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No 62,554 



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TUC demand 
for minimum 
national wage 


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* TUC agreed that a future Labour 
government should introduce a statu- 
tory minimum wage 

@ TMe resolution was carried despite 
strong opposition from Mr Eric Ham- 
mond and Mr Ron Todd 


9 The commitment, which makes no 
reference to figures, could cause diffi- 
culties for Mr Kfrmock If elected 


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The Trades Union Congress 
agreed in Brighton yesterday 
that the next Labour govern- 
ment should introduce a statu- 
tory national minimum wage 
for about eight million low- 
paid workers despite oppo- 
sition from powerful union 
leaders. 

An alliance between 
the electricians and ihe trans- 
port workers foiled to per- 
suade delegates that they were 
taking the first step towards 
legally enforced wage control.. 

In any event, they were told, 
they were cruelly raising hopes 
that would never be fulfilled 

because the price was too high. 

But an impassioned plea 
from Mr Rodney Bickeretaffe, 
general secretary of the Na- 
tional Union of Public 
Employees, to end “exploita- 
tion in Thatcher's Britain” 
was closer to the mood of the 
conference. 

He said: “If it’s OK for the 
Tories to bring in laws making 
tbe rich richer, it’s OK for us 
to bring in laws to stop the 
poor getting poorer”. 

However, the commitment, 
which unions such as Nupe 
have been trying to achieve for 
20 years, could cause diffi- 
culties for Mr Neil Kinnock if 
he achieves power. 


9 Demands for increased funding for 
all areas of education were passed 
unanimously. Page 4 

By Nicholas Wood and Tim Jones 

For, while the Labour leader Mr Bickerstaff argued 
supports the principle of a strongly that delegates had a 

moral obligation to provide a 
legal safety net to protect their 
fellow workers from poverty. 

But Mr Eric Hammond, 
general- secretary of tbe Elec- 
trical, Electronic, Tele- 
communication and Plumb- 
ing Trades Union, and Mr 
Ron Todd, general secretary 
of the Transport and General 
Workers’ Union, retorted that 
the wages move could have 


floor, enshrined m a 
Joint policy document agreed 
by his party’s national exec- 
utive committee and the TUC 
General Council in July, be is 
known to be concerned about 
the costs and will resist pres- 
sure for its precipitate in- 
troduction. 

The resolution passed with- 
out a card vote makes no 
specific reference to figures, 
but Mr Bickerstaffe has his 
sights set on £1 16 a week, two 
thirds of average earnings. 

Swift implementation 
would land industry and a 
future Labour Chancellor with 
a colossal -bfil and modi will 
depend on how union leaders 
interpret the dause in tbe 
motion saying that the mini- 
mum wage should be “phased 
in, rising from its initial level 
to reach its target level within 
a fixed period”. 

Introducing the motion, Mr 
Norman Wflfis, the TUC gen- 
eral secretary, conceded that 
there would be “hard graft” 
over the target figure in the 
national economic assess- 
ment— the summit between 
trade union leaders and La- 
bour ministers planned for 
immediately after an election 
victory. 


iy tbe opposite effect to I 
tbe one intended. 1 

Mr Hammond said: “Com- 
petitive industry cannot be 
rejigged into some sort of 
social service. We cannot ran 
a successful industry like an 
out-patients department of the 
DHSS ” 

In an uncompromising de- 
fence of wage differentials, be 
said drill and responsibility 
bad to be rewarded through 
free collective bargaining to 
create the prosperity to deal 
with poverty. 

Mr Todd said that a statu- 
tory minimum’ could drag 
down wages if set too k>w 
“It could be used as a lever 
to depress wage levels_.lt 
could even be tbe slippery 
road to a statutory incomes 
policy.” 



■•V.- 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher pausing to admire Ryan Mason, aged six months, during a visit to 
Furness General Hospital, Barrow-in-Furness, yesterday. Photograph Harry Kerr. 


Soviet press tells 
of heroism in 
liner crash rescue 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


Tomorrow 


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A clued-up 
champion 



Dr John Sykes will 
not be taking part 
in Sunday’s annual 
CoIlins/77mes 
crossword contest, 
much to the relief 
of everyone else. 
The eight-times, 
winner gives some 
clues to success 



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9 The £4,000 daily prize 
in The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition was 
shared yesterday by 
two readers, Mr L 
Grugeon of Shalford, 
Guildford, Surrey, and 
Mrs Penelope Hilling of 
Leighton Buzzard, 

Beds. 

9 There is a further 
£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list page 25; 
rules and how to play, 
information service, 
page 20. 


$4 billion 
issue to 
aid pound 


former 
ouse of 


Death threat 

Faced with threats to kill six 
French hostages in . Beirut, 
Paris denied it was acting with 
Washington to win their free- 
dom and said two Iraqi dis- 
sidents expeUed from France 
could return Pag® 9 

Speaker dies 

Lord Maybray-King, 

Speaker of the H< 
Commons, died yi 
aged 85 Obituary, page 1 

Visas warning 

The introduction of visas for 
Indians visiting Britain would 
adversely affect Indian-British 
relations, an Indian Govern- 
ment spokesman said Page 12 

EEC sheep ban 

Sheep exports to EEC coun- 
tries were banned last night m 
a new post-Chernobyl radi- 
ation curb. The ban will stay 
in force as long as the Govern- 
ment enforces sales curbs in 
Britain. 


Home New* 

2-7 

Overseas 

9-12 

’ An* 

19 

■ ' lisfe, deaths. 

.•i\ murium 

18 

Books 

15 


IMS 

Cmt is 
Cross«wds 14,20 


Dbuy 

Lewm 


16 
17 

Utws lj 
PremBwds 20 
Science 19 

Theatre. etc ?Z 
TV & Ratfto 37 
Weather » 


****** 




.The Goverametir yesterday 
gave notice that the pound 
win not be.attowed-to slide in 
the run-up to th£ general 
election. ‘ 

It raised $4 bflfion, (£2.7 
billion) in a record issue on 
the international capital. mar- 
kets as extra ammunition in 
case political uncertainties 
send the pound tumbling. 

The previous record! was a 
similar capital-raising exercise 
— for SIS billion - just over a 
year ago. That was made to 
bolster Britain’s foreign cur- 
rency reserves just before the 
winter collapse in oil prices, 
when the Bank of England 
interWned heavily in the ex- 
change markets to support the 
pound. • 

Yesterday’s issue, with 
firmer oil prices, pushed the 
pound back above $1.50. It 
rose 1.1 cents to $1.5005. 

The move prompted 
speculation in the City that the 
Government was about to 
take sterling into the exchange 
rate mechanism of the Euro- 
pean Monetary System — ihe 
EEC fixed currency link. 

This was firmly denied by 
officials at the Treasury and 
the Bank ofEnglahd, however. 
Before the summer recess the 
Prime Minister gave her firm- 
est denial yet of plans to take 
the pound into the EMS at an 
early stages . . 

Instead, the money appears 
to have been raised to help 
support the pound as -the 
election approaches when the 
alternative — raising interest 
rates — could be politically 
inopportune. 

The $4 billion, raised yes- 
terday will lift Britain’s .gold 
and foreign currency reserves 
to almost $23 billion. 

Record issue, page 21 


City backs 
investor 
protection 

-• By LawrenceTever . ~ 

. New roles to protect inves- 
tors after tiie Qtys“big bang" 
on October 27 have been 
passed by. the Stock Exchange 
Council. 

The rales roll .govern the 
way in which members of the 
Stock Exchange conduct their 
business in the equity, govern- 
ment securities and corporate 
fixed-interest markets. 

The 40 pages of rules are 
designed to cater for the new 
dealing, practices that will 
come into effect on October 
27 — when the system of fixed 
commissions on share and 
gilts transactions will be dis- 
mantled, with the separation 
of the functions of stockbroker 
and stockjobber. 

They are prefaced by a 
general principle requiring all 
Stock Exchange member firms 
to' “handle their business in a 
manner which is fair and 


Final version 


21 


consistent with good market 
practice”. This is meant to 
outlaw practices such as exces- 
sive trading of investors’ 
shares, purely to generate 
extra commission for the 
stock-broker. 

Gients of Stock Exchange 
member firms will have to be 
notified in advance of the 
basis on which the firm is 
acting In other words, firms 
must tell , their clients in 
advance whether they will be 
acting as principals holding 
stock on their own account 
and selling it to clients, or as 
the client’s agent. 

Is the latter case the firm 
will be subject to extra duties 
requiring it to act in the best 
interests of its clients. This 
will generally require it to- buy 
or. sell shares for tbe client at 
the best price available in the 
market. 


• Attbe very moment that the 
ill-fated Soviet liner the Ad- 
miral Nakhimov was in col- 
lision with a large Soviet cargo 
ship last Sunday night, scores 
of its unsuspecting passengers 
were put on the top deck 
dancing in tbe open air to tbe 
ship’s orchestra and com- 
pletely unaware of the danger 
which awaited them. 

This was one of. the; many 
„ aphfc defers' i&Fflfe disaster 
— out of the -worst of its kind 
since the sinking of tbe Titanic 
in. 1912 — provided by the 
accounts printed at length in 
tbe official Soviet press, which 
shifted from its earlier practice 
and provided the fullest and 
swiftest description of a 
domestic catastrophe ever 
given. . 

According to Western dip- 
lomatic sources, the timing 
and character of the coverage 
was ordered directly. try Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov,- the 
Kremlin leader, from his holi- 
day retreat. 

The accounts made clear 
that ihf dancers were probably 
among the lucky ones as most 
of the 319 bodies still un- 
accounted for last night were 
believed to have been people 
trapped below decks in their 
cabins when the vessel went 
down in a bonifying 15 min- 
utes which left no time for the 
foundling of the lifeboats. 

Throughout yesierday,- 
teams of Soviet divers contin- 
ued their rescue attempt, but 
no-one held out any Chance of 


finding more people alive: 
The purpose of the continuing 
operation was to try and reach 
the bull of the ship 157 ft 
down and determine whether 
the bodies could be recovered. 

According to the Soviet 
newspapers, 64 rescue boats 
set out the seven miles from 
the coast to try and recover the. 
hundreds of survivors, , many 
of whom were/'c^^^to 

with Soviet disaster reporting, 
many individual examples of 
heriutin were cited. 

One' of the sailors involved 
in the dramatic rescue; con- 
ducted in the pitch darkness of 
a Black Sea night and assisted 
only by the beams of search- 
lights from, the distant shore, 
explained: “The water was 
covered with a layer of fuel, 
paint and thick black oil. The 
paint was evidently from a 
cracked tub and ail of this- 
stuck around the (ifo*rafts. the 
people and the objects which 
had been on board the finer. 

“People who grew weak 
often could not grip the 
rescuers' bands and sailors at 
the risk of their own lives 
dived into the water 
themselves.” 

The eye-witness accounts 
made dear that many of those 
floundering in the rough sea 
were nearly naked, having 
escaped over the side in either 
their night or party dothfes. . 

One of the sailors told how 
rescuers in bis patrol boat had 
Coo tin ued on page 3), col 8 


Surprise move 
by Karpov 
in Leningrad 

From Raymond Keene 
Leningrad 

Anatoly Karpov,, the former 
world chess champion, un- 
expectedly -took time out in 
yesterday's game 1 with Gary 
Kasparov. Their 13th game, 
the first in the- Leningrad half 
of the match, has been post- 
poned until tomorrow. 

Yesterday morning. Karpov 
handed in a doctor's certifi- 
cate. citing respiratory prob- 
lems. 

The lime out is Karpov's 
second and leaves him with 
only one in reserve for the 
remaining 12 games. 


Fifth of firms 
share profits 
with workers 

More than one in five 
British companies operate 
profit-sharing - schemes . for 
their employees, according to 
asurvey by the Department of 
Employment (Our Economics 
Correspondent writes). 

The study was-done before 
Treasury plans- to give tax 
relief on profit-finked pay, 
likely, to come into force next 
year, were disclosed. . 

Schemes were operated by 
58 per cent of public com- 
panies with more than 500 
employees, and 24 per cent of 
smaller public companies. 


Ted Moult, 
bluff voice 
of farming, 
found dead 

By Alan Hamilton 

Ted Moult, the Derbyshire 
former who made a virtue and 
a broadcasting career out of 
no-nonsense bluffness, was 
found dead of gunshot 
wounds at his home yesterday. 
His family said he had suf- 
fered a brief but unspecified 
illness, and confirmed that he 
had taken his own life: 

Mr Moult, aged 60, was 
found idead in. the office oflris . 
300-acre form at TidcnalL 


Family murder 
manhunt for 
former servant 



Mr Moult Family said he 
committed' suicide. 

Police said they were satisfied 
that no one else had been 
involved 

His death shocked res- 
idents, who recalled him as a 
man unspoilt by 
e, radio colleagues who 
created a character in The 
Archers for him in an effort to 
capture his untamed personal- 
ity, and the double-glazing 
company whose products he 
extolled. 

Neighbours said be ap- 
peared to have been suffering 
from depression. 

Mr Jock Gallagher, head of 
network radio for the BBC in 
Birmingham said Mr Moult 
“was one of those larger-than- 
life characters who always 
brought a great deal of fresh 
air into the studio”. 

Although 1 he had been 
broadcasting for many years, 
he “had never lost the essen- 
tial countryman's quality that 
made him so refreshing to 
work with and to listen t<r\ 

True to his public persona, 
Mr Moult who was married 
with six children, always 
claimed that broadcasting was 
never more than an essentially 
frivolous sideline to his proper 
business of forming. 

Obituary, page 18 


Murder squad 
investigating the brutal 
killings of five people in 
Hampshire launched nation- 
wide manhunt yesterday for a 
former sonant at the house 
where the tragedy occurred. 

The man, described by po- 
lice as violent, was named as 
George Francis Stephenson, 
aged 35, who was sacked only 
four weeks ago by his elderly 
employer, retired London 
publisher Joseph Oeaver. 

The charred bodies of Mr 
Cleaver, aged 80. his disabled 
wife. Hilda, aged 70. their son 
Thomas, aged 50, daughter-in- 
law Wendy, aged 40. and live- 
in nurse Ms Margaret 
Murphy, aged 70. were found 
on Monday in -different bed- 
rooms of their isolated house 
at Fordingbridge after they 
had been strangled and set on 
fire. 

The hunt for Stephenson 
last night switched to the 
Midlands, where police were 
asked to assist murder squad 
detectives from Hampshire. 
This followed the discovery 
that Stephenson had returned 
a hire car to a garage in 
Coventry the morning after 
the brutal killings. 

Police said that Stephenson 
hired the red Rover, C352 
YRW. from a firm in the city 
at 10.40am on Monday and 
returned it 24 hours later at 
precisely the time the charred 
bodies. Stephenson is known 
to have hired the vehicle in the 
company of two other men. 

A police spokesman in 
Hampshire said that Stephen- 
son may have since hired 
another vehicle in the Cov- 
entry area and could now be 
anywhere in the country. 


By Michael HorsneR 
detectives 



George Stephenson: Police 
say he is dangerous. 

Dei Chief Supt Alan 
Wheeler described Stephen- 
son as a dangerous and violent 
man who may be armed, and 
warned people not to ap- 
proach him. 

He said that three shotguns 
and a .22 rifle, probably with 
ammunition, had been stolen 
from the fire-damaged prop- 
erty Burgate House at 
Fordingbridge, and warned 
that Stephenson could be 
armed. 

Stephenson. 5ft 9in tall, of 
medium build, with blue eyes 
and brown hair, had worked 
as a handyman for the Heav- 
ers for two months, but on 
August 8 he and his wife were 
fired after a row and ordered 
to vacate their tied cottage on 
the Oeaver estate. 

His wife, a general domestic 
help from whom he separated 
the day they were sacked, was 
yesterday helping police 
inquiries. 

Police yesterday recovered a 
television set which had also 
been stolen from the house 

Continued on page 2ft, col 1 


BT price changes 
favour businesses 


British Telecom yesterday 
announced a package of price 
changes likely to reduce the 
telephone bills of large com- 
panies but increase those of 
tbe average private consumer. 

It said the changes — which, 
if approved, will rake effect in 
November - represented an 
overall reduction in charges of 
03 percent 

The Telecom Users’ Associ- 
ation, a consumer group, how. 
ever, claimed the changes 
actually disguised an overall 
price nse. 

British Telecom claims that 
before privatization, profits 
from long-distance calls sub- 
sidized local calls. It says the 
changes will create a fairer 
balance between costs and 
charges for specific services. 

It has also been said that the 
price changes will help the 
company face competition 
from Mercury, the country’s 
alternative telephone network 
which is trying to attract 


business customers. This, 
however, was denied by a 
company spokesman who 
said: “It has got nothing to do 
with Mercury at all, we are 
continuing our policy of re- 
balancing prices more fairly to 
reflect our costs". 

Under the proposals the 
unit fee fora call will be cut by 
12 per cent from 5p to 4.4p, 
but the unit time will also oe 
reduced. Quarterly rentals on 
home telephones will rise by 
50p and rentals on business 
machines will go up by 85p. 
Some international calls, in- 
cluding those to Spain and 
Portugal, will be more expen- 
sive and connection charges 
will rise by £10. 

Overall, British Telecom 
estimates that the average 
private consumer will pay 1.9 
per cent more, while small 
businesses will pay 03 per 
cent less and large businesses 
will reduce their bills by 
between 1.3 and 1.4 percent. 


Calculus and spacemen in a Moscow prison cell 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


Mr Nicholas Daniloff; the 
Moscow correspondent of the 
US News & World Report and 
ihe only US ritzen to be jailed 
here since the death of Stalin 
in 1953, spends much' of his 
time in pnson doing intnrate 
mathematical calculus wjih.a 
highly-educated Soviet stool 
pigeon planted in his tiny oeH 

by the KGB. 

Details of the conditions m 
which Mr Daniloff is being 
held in a bleak two-storey 
detention - centre . in 
Energeticheskaya Street, in tbe 
east of the city, were giyen to 
The Times by his British wife 
Ruth, who has been allowed 
two visits since he was seized 
by KGB agents last Saturday. 

-He whiles away the time 
talking and solving problems 
with the charming, erudite 
mathematician who the 
have obviously planted in his 


cell to try and gain his 
confidence and report on his 
moods”. Mrs Danfidff told 
me. “There is no doubt at ail 
who the man really is, but he 
alwaysefoimsto be accused of 
spying like my husband;” 

Earlier this week, Mr 
Daniloff gave his wife a piece 
of toilet paper with some of 
the prison calculus on it. He 
also told her that his Soviet 
cell-mate was a believer in 
extra-terrestial life, and liked 
to discuss the possibilties of it 
at length. 

Mr Daniloff, who is 52 and 
suffers from high blood pres- 
sure. is allowed only a one 
hour’s exercise a day in a 
metal cage-like structure 
erected on the roof of the 
building in which' be is being 
held. "This is worrying,- be- 
cause outside he was a regular 
daily jogger, and this was the 



miners, so that she has to 
supply tooth powder rather 
than toothpaste. n : . 

“In the prison they get four 
meals of pretty grim food .a 
day. which is pushed through 
-a grille into the eein Mrs 
. Daniloff said. " Things like 
dental floss' and .shoe laces/ 

-have been removed from 

Nick, presumably on life .... , _ 

grounds that they could -W .mmmwt package, saying 
Sed 10 commit suicide - not •*““ « contained only news-. 


he was set up by the KGB. "I 
think that in the long run he 
will get out rather than be sent 
to Siberia like bis ancestor, but 
there could be a trial first”, she 
said. 

She added that she had been 
told at life prison that the 27- 
year old Soviet teacher who 
“handed jMr Daniloff the in- 


Mrs Rufti DanHofi: 
Two prison visits 

way he coped best with the 
stress of Moscow life and his 
health problem" his wife said. 

Under Moscow prison 
rules, she is permitted to take 
him live kilos of extra food a 
month, excluding luxury 
items (which include chotS 


that- he is likely to do that’ 

' Although Mr Daniloff is 
depressed as a result of his 
Ordeal his wife said he had 
been heartened by the amount 
of interest which it had pro- 
voked around the world. “I 
am afraid that this may be a 
long-drawn-out affair because 
basically it is political", she 
said. . 

like senior members of the 
Reagan Administrations and 
many of Mr DanilofTs col- 


olate) and excluding any con- . Nagpes. she is convinced that 
I 


paper dippings, had himself 
■- been - arrested, but the 
Knpqjlm's chief spokesman 
was Unable to confinn this. 

At the US embassy, officials 
are growing increasingly angry 
at Mr Daniloffs continued 
detention, but in public at 
least they have given no hint 
that any kind of secret deal is 
under negotiation. "We in- 
tend to raise his case on even- 
possible occasion with ouir 
Soviet counterparts", one 
said. - 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


Anglicans and RCs in 
agreement on key 
Reformation question 


By Clifford Longley, Religions Affairs Correspondent 

Official Anglican and Ro- has been treated by some papers from both sides and 
an Catholic representatives Anglicans, conservative ev- contributions from outside 
limed yesterday to have angelicats in particular, as the experts. 

Ived one of the key disputes essential condition for any Almost complete agreement 
the Reformation, concern- further progress towards unity was achieved quickly, but it is 


man Catholic representatives 
claimed yesterday to have 
solved one of the key disputes 
of the Reformation, concern- 
ing “salvation by faith alone". 

In a statement at the end of 
a meeting of the Anglican- 
Roman Catholic International 
Commission in Llandaff, 
representatives of both 
churches said they had 
reached agreement "on those 
issues of salvation and jus- 
tification which gave rise to 
deep divisions between Ro- 
man Catholics and Prot- 
estants in the sixteenth 
century". 

The document containing 
their agreement has not yet 
been published, and has to be 
submitted first to the Pope 
and the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury. Dr Robert Runcie. 

The dispute centres on Mar- 
tin Luther's insistence that 
Christian salvation was in- 
dependent of the merits of 
"good works", and accused 
the Catholic Church at the 
time of maintaining a doctrine 
of salvation by works. 

The Council of Trent, on 
the Catholic side, denied this; 
but until recently many schol- 
ars have regarded the gulf 
between the two positions as 
virtually unbridgeable. 

A resolution of this dispute 


between the two churches. understood 


Anglican 


The international commis- evangelicals felt that remain- 
sion was strengthened by the ing real differences were being 


Inclusion of more evangelical hidden by ambiguities, 
theologians in recognition of At one stage it was proposed 
that feeling. to publish a supplementary 

A brief summary of the document on die Roman 
agreement worked out by the Catholic doctrine of indul- 


thal feeling. 
A brief 


commission, issued yesterday, gences, about which Anglicans 


said it concentrated on a 
"correct” understanding of 


lave parti 
I'esteroay's 


icular difficulties. 


four principles: faith, j ustifica- not refer to this. 


statement does 


lion (including the concepts of The commission is continu- 


righteousness and justice), ingi its woric on other doctrinal 


good works, and the “role of 
the Church” in salvation. 

Each of the four has been 


differences between the two 
churches, notably the ordina- 
tion of women. At the 


defined in a way which "com- LLandaff meeting preliminary 
mands the assent" of all papers were presented and 



members of the commission, discussed. 


The summary adds: "It is their Discussion was also started 


Phil Tuck celebrating with his son, David, aged three, yesterday, after die jockey, on 
Doronicran at Southwell, had equalled the world record of 10 consecutive jumping 


view that this agreed state- on more detailed practical 
ment is coherent with the proposals for uniting the two 


Doronicmn at Southwell, had equalled the world record of 10 consecutive jumping 
victories set 27 years ago. Gilbert's record equalled, page 34 


official formularies to which churches. 


each Communion 
mined." 


The ordination of women is 
expected now to become the 


Ulster border security 


Any outstanding differences commission's main theologi- 
"are not such as can justify cal preoccupation. Indications 


continuing separation be- are that both sides are prepar- 
tween Anglicans and Roman ing for a study of the basic 


King says Garda needs help 


Catholics' 


doctrinal issues, and not just 


The agreement reached is of how relations within and 
the result of a long process of between the two churches 


discussion over two years, should be managed if only one 
involving the presentation of ordains women. 


Britoil to cut 750 Labour to 


staff in slump 


shake 


Britoil reflected the collapse 
in world oil prices yesterday 
by announcing it is to make 
750 staff redundant. 

Six hundred workers are to 
go at its Glasgow headquarters 
and a further 150 at its North 
Sea operational base in Aber- 
deen in the coming months. 

The redundancies, the sec- 
ond round this year within the 
company, are not voluntary. 
Those who are to go have been 
selected on an across-the- 
board basis and have been 
offered severance terms which 
the company describes as 
“generous”. 

Britoil blames the fall in oil 
prices to the current $15 a 
barrel for the latest redun- 
dancies, which mean the 
workforce at the Glasgow 
office has halved to 800 within 
a year. 

It also says, however, that 
some jobs cuts would have 
been necessary anyway be- 
cause of streamlining within 
the company. 

Mr David Walker, the 
company's chief executive, 
said the redundancies should 
be the last For some time, 


allhough he could offer no 
guarantees. 

"The world is not a certain 
place. I believe I have com- 
pleted the rationalization to 
run an organization in a very 
hard time for this industry. I 
have no plans at this stage to 
take any further action.” 

The firm has already made 
220 staff redundant this year. 
“At that time, staff were 
advised that further action 
would be necessary." 

Britoil is engaged prin- 
cipally in the exploration and 
production sectors and is not 
involved in the down-stream 
activities of refining or pump 
sales. • 

- The company estimates that 
the redundancy package will 
cost £15 million to implement’ 
but should save £30 million a 
year. ■ 

Mr Walker added: “The 
company lakes this action i 
with regret, recognizing that I 
competent committed | 
employees will be asked to i 
leave not through any fault of i 
their own, but because we j 
cannot justify certain ; 
activities.” 


up shires 

By George HOI 


A' network of district 
authorities responsible for 
most local services in the 
shires is being planned by the 
Labour Party. 

• Mr Jack Straw, Labour's 
spokesman on the environ- 
ment, said yesterday that as 
well as big changes in city 
areas, made necessary by the 
abolition of the metropolitan 
authorities. Labour was also 
considering extensive changes 
in the counties, involving the 
introduction of a strategic 
regional tier. 

"The major urban centres in 
East Anglia — Norwich, Ips- 
wich and Great Yarinonth — 
used to run their own affairs as 
county boroughs, and did so 
welL 

"We cannot pot the dock 
back, but what we are looking 
at closely is the establishment 
of a two-tier system of tnost- 
purpose' district authorities to 
run personal services like 
education, bousing and social 
services, and regional coun- 
cils, responsible for strategic 
functions." 



You don’t have to be Einstein to enjoy the Energy land 

World Exhibition in Milton Keynes. Just smart enough chile 
to realise it’s a groat family day out where you'll also app< 

learn how heating and lighting bills can easily be 
30% less. in 

We've built 50 of the world's most energy- 
efficient houses, they're all fully furnished and miljqnokeynes 
they’re open to the public for 4 weeks to show 
you exactly how energy can be saved in the Hmun 

home. VffUHLD 

There’s also street entertainment, * 


(andsoped gardens, picnic areas, competitions, 
children’s play areas, a supervised creche, celebrity 
appearances, the space-ag&Wigwam’ house and 
plenty of free parking space. 

So, come to Energy World, you'll have a 
great time and you could save yourself a fortune. 
*N5 August 23rd — September 21 sL 10.00am. 
— 6.00 p.m. daily. Admission: £3. Under 16’s 
and senior citizens: El Under 5's: free. £7 
Family Ticket (Sorry, no pets.) By can Ml 

Junction 14. By British Rail: Euston 


restaurants, bars, barbecue, 


lt‘11 pay you to see it . Line. Hotline: 0908 670311. 


Organised by Milton Keynes Development Corporation and sponsored by the Anglia Building Society 


i 


By Richard Ford 


Mr Tom King, the Secretary 
of Slate for Northern. Ireland, 
yesterday said the Irish 
Republic’s security forces, 
particularly the Garda, needed 
help from British authorities 
to develop anti-terrorist tech- 
niques. 

Mr King also hinted at 
government displeasure over 
delays in improving cross- 
border security. He said that 
while it was impossible to seal 
the 300-mile border, or patrol 
every inch ofit 24 hours a day, 
there was a need to develop 
much greater co-operation, 
particularly in the field of 
intelligence, between North 
and South. 

“I have always made dear 
my impatience to make faster 
progress, but we are deter- 
mined to develop that closer 
co-operation.” 

He said that in the North 
they had had to develop a 
response to the big terrorist 
threat but that the Garda had 
not faced such a similar threat 
from the terrorists. 

"It has produced a different 
attitude and different polidng 
approach. I don’t say that in 
any way as a criticism. We 
have got to all we can to 
help the Garda develop some 
of the techniques we have had 
to develop in anti-terrorist 
programmes. While there is 
impatience to see progress 
there is now the opportunity 
to develop close co-opera- 
tion." 

Mr King's comments about 
helping the Garda will be con- 
sidered unhelpful and undip- 


lomatic in Dublin, but the 
tone of his remarks reflects 
growing private critidsm in 
the North about the lack of 
progress in improving cross- 
border security. 

Mr King's remarks came 
after a record of a meeting 
between the RUC divisional 
commander and the Chief 
Constable, Sir John Hermon, 
in which critidsras were made 
about the Garda's ability, was 
leaked. The report said that 


Mr Tom Rainey, chainnan 
of the Northern Ireland CBI, 
said threats by the Provisional 
IRA and the Ulster Freedom 
Fighters were like a creeping 
paralysis bringing fear which 
slowly built up across tbe 
country. 


Opposition may force 
Dublin to the polls 


The Irish Republic may signs of pre-election ner- 
have an early general election vonsness. 


in the autumn with the oppo- Mr Hai 


sition threatening the election 


aughey 
before ( 


to launch an all out attack on devising a strategy to avoid 
Dr Garret FitzGerald's Fine being Joned into an early 
Gael-Labour coalition when general election and to deal 


... 1L...LTU .fr>nn “Tlie BUi one iu eiiu unui nunauuer 

er0f . th ^f^SiSl' tn&n 1987 but tbe government's 

position in the Daii is nnder 
There is a widespread feeling ... „ 


ofnqger with ffiepresMt threat jith its' I boldltm a 


manag es our affairs.' 


vacant seat is almost 


Hb party has decided to certain to be won by Fianna 
increase the pressure on the Fafl and that would place tbe 


government whose back ben- coalition in a minority pos- 


chers have recently shown 


McCarthy 

retired 


hy BR 


Protesters 
force staff 
to retreat 


By David Cross 


British Rail announced yes- 
terday that Lord McCarthy, 
chairman of the Railway Staff | 
National Tribunal, the top 
appeals body, is to retire in 
November. A successor has 
not been named. j 

The BR board said that it j 
was “appropriate there should 
be some change to the 
chairmanship and member- 
ship of the tribunal, as the 
existing members have been 
in their position for many 
years”. 

Lord McCarthy, a Labour 
peer and Oxford industrial 
relations expert has been 
chairman since 1974, being 
involved in more than 60 
adjudications. 

The British Rail statement 
signed by Mr John Palette, 
managing director of person- 
nel. masks a long behind-the- 
scenes struggle to find a 
successor acceptable to the 
management and trade 
unions. 

BR has been trying to 
persuade the unions to use the 
tribunal only as a last resort 
This reflects its growing con- 
cern, shared by the Depart- 
ment of Transport that 
consultation machinery is too 
slow and cumbersome. 

Names mentioned for the 
full-time job of chairman in- 


clude Mr John Hughes, prin- 
cipal of Ruskin College, 


cipal of Ruskin College, 
Oxford, and Mr Ian Bu- 
chanan. a member of London 
Regional Transport’s wages 
board. 


By Trodi McIntosh 

Anti-nuclear protesters I 
formed a blockade around a 
warehouse at the proposed 
nuclear dumping site at 
El stow, Bedfordshire, yes- 
terday after contractors 
slipped through an unguarded 
entrance to the site. . 

In the heaviest physical 
confrontation so far, about 
fifteen protesters jostled work- 
men trying to gain entry 
forcing them to retreat to their 
vehicles while security guards 
remained inside protecting 
equipment 

Mr Jerry Fitch, the chair- 
man of the Bedfordshire 
Against Nuclear Dumping 
organization, said protesters 
would now mount a series of 
blockades. 

“We will ensure no en- 
gineers wall be able to reach 
equipment” he said. 

The contractors employed 
by Nirex. the government 
nuclear waste agency, eluded a 
blockade on Monday and 
installed drilling equipment 
But engineers railed to gain 
access yesterday to sites at 
Fulbeck. Lincolnshire, and 
Bradwell-on-Sea. Essex. 

Mr John Baker, chainnan of 
Nirex and managing director 
of the Central Electricity Gen- 
erating Board, said extra po- 
lice may have to be called m. 

He added that only low 
waste products would be bur- 
ied at the sites. 

“I believe the protesters are 
misinformed. It is a classic 
conflict of national and local 
priorities." 


Constituency changes 
for 42 seats proposed 


Changes to the boundaries 
of parliamentary constit- 
uencies in 1 1 areas, involving 
42 seats, are recommended 
today by the Boundary 
Commission for England. 

The changes, most of which 
involve only a handful of 
electors, are designed mainly 
to bring the constituencies' 
back into line after the local 
government boundary adjust- 
ments of the past three years. 

They include three cases 
where more than 500 electors 
are to be transferred. 

Just under 2,000 voters 
from Warrington South, held 


with a majority of 6,465 in 
1983 by the Conservative Mr 
Mark Carlisle, QG are to be 
moved to Halton, held for 
Labour with a majority of 
6.829 by Mr Gordon Oakes. 

Arundel (Conservative) is 
to lose 1,312 electors to 
Shorebam, also Conservative. 
Reading East is to lose 533 to 
Wokingham: and other 
changes involve Banbury. 
Barrow, Durham. Guildford, 
Grantham, Hertfordshire and 
Salisbury. 

The changes kwould take 
place at the first general 
election after their approval 


Chaotic 
end to a 
brave new 
world 


Anderton 
says he 
will not 
step down 


while they had promised 
much they had delivered little. 
Senior RUC officers want 
quicker changes and improve- 
ments in the South. 


r said a general 
Christmas was 


beleagured coalition govern- “a probability more than a 
ment with a no-confidence possibility". 


motion (Richard Ford writes).- As the opposition front- 


A meeting of the Fianna Fail bench met, the Cabinet began 
fmntbeoch yesterday decided a two-day meeting aimed at 


the Dail resumes on October w ' th . the serious economic 
22 . problems Facing tbe country. 

«• i on it- T he coalition's foil term is 

■Sn!l not doe to end until November 


By Alan Hamilton 

Mr Eric Sebnry’s mis- 
fortunes began last Friday 
wtaThe ioM his camera 
equipment for £600 and 
bought an old boat, an out- 
board motor, and a sail. 

He loaded the boat with a 
bucket of cheese, five litres of 
orange squash, four bars of 
chocolate and a considerable 
quantity of hand-rolling to- 
bacco and, in the finest tra- 
ditions of Cabot and Drake, 
set a»il from Newport, Gwent, 
in search of a new world. 

His initial destination was 
Milford Haven, an easy 200- 
raile coastal passage down the 
Bristol Channel Had he 
achieved that, he intended to 
proceed to the Mediterranean 
in search of work. Mr Sebury, 
aged 48, divorced and un- 
employed for two years, felt in 
serious need of adventure and 
new pastures. 

But from the outset on 
Monday morning of what 
proved to be a voyage with epic 
qualities of an unexpected 
kind, his sailing was far from 
p lain . As he passed Cardiff his 
engine and he drifted 
helplessly up and down the 
coast with his unrigged mast 
lying in the bottom of tbe 15ft < 
boat. 1 

Naerly twenty-four hoars 
later be drifted within a mile 
and a half of the shore. ! 
Unfortunately the shore was i 
occupied by the high-security , 
Royal Navy torpedo range at 
St Thomas' Head, near Wes- 
ton-super-Mare. The Navy 
observed him and sent out a 
high-speed inflatable to in- 
vestigate; when they found Mr 
Sebmy cold, wet and lea k ing, 
they railed out the lifeboat 

By the time the lifeboat 
arrived, Mr Sebury had lost 
most of his enthusiasm for his 
project and his boat He asked 
tbe lifeboatmen if they were 
carrying any explosives that 
mi ght be used to blow his craft 
to smithereens. They did not 

The lifeboatmen towed Mr 
Sebury’s boat into harbour, 
but entertained suspicions that 
be might be k smuggler and 
alerted the police, who arrived 
to search die craft. All they 
found were Mr Sebury 's co- 
pious supplies of hamHxdling 
tobacco. Meanwhile, the er- 
rant navigator was taken to 
hospital in Swansea to thaw 
out. 

A spokesman for the Coast- 
guard in Swansea, who wit- 
nessed tire rescue, said “I 
think he envisaged himself as 
Chay Blyth. 

"Mr Sebury is the original 
disaster waiting to happen. He 
is perfectly entitled to sail if he 
wants to, but I just hope I am 
aot on duty when he tries 
again." 

Mr Sebury, a former Mer- 
chant Navy man who has also 
worked as a deep-sea diver, 
fitter and photographer, re- 
appeared to inspect his boat 
yesterday with his enthusiasm 
unquenched. “I am not too 
pleased with myself, but what 
could I have done? It has all 
turned a bit sour, hot I am not 
finished yet Exactly where I'll 
endup I don't know; it depends 
on the water and the state of 
the boat 

Leaning against his leaky, 
peeling craft, Mr Sebury said: 
"She hasn’t got a name yet 


The Greater Manchester 
Chief Constable. Mr James 
Andcnon, said yesterday that 
irc will stav “very much in 
charge’* of his force if he is ap- 
pointed president of the Asso- 
ciation ofChicfPolice Officers 
next week. 

He said he would be un- 
likely to have to hand over 
power to his deputy, Mr John 
Stalker, except when he was 
on holiday. 

Mr Stalker was reinstated 
Iasi month after being cleared 
of charges that he had asso- 
ciated with criminals and 
misused police vehicles. 

Mr Anderton said: "There 
has been much speculation 
latclv about my position in 
Greater Manchester should 1 
be appointed next week as 
president of the Association of 
Chief Police Officers of En- 
gland. Wales and Northern 
Ireland for the ensuing year. 

“To remove any doubts and 
false impressions I would wish 
to inform all concerned that 
the anticipated duties of the 
president will make no ma- 
terial difference whatsoever to 
my role and function as Chief 
Constable of the Greater Man- 
chester Police Force, which 
will continue to be effectively 
under my personal direction 
and control. 

“Such minor adjustments 
as may be necessary' from time 
to lime to accommodate any 
additional work or respon- 
sibility specifically within the 
ambit of the president will 
definitely not impinge to any 
great degree. 

“The Police Act necessarily 
provides that the Deputy 
Chief Constable of a police 
force shall have all the powers 
and duties of the Chief Con- 
stable during any absence of 
the Chief Constable. 

“However it is unlikely that 
I will ever be absent from or 
need to relinquish my com- 
mand. apart from when 1 take 
annual leave.” 


Health 


bonuses 


attacked 


but I'm thinking of calling her 
Chaos." 


Proposals to reward health 
service managers with bo- 
nuses for good performance 
were described as useless yes- 
terday by the Royal College of 
Nursing, because the man- 
agers did not treat patients. 

- The college said: "Health 
care is a team effort. Managers 
are only one part of that team 
so why should they be re- 
. warded and no one else.” 

Tbe college also shared 
doctors' concern that the pay- 
ments could be used as a way 
to press managers into further 
cutbacks. 

The scheme, to be in- 
troduced next September, ap- 
plies to the 800 NHS general 
managers at region, district 
and hospital level. Bonuses of 
up to 20 per cent of their 
salary over five years will be 
paid to managers for meeting 
and exceeding objectives, 
which could include reducing 
waiting lists, developing com- 
munity services and ident- 
ifying areas for improved 
efficiency. 

Managers who foil to meet 
objectives may have their 
annual increment withdrawn. 


We liked it 
so much that we 



.“..a book one turns to with constant pleasure. 


with much style and little prejudice* 


TLS April 26 1985 


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■ microojKT, lu ™ :w: > u *»nbi!rs in UwUKonlyand doses on 3aSepiamb« i08e Z 




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cp < 


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bonuses 

;»itackd 



THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Football clubs get cash 
8id to help to reduce 
long-term dole queues 


The Government has ear- 
marked up to £4 million a year 

EJvESA™ scheme ^ *e 

Football League and the Pro- 
fessional Footballers’ Associ- 
ation aimed at creating new 

jobs for the long-term un- 
employed, improving the im- 
age Of the game and helping to 


By Peter Davenport 

City, and will provide 61 jobs peris by experience m the 
under the Community Pro- sport and leisure-related 
gramme. The Manpower Ser- fields, 
vices Commission will Special emphasis wiD be 
provide £250,000 for die placed on involving young 
scheme: people from the deprived 

However, it is hoped that “V are ? s . 6001 


the scheme’ if successful, wfll ethnic communities. 


eradicate the problem of J* expanded to include all 92 

hooliganism. league clubs, providing 

.. around 1,000 jobs with total 

“FhSSSii government funding of £4 

Football in The million a year. 

yesterday^ ■ 1116 ** programme 

ministers, players’ rep re- S “^L-^bsfor the Iong- 

seniatives and officials 

Football T patnip at iKa contact between dobs 2 nd the 

Oldham Athletic. we Iwed, md Mp to tmlne 


be expanded to include in 92 c 5?TSf 

league clubs, providing Mr RichaitiTracey, the Mm- 
around 1,000 jobs with total *» !j? r Sport, said tiiat 
government funding of £4 football must workat matta- 
railiion a year mg uself as safe family 

-r- . entertainment if h was to 


is to create jobs for the long- 
term unemployed, improve 


“Football has suffered some 
massive body blows over the 


Initially the programme win facilities at the grounds, 
operate as a pilot scheme at six It is hoped that many of the 
«• 10 *5® North-west, jobs will become permanent 
including Oldham, Manches- and that ah those involved 


wntaab^duhsandthe ft 

fTE22 tl %SLJ ' h ! Cb . has survived because of the 
are twsed and bdp to utilize cotnmrtmenl of some people 

MSfS«F* bcu £ of,he within the game. Bat it £n W) 


* 


ter United and Manchester 

Explanation 
for elderly 
‘hooligans’ 

The eight Britons, Incl uding 
two men in their seventies, 
barred by the Belgians from 
enjoying an animal reunion in 
Ostend are to be offered an 
alternative venue or another 
date for their trip, it was 
announced yesterday. . 

The eight were told that the 
Belgians would not allow their 
trip because they might be 
soccer hooligans. Today they 
will be given an explanation by 
British RaiL 

British Rail said that it had 
looked into the banning of the 
£488 group booking far a 
weekend in Ostend. 

The eight people arranged 
the weekend for their animal 
reunion; they have been meet- 
ing for some years. 

Mr Eddie Woods, aged 45, 
who works for the Press 
Association, said: “One of the 
people In our party is Alan 
Ho by, the Sunday Express 
sports writer, who is 72 and is 
about to go to Buckin gham 
Palace to receive the OBE”. 


will improve their job pros- 




Mr Richard Tracy, aiming to 
provide jobs. 


. longer rely simply on the pull 
of the game itself lo attract the 
massive support it enjoyed in 
fca the past. Those within football 
°*" now have to work hard at 
marketing the game as safe, 
.?• , enjoyable family 

' • entertainment. 

. , “This sort of scheme repre- 
seats positive marketing 
aimed at families and young 
people. In the longer terra the 
links it will build should help 
remove the threat of violence 
as it gives people a positive 
stake m their clubs.” 

In an attempt to prevent the 
hooliganism that has blighted 
the game over recent years, the 
scheme will include a pro- 
gramme of talks and visits by 
professional players aimed at 
influencing the young in 
schools, youth dubs and 
industry. 

Mr Philip Carter, president 
of the Football League, said 
that the mam aim of the 
j project was to create employ- 

* meat and improve contacts 
between dubs and commu- 
nities. But a side benefit would 
be helping to combat hooli- 
ganism by making youngsters 
reel more involved with the 
clubs they support. 

“We have to make young- 
sters feel that their team 
cannot win every game, that 
they can be beaten by better 
i v; teams. If we can teach them to 
accept that in a fair and 
sensible way, then we will 

• have achieved something." 


Boxing ‘second to football’ 


A London boxing promoter' 
yesterday entered .the debate 
over the safety of boxing -by 
publishing an opinion poll, 
which shows that the sport is 
more popular among Britons 
than cricket, motor racing, 
rugby and motorcycling 
The survey, which Mr 
Frank Warren paid Marplan 
£8.000 to conduct, sampled 
1,518 aduhs in 100 political 
constituencies. It placed box- 
ing second only to football in 
popularity — 62 per cent to 68 


By David Cross 

Other figures show that the 
sport is not as “working class” 
as is often thought Fifty-six 
per cent of ABC1 fcien said 
that they were interested in . 
boxing compared with 62 per 
cent of the population as a 
whole. 

Mr Warren told a press 
conference yesterday that he 
was “sick to death” of bearing 


licensed fighters. That In- ; 
eluded' pre-fight brain scans 
and random drug tests. 

But a spokeswoman far the 
British Medical Association, 
which is campaigning hard to 
outlaw boxing, said that it was 
nonsense to try to make out 
that the risks were acceptable: 
Medical research had shown 
that brain damage to boxers, 
developed over a number of 


£2**5 V™-™ wrecking thequa]- 
ing lobby. I accept that i., k-;- .a 


ing lobby. “1 accept that 
boxing is a dangerous sport 
What we are saying is that we 
are in a free society and, in a 


. . ,,i .. „„ are in a free society and, in a 

Although g ^o^ pdged as democracy, if somebody 
dangerous by threfr quanere of wishes to box, they should be 


respondents, more than half allowed t0 - 
found the risks to fighters 
acceptable. Seventy-five per Mr John 
cent of men said they accepted secretary or 
boxing's risks, while a large Brant 01 Lc 
number of women were not so safety packa 
sure, introduced 1 


Putting a 
match to 
furniture 

The Consumers’ Associ- 
ation has called far stricter 
controls on furniture manu- 
facturers after a survey re- 
vealed that one death in five 
caused by fire in the home is 
the result of inflammable 
upholstery. . 

Under present regulations, 
new furniture must pass a 
British Standard test against 
catching fire from a smoulder- 
ing cigarette but a more severe 
test using a match flame is not 
compulsory. 

The report in the 
association's magazine 
Which?, published today, says 
that many popular forms of 
upholstery such as acrylic 
velvet and Dralon would not 
pass the more stringent match 
test the association wishes to 
see introduced. 

The report says proposed 
Government legislation which 


Mr John Morris, general 
secretary of the British Boxing 
Board of Control, said that a 
safety package had now been 
introduced to protea its 600 


ity of their lives and probably 
causing premature death. 

She said it was inevitable 
that people enjoyed watching 
boxing matches on television, 
but they are not in tbe ring 
themselves. “Our main con- 
cern is for the participants and 
we accept that it will take a 
long-term programme of pub- 
lic information to change peo- 
ple's minds.” 


Three hurt I Cable TV 


in mill 
explosion 

Three workers were aid- 1 
rall y fl] last uiglit after an 
explosion in the dust extractor 
on the ground floor of the 
Joseph Dawson textile mile in 
Bradford, West Yorkshire, 

yesterday. 

At least 14 others were 
treated for shock and inh al ing 
smoke after fire raged through 
the five-storey budding. The 
explosion demolished parts of 
all four upper floors 

> At first, firemen feared 
workers could be trapped in- 
side the mill in Birksland 
Street, a few hundred yards 
from the busy city centre. 

The three iqjnred workers 
were transferred to the re- 
gional burns unit at 
Pinderflelds Hospital, 
Wak e fie l d. 

Assault trial 


companies 
lose cash 

The companies set up to 
provide programming to cable 
television subscribers are los- 
ingmoney. 

The five main cable pro- 
gramme ventures have lost 
almost £60 million between 
them in the past two years, but 
research shows that the ser- 
vices are findina an audience. 

Next week, the Independent 
Broadcasting _ Authority will 
open for public inspection the 
applications of five consortia 
that are seeking to operate the 
di rect-broadcast-saiel lite ser- 
vice and two other offers from 
companies that want to trans- 
late cable programming ex- 
perience to the DBS market. 
According to the submission 
to the IBA from Stamream, 
the cable programming ven- 
ture of British Telecom, 
Thom-EMI and D.G Thom- 
son, cable is winning a 30 per 
cent share of the television 
audience in homes 


saSssSS jgSSEg 

S5G3SS Back in class 


match test compulsory. The 
furniture industry claims the 
tests would reduce choice and 
increase prices. 

Which? reco mtnends buyers 
to look for fiimiture carrying a 
square green lable showing it 
has passed the match test. 
Furniture that has passed only 
the cigarette test carries the 
red triangle label. 

The survey shows that out 
of the 53,000 accidental 
domestic fires in Britain m 
1984, matches and cigarettes 
caused 1 1,000: accidents with 
cookers, particularly _ftyjng 
pan fires, caused 21,000; 
faulty wiring and electrical 
equipment led to 9.000 tires 
and heating appliances caused 
5,000. J . . 

Two fire blankets designed 
lo smother frying pan p 6 ® 


borough Street 
Court yesterday charged with 
assaulting Miss Cnjul 
Wohnsley, causing her Mtml 
bodily harm, oa June 3- ne 
was balled until October 1. 


Paul Worthington, aged six. 
the youngest-yet heart trans- 
plant patient at Papwwth 
Hospital, relumed to school 
yesterday. 



Lawyers unite over claims 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Two lawyers specializing in 
compensation chums have set 
up the country’s first law firm 
dealing with the aftermath of 
disasters, which will con- 
centrate on events with mass 
legal consequences, such as an 
air crash or a drug with 
damaging side effects. 

The firm is the idea of Mr 
Roger Pannone and Mr Mi- 
chael Napier, two north of 
England solicitors with broad 
experience in “disaster” cases. 
Among those they have han- 
dled are the Land’s End school 
trip drownings; the Manches- 
ter aircraft fire: the Bradford 
football ground fire, and sev- 
eral product liability cases, 
including actions over the 


Opren and the heart drug in Strasbourg, says “it seemed 


EraJdin. 


10 11 s 10 make sense lo harness 


They have also been in- the experience of the two of us 
yolved in claims over whoop- Both will remain partners in 
ing-cough vaccine and polio their existing firms and by a 
vaccine. Mr Pannone. a mem- unique arrangement, all part- 
ber of the Law Society council ners of those firms are also 
and a senior partner in the partners of Pannone Napier. 
Manchester firm of Goldberg The new firm's profits are 
Blackburn, says in an inter- shared equally between the 
view in the New Law Journal iwo existing firms. One 
that he had “wanted to see the advantage is that Pannone 
development of a disaster Napier can call on the services 
practice” and that Mr Napier of the solicitors in the other 


was the obvious choice. They two firms in an emergency. . 
“were thinking again and ^W i rTilu WSftT m the big 
again in exactly the same disaster type of case is that 


Daikon Shield contraceptive- to argue a case in the Euro- 
device, the arthritis drag pean Court of Human Rights 


way . when you’re instructed, 

Mr Napier, a senior partner you've got to gear up to do it 
in the Sheffield firm of Irwin immediately. It will have 
Mitchell and the first solicitor phases of intensive activity 


Mrs Katherine Westmore, a passenger bound for San Francisco, watching children at play in the new creche at Heathrow 
Airport's terminal 4. The facility, which was officially opened by Susan Hampshire, the actress, yesterday, has been 
organized by Volvo so parents can leave their children while shopping for duty-free goods (Photograph: Bill War hurst). 

Newsboy Disaster compensation 

case being Lawyers unite over claims 

examined By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

By RobinYouBg Two lawyers specializing in Opren and the heart drug in Strasbourg, says “it seemed 

ine Home umoe is nr- compensation claims have set EraJdin. 10 us 10 make sense lo harness 

8®® “Y examimng doamente U p the country’s first law firm They have also been in- the experience of the two of us 

suiimtteiL ay lawyers lor Mi- dealing with the aftermath of volved in claims over whoop- Both will remain partners in 

Oiae] Hickey, wim is sernag a disasters, which will con- ing-cough vaccine and polio their existing firms and by a 
Me sentence for me murder m centrate on events with mass vaccine: Mr Pannone. a mem- unique arrangement, all part- 
newspaper d©j uiri consequences, such as an ber of the Law Society council ners of those firms are also 
BnOgewater. air crash or a drug with and a senior partner in the partners of Pannone Napier. 

The move comes after the damaging side effects. Manchester firm of Goldberg The new firm's profits are 

The firm is toe ,dea of J^r Blackburn, says in an inter- shared equally between the 
tified that Hfckey confessed m R oger Pannone and Mr Mi- view in the New Law Journal iwo existing firms. One 
a prura shower to tee tailing chae j Napier, two north of that he had “wanted to see the advantage is that Pannone 
sam he imdijed. England solicitors with broad development of a disaster Napier can call on the services 

Mr Brum button, wno experience in “disaster” cases, practice” and that Mr Napier of the solicitors in the other 
f* I 5 '/; Among those they have han- was the obvious choice. They two firms in an emergency. , 

died are the Land’s End school -were thinking again and ' T W’ TCT gfrf' m the big 

tod fired the toot » tolled ^ drownings; the Manches- again in exactly the same disaster type of case is that 
toe boy. told a press coo- ter aircraft fire; the Bradford way”. when vou’re instructed, 

Terence yesterday: I w*s set football ground fire, and sev- Mr Napier, a senior partner you've got to gear up to do it 

op ,“°™. s ^ art *P . eral product liability cases, in the Sheffield firm of Irwin immediately. It will have 

Mr Simon claimed amt two judging actions over the Mitchell and the first solicitor phases of intensive activity 
: ison officers tod torn non to Daikon Shield contraceptive- to argue a case in the Euro- and then it settles down for a 
smke up « conversation win device, the arthritis drag pean Court of Human Rights bit.” Mr Napier said. 

Hickey wnile they took a ■ ■ 

shower together. “The " — = 

conversation was an ordinary 
one, prisoner to prisoner. He 
did not admit that he killed 
Cart Bridgewater but 1 was 
frightened, and 1 was ap- 
proached by a prison officer 
who told me word for word 
what I should say”. Mr Sinton 
said he knew tbe officer's 
name, but did not give it. 

Mr Sinton said that at the 
time he was In solitary 
confinement, suffering from an 
eye injury received in a prison 
fijtiiL “I was told that if I did 
not do what they wanted my 
life would be made hell”, be 
claimed. 

On release from prison, Mr 
Sinton lodged a letter with his 
solicitor in which he confessed 
to lying in tbe witness box. 

He said that on two other 
occasions he tod tried to 
confess his peijury, but twice 
when visited by police be stood 
by bis evidence. He .said 
yesterday that was because be 
was stiD afraid of ; tbe 
authorities. 

Mr Sinton was traced by 

UinL-otfV maafrkar "Mrc A Mil MI ,ilwl iwiwiiui nv«vj|M^ia 

wS 3 Miss Elisabeth Gluck: boilt up an annual £6 million looked like him. 

w ton confronted by be? con- turnover in five years (Photograph: Paul Lovelace). 1 “There is a resemblance." 

fessed that to had Bed! The iffil of Murray Hill 

Former art therapist aaiMSiE 
Krffi* wins business award sSfcgrgfi, 

ssssesc: “ sf- r jr : 

“I ton grateful to Mr Sinton Miss Elisabeth Gluck, a associated companies, which 5S nt r1 Jv P ^ ie fieroL ! 

now andadmire his courage in former art therapist in include an office in France, ?. .[rl:,® 

coming forward.- He was pres- Holloway prison, who . took now operates in training. m? 

sureB by the police and prison only five years to build a recruitment, information rJJ^KHnS , 

officers to make his statement, company from nothing to one technology, music, computer _ r 

and I am grateful that to has with an annual turnover of £6 software and design. They vifr Hanriwonh 

now told the truth. It is the million a. w. was yesterday employ more then 250 people, n kSded noi eSSTio 

best, evidence that Michael presented with a top business some of whom have been nnWSJinn 

could have.” award financially supported by Miss 

Hickey, who spent 89 days Miss Gluck, aged 30. the Gluck lo set up on their own. 5!5?: r ]? ossess 08 30 expIosive 
in the winter of 1983-84 on the chairman of Programmes Ltd. ....... ___ 

roof of Gartree prison protest- was named the winner of the I am optimistic about life TJ® ?*** djourned 

ins his innocence, has fc en in “Women Mean Business” and generally believe every- until today. 

Park Lane near liverprol a competition at the Savoy Ho- one can .. b f su l _ K ^ Css ™J , ,f toey , ■ = 

secure institution for the men- teL London. ^ ni ^ e .^P- \S ' " 

tally ill since March 1986. She set up her telephone P?®P |e on 8™ W® 30(1 f 

In a petition to the Home marketing agency in north- if they warn to set up their own 

Secretaiy/Mrs Wtolan points west London in 1981. “I business, we will back them.” 

out that Mr Sinton is the started with only a telephone snesaia. 

second important prosecution in the comer of a friend's Miss Gluck 100 k the annual 
witness in the case to have office and it took a lotof hard awa rd and £5.000 in prize 

retracted his evidence. work and support from my mone y. from five other final- 

There have been two pro- friends to reach this stage, but ^ j n the contest run by 

vions inquiries into the case, I always knew I would make it options magazine, and spon- 

bnt in neither did the Home iff kept going,” she said. sored by Imperial Life of 

Office find case for action. Programmes Ltd and its six Canada. ofthrfini 


Two share 
£ 4,000 
payout 

Mrs Penelope Hilling, from 
Leighton Buzzard. 

Bedforshire, and Mr Leonard 
Grngeon, from Stafford near 
Guilford in Surrey, share 
yesterday's Portfolio Gold 
prize of £4JH)0. 

Mrs Hilling, a housewife 
aged 61, was overjoyed when 
she discovered that her num- 
bers had come up. “It made me 
feel very wobbly” she said. 
“In fact h still hasn't sunk in 
yet” 

Mr Grugeon. a lecturer in 
management studies at Green- 
wich Colleges, and chairman 

of tto local parish council said 

that to had been playing 
Portfolio since it started, but 
never expected to win. 

“It was a real turn-up for tbe 
books,” to said, “especially as 
I almost forgot to check ray 
numbers in time.” 

Mr Grugeon thought that to 
might spend his share of the 
prize money on reducing his 
overdraft. 

Readers who wish to play 
tto gain can obtaining a gold 
card by sending a stamped 
addressed envelope to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 







phases of intensive activity 
and then it settles down far a 
bit.” Mr Napier said. 

Bomber 
‘does look 
like me’ 

James Hazell has told Bir- 
mingham Crown Court of his 
horror of being named in a 
national newspaper as the 
Handsworth riots petrol 
bomber. 

Hazell aged 31, told the 
court that he saw pictures of a 
West Indian man throwing a 
petrol bomb during the riots 
on the from page of his daily 
newspaper, but it was not until 
his name was published two 
days later that he panicked. 

“1 was a bit horrified and 
panicked and went to 
London.” he told the court 
yesterday. 

Mr Igor Judge, QC cross- 
examining him, asked if he 
thought the photograph of the | 
petrol bomber which * was 1 


Mr Grugeon, who may re- 
duce his overdraft. 

Judge strikes 
out order on 
baby mix-up 

A judge at the High Conrt in 
Dublin yesterday struck out an 
order preventing the parents of 
one of tto babies involved in 
the baby mix-up from taking 
.the child out of tto country. 

No order, however, was 
made on tto earlier direction 
that tbe parties involved 
should not be named. 

Mr Justice Egan said: “I’m 
sure everybody sympathizes 
with both sets of parents in 
this unfortunate mix-up and I 
am sure all wish they will 
settle down happily now with 
their proper babies”. 

The Irish Midland Health 
Board has branched an inquiry 
into the mix-np, which was not 
discovered until the babies, 
now two weeks old, were five 
days old. 

Howell death 
crash driver 
to be charged 

A student is to be prosecuted 
for failing to ensure his 
passengers' safety after the 


Miss Elisabeth Gluck: built up an annual £6 million 
turnover in five years (Photograph: Paul Lovelace). 

Former art therapist 
wins business award 

By Angelia Johnson 


primed across the front pages son of Mr Denis Howell tiie 
of most national newspapers former Labour sports _min- 


iooked like him. 

“There is a resemblance." 
he admitted. 

Hazell. of Murray Hill 
Drive, Winson Green, Bir- 
mingham. denies setting fire 
to a building contractor’s store 
after throwing a petrol bomb 
causing £20,000 worth of 
damage. 


ister, died in an accident in his 
car. 

David Howell aged 21, was 
[ill thrown from the -hatchback’s 
ir- boot when the car, with six 
ire passengers, span out of con- 
ire trol. 

nb Yesterday Mr Donald Haw- 
of kins, the Avon Coroner, re- 
corded a verdict of accidental 


Miss Elisabeth Gluck, a 
former art therapist in 
Holloway prison, who took 
only five years to build a 
company from nothing to one 
with an annual turnover of £6 
million a year, was yesterday 
presented with a top business 

Miss Gluck, aged 30. the 
chairman of Programmes Ltd, 
was named the winner of the 
“Women Mean Business” 
competition at the Savoy Ho- 
tel London. 

She set up her telephone 
marketing agency in north- 
west London in 1981. “I 
started with only a telephone 
in the comer of a friend’s 
office and it took a lot of hard 
work and support from my 
friends 10 reach this stage, but 
I always knew I would make it 
if I kept going,” she said. 

Programmes Ltd and its six 


associated companies, which 
include an office in France, 
now operates in training, 
recruitment, information 
technology, music, computer 
software and design. They 
employ more then 250 people, 1 
some of whom have been 
financially supported by Miss 
Gluck lo set up on their own. 

“I am optimistic about life 
and generally believe every- 
one can be successful if they 
get a little help. We take 
people on and train them, and 
if they want 10 set up their own 
business, we will back them.” 
she said. 

Miss Gluck took the annual 
award and £5.000 in prize 
money, from five other final- 
ists in the contest run by j 
Options magazine, and spon- j 
sored by Imperial Life of j 
Canada. I 


It is claimed that the in- death on the social sciences 
cident happened on the sec- student. The inquest heard Mr 
ond day of fierce rioting Haijit Singh Sandho. aged 19, 
spa t te d by the visit to the city had had tto car for a week. It 
of tto Home Secretary, Mr began swerving then ran into 
Douglas Hurd. • steel railings and an M32 

Aaron Palgrave. aged 21, of bridge. 


Church Vale. Handsworth, 
has also pleaded not guilty to 
causing an explosion and de- 


Police Constable Peter 
Nesbit-BetL a vehicle exam- 
iner, said rubber bonds on tto 


nies possessing an explosive wheel suspension mountings 


device. 

The case was adjourned 
until today. 


had deteriorated, “bat it is 
very difficult for the driver to 
detect”. 



Breguet: N 

Precision mastery 
since 1775 

Abraham Louis Bragnet (1747-18231 

one of lhc raosi phenomenal uaichmatera 
htSory has ever known. 

His gemus has an overriding influence 
hoi only on waiclnnalung techniques 
but also on the beauty 

of ihr Finished obfed 


Unicef starts magazine on children’s problems Q$reoue& 

o.. * ttonnrtw zinc, says its editor. Miss away. Then. 1 heard that kind that you don't see all the There was no water, no ts a 


By A Staff Reporter 


zine. says its editor. Miss 
Edith Simmons. Each issue 


Unicef today launches a can y a cover story high- 
innlar masaziOG which wtU Hahtino an issue nf iiltema- 


popular magazine which wtu lighting an issue of intema- 
high light children’s proWe|JJ5 uonal dimensions, but not one 
throughout the world. which has necessarily been 

rert First ! will emphasize that gj ven prominence by the na- 
childreo are newsworthy — ponal press, 
and not only when they are Under the headline “Not 
missing, starving or being Too Small To Kill” the main 
battered. feature in today's issue has 

The magazine, with an Lindsey Hilsum, a Umcef 


battered. feature in today's issue has 

The magazine, with an Lindsey Hilsum^ a Umcef 
initial quarterly circulation of worker in East Africa, desmb- 
40 000 will be distributed free ing the plight of rebel boy 
MVhnrae 10 schools and sup- soldiers of Uganda. ”1 saw my 


to smother .trying pm™ $000 wifi be distributed free ing the plight of rebel boy 
fe-w? tH ’ charge to schools and sup- soldiers of Uganda. “1 saw my 

One failed the nortereof the fond. It is mod- mother being assassinated, I 

test and toe issue Kiobetake go fleHSwee/c, toe saw them come to my house 

up with toe Government vJne ricai! weekly news maga- and kill my father. I just ran 


Consumer Safety Unit. 


away. Then. 1 heard that 
Museveni's people [Mr 
Yoweri Museveni toe fanner 
rebel leader] were collecting 
boys and girls, so I joined 
them", one corporal, aged 14. 
told her. 

In toe next edition. Mrs 
Simmons will write toe cover 
story on a trip she has just 
completed to Vietnam, where 
she found children suffering 
enormously from acute mal- 
nutrition, caused mainly by 
protein and vitamin defi- 
ciencies. 

"We are tning to present at 
least one poignant story of the 


kind that you don’t see all toe 
time in each edition,” she 
said. 

In another section, a Unicef 
field worker will write a per- 
sonal account of toe sort of 
problems he or she faces every 
day in dealing with children. 
In toe first edition Mr Ulf 
Kristoflerson describes what it 
was like 10 arrive in toe 
African state of Chad after the 
civil war. 

“The capital was in ruins, 
every building scarred by gun- 
fire. "The hotel room where I 
was slaying had a hole in toe 
wall caused by a bomb blast. 


There was no water, no 
electricity ” he writes. “What 
we are trying to do here is 
show that Unicef workers are 
real people with deep feel- 
ings." Mrs Simmons said. 

Each copy of Children First! 
costs 25p to produce and al- 
though Unicef has allocated a 
small budget for toe initial 
issues, it is hoped that com- 
pany sponsors will come for- 
ward to help to pay for pro- 
duction costs. 

Children First! (UniceC. 55 Lin- 
coln* Inn Fields. London WC2A 
3NB). 


Exhibition of antique watches 
From 4th to 19th September. 1986 

In London at / 

cn-iA)UMErr 

Jeweller state 17W 

178 New Bond Street 
TeL 01493 5403 / J J 


PUU5 
BRUSSELS 
GENEVA 
NEW YORK 


M v 



/ 




HOME NEWS 


TUC CONFERENCE 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 




Minimum legal wage • Cash aid for schools 


Call for investment 


/ MS! 

-i i 


Big majority 
shows favour 
for minimum 
legal wage 


The Trades Union Congress strengthening of wages coun- 
in Brighton voted by a huge cils and for introduction of a 

— majority yesterday in favour statutory national minimum 
"' 'of a statutory minimum wage. wage. 

““ It did so in the face of strong He said that it was “make 
7 misgivings expressed by the your mind up time”. They 
"‘"Transport and General were on the brink ofa decision 

— Workers’ Union and the not just for the working poor 
’electricians’ union EETPU, but for the trade union 

■“■■whose general secretary, Mr movement. 

*' Eric Hammond, said they Mr Eric Hammond, general 
. . were being asked to vote for a secretary of the Electrical, 
-■-statutory incomes policy and Electronic. Telecomm unica- 
"" 'feared that a statutory mini- lions and Plumbing Union, 
mum wage would cruelly raise opposing a statutory mini- 
v'- hopes that would not be mum wage, said that to lay 
'"fulfilled. down a statutory minimum 

— «■ However, Mr Norman WQ- wage provided the basis for a 
~~ lis. general secretary of the rigid incomes policy. 

II'.TUC. who successfully com- Removal of cunerentials 

mended the joint Labour was neither sensible nor 
‘VParty-TUC document practicable. 

■ —advocating a statutory mini- _ They could not run industry 
mum wage, said that differen- like an outpatients depart- 


tions and Plumbing Union, 
opposing a statutory mini- 
mum wage, said that to lay 
down a statutory minimum 
wage provided the baas for a 
rigid incomes policy. 

Removal of differentials 
was neither sensible nor 
praaicable. 

They could not run industry 
like an outpatients depart- 



Mr Rodney Bickerstaffe (left) of NUPE, and Mr Fred Jarvis, of die NUT, challengi n g die Government yesterday. 

X/iiiil /.all t TUC REPORT 


would not be immoral or ment of the social services . 


illegal under statutory mini- Mr Jack Rogers, Union of 
7"mum wage legislation. Construction, Allied Trades 

Before the long composite and Technicians, seconding, 
* motion advocating a statutory said many building craftsmen 
l“_minimum wage was carried by regarded themselves as low 
a show of hands, the congress paid. Some half a million 
_ carried by 4.146,000 votes to workers had gone self- 
^^3.671.000’ votes, a majority of employed. because as an 
« -<475.000 votes, an amended organization they had failed to 
’“““EETPU motion instructing bring them the necessary 


the Genera] Council that talks rewards. 


necessary 


—with the Labour Party on a 
Z^oint economic policy should 


Mr Jack Catt Tass, moving 
amendments to to tighten the 


—be based on a framework of EETPU motion by disengag- 
free collective bargaining. ing the issue of a minimum 
^ It recognized, however, the wage from incomes policy, 
«• need to attack poverty by argued that a statutory imni- 
. . achieving a minimum level of mum wage would underpin 
—income for alL EETPU oppo- free collective bargaining. 


-income for alL EETPU oppo- free collective bargaining, 
sition to a minimum wage set Mr George Prior, Socie 
out in the motion had been Civil and Public Servj 
deleted without a card vote, said employees of the Govem- 
Amendmenls by Tass to the ment had had a form of wage 
motion were thrown oul restraint for the past seven 
Mr Rodney Bickerstaffe, years. Incomes policy had 
general secretary of the Na- never solved economic poli- 
tional Union of Public cies and they did not work but 


Willis caU 
for strong 
support on 
low pay 

The time had come to help 
the low paid; they had waited 
long enough, Mr Norman 
Willis, general secretary of the 
TUC said yesterday. 

He was introducing the 
joint TTJC/Labour Party re- 
port Low Pay: Policies and 
Priorities, and called on dele- 
gates to give it strong support 

It also covered pensions, 


Investment the main factor 


There were no quick fixes or 
overnight miracles ahead, Mr 
Rodney Blcbrata&e, chair- 
man of the TUC economic 
committee and general sec- 
retary of the National Union 
of Public Employees, said In 
commending the general 
coondTs economic report and 
strategy and in orbiting the 


There were thousands of 
trained nurses on the dote 
while thousands waited for 
treatment, half a miliiaw 
construction workers on die 
dole while nfflkw a were des- 
perate for a decent home. 
There were old people to be 
cared for and children taught. 

“We can all see the waste 


previous day’s remarks of Mr and we can all see the want”. 

Noil Kinnnrk. fho I-fiKrmr <aii a., ;«■ — 


Mr George Prior, Society of public services, investment, 
Civil and Public Servants, inflation and unemploy- 


Emplovees and chairman of his union endorsed a statutory 
the TUC Economic Commit- minimum _ wage as an under- 


tee. declared to loud applause 
that if it was right for the 
Tories to bring in laws to 
make the rich richer, it was 
"OK" for the Labour move- 
ment to bring in a Jaw to stop 
the poor getting poorer. 

Mr Bickerstaffe moved the 
composite motion on low pay 
calling for retention and 


pinning minimum. 

Mr Ron Todd, General 
Secretary. Transport and Gen- 
eral Workers’ Union, said his 
union opposed the composite, 
because they believed a statu- 
tory minimum wage was the 
wrong way to go about 
improving the posiuon of the 
low paid. 



% paid under 
E100/week* 

Average weekly 
earnings (£) 

Counter hands 

69.1 

85.01 

Shop assistants 

68.1 

95.44 

Kitchen hands 

66.9 

83.68 

Barmen, barmaids 

52.0 

91.09 

Nursing auxiliaries 

50.1 

89.36 

Chefs, cooks 

46.5 

99.81 

Cleaners 

44.9 

92.96 

Footwear workers 

38.4 

112.37 

Packers, butlers, carriers. 

37.4 

99.67 

Caretakers 

36.8 

98.40 

.Record Library derks 

36.2 

111.46 

General clerks 

34.4 

114.65 

Telephonists 

29.9 

106.39 

Farming, fishing and 
related workers 

29.3 

114.36 

Gosting and accounting 
clerks. 

28.4 

120.24 


• (including overtime earnings). 

According to statistics released in 1985 by the Department of 
Employment in the New Earnings Survey, the folkwing categories 
of workers were the worst paid in Britain (figures apply for men 
and women working in manual and non-manual jobs): 


mentlt demonstrated that so- 
cial justice and trade 
unionism went together, and 
was an important expression 
of partnership built on the 
firm foundation of the pre- 
vious year’s joint statement 
with the Labour Party. 

It was the basis for a 
working partnership between 
them, together with the 
employers. 

It did not baulk from the 
difficult issues, nor did it take 
one step backwards from the 
commitment made for a 
reduction of one million in the 
unemployment figures in two 
years. 

The consultative exercise 
indicated a wage packet of 
about £80 a week, although 
some unions thought that too 
low. 

However the report repre- 
sented only one part of the 
policy to expand the economy. 
It was unashamedly about 
improving social services and 
lifting the manufacturing base. 

it was also unashamedly 
about consensus. Without 
consensus low pay was likely 
to become even more abject. 

It was time to change the 
warped approach of the City 
that gave a £40,000 pay rise to 
a stockbroker and a 40p rise to 
an old age pensioner. 

The misgivings of some 
unions was understandable 
but he could not accept foe 
amendment of the EETPU. 


Nurses call INPUSTRY could be establ 

. m • 1 A • 1 • One motiioi 

for training Road to socialism gtscg 
changes ‘payed with jobs’ SSS 

Britain s largest nursing MT ^ «| ment was seel 


Britain’s largest nursing 
union wants to change the 
"stressful" system of nurse 
(raining and establish new 
"nursing practitioners’’ to ful- 
fill some duties undertaken by 
doctors, it said yesterday . 

Miss Alison Dunn was 
speaking on behalf of the 
Roy a} College of Nursing, 
which is not affiliated to the 
TUC. at a fringe meeting held 
in Brighton. 

She said that the college 
wanted to stem the 35 per cent 
dropout rate among trainee 
nurses. 

Potential nurses were ex- 
posed to an “unreasonable 
degree of stress” during train- 
ing and talented men and 
women were dropping out at 
an unacceptable rate. 

The union, which has 
355.000 members, contends 
that it is becoming increas- 
ingly difficult to find the right 
type of recruit and suggests 
switching the present training 
scheme to an educational 
programme. 

Miss Dunn also said that 
Britain should adopt the 
American system of “nurse 
practitioners’’, who would ful- 
fill nursing and medical duties 
in deprived areas where there 
was a shortage of doctors. 

She suggested that the 
health service in general 
needed a cash injection of at 
least £300 million. 

Today’s agenda 

The TUC will be asked 
todav to establish a new policy- 
on nuclear power. Other sub- 
jects for debate are: public 
service pay. environment and 
transport 'policy, equal pay. 
South Africa and other inter- 
national topics. 


The road to socialism had to and the Chancellor alike will 
be paved with jobs. Mr BQl run out and this motion is 


Jordan, president of foe Amal- 
gamated Engineering Union, 
said when he successfully 
■ moved a motion condemning 
government policies. 

It blamed foe Government 
for destroying foe manufac- 
turing base and for being foe 
principal cause of unemploy- 
ment, and called on foe TUC 
General Council to prepare a 
10-poini programme to re- 
store public ownership and 
the wealth creation of manu- 
facturing. 

The motion sought endorse- 
ment of such a plan next year 
or at a special congress before 
the general election. 

The proposal would also 
seek planned trade: extension 
of free collective bargaining; 
special job-creation policies; 
reduced working time; more 
training at all levels; public 
investment in infrastructure; 
promotion of new technology 
and planning for conversion 
of resources from war to peace 
production. 

Mr Jordan said that foe 
decline of manufacturing in- 
dustry was the most serious 
charge against foe present 
Government 

The Government had 
promised the people that it 
would set manufacturing free 
to grow. The result had been 
that it was free to go. 

“We have reached foe point 
where foe country is not 


about foe alternative." 

Mr Bill Morris, deputy 
general secretary. Transport 
and General Workers’ Union, 
said that foe first task of a 
Labour Chancellor must be 
foe reimposition of exchange 
control. His next task must be 
to bring home investment like 
pension funds from South 
Africa and elsewhere. 

“We want them invested 
here to create jobs for our 
people” 

Mr James Knapp, general 
secretary of foe National 
Union of Railwaymen, said 
that the Government was not 
telling foe truth about un- 
employment. Mr Norman 
Teobit would never achieve 
the same reputation as George 
Washington for truth because 
he was a member of a Cabinet 
of fibbers. 

Mr Tony Christopher, gen- 
eral secretary. Inland Revenue 
Staff Federation, said foe 
country was in deep crisis, far 
deeper than any minister was 
prepared to acknowledge. 

Mr Stanley Fitzsimmons. 
Fire Brigades Union, said they 
needed to return to a world 
where economic needs were 
dealt with by economic mea- 
sures and by not putting 
massive resources into mili- 
tary projects to give military 
superiority. 

Mr Alec Smith, general 
secretary. National Union of 


earning its keep and our oil- Tailors and Garment Work- 
slick Chancellor blithely pays ers, said foe Government was 
foe nation’s debts with a committing a calculated fraud 
North Sea credit card as if in its presentation of foe state 


oblivious of its expiry date. 
Even then he fails to balance 
foe nation's books. 

“The oil. foe family silver. 


of foe economy and un- 
employment. There was a case 
for calling in the fraud squad, 
he said. 


Nell Kinnock, the Labour 
leader. 

However, Mr Bickerstaffe 
mamtainpA that there were 
simple, practical, realistic 
alternatives, all spelt out In the 
TUCs economic review, in 
TUC budget statements and in 
the joint TUC-Labonr Party 
document 

He said that three simple 
words — investment, jobs and 
partnership — summed up 
much of what the movement 
was trying to get across. 

first, he said, they were 
fallmg about investing for At 
future. 

That meant investing in new 
machines and new technol- 
ogies needed to rebuild in- 
dustries and pay their way into 
the next century. 

It meant investing in new 
homes and hospitals and 
dealing city shims. I£ meant 
investing in the infrastructure, 
in people, in trafaing, educa- 
tion, health. 

Second, they were talking 
about linking missed skills 
and unmet needs. 

STATE FIRMS 

Council 
‘should 
see CBF 

Motions condemning 
privatization and calling for 
foe regeneration of industry 
were unanimously carried by 
foe congress. The general 
i council was urged to hold talks 
with the Confederation of 
British Industry to see 
whether a common approach 
could be established. 

One motion, moved by 
Tass, opposed plans to pri- 
vatize Rolls-Royce and British 
Leyland. During the debate 
there was strong criticism of 
foe way in which the Govern- 
ment was seeking to switch 
Royal Ordnance factories and 
foe dockyards at Devonport 
and Rosyth to the private 
sector. 

The other motion con- 
demned the Government’s 
continued refusal, as high- 
lighted by the Westland crisis, 
to back industry with a coher- 
ent strategy that supported it 
in competing in international 
markets. 

Mr George Mackay, Tass, 
proposing a motion in defence 
of British industry, that by 
creating record unemploy- 
ment coupled with a poor 
export performance, the Gov- 
ernment had allowed vital 
employment and investment 
decisons to be taken by face- 
less men and women in To- 
kyo, Chicago and New York. 

The motion said that foe 
congress was concerned at the 
threat posed to Britain's 
political independence by foe 
acquisition by foreign in- 
terests of British-owned as- 
sets. Once financial inde- 
pendence was gone, he said, 
political independence fol- 
lowed. 

Mr Jim Magness, of foe 
Engineers’ and Managers' 
Association, moving foe mo- 
tion on regeneration of in- 
dustry, said it was time foe 
Government admitted its doc- 
trinal obsession with 
privatization had positively 
hindered foe. recovery and 
reshaping of industry. 

Mr John Golding, general 
secretary of the National 
Communications Union, at- 
tacked foe condua of the 
privatized British Telecom, 
saying that last year £500 mil- 
lion of profit was paid out 
rather than reinvested in foe 
business. 


be said. “All Hut is missing Is 
a government with die com- 
mon sense and will to bnfld a 
bridge between the two.” 

Third, they were tal kin g 
about a new partnership — a 
government that worked with 
industry and not against it, 
that listened to working peo- 
ple, that laid down new rights 
for workers to share in de- 
cisions at work, that took 
Inside everyone whom the 
Prime Minister left out in the 
cold, including the poor, low- 
paid, women, part-time work- 
ers, blacks, home workers. 

He told the congress that 
that all that was not going to 
be easy. The next government 
would not inherit a healthy 
economy and they would get no 
help from stockbrokers and 
speculators in the City. 

He added: “But Neil 
Kinnock told ns yesterday that 
the Labour Party means busi- 
ness. We mean business, too. 
And we are going to do 
business together when be 
meet the Labour government 
in the first national economic 


assessment.” 

The TUC agreed that the 
first caO on the nation’s re- 
sources must be the creatkm of 
jobs, that die second most be 
improvement of living stan-, 
dards for those most in need — 

pensioners and the low- 
paid — and that the third most 
be the improvement of living | 
standards far the rest of those 
in work. 

He conceded that it was 
going to be faugh working out 
those priorities. There was 

going fa be tOUgb talking on 

jobs, pay, prices, inflation and 
investment, and faugh de- 
cisions. 

The trade union movement ; 
had always had a vision of 
what the country could be like 
if wealth was shared more 
fairly, if workmg people could 
stand Bp as equals and if skills 
and energies could be released 
and used for the common good. 

Earlier, in a strong attack on 
the Government, Mr Bicker- 
staffe had said the simple fact 
was rtta* manufacturing in- 
dustry was still producing less 
than when the Tories took over 
seven long years ago, the first 
time the c ountry had suffered 
ssefa a long-term decline. 

The mflBon new jobs claim 
was bogus and whe re was the 
success in destroying two full- 
time jobs and putting only owe 
part-time- job in its place? 
There were more people out of 
work than every before. 



education 

Cash aid 
plea on 
schools 
backed 

Demands of financial sup- ■ 
port for education authorities, 

youngsters in full-time educ- 
tion and parents, proposed by 
the National Union of Teach - j 
ers . were approved on am- 1 
mously during a debate on | 
education and families and 
government education policy. 

Mr Robert Richardson. 
NUT, proposing foe compos- | 
ite motion, said that the 
enormity of the Government s 
offence against education had 
been realized not only by foe i 
school inspectors (HMls) but 
also by parents, teachers and 
school associations. 

The package proposed that 
all mothers should have finan- 
cial security during and after 
pregnancy with the opportu- 
nity to continue in paid 
employment without dis- 
advantage; that fathers should 
be enabled to participate ac- 
tively in caring For foetr young 
children; and that tax regula- 
tions should be amended to 
ensure foal workplace creches 
were not a taxable benefit 
The motion also proposed 
funds for nursery education, 
after-school facilities and holi- 
day schemes; equipment 
allowances, adequately staffed 
and maintained schools and 
1 properly run ancillary ser- 
vices; that educational 
maintainance allowances 
should be provided, for all 
young people over 16 in full or 
part-time education; and and 
that a comprehensive policy 
on education should be devel- 
oped for the 14 to 19 age 
group. 

Mr Fred Smithies, general 
secretary of foe National 
Association of Schoolmasters 
and Union of Women Teach- 
ers, said that the Government 
had been irresponsible in 
pressing ahead with foe new 
GCSE examination without 
providing adequate teaching 
Dr John dartres. Associ- 
ation of University Teachers, 
saidi“Wrthin a decade our 
schools, on current entries to 
university courses, will not 
have anything like foe reason- 
able number of physics and 
mathematics teachers that this 
society will need.” 

Miss Brenda Hudson, Na- 
tional Association of Local 
Government Officers, draw- 
ing attention to foe position of 
low-paid ancillary and sup- 
port staff in foe education 
service, also complained- that 
foe GCSE had been in- 
troduced without adequate 
resources. 

Tories are 
attacked on 
education 

Conservative policies on 
education were designed to be 
divisive, but the unions would 
have none of that, Mr Fred 
Jarvis, general secretary of foe 
National Union of Teachers, 
said. He was introducing de- 
bates on education and 
training. 

Extra money had been 
made available to some areas 
of education, he said, but the 
public must not be deceived. 
Never in the history of public 
relations and media man- 
ipulation bad so much been 
made of so little to so many. 

Spending this year on 
education had been 6.7 per 
cent less in real terms than in 
1980. 

He hoped that the new 
Secretary of State for Educa- 
tion and Science, Mr Kenneth 
Baker, would pay more atten- 
tion than his predecesor to foe 
reports of the school inspec- 
tors (HMls) in which they 
pointed to shortages of teach- 
erSjStaff and equipment 


?>■■ qj». 


[Geoffrey Smith 

The most notable feature of 
this conference is its subdued 
tone. Last year the TUC came 
dose to tearing itself apart 
with threats to expel even such 
a large onion as the AUEW 
for accepting public money for 
postal ballots. The year before 
that the conference was domi- 
nated by fhe trauma of foe 
miners' strike. 

Now the movement has been 
chastened by its loss of power. 
It knows that it would softer if 
it were to throw out substantial 
unions over balloting or any- 
thing else. It knows that it can 
no longer afford to parade the 
differences within its ranks. 
So the proceedings have been 
relatively restrained even on 
issues which would have 
aroused bitter passions in 
previoas years. 

Even the unions* espousal 
yesterday of die case for a 
statutory minimum wage was 
in one sense an 
acknowledgement of their own 
weakness. There has been 
much talk at this conference 
about the increasing number of 
low-paid workers, many of 
them women and many of 
them in part-time employ- 
ment. They represent foe 
growth of a new servant class, 
according to Mr John Ed- 
monds, the new general sec- 
retary of GMBATU (the old 
General and Mnnicipal 
Workers* Union). 

These are people whom the 
onions have always found it 
difficult fa mobilize, bnt now 
the TUC has confessed its 
inability to safeguard their 
interests by the normal pro- 
cesses of collective ba r gaining. 
So it is calling upon the law to 
achieve a social purpose that 
the unions fed unable to 
accomplish for themselves. 

Logic based too 
much on outrage 


TRAINING 


Call for more apprentices 


Resolutions on youth un- 
employment and youth educa- 
tion and training were passed, 
despite reservations on some 
aspects of them expressed by 
some unions. 

The first urged foe general 
council to press for a substan- 
tial increase in apprentice 
intake in industry and for a 
large education and voca- 
tional training programme to 
provide the skills and 
qualifications necessary to 
meetihe challenge of Britain’s 
industrial competitors and of 
new technology. 

The second' motion called 
fora fundamental re-examina- 
tion of education and training 
for 1 6 to 1 8-year-olds based on 
universal rights to free educa- 
tion and training with im- 
proved financial support. 

Mr Bill Morris, Transport 
and General Workers* Union, 
said that young people should 
be encouraged to continue in 
education with a maintenance 
allowance. 

To those thinking of oppos- 
ing the second motion, he said 
that it was their young people 
who were being victimized 


and who were rioting in 
Brixtoo, Toxtefo and else- 
where- They could not leave it 
to organizations such as Busi- 
ness in the Community, but 
had to become trade unions in 
the community. 

Mr Spike Wood. National 
Communications Union, crit- 
icized British Telecom for 
doing less than it had ever 
done to train young people, 
even though BT was one of foe 
largest and most profitable 
companies. 

Mr Bill Heeps, National 
and Local Government Of- 
ficers' Association, said their 
reservations about foe second 
motion was that it did not 
contain words that had been 
in the original motion calling 
for local funding to be main- 
tained. 

They were committed to 


which spoke of a substantial 
increase in apprentice intake. . 

His union could could not 
find a commitment from 
employers that apprentices 
would be taken on on a lasting 
basis. His industry had crafts 
that were being decimated by 
new technology, and skilled 
people were being thrown on 
foe scrap heap. 

"Employers would love to 
have just what is in foe 
motion. They want a vast 
reservoir of skilled voung 
people to be picked up or laid 
down or not picked up as they 
wish or, as they see it, as the 
market dictates." 

Mr Roy Grantham, chair- 
man of foe TUC emplovment 
policy committee, accepted 
foe two motions for the gen- 
era] council, although he said 
foe language of foe second was 
intemperate. He assured Nal- 


loca! democratic accountable go that the council would not 
ity and Naigo would not accept a centrally controlled 


support any proposals for 
further centralization of ed- 
ucation. 

Mr Bob Gillespie. Sogat '82. 
said his union had reserva- 
tions about foe first motion 


education service. 

They were well aware of the 
weaknesses of the Youth 
Training Scheme and on a 
number of occasions had se- 
cured more funds for iL 


Reports by Alan Wood, John Winder, Nicholas Wood, Nicholas Beeston, Anthony Hodges, Tim Jones and Mark Fills 


There is a logic in this 
approach, but it seems fa me a 
pretty superficial logic. It is 
based- too much upon an 
emotional sense of outrage at 
foe problem and too lfttie upon 
an awareness of the full con- 
sequences of die remedy. 

A statutory minimum wage 
must either push up everyone's 
pay in due course or squeeze 
differentials. Neither develop- 
ment should be welcome to 
anyone concerned about eco- 
nomic prosperity, to which 
both the TUC and Neil 
Kinnock have been proclaim- 
ing their attachment this 
week. 

Higher pay all round would 
be inflationary and would 
undermine the competitive ef- 
ficiency of British industry. A 
contraction of differentials 
might sound a better idea. It 
might be good social policy to 
suggest, as a number of speak- 
ers did yesterday, that the 
better off should accept nar- 
rower differentials so as to 
improve the lot of the low- 
paid. 

Bnt in practice the delib- 
erate squeezing of differentials 
has always caused trouble ia a 
changing economy. It was one 
of foe principal reasons for foe 
failure of successive attempts 
at a statutory incomes policy. I 
suspect therefore, that at- 
tempts to prevent a general 
rise in pay would create ten- 
sion between one group of 
workers and another, would 
impede the operation of a 
flexible economy and would 
ultimately be ineffective. 

To make matters worse, the 
imposition of a statutory mini- 
mmn wage might well reduce 
foe number in work because 
those who offer low-paid jobs 
in various service trades are 
just the people who might be 
unable to afford foe higher 
wages that would be required. 

The policy would militate 
against the very purpose 
which Mr Kinnock had de- 
scribed the day before as his 
first priority: the campaign 
against unemployment. It 
might be thought, therefore, 
that yesterday's vote illus- 
trated foe wisdom of Mr 
Kinnock's declaration of in- 
dependence from the TUC. 
This fa precisely the kind of 
ill-considered derision that the 
Labour leadership should not 
be obliged fa follow. 

Bat in fact Mr Kinnock had 
rushed to adopt foe principle 
of a statutory minimum wage 
even before the full TUC did 
so yesterday. Perhaps he did 
so in anticipation of the think- 
ing In foe unions, in which case 
be would have bedn dem- 
onstrating his dependence 
while pro claiming his indepen- 
dence. Or perhaps it is his own 
tender heart from which he 
needs to secure his indepen- 
dence. 

Whatever the explanation, 
the stand that the TUC has 
taken with foe active en- 
couragement of foe Labour 
leadership is a tribute to their 
social conscience - bnt not to 
the sense of economic realism 
that Mr Kinnock had sought 
to convey foe day before. 








Of all the complicated issues involved in the 
choice of Britain's Airborne Early Warning System, 
there's one that's especially confusing. 

~ Unfortunately, in terms of making a final 
decision, it happens to be the most important 
issue of all. 


IS THE UHF SYSTEM COST EFFECTIVE? 

Yes. 

The system recommended by Grumman has 
been developed over the last twenty years and 
is proven, operational and available. 


Which radar frequency will give Britain the 
most effective protection, not just for the present, 
but into the future? 

There are two contenders, S-Band and UHF. 

Grumman, working with British Aerospace, 
offers the UHF solution. Its main competitors do not. 

S-BAND v. UHF. 

These are the essential differences. 


It can also be installed by British Aerospace 
in the current Nimrod airframe. J 

THIS WOULD MEAN THAT OVER 70% OF THE 
EXPENDITURE TO DATE WOULD BE PROTECTED 
AS WELL AS THE INVESTMENT IN BASING AND 
SUPPORT EQUIPMENT. 

THE PROJECT WOULD REMAIN BRITISH * 
GENERATING CONTRACTS THAT WOULD CREATE 
OVER 30,000 MAN YEARS OF EMPLOYMENT IN 
THE UK. 


1. Radar cross-sections of aircraft and missiles 
appear up to seven times larger on UHF than on 
S-Band 



2. Radar interference, or 'Clutter' especially 
from the sea, (the main area of the UK application), 
is significantly less on UHF which means that 
targets not only appear larger than on S-Band 
but are also more distinct. 

3. UHF is superior to S-Band in rejecting road 
traffic 'Clutter! 

4. Recent tests carried out by the Ministry of 
Defence have also concluded that a UHF system 
causes no discernible interference with ground 
installations. 

5. THE INABILITY OF S-BAND TO COPE WITH 
THE CONTINUING DEVELOPMENT OF 'STEALTH' 
MISSILE DESIGNS WILL MEAN THAT IN 10 YEARS 
TIME THE CURRENT RADAR CROSS-SECTION 
ADVANTAGE OF UHF WILL HAVE INCREASED 
FROM 7:1 TO 100:1. 



The weight of evidence in favour of a UHF 
based system is compelling. Although it can be 
claimed that S-Band is adequate in meeting 
today's requirements, its performance is surpassed ■ 
by UHF. 

As for the future, that lies with UHF. 

A fact that has already been recognised by the 
United States Navy, Japan, Israel and, significantly, 
the USSR. 4 

Unless it is content with an Airborne Early 
Warning System that is already out of date, it is a 
fact that must also be recognised by Britain. 


GRUMMAN GURPORATION. 


Grumman is a £2.3 billion corporation which 
has been in the forefront of aviation and space 
technology since before World War II. 


We are the leading experts in electronic 
integration having integrated more different 
systems into more different aircraft than any other 
company in the world. 

Currently, Grumman supplies military aircraft 
such as the F-14Tomcat, A-6 Intruder, EA-6B Prowler, 
E-2C Hawkeye and C-2 Greyhound. 



GRUMMAN 



Grumman Corporation, 1111 Stewart Avenue, Bethpage, New York 11714. 














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BELLING Compact 4 4/30T__18fc* 23945 

TRIOTY 2314 While Rose 

MUH 21**25445 

CREDA Highlme 22-31945 

BELLING 90DL/R Classic 21- 34949 

BEUJNG 90X/R Executive „.21- 379.99 

TRlCUY 4628 Sovereign Ceramic. 

double oven 23U- 534.95 

Slip-in 

PHILIPS 56B, (Brown)* 21%4- 239.95 

TRIOTY 1528 Princess Deluxe 

(Grey)- 1914- 27445 

BEUJNG Format 600S -23Yi* 469.95 

BELUNG Format 60QX 


(Ceramic) 


’Ask for your Philips pan set daim form 


BUILT-IN OVENS 


£12930 to £39939 or from £6 a month 


BALAY, BELLING. CREItt. SNOESH PHHJKL 


TRIOTY, ZANUSSI 


ELECTRIC HOB UNITS 


-£64.99 to £22935 or from £5 a month 


BALAY. BELLING. CREDA. INDESIT, PHIUP5. 


BLACK & WHITE TV/s 
from £5 a month 

FERGUSON 12 in 

FERGUSON 38050 14in. morel 

BENKSON PTVS/7, 5 in. 

batteryfauins 

COLOUR TV/s from £6 a 

14 in. tortabies 

SOL/6/OX NB14 

GOODMANS 148 monitor styie- 

DECCACOLOUR DN1672 Red 

FERGUSON 37140 

PHIUPS 1014.. 

GRUNDIG P37-2226 

SANYO 3141 (2 Yr. G tee} , 

SONY KV1440U8 

14 in. Remote Control 

FIDELITY XK14C2 

FERGUSON 37141 

SANYO 3144 

SONY KV1442UR, 


4945 

■style 6345 


month 

13445 

13945 

159.95 

15945 

1GS.95 

17245 

17445 

239.95 

16440 

18945 

.199.95 

29945 


BUSH 6140 UMfMW/VHF 18-95 

SANYO 5005 1845 

SONY ICFC3L FM/MVUflW 19.95 

GRUNDIG Sono 36 FM/MWflW 22.95 

ALBA CCR54 IW/MW/VHF 

cassette 24.90 

PHIUPS 3172 0MMWVHF 2745 

SONY ICFC10I 29.95 

TRANSISTOR RADIOS 
from £5a month 

Ail an Battery/maim except where starred. 
PHIUPS D401 8 MW headphones* 845 

ITT tony 300 IYWMW* 9.99 

ALBA TR101 DMMW/FM 13.95 

PYE TR6108 MW/FM&tereo — 1445 

SONY KJ25L IYWMVWVHF* 19.95 

ITT Tmy 320 LW/MW/SW/VHF. 2249 

SANYO RP7161 23.95 

SONY ICF710 IVWMWVHf 2445 

SANYO 8801 -LW/MW/SW/VHF 2845 

SONY ICF35L 1VWMW/SW/VHF— 2945 

GRUNDIG Music Bey 160 

LW/MW/SW/VHF 34.95 

SONY K77600D Multi-band 

receiver 1794S 


Just one look at... 








ipACT DISC PLAYER 

•Fid repeat fl 

manuals®* 

tetsyoupidcout 


mo DEPOSIT 


<209* 

^mr ONLY r tt A — 

III 1111 11 II 


ELECTROLUX Z326 c/w tools.-..— .400 
PHILIPS P6S with power 

head 1000 

ELECTROLUX 'Supair' Z327 1000 

ELECTROLUX 2010 3 suction levels 400 
HOOVER 53430 Sensotronic 

25 - 1000 

ELECTROLUX 2020 variable power 1000 ■ 

ELECTROLUX 380 TurbomatK* 1 100 

HOOVER 53434 Sensotrorac 

55 1000 1 

"This price indudes Electrolux P/X 
allowance, 

Wet and Dry Cleaners 

PHIUPS HL3765 "PRO 20‘ 800 


F OR YOU 
<£ YOUR HOME 


Kettles, irons, toasters, shavers, haircare. food 
mixers, multi- cookers, grills, sandwich 
toasters, heated trolleys, deep fat friers, 
blenders, processors, coffee makers, 
drinksmakos. teasmades, carving knives, can 
openers, telephones, strimmers & hedge 
trimmers. 


ifUAL FUEL 
COOKERS 


£249.95 to £429.90 or from £1 1 a month 

CREDA, LEISURE. NEW WORLD. MRKfNSON 
COWAN. PHIUPS. ZANUSSI 


FREE 

3 PIECE JUDGE 

PAN SET 


from £6 a month 

All with turntable except where starred. 

Capacity (Cd-ft) 


GOODMANS 

SOLAVOX 

SANYO 

SOLAVOX 

SWAN 

TRICITY 

PHILIPS 

SHARP 

SANYO 

PHIUPS 

SANYO 

SHARP 

SANYO 

BEUJNG 


040* 

T2 

(0.6) 129.95 

(0.64) 12945 

EM1207* 

(0.5) 12949 

mah- 

(1.2) 149.95 

COMPACT 20701 . 
A012 

„.«L64) 149.95 
(0.6) 159.95 

M702- . 

(0.7) 16945 

R1 765/58708 

-...(0.6) 169.95 
(06) 179.95 

79101AKB108*-.. 
2511N 

<1 0)19445 

(0.81 22945 

R 1762/72708 

(04) 24945 


COLOUR V/.'s CONTINUED 

16-18 in. Portables 

DECCACOLOUR DPI 653 16 in 

FERGUSON 16A1 16 in 

DECCACOLOUR DP8454/8654 16 in.' 


AUDIO CONTINUED 
RADIO CASSETTES 
from £5a morfh 


SOLAVOX 


16R19 16 in. I 


FERGUSON 37801/1 6A2 16 in. < 


EM2710 Digtouch* ..(0.8) 269.95 
Tnptette* (0.86)36945 



ALL 




FOR EXAMPLE 


fins 



GAS COOKING 


GAS COOKERS from £10 a month 

Free-Standing Standard Owns width 

NEW WORLD Nova wrth gnfl 19"/.i' 229.90 

FLAVEL Fesaval 21 tt* 229.95 

VALOR Bistro high level grill! 9 '4* 239.95 

FLAVEL Crystal 2114' 259.90 

NEW WORLD Tempo slip in 19^* 309.95 

NEW WORLD Option 3 sfip in 19K* 36945 

Automatic Ovens Width 

NEW WORLD 05 41-34945 

LEISURE ‘Superb AH Gas* 21 Vi* 45945 

NEW WORLD Rialto 23Yk* 499.90 

FITTED & WORKING 

Why not have your Gas Cooker installed by 
our professional installation team for only 
£29.90. Ask for full details in store. 

BUILT-IN OVENS AND GRILLS 
£339.90 to £529.99 or from £15 a month 

MOHAJ, NEW WORLD 

GAS HOB UNITS from £5 a month 

BALAY E17S0 stainless steel 6945 

PHIUPS "Hostess' 014 (Brawn) . — 9645 

MOFFAT Module 61 99.90 

NEW WORLD System One 109.90 


GAS FIRES 


£84.99 to £23935 or from £5 a month 
CANNON. ECONOMIC FLAVEL PARKINSON 
COWAN, ROBINSON WILLEY, VALOR 

FITTED AND WORKING 
Why not have your Gas Fire installed by our 
professional installation foam for only 
£29.90. Ask for foil details in store. 

HEATERS from £5 a month 

BalancedMue 

VALOR *N»ada Super 2‘ wall 

heater — 10945 

Water Heaters 

MAM ‘Mersey' multi point 189.95 

MAIN Trent' 25845 

The price indudes wall flues 


PHILIPS 2216 16 in.* 23! 

FERGUSON 37023/1 6A3 16 in. 

Teletext* 291 

SONY KV1882 18 in.* 34! 

TV Reeenien/Computor Monltoro 

FIDELITY CTM1400 14 m 17! 

FERGUSON MC01 14 in 18! 

•Remote Control 

Ail the following sets are com ple te with 
stand, except where starred*. 

20 in. Models 

SOLAVOX 3304* 17! 


BWATONE 
PHILO’S 
GRUNDIG 
SHARP 
Stereo 

BINATONE ‘Alpine' LWMVWVHF 2945 

AKA! AJ201 3445 

GRUNDIG RR325L MW1UMFM 4445 

PHIUPS D8052 IW/MW/VHF 4845 

PHILIPS D8049 MVWlWffiWffM 4845 

SANYO M9703 LW/MW/SWIFM 4945 

SHARP GM747E LW/MWBW/FM. 4945 

SONY CPS230L MW/UWFM 4945 

AIWA CS230 IWfMW/SW/VHF 5249 

SHARP QT 27 iVWMW/SW/VHF 59.95 

Stereo With TWbi Cassette 

ALBA 802 MW/VHF 4445 

SANYO MW200 1W/MWJSW/VHF^ 6949 

PHIUPS 83348 IVWMW7VHF 79.95 

SHARP WO-T282E 

lyWMWTSWTVHF 14945 

Stereo WWi Detachable Speaken 

PYE TR2845 WWMW7SW/FM__ 4945 

PHIUPS D6254 LW/MW/SW/VHF„ 5945 

SHARP GFA2E LW/MW/SWVHF _ 7745 

SONY CF5330O. FM/MW/UMSW 79.95 

PHHJPS D8644 MW/IW/SWIFM 

Dolby 8 NR. 129.95 

SONY CFSW440I 12945 

CASSETTE RECORDERS 
from £5 a month 

ALBA R170 computer data 

recorder 1945 

LUOYTRON 215 hand held micro 

cassette 2549 

PERSONAL STEREO 
from £5 a month 

AH with stereo headphones or earphones. 

ALBA CP8 9.95 

LlOYTRON W176_ 13.25 

GOODMANS PM 70, MW/VHF radio 2545 

SANSLH FXW30R 2749 

SANSLH FXW31R. 2945 

SANYO MGP33 Dolby NR 3945 

GOODMANS PM85AM/FM 4945 


TH-Star 

D7052 MWAW/FM 

RR225 FM/MW/LW 

GF1740E IVWMW/VHF 


SOLAVOX 

hWXl- .. . 

_ 199.95 ■ 

FERGUSON 

ME1 

239.95 

PHIUPS 

5n*fi 

- 239.95 

SONY 

2090.. .. 

29945 

20 in. Remote Control 

SOIffl/OX HIB7Q* 


DECCACOLOUR DT8676 . 

. .23945 


MRT9__ 


FERGUSON 

71X3 

27445 

PHIUPS 

2236 

77AJK 

SONY 2092 

20 in. TMatext Remote Control 

SOLAVOX 20T19. . . 

349.95 

31945 


Ttnti 


FERGUSON 

200 

33945 

SONY 

2056* 

50045 

22 In. Models 

FERGUSON 

37D1 


PHILIPS 

2061 

29945 

22 in. Remote Control 

DECCACOLOUR DV8678... ... 

299.95 

FERGUSON - 

22D2 _ 

33945 

22 In. TMetext Remote Control 

SOLAVOX 22T19 .. 36945 

FERGUSON 

22D3 

38945 

26 In. Remote Crattrol 

FERGUSON 26D2. 

39940 

26 In. Teletext Remote Control 
FERGUSON 26D3 

449.90 


GRUNDIG 

SONY 


Beat Bey ISO 

WM2S. Dolby NR. 


FST 13/. (Hatter Squarer Ibbe) 

GRUNDIG 40245 36cms.« * 25940 

PHIUPS 2319 43cms** 29945 

ITT CT3435 51cms.* 33940 

GRUNDIG PS 5245 51 ans.** 359.90 

ITT CT3535 SSans* 39940 

FERGUSON 51 A3 51 cms. Wetext* .-. 41949 

GRUNDIG M70298/9STT Stereo 66am. 

Teletext* 639^F 

ITT MC3896 66 am Stereo Teletext 

'picture on picture'* 83949 

•Remote Control 

Aerials erected at discount prices 


IN-CAR ENTERTAINMENT 

£2330 to £24939 or from £5 a month 
car RacSosii Car Steeo Cass att m. Car 5ten» 
Radio r>ww— 

AUDIOLINE, BUSH, GOOOMANSk HAfMkRft 
LLOYTRON, MORMOLA, PIONEER, PYE, SANYO, 
SHARP 

INCAR H NT 

£1035 Id £4135 or from £5 a m on th 
N-CAR M-F1 SPEAKERS 
AMSTRAELAUD10UNE, GOODMANS, PIONEER. 
PYE 


HI-FI 


BUSH 

SANYO 

SANSLH 

PIONEER 

PIONEER 


MUSIC CENTRES from £5 a month 

BNAIDNE Philharmonic 79.95 

PYE ST2120 — 99 - 95 

HI-FI SYSTEMS from £5 a month 

MKXHLHSY5TEM5 ____ 

PHIUPS 1662 2* 10W 194 - 95 

SHARP SYSTEM VZ 15S0E 

2 x 12 W 2K-» 

BUSH ' 9100* 

PIONEER SHOO 2 x 32 W 294-95 

SONY ‘ COMPACT 27 2 X 25 W ... 29945 
SONY COMPACT 28 2 x 35 W-. 349.95 

PIONEER S440Q 2 x 50 W — - 374.95 

SONY COMPACT 48 2 x 50 W ... 399-95 

MUH Hl-W SYSTEMS WITH COMPACT 

DISC PLAYER M 

AM$TRAD CD1000 2 x 10 W 244.95 

EUNAIONE CD 20 00 2x74 W 284.95 

HkH RACK SYSTEMS _ 

BB'IATONE ST 20 2 x 14 W_»^ — »-9S 

BUSH 9885. 2 x 7.S W 1M-99 

SANYO GXT250, 2x6 W 1B9.9S 

SANSLH DA-T550. 2 x 33 W 239.99 

PIONEER XZ1010, 2 x 32 W 249.95 

PIONEER XZ3300. 2 x 50 W 39945 

HI-FI RACK SYSTEMS WITH COMfWCT 
DCSCPtAYER 

AMSTRAD CD 2000, 2x10 W 28945 

BINATONE GD2001. 2 X 7.5 W« — 299.95 
B1NAIONE CD2002. 2 x 124 W* — 319« 
• Remote Control 

COMPACT DISC PLAYERS 
from £7 a month 

GOODMANS GCD500 — 159JS 

PHILIPS CD 104 199.95 

PIONEER PDM-6 Remote Control __ 344.95 

STEREO AMPLIFIERS 
from £5 a month 

AKA! AMA 1. 2 x 30 W 64.95 

SONY TAAX 230. 2 x 40 W 8945 

PIONEER SA570, 2 x 40 W 9445 

AKAI AMA 30 IS, 2 x 65 W 11945 

PIONEER SA770. 2 x 62 W 11945 

SONY TAAX 330, 2 x 60 W 119.95 

TUNERS from £5 a month 

SANSUl T500 IWZMWZVHF 6445 

PIONEER TX970L 8FM18AM — 8945 

SONY 513X220 U1WMVWVHF. — 89.95 

TVNER/AMPUFWRS 
from £5 a month 

AKAI AAA1L 2 x 30 W 119.95 

AKAI AA/105L 2 x 35 W 14945 

PIONEER SX1500 2 x 46 W 16945 

HI-FI STEREO CASSETTE DECKS 
from £5 a month 

SHARP RT115. Dolby B NR 59.95 

SONY TCFX 330. Dolby B NR 79.95 

SANSLH D35BF Dolby B NR 79.95 

AKAI HXA101, Dolly B NR 94.95 

PIONEER CT670, Dolby B NR 8945 

PIONEER CT770, Dotty 

BA CNR 10945 

CT11 TOW. twin deck. 


Dolby B & C NR. 

TCW 230, twin deck. 

Dotty B& CNR 139.95 


telephones 


Approved for we by British Telecom 
ONE PIECE TELEPHONES 
from £5 a month 

CHALATRON Rumour 1 

MURPHY PB 12 .”--/: - -." 

BETACOM Fl-1 Hamlngo 

B£TACOM FLS10 Tlarrnngo' 

DIALAIRON Rumour 10 

BINATONE MP200 ’Hotline 2 

British TELECOM ’S/tmter — 

BRITISH TELECOM ‘SLimtel 10* 

TWO PIECE TELEPHONES 
from £5 a month 

PlgSSEY CSI PBT100/101 - 

PLES5EY PBTT31 

ANSWERCAIL ■Honywcod' 

BNATONE MP400 

ANSWERCAUL Trojan 2000 

BRITISH TELECOM Viscount 

British TELECOM ‘Picture Phone 

PUESSEY CSI P8T200/20T — ; — 

BRITISH TELECOM Viscount Super 4*. — 

British telecom lenue 24' — 

CORDLESS TELEPHONES 
from £5 a month 

BETACOM 1000 — 

PLESSEY CSI PCT2200 - — 

BRITISH TELECOM ‘Freeway' 

ANSWERCALL ‘Ranger 2000’ 

TELEPHONE ANSWERDIG 

MACHINES 

from £5 a month 

BETACOM LR3 

BRITISH TELECOM ‘Robin' 

BINATONE Phonecorder Mk 2 

ANSWERCALL ‘Apoflo 4000‘ 


ui!” ‘V, 

l si1. 


... 6845 
-. 98.95 
.... 11940 
12745 


HOME 

COMPUTERS 


HOME COMPUTERS 
from £5 a month 

AMSTRAD CPC464 64KCFU GT6MST65 
green screen monitor & 12 pieces 

oi AMSOfT Software 19440 

AMSTRAD 6128 12SKC.RU.CJVM and 

CWM 22, GT6S 
green screen monitac 

Built in 3* disc dnve 29440 

AMSTRAD CPC 464 64K CPU. 

CTM640/CTM644 colour monitor 
& 12 pieces of 

AMSOFT Software 29440 

AMSTRAD 6128 128K C.PU. CTYM and 

CWM 2.2, CTM644 
colour monitor. 

Built in 3- disc drive. 389.90 

COMMODORE PLUS 4 64K Outfit. 7849 

Word Processors 

AMSTRAD PCW8256 ComputeriWbnJ 

Processor 256K. 
green screen monrtoc 

built-in 3* dtsc drive 45845 

AMSTRAD PCW8512 ComputerfAbrd 


i l’i‘T - ;i. L 

V ;, ‘ 

. « ;» 
\i!-’ 



MM 




from £5a month 


Rut? 

E 

£2 

PL470 

belt-drive 


PSLX220 belt-drive 


3* disc drive-. 


PERIPHERALS 


£150 to £14939 or from £Sa month 


AMSTRAD, COMMODORE, CURRAH, LLOYTRON. 


SINCLAIR. SPECTKA/1DEO 


£7.90 to £9.50ar from £5 a month 


AMSTRAD SPECTRAWDEO 


;< w ;t ; u- 


If you find any tan 
amendy advertised and in 
stock, at a lower price 
many other showroom. 

Wewffl beat the price 
on the spot. 





•A Comet btsart Gedt Card gives 
you 24 times you 
monthly payment kSSSSSraj 

■KMSOMCO1KUSSM0W* 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


DISC CAMERAS from £5 a month 

HAJJNA DISC 102 Outfit 849 

HAUNA DISC 718 1340 

110 CAMERAS from £5 a month 

HAUNA STD built-in flash 1445 

HAUNA SHTM. built-in flash 1945 

HAUNA RBMT Outfit with huilt-ui 

flash 2440 

3Smm. COMPACTS 
from £5 a month 

HAUNA H350 Outfit, buflt-in flash . 1940 
HAUNA HI 60 Outfit, built-in flash 26.90 

HAUNA MW35G, built-in flash 2840 

ZENITH Compact 35 Camera 

Outfit 2945 

HAUNA SPEEDY 33 Outfit, builtiri 

flash 39.90 

VMTAR PS30, bidt-in flash 4649 

OLYMPUS Supertrip Compact 35 with 

flash 4845 

MINOUA FS-E auto exposure 6440 

OLYMPUS XA3 Compact, All flash. 8440 

AUTO FOCUS from £5 a month 

HAUNA AF800 Outfit buit-in flash 5945 

OLYMPUS Trip, built-in flash 59.99 

PANASONIC C500AF 69.95 

VMTAR D535, built-in flash PLUS FREE 

PHIUPS ‘SKYMASTER 4’ 

PERSONAL STEREOI 7449 

MINOUA AF-E 84.95 

CANON Sprint, buift-m flash 8845 

MINOUA AFZ 118.95 

PENTAX PC35AF-M, built-m flash- 11845 

OLYMPUS AF-1, built-in flash 129.90 

INSTANT PRINT CAMERAS 
£2835 to £4835 or from £5 a month 

POLAROID 

35 mm. SLR CAMERAS/PACKAGES 
from £6 a month 

PENWC K1000 body Skxr 35-70 mm. 

zoom lens 13949 

PRAKT1CA BCX1. 9 PIECE SLR OUTHT WITH 

FREE ALUMINUM CASE - 14440 

PENTAX P30 50mni.fi .7 lens 15445 

PRAKTICA BCX2, 11 PIECE SLR OUTFIT WITH 

FREE ALUMRVUUM CASE - 19940 
CANON AE1 Program SO mm. ft4 

lens 19945 

PENTAX Program A 50 mm. fl.7 lens. 

Complete wfth Free Ever Ready 
case Normal Price £15.99 19949 
OLYMPUS OM4Q body, Srcor 35-70 mm. 

zoom lens 209.90 

CANON T70 50 mm. f14 lens 239,95 

CANON A1 50 mm. f 1.8 lens. 27949 

MINOUA 7000 50 mm. fl.7 AF lens. 

PLUS 10 FREE ROLLS 
OF AGRA HIM. 

Normal Price £1 5.00 32945 

LENSES 

£3439 to £14939 or from £5 a month 
MINOUA, OLYMPUS, QZECK, PENTAX. SICOR. 
VMTAR 

FLASHGUNS 

£1 630 to £6935 or from £5 a month 

Automatic, Dedicated 

KAN1MEX, MINOUA, OlYMPUS, PENTAX. VMTAR 

GADGET BAGS 

£1030 to £2930 a Sum £S a month ■ 

GUARDSMAN. ORION. SACAR 


COMET 


We offer a MI installation and 
defivey service on afl major 
items. Any repair woik 
is carried out by Cometis own 
engineers or manufacturers 


CALCULATORS 


CALCULATORS from £5 a month 

CASIO HLS11 Auto switch off 245 

TEXAS TI502 3.90 

CASK) LC3T1C/E 3 key memory _ 445 

CASIO LC787C 3 tey memory 445 

CASK) DCT00.™ 945 

Solar towered Calculators 

TEXAS T! 1626 440 

CASIO SL702 Ultra-sfim 445 

TEXAS TT CARD 1784/5/6 

Ultra-slim 5.75 

TEXAS T1 1795 desfc/hand 845 

CASIO SL80- leaf toy credit aid 845 

TEXAS T12130 9.90 

CASK) JS10 desk top 2145 

Saentffk Calculators 

TEXAS T1 30 Bl 38 functions 845 

CASIO ’ FX82/A 38 functions 845 

TEXAS TT 35 solar powered 10.95 

CASIO FX350 50 functions 1145 

CASIO FX570 79 functions 15.95 

TEXAS 11 57 Mk. n 48 

programmes 1640 

TEXAS T1 56 100 plus functions.. 1740 

CASIO FX115 67 functions. 1745 

CASK) FX3600P 61 functions..— 17.95 

CASIO FX451 98 functions 19.95 

TEXAS Tl 66 programmable - 3640 

-All Ttexas Calculators have a two year No 
quibble guarantee. 

tNo deposit fixed term agreement or you 
have the option to make one immediate 
cash payment in full, interest free in 3 
months time 
TYpical APR 33.6% 

Ask in store for written details. 

ta-BwimtGe. Come bcMmserwe umrad. GragtStim. Mrf 
UnltnMiKiiBMWiq. PncMvaUtonJI iaa»6S« 


SFREE 

3 HOUR 

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ALL VIDEO 
RECORDERS 



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( J ! OPENING HOURS: M0NIW- FRIDAY 9am-8pm (TUES, 9.30am) SATURDAY9am-5.30pm. 

) ALL SC0TTI&I BRATOES OPEN SJNDAY I0am-5pm (EXCEPT DUMFRIES AND GREENOCK). 

FOR THE ADDRESS OF YOUR MEARESTCOMET BRANCH, SEE YOUR LOCAL TELffHONE DIRECTOR* OR RING TELHMTA 24 HOUR SERVICE ON Ot 200 0200 


VR 6463 VHS 

remote control #30 day 2 event 

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•freeze frame ^ - 

£ 379-95 

— ^•PfafodlVHSandBetamotleb. - - 

OR ONLY £1 6 A MONTH* 






















































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* Jftf 




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■ ■’ ■■f!» fc M. i ' 
r i*. ■» _ 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Consumer council joins 
call to relax rules 
restricting solicitors 

Solicitor, FraDCeS < ? b ’ ^ Afliirs CwTes I«» d ^ 


* ... “J - uiwu, u](u aiuues 

aSer C !2 should have lor General of Fair Trading, 
SS to whic *iaisocaIledforan^to 

to nmvS^ restrictions. 

La L° w f W T 1 * Law Society council 
° f Ieg ^ W,M - wilhin the next few 
adlta wks - considering the 

siimi*r V’« 6 , N «™» Con- proposed changes to the prac- 
fj'tJPfe lD rules iiflie Iight^f 
draft V £*»V*"* i *l cornmerrts from local law 

aran paper for proposed societies, 
changes in the solicitors' prac- rwi ^ * v xt 
tice rules, the council saw it - , ®i vert tsing, the Na- 

suppose intention Ion!! 

move some of the restrictions 10 **? P 1 " 

on advertising by solicitors. solicitors 

That will lead In mm sfl0uld fallowed to advertise 
petition among soUciur&and 

therefore lower prices; and the £f n W £l\ P*®^ 6 . 

public will be P given inore ****** 

information and greatw ^ skfll and expenence” 
choice. But the proposed Solicitors should also be 
changes do not go far enough, ^owed— if the diem agrees— 
the NCC says. Jp tell people about their 

Restrictions on mixed “ succes s stones” of past cases, 
partnerships reduce choice *? encourage others in similar 
and the chance of offering a s ! l “ aUon s to enforce their 
more cost-effective service. n &hts. 

"Many consumers would .The council also disagrees 
welcome the opportunity to with the Law Society that 
take a “one stop" bousebuyers solicitors should be allowed to 
package, which might include advertise only through sneci- 


and yet allow them to place 
exactly the same sort of 
information in a free news- 
paper which will be delivered 
through people's doors in the 


weeks, be considering foe same way." 

proposed changes to foe prac- Welcoming foe proposal to 

*L£2 ! JV of allow solicitors to^rovide 

comments from local law independent financial advice. 


so 9® 1 ‘ es * . 4 such as on foe relative merits 

On advertising, the Na- of buying or renting, the NCC 
tional Consumer Council says - says that is a “selling point 
that contrary to the Law ripe for exploitation 11 . 

S^SC* SOIidu J IS It adds: “Consume! 

should be allowed to advertise have a choice bet 

rfiS! u 5 0f !i m> 2!*J*£ s conveyancing servio 
of work they do, “so people. movides i™Wnrif»n 


u f3 y u 5 solicitors it adds: “Consumers should 

have a choice between a 
J e “ <***2^32? conveyancing service which 
■ !? P* 01 ^ Provides impendent fman- 
***“*£ rial advice, a s&oce in which 
on their skill and experience”. ^ provided by foe 


package, which might include 
a survey, housing finance and 


• . . '! 1 ' f -v 

. - IIVf v 

- 'SIS!,!*,. 

■ ilklrf, 

lancy and legal advice:” 

The council’s hacking for 
relaxation of the rules which 
prohibit mixed partnerships 
between solicitors and other 
professionals conies hard on 
foe heels of a report last week 
by Sir Gordon Borne, Direc- 

■ . 1 • ll 

■ HI. *€*^1 

• • ••■ 1 MTi. J. 

Search for 

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Libyans 

intensifies 

• - !!»*• 

• ’ •*i:s »ji • 

• • -sc Vj. 

By Peter Evans 

Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

• • • •» p, - , :-i *j- 

• ■ «iU *ll . 

i '' 

• • • i 

• • \ i: 

Twenty-three missing Liby- 
ans are being sought by the 
Home Office, police and se- 
curity services in foe face of 
renewed concern about Colo- 
nel Gadaffi's terrorism role. 

- -iEJL 

An investigation was laun- 
ched in the wake of the 
American raid on Libya amid 
fears of possible reprisals. The 
aim was to locate 54 Libyans 
who had then overstayed their 


visas. 


The investigation has been 
made more urgent by specula- 
tion of renewed American 
action against Libya and with 
Britain being seen as an ally. 

There could be a number of 
reasons why foe 23 Libyans' 
have overstayed their visas. 
One may be minor variations 
in the way names have been 
filled in when applying for a 
legitimate extension to a stay. 

■ Mr David Waddington, 
Minister of Stale at the Home 
Office, promised urgent action 
when he told MPs on June 3 
that of 5,560 Libyan nationals 
admitted to Britain since visas 
were required after the shoot- 
ing of WPC Yvonne Fletcher, 
54 were unaccounted for. 

He said that in each case foe 
individual's leave had expired 
but there was no evidence they 
had left the United Kingdom 
or applied for an extension of 
stay. “These remaining cases 
are being vigorously investi- 
gated to establish whether 
embarkation, though not yet 
recorded, had in fact occurred, 
or whether action is necessary 
to enforce departure." 

Most have been traced, but 
attention is now being con- 
centrated on the 23 still un- 
accounted for. 


Solicitors should »i«* be 
allowed — if the client agrees — 
to tell people about their 
-“success stones" of past rases , 
to encourage others in similar 
situations to enforce their 
rights. 

The council also disagrees 
with the Law Society that 
solicitors should be allowed to 
advertise only through speci- 
fied media. It backs a ban on 
unsolicited visits and tele- 
phone calls, but sees “no good 
reason why solicitors should 
not advertise by direct mail". 

Mr Michael Montague, 
chairman of foe NCC, says: 
“It is a nonsense to ban 
solicitors _ from advertising 
their services by direct mail 

Contractor 
charged in 
bribe case 

A tenth private contractor 
was yesterday charged with 
corruption . in connection with 
an alleged bribes scandal 
involving more than £50 mil- 
lion worth of building con- 
tracts for works at royal 
palaces and other government 
buildings. 

Terrence King was bailed at 
Horsefeny Road Magistrates' 
Court yesterday to appear 
next month with nine other 
contractors, a former Greater 
London council officer, and 
nine officials of the Govern- 
ment's Property Services 
Agency (PSA). 

Mr King, aged 46, of War- 
wick Road, Coulsdon, Surrey, 
who laces 18 summonses, is a 
director of Clostar Ltd and 
Ferrycroft Ltd, general build- 
ers and plumbers. He feces 1 1 
charges, six alleging be bribed 
PSAofficials with all-expenses 
paid holidays to Las Vegasas a 
reward for helping him, and 
other contractors, to win agen- 
cy contracts. 

Mr King is accused of 
i bribing Mr Stanley Hunt, a 
former GLC technical officer, 
with two holidays to Las 
Vegas. 

He is also accused on four 
counts of raving Civil Servants 
at the PSA District Works 
Offices at Wallington in Sur- 
rey, Westminster and Chelsea, 
false tenders in respect of 
contracts for work art St 
James's Palace; foe Royal 
Hospital in Chelsea, and 
Harpenden House, in West- 
minster. 

The 19 co-accused face 88 
summonses between them, 
some involving cash bribes, 
holidays to Miami and con- 
tracts for work at Hampton 
Court Palace. 

The charges come after a 
two-year investigation by the 
Metropolitan and Gty police 
company fraud department. 


Computer fraud 


City firms victims of 
big electronic crimes 


Millions of pounds have 
been stolen from City institu- 
tions in the past two years 
through computer fraud, 
which is one of crimes biggest 
growth areas, a survey has 
revealed. 

The survey of 30 large 
financial institutions* has 
prompted warnings that foe 
City's “big bang", the de- 
regulation of the Loudon 
Stock Exchange, wjU see i a 
farther boom in foe illicit 
transfer of funds from com- 
pany accounts to Swiss bank 
accounts and the like. 

Trusted employees are fre- 
quently fleeing foe country 
after snitching snms in excess 
of £1 million to their own 
private accounts elsewhere its 
foe world, according to foe 

accountancy firm Detoitte 
Haskins and Sells. 

The firm’s computer .ser- 
vices division says that foe 
growing use of computers in 
foe City has not been matched 

bv tighter security. 

Mr John High, a Delorttt 
partner who organized foe 
survey, said: “The big bang is 
only happening because corn- 


people were getting caught too 
late. 

“If it is detected in the next 
few hours, it is too late. Tire 
person who has perpetrated it 
may well have left the building 
sssi caught a plane." 

Mr High said that only a 
fraction of such crimes were 
reported because companies 
feared the publicity would 
damage customer confidence 
in their computer systems. He 
$aid he knew of a number of 
cases in which sums of more 
than £1 million had been 
stolen. 

Mr High said foe crimes 
were so easy to carry oat 
because many huge companies 
and financial institutions were 
connected directly to Swift, the 
network used by the clearing 
b anks to transfer funds around 

tbe world, and to Chaps, which 

transfers money within Brit- 
ain. . , . 

“Each computer terminal is 
the equivalent of a cheque 
book, but instead of signing a 
cheque, with a terminal you ■ 
authorize. It and the money 
goes." 

Companies should prepare 

.« mm than* 


only bappemng Dera^*^- «ktheir 

RsSSSS KEtoss 


al transferring the ao^y, 
but security systems are not as 
up-to-date as the computers 
are going to be. 

“Everywhere we have feeen, 
we have seen the opportunity. 
If somebody has foe desire, to 
subvert the system. 

Mr High said those mines 
were very likely to be 

wed, but foe problem was that 


in un d it , . 

business, is nsusaily c&Hsed by 
the system malfunctioning, but 
there have been cases of 
deliberate sabotage. 

Mr High said one consofe- 
tion was that so far no British 
company has suffered in tire 
way an American firm did, 
when an employee became so 
angry with his computer, be 
shotit. 


lender, and a service which 
deals only with technical mat- 
ters and leaves the consumer 
to look after their own finan- 
cial affairs." 

But as that is a new area for 
many solicitors, the Law Sod- , 
ety should take on the role of 
training and advising solic- 
itors who want to become 
experts in giving financial 
advice, the council says. i 

In general foe NCC says 
there is “enormous scope" for 
using advertising to provide a 
better and cheaper service to 
ordinary people in areas o flaw 
which are not well served by 
traditional practices such as 
welfare benefits, employment 
and immigration. 



Doctors say plight 
of disabled people 
is being ignored 

ByJiDSIieniuui 

Doctors accused foe Gov- party, said yesterday that the 
ernment yesterday of college would now press the 


Aldaniti, the racehorse which will raise £250,000 for cancer research, with former jockey 
Bob Champion (left) and actor Bob Hosldns In London yesterday (Photograph: Dod Miller). 

Aldaniti in £250,000 cancer walk 


Aldaniti, the horse that won 
the Grand National in 1981 
after recovering from a broken 
leg, is to walk more than 250 
mBcs from Loudon to Liver- 
pool next spring in aa attempt 
to raise £500,000 for the Bob 
Champion Cancer Trust. 

The retired racehorse will 
be ridden for one utile sections 
of the trip by celebrities 


including Princess Anne and 
the actors Bob Hoskins and 
John Hurt, each of whom will 
be expected to raise £1,800 in 
sponsorship for the trust. 

The journey will end when 
Bob Champion, who rode 
Aldaniti to victory after mak- 
ing a dramatic recovery from 
cancer, rides the horse on to 
Aintree racecourse on April 4, 


exactly six years after his 
Grand National win. 

Organizers hope the 
£250,000 raised by the 250 
celebrities who will ride the 
horse be doubled by additional 
sponsorship from people along 
the route. 

All money raised win be 
donated to the Bob Champion 
Cancer Trust. 


ernment yesterday of 
overlooking the needs of phys- 
ically disabled people. 

A working party report pub- 
lished by foe Royal College of 
Physicians claims there are 
glaring deficiencies in 
community services and that 
more funds are needed to 
improve residential units for 
the severely disabled. 

The college says that youn- 
ger physically disabled people, 
between the ages of 1 6 and 64. 
are not included in foe three 
priority groups which foe 
Government has singled out 
for attention: the mentally 
handicapped, the mentally ill. 
and the elderly. 

“Despite the medical 
responsibility towards them, 

foe young disabled constitute 
a group' whose interests none 
of the established medical 
specialties has unequivocally 
agreed to service," the report 
says. 

Because more disabled peo- 
ple are cared for at home, 
those in institutional care are 
likely to be very dependent 
with multiple disabilities, 
including behavioural and 
communication disorders. 

"The trends may well re- 
quire new objectives and new 
approaches to staffing, 
management and training," 
the report adds. 

Dr John Harrison, a mem- 
ber of foe college working 


Govern mem for equitable 
funding between residential 
and community care. 

“The Government pays 
£300 a week for hospital care 
for the disabled and about 
£200 for residential care. But a 
person living at home will be 
lucky if he or she gels £100 per 
week." he said. 

Disabled people had the 
right to as much choice as 
their abilities allow, and pan 
of that choice depends on 
access to finance, foe report 
says. It was plainly inequitable 
that social security payments 
paid for a place in residential 
care were more that twice that 
given to someone living at 
home. 

“Equitable funding would 
allow more choice and would 
allow clearer appraisal of the 
relative merits of community 
and institutional care." it says. 

The college also said there 
was an urgent need for an 
initiative to ensure collabora- 
tion at local level between the 
National Health Service, local 
authorities and the voluntary 
and private sectors. 

It proposes establishing a 
local disability forum with 
representatives from all the 
agencies, together with dis- 
abled people and their carers 
complemented by a system of 
monitoring the development 
of resources 


NEW TELEPHONE 


CHARGES 



champs 




The 1986 review provides for an overall reduction in 
British Telecom’s regulated prices - in accordance with its 
operating licence. 

The main theme of the review is fairness. Some services 
cost more to provide than others, and the differences have not 
always been reflected in the price the customer is asked to pay. 
That’s why there are ups and downs in the panels' below. 

Over three years, British Telecom’s price changes on 

up | pq 

Quarterly rentals for residential The call unit charj 
exchange lines will rise by SOp 5p to 4.4p, so brief < 

(to £13.95), and for business customers 

by 85p (to £2L55). Most cheap-rate ] 

— ‘ call charges w 

Most focal daytime calls 

Monday to Friday will cost 
the customer more. 

The price of the majority of calls over 
national routes up to 56km will rise. 

Calls to Spain, Portugal, Gibraltar, 
and some non-European countries 
will cost more. 

So will cheap-rate calls to the 
Irish Republic. 


The takeover connection charge 
and the charges for connecting new 
customers and those moving 
premises will be increased. 


tionin . exchange line rentals and; ordinary dialled calls taken as a 
^ with its whole will, on average, have-been- kept seme 3 per cent below 
the Retail Prices Index. : ' 

e services Few other major companies can present a similar 

s have not record to their customers. 

oed to pay. The new rental and connection charges take effect from 

Jow. November 1, and call charges from November 3. The main 
Langes on effects of the price changes are given below (exc. VAT)r 

DOWN unchanged! 


Quarterly rentals for residential The call unit charge will be cut from The minimum price of 

exchange lines will rise by 50p 5p to 4.4p, so brief calls can be cheaper. a public payphone call remains 

o £13.95), and for business customers unchanged at lOp. 

by 85p (to £ZL55). Most cheap-rate local and national 

’ call charges will be reduced. . _ , . 

. . The cost ofa local call from a 

The cost ofdayume long distance .public payphone remains the same. 

calls (over 56km) will be 

reduced by at least 12 per cent 

Free Directory Enquiries. 


Another 45 ‘tow cost* national routes 
are to be introduced, cutting 
charges on these additional routes 
by about 30 per cent 


Many calls to Europe, North 
America, and the Middle and 
Far East will cost less. 


The £10 payment for changing 
your entry in the Phone 
Rook is abolished immediately. 


Rebates on rental charges 
for residential low users will 
be increased. 


Peak and standard rate calls to the Irish 
Republic will cost 12 per cent less . ■ 


From October onwards leaflets with your telephone bill will give fuller details. They will also contain useful advice 
on how to get the best value from your telephone. For further information telephone 100 and ask for Freefone 2500. +: 


* Unless otherwise specified, all caH charges above 
refer to directly dialled c ate from ordinary telephones. 


f Please telephone in normal office homs. 


British 

TELECOM 

BRITISH TELECOMMUNICATIONS PLC. 81 NEWGATE STREET. LONDON EC1A ?AJ. 


r-***-’ 










rumman fc, 
>' y^arsa. 


h Aeros 


Pact 


70- 3 OF THi 
PROTECTS 
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BRITISH ASSOCIATION 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Scientists told brain 
implants and drugs 
may assist thousands 


new 

slop 


Brain implants and 
dnjgs could help «> w 
diousands of people suffering 
from senile dementia and 
Parkinson's Disease, scientists 
at the annual meeting of the 
Dnnsh Association for the 
Advancement of Science in 
Bristol were told yesterday. 

Research into the cause of 
premature ageing, with loss of 
memory and mental confu- 
sion, showed there was a 
genetic susceptibility to Alz- 
heimer's Disease. 

The finding also explained 
the slow but steady deteriora- 
tion caused by that disorder. 
About 10 per cent of people 
older than 65 are estimated to 
be vulnerable, but the major- 
ity of sufferers are aged over 

The discovery of the genetic 
susceptibility was outlined by 
Dr Claude Wischik of the 
Cambridge Brain Bank Labor- 
atory at Cambridge Universi- 

l y- . . 

Scientists outlined posable 
medium and long term ap- 
proaches for treating Alzhei- 
mer-type disorders, in which 
the medium-term goal was to 
restore an imbalance of the 
chemical messengers in the 
brain, particularly acetylcho- 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 

line, which is associated with pended on analysis by new 
loss of memory and can be re- techniques developed in the 
stored by substituting drugs, molecular biology research 
Dr Susan Iversen, director laboratories at Cambridge, 
of Behavioural Pharmacology, which revealed that brain cells 
at the Merck. Sharp and were supported by a micro- 
Dohme Neuroscience Re- scopic framework consisting 
search Centre, described the of three strands of molecules 
type of substances that could plaited together tike rope, 
be used to restore memory in Dr Wischik's group also 
disorders where brain chemi- identified an “aberrant” na lo- 


cals had been lost. 

The chemical deficiencies 
were being reproduced in 
animal and volunteer human 
subjects, she said. Drugs 


ral protein molecule which 
was produced in the cell The 
cell tried to get rid of it by the 
usual process to dispose of 
unwanted or “garbage". mol- 


which affect transmission of ecules. But the abnormal one 
chemicals in the brain and was a stable partner and the 


cause memory disorders close- 
ly resemble those seen in Alz- 
heimer's Disease. 

She said drugs which stimu- 
lated the production of acetyl- 
choline also reverse faults 
which were caused in the ex- 
periments. She believes re- 
placement of chemical mes- 
sengers by drug therapy held 
the best hope for treatment in 
the medium term. 

The next form of treatment 
was expected to come from a 
discovery that showed bow 
the fault occurred in the brain 
cells 

The new understanding de- 
scribed by Dr Wischik de- 


Smoking plan to 
save 20,000 lives 

By Our Science Correspondent 


Smoking could be cut by 20 
per cent in the next five years 
without harming government 
revenue, a researcher said 
yesterday. 

The reduction would lead to 
20,000 fewer deaths a year and 
a drop in smoking related 
diseases, Mrs Joy Townsend, a 
research scientist at 
Northwick Park Hospital, 
Harrow, said. 

It could be achieved by a 
policy of sustained health 
education with real increases 
in cigarette prices, she said. 
One m every four smokers die 
up to 15 years prematurely 
and Britain has the highest 
lung cancer death rates in the 
world, she added. 

Increases in cigarette tax 
have boosted government rev- ■ 
enue while decreasing con- 
sumption and tax is an “effect- 
ive ally" of preventive medi- 
cine. she said. Forty years ago 
cigarette tax was a leading 
source of revenue but now it 
provides only a quarter of the 


total, with other taxes, such as 
value-added tax and petrol 
lax. assuming greater value. 

It has been calculated by 
health education campaigners 
that it costs £199 to add a year 
to the lifespan of people who 
give up smoking The cost of 
saving a year of life by the 
simple means of a GP advis- 
ing his patient to give up is 
about £167, she said. 

A year of life gained by a 
coronary artery bypass opera- 
tion costs £800 and a heart 
transplant costs £5,000 for a 
year gained. 1 

“These comparisons are a 
strong argument for more re- 
sources to go to smoking con- 
trol programmes," Mrs Town- 
send said. "A further 20 per 
cent rise in prices, curtailment 
of advertising and continued 
health education would result 
in a further 20 per cent 
reduction in smoking without 
detriment to the budget,” she 
said. 


Plants get 
new role in 
medicine 

Extracts of relatively simple 
compounds from four families 
of wild plants are causing ex- 
citement among scientists be- 
cause of their potential use in 
medicine and agriculture (Our 
Science Editor writes). 

The substances resemble 
simple sugar compounds, 
such as glucose and fructose, 
but they are alkaloids with 
important medicinal prop- 
erties. The derails were de- 
scribed by Dr Linda Fellows, 
of the Royal Botanical Gar- 
dens at Kew. 

These substances have at- 
tracted attention because cer- 
tain enzymes that process 
sugar in any organism are 
unable to distinguish between 
true sugars and these alkaloid 
“mimics", which find their 
wav into the parts of the org- 
anism where enzymes are 
active. The mimics can sabo- 
tage or be used to enhance the 
action of the enzymes. 

One mimic of glucose. DNJ. 
extracted from the black mul- 
berry. strongly inhibits Mah- 

ase, the enzyme which is 
important to digestion, but it 
has little effect in an organism 
like the pest beetle, which 
attacks stored pulses. A mimic 
of fructose, DMDP, which is 
found in some tropical wild 
beans, prevents the enzyme in 
ihe beetle but not in mam- 
mals. 


Safety for 
quake 
buildings 

By Onr Science Editor 

New safety standards for 
the design of buildings in 
earthquake areas may follow 
the results of research into the 
disaster in Mexico last year 
done by Mr Martin Degg, of 
Nottingham University. 

He showed that biddings 
between nine and eleven sto- 
reys high experienced the 
most damage because of the 
geological characteristics of 
the ground, which amplified 
shockwaves and “tuned" them 
to a particular vibration. 

Mr Degg said his analyses 
showed how different types of 
construction responded to 
shaking and he identified the 
buildings that were most 
susceptible. Measurements 
made in his research amid be 
used to assess the behaviour of 
different types of soiL 

Almost all damage in Mex- 
ico was restricted to buildings 
over an old lake bed where 
soft, water-saturated day 
deposits amplified shock- 
waves by a factor of eight when 
compared to bedrock motions. 

The effect of the amplifica- 
tion varied between buildings, 
with rigid structures perform- 
ing better than flexible ones, 
and the height of construction 
played a vital role. Bnfldings 
between six and twenty storeys 
high were worst affected. 


‘Crucial’ child abuse 
conferences disappoint 


The value of special con- 
ferences of health and social 
workers concerned with cases 
of child abuse has still to be 
proven 12 years after govern- 
ment recommendations about 

their “crucial importance , a 
researcher said yesterday (Our 
Science Correspondent 
writes). 

Better communication 
among the professional work- 
ers. police and teachers was 
urged by the Department of 
Health and Social Security, 
leading to the setting up 
“case conferences" to discuss 
action on specific cases oi 
child abuse. 

Although many benefits 
have resulted, a study of some 
conferences produced a cat- 
alogue of shortcomings ana 


negative impressions". Dr 
Brian Caddick said. 

In one case the outcome was 
the arrest of an innocent 
person and the further abuse 
by the real perpetrator of the 
original injuries to a child. In 
other cases, key people were 
frequently absent from meet- 
ings and there were gaps in 
information. 

Dr Caddick. a lecturer in 
applied social sciences at Bris- 
tol University, said probably 
too much had been expected 
of the conferences. 

More research was needed 
to develop understanding of 
how traumatic experiences for 
children and crises for their 
families might better be man- 
aged by the people “to whom 
we give this awesome ana 
difficult task", he said. 


usual mechanisms of the brain 
for dissolving and removing 
such garbage did not work. 

As it accumulated it caused 
the strands to collapse in a 
heap. That tangle of micro- 
scopic filaments inside brain 
cells was recognized a long 
lime ago as a characteristic of 
cells affected by Alzheimer's 
Disease. Bui it needed the 
advances in modern molecu- 
lar biology to show how and 
why it had happened. 

The unwanted protein has 
only just been identified and 
scientists are starting to think 
about ways of preventing it 
from forming. 



Scientists 
uncertain 
over food 
additives 


% 


Miss Caroline Walker, co-author of The Food S cand a l. 


Our Science 
Correspondent 

The nse of additives in food 
does doc benefit consumers but 
is “immensely benefits*!" to the 
food industry, specialists said 
yesterday. 

There Is “massive 

uncertainty" abost the safety of 
chemical additives among scion- 
tific researchers bm the industry 
is gives the benefit of the doubt 
by government departments. 
Professor Erik Millstone, of 
Sussex University, said daring a 

debate. 

Bat Mr Peter Scnduun. a 
food industry scientist, said 
additives were not an issue of 
public safety and the con- 
troversy over their nse has been 
created by pressare groups. 

Miss Caroline Walker, co- 
author of The Food Scandal and 
a member of the Coronary 
Prevention Group, said studies 
reveal dntr children eat large 
•mounts of crisps, sweets, 
knacks and drinks which were 
“tarred up” with artificial col- 
ours and flavourings to make 
them more attractive. 

“Many other foods contained 
additives which misled purchas- 
ers and represented legalized 
consumer fraud, she claimed. 

But Dr Peter King, secretary 
of the Society of Chemical 
Industry, said: “We live longer 
than ever before, our children 
grow taller and stronger than 
their parents and athletic 
records continue to be broken. 
These are not the symptoms of a 
poisoned people." 


Widening health 
gap between 
the rich and poor 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


The health gap between rich 
and poor in Britain is widen- 
ing with an increasing percent- 
age of the population having 
poor living standards, accord- 
ing to the latest evidence. 

The growth of unemploy- 
ment, the fall in low wage 
levels, and the increase in 
early retirement has led to 
more people experiencing 
hardship. Professor Peter 
Townsend said. 

“The social distribution in 
Britain of income and wealth 
seems to have become more 
polarized in recent years," he 
added. 

Professor Townsend, 
professor of social policy at 
Bristol University, presented 
a review of recent studies of 
inequalities in health in 
Britain. 

While only eight deaths per 
1.000 of the population hap- 
pen among men under 64 
years in social classes one and 
two. 1 6 deaths per 1 .000 occur 
in the same group of men 
among social classes four and 
five. The numbers of people 
whose income is below or 
slightly above the “poverty 
line" of supplementary benefit 
has increased from 7.4 million 
in 1960 to 16.3 million in 
1983. 


Among the most deprived 
areas of the country is the 
North-east. In some parts of 
Middlesbrough unemploy- 
ment five years ago was 36 per 
cent 

But hardship is not con- 
fined to the North. The review 
states that in Bristol, the rate 
of stillbirths and infant deaths 
in the St Paul's area, the scene 
of riots in recent years, is twice 
as high as in the well-to-do 
suburb of Westbury on Trym. 
Deaths among adults under 64 
averaged 57 per 10,000 of the 
population compared with 22 
per 10.000 in Westbury. 

Conditions in outer London 
suburbs, especially lo the 
south and east of the capital, 
are far baiter than those in the 
inner city. Professor 
Townsend said, with areas oT 
Hackney, Tower Hamlets and 
Lambeth worst of all. 

However, a different view 
of the health gap was offered 
by other researchers yes- 
terday. A study by Dr Julian le 
Grand, of the London School- 
of Economics, and Professor 
Raymond lllsley, of Baib- 
Univereity. suggested that! 
there has been an almost 
continuous rise in ihc length 
of life of the average individ- 
ual in Britain in the past 65 
years. 


L/CU.JL UU 

freshen up 



AU. MERCHANDISE SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. SOME UNES AVAILABLE AT LARGER BRANCHES ONLY 


V .V 


V s ' 







THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1 986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


* 'Vs 


' {ii Tl '!PHt 




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France denies Muslim 
claim of collusion with 
US on Beirut hostages 


In the face of new threats 
n£i n hH 1C Uv es of six French- 
5S n ,^2?? faeId hostage in 
Beirut, Pens yesterday reftaj 
daims that it was acting m 
collusion with Washington to 
Jh« ? eir T fre ^ 0lU ' andsaid 
?JM w °J r wp dissidenis ex- 
pelled from France in Feb- 
™ary were free to return. 

The new threats against the 
hostages were made by the 
Islamic Jihad, the extremist 
Mushm group, ■ m a text 
accompanying a video-cas- 
sette of one of the hostages. M 
Kanfixaann, and 
left at the Beirut offices of the 
American ABC television 
channel on Tuesday night. 

. Looking pale and ema- 
ciated. M KaufFmann, a 
journalist who has been held 
for the past 15 months, ac- 
cused Paris of having aban- 
doned the hostages and 
appealed to it to taict* urgent 
action to secure their release. 

“We live m constant fear 
and are perpetually obsessed 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 

by death ... Anything could 
happen . . . We are tired, sick, 
and nervously exhausted. Our 
friends must put pressure on 
our leaders, as a matter of the 
most utmost urgency, before 
our kidnappers lose patience." 

M Kauffmans said the 
spark of hope generated from 
the release in June of two 
other French' hostages had 
soon faded. “Having obtained 
that gesture, our leaders are no 
longer interested in us. . . We 
feel desperate and completely 
abandoned." 

M Jeao-Bemard Raimond, 
the French Foreign Affairs 
Minister, commenting on the 
Islamic Jihad's accusation 
that France's policy in the 
region was “still dependent on 
that of the United States'*, 
said: “France’s action is com- 
pletely autonomous and in- 
dependent of all others'*. 

The only specific demand 
made by the Islamic Jihad in 
its communique was for the 


return to France of the two 
Iraqi dissidents expelled in 
February who, it claimed, 
were still being held “in 
atrocious conditions in Iraqi 
prisons". (The group allegedly 
executed one of the French 
hostages in March in revenge 
for the expulsions.) 

France claims the men were 
released from prison soon 
after their deportation and 
have since been seen by 
journalists Irving freely with 
the families in Baghdad. 

M Raimond announced 
yesterday that they had asked 
for. and had been granted, 
visas to return to France and 
were expected to arrive in 
time to resume their univer- 
sity studies m Paris. 

M Raimond said that the 
talks with “those who are able 
to exert some influence" on 
the situation of the hostages 
were continuing normally, 
and that there had been no 
change which could explain 
the latest threats. 



Cathy Evelyn Smith, above, the woman who 
admitted gjving John Bdashi, the actor, bis 
fatal drag overdose in 1982, has been sent to 
prison for three years by a judge who said 
“BefashTs dreg-infested life led to his own 
death" (Ivor Davis writes from Los Angeles). 

“That fact however does not absolve yon 
from responsibility," Judge David Horowitz of 
the Los Angeles Superior Coart said on 
Tuesday. “Every time yon stock a needle in 
someone's arm yon pot their life at risk. 


“And as a resalt of your actions John 
Belushi is dead." 

Smith, aged 39, who often worked with rock 
mosidans, pleaded “no contest" (a plea which 
is tantamount to a guilty one in the US) in Jane 
to involuntary manslaughter and three counts 
of furnishing and administering drags to 
Belsshi, aged 33, who died in March 1982 in a 
Hollywood hoteL In exchange for her plea, the 
prosecution dropped second-degree murder 
charges and 10 other drug coants. 


Alliance 
charts 
Nato path 

From Jonathan Braude 
Brussels 

The Soda! Democrat-Lib- 
eral alliance presented a 
united front here yesterday as 
leaders set out their ideas for 
strengthening the European 
contribution to Nato. They 
spoke to the press after talks 
with Nato's Supreme Com- 
mander, General Bernard 
Rogers. 

With their own differences 
over Britain's nuclear defences 
kept well covered. Dr David 
Owen and Mr David Steele 
argued that political dmshms 
over nuclear policy threatened 
Britain's' future role in Nato. 

Accusing the Labour Party 
of dishonesty in claiming Brit- 
ain could stay in Nato if US 
nuclear bases were closed 
down, Mr Steele said: “Yon 
cannot expect to be part of a 
collective system of security if 
yon are not prepared to play 
your frill part" 

Dr Owen also aired his view 
that Europe would hare to 
“pick up the tab" for its own 
defence 


Iran stays buoyant in teeth of Gulf oil losses 


Mr Muhammad Souri leant 
forward in a knowledgeable 
way. “You know that the 
Exocet missile is not really 
dangerous to the crew of an oil 
tanker?" be asked. 

We were sitting in the 
captain's cabin of the 141,000- 
tonne Iranian “shuttle" tanker 
Tafian, and the throb of the 
engines uniter .our feet made 
the chairs, the table, even the 
cutlery, vibrate softly. 

Perhaps Mr Souri sensed 
some incredulity. “Yes, you 
see we know where a missile 
hits a tanker, and so we give 
strict instructions to the crew 
on where they should take 
position and sleep daring the 
daylight hours sailing near 
Khaig Island." 

The chairman of the Na- 
tional Iranian Tanker Com- 
pany, the man in chaige of 
Iran's vulnerable oil export 
shipments from the Gulf, was 
idling the truth. Most crews 
sailing up to Khaig now know 
that hostile Iraqi aircraft al- 
ways approach a tanker from 
the south, since the pilots 
wonld have to fly over Iran if 
they attacked from the north. 
So their missiles usually hit 


From Robert Fisk, on board the Taftan off Larak Island, Iran 
the port side of the ships when predictions, staged a long- nine months, which now ac- 
-■ --- ’ - — J — j range air raid against the oil counts for more than 60 

loading station at Sirri Island tankers damaged by Iraqi or 
and set three ships on fire, Iranian jets. “At Khaig Island 
destroying the Iranian tanker now. we have 16 berths and 
Azarpod and killing almost all the Iraqis have bombed them, 
her crew. but we have six working again 

“We don’t want to see the — — 1 1 **— • °"' 1 

Azarpod 


they are in-bound and the 
starboard side when they are 
out-bound and fully laden 
with ofl. Sensible crewmen 
therefore sleep on the star- 
board going in and the port 
leaving. 

Indeed, Mr Souri claimed 
that the British-made anti- 
missile aluminium “chaff* 
cannisters with which the 
tankers are being equipped 
now have actually been used 
successfully against an Exocet. 
He said the chaff confused the 
missile’s radar during an Iraqi 
attack on a ship carrying the 
new equipment off Khaig 
Island last month. 

But even Mr Souri does not 
try to disguise what happened 
Ias i month when the Iraqi Air 
Force, confounding all Iran's 


story of the Azarpod re- 
peated," he said. “We don't 
think it will be. Now here at 
Larak we are further away but, 
more important, we have 
taken certain new measures to 
prevent this happening here." 
Mr Souri did not mention 
surface-to-air missiles, al- 
though the two Iranian naval 
officers sitting opposite him 
smiled gratefully at his 
assurances. 

Mr Souri is anything but 
pessimistic despite the toll on 
shipping in the Gulf these past 


at our “C" terminal there and 
six- more at the “T" terminal. 

“Our oil is flowing normally 
again and soon we shall return 
to our normal number of ships 
in the shuttle to Khaig— 14 or 
15 tankers ferrying crude oil 
and eight ships taking oil 
products to Kharg." 

Shipping agents in the Arab 
Gulf states, it should be said, 
dispute Mr Souri's figures, 
claiming that there are only 14 
berths in all at Khaig and that 
three at the most are working. 
Yet even they admit that the 
Iranians' capacity for repair- 


|uim^ vwuvi ii»w» « p ” — ri w - - - _ 

Warning shots for Soviet freighter 

n.< m .1 An w chine {whuthw mm> flthcr tonfov it bud recantmed an 


Bahrein (Renter) - Ajb Ira- 
nian warship fired warning 
shots to force a Soviet cargo 
vessel to heave-to for inspec- 
tion in the Golf on Tuesday 


said- Iran chal- 
or stopped 10 cargo 


ships, including one other 
Ssviet vessel, in the 24 honrs 
op to yesterday morning. 

The incident comes as the 
Soviet Union and Iran are 
seeking to improve long- 
strained relations. 

• BAGHDAD: Iraq said yes- 


terday it had recaptm-ed an 
offshore oil platform in the 
northern Golf, wiping oat the 
Iranian force that seized' the 
structure the previbas day. 

All Ir anian naval vessels 
around the platform woe also 
destroyed. 


ing bomb damage and main- 
taining their flow of oil at 
about 1.2 million barrels a day- 
through the Gulf is little short 
of a miracle. 

It was also the first time that 
a senior Iranian oil official had 
given details of the country's 
export capacity and tanker 
movements since the Iraqi 
attack on Sini Island. “Iran is 
now buying its own ships for 
the shuttle voyage." Mr Souri 
revealed. “We have bought 
eight tankers in the last eight 
months and we are about to 
purchase another two or three 
soon." 

He insists that the Iraqis 
wiD not be able to cut off 
Iran's oil exports, however 
hard they try to attack the 
tankers. He confirmed that the 
Iranians were now planning to 
maintain up to three empty 
vessels off Larak to take up 
spare capacity on the Kharg 
shuttle if jankers are badly 
damaged. 

Iran is now keeping spare 
seamen ashore at the naval 
port of Bandar Abbas to take 
over ships whose crews decide 
to abandon the dangerous 
shuttle voyage. 


£300m aid 
from EEC 
for growth 
in Crete 

From Mario Modano 

Athens 

Crete, the largest Greek 
island, with a population of 
500.000. is the fim beneficiary 
of the European Community's 
new “integrated Mediterra- 
nean programme" under a 
sc\cn-ycar development plan 
costing more than £300 
million. 

The plan, one of seven 
prepared by Greece and the 
first to be approved by the 
European Commission, aims 
at developing agriculture and 
tourism. Crete's traditional 
sources of revenue. 

One project will take advan- 
tage of the warm climate to 
diversify into tropical crops. 

Another will seek to ease 
Crete’s heavy dependence on 
tourism by channelling it to- 
wards a more selective mar- 
ket. away from its saturated 
holiday resorts. 

The main emphasis will be 
on industrialization.. One 
third of all credits allocated in 
the formal agreement signed 
at Heraklion on Tuesday be- 
tween Greece and the EEC 
will be spent on developing 
industry, manufacturing and 
advanced research projects. 

The Community has under- 
taken to contribute just over 
half the total cost of the 
programme. 

The Greek Government 
will cover the rest, but the 
island may also benefit from 
Com muniiy loans of up to £87 
million. 

Mr Costas Simitis. the 
Greek Minister of National 
Economy who signed the 
agreement with Mr Grigori os 
Varfis. the European Comm- 
issioner for Regional Funds, 
said the application of the 
programme came at a period 
when mistrust between the 
socialist Government of 
Greece and the EEC had been 
replaced by a stable relation- 
ship based on realism. 

Crete was given priority 
because the island was one of 
the regions of the European 
Community most likely to 
suffer from the effects of the 
entry of Spain and Portugal- 

The Greek Government 
said the sum to be spent in 
Crete represented an invest- 
ment of up to £500 for each 
citizen. 

There are suggestions that 
the Government sees it as a 
debt of honour to a population 
whose loyalty largely contrib- 
uted to its rise to power. 


Jews deny 
partin 
gas attack 
at opera 

Moscow (Reuter) -Tass 
yesterday described as Zionist 
provocation a tear-gas attack 
at New York's Metropolitan 
Opera house during a perfor- 
mance by a Soviet dance 
company. . 

The American Jewish De- 
fence League has denied any 
involvement in the incident, 
in which about 30 people wwt 
treated for smoke inhalation 
and eye irritation after the tear 
gas sent thousands of people 
running from the opera house. 

Death crash 

Graz, Austria (Renter)- An 
Australian woman died and 
20 people were seriously in- 
jured when a tourist bus 
collided with a truck in Styria. 

Racing fixed 

Hong Kong (Reuter) — 
Yang Yuan-loong, aged 63, a 
Hong Kong businessman, was 
given a suspended two-year 
jail sentence for conspiring 
with others to fix horse races. 

Animals ban 

Brussels (Reuter) — The 
European Commission is ex- 
pected to ordera ban this week 
on meat and live animal 
exports from Italy, because of 
outbreaks there of foot-and- 
mouth disease. 

Blaze deaths 

Paris — Seven people died 
and 17 were injured in a fin; 
which swept through a decay- 
ing block of flats in the city 
housing immigrant workers: 
Arson is suspected. 

Blast tragedy 

Dakha - At least 20 people 
were lolled and moreihan 30 
wounded when a rice min 
steam boiler blew up in an 
industrial township outside 
Dhaka. 

Players held 

Prague (AFP) — Six mu- 
sicians belonging to the in- 
dependent Jazz Section of 
Czechoslovak Musicians' jazz 
performers group have been 
arrested ana charged with 
earning money illegally. 

Envoy protest 

Spain is to recall its ambas^ 
sador to Chile in protest at 
Santiago’s failure to answer 
adequately allegations that 
Chile's secret services had 
spied on the Spanish Em^ 
bossy. 




in this competition 
ou win a Concorde holiday 


Just imagine what the 1st prize is. 




THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


1U 




Dmo^ncd^enaj 




mm 


Lady 


'mjedAxjaiaj 


To be successful, every plot 
has to be carefully tended. 


At English Estates, we've matured into the 
largest developers and managers of industrial 
and commercial property in England 

Hardly surprising when you consider that 
we've had fifty years experience in the field 
In that time, we've planted over 38 million 
sqit of property in our plot, at more than 500 
locations throughout the country. 

Funded principally by the Government, we 
operate in the assisted and rural development 
areas where private property developers do not 
wish to be involved 

At present, 113,000 people are working in 
our properties in these areas. In fact last year 
alone, over 1,600 businesses moved in with us. 
We feel this is a sure sign of our success. 


We offer a wider range of properties than 
anyone else in England And we can custom 
build premises; each individually designed to 
meet specific needs. 

But our service doesn't end when the 
building does. We ensure that our estates are 
carefully tended to maintain an environment 
in which businesses can bloom. 

And because we have 16 offices up and 
down the country, we are always on hand to 
offer help and advice. 


□□ENGLISH 

□□ESTATES 

The Developing Agency 


For example we can put companies in touch 
with the relevant national and local assisting 
agencies. And advise them where they can go 
for details of grants and other forms of financial 
aid they may be entitled to. 

In certain areas, we can even provide a 
specialist business adviser to get to the root of 
any problems that may crop up. 

As you have probably realised by novt£ we 
do everything we can to help the businesses in 
our care to flourish and grow 

And that's what has made us an impor tant 

part of England's business success. 

So while the other two agencies have been 
working in their parts of Britain, we’ve been 
carefully tending a fairly large plot of our own 


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Pretoria tries to counter pressure from within and without 


Protesters seek court 
order to lift ban on 
Soweto mass funeral 

Prom Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

and t***? 81 a time, only 200 Bureau for Information said 

was **** attend, frniemb that six of the 27 bodies 

Soweto todisctuL 551 ^ P 1151 ** beW indoors, no mentioned by The Star were 
spouse to the Govern banners, placards or postern those of victims of “normal 
tin « mil fcSHTrf "my ** displayed, no marches crime”. 

nm«ais of or processions may take place, Mrs Helen Suzman, the law 
and only ordained ministers and order spokesman of the 
ra ^y speak- Progressive Federal Party, the 

i ne chairman of the Soweto official opposition in the 
Civic Association, Dr Nthato House of Assembly, said she 
Motiana, one of the leading ~ ’ ... — - 


• . auMVAtfid 

victims of police shootings. 

Meanwhile, they instructed 
their lawyers to seek an ur w m t 
injunction from the Supreme 
Court setting aside the govern- 
ment ban. 

South African Council 
ot Churches said yesterday 
that the funeral ba/^owed 
that the authorities were not 
prepared “to respect the fcel- 
mgs, tire mourning and the 
pain of the people of Soweto". 

“The Government would 
be to blame” if this lade of 
respect for human dignity 
resulted in further unrest 
. The government edict was 
issued on Tuesday night as 


opponents of the Govern- 
ment said yesterday police 
officers bad called at his bouse 
and told him fo^n no funeral 
could be held without police 

authorization. 

“1 told them: ‘‘Hist, you 
murder our people, and now 
yon want us to ask for yonr 


feared there could be “tragic 
consequences" if the funeral 
restrictions were not lifted. 

The effectiveness of the rent 
boycott as a weapon of protest 
is evident from figures dis- 
closed by MrNko MaJan, the 
white Town Gerk of Soweto. 

These show that the sums of 
rent collected in Soweto in 


permission to bury them. Why June, July and August were 
should wer , Dr Motlaxjasaid 900,000 rand, 1 .6 million rand 


Soweto's Dube district. 

There continues to be a 
dispute about the number of 
for a funeral people killed in fast week's 

for those shot dead by the c accoffons to The 

Police last week. whS vi- ^L Jo ^ TniCsb ^ S .^ en f g 

paper, it reported yesterday 


police last week, when vi- 
olence erupted over threats to 
evict people refusing to pay 
rent for their homes. 

Among other things, the 
decree stales that no more 
than one person may be 


during a break at his surgery in 'and L3 million rand, com- 
snw**tn’e TViha «*•» pared with a monthly rental 

income of 5 milli on (£1.4 
million) before the boycott 
started on June I. 

It is difficult for the aufoori- 


that there were 27 bodies 
awaiting burial at various 
funeral parlours in Soweto. 

The official casualty toll still 
stands at 21 dead and 98 
injured. The Government's 


US official hints at 
cutting air links 

By Henry Stanhope, Foreign Policy Correspondent 
Further decisions this mo- "broad harmony of view” in 


nth on sanctions against South 
Africa were promised yes- 
terday by a senior American 
official, who said in London 
that he could not rule out the 
severing of air links between 
the two countries. 

He added that he “would 
not be surprised” by an early 
meeting between the US Sec- 
retary of State. Mr George 
Shultz, and the African Na- 
tional Congress leader. Mr 
Oliver Tamba 

"We are determined to ex- 
pand and elevate our level of 
contact with all the key 
players," said the official, who 
was commenting on condition 
of anonymity. 

Speaking after talks with Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, the British 
Foreign Secretary, and with a 
senior Japanese government 
official, he said the aim was 
not to carve out identical 
policies but to achieve a 


the West — on the timing of 
any measures as well as their 
likely impact 

With Congress returning 
next Monday, be made dear 
that neither of the sanctions 
Bills drawn up by the Senate 
and the House of Repre- 
sentatives was acceptable to 
the Administration in its 
present form. 

Nor was there much enthu- 
siasm to “bail out" frontline 
states in southern Africa from 
the folly of any double-edged 
economic sanctions they may 
try to impose. But the Admin- 
istration would certainly like 
to do more for regional 
development if the money 
could be found. 

People were going to have to 
negotiate on South Africa if 
they were to avoid “the 
abyss". The longer they de- 
layed. the higher the price. 


Prince sees 
Raleigh 
pioneers 

From Paul Vallely 
Boston 

The Prince of Wales yes- 
terday met young participants 
in American projects of “Op- 
eration Raleigh”, the four- 
year international youth lead- 
ership programme which was 
at his suggestion la 


l»w*. 

Two recently-retnnied Ral- 
eigh venturers discussed their 
work mi projects in rural areas 
of Plapna New Guinea and 
Peru, at a private meeting. 

Mr Jim Frattarola of Penn- 
sylvania reported on his three 
months In an Isolated village, 
in the Amazon basin, where he 
and other volunteers helped 
local people build two cable 
suspension bridges to provide 
access to districts which are 
cot completely off in the rainy 
season. 

Miss Serena Wilson of 
Connecticut discussed her 
work with a medical group m 
Papua New Guinea, where she 

assisted a team of field doctors 

in a rural programme of 
cataract surgery* . . „ . 

Tbe Prince, who is iu Boston 
for the 350th anniversary of 
Harvard University, at which 
he will deliver the main ad- 
dress today, arrived here on 
Tuesday evening- 

He was greeted at the 
airport by a guard of honour 
from the Massachusetts Na- 
tional Guard who seemed 
determined to remind him ol 
their independent status. 

They wore the red and bine 
militia uniforms of their revo- 
lutionary predecessors from 
the American War of Indepen- 
dence. complete Pow- 

dered wigs and tricorn hats. 

The Pnuce has been ^wel- 
comed by cheering crowds* 
all of his public engagements. 

So far there has been no sign 
of the demonstration agmnsi 
British policy m Northern 
Ireland which the security 
agencies here feared mighty 
staged by members of. the 
cities targe frish community. 


Spotlight 
on Gadaffi 
criticized 

From A C or re s pondent 
Harare 

Dr Nathan Shamnyarira, 
Zimbabwe's Minister of Infor- 
mation, last night attacked 
media attention to the Libyan 
leader. Colonel Ga d a ffi , at the 
summit of the Non-Aligned 
Movement here. 

Dr Shamuyarira denied that 
Colonel GadafiTs arrival in 
Harare late on Monday night 
had been unexpected. He also 
rejected reports that he was 
yesterday on the point of 
leaving without having foe 
chance to address foe summit. 

“He has been taking full 
part in the discussions today,” 
said the Information Minister, 
commenting on suggestions 
that foe Libyan leader, who 
had wanted to have the sum- 
mit in his own capital, Tripoli, 
was at loggerheads with less 
radical statesmen. 

Argentina's President AJ- 
fonsin left unexpectedly yes- 
terday, five days before the 
summit was doe to dose. He 
succeeded in gaming the floor 
.on Tuesday, ytwd of foe pre- 
arranged list of speakers, mak- 
ing an appeal to the interna- 
tional community to rec- 
ognize Argentina's daim to 
the Falkland Islands. 

Radical Latin American 
states, led by Cuba, have 
apparently been lobbying be- 
hind the scenes. The con- 
ference chairman. Mr Robert 
Mugabe, the Zimbabwean 
prime Minister, has begun 
referring to foe Falklands by 
their Argentinian ‘ name. 

President Alfonsin accused 
Britain of defying aQ resolu- 
tions on the eradication of 
colonialism adopted by Inter- 
nationa] organizations. 

• RABAT: King Hassan’s se- 
nior political adviser said 
Colonel Gadaffi was wasting 
his time appealing to .foe 

International Court against 
Morocco's renunciation of its 
Treaty of Union with Libya, 
because the renunciation was 

irrevocable (AP reports). 


German refugee influx soars 

- An influx inflame an i niense debate . 


Bonn (Reuter) -AJ> 
of refugees into Wcs J°Yn 
many grew by 50 per 

August to total n . WI * f 15 ;P2n 
the vast mqjorttv “tern 

from the Thud 'Vorld. 
interior Ministry said . 
icrday. . ntw 

A spokesman said ^ i .-onsuiuiioin»i ■-«*•»*. -»■«; 
increase brought the nu anchors the right to political 

who have sought ag’jyj hcre | u ^ an d replacing nwiih a 
so far this >wrw guarantee. 

The rise appeared 1 ikc‘> 


inflame an iniensc debate on , 
ways of stemming a stream of 
refugees from .Africa. Asia and 
the Middle East which is 
expected to top 1 00.000 by the 
end of the year. 

C hancellor Helmut Kohl's 
Christian Democrats , ws- 
tetdav proposed scrapping a 
constitutional clause which 


ties to break the boycott 
because there are no easily 
identifiable ringleaders, and 
forcible mass evictions would 
undoubtedly provoke wide- 
spread violence. So far only 
seven famili es have been 
evicted m Soweto. 


Botha bid 
to head off 
sanctions 
by Japan 

FyomDarid Watts 
Tokyo 

The South African Govern- 
ment Is a last-minute 

attempt to forestall the im- 
position of tighter trade sanc- 
tions by Japan. 

Mr RJF. “P&” Botha, foe 
Foreign Minister, arrived here 
last night for an unofficial visit 
requested by Pretoria. 

Japan does not have fnO 
diplomatic relations with So- 
uth Africa ami the visit was 
dearly arranged at short no- 
tice. The Forrign Ministry 
knew nothing of ft until three 
days ago. 

Despite the lack of fnH 
relations, Mr Botha mil feoday 
see Mr Tadashi Knranari, the 
new Japanese Foreign Min- 
ister. 

Trade between foe countries 
has declined in recent years. 
Last year Japanese Imports 
from Sooth Africa were about 
£1.23 billion and exports 
about £700 mflUon. 

• Far East tour: Western 
diplomats in Tokyo believe Mr 
Botha's tear, also taking in 
Taiwan and Hong Kong, is 
aimed at strengthening Far 
East trade ties in case Europe 
and the United States impose 
strict sanctions to force Pre- 
toria to dismantle apartheid 
(Renter reports). 


Mr R-F.“Pik” Botha arriving in Tokyo yesterday. With him, 
right, is the Consul-General to Japan, Mr Jan WentzeL 


American reporter 
threatened with 
smuggling charges 


Moscow (AP) — Soviet of- 
ficials are threatening to 
charge foe American journal- 
ist Mr Nicholas Daniloff, 
with smuggling after finding 
some items in his household 
goods that were not listed in a 
customs declaration, accord- 
ing to Mr DanilolTs wife. 

Mrs Ruih Daniloff said the 
customs authorities had tele- 
phoned her husband's office 
in Moscow' and told a trans- 
lator that a smuggling case was 
being initiated. 

The announcement came 
on the fourth day of Mr 
Dani loft's detention in Le- 
fortovo prison. The KGB has 
accused him of espionage, but 
no formal charges have been 
filed. 

Before Mr Daniloff was 
jailed, he and his wife were 
due to leave the Soviet Union 
at the end of his five-and-a- 
half years' assignment as 
correspondent for the IS 
■ Sen's & World Report mag- 
azine. 

Last month they' sent their 
household goods to the 
Butovo customs house for 
clearance. Mrs Daniloff said 
customs agents spent two days 
going through the items. 

“In the bottom of my 
jewellery box, I had some 
rubbishy old jewellery,” she 
said. “There also was a pocket 
watch that Nick got from his 
father on his 21st birthday, a 
locket that belonged to my 
mother and grandmother, a 


brooch and a Mexican bra- 
celet.” 

Those items were not listed 
by the DanilolTs when they 
entered the country', or oa 
their outgoing customs dec- 
laration. because they did not 
consider them valuable 
• WASHINGTON: The Rea- 
gan Administration main- 
tained its war of nerves with 
the Kremlin yesterday oyer 
Mr DanilolTs arrest (Chris- 
topher Thomas reports). 

There is no doubt in foe 
minds of senior officials that 
he was arrested in retaliation 
for charges of espionage 
against Mr Gennady Zakhar- 
ov, a Soviet physicist em- 
ployed by the United Nations. 

Officials are worried that 
the two incidents could seri- 
ously disrupt the steady 
progress towards improving 
superpower relations, but both 
sides arc clearly anxious that it 
should not spoil the chances 
fora Reagan-Gorbachov sum- 
mit later this year. 

Mr Zakharov is due to 
appear in court again in New 
York on Tuesday. If foe judge 
decides to release him into foe 
custody of foe Soviet Ambas- 
sador. US officials believe the 
authorities in Moscow might 
then release Mr Daniloff 

Both Mr Geoige Bush, the 
Vice-President, and Mr Cas- 
Weinberger. the Defence 


Dani 


:rctary. have said that Mr 
niloff has been framed. 


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■ 









OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1 986 


India warns of 
damaging rift 
with Britain on 
visa controls 


Harare (Reuter) — The in- 
troduction of visas for Indians 
visiting Britain would ad- 
versely affect relations be- 
tween India and Britain, an 
Indian Government spokes- 
man said yesterday. 

The spokesman, who is in 
Zimbabwe with Mr Rajiv 
Gandhi, the Prime Minister, 
for this week’s Non-Aligned 
Movement summit, said it 
was appalling, at a time when 
the Commonwealth and the 
rest of the world were trying to 
destroy South Africa's racial 
policies. thaL South Africans 
could still visit Britain freely. 

"It is difficult to avoid the 
conclusion that this discrimi- 
natory measure is motivated 
by considerations of race and 
colour." he said. 

After complaints of im- 
migration chaos at Heathrow 
airport. Britain decided on 
Monday that visitors from 
India. Pakistan, Bangladesh, 
Nigeria and Ghana, who had 
previously been able to arrive 
in the country without a visa, 
would in future have to get 
one. 

He said the decision would 
cause "avoidable and un- 
necessary hardship and har- 
assment to bona fide Indian 
visitors", and would “ad- 


versely affect the long-stand- 
ing friendly relations between 
the peoples of India and UK". 

President Babangida of Ni- 
geria played down Britain's 
move here, calling it a purely 
administrative and technical 
measure with no political 
motives. 

• DHAKA: Bangladesh yes- 
terday requested talks with 
Britain on the visa controls. 

"The Government regrets 
the move because it was taken 
outside the informal process 
of consultation and dialogue," 
it said in a statement 

Dhaka would be prepared to ; 
discuss the issue with the j 
British Government because ! 
of "excellent relations be- ! 
tween the two countries". 

• ISLAMABAD: A Pakistan 
Foreign Office source said his 
Government was considering 
imposing visa restrictions on 
Britons in response (Hasan 
A kh tar writes). 

The source said that in 
spite of changes in immigra- 
tion rules over the years by the 
British Government and Pak- 
istan's decision to leave the 
Commonwealth, the visa pro- 
cedure for visitors from Paki-. 
stan had remained more or 
less unchanged since indepen- 
dence in 1947. 



|„ . v ~ jpiriw’ a:; ^ v • ' 1 



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_ * ’ *■ * N * ' - ■* 1 ’ v" * • 




Mr Richard Nelson, president of the Money Company, displaying a tea set that bel 
Adolf Hitler. It is to be anctioned in Hong Kong tomorrow, together with coins, me 
other memorabilia from the days of Germany's Third Reich. 


Nixon hits 
back on 
Watergate 
era tape 

From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

Three months before he 
resigned, a defiant President 
Nixon dismissed Watergate as 
“the thinnest scandal in 
American history" and de- 
clared that “if these charges 
on Watergate were true, no- 
body would have to aslc me to 
resign - I wouldn't serve for 
one month". 

These comments, held on a 
tape recording released for the 
first time by the National 
Archives, were made by the 
former President in an inter- 
view in 1974 with Rabbi 
Baruch KorfT. 

The tape was among 4,467 
recordings made routinely nnd 
openly by the White House 
Coouttamcations Agency dur- 
ing Mr Nixon's presidency. 

Mr Nixon, commenting on 
how the media were handling 
Watergate, said: “They are 
consumed by this issue. I can 
see in the eyes of them ... 
their hatred. I feel sorry for 
them in a way." 

When asked bow historians 
would assess the scandal, he 
said it would be regarded as 
something HHfwult to trader- 
stand, particularly “in the 
campaign of an individual who 
is a political pro, which I am". 

He said “Watergate would 
not have happened" if be had 
paid attention to it rather than 
to trying to extricate the US 
from the Vietnam war. 


21 


imitua 




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FAQ agricultural strategy 

Land revolution 

can feed Africa 

From Cbarics Harrison, Nairobi 
Africa is able to meet its Last year African leaden 
ovro food needs — provided it agreed to .increase pubhc 

can revolutionize its farming Tto 

fivupnw to avoid a recurrence tween 20 ana -a per cent. » ms 
of crises like the 1984 famine commitment was later mcor- 
whiefa brought widespread porated in resolutions adop- 
saratio^walaigepan of ihe S a. ih«= jcaa. UN asaon 


continent. 

ing'the FAO study to produce 
United Nations Food and recommendations for the ple- 
Agriculture Organization nary session opening on 
(FAO) and now under dis- Monday. 
cussion by African agriculture The theme of the stodyij 
ministers meeting at Yam- that African 
oussoukro in Ivory Coast not continue w “ ^ 
Between now and Septetn- tween famines and crop sur- 
ber II the conference is ex- pluses (which are all too often 
oected to draw up a com- lost through poor storage, 
mtiment to press all African large insect 
governments to devote more marketing and distribution), 
resources to forming, and to But there is no magic solution, 
promote an international ef- With the population dou- 
fon to overcome the problems bling over the next -5 years, 
of unreliable rain folk environ- half of Africa will have to 
mental degradation, poor depend on food imports it 
forming practices and inad- production is not quickly 
equate incentives for African increased. The political con- 
formed to get the best out of sequences of such a situation 
their land. must not be ignored, the FAO 

The document, African warns. . , . 

Agriculture - The Next 25 But Africa has the land. 
Years, is essentially a strategy water and technology to pro- 
for Africa to regain the duce much more food. The 
capability to feed itself It has most important ingredient of 
been drawn up in the light of recovery is the conservation of 
modern forming techniques, land and water resources — 
the availability of new seeds stopping the advance of 
which can better withstand deserts and halting soil ero- 
drought and the need to sion and deforestation, 
expand production dramati- More incentives must be 
rally to keep pace with a fast- provided to encourage form- 


on Africa last May. 

This week in Yamouss- 


growing population. 


ers to produce more (this 


The FAO director-general, means higher cash prices for 
Mr Edouard Saouma, points food crops), and other ob- 
oui in a message to the stacks, such as inflexible land 
conference that, if agricultural tenure systems and inad- 
perfoimance is not greatly equate housing, must be 
increased, there will be re- tackled, 
peated and massive famines. The FAO study says there 
and many African states will are vast differences between 
be unable to finance imports the situation in different parts 
needed to feed their people. of Africa, and the needs of 
If trends continue, only four each country and region must 
African countries will be able be taken into account. 

.to feed themselves in 25 years' But the feet remains that 
time and the rest will have to food production per head in 
import 100 million tons of Africa as a whole has fallen by 
cereals a year, the cost of nearly 20 per cent since 1980, 
which would for exceed the and this cannot be allowed to 
revenue earned from African continue. 


exports of coffee, tea, cotton, 
cocoa and other products. 


“The poor performance of 
African agriculture has not 


VUVU43 ouu VIUtv4 piVUUVk^. /"mil IVOM C^gllVUltlMV IHM 

"Given radical reforms in been caused by drought — 
agricultural and economic though exceptionally low rain- 
policies, food production in foil has aggravated the situ- 
many countries can increase ation," it adds, 
significantly," Mr Saouma Although reserves of good 
adds. arable land are small in many 

1 Agriculture accounts for areas, there is enough forming 
half Africa's gross domestic land to provide food for the 
product. 80 per cent of its continent Most of the in- 
employment and 90 per cent crease must come from Im- 
of its foreign exchange earn- proved seeds, greater use of 
ing& Yet few African coun- fertilizers and pesticides and 
tries spend more than 10 per by mechanization, 
cent of their budgets on the Much of the cost of fertil- 
form sector, and less than 20 izeis and other inputs roust be 
per cent of foreign aid goes met by the developed world, 

| there. the FAO says. 

Poland’s Turmoil in 
farm fund Spanish 
plan dies opposition 


From Roger Boyes 
Warsaw 

The Roman Catholic 
Church in Poland yesterday 
announced that it was aban- 
doning a much cherished 
scheme to channel millions of 
pounds to private formers and 
thus improve food supplies. 

The Church laid the blame 
squarely on the Government, 
saying that it was attempting 
to control the funds and 
undermine the autonomy of 
the proposed foundation. 

The announcement marks 
the end of four years of hard 
negotiations, during which 
Church emissaries have trav- 
elled the world for cash 
donations. 

The Pope raised the issue 
during his 1983 visit to Po- 
land. But over the past year, 
the foundation has been dying 
a slow death. 

On Tuesday the Primate. 
Cardinal Jozef Glerap, met 
the organizing committee. 
According to the commu- 
nique, they concluded that 
talks with the Government on 
the fund had come to a total 
impasse. 

The idea was to raise money 
— about $2 billion (£1.3 
billion) was originally set as a 
target — which could be used 
to buy fertilizers and modern 
equipment in the WesL 

The Church foundation 
would then distribute the 
equipment, as diverse as spare 
tractor tyres, milk-cooling ma- 
chines and combine harvest- 
ers. to private farmers. 

The Church says that it 
received commitments of $28 
million to a pilot scheme. As 
Church officials said yes- 
terday, they were confident of 
raising $180 to $200 million. 

Government officials had 
always 1 hinted that these tar- 
gets were unrealistic and that 
the foundation would never 
raise enough cash to make an 
impact on Poland’s under- 
mechanized agriculture. 

But the crucial issue was 
always who would control the 
money. The Church says that 
the Government wanted to 
insert two restrictive clauses 
in the statutes of the 
foundation. 

The authorities insisted, 
according to the Church, that 
the decision of the Agriculture 
Minister would be final and 
unchallengeable. 

Cardinal Glemp has asked 
the organizing committee to 
: search for other ways of 
1 assisting Polish formers. 


From A Correspondent 
Madrid 

Spain's biggest opposition 
party, the Popular AlUance 
coalition led by Seiior Manuel 
Fraga, is in turmoil less than 
three months after the general 
elections of Jane 22. 

Bat yesterday the party's 
new Secretary-General, Seiior 
Alberto GaUarddo, aged 27, 
said the Popular Alliance was 
not in a state of crisis. 

He said all that had oc- 
curred with Monday's dis- 
missal of Seiior Jorge Vest- 
rynge, his predecessor who 
had led the party since 1979 
and who was a dose associate 
of Sehor Fraga. was a “nec- 
essary renewal" to put the 
party on a stronger footing for 
regional and general elections 
next year. Few believe him. 

For his part, Seiior Vest- 
| rynge looked ashen and 
; shocked when Seiior GaO- 
arddn was named as his 
successor at a party function. 

Seiior Fraga. aged 63. who 
had treated Seiior Vestrynge 
as his political godchild, had 
told him on Monday that, 
although he never intended “to 
ever throw anyone to the 
lions" he was nevertheless 
dismissing him because he had 
talked too much — especially 
about the possibility of Seiior 
Fraga running for mayor of 
Madrid next year. 

But the immediate cause of 
the crisis and his dismissal 
was not Senor Vestrynge "s 
speculation concerning Senor 
Fraga's intentions in the forth- 
coming municipal elections, 
but his own moves to change 
the party statutes to ensure the 
leadership would be exercised 
in a more collegiate way. 

Several members of the 
Popular Alliance think the 
party would have a better 
chance of being an alternative 
to the Socialist Government if 
it adopted a more centrist 
position and shed some of the 
more right-wing ideas that 
link it with the former Franco 
dictatorship. 

For some members, this 
wonld include shedding Seder 
Fraga who. though a con- 
firnral democrat, was a min- 
ister in the Franco Govern- 
ment. 

Further signs of a leader- 
ship crisis in the party- sur- 
faced with squabbling ‘at its 
teventh national congress in 
February this year and its poor 
showing m the Jane general 

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Gatecrashing couple 
sell story of Berlin 
escape to newspaper 


mm&p&zsi’ 

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Tamil boat ! Islamabad 


-J 1 * y™* East Berlin cou- 

EjL«*0 Week ttcapof 

j£° m East Germany to West 
J^nnany, astonishing both by 

4 . “WHW loity 
. {^^.^Kfcpoint Charti? 
nave sold theu- story to the 
mass-circulation Bild, which 

Bas been telling it all week. 

The- tale of the “ fantas tic 
stperflighf* has been exciting, 
-doubtless having been helped 
along by the age-old narrative 
skills of AML . 

Herr Hans Joachim PofaU. 

33, made the border dash 
with his companion, simply 
described as Martina, aged 26 , 
huddled on the floor of the 
cabin and curled protectively 
round their eight-month-old 
daughter, i 

Herr Pofahl is quoted as 
reliving the" moment when, 
haying' smashed 'through the 
striped, metal boom lowered 
tv the East German guards in 
front of approaching vehic les. 
he suddenly saw an iron gate 
closing in from of Ww 

“HI never doit. That damn 
gate is quicker than me. 

“I’m staring ahead, steering 
through this narrow s p ac e 
The gate is racing up towards 
me. An enormous noise, and a 
crash. Gunfire? The wind- 
screen is breaking.. Bits of glass 
all over me. It’s as if we’ve 


Fran Frank Johnson, Bonn 

been hit by a gigantic fist. The 
tony is flying to the right” 

To avoid the &te he 
swerved into the lane for 
traffic coming from the West 
He hit the gate as he did so and 
as the East German guards 
opened fire. 

CHI was coming from die 
engine. He tried to change 
gear, but realized the dutch 
had given out How far do 1 
have to go. he wondered. 

Straight ahead there was a 
street crossing. He hoped 
there were no cars on it 
“Am I still in the GDR (East 
Germany/?" he asked himself 

He saw cars parked in the 
street on either side, and a 
group of young people. “Am 1 
in the West?" he asked them. 

“Sure," they said, before 
understandably asking him 
where he had come from. 

Through it aO Martina was 
lying on the floor of the cabin, 
curled round the baby. 

In yesterday's final instal- 
ment of the story, Herr Pofahl 
revealed that, w hite searching 
for a suitable place to crash 
through the Wall, they had 
first considered the Branden- 
burg Gate. 

Late one night they went to 
examine its potential, when 



Mexico poll anger 
links left to right 


• From A Correspondent, Mexico Oty 
countrywide movement organization -that will be con- 
st the. Mexican Govern-- pletely Independent of the 
s control of national government mid the PRL It is 


against the Mexican Govern- 
ment's control of national 
elections was strengthened 
this week when the four main 
opposition parties annoanced 
a “national forum on effective 
suffrage” for Satnrday and 
Sunday and called on all 
electors and civic organiza- 
tions to attend. ' 

The right-wing National 
. Action Party (PAN) and three 
left-wing groups — the United 
.Mexican Socialist Party 
4PSUM), the Mexican 
.Workers' Party (PMT) and 
the Revolutionary Workers* 
Party (PRT) — said they had 
buried their political dif- 
ferences “to fight for demo- 
cratic ejections". 

The parties complain ..that - 


also demanding that govern- 
ment subsidies for PRI elec- 
tion campaigns be Stepped. 

Meanwhile, the PAN will 
present evidence of alleged 
electoral fraud in ChOmahaa 
on Sunday before the Inter- 
American' Human Rights' 
Commission of the 
Organisation of American 
States. It also plans to pat 
evidence of fraud In the Du- 
rango elections before the 
commission later fh« year. 

Opposition pro te st s are 
continuing in all three states. 
In Oaxaca, eight opposition 
members are in toe second 
week of a Jbenger strike. The 


recent mate elections in. opposition . parties said they 
Ghfauahn^DurangoamlOa-' worfd launch pilgrimages to “ 


xaca woe manipulated by the 
rating Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party (PRI), and that 
their protests have gone un- 
heard because the government 
runs the election process and 
dominates the state electoral 
colleges that judge the validity 
of the results. 

The opposition is demand- 
ing the creation of an electoral 


condemn electoral fraud and 
achieve democratic elections". 
- Mexican observers point oat 
that the alleged PRf-govwn- 
ment manipulation of stale 
elections this year has 
achieved the impossible by not 
only uniting the traditionally 
divided left, but bringing it 
into an alliance with the 
conservative, right-wing PAN. 


Crackdown I 14 killed 


in Bolivia 
defended 

La Paz (Reuter) — The 
threat of civil war forced 
President Paz Estenssoro of 
Bolivia to decree an indefinite 
state of siege. Seflor Fernando 
Barthelemy, the Interior Min- 
ister, has told the National 
Congress. 

In a speech explaining the 
President's reasons for impos- 
ing the state of siege last 
Thursday. Sertor Barthelemy 
said the decree “came in a 
moment of great upheaval 
that threatened the nation s 
peace". 

He said on Tuesday that 
leaders of the Bolivian Work- 
ers Confederation (COB) and 
“fringe parties called for an 
uprising against the Govern- 
ment in a practical civil war. 
The Government was seeking 
a return to public order with 
this preventive measure". 

The minister also said the 
Government had discovered 
one Cuban and an unspecified 
number of Nicaraguans train- 
ing Bolivians for “subversive 
celts with shock squads". 

The Cuban and Nica- 
raguans had arrived legally as 
technical advisers, he said. He 
gave no details on whether 
they were still in the counuy. 

Senor Paz Estenssoro de- 
creed the state of siege to 
counter what he called a plan 
by left-wing labour and politi- 
cal leaders to take advantage 
of a protest march on La Paz 
by 7.000 tin miners last week 
and “liquidate’* his 13 -month- 


in two air 
crashes 

• Sydney (Reuter) — An air 
ambulance and a small charter 
aircraft crashed in separate 
accidents, killing 14 people, 
police said yesterday. 

In Melbourne, a Cessna 402 
crashed shortly after take-off 
from Essen don airport, killing 
four patients, a nurse and the 
pilot In northern Que en sla n d, 
a missing Piper Navajo was 
found on a mountainside near 
Cairns, with eight people 
dead. 

Power chief 

Moscow (AP) — The Soviet 
Union has appointed Mr 
Vadim Malyshev, aged 54, to 
replace the sacked chairman 
of the stare atomic power 
safety committee. • 

Egli to quit 


president Alphoos Egti of 
Switzerland, above, says IB- 
henlth will force him to give up 
at 


suddenly a voice from the 
darkness asked than: “What 
are you doing hereTTfe was a 
policeman. 

“Can’t you see, we'te just 
going for a walk," Herr Fatah! 
replied. 

“In the middle of the 
night?" asked the policeman. 

"I have to work during the 
day, and anyway it’s my 
business when I go for a 
walk." 

“Your papers!” 

The policeman checked 
their names noth his list of 
known troublemakers. They 
were not on h. 

After this, the couple de- 
cided against the Brandenburg 

flan* and fairing 

strolls in Friedncfastrasse, 
near Checkpoint Charlies 

On the fateful day. Heir 
Pofahl reported sick at work 
for the week, in order to make 
all the preparations. They sold 
their television for about £83 
and Martina hung out the 
washing so as to make every- 
thing took normaL 

The story ends with them 
strolling along the Kur- 
furstendamm, the rich street 

rayfog^mevoy^&wM^ Nicholas Burton, aged two, falling towards the outstretched arms of a rescuing police officer 
a fairy tale andthatshe would being dropped yesterday from the roof of a burning btukting in Boston, Massachusetts, 

now like to visit Paris. The child’s mother, Veronica, stands on the roof waiting lor her torn to leap to safety. 


captain 
feels no 
guilt 

Hamburg (Reuter) - The 
West German captain sus- 
pected of illegally taking 155 
Tamil refugees to Canada said 
sesterday he considered the 
matter dosed. 

Herr Wolfgang Bindel said 
from his home in NoitJenham, 
near Bremen: “The police 
have not approached me, i 
therefore the whole thing is 
over. Why should I feel guilty? 
Guilty of what, anyway?" 

A spokesman for the public 
prosecutor's office in the 
nonhem city of Oldenburg 
said authorities were consid- 
ering whether they had 
enough evidence to bring 
charges against Herr Bindel. 

He has denied all involve- 
ment in the affair, although 
Hamburg police have said his 
ship, the 425-ton freighter 
Aurigae. took the Tamils from 
Europe to Canada last month. 
Two Sri Lankans have admit- 
ted organizing the trip. 

Herr Bindel returned to 
Nordcnham on Tuesday but 
refused to speak to dozens of 
newsmen who besieged bis 
house. 

He denied telling a Toronto 
newspaper that he bad treated 
the Tamils well and did 
everything to ensure they were 
found quickly. 

• COLOMBO: Tamil guerr- 
illas have severed the cause- 
way linking Mannar in Sri 
Lanka with India, security 
sources said yesterday ( Vijitha 
Yapa writes). 


t 




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■ 




4J4HS*! 1 : 


control 
rejected 
by tribes 

From Hasan Akhtar 
Islamabad 

An all-tribal assembly, tbe 
Loi Jirga, which included four 
members of tbe Pakistan Par- 
liament. has rejected any move 
by the G o vernme n t to extend 
the law and constitution to the 
tribal areas bordering Afghan- 
istan. 

The tribal areas in the 
North West Frontier P ro v ince 
and Baluchistan are admin- 
istered by the traditional tribal 
system. 

The writ of the court $ 
remains virtually nooneadsteat 
in these tribal areas even after 
the creation of Pakistan in 
1947. 

The Loi Jirga is reported to 
have warned tbe authorities 
against any contemplated 
change in (be tribal admin- 
istrative and social systems. 

It said that even the British 
could not enslave the tribes. 

Tbe Loi Jirga. led by MalDc 
Jahangir Khan and Malik 
Fazal Khan, both mem bars of 
tbe National Assembly (the 
Pakistan Parliament’s lower 
bouse). Malik Gnlab Khan 
and Malik SaadnUah Khan, 
both members of the Senate, 
the upper house, also de- 
manded compensation for loss 
to life and property by Afghan 
military incursions into the 
tribal belt and adequate 
employment for tribal people 
In Pakistan's services. 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


SPECTRUM 


The entertainer in old age 


ITHE TIMES 


P RO FI 



KINGSLEY AMIS 



ingsley Amis once de- 
fined his intentions as 
pan of his entry in a 
literary encyclopaedia. 
'"What I think I am doing 
is writing novels within the main 
English-language tradition: that is. 
trying to tell interesting, believable 
stories about understandable 
characters in a reasonably straight- 
forward style: no tricks, no experi- 
mental foolery.” 

No style could be more instantly 
familiar’ - bluff, matter-of-fact, 
colloquial and insistently squaring 
up for a fight. And no name springs 
more rapidly to people's lips in talk 
of the post-war English novel than 
that of Amis, a writer who has 
turned himself into a living emblem 
of the nation's vain attempts to keep 
things in perspective. 

Amis, who was to reject derisively 
the canon of modernist literature, 
was bom in 1922. the year of the 
publication of it ysses and The 
JlVwre Land. He was brought up in 
Nofbury. south-west London. His 
father was an export clerk for 
Colman's Mustard, but avoided 
being moved (o Norwich in 1938 
when the company merged with 
Rcckius. 

So the following year Amis, who 
had been attending the City of 
London School, was evacuated with 
the rest of London's children. He 
went to Marlborough College in 
Wiltshire and then to St John's 
College. Oxford, to read English. 
There he met Philip Larkin. 

“I got drunk with him several 
times before l realized he wrote any 
poetry” says Amis. “He was a 
different character from what he 
became later. He was a flashy 
dresser, he shouted a lot. drank a lot 
of beer and played jazz records.” 

Amis had wanted to be a writer 
from the age of 10. but he shared 
Larkin's reticence on the matter. 
Literature was their work. They 
would discuss the latest release from 
ihc Louisiana Rhythm Kings end- 
lessly. but not books. 

There were two obvious reasons. 
First the war - most knew they 
would have to ftghu and this 
engendered a certain seriousness 
about work. Second, there was an 
antipathy to the grand self- 
consciousness of modernism. Lin- 
der the influence of their tutor. 
Gavin Bone, they were coming to 
believe more in a reticent English 
tradition, exemplified by their early 
championship of John Betjeman. 

In 1942. while most of his 
contemporaries — including Larkin 
- proved to be unfit for service. 
Amis was called up. For three years 
he was with zhe Royal Corps of 
Signals. His war was not dangerous 
but it was a hard, dour experience 
which reinforced his seriousness 
about the primacy of craftsmanship 
and gening on with the job. 

In 1 945 he returned to Oxford 
and took another four yeans to 
complete his degree. Despite Bone's 
influence, he also produced a dis- 
tinctly modernist novel called The 
Legacy. 

“It was terrible, terrible. It got 
modernism out of my system. It had 


a hero called Kingsley Amis and it 
was full of pointlessly long descrip- 
tions of things." 

By 1949 the job jtroblem was 
looming. He was married now - to 
Hilary Bard well — and he had two 
children. Philip and Martin. He had 
decided on leaching as the only 
thing he could possibly do. He had 
vaguely aspired to a quiet country 
school where he could get on with 
his writing, but at the suggestion of 
an Oxford contemporary, the au- 
thor John Wain, he opted for 
university lecturing. This was a rare 
calling in those days before the 
expansion of higher education. 

It was with this in mind that he 
visited Leicester University, where 
Larkin had become a librarian. It 
was a Saturday morning and Larkin 
had some work to do so he left Amis 
in the common room. He watched 
the lecturers as they milled about 
They were a new breed to him — 
provincial academics — with new 
pecking orders, rituals and anxi- 
eties. It gave him an idea. 

Amis took a job at University 
College. Swansea, and settled down 
to leaching and writing his second 
novel. Us centra] figure was a young 
assistant lecturer in a provincial 
university, discontented with his 
lot. consumed with loathing for bis 
professor, saddled with a girlfriend 
he did not fancy and barely able to 
finance a serious beer habit. He was 
Jim Dixon — Lucky Jim Dixon. 

tier taking almost a year 
to make up its mind. 
Gollancz published the 
novel in January 1954. 

- To his amazement Amis 
found almost at once that he was 
part of a literary movement — or 
possibly three literary movements. 
FirsL there was the provincial 
movement, a group headed by 
William Cooper. Second, there was 
The Movement itself, a loose 
collection, mainly of poets said to 
be in the process of knocking some 
hard common sense into English 
letters. And finally he was an Angry 
Young Man, left-wing and obsessed 
with the vacuity of our national life. 

None of these movements ac- 
tually existed, of course, and cer- 
tainly Amis did not regard himself 
as a card-carrying member of any of 
them. But they served a journalistic 
purpose and they helped book sales, 
so he did not complain. The real 
po.m was that Lucky Jim had struck 
an extraordinarily universal chord, 
as A.nis only gradually realized. On 
one occasion he met a Yugoslavian 
profc&or who told him that stu- 
dents .it home identified very 
closely with Jim. “He represents 
their’ own struggle against 
Stalinism”, whispered the profes- 
sor. “Say no more." 

But for Amis. Jim. and indeed all 
his characters, have no such sym- 
bolic weight. Jim was not fighting 
the system — just the bit of it he hap- 
pened to be in. ff either the 
characters or their situations be- 
came generalized, the poignancy 
and hilarity of their thousands of 
tiny dramas and defeats were lost. 
For then, as now. Amis's ideal novel 
is quite simple, quite Specific “To 


■Mill L/ 1 . 1 UII 

A 


Story-teller: Amis, whose 15th novel appears next week, with his heroes P.G. Wodehonse and Evelyn Waugh 


me the most fascinating sort of 
fiction is a good, truthful, funny 
account of how human beings 
behave and live. Human nature, in 
feet. I have very little to offer the 
reader in the way of thrills and 
excitement, though I hope they are 
going to be interested and 
involved.” 

By 1961, four more Amis novels 
had been published and he had 
become established as a leading 
literary light, a figure representative 
of the new, undeceived realism of 
the 1950s. Only his third -/ Like It 
Here — seemed to raise significant 
critical doubts. 

He left Swansea in that year to 
take up a fellowship at Peterhouse 
College. Cambridge, where 
F.R. Leavis described him as a 
pomographer, and where he became 
dismayed at the factionalism of the 
study of Eng. Lit. 

In 1963 his life was turned upside 
down. His father died. He separated 
from his wife and three children — 
Philip and Martin had now been 
joined by Sally. He left his job to 
write full time and went to live in 
London with novelist Elizabeth 
Jane Howard. 

Luckily he started his new life 
with a range of projects in hand 
including The Egyptologists, a novel 


I 


being co-written with Robert Con- 
quest, and some work on Ian 
Fleming which was to emerge in 
1968 as Colonel Sun: A James Bond 
Adventure. Meanwhile the main- 
stream novels continued to flow 
steadily as well as poetry and a range 
of non-fiction work — editing The 
Oxford Book of Light Verse, a short 
study of Kipling, a book on drinking 
and so on. 

n 1965 he married, Elizabeth 
Jane Howard but they were to 
separate in 1980. Amis 
moved into his present bouse 
near Regent's Park in Lon- 
don, which he shares improbably 
with his first wife and her husband. 
“It seems a bit like an Iris Murdoch 
novel ... but we're all very old 
now.” 

Meanwhile his own recent novels 
— Jake's Thing, Stanley and the 
It omen- and his latest. The Old 
Devils, to be published on Thursday 
next week by Century Hutchinson — 
have taken on the lineaments of age. 
Now Jim's irritation with preten- 
sion has been mixed with the 
enemies of constipation, chest pains 
and impending dissolution. 

“Being old is quite awful really. 
But it's amusing as well and if you 
can make the thought of it seem 
funny, you might help people.” 



We can only employ 
Sid out of the kindness 

V\fe have to raise OI \^OUJl XTCoxl injury, starva- 
£14.000 a day to keep Sid ■^Jenkins tion and neglect. ■ 
and his fellow RSPCA Inspectors on The RSPCA receives no Govem- 

the road, fighting the horrifying ment support It relies completely 
and, sadly, increasing abuse of on your generosity, 
animals all over the country. Only your donations can help us 

In- keep Sid Jenkins on the road. 

For example, it costs at least 


Dav 

* 

spectors 


in and day 
deal with 


out, 240 
animal 


suffering of all kinds, from ||gj 

experimentation and factory Please send as much as you 

forming, to mutilation./-^...,,, can - toda y- 


£7 a day to run his van. 


;CharityinActioii 


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| £7 □ other . or charge my 


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| R eturn coupon with your donation to: RSPCA FREEPOST Horsham, Sussex. RHl2 1 ZA. E^jl wbI Ib^ ^ j 


IBIOGRAP 


1922; Bom south 

London April 16. 
Educated at City 
of London School. 

1939: Evacuated from 
London. Completed 
his schooling at 
Marlborough, 
Wiltshire. 

1941: St John's Coliege, 
Oxford to read 
English. 

1942: Joins the Royal 
Corps of Signals. 

1945: Returns to 
Oxford. 

1943: Marries Hilary Arm 
Bar dwell. 

1949: Completes degree 
and becomes lecturer 
at University 
College, Swansea. 

1954: Publication of 
Lucky Jim. 

1955: That Uncertain 
Feeling 

1958-59: Visiting FeDow 
in creative writing at 
Princeton 
University, USA 

1961: Fellowship at 

Peterhouse College, 
Cambridge. 

1963: Father dies. 

Separated from wife. 
His three children 
- Philip, Martin and 
Sally - all came 
from hhs.Grst 
marriage. Gives 
up job and moves to 
London with the 



The angry young man as 
groom: Amis on the day of 
his wedding to Elizabeth 
Jane Howard in June, 1965 

novelist Elizabeth 
Jane Howard. 

1967: visiting professor. 
Vanderbilt University, 
Tennessee. 

1979: Collected Poems 
1944-1979. 

1980: Separates from 
Elizabeth Jane 
Howard. 

1986: The Old Devils, his 
15th novel. 


Martin Amis, of course, has 
grown up to establish his own 
reputation as a novelist with some 
brilliant firework displays that leave 
his father admiring but uneasy- “I 
respect him as a craftsman. He is 
very intelligent and very talented 
but I think he is going up the wrong 
alley. I say give the reader some- 
thing to enjoy in every sentence but 
he goes further, so that after a while 
I'm dying for an ordinaiy sentence 
that just says something tike, ‘ They 
finished their drinks and left.' 

“Sometimes it reminds me of 
what C.S. Lewis said of Kipling — 
he fdt 'bombarded with felicities’." 

It is worth noting that Martin’s 
latest novel Money contains a 
character called Martin Amis — as 
The Legacy, the emetic his father 
once look to cure himself of 
modernism, had contained one 
Kingsley Amis. 

But Amis phre, now 64, is not 
about to change. He loathes the very 
idea of development, quoting his 
old friend Larkin — “I got it right 
first time”. Besides, he simply loves 
writing in the way he does. He does 
not believe there have been any 
great English writers since the 
Second World War and quotes 
Larkin again — “we are just the best 
of a bad lot”. He identifies his own 
. heroes - Waugh. Powell and Wode- 
house — as essentially pre-war 
figures. 

Finally it is this sense of an 
empty, somewhat vacuous age 
which seems to come close to the 
heart of all his work. His novels are 
no-nonsense, well-made, good-hu- 
moured products. They are about 
the struggle to get by in the gutter 
and their heroes seldom roll over to 
gaze at the stars. Like Laritin he is 
awestruck by the idea of religion but 
he cannot subscribe. 

Instead, his novels are happily 
committed to the obliteration of 
cant without thought of what to put 
in its place. It is the very determina- 
tion of his opposition to the world 
and its stupid people, decaying 
bodies and perverse inanimate ob- 
jects which holds them together. In 
the depths, of course. Amis might 
find nothing, not even a reason for 
writing novels, and he might dis- 
cover that the homely tradition to 
which he subscribes was softly and 
silently severed some years ago. 

Perhaps he would never admit ft, 
but he seems to know, and it is that 
knowledge which fuels the helpless 
sense of indirection and purpose- 
lessness in his characters. These 
fines are from an early Amis poem 
called Belgian H 'truer. 

Then if history had a choice, he 
would' point his cameras 

Oh yes anywhere hut here, any 
time but now. 

Bryan Appleyard 

SfTaamm N w iw wi Ug. 13 W ■ 


Campaigners for 
the lost cause 



Fresh revelations in 
the Carl Bridgewater 
case highlight the 
lonely role of the 
investigativeauthor 
- a tradition dating 
Journalist’s dream to right back to Conan Doyle 

injustice in a murder case, 


WHEN PAUL FOOT w as 
first asked to write a book 
about the controversy 
surrounding newsboy Can 
Bridgewater’s murder in 1978 

he was not keen. The jury had 

been unanimous and there 
was an unchallenged confes- 
sion by one of the accused. 
And while it might seem 
every investigative 


Foot had had a chastening 
experience from his previous 
book. The A6 Murder. His 
bid to exculpate James 
Hanratty taught him bow 
much work would be in- 
volved, and how little it 
might eventually achieve. 

His concern appears to 
have been justified. Paul 
Foot's book Murder at the 
Farm is to be published next 
week by Skfgwick and Jack- 
son, but its section dealing 
with the part the evidence of 
Brian Sinton played in secur- 
ing the conviction of Michael 
Hickey, one of three men 
convicted of the murder, is 
already completely outdated 
by Sinton's appearance at a 
press conference yesterday to 
announce that he had been 
lying all along. Hickey had 
not, after all confessed to the 
murder in the showers of 
Win5on Green Prison. 

At one time after his 
release from prison in 1980, 
Sinton tried to contact Foot, 
who at the insistence of 
Michael Hickey's mother had 
begun writing about the case 
in the Daily Mirror, to tell 
him his stoiy. The call, 
confused and rambling, was 
taken by a colleague wbite 
Foot was out of the office. 
The opportunity was lost, 
and Sinton, now living as 
Brian Barradough, was not 
found again until Fool's book 
had been printed. 

FOOT TAKES it philosophi- 
cally. “It was a foul up. The 
feet that the news breaks now 
is entirely coincidental, and 
while it attracts interest to the 
case obviously I would dearly 
have loved to find Sinton 
before I finished writing. We 
were looking for him for 
years.” 

What finally determined 
Foot to tackle the book was 
Michael Hickey's second 
rooftop protest against his 
conviction. For 89 days in the 
winter of 1983 Hickey went, 
on the roofof Gartree prison- 
near Leicester. “It was sud- 
denly obvious”, Paul Foot 
says, “that if Michael could 
spend a whole winter on a 
prison roof, I could write a 
book” 

Foot, nephew of Michael 
Fool, public schoolboy 
turned editor of Socialist 
Worker and best-known pub- 
licist for the remote-left 
Socialist Workers Party, 
works in an idiosyncratic 
British tradition of patrician 
concern with injustice and its 
victims — often petty crim- 
inals — in the lower levels of 
society. 

The tradition reaches back 
to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 
and his campaign for Oscar 
Slater, a German Jew with a 
background of petty crime, 
convicted in 1909 of the 
murder in Glasgow of Miss 
Marion Gilchrist The creator 
of Sherlock Holmes was con- 
vinced the case was “vitiated 
from first to last” and pub- 
lished a pamphlet demanding 
“reconsideration” in 1912. It 


was not until 15 years later 
that the Scottish appeal court 
sei the verdict aside. Slater 
was given £6.000 compensa- 
tion for his 1 9 years in prison, 
and died, aged 75, in 1948. 

MORE RECENTLY the 
great author/campaigner has 
been Ludovic Kennedy, who 
did a correspondence course 
in journalism while he was at 
Eton, and went on to write 
books which brought a 
posthumous pardon for 
Timothy Evans, the Welsh 
illiterate framed by the 
necrophiliac John Christie at 
the eponymous Ten 
Rillington Place, a free par- 
don for the Glasgow builder 
Paddy Meehan, who had 
been convicted of the murder 
of Mrs Rachel Ross in 1969, 
and who eventually received 
£50.500 for the seven years he 
served of his life sentence (.-I 
Presumption of Innocence/, 
and immediate release (but 
no pardon) for David Cooper 
and Michael McMahon who. 
on the evidence of an habit- 
ual liar, served more than 10 
years in prison for the murder 



Old campaigner: Paul Foot 

in 1969 of a Luton 
postmaster. 

Mr Kennedy's latest book, 
like Sis first, seeks to exon- 
erate someone who has al- 
ready paid the capital 
penalty. The Airman and the 
Carpenter develops the case 
made out by the American 
journalist Anthony Scaduto 
in a book called Scapegoat 
that the carpenter Bruno 
Richard Hauptmann was 
framed for the kidnapping 
and murder of the Lindbergh 
baby, for which he was 
electrocuted in 1936. 

There is no shortage of 
continuing cases, though, for 
investigators willing to de- 
vote their energies to them. 
The BBC Bough Justice team 
won the release in 1983 of an 
unemployed squatter, 
Mervyn “Jock" Russell, con- 
victed in the “handful of 
hair” murder after its tele- 
vision investigation of the 
case prompted new evidence 
from a pathologist Russell 
has been paid an interim 
£ 1 5,000 for the seven years he 
spent in prison. 

Robin Young 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1045 


ACROSS 

8 Beyond comparison 
(3.10) 

9 Ship's stoker (!. 1.1) 

10 Meddle (9) 

11 Jumped (5) 

13 Struggle (7) 

16 Ruin (7) 

19 Fourth Greek letter 
(5) 

22 Beater (9) 

24 Chafe (3) 

25 Mom Blanc defile 
(2.7.4) 


DOWN 

1 Attraction (6) 

2 Invasion Reel (6) 

3 Aioner(8) 

4 Confer (6) 

5 Aspersion (4) 

6 Put in (6) 

7 Remove (6) 

12 First woman (3) 
14 Fabulous place (8) 



15 Illuminated (3) 

16 Ancient Athens juror 
<6> 

17 Seedy (6) 


*8 S) cophani (6) 

20 Grubs (6) 

21 Lie in wait Tor (6) 
23 Sod (4) 

SOLUTION TO NO 1044 

7 None 8 Sequence 9 Do-gooder 13 
Unrez^^TAfS^ 11 * ,?Nun WAbras,OB 34 Accoutre 25 Ripe 26 

Janson 3 Disco 4 Pique 5 Deed 6Lo- 
13 Schooling 14 Yard 15 

Bonn 18 Ulcer 28 Bathe 21 Arena 22 Tone 23 Pest 



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THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 lyao 


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O great was Onassis's hunger 
for fame that he wanted to 
I turn himself into a fictional 
w ^character “I think it should 
read like a novel,- he told* Peter 
Evans, his putative biographer, and 
he wanted to be„.“thc villam.’ 
Villains always have the best 
parts: [n that respecu at least, he 
has got his wish. If he wanted to be 
enrolled on the first page of the 
demonology of caprtaiism. he 
could have found no finer testa- 
ment than this book. 

Of course there are always 
excuses. As a boy he experienced 
the instability of fete: the Turks 
sacked his native town of Smyrna, 
his uncles were executed, and his 
rather was placed in a concentra- 
tion camp. But he did what many 
a^ucessfiil people do: he turned this 
’Eense. of instability into a sense of 
anger, resolving to “kick the shit 
out of anybody who threatened me 
or my family ever again." And he 
teamed how to dissimulate, per- 
haps during the period when he 
became the lover of the Turkish 
lieutenant who occupied his 
fetber's nouse: he learned secrecy; 
and he learned how to play a part. 
As Peter Evans puts it here; “He 
would be a man who would always 
be alone" 

At the. age of 23 (although he 
consistently lied about his age. as 
he lied about everything else), he 
emigrated to Argentina; and it was 
f in Buenos Aires that he began to 
make the fortune that he carried as 
a burden for the rest of his life. And 
here he displayed that other aspect 
of his success: his sheer energy 
could have blown all the -light- 
bulbs in Argentina. In the early part 
of his career, as he progressed from 
telephone operator to tycoon, he 
worked literally night and day. and 
from that energy sprang a sexuality 
that never let him rest 


(hdiin^ 




Peter Ackroyd 
reviews the 
empty life of 
another Socrates 

ARI 

The Life and Times 
ofAristotle Socrates 
Onassis 

By Peter Evans ' 
Cope, £1245 

That, you might say. is the good 
news, and certainly re p r esents the 
best part of Peter Evans's book. 
The rest is history — a history of 
deals and disasters, seductions and 
marriages. There was the af fai r 
with Maria Callas, a struggle 
between Greeks that was reminis- 
cent of the worst moments of the 
Peloponnesian War; die divorce 
from bis first wife; and that the- 
maxriage to Jacqueline Kennedy, 
when be played the conventional 
role of a Greek bearing gifts. But 
despite the strong cast, tins is not a 
particularly intriguing soap opera: 
the fives of the very neb are never 
very interesting; nor is the society 
in which they move — of playboys, 
“aristrocratic" ' bustiers, young 
women on the marriage-go-round, 
and the assorted hangers-on, who 
are sustained by nothing but the 
power or the promise of money, 
fending off the emptiness at the 
heart of all their activities by manic 
acts of self-aggrandisement. 

And the love of display was 
Onassis's essential quality; also — 
his “showmanship" as Peter Ev- 
ans calls h. It is as if his social and 
emotional lives were merely an 
extension of his financial career — 
just as he manipulated figures and 


statistics, without a thought for the 
human and material costs in- 
volved, so he would give parties for 
celebrities, where ottiy the exterior 
feces mattered. The one thing at 
which be excelled, therefore, was 
the making of deals; like the 
conjuror or magician to which he 
was often compared, he could keep 
several sets of figures in the air at 
the same time, confuse the opposi- 
tion. and then emerge with every- 
thing in his own pocket 
Peter Evans is interesting about 
the financial minutiae of such a 
life; buz he is not so helpful on hs 
emotional ramifications, 
there is not much to be helj 
about — Onassis seems merely 
vacuous, unformed, afflicted by the 
uxtassuageable desires that spring 
out of such an emptiness. 

he chapter headings from 
various Greek classics sug- 
~~ that Mr Evans is 
trying to place him in 
some great tradition (with talk, loo, 
of Greek “loyalties" and 
“passions" to add a little romantic 
fuel to the classical conception); 
but the attempted transformation 
does not work. Onassis remains an 
unpleasant oaf a combination of 
sadist and confidence trickster who 
just happened to succeed. Marx 
once made the point that money 
“can just as easily turn the real, 
natural and essential powers of 
men into abstract ideas, and so into 
imperfections, into torturing phan- 
toms of the mind, as it can turn real 
imperfections and phantoms of the 
mind into actual essential powers 
and capacities." This might be the 
story of Onassis— a man who 
turned real things and realpeople 
into abstract instruments ofhis will 
to power,, and who was then 
tortured by anxieties and depres- 
sions that became more real than 


T 



anyone whom he compelled to 
share his unhappy existence. 

This biography is racily written; 
and Peter Evans's brisk journalistic 
style cannot really be said to do any 
disservice to bis subject — Onassis 
may not deserve any less, but be 
certainly, does not deserve any 
more. There are occasions when 
Evans's imaginative reconstruc- 
tions seem a little fanciful; but who 
are we to complain when Onassis 
himself informed his biographer, in 
his usual boastful way, ‘‘you've got 
one hell of a story, let me tell you." 


The real problem with the biogra- 
phy is actually quite different: it is 
impossible to care about the histo- 
ry or the fete of anyone at all 
connected with this whole unhappy 
“story". In Gothic literature, the 
fete of the damned soul was to 
destroy anyone he touched. Those 
dose to Onassis simply become 
uninteresting. 

People grope for emblems to 
explain a life — any life. Hence the 
feet that companions noticed the 
crucifix and calculator placed be- 
side Onassis's bed as he lay dying. 


I Although this discounts the possi- 
bility that he put them there 
deliberately, precisely so that ob- 
servers might find some meaning 
in his otherwise tawdry existence.) 
But there may be nothing to 
explain. A dose’friend once said of 
him to Peter Evans: “The key to 
Ari is there is no key." And that is 
the final point: he was a man 
without meaning. It is instructive 
that, after his death, his daughter 
and his widow could find nothing 
to talk about except the financial 
arrangements. 


Quite early in his massive and 
devastating book Robert Con- 
, quest gives a neat reminder of 
Staling motives in forcing 
through the collectivization off 
the Soviet peasant farms. The 
policy should be thought of, 
Mr Conquest writes, “less in 
social terms of collective own- 
ers hip. and work but more in 
terms of it providing a method 
of patting it beyond the power 
of the peasant to withhold his 
product from the state." It was 
a means of gaining absolute 
control, -i- 

This is the key to under- 
standing Statin’®, rejection, of. 
all compromise. Admittedly, he - 
needed more food for his lost : 
expanding industrial areas. 
The indmdnal farms across* 
Southern Russia and the 
Ukraine were generally small 
and primitive. A gradual merg- 
ing of them, once the new 
factories could produce trac- 
tors and combine harvesters in 
adequate numbers, could have 
given him the food. Bat could 
be be sure of It? He regarded 
the peasant as both deceitful 
and greedy. So, after typical 
bestitations, he plunged into 
the dash course to disaster. 
He was soon using thousands 
of party activists and military 
and security police units. 

Mr Conquest's detailed pre- 
sentation of the story, region 
by region, is the first and 


Power 

through 

famin e 

Iverach McDonald 


THE HARVEST OF 
SORROW 
By Robert Conquest 

' Hutchinson, £16,95' 

' - i.i ' i. ■ ■ .. .r . - . ' . r ., J 


greatest of his hook’s merits. 
First-hand accoantstell of the 
deportation of peasants, the 
shootings, the peasant resis- 
tance, the savage requisitions 
of grain by the State, the 
blockading of whole areas to 
stop food going in, and finally 
the spread of stark famine. 

What Mr Conquest records 
I can confirm in part, for I was 
in the stricken areas in August 
1932. Three million peasants, 
he writes, were on -the move 
that year, searching for food. I 
mingled with hundreds of 
them as they silently lined the 
banks of the Volga, waiting for 
the already over-filled boats; 
and then with hundreds more 
as they lay inert outside 


stations In the North 
Caucasus. 

. The in tensifi ca t ion of the 
calamity leads on to Mr 
Conquest's second mala con- 
tribution: his assessment of 
the casualties. The totals — 
about 14.5 mOtion peasants 
dead, some seven million of 
diem directly in die famine, 
others in the camps or by 
shooting — were horrifying 
when first read in the extracts 
in The Times. 

The third main contribution 
comes in the several chapters 
that Mr Conquest devotes to 
thp Ukraine’s «. special 
s uffe rings. 

' There remains the question: 
how amid .ft happen? Part of 
the answer ties in the very 
st rnct u re of any large-scale 
authoritarian regime. Any ex- 
cess or mistake in an order 
from the centre is straight- 
away repeated a thousand 
times, and thereby magnified, 
when it comes down to the 
districts, c a usin g widespread 
local reactions, which in torn 
prompt the centre to anaonnee 
a plot and impose harsher 


The Harvest of Sorrow re- 
veals the truth about the 
dreadful years as folly and 
unflinchingly as Mr 
Conquest’s The Great Terror 
presented it about Stalin's 
later crimes. . 


Rum affairs in old university 


My, how Bookereeld has 
rejigged the logic of the pub- 
lishing year. Only a couple of 
years ago, the best a reviewer 
could expect from early Sep- 
tember was a parcel of reis- 
sues. translations of justly 
obscure Eastern Europeans, ■ 
and teenage fiction. Not now. 
This week we have two titles 
that would grace anyone's 
short list; and a third by a 
young author with two literary 
prizes already under his heft. 

It is of course the. purest 
coincidence that the Booker 
panel met for the first time on* 
•Tuesday. 

There are a couple of ques- 
tions Janice Elliott must want 
to put to Messrs Hodder & 
Stoughton. Why, if they be- 
lieve Dr Gruber's Daughter to 
be her “most ingeniously orig- 
inal novel to date" (vide its 
dust-jacket), have they not 
seen fit to draw it to the 
attention of the aforemen- 
tioned panel? Miss Elliott is 
one of the most accomplished 
literary stylists at work in this . 
country, with an imagination 
second to none and an ex- 
traordinarily consistent out- 
put. Her new book is just 
about her best so far. What 
.more do they want? 


FICTION 


John Nicholson 

DR GRUBER’S 
DAUGHTER 
By Janice Elliott 
Hodder & Stoughton, £9.95 

COLOMBO HEAT 
By Christopher Hudson 

Macmillan. £9.95 

ALONG WEEKEND 
WITH 

MARCEL PROUST 

By Ronald Frame 

The Bodley Head. £9.95 


But not half so rum as the 
world of 161 Radpole Road. 
The setting of Miss Elliott's 
latest black comedy, in an 
ancient university town, is 
inhabited almost exclusively 
by refugees from Central Eu- 
rope of whose existence the 
Home Office is unaware. It's a 
house where the. past looms 
larger than the present, and 
the future hardly bears con- 
templating. There is a pair of 
young lovers to provide light 
relief; but for most 161 resi- 
dents, life in Coronation Year 


Britain is not just a struggle 
but an unfathomable puzzle. 

Take Elenora Fitch. Use 
Lamprey’s only legal tenant A 
beautiful blue-stocking ap- 
proaching mid-life, she is in- 
creasingly obsessed with the 
question of whether Chaucer's 
prose is erotic. Her own 
continuing virginity is another 
mystery too. Recently chosen 
to portray Gloriana in the 
university's aquatic celebra- 
tion of the enthronement 
Elenora finds herself ripping 
the clothes off every able- 
bodied man she meets — in 
her fantasies. Most frequent 
subject of her torrid imagina- 
tion is -Gustavus Mowle, a 
fellow scholar who might an- 
swer her physical and intellec- 
tual needs, were he not already 
attached, albeit unsuitably. 

So joyless is the Mowle 
union that Valerie Mowle 
spends most of her waking 
hours in intimate conversa- 
tion with an imaginary 
"friend” — the young Princess 
Elizabeth. Fortunately relief 
for Mrs Mowle is on the way, 
in the shape of Detective 
Sergeant Rainbird, a provin- 
cial sleuth whose ambitions 
exceed his ability, but who 
stumbles on the answers to the 


questions that are bemusing 
the 161-ites. 

Miss Elliott writes like an 
angeL Her imagination is dia- 
bolical. She should find a 
publisher who appreciates her. 

Christopher Hudson is a 
less ambitious writer. But it 
would be a mistake to under- 
estimate the author of The 
Killing Fields. In his new book 
Hudson slicks to.lbe Far East, 
and demonstrates again his 
ability to capture the atmo- 
sphere of a country at war. by 
setting his story in what 
• Churchill described as the 
. 'most dangerous moment of 
' World War Two — the Japa- 
nese attack on Colombo. Mr 
Hudson's contempt for the 
dying Empire does not pro- 
vent him from constructing a 
gripping fable against a back- 
ground of military history. 

Ronald Frame’s new collec- 
tion of seven short stories and 
a novella enhances his reputa- 
tion as one of our most gifted 
younger writers. The title 
story nails Mr Frame's colours 
to the mast; he is a neo- 
Proustian. obsessed with de- 
scriptive detail and unable to 
leave the past behind. Objects 
and places fascinate him; so 
does social class. 


Golden 

boldies 

ofscifi 


SCIENCE 

FICTION 


Tom Hutchinson 


THREE GO BACK 

By J. Leslie Mitchell 

Grccnhdl Books. 01.95 

THE INNER HOUSE 

By Waiter Besant 

GreenhiU Books. £7.95 


Nothing changes; everything 
changes. Science fiction is, 
consistently, the most idealis- 
tic of all literary genres of 
importance: but it was not 
always as acceptable as it is 
today, when often it is preach- 
ing to those already converted 
by the newest science feet. 
Reality prepares us for the 
fantasy. 

Here is a chance to look 
back in nostalgia, with these 
two books from a most prom- 
ising publishing venture. The 
intention is to reprint novels 
from SFs early days: trail- 
blazers w hose powers of illu- 
mination were undeservedly 
dimmed. 

Three Go Back was written 
by J. Leslie Mitchell — who 
also wrote under the name of 
Lewis Grassic Gibbon — in 
1932. when disillusion with a 
world fit for heroes had set in 
like rot. And the author sets 
up his trio of characters — • 
ambiguous woman, pacifist 
man. and armaments manu- 
facturer — with the air of a 
man propping up symbols to 
bowl over. 

The airship on which they 
are travelling drifts through a 
time-slip to above a prehistor- 
ic Atlantis, and the discovery 
of a noble savagery that brinm 
out the best and worst in 
them. 

The power of the Victorian 
novelist Waller Besant’s The 
Inner House is in putting the 
narrative into the mouth of a 
yea-saver, a place-man, in a 
horridly brave and anony- 
mous new world; he cannot 
understand why the discovery 
of emotion should 'cause a 
palace revolution. It makes for 
a delightfully cynical 
distancing. 

• The Swards of Comm, by 
Michael Moorcock ( Grafton . 
£9.95). Mighty Moorcock 
strikes again with this epic of 
wonders, a triptych of books 
concerning the quest of Prince 
Corum Jhaelen through all the 
fifteen planes of Earth. 

• The Songs of Distant Earth, 
by Arthur C. Clarke (Grafton. 
£ 9.95 y An emotional event 
from the master science-fic- 
iioneen the story of the 
Magellan’s deep-space, voyag- 
ing and the relationship be- 
tween the commander and a 
girl on a planet where the 
hypership lands. He will go on 
into the future, white she and 
Iheirchild will have been long- 
dead. A touch of the space- 
way sobberies, but. 
marvellously well told. 




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David Caute is a rapacious 
author. In his new novel he 
makes a bid to synthesize 
history and humour, fact and 
fantasy, high culture and pop- 
ular fiction. It’s about the 
career of Richard Stern, a 
lecturer at LSE and author of a 
book on Sartre. Ambitious 
and sardonicjbe is riding high 
in 1968 when “the Left held all 
the ladders and Stern knew 
it", white bis veteran colleague 
and rival is spumed as 
yesterday's man. 

A decade later Stem win be 
mildly working for the BBC 
News From Nowhere, its title 
on loan from the Utopian 
Socialist William Moms, is a 
political fable: the disturbing 
portrait of a man acting in bad 
faith for good historical rea- 
sons. After the revolution- 
fails. Stem loses both bis job 
and bis wife, who is absorbed 
into the women's movement 
He embraces a life of action as 
a newspaper correspondent in 
Rhodesia, then in the throes of 
becoming Zimbabwe. Here he 
has to cope with another 
jealous veteran, bis editor, 
who spikes most of Stem's - 
reports: “To write good copy 
you don't need to pretend 
you're Raymond Chandler" 

The names and styles of 
Chandler. Hammett Heming- 
way, and Maugham jostle with 
Sartre as models for Stem’s 
pose and his creator's prose — 
which is maybe Stem's too, 
since it is he who is writing 
this novel, against himself 
“Good God! Africa has turned 
him into. BigglesT, exclaims 
one of his wife's feminist 
friends. It is Biggies with sex: 
Stem veers between his cool 
blonde wife and Esther, a 
sultry, elusive freedom-fight- 
er. He is like his outmoded 
elders in wishing that * 
"women's bodies didn't have 
people attached to them." The 
unease of 196 Os man in' recon- 
ciling women’s autonomy 
with their anatomy is loud. 


NOVEL 

of the week 


Victoria 

Glendinning 


NEWS FROM 
NOWHERE 
By David Caute 

Hamish Hamilton, £10. 95 


Stem’s adventures amid the 
faction-fighting and betrayals 
of. emerging Zimbabwe are 
frahkly confusing, as is some 
of the writing. Erectile pas- 
sages about girls' bodies are 
flanked by overwrought imag- 
ery: “Stem caughtlhe fleeting 
hook of Tom's eye on the eye 
of her eye. which remained in 
neutraL armoured for battle." 
Even walk-on characters are 
prodigal with epigrams: "A 
writer blessed with sanity is 
simply a bank manager in 
drag." 

This is an overstufTed but 
irresistible period piece, and it 
is Caute's “French novel": 
Sartre, “his oyster . eyes 
askew" appears in person, as 
do other notables and the 
word "intellectuals’’ is used 
casually to denote articulate 
radicals, as in France. The 
book is tailored for those with 
sophisticated textual tastes: 
Stem's best friend comments 
on the narrative, and com-’ 
plains of the way he is treated 
by the author. The manuscript 
of the novel may not even 
exist, having been left — in 
mid-sentence — on a window- 
ledge in Beirut 

A politician lunching in the 
Reform Club in this book says 
of a le Came noveL- "I enjoyed 
iL Couldn't understand the 
plot of course." Nn\s .from 
Nowhere provokes the same 
pleasurable confusion. It nev- 
er did le Carte any harm. 



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Ronald Butt 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Fellow 

traveller 

Will the obsessive ovcr-iuming of 
stones ihai has accompanied the 
Stalker affair never cease? First 
John Stalker, then his boss. James 
Andcrion. had their use of trans- 
port facilities publicly questioned. 
Now news reaches me that Tony 
McCardcil. the Labour councillor 
who is reportedly calling for an 
inquiry into Andcrion. was him- 
sellThe subject of an investigation 
into claims that he fiddled his 
travel expenses. Last September 
McCardcil was dismissed from his 
job as a crane driver for the British 
Rail subsidiary. Freight! iners. af- 
ter the company alleged that he 
had pul in a £ 1 2 expense claim for 
a rail trip to Birmingham, even 
though, as an NUR official, he 
owned a rail card entitling him to 
free travel. McCardcil later said 
that he had paid the full fare and 
that he had been stitched up — an 
explanation which he may need to 
repeal at the Greater Manchester 
police authority meeting later this 
month when he hopes to secure 
his election as the authority's 
chairman. McCardcil is currently 
chairman of the authority's fi- 
nance committee and the city 
council's police monitoring 
committee. 

Black watch 

So much for the effectiveness of 
neighbourhood watch. Publican 
Gerry Diaz, who runs the thir- 
teenth century Ye Olde Swan at 
Thames Dillon. Surrey, held a 
meeting early this week to set up a 1 
watch scheme. His neighbours, all 
of whom live on an island some SO 
yards from the ri verside pub. 
trooped over the connecting 
bridge, leaving a policeman ou 
guard. By closing lime a commit- 
tee had been set up and Diaz had 
promised always to be on the look 
out for suspicious characters 
crossing ihe water. The islanders 
went to bed warmed by feelings of 
public-spirited security. Four 
hours later the Swan was burgled. 

Export or die 

After my worrying paragraph 
about the Council of Europe 
report that said ageing was demo- 
graphically contagious, the Wall 
Street Journal reports that Japan's 
ministry- of trade has come up with 
an unorthodox plan to stimulate 
the economy: export old people to 
the United Stales. Such “silver 
communities" of elderly Japanese 
would encourage relatives to 
spend yen visiting them. “We 
don't have any nasty purpose to 
exporting old people" said a 
ministry’ spokesman. 

• Liberals who remember the 
beaching of Jeremy Thorpe's 
hovercraft fear the worst for this 
year's party conference in East- 
bourne. David Steel is planning to 
descend, appropriately some 
would say. in a hot-air balloon. 

Go for gold 

To save gnomes of Zurich getting 
caught short outside banking 
hours, a Swiss bank has installed a 
gold-dispensing machine in the 
city — press a button and out 
shoots a 10-gram gold bar or a 
choice of four gold coins. Unlike 
cigarettes and chocolates, these 
vending machine goodies are not 
packed in throwaway wrappers: 
they emerge from the heavily 
guarded machine nestling in vel- 
vet-lined boxes. 

Twilight zone 

The Norw ich branch of the right- 
wing British National Party is 
plying a new line: wares designed 
to advertise a rival scheme to the 
left's nuclear-free zones. “Join us 
now.” wad the stickers, “make 
Britain a riot-free zone." The BNP 
tells me ominously that after 
“exhaustive analysis ' it has “pin- 
pointed the cause of riots in our 
English townships". The last per- 
son I heard refer to “English 
townships" was Lany the Lamb. 

Not knockout 

After 41 i. Cooper and Bruno . 
boxer Barry McGuigan this week 
began the long haul to TV stardom 
outside the ring. McGuigan's first 
chat show for BBC Northern 
Ireland. I fear, has been mauled by 
critics the other side of the Irish 
Sea. Although shored up for his 
first show by such gabfcsl naturals 
as actor James Ellis and flautist 
James Galway. McGuigan. writes 
the Irish Independent' s critic, 
looked nervous inside and out: 
“The entire show was unprof- 
essional. unsmooth and clumsy." 

The score 

All is not well with the finances of 
the magazine of the Composers' 
Guild of Great Britain. Among 
preferred solutions, recorded in 
the minutes of the guild's AGM. 
was that of an editorial committee 
member “The cos! of printing 
might be reduced (a) by lower 
printing costs . . .“ 

Tonsil-aid 

A heroic performance by Ian 
McKellen at the National Theatre 
the other day rescued his attempt 
to raise money for Aids charities. 
During his second one-man 
Shakespeare show of the day. his 
voice failed. Fortunately, in the 
front row sal Sir John Mills, who 
from his wife's handbag conjured 
a packet of throat lozenges. These 
McKellen proceeded to suck be- 
tween soliloquies through the rest 
of the evening, thus raising 
£50.000 for a good cause, and 
saving Sir John himself from 
taking the stage. 



Brighton’s liberating breezes 


Michael Vernon finds the present state 
of the TUC is allowing the Labour 
leadership room for political manoeuvre 


Neil Kinnock had his triumphant 
half-hour at Brighton this week. 
The standing ovation afforded 
him afterwards was reminiscent of 
the Labour movement revivalism 
of the early Sixties. He is thus seen 
to have established his generalship 
over the movement - he gave no 
hostages to fortune in his speech — 
but he leads a different kind of 
army from 20 years ago. 

It is not just that membership 
has dropped by more than two 
million since 1979. but that a trade 
union card no longer guarantees 
I hat the holder supports the 
Labour Party. The percentage 

supporting Labour dropped from 
7.1 percent in 1964 to 39 percent 
at the last election. While activists 
have demonstrated their tra- 
ditional loyally — as Kinnock 
stated. 37 unions have reaffirmed 
their faith through postal ballots in 
political funding — this in itself 
docs not rc-cstablish the individ- 
ual worker's commitment of the 
Sixties. 

But. paradoxically, this drop in 
traditional support does some- 
thing else. It frees Kinnock and his 
political colleagues from being 
tied hand and foot to the demands 
of the unions (even if they remain 
ihe parly's paymaster). The 
unions know it and Kinnock 
demonstrated his less restrained 
powers by speaking beyond his 
immediate audience in the con- 
ference hall on Tuesday. There 


would be no blank cheques, he 
said, no “cosy, cosmetic embrace 
that isn't ^worthy of the name 
consensus". 

It is this new reality that means 
the trade unions will have to listen 
to a Labour government on such 
difficult issues as incomes and 
industrial relations. The former, 
by definition, is almost beyond 
satisfactory resolution, but the two 
wings of the Labour, movement 
have come some way in establish- 
ing a framework for the latter 
without a damaging split. 

Ballots, as Norman Willis, the 
TUCs general secretary, re- 
minded his colleagues, are here to 
stay because trade unionists are in 
favour of them. “Don't delude 
yourselves that our members, let 
alone the electorate, will be fobbed . 
off about state interference in 
union affairs." he said. “That just 
won't wash." 

But will the agreement con- 
tained in the TUC-Labour Party 
liaison committee document Peo- 
ple At Work: Afrit’ Rights. New 
Responsibilities be binding 
enough to work? As the transport 
workers' leader Ron Todd said, 
the agreed policy does not pre- 


scribe pre-strike ballots before any 
walk-out takes place. 

The 1984 Trade Union Act 
made it a condition or legal 
immunity that before calling ac- 
tion a union must obtain the 
support of Us members through a 
secret, properly conducted balloL 
If it docs not. employers and 
others, such as their customers 
and suppliers, may take civil 
proceedings against the union or 
its officials. 

Under the Labour-TUC pro- 
posal. a Labour government 
would inlrHucc statutory pro- 
vision for inclusion in union rule 
books of a right for union mem- 
bers to have a secret ballot on 
decisions relating to strikes. The 
TUC would draw up a code of 
practice giving unions detailed 
guidance on the methods to be 
adopted. 

Employers or their customers or 
suppliers would not be able to seek 
injunctions or damages. However, 
a union member could complain 
that the statutory balloting pro- 
visions had been breached. His 
complaint would be investigated 
by an independent tribunal 
headed by a legally qualified 


person, which would have the 
power to require a union to 
remedy the complaint. Appeal to 
the ordinary courts would be 
permitted only on a point of law. 

The proposals may satisfy trade 
unionists' hatred of their affaire 
being dragged into the courts. But 
will they, in the end. satisfy the 
electorate at large, supposing a 
union called a strike before a 
ballot? The tribunal on receiving a 
complaint, may ultimately 
“require” the union to remedy its 
fault, but bv-that lime the strike 
might well be over. Or the union 
might refuse to acquiesce to the 
tribunal's demands. What hap- 
pens then? 

It is questions such as these that 
Labour will have to answer during 
the general’ election campaign. In 
the semi-euphoria of an agreed 
compromise on industrial rela- 
tions this week, it was John 
Edmonds of the General. Munici- 
pal. Boilermakers and Allied 
Trade Union, who produced the 
most telling, phrase. “This 
motion,” he told delegates, “might 
just rekindle the raith of our 
movement." 

That is one thing. But in 
producing their package, will the 
Labour movement have rekindled 
the faith of the electorate at large 
that there will not be a return to 
the bad old days of industrial 
strife? 


Bernard Levin: the way we live now 


The basement, 
where bargains 
will always end 



A very successful businessman of 
my acquaintance once told 'me 
that the only piece of advice ever 
given to him by his father (who 
had started and built up the 
business) was: '"Remember, there 
are no bargains." My friend added 
that although that was the only 
counsel he had received from his 
father, he had never needed any 
other, and had based his approach 
to business upon the great prin- 
ciple enshrined in his father's 
words. ■ 

But you would be surprised (or 
not. depending on your view of 
human nature) how many people 
go through life, and often through 
the bankruptcy courts also, deny- 
ing that immutable troth. The 
latest group to come a cropper 
from believing that in certain 
circumstances twice two, if spoken 
to nicely enough, will make five, 
arc those who invested in buying 
what are called “franchises", in 
this case from a company called 
La Mama, which found itself in 
the hands of the receiver. The 
buyer of a franchise buys the right 
to trade under someone else's 
trade name, normally in the form 
of a retail outlet: the financial 
burden and risk are assumed by 
the franchise purchaser, and he 
takes most of the profit, if any. In 
this case the if took precedence 
over the any. and the purchasers 
of La Mama franchises are bleakly 
contemplating the loss of large 
sums of money. 

In a most sympathetic letter to 
this newspaper. Mr Robert Rid- 
ing. who is the editor of Franchise 
World ’ a magazine devoted en- 
tirely to the practice of franchis- 
ing. revealed that La Mama 
franchises were still being bought 
in the very month that saw the 
receiver installed, though by then, 
as Mr Riding said, “the writing 
must have been clearly on the wall 
in the shops of the earlier 
franchisees". 

He also offered some practical 
advice to those contemplating the 
purchase of a franchise, advice 
which gave me goose-pimples to 
think that such elementary 
precautions 3S he was recom- 
mending (“Talk to existing 
franchisees — chosen by you. not 
the franchiser", and “Those who 
bux in at the formative stage must 
realize that the risks are high", and 
"Nexcr take short-cuts in assess- 
ing a franchise") should have to be 
urged upon people thinking of 
parting with their life's savings, 
and be frequently, when urged, 
ignored. 

1 well remember the outbreak of 
a wheeze nicknamed "pyramid 
selling": over-si mplifying. it could 
be described as a more elaborate 
form of franchising, but in this 
case it was obvious to even the 
greatest financial idiot in the land 
(me) that it not only wouldn't 
bring the predicted and longed-for 
riches, but that it couldn't. 

Most of the pvram id-construc- 
tors were crooks it is important to 


realize that most of the franchising 
companies, certainly including La 
Mama, arc perfectly respectable 
firms, and that their business of 
selling franchises is entirely above 
board. But there are no bargains. 
In effect, franchise companies are 
shifting the risk inherent in any 
business from their own shoulders 
to those who buy their franchises. 
Should not that fact alone make a 
prospective purchaser realize that 
he is getting into water that may be 
too deep for him? Yes. it should; 
but it doesn't And the reason it 
doesn't is the pathetic and ruinous 
belief that you can gel something 
for nothing, that there is a crock of 
gold at the end of the rainbow, that 
if you give the stone another 
squeeze, just one more squeeze, it 
will drip blood. 

Some years ago. there was a 
bearded sandwich-man who used 
to patrol Oxford Street with 
boards, fore and aft, bearing a 
legend which began with the 
striking claim. “I won £163.000 on 
the football pools last year." The 
sandwich-man was a very ragged, 
unkempt heavily patched figure: 


without his boards, he would have 
been simply a tramp, and he 
occasioned much mirth as he went 
upon his errand, with its implau- 
sible announcement Ooser insp- 
ection of the message, however, 
revealed that it was not he who 
made the claim, but a man who 
had simply hired him to spread 
the word. And this man was 
selling his expert knowledge of 
how to win the pools to anyone 
who would stump up the fee for 
his regular weekly bulletin of 
advice. 

I 

And many did- Did none of 
them ask why. if he was such a dab 
hand with the Treble Chance, he 
should want to make a much more 
complicated living by selling his 
precious expertise to strangers? 
Why should he not simply win big 
every week, particularly since, in a 
pari-mutuel system like the pools, 
the more winners there are the less 
there is for each of them? 

Christmas comes on the 25th of 
December, and only on the 25th of 
December. 1 am not going to turn 
strict moralist and talk about 


greed serving the greedy right; 
there are plenty of upright folk 
with a small nest-egg they would 
like to turn into a slightly bigger 
one. with which they could look 
forward to a slightly more 
comfortable old age. Invested 
wisely, the nest-egg might well 
steadily increase in size by a few 
per cent a year. What it will not 
do, however, merely by being 
invested in Consolidated South 
Sea Bubbles Ltd, is to increase 
overnight by 100 per cent. 200 , 
300. and those who allow them- 
selves to think that it might, just 
this once (for the young man from 
Consolidated South Sea Bubbles 
was so confident,, as well as 
charming), will end their old age 
with no nest egg at all, and 
probably not even any bubbles. 

But that is not because the 
South Sea Bubbles man is a 
swindler, it is because there are no 
bargains. Many years ago, I came 
to the conclusion that 1 was not 
destined to earn any money, not 
so much as a bent doty, except by 
writing words on pieces of paper, 
or speaking them aloud. The 
consequence is that I have no 
shares, no investments,™) kruger- 
rands. and oh my word, no 
franchises; even my surplus mil- 
lions are accommodated in an 
ordinary bank, and I will not pul 
myself lo as much trouble as it 
would take to transfer some of 
them to a building society, though 
many experts, some- of them 
knowing what they are talking 
about, insist that the building 
society would give me a better 
return. 

The consequences are two; first, 

1 must recognize that I cannot 
change my Rolls-Royce for a new 
one more than once every two or 
three years, or my yacht more than 
once every five; but second. I sleep 
soundly o'nights, with an innocent 
smile playing about my lips. And I 
willingly pay for the peace de- 
scribed in the second part of that 
syllogism with the grinding pov- 
erty implied by the first. 

When the next wonder share 
gets into the headlines (whatever 
became of the Australian nickel- 
mine that turned out to be lull of 
nothing but very rusty abandoned 
bicycles?), I shall not be found in 
the queue for it. not even if it is 
North Thames Gas Board Pre- 
ferred. and when those who buy it 
at £99 later sell it, looking be- 
wildered at fourpence a gross. I 
shall keep my own counsel know- 
ing that, what brought them to 
their bewilderment was that they 
were not content to buy at 99 in 
the expectation of selling at 105, 
but must needs buy at 99 in the ea- 
ger certainty that they would soon 
be selling at 877 on a still rising 
market. I am sorry for those who 
bought La Mama's franchises, but 
1 must tell them that my friend’s 
lather was a wise man for telling 
his son that there are no bargains, 
and his son was a wise man for 
believing him. 


Where security crosses lines with justice 


When the organizers of Cruise- 
watch set out to monitor the 
movement of a missile convoy 
from the US air base at Greenham 
Common, they rely heavily on 
their “telephone tree''. A network 
of sympathizers is alerted each of 
whom, in turn, phones other 
numbers to pass on the message. It 
is a crudely effective system, but 
when the third convoy rolled out 
laic one night in June 1984. things 
started to go wrong. 

According to Cruisewatch. five 
key links in the chain found that 
their telephones had simulta- 
neously stopped working. Equally 
mystifying, the organizers claim, 
was lhaf all the lines began 
functioning again without anyone 
having notified British Telecom. 
The implication was clean the 
“tree" had been bugged and 
deliberately put out of action. 

Since that incident, the Cam- 
paign for Nuclear Disarmament 
has assembled a dossier contain- 
ing more than 100 allegations of 
disruption to telephone services at 
limes when Cruise and Polaris 
missiles have been on the move: 
“Lines blocked . . . public phone 
boxes disconnected . . . crossed 
lines and connections with police 
communications . . . playbacks of 
prex ious conversations.” 

To try to prove that campaign- 
ers were being bugged by the 


security authorities, a group in 
Sheffield put out the word, by 
telephone, that it would . be 
protesting outside a US electronic 
surveillance centre on one particu- 
lar Wednesday. It then arranged, 
by word of mouth, to go on an 
earlier date. According to those 
involved, the police on duty at the 
centre were astonished when the 
demonstrators arrived. "Will you 
be coming up again on 
Wednesday?" they inquired as the 
protest ended. 

Evidence of telephone tapping 
‘ in the CND’s files, and from other 
sources, was substantial even be- 
fore CND campaigners decided to 
resort to the law. And although the 
High Court refused, earlier this 
week, to accept that the phonetap 
of CND's vice-president, John 
Cox. had been illegal, the case did 
establish, for the first time in 
public, that an “intercept" — to 
use intelligence jargon - had been 
carried out. : 

CND officials arc also claiming 
a significant constitutional victory 
with the ruling of Mr Justice 
Tay lor that there are no grounds 
for the government's claim that 
[he courts, in the interests of 
national security, should refrain 
from examining the legality of 
telephone tapping. To this day. the 
Home Office invariably refuses 
either to confirm or deny that any 


such thing has taken place. But the 
judge observed that to deny 
citizens the right to compensation 
for an illegal act by the govern- 
ment would be “a draconian and 
dangerous step indeed". 

Although the legal skirmishing 
over Cox's case seems sure to 
continue until it comes before the 
European Court of Human Rights, 
all future challenges to the legality 
of official phone lapping will be 
dealt with by a tribunal set up 
under the 1985 Interception of 
Communications Act, Composed 
of "five legally qualified persons”, 
it will have the power to see at 
least some of the paperwork 
involved in securing an intercept 
warrant from the Home Secretary 
before deciding whether it was 
justified. 

But as CND and other critics of 
the act point out. the tribunal is 
effectively powerless to act where 
telephones have been tapped with- 
out a warrant having been applied 
for. “So unless you have positive 
proof of interception, and who is 
doing iL the tribunal can't help 
you much." CND says. 

* The detailed complaints 
submitted by members of Various 
peace groups suggest the authori- 
ties feel free to make life as 
difficult as possible for them, 
sometimes blatantly. Di Mac- 
Donald. a Croisewatcher from 


Southampton, tells of trying to 
telephone another contact to alert 
her of a convoy heading her way. 
She says she was followed into a 
public call box by a policeman 
“who said, as 1 was making the 
call, 'it's engaged isn't it?' When 
the number connected it was 
engaged. I then tried to phone my 
home, but the policeman placed 
one finger slowly on the receiver, 
cutting me off from my husband.” 

In another incident, Medelaine 
Haigh, a former teacher, was 
visited by two policemen after she 
wrote to her local newspaper to 
protest against the cancellation of 
an anti-nuclear gathering in her 
area. They told her they were 
investigating a mail order fraud, 
but Mrs Haigh’s local police 
station denied allknowledge of the 
two men and their investigation. 

After 18 months of complaining 
to various authorities, the Chief 
Constable of the West Midlands 
admitted that his Special Branch 
was responsible for these events. 
Like CND, Mrs Haigh is deter- 
mined to take her complaint 
against such official surveillance 
to the European court in pursuit of 
her right “to hold opinions and to 
receive and impart .information 
without interference by public 
authority”. 

Philip Jacobson 


A socialist and 
a reactionary 


I always thought Neil Kinnock 
was a decent son of man and now 
I know. It is mie that until lately 
his instinct was to subject reason 
to rhetoric and that he made his 
way to the top by striking the kind 
of class war attitudes which now 
embarrass him from the left of his 
party. But those who haye never 
roused the Tribune meeting can- 
not hope to wear Labour's crown 
easily, and most people recognize 
Kinnock as a humorous and 
kindlv man. Now we know more. 
He is also a decent man because he 
is a self-confessed reactionary. 
When it comes to the interest of 
those for whom he is directly 
protective, “enlightenment" must 
make way for common sense. 

In an interview with the maga- 
zine Evcrywoman he was asked 
what impact the “so-called 
permissive society” had on his 
thinking. "There's only one an- 
swer to that.” be replied. “I m a 
father. And no matter how much I 
try to convince myself towards the 
course of "enlightenment’ 1 know 
damn well that, put to the test. I'm 
what people would call a reaction- 
ary. I know it 1 try and rationalize 
it but it's no good. 1 come to the 
same conclusion all the time. My 
children stand a chance of being 
hurt in the forseeabJe future by 
what's called permissiveness.” 

Lest he be mistaken for Norman 
Tebbil, he afterwards explained 
that by permissiveness he had 
simply meant “drugs, sex exploita- 
tion and the idea that rights do not 
carry responsibilities.” The 
explanation is as illuminating as 
the original impulsive and honest 
answer. To most people Kinnock’s 
feelings are simple decency and 
moralilv. But in a socialist milieu 
he feel's obliged to accept^ the 
caricature of “reactionary” as 
contrasted with “enlightenment.” 

Everyone understands why. La- 
bour is a gradualist, not a revolu- 
tionary party, but the idea of an 
irreversible new Jerusalem of 
socialism is in its bloodstream — 
and democratic as well as revolu- 
tionary socialism has always been 
associated with libertarianism and 
breaking old moral constraints. 
That was true of the French and 
Russian revolutions, and even of 
some of the sectarian extremists of 
the English “puritan” revolution. 
For one thing, de-stabilizing the 
family helps to undermine a 
society, though once the new 
power structure is in place a new 
Puritanism soon descends. “We 
have no pornography in Russia." I 
(once heard a Russian ambassador 
proudly proclaim. 

In a milder way the same thing 
was true of the old socialist 
intelligentsia in Britain; the link- 
age between socialism and what 
was oddly called free love was a 
standing pre-war joke! And that 
has left behind a hang-up in the 
Labour Party. The permissive 
society was a world-wide phenom- 
enon. but it would have been less 
extreme in Britain had it not been 
bom in a Labour parliament It 
was also Labour MPs who were in 
‘the van of the fights against every 
attempt to curb its excesses — 


resisting, for instance, legislation 
against late abortions to protect 
viable babies and to curb video 
and cinema obscenity. They even 
tried to stifle as unnecessary a bill 
to pro tea children from being 
exploited in pornography. 

In such a party. Neil Kinnock 
has to pay his respects to “en- #■ 
lighienment", even when confess- 
ing that as a father he cannot take 
it Most Labour voters and trade 
union members feel exactly the 
same. (Decency forbids me to 
print some trade unionists' off- 
stage remarks at last year's Labour 
conference when "gay rights” 
campaigners carried a motion for 
lowering the age of homosexual 
consent to 16.) But they feel the 
same over much else on which 
Kinnock cannot follow them. 

On the sensible decision of the 
government to use visas as a 
safeguard against illegal immigra- 
tion from the Indian sub-conti- 
nent he will be alongside the glib u 1 
Gerald Kaufman in calling ii 
racialism. Never mind the impos- 
sible situation at Heathrow and 
the abuses by which unscrupulous 
agents in Bangladesh milk would- 
be immigrants of their savings and 
dispatch them here with no right 
of settlement. Never mind the 
social problems caused by more 
immigration than Britain coukl 
absorb, which resulted firm the 
bogus "progressive" equation be- 
tween immigration control and 
racism. (Restraint would also have 
been necessary had equal numbers 
wished to come from white coun- 
tries.) Never mind the wishes of . 
the majority, including Labour * 
voters. 

On a whole range of other social 
attitudes, from the damaging 
educational fashions inflicted on 
schools structure and teaching by 
the progressive establishment, to 
maintaining law and the defence 
of the realm, public opinion is not 
instinctively with Labour. The 
Tories' failure to make inroads 
into unemployment and the lack 
of sufficient money for hospitals 
and schools will hand some votes 
to Labour. But Kinnock's party 
goes against the public grain on 
much else, including union ballots 4 , 
which ordinary members want but 
which Labour accepts only reluc- 
tantly (with some heavy qualifica- 
tions) because of Tory legislation. 

There are now two union 
worlds, the new one of Bill Jordan 
of AUEW and of Eric Hammond 
of EEPTU who reflect what their 
members want, and the old social- 
ist world of the union bosses, 
which is basically elitist. There are 
also two Labour Parties. 
Kinnock's offers consensus and 
promises not to be deflected (even 
by the unions) from serving all the 
people. But there is is also the 
party of the old socialists and the 
union barons; what will they do if 
they again have an inflation- 
making Labour government over 
a barrel for pay? Finally there are < 
the potential Labour voters. 
Kinnock's problem is that on fr. 
many other matters they are just 
as reactionary as he is on sex 
exploitation and drugs. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


One takes your 
brunt, Colonel 


Like most journalists. I get a 
stream of directives from govern- 
ment departments telling me not 
to print state secrets, such as the 
fact that nuclear waste is mostly 
buried.benealh new motorways or 
that Northern Ireland is shortly to 
be auctioned off, and like most 
journalists I ignore them. But the 
other day i was startled to receive 
a circular from a Home Office 
department slating starkly: “The 
press should note that in future 
they are not to use the expression 
'by dint of.” 

Scenting a story here, I was 
round to the Home Office in a 
flash and demanding an audience 
with the man who had written the 
directive, a Mr R45/2746/1298, 
though reluctantly he allowed me 
to call him Colonel Smithers. 

“A genuine colonel, are you?" 1 
asked. 

“We're all genuine colonels in 
Intelligence.” he said. “We get the 
title the day we arrive.” 

“In Intelligence, are you?” I 
flashed at him. 

“No.” he admitted. “But 1 have 
hopes. So what's this all in aid of?” 

“Why can't I use the expression 
'by dint of? How is this going to 
help the Russians?" 

“The Russians?* he said. “This 
is nothing to do with the Russians. 
This is to help us. The government 
is embarking on a programme to 
make the English language more 
cost-effective. You've no idea how 
wasteful and disorganized the 
language is at the moment, with 
millions of pounds being spent to 
maintain words that nobody 
wants or uses. If we could get 
English streamlined, we'd save 
billions in everything from dic- 
tionaries to computer languages." 

“Can you do this by eliminating 
'by dim of?” 

“It's a start." he said, “and it's a 
good illustration of useless lan- 
guage. The word "dint* is only ever 
used in that one expression. I 
mean, you never hear people 
saying. "That’s a bad dint you've 
got there*, or Tm having a bit of 
trouble with dims*. People don't 
even know what a dim is.” 

He was righL I hadn’t the 
faintest idea. 

“So ‘dim* is an obsolete, one-use 
word. Outside of ‘by dint of, 
nobody ever uses it and "by means 
of is just as good. I'll be frank with 


you; we can’t afford to keep words 
like ‘dint’ any more.” 

“What other words like that arc 
there?” 

“Oh, thousands. There's beck, 
as in ‘beck and calf. There's brunt," 
as in "bear the brum'. There's 
poke, as in 'pig in a poke'. There’s 
escutcheon, which only ever gets 
blots on iL there's ell, which is 
something only taken in return for 
an inch, and there's kith, which 
only ever goes with kin. And 
there’s kin as welL All outmoded.” 

“Not poke,” I said. “Poke still 
means a ‘prod’, even when it no 
longer means a bag.” 

“That's my point!” he cried. 
“Gearing up the language means 
we can now teach it properly to 
foreigners, so instead of telling 
them that a poke is a prod or 
something you used to keep a pig 
in, we now can avoid confusing 
them by saying straight out a poke 
is a prod!" Know what a brunt is, 
by the way? Or how long an elf is? 

I didn’t his case seemed water- 
tight- “Stymie?” I suggested. 

“Now you're getting the idea!" 
he said. “And ilk, and scotch . . .” 
"Scotch?” I said, startled 
"As a verb, such as scotching a 
rumour. And those dreadful words 
which mean the opposite of what 
we think they mean today, as in 
'without let or hindrance* or "the 
exception that proves the rule*. Or 
crick in the neck . . “ 

“You're going to get rid of cricks 
in the neck?" 

“No, but we’re going to get rid 
of a word which is wastefully 
restricted to the neck. Ever heard 
of a orick in the ankle? We don't 
think that 'crick' is pulling its 
weight And I’m seriously worried 
about rampage.” 

“Tell me more. Colonel," I said 
edging nervously towards the 
door, as the familiar look of 
togotrianui appeared on his face. 

Well, you can only go on a 
rampage. You can't have a ram- 
page. or stage a rampage. You 
can t say. There was a rampage in 
Leeds last night' — you can only 
have people going on it . . . 

The rest was lost as I quietly 
closed the door and crept out to 
spread the news. He had the look 
of a man who would brook no 
opposition. In fret, that may be 
the last time 1 shall ever be able lo- 
use the word “brook” as a verb. 




4 


m 









LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 




‘ mi. l. t 




THE THATCHER GENERATION 


Finding a position for the SDP 


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Youn .g people in Britain are 
sceptical of the power of 
goyemment to improve their 
jives. TTiat is the hopeful 
iSJ? 1 °f this week’s series of 
,n Jk* Times on the 
attitudes of those who have 
attained the vote while Mre 
Thatcher has been in office. 
They are also sceptical of their 
own powers to improve their 
lives. That is the depressing 
lesson. e 

We called this group, who 
make up 1 5 per cent of the 

electorate, Thatcher's Chil- 
dren. As the Prime Minister 
journeys to Scotland this week 
her mind will undoubtedly be 
concentrated on the disastrous 
electoral prospects for her 
1 party in the northern regions 
of the United Kingdom and 
what she can do to improve 
them. But it is also an opportu- 
nity for her — outside the con- 
fines of Downing Street -7- to 
consider responsibilities wider 
than her leadership of the 
Conservative Party. 

As the most powerful and 
influential Prime Minister 
since the wartime Churchill, 
she has a duty to consider her 
impact upon the generation 
who have known no political 
leadership but hers. She must 
consider whether an 
overwhelming apathy amongst 
the young is an inevitable 
component of her political 
legacy. She should be asking 
herself what she can do about 
it She should be worrying 
what others might do with it if 
she foils to live up to the 
challenge. 

Among professional election 
campaigners too many men- 
tions of die “youth vote" tend 
- to produce cynical yawns. It is 
important, of course. No poli- 
tician can say that young 
people are not important; pop 
concerts and rallies have to be 
organized, if only because the 
other side is doing so. But 
young votes do not decide 
elections. Young people are 
unreliable attenders at the 
polling stations. That form of 
apathy, at least is nothing 
new. 

The leaders of the political 
parlies will all find jnfprma- 
iton to interest ancf!. disturb 
them in this week’s findings. 
Dr David Owen will not be 
happy to read that 42 per cent 
of our sample had no opinion 
about him whatsoever — a fig- 
ure which reinforces the fact 
that the SDP leadership's 
experience in Government is a 


fast wasting asset. It has be- 
come commonplace among 
Tory strategists to say that the 
electorate has forgotten the 
Winter of Discontent; less 
commonplace to hear Alliance 
recognition that the Foreign 
Secretaryship of Dr Owen is 
ancient history and that the 
Gang of Four has gone back to 
China. 

As for Labour. Mr Neil 
Kinnock is still seen as a weak 
leader. It would be unwise to 
wriic off the Labour Party 
completely as vote-winner 
amongst young people. But the 
message that the Opposition 
has the policies to put Britain 
back to work has not hit home. 
Michael Foot is out of sight 
General Galtieri is out of 
mind. But Labour's .1983 
credibility problem remains. 

Mrs Thatcher can be proud 
of the youthful scepticism 
concerning the power of the 
state 10 provide jobs. She 
ought to be concerned, how- 
ever. at its collateral effects. 
She can be proud of her 
reputation for strong and 
determined action. She ought 
to be worried about whether 
she and her successors can 
continue to live up to that 
reputation. 

For the overall picture of 
Britain's youth that is revealed 
by The Times survey is full of 
blank spaces. Mrs Thatcher is 
only one of the painters who 
can be held responsible. Mod- 
ern Britain appears to be a land 
unfitted for heroes of any kind. 
It was tempting for our inter- 
viewers — whose own roots 
and outlook were set in the 
sixties — to look for those who 
might have displaced political 
faith- in the young public's 
mind. A vote f&r Geldof, 
perhaps? Some modem echo 
of the call that Bob Dylan 
should be President of the 
United States. But there was 
virtually nothing. 

Does that matter? Were we 
looking in the right directions? 
A degree of humility is nec- 
essary when one generation 
attempts to judge another. It is 
easy to look grimly at the pop 
culture of the past ten years, 
fbr. example, and to divide it 
between punks (who appeared 
to believe neither in them- 
selves nor in anything else) 
and bland superstars (who 
floated in the traditional 
showbiz world-apart). It is 
easy to look at a popular 
television programme like 
Spitting Image and despair of 


the way that noone (from the 
Queen to Tina Turner) is 
spared from brutal parody. It 
is tempting to see a lack of any 
equivalent of sixties musical 
- ideals, to recall that on That 
Was The Week That Was, at 
least some targets were pro- 
tected. at least some things 
commanded belief. 

As to whether such reflec- 
tions add up to more than 
misplaced nostalgia, that is 
much harder to say. But 
political leaders - and would- 
be political leaders — should 
put their minds to them. Is the 
political apathy of so many 
young people towards their job 
prospects a passing phase, 
which will be eased by eco- 
nomic recovery? Or is it a 
dangerous vacuum which 
could be exploited by anyone 
who had the nerve to make a 
sufficiently grandiose claim or 
provoke a sufficiently serious 
emergency? Should we be 
looking nervously to the les- 
sons of the thirties? Or has the 
material prosperity of the na- 
tion meant that no-one need 
ever be hungry enough for a 
job to fall for the authoritarian 
lure? 

This week in The Times we 
have described a malaise. No 
one person is to blame for it 
but one person has the real 
power to decide what are the 
serious questions here and 
whether they need answering 
by action. That is the Prime 
Minister's task. She has cre- 
ated a political culture in 
which cost-cutting and ef- 
ficiency are prized. Can she 
adapt it into a culture in which 
to take on a new workforce is 
as admired as to slim down an 
old one? She has reduced 
unreasonable faith in the state. 
Can she boost individuals’ 
faith in themselves — and can 
she boost it beyond the benefi- 
ciaries of the Big Bang and into 
the disillusioned jobless with 
whom she spent yesterday in 
Barrow? 

Her standing amongst the 
young electorate is higher thanr 
conventional wisdom would 
have us believe. She has the 
proven ability to provide polir 
cies and political leadership 
that can command excite- 
ment. She has the responsibil- 
ity to to build upon' the 
revolution in attitudes that she 
has engendered. The young 
have little faith. She owes it to 
them to try to answer what 
little faith they have. 


NONE ABOVE THE LAW 


V.ik-s KinsW 

;es yoii 

; 'dona 


A month ago in the High Court 
a barrister acting for the 
Government in the suit 
brought against it by the vice- 
president of the Campaign for 
Nuclear Disarmanenl made an 
extraordinary claim. It cannot 
be assumed he was exceeding 
his brief; he was enunciating 
official doctrine. 

Pleading on behalf of the 
Home Office. Mr John Laws 
said that the courts were 
debarred from any inquiry 
huo action by civil servants as 
soon as a government lawyer 
waved under a judge's nose an 
affidavit from a permanent 
secretary bearing the words 
“national security". A class of 
slate officials, not just con- 
fined to operatives of the 
Security Service, were perma- 
nently and literally above the 
law. 

The judge. Mr Justice Tay- 
lor. evidently thought Mr 
Laws was trying it on. Surely, 
he asked, the speciousness of 


the doctrine would have re- 
quired the Government to 
forbid any court proceedings 
on the issue of telephone- 
tapping or. at least to have 
insisted that they look place in 
camera. 

. Mr Laws did not blush. Not 
only did considerations of 
security preclude the High 
Court from trying the case but 
if it persisted, then it would 
never find grounds forjudges 
menu The only matter CND 
could contest was whether, 
proper procedure in authoriz- 
ing phone-tapping had been 
-followed by the Home Sec- 
retary. But — according to Mr 
Laws' -the fact that certain 
guidelines about the way taps 
were authorized had been 
published did not give anyone, 
including a judge in the High 
Court, the right to insist on 
their maintenance or continu- 
ation. Guidelines. Mr Laws 
said, could be changed at wilL 

Mr Justice Taylor this week 


found in the CND case for the 
Government He has judged 
that the Home Secretary's 
action was taken lawfully. The 
content of the adjudication is, 
however, less important than 
the fact of his judgement 
For the key issue here is not 
the state's capacity to defend 
itself against internal threats 
or, specifically, to equip itself 
to listen to the telephone calls 
of Communists. The issue is 
the ability of the courts to hear 
and judge allegations of 
wrong-doing. 

The passage of the Intercep- 
tion of Communications Act 
last year and its provision for a 
tribunal diminishes Mr Justice 
Taylor not one whit. The judge 
comes of an old school, to 
which the lesson was read 25 
years ago by Lord Denning. It 
says clearly: there can in 
Britain be no citizens above 
suspicion. The courts must be 
open to allegations of criminal 
behaviour by ail the state's 
servants. 


MORE SHARES FOR MORE PEOPLE 


"The idea of individual share 
ownership has captured the 
imagination of the public. It is 
a sea change. " Mr Nigel 
Lawson said Iasi year.Even as 
ihc Chancellor was speaking, 
the Department of Employ- 
ment was asking how many 
companies with a £750.000- 
plus annual turnover operate 
share-ownership schemes for 
their employees. The answer. 
15 per cent, was more than in 
the mid- 1 970s. but it is not yet 
a sufficient declaration by 
employers in favour of popu- 
lar capitalism or even work- 
force participation. 

Greater popular participa- 
tion in equity is desirable. The 
leap during the past four years 
in the number of stock-holders 
ranks as a permanent achieve- 
ment of Mrs Thatcher's 
administration. The Employ- 
ment Gazette helps explain 
w hy ihat growth has noL gone 
further. Many companies 7 a 
quarter of ail those offering 
employees a stake in owner- 
ship or profits — still prefer to 
deal employees into their prof- 


its by means of a straight cash 
handout. 

A total of 30 per cent of 
major companies involve 
employees in shares or profits. 
This is’ a handsome figure. But 
a third of them offer shares 
only to executives and it seems 
that since the tax arrange- 
ments were changed in 1984 to 
favour this kind of scheme, 
this is where much of the 
growth has been. 

Yet . the Department of 
Employment's survey is preg- 
nant with optimism about the 
possibilities of wider share- 
ownership. Employers believe 
that equity holdings by staff /fo 
enhance a sense of belonging, a 
commitment to the enterprise. 
Write that sentiment on the 
national canvass and it jus- 
tifies the extension of share- 
ownership as a mechanism to 
educate and attach people to 
the free enterprise system. 

As the promotional band- 
wagons for both the Trustee 
Savings Banks and British Gas 
begin to roll, the prospect 
grows for reducing the figure of 
the 51 per cent of all 


shareholders who hold stock in 
a single company. What that 
proportion implies is that 
employee share participation 
has not yet inculcated a habit 
of buying and selling shares. 

Pundits in and out of the 
City have criticized Mr 
Lawson's personal equity 
plans for the less-than-compeL 
ling tax incentives offered by 
the Treasury. The astute have 
done their sums and shown 
how there can be no balance of 
advantage in personal, share- 
holding until some of the 
peaks elsewhere on the land- 
scape of tax relief (for pension 
purchase, for house purchase ) 
are levelled or lowered- 

Above and beyond that 
attitudes towards stock remain 
to be shifted and not just by 
speech-making politicians. 
Just as good industrial rela- 
tions are as much the result of 
strong-minded managers as of 
legislation, so popular enthu- 
siasm for the capitalist system 
will result as much from 
employers sharing the sur- 
pluses as from fiscal devices 
made in Westminster. 


From Mr Roger Uddle 
Sir. Danny Finkeistein (feature. 
August 27) is right to draw 
attention 10 the fundamental im- 
portance of proportional 
representation, but wrong to be- 
lieve that I and others in the SDP 
ar& “wary" of it. PR is right 
because it is fair. Its achievement 
is central to the more consistent 
economic and industrial policies 
Britain needs. 

Whether it mil usher in the new 
era of “multi-party" politics, 
where Danny Finkeistein appears 
to believe that a separate SDP can 
foster coafiuun and consensus by 
making itself virtually impossible 
to work with, is more debatable. 
Dutch and Israeli experience sug- 
gests it will; German that it won't. 
In Britain there is no psephologi- 
caJ evidence for the view that the 
SDP appeals to a separate constit- 
uency from the Liberals. 

Secondly, I do not favour 
“coalition with Labour at any 
cost". In Lambeth Council I voted 
for a minority Conservative 
administration because the only 
alternative was Ted Knight's anti- 
democratic left 

Where I differ fundamentally 
from Danny Finkeistein is in 
warning a “broad church" party of 
the centre-left in British politics. 

That is a concept that means 
something to me as to millions. It 
is why the Alliance must be 
defended at all costs and why 
members of the SDP should stop 
being obsessed with their own 
ideological purity. 

Yours faithfully. 

ROGER UDDLE. 

46 Geaver Square, SE1 1. 

August 27. 

From Mr Andrew Adonis 
Sir, Most SDP members reading 
Danny Finkelstein's feature will. I 
think, have been surprised to see 
their party carved into “pro" and 
"amT-David Owen “factions", 
each preparing to engage in a 
“fight" at the party's forthcoming 
conference. Those of us who wish 
to see the Alliance remain a 
serious political contender know 
that it can ill afford either factions 
or fights. 

But it is particularly disturbing 

Ethical questions 

From Canon David Stevens 
Sir, Father Kevin Kelly’s attack 
(article, August 30) on “Vatican 
sexual ethics” could seemingly 
land him, with Father Curran, in 
the same doghouse of “ineligibfl- 
ity to teach Catholic theology", 
and this would be very sad both 
for him and for those who admire 
his work. 

There is, however, another and 
even more serious possibility — 
that potential converts to “Rome" 
might be deterred by the unedify- 
ing spectacle of a Church appar- 
ently bitterly divided over crucial 
moral issues — one part bolding 
“official positions" (stigmatised as 
“so-called Christian") and the 
other teaching personal principles 
(“bringing comfort and healing”). 

This determined effort to 
present a dichotomy is bewilder- 
ing to anybody who has experi- 
enced in action both the strong 
moral principles of traditional 
Catholic moral theology and is 
profoundly grateful for their firm- 
ness, and the helpful comforting 
way in which these principles are 
generally applied in particular 

NHS treatment 

From Sir Richard Doll 
Sir, The interpretation of health 
service statistics is more complex 
than is always appreciated and 
people are often misled (as Dr J. 
D. Manson apparently was in his 
letter of August 28) into thinking 
that an increase in the frequency 
of hospital attendance means a 
deterioration in the country’s 
health. 

If however, people live progres- 
sively longer, so that the propor- 
tion of old people with a high risk 
of disability increases, and if 
advances in medicine enable con- 
ditions to be treated that were 
previously unbeatable, an in- 
crease in hospital attendance may 
occur when the state of health 
actually improves. 

No one with any experience of 
the health service can deny that in 
many parts of the country the 
service is coming under increased 
pressure and that the funds avail- 
able to it are becoming progres- 
sively less adequate to meet the 
demand. Yet death rates at each 
age (which are generally thought to 


Looking askance 

From Mr F. B. Field 
Sir. Mr Simon Jenkins. Chairman 
of the Environmental Panel of 
British Rail reports in his letter 
(August 25) that h is proposed to 
experiment with chevron-angled 
name boards at selected stations. 

This will not be an innovation 
but a revival of the style of naming 
that was used in the early 1920s for 
stations on the main lines of the 
old Midland Railway, of happy 
memory. 

Yours truly. 

F. B. HELD. 

7 Wallace Road, 

Larkhall. 

Bath. Avon. 

From Mrs Pamela Pick 
Sir. May I refer to tile habit in 
other countries of putting the 
numbers of the bus on the sides as 
well as the front — 1 like to know 
what I have missed! 

Yours faithfully. 

PAMELA PICK. 

Pine Tops. 

2 Conisboro Avenue. 

Caversham. 

Reading. 

Berkshire. 


to see dial Mr Finkeistein believes 
the dividing line between his 
factions to be attitudes towards 
the Labour Party, and that his 
fundamental charge against the 
"Liddle strategy” is that it seeks 
“coalition wiilt Labour at almost 
any cost” It is Labour that 
dominates his analysis; the 
Conservatives receive hardly a 
mention in either the “Liddle" or 
the “Owen" strategies he de- 
scribes. 

This is myopia of the worst 
order. The Alliance must not trim 
to fit any possible post-election 
coalition: if a coalition is nec- 
essary its form will, in all probabil- 
ity. be decided by the electorate 
itself. But the Alliance must 
clearly identify its main oppo- 
nents in that election. 

You can tell a party, like a 
person, by its enemies. It is the 
party that has — literally — taxed 
the poor to give to the rich, 
severely weakened the industrial 
base of our economy, begun to 
dismantle our welfare services and 
shown indifference to the four 
million of our fellow citizens 
without jobs that ought to be our 
principal opponents. 

Mr Finkeistein believes that 
proportional representation ought 
to be the SDP*s “primary aim". 
Yet its achievement must not be, 
as he suggests, an end in itself 
The Alliance parties must say 
loud and dear what purposes they 
intend to pursue when the era of 
the “New Politics" dawns. Plati- 
tudes about “partnership" result- 
ing from “multi-party 
government" are not enough. SDP 
policies commit the party to 
reducing inequality, improving 
the welfare state, maintaining 
public spending and rooting out 
injustice in our society — dare I say 
“left-wing" objectives? 

Unless these objectives are in- 
ducted among its “primary aims" 
then the party has no future. Like 
the Liberal Party of the 1 920s it 
will become an essentially irrele- 
vant feature of our party system. 
Yours etc. 

ANDREW ADONIS. 

Nuffield College. 

Oxford. 

August 27 

cases, where always the person 
takes precedence. 

The problem with the Curran 
trend in moral theology is not that 
it signals some novd personalis! 
approach to moral problems. That 
has always been there in pastoral 
practice. Rather it is that there 
appears to be a confusion between 
principles and pastoral casework, 
with the latter bulking so large that 
there is real danger of loss of sight 
of the basic principles, and a 
resultant declension into the 
moral anarchy of the world. 

To take Fr Kelly’s most 
colourful example - for every 
homosexual rescued from the 
scourge of Aids' by the channel- 
ling of his inter-personal love into 
a permanent relationship, how 
many young people have declined 
into promiscuity and all its atten- 
dant ills because they have con- 
cluded there is no authoritative 
guidance to be had any more, not 
even from the Catholic Church? 
Yours et c, 

DAVID STEVENS, 

3 Chapel Street, 

Belton in Rutland, 

Leicestershire. 

August 30. 

reflea the inddence of disease) are 
falling. At many ages, indeed, they 
have fallen more sharply in the 
last decade than at any previous 
time, apart from the miraculous 
years following the introduction of 
sulphonamtdes and antibiotics. 

Between 1978-79 and 1983-84, 
for example, the death rate of 
infants fell by 25 per cent, of 
children aged 5-9 years by 22 per 
cent, of young adults aged 25-34 
years by 10 per cent, of the late 
middle-aged, 55-64 years, by 6 per 
cent and of the old, aged 75-84 
years, by 10 per cent. 

What effect changes in living 
conditions may have had is diffi- 
cult to assess, tut health education 
and preventive and curative medi- 
cine are all contributing to longer 
and fitter life. 

Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD DOLL, 

Imperial Cancer Research Fund, 
Cancer Epidemiology and Clinical 
Trials Unit, 

University of Oxford. 

Gibson Building. 

The Raddiffe Infirmary. 

Oxford, 

September I. 

Shades of racism 

From the Director of the Runny- 
made Trust 

Sir. Professor Flew (feature, Au- 
gust 21) acclaims as “the truth" 
the proposition that “highly 
significant differences in achieve- 
ment between the non-white 
groups in Britain" are in the main 
to be explained by cultural dif- 
ferences rather than by “hostile 
discrimination" or the groups’ 
own “genetic endowments". 

This “truth" is suddenly and 
baldly asserted towards the end of 
an article whose arguments have 
ranged over a lot of targets, but 
have not been addressed to this 
point One cannot therefore, as- 
sess his evidence or reasoning on 
the matter. 

No definition of culture, cul- 
tural difference or achievement is 
offered, and since these terms are 
understood in at least as many 
different ways as is “racism", it is 
puzzling to wonder to what ques- 
tion the article is supposed to be 
addressed. 

Yours faithfully. 

ANN DUMMETT. Director. 

The Runnymede Trust 
178 North Gower Street NW|. 


Risk of missing 
the Airbus 

From Sir Anthony Meyer. MPfor 
CiwydXonh West (Conservative) 
Sir. It is easy to understand the 
Government's hesitation, re- 
ported in your issue today (August 
29). in providing the very large 
sums of mono 1 needed as launch 
aid for the new generation of 
Airbus civil airliners. 

It was equally easy to under- 
stand their hesitation in backing a 
European rescue operation for 
i Westland helicopters; or in using 
i their support for British Leyland 
to nudge it towards a partnership 
with one of the European car 
producers. In every case there has 
been clear commercial advantage 
in allowing ihe Americans or the 
Japanese 10 come in and take the 
load off our shoulders. 

The only trouble is that, by the 
end. Britain will have opted out of 
the effort to maintain a modern 
industrial base in Europe; and 
Europe's own ability 10 keep its 
industry alive, and tiie jobs that go 
with it. will have been seriously 
weakened by Briiain's defection. 

Large civil airliners are one of 
the few products in which Europe 
can compete with the United 
Slates and where the Pacific 
nations are too far behind to catch 
up. The products of Airbus 
Industrie have proved their 
attractiveness to airlines world 
wide. To opt out of this pro- 
gramme now. however strong the 
short-term commercial argu- 
ments. is to throw away our last, 
and almost certainly our best 
chance of remaining a modem 
industrial nation. 

1 am etc. 

ANTHONY MEYER, 

House of Commons. 

August 29. 

Example of BAe 

From Mr Tom F. Jones 
Sir, As the debate about the type of 
ship most suited to naval warfare . 
and peacetime tasks continues to * 
nimble, it seems 10 me that there 
is an admirable way forward. 

I have much admired the way in 
which British Aerospace has “put 
its money where its mouth is" and 
fimded what I believe is called a 
technology demonstrator aircraft 
It does not pretend to be anything 
other than a test bed for new ideas 
and new equipment 
Why not then, encourage the 
British shipbuilding industry to 
get together and jointly fond a 
short and fat demonstration vessel 
that could then be built and put 
through its paces? 

What is so dearly needed is 
proof that such a configuration 
would perform well in the same 
range of operational conditions as 
long and thin Type 22 and 23 
frigates now in service. It would 
cost many millions; but so did the 
British Aerospace aircraft 
Yours sincerely. 

TOM JONES. 

8 Cross Park Way, 

Crownhill, 

Plymouth, Devon. 

Totally improper 

From Mr A. G. Hassall 
Sir, Prior to decimalization the 
quarrying industry (particularly in 
country areas) would sometimes 
specify a screen to give a little (or 
big) inch stone (letters, August 12, 
15, 20, 26. 29, 30). Only a hard 
won knowledge of the idio- 
syncracies of the particular pit or 
quarry would determine whether 
we supplied a %" or 'Via" screen 
fora little inch and P/w" or 1V6" 
for a big inch aggregate. 

Decimalization has robbed us of 
much of the romance and mys- 
tique jealously won and guarded. 
Yours etc, 

ANTHONY HASSALL, 

59 Warrington Road, 

Penketh, 

Warrington, Cheshire. 

August 27. 

High and mighty 

From Mr Barnet Litvinojf 
Sir, Irving Kristol (feature, August 
26) suffers from a near-universal 
malady of people beyond these 
shores: failure to understand that 
mysterious English sense of hu- 
mour. He doesn't realise that we 
cannot even mouth the phrase 
“The Viscount White law of 
Penrith" except with tongue 
firmly in cheek. U and non-U. like 
its precursor. One-upmanship, 
started a game, not an uproar. 

Yours faithfully, 

BARNET LrTVINOFF. 

28 Hollycroft Avenue, 

Hampstead. NW3. 

August 26. 

Not entirely 

From Mr J. Enoch Powell. MPfor 
South Down ( Ulster Unionist) 

Sir. You state (leading article, 
September 1) that Mr James 
Molyneaux “now has so little to 
say to the world that he has 
formally ‘suspended’ his relations 
with journalists". 

Luckily on page 2 you had 
reported an important speech he 
made in my constituency on 
August 30. 

I am. Sir, your obedient servant, 

J. ENOCH POWELL 
House of Commons. 

September 1. 

Making a good start 

From Mr H. .4. Guy 
Sir. Mr T. J. Carr’ (September 2) 1 

asks for a "good place that 
welcomes casual visitors for - 
breakfast between 7 and 9.30 am". | 
On the A3l in Hampshire, near 1 
Ringwood. there is a sign that 
proclaims: All Day Breakfast. 

£1.50. •wiuasi. 

Yours faithfully. 

H. A GUY, ' 

20 Sherborne Road, j 

Southampton. ; 

September 1 



SEPTEMBER 4 1793 

In 1793 radical societies, finding 
their inspiration in France, 
proliferated. Thomas Muir, an 
advocate and church elder, teas a 
co-founder of one. His farcical 
trial and socage sentence were but 
the prelude to a series of 
adventures. From Botany Bay he 
um rescued in 1796 by an 
American naval captain, 
shipwrecked, captured by Indians. 

and later imprisoned in 
Havannah, from where he was put 
on a Spanish frigate which was 
attacked by the English. Muir was 
badly uaunded and was held 
prisoner by the Spanish even 
though he had fought for them. 
The French obtained his release, 
but his wounds proved incurable 
and he died in September, J 798. 


Edinburgh, August 30 

TRIAL OF MR MUIR FOR 

SEDITION. IN THE HIGH 

COURT OF JUSTICIARY. 

Monday came on the trial of Mr. 
Thomas Muir, the younger, of 
Hunterhill, for seditious practices. 

The prisoner, in the indictment, 
was accused of wickedly and 
feloniously exciting, in November 
last, at different meetings at 
Kirkintilloch, Campsie, &c. de- 
nominated Societies for Reform, 
by means of seditious speeches and 
harangues, a spirit of disloyalty 
and disaffection to the King and 
the established Government — of 
advising and exhorting persons to 
purchase and peruse seditious and 
wicked publications and writings 
(viz. Paine's Works, a Declaration 
of Rights, the Patriot, &c.) calcu- 
lated to produce a spirit of disloyal- 
ty and disaffection to the King and 
Government — of distributing or 
circulating a seditious writing or 
publication — of producing and 
reading aloud, in a public meeting 
or convocation of persona, a sedi- 
tious and inflammatory writing ... 

To these charges Mr. Muir 
pleaded Not Guilty — He said he 
had nothing to observe on the 
relevancy: he would trust himself 
entirely to the Jury. He had given 
in, when last before the Court, 
written defences; in which he 
declared the libel to be false, and 
that be would prove that he had all 
along supported the Constitution. 
Being asked if he had any other 
defence, he said he rested upon his 
written defence; he had uniformly 
advised the people to pursue legal 
and constitutional measures: and 
that he had also advised them to 
read all books written upon the 
great national question of Reform. 

The Jury being named. Mr. Muir 
objected to every one of them; he 
said thetas the gentlemen, howev- 
er respectable, were all subscribers 
to the Goldsmiths Hall Associa- 
tion, and had offered a reward for 
discovering those who had circulat- 
ed what they deem ed seditious 
writings, they had already pre- 
judged him, and were therefore 
improper persons to pass upon his 
assize -. 

The Lord Advocate addressed 
the Jury on the part of the Crown 
and, among other observations, 
said that if in the range of his 
official duly, in bringing persons to 
that bar accused of similar of- 
fences, there had been any one 
whose actions pointed him out as 
the most striking object for prose- 
cution, or whose conduct was more 
peculiarly marked by the spirit of 
diabolical mischief — this was the 
man! — Under the pretence of 
Reform, he had been at particular 
pains to instill into the minds of 
the uninformed and unwary, doc- 
trines of the most pernicious 
tendency, destructive of all order, 
and calculated to subvert and 
overturn the Constitution; and by 
an insidious comparison between 
France and this country, had left 
little room to doubt that his wish 
and motive was to introduce the 
same anarchy and confusion here, 
which, in that infatuated nation, 
bad occasioned such bloodshed and 
ravage — 

Mr Muir (who managed bis own 
defence, unsupported by any Coun- 
sel) then rose. — He said that 
amidst the inquisitorial keen ess of 
his adversaries, aided as they had 
been by domestic spies, it was a 
consolation to him that his moral 
character had been a friend to 
Reform; and to this charge, had it 
been so laid, he would have pleaded 
guilty at once, and saved the Court 
from the lassitude arising from so 
tedious a trial. 

As to the affairs of France, of 
which so much had been said, with 
respect to some advantages they 
possessed by their constitution and 
their mode of taxation, he had only 
stated facts, which he trusted could 
not be considered seditious ._ 

The Court rose about two o'clock 
in the morning, and at twelve on 
Saturday the Jury returned a 
verdict of finding the prisoner 
Guilty. 

The Court then proceeded to 
pronounce sentence, and, after a 
short deliberation, ordained him to 
be transported beyond seas to such 
place as his Majesty, with the 
advice of his Privy Council shall 
judge proper, for the space of 
Fourteen Years!... 


One in the eye? 

From Dr John Cooke 
Sir. Travellers with a sense of 
history may easily imagine them- 
selves transported back a century 
when passing through the wilder 
parts of the American West. Even 
so. whilst wandering in the Ne- 
vada desert recently. I was some- 
what startled to catch sight of a 
tattered newspaper blowing in the 
wind, bearing the prominent head- 
line (above the report of a golf 
tournament) “Norman takes the 
British Crown". 

Yours sincerely. 

JOHN COOKE. 

Arachne Productions. 

PO Box 28. 

East Chatham. 

New York 12060. 

August IS. 




18 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


/ 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BALMORAL CASTLE 
September 3: The Queen has 

appointed Miss Angela Bowl by 
a Commander of the Royal 
. Victorian Order. 

At Her Majesty's Command 
the Insignia were delivered to 
Miss Bowlby this evening. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
September 3: The Duke of Kent. 


CoIonel-in-Chief of The Royal 
Regiment of Fusiliers, today 
visited the 6th Battalion in 
Salisbury. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Captain Michael Ounpbell- 
Lamerton. 


Princess Alexandra will open 
the Home Reach Project at Red 
Cross House. Inverness, on 
September 8. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Mrs Beryl Markham will 
be held at St Clement Danes 
today at noon. 


Memorial service 


Mr M.M. Sacher 
The Ambassador of Israel at- 
tended a memorial service for 
Mr Michael Sacher held on 
Tuesday at the West London 
Synagogue. Rabbi Hugo Gryn 
officiated. Lord Sieff of 
Brimpton. honorary president, 
Marks and Spencer, Mr Abba 
Eban. chairman. Foreign Affairs 
And Defence Committee of the 
'Israeli Parliament, and Mr Mar- 
tin Gilbert, son-in-law, gave 
addresses. Among others 
present were: 

Mr* sacner (widow). Mr and Mrs 
John Sacher and Mr and Mrs Jeremy 
Sacher I'-ons and oaugtilorc-ln-tawl. 
Mr M H Sacher (son). Mrs Martin 
Gilbert idaugtilcn. Viscount Dunluce 
(son in law). Ladv Stefl of Brimpton. 
the Hon Michael and Mrs sieff. the 
Hon Mrs Edward Sieff. Mr and Mrs H 
Sacher. 

Lord Rayner (chairman. Marks and 
Seencertwilh Mr Brian Howard (Vice- 
chairman* and Mrs Howard and Mr 
Nigel Colne and Mr Albert Frost 
(directors*. 

Lord and Lady Rayne. Lady 
Mcrrtijle. the Hon Dai id Astor. the 


Han GreviUe Janner. mp. and Mrs 
Janner. the Hon L H l Cohen (Jewish 
Colonization Association i. Lady Jo- 
seph. Sir Sigmund Sternberg, sir 
David w’olfaon. Lady Bagrit. Mr 
Abba Eban. Malor General Desmond 
Cordon. Mr and Mrs Andrew Cra 
ham. Mr Gerald Brtsch (representing 
the Director and Stall of the National 
Gallery i . Mr Rscnard DOtnb (An0o- 
terael Aroiaeotogtcal Society]. Mrr J 
Mrs A Kramer (Zionist Federal 
Educational Trust). Mr Stephen 
Goldman (Hebrew University of Jeru- 
salem!. Mr Martin Savin (Zionist 
Federation of Great Britain). Dr 
Shtomo Tadmore (Jewish Apencyi. 
Mr Alan MlUeU ■ Joint Israel An " 
United Kingdoim. Mr Martin Mend . 
tWetzmann Institute also representing 
British Israel Chamber of Commeswa. 
Mr Michael Fldlcr [Conservative 
Friends of Israeli. Mr Conrad Btakey 
(Marietta Textiles also representing 
the President of J Salisbury). Mr 
George Menzles i Klaus SieHmann and 
Company). Mrs Delrdre Bums IWTB 
Publications). Mr A H woo If (Scott. 
Goff. Layton and Company). Mr 
Gerald Corcoran (president. Alex Retd 
and Lefevrek Mr A Hervard (Textile 
Institute). 

Professor and Mrs Anthony 
Mellows. Mrs M Mocatta. Mr and Mrs 
Anthony PrendergasL Mr EIHs BlrK. 
Profesoor Albert Neuberger. Mrs Ann 
Marks. Mrs A Kaftan. Dr and Mrs P E 
Thompson Hancock. Mr and Mrs 
Peter Hal ban. Dr and Mrs John Stome 
and Dr F G Taylor. 


Birthdays today 

Miss Joan Aiken, 62: Sir Hubert 
Bcnneti. 77: Sir John Chamley. 
64; Lord Dormer. 72: Dame 
Margaret Drummond. 69: Mr 
Henry ForxL II, .69: Mr Denis 
Howell. MP. 63: Sir Nicholas 
Jackson. S2; Mr H. J. Joel, 92; 
Mr Bill. Kenwrighl, 41; Mr 
Dinsdalc Landcn. 34; Air Chief 
Marshal Sir David Lee, 74; Mr 
Justice Mars-Joncs, 71; Mrs I. B. 
Robertson. 53: Mr Tom Wat- 
son. 37. 


Luncheon 

HM Government 
Viscount Whitelaw. CH, Lord 
President of the Council and 
Deputy Prime Minister, was 
host at a luncheon held at 
Lancaster House yesterday in 
-honour of Mr Goh Chok Tong. 
.First Deputy Prime Minister 
•and Minister of Defence for 
Singapore. ■ 


Dinners 


Institute of Taxation 
Mr Robin Ivison. President of 
the Institute of Taxation, was 
host at a dinner held by the 
council at the Royal Air Force 
Club last night in honour of Mr 
John Martin. 


Society of British Aerospace 
Companies 

The President of the Society of 
British Aerospace Companies. 
Mr R.H. Robins. Rolls-Royce 
pic. was host at the Fa m borough 
international Air Show Hying 
Display dinner held Iasi night at 
Grosvenor House. Parit Lane. 
The guest of honour was the 
Hon George Younger, MP, Sec- 
retary of State for Defence. The 
Vice-President of the Society. 
MrT. Mayer, Thom-EMI Tech- 
nology Group, was among those 
present. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Lord Nod-Boxton 
and Mrs A. Granger 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin Nod-'Juxlon 
and Abigail Granger. 

Mr A.E. French 
and Miss CM. Towneley 
The engagement is announced 
between Arthur Edmund, youn- 
ger son of the late the Hon 
Ben ram and Mrs French, and 
Charlotte Mary, second daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Simon 
Towneley. 

Mr HJ. Burnett 
and Miss HJ. Romer 
The engagement is announced 
between Jay. son of Mr and Mrs 
H. BumetL of Philadelphia, 
United States, and Jane, daugh- 
ter of Mr Ian Romer, of 
Hawkiey, Hampshire, and the 
Hon Mrs James Tennant, of 25 
St Leonards' Terrace. SW3. 

Mr NJJ. Andrews 
and Miss V.C. Pearce 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs P.R.S- Andrews, of 
Whitchurch Hill. Oxfordshire, 
and Verity, second daughter of 
Mrs I.R. Pearce and the late Mr 
G.A. Pearce, of South water. 
West Sussex. 

Mr J.M. Coder 
and Miss F.C. Gould 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan Mark, youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mrs R.C. 
Cutler, of MarbelJa. Spain, and 
Frances Christine, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs RJ. 
Gould. of Lymington, 
Hampshire. 

Captain KJ. Dnrward 
and Miss R.C. Baker 
The engagement is announced 
between Keith James, elder son 
of Mr and Mrs RA. Durward, of 
Monymusk, Aberdeenshire, and 
Rosemary Courtenay, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.H. 
Baker, of Cobbam, Surrey. 


Mr AJ. Erskine 
and Miss F.SA. Lovett-Tmmer 
The engagement is announced 
between Alistair, youngest son 
of Mr D.AJ. Erskine. of Guern- 
sey. Channel islands, and Mrs 
M.E. Erskine. of Winchester. 
Hampshire, and Fiona, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs M. 
Loveu-Turner, of Wjndlesbam. 
Surrey. 

Mr M J>. Fanner 
and Miss C.E. Orde 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, only son of 
Mr and Mrs David Fanner, of 
Horsham. Sussex, and Char- 
lotte. younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Martin Orde. of South 

Queens ferry. West Lothian. 

Mr J J>.M. Fisher 
and Miss C-M.C- Upton 
The engagement is announced 
between John Dominic Morti- 
mer Fisher. 15th/19th Kings 
Royal Hussars, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs Benjamin Fisher.of 
Beaumont House. Beaumom- 
cum-Moze. Essex, and Christine 
Marie-Claire, onlv daughter of 
Mr and Mis Geoffrey Upton, of 
I Durringion Park Road, 
Wimbledon. 

Mr P.M. Green 
and Miss D.M. Rohan 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, son of Mis E. 
Green and the late Mr EL Green, 
of Cambridge, and D'Arcy. 
daughter of Mr R. Rohan and 
the late Mrs A. Rohan, of 
Westchester, New York. 

Mr J.W. Mathieson 
and Miss RJBL Reeve 
The engagement is announced 
between John William, younger 
son of James and Leonore 
Mathieson. of Cairn Flats, Clin- 
ton. South Otago. New Zealand, 
and Rebecca Brian ne. younger 
daughter of Robin and Brianne 
Reeve, of The Old Rectory, 
Coombes. Lancing. Sussex. The 
marriage will take place at 
Coombes Church on September 
13. 


Mr CC Lloyd 
and Miss S-L- Matthews 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, son of Mr 
Robin Lloyd, or Wiltshire, and 
Mrs Annette Lloyd, of Windsor, 
and Susanna, daughter of Mr 
Peter Matthews, of Bath, and 
Mrs Pauline Matthews, of Lon- 
don SW6. 

Mr P.A. Nome 
and Miss LJ. Clark 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, youngest son of 
Mr and Mrs D.L, Nome. of 
Kingswcod, Surrey, and Linda 
Jane, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
P.A. Clark, of Gerrards Cross. 
Buckinghamshire. 

Mr M. Ryan 

and Miss S. GHbart-Smith 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin, son of Mr and 
Mis P.L- Rvan, of Kenley. 
Surrey, and Sara, daughter of 

Mr and Mrs J.B. Gilbart-Smiih, 
of East Horsley, Surrey. 

Mr J-H. Spence 
and Miss M-KJVL Scfaeutz 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian, son of Mr and 
Mrs J.M. Spence, of Frensham, 
Surrey, and Mv, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs L.I. Scheuiz. of Stock- 
holm, Sweden. 

Mr HJ. Thomas 
and Miss FJ. Wilson 
The engagement is announced 
between Howard, younger son 
of Mr and Mis David Thomas, 
of Welham Green, Hertford- 
shire. and Fiona, only daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Eric Wilson, of 
Taunton. Somerset. 

Mr J.M. Wyatt 
and Miss D-S. Day 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan Martin, only 
son of the late Mr James Wyatt 
and of Mrs Margaret Wyatt, of 
Combe Down, Bath, and Diana 
Susan, eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Dennis Day, of Thick- 
ets. Oxshott, Surrey. 


University news 

Oxford 

Elections 

ST EDMUND HALL 
BrlUsli Petroleum Junior R nw n ft 
Fellowship: Stephen Peter HesuTOo 
(BSc Aberdeen). 

NUFFIELD COLLEGE 
visiting MtawstUps: Mr Kenneth 
Baker. MP. Secretary of State for 
Eduction and Science: Mr J W 
Edmunds. General Secretary of the 
General. Municipal. Boilermakers and 
Applied Trades Union. 

Faculty Fellowship: Dr A M Vaughan 
iBa. PhD Cambridge). Rhodes lec- 
turer-elect in Commonwealth Studies. 
Gwilym Gibbon prise Research 

Feiiowsh _ 

Powell (I 
RAF. 


UowsMp: Wing Commander D J 
(BA Open University). M8IM 


Latest wills 

Sir Ronald Gould, of Goring-by- 
Sea. West Sussex, formerly gen- 
eral secretary of the National 
Union of Teachers, left estate 
valued at £208,388 net 
Major Arthur Evelyn Hardy, of 
Saltwood. Kent, breeder of 
prizewinning rhododendrons, 
left estate valued at £1.272,968 
neL 


Science report 

Social skills ‘would 
help the disfigured’ 

By Peter Brock 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS and III MEMOfBUM 
£4 a Sue + 15% VAT 

(minimum > tool 

Announcements, aulhcnikaicd by the 
name and permanem addrest or die 
sender, may be sent lo: 

THE TIMES 
P0 BOX 484 
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London El 9XS 

or telephoned (by telephone subs- 
cibcis (ml)) to: 81-481 3024 

Announcements can be received by 
telephone bcl»ccn 0.00am and 
5.30pm Monday 10 Friday, on Satur- 
day between 1.00am ana 12 noon. 

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Honing day by 1 30pm. 

FOTTHC0WN6 NABHMGES. WEDOH&S 

etc on Coun and Social Page £6 a to 
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Court and Social rape annouccmcnu 
can nm be occepied In telephone. 
Enquiries (o B1-BZ2 9553 
(alter tOXaml. nr Mild lu: 

1 PraoloctM Sam, LsaAw El 9XH. 

Plcacc alW* at least 48 hours before 
publication 


RnaVr lltcrrlMl* luita Cirui llie to (Dm 
Mturh are C.ies .11 % aiwl umo God llie 
Umihip. llval -we Cnd'< 

SI Mallhew 20 21 


BIRTHS 


BAKER On August 26th. lo VaJrrte 
mev Toms i and Julian, a doughier. 
Catherine Anne Rosemary, a srater 
lor Alexander 

BELL On August 30th. to Patricia 
trier Rice) and Dr Richard Bell of 
Harpenden. a m«i. Andrew Richard, 
brother (or Helena. 

CHARLTON On 29lh August at 

Hexham Maternity L'nIL lo Jeon 
' Lvnit and Dav id. a son. Stephen 
CeoHrey 

CHUDLEV Alexandra Lily. Dorn 73th 
.August. Michelle inw Jordon i and 
Tim of Stable Collage. Grooms Lane. 
Creaion. Northampton, a beautiful 
■ns! or lor Man new. 

COLLY EAR On August 2511). at 

Queen Mary "s Hospital. 

■ Roc ham ol on. lo Laura (nee Verdeni 
and Jonn. a --on. Jonathan. 

CUSS ■ In Heidelberg on Jlu August. 

to Caroline »nmf Mcndham) and 
- David, a daughter. Sophie Elisabeth. 

GREENWOOD On August 29th to 
Roger and Lesley inee Lambourm. a 
daughter. Emma Catherine Lem In 

HANSON On September 2nd. at the 
Airedale Hospital. West Yorkshire lo 
Claudia mw Mackintosh) and Paul, a 
daughter, Chino Scarlet. 

HARRISON - On JO»h August. In 
Canada, to Alison tnee Abram i and 

■ Michael, a son. Adam Michael 
James 

HARRISON - On August 30th at John 
Radchfie Hospital. Heodingion. 
Oxford, to Diana mM Green i and 
John, a son 

ISAAC On .August 30th al Queen 
Char Mlv's Hospital, to Jane irwe 
Shorn and Philip, a daughter. 
Phoebe EliMbHft 

LUBBOCK On September 2nd at St 
Thomas' Hospital, lo Miranda in« 
McNrilc) and James, a daughter. 
Sophie Caroline, a aster for Richard. 
MARRACHE On September 3rd. at 
the Undo Wing. 10 Tltcaiw in** Colej 
and Abraham, a daughter, \ictorta 
Luna 

McMULLEN On September IsL in SI 
Alban's, to Shrilrv nice Chamfer) 
and Alan, a daughter Susanna Rose- 
mary . a sfMer for Ben. Sophie. Emily 
and Thomas 

NICHOLS On 28th July, to Linda wee 
Clinton) and Pwrr. a son. Oscar 
• Peter Leo. al the Bristol Maternity 
Hospital. 

PHILLIPS - On September 2nd. at 
Emom Ctetnct Hospital, lo Sue (two 
. Hunt* and Andrew, a son. Edward 
Adieus John. Grateful thanks to all 
involved at EDH 

RELPH - On August 23rd at the Oty 
Malrmn> Hospital. Carlisle, to 
Mctona mec Storey) and Richard, a 
son. Gregory William EllioL 
STOOP - On August 30th. al Queen 
Char (ode's Hospital, to Julia irwe 
Cromptom and Michael, a son. Piers 
William, a brother for Ben. 


TRELTV1NG ■ On September 3rd. al 
Queen Charlotte's Maternity 
Hospital. London, to Elizabeth and 
Jonathan, a daughter. Stef ante Lara 
Francesca. 

WILSON - On September 2nd. to 
Cheryl mee Pheneyl and Nigel, a 
son. Alexander Paul. 


MARRIAGES 


CARULL : CLINTON - On August 
l5Ui. 1986. at S( Mungo's 
R.C. Church. Alloa. Cert, only son of 
Mr and Mrs Stephen D Cartdl of 
Fulham. London and Anne, eider 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Joseph 
Clinton of Sauchle. Alloa. 

MILLAR : JACKSON - On 30th August 
1986. al the parish church of St 
Paul. Ealing. John Christopher, son 
of Mr and Mrs John Millar of New- 
ca&tte-upon Tyne. to Georgina 
Frances, daughter of Mr and Mrs D 
H Jackson of Mintons. Cornwall. 


DEATHS 


ADDIS. On 2nd September, after a 
snort Illness peacefully in London. 
Robtna Scott D U E., of Woodstde. 
FranL Sussex. Family funeral al 
Front. Memorial Service in London 
later. 

ALEXANDER - On August 31sL peace 
fully at home. Wilhetmina iMtoai 
aged 79 years, of Faygate. daughter 
of the late Sir Claud Alexander. Bart, 
of BaUoctunyle. Funeral Service at St 
Saviour's Church. Colgate, on 
Tuesday. September 9th. at 
11.30am. Family flowers only 
please, but donations may be sent to 
The British Hackney Horse Society. 
W Stockton. Warminster. Wills. 
BIRD. Veronica - On 30lh August after 
a short illness. Beloved wife of Mi- 
chael. mother of Nicholas and Alcxts. 
Funeral private. Memorial Service to 
be announced No flowers. Dona- 
tions if desired to Princess Alice 
Hospkc. M extend Lane. Esher. 
BOULTBEE BROOKS ■ On 3tst 
August. 1986. Dorothy BoullDee 
Brooks, of Dickirts Farm (formerly of 
Blackwell Court. Bromsqrovei, at 
home, in her SAtn year. Very dearly 
loird sister of Margot. Family funer- 
al at St Bartholomew's Church. 
Tarrdebiggr. on Friday. SUi Septem- 
ber Memorial Service on Thursday. 
18th September at SI George's 
Church. Brailes. near Ships! on on 
Si our at midday 

CLARK. (Peicn Norman Smithes, after 
a long Illness, aged 76 years. On Sat- 
urday 30U) August. Brother of 
Douglas Clark A retired photogra- 
pher. Funeral 3.00 pm. on Friday 
54 h September at Reading Crematori- 
um. All Hollows Road. Cav-ersnara. 
Flowers to Tonulin A Son. Henley 
on Thames. Oxford. 

COOK. Altson i nee Kenjhly Poach] on 
1st September, al Harnham Cron 
Nursing Home. Salisbury. Sadly 
missed by her family and friends, pri- 
vate cremation, family flowers only 
Enquiries lo D K Shergold tel 0722 
28966. 

FREETH • On the 29th August 1986. 
suddenly al home James Ernest (Juni 
aged 81 years, of At Mon SL Shakton. 
Devon. Loving husband of Phyllis 
and dear father of QirtsOne. 
Grandpa of Ben and Lucy. 

DAUNT - On 28)ti August. Sybil 
Victoria, peacefully in a nursing 
home, previously at Hampton Court 
Palace. Widow of Admiral Sir Guy 
Gaunt KCM C..C.B. Sen Ice ai The 
Park Crematorium. Aldershot on 
Tuesday. 9lh September al 11am. 
Family flowers ontv please. Dona- 
tions. if desired, lo The Royal Naval 
Association. HO 82 Chetsea Manor 
SI. London SW5 QJ. 

HANKM - James William. Squadron 
Leader H66 Squadrooi. formerly of 
Basingstoke. Hampshire, latterly or 
Whitby. Yorkshire, peacefully into 
Heavenly Father’s care on 3rd Sep- 
tember 1986 

HUGHES On September Isl 1986. 
peacefully at home. John, beloved 
husband of Ethel and father of 
Robert. Cremation private. 

HATER - On August 3tsL 1986. Jacob 
Maurice after a short illness In 
hospital at Monster Holland. 
Tries ho nr 010 31 070 6311*6- 
LAMG - On 2nd September. 1986. 
suddenly whilst walking in thesuo ui 
Dorset. Dorothy Linton ’Dot) -fg-d 
S3, widow of Captain H D B Uuw 
Dearly hived mother of Hugh and 
Sylvia, and grandmother of Carrillo. 
Marc. Hugh and Rodenc. wl be 
greatly missed by her family and 
friends worldwide. Funeral Service 
al me Chapel St Theresa’s Convent. 
46 Roland Gardens. SWT. at 
10 06am. Saturday . 6Ui Scptcs.iber. 
followed bv private cremaboo. 
Flowers and enquiries to A France & 
Son tel 01 405 «901 


MALONEY. Eleanor Wlban - On 3rd 
September. 1986. peacefully. 
Donations if so desired to The Royal 
Marsden Hospital. Downs Rd. 
Sullon. Surrey. 

MARTIN - On August 30th. peacefully. 
Ernest Victor Martin, aged 83. Be- 
loved husband af-Dorothy for 56 
years- dearty loved father of Peter, 
tnc and Joan and Grandp a of Part 
and Alice. Crusader Leader for over 
60 years, and for 21 years Secretary 
of Mr Fegan's Homes. Funeral at 
Angmerlng Baptist Church on Mon- 
day. September 8th at 2pm. followed 
by cremation. Family flowers only. 
Donations. If desired, for *St Bama 
has Home', c/o F A Holland & Son. 
Little ham pun. let LitOenampton 
713939. 2 Timothy a v 7 + 8. 

MORRISON - Peacefully on 1st Sep- 
tember 1986. Kathleen Ahce 
Morrison aged 83 years. Duttful wife 
of John Percy and beloved mother of 
Mary and Michael. Service al the 
QUllerns Crematorium. Amcrshara 
on Friday. 5th September al 11-30 
am. All enquires to Cooks. Chesham 
0494 785151. 

READ - On September Is*, after a short 
illness. Ruth of 2 Manor Court. 
Breasion. Derbyshire, dearly beloved 
wife of Ernest mother of David and 
Elizabeth and grandmother of Sarah. 
Nicky. Christopher and Kate. Funer- 
al at Breasion Methodist Church, al 
2pm. on Monday. 8lh September, 
donations if desired to Save the 
Children Fund c/o A W Lymn. West 
Park. Lime Grove. Long Eaton NG10 
4LD. but If floral tributes are pre- 
I erred, they will be appreciated. 

ROTKWELL - On 1st September. 1986. 
In hospital. Captain Leslie RothwelL 
former |y of The Royal Corps of Sig- 
nals. much loved husband rt Agnes. 
Funeral private. 

SEAL - On 1 1 Eh August, suddenly but 
peacefully at home In Gillingham. 
Kern. Ada Beatrice, aged 84 years, 
much loved mother of Doreen and 
grandmother of Caroline. Martin, 
taut and Melanie. 

SESSIONS - On 2nd September 1986. 
peacefully In Poole General Hospital. 
Cohn of 68 Manor Road. Verwood. 
Dorset, formerly of Wisbech and 
South Motion. Devon. Dearly loved 
husband of Barbara and of the tale 
Winnie and father of John and Blair. 
Funeral Service at St Michaels and 
Alt Angels Church, verwood on Sat- 
urday 6th September at 12.30 pm. 

STEW - Op 2nd September. 1986. 
after a long Illness courageously 
borne. Gerard, much loved husband 
of Lore and father of Margaret 
vLevene). Robert and David and six 
grand children. Private Cremation. 
Memorial Service lo be announced. 
No flowers please, donations, tf 
desired to A J R Charitable Trust or 
Masonic Grand Charity. 

WOOD. Annie Louise - On 28th 
August 1986. al St Saviour's Hospl 
laL Hythe. aged 84. Funeral Go vice 
al Hawklnge Crematorium. Aero- 
drome Rd. Hawklnge. Folkestone. 
KenL at 2-30pm. Monday. 8Ui Sep- 
tember. Flowers may be sent to 
Hambrook & Johns Funeral Direc- 
tors. 1 Dymchurcfa Rd. Hythe. KenL 
lei Hythe 66525. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


WETTDH - A Service of Thanksrtvtm 
for the life of wing Commander -Bill' 
Wedon iRetdl one Hme member of 
'BOO* City of London Squadron R. 
Awe. AF. and founder of wetum 
Cleaning Serviced. Will be held ui the 
Church of St Clement Danes. Strand. 
WCl on Friday. October loth. 1986. 
at noon. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


RAWCL1FFE. Gordon Hindu, died 3rd 
September l979.Tlte sundown, 
splendid and serene*. From his 
brother. 

THOMPSON. Edith, who died Septem- 
ber 4th. 1985. remembered today 
and always with love and affectum,' 
Julie. Paul and Noel James. 


RUBY ANNIVERSARIES 


HIXSON - HOPE & DEMIS - September 
7th. 1946 at SL Michael's. Chester 
Square. Any then present particular- 
ly welcome at Sunday Luncheon. 
September 7th. MIDHURST Sussex 
(4940l 


DIAMOND 

ANNIVERSARIES 


HERMMAN : RATSEY • On September 
4tlL 1926 at St- John's Church. 
Hove. Cecil to May. Now at Wan bey. 
The Drive. Outficaer 


Many disfigured people who 
consult plastic surgeons in the 
hope of haring their fires 
transformed have no need of 
surgery, judging from the re- 
sults of psychological experi- 
ments canned out by Dr 
Nicbola Rumsey. Instead, 
tr ainin g in SOdal slrilLq could 
return them to a normal, 
unflinching fife. 

In order to find a way into 
the thinking of the disfig ured. 

Dr Ramsey, a social psycholo- 
gist from Didmarton, 
Gloucestershire, interviewed 
patients attending London 
hospitals in search of plastic 
surgery. 

• They talked of embarrass- 
ment, of being stared at and, 
above all, of being rejected. 
Some believed that cosmetic 
surgery would remove their 
disfigurements which ranged 
from old accident scars to port 
“winestains. 

Then, with the aid of a 
make-up artist she went on to 
the streets; half the time she 
was disfigured with either 
accident scars or port wine 
stains while for the rest she 
was her usual non-disfigured 
seif. Dotted around were fel- 
low psychologists who, from 
behind their newspapers, 
gauged the distance riven by 
800 passers-by to Dr Rumsey. 

It seemed that the patients 
were right People gave the 
disfigured Dr Rumsey a wider 
betth. 

But her next step was to 
sharpen the focus on non- 
verbal behaviour which was 
achieved by studies of helping 
behaviow. 

These included an experi- 
ment in which letters of 
application, apparently writ- 
ten by a graduate student, were 
left in telephone boxes around 
London. To each was attached 
a stamped and addressed en- 
velope and a photograph of a 


facially disfigured or non- 
disfignred young person. It 
was dear that the letter 
needed to be posted mgently. 

There was a high rate of 
return as sympathetic tele- 
phone users did someone a 
good turn and posted the 
letters. There was no dif- 
ference in the rale of return 
between the two types of 
photograph. The results of the 
other experiments were simi- 
lar: the looks of a person do 
not affect the response or the 
instinctive loudness of most 
people. 

This led Dr Rumsey to 
investigate die social behav- 
iour of the disfigured 
themselves. 

An actor, disfigured by a 
make-up artist, or non-dis- 
ftgured, carried oat a series of 
interviews. His approach var- 
ied from fluency, plenty of 
gestures and eye' contact to 
little eye contact, static hands 
and a monotonous voice (the 
latter being the withdrawn 
behaviour noted by Dr 
Rumsey among many would- 
be plastic surgery patients, 
frightened of negative re- 
actions from others). 

The impressions formed of 
him were significantly more 
influenced by his social skills 
than by the disfigurements. 
Which apparently leaves the 
onus for moving back into the 
social mainstream on the dis- 
figured. “It is hard for a lot of 
them to accept that 1 ". Dr 
Rumsey said. 

She now wants to see more 
research on how best to equip 
the disfigured with soda! 
skills as well as the way in 
which social pressures im- 
pinge npon their thinking. 
Television advertising of 
beaaty aids and magazine 
articles are examples. 

Source: Human Leaning (In 
press). 


OBITUARY 

LORD MAYBRAY-KING 



class 

took 


honours 
his PhD 


First Labour Speaker of the Commons 

^ , . telescoped into a fraction of 

Lord Maybray-King. PC. a 
Deputy Speaker of the House 
of Lords since 1971. died 
yesterday at the age of 85. As 
Sir Horace King, he was 
Speaker of the House of 
Commons from 1965 to 1970, 
the first in history to be chosen 
from the Labour ranks. 

He had represented the 
lichen Division of Southamp- 
ton from 1955 lo 1970 and the 
Test Division for five years 
before that 

King's success as Speaker of 
the House of Commons rested 
largely on his ability to bal- 
ance the claims of tradition 
and reform at a time when 
Parliament’s conduct of its 
affairs had come under lively 
questioning. 

Change for its own sake 
made no appeal to a man so 
deeply versed in history and 
procedure and so sensitive to 
the appeal of ancient usage- 
The test he applied to any 
proposal to jettison a custom 
hallowed by time was whether 
or not it served the cause of 
efficiency. A reform which he 
had no hesitation in helping to 
effect was a quickening of the 
momentum of Question 
Hour. 

His capacity for firmness 
with Ministers, as with back- 
benchers, owed much not only 
to his years of experience on 
the Chairman's Panel but to 
his possession of all the quali- 
ties of the best type of bead- 
master. His fatherly tolerance 
did not extend to standing any 
nonsense. 

He was one of the best 
raconteurs in the House, a 
virtuoso on the piano and 
piano accordion, whose range 
as a composer embraced not 
only lively ballads but at least 
one charming Christmas car- 
ol. "Is the Little King 
Sleeping?”. 

Entertaining children was 
one of his hobbies. There 
could be liule room for pom- 
posity in the make-up of a 
Speaker who within a couple 
of months of attaining the 
position could be found lead- 
ing a party of schoolchildren 
in rollicking songs or organiz- 
ing a treasure-hunt along the 
corridors of the Palace 
Westminster. 

He was born Horace 
Maybray King on May 25, 

1901, the son of John William 
King of Newcastle upon Tyne. 

He was educated at Norton 
Council School. Stockton Sec- 
ondary School, and King's 
College London. He graduated 


with first 
1922 and 

1940. •• 

He was head of the English 
department at Taunton's 
School, Southampton, from 
1937 to 1947 and headmaster 
of Regent's Park Secondary 
School in the same city until 
1950. the year in which he 
entered Parliament as Labour 
member for the Test division. 
He had unsuccessfully con- 
tested New Forest and Christ- 
church in 1945. and was for 
many years leader of the 
Labour group on Hampshire 
County Council, and an 
alderman. 

He quickly established him- 
self in the Commons as a 
thoughtful and persuasive ad- 
vocate of Labour policy on 
education, and as a man of 
cultivated literary tastes. 
Within four years, he was 
appointed to the Speaker's 
Panel of Chairmen of Com- 
mittees and steadily won gold- 
en opinions for the skill, 
impartiality and good humour 
with which he carried out his 
duties. 

It was no surprise when, in 
November, 1964, he was elect- 
ed chairman of Ways and 
Means and Deputy Speaker. 
Seven months later he was 
sworn or the Privy Council. 

Little did anyone guess that, 
in a few months, death would 
of .remove the Speaker, Sir Harry 
Hylton-Foster, and that on 
Horace King would soon fell 
the burden of guiding a House 
in which the tide towards 
reform was running strongly. 
His election that October to 
the Speakership was unani- 
mous; it was a sign of the 
times that the procedure was 


TED MOULT 


Marriages 


MrSJP.G. Hughes 
and Miss P. Pope 
The marriage took place on June 
28. in Scarsdate. New York, of 
Mr Simon Hughes son of Mr 
and Mrs C.E. Hughes, ofCTwyd. 
and Miss Patricia Pope, daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs LJ. Pope, of 
Scarsdale. New York. 


Mr CPA Norman 
and Miss SJVL. Caro 

The marriage took place on 
Saturday, August 30. at St 
Stephens Church. Clapham 
Park, of Mr Philip Norman and 
Miss Susan Caro. The Rev D. 
Smart-Smith officiated. 


Mr W5J>. T rower 

and Miss M.L. Chaste! de 

Boil) vide 

The marriage took place on 
Saturday at St Mary's Church. 
Walkem. between Mr William 
Trower. son of Mr and Mis 
Anthony Trower. of Stan stead 
Bury. Ware. Hertfordshire, and 
Miss Mary Chaste! de fioinville. 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Gerard 
Chastel de Boinville. of Walkem 
Hall. Stevenage. Hertfordshire. 
The Rev William Pryor offici- 
ated. assisted by the Rev John 
McDermott and the Rev Ron- 
ald Stephens. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Julia and Selwyn 
Curtis. Mr Jonathan Trower 
was best man. 

A reception was held at 
Walkem Hall. 


Service dinner 

The Royal Hampshire Regiment 
The Lord Lieutenant of Hamp- 
shire was present at a dinner 
gKen by General Sir David 
Fraser. Colonel of the Regiment, 
and officers of The Royal 
Hampshire Regiment held at 
Regimental HQ, Serie's House, 
Winchester, yesterday. 


Reception 


English-Speaking Union 
Mr Robert C. Cumming. Chair- 
man of the English-Speaking 
Union in Scotland, and Direc- 
tors of John Walker and Sons 
were hosts at a reception held at 
Hopetoun House. South 
Queens ferry, Edinburgh, last 
night on the occasion of the 
World Members' Conference of 
the English-Speaking Union. 
The guests included: 

Mr Anthony Wesxnedqe. Mr David 
Adam and Mr Stephen Campbell 
(dirpciors. John Walker and Sons). 
Mrs R.C Cummins. Mr J. Sinclair 
Armstrong (president. English -Speak- 
ing Union of the Untied Stalest and 

Mrs J. Sinclair Armstrong. Sir Donald 

TebMI i chairman. EngQsit-Speaidng 
Union o t the Common woaitol and 
Lady TrfctoU. Sir Monty and Lady 
Flnniston. Convener James CooJv- Mr 
Anthony Wheeler (president. Royal 


Munn 'chairman. Scottish Manpower 
Sen kb Commission) and Lady 
Munn. 


Supper 


Raggruppamento Selenia Elsag 
On the occasion of its participa- 
tion in Famborough 86. the 
Raggruppamento Selenia Elsag. 
the Italian large-systems 
electronics group, arranged a 
recital of chamber music in. 
Middle Temple Hall Iasi night. I 
Solisli Veneti performed ‘The 
Four Seasons' by Vivaldi, and 
afterwards the guests were enter- 
tained at supper. 


Dame Anna 
Neagle 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Dame Anna 
Neagle. followed by a musical 
tribute, will be held in West- 
minster Abbey at 1 1.30 am on 
Monday, Onober 20. 1986. An 
orchestra will play from 11.15 
am. Those wishing to attend are 
invited to apply for tickets in 
writing ia The Receiver Gen- 
eral. Room 15. 20 Dean's Yard. 
Westminster Abbey. London. 
SW 1 P 3PA. enclosing a stamped 
addressed envelope, by Mon- 
day. October 6. Tickets will be 
posted on Monday. October IX 
Ail are welcome to attend. 


Ted Moult, a Derbyshire 
farmer who became a familiar 
character on radio and televi- 
sion, through quiz shorn, 
television advertising and, lat- 
terly, as a minor character in 
BBC. Radio 4’s The Archers* 
was found dead from a shot- 
gun wound yesterday. He was 
60. 

To quiz programmes, which 
provided him with his intro- 
duction to radio broadcasting, 
he brought a shrewd common- 
sense which was, on cursory 
acquaintance, belied by the 
foamy, even slightly gormless, 
exterior he presented to the 
public. Moult was a complete- 
ly natural performer who 
translated effortlessly from the 
mire of the farmyard, to the 
sanitized ethos of the broad- 
casting studio. 

Edward Moult was born in 
Derby on February 11, 1926. 
and grew up into a fanning 
community, working on the 
land from the age of 1 5. When 
he was 22, he became a tenant 
fanner at Sinfin near Derby, 
later moving to Scaddows 
Farm near the Derbyshire 
village of Ticknall, where he 
was to spend the rest of his 
life, and from where his 
surprising entree into radio 
was to be launched. 

He liked to recall that his 
impetus towards broadcasting 
came from a conviction that 
he could perform better than 
any of the panellists on BBC 
radio's Brains Trust, rightly 
considered to be one of the 
most stimulating programmes 



ever to po on the air. In the 
event, in response to bis 
writing to them, the BBC 
invited him to participate in 
its Brain of Britain quiz, 
which he won in 1959. 

This fed to his participating, 
as presenter and panellist, in 
many radio favourites, such as 
Treble Chance, Housewives' 
Choice, Woman's Hour and 
Any Questions?. He was also 
familiar to television audi- 
ences through bis appearances 
on Whai's My Line?, Ask Me 
Another, and The Kenny Ever- 
ett Show. 

He appeared in one feature 
film. Bullshot , and wrote a 
book, the autobiographical 
Down to Earth. His career as a 
media personality led to some 
acting: he appeared, in a guest 
roie, in BBC TV's James 
Herrion series. All Creatures 


Great and Small, and devel- 
oped an enduring affection for 
pantomime in which he 
played each Christmas. 

Though he had, for some 
years past, greatly scaled down 
his radio and television wodk. 
he recently became familiar 
again through his advocacy on 
television of the merits of a 
brand of double glazing, to the 
advertising of which he 
brought his persuasively 
earthen qualities. 

In 1982, on the death of 
Edgar Harrison, then playing 
the retired and ageing Dan in 
The Archers, Moult applied 
for the job. To his amusement, 
he was turned down on the 
grounds that he sounded far 
loo youthful and energetic to 
play the 85-year-old head of 
Ambridge's chief dynasty. 
However, his performance at 
audition delighted the saga's 
producers so much that a 
minor character role, that of 
Bill Insiey, a retired gentleman 
farmer, was specially created 
for him. 

To the broadcasting studio 
Moult brought the fresh gusts 
of his native Derbyshire up- 
lands. and on the air he 
succeeded in remaining the 
professional farmer he was. 
He always appeared to be 
wyriy detached about his 
feme, and was known in his 
village as a kindly man, jovial 
and generous with gifts of 
produce for his neighbours. 

He leaves his widow. Marie, 
three sons and three 
daughters. 


SENOR JORGE ALESSANDRI 


Sehor Jorge Alessandri Ro- 
driguez. president of Chile 
from 1958 to 1964, died in 
Santiago on August 31. He 
was 90. 

He was bora in 1896, the 
elder son of a famous and 
controversial father, Arturo 
Alessandri Palma, president 
of the republic from 1920 to 
1925 and, again, from 1932 to 
1938. He was trained as an 
engineer, and throughout his 
life took a particular interest 
in public works. 

With his antecedents, how- 
ever. he could not turn his 
back on politics. He first 
entered the Chilean Congress 
in 1936 as Deputy for Santia- 
go, at the same time pursuing 
an active business career as a 
director of a number of paper 
factories, sugar refineries, and 
banks. 

He first entered government 
in 1948 as Minister of Fi- 
nance. During his two years in 
the post he succeeded in 
improving the country's fi- 
nancial and economic situa- 
tion. removing the budget 
deficit and obtaining a sur- 
plus. He also renewed, pay- 
ment on Chile's external debt 
which had been suspended. 

fn 1957. he was elected 
Senator for Santiago, during 
ihe presidency of Carlos Iba- 
nez del Campo. his father's 
inveterate political opponent. 

In the latter year. Jorge 



Alessandri succeeded Ibanez 
as president, defeating in the 
elections four other candi- 
dates. two of whom - Eduardo 
Frei and Salvador Allende - 
were to succeed him. 

Alessandri was the 
country's first right-wing pres- 
ident in 20 years. But it was a 
narrow victory. In a record 
turnout, his three opponents - 
all left wing -polled more votes 
between them, and Allende 
came a close second. 

He came to power at a time 
when social and economic 
pressures were mounting rap- 
idly. and when the rising cost 
of living was spreading deep 
discontent. He promised 
strong national government, 
which would not intrude on 
private enterprise, but which 
would encourage greater for- 


eign investment and gradually 
adjust social inequalities. 

Practicality, and firmness to 
the point of inflexibility, were 
the keynotes of Alessandri's 
character. Though a firm be- 
liever in free enteipnse, he 
recognised the need for at least 
a limited attack on the 
country’s antiquated system 
of land tenure, and in 1962.be 
passed the first Agrarian Re- 
form Law for land redistribu- 
tion. Though it was a modest 
measure, it established agen- 
cies which were to play a. 
fundamental pan in re-shap- 
ing the Chilean countryside. 

He also reorganized the tax 
system, and encouraged some 
diversification of industry. 
But the lack ofa firm majority 
in congress obliged him to rely 
on shining alliances, resulting 
in indecisive government. 
Nevertheless, his pesonal pop- 
ularity remained high, since to 
many Chileans of all classes he 
represented traditional virtues 
of austerity in private life and 
rectitude in public. 

Indeed, when he appeared 
on newsreels in cinemas in 
Santiago, the audience ap- 
plauded spontaneously. That 
respect was evident in 1970 
when, in the presidential elec- 
tion which Allende won. 
Alessandri, at the age of 74. 
ran him a dose race, losing by 
less than 40.000 votes in an 
electorate of 3'£ million. 


* 


the customary nmc. 

Since his election lo the 
Chair, he had been trying to 
implement recommendations 
from the Procedure Commit- 
tee for tightening up Question 
Hour. His methods did not 
lock the headmastcriy touch. 
Long supple men lories and 
ministerial answers brought 
prompt admonitions: even the 
Prime Minister and the Lead- 
er of the Opposition were told 
to keep them shorter. The 
result of this campaign was 
that King was able to report 
that in the first month of the 
session a third more questions 
had been orally answered than 
the average for the first month 
of the previous ten sessions. 

But King never gave an 
impression of bustling. His 
rulings were invariably deliv- 
ered with deliberation, the 
fruit of careful thought. If he 
felt he had misjudged a mem- 
ber. his apology was prompt 

In April. 1966, his re- 
election as Speaker was auto- 
matic. and when the House 
rose for the Whitsun Recess he 
went on a visit to the United 
States. While he was there, his 
wife. Victoria, whom he had 
married in 1924. died sudden- 
ly in Southampton. 

He announced his retire- 
ment in December. 1970. and 
in 1971 was made a life peer, 
taking the title of Lord 
Maybray-King. In that year, 
loo. he was made a Deputy 
Speaker of the House of 
Lords, a position whose duties 
he tended to find onerous as 
the years went by, and he 
found it increasingly difficult 
to attend the House. 

He was a devoted honorary 
treasurer of Help the Aged 
from 1972, president of the 
Spina Bifida .Association, and 
sat on the BBC Complaints 
Commission from 1971 to 
1974. He was a Deputy Lieu- 
tenant for Hampshire, and the 
recipient of several honorary 
degrees. 

He published or edited sev- 
eral books on subjects that 
ranged from Homer and Ma- 
caulay to Hansard and the 
duties of the Speaker. 

In 1967. he married, sec- 
ond, Una Porter. She died in 
1978. and he married, third, in 
1981. Mrs Ivy Duncan For- 
ster. This marriage was dis- 
solved last year, and he 
married, fourth, in March this 
year, Sheila, a former family 
friend. There was a daughter 
of the first marriage. 


* 









I-H 


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on s 




. .'i 


■ * 


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pKl 


Television 
Hen house 
of horrors 

A fresh dimension was added 
to tite price of free-range sags 
night by Animal Squad 
(onO), a new series about the 
°*»n RSPCA inspector. 

In a dilapidated battery hen 
unit which was little more than 

a charnel- house, police walked 
<wr the bones of dead birds 
“W Picked hundreds of hen 
carcasses off the cages where 
they had been left to rot. 

Outride, the bodies of more 
dead birds decayed in plastic 
sacks. In another hooding 427 
birds continued to live and to 
.lay eggs, some of them stand- 
ing on the bodies of their dea d 
cage-mates. The owner of this 
neglected farm insisted that 
his birds were “quite fine" and 
sold their egy in a nearby 
health food shop. At the" 
programme's conclusion the 
live birds were destroyed and 
the^owner eventually fined 

The stoic keynote was 
struck by the RSPCA inspec- 
tor, who expressed his feelings 
in a recitation of the 
he Intended to bring. “Failure 
to_ inspect," he muttered. an- 
grily, surveying a scene for 
which tor stronger langnay 
would have been appropriate. 
The sentimental tide song of 
the series was among its most 
repellent aspects. 

- Repulsion is also the stock- 
in-trade of the actor Derek 
Martin, who has cornered the 
market in corrupt policemen 
with his rat-trap grin. 

King and Castle (ITV), a 
new underworld drama by lan 
Kennedy Martin, takes tins 
stereotype oat of the police 
force and Into the debt collect- 
ing business* where he is not 
pleased to receive a request 
from his former colleagues for 
a “Friday manifia" of £150. 
Mach of the script's wit was 
predicated on widespread pub- 
lic acceptance of police 
corruption. 

The cornerstone of the 
series' appeal will be the 
relationship between this 
contemporary rogue and his 
wide-eyed leg man, a well 
educated martial arts master 
and disadvantaged single fa- 
ther played by Nigel Planer. 

Planer is celebrated as the 
creator of the moaning hippie 
in the comedy The Young 
Ones; he is a skflfol actor who 
can look as wistful as a 
labrador poppy when required, 
hot In this opening episode toe 
vital spark of toe two roen^s 
relationship was' obscured by 
toe effort necessary to* estab- 
lish their characters. ■ 


iii£ iiMjbS THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 198b 


ty 


THE ARTS 


Jokers need 
to go wild 


Theatre 


Rookery Nook 

Shaftesbury 


Celia Brayfield 


Ben Travers was good at 
birthday parties, and it is a 
shame that he is not still 
around to celebrate his hun- 
dredth. Short of the man 
himself, the alternative has to 
be a slap-up revival of Rook- 
ery Nook which, as he rightly 
claimed: “has made a 
appeal to the British public 
the total number of its perfor- 
mances has been many times 
greater than that of all my 
other plays put together." 

The last lime it played in the 
West End was during bis 
lifetime in the late 1970s. The 
show was not to his liking; and 
1 remember getting more fun 
out of it shortly afterwards 
when I saw it played by 
amateurs in a Cornish church 
halL 

Travers said he had no idea 
why the play was so popular; 
but there may be a due here. 
Farce usually demands disci- 
pline and techniques available 
only to professional actors, 
and farce specialists at that. 
But this piece, rooted in 
English village life, with its 
gossips and snoopers, its local 
eccentrics and ferocious con- 
formists. contains something 
with which generation after 
generation of amateurs have 
been able to identify. 

They may not deliver the 
whole thing, but they can get 
along. And better an affec- 
tionate church hall perfor- 
mance than a cold-blooded 
West End revival that goes off 
at half-cock. 

Mark Kingston's produc- 
tion. which is affectionate and 
mechanically inventive, is the 
best I have seen; but in one 
respect I still prefer the Cor- 
nish amateurs. That is the 
central partnership between 
the two cousins. Give and 
Gerald, who are left in charge 
of the title property and the 
fleeing Rhoda, who invades it 
in her pyjamas. 

Originally a vebide for the 
highly competitive double act 
of Tom Walls and Ralph 
Lynn, it calls for two actors of 
outstanding comic personality 
— one projecting rapacious 
opportunism (whether with 
the drinks cupboard or any- 
thing in silk stockings), and 
the other the byzantine moral 
contortions of a bridegroom 
who finds himself in pos- 
session of a delectably dis- 


tressed virgin. You cannot say 
that what Ian Ogilvy and Tom 
Courtenay do in these roles is 
positively wrong; only that 
they do not fin them out 
The play, of course, is dean 
as a whistle and the produc- 
tion rightly preserves the 
1 920s setting (by Alan 
Pickford) but m straining to 
recapture that supposed age of 
innocence. Mr Ogilvy reduces 
Clive to a blazered bounder in 
Oxford bags whose thoughts 
stray no further than taking 
Rhoda for a spin in the car. 

As for Gerald. Mr 
Courtenay scales him down to 
a slow-thinking, rather petu- 
lant victim of circumstances, 
whose spirals of misunder- 
standings and desperate 
gibberish come over as effects 
carefully arranged by the play- 
wright rather than desperate 
hnprovizations by the charac- 
ter. Here, as elsewhere in the 
show, the pace needs revving 
up. Travers's far ces always 
start slowly: what one misses 
here is the wild acceleration 
that should take over after the 
first acL 

Hie production is at its 
brilliant best whenever it 
touches on Travers’s favourite 
theme of domestic bullying. I 
doubt whether even the old 
Aldwycfa team ever sported 
such a crack squad of tyrants 
and victims as Peggy Mount, 
Nichola McAnliffe, and Derek 
Smith. 

In the Robertson Hare role 
of Harold Twine, the fatal 
Gertrude’s terrorized spouse, 
Mr Smith begins on tra- 
ditional lines by nibbling his 
straw hat (bis one surviving 
gesture of independence), and 
executes a vertical take-off to 
the zenith of acrobatic com- 
edy. Briefly off the domestic 
borne, he fixes the company 
with a ghastly convivial gri- 
mace, almost singing his lines, 
until the name or Gertrude 
catapults him across the stage, 
twitching from head to root. 

Lethargic pace remains an 
enemy even to Lionel Jeffries 
as the whip-brandishing Ger- 
man neighbour; one bully 
from whom the show fails to 
draw blood. Travers's lines 
often sound pretty makeshift 
until they get carried into, toe 
higher lunacy of the action; 
but no doubt the company will 
shortly he getting their foot 
down. • 

Irving Wardle 



‘•J* 

A .> y 

Lionel Jeffries, Ian Ogilvy and Tom Courtenay In Rookery Nook 

A painful experience 


Cramp 

Bloomsbury 


The Hull Truck Theatre 
Company's juggernaut trun- 
dles on with Cramp, their 
Fringe First success of 1981 
which - now substantially 
updated and revamped with 
music - opened in Edinburgh 
last month. The score, by Tom 
Robinson and Hereward K, is 
a pleasantly melodic, syn- 
thesizer-based amalgam of Mr 
Robinson's chanson in- 
fluences interspersed with 
peppy disco numbers. The 
singing is far from amateurish 
and the harmonizing particu- 
larly commendable. 

What transpires in the in- 
terim constitutes one of the 
most depressing experiences 
currently available in London, 
an unutterably witless lava- 
flow of lazy plotting, dim 
chippiness and pointlessly 
foul-mouthed speech. Since 
they hit the West End with Up 
'n' Under two years ago, Hull 
Truck appear to have been 


labouring under two very 
wrong ideas: that the York- 
shire proletariat is somehow 
their own personal discovery, 
and that their present artistic 
director John Godber is ca- 
pable of writing funny 
dialogue. 

Whatever one may fed 
personally for or against the 
small-town boors whom they 
impersonate in play after play, 
with their entrenched smug- 
ness and swaggering misogyny 
posing as earthy charm, the 
fact remains that Mr Godber 
has never suggested the least 
danger of developing them 
into dramatically potent 
characters. That is simply not 
his style. 

The present farrago is in- 
troduced by a sombre little 
lecture about the inequities of 
life in the wake of the miners* 
strike, and quickly jumps to 
the domestic problems of one 
Dave (Chris Walker), a 19- 
year-old technical student 
who pumps iron in his 
parents' garage and worries 
about whether he is as other 


men. Another man. Max (An- 
thony Browen). attempts to 
lift Dave's usual 200 lbs but 
finds he cannot (he is not a 
weight-lifter, you see). They 
exchange jokey badinage, such 
as: ‘Ah'm off.' 'Aye. Ah 
thought sum mat smelt.' Later, 
they go to the disco, where 
there is some feeble love 
interest Dave gets drunk, 
invites a chum to perform a 
sexual service for him and, on 
his declining, cracks the 
other's head before -returning 
home to hang himself 
At this point the company 
sing: “Another hero pays the 
price/Anotber fool in 
paradise" - although one 
searches in vain for evidence 
of a rhetorical connection 
between the lot of the com- 
mon working man, broken by 
the dastardly NCB, and that of 
our Dave, twanging his pecs in 
the garage of bis doting par- 
ents (Maureen Morris and 
Stephen Crane). There may 
well be a hidden sub-text but 
then there is scarcely a text 

. Martin Cropper 


Rock 


The Boss 
Goodman 
Testimonial 
Dingwalls 


With its poor ventilation, bad 
acoustic, cramped layout mid 
numerous floor to ceiling 
pillars obscuring the view of 
the stage, there can be few 
locations in London so obvi- 
ously unsuitable for present- 
ing live entertainment as is 
Dingwalls. 

That it continues to enjoy 
pre-eminence as a rock music 
venue must be ascribed in 
large part to the astute judge- 
ment of the club's booker for 
the last 12 years. Boss Good- 
man. on whose behalf this 
long concert featuring many 
pub-rock luminaries past and 


present playing in ad hoc 
combinations was staged. 

Some, such as Graham 
Parker and Ian Dury have 
gone on from the pub circuit 
to better. things. But with the 
exception of Nick Lowe lead- 
ing a band compromising 
Martin Beliqont, Paul Carjack 
and the magnificent Pete 
Thomas (from the Attrac- 
tions), who were joined lat- 
terly by Graham Parker, none 
of the musicians at this curi- 
ous anniversary knees-up be- 
haved as though they had any 
reputation to protect. 

Performances ranged from 
the inept (Lem my. Rat Scar 
bies, Mick Green and Wurzel 
ruining “Shakin’ All Over”) 
through the embarrassing (Ian 
Dury yelling his way through 
“Johnny B. Goode") to the 
unspeakable (Buster 


Bloodvessel, wobbling like a 
huge lump of lard, bawling a 
tuneless 10 minute chorus of 
“Wooly Bully"). If in the 
ordinary course of events 
Goodman was to book acts on 
the strength of performances 
such as these, Dingwalls 
would have been trot of busi- 
ness years ago. 

The spruce harmonies and 
fluid shuffling rhythms that 
characterized Nick Lowe’s “1 
Knew the Bride" and “Half a 
Boy. Half a Man" did not 
happen by accident, and like- 
wise Graham Parker's 
pummelling version of Don 
Covay’s “Chain of Fools" had 
evidently been worked on 
before the gig, offering some 
recompense to people who 
had paid £10 to get in. 

David Sinclair 


Promenade concert 


LSO/Abbado 

Albert Hall/ 

BBC 2/ 

Radio 3 

It would be of interest to know 
if the presence of television 
cameras among a well-filled 
Promenade audience is a mat- 
ter of cause or effect, but on 
Tuesday night they combined 
to ■ generate a considerable 
warmth of presence for Albert 
Brendel. as soloist with 
Claudio Abbado and the Lon- 
don Symphony Orchestra. _ 
He has on occasion dented 
that he is an “intellectual” 
pianist, but Mr Brendel was 
certainly mindful of the part 
lhat intellect plays in the D 
minor Piano Concerto by 
Brahms. 


If the satisfaction of such a 
work is in direct proportion to 
the degree of perception from 
its performers, then di vidends 
were generous on this occa- 
sion. Mr Brendel played as the 
fancy took him: spacious and 
elegant in the first movement; 
rhapsodic without _ being 
indulgent in the Adagio, and 
with a wonderfully poised 
vitality in the finale. He was 
complemented by orchestral 
playing of logic and 
conviction. 

In his balance of texture, the 
conductor favoured an un- 
usual amount of low-register 
sonority, which was again 
evident later in the pro- 
gramme. Debussy’s Nocturnes 
seemed to be additionally the 
subject of lighting experi- 
ments for television's benefit, 
with multi-hued colour to 


brighten the central “Fetes", 
but a severe monotone for 
“Nuages" as Debussy's “study 
Hi grey", and for the final 
“Sirftnes". 

In this last the ladies of the 
LSO Chorus were scattered 
among the orchestra instead of 
being- in the usual choral 
duster, with a noticeable gain 
in the blending of their word- 
less voices with' the in- 
struments. Though perhaps 
more inclined to favour a 
cantabiie approach to phras- 
ing in place of impressionist 
evocation, the conductor ob- 
tained a performance that 
glistened with vitality and 
detail, bold tonal range, down 
to wonderfully soft endings for' 
each nocturne, and with con- 
trolled changes of perspective. 

Noel Goodwin 


Gallery 


Warrior of the arts 





.^SSfess^K 


STEADrtAN. 



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Even by the olympian standards of the 18th 
century, the man who combined the exacting 
taste of an influential patron of the arts with 
the tactical brilliance of the military genius 
was a rare animaL 

Any general who was capable of leading an 
Austrian army to victory merits some scrutiny 
and of that select breed, few were more gifted 
than Prince Eugene of Savoy, whose death 250 
years ago is being celebrated in a series of 
exhibitions in and around VicnnaAt Schloss 
Hof and the nearby castle of Niederweiden, a 
few miles east of Vienna, those with a few 
hours to spare will find these two sides to 
Eugene's character amply illustrated in two 
lavish exhibitions. 

In Schloss Hof. whose architectural splen- 
dours inspired two fine Canaletto elevations 
(displayed here), several rooms of the prince's 
former country retreat have been turned into 
museums of military history and Eugene 
memorabilia. 

The soldier prince's ornate pistols, cuirass 
and battered snuff-box. souvenirs from the 
battle of Malplaquet are on display alongside 
brightly coloured maps of the campaigns 
which he undertook with the Duke .of 
Marlborough against the French. 

A portrait of die duke by Adrian Werff, on 
loan from a Florentine museum, is a welcome 
note of relief from the long rows of portraits of 
Prince Eugene which gaze down benignly at 
the visitor at every comer. Most portray the 
roan who was described by Louis XJV as 
“incapable de tout" and whose sickly hunch- 
back appearance induced mirth in the Parisian 
court more favourably than contemporary 
accounts record. It is impossible as one sees an 
these heroic portraits to believe that his upper 
lip was so narrow that it prevented him from 
ever shutting his mouth as the Duchess of 
Orleans relates. 

The exhibition at Schloss Hof also attempts 
to record the acheivements of the baroque 
which flourished in that area of central Europe 
which Eugene's armies freed from the Turks. 
Silver coins commemorating the downfall of 
the infidel and a series of opulent ivory reliefs 
on the same theme are contained in the 
smaller rooms. 

Despite these, however, the visitor leaves 
Schloss Hof more aware of Eugene’s military 
genius than his no less significant role as a pa- 
tron of the arts. At Niederweiden, this 
impression is balanced by the presence of 
several architectural models and drawings 
devoted to Eugene's building activities which 
as well as Schloss Hof included the spectacular 
Belvedere Palace in Vienna and the smaller 
but no less worthy Winter Palace in .the 
Himmelpfortstrasse. 

Two giants of the Austrian baroque, Fischer 
von Erlach and Lukas von Hildebrandt, 
worked for Eugene and the drawings, many of 
them from the Albertina in Vienna, are an 
insight into the workings of the two great 



Prince Engene of Savoy: arts patron 

architects' minds. Both look as motife the 
forms of the Turkish tents which had so 
recently been erected at the gates of the city 
during the second siege of 1683 and their 
forms, in their exuberance and imagination, 
seem the complete antithesis of the “perfec- 
tion of restraint" which marked the highly 
disciplined armies which occupied the other 
side of Eugene's life. 

For those who cannot face the 8am bus to 
Schloss Hof or would rather remain in Vienna, 
a related exhibition can be seen in the opulent 
national library on the Josefsplarz-Here, 
underneath the vast oval dome of Fischer von 
Erlach's greatest secular work, the 15.000 
books of Eugene’s library are on display, “an 
excellent supply ofbooks". the prince called it 
and a tribute to the breadth of bis int e rest s 
which included, apart from architecture and 
war. trees and all forms of tropical birdlife. 

But even among these books, the art of war 
is never far away and the soldier-patron was 
able to combine his two great passions in the 
magnificent quartos of military treatises, each 
one of which was lovingly bound in the skins 
of the defeated Janissaries. 

Richard Bassett 


WOMEN IMPRESSIONISTS • TamdrCatb 



* TV fiat ctp book ibe piteafr ifrc ■ ■ 

f i y i urt fill nS a a m p nm ight aw Ac uumhAmj 
wok of iboa kroon «bo jebned m aadb Is b 

ImWlnmB y tea) a a mak AaonH nmaat. 

ih»i uinik 


QPhaidon 


Audiences and jury did not have the 
same idea about the films shown at 
this year’s Locarno Festival. 
Report from Geoff Brown 

British Lamb wins 
the bronze leopard 


If it had been left to Locarno's 
audiences, toe top festival 
prize might well have gone to 
toe British film Lamb — that 
stem, well -wrought account of 
a misguided Irish priest taking 
an epileptic urchin under his 
wing. 

Spectators who fidgeted 
through wayward, clumsy and 
uncouth delicacies from far- 
flung countries, received 
Lamb, directed by Colin 
Gregg from Bernard 
MacLaverty's novel, with the 
rapt attention due to a siark 
story punched home in crys- 
tal-clear images. 

Not that the director re- 
turned from Locarno empty- 
handed: at the closing 
ceremony. Gregg hopped on 
to the platform to collect, in 
all, three scrolls of paper, a 
gold ingot in a presentation 
case and a bronze leopard 
coucham (toe festival's third 
main prize). 

Lamb also received the 
unique accolade of a tele- 
vision screening throughout 
Switzerland and Italy on toe 
day of its festival debut, an 
event arranged by RAI tele- 
vision. Ax a stroke the film 
clocked up some six million 
speculators — far, far more 
than in Britain, where it 
received a meek commercial 
release earlier this summer. 

Locarno audiences also rel- 
ished 40m 2 Deutschland, a 
highly impressive d£but film 
by toe Turkish emigre Tevfik 
Baser. The forbidding title is 
perfectly apt, for toe 40 square 
metres of her tiny Hamburg 
apartment are all toe central 
character knows. 

Her Gastarbeiter husband, 
fearing cultural contamina- 
tion, forbids contact with toe 
world outside; so days consist 
of staring from windows, rev- 
erie. incomprehension and de- 
spair. This might suggest a 
glum essay in cultural schisms 
and claustrophobia, but Baser 
— trained in photography and 
toe graphic arts — invests his 
story with a potent sense of 
mystery. 

A night-time exterior shot 
shows blackness punctured by 
white television screens 
flickering in separate apart- 
ments: remnants of toe wife’s 
Turkish past give ironic col- 
our to the drab d6cor; through- 
out. a prowling camera 
prevents the character’sprison 
from becoming the 
audience's. Baser bounced on 
to the award platform to 
receive three scrolls of paper, a 
silver leopard (toe second 
prize) and much deserved 
applause. 

By comparison Janusz 
Zaorski, the Polish director of 
toe top prize-winner Jezioro 
Bodensltie (Lake Constance), 
received his golden leopard to 
muted dapping, polite moans 
and whistles. Perhaps the jury 
had been seduced by toe film's 
promising credit sequence, in 
which toe hero returns, 
haunted and curious, to his 
wartime internment camp on 
the borders of Lake Con- 
stance: It is more likely, 
though, that they succumbed, 
as juries often do. to com- 
promise and internal pressure; 
for There was nothing in toe 
remaining film — a comedy- 
drama lacking all verisimili- 
tude or resonance — to deserve 
so high an honour. 

No controversy surrounded 


toe top prize-winner in 
Locarno's television movies 
section, toe Israeli Avauti 
Popolo. The film follows two 
Egyptians in toe aftermath of 
toe 1967 Six Day War, stum- 
bling across forbidden whisky 
and an Israeli patrol en route 
to toe Suez Canal. 

Their adventures are wittily 
written in a vein of black, 
dangerous comedy, and staged 
with an infectious cinematic 
brio that promises well for the 
young director Rafi Bukaee. 
At the award ceremony 
Bukaee duly received a scroll 
of paper and the golden 
leopard’s eye — a startling 
representation of an eye split 
open, with a leopard instead of 
a pupil. 

Locarno has always offered 

excellent retrospectives, and 
.this year we were spoiled with 
three. One saluted the fine 
actor Francois Simon, son of 
Michel — a leading light of the 
Swiss film renaissance, able to 
conjure toe most diverse ex- 
pressions from his fragile 
voice, furrowed brow and 
deep-set eyes. Another dipped 
into the prolific output of 
Ennio Flaiano (1910-1972) — 
an esteemed novelist, journal- 
ist. man about town, script- 
writer for Fellini. Antonioni 
and Italy's best commercial 
directors. 



Homage to a serious joker: 
Ennio Flaiano, scriptwriter 
and man about town 

Italian scriptwriters always 
come by toe pack — 10 names 
are not uncommon on film 
credits — but toe festival 
spotlit Flaiano's individual 
brand of serious joking with a 
highly inventive exhibition 
built round stills, posters, 
newspaper cuttings, letters, 
drawings, book-jackets, tele- 
vision dips — even the sounds 
of Flaiano's favourite records. 
Those seeking a similar con- 
text for Francois Simon were 
out of luck: Francois Simon — 
La Presence, a film portrait 
prepared by toe actor’s widow, 
crumpled both his life and 
work into a morbid, preten- 
tious collage. 

But toe chief object of 
retrospective attention was 
Keisuke Kinoshita — a direc- 
tor little known in toe West, 
though in a career stretching 
back to 1943 he has made 
some of Japan's most re- 
spected and popular films. 
Luckily British audiences will 
be able to share Locarno's 
discoveries when toe National 
Film Theatre mounts a 
Kinoshita season next year. 


SADLER'S WELLS ROYAL BALLET 

First London performances of 
DAVID BINTLEY's 
highly acclaimed fairy tale ballet 




SNOW QUEEN 

Sept 9 101922 at 730 Sept 20 at 230 and 730 


Swan Lake 

Septll 12 15 at 730. 
Sept 13 at 230 and 730 


Quartet/ 

The Wand of 
Youth/ 
Tchaikovsky 
Pas de Deux/ 
Flowers 
of the 
Forest 

Sept 16 17 
18 at 730 


TIKSMOWQuai 

SMlnUi 






Reservations 01240 1066/1911 
Aocess/Visa/Dtners Chib 
Tickets 

£1-0O-£22-5O (eves) £1-1330 (mats) a 

& 





20 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


Former servant 
key to 




Continued front page 1 

with a video recorder. It was 
found in the possession of a 
man from the Bournemouth 
area who was detained and is 
assisting police. 

' A friend of Stephenson, he 
is not believed to be connected 
wjih the burglary and 
murders. 

Det Chief Supt Wheeler 
said: “We urgently want to 
trace Stephenson. From in- 
quiries we have made we 
believe he is a dangerous and 
violent man. He may have one 
of the weapons in his pos- 
session. It is for that reason we 
are disclosing his name. 

* We would like to stress to 
all members of the public that 
they should not under any 
circumstances approach him 
but contact any police station. 

~He added: ‘*1 think it is 
quite possible Stephenson 
could be anywhere in the 
country. I have no idea if 
anyone is with him but we 
have had one report that there 
is -a lady with him. ft could be 
one or more people we are 
looking for in connection with 
the burglary .and murders.” 

Because of the scenes of 
disorder at the six-bedroomed 
house, which was broken into 
while the five victims were 
having dinner on Monday 
night, police believe that more 
than one man is likely to have 
been involved. 

A rear ground-floor window 
was used to gain entry before 
the Cleaver family and their 
live-in nurse, who had worked 
there for four years, were tied 
up at gunpoint, callously bun- 
dled upstairs and strangled 
before their killer sought to 
destroy evidence before set- 
ting their bodies aiighL 
Post mortem examinations 
have been completed, but 
police would not disclose the 
injuries of the victims, who 
were badly burned. Nor would 
they comment on a report that 
the younger Mrs Oeaver had 
been raped. 

The stolen guns — two 12- 
bdre shotguns, a .410 shotgun 
and a .22 rifle — were licensed 
in the name of Mr Cleaver, a 
wealthy man who enjoyed 
field sports, fishing and grey- 




Today's events 


Royal engagements 

Prince Michael of Kent at- 
tends the Senior Grand Manx 
Grand Prix. Isle of Mau I. 
New exhibitions - 

Four Ayrshire Artists: 
watercolours: Maclaurin Art 
-Gallery. Rozclle Park. Ayr; Mon 
to Sat M to 5. Sun Z to 5 (ends 
Sept 28). 

An and crafts: Cosy Gallery. 
SI Upper Lisburn Rd. Belfast 
Thurs to Sat 12.45 to 6.30 (ends 
Sept 27). 

Alastair Hull: Afghanistan: 
rugs, furniture, glass, pottery; 
textiles and clothing: Cobbs 
Mill. Mill Lane. Hurstpierpoint, 
Sussex: Mon to Sun 10.30 to 7 
(ends Sept 14). 

Exhibitions in progress 

History of shell collecting: Art 
Gallery and Museum. Kelvin- 
grove. Glasgow; Mon to Sal 10 
to 5. Sun 2 to 5 (ends Sept 28). 

At Home: Scottish interiors 
1820-1429: The Fine Art Soci- 
ety. 12 Great King St. Edin- 


burgh; Mon to Fri 9.30 to 5.30, 
Sat 10 to 1 (ends Sept 20). 

Gardens in Focus: photo- 
graphs by Heather Angel: The 
Ascrcavie watercolours: work by 
Margaret Stones and John 
Hope: The Enlightenment of 
Scottish Botany Inverleith 
House. Royal Botanic Garden. 
Edinburgh: Mon to Sat 10 to 5. 
Sun 1 1 to 5 (ends Oct 311. 

20th century drawings: work 
by artists of the British School: 
Octagon Gallery. Fitzwifliam 
Museum. Cambridge: Tues to 
Sat 2 to 5. Sun 2.15 to 5 (ends 
Sept 28). 

Jewellery and carvings from 
Central Asia: The Read Molteno 
Gallery. The Buildings. Brough- 
ton. Slock bridge; Wed to Sun 
10.30 to 6 (ends Sept 14). 

William Barnes of Dorset: 
poet, painter, scholar and artist 
1801-1886: Dorset County Mu- 
seum. High St. West Dor- 
chester Mon to Fri 10 to 5. Sat 
10 to 1 and 2 to 5 (ends Oclr 4), 

23rd summer exhibition: 
work by 75 gallery artists: Colin 
Jellicoe Gallery. 82 Portland St. 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,142 



ACROSS: 

1 Showing opposite of love, in 
mental disposition (10). 

9 School in distress (6). 

10 Turncoat finds fault with 

.. other ranks (8). 

tl Dramatist takes pieces with 
queen (8). 

12 Dance played by co-op- 
erative types (4). 

13 Set up makeshift way. as re- 
sult of embracing? (4-6). 

.15 Publicize right to support 
strike (3-4). 

^ S °lxwind i (7) EelS ^° VC on 

20 Is 16 straightening this 
desk? (10). 

21 Something put on in king's 
honour (4). 

2 3 Obsessed with a particular 
part of record (3-5). 

25 Greek, attaining eminence 
among expert combatants 

' (S)r - ■ " 

26 Kind mother (6). 

27 Arab delicacy - looks invit- 
ing? (6,4). . 

DOWN: 

2 In Copenhagen. Danes' 
business schedule (6). 

3 Somehow relax MEP. for in- 
stance (8). 

4 Disorganized when meat's 
all gone? (3,2,5). 


5 Organ note's distinctive 
characteristic (7). 

6 Prune won't make you fat 
(4). 

7 Reminder one girl got for 
overspending (8). 

8 Steps taken to avoid weapon 
cuts? (5.5). 

12 Captain played for money, 

not free (10). 

14 University rank for num- 
bers of bookmen (10). 

16 Make new production with 
special care in network (8). 

18 Exeter man, perhaps, in 
navy (4.4). 

19 Connecting device leaking 
badly (7). 

22 It relies on two banks for 
advances (6). 

24 Terminates alliances (4). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,141 


mt. 



" - ‘-. . f;, '- v yr. , 

;;r 

.V-; & 


hound racing, but who had 
become increasingly reclusive 
after ihe stroke which disabled 
his wife 15 years ago. 

Mr Wheeler said: “Stephen- 
son is the key to this investiga- 
tion, and because of the fact 
that the fi rearms are outstand- 
ing and we believe him to be a 
violent man from the in- 
quiries we have made, we owe 
it to the public to bring the 
danger to their attention.” 

A blood-stained woman 
seen near the house after the 
discovery of the murders was 
eliminated from inquiries 
when it was found that she 
had been scratched when she 
fell over some wire while out 
walking. 

Mr Cleaver's second son 
James, who has a villa in 
Portugal, flew home on Tues- 
day after learning of the family 
tragedy. The two children of 
Tom and Wendy Geaver, 
Melissa, aged 19. and Jason, 
aged 21, were being cared for 
by relatives last night 

Stephenson was born in 
Bishop Auckland and lived 
with his parents, two brothers 
and a sister in the north-east 
though some of his childhood 
was spent in West Germany 
where his father served in the 
Army. 

He trained as an apprentice 
fitter at Easingion Colliery, 
County Durham, before mov- 
ing to Coventry in 1968. 

• Founded business: Two 
happy households, of father 
and son. have been destroyed 
by the Fordingbridge killings 
(Michael McCarthy writes). 

Mr Geaver founded an 
educational correspondence 
course business in the Twen- 
ties and expanded successfully 
into publishing before selling 
out and retiring to the edge of 
the New Forest. 

His son Tom and his wife 
were frequent visitors* from 
their own home in OxshotL, 
Surrey, and it was paying such 
a call that they met their 
deaths. 

Mr Tom Geaver. according 
to neighbours, had a business 
involved with running private 
schools in Britian and abroad, 
and Jason worked with him. 
Melissa is a student 



The smoke-blackened home of the Cleaver family at Fordingbridge in Hampshire where police found the charred bodies of 
the five murder victims who had been set on fire by their attackers after being strangled. 



Family photographs on the mantiepiece and paintings on the walls inside the Cleaver family's isolated Fordingbridge house 


Heroism in 
Russian 
ship rescue 
revealed 

Continued from page 1 

stripped offlheirown clothing 
and given it to the survivors 
hauled from the water. 

A honeymoon couple, Al- 
iona and Yuri Pavlikovi. told 
of their ordeal after going to 
their cabin shortly before the 
fatal collision at 11. 15 pm 
when the cargo ship, the Pyotr 
Vasev. ripped open the star- 
board side of the liner alter 
mysteriously failing to re- 
spond to radio warnings that it 
was sailing on 8 collision 
course. 

-We were about to faU 
asleep when we felt this 
collision”, Aliona said. “I am 
a coward, that is why I 
screamed. Yuri found the 
lifebelts and helped me put 
mine on. Wc made our way to 
the deck in the darkness. It 
was terrible, the deck started 
sloping away from us and we 
slid over the side. People all 
around were screaming. 

“The barman, who was near 
us in the water tried to 
encourage me. We swam for 
two hours. Then we saw the 
tug boat Mars." 

Among the first rescuers to 
■arrive at the scene were cadets 
from a Black Sea training 
school in rowing boats. 

Later the survivors were 
taken to the port of Novoross- 
iysk which the liner had left 
earlier with all its lights blaz- 
ing. Special communication 
lines were set up to enable 
those rescued to contact rel- 
atives all over the Soviet 
Union. 

It was disclosed yesterday 
that the captains of both 
vessels survived the disaster 
and they were understood to 
be helping the Kremlin in- 
quiry commuion headed by a 
leading member of the ruling 
12-man Politburo, Mr Gcidar 
Aliyev. 

The government paper 
Izvestia has already laid the 
blame for the collision in 
which nearly 400 people ap- 
pear to have died on those in 
command of the bulk carrier. 
It openly accused them of 
gross negligence for failing to 
respond to the warnings from 
the bridge of the 50-year-old 
liner. 




‘ THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Concise Crossword page 14 


Manchester. Mon to Fri 1 0 to 6. 
Sat I to 5 (ends Sept 13). 

Last chance to see 
Shipping sketches by John 
Wilson Carmichael; Laing Art 
Gallerv. Newcastle, 10 io 5.30. 

The" British School at. Athens 
and the Ashmolcan: Randolph 
Gallery. Ashmolcan Museum, 
Beaumont St, Oxford, 10 to 4. 
Music 

An evening of popular and 
Scottish songs, by the Peebles 
Singers: Parish Church Centre, 
Peebles. 7.30. 

Talks, lectures 
Home Spun: spinning, by 
Freda Walker. Lake District 
National Park Visitor Centre. 
Brockhole. Windermere. 1.30. 

The American Shakers: their 
community and craftsmanship, 
by John Wilson: Lecture Hall, 
The American Museum in Brit- 
ain. Claverton Manor, Bath, 7. 

General 

Ceramic sculpture, demon- 
stration by Peter Care; Ciren- 
cester Workshops. Brewery 
Court. 10 to 3.30. 

The American Shakers and 
the Oval Box Tradition: Shaker 
furniture demonstration, by 
John Wilson: Lecture Hall. The 
American Museum in Britain. 
Claverton Manor. Bath. 2 to 5. 


Roads 


The Midlands: MJ: Contra- 
flow neaijundions 20 and 21 
(Lutterworth). M5: Two lane 
contraflow in use between junc- 
tions 4 (Bromsgrove) and 5 
(Droitwich). 

Wales and West MS: Lane 
closures on southbound 
carriageway between junctions 
25 (Taunton) and 26 (Welling- 
ton). M4: Lane restrictions in 
both directions between junc- 
tions 44 and 45 (Swansea). A4: 
Repair work on Bath Road, 
Bristol near Kensington Park 
Road. 

The North: M6: Roadworks 
beneath junction 16 (A500): 
single line traffic northbound. 
M63: Major widening scheme at 
Barton Bridge: avoid if possible. 
A54: Roadworks on new bypass 
at Kclsall Hill. Cheshire. 

Scotland: M8: Roadworks at 
Newbridge Road. W of New- 
bridge causing diversions and 
deiays.A80: Glasgowbound 
carriageway dosed due to 
resurfacing between Haggs and 
Castiecarry. A7: Single line traf- 
fic between Langholm and 
Canobie due to resuifadng 
work, Dumfries and Galloway. 

Information supplied by AA 


New books — paperback 


The Literary Editor's selection of i nt er estin g books published this week: 
FICTION 

A Po s th u mous Confession, by MarceUus Emants. translated and 
introduced by J.M. Coetzee (Quartet Encounters, £4.95) 

Blood Libels, by Clive Sinclair (Picador. £2.95) 

Fires, by Raymond Carver (Picador. £350) 

Fly Away Home, by Marge Piercy (Pavareie, £3.50) 

High Ground, by John McGahem (Faber, £3.50) 

NON-FICTION 

Amritsar, by Mark Tiily and Sassh Jacob (Pan, £3.95) 

Reading Latin, by Peter V. Jones and Keith C. Skfwefl (Cambridge, text 
£5.95. Grammar, Vocabulary and Exercises E9-95) 

Pierre Boulez, A symposium, edited by William Glock (Eutenberg. £12) 
The Long M arch , by Harrison E Salisbury (Pan, £3.95) 

Woody Allen. His Rims and Career, by Douglas Broda (Columbus, £655) 


The Halifax House Price Index 





Average 

Annua) 


Average 

Annual 



Index 

price E change% 

Index 

prieeE 

danga% 

1983 


100 X 

30698 


100.0 

34.795 


1984 


1072 

30952 

72 

108X 

34.059 

69 

1985 


117.0 

32953 

9.1 

115.4 

37.357 

8.0 

1985 

Quarter 2 

1153 

32G83 

8.9 

1168 

36292 

66 


Quarter 3 

117.6 

32678 

7.7 

1(6.4 

37647 

7.7 


QuarteM 

120.7 

34.407 

67 

119.6 

40122 

96 

1986 

Quarter 1 

1226 

35.164 

92 

1206 

40892 

9.0 


Quarter 2 

1266 

38258 

11.0 

1252 

44.492 

10X 

1985 

August 

1172 

32852 

76 

1161 

37 439 

68 


September 

1169 

33890 

8.1 

1176 

36636 

8.1 


October 

1168 

34X88 

64 

1160 

39680 

68 


November 

1206 

34.359 

82 

119.7 

40X71 

92 


December 

1222 

34.917 

9-7 

1221 

41.015 

108 

1988 

January 

121.0 

34272 

8.7 

1206 

40529 

86 


February 

1223 

34.941 

63 

1196 

39.733 

64 


March 

124.0 

36034 

9.7 

1225 

42357 

102 


Apnl 

1267 

37638 

10.0 

1227 

46771 

7.4 


May 

128.4 

37.800 

11.0 

125.4 

44.121 

106 


June 

130.8 

3S.453 

121 

1276 

45611 

124 


Jtiy 

1323 

40260 

13X 

1263 

46382 

11.0 


August 

133.1 

40X26 

136 

130.7 

47X04 

126 


Source: HaMax BuBdtog Society 


Fam borough show 

Fambo rough International 
*86. the Society of British Aero- 
space Companies exhibition 
and flying display at Fam- 
borough airfield, opens to the 
public tomorrow and continues 
daily from 9.30am to 7 pm until 
Sunday. 

Tickets are available on the 
gate or from Keith Prowse Ltd, 
.tri: (01) 741 8999. 


£250,000 bond 


winning i 
month's £250.000 Premium 
Bond prize is IJB 072696. The 
winner lives in Chichester. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today . at 1 1.45 am and 3 JO pm. 


Weather 

forecast 

An anticyclone will move 
E into the SW with a 
ridge of high pressure 
across southern districts. 
A deep Atlantic de- 
pression will move E to 
the N of Iceland with the 
associated fronts crossing 
. Scotland. 

6 am to midnight 


London, SE and central England, 
East Anglia, Midlands, Channel 
Islands: tarty mist sunny periods 
developing; wind westerly light; max 
temp 19C (66F). 

E, SW, NW, central N England. 


Wales: Early mist, sunny periods 
developing: wind westerly light; max 
temp 18C (64F). 

Lake District, Isle of Man, HE 
England, Borders, Edinburgh and 
Dundee, SW Scotland, Glasgow, 
Argyll, Northern Ireland: Sunny 
intervals at first becoming more 
cloudy with some rain later: wind 
westerly light becoming moderate; 
max temp 1?C(63F). 

Aberdeen, Central Hr 
Moray Firth, NE, NW 
Orkney, Shetland: Mainly doudy. 
occasional rain becoming brighter 
from the N with showers later; wind 
westerly moderate or fresh but 
strong to gale force in exposed 
places; max temp 15C (59F). 

Outlook for Friday and Saturday: 
Sunny intervals and showers in the 
N. Mainly dry in the S with sunny 
irrods developing especially in the 


E" 



b-bTue sky: be -blue Sky and cloud: c- 
cloudy: ixrvrrrast: f-fog; d-drisie: h- 
hdb: mWmbt r-raln: s-snow: th- 
ihundprsiorm. p-showera. 

Arrows show wind direction, wtud 
so^edmipbl circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


HT 

PM 

HT 

58 

301 

69 

42 

233 

41 

123 

826 

127 

3.1 



11.3 

811 

11.7 

5.1 

667 

5,4 

56 



42 

627 

52 

«6 

210 

4X 

41) 

1260 

3.9 

53 

11X3 

5.5 

/.I 

7.42 

7.1 

67 

714 

90 

53 

365 

5.4 


12.19 

9X 

24 

11.8 

2 X 

46 

1.01 

4.7 

67 

7.28 

7X 

67 

6.18 

7.0 

3.8 

867 

4X 

53 

562 

56 

20 

8.19 

23 

4.4 

1230 

46 


12.18 

8.1 


1207 

4.4 

90 

7.31 

9.3 

52 

462 

52 

4.0 

1248 

4.1 


7 . 18 
422 
1206 

In metres: ImeOttKML 


Sundaes: Sun sate 
6.17 am 761pm 



Around Britain 


6.06 am . 603 pm 
i mooru 8.10 am 


Lighting-up time 


The pound 


AoaMaS 
Austria Sch 
Belgian Fr 
Canada S 
Demerit Kr 
fWadfrii 
Ranee Fr 
Germany Oat 
Grew* Dr 
Hong Kang 5 
Ireland PI 
itafyUra 
Japan Van 
H e ine lands GW 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa fld 
Spain Pm 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland ft 
USAS 

YugniariaDnr 


Bank 


2X35 

6835 

2.14 
11.33 

7.75 
1832 

617 

2 K00 

nas 

1.15 
219000 

244^0 

8575 

1137 

224.75 

4.75 
20535 

10.72 

£57 

1357 

76530 


Bank 

Sefls 

2.40 

21.15 
8235 
205 
1133 
725 
932 
330 
192X0 
. 1135 
1X9 
2070X0 
230X0 
338S 
10.77 
21235 
4X5 
19535 
10.17 
233 
1487 
82500 


Mas tor smaB d en omination tank notes 
f as suppted by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and other foranp Oitency 
busness. 

Hetai Price Index: 384.7 

London: The FT Index Closed 141 43 at 

1324.6. 



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4 The 

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London 8.11 pm to 5.48 am 
Bristol 62 r - — 

Edinburgh 


Sun Bain 

Max 

in 

* 

C 

F 

i 

IX - 

15 

59 

3.1 - 

16 

61 

4.1 

18 

64 

69 - 

Ifl 

88 

11j4 

21 

70 


021 pn to 5X9 am 
830 pm to 5.54 am 


30pmt 

832 pm to 554 am 
831 pm to 6.12 8 m 


Yesterday 


_ 8 t midday yesterday: c. 
in r, rabr s, sun. 

C F C F 

1 1457 Ooemsay s 1559 
c l 4 57 In vern ess f 1254 
1 1457 Jersey C1661 
c 1661 London C1355 

1 1457 RTncttSSer e 1355 

Etfinbtogh c 1254 Hewc— 8 e r 1050 

Glasgow 1 1355 HDttsway s 1355 


Cardiff 


Anniversaries 


Births: Francois, Vicorate de 
Chateaubriand, writer and poli- 
tician, St Malo, 1768; Anton 

Bruckner. Aosfdder, Austria. 
1824; Darios MUhand, Aix-en- 
Province, 1892. 

Deaths: Robert Dudley. Earl 
of Leicester, favourite of Queen 
Elizabeth L Corn bury. Oxford- 
shire. 1588; James Wyatt, archi- 
tect, Marlborough. Wiltshire, 
1813; Edvard Grieg, Bergen, 
1907; _ Albert Schweitzer, 
humanitarian, Lqjnbarcne, Ga- 
bon, 1965. 


Onr address 


Information for indtskm tn The 
Times infprmaUoo servic e should be 
sent M* The Editor. I Its. The Times. 
PO Bax 7. 1 Virginia Sheet. London. 
El 9XN 


. NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
/, Primed by Lo nd o n Post (Prim- 
ers) Limited of 1 Virginia street. 
London El 9XN. Thursday. Septem- 
ber 4. 1906. Registered as a news- 
paper 41 the post Office. 


Se a bo rn 
BridRngton 
Cromer 
Lowestoft 
Clacton 
Mot o ato 
SOUTHCOAST 
Folkestone 10.7 

H asti ngs 73 - 

E as tbo urn e 7.9. - 

Brighton 5.7 

Worthing 6.6 - 

Uttfehmptn 63 

BognorH 7,1 

Souftsea 33 - 

Ssndoem 8.1 

SbsnkBn x 

Boummnth 5.4 

Pooto 5.6 

Saratoga &4 

W eymouth 2.7 

Eswooai 4.4 

TefgnrrwBtti 83 - 

Torquay 63 - 

Falmouth 3.1 

Pe nz anc e 23 XI 

Jer s ey 53 X3 

Guerns ey 24 

WEST COAST 
ScBtyWes 03 - 

Ne wqua y 03 XI 


x - 21 70 sunny 

21 70 sunny 
19 66 sunny 
19 66 sunny 

19 68 bright 
ZD 68 bright 

20 M bright 
20 68 sunny 
19 08 dowry 
19 66 suraty 


19 66 

20 68 
18 64 
18 S4 
21 70 
21 70 
20 68 
17 63 
16 61 
17 83 
17 63 


brirfit 

b righ t 

sunny 

doudy 

sunny 

sunny 

bright 

brlttrt 

ctaudy 

doudy 

doudy 


15 59 doudy 
17 63 doudy 

These are Ttttsday'a figures 


Surinam Max 
hrs in C F 

Rfmcanfce x - 17 63 duM 

Tenby 03 - 17 63 doudy 

Cofwyn Bay x 

Moracsmbe 43 - 15 59 bright 

Douglas x 

ENGLAND AND WALES 
London iix - 22 72 sunny 

BhtamAifpl 63 - 20 68 sunny . 

Bristol (Ctrl) 8.7 - 18 64 sunny 

Cardiff (CW) 13 .02 17 63 drftzfa 

Anglesey 83 .01 17 63 sunny ’ 

B'pool Aspl 7.S - 18 61 bright 

Manchester 7.9 - 19 66 sunny 

Notengham 53 - 19 68 sunny 

Mctl-o-Tyne 03 - 15 59 cloudy 

CertWe 13 - 14 57 doudy 

SCOTLAND 

Eakdateouk 22 XI 14 57 showers 

Prestwick 25 - 15 59 doudy 

Bfsagsw 24 X 2 16 61 ram 

Time . ,ia 14 57 ram 

Stornaway 33 X 2 14 47 sunny 

L ere** 7.8 .12 12 54 showers 

Wick 6-3 .09 13 55 showers 

KMom 24 .02 15 59 showers 

Aberdeen 25 - 15 59 bright 

SI Andrews 3.7 - 17 63 doudy 

BWwtgh 13 - 16 61 doudy 

NORTHERN IRELAND 

42 X5 16 61 rakt 


Abroad 


WtMAYi C. dau* «L f. Wo fg, log; r. rain; s. sun; an. snow t thunder. 

C F 

s 25 77 Ctfegoe 
. . s 29 84 Cptwgn 

AteoftWa- s 30 86 Cdrtu 
Algiers a 30 88 DobOn 
Amst'dm r 14 57 DubrosnBt 
s 29 84 Fam 
8 38100 “ 


Athene! 

Bahrein 

Batbads* 


Beirut 


f 2S 79 Funchal 
Geneva 

S Si 75G8HMM- 
C 17 83 MsWd* 

Bermuda* s 28 82 ongK 

Btonfiz s 21 70 hmsbrek 

Breda's s 22 72 Istanbul 

1 16 66 Jeddah 

f IS 69 Jtfbreg* 

s 23 73 Karachi 

f 22 72 LPafansa 
s 33 SI Lisbon 
a 31 88 Locarno 


BonTna* 


Budapst 
B Aires* 

calm 

Cape To 
CVmca 
Chicago* 
Cfa’chomta 


C F 

r 12 54 Majorca 
C 13 55 Malaga 
» 20 84 Meha 
f 14 57 Meft ’ me . 
s 24 75 Mexico C s 21 
S 28 82 MareT 
s 27 Si Mfan 
c 19 68 Mrearaar 
s 23 73 Moscow 
s 23 73 Muaich 

4 25 77 Nairobi* 
f 16 61 Naples 
f 31 88 N BeM 
8 22 72 N York* 
s 25 77Nfca 
s 38 97 Oslo 
s 19 68 Parts 
c 28 82 Paktan 

5 25 77 - 
a 29 84 
f 21 70 



73 

C 22 72 

S 23 84 Ti 

a 33 91 Tenerife 
c 2i 70 Tokyo 
s 23 73 Toronfo- 
f 16 61 IMs 
c 17 83 Valencia 
C 27 81 VeocW 

t 20 68 Vienna 
d 9 48 Wans . .. 
f 28 82 Wxstrtoo- o 21 
f 20 88 wernton c 10 
t^J, ? !!«* ** * 2 ' 



* as 79 L Angels C 21 70 

s 27 81 Luxwsbg r 13 56 RiodaJ 
f 10 GO Madrid s 30 88 RM 









21 








s »*ip> 


. -. -V.- 


1.1-..V.. 

. ■■■■ ■.' ••!«. 
• . >• 


*■ Aiiii 

, / i 
- -« - •** 


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Ink* 


business and finance 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 33 
TELEVISION AND RADI037 


THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


•i.‘‘ '*il ) 


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2 1 |. 

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■ i i ■■ 

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‘ ' ’ *.J 

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■' " V.7- 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

stock market 

FT 30 Share 

1324.6 (+4.6) 

FT-SE 100 

1670.7 (+2.9) 

Bargains 

22057 

USM (Datastream) 

127.13 (-0.11) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

1,5005 (+0.0110) 

W German mark 

3.0415 (+0.0178) 

Trade-weighted 

71.4 (+0.3) 

Prudential 
pulls out 

The Prudential Corporation 


Bank objection 
rejected as MMC 
clears Elders bid 


The way was cleared for 
US Dollar another mega-bid yesterday 

1 ,5005 (+0.01 1 0) when tiie Monopolies and 

Mergers Commission gave the 

? arfc green light for Elders DCL, the 

3.0415 (+0.0178) Australian drinks group, to 

Trade-weinht»H it* £1.8 billion takeover 

71 amXqP™ 11 b,d for Allied-Lyons, the food 

• \" ru -«5/ and drinks conglomerate. 

" The nine-month MMC in- 

Pril/lan+^^1 vestigation had been 
JL X llllcll prompted by concern over the 

high level of paring and bank 
Tkll IlC rhll-f finance involved to mount the 
J-J UUl hid but erven after unprece- 

The Prudential Corporation SSS^S pp ?$i 0 H. from ^ 
is effectively to pull oat of thc ^ >J ^ n ^Z 

South Africa through an beaded not to Mode the 

agreed takeover of Prudential “S n . rr - t „ m 

Assurance Company of South 
Africa (Pacsa). ts quoted SST?? 1 -°L 
subsidiary, by Liberty Life 1351 - n,8 l lt: 1 do find rt 

one of the country's biggest SnimKSS^taS' thal thC 
insurance groups. commisaon had an opportn- 

Lihertv i«s maVim. » n . ,l y of drawm g attention to 

L wny S making 3 pro - thp v/M-v nncat i c fa ptAn/ Tiaturp 


ferred ordinary share offer, 
which values Pacsa at R304 


the very unsatisfactory nature 
of highly leveraged bids. I 


By Cliff Feltham 

and welcomed the strongly and last night was 
commission’s report. “There 35 Ip, down 2p on the day, 
have been a lot of unfounded valuing the group 31 around 
reports, some of them from £2.4 billion. “ A new bid 
Allied, about our financing would have to be around 400p 
plans so I am glad we have put just for openers, " one brewery 
that right.” analyst said- 

Tfae commission found that But Mr Elliott may switch 
the bid would be highly lever- his attention to Courage, the 
aged by British standards — brewing business owned by 
leaving Elders with high Hanson Trust, and thought to 
borrowings relative to its cap- be on the market for around 
hal base — bnt concluded that £1.3 billion. Hanson last night 
the Australian predator would declined to comment on 
be acquiring in Allied-Lyons a speculation that a deal was 
mature business with a stable imminent, 
cash flow. The proposed sale Allkd-Lyons has also been 
of Allied-Lyons’ food division strengthening its defences and 
would also offer an immediate is dose to purchasing the 
prospect of reducing the cap- Hiram Walker spirits business 
itaJgearing. of Canada for about £600 

The report discloses that the million. 

Bank of England- thought to m H dere. whose best known 
pnbhc cdvidCTce product is Foster’s, the top- 
on a takeover bid for the first selling lag-r in Australia, 
ume - strongly opposed the beco me the British 

takeover because of ihe high- brewer of its chief Australian 
levels of capital gearing and rival if it ^ over Allied- 


3£n ££ 


in the groups merging opera- 
■ tions from next January. 

Prudential, which had a 64 
per cent slake in Pacsa, will 
end up with a 6.7 per cent 
interest in Liberty, and it 
intends to keep this. The new 
Liberty shares, valued at 
R140, will pay a fixed amnia! 
dividend of R5. 

Mr Brian Medhurst, manag- 
ing director of Prudentials 
overseas division, said the 
decision to merge with Liberty 
had resulted from political 
developments in South Africa 
which had seen many senior 
insurance personnel leave the 
country. 

P&O profits 

Peninsular and Oriental 
Steam Navigation Company 
yesterday announced pretax 
profits up 19 per cent to £69.8 
million on turnover down 7 
per cent to £721 million for 
the six months to June 30. The 
interim dividend was in- 
creased by l.5p to 7.5pi 

Tempus^p«8r22 

Builder ahead. 

Wilson (Connolly) Hold- 
ings, the private housebuilder, 
yesterday reported interim 
pretax profits up 31 per cent 
from £7.4 million to £10.3 
million. Turnover rose from 
£423 million to £55.7 million. 
The interim dividend of 0 l8p 
represents a 39 per cent on last 
year’s half-time payment 

Tempos, page 22 

£30m issue 

Scottish Metropolitan Prop- 
erty is issuing £30 million 
nominal of debenture stock at 
a coupon to be determined 
and an issue price to be fixed 
by reference to 1 3'A per cent 
Treasury stock 2004-08. The 
issue will refinance borrow- 
ings and provide resources for 
properly acquisitions. 

Cash call 

Goodhead Prim Group pro- 
poses a rights issue of 3.69 
million convertible shares at 
£1 each to raise £3.53 million 
net to repay a loan and to 
provide working capital. 

Simex futures 

The first futures contract 
based on Japan's Nikkei share 
average opened for trading 
yesterday on the Singapore 
International Monetary Ex- 
change. Almost 1,800 con- 
tracts were traded. 


1 rules to govern bids of interest cover. 



s :x : ;- * \ 


From lefc'Mr Jim Butler, senior partner PMI (UK); Mr James Brown, PM3 chairman; Mr 
Paul Boschma, KMG chairman; and Mr Bill Morrison, managing partner, KMG (UK) 

PMI and KMG set to form 
world’s biggest accountants 


this kind and, armed with the 
representations made by the 
Bank of England they were in 
a strong position to do so.” 

Mr John Elliott, the Elders 
IXL chief executive, now has 
21 days to renew his offer or 
he must wait until December 
6, 12 months after the original 
bid lapsed 

Mr Elliott yesterday said be 
was considering his options 


The Commission noted the 
concern but did not think it 
should lay down guidelines, 
suggesting the issue shouldlx 
looked at by the Bank and the 
Stock Exchange. Meanwhile' 
in the Giy, analysts were 
divided on i£ and when, Mr 
Elliott will resume hostilities 
with Allied-Lyons. Since his 
original offer of 255p a share, 
the Allied share price has risen 


Lyons (Derek Harris writes). 

Castlemaine XXX X, the 
other dominant brand in 
Australia, is brewed under 
licence from the Bond 
Corporation, by Allied in 
Wrexham. Clwyd 
Elders has indicated that it 
would expect Bond not to 
want this brewing connection 
to continue. 

Comment, page 23 


Peat Marwick International Bot= 
(PMI) and Klynveld Main the mi 
Goerdder (KMG), two leading, 
accountancy firms, yesterday highly 
announced their intention to interna 
merge, thereby creating the R 
largest accountancy practice in 

the world proce« 


By Teresa Poole 

Both PMI and KMG said 
the merger would create a 
unique organization, with 
highly developed expertise on 
international assignments. 

Bnt before the merger can 
proceed the proposals will 


R-R and US rival Bank gives 
to develop engine . licence 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


p engine licence 

[rinstra] Correspondent tO Nomura 

collaboration agreement an- By Rictenl Thomson 
nounced at Famborough yes- B*nkmg correspondent 
wrdAy, the Italian company Nomora Securities, one of 
Piaggio is to acquire a -10 per ^ worid ’s lar?esl securities 


Rolls-Royce and its big collaboration agreement an- " By Richard Thomson 
American aero-engine rival, nounced at Famborough yes- Banking Correspondent 

ESSLf - lhe mia * C0 TA , “ ,y Nomura Securities, one of 

AfiSJ Pia ® ,0 ‘ s f -10 per ihe world - s largesl securities 

“«ts*ake in the development houses, announS yestenlay 

-2^ifc5diG52?^ f ne ^ W e thathhad received a licence 

^prt^bytheAngJo- fih m the Bahk of England to 


design, development and 
production of components as 
well as assembly of the RTM 
322-01 Turbo shaft engine 


. up a London banking opera- . 
~~ tion. It is vthe onlyTapanese 
ana securities house so for to apply 
for and receive a licence. 

L-__ . The new licensed deposit- 


century’s new mneration or of a new helicopter engine STh had reed vS alaS 
- vertical take-off fighters. being produced b^theAtilo- ^ tlRankSf EiSSro 

fJf'mSBSJS^tSSS RoIlsrRoyce Ske d^fand SSn a « 

which ° Turbomeca. . . up a London banking opera- 

- -I 9& ^ ni covers ** tion. It is:ihe ML^Jap^se 
■SfSKSmSi^SSJ 1 ^™ dc 7 lopmenl ** securities house so for to apply 

the pR J? UCUOn ® f ^ ?* l Rr e 5R5 for and receive a licence. 
Kolls-Royce said at the well as assembly of the RTM ^ 

Famborough Air Show yes- 323-01 Turbo shaft engine -• The new licwtsed depoot- 
terday that the collaboration which could be selected to { a ^ er n J° called Nomura 
could result in a flight power the Anglo-Italian and 
demorotranon of a supo-- British government-backed 

technology engine before the EH10I helicopter being pro- iS 

end of the 1990s. duced by Westland. million and a staff of 35. It will 

US studies will be funded by The new engine, making its 

.the Nauonaj Aeronautical and first pubUc flying appearance ! 

Space Adminstratjon and the at Famborough, is also being Lon ^ on op 7 aUO head_ 
British by the Ministry of offered for theSikorsky Black g ua f lers of ,ls European 
Defence. No financial details Hawk and Sea Hawk and the DD JJ“ess. 
were' being disclosed WS-70 version of the Black . Dr Andreas PnngL manag- 
The two companies signed a Hawk that Westland plans to mg director of the new corn- 
letter of intent in London manufacture. pany. sard: “Most of the big 

yesterday. • British Aerospace yes- international financial 


The combmed practice will 
have a fee income of $2.7 
bflOoo (£13 billion X operate 
in 88 countries, and employ 
almost 60,000 staff. 

Agreement on a combined 
organization comes almost ex- 
actly a year after the break- 
down of earlier merger talks. 

Mr Janies Brown, chairman 
of PMI, said yesterday that 
the companies had not been 
psychologically ready for the 
merger last September. “Bnt 
as the time has passed, we 
have come to see the obstacles 
to be overcome were really not 
that large at alL” he added. 

KMG, which has a strong 
base on the Continent, has 
also been approached by Ar- 
thur Andersen, Ernst & 
Whinney, and Deloitte 
Haskins & Sells. Bmr Mr Paul 
Boschma, KMG chairman, 
said .that no discussions had 
been held with any other firm. 


The World’s Largest Account- 
ing Groups by Fee Income 

Fee income (Sm) 

1. Peat Marwick/KMG 2.700 

2. Arthur Andersen 1 ,574 

3. Coopers & Lybrand 1,410 

4. Price Waterhouse 1,234 

5. Ernst & Whinney 1,185 

6. Arthur Young Infl 1 ,060 

7. Touche Ross Int’l 973 

8. Deloitte Haskins & Sells 953 


lawn: tnunmtoiuJ Actarnttn Bnl- 
laUn 


have to win the baddng of 
partners in the individual na- 
tional firms, which are free to 
reject the plans. Negotiations 
to merge each KMG member- 
firm with its PMI counterpart 
will begin immediately at local 
level, and each firm will vote 
on its own merger. 

Mr Brown said initial re- 
action from member firms was 
supportive, while at KMG, the 


firms have said they are in 
favour of the deal. 

The joint practice will com- 
bine PMI’s strengths in the 
United Stales, Britain, and 
Australasia with KMG’s pre- 
eminence in Enrope. PMI is 
best known for its hankin g, 
insurance, and financial ser- 
vices clients, while KMG is 
strong in the manufacturing 
and energy sectors. Together 
they will audit 1,425 of the 
6,000 largest companies in the 
world. 

The new organization will 
be known as Klynveld Peat 
Marwick Goerdekr, with 
headquarters in Amsterdam. 
The chairmanship will go to 
PMI for the fost three years 
and Mr Brown will hold the 
position for the first year until 
his retirement. Mr Casper 
Broeksma. of KMG, will be 
the first executive partner. 
Completion of the merger is 
planned for January 1987. 

In the UK, the combination 
iff Peat Marwick and KMG 
Thomson McLintock. KMG’s 
British operation, would cre- 
ate the largest practice, with 
fee income of £167 million and 


chairmen of the 15 bigger staff of more than 5,000. 


$4 billion 
raised 
in record 
issue 

By David Smith 

Economics Correspondent 

The Government yesterday 
raised S4 billion (£2.7 billion) 
in a record issue in the 
international capital markets. 

The issue, a ten-year float- 
ing rate note, announced in 
the morning, was originally 
set at $3 billion, h was raised 
to $4 billion at lunchtime as it 
became clear that demand for 
the tightly-priced issue was 
extremely heavy. 

It will raise Britain’s official 
reserves, which stood at SI 8.9 
billion at the end of August, to 
almost S23 billion, the highest 
since early in 1982. 

Treasury and Bank of En- 
gland officials said that the 
decision to bolster the reserves 
in this way was taken because 
the opportunity arose to bor- 
row on highly favourable 
terms. 

Officials denied that there 
was any other liming signifi- 
cance in the announcement. 
Just under a year ago. and 
before the Group of Five 
meeting at the Plaza Hotel in 
New York. Britain raised SIS 
billion — the previous biggest 
issue of this type — in a similar 
exercise. 

After that came a period of 
heavy intervention in the 
foreign exchange markets by 
the Bank of England, firstly to 
drive down the dollar and 
then to support the pound as 
oil prices weakened. 

The $4 billion issue, priced 
at 'A point below the London 
interbank bid rate, was co- 
managed by Credit Suisse 
First Boston, the biggest issuer 
in the Euro markets, and 
Warburg Securities, the major 
British nouse. 

A total of 31 other banks — 
including 13 British banks — 
participated in the issue. The 
notes are priced at par and 
available in S10.000 and 
$500,000 denominations. 

The issue has no direct 
consequences for the funding 
of the public sector borrowing 
requirement, which is through 
issues of gilt-edged securities. 

The $4 billion, when taken 
to the reserves, will be in- 
vested in dollar securities by 
the Bank of England and could 
generate a net profit. 


could be ^fected to » 5= 

power the Anglo-Italian and 

Fmm i g r Ver r < i nl r baCkCd s^ia?i«jd^raSi4lof£50 
d E ^'by h ttd. be,ng ^ 

The new engine, making its a ; nn; ?i n 

first public ftang appeaimice "teniationaL Nomura s mam 


Go home, Lloyds Bank told 


From Stephen Leather, Hong Kong 


Defence. No financial details 
were being disclosed 
The two companies signed a 
letter of intent in London 
yesterday. 


Rolls-Royce said the agree- terday announced substantial 


mem was in accord with a 
memorandum of understand- 
ing signed in January between 


American and European or- 
ders worth a total of $65 
million (£44 million) for its 
Jetstream 31 turbo-prop and 


mg signed m January Detween million (£44 million) 
the US Department of De- Jetstream 31 turbo-pre 
fense and the Ministry of 125 executive jet aircra 
Defence, to collaborate over The new orders will further 
five years on joint studies to safeguard the 1.500 jobs at 
indemify the next generation BAe's fectory at Prestwick, 
of advanced short lake off and The company also an- 

verticaJ landing (ASTOVL) nounced orders from five 
aircraft. - European and North Ameri- 

In another significant can customers for seven 125$ 


(Jan 1=100) 


NEW YORK 
PLATINUM 


Dr Andreas PringL manag- 
ing director of the new com- 
pany. said* “Most of the big 
international financial 
conglomerates are banks 
which have extended into 
securities. We are moving the 
other way.” 

- He said that bank lending 
was at present relatively un- 
profitable, so NI Finance 
would initially concentrate on 
securities-related business as 
well as swaps and foreign 
exchange. It would be working 
closely with Nomura Inter- 
national. he added 


Mr Michael Me Willi am. 
group managing director of 
Standard Chartered Bank, yes- 
terday hit out at Lloyds Bank's 
bid to acquire up to 29.9 per 
cent of Standard's shares. 

Lloyds has applied to the 
United States Federal Reserve 
Board for permission to buy 
the stake in Standard Char- 
tered after it lost its £1.3 
billion takeover bid m July. 

Under British takeover 
rules, Lloyds cannot make 
another full bid for the next 1 2 
months — unless it is an 
agreed takeover or a third 
party makes an offer. But its 
application to the Fed shows 
that Lloyds has not given up. 
Lloyds needs American ap- 
proval to increase its 4.7 per 


cent stake because Standard 
owns the Union Bank of 
California. 

Mr McWilliam. speaking in 
Hong Kong, criticized Lloyds' 
persistence and said Standard 
had “protested strongly" to 
the regulatory authorities in 
London and the US. 

“We have protested because 
we think this development is 
harassing We know this move 
is inhibiting the proper 
management of Standard 
Chartered's business and we 
would like Lloyds to absorb 
this clear message - they were 
unwanted when they "made 
their bid. they failed, and we 
would like them to go home 
and get on with their business. 

Mr McWilliam said the 


group was considering the 
possibility of floating off its 
Hong Kong banking side as a 
separate unit with its own 
listing. At the same time, “we 
need to bring about an 
improvement in Standard 
Chartered's results.” 

Business had improved in 


falls at ASD 

ASD. (formerly Associated 
Steel Distributors), the steel 
stockholding business which 
came to the USM in March 
1985. yesterday reported in- 
terim results for the six 
months to June 30. 

Pretax profits fell from £1.4 
million to £1.2 million on 
turnover up 15 per cent at 


the crown colony since the £ 34.7 million. The dividend 
nan of the year, he said, but was maintained at 4p. 


he gave warning that ihe local 
results would not appear very 
good because of two big 
shipping problems. 

• The first Standard Char- 
tered board meeting to include 
the new directors Sir YK Pao, 
Tan Sri Khoo and Mr Robert 
Holmes a Court, will be held 
next Tuesday. 


ASD's hopes for a good 
recovery in the second half 
now look unlikely. However, 
margins are no longer falling 
and a move into higher value 
products will compensate for 
lower volumes. The group 
plans to become a broadly- 
based industrial distribution 
business in the long term. 


Gold breaches $400 


LONDON GOLD 
BULLION 


Tempos 22 Traded Opts 23 
Wall Street 22 Unit Trusts 24 
Co News 22 Conunodilks 24 
Comment 23 USM Prices 24 
Stock Market 23 Stare Pres ~ 
Foreign Each 23 Commercial 
Money Mrkis 23 Property 


JUL AUG SEP 


The price of gold rose above 
$400 an ounce yesterday to be 
fixed at its highest level for 
almost three years 
Gold leapt above $400 in 
New York and consolidated in 
London, where It was set at. 
$407.2 in the morning. The 
, metal fell to $405 at the 
.afternoon fix after profit-tak- 
ing, dosing at $406.75. 

Analysts say gold has 
greater potential than plat- 
inum, which rose above $650 
for the second successive day, 
only to fall back sharply. 


“Gold has moved np very 
constrnctively, consolidating 
after each rise, bat platinum i 
has gone too for too fast,” said 
Mr Neil Buxton, a metals i 
analyst at Shearsou Lehman 
Brothers. 

“In the short-term we’re look- 
ing for gold at $425 bnt we 
wouldn't be surprised to see it 
at $500 withfii six to eight 
weeks.” 

Platinum has extended its 
premium over gold recently on 
fears of a supply shortage and 
a Sonth African export ban 





r d |1 

TT71 

. T1 

vli 

lVj 

ii J 

* A 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


New York 
Dow Jones 
Tokyo 
Nikkei Dow 
Hong Kong: 
Hang Seng 


1866.84 (-3.52)* 
1850S.42 (-189.48) 


Hang Seng 1944^+14^ 

Amsterdam: Gen Vtn'n! 

Sydney: AO 1220.0 (+9.0) 

cSSSSank 2103.6 (-352) 

Ztsich: „ 

SKA General 534.30 (SAME) 

London dosing prices Page 25 


INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 

3-montti MM* 

3-month eligible bdta9”s»-9»% 
buying rate 

Prime Rate 7K% 

Federal Funds 5%%* . 

3-month Treasury fMsS2+&23M> 
30-year bonds 97 '*sj- 972 ’;u 


RISES: 

Blue Circle 568p 

Glaxo 1005p 

PSO :538p 

WATyzack 48p 

R.H. Lowe IMp 

Stal-PKis Group 333p 

Afex Corp 98p 

Brownlee — 76p 

Wilson ConnoHy 286p 

Wholesale FitL 305p 

Textured Jersey 1 5Qp 

Laporte 408p 

Attwoods KJP 

Standard Chart 724p 

Consolidated Gold — . 542p 

De Beers 742c 

Instem 193p 

RivWn I.D.S ■— 7B3p 

Steel Bunin 244p 


jamesFfeher JftQI 

«r£ — 859p l~20p) 


SE approves final version 
of rules for big bang 


CURRENCIES 


London: 
£$1.5005 
& DM3.0415 
ESwFiS.4556 
£: FFr95633 
£ Yan231 -98 
& todex:7l.4 


NewYortc 
fc $1.4990* 

$: DM28260*' 
5; Index: 110.1 

ECU £0.688606 
SDR £n/a 


GOLD 

Sr$O7^«05.00 en 
2^5406^30^40750 (£270.50- 
271.75) 

S405.95406.45* 


north sea oil 

grant (Oct ) --P™ 

• Denotes latest trading price 


The Slock Exchange has 
temporarily shelved the 
requirement for member 
firms to obtain agreement 
leuers from their clients be- 
fore big bang on October 27. 

Revised Stock Exchange 
rules adopted by its council 
this - week to regulale firms’ 
conduct of business in the 
equities, gills and corporate 
fixed iuieresL markets, also 
introduce a requirement that 
firms have written rules 
governing dealings by partners 
and employees tor their own 
account. Most big firms al- 
ready have rules, though not 
necessarily in writing. 

Controversial price-report- 
ing requirements which have 
been opposed by market mak- 
ers remain intaa. However, 
rules prohibiting churning, i-e. 
excessive dealing in order lo 
generate commission, and 
manipulative or deceptive 
finding have been replaced by 
a genera] principle that firms 
“handle iheir business in a 


By Lawrence Lever 

manner which is fair and Only In the case of the 
consistent with good market management of discretionary 
practice”. funds for clients is the Ex- 

Other new rules include a change insisting . that client 
requirement that firms tell agreement letters be signed 
clients that they might be before big bang, 
prejudiced by the aggregation The Securities and Invest- 
of their order with orders of ment Board's own draft con- 
other dienis. and the facility duct of business rules insist on 
to show net prices on contract diem agreement letters across 
notes, provided that the ihe board, making an except 
amount of commission tion for “execution-only” cli- 
chaiged is also disclosed. enis. 

Rules requiring a firm to The Stock Exchange says its 
disclose material interests in a own rules stipulating client 
share issue which it or a agreement letters “should not 
connected company, has un- be brought into effect until 
derwritien have been con- and unless the SIB's conduct 
siderably relaxed. of business rules^make such 

The requirement for signed letters mandatory”, 
dient agreement letters will Another new departure 
not come into effect on big from the SIB's rules is that 
bang. Firms amply have io comma notes need noi state 
give written notification to the lime of execution of a 
clients- of matters such as the' transaction. Instead, the Stock 
capacity on which they are Exchange rules state it will be 


acting and disclose potential 
conflicts of interest Written 
acquiescence from the dient 
will not be required. 


sufficient to include “a ref- 
erence to the fact that the time 
of execution will be made 
available on request”. 


Between January 28th and August 14th _ 
1986, the unit price of the Count^^tt| 
Japan Growth Trust doubled in , *\ 

value in what we believe to be a J 

record breaking 198 days. 

It is also the top-performing 
authorised Unit Trust in the U.K. 
over the last twelve months - £1000 
invested 12 months ago is now 
worth £2538. 

Nevertheless past performance »j£l§ 
can be regarded only as a 
guide to the quality of the fund 
management and should not be 1tL*Q 
relied onto predict future returns. 

The price of units and the 
income from them can go down 

as well as up. ffiRTBR 

The Fund Manager is confident, ■ Sn i M 
however, that a fundamental fTLttosCoum 
historical change in the Japanese i 161 owor** 
domestic economy has given j ” B0Se!en ^ m “ de 
thefund considerable long term | unmc m 
growth potentia I. I ***«». (« wl 

To find out more about this J 

record breaking fund, telephone I p** 
01-3821199 I 

on any business day or fill in the . &The IS 
coupon. I 






AH prices cufcuJcmd on on offer lo bd pnea bom to 2.9.66 wtfl 
ncome reimami Sourca DC Opoi 


[""port*©: County UnHUmrt Managers Ltd, 

. 1M Choapskta, London EC2V 6RJ. 

I Reosesendnwdeiaikaf the Japan Growth Irvstw 

I Surnames Mr/Mrs/Mtss 

first names; (in full) 

I Address, fmfufl l- . _ , 


■ fi^^hore^dwnholilwCe^ShcwafadiangeSdwmeD i 
| UNITSA/eD I 

| AThc NatWest Investment i 
Bank Group ' 






11 


nUalNfcas ainu riNAiNCn 


WALL STREET 



AMR 

ASA 

AHedSun 
ASeaSns 
AAs Cwmns 
Alcoa 
A max Inc 
Am'rda Hs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
AmCynm'd 

AmB Pwr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Mom 
Am Sfnrd 
Am Toiegh 
Amoco 
Arrnco Steel 
Asarco 


Bankamer 


Beth Steel 


Bsel 
Brden 
Bg Warner 
Bnst Myers 
BP 


Can Pacific 
Catorpfffer 
Celanese 
Central SW 
Champion 


Chevron 
Chryste* - 
Citicorp 
Clark Equip 
Coca Cola 


Cmta'm EfK 
Comwftft £ 
ConsE<» 


Cntri Data 
Coming Gl 
CPC Inti 
Crane 

Cm Zener 

OartS Kraft 
Deere 
Delta Av 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
Dow Cham 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Eastern An- 
Esrni Kodak 
Eaton Corp 
Emersons 



V 


Sep 

2 

9 

55 

38% 

56% 

34% 

Firestone 

Fsi Chicago 

24ii 

29% 

24% 

30% 

40% 

41% 

Fst IraBnCp 

62% 

62% 


SO’t 

FsfPiei1«C 

7% 

8 

3% 

3% 


58% 

58% 

37% 

37 

FTWactiva 

42 

42 

14 Vi 

14% 

GAP Corp 

34% 

33% 

30% 

20% 

GTE Corp 

58% 

58% 

90% 

93% 

Gan Corp 

7654 

76% 

87% 

88% 

Gar Dy'mcs 

7314 

75 

84% 

86% 

Gan Electric 

75% 

/«% 

30% 

30% 

Gen Inst 

21% 

21% 

64 V, 


GenM8s 

86% 

88% 

90% 

91% 

Gan Motors 

70% 

72 

2% 

W 

GnPDUtpy 

24% 

24* 

38* 

38% 

GenftttO 

3% 

3% 

24V: 

?4* 

Georgia Pac 

33% 

34% 

S7ii 

£8% 


44% 

45% 

VA 

7% 

Goodrich 

39% 

40% 

15 

59% 

14% 

59% 

Goaduear 

Gouwinc 

3b % 
21 

34% 

21 

57h 

57/, 

Grace 

49% 

R-.'U 

34% 

35 

Gt Att&Tac 

23% 

25% 

50* 

50% 

Gr’hnd 

31% 

31% 


12% 

GrumanCor 

25 

25% 

44% 

44% 

Gut! & West 

a 9% 

71% 

66% 

67 

HeuuHJ. 

46% 

46% 

9V, 

8V, 

Hercules 

55% 

56% 

59% 

60% 

H'teH-Pkrd 

46 

46% 

60 

40 

60% 

48% 

HonafMfl 

1C Inca 

69% 

77% 

71% 

28% 

33% 

76* 

34% 

78 

Ingersofl 
mono Steel 

58% 

19% 

59% 

17% 

40V. 

40% 

IBM 

135% 

im 

35% 

36% 

IN CO 

12% 

12% 

52% 

53% 

Int Pacer 

66 

67% 

72% 

73% 

tat Tel Tel 

53% 

54 

63% 

.6614 

taring Bank 

56 

55% 

10% 

10% 


71 

73% 

50 

49% 

KatssrAkxn 

17% 

I7U 

218 

226 

Kerr McGee 

28% 

29% 

37 

37S 

KmbTyCfck 

63 

85% 

26 

27% 

K Mart 

50% 

51% 

40% 

41% 

Kroger 

LT.vCorp 

60% 

63% 

48% 

48% 

2% 

2% 

44 U 

44% 


76% 

78 

38% 

38V. 

Lockheed 

46% 

48 

55 

56% 

Lucky Stre 
ManH'nver 

24% 

25% 

18% 

19 

46% 

47% 

36 <i 

37% 

ManviUeCp 

2% 

2% 

39% 

39% 


48% 

48% 

140% 

141% 

Marine Mtd 

51% 

51% 

41W 

42% 

Mrt Marietta 

46% 

47% 

30% 

30% 


28% 

30% 

34 !i 

34% 

McDonalds 

61% 

82% 

SOS 

52 


83 

86% 

31% 

32% 

Mead 

55% 

56% 

12% 

12% 


110% 

115% 

24% 

25% 

Mmsta Mng 

110% 

112% 

55S 

58% 

Mobil Oil 

35% 

35% 

65% 

68% 

Monsanto 

70 

71% 

29 

30 

Morgan J.P. 

93% 

95% 

49% 

■49% 

Motorola 

40% 

42 

62 V. 

62% 

NOT Corp 

5 ?* 

54% 

24>i 

25% 

NL Indore 

4% 

5 

41 ii 

42% 

Not Disttrs 

38 

39 

18 

18 

NatMedEnt 

24% 

74 

102K 

101 

NaiSmcndt 

10% 

10% 

43% 

45% 

Norfolk Stfi 

79% 

81% 

56% 

56% 


39X 

39% 

18 

17% 

OocWntPW 

79 

29% 

49% 

50% 

Ogden 

OthCorp 

41% 

41% 

81% 

82% 

43% 

44% 

B% 

8% 

Ouwns-M 

43 

43 

55% 

56% 

PacGasB 

27 

27% 

71% 

70% 

Pen Am 

5% 

5% 

36% 

87% 

PannevJ-C. 

78% 

78% 


Sep £9 
2 29 


87 
21 % 
75 
10% 
86% 
67’A 
78% 


Stfi Cal Ed 


Pfizer 
PneipsDge 
Ptlrto Mrs 
Philips Pet 
Polaroid 
PPG mu 
PrcfrGmOl 
ftj S E 8 G 44% 
Raytheon $6% 
RynUfiMet 43% 
Rockwall M 41% 
Royal Dutch 81% 
Safeways 60% 
Sara Lae 67% 

SFESopac 29% 
Schi'bergar 33% 
Scott Paper 62% 
Seagram 58% 
Sears Rbck 44% 
Shed Trans 56% 

Efil/ 

In Bk 89% 


36% 

76% 

48% 

48% 

36% 

53% 

316% 

40% 

33% 

ass 

121 

3E% 

58 

47 

97% 

55% 

22SK 

22 % 

«% 

46 

m 

22 

51% 

59% 

112 % 

58 

35% 

7154 

42% 

55% 

23% 


Sid 04 OMo 
Sterling Dra 
Stevens JF 
Sun Comp 
Teledyne 

Temeco 

Texaco 

Texas E Cor 

Texas Inst 
Texas Utils 
Textron 
TravlrsCor 
TRW me 
UAL Me 
UfiHewsrNV 
Un Carbide 
UnPacCor 

Utd BranCS 

USGCorp 

UtdTechnd 

USX Corp 

Unocal 

Jim Water 

WmerLmW 

Wells Fargo 

WstghseB 

Wayerhser 

Whtrtpool 

Wootworth 

Xerox Carp 

Zenith 


68 % 

20 

76 

10 % 

68 % 

68% 

80 

45% 

65% 

43% 

42% 

89% 

62% 

68 

30% 

33% 

63% 

60% 

46 

55% 

57% 

90% 

21 % 

38% 

75% 

48% 

50% 

36 

54% 

321% 

41% 

33%. 

28% 

121 % 

38% 

59 

48% 

99% 

56% 

224 

22 % 

59% 

28% 

40% 

45% 

18% 

21 % 

51% 

59% 

113% 

57% 

36% 

74 

43% 

57 

25 


CANADIAN PRICES 


Abrtib! 
AlcnAlum 
AlgomaSti 
Can Pacific 
Conunco 
Con Bates! 
HVr/SOCan 
HdsnBMin 
(masoo 
Imperial OR 
In Pipe 
Ryf Trusrco 


CO 
ThmanN 'A* 
VantvCorv 


22% 

22% 

42% 

42% 

13% 

13% 

15% 

14% 

13 

13% 

34% 

24% 

27% 

27% 

27% 

27% 

33% 

33% 

43% 

43% 

41 

40% 

33% 

33% 

82 

84% 

21% 

21% 

30% 

30% 

2SS 

3.05 


pjmcivRiinM runm 


Early dip 
for Dow 

New York (Renter) — Wall 
Street shares yesterday re- 
sumed the sell-off that began 
late in Tuesday's session. 

Analysts said that firm oQ 
and gold prices continued to 
ignite fears of a resurgence of 
inflation farther down the line. 

Mining companies contin- 
ued strong for a second day 
and o3 shares joined in. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average was down 1.41 to 
1868.95 by mid-morning as 
declines led advances by a 
seven-to-foor margin on a 
volume of 16 milfioa shares. 

Among the hardest hit of the 
30 Dow Industrial shares. 
International Business Ma- 
chines was down Va at 135%, 
General Minors down Y* at 
70%, and Minnesota Mining 
down x h at 109% whDe Gen- 
eral Electric edged np Yt to 76 
and Merck was op 7 a at 111%. 

Household International 
was strong for the second 
consecutive day, showing a 
gam of 1 Y* on volume of 59,000 
shares at 51%. 

Another company with a big 
finance subsidiary. Beneficial 
Corp, was np 2 at 75. Mr 
Robert Raift, an analyst at CJ 
Lawrence, discussed the pos- 
sible sale price of Benefidal, 
which put itself on the section 
block. He pegged its value per 
share in the $80 range. 

Earlier estimates reined the 
company at as much as $100 a 
share. Drug shares were 
mostly lower, computer and 
airline shares were mixed and 
oils were mostly higher. 
Among the latter, Exxon, 
Chevron, Texaco, Atlantic 
Richfield, and Royal Dutch all 
showed fractional gains. 



Interim Statement 

The unaudited estimated results of the Guardian Royal Exchange Group 
for the six months ended 30th June 1986 are as follows: 


Investment Income 
Ltss Interest Payable 


First 6 months Fim6nxiiuha 

Year 

1986 . 

1»»5 

IMS* 

£m 

lm 

£w 

97.3 

93.6 

193.6 

5.6 

. A2 

.. - 14.3 

91.7 

85.4 

179.3 


Short-term insurance business 

(45.6) 


lS5.6f 


{ 154.3) 

Long-term insurance business 

9.9 


7.6 


19.1 


Profit before loss on discontinued 
international professional indemnity 
business, taxation and extraordinary item 
Loss on discontinued international 
professional indemnity business 
Profit before taxation 
and extraordinary item 


(35.7) 

ns.ni 

(135.2) 

56.0 

7:4 

44.1 



(6.6) 

(40.6) 

56.0 

Oj? 

3.5 


taxation 

21.1 


5.6 


15.0 

minority interests 

0.9 


1.2 


2;j 


Profit (loss) after taxation and 
before extraordinary' item 
Extraordinary item - contingency claims 
provision in respect of discontinued business 
Profit (loss) after taxation and 
extraordinary item 
Ordinary dividend 

Profit (loss) transferred to from 
retained profits 

Eaminc.- per ordinary -.hare (alter taxaton and 
before extraordinary item! 


22.0 

6.8 

17.3 

34.0 

(6.0) 

1135) 

— 

— 

(55.0) 

34.0 

(6.0) 

(6&S) 

16.0 

14.2 

45.6 

iao 

(20.2) 

(U4.4) 

2I.3p 

i&Aip 

I8.7ln 


A'vfirff /f.l /Ill'll Ik wl * U it/ l.citfiiN /■■* ffi*-##. »n* JV>.» N fr/.ii rnvirif/ ifu .\ttrhltn% m Hrptil 

III'./ fl/ifi/l Il'U'. Ni |i Ittfl H tih !/••• /i'iiJiVIIII "If V 





Results by Territories 


1 n.**r- In**-'- 

l ’niter- 




«Tjrin4 m**ri 

\rT irriom: 

mmi 


lV-oniiin. 

K— >it» lnr-ny. 

Pr**tiiuRi» Ri-jiIi 

lnr-mr 


Ith 

Lm Lm 

Lm Jim 

lm 

Australia 

aajo 

1 0.0 1 7.2 

4i9 14.81 

7.0 

Canada 

60.5 

10.9 1 5.6 

55.6 (S.o) 

6.7 

Cermanv 

US.!) 

1 7.4) 11.2 

100.7 14.61 

9.1 

Republic of Ireland 

21 JS 

iO.ii r..i 

15.2 0.5 

2.1 

Snuli Alrica 

15.7 

tO.Ti 1.7 

23* I0.SI 

2.4 

UK. 

274.4 

(26.6) 37.7 

228.7 (36.8) 

33J 

USA. 

82.4 

12.91 9.3 

97.7 1 111.51 

8.1 

Mi-cel In neou> 

113.0 

(1.2i 1ST 

102.5 il7.li- 

16.S 


721. 1 

« 45.61 91.7 

666.5 <>$5.6/ 

Ai.4 

t. u Lri —. -iv.'i-i.’i d 'iK 

i.'/t 







Firs! 6 

Fu-i H 




month- 





1988 

ItWi 

The territorial result are -rated after 


£m 

£m 

reinsurance pnuoction trum croup companies 

Australia 

0.3 

(38i 

including proitciinn under the worldwide stop 

Canada 

1.9 

1.3 

los* arT-uu-wnent*. The 'Miscellaneous 

S>Hjth Alrica 

0.6 

0.4 

undenvritinc result includes this reinsurance in 

UAA. 

1-2 

14 7) 

respect of the territories shown opposite: 

Others 

12. 

U.2) 




5.2 

l8-0) 

Exchange Rates :ai>h i m i«»« 

snh-liiTK* r*‘. 

'Jih-lnr* Wh* sith-liUM* 1*1 

Australia 2.2S 

156 

Republic of Ireland 

1.12 

1.27 

Canada 2.13 

J.75 

Siuth Africa 

aas 

2.56 

Germany 3.36 

357 

L.SA. 

1.53 

1.31 

Life New Business 

Fir*' ■•mah- l:**l. 

Fit-i linmlli 

i* r«- 



Lm 

tni 


New Sums Assured 


2.7-9. j 

2.657U! 


New Annuities per annum 


70.4 

69.4 


New Annual Premiums 


; v4-l 

31.8 


New Single Premium* 


1(5.12 

101.2 



The elfeet of exchange rate movements has. 
heen to decrease net premiums by £tf. lm 
and invesiment income by ££9m and to 
increase the short- lemi business underwriting 
U*ss by £i>. lm. Alter allowing lor the ellect of 
exchanse rate m-vemems. the under! vinp 
growth in net premium' was. Hi", and in 
invesmienr income was 1 ■ 

The henefiis ol earlier premium rating 
action cm commercial lines business are ro.w 
em ermine but thehenetits ol similar act inn on 
personal lines business have been atfected by 
increased daim.*. Imjuency and costs. A- a 
ctmstjquence ol the positive steps which have 
been taken, the imdenvriiing results in _ __ 
Canada, the 1‘nited Kin*d»m and the I'.S.A. 
shew significant improvement* when 
cumpareri with the underwriting results lor 
the first six months of ] A§5. The eflecr nfrhe 
premium re-ratinc action in Australia has . 
been ofi'sei hv the impact of 
cyclone and ninjur lire fosses, an 
increase in motor repair costs 
and increased competition for 
hiisines* follflwins the lft* m 
worker*' cimpea^uriun business 
in the private sector. The 
underwriting experience in 



Germany has been rather less iavmirable than 
I'T the corresponding period m 19S5. 

The rareoi orwuth in investment income 
ha* been asri-red b>- increased cash flows from 
the improved underwriting experience. 

The profit* from fon^-term business 
continue 10 make a \ aluahle contribution and 
shim a W increase on the profits for the 
same period in 

Dividend 

An imerim dividend in respf n of the year 
1936 will be raid on "6th January’ 1&?” ol lU.i>p 
per *hare < lLti-o - 9p per share' which, with 
(he tax credit available to eligible 
shareholders, is equivalent In l4.0£p per share 
i IMS- M per sharel. This dividend will 
he paid to holders ol ordinary shares whose 
name* appear on the register on 
i*th N-vember lft^j. 

t 


Guardian Royal Exchange Group 


iHoarfl lHhn> > -l->l , *'i ■*' .'l>< 


Hillsdown ahead 
45% at half time 

By Richard Lander 
Hillsdown Holdings, the ac- 


quisition-hungry food and 
furnishing conglomerate, 
came in slightly ahead of 
market expectations yesterday 
with pretax profits of £19.6 
million for the fust half of this 
year — 45 per cent up on the 
same period last year. 

Coming a week after 
Hillsdown added two more 
companies to its stable for £76 
million, analysts were im- 
pressed by the fact that more 
than four-fifths of the profits 
expansion came from organic 
growth. The shares added 2p 
to 310p as the City raised its 
foil-year profit forecasts to 
about £45.5 million, com- 
pared with £33.4 million last 
time. 

The results, achieved on a 


31 per cent rise in turnover to 
£686 million, reflected higher 
results in six of the group’s 
seven operating divisions. 

The biggest gains were made 
in food processing and dis- 
tribution, where operating 
profits trebled to £4.7 million 
and furniture and plywood 
distribution, where tbe 
contribution soared from 
£900.000 to £3.3 million. 

The only section io show a 
decline was the fresh meat and 
bacon operation, where profits 
fell by one-third to £1.4 mil- 
lion "because of stiff com- 
petition in the red meat 
industry. 

Hillsdown is increasing its. 
interim dividend from l- 2 p to 
I.4p and making a one-for- 
foree scrip issue. 


COMPANY NEWS 


CRH up by 15% 


Cement-Roadstone Hold- 
ings. Eire's principal supplier 
of cement which also has 
considerable interests over- 
seas. yesterday reported pre- 
tax profits up by 1 5.1 per cent 
to Ir£l0.76 million (£9.77 
million) for the first six 
months of 1 986. Energy sav- 
ings and the continuing bene- 
fit of recent rationalization 
measures were significant 
factors. 

Turnover slipped by 8.5 per 
cent to Ir£233.8 million. The 
imerim dividend is being 
increased from l.lSpto 1.27p. 

By the end of this year, 
cement sales in the Irish 
republic could be 53 per cent 
below 1979 levels and at the 
lowest since 1 968. In the first 
half of 1986, Cement- 
Roadstone experienced vol- 
ume declines of 1 1.5 per cent 

Other products in the 
domestic market su fibred 
similar volume decreases as 
cement, but profits in Eire 
held up reasonably well over- 
all. 


In brief 


• H & J QUICK: Interim 
dividend 0.75p (0.6p) for the 
half-year to June 30. Turnover 
£60. 14 million (£51.04 million). 
Pretax profit £506.000 
(£249,000). Earnings per share 
S.6p (3.9 lp). The board is 
realistic about prospects for the 
second half, which is tradition- 
ally tough. 

• JAMES NEILL HOLD- 
INGS: First half of 1986. Pretax 
profit £523,000 (£2.5 million). 
UK sales £23-68 million (£15.24 
million), expons £7.75 million 
(£7.97 million). Jess transfers to 
group companies overseas . of 
£1.55 million (£2.34 million); 
overseas sales £12.8 million 
(£6.45 million). Interim divi- 
dend 2.5p (same). Earnings per 
share 03p (I2.8p). The 1985 
comparatives do not include 
Spear and Jackson Inter- 
national, which was acquired 
last Dec. In spite of the setbacks 
of the first half the board 
believes the group is back on 
course and that prospects are 
good. 

• ARMTTAGE BROTHERS: 
Dividend 3Sp (30p) for tbe year 
to May 31 last. Turnover £16.57 
million (£15.64 million). Pretax 
profit £453.000 (£358,000). 
Earn ings p er share 63p (62p). 

• IN STEM: Half-year to June 
27. Interim dividend lp(0.75p). 
Turnover £3.64 million (£2.94 
million). Pretax profit £480.000 
(£379,000). Earnings per share 
6.69p (5p). The board reports 
that during the first half, the 
company achieved a record 
ruder intake for any six-month 
period. 

• COMBINED LEASE FI- 
NANCE: Imerim dividend 
0.45p. in line with the policy set 
out in the prospectus. Turnover 
£1 1.79 million (£7.1 million) for 
the six months to June 30. 
Pretax profit £1.06 million 
(£502.000). Earnings per share 
6.44p (5.09p adjusted). 

• REA BROTHERS: The of- 
fers for all three classes of capital 
have been declared uncondi- 
tional in ail respects and remain 
open. Acceptances have so far 
been received as follows: 25.59 
million ordinary shares (94.9 
per cent), 200.000 4 J per cent 
preference shares ( 1 00 per cent), 
6C0.442 5.425 per cent pref- 
erence shares (99.2 per cent). 

T COWIE: The company’s 
subsidiary. Eastern Tractors 
(Holdings), has bought John 
Riches (Agricultural), an off- 
shoot of Cargill UK and a 
distributor of agricultural 
machinery' in East Anglia. Tbe 
price was £367.000 cash. In tbe 
year to May 31 Iasi. Riches 
made, on its ordinary activities, 
a loss of £160.000, before an 
extraordinary income of 
£250.000. 

• INTERNATIONAL SIG- 
NAL & CONTROL GROUP: 
Mr James Guerin, the chair- 
man. told the annual meeting 
that ihe five months since the 
end of the last financial year had 
been a period of high activity. 
The company has acquired 
Electro-Magnetic Processes and 
expects io formally complete the 
purchase ofCaidion Electronics 
within the next few days. These 
two will be a significant addition 
to ihe group's capabilities. Trad- 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN 10.00% 

Adam & Company 10.00% 

BCQ 10.00% 

Cfcbank Sarinrcr 10.75% 


Consolidated Crds. 
Ctttttsital Trust— 


-. 10 . 00 % 
-. 10 . 00 % 

Co-operative Ban*,,,.., 10.00% 

C. Hoars & Co 10.00% 

Hong Kong & Stanza 1000% 

Lloyds Baik 10.00% 

Nat WestmmstEr 10.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland — 1(100% 

TS8 10.00% 

Ctotenfc HA 10.00% 

t Mortgage Bate Rate. 


ing has continued at a high level 
and tbe order intake has been 
most encouraging. Present in- 
dications are that 1986/87 will 
prove another successful year. 

• ALLTED PLANT GROUP: 
The group has acquired the 
mechanical handling division of 
Geoffrey E Macpherson for 
£504,248. This extends the mar- 
ket area of the APG forklift 
division to Nottingham ' and 
Derbyshire. 

• SQUIRREL HORN: Half- 
year to June 30. Turnover £3_57 
million (£3.3 million). Pretax 
profit £27,477 floss £59,573). 
No tax (nil). Profit per ordinary 
stock unit O.OOSp floss 0.012p). 

• LAMBERT HOWARTH 
GROUP: Half-year to Jane 29. 
interim dividend 2p (Up) 
Turnover £1 1.9 million (£10.73 
million). Pretax profit £559,000 
(£427,000). Earnings per share 
6.7p (6.5p). The directors are 
confident that the profit 
improvement will continue 

• SHIMADZU CORPORA- 
TION: The company plans to 
issue S100 million (£67 million) 
of guaranteed notes, due 1991, 
with warrants to subscribe for 
shares of common stock of the 
company through an inter- 
national syndicate lead-man- 
aged by Nilcko Securities 
(Europe). The notes are ex- 
pected to carry a coupon of 2% 
per cent, payable annually in 
anear on September 25, starting 
in 1 987. The issue price will be 
100 per cent. 


TEMPUS 


P&O rides high on 
the profit waves 

■AT _ .... i /■» — on, 


A 19 per cent improvement 
in interim profits year on year 
is good enough by any stan- 
dards. But P&O shareholders 
can look forward to what 
promises to be an even better 
second half. 

In tbe first half, operating 
profit was £80 million. The 

housebuilding, construction 
and development division 
more than doubted its 
contribution from £9.6 mil- 
lion to £20.6 million. Bo vis is 
very strong in the active 
South of England market, 
and its policy of concentrat- 
ing building and marketing 
effort on second-time buyers 
has been paying off. 

It has been strongly sig- 
nalled for some time now that 
last year's container and bulk 
shipping results were excep- 
tional and would not be 
repeated. In the event, 
operating profit from this 
division halved from £20 
million to £9.8 million- 

interim pretax profits of 
£69.8 million did not indude 
any contribution from Stock 
Conversion bought at the 
mid-year stage. Nor did it 
include tbe balance of Over- 
seas Containers. P&O pur- 
chased tbe minority interests 
in OCX. at the end of May. 

Had these two companies 
been wholly-owned subsid- 
iaries for the full six months, 
pretax profit would have 
been £87.9 million, an in- 
crease of 50 per cent. These 
two companies will be ac- 
counted for as foil subsid- 
iaries from now on. 

Second-half profits will - 
also benefit from the seasonal 
bias to P&O’s earnings pat- 
tern. Housebuilding, in 
particular, is heavily 
weighted towards the second 
half; reflecting the impact of 
winter on the rate of 
completions. 

Allowing for these factors, 
P&O should be aide to report 
up to £165 million pretax for 
tbe full year. Recent strong 
performance has taken tbe 
share price up to 538p, 
putting the shares on a 
prospective multiple of 15.5 
times earnings. The prospec- 


tive 4.9 per cent yield under- 
pins the share price at these 
levels, but it will be difficult 
to make porgress from here in 
the short term. 

Wilson (Connolly) 

Wilcon sells its homes f° r 
£37.000, £10,000 less than the 
national average published 

by the Halifax Building Soci- 
ety this week. However, the 
company's margins are the 
envy of the industry, standing 
at 22.5 percent in 1984. 

Housebuilding accounts 
for about 85 per cent of the 
profits of Wilson (Connolly), 
the parent group. 

Wilson concentrates on 
quality rather than quantity, 
avoiding the “boom or bust” 
approach which has been the 
downfall of many of its 
competitors. Its 10-year com- 
pound growth rate for pretax 
profits and earnings per share 
is an impressive 30 per cent. 

Wilson’s return on capital 
targets set at the time of land 
purchases of well over 20 per 
cent assumes no inflation in 
house prices. This policy has 
been rewarded in the last few 
years. 

The Halifax draws atten- 
tion to a stabilizing of prices 
but its forecasters are still 
expecting price increases of 
over 10 per cent in 1987. 
Wilson is confident of tbe 
outlook for the market, 
particularly in tbe run-up to 
an election. 

With a better half from 
contracting and an improved 
return from property, 1986 
profits should reach £25 mil- 
lion. The shares have per- 
formed well and are on a 
premium rating. This is well 
deserved. 

However, those looking in 
tbe bargain basement should 
consider equally attractive 
companies such as Fairbriar 
and Persimmon selling on 
p/e ratios a third lower. 

GRE 

At the tail end of the insurers' 
interim reporting season 
came two sets of satisfactory, 
if uninspiring, results. Bout 


Guardian Royal Exchange 
and Sun Alliance turned in 
figures which were, if any- 
thing. slightly better than 
expected. 

On a day when the 
composite sector looked 
weak, the market marked 
ORE shares down 20p to 
S59p. That seems unfair 
given that ORE’S results 
showed that last year's poor 
performance was a one-off 

Largelv by jacking up pre- 
mium rates sharply, GRE’s 
crucial United Kingdom 
underwriting result improved 
from a £37.7 million loss last 
vear to a £26.6 million loss 
this time. At the same lime 
United Kingdom premium 
income rose at the expense of 
some loss in market share. 

This enabled the company 
io improve pretax profits 
from £800.000 to £56 million 
over the six months to June 
30, helped by an 1 1 per cent 
increase in investment 
income. 

GRE has not yet solved the 
problems on personal lines 
which continue to produce 
the lion's share of British 
underwriting losses. But with 
Ip dividend rise to lOp and 
with a yield of around 5 per 
cent the shares look respect- 
able, though without the 
spectacular recovery poten- 
tial of those with a bigger US 
exposure. 

Sun Alliance pleased the 
market with a pretax profit 
tumround to £43 million 
from a £15 million loss last 
year, with the overall under- 
writing loss sharply reduced. 
Even more encouraging was 
the huge 30 per cent dividend 
increase, which no doubt 
helped foe company's shares 
up 5p to 732p - foe only 
composite to rise yesterday. 

Though it underlines the 
strength of Sun Alliance's 
balance sheet, foe rise is 
somewhat illusory since foe 
move is meant to reduce foe 
disparity between interim 
and final payments. It does 
not follow that this year's 
finalAvill jump by the same 
amount. 


SUN ALLIANCE 

INSURANCE CROUP 

INTERIM STATEMENT 

The estimated results for the six months ended 30th June 1986 are set out below with foe comparative figures 
for 1985. 

6 months to 6 months to 




30th lane 1986 30th June 1985 

Year 1985 


( unaudited) 

(unaudited) 

(audited) 


£za 

£m 

£ra 

PremiutD Income 




General Insurance — 

9583 

826.1 

1.778.5 

Long-term Insurance _ — . 

305* 

285.9 

576.6 


1,263.9 

1.112J0 

2355.J 

General insurance underwriting loss — 

(73J0I 

(123.8) 

(183.4) 

Long-term insurance profits — 

11^ 

m 

20.9 

Investment and other income ~ 

10A5 

98^ 

200-2 

PROFIT (LOSS) BEFORE TAXATION 

43-0 

(15.0) 

37.7 

Taxation — — 

93 

32 

2.8 

PROFIT (LOSS) AFTER TAXATION _ 

33.1 

(18.2) 

34.9 

Minority interests — 

3^ 

2.4 

7 2 

PROFIT (LOSS) ATTRIBUTABLE 




TO SHAREHOLDERS .... - 

29^ 

(20.6) 

27.7 

EARNINGS PER SHARE 

15-Op 

(I0.4)p 

14.0p 


TE3UEUTORXAL ANALYSIS OF GENERAL INSURANCE KESUIXS 


United Kingdom & Ireland 

Canada 

Australia — 

Other overseas areas 

Reinsurance 

Marine and Aviation (worldwide) 


Reinsurance from Chubb Corporation . 



Undrew 


Under- 


hremfom 

writing 

Premium 

writing 

Premium 

income 

rest dt 

income 

.result 

income 

Cm 

£m 

■ £m 

£rn 

£m 

49&5 

(353) 

407.2 

(63-J) 

824.5 

1723 

(123) 

94.8 

(13.4) 

199.1 

106-4 

13.9) 

913 

(6.9) 

1802 

495 

(031 

47.6 

(10.9) 

92.8 

282 

(9-8) 

323 

(8-9) 

663 

66-5 

(53) 

63.9 

(93) 

1203 

11.9 

(33) 

143 

(6.4) 

293 

745 

(2JM 

743 

(4.4) 

146.4 

9583 

(73 3) 

826.1 

(1233) 

1,6593 


Under- 

writing 

result 

£m 

171.0) 

(30.8) 
(18.0) 

(17.8) 
(16.71 
(11.71 

(14.8) 
(2.6) 

(183.4) 


119.0 


UNDERWRITING RESULTS 

General business premium income increased by 
16J)V The underlying growth after allowing for currency 
fluctuations was tt'.lV 

At Home, results have shown a marked improvement 

since the setback, caused by the severe weather in the early 
pan of the year and. despite an increase in large fire losses, 
an underwriting profit was achieved in the second quarter. 
While motor business remains substantially unprofitable 
there are some signs that rating increases are beginning so 
take effect. 

In Europe there was a reduced kiss from Holland but 
underwriting experience there remains generally poor. The 
results of other European countries shew little change. 

Tbe improvement in the USA. has continued and 
most lines produced better results. 

Market conditions in Canada bare also been improving 
and results have benefited both from rate increases and 
from lower claims frequencies. 

LONG-TERM INSURANCE 

New Life and Annuity business (Home and Overseas): 

6 mouths to 
30th June 1986 

£n> 

Annual premiums 4(M> 

Single premiums 763 


1.778.5 (183.4) 


The increased underwriting loss in Australia reflects 
aaiarp deterioration in motor experience and heavier 
commercial property claims. 

a a nS'SftSS' 

INVESTMENT INCOME 

omJh W ^Si n S >m u inc I? ased ^ 5-7%. The undertymg 
gro^^alkjwmg for the effect of exchange movements. 

DIVIDEND 

in«rim dividend for 
KS , R? arc (1985-5.75p)-an increase of 
ju.Ay%. part of this increase is to reduce the disoaritv 
berweeri fhe mienrn and final dividends and it does not 

** increased* co£ 

"sP^gfcThe dividend, costing Ll4Am. will be 


6 months to 
30th June 1985 
£m 
44.7 
80.6 


\fear 1985 
£m 

83.9 

I55J 


Snd September PHia. 


SUN ALLIANCE AND LONDON INSURANCE pic 















*Sh on 

'av es 


;* -a : 
a.,-,- 

•■-. '»•.■} ■ ! ‘ 

k v 


. , : '-i 


’• H ;m*-, 

• \: t 

. • i • 




NCE 

ROUP 


. THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 

STOCK MARKET REPORT r- 


Fears on inflation and New York 
bond prices tumble hit gilts 


■■ * ,' : f 


.. ■*-V s 


‘ 1 "kt . 


l c .' 

■ f.-.i. •. 


Kr, 


■ •.« ;:*. 
- !■• '•"■ 
•• T.* -I * 
• . ’*■ .V 




By Michael Clark 

ahasiTSu^S'ySSd^SSa 1 price ofpredousmetals 

investors contiWn?^ V? ** again been ^joying re- 
an inm^^ v 2SJ ? ^ newcd ™PPon. Planum 
view of the ern?nfiSf SS,raiSllc •® l * n le<J lhe "ay bi^Jer and 
FalS of ft ?£«*>« cIosd y followed oy gold. 

reSd it^fei 1 V*% H* •’““ion price sSged 

Jh? 0f »“ MM-an-ouSS 

DTOSDecinf hf.!? 1 ' .growing level on world markets yes- 

i£ 5 S^S sawiaaS 

g&uuj! 

S&ls** « *3SL£S?*SrS22 


NEW YORK 
DOW JONES 
HOME BONDS 


LONDON FTA 
government 
ALL STOCKS 


prices higher. 

The gilt-edged market took 
«* cue yesterday from New 
York where bond prices were 


like Anglo ' American Gold 
$3% up at $62*, Vj»al Reefe 
$S at 57214 and Bandfontein 


SmfvlSlr ^ m prices were 56 at 581%. The platinum 

Producers saw Impafa rise 40 
riH - t0 1201 ants and 

E2L abon J ^ un ^ acl °f Rostenburg 49 cents to 1200 
higher prices on the US cents. 


(Jan 1=100) 


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP 


economy. 

• The Heunvort 
Grieveson analyst Mr Chris 

Marsay remains bullish 


cents. 

But the rest of the . equity 
market spent a quieter day 
after shaking off the overnight 
setback on Wall Street. The 


ZZTfr n _ FT index of 30 shares rose by 
Ef*? f0 ? f 1 ** 0 4.6 points to 1.324.6. The FT- 

Kf^JS. 0kera *”* SE 100 index closed 2.9 points 
^J2^S^P rospects “i* higher at 1,670.7. 
gnfOHPded. The company’s Confirmation that Elders 


says some brokers’ fears 
about growth prospects are 
anfoanded. The company’s 
penetration of the US market 
continues and Mr Marsay 
predicts that pretax profits, 
due next month, win rise 


IXL, the Australian brewer, 
had been given the green light 
to bid for AJlied-Lyons came 
as little surprise to the market 


from £403 million to £560 mil- Allied dipped 2p to 35ip on 
bon. He is looking for . the news. In the past few 

£715 million next year. The weeks, the shares have risen 

sharesrose iQp to £10.05. by nearly 50p in anticipation 
T , „ , that Elders wfll renew its 

. Last week s huge trade deft- assault Some brokers have 


cit is also still having an 
adverse effect on sentiment 


even predicted that Elders will 
bounce back with an offer of 


But as one London dealer up to 400p a share, valuing 
pointed out the Americans Allied at £2.7 billion. How- 
still have the benefit of lower 
interest rates. The gilts market 
has been pinning hs hopes on 
a further cut in bank base rates EQUrnES 
thoughout the summer, ' but sees (na , i 163 -i 

^w^byihcBank 200 m 

of England, which is reluctant Beavarco (i45p) 148 

to sanction any cuts just yeL Borlan d. (izsp] iss-i 

As a result investors have aSa mJmi 2 Sp) 130 

again been turning to their Co and Electrodes (84pj 113 

favourite hedges in times of £*** . ,a °-» 

trouble and this has done little Kfij ffig & ll 

to restore confidence m the GT Management (2i0p) 206 

gilts market Sl^ c M sop) ,J 7 1 


ever, the market expects Al- 
lied to put Up fierce resistance 
to any new offer. Elders’ 
shares, which are quoted in 
London, fell 3p to 198p. 

Hanson Trust shed Ip to 
192p as reports continued to 
circulate that rt was in Talks 
with Anheuser-Busch, 
America's biggest brewer, 
about the sale of its own 
Courage brewing business 
which h acquired following 
the £2.1 billion takeover of 
Imperial Group earlier this 
year. 

Markeimen claim that Han- 
son may be asking about £13 
billion for Courage, but this 
may be regarded as a little on 
the high side m the wake of the 
Monopolies Commission's 
proposed inquiry into the tied- 
house system few pubs. 

The rest of die brewers 
dosed mixed after a quiet day. 
Bass firmed 2p to 765p, while 


RECENT ISSUES 


Three Month Starting 

Sep 66 

Dec 86 

Mar 67 

Jun87 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

Previous day’s total <»en i 
Three Month Eurodollar 

Sep 66 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jim 87 

US Treasury Bond 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 


LongGH 

Sep86 

Dec 66 

Mar 67 

Jun 87 
FT-SE100 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 


BBS Design (67p) 
Beavarco (I45p) 

Borland (125p) 

Broad Si (43p) 

Chelsea Man (125p) 
Coated Electrodes (84pl 
Cobne (11 Op) 

Evans HaBshaw ttZOp) 
Fletcher Dennys (70p) 
GT Management (2t0p) 
Guthne Corn (isap) 
Harrison (150o) 


High Low Close EstVol 
90.19 90.15 80.17 338 

90.71 90.61 9063 2339 

90.78 90j68 90.70 337 

90.65 . 90.51 90.62 30 

9035 9032 9032 5 

9015 9015 9015 10 

Previous day's total open Merest 22915 
94.24 94.19 9420 611 

9426 94.16 9420 6058 

9418 9409 94.11 1028 

3089 93-88 9391 723 

Previous day's total open (merest 5672 
100-11 98-30 9830 887 

99-15 96-06 98-08 8931 

— — - 97-10 0 


Provioos day's total open interest 1273 

101-30 101-30 -■ 101-29- • Wf-10 -90 

101-30 101-30 101-12 101-12 257 

NT — - — 101-12 0 

Previous day's total open interest 15419 
121-06 121-08 120-03 12603 341 

121-02 121-11 119-24 12608 13486 

NT — — ' 120-06 0 

NT — — 12606 0 

Previous day> total open interest 8447 
16930 170.50 169JW 17030 4Z7 

17240 17350 17240 . 17356 32 


HtKe Ergonom (92p) 
Hughes Food (20p) 

Lon uW krv I330p) 

MS Cash A C flOOp) 
Marina Dev (I10p) 
Moggn Grenfeti poop) 

Stanley Leisum fllOp) 
TV- AM (130p) 

Tandy Inds (112p) 
Tharros TV fi9(fc) 
Tftibet A Britten (12Sp) 
Treas 2H%*/1 2016 =§7 
Unrfock (63p) 
Wmdsmoor (106p) 


90 

24'J4-«J 
421 -4 
82-1-1 
95. 
448-2 
190-5 
121 
16S+1 
144 -1 
237 
150 

£42 6 b 

69 

106 


Sooth African Breweries ad- 
vanced 9p to 202p, Vamt 
hardened 2p to 390p and 
Wolreiluunpton & Dudley a 
similar amount to S4Sp. 
Grand Metropolitan, the 
Watney Mann and Truman 
group, slipped by 3p to 398p. 

HAT Groap, currently the 
tar^t of an unwanted bid 
from BET, recovered an early 
fall, to dose all-square at 1 39p. 
BET has again been buying 
HAT shares in the market and 
now speaks for 10-3 million 
shares, or 13.42 per cenL BET 
rose 6p to 416p. 

Shares of Foseco Mlnsep 
have been a disappointing 
market of late and at present 
are standing well below their 
year's high of 298p. They 
slipped another lp to 244p 
yesterday, unperturbed by the 
news that discretionary clients 
of Mercury Warburg Invest- 
ment Management have in- 


Yelvarton (38p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Aid Irish Bh N/P 
BBA Gp N/P 
Berkeley Tech N/P 
Brown A Tawse N/P 
Cityvisian F/P 
Forward Tech N/P 
Sedgwick N/P 
Suttfe, Speak N/P 
Television Sth F/P 
Top Value F/P 

(Issue prtoa in brac ke ts). 


90.18 

9065 

90.74 

9055 

9035 

.9015 

rastlSOSI 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


S ept em b er s 

1.4916-13010 


N York 1. 49161 JOlO 
Montreal 20707-20819 
Ams'dain3»15904454 
Brussels 6267-6126 
Cphgen 1 1^4772-11^501 
Ditt 1.10261.1077 
Frartdurt3H26B-a0529 
Lisbon 215-81-219^2 
Madrid 19020-199.33 
MHan 2069^63105^0 
Oslo 108921-109348 
Paris 09204-100110 
SfkMm 102783-103173 
-Tokyo 2304333266 -■ 
Vienne 21852147 
Zurich 2444624661 



Imartb 

053-052pram 

046O30pram 

IK-IUpram 

1611 pram 
1%-%pnm 
15prem-13dls 
1 %-I%pram 
99-163*1 
50-84dte 
l-Sdta 
3X-4Xdfe» 
2K2Xprarn 
li-Xpram 
. IXt-'Aprem 

9K-8Upram 

1 %-IXpram 


SmaMbe 
153-1 Aepram 
056080pram 

4V-3Xpram 

47-38prain 

2K-Xpnm 


116190dh 

7-lldfe 

11H-12Ndb 

6V5ftpram 

IK-Hpram 

34Vpram 

25V22K prw 

3%-3Kpram 


Smfcfl Ind ro c o mparad wib 1915 was up airt4 (day'i rang* 71 .3-71.6}. 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Hat Dealings . LastDaaUngs UMDadanHon Fflr SatHsmant 

Aug 4 Aug 15 Nov 6 Nov 17 

Aug 18 Sep 5 New 20 Decl 

3<9p 8 Sap 19 DecA E30C15 

Ml options were -taken out ok 3/9/86 Prastwldi. FenantL Amstrad, Downibra®, 

Thompson, T-Lma. Conroy, Bfflwo, VkffiairaJSood Relations, BOMS, MacWtan. Ctare- 

mom, Greenwich Res^THr. 


Argentina austraT i 

Australia dolar 

Bahrain (Snar 

Brazil cruzado * ___ 
apms pound— 

Finland Timka 

Greece drachma — 
Hong Kong dollar _ 

India rupee 

Iraq dinar 

Kuwait (flnarKD — 

Malaysia doflar 

Mexico peso 

New Zealand dolar . 
SautS Arabia riyal _. 


South AMca rand . 

UAEdWiam 

•Lloyds Bank 


_ 134861^5540 v. 
_ 24408-24453 
_ 05625-05665 

20562072 

_ 0732607420 
—.72965-7.3385 

2002620220 

11^663-11^750 
18L6616J0 

__ 0435604^ 

3J822-3.8882 

10661110 

_ 6084635793 
_ 559665 J360 
_32»tW22H7 
„ 35023-35463 
— 5481555215 


Australia 

Canada 

Sweden 

Norway - 

Denmark- — — 
West Germany „ 

Switzerland 

Netherlands — 

IS 

£g£5"L= 


. 1551613540 
. 2156621575 
. 2597625990 
. 05120-06127 
.1387613883 
. 0885668900 
.7297673025 
. 7.70567.7100 
. 2037620380 
. 1347613405 
.2299623000 
. 63700-63750 
. 1553615530 
, 14053-14065 
_ 4217-4222 
. 7301673015 
. 14536145.70 
. 13336133.10 
_ 1437-1430 


i nppMd by Barclays Beak HOFEX awl I 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


AlMd Lyons 
(*351) 


Cons Gdd 
1*542) 

Courtaiids 

(*282) 


Com Union 
(*303) 

Cabte&Wke 

(*3371 


Grand Mat 
(*398) 


Land Sec 
(*332) 

Maras & Span 
(*217) 

Shea Trans 
(•945) 

Trafalgar House 
(*297) 


Beecham 

T418) 


Oct Jan Apr 
55 86 78 

35 45 55 

14 25 37 

115 135 142 

65 95 107 

32 55 70 

127 134 145 
67 100 110 
53 77 87 

28 40 48 

16 27 38 

8 17 - 

1» 9 — 

26 36 44 

12 22 31 

_2tt 13 18 

47 57 87 

25 40 52 

8 22 33 

3 % 11 — 

180 — — 
130 — — 

80 — — 

15 20 26 

G 10 15 

2 5 — 

77 — — 

30 — — 

- 58 68 

35 - - 

207 232 — 

157 185 200 
107 140 155 
62 100 115 

37 45 52 

14 28 36 

5 13 20 

41 48 53 

22 30 36 

a 14 21 

195 208 220 
145 160 170 
95 115 128 
"~42 5 56~ 

27 35 43 

10 20 29 


Thom EM! 
(*499) 


■that Sapl Dae M m Sep Pec 

500 33 53 65 7 17 

550 9 30 43 30 37 

600 2 13 20 TO 77 

420 87 100 110 2 4 

460 47 65 77 3 10 

500 15 35 47 12 20 

550 2 15 — SO SS 

300 115 — — 1 — 

330 85 98 — 2 2 

380 55 TO 62 2 5 

390 30 43 57 4 9 


Brit Aero 
CS05) 

BAT tads 
(*42S) 


1» — 
4 — 

8 — 


Barclays 

(*512) 

Bril Telecom 
(*19B) 

Cadbury Schwpps 
Cl 77) 


Series Nov Feb Hay 

460 53 68 — 

500 30 50 60 

550 12 2S 35 

380 70 86 — 

390 47 60 65 

420 25 38 45 

460 8 20 28 

460 62 77 90 

500 35 50 62 

550 12 20 32 

180 27 32* 40 

200 14 20 27 

220 8 9Mr 17 


Nov Fab 
8 13 

28 32- 

58 62 


30 32, 
1H 2 


Ladbroka 

(•368) 


Midland Bank 

(*572) 


Bkie Cnae 
CM8) 

DeBoers 

C742) 


59 72 78 

33 48 55 

12 30 X 

4 15 

25 34 42 

'l s s, 
f ■ s 

5 19 

80 100 110 
35 60 80 

7 30 SO 

97 46 67 

6 27 42 

1 10 

180 1» 200 
.130 145 165 
90 110 130 
■M BO 95 

90 100 108 

60 70 78 

90 46 52 

30 44 54 

15 31 40 

6 17 26 

1U 9 

120 155 — 

00 115 150 
40 ?0 120 

Mi 62 95 

59 - - 

di — — 

34 40 43 

14» 23» 27 

4 13 17 _ 


114 5 

4 10 

15 30 

47 53 


» » 
114 10 

13 25 
35 40 
12 20 
38 40 
65 65 


380 70 

390 47 

420 25 

460 8 

460 62 

500 35 

550 12 

180 27 

200 14 

220 5 
150 25 

160 10 
200 4 

300 52 

330 28 

360 11 

300 93 

330 63 

360 35 

300 98 

330 43 

380 23 

100 42 

110 33 

120 27 

500 87 

550 47 

600 20 
460 80 

5 00 47 
550 18 

600 7 

160 28 
180 15 

200 6 

500 127 
550 77 

600 48 

650 25 


80 - 
55 63 

29 38 

45 — 

37 — 

30 33 

105 115 

65 80 

30 42 
95 — 

65 82 

35 47 

36 W 
22 28 
13 — 

142 — 

92 — 
80 92 

38 57 


4 7 
8 15 

27 28 

Ife — 
2 — 
6 — 

2 3 

5 80 

IS 17 
4 5 

6 8 
8 12 


'MONEY MARKET^ 
AND GOLD 


The markets stayed quiet all 
round. The period rates saw 
the occasional spot of profit- 
taking as operators tended to 
postpone their base-rate hopes 
to the end of the month rather 
than tire middle, bat the effect 
was not great Most dates 
firmed by '/n or Vi*, though 
the key, three-month inter- 
bank terra deposit stayed { 
virtually unchanged. 1 

Eurodollar deposits mart I 
unsettled by the shake-oat in | 
New York bond markets. 

Ba*8RatM% 

Ctaaring Banks 10 
Nnancs House 10 
naeouri Marie* Loans % 

Overnight High: 10X Low 9)4 
Week mad; 10 
Truatay BSa (Discount %) 

2rmS 9"» IrmK 9»ie 

3mnth 9*» Srnntt 9 s * 

Prim Bank 8«a (Dtocouk W 
1 ninth 9 j, :o-8 3 *j 2mnth g |l to-9 7 '3j 

3 mnth 9 w w-9'A 6mnth 9^n-8S 


1 mmh 101% 
3 mnth 10“3» 


2mnm 10 s * 
6 mnth 9'*w 


taterbank (%) 

Ovomwm: open 1 0X dose 8 
I IvwmTkPw-IOXi 6mnth9»»OMi» 

1 mnth IOH-10'ia 9 mnth 9**u*9 M ia 
3 mnth S"’i(h9% l2mtti 9<*n«<>ie 
Local Authority Dapodta {%) 

2 days 10 . 7 days 10 

1 mnth 10 3 mnth 9K 

SmmhtPw l2mth9K 

Local Authority Bwda (%) 

1 mmh 1014-1 6 2mmh 10V9% 

3 mnth lOH^-9% 6 mmh 914-914 

9 mmh 99k-9% i2rmh9VM 


VaalRaoia 

(*72) 


50 22K 24» — 

, 60 13K 16 1BK 

70 B 10 12 


Nov Mir Jun 
30 38 42 
18 — - 
10 — — 
— 16 — 
S — — 


22 24 

4 8 

10 22 
27 45 
67 75 

1 2% 
3 4 

614 8tt 


in 1 mrafi 10S-10 3 mmh 9VOX 

_ 6ranm 9*-9K 12mth 9S4-8H 

DedarCDaK) 

„ 1 mnth 6.80-5.75 3 mnth 5^5^60 

50 6 mnth 5^5-5.60 12mtti 5.80-5,75 
BO 

“ euro money deposits % 


1 

Ifc 2S 

2 t 
12 18 


Tr m* 1991 
reu«) 

Tr 11 <4* 03/07 
(*£118) 


FT-SE 1525 175 187 

nuT 1550 150 162 

?W) 1575 125 142 

f 1600 -100 122 

1625 78 102 

1550 60 65 

1675 42 68 


2ft — — 
lJis 1ft 1ft 
»n ft 1ft 

4ft — — 

3ft 4ft “ 
2ft 3ft 4 'ib 
1ft 2ft 3’ io 

1 J IA 2' IB — 

Oct Nov Auo 
202 - 1 


Nov Mar Jmi 
7 9 13 

12 — . — 
24 — — 

- 34 — 
44— 

Ana Now ftb 

1ft 2 2ft 
2 ft S*i» 5ft 


7 days Sft-6»n 
3 mmh 5ft -6ft 


7 days 4ft-4ft 
3 mmh 47 ia-44 if 
French Franc 
7 days 79t*-7 1 ia 
3 mnth 7%-7ft 
ShIu Franc 
7dms 2ft-2 
3 mnth 4ft-4 
You 

7 days 5<»4 *h 
3 mnth 4'ft*4’»w 


CM Sft-fiK 
Imnth 5ft-5ft 
6 mnth 5X-5ft 
CM 54 
1 rmith 4 a ia-4 , ig 
Smrth 4ft4X 
CM 7ft-6ft 
Imnth 7ft -7ft 
Snufth 7ft- 7ft 
CM 2ft-1ft 
1 mnth 4 , i6-3 tt w 
6 mnth 4ft-4 
CM ' 5ft-4ft 
1 mnth SN»-5 1 » 
Bmnth 4ft4ft 


2ft 4J» 
o,, «« 5ft 
5ft *•* — 
7 i m — — 


GOttS406J)(M07^0 
Krugorrand* (par coin) ; 

S 4®So407e0 (£27ti.7tM71 .75) 


Alia Sapt 

Oct 

1 

4 

7 

2 

7 

11 

4 

10 

17 

6 

14 

21 

11 

IS 

30 

16 

25 

38 

27 

38 

48 


Septembers, 1986. 


Total conuasta 19072- 


Cads 14244. Pnl* 4826. 


Itodwiying Manky pic*. 


SB730M50H 
'Excludes VAT 


Fbcod Rate Starflng Export Flnanco 
Scheme IV Awago referancs rale lor 
interest period August 8. 1988 to 
Sepnmoer 2. 1966 inclusive 9990 per 
cant 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


COMMENT 


minion shares (15.08 par 
cent). The shares have a big 
following among analysts, but 
have felled to live up to 
expectations. 

Still hoping that Goodman 
Field will eventually bid. de- 
spite recent denials. Ranks 
Hovis McDougall rallied from 
an early mark-down, closing 
6p up on the day at 269p. Last 
month, Goodman, an Austra- 
lian food producer, bought a 
14 per cent stake in RHM 
j from S & W Berisford. 

Meanwhile, the fest-grow- 
ing Hillsdowu Holdings has 
again pleased shareholders. 
Yesterday’s interim figures 
showed pretax profits soaring 
from £13.5 million to £19.6 
million and earnings a share 
up by nearly 50 per cent to 

8.2p. 

Dealers are damung that 
the shares of Underwoods, the 
high street chemist, appear 
to have been oversold re- 
cently. Yesterday, the price 
rallied 8p to 18lp, amid 
speculation that the group 
may be about to hit the ac- 
quisition trafi. There is 
talk in the market that 
Underwoods’ board may be 
coaskleruig an ambitious bid 
for its huger rival 
Snperdrng, which was down 
Sp at 475p. 

Shareholders have been re- 
warded with an interim pay- 
ment of 1.4p and the board is 
proposing a one-for-three 
scrip issue. The group is 
looking for another strong 
performance in the second 
half, 

ASDA-MFI rose 4p to 
lS8p- Scrimgeour Vickers, the 
broker, has just published a 
circular on the company and 
rates the shares as a “buy.” 

Nervous selling hit the big 
four clearing banks, but prices 
later steadied and dosed 
above their worst levels of the 
day. Barclays slipped by 5p to 
512p. after 509p. Lloyds by 2p 
to 4o2p, after 459p, Midland 
by 5p to 572p, after 569p and 
National Westminster by 6p 
to559p. 

It was a simitar Story 
throughout the rest of the 
financial sector. Among the 
insurance composites, Guard- 
ian Royal Exchange dropped 
20p to 859p, despite announc- 
ing an increase in interim 
pretax profits from £7.4 mil- 
lion to £56 million. But Sun 
Alliance managed a 5p rise to 
732p, following the half-time 
figures showing a return to the 
black with pretax profits of 
£43-million against a loss last 
year of £15 million. 

Elsewhere, General Ao- 
rident fell 13p to 864p, 
Commercial Union 3plo 3Q2p 
and Royal Insurance 5p to 
855p, after 847p. 

Adam ahead 

Adam & Co, the Edinburgh 
private bank, yesterday an- 
nounced pretax profits up 
from £51,000 to £1 12,000 for 
the year to June 30. It is also 
merging with Continental 
Trust, a London private bank, 
which will give it a London 
office for the first time. 


MMC passes Elders 
buck back to Bank 


Anyone reading the conclusions of the 
Monopolies Commission on Elders 
I XL’s proposed takeover of Allied- 
Lyons, without the foreknowledge 
that the deal had been cleared, could 
be forgiven for thinking the verdict 
would be differenL 

The commission outlines the 
frightening gearing caused by a debt- 
based bid as proposed by Elders. At a 
price of £3.85 per Allied share, which 
would hardly be a knockout bid, debt 
would start at 161 per cent of equity 
and fall after a year only to 114 per 
cent of equity. Even that allows for the 
sale of Allied's food businesses, a 
massive revaluation of Allied's assets 
and the instant resale of Hiram 
Walker if Allied finally landed the 
Canadian spirits company. 

This compares with the 50 per cent 
gearing recommended by the Bank of 
England in its unusually forthcoming 
evidence. The Bank thought 100 per 
cent would give cause for concern. 

At the same time the commission 
does not know what the effects of 
Elders' plan to sell half shares in pubs 
to tenants might be until it happens. 
Likewise, It recognizes that the in- 
tended break up and sale of the food 
businesses might cause new monop- 
oly problems (to be dealt with later) 
and disruption. It also acknowledges, 
with little comment, that the present 
set-up of Grand Metropolitan brewing 
Elders' Fosters brand while Allied 
brews the rival Australian 
Castlemaine would be untenable. 

Given that few benefits from the 
takeover are catalogued, it may be 
thought that virtually any bid that 
does not directly concentrate market 
share, in the Commission's conclud- 
ing words, “may be expected not to 
operate against the public interest”. 
This would cause unease even in the 
City, where competitive pressures, 
combined with outdated vetting of 
mergers, would leave the way open for 
unfriendly legislation. 

The investigation proved un- 
satisfactory mainly because of its 


genesis in general fears about the 
financial and economic threats from a 
move to highly-leveraged, debt-based 
bids as in the United States. There, 
Si 50 billion of equity has been 
replaced by debt since 1983. This was 
why the Bank of England forthrightly 
opposed the deal. But it is the 
accumulation of a series of such bids 
that is damaging, to financial stability, 
industrial investment and even 
employment. The commission can 
only judge an individual case and. in 
the middle of the inquiry*. Elders 
became more creditworthy through its 
link with BHP. 

The commission has predictably 
patted the ball back to the Bank of En- 
gland and the Stock Exchange. The 
Bank favours discussion of the prob- 
lem. But it is hard to sec any hard and 
fast rules over gearing applying 
reasonably to all cases. The Bank of 
England can warn the financing banks 
in its patch, but the problem is not 
easily to be resolved in the present 
framework. 

Meanwhile, life has moved on 
rapidly for both Allied and Elders 
since the initial £1.8 billion bid was re- 
ferred. Elders looks much stronger, 
though its role is still up in the air. Al- 
lied nas still not finally landed Hiram 
Walker (which would require further 
recourse to shareholders) but has 
produced profit growth and prospects 
of perhaps £310 million pretax this 
year, which many in the City think 
would require a bid of £2.9 billion. 

Bankers and City institutions are 
also taking a more sceptical view of 
this kind of bid. not least due to the 
publicity of this case. To complicate 
matters. Courage is now on the 
market — Hanson would like £1.S 
billion — and rumours of a £1 .3 billion 
purchase of Courage by the American 
Anheuser-Busch could cause Elders' 
John Elliott to weigh his options 
carefully. A quick bid could catch 
Allied busy in Canadian courts. 
Waiting until December would give 
all concerned more time. Courage 
would be an easier swallow. 


British Gas rides out storm 


While Britoil, admittedly a pure 
exploration and production oil com- 
pany, wilts under the pressure of lower 
oil prices, the slump in prices has not 
had the serious effect it was expected 
to have on British Gas. 

Almost' all of its "gas purchase are 
on long-term contracts skilfully nego- 
tiated some years ago, but neverthe- 
less the fall in world oil prices should 
have given the oil companies the 
chance to move deeper into the 
industrial market as heavy fuel oil 
costs again became favourable. 

Some customers switched from oil 
to gas, but since last month’s Opec 
agreement, heavy fuel oil prices have 
risen by 50 per cent and show signs of 
rising further. The threat to gas, it 
seems, never really materialized. 

Most of the numbers now being 
crunched in the run-up to the 
privatization — November 21 now 
seems the most likely, date for the big 
sale — were collated when heavy fuel 


oil was at its lowest price for 10 years. 

The latest review of British Gas 
from its broker, Hoare Govett. is 
based on a lower oil price 

Because British Gas has been forced 
to lower prices to Industrial customers 
to stay competitive with cheaper oil, 
Hoare Govett suggests that this year 
operating profits will be under pres- 
sure but, even after making provision 
for repaying part of the £2.5 billion 
debt the Government introducing to 
the balance sheet, dividends should 
not threaten cash flow. 

However, no figure is being put on 
that dividend. The 1987-88 financial 
year is the the first the brokers are pre- 
pared to put an estimate on. 

In that year, when the effects of the 
oil price changes will have worked 
through — possibly to the extent of the 
domestic consumer benefiting from a 
price cut — sufficient free cash will be 
available to pay a dividend of between 
£240 and £310 million. 



Group half-year report 

SKF Group sales for the first six months of 1986 totalled 10,380 million 
Swedish kronor, an increase of 349 million or 35 per cent compared with 
the first half-year of 1985. Profit after financial income and expense 
declined 9 per cent to 730 million kronor as against 803 million for the 
corresponding 1985 period. 



Jan-Jone 86 

Jan-Jtme 85 

Sales (MSkr) 

10380 

10,031 

Operating Income before 
depredation (MSkr) 

1,148 

1,168 

Income after firamrial 
income and expenses (MSkr)' 

- 730 

803 

Capital expenditure (MSkr) 

360 

318 

Average number of 
employees at work 

44,077 

43,509 


The European economy remained firm with a gradual uptrend in its 
business activity. Although the improvement rate was somewhat below 
expectations, industrial investment crept cautiously upwards. Hie US 
economy was less favourable than awaited, with weaker development 
shown in the OEM industries and a wait-and-see spring climate among 
distributors. The economy in most of the oil producing countries 
continued to deteriorate, and business activity in many of the Asiatic 
markets was subdued. 

The Group’s 730 million kronor profit after fimro c fa l income and expense, 
corresponds to net earnings of 19.40 kronor per share (21.65). 

Of this income, rolling bearings accounted for 504 million (582). The 
decrease was caused by sluggish development of prices in Europe, falling 
export prices and the currency developmetit in several overseas markets. 

AMebobget SKF, S-415 50 Goteborg, Sweden. 






ouoiJviLos AjnjJ til's Ai>£d 


The iuvuzS TkiURbvAY s ct*£cJywjziC 4 i>oo 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


BM Orfet Ong Yld 


B <0 Offer Cmg W 


BO Offer Chng YU 


131 . Fmovy P pmwn o nt. London EC2A 1AY 
01 - 8 ZS sera 01-260 85*0/1/2/3 
Ctnta i Gram he 599 634 +0* f 9S 

Do Acajm BB2 TOO +0* 1JH> 

Ejonm & Ml W4 2 t5 U« +£2 077 

Do B*w WUMrawU 7S.1 SU* +19 0.78 

finance A Property 6 64 710* *05 2J» 

Get i fitted means *07 Siam .. 8.13 

Do Aeon 82-7 87.0* . . 8.15 

Earn means 759 bi.i* +aa *.TO 

Do Aeon 1800 isa&m 42-1 4 ere 

HMI YJsU Incase 74 1 79-2 ■ +02 B«8 

Do Ann 1875 211 2 * +06 7 49 

M means 80 J 883 +0.1 £10 

Do Atom 808 88-5 .. £11 

DO 5% WMittvri 740 BOO .. £11 

Managed Fin 65-5 m +oz . . 

P m to ra n c e means 290 31-6 -0.1 983 

Da Accum 95.6 102-2 -02 980 


1325 Ml J .. Ul 

2S4XI 2702 +07 451 

2085 2175 *07 *51 

101.1 105.4* -1.1 £0 

838 880* -37 286 


Do Accum 95.6 102-2 

SmdfOr GO'S Accum 131 .6 140.7 
Wand Amy Snare 87 i (La* 


PorttoM TS UK 


792 82-1* +08 1-55 


Portftwo TSI Japan 1082 il£8* +£6 000 

PORKMTfllUS 715 74 S ® -08 1.06 

PorrVWJ Tat Europe 1232 1273* *03 000 
Pordoko Tst HK 425 4*0* 41 0.10 


Buran EH3 8YY 
*031-228 6066) 

4431 4838 ■ 109 

447 8 467 0 020 

230S 253.7 132 

4430 4715 
199 0 TOM .. 

1739 185.0® -07 028 

1+5 4 159.0 +19 128 

1952 207.7* +04 5-20 
202.4 215-5 -39 000 

141.7 1508 +06 087 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25 /» Aharona Gm. London W1X 4AD 

01-491 0295 

American 4T.4 507 076 

Ausnlan 165 17 7* . 305 

Japan 8 Ganertl 1109 1203# . 0.17 

teUi non* 455 487* . 520 

Hanudonal Trial BIO 807 . 1-63 

hcorna Qm Tar *7.0 503 . . 328 

Gas 6 Fuad Int 204 212 .. 697 

(Boon Mamas 34.1 385 . 2-04 

Epeaai Senkn 397 4£5 154 


3 OrnWa SL E 
031-225 2561 ID* 
M Ex 02) 

Japan Ex (43) 

UK Ex 01) 

Pia Pm m 
F sai Pm UK 
BOMm 
BG Energy 
BG Income Qnxttt 
BG Jam 
BG Technology 


WMMy. KA9 0NB 

2838 3038 +22 224 

33Z9 354.1 +3.2 370 

2229 237,1 +3J 020 

1532 1636 -02 OS6 

403 S23® -0.1 130 

62 -J 556® +0.1 100 
612 64** +07 050 


cowtable unrra AWtllJTRAUQN 
35, Fuji man St, uanenenar 
081*238 5686 

FpufeaW Peiean 752 805 ill 

hwi tacome Truer 77.7 827 ;» 

ci 8 Rad Hr 833 56.7 837 

T* Ot few Trueta 032 57-3® 1 » 

r msoTium 765 sojc £38 

runer Trust Ol.i 885s 154 

Far Emm Trust 846 901 054 

on Oram 522 566 12! 

EQUITY 8 LAW 

91 Georga Hse Cupuaton & Cownfey CY1 
190 

0203 663231 

UK Growth Actum 1527 1824 328 

Do Income 13£B UU .. US 
HWwr he Acoum 2S40 Z707 +07 451 

Do mane 2045 2175 *1X7 451 

GJO/Foad Acorn 301.1 108.4* -1.1 £® 
Do Weems 832 882* *37 226 

NmAm* Tat Accum 1342 1434 -02 024 

Far East Tit Accum 1832 1742 -Ul 058 
Euro TO Accum 1878 i7S5o +£i 12* 
Garni Thai MU 2602 -01 3-OS 

MciM7MMMararr 

1. Lamm POumey «. London EGffl DBA 

01-883 4880 

US SmaAar Ctf 4 734 77.4 ..077 

Crow Fund 1082 1182 . 05S 

Income ted 81.7 874 ..451 

Fm Eealam Fqnd 789 83.7 . 032 

OreraMS femme 731 782 -- 348 

Fated aaanaat SR2 S3* . 850 

MUalRNFm. 405 43* .. *JX> 

Europeee femme 845 907 . 292 


190. won George SL Ougoir 02 SPA 
041-332 3132 

Balanced Gm Me 455 489 .120 

DO Accum 48 .1 *8.0 .. .. 

heooe Gei toe 415 m s . . 521 

Do Accum 431 452 . . . . 

Sen*® Go-4 lee 402 530 .. 120 

Do Accum 504 636 .. .. 

FBSBJTf BWESTWOfT SERVICES LTD 
Bsor Waft. Thnfartdge. TN9 1DY 
0732 351144 

American 1052 1139 -0.1 027 

Amer EtMly femme 332 389 -. 401 

Anar astM Sts 302 538 *02 120 

FUbelnc 35.* 37.7 ..370 

-GM&Fbadtot 314 338 -.625 

-Growth 6 hcane 992 1065 +02 456 

.Japan Sped* SO 462 509 +1J .. 

.Japan Truer 1489 lOOJS +32 . . 

r Managed hi TOr 1482 IMS +12 not 

IWaafemme E**y 831 889* -09 822 

AgWeemari 3(5 308® +04 233 

Ml Earn Aah Tat 3£l 349 +03 048 

Ss*«Sd SB 1872 1802c *SJ 028 


Gram G*Ny 20(9 71U +u.i 195 

QuvdM 284.1 294.4* -02 Z21 

N Amman 1*1.7 i502 -04 155 

Mate 2(42 2808 -2.1 312 

Pnopsriy State 2829 2738 143 

Gmaiar Cu m pas su 917.4 231 j -02 1 85 
Ewnpe*i Thai 2607 2774 +09 15Z 

OUDHK33 MAHON UWTTRU3T 
MANAOBIS 

PO Boa 449. 32 9 MNMtt-HI, LOBOOB EG3P 
3W. 

01-823 9333 


Bar Offer cmg YU 


414+ v 






*sSTS3on I 


Japan A Genettl MU 1285* 

teai home 455 487* 

hURUdonal Trial 812 837 

Income am Tst 47 2 503 

G*s A Fixed IM TO4 212 

Octal UMS 34.1 385 

Special Sduaeore 39.7 425 

BARCLAYS UMCORN 
U acorn House. 2S£ Romfcxd Rd E7 

a I -534 5644 


And Accum 
Do income 
Capra 
Exempi Trust 
Ena Income 
Financial 
500 

General 

G* A Ftaad he 
Japan A Gen Inc 

DO ACC 

Oraaith Accum 
hcane TruM 
Lasae Trust 
Soeoai SHuaVons 


87.7 8X9 -09 158 

1202 134* +12 148 

90.1 954 +0.7 1.49 

70.4 7*S» *03 Z39 
4359 4622 +2.4 391 

764 819 +06 544 

235.7 2507 +25 3K 

2881 2859* +1.1 309 
141 3 1503 +05 306 

549 57 0* *0.1 961 

1771 1885 -15 B06 

179.1 1ML5 -22 a» 

181.6 1839 +05 254 

3381 359.6* +19 388 

80.6 85.7 +2.1 158 

144.3 1535c +0 4 298 

1985 207.7 +15 258 

1085 1155 +05 253 

533 5G6 -05 020 

52.8 58.1 -04 020 

156.1 1649 -04 056 


rumm PMtn. BrW BS2 OJM 
0800 373393 

Amer Gram 234 245 .. 150 

Equity Wl femme 433 *6.1* +05 LbO 

EurapawiOraft 30.1 32J .. 250 

General Eahy 399 419* -0.1 £60 

0* A Rxedfen CM 309 M2* +0.1 350 

ON A ftaed he 254 285* +0.1 950 

MB SecaMu 255 285 . . £30 

Japan acm 35.1 374 -05 090 

COUNTY UTMANAOEM LTD 
181. megahe, unur EC2V BEU 
01-726 IBM 


3 gotfa^Sq. London S3A BAN 

American Enapl 13549 3819 . . 198 

Japan E*e«'.-;a E*z39 4389 .. 096 
Am Prapeny T« 1107880 * ..300 

Property That £20390 890 


3 London ms Bugs. London wee. London 
EC2M WO 
01-828 5181 

Amer A Gen Inc 2954 2395* -19 048 

DO Accum 2309 2*6.0* -19 0.48 

AM Tumema toe 2164 ZSOO -04 1.11 

Do ACOJDI 224.4 2384 -0.6 1.11 

r»fimi TK he 9119 224.8 +04 191 

Do Accum 26(4 Z70.2 +44 191 

Conn A GS Inc 889 339 +04 5.37 

DO Accum 117.4 1245 +44 557 

Extra Inc TM he 1829 1725® +44 458 

DO Acctan 1782 1674* +47 496 

femme Trut 1174 1259 +44 493 

Do Accun 1238 1314 +0.6 493 

HI Gram Fd toe 1849 1749 -89 . . 

Do Accun 182-4 1944 -09 .. 

Japan A Gen he 915 974 -04 0.07 

Do Amin ms 974 -m out 

Mommy femme Fd 838 msjs® +04 *56 
Hecouaty 1374 1484® +45 191 

Do Accum 1484 150L6* +49 151 

Euopaan ho 6(4 M.« +09 041 

Do Accum 644 684 +05 091 


-19 048 
-19 0.48 
-05 1.11 
-0.6 1.11 
+09 191 
+45 191 
+04 S57 
+44 557 
+09 458 
+07 456 
+45 493 
+0.6 493 
-42 .. 
-09 .. 
-04 0.07 
SA 047 
+08 *96 
+45 151 
409 151 
+49 041 
+02 091 


00 Accum 
MO*** 
Do ACCUm 
Far Eed a* 
American Acc 
Euopeew Ace 
wmiMde Am 


mi 3535 

0059 5435* 
7405 7874* 
949 1009* 
600 039 
567 804 
523 8A5* 


NOWWCHUrMMIAqDB- 
PO Bax 4. NanMi NR1 3*0 




Oram Ran he 

Do Accun 
henna Fuad 

jwEoufr m 

Do Accun 
UM Trust he 
Do Accun 


PERPETUAL UNH 1 MUST 

48. H M Sam Hentoy flu dumb 

0*91 578888 


555 58.4 
55.1 589 


1404 1434 
1245 me 
138) UH8C 
rn.1 14890 
1319 1403 
2284 2430 


+19 483 
-09 0.44 
-04 044 
-32 0.00 
-0.3 098 
-04 Q» 
+0.1 1-14 
♦0.1 1.14 
-05 034 
-05 054 
-£9-000 


WorttlMda Hac 
Amar Oradi 
hd Emerg Ctfs 
Far EM Gram 
European Get 


2785 2970 
1969 2039 

1534 104.6 

709 739 
819 879 
773 KM) 
831 679 


• tVWV. Ii 


s m 


PMuan End. OortAM. Sumy 
0308 885055 


FP Eqdqr DM 
Do Accun _ 
FP RMd fen Qm 
D o Acoan 
StawerdiMp DM 
Do Accum 


2035 2159 
3385 350.7 
115.1 1224 
1319 1309 
1759 1884 
1814 1825 


Energ y Trial 
Extra hoome 


479 509* 
185-9 1784 
1885 1799* 
565 589 


Fauna* 1885 1739* 

B* Strategy 585 589 

Qmaiti femHttnenf 2895 SiffiJ 
heom 6 Gram 419 438* 

toWt Quo 2 00.7 2135# 

NmAnMr Groanh 1037 1109 

hd Recovery 114.1 1213 

SffiMer Co s 2139 2205* 

GKml he TM 504 63.1* 

Spaa* So Acc 2832 8039 


RMS H COURT 

PuUc thane KhgsMy NC2 

01-406 4300 

Capua) 3495 3815 


Gran he 
Kgft YMd 


1489 1489 
215.1 2209* 


QT UNIT MANAGERS 

Bdi Floor. 0 Qevonatarn fia London ECOI *YJ 

01-283 2575 OeeMg 01-828 9*31 


Uav Tech Acoan S3J 568 
Do heoma 529 58.1 

Wondmde Tnta 156.1 1M0 
■B‘ TO hv Fund Acc 331.6 3527 
Do he 2149 2299 - 

BARMS FUND MANAGERS 

PO Box 156. Beduhtiam. Kant BR3 ■ 

01-658 9002 

Australia 830 80S 

fosatm 581 682* - 

Eowiy femme 573 Bi.s 
Eixope 131.8 1*1419 

Growth 8 he 649 mm ■ 

Japan Spaa* 1067 1182* 
Japan 5unnse 907 97.0 
Ffesi Europe 1185 1239 

Fnt Japan 90.6 90s 

First n Amer 512 547* 


first Smew CD's 638 607 

BAHWNOTON MANAGEMENT 
10. r and m c l t SL London ECS 
01-623 8000 

Planned few 1325 1419 

aeapeaihc 979 tat 3 

00 ACCUn 1209 1253 

General me 161.8 1715 

Do Accun 2203 23 (9 


CROWN UNIT TRUST SBUnCES 
damn Hoi** Wri ng GU2I WW 

04862 5033 

Hah hcane Trust 2(85 2835 +15 498 

Oran Trust 2253 HID* -09 £59 

Amenam Thw 1312 MQJ -0.1 071 


Sumy RH2 88L 
HM 

UK femme 505 539 

UK GhMdi Accun 517 500 

Da DM 517 53.0 

European Gram SB5 602 

Puohc Grown 579 807 

Shi UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
4. MahtH Crescent. Emrtourgh 
031-228 3(82 


UK Cap Fnd Inc 
Do Accun 
femme field 
Mmi Ezanfex 


995 U85* +04 290 
1*33 15X3 +05 £00 

804 KJW +09 800 
1825 1919* +03 190 
1704 1874 +09 080 


Amencan Fund 
Cap** Fund 


749 80.1 
801 10(9 


Gram 6 w Fund 1309 1307* 


E uropean he 
Do Accun 
Genual me 
Do Accun 
G* YMd he 
Do Accun 
Hm Yield he 
Do Aeeum 
Jtpai heoma 
Do Accun 
N Amenan he 
Do Accun 
Pacric Income 
Do Accum 
Sfflfer Co's he 
Du Accun 


1325 1419 . 394 

972 1023 +0-3 190 

1203 1259 +09 150 

161.8 17)5 +2.1 299 

2203 23(9 +29 298 

1119 1103* +02 938 

1845 1901* +03 938 
889 9*5* +09 843 
1769 1881 +12 543 

25 55 2687 -23 ft 19 

2573 270.6 -2* 0.19 

*9.7 528 -02 057 

57.7 813 -03 057 

136 I 1429 -12 094 

1533 1808 -13 02* 

805 US7 +04 132 

954 1015 +05 152 


►vyi Dot Fund 
kwamofeonai Raid 
Resatrcu Fuad 
SmAr Jap Co'» Fn 
Tokyo Fuio 
(Ex) Am* (2) 

(Exj japan p) 

(E»i Pacfc »*) 


Fund 1109 1108 
m Raid 2015 2106 
1 Fuad 233 2(9 
Co's Fnd 381 306 
id 1625 1B06* 

% 1329 1579 

117.0 1205 

C (41 2885 2989* 


is&r* pw2 5i s & 


BRirANMA(MT TRUST 

7*-7B Faobinr Pavemara London EC2A 1JD 

01-588 2777 DarsmgOI-638 0*78)9 MoneyGukh 


0600-010-333 
Gram a 
fed Recovery 
SmaMr Co'i 
UK Gnwm 
Extra he 
ON _ 
he 6 Growth 


895 805* +01 041 
1044 1114 -03 280 

1407 1501* +13 130 
388 415 +09 £10 

501 56 B* +0L3 749, 
265 200 .'. 7.81' 

2005 2109 +15 4.16 


. £12 
+07 192 
+08 429 
+13 088 
.. 194 
+02 040 
-03 .. 
-24 090 
+23 347 
.. 018 
.. 033 
.. OlO 
-01 328 


EAGLE STAR IMT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bam Road. Cnebenaem. ODucamr GL53 7LO 
0242 521311 

UK Battnced he 712 709 +02 £78 

Do Accun 723 77.1 +02 £72 

UK Growth Accum 863 EJ +05 198 

UK ngn me Inc 573 7i5 +08 432 

N Aiiiortcan Accum 87.7 722* -01 f.06 
Far Eastern Accum 1080 110l -09 090. 

Ewmaan Accun 88.8 Bl9* +02 074 
UK ON 8 FT Inc 5*9 504 +01 023 

Do Accum 984 502 +01 798 


US S General 565 629 -01 090 

Tadi & Growth 635 600 -01 120 

Japan 8 General 772.1 2321 -05 010 

Far East 8 @(n 1279 1389 +12 040 

European Fund 2715 2904 -01 030 

Germany Fun] 754 807 +19 090 

CaHTHOBEFmPMAHAOBM 
£ SI Mary Axe. London GC3A 88P 
01-823 1212 Deaton 01-623 5786 Deetog 01-823 
5806 

American ThM 901 905 .. 090. 

AiMraton Trust 102 18.4 . . 035 

(Milan TM Aeon em 042* .. ii“ 

Do DM 520 5X7* .. 1J 

CDnxTBSdYy Share 565 6 Q 4 ).< 

European Truu 535 595 . 030 

Extra hcane Thai *01 525 . . 5J® 

Fnr Eextam Tnm 1503 1872 . 000 

Raid interest Fuad 283 202 . . 999 

Gil ThM 272 203 ..028 

GtoaM FUM Accum 1820 19X7 . 019 

DO DM 1735 1845 . . 018 

GOfcf Sham That 129 >35 . 293 

Haagsd American 315 341 .. 010 

High heoma ThM 1419 1519* . 071 

hong Kong ThM 282 301 . . 1.10 

tnxxna Fund 7H 91.1* . . 3.19 

inauance Aflanohe E4778 5138 . . £W 

Japan Trust 1604 1709 -39 000 

Managed ExtoigR 2787 291 A . ■ £23 

OH IBw» ThM 335 302 . - L7B . 

&MCM snx Trust 932 «L8* .. 078 

lAt&raCaRecTM 717 708 .. 142 


a 9w«m Lana. Lcndon BC4P 40U 
01-290 5488 
NC America fem 3882 9044* -05 132 

Do Accun 3ii.i 3309* 

MG Enaryy Res 1207 137a 

NCIimm 903 900 

NC Japan 10S5 20X0 

NC Smolar Coe 1419 1509* 

NC 9Mr Bmp Col 1923 2001 

NC Ewrpt S 1289 U19 

NC Amer Prop 61157 12.18 

HC Property 1803 1669 


311.1 3309* -00 132 

1207 1379 -09 248 

M3 909 +04 496 
1959 2000 .. 091 

1419 1600® +07 £92 

i 1923 2001 +05 040 

1289 U19 hfe 858 

61157 12.18 .. .. 

1803 1669 . . . - 


ROWAN IIMT TRUST 

38 Nng WWam SMOL UhdQU GC4R BAS 
01-636 5678 

AmancNi M 2385 2425 .. 190 

Secure** (A 7419 7889* +840 £99 

HimiYIaH^ 1780 1705 .. 835 

li*Ni(3) 4215 4205 .. 174 

fixed Hemal 1729 1739 .. 240 

Mgn BKarent 12+9 1259 ..1027 

Fu Em 09 2449 2(75 +2L0 090 


NOT AL UK HIM) MANAOEfeWT 
Now KM Plaox Urerpo* L68 SHS 
051-227 4422 

Booty That 835 075 KL1 W 

JMThM 747 79.4® *02 151 

GB Thai 208 282 -.018 

US Trust 3£9 3&8S .. 198 

Pscttc Bade TH 435 407 -01 099 

aOCMoiSL London SC2 
01920 0811 

Eo*y DM 1109 1208 +08 148 

Do Acoan 1872 1779 +08 148 

HM femme ThM 025 908 +19 4M 

Do Accun 1001 1104 +191 430 
US Orowti 573 «1 5 -04 095 

DO Accun (9.1 823 -03 BM- 


Amwicen (femdh 
r*w»«i Accum 
Gat heoma 
High hemaa 
ham ■ Gram 

Japan Growth 
sped* 3to 


889 864* 
184.1 1853 
604 594 
813 80SN 

iota mas* 

884 1Q£0 
1007 11S7C 


GOVOTUOHHJWdT MANAGEMENT 
MnUiBster Haa. 77. Lowkn Wan Uahon EC2N 

IDA 

0V588 5020 

M Gram 889 834 +13 194 

Amoricsn Grawdi 804 683 -04 039 

Amencan Inc 705 704® -05 5^ 

Ewopoan Growth 2*07 2574 +£5 023 

GUd 6 Mharah 384 41.0 +19 £07 

Japan Growth 1829 1732 +1.1 . . 

GNE IMT HAMMERS 
(toy* Endlong*. EC3P SDN 
01-888 9908 

ON 6 Fund M 1192 1239® -02 085 


-r&n 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Tuesday's trading 


EK dMdend. c Cum OMdand. k Cum 
stock spfit a Ex stock spfiL m Cum M 
(any two or mors of above), a Ex al (any 
(wo or mom of aboni Dealing or 
valuation days (1) Monday. CZ) Tuesday. 
® wamweby. (4) Thursday. (5) Friday. 
(20) 2StV> of month. (21) 2nd Thursdsy ot 
■ month. pZZ 1st and 3rd Wednesday of 
month. (23) 20di of month. (24) 3nl 
! Tuesday ot month. JZ) 1st end 3rd 
Thursday of month. (2H 4tfi Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1st Weikiesday of mornh. (281 


(33) 1st day at Fdbnivy, May. August, 
; November. (34) Last wortdng day of 
month. (35) 15th of month. (3§) i4fti at 


2lst ot month, 
of month. I 


Wednesday of month. (4d) Vahmd 
monthly. (41) Lust Thursday of Stock 
Exchange eocount (42) Last day of 
month. M3) aid and 4th Wednesday ot 
month. (44) Quarterly. (45) 6th at month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday of month. 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 




43 28 19.1 
1.0 1 7 05 
34 39 126 
59 

£9 83 59 


118 85 
217 142 
10 8‘j 

3(8 287 
729 as 


bTSsmU 

Br Empfea Sac 


Do Cap 
Drayton CM 
Drayton tm EM 
fray** Japan 
Ouxtoa Lon 
E*n Amer Anal 

SS?Sm 

Endton w 
En^Mi Scot 
En»go 

f ■ C A*anca 
F AC PaeKio 
Hm cnaferito 
FV*t Scot Amer 
Fvn Un Gen 


IBS 145 naming (Sever 

qm gu n.mfe .1 r rnxramr 

4"* UWM 

129 B*h nerong Far Es 
1*0 100 Ftanmg FtodgBr 
739 *80 Ftooen Jipan 
165 123 Ftontog Uwcar 
W 123 Flamfeig Own* 
182 '*0 naming Tech 
1*0 107 Owning (Mvara 
101 68 Fa Col 

109 88 OBCCeplOd 

225 118 GT Japan 
187 1U General Fund* 

330 278 General COni 




G W Joynaon mkS Co report 


116 *-i 

815 • .. 

138 *-1 

386 •-£ 

103 -a 

127 +1 

248 

58*1 #— *i 

Jl :: 

41 -i- 

232 -3 

156 

138 

353 -1 

111 +1 
749 -6 

19B -2 

110 -2 

ira . -a 

078 *+12 

18* +2 
95 
75 

115 -1 

209 -1 

3? .-£ 

88 

885 +2 

178 *+2 

303 m-a 
12* -2 
136 

734 -4 

16* • .. 
158 *-t 

130 *+1 

MO 

101 * . 
ml -a 

1B7 *+1 

304 
144 

124 -1 

144 -2 

218 -2 


L— 


1*9 4.1 3*7 
19 09 .. 
14® 09 .. 
0JOO *9 302 
09 09859 

47 £9*7.1 

84 J 7 633 

85 14459 

£0 ££504 

19b 15 839 
29 £3 809 
£1 19 807 

01 19 . . 
159 49319 

87 £8 74 
89 19 829 
74 49 342 
128 49 332 
14 1.1 .. 

39 29SZ5 . 

07 09 .. 
05 34 4£4 
39 £5834 

39 29969 
£9 £1882 
24b 24 689 

20b 09 
£9 19 874 

179b 59 287 
34 24 80S 

02 42319 

490 £8 449 
82 15 801 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47+i 34>« 
71 31 

48 21 
154 116 
2* 13^ 

20V 12t 
158 131 
iao so 
247 187 
108 66 
750 375 

M 77 

151 75 

900 480 
7)8 153 


American Expreaa 

bSSooC ' 

Brasma Arrow 
Deny MM 

Do -A- 
Etocn 
Eng Trial 
Exeo 

Fxpfei r ai l u n 


Fran Gp 

lumson wni 


£2 IS M * ° 

292 Memeeaa (Mae 

127, 7B Paaoc fenr Tat 

206 162 Oman New Coat 


-1 

-1 14 £7 37M 

784 

69 45 179 
. . 700 39 108 

.. 700 39)09 

69 49344 
e .. . 49 29187 
+9 2.1 £9 159 

S 39 24 1*9 
93 1-33*4 
i .. 7.1 03 02 

£6 1.7 401 

. 179 £1 189 

.. 1Z80 7£ 73 

. . 2£8 00 109 

+5 01 £3 327 

I S 200 89 69 
-2 05 04 .. 

+4 100 (U) 02 


COMMODITIES : " 


m .. 2.1 

215 +5 49 

173 29 

112 £4 

165 +1 84 

£5 
59 
77 

• 49 

.. 2.1 

-8 29 

-1 7.1 

-3 39 

39 

• .. 01 

+3 07 

19 

.. U 

• -10 79 

10 

188 
+2 34 

-3 2*9 

0-2 49 

04 

.. TJI 

-3 £1 

.. 03 

-1*1 04 

• .. 79b 

29a 
29 

-V 19 

• 29 

.. 1.1 

79 

-I 39. 

• .. 37 


SUGAR {FYora C. CzemRooar) 

Oct 1169-100 

Dec — 1200-24-0 

Mar 1399-394 

May 14SJ&408 

Aug 151.0-50.6 

Ocf 154.4-500 

Vot 4662 




SOYASeAN 

Oct . 

Dec 

Feb 

Apr 

Ai« 

Oct 

Vat 


_ 13SL0-34.6 
131-8-314 
133A32JS 
135*335 

— 133M2J0 

- 133*305 
_ 135.0-330 
325 


133.TC-3340 

13650-3025 

142J0-4325 

140504025 

148504650 

14050-4450 


Unofficial prion 
Official Turnover figures 
Price in E par ra a e i c tonne 
BNvr bi p m oa partfpy 0 *” °* 

Rodoif West 6 Co. Lid. report 

COPPER GRADE A 

Cash - 90550-90000 

Those Months . 9205052150 

Voi 18500 

Tore -- — _ Rrmar 

STAMOARO CATHODES 

Orth 881.00-88350 

Three Months . 90250-804 JJO 

VQl N3 

Tone — Idki 

LEAD 

Cash 273.00-27450 

Three Months . 27&OCKS7G50 

Vo( 2000 

Tone — ■ SffiatOer 

ZMC STANDARD 

flash— .ffiftflMKLTO 

VOt MI 

Tone — kfla 


Cash 51SJMB6J8 

Three Months . 5 f)9 50- 59 0. 00 

VOI 2400 

Tone Steadier 

SLVtER LAME 

Cash 3S9.00-360.00 

Tlsee Months . 3675036750 

Vot 3 

Tbne — CM« 

S0VER SMALL 

Cash 3695096050 


Three Months. 36750-36750 

Vot — Ml 

Tone idle 

ALUMNUM 

Cash — — 78650-791.00 

Three Months . 77250-77000 

Vbl -1850 

Tong Steady 


Cush 

Three Months . 

Vol 

Tone 


2S35-2S4G 

2570-2575 

m 





IXNDONMCATHjfUflZ-S 

EXCHANGE 
Pig Contract 
p-perkito 

Mon ®' Open Ctose 
um?- 1045 
Nov unq. 106.7 

55 ««q. 985 

Agr unq. 

Jun unq. 99.0 


PlgMeatvofeo 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
U*e Cats® Contract 
p. per kilo 

Mo* 1 #) Open Close 
S«P uno.S65 

2* «-3 

unq. 1005 

s ^ H 


Vot: 8 

LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 

£ par tonne 

Wheat Bailey 
lonffl Ck»ft Close 

S 32S^ 1 g4JM 

w 10750 10750 

“ 11000 
11255 11240 

11920 11350 

uf 11040 — 



LONDON 


POTATO FUTURES 


£ per tome 


Month 

Open 

Close 

Nov 

tfl.0 

MU 

Feb 

1200 

1275 

ffiy 

1555 

1720 

1501 

T745 

NOV 

865 

855 
Vot 998 


WFFEX 


GJU. Freight RitnreeUd 
report 310 per Index pohM 


freight index 



Htgh/Low 

Ctose 

Oct 86 

826.0800.0 

8200 

Jan 67 

6205-8105 

6275 

Apr 87 

886.0-8555 

8855 

Jl8 87 

790.0-7800 

7855 

Oct 87 

87558705 

BOA 

Jan 88 

- 

8575 

Apr 88 

B2S5-3255 

9325 


Vot 860 lots 
Open tmarast 2054 


Nov 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

Jut 

volume: 

Wheat 

Barley 


Hnh/Low Ctose 


m 7 tots 

Open interest 38 

SpmnuneacQmnwitsryr 
Tanker index: 

T 1785 down 4£5 on 2V9/8B 


m 


up 2l5on 2/5/86 
























































1 j i;m:vt »7.wa a ;* y a ,t, i : ~ 


iUiac\^Ji»l3i^a»i 




STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Selective support 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end September 12. §Contango day Sepieraber 15. Setilement day September 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 



—^cld' 


Q Tiiw i %'c-i^apini I IteHrO 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Gaims required for 
+52 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


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IK IX MkRani 130 *2 

240 158 Wagon M 249 to+12 

X V a »S&(C4W) » ; 

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375 339 wagmoM 3G3 -4 

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231 174 wwcooe 180 

90V MV wil.l 45 

110 S HMnd S3 

118 78 wm IX 

295 210 W Romo 200 

134 X WlNMOe IX *8 

303 177 numeral* 228 -1 

in 123 WmUkoW) 143 -2 

740 395 W9UH Hdae 670 *5 

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HO 428 Wrote* STB +3 

04 56 Wood mu X 

44 26 Wood ISW) 42 

93 p'l WMOM C Fta 73 • 

X X WlMH Eon 70 -3 

178 135 Young (HJ IX 


INSURANCE 


107b 5.4 71 
1C 11910 
SSI 21 174 

73 2914.1 
ISO 41 121 
71 59 84 

21 17M1. 

61 si 71 
.. .823 

44 14 11? 

12.1 31 124 

21 US39 
19 1817.7 
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31 17 240 
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41 12 399 
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79 71 95 
1410 81 120 
88 59 89 
2000 30 231 
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131 21 184 
31 37 139 

14a 31 149 
41B 39 11 5 
20b 17 118 
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312 

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OVERSEAS TRADERS 


313 243 Enm Plod 
221 158 Etfcra 
277 214 BS 
43V 2BV Bbul 
153 102V Etoeo 
29V 17V Bacmrtox (A£) V ! 
104 52 n«m 

2BV 1BV Estautrt 
361 282 Endbh Cana Cay ; 
23V 18V Enron 044) V ! 
184 18* Emm Howe 
.nTviSO'i Gurapro Feme* 
M2 112 DoHM 
3*2 158 EWM 

<23 312 baa 

55 22 Falcon 

42 X FMMtaBU 
1*3 106 Fenner (Jfi) 

75 58 RM tadnar 

638 -a® Finns i 

67 35 Fkzweton 

iM 84 ramn cw 

X 31V Feoai 
123 m Foamy 
4iv 27V Folu* Group *V* 

IX 157 Faewgto * Herray 

67 46 Frencti (ThmO 

131 84 GB W 

385 2S6 GXN 

SIS 360 OR i 

118 eo Oman Eng 
157 wo amrar 

iso in am* 

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3(4 194 OylMtod 

505 250 Owing Kerr 

ix 107 Gmtpan HWgt 

312 206 Omdi 

MV 6V GwM 
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232 134 MS. Ena 

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2BS 180 MMl 

zoo 230 >aaa 

<1 25v lamoo ad 

X 20 IMon 

IX Ml ftanwn 

192 145 Do 8% CM I 

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125V 115V DO 109 I 

ara i33 lamraaw. : 

273 175 Ham. (PMM 

629 431 HMdnrShWay 

UO 90 Hmrtay 1 

205 81 tay^wnwg 1 

221 140 Hamit Carsmtc ! 

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86 X Hewn (J) 

142 122 HataBalJob i 

67 82 Hda 9 di 

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286 14 Hopfcfcaon. 

120 81 HoMan 1 

HO 234 Humag/woe 1 

115 n Hunan Group i 

399 Stir, unarm Whanpn ‘ 
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its 210 aotran 1 

285 2«. Jachsmn Bownt 1 

' MSV 88V janaw IM 1 

615 478 Johnson Owners ! 

228 133 Jdam MstthW- i 

44V 22V Jahruon A FB 
345 236 JohnsUn ! 

140 X Jones A SNpmn 1 

132 .87 Jainlsn (Ttmais*) 1 

X 21 KMisa o 

M . 25 Kaon 

325 188 xabeylnd ! 

130 t05 Kroody SOM* 1 

296 230 Kmvmwm 2 

215 128 MMtv&Z* 2 


115V 103 Trees izv» 

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123V 
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103V 57 

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124V 106V 
107V B9>i 

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128 V MOV 
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IBM 

133 'j 111V 

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433 128 Grand MM MS 9-3 ULS 14 113 

248 .208 Kennedy Braetaw £» 24 1.1 11.7 

391 312 Lem*. 368 +8 18-1 44 171 

565 447 Lon Park Hoaa 566 Ml 16 171 

IM 76V Mm* OwrtoBO 92 »+1 2-1 21 161 

105 67 PHncO Of W Hoaa 83 • .. 2.1 25 151 

79 53V Oman MOM 78V ■ . . 2.7 31 161 

405 368 Stray Hoaa ’A' 388 -3 60 1 A Ml 

81 X Sana ®S .. ii 21161 

an Mi TrusOKMza Fora *52 P-2 79 52 15.1 


119 UtU. 
29 89 8.1 
114 59 99 
219 59192 
189 41104 
M1B 89 11J7 
29 51 124 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


X 22 
1XV120 
323 218 
75 42 
7BV 41 
*113 X 
86 64 

73 S3 
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238 178 
Ml » 
77 XV 
233 159 
273 134 
480 319 
4*5 306 
118 64 
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393 255 
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710 496 

79 52 

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123 70 

196 163 
313 212 
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M ra c ha ar Bp 
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Moram Qrudba 


M u wnwn Took* 
Nona 5 Land 


Ottos Deer Mach 
PWvKoel-A- 
Parmti jt 


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HL7 59 12.1 
89 41 129 
33 87 147 
79b 59 131 

43 49 214 
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09 01 144 
51 52 91 

7.1 81 . . 

69 29134 

141 39189 

0.7 1.7 921 

2.1 62 U 

7.1 5 4 201 

59 61 174 

79 12 281 
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10 61 80 
121 79 131 

4.1 59 962 

84 99111 

179 63 69 
109 14 61 
69 46 61 

2.1 19 109 

4J7 39 M.1 

167 19 279 

129 42165 
161 51 11.1 
5.7 39 189 
109 17*32 
01 7.7 119 
29 21164 
129 01 99 

64 49 29 
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24 09312 
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57? 39171 

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79 29199 
132 51129 
207 40 111 
27 24 61 
54 27 362 
101 49179 
61b 31.202 
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65 54 33 
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61 52 60 

79 49 144 ■ 

19 01 297 

19 31-162 

304 M 152 
39 19149 
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107 34 121 
51 49 89 
51 41 184 
29e100 67 
17 64 217 
114 39 Ml 
67 49 127 
214 79 229 

66 43174 


09 22 19 
39 32218 
69 31 68 
39b 69 61 
34 49 102 
32 29 214 
39 49 59 
64 63 71 

19 69 IOO 
142 64 132 

74 89 112 
89 29189 
57 61 M.1 

159 37 <33* 
114b 27 157 

29 27 99 
19b 42 116 
169 S91BJ 
37 24 160 

27 49109 
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41 39119 
68 12 234 

41 64 79 
25 67 62 
62 41 63 
89 39 .. 
68 67 214 
32 41 04 
61 109 57 
$.3 59 128 

111 62 65 
121 49147 
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160 63 67 
1.1 32 611 

161 69124 
19 09 413 
14 32 464 

131 51 121 

121 51 60 

150 39 161 


216 177 
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336 2X 
301 22* 
431 213 
954 161 
B34 720 
70S 484 
349 287 
2X 231 
22S 173 
438 257 
88V XV 
285 220 
3*8 £23 
15V 12 

M2 718 
*53 381 
887 768 
415 324 
474 348 
44S 390 
772 520 
927 772 
EGO 120 
474 3M 


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46 2.1 60 
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Hanson CrttaMO 383 
mencape 471 

Jacks (Wire XV 

Lonrao ?«5 

Oommi Wtoon *7 

hanon lea, 218 

DO A 218 

Pi** Pack 153 

S™ Darby 47 

saw Brat 580 

Tow Henley 178 

VUd CjBO 319 


07 13 149 

160 56 129 
59 70 

M8 76183 
•3 299 6? 334 

18 49 12-1 
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36 77 ■£ 

68 39 71 

05 39 71 
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100 47 89 


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M4 M 
220 128 

IX M 

X 84 
225 IM 
«0 325 

KV X 
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IX 93 
131 94 
103 33 

IX 137 
IK OO 
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333 328 
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DRAPERY AND .STORES 


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™ 1 4 Backs lets 


400 305 Chart 

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438 218 omens Grp 
540 346 OuM 

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274 194 EM _ 

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203 1B3 Fbraurar 
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18 830 OUS 
11 V721 DO If 
307 190 Hfertu Oueatmay 
33 25 HtMno 01 London 

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226 WS Lw Cooper 

ss aa^ sx. 

asi 183 Maittl^netr 
380 283 Maun (John) 


tax Of MM 

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BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


ZS1 

£ 

12 

IK 

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280 

IW 

11 

5 

260 

230 

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46 

32 

740 

410 

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261 65 74 


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-2 84 92 214 

.. 3L2 24332 

.. 61 74 79 

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+6 17.1 64 149 

+2 99 49 214 

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-2 43 1.1 274 

+4 74 14 162 

.. 66 <9 1Q1 

.. 134 23252 

.. 54 24 20.1 

+4 61 24 192 

29 22 04 
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77 46168 
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67 67 160 
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+V .. ..261 

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249 

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+2 39# 22 .. 

+S 2 29 34154 


200 178 AAH 

Z39 ISO ABB HHWre h 

IX « AIM 

871 553 APV 

110 so Amman. 

an 172 AitoeM 

343 307 Mexandra MPwHT 

ISO 144 AboadE 

275 WO Aflttrind 

« ’56 AppadON 


440 355 Art A Lacey 


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ELECTRICALS 


37.1 64 212 

274 44 54 
GOO 63 99 


190 AO Btfl 
120 Alptanartc 
X Atiwa d. 

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63 Artw 
205 

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386 277V BOC 


££ s 

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174 112 BvtlMII • 1» 

4S5 1» ewowRand 235 
5? 40 SUrtow Hepnun « 

305 IK Banon Transport STO 
32 21 arynas (Ctur»« X. 
Ml IX Boansn niia m 
BO <7 Proto re ss 

630 »I Bunt <dt) 3S3 
443 318 Baadsmi 416 

.. .. Betoir Comae* .. 

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552 214 BUI008I 
620 310 BwMOd 
335 335 BtobvU) 

205 MO Bdda 
123 78 Eton U) 

153 MV Bknra rkukara 
200 IB Afnmgtaen IM 
174 137 Btodt Altwe 
256 178 Btadt IPocer) 

61 34 BaefcMMd Ho4b* 
403 180 BSI* Arrow 
335 IX Bootam 
285 265 Doonr 


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11.1 47162. 
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62 U 132 

184 29 109 

69 87 89 
119 49 144 
68 24194 

12> 52 104 
68 54 65 

68 19 71 
01 1.1 139 

269 79161 
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65 24 129 
14 69 60 
3.4b 19 260 
229 5515.1 

24 68 99 
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109 69 137 

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( COMMERCIAL PROPERTY") 


Norwich and Prudential 
in £ 60 m shop scheme 


' • Nonrich Union, the 
' insurance company, will un- 
■ veil tomorrow its plans for 
a £60 million Joint retail 
• development with the 
Prudential Corporation - a 
350,000 sq ft scheme at U- 
' ford, north-east London. 

’ Norwich Union and the 
Prudential want permission 
from the London Borough 
of Redbridge for a three-level 
centre linked to Marks and 
Spencer, Littlewoods and 
C&A. There will be a 
department store, 90 nnit 
shops, other large stores, a 
food court, restaurants and 
parking for 1.000 cars. 

Hlllier Parker and Bernard 
Thorpe & Partners, the let- 
ting agents, say several retail- 
ers are interested in taking 
the department store. 

Last week Norwich 
Union announced it had 
bought the head I ease of 
Fountain House in the City of 
London for £27.51 million 
from the Stewart Wn'ghtson 
Group. The purchase, 
through Edward Erdman, 
shows the insurance com- 
pany an initial yield of 7 per 
cent. 

But the potential for 
capita] and rental growth 
within the 100,000 sq ft of- 
fice building in Fenchurch 
Street, must be enough to 
reduce that significantly. The 
freeholder is the 
Clolhmakers Company. 

Norwich attributes part 
of its good performhnee to its 
investment in commercial 
property, and could spend up 
to £325 million in the sec- 


tor this year. 

• Guardian Royal Ex- 
change. the insurance com- 
pany, has bought the 
former ABC cinema site at 
Maidenhead, Berkshire, 
from Booth bourne Properties. 
Permission has been ob- 
tained for 30,000 sq ft of of- 
fices and a replacement 
5,800 sq ft cinema on tin site. 
The scheme wifi have a 
value of £7 million on comple- 
tion. The joint letting 
agents are Goldstein Leigh 
Miles. Edwin Hill & Part- 
ners and Richard Ellis. 

• London & CaKrnst 
Properties, the joint venture 
company between London 
& Metropolitan Estates and 
Cal trust Developments, . 
the Scottish company, has . 
C&A as its anchor tenant : 
for its £2 1 million, 100,000 sq 
ft shopping centre io Ayr,' 
Scotland. 

C&A is taking a 19,000 
sq ft store on a 125-year lease 
at a peppercorn rent, pay- 
ing a substantial premium far 
the shop. The developer 
says that half the scheme will 
be pre-let by the end of 
this month, ready for opening 
at Christmas 1987. The 
Joint letting agents are Healey 
& Baker, Strutt & Parker 
and Donald Stewart & Co. 

• Hunting Gate Develop- 
ments and Allied Dunbar 
Property Funds have sold 
10.75 acres of land on their 
Shire Park business park 
at Welwyn Garden City, 
Hertfordshire, to the Dig- 
ital Equipment Company. 

Hunting Gate is 


By order of The Secretary of State for Defence 
On the Instructions of 
The Property Services Agency 

FOR SALE BY TENDER 
FITZHAMON PARK 

ASCHURCH nr. CHELTENHAM 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE 

48 Flats 

With 2 & 3 bedrooms : 

1 acre site with 

Residential Planning permission 

1 shop and 12 garages 
4.143 acres in total 


Bernard Thorpe 

; jrid Pjineis ,• 


1 Queen's Circus, Cheltenham GL50 1RX' 
Tel. (0242) 39202 • 


developing two speculative 
buildings at tbe entrance to 
Shire Park with 37,600 sq ft 
and 23,500 sq ft. ICI has 
permission for a-160,000 sq ft 
office complex on 14 acres 
of the scheme, leaving 32 
acres still to be developed. 

• Samuel Properties, 
which recently agreed an £86 
million merger with 
Clayform Properties, has sold 
its 200,000 sq ft office 
development in Los Angeles 
for £37.5 million (£25 
million). 

The iiilding, pre-let to 
Hughes Aircraft Corporation, 
part of General Motors, on 
a 10-year lease with agreed 
annual rent rises, has been 
bought by the Showa 
Corporation for cash. It Is 
located next to Los Angeles 
International Airport. 


The Mountieigh Group, the 
Yorkshire textile compeny- 
tumed -property developer, 
will be transformed into one 
of the sector's larger and more 
interesting companies through 
its agreed acquisition of 
United Real Property Trust, 
the old established property 
company. Its £117 million 
offer for United Krai closes 
this afternoon. 

Mountieigh is paying a 
healthy price for United Real 
by offering 975p per share. 

United's last stated net asset 
value was 744p per share. But 
Mountieigh believes United's 
true worth is I250p per share, 
making its offer stand at a 28 
percent discount. 

Dramatic leap 

Mountieigh is likely to de- 
velop the most attractive parts 
of the United Real portfolio, 
including State House, an 
office block in Holbom. cen- 
tral London, which alone 
could bave a site value of £35 
million. . 

■ But much of the rest could 


United Real buy 

lifts Mountieigh 

into big league 


By Judith Huntley 


be sold, providing Mountieigh 
with useful cash. 

It is a policy already being 
applied successfully to the £58 
million portfolio of properties 
which Mountieigh acquired 
from Samuel Properties be- 
fore that company's merger 
with Clayform Properties. 

Sales are under way and the 
Effra site on the south bank of 
the Thames in London was 
sold by Mountieigh almost 
immediately it was acquired 
from Sam tie L 

Mountieigh has also bought 


Industrial rents ‘are in then- 
best position since 1970s’ 


The industrial property 
market is seeing sustained 
improvement in rents, an 
important barometer of tbe 
sector.The closer balance be- 
tween supply and demand 
especially in the South-east of 
England and some areas of the 
Midlands is due to the brake 
on new development which 
has been operating in the 
private sector for the last five 
years. 

Debenham Tewson & 
Ch innocks, in its latest survey 
of industrial rents and rates, 
argues that the sector is in its 
most favourable position 
since the late 1970s. 

Industrial rents in most of 
the 24 centres surveyed, show 
rises. And if interest rates 
continue to fall, there will be a 
further incentive for indus- 
trialists to resurrect invest- 
ment plans, thereby benefiting 
the property market, the sur- 
vey says. 

But it sounds a warning that 
if the present stability between 
supply and demand in some 
areas is to continue, new 
institutional money coming 
into industrial property will 
need to increase by 400 per 
cenL This would allow the rate 
of development to return to 
the levels before the recession. 

The firm has also examined 


INDUSTRIAL RENTS & RATES 


Impact of uniform business rata with revaluation- 
industrial warehouse premises 


NEUTRAL 



172 182 192 202 212 
Rate Poundage 1985 


the pound will have on indus- 
trial property. The chart 
shows which areas will benefit 
and which suffer if the new 
system comes into being. 

Debenham Tewson says 
there will be a substantial 
reduction in liability for rates 
once the revaluation is com- 
pleted in 1990. Rental growth 
has, lagged behind that for 


behind that 

shops and offices which will 
ther-impact the Government's . • lead to a significant shift in the 
.proposed rating revaluation rates burden away from the 
and uniform business rate in industrial sector, particularly 


in the North of England and 
the Midlands. Only the more 
prosperous areas such as Berk- 
shire are likely to face higher 
revaluations. 

But plans to introduce a 
uniform business rate in the 
pound will result in an in- 
crease in the rates levied for 56 
■per cent of industrial space. 
The rates payable will fall in 
the large cities but indus- 
trialists operating outside the 
metropolitan areas will see a 
hefty rise in their rates burden. 


ihe an deco Hoover factory in 
west London for just under 
£10 million. 

At least two potential 
purchasers are believed to be 
offering substantially more 
than that to buy the building 
from Mountieigh now. 

Tbe deal with United Real 
has involved several months 
of painstaking talks with Mr 
Maurice Wobl. United Real's 
former chairman and a 51 per 
cent shareholder who ‘ now 
lives in Switzerland. 

It will be a dramatic leap 


forward for Mountieigh. a 

fast-growing company which 
has seen its share price treble 
between January last year and 
its bid for United Real. 

It was only in 1981 that 
Mountieigh sold its textile 
interests to concentrate full 
time on property .develop- 
ment. 

Since 1981, Mountieigh s 
earnings per share have risen 
from 7.47p to 77.67p by Apnl 
1986. Dividends have more 
than doubled in that time, 
with assets per share rising 


from llS.96p to 548. 79p, 

But behind the apparent 
overnight sensation lies 20 
years or more of work by the 
company's driving force. Mr 
Tony Clegg, the Lancashire- 
born and educated man who is 
now Mountlcigh's chairman 
and chief executive. 

Mr Clegg arrived at the 
Mountain Mills Company, the 
Yorkshire textile company, as 
manager in May 1961, becom- 
ing a director two years later. 

Leigh Mills merged with 
Mountain Mills in 1966 and 
Mr Clegg became a director of 
the new company. 


Transformation 

Bv 1972 he was the joint 
managing director of Leigh 
Mills. 

The transformation from 
textile company to property 
company started in 1976 and 
it was in 1479 that Leigh Mills 
became Mountieigh. 

Three years ago. Mr Clegg 
became Mountlcigh's new 
chairman and has overseen its 
growth as one of the sector's 
Highly rated companies. 


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Suffolk. College of Higher & Further Education, 
West Glamorgan Institute of Higher Education. 



344-354 Grays' bm Road, Loudon WC1X 8BP 

The CNAA is the lamest dejpve-mMrdinR’hody in the UK. 

Over one-third of ail students who an studying far a degree attend 
CNAA-appmved courses in polytechnics and other institutions of 
higher education outside the universities. 




0 


■ ) v :* : 


. Generating energy is not simply 
providing kilowatts. It must be provided in 
quantity, safely, efficiently and in an 
agreeable environment. 



Hitachi's wide-ranging technologies in energy (from left to right): 
nuclear power reactor, generator-motor, laser-test of LPG gas combustion, 
and nuclear fusion plasma testing device. 


The world’s need for energy continues 
to burgeon: and our wish to live in safe, 
peaceful and unsullied surroundings 
remains as strong as ever. Here is how 
we are working towards achieving these 
twin goals. 

Hitachi’s scientists are making 
tremendous progress in nuclear fusion, 
often called “harnessing the power of 
the sun" Nuclear fusion also has been 
called the ultimate energy source 
because it is generated by a mechanism 
similar to that of the sun. One gram 
of the fuel— hydrogen, deuterium and 
tritium— generates the same energy as 
8 tons Ca tank truck-full] of oil. 

Recently, Hitachi played a major 
role in a landmark feasibility experiment 
conducted by the Japan Atomic Energy 
Research Institute. The experiment 
succeeded in producing the first plasma 
for nuclear fusion— and brings us much 
closer to having this energy source 
‘on line’ earty in the next century. 

Since Hitachi’s beginnings three- 
quarters of a century ago, we’ve become 
a premier developer of many energy 
sources. Besides hydroelectric and 
thermal power plants, we’ve been in 
nuclear power more than 30 years. 

We are also working on solar 
energy, coal gasification, and new types 
of batteries and fuel cells. 

We link technology to human needs. 
We believe that Hitachi's advanced - 
technologies will lead to systems that 
are highly productive and efficient yet 
eminently safe and comfortable. Our 
goal in energy-and communications, 
transportation and consumer elec- 
tronics as well -is to build products and 
systems that will improve the quality of 
life the world around. 







4 


i, 



t 



0 HITACHI 

Hitachi, Ltd. Tokyo Japan 














THE 



TIMES 





GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


September 4, 1986 


I - k undeniable that training 
,n Bntain is critically unde£ 

EfSJi* 1 ** 1 is loo often 
Jbe first fringe benefit to be 

thin. tE:* uL 0rd£r books i°° k 
Rri&PS , l ab ? ul “ effective as if 
British Rail doubled its prices 
because there were half as many 
as kst. year, and it 
drel^ lhC 881116 vicious 

But simply increasing training 
budgets does not necessarily result 

!£«r!? ler *? filter quantity or 
quality of learning. More to the 
point, it does not guarantee that 
the learning will be applied to 
grease performance on the job. 
*b»s IS particularly true of 
fnanagement training, which, 
ironically, has a higher unit cost 
than almost any other type of 
training. 

. Industry is not getting value for 
its meagre levels of investment in 
training and die remedy is largely 
in its own hands. The reason is the 
low status of training within 
compan i es, and the limited view 
of its contribution towards achiev- 
ing company objectives. 

At the simplest level, training 
undertaken by managers should 


be geared to the requirements of 
the role they perform or are being 
prepared for. Stories of managers 
who excel in a management course 
and return to their desks full of 
good ideas only to be told by the 
boss to “forget all that stuff and get 
on with the job” are legion. 

A recent survey by the Alfred 
Marks Group revealed dial 67 per 
cent of managers interviewed had 
not applied what they had teamed 
on courses. Another 23 per cent 
had made no attempt to do so, and 
the remaining 44 per cent had 
been unable to because of “the 
entrenched attitudes of bosses, 
company power structure and lack 
of resources”. 

With the average management 
course costing at least £1,000 a 
week, this represents a significant 
ires on investment, not to men- 
tion demotivation of the man- 
agers. the costs of which is no less 
real even it is more difficult to 
quantify. 

This . problem could be over- 
come if management develop- 
ment was planned systematically 
with the full commitment of the 
chief executive. The line managers 
should be involved too. They 


Training will not 
succeed unless it 
is made part of 
the management 
process, reports 
Trish Nicholson 

should brief the trainees on the 
purpose of the course and on what 
is expected of them on their 
return. Afterwards, debriefing 
should check out what has been 
learnt, provide opportunities for 
direct application of ft, and result 
in a plan of action agreed with 
superiors. 

This degree of involvement 
provides an incentive for those 
being trained by increasing the 
expectations the company has of 
them, and it leads the company to 
examine more closely just what it 



is buying by way of management 
training. Companies should be 
challenging their providers of 
training to design “courses for 
horses*', rather than off-the-shelf 
packages of what is readily 
teachable. 

These measures would enable 
companies to get better value from 
current investment, but the prob- 
lem of improving performance 
goes much deeper than this. It 
penetrates the whole structure and 
culture of the organization. 

Even where systematic pro- 


grammes of management develop- 
ment do exist, they often foil 
because values inherent in the 
programme, while successful at 
the level of personal development, 
are inconsistent with the culture 
and values of the company as a 
whole. This results in uncertainty, 
frustration and disruption. 
Achieving the match between 
management development and 
company ethos depends on the 
status of training within company 
structure. 

If the training function becomes 
encapsulated within a depart- 
mental structure, it becomes iso- 
lated from the decision-making 
process which determines com- 
pany direction* and is unable to 
initiate input to corporate plan- 
ning or respond rapidly enough to 
its needs. The concept of the 
company trainer as a “catalyst” 
implies an unchanging and 
mechanistic stability which is no 
longer appropriate. Management 
training should play a role which 
is pro-active and organic in its 
contribution to company objec- 
tives and its capacity to be 
fashioned by them. 

This involves more than just 


courses, however well designed. 
Management development prac- 
titioners need the authority to 
engage training as a way of 
working, to the extent that in- 
dividual development and cor- 
porate development interact with 
and boost each other. This can be 
achieved only by enmeshing train- 
ing with the company's manage- 
ment processes. 


T he methods themselves 
are not new; it is the use 
made of them which 
creates the impact on 
performance. They in- 
clude planned experience such as 
departmental rotation, used ex- 
tensively in Japan; delegation of 
major projects to give responsibil- 
ity as early as possible in a 
manager’s career; secondment to 
other sectors to broaden perspec- 
tives; and “action learning” on 
Professor Revan’s model, which 
has enjoyed marked success in 
Belgium. 

The model is that managers 
learn best from sharing one 
another's problems and challenges 
in small stable groups. Hard 
questioning and discussion deter- 


mine appropriate action, on which 
group members give frank but 
supportive feedback. The Ameri- 
can system of mentoring is a 
further component which can 
have a summaiive effect on other 
methods. 

Such a regime demands from its 
practitioners high levels of inter- 
pereonal skills, as well as intimate 
knowledge of company operations 
and objectives. Pump-priming 
investment should begin with the 
training managers. Those respon- 


sible lor management develop- 
ment need to report direct to the 
chief executive, from whom the 
direction and values of the 
organization emanate, and to have 
access to all sections of the 
company. 

Management training, which 
should be the seed com of 
economic growth, is too often 
foiling on stony ground for want of 
a receptive learning environment 
within industry. 

Trish Nicholson, an anthropolo- 
gist, is regional training adviser for 
the Highland Regional Council 
and tutor in managment with the 
Open Business School 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 44 


S«vJ* 


Director of 
Marketing 


IPSWICH 


£30,000+ 


Applications are invited for the post of Director of Marketing 
of the Eastern Electricity Board which will shortly become 
vacant following the promotion of the current post holder to 
Deputy Chairman of the Southern Electricity Board. 

Eastern Electricity is the largest of twelve Area Electricity 
Boards with some 2.8 million customers and a turnover in 
excess of £1.000 miUion. The Board is leading the Electricity 
Supply Industry's drive to increase elect ricit y s share of the 
energy marker our aim is to double this share from 14% to 
28% over the next decade. 

The Director of Marketing is a member of Eastern .Electricity's 
Executive and is responsible for die development of marketing 
policy and its implementation through effective targeting of 
line management. 

The successful applicant will have a proven trade record in 
marketing within a large organisation and preferably in die energy 
sector. He or she will also be able to demonstrate entrepreneurial 
drive and sound management skills in order to play a full role 
in the corporate management of the Board. 

The Director of Marketing is also responsible for running the 
Board's successful retailing and electrical contracting organisation 
which — with over 120 shops and an annual contracting business 
of £20 million — operates in direct support of the drive to 
improve electricity sales. 

Salary circa. £30,000 progressing to £34.000. Assistance will 
be given, where necessary, with relocation expenses. 

Comprehensive personal and career details should be sent 
under personal cover to Mr. WXJ1 French, Secretary; 
Eastern Electricity Headquarters, P.O. Box 40, Wherstead, 
Ipswich, Suffolk IP9 2AQ, not later than 29 September, 
1966. 


Eastern Electricity is 
an Equal Opportunity Employer 


INVENTORY CONSULTANT 

LONDON BASED c£17,000 + car. 


Resource evaluation » a lutfdy sxxwW »n 
voJvcd in working capital improvement, i m 
looking for a number or consultants <J um °r 
assignments for a wide range of clients. 


cnee of IBM Systems would be an advantage. 

These exciting positions offer Invattory 

CSr&ESaSZaPESSlSSt 


These exciting positions offer Invattory 

{£w^hc (fcSonfKd authority to implement the very latest technologies 
available. 

i, — -m.m Kir« tn become part of Resource Evaluation s 

exciting firtnre please contact Stephen Salt on 01 408 1694, or 
send a CV to the address below. 


Management Personnel 

v Racnatmetf Setacfroa&Seareh 

2 Swallow Place. London W1 R 7AA 
Telephone 01 408 1694 



TRAINEE press officer 

West London 


Salary range £8-000-£9.000 

LcadineyrivJB 

with the horn ‘A' Levd to Degree and Professional 

Accountancy. Bu»jra«iuhcs * w ^ awJ 4 , countries. 

Good " pen " K ' _ 

, . ... ... . the Principal. IMhurnLav Tutors Ltd. 200 Greyhound Road, 

Apply with C I to the trirK,! ^- l ^ ndon w]4 9 ry. 


KRONOSPAN LTD. 
NORTH WALES 


MAINTENANCE 

MANAGER 

Salary circa & 17,000 p.a. 

Applications are invited for this important ap- 
pointment in a £30 million T/O manufacturing 
company which is a leader m its field. 


The person appointed will report to the Works 
Manager for all maintenance matters in an up to 
date factory using highly automated machinery, 
employing around 300 people on a continuous 
24-nour a day process, seven days a week. 

Sound experience of mechanical and electrical 
plant and production machinery is essential 
supported by a practical outlook and a strong 
personality to ensure that derailed maintenance 
routines and disciplines are adhered to. 

As this is a demanding environ man needing 
much contact with plant and machinery, candi- 
dates should preferably be under 40 years of age. 

Assistance will be given with relocation to this 
very pleasant area. Candidates should send in 
confidence a foil C.V. toe 

Mr MJ. Webber, Personnel Manager, 
KRONOSPAN LTD., 

Chipboard Manufacturers, 

Chirk, i«— r Wrexham, 

Clwyd, 1X14 5NT. 

Teh 0601 773361 “ 


Commodities Research Unit Ltd 


INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANCY 

Commodi ti es Research Unit Invites applica- 
tions from economics graduates to join a 
growing consultancy practice that serves the 
metals and minerals industries worldwide. In- 
ternal growth has created the need for up to 
four economists. Applicants may have just 
completed a first or second degree, or may 
have some working experience as business 
economists or analysts. Skills in economet- 
rics and/or knowledge of French, German or 
Spanish would also be valuable. Key require- 
ments are an enquiring mind, the ability to 
collate and analyse data, and the ability to 
write and communicate well. 

Successful candidates win work within spe- 
cialist teams on large scale studies, forecasts 
and consultancy projects. Advancement in 
salary and responsibility depends on perfor- 
mance and merit alone. Overseas travel is 
common after an initial training period. 

Starting salaries will depend on qualifications 
and experience; profit-sharing scheme; con- 
tributory pension. 

Applications, 'with curriculum vitae, to: 

Research Director 
Co m modit i es Research Unit Ltd 
31 Mount Pleasant 
LONDON 
WC1X 0AD 


PERSONNEL/ADMIN MANAGER 

S.W. LONDON 

Our efert builds Theatre Ffen & TV Scenery, and as such 
eraptay c80 staff with a wife variety ot skits providing a 
ssnrice wwkhwte. This new postal weds an experienced 
Personnel & Admmistration person to not only install mod- 
em management techniques bat be familiar with current 
Employment Law and Training methods. 

Aged 30+ tin successful candidate will confidently hade 
the Board and shop floor aSta. A good education (Arts 
degree?] carted «flh PM qualification would be ideaL The 
ability to thrive in an unstructured environment yet bring 
protesjonafem to a yotmg team ts essential. An attractive 
safety is offered. 

Please caU Miss Una Jeffers 
on 408*1631 k 

25 Hanover Square, London W1. 

Middleton Jeffers 


OVERSEAS SKI ING 
REPRESENTATIVE 

Wanted: 

Rep/Ski guide Rep/etakt girts 

Qualifications: 

Over 25 . Over 25 

French. Italian French. Italian or 

or German Speaking German Speaking. 

Competent skier. Cooking experience 

Phone: Tessa Harvard Taylor at 
John Morgan Travel 
on 01 499 1911, 


Assistant Pensions Manager 

In excess of £20,000 per annum 


Glaxo Holdings pic is the parent organisation of 
one of the world's most successful healthcare 
groups, with subsidiary companies in over fifty 
countries, many with their own manufacturing 
facilities, and agency representation in 100 
others. 

Within the Trustee Companies' administration of 
the Glaxo Group UK Pension arrangements 
there are 10,000 employee members, 6,000 
pensioners and 2,000 deferred pensioners. 

The Assistant Pensions Manager is likely to be 
aged 35 - 45, with a P.M.I. qualification, and 
substantial experience of self-administered 
schemes, as well as a high level of knowledge of 
S.F.O. and O.P.B. requirements, and the 


interpretation of Trust Deed and Rules. The 
person appointed will be involved with the 
further development of the Group's Pension 
Schemes and communication procedures in 
relation to the changing requirements of 
Occupational Pension Schemes and compliance 
with current and pending State legislation. 

The appointment is based at the Group's offices 
in Islington, London, N.1 . 

The Group's total remuneration and benefits 
structure is highly competitive; where 
appropriate, assistance with re-location 
expenses will be considered. 

Please write briefly in the first instance to: 
P. j. Murray, Group Personnel Services Manager, 





GlaXO Holdings p.l.c. 

Ciarges House, 6-12 Clarges Street, London W1 Y 8DH. 


Computer Sales Consultants 

London HQ, c£38k Package+Car+Stock Options 


Our client is a public company and the 
leading supplier of computer systems to the 
accountancy profession with over 1400 
multi-user installations and a rapidly 
growing client base in the commercial 
financial sectors. Many of their clients are 
currently upgrading to the company’s new 
generation of Unix based systems. 

To meet this increasing demand, the 
sales team for the South East is set to 
expand and the need is for mature sales 
executives to develop both new and 


Lloyd 
Chapman 

si Associates 


existing business within the profession and 
associated markets. A background in 
accountancy is essential, as is at least two 
years’ experience in sales or in running your 
own business. 

You will have the confidence and 
personal credibility to work at senior level, 
and will be looking for a professional 
environment in which your career and 
talents can flourish. 

To apply, please telephone or write to 
Brian Burgess quoting Refi CM 050. 

International 
Search and Selection 

!60New Bond Street. London Wl YOHR. 

Telephone: OI -409 1371 


NEWTECH (CLWYD) LTD. 

Are you capable Of promoting innova- 
tion? WINTECH, the technology arm of 
the Welsh Development Agency is look- 
ing for an agent for North Wales to be 
based at NEWTECH - Deeside. The per- 
son would be a professional qualified 
technological generalist with a commer- 
cial orientation. 

WINTECH has been set up to improve 
the technology base in Wales and to 
promote contact between those capable 
of assisting the exploitation of this base. 

The appointment is initially for one 
year, but the programme is anticipated 
to be ongoing. Salary wilt be between 
£13-15,000 

Enquiries and applications 
should be sent to 

The Personnel Officer, 
Newteeh (Cfwyd) Ud., 
Newtech Square, 
Deeside Industrial Park, 

Deeside, Clwyd, CHS 2NU. 


THE 



TIMES 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


Appear every Tuesday in 
The Times 

To place your 
advertising 
please telephone 
01 481 1066 











1986 GRADUATE OR LOOKING FOR AN EARLY CAREER CHANGE? 


If you've recently graduated and 
believe you’ve got what it takes to 
succeed in management, you’ll be 
very keen to invest your talents in 
a business where they're certain to 
prosper. 

That’s why you should be talking 
to Mars Confectionery - because 
our approach to business invari- 
ably brings out the best in bright, 
ambitious, committed young peo- 
ple. We are looking for future 
managers in a number of business 
functions, and can offer you: 

• EARLY RESPONSIBILITY - 
in challenging and stimulating 
jobs 

• PERSONAL DEVELOP- 
MENT - via a structured 
programme of management . 
skills training 

• RAPID CAREER PROGRES- 
SION - to full management 
responsibility within 2 years 


Invest 

vour management 

POTENTIAL 

in a winning 
career 


• EXCITING ENVIRON- 
MENT - working among 
talented business professionals 
dedicated to success 

• TOP REWARDS - starting on 
££9,500 and rising to over 
£20,000 as a manager. 

If you're a confident, self moti- 
vated graduate, determined to 
succeed, put your skills in a win- 
ning position right NOW with one 
of the country’s most progressive 
FMCG companies. 

To obtain an application form 
please ring our 24-hour recorded 
answering service on 01-235 1535 


I 



We are an equal opportunity employer. 


Hogget t Bowers 

Executive Search and Selection Consultants 

BIRMINGHAM. BRISTOL CARDIFF. GLASGOW, LEEDS LONDON. MANCHESTER, NEWCASTLE. SHEFFIELD & WINDSOR 

Operations Services 
Manager(s) 

Various locations c £20,000, Car 

A company devoted to the sale and service of domestic products is 
currently seeking to recruit Operations/Services Managers) to manage the 
activities of the technical support teams. Reporting to the Chief ExecuUve 
as part of the key management team, the Operations/Services Manager is 
responsible for a budget of at least £2-3m. The- key skills are the ability to 
plan, schedule and direct the activities of a geographically dispersed 
workforce who are contracted to provide services for the company. The 
need to develop and maintain good standards of workmanship amongst 
the workforce are taken for granted but of greatest importance is to ensure 
standards of customer service are excellent. Previous experience of 
managing a diverse and multi-located workforce within a customer service 
industry is an essential pre-requisite. 

Stella Sinden, Hoggett Bowers pic, Albany House. Hurst Street, 
BIRMINGHAM, B5 4BD, 021-622 2961. Ref: 34012/T. 

Information Analyst - 
Business Graduate 

Industrial and Commercial Properties 
London c £18,500, Car 

This international business with manufacturing, retailing and distribution 
activities has a varied and rapidly expanding property portfolio currently 
running at £lbillion. The impact property values have-on the company's 
investment programmes and balance sheet makes this new appointment of _ 
■ -significant importance to the future strategy of the Group. Key account- 
abilities will be the collation, analysis and evaluation of trends in property 
values within the company's various geographical and business sectors. 
Liaising with senior property management, both internally and externally, 
the successful candidate will be expected to develop a total property 
information service together with recommendations beneficial to the 
Group's future property policy. Requiring high analytical skills, strong 
communication abilities and above all commercial and business acumen, 
the position would suit a business graduate, preferably MBA aged 26 - 32, 
keen to develop a career in a high profile environment. A working 
knowledge of micro computers is essential. The opportunities for 
advancement are excellent with a comprehensive benefits package. 

G. Sable, Hoggett Bowen pic, St. John's Court, 78 Gartside Street, 
MANCHESTER, M3 3EL, 061-832 3500, Ref: 29687/T 

National Accounts Manager 

Media Sales . c£I8,000, Bonus, Car 

Ambitious, yet realistic further expansion plans of this progressive and 
successful subsidiary of a major international company with substantial 
interests in newspaper and consumer publishing have created the need to 
increase the small high-calibre strategic management team. To realise the 
continued profitable growth and exploitation of a totally innovative media 
marketing concept it is essential that you have a record of achievement in 
national account management with a demonstrable ability to negotiate and 
liaise effectively at a high level substantial contracts, both regionally and 
nationally, with household name fmcg companies and leading agencies, 
and to secure new business in a highly competitive and entrepreneurial 
environment. A publishing background is not essential given an ability to 
absorb quickly the specialist aspects of this market. Future prospects are 
exceptional and a performance orientated role and salary ensures 
achievement is well rewarded. 

Stella Sinden, Hoggett Bowers pic, Albany House, Hurst Street, 
BIRMINGHAM, B5 4BD, 021- 622 2961. Ref: 34013/T 

These positions are open to male or female candidates. Please telephone for a Personal 
History Form to the relevant office, quoting the appropriate reference. 


pass* 




and 


«IS§lls 








fesSK**- 



operates 






Honours Graduates 


Careers athorne 
and abroad - karting 
to the top in 
Adndnistrahon 
andManasernent 

Agpdupto31 . 


In Gil tans Mdtita&a trass/ 
fi*tf ExoBr Wan BnApka 


BaiMs 


HtapctatfliK: 


UefijfnmSfffta 


Mr&nhMGMSviice 


Bra ti Ms ■dims titans 
tafekjs 


This programme of recruitment is designed to attract 
mdwdiak of outaanding infriloct and manageriaJ 
ability wbo can demonstrate the poeratial to reach the 
highest kvds of Government Service. Successful 
candidates wiD be expected to progress rapidly to posts 
of high Influence and responsibility and it is likely that 
die intake will include, for ex am ple, future fermapent 
Secretaries Amfamdois. and other top managers of 
government and Ruhamentary business. 

, The hgberage linns will enable experienced 
candidaxs to apply especially those with commerria] or 
industrial backgrounds, and applications from such 
candidates will be pankoSarfy wkomed- 
Safariee Aged under 26 X least £8685. Age 26 or over at 
least £IL5 &l (These salaries include £1365 Inner 
London Weighting which does notappfy to poos outside 
London.) 

— a thorough baking programme, combined with 
hmmto h «mr> h > * u «* ,i» in pnKfy mafriwg , planning 
and imptemenlrtiOD. 

ara mnfanry ij n i liliw t inn imI ip u Kl it it wiwnifaiid 

who want to broaden their horizons. 

— in tens i ve trahang, followed by management of » 
far office deal i ng wi t h taxation on a wide mage of 
business. 

— concerned with all aspects of foreign affairs 
and representing this connhyamd its interests 
Intel liuuaBft 

— miff ■.■■. M gmnynt,iirbwnuEthf 
pre para tion of material for t^ yri a rimi 


— spedaBst advice an pr acti ce and proced nr es to 
tbe respective booses. 


Applicants must have, or expea to oborin in 1987. a degree with at leasi second- 
class honoms, or an acceptable equivalent qua li fication, ora postg ra du a te degree 
considered to be of comparable value: 

One day Qualifying Tests wiD be hdd in October and Jsnuaty 
For hill details and an application Shth (u> be rearmed by 25 September 1986 for 
the October tests) write to Civil Service Commission. Alencoa Link, Basingstoke. 
Hants FG21 1JB, or telephone Basingstoke (0256) 468561 (answering service operates 
outside office hotnsVFkasie quote refi A/8J/U/13L 
TbeOvil Service is an equal opportunity employer 


DIRECTOR- 

Science Reference and Information 
Service to £28,430 


Thn fVrqwl n pm an h and managft . 
Tn g nt. pif frhf> T Wftiah Trfh rsi.Ty*K 

Tiatfnna .1 reference collection in 
science and technology will 
present a m^or challenge to an 
experienced manager with sound 
Bdsafl flc/t eflhllloal twar |pTitd«.la. 

Tha SMS hr n news an f m p g aw riu n 
collection of patents andjournals 
and provides Information services 
which are of particular use to 
Industry Once in post, you will 
have responsibility for a staff 
of 300 and an annual budget of 
£6.4m allocated fire development 
jmfchritdaH, araprtgttiona , m<dn- 

talnlng existing services and 
introducing new ones. Hbu will 
also be required to represent the 
Science, Technology and Industry 


The British Library 


TOvlBlrrn at. ■nafcirma.l r l p rl 

international hoards. 

Proven leadership and com- 
munication Skills are essential 
A science degree is desirableend 


with, a knowledge of the Hbra^ 
information soane is important. 

Salary range £25, 095-£J^430. 

Ibr further details end an 
app l ication, ferm (to be returned 
ty 25 September 1986) write to 
Civil Service Commfesion, 
ALsncon T .inX, BasingBtokB, 

Hants RG21 ldB, or telephone 
Basingstoke (0256) 468551 
C answering service operates 
outside ofQoe hours').. 

Please quote ref: G/6988. 


Financial Librarian 

to £20,000 + sub mortg. 

A leading Accepting House requires an experienced librarian to 
provide a research facility for their Corporate Finance and 
Investment Divisions. 

As head of a small support team your responsibilities will be to 
nm the library services and to maintain exis ting functions. 

The ideal candidate will have had considerable exposure to 
modem information systems wi thin a City institution and be an 
efficient and enthusiastic administrator. Age range 30-45 . 

For further information please send foil cv in strict confidence 
to Sara Bonsey. 

18, Eldon street, Moorgate, London EG2M 7LA. Tat 01-588 4224 



registrar icma 


The Registrar manages a busy 
department dealing with enquiries ; and 
advice, applications for student 
registration and membership, and 
maintenance of computerised records. 
The Registrar is responsible for die 
management of 18 staff, and for the 
development and implementation of 
computerised administrative 
procedures. 

The person appointed will be aged 28- 
40, with a degree or professional 
qualification, have experience of staff 
management and computerised 
systems, and be familiar with the 
business work environment. 

We offer an attractive benefits 
package; salary negotiable, within the 
scale £12,150 to £15,500. 

Please apply in writing with CV. and 
quoting current salary, to t he 
Personnel Manager, The lift li lw U of 
Cost and Management Accountants, 
63 Portland Place, London WIN 4AB. 

The ICMA is the professional and 
examining body for management 
accountants, with over 66,000 
members and students worldwide. 


FINANCIAL SERVICE 


for people in the Public Sector 

We are a leading mutual org an i sa tion in providing 
insurance and invesSmenl services to profession 
groups in the public sehrioe areas. 

Our present expansion programme means we 
need to take on a number of additional Sales 
People to support our nationwide Public Officers 
Assurance Service. . 

Area Representatives 

The requirements for enthusiastic 
people who want to enter or develop a 
career in insurance sales whilst maintaining 
contact with their present occupation. 

Our careful selection procedure Includes "on.the 
job" experience for new entrants to sales or 
insurance - without commitment Our training 
ensures effective results quickly and regular 
support is based on individual needs. 

The rewards lie In providing a valuable service to 
working colleagues, a guaranteed personal 
territory, attractive commission earnings, bonus 
opportunities and- other benefits. Minimum 
eamingswffl be £12,000 p~a. Top performers wfll 
earn considerably more. For these positions, you 
wiH be between 30 and 50 have a stable career 
background and possess a current fufl driving 
ficence. 

Write to Paul Coombs, Public Officers Assurance 
Service. 12 Christchurch Road, Bournemouth BH1 
3LW for an application form. Please quote 
reference NI02. 


Ports and Maritime 
Consultancy 


c£15,000 + Car 


Near Heathrow 


ABP Research & Constancy Ud is the sister 
company o( Associated British Rtfs, the largest ports 
goupintheUK. 

Wb speaakse in International pod. maritime aid 

related research and consultancy. We are seeking a 

Constftent whose responsttMHG wHI tedude: 

- Studes and Appraisals 

- Protect Management 

- Bosnass Development 

A degree in Economics, Maritene Sturies or a 
related dsapkne, and appropriate subsequent 
expenence. are essential- The succasriui canddate is 

Italy to have worked in the port or shipping industries. 

In a oorauttency atgarisstion or In an academe 
msntu&on. Relevant experience can relate to subiecte 

suefl as port development studies, port and maritime 

economics, port operations, policy and oiganteatna 

port tariffs and pfenning. The successful Candida® 

must nave a poottre. oulwand-gang pereonafty and a 
good atftity to conceptualise problems. 

A knowledge of Spanish or French would be useful, 
but not essential. 

The post «8 based near Heathrow Airport. London 
and a starting salary of c £ tt.OOOp a. plus car is ottered. 

Pk»w apjglyjn writing enclo s ing a fufl c-vi te- 
Mr. Eric E. PoSock, Managing Director 
(Conaultmey), ABP Reeearch & Consultancy Ltd, 
Research Centre, Hayes Road, SouthaB, 

MddtoS8xUB25N0. 


VJHP 


ABP RESEARCH & 

CONSUIlCANCY LI 


HEAD OF 
AID SECTOR 

OffUSTlAN AO seeks appficaiioro for this crudsi 
andexatkig senior post within its Staff 
Management Teanu Rmorong to the Director, . 
rWshe will be responsible for advising on and 
fonmAa mg policy on aid and development and 
dtsasiti’ emergency matters: monitoring its 
implementation: and gukfing reiationships with 
partner org an i s a ti ons. 

Appfcane. should be committed Christians and 
me :to demonstrate they passest seme or aH of 
the roflowing requirements; 

Overseas experience of smafl scale developm en t 
and wner^oncy programmes: experience of 
working with rational ommdb of churches or 
■ other ecumenical organisations. Must have 
of team leadership and be used to 
working under pressure. 

This post involves considerable travel in the 
devooping world and Europe, and the appointee 
■Will be expemd to undertake public speaking 
engagements. 

P1e«e apply jin writing only for job description and 
.appGcauon form, endosng24p sjLe^ to rersonnd 
OB^Omstan Aid. POBox I, London SW9 • 


f Christian Aid 

' THt CHUWCHqs IH ACTION WITH THE WOHLOI POOF 


FINANCIAL 

SERVICES 

Top London bretarm teams 
two tranw brokots 23-35 as 
W<f a progressive, unfed 
(Bam. 

Posrtiw. confident manner wtft 
«« 0 «V and wofenenatem 
tes**** No pmnis ooKri 
b* 8 necessary as MI teanro 
given 

Call Mr. a. McXeown on 

01-409 0096. 


ST. HELBM 
GflVEHIIIEIIT 
Representative 

la UK. to mark tram tone or 
oHia* Sr. Hmnan or otto. wBi 
cunwv tnow edge nf St Hdfea. 
curanereh! **J otter maftwr 

eumnee necesssy- 

Satffy £11000 range pto 

aHowances. 

Aoo*y for detads ft omen 
nmsentathe. 

B. W. ROVE. 

Tel: 0243-572284. 


I 

\ 











29 



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THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 



Kraftwerk Union AG 


CHIEF ASSISTANT BUILDING SURVEYORS-TO £21,000' 


Our 


Kraftwerk Union AG, 

a SLdssidiary of Siemens, is internationally 
engaged- in designing, projecting 
and constructing fossil-fueled and nuclear 
power plants. Our international projects 
require an intensive language training 
of our employees world-wide. 

Language Training Dept 

needs to develop computerbased 
foreign language learning modules for 
universal self-access and is looking 
fora 



The Georgian 
House 


The Victorian 
House 


The Edwardian 
House 


The Art Deco 
House 


A PROJECT PORTFOLIO 
THAT INCLUDES THEM ALL 


CBT/CALL 

Course Design Specialist 


at our engineering offices 
in Offenbach (near Frankfort am Main), 
West Germany. 

\bu should have had experience in. 
developing computer-based courses. You 
should, furthermore, have a firm under- 
standing of learning. theory, didactics and 
various techniques of presentation, 
practice and evaluation. You will be 
assisted by a .small group of course 
material developers of various 
foreign languages in researching and 
developing CALL software using several 
authoring systems, compiler languages 
and PC-hardware constellations. 
Therefore you will need to be 
well informed as to the current educational 
software and PC-hardware markets 
and have a working knowledge 
of several computer languages such as 


En-BASIC, C, Super-PILOTand 
Pascal Management skills and qualities 
will also be required. Although 
you should be used to working to 
specification and meeting deadlines, 
you should also have creative talents, 

■ show initiative and generally get along well 
with people. 

The position should be filled 
in October 1986 and (initially) the contract 
will be limited to 18 months. 

if you are interested please send your 
application to 

Kraftwerk Union Aktiengeseifschaft 

Personalabteilung 
Postfach 101063 
06050 Offenbach am Main 
West Germany 



The Post War 
House 


The Modem 
House 


The Avant Garde 
House 


HAS TO BE SPECIAL 


A major, freehold property owner, our 
dienes have an unusually broad portfolio of 
high quality houses, flats and maisonettes in the 
central Home Counties: the subject of an 
impressive annual major maintenance and 
improvement budget of £15 million. 

They are taking a significant new approach 
to property management, creati rig four separate 
project teams, each of which will be responsible 
lor about 6000 units, lo head each team of about 
a dozen people, they now wish toappointa 
building professional who has already achieved 
Associate Partnership level or similar in the 
public or private sector -and who now feels 
capable of tackling a brief that is exceptional 
not only in terms ofitsdiversity but also in 
terms of its finance! dimensions. 

In both respects, we believe there is little 
to compare with these roles anywhere in the 
private or public sector today. 

We also believe there will be few people 


in the profession today capable of matching our 
dients' stringent selection criteria. For they 
will naturally only be looking for those qualified, 
innovative men and women - probably not 
aged less than 30 - who areas powerful 
technically as they are in the skillsof business - 
and man-management. 

A further key aspect too will be the 
professional flexibility necessary to manage a 
number of major projects at any one time, 
usinga combination of resources including own 
staff and external consultants. But the value of 
the experience to you r future career 
development should be substantial. 

If you feel you are of the calibre to take 
up this special challenge, please telephone 
during normal business hours or alternatively 
send yourCVto:- 

Mac Smith, Deansgate Management Services. 
63-66 Sl Martin’s Lane, London, WC2N 4JX. 
Telephone: 01-240 9555. 



DEANSGATE 

MANAGEMENT SERVICES 

ADVERTISING-SEARCH -SELECTION 




&KERBY 


LTD 


Recruitment Advertising 
Executive Search 
Management Selection 
International Recruitment 


178-202 Great Portland Street. 
London WIN 5TB. Tel: 01-631 4411. 
8 Mathew Street, Liverpool L2 6RE. 
Tel 051-236 1724. 



TRAINING 

Marketing and After-Sales 
Berkshire-based 

c.£18,000 4- bonus + BMW car 

With total sales more than doubling over the last 6 years, BMW 
(GB) Ltd continues to enjoy outstanding success in the British quality 
car market A major part of this success can be attributed to the 
■effectiveness of our comprehensive dealer development programme, 
which is dedicated to enhancing all aspects of customer service 

Expansion has created two additional opportunities to join the 
highly-motivated manpower development team responsible for training 
our dealer personnel. Both rotes offer the chance to apply your 
practical business skills in a stimulating, challenging environment, 
together with excellent prospects of a subsequent move into line 
management within the-BMW organisation. 

Working with the benefit of superb training facilities, you will - 
design, adapt and run non-technical and management courses aimed 
at developing the skills of dealer personnel and thereby improving 
business peSormance. Comprehensive induction training will be 
provided, and considerable UK travel will be involved. 

You should be a graduate (or equivalent) with excellent 
interpersonal and communication skills - ideally gained through first- 
hand training experience in a commercial environment For the 
marketing post you will need broadly-based marketing experience — 
preferably in the automotive industry; for the after-sales post you 
should have pined management experience with a car manufacturer, 
importer or retailer. Ukely age range: late 2Qs-late 30s. 

Salaries are backed by attractive benefits including private 
medical insurance and — if appropriate — generous assistance with 
relocation. 

Please send full personal and career details, quoting 
ref: MO/CF/T, to: Catty Friend, Personnel Officer, BMW (GB) Limited, 
Blesfieid Avenue, Bracknell, Berkshire RG124TA. 


BMW(GB) LIMITED 



Quality 
Graduates 
in a Quality 
role 


KEsis a leader in technology drinks 

systems and products. Bart of me Mare Groap 
of Companies, we’ve established a reputation 
for unsurpassed quafey. 

Our refreshing look at beverage systems 
indudes remarkable achtevemente in 
nwubcuringstandaids. Strivixg for the 


Ybu also have a flair forpeople and 
c om m unic a tio ns. 

If you believe you would like the challenge 


meet the manet’s most exacting needs. Yours 

will be the task oIsncreasBig this prestigious 
reputation. 

Innovation, the hey to our business, is also 
the haDmaik of our people. 'Axing, dynamic, 
ambitious. That's what typifies the Kttx 

_ L And that is what we now seek 

Youhave a natural flair for foveibgating, 
analysing and producing imaginative solutions 
gained &om a degree or sSmtiar in a science; 
engineering OTteainotogy background. 


standards.! , . ___ 

addition, the prospect ofiast progress into 
general management within a meritocratic and 
highly flexible organeahon. 

Excellent salary from £9500 to £1 W00 
plus a range of top quality company benefits 


write with career details to- Mandy 


Tel: Basingstoke (0256) 471, 


RG240NU. 


KLIX 



Programmer/ 

Analysts 


When a major finandal group offers a rare 
chance to start a challenging and rewarding 
career in one of the most beautiful settings m 

the world, it’s time to sit up and take notice! 

Our deni is the Data Processing subsidiary ofa 

highly profitable, nationwide f ” 


Analysts 

Mew England, USA 
to$45£00pia. 


period of exceptional growth and expansion, 
the demand for their services is so great that 
they have embarked an an international 

' -? to find a select number 

; to be a part of their 

success. 

To be considered, you will need over 
4 years' data processing experience 
preferably gained in the financial sector and 
will ideally possess degeg level quaHficartoos. 
Ycu must experience in most c/the 
following areas within an IBM environment: 

# COBOL •QCS« MVS «DL1 
The kxation and qaafity afMestyle is quite 


simply superb. Rhode Island is rightly 
knewm as die Ocean State having a proud 
sailing heritage and over 400 mdesof 
spectacular coastline that is so popular it has 
become one of the most cosmopolitan States in 
the USA 

Highly competitive salaries arc made even, 
more attractive oy their outstanding benefits 
package that includes medical anasavings - 
plans together with a superb relocation poEcy 
and full i mmi gr a tion assstanoe. 

Obviously competition for these once in a 
lifetime opportunities will be fierce, so for your 
best chance phone Matthew Swift immediately 
on 01-631 4411 or send a 
)M compr e hensive C V to 
\ Moron Dolphin & 





IN 


02 Great Portland St. 

London WIN 60, 
quoting re£ 3280- 


YOUNG ADVISERS/PROFESSIONALS WITH POTENTIAL 


CHy Regulation 
AU Gsted and USM companies must 
comply with legal and Stock Exchange 
requirements on matters concerned 
with raising new capital. 

As pat of the group receiving 
submitted proposals, you wi identify 
rrregulartttes or toe need for greater 
darificaton. Immediate and ongoing 
Baison with company stockbrokers 
and other professional advisers 
ensures the fofl and factual presen- 
tation of Wormation to toe public. 

This is a busy office with a varied 
workload and constant chafienge in 
scrufinlsteg innovative financing 
arrangements. r -- 


You are Ekeiy to be in your aarty 20’s 
with a background or interest in 
finance, corporate law, company 
secretarial work or a business related 
cfiscipine and will be of graduate 



THE 

STOCK 

EXCHANGE 


You must have an analytical mind, 

have an eye for detail and have wb8 

developed oral and written skflb. 

Success depends on: . 

• a persuasive manner in debate with 
a firm but diplomatic approach 

• the capacity to establish confidence 
by a positive and supportive 
outlook. 

Absolute discretion and integrity in the 

processing of highly sensitive and 

confidential information isvitaL 


E9JOO-E1AOOO + benefits 
To ensure quality and speed of sen/ice 
and specialist expertise we wish to 
further strengthen this professional 
group. 

Early familiarisation wffl allow you to 
make an immediate contribution. 
Scope and autonomy win enable you 
to acquire Increasing authority and 
progression. 

Part-qualified, or not, you will be 
encouraged to complete professional 
studies. 

Salary wiU relate to your level of 
experience and is reviewed regularly. 
Benefits include non-contributory 
pension, freetraveland BUPA. 

Write with details erf you background 
to: Bzabeth Finley, Personnel Officer, 
The Stock E»hange,<Xd Broad Street 
London EC21HP. • 







iivLui i 1 Oa Zjt i "t i >60 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


FINANCE PROFESSIONALS 

To £36,000 p.a. London 

The challenge of change in International Capital Markets 


Our dient is a highly successful subsidiary of a 
major European Bank. 

- It operates in a dynamic capital markets 
environment in which change is constant and financial 
control is key to further development. Expanding 
business creates exceptional opportunities for finance 
professionals who are nor only technically sell-assured 
but who demonstrate the personal qualities to quickly 
progress to successive!) more challenging positions. 

Bond Accountant c£35k 

Reporting to the Group Financial Controller, you 
will manage a team of three Accountants, and report on 
and provide financial control of pan of the company's 
trading a cavities, commenting in detail on specific types 
of deal on an ad hoc basis. A Chartered Accountant with 


at least IS months experience in the trading arm of a 
major financial institution, you should have good 
all-round knowledge of Bond Accounting including 
Futures and Options. Pref er red age; late 2Q*s. Ref. 5002. 

Business Analyst £30-36k 

Reporting to the Group Financial Controller, you 
wiU irake a substantial contribution to projects of 
varying sizes and complexity. Involved in all stages, you 
will identify, analyse and prioritise systems needs, 
primarily concerning firantiai control and reporting 
applications. As a Chartered Accountant you’ll possess 
sound technical accounting skills probably acquired 
within the computer audit arm of a major professional 
practice orcommerdal company. Sound understanding 
of computerised financial systems and the ability to 


assume a senior role within a multi-discipline team will 
be essential. Preferred age; 25-27. Ref. 5006. 

The need is emphatically for assertive, potential 
high achievers who relish die challenge of a changing, 
intellectually demanding and creative envir on ment. 
Salaries are negotiable and are substantially enhanced by 
bonuses and a developing benefits package. Prospects 
within dlls dramatically expanding organisation are 
ou tstandin g. 

For an initial, totally confidential discussion, please 
phone Pad Scaffold today between 9am and 8pm or 
between 9am to 6pm during the week on 01-387 0958 
or 01-387 1309 or write to nun at; 

Stafford Long & Partners, Jeflicoe House; 

374 Eusron Road, London NW1 3BL. 


Stafford 


ARE YOU AT THE CROSSROADS 
OF YOUR CAREER? 


Very often, executives and other ^ 

professional people contemplate ^ 

a change right in the middle 
of their career. 

Most often their reasons 
for this are a general dissatisfaction with their 
present career and the belief that they could 
and should be doing better. 

Chusid Lander is a group of specialist 
career consultants who for many years have 
been helping people earning £15,000 a year, 
or more, to get better jobs - whether they are 
currently in a job, unemployed or feeing 
redundancy. 

Wfe have turned pessimism into 
optimism, failure into success and 


jaded Executives into highly 
successful people earning very 
much more -and we can prove it 
J 9 For many years, we have been 
guiding people in the right 
direction - now it's your turn! 

Telephone us to arrange a confidential 
personal assessment, without obligation, or 
write to: The Administrator, Chusid Lander, 

Ref: g/ 9 /i 35/37 Fferoy Street London 

W1P 5AF - enclosing a brief career summary. 

LONDON 01-5806771 MANCHESTER 061-2280089 

BIRMINGHAM 021-6438102 NOTTINGHAM 094937911 
BRISTOL 027222367 GLASGOW 041-3321502 

BELFAST 0232621824 

(H CHUSID LANDER 


Recruitment 

Executive 

<£ negotiable salary and benefits package - 

If you are currently working in a fast moving 
commercial or professional environment, then 
Law Personnel, have an opportunity for you to 
develop your talent in the selection and 
introduction of legal personnel 

Probably aged up to 35and with a sharp 
organised mind you should bea good 
communicator and have the confidence in 
dealing with clients and candidates at all levels 
within the legal profession. 

An excellent remuneration padage, 
negotiable depending on age and experience, 
is available. 

Fra further information please telephone, in 
strict confidence. Mack Dinshaw. to discussa 
bright future with Law Personnel 

.(gw 'Personnel 

Staff u “— — ■ — » — ■ — — 


“workfwkJe. 


J5 AkJwycft, London WC2B 4JF01-242 1281 
evenings O-tOpm) 01-204 5819. 


n]p]0 APPOINTMENTS 



A challenging opportunity to work at the 
sharp end of one the UK’s most complex 
running stories. You will be expected to 
provide voice reports, interviews and 
tape packages for a wide rang e of ne ws 

^SY^willbeo^oftwo'r^m 

working for radio news, with possible 
occasional contributions required for 
network news or current affairs 


REPORTER 

RacfioNews 

Belfast 


NEWS 

PRODUCERS 

Radio Nottingham 
Radio Sussex 


10,412 — £14,725** 



day fortnight of 0600— 1800 hours but 
assignments will often involve spells 
away from base outside these hours. 

You must have proven broadcasting 
journalistic abflitywith authoritative micro- 
phone delivery and a thorough knowledge 

of Northern Ireland — or the ability to 
acquire it quickly. You should also have a 
deep interest in UK and international 
events and hold a current driving licence. 

We offer an attractive salary of 
£13,500— £18,300” (according to quatifi- 
cations and experience). (Raft 2458/T) 


To join foe newsroom teams working 
primarily on the preparation and 
production of the stations 1 news output 
and ctarent affairs programmes, 
including newsreading, interviewing and 
reporting. In addition, you may produce 
feature programmes and take part in 
announcing duties. 

Journalistic experience at sub-editor 
or reporter level, good microphone voice 
and current driving licence are essential. 

Radio Nottingham (Ref. 2412/T1 


Radio Nottingh 
Radio Sussex 


(Ref; 2412 m 
(Ref: 2457/71 


Radio Lincolnshire is looking for a young, 
reliable and enthusiastic journalist to join 
it's lively newsteam. We are looking 
for someone with at least three years jou r- 

. . nalistk: experience in newspapers or radio. 

REPORTER Our huge, diverse editorial area keeps us 
. . busier than yot/d imagine, an d we ne ed 

Radio Lincolnshire someone whocan get stuck in straightaway! 

£8,954— £11,110 A good microphone voice andcurvant 

driving licence are essential. 

Rather details from News Editor 
Mike Curtis on Lincoln (0522)40011. 

(Ref:2463/T) 


Relocation expenses considered lor 
permanent p osts . 

... . “Plus aflowanco of £1,020 pA 

We are an equal T4us allowance of £S97p*. 

opportunrtes employer contact us frrimecBately for a ppflcatkm form 


BSC Appointments, London W1 A 1AA. 
TeL 01-9275799. 


•« ! I \ } 


Chartered Secretary 

Up to £13,000 + Car 

We are looking for a Chartered Secretary to join a team 
providing a legal and secretarial service to the Group’s UK and 
overseas subsidiaries. 

Based at the Group's international headquarters at Peterborough 
and reporting to the Group Secretary, you will have specific 
responsibilities for the provision of legal and secretarial services to a 
number of subsidiary companies in the financial services sector of 
Group operations, with particular emphasis on travellers cheque and 
foreign money activities. A number of the companies are based 
outside the UK and part of the secretarial functions will involve 
attendance at board meetings in Europe and the Middle East. The 
position also encompasses the provision of legal services to the main 
UK travel company. 

Ideally you will be a Chartered Secretary with some post 
qualification experience. A comprehensive knowledge of banking 
law and practice and a European language is desirable. 

Benefits include contributory pension scheme, profit share scheme, 
personal loan facilities, holiday concessions and relocation assistance 
if necessary. 

Please apply in writing, enclosing a full c.v. and quoting 
present salary, to the Personnel Manager, 

Group Central Services, Thomas Cook Group Limited, 

PO Bax 36, Thorpe Wood, Peterborough PE3 6SB. 

The Thomas Cook Group Limited — a member of the Midland 
Bank Group and an equal opportunity employee 


Cook 


STOCKBROKING 


A Private International Financial Services Group based in the U.K. and owned by 
4 leading Banks and Investment Managers is seeking a young individual (28/40) 
to manage an innovative venture in UK Stockbroking. 

A strong emphasis on marketing ability rather than portfolio management is 
required, although it will be essential for candidates to have an in-depth working 
knowledge of dealing, settlements and all Stock Exchange procedures. 

The successful applicant will have had several years experience in a Stockbrok- 
ing firm where his or her leadership qualities have not been put to the test A 
working knowledge of German or French would be an advantage, but not 
essential. 

The challenge that this position offers will be matched by competitive 
renumeration, reflecting the Group’s commitment to this new U.K. Operation. 

Please apply in confidence including a detailed and specific 
curriculum vitae stating achievements of date and current 
renumeration to: 

Gerald Troncin, 

17 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, 

London WC2A 3ED 
01-404 5554 


LONDON BOROUGH OFTOWER HAMLETS 
An equal opportunities employer 




CHIEF EXECUTIVES 

Circa £30,000 per annum (Ref. isi/ncs/t) 


the Councils dec enuafedn g Its 
functions Into seven neighbourhood 
areas each with Its own Neighbourhood 
Committee of Elected Councillors. We 
are looking for four experienced and 
highly motivated managers to lead a 
wide range of services within the Globe 
fown, Isle of Dogs, Stepney and 
Mapping neighbourhoods. The holders 
of these posts wHfacegreat 
challenges and obtain immense Job 
satisfaction. They wffl be part of a 
unique experiment in local government 
administration. 

If you befiere you are the right person 


for a demanding and exhausting Job in 
an inner city area, please ask for an 
application form from The Head of 
Personnel and Management Services, 
Room 23, Town Hall, Patriot Square, 
London E29LN, or telephone our 
answering service on 01961 0077 
quoting the above Job title and 
reference. Completed forms must be 
returned by 29th September 1986. 

AppScants are considered on the 
basis of their softabSty for the post, 
regardless of sex, sexual or ie nt a t io n, 
reSgion. racial origin, marttai status, 
disablement or age. 




i"* a’ ■ "a’ - ■ : • ■ ■ 


TOWER HAMLETS 


PPP MEDICAL CENTRE 
ADMINISTRATION MANAGER c £14,000 


Private P a tien ts Plan is a marxet leader in. the field of -Medical Insurance. The 
Medical Centre is a subsidiary operating currently from three sites and is 
administered from the original centre in New Cavendish Street 

We are currently seeking an adminis tration professional to be responsible for 
the day to day a d mi n i stra tive functions of the centre including accounting, 
metical secr etaria t, maintenance and refurbishment, office services, etc. 

Rep or ti ng to the General Manager of toe Centre, the s uccessful candidate will 
be able to demonstrate supervisory skffls establshed during at least live years 
in an atinh iis trative supervisory rota. Prefe re nce wil be given to candidates 
with an accounts qu a lifi c ation (fmaQsQ or simSar and broad experience of office 
systems gained in a comma rrial enviro nm en t . Some experience In the medical 
sector would be preferred. 

An exoefientj benefits package includes free private health oover, mortgage 
subsidy, generous hoHday entitlement, contributory pension and free fife assur- 
ance scheme. 

Please reply enclosing comprehensive C.V. and stating present salary to 
°aufine Wyatt-1 ngram. Personnel Officer. 


Private Patients Plan 

PXPj PPP Hou**. CfMcant Road. TunforxJgo Wofi*, ICent'TNt 2 PL 
Telephone: Tunbndyi* Walls 40111 


Are you earning £20.000 — £ 100,000 p.a. 
and seeking a new job? 

Con n aught s dfeoreet and successful Execu- 
tive Marketing Programme provides profes- 
sional excellence to helping you to identify 
those unadvertised vacancies. 

Contact us for a free and confidential 
meeting to assess if we can help you. if you 
are cunrentiy abroad ask for our Executive 
Expat Service. 

: 01-734 3879 124 hours) 


Connaught 


32 Savile Row, London, W1 
The Executive Job Search P 



rjTT^TjTTl 


Training Organisation 
cXI 7,500 

We n a snail, profe ssi o na l tra in ing or g ani s a tion that 
spactafcsas si Dewlopmere Training lor Industry and Education, 
usmg tin madiwn of the outdoors. We are based at a superbly 
r o seoara ia l centra In Bte Lake District 

Wo seek a young and sett-motivated Bnsaor of Marksting, to 
lead our current expansion. Salary and benefits wftl be negotia- 
ble depencSng upon experience. 

Pfease state coafidentiefiy wtt fuBest detaBs to Ore Cfetam, 
K a kafend Training. Ashmeadow, Amfede, Cambria LAS QAD. 
Telepho ne : ( 0524 ) 781710 . 


GRADUATES 

CONVINCE US YOITVE GOT POTENTIAL— 

Join London's top publishing companies selfing 
advertising space. You won't need experience - first 
class treeing is provided - but you must have drive, 
enthusiasm, and a highly competitive commercial 
instinct. 

if you are 21-25, ambitious and would like a salary and 
commission package c. £10,000 can immetflately and 
speak to: 

Dan l aaaan l or JUnea Breee 


Career Crisis? 


You may be to foe wrong job, have unfulfilled 
ambitions or have been made redundant Our 
unique, action oriented, . individually tailored 
programme for senior executives wffl ensure 
that you attain your career objectives quickly. 
If you do not your fee will be refunded. To 
arrange a free, confidential discussion tele- 
phone 01-631-1110 

Eaecutiue Action 

3 7 Queen Anne Street, London W1M9FB 


SHOWROOM 

ADMINISTRATOR 


Woodstock design sind make fine furniture, kitchens 
and bedrooms fra discern mg clients. We require a 
profe ssi o na l, efficient person with idevent experience 
to take charge of a variety of responsibilities iodudrag 
dealing with our diems, hairing whh our designer? and 
arranging showroom displays. 

This is a demanding and rewarding position offering 
job satisfaction and career prospects. Typing and driv- 
ing licence essential as is non-smoking and a sense of 
humour. 

Woodstock Furniture Ltd, London WCl. 
01-833 0404 


CHANGE OF DIRECTION 

Joto us, Garry Besrenr and Pater Richards, w* were frus- 
trated Safes Managers, now we are eamew a substantial fire 
figure mam wttfm a large Emu&fnSen financial insttaaon. 

WS ate now InoMno tor two people, aged b etween 27 and 5ft 
Swing within a SO rata radus of London earning between £15 
- £30000, to jon our S sta afa ms in a planned expansion 
programme in the finance! semes industry, to develop their 
own pracaea. __ 


Telephone us ofc 
AJSed Dntnr 
Am ra c e pie - 
Friday between 
3 - &30pm on 
01-637 7200. 


ALLIED 


rat hkucml uuMGEMemaou? 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANTS 

CENTRAL, SOOTH & SOOTH EAST LONDON, 
THAMES VALLEY, SOUTHERN HOME COUNTIES 

INEGOTIABLE 

Accountancy Personnel, Britain's 
leading consultancy in the specialist 
recr uitment of accountants and their 
staff, has a proven policy of continued 
expansion through the training and 
development of its consultants, 
providing unrivalled career 


i f L 1 1 11 1« L-KW. J 1 « t EYTo TT k'A’r.UYi EiTti 


challenging responsibilities. To join one 
of our successful professional teams, 


D'J . re.';! i c*v n* rTTi 


ucated to degree level and preferably 
have an accountancy or commercial 
background. 

Contact Rickard Wallace ms 
01-834 0489 

Accountancy Personnel 
6-8 Glen House, 


London, S Wl E 5AA, 


Nina Campbell Ltd 

9 Walton Street London SW3 2ID 

INTERIOR DECORATOR 

SALES ASSISTANT mid 20s with a happy, out- 
ing personality. previous retail experience and a 
flair for display. 

To apply telephone Marilyn Gailely 
on 01-225 1011. 


Wr arr an row of i <ppnrtuiubt* flmufi. Afiptitvti/n* ore ted- 
rnmr rntardL** *f *rx. marital rthnie origin at 


disability. 


TRAVEL 

CONSULTANTS 

Raprasanting French. Ital- 
ian and Austrian $M and 
summer resorts require 
Satas/Admirdstratkm As- 
sistant Languages, winter 
sports, travel expsrtaraa 
an advantage. Typing es- 
sential. Salary negotiable. 

Pfease reply to BOX F21 


ANTIQUE 

SHOP 

CHELSEA 

Specialising m fine 
English ftirairure 
requires aasisunt. A 

sood driver csscnliaL 

E»«Uew prospects. 

01-373 3040/ 
01-373 3636 


' V errs t . 
Z*. ' *i~sj 
-O': Vi «« 

•a.-'a.rTAs 











- . V 

- •• ■ ' 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 




SENIOR APPOINTMENTS 


EXECUTIVES & SALES PPOPPagirmai Q 


i W . !*"S 

r\ ’*■ 

■ ; ■» via4 

i Mv/io' ,ht C 


■BAun'QianM.wQ 

00322442*8 

RHWKQUH 

(BMawt 
■OU0N 
0204 WW00 
■WOfWW 
0224723m 

0*72237315 

CAAOtFF 

0222332131 

CHORE* 

02*4 4S031 
UHIBY 
0332371971 
QWmunQM 
031-22<t4U1 
OLASOOW 
0*1-248 2811 
i an« 
0332458361 
LBCESTEM 

OS3328354 

uvBwoat 

ow-tmmm 

LITTON 

05S24157M 


^«clor Designate. Buie salary £ 15 , 000 . 

of £20,000+. Choice of executive 
car. Total control of snail industrial sales 
force through stockists and distributors. 
Benefits indude BUPA and n/c pension. 

SALES EXECUTIVE 

£15,000 plus axcellsnt bonus. Choice of 
top range car. Dealing primarily with 
France and Germany. Selling export sports 
equipment, so leisure goods background 
ideal. Excellent prospects for promotion. 
Take advantage of our nationwide faeflitfas 
and ring your nearest branch for details of 
these and a thousand other opportunities. 


MI-2211131 
HUDN KEYNES 


M»CA«nJC 

WKW91T1 


0604 37548 

NonaaKAU 

06039016*1 

READING 
omsooTCS 
HIM I lUjl 
07422073 
WATFORD 
062346885 
LONDON. MCA 

EAUNB 
01-578 58S1 
ELDON STREET 
01-438 ISOS 
KLUtKJLCE 
01-434*841 


Hestair Management Servkzes Limited 


MANAGEMENT 

CONSULTANTS 

Are you eager for success? 

Are you available now? 

As a result of our continued growth we require several 
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS to maintain our development. 
Could you be one of them? 

You must be highly motivated with an appetite for achievement 

Your successful track record will show that you are thoroughly 
experienced in the business to business area and capable of 
problem solving for small and medium sized companies, be they 
financial, commercial or manufacturing. 

You will receive comprehensive training and the back-up 
necessary. A first rate remuneration package commensurate with 
effort is offered. 

I If this is your sat of chaflenge and you 

s-y' 1 would like to join our expanding team. 

/■rwrL-wrWN please send complete career details to Marie 
— l f Z|I l{, ) Quinery. Ref: tt , Independent Consulting 
VTr" 1 P and Management Company Ltd.. Rawptug 

House, 147 London Road. Kmgston-upon- 
i Thames, Surrey KT2 6NR. 


n i'f . . 

' ' *fr [, 

—* l "•*' rt,Vi 

ESE®1 

,ple !n ,h e 

- • ' r . . areas ^ 

“ Re PreseiiiajiJ 

' - 1 .VJJBK*- 

> --A I .. 

.-I-V g 

' ' Tl R, 

•’■■•’•W r^; 

•• •»: 

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.“ . -- - ■- _ I 

. ' ■>’ 

W3 r 

• ■ •' ’•'rsm 

• • •■■■■'•• -41* JS; 

r ; r-.. 

- • - r 

.... ; ^ nil 


PENSION FUND 
ADMINSTBATOfl 
STOCK MOCKERS 



Td Angus Watson 
01-626 8524 

■MMBSat PMSHMl 
Coasuftaiit 


MKRO/tAUX/tUPrOirr «nM 
omno/AiMMl dealer ragum 
pmn with flood ad round, 
knoudrdflp Ml Dot. Xenix, lead- 
ing cMlwaiv He. S alary mo but 
min nt coming* £20.000. Con- 
sider profit stvarc/DlrrclonJup. 
PtKHIC 767 8835. 


LADY ASSISTANT 
REQUIRED 

As tfinl ranter of a smaO prop 
bu»g concern near ftymea- 

Piefened age 30 & 40. 

tamfadge rt art*** costume 
iwoby and accessories a definite 
stallage. Fad Xante typera 
and afaiity to dim essanM. 
Mn be abk to com in a hectic 
atmosphere. 

Hous; SJQm to 6pm tatty 
toFitty SttrynepottMt. 

. Tefe 01-003 6602 


I AM SMART. wrO rotten. coirtV 
denl and leflouy guaUTMd 
wwwm Mm lor a lob that 
rcdtnrw a weH disciplined- 
mint flair and ambUion. Con 
you help or? Phone 01-388 

8544. 



I OF 

THE TIMES 




Our client, an expanding Trading 
and Broking company is currently 
seeking a high calibre Physical 
Broker with a record of progressive 
achievement in the soft commodity 
business. 

Candidates aged 28-40, with well 
developed contacts in the feedstuffe 
and related markets would be of 
particular interest to our Client 

For further information please 
contact Trish Collins on 
01-481 3188 




1 E—pc Home. World Trade Ctatn, Loadca El »AA | 

cqwticiR.UMVTTAEwni.aymi evs vmeMonoBy wrtnan. 
M> n»«M Ml RMtoaf employ- 1 Choice. of «yir. vbo/ACccm 1 
inenL 7H: 0296 625411. I Tal pMS on 0296 625411. 


kidyFarquhanofllMcd " 

47 Now Bond Street. London. W1Y9HA. 
01*4938824 

GRADUATE RESEARCHER 

For leading executive search consul- 
tants. Essentially a first class telephone 
manner and personality, a methodical 
and thorough approach combined with a 
flair for extracting information and inter- 
prating ideas. Must have at least one 
year’s work experience and be willing to 
use a database. Oxbridge or similar pre- 
Jerod- Salary c£15,«K) + benefits. 
London W1. 

YOUNG GRADUATE ASSISTANT 

With typing (40+) for database. Willing to 
work as part of a team and tram in re- 
search. Salary £9,000. London W1. 


JFL 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


1AM AOMMSTRATO* in MTU- 
mm. 36/40. £16000 

Languoflr Staff A«y 466 892. 


ComuUoocy pii gluing Ip auto- 
pm accmo i M ham a vacancy 
for on Interviewer. Prrvoftn 
agency ex P f lute bkmpl 
salary ncgp Ma tile- TrhThnne Rj 
Rcc Cone 493 6446. 


CVS, W I LR V B. W HBJP AND 

cxpei 1 job March guMance. 
Rodney Six AMonates Tel 
BrrUiamsted rOsajTI 7 2 209. 
MECOMX A PART TIME. ESTATE. 
ACCMTT BUBT SW1 (MOM* 
agenlsvefcareaay nirrex-pub- 
Pc school mdixldiMI imder 46 to 
help purchasers buy flats antf 
houses l-6pm. C68SO pa plus 
good cotanalMon. 01 821 0786. 


Well o*er 90% of oar cSettt 
in Senior sad Middle 
Management achieve job 
search success through the 
nit f+ *f r t +¥! job marl rrt 

To find out boa our career 
development and CV. 
Services can mniiniic your 
cifiu progiuMNu coBttg 
ns now tor an exploratory 
meetmf -at no cost orobli- 
gsaon-or ceod ns your CV. 

Yonr tone aonld depend 
ont 

Conor AMmy Services lid 
6 Qnecn Street Mayttu- 
London W1X7PH 
T*t 01-493 2646 


pony Nrw properly Protect 
menapunrm company wnii po- 
tmua) MMMlr Can and Nigertaii 
dWMrir requires a tifiniQiiiu 
Director wm must be nuenl tn 
Arabic. Hausa and Cnglnlt and- 
have a good wortong knowt- 
edge of French. He must be a 
qualified Enguteer wuu a de- 
gree m rngthferotg aad several 
yean or tx u e t ie u o in real es- 
tate work. butudtag 
architectural aeUps expcrtuice. 
and mud be of proven aMniy in 
the managerial fieM. Pleoee 
contact iNqtnek ud ref JVB 
with mil CV al cjo Jaqtm 4 
Lewis. 2 South Square. Gray's 
bin. Loudon WC1R 5HR 



BANKING & ACCOUNTANCY 


PARTNERSHIP 

SECRETARY 

c.£25,000 


The impending r et ir eme nt of die paromhip a ecfet u y to a 
snhaawM firm of Londm arfknois ncccssitatra the teenmnaan 
of b qualified AOS as hti cepboODent. 

Aged finan xmd-30’s to SO he or she will be respeonble fix’ md aUe 
to advise on ill a spects of accounts and admausaanoo af the 

praaice, from supervision of house keeping requiremems 10 the 
eaecrnkmofaflad m ii uMiau v e d erisi o ns . 

He or die will be a member of the pumas’ c nroniC Bc s : the 
candiffair must have a sound knowledge of computerised 
ac countin g and technology. The salary is negotiable within the 
guide indicated above and the post is pensionable. 

For further infbanarion contact A F P Ba&s of Renter Shakia, 
26-28 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4HE, telephone: 
01-405 6852 quoting r efe rence C216> who has instructions tn 
p r epar e a shortlist. 

REUTER SIMKIN 

LONDON • LEEDS • WINCHESTER 

M RECRUITMENT ft MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS Ml 


PERSONNEL 
AND ADMINISTRATION 
MANAGER 


Daniel J Edelman Ltd is a leading international public 
relations consultancy, with a staff of 90 and a firm 
commitment to the personnel function and its 
development Supported by office managers and services 
staff, the Personnel and Administration Department 
covers all aspects of backing up a highly-motivated and 
professional staff. The key areas of executive recruitment, 
staff training using internal and external resources, and 
management involvement in the planning of the 
company’s development form the framework for this 
position, which will offer scope for innovation and career 
progress. 

The ideal candidate will be a graduate, IPM qualified, 
with at least 3 years’ experience in the service sector; a 
commitment to developing the use of office technology 
and an interest in the broader administrative area are 
essential, as is a willingness to manage non-personnel 
functions. 


for this 



Is ?nd fvlaritir 
Consultancy 


Tbe lines dratted. 


—MONDAY 

f ft f ngMtim- Unrongty A pp uinliij e nt s.ftep & 
Public School Appo in tments, E du c ationa l 
Courses, Scholarships and Fellowships. 
la Qenae de b Ciemc and other secr etarial 
appointments. 

=====TUESDAY== 

Computer Horizons: Com p u t e r Appoint 
meats with edftoriaL 
f . jx p al AffMatentB Solicitors, Com- 
mercial Lawyers, Legal Officers, Private & 
Public Practice. 


ruuin. IWMW 

Legal La Owne for top legal secretaries. 

Fabfc Seder Appointments. 

WEDNESDAY — = 

La Creme de la Qeme and other secretarial 

fl n n nintmwils. 

Property. Residential, Town & Country, 
Overseas, Rentals, with cdxtoriaL 
Antiques and Collectables. 

===== THURSDAY—* 

General Ap pointments: Management and 
fafpmiw mpointments with editorial 
La Creme debt Creme and other secretarial 
appointments. 

— FRIDAY 

Motors: A complete car buyer’s guide with 
editorial 




Recruitment Consultants 

Better your connections 


Not all recruitment companies are the same . . . 

WE .are a young but rapidly YOU arc under 30, have 
expanding fmance/acconntimcy a record of achievement in 
consultancy, have a first dass finance/accountancy reernit- 
reputation, offer an environ- ment, offer high potential plus 
meat conducive to the most the personal qualities essential 
ambitious, and seek nothing less to success, and seek fast track 


than pre-eminence in the market prospects coupled with ex- 
place. ceUent rewards. 

If our corporate philosophy and objectives coincide with your 
personal profile and ambitions, WE should be talking. With on 
target earnings of aroimd £25,000 phis car (consisting of a generous 
five figure basic salary plus quarterly bonuses) can YOU seriously 
afford to ignore these outstanding opportunities? 

Not all recruitment companies are the same: YOU owe it to your- 
self to find out why. 

Call me, JohnGonstable, Go the evenings/at weekends 549 5519) or 
write briefly enclosing a CV and out of hours number. 


The Institute of Chartered Accountants 
in England & Wales 

RESEARCH 

ASSISTANT 

A research assistant Is required to work on a 
number of auditing research projects initiated by 
the ICAEW Research Board. These projects are 
on the subjects of audit methodology, audit risk 
and auditor changes. The successful applicant 
wffl work under the supervision of the Director of 
Research and the Under Secretary to the Re- 
search Board. 

Applications are invited from those with either a 
background in professional auditing or with re- 
search skids in interviewing and data collection 
and analysis. 

The post is available as a fuB- 
tlme appointment for one year 
in the first instance, but a part- 
time appointment may be 
considered for a suitable appli- 
cant The fulltime salary wiH be 
on a scale from £10,000 to 
£12,000 p-a. 

Applications, giving personal 
and career details to Mrs. M. 
Owens, Personnel Officer, 
Chartered Accountant's Han, 
Moorgate Place, London EC2P 
2BJ. (Telephone: 01-628 7060). 


An attractive package, including promotion propsects, 
awaits the successful applicant, wno must be available to 
commence work by November 1, 1986. 

Written applications with full CV should be sent to 
Shona Kelly, Personnel and Administration Manager- 

EDELMAN 

Stanhope House, Stanhope Place, London W2 2HH. 

J22S/33 


!M 


Amvim 


WJLl 1 

1 

iiiiiiiiiliii 


DIESGUNDfetoUJB 


GUIDANCE FOR 
ALL AGES! 

> MiisSriWMsktltoWKa 
15-24 |n JtfeM^anW 

35-54 ys MCMKflatgedanqr 



BRtmM TKMimOM Associa- 
tion - A iuuuimi w. The British 
Tnolhtao Association (Mb to 



XEC L'fivt C.ON'XECUONS 


franchises etc. with e di tori a l . 

I to l and Guide. 

===== SATURDAY— 

OraseasaadmHoBd^>«WCotlages. 

Hotels, Flights ete. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS 
PERSONAL COLUMN, INCLUDING 
RATALS, APPEARS EVERY DAY. 


-3 L-' 


| Court & Social £6 Verlme. 

I AB nus subject to IS% VAT 


UUm PO Bor 484, 


VniiSliHi.litotan 


ieepbcne(D®yn 

Date of insertion- 


rtomserticBidOto) 


UNDERWRITER 

MORTGAGE/UNSECURED 

LENDING 

An excellent opportunity for the ambitious Advances 
Executive to capitalise on experience by moving to 
our deinL a Major US Banking Group. The post 
involves the analysis of proposals regarding secured 
and unsecured loan applications and consequent 
recommendations for action. Candidates will have at 
least 5 years lending experience of which our deints 
would expect to find three years credit analysis, pref- 
! erably connected to consumer lending (both Small & 
Big ticket) and some knowledge of automated mort- 
gage processing systems. Experience of the US 
Banking environment would be an advantage but by 
no means essentiaL A comprehensive benefits pack- 
age, consistent with the banking world can he offered 
and die salary will be commensurate with a post of 
this leveL Age: c 25. 

For further details and first interview please contact 

ROBERT MILNE 

on the telephone number below or 
write enclosing full CV. 


Crawford Recruitment Services limited 

Wabnar House, 288 Regent Street, London W1R SHE 


FINANCIAL 

ACCOUNTANT 


To work with the Financial Director of the 
British owned insurance Group. You will 
be involved in an the active companies in 
the Group, this will include day-to-day Ao- 
courrts, preparation of monthly Manage- 
ment information, Systems development 
and Year end Accounts. 

If you are a recently qualified Chartered 
Accountant looking for a move into the 
Commercial environment; please contact 
Chris Farmer on 01-543 5133 

Alfred Marks 
Recruitment Consultants 
77, The Broadway, 
London SW19 ORJ 


ALFRED MARKS 




W OUI WO - Exp*rlen«6, ma- 
ture penon oimaay mMttng to 
Oxioraaiirf. England with ax 
nraiicf in um of branded 
food in IM MMMlr EM and 
Arabian GuV. Pretrn irara 
BOTH and rrtrrencw atr *»- 
sratUL wr ora on nuMbtiad 

S>W Company storting a cola 
oincr m Oxford. Only qualified 
pmannd nerd in aMy «iUt 
Ortaurd C.v mk Freyial Proa 
ucu AC. Baarmraaw 89. 6900 

2UB. Swttrerfond. 




TNscouW bo your opportu- 
nity. If you fevo In London or 
me Home Cou r tee. ara 25- 
K Wm busmen acuman, m 
wfl tran you for a now career 
«4fh Brttamra toadbig com- 
pany In the financial oanitaM 
Stony. 

Foe Mw M e na Mi an flag 
C«fc« Lockwood 
01-242 4240. 


Wton n II WMI 6 required 
to wm our ronidiy exnap d m q 
tnanga office The tuccmfui 

apMKani should hosesome rct- 
manl «nnew Been both 
numerate and a good lypM. to 
handle U*e management of Mgh 
clam fumMied houw and 
anarbnems. AHMy to deal wW 
people rsMidlai- Anrartni sala- 
ry and other nemnta contact 
Stuart Oold 01-666 3111 
Altacombe A B Ingland ResMMn- 
uoi Ladings 68 St Johns Wood 
High Stmt NW8. 


wmO M A Pons Pth reprwwa- 
me ww, good hnowiedar of 
bouUoor wear, lor Its sports- 
wear coOectwn. mm and 
womens tops, unuarrs + tiro s 
rs and sidrts. Re«y to our 
oflura- CHEATIOha 

■anonymc*. so. rue du Ptai. r 
- 99600 LULL Telex: 196 107 


SALES-* 


MANAGEMENT 

ACCOUNTANTS 

BUDGET 

ANALYSTS 

COST 

CONTROLLERS 

Far the best in temporary 
assignments, call 

accountemps 

01-638 8171 

A Civilian o' Flo??" Ho ‘I F-rscrr*; 


FINANCE DIRECTOR - 
JORDAN 


We are acting for an internationally known school based 
in Jordan which has developed to the point where a 
Finance Director is required to handle its financial and 
administrative affairs. 

The ideal candidate will be aged 35-50 and will demon- 
strate considerable previous financial responsibility 
gained either in a large organisation, or in industry or 
commerces Knowledge of the Middle East will be an 
advantage. 

The initial contract would be for 2 years (renewable). 
Salary is tax free; the remuneration package includes 
furnished accommodation, allowances towards services 
and usual expatriate benefits. 

Please reply in confidence and with written details to 
Clare Wilson. Mariar International, 14 Grosvenor Place, 
London SW1X 7HH. 


RIBA Services Ud is a wholly owned, subsidiary 
company of the Royal Institute of British Architects, 
involved in publishing information services for the 
profession. Additions to our titles and the develop- 
ment of existing services has created the need to 
seek out and allocate high calibre staff to maintain 
and strengthen this development 

SALES & MARKETING MANAGER, Exhibitions. Con- 
ferences and other services. 

This is a new appointment designed to further de- 
velop the sales of our existing and very successful 
exhibition, conference and service departments. We 
are looking for a person of high personal motivation, 
probably with a background in exhibitions or publish- 
ing sales and marketing who can manage and 


develop the potential of a small but committed team. 
A remuneration package ri excess of £20,000 pa. is 
envisaged. 


f £ iiloi il’TI 


to take control of the day to day raponsituDty for 
sales, visitor promotion and administration of a major 
computer exhibition entitled the Construction Indus- 
try Conrcuter Exhibition (CICE) plus other specialist 
events. The CfCE is an established and rapidly grow- 
ing exhibition with' considerable scope for further 
expansion. That expansion will be the reponsibility of 
the appointed candidate. The successful candidate 
will need to demonstrate sales ftsr and good admin- 
istrative ability. Income circa £16,000 pA depending 
on age and experience. 

AKA SALES MANAGER 

This appointment is again newly created to add addi- 
tional resources to an existing saiesforce of ten 
(mixed) and would involve the presentation to manu- 
facturing companies of the complete range of 
information services available from RIBAS. The suc- 
cessful applicant would need to demonstrate an 
understanding of the construction industry and of 
publishing. Alternatively, he or she should be able to 
show a history of successful achievement in a sales 
environment, as this position sits firmly in a competi- 
tive market and requires a high degree of self 
motivation. 

Please write with full CV to Ms Dawn Webster 
Sales Administrator 
NBA Services Ud 
66 Portland Place, 
London WIN 4AD. 



Cmthiaed tm page 32 





















32 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


LA CRfiME DE LA CREME 


/ 


Senior 

Personal Secretary 

City Office up to £11,500 


City Office 

British Telecom seeks a 
highly experienced Personal 
Secretary to work for the 
District Manager of its Gty of 
London District. 

The successful candidate 

will have a full appreciation 
of the secretarial needs of 
senior management in a 


' CITY OF S 
LONDON! 

# DISTRICT 1 

Providing better 
business connections 


major customer-orientated 
organisation, and will have 
the ability to liaise at the 
highest levels both within 
ana outside the company 

You will have good 
shorthand, with at least 40 
wpm typing, 120 wpm audio 
and experience in word- 
processing. Most important 
is an assured manner in 
dealing with people both on 
the telephone and in person, 
together with the ability to 
work under pressure. 

Ex cel lent working 
conditions in modem offices 
located at Riverside House, 
2A Southwark Bridge Road, 
London SE1 9BA. 

Please write, with full 
CV, to Mrs. i Lewis, PR62, 
Fleet Budding, 40 Shoe Lane, 
London EC4 3DD. 

British 

TELECOM 


Secretary 

to 

Parliamentary 

Adviser 


IGBlIi 



The Parliamentary Adviser maintains contact with 
Parliamentarians of all Parties to explain British business 
policies at Westminster. His secretary must have an interest 
of Parliament and its procedures and the ability to converse 
with Members of both Houses. Good secretarial speeds are 
essential and WP experience is desirable. 

Salary circa £8,000 p.a. depending on age and experience. 
Other benefits include BUPA, season ticket loan, 23 days 
holiday per year, subsidised restaurant. 

We also have other vacancies for secretaries with good 
secretarial skills — at all levels. 

Please reply enclosing comprehensive CV and stating 
present salary to Personnel Department, Confederation of 
British Industry, Centre Point 103 New Oxford Street, 
London WC1A1DU. 


COMMITTEE ADMINISTRATOR’S 
ASSISTANT 

Cowls lor Bio Brart Petty Sessions m o I outer London an a dratattterad by tie Clerk to da 
Justices woo is dso me Clerk to tte Magstraw' Cowls Commnoo. ita statutory body s nsponMe tor 
Umotmmg afl r mowas . and e wort is earned ouittrou tyMte Coramcee Seagate. naiagte by tte 
Cmunnee AWmsmor with sinnt bum an awsunL 

We an botany lor someone who las good general office stats induing fast, activate typmg; tbe abfity to 
use/Mhngness to loam word process in g e numerate aid a able to «wk on thdrwwi Motive. 

Parting aafay wdl be detemane d at Inteiwew accontng to gutetetens and eapwana wdton a scan ol 
E7.038 - &JB57: tbe post 6 siperanmoMe and JNC condtnns of serves of magMratos* cowl staff apply, 

For a pp t ohon form please Ufapfmne Of AST 8835 or witt to: Iba Gfafc to (to COmraBao. Brart PSA 
Ma y st t a n a ' Courts Lonunme. 1st Floor. Tbe Cowl House. St Utayi Road, London NMH0 4BH. 

OosaiQ date 19.946 


BEDFORDSHIRE 
UP TO £15,000 pa. 
plus Car 

EntrepreneriaL c omm e rda fly aware wtoi strong secra- 
tarial sWBs/PA capability as support to young 
sucessfuJ Chairman in sales promotion field. Location 
Bedfordshire. Salary and car applicable to ideal 
person. 

Please apply in writing with CV to: 

PO BOX S61 
18 Leighton Place 
London NW5 2JG 


ALAN PASCOE ASSOCIATES LIMITED 

This rapidly expanding sponsorship and marketing 
consultancy requires; 

SECRETARY 

To provide hid secretarial support to Managing Director 
and Company Director, plus day-to-day administrative 
tasks. Fast accurate typing and shortfiand essentiaL 
Mealy, applicants w* be able to start with*) next couple 
of weeks. Salary according to age and experience. CV 
and current postton/saJary to; Lethe Bremtet, AM 
ltd.. Durham House, Durham House Street, WC2N6HC. 
No Agendas. 


TOP FLIGHT SECRETARY 
£12.198 to £13.761 

Can you control a bu» offtoe? Good iwno speeds *xi wp oowi- 
■m eueui Adng kuidm mtov for a erasable oroamsrton 
Piewous Mpenoce of fund rwmg an ataotage Ths cams uneonmem 
neats a maw* outlook and aiakty to work on om raraove T he w arts 
are hgn ana dunes no. Contact Jan McGany on 01-831 4296. 

FUTURES SPKIAUST^ 

Futures Ltd . 61 Great Portland Street. London WIN SDH 


SECRETARY/PA 

The General Secretary of a profosioiifll motion a repmres an 
espenenad person. in current typing practice, who is O exMe and 
organised, and is prepared for loaned uaUmal tiara. A knwwMjs 
ol mopaUB mdd bean advantage. The portion calls for an 
^ipikant who k prepared far reriauon and ravutarntm wirhin ibe 
OfEanisation. resident preferred. Circa £10400. Apply with 
Cvand contact telephone to: BOX G77 The Thnes, Advwtsanent 
Depu PO Box 444 Virginia SL. London El 90D. 


Mai rare of PA/Seoe&y wdh 
the Artsy to tidda todays tech- 


iia 


W#h good starthand and typng 
Skdb. sand commareal even- 


ita Oersaadng of WP. London 
could be yu oysta. IS bra- 
dan. hn aod mancal reams 
era te be youra. 


lid Ui'lf t: 


Become a temoray «<n us and 
take a u e m or aw step ado (to 
best of bom van*. 
Telep hone 01 589 4422 

Senior 

Secretaries 


SENIOR 

SECRETARY 

Mayfair£8,000p.a. + Benefits 

The prupcnyTinvcstnicnr division of Greyhound Financial Services Ltd 
urgently rajuinsa super secretary with sound administrative abilities to work 
in * small friendly serviced office complex. 

This is a unique opportunity as. combi ned with your superlative typing 
skills (70+ wpm), you will have regular con cxrwirh the tenants of the sen-iced 

complex where you will be required to represent die Company, You should 
be in your mid- twenties and have die presence, strength and warmth of 
personality necessary for this potation. 

In addition to die benefits chat only a major organisation can oflec you will 
be trained where necessary io the use ofW.P., telex and fax. 

In the first instance, please telephone Irene Woodson 01 -W3 5518or 
send your Full CV to the Human Resources Manage t Grevhound Financial 
Services Limited. 9- 10 Grafton Street, London Wl. 

GREYHOUND. 



TERRITORIAL AUXILLIARY AMD 
VOLUNTEER RESERVE 
ASSOCIATION FOR GREATER LONDON 

The Senior Executive of the Association requires a secretary-PA. The post 
calls tor exceflent secretarial skifis, including shorthand. Applicants should 
have a good academic background, an aridity to communicate at senior 
level ana be able to organise priorities. The association offices are located 
in pleasant sumxindtngs in the Kings Road, Chelsea. 

Salary scale £9,170 rising by four annual Increments to £10,462 (inclusive) 
dependant on qualifications. 

Please apply in writing with C.V. to: 

Mr John Sayers 
TAVRA For Greater London 
Duke of Yorks HQ 
Kings Road 
Chelsea 

London SW3 4RY 


PA/ BANKING 
PERSONNEL & AOMIN 
c£ 12,000 AAE + benefits 

Are you the absolute ultimate in dis- 
cretion? Can you motivate, mix and 
match in a very busy department 
using your exceptional skills (min 
100/60 and W.P.J? 

International City based bank direc- 
tor (Head Office Switzerland) needs 
a confident PA with the poise and 
p re se nce to communicate effectively 
in this vibrant international and of- 
ten multi-lingual atmosphere. 


01-491 7100 



TOP TEMPS 
WITH TONGUES 
and temp to perm 

We have vacancies in bonking, 
travel. Government bodies and 
Associations, publishing and com- 
mercial conc e rns where your 
excellent shorthand, W.P„ and typ- 
ing skills are needed now. 

Many of these positions can become 
permanent. 

If you an searching the market for 
those extra special jobs usmg your 
linguistic skills, please phone us 
now. . 


01-491 7100 


STOP PRESS 
£11,500 

This wel known daly 
piificatfon requires a 
capable PA to assist 
one of ITs main boa r d 
directors. ttis main 
responsfcl fetes are on 
ins operational side 
and you wfl be provid- 
ing a fuB stopcxl rota to 
your boss, organising 
ns busy day including 
Ns dtaqr, meetings and 
travel arrangements as 


highly confidential 
matters. 

You should be wefl 
organised with an eye 
for detail and above afi 
a sense of humour, 
have at least 3 years 
soAd experience and be 
looking tor a chadeng- 
ing and rewardng 
career move. 

Age: 24 Skits: 100/60+ 
WP 

WEST END OFFICE 


JERMYN STREET 

MARKET RESEARCH CONSULTANCY 

Wa are a nine month old market res ear ch consul- 
tancy who need a flexible and cheerful person to 
type, answer the phone, organise travel, deal with 
dents and organise messengers. 

Only those with exceAant typing skfis (knowledge of 
Word Processing preferable), who are personable 
and enjoy working In a Nvaiy atmo sp here need apply 
to this dynamic and friendly company. Salary 
c£8500 accor tfn g to aga and e x perience. 

If you think you fit the ML calt 

Howard on 01-839 7496. 

(No agencies) 


SECRETARY 

Prestigious 
Advertising Agency in 
W6 seek a Secretary 
for the Financial 
Director. 2fr+ with 


EXHILARATING 

OPPORTUNITY 

Experienced and capable secretary/PA 
required to join extremely busy, new 
Sloane Street estate agency. 100/60 
shorthand, Audio and word processing 
skills needed. Age 25+ . Circa £9,500 

Please send CV to: 

Francis Russell, 

138 Sloane Street, London SW1. 



SIR BASIL SPENCER 
PARTNERSHIP 

Has a vacancy fix a PA/SECRETARY to the Architect 
Senior Partner. This position would suite second jobber 
or mtdligem college leaver with skills of 50/90 wpm 
(lyping/shorthandl Good salary, 18 days holiday with I 
bonus week at Christmas. 

Please telephone Karen for immediate interview 
on 01-226 717S. 




L^v-iy i 1 ,m 

r-;v 1 ’.'I 


BI-UNGUAL PA 
SEC £11,000 

With French &/or Ger- 
man for Kensington 
marteting Co. work with 
Directors and help run 
the show. Good typing, 
no s/h. Age 25-50. 

SEC, SOME 
SPANISH, £9,000 

for City Bank. Usual 
mortgage plus perks and 
lots of involvements. 
80/50+ skills, age 22+. 
Late appointments 
welcome. 

FLAIR 

recruitment 
01-938 2222 


£10,000 PA/SEC 

■O no* <or SOM, partner ol no 
*•« and Com pa ny A good him 
of runout and good UA 90/60 
otaa WP ****** 

boss Phene Careen* 07 8478 or 
73* 37GB im«> Maun 133-136 
Otlfrd SL REC CONS 

MILLER 

MCNISH 


SECRETARY/ 

PA 

to Songwnter/Composer. 
Should be sell motivated 
organiser with immaculate 
speeds. Salary neg. 
Apply n writing wnn CV 
u J09 The Times 


HTiMiir 


ASSIST ANT/SEC 
TO £10,000 
+ BENEFITS . 

Acting as sacretanf to martadmg 
function of frtai u no m t Offshore 
Groin). Ability to coordinate 
sales. nurMng rio t mah oo and 
gngecTS. maran tar chats, onp- 
mzE edntnans md tese with 
dares and c on tra ctor. . A fertile 
aooteam xlraUy 3&+ raff » **e 
tar detai and dumane apgrotw- 

Susaa HamBtn 
Peretmitd 

33 SL Georae SL, Wl. 

Tet 499 5408. 


PA RESEARCH^ 
OPTO £12,000 

Edtaitetod compary n Wl are 
seeuig a mo net secreav wtti 
stiotmand to asasi nra exaai- 
hves knmautc presenoaon. 
meinjem sta eueVem stalls re- 
udM Cell Camel, (tosonred 
tocsw marts. 

01-242 DTK 


LEGAL NOTICES 


CMINKARN LIMITED 

TO HHUM IT MAY CONCERN 

New r inn*, mat: 

II Al an Extraordinary General 
Meeting ol Um> above named 
romoany dulv nanrwt and 
nrM al Minnndor How, SO 
HirVoaie. Bradiord BDI ITH 
on It Wwn l w IWe «rrW 
rrvXudoin wrr ftivd lhaL 

1 1 wwn io ihc nmtno of tte» 
oiiMKin No 3 brtow a 
payment o» CI09.909 Oul Ol 
Um> Ccmoany rapiial (as 
defined bv Wlion 171<9< ol 
The Gompanm Ae, loa&iln 
nspHI ol IIh* porrhav bv 
I ne Comp an y H* own Vijrr. 
Horn krtlh Bnw« and 
Frank Ldvrua, Duruiam to 
ino a orer mei n., referred to 
■n Reoluiion No 2 Mow 


2i ThM loliowmq Ihe luMn, 
al Rr«hM» No. 1 atmr 
at me Irmrs ol Ihr rwnrart 
■mmderf to hr made be- 
loveen I hr Company ill 
and keen Bennetl (21 a 

ropy ol wlurn was an 
netrd to ihe nourc at Hit 
mreiHto and marked "A" 
and unt tailed lor Ur pur. 

none or tdenliflraiiOn tiv 

OrOumunlir Mr gp 

and durrnee ol 30.7+4 
Uidir. in Ihe Company 
tor CN 216 be author, 
rvd: and 


hi Ihe Ptm ol Ihe row r an 
nUemied IO Or made be- 
tween Ihe Conuunv <11 
and Frank Lawson ,2i a 

mpv ol whrh was an- 
nesed to Ihe naUre CP the 
im-rnnu mid nvuked “S'* 

and (nKulIrd lor me pur- 
pose M KP-ukrtlr align try 
Ihr Oval man lor Ihe Side 
.aal pun Ken ol 30.744 
shares in I nr Company 
lor C?7n?3o he 
dUhorra-d 

71 The sialuiory drrkiulm of 
■hr ditertorv aod audllors' re 

port requited nv srrtMm 173 ol 
Ihr Companies Arl l<M$ are 
diailable lor InsperUon al Ihe 
mmnm's irwanr-rt otlire *A 
Pm natal Uniw Creetland 
HjIHh torsi torvunre 


3> \nr rrrdilnr at the Conmanv 
iimv al anv Itme Vriinui ine 
Inr weeks irmra-rliatrly 1(4 
lownw I si sa-Dleniiirr l«Hb 
aod, to Hie HrW, Court ol Jus 
lire i or an older mohibiimg 
Ihe payments 


SALES 4 MARKETING 


CAN YOU NEGOTIATE? 

A new expanding Branch in the Financial Services Industry 
based kt the erty reams people who are self disripiinea, 
atxatetf and of good repearance. In retren we offer a chance 
to build a He-time buswesss with excel tent prospects and 
future management opportunities. If you live in the London area, 
are between 21 aid 45 and want to get the most out of life, 
send your CV to Maureen Drinfcwater. 1st floor Thavies hn 
House 3-4 Hclbcm Grots EC1N2JJ or Tei 01 353 0904. 


iim«] 


FINANCIAL 
SERVICES PLC 

FqanaoB On fasti Pw*e Co re 3 
vkvob is itodra a* wa « 
earangs poraasd un maan 
fun a»w»B naq ror Mccasrui 
4WK 

Phone Jotra LnUea 
01-353 4048 



reqrdrad for busy London 
estate agents. Hrg h rrami- 
neraaan tar right pet son 
iMth expenence. 

Mum nriv eadBriaa tv. ta 


Ptem ngtv cnrmelag tv 

BOX A98. 


GRADUATE 


GRADUATE TRAINEE 

Seveooab bated commodity merrhnna an loo bug tot a 
graduate trantec. catty 20'e. 

The training programme wiB expose the succratfol appC- 
esat to «U a^Hcts of tbe company's buying, selling and 
BtackboUmg operations. As a natter he or SOB wiBbe in- 
volved in setting to wholesaler*, anermarkets and food 
manufacturers and buying the products direct from the 
country of or igin . 

Tbe successful person is Hkely to be; 

a) interested in selling and marketing, 

b) enjoy cavdhK in the UK and abroad and 

c) be ■mhMno* fepr respone*lity and success- 

Initial iiiUuv k'wa win be conducted by telephone on 8/9/10 
September, with final interviews in Sercnoaks on 15/16 
September- It would be helpful i£, when writing, applicants 
couU give a telephone number at which they esq be essSy 
contacted. 

Full tv. toe John South rorth. H & T Walker Ltd. Walker 
House, London Roqd, Rhnerbend. SevenoaJu, Kent TNI 3 
2DN. 


FACULTY SECRETARY 

Up to E&087 (Pay award pending) 

TTw Faadtv of Education. Human and Soda! Stod- 
188 is seeking a mature secretary Jo otter 
secretarial/ administrative support to the Dew and 
the Faculty Administrative Officer. 

Appfleants should have exceflent shorthand and 
typing skBls, the abifity to work under prasaureand 
have the confidence and communication sklfls to 
deal wtth a wide variety of people. The poat hower 
wiB be committed to me use of new technology. 

AppB ca Bo n forms and further detaBs me 
avaBablo from the Personnel Department. 
South Bank Polytechnic. Borough Road, 
London SE1 0AA. Tel: 01-928 3512 (an- 
swering service 940m to SiXJprnf. 

Please quote Ref: R81 

Closing date: 22nd September, 1986. 

An fod Opportunities Employer. 

South Bank 


Polytechnic 


W.H.NEWSON GROUP 
OF COMPANIES 

SECRETARY/PA 
TO FINANCIAL DIRECTOR 
C £9,500 


London. 

TWs interesting, varied Job to 

in a pteaaam period house near Sloane Sq and 

Victoria. 

The tufl range of 

tiuttes tedude tnvolveftient hi the financial work of tba 
director. 

SdSSSS: rSr ^o^belSdSTSmpany w«h a 

fnaiKfly. Wormal style. 

Ptesse send CV to W. Ctok^ones, Pwwrmrt Nteh 
aqar W.H. Newson Group. 190 Bxiry St, London 
Svi. Tel 730 S93a 


WkMm fcr tomorrow 
JJSttoheartef lonttaa 


THE LONDON INTERNATIONAL 
FILM SCHOOL 

uroentty require an enterprising 
PA/Secretary to the PrindpaL 
Duties involve the Initiation and maintenance of a 
wide range of office procedures. A high pressure 
environmen t, deaftig with an International Student 
Body, demands considerable tact and adaptabSty. 
The post cafta for initiative, a flextoto approach to 
work and a wifingness to accept rosponsibSties. 
Good organising abfity and SH typing skfis are 
essenttaL A knowledge of fita produrtion proce- 
dures and WP experience would be an advantage. 
Non smoker preferred. Salary £8,800 pa. index 
finked. 


Applications in writing oily to 
Tke Admi nist rator, UJF&, 
24 Shelton Street, 
London WC2H 9HP- 


MACHIN 

CONSERVATORIES 

Susy archrtecf/tffrector of expanding design 
company urgently requires PA/secretary to 
work in new riverside design studio. Word 
processing essential and design knowledge 
an advantage. Experience at senior level re- 
quired. Age 25 - 35. Car driver. Salary 
negotiable. 

Hand written reply with CV. To: 

Machan Designs Ltd, 

4 Avenue Studios, 

Sidney Close 
London SW3 6HN 


GRADUATE SECERTARY 
PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

required for 

CHAIRMAN & MANAGING. 
DIRECTOR 

of large pubtc company based in 
Birmingham. 

Hot class secretarial and administrative 
skills essentiaL Age 25-32. 

Apply in writing with CV. to: 

Walter Judd limited (Ref: L767) 
(Incorportcd B a ctitk fi cr fl in Advertising) 
la Dow Lane, Lm dn a EC4M 9EJ. 


legal secretary 

jntcmaikxnl legal dinks. 

The soccesful cackle win be 

machine and wp. Experience and ost accurate typing are 
but uairaas *iD be given oa our pannular wp 

system. 

Ifyou have an mterest in legal maners. gpod organisational 
skuls. and a proffessumal approach to coping w a busy offioe 
then we would like to hear from yon. 

Starting salary £8.300. 

Pteare write enclosing detail* of your career history to Susan 
Moon. MR! Ltd. 37-43 Higti St Hampton Wick. Kregston- 
■pon-Tharoes. Surrey KT1 4DA. 

Closing daw 14th September. 


RECEPTIONIST/ 

TELEPHONIST 

Expanding West End company requires well groomed 
ReccpbomsuTdephrarist with good speaking voice » 
handle busy switchboard. Abo typing and other duties. 
Some German p re fe rre d . Age 25+. c £8,000. 

Send detailed CV. to 

Operations Director 
Weridex Europe 
GSmoore House 
57-61 Mortimer Street 
London WIN 7TD 


EMANUEL 

Require a Manageress and 
two Assistants for their new 
retail shop opening soon in 
Beauchamp Place. 
Manageress must be highly 
experienced in retail 
management. Salaries 
negotiable. 

Tel: 01-629 5569/5560 


USE TOUR FRENCH 

OE12000 

West End based Private Bankers/Ttada Hnan- 
oara need an able 25+ Secretary who is 
absolutely fluent In French with short han d In 
bom languages to look after the* top parson. A 
team player who taftoxUe and adaptable and 
start quickly shot tt cal IGvyn on 408 163T. 

Middleton Jeffers 


SUPER SECRETARIES 



HUUIAIrt awmUnB rate pe- 
u«l Good tytona uradui. 
94XM&.30. OwtiSary. Wrtle 
tottb C.V. to PtocMn K4B«w. 
ATCMtocw. 234 Upper l«Gf<- 
n » oo Howl. Putner. sw» 
CTO. (No Agmoes) 


to help select press ankles <rf intrarat. deal with 
prescriptions and book ordering, maintain general 
information files and type general departmental 
canespoodance. Ability to wort on own initiative 
essentiaL 

Minimum re quire m e nts 5 *0* levels, A levd En g li sh 
prefarodand good typing skills. S h o rthand and 
knowledge of telex osefuL Most be willing to train on 
wood processor and compmer. 

STARTING SALARY £7,000 

21 days holiday, BUPA. company pension scheme. 

Non-smoker preferred. 

Please send CV to> 

Genenl Petroleum & Mineral Services (CJL Lid), 
15 Kirigbtsbridge, London SW1X 7LY. 


kXlCUUVI WUKM. tor are 
•ooking for an nnwlmci P«r- 
eon wilt, mund acaMRttc 
McHtouund iqraduateTMo work 



PA/SCCaETMHES Canon SL 
£12 MO. preCR ibaring and 
BUPA. d r.peraton aennne 
working for the intmwttoiw! 
Deputy CN4 C«a4M at Out 
pmUgMMS tmeJtiuejil bank a 
working Ewwas background 
would 0* very ladU. You 
kbouU possess wod (eaytartw 
sfcUls together wm, pose and 
confMence. paroculary whan 
dealing with ktnportaiu cUaMs 
Age 22 SO. Bernadette of Bond 
SL Ot 639 1204. 


I1BIIII W04LO CzurKy reoulrea 
lunerawwawi wbh typmg and 

wwmnum. PosUbly WK- 

aato tor gra duate collego leaver- 
Phase ring Prawaa Ttonps Ud 
639 1331 


n o — Be n in mow 

sanaard ictulml Mr translat- 
ing/ uamrU wom for 
company tondi- 
today: inttmaBonai Secreurtra 
01-491 7100. 


Mseraornsr/an. awa. asc 

2I+. Herald and ETC 

Kiev era. an advantage, bid 
wto train. ExceQeot letophon* 
manner raa rauai Tya ng 3B 
want. Smart otnrr and friend- 
ly non. Tog ratory. Tec Mrs. 
Prosser. Betoraita (Licensed 
Amr.l 789 7488. 

CRT uijdAO. + !P. law Se 
„ne .Ternary fee urge Finance 
Company In work al Olreetar 
irvrl. X tram to Wang, rusiv 
s/H, fun PA ddm Sunrr Jew 
Call Jane on Ot SJgSffllNme 
lor aaenWiMII. CrrO eenotoy- 

mn 1 1 agmry. 

EFTCteMT SECaCTAITT PA 

Good skiK3 and abtncy io deal 
with aditumsiratran of hreoe 
and ranany expanding inienor 
dertwt be nm eas. SWIO. Must be ' 
nmdnie. enUnmstlc. non- 
smoker and filter. Tel 0635; 
46061 1 


in 


C.S9J0QQ + 
Young and Rvely team ot 
mayor pubSshmg 
cranpany is kx)king tor a 
bngW. enthusiastic 
secretary to work for 
one ot tbeir executives. 
Accurate typing and a 
good working 
knowedge of German 
and French are required. 
Short han d would be 
useful. 

25 days holiday! 


International 
k-iL \ Secretaries 

*Jy orSTnoT*^- 


A HOEMN OT A BOSS cCiaOOO. 
Heart fen pin man nartner of 
wHI known property co for PA 
to replace M& present one who 
H Man >o (ravel round toe 
world. Will involve and dele- 
gate an be can and toere w a 
dianra to accompany bun 
aramd propertied. Furfy SH 
adeousie Aga 22*. Contort 
Stuart WUUwm 689 0Q95 Mer- 
nUg Scoc Rerndnnm. 


PART-TUNE Mon Cram. Fifl 
nun. Marketing Dtteeior needs 
a Sec. with good *w»o to run 
•nan nut my mkv Exp. in 
marketing cmnnnmem an an- 
taniage iMAMnwr or euerintf 
Dm DO) essential. Low or In- 
\«v«nrni. 24 tin a week. 
Salary nog £4.60 an Bora. Can 
Jotin Donafdaon « Tertnen LM 
Ot 736 9610 unay reply on 
Ainoi. 




expanding 
protassionai company 
seeks a wea educated 

receptionist for their 
very smart new offices 
In central London. 
Switeri board experf- 
^tetoJ^Age 

Meredith Scott 
Recruitment 

1 7 Jtra A, fata BOY IM 
Tet Ob MJ I034/00SS J 


BIG BANG BALL 


HELP WANTED 
NOW 

01-8341002 


W EcekMon Squwa. SWI 


STEPPING 




40 wpm needed for »a> 
hrady flna m daimd sanra- 


Tefc AaiaM 
01 235 5842 






CHALLEHGE 

up-maticet SU oper- 
Onr taotang lor semsong 
tes of parsonaRiy for 
cwdwHteu coamna and m- 
rap. Iraargsti n g 
ccmbtaaitafj wtth beta aatary 
c o mm&kta n. Age 25 + 
stfng and French an 

ZSrigt&SSSZSi 

gWto.ato-ee. 


“™ta NECOnATOK 83-30 
PWireg by EMM* Agency in 
SW1. toceuigenL smart app ua - 
«e. hunanvg and drwng 
MWien rewnred. Non esom- 

s££!L orr%om M apwy. 

negonagie. oi (ra 
1467. Coalra. w 


PAST TIME VACANCIES 


HAfBwimoKxccunvc.PAu 
Chairman ol nmaU epeciaBsed 

company wni, btoe cMv cU*m» 

in enoatruction tenRry vxpon 
ana u K. I8>2a nows weetay. 
could be tern, tone only. WW 
Gordon Carter. P.O. Box 213- 
London swi. 











































need bailing out 



imioNi 

... i- . 

" p 


' *•*' iVnw* 

1 * f all* \ f 

1 a i « -S H«V 
' ; NTbi 

TP 


EMANUEL 

•• ’-V^Sjwresrfr 

• • t.r.vioffoe, 

•icr-nescr 

r - : *. ••*.p Piact 

v 1- * ’ 1*^1 be "sr 
»•■••• * ■■•■ reU 

H-629 5569 S 


E YOUR FREKG 
ex 1 2000 

... - -;t '•?*#'• ’»‘ 

-.• - r - •• 


*KTHO*Of EYTOM. From** (Ml 
on urn* i28‘r"*x 24‘ ■ “i _ 
Tuscany Beach Some, jczjj oo. 
OS 668 9171 after 7pm. 


nm CCMT ruir Imom Rimlan 
dyrd ermine VGC. Vaturt ai 
£2.61X1. accent X.1 XXX). 0386 


VIDEO BARGAIN Full remote 
control 1987 iioeo player 
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cowranuurs 1972 rotnu 

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two bedroom garden ftai. l rmn 
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ID) or Ol 679 7053 irves) 
FLATMATES Srtrrmr Sharing. 
UiHi esiab Introductory vfYKe. 
Phf tel for appe 01589 5491. 
315 Brnmpkn Pood. SW3 
MUNOTON com unable room, 
week day lei £40 pw e*cl 
phone. Wlb Plot raalorr per- 
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SMM. M/f. D/R. Beaut Lux 
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Ctrl Tel. 01-751-7765 IOJ Ol- 
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W HAMPSTEADr 24+. prof o/j. 
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flat CTO p.w. SUM IxzaxvEM- 
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BATTERSEA 2 Prof n/» lor date 
room In pteasanl Hat £35 per 
person p w 627 3093 Mrvn) 
CHtSWfCK gufet prof. Edwardian 
Hw. O/R. Nr Tube. N/S. 
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CROUCH END NS near 2 tubes/5 
lut»o dure home, own room. 
£40 pw nwlusne. 348 5260. 
EARLSRELB 2 prof M/F share 
rm Lux me. AD mod com ™ 
DW each. 870 7816(6.30 pan. I 
FEMALE 22 reoulm O/R lo 
*hare house/ Hat. male/ female. 
Central £40 PW. 01-603 BOBS. 
KKSHOATE Aitrarute sunny rm. 
Stsanom arrom for I prof pen 
nr lube C43 EmI. 883 5290 
HOTSPUR PARK. M/F n/s. air 
to share rh Itw S mtm B B 
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NX. done rity. Large room, own 
bathroom Prof n/s. Mon/ FT1. 
C4S Lnr 226 2466. 

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bathroom. Pro) N/S. Mon/ Frt. 
£45 Mir 226 2466. 

PARSONS GREEN SWB Ootrl 
b/mi + kit ch. onv. md. 
£4Spw Tel: Ol 878 6800 
SLOAHC AVE Young prof F to 
share fully lam. uunttyZbedaa 
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MUSICAL 




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SWL Second Door £MMly fla£ 
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roam. 3 beds. I wmn mpb 
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houses lo rent in kntghtmnage. 
Chelsea and Kensington CT) 



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Less Una a roooth before the 
seleeDoa trials cwameoce at 
Fremantle, the Ametioui sju- 
dkne bosses are lealizjng too 
batr Hut oothoqt comes free in 
this world. At a recent meeting, 
held in New York, between the 
cUfengiBK syndicates, all six 
US crews reported a serious 
shortage of finds. 

“The race for sponsorship is 
as competitive ns the race for 


ing director of Dennis Conner's 
Santiago group, said. Both his 
syndicate and that representing 
the New York Yacht Clob report 
a $4 mil lion shortfall in their 
SIS million budget. Chicago's 
Heart of America challenge 
requires a further $2.7 mUlioa to 
cover its S7 milli ng spending 
plans and the Golden Gate 
giwWwig * of Sag Francisco has 
so far raised only $43 million 
towards its S7 miftioa budget. 

Foods are so short in the 
Courageous camp that Leonard 
Greene, the syndicate's boss, 
was forced to cancel plans to 
bn3d a rep la cement for their 11- 
year-old boat. Now, all are left to 
ponder on what they might have 
received bad each syndicate 
been more commercial in its 
outlook. 

Last February Philip Morris 
pnt throagfa a proposal offering 
the sit syndicates more than S4 
mill no providing they partici- 
pate m a regatta on the west 
coast. Last month the ofler of Si 
million by American Express 
was summarily withdrawn after . 
two of the syndicates objected to 
the proposal worked oat with the 
US Yacht Raring Union to 
distribute the funds on a perfor- 
mance related basis. 

Britain's Royal Thames 
Yacht Chib group may have set 
their rights much lower, but 
having beaten their £5 mUtion 
target, the team most now be in a 
better financial state than those 
high-spending groups now 
forced to make significant cat- 
backs just as the Cop races 
begin. 

• One eminently sensible 
change to come out of the 
issttfaR of syndicate heads ia 
New York was the agreement 
that crews who fall overboard 
may now be picked np by the 
robber support boat instead of 
waiting for their yacht to round 
np am) return. 

Five crews went for an un- 
expected swim during the 12- 
metre world championship off 
Fremantle last February and it 
is still a wonder none were 
injured In the meKe as the 25- 
ton yachts crashed roand the 
marks jast feet apart. 


SPEEDWAY 


The support boats are now 
allowed to more in immediately 
lo pluck the hapless crew mem- 
bers on! of the water bat most 
then rent off their engines and 
drift unto the 12 -mrtrc con- 
cerned returns for the pick op- 

• Wbo did develop the wins 
keel concept that won the Cap 
for Australia? Was it the 
brainwave of Australia II de- 
** — > Ben Lcxcen. the test task 




model basin (NSMBj. as the 
New York Yacht Club members 
befieve.ornas it JoopSboC.tbe 
scientist working with the Dutch 
aerospace laboratory? 

In a book entitled Kee lh au le d, 
which is pnblisbcd this week, 
the American journalist. Doag 
Riggs, has set the cat am on gst 
the pigeons by giving the credit 

loSlooL 

The story has received an 
immediate riposte from Dr Peter 
van Oossanen, director of re- 
search at the ship model basin, 
who says in a telex sent to the 
publishers, Stanford Maritime: 
“He only carried out computer 
calculations on a sub contract 
basis and bad no knowledge of 
the fall extent of the research 
work carried out at the NSMB. 
It is an to justice to l hr work 
carried out by Lrxcen and 
NSMB that ibis book should 
rotate around the role played by 
Sloof w bo even today Lx claiming 
it was all bis brainwave." 

Wing keels aside. Riggs’s 
book, which traces all the under- 
hand actions that have occurred 
since the schooner America first 
won the “100 Guinea Cup" in 
1851, provides a good read, 
sen ing the scene for another 
round of chicanery at Perth. 

• The Britons earned another 
psychological boost this week 
from two informal races against 
South Australia and Dennis 
Conner's newly arrived Stars 
and Stripes. Crusader I shared 
the honours with South Austra- 
lia, with both boats leaving the 
Sandtogo saDars well in their 
wake In the light conditions that 
prevailed. 

• Dates for the diary. 

Ch — on gtf o h wl npt ta n Mat niat naaMt 
■Mb aaitaa. OflotarMO; towoliwid 
robin Mfioa, Nowmbor 2-1fc thW round 
robin Mhoa, Donator 2-19. Loots 
VuKton Cup: SaniMkiato. Oocwnbor 28- 
Januaiy 7; finals. January 13-23. Ds- 
fa n e a btats: Brat imaid robin aauaa. 
Oetobar 18-30; Mcond round robin 
aaiiu. Nowobar g-21; MM round robin 
Sanaa, Dac a mbar 2-20; Sana- fi d s. 
Dacambar 26-Jaruary 8: Da f anda r cap 
final, January 14- 25. Amartoa's Cup 


float, January 14-2S. America's Cup 
neat. January 31-Fobruary 15. 

Barry Pickthall 


■auxnponr/ 

for a teUUw brand ex- 09 
Company DinxEor mftt 40's. 
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_ n Harvest of 
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grapes 

By Keith Macklin 

Outbursts of auger from vol- 
atile riders are nothing new 
amid the fierce tensions of the 
world championship. However, 
Hans Nielsen’s victory in Po- 
land last Saturday was marred 
by a bitter explosion from 
Tommy Knudsen. and com- 
ments from the deposed cham- 
pion. Erik Gundersen, which 
smacked more than a little of 
sour grapes. 

Nielsen's failure to beat 
Gundersen in the post two finals 
has been attributed to bis lack of 
“devil", an ultimate unwilling- 
ness to take borderline risks on 
crucial bends. There is little 
doubi that Ivan Mauger, the six- 
times world champion who was 
his pits adviser last Saturday, 


By Conrad Voss Bark 



iTTiilitli -j *1 [•)# 1 


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Nielsen did. and in the 
controversial fifteenth heat, 
Knudsen crashed, his bike injur- 
ing the Italian rider, Armando 
Castag n a. When Knudsen was 
blamed, and excluded by the 
referee from the re-run. he blew 
his top at the referee, and laid 
the blame for the incident on 
Nielsen. 

Such altercations are not un- 
known at this level, but Knud- 
sen says that without the spill he 
would have won the heat and 
gone on to take the title. There 
may be a small amount of 
sympathy for Knudsen and for 
the Swedish referee who had to 
make a hairline decision. There 
will be less sympathy for 
Gundersen. who took defeat 
ungraciously, criticizing 
Nielsen's riding tactics in a 
classic example of the pot calling 
the kettle Mack. 

Nielsen himself is happy 
enough to have won al last, and 
like all winners can afford to 
shrug off the complaints of the 
losers. He will now move up The 
money bracket and his success 
also means a financial boost for 
the Bradford promoter, Alan 

Ham. 

The proposal to make the 
world individual final a two-day 
event in The Netherlands next 
year is getting a mixed recep- 
tion. The school of thought is 
that a two-day event will build 
up the excitement over a longer 
period and increase gate in- 
.come. But many riders believe 
that a championship spread 
over two days will kill off the 
sudden death excitement of a 
single meeting, an essential fac- 
tor in attracting a speedway 
crowd 


Ministry officials have gone 
away in a sober mood after befog 
told by regional authorities in 
En g land and Wales of the havoc 
caused by agricultural pollution 
on salmon and sea trout rivets. 
Latest reports come from Wales 
where fish mortality from farm 
wastes have increased dramati- 
cally since the mid-1970s. Many 
major rivers and numerous 
tributaries have lost nultioas of 
fish and fish eggs. 

It is impossible to quantify the 
total losses hot a Welsh fishery 
scientist, Mr G T James, ia the 
latest report of the Atlantic 
Salmon Trust, gives details of 
many thousands of fish killed in 
numerous rivers daring the past 
few years. 

One slurry discharge from a 
form killed an estimated 5,100 
salmon, 120 sea trout, and 
17,000 brown trout. Last year a 
tributary of the Teifi suffered a 
fish kill along a 45-k3oaietre 
stretch at the height of the 
salmon and sea trout spawning 
season from a discharge of the 
fungicide, sodium penta 
chloropbenale, inadequately 
stored at a disused mushroom 
farm. 

“There is no doubt that 
sahnonid spawning areas have 
been seriously affected. If not by 
background pollution, then by 
sporadic larger discharges of 
shorter duration. Some tribu- 
taries of major rivers do not 
support fish life whilst others 
sustain reduced stocks. Lower 
levels of pollution, whilst not 
causing fish mortalities, can 
affect a stream's plant and 
animal life and render it nnsnit- 
able {» fish to survive." 

Publicity campaigns and ad- 
rice to fonners have inaensed 
bat "il has been consistently 
emphasized that it is a pref- 
erence of the Authority (Welsh 
Water) to co-operate whenever 

possible with formers laced with 
problems rather than to in- 
stigate legal proceedings." How- 
ever, Mr James says a "new 

tough policy" is bring brooght in 
this year. Whether this means 
that more farmers are likely to 
be prosecuted for polluting the 
rivers is by no means dear. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


TAKE THE OFF to Pom. Am- 
Uordam. BnmMs. Bruges. 
Omni Some. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne Jk Dieppe. Time Off 2a. 
- Gtmter CKnr. London. SWIX 
7RQ. 01 238 8070 

m—gnuL and cam c*n«- 

ah* Marti nun and 
mrtnmbwlDi prholepool. In 
seciodw location aiati 6ept- 
OCt. . 01 724 7776, plays 
H«Moi AMI 2136. 


108% mortgages available op to 

tioiuno 

He evide nce of income requfred for 
leans ep to £2504108 for qwflfyfog 
Applicants 

MIRAS facBly available over £30,000 
Re-mortgages for tpiaflfytag purposes 

Ring 01-235 0691 

For full Information 
Open until 8pm today 

Wmkworth 
Financial Services ' 

25n Motcomb Street y 

London SW1 A 


CRICKET 
Britannic Assumes 
county tnftiiHHOftMim- 

t ll.O to &30 . 110 overs rolnwminn} 

IERBY: Derbyshire v North- 
amptonshire 

CARDIFF: Glamorgan v Nott- 
inghamshire 

FOLKESTONE: Kent v Warwick- 
shire 

THE OVAL: Surrey v Glouc- 
estarehire 

WORCESTER: Worcestershire v 
Somerset 

AndeChaflenge fll. 0 , 50 overs) 
SCARBOROUGH: Hampshire v 
Yorkshire 

Socond XI championship 
Ch oen if o ro. ES6QX « MldCMrowg Of lin t: 

OtottoMurstoBvDeroysmraiSoraiHnip* 
tan HampoMra v SarowsBC OM TnftoRt 
Lancashire v Kant; Fd g bixMiu Warwick- 
shire vYorhxhra. 

FOOTBALL 

FA CUP: lY a finfin iy round re pla y 
B o ktowm St Mkhaal » Oktawkitard (6-0). 
camiAL UMsaua fw dhtem: W 


Md Wed V Derby (701 Socond dvlaiOK 
Pon Vais v texs easily (7.0). 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Futtorn v 
Chartton (2.0). 

NENE OTOUP UNITED COUNTIBS 
LEAGUE: Pramtar dtatoint Anwhtl v 
Kwrewaarc Long Buck&y v Woooon: 


Nonfa m pton Somcor v Rauixte. 
MACBM SOUTH WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Cwdltf v Het«hrt (3.01 
SOUTH EAST COUNTHS LEAGUE: Sac* 
and dtafrioR Brisrt Hovers v Luton (7J9; 
TotJBrtmn v Boumomoutti &&■ 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
STONES BrrrptCHAMPKINSHIfoLfrtii 
V WBmngton {7 JO). 

OTHER SPORT 

CflOQUEt: Cholmian's Salvor (South- 
port); SpeiKer-EH Cup (Budreuh 
Sateioti), PrasKtanfa Cup (Huriingharn): 
Cr uB tn ha n Tournament 
EQUESTRUUBSM: Burghtoy Norm T rtata. 
QOLft woman s Homo mamataorais 
fWhwtag han Ba rrscfcs QCjt Womwi'a 
ffSC** 1 Ww 

POWERBOAT RAON& Guamsay. 
SOUASH RACKETS: WantogtonlfBitallofl 
toumamont (Warrington SpSrs du^, 




















































































34 


SPORT 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


RACING: CARSON AND EDDERY TAKE RIDING HONOURS WITH TREBLE APIECE 


Come On Chase Me to complete treble 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 

When it is time to review 
this Flat racing season much 
will be made of the extremely 
successful beginning by the 
first-season sire Sharpo. and 
rightly so. 

While such a last animal is 
automatically expected to get 
fast two-year-olds himself it is 
not always the case, as any 
breeder will testify. The feel 
that Sharpo has done so is a 
bonus for English breeders, 
especially since his influential 
sire. Sharpen Up. is now 
resident on the Gainesway 
Farm in the heart of 
Kentucky. 

When he was retired to 
Lord Derby's Woodland Stud 
in Newmarket at the end of 
the 1982 season Sharpo was 
syndicated for £20.000 a 
share. Now. following the 
impact made by his first crop 
of runners this season, shares 
arc currently trading at four 
times their flotation value. 

Although he ended his rac- 
ing career in a blaze of glory by 
winning the Prix de L’Abbaye 
at Longchamp on Arc Day. 
and with it the European 
sprinters' crown. Sharpo ba- 
sically made his name by 
winning the William Hill 
Sprint championship three 
limes in a row at York. 

Only Tag End had ever 
achieved that feat and that 
was in the late twenties and 
early thirties when the race 
was' still known as the 
Nunthorpc Stakes. 

Now. in napping Come On 
Chase Me to win the Sha Tin 
Stakes at York this afternoon I 
am banking on the 
Knavcsmirc again having an 
electric effect, this time on one 
ofSharpo's first crop. 

While conceding that it is 
possible to argue that Crofter's 
Cline. Abuzz and Baltic Shore 
have all put up slightly better 
performances this season I am 
swayed by the feet that Come 
On Chase Me. is fresher and 
probably more open, to 
improvement. 

For when he was successful 
at Lingfield midway through 
last momh Jimmy 
Elherington's colt was having 
his first race for ten weeks and 
only his third in alL 

Living up to his name, he 
led his rivals, who were no 
slow coaches themselves, a 
merry dance from the start 



Delayed Cauthen 
misses sauna and 
first-race winner 


By Michael Seely 


The blinkered Cree Bay, seen here edging out Gold Prospect and Chummy's Pet at Ascot, is in action at York (5-0) 


and won by three lengths, 
virtually unchallenged. 

Caught in that sort of form, 
on ground that he will relish. 
Come On Chase Me could 
prove very hard to peg back 
even for Abuzz, who won 
nicely at Newbury last time. 

In ' the Gimcrack Stakes, 
Baltic Shore finished one 
place ahead of Crofters Cline 
in seventh and eighth po- 
sitions. respectively. Today 
Baltic Shore has a 5 lb 
advantage. 

Crofters Cline, on the other 
hand, will be ridden for the 
first time by Pat Eddery. With 
due respect to Julie Bowker. 
who has done absolutely noth- 
ing wrong on the colt so far. 
Eddery is a champion and 
Jimmy Wilson is calling on his 
expertise to advise with the 
future in mind. 

My feeling remains that 
Eddery's best chance today 
lies with North Ocean in the 
Kowloon Maiden Stakes. A 
close third in a handicap at 
Newmarket last lime. North 
Ocean looks marginally better 
than Willie Carson's mount. 
Usfan. 

The ground, which is ex- 


pected to ride on the soft side 
of good, should enable Aco- 
nitnm to get his head in front 
at long last in the Dubai 
Handicap. It was here in July 
that he got nearest to winning 
this season when runner-up to 
Dorset Cottage. Since then he 
has run well to finish fourth at 
Goodwood and fifth at 
Newbury, in what I regard as 
better races. 

John Reid, his jockey, who 
is enjoying such a good sea- 
son. is hoping to win the Hong 
Kong Marlboro Cup as well as 
on Eastern Song, who along 
with the recent course winner 
Manton Dan, has an undeni- 
able chance. 

In this instance, (hough, I 
just prefer Padre Pro, who was 
dearly taking on something a 
bit special at Ripon where he 
was runner-up to Catherine's 
Well in the Great St Wilfred 
Handicap. 

French triumph 

Premiere Cavee, trained in 
France by Jonathan Pease, 
thwarted Tarib's attempt, to 
become the sixth consecutive 
English-trained winner of the 
group three Goldene Peitsche 
(6ft at Baden-Baden yesterday. 


Tuck equals Gilbert’s 
27-year-old record 


- Phfl Tack yesterday equalled 
Johnny Gilbert's 27-year-old 
record for the most consecutive 
jumping victories when Doroni- 
enm won the Rating Piost Handi- 
cap Hurdle at SOUTHWELL. 
Bat Easter Brig, an odds-on 
chance to help Tncfc take the 
record outright, finished a dis- 
appointing fifth in the the 
Gorerton Handicap Hurdle. 

Donxncnm, who had already 
featured in Tack's run, over 
fences, was his tenth win in a 
row, a sequence started on 
Aognst 23 at Qclmel. Whereas 
Gilbert achieved his record over 
hurdles only. Tuck included 
three steeplechase victories 
among his 10; Gilbert compiled 
his record in a 1 23-day period hot 
Tack took only 12 days to eqnal 
it. 

Both Dorotricmn and Easter 
Brig are trained by Gordon 
Richards, who has provided 
Tuck with all of his 10 winners. 
Doronicnm tracked Prince 
Metternicb until taking up the 
running at the seventh flight. He 
then shook off the challenge of 
Cider Spy and strode dear to 
win by five lengths. 


Easter Brig and Locyiet were 
10 lengths dear of the field at 
one stage in the final event bat 
Easter Brig weakened from four 
flights oat with the race even- 
tually going to Mister Pitt. 

At BATH, Pat Eddery com- 
pleted a 12-1 treble on Northern 
Amethyst, Easter Lee and 
TafaillatD bring his total tor the 
season to 142. And his perfor- 
mance on Northern Amethyst 
had the most hardened of pro- 
fessionals gasping in 
admiration. 

In the early stages of the 
Pennsylvania Maiden Stakes, 
Eddery had only three of his 19 
rivals behind him and he was on 
the ontside going the longest 
way roand. He had advanced to 
about tenth at halfway and by 
the time be had threaded the 
favourite through the field. Ad- 
mirals All was dear and looked 
impossible to catch. 

Even then Eddery sat quiet 
and suddenly inside the final 
fnrjUmg Northern Amethyst 
quickened for him to cat down 
the leader and win on the line by 
ahead. 


The chaotic: nature of 
Britain's motorway system, in 
the summer highlighted Steve 
Cauthcn's weight' problems at 
York yesterday. . 

Although the 'roigning cham- 
pion arrived at . the track at I -20. 
in time to take, the mount on 
Lucky Stone in the opening 
Avondale New Zealand Stakes 
at 2.0. the jockey's customary 
visit to the course sauna to shed 
the accessary poundage was 
made impossible. 

Cauthcn’s hand luck was John 
Reid's good fortune and this is 
the second lime ft has happened 
at York this season. - 

The super sub. who came in 
for the mount on Triptych in the 
Matchmaker-. International at 
i he Ebor meeting when Yves 
Saint-Marlin missed his aircraft 
from Deauville, rode his 44th 
winner of the campaign when 
driving Lucky Stone past the 
post a length in front of 
Momcrana. . . 

Reid. looking forward to good 
rides on Double Schwarz in the 
Vernons Sprint Cup at Hay dock 
on Saturday, and on Park 
Express in the Phoenix Cham- 
pion Stakes in Dublin on Sun- 
day. said:. “Things are going 
pretty well. 1 only hope it lasts." 

Explaining the situation: a 
spokesman for the stewards 
said: ‘‘Cauthen rang the course 
from his car. and told us that he 
* might not get here in time, and 
that in any event he would have 
to put up overweight. As he had 
made every effort to get here, we 
allowed a jockey substitution to 
be made after declaration time. 
But -we told John Spouse. Clive 
Brittain's assistant, that we 
would have to fine the trainer a 
statutory £25." That seems a 
splendid example of illogicality, 
to say the least. 

Cauthen. who was riding 
regularly at 8st 61b earlier in the 
year, was required to do 8SL 81b 
on Lucky Stone. “I bad to ride 
work at Newmarket this 
morning," be said. “And then 
all the way up the A1 there were 
cars going 20 miles an hour in 
the fast lane. So I would have 
had no time to go in the sweat 
box to take off the necessary 
half-a-pound." he concluded 
cynically. 

The jockey's . misfortunes 
continued in the Sun Life of' 
Canada Garrowby Stakes when 
Willie Carson brought Sultan 
Mohamed with a well-timed run 
to beat Cauthen on the front- 
running Enbarr. 

The winner collected a 51b 
penalty for the Cambridgeshire, 
the weights for which were 


published yesterday. Sultan 
Mohamed has been allotcd 8 st 4 
lb. Siwah Katem and Patriarch, i 
two of John Dunlop's other 
entries, have been given lQst lib 
and 8st 131b. respectively. 

"We're going to have to think 
about it before we make any 
film plans." said Tony Couch, 
the Arundel trainer's assistant. 
Haricstonc Lake. Dunlop's re- 
cent easy Ostend winner.- has 
been made favourite for the 
Ccsarcwich at 1 6-1 with only 7st 
91b to shoulder. 

Lad brake's have TremWanL 
last year's 'winner. Star Cutter, 
and Power Bender as their joint 
favourites for the first leg of the 
autumn double at 16-1. Luca 
Cumani. that noted big handi- 
cap expat, has Ai Bashaami on 
the 7st 121b mark. “The colt is a 
likely runner.” said the trainer 
at his home in Newmarket- . 


athletics 

Moses is 
out of 
grand prix 
final 

From Fat Bntcho’ 
Athletics Correspondent 
Lausanne 

Ed Moses's last chance of 
breaking his 400 metres hurdles 
world record in Europe this year 
will be in London tomorrow 
week. Because, in a move which 
will shock the organizers and 
sponsors. Moses has withdrawn 
from the Mobil Grand Prix 
Final in Rome next Wednesday. 

The ostensible reason for 
Moses's withdrawal from a 
meeting, towards which.be has 
avowedly been working all sea- 
son, is. according to his man- 
ager. Gordon Baskin, the 
cancellation of the 400 metres 


Coarse specialists 

YORK 

TRAMERS: N Vigors 6 vrtnnors tram 20 
runners. 300%; J Dunlop 28 front 100. 
28.D%i H Cecl 26 from 95, 27.4%. 
JOCKEYS: fta Eatery S8 wtnmro tram 
294 rides. 19.7%; W Caraon 52 from 287, 
1 8.1%i W R Swinbum 27 from 1S2. 167%. 

WORCESTER 

TRAWR&R Hotter 17 wfcmra from GO 
runner s. 283%; L Kernnrd 23 from 99. 
23-2% J Jenkins 2B from 118. 20.0%. 
JOCKEYS: S Sherwood 17 winners from 
48 rttM. 354%; P Scudamore 35 from 
204. 17.2%; H Davies 27 from 178. 122%. 


Cumani went on to say that 
Then Again, bis recent winner of 
the Waterford Crystal Mile, 
would not now be aimed at 
Ascot's Queen Elizabeth II 
Stakes. “The new plan is to go 
for the Challenge Stakes ai 
Newmarket ana then the 
Breeder’s Cup mile , 

After Cash Asmussen had 
finished unplaced on Majaahed 
in the Cambridgeshire ural the, 
French champion jockey said:' 
“I've had io turn down the rides 
on Triptych and Marouble in 
Ireland over the weekend. I shall 
be at Longchamp on Sunday, 
when I've got six good rides." 

The 26-year-old Dakota-born 
rider then outlined his plans for 
the rest of the season. “I shall be 
based in France until after the 
Japan Cup on November 23. I'll 
then return to the States for the 
winter before going to Tipperary 
to take up my new job- with 
Vincent O'Brien in March." 

The riding honours of the 
afternoon belonged to Willie 
Carson. The dynamic Scotsman 
proceeded to show us exactly 
why he has. been champion five 
timesby landing a 90-1 treble on 
Sultan Mohamed. Great Aspect, 
and Entrancing. 


YORK 


Going: good to soft 
Draw: 5f-6f low nun 


Style (8-8} at Newmarket 
3rd to New Attitude 
NORDAVANO (8-8) 
MtwmarkeUEarfer 


numbers best on soft ground 
2.45 KOWLOON MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £3,479: 1m) (10 runners) 

101 0-23282 tOGICST PEAK (B)(W Du Pom III] G PntdanMSonlon W — GtMMMO 
m 00-00 UESUTMOOHE (GMoorfi) R Amtstrcng 9-0 SCattmT 

.... - ■» --- PHEddwrrA 

JlMdl 


good. July 8. 10 
SefectKffiN 


Bar 0-0)1 

■rani I 
NORDAVANO 


nedc2nd n Glory Forever (9-0) on the same course 


1W 

105 

106 
107 

toe 

in 

112 

113 


00-00 UEWTMOOftE iG Mdocb) R Anrrstrcrig 9-0 

■ 3030 NORTH OCEAN (USA) (S Frnftoft) L Cunanl 90 ■ 
203402 SURE LANDING {Safesbtxy Famrs LteJ C Nafcson 9-tM 

m K2 USFAN (USA) (Prwce A A FasaQ J Dunlop 94) 

|H. FORM (h) iStaMi Mohammed) 0 Dotueft 94) ._ 


W canons 


00 VITAL I 

0 CONCORDES DEHON (USA) (J Duffel) G Hotter (f-11. 

0-00 SCENTED SILENCE (USA) (J Duffel) G Huffer 0-1 1 . 

002 SKEAM (BFlfVra J ChanOter) G Harwood B-1 1 

0-33420 STICKY GREBC (USAMOF) (R Sangsnr)B Mis 8-fl Bltaant 

9-2 Usfan. 3-1 Noun Ocean. 4-1 Sticky Groom. 8-1 Highest Peek, 
8-1 Sure Landing. 12-1 others. 


FORM: HIGHEST PEAK (8-81 II . 

. NORTH OCEANgW) 


Rtpan 2nd to Hamper (8-6) on Satwtey (1m If App. 
iAN (9-2)2VH3fd to Roman Beadi (9-31 at Newmarket 
(81. £4006. good. Aug 23, 8 ran). SURE LANDING (Ml 41 2nd ra No Restraint (8-11) at 
fm App ce, £1315. good to firm, Aug 20. to ran). USFAN (8-7) head 2nd to 


£1143. soft. 14 rani I 


4^5 PEAK HANDICAP (£3.366: 1m Bf) (12) 

402 411-400 BACKCHAT (USAMD) (K AbcUb) G Harwood 43-11— NON-RUNNER 3 

403 220310 DUAL VBmlRE (A Soutsorf John Fttzgvakl 4-94 J Raid 12 

404 231010 WASSL REEF (State) Ahmed A!Maktoum)J Dunlop 887. — W Canon 4 

405 003434 REVISIT ffl) (RGmanM WH«r404_j = WHSuMbomS 

408 0-02000 NAFTXjOS (C apt M UMKS)C Brtttafcl 4^3 PfloMmao2 

407- 134011 WESSEX (ftiOnJa Thoroughbreds B Lttt) N Tinkler 4-8-13 _ Wm r«kf#r6 

408 144133 UEH WAIT (W Du Pont «t)G Wlcfrarfi-Gonton 38-11 GDuRMdl 

409 0/08004 LUHNA7E(J Routes) J Leigh 50-10 : —9 

411 040424 TRESfOOER (BF) Mppocrorao Racing) M W EaatBfby 4-8-8— G Carter (3) 7 

412 104000 ROS1HBMEJ0) (Mrs NNUtuqK Stone 4«0 LChemochl 

414 11-0000 PAItfS SSTER (Mse B Dujdbuiy) C Thornton 5-7-13 J Low* 11 

416 200040 LOSTOPFORTUNnr (Sheik Mohamed AISatsrnjBHanbury 3-7-7 R Fax 10 

4-1 Ue In Wait. 9-2 Dual Ventre, 8-1 Wesat Reef. 8-1 Naflftn. Wessex, 
10-1 Rewst 12-1 Lurntnate, Tresttder. 14-1 others. 


good to firm, Aug 2d 10 rani USFAN (8-71 head 2n 
. £959. good to ram. Aug 12. 7 ran). CONCORDE'S 
tcafy Better (8-11) at Bath (8L £1031. good to soft. 


Yarmouth ( 

Coaces (9-0) at . . 

MON (8-1 1) 51 debut 2nd to Baacaly Bettor (8-11) at Bath (# 

25. 22 ran) SCENTED SILENCE (8-11) iv,l Goodwood 2nd to Damgttoone (8-11) 
£2070. good. Aug 22. 9 ran) STICKY GREENTa best effort a Newbury 2t 2nd to Local 
Silver when m receipt of 3tb (Bf. £3854, good to farm. July 12 12 ran). 

: USFAN 


York selections 

By Mandarin 

2.45 North Ocean. 3. IS Aconitum. 3.50 Hcndeka. 4.25 Lie In Wait. 
5.0 Padre Pio. 5.30 COME ON CHASE ME (nap). 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.45 North Ocean. 3,15 Atoka. 3.50 Hcndeka. 4.25 Revisit. 5.0 
Elnawaagi. 5.30 Bailie Shore. 

By Michael Seely 

2.45 North Ocean. 4.25 Naftilos. 5.0 MANTON DAN (nap). 

3.15 DUBAI HANDICAP (£3,334: 1m If) (8) 

202 00*033 GUNDREOA (BF) (Mss M Camngton-SmOi) C Bnttui 4-9-7 G Hoorn 2 

M3 300240 ACONITUM (J GatvanoralJ Bethel 5-9-7 J Rate 3 

204 831300- KftlARY BAY (R GonwsafflN Tattler 4-9-6. . . PM Eddery 7 

2to 113*30 ATOKA (GER) (D) (R Kasetowskyt John FscGeraU 4-9-1 R HRs 5 

210 1-02000 ROMANTIC (WCLE(PCocfcroftl H Wharton 39-1 JH Brown (5) 4 

211 30 0104 EXCLUSIVE NORTH f ‘ ‘ 

213 (HM3&8 TRY HARDER ( 

215 0-00000 RUSSEU. I 

<1-4 Exclusive North. 7-2 Gundreda. 5-1 Atoka. 6-1 Try Hamer, 8-1 Acoraun, 
10-1 Kflary Bay. 12-1 Roma/foc Unde. 14-1 Rusaee Creek. 



hmd at Goodwood; previously (7-7) a 
tom, June 17. 16 ran). 

Selection: PATH'S SI STE R 

SO HONG KONG MARLBORO CUP (Hancficap: £16,596: 6f) (13) 

501 002110 HANHSTAR (p) (S Brewwr) P Make) 6 9-10— Pat Eddery 10 

503 004104 OUR JOCK (D) (Uni McAIpkie) R Smyth 4-9-4 WCmantt 

505 3-11004 EUIAWAABI (IISA) (C-O) (Hamdan AlMekMum) HThomeon Jonw 38-2 _ 

A Monty 8 

506 2-201B1 HAHTDN DAM K Tuck) N Vigors 38-2 (7fltt P Cook 13 

507 ass 

. m ran 1 


509 

510 20-0131 eastern: 


1511 1-02002 PADRE no (D) (Me 

513 003210 SOLLY'S CHOICE (USAMM 

514 030000 VH.TASHn)U MnhaQjl 

■ r niii 1 1 itfiri rm iteg 


(Mrs W Tueoch) C WWn 3*9 
" D Artuthnot 5-8-7 


WRSwHamS 

CtBpran) □ W CtUpnWn 5-83 - APraodY 
- 382 M Wood 2 


n<UM£iruic«oninnnana4-9 > > J n Brown pi • 

VE NORTH WSA)(B) (Dr CUIRAmotrong 398 __ SCawhenl 

OEH<C|(Af Bunoa LKOJMHRvFitzgerMd 38-11 MHNsB 

. CREEK (h Jaffa] C Boom 488 JMMhu»6 


FORM: GUNDREDA (8-12) M 3rd to Soto Styte (8-71 at Wohemampron (Tm If. good to 
Aug 251 Eaifnr (9-1) 2'il Newmarket 3rd to Power Bender (8-8) (1m 2f. £3844. 


soft 


Hr* 18-12) ai Sandown t 1m 2f. £8077. farm. JuJy 5. 9 ran). ATOKA (8-0) 9ih to Uy 
Generation (8-13) hare. Prewoualv (8-3) 41 3ro to MaAman 1 8 - 8 ) ai Goodwood wdh 
GUNDREDA (8-9) belwid 11m 21. £16466. Inn. Aug Z 1 1 ran) ROMANTIC UNCLE below 
bnlwnoMB-iOt (VM 2nd ro Dogmatic (9-6) a! Cftesrer (7t, C3960. soft. May B, 9 ran). 
TRY HARDER |8-1 3) 5’ jl 5Bi to Inah Passage (8-IJ at Tlursk \7l. E2939, good to fern. Aug 
2 9 ran) 

S election: GUNDREDA 

3£Q EBF SAUDI ARABIA STAKES (2-Y-O C & G: £4.428: 71) (8) 

an 

306 

.vs 

309 


516 018-302 CARELESS VMSPER (Lord Matthews) I Matthews 3-7-9 GDkdw»3 

517 00300 BOM ACCEWLW ROSS) H WTMig 3-7-7 .LB^oQ* 

518 OOOQOO HUE TWE8 (D) (W Bfey) W Beey 4-7-7 AWtane(T)» 

84 Eastern Song. 7-2 Manun Dan. 4-1 Our Jock. 8-1 Manimstar, 8-1 Croa Bay. 

10-1 Pedro Pto. 12-1 Elnawaagi. 18-1 Caretess Whisper. 20-1 others. 

FORM: OUR JOCK 
(9-1 II beheld (81. 

course and dsancem May when. . 

soft). MANT ON DA N (9-1) beat Respect (9-7) 41 hero (51, 

ranL SHARPETTO (9-3) 4Sil 60t to Joktst (82) at Yarmo 
ron). EASTERN SW4G (9-11) beet ZiAuKmght | 

vwiiaty (8-10) 41 3rd to AcusMa (8-7) at Phoenix 

26. 8 ran). PADRE PIO (8-11) 4) 2nd to Catherines We* (8-11) at 

CHOICE (9-1) 7HI away 6th and IDLETWtES (7-8)701 of 10 

SULLVS CHOICE (7-12) proviousiy beat Laune Lornwn (8SJ SIM . 

good. Aug 9. 9 rant CARBiss WMSPER (7-12) Yd courae and dntance 
Kfcy (9-4). w dh CREE BAY (»3) 8th Q(15 (£5431. good. Awg 19). 

SilwcilQn: EASTERN SONG 


It. good. Aug 23. 17 ran). BLNAWAAOT* best effort came over 
ttlwi (^7) 'AI winner frotn Pamaruds WeBs (7-t2) (good to I 
■) beat Respect (9-rt 41 hero (St. £3824. goo d to firm. Aug 20. 12 

■)4^l 68) to Jofcw (82) at Yarmouth (61. £3090, good, Aug27. 10 

ran). EASTERN SWG (9-11) beat Z>iuKmght(9<n II at BngMon^f. ftm. Aug B). Pnv 
(8-7) at Phoenix Park (Grain 5. fif. OR 13090. (pod. Ji*r 


&30 SHA TIN STAKES (2-Y-O: £6,128: 5f) (5) 

601 tmvro csonws CUNEJPKD tenstord) J WBscn M. 


311 HENDGKA (USAK01 iSheAh Mohammed) H Cm! 94 SCwrtfwnS 

010 PtINTA CALAHONDA (D) (□ FaUkneO N BycroR 9-1 DWchoHcT 

tt BENGAL F4RE (N Ph*)K| G Swum 811 CtamtMl 


602 

60t 


BOB 

609 


1TI041 
0310 BALTIC 


311 COME OR CHASE ME (B) (O Norvefo) . 
SlEL8Y(VSass»JOBrernanB-7 


1 6nttato8-13. 


Pal Eddery 1 
M Roberts 5 


^IlSfSSSmBOiUt Mahwined) M Stotfe HI 

w H smnoaniz 

JEmeHMKsi8-11 M Wood 3 

J canola 


311 

313 

3)4 

3(7 


CMOO DMewaWS mB ffPSY a May) □ Brarrnan B-1 1 ■ ... JCwmo a ( y 4 


00 HIGHLAND LA0U) ID Himwft) D Money 8-11 

34 NOROAVANO (USA) (B) (Bn lABammlM Jana 8-11 TNes7 

0 OH DANNY BOY (Mrs N Nacw) EWeymes8-It E Genet (3) 6 

0 TRY HOLS SUPPLES IH41 5 Sugobas Ltd) M C Oiapman 8-11 JHWWWS 
10-11 Hendeka. 100-30 Bengal Fee, 9-2 Nordavano, B-1 Oh Danny Boy. 
12-1 hhghiand Laad. 18-1 others. 

FORM: HENDEKA (9-3) pushed out to beat Random Rover 18-111 a neck at Goodwood 
(7f, £2558. good to fem. Aug 33. 11 ranL PU HTACALAHOtflIA (8-11) Slit 5th to Lack A 

York results 

(Mng: gooQ to nft 
a a 1 6 ft 1. LUCKY STONE M Rett. 7-lfc 
n. 3-1 ' 


5-4 crofter's Ckne. 5-2 Abun. M Baltic Shore. 8-1 Come On Chase Me. 
12-1 SWby 

' fm (8-4 VA at Newb ury (5f Ustod. £8897, good to 
end CROFTER'S CUNE »-0J 7th 
.TICSH 


) m The Omcrodt hero. Prawouaty BALI 

90. good. July 28. 10 ran). 


i (8-111 41 et Windsor (51 mdn, £990. 
fsathar held on by 1 VA from Beg O Rll) 

good. Aug 2. 13 ran). COME ON CKA^ ME (9-2) I 

ana Mandub (9-7) 3) at Ungfiett (51. £2034. good. Aug 16. 8 rani STELBY woe beaten 
last tone: earfaer (7-13} hea} 2nd to Get Or Gwaghty (8-5) at Newc as tle (61 auetoxt. 


at Newmarket (8t, £1 0098. 


£1427. good Aug 11, 8 rani 
Selection.- ABUZZ 


WORCESTER 


Going: Finn 
TM HARTLEBURY SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE 

{£677: 2m) (13 rwwers) 

'VStSL 


20 P9-2 R8MNTD«BRH 
27 084 GAM THE DAY 


28 

29 


SARBMKYBOB Smart 10-1831 
BALLYEAM0N P Jones 12-104 



-1 W-CRAVBI BOV (D)R Price 5-11- 
4 0P0- RAMDAM Mrs A Hewitt 4-10-12 


6 1-W SUNNY REEF (D) J Coeyrnw O-IO-l I. 
0 0-03 CAUPHJ Gkwar 5-10-9. 


S 1-01 SEASONED EMBBimJBmGey 5-10-12 (TfK) 

r£ag 

. s Haute m 

B 60- THE RU8KF Jonten 8-1M— CSmn 

10 -tm HADDAK(USA1BPA1B5-186 CEwwaff) 

11 AMI NK3HTTRAMteWCtey5-1M DiaoeCtey(7) 

14 in MATTS IWSK (n J Pfitch-Hnn8-10-4i_ RGoftMett 

15 3-PP CO«BJY PRtIC&S ¥ Tutu 4-103 PScademara 

19 046 MODERN MAN jmjDratoey 6-183 ODntaf 

OtWcerWIW- 


31 004 AYRESOMEMtasS Brown 11-100- Mm CTM mVC 
33 OPB- CRAWFORD CROSS T Tory 12-180 — L. H Dwoody 
7-2T«Uby Lad, Foot Sflck. 5-1 Ma|or Tern. 6-1 Another 

Plater. 8-1 Tharaascotft 10-1 Queensway Boy. 12-f rotoeis. 

4J30 WYCHAVON NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-Ck £685:' 
2m) (16) 


20 004 PORTOIRBE 

21 -633 OR COflNBJUS(B)GHm 5-103 


.SMackar (0 


2-1 Seasoned Bitter, 44 Sumy Reef. 5-1 CaBph, B-1 
Haddek. 10-1 The Rusk, 12-1 Ratndara, 16-1 othereT 


Worcester selections 

By Mandarin 

230 

Best 4.0 Tea) by Lad. 430 
Col me. 530 Rose’s Member. 


3 

4 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 
18 
20 

23 

24 

25 


1 StLCA CMAVI D Bswortt 11-5. 


C Drawn 


1 ANOELDRUIMIBt (CD) A Inghan 11-0 l **m lUrtt 

3 GAY CARUSO F Jordan 11-0 CftAh 

9 HEW PADMTOKH Date 1M..„ 


miA FVIWwyn 11-0- 

CORUDT RaaMr n-o. 


UTILECOTE^^^^^^H 

LONDON CONTACT M Pfoo 11-0. 

I JiKkasH 


HCCotfM 
ISh n awe rt tm 
■ HMn 


MONIBHtaSffMi 

KD RIVER BOY Rf 


M-fl_ 

(Hodaes it-0 

VANTASTIC Mrs J WmenlUJ 

CAaESTW G Baktlnfl 109. 


P Leech 
. TWal 


CUPDS BOHBt A Jamas 1M. 

I IVY MAY J M Bradey 100-^M 


K&LY UNDO J Cugrava 109- 

MOSSAUL GThomer 10-9_ 



3.0 Deep Ridge: 3 JO Tarqogan’s 
‘ “3 Silca ChiavL 5.0 Si 


&0 REDDITCH CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS 
HANDICAP CHASE (£1,629: 2nt) (8) 

6 aw DEEP HDGEKXnR Hodges 8-11-8 WMm 

7 043 fllEDDg M(B)R OSuMron 9-11-0 —R Guest 

8 -OPO STRETCH (JUT A Monro 8-10-7 G Leaden 

9 900 SUEVE BRACKEN (D) W Clay 10-10-5 HanoCMy 

10 U80 BROSTAIGH (D) Mrs S Davenport 11-104 Jltaat 

11 3-6U BLACK EARL I Wardle 9-190 K T pwaend 

12 PM HERO WOLF RJudtoS 9-190 J wfr BMln ey 

13 IMS POSTDYie(D)W Mean 11-190 — 

2-1 Deep RMga. 92 Fradrfc Bee, 8-1 aostaigh, 9-1 Nero 

Mod. 12-1 PDstdyne. 15-1 others. 

3J0PRAHX GROUP HAftiHCAP HURDLE (£1,794; 
3m) (14) 


32 SWEET SNlltfflT R Woorttouse 198 P Tncfc 

114 Angel DTumnar. 7-2 Sica Chiavt, 5-1 London Contact, 
l SnugSt, 91 vartestte. 10-1 Utttoooto Lad. 19:1 others- 

5.0 ALCESTER NOVICE CHASE (E1J85: 2m 4ft 

07) 

1 4F-1 LANCE PWAIE R Pocock 8420 P ater ) lottos 

2 03-1 ST COLMEG Richsds 9120 P Tncfc 

3 BW* ALUMNUS TTwy 8-11-7 R 

4 -0F0 BON WAY (B) K Bridgwater 7-1V7_ W8 

5 pnt C UM M MgA Mom 6-11-7...—. G 


1 (09 ALHE OICKIH g R Ho Mnohood 8-11-10— 

2 -211 TAROOGMirS BEST R Powocfc 911-3( 

3 12-1 DtSCAWBOT CTfcfcter 91 1-<1 MDwyor 

5 -012 fBEXIDN ASH Cq (BF) R CTSdtonn 4-1M(7taJ 

6 093 DROPSHOrmaBokteg 11-196 R 

8 3P-3 WASSai (USA) (Cl J Janktns 9104 

9 104- DEW R Hotter 9102 H 

10 PCD BE MY LUCK R HoddBS 5-10-1 MrP 

12 -000 BORPaiGaiCLuxun 13-190 1 

14 34-2 AVERAGE L Kotoont 5-10-0- 

15 «JP- AM SPACE H Hodge* 7-ISM 


7 -0P4 FUTTEHVXLE (B) R Paacodc 7-11-7 _ PC7D 

9 493 HY TAB Earl JonM 9-1 1-7 JB 

11 9F3 LORD LAURENCE (BF) D Gaxtaflo 7-11-7 

SSariOtEccta 

14 00F- OAKLEY HOUSE (M F WAttwyn 7-11-7. 

15 O n- REGAL EXPRKS T Grcethead 911-7 Mr L Lay 

18 801- ROONBtSWB Tunter 6-U-7 CWteroa 

17 F34 SAWYBTS SON Mrs P ft^iy 7-1 V7 DHood 

18 33F- TAFR Hawaii 9-11-7 MnLSheedy 

2D .1/00 BEAU NA VET W G Timer 91V4 R Baity 

21 OfF- DUVESSA P Hobbs 7-11-2 HDmteo 

22 009 GO PBrtAJ^Mte 911-2- L Bfoam&efd (4) 



23 4(0 TMXBrsaUESrmP Hobbs 191 1-3 GBcCoort 

94 Si Cofcne, 5-2 Lance Private. 4-1 Lord Lawnmce. 8-1 
Hy Tab, 12-1 Tat 14-1 Oaktoy House. 19-1 others. 

530 GRUNW1CK STAKES (NH fiat £760: 2m) (26) 

2 0OSIW RULER WCesay 5-11^ EBocfctey(7) 

4 MQBSW REVENGE D Nfchoteon 91V-7 

Mr R Sevan (7) 

5 Ml GNLDER H toper 91 1-7 MrR taper 

.6 3- RAM CHASER MP Daws 911-7 GUoxtefT) 

7 ' 3 BOOK NHMHIRWdatoOUSO 911-7 

rAJfcoMon(7) 


18 -340 LOG CABM WCtaj 9190 

19 -000 ELCnONMWwtfO-RH). 


20 09P EASTH1 ROSE M Tate 7-1IWJ. 


. MrT 


84 Tarqogan's Best 3-1 Dtecten Boy. 92 Sexton Ash. 13- 
snu91 DrapshoL 12-1 • ' 


[ZWaasem. 

;4j0 DROHW1CH HANDICAP CHASE (£2,435: 3m) 
(18) 

5 -UP1 TEALBY LAD (qSMeaor IT-11-10 1 

THOMASCOUHT P Wtolte 911-7- 
HELLO HUJNEY J Jontes 91 1-8 . 

COTTAGE RHYTHM (C-O) Earl Jones 1911-8 

LEAN OHT O WH Wms 911-5 

RXIT STICK G Bakteto 911-3 S Starwood 

MAJOR TOM (PKBnW Wgixman 911-T ilfctotoa 

GUSaiSWAY BOY 0» Miss A Mng 7-11-0 (7m| 

T(C^( WMM 14-1910. S J 0%e* 


7 IWJ2 

8 P09 

9 900 

10 SEMI 

11 4-2B 
14 922 
17 014 

21 P90 

22 mo- 

23 UP9 


ANOTHBI PLATtH (D) P Beley 11-189- S 
MANSION MARAUOBI P Hedger 10488 

MrTMhcMI 

24 P4U QUIE HOT nNAyUte 7-108 LBtoomfieW 


> 8 

9 

10 

12 

13 

H 

IS 

17 

18 
20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 

26 
Z7 
28 

29 

30 

31 


51DNEHALL SECRET M James 911-7 


WARNER'S B» J Webber 91F7H 

ALLGOLD MEMOS? L Kwwwd 4-11-5, 

MBSKQLY R HoNmheed 4-1V5H 
BOI«A COUNOP Dans 4-TteM 


BRAVE ANDREW Mm J Evans 4-11-1 



DEEP MOMENT Mm MR M 4-1 1-5 
ITS A LAUGH M Pipe 4-1 1-5 

LYNS MAGIC G M Price 4-1 ij 


PALMISTRY P 

rj 


4-118. 

*-11-5 



1 Rato I 


■ BlCff NKKB- Mrs M RfcneM 441-6— II M u gao ridge ffl 
BANK HOUSE LODGE K Whrie 911-2— .M Hoad (7) 

STANFORDS START Tory 91W HrMFUka 

BALLVBOYNE B Smart 4-T1-0 CLtewoRyn 

P- MYSTICAL ROSE FJonfro 4-1 14) CWtoron 

SEA FLPWH ? (HZ) D Banns 4-11-0 . MteeT Daite 

SEALED MPIOMS A Moo»44W) Itee C Mooni 
SECRET KEEL D Nineteen 4-1 1-0 _ WHonohroys 

9 STAItOB Weis 4-11-0 Mtea S Yaniey 

STAR ASmONQNBI R OatMta 4-1 VO 

HrSOriHMte(7) 
91 Its A Laogb. 4-1 Deep Moment 91 Hoafs M em b e r. 9 


12-lflfcfa MdcoL 14-1 Others. 


74 <av Houvooke Sutton (Sthi 5 Oue 3J) (1m 

SyrnpabcatW_i92Zate»J0J*gy». - ~ 


Hamerona iP Rotenson. 91 it-tov)-. 3. 
HtedMWHia Misi (M Brffifl. 14-1) ALSO 
RAN 3 rt-(aw Hooray Lady )40i). 4 
ScmMarra (SthL 192 Lucky Pick. 14 
Smart SefoM |Etm. 33 illustrate. LuOaby 
Baby. Petroc Concert Tattmd Bay il 
ran it. 2L nk. nh. M. C Britain at 
Newmarket. Tote £4.90: £1 10- £< 70. 
£340 OF £710 CSF: £3694 limn 
1907SK. 

2J0 |7tt 1. TRAVEL MAGHC IM HAS. 9 
1): 2. A Jr Command (Jute Bowker. 11-lh 
3. Baton Boy iJ Lowe. '3-21 ALSO RAN- 
7-3 fav S^pwre Oflone (Bin). 7 Transflash. 
192 Major jacko. 1 0 P as tor ag e (4tfu. The 
MvaB. 14 Emerald Eagw (5m). 16 Hay 
Street 25 Shetonan 50<nnrowne 12 ran. 
’,). M IL 3. 2J.-I B Herttury at 
Newmarket. Tom- £560 £1 90. £2.60, 
£2.00. DF. £25.50. CSF. £6309. Tncast 
£40X32 imm 28 SZaec. After a stewards' 
axnwy the rascR snod. 

30 lim 21 110yd) 1. SULTAN 
MOHAMED [W Caraon. 100-30 fevt 2. 


1 4 Uf uokw 50 Sweepy letm 9 ran. 
nk. r.l. 81 J Duniop « ArinM. Toro: 
£5 50. £1 40 Cl 70 £2.10 OF. 0240. 
CSF £3981. 1mm 28.77S0C. 

4.40 (tm 4H 1. CALL TO HONOR (W R 
Swirttum.4-1) 2 Castte Rook (W Carson. 
15-8). 3. Ambassador (T Iwn. 196 fa*i 
ALSO RAN- 10 Ssarym (5tn). 20 Snow 
Wizard (4th) 25 Moey Pannage l6tML 50 
Named Baser 7 ran 3. a &, 3). 151. O 
Dump at Newmarket Tote. £4 60: £2.00. 
£160 DF: £7 40. CSF. £11.30. 2toio 
3984 sec After ■ soiwards' mowry the 
result Stood. 

Jackpot C20.14ZK; Ptaeapot 08.15 


Rutter: 2 


(C 


Bath 


(5lhi 3 Shi«. 10 Ltottsw (*nL M 
Andarta |6Bi). 8 ran. *•!. 2L ffAirt /.l J 
Dunlap at Arundel Tote: £3 70. £1.60. 
Et.4(L n 40 DF. E4.90. CSF: £15.15. 
2mm 166 SUC 

3JS liml 1. GREAT ASMECT (W 
Carson. 91 toy) 2 Elegant Me (S 
Cauthen. 91 1 3. Someone Else lG 
Asmussen. 91). ALSO RAN: 7 Ben Led) 
4461L 9 AJpenhom (5thV ID Fountain s 
Choca. H Comeught Flyer. 25 Euroeon 
(Sthl E ran. ah WL2bf. 3. IL 41 W Hem « 
Wtost Hstoy. Tom: £2 40; £110. £1.40. 
tMQ. 0ft £3.68 CSF: £808. inwi 
4390sec 

4. W(7l) 1 . ENTRANCIHC (W Carson. 9 
it- 2 Stately Lae* (S Cautheo. 91L 3. 

PMMV^Robunon. 11-1). ALSO RAN: 


Going: good 

20 dm 0vtf 1 SAUGHTREES (Paul 
Eddery. 14-iJ. 2. Count Afcnactea (R 
Cochrane. 16-11 a. s putl ori Lad 
(Dettou Wheatley 92iMlN) ALSO RAN: 
9-2 |!-(av Sweet Gemma (5di). S St James 


Trojen 

Jack. Mm venezutea _ . 

Dihq. Chief Runwr 15 ran MR 

McGregor, 1 -L 2L nk. 2f. 111. PWi 

Ijmtaim To» £17.00: £350. 

£270 OF- £110 10 CSF: £216.11. Bought 
m lor 2100 gumeas. 

230 11m 3f 150yd! 1. NORTHERN 
AMETHYST (Pat Eddery. Evens fa*fc Z 

Arapfcato AttiC Ouffittft 1 TongMn 

(R Cccnrane 391). ALSO RAN: 11-2 
NObteRtee i92Mmhtti.9No0laFae.i6 

Tcwmikp. 20 Dmuan. Mafca Peace (Stti). 

Pnama Pany (5th>. Sriaroai |4jni 3Q Btey 

Bey. Jin&aou Aspatu. Sours SfcJroa, 

HdgatrLady Home Fteat *tai BtoeWL 

Mcma.SoIert Broeze 20ran.Hd.Bf.7L3L 
If. O Etartrth at VWMSbwiy T« £230: 
£130 £4. tO- £7 70. DF: £21.10 CSF: 
£2330 


.. fc 2. Wnta ftoM (P«4 
Eddery 91k 3. Uael Tba Groafc (P 
11-4 tov). ALSO RAN: 7-2 Bekm Zero 
(481). 192 Mancnesterskyron (684. 9 
noQOHim (Mi). 12 BOH Ftflag*. 16 
Buodtexag. Conran Pitch, paragon, za 
Joyful Dancer. 25 AsMay Rocket 33 

We5tornam. 13 ran. 1 'nl sh IXL2L W. 
M E Francs a Lambotan. Tora £3650: 
£840. £2.60. £130. DF: £25050. CSF: 
£16238. Tncast £50961. 

390 (im Sf12wfl 1. EASTBt LEE (Pat 
Eddaiy- 7-2 fewi 2 Harbour Bazaar (S 
w ma wortti. 9it a Up To Uacfo (A 
McGtana. 92) ALSO FUN: 4 WI«acL5 
Siwtetar Taxsawar (GttO, 9 tovfian Orator 
(4th). 14 Gotten Croft. 16 Appracaine. 
Gwyn Howard (5BiL 20 Faraway Lad. 
Solomon Lad. 25 H Punftw ec chtt . Ltt- 
ctju*. 33 Catch The Thatch. Baydon 
Oueen 15 ran. 21,1. M II. "A, 2L D 
Eiswonh at Whfobuy Tote: £3.70: £l .60. 
£390. £1 5Q DF: £16.10. CSF: £3*3a 
Tr cast £12691. 

40 (Sf 187yd) 1. TAMLLA (Pat Eddery, 
4-Star); £ Cbtttoo<R Cochran*. 14-1 1 4 
GraeoW Jazz Time fS WMwonh.-9l) 

ALSO RAN: 10 Naparm. 20 Udy ! 


20(51 167yd) 1. CRY FOR THE CLOWN 

(R Cochrone, 4-5 tavj; 2 Centaul (B 

Thomson. 91); 3. Sw tta ra Laaa (S 
Dawson. 33-1 J. ALSO RAN: 7 LucTOW 

(fthi 8 Jowck. 18 Taecher's Game, 20 

Gkxy Bee, Spanish Sky (Oh). 25 Castle 

Comet Pernurthm. 33 B»e Bkss (SthL 

Oriole Dancer 12 ran. «t4Lshhd.w.lL 

A BaBey at Naw ma rt i e t Tote: £220; 

n^O. £200. £3.40. DF; E5.70. CSF: 

£680.TncasC £85.70. Ptecapoc E4JXL 

Southwell 

Half grow) 

21 5 (2m ride) 1. Snake (fiver I 

7-2); 2 Bteck River (5*1): 3.1 

Person (25-li Mind The TMna 91 tav. 16 
ran 3L 15L F Jonaan. Totor £7 JO: £230. 
£1.7a £990. Of: £160. CSF: £25 33. 

245 (2m hde) I. Strewbatry SpM (S 
Johnson. 291); 2 Hap ftekar (14-1). 3. 
Star Of Tara (192). Galaxy Princess. 


other 


. DF (winner 
horse* £9^80. 


CSF: £297.82 • 


any 



.Ftopperi 

Frantoy Queen. Londy bte. Maroan Mel- 

ody. fteoy. 16 ran 2 f «. 21SL 3. 71 nfc. J 

Tree at Beckhamptan. Tote £1-42 £120. 

£260. £1.70. DF: £&30- CSF: E&89. 

420 (5f 167yd) T. ATTEMPTING (B 
Thomson. 9-21 2 UUe Bolder (M 
Roberta. 7-2). 2 Jot Kteto (Paul Eddery. 
?-4 fak). ALSO RAN, SSftadtoft MiM (40)1. 
14 swan Henttoara. ie MMmntwLSO 
Httaen AMtt. 25 R« s Paw, WCtwua 

Gal (5rni uaseteto Dream, 50 Borauwn. 

Fan Moon. Hal A CM). Lady Wesfcwn. 

Mane Baby. 15 ran fft. 4L 3- nk. fcL B 

Htosat Lenttoum. Tote: win gJg-.tt.3P. 
tl.TO. £1.38. DF:E7J». CSF: £20.19. 


3.15 (3m 110yd cti) 1. San D8V)noi(D 
turn 7-1 1 2. Sprits Hi (7-0: a 
Mttrw aae (91), Parcetotown 11-4 fw. 15 

ranftR:GraindMastBS.2L%J. JBtorxSeL. , 

Tote £5.80; £220. £230. £2-10. DF: 

£19 50. CSF: E36JXL Tncast £19833. 
345(2m4f ndto] 1. Doroofcinn (P Tuck. 

Evens to rttCttr SpY(19U IDoubto 

Dooxtot ffl-1). 13 ran. 51 3L G Rtthartfa. 

TOW £240: £1.40, £230, Q50 DP. 

£10.70 CSF: £16J» TrictSt £71.06. 

4.15 (2m 74yd (M 1. me* Of Pneoe (S 
Bvto. 913 to*L 2 Answer To Pnwr 0-l]c 
3. Cheeky Run (33*1i 6 ran. M. 29.CJ 
Bel Tow EL 70. (13). £340. DF: ETJCL 

csf: gao. 

446 (3m hdte) 1. Mister Fit (N Feam. 

14*1); 2 Lucytet (7-a. 3. Pass Ashore (12- 

M Easter 8m iS-lTtov. 13 ran. m 12 - 
T Sf. Tote: til* £4.50. £1^0. £220. 
DF;£43. IP CSF:£«3.06. TrttPSC £571^1. 
Ftenmet £23275. 


Weights for the Autumn double 


CAMBRSlGESHIREHANDICAPttlm 110* 
5wah KjdBm 4yr lOst Itt. Then Again 3 9 
12 PraskSum 4 9 11. Lucky Ring 4 9B. 
TromWanrS 9 3. Kufurre 493. Stoner 4 9 
1. Dusty Doter 3 9 1. K-Bomry 5 9 1. 
Advance SS asamand 3 9 0. MufoS 9 p 
Mno Btttxo 3 9 0. Dates 38 13. PatnachA 
8 13. Star Cutter 3 8 13. Eve's^ Brar38 12. 
Diggera Rest 3 8 il. Chmataene 3 8 it. 
Cromwell Peck 3 8 KL Vtodert Boy 3810, 
My Generation 3 8 10. Bott And BeauWui 
4 8 9. vianora 3 8 8. Saraete Mac 3 8 & 
Freedoms Choice 4 8 8. bw^y 3 8 a 
tong s Head 4 8 ft Plod 3 1 7, 
ResoucaM FNeon 3 8 7. Chartim 3 8 7. 
runraraato 3 8 7. Prince Paeadfflo 38 7. 
Data 3 8 ft Oriental Setter 3 8 5. 

Lavender Mist 3 6 5, Effigy 4 8 5» Suttan 

Mohamad 384. Tftfly Raro 484, KUftour 
4 8 4, Chalk Stream 3 8 4. Vangfcttous 3 8 
4. AvenMo384.NteitOul PeBte»384, 
SR Ties Ona Ont 9 8 4. Tender Lwkn 

SjSkSI 

5BQ.GoBenn , s5713.RanaPratop67 
13. Haber s 7 13. 

Qliet RW 4 7 13. Geonte Rh«r37 12 
3 7 12 Wa^to 37 12 Ster Of A 
IBSaama57120Bme 


4 7.3* Ptfo 4 7 3, nnQipff 3 ■ A rWt 
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hurdles at the meeting in Rieu, 
just outside Rome, three days 
before the grand prix final in the 
Italian capital. 

The administration lor. both 
meetings is the same, and since 
the grand prix final does not pay 
appearance money, relying on 
the final prize-money to attract 
the athletes, there are- advanta- 
geous deals done wiib athletes to 
appear in what is seen as the 
warm-up meeting in RietL 

But Biskin claims that money 
is not the problem. He admits 
that Moses has done better 
financially in his nine races in 
Europe so fer, after a year off 
through injury, than he has ever 
done in his 10-year career at the 
top of die spoil. Instead. Baskin 
hinted yesterday at some sort of 
“conspiracy" against Moses by 
European promoters, who have 
tried in the last two years to 
•combat excessive demands 
from athletes and managers by 
forming a cartel with, a maxi- 
mum appearance fee of $15,000 
for the likes of Carl Lewis, Said 
Aouita, Steve Cram, Sebastian 
Coe, and Moses. “This is alien 
to our American free-market 
way of thinking," says Baskin, 
who admits that he has man- 
aged to exceed the maximum 
wage for Moses by going to 
meetings outside the grand prix 
circuit 

Baskin seems to think that the 
“conspiracy" stems from an 
incident in Zurich two years 


> 


4? 


Lausanne results : 

MEM: 100k 1. B Johnson (Can). 
10.1950c: 2 B Marie Rom (Ft). 1027; 2 C 
StnWi (US), 1028. 200 k 1. D WHams < 
(Can), zoJOsec; 2 P Barra (Fri. 2297; 2 U 
G Qusrtftwve (Ft). 21.01. 400k 1. U 
(US). ttiSesac; 2B dark (AusL 
I McKay 4562 800 k 1.W 

ItanL 1:44.72 2 P Cotard (F^ 


Robinson 
421&2A . 

■ r. 1 . E Jones (US). 21284: 2 M Fal 
22271; 2 F Lahtte (Mori, 22284 
1, S Aouita (Mori. 35132 2 M. 
Gonzalez (SpL 35203: 2 J-M Ahascte 
m2S2922000w1. P Delcae »wit 2 ). 
735.10 2 E Ignatov (BUI *51.47: 2 M 
Ha da te inar (Swfel, 7&M. 2000b 
rtaapUcbaan: 1, J KartUd (Kan). 21922 
2 H Marsh (US). &21.70; 3, S Oowocfta 
(Ken). 824.16. 110m hurdhte: i s 
Caristan (Fri 1329cris 2, C Sata (SpL 
1267: 2 A Bryggare (FinL 13.75. «Um 
IwdtoK 1. E ftwacs (USL 4728aac; 2 M 
Dederoef (Ivory C), 42033, HAmlke 
49.13. Tmt fcaaps 1, C Maikov _ 
1670m; 24 Ttewo (DfoL 1256: 2 
Abbattaku (HigL 16 J «L^fcawin: 1. K 
Tatelmaiar (WG). 83.48m; 2. E 
L 7278; 2 A Unden 
7254 Long. Jump; 1, A Ctacfwv 
724m: 2 RGtoor pwitt). 722 2 S 
fca (PoQ. 7.74. FWe vatefc 1, P Calai 
(RL 280m; 2 A Tarav (BUL 560; 2 T 
Vt^wran (R). 272 MgftTnap: 1. J 
Howard (USL 226m; 2 C Waanhardt 
(WGL 226; 2 G Nagel (WGL 222 Shoe 1, 
W Guntoor (SwftzL 2fJ38m; 2 A Amfcte 
(M. 21 24; 3. J Bramer (US. 2032 
WOMEN: 100m: 1. E AsftfOrtf (USL 
1 1.1458c; 2 A issaienko (Can), 11.40: 3. Y 
Janota (Pol). 11.72 400m; 1. A Qterot 
(Cuba) 51.11aae 2 R Stonwnova (BuQ. 
51.72-2 J RSchndsoir^nL 5250.800 k 
1. C Groenendaal (UK. 15922 2 G 
Buwmaroi (WG). 1*9.77; 3, N Sterewe 
. 159.80. 100m taunflaa: 1. X Stem 
unL 1288swr. 2 B RtuarattBrown 
1205; 2 R HoyglSmfizi, 1232 
paras 1. C LawojUS). 670m; 2 S 
bewa (BuO. 6.62: 2 L NJnova (Bid). 
252 Dfacos: 1. H Ramos (Cabal 63.14m; 
2 R Kafciwiqz (Pofl, 5262 2PNaar (US). 
5274. 


ago. when Andreas Bruggcr, the 
promoter, cancelled Moses's in- 
vitation to run, because, accord- 
ing to Brdgger, Moses, and 
Baskin asked for too much 
money. -What would seem to 
back the “revenge" thesis is that 
the promoters of Cologne two 
weeks ago and Brussels this 
Friday — two grand prix meet- 
ings which Moses needed to 
attoid in order to get sufficient 
points to have a chance of 
winning (he overall grand prix 
prize of$25.000 — offered, again 
according to Baskin, “40 per 
cent less than two years ago, and 
even less in Brussels. 

But the real reason for the 
Rieti cancellation is probably 
much more mundane, if any- 
thing to do with Dr Primo 
Nebiok). the president of the 
IAAF. and the Italian federation 
could ever be mundane. Add to 
which, Moses's first appearance 
in Italy for some years would be 
at a tiny up-country meeting, 
somewhat upstaging Rome, and 
there you have the more hkeljy 
scenario. But this whole affair ts 
redolent of the sort of wheeling 
and dealing that is afflicting 
athletics, in its infancy as a 
professional _ sport. But, -with 
promoters still having too much 
Tower over the fete of athletes, 
the- competitors should make 
harder efforts to follow up the 
idea of forming a trade union, 
which was originally aired at 
Brussels exactly a year ago. For 
the IAAF Athletes Commission 
is not under way yet. and the 
athletes certainly need more say 
ra how their sprat is being run. 

The other thing that is 
frustrating fra- Moses, a, 

from the damage ro his pu 

image that this non-appearance 
will cause, is that Ins .4738 
seconds, which be did here in 
Lausanne two nights ago, in- 
dicates that. “Pm probably in 
the best form of my Hie, because 
I made at least lour errors in the 
race. The way the season has 
been breaking up for the 

Commonwealth Games and the 
European Championships, I just 
haven't been able u> suing three 
or four races together as I would 
like, which could produce a sub; 
47 seconds time. 

An additional factor in. ihg 
“conspiracy" theory is that An* 
drt Phillips and Danny Harris; 4 
the two men with any chance or " 
beating Moses, now seem 30 be * 
avoiding hhn, T 

It also seems certain now that 
Aouita and Cram are not going 
to meet this season, for Cram is 
due 10 run the 1,500 metres in 
Brussels tomoRow, and Aouita> 
foe 2,000 metres. If it is not t 
question of money, h. is eqni&x - 
undear why the two tu? avoid: 
mgeadtothee. 













SPORT 


35 




’»«1L 


Poor batting by 

Notts makes 
task of Essex 
all the easier 

By Richard Streeton 


CRICKET 


are 77 runs^afoaiTltf ™ his second. 

Nottinghamshire ** Johnson punished both 

■ When Nottinghamshire 

-won the toss and were howled iSE 0 ™ 70 F 0 ™ 11 overs 
■out for 121 before before a double chang e 

yestJrday thdr ™^ 5™“**“ BanrickSd 


mathein»tic»l chanc?°to 2 ntCm « and <W 

snaich the county chamraoo- ST ^“£2^ 

ship from Essex r,_ 9!! Barwick s third ball; 

iher inio the realms of fantasy '■ pntopgas 

Glamorgan, tSSfS h aHemmed a form™ ^ 
in the table, also struggled on a 


en- 


■ ' m t 


■pitch’ which regularly 
couraged the bowlers. 

Glamorgan were 78 for five 
before Omong and Thomas 


attempted a forcing stroke 
on the back foot. 

Birch seemed to have set- 
tled in but was then caught at 
mid wicket from an ambitious 
hit- Hadlee fell to a good catch 
at backward square leg; 


a s-.SAfflsf sggi tst * t 

sfsw-stsras !™£?I£g 


. . _ - - overs 

witn some fine stroke~play. 

- Nottinghamshire’s failure 
to secure any batting bonus 
points means that Essex will 
need only three points from 


bowler. 

Glamorgan made a stub- 
born start before Morris edged 
Hadlee and was caught be- 
hind. Hopkins and Jones 



Cowdrey 
has 

himself to 
blame 

By John Woodcock 
Cricket Correspondent 

. »orid records will be broken by 

Whar are *e coving to! At the the 27 reams taking pan today 
end ofu >^or&iUina^tfae , n lhe 10 0k m team lime trial 
atmu f. gert Mn ) y opens the mad racing 

*?*"*". . aM ? B y segment of the world champion- 

chvnpionshtp. Christopher ships in the grounds of the 
Kent warn, talks i c r — « », i 


CYCLING 


Altitude likely to 
reduce chance 
of world records 

From John Wilcockson. Colorado Springs 
!i is not expected that any Air Force Academy circuit since 




JJv- 

m!z ''S 


made some unwonbled 
J&LSxS *3? if Nottingham- strokes before both were dis- 
shire^in thuj game and take missed by Afford, the left-arm 


dean sweep: Athey on his way to an impressive 76 at the Oval (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 

Athey blunts Surrey’s edge 


maximum points from their 
own last two matches. (Should 
the teams finish level on 
points, Essex would be cham- 
pions by virtue of having 
more wins.) 


v.. 


spinner. Maynard and 
Holmes fell to Pace. 

Ontong and Thomas at- 
tempted nothing rash but hit 
hard when the spinners over- 
pitched. They grew m con- 


Nottinghamshire’s morning fidence as Nottinghamshire’s 
najw m nnt “ spirits sagged riSteand the 

bowlers struggled with crum- 
bling footholds. 


•;i? V 1 * 

■"» Nil 


mist 


x- 




'Sr 


•ft «■ 


Collapse was not attributable 
-to the pitch alone. This wicket 
was first used for Kent's visit 
last week, when only one day's 
play was possible. It was shorn 
of grass at both ends and there 
was always slow turn for the 
spinners. Once the sun 
emerged at lunchtime, the fast 
bowlers also got the odd ball to 
lift. 

Overall Glamorgan prob- 
ably had more cause to feel 
aggrieved about the con- 
ditions than Nottinghamshire, 
'.for whom only Robinson 
showed a fitting approach. 
,;Robinson, the ninth man out, 
was undone by a lifting ball 
and drove to first slip, after a- 
; sensible and watchful innings. 

■ More than one among the 
.others attempted unnecessar- 
ily adventurous strokes and 
“paid the penalty. Nottingham- 
shire also made a poor start. 
Thomas had Broad leg-before 
in his first over, not ottering a 


NOTTMGHAMSHIRE: Rest (ratings 

B C Broad Ibw b Thomas 

M Newell o Thomas. 


0 

........ 2 

R T Robinson e Hopkins b Berwick _ 45 
P Johnson b Barrie* — 37 

X E B Rice b Ontong 4 

nricfc 5 Ontong _____ 20 

R J Hadlee C Morris b Berwick 0 

1 
6 
0 

0 

Extra (b 2, w 1, nb 3) 6 


J 0 Birch e Barwicfc 6 Ontong . 
R J Hadlee c Monts b Bamiat 

•ffi N French bw b Ontong 

R A Pick c Hopkins b Ontong . 
EE Heavnmgs Om b Ontong _ 
J A Afford rat out 


Total (30.1 QMS) 


121 


FALL OF WICKETS; 1-0. 2-1 a 3-70. 4-75. 
6-107, 5-108. 7-111, 6-121. 3-121. 10-121. 
BOWLING; Thomas 6-1-42-2: Smith 5-1- 
26-0: Banridt 10-2-254; Ontong 9.1-1- 
2B*5. 

GLAMORGAN: First Innings 

J A Hopkins b Afford ; 21 

n Moms c French b Hadlee 2 

A L Jones c Ranch b Afford 33 

GCHoknesc Birch bHadae 13 

M P Maynard c French b Rice 0 

RC Ontong not out 49 

J Q Thomas notout ___________ 59 

Bctra0b9.w1.nb1) 11 


Total (5 wtas. 80 overs) . 


__ 198 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-15. 255, 3-68, 4- 
685-78 

Boms points: Glamorgan 5. No tii ng hn ro- 
sMrw2. 

Umpires: D J Constant and J A Jameson. 


Crowe stands firm 
amid the storm 


V)’ 




H* 




By Paul Martin 

• “It is ahrays hard to art down 
> huge tree, let aloae three,** 
says Martin Crowe, the batsman 
■whose appointment to Somerset 
at the expense of Vir Richa rds. 
Joel Gamer and possBHy even 
Ian Botham, has sparked off the 
dab's biggest crisis. 

It is a mark of the Z3-ye»r-old 
New Zealander’s own gro wing 
s ta ture and natality that be is 
ibte to stand his gronnd firmly 
as the storm rages. 'It’s a tricky 
situation for everone, bat all I 
think about is that Somerset 
have made a brave decision. 
There was no way to avoid this 
acrimony. I hope it all works hr 
. them — they deserve that for 
thinking of their future.” 

Crowe, who flies back to New 
’.Zealand today after his team's 
first Test series victory in En- 
gland, believes that he can fulfill 
a role in Somerset that the 
. “megustars*', to use his term, 
.have failed to. He believes the 
young players of the coanty have 
Ibeen sadly neglected over the 
years. He said that, daring his 
first spell at the county in 1984, 
“ I coaid see they were lost: they 
had no direction, no sense of 
purpose, no pride, they were 
drifting. The chab had no leader- 
ship. ” To remedy, this, he had 
run a “Young Nags” dub for 
uncapped players indoding a 
semi-formal night out and 
coaching sessions. Now he 
hopes to reawaken the entfan- 
siasm and setf-coofideace that 
be believes has evaporated since 
Jusdoarfare. 

*1 know how hard it can be as 
a young player,” he add. T 
faced Thompson and Lillee m 
my first senes aged 19: no one 
helped me. I didn't know what to 

do. They said you’re big enough 
to look after yourself. Bat yon 
need analysis of your ga me, h elp 
in coping with the pressure. It 
Imt taken me two or three years 
to get back on track.” . 

Shire then Crowe has indeed 
become a star in his OWB right, 
though be insists be will never 

be ’Yeally dedicated enosgh to 
be a truly great player — to me 
it’s more important to enjoy 
cricket asd be part of a t eam. 
He believes Ins retadyey 
comfortable suburban npbrmg- 
ins is not conducive to the 
gnttmess of a Boycott or a 
Bradman. 

Though his team u hni ger 
Glenn Turner, die former 
Worcestershire and New Zea- 
land player, says Martin has 
supreme natural ability and has 


V».Hr 



Crowe: self-contained 
matured immesnsely on this 
tonr, be still finds his emotions 
getting the.better of him. In this 
and in his serious and self- 
contained nature, he says he 
takes after his mother rather 
than his gregarious father or his 
rebellions, outgoing brother. 

He has been steeped in the 
game from childhood, to father 
and elder toother, Jeff, also a 
Test player, teaching him the 
virtues of a straight bat in their 
back pnbn near Auckland. 
"You could only score 4 ras 
with a straight drive to the 
garden fence,' recalls his fattier, 
David, who has accompanied the 
lour and is writing a-book on ft 
with his sons ms sub-editors and 
censors. ”We would bowl short 
so the hoys beca me strong 
driving off the back foot.” 
David, teaching them persever- 
ance, mercilessly scored 239 off 
his son's bowiing when Jeff was 
TO and martin 6, "bat soon they 
tamed the tables on me”. 

He has spurned offers from 
more other dubs like champion- 
ship leaders Essex, believing 
that there be would have 
"become an individnal, while at 
Somerset I can give more. I am 
young and hungry and want to 
do well, and if anyone wants my 
help I am always ready." 

Crowe believes the comity will 
succeed with or without ton 
Botham,- ”if he goes be goes, 
people should respect bis 
decision". Though Ian was 
a "sometimes indescribable 
person” he who also had a 
“beautiful" loyalty to Us 
friends, hot "that is not the 
issue", he said. 

”1 rtiink the whole thing wiD 
blow over in a month or two,” 
Crowe concluded. "People will I 
hope think of 1987 as the year 
Somerset started to move 
again" 


Row over Gavaskar 


New Delhi (Reuter)- The 
Indian Cricket Board have sum- 
moned India’s selectors to a 
meeting today to discuss the 
omission of Sunil Gavaskar 
from the squad to face Australia 
fe in the first two one-day inter- 
r nationals next week. . 

■ The h oar d have also advised 
the selectors lo pick the squad to 
face Australia in a threc>Tesi 
series and six one-day inter- 
nationals on the basis of merit, 
adding that they were "deeply 
perturbed” over the reasons 
given for omitting ■ Gavaskar. 
The selection committee chair- 
man, Chandu Borde, bad said 
that Gavaskar, now 37, had 
been omitted to allow India to 


build a young team to retain the 
World Cup next year, 
g GWALIOR - Greg Ritchie 
hit 124 off 125 balls yesterday as 
the Australians took charge of 
their 110 -overs-a-side one in- 
nings match against the Indian 
champions. Bombay (Reuter 
reports). The touring side fin- 
ished the first day on 3 84 for 
four from 85 overt. The two 
teams have agreed to play 1 lp- 
ovcrs a side and end the match 
at lea on the last day to enable 
both sides try reach Jaipur two 
days before the first one-day 
international on September 7. 

SSS9SBUS 

out) v Bombay 


THE OVAL: Gloucestershire, 
with 2 first innings wickets in 
hand, have scored 252 runs 
against Surrey. 

A fine innings of 76 by Athey 
and another by Lloyds, who 
made 66. helped Gloucester- 
shire remain buoyant along a 
difficult course against a persis- 
tent and potentially hostile at- 
tack spearheaded by the 
dangerous Clarke here 
yesterday. 

There had been run about at 
the stan of the day and with a 
strong, blustery wind, it was 
very much a sweater day as weD 
as being a frustrating one. wiih 
nearly two hours lost to bad 
light in three breaks in play. 
Having received an invitation to 
bat, Gloucestershire soon lost 
Romaines. comprehensively 
beaten and bowled by Clarke's 
pace and late movement off the 
pilch. 

Tomlins, too. had been de- 


By Peter Marson 

feated more than once by 
Clarke's speed and he only 
survived briefly before being 
trapped leg before by Bicknell to 
make the score 41 for two, 
Athey, who was then 23. had 
displayed a fast reaction to 
anything pitched short, and in 
this way he enjoyed himself 
mainly at Felibam's expense. 
Bain bridge was another to ap- 
pear uncertain a gainst riirtu 
and an edge past slip preceded 
his departure to a catch there by 
Jesty. 

By now poor light was grad- 
ually getting worse but at least 
that left Clarke hidden from the 
batsman's view. However, with 
the score 86 for three and Athey 
a step away from a half century, 
the umpires looked to their 
meters and Athey and Stovold 
made for the pavilion for the 
first break which lasted IS 
minutes. 


Later, Fdthara bowled well to 
lake the wickets of Stovold and 
Curran but when he veered off 
line and bowled short. Lloyds 
was smartly into position in lhe 
way Athey had been and after 
settling, Lloyds began to hit the 
ball hard and often. 


OLOUXSTER8WRE; first Innings 

PW Romanes b Clarita 0 

K P Tomlins few fi Backnal IS 

CWJAiheycLMicht) Doughty — 76 

P Batofindoe c Jesty b Cm* 5 

AW Stovold KmrbFeimam 20 

K M Outran b Fefiharo 5 

J W Lloyds c Stewart b Butcher 
IRC Russel not out _ 
CAWAhKwbCMa 
*D A Graveney nor out 
Extras (b 4. to 7, w 2) 

Total (8 wkts, 72 overs) 

D V Lawrence to baL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2, 241. 349, 4- 

102. 5-114, 6-136, 7-221 . 3232. 

Surrey: ‘A R Butcher. G S CMon. A J 
Stewart M A Lynch. T E Jesty. tC J 
ftcharts. M A Fettham, R J Doughty. KT 
Mediyeoit S T Clarks. M P BUmC 
Umpires: R Palmar and N T Ptows. 



Hats and coats off to Curtis 


Worcester won the toss, and 
boned in sunshine, on a tranquil 
pitch. Somerset, who have 
understandably been looking a 
Hole disorganized lately, pro- 
duced Botham, though not 
Richards or Garner. Roebuck 
led them philosophically, as 
usual. 

Only one wicket fell before 
- lunch. - when Botham had 
D’Oliveira leg before for 34. 
Curtis and Smith moved calmly 
into the afternoon. D’Oliveira* 
had completed his 1,000 runs 
for the season. Curtis went 
serenely to a century. The 
brawny Smith lolloped gently in 
his wake. 

The Worcester ground did 
look lovely, though 1 was re- 
minded of the comment of a 
former secretary of the county 
club. Brigadier M. A. Green, 
who said, truly enough, that we 
only say Worcester is a beautiful 
ground when we have been 
looking at the carhedraL Imag- 
ine the ground without h, and 

Miller in 
demand 

f Gloucestershire and Sussex 
have been given permission to 
approach Geoff Miller, the for- 
mer England all-rounder, who 
has been released by Derbyshire 
at his own request 


By Alan Gibson 

what would be left. Indeed, a 
few years ago there was scaffold- 
ing around one of the cathedral 
pinnacles, and while it was 
there, the ground had never 
seemed the same place. 

Smith, having tried success- 
fully one big drive, was caught 
from an attempt to repeat it, 
which only produced a dolly lob 
to point, at 194, after reaching 
his 50. At 217 Hick, who had 
been looking formidable if a 
little weary, was out, to Dredge. 
We now observed that the 
scoring rate had been steadily 
dropping though the batsmen 
rarely seemed to be under any 
pressure. At tea,- after 78 overs, 
the score was 250 for 3. 

After tea Curtis progressed to 
his highest score in his first-class 
career, and with Neale in to ioin 
him the innings took a brighter 
aspect The sun stayed out and 
the weather grew quite warm. 
Overcoats, even cardigans, were 
being taken off It was a pleasant 


evening, nonetheless because 
there was nothing much at 
stake. 

WORCESTERSnE: First tontnss 

TS Curtis c Hanfia b Marts 153 

DSD'OhmtowbSotfani_-___ 34 

DM Smtti c Dredge b Marks 52 

□ A Hick t> Drodgs 13 

*P A Neste not out ■ — - 43 

DN PatBJ b Botham ________ 40 

Extra (b 2. to 7. nb 1) 10 

Total (5 wkts dBC, 96.1 overs)_ 345 
IS J Rhodes. PJ Newport N V RatUort. S 
M McEwan ant A P Pridgeon dto not baL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-61.2-194.3417.4- 
296.5-345. 

BOWLING: Bottom 22.1-465% Taylor 
19-1-85-0: Dredge W44M: Pringle 10- 
0460: Marks 294-105-2. 

SOMERSET: First Innings 
N A FeAon b Radtord . 


*P M Roebuck not out . 


JTGardb Radford 


E Hardy notout . 
Extra (lb 1) — 


.16 
.13 
- 0 
_4 
-1 

Total CZ wkts, 10 ornis) 34 

R J Barttea, R J Harden. I T Botham. V J 
Marks. N J Pringle. N S Taylor and C H 
Dradge to baL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-18. 2-18. 

Bonua Points: Worcestershire A Somer- 
set 2. 

Umpires: B Dudleston and R Jinan. 


Cowdrey, the Kent captain, talks 
about haring been “letdown” by 
his opposite number and old 
friend, Graham Gooch, regard- 
ing aa agreement reached on the 

Essex declaration. It happened 
at Folkestone on Tuesday. 

The beat way for Kent to hare 

won the march would have been 
to coDude with no one. The last 
day broke warm and smmy, with 
every promise (which was fid- 
filied) of six boors of uninter- 
rupted cricket. Although Kent 
were stfll 103 runs behind on the 
first innings, with three wickets 
standing, they were in the happy 
position of bring able to leave all 
the running to Essex, to whom a 
victory meant the richest of 
prizes. 

In the event, Kent added 
another 47 first-innings r uns , 
which put Essex trader even 
greater pressure to take risks. It 
was not as though there could be 
no fixture in their doing so. Far 
from ft. It was Che sort of pitch 
on which they most have known 
that their two spinners. Acfkid 
and Childs, could make even 125 
n treacheronsly attractive target. 

At luncb Essex were 37 for 
two in thrir second innings — 93 
runs ahead with four hoars left 
for play. It was then that Kent, 
quite unnecessarily, did a dcaL 
Had Kent continued to make 
nuts hard to get Essex would 
still have had to declare, but on 
less favourable terms than those 
agreed by Cowdrey and Gooch. 
Instead, the introduction of 
Asktfs leg-breaks immediately 
after Iimch, to give Essex easier 
runs, led instantly and inevitably 

to a surrendering of Kent's 
initiative. 

It is another matter whether 
or not Gooch left Kent with 
marginall y stiff er proposition 
than had been arranged. If he 
did, Cowdrey would still have 
been wiser to keep quiet about it 
and Essex will have it on thrir 
collective conscience when they 
go to Buckingham Palace to 
receive the Britannic Assurance 
Trophy. The first mistake, I 
thought, was Kent's, for having 
taken the pressure off Essex. 

Not many yean ago soch 
conspiracies were contrary to 
championship regulations. 
These stated that “it is not the 
intention that any declaration 
sbonld become the subject of an 
a geemen t b et w een the captains. 
If the umpires have grounds for 
thinking Hmf any such agree- 
ment has taken place, they shall 
report it accordingly and if that 
ag re e m en t is proved any points 
scored shall not be counted in 
the championship table.” With a 
wink and a nod something might 
so met im es be worked out in an 
effort to get finished, but ft was 
always discreetly done. 

Now that sides are allowed to 
forfeit an innings, fbarth-iimiags 
targets are regularly negotiated, 
as this one was meant to be, as 
though with slide rale or com- 
pass. The captains and their 
advisers go into conclave and 
emerge to announce that the 
settlement is for 292 runs in 71 
overs, or whatever. The way 
things are going with every pitch 
always covered and a day's play 
comprising i statutory number 
of overs, the counties win be 
captained soon by computers. 


United States Air Force Acad- 
emy. The 25 km circuit, that has 
to be lapped four limes, has a 
base aiutude of 6.500 ft and 
indudes a climb of 5 km each 
lap loan altitude of nearly 7,000 
ft 

It is not the type of terrain for 
the favoured Italian or Soviet 
teams to improve on their 
winning times at the 1984 
Olympic Games and Iasi year's 
world championships. England 
won the gold medals in this 
event at the Commonwealth 
Games, but the British coaches, 
Bernard Bunts and Keith But- 
ler. did not consider the team 
would have long enough to 
acclimatize to tbe high altitude 
of Colorado. It was not the 
decision with which the riders 
agreed, a view confirmed yes- 
terday by one of the British 
team. 

“We have been here for two 
weeks and every one feels fine.** 
Alan Go mall said. “We have 
had our ups and downs, but we 
are all pretty even now. h just 
lakes longer to recover from an 
effort at altitude “Gomall and 
his five team colleagues have to 
wait until Sunday before 
competing in the 112 mile 
amateur road race that ter- 
minates the championships. 

The Soviet squad, led by the 
powerful Alexander Zinoviev, 
has been training daily on the 


completing the Coons Classic 10 
days ago. All four men are fully 
adjusted to the altitude and 
have a distinct advantage over 
the Czechoslovakian, East Ger- 
man and Italian teams that 
arrived here later, A winning 
time close to two hours is 
possible. 

Huge crowds arc expected for 
the road races weekend, with the 
Tour de France winner Greg 
LcMond. the principal Cavounte 
in the professionals' 162 mile 
event on Saturday. LeMond is 
due to hold a press conference to 
discuss his chances this evening, 
and perhaps to counteract tire 
one hosted last night by his 
French rival Bernard Hinault, 
who defeated the American in 
the Coots Classic. 

Sean Kelly flew to Colorado 
Springs yesterday, having 
missed a plane connection on 
Tuesday. This means that the 
Irishman has only iwo days to 
adjust to the unaccustomed 
altitude and the dry' heat that is 
forecast for Saturday. In con- 
trast. men like LeMond. Hinault 
and lhe other favourite. Phil 
Anderson, of Australia. Steve 
Bauer of Canada and Adri Van 
der Poel. have been at altitude 
for three weeks in the Rocky 
Mountains. 

Otic surprise omission from 
lhe American team is the Olym- 
pic champion. Alexei Grewal. It 
was announced yesterday that 
his place will be taken by the 
experienced Jonathan Boyer, 
who was fifth in the 1980 
championship race, but has 
shown little form this season. 


Breakthrough by 
a forgotten man 


Lamb leads spree Kent given 

shivers 
by Moles 


• Phil Newport, aged 23, 
Worcestershire's pace bowler, 
was yesterday awarded his 
county cap. Newport joined the, 
dub from Bucki n g h a m shire in 

1 982 and has taken 80 first class 
wickets this year in his first full 
season. 

• Derbyshire batsman, Alan 
HiU. today announced that he 
wOl retire from first class cricket 
to join the coaching staff. HilL 
aged 36. made his debut m 1972 
and is currently in the middle of 
bis testimonial year, be will take 
over second team coaching and 
also help out the commercial 
department this winter. 

Minor final 

Cumberland and Oxfordshire 
will contest the Minor Counties 
Championship play-off at the 

County Ground, Worcester, on 
Saturday, September 13. 


DERBY: Northamptonshire 
have scored 421 all out 

Allan Lamb harvested his 
fourth century of the season in 
102 balls as Northamptonshire 
piled on the runs after a poor 
start against Derbyshire. 

When Holding dismissed 
Wayne Larkins and Robin 
Boyd-Moss in successive balls at 
24, Northamptonshire were 
momentarily in trouble before 
Geoff Cook (31). who passed bis 
1.000 runs for the season, and 
Robert Bailey (114) conspired 
with Lamb to send the score 
racing to 421 an out at the dose. 

Lamb went on the rampage 
after lunch with a powerful array 
' of attacking strokes to lake him 
to 50 off only 60 balls — and the 
second 50 of a superb century 
was even quicker. He punished 
the Derbyshire bowlers, scoring 
almost at wilL pulling ana 
driving with immense power 
and his 20th four carried him to 
three figures off only 102 balls. 

The same stroke also com- 
pleted a century stand with 
Bailey in only 23 overs and 
Nortbants had a second batting 
bonus point in the bank after 
only 41 overs. Bailey joined in 
the assault with a six against 
Finney as he completed his half- 


century off 77 balls. Lamb 
followed suit with an immense 
six on the the pavilion balcony 
and through a plate glass win- 
dow. The pair added 200 in 36 
overs and Lamb had made 159 
off 160 balls, with a six and 27 
fours when Jean-Jacques had 
him caught behind the wicket 
going for another forcing stroke. 

Bailey however kepi going 
merrily as he hit two sixes and 
13 fours and reached his century 
off 134 balls 

NORTHAMPTONSWRE: Rrst Innings 
■G Cooke Maher b Jean-Jacques — 31 

W Larkins bWoktino 14 

R J Boyd-Mass c Mshar b Hohflng — 0 
A J Lamb c Mahar b Jean-Jacques . 159 

RJ Betty bHottna 114 

DJCapele Maher oJswKtacqura — 5 

H A Harper Ibwb Finney 35 

tD Riptey notout 26 

NGB Cook b Rrmey 4 

N A Mafiendor b Jeao-Jocques 2 

G Smrth b FImey 3 


iFImiBy — 
Extras (b 5. to 11. 
Total (96.3 overs) 


wl.nbll) — JB 

421 

FAIL OF WICKETS: 1-24. 2-24, 363, 4- 
300. 5622. 6-342. 7-384. 3398. 9-409. ID- 
421. 

BOWUNG; Holding 24-3-86-3: Warner 18- 
1-95-0; Jean-Jacques 23-2-994; Finney 
203-1-756: Shartna 11-1496. 
Derbyshire: *K J Bernes. fB J M Maher. A 
Ml. J E Morris. B Roberts. A M Brown. R 
Srarma. A E Warner. M Jean-Jacques, M 
A Hoktng. R J Finney. 

Bonus ports: Derby 4, Nortftana A 
Umpires: P B Wight and D Uoyd. 


Leading first-class averages 


Batting 

Qusificsitan: 8 inns, avge^ 45J» 

I NO 

JJWHtaker 30 9 

CG&88r«dae 32 4 

AIKeBdwvan 19 5 

G A Hick . 34 6 

BMMcMRan 21 4 

RJBaOey 38 9 

RJ Hadlee 17 4 

CEB Bice 25 6 

MN8MA 24 9 

MW Gafllng 23' 3 

AJLamO 25 4 

RTHottnson 25 5 

A j Moles 14 3 

G Boycott 19 1 

IT Botham 15 2 

AR Border 32 4 

PM Roebuck 33 8 

VJ Marks 31 11 

PW G Parker 40 7 

DNPasi 27 7 

TSCunJs 37 . 9 

A A Metcalfe 40 1 

J E Morris 37 2 

‘denote not out 

Bowfing 

Quaflficrton: 20 wfcts, mgs 2400 


M D Marshall 
R JHWttB 
jHChtts 
STOBfka 
C A waish 
A H Gray 
T M Alderman 
M A Holding 
J Simmons 
APPndgeoft 
PWJarvts 
PBOlft 
JEEntourey 
WW Daniel 
N A Foster 
MPBcknek 
GCSmaH 
Imran Khan 
K E Cooper 
N Gifford 


O 

oaa 

4903 

632.1 
3003 
7513 
3283 

610 

343.1 
205 
516 

428.4 

4133 

4733 

402.1 
7413 

165 
5863 
3052 
3733 
49 SA 


M 

167 

138 
211 

89 

188 

63 

139 
SB 
49 

131 

82 

120 

170 

52 

204 

36 

145 

to 

86 

141 


Rws 

1493 

1879 

918 

1823 

999 

1681 

722 

1053 

629 

1091 

1200 

1142 

5S3 

931 

670 

1385 

1233 

968 

1543 

934 

1288 

1788 

1575 


Runs 

1425 

1094 

1433 

695 

2017 

934 

1882 

913 

601 

1331 

1332 
1002 

572 

1387 

2147 

503 

1680 

850 

898 

13*5 


HSAvge 


200 * 

222 

163* 

227* 

136 

224* 

129- 

156* 

112 * 

183* 

160* 

159* 

102 

135* 

104- 

150 
221- 
HO 
125 
132* 
122* 

151 
191 


W 

96 

68 

89 

42 

109 

49 

98 

47 

29 

60 

60 

45 

39 

62 

94 

22 

72 

37 

39 

54 


71.09 

67.10 
6657 

65.10 
58J6 
5756 
5653 
55.42 

5626 

54.55 

5454 

5438 

5330 

51.72 

5133 

49.46 

4932 

4840 

46.75 

46.70 

46.00 

4534 . 

4530 


Avge 
1434 
1636 
16.10 
1854 
1850 
1936 
1820 
1942 
20.72 
22.18 
99 .an 
■2226 
2235 

2237 
2234 

2238 
2291 
2297 
2 80 ? 
2335 


7183 

132 

2105 

91 

2113 

419 

95 

1091 

47 

2121 

457 

122 

1213 

52 

2332 

4382 

94 

1380 

58 

23.79 

2384 

49 

719 

30 

2336 


PA JOe Freitas 
J Gamer 
DR Pringle 
NGCowans 
TDTopley 

WICKETKEEPEIB: R J Parks 80 (73CL 7s0: D E East 72(53. 1$k 
S J RhodK 65 (55, 10): R C RusssR 52 (48 3): P R Dowmon 48 
(43. 5): G w Humpege 46 (39. 7); S A March 44 (48 2). 
FIELDSMEN: M A Lynch 3& K M Curran, R A Harper 2& G A 
Hick 27; C S Cowtkey 28 C E B Rce 25: K J Bamen 24. 
FASTEST HUNDRED: I V A RlcftanJs l02ofl48baU.SonmsMv 
G lam or gan , m Taunton. May 8 

BEST BOWLING: C A Walsh, 9 tor 72. Gtiuc — KttTC v 
Somerset, at Bristol July 21. 

Final New Zealand averages 

Batting ■ 


JGBrwwrefl 
M D Crowe 
jv Coney 
K R Rutherford 
E J Gray 
BAEdgar 
JGWrtgnt 
JJ Crowe 
IDSSmth 
DA Stirling 
TEBWn 
TJFranUn 
W Watson 
ALSO BATTED: 
ChatMd0*.& 

Bowfing 

RJ Hadlee 
JV Coney 
J G Bracewrt 
E J Gray 
E JGhatfieid 
DA String 
W Watson 
B Banes 
M □ Oowe 


Smith 3833: J G iVrigm 4-1-13-0: K R Rutherford 60-254. 


1 

NO 

Rum 

HS 

Auge 

11 

6 

386 

110 

7720 

IB 

6 

763 

106 

6625 

17 

5 

688 

140- 

57.33 

19 

3 

848 

317 

53.00 

13 

4 

467 

108 

61.88 

19 

5 

590 

110* 

42.14 

19 

1 

668 

119 

37.11 

19 

2 

624 

159 

36.70 

9 

3 

215 

48 

35.83 

7 

3 

116 

26 

2900 

9 

2 

172 

37 

2AST 

10 

0 

227 

96 

22.70 

6 

3 

30 

10 

1020 


By Ivo Tennant 

FOLKESTONE- Warwickshire 
have scored 219 for six wickets 
against Kent. 

It was so cold on the Channel 
coast that the tent (laps were 
dosed, flags were taken down in 
case they blew away and piping 
hot tea was served in tbe middle. 
It was opaque too. for much of 
the day. as five stoppages for 
bad light and ram would 
indicate. 

Yel the players struggled 
manfully on. Andy Moles batted 
243 minutes for 82. his sixth 
half-century in 15 innings to 
total 675 runs at an average of 
over 36. while Dennis Amiss 
showed what a dass player he 
remains. 

Amiss and Moles, years apart 
in age but closer in technique, 
put on 1 12 for the third wicket. 
Kent also had their bright 
moments. Davis, aged 20. a left- 
arm spinner, made a promising 
start to his career. He is from 
Margate, a town not renowned 
for producing cricketers. 

Warwickshire, who are on the 
verge of signing a young fast 
bowler from Antigua. Merrick 
(this means one or two of their 
three overseas players may not 
be retained) won tbe toss. In 
between stoppages they lost 
Smith and Kallicharran lo fine 
catches by Marsh, one taken 
standing up to Christopher 
Cowdrey. tbe other a diving 
effort. 

Amiss was soon batting 
delightfully. To his credit Davis 
kept him m check: for a while. 
Then Amiss's frill repertoire of 
shots appeared. His 73 in 109 
minutes included 11 fours. Da- 
vis eventually bowled him and a 
subdued Humpage went to an- 
other good -catch by Marsh, 
while Moles soldiered on. His 
innings included eight fours and 
a six. 


For most followers of the 
game, the great personal story 
on the first day of the season last 
Sunday was the second come- 
back of Terry Holmes. Every 
branch of the media turned out 
in force at OdsaL sharing the 
crowd's tension and dreading 
the moment when Holmes 
would go crashing to earth and 
arrive clutching a dangling arm. 
as he had done in two previous 
games for Bradford Northern. 

Everyone now knows that 
Holmes came through his time 
of trial with his shoulder, and 
bis reputation as a rugby player. 
intacL He did nothing spectacu- 
lar and did not take unnecessary 
risks but his passes made two 
tries, and that is a pretty good 
percentag: in scrum half play in 
any sphere. 

The return of Holmes took so 
much attention that no one 
seemed to notice, or be aware, 
that on tbe field at Bradford was 
another player whose rugby 
career seemed in ruins less than 
a year ago. Steve O'Neill re- 
ceived such an appalling leg 
injury that those who heard the 
crack of fractured bones on the 
field and on the terraces went 
cold inside and felt slightly sick. 

On September 22 last year 
O'Neill, a front-row forward 
with Widnes, was playing in a 
league game at Wigan. So was 
Steve Rogers, the Australian 
international centre who was 
making his expensive debut for 
Widnes. Early in the game 
Rogers suffered a leg fracture, 
winch ended his career with 
Widnes before it had begun, and 
O'Neill watched as Rogers was 
carried off. unaware that his 
own turn was coming. Later in 
the game, O’Neill went down 
under what has always been 
accepted as a perfectly fair and 
normal hard tackle. Everyone 
on the Central Park ground 


RUGBY LEAGUE. 
DIARY 

Keith Mackln 



Heard the crack and the resultant 
compound and complicated 
fracture finished him for the 
season and seemed to have 
ended his career. 

O'Neill refused to accept thai 
the multiple break meant en- 
forced retirement from Rugby 
League. He battled his way back 
to fitness after weeks in hospital 
and months on crutches, slogged 
away at training and got his 
reward when he was seated as 
substitute forward for the first 
league game of the season at 
Bradford. He came on, un- 
observed. late in the game, and 
his comeback was. for him, a 
-bigger (airy tale than the return 
ofHolmes, for in the dosing 
minutes he dived over for a 
consolation try for Widnes. 

In general terms, Sunday's 
opening day brought lhe usual 
surprises which can play a large 
pan in the destination of the 
championship, with an un- 
expectedly convincing win by 
the newly-promoted side. Bar- 
row. over Hull Kingston 
Rovers. The attendance average 
in the fust division was a 
healthy one at more than 5.500 
but second division attendances 
were mostly around the 500 
marie. 

The new National Amateur 
League got offlo a rousing start, 
with improved attendances for 
amateur fixtures and some 
exciting matches, and the Great 
Britain manager. Maurice 
Bam ford, underlined his deter- 
mined and ruthless fitness pol- 
icy by leaving out several 
allegedly unfit top players from 
his training squad this week at 
LillesbalL 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASEBALL 


TENNIS 


Mricm l.» »«<r. Boo- 
i Rogue 6; CJwtend 

> Jays VCt M cano Whan 


NORTH AJWUCA: American I 
ion Rad Sox 8 Texas I 
Mwns 9. Toronto Bbe Jays! . . 

Sox 8 Kansas Cay Royals 0; 

Turn 4. MhaaukM Browers 8 Cakfoma 
Angels 10: Baltimore Orioles 1. Now Tom 
Yankees*. Oaktand AtMetes 8: Derod T«ars 
7. Seauto Umn S. National Liagia: 
Cncmnao Rods 9. PrtBburan Prams 1. 
Montreal Expos 1. Los atom Dodgers ft 
San Franosco Gams 4. New York Men ft 
San Diego Padres 6: PMideiplaa Platts 2, 
Atlanta waves 4. Si Louts Cardt n ats ? 

i v Houston Astros, suspended 
ihpn. 


PRUDENTIAL JIMOR COUNTY CUP: Bon: 
Croup 2t« Bnstoft YorksMeC. Hertforomra 
3: Devon S. Sown Wem 4 Group 3 w 
EdjJDBSton Archery! Kent 0. Avon I: Hump, 
stweandlslaof Wigli<& Buciojhamofwe 3 . 
Group 4 |BI Carreras Cross). NortoBi 7, EM 
oi Scotland 2. Sussax 5. Oeshra 3. Groups 
_ ■- Norm 


a Lancaster)- Notenonomswre 6. 

IM 3. Dorsal 8 Staffordshire 3 Groups (at 
PeteTOorougal: Gtouceetanlira 8 Durham 
and Qawiana ft Lecesterslva 5. Warmck- 
sw 2 Group 


FOOTBALL 


WEST GERMAN LEAGUE: BoruSSia 
MOncnenotaoracn 1. Welder Bremen J: 
Foruta Dussefdorf 2. Wsktiofl Uannhean ft 
Bonissa Donmund 8 FC Hamburg ft 
Cologne i. Baser Leverkusen 4: Hamtitag 2. 
Brown Frank**! ft Scnake 2. Barer 
Uertmgeni. 


GOLF 


WARWICKSHIRE^* brings 
A J Mores b Bapens 


P A Smith c M*TBh & C S Gewttm 
A I Katocharran c Marsh b Bepbsts 
D L Arnes b Davis 


‘donate not out 


1G W HdRtpage c Marsh D Baptists 

Asd Dfn c raws 0 Underwood 

A M Ferretra not out 

A J KorrnotouS 


0 

M 

Rum 

W 

Awja 

1535 

42 

390 

19 

2032 

75 

23 

194 

7 

2771 

411 

122 

1042 

37 

28.16 

4382 

143 

1087 

37 

2927 

1914 

47 

457 

13 

35.15 

255 

36 

1025 

28 

36.60 

3081 

59 

963 

26 

37JJ3 

1573 

18 

610 

15 

40.66 

495 

8 

ISO 

2 

95 DO 

agar 1-04-0: T J FTCnldii 

14MIDS 


Extra (to 4. w 2. nb 2) . 
Tool (B wkts, 87 overs) ... 


■82 
.11 
- 2 
.73 
.19 
.11 
.13 
..0 
8 


WHITTINGTON BARRACKS, SUBerftMre: 

Women's heme Internationale; WMea bt 
itated, 5-4 {Ween names tasty Fromms 
(Wales 2. Ireland n- V Thomas and U 
RBvrinQs bt C Hourvtane and M McKenna. 3 
and l.T Ctxjoo and L (shenwod lost to T 
0 FMy and LBehan. 1 nole: S Aobsns end J 
Foroerbt V McOuflandand E Hms.2 and 1. 

Singles (Wales ft (rated 31 Thornes lost » 

Hourmane, 2 and i: Crwg « GResy. 3 art 
1: Rawtoos fit Benin. 4 and 3: Hotels m 
M cKenna. 2 ana 1. Fnasr ton id Htens. 2 
and 1. bnenrcoa tost b McOufite. i hole. 

SmCxnd lead En gland. 2-1 (Entybli names 
ten Feunoroee (England I. Seated Zf. P 
Johnson and S Siapcott halved w*i B 
Reeerison and S ttwson: J CoUngham and J 
Ttemna naked w«i L Hop® and A Garamft J 
Hk and S uoorerott kw » J Forties and L 
Anderson. 3 and 1 

LEADING US LPGA MONEYWINMERS M 
USt TPBratSey.S483.149 (about E3KL008L 
2. J Mistar. 5275374. 3. B Klrift52S8397. 4. 

AAIOOBS22«309:5 JGMOes. 5196332:6.0 
Johnson. S1W334: 7. M-B Zimmerman. 

5192666. 8 P S n een en . $162,819: 8 V 
Sknter. SI 58394. 10. JDckinson. 5152507. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

STONES BITTER SECOND DIVISION: 

Runcorn 20. Keteey 6 
AUCKLAND: Omnitt World Cup; FM 
New Zested m. Austrctt 10. Ttadutea 
(tiqMrt Fiance 2*. dial Bntun 1ft 

SAILING 

HAYUNQ ISLAND $0: Contender European 
4- t, sweet 16 (P 
Nmanosj. Gianad SC. 2. Blast Is Stack rw 
ucCtosm. Non» of rated y& 3. weo&s 

Wonder (J Webb). RAF SA: 4. 395 (J 

HatewiL Haywgs tend SC. Overoit: 1. n , 

NewendE: 2. Harrow 3. N Upton-Brown JJlOWD SiWfly 


Dertuslwe ftCambrx>oe0. S3ora^craU>« 
(It NoBmg nan n Somerset 9. Hereford ami 
Worcester 0. Swapshra 5. North of Scotland 
4 Group IB iai Maxtenheao) Bedtorasnee 7. 
Wwtsnxe 2. Nonhampnruiira 6. CunMa 3. 
Group 11 (at Glasgow)-. Channel tends ft 
Norouitetana3: South □< Scotland ft te of 
Man D Piwn eted: Devon. Hampstare end te 
olMgro. Sussex. Nowteamstaa. Lacester- 
ahue. Camondpestwe. Snropsrore. BaafonJ- 
eiwe. South of Scotland niliaauil South 
waies. Avon. East oi Sauted. Non* Wales, 
Durnam and Ctoveted. Defttystura. Hereford 
and Worcester. Cumbria. Me tti Man. 

GMk Group 1 (el Queens dUU Surrey 7. 
Essex ft Yorkshire 9. Avon 1 Otoup ? (at 
Cheaham Boo* Devon 7. UtUuai 2; 
LeroesnrsNra 6. Noatngnentero 3. Groups 
(at Cheltenham); Wamnoorore 7. Kant ft 
Berksnu* 8 Hampshire and (ale ot Wight 1 
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ahra ft Lancasters 1: Sussex 7. Ln co tnpSu 
X Group 5 (at Winchester); Chestm », 
Oxfocosnrs ft NotftSfc G. Metd o rd s iwe ft 
Grot* 7 (at SofhuN Anfeni Hereford end 
Worcester 5. East of Santana 4: Qoucesur- 
shrt 5. aatiorostw# 4. Group 8 (at Eater): 
South Wales 7. Somerset 2. North of Seolted 

i iiavKsean 

TShropetw 8. Group (at Hetetburgnu 
South oi Seated ft Channel tends 1: 
Cumtina 8 tele of Man 0 Promo te d : Staroy. 
Devon. WanvKAahrn. CamonGOHtm. Nor- 
Jo*. Hereford and Worcesiergotah Wales. 
Suite. South 01 Scotland. Relented. Avoy 
Non m gtaBt u hra. Kent. tecomiKra. Oxford- 
awe. Gtoucasterawe. Sowaet. Shrop- 
shre. teal Man. 

MEN’S SINGLES: Fotath round: BBockar 
fNG) lx G DomeBy (US). 6-4. 63. 8-7^4; 
M Maar (CzlM MWttndar (Swg). $-7,6- 
3. 63. 6-4: M Srejber (Cz)bt T Wfeken 
(ItSI. 67. 7-6. 6V64. 

WOMEN'S SINGLES: Quaftr-Mr S 
Graf (WG) Of B Gadusak (US). 63. 61 . 

~ VOLLEYBALL 

Womens world champkmships «n 

CrochMfoeabiekGroiro. A [tu Z ana). Bitimr- 
«• 3. Caachoslovalua 2. South Korea 3. 
Canada 0 Owgi B (Bt Pbeni Ctena 3, East 
Germany 1: Sovrot Unon ft frnsro 0. Graop 
C (at &mo* Guta ft tezs 0. Peru ft west 
Germany 0. Group D (at Otomouc]- Japan ft 
NQftnKorMI. Untied Slain 3. Rahrl; Japan 
3, nvy 0 


[Draycoa water SC), a. Webb. 


SPEEDWAY 


.219 

G C Small. T A Mimton and *N Sffort to 
tiSL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-21. 2-32. 3-146. 4- 
195.5-196.6218 
KENT; M R Benson. N R Taytor. C J 
Tavaro. D G Atttt. G R Cowdrey. -C S 
Coworoy. E a E Baptiste. tS A March. R M 
Qkson. A P DOB and D L underwood. 
Bonus pores: Kent 2, wanriekshra 2. 
Umpires: A G T WMahaad and K J Lyon 


NATIONAL 
Keynes 26. 


LEAGUE: Poole 51. Mfen 


SQUASH 


The fourth race of the BASF 
40th Anniversary Merlin 
Rocket championships at 
Abci^och was postponed due to 
heavy winds. 


HONG KOfkk opra taumBinamrAvrouxi: _ An 

M. 1M. 10* Jansner Khan (Paifl M S U P 

{teas* iAusl 9*1. 9-4. 65: A Adamm NieH Act 


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C Jotim (BS) n a wamstedt 
(SweL 610. i-8 93. 85. 66: P Kemon H» 
WDlttdd*BS(GB).M.92.6l 1 6h 


Nigel Aspinall won his 200th 
game in 20 appearances since 
1966 in the President's Cup 
Croquet Tournament at 
Hurlingham yesterday. 


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36 


SPORT 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


FOOTBALL: EVANS AFRAID OF BEING DRAGGED INTO ENGLAND’S HOOLIGANISM PROBLEMS 


Worried Wales 
campaign to 

prevent a clash 
of supporters 


Worried Wales have plead- 
ed with their supporters not to 
risk a confrontation with En- 
gland supporters next week 
when both countries play in 
Scandinavia. England face 
Sweden in an international 
match in Stockholm, while 
Wales begin their European 
championship campaign 
against Finland in Helsinki. 

Welsh supporters plan to 
travel by ferry from Newcastle 
and Alun Evans, the Welsh 
FA secretary, said yesterday: 
“I will be contacting the FA. 
We are afraid we might be 
dragged into another country's 
problems. We will make every 
effort to work with the FA to 
ensure there are no incidents. 
We don't want a repeat of the 
West Ham United - Man- 
chester United ferry fracas. 

“We urge any Welsh 
supporters going to Finland to 
ensure that they do not find 
themselves travelling through 
Sweden. It's in everybody's 
interest that British football 
has a clean sheet next week." 

UEFA, who are closely 
monitoring the behaviour of 
supporters, meet in Prague 
next Thursday to reconsider 1 

Top clubs 
lured by 
Cup cash 

Everton and West Ham 
United are among 14 first 
division clubs who have given 
the much-maligned. Full 
Members' Cup a boost by 
entering this season's com- 
petition. Although Liverpool. 
Manchester United. Tottenham 
Hotspur and Arsenal have de- 
clined to take pan, the tour- 
nament has attracted almost 
twice as many clubs as it did 
last season. 

The Full Members' Cup was 
widely condemned and at- 
tracted little interest in its early 
stages but Chelsea's 5-4 victory 
over Manchester Gty in last 
season's Wembley final drew a 
67.000 crowd. The two finalists 
each made more than £100.000. 
a figure which has dearly in- 
terested dubs who previously 
shunned the competition. 

Every match will be a straight 
knock-out. with extra time and 
penalties if needed. There will 
be no replays. The 22 second 
division clubs will take part in 
the first round Aston Villa. 
Charlton Athletic. Coventry 
City. Manchester City, Norwich 
City, Southampton and 
Wimbledon will come in at the 
second round stage but Everton. 
West Ham United Sheffield 
Wednesday. Chelsea, Newcastle 
United Oxford United and 
Watford will not be involved 
until the third round 
DRAW* Rnt round: Sundortand v Barns- 
ley; Grimsby Town v Hu« Cay. Stoke City v 
Sheffield Unwed; Huddersfield Town v 
Blackburn Rover Leeds United v Brad- 
ford City; Ounam Attune v Derby County; 
Brighton and Hove Albion v Birmingham 
City: MlSwaH * West Bromwich Alban; 
Shrewsbury Town v Readng; Ipswich 
Town v Plymouth Argute: Portsmouth v 
Crystal Pataca. 

Matches to be played on September 17. 
October lor October 22 


the ban on Football League 
dubs competing in European 
competition. The ban fol- 
lowed the Heysel stadium 
tragedy 16 months ago when 
Liverpool and Juventus 
supporters at the European 
Cup final clashed 
England's inclusion in the 
European championship was 
at one time threatened and 
Evans added* “We don't want 
anybody to have any excuse 
for blaming British supporters 
for more trouble." 

Welsh followers do not 
travel in large numbers, but 
Evans confirmed: “Some are 
planning to travel by ferry 
from Newcastle and there is 
every chance England 
supporters will also be ou 
board" 

• Tony Norman, the Hull 
City goalkeeper, has with- 
drawn from the Welsh squad 
because of a persistent back 
injury. Norman, who made 
his debut for Wales last sea- 
son. winning three caps, has 
been unable to train since be 
injured his back in the open- 
ing game of the season, al- 
though he has not missed a 
match so far. 

Knock-out 
blow for 
Hartlepool 

Middlesbrough, who began 
the season playing on the 
ground of their neighbours, 
Hartlepool United returned to 
Ayresome Park on Tuesday 
night to knock Hartlepool out of 
the Littlewoods Challenge Cup. 
Ripley gave Middlesbrough the 
lead after 31 minutes and 
Hamilton, who had missed a 
fifth minute penalty, made it 2-0 
to earn a 3-1 win on aggregate. 

Robinson, the Shrewsbury 
Town forward scored a hat-trick 
in the Iasi six minutes of his 
side's 4-0 win at Crewe Alexan- 
dra to also earn a place in the 
second round 

Walwyn. who netted three for 
York City in their first leg match 
at Sunderland scored in the last 
minute of injury time on Tues- 
day to deny Sunderland a place 
in the second round Buchanan, 
who was signed from Blytb 
Spartans last month, scored 
twice for Sunderland and when 
Proctor made it 3-0 in injury 
time. Sunderland looked to 
have done enough. But 
Walwyn *s last-gasp goal took the 
game into extra time, with the 
aggregate scores level at 5-5, 
from which York emerged the 
winners on away goals. 

Stockport County scored 
through Wilkes after 22 seconds 
of their 3-3 draw at Tranmera 
Rovers which gave them a 5-4 
aggregate win. Two goals in the 
last three minutes took South- 
end United to victory at Brent- 
ford while Huddersfield Town 
needed extra time goals from 
Cork and Shearer for a second 
round place after Halifax Town 
had wiped out their first leg 
deficit with goals by Galloway 
and Thorn ber. 



In demand: Bayern Munich want Lerby back 

Come back Lerby 


Ulli Hoe ness, the Bayern 
Munich manager, wants Sorcn 
Lerby. the Danish World Cup 
mid field player, back in his ride 
by the end of the year. Lerby was 
transferred from the West Ger- 
man champions to Monaco 
during the close season, but 
Hoenesssaid he let him go only 
because he could not match the 
salary. 

“If he just gives me the word, 
we will stan talks about buying 
him back. 1 told him in the 
that there was a big 
between being sev- 
enth or eighth in France and 
being champions of West Ger- 
many and perhaps Europe." 
Hoeness said. 

In the West German league on 
Tuesday. Bayer Leverkusen 
brat Cologne 4-1 to remain at 
the top. ahead of Hamburg. 

Cologne, chasing their first 
win in four matches, had most 
of the play but lacked marks- 
men. Rolff, Waas, Hinterberger 
and Scheier scored tor 
Leverkusen. 


Hamburg stay level with 
Leverkusen on seven points but 
behind on. goal difference after 
goals from Gruendd and Kaltz 
had given them a 2-0 win over 
Eintracht Frankfort, who suf- 
fered their first defeat of the 
season. 

Werder Bremen withstood a 
continuous onslaught from 
Bernssia MOncbengladbacfa. 
scrambling shot after shot away 
from their goal area, before 
emerging 2-1 winners, to move 
into third place. Kutzop scored 
twice from the penalty spot for 
the winners, while Thiele sewed 
for the home team. 

Bayer Uerdingen lie in fifth 
place behind Frankfurt after 
their unbeaten run was brought 
to an end by a 2-1 away defeat to 
Schalke, for whom Bistram and 
Taueber scored. 

In a match between the 
season's probable relegation 
candidates, Dteseldorf moved 
off the bottom of the table at the 
expense of FC Hamburg, who 
they beat 2-0. 


Six world stars retire 


Bonn (Reuter) — Only six of 
the 13 players who represented 
West Germany in the World 
Cup Final in Mexico two 
months ago are in the squad 
announced by The manager. 
Franz Beckenbauer, for a match 
with Denmark on September 
24. 

The changes were largely 
forced on Beckenbauer by the 
decisions of six players — the 
captain, Kari-Heinz 

Rummenigge, Hans-Peter 
BriegeL Felix Magaih. Ditmar 
Jakobs. Norbert Eder and Dieter 
Hdness — to mire from the 
international scene. 

But Beckenbauer has resisted 
the temptation to start from 
scratch, listing only two un- 
capped players in the 19-strong 
squad for special training from 
September 7 to 10. They are 


both forwards — Roland 
Wohlfarth, of Bayern Munich, 
and Dieter Eckstein, of 
Nuremberg. 

Wohlfarth’s did) colleague, 
Micbael Rummenigge. the 
younger brother of Kari-Heinz, 
who made a brief appearance for 
his country as a substitute three 
years ago, is also included. 

Kari-Heinz Forster, the stop- 
per, who played in the 3-2 defeat 
by Argentina in Mexico, and 
Pierre Littbarski, the winger, 
who was on the bench for the 
World Cup final, are not listed 
because of dub commitments in 
France. 

SQUAD: Qoa ft— p arr E bnmei. H 
SchumBdwrJiihnmifr K Augentfntar. 
A Braiune, T Barthold. Q Buchwald. W 


Rummerngge, R WohHarth, R VOIor, H 
Waas. 


Bassett’s 

pride, 

Croker’s 

fall 

Dave Bassett, the Wimbledon 
manager, wishes the League 
programme finished today. “AX 
feast that's what my Mum 
wishes." he said. Bassett can 
afford to joke as Wimbledon, a 
Southern League dub 10 years 
ago. proudly stand oh top of the 
first division after beating 
Charlton Athletic 1 -0 at Selhorst 
Park on Tuesday flight 

"Even if we are relegated, we 
can say we were top of the 
League." said Bassett, whose 
side’s winner came from Dennis 
Wise, aged 19, three minutes 
from time in front of only 62131 
spectators. 

The match was watched by 
Ted Croker, tire FA secretary, 
who recently suggested that 
Wimbledon should not be in the 
first division. “We made our 
poim and Mr Croker probably 
regrets saying that," Bassett 

said. 

Lennie Lawrence, the Char- 
lton manager, was bitterly dis- 
appointed by the defeat, 
especially after Tais side had won 
at Manchester United on Sat- 
urday. “I spent two days trying 
to nail the players feet back on 
the floor, but seem to have 
foiled," be said. 

Maurice Evans, the Oxford 
United manager, also had harsh 
words for bis side after the 3-1 
defeat against Everton at 
Good ison Park. “Absolute rub- 
bish." Evans said. 

But Howard Kendall, the 
Everton manager, was delighted 
that his makeshift team had 
reached second in the table. 
Everton took 51 minutes to 
break through, with a Steven 
penalty, but Houghton equal- 
ized before Harper and Langley 
sealed the points. 

Tottenham Hotspur, the pre- 
vious leaders, went down 2-0 at 
Southampton. Clarke, the 
£400.000 signing from Bourne- 
mouth, scored his fifth goal 
since arriving at the Dell and 
Wallace notched the second to 
hand Tottenham their first de- 
feat this season. 

West Ham United also came 
unstuck for only the second time 
in nearly a year at Upton Park. 
Goals from Clough and Webb 
gave Nottingham Forest a 2rl 
win, but. while Bobby Robson, 
the En gland manager, can rub 
his bands in anticipation at 
these two exciting prospects, it 
seemed highly questionable 
selection policy that Andy Rox- 
burgh, the new Scotland man- 
ager, could leave out 
McAvermie from his squad after 
the way the forward burst 
through to give West Ham the 
lead. 

Quinn and Adams, the Arse- 
nal yo uniters, scored the goals 
that ended Sheffield 
Wednesday’s unbeaten start to 
the season at Highbury, bat 
Chelsea were booed off at 
Stamford Bridge after die 0-0 
draw with Cbveatry City. 
George Curtis, -the Coventry 
manager, was jubilant with his 
side's start saying: “Everybody 
was talking about us as being 
relegation candidates. Hus year 
we intend surprising a few 
people." 

Oldham Athletic went top of 
the second division, their high- 
est league position in 50 years 
when Ron Fulcher's 25th pen- 
alty was enough to win 1-0 at 
Ipswich Town, despite Old- 
ham's Milligan being sent off 
after 73 minutes with his second 
bookable offence. Leeds United 
also won with 10 men at 
Barnsley, Baird scoring the only 
goal after 27 minutes and being 
sent off six minutes later for a 
foul. 


HOCKEY 


German coach tips 
England to 
win World Cup 

FromSydney Frisian. Hamburg 


Klaus KJeiier. tire West Ger- 
man coach, believes that En- 
gland can win the World Cop 
starting in London on October 
4. He is co unfounded by the 
speed, fitness and skills of the 
England team, who defeated 
West Germany 4-2 in Tuesday’s 
international match and drew 3- 
3 in the training match yes- 
terday morning. 

England’s strongest asset on 

Tuesday was their adaptability. 

which enabled them to put 
together a match-winning for- 
ward line in the absence of the 
injured Batchelor. Keriy, whose 
injury problems have now been 
overcome, was England’s spear- 
head in Tuesday’s match. He 
made the German defence look 
ordinary,- none more so than 
Fischer, one of the world’s best 
deep defenders who. according 
to Kleiter. is worried about his 
exams and could not give of his 
best. 

In yesterday's match, which 
was played in appalling weather 
conditions, both sides made 
several England’s field 

of choice having been reduced 
from 16 to 14 because Barber 
and Hughes were not available 
for business reasons. The Ger- 
mans. who rested Fischer, took 
a quick 2-0 lead through 
Schmidi-Opper and Hilgers. 

But shortly before halftime. 


Dodds reduced the lead fr om a 
short corner. England emerged 
from a perilous situation m ine 
second halt having at one nme 
been reduced to nine men as 
Leman and Keriy were given 
yellow temporary suspension 
cards for dangerous tackling. 
Hilgers put the Germans 3-l in 
front before GrimJey replied 
with some help from Sherwani. 
And almost on time. Dodds 
saved the match with a scram- 
bled gOfil- 

Colin Whalley, the England 
manager, while rejoicing in his 
team's deeds of derringdo, still 
sounds a note of caution. His 
experience tells him that tire 
Germans, who can rise to the b ig 
occasion, should never be writ- 
ten off for the World Cup, 
despite their setbacks, and by 
the time be comes to London. 
Fischer himself may get his 
sums right. 

England now play Spain in 
two matches at Barcelona on 
September 20 and 21 and are 
looking forward to these enga ffi- 
ments with renewed interest 

WEST GERMANY: T Rank. A MW, T 
Gunn, V Fried. U Hanoi, A Kotor. E 
Schmkft-Opper, J Hurtsr. T Rock. S 
EUocfter. M Hiknro- 

BfOLAND: J Hast J BoBor, D Fafim* 
P Boland. M Grintoy.J Shaw. R Dodds, R 
CWt [sub: K BnauraJ. R Loman. S Korty. I 

Umpires: J Uaopors (BMgiunQ. M Rotor 
feast Germany). 


BASKETBALL 

Palace and 
Brunei 
set to join 
forces 

Crystal Palace, England's 
most famous but recently trou- 
bled National League dub, are 
to mew with their division one 
rivals, BruneL Home fixtures for 
the season beginning on 
September 20 will be split 
between tbe Crystal Palace na- 
tional sports centre and Brunei 
University, Uxbridge. 

Palace have won more na- 
tional titles than any other 
English dub but have had 
financial problems for several 
seasons and earlier this summer 
announced they would have no 
American players and would not 
pay their English staff ibis 
season. 

The clubs readied agreement 
in principal yesterday morning 
and the m e rg e r was due to be 
ratified at a meeting of division 
one dubs 

The merger reduces to 13 the 
□umber of division one dubs for 
the new season, following 
Manchester United’s takeover 
of Manchester Giants and the 
withdrawal of Worthing. 

• Bracknell Pirates have sacked 
Mize lie Rivers, their new 
American player, only 12 days 
after he arrived in this country. 
Mark Dunning the Pirates' 
head coach, said that Rivers, 
aged 23, a 6ft 9in centre from 
Little Rock. Arkansas, was “just 
not good enough.” 


RUGBY UNION 


Wood can improve 
image of the game 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


If Dudley Wood, the new 
secretary of tbe Rugby Football 
Union, «•»" n w fa twin as con- 
tented a front as he did yes- 
today over tbe next few 
tn r bnic nt years for the sport, he 
wiB be doing wefl. Mr Wood, 
formerly Surrey's re pr ese n tative 
on Oe RFU committe e, was a 
defigbtfiri chief speaker at the 

launch fa London of the fifteenth 

Rothmans Rugby Yearbook and 

confirmed what an admirable 
choice be may prove in public 
relations terms for the game. 

Mr Wood fan two initial 
objectives: to Improve the ef- 
ficiency of the RFU and improve 
both the union's and the game's 
image. His task has not been 
helped by recent events off tbe 
field nor, one imagines, by the 
documentary programme First 
Tuesday produced by Yorkshire 
Television , who did not have to 
work too hard to portray Rngby 
Union as the villain over tbe 
case of Steve Ford, the pro- 
fessionalized Cardiff wfag. 

“My fast task is to change our 
ad minis tration, not because ef 
the people who have been work- 
ing there for years hot because 
the work has increased at such a 
rate no team could keep up with 
it” Mr Wood said. ‘We have to 
delegate, be more efficient, find 
ont what out targets and objec- 
tives are. 

“We mast also get oar public 
relations right. For example, we 
in England have worked hard on 
oar amatear stafas oommitlBe to 
change the International 
Board's thinking on writing 
books or broadcasting and 
retaining the money. In the end 
ft worked tort we still got advene 


co«MB»»nfg because the new rul- 
ing was not made retrospective. 

The reason for that — which 
vras not made dear— is because 
it would have been so unfair to 
all the people who went without 
fiimiirifau rewards to retain their 
ants tern stabs. Not only weald 
it have been unfair they aright 
even have sued us”. 

Mr Wood left a life-long 
career with ICI to become RFU 
secretary. “But though rugby 
was my hobby, when 1 was in 
business, now it is my business I 
hope the fan I have always had 
from rugby remains. If I am not 
enjoying it, I am sore those who 
play it will not”. 

There has been discussion as 
to whether the tide of secretary 
is tbe correct one rather than 
chief executive of tbe RFU; Mr 
Wood is not worried by tides bat 
suggests that be expeds to do 

some leading, rather than be led, 
in official RFU thinking, “in my 
own opinion 9 93 per cent of 
people involved fa die game 
want it to remain amatear”, he 
«iJ With a veiled reference to 
New Zealand’s investigations 
into the financial implications of 
tbe simmer tom by the New 
Zealand Cavaliers to South 
Africa he added: “We all hope 
the World Cap wfil go ahead but 
it is not sometfa m g we can 
fudge.” 

Should the tomnament do so, 
one of the stars may well be 
Philippe Sella, the French cen- 
tre whom Rothmans have muned 
as their player of the year. 

Rothmans Rugby Yearbook, 
published by Queen Anne press 
(hardback £1455, softback 
£9.95). 


Record on 
violence 
defended 

By Bryan Stiles 

The public should give rugby 
the chance to sort out the 
problem of violence on the field, 
according to the president of the 
Rugby Football Union, Alan 
GrimsdelL Mr Grimsdel! was 
speaking at Twickenham yes- 
terday after the imprisonment 
of David Bishop, the Wales 
international, for punching an 
opponent in a Welsh dub 
match. ' 

Mr GrimsdeQ defended the 
record of the sport claiming it 
was no worse than when be 
played the game 30 years ago. 
“The number of instances of 
this nature is very small com- 
pared with tbe number of people 
who play tbe game every week,” 
be said. “It is certainly not any 
worse than it was in my playing 
days in Buckinghamshire. 

“Referees cannot see every- 
thing that goes on and you 
cannot stop people going to 
court Once the law is involved 
you cannot stop it” • 

. Mr Grimsdell was at Twick- 
enham for the reception to mark 
the start of the second season of 
awards presented by Pernod to 
reward high try-scoring in En- 
glish rugby. The company wiD 
again spend- £60,000 on equip- 
ment for high try-scoring dubs 
in English county cup com- 
petitions. 

#Three weddings have dis- 
rupted Wasps' preparations for 
their first match of the season at 
Maesieg on Saturday.Their En- 
gland international lull back, 
Huw Davies, is on honeymoon, 
the England wing, Simon Smith, 
is attending a wedding and the 
England under-23 scrum hal£ 
Steve Bates, is also on 
honeymoon. 


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BOXING: A NATIONAL HERO IN HIS COUNTRY 


Tangstad’s outlawed trade 
slips under Norway guard 


LAS VEGAS (AP) - Steffen 
Tangstad, tbe only professional 

boxer in a country that outlaws 

tbe sport, suddenly finds kbxtsdf 

something of a national hero fa 
Norway. Reporters and photog- 

raphers from Norwegian news- 
papers have virtually lived with 
Tangstad bene during the past 

month, sending back dozens of 
photographs and thousands of 
words on his improbable quest 
for a portion of tbe heavyweight 
title. Verdens Gang, the 
country’s biggest newspaper, 
alone sent four writers and two 
photographers. 

And. while Norway’s state- 
nm television refuses to show 
Tangsad’s boot against Mi- 
chael Spinks, tbe International 
Boxing Federation champion, 

demand is reportedly heavy for 

tickets to closed-circuit show- 
ings set for 430am on Sunday. 

A Bergen company, Initiativ 
Bergen S-A, has arranged to 
show the closed-circuit broad- 

cast at 32 locations fa Norway. 
The company claim that be- 

tween 50 and 60 par Beat of the 
tickets have been sold in ad- 

vance. at prices ranging from 
£25 to £50. 

“It’s a ii trie bit fanny, people 
don't quite know what to do 
about it." Tangstad said. “In a 
way they accept me, bat fa 
another way they don't accept 
the sport. They want to see the 
fight, bat then again, they don't 
want to show it no national 
television." 

Tangstad himself isn't happy 
about his country's 1981 de- 
cision to ban professional 
boding- “There's a lot of dorab 
laws in Norway,” said Tangstad, 

who lives in Tonsbtrg, about an 

hour's drive sooth of Oslo. 
“They don't give people the 
freedom to do what they want to 
do." 

To pursue his career. Tang- 
stad was forced to leave the 
cu pon y in 1981 after only one 

professional fight. The dedsten 

to ban professional boxing 
couldn't have come at a worse 
time for Tangstad, the nation's 

top prospect who was a five-time 

Scandinavian champion and a 
member of the country's 1980 
Olympic team. 

“I made up my mind several 
years ago to be a professional 
fighter and I left my country so I 
coaid do that," said Tangstad, 
aged 27. “Lookup back, it was 



Tangstadaui unlikely attraction at home, an underdog abroad 


tough. But it didn't seem as 

tough at the time." Tangstad 

moved to Chicago, where he 
buOt up a 16-9-1 record before a 
combination of homesickness 
and frustration with small pay- 

days prompted hhn to mere to 
Denmark in 1983. From there, 

he fought a succession of Euro- 

pean heavyweights, finally win- 
ning the European title with a 
12-round decision over Laden 
Rodriguez In November 1984 
Foot months later, however, 
Tangstad lost both the tide and 
his first professional fight to 

Anders Ekhmd. of Sweden, who 

Stopped him fa tire fowth round. 

Tangstad clabnwi he fought with 
on injured back, but do w hesi- 

tates to use that as an excuse.“It 
was such a big fight, such a big 
promotion. It was a Norwegian 
guy against a Swedish gny. the 
first time two Scandinavians 
had foagfat for tbe European 
tide," he said. "He was better 
than me tint day.** 

Tangstad recaptured the tide 

last April against John West- 

ganL of England, bat still had 

net cracked the world heav y- 
weight rankings. He remained 
virtually nkorn outside of 


Europe until Botch Lewis and 
Don Kissg, the American pro- 
moters, selected him for Spinks* 
second heavyweight title defense 
— a selection many boxing 
observers felt was made to give 
Spinks an ea$y title defense. 

Tbe Nevada Athletic Com- 
mission publicly called for tbe 
promoters to justify Tangstad as 

an opponent, before finally 
approving him for the fight. 
That has not impressed Las 

Vegas oddsmakers who ™h«» 

the brawling Nnrwefaan an 8-1 
underdog in the scheduled 15- 
roand fight at the Las Vegas 
HBton/’u’s easy to pick Spirits 
a$ a winner." Tangstad admits. 
“They know more aboat hhn." 

Tangstad professes not to be 
distur b ed by toe whirlwind of 
publicity. And, after spending 
five weeks at the Hilton prepar- 

ing for tbe fight, he feels be may 
have tbe borne advantage 
against Spinks. “This feels like 
home to me, now," he said, 
gesturing out his 20th flow 

window at the massive resort. 

“We went to Los Angeles for a 

day and. when we got back, I 

came in toe room and thoi ' 

It's sure good in be borne.' 


Graham 
bout on 

Herol Graham, who has been 
given medical clearance to carry 
on boxing, will meet Tony 
Harrison, of tbe United Stales. 

at the Albert Hall on September 

17. The bout bad been in doubt 

when the British and European 
middleweight champion bad to 
undergo hospital tests, which 
■included a brain scan, because 
of headaches. . . 

Mike Barrett, the bout’s pro- 
moter, said yesterday: “Henri is 
100 percent fit and bis trainer 
Brendan Ingle phoned me to say 
that he wilfdefinitely go ahead 
with the fight." Graham, who is 
ranked No 2 in the world by the 
World Boxing Council, bad 
apparently been suffering from a 
virus. 

Brian Anderson, who is also 
trained by Ingle, has been 
nominated to meet the southern 
area champion. Tony Burke. in 
an eliminator for tbe British 
middleweight title. 

Move to match 
Bugner 
with Holmes 

Sydney (AP) — The former 
European and Commonwealth 
heavyweight champion. Joe 
Bogner. could meet the former 
world champion, Larry Holmes. 

of the United States, m Sydney 

later this year, tin: Australian 

promoter. Bin Mordey, 'said 
yesterday. 

Bugner, aged 36, will end a 30- 
momh absence from the ring 

when he fights the American, 

James “Quick" Tillis, at tbe 
IZOOO-seater Sydney Entertain- 
ment Centre on September IS. 
Mordey said he baa asked his 

American agent, Don Majesfd, 

to contact Holmes and offer him 
a match with Bugner, ■ if the 
former European and Common- 
wealth champion, now based in 
Sydney, defeated Tfllis “Nego- 

tiations have begun bat it wifi 
depend on what tenns and 

conditions Holmes and his 
agents want, or need, aid 
whether Hohnes himself has the 
fitness," Mordey said. 

The Humaran-bor 
sakh “A fight with 
would really appeal to me. but 

first I have to take care of 

Tii/is." Holmes has not fought 

since his two defeats by Mhrheal 
Spinks, but, has frequently 
talked of making a return to life 
ring. 


TABLE TENNIS 

England 

warned 

Desmond Douglas. England’s 
top player, has warned his team 
mates not to be complacent as 
they launch their campaign to 
regain a place in the European 
premier league against Turkey 
in Ponies bury, near Shrews- 
bury. on September 27. 

The England men's team last 
played Turkey in the European 
championship earlier this year 
and won 5-0. but Douglas is 
taking nothing for granted. “I 
beat their number one. Yaldiz. 
in straight games in Prague fail 
they were both dose games and 1 
intend to treat him with 
respect." Douglas said. “Turkey, 
will be no pushovers." 

The fixture is the first of seven 
for the new season and Donald 
Parker, the England team coach, 
knows exactly what he wants. 
“Wcare heading for the premier 
division.” he said. 


MOTOR RACING 

Switch for 
Sheene 

Barry Sheene and Johnny 
Cgcoho, the former world mo- 
tor cycle racing champions, are 
to renew past rivalries on Sun- 
day on four wheels in 
Silverst one's Istel RAC Tourist 
Trophy race, the tenth round of 
the European Touring Car 
championship. 

Sheene, twice world 500cc 
champion in the mid-1970s, 
drives a Colt Starion turbo for 
the demanding 107-lap. 500- 
kilometre race, while Cecotto, 
tbe world 350cc champion in 
1975, will be at the wheel of a 
Volvo 24OT. 

Sheene Is warming to the 
rge of taking on Cteotto 
“I used to beat him ail of 
time on the 500cc machines, 
but he used to beat me in the 
750cc races. It's good to race 
against hhn again." 


TUESDAY’S FOOTBALL RESULTS 


RUST DIVISION: ArsaraJ 2. ShafSM 
WEttiOsday 0: . Chjn; vi mmrn ft 
Wmttedon 1: CheteHM 0. Covonuy Ccy ft 
Ewton 3, Oxford United 1: SouStsmp^g 

Z Tottenham Hotspur ft WMHamUniad 

I.Nottnghcra Forest 2. 

SECOND NVMON: Barnsley ft Loads 
UrAsd 1; Hoi City ft Portsmouth % 
temtti Town ft Ofdham a M eflc ft 

Shettia*! umsd 2. MBral i; Stofcs C*y 1. 

Wost Bremwfcli Albion 1. 

LfTTLEWOOOS CHALLENGE CUP: Ftrtt 

gsad . first tag: Gsrfesta 1. Grtmsty ft 

Mod. Mcend tog: Btacktwm Z 

0 (Btoddmn won 5-1 on oo- 

uofaon ft Bury 0 (unl-a? 

ft Southend 3 tang 2-4fcBrtasol 

C i, Bournemouth i (oggjfib Bumtay 1, 

Rochdale 3 tan zSfGrcbMgell l. 
Onent O (aggS-SfcCnww D. avowrfxvy 4 

Lincoln C. 

Lmcotn won on arw goals); MansStaj 2, 
wabaa 4 tag 2-^ Mldfiestraiqh Z 
Hwttepool Ojgg 3-ifc Newport i. Scaur 

ottarton A Doncaster 1 teas 5-z£ 
Swansea S. Hanford 1 (agg 8-4: Torquay 




. ft Swindon 3 tag 2-6); Tranme 
Stocfqxxt 3 tag 4-5); Wraxhai 
ChestalWd 2 fojg 4-2); York 1. Su 
tad 3 tag 5-5. Yoifc won on away a 
ESSEX sBeOH LEAGUE; Bowers L 

.1: East Ham 0. East Thurrock 2; 

Manor ft Bramwood 3; Statists 

Pudtaet 2; VAham 0. BrighSngsea G 

SCXmf-EACT COUNTIES LESSuE: 

d hr Ulon: Futtam 1, MHhrall A Sm 

dMsfcn: Catehnasr 3. Southend 1; < 

tnl Pataca 5. Brentloed 2; Northompt 

Swindon 2; Reading 2, Oxtocd 4, 
LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Pn 
(Britan: Amarahsm a N crt fawoo 
Yoatag 1. HenweS 1. 

C0MUNED COUNTIES LEAGUE: 

adwdMsk»BAaWaybrfdgal,Wes 
1;Oapstead4. Maktan3:FSlMgti Rc 

GtfVAUXH AU- CONFERENCE: Enfli 

srsarr^ 

GREAT HUS WESTERN LEAGUE: 
retar tt vtsma: Ocvodon 5. Prorn 

Bafrajaate r. Doodah i : Waston-s. 

Majj? 7, Chard ft Fiat cBnsnn: Bad 

vwwjoje m iKUotOn Z» WByrrfcnjj 


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Today’s television and radio programmes and Peter Davalle 


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BBC 1 


6 -°° Ceefax AM. News 

headlines, weather, travel' 

_ __ ®fto sports bulletins 

6,60 ^?Si 1 S£^ lhFrank 
Bough and Debbie 

Greenwood in London and 

regional news, weather 
and traffic at 6J37 727 

jntefnatenal news at 7 . 00 . 
7.30, B-00, {L30 and 

sport at 7^0 and 8 J 20 ; and 
a review of the morning 
newspapers at 827. c&ier 
rtems inctuda Dr Richard 
Smith's 'phone-in medical 
advice. 

9-20 l££l Ul * m Con Sross 
1986. Vincent Hanna and 

Nicholas Jones introduce 
the fourth day's debates 
from Brighton. 

1020 Play School presented by 
Stuart McGugan with 

„ ' guest Elizabeth Watts, (rt 

1020 Trades Union Congress 
1986. The debate on 
nuclear power 12.45 
Ceefax. 

1.00 News After Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and 
Moira Stuart, includes 
news headlines with 
subtitles 125 Regional 
news. The weather details 
come from Bill Giles 120 
Mop and Smiff. For the 
very young, (rjl.45 
Ceefax. 

2-15 Trades Union Congress 
1986. South Africa and 
sanctions are debated 
4.12 Regional news. 

4.15 The Kuncfcy Koala Show. 
Three cartoons. 

4.40 Film: One Hour to Zero. 
Another adventure in the 
Children's Rim Foundation 
season, this one about 
two boys and a burglar 
who are left behind when a 
remote area in Wales is 
cleared alter an 
experimental reactor 
malfunctions. Starring 
Dudley Sutton, Toby 
Bridge and Andrew Ashby. 
Directed by Jeremy 
Summers. 

525 Kick Start The Grand 
RnaJ of the Norwich Union 
Kick Start Trophy. The 
commentators are Peter 
Purves and Jack Stites. 

6.00 News with Sue Lawfey and 
Nicholas Wttchell. 

6.35 London Plus. 

7.00 Top of the Pops 
presented by Gary Davies. 

720 EastEnders. Dot confides 
in Dr Legg about a serious 
problem: PauNne is upset 
when Michelle refuses an 
offer of help; and Pauline 
saves Debs from an 
unscrupulous caller. 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Anne 
Diamond and Adrian 
Brown. News with Gordon 
Honeycombe at 620, 720, 
720, 820, 820 and 920: 
sport at &40 and 720; 
exercises at 625; cartoon 
at 725; and Jeni Barnett's 

825 K^SS*f^Socedby 
Timmy MaBett 


I TV/LONDON 


925 Thames news headlines 
followed by Lost 
Kingdoms, A portrait of 
the Great Chief AngaGa 
Tongofg HofZaire.(r)&U 

Heavy Horses- Ctydesale 

horses on a Canadian 

farm 10.10 Indian 

Legends of Canada. 
Mandamin. the Legend of 
Com. (rj 1025 Cartoon. 

1020 Street Hawk. Jesse Hawk 

comes to the aid of a 
neighbourhood watch 



i IN SICKNESS AND IN 
HEALTH (B8C1. 920pm) Is back. 

but with a great hole at its 
heart. AH that remains of Else, 

“the silly old moo", Is her 
wheelchair, a touching and 
eloquent reminder to us 


Judy Davis: Rocket to the Moml 
on Channel 4, 920pm 


BBC 2 


Switch*. 

Slice# 


820 Bodymatteis. Dre Graeme 
Garden. Alan Maryon 
Davis and Gillian Rice are 
joined by this year's 
remarkable Mastermind 
winner, Jennifer Keaveny, 
and memory expert David 
Berglas, in an exploration 
of the human brain's 
facility to remember. 
(Ceefax) 

820 Lenny Henry Tonite. The 
first of a new sales of six 
situation comedfes. 
Tonight, the comedian " 
plays the part of Vince, a 
motorcycle messenger 
longing to become a fully- 
fledged Hells Angel. 
(Ceefax) 

920 News with Julia Somervifle 
and John Humphrys. _ 
Regional news and 
weather. 

920 In Sickness and in Health. 

Alf Garnett, the loud- 
mouth bigot, is now a 
widower, distressed at the 
financial loss the death of 
his wife has caused, (see 
Choice) 

1020 Rim: The Getaway (1972) 
starring Steve McQueen, 
Ali McGraw and Ben 
Johnson. Doc McCoy, a 
bank robber, is released 
from prison through the 
connivance of crooked 
businessman. Jack 
Benyon, and finds himself 
in charge of a bank 
robbery that goes wrong. 
McCoy and his wife, Carol 
are soon on the run with 
the loot chased by the 
police and a ruthless 
gangster. Directed by Sam 
Peckinpah. 

1220 Weather. 


1120 About Britain. Sir John 
Betjeman's Comwafl. 

12.00 The Little Green Man. 

Animated adventures of a 
visitor from another 
planet (r) 12.10 Puddle 
Lane. Puppet show with 
Neil Innes- (r) 1220 The 
Sullivans. 

120 News at Ore with John 
Suchet 120 Thames news 
120 Levkas Man. Episode 
one of a drama serial 
about a young man 
searching In Greece for his 
missing archaeologist 
father, (r) 225 Home 
Cookery Club. Smoked 
Mackerel Pate. |r> 

220 Daytene. Sarah Kennedy 
chairs a studio discussion 
on the male pill which is 
due to be on sale In High 
Street chemists in the 
1990s. Among those 
taking part are one of the 
original guinea pigs, 

Jimmy Bremner, and his 
wife. Gillian, and Dr David 
Dehrin. 3.00 Take the High 
Road. 325 Thames news 
headlines 3.30 Sons and 
Daughters. 

420 Hicks. Christopher 

Lilhcrap introduces a story 
about a mouse- 4.10 
Roadnmner. Cartoon. 

420 Animals in Action. In this 
first of a new series. Vicky 


Ucorish and Mike Lin ley ' 
examine animals riving (n 
cold climates 425 Under 
the Same Sky: The 
Mushroom Mountain. A 

S from Belgium about 
entrapped 
underground. 

5.15 Blockbusters. Quiz game. 
525 News with John Subnet 
620 Thames news. 

625 Help! Vn Taylor Gee with 
a benefits up-date. 

625 Crossroads. 

7.00 Emmerdaie Farm. 

Excitement mounts in the 
village as the day of the 
cricket match draws 
approaches. 

720 Fresh Fields. The first of a 
new series of the 
successful sitcom starring 
Julia McKenzie and Anton 
- • Rodgers-tOracle) ' 

820 FBm:Stq>efmanll(l980) 
starring Christopher 
Reeve. Superman has his 
work cut out to contain 
General Zod and his aides, 
Ursa and Non, when they 
' are released accidentally 
from their prison when 
Superman throws a 
terrorist’s H-bomb into 
space. The trio travel to 
Earth with the object of 
killing Supermen whose 
father was the cause of 
their incarceration in the 
first place. Directed by 
Richard Lester. 

10.10 News with AfastaJr Burnet 
and Leonard Parkin. 
Weather followed by 
Thames news headlines. 
1020 Kojak. An eye-witness to a 
radical group's bombing 
disappears when Kojak 
wants to question Mm. 
1120 Fftm Five to One* (1963) 
starring Lee Montague. A 
erman's plan for his 


625 Open University: 

Meanings of Madness (3) 

920 Ceefax. 

4.10 Trades Union Congress 
1986. A continuation from 
BBC 1 of the fourth day's 
debates in Brighton. 
Presented by Vincent 
Hanna and Nicholas 
Jones. 

525 Ceefax. 

525 -News sutranary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

520 Our House. Austin 

Wookey's bungalow in the 
MendJps is explored in this 
programme. Buflt of 
asbestos and beavertxnrd 
in 1 927, the house has 
been a mine of innovation, 
being the first in the area 
. to have a flush toilet as 
well as boasting two 

storeys, among a host of 
other, at the time, new 
ideas, (r) 

6.00 Star Trek. Captain Kirk 
and the crew of Ihe ' 
starship Enterprise are 
locked in battle with a 
force of alien KHngons- 
Hiding beneath grotesque 
make-up is Susan 
Howard, the glamorous 
Donna from Dallas, who 
plays the alien King 
Kang's hideous wife, (r) 

620 FHm: The Scarlet Runner 
(1976) starring Robert 
Shaw, Genevieve BujokJ, 
and James Earl Jones. 
Swashbuckling yam about 
an IBth century pirate and 
treasure hunter. Red Ned 
Lynch, who becomes 
locked in a feud with the 
amoral governor of a 
Caribbean Island. Directed 
by James Gofdstone. 

820 Famborougb 8& 

Raymond Baxter and 
Chris Serie are the guides 
for this preview of 
Famborough's t ' 
International air 
which has more than 600 
exhibits on display, 
including two new 
experimental fighter 
aircraft. 

920 My Mule. Question setter 
and master, Steve Race, 
introduces another edition 
of the lighthearted musical 
quiz between Denis 
Norton, John Amis, Frank 
Muir and Ian Wallace. 

920 Moonlighting, Madcfie and 
David are hired by a dead 
escapologist's wife to 
guard hisTxxJy In the 
mortuary because she is 
convinced that the man 
welcome back from the 
dfead to murder her. 

Starring Cybfll Shepherd 
and Bruce Wfflis. 

10.15 Making Waves. This last 
programme of the series 
includes action from 
Guernsey's International 
Power Boat Week; and a 
of Tony BuUimore, 


1025 


Garnetts, plus amir 
representation of friends and 
neighbours, are gathered in 
the parlour for the cBstribution of 
funeral Scotch and sand- 
wiches. There is little 
evidence, in episode one of 
Johnny Speight's new series, 
that the departure of Else has left 

a corTBsporKflngly great hole 

at the heart of Aif Garnett. After a 

morosely- delivered 
reprimand to his Creator ("why 
did he have to take her n, 
the bigot gets back to Ms tamfltaf 
targets, the immigrant 
“coons". But first, there is a 
series of characteristic 


CHANNEL 4 


I Sue 


ES 


en the bookie’s safe] 
breaks into produces 
nothing. Directed by 
Gordon Fleming. 

12.40 Night Thoughts. 


the Year. Bob Langley, 
Malcolm McKaag and! 

King join him on his 

trimaran. Apricot 

might, presented by 
Ian Smith. The latest 
national and international 
news including extended 
coverage of the main story' 
of the ray and a report 
from Brighton on the 
fourth day’s debates at the 
Trades Union Conference. 
1120 Weather. 

1125 Open University: 

Weekend Outlook 1120 
Health Care in 
Mozambique. Ends at 
12 . 10 . . 


220 Ffeit: Nicholas Ntckteby* 

jT947) starring Derek 

seasonofMrrsl»sed on 
novels by Charles 
Dickens. When his father 
dies Nicholas and his 
mother are left penniless. 
He becomes a teacher at 
Dotheboys Han. an 
educational establishment 
ruled with a rod of iron by 
the sadistic headmaster. 
Wackford Squeers. With 
Cedric Hardwicks and 
Bernard Miles. Directed by 

Cavalcanti 

420 The Gong Show. The 
talent show for the 
talentless, introduced by 
Chuck Barns. Among 
those risking ridteufe this 
afternoon is a man who 
tafcs backwards. 

5.00 RbmRn-Up Girt (1944) 
starring Betty Grabia. A 
musical made to boost 
Second world War morale 
about a young Washington 
typist who fads for a 
military hero. Directed by 
Bruce Humberstone. 

620 TUC Conference Report 
Julie Half presents 
highHghs of the fourth 
day’s debates hi Brighton. 

720 Channel Four news with 
Trevor McDonald and 
Nicholas Owen. 

720 Comment from Ctemence 
Watt of the All London 
Parents Action Group. 
Weather. 

820 Equinox: The Tin Soafl. A 
documentary exploring the 
50 year history of the 
concept of the Citroen 
2CV. On the drawing 
board in 1934, the durable , 
machine eventually 
reached the pubUc in 1948, 
since when more than 
three milfion have been 
sold. How does the model 
retain its popularity? 

920 Gardeners’ Calendar 
Introduced by Hannah 
Gordon. Among the 
autumn gardening tasks 
tackled are the 
of 

and 

primulas, and the 
preparation of a catalogue 

- of bulbs for flowering in 
the house- (Oracle) (r). 

920 Rocket to the Moon, by 
COfford Odets. Judy Davis, 
John Malkovich; Efi 
WaUach, lan McShane and 
Connie Booth. A love story 
set to the summer of 1938 
in New York. Ben is a 
successful dentist, 
married to an over-doting 
wife, who fells for the 
charms of bis attractive 
nurse, ffis father-in-law 
learns about Ben's 
infatuation and urges him 
to be unfaithful to his wife. 
Directed by John Jacobs. 
(Oracle) (see Choice) 

1125 South Africa: After 

Apartheid. A discussion 
on wtiat the future holds 
for South Africa. Dr Denis 
WOrral, the South African 
Ambassador, Tansanqa 
Linda, mayor of a 
township near Port 
EEzabeth, and Ngfla 
Muendane, a member of 
the Pan African Conoess, 
are each interviewed by 
Raymond Ackerman, Dr 
George Kanyeihamba and 
Wiseman Khuzwayo. How 
Britain’s Labour and 
Conservative parlies see 
the future in South Africa 
is described by Detfis 
Healey and Julian Amery. 
Ends at 1220. 


CHOICE 


explosions over the pecuniary 
disadvantages of sudden 
widowerhood (“Talk about the 
cost of living ! What about the 
cost of dying! “). Alf, the 
colonialists champion, is 
heart at his quintessential best 
when, in a comer over 
Britain's role m the slave trade, 
he delivers his magisterial 
judgment that the slaves were 
only chained up because they 
kept running away. Vintage 
Speight, this. Elsewhere m 
the script, there is much 
sourness. The loss of AITs 
old sparring partner is sady 
evident 

• In his 1938 J 
ROCKET TO THE 
(Channel 4, 920pm). Clifford 
Odets explored, with much wry 

( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. Stereo on VHF ( 

525 Shipping. 620 News Bn 
Weather. 6.10 Fanning. 

ILK Prayer (a). 

620 Today. With Brian 
Redhead in Brighton at 
the Trades Union Congress. 
Ind 620, 720, 820 
Nows. 6.45 Business News. 
625, 725 Weather. 720, 

820 News. 725, B25 Sport 
725 Thought for the Day. 

823 Five Hundred Mila 
WSIkies (4) North 
ComwaH. 827 Weather: 
Travel 
. 920 News. 

925 On The Day I Was Bom. 

(New series) Larry Harris 
talks to Harry Patt erson ( 1 % 
920 The Natural History 
Programme. What 
sharks have to fear from 
man. 

1020 News; The Good Book. 

Brian Redhead continues 
his exploration of the Bible 
(0 

1020 Morning Story: An 

Independent Opinion and 
The Pen -wiper. Read by 
LeonSinden. 

10.45 Daiy Service (s). 

1120 News; Travel; Mothers of 
Invention. Georgina 
Ferry investigates schemes 
to encourage female 
scientists (r). 

1128 Tune for Verse. From 
Belfast With Paul 
Mukfoon. (8) 

1220 News; You and Yours. 

Consumer advice. 

1227 Triva Test Match. With 
teem captains Tim Rice 
and WUhe Rushton (r) (s). 

1225 Weather. 

120 The World at One: News. 

120 The Archers. 125 
Shipping. 

220 News: Woman's Hour. 

320 News; The Afternoon 


Jackie 
and Jennifer 

Pieroey^s). 

420 News. 

425 A Good Read. 

Paperbacks discussed 
by Brian Gear, Ronald Eyre, 
Amanda Theunissen 
425 Kaleidoscope. Last 
night's edition 
520 Plw. News magazine. 

520 Shipping. 5JSS 
Weather. 

620 News; Financial Report 
620 Brain of Britain 1986. The 


humour and not a httie 
pathos, the snatched moments 

Odets portra^sdasmere 
intervals m a remorseless 
twentieth century game of 
Making the Best ca ft. The 
passing years have been kind to 
the play.; only in the last act 
of tonight's television adaptation 
(fothe emotional resolutions 
take quite a lot of swaHowmg. 
The players, faufttossfy 
directed by John Jacobs, include 
Judy Davis as the dental 
surgery catalyst If 2 Passage to 
India made you temporarily 
forget the unique style that Miss 
Davis displayed m My Brilliant 
Career, then you wS vividly be 
reminded of it throughout 

Rocket to the Moon. Thera isn't 

an unemployed inch in tier 
body. 

Peter Da valle 

final of the general 
knowledge contest (ri 
720 News. 

725 The Archers. 

720 1886 . How provincial 
papers reflected the lives 
of the people of Brighton 100 


720 Death of a Teenager. A 
dramatized documentary 

by Jeremy Sandford and 
Phdippa Finns. Based on 
the loumals kept by the 

mother erf JtU Hoey. 19. 
who took her own life (si 
8.40 Profile. 

920 Does He Take Sugar? 

For disabled listeners 
920 The Archive Auction, with 
Graham Fawcett 
925 Kefeidoscape.tndudes 
comment on A Mouthful 
of Bvds, at Birmingham Rep 
10L15 A Book at Bedtime: 

Academe Year (9). Read 
Michael Deacon. 1029 


1020 The Wora Tonight 
11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight. 

1120 Other Tunes. Other 
Places. George Scon 
recalls times and places with 
the music of the day. 

12.00 News; weather. 1223 
Shipping. 

VHP (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 52&620am 
Weather. Travel. 125- 
220pm Listening Comer. 
520225PM 

(continued). 1120 - 12 . 10 am 
Open University; 1 120 A 
Jewish Testimony. 1120 A 
Christian Testimcxiy. 

( Radio 3 ) 

On VHF/FM fin cterao) and MW 
625 Open University. MU the 
reformer. Until BJKam 
625 Weather. 720 Weather 
725 Concert Rimsky- 
Korsakov (May Night 
overture). Suk (Love Song, 
Op7 No 1: Stepan, 
lihaud (Suite 
i), Giordan! 

(Caro mfo ben: Wundertich. 
tenor), StradeBa (Sonata 
a 4 to A minor), Schubert 
(Entr'acte in G minor, 
Rosarrtunde). 8.00 News 
8.05 Concert (conttQ: VBa- 
Lobos (Bachaniats 
Brasffleras No 9), Saint- 
Saens (CbBo Concerto 
No 2: Hatrefl/Berlin RSO). 
Bartok( Hungarian folk 


songs; Center . violin. 
Anderson, piano). Bax 
(Dus wortdes Jo*]. Copland 
|S Salon Mexico).. 920 
News 

925 This Week's Composer. 


S rzd. Consort of 
USICI 


fusKke, with Christopher 
Hogwood playing the 
harpsichord and virginaL 
Songs and instrumental 
music 

925 Schubert piano music, 
lam Lake plays works 
inducing AndantH inC, D29; 
Hungarian Melody. D 
817: and Twelve Lander. D 
790 

1025 Brro&n Youth Orchestras: 
Bntten-Pears Orchestra 
(under 5chnwJ),with Barford 
(harp), Mason 
IharpsidiOKQ, Bumstde 
(piano). Part one. Mozart 
(Mamage of Figaro 
overture), and Symphony 
No 36 

1125 Sue Comments: foreign 
rad« broadcasts, 
monitored by BBC 

112S Bntten-Pears Orchestra, 
cart two- Bach, err 
Webern (Ricercara, BWV 
1079), Martin (p Petite 
symphon* concertante) 

1125 P«d Piper, music ot me 
Mddfe Ages Presented 
by David Munrow 

12.15 Heroen Howeds; 

Fairfield Quartet play the 
Rhapsodic Quintal Op 31 . 
and String Quartet No 3. 

120 News 

12S Michele Campanefla: 
piano recital. Weber 
(invitation to the dance, and 
Sonata No 1), and Franck 
(Prelude, Chorale and 
Fugue) 

225 Death m Venice; Britten's 
two-act opera. With 
Kenneth Rieget as Gustav 
von Aschenbach. and a 
cast mat includes Allan Monk 
and Jeffrey GaU. 

Canadian Opera Chorus and 
Orchestra, under Richard 
Woaach. Act two at 325. 
News at 425 

520 Manly for Pleasure: with 
Graham Fawcett 


620 Proms 66: Thomas 

Trotter (organ). Uszt, arr 
Guiflou ( Prometheus), Wldor 
(Symphony No 6 in G 
minor) 


725 Stalin vWbRs: with Paul 
Nicholson as H G Welb 
and Timothy West as Stalin 
(r) 

8.10 Quintet from Quebec 
Soaete de Musique 
Contem porame du Quebec 
perform Serge Garanfs 
quintet (or flute, oboe, cello, 
percussion and piano 


820 Proms 86 

(contdV Concert 
dedicated to the memory or 
Hans KeHar. BBC SO 
(under Gunter Wand). 
Bruckner (Symphony No 


925 Letter from Ulster by 
John Sinmson, Senior 
Lecturer m Economics, 
Queen's University, 

Belfast 

1020 OthmarSchoedc 
vtrtuoso Ensemble 
(under Monod), with Heinz 
Rehfuss (baritone). 


Elegy. Op 36 (Song cycle to 
poems by Lenau and 
Eictwndortf) 

11.05 Possible Orchestras: 

Sonon Ltmbnck plays 
Vnner's Cinq chansons pour 
percussion. Also works 

by Toni TehermfSu (played 
by Nexus), and John 
Cetona- 11.58 News. 1220 
Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

Newson the hour Sports 
Desks 125 pm, 2.02, 322, 4.02, 
525, 6.02, 6.45 (mf only), 9.55. 
Cricket Scoreboard 7.30 pm. 

Tennis (US Open, at 11-02 pm, 
1225 am). 

4.00 am Colin Berry. 520 Ray 
Moore 720 Derek Jamoson. 920 
Ken Bruce. 11.00 Jmww Young 

1.05 pm David Jacobs. 225 Gloria 
Hunniford. 320 David Hamilton. 

5.05 Selma Scon. 7.00 waiiy 
Whyton introduces Country 
Chib. 9.00 Rhythm and Blues- Pats 
Jones on the birth of rhythm 
andbiues inthe60s 925 Sports 
Desk. 1020 The Good Human 
Guide (new senes) with Tne 
National Revue Company. 

1020 Star Sound Cinema. Movie 
magazine presented by Nek 
Jackson. 1120 Brian Matthew 
presents Round Mi 
am Patrick Lunt. 

Night Muse. 


d Midnight. 120 
it. 3.00-4.00 A Little 


WORLD SERVICE 


6.00 NewsdMk U0 Naum Notebook 

720 News 729 Twenty-Four Horn 7 JO 

New Waves on Shortwave 7-*5 Network 

UK 600 News 029 Reflections 615 

Country Style 630 Jorm Pew 820 News 

829 Review ol Bnuh Press 615 World 

Today 630 Financial News 640 Look 

Ahead MS Fambarough to Show 1020 

News 1021 Gdbert and SuBvan Phenom- 

enon 1120 News 1120 News About 
Britain 11.15 New Ideas 1125 A Latter 

tram Enqiand 11 JO State d the Nabon 

12.00 Radio Newsreel 12.15 Too Twenty 

12.45 Sports Rotmdup 120 News 125 

Twenty-Four Moure 120 Network UK 1.45 

A Land 0t Song 220 Outlook 2.45 A 

Decade ol H4s 320 RaOo Nawsrml IIS 

The Pleasure s Yours 420 News 429 

Commentary 615 State t the Nation 5.45 

Sports Roundtm 7.45 Here'S HumpW600 

News 829 Twenty-Fow Horn 020 
Business Matters 600 News 021 Book 

Choca 925 In the Meantime 615 A Joly 

Good Show 1600 News 1029 WMd 

Today 1625 A Letter bom England 1630 

Financial News 1640 ReOecnons 1645 

Sports Roundup 1120 News 1129 Com- 

nwitBY 11.15 Merchant Navy Pro- 

gramme 12.00 News 1229 News About 
Brtain 12.15 Radio Newsreel 12J0 Music 

Now 120 News 121 Outlook 1 JO A Land 

oi Song 125 Book Choice 1J0 In the 

Meenttne 600 News ZOO Review of 

British press Z15 Every Day a Holy Day 

230 Lozt Piano Music 320 News 329 

News About Britato 3.15 World Today 4J5 

Reflections 650 Financial News 520 

News 529 Twenty-Fix* Hows 525 World 

Today. AI times in GMT. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1 053kHz/285m;1 089kHz/275m; Radio 2: 693kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m; Radio 3: 1 21 5kHz/247m:VHF-90- 

VHF-92-95; LBC:1152kHz/261m: VHF 97^; Capita!: 1548kHz/194fn: VHF95.8; BBC Radio ! 


92-5; Radio 4s 200k Hz/1 500m: VHF-92-95; LBC:1 152k Hz/26 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 94,9; World Service: MF 648kHz/43m. 


London: 


BRC1 WALES U5pnHL00 

tv.iMtnh-eic.Tni 


■ Wales T oday 635-720 Gar- 

I 


demng Together 1220-1225 am 
news and weather SCOTLAND 635-720 
Scotland NORTHERN IRE- 

ipnt-&40 Today's Sport 520- 
1 Utstv 635-720 The 
Battycaette Fleadh 630-600 As I Roved 
Out 12JXMZ05«ni News wvt »wm«v 
er. ENGLAND 6J5pm-72Q Ragkmal 
newsmagazines. 

jANNELassaaw 

1630-1120 Shadow of Fear UOpm 
News 1J0 Home Cookery 1.35*30 FUp- 
tkto 320-420 Country GP6004Lto 

« 16 -J Prisoner Cel 

Btock H 11 Ao FuU Lite IZiOamUn- 

wuchablaa 1.10 Oosedown 


GRANADA 

Reports 920 FBnc Raising the Wind 
1120 Granada Reports 1125 About Brfr 
ati 1120 Connacbons 1125-1220 
Grenada Reports 120-220 Ctxeitry 
Practice 320-600 Youig Doctors 
600 Grenade Reports 62M25 This is 
Your R«tt 1640 Quincy 1120 AI 
Kkidsoi Country IZIOanaWnoTstha 
Boss? 1240 Closedown. 

TS W i* London except: 9-28wn 
22U5. Sesame Street 1025 Human 

Face of the Pacific 1650 European 

FA TUea 1120-1120 Connections 

120pm News 120-Z38 The Baron 

615-525 Give US a Ctue 600 Today 

South West 625-720 Carson’s Lew 

1022 Minder 1120 Jazz tZ40am Rxff- 

scnpl. Closedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


ANGLIA 

Tuankhamun 1020 Wheels 1120- 
1120 Once Upon a TTrao_JJarT20urn 
News 120-220 The Baran B20625 
■ About AngHa 720-720 Amthfeig Goes 
1020 Secret Woridell.lOFikn: 

-Czech Meta 122Sen East Comes West. 
Ctoaodown 

ZB As London except: 
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1025 Professor KhzsMOSS FketM 
XL5 1120-1120 Once upon a TlmaJWn 
120pm News 120 Tucker'S Witch 
320 Bygones 320-600 Young DocfcxS 
6.00-aSSLookarouncl 1640 Prime 
Unister in Scotland 1120 Mysteries of 
■Edgar WaBaca 12J5m Closedown. 

HTV WEST ^ftaSemCAbf- 

nla HMwieys 650 Optanaofttw 

WBd 10.15 vhttage Spirit 1125-1120 

Poor BBty Render t^sn News 
1 JO-225 Country Practice 6JQ-6J5 

Weekend Outlook 1640 WMumd 

Outlook 1025 West This Week 11.15 

Levkas Man iZlSamThaTs Hofly- 
wood 1221 Closedown. 

HTV WALES 

650 Catltomla Highway 

Wales at Sat 1020 Parents and Education 

1120-1 220am Levkas Man. 


TVS** London except: 928am 
■LiS sesame Street W20-11 20 Shad- 
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320600 COIXlty GP 528-&JS 
Coast » Coast 1020 Prisoner Cel Block 
H 1120 Fufl Ufe 1210am Untouch- 

ables 1.10 Company. Ctosadown. 

■ CENTRAL ^jjgSmS^ 

Road Ends 650 RoWMory 1615 
Moon Jumper 1640 Suretval of the FWast 
>1125-1120 CatHomia Highways 
:12JQpm-120 Contact l2> News 120- 
230 The Baton 020 Crossroads 
625-720 News 1645 F3nc For the Deem 
ot a Cop 1225am Jobfinder 125 

Ctasednm. 

GRAMPIA N 


6M North Tonight 1640 Prime MMsisr 
ki Scottand 11.* wont into tmaga 
1220am News. Ctosadown. 

C2£ Starts: 120pm Tha Imper- 
=S£sonation220Flaiabaiam215ln- 
wval 235 Ray on Tagore 520 
graixiyl Bwf 520 Abbott and CostaBo 
Show 62o Breokade 630 Wine Pro- 



YORKSHIRE 

and the Wheaied Warriors 9 l 50 Ceii- 
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: Freeze Frame 1125-1120 Friends of 
my Fnands 1220 pm-120 Lunchtime listf 
.120 News 120 ReooUacbonS 220- 
230 Parlour Game B20-63S Calendar 
. 1020 T J Hooker 1120 New Aveng- 
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1 II PTFR As London except 

cr> 625am Sesame Street 
, 1025 Little House on the PraMe 
11120-1120 Maxthe Mouse 120nm 

I Lunchtime 120-230 Chips 320-600 

Diffrent Esrokas (LOO Good Evening U- 

star625635PQficeSfat1640Ceto- 
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SCOTTISH As London ex- 

1 " capt Bg Sam Siw a m B 

Street 1025 Posakton Fries 1120- 
1120 Cartoon 120pm News 120420 
Ti^car's wttcti 3J0 Pariour Game 
320220 Struggle Banaatn the Sea 020- 
625 Scotland Today 720-720 Take 
me Hlgti Road 020 Prone MMstar in 
Scotland 920-1020 From star Wars 

to JadL Making of a Saga 1020 JoaMa 

1120 Lata Call 1125 Tales From the 
Dsrioioe 1215am Ctosadown 

TVNETEESggffa^ 

630 Sesame Street 1625 
Spaceman 1640-1120 Nature ot 
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ENTERTAINMENTS 


COMEDY TSEATV 930 21578 


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D/Tam Tam ri Prirrewon. ait 
2 30 A 7 50 Tr y _Ka ttujKL. *7 
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tutors WELLS 27a B916 
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AOtXPHI a» 7t.Il or UP ' 7913 
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1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 

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TAYLOR FEHHAUOON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
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****** 


38 


THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1986 


THE 


TIMES 


First pnMrtbed in 1785 


SPORT 


Lendl’s form too 
much for the 
flash of Leconte 

From Rex Bellamy. Tennis Correspondent, New York 



Ivan Lendl, who holds the 
United States and French 
titles and was runner-up at 
Wimbledon, has again ad- 
vanced to the United States 
semi-finals. He brat Henri 
Leconte 7-6. 6-1. 1-6. 6-1 at 
Flushing Meadow yesterday 
in a match of many fluctua- 
tions, most of them concern- 
ing Leconte's Form. The first 
set was thunderously exciting 
but For the rest of the match 
Leconte was too flashy to have 
much chance of winning. 

In preparation for Leconte's 
violent left-handed assault. 
Lendl had practised hard with 
his left-handed coach. Tony 
Roche, who must have had an 
aching arm after all the serv- 
ing and volleying Lendl asked 
of him. Roche must have 
considered the efforts worth- 
while. Lendl played relent- 
lessly well. * sternly 
concentrating on every point. 

By contrast. Leconte was 
prone to have lapses, which 
Lendl coolly exploited. Lendl 
never knew what to cxpecL 
That applies to anybody who 
plays Leconte. But Lendl 
never allowed himself to be 
either intimidated or 
disconcerted. 

Leconte had three set 
points, against service, at 5-4 
in the first scL But those 
chances eluded him and a 
wayward forehand volley cost 
him a crucial point in the tie- 
break. Mentally, he was on his 
heels for a while after that 

Leconte did play a superb 
third set but a loose second 


game in the fourth set put him 
at a disadvantage from which 
he was never to recover. He 
had at leas! checked an 
astonishing run by Lendl, who 
in last year's championships, 
and this year's, had won 26 
consecutive sets. 

This ninth day (out of 13) 
began with the following line- 
up in the men’s singles: Lendl 
v Leconte. Edberg v Wilkison, 
Srejbcr v Becker and Nyslrom 
v Mccir. As the rankings 
suggested would happen, Tim 
Wilkison was the only Ameri- 
can (out of seven who all 
played Europeans) to advance 
beyond the last 16. Wilkison 
and Srcjber were unseeded. 

The women's singles had 
contracted even more, with 
Martina Navratilova and 
Steffi Graf already through to 
'one semi-final. In the other 
half of the draw the quarter- 
final pairings were Helena 
Sukova v the unseeded 
Wendy Turnbull and Manuela 
Maleeva v Chris Uoyd. 

The most obvious absentee 
from the men's list was the 
second seed. Mats Wilander, 
who was beaten 6-7. 6-3. 6-3. 
6-4 by Miloslav Mecir in a 
delightful match on Tuesday 
evening. Mecir likes playing 
Swedes. He beat Stefan Edberg 
in straight sets at Wimbledon 
and on shale courts he has 
baffled most of the leading 
Swedes. Wilander included, at 
one time or another. Obvi- 
ously. he is becoming almost 
as effective on hard courts. 

Whereas Leconte is the 


most exciting and flamboyant 
player in the world, the lightly 
bearded Mecir is the most 
subtle and charming. His 
stroking technique is as decep- 
tive as his footwork. He uses 
all the angles and commands 
deft variations of length and 
pace. Mecir has what is known 
in the trade as weight of shot, 
which is to say that his 
delectable timing puts more 
pace on the ball than the 
muscular effort suggests is 
likely. 

He has a sure touch, too. As 
for the footwork, Mecir is a 
dreamy-l coking chap who al- 
most seems to lumber about 
the court But his opponents 
will tell you that he is very 
fast They call him “The Big 
Cat." 

On the other hand, the 
Swedes, though they differ 
among themselves (with 
Edberg and Joakim Nystrom 
providing the extremes), all 
play to conventional patterns. 
Mecir does not do that so he 
puzzles them. This time it whs 
Wilander’s turn to work and 
sweat and shake his head in- 
bewilderment 

The unfamiliar Czecho- 
slovak in the last eight is the 
uncommonly large Milan 
Srejber. who beat Becker in 
Florida earlier this year and 
has a chance to see if he can do 
it again. It would be interest- 
ing to know which has the 
faster service. Facing either 
must be rather like fielding at 
silly mid-on when Ian Botham 
is in full cry. 

Results, page 35 


HORSE TRIALS 


Leng poised for fourth win 


Virginia Leng. the reigning 
world and European cham- 
pion. attempts her fourth 
successive win at the Remy 
Martin horse trials which start 
today in the grounds of Burgh- 
ley House, near Stamford in 
Lincolnshire. 

The fact that Mrs Leng is 
without her two lop horses 
(Priceless is resting and Night 
Cap competes in this month s 
Polish championships) is of 
little comfort to her fellow 
competitors. Mrs Leng and 
her powerful supporting team 
headed by her mother. 
Heather Holgatc. have limed 
to perfection Murphy 
HimscIPs arrival at Burgh Icy. 

He won the Avenches three 
day event in Switzerland two 
tears ago as a six-vear-old. 
completed Chatsworth last 
year and won Le Touquet 
three day event in France this 
year. The next rung on the 
ladder is Burghley. which Mrs 
Leng aims to win again. As she 
said a few days ago: **I have 
been so lucky at Burghley it 
might be nice for someone else 
to win but I am not going to 
give it away." 

Apart from the United 
States' dual world champion. 


By Jenny MacAithur 
Bruce Davidson, with his 
Galcombe winner, J J Babu. 
and New Zealand's Mark 
Todd with his Badminton ride 
Michaelmas Day, Mrs Leng's 
main opposition is likely to 
come from those who were in 
ihe winning learns with her at 
last year’s European 
championships, held at 
Burghley, and this year's 
world championships in 
Australia. 

Ian Stark, a member of both 
those teams, has retired his 
championship horse. Oxford 
Blue to the hunting field and 
his Badminton winner. Sir 
Wattie. has been selected for 
the Polish championships. 
But. like Mrs Leng. he has 
quietly been bringing along a 
young’ horse, Glenbumie. He 
was fourth at Le Touquet, his 
first international three day 
event, and was third at last 
month's Scottish champion- 
ships which Stark won on Sir 
Wattie. 

Loma Clarke, also a mem- 
ber of both championship 
teams, is seeking her third 
Burghley win and could well 
achieve it with Deborah 
Watson's 1 1-ycar-old. Myross. 
providing he puts his best foot 


forward in the dressage. 
Myross brought his rider the 
individual silver medal last 
year and the individual bronze 
in Australia. A win this week- 
end for the popular Mrs 
Clarke would be both timely 
and remarkable. Myross and 
Anne-Marie Taylor's Justin 
Thyme being the only two 
British horses at Burghley who 
also competed at the world 
championships in May. 

Two other dual winners of 
Burghley competing this year 
are Luanda Green, now rid- 
ing as sharply as ever after the 
birth of her son last year, and 
Richard Walker. Mrs Green 
had a relatively new partner in 
Nigel Taylor’s former ride. 
Count de Bolebec, but had a 
reassuring outing on him at 
Ireland's Punchestown three 
day event in May where they 
were fourth. Walker is riding 
Accumulator who was on 
superb form at Gatcombe 
where they finished seventh. 

At Badminton this year four 
out of the top six places were 
filled by men and Burghley 
could see a similar result 
Robert Lemieux has two good 
prospects in The 
Gamesmaster and The Poser 


FREE GOLF AND A 
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Broome Park Canterbury 


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RUGBY LEAGUE 

Fulham’s 

closure 

temporary 

By Keith Macklin 

Fulham could make a 
speedy return to the second 
division within a fortnight of 
their closure. The Rugby 
League council, meeting in 
Leeds yesterday .received a 
proposition from a London 
consortium which promised 
to re-form the Fulham club 
and play games at Chiswick 
Polytechnic. 

David Howes, the League's 
public relations officer, said 
that Fulham seemed to have 
been saved "at the thirteenth 
hour." Howes said that some 
of the proposed consortium 
were previous members of the 
Fulham management 
committee. If the attempt to 
revive Fulham is successful, 
the dub will reappear to play 
the Lancashire Cup first round 
tie against Whitehaven in 
Cumbria, on September 14, 
and would then play the home 
League game with Sheffield 
the following Saturday. 

The revival of Fulham is 
dependent on the consortium 
producing plans which are in 
line with the Rugby League’s 
rules on financial backing and 
administration, but .League 
officials were confident last 
night that Fulham could take 
their place again in the second 
division. 

At the start of the present 
season, Fulham withdrew be- 
cause Paul Faires. their new 
chairman, believed the dub 
could not last a full season 
with its present support 
The return of Fulham 
would be an immense relief to 
Rugby League officials, who 
had to rearrange second di- 
vision fixtures in a manner 
which caused protests from 
some clubs. 

Rugby League diary, page 35 



Checking out: a two-fisted Wilander could not repel Medr's weight of shot 


CRICKET 

Somerset 
will not 
be held at 
gunpoint 

By Paul Martin 

Despite compromise pro- 
posals by a faction at Somerset 
for Viv Richards and Joel 
Garner to play in some 
matches next year, the dab 
will not backtrack on a verbal 
agreement that their replace- 
ment, Martin Crowe, will be 
entitled to play in all matches 
for which he is fit, Michael 
Hill, the dub chairman, said 
yesterday. 

Crowe has made it dear that 
he would expect his contract 
terms to be fulfilled, otherwise 
he would consider the contract 
unable to be fulfilled and 
wonld take op any offers from 
other comities next season. 
Essex, he said had already 
made him a substantial offer 
bat his first loyalty lay with 
Somerset 

Nor will the dab yield to 
any ultimatum from Ian 
Botham or his supporters, Mr 
Hill said “No one should be 
held to ransom or at 
gunpoint," Mr Hill said "The 
dub is bigger than any one 
individuaL We wonld simply 
say no to any threat" 

Peter White, chairman of 
the Taunton committee, said 
Botham had told him that he 
would resign from the dub if 
Richards were not kept on, a 
message Mr White passed on 
to Mr Hill and the Press. 
Botham has been offered a 


Martin Crowe interview 
and other cricket, page 35 


new two-year contract and 
Mr Hill hoped he would 
accept it An ultimatum wonld 
be said only swing undecided 
Somerset members against 
Botham. 

Campaigners for the reten- 
tion of Richards and Garner 
will not force a special general 
meeting, though they have 
enough signatures to do so, 
unless their compromise plan 
is rejected by the committee. 
Mr Hill believes that al- 
tfaongh letters for and against 
the sackings are running even, 
most members wonld support 
the committee at any special 
meeting. "It was the members 
who kept demanding we 
should not lose the services of 
Crowe." he said. 

The com promise formula 
being developed by a leading 
Somerset figure. Roy 
Kerslake, has been made pos- 
sible by a reinterpretation of 
the rules governing overseas 
players. It appears that as all 
three overseas cricketers had 
been on the dab's books 
before the Test and County 
Cricket Board stipulated that 
only two such players could be 
registered all three could 

remain. 

When Crowe plays, Rich- 
ards and Garner would have to 
drop out but Richards and 
Gamer could play together, as 
they were registered before the 
first limitations. 

The dub, it emerges, had 
initially mooted a reduced role 
for the two West Indians, 
which, they say, they had 
declined until die sackings 
"concentrated their minds". 
According to Mr Kerslake, the 
two men favour a compromise 
and have intimated that they 
might benefit from a more 
restful year. But Tony Brown, 
the dub secretary, expressed 
deep scepticism that any such 
compromise conld work; it 
wonld be up to the proposers to 
Show it 

Another drawback was 
financial: the dnb had no 
desire to pay wages to players 
seldom used, Mr Hill said. 
Regarding suggestions that 
sponsors might be found to 
pay for Richards and Garner, 
he said he wonld welcome such 
a move for any of his players in 
less extraordinary circum- 
stances but money was still not 
the main consideration. 


GOLF 


Lyle and Stadler hope to 
expunge bitter memories 


From Mitchell Platts, Crans-Moatana 


Sandy Lyle has spared the 
Ebel European Masters, the 
richest tour event this season 
apart from the Open 
championship, the embarrass- 
ment of unfolding without 
Europe's acknowledged top 
golfers.Lyle swings into action 
on the Crans-sur-Sierre course 
today but Severiano 
Ballesteros and Bernhard 
Langer are absent and Nick 
■ Faldo has withdrawn because 
of a wrist injury. 

The Ebel European Masters 
is worth £250,000. with a first 
prize of £42,000, but the Swiss 
organizers have always leaned 
towards enticing American 
golfers to compete rather than 
persuading Ballesteros and 
Langer to play.In truth the 
likes of Howard Clark, Sam 
Torrance and Lyle cannot 
complain if the defending 
champion, Craig Stadler, and 
his American compatriots, 
Johnny Miller, Donnie Ham- 
mond, Sam Randolph and 
Roger MaJtbie are being paid 
as the sponsors have substan- 
tially increased the prize 
fund-Morever, Ebel. who have 
signed a contract to support 
the championship for a further 
five years, are likely to force 


the prize fund to more than 
£300,000 next year. 

What worries PGA officials 
is the stubbomess of local 
organizers to accept that the 
championship would have 
more prestige if Ballesteros 
and Langer were not denied 
their usual appearance money 
fees of around $50,000 and 
$35,000 respectively. 

In essence, appearance 
money always attracts con- 
troversy, yet it is a necessary 
evil. Nobody can dispute that 
the agents in the game are not 
performing the correct role for 
their clients by engineering 
such payments, nor that 
championships take on a new 
lease of life when Ballesteros 
and Langer tee up. 

It will never be systemati- 
cally erased from the scene, 
although it might one day 
wither and die if prize funds 
on the PGA European Tour 
continue to climb towards 
those in the United Stales. But 
Ballesteros, resting at home, 
and Langer, who will be 
playing in an exhibition match 
with Greg Norman and Tom 
Watson in Paris this weekend, 
will certainly not take a pay 
cut while American golfers are 


receiving huge sums to per- 
form. 

Meanwhile, the show goes 
on with Stadler hoping to 
retain the title and expunge 
the memory of his two most 
recent sorties into Europe. He 
was compelled to retire 
through injury after the first 
round of the Open champion- 
ship. then lost a play-off for 
the Scandinavian Open after 
being three shots ahead with 
three holes to play. 

Lyle. too. has bitter mem- 
ories of this Alpine course 
which in tbe winter becomes a 
nursery slope for hopeful ski- 
ers. It was here three years ago 
that he moved so far clear of 
the field that winning ap- 
peared a formality but he lost 
his way over the dosing 27 
holes and Faldo beat him in a 
play-off 

Gordon J Brand. Clark, 
Torrance and Ian Woosnam 
bolster the British challenge 
while Peter Baker, who has 
now been given an invitation 
to the Panasonic European 
Open ai Sunningdale next 
week, will hope to win at least 
the £1,500 he now requires to 
earn his lour card for next 
season. 


Wennersten surprises field 


It was, after alL “the other" 
Swede who took the lead on 
the first day of the Bowring 
Scottish Open women’s 
championship at Dalmahoy 
yesterday. Liselotte 
Neumann, aged 20, the run- 
away leader in the WPGA 
order of merit, may have ban 
tolerably satisfied with her 73, 
one over par, but neither she 
npr anyone else could match 
the 69 of her elder compatriot, 
Marie Wennersten. 

One shot behind, lurking 
menadngly. is Laura Davies, 
winner of the order of merit 
last year, and, surprisingly, 
Patricia Gonzalez, the former 
Colombian champion, and 
Suzanne Stnidwick the for- 
mer England junior cham- 
pion. Miss Wennersten, a 
good enough golfer to have 
played on the United States 


Tough test 
for Britons 

Port Cervo, Sardinia — 
Britain have sent their stron- 
gest team yet to capture the 
Sardinia Cup — Italy's equiva- 
lent of the Admiral's Cup — 
which starts today with a 30- 
mile inshore race (Barry 
Picklhall writes). But with 1 1 
other nations also fielding 
good boats, they face for- 
midable competition over the 
five-race series, particularly 
from the Germans, holders of 
both the Sardinia and 
Admiral’s cups. 

The Humphreys-designed 
Marionette, skippered by the 
team leader Chris Dunning, 
and Martin Gibson's Pocket 
Battleship, drawn by Ed Du- 
bois. have been modified 
since failing to be selected for 
Britain’s Admiral's Cup team 
last year. The third member of 
the team is Stephen Fein’s 
latest one-tonner Full Belt, 
another' Dubois design which 
should prove her potential in 
the seasonally strong winds 
experienced in this part ofthe 
Mediterranean. 

David Howlett, who fin- 
ished third in last month’s 
threequarter-ton cup. has a 
hand on the helm of Mario- 
nette while Pocket Battleship’s 
crew have been strengthened 
with the inclusion of Edward 
Heath’s former sailing master 
Owen Parker, together with 
helmsman Andrew HursL 
America’s Cap Diary, page 33 


By John Hennnessy 
tour in 1984. produced a 
model round of 1 5 par figures 
and three birdies. Miss 
Wennersten and Miss Davies 
had tbe worst of tbe con- 
ditions for the day. 

Moreover, with the course 
set up back to front they had 
the more difficult half to cope 
with first. But Miss 
Wennersten, aged 28. brought 
her experience and held her 
game together for 13 
successive par figures. The 
vulnerable 406 yard 14th then 
came into view and her putt 
from the edge of the green, 
after two woods, was only a 
millimetre away from an ea- 
gle, and she finished with two 
threes, with a nine iron to two 
yards at the 17th and a fanned 
iron to four yards at the lasL 

Miss Davies and Miss 
Sirudwick shared a common 


depressing experience in drop- 
ping shots at three successive 
holes. Miss Davies thereafter 
did not put a foot wrong and 
Miss Stnidwick made amends 
with an eagle at the 14th and a 
birdie at the I7ih. But both 
they and Miss Gonzalez 
missed the obvious chance of 
a birdie at the 224 yard 18th 
for a share of the lead. 


LEADING SCORES: 69: M 
Wennersten (Swe). 70: L Davies, P 
Gonzalez (Col). S Stnidwick. 71: M 

Walker. J Soulsby, M Marshall (US). 
72: G Stewart P Conley (US). K 
Espmasse (Fr). T Fernando (Sri 
Lanka). B New. 73: A Nicholas. L 
Neumann (Swe). K Douglas. 74: F 
Dassu (Ip. C Fnend (US), J “ 

N Homs (US). N McCormack, Max- 
ine Burton. R Comstock (US). A 


Burton, C Waite. M 
Lewis. D Reid. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



Whitaker boon dug back 

Whitaker tops 

James Whitaker, the 
Leicestershire batsman, has 
been named the Britannic 
Assurance player-of-the- 
month for August. Whitaker, 
aged 24, relumed lo tbe side 
after injury on August 6 and 
male three centuries and two 
fifties. His nine innings pro- 
duced 551 runs at an average 
of 9 1, with a top score of 1 75. 
Essex were named team -of- 
the-month. 

Bad break 

Phil Hogan, the Hull Kings- 
ton Rovers international 
Rugby League forward, faces 
another operation on his arm 
after breaking it for the second 
time in six months during last 
Sunday's opening match at 
Barrow. 


Boulter blow 

The British Olympic 
Association announced yes- 
terday that John Boulter, the 
former Olympic athlete, has 
turned down his appointment 
as genera} secretary to the 
association. In a letter to 
Charles Palmer, the BOA 
chairman. Boulter said: "After 
six weeks of increasingly des- 
perate search, my wife and I 
are forced to the conclusion 
that we cannot afford to buy a 
house in which we would be 
prepared to live, within a 
reasonable distance of the 
BOA office in Wandsworth.” 

For the past 14 years 
Boulter has been an executive 
with a major, sportswear com- 
pany in France. 

Smith samba 

Robert Smith, the inter- 
national showjumper from 
Yorkshire, win compete at 
three shows in Brazil this 
month. His first is at Sao 
Paulo, starting tomorrow, fol- 
lowed by Beta Horizonf 
which includes a World Cup 
qualifying event between 
September 11 to 14, and 
finally at Rio de Janeiro, also a 
World Cup show, from 
September 19 to 21. 

Albania back 

Albania will be represented 
at the Balkan Games for the 
first time in 52 years when 
Ayai Toska. a hammer 
thrower, competes in this 
year’s Games 


Send-off 
for the 
Titanic’s 
lifeboat 


,-mm 



Simon 

Barnes 


Football is in a pretty bad 
way at the moment. True, this 
information does not cone as a 
hold-the-front-page surprise. 
But football and the Govern- 
ment have got together to do 
something about it now that 
really does come as a shock. 
They have launched a scheme 
called “Football in the 
Community", and they gave it 
a send-off yesterday at, of all 
places, Oldham Athletic. 

Football is taking it seri- 
ously. and so is the Govern- 
ment. Mr Richard Tracey, 
Minister for Sport, and laa 
Lang. Employment Minister, 
were both at Oldham as 
cheerleaders. The idea of the 
scheme is to restore football's 
image, and to do something 
about hooliganism and un- 
employment at the ssame tune. 
One is at once tempted to 
scoff. It sounds like an attempt 
to hail out the Titanic with a 
pint pot. But actually tbe 
scheme seems _ fall of good 
sense and good intentions. 

Since the North-West is 
equally famous for unemploy- 
ment and football it seems the 
right place to start. Six clubs 
are involved in this pilot 
project, which has been 
launched on a quarter of a 
million pounds of Government 
money from the Manpower 
Sen-ices Commission. The 
dubs involved are Manchester 
United, Manchester City, Bol- 
ton Wanderers, Buy. Preston 
North End, and, naturally, 
Oldham. 

The scheme has established 
temporary jobs for the long- 
term unemployed, jobs which 
are intended to improve their 
chances of getting a perma- 
nent job later on. At the same 
time, the six dabs will open 
their doors to the public for 
sporting and other leisure 
activities. The newly-em- 
ployed people will be there to 
make it all work. 

A football dnb is a major 
asset to use it bat once a 
fortnight has long been an 
obvious nonsense. Oldham, 
with tbeir shiny new plastic 
pitch, can welcome people onto 
their playing surface all day 

Converting the 
mausoleums 

long without turning a hair. 
The other dobs all have a lot 
of space and other facilities to 
offer. 

A football ground Is a 
mausoleum 13 days of the 
fortn^ht the scheme will torn 
it into a busy part of town. 
“Closer links with the 
community" are what the 
scheme is all about It sounds 
a good deal for both the dabs 
and the community. There is 
also an emphasis on bringing 
in. people from inner city areas 
and, in particular, ethnic 
minorities. 

An anti-hooliganism pro- 
gramme has been built into the 
project There will be plenty of 
visits and talks, which will 
bring in tire footballers them- 
selves. Education and in- 
fluence, they call it It is a 
further aspect of bring town 
and dnb closer together. 
There is no claim that this is 
the instant solution, bat any- 
one making any kind of intelli- 
gent effort in this direction is 
doing the right thing. 

Mr Tracey was quite keen to 
talk about the whole thing in 
terms of image. Image is what 
football has got to improve, he 
said. His use of a marketing 
term was not accidental, the 
very mention of football now 
tends to raise a Pavkman 
shudder in many people: 
inducting those who once went 
every week. 

Football needs people, it 
needs to be accepted, it needs 
to be loved again. This is an 
economic necessity. Football 
has got to come ova- as 
so mu thing other Hwn nasty 
and brutish if it is to regain 
acceptance. In other words, 
football's troubles mean that 
the game is simply forced to 
become altruistic. 

“Football in the 
Community" is full of honest, 
earnest endeavour to be just 
that. The idea is, in the words 
of Tom Lehrer, "doing well by 
doing good." If it is seen to 
work, it will be expanded to 
bring in all 92 League date, 
which will bring inll milli on 
of Government money and 
create 1,000 jobs. Perhaps the 
whole thing is best regarded 
not as a pint-pot bailer on the 
Titanic, but as a lifeboat. Well 
if so, God bless all who sail in 
her. 

Norwich loss 

Last season’s second di- 
vision champions Norwich 
City have announced a loss of 
£410,000 on the season. The 
dob paid a high price for 
maintaining a first division 
wage structure during their 
successful campaign, daring 
which salaries topped £1 mU- 
lion. Bat Norwich have ^i fM i 
nearly half a million pounds in 
season ticket sales this sum- 
mer, and expect to make a 
large profit this season.