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THE 


No 62.598 



TIMES 



SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


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Howe says ^conclusive evidence’ links embassy with El A1 bomb attempt 

Syrian diplomatic staff expelled 


• Britain broke off diplomatic 
links oith Syria and gave the 
ambassador 14 days to leave 

• Sir Geoffrey Hovre told the 
House the allies will be ngit^ foir 
appropriate supporting action 


Sh Oeoffiiej Howe lold a 
hu&hed House of Commons 
vcsicrdav ihai Britain was 
scvenng diplomatic relations 
w-iih Svna after the conviction 
of Arab lerronsi. Nezar Hin- 
dau'i, for plotting to blow up 
an Israeli airliner on a flight 
from Heathrow. 

Hmdawi. ag^ 32, a Jor- 
danian, was sentence to 45 
rars impnsonmeni at the 
.'‘entral Criminal Court for 
attempting wfaai die judge 
called . a "horrendous mass- 
acre" 

The deep involvement of 
the SvTian authorities in the 
plot led to Dr Loutouf Allah 
Haydar. the Syrian Aml^ 
sador. being summoned'io the 
Fbreign Office after the ver- 
dict was delivered. He was 
told he had 14 days to close 
the embas^' and leave the 
country with his 20 staff. 
Rigorous controls are also 
being impo^ on the opera- 
tions of Syrian Arab Aiilines 
and Its employees, including 
stricter searches of crews. 
possenKrs »d baggage. 

. The Eoreign Secretary said 
Hindaw'i was guilty of a 
"monstrous and inhumane" 
crime and the way he duped 
his pregnant girlfriend into 


Next week 


A modern 
plague 



This virus is evil. 

It shows no mercy. 
It attacks^e 
young and the 
innocent 
I don't know what 
we are to do.' 

On Monday, 

The Ttnws begins 
a three-part series 
on how Aids is 
threatening millions 
In Africa 

The City 
earthquake 

Who's who in the 
City revolution: 
on Monday, a 1 6- 
page Big Bang 
special report 



^<dd‘ 


• There is £16,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition, the usual 
£8,000 weekly prize 
and £8,000 in the daily 
competition because 
no one won yesterday. 

• Portfolio Hsts, 
pages 20 and 25; rules 
and how to play, 
page 39. 


Clocks go back 

Clocks should he pul back by 
one hour at 2 am tomorrow 
when summer-time ends 

Qock check, page 3 


TIMES BUSINESS 





litlK 


^ i*.;!!!! Air shares 

*S . . 



A ^ 
i 


I 



Will British Airways shares be 
worth buying? Today's ninis 
page Faniily Money section 
looks at’ the coming 
pn\anzations and begins on 

PMe27 




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Jk. . 


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fill I >1"" 



HotocNeins 2*5 
Oierwas 6 

Appis 18 

\rts 12 

Bblhvdntbs. 
mairfaieK 19 

Bridfiff 15 

BtaiiH^ts 21-37 
Cbnv 1.9 

roan 18 

rnKSHiinhiX20 
Dmy U 

yiitats 20 


Uh ?7pwt 38 
Loulm 17 
Lctfcrc 17 
ObiflHuy- 18 
nulhuaeiit 2 
Rdigiea IS 
SaWRoon 18 
Sdner 18 
Senriew 19 
.Sport 39-C«44 
Theotmjetc IS 
TA’ABadio 43 
Wnther 20 


• Nezar Hindawi made a victory 
sign after he was sentenced to 45 
years in jail 

• ^ passengers and crews on 
Syrian Arab flights win be 
searched at Lrmdon airport 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


• Mis to believed to have bagged 
^ Syrian Ehnbassy and tapped 
its telepIuHies (Plage 4) 

• Tlie Syrian Ambassadw re- 
m a in ed impassive when he was 
ordered to close Ms embassy 


carding the bomb had arous- 
ed deep and universal rqnig- 
nance. 

There was "conclusive evid- 
ence" linking the terrorist wdth 
official Syrian ^encies — its 
embassy in London and its in- 
lelli^nce services. 

Britain's tough response to 
the attempted murder of tite 
375 peoi^e on the £1 AJ fli^t 
which was foiled by the 
lance of one of the Israeli 


eroftfae Liberal Party, said the 
case showed that tne trail of 
blood left by Synmi-trained 
and sponsored terro r ist s led to 
the doors of the Syrian Embas- 
sy. 

Sir Geoflrey said the Syri^ 
claim that they dealt with Hin- 
dawi as a, bona fide joumalisi 
was "ftanUy incredible". 

It was u^spuied that the 
terrorist travelled on an of- 
ficial Syrian passport under a 


and that the S/rnm Govern- 
ment had said rt wall oontmue 
to take respohsibiUty for then 


safety. 

A^ 


Syria hits back by severbi^ links ' 

Syria bas severed Hs dip- bees in respoase. to 

tomalk links with BrkaiB and R riiam ’s dectoiOD to toeak 
c tos^ its airapaoeuid ports to ifi pifluatic Hikl 
B ritish airlinm and slii^ a The statemort denied tiiat 
nvenunent statement wM Damascas had been involved 
(Renter reports ftom Damas- in fh<» wttwwp* inihtatmy m 
cos). It said the measnres had At airliner. 


airline's security officers, was 
applauded in Israel. 

it was disclosed ilmt MIS 
has had tbe Syrian Embassy in 
Belgrave Square under sur- 
veillance for some time and 
has been tailing telephone 
lines. 

The Forei^ Secretary’s 
statement, which followed a 
mee^ of senior C^lnnet 
ministers eariier this week, 
received full support from ^ 
sections of the House as MFs 
pul aside political differences 
to underline the countr^s 
determination to present a 
united front in the ft^t 
against international terror- 
ism. 

Mr Donald Anderson, 'a 
Labour ^kesman on foreign 
affairs, said: "The (Dpposilion 
enthusiastically applauds the 
sentence on this evil man and 
shares the Cjovemmeni's 
sense .of outrage at the rc^ of 
Syrian offidaJs." 

Mr Alan Bdih, depu^ lead- 


felse name, that the Syrian 
Foreign Ministry tmee backed 
his applications for visas, and 
that te aaet the Syrian Ambas- 
sador. 

Birtain is contactiiig its 
allies with details of the case 
and the measures imposed. Sir 
Geoffiey said they would be 
asked to take "appropriate 
supporting action". 

Mr Anderson was joined by 
Labour backbenchers in sug- 
gesting that the Soviet Union, 
for long Syria's parent state, 
should be put to the test over 
its declarations of opposition 
to lenorism ^ Britain ftir- 
nishing Moscow with details 
of the case: 

SirGeoftrey agreed that the 
Russians were exprestiog 
more interest in the fight 
against lerTorism. but was 
"cautious" about the postil^ 
ity of persuading them to curb 
the Brians. 

He said there were about 
250 British nationals in $yiia 


about the threat of 
reprisals, given Hindawfs 
li^ wifi] the Abu Nidal ter- 
rorist group, the Fbreign Seo- 
ret^ said Britain would not 
"fiinch” fiom taking action 
because of such a possibility. 

Britain's dedtion to cut ties 
whh S^a drew support fiom 
the allies and condemnation 
from the Soviet Union. 

In the US the news was so 
well received that the Stale 
Department was sOenoed to 
allow the' White House to 
make the first approving 
siaiemenL 

By for the most jubilant 
response came ^m Jem- 
salem, which considers Dam- 
ascus under the regime of Pre- 
sident Assad to be its most 
dangerous Arab adversary. 
Tbe Isradi Ambassador in 
London praised Britain and 
asked for further iniernational 
co-operation in- countering 
terrorism. 

The Soviet Union, which 
regards Syria as its main ally 
in the Middle East, quickly 
coudemned the Briti^ action 
as a fabrication. 

Most noticeable by their 
silence were tbe moderate 
AiTfo states, which have found 
themselves agBpi caught be- 
tween sympathies for radical 
Arab nations and the West 

Jordan and ^ypt repeated 
familiar statements condemn- 
ing international .terrorism, 
but did not rebuke Syria. 

Britain's European, allies are 
expected to react approvin^y. 

Bad^inNind, pages 4, 5 

Leadi^artide, page 17 



El A1 bomber 
sentenced to 
record 45 years 

By Stewart Tendlo:, Crime Reports 


TJnk ‘nonsense’, says envoy 


Dr Lontonf Allah Haydar, the Syrian Ambassadin: Had 
links witii ternirist (Photx^inqili: Graham Wood) 

Security tightened 
for Arab arrivals 

By Harvey EUibtt, Air CmrespondeBt 


By Nicholas Beeston 

The Syrian Ambassador to 
London, Dr Loutof Allah 
Haydar, remained cool and 
impa^ve yesterday when he 
was instnuned to close his 
embassy and return with his 
sio^ to Damascus. 

Haydar, who was di- 
rectly link^ with the Hindawi 
terrorist operation, was told 
by Sir Patrick Wri^t, Perma- 
nent Under-Secre^ at the 
Foreign Office, that Britain 
was severing all diplomatic 
ties. 

Dismissing as "nonsense" 
the allegations made gainst 
him, tite envoy claimed that 
the entire operation had been 
a joint American and Israeli 
intelligence plot and that "all 
Britain had to do was dance to 
the tune". His remarks were 


"fianidy incredible" a Foingn 
Ciffice source said. 

The British action .means 
that 21 Syrian staff will return 
to Damascus and 19 British 
diplomats and andDaiy staff 
will be recalled. 

The Foreign Office move 
fell short of disciptining Syr- 
ian Arab Airlines because 
"there was no evidence to 
suivort Hindawi's auctions 
that they were involved". 

Britain would have more to 
lose than Syria if it took action 
a^nst the airline: British 
Airways flies over Syrian air- 
spare 75 times a week, but 
Syrian Arab Aiilij^ only has 
three weekly flights fiom 
Heathrow. 

Although diplomatic ties 
will be completely severe^ a 
section wiD be opened in a 


western embas^ in 
to look after the interests of 
the 250 Britons living in the 
coun^. 

Syria will be allowed recip- 
rocal privities, piobaUy with 
an A^ emba^ in London. 
There are some 2,000 Syrians 
living in Britain, three quar- 
lera of them stndmts. 

Tbe Government action 
was applauded by Conser- 
vative and Opposition MPs, 
but there is conoem at the 
Foreign Office that Britain's 
influence in the Middle East 
will be jeopardized. 

Foretgn Office sources adr 
mit that President Assad is "a 
dangerous enemy”, with 
considerate influence over 
Ai^ nations as the Soviet 
Union's nuun aUy in the 
r^ion. 


' Passrageis and crew on all 
inbound Syrian Arab flights 
are to be rahjected to a 
detailed body semtii as part of 
tbe Government's di^ati- 
cally increased security 
measures. 

As they leave the aircraft at 
Heathrow they will be chan- 
nelled through a checking area 
where they will be body 
searched ^ seenrity men. 
Th^ wffi tbCT have to identify 
their lugg^, which will be 
put throngb an X-ray machine 
and sutgrel to random de- 
tailed searches. 

Normal practice at the air- 
port is to searrii only out- 
bound possergers. 

A directive fiom the 
Department of Transpt^ was 
sent to the British Anpons 
Authority at Heathrow within 
minutes of the sentencing of 
Hindawi. The new airange- 
ments will be in force for tiie 


scheduled airiyal -of. tbe first 
Boeing 747 jet fiom Damascus' 
this anenaoon. 

The Government had 
planned to ban all ffi^is fiom 
Syria but this could have put 
at risk more titan 70 British 
flights a week which over-fly 
the country. 

Syrian Arab operates three 
flints a week fiom Damascus 
to London.The aircraft, which 
stays at Heathrow overnight 
before flying the return 1^ 
will also be moved from its 
normal stand to a remote area 
■where it can be kept under 
surveillance and guinded by 
armed police. 

Liby^ Arab Airlines will be 
bann^ fiom flying to Britain 
fiom the end of this month 
because of "support for terror- 
ist activity”. 

No Bntish airline flies to 
Syria, and British Caledonian 
has suspended flights to Libya. 


Nezar Hindawi stood 
expr^miless at the Central 
Criminal Court yesterday as 
he was sentenced to a rreoid 
45 years for trying to use Miss 
Ann Murphy, us pinnam 
gtrifnend. as a human bomb 
to destroy an El A1 fl^t 
carrying 375 people. 

HindawL ag^ 32, and re- 
gar^ by prmce as a "first 
division " Middle Eastern 
lenorisL, trained by Syria and 
linked to the Abu Nidal 
oiguization, was told by Mr 
Justice Marjories that his 

Last ntoht Miss Mnrpby, 
Hindawfs foram- gjrifiiend, in 
a BBC TV inteiriew said: *1 
don't fed anything for him 
anymore. I oonM not feel 
anytidng rw anybody like that 
wlra cOBld do such a boiriMe 

thing -** 

plan was a "callous and cruel 
deception" which would have 
led to a "horrendous 
massacre". 

As Hindawi went down tbe 
steps of the dock, io court 
number one, he was seen to 
make a sniatl victory 
sign.Later he is reported to 
have said, phflorophically, 
“God is peal 

His brother and cousin face 
terrorist allegations in West 
Berlin and Italy 

During the trial tbe conn 
was lold Hindawi bad been 
trained by Ll CoL Haithan- 
Said, identified by secniity 
sourres as tbe West European 
ofgan^ of $yiian-inroired 
terrorist activitre ,and flown 
to Britain on a Syrian Arab 
Airlines flight as a member of 
the crew. 

After he sent his prifiiend 
Miss Murphy, .fi.ve moiilhs 
pregnanL <m onnn El Al 
on April 17 , the Syrian 
natioiral day, the bomb was 
discovered ^ aiifine staff 

Hindawi, by then on tbe 
run, was sent to the Syrian 
embassy, greeted by the Syrian 
ambassador and hidden by 
Syrian diplomats overnight 

While awaiting trial, 
Hindawi smugs^ a messi^ 
fiom Brixton prison callii^ on 
the Syrians to help to get his 
release by an excha^ ol 
prisoners. 

He suggested 

Mrs.Thatcher's visit to Israel 
last May would be agood time 
■ 

No mitigation or 
anierendents were offered for 
Hindawi , who had waited 
nervously as the jury returned 
10 court after tix hours. 

He was impastive as the 
judge told hun:" If your 


anempi had succeeded and 
that bomb had gone off some 
380 innocent dvilians , men , 
.women and children would 
have perished, including the 
woman you professed to love 
who was carding your child." 

Mr Justice Mars-Jones 
said:"We will not tolerate the 
activities of terrorists fiom 
other counrties operating here 
or from this country. 

"They will be tracked down 
and brought to justice. Whra 
itaai happens they can expect 
no mercy from our courts." 

Hindawi was also given two 
18 month sentences, to run 
concurrently with the main 
sentence, for possestion of a 
gun and ammunition. 

In prison Hindawi is likely 
to be interviewed by the 
security services as one of the 
most important terrorist cap- 
tures the West has made 
Information he has p'ven 
Kwui terrorism in France has 
already been pass^ to Paris. 

The ease with which 
Hindawi came into Britain, as 
a member of a Syrian air crew, 
has revealled weaknesses in 



s,.*s •'‘•.''A- 


Nezar Hindawi 
the way^aiicrews.are su^- 
vised whidi have been 
examined. 

Speaking on BBC tele- 
vision. Ian evening, Miss 
Murphy said:"Ii was 
horrciidous.A terrible strain. 

"1 was very happy tlrat 
week... and for this to happen 
was absolutely dreadful” 

She had b^ lotfldng for- 
ward to her wedding in the 
Holy Land. 

She said the discovery of the 
bomb was "shattering" and 
really terrible. 

Her child would not bring 
back bad memories."! love 
her very much. 1 don't tUnk 
she will remind me. 1 will tell 
her ail about what happeiied 
when she is old enou^. 1 
think she is entitled to know** 

Miss Murphy.who has been 
under sedation, may have to 
be protected fiom possible 
retribution. 


-O * iir "A 


Wapping attacks 
‘will cause death’ 


By David Sapsted 


A Home Office minister 
said yesterday that unless 
attacks ceased on lorries 
operating from New 
International's Wapping 
plant, it was inevitable that 
someone would be killed or 
maimed. 

The warning from Mr 
Dou£^ Hogg, the Home 
Office minister responsible for 
the police, came hours after a 
senior ^tland Yard officer 
had blamed striking printers 
for an "alarming" nse in the 
number of attacls this month. 

It^ Hogg commented; "All 
reasonable people, inclu^ng 
those involved ui ne^tiations 
10 resolve the dispute at 
Wapping. must condemn sudi 
indiscriminate acts of violence 
which have nothing to do with 
traditional trade unionism or 
peaceful pickeiin& and which, 
n continued, are likely to kill 
or maim.'* 

The latest spate of attacks - 
82 this monin. including 23 
last weekend - came to a head 
when a brick was dropped 
fiom a bridge across the Ml in 


an attack similar to ffie pne 
that killed a Welsh taxi driver 
during the miners' strike: 

Mr Wyn Jones. MetropKi- 
tan Police Deputy Assistant 
Commissioner in charge of 
policing East Lraidon, ap- 
pealed to printers, who went 
on strike and were dismissed 
when newspapers bdoi^ing to 
Mr Rjumeft Murdoch, includ- 
ing Toe Times, moved to 
Wapping in Jann^, to slop 
this "ai^ling" violence. 

He sw the police would 
not hesitate to bring conspir- 
acy chaiges - which cany a 
maximum sentence of 14 
years - against griMips found 
to be organizing such attacks. 

"1 have made my aj^ieal 
because there seems to have 
been a distinct change in 
taaics by the pickets: they 
now seem to be concentiatii^ 
their resources on attacking 
lorries and depo^" he said. 

"Unless there is a chai^ in 
attitude, it seems inevitable 
that we see a death or 
serious injury, mther involv- 

Continned on page 20, col 8 


Sweeping changes 
in rate reforms 

By Martin Fletcher, Political R^orter 


Mr Nicholas Rkfley, Sec- 
retary of State fbrthe Envinm- 
ment, yesleid^ dismissed 
feais that the Government's 
proposed rates reforms will 
lead to huge increases for 
bntinesses. 

The Government is propos- 
ing to utice non-domestic rat- 
ing out of the hands of local 
government after 1990 and to 
impose a uniform business 
rate (UBR). 

Mr Ridley conceded that 
some business rates would 
rise, but stressed that the 
increases would be phased in 
over a number of ymus. 

The UBR wffi be set by 
lowering existing high 
commercial rate level^ which 
lend to be in the north of the 
country, and raising low rate 
levels, found predominantly 
in the south, so that they 
conform toa national average: 

Tbe Government's own 
forecasts, based on this year's 
rate levels and a national 
average rate of 213 pence in 
the pound, stages! that 
commercial rates in S^enting- 


um and Chelsea would rise by 
81 per cent, while Sheffield 
iHisuiesses would get a 40 per 
cent reduciiorL 

The overall rates Nils of 
businesses nationwide will re- 
main roughly the same, but 
small businesses in corrently 
lowrated areas fear they wiU 
be hit by swingeii^ increases 

Mr Ridl^ has ignored pleas 
for a re-think and speakiiig in 
Sussex yesterday be denied 
that the impact on businesses 
would be traumatic: 

He outlined some of the 
wider advanta^ of the uni- 
form business rate:He claimed 
that by equalising rate levels it 
would reverse the growiira 
trend to locate in tbe south 
rather than the north. 

It would also increase local 
accountability ^ preventing 
left-wing coundls hiding the 
cost of their activities from the 
general public by hiking the 
business rate, he said. 

He said that after the 
dtaiues businesses could be 
conndenl of rate rises no 
greater than the inflation rate. 


Stock Exchang e rings out the old 


By Carol Leonard 

The London Stock Ex~ 
change bid a sad farewell to its 
old traditions as the last 
trading day before Big Bang 

came to a close. 

More than 2.000 Stock Ex- 
change members thronged the 
normally sober floor of the 
Throgmorton Street building 
armed with glasses of cham- 
pagne. 

“I've never seen ii so 
crowded, it was like New 
Year's Eve;" said one dealCT. 
“There were several people iq 
tears - especially among the 
older members Towards the 


end it was impostible to get 
deals done." The market men 
also took what could be their 
last three-hour lunchbreak. 
Rom Monday they win have 
to g» used 10 functional 
American-siyle meals and 
mineral water, siayii^ alert to 
take on their American and 
Japanese competitors in the 
afternoons. 

But determined to go out m 
style, they filled the res- 
taurants and watering holes 
around the Square Mile until 
there was standing room only. 

Jonathans, the members' 
^bar in the Stock Exchange 


tower, was packed, as was the 
popular L:mg Room bar 
across the street tuid The 
.^rlMir^eur Gub in Thn^ 
mortonStreeL 

A gfcy pantomime donkey, 
containing two gilt-edged 
traders, was lifted shoulder 
high by the crowd, many of 
whom had climbed on top of 
the new computerized dealing 
counters to ^ a better view. 
.And the staid, lop-haned 
Government Broker, making 
his last trip to the floor, was 
mobbed. 

Pai^: mppers. sparklers, 
qnayi]^ tbam 


games added to the end-of- 
tenn atmosphere and a spir- 
ited rendition of Auld l^ng 
Syne at 3.30pm brought any 
serious butiness tiiai had been 
going on to an abrupt end. 

The scenes were more 
reminiscent of Last Night Of 
llie Proms than one of the 
world's foremost financial 
trading floors. 

"Everyone has been very 
emotional." said another mar- 
ket man. “There's a mixture of 
exciiemem about the new 
wcHid that is just b^nnin^ 
and sadness about the old one. 

and toy gun ^ Family Money, page 28 


Thatcher 
to yisit 
Strasbourg 

Ftom Rkhard Owen 
BrnssKs 

Mrs Margi^ Thatcher is 
planniiig to visit the European 
Parliament in December to 
report to MEPs on tbe EEC 
Summit in London at tbe 
beginniiig of December and 
"set the seal on Britain's 


commitment to the 
Etiro-MPs and Parliament of- 
ficials revealed yesterday. 

An address to tbe Stras-i 
bouig Assembly by Mrs 
Thatcher, accompanied by Sirj 
Geoffiey Howe, the Foiei^ 
Secretary, in his capacity ^ 
President of the EEC Council 
of Minisiers, wuld "br^ the 
six-month British Presidency 
to a triumphant end", sources: 
said. 

The Prime Miniver is said 
to be in an ebullient mood 
about Stain's role in Europe 
and deterinined to lacUe 
some of the EECs outstanding; 
drawbacks, including farm 
surpluses and agricultural 

policy. 

She is reported to be consid- 
ering an address v/hi(± would 
emphasize the positive con- 
tribution Britain is making to 
the EEC 1 3 years after joining, 
and would silence critics who 
doubt Bri tain 's commitment 
to Europe ideals. 

Mrs Thatcher's visit would 
come on the eve of thei 
ratification hv national par- 
liaments of the Twelve, 
including Westminster, of the{ 
controversial Sngle European 
AcL This amen& the Treaty 
of Rome, tbe EEC's founding' 
document, and in the view of 
anti-marketeers codifies the 
transfer of soverei^ty to EEC 
institutions. 

h gives the directly elected 
European Parliament greater 
powers to l^islate and in- 
creases the use of majority 

Gontinned on|^age 20, col 7 


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HOME NEWS 


‘Blackout’ call 


on defence base 


> The GoTemmenC wss aocBsed yesterday of imposiiig 
'' total news bbdunt" on American iriaas for the Holy £odi 

• nnclear sabmarine base in Scotland after the Minbtry of 
; Defence reused to oonfim reports that the US Nary was 

• seeking to expand it (Omr Poifflcal Reporter writes). 

The reports, dti^ Nato simnest daim t^ 

' Americans hare approidied the British Go v er nm ent widi a 

• view to extending die base to take hnnier-killer andear 
- sebmarines capable of carrying cniise missiles after the 

Poseidon sebmarines are phased ont. 

That wonld appear to expbui the Tehemesoe with wiiidi 
' Mr Geoige Yooger, Secikaiy of State for Defence, and 
^ Mr Caspar Weinberg, the American Secretary of State, 
' last week denied otsm reports that the Americans wonld 

• pall ont. 

Bnt Mr Georne Fonlkes, a Labonr fordga afifeirs 
' spokesman, described tfab as *^gnfte naaooeptahle*'. From a 
' constitntioiial point of view it was **Dntn^eoas f*M* dm 
■ Goremment should impose a total news Uadumt". 


Brighton 

reward 


Gold case 
remand 


The reward fm infomia- 
:.lion leading to the arrest 
and oonvictkm of the killer 
^ or IdUers (rf die Brighton 
."sdoolffris Nicola Fdlows 
' and Karen Hadaway, 
r reached 02,000 3 «stenlay. 

Sussex Police said 
.infonnation from moe 
■ than 13,000 pmtole was 
.'bcii« fed into the police 
* nadwalcompoter. There is 
:'a backlM atthm^ mne 
'.terminals are being 
rraanned 24 horns a day. 
t In tenns of infimnadon 
analyied, the mnte hunt 
■. has ontstripped the opera- 
lamidied after the 
(• bombing the Grand Ho- 


Stephen Donovan, a^ 
I. a Dropatv demer 


34, a property dealer 
chareed with disbonesdy 
hanming £250,000 pro- 
ceeds m dw Bihiks-Mat 
goU ImOioD raid, was re- 
leased mi £20,000 bad imd 
November 20 at HOrsereny 
Road court yesterday. 


Mr Donovan, vHw wu 
ordered to liro at his 
parents hmne in Eif Row, 
St^ney, is j(dndy dbaiged 
with Av Mkdiaei Bri ton , 
aged 4^ a solicitor, of 
Oriisle Place, Victor^ 
who was bailed at an eariier 
bearing on condition that 
be rmides at a priioe 
statiuL 


Blow for dry Ulster 


The tott e rin g llbter Sabbath was dealt a further Mow 
/yesterday when the Govenunent miveiled pn^osab to 
: alhm the provinoe*s 2,000 pnbs to open on Snnday 
' (Ridiard Fi^ writes). 

A drardi-ted rawpaign (rf oppositimi b to be handled 
:* bnt die Government faitends to i nt ro d uce the l«ishtioii 
- daring the next parlhmentary session, with pans being 
‘ able to tqien on Christmas Day and Sondays fimn next 
■ October. 

The Government also wants to imposetightm' controls on 
' prorinoe^ dobs which have made a mockeiy M iioenring 
' regnhtimis and to ban a botde” dobs. Drinldi^ 
dnbs have grown in mnnber from 185 in 1967 to 606 in 
J 1985, senile ^ million wmthM'liqnor. The chafes will 
' crack down on premises ran by, or having dose connections 
1 with, para^iilitary oiganiz^ioas on both rides of the 
sectarian divide. 

Mr Rklinrd Necdhnni, Undei^Secretaiy of Slate for 
' Nmtban Irdand, said: ‘^We cannot go on as we are with 
‘ tte present Ikeinjng hws being igno^ and unenfmced.** 


Baker call 


; over head 


Mr Kenneth' Baker 
(right), Secretaiy irf State, 
fm Edncadon aid Sdmioe, 
yesterday mged Labonr- 
controlM Brrat orandi to 
ndnslate immediately Miss 
Manreen McGoUrick, the 
headnustrass suspended 
since July for aB^edly 
maldi^ a ractet remark 
The High Comt decided 
earlier tiw week that Ae 
conncfl had DO legal right to 
oontinne disdpliaaiy heai^ 
lags i^aiBst Miss Me- 
^Mrick after goveniois at 
Sodbrny Infants School 
had acquitted hm of lac- 



r 

: Food additive ban 


From next half-term, certain chemicals wfll be banned 
~ from ImKhes eaten by pupils m Gloacestnshire schools. 

Experts believe t^ additives — iodndi^ E102 
tartrazina and EllO sunset yellow — are responsible for 
- making ybongsters hyperactive. 

Over the next year nil rfiemical ingredients will be 
banned. 

Mr George Harris, schools catering manager for the 
. county, said: **lt*s si^^ed that th^ two colonis in 
partknlaT have adverse links with hyperactivity, llijs has 
cansed a great deal of concern and we are taking them out 
' Both ate artifida] colonrs foond in, for example, 

, braadcnunhs on fish fingers. 

**Bat the children need not worry — fishfingers wQl stfll 
be orange.'" 


Carlisle 


Solvency 


to retire campaign 


Mr Mark Carlisle, aged 
57, the fbniier Secretaiy of 
State for Education, last 
n^t became the 38th Tory 
MP to armounce that be. 
would not be standing at 
the next election. He 
stressed that he was retir- 
ing tor personal reasons. 

w Cariisle, has beoi an 
MP for 22 years, 
representing first Rnnooin 
and then the new Warring- 
ton Sonth cmistitnency. 


An anti-gine sniflBng 
campaign was boosted yes- 
terday when Mr Kennetta 
Baker, Secretary of State 
for EdncatUm, presented 
£10,000 to the Solvency 
Abuse Qinic at Newcastfe- 
npon-Tyne University. 

He helped to raise the 
money on a sponsored walk 
with former addicts fnmi 
Merseyside and Tyncsi^ 
AnotiiCT £10,000 will go to 
a Merseyside tmit. 


mta/t 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


% 

Agency claims Saatchi throne 


Early start 
to Liberal 


By Jonathan MOfer 


toniled Saatchi as Britain's 


A Thoirmson executive 
said: "Mrs Thatcher's fevour- 

' Britain’s two lamest icr three years at flic lop. iie agency has been taockrt 

advert!^ 

country's number one. advertising industry research ^ 

Earlier this week Saatchi company. Media Expenditure Thompson s callings for 
and and J Walter Anal]^ Limited (Meal), issue l^don and provindri agen- 

Tbompson qpent £56.000 be- new ngures. were £1793 million, an 

tween them on new^per According to Meal's figures, jnereaw of 27 percent, accord- 

advertisements knocking eadi released to the industry on ingtoM^ 
other. Thursday and promptly leak- Saatriirs billings fbr the 

Yesterday Thompson exec- ed, Saatefai's UK billings stood at £172.5 millioa, 
utives took advantage of new trailed those of J Waiter an increase of 9^ per con. 
ammunition in an indepen- Thompson duriim the 12- Saatcfars,_ which claims to 
dently produced report, which month period endmg Septem- he three times larger than 


executive 


Mrilia Correspondent largest advertising agency af- 

. 1 ler three Years at the lop. 


Thompson's biPing s for 
Lpndon and provincial agen- 
cies were £1793 mininn, an 
increase of 27 percent, accord- 
ing to MeaL 

Saatriirs billings for the 
year stood at £172.5 millioa. 


manoe of its subsidiaries British advertising, it would 
worfd-wide is taken into ac- be no more than a pysdio- 

coant, demanded a recount, logical si^back for Sauchrs, 
and insisted that Meal include according to ^ Lnke Jtriin- 
in its figures the performance son. a media anriyst ibr 
of a Saatchi subsidiary, KleinwDrtGrieveson,tiieQty 
KHBB, wfaidi has previously bnriterage. 
been counted separately. figures show that 


efforts in 

Knowsley 


bSi MuSSd amre iow that David Stad ^ 

irthiiisdoneSaatchrstotal Bt^’» SS^nsatV«y. 
binings would be £195.6 mil- dfS Doriand. a aibsi^iy of ^ot. m.ihe 


feta" Saatchi. tetamedia position. *ggS^ ^CTondav. 

A -n. — j He arrivedjusi before U 


showed the company had ber 30. 


Thompson's when the perfbr- 


A Thompson oflScial Ogitvy and Mather itm 

the move was an "inevitable'* from fifm to fourth place, with 
response by Saamhi billings of £^.6 million, tiad- 

u Thompson makes its ing i^aoes with 0'Aicy Masius 
claim stick that h has reoov^ Bmton and Bowi^ with 
ered the leadership position in £883 millioii. 


£40m subsidies 


saving Hvhen 


bus free-for-all 


is operational’ 


By Mark Ellis 

Savings of £40 million a At a Dqiortment of Trans- 
year in subsidies and little port press oooferepoe, exam- 
chat^ in bus services were pies were given, with savmgs, 
predicted yesterday by Mr of the new style operations 
John Moore, Seoec^ of where services had been 
State for Transport, in the largely maintained, 
countoown to deregulation at -jijg figures were: Avon 
mi^ght tonight £1 million; Berkshire 

Cferegulation means the end £ 350 , 000 ; Cheshire £650,000, 
of the system (fn^^ce Cumbria £36a000, Lanca- 
licensing and about 200 new shire £5 million. West Sussex 
bus operators w^ be runnii* £|^ and Surrey £2 

services from this wedtend, m:ii:nn 

which is being heralded by the ^ 

9B fh« LOHOon 035 Dot been oe- 



. . -m >- ----- 






0: 


■k 

1 


A 



Government as opening the ^ 

industry to free competition, regulated yet tat some routo 


industry to tree competition. 

Mr David Mitchell, Min- 
ister of State for Trtmsport, tender, 
warned that the public could The Government has con- 
exi^ a **tempoi^ hiatus’* ceded that jobs in the bus 
while operators ironed out industry have bnn lost, 
limetable proMems and driv- among them 1,900 in Greater 
ers learned routes. Manchester, but all had .been 

The Govemmeni's move is shed ihrou^ voluntary re- 
designed to reduce the dundancy. 

•Talks 

buses, ^.tes raug fisier yenei^aiKi the 

than inflation. issue will be referred to the 

Tiaffic Commissioner, who 
end of royi mtvto licensing, has statutory noweis to reduce 

the Sm« on the 

run by opemtors. win see nital ji,y'sn^ 

and other unprofitable routes 

disappear, higher fores and The streets have been 
lower rafety standards. clogged Isy rival services in- 

Mr Moore said that al- tioduced _by bia opOTtors 




■M 


.jift 



He arrived just bciore tni- 
bour ^t its new, moderate 
Merseyside fooe on di^lay, in 
llte form of Mr Gtarp 
Howartb — impos^ on the 
local party as candidate for the 
Novembv 13 by-dection, _by 

Labour’s National Executive 
Committee, in order to bioefc 
the sefection of Mr Les 
HuckfiekL who was backed by 
the Militant Tendency. 

The Liberal candidate. Miss 
Rosemary Cooper, a^ Liver- 
pool Qty oounoUor, is seek- 
j to overturn a ' Labour 
majority of more than 17,000. 

Mr Steel said it would be a 
stiairiit fight between Labour 
and the Alliance. 

Mr Huckfield, die Euro-MP 
forMerseyside East, foiled ina 
High Court attempt on Thurs- 
day to sU^ the party’s NEC 
immsiag Mr Hbwaith as. 
Labour^ candidate. 

The Conservative candidate 
is Mr R<^ Brown, aged 35, a 
barrister from Bury. 




Kidnap 
suspect 
for trial 


... 

1^' 



fc.: 




i 


Mr Leon Britiaii, tiie former Hmne Secretaiy, being escorted thronsfr students protesting 


about alloed ^lice bniCality, after ^leaking at Birmi^ham Unhoshy yesterday. Before 
learimL Mr Brittan had told the meetins am hanDv to nui wbatevo' fining tberananraf- 


learii^ Mr ftittan had told the meeth^ **1 am happy to nra wliatem gauntlet the ragaomf- 

fins ontside want, to come here.” 


Nirex list of dumpl Me 



sites ‘within year’ hope for 


By Trndi McIntosh 


energy 

By Keith Hindley 
The srintSoD to the world 


thoi^ der^ulation would be antiapatcd deregulation. 

tiie biggest change in the bus Mr Malcolm Waugh, chair- 
industry since 1930. safety man of the regional coundl's 
controls would be enforced as transport committee, said that 
stxonriy as before and op- he would be recommending a 
erators who objected services cut of a third in the number of 


At least half of Britain could development order from Far-. ^ Mr Rees was an 

be suitable for the deep burial liaxnent t^ore plans for a The sohitiOD to the world ta returned to i 
of intermediate level radio- deep burial she could go energy erhns lies hi meOiaae Kin^om, and I 
active waste, according to ahead. gas permeathig tfae-deep roda for the rai 

Tbespokesmansaidanum- ^ Sri beS 

ber of ilndustrial and private fo?itetast 

ment 5 nuclear waste agency, landowners had invited Nirex OnineelteofYorkUiiivefsily ^ to 

The agent^r plans to have a to consider their sites as mOinada. 
list of possible sites for the dumps. A general list of sites Speakhig last nlglit at. the defe^ Sid Ac 
bun^ of such w^ drawn up suitable for deep burial vronW Royal Geognphical Society in 
by the middle of next year, a beavailabtebynexlyeartath London, Professor WfisonOiit^ 

mnlrMmsiTi sflirf vpctfnviav. i- J- uiacuiuufg • as i 


could be fined. 


services in the city centre. 


Willis in 


Traders 


spokesman said yesterday. would be several years before 
But ta rul^ out the likelj- a short list was drawn up. 
hood of certain mines, indud- . . . 


fayour 
of ballots 


It would be "unthinkabie** 
for any new trade union laws 
to omit balloting for strikes 
and union elections, Mr Nor- 


rally to 
defy law 


By David Cross and 
Tnidi McIntosh 
London's ny-phehera, 3- 
iegal street tradm who sell 


ing the Geevor tin mine at 
Fenwith, Corawail, being 
consider^ because of prolv 
lems of ground water and 
gases. 

"We are certainly looking 
for possible sites both on land 
and ofishore. but it is a long- 
term, complicated plan. Fdw 
per cent of the British land 


would be several years before fined hs befief Oat tihe ntetfc- 
s short list was drawn up. ane coidd proride an atawst 
Nirex has turned down an hmWess souice oS cniogy. .• 

invitation from the owners of in igg Rritamrica Awuid 
the Geevor mine because oT Lectore, Dr Wilson said that a 
the presence of fost-flowing great deal (rfevldenoefbrdeqi 
water in rocks near by. metiiane had aecnmidatad 

The anti-niielear nmtecters' since Dt Thomas Grid, Of 


A BritiA burinessman wdio 
is aocured ofbemg involved m 
a £1.5' million plan, is 

to stand trial in West Ger- 
many after a successful extra- 
dition action at . Bow Street 
magistrates court yesterday. 

Alan Rees, 3S, a 

businessroan of Beaumaris 
Way, Blackwood, Gwent, is 
diai;^ with being concerned 
in the kidnap of a manager of 
Air Lufthansa, carried out in 
South America by the Boliv- 
ian Socialist Falange in 
November 1983. 

He was also accused of 
handling the negotiations fin* 
ransom. 

Mr Rees was arrested udien 
he returned to the United 
Kingdom, and bank notes 
used for the ransom were 
found in his jiosst^on. He 
had been worung in Bolivia 
for the to 40 years and had 
set up a company there. 

Mr Clive NichoUs, for the 
defence, . said the case was 
'*unsatisfactoiY . and 
di5turt)ing*'.^'He said state- 
ments about Mr Rees bieing 
involve ' had now been' re- 
tracted by the kidnapperSy- 


water in rocks near by. 

The anti-nudear protesters’ 
new national group, Britain 
Opposed to Nudear Dump- 
ing, claims that Nirex plans to 
dump imported nuclei waste 


eraeral secretary rirtaally anything from a bat- 
of the TUC. setd yesierdEy. tered imclicd on ton 


mass appears to offer reason- as soon as the disposri sites 
able geology for deep burial arc in operation. This was 


"This is the major reason 
why the TUC has agreed with 
the Labour Party that any 
ftiiure laws introduced by a 
Labour government will in- 
clude secret ballots on strikes 
and executive elections**, he 
told delegates at the Institute 
of Personnel Management an- 
nual conference in Harrogate. 

"It would be unthinkable 
not to make legislative pro- 
vision in this field.** 


Trade union members were 
looking increasingly to their 
unions "to provide progress 
without strikes and without 
pickets — quite simply with 
the minimum of husle, es- 
pecially self-induced hassle”. 


"The fiiiure of Britain's 
industrial relations cannot rest 
on who has the upper hand at 
any particular time. It must be 
ba^ on eifidem manage- 


tered suilcase priched on top 
of a plastic mOk-crate, were 
ont in force yesterday outside 
Selfridge's to Oxford Street, 
despite the first inison sen- 
tence imposed on a coUeagoes. 

As a Comt jndge, Mr 
Jnstice Henry, issn^ a 
permanent ban on another 
street trader, Mr Steven 
Ward, aged 26,a fly-pitefaer 
from Stepney, said mt what- 
ever Westminsto’ City Comicil 
did *it's not going to change, 
it's never gofa^ to. It's a way of 
Itfe in Londmi and has been for 
the past lOO years or nKHe." 

The six-week sentence im- 
posed on Tbnraday on Mr 
Ronald Jordan, an nnibrella 
seller aged 44 from Finchley, 
north London, was "absolotely 


sites,” the spokesman said. 

Nirex hoped to have two 
nationri nudear dumps in 
operation by tta turn of the 
centuiy: a shallow burial site 
for low-level wa^ and a deep 
burial site for intermediate- 
level waste. 

Nirex would need a special 


doiied the agency yes- 
terday. 

Nirex rantractors will start 
test drilling al a proposed 
waste dump at Killin^olme, 
south Humberside, on Mon- 
day. Test drilling has startedat 
three other shallow burial 
sites. 


Conidl Univier^, first po- 
posed the notion nearly a 
decade ago. 

The strongest evidence for 
methane came from astro- 
aonrical stages whid shoved 
the laa to be a * common 


Ten years 
for man in 


lor manm 
acid attack 


A former soldier was jailed 
for 10 years at Bristol Crown 
Court yesterday after being 


constituent of the onter plan- found ^ty of causing griey- 
ets, moms and stai& The .ous bodily harm to his finmer 
prtoiitiye earth, too, mast have' lover Miss Debbie Brown, a 
been rich to nrihaae. staUe gut, aged 19. 

'Pnfessot Wbon bdieves J^i 

A, tot pbm <» look an jS? ™ ^ 

dooc 16 me wrkT, -kot 

20, both ofNcviUe Strec4 


Stressful lives of air pilots’ wives 


(^rdifr, denied a joint charge 
of causing grievous bodily 
harm with intent to Miss 
&OWD, of Frome Road, Trow- 
bridge, Wiltshire: 


^ Harvey EUtott, Air Correspondent 

Wives of Britisb airline pysdiiatric outpatients”. comtaied with a relativ^ sulphuric add at WmBimro 
pilots see themselves as one The findings, which follow higli disposable income, s intent to disfiaure her in 
parent familes. cut oif from two years of detailed analysis regarded as deriraUe. But this an attack on Anril ^at a stud 
noniial social ooniact and of replies from hundreds of stereotype is not borne out” at Westtarv Wiltshi^ 

living a life fiir removed from *»«:.■ 

the glamorous image normally 


pilots and their wives, are 
published in Pilots Under 


Detailed analysis, of the I where she works. 


assodaied with the world m 5//ssr by Professor Cary Coo- 


aviauon, says a new booL 
Yet they are expected to 


ments knowing what th^ are 
doing and workers confident 


doing and workers confident 
ttat their interests are being 
given proper weight” 

Mr Willis attacked recent 
changes in legislation which, 
he said, meant "get-outs from 
the law for small firms” and 
less individual protection. 

The unions were accused 
constantly of having too much 
power, being unrepresentative 
of their members, dividing the 
; nation and opposing un- 
necessary change. 


k^ss^riSfULiss; »°-M u, fad u. 

-..Cl- - . £ 


per and Dr Stephen Sloan. 

They say: "Superficially a 
pilot and his work are seen by 
many praple as glamorous 
and his wife is someone who is 
seen as beiim part of this 
glamorous life-style whkfa. 


replies showed that 22 per 
cent of those surveyed had 
mental health probtems at 
least as bad as any in a 
psychiatric hosphaL 

Pilots Under Stress by Stqihen 
Sloan and Cary Cooper 
(Routledae and Kraan Panl; 
£ 20 ). 


Khalid was sentenced to 
three years', youth custody, 
after being convicted of the 
lesser charge of grievous 
bodily harm. 

The court was told that NCss 
Brown was severely burned on 
her foce, heck and chert and 
would be scarred for life. 


FORCED DISPOSAL HIGNlf ffllPORTANT PUBLIC AUCTION 


OF SEVERAL HUNDRED EXCEPTIONALLY RNE AND MEDIUM QUALITY. HANDMADE 

PERSIAN CARPETS 

RUGS AND RUNNERS 


and others from the more I m poft am weaving centres of the East Included are many antiques. 
sMks, krtims.rxxTnadIcs and other unusual Kerns not generally to be found on the home market 
This mercharxiise is the property of a number of principal direct importers in the UK whirtt has 

been cleared from 

H.M. CUSTOMS & EXCISE 


with packing cases of perfrune 
at £2 a bottle. 

Mr Ward, whose aiqiUca-. 
tion for permission to tx^e is 
shortly to be beard by the 
authorities, said: "Fd shH> tins 
game tomorrow if the conncil 
wonld only gi^'^ toe a proper 
licence.” 

Bnt Westminster City 
Conncil said yesterday that: 
"Ill^al trading was an im^ 
warranted nuisance and we 
have had many complaints 
from residents.” 

The conncil was still consid- 
ering an applicatitm fr^ Mr 
Jorwu for a lioenoe. 

In Pentonville jaO, sech 
ooBSideratfons hai^ both- 
ered Mr Jordan. 

"Look there's an art to this 
job.” be said before his sen- 
tence. "It takes years to iearn 
to appear in the right place as 
soon as those big, black rain 
dODds threaten tte skyline.” 


PARLIAMENT OCTOBER 24 1986 


Chernobyl fallout 


Restrictions on moyement 


of sheep to be continued 


AGRICULTURE 


bond, to be disposed of at nominal or rw reserve for immediate cash reaTnation. Eveiy item 
Quarenteed authentic. Exi»rt advice availabio at time of viewina. To be tra n sf er red from 


guaranteed authentic. Expert advice availabio at time of viewing. To be tra n sf er red 

bonded warehouses and offered at the 


ENGLISH SPEAKING UNION 

DARTMOim HOUSE, 37 CHARLES ST.. 

BERKELEY SQUARE. LONDON, W1 

(Ar^aoenttoChesterfioid HoteQ 

On Sunday 26th Oct, at 3 pm 

VIEWING FROM 12 NOON ON DAY OF SALE 

auctioneers NOTE: Owing to the urgency of realising immediate cash, these 
items are being offered under instructions to ensure complete disposal. 


Lynn Relton & Co 

Our report yesterday. "Solic- 
itor in ‘luxury suite for 
inronners~ staled that “Mr 
Michael Reiton, of the We$t- 
minsicr firm of Lynn Relton & 
Co” was helping police in- 
vestigating the Brinks-Mat 
robbery.Mr Relton sold his 
interest in Lynn Relton A Co 
earlier this year and is no longer 
connected with the firm. 


Restrictions on the movement 
and slaughter of more than four 
million sheep in Britain, im- 
posed in the aftermath of the 
Chernobyl nuclear disaster, now 
applied to less than 300.000 
animals;, Mr John CaniBier, 
Minister of State for Agri- 
culture. Fisheries and RxxL told 
the Commons. 

Radiation levels in shera in 
upland areas had not bera 
rrtling os fast as in those in 
lowland areas. New insmunems 
had been developed to enrtile 
live monitoring of she^ under 
field conditions and the Gov> 
eniment was lookii^ at various 
ways of finding action to speed 
up the ending of restrictions. 

Mr Gammer was moving a 


motion that the Food Protection 
(Emergency Prohibitions) 
(England) (No 2) Order 1986 
and similar motions appiying to 
Wales and Scotland be ap- 
proved. These cover the re>- 
striction of movement ofsbeepu 

After Chernobyl, the UK had 
shown it bad the most cleariy 
prepared and carefully worked 
out and comprehensive scheme 
for compensation in Europe. No 
other country had gone to the 
same lengths to nuuce sure hs 
farmers were property looked 
after. 

"We believe that the totality 
of compensation arrangemenu 
we have DOW agrred upon — and ' 
we are giying priority to getting 
sums paid out as quiduy as 
possible — represent a fair and 
balanced response to the needs 
of the pioduoeis.” 

Mr to y nor Jehu, chief Op- 


Hailshflm 

in talks on 
family courts 


ih^bt that there canjein 


£7 million for Africa 


BALUNGTON GRANGE LTD, 28 ROSSLYN HILL, HAMPSTEAD, NWS. 

Tefc 01-794 5912. 

i^yiragt cash, duqwff all irtaer credit cam. . 


Buytne TIm TMim arinmui 
Aii«ifid «h ae. a m ao; 

Canada S2 7S Canarm 200: 
Cyprus TO cenis! penmaric Dicr lo oo. 
Finland MLib 9 DO' France F 8 oo* w 
0^manv DM % SO. ^braltar 60p. 
CtMB Dr 180; HoHam] Gl 3 5a tn«|i 
RepuMtt dOp. iui> I. 2.700. Lincm- 
EMurg U 45: MaoPira Csc tTO: Malta 
5&C M^rdCco Oir lOCX). Norway kt 
lOpD; PaKistan Rs»^ 18; Ponugal Car 
170. ^tnqaporc sa.SO: bCMJXt Pn 200. 
Sw^dgn iskr 12 oO. sipiTpnaiid s Fit 
J.Oa Tunisia Din&O Oo. L*SA Si 75* 
yumuxuk Din 700. ^ 


Britain is offering the Inter- approve the IFAD (Second 
rational Fund for Agricultuml Replenishment) Order 1986 
Devdopment _ £7 miflion to- which authorises a British 
wxuids-iis ATrican spe^ pro- contribution of £9.226.517 to 
gramme, whij^ is des i gned to IFaD. a speciaiJsed agency of 
Improye self-reliance in the the United Nations. He said that 
countries most liable to droi^t the first year's trandie of riwr 
and famiiie. Mr Chrisiopner contribution would be released 


case for a wide iotemaxional 

agreement that would esuUiah ^ 

the responsibility of national 

governments to provide com- ^ 

pensation when events within 

their own coentry contaminated ^ 

efsewbere. Was the Govenunent o® 

pmHiigfbrsudiuweeiiini} S^SSj^r dLtoJJgS 

Mr Gmnier (he Govenw Icgitinn^. 

Mr-Mchite Bnwm, an Op- 
with ail the countries position .spokeSaTiaid tffi 

mvolved. d^te disappointment over tte 

Mr Mark RoMaaon, Under <5pPOS*»ion 

Secretary ofSiate^Weiab Office, 

said: "I would not wa nt to ghre -On IBegiiiiiiacy, the Uw 
an mdicanon as to. prei^y Commission lecomnedthatte 

when the final restncDon win be conseduences ^ 

lifted. Weare a otin tte tbMmess SMshould be 
of ^zmg miq crystel bans, we the law. he raid. Legislation^^ 
areintiiebiManeteofsafttyu been promised but was not in' 
The oriSen were approw^ . theBflL .... 

Vishorshdld • 

provided UT the Bin. Sir Patrick 
Eighty-seven visitots to Britain MajAe^ the Solicitor GeneraL 
from theso-csBed visa countries nkl: thut- on'tbe reform of the 
in the lodfen sub-oontiiient arid In^ On ilfegitimacy. those vdio 
Africa were still bdng detelned -supported action were not likdy 
on Wednesd^. Mr Itevid. to be disappointed long. 

mm -im nart of- 
H™c Office. aid. in » wnnm consntalionstetag nidSSjS 
reply- • ••• Kv Lfliri . 


yishorshdld 


Patten, Minister for Overseas 
Development, announced in the 
Commons. 

He was moving a motii^ to 


m advance to keep IPaD going 
as it awaited other contri- 
butions. 

The motion was approved. 


umcc, «Ki..in a wnrra consultations being nndS^ 

He said that iti'tfaosecilrtaiiied,' tire Lord Chan- 

56 were from Ban^adesh, 17 edtor. whiCh Woukl be'eom- 
fhom India, .12. from. Pakistan, IW jjf.tlte numfli. 
ope from Ghana and one from wlurti .representation^- 

Ihigoia. . would be ccatsideied. ■ . « 




I • • 






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1 ;' 

4 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


HOMEiffiWS 


Owner fails in test case 


to get refund after 


new car breaks down 


By Mkhael Hbrsneil 


A mired businessman was 
£1.500 out of pocket yesteiday 
after his test case in the 


Court to clarify the ri^ts of 


had owned it for three weeks taxi fare home amounting to 
that was a reasonable time for £37.90. 
him to have accepted it and he 


m 


new car buyers resulted 
only panial victory. 

Mr Leslie Bernstein's Japa> 
nese car had proved too 
inscrutable a rogue on which 
fo base an aJl-emlnaciiig 
judgement 

Mr Bernstein bou^t a new 
£7,995 Nissan Laurel car in 
January last year. The vehicle 
had 142 miles on the clock 
when it seized up and came to 
a grinding halt on its first long 
run. 

The owner asked for his 
money back but Mr Justice 
Rougier ruled that because te 


could not send it back. 

The Automobile As- 
sodation, which supported 
Mr Bernstein's daun, is 
considering an appeal. 


The judge nevertheless de- 
cid«l that as the car Toad 
suffered a breakdown when 
the camshaft seized after a 
tiny piece of sealant blocked 


Pamsons Motors, of 
Golders Green, north Lon- 
don, who were supported by 
Nissan, must pay the es- 
timated £I0,(XX} costs of the 
action. They sold the car to Mr 
Bernstein in Dec e mbe r 1984. 


Thejudge had been asked to 
define when a car was of 
merchantable quality for the 
benefit of motorists and 


the oil pipe, it was not of 

merchantable quality and un- it would be 

fit For the purpose for ^ich it imposaW_e to make an 


was sold. 



He was entitled, therefore, 
to reject it under the terms of 
the warranty even though it 
was repair^ at a cost to 
Nissan of £700 and was then 
“as good as new". 


The car was eventually sold 
to another buyer for £6,000 
and Mr Bernstein, of Cmriiig- 
way, Ealing, west London, was 
entitled to that money and the 
interest on iu 


all-embiadng defim'tion. 

He said that no system of 
mass production could ever be 
perfect and even the buyer ofa 
new car must put up with 
teelbipg trouble& 

If a car could never be 
repaired it could not be de- 
scribed as merrhaniable: 

Id considering what would 
be a reasonable lime in which 
Mr Bernstein could have 


Mr Leslie Bemsteiiti who 
won partial victioiy 


hsmded the car back, thejudge 
. . said what would be a reason- 

T^udgealmawarM him able time for a bicyde would 
£1 50 (ramag^ for his ^tally not reasonable for a audear 
spoilt day" when the car broke submarine, 
down, and £50 for the loss of „ . j. .. . . _ 

the car, until a replacement „ three weeks Mr 

was offered. Bemstem must have been 

deemed to have accepted the 
He also recovered the cost car and could not have his 
of petrol left in the carand the money back. 



- . — • • • ■ 

Jury told 

body of 
man put 

in tomb 


1 


I 

I 

fe 

fe 

t 

9 


Dr Denys Vanghaa. Kegpernfrt»gfTiidwa*thgSi»iiiMelVfiicMiiwin T-irnHwn, <4M«plfiwgrtMiiiiariianiMnnifwha>fahgligw»iltii 
be the earliest snrrivii^ we^t-diiven pendnlnm dock, which has been booght for tbe Tme MeasmemeBt Galtery. The 
dock fois a Latui insciipCion wUch tea^te *^vaited by Ch Iliiygens>, The made by Jan van C»U in Nymegea, AD 

1657**. POndnlpm dodcs led to a diamatic imprarement in timekeeping The first was made by Christiaan Hnygras, a Didck 

scientist and mathemetician, on Chiistnias Day 1656 (nmU^nvh: MaA Fq^cs). 


Bamber 


jury’s ‘key 
decisions’ 


The jury in the Jeremy 
Bamber murder trial fece 
three crucial questions. Mr 
Justice Drake said yesterday. 

Summing up on the seven- 
teenth day of the trial at 
Chelmsford Crown Court, he 
said much of the evidence bad 
been “irrelevant". 

Mr Bamber denies killing 
five members of his femily to 
allegedly inherit his parent's 
£436,000 fortune. 

Thejudge said that the three 
key decisions the jury had to 
mate were: 

• Do you believe Jeremy 
Bamber or bis girl fiiend Julie 
Mugford. who told the police a 
month after the Idlings tlmt 
Mr Bamber hired a mercenary 
to kill his femily? She said he 
spent months planning “the 
pmect murder”. 

• Are you sure Mr Bamber's 
adopted sister Sheila Ca^ll, 
nicknamed Bambi, did not kiU 
her family and then commit 
suicide? 

• Did Mr Bamber receive a 


New formula Pill 


good for the heart 


Dispute in 
‘cash to 


By Pearce Wr^t, Sdmice Edhw 

The changes in the formula- disease patients as the hazard- 
tion of the contraceptive pill ous variety, 
to reduce possible incieam Heart specialists have found 

risk of breast cancer have also a lower ri^ of illness when the 
overcome the side-effects that cholesterol in blood serum 


kiU’ plot 


telephone call on the n^t of 

is rather. 


the killings from his 
claiming Sheila had “gone 
berserk with a gun"? 

The judge said: “The an- 
swer to each of these can 
independently of each other 
lead you to the decision to find 
the defendant guilty or not 
guilty.” 

The bodies of Neville and 
June Bamber, both aged 61, 
Mrs Sheila Caifell, and her 
twin six-year-old sons Nicho- 
las and Daniel were found at 
the family's fermhouse borne 
at Tolleshunt D'Arcy, Essex, 
in August last year. 

The prosecution allege that 
Mr Bamber. aged /5, of 
Goldhanger. killed them with 
a .22 rifle and then placed the 
murder weapon on his sister's 
body to put tbe blame on her. 

Tlte judge said that Mr 
Bamber mid Miss Mugford 
had “flatly contradicted each 
other" but evidence from her 
had to be treated “with a great 
degree of caution". 

He said that when an inti- 
mate relationship ended after 
20 months there were “stre^ 
sses and strains" which can 
lead to one partner doiitg 
something to try and hurt the 
other. 

The telephone call Mr 
Bamber told police he had 
received from his fetfaer was 
“an essential and crucial 
element" in his defence, the 
judge said. 

He warned the jury that the 
police's initial belief that 
Sheila had carried out the 
killings before committing 
suicide was wholly irrelevant. 

The trial was adjourned 
until Monday, when thejudge 
expects to comidele his sum- 
ming UpL 


could increase the risk of 
coronary hean disease and 
other cardiovascular dis- 
orders. 

The benefits of using a 
combination of steroids, but 
in much lower d(»es, were 
explained to a meeting at tte 
Royal College of Obsietridans 
and Gynaecologists, in 
London, yesterday. 

Professor Maurice Mishkd 
presented the latest results 
from an investigation known 
as the Lipid Research Clinics 
of North Ameria Population 
Study, which monitored the 
effea of changes in the Pill on 
the levels of cholesterol in 
thousands of women. 

Professor Mishkel's clinic at 
McMaster University, in Can- 
ada, was one of the centres 
which observed the change in 
the proportion of the two 
forms of cholesterol called 
high density lipoprotein, 
HDL, and low densi^ lipo- 
protein, LDU following the 
new formulatioDS of the oral 
contraceptive. 

The low dentity molecule is 
r^arded fiom dietary and 


Two detectives posing as 
killers argued about money 
with a Site who wanted them 
to murder Mr Rajiv Gandhi, 
in Diooo serum .the Indian Prime Minister, a 
contains more of the HDL court w^ loid yesterday, 
molecule. \ JarnaiJ Ranuana, a^ 46. 

The meeiiitg was also told of .one of three Sites who have 
a significant switch fiom oral denied conspiracy to murd^. 


contraceptives to three- 
monthly injections, redded 
largely as experimental in 
Britain, in femily planning 
pn^rammes elsewhere. About 
2S \per cent of women in a 
national scheme in Thailand 
now prefer quarteriy injec- 
tions 10 the oral pill. 


• Women are haviiig to w^ 
up to three months to see a 


had agreed to pay £60,000 for 
Mr Cteulhi to be killed on a 
visit to Britain last October, 
Mr Igor Judg^ QC for the 
prosecution, said. 

He told Krmingham Crown 
Court yesterday that the 
disagreement was because he 
could not produce proof that 
he would be able to pay after 
the assassination. 

The meeting was secretly 


doctor after bdng told they 


may have cervical cancer, a 
gyna^l(^5t from the British 
Medical Assodation said 
yesterday. 

Dr Peter Hendy-Ibbs, who 
has prepared a report on the 
subject, said such delays were 
“most undesirable" as they 
caused considerablee mentm 
stress to patients. 

Cervic^ cancer, which has 
trebled, or even quadrupled in 
some areas, can be cun^ only 
if it is caught early enoi^ 
Yei it can be five montiis from 
the date of the smear test until 


heredity studies among heart action is taken. 


‘Penny for 

guy’ risk 

to children 


A child care group has 
app^ed to the pifolic to call 
tte police when they are 
approached by children out- 
side late-night public houses 
begging a “penny for the guy". 

Onicials at ChUdwatcn s^ 
that they had been inundated 
with reports of children as 
young as eight begging outside 
public houses as late as 1 1 pm. 

Mrs Diane Core, oiganizer 
of C/uldwalch, urged the pub^ 
he not to dve money to the 
children. 'SOrder them home 
and if they refuse logo, call tire 
police," tiie said. 

A police spokesman said: 
“We will treat such calls with 
high priority. Apart from the 
feet that the kids are Ineakiiig 
the law, they are obviously 
very vulnerable." 

Mrs Core said that Cbi7d- 
watch had received repons of 
children who were foroed to 
hai^ over half the night's 
takings to iheir parents. 
“Some paints actually send 
out their diildren at times like 
Halloween and Christmas to 
beg for money for the whole 
family." 


Polo route 
to Xanadu 
retraced 


By Alan Franks 

Two Cambridge University 
undergraduates claim to be 
the first Britons for more than 
a century to have found the 
ruins of the palace which 
inspired ^e poet Samuel Tay- 
lor Coleridge to write his most 
famous poem. Kubla Khan. 

The students. William 
Hamilton-Dalrymple, 

21. reading history at Trinity 
College, and Louisa Slack, 
studying English at Care, 
have just returned from an 
8,000-mile journey between 
Jerusalem and Inner Mon- 
golia. in the footsteps of 
Marco Polo. They hitch-hiked 
and took public transport to 
Shang-iu (Coleridge's .>^- 
adu). 

According to their account 
of an exchange with a Chinese 
schoolteacher living near 
Shangrtu, the entire central 
site of the old palace may 
disappear as early as next year 
when the plain in which it 
stands is turned into a wheat- 
growing area. 

Satarda}', page 7 


Mr Jutfge said that Mr 
Ranuana told the deteaives 
be was “101 per cent" sure he 
wanted Mr Gandhi kified, but 
refused to show any docu- 
ments or bank accounts with 
his name on them. 

Mr Judge has said the three 
Sikhs were arrested shortly 
before Mr Gandhi arrived for 
his oftidal visit Police 
mounted a secret operation to ■ 
penetrate the plot 

Mr Ranuana, a company 
direaDT, of Canon Slreei. Mr 
Sutevinder Gill, ^ed 31, a 
dyer, of Worthington Street 
and Parmatma Marwaba, 
^ed 44, of Ke^eston Road, 
all Leicester, deny conspiracy 
to murder. 

They’ have also denied 
soliciting the two police offi- 
cers to murder. 

Mr Ranuana has further 
denied possessing a revolver 
and bullets, and to supplying 
dn^ 

The bearing continues on 
Monday. 


Magistrates’ meetii^ 


Hailsham stresses Action on 


training for bench 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Aifeirs Coirespondeat 


soliciting 

demanded 


M^strates should undergo 
training and those who refiw 
should not expect to chair the 
bendi. Lord H ailsham of St 
Marylebone, the Lord Chan- 
cellor, said yesterday. 


“Not so pleasiDg is the feet 
that some very senior mag- 
istrates are randy seeiL They 
should reflect that anyone 
who for whatever reason does 
not take part in continued 
He added that magistrates training should not expect to 
sitting on domestic and juven- take the chair.” 
ile court parrals who ooilld not The Lord Chanodlor said 
undertake the extra training he had also introduced in 
he announced in April should April further tiaii^ every 
not seek reappointment. tlnee years for magjstnaies-on 
Tbe Lord Chancellor was domestic and juvenile court 
addressii^ the annual meeting panels. That was in the wate 
of the 
atioo in 

sized the imponanoe of Where magistiates on tbqse 
training for ma^stiates and panels could -not undec^ .a 
rebuttM recent criticisms that programme of ftir^er tfaining 
they were untrained. they could sit far the rest of 

The first ihree-ye^ period their three years “but it would 
of compulsory trainii^ for not be appropriate fondbem to 
magistrates appoint after seek re^pointmenf*. 

January 1, 1980 had just been Lord Hailsham saM that in 


M^jstntes demanded yes- 
terday foat tbe Govenment 
dther intnidiioe ^ective 
tences gainst soficitiBg 
legalize prostitofin. 


or 


Kenneth Marcheni kflled 
his girl friend's husband and 
then dumped his b^y m a 
cottcrele tomb in his oa» 
gBTirtep, a jury was wld 

Mr Maichent, aged 35, « 

ElrntreC' Avenue. Mai«ots- » 
fidd, BristoL deoies tbe • 
der cd'DavidFarneU, aged 46, 
lastAj^ ' ^ 

Mr CWiir Wfflis. QC fiff the 
prosecution, told Bristol 
Crown Court that Mr 
Marchent clubbed Mr E^und] 
sensdess, idaced a idas&c bag ! 
over his head, attrapted to ~ 
strange him and then threw 
tbe body into a hole in his 
garden. 

Mr Wilfis said: “T^ crown 
says that this was indeed a 
deliberate muidCT. Fmtu- 
hously, he already had a hole 
dug, ai^ trad than mmniiw 
obt^ed fime wfaidi, in ^ | 
view at any rate, would assist I 
in the disposal df tbe body.” ! 

Mr Willis described how tbe * 
accused b^an living with Mrs 
Sheila FaineU, a mother of 
three, in 198S, after die had 
been married to Mr FmidL nf 
the Ov^ Bath, for eightye^ 
On tbe day of his dratli, Mr 
Flamell, a graeral labourer, | 
went to Elmttee. Avenue to 
discuss access to his three 
daughters, who were livisg 
with his estian^ wife and 
Mr MarchenL There was an 
argament between tile men. 

Mr Willis said: “Vftiat in 
fart Krttneth Marcbent did 
was' to go into the hall to 
(fotain a lump hammer, bto . 
ParneQ, dand^ at the sunk, | 
next heard a thump. | 

“She turned around to see 
David Farnell JookiQg dazed | 
and Kenneth Marcbent stan^ 
ing .bdiind him holding this 
lump hammer." Later, she 
heard more thumps. 

Mr Manfoem puoed a btadc 
plastic bag over Mr Fatnell's 
he^ dubbed him agw and ^ 
then raided his victim's pock- ) 
ets before mdering his ^ j 
fiiend to blade out the wm-j 
dowsso-tbat netgbbouxs could ^ 


They overwhelmingly not see. 
r^reed at thefiannnal meeting . Mr Willis allqgBd that Mr 
tfiat if the law oould nol be ParneH was dragged out by the 
mmle u effective delorent til accused and put into the graved 
solidtii^ it should be “witii- and covered whh stones and Vi 
drawn Croat the penal code**, ndible: , Mr Marteent ' tbed ;2 

The jiryd went to hi& motbet's . home 4 

^SoverttDsent to consider wdiere h e collected lime w h ic h ^ 
ampwiiwHitB to Street ^ qirinkled on the grave. 


Magistrates' Assod- of tte inquiry iptp ^,(teafo of Ofifeoces Act, 1559, ta pnrride Afiowatds, tlw accused, is said 4 

London. He empba- Jasmine Bedc&cd. - nme ^feotive srattenoes. to teve condeted. over the^ 



orer -tiie recenMIiglr iGont ^Mai^t,to girtfii^H 


raifpg that ma^lstira mart ^ her three dnkfaen, tben^ 
-'ve iheir manu^ to the pres& drove^ Leicestvthie^tday 1 



tionld aflect recrnitmeBt; 
some-teaglrtrates said. 

IKryDoiiglas dn^. 

man of the aaaoc M thm,'ndi».- 


completed, he said. recent years the selection ciwted-tiisi fear but 

“It is pleasing that many procedures for the new (hat other footers;, such as 
magistrates appointed prior to appointments a year to the employment, did gfre'ine to 
1980 have appredat^ tbe bench had become more stiin- oonceni abM recrahinent te 
value of further trainings gent and searching. tbe bench. . 


to see her rdalrves. But Mrs ^ 
Fapi^ fold her sister 
hadhfoipeaed. ' * ^ 

Nlr MaicfaQat'aOeBBd^. told '* 
police t^t acting . in 4 

seU^defence because Mr Par- 
neU was threatening fafe wife j 
and hinKglf* 1 

The trial continuesL 


Actually, the tale isn't so much 
lost as misjdaced. Because everyone 
dunk s Cutty Sark is the ship moored 


on tiie Thames at Gieenvicfa. 



But before tiiar, rt was the name 


of the rather wooden-feced young 
lady shovu here. 


Destroying crops, slaughteruig 
livestock and Juixog boats onto the 


£15m rail link 


Her career as a witch was 


British Rail, Greater Man- 
chester Transport Authority 
and Manchester Airport 
Board have agre^ in principle 
to build a £1 5 million rail link 
fiom the city centre to the 
airport. 


described by Robert Bums 


Tam o'Shantcr. 


Heart death 


Mr William Hopewell, ^ed 
40. of Nottingham, had a rare 
heart condition when be col- 
fepsed and died during last 
month's half marathon in the 
town, an inquest was told 
yesterday. A verdict of natural 
causes was recorded. 

Disease tests 

All 6.(XX) residents of 
Stonehouse. Gloucestershire, 
will be asked to ave blood and 
saliva samples mm Novem- 
ber 3, as part of a fSO.C^ 
programme to test for men- 
ingitisL 


Credit industry urged to help debtors 


By Midiael Dynes 

Britain's multi-billion 
pound credit industry is being 
urged to dip into its profits to 
help the gromng ranks of 
debtors struggling 10 pay off 
arrears. 

In a week when mortga^ 
interest rates have begun to 
rise, financial experts have 
told The Times Home Front 
campaign: “Money lenders 
must take on more res- 
ponsibiliiy for the growii^ 
problem of debt arrears that 
their easy credit policies are 
creating." 

Sir Gordon Borne, director 
general of tbe Office of Fair 
Trading, said: “Financial in- 
stitutions of all kinds are 
felling over themselves in 
their eagerness to offer credit 
arid, indeed, to thrust credit 
upon us. 

“Their over-enthusiasm to 






FRONT 


mem of the Environment to campaign, but Sir Gordon was 
run the service, but needs eager 10 emphasize the 
another £14,000 each year to contribution made by other 
maintain it She has appealed forms of crediL especially 
to Britain's banks, building credit cai^. to the increase in 
societies and credit comparues repossessions, mortgage 



lay in crossihg 


nittiung stream — 
somclhmg no witch 
<fo. Yet Cutty 
Sark sdU mani^ la 
puO off the horse’s : 


at the last 


a % 


■m: 




1* til 








instant Tlic Euxtous:? 


J 


-eloper hunched oaZ 


the Qydc in 1869 
hamed after the witch, in hopes' 
ofemuIzth^terawcscHnespe^. j! 


to help ouL 

Mrs -Andrews said: “Finan- 
cial institutions as a whole 
market situation has already spend £260 miHion each year 
led to a considerable escala- on advertising— they would 
tion in repayment arrears. surely improve their imagp by 
“Many of these debt casual- ^nding a small part of that 
ties would not be there if it figure on assisting tbe agencies 
wasn't for the new orthodoxy which pick up tiie casualties of 9., “bind 


ar- 


rears and other kinds of 
consumer debt. 

He accused c^it card com- 
panies of “going to absurd 
lengths in marketing their 
services". 

Sir Gordon said: “Once 

their 


in 


of crediL Financial in- 
stitutions have a responsibitty 
to help tackle the probleni 
they have largely created.” 

Sir Gordon is supporting a 
campaign by Mrs Ann An- 
drews. a barristrt and debt 
counsellor at Birmingham's 
Money .Advice Centre, to 
launch nationally a Housing 
Oebtline telephone sen’ice. 
Mrs Andrews has been 


lend in a very competitive given £26.000 by the Depart-. 




easy credit' 

Sir Gordon said: “There 
should be less ambitious 
rhetoric about expanding 
home^ownersh i p and the 
potential borrower should be 
more wary about the steady 
drip of over-cDcouragement to 
bomjw.” 

The dangers of the building 
societies' relaxed lending cri- 
teria have already been high- 
lighted by the Home Front 


credit card repayments, ar- 
rears on other debt repay- 
ments. particularly mongagi^ 
quickly follow. 


"Many financial institu- 
tions are becoming increasinlv 
aware of the growing public 
criticism over their lax lending 
policies. If they fail to lav- 
down more stringent lending 
cnicria ihev may well face the 
prospect of govemmeni inter- 
vention." 


ran of* 
>■ 


• * I* 

When Tam saw (he lights . And also from the l^end came^ 

blazing within the hallowed walls, , ^ ^ P^8 “ “ares 

tope in tiie figurehead's oiitstirtdhed| 

especii^y =» 

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he came forward, he saw, and he was 


conquered by love. 


lust? Qoc: he dubbed her. Cutty 
Sark, the old Scots phrase, for 


the short shirt she 


almost wearing.) 


Cutty Sark discovered 
Tam o'Shanter spying on her. 
Aod she pursued hitn and 


1 

grey mare nrath such 


spirit that they came witiun 


a hair of death. 


Their one salvatioD 



hand, following an 
festpassage. 



. Yon Bay wemder xHby 
chose to illiistiate the ship oi^ 
our laheLiatiier the.scantilii^ 


1 

clad young witch. 


I 


But tiut. wiy we can 


our 'custofiiers 


Ira forone tiung onty. 



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Te 

of 




THE HINDAWI CASE 


\ The yengefiil terrorist • The fated love affair # The Secret Semtfe 




Arab J ames Bond 

linked to terror 

dating back to 70s 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 

The arrogant conceit of the Libya, Syria and even ^ Their (eader was a man de- 

IRA. They discovert Syrian scribed by Hindawi as Briga- 
links with the attack on Rome dier General Mol^med al- 
airport and the bombing of an Khoury, who be said was head 

newspaper in PSms ' ' ““ 


terrorist Nezar Hindawi led 
him to believe that he would 
never lace justice. While 
awaiting trial in Brixton 
prison in south London he 
conceived a desperate plan to 
get his Syrian controUers to 
demand his. fie^m in ex- 
change for Israeli prisoners. 

He a letter smu^ed 
out to his cousin. Awni 
Hindaivi, in Italy detailing 
how it could be done and 
recommending that the plot 
should be sprung while Mrs 
Maigaret Thatcher was visit- 
ing Israel in May. 

Hindawi also wanted West- 
ern hostages kidnapped _ in 
Beirut and, in one chilling 
sentence, told his cousin: 
‘‘You are authorized to study 
any solution. Time is running 
out quickly." 

Italian police intercepted 
the letter and arrested the 
cousin. 

Hindawi’s bizarre plot was 
the linal, fbrioni. throw in a 
terrorist career wiiich had 
taken him to Brrtain, West 
Germany, Italy, the Lebanon, 
Lil^ Syria sad Eastern Bloc 
countries. 

The spur for Hindawi was a 
virulent hatred _ of Israel, 
spawned when his wril-to-^ 
fam ily was ejected from its 
frrm in 1948. He became a 
founder member of the Jordan 
Revolution Movement, 
linked by police to the Abu 
Nidal organization. 

He boasted “the filling of 
Jewish blood is legitimate and 


m 

1982. 

Hindam's brother, Ahmed 
Hasi, and another man, are 
being held in West B^in 
linkra to the bombing of a 
German Arab cnltural 


lilitary inielligence. He 
introduced to Brigadier 


of milii 

W3S 

Okurah and Lieutenant Colo- 
nel Haiihan-Said, the head 
and deputy head ofSyrran Air 
Force intelligeDce. 

With slight difTereoces in 


organization which Nezar the spiellings of the names the 
Hin^wi is believed to have three men exist and do hold 
inspired before coming to die functions described by 
London for the attack on Hindawi. 

Right 016. In February the Syrians 

Mr Hasi is also suspected of decked on the El Al attadc. 
taking part in the bombing of Haiihan-Said arranged for 
the Le Belle discotheque in Hindawi to be issued with a 
West Berlin, which was in- special government passport. 

— -■ He travelled as an accountant 



"Dear brother, many jrart- depaitmeiiL 
ings, it is time to aa. This is Hindawi flew to London on 

war time. / vfrite to you what he described as a practice 
noping you wpn'i disappoint run working with a Sheffield 
me. student living on a Syrian 

Go to Damascus and talk to Government sdiolaisbip who, 
brotha^ Abu and Ahmed- Hindawi said, had access to 
Haithan of the foUawing: explosives and a Syrian intelli- 

AhmedJibrilhastwo Israeti ssnce officer called Hassan 
prisoners. Haithan has Ids Sharif 
wird. _ In March, aaording to 

Thaudier will be wiling Hindavd's cpvrin, there was 
Israel next Saturday. training with the Syrians, 

He has two Israeli prisoners After the training Hindawi 
.Abu has their vw/d as welL went to West B^n. He and 

A prisoner exchange shoidd his brother visited the Ger- 
be organized which must in- man-Arab Society and 
dude my lather HasL IJ Hin^wi asked the organizers 
n^asary ti^ can be acconh why they were not more active 


fighting Israd. 

According to his brother the 
Syrian Erabas^ in East Berlin 
provided a carton of plastic 


pushed in Thatcher’s visiL TeU 
Haithan if necessary to include 

some foreigners from Beirut in 

permissible until the end of the exchan^ 

STworld. His group so,^t 

finana and help from Ubya connecting autobahn and 

andSyna. lawyer and the samer amount bidden umiMt was needed. 

A sei^ Damascus ^^"^y^^Zhorized to studv Seven days later Hindawi 

gence officer, Haithan-Said, rou toe autnOTLea to su^ Teanneared in i He 

Sained Hindawi and armed teappearea in Lonoon. ne 

him with a £ilse passport and 
the bomb whi(£ so nearly 
murdered his pregnant girl 
friend and the 374 other 
passerigers on R Al flight 016. 

When the giri friend. Miss 
Ann Murphy, was stopped at 
Heathrow, Hindawi was 
whislred away to the Syrian 


omgiuaciy. Royal Garten Hotel, Kenring- 


strumental in launching the 
American air attack on Libya. 

The arrests and the expul- 
sions are the final chapter in 
the history of a group called 
the Jordanian Revolutionary 


ton, posing as an airline 
stewara from the Syrian flight 
on which he arrived. . There 
was little check on the crewsL 

The next day the bomb was 
delivered to him a man 
posing as another crew 


Movement or the Jordanian 

Wh«thebombw^»diaov. 

safe house despite a poUce hue S^lionto^KH^ ered Scotland Yard issued a 
and cry. 


Hindawi was beir^ looked 
after -1>y three Syrian dip- 
lomat5,.but he fear^ that hu 
protectors ml^t eventually 
become his executioners and 
he fled the next day and gave 
himself up to the ^lice. The 
diplomats have since been 
expelled and a founh Syrian, 
suspected of being in charge of 
intdligence operations in 
Britain, fled to Damascus. 

At Paddington Green sta- 
tion astonished officers lis^ 
tened to his "James Bond 
style*' story. Although 
Hindawi had already been on 
their list of suspected terror- 
ists, the police knew little of 
his activities until his arrest 
helped the British, West Ger- 
man and Italian security 
authorities to uncover a net- 
work linking the Red Bri- 
gades. the I^uiar Front for 
the Libmtion of Palestine, 


0 {>posibon 
sera regime. 

‘‘ But 'the Israelis believe 
Hindawi was a disaffected 
member of Yasser Arafat's 
FLO who decided on action 
not diplomacy. 

Police describe him as a 
“first division" terrorist sus- 
pected of involvement in ter- 
rorism going back to the 
1970s. 

In July last year Hindawi 
and members of his group 
went secretly to Lilqra to laUc „ . 

to the Gaddafi regtme about to be an arms dealer, 

finance and help. The Libyans said hesaw Nezar in 


picture of Hinda^, believed 
to have been sent from Italy. 
HindawTs cousin is under- 
smod to been watched by 
Italian inteOigenoe after his 
telephone number was found 
duiiag the arrest of terrorists 
linked to a Lebanese group 
sharing responsibility with the 
Red Brigade for the death of 
an American genenaL Hindavn 
was trapped. 

The Jordanian businessman 
who was also arrested is 


either suggested they should 
try Syria or actually recom- 
mended them. TlW Italian 
intelligence authorities believe 
that both the Libyans and the 


London shortly before the H 
Al _ bomb was p^ted but 
claims he was woildng with 
Italian intelitgence. 

The It alian poUce may have 


Syrians eventually c^e to use known of bis trip, providiqg 
the group of Jorc^ians. the tip ^i^ch pla^ Hindam 

In January this year in London. It was not until 
Hindawi was in Dam^cus Miss Ann Murphy tried to 
where he met a group of senk»- board an H Al anyone knew 
Syrian intelligence officers, why. 


PICTURED AT VICTORIOUS EASE 

in Thursday’s edition of The Times, Kingley Amis 
was good enough to share the Booker Prize 
limelight at his home in Regent’s Park with a 
bottle of The Macallan Malt Whisky. 

There it sat attentively at his feet, in the 

photograph, as if in deference to 
the man who has earned the summa 
CUM LAUDE of the literary world, and 
who has penned so many kind 

words on the subject 
of its own prize- 
winning virtues. 

Long may the old 
devil continue to 
delight every judge 
of a good book, and 
to assuage his Muse with the sheny-pak-mellow 
refreshments of his favourite malt. 

THE MACALLAN. THE MALT. 



Girl left 
holding 
bomb and 
the baby 

By Our Ofme Reporter 

Miss Aim Mmrpliy itiU 
never forget Nezar Hbidaira. 
Qidi duy her daimiliter San 
wfll be tbm to ranind her of a 
diaotic love afiair widi tiie 
volatile JwtlaiiiBn jovnialisL 
The tmnaiice ended when 
hfiss Morphy, five mondis 
pregnant, was drawn tira bomb 
her boy fiiend and fiidier of 
her baby, had placed in a 
for her to take on El Al Qbdit 
016. 

Hindawi told bOss Mnrpby 
he bad beoi a termist hot had 
given np vibleine. For 18 
HKHitiis Hindawi, die eatiiit- 
teied soon of a Pal«rtine 
refugee fiunily , had dalBed 
with her and tbeo'fiially 
betrayed her as a pidhical 


The affidr bqan late in 
1984 when Mnrpby, a 
Catholic aged neariy 30, came 
to London from Dnblin as a 
dumbennaid at the London 
HiltiHi. One of nine chiUrett 
she had left schod at 14 and 
worked in a ftetory. 

# Reft^ee boy who 

grewuptolOTethe 

highlifep 

She and a. friend. Miss 
Theresa Leonard, Eved in 
Earls Court whde many fiats 
and small hotels are ns» i^ a 
stream of peripatetic AnUi 
visitors. 

Miss Leonard met a Jor- 
jgnMM who shared a fiat witii 
HindawL Hmdawi was nraefa 
travelled, anogant, flamboy- 
ant and a man who in his own 
words eqipyed high life**- 

fri ^ npheavais of the 
creation of Israd in 1948 the 
Hiadawifainily were forced to 
flee from a praqieroBS fann of 
gram in tee district of 
Bet Sbe'aa. They crossed the 
Jordan to settle in the village 
of Baqnra. They conld look 
across the river to the guns 
cova^ the bordo' and the 
lands tiiey had once owned. 

In 1967 daring tte first 
Aiab-Lsradi war LHndawFr 
is said to have ben 
by the Irtaelis and 
file Cumly bme razed. 
yomig Hindawi was storn^ a 
smomderhq ai^er i^ainst the 
landis and the Jews. 

Hindawi came to Britain in 
298f)^ apparency to lean Ei^ 
Usb and work as a journalist 
althoii^ he was less tinn 
snccessfhL 

He worked as a messeiigg 
ibr the AlrAmb newspaper in 
1982 bot was dismissed after a 
monfti fin- temper tantrums. 

He vMt Miss Marphy in 
1984 and sbe fell in love with 
the riianning Jordanian and 
bdievol be m &Bn for her 
as wdL 

Two mondis bter he van- 
ished. Miss Murphy was pr^ 
nant hot die only contact was a 
postcard from Rome^ 

The Irish wnnan ndscanied 
and that aatnmu Hindawi 
reappeared and vanished 
again. In Novembo- M^ 
Morphy was again pregnant 
bat foi^ her lover was not 
inteRsted in the child, tellii^ 
her to get rid of itJVCss 
Murphy decided to keep the 
baby a^ ftngec him- 






embm 






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The bag that hid tiie bomh, the caknlator that wrnild set it off in noA-eSr and te pistol 
passport bdo^SiV to Nezar Hnodawi in Ins attest to blow up te El Al jrt. 




Cast ofdraracters in a cgseoftoTorisip (from top Irtt): George Hafaash,tePialestfaie leader 
Israelis thoii^t thn vrere Iteckii^ Presudent Assad of Syria; and hfr Faronk al-Steia, 
the Syrian Foreign Muiister. Mbs Am Morphy, te hntnan time bomb, Mr ahn-d Hasi, 
Nezar HindawTs brotiwr, and Ahmed JitoiL-heikd d'te Popular Frtmt te te Libnation of 

Palestme. 


^liltehan 

Evidence df 
complicity in te 
bomb ptot mar 
collected by te 

vice, MIS. The 
bossy in Beigma _ 
believed to have bbM 
with biteng mid 
tapping devices. 

It had bea * 
inierest for botit 
^)ecial Brandi 
suspected invd 
Syruin tnielligenoo 
an internatioi^ “ 
lerrorisi oigan^ 

The Syrians mast ., 
suspicious tbrt tbeir 
was being watdtod 
precautions would 
taken to avoid 
phone calls to ' 
unwise conv^ 
the embassy. 

Modern t 

eavesdix^iinng dmdite tnte; 

tha t converratitms 

iDonitcnod from a 
some way away aodn^^*^ ' 
normal cable te tephd i to — 
to be tapped. Tta etedteKfJv. 
fines beanm iqr 
are all niteicepM by OCO^ 
the ea-vesdrojnmiB -'dotsMb- ^ - 
nications cente 
Cheltenham. 

Evmi dedric 

cannot escape te^MSvA- * 
leners becanre cadLftetoew 
a different decuoaic|^ and 
can be analysed. f : 

Diidomats in 
most vulnerable 
gi^ know they , 
using unscramUed Wtfsgfi 
lines or sending chblra sT tii|9 
want to pass secret tetj s a8t% ^ 

But all diptomits coqpr 
sionally have to make a 
judgement about te ridts^ u 
they want a qioick answer from, 
their ^venunent back home, 
sometHnes they have to make 
acalL 

The 

tapping of the Syixan eml 

been going on imetw 
mittentiy ibr moniban two 
ye^ aoGOidus to.' one seo- 
uiicy source: OmciaBy a. wap. 
rani for npofaig is issued lo 
MIS vten teic Ha 
subversiw;: tbrtoilB .ie 
pioapgp aotiVita that ft 
to te 

'Acoord^ 
sources. Dr 
teS^^riatt' 







10 



►vT V 



as < 
feai 


In April he appearal at ha- 
flat ssidng he wanted to many 
hn-. There was talk tti* going to 
Ireland to meet her paimits at 
Sanym^iD Park , Dan 
Lai^haire, Co Dnblhi, and 
marriage in a Catelic dinrch. 

In fact he already had a wife 
called Barbara, die daintier 
of a Polish fiumer, who he m^ 
while t^ were bofli attending 

a Kensmgte lairanwsclHNd 
mim 

Mrs Hindavri retamed 
home pennanmitiy with her 
danghtte' Natasha ui 1982. 
She settled in the village of 
Rad^ra Fudlaski close to te 
Soviet bordm- whoe HSndawi 

ortiueetimesa 


year. 

Hindawi taU. Misa Mnrphy 
he vras squrated and gettn^ 


divorced. He suggested a holi- 
day in Iraael aiio the possibil- 
ity of ma rria re . hfiss Mnrahy 
was apparmfly unaware of die 
diffienfties which might firae a 
Jordanian tryii^ to travel to 
Israel, let ahme get married 
there. 

6 Despite pledg^ of 
love, there was little 
romandiig 9 

Hindawi gave Affiss Murphy 
£100 to boy new dothes and 
boui^ the ticket for £399. 

Miss Morp^, believuigshe 
was to meet Us motiier, went 
oat and firand an wnament to 
take as a gift. Desjte 
Hindavri^ pleteu of love 
there was still littfe nrnianc- 


ing, JUst one nftht out Ibr a 
dirap meaL 

Ste aooqited tint she woidd 
travel alone, decile te bet 
she was pregntat, hecanse 
Hindawi said he already had n 
ticket diroi^ Us joanalistic 
work. He would travel to 
Jordan separately. 

It was alL he said, to be a. 
surprise. He got airaiy when 
she said she h»l told hte si 



i. 


about te trip. 

The night bdbre te 
he appeared at her flat with a 
new tnvd Irag and consid- 
erately pocked It for her widi 
the new dresses she had 
boagi^ 

The next day she was 
surprised to find he seemed 
nervous mi the way to te 
airport. 


Parliament 


Howe tells of envoy’s involvement 


The fiDltowiira is die text of 
Sir Geoffiey Howe's state- 
ment to the Commons: 

The House -will be a-ware 
that the trial of Nezar 
Hindawi at the Central Crim- 
ind .Court ended today. 
Hindawi was found guilty of 
attempting to {riace a bomb on 
and El Al aircraft at Heathrow 
on April 17 and was sentenced 
to 45 years imprisonmenL 

Hindawi has been con- 
victed of a monstrous and 
inhuman crime. If be had been 
suocessfril, hundreds of inno- 
cent lives would have been 
lost The way in v^ch he 
d^iv^ his pr^nant girl 
friend into caiTying the bomb 
was particularly wicked, and 
has aroused d^ and univer- 
sal repugnance. 

■There is conciuave ev- 
idence of Syrian official 
involvement with Hindawi. 
The House will recall that in 
May, after Hindawi's ancst 
te Govenunent demanded 
the withdrawal of three Syrian 
Emba^ attach^ whose dip- 
lomatic immunity the Syrian 
Government declined to 
waive, so that the pc^ce could 
question them. 

Evidence at the trial re^ 
vealed something of the part . 
these attachfs prayed in *hi; 
afiair. The Syrians claim that 
they dealt with Hindawi as a 
bona fide journalisL That 
claim is frankly incredible. 

Evidence was produced at- 
the trial that: 

• Hindawi spent some time 
in hotel accommodation re- 
served for Syrian Arab Air- 
lines crew: 

• Hindawi spmt the njght 
after the bombing attempt in 
Syrian Emba^ accommoda- 
tion, where his hair clippings 
and hair dye were found. 

Certain facts are 


• Hindawi travelled on an 
ofiicia] Syrian passport in a 
false name; 

• Hindawi's visa applications 
were, on two occasions, 
backed by official notes from 
the Syrian Foreign Ministry: 

• Hindawi met Dr Haydar. 
the Syrian Ambasster. to his 
embassy after the discovery of 
the faomb.^ 

In addition we have; 

• IndepjBndent evidence that 
the Syrian Ambassador was 
personally involved several 
momfas before the commis- 
sion ofthe offence, in securi^ 
for Hindavri the sponsorship 
of the Syrian intelUgeDoe 
authorities; 

• Equally compelling ev- 
ident tint du^ his deten- 
tion Hindawi sought to 
contact secretly, Syrian miefi!- 
gence officials in Damascus, 
with a request for their assis- 
tance in securing his release. 

The whole House will be 
outraged by the Syrian role in 
this case. It is unacceptable 


that the ambassador, mem- 
bers of his staff; and the Syrian 
authorities in Damascus, 
should be involved with a 
criminal like HindawL 

We have therefore decided 
to break diplomatic relations 
with Syria. Dr Hayr^ was 
infbnpM of this decision this 
morning and was told to dose 
his embaray and leave the 
country within 14 days. , 

The British Embassy in 
Damascus will also be dose± 
We shall seek to make alter- 
native airangements of the 
usual^ land for the protection 
of British interests in Syria. 

We are also d^teoit^ the 
securi^ anangiemems sur- 
rounding te operations in 
London of Syrian Arab Air- 
lines, by imposing special 
controls on all Synan Ar^ 
Airlines mreraft and crew, 
including stricter searches of 
personnd, passengers and 
bt^gage. 

The House will recall that 


last June we introduced a 
tougher and stricter visa re- 
gime for Syrians wishing to 
enter the United Kingdom. 
We shall maintain and 
strengthen this regime. 

We are taking urgent steps 
to inform our European part- 
ners, and other ^endty gov- 
ernments, about the details of 
the case and the measures we 
are taking. We are impressing 
on theca the wider security 

implications of te involve^ 
ment of the Syrian authorities 
and are urging them lo take 
appropriate supportingaction. 

We regret that these actions 
have been forced on us by the 
unacceptable behaviour of te 
Syrian authorities. We remain 
determined to play our foil 
pan with moderate Arab 
states in the search for peac^ 
fill settlement of the region's 
problems. 

But we remain second to 
none in our determination to 
continue the fight to stamp 
out tenorism in our midst. 


MPs unite to applaud tough stand 


Mr Donald Anderson, 
Opposition spokesman on fin^ 
efgn and Comnionwealtii ^ 
fairs, told the Commons itiras 
drarly nnacceptaUe fin the 
Syrian ambassador or his staff 
to remain if the Home Sec- 
retaiy were convinced of that 
country's involvement in the 
bombploL 

Mr Anderson, MP fin- 
Swansea East, sahl hb party 
endiiraiastically applauded te 
sentence on ^Thts evil man" 
and shared die Govenunent'^ 
sense of outrage at the role of 
Syrian officials. 

He said he believed a dear 
message should come Cram a 
united Hoose that terrorisra, 
from whatever source, will be 
-met with a S 4 >eedy, robost and 


Mr Anderson asked 
whether te Foitign Secretary 
was aware of evidence imkinp 
Mr tfindawi to te Aba Nidal 
mnp which ms respo m aMe 
for te Berlm discMbeqne 
bombii^ If dlls were so, Mr 

Anderson said, there was some 

doubt on te jnsti&ation for 
te bombii^ of Libya by the 
Americans. 

Sir Geoffrey said there was 
BO evidence implkatii^ Syrft 
or any comitry other Mwti 
Ubya. He add^ that it was 
right to emphasize the hn- 
portanee of a concerted omi. 
num response to government 
miscondBCt of this sort. 

Mr Alan Beith. Liberal MP 
fbr Berwidk-oiMii-Tweed. «aM 


and sponsored terrorists led 
to te doors of the Syrian 
Embassy. He asked whether 
mere was not a case for 
steping Syrian Arab Airline 
fliglits into tills ooantry, 

Mr R^ Adky. Omsei^ 
vative MP for Christchnch, 
^mied against gettfng in- 
volved in an oigy of seif- 
congntnhtion. 

The bomb in the hag had 
Im carried through all the 
checks at Heathrow, which 
bad been particnlarly strkt 
mcently, .and had only been 
found by oflidals oTE) AL 

. He suggested the anthori- 
tira at te afapoit shonU he 

oclrail ttilhnMiAra BKiMl A* 


oventei todowitBHindavri. 


That can was critical iio 
many ways: fiist it implicit an 
official Syrian ravofrement in 
te plot, providing a link not 
just with intdligenoe agents 
inside the embassy but wifo 
te ambassador buasrif and 
therefore with the govenunent 
of Presidem Assad. 

Second, it placed the British 
Govranment in an aimallihg 
dilemma. A decisioa to taken 
stro^ stood arainst te terror- 
ist acii-vities of Libya was one 
thing. I^plomatic relations 
had been cut off and te 
Libyan leader Colonel Gadaffi 
was not a leading figure to be 
reckoned with in te Mkiffle 
East But Syria, with its in- 
fluential leader President As- 
sad. had to be treated totaUy 
differently. 


Of all tile aoemrios fbr 
British Government action, 
pored overly the MkfaUe 
experts in the Foreign OfSq^- 
the one inescapable step 
peared to be the lemo^ 
te ambassador Dr Haydar, 
but preferably without Us 
being expelled 

Since be had been at his post - 
in London for more fhqp 
years, the best sedution was for > 
him to be moved to anothm 
capital and replaced by u 
envoy with a clean sheeL - 

As one diplomatic source 
commented: ''The 'British : 
Oo-vernment Ims lo take a- 
tough line on terrorism but 
with Syria there is so xandi at *' 
stake. Apart from the threat of 
revenge from the fifces ofthc' 
Abii Nidal organization 
apuisi Britidi diitim^.. 
abroad. Syria could mite smt' '* 
that Mtain played no foriher. 
role in the Middle East peace 
process. That would be a bkwr 
10 the Foreign Office. ' . 

"To take on Prerideitt 
sa^ te loiQbert leader ro te-v 
Middle East, would be 

dangerous indeed. - He ( 

turn the political and ^ 
nomic screw on Brit^h^fte 
would send diivens down te= 
spines'of Brilhh indusixy; ..■ . . 

involved m 

terroiism but in dipfote^-'.'A 
terms there is a 
^ght attached to ^3 
me cornecHone of te 


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Two diftiomats and 
wives were tiiis week . 
drawn from te British: 
^sy in Beirut becaaa 
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UVblOEAS NbWS 


THE HINDAWl CASE 




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The genesis of terrorism 




Foreign reaction 



Trade and diplomacy ^i; 


Air slaughter plot points to Syria’s Iron Man 


From Robert Fisk, Beinit 

The aucmpi to slaughicr the 375 
passengers and crew of E) Al flight 016 
have had us genesis high above ihe 
M^iterrancan early this year when a 

tFISS? from 

1 npon to Uamascus. was iniereepied by 

Israeli jMs near Cj-prus and ordered lo 

Jand ai TeJ .Avjv. U was just after one 

o clock on Ihe afternoon of February 5, a 

date still remembered with bitterness 

and anger in Syria. 

The Israelis said later they had 
beljc\^ that Dr Geoige Habash. leader 
ot the Popular Front for the Liberation of 
Palestine, was on board ihs aireraft, 
tra><Hling tack lo Syn& from a meeting 
of radical ^lesiinian officiais in Tripoli. 

Bui the hijacking - for that is what it 

uf^ T to be a monument^ 

blunder. Habash was not on the plane; 

siidng in one of the from seals was 
Mr Abdullah .Ahmar, assistant secretaiy- 
^nml of the Swan Arab Ba'aih 
^ahsi Party, efleciively the most 
important man in the Syrian hierar^y 
after President Assad. 

.After holding the aircraft for five 
hours, the Israelis allowed Mr Ahmar 
and his eight Syrian and Lebanese 
c^panions to fly to Damascus. Syrian 
omeials and the state-controUed news- 
papers immediately embarked on a 
chorus of threats against the Israelis; but 
because rhetoric is a common commod- 
ity in the Middle East, they were largely 
ignored. 

This case was different, though. In 
Tripoli. Mr Ahmed Jibril. head of the 
Popular From for the liberation of 
Palestine General Command whose 
headquarters is in Damascus, declared 
that passengers on American and Israeli 
commercial airliners could henceforth 
become reprisal targets. 

Rereading his comments is a chilliitg 
experience. “We you to tell the entire 


world not to board Israeli or American 
aircraft," he said then. "From this day 
on. wc win not respect civilians who use 
them.” 

Major Gcjreral Hikmai al-Chehabi, 
the Syrian chief of stalT. announced: "We 
will answer this crime by teaching those 
who committed it a lesson they will not 
forget. We win choose the m^o<l the 
time and piaceL" The die was thus cast 
for those in Syria's four main iitielligence 
services to decide the mefood. the time 
and the place. 

But in any analysis of Syria's intelli- 
gence stTuaure, care must be taken to 
draw a distinction between the govem- 
ment apparatus the officials actually 

6 From this day 014 we wjQOi 
not respect any av iliaiMs who 
nse planes 9 

controlling the network of secret police 
forces and the indi vidua! denizens of 
these vast and ruthless bureaucracies 
who are engaged in their own arguments 
and feuds. 

In other words, it is not sufficient to 
deride Prcsideirt Assad's disclaimers of 
Syrian involvement in hijaddngs or 
bombings. Mr Farouk al-Sharaa, the 
Syrian Foreign Minister, probably meant 
exactly what be said when he defined 
"terrorism" as "any act of violence 
directed against civilians, innocent peo- 
ple. against air navigation such as 
hijacking aircraft or ships, bombing 
airports or cities ..." Syria is against 
such acts. President Assad says. 

But inside the brutal organizations 
designed to protect the state ^ and its 
leaders — there are those who do not 
dwell on such definitions, who have so 
long inhabited the dark world of 
repression that supports every police 
state that means and ends become 


conftised. A mere glance at the apparatus 
of the Syrian Muhabarrat (im^UiSCQce) 
service proves this to be true. 

On the outskirts of Damascus, for 
example, on the road to the international 
airport not 200 yards from the railway 
line to Der^ there stands a gaunt black- 
painted building guard^ by iron gates 
and four young gunmen in jeans. Few 
visitors to Damascus are not struck by its 
appearance, for each floor is wider and 
longer than the one beneath, creating a 
curious inverted-pyramid effect, and the 
fiat roof sprouts with radio aerials. 

Diplomats say that this headquarters 
of S^a’s secret police, built by the East 
Germans, has even more floors beneath 
ground level than above. It is in thcM 
basements, according to former pris- 
oners. that the Syrian Muhabairat 
practises torture on the supposed ene- 
mies of the Slate. 

In one room, for irutance^ there is 
reported to be a machine that fmees a 
metal spike into a prisoner’s anus; in 
another, a set of freezing showers in 
which victims are forced to stand for 
hours before enduring fieroe beatings. 

Amnesty International reported only 
last month that a Syrian Grom Hama 
named Mr SuUeman Mustafo Ghaibur 
appeared to hav&heen tortured to dath 
•by the security authorities in ApiiL his 
'broken body bong returned to his foinily 
with a death certificate saying he had 
committed suicide. Mr Ghaibur was 
apparently an inmate of that suange 
black building on the Damascus airport 
road. 

But this is only the headquarters of the 
civilian security police, an establishment 
run with an iron hand by Brigadier 
General Alt Haidar, an Alawite who is 
reg^ed as one of the pillars of the Assad 
r^me and who is deeply resentful of the 
ri^ secret service of the Syrian "special 
forces" headed by Colonel Rifoat EI- 
Assad, the president's brother. 


When the president suffered his bean 
attack in 19^, General Haidar was in 
oDnstant conflict with Rifaaz, who was 
eventually sent into virtual exUe in 
Switzeriand. Today. Colonel Ri^t is in 
foreign seclusion again, commud^ be- 
tween Geneva and Paris, editmg a 
ma^’ne called .4/ Tala'a. 

His security men have been down- 
graded, in some cases sent out of 
Damascus. The only ghost of their old 
power remains in northern Lebanon, 
where local pro-Syrian groups are still 
loyal to RifoaL 

Infinitely more powerful is the 
president’s own intelligence service run 
by Major General Mohamed Et-Kboury. 
a^ 52. a Sunni who is perhaps 
P^dept Assad's most important ad- 
viser. His headquarters is in the 
presidential palace in Damascus, with 
his office adjacent to Presideni Assad's. 
He is already in charge of security al the 
new presidential residences above 
Damascus and Inlaldda. All along. 
General El-Khoury has remained loyal 
to the president, who has in return k^t 
him out of the power struggles the 
other intelligence services. 

It is General Et-Khoury who has been 
the architect of Syria's policy in Lebanon 
sinoe 1976 and it is he who is credited 
with smashiz^ the power of the Muslim 
Brotherhood ftindamentalists in Syria in 
1982, an act that gaiiied him instant 
promotion. Using Colonel Rifaat's gun- 
m^ El-Khou^ effectively wiped out 
rcsisianoeL Residents of Hama who talk 
secretively of the mass executions in the 
last stages of the uprising there were 
witnesses to General B-Khouiy's 
ruthlessness. 

General EI-Kbo^ is an air force 
officer — his operation is officially an air 
force intelligrace network —and his 
relationship whh President Assad is all 
the closer because the president was 
himself a inloL In Lebanon, General El- 


Kboury's powct is exercised by Brigadier 
General Ghazi Kenaan, a slim, highly 
iritelligent man whose military power is 
circumscribed by the ^ that he is not 
permitted to make political decisions. 

Nevenheless, General Kenaan's pos- 
ition demonstrates the contradictions 
within the Syrian security authorities. 
While Syria's enemies in Lebanon nKard 
General Kenaan with fear, many th^ 
sands of Lebanese rely on his presence 
for some form of order in west ^niL 
Foreignera who might n^rd (^eral El- 
Khoury's intelligence force with distaste 

find themselves relying upon Kenaan's 
efficient Muhabarrat gunmen to keep the 
streets of west Beirut clear ofkidnappers. 

The Israelis have indicated that they 
bold General El-Khouiy's department 
responsible for the bomb that was to be 
put aboard the El Al aircraft. But in 
Beinit the word is that they are wrong: 
that the likely culimts lie somewhere 
within the military intelligence service, 
run by Ali Douba. 

6 The problem whh 
intelligence services is that 
they become law onto 
themselves 9 


His own secret network has been 
responsible for producing foig^ pass- 
ports and it has immense authority since 
it op^ies ftom within the military 
establishmenL Donba's headquarters are 
in the Defence Ministry complex at one 
end of Kuwatly Street in the centre of 
Damascus. 

Ali Douba played a proroinenl role in 
excluding Ri^t El-Assad tom political 
power. His Alawite background protects 
him tom the attentions of Mohamed El- 
KJioury. It is with Douba's department 
that Uie more extome Palestinian 
groups, including Jibril's, are expected to 
di^ Douba's operatives often attend 


meetings of Arab radical organizations. 
Several of his men were present at the 
Tripoli meeting which Abdullah Ahmar 
attended in February and it was Douba's 
office that agr^ with the LilQ^ans last 
year to assist in creating forged docu- 
ments for ^nts operating in Lebanon 
and travelling to Eastern Europe for 
“Uarning". 

The problem about all intelligence 
services is that they become law$ unto 
themselves. The Syrian ones are no 

different tom others. The independent 
power acquired three of the four 
secreymlice oiganizaiions in Damascus 
hasefl^vely precluded outside controL 

Loyalty to President Assad is the 
quali^ by which they are judge^ 
President Assad, it is reliably said in 
Damascus, is kept in ignorance of the 
exact methods employ^ by Douba's 
men. 

Besides, the political arguments over 
Middle East violence are as fomilim’ to 
the Syrians as they are to other Middle 
East combatants. If assisting Jibril's 
guerrillas is an act of "international 
KTTorisra", the Syrians, so is 
America's _ assistance to the Contra 
guerrillas in Nicaragua. If it is proved 
that Syria is carrying weapons lo 
extremist ^ups, then what about the 
American aircafl carrying supplies to the 
Contras? If Syrian nands are detected 
behind the attempt on the El Al plane, 
what about France’s blame for the 
bombing of the Greenpeace ship? So it 
goes on. 

The a^menis, of cours^ avoid the 
reality oi Syrian power politics and of 
superpower anger. But the chances are 
that those who planned the El At 
bombing and who probably still work in 
a humdrum Damascus office off 
Kuwatly Street will get away with it. 
blamed by their own superiors more for 
the foilure of their plans than for their 
involvement in them. 




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Mid-East alert 
as diplomats 
fear reprisals 


British diplomats and Arab 
leaders throughout the Middle 
East were last night anticipat- 
ing a furious reaction tom 
Prudent .Assad of Syria to the 
break-off of relations between 
London and Damascus after 
the conviction of Nezar 
Hindawi. 

British embassies in Beirut. 
Damascus and Chiro were on 
the alert for reprisals after Sir 
Geoffrey Howe told the House 
of Commons that: there was 
“conclusive evidence" of Syr- 
ian involvement in :the at- 
tempted bombing of the E! Al 
airimer Iasi .April. 

President Assad has 
claimed that the Israeli intelli- 
gence sert'ice may have been 
behind a plot to implicate 
Syria in the attempted 
bombing. 

But by early yesterday eve- 
ning. neither 'Syrian sia'te ra- 
dio in Damakus nor the 
official Syrian Arab news 
agenev had made any com- 
ment' on Sir Geoffrey's 
statement. 

The main news item on 
Damascus Radio was a report 
of Syrian attempts to bring 
about a ceasefire between 
Palestinians and Lebanese 
Shia militiamen in the south- 
ern Lebanese city of Tyre. 

The first .Arab rBaciion 
came from Cairo where Mr 
Boutros Ghali. the ^piian 
Minister of Slate for Foreign 
.Affairs, said: "Egypt's position 
on internal ional terrorism is 
well-known and has not 
changed. Eg^pt condemns 
international terrorism and 
thinks it is necessary that 
international rules should be 
laid down to combat iu" 

Mr Ghali stopped short of 
making any specific comment 
about Syria's alleged complic- 
ity in the bomb ploL 

For several days. British 
diplomatic personnel have 
been warning British residents 
in Beirut that they should 
leave the Lebanese capital, the 
Muslim, western sector of 
which is under effective §yT- 
ian miliian coniroL if tbey 
ha\e no pressing reasons to 
sta\. 

The Foreign Office last 
uwk rcduoid the staff of the 
eirbas.sy in East Beirut to a 
ihrec-nian team. No British 
Embassy sialY have operated 
from their offices in west 
^irut for months. 

President Assad's version of 
the bomb plot was given 
during an interview in Damas- 


By Staff Reporters 

cus with TYme magazine ear- 
lier this month. He claimed 
then that Israel had plotted an 
attempted bombing of the 
plane in order to implicaie 
Syria. 

"Syria has no interest- 


blowing up an aeroplane does 
not cause the end of Israel", he 
said. "Does Syria feel proud 
before the world that it has 
downed a civilian Israeli 
p!ane?~.If Syria iiad had a 
band in it. the accused would 
not be feeing uial in a British 
court." 

The Syrian leader said that 
Hindawi had been granted a 
Syrian pas^n after the 
authorities in Amman had 
refused to renew bis Jordanian 
passport. 

This was "an ordinary mat- 
ter that happens often in Arab 
countries." 

Israel 

Mr Yehuda Avner. the Is- 
raeli Ambassador in London, 
said yesterday that the 
Hindawi trial provided pos- 
itive proof that the Syrian 
Government was involved in 
state-sponsored terrorism. 

Mr Avner, whose prede- 
cessor. Mr Shlomo Argov, was 
shot by terrorisis tom the 
.Abu Nidal organization in 



Hindawf 5 movenieiits across Enrope and the Middle East in pfsrsnit of state^wcked violence. 

Inter-continental travels of a working terrorist 


Nezar Hindawi traveOing in was in Cairo, then Amman and 
hb own name or tm a false after that Londoii. From thme 
Syrian government passport be moved to Italy before 
moved backwards ^ for- crossh^ the iron Cmtain to 
wards across Eorope and the appear in Poland, iriiere his 
Middle East He dahned some wife lived, then into Romania, 
trips were financed by jornnal- Later be was in Bavaria, 
bm, but they have been linked 

to a trail of terrorism (Stewart In Jnly be travelled secretly 

Tendler writes).^ to TripolL The trip b not 

At the beginnii^ of 1985 he induiMinlibpapersandona 


munberiff trips there are gaps 
in hb passport wbkh are' not 
explained. He often nsed east 
and West telin as staging 
points. 

His first doenmented 
connection wito $yife came in 
Jamiary thb year and a numth 
later he had stored hb Jor- 
danian passport in West Ber- 


lin Mifle he assim^ the 
dbuise of a Syrian civO ser- 
vant traveOing tm official 
bflshiess. 

BQs tnivds oonaected bin 
with bb brother Ifvmg in West 
Bttiin and hb oonsin in 
Gmoa, Italy, both of whom are 
now fink^ by police to 
teiTOrbin. 


against interuationl state 
terrorism." 

A government statement on 
the case is not expected until 
after tomorrow's Cabinet 
meeting. News of the vondict 
came as most ministers were 
honouring the start ofSzmhal 
Tora. a holiday which marks 
the Stan of the annual cycle of 
reading from the Bible. There 
was no official comment 


West Berlin 


Like dt^ens of other Shin 

Bet agents operating in air- 

London four ye^ ago, issu^ ports round the worid, Mr A 
a strong statement aftCT the specially trained to cross- 
conviction of Hindawi. examine and se^ sdl pas- 

He said: "British justice has senge« inegulanties 

again manifested itself in the which might rev^ a potential 
Ilia] of Nezar HindawL Ev- nuacker or bomlw- 
idence revealed in court dem- H was anoti^ EI Al seewty 
onsiiated irrefutably the direct man at Madnd airp^ in June 
complicity of the Syrian state who manag^ to douse xbc 
in the perpenration of the suit^^ with a fire exun- 

horrendous and premeditated gursher ^ n was about lo 

be ioad^ aboard a Tel Aviv 

“We have long warned of flight whh a bomlx He was 
Syria's active involvement in seriously mjured when it oc- Justice authorities in West 
international terrorism." ploded but the aircraft and its Berlin, where Hindawi's 
in Jerusalem last ni^i, passengers were saved. brother, Ahmed Hasi, aged 35, 

there was considerable pride it was Q ATs security men also feces tria! on a bomb 
orer the faa that it was during at Vienna and Rome aiipons diaige. yesterday defined to 
the special check in at El Al's last Decembw who fired at the comment on Hindawi's 
isolated Gate 23 at Heathrow terrorists who were machine 
that the bomb was discovered, gunning passengers and suc^ 
after it had been cleared by the ceeded in killing them or 
airport's usual security scr- driving them off. 
vices, using X-rey scanners. -pljp special security checks 
“Mr A .asihesOTatyman „„ gj ^1 mean that 
who found ihe opjjjb was passengers on ihe aiiiine's 
known at ineCentim Criminal Qjgjns have to arrive at the 
Court was a member of Snin aimon 31 least two hours 
Bet. the secret countcr-inielli- before take-off. 
gence service. 


sentence. 

Thai b a matter for British 
justice,' a spokesman said. 
"The outcome of the Hindawi 
trial vriJl also have no bearir^ 
whatsoever on our trial of fus 
broiher." 

Government circles in 
Bonn were also not prepared 
to cororoeot on the Hindawi 



The judge 


Sir WUliani Mars^ones, 
the judge who yesrerday 
hand^ down Britain's biggest 
sentence when he jailed Nezar 
Hindawi for 45 years, believes 
that trial by joiy is the "last 
bastion of fre^om". 

Sir WilGam. who b 71 and 
has been a Court judge 
since 19W, was educated art 
D^bifth Count}' School Sf 
John's CoU«}ge at Camb'idge. 
and the University College of 
Wales, where he was Presi- 
dent iff the Central Sti^ento* 
Representative Council in 
1936 and 1937. ^ 

He sen-ed as a member of 
the Royal Naval Volimtew yif 


President Chaim 
revealed this in July 

praised the anonymous heroes the verdict "The British de- week by Mr Faruk al-shaia, 
of the service who, he said, ciston is a giant step in the the Syrian Foreign Minister, 
risked ifaeir life ev'cry day for right direction by Western would not take place, 
the safety of the state. democracies in tiie fight gy^a jajj Monday let it be 

known through tuplo malic 
circles m Damascus that the 
minister would make an of- 
ficial visit to boon on October 
29. 

The West German Fbicipi 
After lus report was pub- Ministzy reacted with initial 
Ibbed. the Conmussioner of surprise, but then said there 
Police issued "explicit" was an inviiation and talks 
iustractioiis that the invest^ about a visit were in progress, 
don of compbiots of serious .A Foreign Minbny spolres- 
erhae should be earned out by man said yesietday that efforts 
ofliceis who are not in the to find a suhabie time for a 
direct chain of command over visit by Mr al-shara thb 


A musician dedicated to freedom 



the officer agunst whom tbe 
compl^t b being made. 

Sir W'iUbin was also a 
member of the Home 
Secretary's Mvbcny Comidl 
On the Penal System tom 
1966 to 1968. 

.A fether of tbree sons and a 


had 


been 


autumn 
unsuocessfiiL 

But Bonn and Damascus 
had agreed that the visit 
should take place after the 
West German federal riection 
on January 25. he added. 
Syria's short notice of its 


Justice Mars-Jwies. 


Reserve tom 1939 to 1945, v^iose report chai^^ed police 
after which be was made an complaints procedure. 
MBE- 

Itt 1964. be conducted the aflegatioiis^'iisf .Metopoli- 
Home Offke inquiry into tan police ofricers. 


member of the Garrick ClDb. own invitation is seen in Bonn 
the judge fists hb hobbies as as a "trial balloon" in an 
acting and guitar", attempt to up arran^e- 
He contributed to Atkins' ments for a visit by its Foreign 
Encydopedn (ff Court Forms Minister which the West Ger- 


and Precedrats; and has been 
president of the North Wales 
.Arts .Association since 1976. 


have been debyii^ 
Recent evidence of Syrian 
mvotveroeni in inieniational 


terrorism, including the 
Hindawi case, has nutde West 
German Government circles 
view an early visit as 
unfevourable. 

Washington 

The United States, long 
fhistrated by the bek of 
condurive proof that Syria b 
en^ged in acts of inter- 
national terrorbm. b deeply 
satisfied by tbe tough, smn 
diplomatic reprisals taken by 
tbe British Government. 

Hopes the action will 
encourage other allies to take a 
more assertive position 
against Syria and other coun- 
tries on Its list of "terrorist 
nations", particularly Iran and 

Immediate US diplomatic 
policy towards Syria not 
be affected rince Britain's 
action b regarded as a strictly 
bilateral matter. 

But the break in diplomatic 
relations by sudi a ally b 
an important boost to 
America's resolve to take its 
own decisive steps^ against 
Damascus, including tbe 
possibility of severing of dip- 
lomatic relations, if it could 
find conclusive proof of Syr- 
ian involvement in terrorist 
acts against American tarots. 

But the US does not have 
the same options for military 
action agaiast Syria ash bad 
against Libya, which it 
bombed in April. 

FiisL Colonel Gadafiffs le- 
gjme b widely disliked in the 
Middle East and Libya bnot a 
central player in ine Middle 
East peace efforts. And it b 
milit^y weak, unlike Syria. 

Additionally. Li^ b geo- 
graphically and politically iso- 
late unhke Syria. 

Moscow 

The offidal Soviet news 
agency Tass said last night 
Britain had invented allegar 
lions about Syrian involve- 
ment in tbe attempted bomb 
attack 

Tass reported that London 
had broken relations with 
Damascus, but did not men- 
tion the conviction of a Jor- 
danian who testified that he 
took reluw at tiic Syrian 
Embassy after felling to Mow 
up an B Ai Boeing 747 on 
April 17. 

X 


"Tbe obviously inveiiied 
allegations about Syria’s 
involvement in an anempt to 
blow up an Israeli aiifino’ at 
the London airport b beix% 
used as a pretext for thb 
UDftiendly and provocative 
act." Tass said. 

France 

There was no immediate 
French Government reaction 
to the news that Britain has 
broken off diplomatic rela- 
tions with Syria, although the 
Minister of Forrign Affairs, M 
Jean-Beniard Raimond, said 
that this decision would lead 
lo an exchange of views by 
European Community 
members. 

The Government still main- 
tains that as yet it has no dear 
proof of any Syrian Govern- 
ment involvement in the re- 
cent Paris bombings attadcs, 
responsibility for which 
been claimed by Arab terrorist 
groups. 


Diplomats 
warn of 
backlasl 
by Assad 

By Nkht^ Beeston 
Arab diplomats in London 
said yesterday that Syria's 
rivals would welcome tbe 
break of di^omatic relations 
bdween London and Damas- 
cus, but said pro-Syrian 
groups might avenge the 
dedsion. 

Particubfiy at risk, they say, 
are the handnil of Britons stfil 
living in the Muslim sector of 
^irut, where a number of 
Syrian-backed militias oper- 
ate. 

Earlier thb week two British 
diplomats and three. . dip- 
lomatic wives were withdrawn 
tom the Beirut embassy, 
wfeich was seen as a move by 
the Foreign Office to.pr^lA 
the Uiai ukuIl 
T think there will be a 
backlash", one Arab diploniat 
said. "Syibn President Hafez 
Assad trill become tougher 
and blame the and the 
medb for launching a cam- 
paign against him.” 

But he dismiss^ the 
possibility that ftitain could 
fecea terroibx campaign rimi- 
lar to the strii^ of bomlnng 
attacks in Paris last month, 
after the arrest by French 
authorities of the leader of a 
Lebanese terrorist group, 
Georges Ibrahim Abdullah. 

Another source emphasized 
that the trial evidence Jell 
"many questions unansrrer- 
ed" and that Hindawi was a 
"pawn in a bigger game", 
rather than a committra pro- 
fessional terrorisL 

In spile of evidence chim- 
ing that he was backed 1^ 
senior Syrian intdligence offi- 
cers and diplomats, source 
argued that Hindawi was not 
closely affiliated to any one 
terrorist organization and did 
not have powerful connect- 
ions. 

Althou^ Arab countries 
are not expected to react 
publicly to the outcome of tbe 
trial and its embarrasraag 
effea on Damascus, dip- 
lomats agreed that boto Iraq 
and the Palestinians loyal to 
Mr Yassir Aia&t, the chair- 
man of the Palestine libera- 
tion Organization, would 
welcome the adverse publicity 
focused on Syria. 


Declining trade links 
in a small market 

By Teresa Poole, Business CorrespoDdeiit 

Syria's shortage of foreign weQ down on 1983. Britain's 
exchange and the country's most important sales to S3^ria 
state-controlled economy has are of industrial machinery 
made it a maiket of limited and transport equipment, 
attraction for British oompa- including power generating 
uies, equipment and road vehicles. 

The high level of military but there is also trade in textile 
and defence Spending, particu- yam febrics, iron and sted, 
laily at a time of '^ing oil and chemicab and phanna- 
expon revenues, has ineviiab- ceiiticals. 
iy had an adverse effect on Imports fiom Syria, ntainly 
economic deveiopmenL De- oil and petroleum products. 
Jays of more than a year are fell by about 80 per cent in the 
common when obtaining let- same period, to £15.2 mtUioiL 
ters of credit for trade deab Britain buys some textile fi- 
and companies have faced bres and telecommunications 
considerable^ting periods goods tom Syria, but these 
for paymenL are of iilife significanoe com- 

Syria, with a population of pared with the effect of the 
about iO.6 million, is not an lower oil price, 
important market for Britain. Imports of certain goods are 

In 1985 Britain had a small prohibited, particularly items 
positive bsdanoe of trade with that are produced domes- 
Syiia - British exports tically. Op^rtunities for di- 
reached £81 million and im- reci fore%n investment are 


ports were £79 million. 

This year, even without 
diplomatic ructions, the level 
of activity has feUen sharply. 


limited but a number of 
British companies maintain a 
base in Damascus. These in- 
clude Imperial Chemical In- 



A'.. 


Exports Tor the first eight dustries, Beeci^ Plessey, 
mon^ nracbed only £43 mfl- RacaL WS Atkins and How- 
lion and are expected to be ard Humphreys. 




■^rr 


Damascus 
and the 
European 
bombings 

By Steuvit-Tendler 
Crime Reptotor 

Four times since the violent 
politics of the Middle East 
erupted on European streets 
tile Syrians have been linked 
to terrorism in Britaiiu 
Syria has been identified by 
Western intelligenoe officios 
as one of a group of countries 
practising "state terrorism", 
and ^ Hindawi trial has of- 
fered the firmest evidence to 
indict them. 

In 1978 two Syrians were 
lolled when a bomb destroyed 
tbdr car on New Year's Eve as 
they parked in London's West 
End Detectives believe the 
men died as they connected a 
bomb intended for the offices 
of Egypt's national airline. 

In 1982 Mr Shlomo Aigov. 
the Israeli ambassador in 
London, was shot in the bead 
in Park Lane. Three men, two 
Jordanians and an Iraqi, who 
wens linked to tbe Aba Nkfal 
oiganzation, then based in 
D^ascus, were gjven long 
prison sentences. 

After the hearing, the Nidal 
organization spoke to The 
Times tom the Syrian capital 
and admitted the shootmg,' 
whidi launched Israel on its 
invasion of southern 
Lebanon. 

Last year four Sj^ians were 
exp^ed tom Britain after de- 
tectives thwarted what is 
thought to have been a plan lo 
attack two leading PLO fig- 
ures. Last weekend two men. 
holding Iraqi passports were 
depoitM to Syria after being 
iniereepied by police at tire 
start of what was though to be 
another Abu Nidal attack. 

In an interview last week in 
Time magazuie. President As- 
sad of Syria said: ‘^e cfaal- 
len^ (western) intelfigence 
services to prove that Sym 
was behind a single terrorist 
opCTlion anywhere. No ter- 
rorist acts are carried out tom 
Syria by Syrians or 
other5."He said tbe attempted 
El Al bombing was the work of 
the Israelis. 

"If we were convinced that 
terrorist acts could serve our 
cause we could carry them 
out Bui terrorism serves Is- 
laePs interests — not ours." 

During the case statements 
by Hindawi to the police were 
ouL He said he went to 
toe embassy after the discov- 
ery of the bomb at Heatiuow 
with an envelope to give to the 
ambassador and met a toplo- 
mat, identified later as Mr Za- 
ki Olid. 

When he met the ambassa- 
dor Hindawi said: "He came 
to me and shook hands. It was 
a very warm peeling." 

Before reading toe message 
in the envelope the ambas- 
sador rang Darnascus. Accord- 
ing to Hindawi toe ambassa- 
dor told someone on the otoer 
end of the line that he had got 
hismessa^ 

Hindawi said tbe ambassa- 
dor told him to change his 
clothes and arranged for a car 
10 take Hindawi to a bouse. 

Hindawi was taken tom the 
embassy in a car driven by Mr 
Oud and another diploniat, :: 
Mr Mounir Mouna. described 
by Hindawi as a security 
offid^ to a house in West 
Kensington. 

During bis overnight stay 
there Mr Mouna tried to alter 
bis appe^nce by cutting and 
dyeing his hair. In the mom- 
ing hre Mouna and an attache 
called Mr Ahmed .Abdul Latif 
came to take him away. 

The three were identified by 
Hindawi tom a photograph 
found in the house. 


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WORLD SUMMARY 


French deny part 
in Bokassa return 

Flaiis — Hie Fiepcb Mipi$ter for CiMiperatk^ M 
.. Midiel Ap Tfllai* haee sjijd Ifaat GovcnuDCst did not 
paitidpftte in any opoxtw to said the former empanr, 
Mr Jean-Be^ wkassa, back to the Caitnd African 
RepobUc ^Bsan MacDoinld writes)u 
^ statement came after <me hfr Bdkassa's ddest 
. son, Geor^ Bokassa, irim said here tbat lib fidher^ 
‘ renoB to the Gential African Republic, vrhere he fiii^ the 
dndi sentoce for crimes committed dnraig hb time m 
power, iras an opecatioo monnted by persons nnkiiomi and 
that he had advbed hb fidto asa^ goim hade. 

llie ex-empaor remains in pibon in the Central Afikan 
Repnb^ capi^ BaaqgnL Hb wife and five ofhb diildieB 
are no wtod E in France hariiQ ben reftsed atiy in 
uwD cumitry- 

They were met on axTivil yesterday by the F^cndi polioe, 
and it b nndostood that tii^ are bring questioned <» how 
thq^ Bttnaged to teave the cMmliy midetEclEd. 


£1.7m gold for 
pilot defector 


Tflipffi (A ^ A TftiwftD 
said yesterday tiiat a Chinese idiot who landed hb MX! 19 
fighter in Som Korea would be wricome in Taiwan, and 
could receive grid worth £1.7 mBlkm. 

If the ComiiMnist Chinese military pilot biOTved to be a 
defector seeking fineedmn, the Government of the Republic 
of China welcomed 1dm shicerdy, the military spokraman 
sai^ 

Taiwan oflers varyi^ amounts of gold for different types 
ot mifitary aircraft rbat Odnese idiots tnm over when 
defectii^ The pilri; identified by tej^Je sources in Seoul 
as Zheng Tabhe, aged 2fr, lan^ hb Chinese Air Force 
MiG at an uifirid souto of the Sootii Korean capitaL 


Mine kills 13 die in 
producer air crash 


Mr Afam Stewart, aged 
35, a producer worichig for 
the Thames Television enr- 


Peshawar (Renter) — 
Forty-one people esrap^ 
irtien a disintegrati^ aii> 


rent aSurs programme 
7hb has been killed 
by a landmine wh& OB an 
assignment in Sudan. 

He was covering a stmy 
on the bmine and civfl war 
in Southern Sudan when 
one of the crew vehides 
was destroyed I 7 the 
landmiDe. A camreaman, 
Mr Ian Kmiaa, was taken 
to hospita] in Nairobi badly 
bruised and riialcea. 


&ld and boded on fts 
ba^ 

Thirteen Pakistanis, in- 
dodiim three small chi^ 
ren, dkd when tiie Palds- 
tan International Airlines 
Fokker Friendship plane 
crash-landed. 

Airiine ofiBdab said 28 
people were taken to hos- 
pital and a further 13 were 
almost unscathed. 


Ershad reappoints 
his old Cabinet 

Dhaka— President Ershad of Bangtodesh has awpomted 


a 

the old Cabinet to fceqi cou n ti n uit y in govenunent beftm 
4^ years of mar^ 1 ^ ends eariy next month, rijiriau 
^ said (Ahmed Fad writes). 

Gaeral Ershad, elecM dvflian president eariier thb 
month, administmed tiie oatii of oflto at toe PresideBt's 
' haase to die Prime Minister, Mr I^Ganur Kahma» 
Chondhury, tiiree dqmty prime mimst^ 18 ndidsteis, six 
nunisters of state and toiw deputy ministecs. 

; Guerrillas free two 


Algiers (AF^ — Polbario guerrillas fighting against 
Moroocancontrolof toe Western Sahara have tmnea over 
to French consular anthmitiro here two Frendimen whose 
light ptone was shot down a wedi ago in the disputed 
tefritory. 

The Frendunen said torir Cessna airenft had been hit 
twice by madune-gun fire iriiOe flying over the Western 
Sahara after partkipaling in a Pat^Dakar air race. 

Five held Syrians 
in Chile j^ed 


Jernsalem —Three Syri- 
captured in Smith 
Lebanoo in Mardi have 


miUtary court in Lod, riler 

admitting |0 infil- 

tiate Israel to take hos- 
tages (bn Murray writes). 

The three men were 
caughtwiiciiotoeismtoeB- 
gronp were IdOed after the 
electronic fence round 
Israri^s northern bonier 


Sandro — The Chilean 
Government bus an- 
nonnoed die ctotnre of five 
men it says were part of a 
25-fitrong comuiaiido unit 
whidi att^ted President 
Knochet's car last month, 

Idlling five of hb body- 
geards (A Conespimdent 
writes). 

They were all sud to be 
members of toe Manuel 
Rodrignez Patriotic Fkoot 
gaerrilb of ganfa a ti oH. 

Duke at controls 

T Tftiigyniig (Rgiitef)— The Duke of Edinbui ah left Hong 
K ff n g for CantoD yesterday at the oontrob of an pas- 
senger jet to visit a panda reserve in the western Chinese 
Drovince d Sichnan and an elephant park in Ynnan 
Evince as piesidmit of toe World WOdlife Fu^ 

Rebels closing in on 
Suriname capital 

Friim Christopher Thomas, Washington 


Suriname's shaky militaiy 
Government is under growing 
riege ftom niial'based rebels, 
■who are vraging a devastat- 
ii^y effe^ve bombing cam- 
paign against important econ- 
omic targ^ 

According to reports reach- 
ing State Department 
sourceshere. rebels supported 
by Surinamese exiles in Hol- 
land have over the past three 
months moved beyond their 
stronghold in the country's 
eastern region, and last week 
ambu^ed an Army patrol 
only 30 miles south of Para- 
maribo, the capital 

A week eariier, guerrillas 
raided a state-run palm oil 
plantation, causing heavy 
dama^ 

Several weeks ago, iriieb set 
fire to a border town they had 
for 24 hours, trap- 
ping up to 500 government 
solmers garrisons! there, 
Bocordii^ to guerrilla lead^ 
quoted in Dutch newspapers 
at the time. The attack ^ve 
rise to renewed ratnouis of the 
possible collapx of the six- 
year-old left-wing regime of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Deysi 
Bouterse. 

Suriname, ^ven to the 
Dutch by Britain in 1667 in 
exchange for Manhattan Is* 
land, gained independence in 
1975. 

Sergeant-Major Edward 
Demees. director of the state- 
run Suriname News A^ncy, 
in 9 iHpnhnne interview 


thb week; Things have been 
quiet here for the past few 
^ys but T cant tell you what 
mi^l happen in five min- 
Ut€S-'’ 

The rebels ^ led by Mr 
Ronny Brunswijlc, aged an 
Army deserter who was ColO' 
nel wuterse's bodyguard for 
about a year. 

Government troops are on 
constant alert because of a 
series of raids on milita^ 
outoosts. Because the guerril- 
las nave b^un hijacking small 
aim^ the Government has 
banned all flights to the 
country's interior. 

The Government says 
seven solders have been 
killed so ^ in the clashes, but 
the Dutd) press puts the losses 
much higher. 

Officials acknowledge that 
Mr Bnmswijk has some de- 
gree of support among the 
ethnic mup known as the 
‘‘Bush Negroes," descendants 
of runaway slaves who settled 
in Suriname's interior and still 
maintain a lif(^Ie dose to 
that of tbdr African ancestors. 

Government offtdals de- 
scribe Mr Brunswfjk as a pawn 
of the exile movement in 
Holland. 

He has demonstrated a 
deadly effidency as a guerrilla 
fighter, inflicting grave dam- 
age on an economy already 
devastated by falling demand 
for bauxite, the country's prin- 
doal exDon. 


Russians begin crasn mvesngauuu 


XT .a. 


From ^^Cebaei Honisby 
Johanaesbiiig 

A large team of Soviet and 
Mozambican officials came to 
South Africa :)«sientoy to 
bean a Joint investif^tion 
with the &uth Africans into 
the causes of the air crash in 
which President Samora 
M^el was killed on Sunday. 

In the Mozambican capit^ 
Maputo, Nolicias, the semi- 
'offidal daily paper, for the 
first time put on public record 
suspicions that tbe ccuh, 
which occurred just inside 
South African territory, mi^l 
not have been an accidenL It 
su^ested that the pl aners 
route could have been altered 
by *‘iedinica] interference”. 

, In Gsfoorone; the Botswana 
Govemmeni, in its first of- 
ficial comment, tuged that 
“no stone_ should be left 
unturned in an effort to 
discover the real truth behind 
the plane’s crash within the 
border of South Africa." 

The statement, broadcast by 
Botswana radio, spoke of tbe 
“strange ooincidCToe" that 
President Macbel's p^e 
should have deviated into 
South African territory and 
that he should have met his 
death “in a county 
obviously did not wi^ him 
weir. 

The main riddle Triiich tbe 
investigators have to solve is 
why the Soviet-built plane, a 
Tupolev 134, which had 
pased over Zimbabwe and 
southern Mozambique on its 
way from Zambia, suddenly 
veered to the west as it was 
approaching Maputo airport, 
crossed into South Africa and 
strudr a hillside. 

The six-man Soviet delega- 
tion, led by Mr Ivan Dontsov, 
the head of the Soviet state 
committee for dvil aviation, 
was met at the South Afriran 
border town of i^matipoort 
about 40 miles north of the 
crash site, Iqr General Ixithar 
Neethling, bead of the South 
African ixilioe forensic unh. 

Mozambique's delation 
appeared to be led by Dr 
Fernando Vaz. tbe country's 
Deputy Minister of Health. 
Afw a fneliminary con- 
ference in a locd hotel tbe 
investigators split into two 
groups, some goi^ to the 
crash site to examine wredc- 
age, md othm visiting snrvi- 
voTS in hospital 

One of the key witnesses is 
Mr Vladimir Novoselov, a 
Soviet airman who, the South 
Africans say, was the pilot of 
the ill-foied plane, but is 
recorded as the fright-engineer 
in the ofiSdal Mozambique 
list of passengers and crew. 

• Sdiool ctashes: Sjambok- 


-- 

H d * 





pap» 

accuses 

lS'et(»rm 

Maputo (Reuter) - A mili- 
tary cortete took Pffiiidem 
Samora MacteTs body 10 lie 
in state at Mi^oto hall 
ycstcr^yt aod toe 

newspaper, rfeiiaos, 
said every Moatobicau tos> 
peered that South Afrito was 
to blame fir the plun crash in 
which 1» died. 

The widdy-tead dauy pa- 
per. which Kficrally.Teflecto 

government thinkli^jBked ia 

8 front-p^ editaiA *^0 
anyone siili have dot^ about 
who was rcsDi»»tol^ ft 



Mrs Graqi Machd beis^ comforted as she dh^ to tile coffin of her biisbaiid. President Samora Machd of Mozambiqiie, 

who died when his plane crashed in South Africa last Sunday. 


wielding bladr youths disr 
nipted matriculation exam- 
inations at several centres in 
Soweto, the black township 
outside Johannesbnig, yes- 
terday, tearing up exam papers 
and sending candidates and 
invigilators fledog. Several 
students were injoi^ 

At two examination centres 
in the Oriando West district of 
Soweto, youths, some armed 
with krtives, fought with stu- 
dents Girt pupils stumbled 
and fell as th^ were being 
whipped by their attackers 
On Thursday some 30 peo- 
ple set fire to the Thaba Jabola 
school in Soweto, one of the 
examination centres cauring 
“reasonable damage," accord- 
ing to the Government's Bn- 
rean for Information. In other 
townships the exams seem to 
have bem undisturbed. 

Yesterday was the first day 
of the matriculation examinar 
lions which continue until 
almost the end of next month. 
They determine pupils' final 
schooMeaving qu^fication 
and their chances of getting 
into a university. 


Lesotho project to go ahead 


From Midiad Honidiy 
Johannesburg 

Sootii Afimaaud tiie small 
fauMOodEed kii^dora of Leso- 
tho yesteniay s^ned a trea^ 


The Lesotho Hlghhuids Maloti Mountains, and pomp 
Water Prqiect, as the scheme part of the wata aortliwards 
is known, was described last throi^h 120 miles of tunueb 
month by Presideac P.W. into tbe Orange Free State and 
Botha as “the largest and most discharge them into the Vaal 
far-reaching enterprise" ever River system, donhfiiig its 


South Africa on Sohday night 
was not an acetdenu- - 
Oifacr AfriCM stPto hare 
accused Pretoria <^.|bspossi- 
bihty and N/virroratamene- 
ed- “Every MoxambKaji has 
the same suspicion.?' 

Mr Machel and me titan 
30 others died in titocasb u 
ihey were leiuriUng from a 
one-day trip to Zaro^, 
the Prradrat had to to y to 
three other African teadetii 
Pretoria has c fi«ms s cd .aMo- 
gations that it was fe^xmstUe 
and invited Mozantiiman and 
Soviet officials to join an in- 
vestigation of thc jonah . ^ 

TTie R o ss ian *btiDt- 
had a Soviet pdloL whs m 
among the lO survivors . 

Among monrnera who Vr 
rived yesterday was Mr Jntita 
Nyerere. the furaner 
zanian piesddent and tender of 
his country's ruli^ptoty, vfoo 
had been a fHend of 
Machel for room than 20 


LesotfaoTs “white gdU", its ah- ^ Lesotho wfll benefit by gfi- 

undaBt but under-exploited « ™ be*® Unv « linked hydro-clcctric 



water Rsonrees, for the benefit nwtiations between Sonth ^ 
of both comitries. Africa 

“When blood flows, people 
snfTcraiid die, bnt wba water 
fhiws;, we prodnoe, live and 
create hope,” Mr R. F. “POe” 

Botbt, die Sonth Afikaa For* 
e^ Mhuster, said at the s^n- 
va% cerom^ in Masen, Le- 
sotho^s ewibd. 

The member of Lesotho's 
ndiiK Mfliteiy ComKfl les- 

“We buh M * billion nud cntiU the 

price is too bm fto good ncSgln oonstniGtion of six dams, the 
bonriy relations, and that dia- last ofwhich will be finished in 

logne and n^ociatioo are . . 

f rfdomnn^traffibp 5 a- TM aim B tO dam the 

perioriT^a dS^reement headwatm ofthe Rh- 

and conflict.” er» which ■" 


Africa and Lesotho for toe and 

it will deriw snbA^ ««- 
ngattfl y bag bold y by ^ ^ roynllioo 

pota^boRiUr^ channl on water deibwed n 

Tbe treaty s^ned yesterday 
only Mnds toe two sides to the 
tost phase, due to be com- 
pleted in 1995 and costing 
about 1.4 billioa rand (£440 
mfflion). llie whole project 


hi Lesotho's 



Listing reasons ito i 
picion « South 
ias said: “About tow 
ago Mr Magnus Mmu the 
South African Defence Min- 
ister, made direct throais 
against Mr Machd." 

Mozambican officials tavt 
said on a number of QccasitoU 
they feared Mr Machel would 
be assassinated 

The editorial said mysteri- 
ous circumstances surrounded 
the crash. “It was viriUe on 
Quriadar. There was no break- 
^wn on board the aircraft. 
The Maputo runway lights 
.were switched on and toe ap- 
inopriaie instructions trans- 
mitted But toe plane did not 
land” 

“Shortly afterwards it crash- 
ed in South Afirwsmi territory. 
Hour was this poasibie? 
did toe phme stray so for from 
its route?" tt» paper asked 


Vatican appeals for extra cash 


Ftom Petn* Nkhols 
Rome 

The Vatican is dxiut to 
lairnrh a Campaign to tnate 
Roman Catholics throughout 
tbe world understand Rome's 
serious finandal difficulties. 

The group of cardinals ftom 
an parts of toe (jatholic world, 
who meet annually to advise 
on finandal mattera, under- 
lined “the urgent necessity for 
grea^ help" and proposed 
studies “at every levd of the 
Church" of means for bringing 


more money to Rome. 

The cardinals pointed out 
that local churches and re- 
gional episcopal conferences 
often had spec^ arrange- 
ments for financing and cam- 
paigns for gathering funds, as 
the Holy ^ had to depend 
economically largely on vol- 
unta^ oflerugs. 

Briefly put, the Papacy's 
financial situation as reveafed 
ty this meeting is that the 
expected budget defidt for 
1986 is calculated to be about 
$16 million (£11.5 million) 


more than last year. Peter's 
Pence, toe anni^ contribu- 
tion made by Catholics 
throughout toe world to toe 
Pc^ no longer covers the 
deficit and so capital resources 
have luKl to be dug into. 

What the caimnals will 
certainly have done well to 
consider is that the disap- 
pointing T^t fipm tbe Pe- 
er's Pence coflection is said by 
a number of bishops to be a 
result of toe 1982 scandal 
involving the Vatican's bank 
which cost them S250 million. 


Kohl seeks 
security 
for Europe 

From Mohan AR 
Washington 

Herr Helinat Kohl to* 
West German Chancellor, has 
warned that new strat^c 
systems and progress in tos- 
armament must not lead to 
less security, “but to more se- 
curity for us Europeans, too". 

Herr Kohl returned home 
yesterday after talks with Pre- 
sident Reagan in Washington 
on Tuesday and a major 
foreign pobey speech to the 
C^c^o Counefl on Foreign 
Relations on Thursday. 

He has made dear in his 
talks mto toe Reagan Admin- 
istration that US and Soviet 
imposals for ladicai reduc- 
tions in strategc nudear 
forces must take into account 
the superiority of Soviet con- 
ventional forces in Europe to 
avoid strains in Naio. 

Herr Kohl emphasized that 
toe defence of Europe is also 
toe defence of America and 
said toai d^ite the inten- 
sified debate in toe US, he did 
not exp^ American forces to 
be unilaterally withdrawn 
from Europe in tbe forseeable 
future. "It would send toe 
wrong signal to tbe other side 
at toe wrong time," be said. 

He also said arms control 
was not an end in itself, nor 
was it a panacea. 

Herr Kohl said President 
R^an agreed that more atten- 
tion would have to be given to 
the conventional forces issue, 
and that this would be particu- 
laily necessary if drastic 
relictions of toe nudear 
potential of either side were to 
come about 

He said toe vision of a non-: 
nuclear worid, as reflected in 
President Reagan's Suat^c 
ETefence Initiative and in toe 
proposal by Mr Mikhail 
Gorb^bqv, the Soviet leader, 
at Reykjavik, would fun- 
damentally dter toe existing 
alliance strategy to toe detri- 
ment of Europeans if toe 
conditions in toe field of 
conventional weapons re- 
main^ unchanged. 


Aquino’s deputy joins 
call for purge of left 


From Kdfh Daltum, Manila 


Vice-President Salvador 
Laurel yesterday joined toe 
Defence Minister, Mr Juan 
Ponce Emile, in calling for a 
Cabinet reshuffie, indicating, 
that be fevomed a purge of 
allied left-^wing mimsteis. 

In another show of disagree- 
ment with his Cabinet col- 
leagues, Mr Laurel also dec- 
lare that be and Preddent 
.Aquino should run in fresh 
elections if a new constitution 
is rejected in a plebiscite in 
January. 

Recalling his efibrts on 
Tuesday to help settle 
disagreements between toe 
President and Mr Enrile, Mr 
Laurel confirmed that toe 


Defence Minister had ui^ged 
Mrs Aquino to dismiss ei^t 
of her ministera because 
were “pulling in tbe direction 
of the left". 

Mr Enrfle's purge list in- 
cluded the ministers ofjustice, 
natural resources, labour, 
tourism and local govera- 
ment as well as Mrs Aquino's 
executive secretary, speech- 
writer and spokesman, mili- 
tary offidaissaid. 

• Pmge rei*cted: President 
Aquino said yesterday she 
would not bow to demands by 
her Defence Minister to dis- 
miss left-wing Cabinet mem- 
bers (Reuter reports). 


Parliament 

uproar in 
Canberra 

From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

A i»iliameotBry debate, 
combative even by the robust 
standards of Australian poli- 
tics, brought to a premature 
end the current C^berra ses- 
sion. An adjouniment was 
rolled yesterday under stand- 
ing orders zelating to “grave 
disorder." 

It was tbe fiist time in 13 
years that the order had been 
invtflced. and followed pro- 
longed uprov in which MPs 
exchanged insults and dro- 
wned one anotoers' attempts 
to speak. After the feilure of 
i^ieated attempts to restore 
Older. Mr Leo McLeay, the 
Deputy Speaker, adjourned 
the House of Re^esentatives 
for two weeks 

The furore started late on 
Thursday ni^t when a Gov- 
ernment Mr attempted to 
raise auctions of corruption 
involving the (^eensland 
Administration of Sir Job 
Bjelke-Petersen. 

With a (Queensland election 
only a week away and Sir Job's 
iron grip on the state appar- 
enily slipping, his National 
Party coUeag^ in Canberra 
were not keen to have these 
allegations aired. 


Budapest dissident 

bookseller ericted 

From Richard Bassett, Budapest 


The authorities here crack- 
ed down on dissident activity 
less than 24 hours afta* toe 
30to anniversary of the Hun- 
garian uprising by threatening 
to evict a publisher and seller 
of underground samizdat lit- 
erature from his flat 

Mr Gabor Demszky, who 
has run a samizdat bookshop 
from a flat at the top of a 
crumblmg 19th-century apan- 
ment block for the past year, 
was told yeste^y that if he 
and his wife did not leave toe 
building within IS days “phy- 
sical force" would be em^oy- 
ed to remove them. 

Mr Demszky, one of the 
brightest and most impressive 
of Hungary's imdlectuals, 
told The Times he believed 
the feet that he bad signed last 
weekend's joint East Euro- 
pean dissident document on 
toe Hungarian revolution was 
partly responsible for tbe 
threat of violence: 

The document, which unit- 
ed on paper for the first time 
leading dissidents from all 
Eastern European countries, 
has infuriated toe Hungarian 
authorities. 

Another disrident asso- 
dated with toe document, Mr 
Jeno was warned that 
toe autoorities could not 


“guarantee his personal safe- 
ty" if bis activities continued. 

It was not clear yesterday 
where Mr Demszky and his 
wife, who has mild tuterculo- 
sis. would go. 

The loss of toe bookshop is 
a blow for other Hungarian 
dissidents, and althougfr it will 
doubtless be re-opened by an- 
other dissident in toe near fot- 
ure, its temporary toss will 
seriously impede their activi- 
ties in toe short xenn. 

' In contrast to this intransi- 
gent stance, tbe authorities 
showed themsclvK to be re- 
markably flexible in their io- 
terpretaiion of Uk event dur- 
ing Thursday evening's tele- 
vision broad^x on toe Htui- 
garian uprising. 

Hungarians who fast fouj^ 
a^inst toe Russians durmg 
the uprising were interviewed 
for the first time since 19^ 
To toe surprise of many Hun- 
garians none said :anything 
critical about the revolution. 

While toe programme was 
being screened throughout Bo- 
(fepest scores of journalists 
listened to a number of di^ 
sidents reading poetry and 
writings about the 1956 
revolution in a remote villa in 
tbe suburbs of toe city.- 


California split over English as offidal lan guage 


From Michaei Binyon 
Los Angeles 

California, linguistic hot- 
house of toe Eo^b-speaking 
world, has taken to toe bar- 
ricades over the use of ^g- 
lish. In a test vote that hu 
enormous implications for all 
Amoica, toe state's 26 million 
inhabitants will decide in two 
weeks time whether to desigr 
naie Engltsh as California's 
“official language". 

The i^e has fiercely (fi- 
vided this polyglot communi- 
ty. Supporters of Proposition 
63. as toe measure on toe No- 
vember ballot is called, insist 
tbe move is needed to main- 
tain unity and cohesiveness in 
toe fece of huge numbers of 
non-English-speaking immig- 
rants, especi^ly from Latin 
America and toe Far East 

They say it would towairt 
moves Latin politicums to 
create islands of Spwish- 
spe^ng culture in California, 
which could become the nuc- 
leus of a disafTected separatist 
movemdit Quebec i$ toe 
often-cited example. 

Opponents of toe propo- 
sition say it is ascarcely veiled 
racist threat to. toe la^ 
Spanisb-speaking minority, 
and is a symbolic protest by 


Anglos against toe wave of un- 
migrants from the south that 
is transforming toe fece and 
sound of southern California. 

They fear the move coukl 
cut fu^ for bilingual educa- 
tion. could lend respectability 
to discrimination, and oim 
toe way to frivolous lawsuits, 
with enorls to eliminate such 
important multilingual ser- 
vices as court interpreters and 
emergency telephone sendees. 

Tbe issue is of national im- 
twnance as it brings into ques- 
tion America's “meltine pot" 

mmmmmms: 


based in Watoington, is cam- 
paigning for English as the of- 
ficial langu^ of the United 
Slates, and its advisory board 
includes such respected fig- 
ures as Alistair Cooke. 

Supporters of the prop^- 
tion chum they are only trying 
to prevent California becom- 

is- 




US MID-TERM 
ELECTIONS 

theory; the linguistic unity of 
the United States which has 
been the ftamework for 
assimilating millions of non- 
Endish speakers into toe 
mmnstream- 

It is also especially sensitive 
now that Uiqgal immigration 
has become a flood, and an 
anti-Spanish backlash is in- 
creasingly evident in other 

sputoera states, espedally Flo- . most Spanish-speakere'in Gtl- 
rida and Texas. A nanoaal jfornia, especially those fipm 
movement called US English, toe old ftunilies who settl^ 


tic and ethnic gbettoes. They 
say unless new immigrants are 
forced to learn En^sh they 
will never be able to move into 
toe mainstream of American 
society. 

Among toe most fervent 
and respect^ supporters is 
toe proposition's honorary 
chairman. Senator Sam Haya- 
kawa, aged 80, of Japanese 
descent, who in 1981 in- 
troduced a similar measure in 
the US Senate. (Siting the 
dangers and costs of bilingual- 
ism, he rove a warning to 
Latin rabble rousers, and 
claimed some Chicano ac- 
tivists want to establish a 
separate Spanish-speaking 
slate in the south-western US 
and northern Mexico. 

The measure has alienated 


here long before the English- 
speakers airived. In feet, they 
say, Spanish had an estab- 
lished right in California, as 
toe state's original 1849 cons- 
titution was written and print- 
ed in English and Spanish. An 
office of state translator was 
established then and lasted 
until 1897, and an 1876 law 
remained on the books until 
1933 callirtg for the printing of 
some legislation in Spanish. 

Opponents say no such “of- 
ficial language" law was ever 
promulgated in individual 
states' constitutions, even in 
the eariy vears when Dutch, 
German. Norwe^n, Polito 
and other languages were fer 
more widely spoken and used 
in churches, clubs and schools. 

Spanish is toe obvious tar- 
get of Proposition 63. Bui 
other minority groups feel 
threatened — the 


position to Turkish alteiapts 
to exterminate toe Armenian 
language. 

Opponents point to' studies 
glowing that 90 per wnt of 
first generation Mexica^m- 
ericans bom in theUSare pro 
ficient in En^ish,. and that 
the second generation mai- 
ority speak English only. 

But. despite opposition 
from most leadingCaliforaian 
politicians, inctudihg Gfov- 
cmorGeoige Deukmejian and 
his challenger. Mayor Toro 
Bradley of Los Angeles, polls 
show that 70 per cent ofTOtera 

Favour the move, with only 22 
percent against IL 

If it passes, the two immedi- 
ate largets would be bilittguat 
education andbilinguBl voting 
ballot sheets. Both, however. 
^ „ are to some extent niasdhted 
teans, .he Chin««, a«djm,teete^ ftdoil Iw. . 

Armenians. Vietnamese and The real efl^wpsychdog*- 
otoers from the 100 or so lin- assertion that CalUoiv 

guistic groups in C^ifomia. 9f toe Anglo-Saxcm 

^ ... culture. Many say toisifes- 

H *bc semial ill the kmg term to ore- 

I*"' American unity; raw 
^ in Cal^t^ia in toe last {iberalsseettedangv 

craiury and havc^ pigged to iriga momentum wl^cfa cron- 
fight anything similar; the tually turns away- aU neitrei^^ 
large Los .Angeles Armenian ers to the US^whO' 
community compares the pro- speak fluent 








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paper 



THE 


accuse 



TIMES 


Pret( 




)ria 


October 25 - 31, 1986 


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SATURDAY 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


m 

n Xanadu did Kubla Khan 


a stately 


pleasure 


dome decree 



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s 


53? >: 




HamiltoiHDftirympIe and LonisaSlack with pottery remains 


. . . to which, 700 years later, travelled 
two resourceful young Britons, courtesy of 
their innocence, their colleges and a scrutable 
Mongolian policeman who thoughtfully escorted 
them away from Xanadu by taking them straight to it 
AJan Franks unfolds the story of a remarkabJe journey, 
one decreed as much by Coleridge’s poem as by Marco Polo 




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j fter 8,000 miles, and 
^ three months on a 
X 1 supposedly impose 
sible journey 
through se^ed bor- 
ders and sconrhing deserts, 
two fresh-faced Cambridge 
undergraduates, strait from 
the pa^ of Evelyn Waugh, 
stood in the middle of a 
Mongoi/an plain with a storm 
raging about their ears and 
beheld the ruins of Xanadu, 
the palace that inspired one of 
the most famous poems in the 
English language — &muel 
Taylor Coleridge's Kubla 
Khan. 

They had no right to be 
here; this is one of China's 
forbidden regions. .As the 
lightning flashed overhead. 


illuminaliDg the broad, deso- 
late valley and the wredcage of 
the great Khan's once sump- 
tuous summer retreat, il^ 
found themselves standing 
where no l^ton is thought to 
have stood for more than 100 


years. 

It was the culmination of a 
most implausible mission, the 
aim of which was to foUow in 
the footsteps of Marco Polo, 
who 700 years travelled 
from Jeruralem with a phial of 
oil from the city's Holy Sep- 
ulchre. one of the most sacred 
relics of Christendom, to 
Kubla Khan's court at Shang- 
tu. 

For generations of anthol- 
ogy refers. Xanadu has been 
the mythical location of Kubla 


Khan's palace, conjured not 
from historical evidence so 
much as from the fevered, 
opium-fed ima^nadon of 
Coleridge Ove centuries later. 

But the place did indeed 
exi^ and still does — but only 
ju^ for, as the two students 
discovered from the local 
population, the ruins of Xan- 
adu (or Shaug-tu, to give it its 
local name) m^ soon be iaz^ 
when the plain on which it 
stands, 200 miles to the north 
of PeldDg, becomes a wheat- 
growing area. 

The two believe they may 
be the only English travellers 
to have set eyes on '^Xanadu" 
for more than a century — ever 
since $ W Bushell. physician 
to the British l^uon in 
Peking, recorded his si^iting 
in 1872. 

Whether their claim is cor- 
rect or not, the story of their 
journey — funded by - their 
colleges and costing only 
flOOO — represents a splenica 
piece of modern Briti^ 
eccentricity, with all manner 
of echoes: Freya Stark, Peter 
Fleming. Rob^ Byron, Sir 
Ranulph Twisleion- 
Wykeham-Fiennes, and so on. 


n:uinuiD is one of the rarest nmis m earth and 
one of the roost vahi^Ae. h is prodnoed in 
csfc^oor^ysmaDmianxidesaitdihetoialviinld j 


r he pedigrees o^e 
two students seem 
perfect for such a 
venture: he. William 
Hamilton-Dalrym- 
ple. a 21-yeBr-oId histo^ man 
in his thira year at Trinity, son 
of Sir Hew Hamilton-Dalrym- 
ple. tenth baronet, and plainly 
either brilliant, or bonkers, or 
both; she, l^uisa Slack, a 20- 
i year-old En^sh student from 
j Qare. an impeccaUe English 
; rose, daughter of the former 
headmaster of Bedales. 

On the face of it, 
Daliymple's desire to repeat 
Marco ^lo's journey w» 
somewhat greater than his 
wish to emulate the man. 
**Marto Polo is the 
overrated human being in 
western history." he thinks. 
“His account of the journey is 

stunning in its boredom." 
^nadu represented the fi- 
challenge in an undertak- 
ing that was. to all intents and 
purposes, dafr. and one in 
which they risked arrest or 
deportation at almost eveiy 
stage, particularly during thw 
two-week traverse of In^ 
After 1 1-weeks, during which 
they had to dress up as loc^ 
— he in a Mao jacket, she with 
a veil in order to be allowed 
on the Chinese buses — the 
revisionist Polos reached ihe 
inner Mongolian town of 
Duolon. 

“We decided to set off on 


e3a:^ODa]ly smau mianniKS ana UK loui ' 
oiopm h onn* annmd SO tonnes aanaali^ 
compared with about l,2(MtDnncstfgoId. 


irial Uii 


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Aludi of the {daiinum produced is 
usLd m a rofullyptmingraoge^^ 
itfdinukigj'applicatioiisand a _ 
yigntfigani prcfortioii is made into 
jtmllcTy. CoiiKqucmly the meiai is 
rdways in demand, li is also a readily 
ti^rablccoinffiodity. ^ 

Now J<dinson Maiibey platinum 11 
bars are ax'^jaUe to the pmaie W 
imvstiv. or awrse, like any Mbcr 1 
im'csiiTH.-nt. the v-alue of J 

pkHinumcunlallasweBas n 

rise, particulurlv in theshon icrm. V 

But the price in smiling has ^ 

nesrty qiiBilnipIcd during the 
post decade aodOfMf a sumlar 

^ •- .M •m. a - -** — nrai ~<4 








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inflatioattoii. V v 

Johnson .Manhcy pbimum bars are 

producttl in ritihi unto U tetro^. 
each cnc heini: individual])' numheied. 

You can iillw possession ofihe bars m the 
rK,Hi«liii.hcascVATmusthcdi35^. 

.Aliimilnvly. ihty can he held in sale wepii^ V 

at our vjwhs in Jcifsev orZutidi, in whidi case no * 

\AT ispm-aMct>n^^j\ulu^'ihi: gum nnff f to 

mnirdiase timm at any cioie. fuO inffMtiu^ 

Ji^mson .\latthc>' platinuin bars, and an a^ilication form, simply 
ftwiplrtc and sold the ooupm by Freepost. 


■ 


ICKNSCN MAITHEY 

Waiinum refiners for over 150 x-ears. 


«iii^ 


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.«»_ •»- 

iHia 


J*ltf3scsi!nJniefullinlivnuHwnonJohn!!on,Xl!Hilu!\ jJaiini^bats 


enlisted as interpreters. The 
police remamed adamant that 
Shamtu was a closed area 
until, just as Willie and Louisa 
were about to go, one of the 
mlicemen said that in return 
for the equivalent of about £ 1 8 
they could be escorted out of 
the area - by way of Shang-tu. 

It was an unlikely party in 
the jeep which set off os the 
last 1^ of the journey that 
morning; two Cambridge 
undergrads, two Mongolian 
schoolte^hets. and a pair of 
securi^ ofiiceiSL As they trav- 
dled, hills lopped ^ cairns 
appeared on the horizon. The 
old Mottgol appellation for 
Shang-tu had been Chao 
Naiman Sume Kfaoian (City 
of 108 Temples), and when 
one of the teachers wrote out 
that figure on a piece of paper 
and handed it to Dahymple. 
the travellers realized ih^ 
were on the threshold of their 
destination. 

"A colossal thunderstorm 
was raging, says Dalrymple. 
“We came down over a rmige 
of hills, and suddenly, to our 
left, there it was — this 
extraordinary site of ruins. 
There was this huge, long 
rampart. 20 feet high, stretch- 
ing out across the flat plain. 
And there was this incr^ible 
storm — driving rain, freezing 
cold. Yon could hardly have 
been further from the vision 
which Coleridge describes. 

“Polo wrote that there was 
an outer park of some 16 
square miles, but we could 
find no trace of it The wall 
that we saw must have 
covered about five square 
miles. What we found was an 


outer and an inner Cndosuie; 
the floor of which was covered 
with cedumn bases and old 
tilesL In the remains of ^e 
outer wall we found mote 
lenuiants of pottery. 

“The ramparts running the 
length of the plain were dou- 
ble; with a diuA in the middle; 
they were made out of rubble 
and mud, shaped steeply on 
the insid^ and vith a lower 
angle feeing out We could 
find absolutely no evidence of 
the marble which Marco I^lo 
claimed to have feund there." 


C learly thirty had 
altei^ considerably 
since Bushell's visi^ 
though there was 
one remarkable 
anefect ^11 left intact near the 
dais at the centre of the iimer 
enclosure — a three-foot-tall 
statue in flat reh'ef, ponrayiiig 
a figure holding a cup. “It was 
ptKk-raarked, evil narrow, 
with a pointed beard," 
Dalrymple says. “There 
seem^ noth^ remotely Chi- 
nese about it It was dark. 


bridge, which confirmed that 
in all probability they do date 
fronr the thirteenth century. 

Their mission complete, 
Willie and Lo uisa took their 
holy oil fipm the Holy 
ulchre in Jerusalem (the very 
same substance that Polo had 
transported to Kubla lUan. 
although the 20th century 
travellers theirs safe in a 
small plastic bottle that had 
ori^nally held oils from the 
Body Shop in Covent 
Garden), poured the contents 
on to the site where the Khan's 
throne had once stood and 
there, in the pelting rain, half- 
way, across the worid from 
Cambridge, recited in unison 
the poem that had been the 
cause of their odyssey: 


An hna^native vision of Xanadu, drawn by Gerald Metcalfe, 
and based on the poem by &miiel Taylor ColerM^ above 


SATURDAY 


Domingo’s 
recorded 
Otello 
a triumph 

Page 13 


broodi^ like a pagan Celtic 
imaae from a hiU fort in the 


image from a hill fort in the 
west of Ireland." 

During their 40 minutes at 
Sbang-tu th^ were kept under 
close surveillance by the pol- 
ice, and forbidden to toke 
photographs, but they none 
the less managed to smug^e 
out 15 fragments of tile and 
pottery, which they hid in 
their sleeping b^ for the 
journey home from ^king. 
The Times sought an expert 
opinion on the fragments' 
authenticity from the 
FilzwiJJiam Museum in Cam- 


In Xanadu did Kubla Khan 
A siatldy pleasure-dome 
decree: 

Where Alph, the sacred 
River, ran 

Through caverns measure- 
less to man 
Dawn to a sunless sea. 

So twice five miles of fertile 
ground 

With walls and towers 
were girdled round: 

Ana there were gardens 
bright with sinuous rills 
Where blossomed many 
an incense-bearing tree: 

And here uvere forests an- 
cient as the hills. 

Enfolding sunny spots of 


Arts Mary 

Briitee 

Chess 

Coaceris 

OiHSiNird 

Danoe 

Drink 

EstingOet 

Filiiis 

Galleries 

Gardeinic 


13 Oniaiid AbM 9 


13 Opera 

13 Radio 

14 Revieir 


Rock&JaB 14 


14 Sboppmg 
11 Trierisioii 


laaesCook II 


14 TniTd 


TV& Radio 14. 


TV’ ninx 


greenery. 


“They all thou^t we were 
mad," Louisa says. “Com- 
pletely and utterly off our 
heads. Maybe they were 
right" 


• X. 


■Mturkct 


" V: ■ -n' 

CYPRUS 


Marco Polo's 
rone to Xanado 


XiVNADtJ 




f-JS'.'v- 

. «• A 




/ / 

PeluBg < 




ISRAEL 




SYRIA 


IRAN 


CHINA 




PAiaSTAN 







« ... . / 




How Polo saw Shang-tu 









Nome ... 


foot the following momipR" 
savs Hamilton-Oalryinple. 


IXMAVk. 




r.- r 


ttmu « 


1-nviwo.t M.H •Ifck-ph.intlll 43l)0l>|l ihMnBnn.’W) 

IV 24iH>ur JiuYtcririi:iirivtCtiUl-S3i 912) 

T 25/10/86 


says Hamiltcm-Oalrympie. 
“using the River Shang-tu 
[Coleridge's "Alph~l as a 
guide.' Bui the hotel staff 
reported us, and at six in the 
morning the authorities came 
down on us. There was a 
knock ai the door and the 
security guards came m." 

Two scboolteachera were 








ai 


Kidrfa Khan, who began it all 


T here is at this place a 
very fine marble palace, 
the rooms of which are 
all ^t and painted with 
figures of men and beasts and 
birds, and with a variety of 
trees and flowers, all exeoited 
with such exqinsite art that 
you regard th^ with-deligth 
and astonislunenL 
Round this palace a wall is 
built, enclosing a compass of 
16 nailes, and inside the Park 
there are foimtains and rivers 
and brooks, and beautiful 
rueadows, with all kinds of 
wild animals (excluding sudi 
as are of ferodoas natnre), 
which the Emperor has pro- 
cured and placed there to 


supply food for his gerblcons 
and hawks. Moreover (at a 
spot in the Park whme tfam is 
a channii^ wood) he has 
another PaJ^ built of cane. It 
is gilt all over, and most 
elaborately finished inside. 
The Lord abides at this park 
of his, dw^elling sometimes in 
the h^Ue P^ace and some- 
times in the Ckne Palace for 
three months of the yenr, to 
Hit June, Jnly, and Augnsfr 
preferriog this residence be- 
cause h is by no means hot; in 
fad it is a very cool place. 
When the 28tfa day of August 
arrives, he takes his depar- 
ture, and the Cane Palace is 
taken to pieces. ' 


au^fatewaiibedgigritf- 
ks diss^ c^nuras tire 

. bc^di^ril urdaSng^comkvts^^ 

; hia tiie-wris^, ^^^ptiSrSs.di^mdive ^ spq^:. 

:a minute Berna. ihe (ewSFdscan f^s;. 

A teQn'td 9idl|rn^ Ftcm 


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■SmoeieSS 

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VTEflWU*'' UD i LM«GH£06Ei>1J£'LCIKDDr4rneiK;i.m bl9«e«e2e'0!fla43&C0: 


Available fromGarrard.Aspreyand Maopin 8 Webb, 
Brompion Road. Knightsbridge. London SW1. 






















Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


IKAVliJ^ 1 


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Te 

of 


V 






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Bewitchinent on the 




The Seychelles are 
still full of magic 
which flourishes 
in unexpected 
plac^; Shona Qawford Poole watches 
as the islanders land their catch 


SPOTS 




The Seychelles are exactly ss 
advertim only more so. it is 
not simply that coconut palms 
nod dnuilcenly over beaches 
ofseamlessblmid sand lapped 
by the turquoise perfection of 
the Indian Ocean. This is the 
view at every turn, save for a 
few mucked-up miles of coast 
along the road which links the 
airport with the capital 

When John Profuma the 
Parliamentary Under-Sec- 
retary ai the Colonial Office, 
visit^ the islands in October 
19S8, the Man<Aesi& Guard- 
ian reported that be returned 
“bubbling with discreet enthu- 
siasm over the beauty of the 
Se^elles“. He thou^L the 
paper leponed, that this group 
of “obscure islands” could be 
be developed into “a flourish- 
ing resort for tourists”. The 
chief (Stacie then was the 
week^ong voyage out from 
Mombas^ and Profiimo set 
one of bis dvil servants the 
task of seeking out a suitable 
site for a flying ^t base. 

The airport arrived in 1971, 
followed by independence in 
1976. The first coup, in 1977, 
caused a dip in the ^ph that 
diarts the international ex- 
change '-of hard foreign cur- 
rency for a deep suntan. If the 
political comiriexion of the 
government turns' redder try 
the day, its public feoe is 
artfully made-up not to scare 
visiting sunseekers. 

And for local consumpUon, 
what little there is of the 
islands's history has been 



rewritten- Of course theie is 
no ideol<%ical mileage in rub- 
bing out the IStb century stuff 
about the first settlers on these 
I IS granite and coral islands 
adrift over 160.000 square 
miles of oceaiL just four 
d^rees south of the Equator. 
Disregarding an entirely 
speculative piratical past, a 
French expedition led by Cap- 
tain Lazare Picault establish^ 
the first settlement on Mahe, 
the largest of the islands. As a 
contemporary map shows,^e 
“camp des noirs” was at the 
furthest end of the establish- 
ment fiom the*commandant's 
garden. 

French settlers followed 
bringiiig slaves from Africa, 
then more slaves, fteed from 
Arab dhov^ were released on 
the islands by the British who 
had been awarded the S^- 
chefles in ISI4 in the terri- 
torial reshuffle set out in the 
Treaty of Paris. 

All is well histori^ly 
spring, until the first British 
Governor, Sir Bickhara 
Sweet-Escott KCMG. took 
over in August 1903. In the 
spring of that year boaters, 
pith helmets, and starched 
collars were de rigueur for the 
unveiling of the Queen Vic- 
toria dock tower (a miniature 
Big Ben) in the centre of the 
capital, which is still called 
V^oria today. But no one 
could tell me-where-her-siatue 
had gone. It was not on show 
in the museum, nor there 
any record of Sir Bickham 
Sweei-Escott's successors 


WEATHER EYE 


Daytime ten^reratures are 
almost invarwly in the mid to 
high 80s. The humidity is 
aJways uncorrKvtabiy high, 
atthbugh sea breezes can 
moderate the effects. The 
winter is wetter than the 
summer, it is generally dry and 
sunny in the mornings, with 
frequent showers in the 
afteiTKions (approximately 10- 
15 days with rain each month). 








y \ 


Palm perfection: for connoissears of samly beaches and (above i%ht) gables of combated tm 


whose photographs once bung 
there. 

I failed to find anything 
adequate by way of a guide 
book, but the museum was full 
of interesL It offers a rich 
choice of those gobstoppers of 
inconsequential information 
which lodge undusted in the 
bag miiKl Exhibit SO, a 
giant clam as big as an 
armchair; carries the explana- 
tion that its kind “sometimes 
produce a non-piedous pearl 
as big as a golf l^r. 

Colonial governors are out 
but witchcrafi is in. Standing 
before a conglomeration of 
twigs, matchtoxes. a broken 
Christ fVom a crudfix. a “pink 
formula” Steradent bottle, 
blue glass eye bath and foxed 
copy of Pilgrim's Proffvss 
whose status had been en- 
hanced by a glass-fronted 
display case, 1 rea± “There is 
no doubt that witchcraft is still 
extensively practised. Culled 
gris-gris it was brought from 
Afnca by the slaves of the 
carfy French setliers. . . Sor- 
cery of many kinds, from 


relatively harmless to bloody 
rites involving murder ^ lus 
festered in isolation for more 
than 200 years. - 

“Many S^chdloise.” said 
the card, “still love to consult 
bottkomme-du-bois and 
sorcier,'” 

Out in the sunshine 
Victoria's silhouette has 
changed less than most towns 
of its age. New buildings have 
not swamped the French 
gothic gaUes wrought fiom 
corrugated tin. If mere are 
more houses than there used 
to be on the steep green hills 
shouldering into town, tl^ 
are all but hidden in the thick 
cover of cinnamon, ban^ 
and lakamaka trees. 

In the market, trade in fish 
and vegetables and spices is in 
Creole as it has always been. 
The daily newspaper, the Sey- 
chelles Nation, may publish 
token stories in a new fangl^ 
phonetic rendering of the 
language that baffles the mid- 
dle-ag^ but young and old 
still go about their business 
and their kitchens in Creole. 


Little fish are carried home in 
plastic bags. Big axe 
transponed as . they always 
have been, by a loop of string 
through mouth and giU.' 
Everywhere you look people 
are (arxyii^ catching, ^Ung, 
buying, looldngat fish. 

.At the ‘quayside the boats 
unload their catches of Day- 
Glo red croissant, the most 
expensive fish on the menu, 
and rich hauls of vieile 
macondc. job jaune. bour- 
geois. becune. lascar and 
cordonni^. 

Visiting sportsmen dream 
of record-brraking black mar- 
lin. sailfish, yeifowfin tuna, 
bonito, shark and kingfish. 
Scuba divers hope to meet 
parrot fish. lion fish, ^nerfiy 
fish, and zebra fish face to face 
while the incorrigibly idle are 
content to encounter octopus 
in cuny. Small boys throw 
back the shore-^berrnen's ac- 
cidental haul of baby bubble 
fish, which blow themselves 
up as big as ping-pong balls 
when netted. 

For Gonnoissems of empty 


beaches, finding the right 
anses is the game.-On Mahe it 
can be playra by public trans- 
port on shori-wheelbase btrses 
that hurtle round the island 
lerroriziiig pootling Mini 
Mokes and Jeepalikes. If you 
could not alr^y spot the 
visitors by their clothes — so 
much sloppier than the locals, 
tumeJ out in immaculate 
frocks with decent necklines 
and neat sleeves — their 
frivolous open transpon is a 
Indge of holiday freedom. 
Beau Vallon is the best-known 
and busiest beach. It has 
several of the large hotels and 
is rated spoiled by people who 
remembCT it before there was 
any development at all. But if 
the likelihood that there may 
be someone else within shout- 
ing distance rates as too 
crowded for perfeaion. soli- 
tude is virtually guaranteed on 
one of Mah6's southern 
beaches, or on any of the 
smaller islands. 

Island hopping is en- 
couraged — why not? People 
have to pay to move ^und. 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Tire Seychelles Tourist Board, 
4th Floor, PO Box APE. 50 
Conduit ^eet, London W1 A 
4PE (01-439 9599} Offers 
unusually good leaflets on 
where to stey and what to do. 
British Airways (01-^7 4000) 
operates wewy direct flights 
to the Seychelles from 

return, to £2,478 return 
First Class. 

On Mahe I stayed at the 
Sunset Beach Hotel (010 248 


Praslin offers more perfect 
beaches, and the VaHte de 
Mai National home ofa 
black parrot which is heard 
more often than it is seen. 

La Digue is smaller stiU. and 
car free. Transpon is by ox 
cart (smelly)^ bicyA (hot) w 
walking (bolter). Hie sched- 
uled attractions are a capn 
plant, a corral of tfeprcssed- 
looking giant tortoises and the 
paradise fly-cateber. Its 
beaches are stupendous- ^ 

Getting back to the to^t 
lights of Victoria felt qmte 
exciting after the torpor of the 
outer islands. 

Canned muuc is the only 
real blight, as long as flood- 
lighting cables running , up 
palm trees offend no sensibii* 
ities. I listened in vain for the 
dances called the sega, movr/a 
and camtuia. Even tlfe live 
musicians sounded as if they 
had learned their trade ftom 
tapes copied so many times 
that the sound had been 
bleached of definition. Maybe 
that is the real Seychelloise 
soun^ 

47227). Half board costs £110 
aweakperootmia. 

On Praslin I sta^ at La 
Reserve. Ansa Petite Cour. 
Accommodation here is in airy 
bungalows dotted through the i 
grounds. Half board costs 
about £90 a night per cou]:^ 
As well as hotels there are 
numerous smaltor guest 
houses scattered mroughttie 
islands. Car hire costs &2a 
day with unlimited mileaga 
Eating out costs an average 
£20 for two. 


In foil 


flight 
to Ireland 


FARE deals 


Thanks to NGBOl Pffoe CM 

Ikea British Airways* Acr 

Linns aad Dan Ahr, iraventft 
hewing ibrlreimid can dBase 
sone of the best vatao fires 
ever seen over the Irish Sea* 

To travd wHh Kyanalr. ea 
tsdeveadcot alrtlpei heMeea 
Lutraand DahUatt^fisraiaa 
flat £85 reiani (chBdrcntiavcl 
for half price) aad hdaK ftee of 
bookiu restrictieas,, paa- 
senscars can fly whenever they 
want Other akUttt my 
c harae less, hat tba^peono- 
doBd fens tie pesfcngerr to 
specific Dtehts. 

Ryaaoir^ fiues are M 
ncccssfel that it carried over 
34,0M pa ss e ngers hi ilw flnt 
three months (tf flying tad Is 
start a daily Lnim te WalC9^ 
ford servfce at £l09.ielB5^ 

^nce May. fores haire tnm- 
Ued Ok the rootea hetiveea 
London. DahUn. GHk nad 
Shannon and Dnn . Alr^ 
“Latesaver*” fore afaied at last 
miiiste bn^t tcavcHcis costs 

a mere £65 rctnm. 

The lower fores have stimu- 
lated more people In Qy as 
passengers def^ from tte 
forks. Competition wiU h»- 
r om# flerceroflriag.tiB winter 
when Virgin Atiantic (firam 
Gatwick) and British Ak Fci«> 
lies (from Lntan) tsimrh thek 
own Dublin fUgll^ . 

As new services and foies 
pioliferate between Brkain 
and The Netherlands, 
Loadmicrs are spdtC for 
choice. BA* KIM and British 
Midland fly foam Heathnw, 
Netheriiacs from EdMon. Ak 
UK from Slaasled nad B Chi. 
ia.M and (from M onday) 
Traasavia frtm i^alwldt. 

However, hasinessmea 
vahring fkxihflfty wfll pay np 
to £170 for n reiarn 
Heatiirow/Schfoolfflgfat while 
kiSBre travellers can pay as 
little as £59 retam for a 
BA/KLM Latesaver or £69 
return for a BM PEX (instant 
pw^Be) excariioii. 

When Transavia launches 
its Catwidi/Arasteidam ser- 
vice it hopes to offer half price 
**Biiriiicas Oass" tees fiw the 
man is the street ef just £85 
return until the end isf the year. 

Alex MeWhirter 

The author is travel eeflior 
r* Business TlnveAsr 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 2S 1986 


TRAVEL 2 


A first 
taste 
of Paris 

Children in Paris can digest cultun 
and cuisine in rou^ly 
quantities. Guy Topham and fais 
family struck a happy balance 


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OUT AND ABOUT 


Piers of the realm 


T he most memorable 
sight of Paris had 
been a tane aux 
/raises. It had iain 
laifguorously among other 
such coniections in the win- 
dow of a pdtisserie somewhere 
near the Louvre and had at 
once become the ol^ea of the 
‘Children's desire. 

Thev had to manage with 
pain chocolat, which could be 
munched while walking, be^ 


come, aware of the romantic 
mythology that had bailed 
their parents. 

From the Care du Nord, the 
taxi's route was along the 
Boulevard de Rochechouan 
towards the Place l^ll& It 
was Saturday ahemoon and 
polyglot crowds swarmed 
around the cheap shops. 

Then we swung uphill and 
suddenly were in a little leafy 
square nnth trees and benches 


-JnnHH' jaunts: a perfect view for young eyes itf iiOB/AnoF from Um top of Notre Dame 

siiiing-FOom and dining- cious refriemtor b the flat most deserted and we had 1 
room. Above alL there was a Varieties m tone aux /raises, Hameau to ourselves, 
kitchen. the pain with the most In sharp contrast came ne 

Expicnation that first eve- chocolat and the textures of morning's visit to the ch 
ning was inevitably up the bill the anays of pdies were dungeons of La Conciei^ 
to the summit. Those who can inspected the cells of Marie Antoinei 

remember the Place du Tertre But the mab Direct of the and the rusty blade of tJ 
as a quiet square with the holiday was to mtroduce Paris guillotine han^ng on the wa 
smell of Gauloises, the sound and tl^ was begun from the This was follow^ by a wa 


G» Si Lame 


'Boutevaro 


cause we were only there for a arrange before the small 
few hours, changing trains, charming Theatre de I’Atelier. 
and it was no time for sticky At the end of a . cul-de^c 
fingers and stained shins. stood the Residence Charles 

But the memory rankled Dullin where we were to stay, 
and Paris remained high on looking much more raodm 
the list of places to be revis- than its 18th-century origins, 
iled: tarte atuefraises and then The flat itself was most 20th 

the EifielTowtf were what the century and as electronic as 
children wanted. As it hap- could be with a double bed- 
pened. their wish coincide room and double so&-beds m 
wjth our own. » 

“The small hotel where we ^**®®*4 

usually stay in Paris is near the / ®* ^i2" 

Madeleine and the windows of / MM 

Fauchon. which have raised V, 

the titiilaiion of gluttony to an 
an. Yet that, like all the 
charcuieries. patisseries, bon- jP^^|Fvr-~^ 
cheries, and bouiangeries and ^honnaKk 

street markets could only f 
tempt, for there was nowhere / A 
to cook or eai their wares. / Tow i 

That was when we noticed / I 

on the back page of a travel / 

brochure that an alternative to f i 

a hotel in Paris could be a flaA ^ ‘ ^ ^ rt ■ 

The operator. French Leave. 
oiTered a week's holiday. 

including air or surface travel. i« 

the Rteide'^e^nlnfi^nace 

itting a Mmtbrtable hotel in charies DuJIin, 75018 Paris 
the middle range. Moreover. « 42 57 14 55} are included, 
the flat would be on Mom- together with dr or 
manre and the girls, at 1 1 and travel, in holidays offered by 
13. would surely be. or be^ French Leave, 21 Reet 


of an accordion and French as 
the spoken language be 
disappointed. Those who 
could not found it magical. No 
matter that the language the 
crowds spoke was probably 
German, Dutch and Japanese. 
The street lights were reflected 
in bright eyes and tout Paris 
still sparkl^ below. 

Next morning the local 
shops and the rn^et in Rue 
L£pic were noted, particul^y 
the fbod that we could now 
biQ' and pack into the caps- 


Gmv \ 
du Nortf' 


, Jeo de 


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Tmrer 


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Ttukries 


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LFRANCE 


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desPUflies^ 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Seff-catering apartments in 
the Residence Duflin, 10 Place 
Charles DuJIin, 75018 Paris 
(1 42 57 14 59 are Included, 
together with dr or surface 


together with dr or surface 
travel, in holidays offered by 
French Leave, 21 Reet 


Street London EC4. Prices for 
one vteek range from £301 
lor a one-bed flat with shower. 

Our flat with four sharing its 
three rooms would cost with 
rail travel £192 a head. 


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top of the Eiffel Tower. Riding 
by lift within that open 
Meccano-cage of girders is 
aKraysa thrill and never more 
so than the first ascent Up 
there a brief topographic^ 
lesson was held: Aat was 
where Paris began; those were 
its palaces, those its boule- 
vards; its fortifications ran 
first here, then there. 

For a week's stay, sightsee- 
ing had been planned in 
chronoiogica] sequence begin- 
nir^ with the Middle Ages. 
This meant Notre Dame and 
Sainte Chapelle. to marvel at 
the stained glass. 

Lunch then, as on other 
days, would be somethin 
quick and light at a avperie. 
preferably out of doors as in 
the menagerie of the Jardin 
des Plantes. Dinner aliemaied 
between small Montmartre 
restaurants and feasts at the 


most deserted and we had Le 
Hameau to ourselves. 

In sharp contrast came next 
morning's visit to the chill 
dungeons of La Concieigerie; 
the cells of Marie Antoinette 
and the rusty blade of the 
guillotine han^ng on the wait 
This was follow^ by a walk 
through the Cour de Com- 
merce in St Germain des Pres 
to see Marat's newspaper of- 
fice — now being restored — 
and then the waxworks of the 
Musee Giivin in the Boule- 
vard Montmartre and the 
relics of revolutionary Paris in 
the Musk Carnavalet in the 
Marais. 

The last century meant 
more museums, of course. 
The Louvre, the Impression- 
ists in the Jeu de Paume (now 
about to be moved) and the 
C^ng^e, all in or around the 
TttOeries. were essentials but 
the visits were kept short and 
in search of a pap'cuiar 
picture or punter. Aching feet 
were then rested on an after- 
noon cruise in a bateau- 
mouche from the pner beside 
the Pont de TAlma, liddng ice- 
creams in the sun. 

Hnally. our own times in- 


flat with little parcels of voived a look round the 
delicacies. Centre Pompidou and a long 

T he next pieriod was ramble through the big stores 
the 17th and 18th along the Boulevard 
centuries- and Le Roi Hausmann. 

Solell which, of Sudttenly it was the last 
course, meant Versailles. Tte night The girls walked whh us 
train from Gare St Lazare was through the crowds and noise 
swift, the walk to the palace of the Place du Tertre to the 
agreeable, but then we discov- quiet street behind, where you 
ered an hour-long queue for can lean on a wall and look 


the state apartments. Instead 
we decided to walk in the 
grounds. But Versailles is on 
the grand scale; it is a grod 
step even to the first objective, 
.the Basin d'Apxiflon. It .was 

■ ^ • 9 •. 


over the glittering dty. Our 
IS-year-oId talked about Mo- 
net and his lily pond and it 
seemed likely that no more 
prompting towards the off- 
ings of Paris would be needed. 


then, ax the turning into the The 1 {•^ear-old sdll talked of 
Alice d'ApxxIlon, that we saw tartes aux finises and boasted 
bicycles for hire at 21 franesan of the len^ of the snake she 
hour. We mounted and were had frishioned from folded 
off. whirling through the metro tickets. But^ both 
woodland avenues, bumping seemed to feel proprietorial 
over paths between the trees, towards our slopie of Mont- 
seeing almost nobody until we maitre, its shop^ little res- 
came up)on our destinations, laurants and the view from the 
The pink and gold glories of summit Next time they would 
the Grand Trianon were al- not be strangers. 


“Welcome to Eastbourne 
Pier" says the greeting. .A 
ncartv notice invitingly an- 
nounces that “Admission to 
the Wer is Free" Yet another 
invites visitors to take a stroll 
(“No dogs on the Pier, if you 
please^ and lists the anrac- 
tions on which you can spend 
what you have saved on the 
admission fee. 

Eastbourne is a good choice 
if^u want to recagture^me 
of the nostglipc annospbere of 
the seaside piers of old, when 
they were an institution of the 
Victorian -aae darina. un- 
inhibited and totally devoted 
to the pursuit .of pleasure. 
Eastbourne's pier was com- 
pleted in 1872 and is regarded 
as a fine example of the woric 
of Eugenius Birch who. over a 
pmod of 30 years, built 13 
piers throughout Britain. 

Lord IMfbiit the rni- 
presario and a of ^soer^ 
ment regarding piers (since his 
company owns seven of 
themX r^ards Easttx>unie's as 
the most beautiful of piei^ 
Naicira/ly it is one of his 
collection. 

It has undergone change but 
the accent is ^1 on pleasure, 
entertainment and eating. 
Amusement arcades — now 
euphemisdcally redded fam- 
ily amusement centres — 
abound Madiines of the 
“What the Bader Saw” vin- 
tage have long disappeared to 
museums, dl^Jaced by more 
up-to-date tecfanoli^ which 
concentrates on science fic- 
tion, star wars and space ships. 

The sun was diining outside 
on the blue and white livery of 
the pier, but in the darkened 
cave of temptation known as 
the Blue Room, lights were 


CHATHAM BOAT JUMBLE: 

More than 100 stalls sefling a 
wide range of marine items 
iirom foul-weather clothing to 
boathooks and bilge pumps. 
Licensed bar frexn noon-6pm, 
Rght refreshments. Visitors 
may also look over the 
boat^rd, slipways, museum 
and risitors centre. 

Chatham Historic Dockyard, 
Chatham, Kent (0634 ^2551). 
Tomorrow, 10am-6pm. Adult 
£1.25, child 75p. 

ALAN BENNETT READING: 

Haif-tarm treat for children, 
paidcularty if they have never 
heard Bennett, a brilliant 
story-teller, before. He will be 
reai^ excerpts from MMs 
the Roofr this morning. 

Royal Court Theatre, Skane 
Square, London SWi (01-730 
5174). Today, 11 .Stem. Adult 
with child £1.50, without child 
£3. chUd 50p. 

CHILDREN'S CONCERTS 
Johnny Morris narrates Tubby 
ttie Tiiba and the New 
Symphony Orchestra plays 
movements from Beemoven's 
Fifth Symphony, Sibenus's 
Kar^ and Lutosiawski's 
Little Suite. 


iSTmlEiuvnilfil I (iTc w 


3191), today, 11am and 2pm. 

Judy Froshaug 


iaiwp«p 






Sfliii 


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Victorian skyline: 

Eastbonme Pier 

flashing and the electronic 
machines emitted bleeps and 
mild grunts as th^ swallowed 
and digttied a &ir amount of 
the British coinage. This enor- 
mous hall used to be a music 
pavilion seating 900 and was 
later a ballroom. The music is 
now the dink of money 
changing bands and the 
performers are bingo callers in 
what is said to be the biggest 
amusement arcade in the 
country. 

Outside in the autumn sun- 
shine, brightly coloured deck- 
chairs were becoming occu- 
pied by sun worshippers, 
while other visitors read news- 
papers on the less comfortable 
but more omaie wrought-iron 
seats that line the pier. 

About 16 shops cater for 
most tastes. One near the 
entrance sells sea shells, many 
turned into ornaments; an- 
other offors saucy seaside 
postcards and rock, while yet 
another dispenses locally 


OUTINGS 


DOMESDAY: There is only 
a week to go before the end of 
the spectacular enchibition on 
Winchester which odebra:^ 
foe 900fo anniversary of the 
Domesday Book, foe historic 
survey of England ordered 
by Wiiiiam the Conqueror. The 
exhibition closes on 
Saturday. November 1. and will 
then be shipped across foe 
Atlantic to go on display at 
Disneywortd in Floriaa. 

Readers of 77» Temes 
have a special chance to vbit 
Domesday 900, vriiteh will 
make an ideal outing for half 
term week. The family 
coupon on the right win admit 
two adults and two children 
for a total of £3 — a saving of 
£4. 

The exhibition Is in the 


caught seafood. There are also 
souvenir, craft-work and Jei^ 
ellc^ shops, and a studio 
which turns out dainty glass 
animals. The hungn* can buy 
sausage and chips for 85p or 
more up-market chicken nug- 
gets (and chips) for £1.95. 

At the pierh^ bar there is 
live entenainmenL There 
seems something incongruous 
about dan'emg" a smoochy 
waltz or a cha-cha at 1 lam, 
but ballroom danditg at all 
hours of the day and night 
always been part of the pier 
tradition. It used to be per- 
formed to the music of an 
orchestra, but nowadays it is 
more likely to be a one-man 
band — an electric organ 
producing all the insirumenial 
^unds of a fill) band. 

From the pierhead there is 
angling— the oldest and most 
consistent of pier pastimes. 
There are fishing trips out lo 
sea, motor-boat excursions on 
the Skyiaik, passing Beachy 
Head, as well as faster wd 
more exciting speedboat trips. 

Another of the traditional 
pier features is the clairvoyant 
who. at Eastbourne, combines 
the dispensing of insight with 
the sale of herbal remedies. 

Nowadays the pier season is 
no longer confined to the 
summer months. After the 
holidaymakers depart it be- 
comes a social centre for the 
people of Eastbourne, fulfill- 
ing the management's wish to 
make it pay all year round. 

Cyril Bainbridge 

The author's latest book. 
Pavilions on the Sea (Roben 
Hale, £12.95). a history of the 
seaside pleasure pier, was 
published on Thurs^y. 




FAMILY TICKET 

roMeaOTY^^^ 

Tbisvouctar 

admits two acuisjid 

and two y^AVHdnLW 

attho^Great 

wmhBsiBr. ! ' 

HamosWre, W 

for a total //jl iilA Am 


(^1. 1986). 
OpenlOam-epmi 


oentury Greet Hail, set m 
a gont tantsd ancampmant 
guarded |by a Norman knight in 
chain armour. Sound and 
visual techniques are used to 
create the atmosphere of 
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TO GO 


» 




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Please send me a free copy of the Sid Travellai m France, mcludmg list ctf 
holiday opeiatazs. 


Address 















































Te 

of 





SHOPPING 


By Beryl Dovniii^ 




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For v^etarians or fruit lovers: tbe organic digital dodc 
■draws Its power from natural energy in firmt or v^ebUdes, no 
batteries needed £955 (£2^ p&p); Tridias 


■ 

A « - .i.’, 

• • • 
^ •• •••••■• •• • ***■**■ 
■■■■■^ aJ’ A.. ^4 - * i 

For lovely legs: black or navy 
tights with tassels by Charnos, 
£4.95 (£1.65 p&p^ Jennezs 


■ . iSi : ■ 


For the man who has everyttiing: paper lot of Lloyds* new 
bnilduig with as mimh metallic slmse as Ridiard Bogms* 
original £1955 (£150 p&p); Boyal Academy of Arts 





For toddlers: cuddly snow 
bcv in bobble hat £1455 
.(£4.^ P&p]^ Harrods 


«-v» sleepy beads: bone china ctdfee set by SaiahiSriMehaa 
six cops hand-decorated In ^ 

£32. sugar bowl £850, mOkJiig £1 150 (£550 pdl9); Ltety 


Book your Christmas 


here 


The gre^ divide between 
commercial and cbari^ cat- 
alogues widens ai this time of 
year to a Christmas canyon. 
As the store '''magazines" get 
glossier, the charity gift cat- 
alogues by comparison look 
like something produced by 
that old-fashionM figure tbe 
tallyman. 

His shiiling-a-week coUeo 
Uons were the ba^ for easy- 
payments mail order in this 
couniiy. and the resultant 
down-market image of our big 
book -catalogues — 
Littlewoods, Empire Stores et 
al — has only just staned to 
change with 'the appearance 
this year of a new breed of 
slick, slimline fashion cat- 
alogue called Bymail. 

The magazine presentation 
is as young and zippy as the 
clothes, for this is an extra 
shop window for the designer 
Je^ Banks, of the Warehouse 
fashion chain. It makes an 
instant impact on a country- 
wide clientele — there is a 
limit, he says, to the number 
of shops that can be opened 
without diluting the &hion 
content 

There is no doubt that he 
has found the right formula 
for fashion — already another 
version of the Banks-style 
catalogue has appeared called 
A7r. Produced by GUS who 
own ■ Kays, Marshall Ward 
and many other titles and 
ha've half the £2,942 million 
catalogue market.it is also 
aimed at a young sophis- 
ticated market 

"People who would never 
have considered themselves 
mail-order shoppers are now 
buying", says I^ul Harris, 
merchandising director of the 
GUS mail order group. "It is 
partly convenience, parUy die 
fact that the presentation of 
the new catalogues inspires 
confidence. They appeal to an 


Buying presents can be tiring work. 
Mail order catalc^es can 
take the strain but if 
they want more 
customers they 
should put on 
some fashion 





.. M 


audience which has been 
brought up to look for quality 
and value in all price ranges." 

At the top end of the 
maiket, mail-order shoppers 
have always used thdr own 
credit or account cards rather 
than -the fraTities originally 
offered by the shopping club 
catalogues Hamods have been 
in tbe mail-order business for 
most of their 137 years and, 
since 1981. have bera produc- 
ing a glo^ Christmas cat- 
alogue which has developed 
into an. editorial-style ma- 
rine with a 220.000 print run. 
Of these, 85,000 are sent to 
account customers and 40,000 
to subscribers in the States. 

With such a record there 
can be no dmibi about 
customers' confidence, yet 
there has never been anything 
in any British catalogue to 


For sporty types: adjust- 
able wriswand (above) with 
towelling backing has rip 
pocket for valuables and 
digital watch, removable 
for washing £4.^ post free: 
Lionkeen 

comp^ with the leading 
American ones. 

Neiman-Marcus mail-order 
customers are offered a di- 
amond, sapphire and emerald 
necklace for $87,500 (about 
£60,000). Marshall ^ Helds 
shoppers are a soft touch in 
goldra sable for S25,OOQJSa^ 
Fifth’ Avenue will deli'VCT'a 
child-sized Mercedes Benz for 
S4,0GO. 

Th^ American catalogues 
at least have the courage of 
their own convictions and rriy 
on sales and customer con- 
fidence rather than on ad- 
vertisements for their rev- 


enue. The magazine-type 
catalogues produced by 
Selfrid^ and Harrods both 
subsidiK their costs with 50 
per cent advertisements. 

So it K refreshing that oneof 
tbe best commercial Christ-' 
mas catalogues of this season, 
from Gen^ Trading Com- 
pany. has concentrated simply 
on the dear presentation of 
the goods tbe buyers have 
selnted. rather than on those 
their suppliers want to selL 
Liberty this year have also 
returned to an editorial-only 
look. There are a few supplier- 
supponed pages, but these are 
not instrusive and the result is 
clear, condse and covetable. 

The charily catalc^es also 
steadfestly maintain their 
commercial iniesrity but, if 
they are not caretul, they may 
find themselves lumbered 


with the down-market image 
which tbe big book catalogues 
axe trying to leave be- 
hind. Save the Children in- 
troduced their Pnsents ‘Cat- 
alog in 1981 to complement 
their unpretentious Home 
Shopper and have prov'ed diat 
trading up pa>'s dividends. 

Maybe using better quality 
paper and more creative lay- 
out designers would produce 
howls of outrage from those 
who. .complain that diarities 
alresady spend too much on 
overheads; but there would be 
little cause for complaint if the 
strata resulted in consid- 
erably-increased sales to peo- 
ple like me. who would spend 
more if the experience were 
more pleasurable. Does doing 
a little good here and there 
always have to feci like taking 
medicine? 


For mad hatters: white 
earthenware pot-with-a-hole 
(above) fm’ witty tea pai^ 
ties. About seven inches in 
diameter -£1650 (£2.70 
p&p); General Trading 
Company 

ForfOm fanatics: push a 
knitting needle throi^ the 
Phenaustoscope (above 
left), spin tbe d^ and the 
pictures appear to move 
— a precmsorof the cinema. 
Pack of six cnt-ouis 95p 
<75p p&p); Natioiml Mu- 
seum of l^tography 

For crystal gazers: glass 
scent bottle (above r^hQ 
with silver top stamim 
Birmingham 1908, £365 
from a selection of Vic- 
torian and Edwardian ob- 
jects at PenhaSgon 


ADDRESS BOOK 


Brittrii Museuffl Shofx 48 
Bloomsbury Street, London 
WC1 (01-3231224). 
Catalogue free. LMt ordera 
November 25. 

General Tradhig Company: 
144 Sioane Street London 
SW1 (01-7300411). 
Catalogue £1 refundabfa on 
orders over £10. Last 
orders December 12. 

Harreife: Knightsbridge, 
London SW1 (01-730 1234). 
Cataloaua £2at 
W. H?^fth. Last ordere 
December 10. 

Jennefa: 48 Princes Street, 
Edinburgh 225 2442). 

Catalog free. Last orders 
Oecemberl. 

Uberty: Regent Street 
London W1 (01-734 1234). 
Catalogue £1. Lest orders 
December B. 

Lionkeen: PO Box 12, 


Crenbrook. Kent (0580 
24021 1). Catalog free. 

Lest orders Deoerrfoer 7. 

Mationel Museum of 
PhotBorephy! Prince's View, 
Little Horton Lane. 

Bradford J^74 727488!). Man 
orderlsaftet free. Last 
orders Deoembar 12. 

P en hoB gop: 41 W a flln cto n 
Street London WC2 (01-836 
2150). Cataloi^£2. Last 
ordera Daoeniber 16. 

Royal Academy of Aria: PO . 

Box SO. Hetefon, Cornwall 
((^56limcaitaibgije 
free. LBSt^ordars November 30. 
Save llwlClilidren Nome 
Shopper SCF TVadinQ 
Department PO Box 40, 
Burton-on-Trent StaffordsMre 
(0^ 562511). CmaiDgue 
tree. Last orders Novmnber2S. 

TtfdteTlie Ice House. 124 
Wafcot Street B^ ((^25 
68456). Catalogue free. 

Last orders December 16. 


Olorafilia's MEW TAPESTRY CATALOGUE 


Simply the Best Riga alter colour fiage 
of tho moot oxdSng noodtepoliit and 
ambraUonf kHa and aooossortea youll 
aoar saa. Smd SI for eatalogua 
(rahindabte artth ord^ or vlalt tha 
GloriflHa Shop. 

gorafiBi TO Fwopo rt ino ■t R in p ^ .Oid liBB 
n» R T dgaway, RUi HOLLoiiOBn NWT 1YD 



PLANNED GARDENS 

m tronble^n gardens. May we show 
>od whai can be done with our 
FkMTing Ticci and ShnibL Roses. 
Fruit Tites and Bushes. ConHers, 
and Bolder Pbntd? 

COLOUR CATALOGUE 
(I7p stamp please or phone 0452 
740260. UK mainland only) from 

HlGHHaO NUn^iES 

( 16 ) WluDninstBr. Gloucesier GL 27 PL 


COWSUPS 

HV ihr irife vrihl form, 

ffwvn fmn sfW. 

Fliwieni m briliianl lenk^ ycBoiw, 
vwtedy traamnL ana wit ikmr . 
Sprimeof 

£5.B0 t down. £10^ 25 

£18.60 B0.£S6 100 ptaala 

(Vrbee paid Tfir. InuueiUaia Mm. 
ri»4iimtn ahle to coBfci wD M they 
can puittew mom ifaoinsWy. 

C.I! lIENDSaSON » MN 
LEYDENS NURSray 
Stick Hill, UartlM 
Edeabrida*. IMiil. TN8 6NH 

Td: 107821 aessia. 


THE INCREDIBLE 
SEED CATALOGUE 


Sitear {^idmra refawoa booh Of ptants m 
ha coloii'. 2908088, )5QQ Ikjstradam 

naariyAOOOvoriete. FuVy Moonatlve whan 

and how 10 ptam. Raffl. unusual and 
towourina. Quarmy mUia tsricily frnitid. 
Sooira your n?H eopv. posiatf No wtH b ir - 
Wrin Tbompaon fr MovA Dapt 23 
london Road, tondch IPS DBA. 

Tai 34)81 (0872)686757. 


A CtASSIC 100-PA8E HltUBI 
GATAUGUE FOR GARDEN 
LOVBIS 


&M0 

MmiH. lUBfeni. eocitaa. ioh.. ntH. 

hee iijf je eewiil^lf HlBti Sad flB jVtH*- 

iiB and atevean. Onr 70 aiw ntrlH. phH 
HIIUER raiAHBffB - 86 nlnrhil p^n 
¥■7 ipiata] pUpta. FKSR bat cm Up 
Aiiili nvanU pottift ippndaad. 
HUlL8r)hiwteMCRlKhaaMr)LM,D8ptTr. 
AapOald Baaaa. AapOiM. Bonaif, HWil 

SOU »L 


TURN WINTER 
INTO SUMMER 


withGROWUGHTS 


IDEAL FOR 
GREENHOUSES 
AND THE HOME 


A a 

'T/smg e growlight 
you am have on 
indoor garden in any 
<hrk atmee" 



SUNDAY TIMES 


Wt-is All lamps used by 

I systems are 


recommended by the 
Electricity Council. 


For o free brochure phone 

name ^ ^ ^ 


l#«*e««ew«eee«««o»evwoooeeeoeoeeeee emee 


S u d A rSymretrS) 

WStrotfori 

WukdMai, 

lorfodl Roei 
ns«a 




m THE GARDEN 


By Francesca Oreeno^ 


Plotting a pathway to enchantment 


The small garden, according^ 
to Sir Roy Strong, "is central 
to garden design in the laA 
quarter of the 20th century”. 
His book Creating Smail Gar- 
dens contains no practical 
hordcuiture — most gardenexs 
are too obsessed with plants — 
but concentrates instead on 
imaginative design wi thin a 
small outdoor space. 

Such fine dreams axe 
substantiated by 24 small 
. gardens described and photo- 
graphed in so glamorous and 
basiling a manner that a 
reader might ditch both 
Capability Brown and Repton 
in the hope of creating such 
style in a scrap of yard. Nor is 
the eftect solety a function of 
the pbotc^pber's skUl: I re 
cepily visited one of the most 
unlikely gardens, where in a 
dingy space, not much larger 
than my Idicben, Colin Wdls- 
Brown has created a magira] 
garden with a grotto, fish- 
pond, and pleasant walks and 
vistas. 

I explored the garden on a 
lovely autumn anemoon and 
when evening fell look^ 
down on it from the balcony. 
Qever lighting makes the 
statue (a comely Bacchante) 
gleam softly and turns the 
flowers pale agrinst the dense 
curtaining of high shrubs and 
dimbing plants. The continu- 
ous splash of the fountain 
draws the ear as well as the eye 
to the garden and away ftom 
the sound of London traftic. It 
is in the still warmth of nights 
such as this that (Tolin Wells- 
Brown feels it '‘in^ssible to 
go to bed and lave such 
enchaniinenr. 


naa ifuaiRiiBo 



Phumli^ perfectioii: Coliit WeUs-Biown's garden des^ a place of privacy and serenity 



at the Clidiea Phyik Gaidcn 

ie mtfttMflOH £g^ 

Gorrfpii Aiafofy Seef^ 

THE DEVELOPMEirr OF 
GARDEN DESIGN AS AN ART 

Annip^firtmiirrv iiti ai>|iertjiori&iden 
rirreipn ffk ■ Hna art 

Z, 10, 17, 24 NoveiDber 
10.30 mjm. • 3.30 p.ih. 

WINTER FfiTE 

Tlianflay 4th Dcember 
1 1.00 m.01.. - ZM PuIBm 

Snnlk4l^- CHRlfTTOFIfER LLOYD 
ROSEMARY VER£Y 

Fiff dnatK- 86 Royal Boed 

LoadoA SW3 4US 
Tf>lpfWiMK: 332 4347 


Mondiya 

lOJ 


He had Just returned from 
work when I arrived and was 
urbanely elegant in his dty 
suit at first glance a most 
unlikely gardener, ^th a 
drink in one hand he dem- 
onstrated with the other "an 
evening sherry task": the deft 
removri of the seeds and outer 
envelope of honesty- pods, to 
reveal the silvery inner oval. 

1 doubted whether this 
courtly gmileman ever got his 
hands dirty and discovert 
almost at once that I was 
completely.- wrdng. Colin 
Weili-Brovm is the most 
assiduous .and methodicri of 
gardeners and his fragtwt 
leafy haven is labour intensive 
to a degree which would not be 
tolerable on a larger scale. 

At limes, some jobs can 
become a . dreary chore, for 
instance when the two days 
taken off for tbe complete 
removal of the summer bed- 
ding plants and their replace^ 
mem with wallflowers and 
spring bulbs turns out to be a 
period of non-stop November 
torrent, 'and the gardener 
works on "cold and sodden in 
an ever-increasing morass of 
mud and slop", worse in the 
confines of a small garden 
than a laigerarea. 


Ilf. II. n.. 


dened forye^ in Kent before 
he moved into his London 
house but 16 years of 
Dut^ing has ^eady modi- 
fied his gardening practice. 
(Tertam lessons from his 
experience would help any 
small'^rdener. The first 
essentiri is a detailed plan 
which builds a range of variety 
and detail into a tiny space. 
Admittedl}^. it is ambitious to 
consider vistas or aheniative 
paths around a garden only 24 
feet by 17 feet — and to aspire 
to a pool with a fountain and 
fish, steps, statuary, and aidt- 
ways clothed in wisteria and 
other ftagrani dimbing plants 
may seem even more 
grandiose. 

Yet where everything is 
reduced in scale and planned 
in minute detail, the eftect is 
extraordinary. Colin Wdls- 
Brown. a textile designer, 
planned his garden with a 
trained eye for detail, texture 
and tone. Square paving ech- 
oes the line of the house at the 
lower level and steps lead to a 
raised area where paths and 
beds curve. Each area has its 
own colour scheme, and every 
one of the hundreds of plants 
makes a contribution to tbe 
general effect. 


back gardens, the - soil was 
poor and dank, and with no 
access from tbe street, it was 
impossible to replace iT with 
good, topsoil. No rubbish 
could be removed so the 
rubble created by the 
improvements in the lower 
court contributed to the raised 
level of tbe upper p^ The 
beds also b^n to rise with 
imponed stable manure, from 
a nearby riding school, dug in 
with many ba^ of peat, all of 
which hM to be carefiUiy 
manhandled up and down die 
stairs and passageways of tire 
house — but tbe soil is now 
rich and workable. 

This garden, enclosed by the 
tall drapes of its foli^, is 
shady as well as small. Tbe 
several ivies survive happily, 
as does the ground-hugging 
heixine which spills daintily 
over the brick b<^ and on to 
the path lo min^e with moss. 
There are other shade plants, 
many of them specialities such 
as the silver-leaved lungwort 
and a Brunnera with spring 
foigei-mcsnot flowers and all- 
season creamy vari^ied fo- 
liage. but Colin Wells-Brown 
made every effort to avoid 
exclusive use of shady-garden 
plants. 


climbing the boundaries and 
tbe axchways, and other, suix- 
loving plants sudi as cosmos 
and Sidalcea growing straight 
and true, while not one of tbe 
. b^onias in their tiered 
groups, was leaning inwards. 
The secret is that everything 
has been disoreedy but se- 
curely staked, a necessary 
I»ecaution, not only to pre- 
vent the plants leaning in- 
wards tow^ what sun there 
is, but to support the lush 
growth, the result of rich soil 
and shade, especially on those 
days when wind gusung off the 
walls of the house anempts to 
lay the garden fiat 

This verdant lushness also 
attracts more than a share 
of plant pestsand Colin Wells- 
Biown wanly described the 
honor of returning from a few 
.days holiday "to find half the 
garden grotesquely webbed ' 
and browned the red spider 
mite” . Growing so many 
plants, especially thirsty 
climbers und folse-cypress 
trees, can cause drought, and 
freely a day passes when it 
docs not need watering. Colin 
Wells-Brown uses the same 
method as 1 do, turning 
nose down on the base of each 

plant for several secoiKis . 

A small sheltered town 
garden has its own rules. 
Fuchsia usually overwinters, 
trailing down from the bal- 
cony 10 iaterminglc with the 
m^gqn lilies growing fo 
tubs below. This winter took 
ite loll, though • not predict- 
ably: the pink flowered jas- 
mine Jasminum pofyarahutn 
was lost but the Fatshedei^ 
which I would consider an 
indMr plant survived. 

Sir Roy proclaims it "a 
classic small garden, a vision 
of abundance" Colin Wells- 
Brown himself sees it as an 
outdoor drawing room, a 
place of privacy and serenity 
and beauty. 

*Creaiing Small Cardens 
(Conran Octopus. £10.35) 


WEEKEND TIPS 


Rake tile lawn toremove 
dead matter suid spike it to 




• Tins is Ac tine to aiAe ' 
a new rodk garden or to 
rehabilitate an old one. . 
Make snreit is in a position, 
of good son nod draimige 
and that the rodts are 
cqmidetely stable. 

• YMnaystfllbeaUeto t 
ccp^wornpatchcaOBtin ' 

lawn: fivk ft^tiy, rake 
general feitilxzera^sprUda ' 
grass seed — protect from y 
birds and hasten gennlnation. ' - 
by covering with dear 

polythene and remove at tike V 
fiist signs of growth — bat 
don't fwget to water, 

• Ckan die greenhouse ■ ^ 
thoroughly, nalK npaiff Ip 
theframelf neccssaiy.niid' 
replace any broken gi^ 

before the cold weatW 


9 Cat down tile top grawth' 

of hardy perenniak aftc^they 
have finiriicd flowexina 
9 Waidi out for slug 

damage; if it rises above A 

toleraMe level, nsc b^aad 

braces; ring plants both with 
sharp gravel and a 
spri^ of molhiscidile: 

9 A layer of gravel mr 
diippfaig drawn up anmnd 
alpine plants will give 
them protection throagh te 
season from fetal damp. 





WINDFAUSr 


Ttffn tMVtf A Stnte IfUl 

98^ wiiiinui traONm 
ten pcao I tel 

UMn. 

Nn M 19 ttfjm 

Mm ta 

OMfroni 

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Able LABtl.S 




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Ablo WOVIN 


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Offdorte 

ayiwyww frapAY* dJTm 

"Bwetoemu ■- Di^ A 







i7cmwGm 
HFVLLOFm 
BLOQMERSr^ , 


tdeonm naMou 























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tv 







By FtaflCfSi .. 


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weCKENOTW 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY jOCTOBER 25 1986 



EATING OUT 


FranosMo^ 


- -I— ' ^l-— -| ■ " I ! ri MM ^^ .■■■■ ^1 • 



The art nouveau 
of hi-tech style 


THE TIMES COOK 



and savoury 


So you thought you'd seen it 
ail? You saw the Pub Lotus 
where the tables were magne- 
sium alloy wheels and the beer 
pump handles were gear- 
shifti You saw the **ihemed" 
pub near Euston that was a 
POW camp with barbed wire 
and sirens: You saw— and can 
still see — Payton Plaice which 
is a masterpiece of piscine 
kitsch and - marine theatri- 
cality. But you had not. until 
now. seen an attempt to many 
art nouveau and hi-tech which- 
succeected only in begetting a 
decorative Minotaur called 
daft Ma.xim. 

•The thinking behind the 
monster is as clear as it is 
mi^ided. The idea, ev- 
idently. was to combine 
characteristic and easily ident- 
ilTabfe brasserie desi^ with 
the r^ro an nouveau that is 
the signature of Cafe Maxim's 
parent restaurant, the neigh- 
bouring Maxim's de Paris. 

Maxim's de Paris is a 
workmanlike pastiche of Pa- 
risian tum-of-the-centuiy res- 
taurants. The Cafe is done 
with no conviction at all. 
Generically ait nouveau 
shapes have been moulded in 
fibreglass and dumped here 
and there. Muddy looking 
murals of giiis bathing clog the 
walls. Everything else is black 
and white ~ the floor, the 
chairs, the waiters' outfits. 
The clientele wear the be- 
mused air of lost tourists, 
people who just happened to 
be passing. Still, it is evidently 
a comfortable place in which 
to cat alone - there were quite 
a few solo diners the night 1 . 
was there and they were 
treated with counesy, which is 
not always the case. 

*nie cooking is not bad at 
ail. The menu, which comes 
attached to a ribbed rubber 
clipboard (a "liinctionar' item 
with no conceivable function), 
is reassuringly brief and com- 
posed of mostly familiar 


Jonathan Meades on 
the unconvincing 


hybrid spawned by 
a famous parent 

hems. I went with four peopfe 
and among the dishes we ate 
were marinaded salmon with 
sour cream; overixtiled quails' 
eggs with Evonne ham; a 
well-received fmllet^ of wild 
mushrooms and courgettes 
with a wine^based sauce; a 
massive bouillabaisse with a 
rouitle that, for once, did not 
come out of a tin: veal diops 
with anchovy butter; a dreary 
salad of spinach and bits of 
bacon; du(^ legs with peas and 
a well-made sticky sauce. 

It is mostly rather better 
than one expects of such 
establishments. The short 
wine list is not greedily priced 
and is quite well chosen: there 
is a '79 Fiiou which is one of 
the less disgusting bevvies 
from the great wine lake 
between Montpellier and the 
Spanish border. We stuck to 
the Loire and a decent 
Sancerre and a Chinon as soft 
as cotton wool but rather more 
palatable. Two will pay be- 
tween £35 and £50. 

A few years ago Granada 
Television brought an action 
against Ford in order to 
prevent the car manu&cturer 
naming its new model the 
Granada. The TV company 
lost and was ticked offby tte 
judge for its presumption in 
claiming ri£^ts to the naime of 
an And^ucian city. 

Two Chinese restaurants, 
one in E^ing and its offshoot 
ii) Knigbtsbridge, are also 
called Maxim's. But it is not 
difficult to distinguish 
Cantonese establishments 
from pseudo riench ones and, 
furthermore. Maxim's is a 
commonplace name for res- 
taurants in Hong Kong — it is 


a phonetic representation of 
the Cantonese for "darilng 
heart". 

Maxim'^ in Knightsbridge 
is. an oddity; it caQs itself a 
Chinese wine bar, it is ele- 
gantly decorated, it is staffed 
by English waitresses and 
there's a jazz trio with a scat 
singer — a little goes a long 
way. At the carved serpentine 
bar, boorish young men stand 
and l»rk at each other. 

By the standards of most 
Pekinese restaurants the menu 
is rather short and there can be 
little doubt that the nature of 
the operation is reflected in 
the tUsparity of quality lie- 
tween the main coui^ 
(which are run-of-the-mill) 
and the snack-type dishes 
(which are as good as you'll 
find). Of the latter we had a 
"hot basket" selection of saiay 
(no sauCek prawn and sesame 
toasL spring roll, spare ribs 
and so on. These were fine, 
but deep-fried aubergine was 
finer. 

Of the other dishes we ate, 
only the deep-filed prawns 
with gariic and ginger was top 
drawer stuff. The rest — flaccid 
Singapore noodles, .oversweet 
shredded beef with chilli, de- 
liciously crisp Iamb with ice- 
berg lettuce that tasted like 
paper, shredded pork with 
“seaspice" — were no more 
than compeienL We drank the 
bouse di^pagne which was 
an ideal accompaniment to 
the snadcs but no match for 
the fierce flavours of chilli and 
gin^ — tea would have been 
better. Two will pay about 
£43. 


Maxbn 32-34 Panton 
Street, Lortdon SWI (01-8^ 
3C62}. Open Mon-Fri ll^Oanv 
midnIgiTt, Sat 5.30pfn-1am. 
Maxim’s 143 Knigntsbildge. 
London SWt (01^ 2^). 
Open Mon-Sat 11.30afn-3pm, 
5.30-llpm; Sun noon-2pm 
and 7-10.30pin. 


Say pudding and we think first 
of treacle taa or rhubarb pie. 
or of something else that is 
probably boi and certainly 
sweet But what about black 
pudding, Yorkshire pudding 
and ihai other national in- 
sthuiion. steak and kidney 
pudding? How did one word, 
pudding, -come to be so hard 
and confusingly worked? 

Black puddings, made at 
hog-killing time, were first on 
the culinary scene. The Ro- 
mans had made blood pud- 
dings. but it was not until the 
14th century that we called 
them pudingii, Anglicizing the 
French boudins. At first the 
term applied only to lengths of 
stuffed gut. Gradually it came 
to encompass almost anything 
stuffed, fiom carrots to capon 
necks. 

Then, eariy in the 17tb 
century, it was discovered that 
stuffii^ could be boiled in a 
doth as well as in animal ^t. 
At this crossroads, the ban- 
ning of the boom in English 
suet puddings, the word pud- 
ding set off m two directions. 
Colli^ pudding, a concoction 
of flour, suet, breadcrumbs, 
sugar, eggs, milk, and dried 
ftuit seasoned with pepper, 
was typical of the new path. 

The success of the boiled 
suet pudding was its practical- 
ity. While a piece of meat or 
soup boiled in the cottage 
cauldron, a suet pudding 
wrapped in a cloth could be 
cook^ simultaneously. Al- 
though often sweetened, it 
began the meaL taking the 
edge off hearty applies be- 
fore the meat. Combining the 
two, cooking a meat filling in a 
suet crust in a one^bowi meal 
was a later development, as 
was Yorkshire pudding, baked 
under roast meat but tra- 
diiionafiy eaten before it 

Chicken or game puddings 
are less often made now than 
steak and kidney, and need 
not be heavy if we revive the 
old practice of including- a 
proportion of breadcrumbs in 
the crust Substituting butter 
for suet IS another centuries- 
old idea well worth 
resuscitating. 

Steamed chicken pudding 
Se/vss sof to eight 

1 boiling hen, about 

1.8kg (jib) 

2 carrots, chopped 

2 onions, sliced 

1 stick celery, sliced . .. 

Bouquet garni of thyme, 
parsley arid bay leaf 

Salt 


Heasing hot puddings do not need to be sweet nor made 
with suet Shona Crawford Poole suggests 


leals 


OtanoLMOMar 

• = • 



with siring and steam for 
about t''l! hours. 

Using a butter- or bard 
margarine-based steamed 
pudding crust there is no 
reason wlpF vegetarians need, 
to be deprived of these unbeat- 
ably warming winter dishes. 
When devising fillings make 
sore to choose ingredients that 
will still have an interesting 
texture after lor^ cooking.- 
Browning the filling ingredi- 
ents enriches the flavour. For 
stock, keep the liquid the 
chestnuts were cooked in and 
use it to deglaze the vegetable 
browning pan. 

Chestnut and mushroom 

pudtSng 

Serves four 

225g (8 oz) cooked, peeled 
chestnuts 

2 tablespoons vegetable oH 

1 70g (& oz) oeleriac, peeled 
and cubed 

170g (6 oz) shallots or 
pickling onion^ peeled 

110Q(4oz)button 
mu^rooms 

Bouquet garru of bay. 
parsley, thyme and sage 


Salt 


Freshly ground black 
pepper 

For the crust 

1 1 0g (4 oz) self-raising flour 


% teaspoon salt 



Freshly ground black pepper 

(8 oz) smaif onions, 

Ted ^ 

oz) button I 
mushrooms ; 

Forthepsstiy 

225g (B oz) self-raising flour 



225g (8 oz) fresh 
breadcrumbs 


225g (8 oz) ertd butter, cubed 


Sait 


Cold watw to mix 


Put the bird in a pan, cover it 
with cold water and bring it to 
the boil Discard the water, 
refill the with fresh water 
and bring it slowly to the bofl. 
Skim and add the canots, 
onions, celery and bouquet 
garni toother with a tear 
spoonfbl of salL Simmer the 
chicken for about 1 16 hours, 

' Leave the chicken to cool a 
little in the slock, then remove 
it from the liquid and take the 
meat off the bones. Discard 
the skin and chop the meat 
into large chunks. 

Skim the fat from the stock 
and reduce it by fast boiling to 
about 750ml (1 pints). 

To makethe butter crust sift 
the flour into a mixing bowl 
and add the salt and diced 
cold buaer. Rub the fiit lightly 
into the flour until the mixture 
resembles breadcrumbs. Stir 
in the fresh breadcrumbs. 
Sprinkle the mixture with 
water, mix lightly vnth a fork, 
and continue adding water 


and mixing until it makes a 
dou^ which will j^t hold 
together. Sift a little flour over 
it. and lightly roi) out the 
dou^ to a thickness of about 
Icra (1/3 inch). 

Line a well-buttered pud- 
ding basin of 2 litres (3’6 
.pints) capacity with the 
dough, trimming the surplus 
from the edge and rolling it: 
tiiio a circle for the top. 

Toss all tia filling ingredi- 
ents in two tablespoons of. 
seasoned flour and put them 
in foe pastry lined bowL Pour 
in cold Slock to come about 
two-thirds of the way up the 
filling. Fold foe dough lining 
which is proud of foe filling 
towards the centre of the bowl 
and dampen foe ed^ with 
water. Top with the circle of 
dou^ and press to se^. 

Cover the basin with well- 
butiered gie^proof paper 
and foil which have been 
folded logefoer to make a 
2.5cm (1 inch) pleat across the 


diameter of foe bowl and tie 
down firmly with string. 

Stand the pudding in a tmge 
saucepan and pour in boiling 
water to come about halfway 
up foe sides of foe basin. Bring 
back to foe boiL cover and 
simmer foe pudding for about 
four hours, taking care tiiat foe 
water does not go off foe boil 
Top up whh boiling water. 

■Ser^e foe pudding from its 
basin with a clean cloth 
pinned round iu Just before 
sennng, ciit a rinall round hole 
in the top of foe pudding and 
pour in a little more hot stock. 

To serve three to four, use 
half quantities of foe above 
ingredients and a 1.5 litre (3% 
pint) pudding basin. Steam 
the pudding for about 2Vi 
hours. 

For individual steamed 
puddings that can be turned 
out, roll foe crust thinner and 
use it to line small basins 
holding about 30()ml (16 pint) 
each. Top with foil, lied on 


t lOg (4 oz) chilled butter. 
diced ^ 

nOg (402) fresh breadcrumbs 

1 teaspoon finely grated 
fresh lemon zest 

To reconstitute dried chest- 
nuts. soak them in cold water 
to cover for four hours or 
more, then simmer them until 
tender in lightly salted water. 
Drain and reserve foe cooking 
liquid. 

To peel fresh chestnuts, use 
a sharp knife to slit foe shiney 
brown skin on the domed 
surface. Lay them in a single 
layer, flat side down on a 
roasting tray. Pour in 3{X)mi 
(16 pint) water and roast them 
in a preheated, moderately hot 
oven (200C/400F. gas mark 6) 
for 3 to 10 minutes: Peel foe 
chestnuts white they are still, 
hot, then simmer them until 
lender in lightly salted water. 
Drain and reserve foe liquid. 

Heat foe oil in a frying pan 
and lightly brown foe chest- 
nuts, followed by the celeriac. 
onions and mushrooms. Set 
them aside and add the chest- 
nut cooking water, made up to 
600ml (1 pint) with cold water 
if needed. Heat scraping up 
the caramelized vegetable 
juices, and adding the bouquet 
garni. Simmer for half an hour 
then strain and cooL 

Make and shape the crust as 
in foe previous recipe adding 
foe zest with foe crumbs. Toss 
foe vegetables in foe seasoned 
flour and fill the pudding Add 
stock, cover and cook as in foe 
previous recipe for about 2V6 
hours. Serve with glazed car- 
rots and bnissels sprouts. 



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Monsieur Le Beige, the John 
McEnroe of foe M&:onnais, 
slams his fist on foe tkble and 
declares loudly: "What fo^ 
allow in Monirachet I have 
never made here in Mficon. 
I'm treating Pieireclos like a 
great wine.'' Jean-Marie 
Cuffens, 32 yeara old and foe 
only Belg^ winemaker and 
grower in the region, is cleady 
a determined young man. 

Everyone in Burgundy re- 
fers to him as Le Beige. I 
spotted Guffens's name on a 
London list when bis rel- 
atively stratospheric prices, 
for what appesued to be 
humble appellaiion contrdlie 
Macon wines, looked like 
misprints. 

Sitting down to dinner in 
the Guffens's farmhouse 
kitchen on top of foe bill at 
Vergisson. with their '86 wines 
safely fermenting below, I am 
aware that foe wines have a lot 
to live up to and that I am the 
only perron at the table with 
clean finjgernails: everyone 
else here has helped to harvest 
the just-picked '86 Guffens 
crop and their nails are still 
stained purple from foe young 
inkyjuice. 

But the wines do not dis- 
appoint. Gufiens's blue eyes 
blaze with the crusading zeal 
of a man keen to establish foe 
reputation of his wines, his 
region and himself. His anger 
and resoluteness have not 
been misplaced or disripated 
with time. He first came to 
France, 22, to learn about 
wine, principally so that he 
could export French wines to 
Belgium, which he still does as 
a second string. This early 
interest develOTjed rapidly and 
he was soon enroll^ at foe 



Lycee A^cole of Macon 
studying winemaking. 

The next stage was to find a 
property in France but, with a 
limttol budget, foe choice was 
difficult Guflens explains bis 
eventual purchase of a small, 
steep, difficult-to-work vine- 
yard full of ancient vines, 
close to Pierreclos carrying 
this village's AC of Macon- 
Pierreclos: "I bought it be- 
cause it was foe only vineyard 
that nobody wanted but every- 
one knew it made, foe be^ 
wine of foe village:” 

. Guftens also vinifies part of 
foe Pouilly-Fuisse. Les Grays 
vineyard, to foe south of 
Ver^sson, whose vines are 
almost as old and even steeper 
than those of Pierreclos. 


Apart from exceptional soiL 
old vines, small yields, picking 
foe grapes in two stages to 
ensure that each and every one 
is fully ripe, avoiding the 
bumper crop-encouraging 
chemical fertilizers and 
employing cow manure in- 
stil. Guffens. ably assisted 
by his wife (^rmatne. also 
from Belgium, is as festidious 
in foe cellar as he is in foe 
vineyard. He claims foal even 
if you have good ground and 
gow grapes foe next stage, of 
vinifying and preserving this 
quality in foe bottle, is not 
easy. Other winemakers 
wowd perhaps disagree, but 
then they filter, pump and 
sulphur their wines — all 
treatments he avoids. And 
none of them exclusively em- 
ploys a gentle, revamped 
wooden 1 7th-century 
handpress. 

Although Jean-Marie 
Guftens first made wine in 
1980. 1985 is foe first vintage 
to have been shipped to 
Britain: it is stocked by 
Laytons. 19. Midland Road. 


London NWl. The Guffens'^ 
Macon-Pierreclos wines may 
welt be twice the price of 
supermarket red and white 
M&con. but they are the finest' 
Maconnais wines that I have 
ever tasted. The '85 Macon^ 
Pieneclos Blanc (£8.43) withe 
its pale gold colour and 
extraordinarily fine buttery 
bouquet and taste outclasses, 
many a Cote <rOr white t 
know at foe same price, as 
does its red sister the *85 
Macon-Pierreclos. Cuvee 
Vieilles Vignes. whose enor- 
mous deep purple colour, 
violet scent and rich, velvety 
taste shows the heights the 
Camay grape can reach in this 
pan of the world (£6.33). 

The star in foe Guffens's 
stable is. however, foe '85 
Pouilly-Fuisse, Les Grays, 
with its wonderful i^e 
greenygold colour and elegant 
smoky taste (£14.76). If foe 
locals feel that Jean-Marie 
Cuffens is crazy, wine loviera 
certainly won'L 

Jane MacQnitty 




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7 


J 


12 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 



THE ARTS 


The novel 


approach 


to literary 


glitter 


“1 really can't believe I <^ n«* 
u<Mii here", soiirfced the 
AastnUian novelist Peter 
as he surveyed the 
oofvdy purliens of Bacdios 
Merehi Victoria. Everyone 
has to come from somewhere, 
bnt it seems that only Booicer- 
shortUsted liteiati are granted 
the opportunity of interviewing 
themse lves in their native 
towns. 

Otimibas: The Most Beaad- 
fid Lia (BBCl) did the viewer 
^ signal service of dispens- 
ing with the poodle-faking 
style cmnmon to literary pro- 
files and, instead, gave the 
snbject free rein to confide 
snch filings as his wish "to 
celebrate fiie hmnan spirit" — 
the_ sort of thing a fictional 
satire would have an antfam: 
say. 


Ten years ago today the National Theatre was officially opened on the South Bank. Sir Peter Hall.looks 


he win hand over the reins 


To a meata or lesser de- 
cree, al! fiction word reading 
IS antobiographical: it never 
comes as mudi of a revelation 
to learn that individDal writers, 
lave taken their inspiration 
from fia worid around fiiem. 
Exercises snch as this — 
dressed np whfa gorgeoasly 
photographed bndMspes uid 
gobbets of dnnatteation — 
tend to edio the pro^nies of 



pop promo videos, and in the 
process to eclipse, or at least 
subvert, the purposes of 
literatnre. 

It was a decent idea to adapt 
for tekviskm J. B. JMesfiey's 
nostalgic novel of fiie variety- 
theatre life. Lost Empires 
(Granada), thoo^ not per^ 
haps in a venion of eight 
boors* duration; sandbagg^ 
with tactical advice, the yom^ 
hero had to wafi90 minntes for 
his first proper kiss. 
voice-over is a ghastly mis- 
take mderins Pricey’s 
stolid prose bom distractlngly 
and redundantly. In '*stately, 
handsome Edinbmgb** (were 
these really the acntest epi- 
thets be could manage?), "the 
pale sunlight was brushing the 
stone wi& brilUant gold." 
Either we have eyes or we do 
not 

At times, the opening dou- 
ble-length episode was like 
clawing one's way throngh an 
Edwaidian pnddi^ and of the 
choicest plnms — John 
Ci^e^ granite misogyny, 
Brian Glover's faOiDg'down- 
drnnk bombast, Lanrence 
Olivieri dipso-paranoia — tiie 
last has alrauiy cmne to a 
bloody end. 


Martin Cropper 


RADIO REVIEW 


• David Wade's review of 
radio programmes has had to 
be held over. It wU] appear on 
the Arts page on Monday, 
October 27. 


N ational institutions like 
Wimbledon or the Brit- 
ish Museum seem eter- 
nal fixtures. Their be- 
^nnings are remem- 
bered with difficulty and with 
surprise. It is like that now with the 
National Theatre. Denys Lasdun's 
building stands on the ^utb Bank, 
temtliar after ten years orhard use, 
and confident that London's river- 
side would today seem incomplete 
without iu 

We planned the openii^ of this 
splendid palace in a tin*^roofed 
prefab in a Lambeth hack street. It 
leaked, was full of rats, and had long 
served as the NTs offices. Behind 
iL blackberries grew wild, a healthy 
reminder that any city is tempxiraiy. 
At this time of year, some of os 
would pick them in the evenings to 
take borne. 

It was an unreal period of waiting, 
wondering when and how we should 
leave the Old Vic for our new home. 
Laurence Olivier was expected to 
lead the company into it But 
bunding delays turned months into 
years, and this, combined with 
Larry's ill health, made him give up 
and tragically miss the most appro- 
priate opening in En^sh theatrical 
bistoiy. For. without him, there 
would be no National Theatre. 

The new building's empty towers 
■and terraces _ continued to rise 
besitantiy on' the Soutii ^nk. A 
dozen yeara ago it was inhabited 
only by painfully slow workmen. I 
wandered through it many times. 
Sometimes it looked like a wonder- 
ful place of enjoyment waiting to 
welcome thousands; sometimes like 
a grey ghost-ship moored somewhat 
temporarily^ to the bank of the 
Thames. Hther way the size of it 
frightened me. I pondered in near 
panic how we could fill with plays 
and people, six days a week, 52 
weeks of the year, not one theatre 
but three, all under the same roof 
That is, if we could ever our foot 
in the door. The buildmg delays 
were be^ning to seem endless and 
absurd How could we speed things 
up? Finally, we decided to force our 
way into the unfinished building 
and open it piecemeaL It was a risk 
but at least we were being 
constructive. 

The old Lambeth prefob, where 
we thought out our sirat^ and 
planned our opening repertoire, was 
pulled down: the bfockberries van- 
ished But the National Theatre 


Ten years hard 


quickly flourished packed with 
audiences curious to see the brand 
new playhouse. One by one, the 
Lyttelton, the Olivier and the 
Cottesloe staged [rtays. The ndiole 
process took a full twelve months ~ 
and they were the most complex 
and demanding of my life. 

The country was in a de^ 
economic depressiorL The South 
Bank theatre, compared to other 
subsidized theatres here (though not 
abroad), was hideously expensive to 
nm. It also looked unfoshionably 
rich. We were viewed with 
aptmhension, even with dislike, a 
dislike which often found voice, 
providing sharp copy for 
newspapers. 

Berause of all this, the adrenalin 
pumped extra hard: there was 
^ong us an absolute determina- 
tion to succeed. I bave always 
enjoyed a good scrap and I have to 
admit that it was very exciting — 
even when it was alarming. 

I can't pretend I was ignorant in 
1976 of the thousand natural 
knocks, as well as the rather fewer 
delights, that are likely to attend the 
launch of any new cultural giant in 
our foilure-loving society. And this 
was compound^ because it was 
happening in the passionate world 
of the theatre. 


•lom nBynsB 


F ourteen years earlier, I had 
started the RSC That was 
an exhilarating and taxing . 
experience; but the NTs 
bi^ on the South Bank 
had problems infinitely more diffi- 
cult I give thanks we were 
blessed not only with grrat actors, 
writers, directors and dra'gners, but 
a superb technical and admin- 
istrative team, many of whom are 
still with me. And. from the start, 
the public always supported us. 

This article is headed *Ten years 
hard" — but it needs qualifying. 
Alihou^ it expresses hard work 
and many difficulties, my life at the 
NT has bwn far from a punishment 
It has been a decade full of 
happiness, and real achievement 
some my own, but most by other 
people: I have seen young actors 
grow into the greatest parts in our 



have staged nearly thirty foreign 
playwri^ts from Aesc^us to. 
Mamet yet I am still criticized for 
doing too much British drama. The 
teft-wing Press tOce to denounce the 
NT asa purveyor of Ayckbourn and 
Sha^ to the middle dasys; the 
righi-^ng Press wax feverish be- 
cause puUic money is being .spent 
on "Marxist" playwrights like Hare, 
Brenton and Bond. But I accept all 
that I tldnk if the damour ch the 
axe-grinders is equal, 1 have iti^ut 
right 

Of course, good news is not news 
— which means that it is duD. And 


cold and unhappy ouiskJeasyou me 
inside. But I don't reM the ^ 
times any more than I i egret oao 
weather. They were chaUmigcs 
which faardeneo our resolve. I have 
made mistakes of cours^ — 
occasioiudy big ones. But the NT on 
the South Bank has b®®** , “ 
oindoifoted sucoess-story padcra 
with ofigiiial snd dangerous 

also, consistently, with audi- 
ences. Bat of course I am 
luqfudioed. 


rm afraid that, loqldag bade over 

at the triumphs 


dramatic heritage; writers become 
international names; and directors 
deliver dreadful flops, and then, 
because they went on working in 
artistic security, create undoifoted 
masieipieces. 

But it has also been tough- One of 
the reasons, I suppose, is the bmden 
of our name: Stratford chained in 
my time from the dead weight of the 
Shakeqjeare Memorial Theatre to 
the Royd Shakespeare Company (a 
title which Bill Gaskill once t^y 
remarked has everything in it but 


God): But the name National 
Theatre has a boastftiL comprdien- 
si ve sound. It seems to say, however 
modestly we inflect it. "Look at us— 
h's we who represent the country's 
drama". The unspoken, maybe 
subconscious, response has to be 
“OK, prove it". So we have no ri^t 
to fo^ 

We have put on more new i^ys 
at the South Bank than any otb^ 
category; yet dramatists still de- 
nounce the NT for its ladt of 
commitment to new writing. We 


the 10 years, it's not 
(and there are many — certainly 
enough for us to feel proud) that 
come first into my mind. It's the 
setbacks aoKl the neai^disastexs that 
rise before me, like volcanoes in the 
ocean. 

I have seen a ooUcague-director 
•brou^t unsuccessfully to trial at the 
Old Bailey by Mai^ Wbhehouse for 
a p^culv scene in 77!ie in 

Britain. There have been three 
damaging strikes. And we have 
suffered severe financial crises — 
year after year our grant has been 
reduced in teal terms; in 1985. we 
even had temporarily to ^ut the 
Cottesloe. The tbov^t loo never 
leaves me that, nifficieotly fi^ 
nanced, we could have realized fiiOy 
the enormous potential of the NT; 
toured the country for 40 weeks a 
year instead of the usual 15 so, 
brou^t regional companies to tte 
South Bank, and created a genuine 
national theatre. Perhaps the Arts 
Couiicil will reflect on this in the 
future. 

The wora of all these setbacks 
was, I supose; the 1979 unofificia] 
strike xriiich closed down the NT 
completely for 10 days aiul then 
went on fbr another two mmtiis 
while, witii the suimort of the actorSk 
we stroked to st^ some ixoduc- 
tions without settittgs or in the 
wrong ones. 

Strikes not only bit at your work, 
they hit at your heart. Des^iite your 
anger, you are hurt by the pidrik at 
the people you have woii^ 
with, huddled round a toazier — as 


At first, this article contained the 
names of those who had contributed 
to that successsiory. They are 
brilliant names — a rofi-cw of 
nearly all the important talent in the 
commnporary ^ti^ tii^txe. BuL 
although they would shine on this 
page; it was dear to me that to list so 
many was not possible. And to 
mention only a few gave an 
unbalanced picture. So I hope that 
ih^ and you will ft>t 9 ve me. 


W hen we opened the 
NT, Tom PhiUips de- 
sgoed an intr^uing 
poster for ns. Lettered 
across it — much 
mocked at the time, 1 lememto — 
were the words "The New National ' 
Theatre Is Yours". Now, when I 
walk through the foyers and see 
people, knees buneb^ sitting on 
the floor listening to ja^ or 
children buying books _ at the 
bookshop, ex' in .an auditorium hear 
a roar of laughter or fed a tense 
silenc^. I know that the poster 
right. - . 

I still have over two years iefl at 
tire National and — as a ffiiector 
there —six more productions. Then 
my contraa is up: I have toU my 
Chairman and Board that I do not 
w^ them to consider an extenrion. 
liie Sun^ Times, the latest axe- 
bearer — anri a somewhat bloody 
one at that — will ixol^y daim 
that this proves the lightness of 
tbdir recent articles on Trevor^unn 
and myselfi But they are wnnifr By 
the end of 19M I didl have IS 
years at the National Theatre aixl 
that is long enough. After founding 
the RSC and c^iening the NT, and 
with the bapi^ and fruitful oontin- 
utun of G^ndebourne, I lkH>e to 
have the time and energy todo one 
more mqjor job. I have' loved 
working on the SouUi Bank. And I 
celebraie our tenth Urtiiday by 
thanking everybody who has vaa^ 
itpossi^ 


Provoking thought 


CONCERT 


Philharmonia/ 

Salonen 

Festival HaU 


so much, after all, with what is 
vaguely heard, partly under- 
stood, difiiisely located. And 
then the grand jamlxiTee of the 
middle movement seemed at 
first too much a child of 1968, 
impossible to perform in these 
more sober times except as a 
historical exercise. 


Last night's performance by 
the Philharmonia of Berio's 
Sinfonia was the shining 
exception to the n^eci of 
contemporary orebestral mu- 
sic about which I wondered a 
week ago, and the people 
behind me bated it. But, and 
this is surely the important 
thing they spent a full ten 
minutes, while we waited for 
the platform seating to be 
altei^ telling each other vdiy 
they hated it, in great and 
exact detaiL 


Yet the savage cut to Daryl 
Runswick's narration, which 
had seemed out of plat^ 
helped turn this movement in 
its later stages towards a 
bleakness and numbness of 
feeling. 


»l 


India's qreat classical vGcafist 


KISHORI 

AMONKAR 


in concert 

at The Queen Elizabeth Hall 
October 31 at 7.45 p.m. 


T r. 


■--1 1 - ' 


.rC'i'v 


01-455 3262 




ARTS 


I cannot ever remember a 
work from the standard 
enory being discussed wim 
such acuity and at such length, 
and. pace the managiiig direc- 
tor of the London Symphony 
Orchestra, I would rather 
measure the success of a 
concen in terms of audience 
thought than audience 
numbers. 


The carnival had gone, and 
here was the litter on the waste 
groun^ Indeed, so powerfiil 
did this movement b^me in 
its ending that the recollec- 
tions of the same world in the 
fifth movement were super- 
fluous. and for the first time 1 
found myself wishing Boio 
had kept to his original plan of 
ending with a shon finale. 

But ftili marks to the 
Philharmonia for the clarity of 
their playing, and to the 
vocalists of Electric Phoenix 
for bobbing so merrily in the 
musical waves. 


It was. too, a performance 
to make one think. Having 
been used to hearing the work 
on recoTxL 1 found at times the 
very incisive, strong and di- 
rect conducting of Esa-Pekka 
Salonen made the sound too 
palpably present: Berio works 


The pmogramme was com- 
pleted with two works we had 
he^ Berio quote: La mer and 
Grid's Piano Concerto, of 
which John Lill gave a perfor- 
m^ce of remarkable rhyth- 
mic and dynamic controL ably 
keeping the ice patterns 
frozen. 


P^nl Griffiths 


There was a time when force 
occupied a lowly status on the 
British stage. It was tfom* 
.discovered to have an andent 
pedigree and was elevatol in 
the repertoire. Now it has 
become invindUy respectable, 
bracketed with trag^y as a 
high-stBtns ruthlessly trutiifal 
genre, and we are in danger ei 
forgetting tiiat it started off by 
making people langh. 

Seeius Fnm A Marriage is 
an extreme instance eS this 
gentrification. Adapted by Pe- 
ter Barnes from three of 
Feydeau's last pbys and di- 
reried 1^ Barnes's r^nto 
ooDeagne, Terry Hands, it 
foUows the career d the 
luckless dentist, Lncien 
FoUbraguet, from his surgery 
to his living room and fii^y 
into die hell-hole of the mar- 
ital bedchamber. Jnst uliat 
kind d man Lnden m^t be 
off tile premises we never find 
out as be is seen from first to 
last as the wretched victim d 
family life. 

He cannot so modi as 
attempt to extract a tooth 
witbODt his wife bargiiig in to 
demand that be dimi« the 
maid; to accuse him of adul- 
tery; and to tiueaten to leave 
hoBM (at wbkh he fleetingly 
eitioys a foise ray of hope). 
Playing pregnancy as bv 
trump cBid, she stays put to 
rain his meals and snmmon a 
team of medical and family 
syrapatiilzers, who likewise 
treat him like dirt and foully 
hold him responsible for what 
turns out to be a phantom 
labour. Laden then has a 
night ont at the arts bafl, 
Fetnrning at foor in the morn- 
ii% attiiid as Louis XIV in a 


Farcical extremes 



Scenes froD 
aMarmge 

Baitlcan 


rainsoaked cocked hat which 
sprays its contents over his 
already enraged sponse. 

Ftom this lie rfnfcg into a 
whirlpool of vflificatkm, hd^ 
less to defend bimsdf ageing* 
a woman who knows to 
twist every ranarfc to pot him 
back whm he beloiigs — in 
the wroi%. News d her 
moCher'is dratfa (which tnras 
oat to be as nmehan fllnskn as 
the phantom iwegtiancy) gives 
Mm a brirf inteiTal of 
sanctunonioos lamentatiiHi; 
hot by the end, tiie siccidess 
partnm are aQ set for their 
next 


Coming from Feydean, this 
Dserable chronide ot^ht to 
detonate a oomk explosion on 
the grand scale. As it happens, 
last n^it^ andienoe sat 
through it with hardly a giggle. 
What has gone wrong? 
Barnes^ text is mnscnlar, 
highly speakaUe and laced 
witii good jokes tint never 
hold im the fordcal mechan- 
ics. Maybe Feydean hhnself is 
partly to bfome. The plays are 
new to me, bat yon do not have 
to be a feminist to be pnt off by 
their sexnal one^odedness. 

However, force does not 



vobe, plaj^ strfBy aarid the 
(qien^ screams d Lncacn^ 
ffrstpdieat 

Those sereams, h ow ev g, 
are abo the prodoction^ 
deatit^nelLTb^aieso blood 
cordfing tint tiiere . fo no 
chance oflhPMfogtewetds any: 
fnrtiier d&nax; and tin eve- 
nhig jvooe^ with . shnfiar 
skd^anmter Mows .w hi di 
innst be cxhasstii^ (0 play 
and are certain^ - thing to 
watch. 

The preraffhig atmosphere 


as thoagfa we are benig ravitod 
not to whness a comic 
qniise to pain, but a series of 
didactic exampfes iff bow map- 
riage can go wrong. Again and 
agata, at die tev w thdr 
vnees, Janet Dale and lYeror 
Peacock fllastraie tiie tnctfes ‘ 
of female dominatfni and .tin 
foitility of nude annasement. 
Yon get the messi^ load and 
dear and wut fiv tin oondc 
detail which fails . to 


In place of surprise Imiiqg, 
physi^ invmtioa and the 
acoelmathig derangement tint 
make force a Joy, the evening 
renn^ on a feid of mawt- 
onoos cosqdaint, dzverrified 
only by the sight of Imda 
grtfag has swtod in a twist, 
coUidii^ with an openiiQ door 


Janet Dale prejiaxes for battle in the bedchamber 


and other sight'aags yon 
I- a muem 


ofiLlh tin 


have to be foir. Whidi Inings 
ns down to hifr Hands's 
oootribatfoii, which is as pmi- 
derops and slack a conuc 
production as I have seen on 
this stage. There are some 
good tiii^ hi it: nofablyatrio 
of replaoeisait maids aff 


played 1^ Snsan Golverd, 
unrecognizably transfonned 
fiora a Fiarfoian to a smiy 
Gcnnaa frafling a rag doll; and 
a -simslimg qaartet of lady 
saxQphonistB who oocirpy one 
side of Gerard {fowhmd's 
samptnons bdU ^oqm le^ 


see. coming- 

dremastenoes, there is soon 
fhn to be had from Miriam 
Kaclhi as a pnahy nddvtfe, and 
Fteter Jones as a sdgnaziai 

ande whose pasmoa for cards 
i^en a UcssM rdief froar the 
marital 


Irving Wardie 




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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 





REVIEW 


A sax 
for all 


«ii:; :+; l+iTr ' v '- •:•:• - : r 'r r >;+. . ■- .f -'- -; ;>' ' ' •.< ■ ' 



i! - ! *^f!5^¥;-;-; Jr*:;:- 


.:■•.•• •x->>j;>>>^xv>xv >>:• •- v/ 


JAZZ RECORDS 


Jamie Talbot Altitude 
(Move MVLP 21 ) 

Only a few years since he 

a|>preniiceship 
with NYJO. Jamie Talbot has 
matured into an alto saxo- 
phonist of formidable gifts, 
capable of contributing to the 
musk of such disparate styl- 
«is « Stan Trace>'. Ian Duty 
and Nelson Riddle. 

Pro^mmed to display 
musician as comfortable with 
the pop-tinged samba of A1 
Jameau's “Momin’ ” as with 
the I OO^proof bebop of Char- 
lie Parker's “Relaxin' at 
Camarillo", Altitude - 
Talbot's debut as a leader — is 
by no mnns a purist's delight; 
a cockiail-ioui^ bossa nova, 
prettily sung by Claire 
HammilL sees to thaL 

On the other hand, several 
pieces feature the son of 
gimlei-eyed alto-and-tenor 
statements that are the very 
stuff of hard-bop classicism:. 
Talbot's Tosy-cheeked tone 
and liquid phrasing also make 
him aa eloquent balladeer he 
projects **1 Can't Get Started" 
and *TTiis Masquerade'* with 
a sweet elegance. 

Abetted by a band including 
Dave Quincy's hoarse^toned 
tenor and Dave Cliff's intelli- 
gent guitar, Talbot gets 
through 10 tunes in 44 min- 
utes without ever seeming to 
be in a hunry. Altitude is yet 
another tribnle to the current 
health of British jaaz. 


:-v. V..- 




Wild voice 
of scorched 















i 




• -- .+-^ 


<C ; 








-.yx-.y:- - 

■ f:- . ;-;-r - - 

^ ,v < .> .. . 

■ : ■ ■ -X . ---.y.: ■+:o; - y- % 





Wamen 
JJe&r,B 
tPHtb Baltsa. LSOi 
.'Philips 416 807- 

bfacK disc and cassstts) 

Wapicn ex c e ro t s Behrens, 

Munich Radio 50/Schneider, 

EMI ELZ704221 (black 
disc, also on and cassette) 

Agnes Baltsa's is not by any 
means a usual sort of 
voluptuousness: h is raw, 
unpredictable,, sometimes 
crudely vulgar, .voiced as 
much in a ble^ open tone as 
in radiance. It is. in a word, 
wild, and it throws an entirely 
new light on .the Wesendonx- 
Lieder. We are way out of the 
drawing room, out of the 
hothouse even; this is fiercely ^ ^ ____ 

. Imm ... lodepoideBt vmce: Agnes Baltsa 

individual singing, scorching . 

its own path 6 ver the almost a -personality, and her wav 
Elgarian bloom and splendour with Wagner is considerably 
of Jefi^ Tate's accomiani- less surprising, though 
tnent. There is a strength of scarcely less admirable. For a 
will ^ here_ that on conv» singer who phrases in such 
passion without a hint of self- wide, arching spans, she has a 
indulgence, and that shame- great d^ofuse for the words. 

Indeed, the vowel sounds 
become very essential ele- 
ments in her phrasing, 
conc^ hall (at the end of suggesting even that the mel- 
“Siehe sull. , for mstaneeX ody springs dtr^y from their 


Wesendonk- 


Bertloz: Las nuitB 
so/Tate. 

'-2 (CD, also on 












Emotional oombaCants: Pladdo Domingo and Katia Riodarrili in the deadi scene from the ZefiBzeUi film of OteUo 



Verdi OteHo. 



Scaia Orch/Maazel 


Diaz, La 
Ml 


CLASSICAL RECORDS 


:h/M 

COS 7 47450 8 (2 CDs also 
black disc and cassette) 


and incomprehension begin to 
eat «way at her peace of mind. 
Compare the timbre of the Act 
I Low Ducl which both she 
and Domingo treat as a piece 


Richard Williams 


ROCK RECORDS 


Bg Audio Elamite No 10, 
Upping St (CBS 4501 37) 


From the opening bars of 
♦'C'rnon Every Beatbox" 
where hip hop collides wth. 
Eddie Conran, breathing new 
life into the Woodstock mes- 
sage ofiove and unity, to close 
of play with "Sightsee M.C.!". 
a tour of post-punk London 
where Mick Jones declares 
with authority "I'm your 
guide for the ride". No 10; 
Upping St draws ti^tfaer a 
range of unbelievably dis- 
parate -rock music strands to 
produce an album of in- 
triguing vibrant contem- 
poraneity. 

Having assembled -BAD. a 
group capable of creming a 
unique synthesis of cultural 
influences. Jones has now 
picked up the best threads of 
the relationship with his old 
partner ftom The Clash. Joe 
Strummer, who co-wrote five 
of these songs, and co-pro- 
duced the album. 

“Beyond The Pale" is a 
richly' poignant melody, an 
immigrant song delivered in a 
series of poetic vignettes 
reminiscent of Ray Davies's 
work when the Kinks were at 
their peak. "Limbo The Law" 
finds Jones at bis indecipher- 
able besL wrapping loose 
southern English vowel 
sounds round a verbose guns- 
and-dole-queue declamation 
SCI to a racing beatbox percus- 
sion track. 


'After the squalls, verbal and 
meteorol^cai. which greeted 
the opening of the Z^reOi 

film of Otcilo comes the of pure bel i^to phrased with 
recordii^ It may reassure utmost restrainL with the 
some or the 'outraged musi- anxious flutter in the soprano 
cologtsts. who feUed to under- for the. opening of "^ce! 
stand that Zeffirelli was Sake!" in the final aa before 
making a movie for a dhema Desdemona tries to calm and 
audience, that this is Verdi's compose her thoughts in the 
OtcHo plain: “Fuoco di gioia" Ave Maria, 
and the Willow Song are in Justino Diaz's Ixgo is an 
and the b^let music written equalsucoessanditcomesasa 
for the Paris production is ouL surprise to learn that he has 
This OteUo, recorded with never sung the role on stage, 
Maazel and the S^a forces although wiH be rectified 
well before filming com- ■ in Govent Garden’s new. 
menced, is an outstanding production next Januaiy 
version. which uses the tiutt film 

It does ihou^ still refiea principals. He too exdcises a 
many qualities of the film, good deal of restraint, sjnin- 
There is Riociaredi's Desde^ kling his poison with finesse 
mona, a pure .and youthful and never resortii^ to mefo- 
figure until both apprehension dramatic snaiis. The whis- 


pered end to the Credo, "E 
poi? La mortee il nulla", sums 
up the approach. 

Some of the minor roles are 
no more than adequate and 
the Cassio of Ezio di Cesare, 
without Urbano Baiberinrs 
screen presence to back him 
upt,. is decidedly weak. The 
paformance of the Scaia 
chorus, however, and the way 
in which il is recorded is quite 
outstanding. 

And so to Domingo in the _ _ 

title ^e. As noted from Los (Rb8295x’There"is much'to 
Angeles a couple of weeks ago nscommend it, including 


max of this new sa comes in 
Aa III, which is musically 
virtually flawless, with two 
human , beings, Desdeitlona 
and Otello, locked in emo- 
tional combaL lopping up one 
another’s tortun^ feelings. 
This Aa also shows MaazeL 
who is careful not to make his 
strongest statements too early, 
and the Scaia orchestra at their 
formidable besL 

Those who want the earlier 
and more apressive OteUo of 
Domingo will find that RCA 
have recently repackaged their 
1979 recording on CD 



- 


lessly makes use of u 
recording's, ability to regkter 
effecis that would be lost in a 


after his l(X)ib stage OteUo, 
Domingo has been changjx^ 
his approach both dramatic 
and vocal He is now mud 
more of a.tenor OteUo. with 
darker baiitonal limlHP al- 
most brushed away. And it is 
anguish rather than or 
pure jealousy which is the 
dominating emotion. The cli- 


James Levine’s conducting, 
although I.am not among the 
admirers of Renata Scono in 
the title role. My choice goes 
to the new. seasoned Domii^o 
on EML Both companies with 
admirable eranomy get the 
opera on two well-filled CDs. 

. Jobn Higgins 


'One is bound to wonder how 
this rough . independence 
might woiic out in a major 
Wagnerian role. 

In Berlioz, though, the lack 
of cultivation is rather 
strangely less acceptable. This 
has somethii^ to do with tbe 
words, Gautier bdng a dis- 
tinctly less naive writer than 
Mathilde Wesendonk. The 
musical lines too seem to 
demand a more generously 
upholstered and elegant man- 
ner than Baltsa is willing to 


contrast Elisabah's prayw 
and the Elsa fragments show 
the power of tiiis kind of 
artistry, vriiile "Dich, teuere 
Halle" and tbe Liebesiod dis- 
■play the youthful brilliance 
that is her hatimaik in mo- 
ments of Wagnerian ecstasy. 

But the record is not with- 
out its worries. There is a 
troublesome vibrato, es- 
pecially in the middle register, 
and the low passages in 
Senta's ballad and the 
Sieglinde solo are gruff. Yet 


su^in. Her coldn^ of grief {jje feults seem insignifi- 
and daermined resilience are cam beside the eagerness and 


out of place in ’‘Sur les 
lagunes" for example 
though they are exactly the 
qualities tiiai would malte.her 
a formidable Cassandra. 

Hildegaxd Behrens is of 
course nothing like so eruptive 


golden power she brings to 
Brunnhilde's unroolation. Pe^ 
ter. Schneider conducts with 
splendid accomplishment .but 
curious immaturity. 

Paul GrifBths 


White House democracy bombs 



PAPERBACKS 


SUeatibw: Ktesinger, 

Nixon «id lha Destmctkxi of 
Cambodia, emanded 
edition, by Wiltiam Shaweross 
(The Ho^rtb Press, £5.95) 

In 1970 Cambotfia was a 
fertile and peaceful country 
made up of illiterate peasants, 
mostly small landowneis, who 
were di^ly loyal to their 
monarclu Prince Sihanouk, 
their village, and the local 
Buddhist temple. All this was 
shattered when Kissinger and 
Nixon ordered the invaaon of 
neutral Cambodia 1^ Ameri- 
can and South Vietnamese 
troops in April of that year. 
William Shaweross. a tireless 
gladiator in the cause of 
Cambodia.' has written a for- 
midable account of its 


-j c** 1 • I destruction and the missed 

David Sinclair ) opportunities for its salvation. 


An Auctkm w9 make Kistoiy : 

Hambuiig- 

November 29 th, 1986 


I n its tluid auction in 198^ 
the Hanseatisches Auktions- 
baus fUr Hislorica will con- 
tinue its success by yet another 
special auction sale of 
collectors' items of historical 
importance: 

P ossessions ofhiSDrical 
personalities, their auto- 
graphs. awards, documents and 
citations as weQ as works of att 


fatt A aim 

A 


with histDrical associadoos 
form a m^r part of this sale, 
supplemented by a fine selec- 
tion of international miliiaria, 
medals, citations and antique 
arms and armour. 

P lease orderyourper- 
sonal auction caudt^ue 
now by bank draft of 
DM 3 Qj 00 for international 
airmail delivery. 


Hanseatisches Auktionshaus 
FOR Historica 
Husken/Sch Afer ohg 

NEUER WALL 75 ■ 2000 HAMBURG 36 ■ WEST GERMANY 

TEL. H.AMBURG 363137/39 




A superbly 
illustated 
selection of 
cricketing 
greats as 
m^orabl^ rich 
and varied as 
the ton^ of the 
celebrated 
conunentator 
himself. 

In bookshops 
now at£14S5. 





Because we know what we 
do about the Nixon' r^me, 
accusations against it may not 
seem very newsworthy; but 
what is hews is Kissinger’s 
profound cmnplicity with the 
man he had labelled only a 
year before as dangerous. It is 
the psychological transforma- 
tion of Heniy Kisanger, on 
being appoint^ National Sec- 
urity Adviser to President 
Nixon, which is one of the 
most interesting features of 
the book. When be became 
chief architea of the Vietnam 
war, the American establisb- 
ment was confident that. he 
would have a moderating 
influence on Nixon's wilder 
notions of "bombing the hdl 
out of the bastards". 

Instead Kissinger and 
Nixon locked themselves into 
the White House, developed a 
hoi-4ine to the Pentagon, and 
introduced a modus operandi 

of total secrecy that bypassed 
tbe Defense DeparunenL the 
State Department, and Con- 
gress. Far from controllingthe 
Prerident, Kissinger seems to 
have been taken over by hhn. 

Among the disastrous de- 
cisions was abandoning 
Prince Sihanouk. No doubt 
the White House distrusted 



- . V .. . 1 / 

Complicity in actfotesatnratiODboiiili^ fayB-52s 


his hi^ievel friendships in what was going on," a State 
Peking: but it should have Department official told 
understood his difficulties, Shaweross. In 1971 alone "a 
been grateful for his tolerance single B-S2 squadron dropped 
of American air raids into in one year half the tonn^ 
Cambodian territory, and re- /dropped by US planes in the 
alized that the peasants' Pacific in World War IF*, 
overwhelming loyalty to him fGssinger, Nixon and the 
might prove valuable. - Destruaion Cambodia is a 

From a military point of tough, aggresave. partisan 
\iew the blunders were even book and, no mean, bom- 
woise. The fetal dedsion to hardier himself, Shaweross 
invade Ounbodia seems to has allowed himself consid- 
have been made by Kissing . erable overkill. But readers 


sible behaviour of an elected 
leader, and his assistanu in a 
country proud of its demo- 
cratic saf^iuaids. 

Isabel Bntterfield 


BOOKS IN BRIEF 


Unexpimned Lraighter by 
Alice Thomas Bits (Penguin, 
£2.95) 

This is ope of the novels Hi^ 
should have been on the 
Bocricer short list last year. 
If Lydia, sophisticated Fleet 
Street hackette, has retbed 
with an initating woman 
friend to a cottage in di^test 
Wales- tn recover finm a 
broken love.affiilr. She thinfce 
that the remote rural ernmnn- 
nlty will be a haven of peace^ 
and the neigbboars dnllm and 
more oidirary than tbe Q 
Vino's gan& She fin^ that 
teagedy and- niisiinderstand- 
ing, jnst like lai^hter, seem to 
travel on tbe wii^ Alice 
Thomas E3]is is a witdi who 
writes like a niischtevoBS 
ai^eL 

Kabul (Mastrophtt, The 


and Nixon alone in a pea with 
the Pentagon: "No one: but 
Kissingo* and Nixon knew 


cannot fell to be dismayed by 
this .wdl-researchM account 
of the despotic and irrespon- 


Retrent of 1842 by PatricK 
Macfory (Oxford. K.9^ 

On Jalinaiy 131, 1842,Snrgeon 


Brydon, - -bleedSng and ex- 
hausted, limped into 
Jalalabad. He. was. the. sole 
.survivor of General 
Elpbinstooe's Army of die 
Indus, which had b^ wiped 
out _en.. route. firoin Kabul by 
revolting Afghans. The 
disaster was a blow to the 
previously unquestioned 
supremacy of the British Raj. 
The story of ftrily and hmrofem 
from an (dd chapter of im- 
perial histmry b told wift 
schofership and exdtanenL 

The Sea Wail ^ Marguerite 
Ouras (Faber, &L95) 

First pnblished in France in 
1952 as Un Barrage Contn U 
PadfiqiUf this is the stoiy of a 
Fre^ widow, attracted by die 
romance of the Orient, who 
invests her savings in a strip of 
huid on the ladoChina coast 
in tbe eariy part of this 
century. It is a rotten invest- 
ment Each year the flood tides 
destroy the crops, and no wall 
can keep the ocean at bay. 
Battered by the forces of 
natnre, gromd down by pov- 
oly, the widow and her two 
children straggle agunst the 
rienental absurdity of exis- 
tence, symbolized ^ the sea. 

Philip Howanl 


THE TIMES 
ARTS DIARY 

Publish and 
be damned 

An intri^ing insight into a 
personality clash ai the Arts 
Council is about To be pro- 
vided by the protagonists. Sir 
Roy Shaw, who was secretary, 
general until 1983. and. 
Charles Osborne, literary 
dimaor until this year, dis^.- 
close in their respective mem-' 
oirs how each tried to oust ihe- 
other from office. Osborne.' 
will be first into print next-’ 
week with his recoUeaion of. 
-Roy the Obscure" as by fer- 
tile least satisfaaory head of. 
the council Senior staff made 
a concerted attempt to prevent 
the council from exten^ng his 
four-ydar term of office, says I 
Osborne. 

-Sir Roy. is equally acerbfo 
about "the notorious literary^ 
director" in his book whidi^ 
will come out in January: "1- 
fell -it my duty to try to;, 
persuade him to resign." Iii'. 
the event, neither succeeded. , 

Czech check . 

Members of the Royal Shake-' ‘ 
speare Company rehearsing*; 
'Arthur Millef s play The 
Archbishop’s Ceiling, are’.*, 
receiving speech training from j 
an unusual quaner — the man ~ 
hired to photograph the~ 
produaion. ITie play is set in'- 
Eastern 'Europe, hence ihe^_ 
lessons from theatre phou^' 
rapher Ivan Kyncl who hails , 
from Oecboslovakia. > 

• H. M. Youth Custody .* 
Centre in Castington, 
Northumberland, is . 

looking for a playwright to * * 
mstriKl its m^Hm and 
long-term residents in creative ' 
writing and drama 
production. The successful 
applicant will according to 
tbe job description, be snbjea ; ~ 
to tbe Offidal Seaieis- AcL 

^ • * at 

Rock and role i 

Roll over Beethoven: a rock-'” 
music course at Perth College -- 
of Further Education is prov- 
ing so popular that the next-^: 
batch ofstudents will ^he to - 
a Higher National Di^oma,--^; 
equi^ent to those awards C 
for mechanical engineering- *- 7 'l 
and motor maintenance.' 









Van Hal« and Sade ' 

American guitarist Eddie Van,.:,: 
HaJen and British singer Sade 
Adu are said to be the most 

popular sources of inspiration 

this term. 


m 


HaUoffame 

Sir Peter Hall professes him- 
self amused by helpful sugges- 
tions from Arts DfOfy readers 
for his South Bank swan-song. 
Bottles of bubbly are duly - 
awarded Tor tbe following 
submissions: 

You Can ’/ Take it With You 
School for Scandal (per- 
fonned on a high-wire) 

A FareweU to Alms 
All’s Well that Ends Weil 
Entering into ilie spirit of 
the thing. Sir Peter has come 
up with a few ideas of his own. 
Tongue firmly in cheek, he -j-; 
promises to divulge them in 
next week’s Diary. 

Gavin Bell 








Royal echoes 
of games past 


I have for some time believed . . 
that Kasparov is a modem ° 
Alekhine. His attacks exhibit 7 
the same sudden fire: be is g 
capable, when necessary, of an - 
identically rigorous positional 5 
logic and he employs amfiar . 
openings. Kaspa^ is even 
capable of committing griev- 3 
ous errors stemming from ^ 
over-confidence, as Alekhine ^ 
was. Karpov has specifically 
denied this comparuon, but I 
wonder if he is truly con- 
versant with Alekhine's 
games. 

While 1 watching the 
22nd Kasparov-Kaipov game 

in Leningrad I was forcibly 
reminded of an Alekhine 
world match game from 1929. 

As common motifs 1 remem- 



Whiie: Bi^olyubov; Blade 
Alekhine. 


Freeing d6 for his Knight and 
also threatening ...Rb3 to at- 
tack While's w^ doubled 


pawns. 

WMl 


NdE niM fM 


32 8e3 
MNmS 


Ml* 35 na mat 


the iransformaiion of if 32 ^^ 35-5 3 ( 5 ^ 33 
what appepxito be positional positional 

pressure into a devasiaung advaniaee. 
blitz on the opponent's King. 

In both cases: I recall^ the 
viaim's King was imprisoned 
on the King's flank and a key 
element was a Knight opoal- 
ing from d7 (d2 in .Alekhine's 
case) threatening to deliver a 
deadly check on fS (or fl ): 

On muming to London 1 


A. beaut! ful prequel to 
Kasparov's Nd7! against 
Kar^v. Here Alekhine has a 
memorable note: "This sud- 
den stroke — threatening mate 
in three by ...Nfl-F — should 
have won at least the ex- 
chan^ But Bogolyubov pre- 


checked my sources. Amaz- 

1929 World Championtitip Miai sstoa u 

match against Bogolyubov. whhe resigns. 

1 join the position after 

White's 2Sih move: • Baymond Keene 


BRIDGE 


Giving spice to 
a familiar recipe 


w 


N 


Oarazzp HidiMt 


DouUb 


No 


Start 

2 * 

Na 


HoHnan 

No 


Oponlng toad OB 


One quality that distinguishes 
the great chefs of the woiid is 
presentation. It is Victor 
M olio's skill in that field 
which makes his latest book. 

The Contpleat Bndge Plover 

ShMifs wo sHtSa 

Unless the technical content , A ^ “ 
breaks entirely new ground points. ^ 

my palate has become a IkUe Hoffman won tbe in 

jaded with the anonymous dummy and played a dub to 
struggles between the points of itis 49. 

the compass. But there are few Hoffman's plan was to 
undiscovered truffles in the enjoy the 4 a and then take 


m 

bridge world. MoUo does not 
claim to have found any new 
siratagems. He explains his 
philosophy as follows: "When 
the cardi^ points come to 
life, and blood runs throu^ 
their veins, it is no longer true 
that Harry and George. Jane 
and Joan play the same way in 
identical situations." 


the double diamond finest 
A club ruff, a further dia- 
mond finesse and another 
club nifT would produce 
seven tricks, with the^QIO 
certain to, produce another 
two tricks. 

The plan would succeed 
against 99 players out of a 
T-. r hundred. Unfortunately for 

this hand were no mere Harry, hundredth. He switched to the 


CDNCESE CROSSWORD NO 1089 


GeoT^ Jane or Joan. 

Pairs. Lovo ail 
EasL 


♦ Q874 

C’ AQ102 
*7642 


Dealer 


♦ - 

7X9876 
C KJ87 
4 KQJ5 


N 

W B 
S 


4 AKJ98S 
73 
V 653 
4 1053 


4 1032 
7KQ10542 
C 94 

4A9 




r.* 


King of Diamonds, pinning 
tbe lead in dummy and killing 
one of dummy's vital .entries 
before Hoffman was rrady to 
use it. 

The Compleat Bridge lUayer 
contains suffteiem bands to 
satisfy the addict, and enough 
colour and personality to 
bring the game vividly to life 
for everyone. 

Jeremy Flint 
& . 


Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
-corrcci solutions opened on Thursday, October 30. 1986. Entries 
should be addressed io The Times Concise Crossword Com-."' 
petition. I Pennington Street. London. El 9XN. The wianeis-and 
solution will be announced on Saturday, November 1, 1986. ... 

ACROSS 

1 Physically disabled 
(ID 

9 Wash, iron (7) 

IQ Musical exercise (5) 

11 Recede (3) 

13 Remove skin (43 

16 Baffle (4) 

17 On ship (6) 

18 Approve (4) ' 

20 M^ievai violin (4) 

21 Pardon (6) 

22 As well (41 

23 H oly R oman Em- 
■peror 962-973 (4) 

25 Wife's title (3) 

28 Ukeness(S) 

29 Reindeer CD 

30 Anniveisarypony 
( 11 ) 

DOWN 

2 MalireaKS) 

3 Aenrafs lover(4) 

4 Be concerned (4) 

5 Common l^(4) 

6 Evasive (7) 

7 Compulsive ihefi 
(ID 

8 Circular window 
(4.Z5V 

12 Barkemine(6) ' 

14 Din\-(3) 

15 Pranicaljolcer(6) 

19 PSKil>*{7) 

20 HfUi ^xfiac sign (3) 

24 Ritual re3irkiian(S) 

25 Lake (4) 

26 Mark for life (4) 

27 Unruly child (4) 





SbLUTIONS*IONO 1088 

ACROSS: I Rating S Floppy 8IOU 9 For- 
mer 10 Nudity 11 Sari 12 Fosse Way 14 
Awhile 17 Sa^ WCTapim 2? Nest 24 
Rodral 15 Elixir 26 'Tom 27 Feisty 28Eif- 


DOWN; 2 Aroma Jlsmaili 4 Giraffe 5 
Funds 6 Oldie TPii&ll 13 Spa ISWei- 
came 16 Lit 17 Supreme ISPontifT 20 
Press 21 Ratty 23 Snide 


Tie viiinm of prize ovK'ise A t» lOSS are: 
Miss.inne llaod. .S/ U'ltfnif’s Road. Cerhrie^, 
XoahamhtrfamLaiHiStrR. Ashivig. H 'yndham 
Crescent. Bridgend. Mtd-Ghintorgail. H aks. 


SOLUTION TO NO 1083 (tasi Saiurdav's prize Concise) 

ACROSS: I Eurhythmies 9 Antonym 10 Dimly 11 Ewe 13 
Ream 16Scui 17Amhem 18 Din 20 Flop 21 Adhere 22 Dust 
Dodo 25 Cow 28 Lurch 29Isradt 30OiiivK)tawam 
DOWN: 2 Ultra 3 Hank 4 Tame 5 Made OConikal 7Tana^ 
diddle ^ Nrato^bia i2Weever 14 Mat 15 Studio 19Ros- 


23 


trum 


Name—... 


Omega 25Ciiar 26 Wish- 27 Dray 


.Address ...... 


I M««M ■ M tlMMMMMM I ■ IM 


- 



0 











































THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER IVSO 


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RISING FINN: Esa Pekka 
Salonen, the promising young 
Finnish conductor, takes the 
baton with the Philharmonia 
Orchestra with whom he made his 
British debut in 1 983^. The 
programme comprises the 
Lemminkainen Legends by 
Salonen's compatriot, Sibelius, 
and two works ^ Haydn, the 
Symphony No 99 and the Trumpet 
Concerto in which the soloist is one 
of our finest trumpet players, John 
Wallace. Royal Festival Hall (01-928 
3191), tomorrow, 7.30pm. 


VOX BOP: Bobby McFerrin uses 
his extraordinary vocal faciiity to 
imitate the sound of Jazz 
instruments —from Miles Davis's 
drizzling muted trumpet to Max 
Roach’s sizzling hi-hat cymbals — 
with a fidelity that has won him 
ovations around the world. This is a 
solo concert but McFerrin's skiil 
is such that at some time during the 
evening the audience will find 
itself looking around for the phantom 
bass^player. Royalty Theatre, 
Portugal Street, London .WC2 (01 - ■ 
831 OmO). Wednesday. 




IN PREVIEW 


TRE INFERNAL MACHINE: 
Smon Callow directs his own 
translation of the Cocteau 
version of the Greek tragedy 
of Jocasta and Oedipus, set in 
1930s Paris. Maggie Smith, 
Lambert Wiison, Robert 
Eddison (as Tiresias). 

Lyric, Hammersmith (01-741 
ail). Previews from Fii. 
Opens Nov 4. 

THE SEAGULL: Premiere 
production of a new 
translation, by Michael Frayn, 
of the Chekhov classic 
comedy. Patrick Mason 
directs a cast headed by 
Prunelia Scaies. 

Palace. Watford (0923 25671). 
Previews from Fri. 


OPENINGS 


DAVE ALLEN LIVE: One-man 
show by the popular TV 
comedian. His first West End 
show tor five years. 

Albery (01-836 3878). 
Previews today, Mon-Wed. 
Opens Thurs. 

SCHOOL'S OUT: Jamaican 
comedy by Trevor Rhone; 
Yvonne Brewster directs 
Maicoim Frederick, Paul 
Moriarty, Ben Thomas. 
Theatre Royal, Stratford East 
(01-534 0310). Preview today. 
Press night Mon. 


SELECTED 


ROOKERY NOOK: Tom 
Courtenay oddly though 
effectively cast in Ben 
Travers's classic farce, tan 
Ogiivy, Peggy Mount and 
Lionel Jeffries pile on the 
mayhem. 

Shaftest:^ (01-379 5399). 

THE HOSTAGE: Brendan 
Behan's burlesque of low-life 
Dublin in a robu^y boisterous 
revival. 

Tricyde (01-328 8626). 


OUT OF TOWN 


BELFAST. What the Butler 
Saw: Joe Orton’s last com^, 
seen in the West End in 1969. 
Unsuitable for children. 

Lyric Players (0232 660081). 
Opens Wed. 

GLASGOW: Hidden Fires: 
Robert David MacDonald 
directs his own translation of 
the- play by Alfred de Musset 
Citizens ((Ml 429 002^. Free 
preview Thurs. Opens Fri. 

MOLD: When Did You Last 
See Your Trousers?: Ray 
Galton and John Amrobus 
piece, directed by Roger 
Smith, with William (3aunL 
Michael Sharvell-Martin, Hetty 
Haynes. James Griffiths. 
Theatre Ciw^d (0%2 55114). 
Until Nov 8. 

NOTTINGHAM: VShunta 
Jo'medl: Sequel to Barry 
Heath's WW2 family comedy 
Me Mam Sez, premiered here 
in 1985. 

Playhouse (0602 419419). 
Preview Wed. Opens Thurs. 

PLYMOUTH: The Shadow of a 
Gunman; Sean O'Casey's 
drama directed by Rogv 
Redfam, with John OTode, 
Doreen Keogh. 

The Drum, Theatre Royal 
(0752 669595). Until Nov 1. 

GUILDFORD: -The Women: 
Clare Boothe Luce's 1930s 
comedy about New York 
society with an all-female cast 
directed by Keith Hack. With 
Maria Aitken, Faith Brook. 
Barbara Ewing, Julia Foster. 
Georgina Hale, Patii Love, 
Diana Quick, Zena Walker, 
Susannah York. 

Yvonne Amaud (0483 60191). 
Opens Wed. 


TELEVISION 


TREASURE HOUSES OF 
BRITAIN: The civilized and 
knowledgeabie John Julius 
Norwich conducts a three-part 
tour of castles and stately . 
homes, starting with Hodwick 
Hall. Burghley House and 
Chatsworth. 

BBC2, Mon-Wed, 4.30- 
5.30pm. 

SPEAR OF THE NATION: The 
story of the African National 
Congress, much of it filmed 
secretly in South Africa 
despite the government 
restrictions.1nciudes 
interviews with Oliver Tambo 
and Winnie Mandela. 

17V, Tues, 10.30-1 1.30pm. 

HAILSHAM'S LAW: The Lord 
Chancellor, now in his 80th 
year, offers a robu^ critique 
of the Enqiish legal system 


and says tfiat too many laws 
are passed "to reflect the 
machismo of mmisters”. 
BBC2, Wed. 8.20-gpm. 

CAVIAR AND CORNFLAKES: 

Life in Moscow in the 
aftermath of the Chernobyl 
disaster as seen through tiie 
eyes two Britons. joumaSst 
Pwick Cockbum and 
diplomat Donald MacLaren. 
P^ucer is Richard Denton, 
who made Comrades. 

BBCI, Wed, 9.30-1 0.25pm. 

THE TWO OF US: Nicholas 
l^ndhurst (Rodney of Or^ 
Fools smd Horses) and Janet 
Dibley breathing new life into 
the familiar sHcom plot of the 
oOUpie who live toge^ but 
draw back from maniage. 
nv. Fn. 8.30-9pm. 


FILMS ON TV 


8% (1963); Fellini's dazzling, 
sometimes indulgent self- 
portrait of a film director on 
the verge of a crack-up. 

BBC2. today, 9.35-1 1.50pm. 

THE UFE OF EMILE ZOLA 
(1937): Warner Brothers re-run 
of the Dreyfus case, with a 
fine performance from Paul 
Muni. 

Channel 4^ tomorrow, 
10.15pm-12.2Sam. 

ON THE TOWN (1949): 
Exuberant Gene Kelly-Stanley 
Donen musical about three 
sailors on leave in New York: 
BBCI , Tues. 2-3.35pm: 

THE NAVIGATOR (1924): An 
avalanche of brilliant gags 
from Buster Keaton, adm on 
an ocean liner. 

Channel 4, Tues, 2.30-3.35pm. 




ENGUSH NATIONAL OPERA: 
A new Cav and Pag opens on 
Wed at 7.30pm: the double-bill 
is directed by Ian Judge (of 
END'S Fausfi, and conducted 
by Jacques Delacdte. 
Meanwhile Akia rolls on 
tonight Tues and Fri at 7pm, 
and there is a final Butterffy 
on Thurs at 7.30pm. 

Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 

OLYNOEBOURNE TOURING 
OPBU: In Ptymoutii this 
week with three productions 
from the summer: Malcolm 
Donnelly is a powerlui new 
Shr«3n Boccanegra on Tues 
and Thurs at 7.30pm; Martin 
Isepp conducts Dem Giovanni 
(Wed and Fri at 7pm); and 
Aibert Herring, travelRng well 
with its new young cast and 
the superb puying of the 
London Sinfbmetta, plays on 
Nov 1 at 7pni. Not to be 
missed. 

Theatre Royal, Plymouth 
(0752 6695^. 

OPERA NORTH: The first 
production of the company’s 
ambitious Trojans project, The 
Capture of Troy, arrives in 
Manchester on Tues and Fri 
conducted by David Lioyd- 
Jones. Highly recommended. 
On Wed, Butterfly with 


OPERA 

LADY Vb Lucia Aiibertf will now 
be singing title role in all the 
current run of performances of 
Verdi's La traviata. Katia Ricciarellt. 
who was scheduled as Vroietta 
has now withdrawn. Visitors to the 
Wexford Festival were among 
those who first spotted Afiberti back 
in 1979 when she was in an an 
obscure comic opera, Crispino e la 
comare. Since then she has 
become one of Italy's leading 
coloratura sopranos. Royal Opera 
House (01-240 1066). Tuesday and 
Friday at 7.30pm. 


one more performance on 
Mon; and the Gtyndeboume 
Intermeao a smgie last 
show^ on Wed. All 
performances begin at 
7.15pm. 

Theatre Royal, Glasgow (041 
331 1234). . 

WELSH NATIONAL OPERA: 
Stin in Cardiff with two ' 
performances of The Magic 
Bute tonight and Fri at 
7.15pm: Anthony Negus 


o 



Tz 

■T-TgltwJ 


conducts a strong cast of 
young singers inauding A 
Dawson. Marie 


Dawson, Marie 
Bronder and 
New Theatre, 
32446). 



uding Anne 
el, Peter 
Dalton. 
(0222 


ROCK 


. P •• .s • ' ^ 

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’"x v” . 'vk ' 



On Wed, Madam Butterftyvrf&i 
Natalia Rom, and Thurs, Giles 
Havergal's harum-scarum 
Barber of SeviUe. All 
performances start at 7.15pm. 
Palace Theatre, Manchester 
(061 236 9922). 

• 

KENT OPERA: On the last leg 
of their autumn tour, and 
bringing to Cambridge two 
periormances of The 
Comonation ofPoppea (Tues 
and Wed), one of Nicholas 
Hytn^s Marriage of F^ro 
(murs) and one of their new 
yet traditional Carmen, 
directed by Robin Lef^e. All 
performances are conducted 
By Ivan Fischer and begin at 
7.30pm. 

Arts Theatre, Cambridge 
(0223 352000). 

SCOTTISH OPERA: The new 
lolartthe continues with 
performances tonighL Tues 
and Thurs; (Sraham Vick's 
sparsely staged Carmm has 



explores the fate of the individual in a 
totafitarian country in The . 
Archtashc^'s Ceding, a play written 
in 1977 but having its fu^ 
performance in Lon<^. The main 
characters are a successful 
American novelist and two dissideTTt 
writers who meet in the faded 
splendour of an archbishop's palace 
ki an east European capita. The 
cast irtoludes Roger Aliam, David de 
Keyser and Jane Lapotaire. The 
Pit (01-628 8795), opens Wednesday 
after previews. 


(0272 291768); Tues. Oxford 


, rrm / * r. w. Lrr.r. | ' 


Wed/Tnurs, Harnmersmith 
Odeon. London W6 (01-748 
4081). 

THE FABULOUS 
THUNDERBlRDSr In the last 
they have become a 
major act in America without 
significantly changing their 12- 
bar R & B approach. 

Tues. The Hacienda. 
Manchester (061-236 5051); 
Wed, Town & Countiy Club, 
London NWS (01-2^ 3334). 

THE RESIDENTS: The oddboll 
eyebafis promise “a cabaret- 
s' show with a heavy 
Residents' twist to it ail”. 
Expect somet hin g weird. 

Tues, Hammeremfih Palais, 
London W6 (01-748 2812); 
Wed, The Hacienda, 
Manchester (051 236 5051). 


TELEVISION 

FOOL PROOFt Shaughan Seymour, 
who was a notable Lewis 
Biot in C. P. Snow's Strange^ 
and Brothers, plays CecU Madden, 
the Michael Grade of his day, in 
The Fools on the Hid, a play by Jack 

Rosenthal which mixes fact and 

fancy to take an affectionate behind- 
the-scenes look at the earfy days 
of television. Atop the "hin stands 
Alexandra Palace from which 
Madden and the other pioneers 
transmitted the first BBC 
Television programme 50 years aga 
6BC2, Monday, 9.30-1 0.50pm. 


qrOWINQ PAINS: ErafllBSsIvm. 
the son of Martin Sheen 
and a member of the "brat peck"^ 
of young HoHywood cfitors, plays a 



tee 

Then This ts Now 

also wrote the screenf^y. based on 
the novel by S. E. Hinton whose 
other studies of adolescent angst 
Rumble Fish and ThaOutsicfen, 

were filmed by Francis Ford' 
Coppola. Cannons Oxford Street 
91-^ 0310) and Panton Street (Q1< 





OPENINGS 


REFURBISHMENT: The first 
extension to the National 
Gallery designed by 
E M. Barry, and opened in 
1876, has been restored to its 
original glory (with help from 
the J. ftuf (Mt^ endowment 
fund), arxJ provides a 
magnificent setting for the 
ganery's fine collection of 
British paintings — Hogarth, 
Gainsborough and Turner 
included. 

The National Gallery. Trafalgar 
Square, London W62 (01-8& 
3^1). From Wed. 


Street, London SE1 (01-928 
7521). From Thurs. 

DAZZLE: show of 

British cont emp o ra ry 
jewellery, with Anne Finlay, 
and Simon Fraser among the 
Scots. 

City Art Centre, 2 Market 
Street, Edinbu^ (031 225 
2424). From Wed. 



• Joan Armatrading, tlie 
heart on her sleeve 
singer/songwriter has dni^ 
the last 14 years inoonspicn- 
onsly recorded a catalogs of 
material notable for its vari- 
ety. thoughtfulness and int^ 
rity. Hiis is the end . of a 
len^y Biitisfa toar for bo' 
legions ^ devoted fans. To- 
morrow, Royal Centre, Not- 
tii^iam (0602 472328): Mon, 
Oxford ApoUo (0865 244544); 
Wed/Tfaurs, Wembley Araia 
(01-902 1234). 

ORCHESTRAL MANOEUVRES 
IN THE DARk; BillyGibbons 
once claimed that 2 Top 
stole all their dance stops 
from OMD's bass player. 
Tomorrow, Guildhall, 
Portsmouth (0705 822251); 
Mon, Colston Hall, Bristol 


CONCERTS 


ALL BEETHOVEN: Peter 
RankI solos in Piano 
Concerto No 3. Norman dti 
Mar conducts the London 
Symphony Orchestra in the 
Leonora No 3 Overture and 
“PastoraT* Symphony. 
Barbican Centre, S3k Street. 
London EC2 (01-628 8795, 
credit cards 01-638 88^). 
Today, 7.45pm. 

FLOR/FEGHAU: Oaus Peter 
Rot's turn to conduct the 
LSO. 'm Weber's Frdschutz 
Overture and Beethoven's 
Symphony No 5. Jose FeghaB 
is the soloist in Mozart's 
Piano Concerto K 488. 
Barbican Centra. Tomorrow. 
7.30pm. 

MARRINER/ST MARTIN: Sir 
Neville Marriner conducts the 
Academy of St Martin-in-the- 
Fields in Vaughan Williams's 
Tallis Fantasia, Beethoven's 
“PastoraT' Symphony, and in 
W^n's Violin Concerto the 
soioist is iona Brawn. 

Royal Festive Haii. Tues. 
7.30pm. 

ALL BACH: Maurice Gendron, 
a fine cellist, plays Bach's 
unaccompanied Suites Nos 1, 
2 and 3: 

St John's Smith Square. 
London SW1 (01-^ 1061). 
Fri, 7.30;xn. 



KEIFER & SERRA: Huge 
contemporaiy American 
abstmn scugXurss in 
impres»ve double act by 
Anselm Keifer and Richard 
S6rr&> 

Saatctti Coilectkxi. 98A 
Boundary Road. London NWS 
(D1-624 8299 far appointment). 


JAZZ 


LOOSE TUBES; Ctos^ dates 
of their successful Britah tour. 
TonighL RNCM Opera House, 
ManSiester (061 2^ 4504): 
tomorrow. Hm^rkat Theatre, 
Leioester (OSw 539797); Mon, 
Warwick University Arts 
Centra (0203 417417}; Wed. 
Blueooat Arts Centre. 

Liverpool (051 709 5297). 

LEWISHAM JAZZ FESTIVAL: 
Starts Mon with the McCoy 
Tyner Trio, fresh from a 
season at Ronroa Scott's; and 


• Mimmo Paladino, die coor 
temporary Italfan * paindi^ 
star, has a show openiiig this 
week. ' of etchings, woodcnts 
and linocnts the past 
three years. They indnde the 
woodcDt panel in the Lae- 
rimose series above. The same 
gallery also has Niebolas 
Pope: New Departures, by the 
Aostraliaii-boni scnlptor last 
seen cread^ or^nic-looldi^ 
abstracts. WadSngton Gal- 
leries. 34 Cork Street, London 
W1 (01^8611). From Wed. 

WATERCOLOURS: Autumn 
exhibition and sell-off of 
works by the esteemed Royal 
Society of Painters in 
Watercolours. 

Bankside Gallery, 48 Hopton 


• Kim Novak discoiicerts fm-- 
mer polkeman Janies Stewart 
with a cluusge df ideotity in 
Alfred Hitchcoc k's masteriy 
thriller, Fertigo (TTV, today, 
10pm-12.20Bm). Made in 
19^ the film wasi mysteri- 
ously kept out of ciro^tion 
for many, years at Hitchcock^ 
insistence, while its reputation 
steadily grew. It is worth tte 
long wait 

TUNES OF GLORY (1^; 

Alec Guinness as a roistering 
Scottish colonel in conflict 
with his martinet replacement 
(John Mills). 

Channel 4, Thurs, 9.3D- 
11 . 30 pm. 


RADIO 


THE REAL DALLAS: William 
Davis visits the city that daims 
a thousand millionarres and 
looks for the reaMHe 
incarnations of J. R., Miss 
Ellje and Sue Etten. 

Radio 4, today, 4-4.45pm. (On 
November 1 he reports from 
Denver and Los Angeles on 
The Real Dynasty.) 

PENDENNIS: Dominic Guard 
as the romantic edolesoent 
who becomes a world-weary 
sophisticate in a lively eight- 
part adaptation of Thadreray’s 
comic novel by Peter 
Buckman. 

Radio 4, tomorrow, 7-8pm. 


The fruits of passion 





mmm 


BLOOD RAINS: Mike Walker's 
atmospheric ^y is set in 
Malaya in 1960 and explores 
the human dimension to the 
war against the Communists. 
Megumi Shlmanuki plays a 
Malayan woman wtfase 
memories are stirred by a 
chance encounter in a bank in 
England. 

Radto 4, Mon. 8.15-9.30pm. 

LA PESTE Albert Camus's * 
symbolic tale of bubonic 
plague gripping a French port 
in Aoeria. Ronald Pickuo as 












including Clive Merrison, 
Alfred Burke and Brian 
Glover. 

Radio 3. Tues, 7.30-9.30pm. 

A CLASS APART?: Report by 
Kevin Mulheam on the pros 
and cons of special education 
for disabled children, followed 
by a phorie-in and shidio 
discussion. 

Radio 4, Thurs. 7>40-8pm. 


n his studio in Paris Auguste Rodin 
is contemplating a nude model. As 
she stands up. her hands on her 
and bieasu thrust forward, he has a 
sudden moment of inspiration. 
mover, he demands in a piercing voice, 
''that is beautiful." And with that 


according to a contemporary observer, 
'nhe noble severity of his features, which 
makes him look like a Gothic figure, 
vanished. His face lit up with enthu- 
siasm, his cheeks swelled and his nostrils 
flared." 

Although the Arts Council cannot 
produce the man himself for its ex- 
hibition at the Hayward Gallery, his 
personality shines through.The formula 
repeats that of last year's succe^ftU 
Matisse show, concentrating on the 
interplay between drawing and sculp- 
ture. There is little emphasis on Rodin's 
legendary lechery, but lots on the woric. 
The exhibition organizer. Catherine 
Lampert. vjas once a sculptress herself 
and worked near the Rodin Museum in 
Philadelphia: her interest in Rodin has 
lasted 20 years. She has spent the last 


IiBpited: Rodfa uid hfa sonlptiire Tire Kiss 

four of them sifting through the 7.S(X) 
drawings stored in the Rodin Mu^um, 
Paris, tor ibis show. "During that lime I 
discovered his drawings are more three- 
dimensional than those of any other 
aijist I've seen.” 

The' designers, who include Paul 
Williams (responsible for the recent 
“Romanesque" show), have opted for an 
austere backdrop for Rodin's powedui 
forms. There will be paitfament-white 


walls, plain showcases, and isolated 
staging for the major pieces. 

But despite the sober presentation, 
with an artist like Rodin ifassion kee^ 
breaking through. The highly sensual 
1894 sculpture of “Christ and Mary 


seif-identification. coming as it did at the 
end of a love affair. The extraordinary 
“Gates of Hell". left unfinished at his 
death, is. as Miss Larapen says in her 
catalogue, “his private laboratory and 
library. Its disorienting 
structure . . . manages to be true to the 
chaotic but uncontroliabie course of 
human passion". 

The exhibition includes many eye- 
openers from the reserve collection of 
the Musee Rodin in Paris, never 
exhibited before, such as exquisite 
porcelain designs for the Sevres factory, 
as well as works from America. 

Sarah Jane Checkland 

Rodin: Sculptures and Drawings Is at the 
Hayward Gallery,- South Bank, London 
SEI ( 01-928 3144 ) from next Saturday, 


Davison and ttis OiicMoans 
(Thur^, and the guitarists 
H^ Bis. Chariie Byrd and 
Barney Kessel (Fri). 

From Mon, Lewisram Theatre, 
London SE6 ((}1-690 3431). 

CHICHESTER JAZZ: The 
Buddy Rich Oreftestra opens 
on Mon, foltowed by Wild BDI 
Davison (Tues) and foe bands 
of McCoy Tyner and Courtney 
Pine (Wed). 

Mon-Wed, Festival Theatre, 
Chichester (0243 78131^. 

GLASGOW ALL-STAR JAZZ: 
The Great Guitars — Blis, 

^d and Kess^ — hold forth. 
Mon, MittfwU Theatre, 
Glasgow (041 552 5961). 

PARIS REUNION BAND: A 

magnificent all-star combo 
featuring various Americans 
who were at one time or 
another based in Paris, 
including Woody Shaw and 
Nat Adderley (trumpets). 
Grachan Moncur III 
(trombone), Joe Henderson 
and Nathan Davis 
(saxophones) and Kenny Drew 
(piano). 

Mon, Town and Country Club, 
9-17 Highgate Road, LorKton 
NWS (01-^ 3334). 

TONY COE: Once coveted by 
Basie, now among the worfers 
finest sax(^)honsts, and still 
with a liking for offbeat 
adventure. 

Wed. Old Vic, Nottingham 
(0602 585127); Thure, Band 
on the Wall. Manchester (061 
834 5109): Fri, Moon Qub, 
Bristol (0272 48751). 


FILMS [i 


OPENINGS 


tIKN (1^ EbuHlent arxi 
percepthre comedy from the 

young German fOm-maker 

Doris OOrrifl, with Heiner 
Lauterbach as the macho 
husband who takes up 
residence wHh his wifa's new 
lover. 

3742). Renoir 
(01-837 8402), Camden Pteia 
(01-485 2443). From Fri. 
MURPHrS LAW (18): BlOQd- 
and-buHet-spattered thriller 
fixxn director J Lee Thompson 
and Charles Bronson (a Los 
Angeles cop tracking the Killer 
of his ex-wife). With Carrie ' 
Snodgrass, Kathleen 
Whilhorte. 

Cannon Oxford Street (pl-636 
03m Cannon Panton Street 
01-930 0631). From Fri. 



THE MISSION (PG): This 
year's British blockbuster, 
with Robert Oe Niro and 
Jeremy Irons engaged in the 
mh-century power struggle 
between Jesuits and 
oJipniali^ In South America. 
Roland Joff6 directs with a 
fine eye for spectacle and a 
^,aye lor the script's 
deficiencies. 

Warner West End (01-439 

gay yuppies, presented with 
ease and skill; written 
and directed by Bill Sherwood. 
Sc^n on the HiH (01-435 
33o6)- 


DANCE 


NORTHERN BALLET! Two 
peHormances today and one 
tomorrow of their new Sworr 
Lake at Giyndebourne, then 
Wed-Nov 1. m Manchester . 
wtih new works, the Don 
Qutxore p» de deux end 
Michael Corder's AndeatAim 
and Dances. 

Festival Opera Theatre, 
Giyndebourne (0^ 812411): 
Royal Northern Ctriiege dt 
Music, Manche^. (061 273 
4504). 

ROYAL BALLED Ust 
performances of foe AMfaXT 
nngramine tonight and Wad. 
The Slevwig Baautynkums 
to the programmes Thurs. 
Covent Garden (01-240 1088). 

ON TOUR: Sedtof's WMa 
Rwal BaBet gives Swan Laka^ 

SSweriand (07»^17) and 
Mon-Thurs at the Derngate, 
Northampton (0^ 2^11). 
fallowed Fri and Nov l by a 
mixed biii kHtiuding Pkieapple 
/faK London FfasM BaRal 

K ves CcRpela at the Palaoe. 

anchsster (061 236 9922) 
today and foe Alhambra, 
Bradfard (0274 752000) Mon- 
Nov 1. BeUat Rambert today 
at Theatre RoyH Ptymouth 
(0752 688595) and Tuas-Novi 
at Theatre Rc^ Bath (0225 
65065). London 
Contoimxitafy Dance Theatre 
at The Grand, Leeds (0532 
459351) today and Leiceater 
Haymarket (0^ 539797) 
Tuei^ov 1. Soottiab BaHefs 
Gisede is at the Eden Court 
Theatre, Inverness (0463 . 
221718) today and the King's, 
Edinburgh (031 229 1201) 
Tues-Novl. 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 

SOUTH BAfOC: Advance postal 
booking open for Dumber 
concerts, including mrld 
premiere of Dees's Amerfafth 
Rhapsody, first western 
European pe r f o r ma nce of 
Schnittke's Rrst Syrnphony. 
Public postal/personal 
bookffig from Nov 4. 
telephone from Nov S. 

Ro^l Festival Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-923 
3191); (01-928 8800 credit 
cards); (01-928 3002 
information). - . 

RSC/NAT WEST TOUR: 
booking far Miefr Ado AOouf 
NotNng and The Manchaof of 
Veruce with visits in Novembo' 
to Scunthorpe (0724 840883). 
Ulverston 52299), . 
Carfisfe (0228 25222). Belfast 
(0232 665577) and Grimsby 
(0472 361843). 

VOYAGE OF THE DAWN 
1HEADER: Booking open far 
Gtyn Robbins adulation of 
C. S. Lewis Narnia novel (n - 
production by Richard 
Williams. Jan 20-FM> 14. 
Sadler's Wefts Theatre,. 
Rosebery Avenue, London .. 

EC1 (01^78 8916); (01- 
278 5450 information)., 

TURKEY TIME: Booking open 

for subscribers for Bot 
T ravers play in production by 
Roger Rees. General piibfc 

bpokmg from Nov 3. 


last chance 

BRIGHTON BEACH . 
wetoirs: Last p^ormancas 
of ^1 Smon play. To^ at' ■ 
2.15 and 7.4Spm. 

Lytteffan Theatre. South Bank, 
London SE1 (01-91^ 22^ ' 

COJTOIFORARY JAFAlieSP 
PRINTS: Work inducing 
I? 50 dbtock, siikscrew, 
lithograph, intaglio and ntixed 
media techniques. Ends 
tomorrow. 

British Museum. Great fiusstf' 

Stiwt. London WCl (01-8» 

1555). 





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Concerts: Max HaitfaMi; -. 

Dance: John Perdvait 
riliiL^ Geoff Browi; F&ttf ' 
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Sarah Jaift- 

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ORCHESTRA 


IM^pal Conducron Giuseppe Smopoli 
Pixocipal Guest GoocL: Esa-Pekka Salonen 


ESA-PEKKA SALONEN 
JOHN WALLACE 




Haydn: IVuinpet Cooccra 
SibefiiiK Four Lemminfcaineo Legends 

Wednesday 5 November at 730 

OWAIN ARWEL HUGHES 
JOHN OGDON 

El^tts InmductioQ and Allegro 
Rachmaninov: Pbdo 0»cm No. 2 
Vaughan WnBamg Symphony Na 4. - 

SpoDSored by NtSSAN UK LIMITED 


lUVMONO GUBamrpni^ 

MONDAY NEXT 27 OCTOBER atZSO p.m. 

Handd AKRIVALWTHEQQIBENOF 


WIGMOREHALL 


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ALL EXPENSES PAID. 

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S.ATURD AY S NOVEMBER at Z30 p.m. 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

Marche Slave; Swan Lake Sate , 
Piano Concerto No. 1; NntcmdrerSinte: 
1812 Overture 


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PICASSO 


21 Sqitcmbcrto 19NDvcxiibeA 1996. Open 10-9d2ilf 

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ME AND MY GIRL 

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STEPPING OUT 

HH Comedy by Rirhani Karrte 
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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 


Kingsley Amis’s Booker Prize winning novel concerns the return of media-Welshman Alun Williams to the sceptical embrace 
of his homeland. While his old drinking friends mull over the implications in The Bible, their wives are at a coffee morning 


After all, it was only wme 



wo empty I ^litie bot- 
tles of Soave Superioie (DOO 
stood on the gla^topped table 
next to a silver tray be^ng ten or 
eleven used cofbe-cups. some of 
them half tbll of finished-with 
coffee. The air in Sophie Norris's 
sjMcious drawing room was misty 
with cigarette smoke and loud 
with several conversations. True 
to Welsh punctuality, most of the 
ladies there had arrived at or 
slightly before the off at eleven 
arid so not missed any pan of what 
was going. ITie coffee and atten- 
dant biscuits, having conferred a 
Kind of legitimacy on the session, 
had been made shon woric of. 
swallowed down by some like 
bread and butter before cake, 
scamped or skipped completely by 
Others, and the real business was 
uncorked and poured after about 
twenty minutes. Obviously it was 
drunk at different speeds there^ 
after, though you could have 
guessed that a couple of those in 
the room had been at the Soave, or 
perhaps the Frascati, earlier and 
elsewhere. After all, h was only 
wine. 

Sophie herself was not one of 
the couple. Standing by the french 
window that gave a view of 
garden, golf links and. remotely, 
sea. she looked confident and 
comfortable, very much like the 
wife of a prosperous caterer 
recently semi-retir^ or more, and 
hardly at all like someone who in 
her time had been one of the surest 
things between Bridgend and 
Carmarthen town ~ quite a 
distinction. In tweed skin and 
angora sweater her figure was still 
impre^ive. though her breasts no 
longer jutted out ofher trunk like a 
pair of smallish thighs as they bad 
once femously done. At the mo- 
ment she and Owen Celian- 
I^vies were talking about that 
day's star topic 

**Quite a good-looking man, I 
suppose you'd have to admit,” 
said Cwen, fair-mindedly. "Or he 
was, anyway.” 

“Oh. not too bad if you like that 
rather flashy type.” Sophie spoke 
in the unreoonstnictki, rather 
shrill, tones of Hairiston. well 
suited for expressionles ut- 
terances. “Of course she's lovely,” 

“Mind you, he's a terrible old 
sham.” 

“Soiryr 

“At school with Bcydan my eye. 
Oh. they were both at the Gram- 
mar right enough, but three years 
‘between them. He can't have 
known him. Weil if he did, it 
means Brydan was taking an 
interest in boys three years youn- 
ger, and Fve heard a lot of things 
about him, but that never. You 
ask Muriel. She'll tell you Peter's 
the same age as .Alun exactly, they 
were in the same form, and be 
doesn't remember Brydan at all 
from then." 

“Yeah, well . . 

“And evidently according to 
Peter that ‘Alun' business is alark. 
‘Alan' it always was at school, 
Peter said, in the English way. 
That was before he went in for 
teing a Welshman profession- 
ally.” 

Not many general topics ap- 
pealed to Sophie, and the question 
of Wales or being Welsh stood 
hi^ in her uninierests. “Oh yes,” 
she said, quite dully enou^ to 
have checked anyone less tena- 
cious than Gwen. 

“When he came back after the 
war he'd been out in the great 
world and discovered the advan- 
tages of Welshness.” 

“For Christ's sake tell me what 


they are. Gwen, and I can pea 
th^ on lo my old man.” said 
Muriel Thomas in her breezy, 
booming voice as she movra 
closer. She held a freshly^pened 
bottle ofSoave. just a litre one this 
lime, from which she refilled 
Gwen's glass. “He seems to think 
it's about on a par with the brand 
of Cain." 

"I really meant just to appeal to 
the Saxons. Muriel, you know, the 
way Brydan used to go on. But 
actually we were talking about 
Alun.” 

“Oh God, were you? Pm afraid 
here's one ^on who's managed 
to resist the appeal ofboth Brydan 
and Alun. I'U say no more because 
I am, after all, a guest in your 
country.” 

“You're one of us, darling.” said 
Sophie. 

This was certainly true in the 
sense that, for all her often- 
proclaimed Englishness. Muriel 
conformed closely to a prevalent 
Welsh physical type with her dark 
hair and eyes and slender build, a 
faa often remarked on. at least in 
Wales. If it occurred to her now 
she gave no sign. Holding back 
whatever had been on the tip of 
her tongue, she said: “My purpose 
in grabbing you diaps was not to 
discuss the great A/un but to 
recruit a rescue expedition for 
poor Angha rad's benefiL La belle 
Dorothy hath her in thrall.” 

After a minute the trio b^n 
rather carefully to cross the room. 
The level of atmospheric pollution 
seemed if any^ing to have gone 
up slightly. Eirinking rates among 
the company might have varied 
but there was a pretty uniform 
commitment to cigarettes, 
with foe smoke from those ac- 
tually being smcriced well backed 
up by the three or four stubs left in 
ashtrays but not put out. Empty or 
forgotten packets and various bits 
of wrapping littered foe n%s. 

On foe rug in front of the lighted 
gas-frre, a large and elegant appli- 
ance with frilly simulated coals, sat 
Dorothy Mormn, who had been 
on Sophie's doorstep at ten to 
eleven. At her side stood a half-frifi 
40oz flask of California Pinot 
Chardonnay and a brimming 
blue-glass ^huay with foe distinct 
lion of having two cigaren&ends 
burning away in it at foe same 
time. She was indeed talking 
strenuously though not loudly to 
Angharad Pumphrey, who often 
had to lean down from her leather 
armchair to catch the words. 



thing,- though. She's probably in 
pain.” 

“1 hope so. It didn't do us My 
good, socking up for Donithy. 

Gwen screwed up fierfecc. Not 
a lot of that, though, was there. 

actually?” . 

-“Now you mention it. no, there 

wasn't. It's not much of a defence 
of a bui^ar to say he's always been 
a bnxglar.” 

“Ferlu^ we should bave-ajpeed 
with her about how terrible Doro- 
thy is.” 

“Then she'd have had it in for 
us for Imowmg her. There's no 
pteas^ some people, as you’ve 
probably noticed yoursdC” 

. A general stir b^an. Giasstt 
were drained, but not always left 
empty because there seemed to be 
a fening that no opened wine 
should oe allowed to temain 
iindnink, perhaps out of some old 
Cymric superstition. Things might 
have gone difforently, or just 
further in the same direction, if 
Sophie tmd broached the 34itre 
box of Selected Balkan Riesling on 
of the drinks cabin^ whose 
contents of pn, whisky and ofoer 
strong liquor were of - course 
perfectly ale fibni any or all of the 
party. Two, three women went to 
saygoodbyeto Sophie, who was so 
relieved at being able to speak 
again that she refused to let foem 
gOi, at aiw rate until after ^ had 
answered the door-belL 



A_ 


was not deaf, 
or no worse than most of them; 
she was not drunk, not even 
drinking. What singled her out 
from those around her was her 
looks, which were those of a real 
old lady, though she was not foe 
oldest in years. Pan of it came 
from her clothes ^ no bright 
trouser-suits for her ~ and part her 
untouched or unreiouchra hair 
and the like, but foere seemed 
nothing to be done about her 
collap^ mouth or foe knobbly 
protrusions of jawbone on either 
side ofher chin or the criss-crossed 
flabbiness round her eyes. There 
had been talk of a disfiguring 
illness at some time before she 
arrival in these pans from Capel 
Mererid and presumably after she 
married Ganh, but nobody really 
knew or would telL 

Dorothy Morgan was saying: 
“But it's not just that, their whole 
outlook is different, their whole 
view of life.” Her neat short hair- 
cut and unadorned black-framed 


spectacles gave her a misleading 
air of intellectual striemess. “You 
can tell from foe structure of their 
language Do you know Rusaan at 
all? Well, it's frill of oonjugations 
and inflections. For instance . . 

Meanwhile the arrivals were 
moving into position in business- 
like style, Muriel on the ann of foe 
chair, Gwen on a quilted needle- 
work-box and Sophie squatting on 
foe rug. As they did so they all said 
hello to Angharad and asked bow 
she was and told her they were 
glad to see her and she said 
something to all of them back. 

During foe last part of this 
Dorothy rose to her knees and. in 
a slightly louder voice than before, 
said: “1 was telling Angharad 
about Russian and how extraor- 
dinarily more complicated a lan- 
guage it is than Welsh, and of 
course English, which means . . .” 
She spoke with an unvarying slight 
smile and her gaze fixed on some 
neutral point . . not necessarily 
more sophisticated than we are, at 

least not all the time ” It was 

not known when she slept be- 
cause nobody had ever been foere 
to see her departing for bed or. 
when staying in the same house, 
come down to breakfast and failed 
to find her already at foe table with 
a dgi^tte and most likely a glass 
of wine. . . very primitive be- 
cause they drop the verb “to be” 
whenever they can. Like Red 
Indians.” She was said to have 
been found once telling the man 
who was la}'ii>g foe carpets about 
eohippus. 

Dorofoy's heavy-duty mode 
took an appreciable lime to come 
round from, so that when she 
paused for a second or two. as she 
did after the Red Indians, nobody 
had anything to say at first, until 
Sophie just scraped in on the last 


of foe ^ber by asking to bear 
about foe trip to Leningrad. Not 
again, surely? Yes, again, insisted 
Stophie; and very soon she was 
having foe case for going by 
Aeroflot put to her with un- 
diminshed conviction. 

Under this covering fire Muriel 
Gwen and Angharad were able to 
withdraw in good order. Standard 
Dorothy procure said that when 
she got into that sort of stride and 
someone had to sacrifice herself 
for foe sake of foe others, then 
whoever happened to be hostess 
stepped forward. The punishment 
seemed to even out pretty well 
except that on neutral like 

Dorothy's own establishment. 
Sophie got landed oftener than her 
turn. The others would agree 
rafoer sheepishly among them- 
selves that foe somehow sounded 
as if she minded it less. 

There was no trace at foe drinks 
table of the aimost-fuli litre of 
Soave Muriel had left on it some 
minutes earlier. An untouched 
magnum of Orvieio, however, 
stood within reach and foe set 
effrneniJy about opening that, 
cigarette in mouth, eyes screwed 
up. 

“We haven't seen you here for a 
long time, Angharad.” said Gwen. 

“No. you haven’t, and I 
wouldn't be here today if I hadn't 
happened to have to take a clock 
in for repair at foat place in 
Hatchery Road.” Angharad's 
voice was not old, so much not so 
that public-utilities men and other 
strange still occasionally tried to 
flirt with her over foe telephone. 
“1 bumped into Sian Smith when 
she was more or less on her way 
here.” 

“Of course, it is quite a step 
from where you are." 

“Yes, and it's not much fun 
when 1 gel here, either, if this is 


anything like a fair sample.” 

“Sony about old Dorothy. 
We're son of used to her, you 
know. We could see you were 
stuck.” 

“I hope I never have the chance 
of getting usol to her. What makes 
that woman think I want to hear 
her paltry little observations on 
Russia or Russian or Russians? Or 
anything else on God's earth?” 

No awareness, let alone 
redatioD. of having been unstuck 
showed itself in Angharad. On foe 
contrary, her resentment of 
Dorothy's conduct seemed to 
grow when no one looked like 
offering to excuse it Gosely and 
with apparent curiosity she had 
watched Muriel exi>ose and puli 
the ooik of the Orvieto; now, all 
but incredulously, she followed 
every detail of its pouring, her own 
nearly-emp^ gla^ held austerely 
to one 5id& 



eopfe tended to forget 
about Angharad in the same sort 

of spirit as they foigot about her 
husband, whom, by foe way, no 
living person had ever seen in her 
company, any more than anyone 
had ever seen foe inside of foeir 
house. They wondered about the 
Pumphreys' domestic and marital 
life ^uite as much at these coffee- 
parties as at foe Bible. 

“Well, that's just how she is,” 
said Gwen, defending Dorothy 
rather late in foe day and without 
much fervour. “She's always been 
like it but she's got worse lately. 
Like everybody else.” 

“I mean it's not as if 1 were a 
great friend of hers,” said 
Angharad, accusingly now. “I 


hardly 1mow her. Hardly even 
spoken to her before.” 

“You were there, that's en- 
ough,” said Murid. 

“Wbat sort of a husband does a 
woman like that have?” 

Muriel lit another dgarene and 
said: “Very nice chap, old Pincy 
Motgan. She doesn't do it to him. 
Not when we're about,, anyway. 
They get on cogetiKr lite a house 
on fire.” 

“He's a builder,” added Gwen. 

“A haihfer.” 

“Well, he builds things like 
town hails.” said Muriel 

After stiKfying MuriePs next 
inhalation of smoi^ Angharad 
returned ny her point. .“E^^ahe 
wouldn't let me gd a word in, not 
a single word. Not even to idl her 
bow riveting she was being.” - 

“You always get one person like 
that at this sort of jollification,” 
said Gwen. 

Angharad raised her bnsy eye^ 
brows. “Oh, so that's wliai it is. 
Quite frankly, if it stopped shoriat 
one perfon like that 1 wouldn't 
mind so much,” she said, gra- 
ciously lookzng over Gwen's 
shoulder as she spoke: “I don't 
mind tefling yon it'll be qnne a 
time beCbre I come this way again 
This sort of Jollification, as you 
caO it, quite defeats me.- I'd bener 

make my farewells. Where's 

where's Sophie?” 

The otbCT two watdied Angt^- 
ad take brie£ uiKlemonstiative 
leave ofher hostess and. without a* 
^ance at Dorothy or anybody else, 
limp heavily from the room. 

“That's what I calf oieflowing 
with age,” said Muri^ topping up 
the glasses. 'T>h, I'm that thriJlM 
she didn't mind tdling us what she 
told us.” 

“I thought only beantifttl people 
could behave like that. Poor 


_ ian Smith fell down on 
her way out but soon got up again 
and rnjuie it into the. hall When 
Sophie reappeared sire had Pe^ 
Tlunnas with her. Thes^t ofhun 
standing alone on the doorstep 
had been enough to let hv know 
that he had dri^iped Charlie at the 
Glendower. Without consulting 
him. still less offering him a glass 
of wine, slw crossed to the drinks 
cabinet 

Peter looked rather shaken. 
After a moment's hesitaiibn he 
advanced into foe room whh real 
reluctanoe that be. tried, late on 
and not very convincin^y. to hide 
in a comic pcetenoe of reluctanoe. 
He and Murid vraved to each 
ofoer and it was the same or 
simiter with him and Gwen, him 
and Dorothy, him and a couple of 
ofoezs. his hand at foe 

smoke-fiUed air, be said in a 
bantering tOue: 

“Ski.fois is what all you busy 
housewives get up.to while your 
men-folk are sinpinng and boring 
their heads off in the pub.” 

It was not very good, though 
surely betto' than nothing, and he 
had. done his best to sound 
pleasani and he had sounded 
quite irieasanl at any rate for.him,' 
butnobody seemed to hear much 
and nobody came over, not even 
Dorothy, until Sophie brought 
him a giii and tonic, offering to ' 
fetch ice which he forbade:^ He and 
she chatted about someth!^ very 
likely more than one thing, for 
however long it was before Muriel 
coflected him and took him off If 
his foaken look had departed it 
wffi in place again by this time. 

Of all foe guests only Dorothy 
remained. She would not . move 
before another piece of standard 
procedure femhed Percy over from 
Pedwaisaint to shift her, probably, 
though not certainly, by the power 
of words. There was no standi 
procedure fiH' thaL . 

£Mracr^Jhjm The Old Devils, I?}* 
Kingstey Amis, published fy 
Hutdtmson, £9.95. 


Sevens 

up 

Could there be an elite worid-wide 
rugby sevens series in foe pipe- 
line? Prince Rainier of Monaco 
recently announced on French 
television that a sevens com- 
petition is planned for Monte 
Carlo in May. The observant will 
see that this is something of a low- 
key project, since it will clash with 
foe rugb>' World Cup. But it sets 
things up fora friiure sevens series 
that would tie in with existing 
competitions in Sydney and Hong 
Kong International sevens make 
one of the most pleasing of 
sponing occasions, something on 
which rugby has been slow to 
capitalize: Bui ji could be very big 
business indeed . . . and a frinher 
threat to the game's still<lung-to 
amateur principles. 



SPORTING DIARY 

Simon Bames 

Union bashers 


Ripping 


As foe Ausiralian boats swish 
about in the ever more ridiculous 
America's Cup. vying for a right to 
defend foe trophy, it is panic time 
among the challengers. When 12- 
meire yachtsmen panic, they go 
for the chainsaw. The belief is that 
if you cut a boat about a bit and 
then weld it toefc loufoer again, it 
must go just a bit raster. Italia 11 
has bad SAus3S.000 worfo of 
iieatmeni: Azzura IV is next in the 
queue. Heart of America isn't 
right either: she's had a load of 
work done and is likely to need 
more. Is foere anything about this 
sport that is sane. 1 wondei? 

• even more famous spOrtiiig 
moustache than Nigel Ma^U's 
goes to the starting grid in 
.Adelaide, where the final motor 
racing grand prix of foe season 
will be held tomorrow. Dennis 
“there's nothing like a cold tinnie 
after stuffing foe Poms” Lillee will 
be driving a Ford TX5 turbo in a 
five-tep cetebrit}' race. 


Most rugby leagne men have little 
time for the middle-dass code of 
rugby unioa. Bat Henderson GiU, 
the dashing winger who plays for 
Great Britain against Anstn^ in 
this afternoon's rngby lea^gne 
international wooM lovea gameof 
nnion. “Oh yes.” he said. “If I 
piajvd unimi I'd never get canght 
with foe bail in my hands.” There 
is the point, of course, foat if he 
played union he'd never get bold of 
the hall in the first place. In onion, 
withers are the men hi perma- 
nently clean shorts who suffer 
from hypothermia as well as total 
alienation from their colleagues. It 
is fun to speculate on the old 
coniuidnimoftheresnit ofa match 


between, say. Great Britain rngby 
league and the British Lions rugby 
union teams. Most league men 
reckon that a league side would 
beat a nnion side even under niuon 
rnJes. Such a match has even taken 
place. Id 1944, two teams of 
senricemen had a go at each other 
under nnion rules at Odsal. A 
rugby league XV beat a nigby 
nnkm X\*, 15-10. Perhaps it' b 
time for foe gauntlet to be thrown 
down again. Fat chance of it being 
picked up. I suppose. “A property 
promoted charii}' match against a 
union XV would be a great idea,” 
said David Howes, foe Lei^iue's 
press person. “We would relish 
the challenge.” 


Thommo talks 

Old Australian fast bowlers never 
fade away. They just bring out 
books. Jeff Thomson's Thommo 
Declares is not short on “good-on- 
yer-Thommo" stuff. “En^and 
was a hole. No beaches and no 
wild pigs for me to go hunting. The 
wild pigs bad all b^n ciear^ out 
by the 1 4th century. I discovered 
Pom beer. They should be hung 
for calling that warm stun 
beer ... 1 couldn't wait fora crack 
at the Poms. I fooughL stuff that 
stiff upper lip let's see bow stiff it 
is when it splits.” 


Big draw 


The recent Milanese derby be- 
tween Imer and Milan was. it is 
reckoned, the most boring 0-0 
draw in history, even by Italian 
league standards. Hie two Milan 
clubs share San Sira stadium. The 
Inter centre-forward. Sandro Aiio- 
beili. summed up: “It was a good 
point for us. It was up to them to 
attack — after all they were 
playing at home.” 

BARRY FANTONI 


iKSS il Pay-ride 




Professional jockeys do not nor- 
mally pay for the privilege of 
riding horses. But Michael Wig- 
ham happily paid £234 fora single 
ride at Hamilton on Monday. The 
owTier of the horse. Gary WrighL 
was on what racing people call 
“the forfeit list" ~ he ow^ £234 
for such things as entry fees, 
registration of colours and so 
forth. An owner on the forfeit list 
is not permiued lo run a horse. So 
Wigbam. who rather fancied his 
chances with the horse — Millfen 
— stumped up himself. To make 
foe occasion ycl more bizarre, he 
won. “You've go to put in if you 
warn to take it out.” Wigham said. 


Dons’ donna 

I'm sad to sec that Wimbledon are 
no longer on lop of the First 
Division. No doubt they will take 
foe championshit) with a goixl late 
run. Wimbledon is the son of club 
that cheers you up. They are 
originals in niany ways: the only 
League club, for example, with a 
female physio. Caroline Brouwer, 
aged 27. has worked as assistant 
physio with Wimbledon for nearly 
five years. She did the FA's ihre^ 
year physio course after being a 
referee and getting irritated by her 
helplessness when a player brake a 
leg in the game she wits running. 
“A football dressing room is no 
place for a lady.” she said. 




thetinies 


SUSPENDED 

HEAD- 

NiiSTRESS 

latest 



*Of course, in our day ic was 
the kids nbo got sent home' 


Peter Brimelow 


Saxon echoes from the 

• % • 

New England woods 


New York 

In one of .Alfred Duggan's gmlike 
historical novels — I think it was 
The Conscience of The King, 
about the Saxon conquest of post- 
Roman Britain — the contem- 
porary popular belief is recorded 
that the great Forest of the Weald 
sprang up magically overnight, 
after foe l^ions were withdrawn. 

The frill meaning of this haunt- 
ing folk memory dawned on me 
only about a year ago. 1 was 
tramping the bounds ofa weekend 
property foat we just bought 
in the hills of north-western 
Connecticut, about 100 miles 
from Manhattan, (^“two hours” 
as foe natives would say — 
Americans retain the frontier 
habit of expressing distances in 
terms of iravelling time.) Deep in 
ihe woods, buried in undergrowth, 
i found a drystone wall. 


You practically never 
dix Slone wails in America. Am- 
erican farmers did not have foe 
necessary labour or time, but they 
did have availabie and affordable 
substitutes such as timber and 
barbed wire. 

Howevor. the state of Connecti- 
cut is the southernmost compo- 
nent of the New England region. 
Settlers reached my area in the 
early ISih century. They gave it 
English place names in honour of 
their origins - Kent Bridgewater, 
Torringion. Lichfield — and they 
made it look like England, with 
winding lanes and clapboard 
houses also .seen in the Home 
Counties. They endosoi their 
Helds with dry'sione walls, which 

•k 

{ 


their descendants often call “stone 
fences”, at just about the time tiiat 
enclosures were bringing the simi- 
lar walls that- now cnaiactecize 
parts of the British country^de. 

TTie woods came '7- or rather 
returned ^ later, swallowing fields 
painfully deared over generations 
as faraDy fenns were abandoned 
in the fece of comp^tion from the 
Midwest and Cdifornia. to »y 
nothing of imports. A similar 
process has completely cloaked 
foe scars of the eaii]f industrial 
revolution, once prominent in foe 
area because of water power and 
shallow mineral lodes. More rhtm 
80 per cent of Connecticut is 
forested today, compared with 
only 15 per cent , a century ago. 
Thm are now more deer than in 
Indian times. 

Which is not to say that my 
pro^rty was a bargain. Connects 
cut is one of the most prosperous 
slates in foe Union. The former 
farmland is prized not for agri-. 
culture but ambience, partly 
cause of the purchasing power of 
refugee Manhatuuiiies like myself 

The amaringfoingabout trees is 
how fast foejr grow. Deciduous 
s^lings in full leaf can Uockalihe 
of si^t m le^ ibaa five years. 
Connecticut householders, stand- 
ing amid wools in. which Que^ng 
B^ts and' Artburiaa. koights 
might wdl be lurking, have told 
me that less than two decades ago 
they, were surrounded by. open 
fleCds. It is easy to see ibai once 
the Pax Romana ceased to (nptea 
Britain's pea^ts. its cumyated 
land woiitid i^dly Ttveit to' an 
. in.'-" ••• • ••.’ 


apparently primeval wilderness. 

or course, there are regions in 
^lain where the inexoraUe 
forces of agricultural and indus- 
trial development have proved, 
well .exorable. The -shipyards of 

^ Wooden 
Walk of England were built, or tire 
medieval, sheep boom in Suffolk, 
winch provided the foundation for 
Dick Whiaingion's fortune, arc 
only quaint reflections in those 
uanquil areas today. But usually ' 
•any such ebbs .'and flpws are 
swarnped by the prolonged surge 
of British population growth. In 
the vastness of America — 
Connecticut, one of foe smallest 
states. IS well over half the rize of 

Ws^ - these eddies are fer more 

visible.' 

Britain had been 
raled by Tudor times, when it 
became necessary to build cottages 
and mansions from brick and 
stone instead of wood. But, incini- 
ently, they are still there, ready m 
leap im again if the inhabitants 
panse fora breafoer of even a few 
years. . , 

I spent my 
chfldhpod in foe Noithof En& 
tend an area darkened by the 
iKtones of- the J^h -century and 

iheii uiierfy debauch^ by the 

"tevelopments 
of foe 4pth, I find this- an oddiv 
comforting- fooughL Nature is ‘ 
more TesiUent; foan we think. It ■ 
has ways of rcpairiiig even foe ' 

foosiiemble destruction. ■ t 









X 





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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 




1 Ptamington Street, London El 9XN TdejAonc: 01-481 4100 


The 
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THE SYRIAN CONNECTION 


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sentence of forty-five 
passed upon Nezar 
Hindawi for his attempted 
bombing of an El A1 aircraft 
and the 380 people on board is 
wlcome on two grounds. It 
reflects the universal foelings 
of horror and repugnance 
aroused by his crime and it 
symbolises a general 
deteraiination not to surren- 
der either to lenorism or to the 
fe^ of r^risals. The aspea of 
Hindawi's crime that has es- 
pecially horrified people is 
what Mr Justice Mars Jones 
yesterday called a '‘callous and 
cnicl deception” - namely, his 
willingness to sacrifice his 
pr^ant_ girlfriend and un- 
born child as a means of 
planting the bomb on the 
plane. 

The popular instinct is 
sound is regarding this act with 
particular horror. All the pas- 
sengers were innocent and all 
equally deserving of our 
protection. But Miss Anne 
Muiphy .had a powerful and 
particular claim on Hindawi's 
affection and his ruthless 
preparedness to murder her 
revels a depth of wickedness 
which is not easy to grasp. 

That wickedness, however, 
Krves to foreclose any soften- 
ing analysis of Hindawi's 
crime as merely another in- 
cident in a remorseless "cycle 
of violence” If any general 
conclusion is to be drawn from 
this case, it is that terrorists are 
p^chopathlc criminals rather 
than politicians, let alone 
"misguided idealists'*, and it is 
profoundly mistaken to ex- 
plain their crimes by reference 
to Intimate- grievances or 
politic aspirations. 

Such people are, however, 
wmetimes used by politicians 
in countries like Syria where 
murder and mass murder are 
conventional ways of settling 
disputes. While these methods 
were confined to domestic 
politics, the world paid little 
attention — even passing over 
such atrocities as President 
Assad's bombardment of 


Hama in which tens of thou- 
sands of people were killed. 

Western states continued to 
turn a diplomatic blind eye to 
Syrian involvement in tenor- 
ism when it spread to the 
Lebanon and even into West- 
ern Europe. Thus Britain took 
no action when two Syrian 
diplomats blew themselves up 
with their own car bomb a few 
years ago. But the revdations 
ill court of the Syrian 
embassy's coopmtion with 
HindawPs terrorism were of a 
different order of blatancy. 
When diploniats firpm me 
Ambassador down provide a 
terrorist with &!se documenta- 
tion, whisk him ofT to a safe 
house, try to disguise him and 
finally hdp him to escape; they 
compel the host count^ Do 
implement some such dip- 
lomatic retaliation as the Fon* 
eign Secretary, Sir Geofftey. 
Howe, announced in the Com- 
. mons yesterday. 

This depressing history is 
nonetheless bound to provoke 
bvo questions. Would Syrian 
intelligence have contem- 
plated a crime of the scale of 
planting the bomb on an 
Israeli aircraft at Heathrow if 
Britain had not previously 
reacted so nervously to p^t 
terrori^ activities, both Syrian 
and Libyan? We must at least 
suspect that it would noL That 
lea^ naturally to the second 
question: are the measures 
announced by Sir Geoffrey ~ 
essentially, breaking off dip- 
lomatic relations, with Syria 
and imposing greater security 
restrictions upon Syrian Arab 
Airlines — likely to prove a 
sufficient deterrent to such 
offlcialiy-sponsored crimes in 
future? 

Sir Geoffrey can a^e that, 
in breaking off diplomatic 
relations, he took the sterner of 
two alternative actions. He 
might merely have dedared 
the Ambassador persona non 
grata. As he himself argued in 
the House, however, there was 
abundant evidence of official 
Syrian complicity and it would 


have been absurd to have held 
the Ambassador rather than 
his Government responsible 
for iL Since diplomatic rela- 
tions are designed to amelio- 
rate conflicts between states, 
there is little point in them 
when they are a cause of such 
conflicts, still less when they 
are a means of actually 
prosecuting them. Until SSyria 
has given clear signs of return- 
ing to the usual -forms of 
diplomacy, therefore, the Brit- 
ish government would do well 
to maintain today's disianoeL 

A breach of diplomatic rete- 
tions, however, is essentially 
symbolic. Yet an apparent 
wiilin^ess to accept some 
costs is essential in the struf^e 
against terrorism. It is, after 
aU, because Syria and Ubya 
believed this country woidd 
always place its commercial 
interests in the Middle East 
before the cause of anti-terror- 
ism that they used their 
London embassies as tenorist 
bases. From this standpoint. 
Sir Geoffrey's dilute to close 
down SAA's London opera- 
tions and to cut the airline 
links with Syria entirely is 
inadequate. 

Further steps must therefore 
be taken. Sir Geoffrey hopes 
that the United States and the 
European Community will co- 
operate in sanctions against 
Syria. He should launch a 
vigorous diplomatic campaign 
to ensure that they do so. 
Recently, the Soviet Union — 
Syria's powerful sponsor — has ' 
b^n making discreet noises 
about opposing terrorism. Let 
him therefore uige the Soviets 
to rein in its client. Finally, the 
Western allies must seriously 
consult on what positive ac- 
tion can be taken to hunt down 
and destroy the terrorist 
groups to which states like 
Syria and Libya contract out 
their murders. 

If we shrink from such 
actions, the terrorists and their 
sponsors will be confirmed in 
their view that they are dealing 
with a nation of shopkeepers. 


UNITY IS NOT ENOUGH 


The liberal decision in East- 
bourne to torpedo the defence 
agreement between the two 
leaders of the Alliance has 
been as damaging for third 
party politics as was predicted 
at the time. The Alliance was 
suddenly proved to be 
divided as the old parties it 
was criticizing. 

The Liberals looked like 
unilateralists, the SDP 
multilateralisis.^ The split 
seemed irreversible and the 
.Alliance suffered accordin^y. 
The latest opinion poll which 
puts Alliance support at seven- 
teen per cent is the worst for 
Mr Steel and Dr Owen since 
the formation of the SOP. 

The Alliance has to have a 
united mulUlateralist defence 
policy. Dr Owen was right to 
perceive that he would oury 
no credibility to say otherwise. 
Nor. of course, wo^d Mr 
Steel, which is why his latest 
efforts to lie his party to the 
concept of a minimum nuclear 
deterrent are to be applauded. 

So far he has had a remark- 
ably smooth ride. On Tuesday 
the Policy Committee, which 
has the constitutional power to 
override the Libert con- 
ference, voted with Mr Steel to 
reaffirm the party's intration 
to maintain a minimum 


nuclear deterrent The follow- 
ing day the Liberal leader won 
the backing of his par- 
liamentary party. In vdiat 
must be seen as a personal 
victory for Mr Steel, Liberal 
defence poliQ^ underwent a 
complete change within two 
days. 

But there is still a long way 
to go. Two ^vate meetings, 
r^^tess of how important 
they are, are not going sud- 
denly to reassure the public 
that the Liberals do, after all, 
believe in a nuclear deterrent 
Conservative Central Office 
will seize on the foct that 
hundreds of Liberal activists 
up and down the coun^ still 
advocate a form of unitetera] 
disarmament 

The most effective way to 
dispel these doubts is to (^1 a 
one day special assembly. The 
liberal i»rty would then be 
foced with the choice to back 
Mr Steel's new defence policy 
or rricct it again, and risk 
losing the most consistentiy 
popular leader in Brifish poli- 
tics. 

Nor is unity by itself 
enou^- There is sQso the 
question of what nuclear deter- 
rent the Alliance is willing to 
accept The public can hardly 
be expected to take very much 


on trust any more. The refit- 
ting of Polaris for the fourth 
time cannot be an option. The 
system is rapidly beromiog out 
of date and any attempt to 
keep it going at this late stage 
could well prove to be the 
most expensive and most in- 
efficient choice available; Not 
suprisingly Dr Owen has never 
ftivoured it and is unlikely to 
do so now. 

There are, indeed, alter- 
natives to Trident by which 
Britain can remain a nuclear 
weapon state. But it would be 
folly to go for a deterrent 
which excluded the use of the 
Vickers submarines, the first 
of which has already been 
ordered. That is why the 
extension of Polaris will not 
do. The Alliance would be wise 
10 strike it off their lisL 

If Mr Steel can be persuaded 
tij make sure that his options 
ior a replacement to Polaris 
take account of the Trident 
ppgramme, and if he can have 
hiS position ratified at a special 
Liberal assembly, the Alliance 
could be back in business. It is 
obviously a huge risk, since it 
would be disastrous for the 
Alliance if it ftuied. However, 
as Dr Owen has said before, to 
Yrin all you have to be pre- 
pared to risk alL 


FOURTH LEADER 


One damp autumn day Win- 
nie the Pooh woke up knowing 
that he had something im- 
portant to tell everyone. But he 
could not remember what it 
was, so he decided to call on 
his friend Piglei to ask him 
what it might be. 

He dre^ed up warm 
cause his arthritis was bad in 
the mornings, and stomped 
stiffly down the garden path, 
tripping over an empty beer 
can that someone had thro^ 
over the hedge. "Bother” said 
Pooh crosly, adjusting his bi- 
focals. Biit after a while he 
started to hum a little hum 
from the latest Andrew Liojrd- 
Webber and was feeling quite 
cheerful by the time he readied 
Piglet's house. 

Piglet was finishing his 
breakfast of high-fibre acorns 

with vixamin-cnriched 
skimmed milk. He had grown 
a little hard of hearing recently 
and Pooh had to shout in his 
ear. But Pi^t agreed that if it 
was something very important 
he had better try to help Pooh 
remember what it was. So he 
reached for his stick and both 
animals set off to call on 
Ecyopc. 

Ecyore, the old grey donkey, 
had been mov^ out of his 
Gloomy Place by the council 
into a high-rise field kept by an 


Animal Ri^ts Society. This 
had made Eeyore gloomier 
than ever. But he cheered up 
on seeing the others and 
together they went off in 
search ofKai^ 

Kanga, who had just re- 
turned f^m a meeting of the 
Animal Equal Opportunities 
Group. liv^ on her own now 
since Roo had left to becomne 
a Yuppie — which Pooh 
thought was closely related toa 
Woozel if not to an actual 
Hef&lump. So Kanga joined 
them as they went off to see 
Ralfoit and Owl. 

The Hundred Aker Wood 
had been reduced to fifty akers 
now by Dutch Elm disease and 
acid rain, while someone had 
sprayed “GHELSEA 
RUBBISH” in white paint on 
the bridge where they used to 
play Pooh Sticics. Outside 
Owfs house there was i board 
which announced “Colidge of 
Adduli and Comunity 
Educayshun. Prinsiput Dr. 
Wol.” A young lady owl 
wearing trousers said sternly 
that Dr. Owl was busy *m his 
study and was not to be 
disturbed. But at that monent 
Owl emerged rubbing his eyes 
and listened sagely to what 

they had to say. 

■ "It is cteariy a matter on 
which we must go straight 


away to Christoi^er Robin” 
be sai^ And so it was that 
Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, Kanga, 
Rabbit and Owl all arrived at 
Giristopber Robin's bouse to- 
gether. Christopher Robin was 
out but on the dining table 
a large t^rtbday cake with 
more candles on it than any of 
the animals had ever seen 

Sud^nly Pooh realised 
what it was he had to tell them. 
It was his birthday. What he 
still could not remember was 
how old be was. So Owl 
oiier^ to count the candles on 
the 1^ something called 
binary notation. Half an hour 
later when Owl had nearly 
finished, Christopher Robin 
returned in his Barbour and 
green wellingLons, and told 
them after consulting ba 
pocket cdculator that Winnie 
the Pooh was 60 — whid^ said 
Ow^ was what he made it toa 

Then they all had a slice of 
cake— except Piglet because of 
his diet, Eeyore because of his 
teeth. Rabbit because of his 
ulcers, Kanjga who never ^ 
anything with animal fots in 
and Owl wiu> had fallen asleep 
agai n. 

“Silly old bear” said Chris- 
topher Robin 

affectionate!y."What would 
we do without you after all 
these years?” i 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



More ^ol visits 
by the judges 

front the Chairman of the Board 



lir. At ^ tinw when the prison 
sy^m is again bursting zt flie 
seams, the news (report, October 
23) that tbe Judidu Studies Board 
is considering increased v^ts to 
prisons circuit judges is wet- 
come and it is hopM that visits 10 
Holloway will oommence next 
mondL 

The fact remains that no High 
Court judge, no drcuh jiida and 
no recordiv has toured HoUowBy 
for ai lost eight years. 

In August. 1985,' with tlM 
consent of the GoWmor, this 
board invited the judges on die 
South Eastern Cucuit and the 
metropolitan sdpendi^ mag- 
istrates to vish this prison Not 
one judge took np the inviladon 
and only six sdpeadiaiies ac- 
cepted. 

I hope that every judge will take 
up the opptHtunity of visiting at 
least one prison to see the con- 
ditions in wEuch the staff woik and 
the inmates live, ft is not only the 
priraners who have to ei^ure 
indignities such as the sloppiog- 
out procedures in. male establish, 
meats; the prison ofiBoers have to 
oversee. 

Many of the prisoners lodted in 
cells for up to 24 hours a day are 
unoonvict^ sufiering the tendon 
of the unceitainpr of the results of 
their forthcoming trials. Last 
week, there were riots at. Risley 
Remand Centre. More serious 
incidents are predicted dsewhere 
by experienced governors. 

I( as a result of judicial visits, a 
few people each week are either 
kqn out of the pi^n system 
altogether or are given shorter 
sentences the exercise win have 
been worth while; 

Yours ^thfiiHy. 

JEFFREY J. BAYES, Chaumaii, 
Board of Vidiois, 

Holloway Prison, 

Parkhuisl Road, 

Holloway, N7. 

October 23. 


Nndear deterrence 

From Mr Philip Goldenb^ 

Sir, 1 am delighted to le^ (r^iorL, 
October 23) that the Liberal 
parliamenta^ party and the 
Uberal Policy Cominittee have 
agreed upon a defence and 
.disarmament policy which is 
responsible and r^istic, and 
upon the basiS of which the 
Ubeial/SDP Alliance — and in 
particular those of us who are its 
prospective parliamentary can- 
didates ~ can fight the next 
general election with credibility on 
an issue of such importance. 

However, because of what hap- 
pened at the Eastbourne Liberal 
Assembly, it is not enough that 
tbat policy should sim^y be 
endor^ by MPs and a small 
(albeit lepiesentalive) committee. 
This win leave open the question, 
which our opponents will not 
hesitate to realise, as to whether 
this policy is genuinely accepted 
by the pafty as a whole. 

It is therefore crucially nec- 
essary. both asa matter of internal 
party democracy and by way of 
auihoritative public aifirmation, 
that a special assembly be con- 
vened to put b^nd doubt the 
party's unambiguous commit- 
ment to Britain's full acceptance 
of its pan in the collective security 
of Wesiein democr^. 

It is equally important, in 
addition, that at that assembly — 
as was the case at the 1984 Lib^ 
Assembly — a full-blown and 
honestly presented unilateralist 
amendment be put and defeated, 
so that there can be no doubt, not 
only that the party is positively 
committed to a sensible policy, 
W also that it has exorci^ the 
ambivaleni ghost of EastbourneL 

In politics, presentation is not 
only often as important as realiiy: 
on occasions it is reality. 

Yours faithfully. 

PHILIP GOLDENBERG, 

While Trees. 

White Rose Lane, 

Woking, Surrey. 

October 23. 

Degrees of caring 

from Mr Michel Belt 
Sir, I would wish to reassure Lord 
Moyne (October 22) that British 
Telecom's planned introduction 
of a priority feult-repair service 
will in DO way reduce our current 
of maintenance service to 
customers- 

British Telmm's ^ simidaid 
fettlt-repair service, vdiich aims to 
correct feulis by the end of the 
next woiking day from the time 
the fault is reported, will continue 
unchanged. The cost of this ser- 
vice. which op^tes from Mon- 
day to Friday, is included in the 

basic rentsL 

Research, however, has in- 
dicated that many customers want 

more flexiltili^ in our mainte- 
nance service than is currently 
available. We are. therefbre, offer- 
ing th^ a dioice in terms of 
sp^ of response and period of 
oovo' under our new Servtcecare 
scheme; By paying an additional 
quarterly premium, faults null be 
responded to within four working 
faoins, Monday to Saturday 
(PromptChre option), or within 
four hours round the dock, seven 
a week (TotalC^ option). 
Currently something like 9S per 
cent of faults under our 
StandaitiCare service are cor- 
recied within our target and there 
(5 no question of our lowering this 
quality of service, for which tiiere 
isnodiaigie. 

Yours feithfully. 

MICHAEL BOT, 


Making best use of llie salmon 



Inland Cbmm unications, 

British TelecommunicBtions pic, 
Bl Newgate Street, ECL 
October 23. ' 








•'-'I 








'■•7 


From the IHrector qfThe Saimon 
and Trout Assodalion 
Sir, Lord Moran's aitide, "Time 
to do more for the salmon” 
(Ocioba* 22) is both' ajn and 
timely. Some am^fication is 
necessary in the context of 
information on catches. 

The salmon caii^t, by what- 
ever method, are a poor indication 
of the state of stodcs. Catching fish 
does not teQ you much, excqrt by 
extrapolation aud assumption, 
about the fish whidi have not been 
cau^t, if indeed there are any. 
,.The committee chaired by Lord 
Hunterin 1963 recognised that the 
most valuaUe -manageinent tool 
for the proper exploitation of the 
salmon was its homing instinct 
and r^mmended ^t- cropping 
should not take place nntil fish 
had returned to the rivers from 
which they had migrated. Thus 
there is no place in a sound 
man^oient plan for netting on 
the high seas, drift netting around 
the coasts nor for fixed nets 
outwtih esuiaries- ■ 

Lord Hunter also enundated 
the (xindple that management 
needs to be based on me counting 
of the fish once they have returned 
to Ibdr own rivers. Only in this . 
way can the stock levd be deter- 
mined in detail. Rational manage- 
ment decisions can then be maw 
on the sensible and prudent 
measures which need to ife taken 
loachieve a healthy and abundant 
stock which will support the many 
demands made on it 
Thus much more effort and 
money needs to be spent on 
devdoping and instsdling equip- 
ment which will give an accurate 
count of fish in rivers. 

Yours sincerely, 

JAMES FERGUSON, Director, 
The Salmon and Trout 
Association, 

Fishmongeis* Hal], 

London Bridge, EGA . 

the Director of the Inter- 
national Nutrition Foundation 
Sir, Lord Moran's exceOeni article 
emphasises the urgent need for 
stringent conservation mes^ures, 
since "It would be tragic if our 
graiKichildren found our rivers 
empty of salmon because of fmlure 
to act now”; but unfortunately the 
four relevant UK ministries give a 
low priority to salmon. 

Salmon could be one of our 
most important foods- It, like 
herring, which used to be a cheap 
food v^ely used by the poor, is an 
excellent source of the^pe of fet 
that seems to be eff^ve in 


preventing coron^ heart disease 
and certain other Western dis- 


A few days earlier (October 17) 
under "Medical Briefing” you 
reported that "A regular dietary 
supirieraent of fish oD could 
eventually prove an effective way 
of preventing heart disease”, and 
indeed fish-eating peoples such as 
Eskimos do not suffer from this, as 
some of us have emphasised for 
years- 

The successful forming of 
salmon in Scotland is likely to 
make it widely availaUe at a 
reasonable price, but protection of 
this fish in the wild is uxgenL It is 
difficult to understand the stat^ 
ment Lord Moran quotes fiom 
John Sdwm Gummer for the 
Ministry GfAgricultare:"Idonot 
see salmon as a food r^urce in 
the wild. It is only incidental^ a 
food resource". ' ^ 

Youis foitfifony, 

HUGH SINCLAIR, Director. 
International Nutrition 
Foundation, 

Internationa Institute of Human 
Nutrition, 

High Street, 

Sutton Courtenay, 

Abingdon. Oxforc^ire: 

Lure of Einstein 

From Mr R. A. Biggs 
Sir, One of the great potentail 
benefits of "Bring Einstein to the 
people" (feature, October IS) is 
that it may enable them to see 
connections between things. 

One of the disadvantages of 
formal education is that it teaches 
pupils to think in subjects. We are 
bruded "artist” or "scientist” 
and rarely is it suggested that the 
twain may meet. 

In 1984, Paul Davies, in his 
admirable book Superforcey states: 

There is a deep compulsion to 
believe in the icfea that the entire 
universe, including afl the an»r- 
entfy concrete matter that assails our 
senses, is in reality only a frolic of 
convoluted nothingness, that in the 
end the world will tuni out to be a 
sentpture of pure emptiness, a self- 
organised void. 

The one great hope tiiat must 
emerge is that of unification; not 
only between the disparate forces 
within science !xit ^so between 
aits and science tbemselves. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. A. BIGGS, 

21c Csndington Road, 

Bedford. 

October 2(X 


BBC libel case 

Fmm MrJ. R. Anderson 
Sir, The aftermath. oftheBBClifael 
action provides at least one topic 
for comment in the reported 
statement by Mr Michael 
CockerelU the reporter on the 
Panorama programme in ques- 
tion: 

UmU last week I bad always 
understood that the BBC would fight 
this case to the end once it reached 
the court. Had that happen^ the 
ju^ would have heard all the 
evidence and reached its verdicL 

Last Thursday the BBC told me they 
decided to settle and would not 
continue vrith their financial support 
of me as oo-defendant In these 
drcumsiaiioes I agreed to accept the 
terms of settleraenL (The Deuty 
Telegraph. October 22X 
The real inierBst lies in Mr 
Cockerell's reason for not 
maintaining a position which, by 
implication, he feels justified. If he 
bad continued and the jury had 


found against him be would no 
longer have enjoyed the taxpayer- 
funded financial protection of the 
corporatioTU Would he not please, 
upon reflection, consider that the 
plaintiffs had no such shield 
against financial ruin? 

The spectagle of an organisation 
with virtually unlimitkl funds 
continuing to justify a libel for 
some three ye^ and then aban- 
doning its position aftera few days 
in court without offering evident 
in its own defence is not reassur- 
ing. 

In particular, the foct that the 
original publication of a libel in 
the media is peculiarly widely 
di^minated argues a case for 
placing a heavy duty of respon- 
sibility and personal financial 
aocouniability on the individuals 
concerned. 

Yours faithfully. 

J. R. ANDERSON, 

4 Vardon Drive. 

Wilmsiow. Cheshire. 


Housii^ needs 

From Mr K. G. Braidwood 
Sir, Lord Boyd-Carpenter (Octo- 
ber 13) wrongly attributes the 
disapprarance of rented accom- 
modation in the private sector to 
the "consequence of a good deal of 
w^I intentioned rent restriction 
and landlord and tenant 
i^gislaiion” 

What has laigely destroyed the 
market for private rented accom- 
modation is the state subsidy, by 
way of tax relief on mortgage 
imeresL, to owner occupiers. For 
most of us ft is cheaper to buy 
rather than rent The Inquiry into 
British Houring. chair^ his 
Royal Highness the Duke of 
Edinburgh, makes this abundantly 
dear. 

Today the high cost of much 
residential property (itself parUy 
the cons^uence of mortgage m- 
lerest relief) means that rents have 
to be set at a level u^ich compares 
unfavourably with mortgage 
repayments subsidised by MIR. 
So purchase has become a better 
bargain for buyers and sellets 
alike; 


It is for this reason that proper^ 
companies have sold off their 
previously rented properties to 
owner occupiers and that little 
new invesirnent is now attracted 
-to the privately rented sector. ■ 

Decontrol of what is left of the 
now comparatively small pri- 
vately rented sector will result in 
higher rents and, thereby, a foirer 
return on capital fora few owners, 
but mostly it will result in the 
transf^ of more property to owner 
occupiers; just what happened 
after previous relaxations of the 
rent con^ls and restrictions. And 
by making yet scarcer rented 
accommodations it will force rents 
even higher.. 

The rented sector will not revive 
until the subsidy on morig^ 
interest, which is now costii^ 
dose on £5 billion a yev, is 
phased out or a similar suteic^ is 
made available either to the 
owners or the tenants of the rented 
market. 

Yours sincerefy. 

KENNETH G. BRAIDW(X)D; 

IS Pembroke Court, 

.Edwardes Square; ' . . 

Kensington. W8. 


Ease of access 

From Professor Jeny A. Hausman 
Sir, As 1 waited m line for 40 
minutes on October l9to have my 
passpmi checked at London, 

Heathrow, I wonder^ if tte 
Government could privatize this 
service along with the many other 
industries and services whidi are 
being transferred to the private 
sector in the UK. 

A i^ivate immigration service 
might well schedule its workforce 
to meet the peak load ani^ of 
jumbo jets eaw morning from the 
US. It mi^ also cause the three 
staff membos at the non-US desks 


to help out when they have no 
work during the same 40-minate 
period. 

And, if all else foiled, a private 
inunction service could have 
two lines: the current- "free” Ime, 
together with a "fost” line, which 
would ebuge, say £10. and pro- 
vide service in less than five 
minutes. 

Yours folthftUy, 

JERRY hausman. 

Department of Economics, 
Massachusetts Institiite of 
Technology, 

Cambridge, 

Massachusetts, USA 02187, 


Tlie Church and AUs 

From Mr Richard Rhodes James 
Sir, I was d^ly impnos^ by the 
compassion and sensitivity of Dr 
Edward Norman's artide on Aids 
(October 13). It has much to teach 
Christians. But I wonder if I could 
make the following comment 

'Aids is not a unique elicitmg of 
Divine Judgement Like tte other 
ills mentioned by Dr Nonhan — 
political murder, social selfish- 
ness, personal cnielties — h is tiie 
outcome of the foihne of Gdd's 


creation to obey tbe Maker's 
instrucUoDS. 

When a heavy smoker dies of 
lung canceryou can — if you like ^ 
call it Divine judgemenL Or you 
can say simply, rf cruelly, that the 
person got what he deseed. You 
do not have to be a Christian to 
observe cause and effect. 

This does not absolve us from 
compassion. But itdoessomev^t 
lighten the burden of the chaige of 
being heartless moralisers. 

Yours foithfnUy, 

RICHARD RHODES JAMES. 

15 Almoners Avenne. Cambridge. 


ar • " • • 

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•yf *• . 



ON THIS DAY 


OCTOBER 2S I860 

'Tlx jockeys who deped Adndral 
Rout must haue bem courageous 
orsor^ tried. Admiral wary 
Rous IlTw-IST?) UKU remetrAend 
in the RoyalNauyfdrhauatg 
brought luspiBotesap^ home 

from Newfounatand to pithead 

without a rudd^ and in spite of 
her leaking two feet of water an 
hour. 4/iter 28 years in tiie Senrice 
heretic and pom 1846 is mid to 
have dbnruRO^ the Engtiah Turf 
until hudeadLAt Newmarket he 
used to watch races from the 
Bushes, two furlongs fiom the 
finish, from where he would spot 
jockeys who were rwt trying atd 
beltow at them as they passed 


SP ORTING INTELLIGEN CE. 

NEWMARKET HOUGHTON 
MEETING. 

THE CAMBRIDGESHIRE DAY. 

The tedious ddsy ndiieh oo- 
cuired before the horses for the 
Cambridgeshire nexe started, and 
the late hour at wUch the race was 
fixed, precluded our entering upon 


any remarks on Tuesday’s running. 


It was generally agreed that a larger 
attendance had never been wit- 
nessed on the heath, and a better 
dayls racing was certainly never 
enjoyed, even at Newmaztet. Al- 
thoui^ the weather was mild for 
the season of year, the atnoo- 
qihere was cloudy and occasionally 
small drizzly rain flelL 
The Combridgeshue never excit- 
ed more lively interest, and the 
fluctuations in' the betting were 
most interesting and perplexing. 
Weatherbound, however, kept hCT 
position as first fovourite wifo 
extraordinary firmness, and all 
efforts to shake her were futile. 
Golden Pippin, who had been sent 
to the “li^t aboutT overnight, 
advanced in the morning to 8 to 1 
(taken), and Sir William was 
backed for such heavy amourrts 


towards the finish that be threat- 
ened to be as good as axtything; but 
he subsequently declined to 9 to 1 
offered. 

After Prfitendant, one of the 
French horses, had won the Fi% 
Pound Plate, over the Rowl^ mile, 
people seemed to awaken to the 
foct tbat Madenxiisdle de Chantil- 
ly. who won tte Cforand Subufoan 
Handicap at E^m in 1858, mi^t 
prove dangerous for the Cm- 
bridgeshire, aixl some money was 
invoted in her favour at 50 to 1, 
and a general rush was matfe to the 
new telegrspb station, at the "Turn 
of the Lbj^”. evidmtiy for the 
purpose of "giving the oSoe” to 
London commissiqners. 

29 starters were "tdegraphed”. 
Before the horses could be des- 
patched tern the post a most 
vexatious delay _qccuned. Mr. T. 
Marshall offiefot^ as starter, and 
Dotwitbstanding that Adnural 
Rouse [sic] went to the post to add 
the wei^t of his authority, several 
young jockies [sic] behalf with 
gross insubord^tiorx, and boldly L 
set all command at defiance. Theh 
Admiral carefully noted the princi- 
pal offiEnders* names and th^ m^y 
have cause to'rqient their faad|j 
ooxMh^ as Lord Coventry intends 
to bring the matter b^re the 
stewards of the Jockey Chib. More 
than half an hour was qient in vain 
endeavours to get the field ofb and 
Admiral Rous* er^ostulatiou with 
the jockeys. Mr. Marshall's ^ouis 
to "Go bade, all of you.'” mii^t 
have been heard over half tbe 
heath. Australian Maid — a notori- 
ous brute — was one of the main 
causes of this provoking waste of 
time, standing as stpl as thet. 
equestrian statue in front of the 
Rt^nl Rvffhiii»gp when renewed 
efforts were made to effect a start. 
This maze's piopensitie& are 80 wen {t 
known bets of 2 to 1 were 
offered in the ring on her being left 
behind against winning, and those 


wbo offered this odd wager were in. 
the right for when the flag fell the 
Maid could not be posuaded to{ 
move till after ^ horses werej 
haliwny borne. John Osborne was 
most untotunate with his lot, as^ 
three out of the four — | 
Feodorowns, Moorcock, and Moor^ 
ben — were left so many lengths in 
the rear that thdr diances were atif 
once extinguislxed. Weatherbound, 
the wirmer. was one of those who! 
got away on indifferent terms, butl 
she made qp her ground at every j 
yard, and at the site of the Old ' 
Duke Stand Contadirra, Maggiore, ^ 
Sir WiUjam, Roesla, and " 
Summersi^ who had been in 
front were, beaten, Weatherboundj 
and the French outsider Mademoi- 
selle de Chantilty having the race] 
between thpm- After a tremendous 
set to" which caused ' intense 
excitement in the betting ring, thel' 
favourite won by a nM only. 
Heiress, .singularly enou^. zun-l: 
ning third, as she had dow in the' 
C^aiewitch. Mademoiselle de 


Chantilly is supposed to be partiy 
the property of the Ez^peror| 
Napoleon, ai^ it is contemplated 
by a society of French sportsm^ 
who win also represent Inqierial 
interests, to have a trainii^ estab- 
lishment in England' for interna- 


tional encounters. Meggiare, the 
American, maze, , ran well, but had 
not the heart to finish up the hfll. A 

genetal belief waa express^ that 
MadembiseUe de Chantilly wouldl ^ 

have won easily had she been in the H 
hands of an artist, and Foitfiiam,|" 


who had no mount in the race, the I 
FtmKb party aft erwards found to 
their dugrin, weight have beenj'- 
engaged. 


«: 


Captive audience 

From Mr Marlin L. Perkins 
Sir, The OED defines "dunkle” a$ 
"10 make a dint in” Since yoar*« 
correspondent from Thames 
Dinon (October 20) undoubted^ - 
had bis concentration dinted it iSn 
clear that dunkling was tak^^ 
place. Perhaps Mr Dunkling was T 
actually bedunkled? 

Yours feithfully. 

MARTIN L PERKINS, 

5 Tower Road, 

Orpington. C 

October 20. 


mh 


. % 






1 



THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Michael Sharkey 


Assisi, a place of peace 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
October 24c The Princess Anee, YORK HOUSE 
.•Mis Mark Phillips 
i.'noon opened the new Infant 

' Deparnnent Block and Admin- Vtce-Chaimian of TIk Bni^ 
•iSlraUwe Offices at Yew Tree OveiM Ti^ Board today 
..Primary School, Aston, Bb-- opened the Bnl^_ in Liu- 
mingham where Her Royal embourg Exhibition in 
Highness was received by Her L««enil»uit 
Majesty’s Lofd Lieutenant for His Royal Hi ghne ss, who 
■the West Midlands (the Eari of ^veiled in an ure^ of 32 
Aylnfbnl) Squadron Royal Air Fbroe, was 

The Princess Aniifc Mrs Mark Captain Michael 

Phillips later opened Bemieis Chmpben-Laraerion- 
•Street Hostel ibr Mentally The Diidiess of Kent today 
Eiandicapped, LozeUs, Birm- opei^ the Chneer and Leuk- 
ingbam. aemia in Childhood Trust's 

Mrs Malcolm Wallace was in House, Fremantle Square, Bris- 
"anendance. toU and later opened the Broad 

Lady Susan Hussey has sue- Oub, St Pauls. Ha 


this afternoon opened the 
Society's House in Tetbury, 
Gloucestershire. 

Lieuienanl-Coionel Brian 
Anderson was in atiendanoeL 


"atiendance. 

Lady Susan Hussey has suc- 
ceeded Mis John Di^dale as 
'Xady in Waiting to The Queen. 

“KENSINGTON PALACE 
.. Goober 24: The Prince of 
- Wales. President, The Prince of 
Wales' Advisory Group on 
' Disability, this morning at Ken- 
• singion Palace chaired a meet- 
of the GroupL 

His Royal Highness. Royal 
"Patron, llie Abbodidd Society, 


Royal Highness, as Patron, this 
afternoon opened the new 
extensions to St Peter's Hospice, 
Bristol. 

Her Royal H^ness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 


Queen's Flight, was actended by 
Mrs Peter wiimoi-SitwelL 


This weekend reiiuous teaders from 

tbroi^out the world are converging on 
Assisi in order to spend Mon^y 
together in prayer and fasting for peace. 

Pope John Ptol II. who suffiested this 
assembly, will be joined by the leaders 
of other Christian communions and 
denominations, induding the Aicb- 
btshop of Chnterbuiy, and by Jews and 
Muslims, Buddhists and Bahais, Sikhs 
and Hindus, Shinoists and numerous 
others. 

Assisi has been a symbol of peace for 
800 years since Frands foil in love with 
God, gave up all bis possesdons in 
marriage to Lady Poverty, lived in 
harmony with all God's creatures, who 
called the sun his brother and the moon 
his sister, who preached to Urds and 
converted wolves, and in the happiness 
of holiness accepted on his own body 
the wounds of tbe cross. 

The tranquility of Assisi and its 
friendship contrast sharply with the 
situation of many millions of people in 
the modem world. They are assaulted 
by bomb and gun. They shun tbe light of 
day and dmd tbe dark of nigbL They 
hound and are hounded in Iran and 
Iraq, in and around Lebanon, in Central 
and South America, in the niilippines. 


natw of Jes^ CThrisL DeaUi squads in 

Latin America think they are building 


the KJn^om of God. Muslims make 
human bombs of themselves and blast 


human bombs of themselves and blast 
their enemies to bits in suicides they 


think pleasing to Allah. We are daily 
exposed to the scandal of death in a 


in No^era Ireland, in Lanka, 

The President of France cete- Afej^istan and AlHci _ 


braies his birthday tomorrow. 


'J>iimers 


Society of Engfaieefs 


ing of Cartwrights, solkiiocs in 
Caidifr and Bristol. The guests 
were received by Captain Nor- 


...The annu^ dinner of the Society Lloyd Edwor^ The gu^ 

of Engineers was held last night Jusnee 

. at Brewers' HalL Mr Raymond Watkins, VCL who propc^ a 

Yarnell, president, aocompa- 

nied by Mre Yarnell, presided senior’ partner. Mr John Lituer. 
and presented the (^luiehill replied. Among the guests were 

Medalio Dr C T. ElUon, senior ir^'SSr'S^^LSi ^ ‘ASSESS 
principal scientific offiw, 

Royal Signals and Radar R«glsirar JoJJn pane. Mt Ronald 
c.fakilEhmMnt Cir Mnniw Jockson. iSoulli Walos Tranic 


Fclahltcfiment. ^ir Mnniv 'Saulh Walos Trarilc 

uiapiisunicni. oir moniy conunUrtonwi. Mr Alun EnUyn-Jooea 


-Hnniston also spoke. 


rehairman of Cardin' Bendi} and Mr 
Caretti WfUams. QC. 


The arms race is tbe industry that 
booms by alternately balancing and 
advancing tbe technologies of teroor 
such that we now have 30,000 nudear 
weapons stockpiled around the world 
with their threat of 30,000 more 
Hiroshimas. 

In the &oe of all this violence and 
threat of violence, eveiy rdigion is 
challenged. The plain fact is that in the 
contemporary woiid religion so often 
seems to be the cause of violence rather 
than its cuiul 

Knee-cappings and bullets to the head 
are deliver^ in Northern Ireland in the 


exposed to the scandal of death in a 
thousand ways being administered in 
honour of the God of a tbourand names. 

As part of the inter-religious cere- 
mony on Monday afternoon in Assisi 
there will be an exchange of olive 
branches between all the rdigious 
leaders. Rabbi and mullah. Roman 
Catholic bishop and Protestant preacher 
will reach across to each other with 
these tokens of ixace, and the tefovision 
news in tbe evening will bring it into our 
homes on screens coloured iu papal 
white, Buddhist saftion and Shinto 
black. 

If Monday's prayer and fasting does 
something to change the image of 
reitgion, then that 'wiil be some small 
gain, but religions must do much more 
if the message of their leadm is to go 
any deeper than the television screen on 
Monday evening or the on tbe page 
of Tue^y’s newspapers. 

Religion must thaw the pessimism 
that pervades tbe hearts and minds of so 
many people, who think that wheUier 
the world ifegiut with a big bang or not, 
it is certainly going to em/ that way, and 
that though peace is a beautiftil idea, 
they hon^y think it is not possible. 

This is a deep task. Religion must 
rrach inioour very depths in order to re- 
vive the springs of hope. Without t^ 
converrion. this recall and recovery of 
humanity, the desire for praoe is mere 
wishftil thinking. Hope is made of 
sterner stuff. 

Where are we to find it? We know 
only too well that of ourselves we can do 
no^n^ but with God's help we can do 
everything. Tbe way ahead does not lie 
simply in ethical reconsideration and in 


political resolve, but by calling on the 
goodness of God to repair tbe weakness 
of men and women, by drawing on the 
resources of heaven to remedy tbe evils 
that beset our earth. 

Those of os who bdieve in God know 
that peace is in bis gift, and, imrtorij^ 
him for iL we are open to receive iL 
Goodness is greater than the ugliest evil; 
love is stronger than tbe vilest hate; and 
by prayer and fasting they are broii^t 
close; they resolve n4iat seemed in- 
soluble. find paths where pass^ was 
impossibly promote understanding and 
make forgiveness real. 


OBITUARY 

LIEUTENANT-GENERAL 

MICHAEL BRENNAN 

Poacher turned gamekeeper 


Lieutenant-General Mi- and offering a large 


Why God allows evil and suffering in 
e first nlace is oim of the most 


the first place is one of the most 
profound questions we ask, but the 
more urgent chaUenge to.rdi^on is not 
about how our contemporary fires 
broke out, but about how we can put 
them ouL 

The prayer and fosting in Assisi mil 
be accompanied and complemented by 
pray^and fosting by rriigions groups in 
Britain and throi^out the wor^ llie 
spiritual movement for peace is gaming 
momentum. It has a long way to go, but 
it is awakening the conviction of 
possibility of peace, and that togetiier 
we can aocomplisb it if God will make 
ns his instruments of h. 


Breunan, who was Chief 
of St^of the Irish Army fiom 
1931 to 1940, died yesrerday. 
He was 90. 

After becoming a rebel 
against British rule while still 
in his teens, he played an 
important pari in the guerrilla 
warfare that led to the 1921 
Anglo-Iri^ Treaty. In the 
ensuing civil war, and for the 
rest of his militari' career, be 
was a resilar soldier in the 
service oT the l^ally estab- 
lished go venunent 

Michael Brennan was bom 
at Medici^ County Clare, on 


money for his 
circulated amons Bniisn 
security forces. 

He operated in County 
Clare, where he was win 
aierrilla leader, commanding 
the Clare brigade and the 
flying <x>lumn, and chairman 
of tbe republican county coun- 
ciL levyiDg niegal rates and so 
commanding the sinews or 
war. In these combined roles 
be was most efifoctive. 

After the 1921 Treaty the 
poacher turned gamekeeper. 
Bieanao joined the r egi i lar 
Free State army, and duni% 


February 2, 1896. After leav- the civil war that folloyred the 
ing St Mundiin's CoD^ Treaty he hdd the Liraenck 
Limerick, at the age of 14, be command, giving fiuihiiii ser- 
led tire Hnna Boys in limer- vice to the Co^rave gov^- 
ick aixl a fow years later was menl aiKl acting, necessanly, 
one oftfae first tojoin the Irish as a scourge to some of his 


The Assisi meeting will begin at the 
porziuncola. the small cfaurdi rebuih by 
St Francis wdien he first took liiei^y 
God's odL **Re!niild my House”. 
BoDdings make good symbols Wlren 
the Pope visited Qrventry in the midst 
oftheFalklandswarin 1982 he leferrsd 
to the cathedral there and urged his 
congregation to buikl a ''cathedral of 
peace” in the world. On Monday we 
shall see the world's religious leaders 
deepen the fbundationsoftbecathedtaL 


Volunteers in Limerick City. 

Early in 1916 he was arrest- 
ed for a seditious speed 
delrvened to the Volunteers in 
bis native Meetidt. Thoi^ 
relea^ soon afterwards, be 
was arrested again before tbe 
events of Easter Wedc, 1916, 
and sent (Ulre a more fomons 
Irishman) to Reading Gaol in 
Enria^ where be remamed 
Christmas Eve of . that 

year. 

In 1917 be was arrested yet 


former associates. 

From 1924 to 1925 he was 
GOC Southern Command, 
and fiom 1925 to 1928 adju- 
tant generaL He also held the 
post of inspector general of the 
ibrocs. 

In 1931 he was appointed 
Chief of Staff of the Defonoe 
Foroes, and tiie following year 
gave his allegiance to the 
newly elected ^ivenunent of 
Eamon de Valera, who had 
been on die opporite side in 


Father Michael Sharkey works in the 
Vatican and lectures on newnuui at the 
Gregorian Univerdty. 


.Forty 0«b 

-Mr E.W. Swanion. President of Central and Soadi Middlesex 
TUie For^ Club, presided m the Law Society 
jubilee dinner held last night at The annual dinner of tbe Cen- 


Birthdays 


Science report 


Tlhe Hilton hotel and presented 
*Uie Henry Grierson trophy to 
C.H. Forward. Captain of 
Cricket at Canfond School. The 
other speakers were Held Mar- 
shal Sir Edwin BramalL Mr 
Colin Cowdrey, Pnesident of the 
MCC. Major T.C. Harvey and 
MrJJ. Warr. 


The annual dinner of tbe Cen- 
tral and South Middleex 
Society was held at the Savoy 
Hotel last night Mr Andrew 
Harvey, PresidenL who was 
accompanied by Mis Harvey, 


TODAY: Sir Robert Andrew. 
58: Lord Brimeiow, 71; Mr 
Gerald Coke, 79; Dame Mary- 
Colvin. 79; Major-GeneraJ Sir 
Rohan Delacombe, 80; Major- 
General Sir Julian Gascoigne, 


Leech lacking warm waters 


ftgain and sent 10 Wetheiby in the dvil war. This was a 
Yoiktiure. From there, after significant event in the e^b- 
thvee months, be escaped and lishment of constitutionai rule 
settled dandestindy m Dab- in the country, 
lin, until released under am- Later during his term of 
neriy.BiU he VOS setback in office he took part in the 
gaol for iUegal drilling. nego^tions with the Cham- 

Al his trial he refused to beriain government that re- 
recognize the jurisdiction of suited -in the cession- of tbe 
tbe British courts, setting an Treaty Ports. In 1939 be 
example which others fol- accepted Irish neutrality with 
lowed. He took part in hunger apparent ^uanimity. 
strikes in Cork, Moun^y and After his retirement finom 

Dundalk gaols, before another the Army in 1940, still only 


of LucistriaBS in 


London 


Lord ShutUeworth, President of *** societies. 

. the Association of Lancastrians 

•in London, presided at the proposed^ MMVickeison and 
'annual dinner of the association *2® ^’^*®** to Iw the imradmt 
-held last oi^i ai the Russell who also propOOT a toast to ilie 
^ Hotel. Mr a Hill, Chief Excc- Suesis. Sir Dcoaldson 

Imive and Clerk of Uncashire responded for the guests. 
County COunciL and the Very 

Rev Lawrence Jackson, Provost Corvi^i tfHntiArc 
of Blackburn, also spoke. OCrVlCe OllllierS 

Assodatioa des Andens fleves The Green Howards 
dn Ly^ Frimenis de Londra . ~ ^ 


was in the chair. Tbe guests of Maxim Gilbert, SO; Mr 

honour were Sir John D.C Manse! Lewis, S9; Sir John 
Donaldson. Master of the Rolls. MayhewnSanders, 3S; Mr Joe 
Mr John Wickerson, Piesidriit Mercer, 52; Dr Ludwig 
of the Law Society, and Mrs Rosenfeld. 82: Mr George Rus- 
Vrickerson and presidents of rell, 51; E^fossor D. J. Wise- 
neiflhbourinfi local law societiefi. maiU Do. 


By Gareth How Davies 


. Mme Francoire Manners. Presi- 
dent of the Association des 
Anciens Efoves du Lyoee 
Fiancais Chartes de Gaulle- 
Loixires. presided at the annual 
dinner held Iasi night at the 
Travellers' Clulx M de Saint Do, 
Headmaster, was among those 
..presenL 

.'■Institnte of PnbUc Relations 
- Miss Carol Friend. President of 
^the institute ofPublic Relations, 
welcomed the guests at the 
annual diiuier held last n^t at 
tbe Waldorf Hotel. Mr Da'vid 
Bernstein also spoke: 

Ampleforth College 
On October 10 old boys of St 
Oitbben's House, attended 
Mass at tbe Churdi of the 
Assumption and a dinner after- 
wards at the Cafe Royal to 
celebrate the house's diamond 
jubilee. Father Sebastian Lam- 
bert was remembered, and Fa- 
ther Walter Maxweli-Stuart was 
the guest of honour. 


The King of Norway, Colonel- 
in-Chief of The Green Howards 
(Alexandra Princess of Wales's 
Own Yorkshire Regiment), 


TOMORROW; The Viscount 
of Axbuihnon, 62; Mr John 
Arden. 56; Sir Andrew 
Carnwath, 77; Mr Ian Chap- 
man. 61; Sir Joseph Geary, 84; 
Sir Percy Oadock, 63; Mr Paul 
Daneman. 61; Mr R. J. Ed- 
wards. 61; Mr Bob Hoskins. 44; 
Prpfossor D. L Hughes, 74; Sir 
Gifford Inniss, 76: Air Marshal 
Sir Douglas Jackman, 84; Lord 
Jacobson, 78; Sir Donald 
MacDougan, 74; Lord Molloy. 
68; Viscount Muirshiel, CR 81; 
Mr Gyoigy ftuk, 50; Lord 


Scieatisls have Img been naJ leech's stroctnre and mam above 19C brtwrni Ac 
pnzzled by tbe dedine of (be phsyiolegy, bnt rebuivdy little moaOs of April and Scfitendier. 
oaee-conunon medidnal leech, about hs ecology. Abont aeven bt in Wte- 

Binuio MedianaUs, throngboat centinretres (tbree-and-a-half derMie nen- hv tb* mmithiv 
Europe. As weU as its nmdi inebes) hH^ oUve green with 

priz^ Mood-tetting proper^ reddish smpe^ it feeds chic^ exceeded 19C in onNsra ont 
It also served as a pruniore on the blood of wMiMi—h, ^ ^ iosa nn,. 


din^^ his officers latt night Scanlon. 73; Sir James Soon, 62; 


at Merchant Venturers' HalL 
York. Major-General P. A Inge, 
Colonel of the R^menu pre- 
sided. Tbe guests were: 


Lord Wylie, (JC 63. 


Luncheons 


Tiw Norwegian Ambassador. Malor- 
General C R L GuUirtc. Brigadier M H 
Sharpe. Umienanl-Oolorui G W F 
Lunreii. Mr Terence Cuneo. Mr 
Rooen LufT and Mr jotin Sanderson. 


Manx Regbnent Bnlish Safely 

Colonel Henry Kelly presided at mas in Safety 
a reunion dinner held last ni^t James Tye. t 
at the Naval and Military Club tbe council, 
for the Manx RegjmenL 15th Latio. chainn; 
(lOM) LAA Regiment RA (TA). governors. 
Sir John Paul was tbe guest of presentations, 
honour. 


Baroness Phillips 

Baroness Hiillips was host at a 
luncheon held yesterday at the 
House of Lords to present the 
British Safety Council's IXplo- 
mas in Safety Management- Mr 
James Tye. direcior-general of 
tbe council, and Dr Douglas 
Latio. chairman of tbe board of 
governors, also made 


It also served as a prinutne on the blood of wMiMi—fa, 
baronetcrt an increase in its swimmlDg towards a potential 
activity was believed to foretell host when it distorbs (be water, 
(be onset of bad weaAer. Dr Maloolin Qliatt and Mis 

In Britain tbe medicfBai leech P aala T nliett, of (be Flnesfawater 
is DOW confined to the Lake BiologicBl Association'^ lab- 
District, tbe New Forest, Angie- oratory at Windennere, stndied 
sey, and Sooth Wales. Ai»^ (be Eiriors that afliect its swim- 
tbe reasons advanced for Hs ming activity in Jenny Dam, a 
inoreasii^ rarity are a decrease sbalfow tarn of sqnare 

in its h^ mammais, mainly metres visited by roe deer a^ 
horses and cattle drinkix^ in hotses, in a pra|^ fiMnpMt by 
open water, and over-ooUection. tbe Natural Enrironment Re- 
Researcbers worldiig at a search Council. 

Lake District tarn have con- DiniK 1982-84 they netted 
dnded that it is tbe hiss of (be 841 ieemes and obsemd 
areas of shailoir water, which Ae creatores became active at 
meet Hs relatively higli tem- aroond 7 degrees CelsinsL At 
p g a tnre requirements for swim- 11.9 degrees C. (S3 d^nes 
miag, feeding, optinnim growA Farenbeit), about 10 per ««» of 
and breedH^, which is the diief Ae leeches were active; half 
caosc of its popolatkm decline, were active at 19C (68F)i, and 90 
Nalnralists believe the leech per cent at 22.7C (73F> They 
ooold soon be an endangered coadnded that the tanperatms 
specks. in the taro were idcnl for 


exc eeded 19C in only seven ont 
of 47 years np te 1980. The 
relatively law tempentiDe of 
this and oAer lakes expfaihis Ae 
absence there eS 


brief period of release. 

Most of the year 1918 be 
spent in gaoL ittiiiy at Dun- 
cialk and pardy in BdfosL But 
he was released at Qiristmas 
and then, fiom 1919 until the 
truce, was one of tbe most 
wanti^ men in Ireland. A 
poster bnring his i^tograph 


46, he was given a senior job 
in the Office of Public Works. 

Brennan was a handsome 
man, of medium hei^L 
Uack-faaiied in his youth, ud 
wiA a determined expression. 

His wife, &ids^ pr^e- 
ceased him, but he is survived- 
two daughters and a son. 


DR EDWARD DOISY 


Bnt Acre b evidence that 
leeches wen abuidaiit at the 
begjnnfng of the last oentnry 
Aron^iont Ae Lake District, 
which was one trf the best 
collecting areas far an e xtensi v e 
European tnute in dm ae a tnw s . 
Yet leeches are mC fiioDid ta 
many smaller bodies of water 
sunihr in sin te Jenny Dam. 


to Ae transfonnadon of many of 
tbe smaD lakes into fish pora 
between SO and 100 years ago, 
when their deirtbs were ^ 


Dr Edward Doigy, who was fishm eal the active i^ciple 
awarded the 1943 Nobd Prize whidi ■was found to stimulate 
in Physitdogy and Medicine the production of proArom- 
for his rest^ndi in isolating bin, an essential element in 
vitamin K ud two fom^e- blood dotting. This was subse^ 
hormones, died at St Louis, ' quently named vitamin K 
Missouri, on October 23. He (Koagulations-vitamin) by the 
was 92. tale Dr Henrik Da^ the 

Edward Addbert Doi^ was Danish biochemist with 
born (HI November 13, 1893, u^om Doisy sharKl the Nobel 
at Hume, Illinois, and ^ucat- Prire. 

ed at the umvOTty th^. Ifc Doisy went on to accom- 
was an a gu - ^nt m biochmus- pjjgjj synthesis of vitamin 


try at the Harvard Medical 
S^od before two years' anny 
service fiiom 1917 to 1919. 


Soaice Fr a kw a tie r Bwlagy, 
1986, vol 16, 4QS41Sm 


K homology in boA Ae Ki 
and K2 series - an imijortant 
fiuAer breakthrough in tin- 


Mncfa b known of the medici- swimming leeches, wiA a mnxi- J JVLElfiott A PjATidlett. 


He Uyn wmt.M to Wmb- deraaiidiiig Moodclottiiig. 
gton Umversity School of _ . . ‘T- 

edicine as an instructor m Froi? ^ retue- 


Forthcomii^ 

marri^^ 


Appointments 


Latest appointments include: 
Major-Genenl Martin Garrsd 
to be promoted Lieutenani- 


Management Consnltancies Mr EJ. Ansnunb 
Assodation and Mbs S,A. Bullock 

Mr John Lidstone, chairman. The engagement b announced 
and council members of the between Ted. son of Alma 
Management Consultancies Anscomb and Ae late G^es 
Association were hosts at a Anscomb. of Thames Ditioru 


MrJ.P.McTeagne Mr RM. Fields 

and Mbs L. Dnoesn and Mbs FXL Harvie-SmU 

The engagement b announced A service ofUessiiig was held on 
betweeen Jeremy, only son of Saturday, October II, at the 
Mr and Mrs Neil McTeague, oF Temple Gmrch, London, after 
Gla^w. and Lindsay, daughter the maniage in St Helen's, 
of Mr and Mrs Neil Duncan, of Jersey, of Mr Randolph Merritt 


Johannesburg, SouA Afiica. 


Mr R.M. Rkbanb 

and Mbs D J. Snow 

The engagement is aiuounced 


Fiekb, son of Mr Gordon 
Fields, of Los Angeles, United 
States, and Dr Nancy (jayer, of 
London, and Miss Fiona 
Catharina Harvie-Smith, eldest 


Cartwrights General Royal Marines, in Michael Dell. Deputy Secretary. 

A dinner was held in Cardiff succession to Lieutenant-Gen- Department of Trade and In- 
Casiie last night to celebrate Ae era) Sir Michael Wilkins, next dusiry, at Ae Cavahy and 
1 SOA Anniversary of tbe found- May. . Guards Gub held yesterxiay. 


Creneral and to be Commandant I luncheon given for Mr David I Surrey, and Sally, daughter of between Roy. son of tbe late Mr daughterofMr and Mrs Robin 


Mary Bullock and Ae late Terry 
Bullock, of Berkswell. Coventry. 


Dr B.K.Cuthbert 
and Mbs AX. Ford 
The engagement is announced 
between BilL son of Mr and Mrs 
P.K. Cuthben. of San Pedro. 


AC Richards and of Mrs 
Richards, of Maidenhead Berk- 
shire, and Debbie, daughtO’ 

Mr and Mrs J. Snow, of 
Frampton, Dorset 


Harvie-SmiA, of Reigate, 
Surrey. 


MrS. HMmaa 

and Mbs J.PJ. Cseb-Mencw 


PURE 100% SHETLAND W(X)L FISHERMAN’S SWEATER 


Spain, and Alison, daughter of The engagement b announced 
Mr and Mrs H. Ford, of between Stephen, eider son of 


Mr MdW. Vcnreore-Rowlaad 
and Mbs JJtf.G. Hartley 
The marriage took on 

Saturday, (xtober 18, at St 
Mary's Giuich, Lower Sbugh- 
ter, Gloucestershne, of Mr Mark 


Oakham, Rutland. 


between Stephen, ^ son of 

Julia Hartley. CknoD A Barmiti 


S pecially selected for Times 
Readers, these Shetland Fisher- 


lJ Readers, these Shetland Fisher- 
man's Sweaters are made from 100% 
pure wool, spun from the fleecesof Ae 
Shetland sheep with Ae unusual 
softness and lightness that this yarn is 
known for. Traditionally produced 
without seams in the classic style of the 
Shetland Islands, this hi^ quality 
knitwear can be worn by either men or 


women. 


T he family producing this exclusive 
knitwear founded their comoanv 


-L knitwear founded their company 
in 1893. Tbe traditional use of the 
beautiful colours of the natural undyed 
wool is now enhanced wiA subtle 
blends and mixtures and the sweaters 
are hand-frame knitted by Shetland 
craftsmen. 


The colour desccriptions are Aose 
used by the Shetland Islanders and are 
as follows: Natural (off White). 
Moorit (brown/black). Sholmit/ 
Mooskit (grey/fawn). The sizing is 
generous to allow room for garments 
to be worn under Ae sweateis. 



Dr SjCX Garth 
and Miss S.T. Bransficld 
Tbe engagOTent b announced 
between Simon, elder son of 
Group Captain and Mrs P.A 
GarA. of St AAan, South 
Gbmoigan. and Stephanie, only 
daughter of Mr and Dr P.A 
BransHeid. of Bexley. Kent. 


Llanelly, Wales, and JudiA, 
eider daughter of Mr and Mra R. 
Cseb-Menczer. of Brigbion, 
Sussex. 


Marriages 


Mr H.W. de Bwgb 

and Signorina M.C. SdpEno 

The marriage took place 


Mr R-C Geary 
and Mbs CM. Cardwell 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, son of Ae late 
Mr Douglas Geary, and of Mrs 
Mary Geuy, of SouA Nuifteld. 
Surrey, and Caroline, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs John CardwelL 
of Purley. Surrey. 


Saturday of Mr Hugo de Biiigh, 
son of Ae late Colonel H.G. de 


officiated, assbied by the Rev P. 
Walton. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her fetber, was 
attended by Kate and Emily 
Gaiianaugh, Katy Walsh and 
Rebecca Morrison. Mr Tony 
Morris-Eyton was best man 

A reception was held at Fir 
Farm. Lower Slaughter. 


biochemistry moving, in seivcd ^ 

1923, to St Louis Universi^ ^airman of Ae depar^ent 
Sebo^ of Medicine as profes- a founto mem^ of 

SOT of biochemistiy. He set up Amencm Soqm of Bi^ 

a new department and re- giemists and presideniof Ae 

mained Acre for Ae rest ofbis Socim, a body of 

working lifo. . «wnnone specialists. 

^isy's eazfy interest was m Doisy was a hardworking 
ovarian fiinctioiis, and in this man t^o demanded mudi or 
field he worked dosdy wiA himself His dedication in- 
Or Edgar ADen, the anatomist ^led his colleagues. He. was 
vriio developed Ae first pn^ keen on Ae outdoor fife and 
iiarx:y tesL Tt^eAer wiA often took most ofhis depart- 
Charfes DanforA they pub- merit away wiA him td his 
fished in 1939 Sex and Inter- ferm in Ae country for a few 
nal Secretions. days' fishing and hunting. 

In 1929 Doisy isolated the He married, first m 1918 
sex hormone, estrone. Further Alice Ackert, who Aedm 1964 
success came Ae follomng and wiA whom he bad four 
year when he identified estia- sons» two of whom survive 
AoL an even rnore potent him. He is also survived by his 

• . J - second wifo Maraa^ 'whom 

In 1938 he isolated m he married in l965rThey had 
dystaHine form from decayed, no children. 


THE REV NOEL SCHOFIELD 


Mr N.EJVI. Conidcr 
and Mbs CJ. Rennie 
The eugasemenl is announced 
beiwcen Nicholas, elder son of 
Dr and Mrs Michael D. 
Goulder. of King's HeaA. Bir- 
mingham, and Caroline, youn- 
ger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Colin Rennie, of Asihali Leigh. 
Oxfordshire. 


son of the laie Colonel H.G. de 
Buigh and ofMxs de Burgh, and 
Signorina Carolina Sdpltno. 
daughter of Dottore Tommaso 
Sdplino and Donna BeaniOB 
Sciplino Ciapasso DeUe Pastene. 
Mass was celebrated in the 
chapel of St John Baptist of Ae 
Knights of Rhodes and Malta, 
Rome, by Cardinal Luigi 
Ciappi, assisted by Mgr Micfaefe 
Ptron. 

The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her father and the best 
men were Major Sir Ralph 
AnstniAer of that Hk and Mr 
Daniel Kinahan. 

A reception was held at the 
borne of tbe bride. 


CamBaBder D.CB. White 
and Mis J J>. SQrer 
The manri^ took place on 
Friday. October 24. quietly in 
Chichester, between Com- 
mander Dmnb White, RN 
(retd) and Mis J ennife r Silver 
(neePixley); 


The Reverend Nod Scfao- in 1946 to lecture in Hdnew 
field, who died on (October 22 and Old Testament studies, 
at Ae age of 86. will be remaining until his retirement 
remembered as an efifective in 1967. In bis later yeara he 
teacher of the Old TestamenL was elected a Fdlow of 
John Nod Schofield was WoUson Q>I]ege; 
boni on December IQ, 1899, Hp- omath, i.- 

the son of a Baptist minister. • ^ 

World War he served as an Cot* 

observer m the Royal Flying archaMltwirai It® 

corps., 


service 


Lord Fnltoa 


Corps betore entering 
Regent's Park College, 
London. He then . went to 
Christ's CoU^ Cambridge: 

He was ordained to Ae 
Baptist minisiTy in 1927, 


Holy land 
his most 


Sizes: Small (to fit chest/bust 36''-38''), 
Medium (•Hr-12"), Large (44 '-fo' ). 
Extra Large (48” plus). 

Prices: Smail/Medium £49.95 each 
Large/Extra Large £54.95 each. 


Mr N.M. KeiA 
and Mbs G.V. Onslow 
The engagement b announced 
between Nicholas, son of 'the 
late Mr and Mis J.R. KeiA. and 
Geraldine, younger daughter of 
Ae late Captain R.T. Onslow, 
Royal Marines, and Mrs 
Onslow, of Wcsiend House, 
Hambiedon. Hamphsire. 


Mr D J. May 
and Mbs A.P. Shld 
The marrian took place on 
Friday. October 24. in Kingston 
upon Thames, of Mr David 
May. son ofMrand Mrs J. May, 
of Sutton Coldfield, and Miss 
Anne ShuH. daughter of Mr and 
Mrs M J. ShieL of Ballsbridge, 
Dublin. 


Rewnt's Park College 

Meminial 

Christ’s CoUegE, (^mbrit^ th! 

M rate. Baptia . min&oy in 1927, SSwLfatehf 

Sir Denys Wflkiason, Vice- served for two years as Pastor ™c 

ChanceBor of Sussex Univer- of Bishop’s Siortfond, ,and Society for 

sity. was present at a memorial then beca^ a chaplain to the ^ estameni 

service fbr UmxI Fidton bdd fi>rces. During 1935 he was a ' _ . 

yesterday m Ae Mee^ House, mior at Rawdon GoDege. near Schofield was generous and 

Lecds, and the iofiowing year cnAusmsiic as a readier, and 

^StiiZ^SSSd wasappointedalectuiSInAe preacto wtA a 

MP, ^ tte Department of Hdnew at b^^efyrfwmetmiesdisooncefi- 
iesson. Dr Ma Lin. Vice-Chan- Leeds University wIiot he >**8 of humour, 
cellor of the Chinese University later became head of a flour- - He is survived by his wifo 
of Ho^ Kong, read fiom ishing department Whufined, and Aeir two sons 


chaplain, officiated and Mr 
Edward Heath, _MP. read tbe 
lesson. Dr Ma Lin. Vice-Chan- 
cellor of the Chinese University 
of Ho^ Kong, read from 
Vnivmity. Govemmeni and the 
Community, a public leaure 
given by Lord Ftilion. Proressor 
David Daiches gave an addressL 


fively if sometimes disconcert- 
ing sense of humour. 


He retunied to Cambridge and daughter. 


- He is survived by his wife, 
Whiified, and Aeir two sons 


Pftf 3M.* M.*nd me 


Ailpn<vs urc Ithiiiw ftoM awl packing. /VtVH” 

afinw up io 2! day^ farMtver\\ If you oir not 
HIT Miff ^uudyaur mmey uidumt 
In oslditiofi m tmr f^iiaraniec you /luir dw htTtrfh of 
1 fHtr fuii uafuinn nt^hfs ierhtiii arr WH afimrd. This 

othrreaM • wA' herdtrypuylicd m/fi/rvwk nt tih* 1‘. K, 
fhdtn A* TiH Timrs hislicrman's Offer, 

BtwnieRt^L Bcxh\\ Kent- DAS IBL^ Tel tOS22t 
yJSIh far enipuncs only- 


Small/Mcduim Fi*»'ticTiTkin's MfcCJivrfsi nt 
ifVt C3i:h a.s mdicjitiJ fstlnv, 

Larpz/Exua Lam R>bcnTCin*s SulxiIciI‘^1 ••• 
C.^ ^ cuch fb indiC’.iiw'J IviiiA. 


High price for homely views 


MISS BLANCHE SWEET 

Miss Blanche-SweeL one of MUIe and Marshall Neilan: 


I \IK s 


By Geraldine Nonnan, Sale Room Correspoiideiit 


imni p 


M 1 AI I 


MFnii XI I c Apr«r> 


f*.4 tMITV 


MHIIk 




XHI m.MII 


XliNWiKlf 


THE TIMES 




DIAL YOUR ORDER 

RAPID ORDERING SERVICE 

BY TELEPHONH ON 

access OR VSA 
(m> wtf to eawpkte cat^nm) 

(Crayfofftl) 0322-58011 
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E cnxtii^ fur £ nude pjyhie if' 

The Tihrn FWiemian * .S«c»icr Offer 

Or deNi m\ Acn» , 1 

vi»No. ' i ! i ! I I ! ) f I 1 M i ' ! 

Signaiurc 


Mr'Mrs.'Mivi 
AtUicsk 


I Rik \ii 5AUMn 


Hbtorical prints of what your 
home toHn once looked like have 
a perennial appeal and 
Sotheby's yesterday sold a set of 
eight litfaoeraph views of Hih 
T asmania, in 1833 for 
£7.700, where they had been 
I estimating only £500-£700. 

Instead of choosing roinanlic 
views, Charles Atkinson 
depicted "usefiil and interestiiig 
records of the streets of Hobart 
Town". They are not particn- 
iarly well drawn. Presomably 
few sets were sold for Ihb 
reason, which wonld explain 
their rarity. 

Rarity b what collectors are 
after, regardless of the qnaJity of 
drawing. Two colonred aquatints 
of the '^ty of Victoria, capital 
of Hong Kong" by 


J.PrendeTgast. whidi wen pnl^ 
Ibbed in 1844 and are now v er y 
rare, seenred £5,280 (estimate 
£2.000-£3.000). 


not in great demand and the 
grenp of topograplucal prinb 
made a total of £80,157 with 28 
per onit left nasold. 


AnstraUa and Hong Kang 
eitJoy Ae patronage of particu- 
larly rich collectors. At 
yesterday's sale Greece was ap 
in tbe same league. The — ««%* 
private collector paid £6,600 
(estimate £1,200-£L,SOO) for 
Giovanni BoegTs rare set of 24 
lithographic portraits of 
personalities of Ae Greek 
revaiution and £4,620 (esti^te 
£1.00fe£2.000} for 10 etched 
plates by Gsyassi depictimg 
scenes firaai tire Greek rendo- 
tion pnblbhed in Rome between 
1833 and 1835. 


Richly iOustrated natural hb- 
nuy books ma d e their familiar 
hi^ pricK diough there were 
few s n i p ria es and a ooupk of 
expeisive unsold lots. Redmitt's 


pba AeaaxJhdtM madb £55,000 
(estimate £40JNIO-£SO,eOO) and 
Manettrs OniJtbologia of 1767- 
iTTd' wiA 600 bairo etdour ed 
e ngra ved (dates of • stra ^ Am . 


age of 91.. ■ 

Born. Daplme Wayne in 
Chicago, came fixnn a 
Aowburiness femily and .Went 
on stage for Ae first tinre nt 
theageoffour. 

She enters films in. 1909 
when Ae was 14 and, joining 
Ae BiograiA Company, be- 
came a leadii^ ladbr for the 
outstanding director of. the 

day. D. W. GriffiA. .. 

Proreciing a ^i^ng and 
forcenil personality, Ae ap- 
peared in such GnffiA fik^ 


in ivzj she played Ae title 
role in Anna Christie. Ae 
film adaptation of a plav bv 


Eugene O'NeilL and in the 
folTosriiig year was Ae iiacic 


luuuwui]} yfsar was me tragfe 
heroine of Tess of the 
P'UrberrUles. which was di- 
rected by NeDan. 

dedin^ towaids 
tire ^ ^ent period, 

And After thiiK teUcios Dictiiic£ 
^ wtii^ from 

Site returned to the theatre, 
playing m vaudevflfc and 
stoede, and in 1936 married her 


fsesA Tlie Loncdole OperoiOT BSfd fTeqaent. stage partner 

SSSSfJSSSX: 

made £41,800 (estimate ^ appeaance. takitig 

£40J)0(F£S(M)Oa).nie natural leaving bun 10 jom £a^ aLbzt part in tfe ttemnylS«2 

histoiy books totalled £400,279 Company nt 1915. There her morvie. The Five Fences in 

WiA 13 per cent left aastdd. J^.dh^ecfora indudcd-Cecj} Rr de-.- > 19^.' -■' - 

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births, marriages, 
. deaths 
and in memoriam 


555L*^ •E® ttww itMOl te no Mrv 

thtr ptMU fnrtno- M- 



1 ®- •«> Brtlnrta 

l^nr«^ dTMnw for Timothy. 

S" Of***”" ISWl 1986. 
“ ^ H«<,4lal. Chriimham to 

Anihony Johiu 

^*’1' J»iw* Lancaatw 

swrtw ii»2"ui2r*®'*^ 1986. to 

Nirtwui 

^ J? for GhrtMophcr. 

HSlrtn^ Jl^f^.SSni ai a.M.H. 
Rinirin. to Aoua infe Bayly) azid Si- 

nto n. ST da u^hipy Annabc4 

«*U^™-<^Oct« 6 or laotcuci. 

“S™y5, p" OrtoOcT sand 19B6. lo 
Bw«dpyj and Peter 
”»wii. a daughter. Helena 

October to 
«•*" daughtora. 

Kate ainl Anna 

P" s<»picinbcf- I8U1 

Oackowstoi 

as^^roo. a daughter. Stephanie 
Amelia. 

On t6ih Oriober 1986. lo Gall 
wd &mon. a ton hMctioiaa CharKs 
Ralph, a brother for Atexander. 

Oa» - On Ortober ^^xld 1986. lo 
■ DrOOte inee MlichcU) and Richard, a 
son. C nariot Richard. 

■ On ITth October, lo Karen 
inee Tnompson) and Andrew, al 
Pwnburv, Kmi. a daughter. Qiioe 
Louftc . 

SCOTT On October 2Snd.to Aulren 
inee Trrocyi and John, a son Rory 
Hunter. 

CTWBRIGTON - On 8th September 
1980 . In Snsbano. Australia, lo 
Anne «nee Fhogteyl and Peter, a 
daughler. Sally Anne Loidae. 

SWAN - On October 23ni 1986. at 
Ouecf’ Oiarioiie's Hoswiat- to Polly 
cnee Kile) and M^iael. a daughter. 
^ud la Jessica MargareL 

WREY - On October 23rd 1986. lo 
Lo\eday iiiec Bolllho) and Mane, a 
son. Aleiander Mark Siourchier. 


MARRIAGES 




CALDCRAN : PJUWV-JOWS^ On 23nl 
■October. John Gdideran to Barbara 
Parry-Jones. 


De,\TIIS 




AGKROYD -On Onober22. peacefully 
al home Jn Slough. Winifred Mary, 
aged 88 years, widow of the laie Her- 
bert Webster cBente). dearly loved by 
her rtuldren Joan. Beryl. Harry. 
Jack and Margaret and their fain- 
OMs. Crentofion af Slough 
CremoiodunL Stoke Road, al ii.30 
am on Oci 30. followed by Memorial 
Serxireat Si Laurence^ Church. Up- 
Ion CDuii Road SlouQh al 2.15 pm. 
Flowers to E Sargent and Son. 
Church Si. Slough by 10.00 am or. If 
desired. donaUons for St Laurence's 
Church ResloraUon Fund lo Rev G 
Hondy. the Rectory. Albert SL 
Slough. 

RSRTOM - On 2Sth April 1986. al Sur- 
bilon Hospital. Surbilon. 
Surrey .George Hugh AShion. Broth- 
er of Mrs Emily Roberts and laic of 
57 Oobham RoaiL Kingston upon 
Thames, Surrey. All enoulries to be 
addresed lo Meam. George Garler & 
Co. Kinm* Stone House. 12 High 
Street. Kinobtop upon Thames. Sur- 
rey KTl IKD sohdtors for the 
Executrix. 

ATTERIDGE - On October 23nl 1986. 
pracTfuiiy. at West Beach Nurdno 
Home, Seisey. Kevin Do^. MRCS.. 
LRCP.. In ha 9Sth year. Fortified by 
the Rites of the Church. Beloved hus- 
band. fdiher. grandlblher and great 
grandfather. Reoidora Man aS the 
CalboUc Church, Sefsey at 11.15 am 
Thursday OcKRter 30ih. FoUowd by 
rremaUon ai Chichester Oremaioii- 
urn Ftowers 10 EdvMard White & OD.b 

- South Patlani. CMchttUr. 

BRAY - On Onober 23rd 1906. Victor 
Henry, beloveti father of Jane and 
Sarah, peacefully after a short Ui- 
nrsa. Creraauon at Poln^ Vale 
CrematorLimi on Tuesday October 
28th at 1.30 pjn.. Family fUntfors 
only please, donations 5 desired lo 
the C^icer Research Campaign. 2 
Cariloii House Terrace. London 
SWIY 5AR. 

BRENNAN - On October 24ttu al the 
Mf^aih Hospllat. DuMin. Lieut-Gencr- 
,il Michael Brennan, dear father of 
Minom. Shetta and Alin and grand- 
father of Michaef. 

CAMPBEU. - On 23rtf October. In 
TcKMAoemba. Queensland. Tim. 
much loved husband of Caroline and 
€ie\oied lather of Fiona. Pendope 
and Lucy. 


gSrt^ober. in Oxford. 
bfwedEileen Crace. widow of J F 
<>»«» ^^^iwalalSSPeierand Pam. 
Wantage at 12 ooon go Friday 51 
Ortober. 

MURNB - On 2lsl October I98&.aud- 
iteniy at home on TraMgar Day. LL 
On^ W.ILJ GoMifig M.GL£^ RhL 
iRetiredl. Funeral 2.16 pjn. Friday 
Ofto^ 31N ar WiMomigh Green 
Pansh Chuirh feucvi^ ty Crma- 
non. nowers To W Brydef A Sons. 
TUi ingion. Petwonh. West Sussex. 

October 22 1986. James 
Hyde Bowie, ai home, beloved hus- 
^ of Lonia and father lo Tim. 
Heim. Carol and Nicola. Funeral wfU 
beat SI Leonards. Richlngs Park. fM- 
towed by Private cremalkHt 
Delons lo Asthma Renarrti 

Oau^l. 300 Upper SteeeL IsUnglon. 

jyTRaiBfECOARANOtilfSNA - On 

October 22Dd 1986. suddenly, ai 
LAiUy en VaL France. Jeanne, dearly 
loved wife of Anionj and adored 
mother of Smone and Ghrttuanne 
and their rhiidien. 

HACMELL. - On October 23. suddenty- 
John Danas Ulf Machen. beloved son 
of Lorna Marheti and the late John 
Ulf Marhei). Funeral at Si Mary the 
Virgin, CgtOD-cum-Newland on Tu» 
day October 28 af 2.30, FbinUy 
flowm only, please no lotiers 

MomrOMEBY - On 2isi October. 
SyKia Primrose, fotlewing a car ac^ 
cident. Funeral Service at SL Jtonto* 
Church. Weybridge. on W ednto day 
-October 29ih at 11.30 a.m.. 

PACN-BERESFORD - On October 
2^. Denis John RN iReilred). aged 
80. peacefully in Iretand. DonatlODS. 
H dewed, to R.NJ-1.. 

roWELL - On October 23nl 1986. 
sracefully In too sleep al home. 
George wuson. FUiierel Moudv 
2Tth Ociober 5.00pm Holy Trinlly 
WeslroiJ. Dorldiig. No flowers. 

BCARR . On 23rd October, peaceruily 

, in London. Peter Rotepd Recifortb. 
beloted husband of Anna and father 
or Nictiolas, Catherine and SIcphcn. 
Funeral Sor\'ice at Church of Our 
Lady Of Mounl Carmel and & Jo- 
sephs. near Battersea Park Station ai 
11 am on Tuesday 28th October. Do- 
nations. K wished, to the Institute of 
Cancer Research. 17A Onslow Car- 
dens. London. 5W7 aai 

YEU.WRIGIIT . On Thuraday 23rtl 
Ortober 1986. WltHun Anihony. 
dearly loted husband of Jane and 
iher of KlrtOand. Anna. Brook and 
woiiam and grandfather of Annabel. 
William and TUria. Funeral Thurs- 
day 30th October 1986 al 12 noon al 
St Chad's Churct). Nonon in Hales. 
Family flowers only. Donations lo 
the tnhimi Jockey's Fund or SI 
Johns Ambulance. 

BfALC * On October 23rd. Sidney 
Wale, aged 73 years. of 
HadleyWoocL Herts. He.was Uie life 
Prrwiem of Tottenham Hotspur 
Football Club' and the Chairman. Dl- 
reciors. Players and staff extend 
their deepest sympathy lo his widow 
Cynitoa and family- Mr Wale was 
much loved wtihin the club and wlij 
be rrmembered for hit conuibutlODS 
over the years^ 

MSBSTER - Ort October 23rd 1986. 
Kathleen Mary of Lyminglon. aged 
80. Wife of the tale Frank Webster 
and mother of John and Salty. Fu- 
neral al Bourflomoulh Cmnalorium 
on Friday Ociober Slst ai 3 pm. No 
flowers or letters pieose. Donallonstf 
desired to Bntoh Red Gross, c/o 
F W. House Se Sons. Funeral Direc- 
tors. 33/34 St. Thomas StrecL 
Lyminglon. 

WBT - On October 23ni. peacefully 
In Mignoi Memorial HosiHlaL Made- 
leine O'arcy of Aidenicy CJ.. aged 
72. much lovetf mother of RoMn 
Robins and stster of Betty Dbeon. Me- 
morial Service with IntennenI of 
ashes 12 a.m. Tuesday 4lh Mmm- 
ber al St. Araifs Church foUot^ by 
reception locelebraie her life. Enintl- 
rm 048182-2560 or 01-409-2388 
fofflrei. No nowers. Donaliom . to 
Miwtol HospilaL Akterncy. 

WORRAU. • On the 22nd October, 
suddenly al Ormskirfc. SlieeWi. 
much loved wife of Dan. mother of 
Ghnsllnc and John. grandmoUier of 
Juslhu OUes. Vkciorla, Jocelyn and 
Anihony. Pnvato family cran a t ton 
at Southpori on Tuesi^ 28Ui 
Oclobec. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 




BAXTER - A Memorial Sendee for Col- 
in Baxter, of London and Dm muds, 
was twid on Wednesday Ociober 
22nd. al SI Brides Church. Fleet 
Street, led by the Rector. Cannon 
Oates. 

IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATe"! 


COWELL- In happy and Nhiing memo- 
ry of Gapcaui Patrick James Cowell, 
D.S G and BAR. Royal Navy. Devot- 
ed husband, rather, rafher-ln-law and 
orandfather and brave defender of 
ihis Realm, Born 15-8-10. Died 2^ 
108S. 

B QB BAL - Charm. Remembered on 
tos Birthday. R.M. 


Services tomorrow 


22nd Sunday 
after Trinity 

CAKTERBtJRV CATHEDRAL: 8 HC: 
Q.30 M. BishOD Of Buckingham; li 
Sung Cuch. Mtou m honorem SancU 
Itomftnicl. O praisr the lord iBahen), 
Rev J H R de sausmaree: E. 

Responses tAytewordL JeMa OsUege 
Servict* iMaihtaai. Jesu walking on 
the waves (Pircotol: 5 Thanksgiving 
&TVW*. 6 5 GS. Bish<» of WOfod^ 
ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL: 8. 1130 
HC Missa Sanrii Dominid (RunbnOi 
LOCUS hie iBrucKnerl: t0.30_^aL 
Jubilate ^Walton), Te Drum JLeJgto 
tank Bishop of Chichester:. 3. IS E 
csianiord tn C\. Gome Holy Choet 
fHanei'l. veQFrankHanwr. 
WESTMINST^ ABBEY: a HCtO^ 
M, Jubilate i^ten In 
fDvaon in FJ. Thou \hliesl the raito 
^Orcen#, Be\ RjChapm ^: l l 40 
Euch. MIm Brevis cPreslonk 5 E 
iWaimUo' to D mutoTL The hgpvjm 
are leUing cHavdnK Rc^’ h Charles; 
8.30 cs. Rc\ D Bitoier. _ 

hOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL: 9 
HC. 1 1 Euch iDarke in R. O aoiutvti 
hMu ttotcholmii. o how 
place iPtalnsongX Verv Rev D L 
E<^-ards. 3 E, The Finn Service 
«TninKliv>:. MV shepherd ts me 
Lord iTomXinsL very Rev D L 

^B^TWNSTER CATHEm AU 7. & 
9. 12. 530. 7 LM: 10 30SM. MASS to 
c minor (Vaughan wniimaL Let aU 
the world evouphan wiluaimL Ubi 

canias iBerkrievi 

ST GEORCCT CApfEDR^, ?®1SS5- 
i%ark. 8. lO. ll ItM. 

Sexti Toni lOroce), Lord for ttw tender 
mer CM sake iFarranO. Rev M Hai’cs. 

CHAPEX ROYAL- St. James** P^fSfS. 
a.3G HC. 1 1 15 MP, JuRorura animae 
iBvrdi. Canon a J RuveU. 

Glir.EN^ CHAPEL OT TM SAWY. 
^*02- IMS M. Te Deum fSanfoni in 
cv Lord tel ttte know ftone end 
iCremrV I2.30ljp. 


buARM CHAP&^’ejUntgon 
rants, swtr 11 Choral M. iiev D a 

UN&L^'S^INN CHAPp-: n-30 MP. 

Hear m> J?ra¥p:% ? 

dcIMhnt. Rev F V A Bov se. 

TOWCR OF LOWSON. EC^ IS HC 

1 1 M. JUDiUli- tWalWn). 

hast made nu* days (Ctbbomk the 

TxSrIe' CHURCH. Fijgt S nwK. E« : 

&» HC. II IS MR- 

IWIIUMTI SmfliiK TP D-«n'^USS™5} 

(Huirnon in CL JubdoTc Deo iDyson 
in Oi. the kilter 

ST CLCMCNT DANfg^RAF Pjur^ 
wee- 1130. 12.15^ HG Te 

Di-um and Jubilate. With vmfure clad 
ULivdnk Rev R N Kenward ^ _ 

sa^. 4%?^. gsESM 

Let the words of mv moulh iPurceuk 
Hear me O Lofd iPurrall}. 

ALL HALLOWS BY THE TOWER: H 
Sung^Lurh. Caiiovi 5 ypn ^ 

AU. SAINTS. MaiwM SreeL Wl- 3- 
6 15 LM: 11 HM iKciton to eVLg 
alt Che worid iljrignioni. Rev w H 
Tavior. 6 ewteona and 
LUcktoR m Cl. O Lord, the ma^ of 
aU things rJOuOerU Rev G A 

ALL SDl>L&. Latiohatn 
- “ ■ . ojo. Family C. Rev R 


ST GEORGES. Hanover Square. Wi: 

8.30 HO II Sung Euch (Jackson In 
CL the Rector. 

ST JAMCS^. PlccadlUv. Wl: 830 
HC II sung Euch: £ EP. 

ST JAMES^SiBsex Gardens. W2: 8. 
1030 HC. MIssa Brevis (PNeshiiiak 6 
E. St John'i Service mppettk The 
heavens are leUtog \Y _ 

ST LUKT^ Cheisaa.^BWB'. 8 HC: 

10.30 MP and HC iSiaihain to DL 
Jeso the very thought (BairsiiowL Rev 
D R Watson: 6.30 X, God's goodness 
(Bitooe}, Rev D RWaison. 

ST MARGARE'TS.^ Westminster. 
SWI* 8.I& 12.15 HG 11 Choral M 

Sr MAR^^D?TH^%LD5. WC3: 
a 9/45 HG Rev S Roberts: 1130 MP. 
Rev s Roberts; 2 48 Chinese S ervice : 
4.15 Oiorai E: 6.30 EP. the Vicar. 
ST MARY ABBOTS. Kenstoglon. WB: 
8. 1230 HC: 9.30 Sung EuriL the 
Vicar: il.lB Ma662) the Vican aM 

E 0662). R^'S H H Adaito. . ^ 

ST MARYS. Bowne Street SWI; 9. 
9 48. 7 LM: 11 HM, Missa Bne 
nomine iHeredi^. Haec dies 
iArcadeiU. Jesu duios memoria (Vic- 
toriai. Rev j Macuuame: 6.15 ^«fi- 
sopg i&aid) and Sofemo Dooedictlon. 
ST hlARYLEDONE. Marytebone.Rd. 
Wl: a 11 HC. Messe St Oeclle 
COoimodk Paais Angettims fFtwicia 
Rev CK Hamel Coom 630. RevD 
Head. 

ST MICHAEL'S. Qte ste r Souara, 
swl: S 15 HC: 11 MP. Rev A Ansea 

7.30 InTonnal ES._ 

ST MICHAEL'S. ^CgrtUilIL ECSc 11 
Chora] M ti662). Responses 
cAyievrantk Stop we mmily (Ktng), 
Te Oeum and Juboate tHcwtdis). 
Christian, stand w^ sword in hand 
(Bachi: 12 15 HC 11662). -Rev D 
Burion Evans. 

ST PAUL'S. Room Adam sl W2: ii. 
Rev G cassioy: 630 HGL Canon K de 
Berry. 

ST PAUL'S. Wiflon Place. SWl: a 9 
HC; 11 Solemn Euc^ Missa SteUifen 
Conditor orbis ipUinitoMik Benedlciie 
(Datoy). Jubitote Deo tBritlen). Rev C 
courtauki. 

ST PETE'S. Eaton Sguare, SWl: 
a 15 HC: 10 Maos:^ 11 

Mass in Mode X iC8sctoiinij,.O.how 
amiable are tny dwetongB vWeekleai). 

ST^ SsrafV^^SLQJEa Miln^ SL 
SW3: 8. 7.30 HC; 11 M- Vmie 
iBrinenL Jubliaie (SUnfeS^ ney 
that po down ih imps 

(Sumnoni: 630 CP, Nunc Dtoiltns 
iHencfiei HIIU. Th ey tha i go do^ ig 
the sea to ships iSanwon). Preb j 
Pearra. 

ST STEPHEN'S. Gloucester Road, 
5W7: a, 9 lm: 

Mass cMcNairk Rev R Browne: 6 
Solemn E and Benedtciton. Rev P 

^CEANNUNCIATTON. BryanoKin St 
Wl: 11 SM. Mewjux Orthenraito 
(Gounod). Pams Angehcui tTrancRL 6 
LM and Bcne dl ctton. 

5T ODtUMBA^ CHURW OF SCOT- 
LAND. Pont Street, s^: ii. 


SarraRinu"6r im Lord's 


a^The 

- ^ ^ f. Very 

Rev J Fraser M^jiskey: 6.30. Veiv 

CTOwwoouHT^anS^;^ ®®°T‘ 

Tffi aSuMPTION. Wirwlrt, StncL 
wlraTlOr ja- 4. 6LM: ll S M^MM 

fw I ^ pre ^ aod to 


iPaiestnnak O 


Mivai ton cBtowi , 
FARM STREET., 


of my 


Rev I Benllei 

fil*V%i« _ 

CHFLSTA QLD 


CHURCH. CMfl 


c»urrb & Swa. O. W 
Oiiidrm^ Smwf; 11 M. Obvm 
Rdvcp 6 C. PTM L ThoireiMt. 
CHRIST CHlilCH. CMELSE^ Sl."^ 
HHC. II MP ana HC.Rn'J Barton; 6 

nnOS\TNOR CHAPEI- S AudMlLSi- 
M lA HC 11 SUQv Eiactl. MM 
vote#* iB^rkHavjk A\v vtnm cornu. 
«a|ti2artt. RfvDr A.W Marta. 

TWNm’. firaraiBM Po^ 
aWT R30 HC 11 p J9 

H-rliUl. 6A0 Ci. RCV N C P 

hSl^RII^^ »p^ SueA 
6.30. 12-10 HC.^ 10 30 Cuch. Canon 

ST ALBAN^a Brooke 

SM: 1 1 HM. Canterbury Mass iMalito 

HovkL Jubilate Deo tl MSim Fr 

c«»^lb.w y«. 

. Short 
^ iBvrdk 
„ _ Short Servtee 
iBiTdi. The heavens fee iMliiig 
fSrfitttri. toe ktector. __ 

j^r^fftffiraT^S. PMIMcn evdm 
i>wa lO t«£ It SuttoeucftirHww^ 
m oj. Lortf. for 

uko irarmiii. lw\ J vmr: o 
^\«*«,0M ana Bcwdiciion. 


Ood 

utm i .1 ■ • W'*! ■^• 50 - 'O* 

^^'cTThIbSJrEDA-S. Pla<*: 11 

(AndriefsenL Toia pulctira cs Manb 
iDuniftei 




fPSiesurtni): 
INLONDON. 

ir AJVNC AND 5T ACMES JLU- 
liwan I. Cw g t u ra 

VMperv Oimlala 76. concerto for 

URC. NWB: 9 jo. 

SctjTV^^APCI- CllV Roatt. EC2: 

1 1 p cAuns. . 

Kendall. i** 





Jt; 


mr-7 , 


T.-— J 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

AU PAIR 
IN AMERICA 

The rir$i legN bp pair progranune 
lo the USA- 

Wondorful opportunity fbr 18-25 
year olds with fvu drivi^ uewo 
and good child/tof^l care 
experience lo spend a year In the 
USA to the homes of carefully 
seteeted Amerinn famlUes. 

B Ftre return flighi to New York. 
•SiOOpcr week pocket money. 
SSdby iratotog m New York 
OB arrival. 

• Medical insmnee eic. 

Inlervtews now being held for 
departures ttiroughoul 1967. 

Driailsand appIleaUon fonn toom: 

Dept TT« American litsricuie 
For Fofrlgn Study (UK) Ltd, 
37 Queens Ghue. 
London SW7 SHR. 

Tel: 0I-S84 2274. 


] 


- THE PRESDiCE OP 
YOUR COMPANY 

Is rcQuested al ihe opening of 

•KISS CUDDLE* 

LnudonT^ unMiue nrw ml twn H i 
unrtdopM miaNiy sofi iQy». v^umg 
.irr lOwu-apm 7 dBv« a wmi. 
«\n ic^iMimis av ailapir (or adop t io n 

Otwirrii wtn bo pmeniAd with a 4ou- 
%mik to romiAMnoiTklr thrir \i8it. 
Trdvri atrangm^PH by Rolto Rgyrr 
r«ifi bn ArranoTfl iii rr^prrt of otir VIP 
ir*44Pfils trainfiT to torti nrwporrfiis 
■ r ^w iw irr Uania Ciaui will Or #l honv 
Al Ki*^ It* Ckiddlf* diHino vMIng hours 
rtrrv Sunday nnIJI Xmm eomntcne- 
HHi btonday am Not rmb^ faria 
Ctem wip ate rteprronr any mi- 
fiMs who migiii be iramfemrig lo 
iipw h oi ii^ on Miher Xmaa or 
\jtiaH Dav Tor further drIalK rontact 
KIbB N* Ca^iDDLE. 

HaUtorTu Sauihv. High 8L Cdgtvwvi. 
TCL Ol 051 6618. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


1 


• Contact 

the team with the best 
experience Worid-wide 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

DEPT TT, 
NORTHGfATE 
CANTERBURY 
CTl IBA 

TEL; 0227 46261S 


This School Fee 
Trust Plan could 
dash your 
education costs. 

Send to: 

The Equitabte Life. 
FREEPOST. 

4 Coleman Sl, London 
EC2B2JT. 

Telephone 01-606 661 1 

rd wetcome details of the 
Equitable School Fee 
Trust Plan 

and its savings on the 
cost of education. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


J 


ANCESTRY 

Ooniari 

the fram vidlh Ihe best 
expmenre Wbrid'Wfdc 

ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPTT. 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CTl IBA 
TEl^ 0227 462618 
HERALDRY 


[ 


FOR SALE 


) 


SAVE A PILE! 

Yeun be floored by our pnenbl 






OIBI P la n o tibo finally died. Dee* yeure 
need a new home? ^or rngeical csmuy 
lagenily ovek r e p la ce la en L Happy to 
COeecL TM. 0866 682174. 


r. Cold. Sbver. P i Ptondi ur. 
gently wanted. Top Pricff. wnuama. 43 
Limba OonduM 8l WCl. 01 406 8638. 


WAIftEB Edvwdian. Victarian and afl 
pteted rnraiture- Mr Ashtan Oi 647 
6946 667-669 Oarmt Lane. EarMrtd. 
BW17. 


Name. 


Address 

Postcode 

Telephone 


COUM AMD WMEMAIIV KNOmeS - 

announra grandchlldrpn FcargaS 
Ryan. Loughborough, and Esntefter^ 
indg(». CaniPTbury- Cousin and sister 
lor Zachary. 

JONE6 In rcfurmbra n re of VI 
jnd ATihur'v imoured frieMmii*. GJ. 

*801811X7 FAK Jn PlrradfUy” Demon- 
sii«4ioiK and ntiibliioiiv vhowtiig ihe 
•im ol vnMie. wtitp. atoveb umareU^ 
tuii ^ cap niakbig. Ari exhibJiioti. Livy 
Lilronrv’ dKplav. Ounmakhiq and fret* 
%aiiiauoiiv. taternaumwil CSrand itoine 
tor Riding lor Ihe DfetoPied Journey ina 
Mv-dfawn rarrlagr uiroueh Picratui- 
iv .tnd 51 Jamt« are inrtuclPd in Uda 
<ireaie\ent Open 9 hL1 6.30 dally earepl 
Wertnevday. cioied from Ipm. Admie- 
Mon free 166 PifCa dH ly at Swailte 
Adeney BRfGC. Lwidpn Wl. 


AFKAL lor Pwktai. 

EHmer Sorieiy. PIc ae e thirn al 
•8 50 tomorrow roorrung. Sundw. lo 
John Tioapum*! Appead on Radio 4 Cor 
ttir i^rUntoA'b Dteme SocleCy, Vour 
itoiioUon .ran then be mtt to John 
Timpaon, Parfcinson'B Diaeaw Sorkty. 
3b Poniand Place. LPiteon WiK3DG 
Many ihankA. 


dfiPM 


The Equitable 
Life 

You gain because 
we’re different 


— sort n out now 
befoee the feeUve aeison at 57 bed 
cpeciaUMd nurRno hotm for addidva 
dtetoc act In area of outstanding natu- 
ral nraniy StofM by nurses, 
counsellors, psycfiologiSL physioihera- 
Mal and rfikUtu medieal ofneer. For 
iDustrated proapectua coniaa Ihe direc- 
lor. caoods House. Easl Knoyte. Wilts 
SP3 6BC or l ete Phowa 074783 656. 


Vi LeiiDOii rent a video/Tv by 
day. wk. monlh. Tops 01 *730 4469. 

LET 116 TRACC Your Aooesiara Cxpert- 
pcnonal s er vi ce . Unlooe bound reran! 
of your rsmfly Idstory- fnfual report 
Mftihhi Six weeks. Write today for freo 
brochure and piiorliy nsmnt t check- 
IttL Wlndur Ancestry Rema r eh 
nT/i3». MountbaBen Houae. victoria 
SL Windsor. Berio 8L4 IHE. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 





Toicd« W9 an bat &. 


We fimd over one dmd of d 
l ac a re h iwpifae p f t ve nrib o nt 
cm of capeer in the UK. 


at wholesale 
est htoh-i^ rreca the 
pervicob 01 278 61Z7. 


Lat- 

wtih 


Aseor lOOC lo letRepiy box C20 


For 

Pa lumooH Doue Soriely P lea s e Ito 
ten al 850 tomorrow mormng. Sunctoy. 
to John TliiiptonY Appeal on-Radio 4 
tor ibe Parkinson's DHcaar Soriely. 
Voar donation ran ihen beienl lo John 
Timpson. Parklnsom Dimso Sonely. 
36 Portland Piare. London WIN 3DC. 
Many Thanto. Reme rab fft to pul your 
rJorla bark from aidimii lordahL 


WANTED Cdvmrdian. Victorian and an 
p o nned fumUnra Mr AMoa Ol 947 
6946. 657-669 GOmdl Lana. EOrlsIleld. 
SW17. 

RDYAmOULnWI Itey JW. ngirtici. 

wdmaN. ctr.. wamad. Ol 883 0024. 
— pufT Noned Ibbitod edElon 
nudto i & 2. csooa Id 068 06 4866 


IDS SALE 




SOnVlIN A m d v er sa ry 9 6 bomes of Ra- 
moa • Pinto. 1996. vinlaoe pori. 
CxcaMaM randmon. £85 per bottia. Tel 
Ol 3B6 7S34. 


The Mitkiiaif 
repbra lurnllure toecisUria. One of 
EndBiwTs larpM rollertiens of iTiii St 
lam Onlury period iiyle furniture. £2 
miNtoP stories for immediaie delivery. 
NHilebod. nror Henley on Thames 
i049ii 641115. Bn ura emomh 100021 
293680. Topehun. Devon 10399871 
7446. B r r fcd fV. GlOt 10463) 810962. 


1987 12 SpieodM views of Britoin - a 
beauidul Christmas gill. Jud £3.86 Phis 
p&p. TO: Tlipes Calendar. Spralai iJ« 
o r art ea Book Service. The Old Moat 
Houae. SUPohm Road. Banbury. Ox- 
lordsntre 0X16 8HX or write tor order 
form tor caiecKtors to beaenl dirvci to up 
to 18 friends vrilli a Oreetinos 



2 CKkog Hook TBooe, 
(pePT TT/asnfll Z^OBtaSW^SAlU 



OMAirr- 28-3001 Novrmbrr 
a! C4ai Or ind ea d . Adveni Musk*, eon- 
durior Mary Bmy. DeUUs Srtwla 
Cn'UiMi Mil 194 Caamdoe 
tort. Cambridge GB3 TAR. 


■p Love or Marriaoe. AO 

DaieiiDe.DeplfQi6)23 Abtnodon 

Road. London W8. Tel: 01-93B lOll. 


ovTT I year CAPR o^i. low wewsf 

rates over 2 y e ar s (APB 934»> 8 3y<aiT 

(Am 122^ Wrtnen gooiauota. Free 
Caniogiic. 30a Mghgate Road. NWS. 
01-267 7871. 


VIDEO rnttSATION Latest 8 to* remote' 
control model only £389. TOPS^M Low- 
cr Sioatie 9 . SWl. 01-730 0953. 

YORK CMZY PAVM tor pstioa and 
driveways, spare n eede d , henee low 
prices 061 223 0681. 061 231 8785. 

VORII RJlOBrOMES tor pattaa 5 drive- 
ways. Liquidation sale. Tel 061 223 
OeeiAtol 231 8785. 

SOFA Eilflen Grey. Please rite tor details 
01 789 8866 24 Hr. 


qiAUiy wool carpels. Al trade 
prices and under, also avadabto iOOY 
extra. Lar9F room stee remnants UDder 
half Donnai price. Chancery Carpels Oi 
406 0483. 

TICIICn FOR Aiir BVnn; cats. Star- 
IlglM EXP. Otesa. La Mis. All DiOBira 
and sports 

Tel: 82S-66i^pa-049S. 


A. Ex / Visa 

L Best ttekete tor al sold- 
oul events. Our cb eats indude most 


rerovered b y Sp Hriiorv. 
hUInmwiilP T tte hone; Ol 272 8201 

dJUCR-’WeuM htrs Evelyn Qurik pirate 
cobUn J .Denns' irgenuy oa Ol 609 
2384 ioni>. 


01-4981678 

avto!. Hand bound ready tor 
non - also ''Sundayr*. £12.80. 
Wnen. 01-688 6383. 
mi n ia ture fox terrier x 
Jack Russeu popples for sate, ne iittifu l 
■gn aU tOTi eri. Tel. ASOOl (0990) 21969 
BCAUTVIIL mahoga n y baby grand. Dc> 
celleni eondmocL £1.900 0.0.0. TeL 
Hayviwds Healb i0444) 4BB647 
OLD YORK FLABSTONESi Cobble sete 
etc. Nationwide deliveries. Tcb (0360) 
850039 (Wilts). 


Te'irraidf n tiraiitlfiTl niHimi mrt lltrii 

paremet y hara we artn plhebesimcn- 
ey can buy E8.95 per ro yd vau 
Meraioton vthei rile cafpei 14 ptoto 
roieqrs. Bum in unoenay 12* wide 
fromsteciL 7 year wear giarantee tor 
hote or afflee. £4 76 per sqyd -Kvai. 
Plus me largm setecuon of piam car^ 
petbig In London. 

148 wandteorth B ri dg e Rd 
6W6 


TebOl-^l-JS^/d 

Free Esttmates-Experi FUttog 


HISTORIC BOAT 
FOR SALE 

HNCnSHER 54 ft. built 192B. as 
ttnai DHoliuiF i n ^w it on Launch. 
Enreiieni condition. Many ort riw i 
fratms. FuXy eouippcd for eanal and 
river entBiiig. Ketvta M diesel eogtoe- 


4/6 berth. Lying Cuntoeriand Beef it. 
Regenrs CRtmi, view oy appolniinenL 
Turner, 87 FRzroy Rd. London NWi 
01-722 9806 or OeOl 873946. 
Oflen excvediiig £20.000. 


ctara instridaenis. 
686 4981. 


imm- 

srioe tor quick 




1 


Dtptomors spATtouh 2 
dblf* bnliuvm hnury firi. gtedeh wHh 
PArikimi 20 Hnailvow and Wrsi 

iJMi virw wiviimr. £166 pw. Teh Ol 
048 6227 


BBOJB HU bi^cfb 3 bed 
extended semi. Lux. furnished. S epefa i e 
bte. shQteer and wc. Mod. khchen, 
6^1 waned tedh. GCH. Oarage. 
£i8&pw. 1 yr mui tecTekOi 4526011. 


FVTUev / Btenea Liixucy 9C newly uxe- 
noriy decerwed. fully equipped flat 
available inunedlaMy in pfesUoious 
new Mock 1/2 bedrooms. From £190 
to £160 pw. 01 878 7766 


BOOfH NSNSlRBraN 2/3 bed moMn 
Hte. iMfii* trra^ furtiMiPcL kmo 
lomponxjirt. CdOOpw.TiHOl 373 1I34 
or 01 370 3lo0 


■/ RWWFRg , If you hove a 
aiiauiv property to in ten us about K. 
We Offer a professional A reliable sei^ 
vSrew Otfmshf Cdnatenitne 01-244 7353 


-fc NW3 - liRiL attMttve. 
modem 2 bed biieoiiy nai with g^. 
£160 pw. TN: 346 9997 teves) 


SWT Super mows home. 2 bed. ruQy fur. 
nbhed. teirCK/CHW. TV. ovkinq£l90 
pw Tel 10960) 7D5061 


KDBBIRTOR 6wmy garden fte te 
vooiie maeaqine. Lounge. 9 
£200 pw. TN; 01-609 5941 


teftil982.SmMewt(hMiie , 

hidp. AJI extras irxrrpi am TRXa. P8H i 
W1U1 moip oaent. C9.980. NO offers. NO 
Ite4lrf%. Tcl (07081 8Sf7711 Ofllrr.- 
t0708» 760681 Home 


V12 R o ads te r. In Priim 
Veitow. 29.000 tnilef. MIM 
rondiuofi Over C7.000aa e n i inpeai two 
yearv ruP hisiory from new. pnvnie 
vole. £15.500, T«i 0749 tSMVIeldl 
341811 


944 1984 white, 1 owner. 19X)00 miles, 
nwuiv extras FBH. £13.960 eves 6 
w/ends 0266 793362. 


Lotus, SrimUar GIX/OTG 
Ferrari. ANon. TVIL C-lype eir. 

0562 872326. 


FLATSHASE 




S i ARIA VALB« Share large e gwf ortabie 
flat wiiii female. O/R. nr alt tranroort A 
tocMtttcfc Non R neker preC. £300 
IncI, 01-289 1102. 


DOdCLAMM niPy fum, Otoe rite- Stogie 
bedrm £48 PW. Dbie B edim csuli rau* 
pie). £36 PW oarii. Pbooe 987 2322 
(after i9aml 


UOraNB for Juxury fM to share, male 
Auslrtoian 30e, Mng icnn. WCl ana. 
IX. %tr Armyiage. Ol €37 24te (6102). 


^0/R.prof m/r. n/sregdio 
Share hse with tomale owner. All 
facilitfd. £120 PCM tori. 01 380 6960 


WUidn 4 osOe radi- 
us Swtoe Co tt age. ProftirtonN rcmaie 
N/B. tale twenties. TeL 02 730 6490 


prof fenute We 904 sreks< 
vhorndor s/r house/flat. mural tendon 
TeJ:222-6841 eKL39 9 B pjm 


IVIA Luxury aparmicfiL soli pro- 
RMnaf feraafe. non somJmt pretomd. 
riOOpw. TN 936 464a 
ttlifliirfl - Qteoey Walk'own room- tar 
female in elegant naL Ail ap iiii a ncr sin- 
riuded. £66 pw cxcL Tcl 01 362 6368 
GLAniAM prof tort to share luxury ftei. 
own room. 10 shore aX te cH ltl eo £170 
pern. TN.Oi-360 1090 (a/phooe) 
FULHAMI Sm Shared ho«0e. Own room. 
Shved kflehm/bamreom. £37 pw phis 
bills. TebOl 736 8681. 

MfSlilLL MLL Large farnished room m 
lovely bouse. Good views n/s.12 mins 

itobe£40SiiemlaytoFMday01 00094 6 4 

SW it Nr ERTtfrcltf BR. Prof. M/F, N/S, 
O/Rp in comfortable haev £168 poa 
excL, TN 01-870 8694. 


_ AXSemVE SCM lux 

flal/bouae: up to fSOOpw. usual fern 
req Ptu^ps icay A Levris. Seulh of the 
Park. Cbetoca oflioe. 01-362 Bill or 
North of IA4 terk. RageofB FterX office. 
01-686 9882. 


CNTTgA Krdghtobndge. Brigrana. Pim- 
lico. WgaimuNier. Luxury houoei and 
flAto avtollibte tar loiw or Niorr lete. 
Pteare riog for ramoc Idl Odoms. 69 
Bucfonohoni More Rd. Swi. Ol 828 
8251. 

WCfWAQNDrTOy ftraWteflAi prwtycar- 
peM 2 Dcdrouuwa flat tn qiAct private 
rreidmuN block ai bock of RlrtimoMl 
park. Porter. CH/CHW. Inbertom, ttfl. 
Oonventoni basre 5 tube. Or parking 

tovNiabte. AllinclU9tve£l60pniv.TeiOl- 
568 2992 

• 

KENsaaGTOH gra erami upw iu noor 

1 iiH toUito Idbi bffd Ige for kiL/dJner 1 
mill hioh v| CiTSpw Ifirt 938 2396 

HWIL S/C rurngcouM floor M.lbKl 2 
recepUoti. Kll 4e baUi. Store heiung. 
Phone. £75 p.w. No share. Suit prof 
couple. 01-456 6146 

9S7 8881 The nunilter to remoraber 
wAcn seektog beat ranial pfoperttoa in 
cenirN and prime London arcoo 

£i60/£2.000pte. 

UIXINIY SERVKiD RJiTSk rrani Lo^ 
don from £526 pie. Ritip Town Hse Apia 
373 3455 

ACTON. LovNy 2 MdreottHd CiaL aua 5 
sharers. GCH. £i26pw exd. 01 992 
2439 or S79 0115. 

CHELSEA npbt itmry balcony ixaL ipe 
ffcep. (tale beoroom. UfU porter. Loop 
M. Tel: 01-622 6625. 


ItOfNI 6NB1 Flam and houses lo irt 

ihHHighout me Docktonda arra- 
- TN: 01-790 9660 

'FULIIAM Hal wper mtoi be men. dUe 
btfriR. CH. w^p^. Op Lcl C130 pw. 
T«i 01 736 8766,. 

FULHAM rabdotg 1 <tMe bed (laL recep- 
• lion 5 ntted kflrtwn. stoUc or couple. 3 
mlhs tel. £llO pw. TN Ol T45 7818. 
TEDDBIGTOIL pfaasgni s/c flai overiook- 
tng park. I bed. 1 racep. fcta b. CH.grpe. 
£350 pcm. 01-892 8877. 

1 TIMESHARE OVERSEAS | 

MINI Anyone buying a limi^hafT wiiri I 
1 Rmorts Leisure Cxrbange contacf f 
1 0236 842194. | 


DOMESTIC ANI^TERINS 
SmiAliONS 




gPORUm LARCaOT Ao Burrau. 

affm m/hrlpv. domsb all ttve-to 
UK 4 OtercPte Ay PRr A8im5> Lid . BT 
Regent Sl London w.i oi d39 d85f 




OVESSEAS PROPERTY 
TOLET 




RIVRJU CaiBigi Surmy flat for winj^ 
hnvik/Chrtvtmiks/iaier. S teeps ZrB. 
Pm . 0b03 99328 . 


r < 


LEGAL NOTICES 




IN THC HIGH COL9rr OF JUSTlCC NO. 
006660 of 1086 
CHANCLRV DIVISION 
IN THC M4TTCR OF BARKER * . 
DOBSON CROUP PLC 
AND 

Ri THC MATTER OF THE CmPANKS 
ACT 1985 

NOliCC IS HCRC&Y GriTN that a Prll- 
hon wa^ on Uw 28th July 1986 pioisPled 
10 Her MaievtvY Hitoi Courr of Jiaoc# tor 
Ihe ron ft mwmon of the reduction of Pie 
amount Mandmg 10 me ciedtt of the Sbara 
Premium Arrouni of the abrn’e-named 
Oorapani' to Cidoooaoo. 

AND NOnCe te FLUTHCR CrOCN RMt 
Itte said PeUtlon is directed to be heard 
before the Honourable Mr. JudW 
Mmyn Davies al the Royal Oouitsi of 
Justice. SiraniL London WG2A 
Mmiay the 3nl day of Noventocr 19B6. 
Any Gredilor or Sharehokter of Ihp aaid 
Company dewing to miootp memskiagof 
an Order for the conftotiuUen df Die sted 
rcdutUon of bhve Pfeauum AccouoK 
Should appear at the time of iMring-te 
pmon or toy Counsel lor that pwpoie, 
A copy of Ihe said PetUion will be fur- 
nolted io any vtich person requlrtno Che 
same by uie undernwnuoned SoUcttors'cn 
payment of the regulated charge for iho 


Dated IMS 21SI day of October 1968# 

Lteelt. White Si KM 

21 Holborn viMuri 
London ECIA 20V 
Sohrilaig tor the above.named Oompteiy 


GOSTMA5TCR GROUP OF OOlbCPANSCS 

UMITEO 

AND 

THC COMPANIES ACT 1985 - 

NOTTCC IS HCRCB^' GIVCN. purPlM 
to Section 58Bof Itie Oempantet Act. 1998 
uiai a Meeting of me CmHtors af me 
above named Company- will be held at 
Royai Scot Hotel, too Kiim crom rom. 
London WCl . on Friday the 3Ul Oetoder 
1966 01 lOo'clock in Die forenoon, for Ihe 
purgosev mentioiifd in Scctms 5S9 and 
690 or Ihe ^aid An. 1 

Dated ims iTDi day of October I98d 

C.F. OOALCV 
DtRBCfqR 


HARRIS FILMS LRUnTCD 
AND 

TKC COMPANIES ACT X9BS ^ 

NOnOE te HCRCBY CrirTN. punuUK 
loSKllonSBSoi Ihe OoiYipaftiesAci 1965. 
that a Mreiing of the Ondiion of ihe 
abmg named company vriO be held at 1 
Surrey Street. London WC2R on Friday 
the loth Ocioiwr 1986 at 2.30 eY loci i ‘ ln 
the aiieniaan. tar the aurpows menuoned 
In Srebon and 69Q of the mid ACL 
Dated mis 23ro day of S ep t e mb er 19M 

R.a KINGSTON 
DIRCCTOR 


TRUSlEEACrS 




NOTICE K hrreby giArii porwam lo 47 
n| Ihr TRt STU. Act. 1925 lhal any p(T 
sim Kaving a CLAIM agAinsI or «JHI 
iNTLRun- m thr C2»TATE Ol any Of lite 
dereavd pcratoiN whose nonm, addtcto 
jBd dmmpiKMM ate set oul betow s 
hnebv retiuved to ^end paill(hlars''bn 
* wnfrmr of ftH rtakn or biiemr (o (he pep 
son 01 peivKVi ineuilociea in rntaUon lolhe 
dereaved pervm roureraed before me d8le 
vpert f ied after whirti dale itie Miaieof me 
dCTTiP e d win tor diviribtiird by Ihe pmon 
al tepreventalpns among Ihe pmom 
piUilkHl ihriTio iwriing regard only 10 Ihe 
riaimv and talrreds of which they haniT 
had noUrcb 


MYERS JUlta Of 
Palmen Green. Lixidon N13b died on SIR 
December 1986 tatfculars to Anmony 
Quinn £ Cb Soiidiers of 15 GPehrane 
Mews. Sl JohnY wood. London NWS 
6NY before 2901 December, 1986. 


15 


THEATKES 




236 5568 rr 74| 
Gig 930 6193 Firu 
Ctoff 240 7200 124 Mm 7 Ctopsl 
Tteketmaricr 379 6433. 

L\ra apm. Sris 6pm 6 B30 

SPTEVEN BERKOFFS 
SINK THE BELGRANO! 

Direri from the Half M oo n 
*te4irAflKl.T CQiSte*? FT 
Prpmratre food and drink « 


Sih Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

SlPARAT Y^PITRIP l^ under 

flTl”- Citertleni rtiegp 
wHiis daw of Pf^s ad theatres 
Horn to am. PASfAtlRAilT 4^8 
2033k. BABY CAR PARK. Info 
033 0080 ARI COW 


MW LONDON Drury Lane %irc2 
406 0072 CC 379 6433 Eves 7.45 
Tue A Sal 500 R 7.45 


/T«8. gUOT 8N W I C A L 

CATS 

.Y DAN,V TO BOX. OFFIOC 


Group gookmos Ot-405 1S67 or 
01 9306125. NOW RO O MM TO 
MAY 28 11 


OU> VIC 92a 76X6 cr 261 1821 
From igNov.ftoralireuedi 
only 


FAITN 


PATTI LOVE 


StISAIRiAM YOfOi m 

THE WOMEN 


by Cian> Booine Lttee 

OUVteSt ^ 928 2752 C3C (Na- 
lioiwi Theatre's open stage I Today 
200 rtow pnre mall £ 7 15. Mon 
7 16 iACOBOWSKY AND TNE 
COLONEL by WerfeL vrfiion oy 
hN Bptwman. tup. Thur 7.15. 
wed 2.00 (low prvre mall 4 7 15 


rvi 7 16 


454 0909 GC 
379 6433 FV CaH 24Hr TDay CC 
240 7200 Grp 930 6193 


LE5 MiSERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ONET SM 

L%n 7.30 MM. TIWI A SM SJO 
Laincunere no! admtiied 
uiiuf me toUerval 

IT Tite TOUTS DT ENQUWbi 
AT THE BOS 


PHOENIX 836 2294 cr 240 9661 
Fir^ CaU 240 7200 
Cl p S.1M 930 6123 

DIANA RIGG m 

A ftew play 

WILDnRE 

Piev>r*irH frtMvt 11 Nov 
-: Ooein IS Nov tot 7pm 


PteCAfill£V 487 4606 CC 379 
6665/6433 CmSateS 930 6123/ 
aSb 3962 

FR.TNKIC HOWCRD 
P-\TtllCX CJVPCILL 

• A niNNV tHMO HAPPED m 
THE WAV ID TNE FOmiM 

-fti hMv rpnnv’' S Cxp 
Ptn«i iTnm 8 Nov Ope« 14 Nov 


:or WA5E8W1 9306681 
/2«r Hoiime 93O0B44/5/6.Grp 
Sam 930 8123 KcWi Prewse 
741 9999. Ttekebnaster 379 6453 
Svi Ga6 24br/7day 240 7200 

"ALLO’ALLO 

wuh the TV SNOW SYAR8 

F76CB 30 OCI 

Mop-Tlir a Fri A Sal 6.30 A 8,40 


quExm 01 734 1166/7/ 
0261/0120. 94br rr 240 7200/ 
379 6455. Grp Safes 930 6125. 


LO NDOW" Odn 
WONDERFUL STAIT- Mail 

MAUREEN UPMAN 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

””6 ripples wtui exciteme m " 
STunev ”Ju9 wondrefur OXxp 
Mon Sat 8 Mato Wed 2 JO Sal 6 


ROYAL COUNT SOC 730 1745/ 
1857. CC 24|ir 7 day 240 7200 
ibkii feet llnia 22 Na*. Eves 
Bpfii. Hal MBto 4nfn NAFRAte 
DICK by Aiaa BsM itL Dte 
Rkhard Ever 


SAVOY 01 856 8888 OC 01-379 
to2l9. 836 0479 Evenings 7.46. 
Mato Wed 3. Sal 5 A 8.30 
LAST 2 VfBEW ENDS NOV 1 
CHfUSrOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

r OLf PADOlOf I 

MICHAEL COCHRANE ' 
ODIXTTE TIMOTHY 

CLEESON CARLTON 

MICHAEL PRAVhTS 
AWARD WINNING FARCE 

NOISES OFF 

Dir by lUDCHACL BLAKEMORC 


SAVOY THEATRE Ol 836 8888 
win DAVID LANOTON 6e 

. KILLING JESSICA 

al the Savtov irom Nuv 12? 
NOW TO FDRl OIIT7 


Eves 750 Mats Wed A S Pl 2>sa 
24iir 7 day rr Dkgs on FWI 
CALL 240 7200 atoo 

YICKCnMSfCR 379 6433 or 
any WH Smith Trowel Breorh. 

CHARUE GIRL 
ONLY 12 WEEKS LEFTTO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERF JAN 10 


CVS 


CHARLIE GIRL 

ot VM sia 


01-834 0283/4 
cr 854 0048. Fim ra6 cr 240 
7200 A cr 741 9999/379 8433. 
GrpS 930 8123. Eves 7.48^ W«d 
Mato 5. Sal 5 A 8.16 



DEADLY NIGHTCAP 



C0I8CDY, 01 579 5399 cr Ol -579 
6453/701 999. Flrd CNI 24lir 
240 7200 nkq leei Gra Sales 930 
6123 

Mon Fri a. Wiri Mat L Stol 5 OO A 
850 


^op ffnetc cgffiir laiena of mod- 
ern linie9r*iD J4aiu 
m 

"■A l Oap up revival . Ibebesl I have 
ever vem^WTimest 

ROOKERY NOOK 

^Tiie nMHi rrirhrairri of Ben 
TTtoveiV fbrm'tepcctaiori 

CT lBARTVrS 01-838 1443w 
rial CC No. 379 8435. Evgs 8D 
Tuev 2.45. Sal SJO and 50 


THE MOUSEIKAP 


836 2660 OC 
4JA5/B1O0. 741 9999. Ptobl Call 
24 Hi 7 D^ cr 240 7200 Crg 
StoUH 930 6123 

CABARET 



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Mon Fri 745 Siu Wed 300 
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M hPOktoii 856 3464 OiP Sales 
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VAUDEVILLC Box Oflire A OC 
836 9987/5645 FM csb OC 24 
hrv 240 7200 ifalig fm Cvgv 80. 
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gnSTENAU. SWI Ol 900 7766/ 
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741 9999. Cm Ol 836 3962. 
MonFri aoa Wed Mn 3.0a Sals 

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MILLS HA RRIS 

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by HHAN 
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TDURG VIC 928 6363 CC 579 
6453 r.vrs 7 30. Sal Mat 5. 

5 Ntov. Sflid OvL 


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ANTHONY rfWFAY 9 A 23 

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Bibri 311 -idni Cl.OO. 


PICCAPILLY GAkAEinr, I6ODII1 
Sl.. WlJn 629 2876. 

DAVra STUFF Drawings. 
Watf^roiours and eicliitogs 
26lh OciobiT 22 November 
Mon Tfi iDSJOSoto 10-12 30. 

SPVRL King St r eet, St Ja mev^ 

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5.50. Santo 2«6AO. Record e d 
info. 01 821 7126. 


TNACNOIAY GALLERY. 18 

Tharkrray SL W8. DAVA 6ta* 
CLINK Recetd palnUngto UnUI 
7 NOi 


«nr Admiralty Arrtii Tel: Ol- 
930 6844 Now Eitfita Act 
Ota . Open 1627 October, dai 
Iv. rxerpi 26m. lO-Srin. Works 
for sale 


MCRV, 23/24 Cork Si. Wl Tel: 
01 734 6961/2266. Raymond 
HarrtvChing.*”Thr gilded Trip 
Ivch and rrcenl wild life 
pniptlnvt** &9in Ortober lo 
jjih Noiember, Mon Fri 
9J0nra 6nni 


The Nauonai Mutetim of 
All aad Design, s. Kensingion. 



Record 

ed iiuo Oi 681 4894 WKdays 
10650 sum 2.30650 
Cl6« i Fridavto. 


CINEMAS 




Is 01638 8891. 
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6 15 A 8.30 OTELLO fUi. 
Today 11 00 £ 230 Kidto Ouh 
fimiani Membn^lpJ 


Tovvii Tube 488 


opp Camden 
2445 THE 


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6 30 B50 ENDS Thun. 

Sl ARTS PTi 31 Oct IKN (15> 


Kingv Road 
bW5 561 3742 Denys 

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FUni N 2.16 4.20 630 8.46! 
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499 5757 Maggie Sinllh. 

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A ROOM WrTN A VnF CPCU 
rilm al 1 30 iNOi Suni 3 45. 
6 10 £ 8 40 


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From Nay 7 SROAN tPG> 


CURZ OW WEST PHD Shafiesbury 
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1.40 4 05 6.509.00. Laie Nlptl , 
Show Fri £ Sal ai.45gm. All 
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7,0 9A 


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MOUSE DETECTIVE lUl Sep 
proavdnotoiopenSuii250&l6 . 
H.00 Wte. 1200 2 30 5 16 
8 00 AU piogs bookable in 
advance Ctedtl Card Hot Lme * 

4 Ar r rto/V ton/ Am£.x 1 930 

373?/ ti39 1929 24 hour — 
ver\wr C2 50 seoto available 
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MARBLE ARCH (725 
20111 WiilL Dtonev^ OMDEIL 
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flailv 130 346 600 8 16. 
Rnlured pnrev for OAP9. 
1840 holders SiiidenI card 
hohirrv. I mter 16^ 


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I NDS Thurv STARTS Fri 51 
Ori MEN il5i 


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01 481 4000 

Birth, Marriage and Death Notices 


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» .if 


• / 


I 


'yF - ; 

















T 


} 


-■20 


Record budget 


deficit makes 


US debtor state 


From Bailey Morris, Wasbington 


The United States budget 
deficit rose to $220.7 biUioa 
tfl5S.2 biUioo) in the 1986 
fiscal year, the highest level in 
the country's history, despite 
across the board spending cuts 
last March and sbsuply re- 
duced defence spending. 

Although a record deficit 
bad been predicted earlier by 
the Reag^ Administration, 
the official figure for the 
recently concluded 1986 fiscal 
year was still regarded as a 
political liability in the run-up 
to the November Sections. 
The deficit itself is not an 
election issue but voter con- 
cern over ^e slowing down 
US economy and rising un- 
entploymeni rate is sb^ng 
op in key Senate races. 

As a resuh of the rdeniless 
build-up of deficits over the 
past five years, the US is now a 
detor nation for the first time 
since 1914. Indeed, it has 
bea>me the world's largest 
debtor nation, surpassing 
Mexico and BrazU. 

During the past fiscal year. 


set a new record, it was almost 
$10 billion below the $230 
billion forecast made Just two 
months ago. 

“I am pleased that the 
deficit for 1986 is more like 
$221 billion than the $230 
billion we predicted in Ai^ 
ust,” Mr James Miller, direc- 
tor of the Office of Mana- 
gement and Budget, said. 

But economists and Demo- 
cratic officials reacted dtarply 
to the 1986 figure, rpgazdiog it 
as evidence of a critical turn- 
ing point in the US economy 
in the 1980s towaids rapidly 
growing deficits which will 
lead to lower living standards. 

“There is a high price to be 
paid for this down the road," 
Mr John Palmer, an econom- 
ist for the Urban Institute, 
said. He predicted a share 
decline in the living standards 
of the middle classes as a 
result of either additional 
steep domestic spending cuts 
or higher taxes. 

Indeed, a new poll indicates 
that Americans have become 


Ibe US deficit sur^ in re- 
ins ounilii 


sponse to problems ramiliar to 
^roprans — a sharp slowing- 
down in growth, reduced tax 
revenues and steep increases 
in form subsidies and support 
prices. 

The Reagan Administration 
attempted yesterday to 
dampen concern over the 
defictL saying that although it 


inured to hi^ deficits, which 


have risen hom $S7 billion 
when Mr Reagan took office 
to well over $200 biilion. 

Mr Miller said yestenfoy 
that as a result of spending 
cuts and foeezes over tbe past 
few years, the deficit is now on 
a downward track and would 
be SSO billion lower in the 
1987 fiscal year. 


Hal] gives notice at 
the National Theatre 


By Gavin Belt, Arts Correspondent 


Sir Peter Hall has formally 
served notice that he intencfo 
to leave tbe National Theatre 
when his present contract 
expires in two years* time. 

In an article in today's Arts 
ftge (page 12), the artistic 
director says: "By the end of 
1988, 1 shall have had 15 yeara 
at the National and that is 
loitg enough." 

Sir Peter, aged 56, adds: "1 
hope to have the time and 
energy to do one more major 
job." He does not elaborate, 
but in a recent conversation 
with The Times, he indicated 


that he was considering vari- 
ous options in Europe. 

He emphasized that his 
decision had not bera in- 
fluenced controversial re- 
ports in The Su/u/ajf Times 
conceimng the transfer of 
subsidized productions by the 
National and the Royal 
Shakespeare Company to the 
commercial theatre. 


In accordance with his con- 
tract, Sir Peter has recom- 
mended a successor. Mr 
Richard Eyre, an associate 
director at the National since 
1981. 


Solatioa to Pnziie No 17,180 Solotioa to Pnak No 17,185 


n B ra o a p a 13 

i^scsna 

reansrarasn 

a Ki n n « E a 
>:nrpHciEa aBBEnran 
[S H f? a P3 

Is n [n !? n la a 

kinaES!?! L^EQsaanmm 


PI B a E @ E I? 
i.fEataaaanBS apno 
E a @ H a a n m 
laHiiE anannanEE 
c^EEBEEan 
iilEEEISinnH iJaHEBii 
B O 0 a B 
snaraEiiEE' 
|E n B lii E B PI n 

fynaoEsnsE anEE 
n !!] E a a E B 
yiiEE isaEaBisafiiSB 
aa uBEEB 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,186 


A prise Times Atlas of Woiid History ky// heaven for the 
first three correa sohaiora opened nexi Tfuusaay. Entries shouid be 
addressed to : The Times. Saturt^' Crossword Competition. PO 
Box 486. 1 Virania Strea. London El 9DD. The winners and st^ih 
titm will he pmiished next Saturday. 

The winners oflastS^turdav’s competition are: G R Binns. Balmoor 
Terrace, Peterhead, Aberdeenshire: Mrs J Humphreys. Regency 
Green. Prinleweil. Souiherui, Essex; tV McCrea. Oxford Road, 
Fulwood, Preston, Lancashire. 


Name. 


Address 


• , 



ACROSS 


1 Scholar there in France has 
support fiom Lydia’s aunt 
( 8 ). 

5 Marvellous West Pyrenean 
goal-antelope (6). 

10 Just instruct the amanueosis 
orally (S). 

11 Number symbolizing the 
flame of unrequited love? 
(5.4). 

12 InsUnciive apprehension in 
teaching (9). 

13 Business bead has obliga- 
tion to make an extra pay- 
ment (5). 

14 Definition of nostalgia after 
loss o f directions (7). 

16 Be not distressed about first 
of many put in the vault (6). 

19 Cupid’s sole love — so we 
hear (6). 

21 He looks at books for The 
Listener (7). 

23 Sounds a small openiag — 
ao inch in Scotland (S). 

25 Scored but withdrew from 
contest (9). 

27 Where sportsmen in 
Gloucestershire made the 
feathers fly (9). 

28 Destroyer about to destroy 
this? (1-4). 

29 Fly reneatedlv back east 
across 


30 Judidal type of instrument 

( 8 ). . 


repeatedly back 
IS the Channel (6). 


DOWN 

1 Very strict chap with the 
heart of 29 (8). 

2 Binders to suit Dgar's vari- 
auon (9). 

3 Cherubic figures set it up 

(5) . 

4 So reirogade to be so large 
(7). 

6 Lived in it behind a 
redevelopment (9). 

7 Some trouble on foot, with a 
bit of the mast (S). 

8 .Assimilate a code of laws 

( 6 ) . 

9 Is a bang on the head such a 
benefit? (6). 

15 Old-fashioned gimlet for in- 
stance (9). 

17 Watch uew-style In The 
Mood, by The Splinters (9 )l 

18 One will seize its quarry or 
depart in confusion (8). 

20 By no means genuine hold- 
ing of bankers at Zurich (6). 

21 Time in which river flot^ 
to order (7), 

22 Set up big stake as gallows 
(6)l 

24 Account book detailed for 
tbe shelf (S). 

26 Robots put in to find a city 
(S). 


Concise Crossword page 13 


r- 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


(Thampion flies west for further glory 



• ’ V . ■ : ■ < ■ • 

P' 

V* " • •* w'A 4*^ 

•% % •• V* * • • • “ ^ 

^ • A/-’*’- : • • • < 


Brave, amnwd 
champion racehorse of 
Enrope. receives a onsfortiiis 
Dvzzle from Ids stable lad, 
fttaa Grahaai, at Gatwick 
Airport yesfeniay before fly- 
ii^ to the United States in 
search of further glory. 

The briUiaiit wiiuier of the 
PrU de I* Arc de Triompbe at 
Loagehamp earlier this 
nraam, Dandng Brave will 
now tackle the best Nmlb 
America has to oflio’ in tbe 
$2 mtIUon Breeders* Cop Tmf 
at Santa Anita. 

After an ll-boor flight to 
Los Alleles Dandi% Brave 
will spend 28 boors in qnar- 
antine before travelling the 30 
miles to the raoecomse, where 
he will be stabled Dntfl the race 
OB November 1. 

The CaliforniaB race will be 
ftie cfaampiofl's last and he has 
already been syndicaled at a 
stad valne of £14 million. His 
only defeat in nine races came 
at Epsom in Jane wben be was 
narrowly beaten by 
Shahrastani in the Derby. 

Phoragraph: Peter Sfairiey 


Thatcher wants fair share 


for women in public life 


By Teresa Poole 


Government mmistnes are 
10 face a closer scrutiny for 
signs of any male chauvinist 
tendencies after a pledge by 
the Prime Minister yesterday 
that women should be prop- 
erly represented in public iifo. 

League tables are to be 
drawn up and publi^ed for 
each ministry to establish 
whether women are taking a 
foir share of public appoint- 
ments made in non-^pan- 
mental bodies. 


A ministerial group headed 
by Mr David Waddington. 
Minister of State at the Home 
Office, has also been set upi, as 
part of a wider brief on issues 
concerning women, to exam- 
ine ways in which the Govem- 
meni can ensure that women 
are better represented in pub- 
lic life. 


Mr Geofirey Morgan, direc- 
tor of the ^blic Appoint- 
ments Unit announce that 
all shortlists for public 
appointments must fmtn now 
on contain at least one woman 
candidate. If there is not an 
explanation must be given. 


Women account for about 
8,000 of 40,000 public 
appointments in bodies such 
as the nationalized industries, 
the BBC, the Independent 
Broadcasting Authority, and 
the Manpower Services 
Commission. 


The ministries sancaoning 
the appointments are being 
pressed to ensure that women 
are foiriy represented. Tbe 
Home Office, with 30 percent 


of Its public appointees 
women, has the best record. 

Mr Morgan told a con- 
ference on “Women on the 
Board" at the Institute of 
Directors: "There is no 
conspiracy or plot against 
women. It is quite the 
osite. There isa genuine de^ 
to make sure that women are 
Iiroperly represented in public 
life. For some reason, it is not 
happenit]g as quickly as w 
would wish." 

Dr Leah Hertz, who earlier 
this week launched the 
Women Into Public Life cam- 
I^'gn with a "talent bank" 
listing more than 6(X) poten- 
tial women randi^tes for 
public posts, said of the move 
to include women on 
shortlists: "I think it is a step 
in the right direction." 


Thatcher 
to visit 


Strasbourg 


Condnued fiom 1 

Com 


voting in ' the Council of 
Ministers, as wed as providing 
for a commrHi EEC foreign 
policy mechanism. 

Mrs Thatcher is expected to 
argue that these.inoves do not 
surrender sovereii^ty to 
simply speed up decision 
making in areas vital to the 
future of Britain and Europe 
But some MEPs bdieve the 
visit will fiirtber enhance the 
European Pariiameot's role. 

MEPs and officials say Mrs 
Thatcher would foce criticito 
over her utodonally soepcicai 
attitude to the EEC Sources 
said much would depend oa 
whether the Umdon EEC 
summit proved a success for 
E^tain and a triumidi for Mrs 
Thatcher. 


Wapping 

attacks 


death 


warning 


OoBtiniied from page 1 
ing a driver or an innocent 

bystander.” - 

Mr Alan Jones, mana^o^ 
the transpori company Tw i 
whose Umes are responsible 
for tbe wholesale distnbuiion 
of News Inicrnatio to pap^ 
said yesterday that he had 
been horrified by tlw upsu^ 
in -the number of attacks 
There had been .55 on his 
company's vehicles ibis 
raonih ifloae, be added. 

“These peojfle operate m 
pngs anrf attack dfifenccless 
drireis and their vehicles with 
hammers, bricks and concrete 
blocks. But each attack only 
reinforces our drivers 
determination to get on with 
the job." he said. 

“What IS partzculariy galling 
is that, while we are respon- 
riUe for wholesale distritm- 
tion, members of (the. print 
union) Sogat are delivenng 
them in the provincesL The 
pidens also seem Ip forget that 

the move to Wapping has 
opened up 1,200 jobs with ov 


comp^ir, most of them in 


ligh unempkprmenC 


The recent spate of attacks j 
has so for resulted in only four 
drivers requiring hoi^tal 
tneamtenu all for focial inju- 
ries caused by shattered wind- 
screens. The attadi from the 
bridge on the Ml. near Junc- 
tion 14. led to a narrow escape 
when the brick struck the 
lorry's fender. 

A similar attack in East 
London last weekend saw a 
lump of concrete buried at .a 
TNT truck from a railway 
bridge over ^oreditdi High 
Street, but the missile missed. 

Since the start of the dis- 
pute, Scotland Yanl's *Gold 
Control' which ooofdiiiates 
the policingof the dispute, has 
recorded 430 attacks on lor- 
des, some of them damaged 
when dtoonstiators stonm 
TNT dep<^ 

Latest figttres shw that 
1 JOl arrests have been made 
in the course of tbe dispute 
and 392 polioe ofnoers 
injured. 

• An NGA compositor. Miss 
Me^n Dobney. ^pd 34, of St 
Louis Road. South London, 
was fined £100 by magistrates 
in Bradford for to part in an 
attack on lorries at a' TNT 
depot outside foadfoid last 
July. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today's events 


New exhibhioiis 

New sculptures by Tiro 
Threifall; Coventry Wbitefriars 
museum. London Rd, Goventiy 
(ends Jan 4). 

Silver palette an exhibition; 
Derby Museums and An Gal- 
lery. The Strand, Derby; Hies to 
Sat 10 to S (ends Nov 29). 


Prints by John Piper and tbe 
Society of Wood Engravers; 


Pottery by Micbael and SheiM 
Casson, Aixlrew McGarva. 
Svend Bayer and Give Bowen; 
The Spencer Gallery, 
Wellingborough School, 
WeU iagb enwgli. Nonhanis; 10 
to 5 (ends Nov t). 

Marine watercolours of 19ih- 
20th century. PaUant House 
Gfcallery. 9 North Pallam, Chkb- 
ester; 10 lo 5.30 (ends Nov 29). 

'£)« Music’ - The graphic an 
of new musical notation; 
Huddersfield Art Gallery. 
Hnddenfield: (ends Nov 29). 

Last chance to see 
Recent paintings of Edgar 
Holloway. Burslow Gall^. 
Brighion College, Eastern Rd. 
Bifobtou: 1 1.30 to 5. 

Don't trust the label: an 
exhibiion of fokes, imitations 
and the real thing; University 
An Gallery. Nutti^am. 

Richard Ross: large scale 
museology holographs; John 
Hansard Gallery, The Univer- 
sity, Soutfaampliw; 10 to 6. 

The photographic an: pic- 
torial trtotions in Britain and 
America; Hatton Gallery. The 
University, Newcastle-npon* 
Tyne. 

Recent paintings by Edgar 
Holloway, Bursiow Gallery. 
Brighton Cbllege, Eastern Rd. 
Britton: 1 1.30 to 5. 

Music 

Halle Orchestra: Brahms. 
Tchaikovsky. Shostakovich; St 
Gorge’s H^ Bradford; 7.30. 

Gaia concen by the Cbntfai 
band of the Ro]^ Air Force 
with the Pendyrus Male Choir, 
St David's Hall, The Hayes. 
Cardiff; 7.50. 

Oxford CThannher Music Soci- 


Gardens open 


P V RMi fDf Mo 

TODAY AND OTHER DAYS 
We of Afm Brodcfc CasOe Gardens, 
Brodtok; Spmjia colocOon of trees and 
enrube: walled ga roen, rase gaioen, 
woodland garden, deny, 

OxfoidaiM Grook CcAtage. AStarton, 6m 
W of BMury off A422 Banbiay^^etford 
raad: 4 acres, alpm and wsier gardans, 
fha shrubs, whda and yeHow mders; 
creftsetafcaiao open tomorrow Tf ar6. 
Gioucarterehirec SuMey CaA. Gm HE 
of Ctieltannan] off A46 ai Wnc hc omba; 
line trees, knot garden; P: dady Mfl 
Ociober3T;l1 toSJO. 

TCmORAOW 

CiBBbte Hokar Hal. Cark-lfrCa nmel. 
5m W of Gra ng a o re r-Sands, on BS277 
then on to BSZTB; formal gaitSena, fine 
trass and sfvuba, heafharsi motor tm^ 
seun.ctB^untf]Oaober3f; ]a30io4wA 
C c ip waa, Tra man . Si Martnvm-fAemga, 
2t^m E of Hettton off B3^ Helsion-St 
Kavema rood aliar im M for Mawgan; 
vtfay oarM. aae e m . wooMnd wall, 
fine autunn oolQur; 12 to 4. 
Hertferdahire; West Lodge Park. 
CociciDsm Road, Hadtay Wood Off At 1 1 
ba i w a a n PoOBra 8ar and Southgate: 
Baaia arboreoan, u o ma at a 300 tree 
varrefies. al laoaiid. ma gn ifioBni autiAnn 
ooiota: 1210 4. 

Partti ^ a! MoHdeotf’ by Btairgoura: off 
A93 BMgowna 10 Penh raaa fine trees, 
nvar walla. MiiDfia auaimn colour, wood 
and water gardens. sM: 1.30 to 4JQ 


The pound 


Sarny: Ilford Court Gardena, 
ConmonRoad. 


2m E ot Wohing, on A3 10 
npley: 20 acres* wdd gardens. spiendR] 

aiitiann colour 12 to 4. 


Anniversaries 


«y: redul ^ the Kegeisintt 
I • r 


Trio: Maison Franca ise, Oxford: 
2.45. 

Portsmouth Festival Choir 
Faure Requiem: Chichester 
ChthedraL Chichester. 


Tomorrow 


New exhibitions 
Work by Peicr Toms: The 
Gallery. 20 Dumgate Sl. Doi^ 


Last chance to see 

Work by Mary Kelly: Keole 
Yard Gallery. Castle Street, 
Canliridge; 2 to 5.30. 

National Garden Festival: 
Stoke-on-Trent. Staffs: 10 to 
dusk. 

Exhibition on the lifo of 
traveller R. B. Cunninghame- 
Graham: The Smith art gallery. 
Dumbarton Road. Stiriing: 2 lo 
5. 

The Flower Show: paintings 
by varied anrsts. opportunities 
for the public to join in. quiz 
sheets for children: York City 
An Gallerv. Exhibition Square. 
York, 2J0 to S. 

Work by Byam Shaw, 
Asfomotean Jwuseuni. McAlpioe 
Gallery. Oxford: 2 to 6. 

Music 

Concert by the Broadland 
singers; Si Andrews Church. 
ColytoEL Devon. 4. 

Concen by the Orchestra of St 
John’s Sm.ih Square. .Assembly 
Rooms. Bath: T.jQ 

-f- 


TODAY 

Births: Thouns Macaulay, 
Baron Macaalay, Roth ley 
TefiipJe,Leioesier, 1800; Rich- 
ard Boningtiia, painter. Arnold, 
Notts. 1801; JoiHuin&nDSS the 
Younger, composer of “The 
Blue Danube”. Vienna. 1825; 
George BizeC Paris. 1838; PaUo 
Picano, Malaga. 1881. 

Deaths: Stephen, King of 
England 1135-34, Dover. 1154: 
Geoffrey Chanm, London, 
1400; Evangelista TorricellL io-f' 
ventor of the barometer. Flor- 
ence. 1647; George If, reigned 
1727.6a London. 1760: Sir 
Charles Halie, Manchester. 
1895: Frederick WDUam RoUe 
fBaron Corvo|.auihor of Ha- 
drian the Seventh. Venice. 1913. 


Battle of ^Dcourt. 1415. The 
Ofiiw pubi 
1924. 


tublisfaed the 


Foreign 

Ziqoviev letter. 

TOMORROW 
Binhs: Domenico ScariaQi. 
Naples. I68S: George Danmi. 
Champagne. (759: Andrcy Bely, 
poeu Moscow. 1880. 

Deaths: William HogaitlL, 
London. 1764: Caroliana 
Nainie, Baroness Naime. ballad 
writer. Cask. Perthshire, 1845; 
Sir Aurd Stein, archaeoiogisL 
I^bul. 1943: Igor Kkotsky, 
pioneer of helicopters. Easton, 
Connecticut. 1972. 

The October revolution in 
Russia (new sivie. November 7). 
1917. 


Roads 


IM fi d lan d i: Ml: Roadworks at funetkm 
2730026 comfahowsiope re wFi. access 
roaos cosed m. Con tr aflow at ftfiCDons 
4 ana S iBramsgrovfl/Ooitwvtchp. AS3: 
Rosoworu at Ladoeridge Barfii near 

Tttm Wore i, AI(M): Bnooe worti at 


Cassop Grange bnooe contrefow in 
Mfa- Ri.iadworks O O Tw oon 




ouvmyi H' 

6 anc 7 iSoiirh 
QTKsittefHumD^siaej. eoncratiow m 
use. acoins ro4os si KincfOT 6 ciosea. 
Woeranc seneme 31 Barton BnM. 

testncDOosmbrce 

ScDdaed: M74; Engge work betMen 
luncftons 4 ana Bom wo i a er vic B area, 
soutnooioa camagMay dosed. A9: Om- 
sioa ianes ctosea 6” oom carriageways at 
Ftfumom Bnoge SE ol f omatm 
lafoiniaMfi auppSea toy AA 


Clocks go back 


Summer lime end^ oHiciaiK 
ji on Snndav. -o O iLtru-r 

L.s shil(pl|1 he put hci. k 
.#,7 } am r» 


Bank Bank 

Buys 

AuaMtoS 2285 6165 

AusmaSdi 2190 20u00 

BelgiumR 6280 5600 

CanmiB$ 2935 1945 

DemivliKr 1104 1664 

FbiiandAWc 7.42 692 

FmncaFr 9J3 998 

GemiviyDBi 2995 2825 

Onaeee Or 2f OJte 19090 

HongKongS 1l.tt 19J5 

MandPI 1.1 194 

Iteiy lire 2070 1990 

4te»lYan 24080 22690 

Nemarnmam sm ait 

NOfwayKr 1096 1028 

Portugal &c 218 206 

SouthAlrieaRd 480 040 

SpatePtt 197.75 187.75 

Swedvito 1025 078 

9wlMandFr 2465 2825 

USAS 1975 1j405 

YugostewteDiir 72S99 62S90 

Rates tor sral dbrioRnnatfoit bank riotes 
only as suptAad by Bardays Bar* PuC. 
Diirerant rates appty to travellers* 
Cheques and other forregn currency 
busmess. 

RslaaPd6alntex:3879 

London: The FT Index dosed 12519 up 
ati.7. 






nJ 


2 

( 







For icadcis who may have 
missed a aqiy of Tie 7c«o this 
wedt, we repeal below the 
weekls Portfidia price efurages 
(todays are 00 page 25). _ 

"Sr Hh 'Mi M nv M M Tm* 

1 

+7 

43 

43 

44 

+2 



2 

4€ 

48 

42 

43 

U 



3 

43 

42 

42 

42 

+2 



4 

45 

44 

42 

43 

43 



5 

+4 

44 

42 

43 

+5 



6 

+4 

44 

+1 

42 

+2 



7 

+7 

46 

42 

45 

43 



a 

+7 

43 

+1 

45 

41 



9 

47 

45 

43 

44 

42 



10 

+8 

43 

41 

42 




11 

48 

42 

41 

44 

42 



12 

46 

43 

44 

42 

43 



13 

46 

43 

42 

42 

41 



14 

+7 

43 

42 

43 

41 



15 

45 

45 

41 

43 

42 

_ 


16 

45 

45 

42 

41 

41 



17 

4« 

+4 

41 

44 

42 



18 

48 

44 

4l 

44 

4l 



19 

46 

44 

41 

43 

43 



20 

+7 

45 

42 

44 

43 



21 

4« 

43 

43 

41 

+4 



22 

46 

43 

43 

42 

44 



23 

+7 

45 

41 

45 

4l 



24 

-h4 

49 

41 

44 

■frS 



25 

45 

45 

41 

43 

42 



26 

+7 

42 

41 

42 

42 



27 

+7 

45 

43 

42 

43 



28 

48 

47 

41 

42 

41 



29 

48 

44 

41 

45 

43 



30 

4^ 

43 

42 

41 

+4 



31 

47 

49 

42 

44 

43 



32 

v6 

43 

41 

45 

♦3 



33 

4-5 

4-5 

-n 

42 

*4 



34 

■h€ 

43 

48 

42 

42 



£ 

+a 

45 

42 

42 

44 


" 

36 

47 

43 

42 

42 

42 



37 

46 

43 

43 

43 

43 



38 

ii, 

45 

43 

42 

42 



_39 

47 

45 

-►4 

42 

42 



40 

45 

43 

43 

42 

42 



41 

+8 

+5 

4? 

43 

45 



4? 


45 

+2 

+2 

+1 





+a 

4? 

+ 1 

42 



IJ 

a,*: 

6 7 

4 1 

4? 

±lJ 



Weather 


forecast 


A rigoimis depression 
will move E across nortb- 
ern Britain into the North 


6 am to midnight 


ABif 


URidB. 


sionaly tMw and praiongeA taihar 
doudy, som s 


13C 


reji^ 

(S^ 


Siam or daor intaruafa: 

.xaoB^ iOcaBy 

NW; max tamp 
ShowoTB. heavy 


Mtd 'SW sirang to gm .loraes, localy 
raaniig 



ana pmongad at tanea^ raffnr 


Higii Tides 


sunny or Mr iUmvifia, am 
veenng NW,. 


strong to gals toraB'locatiy 
severe gaie ibrea. parnm saorni force Bi 
piBoes for e im; im mp 12C (54^ 
IHe of Man, No r M e m iraiwdr Mmy 


TODAY 


, Bh ow OT or tong&r oumraMca ot 
; wild tm srang to 


im. fiaevy ai tfines: 
gale force. oo casK ma y savora gate friraa; 
fnav temp 12C (54^ 

Re bwwiQi Boraara, ow oooaaME 
Mamy doudy, ah ow era or longer ouh 
firaaks of rate, heavy at Umae: wtod mamiy 
BO UlH a oatP rty at first, Pe uuw iinp vanetite. 


4vgnnw wM 

Cvilif 


AM 

6.39 

6l46 

11>fT 

434 

n26 

10j30 

a46 

lOito 


4,33 


then northwoMeily. fi 
oocaslonany gda braa 


treab or anm 
Ip IS 


HoMiaarf 

hS 



max temp 


Dundsa, Ahartaan, Gtea* Uvarpoof 


es; Mainly cteu^. showBrs or 


outbreaks of rate, heavy at tunes; 
or SE, s tron g to gale tome. decUng 
northerfy later: max temp lie (52^ 
aioraf nra^ ivi iwf wee^BM, ragyas 
Rather cloudy, aimers or tori^ out- 


brealcs of rate, heavy at flmas; N or 
gate nroe. localy eavara 


1121 

1042 

8j02 

44 

2.16 

446 

iijoe 

104 
1QJ20 
. 940 
1045 
434 


Nc Strong id osie 

beemteg NW tettn iftex tsRip 


gate force. 

Ticgap^ _ 

Otiflook for foisonoar and Monc^c 
ShoMfS at first beoomatg drter for B time 
but ombraaks of ram aoraacflng from W 


Hr m HT 

6jD 717 Sj 9 
3.3 &5f 34 

9.7 

24 457 3.0 

9.1 1146 &5 

45 11.02 41 

&5 356 55 

431052 35 

4.1 556 / 45 

as 557 35 

43 343 44 

55 11.17 55 

651150 54 
43 627 45 

75 422 75 

22 353. ao 
4.1 657 45 
65 1144 49 

54 1041 &0 

a.lm'rite 2J7 
45 lau . 44 
1.7-1156 14 
35 446 ar 

49 4.16 46 

35 4.12 35 

74 1151 
42 952 


TOMORROW 




{Bter or^Stfx^.Vftrrd^itt first and again 


iBier. Rateer ookf. but tamperaturas 
bacon ang nearer normal in S. 



AM 

655 

7.02 

12.T3 

456 
11.15 
1053 
349 
laOfi 
646 
424 
358 

1153 

1055 

aoB 

410 
ai3 

14ll 

10.17 

1157 

947 

1022 

457 
403 

411 
1153 

9.^ 

4.13 


KT M 

67 7.13 
35 7.07 
901150- 
25 459 
85 

4311.18 
41 456 
4.1 10.48 
as 547 

34 5j05 

41 454 
52 1142 

64 1154 

42 857. 

68 441 
ai 348 

69 554 
49 

ai 11.14 
29 

45 1055 
15 

35 458 
45 456 
35 457 

65 

40 0L48 
as 406 


Hr 

65 

65 

90 

29 


40 

48 

35 

42 
64 

43 
55 
62 
42 
69' 
20 
as 


45 


40 

as 

44 

35 


42 

62 



TODAY 




741 am 


548 pm 


TOMORROW Sortrinas 
643 am 


3.19 pm 
Last quarter: 1126 pm 


1045 pm 




8im 
446 pm 


243 pm 

Near mcxai: November 2 
GMT be g te s fiOOSimay 


lunpm 


Aroimd Britabi 


SunRate 
fire In 
82 - 
72 - 

59 - 

67 « 

lao w 


C F 
11 52 
11 52 
10 50 


10 50 

11 52 


X 

95 
88 

Caalbaivna 81 ‘ 
95 


11. S2 
12 54 


b-bixw *fcy: bc^big r Ngy aa d fleu to c- 
cM>v e reagt£ r4og: tHUizaiR ih 

hail; nusr-mtst- ^rxin: Mnow: tti- 
mufiomiom: 

Arrows vlwiw wind dirvcOoci, toftod 
spmi imahi ordMl. Tentperature 
centigrMr 


Btoonor^i^^ 


Yesterday 


8*1 
Bl 
Br 
CardW 


Temperatures at midday 
doud; t. far; r, reans, sim. 

C F 
61152 
I11S2 
no 50 
n050 
C1050 
C1050 
r 1050 


yesterday: c. 


89 

66 .01 

88 51 
79 52 

84 52 
82 56 

85 .14 

89 .11 
7.7 20 
75 .16 
87 .17 
94 26 


12 54 
12 64 

11 52 

12 54 

12 54 

13 55 
12 64 
12 54 

12 54 
18 . 66 

13 86 
IS SB 

11 52 
13 55 

12 54 


Buraiy 

arniy 

simy 

aunof 

sunny 

Stmy 

sunny 

sonny 

surmf 

sunny 

s tf ifiy 

temny 

sunny 

stsviy 

sunny 

sunny 

stmny. 

simy 

sunny 

sumy 





SunRten ’ 
fn te O 
92 .10 13 
75 -57 13 
• 56 13 
X 26 12 
67 .06 It 
35 22 9 
67 .02 9 
79 52. 13 
64 51 to 
95 .11 12 
75 .12 'll 
59 .02. 11 
21 "10 
9 
9 

- 10 
.09 10 
85 20 8 
54 24 9 
75. JS 9 
61 .15 9 

74 .14 9 






C 
rti 
P 848 
rl152 
C12S4 
C105Q 
C 948 
r1152 


Abroad 


lODCXAY; c. cteuEfc6 drisda: f, falR fg» fog; r. 


; VI, anoar 'L teundar 


Ligbting'up time 


Lenden 6 18 Dm to 8J^3 am 
Bnstoi 627 Bffl to 623 m 
Gimteurgh 6^19 pm to 836 am 
Manchteter 621 pm to 626 am 
PMZ»ce 842 pm 10 652 am 




. C 
a 20 
s 24 
c-26 
c21 
# t1 
s 24 

c 17 


76 CTpiiaga 
79 CDflB 
70 
52 
75 
90 
64 
63 


TOMORROW 

London 5 16 pm to 6*i5 am 


Bnstol 2’U4^m 


EcMtoirgn 57l7|ni to 5.3$ m 


Bennuda* 

Baim 


Mtenciwsier SlS^pm to 828 am 
ftenianoa 5.40 pm m 633 am 




4fld huH toplay. 


pa^39 


nTiMCS uMrrtu. 

Oy LoiKion vriM ifRint- 

LiniFM or S 

LgMidcNi C I OXN arsiT W Nffws 
^ •Miiftvl L»ct I B « jr«rntfn 8 ir « el . 

P'grfr . Ci4fr«iyin 18J 

^>tii Ck I RMr* 

^ f, at .Uw. Ptwi 

Oilkr 


OapeTfi 


0*4405* 

Cncnvreh 


8 

re 

f 

0 

c 


6 

9 

24 

15 
11 
10 
It 
10 
21 
29 
18 
22 

16 
ta 


^ UatateM 
^ VonsIC 
76 


iiSSST 

WLPabnaa 

04 

Sai4caniD> 

TfitAngate- 

61 . Utavitog 


C F 
aTl*62 
f 9 48 
t 22 72 
r 11 62 
r 13 66 
re 21 TO 
C 2S 73 
823^ 
6 11 52 

f 23 78 
s 7 45 
f 26 79 
MO 50 
e 21 70 
-rsa 99 
i 26 77 
832 90 
C23 73 
r T8« 
6 W 57 
c 18 64 
4 7 45 
« 12 54 


F 


N 

NYoifc- 


Oele . . 

PMa 

PaHteg 



Ilaide4 

Riyadh.: 


c 

f 19 
I 

c 13 55 
c 23 73 8 
f 29 84 
f 15 » 
c 11 62^ 

1 11 52 
G - 9-48 
f 27 81 
I 2f 70 
8.26 82 

•|f gtdn^' 

.a SB a Toran 
8 3 37 
1 11 52 
e 12 64 
8 a ra Vaitei 
1 a es vimm . 
t js x Wnaw 

^ ZuriM,, .. 


e 

I 

f 

s 

c 

re 

f 


f 

a 

c 

s 

c 

.c 

a 

t 

8 

is 

4 

f 

0 

f 

r 

8 


C F 
20 88 
7 48 

15 59 
32 90 

16 64 
15 69 
28 62 ' 

7 48 
12 54 
23 73 

22 76 
27 81 

23 73 

18 8f 
tS 59-' 
21 70 

19 66' 
9 46 

74 .ST- 
IC 50 
7 46 
26 79 
14 57 
9.48 r 






. s 


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r 


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p 

% 

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r . 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 39 
TEUEVISION AND RADIO 43 


SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 



Executive Editor 
Kenneth Reet 


STOCK MARKgT 


FT 30 Share 
1251.6 (+1.7) 

FT-SE 100 
1577.1 (+4.6) 

Bargains 

25605 

USM (Datastream) 
125.16 (+0.53) 

THE POUND 


US Doflar 
1.4130 (-0.0105) 


W German mark 
2.8705 (+0.0335) 


Trade>wetohted 
67.9 (+0.4) 


US calls on W es t 


to curb Opec 


by stockpiling 


OT&Tii 


docks plan 


Ocean Transpon and Trad- 
ing which rejected a ^8 
millioir bid (font the New 
Zealand financier Mr Ron 
Brierley this monili. is to 
devefop its 8.S-acre former 
indusnia! estate at Millwall 
Dock on the Isle of Dc^s, east 
London, in a joint venture 
with Roger Makrolm, the 
housebuilding subsidiary of 
Bell winch (writes Judith 
Huntley). 


By David Young, Energy Correspondent 

A all for the West to fi|^t unhealthy and unacceptable, can pul Z5 million barrels a 
Opec's attempt to reassert its He told the Oil and Money day on the market atany time, 
authority in the worid oil conference: “The renewed When we reach 750 million 
market was made in London ch^enge of Opec needs to be barrels we could put 3 million 
yesterday by the United States met, but it nee^ to be met not barrels a day on the maik^ 
Ener^ Secretary, Mr John with compbcency or an in- but the US cannot cany this 
Herrington. croaked eneigy appetite or responsibility alone: 

. As Opec's president, speak- with government inierven- ‘^C^er countries should be 
ing at the same oil industry lion, bm with an energy call- building stocks today. If our 

lo-arms by all nations. allies would match our effons 

“Today^s 03 market has wecould wt6 miUionbarrds 
dearly shown thai pro- a day oi oil on the market 
grammes to protea our eoon- which wuld calm even the 
omy in times of disruption most serious (tisruption.'' 
need to be continued in The United Slates has been 
earnest Here the key is straie- critical of Norway's decision 
Mr Herrington said the re- gic stocks. to co-operate mth Opec in 

esiablisluneni ofOpec'sdomi- . . '‘Vtir 500 million bands of cutting production to support 


Pound stronger on dollar surge 


By Rodney Lord 
Economics Editor 


o — - v—w •PVKAAM. waa taawuhOM j 

coflloaice, predicted that oil 
prices could sbortfy cUmb to 
$ 1 8 a band, the United States 
said Western countries should 
continue to build strat^c 
stocks of oil to blunt the Opec 
price weapon 


nance over production was strai^c petroleum 


OT & T expects planning 
permission by the end of the 
year and the reridential 
development is due for com- 
pletion by 1991. 

The company says preta.\ 
profits of £2 million wiU come 
from the scheme next year 
with similar amounts ex- 
pected in the years to 1991. 


Shops scheme 


Prudential Portfolio man- 
agers. part of the Prudential 
Coiporation. hopes to jran 
forces with rival developer JT 
Bayliss & Co to build 575.000 
sq ii of out-oftown retailing 
ai^ leisure at C^bs Cause- 
way near Bristol. Marks and 
Spencer and Chirefour are 
supporting the scheme. 


Broker bought 


Brown Shipley, the mer- 
dtant benb has announced 
ilte »xiuisilion of 'another 
stockbroker. Scottidn-based 
Sliding Hcm^ and Co.for£4 
million, and has reached pro- 
visional agreement to buy Si 
PauTs finance and Investment 
Company. 


No ^eement 



its move to bring supplies 
back in line with demand and 
has praised Britain's contin- 
ued refusal to disaiss tiie 
matter with Opec. 

However, the Norw^an oil 
minister, Arne Oeien, said 
yeste^y: “The Opa Geneva 
meeting was an Importwi 
move towards price stabUity. 
A more penzranenl system 
from Opec in December could 
push the price up toS18-S20 a 
barrel in the not too distant 
future.” 

Mr Oeien is to meet Mr 
Rilwanu Lukman, the Ni- 
gerian oil minister and Opec 
president, in London today to 
discuss fimher co-operation. 

However, no meeting has 
been arrant between Op% 
and Mr Peter Walker. Brit- 
ain's Energy Secretary, al- 
thou^ the Depsntment of 
Energy's official view remains 
that Mr Walker is always 
prepared to men fe3oiw en- 


A stnm^ traid in starfing 
appeared yesterday to vin- 
dioue, for the time being, the 
Govemraentls decision to 
stand oat against a sec^ ziw 
in intoest rates. 

Tke pound ended n rather 
happier week with a strong 
rise against the mark adiieved 
largely oo the coat-tails of a 
firmer dollar. 

Steriiim's rise made tiie 
likeUhooo another rise in 
rates, such as was widely 
predicted at the end of last 
week, still more remote. 

In the interbank movtge^ 
three-month money, regarded 
as one of' the beUweOers, 
eased by of a pwt to 11 '46 
per cent, bringhig it back to a 
levd only fractioiially higher 
than hank base rales. 

Sterling dosed abont 3Vi 
pfeniugs Ugher at DM2.87€r7 



Thnrsday, but the snsestion ihtiiar recovered; its London 
by the Governor of thewuik of close was stSl up on the 
England, Mr Rolrin Leigh- day. 

Femberton, that laigets for the The Ammican cnrrency was 

broad measure of the money supported by better-tiuui-ex- 
$H|^ly shonld be abandoned, pected figures for output of 
seems to have been cafanly dorabte goods and by Pred- 
received. dent Reaian^ oommeitts that 

Most ^ the hteiest in die economy looked as if It 
foreign exch a n ge maikets fo- were iwading fw a boom. 

on tiie doQar rate Most dmders see the 


Rol^ Le^h-Pembertmi: 
L^ pressore for rates rise. 

and the index closed 0 j 4 
higher at 67.9 compared with 
the previons dose. Earlier it 
reached 483 as the doliar 
surged ahesd. 

Against the dofiar it fell 
abont l*A cents to dose at 
$ 1 ^ 110 . 

Some concern remained af- 
ter the dbcowa^^g set of 
bade fixnres annonnoed 


against die Japanese yen. In 
early tradiiv the dollar smg^ 
iqiwards on sboi^ boyii^ by 
Japanese institiitions. 

By midday die d nltar stood 
at Y16130 after a start of 
YldOJISL And against the 
nark die doltor was quoted at 
2J02SS, compared widi a rate 
of ZXI240 at the <H>oiiliig. At 
ntid-morniiig a wave eS seUhig 


Reagan AdministniCiOB con- 
timung to emidiasitt the rosy 
side m the economy, thereby 
boosting the doUar, untfi 
Congressional elections on 
November 4. 

Once the election is out of 
the way, US pressnre cm its 
tradii^ partneis to help cot its 
enonnoos trade deficit m likely 
Elsewhere in the foreign 


pressnre hit die dollar, which exchange market the Irish 
may have been prmnpted by pant was steadied by an 
intervention by the Bank of increase in the sbort-ferm 
Japan, whidi has seen the yen lending rale by the Osnml 
depreciate steadily dits week, ifanie of Ireland fram 12 per 
Bnt after tolling sharply the cent to 13% per oeoL 


Reuters 
offer 
$92m for 
Instinet 


eigy ministers whik they are 
in London. 

Mr Lukman said yesteniay 
that Opec's campaign of pres- 
sure on noxMnember o3 
exporteis such as Britain to 

Mr John Herripgton addres,sing yestaday's confenxice co-c^ieraie with it is still in 

(Photograph: Nidi-Sogm). force. 


Reotefs, the international 
buriness information group, 
yesterday announced a $92 
miliioo (£64 miliioo) ofler for 
the Instina Corporation of 
New York, the suppliers of an 
equities computerized dealing 
system. 

The move, whidi Instinet 
executives said came as a 
complete surprise, could lead 
to Reuieis develoi^g a rival 
to the Stock Exdiange's SEAQ 
system. 

At the moment Instinet, 
which vi^ itself become a 
member of the Stock Ex- 


change on Monday, has <h^ 


Job cuts 
at Bank of 
America 


Hong Kong and Canada 
yesterxlayefided talks aimed at 
a new bilateral agreement on 
the crown colony's textile 
expcHls without ^cement, a 
senior trade official said. 
IViMress had been made, be 
sai(L differences remained 
over export growth. 


US share offer 


National Westminster Bank 
is olfering sbares worth the 
equivalent of £153 million in 
the form of .American Deposi- 
tory Receipts. The shares, 
which started trading in New 
Yoik on Tuesday, are each 
equal to three onhnary 
NatWesi shares. 


BAe posting 


The board of British Aero- 
space has elected Sir Kenneth 
Durham, one of its non- 
executive direaors. as deputy 
chairman from Ottober 31. 


Addison offer 


.Addison Consultant group 
has declared its oner for 
Aidcom International un- 
conditional. It will remain 
open until funher notice. 


WaU 
Co News 


22 

22 

MoBC)' Mrkts 22 
FWebnEHch 3 
-nwMOpts 23 
Camnwni 23 


Stock Market 23 
Tempas 23 
UnitThsts 24 
ConiMdaiec 24 
USM Prims 24 
25 


Hong Kong (Reuter) — The 
troublra Bank of America 
may cut as many as 270 jobs in 
Hong Kong and Bangkok to 
reduce costs. 

In statements issued 
simultaneously in Bangkok 
and Hong Kong yesterday, the 
bank said it had already cut 61 
jobs in Thailand and might lay 
off 18 per cent of its LlSv 
employees in the crown col- 
ony by the end of the y^. 

The bank, which laid off 
100 people in Singapore this 
weel4 said h might also close 
some of its 11 branches in 
Hong Kong. 

It sa}d.'“We found it imper- 
ative to make these changes to 
focus more dearly on our 
business strate^es 

Bank of America has 80,000 
employees m 70 countries. Its 
parent. Bank America 

Corporation, is the second 
lararai bank holding company 
in the US. 

The bank lost $23 miDioo 
(£f6 million) in the third 


|u^er of this year after a 


miUion second-quarter 
defitiL 

Mr Samuel Armacosi, the 
chief executive, was replaced 
this month by Mr AW ‘Tom” 
Oausen, former president of 
the World Bank, amid 
speculation about the beuik's 
future. 


Prices down 


The prices of West 
Germany's imports last 
month were 21.5 per cent less 
than a year earlier, according 
to figures yesterday. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


Mmar Ynrtr 

dSjSSs 1838.16 (+3.23r 

Tokvo 

Nikkei DOW I6a84.w (-24.27) 

Gen 

Sydney: AO .....m...-. 1362.3 1-5.2) 
CommerztJank — 19684 (+28.9) 


General 3840.21 (+23^61) 

Parie: 383.1 (+12.^ 

Zurich: _ _ 

SKA Genarti ... 639 50 (same) 

Lonilem dotk^ prices Page 25 


IbfTEREST RATES 


London: 

Bank Baser 11"b 


3-inonth Interbank 1t»ic-lt®«^ 
3-mon8i biM$:10”i6-'*n1ta 
buyincirata 


US: 

Prime Rate 7Vi% 


FeOwai Funds 


SHnonth Traasory Bitis 5.27-5.2S%' 
30-yev bonds 


CURRENCIES 


LOiKfexe 
£; SI .4130 
£: OM2.8705 
E: SwFr2.3S97 
EFFT95682 
E: Yan227.70 
C lndBX;87.9 
£0.727702 


NewYwk: 

S: £1.4130* 

S: DM2.033S* 

S; SwFrl.6745' 
S: FFr6.644r 
S; Yemei so* 
£ tndeK:iii.s 
SOR £0.850406 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Biue Oircte S23p {+15p) 

Royal Insurance 5i5P(+15P 

PiHdngton Bros. S03p t+20p 

Hetoal Bar 3^ (+17p] 


Kennedy Brookes — gTp (+1® 
Pairlins Boats K3p (+im) 

Souttiend Stadium — l97p(H-10p) 
8. Matthews 27^ (+60) 



Baker Harris 203p 

Pearson 553p (+13p] 

auebffd Toys 27^ {+«» 

Oialene 

Peek Hidings 4fe (+7pj 


FAU5; 
Glaxo 


• • • ■ • a ■ M 


92pp(-l0p) 


F.H. Tomiore 275*1 

r*06> 


StothenAPttt i^( 

smiths Industries S5p (^) 

BBA Group lf3P 

GonSi Gold — — 644p(— 15p| 

Geevor Tin Mihes 2^ (“7P| 

1-7D 


Bogoi Priepah 36p 


GOLD 


Big differences in 


impact of cheap oil 


Brussels (Reuter) ~ Motor- to May IS this year, during 
ists and. households in some which time the price of crude 
European Economic Commu- virtually halved to $14 
nhy countries have haidly baneL 


a 


belted from the steep ton in 
the price of crude oil tms year, 
Mr Nicolas Mosar, the 
Community's Energy Comm- 
isrioner. said yesterday. 

In answer to a written 
question from a Member of 


Motoitsts m Greece and 
Portugal saw only a minima! 
ton in costs, with cuts of 4 and 
3 per cent respectively in the 
price of regular-grade petitA 


But petrol prices in W^ 


the European FBriiamcnt. Mr Germany ton 23 per cent, in 
Mosar imblished figures show- Luxembuig 19 per cent, in 
ing letw oil product ixices for Bgip itm 16 per cent and in 
the period when the cost of Britain IS percent 
crude was tolling. ** 

His analysis shows that in While heating^oQ prices rose 
Denmark, petrol, diesel, heal- 13 percent in Denmark, they 
ing oil and heavy fiid oil toll 32 per cent in both 
prices rose in foe four months Belgium and Ireland. 


Carclo in £16.1m bid 
for Jonas Woodhead 


oom- 


create as eqgmeenng i 
with sales of £100 milr 


By piff Feltiram 

Caxclo Engineering Grouj^ 
foe Huddersfield manotoor j^y 
tuier of car clutch and brake lion a year in growing and 
cabl^ has ma^ a £16.1 important marketSL” 
million agreed bid for Jonas Woodhead ts oite of foe 
Woodhe^ & ^ns, foe York- leading manutoctuiers of ve- 
shire engineeiing group. hide suspensions cars and 

Caido owns 24 per cent of loriies with an expanding 
Jonas Woodhead, largely ao stake in foe replacement mar- 


quired this year firom Mr Ron 
Brierley, the New Ze ala nd 
bu^essman. 

Mr John Ewart, Carclo’s 
chairman, last night shrugged 
off foe possibility ofa counter 
bid. 

Tt is obviously impossible 
for me to say th^ won't be a 
rival bid but in view of foe 
we already own thm 
seems doubtiuL Our bid wiD 


ket employii^ 1,550 people. 
A new management team has 
timied foe company round; 
last year it made a pretax 
profit of £1.13 million after a 
previous loss of £1.18 million. 

Caxclo is oftoring five of its 
own shares for every 22 
Woodhead, valuing them at 
I09p, with a cash alternative 
of 9^. Carclo's shares rose Sp 
to 96p yeserday. 


12 subscribers outside the 
which it has in the US 

In foe first nine months of 
this year Instinet had a trading 
loss of $1.53 million on 
operating revenues of $1 1.39 
inillron. The $92 milUon Reu- 
ters offer is 3.6 times the hook 
value of Instinct's assets^ 

Reuters is offering $7.^ 
cash or $7.2S-worth of its 
American Deposhary Re- 
ceipts per Instinet share which 
at Thursday's closing price in 
New York stood at $5.25. 

Last year Reiners puidiased 
a 6.6 per cent stake iri Instinet, 
together wifo an option to take 
its stake up to 28 per cent. 

Reutears also already has an 
agreement entitling it to mar- 
ket the Instinei system outside 
foeUa 

Yesterday's ofier was con- 
tained in a letter handed to Mr 
Bill Lupien, foe Instinet chair- 
man, 1^ Mr Glen Renfrew, foe 
managing director of Reuters. 

Mr Renfrew said in his 
letter that the purchase would 
be in line with Reuteis' strat- 
egy of "assembling a com- 
prehensive package of sec- 
urities services on a single 
work station.” 


Revolution 

intheQty 


Oo Monday file Stock 
Exduuw eoters foe new 
world ofalpha, beta, 
eaiiiiiia and debt stocks, mar- 
ket-makersi larimaiyde^ 
ers and boe^ deals. 


Tie Tunermaiks 
Bang irifo a 16-page surrey of 
the manges in Oty prac- 
tices and what foey mean to 
profesakraal and private 
invesUtts. 


Ob Taesday we shall 
highl^ ht the alpha stocks as 
part of an extended cover- 
age the market. And be- 
canse of foe extra 
stenificanoe of the range of 
prices in wlucfa shares are 
bo^t aad sold, we will itoote 
both bid and t^er (buying 
and sellii^} prices b our daily 
iistofSEprix^ 


Changing face of VAT man 


itovantage to many smai! busi- 
nesses as they are often kept 
wsitii^ for paymeDL It wonld 
also mean VAT would not be 
paid MI bm) debts. 

The cash option would ap- 
ply to bnsiiiesses wifo an 


By Derdc Harris, Indnstrial Editor 

The VAT man, often seen ii&easli^ foe risk to this aUeatinvokfaigcMild beab^ 
by small bosinesses as one of great levenne source,” 
tl^ greater sconzges, pre- It oonld, he sn^ested, pot a 
seated a new and caring face dfSerent compkid/m on puUic 
yesterday with iwoposals to percepthms of the VaT man. 
ease tte bmden on smaD Tbm an also plans to 
bnsinesses. bring In consoBanto to advise 

One of the proposals pnt Cnstoms and Iodise on how ^ ^ 
forward fo a Costoms and fo® systan of remrd- armnaitiiniovercd'fKMMMlOar 

rvrh«> disenssion paper was keeping mi^ he simplified . abont 660,000 bosi- 
tbe optimi of a rash-based forsiuill bashiesses. nesses m* aboat 44 per cent of 

svstein and anmial instead of Another proposai was all businesses conld boiefiL 

qnarterly n rt ura s. Yearty VAT retarns would 

Mr !>«« S«ok., MBtor S^SvAT. ® be BnW «. rrgohr. idWtai 
of Slate at the Trrasury, said could be ofoer relief, 

that actKm w^ be akra m at hand, added Mr Brooke. He 
next year s Hnance Bill after jjmj ^ Euro- 


nr* ■ ■■ — ^ • “ fp — — 

payments. It was also si^ 
ge^ed that foe various spedal 
VAT schemes for rettiios 


Fi IN 


tns. 


London Fata 
am $413.00 PTO-Wlp^ 

closa $410.75-411 .25 (£291. 00- 
291.50) 

Hew Voifc 

Comox $41 0.50-41 l-OO* 


NORTH SEA OIL 


cmsnl 

Mr Brooke sa^r^Each of 
the changes would represent a 
s^trificanl simjdication of and 
rednetion in the adnunistrative 
burden on small businesses.” 

Customs and Exdse was 
cleariy arudoos to show B 
cared. 

Mr Peter Treveft. fimtt foe 
VAT control directorate, said: 
“litis shows perhaps that we 
are more open-Dimded than we 

are uaraUy g^ven oefot fto’. 




pean directive would leave 
room for the VAT registration 
threshold to rise from the 
present £20,500 to more tiian 

£2Sjm, 

Britain and the Irish Repub- 
lic have much h^er foiub- 
olds than othtf membMS of the 
EEC and the British Goven- 
mmit has been pressing the 
Enropean Econonuc Conunu- 
nity Commission for greatm 

Cash-based VAT collection 
instep of foe fax bring pay- 


should be simplified. 

And to ease tbe barden on 
Exdse resooroes, the de- 
r^^stxation of about 2S0J)00 
bosiiKSses which have opted 
for the VAT net even titmigh 
th^ turnover is briow foe 
reg^stratimi threshold, was 
proposed. 

Tbe paper emphasizes Chat 
no dedsioD has bran taken and 
also points out that it is not 
clear whether such ■ a rale 
woujd be compatible with 
EBj^peanlaw. 


.1/ 


vv?-. - 





I 




\ r 


Hoare Govett in 


£lbn consortium 


By Richard Thomson, Banldng Correspondent 


Hoare Govett, one of the 
City's largest stockbrokers, is 
to lake cha^ of several 
hundred million pounds of 
equity underwriting capital 
This foUows an agreement, 
signed yesterday, to set tm a 
consortium whb five leamitg 
institutions. 

This deal and a similar 
arrangement by Cazenove 
made in September, add huge 
resources to the equity under- 
writing cajaci^ of the City's 
new financial institutions. 

Like the Cazenove deal, the 
syndicate of institutions has 
agreed to bade the broker’s 
undenvritirtg activities by 


members overshadow the 
underwriting capacity of Brit- 
ish merchant banks. 

Tbe five members of Hoare 
Coven's consortium are Legal 
& General Assurance, Nor- 
wich Union Ufe Assurance. 
The Prudential Assurance, 
companies within the Royal 
Insurance Group, and Stan- 
dard Ufe Assurance. 

Each syndicate member has 
givea an equal capital GOimn- 
^ent, and their return will 
be in the form ofa share in the 
commission income fiom 
underwriting. 

‘We are now able to operate 


£lbii issue 


siirpnse 
for dealers 


By Graham Seancant 
Financial Editor 


&dv 3 ncuig cgp jtfli to Ho&rc niuch zs 3 incrchflDt b^ik, u 


Govett to be used on a 
discretionary basis. 

Tbe broker will be able to 
call on total underwritiitg 
resources of up to £1 billiom 
Any amount above tbe dis- 
cretionary limit will have tobe 
used in consultation with 
other syndicate membera 

Hoare Govett said it bad 
readied, in principle an agree- 


ment whb the institutions to 
form the syndicate as early as 
next summer. 

Mr Stewart Douglas-Mann, 
a managing director of Hoare 
Govett, said the broker’s par- 
ent company. Security Pacific, 
was constrained by US bank- 
ing regulations and could not 
put up more than a small 
amount of capital for under- 
writing. But he added: 'There 
are wider benefits from tbe 
d«»l. The consortium 1^ 
more resources than Security 
Padficor most US investment 
banks.” 

The Hoare Goven and 
Cazenove syndicates have, in 
a few weeks, s^led the 
capital of financial instituions 
for equity underwriting. The 
arrangements enable the bro- 
kers to offer the same range of 
services as merchant bmtks.' 
But the resources of syndicate 


we did as advisers to Elders m 
the recent acquisitioa of Cour- 
age brewery,” Mr Douglasp 
Mann said. "We have been 
able to of^ these services 
behind the scenes for some 
time, and ths deri amply 
fonnatizes the situation.” 

Hoare Govett does not in- 
tend to confront the menchant 
banks head-on. It expects to 
act with them as joint advisers 
in deals. 

The broker pointed out that 
last weeiUl foad placed shares 
worth more than £250 million 
IS countries^ 


m 


Confusion hits 
mortg^e rise 


Four more home loan in- 
stitutions have raised their 
mortgage rates after the Hali- 
Cn and Abbey National in- 
creases this we^ but there is 
confosion over the new rate. 

Nationwide and National & 
Provincial Building Societies 
both rise to I2'A per cent, in 
line with the Hali&x, while 
Lloyds Bank and Leeds 
Permanent increases toll be- 
tween 12^ per cent and the 
Abbey NationaTs 12^ -per 
cent 


Gilt-ed^ dealers celebrat- 
ing their day on the Stock 
^change floor were caught in 
mid-conga yesterday after- 
noon when foe Government 
Broker announced a surprise 
new issue of stock. 

The £1 biUion convertible 
issue is the biggest single gilt- 
edged stock raised since 
March and follows a heavy 
public sector borrowing re- 
quirement last month. 

The terms of the five-year 
Treasury Convertible rec- 
ognize the recent rise in 
interest rates. The stock car- 
ries an interest coupon of 10 
per cent and will be sold 
tender on Wednesd^ at a 
minimum price of £96.25 per 
£100 nominal of which £40 is 
payable immediately and tbe 
rest in one month's time. 

It is repayable in 1991 but 
may be converted (at £102 per 
£lOb) into a 9.5 per cent stodc 
redeemable in 2001 or (at 
£105 per £100) into a 9 per 
cent stock dated redeemable 
2011. Such doubleheaded 


in 


convertibles ^ unusual but 
arc ' by foe Bank ' of 
England as making foe stock 
more attractive by ^ving 
investors more options. 

It also gave g^t-edged an- 
alysts some headaches yes- 
terday as they struggled to 
enter the deuuls oftoch a 
complex issue into their new 
electronic systems. 

Unlike tbe issue of 16 
laplets a fortni^t ago. this 
issue is not specmcally geared 
to Big Bang. But h is tax fieein 
tbe hands of notwesidenis, 
giving dealers plenty of stock 
to sell to foreigners attracted 
into foe new markei 

Tbe Bank regards foe issue 
as a rign of confidence in foe 
stability of the gilt-edged mar- 
ket! Prices have steadied after 
foe rise in shon-term rates. 



24 months of 


performance to 


1st October. 


Trust 


Percentage 
increase 
in value 


Position and 
total number 
in sector 


European 
Paci &c 
L'K 

Worldwide 

Recovery 

International 

Japan 

income & Growth 

High Income 

Practical 

American 


+ 171.4 
+ 101.2 
+ <H.S 


1st 

2nd 

7th 


22 

34 

104 


+78.3 
+ 76.7 
+73.2 
+67.5 
+51.6 
+41.0 
+ 13.3 


6th. 

7th.. 

25th 

6th... 

6th.. 

3ni 

42nd 


86 

86 

.. ..'..37 
82 


.15 

5 

79 



Six of our unit trusts are in tbe top cjuai^ 
ter of their respective sectors and all ten 
continue to make money for their investors 
over the last 12 months to 1st October, too. 

For further details telephone 
us on 01-489 1078, or write to 

Oppenheimer Fund Manage- 
ment Limited, 66 Cannon Street, 

London EC4N 6AE. 



Oppenheliiier 

RmaManagfementlrd 


A member company of the Mercentae House Group. 




r-hv-: 

• • * 



















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can I 
that 
grec 
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ihir 

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unc 
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22 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


WALL STREET 


Modest rise in Dow 


New York (Renter) — Share 
inices added modestly to 
Tbnrsday^ broad advance de- 
spite some mild declims in the 
bond mark^ in early tradii^ 
yesterday. 

High technology issoes, 
particnlarly compaters and 
semkondoctors, pulled ahead 
while stocks associated 
takeover talkcontinaed to trade 
actively. 

After advancing nearly 27 
points 00 Thursday on im- 
proved economic Sgmes, die 


Dow Jones industrial average 
added another 2.d7 to 1S37UM. 

The transport indicator 
edged op 0.12 to 829.50 while 
the odihies average slipped 
0.51 to 20lJd4. 

The broader Standard & 
Poor's 500-share index 
stowed a slight gain of 0118 at 
23930 while the New Ymic 
Stodt Exchange composite in- 
dex edged np 0-05 to 137JB1. 

Advancing and declining is- 
sues ifece about even on 
T^ihnite of 15 million shares. 


Oct Octl 

23 22 


Oct Od 
23 22 


Oct Oct 
23 22 


AMR 

AU 

Alieti Signal 

AAedStrs 

AfesDHmrs 

Alcoa 

Airaxinc 

Am'rdaKs 

Am Brands 

Am Can 

AmCynm'd 

AmElPwr 

Am Express 

Am Home 

AmMotom 

AmSt'nrd 

AniTei^ih 

Amoco 

Armoo Steal 

Asarco 

Ashland 01 

AtRichfiek] 

Avon prods 

BkrsTstNY 

Bankamer 

Bk of Baton 

Bank of MV 

Beth Steel 


BseCascda 
Brden 
Bg Warner 
Bret Myers 
BP 

BurTtonlnd 

Burl'tonMtn 


CmpMSp 

Can Pacific 

CatarpBer 

Cebnese 

Central Sw 

Champion 

Chase Man 

ChmBkNY 

Chevron 

Chr^ier 


Clark Sqiip 
Coca Cota 
CoigatB 
CBS 

CtmtaGaa 

Cmb'mEra 

Comwith & 

ConsEdis 

Cn Nat Gas 

Cons Power 

CmrlDeta 

Coming Ql 

CPCInd 

Crane 

CmZeOar 

Dart&Kraft 

Deere 

MtaAIr 

DetrtatEd 

Digits Eq 


DowChem 
Dresser ind 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Eastern Ak 
Estm Kodak 
EatonCom 
Emerson El 
Exxon Cocp 
Fed Doc Sts 


60ft 

38ft 

40ft 

e6ft 

3 

38ft 

13ft 

2Sft 

44ft 

85% 

76ft 

28ft 

57ft 

75ft 

3ft 

42ft 

23ft 

64ft 

5ft 

14ft 

57ft 

56 

33ft 

44ft 

I3ft 

40 

58ft 

6ft 

55ft 

rrtif 

46ft 

35ft 

78ft 

38ft 

36ft 

61ft 

73ft 

62ft 

11 

37 

213 

34 

29ft 

36ft 

43ft 

42ft 

37ft 

49ft 

19ft 

38ft 

39ft 

130 

42% 

30ft 

32ft 

45ft 

3lft 

13ft 

25% 

52% 

73 

29ft 

50ft 

56ft 

24ft 

50% 

17% 

98ft 

43ft 

53ft 

18ft 

44ft 

62% 

9% 

58ft 

72ft 

B2ft 

66% 

94 


58ft 

37 

40ft 

66% 

2ft 

35ft 

13% 

25ft 

44% 

84ft 

75% 

27ft 

57% 

75ft 

3% 

42% 

23ft 

85 

Eft 

14% 

57ft 

56% 

32% 

43% 

13% 

38% 

58% 

6% 

54ft 

58ft 

45ft 

35% 

76ft 

39ft 

36ft 

60% 

71ft 

61% 

11 % 

36% 

209ft 

34% 

28% 

35ft 

43% 

42ft 

36% 

49% 

19ft 

37% 

38% 

128 

42ft 

30ft 

3tft 

44% 

30% 

14 
25 
52% 
74 

29% 
49% 
53% 
24% 
48% 
16% 
96% I 
42% 
53% 

15 
44% 
80% 

9% 

57ft 

89% 

81% 

66% 

90% 


F Sr pstone 

FstChicaQO 

FstIntBricp 

RdPennC 

Ford 

FTWachva 

GAPCoip 

GTECorp 

GenCorp 

GenOy'mcs 

GenEHKtnc 

Gen mat 

Gen MBs 

Gan Motors 

(BiRiUtny 


Goo^ioh 


Qoukftnc 

dace 

GtAu&Tac 

Gr'hnd 

GrumanCor 

Gi4f8West 

HeteHJL 

Herouiaa 

n iatS*rTutl 

H on e y wo H 

fCkKfa_ 

I kigarsofl 
' IrfindSM 
[ IBM 
^MCO 
tut Paper 
tatTerra 
m^Bank 
JhRsn&Jhn 
Kaiser Alum 
Karr McGee 
KmblyCIrk 
KMail 
Kiogsr 
LT.V. Corp 
Litton 
Lockheed 
Lucky Ses 
Man H'nver 
ManvBeC^ 
Mapeo 
Marine Mid 
MrtMarMB 
Masco 
McOonakts 
McDonnefl 
Mead 
Merck 
MinstaMng 
MoMOS 
Monsarao 
Mor|^J.P. 
Motorola 
NCR Corp 
NLIndstrs 
NatDistlrs 
Nat Med Em 
NatSmcndt 
Norfolk Sih 
NWBancrp 
OcbdntPBT 
Ogden 
OGnCom 
Omns-a 
IteGasB 
Pan Am 
Penney JjC. 
Pannzoil 


QDJf. 

407i 

29ft 

54% 

9% 

S9% 

39% 

37ft 

57ft 

76% 

71% 

7SVi 

19 

88 

70% 

22ft 

3% 

-yiif 

OV7l 

42 

42ft 

42% 

20 % 

53 
21 % 
32% 
25% 
eSft 
42ft 
54% 
39 
67ft 
25% 
52ft 
18ft 

121ft 

12ft 

AOU. 

CMfTB 

53% 

47 

69% 

17% 

27ft 

79ft 

47ft 

30% 

2% 

75% 

44% 

35ft 

44 

2% 

54 
49ft 
39ft 
26% 
60% 
79 
59 

109ft 

106ft 

37ft 

70 

63 

35% 

46 

5% 

42% 

24ft 

9ft 

83% 

36 

29ft 

42% 

41% 

41% 

24ft 

5ft 

77% 

73% 

28% 


Sft 

MM# 

4sn% 

54% 

9ft 

55% 

38% 

37% 

57ft 

78% 

73 

76% 

19% 

8S 

68 % 

22 % 

3ft 

38 

40% 

42ft 

42% 

19% 

50% 

21ft 

32ft 

24% 

66 

42% 

53% 

37ft 

67% 

25% 

S3ft 

18ft 

120ft 

12 % 

68 % 

52ft 

46% 

68 % 

17% 

27% 

78ft 

46% 

31% 

2 

74ft 

44% 

35% 

43% 

2 % 

52ft 

48% 

40% 

25ft 

58ft 

79 

56ft 

107% 

105% 

37% 

89 

82% 

34 

45 

5% 

42% 

24 

9% 

84 

34ft ' 
29% j 
43% I 
40% 
40% 
23% 
5ft 
76% 


Pfizer 

Phelps Dge 

PhUoMrs 

Phiii^Pec 

Polart3id 

PPGM 

PlctrGmbl 

PbSESG 

Ra y theon 

RynidsMet 

RockweSM 

Royal Dutch 

Safawa ys 


58% 

21 % 

72% 

10ft 


Schl'barger 

SoottPa^ 

Sa aoram 

Sears Rbck 

ShsI Trans 

smgar 

SmtMnBk 

Sony 

SthCalEd 


StdOflOhio 

StarilnoCta 

Stevens JP 

StfiComp 

Teledyne 

Tenneoo 

Texaco 

TkxasECor 

Texas mat 

Texas mils 

Textron 

TravIrsCor 

TRW me 

UAL Me 

Unilew NV 

(MCaiDide 

UnPacCor 

Utd Brands 

USGCorp 

UtdTechnol 

USX Corp 

Urmcal 

Jknwaner 

WmerLntt 

Wensi^rgp 

Wsmhse^ 

Weyer h'sar 

Whrrtpool 

Wo oiw onh 

XeiQxCorp 

ZdnttT 


73 

40ft 

62% 

45% 

41% 

87ft 

60% 

es% 

30% 

33 

64ft 

61% 

43% 

52% 

46 

85% 

23ft 

33% 

n/8 

48% 

48% 

■sra. 

d07l 

55 

310ft 

39% 

35% 

29 

112 % 

34ft 

S9ft 

45 

93 

OoTt 

207% 

21% 

80% 

35% 

38% 

41 

26% 

22% 

43% 

55% 

106% 

56% 

37% 


58% 

21 % 

70% 

10ft 

68% 

68% 

71ft 

40 

82% 

43ft 

40ft 

89 

00ft 

84% 

30% 

31ft 

63 

60% 

42ft 

53 

45ft 

84 

20ft 

32ft 

Ilk 

48ft 

36% 

54% 

306ft 

39% 

36% 

29 

108% 

34 
56% 
45 
91ft 
57% 

209% 

21 % 

59ft 

35 
36ft 
40 
4tn« 
22X 
42Vt 
55X 

106 

5SK 

37 

67% 

4^% 

54K 

19 


The Dorset-based FR 
Croup, u^icb makes equip- 
ment for the aircraft, enei^ 
and decuonics industries, rc- > 
ports higher interim results 
and plans for a £41.72 million 
(gross) ri^ns issue. Turnover 
rose ^m £37.02 million to 
£46.08 million in the Gist half 
of this year, while pretax ^Gt 
expanded from £5.93 million 
to £7.15 mUGon. ^ 

The interim dividend is 
being lilted to 1.35p, rom- 
parra with 1.12p 1^ time, 
adjusted for the one-for-Gve 
scrip issue in iun& Ehrnings 
per share rose from 6.74p, 
adjusted, to 7.95p. The ri^ts 
issue will be on a one-for-foor 
basis at 285p a shaiOL 


78.4P 

I4.3e 


p(79.8p). 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 












•.<•-1 


•:<< 




: -T. • ! 


m. 




.111 


•WTil 


iBat67«9|day'a 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


ArgaminaaustrHr 
Auabtfa dollar 
Bahrain OMar-— — — 
Braa ouaado * . 
gyuapou^ ■ ■ 

rfcliynd wif Kry 

Graeoe drachma 

Hong Kong dolar 
MGarupaa 
Iraq dinar 
KiwraitdMarKD 
Maiayala dollar 

Mexico peso 

Naw Zealand dollar ^ 
Saudi Arabia rtyal 
Singapora doflar 
South Africa rand 
UAEcMam 
’UoydaBank 


1J444-1.5505 
2.20792^19 
052954)5335 
- 1951-1953 
a72404).7340 


SMgapora . 
Australia ... 


19250-19450 

11.0295-11.0381 

1&15-1655 

..... n^ 

... 0.41304)51^ 
...3.7180-3.7230 
.. 11400-11805 
... 2.77892J867 


Sweden ^.... 

Norway . .......... 

Dsrvnark ......... 

WastOermany 


Nemanarios 


3590SG5957 

X1979-35148 

5.15695.1995 


Japan 

itaN^ 

BeoumlCOrani) 
nongniofig 


Spam . 
Austria 


CANADIAN PRICES 


Abm 

AIcnAium 

AJgoma^ 

uwi Kacme 

Cominoo 

ConSaifirat 

HkrySUCan 

HdanBMM 


bnpfxMOl 

Inm 

Ryftrustoo 


StadCo 

ThmsnN-A* 

VarityCorp 

WkrHkain 

WCT 


24% 

44% 

14ft 

15% 

13% 

24ft 

2Gft 

24% 

33ft 

44ft 

39ft 

30% 

64% 

23 

28% 

274 

36ft 

13ft 


24ft 

43% 

14% 

15% 

13% 

24% 

27% 

24% 

33ft 

44% 

40% 

31ft 

83% 

23ft 

28% 

275 

36% 

13% 




LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Decas 

Mar 87 

Jim 87 

Sep 87 

08087 

Mar 88 

Pravvoua day's total 




a£vM sAsne cEkaxncuoa HM IrMMdosalaiiewasDr pSi8axMtT«d.vUnQMM 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


CaB opOBAa vara Man out ons 2^10/86 Amstrad, Burton, Abaco, Saara, Cormaaa, 
Peak HoJdkm Kennady Brookaa, Quasi Automation, Morgan GranM, HlclGoninfinl., 


ThraaMofwEam 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

JunB7 

Sep 87 

USTtaaaoryBond 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

SwrtGtt 

Doc 88 

Mar 87 

Jim87 

LongGnt 

De^ 

Mar 87 

JunB7 

Sap 87 


Puts: Abeoo inv es tmant s , TSB. 


BusMass Morvagas, Mecca Lalsufa, 
Frtch Lovatf , Praiijaii, Rakia Digtnoortng. 


Mecca Lalsufa, WMooma, TSB, 160 


Dec 86 
Mar 67 


. 89.10 

. 89^ 

. 8248 

- N/T 

N/7 

Intarast 13588 

. 9454 

. 9357 

. 9279 

. 9358 

, 9927 

. 954)0 

. N/T 


96-16 

m 

HfT 


110-12 

N/T 

NT 

HfT 

15950 

N/r 


MMi 

8276 

89.15 

8245 

89^ 


8952 

8950 


Pravioua 

94.05 

9359 


9350 

P 

96-00 


9177 


95-2 

9950 


96-16 


110-15 109-18 


M Offyi Om Ykf 


Bd oner Chng YU 




W EdE 
Oepodi 


it.45 izoe 
1215 T2J9 
14.73 1U1 
1444 1&21 
1055 
loia 


Ekffrapi App Mbnd 1302 1339 


BO. HoUenhMf Rd. Boun an o mn 
0202 293373 

Property Fund Inc 2058 2175 
Do Acewn 2783 aslZ 

EMqf Beu Uoome 1003 105S 
Do Accwn 1093 ilS.1 

g aecpua Fund 2333 24B3 


4002 

-002 

-013 

-012 

4)36 

-41.12 

-002 


4102 

4131 

-ors 

41.18 

-ODi 

•4L13 

4L01 

431 


OHS SAL 


24. IM 6t Reave 
p BvTiiae 

Eqmty Gmwn 


Orowfti Aeoen 


BU Onv Gang YU 


1813 1303 .. .. 
3060 2187 -43 .. 


Spedei Sun 
NartfiAmedca 
Pv£hi tad 


on 5 tad as 

UoeiteLnitad 

Bquev 


l4Utand Bk UT 

iAsvid an ex 


1433 

1704 1704 
1273 1337 
1383 1567 
1093 1157 
1843 1943 
1365 1443 
1BZ.1 1917 
2153 2275 


Rvgv i Sixiey RM 
07372 42424 


WanMey, MttV HAS ONB 


07372 42424 

M e w ed pe rt 
PeffuuiMrae RUe 
VAh Pren Rvt 
UK OBporuty 
Bra ppoonmy 

Ncnfi MII4F ^pp 

Fv Eaet Qpp 
GV Pfopaertee 1 
Gtti PiapSenae 2 
Ptand hi 


Equfly unfee £8837 

Piepvtv Unto C2i38 

EMy Bend/tac E4235 45.13 
PMp Bon^ne 0937 30JB 
BdBdEjneuec 23042 3537 
and EqiOy Acoin 52Ll 3408 
U 277.7 2953 

au Rnopaiy Aeeum 2D4J 2183 
au iiMoed Ade 2302 882.1 
au DepoS Aeoin 173 .€ 1807 
au GO Aeevn 1723 1823 
au Armt taun 2302 2S2.I 
au me Money Ac 1973 20Oi 
au Inoex Aficun 1063 llOO 
au Fv EU Aeeuni 187.1 1963 
au Otocal Acoum 901 1003 
au Euro Aeom 1053 1113 
au Jepvi Acoum 1043 1113 
auGUeakPemAc 90l 1043 
au EufO tae AC TOOl 1143 
au Jepvi Pm Ac 107.7 1143 
LAE SIP 1093 1163 

00 2 n3 783 


EquktSv 4 
Mvite 4 
COmr Sv 4 
Money Sv 4 
tadlniPdSv4 
Anencvi Sv 4 

Inc Ser A 

Mv Ser 4 




1127 118.7 
3443 3B8 3 
197.1 2073 
1909 2073 
1709 1843 
2553 2683 
W.7 3023 
1002 1153 


+035 

-M)36 

4033 

-HUS 

-032 

+03 

+13 

+03 

-13 

+03 

+03 

-13 

- 0.1 

-13 

-104 

-05 

-03 

-02 

-03 

-05 

-7.7 

-13 

-03 


927 

1093 

95.1 
907 

1304 

853 

91.1 
BU 


1003 

1013 

1014 
98.1 

1103 

1003 

903 

1504 

1007 

984 

101.1 


Dvxve Find 
miu nesUer 
Piopeny Find 


NLA T 




EAQL£ STAR MBUHANCE 


0242 521311 

Soeve tad 
Bhn Obv tad 
Adkvueue Fund 
RgrfonnvKe Fund 


QLSSTLQ 


1823 1073 
1303 1273 
1408 1504 
1443 1513 




BUy Pd Aoe 
BrqpMn Pd Aeon 
Rued kn Aoe 
GU Mow P5 Ace 
M Mvi lU Aoe 
M F«o m Pd Ace 
Jepen Find 
mAnvrcanPdAce 
Pfoo Pd Aoe 
MiApte kiv Acs 




2103 

2913 

2013 

3243 

1533 

2303 

180.9 

2043 

5073 


raQ3 

&3 

mi 

2123 

3413 

1920 

2807 

1694 

2143 

S33J 


«03 

-0.7 

-12j0 


-03 

-3.1 

+03 

+02 

-83 

+ 0.1 

-49.7 

+03 

+04 

-54 


Smy Hfiute. 500. Arnwy BNd. 
C3ns MMon Kevnei MK9M 


C3ne MMon Keynes 
0909008101 

Pfopanv Tksid 
Mom Fund 
Mmged tad 


1157 


Equiv Fend 
Ragd imveei tad 
FV EM Fund 
Ntfi Amv fane 
NnHeMwcM Ptmd 

SUN 

psn PuiSr 


3973 

2483 

1273 

2014 

1703 


1213 

2303 

4105 


1 TTsevlneidlg Sl Imdon EC2 
01-560 1212 

EngtejWaUnd UnOe 1803 1503 
EourryaLAW 

Anmhim RcM HUb W ycp nae 
0484 33377 

UKEdVdeetad 4297 4409 
Mghar Ueeme FtpU 4043 4254 
Properly FvU 8824 8702 
Ftaud hasreel tad 2253 2373 
Me»umad See Pd I0i3 i07.i 
OU Depoeii tad 1703 188.1 
lan Ansnei Fund 23i3 2423 
tatatad 2853 2794 
euRve Fund 2894 8414 

Uiv na ionV tad 277.7 913 
Mfavd Piad 3303 9823 


-23 446 


-23 .. 
-13 .. 
-MI3 .. 
+ 2.1 .. 
+ 0.1 .. 
+03 .. 
-2.7 .. 
-103 .. 
-02 .. 










I 


1243 

1293 


1443 

2123 

1793 

1513 

1013 

1002 


rah vii BU, 
0309 


DoMBelM IQA 


LifeCesh Aceum IlOO 1943 
UK 6q tawn 1723 101.1 
Stt te vta i p Aecuei 1809 1804 
Uietaoim Aecuon 1203 1272 
meMfrUAO Ace 953 1013 
Lffeiiared Aceuni 1503 1SU 
UfeO'em Bq ta 1834 172.1 
UfKPrnMriy Aeeem 1903 143.7 


AOed EMar Auwanee BsMoon SN1 1GL 
079028291 

FisedmOspAGeun 2223 284.7 +02 


IKrTaRNATlONAL 
waio w P|m BrMol 
0272 290588 


B82 CJH 










Eep^ Aoevn 
Prepviy acobi 
FV EU Aceuti 




iKc^«. 

r . 


I-I .fl . '.1 


Hgh liKxm 
Movne 0 tawm 
SmIg Reeoira 

AmMVI 
Fv Eeevm 
Smeiv CkTe 


€406 6743 -02 

317.1 3833 +01 

1822 1003 -7.9 

-1.1 
-13 
+03 
+03 
+03 
+03 


nX4AD 

-437 
+034 
-321 
15&2 1933 -032 

191.9 2^ +22 

1017 1092 -282 

183.8 1915 4036 

9093 3253 -2271 
14S3 1530 ^34 


M ea d 

gaKy 


(VIA tad 


Ml Amt 
Fv Eest 




131.7 

1473 

1083 

108.4 

97.1 

1011 

1094 

1212 

1219 

1412 

1403 

1503 


1387 

155.7 
1153 
1123 
1023 
1133 
1152 
1323 
1325 
1417 

147.7 
1519 


15 RMcnf Ctae. London EC2k 
014125 Sim 

OT PMi Send tad 1943 19U 
GT ta kta VWd 1012 1512 
07 PU FV Eetl 1892 209.7 
OrnviMrmAiMr 1319 1442 
OT ta UK A GE 2433 2SU 
or FU WertOMUdi 2713 2943 


[f jji • • irfl ( 3 kii ' 


2(V24 Adcaeomoe tal CiDfOon cm 6BS 

01-595 0411 


-13 

-03 

-123 

•08 

-13 

-20 


B 




1 



1 



-4 j ' * I 

f ’• « 

f M '. M 




Reita n eV v iiv u PIm Rindi 


MtasO 

EiMhr 


Gtt A tad M 
ifun Unied 
Cerii 

Ntt) AmpUen 
Pv Baa ak 
iravnMcni Aoe 
SpedV SM 


352. Rcmloid Rb. landen E7 aJB 
Dl-594 5544 

fioufiy AodPD . 4268 4484 


Cash 

NOi Amerlcvi 
Fv ElOl 


fiMy AodPD 4268 4484 
to W ■■ 'JTSI 394.9 
G« EdM Acevn 1972 207.8 
Do mv 1743 1933 

imemaBonV Accum 251.7 2753 
DoMel 2302 9424 


2911 3117 


609001 STB 
k Ujn m a 
AmencM me 


1343 

1403 

1113 

1123 

991 

1192 
1143 
1343 
1323 
1576 
1716 
1011 
1094 
1242 
1253 
1412 
1402 

1193 
1503 


1413 

1484 

1214 

1163 

1044 

122.4 

1213 

1413 

1318 

1942 

191B 

113J 

1112 

1323 

1323 

1417 

f477 

1218 

1549 


MenooBd 

UKEUV 
tad mt 


Esaa u i 

nwiMKraB 

Amencan 

Jun 

Jepen SuArGoTs 


111.7 

1294 

1073 

95J0 

1067 

1017 

1083 


121.1 

1223 

1117 


1173 

1342 

1T32 

1003 

1113 

1129 

1064 

87.7 

1273 

1294 

1173 




NBim RasM 


BENBUL POKTFOUOUPe 
gonvoA Sl Cfuehtfd Hena 
(ISB2 31971 


Fv ClM 

NiQh T egweiog y 

EpadVSta^ 

LMALAOBNBL 


COLONUL MUTUAL 

24 Ludoeic Ml Unoon eC4P 4BD 


24 LadOBB Ml 

oi-Mln 


Do 

p iw iy AoetfB 
to mfi * **’ 
Aftiehca Aocum 
Do mri 
Aumlie Aceum 
Do Mai 
RnendU Acevn 
to UM 
SOO Accun 
Do heal 

Jepen tOan Acc 8 
Irani 2 
Inoome Accum 
to iriuii 
Lveive Acciiii 
SpeoV 9ts Aovn 
Un+ Tevi Aceum 
Oo mel 


1485 1574 
2048 2119 
1708- 1894 
1U3 1843 
1510 1442 
162.7 TTia 
1459 

1843 2M4 
1783 1K1 
2112 2216 
1902 2002 
8892 3043 
2533 2872 
237 2 249.7 

2114 9223 
V418 1810 
1200 1244 
105.4 1113 
918 1018 


-13 

-13 

+ 1.6 

+13 

-12 

-13 

-07 

-07 

-116 

-MO 

-l3 

-13 

-1.7 

-12 

+12 

+13 


Cep UiedCay 
Gv Lri eta ewaiiv 
ceouiKCm 
Gra uMotfv 

Cap Ml 

top LMMnpvi 



14157 
nliv 1812 
121.7 128.1 
2298 3423 
Ml 1019 1793 
no 182.7 2023 
If 2TQ3 221.3 
top 1206 1253 
irw 1917 T39.7 
Cm 3427 9713 
W 3882 4017 
top 172.1 181 1 
Inv 1894 1994 


Do UK 
Do Bf a 
UK Eauiq! 

09895 Eouky 
Dttfv Cas 
GV ta 

toss 

Ffaud hif top 


ji 

iriT I i , 


CMUPvmdK cap 1153 119.9 
CWtatrai kw 1212 1313 


CMUftatMen 

CliMPenMivi 


1212 1313 
2333 2412 
8673 2713 


2911 

3074 4115 
1933 2033 
1443 1523 
1105 1114 
1123 1110 
1105 1114 
1117 117.7 
1948 .1574 
1443 1823 


GfESHAVUMT 
23. Piuiue ol Wilei 
0202 792122 


neadi Bewiwnoifei 


Mvvsed Bond 4103 <33 

MofS FiXU 1883 1914 

tooNy PtfU 3310 3533 

Hned tafeat tad 141.1 1417 

tapeny tad 2122 2213 


+04 .. 
• • • • 
^3 


^ 4 ' 


eoai ic n ci ALutiOH 

Si H e kWi , I UiuereiiVL 
0lv28a 7500 


345b, Hign SL Quomn 
0634 4tfiSi 

Back Hcna Men Pd 3 
Mvuoed hnr FiiU 840 
tapeny Fund 171 
Raed Meraei Fund 173 
Cm Fund 150 

Income tad 522 
EiM hKQow tad 303 
woilBwide CMi ra 518 
Beanev) Find 28S 
Sndr Coa A M Fd 554 
M redmkoQy Fund 8i2 
N Baer 4 Con Fund iM 
Enerdy mi tad 113 
Pac i ife Bum Rnd 232 


39428 
8415 2844 
1715 1878 
1739 1511 
1554 1743 
5217 3393 
8014 8114 
5119 3317 
2855 8002 
550 3710 
8123 8289 
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Offices 
detest 
in Tokyo 

By Judith Hbb^ 
Commerda] 
Property Correspondent 

Tokyo is now the most 
expensive oflice location in 
the worid, outsirippine even 
the. aiy of London which is 
seems a cure shortage of space 
and soaring rents because of 
Big^ng. 

Thecost of occupying office 
space in Tokyo's central busi- 
ness district, Marunouchi, is 
n6 a ^ ft coinpared with 
£63.^ in the City, according 
to a survey by Weather^ 
Green & Smith, the firm of 
surveyors. , 

The largest rise in office 
costs, excluding currency 
movements, has been in the 
West End of Zjondon where 
financial corporations, whidi 
would traditionally be in the 
Square Mile, have been t^ng 
la^ amounts of space after 
being unable to find what t^ 
want in the City. Total costs in 
the West End are £47 a sq ft, a 
15 per cent rise on last year. 
The Oty of London has 

an unprecedented boom 
in the denumd fi>r large offices 
able to offer very, big dealing 
rooms and to accommodate 
the electronics needed for 24- 
hour trading. Rents have risen 
from £30 a sq ft to £40 a sq ft 
Ttaeip is estimated to be a 
demand for 10 inillion sq ft of 
offi^ in the City, faroutstrip- 
pingsupply. 

It is now almost impossible 
to find a building of more than 
50,000 ^ A and developers 
are rushing in with schemes to 
lake advantage of the bull 
markeL- 

Japan shares 
for Renters 
screen service 

By ^iwrence Lever 

Reuters, the business 
informaUon group, yesterday 
announedi it had agreed with 
the Tokyo Stock Ewbange to 
display prices for mote than 
;t500 Jai^ese shares and 
bonds oil its monitor service 
Grom Monrfoy. 

The shaTK mchide the 
1,565 most actively traded 
shares oh the Tokyo Stock 
Exchange: 

The price informaiioa will 
be direa feed — coming 
straight from the TSE and the 
six legiohal Japanese ex- 
changes encompassed in the 
a^eemenl, latnd’ than via a - 
third party. The prices will be 
indicative rather than firm 
dealing prices. . ' 

Until now Renters has di»-' 
play^ delayed price infonna- 
lion on the prices of 900 TSE 
siodcs. 

The Osaka Stock Exchange 
the second lai^sst in Japan, is 
not included m the service, 
but its prices are expected to 
be available in the service 
from eatfy next year. 

Hiunbro buys 
Deltatonch 

Hambro Countrywide, the 
country's laigKt estate agency, 
yesterday bought the entire 
share espial of Delatouch. 
lliis gives it total control of 
Mann & Co's Bournemouth 
partnership, which made tax- 
able profits of £400,000 in the 
year to May. The value of the 
deal is £5.2 million. 

Mann & Go's Bournemouth 
partnership expects to make 
pretax profits of not less than 
£1.73 million in the three 
years from June 1 1985. It has 
forecasi jHofits of at least 
£600,000 for the year which 
standi June 1 1986. 

Arlington 
in buyout 

Arlin^n Seoirittes, the le- 
cently^^zed business parks 
developer 1 1 per cent owned 
by Mr Robert MaxweU. has 
issued 1.80 million shares to 
buy out a 20 per cent mieresi 
in ils 123-acre Bumin^iani 
Business Park partnership. 

Ariington. with a 67.5 per 
cent interest, says the issue 
will not adversely affect this 
year's earning per share. 
More shares may be issued, 
and Ariington plan to buy 
another 20 per cent. 

Dividend up 

British Assets Trust, whidi 
is based in Edinburgh, has 
declared a founh quarterly 
dividend of 0.575p for the 
j-ear to September 30 last It 
will be paid on January. This 
raises the year's total Gnom an 
adjusted l.78p to 2.05p. fte- 
lax revenue expanded itoni 
£1^88 million to £12.64 
million. 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


BUSINESS AND HNANCE 


23 


Mainmet ' Holding Mr 
George C Towkr ^mes 
chairman and Mr Eric Smifo 
joint managiire director. 

^icom: Mr Datnk Chon 
Ching Hwa has been made 
chairman, Mr SA Swindea 
and Mr C R Kimber join the 

board- _ 

Benchmark Group: Mr 
ter BendaU and Mr Maitm 
Forman join the board. Bencb- 
ma^ Trust, and Mr James 
CampbeQ becomes associate 
director.' Mr Nidudas E^ 
Mr Midmet Jernud, Miss 
Jane Kdme and Mr Jeia 
Shulman have been made 
associate direaors. Bench- 
mark Ftoors. 

- > -.Jl- ; • r-r - ; ■ 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Dealers banking on bid of 
£1 .2bn for PUkington 


COMMENT 


By Michael Clark 
and Carol Leonard 

It may have been the end of 
an era for the nock market 
yesterday, but it was still 
business as usual for the 

speculators with all the hot 
money riding on that lon^ 
awaiira bid next account for 
Pillungton Bros. 

On a day whdi the market's 
ihoudns were fbcused on 
Monday's Big Ba^ extrava- 
ganza, the 20p rise in the price 
of Pilkingioiu to equal its high 
for the year of S03p, was 
bound to attract attention. 
One big buyer was known to 
be on the prowL strinriiv the' 
market bare of remaining 
Stock. He is known to have 
paid 512p for more than 
500,000 shares and to lave 
bid other marketmakeis for 
Stock m even higher levels. 

Pilkington attracted 
more th^ its fair share of bid 
speculation in recent wedcs, 
with Rio Tinto-Zinc and BTR 
both mentioned as possible 
suitors. Dealers have also not 
ruled (mt a bid fiom across the 
Atlantic from one of the big 
American industrialistsL 

Last account, the shares 
werejiadingatatx)mthe440p 

• Polly Peck, the Turkish 
mineTal water to tdevisioa 
group, firmed 3p to 173p 
as Mr IBdiard Lake, die kad- 
ii% chartist at Savory 
Milln, die broker, dedaied 
that the stock had brokeD.iiilB 
new ground. ejqpect it to 
return to its May peA (ff 
213p within die next few 
wedts," he said, after placing 
the sto^ <m his buy 
lisf^And to move h^ter stiD 
in the raedimn term." 

levd before a tour by analysts 
of the ^up's activities in the 
US. Since then, they have 
enjoyed unreserved support 
from leading brokers like 
Hoare Govett and have 
shnmged off all bouts of 
prof^taking. One confident 
dealer exclaimed yesterday: 
'The price tells alL It looks as 
though a bid is on the way.” 

Draleis are confidently talk- 
ing of an opening bid ofSTOpa 
share, valuing the^ass manu- 
fectuierat £1.2 bihion. 

But the Pilkington board is 
likely to put up a fierce 
defence and defensive ao 
quisiiions have not been ruled 
ouL In the past few months 
the group's name has been 
linkra with United Stimitific 
Holdings, the maker of the 
Aivis armoured, car. Despite 
the flurry of activity In 
PilkiiigtoD, shares of USH 
slipped 3p to l3Sp but could 
come in for reoeiied support 
next week. 

The rest of the equity 
market took a back-seat to the 
"end of an era” edebrations 



END OF AN ERA 



69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 


mi the floor of the Exchange 
and in the boxes around it 
Volume was only roaimnally 
up on the previous day, as 
some., dealers attempted to 
ba^ce their books ahead of 
MoD^y. 

The FT 30 Share index 
tonefaed i;2Sl.t'at 1 pm, a rise 
of 1.2 and remained more or 
less unchanged throughout the 
afteniomii as dealing ground 
to a virtual halL Several firms 
dosed their pitches early and 
others did not open at m By 
the dose the FT 30 index was 
up 1.7 at 1,251.6. The broader- 
bas^ FT-SE 100 index fol- 
lowed a similar pattern, 
dosing 4.6 higher at 1,577.1. 

Gifts ended the day as much 
as £.Vt better and the Treasury 
the opportunity to issue a 
£1 billion tranche of 10 per 
cehL ' Treasury convertible 
stock, 1991, whh £40 payable 
on tender and the balance on 
November 24. The minimum 
tender price will be £96.25. 

Among the leaders, Ghm 
lost lOp to 920p, GKN 9p to 
247p, Tate & 8p to 543p 
and lO Sp to I,072p. 
Telecom finned 4p to 184p 
ajid Allied-ljnws a couirie of 
pence to 293|x 

Siake-buildiim speculation 
was still good lOT companies 
such as Bte Grde Indnstries 
and Sears, both firm markets 
recently on the antipodean 
influence.' Bine Grde ad- 
vanced another. 15p to 623p, 
vrith the market convinced 
■that the- Adelaide Steamship 
Company is oontinuiQg to b«y 
shares. Sfome dealers claim it 
may now hold just under 5 per 
cent of the equity and are 
expecting an announcement 
shortiy. Blue Grde has been a 
dull market in recent months, 
dogged by cheerless profit 
expecations and che^ ce- 
ment imports from Grem. 

Analy^ maintain that the 
group, still 10^ bdow - its- 
peak, is vulnerable to a bid. 
But the sceptics claim that the 
Australians 'are just trading in 
the shares and do not have the 
financial m'usde to launcih a 
fiill bid for Hue Grde, whidi 
is still capitalized at about 
n50 milUon. 

Sears' share price has also 
been making the most of 


recent takeover speculation. 
There has been talk that 
another Ausirdian, Mr Rob- 
ert Holmes A Court, has built 
igi a holding of about 10 
million shares, or Just under 5 
per cent of the lotid. 

Sears, which indudes the 
Selfndges, M^ipin & Wdib 
and Suone stores group and 
the William HiU bemng office 
chmn, has often been tipp^ as 
a likeW t^reover laz:^ and 
there has been some heavy 
turnover of the shares in the 
pan few weeks. The market 
bdieves Sears is one of the few 
remaining bid targets left in 
the Hi^ Street w(^ looking 
at and the ideal break-^p 
situation, with assets worth a 
lot more than the current 
stock maiket value indicates. 
However, weiring in at al- 
mosi £2 billion. Sears would 
provide a substantial drain on 
even the most ambitious 
predator's rBOurcs. But this 
latest bout of takeover spec- 
ulation refuses to gp away, 
with the shares advancing a 
further 3p to 131p yesterday. 

But Mr Gec^frey Maitland- 
Smith, the chairman of Sears, 
has said there is no evidence 
of anyone attempting to build 
up a soke in the company, 
liie 9ze of the market in Se^ 
makes it an itteal target for 
qieculatofs wishing to trade in 
mid out of the sfaarm. 

Meanwhile, Mr Ron 
Brieriey, a New Zealander, has 
been adding to his bolding in 
Horizon Travel, the package 
tour operator and be now 
qieaks for 8.7S million dares, 
or 17.5 per cent. The news 
failed to move the shares, 
which ended unchanged at 

122p. 

Hawker Sddeley attempted 
to rally after tiiis w^'s 
-disappmntiiK prints .news, 
which turned out to be . wise 
than most expectations. The 
price hit 4np early on but 
soon ran of steam and settied 
at405p.a fefl 6t2p dutiieday. 

The dares of F J C UDey, 
the commercial property dev- 
eloper and structiua] en^n^,- 
were suqomided at 2Ap ~ just 
6p atove the year's low — 
pend^ an announcement 
shares slumped fay 16p 
on Wednesday and, c^er 


this week, tire group an- 
nounced that it was postpon- 
ing hs interim ^ures (to July) 
for a week. Toe market is 
wmried that the group 1^ run 
into difficufties wiih several 
la^ overseas contracts, 

BBA Gro^ the fest-grow^ 
ing automotive parts manu- 
feaurer, was a ^oomy 

markei. felling by 19p to 142p 
— just ] Ip above its low for 

the year — after a downgrading 

of profits by Cazenove, the 
broker. Cazenove was said to 
have been a Ing seller of the 
shares. 

Jonas Woodbead firmed Sp 
to 9^ following an agreed bid 
from Carclo Engmeering, 
which already has a 24.1 per 
oem stake in the company. 
Careio is ofkring five of irs 
own slates for every 22 
Woodhead shares. The deal 
values Woodhead at l{)9.1p a 
share. 

Composhe insurers had an- 
other good day on hopes of 
good tnird-quaiter results next 
month. Roytf Insnranoe and 
Gennal Acddent both put on 
ISp to 844p and 834p respec- 
tivdy, while Son Aliianoe 
gainra 12p to 7 14p, Guardian 
Royal lOp to 829p and Trade 
Inuamnay iQp to 21Sp. 

• Dee Corpmatira came 


SBC, down another Ip at 
20lp. The ownpany was quidi 
to knodt down a sugges- 
tion that ite auditors are plan- 
ning to take a critical kKdc 
at Hs accomting prooediires. 
Thesi^gestion appears to 
spring bmn a circular from 
the lirerpool broker - 
liliiey wbicb kwked doselr at 
some retaOers'' anditii^ 
INtiicies. 

Some life companies were 
lif^ with them. Rduge went 
Sp higher to 4l8p, the Pro 7p 
to 764p and Pearl 5p to 
i,468p. 

Banks saw some activity 
with the parUy-ioid TSB 
shares firmi^ just to 81 pl 
I nstitutions are expected to 
begin buying the slock next 
week when their dealing costs 
will be lower. Lloyds gained 
7p to 409p, Baicfays Sp to 
4Mp and Sudani Chartered 
Splo764p. 

Oils, however, painted a 
different picture, . losing 
ground on tw realization that 
oil prices are not going to 
return to $18 a barrel in the 
near future. Sb^ fell furthest, 
droivmg 1 3p^to 898p. BP lost 
12p to 646p. BritoD 5p to 130p 
and 1 C Gas 2p to S68p. 

Rncal, the dectronics and 
communications group, went 
up 6p to 166p on talk that it 
might soon be armouncing a 
commennal tio-up with a for- 
eign firm. 


Bntish Gas: a case of 
convincing Aunt Ada 


The British Gas patbifmder prospectus 
looks set to appear next Friday. And 
so begins the mammo^ share sale 
which more than any privatization to 
date will prove a test of Britain's 
appetite for wider share ownership. It 
is one thing to package up a company 
like British . Telecom in high-tech 
finery and sell it as a growth industry. 
But quite another to persuade Aunt 
Ada that the boring old gas board is a 
sure-fire home for her meagre savings. 

There will be those who will reg^ 
the whole exercise in much the same 
light as a flutter on the 3.30 at 
Kempton Park but with infinitely 
better odds. TSB has a lot to answer 
for. There will be those who are 
tempted by the perks that will 
accompany the offer. But for the rest 
of us the prospectus will be foiriy short 
on answers to some key questions. 

In a sense, British foils foiil of 
one of the c^inal conventions of a 
new issue; that the company is 
allowed to make a forecast for the 
current year, since it is supposed to be 
able to plan that for ahead, but not for 
the accounting period that follows. 

For that reason, the real interest lies 
in what is not in the prospectus. 
Certainly profits in the current year 
will be nothing to write home about' 
Some a^ysts expect a foil at the 
operating level, though it is more 
prolable that there ^1 be a very 
modest increase in the £1 billion or so 


of fast year's historic<ost profits. 

Though they will not be told on 
Friday, every would-be Briti^ Gas 
investor nee^ to know thaL other 
things being equal, there wiU be a 
sharp bounce in profits for the year to 
March 1988. This arises from the way 
the complex price fixing arrangement» 
are made between the producers who 
contract to supply British Gas with 
gas for anything up to a year ahead 
and the w^ these are related to oil 
prices. Suffice it to say that the 
benefits to British Gas from the low 
oU prices of this year will principally 
flow through to the bottom Une next 
year. 

That should lead to an increase of 
between 20 and 30 per cent in 
operating profits in the next financial 
y^. If the institutional investors get 
the message, that should augur well 
for the flotation. By comparison with 
the benchmarks for British investors. 
Shell and BP, British Gas will be 
inaking high-speed progress. Our two 
oil majors will show something like a 
25perceni fall in profits between 1983 
and 1987. 

Overseas investor more iamiliar 
with -investing in utilities like British 
Gas, will like the look of the high yield 
and ample dividend-paying capacity 
that will be apparent even from the 
pathfinder prospectus. If someone can 
get it across, even Aunt Ada would 
buy that. 


Barclay twins face a fight 


The mysterious Barclay twins have 
run into heavy weather with their 
£750 million bid for the Imperial 
Continental Gas. You might have 
thought there would be a ru^ to take 
profits in any stock that has been the 
subject of persistent takeover rumour 
just as soon as the bidder showed his 
hand. Especially, as in the case of I C 
Gas, when the profits are handsome. 
Since the start of the year, the shares 
have climbed with barely a pause for 
breath £^m 300p to more than SOOp. 

Yet when the Barclay-oontroll^ 
Gulf Rraources emerged with an ofier 
worth 33pp in cash, the 1 C Gas share 
price racefid even further ahead. It 
remains stubbornly out of their reach, 
closing last nigjit at S68p, and the 
market clearly scents a competitive 
bidder in the wings. Yesterday after- 
noon there was t^ of a countefbid 
next week in the region of 623p a 
share. 

That looks a stiff valuation and 
could only be justified by a company 
willing to put a hi^ price on the 
potential and the bra^ name of Caior 
Gas, the prime asset of I C Gas. 

For the brokers who analyse the oil 
and gas sector, a valuation of more 
tton £6 a share looks on the rich side. 

But the Barclay brothers have done 
their homework thoroughly- And 


more particularly, so have the eight 
banks which participated in the £670 
million loan fodlity to finance the 
bulk of the bid cost 

So the market is probably ri^t to 
assume that there is headroom in the 
calculations and that the first offer 
from Gulf is a sighting shot The 
Barclays appear to rival tiie legendary 
Howard Hughes when it comes to 
divulging de^ls of their business. But 
from what little is known of their 
purchase of Eilerraan Lines, they are 
no slouches at turning round a 
business. 

There were roughly 30 potential 
buyers for Ellerman and one by one 
they backed off after considering the 
daunting task of turning round the 
group's shipinng interests. The 
Barclays not only outbid the rest of 
the pack, but they sorted out 
EUerman's shipping interests well 
enough to satisfy both the banks and 
the dipping management who later 
put logger a leveraged buyouL 

Tbe Barclays appear to have well 
laid plans for selling off 1 C Gas’s 
other assets and revitalizing C^or. 
But they may not get. a chance without 
a fight. 

John BeU 

City Editor 


( TEMPUS 

To mkins * outlook healthy 
despite sickly share price 


FH Toinkiia' share price has oontrols and introducing 
been looking a bit side since perfr»naiice-related bonus 
early last month, but it is not schemes for the management 
altogether clear v4iy. It is Consequently, FH Tomkins 
unlikely that Pe^-Hatter^ looks l^ly to raise inetax 
ley isioblame,(tepite wih^ profits to £28.5 million for 
optimistic forecasts node in the year to end-Aprii 1987 to 
the heat ofthe takeover battle give earnings pa* dare of 
last May. Then, it forecast a 20p. 

19.3 per cent jump in its Over the last five years, 
{Hcox profits to £21.6 mil- Tomkins' earning have 
lion for the yev to Mardi 29.. grown at 35 per cent a year. If 
It is not uncommon during it makes tlus year’s forecast, 
bids for companies to refine it win have grown at 40 pn 
iteir accounting pcdic^ and cent a year for the last six 
Tomkins claimed at the years, 
time that "bid^nspiied" Yet the price has sunk to 
profits had been added into 273p. putting the shares on a 
this foiecasL So Tomkins was prospective ^e multiple of 
not surprised when P^er only 13,5. They are now 
inadejust£19iniIlionforthat standing at their lowest 
year. After all, it had been prospective and historic mnl- 
aveiaging only £18 million tipte for the last two years, 
for tbe iHeoediiig four year& With cash balances of £23 

But, under TnmirinV own- mDUon, no net debt and net 
ership. it las been improving assets of more than £110 
its per f o rma nce markedly. . minion, a rodey share price 
One of Tomldtts' first acts will not stop Tomkins from 
was to dose P^er-Hatteis- mafciiig acquisdtiems — but h 
ley's head office, saving £1 wUl pay in cash rather than in 
million in central overheads shar^ 

All but two of Pfigler's dfiiBc- 

tors have now left tbcAsda-MFI 


oompaxty. 

Tomkms has also reduced 
pipglei^s working caintal by 
severd million pouiuls^ inr 
creasing Hs cash bafenoes and 
pushing up interest income. 

llie underlying buaoesses 
have also st^pM up their 
peifonzai^ and sbr^ im- 
prove their profits 1^ more 
than £2 milfioB this -year. 
This is being done in the 
traffitional Tomkins manner 
by instituting tight fmandal 


Sr Noel Stockdale, chairman 
of Asda-M^ hdd his fare- 
well lunch for Gty analysts 
and jounoEsts yesterday at 
the Savoy. He retires after 
Wednesday^ aimual meet- 

ingi 

Altbough Sir Nod could 

not resist a final dig at 
stockbrokers, who are now 
going to learn all about price 
wars laving planed Sr Nod 
with quesuons about them 


for years, idatioia between 
the company and tbe Gty are 
most harmonious. 

After underperforming the 
market since the merger of 
Associated Dairies and MFl 
in April last year, the dares 
have recently, been lereaied. 

The underperformanoe 
was most naif^ at the end 
of July, when the company 
aimouiiced flat profit fi^ues 
for the year to the end of 
ApriL 

Tbe last three months have 
seen a steady climb from lows 
at I26p a share to a at 
170p this weeL Aiolysts 
have been quietly marking up 
their estixnaies ra year's 
profits to around £190 mil- 
lion compared with £166.4 
million 1^ year. 

The prospective p/e ratio 
has crept up to nearly IS. It is 
^ short of the other grocers, 
like J Sainsbnty and Tesoo, 
but the gap is narrowing. 

The new emffoasis m the 
group — on oworfebd and 
frerii fbods in supermarirets 
and on Ugfatipg and house- 
hold texti^ is MFI — wfl] 
oontmue, as will tbe push 
south geographically. 

There may be some 
dories of sQ4e in the team of 
Derek Hunt as diief exec- 
utive and David Donne as 
n0Or«xecutive ehairman A 

greater stress will be put on 
forward piannuig, so iha* the 
group no looger reacts to 
events but anticipates them. 
.There may also be some 
pruning at head office level. 


APPOINTMENTS 


)k Production: Grainger. London Sooth, 1^ 

Mr Jin Myns beccHnes David W . Baker, East Mid- 
manaring director. lands. Mr Jidm D Ma»^, 

TWlLMrRoniddSHainD- London North, Mr KW 
ton has been made deputy RiAy. Noah Ea^ Mr John B 
chief executive and director. Wfll^ Greater Lon^n, 
David Young jmns tla (commercial banking) firan 

January I. 

Midland Bank: Mr J Chris- Anhur Y^e Lmp- 
topher Watfaen becomes card ence Bard, Mr Peter Curtis, 
fwoducts director from Nov- Mr Kim Hayward, Mr David 
Smbw I, retail banking. Mr . Howard, Mr Ian Hantn. Mr 
Robert L Wyatt becomes Mark Mrdynesx, Mr Mark 

chainnaii and chief wccirtve. Andrew 

Forward Trust Group, from MrJohiiReadiiian,MrAshofc 
January l. New regional dxrec- Sh ah aixl Mr C^in Warner 
lois of retail managwhent join the pmtnership.^ 
centres from January, 1 arc Bush & tome - 1 p»- 
Mr R E Ghaninor. Gty and lauonal: Mr Jorgen 
West End. Mr Peter S^Mr DavM Gordon and Mr 


David Whitfleton join the 
board. 

Provmcol Trust: Mr Rob- 
ert J HolEnsbead becomes 
financial director. 

Seascope Insurance Hold- 
ings Mr Jeremy L^ be- 
comes depnty chairman, 
Seascope Reinsurance 
Brokeis. 

National Economic 
D^loimient Office: Mr Ian 
Md)m^ has been made a 

directorand Mr Bryan Qnilter 
a non-executive director. 

Gohmess Ma hon Holdings: 
Mr Stephen R Hill has 
made maiaging director. 
Gtthmess Mahon Devdop- 
ment^quoL 


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Profit from the Future. 




MUmPENSlON. MUmPL.^N. LOW.COST HOMEBUYERS PLAN. RETIREMENT SAVINGS SCHEME. bNIT TRUSTS 
EQUlTYfi: LAW LIFE ASSURANCE SOClET\' PLG AMERSHAM ROAD. HIGH WYCOMBL BUCKS HPl 3 j.M 

— fe : 




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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


138^9 

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37£6 

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BG Tvonologv 1324 1*74 -84 165 


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Fhr Emm Thai BM SO +27 050 

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GiarM 2007 2794 

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Pacific 2384 25199 

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Smala CanpenWB 2122 225.69 

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143 63 CPU IS 

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70 s aMiPu ci t so 

114 S 

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196 196 
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145 IS Deua 

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.Ponfolio card check your 
share pnce movemenis. Add them 
■’*“. ‘"'crail total Cheek 
dividend figure 
« matches^ 

have won ouin^i or a share of ihc 

pnze monej* stated. If yon are a 
wjiuuT follow the chum po^ure on the 
D^k of your canL You must always bave 
your card available when claimii^ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25_t$M 


BI ISTNESS AND FTNANCE 


25 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Confident end to the account 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on October 13 . Dealings ended yesterday. fContango day Monday. Settlement day November 3 , 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 



DAILY 
DIVIDEND 
£ 8 , 000 ^ 
Claims required 
for 


WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required 
for 

+ 1 75 points 


+32 points 

Clan 3 ^teshoii|^u^ 0254^3272 


Nw. C— lyagy 


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808 405 
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Please be sure to taKe accoont 
of any mimis signs 


1“ 


Weekly Dhridend 



1 Please mafcg a note of vour daily loials 

1 for the weekly dhidend of £3000 
1 today's newspaper. 

ID 

HOb 

TUE 

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THU 

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13% 1890 
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11% 1991 
3% 1991 


97%e+% 
104% .. 

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After October 27th, as the echoes fade, the UiC 
financial community will find itself adjusting to its 
new drcumstances. 

Some firms will find the new competitive 
environment unfamiliar Some will ne^ to spend 
time putting their houses in order. Others will have 
to ease themselves into new relationships, adapt to 
new situations, and live under new labels. 

Meanwhile, corporate financial officers and 
professional investors will be asldng the question: 
"Which of the many new financial services groups 
will be the best equipped to serve our needs fr^om 
now on?” 

Merrill Lynch, more than any other, is already 


experienced in operating in truly competitive dual 
capacity markets, intjemationalty, under a variety 
of regt^tory fiameworks. We are one firm for which 
globalisation and 24-hour trading is a genuine, 
working reality. 

In London we are a leading market-maker 
in gilts, UK. and International equities, and Euro 
securities of all sorts. We are a key force in the 
steriing and Euro commerdal paper markets and 
as such a m^or supplier of short term finance to 
companies, banks and governments world wide 

Our cepadty to underwrite capital issues 
and pladngs is based on our own int^rated 
securities distribution network, the world’s largest 


Our financial strength and mtemational 

experiOTce are committed to our domestic and 

cross-border merger and acquisition service; 

IntenaSonalJy our research is acknowledaed 

as the best there is. 


users benefit from all the changes? ' • 

Our coital, experience, commitment and^ 
^ce sre avaiJable after October 27th, as they 
before, to dients who want toe ojmfort erf 
with an investment banking group alrea^ 

accustomed to toe new market environment 

M Memll Lynch we won't heeur much of to 
bang; because torus iffi be business as usual 








f. 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


Edited by Peter Gartland 


The sale that is a little in the air 


PRIVATIZATIOM 

The Transpon Secrciary John 
Moore Gonfimed this week 
that British Airways is coining 

up Tor sale, probably next 
January. 

The Government hopes to 
raise about £1 billion ftom the 
issue, but vHlI there be an 
appetite for the shares? What 
son of shape will the siodi 
tnailiet be in January? 
These are some of the ihetors 
the organizers must address. 

The issue will certainly 
attract the small investor. No 
commercials are yet being 
screened to beat the sales 
drum, but viewers will have 
noticed the aggressive tele^ 
vision campaign to boost BA’s 
public standing. There are, of 
course, good reasons fbr BA to 
be proud of itself Edinbui^- 
ba^ nociebrokers Wood 
Mackenzie claim with some 
ju^'ficatioa that BA’s ef- 
ficiency and profitability have 
been dTamatirally improved. 

But the airline business is a 
game for cut-4hroais. Com- 
petition for major routes Is 
tierce and is only partly r^n- 
lated a fevourably dispo^ 
(but of course totalfy neutral) 
government licensii^ depart- 
ment. Even with improved 
efilctency. and the neatly 
streamlined and cheaper new 
pension scheme for some of 
the siaflT. it is still difficult for 
airiines to make money ^m 
flying on many — principally 
domestic — routes. 

But for private investors, 
the sale will follow what 
promises to be a reasonably 
successful Britsh Gas flota- 
tion, and the taste of the TSB 
premium will still be tickling 
the back of their throats. 


Jeremy Lewis, of stockbrokers 
Seymour Pierce; says: “TTic 
success of the previous issue 
dictates the terms of the nexL 
There is reasonable hope that 
G^ will go weft given a fair 
wind. But more of a question 
mark han^ over BA.” 

The BA issue will have what 
are now the standard trap- 
pings of a privatization. Pay- 
mem will be in two easy 
instalments, and there will be 
a loyalty bonus for inhtal 
buyers who retain their hold- 
injg for three years. Subscribers 
will receive, one new share for 
every 10 up to a maximum of 
£5,000 worth of initial 
purchase. 

BA staff will enjoy 
favourable lenns similar to 
those ofiered in the British 
Gas sale. Every employee will 
get £95 worth of shares free, 
plus two flee shares for every- 
one purchased up to £150. 
Staff purchases of up to £2,000 
will atiraci a 10 per cent 
discount. 


•3 • * . 3 v**Tv 



is going ahead: prospects for 
Telecom foaor: *Must look at 


Airways are sKghtiy ancolain, but British Gas has always looked a winner 


Best of all, though, will be the TSB's successL It was a 
the price of the issue, smaller issue than BT, and in 
Privatizations carry virtually a many ways less atrractive. but 
guarantee of success because the opening premium was 
of their political value. Mi- higher and the hype was 
chael Braumom, a stock- massive." 
broker with Kleinwort If that is the case, the 
Grieveson, says: "The shares question of whether the share 
will have to be attractively markets in general hold up is 
pri<^ BA could be the last far less importanL The spon- 
majqr privatization before the sors of ev^ new issue, even a 
election, and the Government privatization, want the com- 
simpiy ^nnot afford to allow pany to come to the market 
a privatization to founder.” when demand for shares gen- 
Hiat irabiiity to counte- ei^ly is strong. If investors, 
nance failure may already pariiculariy big institutional 
have worked a major change ones, do not want shares, the 
in public perception. The issue may fail for want of 
glamour of privatization may buyers. The privatization 
make per^le shut their eyes to campaign may have guar- 
Ihe risks of share investment ante^ a base of small inves- 
Mr Lewis thinks there defi- tore no matter what the state 
nitely is such a thing as a of the market. 


Even if there is a solid base 
of interest from the small 
investor, a foiling mitfket and 
a hangpver from the annual 
Christmas binge mi^t reduce 
enthusiasm significantly. And, 
of course, we may not have a 
lot of money to spare after the 
£6 billion ^tish Gas sale. 

Mr Moore stressed this 
week that the issue was very 
different from Telecom and 
British Gas. But whatever the 
commercial diflerences, the 
fundamental similarity will be 
there — the Government 
wants to expand the base of 
share ownership, and the one 
million subscribe the bank- 
ers to the issue would like to 
attract will almost certainly be 
looking at a premium. 

Martm Baker 


The mounting monthly bill 


( MORTGAGES ) 

Next month most home-owners will be 
paying higher mortgage bills. Everyone 
knew it would happen sooner or later 
after bank base rates went up to supports 
slithering pound. Round one of the 
inevitable occurred when the Halifox, 
Abbey National and other societies 
announced increases in their mortgage 
rates to take effoct from November 1. 

The higher rates will make a substan- 
tial difference to the cost of living. Abbey 
National borrowers with a repayment 
mortgage of £30.000 can expect to pay 
out an extra £19.71 per month a^ tax 
relief, while a simijar loan with the 
Halifax will now cost £17.89 more. The 
discrepancy is largely accounted for by 
the fact that the Abb^ raised its rates by 
1.375 per cent, as opposed to the 
Halifax's 1.25 per cent 

If vou have a mortgage of more than 
£30.600 you are not automatically 
entitled to tax relief at source, although 
some societies do operate this system. 


The increase in monthly payments for a 
£40.000 repayment mortgage with the 
Halifax is £36.59. The new rates will bite 
hard on bimr borrowers unless their 
local tax ^ices have changed their 
income tax coding to accommodate the 
lack-of relief at source. 

Aloi^ with these big debtors, those 
who wiD suffer the most are the first-time 
buyers, or anyone who is really stretched 
by a mortgage commitmenL For these 
people fluctuating interest rates can he a 
budgeting nightmare. 

But there is a way out. Some lenders 
offer a «^me whereby payments are 
fixed, even though the interest charged 
actually fluctuates. Most schemes work 
this way. The lender woiks out what h 
believes the average level of interest rates 
will be over the year. It then sets a rate 
which will not change throughout that 
period. If interest rates have been higber 
than espected the lender will take into 
account the extra money owed in settixtg 
a new rate for the following year. If rates 
have been lower than expected the 


borrower’s credit will push the new 
yearly rate a linlelower. 

The Halifax has a budget scheme, and 
took pains to point out this week that 
those who had taken up the scheme 
would have no more to pay next month. 
The first change for budget borrowers 
will be in April when the society adjusts 
its rate. 

But most of the society’s U million 
borrowers have floating rate mortgages. 
Apart from the budgeting diffi^ties 
interest swings can cause, it costs more 
than ^0,000 to inform home-owners of 
a change in rates. That cost has to be 
passed on (o members. 

The Yorkshfre Building Society has 
gone as for as making loans on the budget 
prindpid the society's standard. Bor- 
rowers roust specifically request to be left 
out of the scheme. The "vast majority" 
of the Yorkshire's half-million borrowers 
make fixed monthly payments. They 
must be wondering what ail this week's 
fuss has been abouL 

MB 


1 0,000 an hour 
who want to buy 

( BRITISH GAS ) 


More than five million people 
have registered their interest 
in next numthls sde of British 
Gas. We are told inqairies are 
coming in at the rate of 10,000 
an hom. 

The maOshot to cnstomeis 
is BOW Giushad ^ if yon are oiw 
of the 16.25 milliiMi with a 
metered snpply in yonr name 
yon have antil November 14 to 
reg^er yooraetf as a priority 
appUcant with a gnanntee of 
worth of British Gas 
shares. 

Cnstomers can fill in the 
cards fiiey shonM have re-* 
oeived from (he company, or 
log their interest at a British 
G» showroom. 

Some people have managed 
to do 1 m^ and a process of 
*Me-dBpUcation” is in process. 
This serves not only to keep 
the British Gas oompntcr sys- 
tem workii^ bnt enaUes the 
oiganiziers of tiie issue to 
obtain a cittrer pictnre of 
exactly bow many individBals 
reafly are inter^ted in shares. 

De-dnpUcation also serves 
to ident^ anyone who migfat 
tnve been coasiderii^ a nuil- 
'tiirie application. 

The British Gas issne looks 
set to iHOvide the "serions" 
(t^ is, quite rich and pre- 
pared to spend) private inves- 
tor widi a l^ger piece irf the 
action than British Telecom, 
ftitofl or the Tmstee Savings 
Bank sales. 

Hiose who write cheques for 
snbstantiaJ sums can eovect to 


see a large percratage re- 
tnrned as share capital rather 
than cash. 

The smaller investor can 
expect to do well too. The talk 
is ^"an absolute commitment 
not to ball<^ behind foe 
scenes. Everyone who applies 
in good fiiiitli, including foe 
abiqnhons ^d from foe latest 
string of conunercials, looks 
certain to receive at least some 
shares. 

The prospects for British 
Gas do not really depend im 
foe firmer tone for oil to 
emerge from tte week’s meet- 
ii% of foe Opec countries. The 
company generates a lot of 
cash, whsfo is especially 
attractive when interest rates 
are so h^ih, and h has the 
glamour of a privatization. 

Altboogh many Dty bro- 
kers and investment a^ysts 
do not like to think so, there is 
a Telecom factor to 
privatizatitHis. 

More and nuure people seem 
to believe that a government- 
backed Bsoe cannot fiul to 
make money for them. And 
this belief is a strong prop to 
the success of tbe issue: if 
everyone believes ftftish Gas 
is attractive, then it really b a 
good boy. 

Next np for sale is British 
Airways — a totally different 
propositioD. If foe organizers 
of Mtish Gas have their way 
tte public will have precioiis 
little money left to spend on 
the laig^ item in the Jannary 


MB 


over 


unit trusts 


on earth 


do 


in; 


7 




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The high returns shown 1>\' many unit misr*: have 
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If you're not an expert, how do yxni know which one 
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will be on its wav. 



Phrase send roe deraih of 

□ GinrdhiUThisL 

Fev kvij^rem RiMTh erf capini 4^ 
mcome Irotn UK rquim 

□ CRE Gill ^ Rated li m r ei t Trust. 

Secure mcomc iQ K grhg Muhcipinl 
sppreoicion opponunine^* 

□ GRE North AiaeriGtti TnM 
LomHenn capital rioktSi jnJ j >ralv 
m rhe woiid>bQ^ economy. 

□ GREPkcf&Trm 

CovcT^ fapajv Auwralki S.E. 
Aso.dubAfbr kmi^ienn upnd^RMh. 


□ GR£ SmallcT Cooipuiin TriHt. 

For an Jbovc-im^ ntc of coprf j 1 
mum iwvf the luncer irnn. 

□ GRE P ropeti v 5 ban- Trust. 

A ^leculrvi rund of oirtirflv wfrcrvd 
pnipertT^bare^. 

□ GRh Growth EqiutvTnasL 
F« capii jS cruwch nom a mamlv 
UK pentfoho cil equim 

□ (HtE Eumpean Tnm. 

Fur Kmtt-rmxi ctp«j\ prtncih from 
Euroftean cMitmes. 


{Or)lh3ve|r 


] to invest and am looking tor secure mCDmi'O, 


long-term ■’apira] growth l~l. locig-tennen>wth ol'cnpiial and incomeO. 


Name- 


Address. 


Rastxxide. 


lb: Guardian Royal Exchange 
Unit M anagers Limited, 

Royal Exdiange. 

London EC3V 3LS. 

ckc Una Thw Amoohij 



re/3 




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FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARY & EVERYONE RUNNING A GROWING BUSINESS. 

□ How to invest a lump sum. □ Are Off-Shore Investments for you? □ Do you need Life Insurance? 

□ Selecting the best Mortgage. □ Retiiement Planning -when to start, how to do it. □ Kow to 
invest in Unit Trusts. □ How to avoid Capital Gains Thx. d Pensions for the Setf-Employed. □ How 
to pay School Fees. □ What are Investment Trusts? □ Alternative Investment ideas -Property, 

Wine, Antiques, Predous Metals, n Is Investing in commodities worth considering? □ Wills -do you 
have one- is it financially sound? □ Using new technology to make more profits. □ Is PEP Management 
a business to be in? □ How to raise.worldng capital, n Equipment Financing-how to do it? □ Stock 
market Flotations-^ listing/USM/third market. □ Business and Personal Insurance -whose is best. 

□ How Employee Share Option Schemes work? n Management Buyouts/Partnership Break-ups- what to do. 

□The Finandal Services Bill and its impat^ n Can you improve your ca^ management. 

□ How to choose your Stockbroker. ^ □ Finance and the married woman. 




PERSONAL INVESTMENT 
& BUSINESS RNANCE 




M oney S6 opens at London's Olympia on the 
30th October untfl 2nd Novmnber. Four 
of ejtpert advice and ideas in a relaxed and informal 
atmosphere, from over 260 leading financial 
and investment organisations and personalfties. 
• FREE Show Catalogue and Investment Guide. 


Big Bang e)q)Iained m one easy lesson. 
FREE Daily Seminars to all visitors (seats 
allocated on a fust anne first served'basis). 
Specialist Advice (Centres on Unit Thists, 
Financial Management Services, Futures and 
Options and Off-shore Investments. 


OPENING TIMES 


THURSDAY TO SATURDAY HAM. TO 7.30PJd. 
SUNDAY llAJUL TO 5PJII. 

£4.00 ENTRANCE FEE. OAJP.S £2.00. 


MCWEY iW SHrm- .MAS/tflEMENT. FIE F1NAM:E & IKX-ESTMEST E^TSTS !JD.. 213- 2S3 LOWER 80111. RKHMDMJ. SLBBEy TW9 aU, 


•A 



1 •* - •• • .* 


r . 


- p» 


I 


If vou’ re about to invest in a pension 


make sui'e it’s the best oh the mar. 



TAJKOETr 

Maiiagtii 


S(. UliODKK 
AlaiifiUtM:! 
Fiuui 









SCOTTISH 
W riHHVS 

With Frtvllrs 


S 35,846 


ALB WV 
l.IFi: 

Fulfil 


-f > ■ .' ■ ■■ 





mm: mm- 


Valne of Pension Fond over 10 years to 1st April 1980. 

Source: Money Management, Angiiat lfi86 

Assumes 120 xnontiilypreniltints of £100 ^Amount Invested (Allowingfor tax relief ai 30%) 


hi Soars hf’ad an<1 shoulders abave all 

.*"i\ als in < ho pensions field 


Tbe Times, Satnnlay 26Ui Januaiy 19S5. 

If yoifre self-employed or the director of a 
private omiqsany, yoiril know all about the tax 
advantages of investing in a pension plan. 

Your bigger pn^lem will be sheeting the 
best from the rest. Obviously, the most important 
foctor will be the size of your pension iund when 
you eventually retire. 


I ruIfM-i! tbf- 

»l perform i 11^5 ci 

fniiraol in the 

s(ir\e> was lijikt’t 

1 to Tari;ot's \l;j 

Fufid 


Tbe Dally Tetegnph, Saturday 3l8t December 

All too often, this dedsion is tak«i as a result 
of oxnparing projected growth figur^ whereas 
the only realistic ba^ for comparison is achieved 
growth. The table above compares the acnial 
results of an investment in the Ihiget Personal 
Pension Plan - finked to the Ihxget Managed 

Pension Fhnd-with 
leadi^ with profits 
policies and three other 
unit finked plans invested 
In managed funds. 


TARGET 

TARGET GROUP PLC 


♦h Xariiel- -is hnquestumably the iyi, 

Stevf“ Frain ol invesiniem pw^rf4)rmance^^;. < 


Money Management, October 1985. 

What it doesn't show, however, is that the 
Ihjget Plan has out -performed a|l other personal 
pension plans over the last ten years. 

What^ more, only the Target plan proxides 
you with a guaranteed ioanback focility* enabling 
you to draw on your investment whenever you 
like, with no additional management charges. 


hh Prize for the most ouTstaiuJin^i performajice 
ol ihe drs^de must still tio Target Managed 


Money MagaziDC, Febmaiy 1988. 

And, with Target you're not committed to 
keeping up a regular payment You may vary die 
•levri of your investment to suit your personal 
circumstances. Except, of course, with a growth 
record like ours, we think yoifll want to invest 
more rather thw less, lb find out more, fill 

out and return the Fteejxist 
coupon below; or hhone 
0296 394000 and^k for the 
Client Services Department 





UNIT TRUSTS ■ UFE ASSURANCE • PENSIONS • FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT ■ 


r 


Name. 


Pi«8;>e let me have further details of ihelWget F^nsiun Plan. 

Occupation 


TI/ZS/IO 


n 


Address. 


Postcode 


Bus. Tel. Na 


1 Send cosD^t. MF, Target Group PXjC, FREEPOST, Aylesburv.Bncks HP19 3YA. i 


3 


•• TV 
























THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


i: 


Te 

of 








r 



TARGET EUROPEAN SPECIAL SITUATIONS FUND 


A net return of over 130^/b to origiiial investors, since laiuich* 


The Fluid was created to enable investors to participate in the fast expanding Europ^ equity 
markets with the identification of “Special SituaiionsT as the guiding investment principle. 
.We are deGghted .to be able to report that the net retarn to original investors, since launch 

on Idth April 1985, has fliJJy justified the optunism we then expressed. 


STOCK SELECTION 


The Flind looks to provide investors with an 
opportunity to ben^t Gx>m the growth, in 
European markets and the poientia] to 
substantially outperfonn them. 

■ ‘Special Situations': The fund manager 
selects com^nies for the portfolio 
where exceptional circumstances suggest 
that the sh^ price is too low relative to 
the market 

■ Undervalued Stockmarkets: Invest- 
ments will also be made in particular stock- 
markets when they appear to be undervalued 
compai^ to .other, jnarkets or. when share 
prices in general do not appear to reflect 
potential growth .in earnings. 


THE SEARCH FOR PERFORALANCE 


THE NEAT .ADVANCE 


After a dull start this year, European 
economies are now strengthening- The outlook 
for 1987 suggests a contiziuatibn of firm 
domestically-led growth. We are now be^nning 
to witness the beneficial effects of failing oU 
prices, lower interest rates and negUgibie 
inflation on consumer spending. Companies 
are increasing their capital to finance future 
growth and domestic cash flow is riangsharply 
in response to the increasing popularity of 
equity investment. Target European Spedal 
Situations Fund is ideally posiiiozied to 
take advantage of these developments. 

Please remember unit prices can go down 
as well as upL 'Ibur investment should be 
considered long term. 


Last year proved to be a time when the 
greatest increases in ^are values occurred 
in some of the b^t known stocks. As Euro- 
'pean markets were discovered” by fund 
managers the world over, it was fiequently the 
household names which attracted the most 
iiiteresL 

• However, we believe that for the remainder 
of 1986, it could be medium sized under- 
researched companies able 
to demonstrate the strongest run 
performance,' as professional J[ jrnKLvJrtl JL 

TARGETGROUP^ 

these stocks in comparison 
to thdr growth potentlaL 


For latest I'm esniieiU prospects telephone and listen. 


HOW TO INVTST 


lb invest in Target European Special 
Situations Fbnd, please complete the appli- 
cation form below and post it together with 
your cheque to the freepost address or tele- 
phone ourdealers on Aylesbury (0296)394000. 

Fbr your guidance, the offer price of units 
on 14th October 1986 was 122.4p, with an 
estim^ed gross annual yield of 0.67%. 

If you retain the services of a profes- 
sional adviser, we recom- 
mend that yon contact him 
without delay regarding 
this offer. 

*Sotuc«:OBy.aansdc& AUngnresquoucl 
an oflpf to bUi. Ml bicuiM remveMed, to 
Niti October 1^86. 







GBNBKAL IfCFOOM ATION' 

Tlir MigfattM laiitkai l iunUMmc toTwaH Ea r opg — S p ert ^l . 
Si wari— w Paad iaSJOO. Bab aw iKt Ui t miumu way be w a rtf af ItOO 
oroMn-Unhs tndcididBU) B^tbearfccuidyleU la piiblliiifed daily 
U dw FlMBdalTlacfe Mwapapmt 

ApiiOt s t l OM wM be i c fc aaw l gi la ed. A taiili an natr will b» 
i l r rpif r hrrt ita irrali i t nf jwiiripptlrtfiFn inif t 
yoB bold wIDbviMMidavttaad 4£ days AitfTflMy are pttiehHcd, Vales 
ran Ilf mill lim h mrlii Tlanaifri at ■ prirrnni ires tliih ihrlrtii prirr 
eakalaiad la amrtUAcr adUi dcpartmfA of Erad^ regalaOaqs aod a 
«iicQaowill bodcspai/dM^ wfthiB lOdiyaaf rmtptoftlgMd 
ccrttfkaiir. ... 

Aa iatttol charvo afM la ladadffd ta tbs affbr prior of Bates 
(ebf TVasLDsfd rilows for 5Li£9%). bgainnsriraiB U paid toeaafiflsd 
iMnsdlarin IhMB cW» ebarps. ftaUi mmfUblr apoa reeasaL Aa 
aaaaalchsrmof |^(pjas VATJagasaloaofdiofaBdiiidsdactad irom 
ibe Pttbd^ 0osa Ibcobc. CI^ Tm L5d%>. Tbo faad 

BccaBBladoa date b iai SCay Bad aaitiioidcnat thaidatstvecivetbslr 
Ifimr tBT xan rrif rs art m a n s M i riTr fpii n an Isf Tnlj rifiBrnoff rhai 
iDtonobrcamnbiad la Ibsofl^priesof oatiai bm dMiribaud. 

TnaiacsMldilaBd BaabTriMCovady iiorilsd-Aadltan: 

DIG TiMsaOB McKila lack. Msaagrrs TinfrrTmnt Msnaffri I Imlffri 
Bsgbfsrsd In BBtlaad So b47S46ai.TarpeiJioaaB.Gi 
Aykabaiy, Backs BPI9 SGB. 


Tog Target Trim Man a gers rJ«riied,yitEEP0OTi L o ndo n £CdB4EH 


w»b to invest 


in Ibiget Eoxopean 
Special SttnaEluns Rtad 

(nunmui m SSOO^ Bi the price rvliDp on recetK of this appilcailnn. 
Kcase make your chei|ue payable to Tbrgei TtiiA Manners UiBged. 


Name. 


71/15/10 


Addfesa. 


Astcod^ 


My profeaaonaladiiser tot. 


Please oexKl deUOo of how to exchange shares fbr unit irusu I 


ipinse 
( ude 


I I I I T~i I I I 1 r I I I 1 I I I I 

TugK Thist Maiagers UxidLed a member oTtbeUnlLTriist Asoociaoaa 
1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i I t 


FAMILY MONEY/2 



How Pyjama Man 



Three mea from the City with thrir <mn views 



Andrew Chernhivsky-, John Stone nndToBy 



“Will the 
Big Bang 
keep you 
awake at 
nights?” 
asks . the 
worried- 
looking man 
starring in a Sc. Prosper 
poster advertisiiig campugn 
appearing at selected British 
Rail stations. The pyjama- 
suited star performer is look- 
ing pensively out of. his 
beoxxKim window into the 
darkness. 

“What can it aB mean?” we 
asked the company, hoping 
for a re^nse to maidi the 
double entendre of the poster. 
No such luck. S&Fs sales 
director Tony Dqggan was 
Joying a sixai^t bat: “It 
means we wHl son through the 
jungle of market-makers for 
you.” Ah yes, of course. 

^ let's go back to basics 
and try again. 

Big Bug takes place just 
two days from now, on Mon- 
day, October 27. h is the day 
on which loi^esiablished 
Stock Exchange practice is 
turned upside &wn foQowing 
a deal struck in 1983 between 
the Stodt Exchange diainnan. 
Sir Nicholas Goodison, and 
the then Trade Secretary Cedi 
Parkinson. The deal arose 
because the Office of 
Trading was thieatening to 
take the Stock Exchange to the 
Restrictive Ptactices Coun to 
just^ its Rule Book and in 
particular the fixed minimum 
commission payments re- 
quired by stockbrokers for 
executing buying and selling 
orders on stodesand shares. 

“Change your ways and you 
won't have to defe^ them in 
court,” Mr Parkinson effec- 
tively told Sir Nicholas, and 
Sir Nicholas duly set in mo- 


• EFM*BM*EFM«EFM«EFM*EFM«EFM«ErM«BM*ErM«Em«B^*ErM«l 


UJ 

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to EFM Unit Trust Managers Ltd , 

Marketing Department. 4 Melville Crescent. Edinburgh EH3 71B 
Please send me your leaflet on the range of EFM Unit Trusts 



I 


Name. 


Cu, Cho,,^ 

■ ■ '-v/fh 

I L;n)>_rrus 


Address. 


. ■■ 

>,■ -v- V 

♦ r- • t - - • ; 





Please tick the box if you are 
an existing EFM Unit Trust holder 


□ 


■nmes 25/10/86 f 



% 


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•• ’ . ; >*-’^ 8 A' 



Something to smile 

about- nine times over 


For the investor in search ot the 
perfect portfolio EFM Unit Trust 
Managers Ltd have just the thing. A 
ran^e of nine unit trusts — each vvith 
a lite of Its own. but taken together 
providing a full national and 
international investment spectrum. 


The funds are aimed at prov iding 
specific obfectives for the discerning 
investor: Capital appreciation, 
capital with income or high income. 

The EFM Group has more than 
£900 million uncier management for 
its clients and is one of the largest 


Scottish-based unit trust managers. 

With nirie authonsed unit trusts 
to choose from vou don't have to 
eel lucky - just wise. We have a 
leaflet we think you would like to 
read. Send the coupon today and 
we will do the rest. 


m 

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tion a series of events which 
culminate on Monday. -It 
sounds like a cosy, even 
seamy, establishment deal to 
paper over some nasty cracks. 
In fact, it was nothing of the 
kind. 

What ^ Nicholas and the 
moie ^-sit^ted of his col- 
leagues recognized in this deal 
was an opportunity to de- 
regulate . stock market 
commissions and put London 
in a much bener position^ to 
compete in the developing 
area of global securities trad- 
ing wifo the likes of New York 
and .Tokyo. But to compete 
with the American and Ja^- 
nese giants it would require 
more than just com^titive 
commission chaiges. In addi- 
tion it would need market 
partidpants to be bigger, more 

Everyone mnst 
learn the jargon 

muscular and more diversi- 
fied so as to match the clout of 
their overseas counterpei^ 

So the other two ingredients 
of the Big Bang recipe were 
added. Outside ownoship of 
stockbroking firms was 
pained and the once sacred 
distinction between stock- 
brokers (who acted as agents 
of their client) and stock 
jcbbm (who acted as ixin- 
dpals, makiDg a market in 
shares they themselves 
owned) was to be ended. 

. Henceforth it will be pos- 
sible for the broking and 
jobbiqg fruictions to be com- 
bined under the same cor- 
porate roof. Everyone now has 
to learn the jargon of broker- 
dealezs and market-makers. 

But what does all this mean 
for private investors? John 
Stone, managing director of 


life and unit trust group 
Target, s^’s: “The stock ttar- 
kei posi-fiig Bang couU ^ 
come a closed shop for 
pro^ionals where private 
investors will fear to tread.” 

That is a chilling prospect 
which may or may not prove 
accurate, but the omens are 
not good. 

The view amt^ some unit 
trust manners is that in the 
past a stockbroker's natural 
loy^ty was to his cltenL Now, 
with mokcTS and jobbm join- 
ing together undo' one cor- 
porate roof that loyally will be 
split with the result that 
brokers will be allowing their 
market-making rolleagues to 
have access to in-house re^ 
search at the same time as it 
becomes available for clients' 
use. No one is putting any 
figures on it but the fear is that 
UK. unit trust performance 
could worsen overall. 

There could, however. 
positive benefits fiom Big 
Bang for unit trust investors. 
Andrew Chemiavsky, who 
manages the Prolific rai^ of 
unit trusts, points out that 
with stamp duty on Stock 
Exchange dealings coming 
down from 1 per cent to 115 
per cent fironn Monday unit- 
holders should be able to look 
for at leasts I percent dosing 
in the gap between ofier and 
bid prices on UK funds and a 
0.5 per cent dosing of the gap 
on overseas funds. On some 
funds the closing could be 
even greater. 

The smaller the fund, say. 
under £30 million, the more 
the oiferHO-l^ gap should 
close because of gittter poten- 
tial fix' lower dealing costs to 
be negotiated, says Mr 
Chemiavsky. 

But tinlunring with offer-u>- 



-4 


bid spreads and 
lower dealing cc 
ati vely insignitmonS 
flucnces in asiessbili bvdaff 
fund perfonnai^^: 
these minor beneonaUK (ear 
that smaller funds vw 
as well pre-Bi^.,nufc. be* 
cause share triacingaijie ^ ^ 

to be done on a Ito «n*a*. 
com^iiive bans, fn 
small funds have 
have more than tnev 'JMc/ 
share ofcht»P &g- 

Bang will be as mueb a testaf ^ 
goodwill and mabUshsS 

relationships between IW-. 
managers and broken 44-^^ 
financial doui. . 

Such human ihetors don 
easily influence the qudhy of 
unit trust fund nttnagankvt. 
and that is the sicigie Ifrw. . 

There nuiy be m 

Niiscoimt bT6fcers/>A i 

4 


¥ 

. 

-I 


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important factoe isvtsifft 
^ould watch fbr. ^ 

So &r as di^ 
investment is concei 
chartered tficountanis Rpbaon 
Rhodes point to‘ Am^icatt 
experience following the Wri 
Street Big ^ng ia 1971 iThls 
experience suggests (hai pro- 
vided the volume exisxfihero 
may - be a mushroommg m 
small “discount brtkeflT* who» 
do not provide any analytical 

-m* other services bnt Ktuge a 

ba^ dealing process at- « 
competitive dots 

For smaller inve^r-^ ' 
could easily be a oise of. _ 
Metamorphosis raiher t&ib 
BigBang. 


tf 


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VI 




Mondar Tlw Cby. 









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Consumers’ 

chailenge 

■ The Consumers' 

Association has challenged foe 
Government's proposal 
that there should be a 
minimum size of £1 raillion 
for authorized unit trust 
schemes. Investors need a 
choice of funds as wen as high 
standards of management, 
says foe association, which 
argues also that it should 
be up to fund trustees to 
ensure that funds, both 
and small, receive foe kind of 
professionat managemerrt 
to which investors are entitled. 

The association says 
smaller funds are nkely to 
appeal only to investors 
who want a specialist 
investmerrt exposure: 

‘There seems to be little 
evidence of markedly 
poorer performance by such 
funds." \ 

Meanwhile foe launch of 
unit trusts continues. This 
week Laurentian Unit Trust 
Management announced an 
international fund and a 
high income fund from 
.November 1. The 
international fund will aim for 
capital growth from stock 
m^ets world-wide. The 
objective ot the high income 
fund is a high and growing 
income, wrfo capital growth 
as a secondary objective. 
Investment, mainly in the 
UK. will be In companies 
showing consistent growth 
in earnings and divic&nda. 


Interest bonus 

■ As mortgage rates 
rocket investments drag rather 

larnely behirKl. The Chester 
Builoing Society yesterday 
raised its mortage rata 1.25 
per cent and added 0.75 per 
cent to investments — a 
move in line with foe Halifax's 
decision to raise rates on 
Monday. 

But foe bad news for 
borrowers has its brighter side 
for investors. Chester 
depositors at ^ top of foe 
range will receive 9.75 par 
cent net of tax for a minimum 
commitment of £10,000. 

Notice of 60 days must be 
given before withdrawals 
can be made without penalty. 
Instant withdraw^ lose 60 
days' worth of interest. 

If you have a larger sum to 
lock up for a while, the Sussex 
County Building SCoiety 
can offer a marginally better 
rate. The Guaranteed Bond 
Account yields 1 0 per cent net 
for a minimum deposit of 
£25,000. No witndrawals may 
be made until next 
September when terms "will 
be reviewed”. 


ptfiraEfftKesBRcHf/tr 

AgH^TSeRCBWf W 

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operating foe Government- 
inspired personal equity 
plan concept 

PEPS will not be available 
until foe new y^r but in foe 
meantime S&P is 
encouraging would-be 
Investors to put their money 
intoa high-interest bank 
account which will earn foe 
^uivalent of 1 1 per cent 
interest per year, provided 
they subseqi^tly switch that 
money imo S&P's personal 
equity plan. The rate wHi be 
adjusted upwards if ba^ 
rates rise ^ain, but not 
reduced if rates talL if 
customers ultimately dedde 
not to invest in a Save & 
Prosper PEP, the interest rate 


' Croditj^d 
be foe'preNriing 
their high-fot»estbaNc 

acooont, currentiyy7.5p(rc^^ 
Details: Free - ^ 

( 0 a) 0282 l 01 jw . ? 

Gddenho^s 

■ What's the outlook tor 
foe gold price $450. KOO an 
ounce or a fall-b^ to 
below $400 ? Predictions on 
the gold price are as varied 
as weather forecasts but the 
US government will be 
hoping for a bulrislrgold 
market when it tauhoies its 
American Eagle Gold BuUton 
Coin next month. 

The coins, which vi^j be 
available through financial 
intermediaries, coin shops, 
precious metal dealers and 
financial institutions, wMbe - 
marketedinlDZ, '/soz. Xoz - 
and 0.1 oz ounce sizes. 

Prices will be linked tb foe spot 
market price of goto. The 
Americans win tto hoping tofi) 
foe goto gap left by the now . 
widely boycotted South African 
krugerrand. 

Nstional A Prbvfnciel 


IK 


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it 

V 


vi 


raised Its rates along the 
Halifax model of an extra IJS 
TCr cent on moitgages and 
0.7S per cent on investmwits. 

But to encourage first-tkiw . 
buyers it is asking for linit 12 

per cent on its loans — a 


- 1 


poinL Th 0 fsvourrata is 
guaranteed umH the end ot 
next year. 


4 

> 



wiiHOvr TBCTWCTnmnf 

^aBiMGttamHPOfnrou^ 

UM^D IN ASSOCU\TKXiV^ . 

’s^&E 83®^- !' 


Save &.PEP 

■ "If private investors have 
their eyes open, they will take 
their PEPs ration as the first 
tranche of their portfolio." ^ 
says Tony Oog^rt of Save 
& Prosper, which this week 
joined the few financial 
institutions which have so far 
committed themselves to 


IMDLVEHHAMPTOai mivj X ' ■ 

ors (0902) 21040, Tioogy or 29161 ' 

Ato Woman wtf vwr 

Name 
AJoress 






Invesonera £ 

















^ 



A.J 


FAMILY MONEVyS 


AsmmQ^ 



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• • A ■ / * 

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Now listen to this: advice for two visitors at last year's show 

All you ever wanted to 
know about finance 


Tlie financial circus is coming 
to'town again. 

See the amazing pin-striped 
insurance salesman. Hear the 
loquacious unit trust adviser. 
Marvel at the interest rate 
juggler from the building sod- 
ety. And hold your breath for 
the extraordinary Revenue- 
deiying foats of the BES 
virtuoso. 

Yes. folks — h's time to turn 
your financial confusion 
into . - . even greater financial 
confusion as yoc meander 
ever more beda^ed from one 
plausible bit of advice to 
.another, quite difTerem but 
equally plausible, bit of 
advice. 

Then , when day is done, 
siag^faome under the wei^t 
of laigie plastic bags fiiil of 
colour brochure that menace 
you with graph lines going this 
way. and that, percentages. 
quartHes, APRs and SROs. 

Sounds like a nightmare ? 
You bet. 

And if you're not careful 
that is the effect Money ’86 
could have on you. But that is 
not the intention of the or- 
or the exhibitors. So 
we explain v^t to look 





Richard Copley-Smith:- 
trying to suit all needs 

n for and what not to do if 
>u are visiting Money '86 
ixt week. 

Firsu a little background, 
loney '86 is the second 
inual money show to be held 
I London. Money '8S was 
aged this time last year and 
iiacied 12,500 visitors over 
tur days. With three times as 
lany exhibitors this time 
lound. the organizers are 
eariy hoping to attract even 
lore visitors. 

You can take your pick of 
lorc than 250 financial in- 
itutions. advisers, brokers 
id dealers — all keen to 
iswer your questions on 
ibjects as diverse as mort- 
iges and investment trusts. 
;rsonal equity plans and 
;hool fees. 

Among the household name 
chibiiors you will find 
merican Express, the Halifex 
uitding Society, the Pruden- 
al and the TS& 




More spedalized exhibitors 
include the Bell Savings Bank 
of Philadelphia which claims 
to be “the only US bank 
actively marketing dollar ac^ 
counts to the smaller UK 
Investor” and the independent 
investment manager Des- 
mond Simian, who is charm- 
ingly described in the show' 
guide as ”quite human and 
very easy to talk to” 

Money *86 has all the bus 
of the Motor Show but none of 
die vroom. Like ail the best 
ideas, it is simple in concept 
Sell exhibition si»ce to a wide 
range of financial concents, 
get the public along and let 
them talk together. 

Where else in the space of a 
morning or afternoon visit 
could you find out what you 
want to know from Barclays, 
Commercial Union. M&O, 
Sun Alliance and more than 
200 others of your choice? 

It's a golden opportunity to 
ask ail those questions that 
you tboi^t, wrongly, every- 
one knew the answers to 
except you. 

You can ask your questions 
either infoimally by collari 
a representative of the firm 
your choice, or in a more 
public forum at one of several 
seminars which will be held on 
every one of the four days: 

The seminars are free and 
topics range from “Invest- 
ment for Beptmers” and 
“How to invest on the Stock 
^change” to “How charts can 
help you make money from 
floating exchange rates”. Ev- 
ery morning the Unit Trust 
Association is running a ses- 
sion called “Unii trusts: all 
your questions answered”. 
The purpore of this session is 
to allow visitors to brush up 
on their knowle^ before 
visiting some of the many 
organizations ofTermg advice 
on unit trusts at the show. 

More specialized _ invest- 
ments are explored in “Are 
fine wines and fine art invest- 
ment dtentaiivcs?" and 7 ^® 
finures market for the private 
investor". 

People approaching retire- 
mem ^ould find the seminar 
“'Financial planning for 
retirement” of particular in- 
leresL This sesuon is timed to 
start at lOam every day. an 
hour before the show opensL 
Visitors for Ibis seminar 
should go to a special entrance 
to the National Hail at the 
corner of Hammersmith Road 
and Olympia Way and should 
arrive eariy as it was crowded 
every dajf last year. Ent^ to ah 
the seminars is subject to 
availability of space. 

Apart from the seminars 
which are of particular interest 


to private investors, others'aie 
aimed at businessmen and 
finandal intermediaries. 

The show's managing direc- 
tor. ^chard Copley^mith. 
says: “We have tried to create 
seminars to reflect visitors' 
differing d^rtes of sopUstica- 
tion about investment.” 

Unders^ndably. some 
organizations are using 
Money '86 to promote 
particular products and ser- 
vices. The Unit Trust Associ- 
ation, in conjunction with 
Money Magazine, will be 
launching a new publication 
entitled Everything you need 
to know ahoiit unit trusts. 

There is a good deaf of 
emphasis on technology. Na- 
tional Westminster, which is 
installing touch-sensitive 
screens in 250 of its branches 
to streamline the mailceting 
and prooe^'iig of financial 
services, will be demonstrate 
the equipmenL An initial 
application of the ^stem 
could be share transactions at 
branches with the lenninal 
rinting a coniraa note and. 
br sales, a cheque where 
settlement is for cash. Further 




Place: Olympia Exhibition 
Centra. London Wf4 (01-603 
3344) 

Dates: October 30 to Novem- 
ber 2 

Opening times: 11am to 
7.30pm eveiy dw except Sun- 
day. November Z when open- 
ing times are 11am to 5pm 
Adirussiofi: Adults £4, old age 
pensioners and minors £2 
How to get there; During 
Money '86 a special Under- 
ground train service operates 
between Earls Court Kensing- 
ton Olympia and Ken^g^ 
High Sb^' stations, bus 
rc^ 9, 27. 28, 33. 49, 73 and 
91 stop near Olympia. Next to 
tire Exhibition Hail the new 
intercity station operates a 
(tirect service until many parts 
of the country. For further 
information on this British Ran 
service, telephone 01-9285100 

• There Is parking sp^ for 

600 cars at the mutti-stor^ 
covered car park off Olympia 
Way 

developments could include 
information on and quota- 
tions for mortgages, personal 
loans, unit trust uansactions 
and insurance businessL 

But for most visitors. 
Money '86 will be much more 
to do with the fundamental 
problems of bow best to make 
use of limited financial re- 
sources, and the balance be- 
tween savings and risk 
investraenis such as unit 
trusts. 

One word of warning. Don't 
sigti on the dotted line for any 
savings or investment con- 
tract in the beat and at- 
mosphere of the occarioiu 
Listen to the advice, takeaway 
the literature and study it at 
home: 

• The orgarrizers of Money 
'86 are planning a Northern 
Show in Manchester next 
February. 

Peter Gardaiid 



As South East Asia 
moves up fest. 

This is your opi^rtiHhly to enjoy big investment gains - 
HI the sunrise economics of South E^t Asia. 

By buying in on a rising market Now. 

Since April this year Fidelity’s South East Aaa Trust has 

jumped 46.4%. , . r 

These maricets move fest - they won twaitforyou. 

Call us today to discuss the growth prospects forSouth 
EastAria. 

The lines are open every weekend from 9 ajn. to 5 p.m- 
and Monday to Friday tom 9 a.m. to 9p jn. 


Callfree 

08004 Mia, 

now 


Fidelity 

MAJ0NGMC8SEYMAKEMC»«Y 


Early for Burgundy 


( WNES ) 

• 

The shippers of fine Bur^ 
gundies. Doth red and white, 
mm the outstanding 1985 
vintage have sianed to show 
fflmples to the trade, and the 
first offers are now emerging. 
In view of the short harvest 
Iasi year, high quality and 
worid-wide demand, investors 
would be wise to purdiase 
eariy so as not to be 
disappointed. 

The laige vinu^ just end- 
ing in Burgundy, despite hail 
damage in June in the Cote 
d'Or. is likely to depress prices 
for the immediate crop but 
not for 1 985. 

Louis' Latour. a noted 
House based in Beaun^ 
showed last year's vintage this 
week in London. Although the 
lesser lines such as St Veran 
and Moniagny were on the 
light side, the “investment” 
white Bi^uodies revealed 
real promise. 

The true almond 
Chardonnay fruit was evident 
on Puligny-Monirachet Les 
Folati&res and Corton 
Charlemagne. 

In the reds, look particulariy 
for Chateau Corton Grancey 
and Romance & Vivant, Lk 
Q tiatre Journaux. The UK 
agents. H. Pairoi and Co (The 
Old Customs House. 3 
Wapping Pierhead. London. 
El 9PN) will advise stockists. 

There is very evident de- 
mand for good Burgundy at 
auction. Christie's sold 1982 
Corton Charlemagne for £305 
and Montrachet, Le Ramonet 
1982 at £700 on Oaober 2. 
while International Wine Auc- 
tions. which does not have a 
buyer's commission, realized 
^5()0 in mid-September for 
Montrachet 1982. Domaine 
de Romante-Conti and £i, 1 50 
for de Vogu6*s 1978 Musigny 
Blanc, in both cases per dozen 
bottles. 



fc 


F. ChauveneL. based at Nuiis 
Si Georges, has also showed a 
selection of 1985 wines 
m the region. In the whites, 
the crisp St Romain and 
Premier Cru St Aubin both 
showed good fiuii at modest 
rices, but real joys to reserve 
or price appreciation were 
Chassagne Montrachet (both 
single commune and Pr^ier 
Oru Morgeot). Corton Char- 
lemagne with its many layers, 
and Meusault Channes 
the Hospices de Beaune auc- 
tion. Prices for the top whites 
are likely to be £225 per dozen 
bottles upwards. 

ChauveneL founded in 
1853. has sales valued at 125 
million francs and is therefore 
an important Cote d'Or com- 
pany. Local merchants will be 
quoted by the new importers, 
Cordier Wines of The Malt 
Housed 21 London End, 
Beaconsfield. Bucks. HP9 
2HN. 

^The most exciting 
In the world' 

Anthony Hanson. Master of 
Wine with Haynes Hanson 
and Clark (17 Lenioe StneeL 
London SW6 4EHX rightiy 
says in his new list that 
“making good red Burgundy is 
beset with difficulties — but. 
when successful, the ^wers 
produce the most exciting red 
wines in the world”. 

He ofiers an interesting 
range, particularly of single 
hamlet Beaujolais and ei^t 
classic Cote d'Qr reds, includ- 
ing Vosne-Romanee, domaine 
bottled by Jacqueline Jayer at 
£135.45. Clos de Vougpoi 
fh>m Jean Grivot at £258.90 
and a Beaune, Premier Oru 
from Olivier Leflaive, at only 
£9(X30. These prices are 
rase lying in France, so ship- 
ping, insurance, duty and 
VAT need to be aided. Excise 
duty is £8.82 per case. 


listed its 1 9S5s — “a gor^ 
to lance of tannin and acids in 
the wines, which promise 
a long lasting, rich and ripe 
vintage". Investors would be 
wise to include in their cellar 
such lines as Charles Vienot's 
Channes Chambertin at £178 
and Leonce de Valleroy’s 
Echezeaux at £181. both lying 
in Burgundy, excluding VAT. 
Harveys has, incidemally. one 
of the' widest collections of 
white Burgundies, including 
Domaine Rougeot's 

Meursauli Charmes at 
£185.20. 

.A carefully prepared list of 
1985 whites from Burgundy 
has been unveiled this week by 
Justerini and Brooks, the fine 
wine side of Grand Metropoli- 
tan (61 St James's Street. 
London SWIA ILZ). It in- 
cludes two classic Meursaults 
at £20 per boiiie pre-discount. 

Auction room demand for 
good Burgundy continues. On 
September 24. Sotheby's sold 
La Tache 1971 DRC at £220 
per magnum. Musigny 1969 
from de Vogue at £660 per 
dozen bottles, and Bienvenues 
B^iard Montrachet 1983 from 
Andre Ramonet at £550. 
There was similarly stron 
support at the Glasgow sale o 
Phillips on Thursday and 
there is likely to be keen 
bidding at Christie's next 
Thursday, particulariy for the 
white Burgundies. 

Although without a dis- 
cussion of prices, one of the 
best guides to the potentially 
conf&ing n^on is The IVines 
qf Burgundy, by Serena 
Sutciifie. recently published at 
£4.95 by Mitchell Beazl^ in 
its pocket guide series. Wifo so 
many praioucera and individ- 
ual vineyards, it is a helpful 
introduction to this inast 
complex of French regions 
and will inspire investors to 
scour the pages of not only 
merchants' lists but also sale 
room catalogues. 


The Burgundian House of Harveys of Bristol has just 


Conal Gr^ory 


MAXIMUM BONUS BOND 1st ISSUE 


RRST ISSUE OFFER MUST CLOSE AT £4 MILLION 
ON THE IBth NOVEMBER 


16 % 


N ’ 


BUARAHTEED 1 YEAR 
BOILDWR SOCIETY RETURN 

BuikSng Societies and International Stock Markets represent 
to most people a Mend of the safest and the most rewarding 
investments they can make. Now the maximum bonus bond 
brings the two together to offer the shrewd safety first fevas- 
tor a secure combination. Investors will have their money 
divided to secure a 18% Net* guaranteed l year return on 
their account with a leading building society, and the balance 
placed in a managed fund that has product 18.6% net per 
ipound. O' 


annum comi 


Offer to bid 1/10/76 to 1/10/86. 


OFFER STRICTLY LIMITED 
call NOW 

051*227 5749/5762 
051*236 2729/2982 
*At basic rate tax/nia £4,000 


UK ALLIANCE FINANCIAL 
MANAGEMENT 

LIVERPOOL BUSINESS CENTRE 
LIVERPOOL L2 6RE 



. 04 % 


14.14% GROSS EQLIIV' 



FinariQaJ kiumaltsis ntti*n recommend Fnifndir Sraecies as ideal for sows 
birauw BLnUDlNC SOOm' SAVINGS tARN 3n»P liKDRE WHEN INVESTS) 
THROIKJH A FKIENDD’ Si.XlETY HonMOMners, Use iTTve&is £130 mdlkin 

on behalf o| 1911/100 

Tlwre aie lax tree monthly and annual M\Tn» plans 

in lo 



I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 


and til tractii'e lump sum sdiemes I £5 Iri nr llJHm 
choov? IrtifD. Funds are safety mvesied hi Biadiord ^ 
tiin^lf'y Building Society; so ihere^ absulurely no risk 
invi^lv^ Your savings could be eamiiig I0.U4Hp^ tax 
hee grosi equivalenl »r with no lax liobilit}- __ 

whaisoewSend lor ddnils TODAY (Without obligation. ITV 

- We promise no salesman will coin. | 


FREEPOST NO STAMP NEEDED 


BRAOEORDI 


I 
I 
I 

I Send today to: Homeowners Friendly Socleij; FREEPOST. Springfield | 
I Avenue, Harrogate, North Yorkshire HG156R- TSSSiOK ■ 

I MR-MRS/MISS I 


ADDRESS 


IBLiXXCAimLM 


CODE 


/D/hosJc ra^PAnpqins. 


PHONE NOW 
FORBROCHURE 

Tek (0423)522070 (24 hrv) fAX FREE fflGH 

RETURN SAVINGS 



HFS 


I 

I 

I 





Our Japan Fund 




* ♦ 



Sowl^ 

are we recommending 


Our Japan Rmd is one of the leadmg 
unit trusts in its sector and weVe 
confident that it will continue to be a 
good peHormei: 

But where could sudi a spectacular 
gain come fiom in the future? 

EUROPE: 7DMQRRQWS 
TOP PERFORMER? 

Europe is already a success story 
ht 1985/E shares have risen steadily on all 
European stock exchanges. 

The MIM Britannia European 
Performance Thist. launched iii August 
1985, has itself risen by 94% in only 
fourteen months. And the eviderxe indi- 
cates that there is stiU further subst^tial 
growth to come 

Economies in Europe are both strong 
and stable Interest rates are Iom; and 
likely to go still lowen Inflation is low 
too, even nearing 0% in some countries. 

Euro p ea n currenciesareoncourse for 
continuiiig strength against sterling to 
the benefit of funds like our European 
Performance Thist 

Meanwhile, corporate profits are 
rapidly growing (over 15% forecast for 
France and ItalyL 

And some interesting ~ 
opportiirudes will soon 
arise fioin the forthcoming 
French privatisation prO' 
gramme ^rememberBritish 
Telecom?) 

Finalls; our view of these frets is 
si^ported by mar^ independent comr 
mencators: that Europe is an area of 
outstanding and continuing giowth 


Europe? 




MIM BRITANNIA 


Make sure of your stake in it now. 
Invest in the MIM Britannia European 
Performanoe Thist. where our dedicated 
aim is to achieve capital growth fiom a 
portfolio of European shares 

Kemembez; the price of units and the 
income fiom them can go down as wdl 
asupi 

To invest, s^ply coinplete the 
applicatioci form below or call our Unit 
Tost Dealers on 01*^8 0478. 

Ibr your information, as at 21st Oct' 
obei; 1986, the offer prices for distribu- 
tion arid accumulation iiriics were 9&7pxd 
and 97.0p respectively and the current 
estimated annual gross yield 0.92%. 


to offo* net incGme reinvested to Isr Oac4>er 196& 


GENERAL INFORMATION FOR INVEOTRS 

AcbiowM^emem wiO be sene and cmfkates nuied wirhm 
30 deyfc Umr priusernd yieidare pubhihed daily nleadingnanonal 
new*^apefv Onicsean Iwsok] buck lo the Monagersainoc lea chan 
xhe oinenf bid price calcubred lo a- formula approved by dw 
DeparTTnenroTliradeandlnciuscry 

An trnrialfnanasenienc charge of5-25^uonrheaSficaleQUivalem to 
5^ of the tfsuc price} a included tn che pnee oTvnirt anda servxe 
charge ai an annial rare ofl^<M(«-Vu^ofKhe value of the 1rws 
difduccedirDmche1hi£t\girouinconic.ah:hoi^ die 'frusc Deed 
atlow$ a maxnnum annual charge of 2QDf4- 

The Deed pemiixs in vestment m traded opQons and in iccond 

markets wichm the guidehnes laid down by ^ Deparnnenr of 
Tkadeandhviufrry 

The1rusr''sincomediRTibunondatcsarelstMayaiidlKNoveTtd9cr 
m respea of the periods ending 1st March aiK] 1st September. 
Income for Accumukuioa Uhus » reinvested net of die bam toee 
of income tax to sKrease the unit value Income Unto disxnlxice 
dwir TTKome etdw ID the registered address or by mandate direct 
to a bank account 

and tares are avaUaU on request. 

Imstee: Midland Bank'frusr Cbcnpany Ltd. 11 Old 
iewr>L London ECZR SDL 
Managn MIM Briianna Unr Trust Managers L&d 
Regain Office U Devondore Square. London 
EC2M4YR 

Member of the Unit Ihjst Asaooosian 


pocentiaL 


I 


•fc; MW BRITANNIA UNITTRUST MANAGERS 
UMTTEDt ?4/78 Finsbury Pavement. Londcm 
EC^ UD-l^qphone: 01-588 Z777 

1/VKfi wish tw-iwwcrf. (minimum 

£500) in ^ MW Britannia European IVrfornianLC 
~frusr at the offCT pnee ruling on receipi of my 
reminance. A cheque b enclosed payable lo 
MIM Briiannia Untt^Eiist Managers Limtred. 

Please tick box if Accumulamn 

Lkiic&are required LJ 

Retnilar Monthly Savinas Plan 

rick box far mftyrnarion j— 

(tm'C5tmerufiomon(y£2Sperrrionth) LJ 


Surname 

KMr MM 

Finsr NaniekL. 


IBLOCKIAITTALSI 


AJJms. 


.PosTcode. 


Signature. 


■Date. 


P { PWwnektfyoudivannsiB^MlMBTTtanniauntThotdcr 

Thnnfini.nn(»'ailaMe loreadenKefEicr T25.10.SB 


u 


MM BRTEMMA EUROPEAN PERFORMANCE TRUST 


-J 


7 tx,: 





















30 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 





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Avis Europe pic 

(Registered in England under the Companiea Act 19S5 — No- 1995619) 

OfiFer for Subscription 


V * 


'i: 


V? 


a 

4 


of 


ordinary shares of 25p each at 250p per share payable in full on application 

Sponsored and Underwritten by 


Morgan Grenfell & Co. limited 






‘ in pmoTl 
^ipucaiions 


multiple 

any a^iaaon tf n 
or, as 



TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF APPUCATION 

(a) ' The ro »t TTagr creared by tbe of amlicacioos wiD be conditional upon the 

admisriOD of die ii4iole of the ofxlinaiy share cap^ of the CbmpaDy. issued and now being 
i«iwvl, DO die OfiEic^ Liff (rfThe Stock Exchange and listing becoming efiec ti ve not later 
rhgTT 13 Kovember 1986, upon dbe Underwriting A gr ee m e n t referred to in paragrqih 8 of 
Furdi^ Information in the Usting Parrioilais relaring to die Company dated 2Z October 1986 
("die Lining Pardculan”) not be^ tenninated in aococdaoce with its terms and upon the 
option in die leferred to in ^lagrmh 10(8 Further Information in die Listi n g 

Paitiadaxs bemg exerdsed. If Morgan Grenfefl resdnds the Underwriting Agreemenc, die 
said ooncracrwiil also be rescinded widumc Uability. Cheques or banker's drafts ftir amounts 
payable on qiplicttion may be presented for payment befoire sudi conditions are satisfied and 
ihe application' moneys be kept by Midlazid Bank pic in a separate bank account. If such 
conditkins are not satbfied as afivoaid, application moneys wiD be returned (without interest} 
by sending die applicant's cbecpie or banker's draft or a crossed cheque in fevour of the 
applicaxuls) throu^ the post. 

(b> *rhe Company reserves the ri^it with die agreement of Morgan Grenfm in i^ect in 
whole or in part or to scale down any application and, in partfculv, muhfole or su^iected 

present for payment any cheques or baoker's drafts recei v eil If 
' in wfaoleor in part or is scaled down, die ap^ication moneyv 
loediereofvdll be returned (vidioue interest)^ retuTninedie 
dseque or banker’s-draftaocoropanyiiig the application or by crossed cheque in fevour or die 
appUantfs) dirou^ the pose. 

By complecing and delivering an ^iplicaiion Form, yom 

(1) offer to subscribe the number of ordinary shares of Z5p each m the capital of the 

R your Application Form (or any smaller uumber 
ubject to ax Lining Paniculais (of whidi these 
of Aiqilic^on and die Frooedure m Ai^icaiion form pair) and 
the Memorandum and Article of Association of die Company; 

— (u) authorise Mfdlax^ Bank pic ID send a Letter ofAUotmenr for the number of ordtaary 
shares for which your apt^cadon is accepted, and/or t^ chequed banker's draft 
accompanying the applicatioo or a crossed cheque for any money returnable, by postto 
your addi^.(or that of dw first'oained applicant) as set out in your Application Form 
and to prooire that yotn* nrnne (togedier the namely (tfmy other joint appUcmt(s)) 

i^are jplaoed 00 *^ R^jster" oOScmbeisr bf the Cbi^fimiy'm r^pecTof such ordin^ 
shares the entidement to which has not been duly renounced; 

(ni) agree rhat . in oonsideTaiion of the Company agreeing that it will not prior to 13 
Novem^ allot anv of the ordinary shmes rim subject of the Ofi^ to any person 

other than by means of the procedures referred to in the Listing Particulars, your 
^iptication not be revoked until after 13 November 1986 and mat this paragraph 
const i tutes a coUsxeral c o ntract between you and the Company which will becora 
binding upon despatch by post CO or, as the case may be. receipt by Midland Bank of 
your Application Form; 

(iv) w a rr an t dat your lemitrauce will be honoured on first presentation; 

(v) agree that any Letter of Allotment and any money retumdile to you may be retained 
by Iwdland Bank p!c pending dearanoe ofyour remittance; 




agrc that all sqipHcadons, acceptances of applications and oonttaccs resultirm 
under the Ofier be governed by and oonstrued in accordance widi En^n 

fvii) warrant diat, if you tign die ^iplicatioa Fonn on behalf of somebody dse or on 
bdialf of a coTpoiation, you have due authority K> do SO; 

(v^ conftxm that in making such af^lication you are not rehnng on any infbrnntioa or 
iqnesentation in rdation ID the Cmpany or any ^rm sifosidBries odier than such as is 
coniainQd in the listiitg Paniculais and you according agree that no person responsible 
solely or jcMxniy ftir die Listing Piatticul^ or any part thereto will any liability for 
any inftn-maiiaa or nepresentation nor so coal 
(Iid declare, represent and wananr that: 

(1) you undeiaand that the ordinary shares lefeiieJ to herein have not been and are 
not presently intended to be re^scem under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, 
of the Uniira States of America f^dieSecuiitics Act”) or die securities laws of any 
state of the United Stams CSace Aci")l and accordingly may not be ofiered, sold, 
renounced, tiansfened, delivered, assigned, occhanged or odwrwise dispcMed of, 
direedy or indiiecdy, in the United States of America, its territories, possessions or 
any area subject to its jurisdiction ("United States'! or in Canada (coltectively "Nonh 
America'! or to w for the account or benefit of any person who is a nanotial, citizen 
or resident diereoforv^ is normany residenc therein, acoiporation, parmeiship, or 
other entity created or orsnised under any law of the Uidted States or Canada or 
state, domtnion or potiticB subdivision thoeof or an estate or trust, the moome of 
which is subject to United States Fecieral or Qtnadian income taxes tegaidless of its 
aQiirre, prhw rhan AirisCapiiaT Hnldinp, Ine. and its subsidiaries, {"Noith American 

Persons'! at any time prior to 6 Noveiraer l9Ei?; thereafter such shares may not be 
oftkied, sold, renounced transferred delivered assigned eccfaanged or otinerwise 
disposed of.ditecdy or indirectly, in N^h America, or COOT ftirdwaccountor benefit 
of a North American Person unless (i) die shares are duly registered under the 
Securities Act and all apfdicable Son Acts, or (til Tepsoaiioa under die Securities Act 
and all applicfole State Acts is not required and the CompBny has received an ofrituon 
c^counsd CO such eftcesatisfeetDry CD fo or (i^ such shares are sold on TheSiock 
Exchange in London in accordance with die normal trading procedures ^iproved by 
thati 


terrirorv other riian the United Kingdom fnayc^ the same as ccys riturit^ an 

offer to W nor should he fo am ewerie use such form tinle» in the retevaottMrttre m 

an invicacion or ofi^ could lawfully be made to him or such form 
without connawention of any registiatian or other kgii retmiremrms. Any otiMak; 

the Uhted KiiMctem wishing to make an api^ieation bereundCT miw mnsfe Wmieffaa wm 
observance oiFcne lanvs of any relevant rerriiDry in connection rberewfl^ iocluffltnooftJDwj 
any reqiudre Bovemnicntal or ocher oonsems. and c^npliance vfith ajoy odatr 

fbrtnalicies, »id paying any issue, aansfer or oAer taxes due in such twittory. , ^ 

(g)" FortnsofApplicarionincorporsieaw»iantythtcdieapplicaKlsDOtaNoi&A*a«1^ 
ftisoa and is nor apphtog 00 bensdf ofc or with a view to reamer, sale, rermniciidoq or 
to, or fiw dwbeiefe of. any Nordi American Person. Retfscration appliaoanfWTOOtil^BW 

of Alloonenc wUl conoUn a warranty ro the same efilecc by or on boialf 01 owpemonW » 

whose namels) the onhnary shazes are to be regiiiered. 

Copim of the Listing hitiuhrs can be obtained from: 

Mb^Grenfen& Co. limited Motgan GrenfeO Securidm Undeed ’ 

Newlssue Department 20 Fmdwty Grow 

TZLondon'U^l London EC2M 7BB 

London BC2M 5NL i._i 

Midland Baidt^ 

Soxk Exchange oervicea 

Marnier House 

Fepys Street 

London BC3N IDA 


i 


Casenovc &. Co. 

12 Tokenhouse Yard 
London EQR 7AN 



(2) you are notAione oFyou is a Nordi American Person; and 
p) you are aot/noae of you is acqiiiiing any such shares ftjr the accoun t or the 
' whe&ofanyl'foalbAinericm.FeisM.orwidiavseiFtDlh^ofiftr.sale; lenundtfiofv 
transfer, delivery, assi^nnent, exchaue or ether di^Kisitioa diie^y or indiiecdy in 
Nonh America or to dr for beoen of any Noidi Anmicaa Ferwn; and 

fid warrant that not more dian one application has been made by you (or on your behalf) 
am for your benefit on a public application form. 

(d) Acceptance of applications will be effected at die eteciion of the Corapany ehher by 
notification of the baas of location to The Stock Exchange or by notification by the Company 
to Mkftand Bank pic of the determinaiion the Tuxaixr of ordinary shares ft>r wluch the 
application is accqited. 

AO documents and cheques sene by post will be x die risk of the persoo(s) entided 
thereto. 

(f) No person recehriog a copy of the Listing ^iiicolars, or as Application Form, in any 


Midhnd Bank pic MkHaxid Bank pie 

431 Qidbrd Street Pouhry&PriQGmSacet 

London W1R2DA London EC2P ZBX 

from the following ocher branches of kfidhnd Bank pie 

Wi rmmgham BciSCol CkitHff 

P.O.Bw^ P.O. Bok 120 IHSt MwvStmac 

230NewScreer 49CoRiStraec CudffCFl ILFv 

Birmangham B2 4]U Brino) BS99 7PP 

Leeds Liverpool M an ch ester 

P.O.B 0 XIOS 4 Dale Street mBmeJ® 

33 E^k Row Liveqpool L® 2BZ 100 King Street . - 

LeethLSl ILD Manebaitt-MftOSMD 

Reading 
26 Broad Street 
Reading RG12BU 

from die following banks in Soodand and Northern Inland: 


1 

-t 


; V r«“ Ti 


^ I 


Edinbs _ 

BankFLC 

P.a Box IS 
29 George Street 
Edinburg EH2 2YN 

and from aU Avis rental 


BankFLC 
P.O.Bok 30 
30 St. VinceiirPlaoe 
Glasgow G12HL 

in die UK. 


PDBqk183^ 

Donegd Square 'Wes 
Bel&scBT16LT 


BASIS OF ACCEPTANCE AND DEAUNG ARRANGEMENTS 


The Application Lte will open at 10.00 aon- on Thursday, 30 Oanber 1966 and will close as soon thereafter as Mortal GrenfeU may 
determine. The basis on vdiicb dte aroUcadons have been accepted will be announced as soon as pos^le after die Application List closes. It is 
expected that renounceable Letcers of Alloonenc will be posoea to successful applicants on 5 November 1986 and that dealnsgs in the ordinary 
shares will commenoe on Thursday* 6 November 1966. DeauMmstructions will be set out in the Letter ofAIlonnenL The latest t i me for iff fat raiion 
ofrenutidadonofLetcersof Allotinent will be 3.00 pjn. on Sueoember 1986 and shue certificates will be desf^cched by 2 January 198^ 

lise that their application 


AppGcantt deal before reoeipc of a Letter of AUoCment will do so at their own risk. They must 

may not Ime been accepted to the extent they expected or at alL 

The Directors are advised diac 

(a) no stamp duty or stan^ duty leserve tax will be payable on the issue of renouncedble Leners of Alloonenn 

(b) . no stamp duty or stamp duty reserve tax will be payable on the lepstiation of Letters of Ailotmenq whether or not they have been renounced 
prior CO feg te r a rioo; 

(cl the purchaser of rights to shares rqxeaenred by a Letter of Allotment on or before the latest time &>r legistiation of remindation will be 
llabictoscampducy reserve tax at the rate of SOpp^ £100 (or part diereoft of the consideration paid; and • 

(dl the transfer on sale of shares r e pr es ented by a L et te r of Allotment after die latest time ftir reetstraiioo of renunciation will be subject to ad 
v^orem stamp duty (or, if an unooncmiODal agreement to transfer sucb a document is not com{deted oy a duly stamped transfer wtdiin two months, 
stanq> duty reserve at the rate of 5()p per £100 (or part thereof of the conrideiation paid 

The charge to stamp duty teserve.m win not generally apply to purchases by a market maker or to certain purchases by a broker and dealer. 

PROCEDURE FOR APPUCATION — APPUCATION PRICE 250P PER SHARE 


Infert in Bck 1 (in %ure^ die number of ordinary dnres for vriiich you an Applications must be ftjr a miniiinmi of 100 

1 I ordinary shares or in one of ibe CoUowing multiples: 


m 


m 

0 


(or moredian ICX) shares, but noc more than 1,000 shaves, in nuik^les of 100 shares 
fi>r more than 1 ,000 shares, but not more than 5,000 diaves, in multiples of 500 .shares 
for more than 5,000 skates, but not more than 1 0,000 shaxes, in multiples of 1 ,000 diares 
for more than 10,000 dtares. but not mote than 50,000 shares, in multifdes of 5,000 diares 
ft)r mrae dan 50,000 shares, in multiples of 10,000 dnres. 

Insert in Box 2 (in figures) the amount of your cheque or banker's draft. 



The Application Form may be rigned by someone dse on your behalf (and/or on behalf of any joint apf^kantfs)) if dulv *»ithrtin a< ^ to do 
so buc 1^ poweifs) of attorney or corporate fonii(s) of authority (or a duly eeitified copy most be enclosed for iws pgjc iion A 

corporation should sign under the hand of a du ly audiorised offic^ whose lepresencative capadty muse be stated. 

I ns e rt your Jiill name and address in MjOCK CAPITALS in Box 4. 

Tm mist pin a sh^ cheque or banker's draft to your compkeed ^ipficatioD Form. Ytw cheque or banker’s draft must be made 
peyaUe to *Midland Bank pic" for die amount payaUe on application inserted in Box 2 and should be crossed "Not Negotiable". 

'No receipc will be issued for this paymei^.vriiich must be striely for this application. 

Your dieqiK orbanker^s draft must be drawn in sterling on an account at a branch (which must he in die United Kingdom, the Channd 
Islands or die Isle of Man) of a bank which b either a member of the London or Scottish Clearing Houses or which has arranged for its 


cheques and banker's drafts to be pKsenDedftir payment dirou^ the dearinsftciliries provided ftir the members ofth^ Clearing Houses. 
All cheques and banker's drafts must bear the approp ri ate sorthig code nunfoer in die top right hand comer. 

Applications may be accompanied by a cheqw drawn by someone Other dan the applicants), but any moneys to be returned will be 
tetum^ by randing the cheque or banker's draft accranpaiiying die application or by crasMd cheque in fevour of die persoti( 3 ) nam»d in 


0 


BcBc(es)4{and6)L 

A separate Aeque Or bankei^s draft must acc ompa ny each application. 

PhoCQCi^^ of Application Forms wiD not be acoqued. 

An spidicatioD will not be conskleted unless these oonditiOBs are fulfilled. 

Tou may apply joindy w^ odicr persons. 

You must dien arrange ft}r the 'Appliotion Formtobeconipltted byoron jwh aifofeach joint applicant (up to a maximum of three other 
person^ Their full names arid * 


diould be inserved in B 



CAPITALS in Box 6. 



Box 7 must be signed by or on bdialf of each joint applicant (ocher dian the first appUcant who should enwi p l^ f. Box 4 and sign In 
Box 3).- 

If anyone boning on behalf of any joint appilicani(s), the powerfs) of aztomey or corporate ibnn(s) of audiorir 7 (or a duly certified copy 
diereoQ must be eroosed ftir inspeoion. ' 

0 You must send die compleced Anificadon Form by jxsst. or deliver it by band, to Micfland TtawL- pic. Stock Fvr4viwy Services 
Department. Mariner House, Pepys Street, London eC 3N 4DA so as to be received not later 10.00 *n»irsday, 30 

October 19^. 

If you post your Applkacioa Form, you are recomnended to use firtt db$$ post and allow at least two days for delivery. 


YOU MAY APPLY ONLY ONCE ON A PUBUC APPUCATION FORM 


M] 


AV/S 


Avis Europe pic 


PUBUC APPLICATION FORM 


Offer for Subscription, sponsored and underwritten by Morgan Grenfell & Co. T iTnfei.^ 
of 72,0ll,5CX) ordinary shares of 25p each in Avis Europe pic at 250p per share, 

pay^le in full on aqppIicatioEL 



1/We o&r to subscribe ftir 

in Avis Europe pic (or any sroaner number of shares for which this qqitlcatlon Is atfwpmD at 250p 
gr ^re ^ the tetios and subject to the condiiioas set out in the Liwtrie Fardculais 22 

and 1/we attach a cheque 
or banker's dr a ft for the amount 
payable, namdy 



United States and Canada-'North AmecicBn Penons nny not apply 

Applicants should paidciilar aneation ID the wanaoty cooxmlng Nardi Amerkan Fenons in sidypanpaph 

(cijfaO of Terms and Conditions of Apidicacion 


1986 


Sigcucim 


PLEASE USE BLOCK CUTTALS 


3 


Mr. MixMissorddc Foromds) in feQ 

4 

Snname 

/T 

AdAcw ID fen 

• 

- 

PMteede 

Pin here your cheque/banker's draft for the amount in B(»c 2 

r 

FiU m diis seolon only where there is tnore dian one amlfcanL "The first or sole applkanc Aouid oomDlece B««“ 
4 and si^ in Box 3. In^ In to 6 the oames and addresses of the second and nitaiequm appUcantTeadT^ 

3 


PLEASE USE BLOCK CAPITALS 


FOROFROAL 

useomGt 


t 







A 


Mt Mn.Mi»orts6c 
Sornnie 


Address 


Fosveode 


Mr. Mfi. Missornde 


Forename! j) 


Addren 


PbsKode 






I 

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Mr Mn. MAiorfide 
Surrme 


Pcmimris) 


AddrcH 


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AV/S 




AVfsm\Avism.A v/S il: a i//s 



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iikilll# ((MKrWVf I. •• 


4pp6'#'^“ •' 

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|Why small speculators 
are brokers’ favourites 


( SHARES ^ 

The City's financial revolu- 
tion and Govemmeni's 
privatization programme 
nave made it a lot easier in 
recent times for the small 
investor to buy shares on the 

Stock market. 

Firms of siockbroJcers that 
at one time would scarcely 
have given him the lime of 
day are now pandering to his 
cy^ wish in the hope of 
picking up valuable business. 
Many of them now realize that 
the ^ys, of woilcing for 
the big City institutions and 
making a comfortable living 
are over. 

After Big Bang on Monday, 
the majority of instiiutionai 
orders will be divided up 
among the handful of big 
firms willing to risk the loss ^ 
fat commissions for increased 
turnover. 

So the smaller brokers have 
now been forced to turn to the 
Knie man to earn thdr living. 

■As a result, the man in the 
street is now overwhelmed 
with investment advice. He 
can read about the benefit of 
buying shares in his daily 
paper, ponder it during die 
commercial breaks on tele- 
vision and even-run across it 
ducihg.'a visit to the local 
deparunent store. 

The stories of the fat profits 
that have been earned on the 
stock market in the p^ by 
jnviHtors buyi^ shares in new 
isslies such as the Trustee 
Savii^ Bank. Jaguar. British 
Tel^m, Amer^am Inter- 
national, C^ble &, Wireless 
and .Associated British l^rts 
will certainly tempt him to 
part with some of his hard- 
earned cadi. 

However, not all the 
Government's privatiration 
issues have been runaway 
success stories. .The fhst 
tranche of Britoil offered in 
1 982 by tender at 2 1 Sp turned 
out to be a costly lesson for the 
small investor. Many pro- 
fessionals thought the issue 
was too expensive and the 
subsequent slump in oil prices 
left the small investor with 
some hefty losses. 

The real problem 
is when to seU 

But hnvinjg followed his 
broker's advice; parted with 
his money and taken tire 
plunge, our fearless investor 
may find it is fer from plain 
sailing from hereon in. 

After all. any fool can invest 
in shares these days, the real 
problem is knowing when to 
sell. 

The financial Press, invesi- 
pient newsletters and ftnancial 
advisers all seem to have an 
inexhaustible supply of buy 
recommendations, but few are 
geared up to tell investors 
when to take proftts. or more 
imponanily. when to cut 
losses. 






V- . ■ 



Niftinertzh^eo: warning 

OH MS’, AIMV 

^[inaiSTetwwe 


iL---}^BKOKER 


'PhA 


Most dealers in the stock 
market who buy shares for 
themselves live by the old 
adage of '''run your winners 
and cut your Icsers". but for 
the private investor things are 
not that simple. 

There are . a number of 
things that should always be 
taken into account before an 
investor instructs his bitAerto . 
sell his shares. 

What often appears to be a 
lucrative profit on paper may 
not always be quite so attrac- 
tive when convmed into hard 
cash, ^ftts have a habit of 
rapidly disappearing after the 
broker deducts his commis- 
sion, stamp duty is paid and 
the tax man lakes what is 
owing. 

Alrays try to establidi 
beforehand how much the 
costs are likely to be before 
paru'ng with your money. The 
rise in the share price must 
always be enough to cover 
these costs. Otherwi^ your 
initial investment will soon 
dwindle. 

Tte stock market caters fyr 
all types ofinvestor. Some are 
looking for capital gain, others 
for income, or recovery. Some 
prefer Iong4enif investments 
and others are content whh 
just a “quick turn’*. 

Tte professional stock- 
hrok^ must cater for all of 
them. . - . > 

Peier Meinertzhagen is a 
direaor of UK. equity sales at 
Hoaie Goven. the Iroker. 
Every-day he bandies shares 
worth millions of pounds on 
behalf of clients. His invest- 
ment decisions are criticaL 
There can be little robin for 
error. 

' Mr Memertzhagen bdieves 
the boom in the stock market 
may already be over for the 
time being. “We are on the 


thin! and final kg pf a bull 
markei", he warns. “The signs 
are all there and similar to 
those we saw before, the last 
slump in the early 1 970s — 
risir% house prices, increased 
lending and lower industrial 
output. People are borrowing 
100 mu^." 

Bui forthose investors look- 
ing for medium-ierm lo long- 
term invesunents. the crunim 
is unlikley to come until early 
sprii^ Only then, with the 
possibility of a general elec- 
tion _ looming, should they 
consider selling. 

Meanwhile, there are still 
profits to be made in the 
equity market and he thinks 
they should go for British Gas 
expected next month. 

Mr Meinertzhagen urges 
investors to have a taiget they 
wish to achieve. Onfy when 
that target is reached should 
they take profits. 

Meanwhile, Robert 
a director of Wood Ma^en- 
zie. the broker, and head of its 
. private client business, urges 
the small man to be choosy 
about his choice of invest- 
meiiL He advises them to go 
for quality stocks in areas 
plenty of growth potental 
instep of declining sectors. 
“You must not try to be too 
clever and dodge in an out of 
different stocks. Go for long- 
term investments;'' he says. 

_ But . the most difficult de- 
cision for any investor comes 
when he finds he is sitting on a - 
loss. Does he hai^ on in there 
and hope the situation will 
right- itself, or does be cut his 
losses and run? 

"'ll takes quite a bit of 
courage to cut your losses,'^ 
sa^ Mr White; But he says 

that if a share price fells by 
more than 20 per cent, per- 
haps. as a rule of thumb, he 
should consider salvagiiig 
what money he has left. There 
is certainly no answer. 

. For many of London's big 
fond managers the question of 
selling shares hardly ever 
arises except duriiu pmods of 
redemption, or if liquidity 
levels are low. They are then < 
referred io in the market as 
“false sellers". 

There is always 
- a target-in min d 

But even tHC powei^ fund 
man^g^ with . ^miliions of 
pounds at his diqjosal has 
certain guideliries to follow. 
Once'^gain he wifi always 
have a target in mind. Some 
buy for the dividend. Once the 
dividend has been paid, he 
sells the shares hoping to buy 
them back more cheaply later 

OIL 

But if you have bou^t 
shares for a pardcular reason, 
it is ^ways the best policy to 
sell them once that has Im 
achieved and then look for 
other opportunities. 

Michael Clark 


I Next Monday, as well as being 
I ibe day of Big Bang, should 
also witness fireworks of a 
different kind in the House of 
Lords when the Rnancial 
Services Bill has its Third 
Reading. 

The Bill has sparked off a 
wide range of controversial 
issues. One which has not 
been satisfactorily resolved is 
how much the investor 
purchasing a Hfe assurance 
produn should be told about 
its costs. 

Life assurance' underpins 
many products such as 
endowment mortgages and 
school fees plans. Not only do 
purchasers pay large commis- 
sions to salesmen but the 
insurance companies also levy 
expenses or charges 'which 
reduce the amount of your 
money .going towards actual 
investment Commissions can 
frequently amount to 120 per 
cent of your first year's 
miuins and chaigu or ex- 
penses about one filUi of every 
premium. 

The Securities and Invest- 
ments Board .(SIB) has ruled 
against full disclosure of 
commission. Consumer bod- 
ies and the Office of Fair 
Trading disagree; 

Apent should do 
his best for yon 


The SIB has preferred to 
require insurance companies 
to disclose “surrender values" 
— in other words how much 
policies would be worth if they 
were cashed in early. 

The SIB has also said tfaht if 
die insurance companies ^ree 
a fixed scale of commissions 
for their policies, independent 
intermediaries need disclose 
only that oommissiems are in 

line with dial scale. Only 
where the policies sold are not 
within the scale must full 
commiSHon be disclosed. 

But full disclosure of 
commissions oi^t to be com- 
pulsory ^ all sales made by 
an independent intermediaiy. 
He is suppraed to be acting on 
your behw as your agent to do 
the best Job poralile for you. 
The SIB has said as much in 
hsdraft rules. 

Moreover, as your ag™t the 
law actually requires him to 
disclose the commissions that 


Conflict 

looms 

over the 
cut on 

cover 

■ 

he will earn from selling you a 
product. Solicitors and 
accounianis reosnize this. If 
you buy a life assurance 
produa throu^ them they 
will disclose the amount— and 
rebate it from your bilL 

The idtt that intermedi- 
aries should be able to hide 
.their commissions behind an 
industty '»prement, . which is 
available for inspeciioiL is an 
anathema to investor 
protection. 

The Office of Fair Tradii^ 
says on this matter that “if 
considers that competition 
policy and the protection of 
the consumer require a com- 
prehensive disclosure of a 
company's commission rates 
before a contract is entered 
into’’. 

In feet, “life assurance" is a 
clear misretmesenlation — 
very little of the premium goes 
oo insurir^ your life. Tenn 
insurance insures your life — 
and the commissions payable, 
like the premiums, are very 
low. 

The Office of Fair Trading 
says that if foil (fisdosure “led 
to more sales of term insur- 
ance at the expense of endow- 
ment and whole life policies 
this mi^t well be to the 
benefit rather than to the 
detriment of the consumers". 

It adds that “insurance as a 
long term investment", as 
oppo^ to a metiiod of 
insuring your life, is “a more 
debatable matter; there are 
plenty of other havens for the 
consumer's long-term 
savings". 

In recent months the ques- 
tion of disclosure has become 
lost behind a related . aiga^ 
ment This says that, insirad 
of tellii^ investois how liiucfa 
they are paying in commis- 


uons, they should be given a 
breakdown showing ih^ how 
much of their money goes into 
investment and life insurance 
and how much goes in 
commissions and charges and 
expenses. 

This would be ideal for the 
consumer as it rrould show 
bofo commissions and insur- 
ance company charges wd 
expenses. Unfortunately, the 
SIB decided this was not 
feasible in the case of with- 
profits life assurance where 
money goes hito a common 
pool and investment results 
depend on the life company’s 
future profitability. 

It has recently announced 
an independent inquiry to see 
if a solution to the with-profits 
problem is achievable. 

Michad Howard, the Min- 
ister for Consumer and Cor- 
porate Affairs, who is 
overseeing the Finandal Ser- 
vices Bill fevouns providing 
consumers with a breakdown. 

“I don’t think Fve ever 
made any secret of the feef 
that If it is possible to give that 
breakdown then ft should be i 
done," be says. “And 1 think I 
said when the matter came up ' 
at Report stage in the House of 

Two-thirds are still 
with-profhs policies 


Commons that I wouldn't 
necessary expect the kind of 
disclosure to be fixed for all 
time but as more techniques 
became available it might be 
possible to disclose more and 
diflerently." 

Sr Kenneth Beiriil the SIB 
chairmaiL is a little mme 
cautious. In an interview with 
The Times be said: “SIB is all , 
in favour of disclosure. It runs 

through all our rules. The one 
area where we found it Just 
lechnkaUy impossible to do 
so fer — ifsomdiody ttould idl 
us how to do it we would be 
delighted — is with^rofits life 
assurance; Two-tfai^ of lire 
life assurance business that is 
deme is still wiih-prc^ls. 

“If a breakdown can be 
provided we will look and see 
whether it is helpfid. If it is 
helpful we will require iL" 


Lawrence Lever 


iRi 

lb 

:;REASED 

ITEREST 

EX1 

IMMEI 

withni 

Net%p.a.’ 

rRA-ORDINARY SHARES 

DIATE WITHDRAWAL 

0 loss of interest or ifenalty 

*ntos fntorwst paid halTywariy 

Gross Equiv. % p.a.t 

BALA 

9.61 

NCES £1 0,000 AND OVER 

Df%= 13.84% 

BALAN( 

9.1! 

ZES £500 (minimum) ~ £9^99 

>%= 13.18% 

Eltectivell 

BOLT 

23S237B^ 

Men 

fOBento 19B6 fCiosseqtwaiern to baste rale laspaye^ 
t CDovNMinded hdhearbf ^ AR). Ratesm 

ON BUILDING SOOETY 

UCER STREET. LONDON NW1. TEL: 01-9350138 

24 Hour Answering Service 

ibers of the Buildb^ Societies Assodaikxi, 

Ihistee Status. EsttfAshed 1884 


*7 have been your member for 
the past nine months and . . . 

I turaed £1,800 
into £11.725!” 


So wrote Mr. S.C.T. of Wolverhampton to us in 
April. All of that was accomplish^ by closely 
following The Penny Share Guide's advice, month 
after month, week after w^k, proving once more 
that investment in ‘penny’ahares is not just luck, it's 
investment in . a serious service, investment 
moreover that the small private investor with 
^ limited capita can take full advantage of. If you too 
would like to make that sort of return from 'penny' ' 
shares, why not send for absolutely free details 
today? There's no further obligation on you at all — 
just fill in the coupon and find out for yourselfl . 


I To: The Fenny Share Guide Ltd, 3 Fleet Street, ■ 
I London ECOY lAU I 

I YES; please do send me free details of the PENNY ■ 

I SHARE(jUlD£.witlioutcostOTobligation. 

\ ^ 25/10 I 

[ Name ^ block I 

I Add .«««.= I 


.Post Coi 


.ijnrziui 

_i>lease 









The question of commissions 


Xiaite irbat will happen to tire 
tonunissions which private clir 
ents pay to stockbrokers after 
Big Ba^ is anyone^ guess.^ 
Maa}’ people think in 
jnan}' cases fee indiridnaJ 
investor will become the saori- 
'fidal lamb for the inevitable 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


1 ABN 

Adam S Company 

BCCl 

embank Sanringst 

OonsoMaied 

Co.opeiaiive Bank 

C. Hoaie & Co 

Hong Kong & Shanghai-. 

LLo^ Bank 

I Nst Westunslm ^ 

Ro^ of SG0tfeld_ 

citibank NA — 

f Moiwe Base Ritc^ 


...10100% 

.. 11 . 00 % 

-..12.45% 

-IIAK 

- 11 . 00 % 

.... 1100 % 

«-11J»% 

...11.00% 

... 11 . 00 % 

-. 11 . 00 % 

.11fi0% 

-. 11 . 00 % 


fell in Commissions earned ^ 
the Inokers from the b% 
institutional investors. ■ 

A Import piodaoed by the 
Stock foclumge this we^ 
5 bows' that during the 

three years the costs- of bnyui^ 

and sellmg shares have in- 
creased snbstantidly for the., 
very private investor. 

'For Sample, average 
cemmissioiis on share deals 
worth £600 or less have disen 
frim3B3 per cent of tihe total 
value of the transaction to tL81 
ptfcenC. 

I However above tills levd die 
[ private investor bnymg sham 


has only suffered rd^v^ 
small increases in 
commissions. 

As tim comntisrion levels 
have fee private 

investor partidpation in actnal 
share dealings has deefined. 

This might seem a Uttie 
jneongynons giveii the recent 
privatization wave, not to men- 
tion TBBL 

However, what fee ifepres 
say is not that feme are fewer 
Iffivate sharehiddets than in 
1983,. bat that do not 
trade (heir shares as mneh. 

ix 


A New Unit Trust Investing for Growth 
in Financial Services Companies 


F RAMLINGTON Financial Fund will-aim- 
for maximum capital through 

investment in the most inierestiqg sector 
of the moment: finandal services com- 
panies tbroqghotir the world. 

Hoandal services are going through a period 
of rapid ffowd i and rhanyj thus creating an 
important investment opportunity In this couno^'. 
the securities industry is changing dramatically, 
and new I^^Iatibn is rapidly enlaiging the scope of 
profitable operation for banks; insurance companies 
and fund management companies. 

More generally, international de-regulation and 
the in world-wide inflation st^gnificantly 

improves the prospects for financial services opera- 
tions evoywhene. Framlington Financial Fund will 
aim to m^ the most of th^ opportunities, whether 
in fee UK., fee US. A., Eun^ or fee Far East. 

THE FRAMLINGTON APPROACH 
Our ^Kcia] style is to concentrate on smaller 
CMTipanies, trying to identify those wife really good 
growth pmspiiKts before the rest of the madeet 
ledognisestli^pnxnise, aiming for good longterm 
capital growth performance, faults speak for 
themselves. 

OUR RECORD 

Rramlin ginn has an Outstanding long-term growth 
record. The average annual compound rate of 
growth in the price of units (on an offertorbid basis) 
of each of our capital growrh funds betmaen launch 
and 1st Ocufeer 19^ was as follows: 

ftiju/ Launched Crou'fb 

CapMtal Jan 69 +13.1% p.a. 

loternacional Growth Oct 76 +23.3% p^a. 

American & General Apr 78 + 19.0% pjL 

American Turnaround Oct 79 +22.4% p.a. 

Recovery Apr 82 +24.7% p.a. 

Japan & General 1^ 84 +26. 1% p.a. 

European Feb 86 +45.6% p.a. 

Every one of these. Framlington funds has out- 
perform^ the FT All-Share Index, the Dow-Jones 
Industrisj Average and the Staixlard and Poors 

Composite Index. 

* • • • * 

OUR INSIGHT 

Framlington Group pic is itself a finandal services 
compani: This gives us imtilufele insight into the 
sectoc Apart from our unit mists, off-shore funds 



RETIRED. 


WE 



fo^^COME 


GUARANTEED , 

ONE YEAR RETURN 


brand new P^yCL 
RRST PUBLIC OFREWNG 
UMHFD TO £3 MIUION 


□u Bnhis BpnU 

niatte have i mtons 

Nim wih out htjiid iWf sATiidy 
Gimtii Bma kd btniE vou 
our be^ ottet lodiae kKes^tuis 
wJ luve theii iKjnev owM ID 

seo^e a piauniwii t vea* 'dum 
d li'i nef ineit acenurt »nrtt 
a ludnp DiriditK MiMlK 
Die baVMVi.* HKMiifd hi an 
ncdnE nt* iund RUiueed hjr a 


I How ? I 

* By advi^g which investment gives I 

the most income. I 

* By reducing your income tax bill.. I 

* By making your capital grow to I 

increase income in tlfo fiffureL I 

Knight Williams has 'speci^ised for iiiany “ I 
years' in identifying income investments - I 

for retired people. Send for full derails. I 

KnightWilliams 

■ Independent Financial Ad\'ice 

33 Cork Street, London WIX IHB 

01-409-1X271 

I Name — 1-^ — ' — ' — | 

Address 




Members of FIMBRA 
Offices in London & Leeds 


ssnoiK 


zf 


and life insurance imeiests, we are expanding into 
investment trusts, pension funds and private 
portfolio management throqgh acquiritions which 
will biiitg our funds under management tqi from 
i/420 inillioi] to over £L300 million. 

TWO KINDS OF UNITS 

Units are available in both income form (with 
distributions twice a year) or accumulation form 
(tn which net income is reinvested). Since the aim 
of fee fund b out-and-out capital growth, investors 
are recommended to choose accumulation units. 
The estixDBted gross initial yield is one per cent. 


HOW TO INVEST 

U ntil 31 October units are avaOfeleat the 
initial price of 30p each, lb im'est, 
complete the af^cation form and send, 
it to us with your cheque ro arrive by 
3 pm on 31 Octobec Applications of iilO.OOO or 
over wil] receive a bonus of (Hie per cent additional 
units at the expense of the managers. 

F rom 3 Nonrember units will be available at fee 
ruling offer price. 

Investors should r^ard all unictrust investraent 
as long term. They are reminded that the price of 
units and the income from them can go down as 
weliastq). 


... .T5S SHARES 

>ba 1117 osf a T5B letterof acsQgxaficeas port oF^oor remiasaoe: 
yScHiT shares ^ sold free ol cominissioa at the price nitbog 
vheQ the remonoed letter is tecetved and the proceeds used to 
bt 7 units, roonded up io jRiar favour to ibe neaiest wboleiMih. 

should complete the appUcatk»ionnieavinfi the aroo cimo 
be invested blank and send rc cqgecber with |our signed TTO 
letter of auqtuiKJpaiid any Aeqoe. Reioendoer that the tDioimMio 
investiDcat in ftamCngcoa fiiuncul Fond is £300. 

SAVINGS PLAN 

There are fecilffies for investing by monthly direct debit, with die 
&scaftocK£oft<rf miitson 31 Oaobec formppUcttioahaiu 
telephnne 01-6% 3181 beftire 24 October. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Applications will be aduiawledged; oertiScaiies wiD be seotby 
^ r^giscrera, IJoyds Bank Pic, oonnany within 42 days. 

- Tim minsnuni inizial investmenc is £300* From 3fd 
ember units may be bougte and sold daibiL Prices and yfdds win 
be published daily Jn leading. newspapers. When unicsnrusold 
bg^ to the managers paymem IS txNmally made wjtfaia 7 days of 
reoriprof eIk rriwunced ceriificam. 

Inoome net. of bask rare tax is discribuied to of 

income units on 13 Juneand 13 December ca^yeac The first 
distribntioa wili beon 13 June 1987. 

The annual charge ts 1% f -I- WTl of the value of tbefimd. 
The initiaTciiargei adueb is hiduded in theofferprioe. is 3%. 

Conuniasion ^1^4 per cent (-I-VAT) is p^ to qualiSed 
rmennediaries. Qommusion a not paid on sayings ptans. 

The trust ia au authorised unit crust oonsdnited fay Trust 
Deed- Tc ranis as a wider range seearity undo' tfre Ihistee 
Invesoneacs Act, 1961. The Trustee b Uo^ Bank PIc. 

TbenianggefsaiefniDlinSK>a DnitMasagememLimitedtS 
London WUl Builcfiqgs. London EC2M 3NQ. Telephone 01-628 
$18L lelcx 8812399. R^ered in England No 893241. 
Member of chetlnh ThiSt Asaoebtioa. 

This offer b oor DO residencs of the Rqxiblic of freisnd 


^-INITIAL.OFFER- 


+26.1% pA 

+45.6% p.a. 


OfUnttsIn FRaimlingtonFinanoalFund 

AT THE INITIAL Fixed Price Of .50P Each UNTO. 31 ST October 1986 

, • • • 

To- Framlington Unit Management-Limited, i London Waii.Bij 1 loings.Lonoon eczm snq 

I/WSWISHTOINVESTTHESUMOF^ | (AfUNlMtM £500) IN FRAMLINGTON FINANCIAL F^ffCD 

ANDENOjOSE A CFiEQUE PAYABLE TO FRAMUNGION Unit MANAGEMENTLlMrmX I AM/WE AREOl'ER U 


FOB ACCUMULATION UNITS IN WHICH NET INOCIME IS REINVESTED. PIJEASE TICK HERE 


SURNAME ( MR/MRS/MI5S] 
FUU FORENAMEiS) 


ADDR! 



SIGNATUREiSI 


applicants should all sign and if necessary endose details sepdratefy) 



-FRAMLINGTQN FINANCIAL FUND 


1 











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of 


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32 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 



FAMILY MONEY/5 



The asset that is your mortgage 


Mortgages are back in 
the news in a big way 
foDowing the rise in 
mortg^ interest rates. 

UZIVAUONGTON 
assesses the fhndamental 
choices Ilufaig boose- 
buyers 

Biiyiiv a house is both a 
substahlial fwzDciaS commit- 
mentanda sound in vestment 
When die mortgage is paid off, 
you should be the outright 
owner of a valuable asset 
Meanwhile, bowever, there is 
sdll that mortgage. Ai times it 
may feet like a millstone 
round your nec^ but it can be 
an investment in its^ 

With an ordinary repay- 
ment mortgage, you pay in- 
terest and some capitd every 
month, g^ually repaying Um 
loan. With an endowment 
mortgage, on the other hand, 
you pay only interest to the 
ImdOT. and pn^ums on an 
endowment policy to an insur- 
ance company. The whole 
Iran is outstanding through- 
out and is repaid in one lump 
sum at the end from the 
proceeds of the policy. 

The attraction is that it is 
intended to produce more 
than eno^ for the morlga^ 
SQ. there is something left over 
for your own enjoyment 

If an endowment mortgage 
wiU do more than meet the 
loan, it ^onld be more expen- 
sive than the repayment 
method wbidi does just that 
So indeed it would be. for a 
&11 widi-profits pK^cy, but 
low-cost mid unit-linked con- 
tracts can work out at very 
little extra. 

The trick with the low-c(^ 
endowment is that it allows in' 
advance for a proportion of 
the expected bonuses, or 
“profits", to be paid over the 
term. The basic sum assured is 
thus le» than the amount of 
the loan, but the accrued 


bonuses should make up the 
difference when the policy 
matures. , Usually, the sums 
are based on 80 per cent of the 
current bonus rate, which is 
ofrm the maximum a building 
society will accept ^ any- 
thing more produces a surplus 
for the policyholder. 

On a unit-linked endow- 
ment premiums are invested 
in one or more fiinds which 
opmte in a fashion similar to 
unit trusts. That is, the pre- 
miums buy units, the price of 
vdiich is determined Iw the 
total worth of the mud's 
investment holdings. As this 
rises — or falls — so does die 
value of your units. 

Most companies offer a 
range of fund links, between 
which the policyholder can 
choose and switch as he likes. 
So you could, in effect play 
the stock markets with your 
mortgage policy. However, 
one frilre move could be very 
cosily. 

You may be able 
to pay it off early 


Contracts usually assume 
an annual growth rate of 7.5 
per cent net of ail charges. If 
the value of your units goes up 
by exactly this, the pro^eds of 
the policy will just equal the 
loan. In most cases, there is a 
periodic review system, to 
check that growth is on target 
If it exceeds 7.S cent well 
and good; but if it frills short 
you may have to increase your 
premiums, or peitaps extend 
the term of the mortgage, 
provided the lender agrees. 

In the happy event that the 
actual oowth rate, for either 
Qrpe of endowment is better 
that assumed, you will 
usually have the option to 
repay the mortgage early. 
Alternatively, you could con- 
tinue with the policy to build 
up tte extra tax-free cash. 


These are the good points of 
endowment mortgagee but 
they do also have Ihetr dis- 
advantages. If the interest rate 
rises, a repayment mortgage 
will usually be rescheduled, so 
that the extra cost is effec- 
tively spread across Ae 
remainder of the term. With 
an endowment there may be 
no option but to pay more, 
unless the lender agrees to 
defer the extra payments or 
extend the loan term. 

Moving house is not usually 
a problem, as most companies 
are happy for you to adjust the 
terms of your policy to fit a 
new mortgage. However, stop- 
ping the policy is another 
raatier. Surrender values tend 
' to te low in the early years, 
and may te than the 
amount of premiums paid. 

The greatest drawback, of 
course, is the possibility that 
the eventual proceeds will fall 
short of the loan. After the 
long bull market, bonus rates 
for low<osi policies ate now 
at a historically high level 
Sooner or later, with markets 
likely to decline, companies 
will come under pressure to 
bring them down. 

Terminal bonuses are the 
most vulnerable in this re- 
spect. as they are payable only 
in the final year of the policy 
and depend entirely on invest- 
ment returns at that time. The 
r^ular, or so<cal]ed rever- 
sionary. bonuses are under- 
pinned to some extent by 
reserves which the companies 
maintain to smooth out 
fluctuations. 

Unit-linked policies are 
even more at the mercy of 
market movements, as they, 
have no such reserves. These 
contracts are still fairly new, 
and not all buildiitg societies 
will accept them. However, 
their pro^nents would argue 
that ite basic assumption of a 
7.S per cent growth rate Is 
conservative, and the review 
system offers a measure of 


protection. Thoi^ an in- 
crease in prmiums wotdd be 
unpleasant, it is pn>bably less 
painful than a substantial 
shortfall at the end of the 
term. 

Before the introduction of 
MIRAS (Mortgage Interest 
Relief at Source), repayment 
mortgages were structured so 
that gross monthly payments 
were more or less level 
througfjoui the term. Because 
payments in the early years 
consisted laigdy of interest, 
tax relief was at its highest 
then, and net payments ac- 
tually followed an upward 
curve. Most people are hard- 
est pressed at the stan of a 
mortgage, so this gave the 
repayment method particular 
appoL 

Post-MIRAS. net payments 
were equalized, so this low^ 
start advantage was lost, and 
endowment mor^ages be- 
came more popular. However, 
the aboliuon of life assurance 

You could have the 
b^ of both worlds 


premium relief, which was an 
added attraction of endow- 
ment policies, has tended to 
restore the balance. Repay- 
ment mortgages are scHnewhai 
cheaper, but only pay off the 
loan, while the endowment 
types have investment poten- 
tial but also cany a risL 

It is possible to have the 
best of both worlds, with a 
contract such as GRFs 
Homebuilder Plus. This is a 
unit-linked endowment, with 
a built-in guarantee to repay 
the loan. FYemiums are bued 
on a growth rate of only 5 per 
cent a year, so they are higher 
than on standard contracts. 

However, the chance of a 
surplus is also greater, while if 
disaster should hit the mar- 
kets, you will not be left to fece 
your lender empty-handed 


One of the main fears of 
people facing reliremenl is 
whether they will continue to 
be able to make ends mecL 
Come the vrinter months, 
manv elderly householders 
will liAd themselves struggling 
to pay the fuel bills, unaware 
that the monev- tied up in their 
property could be used to ease 
theburdezL 

Few financial benefits are 
laid on for the over-seventies, 
who continue to get a rather 
poor deal from society. But 
one answer to an old person's 
cash [moblexns is to raise some 
money from the home. 

There are two types of 
scheme, both of whi^ give 
access to pan of the value of 
the home. The firsL called a 
home income {dan. modiu^ 
monthly income for life vdiile 
keeping ownerdtip of the 
property. The second a rever- 
sion scheme, involves selling 
the home for a cash sum aiKl 
continuing to live there at a 
nominal leuL 

Home income plans operate 
by raising a mortgage on a 
proportion > up to 80 per cent 
— of the value of your house, 
to a current maximum of 
£30.000 l This is used to buy a 
special type of insaianoe con- 
tract caU^ an annuity. The 
annuity generates monthly ir 
come, pan of whidi pays on 
the interest on the mortgage, 
leaving the rest to spend as 
you please. 

Interest on the loan is 
eligible for tax relief under the 
Govemment's Mortgage In- 
leresi Relief at Source sdieme. 
known as MIRA& As a result, 
only 71 per cent of the 
mortgage interest is deducted 
from the annuity income, 
whether or not you are earning 
enough to te claiming full tax 
relief! Those on low incomes 
who pay no tax receive almost 
the same net benefits as the 
taxpayer. 

Most companies charge a 
variahfe rate of interest, so 
that the monthly income from 
the annuity feUs as interest 
rates go up. Abbey National 
and Allied Dunbar, however, 
offer a fixed rate plan which 
many old people may, under- 


Home is where 
the extra 
liquidity is 


standably. find prcferal^ 
Regardless of dianges in the 
imeresi rate, they would have 
a guaranteed monthly income 
of a fix^ amount. 

Allied Dunbar illustrates 
bow such a plan can work. A 
woman aged 75 owns her 
house cunently worth £26.000 
and has a small income over 
and above her state pension. 
She is given a loan of. say, 
£20.000, repayable when she 
dies from the proceeds of the 
saleoftbe bouse. The rest then 
goes to her frunily. 

While she is alive, she 
receives an annual sum. af^ 
paying off the morfig^ in- 
terest. of just over £1.000. The 
example assumes that the 


another 11 years - men, 
incidenially, for only nine. 

But life is a gamble and 
while not wanting to appear 
pesslmisiic. our hypothetical 
woman may well not live long 
enou^ to reap the real bene- 
fits of her financial prudence. 
Tough luck on her femily. you 
might say. In fact, it is not as 
bad^as it'seems. 

There is some protection 
against an early death. If the 
woman were to die within the 
first vear of the plan, only 25 
per rant of the loan would 
have to be repaid, in the 
second SO per cent, and in the 
third 75 per cent ARer that 
the loan has to be paid back in 
full 


IMBff iQ W(/Heto/- HMHm 

Wf-mti/crMivirm? 



gross rate of interest is fixed at 
8.25 per cent and that the 
woman pays income tax at the 
basic rate. 

You may be interested to 
note that detailed research has 
been conducted into our 
chances of survival over the 
age of 65. According to Allied 
Dunbar's life expectancy ta- 
ble. a 75-year-Qid woman can 
hope to live for at least 


At the other end of the scale, 
too. there have been cases to 
baffle the statisticians. As 
featured in 7%e Times this 
summer, two of Allied 
Dunbar's most faithful dienis. 
May and Mamrie Cbevasse. 
defied odds of 50 million to 
one to reach the age of 100 and 

become the country's oldest 
surviving set of twins. In 1973. 
the sisters entered one of the 


company fiRi-evcr home h*; 
come {MRS- and 
annuitants have itceved an 
income of £S0 a momii for 13 
\cars. 

The principal altentattve 10 
the income plan is tiie feven. 
sion scheme. You sen your 
house to a revefsioa company 
fora one-off lump Ran ind/or 
an annuity income, then teni 
It back at a small cost One 
problem is that, bedittse Uk 
house is sold while you sb& 
live there, it will feS to reach 
its full market value - in some 
cases only 50 per cent of the 
amount it would reach if it 
were vacani. In additioit, re- 
pairs and maintenance and 
rates would continue to be 
your responsibility. 

As always, there are con* 
ditions. You must be over 70. 
or. in the case of a couple, 
have a joint age of 130. If you. 
are claiming supplementary or 
housing benefit, receiving the 
income from an annuity may 
mean a icducuon in some or 
all of the state aid. 

Home income plans are 
offered by the Abbey Na- 
tional Halifax. Naiitw & 
Provincial Cheshunt, New- 
castle. and Kent Reiiuice 
Buildiire SocieUes. They are 
also oflteed throu^ a number 
of other financial institutions 
> .^lied Dunbar. Home 
Reversions. Hinton and Wild 
Insurance. Allchurehcs Life 
Assurance, and Whittington 
Ufe and Pensions, 

Companies oficring rever- 
sion schemes are Home 
Reversions. J.G. Inskip and 
Co. Investment Property 
Reversions. Residential 
Home Reversions, and Stal- 
wart Assurance. 

For more details about both 
home income plans and rever- 
sion schemes. Age Concern 
puNishes a comprehensive 
fact sheet entitled Raising 
Income from your Home. 
Copies are available on receipi 
of a large stamped addressed 
envelope from Age Concern. 
60 Pitcairn Road, Mitcham. 
Surrey CR4 3LU 

Kate Brown 


Free cash, no takers 


mm 


L 4'. 















v: P 



















lilP 








Had we been 


- M 




d we been aroun 

ir iniahr have cal 


id in 14 

ken off. 


Recognising the potential of new 
t^nology, like Leonardo's design for a 
helicopter, is an art in itself. 

And one we're rather good at 
The value of an investment in TR 
Global Technology Fund rose by 48.4% 
over the last year, making us Che No. 1 
international technology fund.* 

Vet our expertise lies in judgement, 
not of technology but of people. 

Evaluating a company and its manage- 
ment is as important to us as evaluating 
its product And we're not easily satisfied. 

Everything is taken into account 
Firom the calibre of their people. To the 
potential of the products they develop. 

Our thoroughness has certainly paid 
dividends. As has our policy of investing 


in smaller companies as well as larger 

blue chip holdings. 

• • 

Remember that the price of units and 
the income from them can go down as 
well as up. And past performance is no 
guarantee of the future. 

But right now we’d say that techno- 
logy is one of the most exciting sectors 
to invest In, however speculative it may 
appear. And the TR Global Technology 
Fund, undoubtedly your best choice. 

Even if we do say so ourselves. 

invest today by calling us directly on 
our free Lfnkline service, 0800 289 300 
any time between 10am and 2pm, or 
complete the coupon. Alternatively, con- 
sult your financial adviser. The minimum 
investment is £500. 


I Send to; IbudwRarmafflUnX That MHnagBfliefRLBL.FirBeposL j 
I London EC4B4AB. I 


would lAe to invest £. 


£500] in the 


TR Global Technology Fund.- 

wife enclose my/our chequefsjtbrttib amount made piiyable to; i 
TRUTM Limited. I 

Please tidi here if you rant income to be ine-invested. >> ■ 


SiirTianf»iMr/hAivMip^_ 

. 

Address 

rBWCXCAPtMUPLbitSEj 



|— f r n ri !■ 

Sienat>ifi> 

na»_ 


Hn joint appTications, an applicants must signand attach their names 

and addresses.) Offer not an^icable to Eire 

Please send me moi^mlixmAkm about other 'feudie RaiHiarn 

Unit Trusts n Share Exchange Q SawngsPlanO 


4 


TOUCHE 

REMNAhlT 


'Source: Planned Sa>nneg*'ofer to bid without fe^inv es tm g n t of ingHTiatvtf^ l5t October. T98fi. 


I 

[TR ODBALTBCHNOIDCY 


Ccnerel Monnatien. ra CteinI fechnoioey Fund IS managed to achieve maximum capital 9twth bom invesemem m companies involved n temnoiacy The 
are oxKj en ba t wi w the three major wwM gods inadeB--USA Japan and the united Klngkmt The Trust l>eed contain potvets far o» Managers w 

Mai«B«niayalsoimi«aupm25^ofthcwlueoftheFond(mtlieU3tetEdSee«nbesM«1(iBL*TlieFuiiarS£0ftS!HiiliedbyaTrua0eeddaMd3lst Septmiber iQSAandisa^wder-raase'invesmwmunderctwIhjgeelnvesmietns 
Aa I96L Appuackins wtt be admvleclsed OT xeoeex of your ifistructions and (xriifkaties win be desiiatched withm 6 weete. Rquirdase proceeds vtdi tw (on^rded mmn IQ days a> retapt tf renamoeo cerOta a s By the 

Mwagtre lines are dealt in daily and UK pnees and yield are pubHsiKd in leading natimal ncMspapen. for your euldarKc, the oflbr piKe of imits <m ITttnday 25rd Oc^^ 

An.Mbai charwof 5% la included in the price flf units. An animal (Mree of l«b plus W of die value of the Fuixi is.deducsed rrwniWy from sress income and 15 taken lino ac^ 

be paid m of basic rate t« on 15th June ffinaO and ISth December (mtenml. Remvneretion will be paid toauthonsed BHsrmeOanes by the Managers and rate« are available on rveuesc MaraeeiV Tbu^ j^mna n t Um TVust 
M gna gprocntUnaied. Mermaid House. 2 Puddle Doch. London EC4V SAT. {Beg Office). Haiisnered Number 792553- Memberoftne Unit Trust Aaopanan.Thistee: The Hnyal Rwinnr -rpyiff nTi pn- 


It is an extraordinaiy 
state of affairs when a 
government stands 
ready to hand out money 
and nobody appears to 
wantit. JENME 
HAWTHORNE 
reptHts on the cash with 
no takers 

The Homeloan Scheme was 
introduced by the Labour 
Government in December 
1 978. to help savers to acquire 
their first home. The scheme 
is quite simple. You give 
notice on form HPA I to any 
institution taking part thtt 
you intend saving for a home; 
The relevant institutions in- 
clude building societies, 
banks, the Department for 
National Saving and Ulster 
Savings. 

• You continue saving, 
though not necessarily on any 
reguDu* basis, for two years. At 
the end of that time, you 
qualify for a tax-free cash 
tenusL In the year before you 
apply, you most keep at least 
£300 in your accounL The 
bonus goes np in steps of 
rou^y 10 per cent on every 
£1()0 saved. The minimum 
saving of £300 gets £40 and 
£1,000 or more gets the full 
£110. 

Provided there is £600 in 
your account in the second 
year, you also get a £600 loan. 
No repa^ent or interest has 
to te ^id on that loan for five 
years. So if you are -buying a 
£35.000 property and are 
fered a £^,000 mortgage loan, 
you would need only to find a 
deposit of i^40Q instead of 
£5,000 and, if you have saved 
£},(XX} or more, you would 
also havethefl lOca^ bonus. 

As the scheme is meant for 
first-time buyera there is a 
limit on the price of homes 
that qualify. These limits were 
increased on September 
this year, and are as follows: 

• Cleveland, Dorhara, 
Northiimbarfaiid, Tyne and 
Weax: £22,100 

• Humberside, Nmth, Sovtii 
and West Yorkshire: £22,M0 

• Derbyshire, Lekestershire, 
Unoolnshire, NortfaanqMMi- 
shire, Nottinghamshire: 
£24400 

• Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, 
Suffolk; £30,200 

• Greater London: £45,700 

• Bedfordshi^ Berkshire, 

Bn rlfiBghanKiur g, and 

West Sussex, Hamp- 

shire. Hertfordshire, Isle of 
Wight, Kent Oxfordshire, 
Sn^t £37,900 

• Avon, CornmlL Devon, 
Dorset, Gloucestershire, 
Sommet Wiltshire, Isl« of 
SdUy: £30,700 

Her^ord and Woieester. 
Shropshire, Staffordshire. 
Warwickshire, West Mid- 
lands: £23.800 

• Cheshire, Cumbria, Greater 
Manchester, Lancashire, 
Merseyside: £23,600 

• Wales: £24,100 

• Scodand: £27,500 

When one consWers the 
escalating price of houses in 
the South, the amounts of- 
fered on Homeloan look very 
small. But why are so few of 
the sums taken up? 

A high street manager of a 
building society who receives 
monthly as much in deposits 
as the asset value of one of the 
minnows, said that in the eight 
years of the scheme's opera- 

iiKai I«a#I Kaam .jI ifr 


A snap survey of three 
building societies in a high 
street reveafed the same situa- 
tion. The Alliance & Leicester 
manager could supply 
infonruiion but no iiocu- 
mentation. The Abbey Na- 
tional had not beanl of it but 
managfil eventually, to find 
an ap^ication fr>nn. Only the 
Halifu was able to offer the 
relevant leaflet 
Nothing was available in 
the Post Office either at the 
counter or among the display 
of leafleiSv e\-en though 
Girobank takes part in tbe 
scheme and is now coming to 
the market with mongages. 
The banks appeared equdly 


devoid of information. 

That very few peoj^ anily 
IS borne out by the figures in 
the table given in answer to a 
parliamentary question on 
July 8. 1985. 

Is it the small cash bonus 
that deters peof^ or the two- 
year savii^ period? Is the £600 
five-year interest-free loan too 
low. or have bouse prices 
escalated too much to make 
the scheme practical? Maybe 
there is too Utile publicitjr, or 
inflation has weaned Bniain 
away from the idea of tiirift. 

Whatever the reason, the 
scheme is worthy of more 
support, especially from the 
young. 


HOW THE SCHEME WORKS 


Minimum saidnga (Q heU during the 

12 months before applying for bonus 

Cash bonus 
(£> 


300-399 

40 


400499 

50 


500-599 

60 


600-699 

70 


700-799 

80 


800-899 

90 


1,000 or more 

110 

HOMELOAN ASSISTANCE 

Year 

Numbers applying Amount 

off esatotance 
(Cm) 

1980-81 

602 

0.42 

1981-82 

5,500 

3.88 

1982-83 

6,280 

4.24 

1983-84 

.4,200 

248 

1984-85 

4.160 

1.60 

• 




1 'no Bmm«f1lStaVtoKta*C.5Nba«MfttewfHhheiemk 1 


SECURED PROPERTY 
DEVELOPMENTS p.l.c. 

OFFER FOR SUBSCRDTION 

Sponsored and Underwritten by 
CHOULARTONS LIMITED 

(hdcmhcrafFmaiUl 

unterthe 

BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 

^*<cjalising in the provision of deferred 

* Experienced management team. 

* FuHy backed by cash and secured assets. 

* MiiiiiaamabscripiioBor£ 47 S.«»«mder^ 

w Nospmisors’ormiia><^iiQS. 

* LiuafodBtiesavailableforinvestors. 

* ImmediBte market in tbe Glares. 

* PrmrisicmalBESeiearaiiceobtsiM 

““ OKwIanons Umiud 
— ^ coupon. 

Choulanoos Limited. Freepe^. Loudon EC28 
Mease send me the Prospectus 


Name 

Address 




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By Neil Hamilton M P 

The 3 year 

battle to clear 


my name 


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NAME 

Billy Connolly 
writes about 
Glasgow 



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THE ART OF 
MAKING MONEY 


III 



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SALVADOR DAU - PART 2 


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16 PAGES OF PERSONAL FINANCE 




WIZARDS OF OZ 


ALL-DAY TV 

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Starts Monday 
What you’ll see 
in the Beeb’s 
extra 1,000 hrs. 








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Rrst hockey, then yachtii^ — are the 
Australians now on the way up from « 
urvter in rugby and cridtet? 

Plus spedal reports: Mansell on the li 
arioi»iri«.and The America's Cup Trial 










FASHION DRAWS 

The private sketches 
of Karl Lagerfeld 









N»ft 4 i 3 



THE SUNDAY TIMES 




111 


$1 






SGNDflf TIMES 


renew 


business news 





^ BRINK OF IS 

'BKBANGl 

^ 6 PAGE SURVEY 

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5 SECTIONS ft 96 PAGES . A COLOUR MAGAZINE ft ALL FOR 50p 


THE 

SUNDAY 

TIMES 

Better than a month 
of other Sundays. 


ft .«. ..^ft.« • *“*■ 

5355 ftv^%. • / ft I. . 















































34 


THE TD»IES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


LAUNCH PRICE OFFER 
CLOSES 31 OCTOBER 


Henderson European 
Income Trust 


Henderson believes Europe still 
promises some of the most rewarding 
opportunities for U.K. investors. 

Yyii can sdll obtain units in the new 


Henderson European Income Thjst 


at the launch offer price of 50p 
each. 

Talk to your professional 
ad^dser now or telephone Vicky 
Law on 01-638 5757. 




Henderson. 

The Investment Managers. 



Price of a champ’s fame 


Mansell celebrates everjithing except his life premhmis 


Nigel Mansell will be making 
his bid tomorrow for the 
World Championship in For- 
mula One racing If be suc- 
ceeds he will follow James 
Hunt into the select cat^ory 
of living legends. 

Mr Mansell must surely be a 
man to be envied in most 
respects. 


But not all. Even Formula 
One racing drivers have to pay 
for their ^amour. Apart fiom 
being su^ect^ to enormous 
centrifugal forbes while sittii^ 
in a cramped cockpit in his 
fireproof underwear for sev- 
eral houis, Mr Mansdl has^ 
serious problem of payi^ 


inannents, though, acconling 

lionm 


should not afito fi/e pramium 


over 



assurance. 

Most people take out lile 
assurance to protect their 
deiiendants in the event of 
Uieir death. The idea of leav- 
ing one's fhmily with a finan- 
cim safety net is naturally 
pleasing to any woman or man 
with mouths to feed. 

And'the banks care about us 
too, they really do. If you take 
out a person^ loan you may 
well discover that the bank 
will insure your life for. the 
duration of the loan. This type 


to Swiss Re's occupaui 
underwriiing ^lide, seem 
rather mod^ 

A Red Arrow pitot will pay 
only S per cent above orc&nary 
rate, while a member of the 
armed forces in Norths 
Ireland need find just 3 per 
cent more. 

But the book has an omi- 
nous red line through the rate 
for a contract on a member of 
a Lebanese peace-keeping 
force. Tbe word ''decline*’ has 
been writen over the figures. 

Mr Dyason describes the 
compendium of rates as *The 
distilled knowledge of ac- 
tuaries and business 


practitioners 


He says: ’’Some things we 

difficult 


Some contracts are 
for tax reasons 


NET 


GROSS EQUIV. 


INVEST TAX-FREE 


Witt this unique new idea from Save & Prosper 
yon can earn 11% net interest, (equivalent to 15.5% 
gross for a basic-iate taxpayer), on your saving ~ 
now! 

That^ if you take advantage of their new 
Personal EquiQr Plan to be lauitdted in January 1987 
10 invest - tax-free - in the exciting wnid of shares 
and the stock market. 

How does it work? 


LATER. 


IS THE 11% NET INTEREST 
GUARANTEED? 


EARN 11% NET-NOW! 

Decide bow much you want to 
invesL Anything from £250 to £2,400. Then 
simidy send your cheque (with the coupon below) for 
deposit in a Special Inienest Bank Account 
with leadmg madiant bankers, Rob«t Fkming 
& Co. Limited, wtaere it will earn interest at the 
rate of at least 11% net p.a. 

INVEST - TAX-FREE - LATER. 


New Government legjdation means that in 
January 19S7 you will be allowed to invest up to 
£2,400 a year — tax-free — on the stock market, 
through a Personal Equity Plan. 

And Save & Prosper, one of Britain's largest 
unit trust groups, with over 50 years' experience of 
investmenL wfl] be launching its own Personal 
Equity Plan. It will be extremely flexible and will 
allow yon to invest throngh their wide range of unit 



Yes. Even if interest rates elsewhere go down! 
And if they go up, then tbe position will be reviewed 
and the rate adjusted to keep it competitive. But this 
special high interest only lasts until 31st December 
1986 and only applies if the money is subsequently 
invested in a Save &. Prosper Personal Equity Plan. 

CAN I GET MY MONEY OUT? 


of life protection has the tratte 
name of ‘Tenn assurance**. 

If you die during the tenn of 
the loan yonr bank will benefit 
from the proceeds of the 
policy. 

Other contracts are taken 
out for tax planning reasons, 
or to protect a company whidi 
relies heavily on an impmtant 
executive — a “key man". 

ff you have a pmch^i ibr 
haitg gliding, pot-4ioling or 
povfoboat racing you must 
own up to iL 

Indulging in a “hazardous 
pursuit", whether trivial or 
noL will protably bump up 
the price you pay for ymu* 
cover. If your full-time job 
happens to be dangerous, you 
protebly will find that life 
contracts will cost you dearer. 

“Ev^ contract is written 
accorditig to the risks on the 
individual fife." says John 
Pyason. deputy life under- 
writer at Swiss Re (UK). The 


write contracts for are 
to monitor accurately. How 
many trapeze artists are there, 
and how many are- killed on 

tbejobr 

A good question, but the life 
company must supply some 
sort of answer if it is to mske 
money. “Aerial artistes”, in 
fact, payjust 2 percent above 
standard rate: 


rates. 

Motor racing is deemed to 
be a pursuit rather tiian an 
occupation by the actuaries. 
Mr Mansell would have to 
£17.50 lo £30 per £1,1 
insured on his life: Tbis is 
han dsomely more than a m^ 
journalist aged under 30, who 
can protect his life fiM* just £6 
to H per £i,(KX) insured. 

The beauty of life a^tance 
from the assured's point of 
view is tfaatoncea contract is 
made the asaued can then go 
and work on an. oil rig or 
take up rock climlnng. 

' “If someone starts out as a 
hank clerk and takes up a 
dangerous hobby, we have to 
. five with it*’ saysa spokesman 
from Commer^ Union. 

“We will have made a 
contract with that penspn 


Insiiraiice deals iire 


based on good fshh 


The risk of being a tiapere 
artist is roughly equivalent, in 
actuarial terms, to being on a 
trawler or being a painter and 
decorater, or even a steqife- 
jack “above 50fr”. Stuntmen 
nave one of ^e most daiH 
gerous jol:^ with a 5 per cent 
extra loadirtg. 

If you have an ordinary rate 
job, such as anelectroplattr. a 
swimming instructor or a zoo 
keeper, unless working in the 
bear or big cat house, you nuty 
still have problems at the life 
office if you have exotic 
hobbies. 


when he or ^le did not have 
these inclinations.”* 

It is pleasing to think that 
the insurance industry .will 
take you on bcardL v^iiiis, 
urges and alL 


If of course, you . do not 
declare a penchant for 
tional Hunt racing at the time 


of making the contra^ your 

mm 


Record attempts in bal- 
loons, bobsleigh runs and ix)t- 
holing will all aniacl a 
premium between 2 and 7.3 
per cent above the normal 
rate. Judo. Iterate and even ice 
hockey — the fight where die 
occasional game breaks out — 


femily may not benefit 
the policy if the hunterbreaks 
-yoiu*. nedL.. Insnance. cqnr 
traris in geri^.must be niade. 
in good faith, and feilure to* 
disclose an important feet’ 
might render.^ contract* 
worthless. . \ 

As the man from Commer-^ 
dal Union says: ^The whole' 
princiirie of this type of insur- ' 
aace is that it isn^ feiribr the* 
. person in a safe occupation to* 
subsidize the person whose- 
job or lifestyle is partxculariy; 
hazaidor- ” 


I us. 


MartmBaka: 


tnists. (h through 
direct dealing in UK 
companies' shares - 
which you can marine your- 
sdf, or, if you prefer, can be 
managed for you. 

In December, you'll be sent details of Save & 
Prasper's new Personal Equity Plan. You can then 
decide whether you want to invest in the Kan and 
how much money (up to £2.400) you want to put in. 


You can withdraw afl of your money at any 
time. Just let us know in writing. And we'll send you 
your mcKiey with the interest It'S earned. 

If you decide to either take your money out 
before 31st December 1S186. or not to invest that 
money in a Save & Prosper Personal Equity Plan, 
then the interest you get will be the usual HIBA net 
rate, which is a variable “money market” related 
rate. 

For your guidance the HIBA net rale was 
.50% p.a. at 20th October 1986. 

So you can't lose. You earn a good rate of 
mterest either way. 

INVEST TODAY. 



IMMEDIATE INCOME PAID FREE OF TAXt 


THE FUND — pmnamy Invests In “exempr 
artosn OGwemment securities (GIRsl. Tueseare 
Gins wnicti are nocilaoietDany UK-laiatlai. 


QUARTERLY DIVIDENDS - paW free 
or arv witnnoidrng taxes. 

A REAL RETURN - inflation is now 
under 3%. tne Fund tnerefore prcwioes a real 
return of more ttian 9%. 


1 % 


DISCOUNT 

to 14tli Novefnt>cr 


Start earning money on your savings right 
now. Rll in the coupon bdow, today. Or. if you'd like 
more information, phone free Moneyline 0800 282 
101 this weekend between 9.30 a.m. and 5.30 p.m. 


NO FIXED TERM - me tnvestinenc can 
be neld tor as long as you wisn. mi can seir at 
any time on any business dsv 

MINIMUM INVESTMENT .£1.000 
me Fund nas been oarttfled as a ~Dlstrlbudng 
Fund" under me provisions orf tne UK. Finance 
Aa 1984 m reflect or Its tasesi account penoo. 


. .. * 

4 - * i 




■ACT NOW. POST TODAY 


lb: Save & Prosper Group Ltd.. 

HIBA Administration Centre, FREEPOST. Romford RMl IBR. 


Existing AcccMinl No. lif anvi 


MIM BROANNIA INTERNAHONAL 
MJM Britannia International is part or snonnla 
Arrow HoMlngs PLC. a UK. public company 
capitalised at over saOOm wttn over 30LOOO tfare- 
naaers. Companies wttnin me Britannia Group 
manage investments valued In excess of SSXXXXn 
from International otnoes in London, soston. 
Denver, and TbKyo. inwesimems clients Include 
pension funds, unit tnsts. mutual funds. Instttu- 
aonai anopmateaooDunts. 


• . . - -r , ■* 











m 


FnaNaiiKts) 


□ Tick box for further details. 


I ) Tick box for extra appUcation form. 


Surname flWr/MisfMiss) 


BRITANNIA JERSEY GILT FUND UMITED 


Address 


Postcode 


I wish to open a SpeciW Interest Bank Account with Robert Fleming St Co. Limited 
on the terms and conditions thereof and enclose a cheque for the mm of £ 


(aumiinini £250, maximinn £2,400i. I am aged IS or over and am a UK resident. Please 
make your cheque payable to Robert ^mhig &. Co. Limited. 

Sgenature Date 


ROBERT 

FLEMING 



SAVE&: 

PROSPER 


COMPLETE OOUPOAT ^ dno reoetvea doaUfid (em 
iDgeiher witn our latest I nvestmem Duuean ana tne Fund 
DToenure: ineMtngyourdnpticaoan form 


f 


I 


MM Britannia hiferriatlonal Lknlted 

PO.Bn 271 . St HBHec Qwmai eoands 


me Fund Is oasen 4n Jersey and Is listed Oft 

London 


•Km - UK moandMMOmtfir oopenangoa 
tw^cirotfvsuncea oaueietoUK OMMmtnttso^ct 
cruCM&tarrrcnve inuesRv^mi«arToam«m.wrBfea 

rimm mr'ouM&oi 

ovfi If' ineiitfOT 11109 ‘nie Func. muemereiaiie 

sccon&derfBfi carter dnoierai'DfluncBdnartnio ' 


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can fund LWiSw^ c iiiii eMriaiij f 


atoee*a|i_ 






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TAta 


ther details. 

KresHieaiiiilioislSyeBisoldoroiiercanaoDly Only one aLcmiM per 
msaHowed ftxomlSGannalteaiiaieitinioinliBmes.lu!^^ 
can iNMieter ouai sepmde acoiiinb Once an accauv flas been 
d sutisequaii deposts camui be acmflEd The ictd dEpaso can toe 
awoalanylnie butdanyflaitiaivnthdfawaiisniadB the NBA net rale 
: pad ixi Itearnouit wiidiam 2 nd Ite batdrKZ.MBieSl Mil tectediied 
accoul Pti Pl K> hasc-iale income tax z 3lsl Oecentoei I96G 


X me nonnal HIBA net qi?. whitti Mi! be inosa^sd !o :D<=tna! (jte 
upon narctef loa Save A Piosim F?ionai Erjuiiv Plan H : 7 i?r-iaH-'a>i»^^t 3 
Mil have a lunhet luoihiv tn ur lar cannot be reciaitnet: c. 


Pi gy^ nnlp that trom isl Januar,- ]98r ibe HIBA net rale acbiies ana ims is 
aniv lo dspiciis of £ 1 000 and above an-/ deposii below me 'Si'ei wii nai earn 
anyiniefesl 


Prosper Group Admmistiahon cl itie accjun is by Save & Piospei Gioin 
Linnied vrfiKh atrepis oeposts as agniis oi Auen Fleming & Co Lmufed 
RobsnFie.-ning&Ca Lmi[odi<;anvaneerolineArceDbngHousesConHnmee 
an0an£<eri!pt{>ster((rderirr:fteteimanciFiaodi(n«e3(mEn[s)Al ISSS 


MIM 


Robeit Ftemmg HoMhigs Umited are liaiar shatenoioers m ihe Save i 


Full terms and condiliars ve available request from Save & Prosper 
&GU 0 Lia HIBA Aotninigraiian Cmtre HE»-,gon House. 28 Wfesiem Road, 
nomlctd RMl 3Lfi and are^iitomalicallv SLiDplied on the receipl ol yM 
oeocsii chaoLB ^ 


RO. Sox 271, SL Heller; ' 

Jersey. Channel islands.' 

reieanone jBs«y>053ai73lt4lUn 4IBB;! Ba eBfnvC. 



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It’s the finish for funny money 


: POLICIES ') 

Fjrott i November 1 
“fmKiy moneys wiD have 
been banished by the 
msoKance companies. No 
longer wiU the 
companies be able to 

show policy benefits as 
adding op toa king's 

ransom. BILL 
HARRINGTON 
explains what the 
dianges mean 

A screen of modesty is being 
put up by Britain's insurers 
around the levels of returns 
used to ilittstiate the possible 
benefits from life and peo- 
sioRS policies. 

Members the Association 
of = Brirish insurers (ABl), 
which includes virtuaHy all 
the life companies, have de^ 
dded to **c 2 uy* ibe returns that 
can be used for OlustrutioRs of 
fitluiebene/TtsL TTieseareio be 
limited to the amount built up 
tbrougbout the term tv aocu- 
ihulating the premiums at a 
maximum rateof 13 percenta 
year before tax. 

For unit-linked and deposit 
administration-type policies 
having such a ceiling plaoBd 

Actual bonus rates 
remain nncliang^ 


on the rate used can check 
exaggerated projections sim- 
ply. The target of the new rules 
is ta^Iy with-profit policies, 
traditionally {xeseiit^ as a 
sum assured to which xever- 
rionary bonuses and tenninal 
bonuses are added to provide 
the total final benefit. 

• 

Instead of having a dazzling 
ultimate sum made up of these 
elements presented to the 
would-be purehaser, life insur- 
ers will just roll up the 
premiums to the 13 per cent 
rate mroi^oui the term if it is 
a pensions policy and not 
subject to tax, or up to 10.75 
per cent (net of tax) per 
annum for otber prides, to 
arrive at die bottom line ^re 
appearing in the illustration. 

To make matters more 
complicated, this roll-up rate 
of interest will be calculated 
not on the premiums the 
policyholder will actually pay, 
but premiums reduced ^ the 
cost of the life cover and other 
expenses, such as commis- 
sion, on a basis set down by 
the ABl. - - 

In other words an attempt is 
being made to get at the 
“invested" portion of the 
premium. In the case of unit- 
linkcxl premiums, the ex- 
penses deducted win be the 
usual management charges, 
induding the bid-ofier sprrad. 


0 PllfPIIUi' 

rf 1%, 

4i?> smtoff 


M 



(HI 


m 








It is important Co realize 
that none of these changes 
affects companies' actual rates 
of bonus and how th^ 
thein to polides; reversionary, 
sp^al and Tenxuna] bonuses 
vw aU coniinue to be declared 
and distributed to policy- 
holders as at present C^y the 
method of illustration is being 
changed. 

So how win it work in 
practice? Take a with-profits 
10-year endowment policy be- 
ing arranged by a 30-year-old 
man, for a premium m £25 a 
month with the Scottish 
Widows’ at their non-smoker 
rates. At present the benefit 
iUustration based on current 
bonus rates continuing 
throughout would be made up 
of a sum assured of £2,S9& 
reversionary bonuses of 
£1,673 and terminals of 
£2.603, making a total payable 
of £6,874, equivalent to an 


annuaf retrtrn on pierm'ums of 
15.8 percent 

Under the new regime, the 
ooropany could show the sum 
assured and reversionary bo- 
nus, as before, but the bottom 
line figure would be sbown at 
£4,611 ~ that is the return on 
prnniuffis at 1(1.75 per cent 

For a 25-year tenn policy 
with the same details, the total 
pay^le would currently be 
indicated at £4U77 — a 
return on premiums of 1 1.8 
per cent per annum. But when 
given the “10.75 per cent” 
trratment the ultimate return 
will be shown as £29,585, 
dramaficaDy demonstratiDg 
the efiect or the lower rate of 
the retain on the premiums 
net of expenses: 

The life companies are ex- 
plicit as to why they have 
taken this step to rid life 
illustrations of the “money 
iliusiOD”. 



^(moirr CALL 
wt'u cm 'Til/. 




9 




Smkr 


The ABI says: “The market 
is now &d^ the prospect of 
lower infiaiion rates. In these 
circumstances lower ptpjeo 
tions in money terms are more 
appropriate." 

The presentation of illu^ra- 
tions using of return, 
rather than grandiose lump 
sums which delude peoirle as 
to their real value in inflar 
tionary tim^ is a step' for- 
ward and will help people to 
judge life policies more 
squarely with other invest- 
ments, such as building soci- 
ety accounts. 

One efiem seems certain 
and this is to briiig (fifferent 
fife company projections of 
benefits for rimilar policies 
much closer together. This 
should change the emphasis of 
coinpetitioD between life com- 
panies to other criteria, sudi 
as past performanoe, financial 
strength and levels of service. 

How fife companies wfll be 
affected depends on their mar- 
ket positiorL The Scotd^ 
Widows' believes it could be 
to its advanta^ as it has lost 
buriness in the past that it 
would otherwise nave gained, 
as it was often not the com- 
pany with the highest 
projections. 

Members advised to 
abide by changes 

But this is an agreement 
between insurers. Intermedi- 
aries such as insurance bro- 
kers are not party to it 
Because diey are not bound by 
it, they are perfectly free to 
present policy benefits as they 
see fit and to use the old 
methods should they wish. 

There may be logistical 
difficulties in get^ illustra- 
tions on the previous basis as 
the new system takes hold, but 
business-hungry intermedi- 
aries are enterpriring. The . 
British Insurance Brokers' j 
Association, however, is 
advising its members to ^de 
by the changes. 

But the association does 
question why the ABl brought 
the new practices in at this 
point, as the Securities and 
Investments Board is due to 
publish rules, expected to be 
more stringeut than the ABFs, 
on policy benefit illustrations, 
which could be in force later 
next year. But the life insurers 
are adamant that they want 
this interim arrangement 

One result of having re- 
moved bonus ninstxmioas 
from the areira of inter-com- 
pany competition may be ttet 
life companies can quietiy go 
about rrauciqg their bonus 
rates behind the screen — 
something they may have 
been wanting to do, but lacked 
the courage actually to carry 
out 


Why 

Dealercall 
meansa 
great deal 
to 9,000 

investors 



g\-2A2 3696 


pEA 


LERCALL no 


_J0.500 


VAUDEND 


12/8® 


Dealercall is the biggest and most effidentsharedeaOng service in 
the United Kingdom. Here^ why. 


Howitworfcs 

•You apply for an investment limit to suit 
your dealing requirements. 

•We send you your personally 

numbered Dealercall Account Card. 

•To buy and sell shares you call 
Dealercall on 01-242 3696 with your 

instructions. 

• Hoare Govett Dealercall negotiates 
the best price available and reports 
back to you. Simple! 


Whatitoffers 

• A high interest daily deposit facility. 

• A free nominee facility to reduce 
paperwork. 

•Limits are accepted for transactions 
over £5000. 

• A pre-recorded commentary on 
market movements. 

• From 27th October, our standard 
commission rate will be reduced from 
1.65% to 1.25% (plus VAT). Our 
minimum commission will be £12.50 
plus VAT 


For further information and an application form send in the coupon below. 


hoare^ 

CiCWFEI 




Nidioias Hunioke, DeafercanUd, Heron Hou^ 
StS^lfigh Holborn, London WCIVTPB. 
Tei:0MM034A 

Please send me furflier ifrfbrrmition antf a 
Deelercafl account opening ftvm. 


T25t0 


! “ 

I 


•. . *. 






T. 


r EBC ^ 

( AMRO; 

♦ • % 

EBC AMRO ASSET MANAGEMENT 


INVITES 


FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES 

To 

A SEMINAR 

On 

"THE DUTCH EQUITY MARKETS, 

POST GENERAL ELECTION - WHAT NEXT?" 

In 

AMSTERDAM 

On 

13th/14th NOVEMBER 1986 


Only 100 places available and tickets will therefore be issued to attendees 

on a first come, first served basis. 

The cost of £1(X) per ticket 

includes a return flight and one nighfs stay at the Grand Hotel Krasnapolsky. 

Speakers will include representatives of appropriate 
Dutch professional institutions. 

Chairman of the Seminar: Peter Gartland, 

Editor of The Times' Family Money. 

For further information please telephone the Marketing Department 
and ask for Mrs jane Swinglehurst or Mi^ l^tharirie Dean on 01 -621-0101 



Amed Dunbar aimoiince 

THE LAUNCH OF THE 

EUROPEAN GROWTH TRUST 

AFDOED PRICT OFFER OF ANEWUNITTRLBT 


T 



I heie is now litdedoubc ihatasa 
prime investment area. Europe 
bas at ia^ come ofage and i5heie'to5ia)i: 
Europe's srockmarl^ have grow*n 
ireraendouslyoverihelast2 yeais- 
lefleoing the eodhomic lecoverywhidi 
has been taking place. * 

GiDwdi, filled by newer; more 
cffidmi plant, sophi^caied service 
industries, high-technology manufeoure 
aixl more attractive tax policies seems 
likdy to continue, piovikiing excellent 
opportunities for the UK investoc 
Our new EuK^sean Growth liust has 
been laundied to lakeadvaniage of this 
turnaround in iheecDnomicoutloolcof 
one of the world's most imponani 
manufiictuiiiigaiid firondal regions. 

It will aim loachlevesignlGcanT aqsital 
grow t h by investing lar^y in the major 
European markets-Germany, France. 
Switzerland andHolland, and primarily 
in leading successful companies. When 
appropriate the fond manager will seek 
to enhance that growth by invesiir^ in 
Euiope^ssmallasiock markes and in 
secondary markets (similarto ourown 
USM). 

Normai dealing in zherrew'fond wiiJ 
oommenceon Nov'emberlOth. Bur by 
makiiigyour^plication now. you may 
ensure your allocation ata fix^ priceof 
2Sp per iinii- simply by oompIetir>g the 
q^licarion bdow. 

THEFUTUREIN EUROPE 
Hie recovery in the fortunes of many 
European countries has been based on 
vervsound foundations. The 1970*s left 


mosthKfustnes leanerand more 
competitive. Paliing inflation and interest 
rates have helped expansion -and the 
growingawareness of national 
governments of the need to stimulate 
trade has helped cut oxanon and provide 
the stimulus formoie investmenL 
— 
about AUJED DUNBAR ' 
Established in 1934. Allied 
Dunbar Unit Trusts has a track record 
of over SO years ofsuccessfuJ 
Investment management .As one of 
the found ing companies of the unit 
trust movement (and today one of 
the veiy biggest in die field) we can 
demoivnratean impiessh'e record of 
solid arxi consisDenr growth. 

We are pan of the Allied Dunbar 
group whid], w'ith over£4 billion in 
fonds. managed on behaifofovera 
million diems can now daim to be 
oneofihe most substantial financial 
services groups in the U.K. 


YOURIN\'ESrVlENTIN EUROPE 
The EuropeanGtowth Trust isa 
paniadarlyaaiaaiveoppoiwzuti' for 
jou to enjoy die prosp^ ofmaximum 
capital growth dirou^ skilled financial 
managememoffoneb i n the European 
markes. Suitable forinvesemensof 
£1 .000 or more, this is an ideal 
opponunlq- forinvestors wishing to 
sh^ in the pocendallysigniflcaiu remrns 
that Euiopeodos. 

Remcmbec the prioeofthe unisand 


theincomeirom them cangodownas 
tveilasup. 

In view of this, your investment- 
should be regard^ asa medium to long 
term holding. 

lb makeyourim'esmieru. comply 
and post the application bdow wifo your 
cheque; We must receive thisbeforedose 
ofbuslness on November 7ih 1 9S6 for 
yourunits tobealiocated at the initial 
offer price or25peach -after that date 
unis will beaJIocated at the prevailing 
offer price. RirNOur information the 
estimated gross starting yield of the 
EuropeanGtowth Trust isO.^'^bperanittim. 

IMPORTANTINKIKVI \TinN 
1 rniipruuNamJ\iclJaJnrxiifc>TediUftvindiciud(inal 
rrr«A 

2. Thtf inr4 IS juihc h\ iitMafcrinr 

TnJfarKlctciiTWiTufcUtn jTnjMDcnJ ll 1^:1 ~«itler 
ranjQi^imcMincni nnJmhL'Thractf im«,>imciu^Actl061 
Vu: Drira DenJ pcnuli> ihc in iru Jude aq 

mni^ «cr\ «cc chaou: iil 4**«iiiThc«Ulc:r price, out iif 
vkhtch rtnir nL-rsmtn A>]XJkl It i^ualrticd imcrniudianc&c 
raicsjrcjt Jilohk-i inrcqtM?4. 

4 . VtrinoifncviillhedLdribulcilTearJi tiri ^tJfkPibcc, 
^ >th the lirM Ali.<anNtii««n DTanj^piiccitn .<r J * kitihcr 
I'W^ ,\n.innuil Icviii rvipliaXAT* t»i ihi-uihH'oCiho 
lurai deduern! lull \€3ri\ tr«iitii(r>sMiCK<iiiic:iitmcei 
inanagcmcni t inctuJInjiihfTfiMct^ kvi The 

TniM DmIslUwihirainaxImurn annual rct'csf 
I plu»\ ^1 hui am ch3nfH:i%*4ibicxt it« 5 ni* >iuh« rvjrice 
Jn Ik rtitnfi uannirhi J Jirpk. 

5 Af^)k.''J21»«n^«llJhL**Jl,'kncl«tcURc\JanJce^ffilaT& 
wlKT^pi isicd appoixlinaielvo ncek.^ hicr 
c».Onim h(Mne^(Ui*\cniin3>'«<U jlliirpin<«rynar 
uniiholjingKick ■ ihc nunj;tcr«> Ji fv i^*v»inanihc 
htdpnti: cik-uLiieduMn^alijmiubjppriiccdln'dw 
Dcp^nmcni 1 af Trade. mJtngsin ret vipi • il \ 1 lur 
liwuanin^ Viu«ilJhc?<(Uji:ha{UL-inAcnlcn)cnr 
niirnialk «iihln~hu.*4fic<(sd3\'^iifn.'Cclpc.liyttH.' 
RUnaf^as. I >1 \ iHir lentauncoJ umr cittuthaie 
T Manaf^. Allied Dunbar LnirTrw>nlcCa fnetnber of 
fbcL ntJ Tna^i aciaiHuii. AlfieU Dunmr Com 

NniTidon.SM IQ. Tdcphiinc;(ii^l.4iiKZ<.fl 
'RWcc' MidUl^ B3nk triMOi. Ud 
8. Thi« r stirr o nc * 1 « ipen 1 1 ' resiiienf* t if the RqMibl I c of 
bdmiiiriiirucitmjU.ciiiwrKrc^KlL-ni^ tifOMupanies 

III ihrrnicedMuKMif Aiiwiica 




l^'-'TajROPEAN 

GROWTHTRUST 




A fixed price ofiferopen 
until NorenfoerTth 1986. 

Pleaseposi with your cheque lo: 
Allied Dunbar UniiTrust Dealers, 
FR£EPQSi:Swaidon.5Nl IXZ. 

^'We wish to invest & in the 

Allied Dunbar-European Gro«-ih 
Thrstaztiie fixed price of25p per unit 
Unlnlmum £1.0001 and endosca 
leminancepayahlcto Allied Dunhar 
Unit Thisis pic 

If you wish to ha^ieiict inaimc 
re-irn'csied please tide bc>.v. □ 

This offer will dose on November 
7*1986. 

After focdiiseof thLsoffec itniiswiil 
beai ailublcai dicdailyquoicd price 


I/^confirm thatlwcareagoJover 18. 
Joint applicanis musccomplete details 
andsi^sqsratdy. uocKCAm'u.spUASE 

(Surname) 

Mr. Mrs-Miss 

First nameCs). 

Address 


1 

Areyouanexisongelient r-i m ! 

of Allied C^ntxir? YcsI—lNni [ I 

Name'addressofyourexisdng t 

financial advisor | 


TE/2V10 


Signatuie 

JOINTHOLDER 

(Surname) 

Mr. Mi&'Miss^^ 

First name(s) 

Sig^iaoJic 


Posioxlc ; 

Date 



Date. 


DUNBAR 

AUied Dunbar I'nii Thjists pic 
Register^ in England No; 2SS988 
, Reghterod Office: .AlUdf Dunbai^ 
Cenf|e; Swindon. SNl lEL 


■I 

J 


... 

« •• h 
r* iV •? 

















1 ii£ 1 I OCi OJbER 25 i9S6 




cr 8 • 






Is the writing cm the wall 


iw »>ecial sectw funds? 


Investment fashions-geographical, 

indidnal, sectional -may come and go. 

The beauty of growth is here to stay 

That’s what the FS Balanced Growth 

Fund was set up to achieve. And no iJs or 

buts about it- that's the result we keep on 

producing-month in, month out 

And talking of results, we'd like to 

congratulate Roger Forster,the winner of 

this year^ Unit Trust Investor of the \fear 

Competition. 

As part of his portfolio, he chose the 

FS Balanced Growth Fund, which was a 

^'ital choice" in his 87% return, a record 

for the competition since it first began 

se\^n years ago. 


No 1 unit trust over the 2 years to end 

September 1986 (Money Management). 

.So as our performance with the FS 

Balanced Growth Fund proves! we 

concentrate on consistent growth time 

alter time. 


FS AT MONEY 86 


THE FIGURES 


The FS Balanced Growth Fund beat all 

other unit trusts in its first two years. 

£1,000 invested in Februaiy 1984 was 

worth £3,073 by Februaiy 1986 (offer- 
to-bid, net income reinvested). 

And the fund remains on top. It was the 


FS would like to welcome you to stand 

No 297 at the Money 86 Exhibition at 
Olympia on 30th October to the 2nd 

November. 

It’s your chance to talk personally to 

our team of fund managers, and get to 

know what lies behind our success. 

Alternatively contact David Campbell, 

our Investment Director at the address 

below. 

Freepost Department TTl, 

190^Afest George Street, 

Glasgow G2 2PA. MVESIMEin' 

Or telei^one: 041-332 3132. MANAGERS 


BALANCED GROWTH FUND 


A 







I .• 


Over the last ttrirty years you probably could not 
have held a unit trust with a better performance than 
M&G SECOND GENERAL 

£1,000 invested at Its launch in June 1956 would 
now be worth £67,208 with aiJ income reinvested, 
compared with £8J.04 from a similar investment in a 
buiiding society. To have maintained its purchasing 


Saxmo GENERAL 

Value of £1J0Q0 Invested on 5tti June 1956. 


Date 


M&G 

SECOND 


F.T.Ordnary 

index 


Buildng 

Society 


power over the period, £1,000 would need to have 
grown to £8,748. 

The Bri&h Stockmarket has been strong for a 
number of years, which is why many investors are 
now looking at overseas markets for new investment 
opportunities. But concentration in one particular 
area can produce v^ volatile investment results, 
and this year's h^ flier can often be next year's poor 


5 June '56 
31 Dec '66 
31 Dec 76 
5 June '86 


£ 1/000 


£1000 

£2,472 

£3359 

£21.042 


£1.000 

£1,699 

£3/437 

£8,104 


NOTES: AD figures indude reinvested mcome ne(of basic-rate tax. 

Pie BuldrigSooety figures are based on an extra rmerest account offering 
above trie yearly rate (source: Budding Societies 

Assooetion). M&G SECOND GENERAL figures are reafaauon values. 


To celebrate M&G SECOND'S thirty-year performance 


er. You should be wa^ of short-term per- 
formance claims, such as the i!}ver 50% growth in 
just five months” quoted recently for a European 
unit trust 

M&G has two intemationa] Funds which solve the 
problem by spreading your investment dTective^ among 
foe major stockmarkets of foe world. 

The M&G International Income Fund aims to 
provide a high income, and one that can be expected to 
increase over foe years, from an international portfolio of 
equities. 

The M&G International Growth Fund aims for all'Out 
capital ^owfo by investing in foe major sfockmarkets of 
foe world 

if you remain optimistjc about the British Stockmarket 
and want a balanced portfolio, look at M&G SECOND 
GBMER^ which alms for consistent growth of income 
and capital from a wide spread of shares mainly in British 
companies. 


of these three unit trusts before 31st October 1986. 

The price of units and the income from them may 
go down as well as up.Thls meanstiiat unittnists area 
long-term investment and not suitable for money you 
may need at short notice. 


INTERNATTOIUU. PERFDRMANCETABLE VMienn 1 st October 1986 
of II OCX} nvesied at the taiMi of M&G's bwo IntematKrai Ftfids. 


Launch 

Date 


M&G 
Unit Trust 


Buddir^ 

Sodety 


International 

Income 

international 

Growth 


May '85 


£1,244 £1.132 


Dec '67 


£4,696 


^K}TES: AD fibres indudo reinvested income net Of basic-ra^ 

The BuidngSooety figures are based on an extra intefest account offenng 
112% above the avers^ yearty rate (source: BuDdmg Sodeoes 
Assooabon). M&G figii?^ are reateanon values. 


MtlHER MfOftMAnON Ori 22rxf 0(M»r ^ 
prices and estimated gnoss cuirent y«Us were 

fncome AocumiiMon Yield 
totomalfonai Income 63-7pzd 66-9p 5-47% 

bitematioiia} Groiiitfa 801-6p 1290-5p 1-M% 

SECOND GENERAL 752 9p 1486-2p 3-80% 
Prices and yields appear dadv m the Rnanaal Times. The 
diffrirencE between the 'offerea pnoe (at which you buy urnte 
arid the bitf price (at whidi you sdl) IS normany An ffiibal 
charge of 5% ts mduded in the offved pnce and an armual 
diargeof uptol%of each Fund's value - cunentiy V4% (except 

IriterrialKKral IfiGOTTK. whch IS ISy - plus IS dffluctra from 

grt» income, income for Accumulation units is ranvested to 
mcTease khar vakie and for Income units It IS distrdiuted net of 
basK-i^ taxon the foHowmgd^es. 

■nernaDGciai eixemanonai 

Income Growth SECOND 


I AS appfications for £1,000 or more received by 31st October, X98G wfil be given an extra 
1% aUocatun of units, fncreasing to 2%forappGcation& of £10,000 or more per Fund. 

I To: M&G SECURTTES LIMITED, THREE QUAYS. TOWER MLl, LONDON EC3R 6BQ 
Please eivestthesumCs) indicated bek>w in the Fundfs} of nny choice (mlnimiim (nvestmentin 

I each Fund: £1,000) in ACCUMULATIOfiLlNCOME units (ddeteasaf^licabte or Accumufabon 
units 'mU be issued for Imemahanaf Growth and SECOND and Income unrts will be issued for 
hiterriator)allrxx>m^ at the price riiing on receipt of this apphcaho^ 

I DO NOT SEPR) ANY MOfEY. A contract note wUl besent to you statng exactly how much you owe 
■ and the settterriBit date. Ybur certificate will 

I foBow shortly. 

I International I _ ' _ I 1—1 


Oistributioiis 

W exl iflatTgi ution 1 June 
fornewRivedDrs 1987 


20 Mar 
20 Sep 


15 Feb 
15 Au, 


Income 

ipm £L00i}i 


20 Mar 
1987 


IS Feb 
1987 


SECOND 

(MIN ILCOO) 




Ml AOORCSS 


You can buy Of sefl ints on any business day. Contrads for 
punjuse or »le viMI be due for setbOTentiiMj to ttnnse weeks 
btec Rmunerotiofi is payable to accredited agents; rates are 
awaiabJe on rmuesL The Trustee for Internenxul Growth is 
Bard^ Bank Trust Co. Lmited and for International Incoine 
and SECOND GENERAL is Uoyds Bank Pic. The Funds are all 


IntematkMi^ 

Growth 

(Mm.ujao' 


Mder-rai» mveshnents and areauthonsed by theSeaelary of 
State for traiteafld Industry; 


MET 

cooc 


M&B SeoiritiBs Llmifesd, Three Quayc; Tower 
Lmdon EC3R GBp. Tci;01-826 4888. 
Member Of the Umr Trust Assooahon. 


DATE. 


77484316 






[^FAMILY MONEY/ 8 ] 


INSURANCE 


Yoa could be foigfven 
f<w tfamldng that term 
assuxance is a secret. 
Tenn assurance can 
provide you iritii 
ext»isive life cover for 
very modest premiuBis, 
yet it rarely reoeives 
mncfa attenti on. 
STEVEFRASER 
explains why 


The cover is called-’ “icrm'" 
assurance because yoii jay for 
protection for a set poiod of 
time, typically for between 
five and 25 years. It is-dr^ 
because it offers protecfibn 
with very few There is 


rartiy a savings demdit or a 
sunnider vaiiieL The sum 


surrender vafueL The ^ sum 
assured is paid out only if yon 
die within the term selecieil 
Tenn assurance could and 
should beTecommended more 
oflen. It is of particular value 

10 ^miljes wliett tlK cost 


cover is criticaL It can -be 

aimnsod to rva until tetim- 
meat wt>ea pension piovision 

lakes over or pemyis be 

eeadtoendm.tteclui- 

dren have grown up • and 
gained flnancnil 

independenoe. 



"'■“BMpS'’- 




So why is term 

not promoted an 
Daniel, technical i 


Mark 
ter ai 


more than £30ayw. too^ 

Uic, ■ .Scpiitable- - Ufe axid 
Biqad^ Frovkicnt arcwnoqg 

a d^. or -so opmiXi^ 

oflerixig tbe most ootnpetitive 


PrannifflS wE M jp;iqi'on SJOjOW for ks than «0 a 


Equitable Lift, says: ^*TScra is 

not a great iocentiye 


salesmen on commission to 
wll it.** Tlie point is that 
commission (m tenn assur- 


ance is very low as the policies 

themselves are so die^ 

Three or four types cu oovtr 
are available: Most companies 

now offer options to tailor the 

cover better to your needs. 


A* 4S-yaai^oid locrfdng 

foe the same cover shoold pay 
around £i06 a year, Ameri^ 

Ufo.andL Zuncli Life being 
among those with the keenest 

pncesatthlsag& ~ • 
Women.^^erally pay less 


on youcageasuie-tixxi^ • V 

-A further point. is Aat'as 

you get older the mauinuih 

sum -for wlai^ thh-bompaiiy 
win i nsure you 'wnmy well 
decrease. Ifyoa tequirea hi^ 

level of lifo cover you shoim 
check the oonpany’s age rules 

carefully. 


yeat - 

If- you wduld prefer to* 
provide yOhr fentily ;witfa an 

m^die 'gather tb^ a lump 

sum dioold you dia^ thatrcan' 


iDOomc policy. . The. iDoome. 

^ he pud mon^) 
tedyr or. annually, Apin, piB- 

miimxsaxc cheap becreise yon- 


Discounts offered 

to non-smokers 


thou^ they obvioudy add to 

the cost Your age and tbe 

term required, however, are 
the main fectois in determiD- 


tfaem to be three or four years 

yoongerthan men When work* 
ing out the premiums. Cover 

can also be arranged, bn -a 
joint-lives basis,, but shook! 

both husband and wife '(fie at 
the same, time, only one sum 

assured would be payable;.. . 
Insuren ofifer a couple of 

dififeieai wi^ of coping with 

inf)ation..T[ie most obvious is 


the. idea of stmrter lenew^ 
contracts whh mdex^inkmg. 

Whichever way the contract is 
arxanped, the base level of 

pfemnrnis.'wil! he hiper: The 
added mtection can'', make 

5u^ Doudies 20'ocrceiit mord 


S less for the same money 

years pass — the inoome 

bdng.>pawe only tbe 

number of. yeais^ uft-.in ;liR 
term sdected. 

iB the past dottple of years 

some othff. innovative kleas. 


such poudies20'pcT cent mort .^ve a ppe are d. Commercial 


Mweeqirasrrelnit 

morcrflexilMlily' 


Union was -one oT-Tlie first 

companies to offer a 
**catiibad(” p()!^ v^ere term 


ingcost 

Smoking does not help the 

cause.' Substantia] discounts 
are a-vailabie to non-smokeis. 
particularly older non- 

smoken. 


index-linking .where the 
amount of cover increases-m 

line with dianges in the Retail 
Nos Index. As the sum 

assured increases so do the 


Level term assurance is the 
simplest available. The sum 

assured remains at the same 

level throughout the policy’s 

life. In other worc^ if yon 
out a 10-year policy your wife 
would . reedye the aw 
amount if y/ere to die. in 
1986 or 1996. Inflation can 
thus erode the protection you 
are providing. The cover & 
very cheap, however. 

A SO-year-old man .who 
wants £30.000 cover for- the 


premiums. 

Alternotivety, some com- 
panies offer ’^renewable 

increasable*' contracts wdiere 
the initial term is sfaorter.rsay 

five yeaxs, hut yoa are guar- 
anteed that it can be renewed 

w&bout evidence of good 
health. Hie new poticy would 
be for a higher sum asmed fo 
take care of inflation. 

It is worth rememberii^' 
though, that tbe increase is m 
effect retroqtective and in^ 
lion n^t well have an 
impact if you were to die.m' 
the -fourth year of tiie policy: 


expensive, than tenn- 
edver. 

Another option irfiicfa is 
worth ;considering - Is 

"pimyertibifi!^. A ^veit- 
ibie polii^ can 'be 'chai^ 

into, say. a wfmle life' dr 
endowment odntcact at any 


time during the tom. Again,‘it 
is nuve expensive Ixit ofifeisa 

gooddeal'moretiexfoil^ - 
Tenh'assuranoecan abobe 

us^ to protect repayment of a 
nedu(^ (Msud as a mort- 
gage dra loan. Tbe premmins 
remain constanr hot the sum 
assured decreases aa yoa pay 
off the debt Because you aie 

efifectivdy getting less for' foe 
same oostas'iime goes fay, -foe 
praams are ainoiK- Jhe 
cheapest available: A ^yeaf- 

oild man can jiroiect'iayznent 
of - a 2S-year moriga^- of 


axe oombined in the nme 

policy. -The premiums wiU be 
more expei^ye, but you 

should ^ hack at least as 
muctaasyou jputin. ' 

■ A' for compahie also pay 

out a penxiilatt of sum 
assured should- you sixfihr 

penhaneot fos^Amieai. -Gty 

of Westminster is :one 

examj^ 


Term asahtanoeiates m foe 

UK areamoBg the chewiest in 

the world: T& last oompari- 


smr with mir Europem new- 
borns —rmsett conducted a few 


boms —rdbett conducted a few 
yems ago -r- dbowed that ralBS 
m the UK were three , tinks 

cheaper : than in West 
Germany^ ■ . 


If you want fife cover portiy 
for protection, tenn assoranpe 
is .foe cheapest and moat 
-cActrve way-of aettrae iL. 






• - i- 




• • • 

“All you need, to he an inxjestmeni-genms^ 
is arising market and d short memory ” 


t • 


A 


t Itimes lil^ tinese, you xrii^t pr^^-.to.haye ycriir 



who have seen it all befi>ze . 


•• - •• • • 4 

If this i&how you- feel, ot^ht to be usixig 


• ^ 


. This is auniqiie arrangement run 1^ sensible pebjde 
who are at least as'concerned about not losmg'inpn^ ]E(^- 
clients as making it, and can d^onstrateite succ^^- 
of this philosoi^. 


For full detaOs, telephone or ii^te tpNic^las 'Bowsd^ 
The TTiinimiiTTi invesfanent is £50,000. ■ ■ 


CAPELrCUEEOTatS : 

Members of the 5 to<^ Ewfoange . . ■ 

01-248.8446 or 0800 400 485 

65 HoIbom Vladilct, .. - ■ 

. Uinddu EClA 2EU and'Bldiiibuii^ \ ' 

Ifelex: 886663 PROCfUKG' • ■ ' • 


- Member ofthe AN? Group- *• 




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• r At • 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1 986 


37 



Y MONEY /9 



honest profits for us all 


C INVESTMENT^ SlewardshiD fund in- 

■ •• - vests in UK. companies whose 


Some investors will have 
moral objections to investing 
m South Africa under the 
present regime. They mav also 
be opposed lo the sale of 
armaments, tobacco and stir- 
coho), and to animal testing. 
Religious, political and trade 
umon affiliations may all 
af^l investors’ atiiiudes. 
y^ai constitutes an ethical 
investment is very much a 
personal decision. 

With individual shares it is 
po^ble. pankrularly ■ with 
smaller' icompanies, to mon- 
itor Uietr aciiyiiies. But what 
happens in the case of pooled 
investments such as unit 
trusts or insurance bonds? 
They may easily have a porv 
folio of 50 or more holdings 
and It IS obviously impossible - 
Ibr the private investor to 
examine every share 
individually. 

'In answer to this problem' 
ethical funds have sprung up 
in the - United States and 
indeed have become big busi- 
ness, In his r^n. The Finan- 
cial Initiative, investment 
adviser Giles Chitty. says 
“mond" niattial funds have 
taken .-off. Socially screened 
invcsinient ise^mated at S50 
bjHion ^ equal tp 5 per cent of" 
all stocl^traded on V^l Sireeu 

Following the success of 
"morarvmuiiial funds in the 
United States Friends’ Prov- 
ident lauhch^ its Sie^rd- 
sbFp unit^.trijst iii the UK tii 
May T9W. With any .invesi- 
meoTljxi^nnance is the key 
duesubn. - Can ' ethics and 
profit be partners? 

■ The' Stewardship unit trust 
has risen by 39,1 per cent and' 
1^2 per cent over two years 

Constraints need 
: not a handicap 

and 12 months respectively to 
October '1^1 986. on an oner- 
to-bid basis, according -lO' 
Money Management statis- 
tics. outperforming the 
Friends' Provident . Ofdih^' 
general fund. 

The Stewardship unit trust . 
has also kepi pace with the FT 
All-Share Index. So U would 
seem the ronstrainis under 
which an ethical fund operates 
are not necessa rily a handicap. 

, The Stewardship unit trust 
was set up to pcotide an 
laypsiment vehicle for people 
whose social, ndigioijs -and 
political views prevent ihem 
from regatding .nnancial gain 
as the sole criterion firr 
investment. 

‘ -As well as.^owing satisfac- 
tory investment performance 
the fund has been something 
of a marketing success and is 
now' valued at £26 million. 
There is also a Stewardship 
pension fund valued at £4 
million. 


products, services and opera- 
tions are regarded as being of 
long-ierm benefit to the 
community both here and 
overset; ■ 

_ Investments in companies 
inyoly^ with annaments. 
gambling, alcohol and tobacco 
are avoided — so are com- 
panies with interests in South 
Afnca. The fund has 2,5(X) 
unit-holders. 

Investigation of companies 
is undertaken by tiie Ethical 
Investment Research and 
Infbrmaiiqn Service (SRI^ 
It looks not otdy at the 
products or services provided 
but also at employment prac- 


um'itmtmmo, 

'mee^ics,,. 



[ices,- aiiiuides towards local- 
communities, natural 're- 
sources, poilutipn contF^ and 
the political and 'social 
envnronment of counbies in 
which the cbmpanies trade or 
^ve substantial interests. 

All this research is time- 
consuming, costs money and 
is reflect^ in the charges 
which are higher than, average 
for a UK general fund. 

The largest holdings are 
Marks & Spencer and 
/^p.A/MFl (retail),-- Reuters 
(communications), 
Hadewoods Foods, and Ox- 
ford Instnimehis, whicb 
makes body scaimera. The 
fund is 100 per cent investee 
in the UK and has an accept- 
able Ha of arouiid 270 com- 
panies, which have been 
vetted as meeting the criteria 
although the fund has only 67 
holdings. 

: TSB is on the acceptable, 
list, so is . British Tel^ni, 
Glaxo is. . DOL Two other 
ethical .funds, with similar 
investment criteria': are -the 
Suclonasterib Mome Fdiow~. 
ship unit trust and the Ethical 
Investment Fund. : botJt 
launched in July this year. 

The Buckmaster & Moore 
Fellowship unit -inist has 
oompBiutii^y low charges, 
with a 4 per cent initial and 1 
per cent annual charge. The 
fund is more international 
than the other ’'moral" funds. 


It 1 $ valued at £550,000 and 
has 24 holdings. Only SO p^ 
cent of the fund is invested in . 
the UK. with the balance split 
between other equity raaiicetS' 
andcaAL 

Unlike the other funds,. 
Buckmasier'& Moore doe^ not 
have an acceptable list o£ 
Aocks but has a team of 
analysts which scrutinizes the 
sharK for suitability. John- 
Fitzmaurice, associate dirBo- 
tor. admits: "It is extremely 
difficult checking up on Jai^' 
nese stocks, for examplk" 
There is also a -comraitiee of 
reference. . 

The largest holding b the 
French Aore group, ^ard de 
FHotel, whidi accounts for 6.7 
per cent of the fiind. 
Buckmaster & Moore likesthe 
cfaemical sector but. has diffi- 
culty fD finding suitable com- 
panies as many of them 
manufiictuie exploAves and 
herbicides. This means that 
"blue-^ips" sucta as ICI are 
ouL High-qualhy electronic 
stocks such as GEC Plessey 
and Racal are all out because 
the . fuDO managers exclude 
armament stocks. 

. However, one chemical 
comprany that meets 
Buckmaster & Moore's cri- 
teria b, Yorkshire Chemical. 
The thud largest holding is 
Perrier, the 'J^iidi mineral 
waierfirmL 

■ The- Ethical Invesinient 
Fiihd "is 'underwritten hy 
R^al .Heril^ and makes an 
initial eba^ of 5 per cent and 
a' monthly charge of 0. 1 25 per 
(xni. Alison 'MacDonald, the 
marketing inahager, 
emphasizes that the iiind is 
paniculariy committed to 
supporting UK companies 

Tobacco stocks 
are 


and does not invest in any- 
corppahy which has ' more 
thai 5.perc«it dfftsbuaneu. 
overseas: ' - 

' LikeFriends’ ProvfdenVthe 
Eth caTlnvestitiem Fund uses- 
£lftl& The£75a000 fiind wifi 
not invest in banks. Also 
excluded are companies mak-' 
ing political donations of 
more t^n £10,0(M. 

' Fidelity Professional' 
Growth trust, while not ex- 
actly an 'Vthical" unit trust. 
Avoids investing -in- toba^- 
Aocks^ -so it may- be of 
particular inters - to non- 
smokers. .Owr one year to 
October 1; it has risenl4.S per 
cent on an offer-to-bid bas^ 

- In the analysis financhti 
■gaiii is regard^ by many 
investors as being at least as 
important as ethic^ consid- 
erations. but there, b no reason- 
why ethical and investment- 
criteria have to be mutually 
exclusive: . 

Stephanie Hawthorne 


INTEREST RATES ROUND-UP 


fBanks 

■Current account — no interast 
^Deposit accounts - seven 


pakJ. 
days' 

^notice rsqurad for withdrawals. 
•Barclays 5 per cent, Uoyds 5 
cent. Midland 5 per cent, NaiWest 5 
per cent. National Girobank 5 per 
'cent. Tixed term deposits £10.000 
'R>£^.9^ 1 month 7,625 per cent. 
3 months 7.625 per cant, 6 months 
:7.50 per cent (National Westmui- 
-ster): 1 month 7.101 per cent 3 
months 7 19S per cent 6 months 
;7.195 per cent (Midland). Other 
banks may differ 

; MONEY FUNDS 

Ftnl Nai CNAft Tatapliona 

MunHim 
nonmyna 


01638 6070 
0162BU60 


766 731 

Baseband 7.85 SIS 
sHQhwRatB 
Account: • 

-ESjsao &S3 aTS 

nODOOtow 7X0 7.19 
CmrADancM 7X6 7X3 
Oaoank 

MonmMaPkS 7.00 7X3 
HreTrm7-<tBy 775 7.80 
HendeisonManay 

Clww Account 785 8.13 
L&G»ailnLDup.7S 
LtaraHICA 7 70 7X3 
mSqHICA 77S 8X4 
UumndHlCA _ 

ISX00-C9X99 7 « 7.66 

£l0i0MundOMr.7 70 7X3 
NawenHien 

tZ0S»E9.999 7X3 7.K 

nOXQO&OW 77S7X8 
OppaMwiw Monoy 
Mmoamni Account 
MdweiDuOoo 7.76 am 

owrciamo 7XS Bxa 

&')Sr;.75 7» .^,22 

710 734 
Dwnaooo 7X9 r.S4 

TiMi&rusycaa 782 am 

7 62 7» 

aoDaz4 
7 87 an 



018261567 
01 8261567 
01 588 2777 

01581 1422 
01 238 0381 

01638 57S7 
013883211 
01 628 1500 
018264558 

0742 20999 
074220898 


017281000 
01 7281DK 


012369362 

012389382 

016570201 
0708 66866 


TaR7-4By 
TyndUiral 
Tinaia7-OBy 
tOTTUw 
WasMmtivsi 
imonH 


0705 8 27733 
one 827733 
012360952 
012360952 
0272 732241 
0272732241 


6X1 7.09 018284661 


a04 8X4 0752 261161 

CNAR-QffvounoBdNeiAniuaiiUie. 

Figins m me iwesi aweiaBle at the MW M 
Reseateh: Deborah Bern 


NsHoiial Savbigs Bank 
Ordinaiy Accoums if a minimum 
balance of £100 maintained .for 
whole of 1966. 6 per cem interest 
p.a, for each compiste monttr where 
balance is over ESOO, othenwlsa S 
per cent Investment Accounts — 
10.75 per cent interest paid withdut 
deducson of lax. one month's 
notice of wftiKirawal. maximum 
investment £100,000 

National Savings Incom 
Minimum hwe^nent £2.000, maxl- 
mum £100.000. Inwwst ”.-25 E®r 
cent variable at see weei^ 
paid monthly without deductran of 
R pnay mOT at3 months' potice. 
PenettAB m first year. 

National Sairings Indexed Income 
Bond _ 

Start rate monthly income (or first 

year, B par CM , Increased at end of 

ea^ year to m a tch kicrease in 
prices as measured Retail Prxxs 
tiKlex. value remains the 

saina Income taxable, paid gross. 
Three months' notice of withdrawaL 
Minimum investment of £5.000 in 
multiplos of £1.000. Msxbnuni 
£100,000. 

National Savings 44i lndex4Jnked 
Ccrtificstttft 

Maximum investment - £5J)00 


^^Wlnkwordi^v 

^ MORTGAGES ^ 

SCHEMES CURRENTLY AVAILABLE 

‘ 4 tImBS incomB or 4 + 2 tar jofnt 
0|^^ican£5 

‘ 100% mortgages witti no upper limn - 
aH legal cosls added to mortgage 
* No evMenea ol tacomc reiiiilred for 
loans for ipiatilying appficants 
' Re-mortgages tor qualHytag purposes 

Ring 01'’23S 0691 . . - ■ 
For full Information 
Open Spin today 

Winkwoith 
Hnancdal Services 

2Sa Moicomh Street 
Cofidoii SWl 


exduding holdings of txher tssues. 
Return tax-free mid hnked to 
ch^es in Hie Retali Pricas Index. 
SuppleiTient of 3.00 per cent h the 
first year, 3 l 2S per cent in the 
second. 350 per cent in the mini, 
4.50 per cent m the fumh and 6J)0 
per cent in the fifth. Value of 
Retirement Issue Certificat e s pur- 
chased in Oember 1S81, £146l76 . 
induiting bonus and supptemsnL 
SeptenAer RPI 3S7A. Crbe new RR 
figure is not announced until the. 
ttrird week of the foBovting month). 

National Savbigs CeilincBte 
3ist issue. Return totally free of 

income and capitBl gains tax. equiv- 

aient to an annual interest rate over 
the five-year ttrm of 7,85 per cent, 
maximum investment £10,000. 
General extension rate tor hcAlBrs 
of eeriier issues which h» ie 
reached maturity is 8.01 percent 

National SavtogS Year^i Ptam 
A one-year regiAar savings 'plan 
convwting Into four-year savkim 
certificaiBS. Minimum £20 a month, 
maximum £200. Return over five 
years 8l19 per cent, taxrfreeL 

National Sanrings Deposit Bond 
Minimum investment £lQO. mext- 
mum £100JXX). Interest 11.25 per 
cant variidJte at six wooks' rxitica 
cradHad annuaBy without dadu etjon 
of tax. Repaqiment at three montiis' 
DoticeL HaK interest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first yew. 

tjQcat Autlwrity Yearliite Bonds 
12 months fixad-rate mvestmenls 
interest 11 IS per cent basic rate tax 
deducted at source (can be re- 
claimed by non-texpay^. miitinusn 
investment £1,000. purchased 
thrcxigh stockbroker or bafifc. 

Guaranteed locome Bonds 
Return paid net ^ basic ras tax: 
Mgher rate texpayere may have a 
further Habfllty on maturiw- 1^ 6 
Syrs New Ureetion Finanee/Ciedlt 
& Commerce, 9 per cent; 4 & 5yra 
Pinnacle 925 per cent . 

tocM aUttioffly town haR bonds 
Fixed term, fixed rate investments, 
jnterest quoted net (basic rate tax 
Harimvnri at sourcs non-feclaifli- 
able) lyr' Leicesier 7.48 per Mm. 
min Inv ESOO; 2&3yrsBn^ ^ 

per cent: 4-7yrs Heielbrd & Worees^ 

ter 7 per cent min inv £1.000: ayrs 
Vale of Gtemorgan 6.13 per 

mm imr £500: Taft By 6.» 

nerc5nt.fh(nrmrEr.OOO ^ 
Further details araHi^ (tom Char- 
tered institute of Pubic FmanceA 
Accountancy, uans Bureau 
6361 between lOam and 2,30pm) 
see also Prestel no 84808. 

Bidding Sedeties 
Ordinary share accounts- 5.25 pw 
cenL-ExtraMerest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cent over ordinary 
share rate. Rates quoted above are 
those most commonly offered, ind- 
vidiial buad^ sbeiem may quote 
dlftorent rales.- Interest on aff ao> 
counts paid-net of basic rate tax.- 
Not redairnabie l^ nm-taxpayers. 

foreign cuirfeney.depDshs 
Rates quoted by RoihscMd's Old 
Court international Reserves 0481 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quirad tor withdraeai and no charge 
IS made cunencaes. 


Sierling 
US dollar 
Yen 
D Mark 
French Franc 
SWBS'Frenc "" 


Maptecem 
5 08 per cam 
aso per cent 
3JS per cent 
725 per cent 
217 percent 



c 


SEGCNC7 
ITEAR 


INTEREST 

BONDS 




gross 

*MherB fncom iBxIs pMat the basic m of 29%. 

Im^stfrbm as littie as £500 and you c^ enjoy this 
fixed and guarantBed rate for a full year. 


- j • / • D j C' 


regency™. 

BUILDING SOCIETY S’lESS:: 


Private 

Medical 

Insurance 


WeVe cut the 



to size. 



BCVA^repuiaiiOR is built on 50 years experience arid 
persDoatservloeia Private Medical Insurance. Throughout 
diax tlnic-we have built upa Rational reputation Tor b€:ing 
*1x51 buy*' in ibe maiffict. 

More mdividiials and oonqianies than ever before 
are nimingto BCWA for tbeir hexttti insurance needs. 

Our sebetnes tnctude excellent cover for private hospital 
cfaarge&,5pectalisi5fee»arK] our patient treatment and an 
Addiiional Cash Payment optiotL 

For foil details (ti'oarconqretitive tmns send the 
coiipodtDd:^ 


medical insurance die less expeittire way. 

BrmlHoiBc, Aim. BmoI BSl 0A& Tdeplinwi ar^)29.r'42 


Bristol Contributory WelfucAssociaiion srsr* ' 

Bristol Hous^ 40-56 Victoria Street, Bristol BSl 6AB. 
PleaKseridin^deiaBsortbePrtvaiepiq^isScb^p _ 

lsmagedunder63 For individuals PI 

Forcofiq:^e5 Q] 

For metnbetsofProfessiDnal/lYade Associations [3 


Name 

A#1rifv>«c 

— ''' 




POSKXKle. 



act of 



British National 


£5,000 invested witihi 


tis3vearsago 


is now worth £tL760. 


. You would have made a very good dedrion and invested in the best peHbrming 
unit-linked UK fund -British Nadonal Life's Equity Fund. Over the last three years 
this fund has convincingly oui-petfiirraed the field of 113 other funds with a growth 
of 135-2%? However, the fects are even bener since your imtestmenc iscompi^y free 
of capital gains and basic qicome cox. 

How do we achieve such good results? Solid and consistent investment skills, 
seeking out die best opportunities for growth, which have regularly placed our funds 
at the top of the performance charts. You can be sure of our backing tpp. since British 
Nadonal Life is owned by Citicorp the world s leading fmandal insdnidon with assets 
over £120 bdlion. 

Don't miss the opportunity again, invest with British National life the clear 
market leader in unit-Unked UK funds over the last three years. So. while unit 
prices can &I1 and growth cannot be guaranteed, your investment is in the hands of 
the leader. 

Send the coupon today and get mote facts from British National Life. 

*5ouice Monev NiaAROnnem fiRum m ihc otTrr io bid umi price sumiftfa over ihrec vean a« publnhed in ihr October ifo«ur 


lam interested in: Lump sum investment f"! 
Fieasesend me more inforraadon. 

Name: - ■ • 


Regular savings Q ipleax cicki 


v 

n 


T nwr 


Occupation: 


Address: 


Fosicode: 


Home Tel. No; 



Butiness lelNo: 


British National 


I 

I 

Send to British National Life Assurance Company Umited. I 
FREEPCDSTHaywaids Heath. RH163ZA. ■ 

Telephone: Haywards Heath (04441 4141 11- I 

A SUBSIDIARY OF CITX^RPO J 


■ ^ ■ ■ 

. 4 * #; : s ■ • . -y .'terecrfv^vwwa..;.ag. j ... 


^jj ?pgg ir 

. %'.:x vTK3fcjg4a,<:'..s.*^. 

Ss - H 

'x# 

' « X s. ' 

■■ s f.r 



No other major building society can dp it. 


Only our Real Gold accountjny^ 
8 l 00% net, with immediate access twice a 
year, for so bw a minimum balancei 

Other major building societies ask^' 
you to wait for your money, or to leave 
up to £5,000 or more in your account 
And we have a Personal Financial 


Service whidi willhe^ you planyour own 
investment portfolio. ... 

Other schemes, you will find, just 

won’ 



r~To FREEPOST (no stamp needed} Bradford A 8ingley~l 
I Building Sodety, Bing^-.-West Yorkshire BD16 2BR.- - { 

I Name . 

I Address • 


■ For deails of our Personal Financial 
Service, send the eoupon-ortfed lOQand 

ask for freephone Bra^or d A B ingley. . 


BATE CA^:VAB:t.A.\0^lSSU^lES29••iNC0^ff'TAX.I^7ERES^CALa'L^'^EDDAlU'.^.VDADDED‘F0Y0UB ACCOUNT ANNUALLY 



I 
I 

PoStOKle I 

J 




% 

9k 


BRADFCWRD & BINGLEV' 
Our p lans are built around you 

ih 


•• 4 

. *4 

. t;* 





•f. 




'•ita • ■ 



1 ^-.. 












THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 



^li I European Report 


Strasbourg 








FOR EYERTONE 



FGHAN SUPPER 


£ 4.95 


'hei 


ifvheiofEfli 
TpvpmpkAtX C 


I pip per order. O^wctad 


lA^^«iai9ifroBi60%i«OOljfid409bJOl4cwRhKwn 

iifiplr li Mhfr oi li f tn iwwp Irn i m yn i inri on^i ininnn 
■Id eML Send dMp« or AesnAfn dob w<li ordbr 
mfl |4-5li mo^M (i-B) or bfxe ). 


iRCEPOSr.POBowJ 



ilfeRMCiiVOm IJR Dtal 


iRpidORa 


BIRTH-DATE 

NEWSPAPERS 


IBIS-ISMl 

Qnler tDdw. collect tonwTmt 
or posted mst class with your 
nwssage in proenbiion tube. 
£15 md. Not the cheapest - 
amply the best pqpeis/servjce 
as ZDjOOO customers have 
abeady tfiscovsnxL Write to: 

46T1wIiM« 


CALL US FREE ON 
0800 52 11 44 


te Xmas QM sqnitaae ai 


newapff dmett fte m day 

hee 

fpttliqscardVMl 1870^ 
jviQpqpcr Mib B*0y sapte mfed 
Ctaosv Aom Mtownr* 
TtvTmesddH-im 
YoilBlat (1830- 1935), 


(foBMfttn Ptasin918-IS^ 


SpDrtiiiq Omde (iflBv 

BSgwrHaaW nasi iso: 
(in-iga?). 


Mcf Office wmtv Reports 


(1909^1939. 


Channel rslesIlM-il 
taenWm^ 11870-1970). 

laMiuitis/iian 
w w rteia 

TUIGUYSKR 
43 


.V ****** "^ GBfiM Ddf 
lodab Mixrrpd in OirMiM 
vanrk vour mmnffr InfludM. 
Co SO for 30 iMOOm wilh fo. 
Ii.'win or 4 tHNKlW* Wly 
ndourrd wirmoops C6.00 or 20 
Sorai» Cmvbuons Mral^msfor 
fiMnilv fnondA or nimls. Also 
oiuilaor ramrOia 18**- 2 for 
CIO SO Conieth Palm £4.50 
buioh^ Rrd SUk Rosr £4.6a 
nonmh Bulb Co. Drot TT, Ul 
HP cayymiw Farm. Myior. 
rabnouUi. Cbmwall TRll 
66N 0326 72720. 

RBTAIHMfir on- VOUCHERS! 
TiM* prrfprt odi ai C16JO ori 
CIO 00. roinplHO wflh Hliistai 
rd diriwiofy Vourhm cdvctI 
Ihp full rosi of a 3 rouno Tab 
ETHolr iwal in o\rr 30 ofj 
London'a finni mlauranb InH 
Maaium. Wlwoim. and Marioi 
A Fninro%. Cmoii raid Ucqs oi 
379 6433 or wrHr wUti rncbuH 
lo TaUr D* Hole. 103-I09 
W.irdcnir SI. London W l V 3TD 

COMOSniES and Mya and Uibiqa 
lo iiilngur from all o\rr iKal 
world, nrailv a hupdmd from a 
frw pmrr lo a frw mud. nuM 
Mriaialiabipinmoin Murtiad- 
mirrd frpr rol raialopiir oT 
anwinq duff for afl aon 
Hawkin & Co. Halnworth. Suf 
folk TH l096B7i 3105 


PENNY PLAIN 

DESIGMOi ENITWtAR a SCPMI^TC^ 



PENNY PLAIN,? S Pber 

Newemde opon TsoCaNEl TPC 
■afcobpneiOPI 2UJI34 



UK seiznre of gold coins lawful 


K a 


1 .K An 


avi 


nOP ofl 
In mn 
Of floff^ 
IbrI 

or mr son* 
from flOM Ud. Baib 


Allgemeine Gold-nad 
SabcradMiidea i Bt a H Ac ▼ 
UHited Kbgdin 
Befbie G. Wiaida, Pteadent 
and Judees R, RarsedaU Thor 
l^jalmssoo, F. Matseber, J. 
Pinbeiio pBiinlia, 1.^ Peai i t i , 
Sb* Vinceiit Evans and M.-A. 


OC« IBT. 

■C SANCniWlr in Omrni 
dm M Cvopr^ mosi 
hroiui ma Cor tadim only. %dr 
OOrrom \oucfirrftnnKn Cl9.fiO 
Obwarts. TM: Oi BOO 9696 for 
more f AB cyrdU rards 

lidipni. 


an 




ooll Mrs. Fdr 


munlaiurr famUian*. 

E2 2aTI»oO0llsHbaW.29Tlm 
MamH. Go\oiiC GanM. Lon- 
don WC3E SHE- Trf . 01-379 


Scr 


9on 


for 
For deiaiN 


(Case DO 14/1984/86/135) 
[Judgment Ociober 24] 

The secemd paiagrmidi of arti- 
cle 1 oftbeFiimPiotopoltotlie 
European Conven ti on on Hu- 
man Ri^us iBoomned the riglit 
of a stale “co einmoe sudi'laws 
as ii deems nneessary to control 
the use of pmpeny ... in 
a oc oi danc c - wridi ite poUic 
intnestT. In so doing the state 
enfpyed ,b wide maigin of 
m p iec ia tioD with regard both to 
raooangtbe means trf' enfinoe- 
ment and to asoertniAing 
whether the ooosequenoes of 
enfineement were jnstified in 


reasons tor 

rsdAu before tlw reform^ 
1Q77/78 (ib&t is the new mxier 
53 ofto Rules of tiieSupiCTe 
Cburt) have ju stified^ 
sion iat the procedure 

ID tte 

^d not allow It to pnrsoc roe 
of judicial review 

efiectiveiy. . ^ 

However, by tte ti^ w 
Cbromissioiiere «wk *eir 

hSay 1, 19ro under 
288« the Tefonn « 
had come into 



BIRTHDAY 

COMING 

UP? 


Onmid 


jn5-i« PaB3 
flits. SmdRr Tiiib. Ob- 
Mb Tdqpapli Evss. fW fbw 5 
Dmcb ad fw QMS Smiyrv 
DOS mi mwi i919 iM Hmhm 
Saw (bf tfa- 


ludy lof nsoMioa 
DdD) rr:» lo 


ACCESS 


t1 


B823lf« 


V6A 



1 


BULGARIA 




XIMB 


If values 


much as value 
send for this 
catalogue 


Viaetaesi^erhu4cktr 

han^mjdrpdopkwho 

insislmihebest^ya 

uxmtf exttptkmd 

formtmyL 

openly sdeaedima 
orzi/ iiff ctom Ai 
phaeihepecf^youem 
ahiiL 

Over 160 mamOous^ 
ideasJhmilwGnmaify 
biXuriousioUie 
ouintgBOUslyopfilenL 
So, ^FwonrsoinABr^ 
formas Aair^lalyour 
v^m^imdy^potket, 

Ai <mijnrnurnaahi^ 

andayoyiheeipemnce 


emOT GIVIIfC rKrrrtilnb drepi 
•HHl nalural luxurMin ml wLDij 
npw iiNf-sbc hop A hrrbai in-' 
nu^romTortrusiiioiMA pinmi^' 
Brociiurp. FmnMisi it). 66> 
Rimbrannt Way. Bury Si.CdLl 
SMIfolk. IF33 2LT. 24 ir. 


Pbonn 0284 2275 
EMIIBM GUOINKTB cUmrl 
Gurrmry. Swnaim. carcUsans. 
lir Col Morliiap, Cupt m r y l 
Onmnals. 9 Maindl SUm. 51 
Port. Cuemeirv. O.t 

I04BII 710tm. 

CmCNET DURV 1907.' 
C.3 96 inr outer mriiMJiig 
m>1•^ 50p rHateour. 

CRICKCTANA lOm TT). IS- 
Aslik^r A«r.. Bath BAl 305 
I022 S1 3357 78. 

KIIC5. Hires for all ihr fanmy, 
fanlasiir rofoure. rasi* to fly.| 
ouamnimL fire raL:- MAL-s 
VCRN KITES m. Malvm 
WRI4 4PZ. 

TW TOTS For roumor* and oa^\ 
•T% Ftm* rol. ralalobur of 40+> 
from Z.I in CIO. Hawlcin A Co. 
Halr^’onii. SulffObi. Tc4. 
1008671 3105 
OmNSEY BSAR md, 

AM-krts by Lp Tnroipiir. LOW 
pnrrs Col brartLCurmspy CSrar 
iTl. UrkflHd. Sv 108251 3764. 

N* CUPOte Londons 
umouF nrw fionw for 

uiiadopird soil toyn Fiw dFialls 
be<» annooncvfnnils coltinui. 



^nmiUifDqQir 

tdeoioi^' 

JVMCAJm- 

pag^end 
unit fivki, 




.diri^ALlO 


.EZL90 






McebebduVAT 
lofSor 
:fi4 



Tbr Snow ai ov Ohm HouM 
Farm Lowly oood uuallty raid 
in M colour 6*'.£2.70 

for lO tnci P6P. TTip wmtba sc 
Of m r if rar oi wui dli gn iiy asrisi 
uAiocondnurov work for wo 
^mrlfapr of Ino fortunafo honro 
as homp 6 abroad. Ordm lo In- 
irmaiMol L r apu r lor ihr 
proirruoa of Horan. rDvoi 
OTil 67a ttmdnt HkW 8L 
London NWl 7JU 
MMKITa IMmrrCbrMnao tor 
50XXX> peopir. Soivo your gUI 
problrras aud help 
Srfrrodo rndferm. 
cardib odKs and wrmobiQS* *8 
In our ffnr omaunoi Cato- 
topup. Atanaoic now from 
MuHIpto geirro sto Society. 2S 
Cffie Rood. LOfideiuswe ICC. 


1st Cbsi taw ta UR 

for lAv tape Hi 


023 rutyip Tor 

11 b (nmniBi sdta) 
ivot “ 

It* ' " 

It* ^ - 

2D- " 

2<* " - 


E132S 

£1525 

£1725: 

£ia25 

E212S. 

£2125 

£2725 


tor Cliildmi. Send 
brochure, 
of 6, 80P • C1.70. 

Dtary. M 14 
Road. %P8 6AF. PmenalShop- 
Pion-Prf 93434.30. 


Teieovch. SAC Omsmas card 
CMNobup. GiMi Pbr A Test 
ForCanrer, Woodbury. Harlow 
Road. Reydon. Ctoex. CMI9 
9Hr.f027979 2235». 





iMil ^ f^tfJiph 

R^BnOO BDB K^BSKSi 


ZPNoreidiRd. 
NodbIkNIUB 
Id; (06(B!| 713937^715123 


Ohr wftfi Wyler Send an eto^' 
uMly oHi wiaiiped bottlej 
momiuni or teroboam wiib 
iMbKihP cord bcartn u 
peraonal mcasapr ai tywhwo btf 
Dm* UK. Just phone 08331 


Hand made fresh rreom 

OorolBln. sw ched in an rte^ 
ganl pdl box. DHlvercw 
mvwhcro In the UK for C 10.991 
inrhA^DMi-aux ChocolPtlcr| 


Shropshtre snabeil 
name, sainion. 
wp% irom Hampers, 
Hantpm A Hanijpm. 
rhum: ftnp DtlliOpI 
«0BR8) 638X82/638517. 



DOMBlmBl 

meareta . Cbrlpbnao Gild ■ 

Cai alopu r . Quest Fbr A Test 
For CBnrrr. WoodDitty. HBHow 

CM19 


Id the pres en t esse it was not 
establisbed that tbe &itidi syi- 
tern &iled either to ensure that 
reasonaUe account be talcen of 
the behaviour of the nplkam 
compBOT or to affintf it a 
reasonable o ptxnUiu ity to put 
its case. 

Aitide 1 of the Convention's 
Fiisi Protocol stipulated that 
"ewery natnral or-lqni person b 
entitled to the peacefiil enjoy- 
ment of fab possessions. No one 
diall be dqvfrad of hb p(^ 
sessions exeept in tiie puUic 
interest and sulgect to- the 
ctHiditioos provided for by tow 
and by the general prinetptos uf 

intenmonal law. 

**Tbe ineoeding provisions 
sbaD not, howevet; in any way 
impair the ris^ of a stale to 
enfinoe such tows as it deems 
neoes sai y to control the use of 
property in aooondanoe witii tbe 
genoal mierest «- to secure the 
payment of taxes «- ocher 
OMitributions or penalties.” 

Allgemeine Gold-und 
Silberscheideanscalt AG 
(bereinafier lefeired to as 
Agosi), a shaietKdder company 
incorporated add having its 
ingistaed office in tbe Federal 
RqpuUic of Gennany, 


first sentence of the first para- ibe practice of the cont ractin g 
graph, was of a geneid nature stans that tbe behaviour of tte 
and enundated the principle of owner of tbe goods and in 
lite peaceful eiijoynieiit of pariknlvdieoseofdDecareon 
propel^. lib part should be taken into 

llie second rule, contained m acoonni in deciding vdwther or 
the second sentnace of die first not to resUHesmng^ed goods 
p a i^ graph^ coveted deprivation . assnming tiiat the kkios we 
of possessions and subjected tc not dangerous ^ dife e m siai 
to certain conditioiis. daids were applied and no 

Tbe third rule, sat ed in tiie «nwifn<iti praetbe coidd be said 
seoMid paragrajfli, leoogruzed coexist. 

that the ooutrading statm were Fm finftitaire to be justified 
entitled, among other thin g s , to under the terms of the second 
Gonirol the use of mt^ieny in paragraph of artiide 1, h was 
accontonoe with me genoal eiKni^tliattiieQqilichieqaire' 

intnesL mena of tire paragraph w er e 

However, the three rules were met and that tbe sate bad stiucfc judkial review nao cdtobuiw 
not -^distinci” in the sense of a toir . between the . efibec. so that three dimcnnies 

being unconnected : tire second interests oftiresisiie and those trf had been removed, 
and third rules were concerned theindividoaL. • Csuctasion tn- 

with partiaihr instairees of Thesirikmgofa fitirbstanoe The iwooedure avauwB «o 

bnerierence with the ri^ to depoided on many tocion and tbe applicant c om| » n y ^ ag i » ™ 
peacefiil eruoyment of property - the behaviour Ot tire owner ^ Oomm^ oners ret u sa ro 
and tiiould therefore be ooh^ tiie property, mdoding the do* restore the Knregenanta ooma 

tirned in tire Kgbtt^ tire general giee ^ tonlt or care wfakfa be not be dis ini s s qt as an 
princqde enunciated in me first 1^ dbNayed, was one ele m ent equate one for the pinpasrem 
ruto. oftbe entire^ of cfacomsanoes tire requhery na of .ibc secona 

The forfeiture of which shoiua be taken into jpaiagrqtii m aitide 1. . 

Kruegerrands (which two in- account In parlicutar, it hadMt bom 

dividuab, X and Y, attempied Accdfffin^,afihou^tbeae(>' establisbed that the briosn 
to ww«e e**^ into tire UK in ond para^aph tti* . article 1 tem toiled efafaer to ensure mm 
owtraveDtion of a pndnlRtion oontanrednbeGciriiGhptooedmal . leasonaible acooimt be raicra « 
on importatkm of gM coins - leqiiirEmeaEs^ tire court bad to the bebavioar of m^amneam 
accoidiiig to Agosi witiimit its ^consider wbetiier tire rqiidicable company or to afimdmv^ 

* ' ^ “ IKDGeihires in tire pres^ case plicant company a i c a s o naw e 

were such as to eaabto, —wnog <^m(Ktuiiity loputitsrese. _ 
otbo' things, reasonaUe account ' The fict that the apixicaiitHre 
tobeialoenoftiiedmeeoffinlt ceas(Hisofiiacwii,imo8enot to 


ImoaiedgeX involved a depriva- 
tion of pnverty. a matter dealt 
with in tire second s e n te n ce of 
the Gist paragiaqih of tire article. 

Howerer, in tire 


dreum- oc care at the 



tiiat deprivaticHi of psmy or, 

pnqmty fiirnied a oonst i tnent ship between die company 
dememoftireinocednrefiirtiie conduct and tire breadi me 
control of Dsem tire UK of gold tow whiA imdoubtedly 


sedc judksal review^ at the 
Couuoissionei^ dedsiew of 
1980 and hence did not 
fill! advantage of tire 


MajF 
receive 



00111 & 

paragraph oT artide 1 was tte 
idevant providmi q^iKcaUe m 
the case. 

wRh the 


the secemd -coned arid also whether die 


safeanaids avaitoUe to owners 

•TT- . 


procedmes in qirestim afibided 



could not 
oonduskm. 
ly time had 



paragraph 
sd the lie 


ofaiti- 


Agoa'i 
i been 


iptoured about a decision of the 
IBcidsh 


fCEE ^JgME Nrl : 


rano ii oPii iB Bh ftnunQ m 
.oSictokSL 


Bsaidnm TaU6 Desk 

VMIe fv deUb: 
iwatnnu 
■ andiaMi 
■W m. TsI Hoc ov 

RHin 

Btitoa HsadL laadsa 
Tsllhc8l-m4NZ 


authorities to condemn 
as fbrfeiled 1,:^ KiDagaiands 
bdongmg to h. 

It alleged that tire decision 
constituted a violation of its 
ri^ lo peacefid ervoyment of 
possessions as guaranteed by 
aitkle 1 rd'drerastProtooden 
lltiie Europjean Convention on 
Human Rights and of its 
under article 6 of the 
Convention. 

: In its lenon of Odubo' 11. 
1984, the Eun^iean Ctaiiiin» 
sion of Human Rights oon- 
dnded, by nine voles to two^ 
that there had beena bfcach d 
article 1 of the First B rot ooo L 
In its jndgment, the E uro pean 
Court <H Human Rights hdd as 
'fidlows; 

1 Aftide 1 arnrat FMocal 


qiplicaiitopaqi^ a leason- 
dde ODDoniiiiity of puttiire in Acooidind' 

-case to the lesponsfirie authoD- nobmd^^nkle 1 of the First 
ties. ProtoooL 

In tbe piment case, tire qa^ 2 AstidedameCanrantion 
de 1 recogiiized the lig^ of a timi offinieiture was dealt with OimiBal dhai^ 

scale ‘‘m eufinoe sndi to^ as it in two distinct stages : . tire The mere toct of 

deems nec essar y to oonind the orntdenmation proceedings be- pro p erty r^ts havic 
use of prapei^ ... in ao- fine tire courts ud tire sub- advent ameted by 
cordanoa with tire public 'sequent detenninalioii by tire ^ Qna^mnriai iqm an act fiw 
interest”. OmmussiaiieRorQisioiiisaod wfakh tiiiid paiw (tire smug- 

Undonbtedly tire prdnlnixm Excise; under seetCT 288 of tire ^^era) were inosaaited coadd not 
on the imponation of Cnstoms and Bedse Act 1952 of itsdf ton to the ooodusion . 
Kruegerrands into tire UK was wfaetirer or not m exodae their diat any d tire procedures 
in iton cmpstible witii the discretion to restore the cmqdaiired of were conoaned 
tenns of tins fHovision. Nevei^ KroegenandstotireqiplicaDlSL with tire dete mringrio n of a 
tfadcas. as tbe second panigiaiiii It was unconiesied that tire - vritwiwai chaty" againat AgosL 

was to be ooiBtrned in tire U^t qoe^mi of Agon's behavionr Axticto 6 the Convention was 
of tire general prioc^ enim- was inetevaiit tn the proceed- 'accordhigiy . not applicable 
dated in the opening sentence of ings befine the Ifim- Court under this bead, 
article 1, there must, in respect under sectimi 44 of the Act fin- Clril rights and 
of enfbicement d this pro- tire txmdenmatiaa of tire Ihe applicaiit had -not in- 
hibition, abo exist a leasoiuUe Krue gerrands as finfeit voked aitkle 6 in ao fiir as it 

retotionrii^ of pngmrtionali^ Tbe question of the related to ”dvi]. righto and 
between tire means employed oompoxq^befaavKHirwas^bow- obfintions” and the court did 
azKl_ the aim sought to be 'ever, im^iGidy raised in its nataiditnecessaiy toexamiine 
realizecL :^plication to the that on its own motion. 

In other wnris, the court tout iOammissipiiiins pn April 1^ - For tiioae reasons^ the court 


Aitide 1 of the First Protocol 
in substance gu ara nteed the 


right of property. It comprised 
'amctrules 


three distinct 


to deter mine udwtiier a fiir I980I, tint is, after tbe cons had hdd; 
babnoe had been struefc bo- -been fbnnally forfeited by tire l by ax votes, to one. Judge 
tween tire demands d tire courts, Ibr the lestoratKmm tin Petm dissenting, that thm had 
general interest in this re^m Kniegenands under sectioB. - been no vkfition ofartide 1 of 
and the -interest of tire individ> 288L . the Fast FkmoooL 

ual or indhridnals concerned; In aooordanoe with tire ndes 2 by ax votes to one, Ju<6e 

In determining nda^rer a fiir Eoglish tow, tire Comim^ Fetmi di8sentuig,tiiat-artiide 6 
batonce existed, the court reo- skuieis were bound to begnided ofdreOmventiontSd not apply 
ognized that tire state eqiqyed a by rdevant consideatioiis. In in tire present case in so teas it 
wide marriu of am rec ia tian me mesem case, the relevant 
with regard b qfli to cnooang tire considerations cetautiyindoded cri 

means of enfince ment and to the allied innooeiioe and dffi- 3 by five vo^ to twoi. Judges 
a scert ai ning whether tire con- genoe of the owner of the Brttiti and Thor VtilqabDsaon 
sequences of enfixeenrent were roiftiud omns and the relation- fWment i iig ;, that it was not 
jurtified in the gmeral interest sh^ brtiwen the behaviour d ‘neoessaiy to talre into aooonnt 
for the purpose of aduev^ tire tire owno- and tire breach of tire artidetiinsofirasitrriaii^lD 
object rathe law in questkm. iiiqiMtaw& tire detenatination of civfl tights 



to tbe ddenninatkm ofa 


COURSES “IL Tbe Tilley set ont m ^ _ Afahoq^tftoeYiasatrendni . Admiopdly;- the preced ui al '/ai^ QU^^oiiSu 


■T resT itbJ 

<6crPomBptg ia B| 



EXAMS 

WUiouidad homHiudyitar 
(Londoni 



DeatAU.VIItain]rHfll. 
Q3MCK2SnR.Rt(086S) 
52200124 h&l 


Law Report October 25 1986 


New car not of merchantable quality 



lARY 



colawns me read by U 
anlliaB irf the mast aSiaeiit 
peopk in Che coMOry. Tbe 



week and are 


THE 



TIMES 


CLASSIFIED 


ly each 
■anefally 
^retevaU 
edbatbd articles. Use 6e 
coqren (right), and fod 
ert how easy, fist and 
ecenooical it is In 
advolfie in The Tfanes 


MONDAY 


THURSDAY 


Edncafirac Univ ei si t y A p po i ntiiiepts, 

PnUic Sefaexti Appoinhsents, Educational 
Cbuxsea, Sdiolardiips ami Fdltnvsiiqis. 


Gemd Ap p nh ilw te ii tei MwnagptnPTit anH 

Eaecolhre MMio t m ente iriffi editori^ 

^hOeme 


appointments. 


^p o iutuie iflsL 


TUESDAY 


FRIDAY 


CranpDter Hraizon s: Crimputer 
ments widi editosiaL 
L^til Amobiliiienls: Sofidtocs, Com- 
mradal Lawyms, Legal Qfficeni, Fiivale & 
PuBlicTEra^ce.. 

L^al La Crone fra top seoEtaiies. 
Fiirac Sedor Appttinhiie&fs. 


Mohns: A ccaiqdeie car bojei^ gnide widi 
erfitttiaL 

Bodness to Bnsmess: Bosme&oppcitiiiiitiesi, 
fianefaises etc. wifii editoziaL 


SATURDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


Hotels, Flig^ etc: 


Fkopei^ ResHfentiaU Ibwn &, Goiiiito; 
Overseas, Rentals, whh edhoriaL 
Antiqoes and CoBectnbles. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL 
COLUMN, INCLUDING 


RENTALS, APPEARS EVERY DAY. 


Pnnstebi v BmussBS Motnis 
(Golden Green) Ltd 
(Befim fifir Justice Roogiet} 

IJiKfiment Ochtirer 24] 

A new car, vriuefa on delivery 
had a minor defect wfaiefa wns 
likely .to, and snbsequen^ did, 
tcause the gngwv* to smt up 
winto the car was being driven, 
was neiiber cf merchantride 
quality nor reasoniMy fit for its 
nnpose under section 14 of the 
Sato of Goods Aa 1979. 

The pmehaser was noL how- 
ever, entitled to ledssiai d the 
contract and i|myment of tire 
purchase price iihad be retained 
tbe car ‘'after tire lapse of a 
iieasonabto time” witiioot inti- 
mating to, the seller that he had 
rriseted h, even tlioq^ tbe 
ddixt bad not at ihai stoge 
manifested itsdC smee the p^ 
chaser was deemed by section 
35(1) of tbe 1979 Act to have 
accepted the car. ^ _ 

MrJustioe Rioiigier soSSSm 
a reserved judgp^t in tire 
Queen's Bendi Diviaoo, awaid- 
iiu the piainriff Mr Leslie 
Montnro Bernstein, £232 dam- 
ages for toeadi of contract 
against the defendant. Famsons 
Motors (Golders Green) Ltd, 
but rriecting tire ^ntifiTs claim 
for lesdmton of tbe contraa. 
under ndiicb he had poiriiased a 
new car fiom ihedemidaDt. and 
repayn^t of the pucriiase 
price, since, although tte defen- 
dant was in breach of ermditions 
implied by section 14 of tbe 
1979 Act the plaintiff was 
deemed under section 35(1) to 
have accepted the car and was 
therefore entitled, under section 
S3, to Aarwpg^ Only. 

Mr H. Jo nathan Barncs f^ 
the itiaintiffi Mr Midiad Cur- 
iMen fiir the defeudanL 


eiled mily 140 mfles, the ca^ ^iecti^ where a penon had tradriiip to tte ooncliiskMi that 
engme had seized iqt because of acquaednotsomuchacarma the cm had not fam of 
drop of whidi haH got nmnipg fight with n defertive menchanlatiie qnaltly, Wa 

.machine the car was nn- fit for its pu r pose, on ridfveiy. 
'merchantabki; and.fiie fict that Ho w ever , 35 efiectiveiy 

,he ^ persevered in ttynwto AMnw ri r i arf die ptafinifr to ro- 
Ign it put ritfri <fid not preejnde wri a ai on if aftra tire lapan of a 
■mm fiom eventn ” 



but the 


into the Intokatitm $ystem 
when the car was be in g assem- 
bled had caused a blodtage 
wdiicfa had deimved the cam- 
shaft of hdiricatioo. . 

Repairs had then been carried 
out See at 
pbimti fThad 
car back and 

taOOty harif- 

it foDowed tint at tire 
meat ofdefrveiy the engnre bad 
contaiiMd material wfaKh was 
significantly lifcdy, sooner 
rmer than taler, to canse the 
blocfcage and thus the sezraieL 
Tbe questimi fbr the court was 
udretner that tendered the car, 
umnefchantaUe or unfit fbr hs 
intended purpose. 

In Bortlat v Sidney Marcus 
Liri([196SI 1 WLR 1013), the 
Court ct Appeal hdd that a 
I-hand c 


cventoofiy seeking leasonaUe time be had retained 

theoarwritfinnt i n tinn W ng toy ri te 
Another firetor.was tire time defendant that he was r^ecting 
totaketire w4uditherepairtbok;aiidhwas ft. 

Secli<n59pnividaltli.t-liM 
flee Of diaige to purchas er ^ ^ leasonable time was a 

W8S socli diflL even wDcn It nM . ^ - 

rectified, tiieie was a ritic of SottiM35(I)didiiraiefei tua 
l^d^efiectssotiiatitooiiU ren^bto ^ to dtscover a 
not be said that the car was as psriKntar ddecq n meant a 
good as new. 


Memiah on a new RoDs-Rio^ 
m^t render it unmerchantable. 


not (» a 


second- 


car was of 


it migfat 
tounUercar. 

tsL this cam; tire efihet of tire 


tiffi ft to ni8 pff ft the 
goods and try them out geiH 
eially. The natnre of a defect 
discovered ex prat facto was 
iirdevantin assessmg what was 
a leasonaWe time fiir tire pm 


TTie feqgch of time reqaoed 


nieichaniaUe quality and fit fiir defect had hero 6 prevent ^ would yaiy according . to tire 


MR JUSTICE ROUGIER 
said that within three weeks of 
delivery aixl after having trav — was veiy 


Its pmpose if a was caprifie of 
beiog driven and ilrfven in' 
safety. It had been argued tiiata 
car whidi could not be driven 
was not unmeichaiitable if tire 
defect was obvions, fix' exanqrie, 
a missi^ wfaed. 

In his Lordship's jwfiment 
vriietfaer a defect was tatan or 
patent was immaterial, fay itsel£ 
to the issue of mencfauitebfliqr. 
In practice obrious defects 
would be rectified befbie ddiv- 
ei^ no one would accept a car 
with a udieel missing. 

There was ahvi^ theref o re, 
some denreni at latency, siiioe, 
the question only arose wherel 
the defect was <hs 
ddiveiy. 

Barnett up^BeA to 
hand cars. The buyer of a new 
car was entitled lo expect mom^ 
how much more on a 

s. One ws 


car fimn going. The enghre mriue of goods: what was a 


could weD have seized up in the reasonable time fiir.a'ln»de 

itefrax 


fist tone ofa motorway cansing would scaioely be adeqnale 
the car to grind to a sudden hah. -iincieacsnlHxiarin& 


Ttore ahfaough the car wu ' Socoostnied, tireptointiffhad 

to had'aieascmriNetiinetotry tire 


driveaUe befbie the seizure^ 

^iigtsafe.;^d^hadnra car out geoefalN; in three weeks 
hem mtradible ^li^ been be had made two or three abort 
s atisfidori ly rectified, ahhoiiqh : trips for tire very purpose of 
the rqre ir had been lengthy and n^itouL ItfbUo^fimlre 

- d_ . - WES' . emitted to .id 

The nature of ^ probtom, compensate him fire ffieoM of 

grtting home, the toss of a tank 
a possbiliQ^ of a fenoefc-on of petraL ' a . totally socnlt dav 
efieex. siDoe the aeizuie could and ihe iiiamvM>i^<4r^M.£ 
haw transmitted stress to raher wNboiitted?^^ it* 


□umber of fictois. 


wasthe 


imractibilin d a defect wfaidi 
Hiffiftiilt to and 


No system of massmodnis ... 

tkm could ever be perfect; a there _been_ any evidence 

buyer ofa new car had to put iq> been 

with leethinglroiibles and have ramMy asa resnhraflresrizore 
them rectified. A defect of this ^ would have 

Jdnd, however, went fir b»oiid eutiiled to damages , fin 

what a buyer had ID aooepL luacloa 

Two fim tflprai^ -- the Sdidtois Amoy^toikes & 
pottaaDal dmger and the T^ at Co; Ahmedali Jh^ .fe Co. 
_knodc-oa damage — tod fais_BedfbnL 


Appeal papers must all be in order 


Fill in ihc coupon and aiiach it to your advenisetnenL whiicn on a separate 
piece of paper allowing 28 Idtcsa and spaces per line. 

Raics arc: Linage £4.00 per line (min. 3 lincsL Boxed Display £23 per sin^ 
column ccniimciie: Coun & Sodal £6 per line. All rates stuped lo 15% VAT. 

Scad 18 : Marnriiia GiOttp Classified AdnmiscRKSS rtaimitfr. 

Newspapera Lld^ PQ Box 48< Vvipnia Stact, LaRdon El MMX 


Name, 

Address.. 




Statement (Docn- 
mentatkin in Appeals) 

Sir John Donaldson, Master 
of tire Rolls, silting with Lmd 
Justice Ulkm and Lord Justice 
Cioom-Johnson in tbe Cburt of 
Appeal on October 22. handed 
down a practice statement 
constriidating and «epa tiding 
Practice Direction (Errors in 
Document^ {The Times May 
2a l983;Jr983]AIlER416)and 
Practice Statement (Prq/anttion 
of Appeal Docummts} (The 
Times Match 13. 1985; [1985] 
AH ER 841). 


I feg pn preteMa^M n MteiiBiiiifiteiin 


Trtephone iDaylimc) 


..Date of insertion- 


(PInse allow throe woriing days prior lo insertion dale-} 
Use yoor Access, Visa, Anrex or Diners cards. 



i I M I i [ i i i l_i f I i i J 



_l 


THE MASTER OF 
ROLLS said that all transcripts 
lodged had to be originals; 
pholocOE^ were not pennitted: 
see The Supreme C/mrt Practice 
I9S5 paragraph S9/9/Z 
In cases whe-p thm was no 
official transcript of tbe judg- 
ment cither the Judge's own note 
or an agreed note, approved by 


(hejudge, must be included. 
Exoera 


Loe]^ where it was known 


that the Judge had a fbU text of 
his KBSoned dectrimi the 
appdlufs soliettor should ar- 
range fire the note of judgment 
to be prepared, agreed and 
subinitted to the judge as soon 
as the Dotioe of fuqieal had been 
seiv^ he should not wait until 
the vpeal had entered the Lfet 
of Forthcoming Appeals, . 

Where both sides were rnne- 
sented below by counsa it 
would save time if crMinsel for 
the appdtom submitted his note 
directly to oounsd fire the 
respondenL Where the notebad 
not been received back fiom the 
jui^ by the time the bundles 
were ready to be lodged, ciqiies; 
of tta nn^vroved note should 

be lodged, and the approved 
note substituted as soon as it 
was to hand. ■ 

Where the appdtant was in 
person the respondents oounsei 
or soUdtOfS would make tbetr 
notes avaitobto. whether or not 
the appdtont had made a note 
faims^ 


fa] county oomt rases a copy: 
€>r the Judge's notes of evidence 
was to be bemoken and in- 
ch bundle^ 


were good, sroonds fbr 


duded in each bundle^ The <rfd 
practioe,^ of some oonnfy courts 
of refiising to make natm avail- 
aUe until tbe agreed rtoie of 
judgment had bm sutonitted' 
was to be (fisoontinued. 

Where the bundle comprised 
more than 100 pwps, three 
copies ofa core bundle oantaw- 
iiu the principal doemnents to 
i^ch reference would be ihade 
was to be todged- ft woidd not 
usually then be necessary to 
lodge more titan one setratite 
full trial documenlsL 

Bundles woe to be 


sonas toreranting 
Bundles should be 


■ pr ep ar ed as soon as the notice of 
appod 1^ been lodged withora 
waiiiitg fire the mpeal 
in tite List of Fn 
Appeals, 


Forthcffliiing 


he CDiamed when tiie fiiluie to 
■ kKlgp. b undl es was due to ftilore 
tn sta rt soon enough on their 
Pi?w?tmn ra the dbtawiiK of 
other docttmenis. ■ . - 


dearly and mddied 
^ docnmait wa 
Iradi page should t 



of the work of 
was not — 


iiun' 


pagp should he numbered 
individnlly and consecntiviriy. 

All documeits had to be bourn 
R^ctlier.. Loose ' doenments 
wQ^ not be accepted. All 
doctimenu most be Jlegitoe. ■ 
lime limits were ,10 be- oom-' . 
plied with and would, be strictly docuiiieiffiationL 


r™*™™*™*"* was not olritt- 

oomEte provided thra^n^I 

ber of staff was fully instiocted 
M whm W r^triied and that 
the sdkaior. m efaa]^ was 

d tiSt 


peraonaHy satisfied the 


to w deliveied to the 
court. London i«enis should^ 

nmmrpd m 


. '"BfwwadO nr* 

ininrat to unnir iny ao» 


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THE TBIES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


SPORT 


39 


Winning or losing will touch a great many more people than Britain’s world champion^p hope 


The power behind the glory of Mansell 


Nigel Mansell strengthened h\fi 
chances of yyinning the world Formula 
One championship with the fastest 
first practice time in Adelaide 
yesterday. Brian James examines the 
multi-million pound Williams project 

behind the Briton. 





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9 


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A ccording to Mis 
Rcwaime Mansell, 
it is qnite wrong to 
suggest diat her 
husband w«i»df F to 
become raocor radqg's new 
world champion in Adelaide 
umKHTTow to to riches 
and finally acfaiere real famp? 

*^MaJce hb name?" she says 
with a tooch of wniian^linn- 
‘‘Listen, Nigd. has already 
been on Qimstion of S^orL 
Twice." 

Itis homespim lomuhs like 
that which have made Mrs 
Nigel Mansell the &voBrite of 
die teaning crew that woshs 
the |nt of the Canon Williams 
Honda team. As die boors tick, 
away to the final crncial nnmd 
of mis year’s dnmpions]^ 
she has the afaiUty to ca\m Us 
anxieties ■ mth a word and 
reduce his occasional attempts 
toacttIieslarwithagfauice.lt 
is a devoted partnmshbt > 
pleasore to wat^ 

But this time she is wrmig, 
of course^ When Mansell 
walked to the deiHurtnre rate at 
Hegthrow last weekoid he was 
asked fm hk antogn^fa jnst 
once. Only one othm passerby 
wassnreenoi^ofttaerecoc- 
mdon to call 0 ^ ‘KSood Inck^' 
If he retunis with the tide, the 
first Briton to achieve diis in 
10 years, he begin to make 
an impa^tm public awarmiess 
that vrill not be measured in 
appearances on televfa^ quiz 
sh^s. Rbsanne ManseD, very 
senaably, will never be qahe 
sme whkber that is a reward 
or a penaltjr. 

The wfami^ or lomng of dus 
dumptonship will aoecC a 
great many more people than 
the Mansells. It ^1 provoke 
celebradmis in boardrooms as 
far distant as Japan, afiect the 
markedly plans of companies 
engaged in such diverse activ- 
ities as. making corapulms and 
cosmetics, and make all bat 
the most stone-hearted think 
very hard about a man who is 
not among ns. 


often made hnid by the life- 
style of its winners, Williams 
w never gone for the private 
jet, the diartered helicopter 
approadu spare money has 
been ploughed back in 
developiug the team. Odier 
people win find it easier ifa w 
he to count dm gahw- 
Ihe. cost aS a competitcre 
two-car radng team is not 
than £8 miliinn a yean the 
e^^nes are a noiMvtifaaal 
esdza adding another £2 mil- 
lion. Canmi find SO per cent of 
tfaeteam'^ budget, in leCnni for 






canoti 













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■ AS - ■ ». . tA- •# ^'■.WSA ' V 


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6 


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non 






wbkh £4 million Or so di^ am 
the coamany naam on an 


die company naam on an 
inch strip on die cars' ades, on 
die front and rear vrii^ and in 
other strat^jc areas like 
Piqnefs helmet and die top 
few indies of bott bis 
and Mansell's driving 
ovmnlls. 


T heir refraw is the 
adverdtion. Cars are 
bOlboards and whfa 
the team finfahing 
first and second ra 
die Biidsfa GP for example; 
the name Canon was sddun 
oCT the worM*^ television 
screens. American authorities 
estimate the cost of prime time 
television at chise to $1 nunkm 
a ndnnte. Thus race alone 
r^aid ^ per cent ef Canon's 
financial foith. Top phces in 
Sunday's race wifo its wi^ 
andtem of 7S0 millioD wQl 
provide Camm and all 
Uams sponsors vrith bnge 
promotional "dividends". 

Tim second main elmnmit is 
the Honda OGOtzibution. Not 
only do Williams racli% not 
have to find £2 million o^ne 
money, they also get die 
incBioilahle benefit of the 
Japanese company's 1,200 
stioi^ research and dev^p- 
moit team. There are never 
fewer than 25 Honda electroii- 
ics experts at the Didcot ha^ 
and as many cra^i^ with 
gauges and measuring in- 
stniments aronnd the cars at 
the trade. 

Honda's reward is the on- 
tlie-lradii 9 *ei^ ' eiqierieiice 
gained fay thebr br^htest 
yohng' 'ei^neeis, "and ' the 
knowledge of race-tested 
electronics dtet puts th» 
years ahead of rivals in road- 
car developmenL 
The thM main element is 
the Wiliams GP radiig en- 
gfoeerittg itself. This private 


Frank Wlfiams, the orator 
of this team, is sdll fating 
hud to recover the. ise of 
limbs paralysed mla road car 
crash last mondi. In the Ificeiy 
event of one of the two diiveis 
he chose becoming cham^oo, 
he will not be thm to share 
the acclaim. He has had 
predons few other rewards for 
his shrewdness. In a sport 


Tbe Caiuni Wfifiams-Hoiida team 

I Nigel Mansdl; 2 Nelson Piquet; 3 Dave Stubbs, race 
team manager; 4 Ken Sagar* trade driver and in charge of 
spares; 5 John Westwood, Piquet's No. lmechanic;6 
Rob C^pbeiK Piquet's No. 2 median^ 7 Les Jones, test 
team medianic; 8 Pfater Wndsor, puNicafibiis 
manager; 9 Frank Demie, anodynamidst and Piquet's 
mtgmeei; 10 Jerry Bcnid, No. 1 mechanic on ^>are car; 

II Grant Gibson, Mansi's No. 1 mechanic; 12 John 

Reardon, Piquet’s No. 3 mechanic; 13 Jim Pbde; 
wheel and tyre expert and trade driver, 14 Midiael 
Jakeman, gearbox medianic; IS Stewart Prattley, No. 3 
mechanic on qiaie car; 16 Patrick Head, designer and 
Mansell's engineer, 17 Jim Walter, truck driver and in j 

chaige of spares; 18 Ken Sibley, Mansdl’s No, 3 / 

mechanic, 19 Alan CbalUs, chi^ mecbuiic L 


PRIX 

ADELAIDE 



Runde 

SiraigM 




40 



STAinyPIMSH 






A 






Grandstands 


FostaTs Comer 


83 laps of 2.347 miles 
Total; 194.845 HTitos 
(Including parade lap) 


Lap record: Ayrton Senna (Lotus-RenaulQ 
Inun 19A43sec 


company employs 105 staf^ 
bidlds K per cent d die car 
whidi seats the Honda o^e. 
After a rocky 18 numdis when 
the current set-iv *as bd^ 
estebUshed it is now dose to 
becoming most snocessfinl 
tram of u time. Wfifiams won 
tiie consbnctns' champion- 
ship In 1980, 1981 and i^ain 
this season, added the drivus* 
chunpionship in 1980 and 
1982 and have two of the dirra 
remainii^ amtenders for tins 
year's crown. 


A Qneoi^ Avrard Cm’ 
indnstiy was one 
sttt of rewuiL A 
-vastly coniplex for- 
mula, involving 
pdnts vrott, practice tin^ 
past perfonnance and drawii^ 
power, gives WDUamsaB sorts 
of privOeges in pit poddons, 
travd concesskms and a size- 
able sidure the sport's prim 
foa^ But aD of that wohM not 
add np to more than $1 nuHion 
a yeu. The rest most come 
fkw paicelUng ont more care- 
ftilly measured inches of the 
team's facade as an adverds- 
ingmediira. 

lliree odier maKW com- 


panies share the ranainhig 
three ndUioo or so shortfall in 
the Williams budget Mobs 
OU, for didr share, get a 28- 
hy6in strip <4’ the car body, 
a^ a rra&don of Mansell^ 
"soi% and dance act**. This is, 
in Ea^ an amurii^ and reveal* 
talk be gives to the oil 
companies* enstomers and 
deqlm on race-eve in every 
country they visit 
The chemical emnpany, ICl 
nbres, ■» their aDocaled 
space on the aid plates of die 
frimt wii^ to Inboard the 
name of the national brand oi 
their pndnets in each conntiy 
where Wniams race^ The 
constant chai^mg of these 
names contributes to die near 
£10^000 annaaUy die team 


spend cm painting and re- 
painting the cars. 

Thai there Is Damn, the 
Itelfam-based male cosmetics 
company. The macho fanage irf 
Fornnda One is a great sraing 
tooL and bodi drivers vrew die 
logo on the bock of their 
overalls, OU throat badges, 
helmets, hades of the gfoves 
and forraims — sites by 
foe finction of an inch becMse 
of the tikidBiood of dose-fbens 
teloisioa s Wt The spare 
remdning mches on die car 
are alloted to Calma, a com- 
puter onni^any that aids the 
teamk e^ineerhig. and Ans- 
tin-Rorer, as reward for 
snpfijfiag the team^ road 
transport: 

CniiMdy, whDe FSqndk 


bebnet and overall is "owned" 
by die team, ManseD retains 
tte lights to about 50 per cent 
of his own imifoiin. At the 
moment his basic fees are said 
to be abont ^SOJKN) per 
season, pahaps a qnaiter Of 
Piquet's own pay. The 
cbam^oasliip will place toe 
Kitm instes^ into the salary 
rai^ of Piquet, Prost and 
Sei^ the ^oit^ best-re- 
warded men. 


member of the Williams staff 


gets a boons for eveiy radng 
point won. 


TOP OF THE TABLE 


They are rewarded, of 
course, ftw die risks toey 
accept A new trrad in tte 
sport nmy now begin to make 
millioiiaires irf toe engineeriiig 
geniuses who des^h the best 
vehides. The talk in Ae 
lane is of a deBoer tared b^ 
to Britain fitm toe Untod 
States "ibr $1 million 


Ifigd Manaen, Great Britain, V)fflBams, 70 pewits. 
Ala&i PRMt Frence, McLaren, 64. 

Nelson Kqubt, Brazil, WiSams, 63." ~ - 

Ayrton Soma, Brazil, Lotus, 55. 

Kdce Rosbeig, Finland. McLmmi, 22. 

Stefan Johamwen, Sweden. Ferrari. 19. 

Gartiard Berger, Austria, Benetton, 17. 
ilaeques Lafmia, France, Ligier, 11. 


If races are vron on the 
trade, they can be lost in the 
pits: the WBEamsteam leckmi 
to diange all Tour tyres in 
seven, sraonds, that b twice as 
frmt as slower rivals. Effiee- 
tivdy, at half a second u ^ 
difierentiaL dmt means ' it 
would take the best driver 15 
faqis to catch die wmst if hb 
pit team let hhn down. Every 


I f thqr wnnted to make 
raooey with their 
spanners," Cballb says, 
"they'd be better ofiT 
ranniiQ tbdr own busi- 
ness in some back street. 
There^ no overtime, yon vrork 
an if toat b what toe job 

needs, and often the satb^ 
dou b snatched away because 
some daft ^ver goes and 
darts something yon*ve jnst 
got r^L Bat toe feeing when 
yonr Moke who tate the 
flag b sometlung yon oonUnt 
pnt value cm." 

Jnst about eveiyftiig else in 
racuig has a price, however. 
Willbms Inve jnrt spotted 
aaotber Mt of valuable, sale- 
afaile space. They have noticed 
tort whinfa^ drivers tend to 
cone back down the strhlgbt 
punching both arms in the air 
for toe crowd and die cameras. 
Offers will be ccMsiiieicd, after 
a snocessftd Sunday aflieiBopB 
drive through Adelaide 
strerts, for the undcrade of 
Nigel ftfonseirs anns. 


RUGBY UNION: THE LAST WEEKEND FOR ENGLAND’S SELECTORS TO MAKE ADJUSTMENTS TO THEIR WORLD CUP TRAINING SQUAD 


Southern touch to Ouhs enjoy the final calm hacks can 


Rugby’s revival 


before the winter’s clutter 


lift Welsh game 


it is. Rodney Webb says, the 
most important game that 
Rugby have played in the last 10 
years (David Hancb writes). 
Webb, ihe fonmer England wing, 
is one of the men who have 
help^ the birthplace of the 
game to a revival this season but 
he knows as wdl as anyone how 
elusive genuine success can be. 

Hence the value he places on 
today's John Pbyer Special Cup 
second-round tie with 
Blackheath at Blis l^«uL 
The cup can provide ambition 
and publicity which might 
otherwise take years to achieve, 
and Ru^by. with years of dis- 
appointment behind them, hope 
to t akf advantage of a London 
side weakened by a string of 


iormer England stand-off haff) 
Bev, and younger brother of 
John, Oxford University's 
cen^ (days at full back. Steve 
Brain. Ihe England booker, u 
the focal point up fronL He was 
delighted at Rugby's forward 
domination last a^nst a 
Fylde pack, including his inter- 
national colleagues, Wade 
Dooley and Steve Bainteidge. 

Bladtheath, poor souls, have 
nine first-team (ilayers on their 
casualty list and maybe wifoout 
Tony Bond, the former Sale and 
England centre, whose wife b 
unwelL However, Doug Huisey, 
tiieir captain, is fit and Hii^ 


By David Hands, Ri^by CorKspondeirt 


By GeiaM Davies 


McHardy, the club ooadi. plaw 
scrum half in the absence of the 


injunes. 

Rugby's previous excursions 
into knockout football ended in 
defeat in 1972 (against Bedford) 
and 1979 (against Covratiy). 
Last month they won their first 
cup ffimc. beating Dixonians 
21-9. and have not looked ban. 
“Wc are playing an entirely 
different type of game, a »>»*- 
cm hemisphere game. Wero 
says. He is chairman of tte 
playing committee^ with 
rcspionsibiliiv extending to 
coaching: *TTte pjaym are 
enjoying iheir fooiball; it^good. 

exciting rugby.** 

TTieir only absentee today, 
though an important ont is 
DavS Bishop, their scram hmr, 

with whose Welsh namesalw he 
should not be confused. This 
Bishop is at Lcicesier University 
but he IS injured, so Mickey 
Jones makes his debuL He prays 
aloitgsiidc Richard PelL who has 
moved from Lciccsrer aiw pro- 
vided the bulk of the points to 
ihe win over Dixonians. 

Mike Risman. son of the 


scram hafin ihe absence of the 
iiyuied Crispin Read. 

Another club caiKain, Mike 
Howells, of Lydney, retuius in 
time for the cup meeting with 
C^bonie: as do HoweU, his 
scrum half, and Ontls, the 
No. 8. The Cut teoihers are out 
in force for Maidstone who 
entertain London Welsh: Mi- 
chacL former^ of Richmond, 
and Peter are in the team while 
David is anrong the 
tdriacemeniSu 

In the last two seasons 
Moseley have removed West 
llanlepool from the.cup oom- 
petiiion and they gave tbrir 
nei^boursL SolihulL the benefit 
of their experience befbre Soli- 
hull travelled to the nonh-easL 
There is no shortage of 
ence in Solihull's ranks, with 
Dingley and Nun. foniier first- 
class players, in their pack and 
Gifford, the former ^gland 
squirt scrum half, at tbeir beeL 

The draw for the third round, 
when the mqjoi; clubs enter the 
competition, will be made on 
Mon^. 


This is the last uncluttered 
weekeirt ihn English rugby 
clubs will enjoy for some time; 
Next Thursday, England's 
World Cup training s^uad de- 
cam|)S to Portugal with some 
three dozen players, and that is 
followed by the three desigRaied 
Saiuidays when cormty ru^by 
may be played, largely affeenug 
the north and soiiUi-^wesL. A 
brief break, and then we arc into 
the djvisioiial championtoin 
which vinu^y takes care of the 
rest of the year. 

It will be, therefote. a good 
opportunity for the sdeciors to 
ms^ final adjustments, if uiy 
are required, to the trainirig 
squad. It is hoped that Hanna- 
ford, the Glourester scrum ha^ 
will be fit to eraveU but h 
remains to be seen whether 


EgertoQ. the Bath Na 8, wilL 
He was dne to play for Bath 
against US Portsmouth today 
but has been unable to rid 
himself of a Umg-standing hack 
injury wtai^, h was bop^ an 
ntimion w^d cure; 

He remains optimistic about 


joining ihe Engtend s^d, but 
the trainina camp will be no 


the training camp win be no 
picnic when they put the jriay- 
ers through their paces over four 
days. Manin Green and De$ 
Seabrook, the Eiigland coaches, 
wfll have the assistanoe of Alan 
Davies, the B team coar^ Tom 
McNah. their OMidrtionjiig coa- 
di. and Don Rutherford, the 
RFU's technical administrator. 

Two of England's leading 
dubs go 10 Wales todi^. but 
several natiorral squad men win 
be missme Harlequins play 
CanfifT withoui Rose; tbdr fiifi 
back who su^ied a leg last 

wrekend. and SSalmon. the 


centre who has a groin sirairL 
Looester visit Swansea without 
Evans, their right wiqg, who 
mthdrew yestetday with an 
Achilles tendon strained during 
the midweek win over Oxford 
Univerrity. 

Quite (iropefty, in view of the 
long season vntich is abeaH, 
(NUentiad EngJrad players are 
aHowiitg their injuries to mend 
and limitmg thetr appearances; 
Some; like Dooley, the Fylde 
lock, started the season raeily 
and are now m^Wng up for lost 
time.He has been ^ked rm* 
Lancashire next Wednesday 
against Yorkshire (as has Nick 
Simms, younger brother of 
Kevin, the En^and centre) and 
Ct^oi^ who plays for 
Swansea. ' 

Lncesier have brou^t in 
^fiUiams to reiilace Evans and 
there will be a confusion of 
Robertses at hooker at Sr 
Helen's: David of Swansea will 
oppose Hany of Leicester and 
both sides are likely to field six 
inieniatioiials.unless Daoey, the 
former Welsh stand-off half has 
to give best to strained stomach 
muscles. 


Despite having over 20 
stitches in fecial cuts — the ro- 


suft of apunch durirtg the ram 
i^iatnsi wasps last week — Phil- 
lips is fit enough to lead Cardiff 
against Hariequins. However, 
Cardus keeps toe pldoe of Ring 
at centre. 


Harlequins also firtd a usefid 
half buck combination in tbeir 


While the other home coun- 
tries will have played some form 
of international oompetiiion be- 
fbre Christmas, and France will 
feoe Romania today and Russia 
and New Zealand over the next 
couple of weeks, Wales have to 
make do with a more junior 
level of compeiiiJoD whh wales 
B (toiyi^ France B at Ponty- 
pridd this afternoon. 


having the best of times at the 
moment buu as always they 
have a sprinkling of intoviduai 
talent like Evans, Davies and 
Gravelle. who are weO above the 
ordinary and, on their d^, can 
be exoeptionaL Wales are 


second ream against Wasps 
Vaadris ^ Loveridge; the AU 
Black, whose name has been 
mentioned in connection with 
the Major Stanley^ XV adiich 
will play Oxford Uaiversity next 
monilL (rartners Ebsworth. 

Several of toveridge's ool- 


Tfae rifting proce s s, which 
b^an whh the tours to the 
South Seas and Italy duriiM toe 
summer, goes on for Tony Gray, 
toe Welsh national coach. With 
this game and the trial on< 
December 6, be will want to be 


leagues will' be enragfod in toe 
second match of toe New Zea:- 


clear in his mind of toe (ilaym 
he wishes to take into toe live 


second match of toe New Zea:- 
land tour of Franoe today, 
against a Rench Selection at 
Qamont-Feirand. 


There is a vacancy on the 
Welsh imernational panel of 
referees following the letuement 
of Ken Rowlarrts (Ynysybwt) 
which both Winston Jrmes arrt 
Gareth Simmonds — who wiH 
both be touch judges for the Alt 
Bla^' matcha agaiim France 
next month, may hope to filL 


he wishes to take into toe five 
nations rtiampionship in the 
New Year. The withdrawal of 
Arthur Emyr (wing) and David 
Fox (hooker) from the original 
selection will have disrupted his 
preparations only slightly. 


Ulster without Matthews 


ByGeoise Ace 

Phniip Matthews is out of the test, rtso on an Adiilles teirton, 
Ulster side drat meets Munster and has withdrawn. He is 
in Cork this afternoon. Mat- imlaced by ^ndan De^an 
thews is sufimiig finm AChilles (wanderers) whh Conor Mo- 
teixlon tioul^ rod cried off Cartoy (UCC) taking over toe 
yesterday. His place in the captaincy. 


Gray has Snored the tempta- 
tion to take im the option to 
include four ndl international 
layers which, although not 
customary for the fixture; was 
munially agreed on this occa- 
sion. ranee have done so uring 
their quota to include 
Cbdorniou. who, at ^ 28, has 
play^ 31 times for his country, 
the first in 1979. . He will be 
pariiiered ]hy Andrieu. who has 
played twice. SaUefranque, the 
foil back, and the prop, 
Portoian. are the two others. 


oeen necessaray true m the post 
of these enoounters, e^ player 
is goi^ to f(Km pan of an 
extensive argument later on for 
membership in the senior 
squad. 

Apatt from three oocarions of 
the 17 times these two teams 
have met. victory has gone to 
toe one playiiV aiftotne. 

WALES B: M Oma^UanaO); I Ewu 
(LianM R BUMod (PoniypooQ. N Ca- 
«lM flJminraMviH (Naaiti): G John 
(CanSfa J wMlIw njwiroi: D 

MaMM. sOMH(!SoiJtti watasPoSoH. 
P FtmSa JMBB aUM . cam P PW 
(NetfiL P NUTpSiein. K MoaWay 
fronmooO. R CoOna ISoulh Wataa 
RoBnL G Jbbw (Ltanam. 

FRANCE B: M uiMkaiiqua (Obk); B 


Mgeni, M AndHau (Nknm O 
gdoiDioa miaausA P Lupiqrau (Dm): 
llniinn Thnnim fioulOuMl. H 8 m 
toauiwt): L Anmry (LouRlea), J-LCarOn 
Uanoa). C Pailalan (TodotnaL K Janie 
oiaouwL V Tharan (Bourgon), V Rdik 
bukmi, Tttaaal (rotSouse), G BowpS- 
Mn ( wtionna). 


middle of the back row goes to a 
fellow internaiionaL David 
Morrow (Baitgor). 

The deposed Irish captain. 
Ciaran Fitzgerald, due 10 lead 
Cofinacbt against Leinster in 


On the Leinster side Ronan 
Kearney is a non-starter and 
Mark Rvan. toe Lansdowne 


TODAY'S RUGBY TEAfVl NEWS 


Galway today. a fitness over. 


Mark Ryan, toe Lansdowne 
wii^ forward, who played 
against LlaneUi recently, takes 


Five of toe team come from 
Toulouse, the French cham- 
pions, arid if that might be 
thought to ffve a solid ba»bone 
to the team, toe same could be 
dirt ofihe Llanelli contingent in 
toe Welsh team. There are rix o' 
them. 

As a team they may not be| 


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Coveniry \ Moseley 
The only John Smith's merit 
taMe A gamo of the ^y ^ 
Hickey return to Ihe Moseley 

bade row efnr a th^ injurtL 

Travers plays on the 
Coventry, vfco ^ uflvifls fit 
hooker lor the unavailahle 


Bristol V London Soottisli 


Jeremy Mackln returns to load 
Scottish in this fbetura rfrnrrangsd 


because of today's cup 
inetchesu Rhodes andneed 


the pack. lAfett is on the wing 
aoainst a reshuffled Bristol pack 


play in 


against a resnuiTiea onsioi pscK 
vmich mchjdes Hone and Crane 
in the back row. 


Oadord 17 r Northampton 

Oxford, after an encouraging 
midweek perfonnance agtum 
Leicester, move MacdoraU. 
trier South African No. R to lock 
and brkn m MSaki. Muffin is 
absent wife Leinster but Ristnan 
and Johnsrxi are fit once more. 


Hartop’s return merely academic 


By Ian McLandifaui 


Rosslyn He v Headiag^ey 


(Srant Puiro. a Queonslanj^. 
maku his debut at contra jOf ™rK 
in this table fi mat^ 
and Anderson join the beci^ 
Brooks the forwards aramst a . 


Neath v S Wales Police 

Jonathan Daries. the welsh 
stand-oH half , plays Ms firat game 
for six waaks after recotfenr^ 
from a pufisd hvnstrirfg. HO ts 


Wasps F Pontypridd 

John EMson and Sean O'Leary 


appear in Wasps' pack against 
Pontypridd. They have a new 

in (jarato Jones 


Hawick, toe Scottish cha^ 
pions. with rmly thdr captain, 
^sion. unavailable, meet an 
on-form &iiiibuigh Academi- 
cals at Mansfidd Park today. 
The visitors have Hartop. a 
Conner Hawidt in tiw 

conre. where he will be in 


White moving to toe flank. 
Prater makes nis ddnit in the 


nwch^hanoM HeaCUni^^ 

have Joyce tuck for his firet 


Jpin^ in the Neath ride by 
Griojak and Gkegpry. vrtio hooks 
because Phiflips IS on 
lapresoitetive duty and Rfcharda' 
suspended. 


half back pakaig 
andWoormnd. 


opporition to Munay. who 
booes to be fit in soite of having 


have JO]^ tuck for his fiiri 
giane since Septemter. 


Waterloo f Saracens 


Ktttitli at flvAer tMtf are 
11 ^ Bilurod hoolar, Jofw. 

Waterkxx unbeaten ki the merit 

trtiia, hBveOoHerte tomw 

Sarueen} and Hestop back on 

thewoigs. 


Richmond t Camb Univ 

Franas Ckxigh has recovered 
from a IMgh injury and leads 
Canfondm against the team 
which nerroMy overeatne Oxford 
University last week. CusMng. 
the scnxn haH, will boon fenular 
m a London Scottish 
member. 


Glamofgan W t Newport 

Ptn Adamson comes in at 
hooker tor Wanderers and wB feoe 
toe former Wales capnakr, Mike 
Watkins. nOD returns to Newport's 
front row mito Hriknan ait prop. 

Bath F US Portsmouth 


For a change Bath can relax. 
iho(^ they have EnM^ players 
HaMoay. Patmer aid TiaH 
availaoia. Sagoe {days Ms first tuB 
g^onthewir^ 


hopes to be fit in spite of having 
an ear stitched last nMeekcnd. 

Ayr, who have ya to win a 
game in this season's MdEwaii's 
raiioiai La^ue. are at home to 
iinhey im GaliL 

The Milibrae side shuffle their 
pack with Templeion moving 
from lock to i^Nhead pxop. 

McAllum shifts forward to lock. 
Brown moves to No- 8 and 
McHaorg returns from tojufy to 
fill toe vacant slot on the ilrok. 
Gala have Cunningham at tight- 
headL Hamer at No. 8 with 


centre for the unavailable 
Miliar. 

Heriot's, who were tipped as 
strong dianengos dor toe 
McEwan's TYo^n. lost their 
Opeitihg game u> West of Scot- 
land ^ slipp^ badly last 
weekend. They ring toe changes 
in their back ' dir^sion with 


Steven and Stephen coming into 
toe centre. Sieveiuon is ai 


follback while Liviitgstone. who 


last yar played at prop, fills toe 
No. 8 position this term. 


No. 8 position this term. 

Their opponents. Glasgow 
Academicals, make one chro^ 
as Kerr is on holiday. He is 
repiaoed in the centre by Garry. 

SiewaiTs/Melville. another 
fended ride, have been hanl-hh 
by injury. Their captain.. Brew- 
ster. hopes 10 make ro early 
V 


return from his elbow ipjury and 
this afternoon Mackenzie. Si- 
mon Scott rod Gibson return to 
their back division. Frame re- 
places Goudie who has a serious 
knee iiuury at Na 8. Jed ForesL 
their visitora. list Roy LakUaw. 
the mternationa] scrum halfi in 
their 16-strong team. 

The fiMiunes of Watsonians 
and Melrose, who meet at 
Myreside. could not be more 
contrasting The home side have 
swept all before them, are on full 
points and can afford to 
stiengihen todr line-up by 
bringing in a winger. Ian Smith. 

Melrose, on the other hand, 
have no points, are beset with 
iqjury and have added thetr 
experienced hooker, Rundman. 
who has sustained a .fecial 
ipjuTy. to add to their ever- 
Icrtgihening casualty list 


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fl 


BOXING 


Harris in 


way of 
McKenzie 


ambitions 


B}' Sriknmar Sen 
Boxing Correspondert 


Tony McKenzie, of Ldccster. 
who so speciaculariy stopped 
CiDlou McKenzie in three 
rounds to win the Britirii Ught- 
wdierweight title last inonth, 
d^ods against Mike Harris, of 
Swansea, at the Stevenage Lei- 
sure Centre, today. 

If be wins quickly again he 
could be bade in toe ring next 
month for his third defence. 
"He wants to win the Lonsdale 
Bdt outright in record time." 
Ken Sqiu'res. his manager, said 
yesterday. "If be does a quick 
job I would like him tadc next 
nranto defenifim a^'n. Von 
can lose toe Briiirii title but you 
cronot lose the bdL" 

It is unlikely, however, toat 
toe diampioa will be aUe to see 
off the Wdshmro quite so 
easily. The score between these 
two stairts at 1-i, McKenzie 


avenging an earner oaeaL 
Harris is a capable boxer with 
five defeats in 25 bouts against 
McKenzie's leooid of 17-3. 
McKenzie has the heavier 
pundi but the British title could 
bring that littie extra out of the 
counter-punching Harris to 
make life difficult ibr the cham- 
pion. perhaps even swinging 


toiw the dialleitger's wqy. 
"Tonv would love Harri 


"Tony would love Harris to 
come forward. Harris is a strong 


and snappy boxer but Tony can 
box too if he has to," Squires 
said The bout should go the 
distance with McKenzie's stron- 
ger finish tellii^ in the end. 

It will be nice lo see Andy 
Straughn. of Hiichin, in action 
again. He has style, grace and 
class. If only he would put his 
beautiful shots together more 
often in contests. In the ring he 
looks like one of those forseifiil 
"Now-what-was-Irtoing?" peo- 
ple; Bui wito the Bntisb 
craiserwei^t title at slake and 
'Tee Jay. of Clapham, after him. 
be shouM not have too much 
difficulty remembering. 

Jay tUB had only five bouts, 
winning four and drawing one; 
though he does have the distinc- 
tion of losing to Evander 
Holyfield of toe United States, 
now the World Boxing Associ- 
ation cniiserweight mampion. 
in the Los Angdes ^ymp^ 
Once the pundes start flying 
anything can happen. Strau^n, 
with 14 wins and two defeau in 
18 contests, should win. 


Defending 


Croydon's Duke McKenzie 
is to defend his European 
flyweight title against 
Giampiero Pinna, of Italy. 


BASEBALL 


Boston are 


one wm 


from title 


Boston (Reuter) — The Bos- 
ton Red Sox moved to within 
one game of their first World 


Series chammonship in 68 years 
bv beating toe New York Mets 


by beatiira the New York Mets 
4-2 on Tnursday night behind 
the artfiil pitching of Bruce 
HuisL 

The victory, claimed at the 
expenre of the Mets' best start- 
ing pitcher. Dwight Gooden, 
gave Boston a three games to 
two lead in the besi-ofseven 
series. The series moves back to 
New York, where the Mets will 
start the third-game winner. Bob 
Oje^ against Roger Clemens 
tonighL Boston endra a sting of 
four successive series wins for 
the viriting team by treating 
iheir Fenway Park supporters to 
a i2-hit anack. 

The crowd also saw HuisL toe 
winner of game one, stretch his 
shutout suing to ISMinnii^son 
his way to becoming the first 
Red left-hairted starter 

since Babe Ruth in ISiSto wina 
series game ai Fenway Park. 

After leaving toe b^es loaded 
in the first inning, the Sox 
got down to business in the 
second. Spike Owen's sacrifice 
scored Dave Henderson, 
who had uipled. In toe third 
inning, ro error by the Mete* 
shortstop, Rafael Santana, 
opened ihe door, and Dwight 
Evans delivered wito a nin- 
scoring single to make it 2-0. 

Heirteison capp^ a two-run 
rally in the fifth with a rtoubte 
dovra the third base line off tbe 
reliever. Sid Fernandez, as toe 
Red Sox seized a 44 Irad. The 
Mets scored riitgte runs in toe 
eighth and ninth innings. 


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40 


SK)KT 


DONCASTER 


Selections 


By Mandarin 

1.15 Hilton Brown. 
MS Plague CRats. 

2.15 Suhailie. 
2.45JokisL 

3.15 Alarm Call 
3.45 High Renown.' 
4 . IS Canoanga 


By Our Newmarket 

Conc^ndem 

1.15 Sir Arnold. 

Ir45 Last Stand. 

2.15 Suhailie. 
Z 4 SJoldsL 

3.15 Don’t Ring Me. 
3.45 Sun StreeL 

4.15 Knockin’ Express. 


By Michael Seely 
2 .IS Suhailie. 4 wIS Canango. 

Guide to our inr-line racecard 

103 i12i 04432 TnilESRMM(CO4n(MrsJRytoy)BHBli9-lO0 


103(13 04432 TNESRMMfCOan (Mrs jRytoyJBHUiO-lOO U7-2 

Raeeeoto nnnber. Orsw h bncfiotB. Six-figun tfts ian a wraier. BFheaKn tanourtts in loiBst 
form (I=4e0. P^uled lo. U-unssated radar. B- reori. Omar h Indcals. TVainar. Age end 
braugntdomi. &elqueaijnL n^fuaaQ. Hina's wai{^ nder plus any MNnnca. ina Times 
name (B-Unkers- V-«sor. H-haod. E-ey ea KeM. & Pin^ Hanmcapijar's i»kig. Appnwnate sailing 
eomewirmar. D-dnance winner. CIVcomaand pricai 


Going; good, round course; good to soft, straigfrt 
Draw; low numbers best 

1.15 LONG JOHN SCOTCH WHISKT HANDICAP EUROPEAN 
APPRENTICE CHAMPIONSHIP (£3.388; 7f) (11 runners) 

1 ( 1 ) 040420 SI SIGMOR(FSdknaii}P cote 4.1 04 Jaaa nyami vaaqnez (SM 

2 (3 303102 HILTDNB80WH(iq(LonIMeiUphi4PCimleli54fi SDvnoa 

3 (5) 231313 SIR AflNOLOD(J James) A SlBwarT 34^1 J unju i Jc Uen ea n (Pwg 

4 (3) 40000 AMffiO LOCO (JtOKBrassey 54-1 GCmlartGB) 

5 (8) in4230 CO«CIOBnrAL(0)(RSarigsiBi}MWDkdintfan44'10 — Joliii Egan <b4 

B (Q 01203 SAILOfrs SONG (■q(lnb 090 ioi}N Vlgom 44-10 ... Luca SomMki ' 

7 (9) 00341/0 GOUVEmO (MTS JU«ms}J Berry 7-«T RankUMmhi 

8 ( 4 ) 000000 DatlKMGlAO(D}|JRBediran)MTano]hns 44-7 _ JerniyMoOi 

9 (11) 1D3tX» SWMaKRTTiamUQB McMahon 344 LeelBrMGGnri 

10 (13 340040 flEIM)EeRWALK(p)(AAitf»i)GHuHer4.44 N 

11 (7) OOOOO CO»lSmEETD(MVHKn4JB0Bley444 DoidriiwaR^ 


9710-1 
or 4-1 
Of 5-1 
92-10-1 
94 5-1 


B (Q 012033 SAIlJOfrS80flG(D)(lnimgmioi}NVig(vs44-10 ... LiK«5onanlMe(IMM *09774 

7 (9) 00341/0 GOUVEmO (Mrs JU«MS}J Berry 7-«T BsMc UMrafcig (WG» — — 

8 (4) 000000 DatlKMGlAO(D}(JRBediran)MTano]hns4-a-7 ..... Jenn]rMaOer(SweJ 91 9-1 

9 (11) 1D3tX» SW Mai (RThomUQB McMahon 344 LeelBr McGmlty (BM) 03 — 

10(13 340040 REIMlEeR WALK (p) (A AMmOGHuHer 4-44 Ml^nek n 12-1 

11 (7) 000000 CO»lSmEETD(MVHKn4JB0Bley444 Doidrii^ Rapmid (R) 92 — 

1905; ASSWAH 544 V Ma ss aM s ia (4-1) J HMlay 10 ran 
CnRIUI SI SKma^ oft Iha coma afewe July. aarSer (04) 3 runnanm to Gray Dasire (Ml ki ItaA 

r\^nin Group avant/Bl.eiSSSaienod to soft May is. -id ranli amigo LOCO(^1«i bade SVI but has 
oeneraDy run baitty shies. HILTON SRCWN ftids thm iSstance ideal now and ( 9-3 was beatm^ a nech to 
Meet The Greek ^1 1 1 at Nawmaifiet last Isna. SAILarS SONG ^3 a neck away 3rd ( 71 . 26027. good. Od 
16. 15 ran). SIR ARNOLD (!B -13 1 K am to HkUan Bilet^ at Newmaitiat with sew tlGH(44L whomiMto 
atiinv ftvm beyond sprint trips. 4 I/a back hi 6 tti (W, £o> 7 k good to (inm, Oct A 9 ran). cgMaDEMUj^l 1 ) 
2 »l Srd to Sttady Edisa ( 8-13 at unaflsid In early August f^EZaeag^ 13 r^ SAKjq^SONG ( 94 ) w» 
7th. DOnONG LAO ( 4 - 7 ) strong finiiliii^ 3 SOI to PWfact TnWig ( 9 - 11 ) at NSmarint (Of. E 6 S 91 . good. Oct 1 & 
24 ran). 

Setoetac SAILORS SONG 

1.45 YORKSHIRE TELEVISION NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £4^ 

71) ^1 runners) 


4 (4) 

5 n) 

6 (I 3 

T (3) 
8 (IS) 
10 ( 3 . 
12 (3 
14 (6) 

16 (30 

17 (IQ 

18 (14) 
« bi> 
22 (13) 
24 (10) 
26 (21) 
28 (16) 

29 (9) 

30 (IQ 

31 IQ 

32 (13 
36 (7) 


034010 PEAT5HOODSHDOTBi(G Ashton) MBrttahi 0-7 

01432 PLAGUE 01UnS(RHasfc8tti}MSin]|ly 94 

0343 PORESIGHriStiaiWiMohaiirneQLPigooaM 

0314 PETER MOON (CWad«rlll)RAraistrang 9-1 

00210 lUNSEA-nC(JC8tThi^)PftMdn9-1 

03012 PREMER LAD (BF>(R Stony) WPaama 94 

32100 ANnNOUS(L>(3DlRWardan)MHEastefby8’12 

004014 SPEEDQIRD(D)(M Baxter) M Ryan 8-12 

0314 MELODY HAXBl (IQ (Mrs P Shaw) B HRs 8-10 

14300 BNALMAGHnil(BF)(HAi4lBMoun)HTTxiiiWOn Jones 8-10. 

404 mORE BRASS (SheNtfiMohaiiiiieQCBntiain 8-10 

420 BUSH OmOADIBlie Swain) Miss SHaU 94 

010420 CLOWN SI1IEAKER(ExaisWSt8e(S)MHEa$»iby 44 

003442 KALEB)OPHONE[J Routes) WBsay 44 

304 wiClin-ASPRMGS(ABudge)JiiniiyFil2geiMd43 

020120 POUHTAING CHOICE (P)(ni^H|]UiiigsLU)K Stone 44 — 

000302 OOMMaNSORGVSY(L May) 0 Brennan 84 

0001 MSB SARAJAIE(G Smyth) RHottohead 7-12 

193 DBIWENrVALLEY(DBue}»iaii)RHaniK)n7-12 

00331 LASTSrAID(D)g:PhatpBon)JHfeidtoy7-l2 

210342 SAUNDBS LASS (C Scott) R Holder 7-7 


.. KDailey 

. SCMdiMn 
mEddtfy 


.QBniM' 

DMcMi 


98 W 
88 &-1 
8212-1 
86PB-1 
<016-1 
9010-1 
87 — 


r noBBnon 
JIMd 

RW» 


KHodspon 
^ QCvtv 
^MWtaod 


82 8-1 


81 — 


8816-1 


8CUtam(7) 



ASlieatafq 

_SDM*an 


1885: IXX1IIAT1C 9-1 S CautMn n2-1) R Johnson Houghton 16 ran 


PEATSWOOD SHOOTBIt 58) In listed race last 8m 
NKSS SlUIAMNE f7-ia in on son mund at 


PnRM PEATSWOOD SHOff 
rWniVI NKSSSARAJANEf?-! 

lAD (B-Q was snotherSW away wi 
^ when »l M 18-1 1) to Wdr am 


miously (8-11) made aO end Met 
iia soft. Aug %20fan). phener 


ly when 2%iad|8-11)toWW Brevet at LegfieW ^.£1932. good ID thin. Oct 9e 20 ran). 8PEB)BHD(B-« 
3K] 4m ID f Try ^ m Iftnimiarkat m.lh 135Kgm. Oc2 17, iSrai^ ICAUIIX3PHOIC 1 KI ^ 

North Pacific (7-12) at Ayrnm, £51^ e good, Oct 13). FOUKTAINS CHOI^ we< beaten m 8n^ ear^ (8^ 
dead-heated wKh Loro wmgate (9%) at Wdtvertiainplon (7f. £1378. good to flmib Sep 15, 9 ran). 
COMMOHSPR GIPSY is ii coh tistf nt; ran wel last 8n» when iy«2rid(&^toAfM6«3te Magic (Mh 
niaiden(lm,£ll672good,Oct14,l1 m). lAST STAND (9-0) a< out to win Yannoiith daimerv shoithead 
tram No be (7r£249S,iMO(L Sap 17, 19 ran^ 

ge i ecfi op; c Siliiii PMai D n giiSy 


2.15 WILUAM HILL FUTURITY STAKES (Qroup I; E-Y^a £44.120: 1m) 
(11 rumers) 


rcTi 


1 (Q 12 ARABMNSieK^PIlippQJDlink3pS4 C 

2 (4) 2311 BBiGALFnE(D)(NPiaipQCBnnato94 

4 (Q 000 GWYNRAS(W Griffiths) JTIioiiias 94 

8 (Q 21 LOVE THE GROOM (Mis VGaucci del BonQJ Dunlop 94 

9 0 12104 MR EATS (RoUvate Ltd) PKeSeviay 94 

11 (Q 31 iEFERENCEPOBrr(I))(LReaifenaii}H Cecil 94 

12 (Q 320120 SANTEUA SAM (RTaonolM Ryan 94 

13 (1) 0D132 STILLMAN OF) (PMuidDan)MHEaswtiy 94 

14 ( 10 ) 111 SUHAILE(S>iaHtMohananoi9HC8eB94 

15 (7) 4111 TOLUCA LAKE (CO) (JVdUodQLPiggott 94 

16 (11) 211013 SMNMG WATER (RCnjtcM 8 y)R Johnson Houghton B-11 

ISOShBAXMAROFF 94 G Starkey (2-1 taw) G Harwood 9 ran 


iAamuaian OT 4-1 

. MRobens 07 6-1 

. fil wwini — 

PRotataaon 8216-1 


95 4-1 
80 — 
77 — 
>99F2-1 
92 6-1 
8712-1 


-.GBwdtr 

rafeaaaiy 

NDay 

_MBWi 


JReid 


27. 9 rail). Ml EATS ^lllwm 41 back 4m, SANTEIU SAM (8-11) 
Diiilap's 2adsmng. LOVETIE GROOML n^ll) niet witbtnouDle in njp 
snort-read at Sandown (7f, E3STS. good to firm, S8pl24, 6 ran). RE 
cotase recent in heating Mulholanda (8-11) 81 at Sandown (1m,£3053. 


(Ml) 


good to finn. Sept 


( 9 - 5 ) also broim the 2 )fD course naoora, by 2 secofids, when a Gornforiahie 61 Itaftlock 
zona (B- 1 1 ) (1 rn 4 (Ms, £ 7 M)l firm, Oct 4,3 ran)L 71)8 rnWdte lag of TOLUCA JJUSS hat 
( 71 ), b^Si: re ocmpleM h in a Don^Rr ni 8 S^ ( 9 -n Dy an easy 21 (tom Socnaone Bi 


PONT 0 - 11 ) brola the 
ii,Sept& 8 rBrO.SUHA 


winner over TMary 
hat-trick came at Ostand 


2.45 SOLAGLAS ENERGY SAVERS HANDICAP (£6.400: 61) (15 
runners) 


1 ( 10 ) 

3 (7) 

4 (Q 

5 n) 

6 (2) 
7 ( 15 ) 
9 n3) 

10 (9) 

12 (IQ 

13 (Q 
15 (14) 
21 (Q 

ZZ (5) 
23 ni) 
2 S (4) 


000240 

111104 

300100 

010000 

010000 

IVOOOOO 

012004 

120030 

021110 


CUE SVMPATICA (Mrs A MuhwQR Boas 4-144 JRaid 

CATHERMESWELL(CD}(H^ppOdlania)M WEast8rty444 _ SCWdian 


000044 

044000 

004013 

404434 


PRECIOUS OCTAL (D){GMoaM) A bi]^ 444 NOHHUIMCR 

DAWirSDELIGHr(V.CD)(Klvory)Kln>y84-0 W Woods (Q 

MATOU(Ciq{MnTPIck|GPrilChanl-GoRh»444 CAmneen 

ALL IS FORGIVEN (VJ)} (Mis I N0nnan)D Thom SR-IS G Sexton 

TUFUH(D)(HM-Makttun) A Stewart 444 MRobeito 

BRIDGE STRST LADY (D){MWRcteQJ Bosley 444 G Baxter 

JOKIST(0)(JVin|o)J Shaw 444 PatEddav 

QUINTA REEF (I1){F Lea) MJante 444 RCochiana 

CHAPLMS CLUB {B44(PSavigOCtapm8n 444 KDaday 

KATMIH) (CO) (G ft indon Eng Co Ud) R WoocDousa B-7-11 N Caillart 

IIEESONiaNG(D)bVVIoox)BMclkM)On&^^ BCmariay 

JARROVIAN(BJI)(ALBBk»d>TI=Miwst3-7-9(6a)d QCartar 

BATON BOV (A Wr^MBritttb) 5-7-7 A Mood 

1985: MATOU 5-7-12 W Ryan (1 1-2) Q PrttchtfOGordon 9 r»i 


rcTi 


8512-1 
8212-1 
91 — 
9610-1 
96 6-1 
90 7-1 
85 ID-1 
98 5-1 


9514-1 

92 a -1 


PORM CATYIERmeswELL{ 9 -lO)t)eatenl)Hlr)lD 4 mbyHan 

rv/nm MATqU( 9 - 6 )Mof 9 ( 6 l,£B 779 .goGdtolirni,Oai 1 )L 


rm^atYoric,abalowpm 

PRECIOUS IMTAL tried over 7 andSf 


mouth (6f. E3090, good. Aug 27. 10 ran). CHAPUNS CLUB 
Thursday, BRIDGE STKEETLADY (^7) behind (5f, £<901, i 
short head and a neck by Naosn) (6<4) under a flib Danaltv a 


leawa 

r 2 nd to 


short head anda neck by Nagain (8^) under 
mn). 


to soft 16 ran 


penalty at Redcar on 


16 rank J 
Thidway 


i. £3915,aoft. May 6, 6 rati), 
ar from Usafie (SB) at Yar- 
y Ughi 0-3) at Newbiay on 
AHNWAN (10-1) beaten a 
(Bf, £2674. good ID firm, 26 


3.15 WHITE ROSE SELLING STAKES (£6,000: 1m 41) (19 runneis.) 


1 (7) 

2 (5) 

3 nQ 

6 (15) 

4 14) 

9 (1) 

11 0) 

14 (IQ 

15 (13) 400100 HOT BETTY ^ (Mis E Adah) Ron Thompson 44-11 RPEIBalt 

17 (72) 301/100- JUDY^ DOWRY (Ms VMoGeougn/WWlunon 44-11 MOhcli 

21 (IQ 100223 SIONEBflOKER(E Angd)D Hay* JcXteB 44-11 ... JRaid 

22 (14) 410 ALARM CALL (D) (Ms D Money) DMnlay 4410 RCoetesow 

24 (Q 040000 BELVEL(K Rohan) P Rohan 445 SMonto 

26 (11) 040340 COLEMAN HAWKINS (SBTawerJPMakii 445 .... GBaattf 

27 (Q 000403 KERRY MAY SMG (4) (RSootQM Ryan 446 PRoMnaon 

28 (IQ 323220 NO STDPPING (B) (Lt-ColJ Dascon) R Hannan 445 MRoboite 

29 (6) 041400 SIR BRETT (^0){RekWaleUQPiMtew9y44-5»-.—~~— CAwnaiaan 

31 (Q 000000 WAV ABOVE (H Hutton) P Rohan 445 JQMm^ 

34(17) OOOOOO COSMC FLIGHT (EPeaiQMliahar 442 MWQham 

19B5t MUSICAL HVSTERV M MUbt (3-1) R Boss IB ivi 

145 EUHFELD PARK STAKES (£a07D: ^ 


000032 


9002-18 

000-100 


031203 

00200-1 


MCXMJESrailDjrMarshegMUsharOM DHelMr 

SKfBQOT (Mrs B RoUnaon) E Carter 7-9-5 — Wtandy Cafler 

RAINING PEARL (R Goodman) BSlevunsSM G Ranch 

CAVAUEItAVANTGARDEtCSMtftar Camels) PVWghamN-M KDartay 

DICK lowaa (VJD) (vvenare Farms SM LI4 K Nory S-M _ A ShmAa (S) 
HARBOUR BAZAAR (V)(M Courtney) RSirepaanfrSO.......^ SWWtMoiih 

HULL TERN (B)(SStaoay) Amts 4-9-0 SWabiMr 

DONT RING ME (BJt)(CTbte^WHastoigs-Bas8 4^11 Pal Eddery 

HOT BETTY OR (Mrs EAdak) Ron Thomoson 64-11 RPEISell 


JRaid 


74 — 

73 — 
83 6-1 
80 — 
82 14-1 

74 — 

75 5-1 
92 8-1 

79 — 

80 10-1 
73 — 
90F2-1 

91 14-1 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 

Suhailie can give Cecil 
sixth Futurity triumph 


By Mandarni (Mkhari PbSUps) 


In an atlenipt to win the 
William Hill Futurity for the 
sixth lime 3 i Doncaster todays 
Henry Cedi win be saddling 
Rtference Point in addition to 
Suhailie. 

Steve Cautben has put his 
own Judgement on the line ^ 
picking the unbeaten Suhailie, 
who recently broke the track 
record at Haydodc when he 
won the Dream Mile. But 
Reference Point is dearly no 
slouch either, having also set a 
course record at Sandoi^ 
and be will derive consid- 
erable benefit from having Pat 
j^dery in the addle: 

Cautfaen’s dedsion was in- 
fluenced to some extent 
Suhailie's greater experieace. 
Also he is probably the easier 
ride as Reference Point is 
renowned for his laziness. I 
believe that Cautben has 
made the right choice and 
Suhailie gets my vote. 

Ijke CedL John Dunlop 
will be two-banded in hu 
attempt to win the race for the 
first time. A fest-finishing 
second in the Somerville 
Tanersall Stakes at New- 


market earlier this month. 
Aral^n Sieik had Thurs^y’S 
Horns Hill Stakes winner. 
Nabeez, behind. I 

hold Arabian Sieik in higb 
r^ard and pre^ him lo 
E^lop's other ninner. the 
Sandown winner. Love The 
Groom. 

Neither the Royal Lodge 
winner. Bengal Fire, nor Les- 
ter Pirn's numer. Toloca 
Lake, will fail for lack of 
siamioa. In this instance 
though, I think that diey wiH 
both find Suhailie too g(^ 

Chuthen can initiate a dou- 
Ue on 0 *Rats in the 
Yorkshire Television ^fur 5 - 
ery. The form of his last race at 
Newbury, where be sjdit Ori- 
ent Line and .Able Saint, has 
worked out wiHL 

No matter how he fares on 
Reference Point. Eddery 
should sijU enjoy another 
profitable afiemoon by win- 
ning the Sola^as Eneigy Sav- 
eis Handicap on Jokist and 
the Variety Oub Sunshine 
Coadi Slakes on Cuouigo, 
who finished fbunh at Ascot 
reoendy behind the hi^y- 
rated Raahia. 


Whatever dtance Jokist had 
of winning the Ayr Gold Cup. 
for whi^ he started second 
fevourire; evaporated soon af- 
ter the sian wben he was 
crossed and badly hampered. 

Twelve months ^o Michael 
Stoule and W^^ter Swinburn 
combined to win the $i Simon 
Slakes at Newbury for the Aga 
Khan with Sharaaii. While 
Kazaroan, their representative 
this dme. may not quite be in 
his class, he is still stiqi^y 
fended following that decisive 
win in the Cumberland Lodge 
Stakes at Ascou 

His opposition today in- 
cludes the highly promising 
Verd-.Andque. not to mention 
Jupiter hj^d, winner of the 
corresponding race two years 
ago, and Nisnas. who beat 
Vei^-Antique at Liqdieid in 
tfaeqning. But lam smi happy 
to go nap on Kazaroun. 

Finally. Perfect Timii^ 
who has won valuable sprint 
handicaps the last two Sat- 
urdays, can complete her tre- 
ble in the Mecca Bookmakers 
Handicapi 


1 (Q 1041 HOLUSTON (DPIWI 1 )R Johnson Houghton 4-45~-_....>.»-^. JReid 85 41 

2 (Q 2D13N SUN STREET (p)(J HE) CBntton 442 GBaxter TB — 

3 (11) 4 ALL FLASH (V)(DDobSaQRS«toUn 440 SWMtemfll 

4 ( 10 ) ZtQQIMI ta8HRENOWN(pewfra5tiMuatiraam9)JJ4filin4fr40»_-_MEditaY 

5 (Q 03/0000- TROY FAR (R 4 'JUpBW)JEdiMid5 4.40 4 CmiliMn • 99 

7 (12) 0401)4 ALUMOnEtKBtehnrtQMCtupiiian 4^ JWMHlit 

8 (Q 202224 MLANOBT (J D»Ms) J Davtas 445 — 92 — 

9 ^ 222121 SHAHTS CHOICE (Lont(^aid)JOuitap 445 CAennen 84 3-1 

10 (4) 002000 SHACK (Mis P Butler) HCoBiigifidga 4-45 Mi a iMii ar 7S — 

12 (7) 924-00 LA ROSE GRISE (R DNano^ Jifmy Rzgoiald 4^„— - M Robtflt — 8-1 

13 (9 30 PALMAHAUI(UtoN) 7 F 8 iTOLtd)UHEastt^ AMiooIttfS} 98 94 

19 (1) 0040 DAWN LOCH (SMch Mohamtwd) J Shaw G Garlir 91 8-1 

19K: RB£Kro 3-7-6 G Carter ( 6 -^ 1 ) M Janris 10 ran 

4.15 VARIETY CLUB ‘SUNSHINE COACH* MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,782: 60 (23 

runners) 

3(15) SICK BEN E DI C T (RBonnyca a ite}BH»s>0 MHIto — 12-1 

5 (Q 4 CAIIANGO(BF)(MrsAPteSGii)MSUuta40 PM EOdwy • 99 P9-4 

7 (la 042 GEORGE JAMES (Sf^lRPmlvaOJDuilap 94 CAmonen H 4l 

9 (14) » tEATSeBCiR(SportngSian9Ud)DLesfc94 JWBtemi 

lD (13) 00 HKm CHATEAU (MUHertJSgeering 44) MBkek 72 — 

12 (ZO) HYPNOU)GY{L(X(JD8rty}WHefilteg»Ease44) RUlM(Q 

16 (A) joevs JET (D Hunt) J Spearing 40 DMehob 

17(16) 03 KNOCKBrEXPflESS(WJoyGe)GHu(fer40 MMMer 91141 

19 (2t). BWNAOHIL (H Al-Maktouin) P Welwyn 941 RCoehiana — — 

23 (Q 03 PROSPECT PLACE (Mrs COeraghty) Mbs S HR 40 — Tr»» CT t 87141 

25 (23) 00 SERGEANT SMOKE (TSnnmjDArtHJtnol 40 KOvtoy 89 — 

27 (22) <)(» SHANNON nVERUKao(2i)J Bosley 4C BOoutey 

29 (1) 04220 SIMORKIS(ETumfl0JGtover40 N0N4UMCR 99141 

31(11] 0 TAVLOR^S REVENGE (T^ytefS Of SolaiQHCoinngilpge 40 MRhiSMr 

33 (6) UPWCU.(DGoeM}RWNcal(ir40 ..... OMcKeown 

35 (Q VERDCN CANYON (Miss HGevaralGPritohaiiHSoraon 40 — PRotltisan 

36(17) WATER CITY (DfCStellkig)RAfnntJang 40 vaniOi(Q — 14-i 

38 (5) 00 ZB< WEST THREE (BiaidwQoa Lid) RAtinSirong 40 m.-RSIM 

39 (7) AS SHARP (CQ>tMLeni09)CBiii»n 411 MRobatte 

46(19) 0 HENnETrAPlA(£(MrsSRu(toQGPntslwi4Gonlon4l1 — SCwOien 18 41 

49 (1Q 022 MA PETITE LASSIE (Knscher)M Francis 411 JRekI 92 141 

51 (12) Pir TALK (Dowager Ledy Bute) JW Wans 411 AMercar — — 

52 (3) SHAMAYtL(HAMriaktaun)H'niom9on Jones 411 .......RHBa — 41 

1985 BUIE EYB) BOY 40 S Cauthen (11-4) M Stoute 17 ran 


1041 

2 D 1 SN 

4 

»Q(QIMI 

03/0004 

04004 


85 41 
78 — 


222121 

002000 

02440 

SO 

0040 


eCauHten teSSFU 


84 3-1 
IS — 
— 41 
98 42 
91 41 


3 (IS) 
5 (Q 
7 (IQ 
9 (14) 
ID (13) 
12 (20) 

16 ( 4 ) 

17 ( 16 ) 
19 ( 21 ) 
Z 3 (Z) 

26 ( 23 ) 

27 ( 22 ) 
29 (1) 
31 ( 11 ) 
33 ( 6 ) 

35 (Q 

36 (17) 

38 (5) 

39 (7) 
46 (IS) 
49 (1Q 

51 ( 12 ) 

52 (3) 


M HMa — 12-1 

.^PMEOdary *99144 
- CAimuaaan 39 4l 

JWBteiM 

MBkek 72 — 

__RUiaa(Q 

DMehoOa 

M MMar 91 141 

R Caehiana — — 

Tljion 87141 

KDartay 89 — 


-14-1 


18 41 
92 141 

— 41 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 

Mirers Runnera PerueiN 


JOCKEYS 


HCaci 

26 

9 $ 

29.5 

MSroutB 

30 

13t 

22.9 

J Duntop 

17 

101 

16 J 

WHastuigs-Biass 

10 

66 

1&4 

BHIIS 

23 

149 

15.4 

H Thorraon Jones 

S 

63 

14.3 


NDay 

SCauttiaa 

RatEddary 

RH«s 

KHo<|geon 

MHAS 


Wnnare * 

Ridgs 

Par cant 

8 

38 

21.0 

37 

237 

15.8 

19 

131 

14^5 

9 

<1 

11.1 

6 

96 

9^ 

.6 

81 

7A 



r 


HUNTINGDON 


Setections 

By Mandarin 

2 J) General Concorde: 2.30 Ishkomann. 3.0 
Axmoch. 3.30 Golden MinstreL 4.0 1 Anriiwg 
Board. 4.30 Jenny Wyllie: 


Going: good 

2.00 TEROTRIM NOVICE HURDLE (^: 2in 
>1(X)yd|) (16 runners) 

1 BAfll»NIC9iM4l46 RCanpbd 

4 20/ lagBALCmiCMg A BaMy 4104 __ 

Mba Starei MorattDTd 

8 SWEETAWVGGraoeyZ-lM PGiacavn 

9 ra lURCYBWmAIng^S'lU 

10 -m BREAKFAST CAR DGrisM 4-10-5 I 


D mfS^Bun 

PGiMayfO 

StovtKitt 


11 CfaCLETfBIJJvikkB 4-10-5 JWMto 

12 000- EVESHAM WTDCRS Mrs J CM 4-TM„JDki^ 

13 PQ -0 HALF A BU CK W Ke mp 4-108 SShSM 

14 OCH KARAKTER RSERBICE A Janas 4-1015 PSCBdane 


16 POO- SIERWOOD FOREST J 


SavBfS 

18 VAL PRIVE D Rim4-10£! 

19 OU WAUBSANDn Spearing MQ4.. 

21 0- EWE LAMB Mrs P Sly 5-10-1 

22 ANrrA‘SAm£PFteatB4-lOO 

23 003- ETE PUSHER flex Cwtar 4-106 — 

24 3420 HALliVWBPPrttcaiard 4-100 


4 - 10 ^ 


„„ CBrowa 

JBariM 

P Wanwr 

HBaitaal 

^ S Jobaann 

PBartoa 

^.^RSiraiige 


3M TEROSON HURDLE (£3.583: 2m 100yd} (4) 

1 13-1 A0H0CHMrsS0lwr7-ll'lD JDuggaa 

3 eOV CRIT)CALPA1HMGJCrDH7-11.S WH MQV a M 

4 1/M KaYISUNSErHtsKMaaiMy7-ll.6 SJOM 

6 2F PARS HATCH JJaifians 4-1 1-1 JWIite 

I- 7 Aonoch. 41 Pam Makt^ 141 ikoyi Sunaai, 34i 
CnwalRaiL 

3.30 TEROSON HANDICAP CHASE (£1,662; 3m) 

( 6 ) 

2 1343 MASTBI TERCEL (mDTTioni 141 1-7 MBiMnan 

3 33-1 PBi.CUMB(D|P8Mey411-5 SMenhaad 

5 042 QQmBfWSTRELJ (9^ 7-1411 RRMM 

5 F41 GUtLA WAT OGandodb 7-144 PBatten 

13 2RF4 CELTIC HAM£r(OPCUxte>7-1(M] H-SOawtey(Q 

I I - 8 GOklBtt MtWM. 42 Master Tercri, 4-1 (aoDA Vfaw, 4 
I AUCbnib, 12-1 CatK Hamlet 

TEROTEX HANDICAP (£1,632: 2m 20()yd) (9) 

4 234 LAM)INC BOARD (QP Hams 41 1-7 RSMm 

5 OOP/ BASR.'SCaiOICERaiainpMi 11-11-2 RRawc 

6 Utn- MAJUBA ROAD DOnghton 41410 PDouHa 

7 23P KMURiraXP) A Jaws 41410 TJuHtoW 

8 1100 VALECHIULSiGE(BUC]KMoraan 12-104 KRyvitQ 
ID P/R- BIRDSTRElUI(gRa)eplianll(M48Mr8CSIna*naa 

11 0P2P KAY HARKBl Mrs M Thomas 41(HI SJONeM 

12 0300 WESTBUNG HOME OGnssea 12-1041 RGoUMete 

13 P8F ABBEY AVENUES Dow 41(M1 MBastttd 


2-1 Chtetet 7-2 Ewe Laonbi 4-i Tuity Boy. 41 Wabner 
Sands. 41 HaBowad, 141 ^ Flashw, 141 oth^ 


9-4 lArxfing Board, 41 KAmir, 4-1 Vale ChaOenga, 41 
MQUta Read, 41 Basfs Choice. 141 others. 

4.30 TEROTRIM NOVICE HURDLE (£980; 2m 
lOC^ ( 11 ) 

2 04» LJBSnY WALK GGracay 7-146 PGneay(7) 


HETOPFICER M Shmna 410-5 

POLYNOR M Rysi 4106 

UHFT TENT Miss B Stenters 4106-. 


PBwtaa 

JHUauiMta 
WlAnta 


2.30 TEROFORM NOVICE CHASE (£1,670: 2m Sf) 
( 11 ) 

1 3D-1 ISHKOMANN JSDOBring 7 - 1 1-7 PScudamora 

2 1-33 BIOKEN WING NHendra 

6 2 FU 2 GlOLHmGKMow 6 - 11-0 KRyan (71 

8 P 3 -P IBDOJW Mrs RWiiro 9 - 11-0 Ifr S Andffm ( 4 ) 

g PSV PBIIIAB 06 K Slone 7 - 11-0 ASBkiger 

10 J 30 ~ ggATcri pramt 

11 4 I 2 F TEXAS TW^OOtigmoft 6 - 11-0 PDaritie 

15 M SPEY HAWK A Jarvis 5 - 10-12 KBUrinM 

16 UNC 1 £ BUFFWVUhffton 5-1012 S J OIU 

17 3944 WASSaUJenhte 5 - 10-12 SSfabton 

16 800 - HPEUBHTf^BtaiiflrYli-iaQ _■ 

11 ^ tohkamann, 100-30 Pannabos, 9-2 Brekan Wkig, 6 -l 
W&sseDU 8-1 Seaiell. 10-1 GicMng, 12^1 others. 


WORCESTER 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Seasoned Ember. 2.4S Long EngR; 

3. 15 Rend] Union. 3.4S Parang. 4.1 
heiteit. 4.45 Tenzing. 5. 1 5 Desert Hero. 


10 0P6 CHARLESTON GEORGE RShaphted 4-146 _ 

12 03- FOIffi FOR UNCLE ICtemM 4-146 RCanpbel 

17 440 ZIGUMCHCnj 3^4-146 CBmwn 

18 JEWlYWYlllEJFraneonie4l4l SSmShEcGtaa 

19 FPF- PLATINUM BLOND Rex Carter 4141 SWaods(7) 

20 2 CM)IEGm.SMaaor4-14a MHMitegten 

21 -400 LADY NLLANENGasaiee 4-140 AAdm(7) 

148 CtecSe GH. 7-2 Jenny Wylta. 4-1 Pabnor. 41 Mat 
OMcw. 41 Rxfl- For Unda. 141 Lady KBa^ 141 ottiersL 




Course specialists 

TRAINB18: P Harris 8 wttnan froni 35 runners, 22:9%: M Ryan 
8 Ircim 35, 22J9%: D Garatotto 12 Iran 61, 1^^^ 

JOCKEY& P Barton 14 wmers froRi 64 rides, 21.9%: 6 Smtth 
EcGles26frcxn 1%219%:PSciid8nore 12rrom84, 14.3%, 


2D Pa23 SBIoniiAGlIlHCO Mrs M Babbage 9-10-12 

H 


oent. 

Filz- 


Going: good 

2.15 ALBION SBJJNG HANDICAP HURDLE (£735: 
2m) (15 mimers) 

4 F80 SHAIiaEXFBaBICERHartop411-7 RCiink 

5 1483 SE*S0NEDanatB>JBraiftey411-6 GlMes 

7 2M G00ORIVESTMEIfrBLtewellyn411-5 RPuacy 


10 0301 NICELY I 8 CELY 

11 0323 LOGCAHNlQi 

12 3000 JUSTSPUDJP! 


ELYmPBawden411-0 I 

(QW Clay 5-1 1 - 0 ...~.» Oli 
jPSni^ii-o 


21 OOP SICYGBAHG E(BF) JJartdnB 41412 SSharwoodT 

22 fiOQ T 0 NrSW)iKIKMAMEWRVnton 9414 l 2 .AJeaai 

26 8 UCKSKnrSBeSTR 0 aMn 4 - 10^11 CJoiMi 

27 BUTTON YOUR UP DMUmson 4-10.11. RDteiwaody 

32 0P4 LOVER COVBIJS King 4-10-11 SMcttoN 

33 MR PARKER JGACRdClO-ll EMuMv 

34 4141 PALACIIIEF(C0)TCasey4-l411 EBwAtaylQ 

36 UF RIC008TAR(B)J8rB(9ey4-lO-ll GDaNei 

39 WATCHrrTOMWMonte4.10-11 WMonte 

40 WBlWOHERDNlcinison 4-10^11 R0MaM 

43 UV HARVEYW CHOICE 8 Shaw 4147 DOSa 

44 SLE OF PANDORA GYandtay 410-7 CSteNh 

47 VOWCHURCH LADY DEcMey 410-7 AShawM 

50 PORCHESTER RUN J Webber 4-146 GMmaWi 

51 RUBY FLIGHT RE^ 4-106 JBryan 

5-2 Tlmlyn. 11-4 nrang, 11-2 Ramadi Dawn, 41 
Shygronga. tft-l AtkinsaiRS. 14i Ano(twrN(xlollt,PalaCM9f. 

4.15 MITCHELLS & BURERS BREWERY 
HANDICAP CHASE (£3,215: 3m) (8) 


80 — I 13 044 NOR1HBMHALO(D)AChainbSfWn410-13 




Bell. 141 JUSt SplxLDr 


15 OOK SaiSnCEBaLCnRVbKSpw4.1411_MPBitanB 

17 OOV UPLAMIGOOS Mb DWIIamO 41410 JBiyan 

18 OOW inoaRNBJUS(B)F 8 n 1 bn 4 l 4 lO BIM 

19 OP-P COOB) LOVE DBUtlnO 4 - 10-10 DJBKdiaO(7) 

21 an- cur A GAPER (QBPraaoe 4-1410 GLandnfQ 

23 OP- RUSTY ROC MDBvtes 41410 APifeam 

25 OFF- CATONBOYAOUin414tO lfT«0tePi(7) 

27 ^ FULLOF9PKDHO‘Nefl41410 RDMMDOdy 

7-2 Nteely Nicely. 42 Log Cabin. 41 Seasoned Bnbar. 7-1 
(3ood InvesttnenL 41 Sonioa Bell, 141 JUSt 
CornaKus. 

Z45 PRIDE OF THE MHJLANDS NOVICE CHASE 
(DivI: £1306: 2m) (13) 

1 0-11 ASM MMQRinCHItahtera 411-5... RHyM 

3 141 LQNGBlQAGaCNrp)DNIcli 0 lS 0 n 411-5 

RDteiwaody 

4 002 - ACEOFSPESMisGJcne3411-0 JBrytel 

5 OOP BMMOnPRMCEiqKBBIiap 411-0 ..Jhaat 

9 *6 GQMQORBmwn7.1l4) JBnMn(7) 

12 002 - ISAAC teWTONHAmMSOa 41 1-0 — 

14 P/P- MOSM-MOSMASnudMl-O PHtew 

18 0/4 PROUD PRjQRIMJwabber 7-1 1-0 GIMinidi 


1 1U1- AWnHERCriYJCi»QRiCiBrd 5 7-11-10 PldCk 

3 aP4 RKMSDELIOifroSbtewood 7-106 SShtewood 

4 124 THELASrPRMCERl)UHEasitetiy41D5.».LWMr 

5 t04 ETON RQUQEjp) MIS URknair-lds GHcOowt 

6 20- BURNT QAI^0NiGtWlSD(l141(HI RDimmody 

7 1HV KNOCK HARD JRaflCOma 7-146. KkhaS 

8 141 FITZieiBEin'iniLKennafd 8-140 (Sax) B lW w i i 

11 44P SAILOfrS RETURN (D)NHnUiQl4l03L.. A Shape 


2-1 Flbtoarbert. 3-1 AnoSiar Ow, 42 Ban Rougei 4l 
BvntONc, 141 Ri^ Do^ 14-1 ifie Last Rime. 

4.45 PRIDE OF THE MIDLANDS NOVICE CHASE 
(Divil:£1,296:2m)(12) 

6 8 fl BOARD8MANSSUPREHODEcUn7.11.0.- DBrawi 
13 0323 MATCH MASTER mH0rNeil7.flJ)_. ROmwaMte 
17 0P4 Oin DAY MesJTh^ 4116 hShS 


4 002- 

5 OOP 
9 *6 

12 002 - 
14 P/P- 
16 0/4 
25 3400 
27 (MW 
29 224 
31 U04 
33 0114 


ISAACICWnMHAnrMSQa4116 

HOSM-MOSM A Streud M16 

PROUD PRjQRIMJWabber 7 - 1 16 

VAL CLIMBER M Castefl 4116 

WSE CRACKER GRIehares 41 16 

G0ANNAG0TBaley4l49 

RUS-Tie-DAY S Harrte 7-106 

WOOD panryRShepheto 4148 


.PITicfc 

'eWin 


1 

3.15 WORCESTERSHIRE HANDICAP CHASE 
(£1,802: 2m) (10) 


17 0P4 Oin DAY MesJ Thome 4116 HDawM 

19 0 ROYAL UASrsnECEM Brown 4116— jaraxM(71 

20aFPP RUSTY BOY R Lee 7 - 11-0 BDawimb) 

21 3ff1 SA^MBSl^DH Jones 4116 GHeSut 

22 ire- SllCKOrROaLOBBrais 4116 PMeInBi 

23 42-F TENZING (^0 Sherwood 4116 SSkarweed 

26 W 1imHARt^Ayhfta41l6 LHaemfiaU 

28 an- WOODLAIO shadow MreMRImell 4116. A siteipa 

30 ore- KBSYTHDBifcliel 7-186 WKaartQ 

32 Q SUtMONG^P Hobbs 4186 PHm£1 

45 Tenzu 76 Sbck 01 Rock. 41 SaHar Min. 116 Mattel 
Master. 12-1 Kis]^, Bowdsmans Suprama 

5.15 CITIZENS OF BRHfNGHAM HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£1,583: 2m) (22) 

1 1^ desert iaRO(D)Fwaiwm 12-126.. I ShoteMfcm 

5 ■OIMNGUNE(Cq)LKannBrd 414 t 3 .Dltat 0 w( 7 ) 

6 on- FUEQOBOVmAJWteon 41412 — 

8 P44 SUPBI GRAS (DISMaltar 7-1411- GChHtei.biaB 


1 234 HlBICHUNI0N(0)DNicha(san4ll-l3. RDinweady 
3 10 P- SIRKENWMRAiiny^411-lD MtesQAimyttitem 

7 232- inmiGHrSONG^rteater 11-116 HESutes 

9 2/4 SreNCSrSLMEmJ Fox 1411-4— 

11 001- MARRUSTARim 00'Ne« 7-1410— . 

12 -434 HARANZKCnmJ Colston 4189 


Forster 11 - 116 — 
IJ Fox 1411-4 


MARRU STARim 0 0'Ne« 7-1410— _ 

12 -434 HARANZIlCa^J Colston 4t89 JSiMm 

14 200/ ROYAL MAN^JSP^ 4140 CEvansW 

16 F 6 a tlTTLETR0UMi(4l))CHto^14I86 .-RHreit 

17 POP- CHAHLEYPBHER(D)Mr 3 MRiaMi 11 - 1 M 

16 9901 CKeSTWn'IWCEpqpPittclUCdll!!^^ 

4-4 MidrigM Song, 76 Fnanch Union. 4-1 Chartoy Rsher. 
41 Sir Kanurirt. 4i Marann. 12-1 Ctwetmit Princa. 

3.45 SIR KEN NOVICE HURDLE (£3.128; 2m 21) 
<25) 

1 1101 TIMLY^Getetekn4i1.3 QBttelay 

2 343 AN(3(ni^NORPOurBMcMation 41412 

3 4-11 ATHMSONSGRIctaiQS 41412 PTiiek 

6 86 COULWOLLOWBCanteldtiB 41412 

MrJCandiMaa(4) 

. 7 EROSTM RULER T Casey 41412.-. GCtetoK Jim 

14 .111 PARANG P Welwyn 5-1412 DBrom 

16 04 raSH CART MSS JTIxniB 410-12 HOavtea 

17 OOP- OUST STAR P Daws 41412 .... PDavar 

15 322- RAHADIDAWNFWBlwyn414l2....M... KHtwoey 


SMoom 

CSmWi 

JSuOtem 


8 ^ aiPBI ORAfi (D) s Manor 7-1411- GChatesJaias 

10 424 POHTRUPEIITlQQPVitehm^lOg OBtowiie 

11 ^ TRBIAR LAD (m^/jentens 4106 SSherweod 

12 000 / NORTHERN QAfemOOrNdl 4147 JSMhani 

13 -UP- AORAKMGHrmj6ltf4.l88 CLJaweBya 

14 214 WUTNER Gli^THOUDRingar 4-106 _ DMi^ 


— CEvansW 19 -FOI SHADY LEGACY (D) R fitaAs 414l (iax) 
I40..-RHytet liRnLWa5aet(71 

186 20 4W NATI0NALlMA0EAJWteon4188..--.J-!^— 

Maaaetidfla(7) Z M WSTBtBEA THEBS( BUCDIJSiann4i40-SMeNaBI 

23 0201 BRUM0EANe|^^iRjinw41^ TYM 

OOitefl 25 044 SA1NTDUBASS0PP(CD)J Bradtay 7.106 ODavtea 

Martov Rstiar. 36 WO- HISSFai (AM(B)TCBaey4l4(r RDaiwoody 

mney nsnor. ^ MPWMQHT (Q H 0 W4186 R tow 

28 lOW 


SKIPWRUHT 


4186 


Rtoggtei 


28 lOIV lX)MlNX)N0B{LKCunnMtem44om4106 AWito 

29 444 KALOOnBERrRHanDp4106.— ..... flCtoah 


004 RJQaBLEFmEIOJFdx4186 


flCtoah 

SHooie 


100-30 Amadts. 7-2 Desert Here. 4-i Montew Una. 41 Fen 
Rupea 7-1 Riego Boy. 41 Agra Knight 141 WMher Geest 


Thou 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS' J Jenkins 31 women tram 129 rumen. 24J)%: L 
Kamard 23 feom 101, 226%; J OU 12 hom 61. 19.7V 
JOexE^: S Shaiwood 18 wKUtere h«m 6 S ndes, 32.7%: H 
Oawas 28 Irem 18S. 15.1%: G McCouft 14 Irom 105. 132%. 



NEWBURY 


Selections 


By MandBrin 


1.30 Pnfcci Timing. 

2.D0 Indisn Hal 
130 Dock. 

3.00 KAZAROUN (nap). 

3.30 Sharp Reminder. 

4.00 Open Hero. 


By Ow NewnuMkfl 
Cbrmppfidcm 

1.30 BUUG^A. 

2.00 Brown Thnch. 

2.30 Arden. 

3.00 Vent<Andqiie, 
3..30 Rock Maduire. 

4.00 Granny's Bask. 


Micteel Scely-i itieaion! 3.00 

^^nifT^g^rivmcjlwdicapper s top rating: .3.30 SIVRRMe TOSK. 

Gong: good to soft Drnw: no advwtig, 

1.30 MECCA BOOKMAKERS HANDK»P (EWOa* 6^ 



n M 

IB 41 
n 4I 
nw-i 

.1* — ■ 
18141 
•t » 


CRMWrM W14.1 


102(14) awmi penrecTTiMBraminvBadontowiBii^w.-*..-- . -^"*522 5 JJ 

im (i3 notn iwc 8 x»MnrAt( 0 )Wi^AW^^ - - » J 

106 luR 109839 owEAMCNAaea TOff JohnyrtPOoM ^ J 22 J 

112 m 930109 T 0 UH 0 INCA(P)(JG 8 «waQLCeB ^44 1 -- — -""J* 2 »*-l 

114 re 46100* POWDER BUIE W(« Mwti WlQ P»Ma i 1 4»13 - ^ ~ f " 'S 

115 nn OWW 7YROLlJEtCyi.BQ(lMlyOAxi9repOott^NVIg«46-l3 -- mf4l 

116 (Q 100009 caeESAYiaj)(OOaiCiten)JSpa wtoOT 6 - 11 ._ Jf - 

119 re 400000 hay 9TREBT(D| (Lore Maiteteite) I Atomw 466 

121 re 440406 HUMBMATIfT(D)(ASoiwa ra9Me Rmcte766 

12 5 nS) 3443 » «fT 60 V A(W 0 raatennAiwte W«QW ^ J - Wg«P 

126 ( 7 ) 800000 JC»RiPATWCK(l»(PBowaa)Pfi« 2 Wl 4 M^--: AT lnaiana — 

127 re MOOOO STOCK mx IASS 

128 ( 1 ) T 30000 NOBeAYRilGKAKrSS»(THWWMMB(toilMICA 44 l - S «*!2 

129 ( 4 ) 310410 MAIIOAM(D)(HAI M a M oijB O PWateiyna64l-^.... -..ASMa^ 96114 

igtSZAMATAW-Wfl KrtM SlOgI* KKrt 

FORM 

^ tewSlw Isa W* »il 


Sri 10 Rcma Soy P 

TrROU.Kt&-iZ)nK 


»d. Aiiqa. lYrniliTQWQ^frlSy^ 


ZO THAMES VAIAEY EGGS HANDICAP (£7.387: 1m M) (18 Oimwr^ 


201 (Q 

202 re 

205 nQ 

206 ( 17 ) 

207 ( 3 ) 
209 (Q 

211 n) 

213 (IQ 

214 ( 7 ) 

215 (16) 

217 ( 14 ) 

220 re 

221 IS) 

2 Z 2 re 

2 Z 3 (IQ 
22 S PQ 
228 01 ) 
230 (IQ 


3011 

031220 

10 

262 

021010 

420130 

400004 

460000 

30(no« 

4-10030 

040400 

121106 

223410 

301003 

021660 

423310 

06010 


moZSM (BQ (Snafch MOhammaoi w Hte^4^ — - 

brown THATCH (StnMtMaMnanaQH Cad ^7 (TM ... wAl tew 

mailman (do) (Mr JMeDougwQ I BaUng 7-41 ■ — PPW 

SEN(» TOMAS eClQ re BteOreJOuilOP 366 - 

GHLACT 1 CHeRO(Sha*hbUhMnRNdiM SWUM 3-411 WN toWateO 

PRINCE ORAC P LamoQ C Man 36-7 — - A W«mi 

EXCEPnONALBEAUTV (M is JM anm)MJarM 36-1 - j— a 

INDIAN HAL (MraRWMaiQPWtfwyn 4-86 M Vamtom 

THArs Yow uw re Dorn) ■ 

RUNNMO FLUSH 00 (NCepoiOOOighWn 466 

TORWADA{FSreaan)P Cote 366 — — " — - 

PAT0(B)(LardM«irMwQiMMnaim46>1 

THORKY ROSE (EtoagHlwSAteaon 686 — AMe^ 

QUEEN OF bathe (8 OMhantar) M Ryan 3-86 P tn wtePd 

BASTWADO (P MalOi^ 1 B te dtefl 47-12 S OWteMre 

LOOKIMWBZ (A RiGhHilQCAtwBi 7-7-10 — . — NMiWe 

KOKTS CRUSADE (H MoulQ 0 Ltote 47-7 ■ Jlreto 

BRl£r(BQ(O 0 inniOMteiai 6 H Candy 47-7. TWtoMW 

19IQ BALLVDIIRROW 844 Paid gddary (4Q R nator 10 m 


16 441 

60 4.1 
tlt4-t 
MB 4i 
MPsa 
Si — 
Sll4t 
MM-I 


form 

wid ftwer Bandar 0 - 1 ): MMN NAL (41) WW II Dach am OR 2(, £214! 



1111141. tn*4 oHdtotoK 
Ml iiQp woro M ondOte 
CEI4Sagood.8apiaOLT3 


baOM Russian Locre ( 41 1 ) a MKampton in AprU ( 1 m 37 . E 2373 . soft. 10 niiiUaN(ft CRUSAQIji-ll) teat 
atm TTCRNY ROSEVns had a raoantaumg to put rwn Bwilglit, teat oaBSOo( 47 ) baat Aoanyao 04 iTMBfcM 
Bam ( 1 m 47 . £2464 soft g et 7 1885. 16 ran). 


Aictk Beau (left) is led over the last by 1 Haventa^ibt in die Rosy Brook Chase at Newbury 
yesterday but got up to force a dead-heat Report and results, pt^ 41 


2.30 DICK DAWSON STAKES (^Y-0: £5.663; 1m) (24 ninners) 

301 p 6 l 21 AHOENtLoidHOaWiMarOHCacaSG.-......-.-.....-... «...W1ly«i 

302 (24) 90321 DOLLAR SEBCER (0) (T RtemOan) U Ryan 96 QOaflteW 

303 re 01 l}RYI)OaC(0)(RHoang»wirtf4WHam»6-. w Canon 

306 ( 6 ) ASADARE (M Jntway ) I BaUng 4l1 - — J U x O M m 

310 (IQ CtJFFORaST1iarrenRKdli)IBaldtog4f1 A Mmay 

312 (3) DORVEn|KAOdiNa)JT]raa4ii... aifiapMBi 

314 (18) 0 FARHURS GAMBLE (W PQm(Qld) N KamtCk41t N SOMfi 

315 ( 4 ) HiaHALOFr(MrsJYamaiQCNai50n411 ACIrIi 

316 (IQ HIGHLY PLEASB)(PM8an418aldiiV 411- SOGoraWR 

317 re 0 HOWY DANCER (A Sa(Riaiou)DArMhnol 411 CUMM* 

318 (12) MPERIAL BRUSH (PPuHon/OEtewortt 411 ~ 

319 (11) KASHKtSS(G'rroaBtrBioadBWCkUQC»tetooti41l SHonM 

323 (5) 0 MANSn (Mrs DOackbunOH Candy 411 W N awwa a 

325 re 0UTRAMta»F0IITUIg(JBlQ0dlhiira6Mawiiaha(04l1 WNSiiliRW 

326 (22) PeCHEDW(MaiAEvaratOlBlldino411. ... RCMawr 

331 ( 1 ) SNAIMONCaTTAaE(RMcCif«y|OEtewarm4l1 AMeOteto 

334 (17) 0 VAUnE(Baarii)jnaiieoma4l1 — 

335 (ID) 00 VOUNaaHILUE(MisaMayiiBrdlP1Wwyn411 PtedEO^ 

337 (23) HOTELL0TT1(ASiruiters)JDHi^86.-.— .. BRoiiaa 

338 01) 6 nND 0 FQunERre>«FBiQ«nalBHto 86 — aThamson 

339 (14) IEAPINTmE(DTylda»MllrUMOPrddiar40ordQR4l TOMn 

340 (20) ODD REGAL RHYTHM (OCtertdWWtfttntel 48 ... Nilitea, 

341(15) RISE AND FALL (TIN Qu^taaUog 86 POaok 

342 (7) 0 SEHAQSBEE(ASpateiQJ»Mgar 86 ROmM 

ISSSc EL CUnE41 1 Rted Eddery ( 12 - 1 } H CaeS 27 rm 


3J) ST SIMON STAKES (Group Ilk £16,905; 1m 40 (9 runners) 


BBC 1 


401 (Q 121431 KAZAROUN (iq (Aga Khan) M Stoute 443 WRSwtabwn 

403 ( 4 ) 121022 lOGHLAIO CMOTAIN(D0n(D HindanaQJOuniBp 4412... STtaMB 

404 ( 1 ) 103110 NnNAS(0)(FSatoan)PGDte44ia TQidni 

485 re 40^36 JUPITER SLJWD (CO) OAdTMtetoddCfinttato 448 AMurray 

409 (5) 1014H AMOHQSrTl)ESTARSrersMKaQ0i)SNomn3-47 JLoww 

411 re 123 'nSHT(FSalvdi)PC0te447 ACM 

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M Jareis 
C Brittain 
WHain 
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TRAINERS 

WShriOW Runnars Par cent 
S 115 37.4 

27 101 26.7 

it 15-8 

IB 127 1E6 

60 241 124 

7 57 “ 12:3 


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Wamors RidSB 

« 338 

16 184 

9 94 

10 IAS 

6 120 


Parennt 

124 

0.5 


MulhoUande for gi 

From Oor Irish Rediig Cttrespoodi 


Paul Cole chases his second Irish 
group race success this season when he 
provides the solitary outside chalinge 
for this afternoon's group three 
Ardenode Siud Lcopardstown Slakes, a 


L.OK 5 runner. MulhoUande, comes to 
rattle with useful cnedentials, having 
b«n ranner-up to Reference Point in the 
Doricing Stakes at Sandown Park. 

Eariio* in the aftenioon we vwl] get a 
line (o the value of this perfonnance 
SHf,? Rererence Point contests the 
wilham Hill Futurity Stakes at Don- 
ator. Should Reference Point upset his 
c stable companion, 

Suhailie. Muihrrilandewill protably Stan 
ravounte at Leopatdstown. 


With a pritt ftind of £IR2S00 ()l ihe. 

w:ni IS most competitive 

M D? wintungover five furlongs 

BlueWnd*< fomci '%as not adveiiis^ldv 
defeat of 

L^> ax Na^ but I suspex^t that be will 

Mils in Ireland and I make him tfioiMte ■ 
danger to MulhoUande 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


SPORT 


41 





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Nicholson has 
Mackeson in 

mind for Voice 
Of Progress 

poS °forr“SS 5!“ ™"“S 


Gold Cud a» ChH^puhamT^a *“5 the Tote Hurdle, 

fonnighi's lirae when trotting ^ Schweppes Gold 

uD in ihp Trophy, in mind as a long- 

up in me Glynwed Imer- ,p™ objective for Saffll 


tenn 
Lord. 

I Haventalight (Peter 
Scudamore) and Arctic Beau 
(Hywel Davies) staged a dra- 
matic finista in the Rosy Brook 
Handicap Chase and the cam- 
era could not separate them. 

Arctic ‘Beau's performance 
gave particular plermne to 
Jaoqiii Thoroe, who took over 


my first winner five 

runners, rve got 1 S horses and 
hopefully thm are more to 
come," she said. 

Yacare, who landed tiie 
Leisure Thinidiig Sink Chase 
by a length from Pla^wy, may. 
go to Ascot for the H £ T 
Walker Goddess Chase next 
month. 

Ron Smyth, who has only 
three jumpers in bis Epsom 
yard, had his first winter 
winner when Problem Child 
landed the Falcon Catering 
Equipment Novices Hurdle. 


national Chase at Newbury 
yesterday. 

"If the ground is fest Td 
definitely consider the 
Mackeson for him," his 
trainer, David Nicholson, said 
after Voice Of Progress, a real 
Newbury specialist, had 
gained his fifth course success. 

Voice W Progress com- 
pensated Richard bunwoody. 

now on the I9^wiimer mark, iiSr*rtiS'1aSSL!l®^5£?’ 
for an earlier misbap wifo 
Heart Of Stone before the 
Flavel-Leisure Hurdle. 

Backed down to even- 
money, Heart Of Stone had to 
be _ . withdrawn when 
Capistrano Prince lashed out 
and struck the fovourite's hind 
1^ 'Hiis necessitated a SO 
pence in the pound deduction 
from all winning bets. 

With the favourite out of 
the way, Safiron Lord proved 
an easy winner, coming home 
six lengths clear of Tingle Bell 
after taking the lead at the last. 


Results from four meetings 

GaBamGaiois, 12 Bmagfnary SM, nishofl 
Ham Jow ai PomypikkL Tola: eSA 


Newbury 

Gotagigood 


FOOTBALL: FOR UNITED AND CITY THE CRISIS IS COMMON 


In spring 
Fratton 
Park could 
have a ball 

By Nkbolas Harliiig 

Ever siBOB. as a fboflmll not in 
my mU^tmaties, I tnrelled by 
train across Enrope for 
Englairf^ World Cop ipialifying 
tie against Polud, Alan Ball 
has kM a special pboe in my 
sportuig aBectiims. For it was 
Ball who eaded my bhiitic 
seaicli for a ticket in Uie teamTs 
hotel foyer in Kalo«rice,a cou^ 
of bonrs befwe he was to be sent 
ofT in a gnnu whiA left Enghuid 
oonteinplaliiig the prospect, 
soon to be realiaed, of missing 
oat on the finals in West 
Gamaiiy. 

The oonseqaenoe of bis dis- 
missal notwithstaiMliBg, BaD 
GOnlhmed to do England, Arse- 
nal and then Sonthan^flon 
pro^ Bnt bfs fitst venture into 
maiu^eiiient w^ Bfaicfcaocd 
was sod a disas ter tha t ft is 
impessible now to begradge. him 
bis nndoobted pleasnre that 
mist come with bqi^assoriated 
with a Portsmontfa team gooig 
strong for promotion. Net that 
Ball weald fed any form of 
contenimeBt, or bideu secnrfty 



Faded giants fight out the 
derhy that does not matter 


The acme problems of ibe two 
Manchester dubs come sharply 
into focus lomorrow the 
ITV televise the l09ih derby. 

Ffew, if any. of those fixture 
between these fomou dubs can 
have hdd less significance for 
die rest of the country than this 
one ai Maine Road. 


By Clive White 

True, Uoiied have begun to 
string some Mims together, 
seven from their last three 
games, but th^ will have to 
sian playing with considdal^ 
more panache before becoming 
of championship materiaL as 
Bryan Robson, tb^ captain, 
has recently described them. 


Between them they have won . 

SlSt-~«S?t quSfoi?^nfiS.5e uSto 
z! r^r'Sf SSr^.n^lffv’^SSS 

tliem. not suipiwn^i *" T^y dotuly need nooiher iitiw- 


bottom four with a quar^ of 
the season gone. Even in victory 
iasi week United looked a loiig 
way from the side thai the Old 
Trafford board thought after 
their FA Cup victory two sea- 
sons ago would be diqniting 
supremacy with UverpooL 
That dreamy start to last 


y dearly need another iiyeo 
lion of forward talent. 
Stapleton, though the leadine 
scorer, can no longer be relied 
on to top 20 goals a season and 
his assoebtion with the poten- 
tially prolific Davenport is gen- 
erally unfniitfol. 

City, desperately short of the 


season which saw them red off cash lequiial lo buy iheir way 
10 consecutive victories must out of trouble, have; nevertb^ 
seem as itnieal now lo Ron less, monp^ized the last 
Atkinson, the mam^, as this week's iransfor in Man- 
present enveloping nightmare. Chester. Having signed Vaiadi 


ftom West Bromwicb Albion in 
lime for last Saturday's game, 
Jimmy Frizzdl, the new man- 
ager. returned to the Hawthorns 
to lash out £20,000 on Grealish, 
the Irish midfield pla;^. To 
think a few yean ago rn^or Cty 
signings were in the order of a 
million pounds or more. 

Frizzell has added a little 
more spice to the occasioo by 
tigning Gidman on a free trass- 
for from United. He said: **! 
think all three win give us the 
experience we have needed to 
Mend with the youitgsteis we 
have in the team." 

United could be without 
Straeban. upon whom ttey 
seem to dqjcnd all too hcavifo. 
forcteaiivi^. Atkinson wiD wait 
as long as posable to see if his 
hamstring rights itself. 
OihcTwize Moses, at the centre 
of an alleged irainii^ fracas 
involving Olsen recently, will be 
recalled. 


Alan Balk happy in the vrind and rain 


WiA pbqress fike MDce 
(Mmi, scorar of 1 3 goals to dace 
miter his Tuesday treUe, and 
Kevin Dillon, Balt would have no 
worries if only they could keep 
dieirfiMin. 

Of Dnion, vrtiose actkni pie- 
tnre appeared apposHely on the 
prognimnie front cover in atid- 
wei^ Ball said: **lt was one of 
the most excitii^ performances ] 
haveseenfrimi a midfield player 


£1.60. E2.70. DP: gSaO. 
£3ea& imh 01.01 sac. 

AO ttm 4n 1 . MAQIC TOWBI U 
lOOaOl; 2. MtfUBfid M (Jenny Mo 
Ik 3. Storm Houm ' 


2J)(3in Ch) <J04it 1. 1 HAVENTAUGHT 

(PScudemora. 2.1): anddohi 1. AflCnC 
BEAU - (H . Davies. 04 hu): a, Maori 
VtoMm. (Stave Kntgm, B4 )l ALSO RAN: 

33 Colonal CiuisQrT^ 4 laa dd^it 4). 

£27,2a CSR B30M. TnoasC ETMASl 
2inln40.66sec. 


ALSO RAN:3 ter Ntake 11^’ 

10SiiiiiyKaym.n 


Powefl. 3-1): 2. 71^ Bai (M 
. 12-1); 3, ^ dTf&ve. 5-1|t 4J0 (liD) 1 

N: 10 Caserta (Q, 20 Nonhan) WHtens. 2, 


Haventalight EZ23. 

230 I2in 100yd hda) t. SAFFRON 
LORD (B Powefl. 3-1 
Hammond 
ALSO RAN: 

Ruler {^)l 33 Bandafce ti], Cap g irano 

Pniioel^LFaddycoup(e%8ran. a, 51, 

a. not recortfed, is^l . L Q Kennaiil at 
TCimton. Ton: £240: £1 .10. £1 .10. E1 .sa 
OF; £342 CSF; £11.76. Haan of Sum 
(avans bv) wRhdmm. not under orders^ 
rule 4 appSas Id aH Das, ueduebon SOp in 
poundL 

3[jll(2m 4f 1. VOICE OF PROGRESS 
(ROumoaA.3-1 te0c2. WStxUnws 
J Baggan, 10-1); 2 Ow Rm (R Roiw. 9- 
AL£0^: 4 Ryaaman Admin 

Cupieih). 6 jQtms Prasom 8 Clay HO 

(4th^|. 7 mn. 12L lid. ti, 121. 121 D 
Meftotoon at fooir on the WUd. ToCK 
£330: £2.10, £3.ia DR £1430. 
£2638. 




ter};2 


anat (W 
Banus AM 
irMBSr^ 


Hbidiay. 20-1): 4, SnmaOilDM (M I 
11-1); ALSO nuTs Hafo Qypw 8 

Vltafplane. 10 Dunlonng. nan Hua. 
tnlrtnsic. Nathm HaMat 1i 0 1 Oyslon, 12 
-pp-Tm); 16 Unex-PWned; 20 MasMuf 
etl4. Pkm. C B M Girt. Valvat 
ram 17 ran. Nk Fast servica. Toptea 
E:gn8s, Natfa. hd, XJ. a. hA a. D Haydn 
Jonas at Ronkpiidd. Tote: £2030: £5.m 
£132 £&7a lM.ia OP; £13330. CSF: 
£8531. Iheasc £127631. 1mta4236Sae. 
Altar 8 steMtods biquinr the iBsuit stands. 

5J){7l}LGOODSAgJIIG(AShouNS.7- 
4 ter): 2 » Harry LawSi (B^iwn 
U 3. StateD (R Cochrane. 
ran: 8 &n IWa Rock. Jelf 
IS MepMstophelBs. Yc 







S^UoubtaCOn fWDi TO WbodSMs Road 

a ll SNpaiong (SthL 33 Brown's Star 
Salthoose Tpu). 66 FMng Jackdaw 
i6Bi).9ran.lL XLnotfacordea!lOLi2LJ 
.Oncird at Findan. Tote: £Sl 20: £230; 
£1.5a £1.40. OF; £1522.0^^^36,70.. c 

43^ lOOydhtBNI. problem CNAJD 
(D MdtMwn, 25-1): 2 Uptown Randhte 
(M Hamiiion,9-1): £ WMbooid Uaa (N 
CotHnan, 12-1). ALSO RAN: 7-2 ter 


1L R Shaalhar ai NaHonarteL Tott: 
£1M S2.ia £1^42 DP; £1332 
£1227. Ifflhi 31.62880. 



stl^12Bb 
e.28lteaww 
. Popthom. 17 


Lad, 

na 


Run |4th). 16 Stangrawe. 

Nayshan, Promenadv, i 
a. II. a. hi. Si. R Smnte at Epaom. TUe; 
£1 7.60; £5.40. £3.00, OlKl D^E1772D. 
CSF:£235.S0l 

4L30^ lOOyd ndM 1, BARNBROOK 
AGAIN XR Amott. 1^ 2 No-U-Tum (Q 
Landau. 5-2 
5-1). ALSO 

Tjncr0dWalk|6lh) . _ 

Mateo's Toiun. 25 Hail's nmea. 33 
Crocsox. 9ran. nR; Caitie RSme. 121. 2%l. 
M.lOLia OEIsworihatWhIneuiy.Toto; 
£5.80; £1 30. £1 72 £1-70. DF: £832 
CSF: £1246 l TrlcasL £6823. 


Liidlow 

Goki^flnn 

1m<5 ( 2m 4r chn . Rmsliaw Wood (P A 
Farral. 5-1); 2. -TaiqoB^ But {B-jM 
tel): 3, BoardThe Train ^1J. BranJKI. 
sh n& P BaaumonL Ttoto: A3Q; £23(L 
£1 ,40. DF: £<30. CSF: £B3 Dl 

-21S^ hdia) 1, Hop Pfclnr(K 
15-21; 2 Loadon Contact (1-2 tett 2 
pSkwH's P« (^1J. 11 ran. 30L 1»l. K 
vTQtB:£f^£13aE1.40.fi24a 
,71JLCSF;£112A 


i^th a chfliniiaB as hmigry for 

overdne snccess as Jidan Deo- difEexence antanmnl cmitffions 
oon.ifPMtsmontfamteoBt^a make to Che nationai game., 
third year naming. **ln the simshine; playas get 

ThtteRwe ills good to see lum lethaig^ hot as soon as yon get 
te good heart, better still that the wind and rain la October and 
after Ttiesday^ 3-1 win over November, yon dtm't half grt 
Derby had rosined Portsmoi^ some good games. Give me 
their top spot, he adcnowledge amditioas like that any thae,” 
the presence of die press. Nite he said. 

SSl It seemed to matter not to Bait 

bittCT Bcrmif^ v^ ^ eicmeals that 

Fashann and Wmbledon, who mMh#^ Portsmmtfa^ 
were 10 go on to vrin promotion m ^ hugest of the 

HfSiM S®S£^i5S M«nitiiwi»dbSp5Srto« SS’rTTiSiM'filr^ 

felt^l^ to nw him^ ^ fiemes. No donlrt 

heard. It ^ probably why, >k, BoWw Bobsoo to have been here 

xjsu*b5 .bS. 

expansive mood, chirpier and if as lo me p^yiag like that aU season. He 

be'U pardon the sugges ti on, seasons oaicame. has been the catalyst for ns." 

squeakier than ever. ^th an naai^eafing home With playeis like Pnnl Mnii- 

Not even the fears that a groin fixture list until the visit of ner and BSike Tait ready to 
strain miUt pot his centre haK, Breton in ntid-Jannary, the letom from htimT and die 
Noel Uake oot of dus dob may have to do a lot mon second divition not exaedy 
afternoon's home jnme' with than mmely stay among die overflowing with quality, it is 
West Bromwiefa Albioa ooold leaders to peisu^ the miwring diSiciift to envisage Portsmouth 
subdae tie little man as he sappoiiets that they are wmdi and BaOnMmakmg it third time 
talked cndinsiastically (d foe watching. faicfcy. 

Doubts over Casey’s fitness 

By Paid Nemngn 

Kidderminster Harriers may WithorwidioutOas^, Aflner 
go into their FA Cup fourth does not plan to cha^ 
quailing round tie au^ to Kidderminster's enterprising 
Chelmsford City today without style for the viat to the Southern 
Kim Casey, at present the most League leadets; "We're not good 
prolific gcnl scoter m senior enottgh defensivdy to do any- 
non-Lea^ footbalL tUng other than attack," be 

«s; ^ S-p 

Kiddeminsier's last UitM 

games w^ a pulled leg mumle tound bmre toe roi^ 
ind has received intensive treat- wiU be at 

mem this week from Aston 
Villa's physioiherapisL Ywvi! To^ 

gates- nr the Vanximu^Opd 
Graham Allner, the Kidder^ i premier diidsion are 
minster manager, ^ yesterday averaging nearly 2JX)Q, expect 
said: **We will give Kim a nines to take ai least 1,000 suppwteis 
test and he will only play if he is witbitaem. 

100 per cent fit. it's the sort of Bath are phailanging for the 
injury which could put him out leadership of the CM VauxhaU 
for several weeks if he ag- Confeienoe but Gerry Gow, 
gravaied it.” Yeovifs mam^, is confident 


United cai 


go back 
to the top 


WEEKEND TEAM NEWS 


Arsenal (7) V Chdisea (18) 
Arsenal, sUn without NicholBS 
and Robson, shotod be uncstenged. 
Chelsea, for whom Speediemn 
Spademan are ^ out of favour, 
have tost Hazard with a groin 
ir^jury and (railed up Murphy arxf 
Lbb. 


of victory. "Batb have slipped 
up once or twice ai home hiidy 
and ifwe keep the game as tig^t 
as possible 1 think we can sn^ 
n," be said. 

Maidstone United, the Cbn- 
ferenoe leaders, travel to 
Southwick. who have climbed 
from Sussex County fbotbaO to 
the first divbion of the 
Vaiixhali-Opef League in less 
than three years. 

Bill Wilhu^ the Maidstone 
maneger, watched Southwick in 
midueek and will warn his 
pfayeis before the matdi against 
complaoency. “Soutliwicfc 
a very difToent game from vdiat 
we're used to," he said. "They 
play very deep and very tight at 
the back and it's important that 
we're not surmised tbeir 
tactics." 


By Hngh Taylor 
Dundee United, who struck 

.mos*. nowble blow for VOIa (20) ▼ New- 

Scotland id European com— 
peiiuon in midweek, are con- ^ited (21) 

fideni that they can return to the 
top oftbe premier division table 

M h suspended EBtotL Newcastle 

vwicomB back Martin Thomas 

M i d to th u m wiU be without the and Mdl^rem and ^vb Jackson, 
suspended Robertson and signed from Bradford City, his 
Levein and so weB ore United cle^VVharion(oonc»sesm 
playing that ifibey gain anotber Baii^fAchittes tendon} are 
victory they can move into the nitea out 
leadership ai the expense of 

^ who to, not playing g^rton (6) V Watford 

uxiaye yjjw 

Sou^rMumsIbrEwrto. 
after an artctabijiiry last March. 

but Cimk, who used to be a With Watson (ham^g) and 
forward, was iminessive as ms Sheedy(^m unavailable Adams 
deputy in the UEFA Cup tie is promoted. Sherwood returns 
a^nst Uaiveisity Cniova and ingoalfbrwiatlordforthe 
willconiiiiue in his new rote. stapen^ Coton against a 

Hibto,>to.sho»sigDsort»i.| 
on the way bsidt but they should 
earn a poim againsi MothenreD 

at Fir Park, eqiedally as the _ . — j. _ 

inooDsistem home team have Ldcestesr City (10) ▼ 
doubts about tbor central SonthaiDpton (15) 
defondox, Kennedy and Boyd. LaioesterwiBmakealBte 

Aberieen, who have by .no 

me^givrauDtope^wiiiii^ Southampton wffl do likewise with 
the champion^p, should force ^ Cjarke. Moran's 
themselves into a more raSaoement at the DeU. Baker, 
chaUen^iig posiaon with a wm Maskell arto (aMens are 
over HamatiHi at Doq^tas Fhik. rectil^'AmBtrung is again 
Aberdeen hcgie for the return of absent 
McLeish. their internatirmal 

centre half, and Hamilton can 

baldly expect to gain tbeir first Tnsm f 121 v liver- cotoinitostodMUit^forWSmafiis. 

le^ue win over sudi strong iahw iowh v ajvw 

opponenis. pool (3) 

- ^ Mfrreo sprang bad to jjS^^ooiag^Shis former (*jb. 
form wifo a conviiKmg victory • 

last week over Duiilee and tuac aftera fiv e ^w oofc tey-off with a 
wtnning side will play against fraOuredtoeandBa^aftBra 
Clydebank at Kilbovm Park, viral infection. GiNes^ is out wHh a 
Dundee shoold cake a step hamstring strain. Luton, wi» 
towards contention among the have scored only one goal in thtir 

leaders by beating fhikhrk, who 
um heavily deteie^ week 
byRaBgeis,aiI>ensPaik. ^ 


Oxford United (17) ▼ 

Nottingham Forest (1) 
Back kquries to vmtehursr and 
TrewMc give Leworthy and Brack 
their chtnoe for Oiford. webO 
returns for Forest alter injury n 
piaoeof MHls. 

QPR (13) V Tottenham 
(4) 

Fenwick, who has missed 
Rangers' last four games, is back In 
the squad Lee. wno has a groin 
strayi. « HKely to tie the only 
absentee. Tonannam, aimirig to 
extend their unoeaien run to eight 
matttws, are unchanged. 

SheflBeld Wednesday 
V Coventry Oty (9) 

Rodger, 19, ttfies over from 
Kteline, who has tom a hamstrkig, 
in the Cfoiwn&y sida WaVrar. 
who made his league debut last 
week, is included n 
Wednesday's ^uad. Shtiun 
hopes to be n in time. 

# 

West Ham United (5) ▼ 

Chariton Atiiletic (14) 
West Ham. unbeaten for eight 
games, are stiO without Martin and 
McAvermie. txit Devonshire 
oodd return after missing nine 
matches if Dickens's s^itic 
heel has not HTiproved. WaHdrd 
stands by for Hilton, who has a 
briHsed knee. OurbisblBy is not 
suffioently match fit to race his 
former cU), so Chadton wifl be 
unchanged. 


WimSledon (IQ v 
wich Chy (2) 

Putney, ir^ured on the first day 
of the season, returns as substitutB 
for Norwich, while Crook 


Tomorrow 

Manchester City (22) v 

Mandkester United (19) 
GUman, signed from Untied 
this week, and Grealish make their 
debuts for City white Vaiadi 
jriays his first horns game. United 
wan on Sbachan'shanstiing 
nury. Moses stands by. 

irenthesisindcate 



DF; 

245 (3m 


m 1. 


M|M)J2.K>temx^ HK. W raj?^£1.10. £1 


a7?^E330. CSF: £835. 


Mr M 

M 

£1-50, 


GOLF 


RUGBY UNION 


Tte R o q ^ f^r ^ 


litfthpfli not won 

Doncaster 

Qatajp good to soft saagM: good, 
nund 

20 (70 1. PRIME PRMCE (B TTiomsoiv 
l3-2).2.Qannaas(AMurTay. 2-1 ji4av):2 
GtataCaatto (R (SuesL 4.1 )l aLw RAN: 2 
Jt-tav SirNca Acoan (^ 7 Cockatoo 
Istand. 10 Sandnioor Oanrer, 12 Orantai 
nuflie. Twee Bitian. 16 Rchamom (4th). 
Runfta Hoyw. 25 Bunched (Sto). BrM& 
12 ran NR: Pillar Of VKsdom. ftr. «L ^ 
1%L 2Vil. R AnoMiong at NawmarlceL 
Toie; £1260: H 90 l £1.70. £1.72 DF; 
£17.ia CSF: £24.94. Imn 29.75sec. 

Z3B(1ni)1.ll-BIXCOPV^Edd8iy.5- 

1): 2. 8^ Come Home (J Cham, 3. 

Ilimrt 
TIcMIA 
DualCw 
Lm Ghda 
Uno's Fete 


(fin £r cr« 1. ^ ^ ^ 

Harvey, . 5-1): 2 !£?*?*£ . 

Scots “ '**■ 

Baker, raw £630C ElAft £1.80. DF: 
£4.90. CSR £9.78. 

3j«5{3m If 19Qyd hdle) 1. Alwins So^ 
McNatt IM): 2. hranier (7-1): KitotlTs 
BBte(5-i).LiKkyCliwfee^1 te>Ll5raiiL 
NR: Thnmn Wifibowm. 2L lU. J Kta 
Tbte: £2140; £432 £130. E230. W: 
£24250. CSF: £10240 
4.15 (2m hdla) 1 . Snake RlwrfC Smith. 
S3ter);2SMMB 
Pnde &1}. 9 ran. I . 

£220; £l!n £3.ia £1,42 DF: £3832 
CSF: £1539. 


Davies wins Open in France out 


a grandstand finish 

From JobB Hennessy, La Manga 


Carlisle 


Baby Com 
wwfay (T 
SIACteK 


iMnafis. B-T): 4. Oemr 
20-1) ALSO RAN: 9-4 (av 
(5ih). 5 MascaUs Oreain. lO 
foKtoale. Ill Lyn Rae. 12 
16 CranMy ttaMn. Corafin 
Lass. 20 Katw Says. Market Man. Mas 
PisaL PentHoaqr, a 0 


hunXes 

cowfo- good to solt 

135 
5-1): 2 
ran.2)&L 

£2.60. £130. DF: £17.72 CSF: £27.94. 

215 (^ 330yd MNt) 1. M area M M (M 
Alston, 25-iy 2 Mia Ckm 
Oaticar 



V (9A 3-1 lav 
.!& P 


AndBunil4-ifc 
[}«*■? 


OamaRieiM. Ibaich 
Avon. Fii«HCa' usasham. 


I. m ran. 


Mitical RevDecL 

0: rajo. 


2%!. no. sh hd. hd. J_S atAjg^i 


1KI, 
Tone 

a:fo.'ET3o: 

£129.30. CSF: £7631.Tncast C47S.I& 
imn 4334sec. BougM in 4w400grt. 

20 (im 2f50y(0 1. roman BEACH (M 
Wtohaffl. 10-1): 2. Sraat Domito |B 
■nmnsen. 14-1); 2 NiM Onm (R 
OocnrafieL 9i^ lav): 4. Soto Sly to (P 

RAN; 9 Alepwnm, 


3. Milesan 
Bear 4Si. is ran 
20L 7L E Alstoa Tottc £14000: 

CS.OOi €l-2i0. OF: WlrmrorZnd wttfi any 
cMharES-IOi CSF: £309.97. 

2.45 tSm 1 , iMOl CI«rfay(M lawyer. 



CSF; 


Hwie. 25 Quiet Rtf. Re d, ^ . 
SitnL Avac Com. 'S"2* 

AnBtocf8tVeiv8L2<rBn 
w Muason at NawmarttgL 
£23a S3M. £2.02 £?» Pf:ipS 3to 
CSF: £156,58. Tncast £68431. 2iiim 
1137S0C. 


jRBoamd. 
£130 DR 

£4.17. 

3.15 (2n) 330yd h«M) 1, fenpacuoioiBy 

S G Dun. 9-1): 2. Smart bidackjfr-l 
V): 3. BoiBftam Down (16-1): 4. RMi do ni 
(14-1). 6-1 jt4a» Moumgaoraa BMor. 
17 fan. NR: Ln^-A-5Unuta.^ KL J S 
wnson. Toie; £10160-. 

ute iM me. 

vwd 

Barrack 


WaUcon, 9-1). 

10 AI Zumimid Knunts Saciv 
Masked BaiL Master LM« Samnann, 11 

3^ WiteS;;:Tbi;£lK6ftai0^ 

SSBIi“RSSSc\JS»^SW t1^DRBUtt0Sfta4JB.Tr«« 


Sy4Sl 
6-1); 


.FbrGaoif(p Hawkins, 
Preben Fur (2-1 jtteA 2 
Newstaad]l6-1L 2-1 jFter Mo!w Mooia. 
8 tan. a. 20. N Ournp. Tote: ESLto: £130. 
£130. £230. DF: ElLto. CSF; £17.12 
4.15 (2m 330yd hdte 1. MoeyGraan (K 

RAM 11-4 l^favA(4ato (Mil il^U:^ cv. h«u. lssp. nano. 

8 The OOMl a MiteCl^ 9 Ab Smlh. 10 


Laura Davies, ibe Womens' 
Open champion, achieved two 
funher distiociions here yes- 
terday. She won the La Maosp 
Gub Spanish Open, and with it 
a prize of £3.750. and therfoy 
overtook Lotta Neumann, of 
Swcxlen. 10 win the Wom^' 
Professional Golf Association 
order of merit for tire second 
succesrive time. This carries a 
bonus of £5.000 from ihe spon- 
sors. Rii« & Brymer, it was 
Miss Davies* third win in tbe 
Iasi five louroanreiiis and ber 
fourth alu^iedier, a WPGA 
leconL 

Miss Davies had a final round 
of 74 for a total of 2^ iO under 
par, to beat Corinne Dibitah, of 
Australia (70 yesterday), by four 
stokes and Dale Reid (74) by 
five. 

Her winniiigs for the season, 
excluding the bonus, reached 
£37,500. also a record and £500 
or so tncHe than Miss Neumann, 
who tanpiished in joint 26th 
place here: 

If (bur strokes soands a 
comfonaUe margin, betokenii^ 
i'a jack of competative interest, it 
did-noi seem at all cut and dried 
as Miss Davies foiled to achieve 
any ranxiii with ber putter. 

Only a 20-fr)Oier at the last, 
her only one of note throi^out 
the round, enabled her to get 
below an ayer^ of two putts a 
bole. She missed five times from 
five fhet or less and when she did 


to batter 
Romania 

From Chris HuiD 
Bucharest 

Jacques Fouroux. the French 
coach, knows that tbe Roma- 
nians can become awkward 
oppo^is unless battered into 
submission. Tbe spearhead of 
his planned onslau^i today is 
expec^ to be the French front 
row, includirig the most feared 
loose-head prop in French 
rugby, Herve Chabowsid.. who 
re-emeises after a year-loi)g 
injury. Lorieux also leaffocais at 
top iniernational level, while 
(janninati, of Bezies. makes his 
international debut at No. 8. 
The other newcomer is Beroi on 

who ^ler^ with a finish of four the left wing, 
and six, whereas Miss Davies The game here is gouig to be 
got a solid three at the 17th and watched with interest by the 
a brilliant four at the la%dariqg Irish since the Romanians will 
to go for tbe green once more take on Ireland in Dublin in 
and gening up and down from three weeks' iiin& 
the saiid beyond the ravine; It 
provided a grandstand fiiiish to 


bole from nine feet fm* a birdie 
at the I3ita. the ball collapsed 
into the side of the bole at the 
last apologetic gasp. 

A par round in such dreum- 
stances pointed to sturdy p(^ 
ers of recov^. Rir Miss Davies 
was not stiikiiig the ball from 
either tee or forrway nearly as 
well as sire can. 

Only two strokes separated 
her fr^ Miss Reid with only 
two boles to play, with Miss 
Dibnab back in the clubhouse. 
These are daiignrous holes, the 
[7th measuring I60yds and 
heavily bunkered, and the iSth 
460yds over a ravine; Anything 
can happen, then, towards the 
end ofa round. 

It was Miss Reid, however. 


both the 
season. 


tournament aiul tbe 




aasb L Dartas, 72 
(And. 70. 76. 74. 70. 291: D RaU. 72 71. 
7^74. 293: S StnidHiicfc, 69. 69. IS. 76: P 
GiieaWMtMiar. 72 76. 73. 72; A She^ 
, 72 76. 73. 72294: G StowBI, 73,78, 


A 

S 

c 


73. G Reyna {% amalaurl 74. 72 74. 
74: j Connaertan. ^ 73. 74. 74: P Conley 
njS). 71.74. 73. 76: D DowSng. 73, 76. 7f. 
74; c Pamon. 73. 76, 71. 74: D HenkM 
(U^TS. 74. 74, 71. 29Sb 8 BOQMvjua. 
7777276, 72 296: M Gamer. 71. 77. 75. 
73;JR]nast.728a73,71. 


OVERSEAS RACING 

Valuable Witness to 
enjoy his finest hour 

Fnm Oiir fomch Radng Cmrespondent, Paris 


BADMINTON 


Baddeley heats fatigue 


Valuable Witness, who iS 
undcfcaied in seven races 
sprc^ over the post iwo 
sons, can gain the most im- 
ponani success of his career in 
the £.15.492 Prix Royal-Oak at 
Longriiamp lomofTow. _ 

Much ofhls recent raong hM 
ID be squeezed in when the 
ground allowed and be missro 
ihc throe mafor cup evimis this 
j'car because of the firm going, 
there will be no problenis M 
that score tomorrow and he 
should take this group one prize 


lo<^ even more competitive. It 
may wc(f be dominated by fillies 
for the 16 runners include the 
first three in the Poule d'Essai 
des PouHches - Baiser Vole, 
Secret Form and River Dsmeer. 

Sarah, who has finished 
fourth on his last two runs, leads 
the British challeim but he will 
do well to reach the name 


at pri^-^a experts^ of against such, sifOMopposmcra. 

FabuJofc ^ Cuiii: »"<1 .THe Klenipo b_S^ Foim. 


Rciuvenate. . 

Faburola eouW ne«r rwh 
Auihaal when btaien . fiw 
lengths b>- him in the Insh w 
Lcelt two weeks ago bui sne 
Slavs well and likes soft grou^ 
El ■ CUire only retained nis 
unbeaten lecora by a neck w^ 
defeating the subsequently 
appointing Tommy Way in tee 
Gran Premio d'lialia 

Rejuvenate respondea 
gar^y. under strong driving, to 


Sieve Baddeley. England's because this was a big event in 
^ L ■ .u n..i.u-Ti Commonwealth champion, England," Baddeley said. “But I 
defeat &lchow in the rant nin (^gnied himself a place in the was very worried that I wouldn’t 
Slakes. She » oomj g improv - xelevised semi-finals of tbe Brit- get into tbe match at all. Vou 
mg son Md looks the best each- jgj| ^irwavs Masters at tire can bit tbe shuttle past him and 
way value. Rmal Albm Hall whh a typi- heissosnongthatMcanstiUdo 

The £36,389 Prix de la Foret caliy courageous Hig^y to brot something with h." 

h^er in 1983. by S-IS. JS-IO, 

*"• siageda beait-sKqipingrecoveiy 

Baddeley's win was de^ from 2-10 to 9-10 in the final 
peraieW needed after the defeat game at which poim English 
by China's Xiong Guobao of expression were apoplectic. But 
England's only other remaining 3 underfill round got ^ 
singles pidycf. nsiiofifll chain- Enfirid teft-handcr moving 
pioiu Darren HalL in tire mom- again and he just had enough 
ing. The t^l FnglMi d No. 1, momentum to carry on and 
ued 25. who so o^ seems to cross the finishing fine firsL He 
pEy to the limit of his abUity walmt^ccnrin to i^y Morten 


Andiieu.PSana,E 
J-P LflSCdrbouf&t P 
BflftizMn H ChabOMfski. DDubrocs (cape), 
J P Gamsu E Cham, A LarieiK» J 
Condom. L Aoctauoz, A Gamilnstl- 
nOMANIA: G FE>rea: C Pemesoeo, 
LunQiLSTcrfan. M Toadar; V Nasose. 

Fp^M Uraaanu 
G ha orohe, I Don G Tianani, G 
H Dtfimras, Ltenamin. 

Ralaraac D Bishop (NZ)l 

Welsh Cup 

• The draw for tire first round of 
the Schweppes Wdsh Rugby 
Union Cup was made yesterday. 
Pool A: Rhydyfeiin v Meeatag; 
*^rayberam v Dunvant Pool fi; Soum 
Wales Pobce v Bryncoch; "Caaiphny v 
Pancoed. Pool C: Podoau v Tonw rahl; 
*LiMtns8nt V SbdM Vela. Pool Ds Ponty- 
prtfj V Rumnqy: ■ nwa ii oko Doefc Qttlnay 
WhOla^ taoi & Vvdra V Bridg^ ^ 
Hamers v Ateravon OunSh Pool R 
*Tand8u V Lianh ao t h; Merthyr v LlaneflL 
Pool Nantyffylon v OM Penanhians: 
"Neath Ath v SMransea Unv, Pool H: 
TbiyMin V Bteirtt; *1^ V NoMm 
J: Aheravon v Momston or Tlnata 
TMiitiiafy v AberaoBfi. Pool K: 
"Cannarthon Ath vCmas Keys; Tteofc h y 
Cardiff. Pool Poncypoof w Dedwac; 
*erttaii Feny v Newport Svaoana. Pool 
Vk Tutors Town v HavertonX West "Mw 
Dock Stars V NaitfL Pool N: 'Thmsaran ' 
Uendotfery; MStoid Haven v Gtamorgr 
WandarofS. Pool 0: "ttowfartdge v Saw 
Ssim Mouniasi Ash V GosMcai. PoM 
R Old iityaama v Panarth: ^tedegar v 
Swansea. Pool Cfe IteyM v filala; 
LMiarao v Mesham. 

Mffihesmartotf " HtfprDi^tfiehcvna 
aaam tor tte sflcpfirf/pw in each prW. 


ATHLETICS 

Kristiansen is aiming 
to break new ground 

From Fat Botdier, Chicago 

Barring accident. Ingrid looked bronzed and fit and as 
Kristiansen's future is as secure bubbly as ever when sbe arrived 
as ber reputation with all the here two nights a^o- She said: "1 
money tire has earned from ber feel good and strong. I think I 
several world reomds; But she have a chance of doing it if 1 
can underwrite both future and don't sian out too fosL" 
reputation further here tomor- In oonirasu the men's event 
row by breaking her world best has “raoc" written all over it. 
time of 2hr 2lmin 06sec in tbe Steve Jones's oouise record of 
America's maiatboo, for that 2br 7miD IJsec, one second 
would earn the Norwegian outside Carlos Lopes's woild 
about S12S.OOO. best, which tire Wdshman ran 

The win is virtually assured. looks saf^ut my one 

Her 6Iosest opponent tePrisdIla 

whose best is 2.28.54.^ Mra 

Kristiansen is unbeaten all year, . , 

which has included world ihS 

records in tire 5,000 and laOOO 

metres, and victories in the S Musyoki and 

European champioaship laOOO ... 

metres and the Boston Musyoki to ^ the tading 
manaihAn roadfunner in the Umied States 

“®”™***' for the last five yeais, and 

She broke the course feextnl surprised Jones mtb a 60:43 
with 31mui 40sec in Tuft's worid best in tbe Great North 
10km on October II and has Run half marathon in Newcastle 
been trainiitg for the past two in June; Vainio is still causnu 
weeks in Florida's Disney some concern as a reinstated 
Worid. Tbe talk here is of her drugs ofiender. Speddiqg is one 
becoming the first woman to of the athletes feels that 
run under 2hr 20nun for tbe race directors should not invite 
marathon, and she certainly him. 




Malley earns bronze 

Flrom Nioohs SooBies, IV^rasCridit 


Six years agO; Avril Malley 
won a li^t-heavyweigbt bronze 
medal in the first world 
c ham pionships for women in 
York and yesienl^, in the 
fourth world efaammonships 
here, sbe found herself oomp^- 
iM for a bronze medal atpin. 
Thoi^ she is aged 29, tire is as 
fit as any ofher opponents, and 
this fitness resulted in a fine win 
over Stefonia Dizewicka, of 
Poland, in her firai figtiL 

With this behind tier. Malley 
went on to a confident tactic^ 
win over Anna Maria 
Col^rossi, of Italy, jputting her 
in the .semi-final Here, the 
European champio n, Irene de 


Kok, of The Netherlands, 
showed her calss as Malk^ 
be^ conceding scores. De Kok 
put the matter beyond doubt 
with a good rear leg. throw fbr 
yuko (fiw points). 

Although this first day of the 
champiotoip was pre^cted to 
be a quiet one for Britain, it was 
not without its excitements. The 
middlewei^i from Motherwell 
Bleen Boyle, aged 20. had the 
misfortune to come fooe-io-fooe 
with two-times world cham- 
inon, Brigitte Deydier, of 
France. And she neany caused 
tire upset of tbe touTnameni 
when she scored with a hip 
throw ~ until the Scots ^ 
succumbed to an aimlock. 


who finished runner-up m all . 

three ofher races In the first half | when it matters, did so again. 


of the season, ending with a two- 
fengib second to Lacovia in the 
Prix de Diane; 

She did not reappear until 
winning the Prix de I'Opera over 
an extended nine furlongs on 
Arc dav. She is in fine fonn and 
tm only a neck to make cm on 
Baiser vole, whose recent cnbrls 
have been in sprint company 
and who prefers faster ground. 


He was a game down and 3-6 
down in toe seocKi^ he was 
nerx'ous for a lime in the 
fust game dofr'tired before the 
end and he had to cope with a 
tremendously talented and uit- 
predictabie opponent who is 
prolxibly the naidesi hitter in 
the game. 

V "! rcall> wanicd to do it 


Frost, the wotM N o. l.whonow 
lives only a few miles down the 
road from him in Waltham 
Cross. 


Haa; Ouaitar-anaiK 
X GuoBM retina) m 0 Ha* (G^. i8-i5. 
15-1; G Baddaiw (Eitf m J iMaanioff 
jpBiyi 8-15. IS-lO. l5-2WeiMme (teaftar- 
fiftfa: N Qutfua iClina) tit E Goena 
(IMm). 11*6, 11-6. MhadWNtfaa; 


laNteialc B OiBland (ScoO an) Mrs N 
to D TaDoraite Mas Halsa* 
15-11. 17-14. 


BASKETBAU 


im Dttt^ Ram 102. Homaspiie BoiBMi 96. 


GOLF 

CMBAtoJfloaArBMaHtBiiaiaiinUBMife 138i 
YhM^^SBte^TG^. 71.67.139:5 
R^.6e. 71 . H llteslUi.73. 56: K Aral. TV. 69. 
dSax 14a B Jons (AuML 73. TO. 146: N 
r4UO(QBL?3.73. 


FOR THE RECORD 


SQUASH 

HOUSTON US OpawJuaangsnnranaiB- 
s«5l- SwaMiBale (1) RNornan (iro lit (3) R 
mom (Aunt ts-ff 11-15 15-7 15-11: g| S 
□8vef|»R(NZ)M(4}PKMyai(GQ 15-11 IS- 
IS 15-14, 

TENNIS 


TOffTD! Ilen% 
sifigiBs. qumr ^ ^ 
Anracone IU8) 6-2 frS: J 


Mh touch 237, 130: 
Canov-A Otb Itaq lacn umcn. 506. 1M: 
Vatesa-R JBnonoz (CtfU 6^ AiMiiaffd|Bv*M 
Avon 3 te 1 2-0. V Kiumov (8iA bt 

M Ciam (Bor^ OcDite. && (M^ 
acwrt: J Rofim^ (NoO. 

14-3. STiis AlSoiiasMBS ICubL DrotaeiN 






Specter (WG) Dt P 
ConnorB(uaM E 


rLAntfi(CybtSDav«iu8) 


ICE HOCKEY 


— WBESTLiMG 

NORTH AMBDCAs MNlonal La^ot: New - — 

Jersey- Deite .6. Los Angete Kings 3; BUDAPCST: Weild rhsmpmmlspa 0*606- 
m 6. MsmgH PorigMie 3. 

\P: PM foum eaeSid In: 

Wasos 4 Sgemen OM 9. Sqmen 



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12 - 0 . 


fHtfi) S- 2 69ki 
Tanev (BuO i 
Boteiev tJttsnaRii Cnachas# Ear) 
}saitai(2L4>i6. 16^- ifliiivTGaSDarl^), 
sJM-J-F CM (frL mtst «ufi 4.40. 124h A 
FyooorenkatusR). tvonze^l Bttria (Pop & 
V Tamas4) KoBoioia JU9 douWa teg; 

dog . 

uissiiev iBiin 4-a: Fyodorenko (USSRVV 
Andra (Romi 3-1 . iSOtaT Johanson fiwcH 
Gngoras (RiM stoViM: R Qen>vski {Bug 
^.^ij^iiiSici {US) 4 ^ OtlUtin 


HOCKEY 

Southgate 

have 

Keriy back 

By Sydney Friskin 

Sean Keriy. Errand's centre 
forward, wi 11 put the disappoint- 
ment of last week's Worid Clip 
finti defeat behind him when he 
leads the Southgate attadc 
against Hounslow, the cham- 
pions, in the premier division of 
the Pizza Express London 
league match at Pickens Lock 
today. 

The Southgate squad of 12. 
from which the team wiD be 
picked, includes Rupert Welch, 
who has represented England at 
three levels under-] 6. under-lS, 
and under-ll . He also pteyed fbr 
Olion and West Warwickshire, 
then moved lo Nesion and from 
there to the Yorkshire club. 
Weltoiu who were beaten by 
Southgate in tbe club cbamirion- 
ship last season at Neasden. 
John Shaw, another World Cup 
forward is also in the Southgate 
squad for today's game. 

Hounslow's ibfee World Clip 
players. Bhaura, OifL and Pte- 
ler could play for them today — 
it is too big a match to miss — 
but they are not in the Middle- 
sex squad for lomoiroiv's 
County Championship match 
against Surrey, the tide holders, 
at Feliham School. The Middle- 
sex^ team, a comtrination of 
Indian Gymkhana forwards and 
Teddington defenders, will be 
captained for tire time being by 
Eaton until Bhaura returns. 

David Aikinson. who scored 
the winning goal fin- Surrey in 
last season's county final against 
Devon is expeaed to play at 
outside right for them tomorrow 
in a foirly balanced side where 
the accent is moving on to 
youth. Guy Marchant, who 
scored a total of 26 goals in 
league and cup maicnes last 
season, will be at inside rfgbL 

A few da^ago, thegrass pticb 

at Slough was under water and if 
it has not dried out suffideotly; 
Buckinghamshire's county 
match agrinsi Oxfordshire tt^ 
morrow wiU be moved to an all 
weather pilch at Lang^. The 
Budunghamshire side, cap* 
lained by Manjrt Flora, include 
Simon Byrne from Aylsebuiy at 
inside left and full back, Jeremy 
Clark, aged 18. from Marlow. 
David Barber, of Exeter Univer- 
sity. and Richard Purchase are 
among the younger playera m 
the Somerset squad for their 
county match against HerefonJ 
at Isca. 

The key match in the Nonb- 
em area is ibe one at Bowdoo 
where Cheshire are at home u> 
last year's Northern champions. 
Yorkshire; More World CUp 
players. Grimley for Cheshire at 
inside left and Hughes for 
Yorkshire, will play in a cnictal 
match which seems to have 
arrived a liiile too soon in the 














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Li'i 1 » t* iK* t'r-i 

J. * ' ' *-r^' 



SudCHn; CMhe$ter v Hiafon: Qy Ctty v 
March , HixstoM V Lmestoft 
V Brattfiam; Harnch and Parkesam v 
ChattenszWattonvNcMn^ Wcsbech 
vTiptree. 

HEfrn=OftDstaiiE seniOA trophy: 
Finf roiimi: BROB Barnet v Mount Grace. 


V Portsmoutfi PC. Second dMakm: ou* 
hani Celtics V Ceniunare CoichesiBi: 
Ptymoutn RaiOafs v Team Walsaff: Just 
Rentals Rhondda v Tower Hamms. 
Women: Firat dhrtokm: LouwoM Stock- 
part V Avon Northarmton; Hemei and 
Watford Rm>els v Typhoo SMMd 
Harters. 


vHammerafi. 

FlUGBY LEAGUE 

Whitbread Trophy Bitter 

International 

Qt omam v Austr^ (OIO Trsnocd, 2.15). 


FM nnmt Eniteid v Ctmtead: Purtey v 
Oxford Unmrsdy. FM dhrimc Kerton v 
Hampstead: London university v 
Buckn^Hrfl. 

HANI»ALL 

BRITISH LEAGUE: Kirkby Select v Tryst 
77(3.01 V 


namem (Stourhndgfl Lawn Tanois and 
Scyii^ Rackets uub. West Mttmsk 
West Lont^ Open townament (Western 
Avenue. Noilholt). 

VOLLEYBALL^ Bank of SfiOttMid 
neiional learan womni'e firat iMsiom 
Asnocinte V Bftnmihani PPG (lit). 

TB«U& Prmty Posy Ciassc (BrG^- 


mfCmiD. 


[a 


11. 


’f f 





jf 

i 


















SATURDAY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Edited by Petrar Dear and Christopher Davalle 


43 


SUNDAY 





1 . 

hf 5, _ . ^ 


• From East to West (BBC 2, / \ 

8.25pin) _ takes 13 Stem V CHOICE ) 

Around Tom Takemitsu, as 

Simon Rattle presents a pro- 
file of the celebrated Japanese 
composer whose music, in- 
fluenced by 20th century 
European composers, is a 
fusion of East and West 


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# The BBC is uyingto keep us 
awake to watch The Anstni- 
1^ Grand Ptix (3.20an£;mth 

o Vi (BBC 2, 


vVr,i? three movies. 

»i.^.T 9-35pm) stars Marcello 

=... 1 ■ :* *» Masuoianni as Fellini's alter 

ego, and Claudia Cardinale. 




ArtiATlOf'® 



The White Sheik (BBC 2, 
IKSOpm) features Alberto 
Sordi as Che dashing model ibr 


8^ 

9M 


tZ15 


1J» 


5^ 




8J5 


BBC 1 


Hw FamRy Ness. 

Cartoons 8.35 The 
MuppetBabiM. 

Satiffday Superstore 
managed by Mika Read. 
Among the customers are 
Nick Berry of 
and Huey Lewis. 
Grandstand kitroduoed by 
Steve Rider. The iineHip 
Is: rames are approximatB) 
1220 Football Foetn with 
Bob Wilson; 12X5 Soio^ 
John Moody^r Lenny 
Howard. 

News summaiy and 
weather: Qiaiidstmd 
continues at 1.10 with 
Raflying: from San Remo; 
12^ 146 and 225 Racing 
from Newbury; tM, 210 
and 210 Rusw League; 
Great Britain v Austrina at 
OM Trafford; 320 Half- 
times; 325 Snooken the 
Rothmans Grand PrfK.425 
Final score. 

News with Moira Stuart 
Weather&IS 
Sport/Regional news. 
Roland irat- The Series. 
The special ojssts are 
Richard O'Bnen and Gary 
Witmot plus music from 
TheStrenmers. 

Dodor Who. Episode 
eight of Tha Trial of a Time 
Lora, starring Colin Baker 
and, for the last time, 

NIcoia Bryant as Peri who 
is sat^cied in order to 
satisfy lev's need tor a 
new body. (Ceefax) 

&10 The Nm Edmonds Late 
Late Braekfut Show. 
Music is provided by Huey 
Lewis and the News. 

720 Every Second Coimts. 
Com^ quiz show 
presented by Paul OanMs. 
725 Tlw Russ Aobot Show. 

The final show of the - 
series and Russ dabbles 
in a fftlle btBck magicx 
(Ceefax) 

Casualty. Two taxi drivers 
are brought in to the 
emrgetH^ ward after 

K ammorWi thrown hn 
ces and Megan, 
whose husband is a night 
taxi driver, starts to worry 
for Ms safety. (Ceefax) 
News and spoil VMth Sue 
Carpenter, weather. 

9.10 I n te r n a tio na l Snooker. ~ • 
l^vid Vine introduces 
coverage of frames eight 
to 17 in tiotb semifinals of 
the Rothmans (3rand Prix 
from file Hexagon, 

Readng. 

11.30 approximately 

b i tsnmtionalTennifc - 
Highlights of today's 
semifinals hi the lades' 
Pretty Poity Classic 
tournament at the 
Brighton Centre, 
introduced by Barry 
Davies. Commentary by 
Dan Masked. Gerald 
WlUlams, Ann Jones, and 
Virg^ Wade. 

1220 Weather. 

( Radfol ■ : ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF(sa6beiQw) 

News on the half-hour untB 
1220pin, men 220. 320, 520, 

720, 9^, 1220 midnign 
620» Mark Page 825 Peter 
Powell 1020 Deve Lae TVavis 
120pfn Adrian Juste 220 City 
to olw. Mark P^ and Graham 
QounmanmakeamudCHltour 
of Manchester. 320 The Amencan 
Chart Show. 5.00 Saturdm 

Uve. with Andy Karshaw 620 in 
concert Joim Martyn the 
Gtastonbury Fesfivai 7.30 Simon 
Mayo 920-1^00 The Midnight 
Ranfiiefs Show with Peach 

r Radfo2 ') 

On medium vrave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on the hour until 1.00pm. 

than 320. 620, 7.00 and ho^y 
tram 1020. Headlines MOam. 

720. Sports Desks 1l22am. 

4.00801 David YamaB 8^ ^ 

Steve Truelove 825 David 
moo Sounds of the 60 b 11.00 
Album Time with Peter Cfeyton 
LOOpoiThe News Huddvws 
120. Sport on 2 inckjding Rugby 
League: Great Britain v 
AustraHa: Foofiiali; Racing from 
Doncaster. Tennis. Plus news 
of snooker, badminton, golf, motor 
racing, encket and Ru^ 

Unk>o.5.00 Sportt RwortO^ 

Brain of Sport 1996. S20Tha 

Press Gang. Uditrheartad na^ 

quiz. 720 Beawig the RacortL 
720 A NigM at the Opera. Popular 

excerpts from theoperae of 
Pued^ Verdi. Bizet Mmsouni and 
LeoncavaHo. 821^40 BfifiM 
the scenes hi the opera iwrang 
studio, 920 S^ Soi^.Tha 

strtngsot the BBC Radio 

OrchSdra. lOLOS Martm Kakier 
lajMam Nigw Owls w^ pave 

Gaily 1.00 fitahtrida 320-820 
DaiWYemaH. 

WORLD SERVICE 
asa Mwia«k 720 N»« *52211?^ 

lour Houra 720 From ewWisMK^ 

MMiOrk UK W NWW 
915 A JoBy flood Shew 900 ^ 

Review 01 me wm PtwJM 
mono Tod» *20 Rnwieal ^ 
Uxik Aiaed 946 ,^£52 

Nawi 1021 Hwa^ Hun*W my 
Iran Ainanca 1020 fsods 'SSS 
1120 rtews 1120 Nw« Afloat Brt^ 

SS SSSu 1W8 

ayaSKSfNSSSH 

SM 200 mm ®??e%2S5SS 

200 Radio N ew s reel 916 Saturn 

Specal 420 News 4jOCpnma|ffl^w 

UitiSneraVuSoinds dihs 
UOPMoSeaMRMcsIO^ 
RremSfOwn Cofiwgondwdia^^ 
leaee WM R tf eafc w s lO A* spons 
toSdiiSWNewl^^ 

MM'JSS^J’aiTSSS 


floea TZOO News 12« 

BriMi 1915 Rade Newsreel 




Edmund RibWi 

lha Week; BMW Smw 900 JI R?.*” 
Reweur Dlihe Bntim FMBs9«0»gg 
tan ue Abuta Tsm 320 *” 

Newe AfloiA BflUl^lSFBm^ 0«n 
Correepancam 9J0 Mi 

New5te4J8 JuHs 0« twyMSLeoer 

from Anedet. M Uni* to GWr, 

Regionai Ty:oiffadngJ>oS^ 


a romantic comic^stnp, 
sought out by a naive young 
bride. Berfo Tunnel 21 (BBC 
Z I.Sam) is an abovo^erage 
TV movie about a group of 
men xuanelling nnder. the 
Berlin Wall to rescue their 
loved ones. 


• William Davis visits Tbe 
Real Dallas (Radio 4^ 4pm), 
indudiqg the real Southfork 
Ranch, which is open to tbe 
public at S6 a time. Hard to 
tell where soap finishes and 
reality begins. 



RtMjl perfoimaiice: lodt group (^Meo Id 9 Imk-up betws 
Anne CJsmpDell Dixon tv and 45 independent railw stations (Cli4, 11.00pm) 


• --f-— 

• . • . . . « . . 4l_ . . 


BBC 2 


920 Cetfax 1125 Open 
Unrvarsity 120 Ceetax. 

2.00 F9ni:Danpliori’(1946) 
Starring Bette Dai^ Paul 
Henreid and Claude Rain9 
Romantic melodrama . 

■ about a ctmeert pianist 
. who finds iw marriage to 
an international cellim 
threatened when an old 
flame appears on the 
i-Dtrected 


by Irving 

Rapper. 

320 Laraitiiei. Western 
adventure&(il 
irnefnanonai 


4X0 

Frames one to seven of 
the best of 17 frames 
semifinaJs of the 
Rothmans Grand Prix. 

5X? WMifCfwss Report 
Jeremy James recalls the 
heroes of the modem 
chessworld. 

6.15 The Secret Life of 
Paintings. Lady 
Wedgwood ex^ores the 
hidden meank^ In Jan 
. van B^’sTha Madonna 
and Qiancalor RoUn. 

625 NewsViewandweather. 

725 Satwday Review. Wgel 
Andrews reviews Femti' 
latest fibn. Ginger and 
Fred: Dave Alien talks 
about Ms career; jeweOer 
Pa2 Preston 
dbmonstretas his art; ivo 


s 



WUHam Feaver reports 
on the crisis in art school 
education. 

825 Fram East to WesL This 
second progranifTie in the 
seiies'on the influence of 
the east on Eunop^ 
mu^c features the 
Japanese composer Tom 
Takemitsu. 

925 FBrkBV (1963) starring 
Marc^ Mastroianni and 
Claudia Cardinale. FeHinTs 
seml-autobio^epMcai 
skxy of a flkn dtrector 
be^ driven to despair as 
he strug^es to cornplete a 
major feature fibn. English 
subtitles. 

1120 nm: The White Shaft* 

(1951) starring Bmnetla 
Bovo and Alberto Sonfi. A 
satire about the world of 
comic strips hi which 
actors pose as the heroic 
characters. Directed by 
Federico Fellini. En^ 

- siAtittes. 

120 The RoehfoniFHes. Soft- 
hearted Jhn lets a hippy 
use his home, (f) . 

NB: docks go back one hour at 

2.00ain. The foHowing two 

programme timea have been 

ecfiuitedte winter lime. 

1.05 Fi^ Berfti Thrinal 21 
(1961) starring Horst 
Buehholz. A made for 
television drama about an 
underground escape from 
East to west Beriin. 
Directed by Richard 
Michaels. 

320 Grand PiixSpedaL Live 
coverage of file Australian 
(Srand mx. Ends at 5.^ 


TV-AM 


6.5!TV>«m introduced by 
Richard Keys. Weather at 
626; news at 7JMk sport 
at7.ia 

720 The Wide Awdee Club 
■ includes guest Kim Wilde. 


ITV/LONDON 


925 No 73L Fun and games for 
the youra 11.00 KnigM 
ffider. Mtchael Knight is ■ 
assigned to protect a 
senator who has survived 
several assassination 
attempts. 

12jQ 6 News wite TYevor 
McDonald. 

1225 Swnt and Greavde. Ian 
and Jknmy discuss (he 
week's football news. 
1220 Wreefi^ from the 
Pavffion, HenieT 
Hempstead. 

120 AbwoH. Hawke has to 
choose between Airwolf 
and his nephew's life 2.15 
The Cuckoo Waltz. 


120 


320 


525 

620 



Bmdng 
-The 

British Ught-Weitanweight 
ChampionsMp between 
Tony McKenzie and Mire 
Harris; and the British 
Cruisarweight 
Championship between 
Andy Straughn mid Tee 
Jay. 

A45 R«alt9 

520 News. 

&05 Btockb u s t ara. 

525 The A-Team face the 
(btimaie chaiienge when 
they are rosporsfoie for 
booking Culture Ckib with 
Boy George instead of the 
western favourite, Cowbc^ 


620 

7.15 

7X5 



8XS 

920 


ite presented by 
CBIa Black. 

Safimfoy Gang. Comedy 
sketches and music from 
Gary Wiknot, Haie and 
Pace, and Kate Robbfais. 
2G-1. Variety game show 
presented Ted Rogers. 
^Orsdo^ 

andsport 




1220 

1.10 


The S1 10 
oberafives are on ftie treS 
of a gang who IdBed a 
datdCtive. (Oracle) 

LWT News headflnes 
foilowad by nm Vertigo 
(1958) starring James 
Stew^and Novak. 
Suspense ttvflier about a 
San Rsndsco poiicenian 
who retires from the force 
whOT he discovers he has 
a fear of heights and a . _ 
coUeague is idDed trying to 
save his life. His first job 
as a civiUan is to shadow a 
frierxt's wife. Directed by 
AHred HttchcodL 
^wdal Squad. Police 
drama series. 

Bfiss ki Concert With 
Hugh Masakela and Maxi 
Priest 

MghtThoi^bite. 


620 


720 


720 


820 

920 

1020 


1120 


1220 


CHANNEL 4 


A QuesOon of EcoTNimtcs. 
Part two - Is Britain Going 
Bust?(rt9204Wliatit’a 
WorttL Corsumer affairs 
series, (r) 1020 The Heart 
of the DnNpm. Part two 
profiles the families of a 
small straet in a northern 
Chinese town, (r) 11.15 
Tjraasura Hunt ki York, (r) 
1220 leaura the Stove 
GM. Episode two. fi) 
Channel 4 Racing from 
Doncastnr. The 1.15, 1X5, 
2.15 and 2.45 races, 
Introduosd by Brough 
Soott 

FitoE BaB of Fk«*'{1942} 
Starring Gary Coo^ end 
Barbara Stenvwyck. 
Comedy aboutai^ 
professor whose 
encounter with a stripper 
causes chaos. Directed by 
Howard Hawks. 

Brookaide. (i) (Oracle) 
Right to Raw proserrtBd 
tw Gus Macdonald. Dr 
Kuba Assegai accuses the 
Reporting London 
programme on Brent 
Education Authority of 
being a crude, partial 
misrepresentation of the 
facts. 

The Greet Australan Boat 
Race. The latest news of 
the America's Cup 
elimination races. 

News summary and 
weather followM by 7 
DaySL Robert Kee, with 
Norman Buchan MP and 
David Prfscott, a member 
of the national executive 
of the Gommunr6t Rsriy of 
Great Britain, examine the 
moral justification for the 
Russian kitervention in 
Hungary thirty years aga 
St ran gei s Abroad. The 
third programme in the 
series on anthropofoists 
retraces the steps Iff 
William Rivers. 

Redbrick. Part four of the 
series on a year in the life 
of Newcastle University. ' 
(Orade) 

Paradtoe Postponed. A 

r^ieat of Monday's fourth 
episode. (Orade) ^ 

HD SUM Bhias. Belker 
disguises himseH as a 
(fisabied person ki order 
to trap a man who prays 
onbank cashpoinnjsersr 
(Orade) 

Queen: Real MacHc. A 
recording of the moup’s 
recent concert afwembiey 
Arena. For the first tene, 
sfanultaneous stereo 
broadcast on the whole of 
the independent radio 
network. 

Flm: The Monster and the 
Giri- (19^starring EUen 
Draw and George Zuoca 
Horror story of a 
professor who transfers 
the br^n of a wrongly 
executed man to a gorfila, 
with unpleasant rasults. 
Diractad by Stuart He^er. 
Ends at 1.4a 


G 


<• 




A 



•• •• -•==• • J 


625 Weather 7.00 News 

725 Aubad9 Dyson. 

Overture; At the Tabard 
Irm; Allegri, Misarara, with 
Affson^iTip(soprBv>); ' 
Krommer, Oarinat Concerto 
inEflaL(^36.witti 
soloist Thomas FKadi; 
Chopin. Elude in C sharp 
minor. Op 10 No 4; Nocturne 
in D flat. Op 27 No 2, with 
John Bingnam (piano); 
Granados. La mqja y el 
rusehor, with ViooriBOe 
Los Angdes (soprano); 
SMing. Suite in A minor, 
vinth Jascha Heifetz, 
violin); WaHerLaigh. 
Concertino, for 
harpsichord and sorfeigs, 
soloist NaviRe rakes; 

Harold air LsnchbeiTy, 

Ballet: La tfflemal 
gantea,Act2. 

920 News 

925 RaooTO Review, ind 
BdUingaUbTary: 

Schdwt'B Trout QuintaL 
and a review of new 
records of oontampbrary 
oomposers, hwludng 
Carter and Copland. 

10.15 Starao Releas9 
Coptand. Symphony No 
3. New York PO undar 
Lsonard Bemstsln; 

GloriB Coates, String Quartet 
No4,piayadbytiiB. 

Kronos uuartat 

11.15 OeveiBnd Orchestra, 
under Christoph von 
Dohranyl. wkh Emanuel Ax 
(piano). Dvorak. 

Symphony No B, in G; 


Brahms, Piano Concerto 
No 2. in B flat kidudng at 
1220 Interval reading. 

120 News 

125 Mozart and Bara. 
BuchbeigerSlivn 
Quartet Mozart Quartet fti D 
. mkxxCK 421); Berg; 

Quartet Oo3. 

220 Handel Chamber Musla 
The Biglish Concert 
directed by Trevor Plmock 
diarpsIchordLTrto- 
^Bia in B flat Cto 2 Mo 3; 
Chaconne in G; Trio- ' 
Sonata in G, Op 5 No 4; ■ 
VioHn Son^ in A mqor. 

Op 1 No 3; Trio-Sonata in B 
minor. Op 2 No 1. 

320 Mengeowg's 

Beamoveo. Lastof five 
programmes on the 
convtota cycle of 
Duom oven s ym p hortia s from 
raaxdsof pubfic 
concerts In 1940. Symphony 
No 9. ki D minor (Cnoral). 

420 Medmerand Bax. Piers 
. Lane and Kafinxi 

Stuiroc (piaiKS}. Bax, Tha 
Poisoned Fountain; 

Medtnar. Russian Round- 
danca, 68 No 1; Sax, 

Red Autumn: Medtner. 

Knight Errem, CO 58 No 
2;. £x. The Devi that 
TempM St Anthony. 

520 Jazz Record Requmts, - 
introduced by Peter da yton . 

5j 45 Critics’ Forum. Subjaets 
include The Life and 
Lovesof aShe Devfl, 
Poussin's Venus and 
Mercury at the Dulwich Art 


Galeryand the fBm The 
MissiQn. 

625 Schubert and Berg, with 
IMitsuko Shirto (singBr) 
afidHaraiKtrHdR(p^). 

7X0 DisoonnacUon. Story by 
Jade Emery, read by 
Maria Aitken. 

820 RieArts Brass 


ipiaysJohn 
Joubert's Chamber 


Music, 

and John Caskan's 
Clarion Saa. 

820 INuouiVIrtixilsidiRoma, 
d&acredbyArneio 
Stefarato jvKW)). Vivakfl. 
Concerto in A (RV 158). 
for strings; Concerto in A 
minor (FW 523). with 
Ravei Vamikov and Andrea 
Thcdti (vkdns); Concerto 
in G (RV 413) with Rocoo 
Phll)^(ce6o);VivaMi. 

The Raur Seasons. IndueSng 
at92S Intarvai reading. 

1020 Paul Roberts (piano), 
plays Scriabin, Five 
Preludes. Op 16: Brahms, 
knemiezzi: m E minor. 

Op 1 19 No 2; in 8 minor. Op 
119 No 1; Anthony 
■ Powers. Sonata (1983) (first 


10X5 The Six Senses. Poetry 
and music on the theme 
of Touch, compied and 
. parfwmad by the Barrow 

1120 Schoenberg and Ligeti. 
Ensambia die Raflie 
iriays Schoenberg's Sitite, 
^2981X1 Li^'s 
Cnambar Concarte. 

1127 News 



On long wave. (^ Stereo on VHF. 
Siiff OOO News briefiig; 

WteShteftlO Prelude 

Music (s)620Ne^ 
FannmgTodayaso . 
Prayer Torlhauay ^) OSS 
Weethan Travel 
7.00 News 7.10 Todw's 
papm 7.15 OnYour 
Ftom 7.4S In Perspaceva. 
Rafigious affa^witii ^ 
Rosamaiy HartiB 720 Down 
to Earth, weekend 
gardenirig 7.M Weethei; 

820 NewsaiOTo^S 



920 News 

9M Braakaway. Radio 4's 
travel and leisure 
programme. 

920 Newsstand. 

1025 ThaWeekln 

WastminsW. Ptmot^, 
pyPetarRiddBiLPoMKal 
fiotor of Til® financial 
Tines. ^ ^ . 

1020 LoowBrtdSWWl^ ■ 
Sharon and studio guests. 

1120 From Our q»m 

CorrespondenL Lifearri 
politios abroad reported by 
BBCforetgii 
correspondent 

1220 News; Money Bpat 
Radio 4‘s financial 
programme. „ . 

1227 b«5o Active's Bogie 
Awards. Join Mean a 
they p>^ up Bogies from 


Mike Rex. Mika Channel. 
Anna Dai^, Ni^ Pry and 
Martin Brown (sfl225 
Weather 
120 News 

1.10 Any Questions? witii.fiffl 
Sinrs. Aiatin Mitchell 
MP. Anna M(£iiriay MP and 
John Boyle. 125 

220 Afternoon 

RQSSkKl- 

Dawn 


House, 
Lo w e -Wa tson (s) 

3.15 Near Myins. John Ebdon 
reflects (xi life « the 
Greek islands. 

320 Naws;Trauai; 

I n te rna t io nal 
Assigriment BBC 
corre^xxiddnts r^xiTt 
from around the world. 

420 The Satim^ FeatixiK 
The Real Daiias. A profte 
' of the real Dallas society, by 
WMtonDavts. 

3X5 MamolrB of a Fox- 
Hunting Men. Siegfried 
Sassoon’s novel abridged in 
7partsandrsedby 
Stephen MacDonald 
520 TheUvfng Wbrid. Dsn 
Janzan ids Jeremy 
(Sterfas abora Ms dramatic 
■ plaits for the Santa Rosa 
NationaiPsrk. 

525 Week Ending. Satirical 
Sketches on the wetit's 
news 520 SMppino 525 
weather; Travel 
8.D0 News; i^orts RouixKip 
)B25 atfotheWaakwitti 


Robert Robineonte) 

720 SSfurday-fiffight Theatre. 
Margaret Cemerow, by 
William KaananM 

820 Bakers Dozen. Richard 
Baiar with records (8) 

920 Thriller! Peter Lowers 
Rough Cktor, abridged ki 
six parts and read by David 
March 928 Weather 
1026 News 
10.15 Brenkig Service 
1020 OpinipnsEthical. moral 
or rMigious issues of the 
wotfk^] 

1120 Science Now. PrsBenad 
^Pater Evans. 

1120 Radio Times Comerfy 
Raracf& The five bete 
teitries in test y^s Raifio 
Times 
oompetitiem 
Phenomenon 


1 161 1004 JKi o now 

com^ writing 
ititi(m(Z)Tha 
menon Squad, by 



EfuiandandS 



1220 Maws; Weather 1i 
Shipping 
VHF(avaitobiaHi 
Wales 

620ain Vl^athei; Travel 125- 
gJDO pm Pro g i s nm i e News 420- 
620 Options: 420 Big Bang; 

The Technology Boom — tha 
London Stock Ex c hang e 420 
Young Ungust of the Year. Chris 
Seriafoliows the prograss of 
two of the eofflpatiurs ki lest 
week's ooiTtoetition 5.00 Locally 
Speaking. A series of six 
prog ranan es on daleets 520 
Por ^'A 30-part senes based on 
ktter 3ws recorded in Santiago 
dec -itoojiteia. 




• • s • 


t • 


( CHOICE ) 


■V ■■■■■■Asne *%&..■. . • nb* ■■■■ ■■■■ ■■ 





K^board wbizz: Sean Edwards as F^eak in &iiart Money, « 
thriller set in the world of oranpater tend (BBCl, 9.1^ 




BBC 1 


Ptan School 8u15 Aittdee 
of Fa 



aiih with the Rev 
Emmanuel Jacob 920 
This Is the Day. A simple 
reli^ous service from 
Kingsmead Cotege. 
BinTungham. 

1020 Aston Ma^oine. 1020 
Taftlng Business. 

1025 Buonffomo Itafial (r) 

1120 Fra nce Actuelie. 
The Languedoc and 
Oedten. (r) 11.45 
TeleioumaL (f) 

12.10 Sea Hear. Magazine 
programme for the 
hearing impaired. 1225 
Fanning kidudes an item 
on a temtagegiri whotodt 
over the running of her 
father's Humbersda farm. 
1228 Weather. 

120 This Week Next Week. 
Freedom of speech - 
should controversial 
rsbeghrana 
? Freedom to 
teach - should measures 
' against racism mean 
special advisers watching 
the teachers? 220 
EaatEnders. (r) (Ceefiax) 

3.00 Fflrn: El Cid(1%1) starring 
Chariton Heston and 
Sophia Lorea Stunningly 
photographed epic set m 
litti century Span when 
the coun^was tom by 
warring factions of 
Christians and Moors. 
Directed by Anthony 
Mana 

520 David Copparfleld. 
Episode two. (Ceefax) 

620 Save a LHe. A guide to 
emeraancy first aid. 
(Ceefax) 

620 News with Jan Leeming. 
Weathte'. 

6X0 Songs of Praisa from 
Belmont Presbyterian 
Church, East Belfast 
(Ceefax) 

7.15 Twenty Vaare of the Thro 
Ronnies. Highlights from 
thefruitfuHyoomic 
association between 
Messrs Barker arxt 
Corbett. (Ceefax) 

820 HowbrIs' Way. Episode 
nkie of tha drama serial 
about south coast sailing 
folk. (Ceefiax) 

8.15 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather. 

925 Sunday Premtare: Smart 
Htonay.tty Matthew 
Jacobs. A comedy thrifier 
about a computer fraud 
dreamt up by two 
' computer hackers. 

Starring Alexandra Pigg, 
Spencer Leigh and 
Edwards. (Ceefax) . 

1025 Everyman: Tlie Frontiars 
of Peace - Jafaiisffl hi 
India. A documentarly 
about the sb( milGon Jains 
in India who practice an 
extreme form of non- 
' violence. 

11.10 Dtocovering Aitimals. The 
mammals of Britain, (r) 

11.35 Grand Prix Highlights. 

The Austrafian Grand Prix. 

12.10 Weather. 


On medium wave. Stereo on 


1.15 


520 


BBC 2 


9,90 Ceetax. 

10.10 Open Uitivantty. 

1120 Grand Prix HighlglitSL 
Highlfghte of tha race ki 
A(»iwe. 

No Limits in the Lake 
DlstricL(i) 

Rugby SperiaL Highlights 
from the games between 
Wales B and France B; 
arto Cardiff and 
Harlequins, 
snooker and Tennta. 
Frames one to eight of the 
final of the Rothinans 
Grand Prix; and the final of 
the Pr^ Polly Classic 
from the Brighton Centre. 
Music hi Cainera. The 
Philip Jones Brass 
Ensemble recorded at IMS 
year's Bath Festivte. 
TMnking Aloud from 
France. Writers and 
r: the view from 
iris. IS discussed by 
Alain RnkieflerauL 
Bamard-Henri Levy, and 
Dan Sperber. The 
chairman is Michael 

■ - -mm_ mm 

ignaDBn. 

620 Tne Money Prog ramm a. 
Mark Rogerson rqxirts 
Kvb from the floor of the 
Stock Exchange on the 
last-minutB preparations 
for the City's Bang' 

7.15 DM You see..? presented 

5 f Ludovic Kennedy. Tha 
fe and Loves of a She 
Devil, weekend World, 
and Goidan Girls, are 
discussed by Marina 
Warner, Robert KHroy-SUc, 
andToyah Willoox. 

8L00 World SeMprasented by 
David Attenborough and 
Jufian PattiW. Vlmrfe 
stories from 16 locations 
in 12 countries including 
Russia and China, 
coinciding with the 2Sth 
annivarsary of the World 
WUdSfe Fund The Duka of 
Edinburgh, International 
President of the Fund, is 
interviewed from the 
Woianda Panda Reserve 
in China; and there will 
also be a contribution from 
Rafiv (^dhi taBring about 
his country's tigers. 

920 Lovelaw. Reports from 
Kenya, Irxfia, Itaiyand 
Hungary, on why people in 
those countries decide to 
hays' cMidren. 

1020 bitemetioiial Snooker. 
Frames nine to 17 of the 
final of the Rothmans 
Grand Prix from ttie 
Hexagon, Reading, 
Introdiioed by David Vkie. 
The cornmentators are 
Tad Lowe, Jack Kamehm. 
and Clive Evsrtoa 
12.00 bilainatioiiBl Tennis. 
Highlights of the dnal of 
the women's Pretty PoUy 
Classic, introduced by 
Bviy Davies from the 
Brighton Centre. The 
com m e n tators are Dan 
Maskeil, Gerald WilBams, 
Anne Jones, arxf Virginia 
Wade. Bids at 12X& 


• Woriil Safari (BBC2, 8pm) 
is an ambitious celebration oi 
wildlife around the g^obe, 
which marts the 2Sth anniver- 
sary of the Worid Wildlife 
Fund by going live to 16 
locations in a dozen 
countries. 

• Everyantt — the Fnmtiers 
of Peace (BBC 2, 10.3Spm) t$ a 
documentao' on tbe S minion 
Jains of India, extremists of 
non-violence who must not 
harm other bvirig creatures by 
word, deed or even tboughL 
Their monks and nuns will 
not baih^ becanse doing so 
would Idll the organisms on 
their skin. 


TV-AM 


625 TV-am begins with Sunday 
Commant; 720 Are You 
Awake Yet?; 725 Wac 
Bora. 

820 DavURroat on Sunday. 
News with Andrew 
Simmons; arvf Derek 
Jameson rav'iaws the 
Sunday newspapers. TTie 
guests include John Uoyd, 
edtorofthaNew 
Statesman, and Anthony 
Hopkins. 


ITV/LONDON 


WMce up London. 920 
Fftm Why Did You Pick on 
Jkta? (158(9 sterrirn^Bud 
Spenicer and Cara Guffey. 
A sequel to last Sunday 
morning's film about ahoy 
from another planet 
Dkected tty Michele Lupa 
Mombig wofaMp from 
Bridgeway HaH Methodist 
Mission, Nottingham. 

lfoirw.Doe8 


11.00 

1220 

120 


220 

420 

520 


Weekend Wi 
Aids pose a threat to the 
human race? 120 Polce 
Five. 1.15 The Smurfs, (t) 
Link. An kiteraiew with 
David Blunkett ttie 
dsabled Leader of 
Sieffieid City Council. 220 
The Hunan Factor. WHh 
Satish Kumar on his four 
month pilgrknage around 
Britain. 

The Big Match Live. 
Manchester City play 
Manchester UnitM 
The Return of the 
Aidstope. ^sode one of 
a new series of Ulliputian 
adventures. 

The Queen hi Hong Kong. 

Hiqhikfiits of the 


H^hfij^ite 


620 

6.40 


7.15 


7X5 


8X5 

920 


1020 

1020 


Sufidmr Sunday. Gloria 
HunnHord's gueste indude 
Saint and Graevsle, 

Patrick Macnee, Penelope 
Keith, and Lenny Henry. 
News. 

Higinray.SirHany 
Second is ki Milton 
Keynes. 

Ctwf s Play. Joe Brawn 
andJoarmavan 
Gyseghemtry to decipher 
cMldrim's descriptions. 
Livtt from lha nccacBBv. 
introduoed by Jimmy 
TarbudcAiriongthe • 
guests are Shirley 
and Roger Whittdter. 
News 

InsMa Story. Drama serial 
about a Fleet Street 
Sunday newspaper. 


• The Retm of tbe Aatdope 
(TTV, times vary), brings ihc 
further adventures of three 
UUiputians in Victorian Eng- 
land. Tbe stranded little peo- 
ple are living in a dolls' house, 
under the protectioD of two 
human chfldren. 

• Peni^winis (Radio 4, 7pm) 
is a new serialization in $ p^ 
of the novd tty Willi^ 
Makepes^ Thackeray, with 
Hugh Dickson as the writer 
and Dominic Guard as young 

Arthur Pendennis, handsome, 
poetic, smitten by the loveliest 
gill in Chatuis — but, alas for 
his prospects, pennilras. 

A. C. D. 


CHANNEL 4 


925 Sunday East Magazine 
programme for Asian 
viewers. Followed by 
D aa iwar akL A drama seriai 
set in a PaMstanl viflage. 

1D20 The Woitd This Week 
Includes Joseph Luns. 
former Seerstery-Generd 
of Nato, talking about the 
threats to the oraanisation 

trim within. 1l2D Woizal 
Gummldge. (r) 1120 The 
Waltons. 

1220 World Swiss 

BassbsILThe Boston Red 
Sox play the New York 
Mats. 

220 Fob’s Programme. Fbr 
children. 

220 Rim: That Certain Age* 
(193^ A romanfic musical 
starring Deanna Durbin as 
the innocent daughter of a 
newspaper owner who 
falls tor a suave, worldly- 
wise journalisL Directed 
by Edward Ludwig. 

News summary and 
weather followed by The 


taikting Image. 
TneSoti 
Mehnn 
profilec 


South Bar* Show. 
Mehryn Bragg presents a 
offkm-makBr 
Michaei PoweB. 

1120 Lwr News headSnes 
toflovradbyEndof 
Empire. Lord Mountbatten 
is appointed Britain's last 
Viceroy of India. 

1220 CsHtamia Highways. 
West coast travelogue. 
Nig^Thoughta. 


HoneyspkHwr, presented 
by Aiison Mitchell. An 
investigation into what is 
going on In tha City and 
now tomorrow's 
momentous financial 
explosion wiD affect the 
man in the street. 

5.10 The Business Programme. 
Tomorrow’s 'Big Bang' 
viewed by the American 
investment Arm Salomon 
Brothers, and the Japanese 
securities house, Nomura. 
With the Bank of England’s 
thoughts on the matter is 
David Walker, an executive 
dkactorof theBank. 

620 American FootbalL The 
Chicago Bears play the 
Mkmesota Vikings; the 
Denver Broncos tadcle the 
New York Jats. 

7.15 Chasing Rainbows -A 
Nation and Its Music. TTvs 
final programme of the 
documentary series on 
popular music in England 
features music of 
ceremony and rituaL 

8.15 Pf&ar of iW. This sixth of 
a seven-part series on the 
history of Zionism and the 
creation of the state of 
Israel examines the 
aftermath of the Second 
Wbrid War as the 
concentration camp 
survivors seek a 
homeland. 

9.15 Ozawa. A documentary 
profile of the Japanese 
ooTKluctor Seiji Ozawa. 

10.15 Flm; The Life of Emfi 
Zola* (1937) starring Paul 
Muni. Biographical arama 
about the 1 9th-century 
French novefist and or his 
champion^ ttie caura of 
the 



Oscar-winni 


(an 



rormance 

□rrectedby 
WHIiam Dieterie. Ends at 



News on the half-hour unta 
1120801, then 220pm, 320, 420, 
720, 620 and 1220midnigM. 
620am Mark Page 820 Paler 
Powell 1(M» Mike Reatl1220pffl 
Jknmy SavBe's Old Record' 
dub (1992. *76 and -70). 220 
Vmtm American Bandstand. 

1978 ooneoft by Van Morrison 320 
Radiol MoraTmewittiAnne 
Nightingaia 420 CherttxisiBrs. 620 
T(fo4(I with Bruno Bnookas 
720 The Anne Nightingale request 
show 920 RcMie VkiraiiL New 
sod. fonk, tezz and fusion cuts 
1120-12Q0The Rankin Mias P 

On macSuRi wave . Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on the hour (exo^ 

820pm). Headlines 720ani. 

32Qmn David YamaH 820 
Steve Trueiova 720 Roger Royla 
says Good Morning Sumay 
US MeiOdias for You. BBC 
ConoertOrohestra introtfooed 
by Riciiard Baker 11.00 Teddy 
Johnson with your Radio 2 AiP 
Time Greets 22()pn Barmy Groan 
320 Alan DeU with Sounds 
Easy 420 Mdra Anderson Sings 
with the Langham Orchestra 

-«r .. ^ 




061 


Mitti your Suixfay 
-^1884} 


)X 

720 The Grumbleweeds (new 
series) 720 Come to the Balet 
wHh Cormac Rig tv 820 Sunday 
HaH-hour from Bethsan 
Tabemade. Belfast 920 Yow 
Hundred Best Tunes. 1025 
Songs from the Shows 10X5 
Hai^ Rich at the piano 1120 
Sounds of Jazz with Pater Ct^rton 
120am Jean ChalBs presents 
Nlghtride 320-420 A Littla Night 
Music. 

WORLD SERVICE 

6Jn Newsdsak 720 Nava 728 Twenty- 
foir Hows 720 Fnxn Our Own Con^ 


0.rs The Pbssuisk Yoin 
StiO News 029 Revtev of tne BdUt 
Ptbbb S.15 Sotanoe In Aedon 846 Histori- 
ans 1020 Naws 1021 SUM Snry 10.15 
Oas^ RaconJ Review 1030 Swday 
Serwea 1120 News 1120 News Aflox 
Britain 11.15 Prom Our Own Cot reap o n - 
dani 1220 News 1221 Play of Oia lwHic 
Biacic SKMv 120 News 120 hmntHbir 
Hom 120 Sjxxts Rouxlup 1X5 Sand 
Jones Request Show fnouing at ZOO 
News BetroOiad 320 Rado 

Newsreel 326 COricart Mi 420 News 
409 Conmeniiry 4.15 Tfw llWich RapM 
4X5 LeOBr frein America 620 Nawa 629 
ReflecaoM 820 News 600 TwemiMour 
Hours 820 Sunday KaW Hour 620 News 
021 Short Story 9L15 Tra naeaure's 
YOura 11X00 News 1029 CbaatBitan 1025 
Book Cfloica 1020 Rnendal Ravisw 
lOXO ReHadfons 10X5 Spans Rourtdup 
1120 News 1128 Corivnentary 11.15 
Letter from America 1120 Talwision 
Began Here 1220 News 1220 News 
Afloui Brmln 12.15 Radio Ne wsreel 1ZJ0 
ReBglous Senrice 120 Nefvs 121 I 
Claudhs 1X5 Eric Coates 220 News 226 
Rewlaw ot the BfflrSh Pram 2.15 Paede's 
ChoM 220 Sdera in Action 320 Naws 
329 NWS About Britdn 3.15 Good Books 
320 Anyi^ Gok 420 Newsdesk UO 
Seoop SXS Racordng ol tin Weak. 


c 




* •• ^9 


•> 


! ’.*■ 
/ >.• 


Xb 




>. 


D 


6^ Wsalher720 News 
725 Beecham Conducts. 

Mozart, Synnhony No 12.15 

35, In OKSKWHaffner) with 
the London Pmnarmonie 
Orchestra: Delius, On 
hearing tha first cuckoo 
of sprim (orohestra of lha 
Ro^ Pnaharmonlc 120 

Society; Handel, I know that 

S nerHveth 

with Dora Labette 
Sibelius, 

Symphony No 4. wftrrfha 
LPO; Rimsky-Kbrsakov, 

Symphonic suite: 

Scheherazde. with the RPO. 

920 News 

925 YourCorxtertChoica. 

Hindemith, Symphony; 

Mathis fuiw Scarlatti, 

Sonata (Kk 99 and Kk 
10^ with Giben Rowiand 
(harpsichord); GeminianL 
Corioerto Grosso In B flaL 
Op 3 No 5 (Academy of 
Ancient Music); Dittersdorf, 

Hero Concerto (soloist 
Mansa Robles); Stravinsky. 

'Of Psalms 
Ihrist Church 
Oxford) 

1020 Music weakly. Induding 
a conversation with hro 
Pogorslch: Mendelssohn in 
Scmland, a talk by John 
Warradc and Micnaal Nyman 
on his Ttew opera. 

11.15 Vermeer QuBftBt plays 6.15 

Beethoven's Quartet in 
F,Op 18 Noland 


Hindamith’s Quartat No 3 




Symphonic 
poem: Don Qdxots, with 
Lynn HarreB (cdtol, Janet 
Fisher (viola) and me 
BBC PhilhainKxilc Orche stra 
imder Edward Downes. 
TuckwsV Wind Quintet 
with Stephen Trier (ba^ 
clarinatL Niaisen, Quintet ■ 

E :Janacek,Miadl 

Performs Mozart 
Plano Concarto No 12, in 
A(K 414) Aideburgh Festival 
Orchestra. 

The Rake's Pfogreee. 

Swiss Radio recording of 
Stravinsity's opera. Act one. 
The Price ot ww. RaH 
Dahrandorf reviews the 
recent book by Sir Afec 
Caimerosson 

raparaiiona after the SeeoiKl 
World War. 

The Rake's Prograss: 
Aettwa 

Strange FHs of Paeskm. 
Anthology of poems on 
the unromantic side of love 
end lust. 

The Raka's Progress; 

Acf ttlTMl 

Too Clevar to ba Good. A 
reessassment ot George 
Bernard Shaw, presented by 
David Wheeler. 

Wood Versus MetaL 
Edward Biakeman 
compares the styfBs of ftite- 


piaying on opposite sides 
of me Bigli^ Channel in the 
early pmf of this century. 

720 Liszt and the Plana 
Racltai by Leslie Howard. 
Hungarian Rhapsodies: No 
5. int major. No 7, in D 
minor: Three Apparitions; 
Welnen, Kla^, Sorgen, 
Zagen (Pretude after Bach) 
Hungarian Rhapsody No 
1. in C Sharp minor. 

820 Xfienna Pttitharmonlnc 
Orchastia. under 
Christoph von Dohhnanyi, 
vfith (Sartiait Hetzei 
(viofin} and Walter Kiefo 
(piano) Berg, Chamber 
Conoano; Dvorak. 
Symphony No 7, in 0 
mmor. 

925 Restoration Church 
Music. London BanxM 
end Choir of New Coflega, 
Oxford, with wortce by 
Bkiw, Purcell. Humfr^ and 
L2cke. indudng at 10.15 
Interval raarikig. 

11.15 Ele^ and Romances. 
Alexander Bame (ceiio) 
and Pfera Lana (pnno]. 



Granados. Madrigai: 
Lisznyai, Autumn; 
Mlihawj. Etegle: 
Rachmaninov, Vocalise, 
Op 34 N0 14. 

1127 Nawa 


c 


FteKgQ.4 


•• ■■-J 


On long wave, (s) Stereo on VHF 
525 Shipping 520 News Briefing; 
Weattw 6.10 Prakxta. A 
seiectian of music (s) 620 
News; Mornfog Has 
Brticen. A sequence of 
inrrnns 655 weather; 

Travel 

720 News 7.10 Sunday 
Papers 7.15 Apna Hi 
Ghar Samapive 7X5 Bells 
on Sunday 720Turnlng 
Over New Leaves 725 
Weather; Travel 620 
News 8.10 Sunday Papers 
8.15 Sunday. Refigloua news 
and views from home 
and abroed. 620 John 
Tmipson talks, tor the 
Week’s Good Cause, about 
the Peridnson's OisaBaa 
' Sixiety 625 weather; Travel 
920 News aiO Sunday 
Papas 9l15 Latter from 
America, by AJlst^r Cook. 
920 Morning Service from the 
Parish Churth of St 
Mkttiaei and AO Angels, 
Colwieh. Staffordshire (s) 

10l15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition 

11.15 PidcoftheWeek. 

1225 Desart Island Discs. 
Albert^ Michel Roux 
ki conversation writh Mfchael 
PartonGon (s) 1225 
Weather 

120 The World ihis- 
Weekerid; News 125 
Shipping 


220 News; Ganteners' 

Question Time visits the 
Whitley Bay Horticultural 
Society. Tyne & wear. 

£20 T?ie Anernoon Pby, The 
Spai<sh Gardener, by 
A. J. Cronin (s) 

320 Big Bm: The 
TectviologyBooni. 

420 Newc; The Food 
Programme. Derek 
Coever vtsitB Paris to view 
the latest fashions at the 
ia^gest food telr in tha world. 

420 The Rsfio Programma 
Presented by LBurie 
Taylor. 

520 News; Travel 

525 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits St Neots 
hi CambridgeshirB. 520 
9iippii» Wasttwr. 

620 News 

6.15 WeekerxfWbman's 
Hour. Highlights the 
p^weoc's programmea 

720 Pendennis (new series) 
toWiOlam Makapeace 
Tnackeray. D rama ti z ed hi 
eight parts by Peter 
Buckman(s) 

620 Bookshelf . Susan HS 
presents Radio 4'5 good 
books programme. 

Museum Cmoica 
Kenneth Hudson is 
joined by comedtan MBce 
Harding to visit the 
London Toy »id Modal 
Museum and the 


Dinosaur Museum in 
Oorchestw. 

920 News; Father Brown 
Stories. Five stories 
dramatized by JcAn Scotney, 
with Andrew Sachs as 
Father Brown M 
920 Law in Action. Presented 
by Joshua Rozanbe^. 

Om Weathen Trav^ 

1020 News iai5 You the Jury 

1120 % Latter That nils. The 
last of three programnias 
in which Sue TaExjt exptorss 
the of marriage 
breakdown and divorce, in 
the context of Christian 
foittt, 

11.15 Music from the People. 

Jkn Lloyd trores the 
20th<cantury revival of 
EngEshtolk5ong{8) 

11X5 Kane's Tales from 
Shakaspeara Vincent 
Kern reiens the stories 01 
fivsofthe Bard's best- 


known plays. 

we^ 


1223 


1220 News, 
dniPDinQ 

VHF (avflable in England arid S. 
Wales only} as above axcepc 
6208ni Wteen frairemo- 
720 Open Unhwsity; 7.10 Open 
Forum 720 Getting Started 
125'220pm Programme News 
420420 Options: 420 China 
Porum. 4X5 women. The Wasted 
Resource, Suoiteoroo 
Haka! 


FREQI^CIES: RacSo 1:1 
92.5; Radio 4c 200kHz/15G 
14589tHz/208m: VHF 94.9: 



MF648k^< 


M S liA ' U ' te e . 3W^ -I ' 

















44 


SATURDAY OCTOBER 25 1986 


Mansell achieves 

fastest time 
after early crash 


Nigel Mansell provoked the 
first ga^s and ended with the 
last laugh when practice for 
the Australian Grand Pnx 
b^n yesterday. Within a few 
rninotes of banning the first, 
untimed practice he was 
watching his car being towed 
away after clipping a wall and 
sliding into the fencing. 

Then, in the afternoon, 
when the official praaice was 
Unified lo 33 minutes by 
showers of startling ferocity 
and suddenness. Mansell 
outdrove his rivals to take the 
lading position at Imin 
i9.2Ssec. which was six-tenths 
of a second faster than die lap 
which gained pole position tor 
the race last year. 

Beside him on the front row 
is the world champion, Alain 
Prosi (McLaren) and third is 
Mansell's Williams teammate 
and fiercest rival. Nelson Pi- 
quet With Ayrton Senna, 
I^ke Rosbeig and Gerhardt 
Beiger all in the group close 
behind, the practice proved 
little b^ond the fact that even 
in the worst of the weather the 
best are still the fastest 
Mansell was making no 
excuses for his morning slide. 
'‘When a car clips a comer and 
goes off. then the driver must 
be to Waroc." he said. “I am 
grateful to the team for having 


From Brian James, Adelaide 

now given me a spare car. or I 
would have to sit out valuable 
pracucetime The circuit is 
fine, but now th^ have voUs 
that leap out ana grab you. I 
didn't even know (ill after- 
wards that rd run over a 
marshal's foot” 

Mansell piedicted that he 
would go even faster today 
when pole position for 
tomorrow's race will be de- 
cided. He observed that bis 
two main rivals, E’rost and 
Piquet vvere also in impres- 
sive form (although Piquet's 
own practice was inremipted 
by art electrical ftiult) and 

Brian James on 
the team behind 
Mansell, 39 

added darkly: "Well all three 
have Senna to contend with.” 

Confirming his intention to 
try to win from the l^nt 
Mansell said: "There will be 
no surrender . . . and no 
prisoners” Senna did indeed 
drive with his usual verve, 
selling the sixth fastest lime, 
and was looking to be prepar- 
ing a charge when be. too. 
touched a kerb, spun and 
wrecked the front of his Lotus 
In the morning Stefan 
Johansson, in a Ferrari, bun- 


dled the Tyrrell dnver, Phn 
lippe Streifi. off the trad( after 
coming up on the Frenchman 
and appearing to be infunaled 
bybeii^ baulked. "I had lifted 
Off after seeing Martin 
Brundle gel dipped by anoth- 
er car.” StieifT said. “I tried to 
explain, but he just went for 
me and tenged me ofT” 
Johansson got his deserts in 
the afternoon practice. 
Powering around the circuit 
he swu^ through a totally dry 
comer into a veritable curtain 
of taiiL His Ferrari continued 
in a strat^t line at the next 
curve, andJohansson climbed 
with a tedly swollen ankle 
from a spectacular slide into a 
walL 

RUCnCE TIUES: 1. N Manssfl (G81 
Wfliams. inan 192SSSM; 2, A Presi 
McLarwi. 1:19.785: 3. N Piquet 
WUams. iSOMBi *. R Amouk 
Ligiar. 1^.481; 5. K ROfiberg 
McLoran, 1 21.295:6, ASenne (Br). Loi», 
1:21202: 7. M ABoreto (IQ. Penari. 
1-21.709: 8. S Jotansson (Sm). Perran. 
122050; 9. G Berger (Ausm), Benetton, 
1-22260; 10, T Fata (H). Berwtni, 
122.564; 11 , P ASottF^ 122.765: 
12 , P Strew (Fr), TwiaiC 121262: 13. R 
Pair es e (it). Brabham. 123296: 14. A de 
^sans (W. Mraidi. 123476: 15. D 
Warariefc (ira). Brabham. 1-23SS2: 16. J 
Dumlnes iGB). Lotus. 123.786: 17. M 
Bnmde (G8), Tynatt. 1;24.061: 18. J 
Pafener (GB). Zakspeed, 124209; 19. P 
Tanbay (ft), Lola. 124.564:. M, T 
Boulsen (Btf. Aitoiws, 1:24.768: 21. C 
Danner (wG), Airova, 125296; 22 H 
Ro t ti e ng a ttar (Netii). Zakspeed. 125.746: 
23. A Narnni (It). Minardi. 12S.9S3; 24, A 
Berg (Can). OseUa. 126912 25. P 
ShfizarS (ft). Os^. (W not quaWy: 26, A 
Jones (Aus). Lola, did not qu^. 



CRICKET 

Crowe in 
threat of 
withdrawal 

Wellington (Reuter) — The 
New Zealander. Martin 
Crowe, said yesterday that he 
would not play in England if 
Somerset's members over- 
turned the county 
committee's decision to sign 
him in place of Viv Richards 
and Joel Gamer. A special 
meeting of the club's members 
on November 8 will decide 
whether to support or oppose 
the committee which ended 
the West Indians' contracts. 

Crowe said the Somerset 
committee had acted for the 
future of the county and the 
matter had been blown out of 
raoporlion. "Richards and 
Gamer put Somerset on the 
map. but in the last two years 
they haven't ^ven the club the 
kind of things an overseas 
player should." be said. 

(Trowe. who had oilers from 
several English counties be- 
fore signing a three-year con- 
tract with Somerset in August, 
said he would promote the 
game in New Zraiand if the 
West Indians were reinstated. 
"I would turn my back on 
English cricket bemuse if the 
supporters overthrow the de- 
cision. they would have 
turned their backs on English 
crickcu” Crowe said. He also 
said that he would look at the 
possibility of seeking 
coropcnsaiion 


FOOTBALL 


Seven-month wait 
over for Southall 


By Qive White 


Neville Southall, whose 
outstanding career was seri- 
ously jeopardized severe 
ankle ligament injunes seven 
months ago. returns today to 
senior football for Everton 
against Watford at Gc^ison 
P^rk. His recovery, which was 
well ahead of schedule, has 
forced Howard Kendall, his 
manager, to drop a goalkeeper 
whose mistakes since taking 

‘Swales must go* 

Peter Swales, the Manches- 
ter City chairman, was told by 
shareholders that he should 
resign at the anneal meeting 
yesterday when it was revealed 
that the dub owed nearly £5 
million aJter makh^ a fou of 
^99,885 in Che last financial 
year (Clive White vrrites). 
Swales said that the assets 
totalled £7.2 millikm and that 
measures, which he wonM not 
disdose, had been taken to 
improve cbe finandal str u ct ur e 

over from Southall he could 
"count on one hand”. 

In defending his decision to 
drop Mimms he said: "He is 
one of the best goalkeepers in 
the first division. It just so 
happens that until he was 
injured, 1 also had the best in 
the business in Southall.” He 


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added: "It is always a difficult 
decision when you have good 
professionals who have done a 
tlrsi class job for you but 1 feel 
I have made the right 
deci»on.” 

The return of Southall, 
whose recovery tai^t had 
originally been Christmas, is a 
rare piece of good news for 
Kendall, who only this week 
Icaml that a calf strain had 
added a month to the return of 
Reid. However, given 
Mimms's capabiliues Kendall 
would no doubt have pre- 
ferred to see Reid. Braceweli, 
Van den Hauwe or one of his 
other injured outfield players 
making an early comeback. 

By coincidence the game 
also sees the return of a 
familiar figure between the 
Warford posts — Sherwood. 
The suspension of Coton has 
given Sherwood the opportu- 
nity 10 face Everton for the 
first time since the 1984 FA 
(Tup Final. 

Walsh, an immensely popu- 
lar player particularly during 
his lime at Luton Town may 
also return today for Liver- 
pool. appropriately at Kenil- 
worth Road. Walsh had an 
ankle operation in the sum- 
mer and then fraaured his 
wrist 

Glasgow’s 
battle of 
the giants 

By Hugh Taylor 

Events in this week's Euro- 
pean matches have conspired 
to make Celtic slight 
favourites to beat Rangers in 
the Skoi Cup Final at Hamp- 
den tomorrow. Celtic played 
so well in their ]-] European 
Cup draw against Dynamo 
Kiev that C^vid Hay. the 
manager, had no hesitation 
yesteimy in declaring that the 
excellent display had been "a 
tremendous boost to our 
morale". 

While Celtic have lost the 
cl^nt Burns. Rangers' 2-1 
win over Boavista has cost 
them even more dearly. 
Souness. the architect of their 
new design, limped off with a 
leg injury which has put him 
on the sidelines toraorrow 
wiih McPherson, the key 
defender. 

In Jqhnston. MeCTair and 
Mclnally. Celtic have an 
outstanding attacking 
combination. While Rangers 
can expect Cooper and 
McMinn to spread havoc in 
their contrasting ways and be 
assured that there will be 
spirited forays from Ferguson 
and Durrant. there is no one 
who can stand in for Souness. 

Rangers, however, recall 
that the last League match was 
so one-sided that the seoreline 
of 1-0 was a travesty. Celtic 
having been overrun, ^t that 
has b^n Celtic's only defeat 
so far in the premier division. 
After f^ng the might of Kiev, 
they are unlikely to be over- 
awed hy their opponents' im- 
ports. as they appeared to be 
in the game at (brox. 

Yet current form seldom 
means anything in .^uld Firm 
clashes. There is so little 
between the Glasgow giants 
that the final could even be 
decided on pen^iilies. 

Other fodtbaU. page 41 


THE TIMES 


SPORT 


Ffast gdbSsked ii 1785 


****** 


Graf 

gets 

last 

laugh 

By Rex BeBamy 
Tennis Correspondent 

Rosalyn Fairbank. of Dur- 
ban. has beaten two seeds. 
Manuela Maleeva and Jo 
Dune, (O qualify for a semi- 
final with Stefii Graf in the 
Pretty Polly toornament at the 
Bngbton Gentrel Yesterday 
Miss Graf beat Robin White, 
of California, by 1-6, 6-4, 6-2 
and Miss I^rt^k beat Miss 
Dune 5-7, 6-3, 6-3. 

Miss Fairbmk ranks 34th 
among singles players and 
14th in doubles, a craft in 
which she maintains a South 
African iradition. Her game 
has matured a good deal in the 
past few years. She is a sound 
and shre^ player who knows 
where to go — and also knows 
where the ball needs to go. 
Throughout yesterday's 
match she gently guided the 
ball into awkward places, thus 
inducing self-doubt and error 
into Miss Durie. 

The British champion, who 
beat Miss Graf in this tour- 
nament a year ago, played a 
typically patchy match. She is 
big and strong and is always at 
her best when hitting fr^y. 
But this was one' of those 
occasions on which she was 
too often careworn. As has 
often been the case,* one had 
the impresaon that Miss 
Durie was thinking too much 
rather relying on what 
should now be dependable 
instincts. 

The other match may have 
hinged on the 14-point sev- 
enth game of the second set, m 
which Miss White had six 
game points but Miss Graf 
broke throu^ to lead 4-3. At 
the end of that set and again at 
the end of the third. Miss 
White was evidently weary 
after the running and bitting 
she bad been made to do. 

An extraordinary incident 
occurred when Miss White 
was leading S-1 in the first set 
As Miss Graf prepared to 
serve the next game, a group 
of German youngsters pro- 
duced a striking example of 
the rhythmic -clapping that is 
common in Germany but 
alien to Brighton. The umpire. 
Dan Biun.t of Stockport, rep- 
rimanded them with: "Please 
be quiet — or leave." 

Those last two words were 
startling. One speculated 
about how the umpire's com- 
ment would have been ^ 
ceived in the United States or 
Italian championships or 
most Davis Cup finals. ProI> 
ably the most charitable re- 
sponse hurled in his direction 



Steffi Graft wins yesterday (Pbotograpb: Hogfa Roatiedge) 


at Rushing Meadow, amid 
abuse and laughter, would 
have taken some such form as, 
"Get dat bum outa here!” 

But as Grafs supporters 
were far from home, had paid 
£5:50 each to watch her play, 
and decided to discipline their 
enthusiasm, T think it was 
not correct for him to say 
that," Miss Graf suggested 
later. "It was not during a 
point They were clapping to 
help me and usually that is