1 H 4 DR 


■A^nAn/Ol 


WANTED 


3 


BENTLEY & Q? 

now urgenil> require to purchase 

DIAMONDS AND DIAMOND JEWELLERY 

immcdhuc cash offer. Valuations made. 

65 Ncv. Bond StMCL W.l, Telephone 01-629 0651, 


RENTALS 


If you have quality property 
lo ta. tell us. 

LANDLORDS - OWNERS 

Expert proftssional jerixt 

QU RAIS HI 
CONSTANTINE 
270 Earls Court Road; $WS 

01-244 7353 


UPFRIEND 

& CO 

care for their 

landlords and tenants. 

01 499 5334 


Id Itoor RM In pm 
lo- Norn a’lowm garden sguare. 2 
bed*. 2 bath* en Stole, rereo. doting, 
k ilrben A I raarti.. IKL nortrr pud keys to 
barden. Long Co Lei. £600 p.w. God 1 
Hard A Smitn OI 930 7321. 


STM MEMHNSTMI. Mansion Mork wlm 
rmb mkme and long window* 3 beds, 
retro. kilrhen Washer/Dryer and 
bMh/viiowrT Long Co Lei. C2U p.w. 
Goddard A Biulib. OI 930 7321 


F M RAPP iManagemenl Servicval Lid re 
guire proprrllev in CrnlrnL South ana 
Wr-4 London Arras lor wraltog anoM- 
ranl* lei OI 221 8838. 


HRIC1 OF RIALE8 PR.BW1I. OTOOkJng 
pari,, good auatitv turn 2 bed fiM. rerep. 
is, IU. |H HU t washer, avail now. £150 
p.w T W.Caoo OI 221 8838. 


SW3/ sUHmbig . 2 doublr bed flaL 2 bath* 
both with shower. Reception, 
diningroom, kuenen. Avan 6 monms al 
£550 pw. Co Let. Barnard Marcus 834 
7316. 


DULWICH. 3/4 bed mod home on private 
estate, large recto, garage Ctose station 
and schools. Long let £X60pw. TeL Ol- 

761 0444 124 hrsX 


WCl. A benutmd brand new Z bed nud 
sonetie. Large double bed. designer 
furnishlngs- porter. £300 pw. Long 
cemojuar let. oi 936 7602 cn. 


AVAR. AW. T HOW Luxury flats A honsm 
£200 ci.ooo pw. Tet Buroras 881 
8136. 


HOLLAND PARK. Library snactous I dbie 
bed 2nd floor IUK.AU new ku £160 ow. 
Long company let. OI 936 7622 rn. 


KEMSWCrnM Sunny gdn flu tn Vogue 
nwg- Loonge- 2 bdrs £200 pw 602 6941 


BARBICAN EC2. in the heart of London's 
financial arras, few mtos (ram Bank of 
Emdand and Stock Exchange. This su- 
perb apartment on 5lh IV in Ben 
Johnson House comprises of 1 bed. I 
bath, receo. If kitchen, oaknny. SMnr* 
porterage, parking. Avail tong Go leL 
£150 pw. 244 7353 


HAMPSTEAD VHAACCNW5. Character- 
ful cottage with Sooth taring roof 
terrace and only moment* from tube. 
Two bedrooms, living room, kitchen 
and bathroom. Well furnished and 
aval taHe in November tor tong letting at 
£275 a week. George Knight - The Let 
tmg Agent 794 1126. 


THREE bedreomed cottage oa Thames 
near Henley set to Nabonai Trust bod 
available 10 let long term al £430X30 
prra plus rain, fropeccabir references 
wo tarod and payment to be made stand- 
ing order Repfy to BOX CM. 


-BARNES SWU. Newly refurbished house 
la tree- kped street 2 mtns tram Swedqh 
school and golf course, aoeiktaastidw. 
era. 1 bath room- a large IHtod kitchen, 
recep. 9*rage. *»r port, (tan bejel 
unfumhhed/funushrd. Co Irt. £250 
pw. 244 7363 


FULHAM SW8. A purpose bum 2«ed flat 
In superb new necetopment. landscape, 
garden, shower room raille and a (Br- 
iber bathroom. Spactou oom-plan 
leceo/dln room. American style kitch- 
en. gge. newty dec oirougboui. Avail. 1 
yr+. CO let. £160 pw. 244 7363 


SWL- Prrtty pofto pai CM to ali amentUei- 
fteceo with Frenca window* teaMig i in 
attrac paito/gita. 2 Mb.gatieykll. 
£165 pw. Cootra. 828 8251- 

937 9681 The 'number to remember 
when seeking best rental propert ies m 
central and prune Lo ndon areas 
£i50/£2J300pw. 

VISITING LONDON /FARM Alien Bales* 
Comnany have a laege srtccaen ol nari 
Sc bouses avadabte tar 1 week* (Tom 
£200pw. 499 1665. 

WL1 Large brigM room- CH. roof terrace, 
direct access gardm £6S pw Inc. O l 
727 6321 before 10am or after 4pm. 

WIM1 1 l llflH Ournung collage oo com- 
nun dblr oed. 2 recent, ch P»l» £626 
prm 01 946 2S74 after 5 pm. 

A WEST END Flat and Hours LW to Tor 
•Mlr/Lrl Dm I* Wool to. ta 402 7381. 

CHELSEA i Off Flood street) 3 bed IBaL 
£500 p w Dtav MOCM. Ol 942 9883. 

DOC H LAN B* Flats and booses lo irt 
uwouqnaut Uie Docklands area. TpkOl 
790 9560 

EHMSMORE CONS. Studta flat with gal 

• irried bedrm. sep KU 6 shwr mi. £175 
pw. Vormtate Securues Ol 589 9326. 

HAMPSTEAD / Regents Park. Luxury 
lumnhed booses. £27S pw nc. W. L. E. 
Ol 459 7746. 

MCHOATE H6 Saner refurtmhed 2 bed 
lux tux. garage avaitaole. £140 PW. oi 
340 7408. 

MAWA VALE S hinn i n g a bed. 2 bam Dai 
wiihgdn.£3SOpw. Allen Bates it Co. Ol 
499 1668. 

MARBLE ARCH Fun. mansion flaL 2/3 
beds. 2 rec. KAB. CH. co let. £178 pw. 
Tel-01 BBS 4037 

MAYFAKt HYDE PARK. The racist luxuri- 
ous long/ short Mis 1/6 beds best prices 
Ol 936 9512 ft) 

NR HARROOC Spec 1 owe bed ItaL 
lounge, kuio. fully Cum. £200 PW. Day 
ai 091 8999/ oi 862 0548 after 7pm 

OKOLLAND PARK. CMVflenl val- 
ue brand new 2 bed. 2 bath flaL £286 
per week. Andre Lanauvre: 491 7822 

ST. JAMES' Lux Mod Fura studio Flat. K 
A B. tor. £126 pw. Replies to Ol 437 
7519 

SW17 - Lge tend flat with l uni bed. 6 
rains, walk [rani tube. £80 p.w Tei: Ol 
767 5833. 

HOLLAin Pane Handsome grd floor flaL 
AVI4I4-6 weeks. Suit 1/2. 2 mins walk 
tune or bra. £iao pw. Tet727 5463 

LUXURY SERVICED FEATS, central Lon- 
don tram £325 pw. Rtog Town Hse Apts 
373 3433 

SERVICED APARTMENTS to Kensington, 
cot T v. 24 nr Sw. Telex. GoUingnam 
Apartment*. 01-373 6306- 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


FRENCH SM Chalet- LA Clusaz- RnidCM 
staff Superb arcom. Abo Ideal Autumn 
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far Las* Aiedratia Can me 
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WINTER MJH Sweuk brires. to Cvprm. 
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01 7M 2562 

ALGARVE LL.YIRV \ilus wnn pooh 
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heiromr 01 409 2838- MdaUOrid. 

ALGARVE ALTERXATINL 
Tnr lines! house* for tpnUi 73 SI 
Laws Si. St* 1 OI 491 0802 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


ITS ALL AT 
TRAILPOMDERS 
- World wide low rosf nights 
The besl - and we can prove U 
■190.000 Clients since 1970 


■VROI Nn THE WORLD FROM C781 

SYUM.V 

£374 

C6«J 

PtRTII 

C374 

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Al nil ANQ 

cyn 

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BANGKOK 

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rata 

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£248 

cam 

INEHI/BUMBAY 

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£385 

rat IMBO 



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cat? 

C369 

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(263 

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C 99 


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Cl SO 

£360 

BOSTON 

Cl 49 


IIUNOf t IL 

081 

C45T 

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TRA1UFTNDERS 

42 48 URLs COLfDT ROAO 
LONDON W8 6CJ 
I uinpeA SA fUqhtv 01 937 5000 
(mg Haul rUrtiK 01 603 1515 
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Cmenonenl umM/8wM 
ABTA IATA ATOL/I4B8 


NEW LOW FARES 
WORLDWIDE 

E260 KARACHI £270 

BOMBAY £325 LAGOS COO 

CAIRO £210 MIAMI C2S3 

DELHI £345 ROME £105 

FRAFUHT £65 SEOUL EH» 

HONGKONG £495 SYEWMEL F7G6 

ISTANBUL El BO TOKYO £580 

SKYLORD TRAVEL LTD 

2 DLHMAN STREET. LONDON WI 

Ta£ Of-fjg 3521/ 

AMUNE 


TRAVEL WORLD WIDE 

Sonnil advice and hodmer on rntacvd tang 
haul irmrt coin. 

SPEtlU. 1ST L I U B ("LASS I'-SA. II.17JT 
■l.tS59 

LOU f OST K 0\OM\ I-.5 A £ C 4NA- 

Dvutm 41550 

■VuM'N.Z. A Rn EaucK. 
tirtjT j:?» 

ABTA 72102. IATA. 

MEMBER Of Ti€ 

INSTITUTE Of 
TRAVa« TOURISM. 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi jtfUurg. Cairo. Dubai, 
baanbul. Stngaporr. K.L. Drini. 
BughoL Hong Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. & The Americas. 


76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London wiv 7DG. 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 1000-13.00 


AM nCKETl SoeeWMs New York £229. 

LA £329 Toronto £219 Nairobi £329. 

Sydney £7S9. Auckland £769- Dartafr 

130 Jenram Straetxti 839 7144 


COSICUmt ON flighu/hou to Eu- 
rope. LSA A most detonation*. 
DUdetnal Travel 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


1ST 6 CLUB CLASS FLIGHTS: Hu ge Did- 
counts. Sw world Travel. iQSTZT} 
26097 /27109/275S8. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS worldwide. Haymancet 
01-930 1366. 


DISCOUNT FARES Worldwide; 01-434 
0734 Jupiter TraveL 


P BGO UN TU B i CROUP FARES Wortd- 
wkkv Tei L.T.G 10701} 887036. 


FUCHTSDOKERS Otscounl Fares wodtf- 
wtde. 01-387 9100 ' 


■BALACA. CANARIFH Ol 441 till. 
. Travrtwfcc AM*. Aloi. 


Regent SL WI. Ol 
734 5307 A8TA/AMM. 


S. AFRICA From £466. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 


SOUTH AFRICA for Chrtatmas Special 
rales. Maior TraveL Ol 486 9237 IATA 


SPAIN. Portugal. Cheapen fares. Biggies. 
01 735 8191. ATOL. 


1ST. Chib A Economy Class. Special 
lares HTT Tel: 01-930 1366. 


WEEKEND or Weeks. Honeymoons or 
2nd Honeymoons — Discover the Magic 
of rtatys romantic cities in Autumn or 
winter Call 01 749 7449 for your 
FREE colour brochure, iwngtc of Italy 
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KONO KOm £488, BAM8K0K £369. 

. Singapore £457. Other FE cities. 01-684 
65 14 A BTA 

LOWEST Air Rites Europe and world 
wide. Ol 836 8622- Buckingham 
Travel. 

SPAM Portugal Canaries Greece Italy ir 
£69. SunwheeL 01-434 4697/8. 

ATOL 1776 

1ST/CLU* Economy nights worldwide, 
comet Travel Ol 434 1091 ABTA 
IATA 

SYD/MEL C635 Perth CS66. All malar 
rarrsns to Aik/NZ 01-884 7371 

ABTA 

TUNISIA. For your hottday where tusHn 
summer Call for our brochure now. Tu- 
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ALL US CfTKS. Lowest fares on major 
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ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. Dlmond 
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BARGAIN Return rare*. Bangkok. Manil- 
la. Hong Kong- India. Austraiuett. run. 
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REST Fares. Best Fligntk. Best nouuays 
anywhere Sky Travel. Ol 634 7426. 
ABTA . 

CANARIES spam Portugal Italy. Greece. 
Madrid fr £67. TcL 01-434 4326 ATOL- 
Air Bargains 

EUROPE/WORLD WIDE towed lares on 
rharter /scheduled ms Pilot FUstfu Ol 
651 0167. A« Aid 1B93. 

HOLLAND. Doily fUghB. £35 O/W. £55 
Rlu. New York. £129 O/W. £255 Rm. 
Miracle Jet- Ol 579 3322 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


PHONE A FLIGHT 



f-9 





Malaga ft- 

£59 


MW 





Lanzarote fr..— — 

- m .-£99 


Subject to Airport Tax 

01-437 9194/0246. 
TANNTOURS LTD. 


DISCOUNTED FARES . 

Return Return 

' Jotxirg/Har £465 Donata £420 

Nairobi - £390 Sydney £760 

Cairo £230 Auckland £785 

Lamm. £360 Hong Kong £550 

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Bangkok £550 And Many More 
AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 
162/168 Regent SI. Wf 
TEL: 01 -437 8239/6/7/8 
Lair A Groim Booking* Welcome 
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Svdttn £420 £7M 

Auckland £4J0 £7?5 

Lo* .Miyics £17* £340 

Jotum . 046 £4SS 

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Rjo £282 £504 

LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


WINTER SPORTS 


Chalet, s/c & Hotel holidays 

- Fabulous discounts - 
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• The best value chalets from 

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01-584 5060 


SKI WEST - NEW1 Special offers on 
groups RING FOR A DEAL) Abo other 
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am for a copy of our bumper brochure. 
1011.785 9999. <VI>U 69256 AU1 1383. 


FREE, rRLE. FREE. Free Lift Paw*, 
tin-invurann-. Free rhlklrm-s holidays 
■under Im on nuny dale*. Hotels A 40bv 
IromCalwtrLA Manrhesirr from Cl 19 
Ski ric-edom Ol 741 4686 & 061 236 
0019 ATOL432 


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er discounts for catered chalets, prices 
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OLYMPICS IN Cpinrhevpit Come A see 
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Ring Le Ski on 0484 548996 
SKI BONNE MWE - Christmas specials to 
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go FREEI Ring us for details Oi 244 
, 7333. 

SKI TOTAL. Superb chalets, apu. hems 
. to Top French/ Ausman Resorts Ir £ 61 . 

■ 10932)231113. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


SECRETARIES lor ArrhUeeh. A Dolan 
erv Permanent A temporary postttous. 
.\M8A SpcrtaUd Her Cora Ol 734 
0632 


DOMESTIC AND CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


POND PLACE The Engusn 
Reuuaranl In Gbrrtea Sliver Service 
Waumtver im/fi rcaid red for immediate 
start, rnendly working aimosphere 
Sauries In exresv of ElOflM Contact. 
Campbell Porter. 01-5 8 4 4 555. 


AB- PAIR for vouog professional lamily 
near Ftorenre. 19+ . Mist loveehUdren. 
Ha m pstead Au Pair A Nanny Agenry-. 
Ol 435 2672 


CTTT WK RAR seeks a romprtpnl ore 
son. Tei 248 8697 alter 3pm 


OVERSEAS au pair agency 87 Regent 
Sir ecL London WI Tei 439 6634. 
LK/Ovenra* Also nUietPs/doou 
lemp/perm 


PORSCHE 


COMPUTER-PORSOHE. We matrh MSOera 
with buyers. To veil or buy. Tei 01 -358 


MERCEDES WANTED 


LONDON ROAD 
GARAGE 
(ROMFORD) LTD 


Mercedes Benz main dealers. Un- 
denvruers for laic and low mileage 
Mercedes. 

CONTACT 
MIKE DUNFORD 
ON 0708 23511. 
AFTER 7PM 
0245 442172 


COMPANY NOTICES 


TNT LIMITED 

■tararparalrd in Ihe Australian Capital 
Territory 1 

NOTICE or MEETING 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 
2Slh Annual General Meeting of the Com- 
pany will be hrkl tn Ihe BaU room. Level 3. 
Hiiion Hotel. 259 Pill StreeL Sydney on 
Friday. 7 November. 1980 al 12 noon 
■Sydney* bun - 
141 ORDINARY BCSWESS 

1 . Acrounu. and Reports, To receive and 
ronudri- the Bakuice Sheet of the 
Company ai 30 June. 1986. ihe ptom 
and Low Account of the Company 
togemer wflh Ihe Group Arcounu of 
the Company and it* SoMdono tor 
the year ended 30 June. 1986. me 
statement hy Director and me Reports 
ol the Directors and Auditors incretm. 

2. Dn 1 bond To declare the dividend in 
respect of the year ended 30 June- 
1986 

3 To elect Direct or- Mr DA. Mortimer 
ovootmed during the year, retires to 
arrordanre with Article 94 of the 
Company-* Article* of Association and. 
bring cl totwe. offers hi mseif for eleettoa. 

4 To eien Dirertore: Mr F w Millar. 
C.B.E. Mr W OlS. Martin. Mr JR. 
Cntib. OBE. and Mr K.G. SmHh 
retire by- rotation in accordance wHh 
Article lOt of Ihe Company's Article* 
01 Association Each ol these rarer- 

* tor*, being eligible, offers hurartf for 
re-election. 

Ibl SPECIAL BUSINESS 
To coroidrf and. if moughr flu para 
wilti er without modtttcatian Ihe fol- 
low mg revolution iwMcti la be passed 
reouirrs to be parted by a matority of 
not uns. than three-fourite of such 
member* of Ihe Company n bring 
etui bed so to do. vote in person or by 
proxy 1 namely-. 

"Thai Sir Ian Poller, who Is new aged 
84 year*, be re- ap poinlcd a otrecior 10 
hold mi ice until the conclusion oi the 
next Annual General Meeting of the 
Company" 

The rtosuwj date for receipt at me 
registered Miter of the Company of 
nominations tor toe office of Director 
■enreoi in the rase of retiring Directors 
and person* recommended by the 
Hoard Of OUVCUmi tS 27 OCUtKT. 
1986 

A member of ihe Company entitled to 
attend and vote is nniuted lo appoou 
not more than two proxies iwno need 
not be members). Where two proxies 
are appointed each proxy must be 
appointed 10 represent a specified pro- 
portion of the member's voting 
enliuemmt. A tab proxy will repre- 
sent too 9 -, of Uie Member's voting 
rnuUcmem. 

By order of the Board 
RH.C NKhOtS 
Secret ray 

Sydney. 16 September. 1986 
• R rostered Office: 

c/o KMG Hunger-fonts. 

7th Floor. City Mutual Biutoino. 

Hobart Ptacr. Canberra City 
ACT 2601 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


SHIPWRECKED FISHERMEN AND 
MARINERS' ROYAL BENEVOLENT 
SOCIETY 

The One Hundred and Forty- Seventh 
Annual General Meeting win be held at 
FtshmongerV Hall. London EC4 iby kind 
pprinraslon of Ihe Companyj on Wednes- 
day. 19th November, at 12.00 noon. 

v.G. Austin 
General Secretary 
1 North Pal lam 
Chichester 
West Sussex 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER OF FIRE 
ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES LIMITED 


AND 

IN THL MATTER OF THE COMPANIES 


ACT 1985 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tool the 
<T*diianv of the above-named Company. 
«-tn»h fa bring voluntarily wound up.'ara 
remit red. en or before the 20Ui day of 
November. 1986. to vend in Ihetr lull 
ChrKiian and surnames. Ihetr addrewes 
and desrripliom. full parurular* of Uirir 
detns or riatnis. and Ihe names and ad- 
di esses of ihetr SoUcilois ill anyi. lo the 
■oidrrogned Philip Mon lacs FCA of 30 
Unibourne Terrare. London W3 6LF. the 
Lumadator of the taut Company, and. If so 
' required b»- noun* in writing from Ihe said 
LaguM-ilor. are personally or' by tbrir 
Sotinlors. 10 roowm and prove their debts 
or claims at swb tone ami place as Shan be 
specified to swch noucc. or In default 
thereof They wtiL be excluded from the 
benefit 01 anv distribution made before 
suchatrbH are proved. 

Dated: uwv 9m day of October 1986 ■ 


P. MONJACK 
LIQUIDATOR 


IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES 
ACT 198S RULE 106 OF THE 
COMPANIES l WINDING-UP) RULES 
1949 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF GOLD «f 
MINERALS EXPLORATIONS PLC 
-NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 
OrtUlors of the above-named company 
are required oa or before 18 Novembee 
1986 10 rend ihetr names and addresses 
and the paruniure of their debts or 
claims, and 10 rsiaStah any nttejney may 
have to Priority, and to send the names 
andaddmresof thetr Soiioiors. if any. to 
Mrs Louise AC Schultevaer of Lange 
Yoorhoui 62- 26614 EH. The Hague. The 
Netherlands, the Liquidator Of Uie said 
company and. If so required by notice Pi 
writing from Che sakf LMiadator. are by 
inetr Soiioiors.- or personally. 10 come to 
and prove their saul Mb or claims, or to 
rslabii&n any iHJe they may have 10 any 
such pnoniy. at such ume and place as 
shall De specified hi such notice, or In de- 
(auli thereof they wiu be excluded from 
the benefit of any dtsuibuucn made before 
such debts are proved. 

NOTE 

This Notice u purely format. Alt known 

Creditors hav e been or will be paid hi full. 

Dated Uu» 21st day of Octob er 198 6 

I— A.G. SCHUTTEVAER 
LIQUIDATOR 


IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES 
ACT 1985 RULE 106 Or THE 
COMPANIES IW1ND1NO-UP) RULES 
1949 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF D UTCH & 
OVERSEAS MINING LIMITED 
NOTICE S HEREBY GIVEN that Die 
Creditors of (he above-named co mpa ny 
are reo wired on or before IB November 
1986 to send their names and addresses 
and me particular at their debts or 
claims, and to establish any title they may 
have to priority, and lo send the name* 
and addresses of Ui«r Solicitors, rf any. to 
Mrs Louise AG ScBultevaer of Lange 
Yoarhoul 62. 26614 EH. The Hague. The 
Netherlands, the Liquidator of the sttd 
com pa ny and. U so required by notice In 
wniing from Uie said Uouldator. are by 
Uietr Sobrttors. or personally, to come tn 
and prove Iheir said debts or claims, or to 
establish any title they may have to any 
such priority, at such time and place as 
shall be specified In such notice, or in de- 
"fauft thereof they will be excluded from 
toe benefit of any dlstrltxulon made before 
such debts are proved. 

NOTE 

This Notice Is purely formal. AD known 
Creditors have been or wiD be paid in fob. 
Dated this 21*1 day 01 October 1986 

E-AG. SCHUTTEVAER 
LIQUIDATOR 


To Place Your 
Classified Advertisement 

Please telephone the appropriate number listed below 
between 9 a.m and 6 p.m. Monday to Friday, 
or between 9.30 a.m and 1.00 p.m on Saturdays. 

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OI 481 4000 

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For publication the following day please telephone by 1.30 pm. 
Marriage notices not appearing on the Court & Social page may 
also be accepted by telephone. 

Trade Advertisers: 


Appointments 

01 

481 

4481 

Public Appointments 

01 

481 

1066 

Property 

01 

481 

1986 

Travel 

01 

481 

1989 

U-K. Holidays 

01 

488 

3698 

Motors 

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481 

4422 

Personal 

01 

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1920 

Business to Business 

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1982 

Education 

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1066 


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« 




l l 'i t~. 1 Oi-kii-'Jl A ui A>uO 


Pressure 
onMoD 
for reply 
on race 

By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

The Ministry of Defence 
has until today to comply with 
a demand made by the power- 
ful Commons defence select 
committee in early July for ] 
details of ethnic minority 
representation in the armed 
forces. 

Failure by the MoD to send 
even a holding memorandum 
would further exacerbate rela- 
tions with the committee, 
which at a private meeting 
tomorrow will discuss what 
some members consider the 
deeply unsatisfactory manner 
and content of the MoD's 
reply earlier this month to its 
damning report on the West- 
land afTair. 

High on the agenda will be 
the Government's declared 
intention in that reply to curb 
select committee powers by 
instructing civil servants not 
to answer questions about 
their own or colleagues' 1 
behaviour. This has been de- 
scribed by one MP as “prepos- 
terous and unconstitutional". 

But members are also an- 
noyed at other aspects of the 
reply — not least the method 
of releasing it. The MoD 
breached convention by giv- 
ing the committee clerks no 
advance warning of publica- 
tion despite their requests, 
and this is seen as a deliberate 
snub and discourtesy. 

The reply was also consid- 
ered to be extremely brief in 
view of the work put in by the 
committee, and to have failed 
to have answered many of the 
questions posed. 

The committee’s request for 
details of ethnic minority 
representation .in certain 
units, and of recruitment and 
promotion policies, represents 
another thorn in die flesh of 
the MoD. which had no 
machinery for ethnic monitor- 
ing. 

The committee took the 
view that statistical informa- 
tion was necessary to prove 
that, and called for figures by 
the time MPs returned from 
the summer recess today. 

Third case of 
meningitis 

Another case of meningitis 
has been reported in 
Gloucestershire - the third in 
d week. 

A man aged 25 from the 
Tuflley area of Gloucester is 
"comfortable” in hospital 
The two other patients are 
recovering. 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother lays the foundation 
stone of the new library at 
Dundee University, 1 1.30; and 
opens the Tayside Scanner Unit, 
Ninewells Hospital 3. 

The Princess of Wales opens 
the new “Discovery and Sea 
Power" Gallery. National Mari- 
time Museum. Greenwich, 
11.45. 

The Duke and Duchess of 



The South African Foreign Minister, Mr BLF. “Pit” Botha, third from left, and Pretoria officials arriving in Komatipooit to see the crashed aircraft. 






The wreckage of die Russian-built aircraft strewn over a dealing in the Lebnmbn Mountains near the borders of Mozambique. and Swaziland. 


Ulster policy reviewed 
as unrest increases 


Machel leaves region in turmoil 


By Richard Ford 


A “mini-Cabinet” meeting 
of all Northern Ireland min- 
isters yesterday reviewed 
Government policies and the 
outlook for the weeks leading 
to the first anniversary of the 
signing of the Anglo-Irish 
Agreement. 

Departmental business and 
individual problems ministers 
were having were discussed 
before the resumption of Par- 
liamentary business at 
Westminster. 

Mr Tom King, Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, 


York attend the Trafalgar Night 
dinner on board HMS Victory. 
Portsmouth. 6. 

Princess Anne. President, 
Save the Children Fund, ad- 
dresses rheir annual meeting, 
Albert Hall. 10.25; and later 
attends a dinner given by the 
1975 Gub. Farmers’ Gub, 
Whitehall Court, 7.35. 

Princess Margaret, Patron, 
Northern Ballet Theatre, at- 
tends the first night of a new 
production of Sum Lake, 
Glyndeboume. 6.05. 


had what one official de- 
scribed as a “brainstorming” 
session with his five min- 
isterial colleagues at the 
Northern Ireland Office. as the 
reviewed the political outlook 

Last night, at a separate 
meeting. Mr King met Sir 
John Heraion, chief constable 
of the RUC, and the General 
Officer Commanding Land 
Forces to review the current 
security situation. 

Government sources de- 
nied the meeting was a sign of 
crisis. 


Contmeed from page 1 

can leader appears to be in the 
minds of the South African 
generals". 

It quoted a statement earlier 
this month by General Mag- 
nus Malan, the South African 
Defence Minister, in which he 
said President Machel “ap- 
pears to have lost control of 
the situation” and that if he 
"chooses terrorism and 
revolution" then South Africa 
would act accordingly. 

Pretoria blamed a recent 
border explosion, which killed 
six South African soldiers, on 
guerrillas of the outlawed 
African National Congress 


allegedly operating from 
Mozambique soil in violation 
of the 1984 Nkomati non- 
aggression pact between the 
two countries. 

But aviation sources here 
believe the explanation that 
President Mach el's plane, a 
Soviet-built twin-engine 
Tupolev 134, came in too low 
in rain, low cloud and reduced 
visibility on its approach to 
Maputo airport and struck the 
mountains. 

There was still confusion 
late yesterday about who was 
on the doomed plane with 
President MacbeL 

The passengers included Mr 


Luis Santos, the Minister of 
Transport, Mr Jose Carlos 
Lobo, the deputy Foreign 
Minister, and the Zambian 
and Zairean ambassadors to 
Mozambique. Also killed were 
President Machel's chief se- 
curity adviser, a senior de- 
fence ministry official, 
members of the president’s 
secretarial and security staff 
and journalists. 

South African government 
sources last night- expressed 
concern that more = hardline 
Marxist and pro-Moscow ele- 
ments associated with the 
Prime Minister, Mr Mario 
Machungo, might fill the vao- 
num left by President MacheL 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,182 



ACROSS 4 Hearing 

1 Ulysses’s concession (5). tic states 

4 Delayed. Giles staggers in to 5 Ugly sisi 

pass Bill (9). has blue 

9 Does be succeed by will- 6 lines m; 

power? (9). mg (6). 

10 Poetically under a Welsh 7 Small n 

town (5). Plam fo 

11 Sombre at first and dark, tenai(9) 

but not in shadow (6). * Turn up 

12 Point in favour of antelope hospital 

(8). 13 Hammei 

14 Jack takes the panish E* 1 

award in scientist’s iionour 15 Maybe 
(5.5). « 

16 Attempt to wound (4). , 

19 Sort out remains of meal *7 Apollo s 

(4) . 18 Dispatch 

20 A nature ill-disposed and mud froi 

one-sided (10). 21 Dwarf p< 

22 What a failhfiti wife, to run 22 It sounc 

off with a writer! (SL sitionta] 

23 A bit of a rash politician, to 24 Nettle p: 

be found in a stately home 25 The ime 
(6). vent a dt 

26 Pawnee relative? (5). Solution to 

27 Ballet posture of Lincoln in 
square dance (9). 

28 Gruff, maybe, finding butler 
behind the teapot (5-4). 

29 Short melody from the 
“Messiah" (5). 

DOWN 

1 SOS! Lading is slipping and 
sliding about (9). 

2 An envelope for Lady Grey 

(5) . 

3 After hill work, have a 
maize-cakc (8). 

Concise Crossword page 16 


4 Hearing impediment of Bal- 
tic statesman (4). 

5 Ugly sister to French author 
has blue veins (10). 

6 Lines my boy used for fish- 
ing (6). 

7 Small research place in a 
plant for ornamental ma- 
terial (9). 

8 Turn up information about 
hospital investment, say (5). 

13 Hammers are used hoe to 
get impressive quiet (5.5). 

15 Maybe a well-stocked 
garden is strange to Caliban 
(9). 

17 Apollo's summerhouse? (9). 

18 Dispatched to gather up 
mua from grating (8). 

21 Dwarf pear, perhaps (6). 

22 It sounds a well-paid po- 
sition (5). 

24 Nettle patrol has no end (S). 

25 The intelligence to circum- 
vent a delay (4). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,181 


SEItSSMIliiniSniellZl 
ts H B R- H £§ H 

B -Tfl S3 n H 0 0 E 

uflUEflBOEE 1 tJHSEStHSI? 

ra a ® c . n n ra 

E EE..- . ra 

- uUHuHIS 
E in !b ■ E n E D 
uyEE3EHQ?**i ’ yiSGOBESB 
3 a g d.ii b m o 
iiESfflEHIIEI mECEEHII 
HI IS B ' IS 0 0 
yOTEHEOEHIEISlS 


The Duke of Gloucester, 
President. Cambridge House 
and Talbot, attends a reception. 
Grocers' Hall 6.15. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
opens the new Medical Re- 
search building. City Hospital. 
Nottingham, 2; and later opens 
the Ash fie Id District Council 
offices. Kirkby in AshfiekL 3.25. 

The Duke of Kent attends a 
trustees meeting and opens the 
new Space Gallery. Science 
Museum, London. 9.45. 

The Duchess of Kent opens 
the new Maelor General Hos- 
pital. Wrexham. ! 1.30: and later 
visits the Laura Ashley factory. 
2J0. 

Princess Alexandra, accompa- 
nied by the Hon. Angus Qgilvy, 
departs for the United Slates 
from Heathrow Airport. 12. 
New exhibitions 

Watercolours by John Ben- 
susan-Butt and Lucien Pissaro: 
Eldon Gallery. Ashmolean Mu- 
seum. Beaumont St. Oxford; 
Tues to Sat 10 to 4. Sun 2 to 4 
(until Dec 7). 

Charles Hamilton Soriey: 
First World War poet Bonour 
Hall. Dundee University : Mon 
ro Fri JO to 12 and I JO to 4.30. | 
Sat 10 to 6 (until Nov 1). j 

New lights in Glasgow; Gal- | 
lery 2. Third Eye Centre, 350 
Sauchiehall St. Glasgow. T ues to 
Sat 10 to 5.30. Sun 2 to 5.30 
(until Nov I). 

Music 

Organ recital by Paul Hoyes 
King's HalL Newcastle Univer- 
sity. 1.10. 

Recital by Elizabeth Glenn 
(soprano) and Malcolm Archer 
(organ); Bristol Cathedral. I.IS. 

Harpsichord recital by Marisa 
Robles; St David's Hall The 
Hayes. Cardiff, 7.30. 

Piano recital by Thomas 
McIntosh (piano); De La Warr 
Pavilion. Bexhill, 3. 

Talks, lectures 

Langdale January and July, 
j by John White; 1.30; Lake 
District National ftirfc Visitor 
Centre. Brockhole, Winder- 
mere. !.30. 

James McNeill Whistler a 
butterfly in the drawing room, 
by Dr. Hilary Taylor Reception 
Room. Wills Memorial Build- 
ing. Bristol. 5.15. 

Two eyes are better than one 
by Prof. DAvid Picfcwell: Brad- 
ford University, Lecture The- 
atre D4. Richmond Building. 
5.30. 

And So to Bath: Early travel, 
by S. Bird: Banqueting Room. 
Guildhall. Bath. ] 2.30. 

The legal profession in the 
1990‘s, by Robert Alexander. 
QC. Fielding Johnson Building. 
Leicester University. 6.30. 

General 

Bristol Festival for Children: 
The An of Minstrelsyc: i 
Young Musicians Platform: 7; 
Si George's Music Trust- 9 
Portland Sq. Bristol. 

Parliament today 

Commons (2J0K Education 
Bill, conclusion of remaining 
stages. 

Lords |2.3Q); Public Order 
Bill, report stage. 


TV top ten 


National tnp ten television pi o yam me s In 
the week ending October 12 : 

1 EostEndaroffrurs/Sun)21.40m 

2 EastEnders (Tties/Sun) 21 .10m 

3 Twenty Years of the Two Ronnies 
15.06m 

4 Open All Hours 1350m 

5 Howards Way 1250m 

6 Dates 1235m 

7 In Sickness and In HeaUi 11.85m 

8 News and Weather (Sun 2051) 
1150m 

9 The Russ Abbot Show 1i.70m 
10 Brush Strokes 1075m 


1 Coronation street (Wed) Granada 
1655m 

2 C o ro na tion Street (Mon) Granada 
1650m 

3 Blmd Dan LWT 13.05m 

4 News (Sat 20:48) ITN 12.10m 

5 Cro ssr o a d s (Thins) Central 11.90m 

6 Creasroads (Tues) Central 1155m 

7 The Runaway Tram (axe. C. Scot) 
nv 1155m 

8 EmmenMe Farm (Tues) Yorkshire 
11.75m 

9 Butaeva Central 11. 75m 

to Crossroads (Wed) Central 11 .25m 
10 Dernpsgy and Makepeace LWT 


1 Naked Video 650m 

2 The Lite and Loves ot A She OeW 
6.30m 

2 Grand Pm Special (Sun 2132) 

4 The Paul Dartefe Magic Show 625m 

5 The Trouble With Sex 5 .70m 

6 Alas Smith and Jones 550m 

7 MASH 5.20m 

8 Cutter's Way 435m 

9 Forty Mmutes 4.65m 
10 The Irishman 4.00m 


Chunnfl 4 

1 Brookside (Mon/Sat) 6.15m 

2 Brooksme (Tues/Sat) 5.60m 

3 Tim Cosby snow 4.00m 

4 SL Elsewhere 335m 

5 Paper Moon 3.60m 

6 Golden Guts 235m 

7 Anmka 2.85m 

8 American FootbaB 2L80m 

9 4 What it s Worth 2.70m 

10 The Great Plant Coflecson 235m 

U re ak l ast t elev ision: The average 
weekly figures for audiences at p* 
tunes (with fives in parenthesis 
showing the reach - Hie number of people 
who netted for at least three mmuiss): 

B8C1: Breakfast Jim: Mon to Fri 
1.3m (6.8ml 

TV -ant Good Momma Britan Mon to Fri 
2.4m (lD.tmi Sat 33m (63m) 

Sun 2.1m 

Broadcasters' Audience Research Board. 


The pound 


Roads 

The Midlands: Ml: Contra- 
flow between junctions 27 and 
28 (A608/A38); also the north- 
bound entry and southbound 
exit slip roads at junction 27 are 
closed. M5: Various lane clo- 
sures between junctions 4 and 8 
(BinrnngJ2am/M50). A45: Con- 
traflow at StowmarkeL Suffolk. 

Wales and West: M4: East- 
bound carriageay closed for 
resurfacing between junctions 
16 and 17 (Swindon to 
Chippenham); contraflow west- 
bound. A30: Contraflow on the 
approach to the Merrymeei 
roundabout between Exeter and 
Launceston. A35: Resurfacing 
means lane closures on the 
east bound carriageway. 

The North: M6: Major road- 
works with various lane closures 
on both carriageways between 
junctions 16 (A500) and 17 
(A534). M62: Contraflow just E 
of junction 33 (A I), W Yorks. 
A56; Manchester Rd, Timp- 
ericy, reduced to single line 
traffic at the junction with 
Woodcoie Rd. 

Scotland: M74: Contraflow 
on the northbound camageway 
between junction 4 (Hamilton) 
and the Bothwell service area. 
A9: Construction of interchange 
with A85: inside lane dosed on 
both carriageways on the Perth 
Western bypass. A73: Single line 
traffic N or Airdire, Lanarshire, 
with temporary lights. 

Information supplied by AA 

Anniversaries 

Births: Samuel Taylor Cole- 
ridge, Query St Mary, Devon, 
1772; Alphonse de Lamartine, 
poet and statesman, Macon, 
France, 1790: Alfred Nobel 
inventor, industrialist and foun- 
der of the prizes bearing his 
name, Stockholm, 1833. 

Deaths: Edmund Waller, 
poet BeaconsfiekL Bucks, 1687; 
Horatio Nelson, killed at the 
Battle of Trafalgar. I80S; Jack 
Keronac, poet and novelist, St 
Petersburg, Florida. 1969. 

Aberfan disaster: 140 lives 
were lost when a coal slag tip 
engulfed a school and other 
buildings at Aberfan. Wales, 
1966. 


N England, East AngHa, Mkfiands, 
Channel Wands: Frafri in the morn- 
ing, heavy at times, clearing to 
sunny or dear intervals and show- 
ers later; vvindSW or S moderate or 
fresh, veering W strong; max temp 
14C(57F). 

SW England, S Wales: Sunny or 
dear Intervals and blustery showers 
after a du4 wot start; wind SW fresh 
or strong, veering W strong orgafe 
force; max terr»p14C (57F). 

N Wales, NW England, Lake 
District, We of WanTSW Scotland. 
Nort he rn Ireland: Sunny or dear 
intervals and Uusteiy showers after 
a dull wet start: wind SW fresh or 
strong decreasing moderate for a 
time; max temp 12C (54F). 

ME England, Borders, EtBnborgh, 
Dundee: R aun^ ^ avy at times In 


SW strang backing S moderate for a 
time; max temp 12C (54R. 


Aberdeen, Homy nth: Sunny or 
dear intervals and scattered show- 
ers; wind SW strang or gale force; 
max temp 1 TC (52Fj! 

GIbmow, Central Highlands, NE, 
NW Scotfand, Aim, Orkney: 
Sunny or dem intsnnfa and show- 
ers, some heavy watt hafl, sleet and 
thunder, and snow on the hBs; wind 
SW strong or gale force; max tamp 
10C (50F). 

Charnel Wands: Sunny or dear 
intervals and showers, some heavy 
with haa, sleet and thunder, and 
snow on the hits; wind SW, fresh or 
strong; max temp 8C (46F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and Thurs- 
day: A9 parts wU have sunny 
intervals and showers, some heavy 
and accompanied by hail and thun- 
der. Snow fa Gkety over hills,- and 
even ova- tow ground in northern 
Scotland. 


Bank 
Bins 
132S 
21 JM 
ea na 
2J06 
11.18 
7.38 
9LG8 
5LS7 
21000 
11.40 
1.095 
206000 
23400 
GW 3.355 

1034 

217.00 
Rd 3.75 

195.00 
1045 

Fr 2.44 

1j*9 

nr 71000 6.1000 


Rates tor small derommaiion bank notes 
only as supplied by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Dine rent rates apply to travellers' 
efteoues and omer foreign currency 
Dusmess. 

Betas Price Mss 3873 

London The FT index dosed down 17.1 
at 1264 4 


□ 


SonriMK Surname 
734 am 056 pm 



dd — 

PonfeUo - how to pin 

Monday-SaxunUy record your daily 
Portfolio i«al. 

Add ihew toueUwr la dete rmin e 
your weekly Portfolio UMal. 

if your lotai matches Ute ou&Uatied 
weekly dividend figure you have won 
ourrtam or a »>are ot tee prize money . 
staled tor that week, and mini claim 
your prize as instructed below 
^ . . How lo din 


™ ozM-Kizre dhwmi tug am ana B bin nlma r 

no cantH van he m rep ea t! oumm tbm BriaW j 

«•**. CanSH • t 

lou must have your card with you EdMvnb o 

when you telephone. ni r 

if you are unable to telephone * 

wmeoneetsrcnn ctuim on your DehaW 
but Uiev must hate your card and call 
The Tirtn Portfolio claims Une 
between the sUnulaiH) times. 

No rcwonsibiUty can be accented 
for rallure to con tan ihe claims office 
lor any reason within the stated 
noun 

.The above instructions aiv on- 
pJii.jbte to both dally and weekly 
dividend claims 


1156am 7.09pm 

Last quarter October 25 

Ughtiag-up time 

London 826 pm to 7^6 am 
Bdstot 6.35prn in 7.16 am 
EtBnliwtdi 628 pm to 7.28 am 
Manchaatar 630 pm to 7.18 am 
Penzance 660pm n 726 am 

Yesterday. 

T emperatures at maoay yg 8 Wrg ay :~cT 
doudt f. las; r, refit; *. wn. 

c F c F 

Balfaat ( 948 tteamaav 11355 
Brinohem r ' 948 tnvataaaa s 643 
BteSpoot c 9<8 •Jersey 1 1 S SB 
BM 11254 London ’ cT254 
CanSH M1S2 Mfichster r 048 
EdMwrgh 0 643 u e wcaed e r. 745 
Glaagow r 541 Rfrtdsaar 11050 


Letter from Moscow 

Vigilantes meting 
out rough justice 


Scores of self-styled vigi- 
lante groups are bein^. form ed 
by young people in cities 
throughout the Soviet Union 
to mete out ‘rough justice to 
drug pushers, blade market- 
eers, corrupt officials and 
others the organisers claim 
are not being dealt with ef- 
fectively by the police force. _ 

The recent emergence of 
the groups, many of which 
include veterans . from the 
.fighting in Afghanistan, has 
been charted m a long article 
in the main communist youth 
paper, Komsomolskaya Prav- 
da. which Indicated sympa- 
thy with their aims by des- 
cribing them as “the children 
of Robin Hood.” 

Describing the youthful 
vigilantes, who often hold 
secret training sessions in 
unarmed combat and speak 
of their debt oT duty to “the 
motherland”, the official pa- 
per wrote: “They do not be- 
lieve in us adults, let alone in 
representatives of. law en- 
forcement organs. And so 
they take it upon themselves 
to instil order in towns afl 
over the country” 

Western observers believe 
the new Soviet vigilantes are 
bang harnessed by elements 
inside the Communist Party 
anxious to push ahead with 
Mr Mikhail Gorbachov’s 
effiirts to dean upthe corrupt 
Soviet system, a. campaign 
which is now meeting stiff 
Internal opposition ar the 
middle levels of. the 
bureaucracy. 

The article cited the Si- 
berian city of Novosibirsk, 
where h said one vigilante 
group, -with more than 35 
members, had destroyed all 
the property of a citizen 
i named as “N”, leaving only a 
document proving his in- 
volvement in corrupt prac- 
tices. It was reported to have 
computer files on another 53 
“completed assignments”, 
with 15 more under investig- 
ation: 

Another new group in the 


Ukianian city of Dnyepro- 
netrovsk, which has a popula- 
tion of around one mulion, 
was said to have taught its 
members judo mid kara^rij- 
tega] inside the Soviet Union 
according to the paper) m 
order to take on a gang o» 
local drug pushers who were 
s pecialising in selling to 
young children. 

The example was also 
given of a Muscovite who re- 
cently joined a. vigilante 
group in the capital ranea 
“law and order” and after a 
mission to help families or 
soldiers killed in Afghanistan, 
was given the assignment ot 

infiltrating the shady world or 
ille gal gambling at Moscow's 
hippodrome, the country s 
mam horse racing stadium. 

. The youngster wasj re- 
ported to have uncovered a 
world steeped in corruption 
which involved illegal betting 
and money-lending, blatantly 
fixed races and connivance 

on the part of the administra- 
tion and local militia. The 
article said the youth “re- 
ported back to his group with 
eight names of the principal 
vmains, . but regretted the 
move and confessed to Korn- 
somolskoya Pravda rather 
than the militia”. The paper 
-blamed the strict control 
imposed by Soviet authori- 
ties over all activities for 
.Soviet youth for many of the 
problems being experienced 
and which the new vigilante 
groups have been established 
to counter. It noted particu- 
larly the emergence of violent 
street gangs- 

• The vigilante groups, the 
paper concluded, were the 
direct consequence of the “in- 
activity or sluggishness of the 
local milhia . . . practically 
everyone who has linked 
their lot with these ‘order’ 
groups has experienced some 
disappointment with regard 
to the militia, after which 
they thought if not me — 
Ihen wbor . • 

. Christopher Walker 


Gibraltar may spark 
dispute at Olympics 


Gibraltar plans to compete If 

m the £92 Olympics in itor 

Barcelona, so threatening the the 
first political dispate of the pm 
Gaines (John Goodbody last 
writes). can 

Spain, which regards offl 
Gibraltar as part of iteepna- A 
try, protested at the bland’s con 
partidpatioe in the European hum 
indoor athletics champion- ( 
ships in Madrid earlier fids the 
year. an 


It refined to allow compet- 
itors from Gibraltar to nse 
their national Das., A com- 
promise was reached at die 
bstminnte-with all the eatfams 
carrying same boards instead 
offiags. \ 

At the Olympics all the,j 
competing nations march be- 
hind their flags at the opening. 

Gibraltar has taken put A in 
the Commonwealth Games 
since 1958- 



Weather 

forecast 

A strong W airflow covers 
the British bin. A 
developing wave on a 
frontal system to the S of 
the country will sweep 
across the S daring the 
day. 

6 am to midnight 



NOON TODAY 




£:;■ V^-'Spj 


High Tides 


TODAY 

London Bridge 




WMflOw 

HflwK.il 

VT** 


MUord Hama 






Around Britain 




Sun Rain 
hra In ' 
■7.5 JOT, 
4.7 .11 

sn 2 $ 

6.4 .20 

as - 

x SB 
8-1 .t9 
6 3 S3 
6-6 .32 

5.1 SI 
55 -24 
5S .14 

6.1 .13 

4.7 JOS 
4 S .17 
5.6 - 

52 SI; 
4.7- 20 
47 .19 
3 A .04 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


stock market 

FT 30 Share 
1264.4 (-17.1) 

FT-SE 100 
1590.2 (-19.8) 

Bargains 


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USMtOatasiream) 

125.54 (+0.84) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

1.4295 (-0.0025) 

W German mark 
2.841 8 (+0.01 50) 
Trade-weighted 
67.5 (+0.2) 

Opec pact 
expected 

Most of Opec's oil ministers 
. expect a final new agreement 
of output quotas will be 
reached today in Geneva. 

The pessimists among the 
13 ministers include Sheik 
Ahmed Zaki Yamani. the 
Saudi Arabian oil minister, 
who said yesterday: “It . 
doesn't look that good”. 

The final hurdle appears to 
be Kuwait's insistence on a 
new increased output quota. 
Most of the other 12 member 
nations have agreed that Ku- 
wait should have a higher oil 
output level but are not pre- 
pared to accept its demand for 
a 10 per cent increase. 

North Sea oil prices moved 
upwards yesterday on expecta- 
tions of an agreement. 

The oil ministers of Kuwait 
and Nigeria are due in London 
tomorrow for an oil industry 
conference. Both have said 
they want to appear at the 
seminar with a new Opec 
agreement in place. 

Merrill move 

Merrill Lynch Europe has 
appointed Mr Michael Wiu as 
European equity market strat- 
egist and manager of Euro- 
pean research. Mr Witt has 
been with Chase Manhattan, 
where he was chief inter- 
national investment officer. 

Hanson buy 

Hanson Trust has agreed to 
sell Clearing Inc, manurae- 
turers of hydraulic and 
mechanical presses, to Hitachi 
Zoscn Corp of Japan for $64 
million. Payment will be 40 
per cent in cash and 60 per 
cent in short-term notes. 

Retail dispute 

Uncertainties over the in- 
tentions of House of Fraser 
have caused the Church 
Commissioners to poll out of 


Poehl comment 
eases pressure on 
dollar and pound 


By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 


Pressure lifted a little onthe more regrettable that Britain 
pound yesterday as the dollar had so far felt unable to join 
rose after remarks by Herr the exchange rate mechanism 
Kail Otto Poehl. the president of the European Monetary 
of the West German Sytem. 

Bundesbank. In a gentle dig at the British 

At a meeting of the German authorities he addedb“I appre- 
Chamber of Commerce in date the readiness of the 
London, Herr Poehl said he British Government to join 
thought that the fall m the the exchange rate mechanism 
dollar had gone far enough. of the EMS — 'when the time 

Experience showed that for- - 

eign exchange markets tended - - „ 

to overshoot when adjust- Share prices fell ip 

merits to currencies became London and New York 
necessary. It would be in yesterday. The FT 30- 
nobody's interest, said Herr share Index closed 17.1 
PoebL if this were to happen points lower at 1,264/4 
again to the dollar. after falling steadily 

Dun ^ lhc afternoon, he throughout the session, 
spent half an hour with the -rt,. nvprapp 

Chancellor, Mr Nigel Lawson, 

and paid what was described “® pp f“ , f®.™* 5 “* 

as a courtesy call on Mrs early trading to 1,804.56 

Thatcher, who was accompa- " 

nied by Mr Robin Leigh- is ripe’ - if I may use the 
Pembenon, Governor of the official wording.” 

Bank of England. - A fixed exchange rate sys- 

Earlier, Herr Poehl said that lem m Europe would not be 
in view of the deregulation of easy to m a n a g e, particularly 
European financial markets, when the dollar was weak and 
of which the approaching Big the mark strong. But if Britain 
Bang in London was the did join it' would have an 
leading event, it was ail the economic and political impact 

Shop sales surge 
to new records 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

Retail sales rose to new the September figures were 
highs last month, although the good, with sales maintaining 
increase was smaller than their strong trend, aided by 
analysts had expected. Sales back-to-school purchases and 
volume rose by 0.2 per cent sales of autumn fashion lines, 
after a 1.4 per cent rise in But ^ 

A warning that the warm Ocio- 

Officrab at the Department ^ ^ ^ 

of Trade and Industry said versely affected sales. 


of which the approaching Big 
Bang in London was the 
leading event, it was ail the 


not only on Europe but on the 
rest of the world as welL 

Apart from saying that the 
fail in the dollar, had gone far 
enough. Herr Poehl bad little 
of comfort for the markets. He 
made it dear that there was no 
case at present for a cut in 
German interest rates which 
might help to underpin ster- 
ling and the dollar. 

The German economy had 
returned to a growth track 
from the second quarter of the 
year, fuelled entirely by 
domestic demand. Nor was 
monetary policy unduly 
restrictive. “I am not a dog- 
matic monetarist,” said Herr 
Poehl, “but I cannot simply 
ignore the feet that we will 
significantly overshoot our 
money supply target this 
year.” 

Sterling dosed nearly 2 
pfennigs higher against the 
mark at DM.2.8434 and the 
pound’s international value 
was 0.2 firmer at 67.5. The 
dollar rose l’A pfennigs to 
DM. 1.9870. 

In the money markets, in- 
terest rates eased slightly 



German words: 

of Commerce in Britain^ and Mr Ian Stewart. 


HabbeL head of the German Chamber 
conomic Secretary to the Treasury 



sales continued strong in all 
sectors last month. The index 
of sales volume stood at 1 22.8 


Indeed, early returns from 
the John Lewis Partnership 


100). 6.2 per cent up showed sluggish sales in the 


00 its level a year earlier. 

. The more repr e s entative 
comparison — of sales in the 
latest three-month period — 


first few days of this month. 

The latest monthly sales 
figures will serve to temper 
liars of a runaway consumer 


showed a 5 per cent increase boom, financed on credit. A 
on the corresponding period targe increase in sales volume 


of last year. In the July- 
Sepiember period, sales vol- 


ume was 1.5 percent up on the interest rates. 


last month could have added 
to the pressure for higher 


previous three months. 

The value of sales last 
month was 1 0 per cent up on a 
year earlier. In the first nine 
months of the year, sales value 
was 8 per cent higher than the 
corresponding period of 1 985. 

The Retail Consortium said 


Lord Barber: delays in fin- 
ding a successor 

Lord Barber 
to retire 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Standard Chartered Bank, 
the international banking 
group, announced yesterday 
that Lord Barber would be 
retiring as chairman at the 
annual meeting next May. He 
will be succeeded by Mr Peter 
Graham, senior deputy chair- 
man, who has been with the 
bank for 36 years and has 
extensive Far Eastern ex- 


£5.3bn mortgage record 


Lending for house pur- 


over taking 75,000 sq ft of 
space in the Church’s Tower 

Ramparts retail development ® wu 


in Ipswich, Suffolk. 




yesterday. This was £1.3 bil- 
lion up on the first quarter and 
£1 billion above the previous 

tljUin plan quarterly high. . 

Exeter Park Estates, the 

London nrn nfi 1 v comnanv the latest analysis of insutu 

chSried TMrSS 'lional investment, also show 
cnairca oy MV a\ir. fimnoinl mcfifll- 



***— V'.*- 

ww ■ 




tzr 


Hfttftin 


Pkkford, the former chairman 
of Haslcmcre Estates, plans a 
£150 million. 238-acre retail, 
leisure and business park 
development next to Exeter 
Airport. 

£llm offer 

Ranger Oil (UKL the Brit- 
ish operating subsidiary of 
Ranger Oil, is offering 45p 
cash for each Berkeley 
Exploration share. The offer 
values Berkeley at £10.98 
million. 

Stork Market 26 Fwfian Excfa 28 
WaUMm* 26 Traded Opto Sf 
Co Non 26,28 Share Prices 29 
Ten pus 27 l nit Tnrtt*30 
Co mm e nt 27 romtmxlilir. M 
Money Mrkts 28 I SM Prices 30 


(hat British financial instilu- 

DoE to pay 
half of study 

The Department of Energy 
is to meet half of the £800.000 
cost of a feasibility study into 
building a barrage across the 
mouth of the Mersey, which 
could potentially provide 0.5 
per cent of the country's 
energy needs. 

The Mersey Barrage Com- 
pany will finance the remain- 
der of the research, which will 
identify* the best site and look | 
into the social and environ- 
mental impact of the scheme 
and its effect on navigation 
and sedimentation. 


Even so, the feet that there Graham, senior deputy chair- 
was no dip after the sharp man. who has been wjtb the 
Angusi rise and that bank for 36 years and has 
September's sales volume was extensive Far Eastern ex- 
more than 6 per cent up on a perience. 
year earlier, show that there is Lord Barber joined the bank 
no shortage of spending in the as chairman in 1974 following 
economy, his spell as Chancellor of the 

Exchequer. Now aged 66, he 
‘ndidVA waacw/ 1 was due to retire as early as 

Ca£6 record Iasi year but remained because 

. . . of delays in finding a 

ttons invested a record £4.31 successor 
billion in overseas securities. When* Lloyds Bank 
compared with £3.69 billion launched a bid for Standard 
in the first quarter. during the summer. Lord 

Inflows into the fin a nci al Barber decided to stay on until 
institutions rose to £16.5 bn- issue was resolved 
lion in the second quarter -40 Lord Barber has presided 

per cent up on the fiisL over a period of change for the 
Capital issues in the quarter hank including the full 
were £1.72 billion — more integration of Standard Rank 
than in the whole of last year, wjtii Chartered Bank, which 
Net inflows to fife assurance merged before he became 
and pensions were up. chairman. I 


tioos invested a record £4.31 
billion in overseas securities, 
compared with £3.69 billion 
in the first quarter. 

Inflows into the financial 
institutions rose to £16.5 biJ- 
iion in the second quarter— 40 
per cent up on the first. 
Capital issues in the quarter 
were £1.72 billion — more 
than in the whole of last year. 

Net inflows to fife assurance 
and pensions were up. 


Highland’s 

mushroom 

project 

By Cliff Feltham 

Highland Distilleries, the 
Famous Grouse whisky group, 
is setting up a new business — 
growing mushrooms. 

About £500,000 is being 
spent on equipping an un- 
wanted five-storey warehouse 
in Glasgow where the com- 
pany is aiming to produce up 
to 300 tons of mushrooms a 
year which will be sold to 
supermarkets in Scotland. , 
Mr John Macphail, 
thechairman, who announced 
the move yesterday, said: 
“Demand for mushrooms in 
Scotland is growing at the raie 
of 25 per cent a year. We’ve 
had expert advice on starting 
up the project and aim to have 
mushrooms in the shops by 
the second half of next year. 

“It obviously is not going to 
become a major part of our 
business, but it seems the best 
way of making use of assets 
which are under-utilized.” 

Highland Distilleries has a 
number of other warehouses 
which coukl be suitable for 
mushroom growing if the idea 
lakes off. The storage space is 
no longer needed because of 
the fell in demand for Scotch 
whisky. 

He said: “There is a huge 
demand for mushrooms at the 
moment and we will be able to 
get them to the shops much 
quicker than existing suppli- 
ers. We tried to sell the 
warehouse but could not find 
a buyer and looked at other 
ways of using it. This offers 
the best prospects.” 

Tempos, page 27 

Maxwell 

stake 

Norton Opax's £151.7 mil- 
lion final bid for 
McCdrquodale closes tomor- 
row at 1pm, although Opax 
can extend. Opax shares yes- 
terday rose 5p to 148p and 
McCbrquodale’s eased 5p to 
263p. Mr Robert Maxwell 
announced be now speaks for 
10.4 per cent of 
McCorquodaie. 


James Capel captures City’s 
broker research title again 



STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


S2 Ssi? 







Now Vortc 

Dow Jonas T 8W.70 (-32.34)- 

Tokyo 

Mkta Dow ..... 1652137 (-177.97) 
Hong Kong: . 

Baatss-2ss»fei 

SptasjKAO 1360.7 1-7.6) i 

rfmWwt 

Comfiwrebsnk 1934 9 (+ 1 S. 1 ) 

BruiMte 

General 3854 68 (samel 

Parf*CAC 3705 isamaj 

Zurich: 

SKA General n/a 

konclon dosing prices Page 29 

Interest rates 

London: 

a*r* Base: IIS 

3-month Inter&uk 1 1 S-tiV* 


fata Rata 7%* 
federal Funds SW 
3-moron Treasury Safe 532-530% ' 
«ky**r bonds & 2 VB 2 W 


CURRENCIES 



London: 


S £1 4305' 

fc 0*119875- 

*04308 l-5wFrl«15- 

FR6510Q- 
. YW1154.73 
tax 475 S- tadnria * 

tt. 7317*9 SDBLG8M061 


lfe$Wft?-3308 
E: FFr93060 1 
IE Van22l 14 
E tadte.97 5 1 


RISES: 

Federated Housing .... 118p (+]4pl 

Storing! fnds. 160p f ** 7Dl 

CarcIoEng 

Litieshafl - 1|3P 

Lee Retngwahon 258p 

Chrysalis Group — I77p 

Counter Products t top 

Jmerbnk Exp. 2Wp 

Mmei Htfiftfls 26Sp 

Infnl. City - IfS? 

Wm. Smcfair 210p 

SAtfcne . — — • 173p 

Cardifl Prt«». ■— — ■ 323p 

FALLS: 

pSSSonBms. A»p(-llp) 

as!a~— 

ISBfft rra fa 

Cons. Gold 669p{-30p) 


GOLD 
London Pxtng: 

298.75) 

New Yoric 

ConaxS424.60-42S.10* 


NORTH SEA OIL 

Brut (Dec.) pn»S14 6SBMtSl3.75) 

-Denotes latest trading prfee 


By Lawrence Lever 

James Capel has substan- 
tially increased its lead as the 
City’s choice broker far re- 
search, according to the Extel 
Ranking of UK Investment 
Analysts, published today. 

The analysts* top ten league 
table has James Capel top for 
the eighth year running, with 
its analysis receiving 825 
more voles than the second- 
placed Phillips & Drew. 
Scrimgeour Vickers is placed 
third. Last year, the James 
Capel research team, led by 
Mr Mike Geering,the highly 
rated Brewery analyst, won by 
a maigiii of 5 13 votes. 



Mr Gearing: “Our analysts 
are efiest driven'" 

internally about every three 


Alexanders Laing and months in order to allocate 
Cruickshank fell back from their business. This is a much 
sixth to tenth place while the more reliable guide to where 
highest new entry into the top the business is going. 


ten was Warburg Securities, 
which incorporates Rowe & 
Pitman. It achieved seventh 
placing. 

The league table was ad- 


”We get peal strength from 
the continuity factor — we’ve 
lost only one analyst in six 
years, none over the past 


justed with Scrimgeour S" ear - 

Vickers being moved from “Our people are allowed to 


second 10 third place -as a 
result of the recent departure 
of its electronics team to 
Smith New Court. 

The survey — formerly run 
by Continental Illinois — is 
based on the responses of 
about 76 British investment 


do largely their own thing. We 
are very unstructured. Our 
analysts are diem driven — we 
encourage direct contact be- 
tween the analysts and the 
dirais”. 


ES 7 ft Rrirkh The survey includes a pro- 

managers who were invited to JP* 

nnt ThAir rhniAA of ]wf _ filSt Onie. it IS OSSW UpQn 


rank their choice of the best 
three analysts in 65 market 
sectors. 


the analysts’ own anonymous ' 
responses to a questionnaire. 


Voles given to analysis are The results show the typical 
weighted with three votes for analyst as being 33-and-a-haIf 
first place, two for second and years old. with seven years* 
one for third. experience: He or sire covers 

“The survey reflects what is no more than two sectors, 
happening already 10 analyses 34 companies and 
commissions.” Mr Geering has spent no more than three 


said \esierd3y.“2nstiiutions years with his or her current 
?re doing this son of research firm. , 


The chemicals team at 
Green we II Montagu, led by 
Mr Stuart Wamsley, which 
includes a 23-year-old gradu- 
ate, Miss Judy Shaw, was 
voted the star analysts team 
on the basis ofhaving received 
more weighted votes than any 
other. The textiles team at 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd were 
second, with the James Capel 
Leisure team third . 

“We very much concentrate 
on the fundamentals of the 
industry.” Mr Wamsley said 
yesterday. Unlike the 
“typical” analyst, he is aged 52 
and has been studying the' 
chemicals sector for 24 years. 

“We separate the analysing 
and marketing functions. No 
analyst should be doing both 
analysing and marketing”, he 
added. 

The Extel survey highlights 
also the macro-economics 
team at Goldman Sachs — Mr 
Gavyn Davies. Mr David 
Morrison and Mr Jeremy 
Hale. Recently moved from 
Simon &. Coates, the team 
received the top rankings for 
their work on international 
economies and currency 
forecasting. 

Phillips & Drew also receive 
a mention for being top 
ranked in five sectors, while 
three Greenwril Montagu 
teams of analysts feature in 
the top six in an alternative 
league table of star analysts' 
teams. 

This is based on the 
weighting of total votes re- 
ceived by analysis multiplied 
by the percentage of the total 
market capitalization repre- 
sented by their sectors. 


Eurotunnel trusts 
in placing success 

By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 


Financing for the £4.7 bil- 
lion Channel Tunnel moved 
ahead last night with the issue 
of the final prospectus for a 
£206 million international pri- 
vate placing. 

Financial advisers to 
Eurotunnel, the Anglo-French 
partnership chosen to build 
the cross-Channel link, said 
they were confident the plac- 
ing would be fully subscribed 
by Friday's deadline. 

Verbal commitments 
worldwide of more than £150 
million have already been 
made on the basis of the 
pathfinder prospectus issued 
last month. 

The price of the 8.58 million 
units, comprising one share in 
the French company and one 
in the English company, has 
.been fixed at £12 plus Frl20. 


On the forecast dividends, this 
means a notional gross divi- 
dend' return to subscribers to 
the placing of 17.2 per cent 
over the 55-year concession. 

There has been some scep- 
ticism whether British institu- 
tions would find the issue 
attractive but Eurotunnel’s 
brokers and bankers were 
optimistic yesterday about the 
level of support. 

About £70 million is to be 
raised in Britain and there 
have already been commit- 
ments ranging from £500,000 
to £5 million. 

About £70 million will be 
raised in France. £20 million 
in the US. £20 million in 
Japan, and £20 million in 
other, mainly European, 
countries. 


Merger terms agreed 
by Davidson and CPM 


By Our City Staff 


Davidson Pearce Group, 
the advertising agency, yes- 
terday announced that it had 
agreed terms for a merger with 
Counter Products Marketing, 
the USM-quoted sales promo- 
tion and advertising company. 

The merger is being brought 
about through an agreed share 
offer for CPM, valuing it at 
£1 1.75 million. The deal will 
increase Davidson's market 
capitalization from £20 mil- 
lion to £31.65 million. 

It will reduce the stake in 
Davidson Pearce held by the 
Ogilvy Group, from 23.5 per 
cent to around 15 percent 
Like Davidson Pearce, 
CPM came to the market at 
the tail end of last year. CPM 
made record pretax profits of 
£1.1 million in the year to 
December 1985 and recorded 


a marginal 3.6 per cent in- 
crease to £602.000 in its latest 
half year profit figures. 

The deal has been backed 
already by shareholders 
accounting for 54 per cent of 
CPM. All the existing manage- 
ment and staff of -CPM will 
join Davidson Pearce, while 
the chairman, Mr Richard 
Morris-Adams, wiD become 
deputy chaimian of Davidson 
Pearce Group. 

In addition Mr Cecil 
Parkinson. MP, a non-exec- 
utive director of CPM. will 
join the board also. 

Mr Christopher Hawes, 
chaiman of Davidson Pearce, 
said that the deal “made good 
sense in strategy, industry and 
business terms. We both be- 
lieve we can grow fester 
together than separately". 


SPORT 43 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 47 


Heath 

spams 

bid 

byPWS 

By Alison Eadie 

PWS International, the last 
growing and ambitious 
Lloyd’s broker headed by Mr 
Ronnie Ben-Zur. yesterday 
launched a £184.1 million bid 
for its fellow broker, C E 
Heath. 

Heath promptly labelled the 
offer “unsolicited, opportunis- 
tic and inadequate” and urged 
shareholders to take no action. 

Only two weeks ago. Heath 
announced that it was plan- 
ning to buy Fielding Insurance 
from Hambros Bank in a deal 
which would result in Ham- 
bros owning more than 20 per 
cent of the combined group. 

Mr Ben-Zur said that PWS 
decided to move fast after the 
announcmenl of the Fielding 
deaL 

“Our offer is much more 
comprehensive,'! he added. 

He believes PWS can 
contribute significantly to 
Heath's North American bro- 
kerage business and on the 
corporate management front. 

Heath recently lost an im- 
portant team of brokers from 
- its North American side to a 1 
rival broker. 

Heath's performance has 
been disappointing recently, 
with pretax profits in the year 
to March 31 static at £30.4 
million. 

The company has suffered 
from the loss, through na- 
tionalization. of its workers' 
compensation business in Vic- 
toria, Australia, and from 
adverse currency movements. 

Heath's shares have fallen 
from a high at 707p this year 
to a low at 427p. 

They jumped 79p higher 
yesterday to close at 559p. 
PWS shares lost 20p to 3I5p. 

The terms of the offer are 
four new PWS shares and 
three convertible preferred 
shares for four Heath shares, 
which values Heath at 572p a 
share. 

There is no cash dement or 
alternative. 

• PWS was formed in April 
this year from the merger of 
PWS International a fully 
listed Lloyd’s broker, and 
Howard Group, which had a 
quote on the unlisted securi- 
ties market 

_ Mr Ben-Zur, managing 
director of Howard, became 
chief executive of the enlaiged 
group. 

PWS estimated its pretax 
profits in the year just ended 
to September 30 of £8J 
million on brokerage of more 
than £1525 million. 

Pretax profits in 1980 were 
less than £250,000. 

Since merger in April, PWS 
has acquired another Lloyd's 
broker, Lyon Traill 
Attenborough, for £928,000. 


Buying your next 



You’ve done it before, so you know the ropes. And you 
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present home. 

Add the feet that there’s no particular shortage of funds 
for larger mortgages and you could be forgiven for thinking that 
finding the ideal mortgage would be a piece of cake. 

But. of course, this isn't so. 

It’s only coo easy to end up with a mortgage that may 
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A\e have immediate access to more than 200 different 
sources of mortgage finance of all kinds. Including a whole 
range of mortgages that are both “Unusual and Esdustw" to 
John Charcol clients. 

And it’s our job to make sure that our customers get the 
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This is even more true for larger mortgages - in excess of 
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So. if you're contemplating a move or a remortgage, come 
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01-5897080. 


107 INDEPENDENT Mf >RTt l\l iE BKi >KERS 

Mercury House, 195 Knightsbridge, London SW7 IRE. Tel: 01-589 7080. 




BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


WALL STREET 


Indexes drop on interest rate fears 


By Michael Clark 


DATASTREAM 




Shares prices were in ragged 
retreat yesterday after. being 
caught in a pincer movement 
of higher interest rate fears 
and news of sharp fails during 
early trading on Wall Street 

The FT index of 30 shares 
started the day cautiously 
following bearish comment on 
the economy at the weekend 
and drifted steadily through- 
out the day as the new 
marketmakers took advantage 
of the quiet conditions to 
balance their books in 
preparation for next week's 
big bang. The index finished 
the session 17.1 points down 
at 1,264.4 as more than £3 
billion million was wiped 
from the value of quoted 
shares. 

The broader-based FT-SE 
100, which managed a 4.5 rise 
in early trading, dipped below 
the 1600 level, to close 19.8 
points down at 1,590.2. 

The news from New York, 
where the Dow Jones indus- 
trial average opened 32 points 
lower, caught many dealers on 
the hop. Dealers blamed an- 
other wave of computerized 
selling for the early shakeout, 
with declines leading ad- 
vances by three to one. 

This was prompted by re- 
newed weakness in the US 
bond market where there are 
growing fears that interest 
rates are set to rise. 

The prospect of dearer 
money was also taking its toll 
in London. Last week's speech 
by the Chancellor at the Lord 
Mayor's banquet has done 
little to calm fears. Dealers are 
now worried that another 1 
per cent rise in interest rates to 
12 per cent may be necessary 
to hall the dide in the pound 


on the foreign exchanges. 

But the pressure on three- 
month money was a little 
easier on the money market, 
with rates dosing a touch 
easier on the day. 

Government securities 
spent another nervous day, 
but managed to halve earlier 
losses of £1 at the longer end 
of the market on hopes that 
the Opec oil ministers' meet- 
ing in Geneva was about to 
reach agreement on produc- 
tion levels. 

Blue chips were marked 
lower with Allied Lyons down 
7p at 298p, ICI 8p at £10.99 
and Tate & Lyle 7p ai 563p. 

Among food retailers, Dee 
Corporation, the Fine Fare 
and International Stores 

• Crown Teterishra 
Productions, the commercial 
and corporate video 
production gran, boasts an 
enriaUe list of Une chip 
clients, making it an ideal bid 
target Mr Goraoa Curie, 
chairman, admits the group 
has received approaches 
bat dealers reckon a bid of 
lOOp is on the way. 

group, slipped 3p to 215p. 
awaiting the outcome of a 
meeting between Mr Alec 
Monk, the chairman, and 
various Scottish fend man- 
agers at a seminar in 
Edinburgh. 

Laura Ashley, the clothing 
and home furnishings group, 
finned 5p to 1 90p, amid hopes 
that the group will be able to 
revive the flagging fortunes of 
■its highly-rated share price. 
Last week, Mr Bernard Ash- 
ley, the chairman, with the 
group's financial advisers. 


\ LAURA ASHLEY 
J LOOKING FOR 
'AMERICAN BUYERS 


1 LONDON FTA 
I ALL SHARE 


Jan Fab' Mar ^ Apr l^ay Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct 


flew to New York for the start 
of a roadshow, aimed at 
attracting the support of US 
fund managers. 

The group came to market 
last November at 1 35p follow- 
ing an offer for sale of 46.5 
million shares which was 34 
times oversubscribed and at- 
tracted £2 billion. The shares 
opened at 193p in first-time 
dealings before hitting a peak 
of 240p. But recently they 
have lost some of their early 
impetus and hit a low of 171p 
after a disappointing set of 
interim figures earlier this 
month showing pretax profits 
up by only 14 per cent at £8.7 
million. 

The shares are already 
traded in New York where the 
group enjoys the facilities of 
an American Depositary Re- 
ceipt. Laura Ashley already 
has 90 stores in the US, which 
now accounts for about 42 per 
cent of profits. At the last 
count, there were more than 
1,000 American shareholders 
on the register, but the group 
is keen to increase that num- 
ber and is hoping to attract 
more private investors. 

Sears enjoyed another early 


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burst of activity, still excited 
by the news that Mr Robert 
Holmes a Court, the Austra- 
lian entrepreneur, had built up 
a stake and the talk of a 
possible consortium bid. But 
after bitting 133.5p, the shares 
soon ran out of steam and 
dosed unchanged at I28p. 
Last week, they stood at 1 12p. 

Dealers have been talking 
excitedly about the break-up 
potential of the group -which 
indudes such famous names 
as Selfridges, Saxone, Dolds 
and Mappin & Webb — and 
have been bracing themselves 
for a bid of 1 60p a share. That 
would value Sears at £2 billion 
— making it one of the biggest 
retailers in the high street 

In- the Unlisted Securities 
Market, Berry Birch & Noble, 
the financial services and 
insurance broker, was making 
its debut. Placed at U5p, the 
shares opened at 122p — a 
premium of 7p. 

Another newcomer was Ro~ 
bands, a Manchester-based 
manufacturer and distributor 
of self-adhesive tapes. The 
shares opened with a modest 
2p premium after Henry 
Cooke, Lumsden, the broker. 


arranged a placing of 23 
million shares at 95p. 

Rotunda, which boasts Brit- 
ish Gas, Marks and Spencer, 
Ford, Rover Group, British 
Telecom , British Home Stores 
and the Ministry of Defence, 
among its customers, is 
forecasting pretax profits of 
£875,000for 1986. 

Amstrad, the fast-growing 
consumer electronics group; 
ran into a few nervous sellers 
following last week’s strong 
run because of fears that its 
new IBM-compatible personal* 
computer had ran into prob- 
lems. Weekend reports 
claimed that ICI had dropped 
plans to buy a large number of 
the machines, launched Last 
month, following evaluation 
tests. Analysts have been look- 
ing for the new PC 1512 to 

• Hopes ace rising tint 
the Opec oil ministers'' meet- 
ing In Geneva can thrash 
out an agreement on price and 
production quotas. The 
word from Geneva is that (he 
Kuwait Investment Office 
has invested £40 mffiu dur- 
ing the past week in the 
smaller British oB exploration 
groups. 

lake up the running on profits 
growth from the PCW 8256 
modeL 

When it went public in 
1980, the group was capital- 
ized at less than £8 milli on- 
Since then, pretax profits have 
soared from £1.7 million to 
£75 million and the group is 
now valued at almost £700 
million- The shares fell 8p to 

120p. 

McCerqnodale, the special- 
ist printer, slipped 5p to 263p 
after Mr Robert Maxwell the 
publisher of The Daily Mirror , 


confirmed that be had been 
adding to his bolding. On 
Friday, be bought an extra 
375,000 shares, taking his 
stake to 5.32 million shares, or 
10.4 p6t cent of the total. 

McCorquodale is _ fighting 
an unwanted,£l4S million bid 
from rival Norton Opax and 
the recent merger talks with 
ExteL, the news agency and 
financial information pub- 
lisher, ended in failure. 

CE Heath, the troubled 
insurance broker, leapt 85p to 
565p first thing, following 
confirmation of a £J90 mil- 
lion offer from its- smaller 
rival FWS Holdings. FWS is 
offering four of its own shares, 
plus three new convertible 
.preferred shares, for every 
four Heath shares. The bid 
values values Heath at 605p a 
share. Only last week. Heath 
announced it was in merger 
talks with Fielding Insurance, 
a subsidiary of Hambros. 

PWS finished 20p lower at 
315p, but news of the ted 
attracted support for other 
brokers. - Muet Holdings 
jumped 1 2p to 265p and Steel 
Bsrrfll Jones lOp to 229p. 

Bid news was also good for 
Berkeley Exploration, the 
USM-qnoted oil and gas 
exploration -group, 8p higher 
at 46p. Ranger 03 has already 
bought 5 million shares (20.9 
per cent) and is now offering 
45p in cash for the rest The 
deal values Berkeley at £10.98 
million. The market seemed 
impressed with the deal and 
marked Ranger 17p higher at 
205pL 

Reports that Bosch, the 
West German industrial 
group, was building up & 
sizeable stake lifted Lee 
R efr ige ra tion 20p to 258p. 
Dealers are hoping that it may 
be the prelude to a foil ttid. 


New York (Renter) - After issues outnumbered rising 
five consecutive sessions of ooesby 
rises, the Dow Jones indos- on a volume of 35 muuon 

trial average dropped by 32.48 shares. 
points to 1,88436 to early TranswwrM gtfed 
trading yesterday. Shares 33%. Lucky Stores which said 
were hit by a. com halation of that its board will meet itew 
weaker bond prices and M selF week to discuss Mr Asner 
programmes. * Edelman’s offer for the cam- 

One trader reported there pany, slipped by ft to 34%. 
were not a lot of buyers, bet list week, the 

t h a t tiie selling hsS calmed ended with a gain of almost 44 

down. The naa&er of faffing points. ■ . . 


oct Od 
17 to 

AMR ! 59 5T" 

ASA S6K 37 

asts" ss & 

AOuCHua 3 3X . 

Mere' 35% 36* 
Anwctnc 13% 13* 

Am'irfa Hb 26* 26* 

Am Brands 44% 45 

Am Can 875* 87% 
Am Cwm’d 76% 77% 

AmBPwf 27% 28 

Am Express S8% 58% 

Am Homo 77% 77% 

Am Motor* 3% 3% 

Am Sfrad 435* 42% 

AmTetoph 24* 24% 
Amoco . . 6BX 87% 
Annco Stool 6% 6% 

Asarau 14% 15 

AatoandOfl 60 69%' 

TCRfcMokl 55% 56% 
Avon Prods 335* -33% 
BkrsTttNY 45 45% 

Sartanwr 14% 14% 
BkofBsun 40% 40% 
Bank OT NY 58% 58X 

Beto Stool 7% 7% 

Boono 54% 54% 

BmCModft -59 .59% 

Brdon .. 46% 46 

Bg warns- 34% 34% 
BrtetMjws 77 76% 

BP 38% 39% 

Burftonlnd 38% 36% 

BurTtonMn 59% 59% 

Boroughs 70 6B% 

CmpbefiSp 62% 62% 

CanPacffle 11% 11% 

CatorpHer 37% 37% 

Cobras 206% 206 
Contra! SW 33% 33% 

Champion 28% 28% 

Chase Man. - 35% 36% 
ChmBkNY 44% 44% 

Cfiovnon - 44% 44% 

Ctoystef 37% 37% 
CHcorp 48 48% 

dark Equip' 20% 20% 

Coca Con 38% 39 
Crigafe 36% 38% 
CBS 126% 126% 

ClmbfaGas 42%. 44 
CmbtnBw 31% 31% 
ComwWiS 32% 32% 
COns&fis 4554- 45* 
Cn Nat Gas 31 31 

OmsPowar 13% 13% 

CmrtDtta 24% 24% 

, ConwgGI 50% 50% 
CPC Ira 71 7D% 

Crane 29 29% 

CmZMIor 50% 515* 
Rut & Kraft 56% 56% 
Doors 23% 22% 

DehaAir 47% 48% 
Detroit Ed 16% 16% 

DtgMEq 95% 95% 
D&W-- 42% 42% 

DowChom 53% 53% 
DiBscerM 17% 17% 
(MtoPUwV-44% 44% 
DuPont 81% 81% 
Eostam'Air 9 .9 

Estm Kodak 56% 57 
Eaton Corn 71% 71% 
Emerson B 81% 81 
Exxon Corp 68% 68% 


Oct Oct 
17 16 

Brawona aj% 35" 

Pst Chicago 30 30% 

FMMBocp 54% 54% 

FstPounC 9% 9% 

Ford 55% 56% 

FTWOctwu 39% 38% 

GAFCOrp 35% 35% 

GTE Cop 57% 57% 

GonCorp 76% 75% 
Gorr^-'mca 73% 73% 

.Gen dearie * 76% 77% 
□on Inst 19% 16% 

Gen MBs 84% 83% 

Gen Motors 88% 67% 

OiPDUtny 22% 22% 
Genesco 35* 3% 

Georgia Pac 3954 38% 

GJABte 41 40% 

Goodrich ' 42% 42% 

Goodyear 41% 38% 
Gotodtoc 19% 19% 

Grace 48% 50% 

GtAtt&ffcC 22% <2% 

Grind 31% 32 
GnnanOor 25% 25 
Guff & mm 63% 63% 

Heinz H-J. . 42% 42% 
Hercutoa ■ 55% 55* 
Hiett-PkRj 37% 38% 

i ssr* asm 

Sngerad 52% 5Z% 
Inland Stud 18% 18% 

IBM . 122% 12154 

MCO ' 13 12% 

Int Paper 71* 71* 
IntTrfTO 52 52 

Irving Bank 49 49% 

Jhnsn&Jtm 70 69% 

-Kataar Afcan 17% 17% 

Kerr McGee 28* 28* 

Kmb-fyCMi 82 82% 

K Mart 47% 47% 

Kroger 31% 31% 

LTvTcarp 8 2 

Limn • 75% 78% 

Lockheed 44%. 45% 
Lucky Shs 34% 35% 

Mankow 43% 44% 
MamSeCp 2% 2*. 

Mepco 51* 51* 
Marine Md 48% 485* 
MrtMSriem 41% 42% 
Masco 26% 26% 
McOonetde 61 61% 

McOww&S 79% 61% 
Mead 59% 59% 
Merck - 109% 108% 
MnatuMig 107% 107% 
MoMOH 37% 38% 
Monsanto 69% 70 
Morgan XP. 83% 83% 

Motorola 35% 35 

NCRCorp 44% 44 

NLMutre 6% 6% 

NMOfsttS 43% 43* 
Nat Med Elk 23% 24 
NatSmcmft 9% 9* 

Norfolk ah 85% 86% 

NWBanop 35% 35% 

OctidntPM 29* 29% 
Ogden 44% 43 
CJnCap 41% 42% 
Owens-N 40% 41 
PtoGtoB 23% 24 
Pan Am -5% 5% 

Penney XC. 76% 76% 
PomzoS 885* 67% 

Feotoco 27% 28 


Oct Oct 
17 16 

'flaw 7" 

PhetosOga 21% 21* 

PWipMrs 72 725* 

PhdkpsPet 10% 10% 

Potanrid 69% 63% 

PreJrGmM 73% 73% 

tSSa 

Hayffieon - 61% 61% 

%%%& I* » 

ii 

Sen Lae «% W a 
SFES opac 30% M* 
SChTberger 32% g* 
ScoU Paper B5% 65 

Seagram 60% 60% 

Bit m pt 

IXinBk H W* 

iSSaiEd - S S 

issas 1 ® is 
aav s & 

310* 311% 

Texaco 35* 35 

TOxasECor 29 28% 

Texas ML 109% 112% 

TwfcsUHs »% 

Textron 59% 58% 
TravksCW 455* 45. 

TRW toe 92 91 

UAL Inc 58 58% 

UnSSwNV ^ 

Ur> Carbide 20% 20% 

UnPacCOr 58% S8% 
Utt Brands 36 36% 

USGCorp 37% 38% 

UtdTechnoi 42* 42% 

USXCorp 28 26*. 

Unocal '23%' .23% 
An Walter .44%' 46. . 
WmerLmbt S5%- 55% 
WWs FSIQ0 104* 104% 
WstohseB 56* 55* 

Whirlpool . . Of* or li 
Wootoorth 43% 43* 
Xerox Corp .54% 54% 

ZarWh .18% 20 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AbiUbl 
; Atai Ahmi 
AigoRisSfl 
ICsnPactfb 
Corainca 
ConBathrst 
Hkr/SUCan 
HdsnBMm 


StadCo 

HmsnNW 

VartvCorp 

VWkrWram 

WCT 


25% 25* 
43% 44 

14* 14% 

15* 16 
13% 13% 
25% 25 
27 26% 

25 24* 

33% - 33% 
45* 45* 

40% 40% 
30% 30* 
84% 84% 
23% 22* 
28* 28* 
2.78. 2-75 
36% 36* 
13% 13% 


iVMfiiiiii 


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Li loses Clark gives 
‘insider’ warning on 
court case Gatt talks 


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FromStephenLeather 1 
HcmgKong ■ 

. Mr Ii Ka-^ing, one bf 
Hong Kong’s richest business- 
men, yesterday learned he ha4 
lost a court battle to dear his 
name of insider d eal ing 
charges. 

Mr Ii Ka-shing, diainnan 
of Hutchison Whampoa, had 
gone to the Crown Colony’s 


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branded him and four of his 
directors as-Hoqg Kong’s first 
culpable insider dealers. 

Mr Li-- who recently took a 
4.9 per cent stake in the 
Financial Timet publisher 
Pearson — vehemently denied 
the accusations. 

* Although insider trading is 
not a crime in Hong Kong, 
being labelled an insider 
dealer is a great source of 
anger to Mr Ii, according to 
one of his fellow directors. 

Lawyers were flown in from 
London to fight - his- case 
during a six-day court bearing. 

The tribunal's report said 
Mr Li, who is also chairman of 
Cheung Kong Holdings, and 
Cheung Kong directors Mr 
Chow Chin-wo, Mr George 
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pable of insider dealing when 
a Cheung Kong subsidiary, 
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International City Holdings 
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and March I 1984 - ■ ■ -■ - 



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11 Please tici here it do itnoie- 

II your answer is Ves tc-an , question inmost cases we hvpt-r-% fc* abk- to 
you the born: fit ol the letirtsasshoitn in the rate 'able Please give lull dotal! .on 
a sepanite sheet •/. tufer 1 cmlter mith ttw nameonda-Jdiess el sour present 
dotier Thtfl sign and <iwe the sheer Vou shouk} »n W sen J us your £ l />>r -,-.-ar 
hist month s C'jver 


1 AGREE ttiai ihrsaopJkationtoeethef with any addmonaldedaration made bj I 
mem connection hereuruh shall be the basis ol theasstirandeancfiliat failure by ■ 
me to disclose all faas known to me and sought by the Companymay lead toa ■ 
daimunderany resulting policy bet ngadiusted or reteaed ■ 

I CONSENT to the Company seeking medical intonnaDonltoai any doctor who ■ 
at any time has attended me concerning anything which affects my physical and I 
mental health or seeking 1 nformarion Horn any insurance office 10 which a _ 

proposal has been made lot insurance on myrae and I authorise the gmrigof I 

such inlormation 

I DECLARE that all statements made by me in this application are true and I 
complete to the best ol my beJref that lftaredtxtosedaU/acK*nown comeand , 
sought by theCompany that premiums will be paidby me or my spouseand the ■ 

payee d the premiums will testde in the United Kingdom • 

Tick this bos il you would like an application fom loryour husband wtfe J j g 


SuiLHeofCcnacki 


• COMBINED ENGLISH 
STORES: The offer to 
shareholders in connection with 
the acquisition of the retailing 
subsidiaries- of Time Prodiaas 
and the acquisition of Sunsites 
has dosed. Applications were 
received for 1.99 million of the 
103 miDkm shares which had 
been placed by Samuel Montagu 
and Hoare Govctt and then 
offered to shareholders. These 
applications will be satisfied in 
fnlL Mr Murray Gordon, the 
chairman, reports that CES 
continues to trade wefl. ; 

• GOODHEAD ' PRINT 
GROUP: A group subsidiary. 
Good head Publishing, has 
bought WHY Publications for 


SSKSSSS^^ DEPT dm. freepost. London sw i y 5yx 

Available only to people living in the United Kingdom 

S^Bl Jr AuunbCt^nrintofi a n nil Inu^wMrJml iniii mldMj.aliciilcCiimrJOv ARM|uiliiMi|>an«iHhCl«U ?■ nil l Cffiv tun 


£720.000. satisfied by the- issue 
at par of loan tunes. WHY has 
three weekly advertising 
publications, - totalling more 
than 115,000 copies weekly. A 
wholly-owned subsidiary, W H 
Y Press, prints the publications 
and gives the Gooahead print 
division extra capacity. 

• GLOBAL GROUP: Total 
dividend Z75p (2J25p) for the 
year to May 3 U Turnover' 
£34^1 mUfion (£26.57 million). 
Pretax :• profit £3794)00 
«E3 12,000). Ea mh u y per share 

•%AVI^S * NEWMAN 
HOLDINGS; Interim payment 

St^c^iraowar£?3t^ mtf- 
iiou (£123.26 miUionL 
Pretax toss £3-48 million (£3.57 
million). Lois per. share 3i.6p 
(29.9 p). 

• J O WALKER: Interim divi- 
dead doubled to 2p for the six 
months to 30/6/86. Ttotiover 
£5.93 million j£^-49 million). 
Pretax profit £37,000 (£86,000 
loss). Earnings per- share 2^p 

(7- ip loss). -v; ••• '• 


• SOUTHERN BUSINESS 
GROUP: Ben worth Copying 
Machines (Holdings), a 50 per 
eent-owned associate, has 
bought the London branch of 
Lincoln Office Equipment for 
about £100,000 cash. The 
London branch, which trades as 
Dunwood, supplies Sharp and 
Ricoh photocopiers to an in- 
stalled machine base of over 500 
customers. This acquisition has 
resulted in the group’s installa- 
tion-base increasing by 75 .per 
cent in the last 12 months. 

• JOHN J LEE& Half-year to 
Sept- 30. .Turnover £2jf8. mil- 
lion (£1.&1 million). 

Pretax profit £213,300 
(£I0OJ?51). Earnings per share 
6.45p (3.62p). 

• USHER-WALKER: First 

half of 1986. Interim dividend 
2.45p (2J2p). Turnover £5.53 
miUioti (£5J3 minion). "Pretax 
profit £325,000 (£346,000). 

per share 836p 

• DU^ ROPES: Sharehoktas 
rave opted to take 403,000 new 
storra _m the recent placing. 

Institutions took 2.1 million of 
foe*®* 3 ! Of ^million. This £2 
million placing was designed to 
givMxonwiioldera the Tight to 
subscribe for up to 62&.000 
shares _and their response ex- 
ceeded the., -company's 
expectations. - 

«KN_B*OVN INVEST- 

-MENTS. The company has 

the Shopping Sense 

diriM madder busin«s 

mitia| £50,000 cash aid afo?- 
^^^■QQO- pay able next ycy . 

More company news 
se28 



By T«esa Boole 
- Basmess Correspood^t . 

Mr Aha dark. Minister 
for Trade, yesterday gave a 
warning tiiat disturbing trends 
in worid trade would continue 
to cast shadows ova: the new 
round of Gatt talks. 

“The gap between- the hom- 
age we all pay to the ideals of 
the General Agreement on 
Tanrifs and Trade, and on 1 ' 
actual practice, is already 
huge and appeals to be grow- 
ing. No country has been 
mnocent in tire- growth of the 
so-called new protectionism," 
be said. . 

The oundaffre effect of 
spedal measmes contrary to 
the Gatt had now bnOt up . 
almost to breaking point with 
the most recent and obvious 
example the U&Japanese 
agreement oh- semiconductor 
sates. . 

At the Gatt negotiations in 
Punta Del Este, Uruguay,, 
where the new round was 
b ra nched, the US had used its 
big influence to push through a 
final dedaration which met all 
its goals. This time its support 
was welcome but in other 
contexts, particularly the 
trend towards iUattratism, it- 
coaid be In direct conflict with 
Community interests, he said. 

Similarly, Japan had 
Mocked a clause for the final 
deda r at i on referring to a more 
equitable balance of benefits 
between Gatt parties. - - 


onpage 


CH 






THE. TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21-1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


27 



1 

f8J5h. ******: ?.» 

Utotant 

s« it* *nh . 1 . 

w 


u >1 


v 


'■s 




.£», P; 


* 





Clark gives 
warning on 
Gad talks 


sc!'* 


U* 



; * v i- 



Eighty years of history ends on Monday 

How to buy and sell 
shares under the new deal 


By Joint Hollis 

For the last 80 years every 
Stock Exchange firm has been 
cither a broker or a jobber. 
The broker gave advice to 
clients and executed their 
orders and for so doing, 
charged a commission. In 
principle, it made no dif- 
ference to the broker in which 
stock the client wanted to de al, 
nor whether he was a buyer or 
a seller. The rate of commis- 
sion would be the same. With 



AWed-Lyons 
ASDA-MFi Group 
BAT fndustrfes 
Barclays 
Bass 

Beacham Group 
BtueCtrda 
BOC Group 
Boots Co 
British Aerospace 
British Petroleum 
British Telecom 
BritoH 
BTR 

Burton Group 
Cable & Wireless 
Cadbury Schweppes 
Commercial Union 
Consol. Gold fields 
Courtauids 
Dixons Group 


% 

* 

25p 

■s 


SEAQ ALPHA SECURITIES 

25p 
2Sp 

50p 
50p 
125p 


50p 

m 

s 

ns 

2Sp 

25p 

25p 

25p 

lOp 


Fteoos ■ 

General Accxteftt 
GEC / 
Glaxo Holdings 
Grand Metropoitan 
Gt Universal Stores 
G’dtan Royal Exch 
GKN 
Guinness 
Hanson Trust 
Hawker Siddtfey 
SCI 


Jaguar 

Laabrokei 


i Group 
Land Securities 
Legal & Genera! 
Lloyds Bank 
Lonrho 

Marks A Spencer 
Midland Batik 


1? 

$ 

El 

25p 

£1 

25p 

•S 


Nat West Bank 
P&O 
Pleesay Co 
Prudential . 
Racal Beetranics- 
Reckitt 4 Coknan 
Reuters Holdings 
RJo TrtO Zinc 
Royal insurance 
Samstwy (J) 
Sears 

Sedgwick Group 
“Sheti" Transport 
STC 

Sun ASanoe 
Tesoo 
Thom EMI 
Trafalgar House 
Trusthouse Forte 

Unflavar 
United Biscuts 


El 
■El 
25p 
2Sp 
, 25p 

2Sp 

rt0p 

2>P 

?§P 


charging value-added tax on 
agency commissions is an- 
other cause of confusion. 
Britain is the only European 
Economic Community coun- 
try where stockbrokers' 
commissions are rhnrpwt 
VAT. 

The position appears to be 


2 sp that no VAT charge will arise 
2Sp where a client d«ai< direct on 
top principal terms, either with a 
||p market-maker or with a bro- 
25 p ker. Where the deal is done in 
jp 

25p 
?Qp 


f; 


Hrrtted' _ 
deferred 


certain exceptions, brokers 
woe required to execute their 
diems' orders with jobbers; 

Jobbers, by contrast, dealt 
solely as principals. They 
made their profits by buying at 
one price and . selling at an- 
other. They dealt with the 
public solely through the me- 
dium of the brokers. 

From Monday, this division 
of functioning has vanished. 
Any firm may act either as 
broker, dealing as an agent for 
clients; or as a jobber, dealing 
as a principal. Moreover, the 
jobber .(now known as a 
market-maker) may deal di- 
rect with investors without 
approaching them through the 
agency of a broker. 

By so doing, however, the 


market-maker win lose the 
protection of the default rules 
which oblige a broker, to 
complete an order by paying 
for or delivering stock even# 
the dient fails to pay or 
deliver stock to him. In prac- 
tice. therefore, market-makers 
will be distinctly choosy about 
dealing direct with external 
clients whose credentials they 
do not know weD. 

Market-makers re gister ed 
with the Stock Exchange will 
continue to enjoy the exclu- 
sive privilege of the con- 
cessionary rate of 50p Trans- 
fer Stamp Duty when taking 
up stock. They alone will have 
the privilege of access to 
money brokers to borrow 
stock for delivery when they 
are “short” of stock. 

Thirdly, only registered 


market-makers will be able to 
display their bids and offers to 
the computerized dealing 
information screens. 

In return for these highly 
technical but most valuable 
privileges they will be ex- 
pected to maintain a continu- 
ous market in the stocks on 
their list, in fair weather or 
foul 

A further complication is 
that any broker, even if not 
registered as a market-maker, 
may in certain drcumstances 
deal for his own account as a 
principal. When so doing he 
does not have the valuable 
privilege of taking up stock ai 
a cost of a SOp stamp. Nor can 
he have access to the new 
market price screen system to 
advertise his price. 

It is likely, theref o re, that 


brokers will tend to use this 
ability to deal as a principal 
only- occasionally and then 
chiefly to help an institutional 
dient who has a large “sticky” 
position. He wDl wish to undo 
the business as quickly as 
possible with the market- 
makers. 

Certainly that is the belief of 
Smith New Court which, as 
the only big market-maker not 
controlled by an outside firm, 
expects to see more than its 
share of this business. 

In any event, the Securities 
and Investments Board rules 
requiring firms to deal at all 
times only within the terms of 
a preset customer agreement 
will require a dient wishing to 
deal in this way to have signed 
such an agreement. 

Government ruling on 



agency terms and a commis- 
sion is charged. VAT will also 
be charged on that commis- 
sion if the broker deals with a 
market-maker. 

If however, the market- 
maker is part of the same 
group as the broker and is not 
a separately incorporated en- 
tity, VAT will not be charged. 
As it is a broker’s duty when 
dealing as an agent to obtain 
the best terms for his client, 
brokers will tend to deal 
whenever possible with the in- 
house market-maker. 

The broker choosing a 
counterparty will have to -per- 
form mental gymnastics in 
adjusting prices shown on the 
screen to take account of the 
varying VAT liabilities. 


Behind the screens at SEAQ 


In principle, die main medium 
of dealing within the market 
will be on the basis of compet- 
itive price quotations As- 
played on tiie screens of the 
Stock Exchange Automated 
Quotations System (SEAQ). 
This simple statement ob- 
scures a multitude of 
qualifications. 

First, only a minority of foe 
participants will have access 
to tire full range of SEAQ 
information. There are three 
levels of service. 

• LEVEL ONE is available to 
any investor who pays for a 
connection. The screen will 
show the best noieat quota- 
tion for every stock in the 
system and the prices at which 
recent deals m active stock 
were done; and the volmne of 
dealings in each stock for the 
day. The beg current 
(the “touch” in the old jc 
parlance) may be a combina- 
tion OTA'S bid and ITs offer. 

SEAQ level-one service will 
not tell subscribers which 
market-makerfc) is making 
the prices quoted. An investor 
will have to telephone a broker 
to find out this information, 
and to place his order 


MARKET-MAKER 

Aiticen 


PARENT COMPANY 

.Independent 


ANZ Bank/CapeLCu 
Cazenove&Co 


Chase Manhattan Securities _~—_ 

Cftiwty Rteqnnri 

FHF Market Makers (Birmingham). 

Gokfinan Sachs 

GraenwaO Montagu 


..Mercury Securities 

ANZ Bank 

Independent 


Chase Manhattan 

■ National We s t mi n st er Bank 
....... Fyshe Horton 4 Finney 

Goldman Sachs 


Hitchens Harrison 4 Co. 


HoaraGovettfndCTPuBey). 
Jacobson Townskw 4 CD.—., 
Kitcat & Aitken. 


.Midland Bank 
— Independent 
.Security Pacific 
.Independent 


Kleinwort Grieveson Securities. 


Laing 4 Cnackshank 

R A McLean 4 Co (Glasgow). 
Morris Lynch Equities 


.Royal Bank of Canada 
Kleinwort Benson 


Sbearson M8sse! (Egdty) — 
Ptiffips 4 Draw fine Edwards 

Morgan Grertall/Pinchm 

Buckmastw/HaroW Rada 

Rada & Co (Dubin) 

Robert Renvng Market-Makers 

Savory Mftn 

Schroder Warn Equities 
wr Vtekers (Trai 


Jones 4W8cox). 


■Mercantte House 
.Independent 
-Memd Lynch 


-She arson Lehman American 
Union Bangue 


GrenfeB 


— Independent 
Robert Fleming 
Royal Trust Co 


Scrimgoour v&ters (Tradere)- 
Smith New Court Ltd 


Stock Beech Market-Maker (Bristol and Bkm.). 
Strauss TumbuH & Co, 


BZW Securities (Wadd Duriacheq. 

WKams de Broe HB Chapfln 

Wood St Securities. 


White 4 Cheesman/S Jenkins 4 Son. 
NCNB/Panmore Garden (Equities) — 


a! H Schrader Wagg 

i - - — — 

BS% owned by Rothschad) 

- B 4 Co mm o n w ea lth Holdings 

. (29.9% each owned by Hambros Bank and Sodeta Generate) 


.Banque Bruxefies I 

.HI Samuel 


.Guinness Mahon • 


.Nat Bank of N Carotina 


LEVEL TWO is available 
to all Stock Exchange mem- 
bers (which in this context 
most mean members of the 
Stock Exchange RIE - Rec- 
ognized Investment Exchange 
- not just tiie Self Regulatory 
Organization) and to institu- 
tions trilling to pay the addi- 
tional cost The screen will 
show, for each stock, every 
registered market-maker's 
current quote and the amount 
of stock for which the price 
grren is valid. 

Level-two subscribers can 
select the most favourable 
price and deal, either direct or 
through a broker by telephone, 
or on the floor of the Stock 
Exchange. Deals for larger 
amounts than shown on the 
screen are subject to individual 
quotation. 

Within level two of the 
SEAQ service there are three 
categories of securities. 


ALPHA STOCKS for 
which firm, commons, two- 
way prices drawn from all 
market-makers wifl be shown 
on the screen, together with 
details of all trades and a 
running total of volmne^ within 
fire minutes of the extortion of 
orders. Initially, there will be 
62 such stocks (Table A), with, 
presumably, TSB and British 
Gas added. 

BETA STOCKS are 
approximately 500 of die next 
most active stocks. The screen 
wili show firm, commons 
prices of all relevant market- 
makers, with periodic up- 
dating of last trade ami volume 
information. 

GAMMA STOCKS are rel- 
atively inactive stocks where a 
commons quotation will be 
given which wiQ be indicative 
rather than firm. 

DELTA STOCKS are the 
team active group, where only 
an approximate middle price 
will be given, as in the present 
Stock Exchange Topic quota- 
tion system. 

Stocks wifl be re-cate- 


gorized as necessary. Delta 
stocks eqjoying unusual activ- 
ity, for whatever reason, will 
be temporarily shown on a 
special features channel. 

It is essential to realize that, 
as presented on Monday, the 
system is passive. Eke a 



Tomorrow: 
WHO REALLY LIT 
THE FUSE? 

mammoth electronic notice 
beard. There will be no facility 
for some time for brokers or 
institutional traders to re- 
spond through the system to a 
bid or offer price. Nor roll 
there be a foeffity for brokers. 


still less clients, to put routine- 
sized orders into the system 
for automatic rooting to the 
most competitive market- 
maker, as is done in the 
Toronto Stock Exchange. In 
the initial stages brokers and 
dients will have to contact the 
market-maker of their choice 
by telephone or in person. 

One feature is that there will 
be many more market-makers 
than in recent years. Instead of 
a dozen or so equity jobbers no 
fewer than 34 market-makers 
will be displaying their prices 
on the screen. None will be 
active across the toll range of 
stocks. 

The existence, of a great 
many more market-makers 
wifl not necessarily lead to a 
more Bqmd market in all 
stocks. It is more probable 
that activity end i nte r e st will 
be c oBc e nf i af e d in the more 
popular stocks. 

At the same time some of 
the i nten di ng market-makers, 
notably Cazeoove & Co with 
its extensive corporate finance 
connections, may feel a duty to 


act as market-makers in die 
shares of companies with 
which they are associated. 
Ostensibly this is to ensure 
that the client companies can 
rely on a good, liquid market 
in their shares. There is also 
the wish to preserve long- 
standing relationships, with 

Com panies . * 

Without in any way impun- 
the motives or good faith 
who offer this service 
to their corpo ra te dients, it 
does highlight the issue of the 
separation of function between 
corporate finance, market- 
making and investment 

It will be several months 
before the pattern of dealing 
and market- making ip hMih M- 
nai securities settles down. It 
may be a year or two before it 
can be determined whether 
there is room 1(0*34 competing 
market-makers. It is however 
worth noting; 

Only market-makers rec- 
ognized by the Stock Ex- 
change wfll have the privilege 
Of the 50p Transfer Stamp 
Duty facility when taking np 
stock. 

• Only recognized Stock Ex- 
change market-makers will be 
able to input quotations to the 
SEAQ screen display system. 

• Only Stock Exchange (ME) 
member brokers and a limited 
'number of institutions wll) 
have access to SEAQ level-two 
service, showing competing 
quotations. 

• Only Stock Exchange mar- 
ket-makers will have access to 
stock- borrowing facilities 
through the money-brokers. 

The combination of these 
factors, together with the 
re stri cti o ns imposed by the 
SIB rides on principal dealing 
by agency broken, w3L in 
practice, preserve much of the 
present monopoly position of 

tioo ^within toe^Stodt Ex- 
change, albeit on a much 
hroa&r and more competitive 
basis. 

The author . a director 
of Dewe Rogerson, is 
expressing his own views. 


A precious jewel flung into the stream 



-S 


Money is funny, unpredict- 
able stuff. It jumps around too 
much and most people do not 
understand it ■ that is why 
confidence is so important. 
We cannot handle it, people 
say, but that chap over there 
seems to know what he is 
doing. Lei him sort it out 
Economics arc the same. 
When people believe a 
country's finances are in safe 
hands, they take a more 
relaxed view _ of . short-term 
squalls. Britain is a good 
example of the need for this. 
Financial structure in London 
is very flexible and a lot must 
be taken on trust. The Cnan- 
celter. keeper of the nauon s 
finances, is the king-pin m the 
whole system. 

• Bus bst week confidence m 
the Chancellor's ability to run 
Britain's finances on a sound 
basis collapsed m the City, the 
rot setting in after the Man- 
sion House speech. On the old 
Beaufort scale formerly used 
by the Bank of England to 
describe money market con- 
ditions. the Chancellors 
speech was most unhelpful - 
the strongest word m we 
authorities' vocabulary- 
After the speech, scrim* 
at an alt-nme low. 
rates climbed: Gilts 
a point down. Some- 


how you knew it would be as 
bad as that. 

The traders were annoyed 
because die Chancellor foiled 
to play by the rules. Blue in 
their language as well as in 
their thinking, they are stick- 
lers for protocol. Ahead of the 
speech, Reg, wizard of dribble 
in our trading team, summed 
up the situation with his usual 
sledgehammer logic. 

A one point rise left him 
stranded. With a foce as black 
as thunder, he settled down to 
do terrifying things in futures. 

Danny was more succinct. 
Danny has lots and lots of 
monev. He is actually fomous 
in the City for being rich, no 
mean achievement- When he 
buys a golf dub, you have to 
srop and think. “Sell the tot.” 
aid Dannv, breezing out fora 
late lunch at 11-30. cigar 

fuming. ^ 

But the Chancellor went 
further. He managed to unite 
the salesmen and the analysis, 
something which ooncep- 
luallv. is quite impossible. To 
the salesman the analyst is a 
kind of village idiot, femed 
round from lunchroom to 
seminar. He spouts a stream 
of incomprehensible non- 
sense. upsets the client, gets 
the market wrong and makes a 
noise when be eats. 


Even the salesmen, with the 
best will in the world, cannot 
feel any empathy with a 
Chancellor who claims to 
have discovered the 
philosopher's stone through 
the number of coins you jingle 
round in your pocket - but the 
analysts have been saying this 
for months _ 

"Like the speech, then?" 
they called over to the Num- 
ber Cruncher as he shambled 
in on Friday morning. 

“Pure rubbish,” came the 
reply, as' the Cruncher fished 
in his briefcase for the Eco- 
nomic Briefing note, poised to 
update ft with a savage 
postscript 

“Hramn." from the sales- 
men as they wandered baric to 
the phones. All over the City 
last Friday morning, salesmen 
prefaced their greetings with 
the words “of course — "* It is 
always a bad day for gifts when 
they* sian the day with that 
phrase. 

The market is always quick 
to turn. Somehow it never 
seems that bad. after alL when 
the Bank reveals a pleasing set 
of money* numbers or the price 
of oil Starts to climb. Bui ft is 
difficult for the market to spy 
an easy way out this lime. 

There is an uncomfortable 


suspicion in the traders' 
minds that the game is up. 
Something really quite fun- 
damental has to happen in 
order to arrest the decay in 
sentiment 

In the short-term, the 
Bundesbank appears to be 
presenting the Goveroerant 
with an ult ima t um . Either 
Britain goes into the EMS or 
German support for the 
pound will be withdrawn. 
This is a poser, not least 
because of the threat to the 
Prime Minister's credibility if 
she is forced into a U-turn on 
Europe. Traders do not en- 
thuse over that. 

Box if Britain foils to reach a 
decision on EMS then rates 
mast rise m order to protect 
sterling. Traders can see that if 
that happened, the 
Chancellor's reputation for 
smooth handling of tricky 
derisons would be harmed 
irreparably. 

More Press flak? Resigna- 
tion. like Brraan? None of that 
seems terribly attractive ei- 
ther. The Chancellor really 
chucked a precious jewel into 
the stream with that speech 
last week, claims Reg in a rare 
moment of lyricism. 

Creeping closer all the time 
comes British Gas. Scheduled 


for flotation in late Novem- 
ber. the issue is a monster 
designed to raise perhaps £2 
billion for the Government. 
This is twice the amount 
which British Telecom pro- 
vided and the short-term cost 
of that issue was a four-point 
rise in the base rates. 

The TSB issue has been 
followed by a one-point rise. 
Are these privatization issues 
jinxed? Ask the traders. 

Traders and salesmen alike 
know that British Gas could 
fuse the entire British money 
market system unless con- 
ditions are absolutely prime. 
Yet the baleful combination of 
events could easily see build- 
ing societies putting rates up 
by two points a week or so 
before flotation. 

Fifteen million voters nurs- 
ing tosses of a couple of 
hundred pounds each, they 
whisper to each other in terror 
in the market. That wSlgo 
down well at the polls. 

In a week’s time, foe market 
splits up. Floor tradinggoes. It 
is just teams of ordinary Joes 
then, against foe world. But 
somehow, after last week. Big 
Bang seems to have arrived 
ahead of schedule. 

Christopher Dunn 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


There is a lighthouse 
across the bay 


The president of the Bundesbank, 
HerrKari Otto PoehL, looked and 
spoke like a winner in London 
yesterday. The West Germans, to- 
gether with the Japanese, are in the 
driving seat, thanks to their powerful 
economic performance — and they 
intend to stay there. If anyone 
entertained a lingering hope that 
Germany, to please the Americans 
and our beleaguered selves, might 
relent and raise interest rates, Herr 
Poehl killed iL 

Almost as he spoke Wall Street was 
coming tumbling down. The prophets 
are predicting a sharp rise in the US 
gross national product figure for the 
third quarter to 2.5 or even 3 percent. 
If true — and neither the US bond nor 
the New York stock market was 
waiting to find out- — it would leave 
the Federal Reserve Board no option 
but to tighten credit, and to that end, 
put up US interest rates. 

The pressure in the bond market 
where the yield on the long bond has 
edged dose to 8 per cent is also 
explained by the looming November 
auction of federal government debt. 
Hie New York houses, having been 
taken to the cleaners once by the 
Japanese, are uncertain how to play 
the next game. Taking their cue from 
Tokyo, they have dedded to sell 
bonds in the tentative belief that to 
sell its paper in the huge quantities 
required by the balance of payments 
deficit, the. US authorities will be 
compelled to offer something very 
attractive. Perhaps a long bond yield- 
ing over 8 per cent. 

If it is the Japanese who are putting 
the screws on the Americans, it is the 
Germans who are frightening the City 
of London. Herr Poehl yesterday 
delivered a timely reminder that 
London is not the only capital market 
in Europe. The setting up of West 
German stock exchanges in July, he 
pointed out modestly, “marks a 
milestone in our efforts to ensure that 
Finanzplatz Deutschland does not 
lose too much ground against foreign 
competition". Herr Poehl went on to 
stress the importance for the Euro- 
pean Community of abolishing 
impediments to free capital markets. 
“A genuine European financial mar- 
ket will contribute substantially to 
further enhancing economic integra- 
tion in Europe." 

The Bundesbank president then 
linked the “prominent role" the City 
of London would play in such an 
environment with the “regrettable" 
fact that the.UK.lrad not seen its way 
to joining the exchange rate mecha- 
nism which is the core of the 
European Monetary System. 

There is no doubt in the German 
mind that the EMS has a significant 


part to play in the development of 
European commerce — and by exten- 
sion in the development of European 
financial markets. 

Or put it another way, if the British 
Government does not get its EMS act 
together, not only will the British 
economy be denial the benefits of a 
more stable exchange rate regime, the 
City of London in the process might 
find it has a real rival as the main 
European financial centre. Sprechen 
Sie Deutscb? 

Opec’s calculations 

The bow-wave of crude oil which has 
been singing into Europe over the last 
few months will subside in Novem- 
ber. Since the beginning of September, 
Opec has largely stuck to its output 
ceiling of 16.8 milli on barrels a day. 
The consequent drop in tanker ship- 
ments will tighten the market by a 
little -in November and by quite a lot 
in December. 

Opec’s members have decided the 
time is right to flex their muscles to 
achieve higher prices for their deplet- 
ing resources. Consequently, Opec 
appears to be locked into a course 
which will result in higher production 
ceilings. But a higher ceiling, with 
some states taking more of the 
increase than others, would make it 
virtually impossible for Opec to 
reduce the ceiling again, if it meant 
that some countries were forced to cut 
below their present levels. 

Stocks of gas oil — that part of the 
barrel used for heating homes and 
factories —» are high -A small increase 
in Opec production from November 
1, say to a little over 17 million bpd, 
can be absorbed. It could cause some 
price weakness next summer but the 
immediate effect would be at least to 
underpin the oil price at today's level 
of about $ 1 5 a barrel over the winter, 
and it may possibly drive it up by a 
dollar or two. 

A larger increase in production 
ceilings, effective January 1 1987, 
would be more difficult to absorb. 
And it would only be justified by 
demand for two months at most By 
March, the industry will already be 
looking at seasonally lower* consump- 
tion patterns with a view to reducing 
its Opec liftings. The dealers and 
traders will anticipate a sloppy market 
and mark prices down. 

The single factor which can upset all 
these delicate calculations re mains 
Iran's war with Iraq. 

It will be a brave man who goes 
short of oil in the expectation of much 
lower prices in the summer. But 
without a serious flare-up in the 
Middle East war, it is hard to see 
prices much above $1 5 or $ 16 a barrel 


( TEMPUS ) 


Highland turns to exports 
in tougher times 


After trying its band at fish 
fanning. Highland Distill- 
eries, which boasts such emi- 
nent brands as Famous 
Grouse and Highland Park, 
has now adopted the bizarre 
path of mushroom growing to 
capitalize on its under-uti- 
lized assets. 

On a turnover rise of 6.6 
per cent, the company in- 
creased pretax profits by 8.5 
per cent to £103 million, a 
little below some market 
expectations but a reflection 
of the tough conditions it is 
experiencing. E a rning s per 
share were an unchanged 
5-2p. 

• Highland continues to 
make steady progress with fts 
Famous Grouse brand — 
sales in the home trade 
increased 4 per cent against 
the industry figure of 3 per 
cent. Volume was main- 
tained in Scotland, with 
growth such as it was coming 
from south of foe border. 

The company continues 
with a policy of price cutting 
but has anxiously observed 
foe alarming increase at foe 
“cheapie” end of foe busi- 
ness, which accounts for 
nearly half foe market 

Highland is pinning much 
of its future hopes on build- 
ing up its export sales, 
particularly in the United 
States, which is beginning to 
show foe benefits of the 
distribution' tie-up with 
Heublein. 

A diversification through 
foe launch of Madison, a 
mixture of spirits and fruit 
juices aimed at the “disco” 
market, might provide a 
buffer against the pressure at 
the quality end of fts 
business. 

But Highland continues to 
suffer from the abolition of 
stock relief, bumping up its 
tax charge in the present year 
by a further 26 per cent to 
£3.9 million. , 

The shares have under- 
performed the market by 30 
per cent in foe last year and 
on yesterday's figures eased 
Ip to 70p. The interlocking 
shareholdings appear to rule 
out any bid and foe shares are 
for enthusiasts only. 

McCorquo^ale 


Mr Robert Maxwell's last 
minute buying of 
McCorquodale shares, at 
prices above Norton Opax's 


260p cash offer, is muddying 
the waters for other 
McCorquodale shareholders. 

Although Mr Maxwell’s de- 
rision on which way to vote 
his now declared 10.4 per 
cent stake could be crucial, 
shareholders must con- 
centrate on foe issues ofOpax 
versus McCorquodale. 

The thrust of Opax's argu- 
ment is that it could do great 
things with McCorquodale’s 
international network. 
Particularly attractive is the 
American presence, which 
would give Opax its much 
wanted entree to the lucrative 
American lottery market 

Opax thinks also that its 
management is superior and 
that the two groups could do 
better together than apart 

McCorquodale says that 
after a period of management 
change and heavy invest- 
ment profits are now begin- 
ning to come through 
strongly, and foal Opax is 
trying to sente foe fruits of 
McCorquodale’s labour on 
foe cheap. 

Opax is offering a cash 
price of 13 times historic 
earnings or a paper price of 
14.8 times, on Opax shares at 
148p. 

Prospectively the offer is 
113 times cash and 133 
limes paper. This assumes 
McCorquodale’s long dis- 
tance forecast is correct and 
tax this year will be 33 per 
cenL 

Printing and publishing an- 
alysts reckon foe sector is 
selling On nearly 15 times 
histone earnings - admittedly 
with some racier companies 
than McCorquodale in ft. 

Racy or not 
McCorquodale's inter- 
national assets deserve a 
decent bid premium. Opax is 
not offering one. 

Acceptance of Opax's pa- 
per means taking a view on 
that paper. Opax is a fast 
growing, ambitious and 
successful company. 

Bui there are doubts about 
whether it can swallow up a 
company three times its size, 
which would involve earn- 
ings dilution, without causing 
stagnation or worse m its 
share price. It could also 
seriously stretch Opax's 
vaunted management skills. 

Opax's management argu- 
ment is not proven. 
McCorquodale has restruc- 


tured fts board and has a new 
and effective chief executive 
who is achieving profits 
growth. 

The trend in recent con- 
tested bids has given incum- 
bent managements the 
benefit of the doubt. 
McCorquodale’s is one 
manag ment that deserves 
that benefit. 

Sovereign Oil 

Sovereign Oil & Gas has been 
working hard at survival and 
may make it yet. Its only 
product is oil and since fts 
average selling price has 
fallen from £22.91 per band 
to £1 1.09, only drastic mea- 
sures needed to be 
considered. 

These included rcining-in 
exploration, renegotiating the 
disastrous Sovereign Ex- 
plorer contract and halving 
its staff But even miracles 
take a little time to work and 
foe company suffered a mas- 
rive, £8 million cash outflow 
in foe first half of this year. 

Sovereign reported a pre- 
tax loss of£9.7 million for foe 
six months to June 30, com- 
pared with a £7.1 million 
profit in foe comparable pe- 
riod last year. 

Lower oil prices have 
forced foe company to reduce 
foe carrying value of fts 
exploration assets. The 
resulting write-offs have 
swollen foe profit and loss 
account charge for explora- 
tion to £1 1.7 million. 

But all is not as black as it 
seems. The cuts-back in 
exploration have been taking 
effect in the second half, 
while the Sovereign Explorer 
contract was renogiated last 
June. The net effect is that the 
company is now in a stable 
cash-flow position. 

The book value of produc- 
ing assets has not been re- 
duced. These .will be 
reviewed at foe year-end. but 
if foe oil price remains at 
about SI 5 (£1 0.70) per barrel 
foe company is confident that 
further write-offs can be 
avoided. 

The non-recourse Mara- 
thon loan on foe Brae field 
and the related asset has been 
removed from foe balance 
sheet. It is only repayable out 
of 60 per cent of Brae cash- 
flows and low oil prices make 
it unlikely foal ft will ever be 
repaid in fuff 


. 4 







r 


T 


28 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Tltnie Month Starting" 
Oacse _ 

Open 

^40 


Low 

nano 

Ctosa 

88.64 

EatVol 

5036 

Mar 87. 

8683 

89.03 

89.43 

89-35 

88JM 

88.82 

8930 

88.12 

891M 

88.03 

8940 

89.35 

89.09 

264 





890+ 

9 

Mnrffi . , 

Hft 

8889 

0 

Previous day's total open 
Thnre Month Eumdonr 

interest i3«l 

Previous days total 

open ansrest 29*68 
9330 3967- 





93.80 

627 

Jun a? 

93.62 

93^3 

93.58 

83.60 

173 

Sep 37 

USTraasuiy Bond 

Ok 86 

33.31 

93-30 

8331 6336 .6339 Ob 

Previow day’s nal own interest 6083 
94-01 93-10 S-19 4838 


MarH7 . 
Jin 87 . 


Start OH 
Dec 86™ 
Mar 87 „ 
Jim 87 


JGR 
Dec! 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sap 87 

FPSEIOO 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


85-44 

Wf 


108*31 

100-25 

Sff 

183.00 

N/T 


— 8342 

— 81-22 


Previous dw - * told open Interest 1189 
96-00 95-44 96^8 B0 

— — 95-56 0 

— — — . 0 

Previous doy>totf open Merest 16087 
10820 108-20 109-17 11288 

1 09-20 108-25 109-19 78 

— — 108-19 0 

— — — 0 

Previous day's total open Interest 2859 

163 JO 160.00 lKf.lfl 434 

— — 16320 0 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Jan8 
Jan 22 
Feb 5 


RratOesBBfls 

Oct 6 Oct 17 

Oct 20 Octal 

Nov 3 Nov 14 

Cafl options wen tafcan oat ate _ 

Bnfch Car Audione, Bristol 0« 8 . 

Brocks. Memory Computer.. Morgan GrenleU. 

Mantle Resources. Gestetner. Quest Automation. London A 
Put T5B, Laura AsMey, AS 
Put A Cat westcoast 


rw oWOUncm 
Jan 19 
Fato2 
Fab 16 


TSB, Seers. TrteemroL Jaguar. Amstrad, 
y Hunt. Kennedy 
OE. Heath. 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


no— - — w— - - mt 

Dattnam a 
□earing Batts 11 
Rnonce House 10 

OMcoant MarM Loans « 

M^ a,SL0 « 8 

Treasury BMs (Discount TV) 

Imrffi 1ia» Imr3! 11 'w 

3mrHhl1*ia Smnth 11 'm 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 daw fr&Uu 
3 mnth 6'»*S n u 


7 days 4Kr4X 
3mmti 4 “ip-4'io 


7%-7% 

8%+» 


Prime Bank BBs (Discount %) 

1 mnth n»i*.ll 2mnth 
3nmth Ii^m-H’w 6 mnth 11 - 10 “* 

Trade Bits (Discount %) 

1 iroith 11"i» 2mnth11» 

3mntfi 11°i» 6mmt) 11K 

rmarbenk(%) 

Overnight open 10* close 8 
1 weetTlOX-lOK 6 mnth iift-ii% 

1 ninth 1i%-11‘** Smnth 11 ’m- 11 »m 
3 mnth 11ft-11% 12mth 1 1K-1 IX 

Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 10K 7 days 10% 

1 mnth 11 Smnth 11% 

6 mnth 11% I 2 mth 11 % 

Local Authority Bends pb) 

1 mnth 11 - 10 % 2 mirth 11 - 10 % 

3 mnth 11 - 10 % 6 mnth 11-10% 

9 mnth 11-10% 12 mth 11-10* 

TmnthPtl^lftw Smnth 11%-11% 
emrah 11 %- 11 % 12 mth 11 %- 11 % 

DoOarCOsnu 

1 mnth 6JS-&00 Smnth 6JJ0-5.96 
Smnth 6105400 12 mth 6204.15 


7 days %-% 

3 mnth 4'i»-3 , *ie 

Yen 

7 days 4%-4% 

3 ninth 


can 6%-5lt 
1 mirth a 1 *® 15 ™ 
fiimtti G'le^nis 
can 4%-3% 
1 mnth 4ft-4% 

6 mm 4%-4% 
cell B%-7% 
1 mnth 6%-ax ■ 
6 mnth 854-8% 
ca> 2-1 
1 mnth Srw-Qiia 
Smnth J’w-a* 8 -* 
can 5fr4ft 
1 mnth 
Smith 


GOLD 


GotdS4265(M2725 
Kr 
S< 


199.00-1 
Platinum 
S 577X10 (24(050) 
*ExcbdesVAT 


ECGD 


Fixed Rate Btertng Export Finance 
Scheme iv Average re fe rence rate for 
interest period September 3, 1806 to 
October 7. 1888 nduahre: 10355 per 
cent 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


MariMtiatas 
feiy’e range 
October 20 

N York 14280-1 4313 
Montreal 15845-15910 
Ame'dain3.l880-32155 
Brussels 5650-59.12 
ephaen 1 0.635O-1 0.711 
Dubin 1J3379-1JM76 
Frankfurt 28200-25460 
Lisbon 207.3640645 
Madrid 18785-18820 
Mten 1953.60-1 
Oslo 


October 20 ■ 
1.4290-14300 
18870-18900 
38100-38150 
58.0058.12 J 
10.6920-10806 
1.0428-1.0438] 
2541085460 
2075020655 
, 18850-18980 ■ 
186350-186880 


104015-104570 10.4385-104538 

9848545225 98000-88164 


St-khbn 9.7515-65000 
Tokyo 22040-221.60 
Vienna 1955-2001 
Zurich 251154534(1 


9.783O8.79?0 

221.1042145 

1957-1959 

2530045340 


113 


!233ir* ra 

5%-4&pram 
80-1 16da 

1 %-l%pram 

SS-ICSS 

5-4%prem 

ira^sos 

lQprem*30dte 
2-pafprem . 
29MKOia 

Bpram^Odfa 

5-1pran 

7%-8 H«8a 

3-2%pr»n 


3-2%pr»m 

1%-1>rawn 

lO%-8Kpram 


i%-i%orem 

4%-4Mpram 


M OTHER STE RUNQBATES 

Aro»iima austral" I 

Austrafa donor h 

Bahra in dinar 

Brazil cruzado 1 

SKS52S2I 

rnranomancaM 

Greece drachma I 

Hong Kong doSarl 
n)|.wgHe 
Iraq dinar M 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



I Kuwait dkwrKDl 

Malaysia dotar^H 

Mexico peso 113050-118050 

New Zealand date 25300456001 

Saudi ArabMrtyel 5843048830 

Singapore doflar 
South Africa rand] 

UAEdkhamHl 
"UoytiaBank 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Sorias 

Oct 

Ms 

Jan 

Apr 

Oct 

nos 

Jan 

JSL 

Marks&Spen 

POT 

180 

200 

220 

19 

3 

ft 

27 

14 

8 

35 

22 

14 

ft 

4 

?4 

4 

18 

73 

-6 

15 

28 

GKN 

(*253) 

240 

260 

280 

26 

14 

3 

38 

24 

14 

46 

37 

25 

2 

15 

30 

11 

22 

34 

16 

27 

38 

Brit Telecom 

PM) 

180 

200 

220 

12 

3ft 

1 

18 

9 

3ft 

26 

16 

10 

6 

20 

38 

12 

24 

39 

17 

28 

41 

AIM Lyons 

300 

4 

is 

3U 

11 

20 

23 










300 

3 

9 

— 

50 


— 

Cadbury Schwppa 

nag 

160 

180 

200 

34 

18 

7 

41 

28 

17 



8 

12 

20 

8 

14 

23 

rzso) 

330 

360 

1 

K 

7 

3 

15 

8 

40 

70 

46 

75 

77 

C910) 

900 

950 

15 

2 

63 

33 

80 

47 

5 

43 

33 

63 

47 

80 

Glaxo 

(*940) 

900 

950 

re 

45 

115 

85 

145 

118 

27 

53 

45 

70 

60 

80 

34 

24 

5 

16 

BP 

f663] 

600 

650 

67 

20 

97 

58 

113 

77 

1 

2 

3 

20 

14 

37 

TraialQV House 

cm 

200 

25 

30 

39 

ft 

5 

10 

1000 

1050 

2/ 

14 

M 

45 

95 

6b 

125 

100 

130 

110 

Guinness 

1*313) 

300 

330 

360 

18 

30 

14 

6 

40 

8 

27 

55 

15 

20 

35 

57 

700 

2 

27 

42 

38 

52 

67 

300 

IK 

ft* 

10 

18 

X 

31 

Hanson 

160 

36 

44 

— 

i 

5 

— 

3 

10 

55 

Cons Gold 

1*689) 

550 

600 

SO 

117 

07 

24 

137 

105 

78 

157 

120 

92 

1 

1ft 

5 

10 

20 

37 

13 

27 

50 

TSB 

C82) 

80 

90 

100 

3 

ft 

% 

11 

5 

7ft 

14 

9 

5ft 

1 

8ft 

13% 

6 

lift 

19 

8 

12ft 

19ft 

P9d) 

180 

200 

19 

9 

27 

15X 

34 

22 

13 

8 

17 

21 

Imperial Or 

C3OT . 

300 

330 

360 

95 

a 

35 

- 

E 

1 

IK 

4 

E 

— 

Courtatdds 

cm 

260 

280 

300 

330 

23 

8 

1 

ft 

37 

2S 

16 

7 

46 

33 

22 

1 

3 

16 

45 

4 

13 

22 

47 

7 

16 

26 


Series 

Dec 

Mar 

Jon 

Dae 

Mar 

Jon 


Swiss 

Calm 

Dec Mar 

Jon 

Doc 

Ms 

Mar 

Jun 

Ladbroke 

1*353) 

. 330 
360 

30 

11 

45 

22 

S3 

30 

5 

15 

8 

22 

lo- 

re 









' 

Jaguar 

500 

37 

50 

70 

27 

35 

45 


390 

3 

12 

18 

40 

45 

47 

Com Union 
r287) 

260 

28 

38 

49 

2 

4 

7 

(*416) 

390 

420 

40 

22 

52 

35 

60 

45 

7 

27 

13 

30 

21 

37 

(W 

550 

600 

1/ 

7 

28 

16 

45 

52 

98 

57 

98 

63 

LASMO 

P23) 

110 

120 

IS 

12 

25 

18 

30 

2a 

3 

7 

9 

15 

12 

18 

300 

1 

17 

24 

14 

20 

24 


460 

9 

22 


52 

58 


Thorn EAH 

420 

40 

53 

73 

4 

15 

20 

130 

B 

14 

17 

14 

20 

25 

Cabte&Whs 

(-312) 

300 

325 

350 

375 

15 

2 

37 

23 

13 

5 

48 

37 

3 

16 

20 

36 

52 

72 

25 

40 

Boots 

(*230) 

200 

220 

240 

34 

20 

9 

45 

33 

70 

66 

41 

78 

1 

4 

18 

S 

18 

20 

8 

15 

24 

(*444) 

460 

500 

550 

13 

6 

2 

30 

18 

8 

SO 

28 

28 

62 

112 

35 40 

85 -.67 
115 — 

MUtendBank 

(*529) 

500 

550 

600 

45 

18 

4 

65 

33 

10 

75 

45 

18 

7 

27 

72 

12 

35 

72 

17 

40 

75 


% 


67 


BTR 

280 

22 

35 

42 

10 

16 

22 

if 

330 

88 


— 

1 



P&O 

460 

50 

85 

— 

1ft 

5 

— 

Ostaiers 

re«D 

600 

650 

105 

55 

— 

— 

1 

2 

— 

— 

(*288) 

300 

307 

~9 

24 

32 

25 

26 

31 

390 

420 

33 

50 

27 

82 

35 

8 

18 

15 

20 

30 

(*5(0) 

500 

550 

23 

4 

1 

40 

15 

58 

28 

11 

GO 

20 

52 

26 

57 

700 

12 

— 

— 

10 

— 

— 

Ra« 

650 

70 

no 

90 

10 

13 

25 











cec 

(*184) 

160 

180 

7 

1 

ft 

18 

24 

16 

6 

1 

IS 

8 

IB 

12 

22 

(*795) 

700 

750 

35 

15 

55 

28 

83 

42 

30 

60 

40 

68 

50 

75 


Saries 

Nov 

Feta May 

Nov 

Fab Hay 

Racal 

P80) 

160 

180 

200 

11 

3ft 

1ft 

20 

10 

28 

15 

a 

22 

40 

15 

24 

40 

18 

28 

40 

2U 



67 

37 

14 



8 

IS 

33 

GO 

25 

40 

Brit Aara 
(**5Q) 

420 

37 

58 

68 

3 

17 

22 



8 






rwm 

600 

650 

50 

28 

60 






6 

15 

40 

80 



Grand Met 
(*445) 

382 

390 

420 

460 

65 



ft 



25 

53 

500 

fl 

18 

35 

60 

53 

68 

(*677) 

650 

700 

750 

38 

22 

10 

67 

87 

57 

38 

GS 

47 

70 

27 

3 

48 

27 

63 

40 

tt 

20 

15 

30 

20 

38 

Oe Beers 
(*750) 

650 

700 

120 

95 

160 

133 

150 

10 

25 

24 

40 

60 

BAT bids 
(*441) 

380 

390 

83 

53 

98 

70 

78 

h 

IX 

lx 

6 

'fl 



IC1 

(•1083) 

950 

1000 

1050 

1100 

150 

100 

50 

10 

180 

137 

97 

65 

197 

154 

117 

87 

2 

6 

12 

23 

44 

12 

22 

35 

54 


800 

46 

68 


75 

93 



480 

8 

24 

33 

30 

35 

38 

, 

Sartos 

Nm 

Hre 


Nor 



2 

12 

Dixons 

(*350) 

300 

330 

360 

58 

36 

15 

68 

42 

55 

40 

1ft 

8 

22 

5 

10 

24 

13 

26 

Barclays 

(*452) 

460 

600 

16 

5 

40 

20 

SO 

30 

20 

SO 

23 

54 

30 

57 

Loreto 

(*231) 

200 

218 

37 

20 

44 

48 

2 

5 

4 

8ft 

Land Sec, 

300 

23 

32 

39 

1 

4 

6 











296 

11 



18 

— 

— 

r324) 

360 

ft 

16 

7 

12 

40 

40 

40 

October 20,1988 

Totri contracts 24838 - 

Cafla 18758. Puts 9078. 

Ori |uLu|uSub mhmiIIm 

ifnCMnyaiy ttviMUj pnCVL 



2E6 

*5 



2B 


28 


t/i 

U4 

u 

> 

cc 

UJ 

co 

Z 

o 

V} 

> 

•m 

—i 


LU 


U 


X 

ID 

3 

X 

c8 

£ 

cc 

cc 

LU 

X 

i/i 


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SMITH • BOOKS FOR STUDENTS - ATLANTA NEWS AGENCY ■ SHERRATT & HUGHES • OUR PRICE - DO IT ALL • CLASSIC BOO/<^ 

Why we’re putting 

£23 millio n into 
a new till 


LO 


30 


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WH Smith has 100,000 product lines. Every yeax; more 
than a million orders are placed with around 2,000 different 
suppliers. So keeping the shelves stocked at precisely the 
right level is an exacting task. Hence the new till 

Ift not just a cash register ift also one of the most 
advanced stock-control systems in the retail industry. By 
feeding sales information directly into a computer; it enables 
stock to be replenished automatically and quickly -and frees 
staff to help customers and increase sales. 

This is far from being our only commitment to electronic 
technology. Similar investments are being made throughout 
the group, as we create growth by meeting the changing 
demands of our customers. 

WH Smith Wholesale, for example, markets 
publications to 18,000 newsagents all over the country. 
Computers are being used to build up a profile of each 
one, helping both newsagents and publishers by making 
sure the right publications are available where customers 
want them. 

Sales improve, the market is actually expanded, wastage 
is reduced,' and the entire distribution process is made 
more efficient 

People today have an increasing amount of spare time. 
Our aim is to help them to enjoy it and, in so doing, sustain 
the growth in our business. Since 1981 WHSmithb sales 
have increased by 88%, pre-tax profits by 205%, and earnings 
per share have risen 180% to 17.2p. 

And thatb good news for everyone. 

If you would like further information about the develop- 
ment of WH Smith at home and abroad, write to Julian Smith, 
WH. Smith & Son (Holdings) PLC \ Strand House ; 

7 Holbein Place, London S W1 W8NR. 


WHSMITH ^ 


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9 • ATLANTA NEWS AGENCY • CELEBRATION * CLASSIC BOOKSHOPS ■ WHS DISTRIBUTORS ■ WH SMITH TRAVEL - TELEVISION 5ERVI 





f 


COMPANY NEWS 


• FORWARD TECHNOL- 

OGY INDUSTRIES: Results 
for the ’six months to June 30. 
No interim dividend (nil). Fig- 
ures £OOQ& The company ex- 
peas to recommend a final 
dividend of 0.7p per share Tor 
the calendar year 1986 (0.5p), on 
the capital increased - by the. 
recent rights issue. Turnover 
electronics 8,446 (6.225), sound 
and vision 4,320 (4,916). Cen- 
tral overheads. 181 (138). 

: Operating profit 683 (35SL In- 
terest charges 163 (236). Pretax 
profit 520 (122). Overseas tax 
260 (100), leaving 260 (22). 
Minority interests debit 3 (2).. 
Extraordmary credit nil (1,075). 
F^ming ^ per share before 
extraordinary items l.Sp (O.lpV 

• CHRISTY HUNT: No divi- 
dend (same) fbr die year to June 
3a Turnover £5.02 miHioa 
(£4.02 million). Pretax profit 
£121.000 (£119,000). Earnings 
per share 0.5p (4Jp). 

• TRIEFUS-. Six months to 

June 3a Turnover £11.81 mil- 
lion (£10.7 million). Pretax 
profit £443,000 (£358,000). 

Earnings per ' share. 2.l4p 
(038p). The board reports that 
the indications are that the 
group should achieve an im- 
proved result fbr 1986. 

• SNOWDON A BRIDGE: In- 
terim 1 p (nil) for the six months 
to July 31 (six months to August 
2 1985). Directors expect to 
recommend a final dividend of 
not less than 2pi Figures' in 
£000s. Turnover 11.187 
(10,802). Operating profit 562 
(399). Net interest received 13 

profit 575 
Earnings 

i;55p; 

• LOWLAND INVEST- 
MENT COMPANY: Final 
dividend 2.4p making 3.6p 
(2.8p) for year to September 30 
1986, payable December 19. 
Income from investments: divi- 
dends £1,335,285 (£1,140,724), 
interest £9,933 (£2,475), interest 
oa short-term deposits £312,924 
(£175,(63), other income 
£44.785 (£29,464), interest 
charges £343.071 (£203378). 
Administration expenses 
£71,787 (£56,416). Pretax profit 
£1,288.069 (£1,088.032). Tan 
£384,742 (£337,724). Profit 
aitnbutable £903,327 
(£750,308). Net asset value — at 
par I46.6p (l0l.7p); market 
value 147.2 


Ip (101.4pX Earuiugs 
.85p (3.1 9p)- 


per tiiare 3. 


• HIGHLAND electron- 
ics GROUP: Results fbr the 
year to April 3a Final dividend 
.Up (l-5p), making 2Jp (Z5pL 
Turnover t £12,958,445 
(£11,936,721). Pretax profit 
£1.064,678 (£1.057,373). Tax 
£398,165 (£374,703). Extraor- 
dinary debt £153,954 
(£158,65 IX Earnings per share 
7.6p (7.8p). Dividend payable 
January 6- 

• COMMON BROTHERS: 
The company is considering 
seQing a minority bolding in its 
wholly owned subsidiary, Ber- 
muda Star Line (form erl y Ba- 

L for cam. 


hama Cruise Line), for i 


• MAL The company mwu* 
to sdl two of its 
businesses. Euro Brokers Har 
low. in New York, and me 
EurodoUar deposit and capital 
markets business of the Hariow 
Ueda Savage Group, m London. 
The businesses are being pur- 
chased fay a consoroum. Touu 
consideration for the goocfavdjs. 
fixed assets and current.assets ot 
the - two companies is . 
million. MAI will retain the 
liquid capital of the businesses, 
estimated at about £4.9 million. 

• BRANDS HATCH CIR- 
CUITS: The company has ac- 
quired the Exclusive Travel 
Group from Brengreen Hoia- 
ingslor £380.000 cash. 

• PORTMAN MINING: 
Beftech Corporation, a com- 
pany believed to be associated 
with Perth entrepreneur Mr 
Laurie Connell, is making a bid 
for 25 per cent of PM’s shares. 

• GR HOLDINGS: Final divi- 

dend S.4p making 7p^saxne) for 
the year to 'June 30. Group 
turnover £23,260,114 
(£28,302,1 18X Pretax profit 
£IJ>36.347 (£2391,985). Tm 
£ 396,359 (£888,069). Profit 

attributable. £816.681 
(£1,408.516). Extraordinary 
credit (net of tax and minority 
interests) £527,398 (£399.275). 

' Earnings per share 19.9 (30.1). 

• GOTAAS-LARSEN SHIP- 
PING CORPORATION: Re- 
sults for the nine months to 
September 30. . Dividend ex- 
pected: 10 cents. Figures in 
USSOOOs. Revenue 126.3 
(123.8). Profit before tax and 
exchange 24J (113). Net profit 
24.1 (11.0). Earnings per share 
Si. 88 ($0-99). 

• ATLAS CONVERTING 
EQUIPMENT: The company 
has boudit the metallizing busi- 
ness of General Engineenng 
Raddiffe. manufacturer and 
supplier of vacuum rnetaliizers 
for 16 years, for £30a000 cash 
from the Receiver. 

• ELYS (WIMBLEDON): The 
company has completed the sale 
of the freehold site. 6/10 St 
George's Road, Wimbledon, 
SW19, to the National West- 
minster Bank. . The consid- 
eration was £1.55 million .in 

• BARDSEY: Half-year to June 
30. Turnover £14.1 1 million 
(£18.08 mfilion). Pretax loss 
£129,000 (£6O8 JjO 0 loss). Loss 
per share before extaordinary 
items 0.7p (2p). 

• SCOTTISH MORTGAGEft 
TRUST: Interim dividend 3.5p 
(3J2p) for the six months ended 
September 3a With figures in 
£000s. gross investment income 
8*385 (7.016). Revenue before 
tax 5,805 (5.085). Tax 1.788 
(1,657). Aminas per share 
5.52p (4.70p). Net asset value 
69l.6p (650^p) 

• HENRY ANSBACHER 
HOLDINGS: Agreement has 
been reached to acquire the 
freehold of Priory House, Mitre 
Square from the National 
Employers' Mutual General 
Insurance Association, for 
£10.55 minion cash. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQU1TES 
Angta Sacs (lisp) 
Appteya id (125p) 
Baaverco (I45p) 
Betry.BIrch&NQtJte (115p> 


(130p) 
Euro Horn® (160W 
Great Southern Jf35p) 
Guthrie Core (I50p) 
Hacrteon «50p) 

Hughes Food ^Op) 
Inwrilnk Express (185p) 
Local Lon Gp 
MB Cash 8 C (100p) 
Marfeorough Tech fllflp; 
Mfltor « Senthouse (105| 
Newnge Trans (75p) 
Radamac Gp (Mp) 
Rotunda (35p) 

Rymen ftlOpj 
SandeS Partera riKp) 
Scot M^ga 100% #25 


194+4 
.. 28+4 
148 
122 
102 
196-2 
143 
• 157 

173-2 
160 
28 

2DS+-10 
' 240 

90 

128-1 

160 

75 

90 

97 

102-2 
165 
218 -1 7 b 


1<*) 
9 : 


Stanley Leisure (1 
Ta3[ Group n00| 
Thames TV (190 f 
T inas sH%i/i 201 
Unlock (63p) 

Whinnoy Mabkay (160p) 
Yatverton (38^ 
Yorkshire TV (12Sp) 


139-1 
81 -3'j 
280 

997 £92»«-3.b 
69 
172 
35 
153 


RIGHTS ISSUES 
Bryant N/P 8 

Bums-Anderson N/P ' 3 

Conriach Fn N/P £1 +*n 

Goodhead Print N/P ' 9 

Lawrence (Wtelter N/P 1 

Lasuratinna N/P -1 -V* 

Norfolk Cap N/P ■ 1 'a 

ParrWi (Jt) N/f* 55 

Ptatignun N/P . 1 

Tansy N/P 26+1 

(teaoa pica In hracksts). 


APPOINTMENTS 


European Interactive Me- 
dia: Mr Byron Timer be- 
comes presidenL 
Notion: Mr Rebin Mathias 
is made, managing director, 
Proofed Packings. 

Ever Ready: Mr Terry 
Turner becomes sales director. 

Bremnen Mr Andrew 
Greystnke joins the board. - 
Multisets: Mr Phffip G 
Williams is made city sales 
director. 

Factron Schlnmberger 
Europe: Mr Jeff Pitman, be- 
comes, managing director. 


Morgan Grenfell: Mr Den- 
nis Warwick, Mr Martin 
Bmldtt and Mr Geoffrey Egan 
become directors. 

Gerrard & National Hold- 
ings: Mr K G Gibbs, The Earl 
ofEgUnton&Wmton,R&HJ 
Askew, Mr DH Clarke, Mr 
TW FeDowes, - Mr RB 
Williamson, Mr 8 J 
EUdhgttm, Mr D ABrayshaw, 
Mr ASR Jones, Mr DH 
Baxendale, Mr R Shepherd, 
Mr A B Tayhir and Mr G 
Spencer III become directors 
of subsidiary Gerrard and 
NationaL 


ENTREPRENEURS 

& INVESTORS 


WHERE TO BORROW 
AND THE BEST 
PLACE TO INVEST 


; Join us for a, valuable 
andstfmutatingcfiscussion 
& dinner with John Edwards 
-Personal Finance Editor, - 
on The Financial Times 
Thursday 23rd at 7.30pm 
Central London 

RJE5BWATTONS REQUIRED 

For detaib please call 
01-581 4393 or 01*245 0935 

member* £20 hon-nwmbm £35- 
tf you are unable to attend, 
please call for membership detaib 


BED & BREAKFAST 
TRANSACTIONS £25 

THIS WEEK IS YOUR LAST 
OPPORTUNITY BEFORE 
INCURRING STAMP DUTY- -- 

CLEVELAND 
SECURITIES PLC 

Ikwawl Palm to Swum 

01-729 8020 



GOOD CRBOBSTTIALS 

3Kn|ghhbidgOfae(i4iindonSWl 7IQL j l 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


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Consolidated Cnte. 
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Jim 

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Lloyds Bank. 


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Jim 
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GUARANTEED 
ONE YEAR RETURN 


BRAND NEW PRODUCT. 

FIRST PUBLIC OFFERING 

LIMITED TO £3 MILLION 


Oir.'kipleBbnQsBondacNertQe- 
mbris have attracted £ rrelbons. 

No* with wtfarart new Security 
and Growth Bond, we bung you 
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iw haw ttmr money divided to 

• the* account with 

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This efl«' may dos* in days. 

- . Da not miss out. 

• Call 0272 ~ 276954 - 

fora Reservation Nimib» 

h^ C4^0Q - A, W 


Bnstol.BSl 5BR 

ADDR 



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***«» » 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


WUMin 








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STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



Shares marked lower 


— eS M 


ACCOUNT DAYS: D e a l i n g s began October 13. Dealings end on Friday. §G>ntango day October 27. Settlement day November 3. 

§ Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


© Tines Newspapers Uafacd 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
. .. £4,000 
Claims required for 
+43 points 

Claimants should ring 025+53272 


C hjUagl3CISgMM TTI BIT »TT?M 



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380 200 te g IBM ,01 Scot 311 4 1U 4J 12 


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BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make 2 note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £84)00 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


193 109 Abbey 171 

zra an mmowi oonur 203 
297 213 Amec am 

74 52 AnxBb 03 

210 12S MMoode 214 

S50 331 BPS feKJUdriM 44B 
420 2B4 BO WMUpl Brick 420 
168 114 BmSl&u 136 
32 22 M»rt0«m CotlWr 29 
182 126 BHwSy 160 

245 130 Barkafcy Cp 213 
83 02 BOB Brass 63 

10'. 878 fitocklm 865 

728 sas BtueCucie 8M 

275 23S BraadonKaoud HI 253 
91 81 BrDredpkm 75 

29 IB tenwifJHkaon 19 

78 37 BKMHM 71 

129 91 ■> Bryan 100 

Z7 7 Burned 9 HaCrni 9 

150 150 gak* »Md te bay 150 

131 BO CPMarOip 128 

560 449 CUM 488 

488 290 CMiayMb 423 

TBS 124 Croucn Dank) 157 
124 84 Daw (flange) 117 

137 72 Doun (HM) 118 

no aa &Sr ina 

83 75 Fat) 83 

71 54 Do ’A' 82 

172 ai Federated teg its 
60 54 ftnfcn Qp 78 

H BO QaWord 89 

US 106 GUa ft Mr OH 138 
385 25* GtaHOn (MJ) 343 
148 88 HAT 142 

315 SS Haftc* Bar 315 

258 198 Handeraon 213 

79 42 HawdaoStuwt 83 


244 144 HHWOM lWteini 188 
648 428 Htgoa&HB 575 

44 2ftb Htetefl SOW 43 


44 29'j Noam Shut 43 
198 128 laasdi Jotnaan 182 
400 285 JanM U) ft Son 438 
*88 298 L*ng (ft 353 

48« 286 MW 353 

118 78 LmranGPjWHiar) 85 
91 47 LMy (FJQ 47 


429 290 Love! {Y.. 

198 128 Magnat ft Sown 194 

325 178 MtedaiS 318 

135 101 UMW m 

210 181 MnWMU 188 


151 96 Mvl tesaM 


448 30* MCAIpMMtta* 
804 228 McCarty & £ 
272 171 Maaar Int 
40 sa Mite n S te ayi 
154 too Monk (A) 

444 306 &9dh dam (John) 
920 798 NMMM 



213 103 NonlngtHTi Bride 198 


110 78 Phoanlx TMmt 

395 295 mat 
mm 448 BMC 
482 340 BadHxf 
323 188 toberoM 
191 133 1 ) Rugby CataaR 


142 87 Sbwpa ft FfeMf 120 


84 70 Smart (J) 

818 sa Tarmac 
348 238b Tartar Meadow 
178 138 TOury Group 
436 328 BMlMMH 
101 7S Kant 
185 138 Tumrt 
381 186 Human 
293 248 WHO _ 

95 58 Mtanknian (f) 
204 172 WtttMa 
M 67 wretam Brea 
187 41 WM H 
250 187 VMaoa [ComwM 
225 120 ftBapey (Baotgre 


1U 87 144 

184 83 Mil 

Ma 02 97 
7.1 33 1U 

12* 2* 137 
103 24 153 
11* U 13.7 
4* 

10.7 87 85 
30 14 235 

44 70 177 

38JI 40 116 
300 50 84 

14-6 55240 

43 57 137 
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88 54960 
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250 31 9.1 
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88 50 114 

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32b 2-7 230 
5* 40 261 
25 30113 
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50 <5.2 124 

54 fl* 223 

89 73 14* 
23 1337.7 

73 83113 

54 88 133 

.. .. S&3 

IMS 47 14.1 
25 40 11.1 

181 54 123 
281 36 187 
20 4.7172 

7.1 89 137 
143 33 888 
107 30 9* 
107 30 3* 
57 87 89 
S3 TL7 81 

102 27133 

74 83 231 
123 43182 

34 47223 

75 40 157 
8 1 81 .. 

181 43123 

4.1 13 188 

82 85125 
14 85 .. 
95 812M 

207 53107 
157 13 182 

83 47 143 

80b 81 88 
.. .. 30 

200 55 85 
203 85137 

185 4512.1 
128 45105 
94 60 174 
85 23184 
88b 84175 

188 88175 
127 8712.1 
84b 81 123 
125 80185 

13 17 83* 
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153 4JT15 
TO* 33 163 

14 17 85 
83 37181 
13 13 M3 
07 04 184 

35 151810 
S3 51173 



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Pnca Chga pence V P/E 


S3 43104 
17 25 83 
lO 04 .. 
12.1 55 83 
17.1b 82 574 
175 89 100 
14 07 203 
154 45181 
14 07 2*0 

45 20173 
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..a.. 89 
84 43105 
.. SB 70 181 
60 52105 
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.. 207 37123 
i*10 73 27193 

.. .. a .. mo 

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+2 ISO 7.1 94 
154 81 .. 
-4 7.1 85 15.1 


19% 13% IMMr 
SA S8'< Unkwar (NV) 

2S6 212 Vbtor 
540 293 view* 

130 102 Men- Prooucta 
795 120 Vhtaa 
204M34h VPI 4M BWI 
183 138 VSB. 

205 116 WSL 
105 121 wedeFMtefM 
245 116 wagon U 
Mb 29 WMiarwMaanbark 


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15* SB WMr 


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295 210 Whantan 
124 87 mamas 

283 177 WHtacret 


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3B3 »-2 

108 
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£183 -1b 

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231 -73 

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121 • .. 
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200 81 113 

7.1 66 67 

25 17 233 


188 125 WMm fjamaa) 
740 385 Vania HMga 


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89 S3 74 
167 43 113 
88 64 80 
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200 • 
100 
228 

137 • 

563 +3 

138 S+2 

543 -3 

TO 

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87 -2 

85 *+S 

101 *-2 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


61 05 381 

05 07673 

200 70 90 

75b 86 113 
.. .. S3 

20 05 230 
40 24 .. 
S IT) 33 109 
675 43 .. 


3*8 205 Attngworflt 2M • .. 13 

184 128 AMmiHhm 1*1 ..a 

lTBb 71b /unotagutt 130 •-« 80 

215 109 teMavTUh 2H f .. 

26 IB Camaaa (20 • 160 

283 194 CanOCMT 230 • 57 

43 is Canm SO +2 

30b 17 Emily ft uon 30b .. 15 

185 132 hoy's Srna 138 ..88 

19* 158 MafatSa 188 89b 

78 02 Nat Horn* torn 78 ..13 

95 78 Do 8% £85 .. 600 

148 1M MMRWkat 127 .... 

283 195 TampMon Gertn 195 -a 


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Emily I ban 


95 78 Do 8% 
148 m Haamttet 


FinancU Trusts appear on Pag* 30 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


CINEMAS AND TV 



FOODS 


43 27 173 
ZB 115480 

11.1 84 155 
87 29 113 

50 45343 

17.1 55 187 
184 43 73 

.. .. 230 

13.1 43 89 
87 <9192 

51 35177 
61 39 184 


74 87 313 
173 81 181 
07 12187 
23 22 187 
87 43225 
85 <9 57 
IIO <5 14.1 
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26 22 
068 554b 
29b 23 
403 223 
817 797 


AObm Ufa 
Mttx & Ate: 


AMara van 

Am 6m 


IBS -4 

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£738 -ID 
£27b -b 
370 +3 


103 43 174 

Ob 81 173 
180 65180 
15 15 175 
88 25170 
25 15224 
<7 8815* 
47 25 17.1 

43 81 83 
33 23 215 
95 17 281 
74 25 181 
25 81 167 
SO 84 85 

175 35 170 

44 lO 217 
70 57 275 
20 OOZU 
83 4.1 143 
27 40230 
114 <1 133 
83 34 160 
8b 30 120 
SO 3217.0 

180 45 113 
70 20 235 

45 81 189 


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323 199 
75 42 

78b 41 
158 69 
M 84 
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1*5 95 
B3 58b 
236 158 
263 19b 
423 308 
119 84 
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Loo M 
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M. Hdn 
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MY HoUhns 


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85 55 65 
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74 95135 
88 23194 
75b 20 170 
114b 23155 
20 35 85 
15b 43 135 


32J 57 114 
.. ..BO 
83 20 235 
139 471*1 
133b 89125 
97b 61 190 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


293 in AfltfaTV'A* 
52 27 QomMI 

HO ITS HTV HJV 
415 283 LWT HUga 
350 1M Sent TV 
273 T49 TVS N/V 
*6 31 7SW 
28* 223 Ihamaa TV 
196 IMbTAAM 
W8 10* IM*r TV 
193 1*4 YMkaHm TV 


.. HO <7155 
20 64 65 
I .. 12.1 85 82 

.. 215 61187 

+3 153 47 11.1 
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I .. 29 82 83 


64 34 .. 
89 83 84 


198 83 FrianOW HoM 1« *4 13 07 895 

45G 326 Grand Mat *45 -B 135 30 MO 

as 208 Kwnaoy BnBtm za m . . 24 i.i 117 

»1 312 LrOtm** 351 •-* 188 45187 

585 4*7 Lon Park hOtatl 523 • .. 145 27160 

100 78b Mount Ctarlolta 95 11 25 MO 

105 67 Ptec* OTW HbMfe 85 21 25 155 

79 5Bb Ouaana Mom 71 -b 27 80155 

*06 sa SmyHoHW 348 50 14 137 

81 58 SSaU* 85 .. 15 25 180 

209 US Tres s n u a* Fbna 154 -1 70 81 183 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


Maxon 
Amber Day 
AtmascuMn A 

sssrfts? 

BUMUUMI A 
Bemata 
Bocks i 
Body Snop 


INDUSTRIALS 
A- D 


35 5* 229 
25 13305 


38 45 123 
33 24 280 


ih tor. 

107V IS'-. 

w* art 
110 - ; 96b 


III'* W 
Mb Wa 
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Mb 91 * 
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BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


7« 4TO 

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CV 33b 
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!8t'.715‘: 
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m as 

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71 » 
MO 318 
190 1J9 

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44* fM 

#* 
363 438 

SJS 

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25B 1*5 

152 116 
36* 710 
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438 216 
576 346 
100 73 

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220 13* 
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US 39 
183 105 
133 51 

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484 310 
!U 50 

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238 P2 

16 830 
11 771 
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163 W? 
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41 74 

138 HO 
Ml 135 
830 675 
Ttt IB 
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.150 -"83 
635 

3*7 199 
363 305 
81 55 
130 TOO 
?ih Kb 
J’ll no 
1*9 135 

W 31 
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35* AM 

”6 » 
kfl *4 
365 

24 M 


Bream (M 763 

Baton 27B 

Canm A 124 

Cashai 151 60 

Owcb 415 

Coas ViyeB* «54 
CoittmM Engk* 218 
Courts (Fun) A 131 
DAhS 5aro*cn A 2» 
Downni (U| 78 

Dorns Grp 348 

Diamrt 576 

EM i GOUmm 83 
EJys tWnttadOnJ 600 
Empaa SUMS 132 
Elam 238 

CaauHa Ootbaa 98 
Fat* An DC* 173 
Fora Iturwq 62 
FomMsw. IBS 

Ftwwjri *26 

Gent Sh 58 

Gouberg <ai i*6 
Gcaovnana Co iSB 
GUS CM ■ 

Do A £9 

Harm Ouaanaway 206 
Hdana Or London a* 
HSttB 39 

HauM 01 Lama 161 
Jonas (Ematl/ 64 
Urn Pncw «0 
LCP_ 138 

imCmcw M 
Loenv too 

Imereti KH0U> 250 


30 0*663 
1 4 1.9 537 

16 1 2 1 265 

BB 2 a M2 
32 26 Hi- 
ll 52 192 
121 2*167 

17.9 39 Ii6 
104 43 is* 
87 51 9.7 
86 30112 
13 17 165 

4 3 12248 

79 14 194 

35 42 103 
136 33 232 
6* 3.7 178 
63 26 170 
29. 30 72 
57 23 202 


U,»B ft fipanoar HB -4 


Umuw* Mbnm 
Una* Brea 
M>*t 

Put* tOJ 
Pemos 

Pinaov lAiMfl 


Fntwn uattMem 2*? 


teed i*iaM 320 

Da a TO* 

S ft 0 Stores 53 

Bovii ISB 

smw ASM) A 2b? 

R> B 53 

Suite IACI 92 

SawtS Sunpicn A 37 
yrwiaiH Bit 

Sthin£if<i 18 

C*W»* 27 

suDMOreo Skku *35 

ies*« ft Urewn 1*7 

TBnr PttMuca TO 

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iramwa 12 

tyyn (vow 330 

Y.-4W4 iM 

WmtKmpor 99 

ttibndlh 636 


93 48 80 

106 25 18? 
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107 54 432 

300 21 190 
300 30 132 

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120 75 117 
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11 23 296 
t< 49206 
63 25 WS 
111 16 2X7 

107 4J172 
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60 19 M9 
8* 17 217 
58 23 206 
131 40 189 
It 1*211 
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43 13 313 
79 26 27* 

86 56 134 

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86 33 155 
17 33153 
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51 55 ’73 

11.0 16 166 

2*6 


ware Ate 

nqim 

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ii.-amcatti 


32 43 137 
26ft 

24 14 33? 

97 29 17-8 
39a 20 


ELECTRICALS 


398 180 *B Pag 
238 130 H*WMC 
153 31 W _ 

99 *3 MKHOVW 

96 S3 Man _ 

500 M ttHCW 
73 *6 Aaoo FuaWy 

17*i • AMMMCMB 
220 M M4SK 


3» •-* 

233 -J 
118 #-10 


143 41W1 
2 1 03 237 
SJ 94124 
US 03 93 
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227 


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100 

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440 

356 

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390 

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258 

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160 121 
79 43 

288 185 
IS® 78 
710 495 

79 52 

88 61 
143 65 

193 105 
19* 128 
91 85 

76b *5 
125 TO 
196 163 
325 212 
42 20b 

216 136 
41 SS 
153 «t 
133 66 
ES 38 

289 188 

198 60 

ZS8 185 
*a 2*7 

ID 9V 
603 383 
41 11 

143 88 
674 332 
520 MO 
U 776 
505 311 
08 51 
365 195 
333 213 
314 238 
164 02 

190 119 
158 123 
589 421 
22S 116 
138 93 

900 805 
2*5 118 
453 200 
283 182‘. 
173 132 
91 48 

125 85 
530 345 
*0b 21 
180 110 
SO 53 
58 19 

152 63 

Ml 151 
66 3S 
150 103 
MS 103 
3 Ob 
182 116 
130 83 


Manawtar amp 
M anoa n — Bams 
liming 

Minital [LoxJay) 

uaat Bn 


Morgan CraeUa 

wr .. 


H a y Teaks 
Nobla ft Land 


NupMi tada 
Onto Baa Mach 
PKfcar Knol 'A' 
Patten jt 


87 20 174 
27 53 9.1 
M3 33 113 
53 5* 93 
98 12 237. 

<3 B.4 73 
26 32 93 
57 <9 93 
83 43 .. 
93 93 21.1 
23 43124 
91 113183 
S3 53113 
113 59 191 

123 99173 
0.1 03155 

TOO 7.1 SO 
14 39543 
103 7.0 123 
LO 1033* 
14 23 562 

133 80107 

57 30253 
121 91 21 

T7.1 43 103 


ftwaaOMByn 266 

Praanafen HUp 10* 

■HP 165 

RadtM Uaw 136 

Ranh frg 514 

Rum Sms 160 

RsKins (St Bridge) 93 
Rad* • Coman 772 
Rrttaarn Osta 20i 

teed Exscuam *1B 

Read M 261 

FMyon 168 

Ranald 58 

naaanor 118 

teuara 501 

Ranrere 35b 

Rtcamo Eng 135 

totem (Lao) 83 

nctetdua watt a 

Rooarnon Ra» 95 

RabUOB (ThHHH) 328 
Rockwara *5 

Hq&m m 

DO 'A' 104 

tet apn n t 2b 

ROM 177 

teaaH (AJ 83 


1S4 23183 
.. .. 973 

8L0 64 192 
283 <7 190 
28 03 248 

83 07223 

193 4JJ1SLB 
4.1 31 MO 
ma 4,1 114 
Z9 OB 407 
217 82192 
121 113173 
94 <1 113 
33 27213 
225 44131 

74 48 133 

17 13 84 
23* 31 137 

Z* 14 1Z3 
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63 <2 133 
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64 54 126 

54 1.1 97* 
14 99 113 
48 34 10* 

53 63 S3 


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93 99 7.1 
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8.1 34 93 

28 .28 263 


88 17 

274 190 
99 SS 
W 48 
481 186b 
144 103 
195 120 
170 M 
184 122 

%’S 


«6 «3 

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a 12 

221 MO 
587 Ml 

IBS 119 

250 SOI 
535 320 
Mb 33 
8b 5 
95 6* 
170 116 
116 91 
293 69 
338 203 
3*9 S« 
M3 200 
196 04 
22 Bb 
90 56 
1*4 TO 
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126 75 


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360 

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392 IM 
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TUB 4£7 
3*0 267 
288 21B 
2» 173 
4*3 257 
B8b 29b 


Com iMhi 
EJ ulyftU. 

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team C E 
Hogg nobn eon 
Later ft Ban 
London ft Man 
Lon Urn kw 
March ft Md4n 


803 XB .. 
35 23 263. 
44,7 S3 .. 
174 31 . 
S3 97 


1G8 127 CMBmon 
107 75 FWay (Jama*) 

400 325 Harraon create 
476 303 Inchcapa 

37 28b Jacks (Wire 
283 1B3 Lnmm 

38 34 Ocam VWson 
258 IM Pswaon Zocb 
200 ISO Do A' 

213 126 Poly Pack 
59b 30 Sana Darby 
930 545 SUatBro* 

224 61 Terser Kouakty 

220 133 Yiia Cano 


103 6* 12* 

99 72 .. 
268 72 203 

25* 54 37.7 

1.7b 4* 123 
17.1 73 113 

3.6 S3 10.1 
03 38 S3 

93 99 58 

73 43 92 


229 99 123 
+2 197 49 TO* 


612 -10 

799 -10 

563 +83 

345 

218 *-10 

188 0-5 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERT G 


346 223 PWS 
15b T2 Peart 
9U 718 PnidanM 
453 361 RsUga 
967 762 ttoSl 
415 321 SMtortkOp 
488 3*6 Smitwrion 
445 380 Baaga HUga 
772 S20 am ASmca 
927 772 Sun Lht 
550 120 Trad* MHMty 
48* 394 W Fabar 


£47 s+b 

262 * 4« 

315 -20 

£14b -b 

772 *-10 

411 0-2 

814 -3 

365 • 

489 ■ 

405 *5 

882 -7 

872 *-10 

193 • .. 

487 b-2 


LEISURE 


144 » 

220 128 
US 88 

63 34 
225 ISB 
410 325 

B2b 48 
B1 BO 
128 93 
131 94 

103 32 

180 137 
160 130 
381 Z7B 
403 32B 

64 39 
228 131 
360 MB 
143 119 

74 51 

IBS T2Bb 


Barr ft WA 'A' 120 

Booaoy ft tewkaa 175 
Brant War IM 

Cancan 62 

CtoyaaB* 177 

FiraP5su» 373 

GHA 54 

HsnSswgar Brooks BD 
Hontao Travar 122 

MLalawo 112 

JVia’a HUga *B 

Lao M 184 

M edwwwr MS 


+2 7* 

t . . 1.4 

4-12 88 

1-2 93 


RsaOy UaaU 395 

Htey Lataure 40 

Saga HoMaya 131 

Sanaaiaati Go 1B0 


Uniten 139 
Tatwntem teapur 89 


■HO .. 

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7.4 99 17.6 
9.7 94 M2 


PROPERTY 


13b 3b Ang Araar Core 
11V630 Ang Am 

63 31 Am Gold 

58 3S MIT 

40 22 AngkMul 

41 22 DO 'A' 

198 120 Ayer team 
425 238 BMWt 
165 80 Oackan 

21b Bb BUM 

a? a cm 

89 30 Carr Bowl 
TO* an dona QoUMda 
553 314 Do Bear* 

248 105 Oaamsl 
BV 4b Doo m lo u l a ki 
Itte 7 DrMoteki 
0 Pa Oman 
200 150 .E Daggas 
SB* 258 EWndaSre 
206 129 B Dio 
7 OR 85 Eftburg 
890 SOD E Rmtf Qtfd 
5b 2b e Rand Prog 
8V 4b FS Cora 
213 S3 F9 Daw 
75 17 GsnorUn 
Bb 4b GanM 
10b 8 Ban Mntng 
10V 5b QFSA 
713 313 QM KUgoorO 
88 35 Ocpang 

ia 85 Ow awHcb Rea 
375 165 OnmM 
158 91 tenpun Aran 
9V 4b H gmony 
408 175 Hate 
B7b 47b JotaaVaa 
12b 5b Ktannt 
Bb 2’. Kkmf 
160 65 Latf* 

13b Bb Lreanon 
475 17D Lotaue 
157 84 MM 
32 15 MreayV UMng 
123 80 HIM 

64 14b Motel Em 
28 Sb Utengura 
10b 4b MUM V 

655 450 Mmorco 
5b 2b NBW WHS 
1*2 73 MU Brown HB 


E*b -b 

950 -® 

ESI -lb 

£53b 

£34 

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130 

318 -2 

123 -6 

E12V -b 

355 -5 

62 4-1 

884 •-35 

533 40 

170 -5 

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.. .. 54.1 

54* 53 .. 
446 97 . 

271 91 
142 42 
142 42 
470 365 
79* 2*0 
26* 21.1 
282 205 


35* 50 HLD 
IB* 34 
4* 24 
820 125 
129 1UT 


E • 

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330 

136 40 

3 •' 

181 

171 «-1 

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£10 • 

238 

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135 • . 

260 «45 

19b 4b 
133 40 

160 


030 CWB8L2 
2* 20 17.1 

2* 96 170 


<0 10 41.1 
6w4 43140 
174 63 Ml 
12* 91 17* 
<3 27195 
95 5*20.1 


12 * 20 .. 
60 33 140 
14* 03 . . 
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15 

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170 • : 

102 

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308 44 

174 42 


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67* 103 . 
48* 54 . 


126 -2 

230 
146 
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£8b a .. 
80 40 

El Ob -b 

388 -2 

109 +1 

32 47 

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54* 235 .. 
54 97320 
B2B 70 .. 
17* 50 .. 

345 5* .. 

86 * 100 .. 
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29* 322 .. 
115 107 .. 


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43 32460 
0.7 07 . . 
37 33 297 
121 7.1 134 
57 50 113 
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191 <0190 
64 54 210 
21 10 430 


80 21221 
130 31270 

130 92 260 

14 30 910 
5* 22223 

131 4.1 MO 


TO 25b Nth Kslart 
2*i. 10b OwmaTra* 

130 88 PluSn TV) 

311 204 Fbko Waihand 
25 Bb Rand MUM Uri 
445 170 Rand Urn Prep 
73b 16 Randtantam 
3TB 225 Rantem 
791 511 HR 
8b 4V Rureartara 
10b 5b SI Hate* 

188 88 SA Land 
31 14b Soultmai 

558 278 Sretpnten 
138 TO Slmgot Boat 
138 73 TreSh 

569 300 IMMt 
62b Mb V teats 
658 233 VaMangmil 
136 50 Mredomaai 
BO 35 Vogels 
17 10b wank* Ctflary 

038 268 Wakora 
313 128 Hfesfern Araac 
30b 15 Waawm Dm 
221 114 wutarn kmg 
268 106 wait Rand COM 
230 BO WMm Creak 
17V 7b VMnMs 

56 20 vm Mgal 

16b 10 3 . ZanUa Copper 
71 26 Zandpari 


12* 40 77 
-3 551 9* .. 

-10 

-15 314 47 69 
4b 26.8 30 550 
-b 125 T30 .. 

-5 160 160 . 

-b lie 40 . 


+m 


-30 46* 90 .. 
-Ib 556 100 .. 
-38 54* 67 .. 
+2 15* 130 .. 
-3 40 90 6* 


-18 67* 120 . 
-23 23* 90 . 
-1 171 60 .. 

I .. 3* 14 .. 

-IS 12* 91 


300 

280 • .. 

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660 -5 

242 +9 

265 +5 

170 *43 

310 

336 -2 

138 -2 

116 

47 42 

215 • 

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755 

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£21 b 4b 

106 • 

82 -2 

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985 

228 42 

168 43 

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14* 40 21.7 
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67 20234 
7.9 40124 
10l4 34 22* 

15.7 <7 210 


52 40 197 
91 80 197 

40 2* 160 

6.7 1.1 499 

140 14 13* 

7.1 00 110 

7.7 90 14.1 
170 00 421 

1.7 10 540 
20 20130 

1U 40 130 


-7 ITS 197 . 
-3 1.1 94 . 


SHIPPING 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


312b 187 
396 213 
368 196 
480 305 
9* 51 

603 480 
76 54b 

12b 4b 
41 26 

240 180 
576 428 
165 86 

334 127 
3B0 380 


Anno Br Porta 281 P-5 

Br CommomWkWl 306 -8 

Caledonre 283 

enurtn 415 • 

Fenar (Jama) 72 • 

Gram 510 

Jacob* CJQ 85 •-! 

Lyle fib 

Itoaay Docks 28 

Ocean Transport 23* •-Z 

p&odu 503 a-a 

Runpman (Water] T53 

Uphote 291 43 

Tumoal Berm 380 


SHOES AND LEATHER 



290 


2S5 


90 

63 11* 

2DG 

14b 

Gamar Booth 

190 


143b 70 110 

-45 

32 

teadktn Sara 

39 


07 

10 .. 

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168 

Lambeit Howanh 

180 

• 

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40 68 

82 

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58 

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70 170 


82 

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112 


50 

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157 

118 


147 


12* 

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273 

158 

Styto 

203 


04 

22 261 


TEXTILES 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


10 

10.7 

41 170 


10* 

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-2 

6J9 

40 60 


62 

7.8 11* 


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• . 140 

396 

114 

110 

3.1 

• . 209 

• . 125 

.. 12 * 

47 14* 

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•-5 104 

57 

• - - 2M 

•*3 229 


104 




17 

+2 



15 

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84 




683 

P-3 

480 

70 70 

Mb 

♦1 



4BK 

-3 

260 

7*140 

95 




133 

-3 

90 

7 * 36 

350 

162 

ft* 100 

59 

-1 

2* 

6ft 11* 

126 


7.1 

50 90 

32b 



. 729 

47 

♦3 

21 

40 68 

141 

•-1 

161 

66 34 

38 

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325 




38 

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14 

2*130 

58 


2* 

60 

tftb 




133 

• 

136 

ib* is 

515- 

-9 

23* 

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E* <1 11.1 
40 90 270 
E* E4 9* 
69 99119 
90 39130 

14 10 87 
92 95 107 
67 65 MS 
.. a . . 54 

69 it 197 
20 6*103 

70 59 70 
30 92 9* 

74 12100 

99 59 0* 


TOBACCOS 


488 

308 

BAT 

436 • -5 

164 

<2114 

TO 

108 

Carrel 

113 



180 

108 

Canon 

IT 3 



tC 7 

127 

Rotknam - 0 * 

154 -1 

90 

62 54 


9 Ex dwdend a Ex all b Forecast ttvWend e Interim 

E ent passed f Puce at suspension g Dnrtdsnd and 
wtiude a specrat payment k Pre-merger figures n 
as! eanangs o Ex oilier r Ex noils s Ex scrip or 

sharp spfit t Tax-free . . No sgnecam data. 












































































THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


M Oder Cmg Yin 


ffte Cmj m 


Etrapon taoont 864 913 - 0 J 270 

FMnari Fuotf 


un. WM StWH a Ossgow 03 2 PA 
0 * 1*332 3133 

Bdmesd OBI fem *40 *84# *03 1-40 

Oo Basra Ml <7H *08 

hcams on me x.r *zx <oj ub 

DO MBUSl SIS 442 *03 . 

Ssnms CD's Inc *s* 525 +09 100 

DO Mens 49 KM *03 . 




ws 
47 

791 

MB 
®S 

2*7.5 
MB3 
1610 
:<t< 157 * 
•1.7 KB 
49 »* 
408 03 
879 72 J 
no ns 


7*rr 


-cs 
*03 
4< in 
*3= *9* 
■C 7 173 
•1! 34 
<49 34 
•24 «•» 
-33 0SB 
•1ST COT 

-so cn 
•Li on 
-t 2 cm 
•0.1 sis 
+2* U 
-10 321 
*fl« 991 
*IJ T 53 
•VS I S3 
•34 2JT 
-04 133 
+G.7C3I 
•23 439 
-74 074 

•10 1J> 

-IS 137 
•09 312 
SM 








zx: 


&\ 




■I* *89 *09 r *» 


Ml »» 

144 nOn *04 »M 
Ml «1 414 I op 






1714 IBM •' J J*J 

14 ? i in fm *c; »» 

ni4 wS *01 an 

MU 2 !B 4 * *» 7 033 


Si- 81 . MM HO. (told Esau, W MX. 
01*471 3377 


HOMn Egw 
Evrapwm 


3907 4320* *12 129 
10 B .7 TIB/ +03 OK 
533 5*3 -01 018 

flU 875 * *04 SSI 

1023 IKS -03 ON 
m toob » -a* am 
745 792 *IS 089 

813 8 22 -M 2U 


2S5S?S &§& 


Hubooi Spec SKs «U 822 -l I 1U 

MtMRi UKOomh 407 BIS *07 214 
hofcom OK Thw 1793 1833 -21 287 


OMLra m ilAO aM PITCOW MW 
31-45 Omni 34 , LMM 6 C 2 V 7 LH 
01-800 4177 

OuMTM Owwrtf 4331 « 0 M + 2 l US 
OuadmM moon* 2408 2 E 82 *4 7 811 
Quadrant M M 4124 43/5 *73 1.98 
QuadraM Aiecm? 3 X 6 2716 m +U 257 


a Sm*mw Urn, London BMP * 0 U 
01*200 MM 


03 8 Turn) H UU 9 1088 
ngg Mm Dons 1122 1112 
Hob TWO OS U* 980 580 
kaT Ssowfi UMs 13*4 1428 
MBommlMt TOO 750 
Pm Ejm im hi tot 5 
SrmvCMM 878 720 


747 714 m <05 331 
UU 9 IMS -03 7.70 

1122 1112 *05 882 

980 580 -09 897 

1344 1428 -53 On 

TOO 75D .. 080 

H) 1015 -93 on 

STB 720 -03 238 


NC taoom 
NC Jasan 
NC M| 0 r UK CB 
NC Smalar Bus 
NC Ammon be 
On Accum 
NC Smanr CM 
Meaner CwspCb' 
NC Emnm ON 


au ns +13 401 

nr/ rau -»i 001 

S 3 S 3 4 *C 8 IS* 

4 883 +10 147 

028 MB *03 i.» 
297.6 3189 -*08 I XL 

1300 1471 + * 1.7 2 00 
8 1983 2073 *13 W 8 

Cl 170 1220 * -13 138 


♦03 1 .» 

+08 m 


ROWMOMTlmUBT 


• 4 J- t r ..l! 4 a 


act 


MMCAPIMT TRUST 

Wacom H**. 292 HMDed M. E 7 

01-234 Mu 

**— ■ - »» 1332 1418 c *20 431 


31 *ng *9tn S 
0-^2902860 
Anar Grown 
Do Kft" 

Anar nm 
DO Aocjm 
Eftpam dtM*i 
DC Aon" 
Gam) 

Da M 9 CMB 
« ■ FaM 
Da Ac am 


Do Ban 
ib cos m y 
Do Beam 
Escape Oat 
Exmnpt Aeean 


IIIMOT 1 ITT 1 

.KZH8AS 

933 887 

975 1017 

91.3 522 m 

545 579 m 
088 1474 
1435 1528 
2384 253 * 
391.8 4185 
814 822 
91 * 925 
823 875 
•13 IT.?- 
2804 2770 
3210 94.0 
17*2 1*73 
1713 131.7 
1924 2048 m 
2075 2207 m 
2319 2*31 
3888 3771 


• 0.7 138 
♦07 138 
• 0.8 4 » 
*01 *24 
-13 1.11 
-20 1.18 
+22 231 
*33 221 
-13 725 
-21 728 
+13 437 
♦11 437 
-84 102 
-103 102 
-143 an 
-143 an 

*12 244 
*34 244 
+33 239 
• 8.1 231 


OvS&HtT” 3Mal UM * >n BCM M 
mnkhM 2230 worn •30 1.88 

Sacum-M a 8813 8885 +105 228 

K^nYroap) 174 0 *77 3 * 1 I 9 U 

Sm * «BQ 4381 +90 219 

km mne mo mo ms in 

H0N manat 1110 1120m -3’ crate 

FarCMift Ml 3470 +111 00 

mvai. up* mm wmanaHT 

Nan HU ta. iMPpool 139 3 N 8 
051-227 4422 

EouATiem 814 m *03 179 

M itw 1 750 717 - 0 « 138 

0 « Tn« 24 7 MO -02 894 

US TnM KB 348 m +04 175 

Paebe Bum TO 439 482 # -12 035 

20 Oman St Lamm EC2 
01420 0311 

Emmy DM 1138 1212 *50 1.84 

Do BCMBl _ IdO.I 1704 <27 134 



ft 


fsnxg? «.™ 

SSF&”“ — 
saws ju s; «l« 


DO AdOJO 
U 5 Grow# 
Oo Aoeim 


NOLAND BANK OMOUP UMTOWnT 
tsmimms 

Camwood Haa.Sa>«r Si Haad.SMMd $ 1 3 RD 
0742 7094*2 

Deal boom* 77.1 822 +17 za 

Do Beam _ 105 D 1113 +22 243 


Emmy DM 1138 1212 +50 1.84 

Do Bccmi teal 1704 *27 134 

HOI boom Thm ns 9420 *121.4* 
60 aqojd ion 111.0m *i.S id 
(aarowm 887 804 +00 099 

Do Beam 879 813 +00 035 

NQVALUJMONQMmWrMANAOm 
Roym lenoen Hew* CtWmr COi IRA 
0208 978115 

Amman Grown 833 882 +12 011 

Capo# Beam 1752 ms +09 117 

anbcoM 503 53 . 0 # -14 078 

Hgn beam 775 B 25 m .+03 101 

iffiCMlGwrii 178 IM id -*11431 

Jspaa amwm no* 085 -u am, 

Spaa# Sn 1088 1134 # *13 1 38 


Croat boms 771 ■ 22 

Da Beam ifl&O 111J 

Conmotfcy 5 dm 1284 048 

Do Beams 1785 1903 

Enn Hpilnc 575 813 

Do Beam Ml 729 - 

QD8 Rnw toe 505 527 

03 Boom 837 B 7 B 3 


Ml ftde 
Do Beam 
boom* 

Do Beam 
Jnei A Paede 
Do Beam 
N Amancan Inc 
Do Beam 
Euro Oil be 


771 322 +1J 24J 

1053 1113 +22 2*3 

1284 1348 -IJ 231 

1783 1903 -22 231 

573 61 Jm +02 T.n 
881 728* +03 798 
803 827 -05 938 

817 KtjCm -14 995 
1513 1081 +23 548 


MV 1 BPM 8 P 0 I 

28 Waamm Ha Bertad RM 1 3 LB 

OSndon 0 70 99 818 8 

Asaar be 3 Own 682 72B 

Capoai Uma TOt.i 111 3 


2843 2821 
MB 181.1 
2813 3000 


+33 548 
+21 381 
+43 3*9 


2620 3007 -144 000 
295.7 3104 -152 008 


104.1 1113 
C BMB 0 #H 552 590 

EunmnOradi 1173 1254 
FbancMISaca 89.1 1053 
Mgh Ram Una 19 VB 1942 
Man VWU Una IBI S 1730 + 
Mm Una 9 i.r 980 

bmenani That 980 Him 
open arawm 89.8 1024 m 

japan Smaaar CD* 1138 121 7 
HomaNuad 297 31.7 


1133 1210 
1355 1443 
1315 1400 


+13 1.19 
+13 1.19 
-02 151 


1319 1407 

1514 1815 

1515 161 4 
713 * 54 # 


*10 on 
-00 202 
-01 VOB 
-22 048 
-03 1.90 
+24 458 
+24 438 
+15 829 
♦13 2*0 
•34 000 
-17 000 
-02 2*8 
+12 243 
+11 420 
*23 4.63 
-22 1.15 


Ttoprfcttifaitfais 

W iHUH IWT » 

FHduyls tndiM 


2!? 






, UNLISTED SECURITIES 






IVJ 


M+^+ 


Mgh La* Camay 


-3 M &2Z75 

-1 1.7 82 15 

33 5319* 

+2 386 “ 

ij uu 

+88 73 01 182 

+1 2.7 33 192 

+2 53 13 175 

rn 45 33 185 

87 4.1 .. 
24 00 12,1 

00 53 14.7 

81 03 172 

83 84 122 
81 4.1 103 
r . 4* 32 12 * 

-2 03 4* 95 

35 50 105 
74 47 184 
m 43 3* 134 

-T 

83 IB 73 
35 13 54.4 

m+3 21 24 141 

m+5 83 35 175 

87 34 213 

-1 1.1 23 153 

122 23 183 
125 83 14* 


+1 3JJ 25 ZZ2 
43 07 153 


07 15 20.1 

04 83 

33 25213 

21 1.1 233 

33 15153 
33 165 EB 


37 

22 

293 

180 

35* 

• 23 

1*8 

86 

235 

100 

79 

50 

158 

130 

71B'i 82 

at 

10 

S3 

17 

185 

80 

148 

S3 

K 

za 

110 

103 

200 

138 

27 

12 

34 

28b 

118 

2* 

78 

31 

SS 

2S 

178 

116 

243 

80 

15E 

78 

143 

93 

B*. 

1 2 

6b 

1 2 

308 

m 

91 

90 

43 

TB 

58 

33 

123 

05 

40 

12 

105 

B8 

82 

22 

7B 

40 

*2 

14 

ISO 

70 

87 

80 

105 

S3 

97 

97 

108 

102 

m 

112 

12 a 

73 

48 

10 

13S 

104 

171 

108 

IBS 

120 

133 

71 

a 

7 

350 

171 

355 

253’! 

n 

SB's 

280 

168 

198 

146 

101 

50 

173 

138 

320 

136 

178 

155 

131 

88 

40 

33 

182 

113 

31 

11 

99 

85 

88 

48 

38 

m 

09 

83 

71 

56 

220 


108 

71 

Mb 17'i 

93 

58 

123 

108 

MO 

T7S 

250 

ISO 

200 

no 

134 

111 

120 

10 B 

188 

K 

148 

75 

385 

194 

2SS 

115 

188 

» 

145 

70 

ZTS'rlBO 

110 

C3 

58 

42 

145 

113 

50 

30 

189 

136 

485 

270 

98 

60 

280 

no 

78 

43 

550 

420 

135 

93 

m 

390 

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81 

100 

35 

108 

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110 

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19 

14 

98 

68 

178 

188 

191 

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98 

90 

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233 

151 

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290 


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118 


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313 


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m . 

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m . 

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31 

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33 


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330 


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31 132 

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INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


E 


+2 

3* 

11 210 

++ 

314 

19 38.1 

+2 

44 

33 37* 

-8 

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i+l 

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68 

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120 

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68 

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103 81 

81 4Ti 
220 155 
147 W0*i 

101 n 

187 115 
IBS WO 
118 90's 

180 138 
in 138 

309 237 
370 300 
214 1ST 1 } 

144 112 
93 79 

303 217 
81 39 

62 33 

74 53 

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TR AMplM 109 

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35 bd « Qan 218 

TO Na m u r m iar 

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81b 831 

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a life 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


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471. 34 ’> 
» 31 
49 21 
15* 115 
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30'. 17< 

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173 90 

380 187 
TW 88 
788 375 
M 77 
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151 78 


COMMODITIES 


LONDON COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 

GW Joyafon and Comport 

SUGAR (From a Cnrnhowl 
FOB 

Dee — 137.6-37.0 

Mar 150.6-50.4 

May 155.2-55.0 

Aug — 1604-602 

Ocf 1642-G3.8 

D« 1703-676 

Vofc 3384 

COCOA 

Dec 1518-16 

Mar 1554-52 

May 1575-72 

M - 1595-90 

Sep 1613-11 

Dec 1839-36 

Mar 1666-60 

V oh 966 

COFFEE 

NO* 2200-2195 

Jan,. 2175-71 

Mar 2120-15 

May 2115-10 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


Edited by Matthew May 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/1 


Fingers crossed in anticipation 

fhe cnmmii.il- . 


The computer industry may 
pcrformi ing 'its act 
to Bntish customers for more 
than 3 decade, but its most 
important performance vet 
opens next week in the City of 
London as it plays the lead 
roic m the Big Bang. 

Next Monday sees the start 
of the Unancia! deregulation of 
the City when the the distino 
lions between old stock ex- 
change jobs like jobber and 
broker disappear and all agree* 
ments about minimum 
commissions for stock buying 
and selling evaporate along 
with them. 

It is also a time when all the 
computers which will drive 

( THE WEEK ) 

By Geof Wheelwright 

the new. deregulated and more 
competitive stock market will 
kick into service — and must 
perform perfectly from the 
first day with the possibiity of 
huge financial loss if there are 
serious problems. 

Extensive rehearsals have 
been underway in the past 
week to ensure that systems 
like the Stock Exchange Auto- 
mated Quotation service 
(SEAQ) will not embarass 
either their users or pro- 
grammers on opening night. 

SEAQ. an electronic 
information and communica- 
tions service that collects. and 
displays information needed 
to trade in equities, will be one 
of the key tools for the new 
breed of market makers. 

It will provide constantly- 
updated quotations on the 
buying and selling of slocks by 
all the major players through 


i v 


issssmarr- 




' 

\;s 

Stft^ ; 




'f 



Small headway 
for the data 
wage slaves ; 


the exchange — allowing 
investors electronically to 
“shop around" to get- the best 
possible rates. 

By conventional computer 
programming standards 
SEAQ was a rush-job — given 
the delays in the government 
deciding to go ahead with Big 
Bang, which only took place in 
1983. and the time it took to 
confirm the plan to base 
SEAQ on the existing Topic 
viewdata systems at the ex- 
change. The system was com- 
pleted in July of this year. 

So far it has been the 
business of dress rehearsals to 
simulate what real-life trading 


trading will be like that has 
proved most problematic. 

Like the complex systems 
used to control missiles or 
send space ships to the moon, 
the big fault-tolerant comput- 
ers that will drive the City's 
trading revolution will only 
get their real test when they 
are pul under the pressure of 
heavy, high-volume daily use. 

While the City should 
reasonably be able to expect a 
good level of service from the 
computer systems it has been 
installing, the fact of that 
matter is that they are not 
infallible. 

Some in the computer in- 
dustry worry that companies 


In with the new: The screens 
that are being installed on 
the floor of the Stock Ex- 
change to give instant dis- 
play of the best share prices 
are also ready for investors 
and businessmen 

installing the new equipment 
will expect too much, too 
soon. Doug Gimmel. manag- 
ing director of the British 
fault-tolerant computer 
manufacturer ITLr suggests 
that some City firms have 
wailed too long to choose their 
Big Bang computer systems — 
and so have made choices 
without entirely knowing 
whai they were doing. 



Out with the old: Eddie Pelc* above, will be keeping a watch- 
ful eye on the Stock Exchange next Monday. Seconded from 
the Hoskyns Group for the past 12 months, he is responsible 
for planning the Installation of the new trading systems on 
the floor. Working through nights and weekends, to avoid 
disrupting the daily business of the Exchange, he has been 
acting as liaison between the Exchange and the outside con- 
tractors while 500 miles of new cabling was put in to cope 
with more than £5 million worth of new computer equipment 


Toward a state of corporate confusion 


A potentially serious shortfall 
in experienced data commu- 
nications staff during the next 
five to 10 years is being 
forecast by leading computer 
industry experts. 

It wifi be caused by the need 
to plan, manage arid co- 
ordinate the growing 
availability of network ser- 
vices and communications 
facilities brought about by 
technological progress and the 
recent easing of communica- 
tions regulations in Britain. 

Financial, retail and manu- 
facturing companies are now 
looking at the benefits to be 
had from sophisticated 
communications set-ups. 

In the rush to implement 
the new technology to ensure 
business competitiveness, 
many companies may be 
forced into boot-strap 
communications measures 
due to lack of available 
specialist staff. 

This could, those in the 


C JOBSCENE ) 

By Eddie Coulter 

industry warn, result in in- 
efficient networks and — in 
extreme cases — disastrous 
consequences with badly- 
planned systems liable to 
bring organizations to a 
communications halt. 

“Shortage of good commu- 
nications managers will be a 
massive problem.** said Dr 
Eurfyl ap Gwilym, managing 
director of Geisco. the net- 
work based services division 
of the American General 
Electric. 

Other factors also point to a 
posable state of corporate 
confusion and mistakes in 
data communications plan- 
ning brought about by a lack 
of good communications 
management 

With the recent introduc- 
tion of Managed Data Net- 


works licences, which have 
eased the rules on Value 
Added Network Services 
(VANS), many new commu- 
nications offerings can be 
expected. 

A projected European 
growth in network services of 
80 per cent a year, along with a 
100 per cent increase in wide 
area networks, is predicted 
during the next five years. 

At the other end of the 
communications scale, voice 
communications and intelli- 
gent PABXs - or CATOs 
(Computer Aided Telephone 
Operations) — are becoming 
more sophisticated and 
converging towards data. 

Amid these two levels lies 
the conceptual plan for 
companies' local area net- 
works which, ideally, will give 
access to specialized databases 
with' on-going communica- 
tions. to larger corporate 
databases. 


• These - will run from com- 
pany information centres 
where communications plan- 
ning and control will be 
administered. Decisions will 
have to be made about who 
accesses what, when and how? 

During the next five years 
this will create a demand for 
thousands of additional 
communications managers. 

Managing consultant. Rob- 
ert Jackson, a communica- 
tions specialist with Logica 
Consultancy, believes that 
even now there are not enough 
people who know data 
Continued on next page 

MICROS 

Person required with goad 
knowledge of Xenix MS-00SS. 
Leading soft-hardware etc. 

Good salary, comm, profit 
share - deeawshfli considered 

01-767 8833 


Events 


V General Practice Computer 
Exhibition — Medical comput- 
ing, Forum Hall, Wythenshawa, 
Manchester, Thursday until 
Saturday (021-525 8706) 

■ Compec, Olympia, London, 
November 11-14 (01-821 5555) 

■ Micros in Design, Design 
Centre. Haymarket, London 
SW1, November 12-December 
19(01-639 6000) 

■ Computers in the City, 
Barbican, London, November 
18-20 

■ British Telecom Network 
Strategy Conference, 
Sedgewick Centre. London El, 
November 18-19 (01-608 1161) 


People and Technology, 
Queen Elizabeth II Conference 
Centre, Westminster, London, 
November 25-27 (01-727 1929) 

CIMAP - Factory automation. 
National Exhibition Centre, Bir- 
mingham. December 1-5 (01- 
891 3426) 

Interactive Video, Metropole 
Hotel, Brighton, December 9- 
tl (01-8471847) 

High Technology in Education, 
Barbican, London, January 21- 
24(01-608 1161) 

Videotex User Show, Barbican, 
London, January 28-30 (01-608 
1161) 

CADCAM 87, Metropole Hotel, 
NEC, Birmingham, March 24- 
26(01-6081161) 


Despite the often reported 
shortages of experienced staff 
in the computer industry they 
seem to have had little effect 
in pushing up data processing 
salaries. Those employed in 
the industry are faring little 
better and sometimes worse 
than their colleagues in other 
industries according to figures 
from management consultants 
Inbucon. 

Data processing managers 
in particular, says the report, 
received only an average in- 
crease of 5 per cent on their 
salaries this year compared 
with an average of over 9 per 
cent for executives employed 
in other industries. 

It was the lowest percentage 

( salaries ) 

By Matthew May 

increase of any of the 19 
industry groupings looked at. 
Highest increases went to 
those training executives ( 1 2.2 
per cent) and managing direc- 
tors (11.5 per cent). 

Only computer pro- 
grammers and senior analysts 
managed to top the general 
average as the table shows. 
The average increase for all 
data processing jobs was 8.1 
per cent. 

The survey, which covered 
a total of 6.500 people working 
in 623 companies, includes a 
special section on data 
processing staff surveying 937 
employees. 

Don McClune. manager of 
Infiucon's salary research 
department points out how- 
ever. that as those computer 
people surveyed were 


predominantly From the 
manufacturing industry the 
increases reported do not re^ 
fleet the large jumps in salaries 
experienced in some specific 
service sectors such as those 
employed by City firms in 
preparation for the Big Bang. ; 

In terms of total remunera- 
tion — once perks such as 
company cars are taken into 
account — computer managers 
fared slightly better with an 
increase of 7 per cent though 
still 3 per cent less than the 
average for colleagues in other 
industries. 

The salary figures shown in 
the table can of course reflect 
large bands. They are widest 
for computer managers where 
salaries range from around 
£19.000 in companies with 
fewer than 500 employees to 
over £30.000 in companies 
employing more than 10.000 
people. The highest paid com- 
puter manager surveyed 
earned over £57.000. 

For computer operators 
however better pay is to be 
found in the smaller company 
where salaries average £8350 
compared with £7.700 in the 
largest. 

As in previous years, say 
Inbucon. data processing and 

ages well Wow those ^r 
many other comparable job 
categories, while the length of 
time spent both in a particular 
jpb and company is also much 
lower than other industries. 

The 1986 Survey of Executive 
Salaries and Fringe Benefits is 
published by Inbucon at £150. 
Further information on 01-584 
6171. 


Head of DP 
Systems managers 
Senior analysts 
Systems analysts 
Senior programmers 
Programmers 
Senior operators 
Operators 


Source: bibucon 


Average 
Salary 
July 86 

Average 
Salary 
July 05 

Rise 

(%) 

Av 

Age 

Av 

Yrs 

in 

job 

Av 

Yrs 

in 

comp 

20,774 

19,794 

5.0 

41 

43 

93 

18^84 

17,048 

7.7 

40 

33 

10.4 

14,389 

13,144 

93 

37 

3.7 

83 

12£60 

11,511 

9.1 

34 

23 

6.1 

12,171 

11,066 

10.0 

33 

33 

63 

9JH7 

8314 

11J 

28 

2.1 

3.7 

9^40 

8£28 

83 

33 

33 

8.4 

7,500 

6340 

8.1 

27 

33 

43 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 




gsg iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinisn 

£70K 1 


Brother typewriters. Made quieter. 
Made to last. Made in Britain. 


Does the chance to sell for the hugest independent supplier of IBM Systems, in a pi 
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It should do, and your experience of successful computer systems sales, into Blue Chip Companies, your drive 
and chari s m a will allow you to reap the benefits for years to come. 

This International multi mi ll io n pound company requires an additional full sales that will be sellin g 
DEC/IBM and ICL equipment on a leasing basis. 

The company offers a high negotiable basic up to £20K with actual namings being restricted only byyour 
abilities. Based in Central London you will receive an executive car or allowance and all the extra benefits that 
are comensurate with a market leader. 

For an immediate interview contact Paul Errington or send your C.V. in confidence. 




CITY RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS LIMITED 
COMPUTER SALES A MARKETING DIVISION 
58 Houndsditch, 

London EC3A 7DL. 

01-623 4688 


ll BlilBIBlBIBIBIBIBIBlWIBIBlBIgiBIBIBII IlBfB 

1 HEWLETT _ 

PACKARD 

COMMUMCATIONS/ 
COMPUTER STANDARDS 

A strategic liaison role 


! tlK-f 


Whatever kind of typewriter you have in mind, 
there’s a Brother that’s exactly right for you. 

Wfe make every kind of machine you can imagine. 
From fully electronic portahlcs for the home to the 
most sophisticated heavy duties. 

They ail bt light-touch* low profile keyboards, 
and special low noise print units (which are amongst 
the quietest in the world). So you get none of the din 
typewriters can normally make. 

They're all incredibly reliable (you haw our 
painstaking quality control to thank for that). So you 


can expect many years of long service. 

They are the first range of electronic typewriters 
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And, with prices starting at just £225, you don't 
need to be made of money to buy one. 

Ibsc the coupon and well tell you more, f 

Brother typewriters. From £225-£S89 


brother 


The future at your fingertips. 


Hewlett-Packaiti Laboratories, 
Bristol is looking foran Engineer or 
Computer Scientist with 
experience in international 
networldngstandards, to actively 
participate in relevant UK and 
International standards 
organisations and to keep the 
Laboratories and Divisions abreast 
of technical developments. 

The individual will also co- 
ordinate with those HP operating 
Divisions active in network 
standards, based in Grenoble, 
France and California, USA and 
contribute to the evolution of 
corporate policy as it relates to 
network standards. 

The position, based within the 
Networks Laboratory of HP 
Laboratories, Bristol, provides a 
stimulating environment of leading- 
edge R and D in computer 
networking and integrated computer/ 
communications architectures. 


The successful candidate 
will have: 

^ knowledg e and work experience 
of the CCITT/OSI protocols 
and/or Local Area Network 
Standards 

sfc previous exposure to the process 
of defining, drafting and approval 
of national and international 
networks standards 

the motivation to contribute 
toward die evolving standards 
strategy of the company. 

An excellent salary package will 
be offered which includes non- 


benefits that one would expect 
from a company well recognised for 
its enlightened personnel policies. 

If you feel you have the 
qualities we need, send a detailed 
curriculum vitae to Geoffrey King at 
the address below, quoting 
reference HP/05L 


IHI.!H;TAU-V<"v TtH. EKi rm*K u iTMUTWJMl n'lWKITIH'BilIHlWllM. : :-<v E-.-r.77 . 

W 

HH-VH. lM- ~ "> 

mnxRWirKucisHt i ug imi-vi wvimuv vtkii hlvtihu^ ?.«?«.-?: tuu v.»re. 

HIM* in* M» mtoiovi &) usTi IN m oui "Mu *• NtM am am* rv* <tnil* i x. i m- unvvwiinm n m«th » 

t * _ 


CRC International 

168 Sloane Street, London SW1X 9QF. Telephone 01-235 0168 


1 





32 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


l COMPUTER HORIZONS/2 J 


10 days left for 
Award entries 



There are just 10 days left to 
enter the 1986 UK Computer 
Press Awards, sponsored 
jointly by The Times and 
Hewlett- Packard. It is the 
third year for the awards 
designed to encourage good 
standards in an area with more 
than 200 publications. 

The eight categories are: 
Computer Journal of the Year 
Computer Journalist of the 
Year (News) 

Computer Journalist of the 
Year (Features) 

Computer Columnist of the 
Year 

Computer Photographer of the 
Year 

Best Designed Journal 


UK 

Computer 

Press 

Huu a r ris 

spxsmdby 

HEWLETT-PACKARD 

and 

THE TIMES I 


Technology Programme of the 
Year ./ ■' 

Computer Press Personality of / 
the Year. / 

The winners will be an- 
nounced at an awards cere- 
mo nv at Claridges on 
WedB^yNovHmKrM. s , ephen ^ of 

The wlewsioii and radio the UK Computer Journalist 

of lhe Year (News) award 
1985 has prepared a . tele- 



will present the prizes which 
include engraved silver tro- 
phies, an HP Vertra desktop 
computer and printer, three 
portable computers and print- 
ers, £1.000 worth of photo* 
graphic equipment and crates 
of champagne. 

Entries most be based on 
articles, magazines, pictures 
or programmes printed or 


vision report on the technol- 
ogy behind the Big Bang in 
the Stock Exchange. It will 
be screened at 7pm this 
Friday in the BBCs Micro 
Live programme 

may submit entries for 
themselves. 

Entry forms and a complete 


broadcast between November copy of the rules can be 
1, 1985 and October 31. 1986. obtained from Horsley Asso- 
Editors may nominate can- dates. Capital House, 20-22 
didates who have worked on Crayen Road, London W2 
their magazines or journalists 3PX (01-402 3347). 


Workers 
don’t want 
union, 
says IBM 

By Andrew Blum 

Officials at IBM headquarters 
in Armonk. New York, said 
union leaders will get a poor 
response from company 
employees if they go ahead 
with a threatened unioniza- 
tion effort next year. 

Comments by the corporate 
officials came last week after 
union leaders said they 
planned to mount a unioniza- 
tion effort at IBM sometime 
nextyear. 

M orton Bahr. president of 
the Communication Workers 
of America union, said that 
several unions wfll meet in 
London next January to dis- 
cuss a drive to organize LBM 
workers worldwide. 

But IBM said, employees at 
the computer giant are sat- 

50-year history of 
no lay-offs 

isfied with their salaries and 
fringe benefits and have never 
expressed any desire to . 
unionize. 

IBM officials said their 
polities have contributed to a 
50-year history of no lay-offs j 
and the company has always | 
respected rights of employees 
to organize. 

“Because our policies ad- 
dress the needs of the individ- 
uals who make up IBM," one 
spokesman said, “they never 
have expressed the need for a 
union in the United Stales and 
in most other countries where ■ 
we do business.” 

IBM said it supports and 
follows applicable labour law 
covering employees in all 132 
countries where it operates. It 
employs 405.500 people 
worldwide. 

“We are not anti-union in 
any sense and to characterize 
IBM's position in this manner 
is completely inaccurate." the 
spokesman added. 

The CWA. which has pre- 
viously discussed organizing 
IBM. called the computer 
giant America's largest un- 
organized employer. 


Wilmot to nurse lame ducks 


By Richard Sarson 
Robb Wilmot. who nursed 
ICL back to health after its 
financial crisis in 1981. has 
formed a new company to 
inject capital and good man- 
agers into ailing information 
technology companies. The 
new company is to be called 
Octagon Industries. 

It will have Dr Wilmot as a 
non-executive director who 
will be joined as chairman by 
Alex Reid, the man put into 
Acorn by Olivetti to turn it 
round after its financial diffi- 
culties two years ago. 

( start-up ) 

Managing director of Octa- 
gon will be Geoff Bristow, one 
of Dr Wilmot's colleagues 
•from Texas Instruments and 
ICL. His first job will be to 
identify suitable companies to 
rescue, working from a small 
office in Maidenhead. 

Finance will come from 




or Dr wilmot s colleagues doctors from the ranks of 
from Texas Instruments and management in the estab- 
ICL. His first job will be to iished computer companies, 
identify suitable companies to |> Reid believes that there 
rescue, working from a small ^ a | ot 0 f entrepreneurial 
office in Maidenhead. talent being wasted In the 

Finance will come from upper echelons of medium 
Oose Investment Manages and large computer firms. 
mcnL which has put £-.5 Sq Octagon Industries' sec- 


Company doctors: Robb Wilmot, left, and Alex Reid 
plan to recruit other company plements the work of Octagon 


million at the disposal of the 
new company so that Octa- 
gon. said Dr Reid, can “look 
at propositions of any size". 

As well as Dr Reid's and Dr 
Wilmot's own “company 
doctoring" experience, they 


ond task will be to establish 
itself as a professional 
management recruitment 
agency, head-hunting people 
with the right skills, to nurse 
the lame ducks back to health. 

The new company corn- 


investment Management, the 
venture capital company, 
which Dr Wilmot joined m 
June this year. Octagon 
Investment has so for put 
money and financial expertise 
into 22 start-up firms, not only 
in computers, but also 
advertising and publishing. 

One example is Maid Sys- 
tems. set up last year by two 
23-year-old advertising exec- 
utives, which provides an on- 
line information service for 
advertising agencies and 
marketeers. . 


The 22 start-up firms form 
an informal Octagon Club, 
which meets once a month, 
with the aim of helping each 
other with business contacts 
and co-operative services. 

The firms joining Octagon 
Industries will also pe able to 
join this club. Hopefully, what 
they learn from each other will 
prevent some of the business 
failures, which have beset the 
British computer industry in 
the last few years. 

Octagon has a third scheme 
for building up information 
technology in the form of a 
private company called Octa- 
gon Ventures, which will 
hatch new businesses not by 
investing in other people but 
by forming divisions to pro- 
vide a range of business and 
computing services. 

Dr Wilmot has put £40.000 
into this with - a further 
£180.000 pledged by other 
private investors. 

All these enterprises put 
into practice his often ex- 
pressed conviction that what 
Britain's information technol- 
ogy industry needs most is not 
more technology, but more 
venture capital, and the 
managing, marketing and 
financial skills to turn them 
into successful businesses. 


A new Manuscript from Lotus 


■ Lotus has announced a 
word and document processor 
specifically, says the 
company, aimed at "technical 
professionals". Called 
Manuscript the package is 
intended for those needing 

to produce complex reports or 
proposals. It can mix text 
with graphics and tables and 
extract information from the 
Lotus 123 and Symphony 
packages. 

The product which will cost 
£395, follows research by 
Lotus which indicated 
nearly 60 per cent of scientists 
and engineers in America 
already use some sort of 
spreadsheet with half a 
million of them using a Lotus 
product 

■ Digital Equipment has 
announced that profits for its 
first fiscal quarter are up 

1 53 per cent to Si 82.6 million 
(£127.6 million} on a 26 per 
cent increase in sales to $2.04 
billion. The results are a 


COMPUTER BRIEFING 


further embarrassment to 
competitor IBM .which last 
week announced a drop in 
third quarter earnings of 27 
per cent to Si .08 blffion on 
sales up 2 per cent to 
$11.91 billion. 

Digital's president Ken 
Olsen, ascribed the gains to 
customers' acceptance of 
"our networked systems 
solutions" - a reference to 
DEC'S strengths in linking 
computers and networks. 

■ Hermann von Siemens, 
an industrialist who for 27 . 
years headed the Siemens 
Company, West Germany's 
largest producer of 
computer and electronics, died 
last Monday in Munich. He 
was 101 years old. 

The company, one of the 
biggest industrial concerns in 
West Germany, was 


a* 


m. 


BRISTOL Baroatan LM. 35-38 H*h Si RJ: 10273) 
856502 

NA1LSEA PAP Systems. Tlw Sum. Croon Glass A. let 
102721 856502 


. BERKSHIRE 


BRACKNELL Ml a Compmtng, LKK 10. Lonphol Lam. 
W 1 0344! 411133 

MAIDENHEAD A«<it Garde Systems. 54-70 
DoortnOKf fid Tef 106281 20302 
READING Conmotercve. 487 Oxford fin Tel. (0734) 
508099 

REA DWG Wrtfcng. 16 West SI Tet t0734| 503465 
SLOUCH 9ougn CorotUK. 245 High Sl Tet i0753» 


ALTRINCHAM Regent Comwnn. 14 Regent St Iks. 
<061 I 938 0333 

NORTHYHCH Bad* Systems. Swoon. Unrt I. GSX 
how*. 71/73 MOOtoncn Ro. W 1 0606 1 2351 
WARRINGTON. Pyraima Micros. Cairo Sl Tel l092Sl 
35713 


CLEVELAND 


MDDLEraQ ROUGH Bners Coronet Senates. 1 King 
EdmnH Sc. Tal 106421 242017 


CORNWALL 


PENZANCE MjerodaL 17A Martel Jew St Tet (0736) 
66338/9 

ST AUSTELL AB+C Computers. 6 Lower Aytmer So. 
Tet 107261 67337 


KENDAL KwdH tonputar Centre. 635KWW Gale. 
Te( I0539i 22559 

PENRITH Peiuith Cooranatuns. 14 Cast* Gate. Tel: 
i Cl 768 1 67146 


DERBYSHIRE 


ALFRETON Gordon Harwood. 69-71 H# St Tet 
<0773*836781 


EXETER Computer-are, 10 Lower Rortn St Tet (03921 
210507 


BASILDON AHm Oept. Store. Eastgate Centre Tt* 
1 2268 1 27858 


GREATER MANCHESTER 


MANCHESTER Exeunt* Repro. 2/4 Orion! (to. Tet 
■061 1 228 163? 

OLDHAM PtoIms-™' Comoiiwr 5ar. I0S/U0 
Yorksiwa St fei 1O6I1 624 4065 


ondwell 

• “I I 

H I EC2 tMMfflg. 157 1 

IQ ^ 

I J 1 1 1 I fiestas 

I WClWKhng.2fil/. 



MIDDLESEX 


NORTHWOOD Screens. Mam AMt. Moor PwkTefc 

1 09274, 30527 

UXBRIDGE UU. Computers, 7 Windsor St Ttefc 10895] 
51815 


KINGS LYNN Canpnnr Mus. 40 New Caotitu St Tet 
105531 774550 

THETFORD Dratted Maos. 21 GariftaU St. Tat 
1 0942 1 61645 


i NORTHUMBERLAND 


NORTHUM9BUAND Mum* ComMtawe. The 
Mart* PL Teu 06651 604816 


OXFORDSHIRE 


BANBURY Atphascan. Boufttxi Hse Southern Rd. W 
10295! 758202 

HEAONGTON Ansofcrte Sand 1 Video. ISOMHgh 
St T«U 0865 1 60990 

OXFORD WUng. 21 Hgfi St ftt (08651 250256 


S HROPSHIR E 

SURREY 


SfflERSBURY Cursor. Mb Law. TeL 107431 241508 


HAMPSHIRE 

HEREFORDSHIRE 


SOUTHAMPTON DaUMsd. 289 Sanitary Ra. lottos. 
M .07031 367204 


HEREFORD Hooeysen Compiler*. 17 Unon Si. Tat 
l 0432) 279404 


!■/- HERTFORDSHIRE 


ROYSTON She* Asux. Long Bara. Noth End. 
Mature*. Ter i0763i 61686 
SAWBRIDGeWORTH Snoods Great. 13 Bed St Tet 
,0279) 7JS029 


BROMLEY WKUK. 33 Wdmore Rd TeL iOIi 290 6466 
CANTERBURY Aptnos Software. 123 Wncheap feL 
102271 47US ^ 

CANTERBURY Canterbury Computers. 56-57 PMat? 

SL let <02271 462101 

CHATHAM Aldan Dept Stow. 220-240 HiguSt. Tet 
<0634,407377 

MARGATE Apftm Software. 47 Hawley Sq Tet. 1 08431 
ZM699 

ORPINGTON Terry Computers. 17 Fatrwey. Pwtjmood. 
TeL 106891 27816 _ „ 

snrnCBOURNE Secrete* Lid. Central Hse. Central 
foe Ter <0795, 77639 


LANCASHIRE 


BURNLEY Burnley Computer Ct t 12 Mjtsread Hse. Sr 

James fits* Tet i0282i 34772 

pmSTON 4 -Mat Compunag. 6? rnaigjte. TeL (0772) 

*•51952 

PISAN S«nin Business Systems. 7 Arcade Sr. TeL 
(09421 826163 


LEICESTERSHIRE 


LEICESTER Sooji Compote*. 105 Betgrawi fid Tet 
t0533i 660240 

OAKHAM 2ebra Coro/tr Sertnces. Gaston Rd. 

UBangMin. TeL iCSTZj 821234 


The desktop computer range proven in use by 
business people throughout America, Asia and 
Europe. And landing on more and more desks of 
major corporations here in the UK. 

The popularity of Bondwell is not surprising. A high 
spec and a low price; lots of memory and 
expandability; a wide choice of models: and a- full 
maintenance service. 

You can use all desktop models as stand alone 
machines or as part of a network; and you can run 
well-known programs such as Lotus 123, SideKick and 
the super value Sage 'Business Wise' software on all 
Bondwell machines. 

Check it all out for yourself at your local Bondwell 
Master Dealer or call us today on 0462 37171 for a 
Bondwell brochure. 

BW36 640K RAM. 5 expansion slots. 8K Bios ROM. 

1 2-inch monitor. Single 360K floppy.and 20MB 
Winchester disk drive. 


CAM8ERLEV Attan Dept Store. High SLIM 102761 
6211 

CROYDON AUdera Dept Stone. North End. TeL (01) 
631 2577 

CROYDON Wtang. LB Sl Ganges VGUl let iDli 686 
—9 57 

Sutton Attdere Oeot Sum. HshSttet tQli 642 
6000 


WARWICKSHIRE 


NUNEATON UunKUy. ]A Queans Re. let 1 02031 
382049 


WEST MIDLANDS 


BIRMINGHAM Lee Computer*. 160 HmhfieU Rd HaU 
On Tet 1 021 1 777 9631 

DUDLEY TMWQUd AMwtrtey Use. 9 Hnntey RO W: 

I 0384) 23949 


SWINDON Wilding, 47,48 Havefcxfc St Ttt 107931 
33111 


YORKSHIRE 


BRADFORD EmcHs. Fouoonc Hie, Ramon 5a let 
102741309266 

BRiCHOUSE Hflp Computer Semces 46BoCftwHtt 

W .5484'. 710324 

HAUFAX Apaoa Ctancutere. 23 Btil Gm. TeL (04221 
J52276 

ROTHERHAM Gr LasureworM Urer L Carma 

Tyt 1 0709- 67391 

WHITBY t>e<-3 PI Software. 8 Rush ip Lane Tet 
H»47>iM0MS 

YORK <or» computer Centre 7 Stonerane Are. Tet 
<0904.641662 


CARMAARTMEN Strong Conputer Syl. 0<yn Catlan 
T e» <026 7 1 231246 

NEWPORT Gwent Computers. 92 Crreasta* fid Tet 

1 0^3 3-84 1760 

WREXHAM orrmeam Computer. 24 AUM St TeL 
<037 8, 35883 2 


.SCOTLAND 


ABERDEEN nn>gnu Canps. 108 Resereaun n let 

.0224.630526 

CUMBgM'AlttDMenW* Compuers. 12 Dtrx* Sq. 
Tel <0 236) <38398 

PEEBLES Perthes Mere Systems. 9 Eshrels. Tot 
<0721 <214.9 


Bondmen] The viable alternative 

Spectrum Group pic are the sole authorised UK importers of Bondwell computer products. 

Spectrum Group pic. Hunting Gate. HITCHIN. Herts SG4 0TJ. Tel: 0462 37171 Telex. 827608 SPUKLDG. 
eries: BW34. £599; BW36 £999 Proiessional series. BVV38-2. £799; BW38-3. s! 199 Portable series. BWIS. £699; BW8. £799 


Budget series: BW34. £599; BW36 £999 Professional senes. BW38-2, £799; Bv/38-3. £ 1 199 Portable series. BW! 

An FfiP &W «r-a ^ are S3-r£ tc 

ISM umi i&V-PC iv^eteta: inKreuporwl Buffos Muvrt-x^. Cir^sta'.vn LjUi 1 — i i> a l-uJcrw* -L.*t jjci.- i’jLv.t jr- 


founded by von Siemens's 
arandfiather, Wemer von 
Siemens, in Berlin in 1847, to 
manufacture and install 
telegraph systems. Hermann 
von Siemens worked in 
Siemens laboratories from 
1919 and was in charge of 
the development of a 
telecommunications 
technique that became the 
basis of the Telex system. 

■ The United States has 
tentatively approved the sale to 
India of a super computer, 
one of the first such offers of 
high technology to a 
country outside Western 
Europe. But officials from 
the US State Department said 
India had not yet decided 
whether to buy the computer 
from one of two American 
firms or from a Japanese 
company. 

The officials said India 
planned to use the super 
computer to analyse 
weather patterns to help * 
predict monsoons. They 
said, however, thatbefore any 
US sale could be made, 

India would have to assure the 
United States that the 
computer would be used only 
for the stated purpose- 


yoi 




-We've already got one - a 
hidden uknosf ham in me staff 
coffee area* 

■ A software package to 
simplify and speed up the use 
of Britfeh Telecom's . . 

electronic mail service, 

Telecom Gold, and aimed at 
City dealing rooms preparing 
for next week's Big Bang, 
has been developed by 
AutoConfs. a company 
which provides automatic 
confirmation services for 
foreign exchange deals struck 
between banks and money 
market brokers. - 

The package, called Bart ' 
Gold is intended for use by the 
City’s smaller banks which - 
use Telecom Gold as a • 

depositary for the deal 
confirmations sent by the 
broking firms. Bart, costs 
around £1,300; 


US-Japan 
price pact 
heads For 
deep freeze 

By Elisabeth Robinfien 
in Tokyo 

A senior European trade of- 
ficial has branded as politi- 
cally damaging the American 
and" Japanese price pact on 
semi-conductor chipsand said 
it should be suspended* 

“The agreement should be 
pur into cold storage for six 
months lo give everybody the 
chance to review less 
precedent-creating, iess poliu; 
cally damaging solutions, 
said Christopher Wilkinson, a 
senior EEC ha formation tech- 
nology official. 

The community charged 
earlier this month that the 
agreement runs contrary to 
international trade obligations 
and called for an investigation 
under General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 
rules. 

The deal requires Japan to 
control the prices of most of 
its exported semiconductors — 
tiny »ices of silicon that form 
the brains of almost all elec- 
tronic devices — whether they 
are sold in the United States or . 
elsewhere. 

“Personally, I think it ■ 
would be a great help if this - 
agreement were suspended 
and the interested parties 
sought alternative ways of 
removing the major 
frictions.'' Mr Wilkinson said. 

He added, however, that the 
community had not officially 
stated a goal for the outcome 
of a GATT investigation and 
would abide by any GATT 
ruling. - 

The EEC has said the accord 
effectively fixes prices for 
Japanese semi-conductors in 
the EEC and other third 
markets while allowing 
American manufacturers 
privileged access to the Japa- : 
nese market. 

The agreement, concluded 
in July, ended a tong dispute . 
over alleged dumping of Japa- 
nese computer memory chips 
on the US market 

Many industry analysts 
have predicted that the five- 
year agreement will break - 
down before 1991. 

The EEC last year imported 
two-thirds of the stint 
conductors it used- . 
(Reuters) ■■ 

• European manufacturers of 
semiconductors art expected 
to file their owi.charges with ; 
the EEC 'comglMning that '' 
Japanese firms are dumping 
computer chips in Europe at 
below cost price. 


Corporate confusion ahead 


EC2 WMmg. 157 MoorgMe. 7B (01)628 0501 
N3 Mayflower Bums* Sot* 42 Hendon Lam. M 
lOli 346 2556 

NW7KJ Systems. Trafalgar Hs*. Gremite PL TH. (01) 
959 3611 

■mw Mwwartnere. 9-17 Part Royal Rd Tet (01) 961 
8544 

SW15 YfrttDg. 339 Putney Bage Rd. let ((H) 788 
3452 

W1 WMti. 54 Baker St. Tet I01J 486 0798 
wa Hew^ «M6 Gtomre RtL fet (Oil 402 6822 
WC1 Wktag. 261/265 Greys km Rd. Tet {OH Z78 
4333 

HC3 IWdng, 278 H^h Hobom. Tht (01 1 430 0333 


MERSEYSIDE 


LIVERPOOL a» + Bytes. Unt 18 Central Sato. 
Rantemn Sr. W i051i 709 4036 
NEWTON LE WILLOWS Source Canto. 4 cross Laic. 
Tel (09252* 29049 

WALLASEY Mwajnea. 37 Seaxcw Rd. Td' 10511 640 
3013 


Continued from previons page organizations providing man-- Communications man age- 

aged data network services," ment staff are already being 
communications generally. said Dr ap Gwilym. lured from British Telecom. 

“Large corporations who From a career point of view, telecommunications carriers 

are well mto communications consultancy could be a viable and PITS (although they - ' 
are OK." he said, but many objective. Knowledgeable themselves have huge de*- 
smaller and medium sized communications recruits in mands). 
companies have the wrong consultancy as well as good For those keen to get into 
people already in commumca- managers can expect to' earn what may tie an opportunist. 
U0 .. n JL^ ana8emenL - L -,- «. £25.000 to £35.000 a year plus market self-study could be 

Often responsibility^ for the usual perks. .-, beneficiaL Bsw formal lines of 

communications is being Generally the communica- education for communica*: 
dumped on people who don t tions field pays welL As a lions management exist al- 
know much about iL communications -planner sal- though, just as computer 

Mr Jackson believes that are in the £20.000 to science is now taught as a 
communications departments £25.000 bracket, while net- recognized discipline, so even- 
must be well structured. wor k controllers can earn tually mi^it communications 
Reporting to an overall fjg.ooQto £22.000 a year. technology. 

controller two speafic func- . . 

tional levels are required. . ; . - c-.-. ■' 

£ 2 . ar£$ IBM PC, 20MB £1295! 

and its application toindivid- Trne> xhe IBM PC, K6kRAM,360k disk drive, 
ual company needs. "They do _ j. 

not have to be communica- m T oi 

lions engineers, but must p I^ a T^;2?f c& .9^ to ^^ ra ^ 
understand what can be with Tandon 20MB hard disk & controller. IBM 
done." said Mr Jackson. The PC complete with 2 300k disk: drives £970. Baric 

other requirement is for net- PC configuration* from £600. IBM. AT/E 20MB, 

work controllers. complete, £2850. Special prices on Proprinter & Proprinter XL. 

“These people are more of ■>nn»r< — — _ ■ , - 

the engineer tvoe. Thev under- MORSE COMPUTERS if?*?! wclV as - .' • 

stand romnuihieations soft- Teteptone 01-831 0644. Tetec 26346. 


Communications manage- 
ment staff are already being 
lured from British Telecom, 
teleco mmu nications -carriers 
and PITS (although they 
themselves have huge de- 
mands). 

: . For those keen to get into 
what may fte an qpportunist_. 
market, self-study could be 
beneficiaL Few formal lines of 
education for communica*: 
lions management exist al- 
though. just as computer 
science is now taught as a 
recognized discipline, so even- 
tually might communications 
technology. 


IBM PC, 20MB £1295! 


ual company needs. “They do 
not have to be communica- 
tions engineers, but must 


work controllers. complete, £2850. Special prices on Proprinter & Prop rinter XL. 

“These people are more of nnn n “?***?* 

the enaineer tvoe. Thev under- MORSE COMPUTERS ^ if?*?! WC1V 6LS - ' 

stand communications soft- Teteptone 01-831 0644. Tetec 26346. 

ware and hardware and ^ 

usually have a good working 

relationship with British ■ ~ y ' - •' • ~ 

Telecom and other suppliers," - 

Dick White, recruitment I c^ WrigMAir umi 
manager of PA Computers H p An j1 !| L,. ! 

and Telecommunications R IfalUlllIlK ' 

(P.ACTEL). agrees that in H — ^YOUTCGnmubS^FOCSn 

iSr^mfnawJnentthe^rrroS" Q COMPUTER ROOM C OtEffiD CTIQN.fflR COftDmONBTO; 

lions management the empha.- | MAiKTEKimcES coksuumct oa-77 3 am. MMWIiBiaJiM 

sis is less on engineeang skills \ 

and more on how a manager 

can understand the diversity — ^ « 1. 

of communications products _ 

and services and their applica- g-^ x~v i , awai 

a, Compaq: Portable £1250! 

many of the nght kind of Compaq P&tabfe 256k RAM, 2 
people as we could find for drives, dual-mode display, £1250. Special 

wcessar- 

fly need to be technicians, but - 

they must know how the lOmb hard disk, 360k floppy 

technology can be used." ccnnibmed graphics and text display. Please phone for Morse ' 
Consultancy will naturally prices on the Portable Pins, Deskpro and Deskpro 286 products, 
be a boom area in commu- Deskpro 386 j) rices & information —available now! ■ vvr ' 

78 HWi-HoHJOni. London WC1V 6LS. 

Telephone 01^31 0644. Telex 2fi254& 


Compaq: Portable £1250 ! 

Compaq Portable 256k RAM, 2 360k 


consultancy work." said Mr 
White. “They don’t necessar- 
ily need to be technicians, but 
they must know how the 
technology can be used." 

Consultancy will naturally 
be a boom area in commu- 
nications and. due to the 
shortage of experienced 
communications managers, 
there is a burgeoning market 
for managed data networks. 

It is expected that many 
companies, having had to seek 
external help in putting their 
networks together, will look to 
contracted outside help for 
network management on a 
day-to-day basis. But there 
arc as yet few viable suppliers 
of suefi services. 

In the City, where banks 
and other financial organiza- 
tions are already large users of 
networks, communications 
skills arc at a premium. “The 
City is making up the shortfall 
through the use of consultan- 
cies and in some instances this 
will lead, to computer service 


comPAol 


Wy- c-asrims 

fw*i i 


AMSTRAD IN THE CITY 

"Armlndm (lie C&Y”iMS9>iii)ar on the oewdinHiidFCilSBjad it* potential m tbe G» 
TTUATOOES THE SEMINAR tNCZUDEi : WHERE AND WU£K: 

BQMiMiMrilhdroi.i •' > Nownber 3rd 1986 ' ■ 

• peAag adPQiy . . • 

• NenratfesiodilKAiqBiad . posidedj . 

a Coma w na m otw ? iw u nfi i « earta'ninf' • ‘OroSa^rRonB 

• SntoaiA— DttKw com pfogitm TteWhRlaMdBiwtw 

■toadfctfbrArottwi ? 

a TJPjndei-bdiKllinttMh hMddWta ■ . : London BCl 


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AMSTRAD IN THE CITY 

agavp computers 

. : 01-828 9000 ■■■.. 

. SPtGIAUSZp. SUPPORT FQft BUSJfi&SS eOypUTens 


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tnu >■ 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 

HONG KONG 


the; 



TIMES 


((Foam 


OCTOBER 21, 1986 


The Queen's visit to Hong 
Kong symbolizes as dearly as 
anything could that the British 
government considers the 
icmioTy s future to be settled 
in a Cur and reasonable way, 
with only points of detail to be 
cleared up before the transfer 

?997 >vcrc * smy 10 0,1113 in 

Some or these details, none- 
theless. are of great signifi- 
cance to the people of Hong 
J^ong. most of whom will soil 
be there when the 99-year 
tease of the territory to Britain 
funs out. Of greatest concern 
is the question of the internal 
political institutions of the 
future Hong Kong Spcdal 
Administrative Region of 
China. 

The British and Chinese 
governments somehow got 
out of phase with the move by 
the Hong Kong authorities to 
establish democratic institu- 
tions after the signing of the 
joint Anglo-Chinese Declara- 
tion of 1984. 

This envisaged a Hong 
Kong continuing to enjoy its 
capitalist economic svstem 
and British-style laws for SO 
years after 1997. 

China, however, had 
wanted Britain to hold Hong 
Kong in trust until that date, 
without important changes in 
the system of n on-dem ocratk. 
bureaucratic government 
which had held good for the 
last 145 years. 

The alliance of- Chinese 
socialism and western big 
business to derive the maxi- 
mum economic benefit from 
Hong Kong, with the least 
political difficulty, suddenly 
found itself confronted with 
the good intentions of the 
British-dominated Hong 
Kong government. 

Though Peking denies that 
cither Britain or the Hong 
Kong government has a his- 
toric responsibility towards its 
people, since China claims the 
right to speak for them, the 
Hong Kong authorities went 
ahead with their multi-tiered * 
plan to put sound democratic 
institutions in place. 

The idea was that Hong 
Kong, having had virtually no 
internal politics before, should 
be rushed into political ma- 
turity in order to prevent 
attempts by future Chinese 


Bumps on the road to democracy 



The Queen and Prince 


state visit to 
Hong Kong today. 
David Bonavia reports 


leaderships to exercise more 
political and social control 
than was envisaged under the 
Joint Declaration. 

This has put Peking in a 
dilemma. China is not — and 
never has been — a democ- 
racy. and the idea of free 
elections from the top to the 
bouom of the system is ab- 
solutely unacceptable to it. 

Last year, elections were 
held at different levels in 
Hong Kong. The grassroots 
are the district boards, both 
urban and rural, which deal 
with the most basic aspects of 
local government, providing a 
forum for discussions of 


Future power is 
a grey area 


and other minority groups 
_ whose descendants may be- 

Philip begin a two-day SK^gSS'.S 

, _ The first lest of strength 

between Hong Kong's fledg- 
ling politicians and the Chi- 
nese government has been 
won by China. This is the 
issue of the proposed Daya 
Bay nud car-power plant 
which is to be built just 30- 
miles from the Hong Kong 
border. 

The siting of the plant is a 
matter of Chinese jurisdiction. 
But after Chernobyl, public 
opinion in Hong Kong turned 
against the location of it so 
close to a densely packed 
population of nearly six mil- 
lion. whom it would be phys- 
ically impossible to evacuate. 

Many local public figures, 
who had previously shown no 
interest in the question, leapt 
on it as a quick route to 
publicity. Others were genu- 
inely concerned at the safety 
considerations. And some lo- 
cal business people were 
financially committed to the 
project and produced eco- 

China won first 
test of strength 


Rotsn Lauranre 




schools, public hygiene, and 
so on. 

The Urban Council, until 
last year the only elective body 
in Hong Kong, has now been 
joined by the Regional Coun- 
cil which operates on the 
same level but in the New 
Territories' rural areas. In 
addition, elections have been 
held for some of the seats in 
the Legislative Counril. which 
previously were allotted ex- 
officio or by the Governor. 
Electoral colleges representing 
business interests and the 
professions have been set up. 

There is to be an official 
review of progress in democ- 
ratization next year, which 
gives the British and Hong 
Kong governments time to 
think up ways of placating the 
Chinese over what the latter 
have evidently seen as an 
underhand move. Peking, for 
all its lack of internal democ- 
racy. is forced to pay at least 
lip service to ft. if it seems to 


be what the people of Hong 
Kong want- 

One grey area is the future 
power and selection of a chief 
executive to replace the Gov- 
ernor from 1997 on. The Joint 
Declaration said that the top 
official in Hong Kong should 
be chosen by local people and 
endorsed by Peking. But Pe- 
king has also made it clear that 
it does not consider the ballot 
box the only means of choos- 
ing the person who will be 
responsible to the Chinese 
government for the good con- 
duct of affairs in Hong Kong. 

The Chinese talk of 
"consultation" as of great 
importance in addition to 
elections. If this reflects what 
happens in China, it would 
mean that candidates for the 
job were selected in ac- 
cordance with their standing 
in the eyes of Peking, and no 
oppositionist candidate would 
be allowed to stand. 

Besides this ■ British-initi- 
ated process of political 
development. China, in 
consultation with public fig- 
ures from Hong Kong, is 
working out a constitution for 
the territory as well as matters 
of important detail such as the 
new shipping register and civil 
servants' pensions. 

The key body' is Ibe Basic 
Law Drafting Committee, 
which is an organ of the 
Chinese legislature, supported 
and advised by the larger 
Basic Law Consultative 
Committee, which has a 
greater number of Hong Kong 
representatives. 

The Hong Kong group 
known as the Unofficial Mem- 
bers of the Executive and 
Legislative . Councils 
(UMELCO) has been less 
involved in constitutional 
matters of late, having suf- 
fered a reverse in its attempts 
to get a better deal for Indians 


nomic. environmental and 
scientific justifications for it. 

Some of tbe new politicians 
sent delegations to Europe and 
tbe United States, where they 
were told that nuclear power is 
safe. Then they drew up a 
report on safety consid- 
erations and went to Peking to 
present it. as some of theft- 
number had already presented 
a one-million signature pe- 
tition against the siting of the 
plant. 

Predictably, this annoyed 
the Chinese authorities, who 
dug their feet in. told Hong 
Kong not to worry .about 
safely because ft was assured, 
and signed the contracts with 
the suppliers. 

China is learning, just as 
much as Hong Kong, while the 
new relationship between 
them evolves. Hong Kong has 
ai least shown that it will not 
accept being talked down to 
without answering back. 


THE WARDLEY HONG KONGTRUST 

A PROFIT OF 5 : 2,100 
ON EVERY £ 5,000 INVESTED 
IN JUST 7 MONTHS 



(offer to bid, income not reinvested 17.3iJ64 4.1 0.86) 


UntlJ recently, investing in Hong Kong has 
been agame of patience. waiting for the inevitable 
explosion of growth in the Hong Kbng 
stockmarket. _ 

\Mdl now ii seems to have happened. The 
Hang Seng Index has risen lo new heights, on 15lh 
October standing at 2289— some 46% higher 
ihan the level recorded on 14th March. The 
volume of trading has soared, with Wednesday 
8th October seeing thesecond busiest day on 
record. 

For those of jthj who invested in the Vterdky 

Hong Kong Trust at launch, your patience is now 
being rewvded. And for anyone with an egre out 
for a new market reinvest m. thiscouid be what 
you are looking for. 

Prospects formredlam-terra 
growth look excellent 

The Hong Kong stockmartoet is attracting new 
investment at an almost unprecedented rate, both 
from the local population and overseas corporate 
diems. . . 

Favoured exchange rates are boosting the 
export trade arxl are ^ingCMErceas ’ 

improved *vahre for money 1 . 

Which is why. tor any invebtor wlw aims to get 

mat tire beginning of new boom markets, the 
Uhidky HongKonglbist should not be snored 

And the long- term outlook 
fe just «* promising 

lnaddUionfotheprospeciofarnediuTn-term 

gain, theoultook for investments in Hong Kong 
over the longer term renansexceiicnt. 

Andwearenucwxwjedabomtheexpin- 

ol theBritish lease tst Hong Kong. Both the 
JapaneseandtheAustralianshav'ereceitiy 
expressed their confidence in thefuture cy 
investing heavily in Hong Kong property- 


Also, the Chinese haw now created their own 
infant stock exchange in Shanghai — just one of 
the more recent signs of their progression towards 
some erf the commercial ways of the western world. 

Hong Kong is already the gateway to what 
could bethelargest growth economy on earth. 

That's why investing in the Uhrdtar Hong Kbng 
Trust should mate sense not only for ticur but also 
for many years to come. 

No one knows Hong Kong 
better than Wardley 

More often than not the success of any 
managed investment depends on the d^ree of 
local expertise. And with ward ley. you could 
hardh- get more local than Hong Kong. Wardley 
Unit Trust Managersarea wholly owned subsidiary 
of Hong Kongfe largest financial institution — the 
Hongkong and Shanghai Ban king Corporation. 

We also have offices in Tokyo, Si ngapore and 

Melbourne. So we are superbly placed to 
understand and profit from market conditions in 
are) around Hong Kbng. 

R»f Maximum profit potential 
nuiitp that investmentnow 


Hong Kongstockmaiket has always been more 
volatie and less predictable than other markets* 
with dramatic swings both up and down. So you 
should consider this to be a more speculative 
investment than in. s^r, a managed International 
Fund. 

Remember, the priceofunitsand tbe income 
from them can go dmra as well as up. 

But if you do wish to mate an investment, tbe 
tinretonrafceiiisnow. 

Vbu even have a choice of bow to invest \bu 
can mate an immediate lumpsum investment of 
51000 or more: Or you may. if you prefer, invest 
through iheWanfley CapiatBiAMer savings 
scheme — from just 530 a month. Full details are 
available on request. Simply tick iheappropriale 
box on the application farm, 

Whatever investment route you choose to 
take, the time to act is NOW 


if anyone has the experience and expertise to 
makeyour momygrew. Itis Wardlqr. 

However, it should be born in mind that the 


Application for Investment 
in the Wardley 
Hons Kong Trust 


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Fljing the flags: Exchange Square, the home of the new Hong Kong Stock Exchange 


Fragrant 

Harbour 

fortunes 


HISTORY 


On January 26. 1 841 . a British 
naval landing party came 
ashore on a small rocky island 
at the mouth of China's Pearl 
River. They fired a salute and 
drank to the Queen's health. 
Thus began the colonial his- 
tory of Hong Kong (the name 
means Fragrant Harbour). 

The take-over of the island 
was not popular in Whitehall, 
but to the men on the spot it 
seemed the only option. 

The Chinese allowed the 
foreigners to set foot in only- 
one Chinese port — Canton — 
and then only for a few 
months in the year. They 
showed no desire for western 
goods - 

The westerners (mainly 
British) more than balanced 
the trade by smuggling in large 
quantities of opium with the 
connivance of corrupt officials 
in defiance of Chinese law. 

Protests were exchanged. 
Chests of opium were handed 
over and destroyed and this 
was followed by the arrival of 
British warships and troops. 

The new colony, with its 
British garrison, handful of 
officials and trading houses 
and several thousand local 
Chinese farmers and fisher- 
men. got off to a ragged start. 
Typhoons blew off every roof 
on the island in the early 
months, the new Chinese mar- 
ket was burned down twice, 
and there were appalling 
health problems. London 
would send no qualified of- 
ficials: they only wanted Hong 
Kong to be self-supporting as 
soon as possible. 

Gradually the colony made 
progress. By 1844 nearly 
190.000 tons of shipping were 
using the fine natural harbour 
separating the island from the 
China mainland Thousands 
of Chinese were flocking into 
Hong Kong to seek new lives. 
Continued on next page 



in. HongKaug^veiy successful^ Andthn 

oatlcK^isdi^indfylB3^xt 

Think of Hong Kong, and you must think of 
Hutchison. Our interests are broad and they touch 
every aspect of commerce and life. 

By all means think of Hutchison as a trading and 
retailing group — we're the largest in the territory'. 
But we are property too and currently investing 
HKS4 billion (US5513 million) in building more homes 
for the people of Hong Kong- 

We are also electricity, communications, whole- 
saling and distribution, manufacturing, quarrying, . 
concrete and asphalt. And we have a substantial 
share in the major English newspaper and one of 
the most successful hotels. The lifeblood of Hong 
Kong passes through our container terminal — the 


largest privately-owned one in the world. 

Our connections with China are excellent and 
we're developing selective opportunities in the vast 
potential offered by that market. 

So although our roots go hack over 100 years, 
it's the future where our focus is firmly fixed. Our 
base is Hong Kong. And we know Hong Kong better 
than anyone. 

For our Annual Report, which will give you 
a clear insight into our strengths, diversity and 
human resources, write to: The. Lord Derwent 
L.V.O-, Managing Director. Hutchison Whampoa 
(Europe) Ltd.. 9 Queen Street. London WIX 7PH, 
L'.K. Or to: A.C. van der Linden, 

Company Secretary. Hutchison Whampoa , 

Limited. 22nd Floor, Hutchison House, 

If) Harcourt Road. Hong Kong. You'll 
see why.. .Hutchison is Hong Kong. 



Hutchison "Wfe mean business in Hang Kang: 


- 1 




■VV 




.1 ..I 









34 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


HONG KONG/2 


{ FOCUS ) 


Export growth is still 
the key to prosperity 


ECONOMY 


Hong Kong's economic 
performance will be belter this 
>ear than had earlier been 
hoped. Real (inflation ad- 
justed) gross domestic product 
will probably rise by 5.6 per 
cent against *a growth rate of 
4.5 per cent indicated at the 
time of the budget in 
February. 

The growth will be export- 
led. as the domestic economy 
is looking somewhat sluggish, 
especially in terms or public- 
sector demand. There are. 
meanwhile, some doubts 
about whether the vigorous 
surge in exports expected this 
year can be maintained next 
year, and Hong Kong's terms 
of trade are also deteriorating 
somewhat. 

In his maiden speech on the 
economy on September 1 7 (he 
succeeded Sir John Bremridge 
as Financial Secretary earlier 
this year). Piers Jacobs 
painted a picture of a fairly 
buoyant Hong Kong, at least 
so far as the private sector of 
the economy is concerned. 

The revised gdp growth rate 
is not so impressive as that 
expected by Hong Kong's East 
Asian neighbours. South Ko- 
rea and Taiwan, but Mr 
Jacobs admitted that he might 
be erring on the side of 
caution. 

One encouraging factor, 
given the expectation of 
continuing recession in the US 
economy next year, is that the 
14 percent rise Iby value) in 
Hong Kong's domestic ex- 
ports during the second quar- 
ter of 1986 - giving a growth 
rate of 8 per cent ior the half 
year — was achieved despite a 
sharp slowdown in exports to 
the US. 


Exports to this. Hong 
Kong's largest export market, 
grew by only 5 percent in the 
second quarter — a rate which 
is now being forecast for the 
year as a whole, compared 
with a budget forecast of 10 
per cent. 

Fortunately, exports to 
West Germany rose 29 per 
cent in the first half of 1986 
and are now expected to rise 
by 32 per cent for the full year, 
against a budget forecast of 18 
per cent. 

The predicted rise of 
domestic exports to Britain is 
also considerably higher than 
in the budget — 12 per cent as 
against 5 per cent — while 


Inflation 
.is under 
control; 
jobless 
rate has 
stayed 
stable 


exports to Japan, which in- 
creased by 1 2 per cent in the 
first half, should at least meet 
their budget forecast rise of 16 
percent 

The government is attribut- 
ing much of this improvement 
to the shift in the trade- 
weighted exchange rate of the 
Hong Kong dollar, which is 
boosting export 

competitiveness. 

The 1>S dollar depreciated 
by 23 per cent against the 
Japanese yen in the first eight 
months of 1986 and 17 per 
cent against the Deutschmark. 
.At the same time, the trade- 
weighted exchange rate of the 
Hong Kong currency (which is 
linked to the US dollar at a 
rate of 7.8: 1 ) declined by 9 per 
cent 

This boosted export de- 



mand for Hong Kong goods in 
Europe although reflation of 
domestic demand by the West 
German government and. to 
some extent, by Britain, also 
helped. 

Hong Kong obviously 
gained nothing in the US 
market by a cheapening of 
exports. But given the protec- 
tionist outlook in the US and 
the tendency towards 
quantamc (rather than price) 
restrictions on imports, the 
exchange rate benefits in other 
markets are probably more 
valuable. 

Mr Jacobs noted that a new 
bilateral textile agreement be- 
tween Hong Kong and the US 
was signed in June covering 
the period 1986 to 1991. It 
provides little room for 
growth in quota limits and 
extends the range of fibres 
covered. 

In recent years. Hong Kong 
has looked to the United 
Suites to absorb 40 percent or 
more of its domestic exports, 
while West Germany and 
Britain have taken about 7 per 
cent each and Japan about 3 
per cent. 

China has accounted for 
about 12 per cent. However. 
■Hong Kong's domestic ex- 
ports to ibe hinterland fell by 9 
per cent in the first half of 
1986. reflecting Chinese mea- 
sures to dampen imports and 
foreign-exchange spending, al- 
though the decline for the year 
as a whole is now expected to 
be 4 per cent against the 7 per 
cent forecast in the budget. 

Hong Kong's re-exports are 
improving after a slow start 
this year and should continue 
strengthening as China steps 
up its export promotion 
efforts (using Hong Kong as 
the entrepot). 

With re-exports for the year 


expected to grow at 6 per cent 
(compared with a budget fore- 
cast of 4 per cent) and direct 
exports as a whole expected to 
grow by 1 5 per cent (against 7 
per cent earlier forecast), the 
outlook for total exports is a 
growth of 8 per cent instead of 
6 per cent. 

Retained imports of food- 
stuffs and consumer goods 
grew by 1 3 per cent and 10 per 
cent respectively in the first 
half of 1986. suggesting that 
private consumer demand is 
quite firm, something also 
indicated by overall consumer 
demand in Hong Kong. But 
retained imports of capital 
goods fell by 8 per cent in the 
same period. 

Mr Jacobs challenged the 
idea that this, coupled with the 
fact that investment in plant 
and machinery fell during 
I98S. is a cause for concern 
about Hong Kong's future or 
that it indicates a lack of 
investor confidence. 

He contrasted the “small”, 
though unquantified, decline 
in investment last year with a 
23 per cent rise in 1984. It 
looked good on a two-year 
view. 

He also drew comfort from 
the fact that imports of indus- 
trial machinery had risen in 
the first half of 1986. The fall 
was in imports of non-indus- 
trial machinery-. 

Despite the improvement in 
exports, a visible trade deficit 
of HKS390 million (about £35 
million) is forecast for 1986. 
compered with a trade surplus 
ofHK$2.5 billion in 1985. Mr 
Jacobs acknowledged a 
deterioration in Hong Kong's 
terms of trade, which, coupled 
with the growing threat to 
markets from protectionism, 
must be a matter for concern. 
And the improvement in the 



ECONOMIC INDICATORS On HKS bfflion) 

1985 1986 

(forecast) 


Fast workers: assembly line 


services balance (on invisible 
transactions) is not expected 
to be big enough to prevent a 
deterioration in the overall 
balance of payments in 1986 
(see table). 

Things look rather better on 
government revenue. The 
yield from profits tax this year 
will be higher than forecast so 
that, with government expen- 
diture running close to budget 
estimates, the government 
surplus in fiscal 1986-87 will 
be bigger than earlier thought 

The public sector will ac- 
count for 16.6 per cent of 







The most 



ions centre 


Despite its diminutive size, Hong Kong is 
one of the most sophisticated communications 
centres in the world with the highest density of 
telephones per capita in South East Asia. 

Keeping the people and businesses of 
Hong Kong in toudi with each other and the 
rest of the world takes some of the world’s 
most advanced communications systems 
Developed and built by the.Cable and Wireless 


Group they make Hong Kong the most reliable 
and cost-effective communications centre in 
Asia. 

This is why most of the major international 
corporations have already chosen Hong Kong 
as the hub of their private communications 
network within the Asia region. However large 
or small your requirements we provide ser- 
vices that will add value to your business 



The Coble & Wireless Group in Hong Kong, 
in touch with tomorrow. 

Cable & Wireless (HK) Ltd. • Hong Kong Telephone Company Ltd. 
Asadata Ltd. • Cable & Wireless Systems Ltd. • Communication Services Ltd. 
Integrated Business Systems Ltd. • Computasia Ltd. 


gjrls at a factory in Kowloon 
Hong Kong’s gdp in 19S6. 
abouttite same as last year. Its 
share of the construction sec- 
tor. where government in- 
fluence in the economy is 
greatest, will fall slightly from 
35 per cent to 32 per cent. 

Mr Jacobs noted that public 
sector spending on construc- 
tion would probably decline 
by 7 per cent in 1986 instead 
of growing by 3 per cent as 
suggested at the time of the 
budget. 

Private sector expenditure 
under this heading would 
probably increase by only 2 
per cent this year too. instead 
of the 6 per cent suggested in 
the budget. Mr Piers said. 

So. overall gross domestic 
capita] formation will rise by 
only 1 per cent instead of 
earlier forecast 3 per cent. 
Taking an overall increase of 6 
per cent in (he private sector 
in 1986. and unchanged public 
sector demand, the impetus 
for growth in the economy as a 
whole during the remainder of 
1986 will have to come from 
exports. 

Inflation, meanwhile, is 
under control. Against a bud- 
get forecast of a 5 per cent rise 
in consumer prices this year, 
the outcome is likely to be 
nearer 3.5 per cent (the con- 
sumer price index rose by 17 
per cent in the first seven 
months of the year). 

The unemployment rate has 
also remained stable at a low 
level. During the second quar- 
ter of 1986 it was 3 per cent. 
"This reflects effective full 
employment and can be ex- 
pected to continue.” Mr Ja- 
cobs said. 

Anthony Rowley 

Business Editor 
Far Eastern Economic Review 
Hong Kong 


Domestic exports 

129.9 

146.4 

Re-exports 

105-3 

114.9 

Total exports 

235.1 

261-4 

Imports 

232-6 

261.8 

Visible balance 

22i 

-0.4 

Services balance 

14.6 

153 

Overall balance 

17.1 

14.9 ■ 

Sana; Hong Kong Gownvnent 


Fragrant Harbour 




Continued from previous page 
safe from the banditry and 
unrest plaguing South China. 

A second Anglo-Chinese 
war broke out in 1 856 after the 
Chinese boarded an allegedly 
British ship during an opium 
search and ignored the terms 
of an earlier treaty. 

This led to strong anti- 
British feelings in Hong Kong, 
with posters openly calling for 
the death of all barbarians. 

An unsuccessful attempt 
was made to poison all west- 
ern families by dosing their 
bread with arsenic. However, 
under the Convention of Pe- 
king in i860, which followed 
the Chinese defeat, the territo- 
ry of Hong Kong' was in- 
creased by the addition of the 
Kowloon Peninsula — several 
square miles of mainland on 
the north side of the harbour. 

A much larger addition to 
Hong Kong came in !89S after 
China had been weakened still ' 
further by a disastrous war 
with Japan. Britain decided to 
take over a large area adjoin- 
ing Hong Kong's northern 
border, having particularly in 
mind the security of the 
harbour. By a convention 
signed in June 1898. the so- 
tailed New Territories — an 
area of 3S5 square miles 
including land north of Kow- 
loon and 235 islands — were 
leased for 99 years. 

As the 1 9th century drew to 
a close. Hong Kong was 
expanding vigorously as .a 
trading port and city with a 
quarter of a million people. Its 
colonial government was on 
the usual lines — a governor 
nominated by Whitehall and 
executive and legislative 
councils with government of- 
ficials in the majority. Hong 
Kong policy was laissez-faire. 
with money and goods flowing 
freely. ... 

The problem of too many 
people persisted. The collapse 
of the Manchu Dynasty in 
China and the setting-up of 
the Chinese Republic by Sun 
Yat-sen in 1912 brought years 
of unrest in China and thou- 
sands more refugees to Hong 
Kong. 

Anti- imperialist feelings 
ran high on the mainland, 
with Britain as the arch- 
villain: and in the mid-1920s 
boycotts and strikes spread to 
Hong Kong and threatened a 
shutdown of business. Sir 
Cecil CTemenii, Governor of 
Hong Kong from 1925 to 
1930. negotiated a settlement 
and succeeded in improving 
relations with Canton. 

Japanese penetration into 
China in the early 1930s 
brought more refugees. By the 
time the Second World War 


had spread to the Far East, 
Hong Kong’s population was 
up to 1 .600.000. 

The colony surrendered to 
the Japanese invaders on 
Christmas Day. 1941. British 
troops and local volunteers 
were ordered to lay down thet r 
arms. Business and trade died. 
Food supplies dwindled. 
Cannabalism was reported. 
Many died or moved to the 
mainland to survive. By war’s 
end the population was down 
to 600.000. 

After the war. when colonial 
administration was resumed, 
the British Government was t 
faced with continual demands 
from the Chinese Nationalist 
government for Hong Kong to 
be returned to China: and in 
1948 the British consulate in 
Canton was burnt down in 
violent anti-British riots: 

The defeated Nationalists 
retreated to Taiwan in 1948 
and now fear arose that the 
Communist People's Libera- 
tion Army might move over 
the border into Hong Kong. 
British Army reinforcements 
were sent. 

Rioting broke out in the 
colony in October. 1956 be- 
tween Communist and Na- 
tionalist supporters and 51 
people were ki lied .Serious dis- 
order threatened when 
China's Cultural Revolution 
spilled, over into Hong Kong 
in 1966. and the British Em- 
bassy in Peking was burned 
down by mobs. ■ 

However, the Hong Kong 
authorities weathered tire 
storm, and a great change for 
the better was enjoyed in the 
colony when China adopted 
an' open-door “smiling 
diplomacy” attitude to the 
Outside wortd in 1 972. 

Following the visit of Presi- 
dent Nixon in that year. Sir- 
Alec Douglas-Home, then 
Foreign Secretary, went to 
Peking and Sino-British rela- 
tions were normalized. 

By the early 1980s questions 
were being asked about Hong , 
Kong's future. What about the c 
lease, due to expire on June 
30. l 986- of the New Territo- 
ries. without which Hong 
Kong was no longer a viable 
entity? . ;; 

Mrs Thatcher flew to Peking 
in September 1982 to opert 
negotiations, and two years 
later the Sino-British joint 
declaration on the colony's 
future was published. 

As in the past. Hong Kong's 
course was to be influenced by 
outside forces. For the Hong 
Kong man in the street, a new 
era of hopes and fears had 
begun. 


Anthony Lawrence 


The problem banks 




Two events which occurred 
w ithin a few days of each other 
recently highlight the curi- 
ously mixed complexion of 
tire Hong Kong financial 
scene. 

On September 8 the Hong 
Kong government took over 
(he management of yet an- 
other troubled local bank, the 
seventh needing official rescue 
since 1983. Yet a few days 
later the Hang Seng index, 
which measures activity on 
ihc local stock exchange, 
surged above 2.000 for the 
first lime. 

True, the latest banking 
casually, the Hong Nin Bank, 
owned by local Chinese in- 
terests. is one of the territory's 
smallest and is not listed on 
the Slock Exchange of Hong 
Kong. 

.And the debt-plagued busi- 
ness interests of Sir Kenneth 
Fung Ping- fan. to which Hong 
Nin was heavily exposed, are 
also in the private domain. 
But corporate problems arc 
not limited to these two. 

in mid-September the local 
crime squad raided the 
premises of the Wing On 
group, which is controlled by 
the Kwok family and linked to 
the troubled Wing On Bank. 

Yet again, as the new amal- 
gamated slock exchange pre- 
pared lor its formal opening 
on October 6. Hong Kong was 
alive with rumours of a scan- 
dal involving the bribing of 
fund managers by certain local 
stockbrokers. 

And all the while the debt- 
plagued local shipping groups. 
TungCirnupand Wah Kwong. 
struggled to reach agreement 
with their creditors and stay 
afloat. 

All this means that despite 
the latest bout of bullishness 
in the stock market and the 
surge in Hong Kong exports 
during |4Xti. the corporate 
sector. is not as a whole in good 
shape. 

The blue chips are. admit- 
tedly. looking good. Hong- 
kong Land'sivcoven front the 
property slump in 198.2-8+ 
continues steadily., Jardihc 
Matheson has cleared the 
decks of us shipping albatross, 
the Hone Kong and Shanghai 


FINANCE 


Banking Corporation has pro- 
visioned for recession-in- 
duced bad debts, and the likes 
of Hutchison Whampoa and 
Swire Pacific- are looking 
healths enough. 

But beneath the level of the 
biggest expatriate-controlled 
business houses (or “hongs”) 
lies a layer of local business 
which is in a rather shakier 
state. All seven of the banks 
which the government has had 
to rescue since, the collapse of 
the Hang Lung Bank in Octo- 
ber 1983 have been local 
Chinesc-ouned institutions. 

In several instances tad 
tanking was allied with plain 
fraud. The shipping groups are 
victims of a worldwide slump 
hut in cases such as Wing On 
Bank, fraud is again suspected 
and the Fung Pin Fan group 

Bine 
chips 
look 

good and 
recovery 
& steady 

appears to 'have made some 
imprudent investments. 

.The surfacing, of all these 
problems in the. tanking and 
business sector could be put- 
down to some extent - to more 
efficient policing. 

The Banking Commission 
has been looking more closely 
at tanks' books in the last 
couple of years and this 
stricter supervision cul- 
minated in a new Banking 
Ordinance which took effect 
on September 1 . The commer- 
cial crime division of- the 
police has -also been stepping 
up its activities. 

More thorough official 
examination of tanks' books 
and more conscientious audit- 
ing of company . books in 
general is beginning to reveal a 
lot of problems. Oftcc these 
become known, or whispered 
about, confidence" 'in some 
particular company.. or- other ' 
rapidly erodes, . ‘ . ; 

Banking lines’ quickly fol- 
low suit. At that point other 
tanks which rndy-fif heavih 



exposed to the particular corif- 
pany can easily ' be pulled 
down too. • 

: " The government's attitude 
toward tanks' in difficulties 
seems to be evolving from orrc 
.of outright takeover (as in the 
case of Hang Lung or Over- 
sea sTrusi Bank) to temporary 
support The idea, as in the 
‘case of Union Bank or Hong 
Nin. is to provide credit lines 
from the official Exchange 
Fund while a commercial 
partner is found to take over 
the troubled bank. 

■At that point the govern- 
ment withdraws. Otherwise? 
the liquidation option, might 
be tried, with asset realiza- 
tions used to compensate first 
depositors, then other cred- 
itors and. fihallv. if ihc'rc 
anything left over: 
shareholders. 

•As for the new stock ex- 
change. formed out of the four 
old exchanges which Hong 
Kong used to boast, it is ^ 
model of technical efficicncv 
and up-to-date trading meth- 
ods: But it too laces some 
problems. 

There arc still 630 brokers 
.occupying seats on the cxr 
change — far too many for the 
volume of business available/ 

especially as brig- institutional 
business finds its wav incicais-' 
ingly into the hands of the 
bigger, tank-linked brokers.-^ 
The exchange is hoping t<y 
get official approval - for a*‘ 
London-stylc Unlisted Securi^ j 
lies Market, which would heltf I 
the underemployed brokers as- ( 
well as providing a riev5“i 
financing source .for smaller-' 
companies. 

Many stockbrokers hav cap^-l 
plied to join -the revamped-:/ 
Hong. .Kong. Futures . :Ex- ! 
change, which is trading stocITj 
index futures and hopes to 1 
begin trading currcncv and i 
interest rate futures later this r 
year. -■ • • g 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


35 


f FOCUS D 


HONG KONG/3 


The word is out: drop English 


EDUCATION 


Language is ihe main bone ol 
-contention in education in 
Hong hong toda\. A recent 
directive by the Education 
Department. advising schools 
3 £l yvols *° conduct classes 
m C hinese instead of English, 
has caused concern in manv 
areas. 7 

Observers take the view that 
Hong Kong’s success as an 
international commercial 
cwure depends largely on the 
ahiiitN ol its people to commu- 
nicate in English. 

As the Chinese takeover in 
I W7 approaches, there is also 
the underlying fear that Hone 
Kong will lose its identity and 
be in greater danger of being 
-swallowed up by China it 
Chinese becomes the official 
language. 

But there is also the recog- 
nition that fluency in Chinese, 
'-particularly Mandarin, will be 
^necessary to facilitate commu- 
nication with the mainland 
and Us leaders in the vears 
beyond 1997. 

Businessmen, bankers, 
•industrialists and government 
■personnel officers have all said 
■they would continue to dc- 
'mand proficiency in English 
-as a condition of cmploxment. 
On the other hand.’, some 
heads of educational institu- 
tions aigue that their pupils 
will leam more efficiently in 
■Chinese, their mother tongue. 


. It could be said that educa- 
tion cannot be of much benefit 
»f it does not include teaching 
proficiency' in English because 
whole professions, such as 
medicine and the law. prohibit 
students from practising until ‘ 
thev can pass the relevant 
British examinations of their 
professional body — in En- 
glish. 

. A spokesman for the Educa- 
tion Department said its 
directive did not seek to ban 
the teaching of English in 
schools — it will still be 
considered a vital part of any 
school’s curriculum — merely 
that the classes should be 
conducted in Chinese instead 
of English. 

Despite many years of Brit- 
ish rule during which the 
official language has been 
English, most Hong Kong 
Chinese speak English badly 
or not at alLOne of the 


predicaments in which Hong 
Kong-born Chinese find 


themselves is that most of 
them speak only Cantonese, a 
dialect understood in only a 
small area of China. 

Some observers believe that 
after the Chinese takeover. 
Mandarin will become the 
official language of Hong 
Kong. Otherwise, they say, the 
localization of the govern- 
ment in the territory and the 
promotion to power of Hong 
Kong Chinese will be handi- 
capped by their lack of pro- 
ficiency in English. 


A property 
bonanza after 
the jitters 


PROPERTY 


The property market In Hong 
Kong is booming, with the 
Hang Seng stock exchange 
Index at an all- time high, and 
property men see no cause for 
pessimism about the future. 

; A serious crisis in 1985, 
when confidence in the future 
was low, was resolved with the 
signing of the Sino-British 
Joint Declaration in 1984. 
Since then prices have soared. 

"International business men 
see Hong Kong as one of the 
most attractive prospects for 
investment in the world today, 
with rents and properly prices, 
as well as labour, lower than 
Tokyo, while the Hong Kong 
economy shows an upturn 
similar to that of Japan." said 
Alan Hill, a property consul- 
tant and partner m one of the 
territory's main property 
valuers- 

. Mr Hill pointed to the 
investment by China in a 
750.000 sq ft site in the centre 
of the city for a new Bank of 
China building as evidence of 



There is ’ 
likely to 
be a glut 
in the 
building 
of luxury 
blocks 


its good intentions-. The Chi- 
nese government paid HKSl 
billion (about £89 million) for 
the site and is putting up a 
building designed by the Chi- 
nese- American architect t M 
Pei, at a cost of HKSI.25 
billion. 


A series of new projects is 
turning Hong Kong into a 
giant construction she. They 
include a second cross-har- 
bour tunnel at a cost of 
HKS2.7 billion, several 50- 
siorey office buildings, a new 
exhibition centre and five new 
hotels. 

Land prices have rocketed 
again after the slump of 1983, 
w hen the future of Hong Kong 
seemed uncertain. A property 
development site near the 
centre of the city sold for 
HRS2 billion last year and a 
commercial building develop- 
ment site which sold for a 
record HKS&45 million last 
year was resold at a HKS75 
million profit less than one 
year later. 

There is now a shortage of 
office spare in the main 
commercial areas. Hong Kong 
Central district, Tsimshatshni 
and Causeway Bay. This is 
because the effects are being 
felt of the depressed market in 
1983 when no new construc- 
tion wit* started. 


However, they are still half 
the price of those in Tokyo. 
Office space In prime areas of 
Tokyo now goes for HKS50 
per sq ft, whereas the going 
rate in Hong Kong for the best 
accommodation is around 
HKS25 per sq ft- 

Mr Hill expects there may 
be a slight fall in office rents as 
the many new office buildings 
come onto the market within 
the next two years. 

In the residential sector, 
rents for top luxury accom- 
modation have doubled within 
the last two years. Other types 
of accommodation have shown 
a steady increase In rents of 1 1 
to 12 per cent annually. The 
market is dominated by for- 
eign companies. 

There has not been a similar 
upturn in residential property 
prices because few companies 
coming to Hong Kong bother 
to buy accommodation for 
their stalk but the increase in 
rents has made residential 
accommodation an attractive 
investment for the builder. 

So many local and inter- 
national entrepreneurs are 
building blocks of luxury flats 
that there is likely to be a glut. 
Mr Hill predicts that rents 
wifi come down within the next 
two years. 

During 1986. 1.835 new- 
luxury fiats with areas of over 
2.000 sq ft will come on to the 
market, while the figure is 
expected to be 1.081 in 1987 
and 1.100 in 1988. These will 
be as the result of develop- 
ments already near the 
completion stage and .are 
significantly higher than any 
increases that have occurred in 
the recent past 


, An office building in Hong 
Knag takes three to four years 
from site acquisition to 
occupation and the many new 
buildings now going up were 
not started until 1984. when 
tbe Joint Declaration put an 
end to the jitters. This has put 
pressure on rents in the popu- 
lar commercial centre* and 
they have doubled within the 
past (wo years. 


But Mr Hill believes de- 
mand will equal or even exceed 
supply with the next few years, 
ghen the general health of the 
economy. “There are also 
fairly dear trends emerging 
for increased owner-occupa- 
tion in this sector of the 
market", be added. 

Hong Kong is still compet- 
itive in the world as for as 
property- prices and rents are 
concerned. The property mar- 
ket is a direct by-product of 
the economy and the economy 
is booming. "There is a signifi- 
cant amount of Chinese invest- 
ment here and as long as Hong 
Kong continues to act as 
entrepreneur for China the 

future looks bright", said Mr 
HilL 

An underlying degree of 
concern among the local 
population is uot reflected in 
the attitude or international 
businessmen. Despite a ten- 
dency to think of high and 
quick profits. & significant 

amount of international invest- 
ment in property is still taking 
place. 

There is a constant rare 
between supply and demand, 
in which building sometimes 
oversteps the demand, with a 
resultant retraction, only to be 
followed by a shortage of office 
and bousing space, and a soar 
m rente, which in turn stimu- 
lates more building. 


WL 


Your top buiinov connection with Hong Kong and China 
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The Chinese residents of 
Hong Kong arc in a peculiar 
position, which is reflected by 
the dilemma of' the educa- 
tional system. If they do not 
leant English, the present 
official language, they may be 
isolated from the outside 
world, and if they do not leant 
Mandarin, they wilt be cut oft 
from effective communica- 
tion with most Of China. 

Those who speak only 
Cantonese arc going to be 
severely handicapped. The an- 



Stndents 

are in the 
unusual 
position of 
having to 
know three 


swer would seem to be the 
inclusion of both Mandarin 
and English in the curriculum 
of all schools. So far most of 
them are not taking, this 
course. 

After 1997 the status of the 
two languages will be parallel, 
but English is also important 
to the Chinese in the move 
towards modemizatk>n.Hong 
Kong students are thus in the 
unusual position of having to 
know three languages to 
survive. 

Dr Li Haiji, chief of Policy 
and Planning in Education in 
China, has said that the 
People’s Republic is conduct- 


ing research to establish an 
educational policy for Hong 
Kong. This seems to put an 
end to hopes that Hong 
Kong's educational system 
will be allowed to function 
independently after 1997. 

Many observers arc worried 
that the territory is still mak- 
ing plans for education which 
will extend beyond 1997 while 
China may be planning exten- 
sive reform. Educational lead- 
ers in Hong Kong are 
advocating more co-ordina- 
tion between the territory and 
the mainland, but the govern- 
ment Education Department 
docs not appear to be acting 
on this advice. 

The colony has two univer- 
sities. the Hong Kong Univer- 
sity in the city, where tuition is 
in English, and the Chinese 
University hi the New Terri- 
tories. where it is mainly in 
Chinese. A third university is 
at the planning stage and w fll 
make a preliminary sub- 
mission in 1988 on its degree 
course. 

There is argument about 
whether it should last three or 
four years. The new institu- 
tion will be a grouping of 
professional schools 
emphasizing science, technol- 
ogy. management and busi- 
ness studies. 

Suggestions for a name for 
the new university are to be 
invited from the public. 
Instruction will be in both 
Chinese and English. The 



Workers and players: 
Intent eyes check a cir- 
cuit board, and the boat 
children having fun on 
the river 


university will have places for 
10.000 students and is ex- 
pected to admit its first batch 
during 1994-97. 

These plans were recently 
announced by the committee. 
Should they have added: 
"Deng willing"? 


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LONDON 



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HONG KONG 


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36 - 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


HONG KONG/4 


IMMIGRANTS 


There arc 8_S00 Vietnamese 
refugees in Hong Kong, a 
quarter of the total in South- 
East Asia. In 1986. refugee 
arrivals in the region as a 
whole have gone down by IS 
per cent compared with the 
same period last year. But the 
number arriving in Hong 
Kong has risen by 97 per cent. 

This is in spite of the closed 
centre policy introduced in 
July 1982 to deter arrivals. All 
refugees who arrived after that 
date were locked up in prison- 
tike camps. 

Despite the high percentage 
of the refugees in Hong Kong, 
the resettlement rate is much 
lower than that of other 
countries such as Indonesia. 
Malaysia and the Philippines, 
mainly because the colony 
docs not have the political 
clout to demand more resettle- 
ment places. 

The refugees do not arouse 
much sympathy among the 
local population, many of 
whom live in cramped and 
squalid conditions and have 
relatives waiting in China to 
come and join them. The 
government intercepts about 
40 illegal immigrants from 
China cadi day and all are 
returned immediately. 

On top of that. 75 legal 
immigrants arrive from China 
daily for family reunions. 

Some Hong Kong people 
sec the humanitarian policy of 
not turning away refugees as 
something imposed on Hong 
Kong by Britain and they fed 
particularly- resentful when 
Britain dote not help the 
territory to rid itself of the 
refugee burden. 

On a visit to Hong Kong last 
month David Waddington. . 
British Minister of State at the 
Home Office, raised the spec- 
tre of repatriation as a long* 
term solution to the problem 
of the 8.500 Vietnamese refu- 
gees in Hong Kong. 


\ 

i 


r 

i 


t. 


fportisi 


Keith Sn*fl» 


Refugees: the 
boats that 
won’t go away 



Mr Waddington said the 
lime had come for countries 
concerned to examine with 
the Vietnamese government 
on whether repatriation was a 
possibility. However, he 
stressed such a policy could 
not be pursued without the 
British Government being sat- 
isfied that the repatriated 
refugees “would not be treated 
abominably/* 

He said the British Govern- 
ment was looking into the 

Vietnam 
was not 
prepared 
to take 
refugees 
back 
en masse 

pattern of refugee arrivals in 
Hong Kong to see whether 
they could be described as 
“economic migrants rather 
than refugees in ihe true 
sense." and whether Britain 
should pursue a policy which 
might lead to more and more 
people leaving Vietnam. He 
said the governments taking 
in refugees should be consid- 
ering making a joint approach 
to V ietnam about 
repatriation. 

The minister said public 
opinion iq Britain would not 
countenance repatriation un- 
less some “independent 
organization of real prestige** 
like the United Nations High 
Commissioner for Refugees 
(UNHCR) was prepared to 
say conditions had changed in 


Vietnam and the time had 
arrived for repatriation. 

Hong Kong government fig- 
ures show that nearly all 
refugees who have arrived 
since 1980 have been ethnic 
Vietnamese. Of the 1.112 
refugees who came last year. 
30 per cent were from the 
north and 70 percent from the 
south. 

So far this year, up to the 
end of August, there were 
1.805 arrivals, of whom half 
were from the north. The 
United Nations* definition of 
refugee is someone who has 
left his country because of 
welt-founded fear of persecu- 
tion due to racial, ethnic, 
religious or political 
convictions. 

In 1981 the United Stales 
Congress passed a refugee act 
sticking strictly to the UN 
definition, excluding those to 
whom Mr Waddington re- 
ferred as “economic 
migrants**. Australia also fol- 
lowed suit The US is taking 
about 1.000 refugees a year 
and Australia 600. 

Two years ago. the Security 
Branch of the Hong Kong 
government suggested divid- 
ing the Vietnamese refugees 
into economic and political 
refugees, with the former be- 
ing regarded as non-genuine 
refugees. 

It was accepted that the 
policy of categorizing refugees 
would be adopted only if non- 
genuine ones could be sent 
back to Vietnam. The sugges- 
tion was not taken up because 


Vietnam refused to lake them 

back. 

Peter Meijcr. UNHCR dep- 
uty charge dc mission, said 
repatriation had always been 
an option. The UNHCR has 
spoken to Vietnam and was 
told that repatriation was 
possible but had to be done 
on a caso-by-casc basis. 

So far. 14 refugees have 
been repatriated and they were 
children or people who had 
arrived against their will. As 
things stand. Vietnam was not 
prepared to take the refugees 
back en masse, nor would the 
refugees want to return. 

Both the Hong Kong gov- 
ernment and the UNHCR 
would like to see Britain 
taking a lead in accepting 
more refugees. In November 
last year Britain offered to 
take 500 in 12 months. Mr 
Mcijer said other countries 
regard Hong Kong as a British 
obligation and would help out 
only if Britain is prepared to 
accept its share of refugees. Mr 
Waddington insisted that Brit- 
ain bad not shirked its 
responsibility. 

Since 1975. Hong Kong has 
accepted for permanent settle- 
ment 14300 refugees and 
displaced persons from Indo- 
china. A further 550 Viet- 
namese refugees were reunited 
with their relatives in Hong 
Kong. 

Of the 8.500 refugees in 
Hong Kong. 3.600 are in open 
centres, where they can take 
up employment and 4.300 
live in indefinite confinement 
awaiting resettlement. Sixty- 
four per cent of the refugees 
have been here more than 
three years and 1 1 per cent 
more than seven years. 

Since 1979. the government 
and voluntary agencies have 
spent more than HKS610 
million (about £54 million) on 
caring for the refugees. 

Emily Lao 

Far Eastern Economic Review 


£**.■ " v ,v" 


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. v . ■ ‘ Jg. ' ■■ -yfe -' V 

■ ■■ V * 3 . 48 



Cheung Chau Island, shaped like a rice bowl with the sea walls ring across it like chopsticks 

Noodles, iced beer and a haven for weekend sailors 

Over the hills to Charley’s 


ISLANDS 


As our right wing dipped so 
low I thought h would scrape 
the lady eating noodles out of 
the top flat beneath us, an 
American voice behind me 
said: “Goddamil. ail those 
empty islands behind us and 
here they're living in 
hencoops.'* 

The speaker was almost 
right. Hong Kong’s 235 is- 
lands are mostly empty be- 



U A warm welcome to Her Majesty the Queen 
on Her visit to Hoag Kong.” 

This is how more than five million people will 
greet Her Majesty in Hong Kong today. 

The Queen has graciously consented to lay 
the foundation stone for the TDC’s Hong Kong 
Convention and Exhibition Centre. This centre, 
when completed in 1988, will be one of the largest 
and most advanced of its kind in Asia. 

Her Majesty will also open the Showcase 
Hong Kong Product Exhibition which will feature 
some of the finest products made in Hong Kong. 

As part of the Hong Kong community, 
we extend to Her Majesty our warmest welcome. 



Kohl 

int Council 

Promoting Hong Kong trade worldwide 



cause they have no water. The 
territory imports millions of 
gallons a day from mainland 
China, for example, and, by 
one of foe vagaries of tire 
system, I who live on Lantau 
island drink and wash in water 
that comes by barge from 
Hong Kong, where most of foe 
water from Lantau catchment 
areas goes anyway. 

The other reason why the 
islands are empty is because 
most Hong Kong residents are 
just too lazy to live there even 
when there is water on them. 

Commuters reckon that foe 
45-minute safari on a bad day 
across Hong Koug Island from 
Tai Tam to Central is foe 
worst they can contemplate. 

Most of them, taking advan- 
tage of foe superb Mass Tran- 
sit Railway, multiple bus 
services and ever increasing 
taxi fleets, reckon they are in 
foe sticks if they cannot reach 
their offices in 30 minutes. 

Travelling to the islands is 
really only popular on sum- 
mo- weekends: “Don’t go on 
weekends,” warns the All Asia 
Guide quite rightly. 

Hong Kongers are not 
adventurous and the attitude 
is infectious: junk parties sail 
out to bays almost within 

hailing distance of foe main 

island and there, packed in 
rows like sardines, get wet and 
squiffy together. 

1 am pretty peripatetic but 1 
don't believe I have set foot in 
Kowloon more than twice in' 
two years. Kowloon is foe 
other end of the 10-minute 
Star Feny run from Central to 
foe Nathan Road shopping 
area. 

Chinese like living in large 
clusters and if you go into a 
travel agent to find some- 
where to get away from it all 
yon will be looked at in 
astonishment. 

The gweilos (foreign devils) 
have picked up the habit from 
them so foal they live only on 
four islands to the west of 
Hong Kong's Victoria Island: 
Lantau, which is double the 
size of Hong Kong; Lamma, 
which is opposite foe teeming 


harbour and smoking power 
station of Aberdeen; Cheung 
Chau, which sits opposite 
Lantau’s Chfrnawan Penin- 
sula; and Peng Chau, a. small 
blob between Cheung Chau 
and eastern Lantau. 

There are about 250-300 
expatriates living da Cheung 
Chau, about 40-50 on Lamma, 
probably none on Peng Chau 
and an estimated 2,000-3,000 
on Lantau. This largest con- 
gregation is made up mostly of 
foe people living in foe re- 
built 


of these employed a substan- ' 
rial number of people until 


recently. 
In foe 


cently built Discovery 
complex, which has shops and 
buses. 

Getting away from it all it is 
noL It is like foe mkMevels of 
foe Peak on Hong Kong Island 
hauled out 30 minutes away 
into foe South China Sea. 

I live in a resort of about 
200 flats called Sea Ranch, 
opposite Cheung Chau (winch 
is shaped like a rice bowl with 
the sea walls slung across it 
like chopsticks). It takes me 50 
minutes to get to Central by 
private launch, 80 minutes ifl 
go over to catch foe big ferry 
from Cherny* Chau and only 
eight and a half minutes by 
helicopter. 

The best trip is by the 
ferry (carrying about L.1I 
people), which has excellent 
noodles and icy beer aboanL 

Archaeological -discoveries 
n)«b on I Jirtaii and lamma ' 

islands show that foe islands 
have had . settlements since 
Neolithic times. Lantau’s 
unique position at foe mouth 
of the huge Pearl River system 
in South China offered excep- 
tionally favourable conditions 
for eariyman to settle, says foe 
government pamphlet. 

I might add that it also 
offers today's man - an 
enchanting, smog-free .hide- 
away from -Central and rare 
breathes cool sweet fresh, air, 
unlike foe other rubbish per-, 
haps a dozen people have 
already breathed .before you 
have your chance at it 

Fishing, salt making and 
time bu rning were the primary 
industries of the island for 
many centuries. The first two 


In foe early 18th century 
-Lantau was constantly in- 
fested with pirates and opium 
smugglers and, to control 
them, the governor of 
Guangdong 'province ordered 
foe establishment of a series of 
forts on Lamatfc the first at 
Fan Lau on tire southwest tip 
of the islan d and known 
locally as Kai.-Ytk Kok 
(Chicken Wing Comer) 
Battery. 

The first three oftbe islands 
listed above are very popular 
with the. people who want to 
walk, camp, sightsee, swim or . 
fish — or get away from it alL 

On Lantau it takes my wife 
and me about two-ondVhalf 
hours to walk over the hflls to 
Charley's restaurant on the 
mam east-west road running 
front Silvennine Bay to foe 
battery and most of foe stone 
paths laid by villagers hun- 
dreds of years ago still criss- 
cross the trills today and. 
mo vide splendid walks.; -. 

Lantau Peak (at 3,067 ft the ., 
highest) and Sunset Peak are'? 
centred to look down on 
attractive coastal and wood- 
land views. Cheung Sha , 
-* v •« T — 


Fuk Vflte^Smre, is two miles 
long and many of foei hig,.- 
“hongs” and banks .have - 
weekend staff cottages there. 

Lamma is Mecca for boot' 
people too lazy to bring their 
own food out with them otf 
weekends and houses a score 
of excellent - Chinese 
restaurants. 

The local shopsand super- 
markets stock anything you 
are likefyto want but if you are 
choosy about wines and oof- 
fee, bring it in from Central 
The art of living among very 
friendly Chinese is to know 
your feny time-tables arid get' 
home at night. _ . 

But even if yon have to pay 
jolting prices for a hotel room, 
the cheap rents leave you 
money lo spare. V 

Donald Wise . 




n 


i£. 


'C / 


t ^ p £ 

vim, 



Isn't it time \ou discovered 

THE MOST EXCmNG GITY ON EARTH? 


I 

I 

I 

I 


Hong Kong is a city of financial power, physical 
beauty and a fascinating blend of cultures. It’s a place 
that has made history and stDl makes news. In all the 
world, it's the one city you must see. Isn’t it time you 
discovered it for yourself? Mail the coupon for more 
information and a free brochure. 

Please send me more information on Hong Kong. . 

To: Hong Kong Tourist Association, 125 Pall Mall, 4th Floor 
London, SW1Y5EA 


Name: 


Address: 


Tet 


I 





ilfitfvl iff 



THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


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to other airlines. 


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When British Caledonian say 
we take you to Hong Kong, we mean 

Hong Kong. 

Not Hong Kong airport. 

Were the only airline providing a 
full door to door service for First and 
Super Executive Class passengers. 


Hong Kong, according 
to British Caledonian. 


With chauffeur driven limousines 
before and after your flight. 

Instead of leaving you in the 
arrivals hall with a smile and a wave 
goodbye, we’ll be waiting with a plush 
Mercedes to take you anywhere in Hong 
Kong and the New Territories. 


If you’re going to Hong Kong, ring 
Brochureline on 0303 79977 or see your 
travel agent and find out more about 
the airline that really goes to town. 

WithBritishCaledonianyoubook 
a journey not a flight. 

British P Caledonian 

, We never forget you have a choice. 














7 

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38 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


HONG KONG/5 


((FOCUS)) 


A lofty view 
for a royal 
day out 
at the races 


Homer Sykes 


Garnett 


>• .'X-:; 


SPORT 


The pomp and ceremony, not 
to mention rigours, of her visit 

■ to China over, the Queen will 
' be treated to a day at the races 

in Hong Kong before retum- 
' ing home. 

She would be the last to 
admit it. at least publicly, but 

■ the highlight of the royal visit 
to the colony will be the 
afternoon at the track on 
October 22 and the Queen is 
in for a pleasant surprise. 

While the racecourse in 
Hong Kong may not offer the 
illustrious history of Ascot 

■ the Queen is guaranteed to be 
' suitably impressed by the 

sport of kings, local style. The 
. people of the colony enjoy 
horse racing as much as she 
does. 

Since her last trip to the 
colony more than a decade 
ago. one of the world's finest 
racecourses has sprouted from 
250 acres of reclaimed land in 
the Shatin district of the New 
Territories — located amid 
scenic seaside hills and sky- 
scraper housing blocks barely 


a furlong from tbe border with 
China. 

The Shatin Lrack. completed 
in 1978 at a cost of more than 
£670.000. is the centrepiece of 
a new town of the same name 
<pop. 500.000). Its capacity — 
and a full house is guaranteed 
for the visit of the Queen and 
Prince Philip — is more than 
50.000. 

Although the current season 
began under the cloud of a 
race-fixing scandal which 
erupted in banner headlines 
near the end of the previous 
season, all that will be forgot- 
ten. at least for the day when 
the royal party will be at the 
irack. 

The Queen and Prince 
Philip will be accompanied by 
the governor. Sir Edward 
Youdc. Lady Youde. and Sir 
Michael Sandberg, chairman 
of the Royal Hong Kong 
Jockey Gub and retiring 
chairman of the Hong Kong 
and Shanghai Banking 
Corporation, and other local 
dignitaries. 

After lunch they will view 
the proceedings, high above 
the maddening crowds, from a 



They're of!! Anxious moments for the punters at Shatin racecourse in Hong Kong where the Queen ami Prince Philip will watch the fittingly called Buckingham Palace Handicap 


seventh-floor royal box. The 
first race on the card, fittingly, 
will be the Buckingham Palace 
Handicap. 

The jockey club, with more 
than 13.000 staff, is the largest 
employer in the territory out- 
side the government. It was 
created (circa 1 846) by a group 
of presumably bored British 
Army officers and other 
socialites of that halcyon era. 

They held a couple of race 
meetings annually at a track in 
the Happy Valley district of 
Hong Kong Island, which 
flourishes to this day. 

Hong Kong's two race- 
courses, in only 65 meetings, 
had a world-record annual 
belting turnover in the 1985- 


86 season of £1.8 1 billion, or 
nearly £268 for every man, 
woman and child in a colony 
of 5.5 million. 

The jockey club's hierarchy 
reads like a who's who among 
the territory's taipans, consist- 
ing of property, textile, bank- 
ing and shipping tycoons — 
some the very people who 
rebuilt Hong Kong after the 
Second World War. 

The general manager is 
Major-General Guy Watkins, 
a one-time amateur jockey 
who formerly commanded the 
4th Regiment. Royal Artillery, 
in Hong Kong 

With a membership of 
about 30.000, the jockey club 
contributes vast amounts of 


the profits it realizes from 
thoroughbred raring to vari- 
ous local charities. 

Its overflowing coffers (after 
taxes) provided the funding 
for such projects as a multi- 



Vast 
amounts 
of profits 
to 


various 

local 

charities 


million-sterling Academy for 
the Performing Arts, on the 
banks of Victoria Harbour 
and just a brief stroll from 
HMS Tamar, the military 
facility where HMS Britannia 


will be docked during the 
royal visit. 

An even more elaborate 
science museum is being built 
on the opposite side of the 
harbour, ruining the water- 
front view of luxury hotels 
such as the grand old 
Peninsula. 

The jockey dub also funded 
acres of land beside the Shatin 
racecourse. It also makes 
liberal donations to myriad 
local charities, from medical 
centres to community ser- 
vices. such as public swim- 
ming-pools. 

Racing of course, attracts 
avarice and, at times, its near 
relative; foul play. In gam- 
bling-mad Hong Kong the 


jockey club is no exception. 

The club was tinged with 
scandal when one of its wo ting 
members (there are only 200k 
Y L Yang a millionaire textile 
tycoon and OBE bolder, 
admitted to arranging the 
fixing of at least six races last 
season. He also confessed to 
controlling a score ofhorses he 
did not own. 


A number of jockeys, a 
trainer and other horsemen 
were implicated, in the affair, 
tbe worst such scandal in the 
colony's history. 

Mr Yang 63, is a man 
known to have routinely 
placed £13,000 bets on a single 
race. But once in the dock, he 


pleaded for leniency on 
grounds he was suffering from 
cancer. He received a two-year 
suspended sentence, was fined 
£268,000 and was expelled 
from membership of the 
jockey dub. He departed post- 
haste for America. 

But what of racing after 
1997, when Britain returns 
Hong Kong to China? Senior 
Chinese officials have given 
the public assurances that 
there will be no interference. 
And why not? They probably 
are nibbing their hands in 
anticipation of the huge sums 
that will flow into Peking's till 
(flank. 


from its southernmost 


Burt Okuley 


Curtain goes up on a new stage drama 


THEATRE 


In recent years theatre has 
become one of the most vital 
forms of artistic expression for 
the young generation of Hong 
Kong 

Completely ignored by the 
community 15 years ago. and 
su'd at the periphery of cul- 
tural life. Chinese theatre now 
claims two full-time pro- 
fessional companies and more 
than 30 active non-pro- 
fessional groups out of 300 
registered with the 
government. 

To be fair, the surge of 
activity in stage drama is no 
more than a promising start. 
Standards are generally 


amateurish, but for a city with 
little tradition for this art the 
current state of affairs is 
heartening 

The crowning monument to 
the growing status of drama 
and other performing arts is 
the new HKS300 million 
(£26.8 million) Academy for 
Performing Arts (APA), which 
was officially inaugurated in 
February this year, paid for by 
The Royal Hong Kong Jockey 
Gub. 

The government will meet 
the recurrent costs of running 
the academy, budgeted at 
HKS49 million (£4.4 million) 
for the academic year 1986-87. 

“No leaching academy in 
the UK has theatre facilities 
like we do here.” said Basil 


Deane, director of the acad- 
emy. who comes from a 
professional life of teaching 
music in universities and 
conservatories. "The academy 
is also exceptional in the range 
of disciplines it covers: music, 
dance, drama, in both Chinese 
and western traditions.” 

The attraction of the APA is 
the promise of professional- 
ism: and yet. despite its 
amateurish state, non-pro- 
fessional production is what 
gives creative vitality to local 
theatre. The significance of the 
flourishing of non-pro- 
fessional theatre is that it 
represents the authentic voice 
of Hong Kong's own first 
generation in search of 
identity. 


This is the generation born 
after the huge immigration in 
1949. It lived through the 
years of youth movements in 
the 1960s. reacted with mixed 
feelings to China's Cultural 
Revolution and its bloody 
aftermath in the 1970s. and 
has since striven to find the 
shape of its unique identity in 
the face of the 1997 deadline. 

Through non-professional 
theatre, the gradual unfolding 
of the social and spiritual 
implications of this odyssey 
has been played out with 
verve on stage. 

Chinese traditional theatre 


has only verse plays and 
operas. The 


re history of stage 
drama is brief. It will celebrate 
its 80th birthday next year. 



€1.1 billion in 

investment 


proves it. 


UK companies have invested substantially in manufacturing in 
Hong Kong. The fact is, manufacturing in Hong Kong is extremely 
profitable, whether you're considering a joint venture or a plant of 
your own. And getting started is easier than anywhere else on earth. 
There is minimal government interference in the private sector. 
Consistent economic policies of free enterprise and free trade. No 
excliange controls. And profits tax is only 18.5%. Tliere’s a skilled 
and eager work forte, the world's third largest container terminal anti 
the most sopltisticatcd communications system in the region. In just 
tliree years, foreign industrial investment in Hong Kong lias risen 
63%. Tlie reasons are obvious. Profit without penalty, success 
without tears. Find out more about how Hong Kong can work for 
your company. 


Contact Mr. D.M. Fletcher. Hong Kong Government 
Industrial Promotion Office, Dept. F, 6 Grafton Street. London 
W1X 3LB. Telephone; 01-499 9821. 

Fax No. 441-493-1964 


)7-i-r 








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Historically, this art form was 
introduced by overseas stu- 
dents as a vehicle for promot- 
ing social reforms and 
introducing “modern 
culture”. 

Social and self-critical con- 
cerns have remained the main 
themes of Chinese stage 
drama and boom periods 
coincided with times of strife 
and disorientation in foe first 
decades of foe Republic and 
during the Japanese invasion 
in foe 1930s. 

The popularity of stage 
drama among young intellec- 
tuals in Hong Kong today is in 
part a continuation of this 
tradition. In part it is also an 
inadvertent result of policy. 

Perhaps of all foe art forms 
stage drama is most suitable to 
Hong Kong, for articulating 
intellectual messages. For foe 
last 30 years nearly every 
important breakthrough in 
Chinese art has been initiated 
in Taiwan: poetry in foe 
1960s, fiction in foe early 
1970s. followed by dance, and 
then sculpture and film. 

Stage drama is the excep- 
tion. One reason for this is foe 
accessibility of foreign lit- 
erature in Hong Kong. An- 
other is foe government’s 
supportoffoe performing arts, 
in cultural matters, especially 
until foe start of Sino-British 
talks, the general tendency of 
the colonial government has 
been a subtle suppression of 
Chinese identity and dis- 
couragement of genuine 
intellectual interests. 

This is still reflected in foe 
language policy and policies of 
school education. In mass 
culture the attitude is to keep 
the people entertained; music, 
dance, horse-racing — it is all 
harmless and pleasant. 

Government cultural funds 
have, therefore, concentrated 
in foe 

first landmark 
was the City Hall and Concert 
Hall complex completed in 
1 962. The first wave of serious 
Hong Kong post-revolution 
dramas appeared quietly in 
the 1960s under such an 
umbrella. 

In the 1 960s and early 1 970s 
local dramas were mainly 
university student produc- 




V ■ ’j*!, .... 

4 



tions. In keeping with foe 
spirit of foe time foe themes 
were mostly philosophical. 

Then foe focus gradually 
shifted to social issues and foe 
early post-Cultural Revolu- 
tion years brought in waves of 
cultural “root” searching. 
These plays attracted a small 
crowd, mostly students and 
young intellectuals, and had 
little influence outside their 
own coterie of enthusiasts. 

The major annual drama 
events throughout foe 1970s 
were foe Hong Kong Student 


Theatre, was established in 
1977 by the Urban CouhciL 
The roost significant 
development in local theatre 
came in the 1980s and co- 
incided with a radical change 
in foe social-political climate 
after foe start of foe Sino- 
British negotiations on Hong 
Kong's future. Amateur . 
groups mushroomed ' and 
community, theatre' 
proliferated. 


riesbysa; 
Willbc “ - 


; that Hong Kong 
with horee- 
racing and night-clubbing. 
One would except pressure for 
censorship to come from this, 
quarter in foe future. 

The fear of the earnest 
theatre enthusiasts at this 
point is foal foe drive for 
academic ' professionalism 
tinder government support is 
beginning 10 divert creative 
attention from foe lifeblood of 


The theme which has since - Chinese stage drama, that of 
fired everyone's imag ination - raw social comment and criti- 



Finding " 
the Hong 
Kong 
Chinese 
Identity 


is the historical-cultural iden- 
tity of foe Hong Kong Chi- 
nese; Tbe 1997 deadline has 
created a defensive stance 
with regards mainland China, 
and foe reinforcement of a' 
Hong Kong identity repre- 
sents a staying force against 
increasing Chinese influence. 

Politically motivated plays, 
such as 1841 . Hong Kong : 
Selected Memories and Hong 
-Kong' Trilogy, have appeared 


cal reflection. 

The most powerful 


Bureau Drama Festival, ter- 
minated in 1983. and later foe 
Urban Council's Drama 

Festival. . 0 .. 

On an incomparably • m number, borne, Uke /■ cfj for Perform i 


performing arts. The 
ndmark of this policy 


grander scale, government- 
sponsored performance arts 
programmes such as the 
successful annual Asian Arts 
Festival have also helped to 
create a theatre audience, 
although foe programme in 
drama is understandably 
tame. 

The idea for foe APA was 
first moored in foe 1970s: foe 
first professional drama com- 
pany. Hong Kong Repertory 


Am Hong Kong, have wen 
become quiteinfluential. - 
The new political situation 
has also affected foe view of 
foe government which now 
appears happy to go along 
with this trend. Ironically, foe 
attitude of “keeping the peo- 
ple entertained” is now sup- 
ported by foe future masters of 
Hong Kong, foe Communist 
Chinese, whose spokesman 
dismissed local political wor- 


and 

urgent expressions of dra- 
matic art are still found in foe 
non-professkmal productions, 
but they survive oh enthu- 
siasm rather than proper 
funding. .... 

Government support for 
non-professional drama for 
the year 1985-86 was only 
.about HKS 150,000 (£13,400), 
which conies out of the Coun- 
Arts’ total 


budget of HKS 15 million 
(£13 million). Dr Deane Of 
APA points out that, as a per 
capita rate, foe Hcmg Kong 
government isspendingonly a 
tenth of what Britain is spend- 
ing on foe arts. 


Chang Tsong-Zung 

The author is an expert on 
Chinese art and calligraphy 
and part-owner of an ah 
■ gallery in Hong Kong 



Sec the “Hong Kong In Focus” 
Exhibition In the Visitors' 


Gallery ofthe London Stock 
■ Exchange. Mob day to Friday; 
9.45 ajxulo &lo p.m! until 
Noverabcro tit Free, . 


TWO CITIES 



ng 


& London 


partners in financial services 





m 







Monument to drama: the new £26 million Academy foe Performing Arts inHong Kong 4f. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


HORIZONS 


A guide to 
career opportunity 


The helpful home officers 


TWK^S ll ’9? vies : c ? tates manager for 
Tand bridge Council in Surrey, speaking 

hefa?v^ ,SC £ and 001 lhe authority, 
buuc\ cs in home ownership and the sale 

Properties to tenants. Bui he is 
» a result, job prospects for 
Housing managers in the public sector are 
going to be blighted. 

t 'his point of view was put to 
i™? n J^nnctt. chairman of the south east 
branch of the Institute of Housing and 
also a chief housing officer, he did not 
agree. ‘There will always be a role for the 
puoiic sector in the provision of 
housing, he said. "The debate is about 
the size of the sector.” 

Today, more than 60 per cent of the 
nation s households are owner occupied, 
but there is a likely ceiling to this trend, 
thou^ii to be between 70 and 80 per 
cent. Some people just don't want to own 
tneir own homes and others are not in a 
position to buy. 

Between them, local authorities and 
■ nousing associations manage roughly 29 
per cent of all rented homes (flats and 
houses) in the UK. Private landlords 
control 1 1 per cent While the majority 
ot housing managers work for local 
authorities and housing associations, a 
few find posts with the larger private 
landlords, or possibly with firms of 
chartered surveyors, administering large 
estates. 

There may also be more openings in 
future with building societies: at least 

Building societies may soon 
move into the renting sector 

one has promoted the idea publicly that 
building societies and other private 
sector institutions should take an interest 
in the provision of rented housings 
The traditional role of housing officers 
has ajways been the management of 
council estates and flats: arranging 
lettings, collecting rent, chasing rent 
arrears, seeing about repairs and mainte- 
nance. advising tenants, and planning 
future provision. 

In recent years they' have taken on new 
responsibilities, including buildings for 
sale and the provision of mortgages and 
improvement grams to owner occupiers. 
By acting as agents and seeing improve- 
ments through. they can assist the elderly 
to remain in their own. now much more 
conveniently planned homes. They may 
also run housing aid centres, where they 
advise on the problems of those who live 
in iho privately rented sector. 

Though some housing officers deal 
with a variety of work, there is a growing 
tendency to specialize in fields such as 
homelessness, sheltered housing for the 
elderly, private sector urban renewal, or 
rent arrears and county court work. 

At Tandbridge. an ex-police officer 
chosen for his. warmth and humanity, is 
gy psy officer. This authority has put 
gypsies on the housing waiting list in the 


With more and more 
council tenants buying 
their homes, jobs 
for housing managers 
could be reduced. 
Joan Llewelyn Owens 
looks at the prospects 


hope that they will become integrated 
with the community, that their children 
will attend school regularly, and that 
some of the more irresponsible aspects of 
gypsy behaviour will alter for the better. 

Mr Scott-Oavies* career has been fairly 
typical, though more graduates are 
entering the profession today. He joined 
Swansea housing department as a stu- 
dent and studied for the institute of 
Housing's examinations by day-release 
and correspondence course. 

During this time he did all the basic 
jobs, including rent collection. This led 
him into some bizarre situations. One 
old lady dug a hole in the kitchen floor, 
filled H with water and kept ducks, and 
an old gentleman, obsessed with cats, 
never threw away a tin of cat food, but 
stacked them like a supermarket display. 

When people get to this sort of state it 
is often the housing officer who alerts the 
social services. Some councils have now 
phased out doorstep rent collection in 
favour of other methods and Mr Scott- 
Davies feels a -certain amount of regret 
about this. 

When he collected rents, he often 
carried messages from one elderly house- 
bound person to another, or did little 
jobs like replacing light bulbs or putting 
plants in the garden. 

Helping people in this way and helping 
them to acquire a home where they can 
express themselves give housing staff 
much satisfaction. Some may not care 
for having to work under the political 
direction of the elected councillors. The 
more senior the officers are. the more 
likely they are to be involved in ensuring 
that political decisions are carried 
through. 

From Swansea. Mr Scott-Davies went 
as a housing assistant to Bracknell 
Development Corporation. His next 
move was to Hammersmith as a senior 
officer, in Tandbridge he is a principal 
officer with a staff of ten. His task as es- 
tates manager embraces all the normal 
activities of a landlord with tenant 

He likes to be accessible to staff and to 
tenants and attends evening meetings of 
tenants' associations. He also goes to 
meetings of the council's housing 
committee, where he speaks on rent 
arrears and presents cases where eviction 


is recommended. "Fortunately, eviction , 
is not normally carried through if arrears 
are reduced." he says. I 

His next promotion is likely to involve ! 
another move, and this seems to be the ] 
pattern if one wishes to get ahead in j 
housing management. i 

Becom ing a chief officer or director of 
housing is not too easy today for the 

R erson who has qualifications solely in 
□using. Some councils are setting up 
combined departments in which housing 
and. most commonly, environmental 
health, form one directorate. 

Often the post goes to the person with 
the environmental health qualification, 
though there are some chief officers, 
responsible for both health and housing, 
who have arrived via the housing route. 

It is because of what he sees _as 
shrinking career opportunities that Mr 
Scott-Davies suggests that a student 
interested in bousing might find h 
prudent to obtain a combined degree in 
housing with finance, conservation, 
technology, or specialist need (elderly 
and mental handicap). This would 
ensure that future changes in bousing 
could be embraced whilst enabling a 
second career to be considered if 
necessary. 

Another possibility would be to study 
for the qualifications of the Royal 
Institution of Chartered Surveyors. 

School-leavers have a number of 
options open. With A levels they can 

Rent collecting also served 
many useful social functions 

take a degree or BTEC HND/C: certain 
BTEC higher awards, degrees and post- 
graduate diplomas have a relevant 
housing content and earn exemptions 
from the Institute of Housing's own 
examinations. 

Alternatively, they can find a job and 
study part-time for the Institute's own 
professional qualification (PQ). Those 
without A levels can take a relevant 
BTEC national diploma/certificate. 
reconized by the Institute for enrolment 
in the PQ programme. 

The Institute reports that there are 
plenty of jobs in housing for school 
leavers and graduates, particularly if they 
are prepared to look towards the London 
or metropolitan boroughs. 

Such places have decentralization 
programmes, involving the creation of 
posts for local management officers, in 
order to get away from the image of the 
big town hall 

Over 100.000 people are working in 
public sector housing services. Many are 
unqualified and those who do qualify get 
rapid promotion in a job which provides 
a mixture of office work and contact with 
people. 

Careers literature is available from the 
Institute of Housing. 9 White Lion 
Street. Islington. London, Nl 9XJ. 



CHIEF 

EXECUTIVE 

(SALARY CIRCA £38*00 F. A.) 

This is a demanding post with a progressive 
Regional Council and becomes vacant in February 1987. 
Only persons with considerable management experience 
and leadership capabilities should apply. 

Usual local authority conditions on superannuation, 
travelling, removal expenses etc. and J.N-C. Conditions 
of Service apply. 

Further details and application forms (to be returned by 
31st October. 1986) from Chief Executive. 

Genual Regional Council, Viewforth, Stirling. 

Tfel: Stirling 7311L Ext. 223. 



South Pembrokeshire 
District Council 

Chief Executive’s Department 

SOLICITOR 

£13,260 - £14,475 


Applications are invited for the above post from suitably qualified 
Sofidtors with 2/3 years Local Government experience. Reporting to 
the District Secretary, the postholder wDI assist in the efficient manage- 
ment of the Council's Legal Service, In addition to a wide range of legal 
work. 

The South Pembrokeshire District Council serves an area of varied 
character, encompassing part of the Pembrokeshire Coast National 
Park, the popular holiday resorts of Tenby and Saundersfoot toge ther 
with an extensive agricultural area and the Milford Havon waterway. 

Temporary Housing, Disturbance Allowance and assistance with re- 
moval expenses available in appropriate cases. 

For an application form and further details of either post, please con- 
tact the Personnel Section. District Offices. Uaraon Park, Pembroke 
Dock. Dyted SA72 6DZ. Telephone 683122, extension 250. 

Completed applications should be returned by 31st October 1986. 


Assistant Broads Officer 
(Administration) 

Grade PO 41-44 
£ 14 . 862 -£ 16 , 0 n pj(L 

Applications are invited for Ms key past vrilh die Broads 
Aratoortfc a leafinn wv fron menM orgrofration. 

The Soweramenr is cunopBy ptoposhifl statutory slate 
(or the Broods, an ana o( nottooaf Importance for 
conservation and recreation. 

The Asstentf Broods Officer (A Omtakr iudon) w» be 
dksedy responsible to the Principal Adviser for aD 
u d a ih iWuU w. BtwncM and pei se n ne i nwBwsoMtie 
Amtnrtty. incfcxftiQ the monitoring ot major Issues and 
the devetaptomf or pofty. 

The Aaihodiy b seeking a person with a Hvefy. enquiring 
nrind and prawn adnftttra&ve ream, supported by a 
dsgree aod/or professional quofificattop. 

For tonher dataBs and oppflearion form phase send a 
large stamped addressed envelope to: 

M Aitkm Ckttk (Principal Adviser) 

Breads Aidfmtty (Application) 

Thomas Harvey Haas 
raCafegafe 
Norwich HR3TBQ 

Ctosfag dote for appNcaiioafcUffowBiKrl96& 


DAVIES’S COLLEGE 

Required for January 1987, 
or as soon as possible 

A VICE-PRINCIPAL 

( Adminis tration) 

STARTING SALARY cXl6,500 

The Principal expects to retire 
within five years. 

Prospective applicants should 
write to him for details. 





LEGAL SECRETARY 
WITH AUDIO 

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Sday a the ngm of 
£9J300-il0.Q00 pi 
Tel 4864080. 


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£10,508 

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UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW 

Director of Building 
Services and Planning 

AppecatoTsareinvW 

Butting Services and Planning which Ob vacant on 
1st January 1967. 

The successful appfearx wttte nsponstte to the 
Uriverwy Gourtfc* tte p&rr^ 

Lkiwrflty bokdngs. servos. groindsandrefttedwCffc. 

(^xfldmesshoiJdtwe eromveienoMrie^ieof 

meoana ra cBon inagcyaxiu{iigco« »u«xt pioc«Are&. 

P^ »»yjfiyi< r riK^{neie<3yvc^'r | ag«asMoaed 

wimdotorefortesftmM _ __ 

The pass is piaoed on Grade W of the sabryscaiesfar 
AodenecAAo-d AdmWmaowSiaff aca sa lary n ac es 
crf£2CUk»pa-Theappo»we^OeOT^amortierof 
tteUrygrgoefSiji^ . 

FurttTprpartiaiterssnaiMtxisoL^rRxntne 

□rector of Personnel Sevas. Uruversty cfGngouu 

GtegawGI2aoa»whomappte»tlons(8eop«jwBft 

Renames weJatttessesc# three refew**haJdbe:»* 
onor before IWiNovembec W8& 
m reply phase quo* ftef No. 5809E. 


DAVIES’S COLLEGE 
66 Sowhampten Row, Holbora WClB 4BY 

iKnupMil mcirpftxJent Koih Fan CuOcpe. Founded IttTT) 


JOURNALIST 

FOR LATIN AMERICA/ 
CARIBBEAN REGION 

CHRISTIAN AID requires an experienced joumalisi to 
write news releases and snides on the Region for both 
external and internal publication. Win be responsible 
for contacts with the media and for providing genera] 
information. Hc/sbe wiD normally be required to travel 
to the Region for-abemt six weeks a year. 

Proven ability as a joumafisL an active miertst in Latin 
American affairs, first hand knowledge of the area and 
fluent Spanish are essential. Candida res shook! be in 
sympathy with the aims and philosophy of Christian 
Aid. 

Salary: £ILI3flL 

Apply in writing only for job description and appjio- 

lioo form, enemas 34p uc. to Personnel Officer. 
Christian Aid. PO Box No 1. London SW9 8BH. 
Poring date forcompiaedapplkaiions November 3rd. 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


COUNCIL OF THE 
BOROUGH OF OSWESTRY 

DIRECTOR OF 
PLANNING AND 
TECHNICAL SERVICES 

to £18,507 (pay award pending) 

The current Director. Mr. Tony Linley, C.Eng. 
M.I.C.EL is leaving in January. 1987 due to his 
promotion to a similar post with a larger dis- 
trict council. We are looking for a successor 
who will be able to consolidate and build on 
the excellent foundations laid by Mr. Linley 
since his appointment as bead of lhe combined 
new department formed when the Council re- 
structured following a major review in 1982. 
The post has responsibility for the management 
of the range of technical functions, including 
planning, architecture, direct works, engineer- 
ing, and building control. 

Oswestry Borough may be one of the smallest 
district councils, but us aspirations are high 
with a mqjor emphasis on economic develop- 
ment. The town and surrounding area has 
enormous potential, and the Council has 
adopted a forward looking policy and em- 
barked on a varied and ambitious programme 
of works. The successful candidate will find the 


opportunity for challenge and immense job sat- 
isfaction. whilst gaining the benefits of the 
superb “quality or Irie" offered by living in a 
beautiful area where the cost of living is below 
the national average, particularly with house 
prices. 

Oswestry is situated in the delightful border 
land countryside where the Shropshire plains 
meet the Welsh hills. Offa’s Dyke longdistance 
footpath and the Llangollen Canal pass through 
the Borough, whilst Snowdonia and the Welsh 
coast are around an hours drive away, as are 
such regional shopping centres as Shrewsbury. 
Chester. Birmingham and Manchester. 

We are seeking a candidate who will bring a 
positive, innovative approach to the job of 
leading the department within an overall cor- 
porate approach. Whilst applicants must be 
professional qualified, far more importance 
will be placed on them having a proven record 
in demonstrating managerial skills. 

For an informal discussion on just how satisfy- 
ing the job and the area can be, telephone 
David Towers, Chief Executive, or Tony 
Linley, the present Director (0691 654411). 

Further information together with relocation 
package details and application form are ob- 
tainable from Sue Beacnam. Personal Assistant 
to Chief Executive, Castle View, Oswestry, 
Shropshire, SY1I 1JR. 

Closing date for applications: Monday. 3rd 
November, 1986. 


PRINCIPAL 

AUDITOR 

£13,300 - £14,200 

Over a live square mile area. The Royal Borough 
of Kensington and Chelsea manages and mam- 
tains a unde range of vital services from 
engineering and housing to social services and 
public amenities. With annual assets running to 
£230 million, it is currently spending £100 mil- 
Eon (gross revenue budget?) plus £30' million 
capital budgets. It’s heavy commitment to conv- 
puter technotopy means mat the Council b at the 
forefront of n developments, presenting ambi- 
tious accountants with a highly professional 
challenge - aid a real opportunity to optimise the 
use of sophisticated computer technology. 

• For this senior post we are seeking an ex- 
perienced and self-assured auditor capable 
of dealing with a range of voluntary 
organisation audits, involving the provision 
of advice on various financial matters. 

• Accounting and reporting skills of a high 
order and required, and you should be a 
Qualified accountant 

• The Council's Finance department is located 
m a pleasantly-situated modem Town Half. 
We can offer flexitime, a subsidised staff 
restaurant and social club, and season ticket 
loan facilities. 

Application forms quoting Ref. T536X from the 
Personnel Service, The Town Hall. Homton 
Street London. W8 7NX. Tel: 01-937 B562. 
(24 hour answering service). 

Closing date for applications: 24th October. 





' * Ai 


the CHuaoes in action with the world s poor 




ANEQUALOPPORTUNnYEMPljOVER 


SUTTON VALENCE 
SCHOOL 

APPOINTMENT OF BURSAR 

The Governors invite applications for the 
appointment of Bursar at this independent 
(HMC) school near Maidstone in Kent 
The present Bursar retires in April 1987 
and the successful applicant will be ex- 
pected to take up the appointment from 
May 1987 or at a date to be arranged. 

Candidates should have a wide experi- 
ence of accountancy, budgetary control 
and personnel management The salary 
will not be less than £15,000 p.a. 

Further details of the School and the ap- 
pointment may be obtained from the Clerk 
and Receiver, United Westminster 
Schools, 53 Palace Street London SW1 E 
5HJ. 

Closing date for applications is 12th No- 
vember 1986. 


SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL 
(An Equal Opportunity Employer) 

CHIEF EXECUTIVE 

£36,393 to £40,029 p.a. 

The Council wishes to recruit a successor to the present 
Chief Executive who wM retire in May next year. 
Applications are invited from persons with considerable 
experience at a senior level in a forge organisation, not 
necessarty a focal authority. 

No specific professional qualifications are prescribed. 
The Chief Executive leads the Chief O ffice rs Manage- 
ment Team but currently ts free from, departmental 
responsibilities. 

Further d erate a nd application form for the post may be 

obtained from: 

Chief Executive. 

_______ Shropshire County Council 1 , 

ITjy^wiyi The ShiieftaN, 

rrA’r I sTCoto 

v M v or telephone 
'qgp' Shrewsbury (0743) 252806 

AppScatien forms most be returned 
no talar than 27th October. •- - 


Financial Planning, 
Resource Allocation 
and Internal Audit 

-a key role In the running off one off 
the Country's biggest organisations 

Based Manchester Salary to £2 5,000 p .a. 

The North Western Regional Health Authority Is the 
second largest region in England, with an annual revenue 
budget of £900 million, spread across 1 9 District Health 
Authorities and including a capital programme of £70 
million per year. 

Reporting to the Assistant General Manager, this position 
carries responsibility for the effective management of three 
important sections of the Finance and Management Services 
Divison — Financial Planning, Resource Allocation and 
Internal Audit. 

In particular, the successful applicant will ensure the 
comparability of all resource aspects of the strategic and 
short term plans, the resource allocation policies and the 
consequences of the Capital investment programme of the 
RHS. He or she will also play a major part in the review 
process relating to District Hea Ith Authorities. 

The position represents an excellent opportunity for 
someone with relevant ski Us to develop and extend these 
three key areas, as well as their career. CIPFA qualified or 
the holder of a similar accountancy qualification, you will 
have extensive experience in financial planning and 
internal audit, gained in the public service, industry or 
commerce. In your mid-late 30’s, you will possess good 
managerial and communication skills together with the 
ability to interpret information quickly. 


If you feel you poaaaes* t*ie right professional and 
managerial qualities for thb position, write or 
telephone for an application form and Job 
description to the Regional Personnel Division, 
Gateway House Piccadilly South, M a nc h e s ter 
M60 7LP, quoting reference number B.133/DL 
Tfel. 061-236 9456, ext 614. Closing date for receipt 
of application forms 31st October 1986. 


Si?sod{?S(I?0g0 


faculty of the CranfiekJ Institute of Technology and the base fof the newty- 
formed Centre of Information Technology — the largest in the U.K. The 
RMCS has excellent teaching and research fadHties and very dose links 
with Government R & D laboratories and the defence industry. 

CHAIRMAN 

Centre of Information Technology 

The Institute wishes to appoint a Professor m the area of Information Technology 
who will also hold the post of Chairman of the Crarrfield Centre of Inlormation 
Technology. 

You'll be expected to provide the academic leadership todevelop the IT Centre, 
welding together the Centre's components on both theShnuenham and Cranfietd 
Campuses and providing a cohesive academic policy on the enabling aspects 
of IT. Leadership in davooping the relationship between the IT Centre and the 
newly formed It Institute at Milton Keynes wiH also be part of the task. 

You'll also be expected to promote Cranfield's IT teaching and research activities 
in Government, Industry and overseas and to establish a systems approach to 
teaching and research withm the broad fields ol IT. 

You're therefore likely either to be working 'me University or possibly in industry 
or a Government R &0 establishment and looking for thie greater freedom for 
development that Crsnfieid offers. ■ • — — - 

The post is based at the RMCS, Shrivenham, with a salary erf cx£30 k 000 p.a. 

For further details please contact: Hmd of Pfersomei Services, Cranfiekl 
Institute of Technology, Cranfleld, Bedford MK43 0AL, UnNed Kingdom. 
Telephone Bedford (I&S4) 7501 1 1 e»L 3330 or 3338 quoBng reference CCTT. 
Closing date for receipt of applications 28th November. 


Clerk of the County Council/Management Services 
Division 

Management Services Officer 

(2 posts) 

Up to Cl 1,604 pj. 

This is an opportunity to join an "internal Consultancy" which has a 
key and growing role in evaluating existing and new service provision 
in the Authority and its associated bodies. The successful candidates. 


membership of a team, examining policies, organisation structures 
and establishments, operating procedures, facilities and equipment 
and subsequently recommending, negotiating and implementing im- 
provements. Salary levels are subject to annual review and represent 
the level of each individuars contribution to the success of the Divi- 
sion. Fringe benefits include generous assistance and relocation 
expenses, car allowance, car purchase loan facilities and flexible 
working hours. 

For further details and an appfication form telephone Mrs. P. Hodson 
on Nott'm. (0602) 823823, Ext 3463, or write to the County Manage- 
ment Servies Officer, at County Hall, Closing date 21st November. 
Please quote ref: 123. 

An Equal Opportunity Employer. 69A 



Nottinghamshire 
County Council 

County Hall-West Bridaford 
Nottingham NG2 7QP 


INTERNAL 

AUDITOR 

£6,705 - £8,711 p.a. 

required by the District Finance Department. Applicants 
should preferably have some audit experience (not necessarily 
in the N.H.S.) and mil be encouraged to study for a 
recognised accountancy qualification. 

The successful candidate will be required to undertake system 
based audits and value for money reviews at all the 
Authority’s establishments, thus access to a motor vehicle 
would be an advantage. A scheme of flexible working hours is 
in operation and a vehicle mileage allowance is payable. 

For informal discussion telephone Mike Martin, Assistant 
Director of Finance (Audit) on Basildon 287611 ext 208. 

Application form and }ob description available from: District 
Personnel Dept, Basildon Hospital, Nethermayne, Basildon, 
Essex SS16 5NL. Tel: Basildon 287611 ext 296. 


BasOdon & Thurrock 
Health Authority - . 









1 

: f 



*n/ 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


BUILDING MAINTENANCE (HOUSING) 

The Maintenance Division is responsible for the repair and mainte- 
nance of approximately 7.000 houses and flats by both direct ctkJ 
contract labour. A computerised system for online ordering and con- 
trol of afl repairs Is in operation on an IBM Mainframe computer. Pre- 
decoration external repairs, and external and internal redeco rations 
are carried out on a planned basis. The Council have approved an 
accelerated programme of special repairs, improvements and 
modernisation. 

New posts have been added to the Division's establishment to cater 
for the increased workload. 

Building Maintenance Manager 

£13,593-£14,808 (Essential User Car Allowance} 
(Ref: 0/148/86) 

The postholder win be responsible to the Housing Manager for tee 
Division comprising a workforce of 46, with a budget of some £3% 
minion, for ensurmg that works to the Council's housing stock is 
undertaken in an effective and accountable manner, to provide quality 
service and value for money. A relevant qualification, management 
ability and experience, plus drive and enthusiasm is essentiaL 

Senior Technical Officer 

£10,902-£1 2,630 (Essential User Car Allowance) 
(Ref: 0/149/86) 

To head a small section involved with major repairs and improvements 
on a contract basis. A sound knowledge of building construction and 
techniques is required plus the abifity to prepare drawings and speci- 
fications eta, HNC in building or equivalent is essential, and preferably 
experience in managing a small workforce. 

Clerk of Works 

£7,644-£9,549 (Essential User Car Allowance) 
(Ref: 0/150/86) 

To supervise and inspect major works in progress on site, inducting 
checking measurements, issuing instructions, maintaining records and 
preparing progress reports, and liaising with tenants and tenants' 
groups. Sound practical knowledge of building trade and relevant 
experience required. ONC in Building, or equivalent, or membership of 
Institute of Clerk of Works. 

Direct Labour Superintendent 

£9,846-£1 0,497 (Casual User Car Allowance) 
(Ref: 0/152/86) 

To supervise a direct labour force, approximately 20, and to control 
the operation of a joiner's shop in compliance with the requirements 
for the Planning and Land Acts (part 3). A thorough technical knowl- 
edge of building, experience in supervision and control of a small 
mufti-trade works department Ideally applicants should be members 
of the Institute of Makitenance and Building Management or pro- 
gressing in studies to final stage. 

AH these posts are available to male and female applicants. 
Assistance with housing. Full removal expenses. Flexitime. Superan- 
nuation and Side Pay Schemes. 

Further details and application forms, to be returned 
by 29th October 1986, may be obtained from: 

The Personnel and Management Services Officer, 
Town Han, Watford WD1 3 EX. 

(Tel: Watford 40175-24 hour Ansafone service) 

The Council is an Equal Opportunities Employer 

88-BD/W47/386 

BOROUGH OF 

WATFORD 




F»omaT^ttmwygtadtf2fcstedbiakS- 
ng to 9 bndmark of 1970* architecture the 
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chebea* two 
tovml^haveaneb^pixxHlaux: and cofflmefdal value 

le^^Cpeationde^de^ is a challenging and speufet 

surveying task- with maintenance responsarimeseaf^in g fromthe 
Mayors Suite fotte baroque splendour of a hundred year aid Mn KA 



FROM THE 
OLD TO THE NEW 

A major 

surveying role in an historic environment 

c£l 6,000 + EXCELLENT KENSINGTON FIAT 
As Town HaH Maintenance Surveyor your brief wS ctearty be wi d e 
SuperrangarTu^fcdpfinederK^ 

surveying properties and preparing spedfkaTJcns and drawings; 
initiating current and future works programmes; and overseeing the 
costing and performance of outside consultants. Administering the 
processing of tenders and contracts wBabo be i mporta n t. 

This high-profife position de man ds wide-ranging experience of 
bu3cfing maintenance supported by a surveysig, buidingservkxis or 
architecture-related quaBticatioa. fluent commurtk^oon skife must be 
complemented by a proven abffity to supervise and delegate 
Acompctitivesalarynegoti^ilearoundfTEdOOisofferedtogetherwith 
valuable benefits inducting a rant and rate free 3-bedroom flat off 
Kensington High Street. 

For further detail please contact JtfeCbnneB on 
01-937 5464 ext 2844. 

Closing date for a pp lic a tio n s: 14th November 198GL 



Head of Administrative Services 
£17,109-£18,249 IncL 

Are you looking for a Senior Management opportunity at the centre 
of corporate affairs, with an opportunity to demonstrate commitment 
and personality? If so you may be the person we need for (Ms newly 
created post 

This key Management rote will have responsibility for the dayto-day 
management of the Personnel, Management Services, Committee, 
Administrative and Information Sections who currently report to the 
Chief Executive, and win provide direct support to the Chief Executive 
with information gathering, briefing, progress chasing and repres e nting 
him at meetings. 

The post could suit qualified people from many professional 
backgrounds but those witii less than ten years relevant experience are 
unlikely to have the necessary authority which the post requires. 

The Council's offices are within easy reach of rail connections to Central 
London and the area is well served with motorways; the Ml . M4, M4Q 
and M2S being easily accessible. Generous finandd assistance towards 
relocation will be available. 

AppficaMo n form and Job desc riptio n are waBabit from: 

The Personnel Section, Three Riven District Cowd, 

17/23 High Street, Rkkmansworth, Herts or 
telephone Rickmmworth (0923) 776811, ext 117. 
dosing date for appOcatkxts, 7th November 1968. 

An Equal Opportunity Employer. 





asiracr 

COUNCIL 


TVHS 


Hum Vteqr IMutal Show* UaM 


Operating bom offices in Twickenham, the 
manage a predominately new bufkfing stock of 1 
properties in West London end the adoining Home 
Counties. The development pipeline wtif increase this 
stock to about 1,700 properties by 1987/88. The So- 
ciety also provide agency services to other housing 
associations. 

We require the following staff; 

BUILDING SERVICES 
MANAGER 

E15JIQ0 + Co mp any Car 

The Bidding Services Manager wffl lead a small team 
and be responsible for the organisation, 
administration and imp l e mentati on of the society's 
maintenance aid major repairs functions. Ideafy 
suitable candidates should have a working 
knowledge of computerised maintenance 
admini strat ion systems, have severed years' relevant 
experience of the housing/building industry and hotel 
a relevant professional qualification. 

The successful ca ndidat e wBI also be a member of 
the Society's Management Team re s pon si ble far the 
Corporate Management of TVHS. 

DEVELOPMENT OFFICER 

From BMXI0 depending upon experience 
pkw essential, car user e No ws n ce 

TVHS has a (Averse fair rent and home ownership 
development programme currently producing over 
100 units per year. Due to an expansion of our 
development agency work and a co mm i tm ent to 
promoting private finance initiatives, a second 
Development Officer is required. 

Familiarity with Housing Corporation procedures 
would be an advantag e, but other appropriate 
experience wfK be considered. The abffity to use 
initiative and act independently is important. 

Thames Valley Housing Society Ltd is working 
towards becoming an Equal Opportunit i es employer 
and positively welcomes apptications from all ethnic 
groups. 

For further detais and an application form, please 
contact; Thames Valley Housing Society Ltd, 1 
Kkigs Street, Twickenham, TW1 3SD. Tee 01-891 

0202. Closing data; 3rd November 1986. 


North West Thames 

REGIONAL HEALTH AUTHORITY 

Support Services 
Manager 

NORTH LONDON BLOOD 
TRANSFUSION CENTRE 

We’re not after your blood - 

Bat we could make use of your drive ud 
experience. 

The North London Blood Transfusion Cen- 
tre is one of the largest and busiest in the 
country, its 240 staff collecting, processing 
and supplying over 200.000 units of blood to 
hospitals in North West Thames Health Re- 
gion every year. 

We are looking for a person who is keen to 
pursue a career in the health service but who 
wishes the scope to develop his or her style of 
management. 

Your role would be to manage a variety of 
support services, at theEdgware based centre 
including data processing, finance and per- 
sonnel and generally looking after the day to 
day running of the centre. 

You would also be liaising with medical, sci- 
entific and clerical staff in drawing up and 
implementing operational plans in aft sec- 
tions of the centre. You would also play a key 
role in the planning and commissioning of a 
new centre during the next four years. 

This is an exciting and challenging job in a 
vital area of the health service and if you are 
a blood donor, all the better because we need 
every drop we can get. 

Application form and job description avail- 
able from the Employee Services Unit, North 
West Thames Regional Health Authority, 40 
Eastbourne Terrace, London W2 3QR. Tele- 
phone number 01-262 8011 Ext. 3120 quoting 
Reference Number 269. 

Ciosing dates 7 November 1986. 



Standards 
for Industry 


British Standards axe produced by co ns e nsu s 
through committees dxawn from the full range of 
industrial. Government, professional and 
consumer interests. Our Technical Officers are 
full contributing members of these committees 
and play a direct and import an t pan in the 
preparation of Standards. Their duties combine 
project management, committee administration 
and specification drafting. They also advise 
co mmi tt e es on standardization principles and on 
BSI policy and proce d u r es. 

We are looking for Technical Officers in the 
following areas: 

BUILDHG • DATA PROCESSING 
ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC ENGINKRING 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 

As weQ as evidence of strong int er pe rs onal and 
co mm u n ica ti ons skills, essential qualifications 
are a Degree or equivalent in a relevant subject 
and/or corporate membership of an appropriate 
professional body combined with experience in 
industry. 1 

Starting salary: £13,638 pa, pension plan, 5 
weeks’ annual leave. Relocation will be 

paid in appropriate cases. 

Detailed information and an application form 
can be obtained from; 

ELspeth MacArtbur, Senior Personnel Officer, 
BSI, 2 Park Street, London W1A 2BS. 
Telephone: 01-629 9000. Ext 3066. 


Finance Officer 

£17,406 - £18,555 p.a. inc 

This Is a key position in the Social Services, 

Administration Division's management struo-j 

tore. 

The job - As Finance Officer you win manage a 
large section providing a foil financial service to| 
the department including both the traditional 
financial housekeeping rote and more recently 
tiie development ot new initiatives in manage- 
ment accountancy. Particular emphasis is 
on long term financial planning, cash 

forecasting, unit budgeting and the provi- 

sion of advice to the Directorate on budget! 
control and value for money initiatives. The de- 

partment is also oommittea to the development 
of new technology applications. 

(The Person - We feel that to undertake tills role: 
successfully you must hold the CIPFA qualifica- 
tion, be a lateral thinker and have a strong 
finterestfn the operational side of local authority 

If you would like to know more please contact 

Cotin Keen on 01-871 6297 , : Application form 

and-iob description from Director of Social Ser- 
vices. Town HaB, London SW18 2PU. Tel. 01- 
871 .6236. Quoting ref. T/480. Closes 14 
November. 


k 


Wandsworth 

an equal opportunity employer 

Awaflpuwws Dtwaaswoo me flam of 
mwrnuMdii)' iw mefob inespecewof 
tBsaWemenr race set or nuntsf sains. 


THE LONDON HOSPITAL 
MEDICAL CENTRE 
(University of London) 

FUND RAISER 


The London Hospital and The London 
Medea! College are seeking to appoint a 
Fund-Raiser to spearhead and coordinate fund 
raising activities. 


with the pres- 
end of that 


The post wlH be for two years irarti 
pect of a renewable contract at 
period. 

The successful candidate wH probably be between 
3045 with a proven record of success in the field of 
fund-raising or marketing. 

Salary £17,000 - £19,000 negotiable. 

Further details and appfcation form available from 
Mr D L Edwards, Secretary, The London Hospital 
Turner Street, London El 2AD. 

r-7G0S. 


Medical C olle g e, Turner 
Telephone 01-377- 


Applications should be submitted within 18 days of 
the date of this advertisement. 


WEALDON DISTRICT COUNCIL 


The Amt Seam has bun s 
new staffing aracmswrttr Be 
Sfcndanfa and a puwh in sar 
Emtisestc 


I elan 
wool 


wtaeti has produced a 
both btfwjudt 


opfcms are Outfit lor Be Uemg posts 

PRINCIPLE AUDITOR 

£13^93-£14,47S 

The post homer rank second toR* CM AuMorUat haw prtoriar 
responstoltes tar 3Es n w ertsab m i and systems ream. The mccass- 
W appfcent «d be a ouaWied accounted or tftenttm Asootoe. aUe to 
offer ski aid nagittbM m attdttg DM GeuKri's atindes 

SENIOR AUDITOR 

£1Q,569-£1 2,207 

** at seeking a sutiUy quriteri auWw writ) ttfevant oqxnence eta 
can cany out Mutely. systems and contact uH. as ml as contobubng 
to VFM sindes and use id computers as an ado to mu. 
flolli DMls ae abated hi mw offices at Habham, East Sussex and carry 
usual causer aSmamx and access to car loan taeftes. Assistance 
wfll rekubon expenses, indented flUdoxK SobHty. o avattrie n 
«w«nae cases 

Twttar Malta ami «pp**a*i tores can baoMaM treat Ptono- 
■ef. StartML Brae— Bead, Cnatanogh. East Sasser. Dr itau 
IkBMfemugk 331L aUmiH 4BL CtaUqi data XU Odtter 19M. 


MANAGER 

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 

Salary £1 1,964-£15 f 870 pa inclusive 

BeaponattetotlKDvecJixofarabonalcJHntyajTOsneOwnhtatenathx^ 
Eteteaa and WUfara ot Gvsssas Sufes hi too UK: 
Forfinanoal mawBa man t gating ot aawta es. projert sotow aa ons. fond 
rasing, staffing and premises mattes, foe the overview ol office 
systems, rtemal semces and (ramtarshp matters and (or 
admnrinton retting to itaaAGM. 

AH anjriaants should sand a M CV and the names of referees to: 

The Oeecior. Uraed Kowtam Couiol tor Owsaas Stutint Hfws. 

60 Westtwma Grow, London. W2 5SB 
T«tetaia0129»a 
Ctoateg date terapp fl caUons 14th Hovambnr IMS 


UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH 

CHAIR OF ACCOUNTING 


AOOfe 


nted tor a newly esanfcM second Cta> o. 


Accounting n the Oetwtment of Accounting and Buswss Method. 

Candidates should have an BseOttt research record tnd a mnen 

atari fy to refato a cademic tfcw fa pmatdS to tin mfarests of tin 

accounting community. Ap pte a taons writ be wekwned from cart- 

dates wt» have spesUued.ifl any area of aecMrtmg. wfctfttr m 

taghor educabon, poetics or Gonmeece/ndastay. It dt desttM. but 


and md be nwohred futiy « ns ffiaehng p rog ni nmes. 

Further paroetuars of ae wunroere are from 

The Secretary hi tea O aiwUh . tiafnerttr of I 

G3 Satrib Bridge. CdUarfb Brt iLSfTatayfaw B31 1 

to whom a p phea li o ns (twain copwsj stmdd t» suonwad by 21st 
Kwemtw I9fl6, ouomgretsencs 48/86. A«*caffls from owoeas 
nead sutenn only one copy at Bair appOeatioa 



Company law partner 


City firm 

Substantial benefits 


- 5f 


■ 


Thisisa quilei 
firm, with a blue chtpcHembat 

CandidatBS must have a prow track tecort. « wr*»’ tottUh 


being a Partner in a megafirm. 

The terms will be very 
term prospects. 


r^‘S!S» 5r ' 


Coopers 
& Lybrand 
Executive 
Selection 


Coopers & lybrand 
Executive Selection Ltmeocf 


Shelley House 3 Nototo SfieN 
London EC2V 7DO 
01-6061975 


Corporate Planning and Taxation 

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce is one of the bugest hanks in fkrrth America a«tl a 
lead ing interoatkmal bank with a commitment tu exparewn in Europe. Tik Ctnpowte 
Planning and Taxation Department is developing as a high-profile OT of spcwflfe*i 
Europe^ide responsibilities for rax:irion, corporate secretarial, legal, financial tegutetionmM 
related matters. The bank wishes to nudtc asenior appointment to that group. 

Legal Adviser 

The ideal candidate will be a qualified 
lawyer with at l east 3 years' post-qualifying 
experience in a laijjporaanisauon be it in the 
praticc.axnmeraalorfinaK^em-fronmem. 

Key elementsof the job content would be 
analysing the Fmancral Services Bill land the 


interest intax taw is desinfok but nc< essential. 
An attractive remuneration package will tv 
offered cvxrmwitsuraie with post experience 
and potential. If you fcd able u> meet the 

challenge pkatse send your CV wfehdaytdne 

tdepheme number and salary expectation 
to either: Shashi Tarma, Asastunt General 



advisory services on a whole ranjie of 
issues. revicwTTffi control procedures for 
procurement of legal advice from external 
sources and managingthe Bank's existing 
relationships with external legal advisers. 

An elememof corporate secretarial duties is 
also envisaged. Experience of and/or an 


or John Hantisty. Manner. Hitman Resources, 
Canadian Imperial Bunk of Commerce, 

55 Bishops^ate. London ECTf.WN. 

OHOB* 




CANADIAN IMPERIAL 
BANK OF COMMERCE 




1C( 


Ttimuss, Sainer & Webb 

Inorderton^theinaeasmgdemandfbrourraitge 
of specialist legal services, die provision of which we see 
as die basis of the sustained growth (rf our firm, we 
need bright, ambitious lawyers (solid tors and 
barristets) with initiative, who wish to develop their 
careers in the following areas:- 

, ... ACQUISITIONS AND MERGERS 
CORPORATE TAXAH0N 
INTELLECTliAL PROPERTY UTIOTION 
■ ■■ ■-■ COMMERCIAL PROPERTY LITiafllON 
PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 
REm PROPERTY WORK 

We are interested in seeing both those with experience - 
the right people will have the prospect of looking 
forward to an eariypartnetshfp-andthe newly 
qualified. 

Contact Tbra Marshall, our Partnership Secretary, or 
any partner you may know personally, with brief 
particulars of your background. 

TTIMUSS, SAINER& WEBB 
2 SERJEANTS’ INN, LONDON EOiY 1IT 
TELEPHONE; Oi-353 5242 


Commercial Lawyer 

c£20,000 p.a. 

Our client, a mqjor organisation with a 
turnover of 4$50m, seeks on experi- 
enced eonunercud lawyer from private 
practice or industry to join them at 
their Headquarter offices in the 
Thames Valley. 

The succenfuL applicant toUX 
undertake a wide range of work, 
including company acquisitions, joint 
ventures (at home and overseas), intel- 
lectual property and contract drafting. 

Please send full personal and 
career details to Confidential Reply 
Service. Ref BBC 9424 , Austin Knight 
Advertising. 17 St Helen's Place, 
London EC3A 6AS. 

Applications will he forwarded 
to the client concerned, therefore 
companies in which you are not inter- 
ested should be listed in a covering 
letter to the Confidential Reply 
Supervisor. 


v 

*' 







SENIOR 

CONVEYANCER 

Applications are invited from cxp cri cnccil and 
enthusiastic Legal Executives with drive and initiative 
for the Legal Department serving the Boris 
Housing South East Division at their oBice in New 
Ash Green, Kent. 

The successful applicant wfll have responsibility for 

major acquisitions, commercial and residenml 
lettings and estate development. The salary will 
reflect the importance of the post and will mdudea 
company rat Excellent terms of employment are 
offered. 

Applications marked ‘Confidential’, giving full cv_ 
should be made to: 

A. J. BkUc, Legal Manager. 

Bovis Homes Limit ed , South £a»a Region, 

The Manor Htmsc, North Ash Road, 

New Ash Green, near Dartford, Kem DA3 8JE. 

B/xnHemnmt&d 
oppomMOn nffpfrpr 



Botis Homes Umitoi 





COMPANY/COMMERCIAL 

We are seeking a young able and enthusias- 
tic Solicitor to assist in this rapidly 
expanding and busy department The suc- 
cessful applicant will quickly assume own 
workload and would expect to service exist- 
ing national and local clientele and attract 
new business by his personality and 
competence. 

Partnership prospects m well-established 
progressive firm located in pleasant area. 
Applications in writing with C,V. to;- 

P*B- Waterworth 
7 Clarendon Place 
Dalkeith House 
Leamington Spa 


.. — -r-r r~r 


Assistant 

Secretary 

BeechamPharmacaulicabResearch 
Division ispart of Beecham Grot#> pic. a mc#)f 
British company with woridwidesates 
exce eding £21 bn p.a. The Division comprises 

some 9 research centres located in &E. 

England andEurope with over WOO staff . 

The Assistant Secretary reports tq tbt 
Divisional SecretaryfHoad of Atfoartsfrafen 
ServK»sandisbasedattlte^te8santiyaJuGi«d 

Divisional headquartersat Srockham Farit, 
nearDorking, Surrey. Ptespons^ffttiesteclucte 
handling a variety of property, insurance, 
contractual and other legal matters, and 
necessitate regular contact with management 
at all levels and external consultants. 

Applicants shouW ba solicitors or 
barristers, preferably with 2/3 years post 
qualification experience. An attractive salary is 
offered together with non-contrfcutory pensrirv . 
flexible ^ hours, and relocation expenses 
it appropriate. There are good prospects for 
career progression m the company 

jWcattora^ • . ' 

^^^^‘w^ehooWbeoenttar 
The Personnel Manager, Beecham 

g^^ ^tfoate.BrockhamPark, 

“^fenworth, Surrey FW3 7AJ. 

Beecfram 

PnarmaceuticeteBBBP 


CONVEYANCING - 
LONDON W1 

WeWb Syrett require eaetntic whbw 
S‘5 " po«ibtyjwwffl« sbauttorgBS 

tor then- Cooveyanetes/htobete DcpntSnty 
Gojd salary, dan a adia g and wotedf-week-. 

Teh Ul -498 Silf ' :- 

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Nropoommerce 


Irnet 


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#*■*»* 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


APPOINTMENTS 


Independently-minded lawyers 

Clyde & Co. is a medium-sized specialist commercial firm with offices 
in London, Guildford and Hong Kong. Our Clients include a wide range 
of foreign and UK companies engaged in all aspects of trade and 
commerce around the world. Our work is mainly litigious, with many 
cases being conducted abroad. 

Because of growth we need four more Solicitors, two for our London 
office and two for our Guildford office. Two of the vacancies (one in each 
office) are for people who would handle a wide range of commercial 
matters. One vacancy fin Guildford) involves work with an emphasis 
on insurance policy disputes, mainly marine. The other vacancy (in 
London) is for someone to deal mainly with reinsurance problems. 
There will be opportunities for foreign travel, and work in our Hong 
Kong office. We offer you stimulating work in a friendly office, with a 
competi tive salary and exceptionally good prospects. 

If you are ambitious, have a good academic background and a sense of 
humour, write, quoting reference 2159, to our Consultant Mrs Indira 
Brown, 6 Westminster Palace Gardens, Artillery Row, London 
SW1P 1RL or if you would like to discuss this opportunity phone me on 
01-222 5555, or on 01-480 6666 between 8 JO p jn. and 9 JO p jh. 


Company Commercial 

Excellent Partnership Prospects 
Lincolns Inn c. £25,000 initially + Car 

Our client is a highly successful medium sized youthful firm with 10 Partners and 75 staff, based in 
Lincolns Inn anain South West London. 

They have an established and increasing amount of Company and Commercial weak and the need is 
to recruit a young solicitor to take responsibility for existing commercial work at their Lincoln s Inn 
office and increase their activities in this area, litis is a fine opportunity that will certainly lead to 
true partnership prospects at an early stage. 

..Candidates should ideally have one or. two years post qualification experience in this field and have 
the drive and personality to build up a commercial depart ment. 

Apply in writing, quoting reference 2161 to Geoffrey Forester* Corporate Resourcing Group, 
6 Westminster Palace Gardens, Artillery Row, London SW1P 1RL. or telephone 01-222 5555 for an 
application form. 


Management Consultants * Executive Search 

Part of Bemdtson International 

BRUSSELS -COPENHAGEN -FRANKFURT -GENEVA- LONDON -MADRID -MILAN -NEW YORK -PARIS 


UK&EEC 

Competition 
and Trade Lawyer 


\$e are looking for lawyers with up to two years 
post qualification experience to work in this growing 
field. Our young and closely knit team is basal in 
London and Brussels, and although initial 
employment would commence in London a period 
of secondment to our Brussels Office is likely. 

In addition to a sound knowledge of the law, the 
work requires an understanding of economic 
principles and a willingness to leam about our 
dienes’ business activities and die industries within 
which they operate. The ability to work creatively 
against tight deadlines and relate to diems needs is 
ess enmi. A knowledge of at least one other 
European language would be an advantage. 

An attractive salary can be expected from this 
leading City practice. - 

In the first instance please write to 
Simon Ptotito, Lovell, White &Ki»& 

21 Holbom Viaduct, LONDON EC1A2DY 


Lovell, White & King 


COMPANY COMMERCIAL TO £16K 

Yowtg, flourishing practice mad to augment their 
team wMi a talented newty or recertify qualified 
solicitor to worit with busy partner. Good prospects 
and above average salary. 

CONVEYANCING TO £32K 

Medium size City practice wishes to appoint three 
soGcitors. newly qualified to around five years POE, 
as part of tries 1 expansion programme. Excellent 
prospects for lawyers capable of undertaking a 
demanding workload in Commercial Property. 


TO £32K 


SOLICITOR 

Residential Conveyancing (with ample 
opportunity to build own non- 
co mentions practice). 

Salary according to qualifications and 
experience. 

Good partnership prospects for the 
right applicant. 

Please semi C. V. to Jane Weller 

Stephens Solicitors, 

22 Mulgrave RrL, Sutton, 

Surrey SM2 6LE 



A challenging opportunity in Commercial Conveyancing 
£16,000 + banking benefits Haywards Heath 


Here in the Commercial Conveyancing Unit of 
Uoyds.Bank at Haywards Heath, Sussex, we handle a 
wide range and variety of commercial conveyancing 
for our own properties throughout the UK. 

Vfe are seeking a new member to join our small 
team of solicitors. This managememappointtnem is a 
challenging opportunity which would suit either an 
experienced ora recently qualified solicitor who has 
a knowledge of conveyancing work. 

\bu wifi gjrin valuable experience by providing 
advice and resolving landlord and tenant problems 
many of which involve high-value transactions. 

Wfe have cxxnfortable, modem offices in this 
attractive town which offers a pleasant living and 
working e n vironment. A salary of at least £l6fl00wfll 
be negotiated and our range of benefits includes 
an annual boons, profit sharing, a pension scheme. 


preferential mortgage and loan schemes and 30 days 
holiday. Assistance with relocation may be provided. 

Applications, giving full cv details should be 
sent in confidence to: 

A B Lydeard, Senior Solicitor 

Gotzunercial Conveyancing Unit 

Lloyds Bank Pic 

Capital House 

1/5 Perrymount Road 

Haywards Heath 

"Wfest Sussex RH16 3SP. 



Lloyds 

Bank 


A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS 


SWEET & MAXWELL 
LEADING LAW PUBLISHERS 
EDITORIAL APPOINTMENTS 

Sweet & Maxwell Ltd., wish to appoint 
Legal Editors to take responsibility. 


after training for practice and students' 
books, looseleaf works and Journals. 

Applicants should have honours law 
degrees and/or professional qualifica- 
tions. Consideration will be given to 
those newly graduated, or qualified, or 
to these with two-three years profes- 
sional experience. 

Law publishing represents an attrac- 
tive and potentially rewarding career 
for those with the requisite qualifi- 
cations and aptitude. For the right 
people we can offer the prospect of 
progress from general editorial work. 



to responsibility for a particular field of 
publishing, ana in due course partici- 
pation in publishing management 

Sweet & Maxwell is part of the Legal 
Publishing Drvison of Associated Book 
Publishers (UK) Ltd., and applicants 
should write, in confidence, - stating 
age, quafifications, experience and 
present salary to> ' 

The Persoanel Director 
Associated Book Publishers (UK) Ltd 
11 New Fetter Laie 
LONDON EC4P 4EE 


* Meredith Scott ' 

CORPORATE TAX MIN £30,000 

Long established, medium sized EC2 practice 
seeks soSctor. ideally with at least live years 
experience and in early 30's, with view to 
PARTNERSHIP. 

'BANKING c£30,000 aae 

Larger EC2 practice requires solicitor minimum 
one year admitted for stimulating and varied 
workload. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY to c£30,000 

Sofldtore, newly to five years qualified sought by 
well regarded twenty partner phis firm tn central 
London. GOOD PROSPECTS. 

PRIVATE CLIENT to c£20,000 

Prestigious central London practice seeks well 
qualified solicitor newly to three years admitted. 

CONVEYANCING c£15,00Q 

Recently admitted solicitor sought by a progres- 
sive EC4 practice far mixed work. 

Meredith Scott Recruitment 

17 met Street, Lomdem EC4Y IAA. M 

■ Ol-SSJ MS or 01-541 U97 (after office kerns) T 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 

Partnership / £45,000 


Twenty-partner firm in Centra] London 
offers partnership to commercial convey- 
ancer . with 5 years' experience of 
heavyweight conveyancing transactions 
including development work and funding. 
(Rec. Cons). 

74 Long Lane. London ECl Teh 01-606 9371 



badenoch & Clark 








STEPHENS & SCOWN 

EXETER 

We are one of the Urges firms in 

COMMERCIAL AND/OR AGRICULTURAL 
CIVIL LITIGATION 
CONVEYANCING 

These racutitt -provide fim class opportunities to pursue spedahst 
c a r een In one or England's most beautiful ones. 

We * progKssrw firm with modem offices in the heart ofthecjfy 
tad offer -successful applicants excellent immediate and long term 
prospects. 

AmltenB should loolv in writing with a CV. to David Dencon, 
Pamxrehlp Admmfanmor, Stephens & Scuwiv 27 St 28 Sowhemhay 
Cast. Exeter, Devon. 


COMPANY/COMMERCIAL 

EC2 

Has respected medium aired Cay linn a waking to reauita 
young, high ca&bre Sobotor B join fins, expanding 
department Ideally candidales wtB have touo years proven 
company/c ont me iti al experience, particularly in USM 
rdaied nansatnorcs. Academe excellence and personality 

ate also important icqnscmtm. 

VAT/CORPORATE TAX 

c£20,000 

On behalf of a major Gty based fern, we are reerxiong 
bnghL dynanat QtfX&dMes wth specialist. knowledge of 
UAT^rdatedaxpcnsBenacinaiieis. Previous experience 

urthm priialp pnirtyrg and a pmiraannwl q iaMirMlnn jtp 

preferred, ahriough reteuam expense a mare i mpo ria rtt. 
Applicants, therefore may be ex Citnoro and Exose Senior 
Officers. So taro**. Bursters or Accountants capable of 
providing a quality comnhancy sennee. 


PROPERTY LAWYERS 

A number of our clients, small, medhan 'and’laige practices, 
seek lo recruit young commited lawyers with up to five 
years relevant experience hr their expanding property 
departments. The work offered ranges from domestic 
conveyancing to complex commercial propeny 
transactions and planning work. Some positions cany early' 
partnership prospects. 

* 

CAPITAL MARKETS 

cJE20,000 + Bens 

Leading US. Investment bank seeks quality buyer aged 
25-30 to join its Transaction Management Group. The 
succesrful cant&iatB is likely to haw served Articles with a 
substantial city firm and will have some post qualification 

experience m the Capital Markets held. This represents an 
ideal opportunity for eariy progression into front-line 
banking rotes. 


For daaakof these aado*erpostttons.oomactJiMHiI»F*™«T or John Cafltaw 


Legal and financial Recruitment Specialists 
16-18 New Bridge St, London EC4V6AU Telephone: 01-583 0073 


DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION AND LEGAL SERVICES 

As a result of the Impending retirement .of a senior officer in The Authority and 
other staff movements, the opportunity has been taken to review and 
restructure the Chief Executive Officer's Department, in order to release the 
Chief Executive Officer from departmental responsibility. A new Chief Officer 
post has therefore been established to head up a Department which will 
provide legal, administrative and valuation services for the Authority 
The Council has an exciting programme for developing new initiatives and 
services, particularly to encourage commerce and industry and reduce 
unemployment. The Department is housed in a newly refurbished Vferehouse 
at the Docks, and all other Departments will be relocated in adjoining 
Warehouses dunng the next two years, as part of a programme to bring 
about the renewal of the Docks area. 

Applrcairons are accordingly invited for the following posts 

CITY SECRETARY AND SOLICITOR 

Safely; £18.651-£20,523 p.a. 

(Subject to present national negotiations) 

The City Council is seeking an enthusiastic and able soficitor with outstanding 
legal and management skills lo head the Council s new Department * 

The postholder will be a member of the Chief Officers Group and will be 
involved in developing a constructive and positive approach to the provision oi 
services to assist the Council in achieving its objectives. . 

Prospective applicants wishing id discuss the position informally please 
telephone the Chief Executive Officer (Richard Shakletoni on Gloucester 
(0452) 22232 ext. 182. 

ASSISTANT CITY SOLICITOR 

Salary: £14,862-£1 6.011 p.a. 

. Applications are invited, tor this post from admitted solicitors with extensive 
legal experience. The posthoider will be responsible for the day-to-day 
management of the legal section and reports direct to the City Secretary and 
Solicitor _ 

The -duties embrace a variety of fegarwork including fingaiwL advocacy and 
conveyancing, and responsibility for certain committees. 

ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 

Salary: £11.952412.894 p.a. 

Applications are invited for this post from admitted solicitors. The posthptder 
will undertake a variety of legal work and sortie committee duties 
Gloucester is an historic Cathedral City and a sub-regional centre enjoying the 
benefit of modem shopping and leisure facilities, it is situated in me Severn 
Mate at the foot of the CotswaWs with ready access to the Forest of Dean . the 
Wye Valley and the surrounding picturesque countryside. Communications by 
road and rail are excellent. 

Conditions of service include:- Full removal expenses and disturoance 
allowance up to £800 in approved cases. Temporary lodging allowance 
Flexible working hours. 

Job description and application forms available from: 

The Personnel Officer. Gloucester City Council, 75-81 Eastgate 
Street, Gloucester fill 1HJ. Telephone: Gloucester 31271 exL 47. 
Closing date: 17th November, 1986. 

The City Council is a committed equal opportunities employer and invites 
applications from men and women .from all sections of the community, 
regardless of marital status, cotour. race, nationality, religion, sexual 
. orientation, trade.uniwi activity, political activity, or - subject to the physical 
requirements of the post — disablement. 


GLOUCESTER 


City Council ,n 


SOLICITOR 

to £20K+mortgags subsidy+car 
New Barnet 


As part of the highly successful 
TSB Group and one of the UK’s 
best respected major Finance 
Houses. UDT has a bright future. 
Not least in the personal loans 
sector: where our operations are 
expanding at an unprecedented 
rate to meet the challenge of 
substantial new business. 

A SolidtDn age 25-35. with 
experience in finance or 
commerce, will manage the 
legal function of our Personal 
Loans Division, in dose liaison 
with TSB Group's own Legal 
Department 

The role involves controlling the 
aspects of the company's 
loan processing activities. 



United Dominions Trust Ltd 


planning and developing cost- 
effective legal services within the 
organisation, as well as recruiting 
and training other legal staff. 

The highly competitive salary 
is supported by an excellent 
financial-sector benefits package 
'which indudes a company car 
cash mortgage subsidy non- 
contributory pension scheme, 
profit share sdieme. 5 weeks' 
annual leave. 

Please send your CV to 
C). Brennan. United 
Dominions Trust Limited. 
Endeavour House, 

1 Lyonsdown Road. 

New Barnet 
Herts EN5 I HU. 


souerrons/LcsAL execu- 
tives aid 3 tucip elms 
'irflWTrd Wchav^vacannrson 
our rmiiH' reirrmp Kent. Sus 
and Sum*' arras. Asitioi' 
Tax tot SUM Manaqnw-tu. ? 
Ashdown Arvada, 

aowhoromn. Ease Sinsrc. 
08926 6&A99 


CONTlfflnOV* KHJCrnm Dor 

wi Town firm, good pmpem 
LIAK VWW CMIMJIUnh 
0956 251 &S 

CONVEY AN CMC SOUdTOR 

VtfMMiilro rounm town inm 
tlSSk Consonants 

0955 25185 
EENEMLPfUCTICC 
nlixi" Suwcx town lim 
u?sk N.PSM-K Communis 
0935 2SIH3 

UML EXECtmVC Hdmmtrni- 

Minim mundVmj Cl 3k 

xti-vtf-x ComuJumv 0935 
,.,.35183. 


JOSHuntlm whales a your ora- 
tion two ran iwm 
nsninrUMK' Him you lUir lo 
Htor Gamut ev» T«h 01-60? 
7905 


CONVEYANCING AMO O* wmk 
Stoll Sou KriKNor won Us 
VMrx mmvwf or 900 tt L-E- 
Maii Man* Arrord PnWnnrl 
0955 815506 

CONVEYANCING EXECUTIVE 
ov ■» MOI ■«*-• tor so 1 prw- 
Ir-r CIS C20.000 Vrreduh 
Si on Rniuimvnl 01 583 

0066 

UTTCATIOH WITH P.F. (or xoltn 
in uiui 2/3 ism- rdnau 
. rspmrrvr su 16 Man Male. 
V<MH Pnvoiiwi 0935 
NI 5.506 

souoToir AOMrrrni ac/ram 

H? South Wrvi London Firm 
ivnn-> onlnnlwm ui'ludmo Mo 
batr torvirs ComuOiaus 0935 
■ 25183 — 


IKE LAW ID Bristol Srwraslli*. 
VOrwifh Btnmngfvim? 

Ptartiir in Cmniin 1 Town?. 
itnnilUliiq ana irwardinq »p- 
podunibs W ralihrn Lau.yrrs 
al Low. Personnel Ol 303 1281 
>Am after Bus Hrvi CaH tor oh 
and prosen aavire 
BRANCH SOLICITOR Two nan- 
mr win Esm-v country town 

Hm Litigation unh 

pirrus M (nalrimviMl EI8K 
upsins Consultants 0935 
25183 

BAYSWATEK Sotituoi rmuire 
tielicilw tat Busy oenerdt prar 
lue willmru to undnUli- 
adsorarv on aoiuntaor TpV 
phone 01 291 1333 
COMMERCIAL CONVEYANCING 
niin no 5oliriiar with 3 /s 
\<vu% isprimHo Stt-'l stars 
Mah*. 4rtnW Pnv»w>I CMS 
815506 

tmoATioN soucitqr r m 

roast Mmi lor rw^ntls admit 
Iwt. (10K CoosUUaHIs , 

0933 23183 • 


















42 




THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


THE SOLICITORS COMPLAINTS BUREAU 

The Solicitors Complaints Bateau, which was set up by the Council of 
the Law Society to improve the independence and quality of the handling of 
complaints against Solicitors, invites suitably qualified applicants for the 
following posts which are now to be filled in anticipation of the new powers 
which it will have to investigate complaints of “Shoddy Vfork'’. 

REPORT WRITERS UP TO £18,000 pa 


This is a new post that involves 
preparing reports on solicitors files 
rallpH for examination, and 
recommending any appropriate action. 
You’d make assessments on the 
competence of a solicitor, and analyse 
the quality of work performed. Yaur 
recommendations will consider 
whether work is up to a proper 
standard, or whether the solicitor's 
bill of costs should be reviewed or 
rectification undertaken. 


Your reports wiD need to be 
extremely accurate, thorough and 
balanced, so you will have to be able to 
analyse each case clearly and concisely. 

To handle these tasks, you'll 
need either to be an admitted solicitor 
with some ten years' private practice 
experience, or to have gained a wide 
knowledge of the law with specialist 
knowledge in at test one area, -for 
example as a Legal Executive with 
litigation and costing experience. 


INVESTIGATION OFFICERS 

UP TO £16,900 pa 


The purpose of this post wili be 
to process complaints received from 
the public and members of the 
profession, involvingyan with other 
members of a team in researching and 
checking each case, and organising 
any necessary remedial sanctions. 

The work includes processing 
Complaints from initial analysis to 
presentation to the Committeefor 
decision. 


YbuH need to be a solicitor with 
at least 2 years' private practice 
experience, ideally including some 
conveyancing and probate work. On a 
personal level it will be important for 
you to be articulate, good at 
administration and to have the skills 
to analyse facts and opinions in-order 
to conduct investigations as fairly as 
possible. • 


Salaries on appointment wiQ be within the ranges quoted depending on 
experience. If you'd like to find out more about these opportunities for 
making an important contribution to the profession, please write enclosing 
your cv to Joyce Collerson, Personnel and Training Manager. Hie Law Society, 
113 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1PL. 


I Company/Commercial I 
p Partner 1 

to £40,000 

Our client is a long-established and successful medium sized firm. 
Expansion of their company/ commercial department has generated an 
early partnership opportunity. 

The ideal candidate will have at least 4 years' high calibre commercial 
experience, with the ability and personality to assist in the development 
of this department A following would be preferred but is not essential. 

For further information please telephone Steven Grubb on 
01-831 2000 or write to him at The Legal Division, Michael Page 
Partnership, 39-41 Parker Street, London WC2B 5LH. 




MidiaelR^ePartner^iip 

International Recruitment Consultants 

London Windsor Bristol Birmingham Nottingham Manchester Leeds Glasgow &WxWwide 
Amember of Addison Gmsuliancy Group PIC jhm 




null 


Freshfields are looking for an able and 
enthusiastic lawyer to join their busy and expanding 
pensions group. 

Previous experience, while preferable, is not 
necessarily a requirement but a genuine interest in 
and enthusiasm for this type of work is essential. 

The opening might well appeal to those who 
wish to expand their experience in a varied and 
demanding practice where future prospects look 
very good. 

Candidates are asked to submit a brief career 
resume, in complete confidence, to:- 
David Ranee, Freshfields, Grindaii House, 

25 Newgate Street, London EC1A 7LH. 


jabriel Duffy Consults 

RESIDENTIAL 

CONVEYANCERS 

TNEG 

Our diems, arc currently recruiting a So- 
licitor with up to 18 months pqe to work 
on a high-quality domestic conveyancing 
caseload. The Firm has an impressive 
client list and full responsibility will be 
given ax an early stage. The excellent 
prospects, benefits, salaries and back-up 
facilities reflect the success of this well- 
established and progressive practice. 

For further details contact: 

Claire Wiseman 
Gabriel Duffy Consultancy 
31 Southampton Row 
LONDON WC1 

01-831 2288 

(Evenings 8c Weekends) 01-740 0289 


WEST LONDON 
SOLICITORS 

We require a Litigation Solicitor or 
senior legal executive to deal with a 
varied and interesting case load, 
involving matrimonial, landlord and 
tenant, and general common law 
matters. 

There is an opportunity to become 
involved in criminal law, if desired. 

Attractive salary and excellent 
prospects for the right person. 

Telephone Ian Diamond on 
01-602 4631 

for further details or write with C.V. 
to 

Ian Diamond at Myers, 

Ebner and Deaner, 

Medway House, 

101/103 Shepherds Bush Road, 
Hammersmith, London, W6 7LP. 



Loughborough 

The Pharmaceutical Dhrtston of Hsons pic 
has an Impressive growth and profit 
record it is committed to further * 
International expansion through organic 
growth and selective acquisitions. 

This appointment, restating from an 
overseas posting, repots to the Divisional 
Secretary, and Involves the negotiation and 
drafting of a wide variety of 
manufacturing, marketing and other 
agreements, many of which wll require 
knowledge of EEC law. together with the 
provision of general commercial advice. 

candidates wil be law graduates, 35 years 
or under, able to demonstrate technical 
c o mpetence, commercial awareness, and 
strong practical ability. Experience in a 
substantial company will be advantageous. 

Starting salary is suffldentiy flexible to 
ensure that the tight candidate Is 
recruited, and other benefits include ftd 
relocation expenses to the Divisional 
Headquarters. 

Please send a detailed cv to Mr. p. A 
Odgers, Personnel Manager. Rsons pic. 
Pharmaceutical Division, Loughborough, 
Le i ce s ter shi re, leii ob& 

initial interviews may 
be held in London. 


Pharmaceuticals 


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ROSLING KING 

Three challenging opportunities to join our expanding 
commercial practice within a pleasant working environment 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

We require two further Solicitors; one with a minimum of 2 
years relevant experience and the other newly qualified. The 
Department deals with a variety of interesting work for 
institutions and property companies involving all aspects of 
. commercial property. 

COMPANY COMMERCIAL 

We are seeking a Solicitor of partnership calibre with an existing 
client base to help develop this aspect of the Firm's practice. 

Excellent salaries will be paid. 

Please reply with Curriculum Vitae to 

Owen Rafferty, 

Rosling King 
2/3 Hind Court, 

Fleet Street, 

London, EC4A 3DL. 


WALTHAM FOREST 
MAGISTRATES’ COURTS 
COMMITTEE 

TRAINEE COURT CLERK 

Applications are invited from Lawyers is respect of the above vacancy. 

The Waltham Forest Petty Sessions Area is situated in a comparatively 
small but densely populated area of North East London. The infinite 
variety of cases dealt with at the court bouse have to be seen to be believed. 
As such, this appointment affords an ideal opportunity for an appropriately 
motivated person to undergo intensive training and thereafter gain the 
wide experience that a typically busy outer London court can provide. 

The successful applicant will receive £9,357 pa. (inclusive of London 
weighting allowance), £10,485 after satisfactory completion of six months 
training and £11,985 after completing a further six months twining sat- 
isfactorily. Progression to a salary of £13.107 and above is assured after two 
years if appointee is then capable of taking all types of Court without 
supervision. 

Further details and application forms, which should he returned under 
confidential cover to me by the 28th October 1986, are available from the 
Chief Administrative Officer at the address shown below. 


J. Robinson 
Clerk of the Committee 
The Court House 
1 Farnan Avenue 
Walthamstow 
London E17 4NX 

Telephone 01-531 3121/3 


BEALE & CO. 

Beale & Co. are looking for able lawyers to fill the following 
pm i lions. There are excellent c a reer prospects for the right 
candidates. Candida tes sho ul d have betw een six months and 
five tears poswpiaJificshon exp er i e n ce. 

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION 

The work is wide-ranging with a particular bias towards 
building and engineering litigation. 

PRIVATE CLIENT 

Assistance is needed in our Taxation. Trust Wills and Pro- 
bate Work. The nght candidates can expect to assume 
responsibility for the conduct of mailers under a partner’s 
supervision, and would be engag ed in direct dtenKouaci 
within a short period. 

Please apply with lull cv. to> 

Mr. A. Smith. 

Beale & Co.. 

21 Great Smith Street 
Westminster. 

London. S.W.IP 38U 


LITIGATION SOLICITOR 
COMMERCIAL 

For a well known, energetic and substantial firm of 
London solicitors with a varied but commercially 
oriental ed practice. 

You wili be reqnired to assist in developing the 
litigation side of the practice which k well estab- 
lished and growing. 

You should already be specialisi ng in litigation, 
preferably with a commercial bias. The opp o rt un ity 
will be of interest to lawyers with a presentable 
personality and the drive to make a contribution to 
our growth. 

Please write in confidence to Box no G63. 


ASSISTANT TO 

COMPANY SECRETARY (LEGAL) 

An intemadonally known Company East of 
Cambridge, wish to appoint a Legal Assistant to- 
support their Company Secretary. Applicants should 
ideally have general experience of Litigation, 
Contract, Taxation and Company Law within a 
Professional Office. Aged 35-40. 

Remuneration package is negotiable from £1 5,000 pa- 
Please reply to BOX G43. 


NEWLY 

QUALIFIED 




We have exciting 
vacancies for 
Solicitors seeking 


IHiJtlWil.’lHL'lrl 


COMPANY/ 


An these positions 
offer attractive 
salaries and good 
prospects 

jjnv 'Personnel 

Son sweat-sow the 
i pnMssKHi miMinde 


Bounding Irw psnna north-wast 
London Ann rich a MU panmal 
erf Wry sa* Sdmw Mth com- 
menaa) conveyancing wpamna 
and elector r lam pwOass 
and 1954 M wort. 

The tsmaal padaoa w® be 
worth £30.00000 tus to the 
nght person and with a patnw- 
snp riio twfw rbcrtBs. 

Sent CV. to Box Ka G70 


ASA LAW 

LOCUMS 

Sotatore & Loral Executwes 
available in all disciplines 
cantrpMe. 

01-248 1139 

We wteome attunes from an 
prospective buns utth spedat 
pat-tune opportune® tor re- 
tired. semi retired & other 
cotonetmi lawyers. 

ASA Lm loom Sorites 

■"XW 


1 V- - 






Paris Solicitor 


Notre bureau de Paris qui compte une vingtaine 
de juristes pratique surtout le droit financier et 
plus large me nt le droit des affaires. La croissance 
de notre activrte A Paris, notamment dans fes 
domaines des final cements intemationaux et 
des placements d’actions sur ies euromarchds, 
nous amfene k r enforcer notre 6quipe de juristes 
de droit anglais. 

Une bonneformation en droit anglais, une bonne 
connaissance de la langue frangaise (ou, k 
d§faut une volonfo del’ acqu6rir rapidement) et 
la capacity de jouerun rdle effrcace au sein d'une 
6quipe sont (es quaGtes de base requises, 

A Paris, vous serez en contact fr6q uent avec nos 
bureaux de Londres, New York, Hong Kong et 
Bruxelles et vous aurez la possibility de travailler 
k Londres apres une periodeJnitiale de trois arts a 
Paris. 

Veulllez ticrire en joignant un C.V. (en anglais 
ou en frangais) sous Ja r^f^ence 100 a G.B. 
Sales, Unklaters & Paines, Barrington House, 
59-67 Gresham Street, London EC2V 7JA. 


LINKLATERS & PAINES 


i 

fl 



INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL 


BAWiaiK 


LONDON ■ BAHRAIN -SINGAPORE • HONG KONG 


Our international banking and capital markets practice 
is carried on in each of these important coramerckl and 
financial centres- We are looking for solicitors who wish 
co train in bankir^and capital markets work as well as 
those with relevant experience. 

If you are an able and an ambitious young lawyer with a 
good academic record, keen to become involved in the 
stimulating challenge of international financial law; we 
would like to hear from you. Successful applicants will 
join one of our banking groups in London and may 
subsequently have die opportunity to work in our 
overseas offices. 

Apply with foil curriculum "vitae to Sally Hornsby; 
Coward Chance, Royex House, Aldermanbury Square, 
London EC2V 7LD. 


COWARP 

CHANCE 



ROYAL AIR FORCE LEGAL OFFICERS 


A Selection Board wm be beta 
shortly to recruit offic e rs far the 
RAF Legal Branch. 

Applications are invited from 
banisters or solicitors aged be- 
tween 26-32 who bam experience 
in criminal and family ter and in. 
advocacy. 

Successful candidates will be 
ccuxurrissioned ix> the rank of Flight 
Lieutenant at asalary commencing 
at £13453* Subject to satis fa ct o ry 
service, officers cm a permanent 
commission will normally have a 
career to age 60 with ifma pro- 
motion to the rank .of Wing ■ 
Commander; Promotion beyond 
that rank is by selection. 

Initially officers will serve fa 


T i C fl i dop but opportunities will occur 
for service abroad on tours of duty 

for up to three years. 

Fbr further information a nd 
details of career prospects, write 
with campsebeniswe car to: 

Air Commodore R. T Dawscaa, RAF. 
Directorate of Legal Services (LG), 
(09/20/ 1 ol Lacan House, Theobalds 
Road, London wcg9KE 

*]fiQ&87 pa? Kata. J» 





RAFOFFICER 


iTTTrnT^ii 


OPPORTUNITY! 



(0708-7553614 

Res. Can. 


MID-ESSEX 

Kstablrilmri and ezpmd- 
ing practice requires 
Anbtmt Solicitor (not 
ka than 2-3 smotf poet 
admission exnerisDcef to 
take <&arflB«busyti£ig»- 
tkm department - avD 
and matrimonial and 
some advocacy. - ‘ 

•' Salary op to £lSjO00- 
Please send cv to: 
Brace Siutpaou, 
144 BiSli Street, 
BiDericay, 

Eases CM12 9DF. 
Tel: 02774-5862 1 . 


HEAD OF 

CHAMBERS 

EsiaWishcd common law 
set in the Temple seeks a 
Silk (dr a Junior with 
comparable practice} to. 
become Head of 
Chambers. ... 
P/eme reply in confidence, 
to The Presat Head of 
Chamber*. C/9 BOX ; 


South East Thames 

Regional Health Authority 


ASSISTANT 

Salt 14 Salary 

£10,874 - £13,222 per atm 

You wffl be a member of a team of Officers in the’ 
Section each wfflr responsbllity for pravfoing legal 
services to a specified nuntfnr of District Health 
Authorities in the Region. 

An application form aixf job description may be 
obtained from:- Regional Pflrsorioel Divfcsion, Thrift 
.House; Cof&ngton Avenoe, BexWH-on-Sea, East 
Sussex. Tele^iore. (0424) 222555, extension 
3147. 

OostUB date: 7» Norember 1988. Ref: 8176. 


* V 




















V 



European Law Report 

Transsexual’s rights not breached 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 . . _ LAW/SPORT 

Strasbourg j jupo: karen briggs is a name writ large in the dojo of fame 


100* Cl G 

House 

V 7JA. 





& PA IX KS 


FINAV 







Rees v United Kingdom 

Sfl 0 " Ryswdal. Presidem 
and Judges Jlior Viihjamsson. 

0. Bindschcdter-Roben, G. 

^rgrcn. F. Golcuklu. F. 
Matscter. j, Pmheiro Farm ha 
LrE. Pcitm. b. WabK, Sir 
Vincent Evans, c. Russo. R. 
Bernhard!. J, Gersing, a. 
Spudmarm and a. Donner 
(Cast No 2/1 985/88/135) 
judgment October 17 ] 

The European Court or Hu- 
man Rights rejected, by twelve 
votes to three, the claim of Mr 
Mark Rees, a transsexual, that 
he was a victim of national 
legislation and practices con- 
trary to his right to respect for 
his private life, enshrined in 
article S of the European 
Convention on Human Rights, 
and. unanimously, his claim 
that ihc impossibility under 
English law for him to-enter into 
a valid contract of marriage with 
a woman amounted to a viola- 
tion of his right to marry as 
guaranteed by article 12 of the 
convention. 

At birth, in 1942, the ap- 
plicant possessed all the phys- 
ical and biological 
characteristics of a child of the 
female sex. However, from a 
lender age the child started to 
exhibit masculine behaviour 
and was ambiguous in 
appearance. 

Treatment for sexual conver- 
sion began in 1970 and the 
applicant changed her female 
forenames to masculine ones in 
1971. He had been living as a 
male ever since and he was 
socially accepted as such, fn 
1977 he changed his name 
again, to Mark Nicholas Alban 
Rees, his present name. 

• Except for his birth certificate, 
all official documents today 
refer to him by his new names 
and the prefix “Mr" where such 
prefix was used. His application 
to have also the birth register 
corrected so as to reflect his 
change of sexual identity was 
turned down by the Registrar 
General on November 25, 1 980. 

In the United Kingdom no 
uniform, general decision had 
been adopted either by the 
legislature or by the courts as to 
the civil status of post-operative 
transsexuals. 

However, with regard to mar- 
riage, for example, which under 
English law was open only to 
persons of opposite sex, the 


established case-law was that of . not dear-cut especially as far as 
four criteria typically positive obligations were eon- 
determinmg sex — chromo- ceraed: having regard to the 
somal. gonadal, genital and diversity of the practices fol- 


psychologita] factors.- The first 
three, that is. the biological 
ones, determined .whether the 
persons concerned were respec- 
tively man and woman. 

Furthermore there was no 
integrated system of civil status 
registration, but only separate 
registers for births, marriages, 
deaths and adoptions, which 
recorded the relevant events in 


they 

is. as historical facts, without, 

except in special circumstances 

(such as adoption or legitima- 
tion). mentioning changes (of 
name, address, etc) which in 
other states were registered. 

Persons were free to change 
their names at will with little or 
no formality. Civil status certifi- 
cates or equivalent current iden- 
tity documents were not in use 
or required. Where some form 
of identification was needed, 
that was normally met by the 
production of a driving licence 
ora passport. 

Sexual reassignment opera- 
tions were permitted without 
legal formalities. The operations 
and treatment might, as in the 
case of Mr Ross, be carried out 
under the National Health 
Service. 

In its report of December 12, 
1984, the European Commis- 
sion of Human Rights expressed 
the unanimous opinion that 
there had been a breach of 
article 8 but not of article 12. 

(n its judgment, the European 
Court or Human Rights held as 
follows: 

Although the essential object 
of article 8 was to protect the 
individual against arbitrary 
interference by the public 
authorities, there might in addi- 
tion be positive obligations 
inherent in an effective respect 
for private life, albeit subject to 
the state's margin of 
appreciation. 

In the present case it was the 
existence and scope of such 
“positive" obligations which 
had to be determined. The mere 
refusal to alter the register of 
births or to issue birth certifi- 
cates whose contents and nature 
differ from those of the birth 
register cannot be considered as 
interferences. 

The notion of “respect" was 


lowed and the situations obtain- 
ing in the contracting states, the 
notion's requirements would 
vary considerably from case to 
case. 

There was at present little 
common ground between the 
contracting states in this area 
and that, generally speaking, the 
law appears to be in a transi- 
tional stage. 

Accordingly, this was an area 
in which the contracting parties 
enjoy a wide margin of 
appreciation. 

Regard must therefore be had 
u> the fair balance that had to be 
struck between the general in- 
terest of the community and the 
interests of the individual, the 
search for which balance was 
inherent in the whole of the 
convention. 

In striking this balance the 
aims mentioned in the second 
paragraph of article 8 might be 
of a certain relevance. 

The Doited Kingdom had 
endeavoured to meet the 
applicant's demands as far as 
possible under its existing sys- 
tem. -in which the birth certifi- 
cate was a record of historical 
fen only and there was no 
provision for legally valid civil 
status certificates. 

In those circumstances, the 
striking of a fair balance could 
not be considered to require 
what would from one perspec- 
tive seem to be the essence of the 
applicant’s demands, namely, 
the introduction of a new type of 
docu mention showing and 
constituting proof of current 
civil status. 

Such a change had not hith- 
erto been considered necessary 
in the United Kingdom, would 
have important administrative 
consequences and would im- 
pose new duties on the rest of 
the population. 

Interpreted somewhat more 
narrowly, the applicant's com- 
plaint could be seen as a request 
to have an incidental adjust- 
ment in the form of an annota- 
tion to the present birth register, 
and kept secret from third 
parties. 

However, the striking of the 
requisite balance could not be 
considered to call for such a 
secret annotation eilhen it 
would involve difficult prob- 


lems in many areas of public 
interest. Tor example by 
complicating factual issues aris- 
ing in family and succession 
law. which could be overcome 
only by detailed legislation as to 
the effects of the change in 
various contexts and as to the 
circumstances in which secrecy 
should yield to the public 
interest 

Accordingly, then; was no 
breach of article 8 in the 
circumstances of the present 
case. 

That being so. it had for the 
time being to be left to the 
respondent state to determine to 
what extent it could meet the 
remaining demands of transsex- 
uals. However, the court was 
conscious of the seriousness of 
the problems affecting those 
persons and the distress they 
suffered. 

The Convention bad always 
to be interpreted and applied m 
the light of current circum- 
stances. The need for appro- 
priate legal measures should 
therefore he kept under review 
having regard particularly to 
scientific and societal 
developments. 

In so far as the 
violation of article 12 was 
concerned, in the Court's opin- 
ion the right to marry referred u> 
the traditional marriage be- 
tween persons of opposite bio- 
logical sex. That appeared also 
from the wording of the article 
which made it clear that article 
12 was mainly concerned to 
protect marriage as the basis of 
the family. 

Furthermore, article 12 laid 
down that the exercise of that 
right should be subject to the 
national laws of the contracting 
states. The limitations thereby 
introduced must not restrict or 
reduce the right in such a way or 
to such an extent that the very 
essence of the right was 
impaired. 

However, the legal impedi- 
ment in the United Kingdom on 
the marriage of persons who 
were not of the opposite biologi- 
cal sex could not be said to have 
an effect of that kind. 

There was accordingly no 
violation in the instant case of 
article 12 of the Convention. 

Judges D. BindscbedJer- Rob- 
ert, C. Russo and J. Goring 
expressed a dissenting opinion 
with regard to article 8. 


World is on the mat again 


lira *■-»> 

Njjifcal (ewriri 


Law Report October 21 1986 


Papers protected by public interest immunity 


ISsSi!-., 

r i n mni w i r » '*■ ' "-IV 





Taylor v Anderton 
Before Mr Justice Scott 
[Judgment October 16] 

There was no jurisdiction 
under Order 29 . role 7A of the 
Rules of the Supreme Court to 
order discover)’ of the docu- 
ments or information upon the 
strength of which search war- 
rants had been obtained, on 
May 7. 1986. of the plaintiffs 
.home, of the offices of a 


company controlled by him, 
and of the offices of his accoun- 
tants. 

While there might be power 
under the court's inherent juris- 
diction to make such an order in 
appropriate cases, the document 
or documents in question were 
of a dass to which public 
interest immunity attached and 
in the present case there was no 
such unreasonable delay as 
would justify the conclusion 


that the public interest immu- 
nity had been lost 

It would be absurd for the 
court to order disclosure of such 
materia] when a definitive de- 
cision from the Director of 
Public Prosecutions on whether 
or not to prosecute the plaintiff 
for alleged fraud was imminent. 

His Lordship so held in the 
Chancery Division in proceed- 
ings brought by the plaintiff, 
Kevin Taylor, against Cyril 





GROSS & CO 
-BURY ST EDMONDS 
ASSISTANT SOLICITOR- 
COMMERCIAL 

Six partner firm in the thriving market town and 
expanding commercial centre of Bury St Ed- 
monds require a newly qualified Solicitor with 
an interest in commercial and tax matters to 
specialise in these and other non-con tenuous 
areas. 

Salary negotiable AAE. 

Phase send O ' to 

Staff Partner, Gross & Co 
84 Guildhall Street, Bury St Edmonds 
Suffolk 1P33 1PR. 


SCHOLARSHIPS 


KING’S COLLEGE 
CHOIR SCHOOL 
CAMBRIDGE 

CHORISTER SCHOLARSHIPS. 
A wri *fl be Wd on Sanity. 
1 November 1986. 

C&nttatos aged 7-9h n fenriud 
® t nr Ft* deads Inn: 

The Tutors’ Assistant 
King's College, 
Cambridge CB2 1ST 

Cioafeg date 27 Octet*. 
PlMM quote ReL T 


SWITZERLAND 



COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


[South 

«*VICIS 

0NK P*»" c T S l 
"SStant 




ii i* 1 * 1 
tituj i* 


3«*‘“ 


|l*-a ****** 

xMflurtfr 4<<M * 

B.W * <#**?■ 

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IBM COMPUTER 
PROFESSIONALS 

SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE 
TAX FREE OPPORTUNITIES— 
SAUDI ARABIA 

Our client a part of a major U.S. Corporation anticipates 
being awarded a further significant sized project in the 
near future. This will involve the operation of a large 
scale IBM 308! and 4341 distributed network system, 
with state of the art technology. 

Openings will include: 

Design and Development Section 

Section Head, Data Base Designers, Systems Designers & 
Programmers. 

Technical Support & 

Quality Assurance 

Section Head, LAN/PC Programmers. Mainframe Pro- 
grammers. Quality Control Specialists, Training Co- 
ordinator and Instructors. 

Business Analysis Section 

Section Head. Business Systems Analysts. Human sub. 
System Designers. 

Operations & Maintenance 

Computer Ops- Section Head, Shift Supervisors. Hard- 
ware Unit Leader. Hardware Engineers mid Maintenance 
Technicians, Section Head Micrographics and Photo 
Processing. 

Senior and intermediate positions will offer mamed^ 
tus. Good quality housing will be provided nee or charge 
with medical care and other benefits and a two year 
renewable contract. These positions offer an excellent 
chance both for capital accumulation and technical 
advancement. 

Interested candidates please send a C-V^jrith copies of 
aoiOificadons, if available now quoting rer JN/SA. dos- 
ing date October 27ih 1986 to: 

ARA International, Edman House. 

]?-!9 Maddox Street, London W1R 0EY 


James Anderton, Chief Con- 
stable of Manchester and 
against the Greater Manchester I 
Police Authority, seeking disclo- 
sure of documents leading to the 
grant of the search warrants. 

Mr Robin de Wilde for the 
plaintiff Mr Jeremy Gompertz 
for the defendants. 

MR JUSTICE SCOTT said 
that the search warrants were 
identical in form, save that they 
related to different addresses; 
they recorded that the police 
officer concerned had reason- 
able cause to believe that there 
had been a conspiracy to de- 
fraud the Cooperative Bank of 
some £240,000. 

Nothing of any relevance was 
'found when the business 
premises were searched, but a 
large amount of private 
correspondence and some 
photograph albums were re- 
moved from the plaintiffs 
home. 

The plaintiff contended that 
the searches bad been carried 
out without any reasonable 
probable cause, and that their 
execution had been excessive in 
that the personal correspon- 
dence and photograph albums 
were not covered by the war- 
rants. 

At an early stage Mr de Wilde 
conceded that there was no 
potential cause of action against 
the police authority, which had 
been , joined on the basis of 
vicarious liability, and therefore 
the proceedings as against the 
authority were dismissed. 

The first defendant would be 
amenable to an order for discov- 
ery if an alleged tort were 
established. 

Mr Gompertz resisted the 
claim to discovery on three 
grounds; 

2 that there was no Jurisdiction 
under Order 29, rule 7A of the 
Rules of the Supreme Court, or 
section 33 of the Supreme Court 
Act 1981; 

2 that the document or docu- 
ments of which discovery was 
sought were covered by public 
interest immunity, and 

3 that section 35(1) of the Act 
provided that the High Court 
should not make an order under 
section 33 or 34, if it considered 
compliance with the order 
would be likely to be injurious 
to the public interest. 

His first submission was cor- 
rect. the other two ran on 
parallel fines. 

The purpose of the discovery 
sought was essentially to learn 
the contents, and that did not 
torn the documents sought into 
"property" which might become 
the subject matter of subsequent 
proceedings. 

His Lordshipdid not wish, on 
this application, to hold that the 
court's inherent jurisdiction 
could not be invoked. 

Alter referring to Norwich 
Pharmacol Co v Customs and 

Excise Commissioners ([1974] 
AC 133), and Inland Revenue 
Commissioners v Rossmirtsxer 
L«/<[I980] AC 952), his Lord- 
ship said that a stage bad 
recently been rea c h e d when the 
papers were before the Director 
of Public Prosecutions, and a 
decision was imminent on 

whether or nm proceedings were 

to be instituted. 

There was nothing particu- 
larly unusual in a two-year la 
between the start of a police 
investigation and a decision to 
prosecute in relation to eases of 
alleged commensal fraud. 

His Lordship was not pre- 
pared to conclude that there k~d 
beat excessive delay on the part 
of the police: In such circum- 
stances it would be absurd to 
order disclosure when the de- 
cision was imminent. The ac- 
tion would be dismissed with 
costs. 

Solicitors; Edwin Coe & Od- 
der Woods: Mr R. C. Rees. 
SwinxoB. 


By Nicolas Soames 

It is only when Karen 
Briggs, the world bantam- 
weight champion, strips down 
to shorts and tee-shirt to do 
her fitness sprints up and 
down the dojo (judo hall) that 
one gets an idea of the sheer 
power she is capable of 
unleashing. 

Carrying an iron weight in 
each hand, she drives herself 
across to the end of the room, 
spins lit one fluent motion and 
speeds back again. As the well- 
defined muscles power her 
over the mat the sweat flies 
and the eyes are steely and 
determined; and one begins to 
realize why basic statistics — 
she is not quite five feet high 
or eight stones in weight — are 
fundamentally irrelevant. 

The voluminous judo suit 
in which she fights makes her 
look less menacing, for it 
softens the lines and disguises 
her strength. No wonder many 
of her opponents get a sharp 
physical shock when they 
come to grips in a contest. She 
has started to crush them 
mentally even before she be- 
gins to display her technical 
command. 

Fitness level that 
is frightening 

That is -why she successfully 
defended her world title two 
years ago in Vienna and why 
the odds are that she will do it 
for the third time in a row on 
Sunday on the last day of the 
world championships at 
Maastricht in The 
Netherlands. 

No foreigner has beaten her 
in her weight category since 
19&4. No foreigner has taken 
more than a minor knock- 
down score off her m that 
time, despite the feet that not 
only has she had to come back 
from serious injury — she 
broke her ankle at the begin- 
ning of the year— but she also 
has won big events when, 
effectively, she was only able 
to use one leg. 

Now she is fit. Frighteningly 
fiL "It will be nice to go into a 
major competition without 
being injured, although in a 
funny way my judo can be 
better when I lave to work 
around an injury,*' she said. 
“It makes me think more.” 

She speaks softly, with a 
strong Hull accent She could 
be talking about basket weav- 
ing. which is why a radio 
interview with her would be a 
dead loss — unless the inter- 
viewer was kitted out with a 
throat mike and spent a 
minute doing judo with her on 
the mat The gasps of fear and 
pain from the shock of being 
thrown would be very at- 
mospheric, indeed. 

For she is not just a world 





All Hull breaks loose when Karen Briggs goes to town. (Photograph: Hugh Rotrdedge) 


champion, but one of the 
finest examples among British 
sportsmen and women.- She 
won her first world title in 
1982 through fitness, strength, 
a little technique and a razor- 
like aggression. She was a 
terrier from Hull who scythed 
her way through the world's 
best 

In 1984 in Vienna she was 
very different, an accom- 
plished fighter, who had 
grafted technique on to her 
mental and physical armoury. 
She could throw and she could 
do groundwork. But now, two 
more years on, she is simply 
the best female exponent of 
judo in the world. 

This was acknowledged by 
Yasuhiro Yamashita, the 
greatest Japanese champion 
since the Second World War, 
who has been in England for 
three months.“Her judo is 
very good - the best," Ya- 
mashita, who has watched her 
with interest and respect, said. 

Of course, no one is unbeat- 
able and she is a marked 
woman. All her leading oppo- 


nents are out to find a chink in 
her armour. France's 
Fabiehne Boffin probably 
studies videos of Miss Briggs 
while munching her croissants 
in the momingiSo the pressure 
is unrelenting. 

“I think I can handle it," 
sbesays with quiet confidence. 
“I just go into myself. I know 
that my judo has been better 
than it has ever been and I 
have been studying the pos- 
ture of my main opponents 
carefully. So 1 think I am well 
prepared." 

She has' made one or two 
small alterations to her fam- 
ous stomach throw and tight- 
ened up her groundwork — 
once she has started a 
manoeuvre, few girls can es- 
cape being turned on to their 
backs and' held for the re- 
quired 30 seconds. This, she is 
sure, will overcome not only 
her known opponents, but the 
unknown quantities, particu- 
larly those from the Eastern 
bloc countries that are making 
themselves felt in women's 
judo in preparation for its 
inclusion mthe main Olympic 


programme in Barcelona in 
1991 

Only reputation is at stake 
in the forthcoming world 
event. Though the world 
championships usually take 
place every two years, they 
will be held in 1 987 in Essen 
for the first time in conjunc- 
tion with the men’s event. 
And it will be on those results 
that the choice of inclusion in 
the 198S Olympics, where 
women's judo will be a 
demonstration sport, will be 
made. 

With characteristic clarity. 
Miss Briggs remarks: "I am 
not thinking any further than 
these world championships at 
the moment If I lose, 1 may 
even retire." This was surpris- 
ing, though it sounded more 
.like a throwaway statement 
than a definite intention. 

• Miss Briggs commands the 
level of respect that Neil 
Adams commanded when he 
was world champion in 1981. 
And in the hard and often 
misogynist world of judo, 
there is no greater accolade for 
a woman. 



v. 


BASKETBALL 

United win 
record 
threatened 

By Nicholas Harling 

The longest winning 
sequence in English basket! 
history will be threatened 
Stretford tonight when Sharp 
Manchester United attempt to 
record their 24th successive 
victory in the Carfsbeig Na- 
tional League. It will be no easy 
task for United as their oppo- 
nents are Leicester, who came 
within three points of knocking 
the league champions out of the 
Prudential National Cup in 
Saturday’s second round tie on 
the same court 
United will do well to heed 
the lessons from that game, 
when Leicester sank 30 out of 33 
free shots in an encounter so 
lysicai that the home side 
usbed with one player fouled 
out and three more on four 
fouls. Bany Young, Leicester's 
under-rated 6ft 6 in American 
was the chief victim of United's 
indiscretions, but he, almost 
made them pay by putting away 
all his IS throws from the line to 
finish whh 36 points in alL 
“It will obviously be another 
dose game," said Carl Olsson, 
Leicester’s coach, who had no 
complaints about United's tac- 
tics. Since four or less points 
have now separated the dubs in 
their last four games, two of 
'which Leicester won in the 
national championship quarter- 
final play-off last season to 
deprive united of a Wembley 
place, clearly the Mancunians 
will once again have to be at 
their best. 

With Young in form. Leices- 
ter are just the son of side to 
interrupt' United's run. “He 
needs to have an arena to play 
in." said Olsson. “If it's the right 
game and the right team then he 
can turn it on." 

On Saturday Untied, who had 
led by 18 points whh 14 minutes 
to go. finally emerged for a 
quarter-final against Solent, af- 
ter Leicester bad transformed 
the deficit into a two point lead 
with two minutes to go. before 
United hit back to take the tie'by 
113-111. 

Gardner — 31 points — was 
United’s top scorer. The other 
aH-Rrst Division match went 
the way of BCP London who 
defeated Derby 83-73. which 
was less than half the winning 
margin they bad achieved 
linst the same opponents in a 
Srst division match the pre- 
vious week. The difference was 
that this time Derby had Sam 
Ellis, formerly of Tyneside. 
Their new American ’signing 
was responsible for 19 points. 

The other five ties all featured 
second division clubs against 
first, but only Tower Hamlets, 
who led Hemri/Watford Royals 
by men points early on before 
succumbing 1 17-95. came at aU 
dose w providing a surprise. 

\ 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Softball rouses 
the Americans 

By CoHn McQuillan 


While most of Europe was 
sleeping last night, the leading 
figures of the fast-developing 
international squash circuit 
were launching their latest as- 
sault upon the lucrative Nortb 
American sports scene in the 
shape of the Moussy United 
Slates open championship, at 
the Texas Club. Houston. 

Jahangir Khan, the un- 
defeated world champion, has 
withdrawn from the Texas field 
with damaged knee ligaments, 
but 14 of the worid's rop 22 
softball players are competing in 
the $30,000 tournament, along 
with Mark Talbot and Ned 
Edwards, the leading American 
hardball players. 

The US Open is a comm- 
ittee's conception of a squash 
tournament It is played on a 
converted racketball court, with 
an international soft ball, to 
American hardball rules and 
scoring and the front wall tin has 
been experimentally lowered 
two Inches, to 17 inches, to 
encourage adventurous drop 
shots and shorter rallies. 

Next week, the players will 
move to join a 32-man field at 
the Careen Court Gub in 
Toronto to contest the $50,000 
Drakkar Noir Canadian open on 
what is now viewed as a 
conventional all-glass court with 
a blue floor, playing with a 
lemon-coloured ball to normal 
international rules and scoring. 
Jahangir Khan is almost certain 
to return for that. 

For the touring professionals, 
these are two welcome stops on 
an international circuit which 


now spans the world and the 
calender year. For the inter- 
national softball game as 
whole, they mark significant 
advance into new and promis- 
ing territory previously domi- 
nated by another code;. 

The Americans actually had 
their hardball squash game of- 
ficially organized and registered 
long before the softball version 
grew from its English origins to 
be internationally accepted by 
half a hundred countries under 
the banner of the Internationa! 
Squash Rackets Federation. 
Like baseball and gridiron foot- 
ball, though hardball squish 
remained firmly limited to the 
Stars and Stripes. Only 
neighbouring Canada bothered 
even to experiment with the 
fester, simpler, but less sati: 
ing version. In the late I ' 
some 10.000 players were in- 
volved in the Canadian hardball 
game. Now the active figure is 
reckoned to be more than 
250,000, mostly playing softball 
on around 1.500 courts at 400 
dubs. 

The tide towards softball was 
encouraged both by commercial 
club owners and Canadian 
authorities keen to be involved 
on the wider international 
squash scene. Even the Ameri- 
cans accept the logic and. 
though many cling to the hard- 
ball game learned at college, 
others are changing to softball 
for the summer months and 
there is a reported 10 per cent 
annual swing from racketball to 
international softball squash at 
American racket dubs. 


TO PLACE YOUR 

PROPERTY 

ADVERTISEMENT 

IN 

THE 

TIMES 


TRADE ADVERTISERS 

TEL: 01-481 1986 


AMERICAN 

FOOTBALL 

McMahon 
out, so 
Bears lose 

Minnesota (AP) — Jim Mc- 
Mahon, the quarterback, missed 
Sunday’s match at Minnesota 
Vikings as the Chicago Bears 
tasted their second defeat since 
1984. Steve Fuller, McMahon's 
replacement, was manhandled 
by the Vikings defence, while in 
contrast Tommy Kramer, the 
home side quanerback kept the 
Vikings in contention in the 
Central division by completing 
12 of 18 passes for 239 yards, 
including two long first-quarter 
touchdown passes. 

The Bears never recovered 
from that onslaught and went 
down 23-7. leaving the Denver 
Broncos the last unbeaten club 
in the NFL this season, but with 
a tough visit to New York Jets 
late last night, while the Bears 
lost a winning sequence of nine 
league matches. 

Green Bay Packers however 
finally tasted their first victory 
with a 17-14 win over the 
Cleveland Browns after storm- 
ing back from 14-3. 

The most important game of 
the weekend was in the NFC 
West, but San Francisco 49ers 
emerged with credit as they 
forced a 10-10 draw with At- 
lanta Falcons — Stamps touch- 
ing down with imin 3 3 sec of 
normal time remaining for the 
Falcons. The scores stayed level 
in overtime 

RESULTS: Minnesota 23. Chicago 7; 
Qafes 1?. PWadelptua 14; Green Bay 17, 
Cleveland 14; Oricinnati 31. Houston 28; 
Buffalo 24. Indlanapafis 13; Los Angeles 
Raiders 30. Mian* 28: New England 34. 
Pittsburgh a Washington 28, SI Louis 21: 
San Francisco 10, Atlanta 10; New 
Orleans 38. Tampa Bay 7; Los Angales 
Rams 14. Detroit 10; Seattle 17. New York 
Gants 12; Kansas Sty 42. San Oiegc 3d. 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
Eastern Division WLT PFPA 


New Yorfc Jets 
New eng" Pats 
Buffalo Bab 
Miami Dolphins 

Indiana' CottS 
Central Division 

Cm'natf Bengals 
Cleveland Browns 
Houston Caere 
Pitts' Stowers 


Western Division W 
Denver Broncos 6 

Seattle Stehawte S 

Kansas C Chiefs 4 

URadere 4 

S Diego Chargers 1 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

Eastern Dhriskwi WLT PFPA 


156133 
196112 
143146 
181 220 
56189 

PFPA 

176192 

152160 

126150 

65183 

PFPA 

179101 

165100 

154152 

136130 

159201 


Wash'ton Redskins 
New York Gians 
DafasCowt 


St Lotas Cardinals 

Central Division 
Chicago Sears 

Minnesota VAmgs 

Detroit Lions 
Tampa Bay Bucc's 
Creep Bay Packers 


1 0 148118 

2 0 142 

2 0 169126 

5 0 98159 

6 0 97157 

LT PFPA 


Western Division W 

Atlanta Faisons 5 

Los Anoeies Rams 4 
San Ranasco 49ers A 
New Orleans Sans 3 


173 90 
156 91 
116130 
107191 
91 191 

PFPA 

160118 
130120 
170107 
129 122 












PAY 


GSHEai; 


RACING 


LEICESTER 


Fourth Tudor fancied 
to show his liking 
for Scottish air again 


Selections 


By Mandarin 

2.1 S Irish Sailor. 

2- 45 Appreciative. 

3- 15 Maiyaasah. 

3.45 Sharp Shot. 
4.15 Tirneswitch. 

4.45 Kirowan. 
5.10 Main Brand. 

Michael 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent. 

2.15 Sher Shah. 

2.45 Sleeping Duchess. 

3.15 Maiyaasah. 

3.45 Sovereign Love. 

4.15 Rough Dance. 

4.45 Primitive Rising. 
5.10 Main Brand. 


* * * it * 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

- - n uJjial HI tt ■■Z 

103(12) 0-0432 7TMKHJRM(taj,BF)(Mr3jRyfey)BH^lB-lW) " 

. . uneaten lavounta tt 1 

Racacant number. Draw in tractate. Sw-Pgura Tramer ..^.^5 

torai (F-feS. P-ouBed up. U-dtatated ridar. B- nwfc OggJ SL ^ rfwonee. Tta ™th» 
brought down. I^puup. R-refosedV. Horoeo ■ iS^^ Ti ifnnr'nrir'I-n Apcrwmats starOTS 

m™(&tta*rra?v3nsor. Fwwod. C-e yashM kl C- Priv ate Harxkcappw s ranng. 

course winner. D-OWence winner. CD-coma and P«»- 


AsiaeMtaBMsisSSSe 


s selection: 3.45 Sharp Sbot- 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 

Following that decisive win 
at Ayr a week ago when he ran 
away with the valuable 
Lochranza Handicap in the 
hands of Tony Ceran, Fourth 
Tudor is napped lo record his 
third success in a row in the 
Whirlies Handicap at Hamil- 
ton loday when he will be 
ridden by the same able young 
apprentice. 

At Ayr. Fourth Tudor beat 
Common Farm pulling up by 
seven lengths, even though his 
weight that day included a 
penalty for winning a handi- 
cap on today’s course by five 
lengths. 

The dramatic improvement 
that Fourth Tudor has made 
this autumn can be attributed, 
in part at least, to wearing 
blinkers. Provided that the 
startling effect does not now 
begin to wear off. I think that, 
with Geran reducing his 
weight to Sst 81b by claiming 
his 51b allowance. Fourth 
Tudor should be capable of 
beating Common Farm again, 
even though he will be meet- 
ing him on 111b worse terms 
this time. 

Trompe D’Oei], penalized 
51b for winning at Edinburgh, 
is certainly not harshly treated 
in the White moss Nursery but 
that should still not obscure 
the fact that on his last visit to 
this particular Scottish track 
he could only finish fourth 
behind Rivers Secret and Fu 
Lu Shou in a similar race. 

Fu Lu Shou has run badly at 
Brighton in the meantime so 
Rivers Secret gets the vote on 
this occasion. He will be only 
51b worse off for the three 
lengths that divided him and 
Trompe D'Oeil when they last 
meL 

Otherwise my hopes at 
Hamilton are that Entire 

(2.15) and Light The Way 

(3.15) will take jockey George 
Duffield even closer to that 
elusive goal of riding 100 
winners in a season. 

I particularly like the chance 
of Entire in the Bimiehill 
Maiden Stakes. For one bred 
the way he is. by Refidno out 
of a mare by Romulus, he did 
well to finish only 3'/a lengths 
behind Print over only five 
furlongs on his Hamilton 
debut last month. The extra 
furlong today is sure to suit 
Entire and Print has since 
franked the form by winning 
valuable nurseries at Newbury 
and NewmarkeL 

At Leicester, f hope to see 
Irish Sailor win the first 



wiiili 


gBBB m 









iafa 

i T i n ^ y ^f^rnSS i 


m mmmmmmm Sm 




Little Potveir, who finished ninth in this year’s Grand 
National, makes his seasonal debut at Fontwell today. The 
nine -year-old is seen here with his trainer, John Edwards. 


division of the EBF Soar Findon trainer. Josh Gifford, 
Maiden Stakes. Earlier this who both rode and trained for 
month. I noted Irish Sailor the popular owner whose 
running well in five New- colourful life this race recalls, 
market race won by PoUenate Today Gifford is relying upon 
and he can now fulfil that Aughra Boura. who should 
promise. Kirowan shaped suf- certainly go well following that 
ficiently well behind Some- encouraging run around 
thing Extra at Nottingham in Cheltenham behind Stand 
August to suggest that he Back, GJenrue and Book Of 
should go well in the second Kells, 
division. In this instance, though, I 

think that sentiment may just 

Results — page 45 lose out to Cobley Express, 

■ m ■— ■■■■■■ the winner of the race 12 

Narrowly beaten in her only months ago. Recently, Cobley 
ces so far at Salisbury and Express ran a fine race at 
aydock, Maiyaasah clearly Chepstow to finish third be- 
ts the ability to win the hind Broadheath and Duke Of 
reake Fillies EBF Stakes, Milan, 
peeially now that she will be Finally. Cowan House is 

eeting Hooked Bid on 31b taken to win the Redcar 
tier terms than when they Handicap Chase at Sedgefidd 
ished last at Salisbury. as he appeared to be going 
A more likely winner for better than Book Of Kells at 
hn Dunlop and Willie Car- Chdtenham when he was 
n may be Sharp Shot in the upended by the third last 
swards’ Handicap, a race fence. 




{V . n i J i 




5. 12 rank wOi f 


4.45 EBF SOAR MAIDEN STAKES (Dfe It 2-Y-O CoHs: *1,969: 7f) 0 

3 (12} 4 BOLD AS BOLD (Mrs R SWna) M Usher 9-Q 

4 (8) 00 BOY JAMIE (Mrs K Wnghton) M Prescott 6-0 

6 (7) V CLDf’roNfG Hubbard) MRyw 90 P 

10 (14) KAJJI BABA (Dexar to Ltd) J Ptrtop B-0 . 

11 pi) 0 MGHAM BROKE (M Hldt^) W Mriaecn 9-0 — 

16 (2) 03 KROWAN (B Hwnoud) 8 HuHar 90 .... 

17(15) 0 UMfEMttpJsdaonlHCoMigridgpM < 

18 (G) MA*CSOUO(H Al Me1rt6um)A StewtetOO — - I 

19 (IQ) 00400 miStCAL BaXS<R Songster) LFVggatt 90 : — E 

20 (Q) 40 PLANE (B) (Cept M Lemon) C BntWn 94) P 

22 (9) PRIMtIVE RBBNQ IS Namrtrs) H CeeflS-Q i 

23 (4) 0 RELKQOftA (W Italy) M Btoralnrd 941 1 

24 (3) 00 ROCHE’S (C Wight) J Spearing 941 ; 

25 (10) 000 SAW JUAN SOHO (A BaMay) B Stewens 9-0 PI 

28 (1) STCUUR CHARGER (Dr TIMony)W Wharton 94 

27(13) THAMBY CROFT (R McGcevy) L Plggott 9fl i — R 

198& SHANNON VALE 9-0. W Carson (11-g) J Dunlop 11 ran 


l3rdoM9toOoad 

^■ttjodds-onlnshacJ 
last time. EariterB-1 1)1l2nd 
, w»i PEARLITICfS-HiB 


• 99 7-2 


BCroeetoy 
Pat Eddery 
. BCaidbaa 
WHmws 
__ N Howe 


nmfr ff 

JISEXT 


' M wrr= 

i h V. * >i ■lie "A ' if 


1 % ' J f wiMl 1 M I 1 . ' ? ItS ffSj 


races so far at Salisbury and Express rai 
Haydock, Maiyaasah clearly Chepstow t 
has the ability to win the hind Broad! 
W reake Fillies EBF Stakes, Milan, 
especially now that she wW be Finally. < 
meeting Hooked Bid on 31b taken to ' 
better terms than when they Handicap C 
clashed last at Salisbury. as he appe 
A more likely winner fix’ better than 
John Dunlop and Willie Car- Chdtenham 
son may be Sharp Shot in the upended b 
Stewards' Handicap, a race fence, 
they won 12 months ago with _ 

Patriacb. Sunk en 

No one will be keener to win ujKESisfc a.* 
the Derek Wigan Memorial SuSStom: ais 
Chase at Fontwell than the a** Mans Bay. 


ji u ay^i y ,j) i,w r A’iM y ri 

i j'TfpJji jC U 'i i ); ' i7 | . .w' 4. ; 1 1 h i n f *1 


10, 13 ran). That 


^ocxL Aug 12). PLANE 8Bi test Bne. Pravun^ (B-7| 5KI481 of Slo LocMbn (B-7) at York (71. £31 79, good. July 
Section: KWOWAN 

5.10 WVMESWOLD CLMMNQ STAKES (Db II: 2-Y-O: £2,488: 6f) (20 runners) 

- 1 (13) 000 DAUN11IIQ PROSPECT fG HemdfleJRCuttteBM— N Adams — — 

2 (17) 000004 FREDOC ASHTON (B)(Lnl HattnglDr^ D Morlajr 93 ROiwrt 

5 (12) 0 UAHLY BOy(M ian4a) M Jama 9^3 TLaraw — KM 

12 0 BEE BEE CEE (B Vine) M FaiharstorvGorBjy 8-13 4Md 

14(10) CODES MESSAGE (T Ramsdai) R Snpaon 8-13~~-—— — SWUnforih — 6-1 

21 (5) 00 BALiNESEDANCBt(P Hammond) R Hannon frio BHobm 80 — 

25 (18) 0044 MUSICAL RHAPSODY (A Goddsn^G PrHchanKJonianB-lO^. PaolEddnnr 80 5-1 

27 (15) 100202 SHARPHAVB1 (0|(M Brittam)M Britten 9-10 — AM«nro(7) 91 7-1 

30 (20) 000000 TAKE EFFECT (M Brittain) M Britain 8-9 — 8S — 

32 (7) NEIZER(S Squires) MTbmpttH 6-7 — RCodama* 

35 (» 333000 PASHIIMA(MreMMoriB/)TftlrhufatfrB. — R» •» — 

39 (4) 0000 HIQHPAUjnN LYMEY (tJ Seals) R Hannon 6-5 GStHtay 

41' P} 00401 MAM BRAND (B) (Rodkhotoa Slud) W O'Qorman B-4 PalEddaiy 94F3-1 

45 (11) OO ESCUDERO (F Baton) S Morton 8-3 W Carson 

48 (2) 000300 ' LttASHAM (R Upton) P Mifldn 93 GBsster 90 — 

50 (19) 304000 ROAN RBEF (B) (D Caotw) MA N Macaulay 9-3 ; Gsy Ksflswsy ffl 87 — 

52 (1) 003000. TAUESW (A WfittiJwatf) R HofinshBed 8-3 — WRpao .97 — 

53 (3) 221330 THE CMPPBMAM MAN (D) (J RaKUto) M Tnqphsa 9-3 HI Emfr 92 4-1 

66(14) . BAA£rSTCPL8C(GBhin)aaunr84) P Robinson . 

61 (18) 20000 DEAR GLQOA(B^F) (R (boon) M Pipe 8-0 — M Roberts 86 8-1 

1885: San 4.15 race 


Blinkered first time ! 

LEICESTER: 145 Rrat Rank, 5.10 Dear 1 
Glenda. 

HAM8.T0W 3.15 Touch The Sal. 345 


: "fontwell park 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Johnny Turk. 2-30 Cobley Express. 3.0 
Splendid Magnolia. 3.30 Hopeful Kyba 4.0 
Arnhall. 4.30 Morning Breaks. 




3rd of 12 to Us Ban Rumocre 
(8-11) 7th. 

Selec«tt PRE00E ASHTON 


TRAINERS 


ESI. firm. Oct 14, 19 ran). TIE CHD*PS«HAM MAN, behind last lime: previoi^y (9-2) 4KI 
Rumowed (8-8) in Yarnxiutbseler(a. £887, good. S^l 16), with IBGHFALUTM LYMEY 


fUA 

nriera 

DV U 

Per Gent 

pVVIUAA 

JOCKEYS 

WbWBtS- 

Rides- 

FerCent 

87 

44 A 

W Carson 

39 

179 

21.8 

lot 

2&J 

SCauthen 

. .. a 

130 

215 

41 

- 2ZO 

- WRSertnbum 

21 

114 

19.4 

68 

206 

OStvtey 

16 

84 

17J) 

52 

105 

pat Eddery ' 

23 . 

183 

12.6 

S9 

113 

B Rouse 

11 

87 

11J3 


H Cedi 39 -. 97 44B wcaraon sa in 

J Dunlop ’ 101 26J SCauthen .... 28 130 215 

lSS : 9 4T • 22B -WR&Wtoini 21 114 114 

GlSd 1* 68". 206 G Steri g _ . 16 ^94 17B 

MraCReavey 7 . 52 135 23 . . 12.8 

CBenshsad 7 59 ‘ITS B Rouse 11 SI 11J 

• Michael Wigham had to pay Out £237 before riding Miltfen to victory in the 
Braidwood Nursery Handicap at Hamilton Park yesterday. When Wigham went to 
weigh out he was informed that his mount was not qualified to run because the owner 
owed Wetherbys £237. Wigham promptly came up with the necessary cash and 
Mififan went on to land an easy win. Wigham explained: T fancied Mid fan a Inland 
you have got to put a bit in to gel something out The owner, Gary Wright. Is a very 
loyal patron and the outstanding payment was dearly an oversight Mil [fan, trained 
by Willie Musson at Newmarket made all the running to win by two lengths from 
Crown Justice. Wigham added: “I have been on the 29-winner mark for two. weeks 
and it is great to reach 30. 1 am enjoying my best season as a full jockey, although I 
had 56 winnere as an apprentice in 197S.” ' 


Stoute close to million 


Michael Stonte’s attempt to 
'land a big-race double at Wood- 
bine, Ontario on Sunday night 
toiled narrowly. Shardari, rid- 
den by Walter Swinburn, was 
caught by Sootfijet inside the 
final furlong of the Rothman's 
International and missed out on 
the £209,702 first prize by three- 
quarters of a length. 

Swig burn Mamed the very soft 
going as the principal reason for 
Shardari's defeat. Clive 
Brittain's Sirk sweated up badly 
is the paddock and finished a 
disappointing eighth of nine. 

Half an hour earlier, Ivor's 
Image, representing the Stoute- 
Swinbum combination, had 


scored an im pr e s si ve victory in 
the E P Taylor Stakes. Pre- 
vionsly successful in the Italian 
Oaks, Ivor's Image trill ran in 
the Breeders' Cup Turf at Santa 
Anita on November L, providing 
she conns out of her race welL 
Shardari still collected 
£69.901 for bis second prize and, 
with Ivor's Image earning 
£92,716, Shade's overseas ham 
this season is already £942£9Q. 
With Sonic Lady engaged in the 
Breeders' Cap Mile. Green 
Desert a possible runner in the , 
Sprint and Ivor's Image in the 1 
Turf, Britain's champion trainer 
elect looks likely to pass the 
million pound mark in the next 
10day5. 


Leaders over 
the jumps 

TRAINERS 


Fltzherbert foils Irish 


MPfoe 

H M 
18 10 

M 

4 

>U 

"O 

M 

-3079 

G Richards 

18 5 

7 

1 

4-1638 

J Jenkins 

16 11 

7 

3 

-28.10 

W Stephenson 

14 11 

3 

3 

-25-74 

JfiDgerakf 

12 .2 

6 

1 

4-17.27 

Denys Sirttfi 

11 6 

7 

3 

-1055 

GBakfing 

a 7 

6 

9 

4336 

•T 89 

8 1 

1 

8 

432X1 

JOCKEYS 

u M M own 

P Scudamore 25 16 8 0 

M 

-2524 

P Tuck 

20 7 

11 

4 

4-2.11 

R Dunwoody 

18 13 

16 

0 

+623 

C Grant 

15 16 

9 

3 

-28.13 

M Dwyer 

14 a 

8 

0 

+731 

BPowel 

10 18 

15 

7 

-43.74 

S Starwood 

10 6 

6 

7 

-12.75 

C Brown 

9 7 

3 

3 

-2335 


Otoy two were declared to Tun 
tor the BMW Scries Qualifier at 
Chepstow yesterday bnt the pair 
provided racegoers with a One 
spectacle and a surprise result, 
the 9-2 chance, Fltzherbert, 
beating the 6-1 on Irish raider, 
Omerta, by a length. 

Brendan Powell told 
FItzberbert's trainer, Les 
Kennard, before the race that he 
(odd win by ridbg in front and 
the jockey was as good as Ms 


Fltzherbert set a respectable 
pace until allowing Omerta to 
bead him with four to jump. 
Omerta, however, could never 
get more than half a length 
ahead and . the pair were in the 


air together over the last two 
fences before Fltzherbert q sick- 
ened away. The two will renew 
rivalry in the; BMW Final. 

The Irish camp were not 
dismayed by the defeat of 
Omerta. James McMorrow, 
whose wife owns the six-year- 
old, declared: “We've achieved 
what we wanted — to qualify for 
the final. Omerta was beaten 
because he wanted the ran. 
You'D see a' different horse at 
Newbnry and hell come back to 
Chepstow to December for the 
Welsh National.” 

Kenmrrd, however. Is also 
ad a m a nt that Fllzherbert win 
improve greatly for yesterday’s 
race. 


HAMILTON PARK 


Selections 


8 PSP- OUAYSSIE BATTLE (OTM Janas 9-10-10 G McCowt 


11-8 Auqhra Boura. 3-1 tittle PoNefr, 5-1 Cobley Express. 
8-1 Round The Twist 10-1 Bnt 20-1 Donaghmoyiw. 

Course specialists 

TRAINERS: M Pipe. 7 umnera from 30 runners, 23.3%: N 
Henderson. 9 from 39. 23.1%: J Gifford. 30 tram 161. 10.6%: P 
Haynes. 7 from 44. 15.9%: A Moore. 20 from 153, 13.1%: Miss L 
Bower. 9 hom 82. 11.0%. 

JOCKEYS: 5 Smdti Ecdes. 9 miners tram 45 rides. 20.0%; E 
Murphy. 7 from 43. 16 3%; R Dunwoody. 17 from 106. 169%; R 
Rowe 27 from 175. 15.4V G Moore. 14 ham 136. 103V R 
Goldstem. 13 from 134. 9.7V 


By Mandarin 


IT 3202 MLANE3SAG ftosf 5M(W> TEUmrife^ 

14 44P4 ANNAGH GLOW P Buttor 5-10-0 _ G Amwtage (4) 

15 U000 JOHNNY TARQUflN R Ledger 13-1041— Mrs N Ledger 
15-8 Stubbs Daughter, 9-<s Freddie Bee. 4-1 Morning 

Breaks, 134! Mtanessa. 8-1 Armagh Glow. 20-1 others. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 

2.15 Entire. Z1 5 Entire. 

2.45 Websters Feast. 2.45 Ainas hme. 

3.15 Light The Way. 3.15 Light The Way. 

3.45 Rivers Secret. 3.45 Be CarefuL 

4.15 SpringwelL 4.15 SpringwelL 

4.45 FOURTH TUDOR (nap). 4.45 Fourth Tudor. 

By Michael Seely. 

2.45 HD may. 4.45 S S SANTO (nap). 

The Times Private Handicapper’s lop rating: 4.45 FOURTH TUDOR. 


4.15 SpringwelL 
4.45 Fourth Tud 


SEDGEFIELD 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Renrcbo. 2.30 Step On. 3.0 Gowari House. 
3.30 Dutch Lord. 4,0 Border Peril. 4.30 Doughty 
Rebel. 


Going: good to firm 

2.0 OUARRINGTON NOVICE HURDLE (£574: 
2m 40 (10 runners) 

1 3 1 BMFfELO EXPRESS Denys Snwti 5-10-10- A Smith (7) 

2 0-20 CAPERSON J Johnson ID-10 REamataw 

4 0(43 POINT CLEAR G Morgan 6-10-10 D Shaw 

5 0322 RENREBOG Richards 9-10-10 — PTnek 

6 0 TOWER HOPE Mrs GRereley 5-10-10 PMvenW 

7 PB-0 TULLVCANNA J Wade B-10-10 K Jones 

8 000- DALTON DANDY V HaE 4- 109 Mr A Orkney 

9 RIMSDALE Miss M Bsl 4-10-9 . CGmM 

70 004 TRAOJASARSHAUOL W»an»4-10-B B Crank 

12 03P- GO GIPSY N Chamberlan 4-10-4 A String* 

7-4 RenretM. 100-30 Go Qpsy. 9-2 Tower Hope. 6-1 Port 
dear. 8-1 Caperson. 12-1 Track Marshall 14-1 othera. 

2.30 GHINDON CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS 
SELLING HURDLE (£470: 2m) (3) 

1 0 BUCKS BOLT J Berry 4-1 M2 Shaman Janes 

5 3222 STEP ON H Dale 3-1M. . ...... M BcMby 

G 3J FRAHMWSS(BJWJSr4n3.1(M STumar 

1-2 Step On. 5-2 Fraud* NHss. 4-1 Sucta Bolt 


3.0 REDCAR HANDICAP CHASE (£1.754: 2m 4f) 

( 5 ) 

1 212F GOWAN HOUSE (CDJBF) w A Stephenson 7-il-iQ 

h Lamb 

2 021- WEIGHT PROBLEM (0) Jnimy Rogerald 9-1 1-4 

HI Dwyer 

: -133 BOOK OP KELLS (CJnJBbmdei 11-10-13.. 0 Button 

S 2 TP- BEJU VENATOR (CD) G Richartb 10-10-12 PTttCfc 

8 OR}- MASTER CROFT D McCart 9-1WJ~, A KapAy (7) 

54 Book Oi Kefls. 2-1 Gowan House, 9*2 Wwght ProUeffl. 
B-t nciujenaldr 10-t Master CTOtt 


ood to soft D 

ST) 



3.45 WHUEMOSS NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £1,616: 1m 40yd) (17 runners) 

4 (8) 00300 SVLVAN OMEKT (D Johnson) P MUctaeS9-7.j — AMcGkmw SO 

7 (17) 0430 BLACK MAMS BAY (B)(T Teh Tan) J Btartngttn 9-4 MWU» 90 10-1 

9 (1) 400034 BEAU BENZ (TBennaU)M-H EasUMtiy 9-4 M Birch as 12-1 

12 (14) 4302 BE CHESmiL (T Waterman) J Whiter 9-1 GPbWbM 93 134 

13 (12) 000300 CABUNETTE (B) (pswthome EmesBrwiits) A BafleyS-O AfaigaB Rictaards (71 « — . 

14 (Ifl 0300 AffllCAN OPBRA (Mrs E Canh/OB) W Saw 942 COww* as 

16 <3} 00120 FULU SHOU (D^F)(M YoOflJP HaSam 8-12^ ...THIHm gt ft-1 

17 (2) 21 GABiC LOVBt (CP) (E Hulchfajwi)CTlnW«r B-11 Wood go 7.9 

18 (13) 810040 HUNTBTS LEAP (C) (J tishnwn) G M Moors 8-1 1 31 LI 

21 (4) 0100 OnSttAL DREAM (D,V)(SHui) JHkK9ay 8-10 ! : m HRl 92 

22 (10) 4000 MCCALLUNJUraH MU) M Brittain 8-1CU ; K Daley 32 

28 (11) 443300 ALHAYAT (A Fousark) R BOSS 8-7 C Rutter m as 

29 (5) 000041 RIVHtS SECnET(r,JJ)(J Simpson) Denys SmBh 8-6 aOraoA 88 8-1 

30 002200 MSS BIULY(M l«)0 Chapman 8-8 A Proud S__ 

31 (7) 000241 TROMPE W)BL(N Ylssowni) J Payne 8S. ft IWarirgr ennu 

33 (8) 000030 KNOCXSHARftV (P WhUa) R HoSnshead S-S - PMOtn M _ 

34 (9) 000040 GARSEKBXY (Q (Exore ot late I Bedford) S Morton 7-12_____ JLoii 86 

198& CAMBUON 8-2 Paul Eddery 7-1 E BcSn 8 ran. 

4.15 HURRAY HANDICAP (£986: im 11) (14 runners) 


96 7-2 
8910-1 
SO — 
7914-1 

9 (1) 0 HOPPWGA»OUW)(Rac0goeraCUJ)CTlionitan9-O JBtaeedWe 

iz (4| 00 KENTON'S LAD (Keraon UtWos 4 Dev Ltd) J Ftogorald 94) M Wood 871S-1 

17 (7) 00 RUNBY(Mr6SPUn*fl)GBa«ngM R Weaver 88133 

2d (12) 00 DREAM DOLLAR p Myora) M McCormack 9-11 W URartoa • 99 9-1 

2S (10) 0 FLOffiATTMA (Maj J Green) J Spearing B-11 MBkch 

23 (81 40 JUST CLASS (Prince A Salman) S Nomm 8-11 jLowe S1 18-1 

29 (9) O LONG VIEW [Mrs LCatey) Mrs GRaveley 8-11 rpbm 

31 (2) 0000 PETANGOtRSpe&lQEAteton B-11 AMada* 

33(13) SNOWKISTpi Songster) MWOektaon 8-11 DMoboUe — F2-1 

19*5; ARABIAN BLUES 9-0 D McKay 10-1 M Usher 1 1 ran. 

2A5 FINAL SPRINT HANDICAP (£1,791: 50 (13 runners) 

1 (13) 000040 DEB8E DO fCJT) (N Rotwaon) C Thornton 3-9-1 1 II Tebbtat (7) 94 — 

2 (31 OQOOOO SPACEHAKBt BOY (CJ1)(T Drake) D Leans 64-11 GDoflMd 92 — 

4 (5) 120000 LULLABY BLUES (1X0) (P 8aMd) M H Esster&y 89-5 M Birch 92 14-1 

7 |B) 04-4014 ALNASW^ (D ThonO D Thom 4-8-12 A Murray 00 94 

8 (12) 430001 WEBSTERS PEAST (D) (L Oxenham) M Uccormadc 3-8-12 (7ex) W Wtarton « 7-2 

9 (1) 010023 WAR7HU.LA0y(GABF)(MBri!tain)M Utah* 4-6-11 KDertov SSF3-1 


f m 0033 SPROfGWELL (ASknpoonJG HuNer 8-9-TC — — : R Carter (S) 95 ry.g 

2 (9) 000320 ELEGANT PASMON (K Coxsn) E Weynws 4-9-1 EGneetffl M 10-1 

4 (13) 220404- LORD SUN(J Thorp) D~Moftatt 4-8-t2 CDwwr 85 OA 

5 (4) 002234 PEARL PET (B) (B Green} P MaMn 4-8-12 ! AMcOone ‘ M o7 

8 (12) 000 SHffiR NECTAR (L Turtand) G BeWfog 3-8-9 — j Wflfismm Mag Zl 

11 (7) 900340 VBUUBBRA (B) (R Artaittinot) W Pearce W L Ctamxfc 5 __ 

12 (11) 003203 NKOLM (R Brewla) J FtageraM 3-8-5 HUch » in., 

13 (B) 204300 TEED BORE (O ZswawQ W Museta, 3-94 m Wktbam m I 

14 (14) 24X1000 OPALFLOWERff: Hedtay-8Mjndere)HCQUngridge66r2 ODirteid ZL 


15 (6) 0-00020 SEAMERE (S Squrts) M TorapWna 3-8-2 

16 0-00000 CHOWNTT (C Boott^ C Booth 3-8-1' ; 

17 (2) 3/0-4000 StWiAR GW. (Mrs J Tynefl) D Thom 4-S-0. 

18 (10) 000 TULL'S DAlXtmra (Mm LMwyWn) aw Rlefteide 3-7-13. 

22 (3) 0/4-000 rrs HEAVB4 (H Outf) Mlsa Z Green 6-7^ 


. A Mackey 93 __ 

MMte 

TW wua to 

— JLotm 83.6,1 
D ow tai (7) — _ 


120000 LULLABY BLUES (CJb (P 9oW0) M H ESSterOy 94-S MBkch 9214-1 

04-4014 ALNASHHE (D ThanO □ Thom 4-8-12 A Murrey 00 92 

430001 WEBSTERS PEAST (D) (L Oxenhem) M Uccarmeck 3-8-12 (7ex) W Wtarton 96 7-2 

010023 WARTHBJL LADY (CABF)(M Brittain) MBUlaln 44-11 KDertov S6F3-1 

000000 BERMGRA GIRL (A Papotto) R Bass 3«9 C Hatter (31 

400100 S0M4ENELLE(CAV)(BWiaetis)JSW8san984 NCerifeto *99 8-1 










■■■iiAii u, . j, mm\ 








18 (10) B32010 HUHAY (O) (Mrs P Dunn) W Charles 4-6-4 R Lappto (7) 96 6-1 

17 (91 040020 DEBACH REVENGE (Mrs C MaSer) M Tompkins 4-7-9 A Marker 9010-1 

.20 (61 000000 TRADESMAN (CJ3) (Mrs M Rutherford) J Hak&tna 8-7-7 M Pry 90 — 

21 (2) 230000 WES8HEE BAY (Hockley PtgLM)N Bycroft 4-7-7 LCberaock 89 — 

22 (7) 000000 BLOCHAiHNS1COLAR(CJ^(N ByCTOfoNByatft 8-7-7 J Lowe 99 — 

198S: LADY CARA 5-9-10 Gay KeOeway 7-2 )t lev J Berry 8 ran. 

3.15 RIGHEAD SELLING STAKES (£1,144: 1m 40yd) (13 turners) 

2 (3) 004000 DECEMBRfiiG SandareonJE AWDti A90 JCo»ro0(7) 74 — 

3 (11) 000000 HOXUSANpLe^B Sterens 4-94 S Wfctelara (7) 82 — 

4 (2| 000000 tJANE^ BRAVE BOY (J EddoB] O Chapmen 494) A Proud 8615-2 

7 (S) 0-00040 MY MYRA (P Comvay) P Mhchefl 4-8-1 1 AMcGtone 8912-1 

6 (9) D/30002 SMRLY ANN (Mrs N Macautey} UK N Macaulay 4-6-11 T WUtams 8110-1 

9 H) OP- SPARKLJENQ WfT (M Tucker) D Tinker 4-8-1 1 — AD(dt*(7) — — 

10 (Gl 433314 KEEP COOL (D) (Mrs J B<gg) A Hottnshead 3-8-10 B Peris 91 7-2 

14 (8) 000000 FLYMG 2JAD (T (Jang) A Ba*ay 3-8-8 EQomrtp) 9010-1 

17 (101 000004 JERSEY MAQ) (B God] C TWder 3-9-5 — Mfikdi B99RJ-1 

18 14] 90! UGHTTHE WAY (BE) (C 8 DStaphenBon Lid) M PreSCOR 3-96. G Duffield 90 IM 

19(121 400000 MSS VENEZUB4t(V)(M*9SPopnrich)BS»vefB 3-95 J WKew 90 12-1 

£0 (13) 0-3000 RES NON VERBA (Mis M Baldwin) Nfes L Srfdt* 3-9-6..—™-,-. S WeUster 84 19-1 

21 (7) 042040 TOUCH THE SALE (EQ(J Btackborow) M Tompkins 3-9-5 AMadtey 8119-1 

1985: FfflSCO 3-8-8 J Bleaadata 13-8 f&y C TbomUXl Bren. 



dajtarp) 9,- __ 

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4* 



yachting 


Kookaburras 
put Bond 
under pressure 
in Defender 


By a Special Corespondent 


___ In three days 

> y of racing in the 

r America's Cup 

.. A Defender se- 

rics, the Kook- 
, aburra camp 

has routed Alan Bond's syn- 
dicate. The Cup holders admit 


ing because ofa flurry of lades 
just short of die line that 
inevitably slows the tr ailing 
boat-The teal gap was prob- 
ably half the final figure. 

The start of this race, by far 
the most exciting of the day. 


to being concerned. Kooka III was awarded to Gilmour by 2 
brilliantly sailed by Iain Mur- secs - However, he was in total 
ray, easily defeated Australa conlro j noni the five minute- 
III. The victory margin over 8 ^ n - siting firmly on the tail 
the current world champion £ f ““ s ^ an S e, y uncombative 
12-metre was 4min 3Qsec She Beashel. gilmour always 
did, however, sail with a wantfid left-»de of the 

course and the less-favoured 
leeward berth across the line. 
The two boats split apart one 
minute before the gun and 
Gilmour broke for the pin- 
end. 

When they came back to- 
gether, heading into a breeze 
that was now freshening -from 
die southwest, they were only 
a boat-length apart the whole 
way up the beat At the top 
mark u was A IV by 14 secs. 
Downhill she widened the 
margin to 25$ecs. However, 
on the second work Beashel 
foolishly allowed Gilmour to 
wander off to the left looking 
for the budding 24 knot 
breeze. When they came to- 
gether .at the bouy Australia 
IVs lead had all but 
evaporated. 

All that had, in fact, kept her 
in front was a vicious slam- 
dunk tack right on the bow of 
Kooka II half-way up the beat 
The red protest frag climbed 
the Kookaburra backstay al- 
most immediately although 


... sail with « 
damaged mainsheet winch. 

Australia IV, the Ben 
Lexcen's likeliest contender, 
showed herself no better. A 
crew error by Kookaburra U 
while setting the spinnaker for 
the final run gave Australia IV 
the race, but it was a hollow 
victory. 

Two months ago Bond's 
chief, Warren Jones, was con- 
fident that Australias III and 
IV should contest the Defend- 
er final. “We're not as con- 
fident as we were then”, said 
Jones after the races. “Blind 
Freddie can see that the 
Kooka s are fast" 

Iain Murray’s start against 
Gordon Lucas, sailing Austra- 
lia Ilf, was a match-raring 
classic. Despite having a man 
up the mast only four minutes 
before the gun. Kooka in still 
totally dominated proceed- 
ings. Murray chased Lucas 
around the big catamaran 
used by MacQuarie radio for 
its broadcasts and then forced 
him through the spectator 
fleet out beyond the starboard 
laylinc. When he was ready, 
Murray tacked on to starboard 
and headed for the committee 
boat, crossing the line nine 
. seconds ahead of his 
opponent. • 

in the first few' kilometres, 
there wasa tack every 50 secs. 
Murray never relaxed his 
cover on the big white boat. 
Then they settled down to a 
long port lack drag race. At the 
top mark Kookaburra III was 
ahead by ! min 18 secs. . 
Downwind little changed. But 
on the next work the two- 
month-old Kooka III, de- 
signed by Murray and Perth 
naval architect John 
Swarbrick. put another 
minute on her lead, stretching 
the margin to 2 mins 15secs. 
‘When the bullshit stops, the 
racing begins,* said Murray, 
steeping oft* his boat 

Australia IV's victory over 
the second -string Parry boat 
was as hollow as a drum. 
Kookaburra II skipper Peter 
Gilmour caught and over- 
hauled Colin Beashel on the 
third beat and looked very 
likely to do it again on the 
final windward leg up to the 
finish. 

Extraordinarily in such a 
light race and with so much at 
stake Beashel almost totally 
failed to cover in the final 3.25 
mile work. Gilmour was al- 
lowed to pick the part of the 
course he wanted and Austra- 
lia IV stayed vaguely in 
contact. 

At the finish the new Bond 
boat was 20 sec ahead, drop- 
ping back considerably from 
the 34 see lead she enjoyed at 
the third leeward mark. But 
the finish margin was mislead- 


later withdrawn." 


round 


13 secs ahead, and the I ead 
was identical after the two 
power reaches. 

The yachts were a magnifi- 
cent sight, creaming along at 
over 10 knots. In terms of 
mast angle Australia IV al- 
ways looked the stiffs’ boat 
but both Kookas seemed to 
have an easier motion through 
the low swelL On die third 
beat Gilmour was in a po- 
sition to cross ahead of 
Beashel But he chose to tack 
under her bow, believing, 
correctly, that he could lay the 
weather mark from that point 

They rounded eight secs in 
front but immediatiey had a 
major problem with the 
spinnaker hoisL It cost them 
the race. While most of the 
crew packed on to the fore- 
deck and wrestled with recat 
citrant billowing nylon, 
Australia IV powered bade 
into the lead with a sharp bear- 
away set and took the shorter 
lefi-ahnd track to the bottom 
mark. . 

‘The spinnaker filled with 
water and went over the side. 
They're a relatively new crew 
and it won't happen again,* 
said Murray, who has earned 
the praise of his patron. Berth J 
millionaire Kevin Parry. 1 
Sloppy crew-work costs races. 
But having had the Cup 
dashed from his lips Gilmour 
won't need anyone to tefl him 
thaL Warren Jones maintained 
a stiff upper-lip. ‘I don't think 
any one out there has got a 
faster 1 2-metre than Australia 
IV/ he added. 

In the day’s low-key race 
Scmth Australia sailed hard 
and well to lead Sydney- 
Steak'N'Kidney all round the 
course and beat her by 1 min 
12 secs. 



the worid: Barry Hearn (second right) yesterday announced the second snooker mini-league withm four days fir (from 
left) Steve Davis, NealRi^^, Cliff Thorbara mid Willie Thame. Also competing will be Hearn's other players, Dennis Taylor, 
tony Meo, Terry Grimms and Jimmy White. The package totals £500,000 over two years with 28 next year 


GOLF 

Theatrical 
finale in 
La Manga 

FromJohn Hennessy 
La Manga, Spain 

Providence seems to have 
invested the last event of the 
Women’s Professional Golf 
Association’s season, the 
£25,000 La Manga Club Spanish 
Open from today until Friday, 
with a theatrical sense of 
occasion.. 

It has drawn together Lotta 
Neumann and Laura Davies for 
the fist two rounds at a moment 
when the young Swede is poised 
to lake over from he new British 
Open champion as the top 
player in Europe. Last year Miss 
Davies received ’ a bonus of 
£2,500 from the order of merit 
sponsors. Ring and Bryxner, for 
this distinction. The prize this 
year has been doubled. 

For Miss Davies, with total 
prize money of £33,750, to 
retain her stature two conditions 
have to be satisfied. First, she 
must win the £3,750 first 
this week and, second, 
Neumann (£36,713) must be 
excluded from the top seven. 

Recent form suggests that 
both firings are possible, 
unlikely. Miss Davies has won 
two of her last four tour- 
naments, while Miss N eumann 
after an astonishing ran of 
eleven successive 72-hole events 
with no place tower than sev- 
enth, has dropped below that 
position in all four. 

Behind these two, further- 
more, a rare old soap is going 
on among sax players for third 
place, carrying a boons of 
£ 2 , 000 . 

The flow of events may be 
influenced by the feet that La 
Manga has recently been sub- 
jected to onprec 
vere weather. Rain has felka on 
and off for the best part of a 
month and a flash storm 10 days 
ago had the water roaring not 
rally under but also over the 
many bridges spanning the Bar- 
nmeo (ravine) which is such a 
feature of La Manga. 

The course is therefore piay- 
long, which should be to 
iss Davies's advantage, pro- 
tected by much thicker rough 
than usual, which should be to 
the more accurate Miss 
Neumann's. The greens, in the 
circumstances, are under-pre- 
pared, - which could be to 
anybody’s or nobody’s. At least 
the skies have now deared so 
that those who suff er the 
inevitable rubs of the green can 
do so in suntanned Mediterra- 
nean comfort., 

OROEROFMEmT jSB utesstatod; 1. L 
Neumann $*»). £36713: Z L Devtae. 
£31750: 3. G Stewart. £25.740: 4, D 
E24341-. 5. M Thomson. 


Otorah 
9. P l 
Mctabs. £21.153. 


Leicester 


RACING RESULTS Hamilton Park 


Going: good to firm 


Chepstow 


RAN 9-2 Tropical Rower. 5 .toanro'sStyto 
(5 It)). 6 ZIW&.14 Ruwwda (4th). Some 
□ream l&tm. 25 Hush Kit 33 Dreemskerry. 
Our Lana. Petatoud*. St Wendred. Tune- 
ful Flutter 14 ran. NR. Royal Meeting. 11. 
hd. ’.■I. sh M. 10L L Cumww at Raw- 
market Toto E9.10: £3-70. ££40. £1 10. 
OF E20 10 CSF £57 80. 

2.45 11m 20 1. TOLLY GALE® OWda. 
10-11: 2. Uno’a PW JP 8urt£ 33-lfcA 
Nations Rosa U H Brown. 16^)- ALSO 
RAN. s-d fav HemmngftKd Gray (6ttiL 
100-30 Penny Forum (5ft ). 11-2 Wow For 
Home. 8 IV# NO idea. 12 R&rtr (4m). 14 
ToHanda. Fitwon. 20 Goyg Greek. 25 
Home Jew*. Toots* Jay. 3 ? Acartem NL 
Magnolia Dancer. Magnoba Prmeees. 18 
.an S\-l. v.l. it. a. 1L W?CRmv« K 

Mwtentesad TOW 05.40; £3J» ; EyO. 
£700 DF £64 30 CSF £31902. Noted. 

3.15 11m) 1. WAAJS (M ROOMS. Ml 
fawl 2 Havel Ttoubedor IM ttfcjl-l): 3. 


130 Mm) 1. IYAMSKI (G Starkay. 13 
ttv); 2.*« (P Wfctton. 4-1); 0* ( 
Ufa (A McGnae. 6-1). ALSO RAW: 13 


Going: good 

y. 13-8 

,0 * 

, 6-11 ALSO RAN: 13-2 

Gaalic Flutter. flHigh Conduct 10 l^dy U 
Paz 6th. 14 Court Town, 16 Olympc 
Panta 20 Out Ot Stock (4th), 25 Arabian 
BUBS. 33 Yours Grewate.&sMm Player 
(5th). 12 ran. W. JU. H>. U hd. W 
Hasbnos-Bass M NmnsrfcsL Tote: 
£ZSO?ttxr £1-90. £1.00. DR £4J0. 
CSF. £152. After a stewards' Inquiry the 
rssu& stood. 


2ran.1L 


20 Scanty Lao. 25 Sunny Match (6M, 33 
Greta s Song. 50 Alrmrtanabfc. 

Tune Warp-13 ran. ibl A 5L2LTLA 
Siewart at Newmarket TOW £1.80: £1.00, 
£2 60. £330 OF £950. CSFX11.K 
345 dm 4ft 1 . HEIGHT OP SWWKK (B 
Croasier. 8-U. ?. JoUa West) (T WMira. 

8-M 3.KartMuv8axawr(WNewnas. 15-Q. 

ALSO RAN 5-2 Monca (4JhL 16 ROtfa. 
UaUM (6th). 2S>1 Donor (5ml. Andrea 
Dawn Bren IkS. 31. 41.41.1 til DArDumnot 
* Nuwteay. Tens- ISOftElTO. £220. 
£1 10 OF- £1350 C5R £32 08. Trackers 
Jewel (13-8 lav) wttnorawn. nor under 
or ders - nee 4 apples to all data. 
OwJaaen 30pm me potato. 


RAN. 2 tev iStthk? 1 GafttyN t«iL M 
Lawnswood Lad(feiL 50 F nmi e y P y itmn 
|5th). That's Motoong 7 rah, It. te. W. 12L 
id S Brawn « NawmaritH To»: £2.70: 
Ei.W. £1 00 DF ESSO. CSF £1354 
4.45 (71) 1. AlOCR COOKIE (W 
Newnes i4-i); : 

Eddery B-ll lav). 

Hits. 14-1) ALSO RAN _ . 

Act oi Treason, t Pndt « Pam. m 
M natmya. Spaa t5W Waikato Modal 20 
Acrmamrann (4m). 25 FUi So UIl 33 
Arrow bspvtt. Fell Apptosa. Just 
Somttnmg. Kumzar. Lady Lax. Lon 
Cartraw (Sm). Radwood Eva. Tjtoaraek. 
Toil Ma know 20renSI.1L Sl.l^.r-.l 
H Caras at W antapa. Totr £14.00-. £5.10. 
£1 30 £5 50 DF ffiOBO. CSF £27.88 
MS |71) I. 3ANNOX BAY IS Cwahan. 

i(MT fav). 2. Batty Jana (P Cook, i4-r]L3, 
SOvaKSaat :A Murray. 100-301 ALSO 
RAN SGanauea «HL 17-2 Spy Wt|*W. 


Z30 (1m 4ft 1. FOLK DANCE (S 
O'Goman. 10030): 2. Q®d% Hep* (A 
Cterk, 12-1); 3. Naakrackv (G Starkay. 
11^). ALS5 RAN: 3 tav Homme d'AKalre 
(«h). 7 Pulsingh. 9 J«a Lark. 10 

£44 SO. CSF: £44.13. Trtcato: E209SS. 

10 ffifl 1. AUCAASSt (R HKs. 10-11 
M&t Rate (A 

Wessex Kingdom. A. 11 H Thon^r 
jona* at Ne»mar*et Tow: E1J0. DF- 
BJH CSF: £2.17 

130 (6ft 1. CONCERT PITCH (Celia 

IjTSrHaetwnlW. (Akson Begley. 20-V 
ALSO RAN: 3 tw — 


Ooln^goodto soft 

2.15 (51) 1. LADTS MANTLE (B Thom- 
son. 7-1* 2. Mb Data (R Linas. 1V4 
fav); 3. Mvarstyfe (K DWfay. T4-1J. ALSO 
RAN: 3 Valentire Song. 5 OnderaKa 
Dawk (4M. 6 Dojrta (ah). 10 . 
Suneet 16 Prarraer Video (5S4, 
Brookhesd Gkt. Fttratous Lady. Kng 
Back. Tncade. 12 ran. U 2L U %L 3LJ 
Dunlop at Arundel- Tot* £12^0: £1.20, 
Z2JBD, £550. DR & 2D. CSF. £2SJ5. 

245 (61) 1. PADOMGTDN BSXE 1. (G 
French, 14-1 ); 2. Jersey Mted (M Bcgj.?- 
Ittav): 3. U Mena tJi N e Booker. SD-U; 
4. Wi nning Format (B Thomson. 12-1> 
ALSO RAN: 7 it tav Acks's Boy. 15-2Just 
A Btt. 8 GoWan Disc, 10 Stsvejsn. St** 
Aim (5ttiL King Cota, 12 Ampty. Rmh 
Bkch. U Simla Lass, Ntoxrty tfigWy. IS 
Lochmar. Pink NTtarky. 20 Or Miens*. 
33 vintage lidy. 50 Spertkng Wtt. 

Sonnedew. 20 ran. 10. eh hd. 3L ILaft M. 
B Stews at Winchester. Tote: £1850; 
£3il0. £320. £3340. £1.60. OF (Wit msr o r 

second with aoy other horse); £2.10, CSF: 
£11256. Tricast £439427. No bid. K» 
Cota finished tourth but was dtequaMtad 
(orteBngtoweigftln. 

jareae Owl (L Chamocfc. 5-1 tt tevfc 4. 
Do*>g UWB. 16-1). ALSORAk 5n lav 
Mesdowbenk. 8 Bom Free Aga in, He? - 
Amadeus. IDMrMubtas. Firro^Affl^ja 
16 Boa*. Just One ltora.A!ra hata (ffl . 
Rose LoubeL 25 Ftak P«jv Mr Motet 
aimnw Oornsi tfitfil JUS A DOCOY- 17 


«L W Musaon at NeemoffcaL 

£Ua E2L60. £1.80. £420. DF. £3320. 

CSF- EB845. Tricast E2SL67 


348 Pm 40yd) 1. ANGEL CITY (B 



H asete n g, 18 
Kay-Ess. Unta 
Mc a is t r osa. Sahara 


■(Slh), 20 H 
Maiden Bidder. 
KSWreOM 

I tLZU B 


of Mom. 20 Mtobadga f _ 

W: WcfSte Springs. 2KL 31, 


2. BrMMMAW (Pal 
. 3 Bridget 0*SM (M 
RAN B uuMriRDom.fi 


5Gengueai(5th). 
is oat-sc. Dxrtoae (ftm. 


Cryooc. 


; t W- 


RaitKih a Jan Contassa. 33 Cmvy 
Wna:!. Heaven omp Know*. Warn Of 
Low 13 ran NR Heed Of Victory M.1I. 
«'.l. 21 6 Harev Cert at 
Tote £1 *L £1 10. E2.M). £1 40 OF 
EC.73 CSF £1865 Alter • steward* 
ms&tf^Wrestet stood. 


Metody. 20 on 1l.2LW.Ni taL 2V4L 
^3 r «tc«StoQ S .T^:£mift2^a 
asor £14 00. £«0J)F. £69.46. CSF 
03157 Tncair £1.68941 

Hatch 

8 tev 

Sazcsrratoo 16 m). 

Garun* Lad 

2M ? BridUto at NMaMTair 
£180. &K £250. Dp £1950. CSF- 
Etf.12. 

450 (71) 1, (MBK9QU. IA Kmfteri^r. 
B-1V2. Jufleard U Oted. i0-il3. “ren 
(R W 5-1): ALSO RAN: 11J0 *1* 
2anyav fern). 5 Ara» (Mil i2 

Tnpta Entente l4ScattatOWLl6 ffMh 

On m>»). » GoortpratJaLK 
Rutnar. Mouta. 33 BfttanM W* 
Onndad. Gwynras. Martay. Phetoff 17 

Stooa m NmumarksLjp te, £8«j JJ-60, 
£220. £1 90 OF £3050 CSF' £7451 
Ftecaprt: £17255 


50RoekW 

Oak 8 ran. NR; 

uk. 71. 101 J Dunlop at ArurtoBL TOW 
£1.70: £1.00. sm E115a OF- £1150. 
CSF- £1057 

4.15 Pm 40yd) 1. BOI DORADO (A 
Geran. MM2, Artueir a ijnn a w 
Guest 11-a3. Ptecbborg (B Outtett 16- 
1t 4, OuaBeg (R Carter. 12-H ALSO 
RAN: 11-2 SBy BOy (BOiL 8PW0S0PttC*L 


HizzyGm 
jamda' PaL BMck nrnr. 20 Sawoe. Rune 
Track. 25 Fhnog Ziad. Ttemenm Fnday. 
33S«rer Cannon, teester Muse. 18 no. 
W. 2-.iL 2L 4L hd. B Hantexy « 
Neunaikot Tote: £3JD; £i.*a in2a 
£5.70. £230. OF- £450. CSF £1851 
Tncest £15150. . 

455 pm 4t) 2. MBStAN RELATIOM 0 

1) ALSO RAN: 3-1 rtftvMewgsBeyWh), 
9-2 Red ShOM m «-* ^9 

Our HaflL 10 Princess Emma®t>L W«s 
Masrewng, 20 SM, 33 Galaxy R»- 
eess.S0Breguet-l2ran.8L2i.hd.nk.4LL 
Cumam at Newmarket Toe: £350. £1.10L 
£340. £3.00. DF £S)20. CSF- £3557 
A&W a Stewarts' aquay tea *esri» stood 
t Plecepot £1255 


FOOTBALL 


Forwards discover 
finishing touch 


(Reuter) — Juventns and Real 
Madrid threw off their shacfclay 
at the weekend, hitting debt 
goals between them and setting 
up the prospect of a high-scoring 
90 minutes when the pair meet 
in the European Cup on 
Wednesday. 

Real drew level with Barce- 
lona at the top of the Spanish 
first division after beating Real 
Mallorca 3-0, ending a ran of 
three league games without a 
win, whoe Juventus slammed 
five past Ascoti to keep their 
lead m the Italian league. The 
Real forward line of Hugo 
Sanchez, Emili o Butragueno 
and Jorge Valdano — the most 
expensive striking force in foot- 
ball — has been misfiring badly 
in the three weeks since the 
team's 5-0 win over Young Boys 
of Berne in the first round of the 
European Cnp. " 

An injury to Diego Maradona 
cast gloom over the Napoli 
dressing room after their 2-2 
draw with .Aidants, which 
dropped them one point behind 
Juventus. The Argentine cap- 
tain injured his left knee after 10 
minutes but stayed on the field 
despite increasing pain, scoring 
the second goal from the penalty 
spot in the 64th minute. “I 
stayed on the field but after 
scoring the penally I asked to be 
substituted.” Maradona 
Maradona is likely to miss next 


inst Roma, who 
moved into fifth place with a 2-0 
win over Torino, the opponents 
of Raba Eto Gyoer of Hungary 
in the UEFA Clip tomorrow. 
Barcelona performed dis- 
in the warm-up for their 
rA Cup game with Sporting 
Lisbon, losing 1-0 to the bottom 
club. Real Murcia, while Real 
Zaragoza slumped to a 3-2 
defeat by Real Betis. four days 
before a Cup Winners' Cup date 
with Wrexham. Sporting scored 
a hard-fought 2-1 win over 
Braga while Portugal’s Euro- 
pean Cup representatives Porto 
struck their best form of the 
season to topple top side, ' 
Belenenses 3-0 away. 

European Cup holders Steam 
Bucharest, who make their first 
appearance in this year's com- 
petition agiinst Anderlecht, are 
proving themselves a class apart 
in Romania this season. Thwr 3- 
I win at Gloria Bazas at the 
weekend puts them four points 
dear at the top after nine games. 

The European Cup ue be- 
tween Austria Vienna and Bay- 
ern Munich should be one of the 
games of the round. Both sides 
stayed top of their national 
leagues with 1-1 draws at the 
weekend, but Bayern will bene- 
fit from tbe return of 
L o t har Matthaeus, who miwi 
their game at Btas-Weias Berlin 
because of suspension. 


Robinson 
to stay 

at Rangers 

Michael Robinson, the Rep- 
ublic of Ireland forward, has had 
his transfer request turned down 
by Jim Smith, the Queen's Park 
Rangers manager, although the 
former Liverpool player has 
started in only three matches 
this season. 

Robinson is also believed to 
be unhappy at bong moved to 
midfield. Robinson joins Terry 
Fenwick, the dub captain and 
England defender, Warren Neill 
and Leroy Rosenior, who all 
wish to leave Loftus Road. 

• Dean Coney, the Engl an d 
under-21 forward, has trad a 
transfer request from Fulham 
turned down because Ray Lew- 
ington, the player-manager has 
plans for him to join forces 
» g»in with Gordon Davies, his 
former goal-scoring partner. 
Lewington hopes to complete a 
£50,000 re-signing of the Welsh 
international this week. 

• Paul Goddard, who scored 
against Norwich on Saturday, 
has been offered a new three- 
year contract by John LyalL, the 
West Ham manay r, but after 
foiling to make a full appearance 
since tbe last day of tbe 1984/5 
campaign, Goddard is insisting 
on fust team football at Upton 
Park. He may receive his wish: 
Frank McAvennie, recovering 
from hamstring trouble, has 
now contracted an ear infection. 


HOCKEY 


Synthetic English 
the new lingo at 
home and abroad 



If anyone had 

predicted drat 
ticket touts 
wonld be in op- 
eration for the 
Worid Cnp fi- 
nal at Wntesdcn few, if any, 
would hare bettered ft. Inside 
the stadium where Australia 
defeated England M banners 
bearing die i ns c riptions “We're 
got them by the Seau and 
Kertys” and “England don't give 
a four-X’’ showed the extent to 
which tibe public iautgftmtioa 
bad been aroused. 

The verdict on the sixth 
World Cnp Is that ft was a 
triumph of organization and 
management for which the 
Hockey Association, led by Ph3 
Appleyard, deserve the highest 
praise. The attendances ex- 
ceeded all expectations, al- 
though the extent of file profits 
will not be known for about n 
week. 

As Appleyard himself has 
said, this is not the end bat tbe 
beginning ha v i ng put En- 
glish hockey on the map, be and 
nis team of workers wfll do their 
utmost for its expension. 

England, having dem- 
onstrated their organizing abil- 
ity to tbe world* are in a position 
to seek, in feet demand, n 
stronger voice In the conference 
rooms of die controlling body, 
the Inter nati onal Hockey 
Federation (FIH), whose head- 
quarters is in Brussels. 

The sixth Worid Cup marked 
the rise of a new dynasty which 
has overthrown the Asian rulers, 
India and Pakistan. The new 
regime has thrived on artificial 
surfaces and there are hundreds 
of them in Europe. In Australia 
there are seven in the main 
cities, on which nearly all their 
domestic tonma meets and inter- 
tional matches are played, the 
more important at Melbourne 
and Perth. 

In England d*** of 

artificial pitches runs feto three 
figures, most iff than laid by 
boroughs and councils. Much 
made of die artificial 
pitches at Bisham Abbey and 

lillwhull, » hifh are ma i ntained 

by. the Sports Council, for 
training weekends com- 
petition. The final stages of the 
county championship and the 
national dub championship are 
played at WOlesden. 

Last month Old 
Longhtoaians, who play in the 
premier division iff the East 
League, opened their own arti- 
ficial tnrf pitch and clubhouse, 
which should soon become the 
envy of those seeking the same 
amenities. 

Southgate have to Che 

synthetic surface at the New 


By Sydney Frisian 

River Sports Stadium at White 
Hart Lane and most of their 
league matches are played-on it 
and also the one at Neasden. 
Likewise Hounslow, another 
leading London dob, hare ac- 
cess to the same type of surface 
at Feltham School. 

Another artificial turf pitch at 
Prescot, near Liverpool, is avail- 
aide every year for the inief- 
leaeue championship, thns 
fulfilling some of the needs of 
the association for more ami 
more top-dass competition to be 
played on sod) surfaces. 

If anyone asks why English 
hockey has risen to such a high 
pitch, the answer Iks mainly In 
the surfaces on which a fair 
of tbe game is now 
played. The drive for more 
‘ surfaces must continue 
The benefits which England 
have derived Grom their silver 
medal at WOlesden are a 
qualification for the Champions* 
Trophy tournament In Amster- 
dam next June and their auto- 
matic entry into the next World 
Cup at Lahore in 1990. The 
main incentive for many players 
in tbe present squad is the 1988 
Olympic Games in Seoul, where 
they will be playing for Great 
Britain; but next August ft will 
be England for tbe European 
championship in Moscow. 

The first six teams from the 
sixth World Cup, Australia, 
England, West Germany, Soviet 
Union, Spain and Argentina, 
qualify automatically for the 
next World Cup at Lahore, 
together with Pakistan, the host 
country. 

Pakistan and India, who fin- 
ished eleventh and twelfth 
respectively, have a lot of 
rethinking to do, their dejection 
having been expressed by their 
absence from tbe closing cere- 
mony. Pakistan left with tbe 
firm resolve to put their house in 
order and India with the ferrant 
plea.to their own government for 
help in providing more artificial 
tnrf pitches. There are only two 
in that vast conn try. 

Out of a total of 42 matches, 
144 goals were scored, approxi- 
mately 34 a match. In seven 
matches England scored 13 
(seven from open play, four from 
short corners and two from 
penalty strokes) and conceded 
eight 

In tbe same nqmber of 
matrliai Australia had the high- 
est total of 31 goals and they 
conceded seven, Charlesworth 
finishing top scorer with seven. 
It wonld seem from these figures 
Hwr the best team one. 

FINAL PLACMG& I, Amnia: 2. Eae- 
taad; i Wta Gcnauqr; 4. Sorkt Uataa; I 
Spam: 6. Arventim; 7, The Netherlands: 8. 
Poland: 9, New Zwfand: 10. Canada: 11. 
Pakhtas 1Z Inffia. 


OVERSEAS RESULTS 


AUSTMMfc Vtoona SponoUi 3. LASK 
Las 0; FC Tirol 2. Bsenstedt 1; Aus&ia 
Vienna 1. GAK Graz 1; VOEST Linz 2, 
Adinira Wader 1 ; Sum Graz 3. Vienna 0; 
Austria Ktagentet 1, Rapd Vienna a 
BELGIAN: Ghent 2. Beeractnt 0; 
Bsrchem 1, FC Bruges 4; Seraing 0, 
Charterer 3: Andertacft 3. Racing Jet 0; 
Bevoran 1. Lokaran 1; Koflrak. 2. FWDM 
1: dntwwp 2. Standard 3: FC Utaa 4, 
Waragam 1: SK Bruges 1, FC Mateffn 1. 
BULGARIAN: Charrwnorats 0. Sradete 2; 
Lokomollv ScAa 5, Vretsa 1; Akaderak 0. 
Tratti T. Beret 1, Spam* pfew*} 1; 

Lotaraodv FtonSv 7, Dtateovgrad 0; 

Spenak Vtena 1, Wtoaha 1; Pton i, Stan 
l:Steria2.Burl. 

CZECHOSLOVAK: Sparta Prague 4. TJ 
Vttkotoce 1; DynamoCesfca Bu&ovica a 
Dteda Prague 3; ZVL ZSna 2. Dulda 
Baraka Bystrica 0; Tatran Prasov 3. 

Bohemians Prague 1; DAC ttonapka 

Strada 4. Sp*rtakTrnavaO;BanBc Ostrava 
4. Skoda Plzen 3: Stevie Prague 1, 
Piasters Mm 1; RH Chefa 3, 


POLISH: Oimpta Roman 0, Gomfc Zab- 
talMtatacV 


Warszawa 1; 
KatOMdca 2; 
Luten 1; Motor 
3: Stesk Wroclaw 
Gdansk 3. LKS 
Szczecin S, Garnik 


Otomoucl. 

DUTCH: ExcaMor Rotterdam 1. FC 
TWente Enschede 1; PC Den Mag 1. FC 
mi V. Ajax Amsterdam *. WV 
VOnlo ft SC Veendam 2. FC UtrecM 2; Go 
Ahead Eagles Deventer 0, Feyenoord 
Ro t terd am Z Sparta Rotterdam 3. FC 
Den Bosch 1; PSV Bntfwan 3. 
PEC/Zwolto 1: Hasten) a Rode JC 
Ketfcrada 1; Fortum Staten) 2. AZ 67 
ABmaarl. 

EAST O&tMAN: Stahl Brandsnbura 2, 
» Dresden Z 8wH Rtess 0, R at- 
Erfart 0: Union Berfn 1. Vocwaorts 

Franldurt 1: Wtsmut AM 1. Kart-uarx- 

Stedl1:Lok Leipzig 3. Enertea Cottbus 0; 

Cart Zens Jena 0, Dynamo Bertn 4. 
HUNGARIAN: Budapest! Homed Z 
Ujpesti Dozsa 5; Vass l. Ferencrares ft 
Durautvaros 0. Debrecen 3; Eger 0, 
Bafcsscsaba Q; Pecs Z ZAaegeixag 1; 
Raba CTO Z SJotak 1: Tatebarrya 1. 
Szombafliety 0; MTK VM 2. Wdecton 0. 
ITALIAN: Ascoi 0. Juventus & Brescia 1, 

Udtaesa 0: Cocao a Fiorertina 0: EmpoQ 0. 

Mam 3: tan ems ^cn a te i^an^xfcma 0; 

Napol Z AlaJarta Z Torino 0. Roma Z 

Verona 2, Avs&no 2. 

LEAGUE OF IRHJU©: Premier DMston: 

Bray Waodwere 1 . Code dty 0; DundaBc £ 

Sigo Rovers 0; Gatway United Z Hcxnq 

Ftenl; Si Patrick 'sAtrfcttcl. Bohemians 

1: Shamroc k Rovers Z Limerick City 1j 
Watertard United 5. AtMOne Town iT^ 


n3; Stal 
Ruch Chooow 
YftdzBw Lodz 2. 

LurtriO, Pokria 
3. Lech Poznan 1; 

Lodz ft Pogon 
WMxzychA 
PORTUGUESE: Grtnaracs 2. Boavista ft 
Chaves 1. Benflca Z R» Awe 1, Bvas 1; 
Sataieiros Z Faransa ft Academica 1, 
Marmmo Is Portenonense 1. Varzxn 0. 
R atana ns a s 0. Porto 3; Sporting 2. Braga 

ROMANIAN: Dinamo Bucharest 3. 
PetroU Ptotastt 0; Rapid Bucharest 1, 

Corvimd Hunedoare ft Bacau 3. Chsnta 

Wmnicu Vicos ft Jkd Petrasani 0. OtaU 

Gated ft FC Bresov 1. Argas Pitesti ft 

Ckq-Nspoca 1. Unhmrsitetea Craiova Z 

Gbri i Buzsu 1, Sterna Bucharest 3; 

Studamasc 2. Ftacva Morenl 1; 

i Ota v Victoria Bucharest (postponed). 

SOVMTt Ka*Bt Ahna-Ata 3, Ararat Yare- 

van ft Dynamo Moscow 3. ShakWyor 
Donetsk ft CDemomorets Odessa 2. Zenit 

Lentnarad Z Dynamo Kiev 5, Torpedo 

Kutasl ft Torpedo Moscow 8, Nstachi 
Batail. 

SPAMS* Sevflte 3. AtUdco Madrid ft 

Rate VtetadOM 1. Ceda 1; Espaflol 2. 

Racrio Santerxter ft Rate Uurcs 1, 
Bsrcteona ft Sporlsno Goon ft Real 
Scanted 1; Athletic Bfeao JTsabadefl Z 

Rate Madrid 3. Real Maflorca ft Las 

Pateas Z Osasuna ft Real Zaragoza 2. 

Rate Betts 3. 

TURKEH: Sartyar ft Estasahirspor 1 ; 
Attey Z Ffeenpor 3; DencAmpor 2, 
Fanartahce Z Besfttas 1, KocmBspor l; 

Bvsaspor 2, GanOtarttefigl ft Ankaritouou 

3. Amaiyaspor 1; Sarounspor 1. 
Galatasway 1: Botunpr 0. Diyarbtedrspor 
ft-Zongtfdakspor i, Trateorapor 1. 
WEST QBttllAN: Schatee 1. SV Hamburg 
1: Beyer uardlngen 1. Bomssia 
Mfinchengtoiaacn IjvFB Stuttgart 1. FC 
Kaisarslautflm 1; Fortura Dussaldorf 0. 
FC Cologne 4; Bteu-Wtess Berfn 1. 
Beysrn Munich 1: SV Waktoof Mannhasn 
0, VFL Bochum ft FC Hamburg 0, Warder 
Bremen 1. 

YUGOSLAVS Dinamo Zagreb 1. Spartak 
Subotica 1 : Zafeznicar Swajevo 1. Rijeka 
Pnsttoa Z 


1: Osflek 3. 
Sioboda ^ 


Tuzia ft Red Star Beteade 1, 
Buducnost Ttograd Z Sutjeska filksic 0, 
Partizan Bteorada ft Vardar Skoplje Z 
Dtnamo \WOvcj ft Radntod Ste Z 
Sar^avoO; HajoukSptel. VatazMostar 1. 


POOLS FORECAST bv Paul Newman 


FRSTDIVISB3N 
Arsenal vChaisaa 
A VBa v Newcastle 
Evarton v Wattpct 
tester vSoton 
2 Luton v Liverpool 
2 Oxford* Noam F 
2 OPR v Tottenham 
Sbefl Wv Coventry 
Wast Ham v Charm® 

2 Wtototadonv Norwich 
Not on coupons: Man- 
chester CJtyvMa 
UntaBd (Soxtey). 

SECOND DIVISION 

2 Barnsley v Shed U 
“ Bteckbom v Snftxd 
C Maea v Shmsaury 
Derby vBnghton 

Greniby * Leeds 
Huddersfield v Hite 
tas«Khv Stoke 
MawrtvPIymomh 
Portsmouth v W8A 

Rasfing « Otoham 

Sutoerfito 


TkffitD DIVtStON 

1 Bolton v Chaster 
1 Bournemouth v Wigan 
XCarfslev Bristol R 

1 Chesterfield v Newport 

2 Darlington v Swindon 
1 Fulham v Buy 

X Mansfield v Blackpool 
1 Nous Oav Doncaster 
X P VaJe v GSSngham 
X WSteaS v Brentford 
1 York v R o therham 
Not on e oimo ns : Bnstol 
CtayvMtodtestxougn. 

FOURTH DnnslON 
1 Aldershot v Hartlepool 
1 Cardiff v Scurthorpo 
1 Crewe v Hsirfax 
1 Exeter v Burnley 

1 Ntfampton v Heref or d 

1 P e te rbore v Lncoln 

2 Rochdale v Preston 
1 WoWesvOriant 

1 Wrexham v Camb U 
Nat on coupons; Stock- 
port v Colchester (Friday): 
Ton 


vBnnmghm 


Torquay 

Ttsnmare 

(Friday). 


TREBLE CHANCE (home teams): 

Hnri de nfl ato. Cartsto. Mansfield. Port 

Vais. Wteaf. Tattord. OyOe. East fife. 
Ayr, East Swing. Stenhouseninr. Snrlmg. 
BEST DRAWS: HuOdes&tt. CsrfSte, 
Mansfield. Pori Vale. TWont 
AWAY& twarpooL Not a ntf to w Forest. 
NpnRCfl. Svandca Omtoanoa 

HOMES Arsenal. Shaffiafd Wednesday. 
Wea Ham. Crystte Pteace. Yortc. Atoer- 
Joi Crave. Exeter. North amp ton, 
ftmeom. Ountarmkre. Radh. 


GM VAUXHALL 
CONFBIENCE 

1 Runcorn v Friddey 
X Tefford v Atomcham 

SKOL CUP FINAL 
Not on cou pon *: Celtic tf 
Rangers (Sunday). 

SCOTTISH PREMIER 

2 Clydebank v Si Mrren 
1 Dundee v Fteurk 

Not on conpona : Hearts v 
Dundee United; Mather- 
wtelvHbennn. 

SCOTTISH RBST 
X Clyde V Forfar 
IDunfennfine v Brechin 
XEfilavQofSth 

1 KSmamock v Airdrte 

2 Morttrosa v Dumbarton 

1 Morton v Pareck 
' SCOTTISH SECOND 
X Ayrv Waabovriank 

1 Berwick vCowdenbeeto 
XE Sttrfing vQ Park 

1 Raffliv Arbroath 
XStenhsmrvStJohnstne 

X Sorting vAtoion 

2 Stranraer vAfoe 


FIXED ODDS: Hornet: Arsente. Sheffield 


BASKETBALL 


FOR THE RECORD 

ICE HOCKEY 


LACROSSE 


PRUDENTIAL NATIONAL CUP; 
murid; BPCC Runs Derby 73 (Cos 33, BCP New York 
London 90 (KelWrrew TZt Tower Harriets 95 
fChnsse 33. Harper 22), Hemel/WNtord 
Royak 1 17 (Knuddes32. Keenan 18. Htee 1ft 
Srrwh 15. Baxter 15): Pteycal Kingslon 122 
(Scat 2ft, TF Group Cleveland 04 (Hotmes 
B): Okfism CetocsM (Lewis 29), CtedmUto 
Exploiera 115 (Btont 2ft: Pornsmouth 121 
(Cumangham 24), Lambeth 81 (Tmsi 2lt 
Snare Meneheeter United 113 (Garttoer 31). 


CtyRktors 111 (Young Sft. 
I Ora 

(ran BuBtes 55, BCP London 100; 


Bobcats 49. PolyceO Kingston Bft Hamte- 
Watioril Rebate 44. OwmcsSwifls Derby 61: 
London YMCA 77. London Jets 67; Stockport 
LonvoJrte 75. DEC Tyne-Tees 51; Avon 
NSMnpan 8a Lambeth Lady TopcaB 51: 
TyphooatrtteW5ftNoiteigit a m«W(fcais63. 


CRICKET 


BULAWAYO: 58<mm match: Young Wist 85i3 - 


NORTH AMERICA: Ntekmal Lnagee |WU 
2. New Yak htendersz 
3, vAuifeeg jets i 

. , 8. Cite 

Hawks 5; Los Angeles Ktogs 7. 

OSers 6. 


MOTOR CYCLING 

BRANDS HATCH: NewteBC Brafra 
teMkeeriaEFtatepotatRl. K bone, vfi 

S ftR Sc«L 105: 3. KHuewsn 91. Ftate mmk 
5 tap *81, Huewen (Suzuki). I3n*i 
^St TSASenh: 2, Scon (Honda); 3, P 

SmsLVJSX 5S« 

Dodson (Honda). 9:165. 7B58jnph). Skte- 

Honda). iftOIS. 7)58. Shtel OKs powerteke 
1. R Burned (500 Honda), 


tndans 280-7 rL Lawrence 117 not out); 
ZriJtabwe 133 (fe A E Baptiste 4-32). Young 
Was! lndarawonbjMl47 runs. 


ADELAIDE: 
font Scuttt Ausntta 22S-5 (47 Own; Q 
Btthqp 66): Queensland 193 (40 omts: R B 
Karr a s not our). Queanatand wan on taater 
scoring rats. 


RUGBY UNION 


CYCLING 


2 taps behret 
HOmtEUL^ craartete 4m As nm H» laps 
0» 22 km track): 1. S KeOy (trej. 2hr Btercft A 
van der Poet (Nebt). same tkns; 3. A da Save 
(Pori, seme tme. 

BARCELONA: Mcnt*** cteSSlB 1. V BWda 
IhrSnwT 3^sac 2. L Rgnon (Fi% at 41; 3. 

^P)i 57 

Auatrate Commonwettri Bank 
atic: Stags 15: (142km): 1. J 

mate) m W. 4hr 44ten 56sec Z J day 
(Eng), at 431. 3. R varetsagn MusL 438. 
Overtet 1. L Wartpwst (SweL 37w 42mln 
Sfisac; Z A Logan (Aral 1l7 a. S Hate? (Aus). 
M: 4. M Ansermet (SwCz). B0: sTo Dsvw 
(Eng), 134 


FENCING 


LBCESTEffc City open tour na me n t Mare 
Fofc 1, P Harpar 2. Z VltaoachOwsU [Pol). 
Epwk 1. O Bamman: Z P tot Sabre: 1. M 
Stefie. Z S Hutton. Women: Fete 1. L Mankr. 
2. F Mcsttosh. fttete i. Y Wslop.2, A Ksnger. 


FOOTBALL 


Sehi 


Swansea: 

Southend 


den 0: Mahrem 5. 
ough A. Osw es try 1 


Ateyn's. DiAweb 3. WSee- 
i, Wfchessr ft WaAngbop- 


GOLF 


LAKE BUBIA VISTA: Dtmey Cteatoc: (US 
unless stateofc Final maid I wdra 276 R 
. Floyd. B6. 66. 70. 7UwonptaTOtg: M Srtevan. 
85, 89. 70. 71: L Hinkle. 6769. 9B. 71. 27ft P 
McGowan. 69. 7ft 09. 68 P Stewart 65. 66. 
71. 74: G Koch. 66. 73, 68. «8. 276: P 
Btaqkmar. 67. 73. 68. 70: A North. 71. B. 63, 
39 276 B Murphy. 68. 7ft 68. 7ft 28ft C 
Perry. 72. 70. 68. 7ft T Purtzar. 88. 71. 67. 73. 


HOCKEY 


CLUB HATOE& Beckenham 1. SurtMon 3; 
Fareham 1. Havant 1. Merlon Z Crarfe iqh 1: 
Old Boteentans 2. Home Bay 0: Thames raiy 
ft Anchonans ft TuftrelgB Wells Z Menton 
Russels ft We6tdtiH>n-Saa4. Beds Eagles 1 


FUUc Gnam A: Mlteft Romans 43, Portuga) 
7 TREVISO: Itaty 22. Tuntsa 9. 
schooto maicbeK AinaBows 6, Queen's. 
Taunton 14; Amptoforth 26. Sedbergh 3: 
Bamanl Castle «. IOnp^. Tjmemouffi 17; 
Berkbamsted 46, Mordant Taylors', tor- 
thwood 17: Bedtora Modem 19. Hadsybury 
1 ft Beihamr 16, Rocftesiar Matts 4: Bnghton 
IS. VWatgrft 6; BryanstoD 17. Rjrtsnioum GS 
ft Capon 8. Colchester RGS 23; Ctntham 
Hcxms 14. Sir Roger Manwoocrs ft Chestamt 
ft Golfs 1ft ChnsL Brecon 7. Monmouth ft 
Const's Hospaal 17. Epsom 24; Church 4. 
Chrchestar 4: CSfton 18. ChaUanham 4; 
DanlonJGS 16. Langley Parte 4; Denatone 11. 
Brcmsgrovs 18: Oesboreogh 15. WUngton 
3. Downside 32. Bristol GSft Duka ot YalFs 
RMS 0, CranSfPOk IB. 

Dirham 33. Edrtwgb Academy 12; East- 
booms 7. Tonbndpo 1Z Gidotaswick 12. 
Oowtoy Heath O: GSnaJmona 31. Strathaltan 
ft Gresham's 29. The Leys & Harrow ft St 
PauTs 10. Hereford Catnatkal 6. Uandovsry 
Coiege 18: Hurntpiareoirit IB. Sutton Vatance 
18: Hymeis 15. Harrona* GS 4: loswch 29. 
Mtoodbrntae ft Jolm Anar 2ft CMUteus A 
Srdcup 4; Judd ft sevenoaks 19: torn 
EOwartrs. Bbirtnghem 3. Notttognara HS ft 
Ktog Edward's. Soumempton T. St Bart's. 
Newtxry 19: King's. Cantarbwy 13. KCS 

Wimbtodon4; King's. By ift Ktocrs. Feteibotv 

ough 3ft Wng Edward's. Rw Ways 6, Queen 
Mary's. WaSaJI 30; King's. Gloucester 3. 
wydrtte 1 9: Kings. TaisSn 14. Shetame 9\ 
King’s. Worcester o. Sothul ft Langley 1ft 
wymondnaraSO. 

Larymer Uooer 11. Gumarsbuni 3: Magdalen 
CS. Brocfdey 25 2ft BitfaH 23. Matruo 0. 
RatdriB 32: MBfield 24. WSt Park 4; Lhi l-fiB6. 
Bedford 8: Monloon Combe 9. Canford 9: 
Nonnach 14. St Joseph's. Ipswich 3; Ouvfie 3. 
St Edvard's. Oxford ft PangoUm* 34, 
Road rig ft Perse 7. Citeord ft ^mouth 38. 
Truro £ Pnor Park 16. Krigswood 3; Queen 
Ekzabeth. Bamet 7. UCS^ift RossaB 48. 
Rybal 3: Rugby 4. Stowe 27: Ryde 0. St 
John’s. Southsea 38: St AibWB 7. 
Haberdashor-s Aske’s. Bstrwr 2ft St 
Emx^s. Ware 13. Richard Hate 7: SrspfaJca 
22. Lord Wardsowrrfi tft Stonynura Z7. Krig 
Edward VB. Lyttam ft Taunton 42, 

Bnstol ft Tiffin 11/St John’s, Leathertwad IS; 
Ttant 14, Uppn^famft 
Trinity. Creadon 19. Gufttford RGS 8. War- 
ra* 16. Loughtraough OS 9: Watfoid GS 16. 
& Gwrioe’a. Harpenden 4; Watbeck Coaege 
19. PocHrigon ift W e ft ng ton. Beritstera S. 
DuhWch 2ft West BueWand 21. Blunder* 7: 
Wluefflsrs 4. Marling a Mmtiedon 1ft 
Rebate GS 4; Worcswr RGS 2ft Krig Henry 
VIII. Coventry 1& Worksop 11. Stamford 29 
Ctefi c aa rtr Christ CoSege. Brecon 7. 
Monmouth 0. 


i?* 0016 Bn “ <a * Wo « 

Adwn 8. Sate 13; ctwadta a Siockoon 5: 
Mel tor 13, H eaton Mersey 7; CHd HUriraans 
15. Umwon ft OU Wacontans 18. Boardrrnn 
snatcosso. 


MOTOR RACING 

THRI1XTON: Raerig Displays Bnwh Font 
2000 chwdpfensbtoc (15 taps): 1, D Coyne 
(Camberfey). Swift DB3 FortLaknn SftSsec. 
MnJ3npri- O— p raa B Gamut, RAC 
Townsand Thorwan British Formula Ford 
1600 rl i ainp l n ns h i p (12 taps* 1. P Andrews 
IWalsteq. Vtan Dranon RF96 Monster. 17 07.7 
99D3. Ctiarawt: J Eics Townsend 
Dwreaen Junior Formats Font 1*00 cnensn- 
aasbtac (10 taps k 1. P Waranch (Airestord) 
Van Dtamen RF86 Scholar. 1550.0, 89^8 
Oranpkra PWarack. Wanra Wools speoal 
■teoon ebamptanship: (10 taps): 1. B 
Chatfield CTrowUndgC BMW 32). 1430.9. 
97.38. Champion: B ChatitokL SAAB twtto 
Mob* cftelangot J8 taps): 1. M Sandro Safa 
(BrzX SAAB 900 ateto. 13:33Ss. 8387 
Ct am pio cr J Uewelyn. 


SNOOKER 

INVERCARGILL, Now Zaatamfc world : 


27-74. 56-44. 4ft8t. 21-79. 26-75, 46*3. 68- 
15. 86-20. 70-41. 77-25. 31-77. 40-75, 62-14 
57-15. 

TABLE TENNIS 

SCHftbKROT BRITISH LEAGUE: Piwntar 

dwisjoa Rotherham 8 MBS St Moots ft 
Omega Raadra 1. Grove Market Dryaton 7 
F)rst dMskxc Dmenram FC 5. Chan Con- 
struction 3c TSp Larfthai 7. Wm War- 
wck&hmfBinnngham 1. TCB Dteprens 7. 
Byfcer Newcastto I: Express Sports Tomay 6. 
Omega Claw 2. 

TENNIS 

BASLE Swiss tadoor grand prnc Hnafc S 
Edbero ISwe) bt Y Noah fr). 7-ft6-2, 6-7. 7-6. 
Doutata, float Noah and G Feign (Fr) bt J 
Grimarssod (Sws) and T Smd (Czaeft). 7-6.6- 


VOLLEYBALL 


ROYAL RANK NATIONAL LEAGUE: Metes 
Fhtt tevWon: SpoeowaN 3. MaMxy ft New 
castle (Staffs) 3. Dragonara ft Cokriesar 3. 
DBG Poole Z Poioraa 3. Portsmouth Hearleaf 
T. Redwood Lodge 3. Capital Cay 1. 
Portsmouth Heatfeal 3, Cokriestw 1 
Women's first tevta i otg Sale 3. Southgate ft 
Arsenal 3. Soothoea Scoronns ft Bradford 
Uyteorakers 3. Southgaut 0. 

WRESTLING 


Second maid: G Kalcnav (Buq bt Ogaan, WL 
449ec S8ka B group: Hist rank A Faflzaev 
(USSR) its Cooper (G». tech touch, 250. 
1WL G Mayer (Swaz) bt Cooper, ta. 423. 

~ "yachting 

^!^^* J ^. L 7 0t ?C i, q*** r ta*Ctessfc 
1. Rte Pen Class It 1. Rot. Class Ht l. 
Ctneftan. Class IV: t. Startet Class Vf 1. 
Can*tna Class VTt 1. Solent Falcon. Class 
VUt 1. Stndsr 


7:30 unless stated 

FOOTBAa 
Fuff Members Cup 
First round 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Swindon v 
Luton (2J3). 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: FWt {fivtatort: bvdr- 
i (7.0): Mandmsier Unltad v 


Grimsby 

Miihrallii 


vKun.. 


Cartole. Manafiob. 


• The pools check chan which 
appeared yesterday was in- 
correct. We apologize for any 
confusion that may have been 
caused. 


FENCING 


Harper sails to victory 


t Harper (SaBe Paul), the 
and Commonwealth 


Pierre! 

British 

champion, beat Zeimek 
WojricchowsJd (British Acad- 
emy of Fencing), his coach and 
tbe current world professional 
champion, by 10-3. to win the 
mens* foil cup in the Leicester 
Open Fencing tournament at 
the weekend for tbe second year 


running. Harper had sailed 
through tbe quarter and semi- 
final rounds beating Dave 
Seaman a member of the British 
icam. and Northern Ireland's 
number one fencer Johnny Da- 
vis respectively. 

.RESULTS; 1, P Harpar (Sdte Pauft 2 . 2 

^^grpir^ 01 ^- 


v West Bromwich __ 
Totfoy League 
Second division 
Huddersfield v Shrewsbury . 

Plymouth v Ipswich 

Portsmouth v r ‘ 

Sunderland v I 

Third division 

Botton v Blackpool 

Bournemouth v Doncaster — .. 

Bnstol City v Brentford (7.45} 

Carlisle v Bury 

Chssisrflsld v Wigan 

Darirngron v GHlir * 

Fulham v Bristol I 

Mansfield v I 
Notts Country v I 
Port Vale v! 

WalsaU v Rotherham 

York v Chester.. S. 

Fourth division 

Aldershot v Cambridge Utd 

Cardiff v Orient (7.45) - 

Crgwa v Coichsster 
Roctidale v Hereford. 

Torquay v Lincoln . 

Tranmere v C 


FA VAS£ firet itxnd repteys: Hvtfoid v 
Si Margaratsbury: Ranham v SNanc 
Favtttsham v Cormthlans Casuab (745). 
MULTIPART LEAGUE Buxton v Horwicfi; 
Marine v Oswestry. GM A ce ep tamre 
Corparatlar Cup: QuafiMng itmtib 
Chortey v Worianston; Mattock v Gains- 
borough; Morecambe v Barrow. 

VAUXHALL-OPB. LEAGUE: Fin l tS- 
vteton: Bdericay wHbury: Boreham Wood 
v Bracknal; Epajm antf Bvefl v Fincfttay; 
Kmrabwy V Oxtord cuy: Laytoraww 
Wort v Stevenage Borough; Leyton 
Wingate * GrayaMamihesd Umod v 
Hampttn: Starnes v Lewes; Wembley v 
Walton and Hersham. Second dmwn 
noiilE Barton v Woherton; Berkhansted v 
Haringey: Cheshum v Hamel I 




Ware v Saffron 

Horerfigreh. Second 

HareheM v Chwtsoy; SOUftaB v Ruofip 
Manor gm Acceptance Coreoratioa 
Cup: Quattfylng rouictBtohopsswtfort 
v Wotangham 77.45k Bromley v Dohwch: 
Garshalton v Httcmm Hayas v Hendon: 
Kngstorean v Morning: Tootrig and 
Mitcham « St Atoens Wndsor and Son v 
W al t ha m st ow 

CAPITAL LEAGUE: BdMd v Wknbtadon. 
SOUTHERN JUNtOR FLOCSXJT CUP: 
OPS V Norwich (7.0k Southampton v 
Chebaa 


SOUTHERN LEAGUE MidteRd cflvfjHit: 
Budctogham Town v Sutton Coldfield: 
Halesowen v Bndgnorth. Southern <ft- 
vraon: Dow v Chatham. GM Acceo- 
tanceOoreontion Cop: Quafttymg muxt 
Basingstoke. Efadworth v 

. jFofcestomv Witney; Ftedcbch 

v WtoenrtaB. 8ffl DaOow Cup: Hrsl round; 
Qoucessr v Forest Green. 

GREAT WLLS WESTERN LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier division: Exmouttt v Saftasfi: 
Radstock v Maftsham. 

BUSJDMG SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Cotenoster Unrad Reserves v Lowestoft; 
March Town v H i sto n . 

RUGBY UNION 

THORN EBB COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP: 
East MrtSands v Stattortsme (at Bad- 
tort); WaranriCEMre v Nortn Mcflands (at 
Coventry) (7.151. 

CLUB MATCHES: Exatar v Sttttouth; 
Neetti v Ebbw Vale (7 0i 
HERTFORD FLOODLIT CUP- Aldershot v 
Stocftwood Parte. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

TOUR MATCH: Cantona v Austrians (at 
Barrow). 

OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: Certeberg National 
Lea g ure Fhet dhtetam Manchester 
Untad v Lacester Fhdars (8 l0). 

SNOOKER: Rothmans Grand Prtc. flnal 
: The Haxagon, Reading); tsto ot 
(at Pudipool " 


^TSaaS: Pretty Pofly Classic (af Brighton) 







46 


SPORT 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


CRICKET 


England settle for draw 
as Gatting puts 
batting practice first 


From a Special 
Correspondent, Bnndaberg 

England's opening tour 
game in Australia petered out 
into a draw at Bundaberg 
yesterday when, in contradic- 
tion of what he said in 
Brisbane. Gatling decided to 
give batting practice to the 
players who missed an innings 
on Saturday rather than strive 
for a win. 

The consequence was that 
on a shortened final day most 
of the interest departed from 
the cricket once De Freitas, in 
a spell of three for 10, and 
Botham had shared the Coun- 
try XI's last four wickets in 
three quarters of ah hour. 
England reached 129 for three 
wickets in their second in- 
nings before stumps were 
drawn at 10 minutes to four to 
enable them to catch then- 
flight to Brisbane without 
rushing. 

Micky Stewart, England's 
cricket manager, explained 
that Gatting decided not to 
enforce the follow-on because 
if he did there was a possibility 
of players going into Friday's 
four-day game against Queen- 
sland without having batted in 
the middle. 

“Our only fixture before 
Friday is Wednesday’s 50- 
overs game at Lawes,” "Stewart 
said. “With Allan Lamb being 
held out of that to give his 
knee extra time to mend, it 
meant we would be taking on 
Queensland anyway with one 
baisman playing his first in- 
nings, and it was decided that, 
with only two hours and 50 
minutes left when the oppo- 
sition's innings ended, there 
was more to be said for batting 
again." 

By doing so, England 
missed what seemed an ideal 
oppponunity to sharpentheir 
out-cricket by tackling an 
objective not easily achieved. 
Schulte, the captain, who bat- 
ted for three hours 10 minutes 
for his undefeated 78. looked 


Botham’s cruise 
is scuppered 

Plans Cor a “breakfast cruise 
wlrti lan Botham" were scup- 
pered yesterday because of the 
public -speaking ban on Eng- 
land's cricketers In Anstndia. 

The Queensland Cricketers' 
Club bad persuaded 130 people 
to pay $40 each for the privilege 
of johung Botham at 7 am fora 
90-minute cruise along the River 
Brisbane today. They decided to 
cancel the event and refund tire 
money when they learnt that 
Botham would not be able to 
speak or answer questions under 
the terms of bis Test and Comity 
Cricket Board contract. 

Peter f .Osh, tire England man- 
ager, said: “When last week I 
agreed to Ian taking part in 
various promotional events I 
told his agent he would not be 
able to do any public speaking. 
An undertaking to that effect 
was signed." 

Botham is still left with one 
engagement today. He win 
appear at a reception to launch 
the autobiography of Jeff 
Thomson. 

at least up to minor county 
standard, and, despite the 
inexperience of the country 
side, there were enough decent 
looking batsmen in their ranks 
for England to have needed to 
work hard to bowl them out a 
second time on a pitch whose 
only imperfection was a ten- 
dency for the odd ball to keep 
low. It was disappointing that 
a match in which England had 
begun so well should be 
allowed to end so limply. 

In England's second innings 
French, who opened with 
Broad, not for the first time 
gave the impression that were 
his technique against pace 
rather more secure be could 
become a consistent run-getter 
in the bottom half of the order. 
He was missed at eight from a 
well hit square-cut and at 40, 
when he was making less 
effort to stay in. overhead at 
extra cover. 

The chances apart, how- 


Australians want 
better facilities 

From Richard Streeton, Bombay 


Far stricter security and less 
overcrowding on Indian grounds 
in next year’s World Cop games 
will be recommended by Alan 
Crompton, the Australian team 
manager, in his official report on 
the tour just ended. The need for 
faci litres for the players to be 
improved will also be stressed by 
Crompton, whose report goes to 
both Australian and Indian 
boards. “I have no qualms 
overall about India's ability to 
stage the World Cup, as long as 
there are improvements in the 
areas mentioned," he said- 

One aspect that concerned 
Crompton was that the. police 
were always present in large 
numbers bat were more in- 
terested in the cricket than in 
fulfilling their own duties. He 
said that food, hotels and trans- 
port, and conditions on the field, 
presented no problems- India, 
though, remembering the large 
media coverage expected, 
needed to improve its telephone 
and telex links with the rest of 
the world. Crompton was speak- 
ing shortly before the Austra- 
lians left for home, 

Allan Border, the captain, and 
Bob Simpson, tire coach, had no 
regrets about undertaking a 
gruelling tour of India immedi- 
ately before playing England for 
the Ashes. Border said his 
young team had handled them- 
selves well in the Test matches. 
“I am glad we have been through 
this toughening experience. It 
should help us in the coming 
weeks," be said. The Anstrn- 

- Ilans shared the Test rubber and 
lost the one-day series, which 
might seem disappointing in 
terms of results. To an English 
observer, though, the Austra- 
lians visibly matured during 
their eight-week visit. A settled 
team has emerged with dear 
potential for the future. 

Should Geoff Lawson's back 
problems allow him to return 
against England — and he is 
reported to hare come through 
early-seasoa trials successfully 

— be will s treng th en the pace 
bowling department, ho India, 
the Australian fast bowlers have 
straggled, bet so would those of 
most other countries on the slow 
pitches prepared with the Indian 
spinners in mind. Reid, the 
gangling. 6ft 8ins tall left-arm 
seamer. inevitably struggled af- 
ter losing almost a stone in 
weight at one stage. He did 
obtain some bounce at times and 
his slanted deliveries towards 
the slips should see him become 
a familiar figure around the 
world's Test centres in the years 
ahead. 

Gilbert, not always lucky in 
En gland last year, has tightened 


his line and control and his 
improved batting helps to 
shorten the taiL McDermott has 
become something of an en igm a 
after taking 40 wickets in his 
first eight Tests and nine wick- 
ets in eight Tests since. Waugh, 
originally hailed as the most 
promising batsman in Australia, 
finished with the most wickets 
ou tour. His brisk medium pace, 
makes him a useful alt-rounder 
tailor-made especially for one- 
day g»mw- 

Anstralia’s batting, at its best 
has a formidable blend of bellig- 
erence and soundness, though 
they are happier against speed 
than spin. In (he team room in 
recent weeks they have spent for 
more time discussing Edmonds 
and Emburey than the England 
new ball bowlers. Certainly 
England's decision to pick only 
two spinners was the biggest 
surprise to the Australian team 
when Carting's party was an- 
nounced. Boon and Marsh, both 
converted to opening the in- 
nings, have become a splendid 
first wicket pair. Boon likes to 
hammer the cover off the baD 
from the start if possible and in 
this respect resembles Stackpole 
after he moved op the order. 
Marsh, with a restricted 
backlift, is cast in a different 
mould. He is also equally at 
home at short leg or in the deep, 
in what is aa enthusiastic field- 
ing side, though none of them, 
apart from McDermott, have 
especially good throwing arms 
by Australian standards. 

Jones has made the No. 3 
position his own after his doable 
century at Madras and Border, 
who follows, has rediscovered 
both consistency and zest. He 
was stale and tired when he 
joined Essex but stresses henv 
much be enjoyed his spell in 
country cricket. He also says he 
learned much from some long 
talks with Fletcher on captaincy. 
Ritchie, who punches the ball 
with tremendous vigour, is next 
in the order, with the left- 
handed Matthews at six. 
Matthews's batting is for more 
reliable than it used to be and 
neither he nor Bright were 
rewarded property for some 
tenacious spin bowling in India. 

India now draw breath until 
early Dacember when first Sri 
Lanka and then Pakistan make 
full-scale Test tours. KapO 
Dev's fitness could remain a 
worry for them and there are no 
obvious seam bowlers coming 
through to socced Madan LaL 
With Indian hockey in the 
doldrums, theft is more pressure 
than ever oh India's cricketers to' 
maintain prestige at inter- 
national level aim the spinners 
are India's key to success. 


ever, he batted for nearly three 
hours with quiet excellence, 
cover-driving with his usual 
wristiness and lovely timing, 
and defending with a high left 
elbow straight out of the 
coaching manual. Broad was 
tactically "retired" at lunch, 
and DeFreitas. who was 
bowled seventh bail on the 
forward stroke, was the only 
man who failed to get an early 
feel of batting in Australia. 

ENGLAND Xfc Rret tarings 491 for 4 dec 
(M w Gatting 171. B C Broad 97. C W J 
Whey 73 riot out w N Stack 70. I T 
Botham 52 rut ou0 

Second Innings 

B C Broad retired hurt 23 

tB N French notout 63 

PAJDePespsbTeys 2 

J E Emburey c Tickle b Emery 

P H Edmonds c Drirmen b Emery — 

D I Gower not out 


Extras [lb 5) 



Total {3 wkts dec) 129 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1*1. M3. 3-103. 
BOWLING: Dennis 13-1-39-0: Teys 1&4- 
30.1: J Scuden 10-1-22-0: Emery 10-1-33- 
2 . 

QUEENSLAND Xh First tarings 

W London taw b Botham 5 

R wntams c French b Ditey 0 

S Scuderi run out - 9 

P Monoghan b DeFraitaa .6 

*L Sctute not out 78 

J Scuderi c DeFrefles b Edmonds 
P Teys c Gower b DUey 
tP Drtnnen b DeFreitas „ 

R Dermis c and b DeFreitas 
A Tickle b DeFreitas 
K Emery b Botham . 

Extras (Tb 3, w 1. nb 19) 

Total 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-10. 2-10. 3-24. 4- 
36. 5-107. 6-127. 7-152. 8-154. 9-157, 10- 
160. 

BOWLING: DUey 11-0-42-2: Botham 14J9- 
13-2: DeFreitas 14-1-37-4: Emburey ll-l- 
34-0. Edmonds 9-1-31-1 ; Gatting 1-1-04). 
Umpires: K Besston and RGies. 

• Whitaker, Richards, Foster 
and Small will all play their 
first game of the tour at Lawes 
tomorrow while Gatting; 
Botham and French are 
rested. Edmonds is the likely 
12th man. Gatting’s absence 
means that the vice-capiam, 
Emburey. will lead an England 
XI for the first time. The 
South East Queensland Coun- 
try XI will field some of the 
team who drew with England 
at Bundaberg. including the 
captain. Lew Schulte. 

ENGLAND XI (tram): B C Broad. W N 
Slack. 0 I Gower. C W J Athey. J J 

Wtaakar. PA J OeFMtas. CJ Richards. J 

E Emburey . P H Edmonds, N A Foster. G R 
D3ey, GCSmafl. 

Crompton 
blames 
the heat 

Bombay (Reuter) - Alan 
Crompton, the Australian cri- 
cket manager, yesterday blamed 
the Indian heat and humidity 
for the controversies which have 
surrounded his side. Indian 
newspapers have criticized the 
behaviour of the Australians, 
dubbing Allan Bonder, the cap- 
tain, "leader of the brat pack" 
and accusing the visitors of 
gamesmanship in the first Test 
in Madras. 

"To a very large measure, the 
incidents were attributable to 
the extreme heat and hum- 
idity.” Crompton was quoted as 
saying by a Madras sports 
weekly. “I think it would be 
inhuman of me not to under- 
stand the pressures the players 
were under in those 
circumstances.” 

• RAWALPINDI (Reuter) - 
Zakir Khan, a fast-medium 
bowler who has played in one 
Test and 12 one-day inter- 
nationals, relumed career-best 
figures of eight for 85 for 
Pakistan President's XI on the 
second day of their match 
against the West Indians 

yesterday. 

After play was delayed 50 
minutes through heavy dew, 
Zakir claimed four of the five 
wickets to fall for 1 5 runs as the 
West Indians collapsed from 
208 for five to 247 all out half an 
hour after lunch. 

WEST INDIANS: Firsi tarings 

C G Greeridge ibw b Monsm 4 

R B Richardson c Salim b ZakJr 
H A Gomes e Satan b Zakir — 

A L Log* Ibw b Zakir 

*1 V A RJctards b Zator 

S TRO Payne IbwbZaJw 

! A Hamer c and b Nadeem — 

M D Marshall notout — . 


- 67 

- 65 

4 

- 54 

0 


W K R Benjamin c Salim b ZaHr . 
itts tow b Zakir ... 


CG Butts 
C A Walsh b Zakir 

Extras (b 5. ta 3. nb 6) . 
Total 


20 

— 16 

2 

__ 0 

0 

— 14 
._247 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-10.2-123.3-137.4- 
158. 5-1 58. 6-237. 7-239. 8241 . 9-247. 10- 
247. 

BOWUNG: Mohsin 11-4-29-1; Zakir 33.4. 
6-854 Nadeem 30-8-68-1: Raz 7-1 -32-0; 
Arif 4-2-14-0; Shorib 3-1-11-0 

PRESIDENTS Xk First Inmngs 

Masood Anwar c Payne & Waisti 11 

Shoab Mohammed c Payne b Marshall 5 

Qasmj Omar nor out — 72 

liaz Ahmed not out 60 

Extras (b 4. lb 4, w 4. nb 5) 17 

Total[2 wkts) 165 

• BOMBAY (AP) - The In- 
dian Government has blocked 
the departure of two Indian 
umpires. P. D. Reporter of 
Bombay and V. K. Ramaswamy 
of Hyderabad, scheduled to 
officiate in the scries between 
Pakistan and West Indies. 
Ranbir Singh Mahendra. sec- 
retary of the Indian Cricket 
Board, said: “Umpires Reporter 
and Ramaswamy will not go to 
Pakistan because the Govern- 
ment of India has noi cleared 
their visit- The Pakisian Cricket 
Board has been advised io make 
alternative arrangements.” 


FINAL TEST MATCH AVERAGES 


India batting 

RJSiiastn 
Kapd Dav 
S M Gavaskar 
CS Panda 
KSnkkamh 
M A zhanxHUn 
M Amamath 
CSharma 
N S Yadav 
K S More 
Maunder &ngn 
0 B Vengsarkar 


NO Runs 
2 231 
0 120 
0 205 
100 
142 
128 
87 
53 
27 
19 
0 

186 


HS Avne 100 
*231.00 1 


121 
119 60.00 
103 51.25 
39 50.00 
53 35.50 
£0 31.50 
51 29-00 
30 2650 
19 1350 
15 633 

O* 000 
164* 


Australia batting 

M 

, 

NO Rum 

NS 

A vo* 

92.75 

100 

DM Jones 

3 

5 

1 

371 

210 

1 

ARBvder 

3 

4 

1 

245 

106 

81.56 

1 

TJZoeftrer 

3 

2 

1 

73 

52- 

73.00 

— 

O C Boon 

3 

5 

0 

325 

122 

65.00 

1 

SR Waugh 

3 

4 

3 

59 

39* 

59-00 


G RJ Mathews 

3 

3 

1 

91 

44 

45.50 

_ 

G R Marsh 

3 

5 

0 

165 

101 

3300 

1 

GMRtttte 

3 

3 

0 

72 

31 

24.00 

_ 

RJ Bnght 

D H Gilbert 

3 

2 

0 

38 

30 

19.00 

— 

2 

1 

0 

1 

1 

1.00 

— 

B A Retd 

2 

1 

1 

2 

2* 

— 

— 


R R Kuflvanu ptayed m one match but rid rm bat 


Bowling 

RRKukami 
NSYadav 
R JSnastn 
CStwrma 
NarmderStagh 


C J McDermott played m iwo matenas but did noi bat 

Bowling 


O 

29 
1363 
154.4 

30 
130 


M H 

2 114 
25 359 
38 383 
2 133 
30 352 


W A«g* 88 
3 38.00 3-85 
8 44.87 4-84 
7 54.71 2-44 

2 61.50 1-34 
5 70.40 3-80 


GO J Matthews 
RJ Bnght 
SRWaugh 
DR Gilbert 
BARffld 


0 

120.1 

86 

35 

35 

60 


M R 

18 407 
12 291 
5 130 
4 119 
11 222 


W Avg* BS 
14 29.07 5-103 

8 36.37 5-64 

2 65.00 1-29 

1 119.00 1-44 

1 222.00 1-33 


ALSO BOWLED: Kaad Dev 45-12-124-0. K SoWtfflth 6-0-19-0. 


ALSO BOWLSH D C Boon 2-0-5-0; A R Borderl 3-3-41 -a- D M 
JOnes 1-1 -04): CJ McDermott 25-3-110-0. 



ROWING 


bronze medaF- 
championships. 


RUGBY UNION 


From Wollongong to Orrell 
and thence to Portugal 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


From Wollongong to Orrell 
may be a shock to the system but 
Peter Williams has. at last, the 
comfort of knowing that no 
sooner has be been# whisked 
back to a deteriorating English 
autumn, than he will be off to 
sunnier climes with the England 
squad who visit Portugal at the 
end of this month. Williams, 
one of the two remaining full 
backs in the squad, returned last 
week from four months in 
Australia, a visit as successful in 
its way as the summer he spent 
last year in the Transvaal, 
playing for the Johannesburg 
club. Pirates. 

It was the second visit in a 
year to Australia for the 27-year- 
old Orrell player. He was a 
member of the England sevens 
squad who played in the New 
South Wales international tour- 
nament in March, and returned 
in June to play for the Waratabs 
club in WoDongong. a two-hour 
drive to the south of Sydney, in 
the Hlawarra District League. 
He was joined there by John 
Morrison, the Bath and England 
under-23 lock. 

The Waratabs were a young 
side and the two Englishmen 
brought much-needed experi- 
ence, as well as coaching ability. 
Morrison being able to offer the 
benefits of a Loughborough 
University education. They 
worked to such good effect that 
the dub won the district league 
for the first time in their 
history — they had not pre- 
viously reached the semi-final 
stage - and the celebrations are 
probably still going on. 

Rugby league offers powerful 
competition there and the stan- 
dard the district league offered 
was, in Williams's opinion, 
some three grades below first- 
class English club rugby. “It's 
very enjoyable because you run 
the’ ball all the time and it was 


very good experience of the sort 
of conditions England will play 
under in die world cup next 
year," be said. "Playing on hard 
grounds gives you much more 
confidence and John couldn't 
bdieve how high be could jump 
in the lirieout off a firm surfece. 
Once you find a rap there is so 
much room in which to move 
whereas here, in muddier con- 
ditions, everyone comes down 
to the same leveL” 

The same was true for Wil- 



Williams: off to the sun 
Iiams when he visited South 
Africa last summer, helped Pi- 
rates win their local league cup 
and found himself elevated to 
playing fuff back for Transvaal. 
In Australia, he played both foil 
back and stand-on half and he 
will be keen to avoid the kind of 
mishap which occurred when he 
returned to Britain last year and 
damaged knee ligaments — the 
sort of strain which is always a 
possibility after a player be- 
comes accustomed to compet- 
ing on a true surface. 

It is. however, that same 


Auckland meeting for 
World Cup managers 


By David Hands 


The managers of the 16 
countries scheduled to contest 
rugby's inaugural World Cup in 
Australasia next May and June 
meet in Auckland at the end of 
this week. They will find waiting 
a 50-page tournament agree- 
ment, the opportunity to discuss 
the ground rules for the com- 
petition and to visit the venues 
where their team will be playing. 

In the case of England's 
Michael Weston, that means a 
trans-Tasman flight to Sydney 
and Brisbane, where all group A 
games are scheduled before the 
management teams gather again 
on Friday week to discuss their 
findings. 

He will miss, therefore. 
England’s training camp in Por- 
tugal between October 30 and 
November 2 which will be 
conducted largely- by Martin 
Green and England's assistant 
coach. Des Sea brook. While in 
New Zealand the managers may 
also discuss the concept of a 
World Cup “cap" which has 
been floated by Air Commodore 
Bob Wcighill. honorary sec- 
retary to the International 
Rugby Football Board, under 
whose aegis the tournament is 
run. “1 believe that may be the 
answer for those countries who 
are uncertain whether to award 
individual caps for every game.” 
Air Commodore Weighill said. 
"Anyone who plays in the 
Worid Cup would get one. 
rather like a blue in the univer- 
sity match.” _ 

The question of the award of 
international caps remains 
somewhat vexed in the four 
home countries. Wales have 
decided that whenever they take 
the field as a fully representative 
side, caps shall be awarded: they 


gave caps this year against Fiji. 
Tonga and Western Samoa and 
will do so against the United 
States next year. Australians do 
the same and the broad concept 
would find sympathy from Mi- 
chael Doyle. Ireland's coach, 
who watched Fiji run his team 
so close last season. 

Ireland will award caps 
against a non-International 
Board opponent for the first 
time against Romania on 
November l but. broadly speak- 
ing. the other three home coun- 
tries award caps according to the 
status and recent record of their 
opponents. Thus. England have 
capped players against Argen- 
tina and Romania but not 
against Japan and the USA 
(whom they meet in the World 
Cup), or Fiji. 

The Rugby Football Union 
are waiting for a recommenda- 
tion from the International 
Board but. as George 
Spoiswood. the Irish RFU's 
development officer, said: “It 
would be ludicrous to award 
caps for some matches in, the 
world cup and not for others.” - 

One cap for any player taking 
the field during the tournament 
may provide the answer, though 
I suspect the feeling is growing 
that if a man represents bis 
country against another fully 
representative national side ti 
should be worth a cap. 

• Marcus Hannaford. the Eng- 
land squad's scrum half, has not 
damaged his knee so severely as 
first appeared during 
Gloucester's game with New- 
port on Saturday. He twisted 
ligaments but the cartilage is 
intact and it is hoped he will- be 
able to resume playing after 
three to four weeks. 


versatility which wiD cause Wil- 
liams problems when he re- 
sumes his playing career this 
month. England wish to con- 
sider him at full bade but that 
position at his dub, OrreD, is 
occupied by Simon Langford, a 
talented player wbo has repre- 
sented the Northern Division 
and is captain of the dub. 
Williams, wbo hopes to have a 
game for one of OredTs lower 
sides this week, appreciates the 
local difficulty. “HI have to talk 
to Simon about it but I have to 
think of playing full back regu- 
larly and get into the divisional 
side in that position. I like 
playing there and at stand-off; 
you are more involved in the 
game at half back but there's 
more space in which to run from 
fullback.” 

Inevitably there is the 
possibility that Williams wiD 
have to change dubs so as to 
enhance his England pros- 
pects— he has yet to win his 
first cap. though be appeared at 
full back for the North against 
the 1 984 Australians and toured 
with England B in Italy earlier 
this year. 

Brain back to 
mastermind 
Warwickshire 

Sieve Brain, England’s first- 
choice hooker in their 'last II 
internationals, resumes county 
rugby for the first time in four 
years for Warwickshire against 
.North Midlands at Coventry 
this evening in the Midlands 
group of the county champion- 
ship. sponsored by Thorn EMI 
(David Hands writes). 

Warwickshire, the county 
Champions, lost Farrington 
when he was sent off during 
Coventry's game with Bridgend 
on Saturday. 

Steve Faim, brother of Mar-'- 
tin, the Coventry full back, 
replaces injured Hickey in the 
Warwickshire back row against 
North Midlands, wbo indude 
Saunders, the Coventry wing 
currently in outstanding form. 

East Midlands play Stafford- 
shire at Bedford needing , to win 
by six points to ensure further 
progress. They are without two 
Northampton backs, Green- 
halgh and Nigel Underwood, 
but Howe, the Bedford booker, 
returns against a side based 
firmly on the successful Lich- 
field and Stafford dubs. 

• Mike Gibson, the London 
Irish No 8. joins Munster to 
meet Ulster at Musgrave Park, 
Cork, cm Saturday after his 
surprise recall for Ireland 
against Romania at Lansdowne 
Road on Saturday week (George 
Ace writes). 



rnitt— i (Old Crescent). W ^ 
fGanyWfl. M CgttoMLon W . 

canjk p Oir (Ota wwBWj. H tiamuon 
mS^RamtoHbBwddtWandarBr^. 
1 p coHns (LaHdniMU Qtaiwon (Skar- 
nesL N Frauds (Bteckrock). R Ksanwy 
(Wanderws), O Fanning (9* «■¥*)- 


Back in saddle 

Zoe Brooks, the Cheshire girl 
who was suspended . from 
showjumping for six months 
last year for using bad language, 
will compete for Britain in the 
Hanover international pony 
show from November 14-16. 
Miss Brooks, aged 13. won the 
junior rider class at Wembley 
lost week. 

TEAM: Z Brooks (Chest**}. V Robert* 
(Yorkshire). G Lcwag r ow (EstMK), N 
Gouts, A Bel (Yorkshire}. 


Oxford to bank on 
Americans 
in the Boat Race 


At least six Americans are 
expected to figure In the 2987 

Boat Race crews. Five of them* 

indn din g Dan Lyons, a mem- 

ber of the US worid champioa- 

ip-winning COXiess fours, 

rrill race for Oxford, who 
eventaaOy surrendered their 
sequence of 10 successive wins 

in this year's race. 

Their other US candidates 
are internationals, Jonathan 

Fish (Pennsylvania) and Chris 

Clarke; Chris Penny (Prihce- 
ton), an Olympic eights bronze 

medal winner, and Chris 
Huntingdon — winner of 
bronze maOaW in the worid 
championship eights and 
fonts. Average age of their 
crew will be 26. 

Cambridge arc expected 'to 
use the nndeas of this year’s 

victorious crew to represent 

them again, which already 
includes the American Jim 

Pew. Then- Britons, members 

of the national eights squad. 

Paddy Bonghton and Stephen 

Peel, will be joined by tiro 
other internationals, John 
Garman and Mathew 
Brittan — a medallist in the 
worid juniour championships. 


By JimRafUon 

an Old Blues’ dinner. “I'm 
going to win the Boat 
SeTtf !< costs me lfcOOO 
Km»if« to come back to Oxforo 
and do it” 

Deborah Brigbt, Lyons gm- 

friend, and a graduate 
t Oxford, is also 

t y^pfaf to have bad her say- 
Eventually, Lyons felt it dip- 
lomatic not to ask for the Na^ 

Secretary's endorsement. 
Such is the energetic style oi 
Lyons, that after bis 
matriculation ceremony m the 
Sbeldonian Theatre on' Sat- 
urday, he was whisked away to 
Heathrow Airport to fly out to 

Boston srad row for PeMnsyiw*- 

nia Athletic Qnb in the Head 

of the River Charles in Boston 

on Sunday. _ . . 

The beginning of the Oxfora 
Mkhadmas term coincided 
with the cinema release of 
Oxford Blue, which is sup- 
posedly a remake of A Yankat 
Oxford. But Oxford's pop of 
Americans are a different 
kettle of fish from the celluloid 
rowing star Rob Lowe. 

Their American post-gr ' 
ate studies range from medi- 
eval history to social studies 

_ *xl * ** - i^flniMUWk ATI 


Lyons, aged 28, a Ueatsant with a majority faflnenre on 
io the Unked States’ mrry, is a the totter, while Cambridge s 


junior member of OrieL The 
United States Navy Secretary, 
Mr John Lehman, himself a 
Cambridge graduate, offered 
to give Lpsss a glowing ref- 
erence: “Why should I send a 
world champion to Oxford?” 

But there can be little dodbt 
that Lyons was influenced by 
Clarke, who is stfll smarting 
from the stigma of being a 
member of the Oxford aew 
which lost this year’s event. 
Clarice is reported to have told 

ICE HOCKEY 

Fife off to 
a flyer 
for final 

By A Correspondent 

Only after the weekend's last 
group matches bad been com- 
pleted did it become dear which 
two teams would meet in the 
English final of the Norwich 
Union Cup. 

Although - Peterborough Pi- 
rates achieved a big surprise 
with their second win' 'of "the 
tournament over the one-time 
favourites, Durham Wasps, 

ttTwin the northern group £y 
Whitley Warriors’ two comfort- 
able weekend victories over 
north-eastern rivals, Sunderland 
Chiefs and Ckvelaad Boadwra.- 

In the- southern group Not- 
tingham Panthers qualified at 
ibe expense of Strestbam Red- 
skins and Telford Tigers, the 
teams with 'whom they finished 
level on points, by virtue of 
having defeated the former 
twice and the latter once. 

Warriors must meet Panthers 
in a two-leg tie to deride which 
of them has the right to oppose 
Fife Flyers in next month's Cup 
Final at the NEC Birmingham. 
Flyers, assured of winning the 
Scottish group.: completed a 
perfect preliminary competition 
with an 8-7 victory over Ayr 


In the Heineken 
Slough Jets, playing before a 
borne crowd for the first time, 
moved to the top of the first 
division with a 7-5 victory over 
their fellow newcomers, Kirk- 
caldy Kestrels. Del Gosse, the 
visitors* Cana di a n net-minder, 
the score down to reason- 
proportions. 

Final Group Tables 

Scotland 


Rte. 

UurrayfioU 8 
Ayr 8 

Dundee 8 

8 


P W 
8 8 


T F A 
0104 44 
0 85 JET 
0 GO SO 
0 37 56 
0 80129 


PIS 

16 

12 

8 

2 

2 


England North 
MMey 8 6 

Petobcro’ 8 6 

Durham 8 5 

OnveSand 8 2 

Sunderland 8 0 

England South 
8 5 

8 5 

TeMorf 8 5 

Soama 8 4 

LeeVatoy 8 1 

Norarich Union CuKdtevebnd Bombws 
5. Pe ter borough Hratea 13r Nottingham 
Panthers 1Z tee Vatey Lions 3; TWonS 
Tigers G. Struattiam Redskins ft Sunder- 
land CMeta 6. VWUey Mentors 14: Lee 
VsSey Lions fi, Straattran Redstone 6: 
Mwrayfietd Racers 7. Ointee Rockets 4; 
SoUu Barons 6. TeSewS tigers 8; 
Whitley Warriors 14, Ctomtand Bombers 
3:. Ayr Brutas 7, Rfe Ftywa S: Dwbam 
Wasps 6. Petortxxotxjh Pkstesi 
Ite h whe n L— cue Hna 


82 52 
68 64 
95 38 
54 65 


.57 46 
72 50 
66 50 

££ 


Aces 9, Richmond Flyers ft Glasgow 
Eagles 11. Bournemouth Stags 5; Oxford 
CrtyStars 2, KHtcatyHasMs ft 
Southampton VBdngs 16. Swindon VWd- 

cate 4. 


Brougbtou and Peel, according 
to their potted Boat Race 
prog ramm e autobiographies 
are reading land lobotomy*. 

• A major row is already 
brewing over the date of the 
race, which is to be sponsored 
by Beefeater Gin to the value 
of £300,00 over the next three 
years. On the same day - 
March 28 - the Head of the 
River event takes place, in 
which 4X0 eights are sched- 
uled to compete. 

SHOWJUMPING 

Progress 
is quick 
for Collins 

By Jenny MacArthur 

Lucy Collins, who started 
showjumping just, four years 
ago. aged 17, has won the overall 
points championship in the 
Vauxhall-Ope! Young 
Sbowjumper ofthe Future series 
after finishing two points ahead 
of Maria Sparkes. Miss Collins's 
prize, given by Owners Abroad 
Group, is a fortnight's holiday 
for two which she will take after 
the final ofthe series at Ofyrapia 
in December. 

Miss Collins has had three 
wins in the series — at Darling- 
ion, Cheshire, and Harewood — 
all of them oo Commander 
Henry, a seven-year-old gelding 
bought from Ireland two years 
agp by Barbara Rich arid now 
owned by Raymond 'Fenwick, 
the man who Bad been respon- 
sible for Miss Collins's progress. 

Apart from one week's train- 
ing with Mike Saywell and 
another with Steven Hadley. Mr 
Fenwick has been her only 
trainer. 

His pupil has learnt fast Last 
month she competed at Wem- 
bley for tiie first time on 
Commander Henry and bad just 
one fence down in both the 
Foxhunter championships and 
in the Grade C Miss Collins, 
however, does not rate her 
chances highly for the Vauxhall- 
Opef final at CHympia. Cbm- 
manderHcnry is big ~ 17.1 hh — 
and she finds him difficult to 
hold in the confined space of an 
indoor arena. 

RESULTS L Co4jra (Commander Henry); 
Z. M Spates (Rawer); 3, T Cassan 


TRIATHLON 

Scott reclaims 
rronmaii title 

Kailua-Kona (AP) - After 
a one-year absence, Dave 
Scott regained the title and 
amrse record as he won his 
fifth Ironman Triathlon 
World Championship on Sun- 
day. 

His time of 8hr 28min 37sec 
took more than 20 minuips off 
tiie record set by his rival, 
Scott Tinley, during Scott's 
absence last year. It also 
earned him $17,000 dollars, 
the first tune prize money has 
been offered for the 
competition. 

CTMOT K Bteffr (WSL flfr 

gjah_(tiSL ftOSJS; T Sta tor (AuaL 


BASEBALL 


Red Sox extend lead 


New York {Reuter) — The 
Boston Red Sox bear , the New 
YoVk Mets 9-3 in last night's 
second game of the Worid 
Series. Red Sox. the American 
League champions, now lead the 
National League champions fry 
two games to nil in the best-of- 
seven series, scoring 18 hits off 
the Mels' pitchers. The next 
three games, will be played in 
Boston. ' 

The Red Sox.' who won 
Saturday night’s opening game 
1-0 on five bits, strode Mets 
Dwjgfat Gooden for eight hits 
and six rung before Ride 
Aguilera came on to pitch in the 
sixth-inning. ' 

Boston saved three runs in 
the third inning, one in the 
fourth. • two 'in 'the fifth and. 
seventh inning and one-more in 
the ninth ma game thatseemed 
more tike batting pracrice.forthe 
Sox than a World Series. 

Red Sox Star oaxier. Roger 
Clemens struggJed and was re-, 
jieved in the fifth miring, by 


Steve Crawford, Wbo.. 
bed with the win. Bol 
niched shut-out ball 


The Mets scored twi 
third innings- and orn 
fifth and collected eig 
alt but Boston’s pixel 

able _ to — 1 ! 

whenet 
of life. . 

After the opening i 

-less innings. Spike Ow 

Boston’s half of the th 
with a walk. 

Boggs then lined 
down the left fieKT 
spring twice, more < 
through Marty Barret 
Buckner. Red Sox wc 
ahead. 

The Mets fought 1 
mthe. fourth innings 
S»re 4- 2 in &vqut o 


on and two oul 

bacfc fa 

Boston increased 








1 



or, 

ans 

t 


• THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Christopher Davalle 


Campaigner’s ambitions hidden by the march of time 


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pm Inn **i « v.!' 

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to*# «*• .-rrar. 


• Red Ellen (BBC2. 10pm) is Bel 
Mooney s profile (rather a sketchy 
one) of a neglected figure in 

itSfTiBS^ 1, ? ,en Wi,kinson 

J 5 ?, 1 ;? 4 ? “only remembered, 

m a ik d for u lead,n B the Jamw 
March, Bui there was a lot more to 
ncr than that, A scholarship girl 
from a working-class Methodist 
lamiiy. she took a degree in history 

at Manchester University, became 
a novelist, journalist, then MP for’ 
Jarrow in I 929. She was a remark- 
able woman, ambitio us , im- 
pauem. passionate, intense, 
diminutive and full of feminine 
charm. She put politics before 
personal life, but had a close and 
fond relationship with Herbert 
Momson. under whose influence 
her politics moved to the right. 
Her nickname came not only from 


6.00 Ceefax AM. 

6.50 Breakfast Time with Frank 
and Guy Michefmore. 
Weather at 6-55, 7i5. 7^5, 
8^5 and EJ85; regional news, 
weather and traffic at 6^7, 
7^7, 7J7 and 427; natioiel 
awl intsmationi news at 7 JJO, 
7-MvB.OO, L30 and 9JJ0: sport 
at 7.20 and &20; and a review 
ctfme rroming newspapers at 

9.05 WiH to Wm. The story of 
Dennis and Julia Bingham's 
attempt to become the first 
husband and wife team to win 
the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy 
sidecar race, (r) 

9-35 Ceefax 10.30 Play School, 
presented by Sizabeth Watts 
and Wayne Jackman 10^0 
Ceefax. 

14X1 News After Noon with Richard 
Whitmore and Sue Carpenter, 
includes news head fires with 
• subtitles 1.25 Regional news. 
The weather details come from 
Michael Rsh 1.30 Bertha. A 
See-Saw programme for the 
very young, (r). 

1.45 International Snooker. Tony 
Meo versus John Parrott, from 


her political leanings but also from 
her red hair, and possibly her 
flaming temper, too. She was a 
tremendous orator — “She helped 
to make the dumb articulate.'* 
says her Parliamentary successor 
in Jarrow. Ernest Femyhough. She 
ended up Minister for Education 
in the post-war Cabinet and 
succeeded in raising the school 
leaving age. Bui she died shortly 
after of an overdose of drugs, 
probably accidentally, although 
suicide was whispered by some. If 
she were here today, she would 
find some things little changed: 
she was one of 14 women MPs in 
1 929. and there are only 27 today. 
And in the town of Jarrow in 1 986. 
one in three men are still 
unemployed. 


5435 Mastarteam- Quiz game for 
teams, presented Angela 
Rlppon. 

64X1 News with Nicholas Witched 
and Frances Coverdafe. 

Weather. 

6JJ5 London Plus. 

7410 TeBy Addicts. Following last 
week's tie, the Cleavers from 
Birmingham meet the 
Woodruffs from north London 
again. Presented by Noel 
Edmonds. 

7.30 EastEnders. Pat Wicks arrives 
on the scene once more. WBI it 
be her son or her ex-husband 
who win have the dubious 


CHOICE 


• Film 86 {BBC!. 10.20pm) looks 
at the subject of last Friday's 
Omnibus, The Mission. Roland 
Joffe's epic about the massacre of 
South American Indians by the 
Spanish Conquistadors in the 1 8th 
century. Robert De Niro and 
Jeremy Irons are the stars, along 
with the Waunana tribe. Also in 
the programme, Robert Redfbnfs 
new film, a comedy thriller called 
Legal Bogies, which co-stars 
Debra winger and Darryl 
Hannah. 


pleasure of her company? 
kathy’s husband is mystified 
by the letter he receives from 
his wife; and Mary plots 
revenge for befog humiliated. 
(Ceefax) 

.8.00 No Place like Home. 

Domestic comedy series 
starring William Gaunt and 
Patricia Garwood as the 
Crabtrees, this evening taking 
a dislike to their daughter's 
new boyfriend. (Ceefax) 

8£0 Yes, Prime Minister. Jim 
Hacker is worried about his 
first television interview since 
becoming PM. Whom should 
he invite to ask the questions? 
And should he wear glasses? 
(r) (Ceefax) . 

9.00 News with Jufia Somerville and 
Philip Hayton. Regional news 
and weather. 

930 Big DeaL Robby Box answers 
a maiden s prayer when 
Emma, a society gnl. asks him 
to play poker with a noble lord 
who has been fteecfog her 
brother. Starring Ray Brooks. 
(Ceefax) 

1030 FBm 86. Barry Norman reviews 
The Mission, and Robert 
Radford's latest. Legal Eagles. 

1050 The Money Makers. David 
Lomax talks to John Harvey- 
Jones of Imperial Chemical 
Industries, (r) 

11.20 Rhode. Brenda regrets letting 
her best friend share a room. 
Starring Julie Kavner. Valerie 
Harper and David Groh (r) 

11.45 Weather. 


r boyfriend. (Ceefax) 
i. Prime Minister. Jim 


SHOW v'UV^a; 

to Progress 
r is quick 
for Collin 




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■to- '.(■ 

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tor.- 

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Ceefax. 352 Regional news. 

355 Jimbo and the Jet Set (r) 4.00 
The Chucktehounds. (r) AOS 
Captain Caveman, (r) 4.15 
Beat the Teacher. Paul Jones 
presents another round of the 
teachers versus pupils quiz 
game. 

430 Record Breakers. The first in a 
new series presented by Roy 
Castle. Fiona Kennedy and 
Julian Farino. Among the 
record breaking attempts is 
one to improve on the 
Japanese record of 10,323 
people sitting on each other's 
knees to form an unsupported 
circle; and another to beat the 
beer mat-flipping record. 

5.00 John Craven's Newaround 
5.1 0 Grange HflL Episode five 
of the drama serial set in a 
secondary comprehensive, (r) 
(Ceefax) 


• Viewpoint 86: The Add Test 
(ITV. 1030pm) is an ecological 
documentary whid) looks at the 


94X1 Gharbar. Parveen Mirza talks 
to Mahesh Kotecha, president 
of the UK Thaiassaemia 
Society, who has a son 
suffering from this particularly 
severe form of anaemia. 

935 Ceefax. 

935 Daytime on Two: the beginning 
. of the school year in Austria 
952 Using old machinery as 
subjects for drawing 10.15 The . 
story of a gnl who befriends a 
badger 1038 Investigating 
science: the electron 
microscope; and the 
prevention of tooth decay 
114X1 Creatures living on trees; 
and the story of Chares II 
hiding from the Roundheads in 
an oak tree. 

11.17 The use of wood in the past 
11.40 Wondermaths 1157 
Mathematical investigations 
12.18 Maths counts ?2A0The 
role of members of Parliament 
1.05 The news as seen 


increasingly severe effects of acid 
rain on Europe's forests. lakes, 
wildlife and even buildings, and 
points the finger of blame primar- 
ily at Britain. 

Aberfan: 196646 (8.30pm. Ra- 
dio4). Vincent Kane commemo- 
rates the 20th anniversary of the 
disaster at Aberfan. South Wales, 
when a coal tip collapsed on to a 
village school, killing 1 16 children 
and 28 adults. The Queen asked 
for the flags of the nation to be 
flown at half-mast on the day of 
the mass funeral, and Welsh 
author Gwyn Thomas delivered 
an emotional tribute on radio, 
including the words. "Death has 
.moved around our villages like a 
busy bagman; our graveyards 
seem to be more receptive than 
others: the feces of our mothers 


more utterly and bitterly 
perplexed." 

• Evocations of the distant past in 
Troubadours (Radio 3, 630pm), 
the first of three programmes of 
medieval songs composed by 
Bemart de Vemadom performed 
by Martin Best and his Medieval 
Ensemble, and the Studio der 
Fruhen Musik. 

• Moving into the 20th century. 
Malcolm Arnold's 65th Birthday 
Concert celebrates the composer 
of the Oscar-winning music for 
Bridge on the River Kwai with a 
concert which includes the first 
broadcast of his Fantasy on a 
theme of John Field. The BBC 
Philharmonic Orchestra is con- 
ducted by Edward Downes. 

Anne Campbell Dixon 





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mum 





v ‘ 


Forceful voice: Red Ellen in Trafalgar Square (BBC2, 10.00pm) 


ITV/LONDON 


9.25 Thames news headfines. 

930 ForSehoote:jitw8ks- 

radioactivity 955 Children talk 
about truth and lies 104)9 How 
a visuaMy handicapped boy 

communicates 10126 PoJitfcs- 
local decisions and national 
decisions 1048 Afevel 
geography 11.10 Music from 
Ghana 1137 Trie irreortance 
of eating sensibly 11.44 An 
introduction to the writing of 


12.00 Tlckfe on the Turn. Village 
tales for the very young, (r) 
12.10 Rafobow. Leamfogwfth 
puppets and withguest The 
Great Kovari 1230 The 
Sutffvans. 

1.00 News at One with John Suchet 
130 Thames news. 

130 Mr Palfrey of Westminster. 
The government investigator 
‘ has tne task of preventing a 
Marxist historian from 
pubfishing a book damaging to 


Luxembourg channel. RTL 
138 Becoming engrossed in a 

book ZOO For four- and five- 
year olds. 

Z15 Intern a ti o nal Snooker. Best of 
rare frames Rothmans Grand 
Prix first round m a tche s 
between Tony Mm and John 
Parrott; and Robert Chaperon 
and Stephen Hendry. 

64)0 No Limits. Jenny Powell, in the 
Lake District with Tony Baker, 
meets the Cumbrian Wrestling 
world champion. Plus the latest 
pop music, videos, and films. 

650 Too Young to Have a Baby? 
Susan Tidy. Michelle in 
EastEnders, investigates what 
’ it is tike to be a young parent in 
real life, (r) 

7.15 Under SaB. The story of the 
reconstruction of the 85 year 
old. 50-foot yawl, Voluta. 

735 Issues of Law. In part five of 
his series on the state of 
English law Michael Mafyneux 
examines alternatives to going 
to court (Ceefax) 

84)0 Floyd on Food. Keith Floyd 
samples Co Cork fare 
including oysters and stout 
(First shown on BBC South 
West) 

930 Top Gear. Wffliam Wooflard 
examines the effectiveness 
and dangers of car ’phones; 
and compares the respective 
merits of three cabriolets - the 
Peugeot 205GT1; the Ford 
Escort and the Golf GTi. There 
is also a visit to a scooter rally. 

9.00 international Snooker. Dennis 
Taylor plays John Virgo: Paddy 
Browne’s opponent is Mark 
Bennett 

1030 Red EBen. Be! Mooney teas 
the story of EBen Wilkinson- 
Red Blen- one of the heroines 
of the Jarrow Hunger 
Marchers, and examines the 
controversy surrounding her 
death, (see Choice) 

10.40 Newsmght 1135 Weather. 

1130 Inter na tional Snooker. Further 
coverage of the action in the 
Rothman’s Grand Prix, from 
the Hexagon, Reading. Ends at 
1Z15. 


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Early morning breakfast bliss for Peter Tilbury and Sue HoMentess 
in It Takes a Worried Man (Ch4, 11.00pm) 


the government (r) (Orade) 

230 Daytime. Sarah Kennedy 
chairs a studio dtecussion on 
Pros ti t u tion - should the law be 
changed? Among three 
appearing are Helen 
■ Buckingham, Margo St James, 
Harry Fletcher of Nalgo and 
David Amess, a Conservative 
MP. 

34M) HeMoom. Antiques series 
presented by John Biy and 
Bernard Price 335 Thames 
news headBnes 330 The 
Young Doctors. Medical drama 
series S8t in a laqe Australian 
city hospital 

44H) The Giddy Game Show with 
Richard Vernon. Bernard 
Bresslaw, and Redvers Kyte. 
4.10 The Trap Door. Cartoon 
series set in a spooky castle 
430 CJLB. Episode five of the 
mystery serial 4^45 Splash 
fodudes a visit to the Central 
School of Speech and Drama. 

5.15 Blo ck b us ters. Bob Hotness 
with another round of the 
general knowledge game for 
teenagers. 

5^5 News with Alastair Stewart 
64)0 Thames news. 


Reporting London. What wiB 
the deregulation of Stock 
Exchange rules mean to 
Londoners? Michael Barrett 
talks to Cedi Parkinson. Plus, 
the high cost of funerals; and 
the worrying increase of 
physical attacks on public 
servants. 

Emmerdate Farm. New 
horizons are before Jbe 
Sugden and PhH Pearce. 
George and Mildred. The 
Ropers discover that their local 
sells draught gin and tonic, (r) 
Des O’Connor Tonight Live. 
The entertainer’s guests 
indude Michael Barrymore, 
Michael Brandon, Barbara 
Cooke, Roger Whittaker, 
Duncan NorveHe, and Nina 
Myskow. 

First Among Equals. Sbnon 
Kerslake is promoted and has 
to saver his business links with 
Nethercote. (Orade) 

News at Ten with Alastair 
Burnet and Carol Barnes. 
Viewpoint 86: The Add Test 
A documentary on how the 
effects of add rain have 
accelerated over recent years. 


S e Choice) 
miner Hou 


Hammer House of Mystery 
and Suspense: And the Wafl 
Came Tumbling Down. The 
demolition off a 17th century 
church leads to a senes of 
bizarre food ants. Starring 
Barbi Benton and Gareth Hunt 

Night Thoughts. 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good 


Good Morning Britain 
presented by Anne Diamond 
and Mik e Morris. Ne ws with 
Gordon Honeyoombe at 630, 
74)0, 730, 84m, 830 and 94M); 
financial news at 635; sport at 
6 j 40 and 7.40; exercises at . 
655 and 9.17; cartoon at 735; 
pop music at 755; and Jeni 
Barnett's postbag at 835. At 
94)5 Timmy Matiett presents 
Wacaday. 



A new Interest for Raymond Gould (Tom Wilkin son) in the form of 


Stephanie Arnold, played by Annie Lambert i 


9.00pm) 


CHANNEL 4 


230 Timeless Burma. A 

documentary about life in the 

Asian country, the first to made 
in Burma after the 1981 
elections which saw Mr San Yu 
succeed the 1 9 year 
presidency of General Ne Win. 

335 World of Animation. Presented 
by Richard Evans. 

3j 45 10 MBUon. The second of tour 
consumer programmes made 
for Britain's 10 million older 
viewers. This afternoon Joan 
Shenton is in Jersey where she 
investigates the disaster that 
overtook a woman who 
entrusted everything she had 
toa storage company; Reg 
Gutte ridge examines the 
claims of a shampoo 
developed for the elderly; and 
asks if making your own shoes 
is the answer for those with 
problem feet (Oracle) 

430 Countdown. The reigning 
champion is challenged by 
Steve Wood, a Telecom 
manager from Horsforth, 
Leeds. 

54X) Bewitched. Darrin is brought 
wealth and success when 
Endora thinks her daughter is 
bang deprived by her 
. husband. 

530 All Stitched Up. Part one of an 
eight-programme home 
dressmaking series. Today's 
edition includes fashion tips for 
the small ladyj(Oracle) (r) 

6.00 World Series BaMbaiL 
Highlights of the second game 
of the series between the 
Boston Red Sox and the New 
YorkMets. 

74X) Channel 4 News with Trevor 
McDonald and Nicholas Owen. 

750 Comment from entrepreneur 
and best-seIBng author, Victor 
Kiam. Weather. 

8.00 Brookside. Tracy’s 
introduction to the world of 
modelling is less than 
auspicious. 

830 4 What it’s Worth. John 
Stoneborough investigates a 
- company that stranded some 
of its disabled customers; and 
Bfil B reckon asks experts 
whether the British Gas 
privatization wifi be a good bet 
for investors. 

ZOO Fane Any Wednesday (1966) 
starring Jason Robards and 
Jana Fonda. Comedy about a 
mflltonaire who is faithful to his 
wife six days a week but on . 
Wednesdays has a change of 
scene with his mistress- 
Directed by Robert Ellis MiDer. 

11.00 It Takes a Worried Man. 
Comedy series starring, and 
written by, Peter Tilbury, as a 
middle-aged man. disillusioned 
with his job and frying to come 
to terms with a broken 
marriage, (r) 

1130 Too Close for Comfort Henry 
is propositioned by a recently 
divorced friend of nis wife's. 

1155 Studio 80. Musical 

entertainment including special 
guest Dionne Warwick; and a 
feature on the Beaties. Ends at 
1235. 


VARIATIONS 


BBC1 WALES: MSpnHhOO Wales To- 
■ * ■ day. MS-7-MCompiiter Challenge. 

030-1000 Aberfan 1000-10$) Ekg Deal 
11.20-11.50 Ron 86. 11 JO-liiSSaws and 
weather. SCOTLAND 1020cm-1030 
Dotaman 035pm-74n Reporting Scotland. 
BJXWOO City Lights 030-000 No Place 
LAs Home. NORTHERN IRELAND 5J5pm- 
S.40 Today's Sport O4B-6fr0 inside Utaior 
035-7.00 Mastarteam. 1145-11.50 News and 
weather. BMOLANO O35pn-7JIO Regonal 
newsmagazines. 

BBC? NORTHERN IRELAND. 7 JSpm- 
PP V* OOP Dacovenno Animals SCOT- 


LAND. 7J35pm-000 GtassOaO-OOD 
Prosban WALES. &3fent-&55 Mastarteam 
ajfe-un tntervai. 

CHANNEL SaSSSSScj. 

News 1-30 Birali Lsgrene 1JS-SL30 Coun- 
try Practice 3.0O-3-M Questions 5.15-5.45 
Sons & Daughters 6X0 Cnamei Report 
035-7.00 Crossroads 11.30 Entrepreneur 
12.00 Jazz 12J0am Closedown 

Joame Loves ChacM&OO Good Evenng 
Ulster S25 Diary Dates &35-7X0 Crossroads 
1U0 Man In A suitcase 1225am Closedown. 

granada aeaaggn ^ 

ports 3JO4JI0 Sons Bnd Daughters &00 
Granada Reports 6JS The Is Your Higtit 6J0- 
7JW Crossroads 1140 Man hi A Suitcase 
1230am Closedown. 

TVQ As London except: 1230pm Get- 
- 1 -— Wig On 1^0 News 1J0 Action 1 1.35- 
230 Counijy Practice 3JXKL30 Questwns 
5.15-5. *5 Sons and Daughters 6JW Coast To 
Coast 6J5 Pofice 5 BJW.00 Crossroads 
1U0 Entrepreneur 1230 Jazz 1230am Com- 
pany. Closedown. 

htvw e s ta^^^,^ 

6^-7410 Crossroads 11J0 World into Im- 
age 1230an Ctosedown. 
t4TV W ALBS As htv west ex- 
5 . . aflkBl cept 6il0ptw-6J35 Wales 
At Six. 

GRA M PjAN ^^jyg^ 

Tine 120-1 JO News 11 JOT J Hooker 
1230am News 12J5 Soley Maclean at 75 
12^0 Closedown. 

SENTMLaigaflg^ 

time 1 JO-1 JO News &00 Crossroads 
&25-7 JO Naws 1 1 JO Sweeney 12J0am 
Jobffnder UO Ctaaadown 

TYNE TEES, 

Northern Ufa BJ5-7 M Crossroads 11 JO 
Worlds Beyond 1200 Listen For A Change, 
Closedown. 

CAT* Starts 11.10am Hwnt Ac Yma 
=-S=11JOHynOFyai1JO Interval 1200 
Bhru Madonna Of The Sever Moons 200 
Countdown 230 Irish Angle 3JI0 Heart Of The 
Dragon 400 Pfatabalam 4.15 Rebecca 
4JteHafoc5JO Bewitched SJO Car 54. Whera 
Are You? BJO World Series Baseball 7 JO 
NewydcSon Smth 7J0 Y Byd Natur 400 Chas- 
ing Rainbows— A Natran And Its Must 
&00 Mlnalon 9J0 Snwcer O Reeding 1030 
Sloe Stand 1045 Uvtaig With Schaopnre- 
nla 11 JO Mfchetanget plays Beethoven 
1230am Closedown. 

ANGLIA As London except 
™ ■ ■ ■ ■ 1230pm-1JO Getting On 1 JO- 

130 News 5.15-545 EmmerdaM Faim 
6J0 About Anglia Crossroads 7 JO-7 JO 

Bygones 11 JO Hunter 1230am Pilgntis 
Not Strangers, Closedown 
TSW As London except 12J0pm-l.00 
JLSI1. Getting On 1 JO-1 JO News 3JB-44W 
Sons and Delimiters 5.15 Gus Honeybun 
5JO&45 Crossroads 6.00 Today Sodth West 
SJS Televiews 6J0 Tuesday View 7J0- 
7J0 Me & My Girl 11 JO Postscript 1 1 35 Fal- 
con Crest 1231am Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

Live 1 JO-1 JO News 3J0-4J0 Country 
Practice 6J0 Calendar 635-7 JO Crossroads 
TUOTaies Prom The DarxsxJe 1200 
Snow Express 1230am-600 Muse Box. 

BORDER 

Sons and Deughws 630 Lookaround 
638-74)0 Crossroads 1130 Tales from the 
Dariskte 1200 Closedown. 

SCOTTISH As London except 

i2JDpm-1J0 Getting On 
1 JO-1 JO News 330-400 Sons and 
Daughters 5.15*45 Emmeraale Farm 6 JO 
Scottand Today 6^ Crossroads 7.00- 
7 JO Taka Hie H^i Road 1 1 JO Law Cafl 1 1 35 
Sweeney 12J5am Soriay Madeen at 75 
1240 Closedown 


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On modun wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on tite half-hotr from 
630am untfi 830pm then at 104W 
and 124X) rradniqht 
530am Adrian John 74)0 Mike 
Smith's Breakfast Show 930 
Simon Bates 1230pm 
Newsbeat 1245 Gary Davies ind a 
run-down of this week's Top 40 
singles X00 Steve Wright 530 
Newsbeat 5^5 Bruno Brookes 
ind 630 a review of the new Top 40 
singles 730 Janice & John fo 
Japa n. 104)0 -124)0 Andy Kershaw 
VHF STEREOS 1 8 2: 430am 
As Radio z 1030pm As Radio 1 . 
12JO-430ara As Radio 2. 


635 Weather 730 News 
74)5 Morning Concert 

Boccherini, Symphony in 
D minor. Op 37 No 3 
(Cantilana/Adrian 
Shepherd); So r. Variations 
on a theme from the 
Magic Flute by Mozart Op 9. 
Eduardo Fernandez 
(gutert Gustave 




On mediun wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 



SOME OF SPAIN'S most popular wines come 
Montilla, near the Moorish town of Cordoba , 
in Andalucia. 

Here, the combination of sun-baked Pedro 
Ximenez vines and white chalky Albero soils kelp 
to create wines with a natural strength that ■ 
have been enjoyed since Roman times. B 

Whether you prefer a chilled dry Sun | 
or a sweet dessert wine, they're still 
great value. 

U IVfj fRO'l 5PAIV 22 UiVCHEMEfi SQ . LC*VD£> N U /.VI 54P 


from 





Ken Buce 1U0 Jimmy Young 
14)5pm David Jacobs ZOO Gloria 
HunratardSJO David Hamikon 
535 John Dunn 7.00 Bob Hofoess 
Presents_The BBC Radio 
Orchestra 935 Sports Desk 104)0 
1030 Listen to Les says Lbs 
D awson. Daptme Oxenford and 

Cofin Edwyrm 114» Brian 
Matthew presents Round Midnight 
14Uam Richard Oegg presents 
Nightride 330-COOAlSte Night 
fifcaic. 

WORLD SERVICE 

UO NavodBSk 7 JO News 7 M Twody- 
loor Hours 7 JO John Butts Other (stands 
7 AS Nofcuoric UK IJO News LD9 Reflec- 
tions 8.15 Trairing tor Tomorrow 8J0 
Synxtooay tor Pow 9J0 Naws 9JS 
Review of the Sritsh Pram 9.15 The 
Wotto Today 930 financ ia l nm 240 
Look Ahead 945 Soonds of the Sixties 
iQjOO News IflJl Dacowy 1030 The 
Betrothed 1100 News HJi News About 
&tinn 1115 Wnanade 1125 A Latter 
1mm S c oti a n d 1220 Redo N e wsr ee l 
12.15 lUteack 1 1245 Sports Roundup 
IJO News 1 -OS Twenty- la x Hoes 130 
Network UK 146 Recordog of the Week 
200 OuttoOk 245 Eric Coates 300 Redo 
M e wem el 3.15 A Jofiy Good Stow 4J0 
News 409 C o mmen ta ry 4.15 Omritous 
44S The World Today 5 j 0 News 5J9 A 
Letter from Scotiand LOO News 108 
Twenty-tour Bcus UO Omtteus LOO 
New 9J1 ke emw o nri Gardeners 210 
Book Choc* 11$ Concert Hall IQJQ 
[ News frU» rite World Today 1035 A 
1 Letter from Scotland tOJO finanael 
I News 1IUS ReQacaors 1045 Spans 
Romtoo TLOO News itJBCommenary 
, T1.15 Fr* io me Modem World iu6 
Otot far Cash 1200 News 1209 News 
About Bncan 1215 Remo Newsreel 1230 
OMWuS UO News 1J1 OidtoOk US 
Ratxxi oo Rakoton 145 Oouwy Styte 
200 News SMRiwrol me Brash 
Pretslia E un p e a n Cancer Sanos 230 
the O e go med aoo News 309 News 
Atxxr Scan 115 The warid Today 3J0 
Dacovenr 400 Newsoesk OO tmema- 
com Geocners 440 Book Choice 545 
The Vtorid Today Ai times In QMT. 


Charpentier. Depuis le 
tour (Louise). Monte Carlo 
PO under Maxintiano 
Valdes, with Julia Mgenes 
(soprano); Janacek. arr 
JHek. Suite: Osud. Czech PO 
under Frantisek Jilak. 

100 News 

84)5 Morning Concert (cont). 
Auber, Overtire: Fra 
Dtavoto. Monte Carlo PO 
under Marc Soustrot 
Vanhal, Wo&i Concerto in G. 

- Soloist Josef Suk. with 
Suk CO under Joeef Vlach; 
Berwald, Symphony in E 
flat (1845). Gothenberg SO 
under Neeme Jarvi. 

930 News 

94)5 This Week's Composer 
Malcolm Arnold. Trio. Op 
6, Jutfith Pearce (flute) Roger 
Chase fvtota) Brian 
Wightnian (bassoon); 
Symphony No 1. 
Bournemouth $Q under the 
composer. 

1030 Ravel and RousseL 
Pasquier Trio plays 
Ravel. Sonata for viofin and 
cello (1922): Roussel. 

String Trio (1937) 

1040 Bach, Berg ... and a 
Chorale. Bach, Cantata 
NO 60: 0 Ewigkeitdu 
Donnerwort. Helen Watts 
(mezzo-soprano) Adalbert 
Kraus (tenor) Phtfippe 


Study No 7; Chores No 1. 
2.15 Around Hans Gat. 

Indudes two pieces by 
the 96-year-ok) composer. 
Brahms, Trio in A minor. 

Op 114; Schubert Die Nachb 
Matter. Biuntine; Gat 
Variations on a Viennese 
“Heurigen” melody. 3.00 
Interval reeding 335 





4,B ; 

530 Mainly for Pleasure. 
Music for the early 
evening, presented by 
Natafie wheen. 

630 Troubadors. First of 
three programmes: 
Bemvt de Ventadom 




On tong wave, (s) Stereo on VHF 
535 Shipping 630 News Briefing; 

Weather 6.10 Farnting 
Today 6JZS Prayer for the 
Day(s) 

630 Today, ind 630, 730, 

830 News Summary 
635 Business News 635, 
735 Weather 730, 84)0 
Today’s News 730 Your 
Letters 735, 835 Sport 
745 Thought for the Day 
835 Yesterday in 
Parliament 837 Weather; 
Travel 
9.00 News 

935 Tuesday Call: 01-580- 
441 1 . Topical phone-in. 

104)0 News; From Our Own 
Correspondent Life and 
pofitics abroad reported by 
BBC foreign 
correspondents. 

1030 Morning Story: Those 
Who Can't, by Judith 
Culler. 






riL ymM 


(records). 

730 Schumann and Matter, 
with Patricia Rozarlo 
(soprano) Mark Troop 
(piano). Schumann, 

Settings from Goethe’s 
WBhelm Meister. Op 98a: 
Kermstdu das Land; Nurwur 
de Setttsucht kannt; 

Heiss mich nicht'reden; 
Singatntchtfo 
TrauertSnen; Mahler. Lieder 
und Gesange aus der 
Juaenxtz&t 

FnS^^noraen; 


Hutten tocher (bass); Berg. 
VtoHn Concerto. 

Bavarian SO under Sir Colin 
Davis, with soloist Grdon 
Kramer. 

1135 Bach and Schumann, 
with Gerhard Opta 

(pano). Bach. Partita No 5. in 
G major (BWV 829): 
Schumann, Sonata No 2. in 
G minor. Op 22. 

1210 Midday Concert. BBC 
Scottish Symphony 
Orchestra under Ben 
Buurman, with Gerakfine 
Allen (clarinet). Part one; 
Gneg. Suite: Sigurd 
Jorsstfan Graham Whanam. 

Concerto No 1. 

130 News 

14)5 Midday Concert. Part 
two: Sibelius, Symphony 

No 6. m D minor. 

1.45 Guttar Jncores- leo 
Wtoszynskyj plays 
Cartos Guastawno. Sonets: 
Vina-Lobos. Study Noll: 


Ermnerung; Schentei und 
Meiden; iwi gtog mk 
Lust Attesting im Sommer. 

730 Dead Men, by MBte Stott 
Play set in Russia in the 
1870s. Cast includes Freddie 
Jones. 

930 Malcolm Arnold's 65th 
Birthday Concert BBC 
Phiftarmonic Orchestra, 
under Dennis Simons, 
with Martin Roscoe (piano). 
Arnold. PhflharmonJc 
Concerto; Fantasy on a 
theme of John Field (first 
broadcast); Symphony No 7. 
Including at 104)0 interval 

1130 R^??lghL Series of five 
theatre and opera 
reviews. Robert Cushmann 
at theTheatre Royal, 
Hayiroriwt tor Hugh 
WMemore's Breakfog 
the Code ’ 

11.10 Joseph Silverstein 
(violin), with Arnold 
Stetnirardr (violin). Jules 
Erskin (cetio) and Yehudi 


Tropical Ecology at the 
University of 

Pennsylvania, talks about 

B ans for the Santa Rosa 

atonal Park- 

1230 News; You and Yours. 

Consumer advice. 

1227 Legal, Decent. Honest 
ana Truthful Comedy 
series set in an advertising 
agency, with Martin 
Jarvis and Christopher 
Godwin (s). 1235 
Weather; Travel 
14)0 The world at One: News 
1.40 T he Arc hers. 135 

24)0 Newsn^bman’sHour. 
includes a report on the 
launch of a campaign to 
increase the number of 
women serving on pubfic 
bodies, 

3.00 News; The Afternoon 
Play. Passing Away, by 
Ellen Fox. When a woman is 
made redundant, it looks 
as if her whole fife is coming 
to an end (s) 

430 News 
4.05 Poet to Poet (2) 

Something Understood. 
Anthony ThwaitB looks at the 


Works by Moszkowsta, 
Bartok and attrlb Bach. 
1137 News 


430 Kaleidoscope 
530 PM. News magazine. 
530 Shipping 535 
- weather 

630 The Six O'Ctock News: 

Financial Report 
630 Top of the Form. 
Nationwide general 


Martin Jarvis (Radio 4 1 2.27pm) 
knowledge contest tor 
schools. 

730 News 

735 The Archers 

730 File on 4. Major issues at 
home and abroad. 

8.00 Medicine Now. Geoff 
Watts rworts on me 
health of medical care. 

830 The Tuesday Feature: 
Aberfan: 1 966-86- Vmcent 
Kane returns to the South 
Wales valley where in 
1966 144 people were killed 
when a coatop collapsed 
on a village school. 

930 In Touch. News, views 
and information for 
people with a visual 
handicap. 

930 Near Myths (new senes) 
Reflections on life in the « 
Greek islands. 

9.4 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
Breaktnq the Code at the 
Theatre Royal and the 
Amsterdam Opera 
House's Falstaff/Eugene 
Onegxi. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: 

Hangover Square (12). 

1029 Weather 

1030 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial Work) 

Tonight 

1130 Today fo Parliament 
1230 News; Weather. 1233 
Shipping. 

VHF (available m England and S 
wales only) as above except: 535- 
630am Weather Travel. 11.00- 
1230 For Schools: 1l4M) Time and 
Time (s) 1130 Time to Move 
11.10 Radio Club. 1.55-330pm For 
Schools: 135 Listening Corner' 

(s) 235 History Long Ago (s) 235 
Contact 240 Radiovision 
History of Britain. 530-635 PM 
(continued). 1230-1. 10am « 
Schools Night-time Broadcasting: 
French E- Horizons de France. 


°8SkHz/275m; Radio. 2: 693kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m;VHF-90- 
*£>£ LBC:1lSadteB6lne VHF 973; Capital: 1548kHz/194m: VHF95.8: BBC Radio London: 

1458kHz)206ni: VHF 94.9; Wwfd Service: MF 648kHz/463m. 


n 





TUESDAY OCTOBER 21 1986 


THE ^ TIMES 


Ftat pabtbfed i» 1785 


+ * + * 


Ballesteros loses 
adviser but 
rift is denied 


SPORT 








By Mitchell Platts 

The multi-million pounds 
business empire of Sevenaoo 
Ballesteros is being switched 
from Madnd to Santander 
following an amicable porting 
of the ways between the 
Spanish golfer and his busi- 
ness adviser Jorge Ceballos. 

But Ceballos. who has 
known the Ballesteros family 
since he was a child, denied 
that there was any rift in their 
relationship amidst an erro- 
neous rumour that be was 
connected behind the scenes 
with the rising Spanish star 
Jose- Maria OlazabaL' 

“To connect me with Jose- 
Mana is like saying that I have 
stolen £3 million from Seve 
and run away to Brazil," 
insisted Ceballos. “Some peo- 
ple like to see blood, like in the 
bull ring, but there is no blood 
here. 

“It is simply a change of 
business logistics. There is no 
problem with our relation- 
ship. Seve wants his office in 
Santander, near to his home in 
Pedrena. and I do not want to 
leave Madrid' 1 . 

Ceballos. a founder member 
of the Faifrvays SA company, 
fonhed in 1981 to handle the 
golfer's business affairs m 
Spain, will be replaced by Joe 
Collet, .an American mormon 
who previously worked for 
Uni-Managers International, 
who initially conducted 
Ballesteros's off-course 
activities. 

“I even suggested to Seve 
that he should take on Joe 
Collet." added Ceballos. 
speaking from Madrid after 
flying home with Ballesteros 


relaxed family lifestyle. “I 
have never considered myself 
as Seve's manager," Ceballos 
said. “I have always been his 
friend and adviser. My par- 
ents came from Santander and 
I spent my summers in 
Pedrena. I met Manuel Seve's 
brother, when 1 was 13 and he 
was 10. I first met Seve in 
1975 when I was a director of 


Schedule change 
likely in 1987 

Severiano Ballesteros left 
Paris following the Lancome 
Trophy on Sunday so ex- 
hausted that it would not be a 
surprise if he once again 
changed his schedule for 1986 
(Mitchell Platts writes). 

Ballesteros said: “1 will 
have to cut bade in 1987. 1 do 
not have any time to myself. It 
is very hard when yon are 
always in contention. There is 
pressure on the course and 
then everybody seems to want 
a minute of my time off the 
fairways." 

Ballesteros confirmed to 
PGA Tour officials that he wOl 
play for Europe in next 
mouth's Nissan Cup in Japan 
but he could withdraw that 
commitment. I also under- 
stand that he is likely to 
decline an invitation to com- 
pete In the Son City Million 
Dollar Challenge in 
December. 


the Spanish PGA. I have tried 
to help Seve's business career. 
I have not got rich. I will not 
lose a fortune by not going to 
Santander." 


from the Lancome Trophy in 
Paris. “Seve requires a fafl- 


Paris. “Seve requires a full- 
time manager and J have 
refused to go to Santander. It 
is a nice village but it would be 
a professional desen for me." 

The problem was that 
Ballesteros's success as a golfer 
had outstripped Ceballos's 
capacity to retain a reasonably 


Ceballos will cease to be a 
director of Fairways SA — 
Ballesteros has 85 per cent of 
the shares and his brothers 
Baldomero. Manuel and Vi- 
cente have five percent each — 
but through another company, 
Camcorp Spain, be will con- 
tinue to work with Roddy 
Carr, the former Walker Cup 


golfer, in helping to organize 
the Peugeot Spanish Open on 
Ballesteros's behalf. 

Meanwhile, I understand 
that Collet who has been out 
of the golf scene for four years, 
will shortly leave his Los 
Angeles home. He has been 
working for a hospital in the 
American city and he is 
expected to move his family to 
Santander at the end of 
November. He will be taking 
over the reins of a company 
which is believed to gross 
more than $5 million a year as 
Ballesteros now has around 30 
contracts worldwide. 

Collet formerly a lawyer, is 
a fine linguist — he speaks 
fluent Spanish —and it was he 
who regularly visited 
Ballesteros in Pedrena when 
the golfer was a client of Uni- 
Managers International even 
though the head of that 
corporation was Ed Bamer. 

It is likely that Collet will 
have a more concrete arrange- 
ment with Bailesieros than 
Ceballos, who it is understood 
was paid a salary with no 
formal contract Ballesteros 
and Ceballos conducted their 
affairs on a handshake rather 
like Mark McCormack, the 
head of the global Inter- 
national Management Group, 
and' Arnold Palmer. “I was 
properly paid but I never 
worked on a percentage 
basis," added Ceballos. 

Ceballos was almost cer- 
tainly influential in 
Ballesteros's remaining loyal 
to Uni-Managers Inter- 
national in the late 1970s 
when the International 
Management Group were ea- 
ger to add the Spaniard to 
their veritable stable of sport- 
rng stars. 

Ballesteros has since shown 
his own dexterity in business 
matters and as such he can be 
as demanding with the people 
who run his affairs as he is 



An American 
Prof at the 
old Academy 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


Why not ask an Am e ric a n , 
whose only previous book was 
entitled Cromwell end the Ne* 
Model Foreign Policy, and who 
admits Oat his knowledge of 
football “was non-existent and 
now qnafifies as minimal" , to 
publish an account of West 
Ham United? After all, given 
time and a typewriter, a mon- 
key could reproduce the Bible. 

It took Charles Konr 14 
years to complete bis task. Yet 
the choice of author should not 
be considered so unlikely. 
Who better to examine the 
dub that became known as 
“the Academy of Soccer” than 
an associate professor of his- 
tory , even if be' is employed at 
tbe University of Missouri? 


Football dab might have been 


delayed indefinitely. Kore 



Sport’s effect on 
English culture 




Bonsignorn Driving her way to victory against Clare Wood (Photograph: Hugh Rondedge) 


Miss Wade beats 
younger players 
to fifth place 


Wembley 
welcome 
for Cash 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


Tbe. aspiring young pro- 
fessionals of British women's 
tennis, promising though they 
are. have yet to inspire con- 


With himself on fc SO*f I fjdence! Thai 


message 


RUGBYLEAGUE 


SNOOKER 


Coach relieved 


By Keith Macklin 

The Great Britain coach, voted 
Maurice Bam ford, heaved a nrcparati 


voted to psychological 
preparation and the building- 


huge sigh of relief at tbe end of up of team spirit. Bamford 


Impressive 
Thorne 
pulls clear 


the Lancashire Cup final on said yesterday: “They are all 
Sunday because of fear of fighting fit and ready to go. 
mj unes. Throughout the final, and looki ng forward to putting 
Bamford bad his fingers on a show against the 

Kangaroos." 


Bamford bad his fingers 
crossed for the three Wigan 
players who could play a 
leading role in his team plans 
for the first international 
against Australia at Old 
Traffordon Saturday. 

Ellery Hanley. Henderson 
Gil) and Shaun Edwards and 
the remaining 14 members of 
the 1 7-man squad to prepare 
for the match yesterday 
moved into training camp at 
Shaw Hill Golf and Country 
Club at Chorley in Lancashire. 

The week will be spent not 
merely in orthodox rugby 
training: but in sessions de- 


Australian tourists. 


Willie Thorne produced a 
series of fine breaks to reach 
the last 16 of the £275,000 
Rothmans Grand Prix in 
Reading yesterday. Thorne 
pulled away from Warren 
King, the new Australian 


who have won all three of champion, with some impres- 


their games to date, field 
virtually a second string side 
for to night's match 

against Cumbria at Barrow. 
Their line-up includes only 
one player — winger Michael 
O'Connor — who is likely to 
play in Saturday’s first test 
against Great Britain at Old 
Trafford. 


TEAM:- Belcher. Shearer. Mortimer. 
Mentaa. O'Connor: Lamb, Alexander 


Dsiey. Bias (capq. Sena. Dunn. Davidson. 
LangmacK Subs: Jack. Dowhng. 



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Midland on 01-589 5599. 


sive snooker as he knocked in 
eight breaks of more than 30. 

King was hanging on grimly 
at 2-2 but Thorne, who had 
swept through the third frame 
with two breaks of over fifty, 
produced farther breaks of 37, 
50 and 87 to go through 5-2. 

King's best chance came in 
the sixth frame. After coming 
back from 48-2 down with a 
break of 23. he fluked a red but 
then missed a simple black. 

Thorne admitted be had 
reservations about beating his 
opponent. “I was really wor- 
ried about playing him. and at 
2-2 at the interval it was even 
worse." 

Thorne also had praise for 
the table being used at Read- 
ing. “That could well be the 
best table I have ever played 
upon." he said. 

“If I can keep going in the 
tournament I’ll definitely 
make plenty of centuries and I 
was kicking myself for not 
making one in die last frame." 

Thorne, who claimed the 
£50.000 first prize in the 
Maichroom Professional tour- 
nament at the end of last 
month, could have some fam- 
ous support if he reaches the 
final on Sunday. Gary 
Lineker, a dose friend of his, 
may fly over to support him. 

While Thome, who will 
meet either Neil Foulds or 
Oiff Wilson in the fifth round, 
has lost 22 pounds in weight 
since last season. Les Dodd, 
ranked 69th in the world, has 
lost 34 pounds to come down 
to 1 7 Vs stones. 

Dodd, however, was 
knocked out 5-2 by M ike 
Hallett in the afternoon's 
other fourth-round match. 
Dodds had beaienKJrk Ste- 
vens, the world No. 9. in the 
qualifying rounds. Hallett 
who had breaks of 67. 93. 42. 
35 and 76. will now meet 
either Jimmy White or Jack 


emerged from two news items 
coinciding with tbe start of the 
Pretty Polly tournament at the 
Brighton Centre yesterday. 

Virginia Wade,* aged 41, will 
fill the vacant fifth position in 
the Wightman Cup team to 
play the United States at the 
Albert Hall next week — and 
six British players -have 
missed a chance to collect 
$275 each (about £180) by 
playing in the Brighton 
qualifying competition. 

Sue Mappm. the women's 
national team manager, an- 
nounced that Miss Wade, the 
team captain, would also play 
against the US if necessary — 
that is. if something goes 
wrong with Jo Dune, Annabel 
Croft. Sara Gomer or Anne 
Hobbs. “1 would have liked to 
pick a younger player’’. Miss 
Mappm said, “but it’s a year 
too early". Belinda Borneo, 
aged 19, has been attached to 
the team “to find out what the 
Wightman Cup is all about", 
as Miss Mappin put it. 

Miss Wade said she was 
happy to be “first reserve" and 
did not intend to play unless 
circumstances demanded it 
That is most likely to occur if 
Miss Gomer's recently 
strained thigh muscle lets her 
down, or in the event of a 
critical doubles in which 
experience could matter more 
than youth. 

The odd feature of the 
Brighton qualifying 
competiton. which included 
10 British players, was the six 
gaps in the draw. “This is the 
first time that has ever hap- 
pened here." said George 
Hendon, the tournament 
director. “Four other British 
girls entered but were not 
ranked high enough to get into 


the qualifying — and did not 
keep checking to see if a 
vacancy had occured. 

“Either they don’t under- 
stand the system — and as 
professionals they should — or 
they just don't care. In addi- 
tion to the experience of 
playing in a tournament like 
this they would have received 
$275. which would have paid 
all their expenses, even if they 
had not won a game. 

Miss Mappin commented: 
“I knew there would be two 
places, so I told six girls. If I 
had known there would be so 
many vacancies 1 would have 
got some more girls down 
here. 1 didn't anticipate such a 
drop-out. It's very sad. Six 
British players could have 
walked on court and collected 
$275 each". 


In a situation like this there 
is a tendancy for everyone to 
direct the responsibility else- 
where. Basically, it rests with 
the players. There is no sound 
reason why Miss Mappin or 
Hendon should have to tout 
for competitors. No ambitious 
professional should need 
bullying or cajoling towards 
easy money and valuable 
competitive experience. 


The qualifying competition 
ends this morning . Three 
British players went straight 
into the main draw, from 
which seven competitors have 
withdrawn — six. it is re- 
corded. because of injuries. 
Bui six of the 10 most 
successful players in the last 
four Grand Slam tournaments 
remain in the field. They are 
Helena Sukova. Catarina 
Lindqvist. Steffi Graf Claudia 
Kohde-Kilsch and Manuela 
and Katerina Maleeva. 


Last vear Miss Durie beat 
Miss Graf in the second 
round. This week they could 
meet in a semi-finaL 


Pat Cash, the. Australian 
now fully recovered from a 
string of illnesses which kept 
him out of action far so long 
earlier this year, plays in the 
Benson and Hedges 
championships at Wembley 
from November 11-16. Len 
Owen, the tournament direc- 
tor. announced yesterday that 
he had awarded Cash one of 
the three wild cards at his 
disposal. 

Cash's illnesses, which in- 
cluded an operation for 
appendicitis just before Wim- 
bledon caused his world rank- 
ing to plunge 4o around the 
400 mark. Since Wimbledon, 
where he beat Mats Wilauder 
before falling to Henri Le- 
conte, the Frenchman, in the 
quarter-finals. Cash's world 
ranking has climbed to 80, but 
that is still too low to gain 
direct entry into this £300,000 
championship. 

Recently Cash won both his 
singles in the Davis Cup semi- 
final tie against the United 
States and Owen said: “I am 
delighted to give one of tbe 
wild cards to such a popular 
player. It will be his first 
appearance in our champion- 
ships and I am hoping be will 
also play in the doubles witif : 
Paul McNamee." 

Boris Becker, tbe Wimble- 
don champion, and Ivan 
LandL the world No 1. head 
the entry, but Owen is still 
holding a wild card in reserve 
in the hope that John Mc- 
Enroe. a former title-holder 
will request to play. 

• McEnroe has accepted a 
wild card entry for the inaugu- 
ral Paris Open, starting on 
October 27, which with 
$625,000 in prize money on 
offer is already the richest 
tournament outside the Grand 
Slam tournaments. McEnroe 
has won his last three tour- 
naments. but would probably 
be forced to enter— and win — 
at Wembley and Houston if he 
is to reach the top eight players 
who qualify for the Masters in 
New York in December. 


Korr was responsible for tte 
original idea, , the source of 
which was equally for-fetched. 
Daring the 1968 Olympics, as 
be watched Smith and Carlos 
salnte with clenched fists on 
the winner’s ros t r um , he be- 
came aware that sport was “no 
logger just fan and games.” 

He deckled to investigate its 
effect on English bdtme. He 
contacted the nine League 
dabs in London. He dismissed 
Arsenal and Tottenham 
Hotspur because their crowds, 
were too cosmopolitan, Chel- 
sea because their spectators 
were “floaters" and F ulham 
“because I wasn't sure if I 
coaid find their supporters”. 
West Ham were eventually 
preferred above MfltwaD and 
Charlton Athletic because 
“they woe nnSqne" 

The chairman, the late Reg 
Pratt, and the secretary, Eddie 
Chapman, opened every door 
in Upton Park. “They allowed 
me to see all their financial 
records and even the minutes 
of every board meeting be- 
tween 1900, when tbe dub was 
formed, to 1970. That was 
8^54 pages of hrfbnnaliaii. 


views the eune itself as “hon- 
zoatal basketball", the spo rt 
that be played in the sheets ot 
Philadelphia as a chi ld, an d 
the self-confessed outsider , 
takes an equally fresh look at 
the old Academy. 

“The theme that mas \ 
through the book is that a 
football dob is the creator of 
mythology and then becomes 
captive to those legends," he 
Av ph.fa.ed- “In West Ham's 
case it is their particular brand 

of open football, their desire to 
win rather than to avoid defeat 
and their concentration on 
home-grown talent. 

“Chibs are vestiges of the 
Victorian era and they repre- - 
sent a whole set of paradoxes* \ 
They are businesses, yet they i 
are ran in an unbusinesslike 
manner. They are social in- J 
stitntions, yet they have their f 
own standards. They are 
dnhs. yet no one has a say in 
r unn ing them except the six or 
seven directors. 

“West Ham have set stan- . 

nwintam them. 

They say, far example, that 
they never sack a manager. 
Unit is not strictly true. Their 
first, Sid King, was suspended 
after a stormy meeting and. a 
couple of days after Charlie 
Paynter took over, he commit- 
ted suicide by drinking corro- 

sire liquid. 


“Often people hold on to 
tradition as an excuse for not 
faring ap to the necessities of a 
ptungmg world bat they have 
kept thefts because it happens 
to work. Although they have 
made mistakes mottg tiie way, 
it Is hard not to admire them 
for that" 


Club that sticks 
to its promises 


“For a historian fike me, 
that was like sitting in a gold- 
mine." But chfcefluig eat the 
words became a “painful" 
process and be found “a whole 
bunch of interesting and virtu- 
ons things to do to give my 
conscience an excuse not to 
write". From 1978 to 1982 he 
penned political speeches in- 
stead. A year ago he vol- 
untarily offered the 
publishers, Duckworth, •• a 
deadline* 


To Illustrate his point, Konr 
recalled the tinting of die 
testimonial match Tor John 
Lyafl, West Ham's current 
manager, for whom be has 
peat respect “I was amazed 
to discover that, after his knee 
had given way and ended his 
career, they arranged it for toe 
Monday before the 1964 FA 
CupfinaL £ 

“That in itself, would not 
have been illogical except that' 
they happened to be playing i£ 
it- Because of the fear of 
injury, it seemed dangeroev 


but Ron Greenwood, tbe man’ 
anec, told me simply tint e 


Otherwise, be said, last 
mghfs party to celebrate the 
publication of West Hum . 
United Tbe Making of a 


agec, told me simply tint I 
hadn't expected anyone to g> 
hart Reg Pratt just said ft? 
we'd promised him that dj 
and we always keep o 
promises." 


Unhappy 

Welsh 

memories 


Silence is 
golden 
for Ball 1 


From Clive White 
Zaragoza 

The referees far. toe two legs 


Bya Correspondent 


Alan Ball, normally one* 
football’s ‘ more loquaejf 


of Wrexham’s European Gap maMgera.. has kept a K 
Winners’ Cup second-round , thls se ? son after tw 

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Rex Williams, the sixteenth 
seed, comfortably beal Mark 
Wildman 5-1 to secure a fifth 
round meeting with Alex 
Higgins. 

FOURTH RQUHD RESULTS: R VWflams 
(Eng) b* M W*>nan lEngi. 5-1 Frame 
saxes i Wiliams ftrstl: (56-56 76-78. 66- 
46. 87-16. 74-24. 55-46 A Knowtts (Engi 
M P Francseo (SAl 5-3 Frame scores 
(Knowles Nsj. 20-71. HIM. 59-7. 71-14. 
38-88. 88-1. 42-76. 103-18. W Thome 
(Eng) bt W Kng ( Aus). 5-2 


Aston Villa have found an 
enterprising way around Lu- 
ton Town's “members only" 
scheme by arranging closed- 
circuit television coverage of 
their fixture at Kenilworth 
Road on February 14. Up to 
3.000 Villa fans will be able to 
watch the game on a giam 
screen at .Aston Villa's Sports 
and Leisure Centre in warmth 
and comfort on a winter’s day. 

The charge has not yet been 
set but it is expected io be no 
more than £5. less than it 
would have cost to travel to 
the game, prov iding a package 
that other first division clubs 
will wish to take up. 



tie against Real Zaragoza will 
be men who have bran in- 
volved in controversial in- 
cidents involving the Welsh 
national ■ team. Tomorrow’s 
first kg here and the return in 
a fortnight’s time are to be 
refereed by Robert Wurte of 
France and Jan. Keizer of The 
Neth erlands . . . . 

Wurtz awarded a penalty 
against Wales far handball by 
Scotland’s Jordan in a crucial 
World Cup tie which cost 
Wales their place in the Aigen- 
tina finals of 19?8. Keizer’s 
similarly controversial de- 
cision far handball against 
Phillips in last season's. World 
Cup qualifier against Scotland 
dashed Wales's Mexican 
dreams. 

Of course. Wrexham’s 


Watson: W'embley doubt 


Watson’s wait 


A fraction out 


Andrea Holmes, from 
Dunstable, just missed 
becoming the women's world 
trampoline champion in 
Paris. The Russian. Tatyana 
Lushina. won the title with a 


Dave Watson, the Everton 
central defender, will be out of 
action for at least three weeks 
as a result of the hamstring 
strain he suffered during last 
Saturday’s win at Southamp- 
ton. The injury is virtually 
certain to keep him out of 
England's European 
championship match at Wem- 
bley on November 12 a g ai nst 
Yugoslavia. 


Dnvta fftllpht Phillips in last season 
^ J 1C UtU b Ul Cup qualifier against I 

With two (fays to go in tbe dashed Wales’s li 
Berlin six-day cycle race, Tony dreams. 

Doyle, of Britain, and his Of course. Wre 
Australian partner, Danny dreams are mulch less tangible 
Clark. .had been caught by the and there is little loocal 
powerful Swiss/ Dutch pair of reason why they sh 
Urs Freuler and Rene Pijnen. capable of extendir 

First life ban js £* ,“S 

The vice-captain of tet ai 

Malaysia's national football - ‘ _ : 

team, Wong Hung Nung. bas 
become the first player to be SnS5£? e tLi?Mi*! 
banned for life by the county’s 
football association. The fall 

back, aged 28, was found “°Janez®2f^ 
guilty of persuading some 
team members to lose defib- ite *5 

era tel y to Saudi Arabia in the 
Asian Gaines last month. . KliPfiifJSSP* 


Pulling out 



Broome included 


Always one step ahead 


The former world champion. 
David Broome, is included in 
Britain's four-strong team for 
the Helsinki international show 
from October 24 to 2ft. The 
other British riders in the show, 
which includes the first of the 
European World Cup qualifiers, 
arc: Joe Tun. Harvey Smith and 
his son Steven. 


polished finishing disptav _Tv . _ 

and97.3 points leaving Miss PmVUlP' Cflfp 
Holmes, aged 16. to tic for * 

second place with 97 pis. Wcsl German dub. Bayer 

• Leverkusen, will not lake 

Champion out 


The Italian tyre manufac- 
turers. Pirelli, still intend 
towithdraw from formula-one 
motor racing and will dis- 
continue supplies to teams 
following the last grand prix of 
the season in Australia on 
Sunday. The recent victory of 
Austrian driver. . Gerhard 
Berger, in Mexico bas not 
made the company change its 
mind. 


ca pable of extending their 
interest in this competition 
beyond this teg, let alone any 
further. 

Zaragoza, who have 
strengthened their side by 
importing two notable for- 
eigners. Sosa from Uruguay 
and Yanez from Chile, were 
tipped by. some observers as 
tiie team with the best chance 
of disturbing the Barcelona- 
Real Madrid monopoly in the 
Spanish League this season. 

However, at the moment 
they languish in fourteenth 
position in a league of 18 
teams and lost 3-2 at home to 
Real Beds at the weekend. 
John Toshack. the Welshman 
who is now managing Real 
Sociedad. has given Dixie 
-McNeil, tbe Wrexham man- 
ager. a detailed report on their 
Spanish opponents. 

Yet such are .toe charming 


successive and agonising fail- 
ures to earn Portsmouth a 
place in the first division. 

He broke his self-imposed 
silence on tbe eve of today's 
match against Derby County 
ai Fratxon Park only to criti- 
cize the referee at Leeds on 
Saturday when Portsmouth 
lost their unbeaten League 
record and tbe Elland Road 
crowd was toe most hostile he 
had- seen ance becoming a 

- manager. 

-Portsmouth were top of toe 
second division for 16 weeks 
last season and among the 
promotion places. for all but 
the last ten days and toe 

- bitterness of being overhauled 
at toe death- by Norwich, 
Charlton and Wimbledon has 
had much to do with Ball's 
new taciturn approach. 

Against Derby today Ports- 
mouth will be without the 
abrasive qualities of Tail in 
midfield because of knee liga- 
ment damage and, possibly, 
Dillon with- a. hamstring, in-. 
Jury. Collins, an Eire under-21 
international first introduced 
by Ball at Blackpool as a 14- 
year-old, stands by for bf* 
debut. • 

Portsmouth's gates have 
been down this season; but 
they are expecting their biggest 
crowd for Derby who* aftera 
slow start following promo- 
tion. are coming to terms with 
.life m the second division, as 

• Bri “ Clough, the Notting- 
ham Forest manager, has ex- 

JSSfV* hd ? in 8 hand to 
Notts County for the second 
tonem a week. Last Tuesday. 
Oongb sent his fall first team 
to Meadow Lane for a fanri- 
game for bani-up 
County Now he has 


'-Uf Hkk. 




Maik Schultz, the reigning 
82 kilogram frecsi\le wrestling 
champion, was eliminated 
from ihe world championship 
>cswrda> in Budapest 


utility player. Falko Goetz, to 
Czechoslovakia for 
tomorrow’s UEFA cup match 
with Dukla Prague because of 
tears for his safety. Goetz, 
aged 23. defected from East 
Germany three years ago. 


Oily protest 


anomalies of European com- sponded in Jrmmv<;;rrij *u - 
petition that Wrexham, who^ ’-SS? sSf y foi^SS r 
have played in .20 European 

l\e&, have greater experience in yas injured at BladmoSiS 


Anti-apartheid activists 
poured oil on toe Newlands 
cricket pitch in Cape Town 
yesterday to protest against 
the forthcoming Australian 
rebel tour. • 




1 ' "A 


this sphere than their illus- 
trious opponam^ Though Paul; Crichton, hfe" 
Zaragoza won the Ruts Cup ■ goalkeeper to SSml? 6 ?® 
iu 1964, they have not played- tonight’s match 


ice in yas injured at Blackpool ^ 
ilhis- Saturday by aanSrilrJvi 
ough PauTcncfaoT^ hi* 


\&S> 


74? T..