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No 62,555 



TIMES 



FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


• The TUC narrowly rejected a motion 
orgtng a halt to the Government’s 
nuclear power programme 

ranging reriew of policy is completed 


•’?» call by the Commo n wealth 
Enancnt Persons Group for w» n fw<«^ 
actum on Sooth Africa was en do fsed 
* A wanting was given of artw» k» 

wre SfMfk »<v lai ti .A. ■- 


By Nicholas Wood and and Mark E3Hs 


Leaders of the unions 
representing workers in 
Britain's nuclear power in- 
dustry yesterday served notice 
on Mr Neil Kinnock, the 
Labour leader, that they will 
• fight relentlessly against his 
‘ policy of winding down their 

- industry. 

They threw down the gaunt- 
. let as a fierce debate at the 
■ TUC conference in Brighton 
yesterday exposed the deep 
divisions within the labour 
. movement over the future of 
atomic jxjwer. 

The issue will next surface 
at the Labour Party con- 
ference later this month when 
' Mr Kinnock win seek support 
for a policy of phasing out the 
plants over decades. 

He will find himsel f sand- 

- wiched between right wingers 
; led by Mr Gavin Laird, the 

- engineers’ leader, who are 
: pledged to defend the plants, 

and the hard left, spearheaded 
by Mr Arthur Scaigill, the 
miners' president, which 
' wants a rapid rundown. 

Yesterday^ the conference 

- voted by a tiny 60,000 major- 
. ity to bade General Council 

policy of a freeze on the 
■■ nuclear programme pending 
„ the outcome of a thorough 

- review. 


. The debate, which iwrfqvh^ 
stinging attacks on Mr Scared! 
by leaders of unions wrth 
thousands of members in 
nuclear power plants, took 
place against the background 
of urgent moves by Labour 
spokesraen to correct a news- 
paper report that Mr Kinnock 
was opposed to phasing out, 
albeit slowly, the country’s 38 
atomic plants. 

The Labour leader’s office 
took the unusual step of 
issuing a statement in advance 
of formal publication shortly 
of a party policy document 
approved by the national 
executive committee to go 
before the Blackpool 
conference. 

It said: “In its timing. 
Labour’s approach is prac- 
tical There is no point in 
fiigftteu- 


in the Soviet Union still fresh 
m delegates' mimic, much the 
-best debate of the week in- 
cluded detailed exchanges on 
the nuclear industry's safely 
. record, environmental factors, 
cost comparisons and future 
energy demands 


deceiving people or 
ingthem. 

“Nuclear power generation 
cannot simply be switched off 
immediately, or even 
quickly.” 

The threat to an estimated' 
140,000 jobs in the industry 
provoked a noisy demonstra- 
tion outside the TUC' con- 
ference by about 200 power 
workers and fed the trial of 
strength in the haQ. 

With the Chernobyl disaster 


But jobs provoked the most 
telling intervention when Mr 
Laird, general secretary of the 
Amalgamated Engineering 
Union, warned Mr Scargui 
and a future Labonr govei 
meat that they would fight any 
attempt to crush da industry. 

“Why is it that we see trade 
onion leaders out to decimate 
an i n d u st r y, a Irigb-teduolgy 
industry, an industry with 

140.000 people, an industry 
that can supply energy cheaper 
than may other farm of fad, 

mrlwting coal? 

“Why is it that we are now 
importing from France the 
equivalent of a power station, 

1.000 megawatts? Why is that 
we are budding a second cable 
and we will soon be importing 
more power from France? 

“The reason is the vast bulk 
of electricity generated in 
France is from nuclear plant 

. Continued ou page d, col 1 



George Stephenson leaving Lymtngtou police station yesterday. (Photograph Chris Harris) 


Police break up attempt to 
hold Soweto mass funeral 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 



• Three tedders 
shared the EA000 prize 
in The Tlines 
Portfolio 



com 

rllfeTerty; 
screeioiMrf Leeds; > 
MrsG.E.Hope.df; 
Paignton, Qevon;aprf 
Mr KBheiuiick, of . - 
Tottenham, north - 
London. Details, page 3. 

• There is another . 
£4,000 to be won today. 

• Portfolio list, page 
25; rules and bow to 
play, information . 
service, page 20. 


Gadaffi rocks 
Harare summit 

Colonel Gadaffi, the Lil 
leader, flew out of Harare 
causing consternation at the 
Non-Aligned Movement’s 
summit by dedaring. tfatt it 
had become “an international 
farce” and that some of its 
states were “spies and 
traitors” He said he was ready 
to form an international forte 
to “spread fire under the feet 
of America” Page 9 

Pleas backed 

Lord Lane, the Lord Chief 
Justice, favours allowing pros- 
ecutors to appeal against over- 
lenient sentences. accordh« to 
the Campaign against Drink- 
ing and Driving Page 2 

Growth ahead 

There are signs of renewed 
economic growth despite re- 
cent gloomy forecasts. Mr 
Nigel Lawson, the Chancellor, 
told the Scottish Confedera- 
tion of British Industry in 
Glasgow Page 17 

Journalist plea 

Mr Nicholas Daniioffi the 
American journalist held in 
Moscow, does not want the 
US to swap ; Jtim for foe 
suspected Soviet' spy, Mr 
Gennady Zakharov - 

Russians silent, page o 

Crowded skies 

A US air traffic controller said 
it was a mbrade there were not 
more collisions in the over- 
crowded skies of Los Angeles 
Page 10 

Jenkins storm 

The Bishop of Dnifcam, the 
Right Rev David Jenkins, 
faces renewed controversy 
from a group of North-east 
clergymen after his recent 
address to .the General 
Synod Pae* 5 


Home News2-5.7 
Overseas 8-I0 
Appis 18£7 
Arts *7 

Births, deaths, 
namaces 18 
Bogiocss 21-28 
Chess 2 

Coart 18 

Crosswords 12^0 

Obey M 
Features 12-14 


taw Report 28 


Leaders 
Letters « 
Maturing- 29 
Obtaary Ig 
Science U 

TV £ Radio 35 
Unbersilies £8 
Weather 20 
Wills . I* 


****** 


Row over 
Militant 
collection 

&GteFBl^5jfaF •; 

MemtoiaOf tills MBftnt 
TentRMc if - ahtotig, the l,t$k 
delegates attending tins Trades 
Union Congress conference in 
Brighton have been ordered to 
donate£50 out of their week’s 
expenses allowance to a spe- 
cial fighting fimd. j .lt’ was 
disclosed yesterday ; 

The . money raised will be 
used to help pay the legal costs 
of Mr John Macreadie, the 
member of the Trotskyjte 
organizational the centre of a 
ballot-rigging row ib the Ovfl 
and Public Services ’ Associ-, 
ation. 

- Mrs Kate Losinska, vice 
president of the CPSA, is 
railing for an inquiry into how 
the money, given the union 
to delegates to cover their 
week - in Brighton,- is being 
used. 

Collections have been tak- 
ing place in the conference hafl 
among delegations with Mffi- 
tani members and sympathrs- 
ere, who have booked into 
cheap bed aod breakfast holds 

Most have been taken dis- 
creetly, though an envdope 
was clearly seen passing 
around among the 1 3 Mili- 
tants in the CPSA’s 30 ; strong 
delegation. 

Mr Macreadie is feeing legal 
bills of £10,000 after failing in 
an attempt in the H5gfa Court 

to win a ruling enabling him to 
take up his new job as the 
general secretary of the 
country’s biggest Civil Service, 
union. His executive has 
blocked him from assuming 
~~ “ an ’ 


alleged voting irregularities. 

The donation swallows up 
around omsthird of the £163 
that CPSA delegates get fro m 
their union to cover tbeirweek 
in Brighton. . ‘ 

Mrs Losinska said: “What 
they do with tbetr own money 
is tneir affair, but this cash has 
been given to provide decent 
meals and accommodation. 

“It is the members’ money 

and it is scandalous that it 
should be handed over to an 
organization " dedicated _ to 
undermining other muons 
and the Labour Party. 


Babies ‘die 
because of 
NHS cuts’ 


. Boctocs “are bejpg told to 
adow vdy small jndu8U|te 
bafeihs 10 dfe.beqniss. treafr- 
mtnt is too expensive, a dfild 
qiedafist darined fast night 

Neonatal units all over the 
country are turning away- tiny 
babies who are seriously ffl 
because of cut backs , in staff 
and paediatricians, say that 
despite five national reports 
over the past IS yean urging 
improved raze, British, neo- 
nate rare remains inadequate, 
unstructured, understaffed 
and undereqinpped. 

Dr Peter Fleming, consul- 
tant paediatrician at the Bris- 
tol Royal Hospital for Sick 
Children, said y esterday that 
incubators were standing 
empty and equipment was 
lying idle in- special baby care 
units throughout the country 
through lack of staff and cash. 

His unit was half empty but 
the hospital had had roturn 
away several babies over the 
past few months. “We are 
between -30 and- 50 percent 
short of staff at both our units 
in Bristol, stud Dr Fleming.” 

Dr Fleming = said that 
administrators had. re- 
proached him for treating so 
many babies. “They say:Tf 
you let the children die they 
wouldn't need intensive care 
for so long The loss of a 
small baby causes less grief in 
society than someone ehe:” 

A national study, co- 
ordinated by St George's Hos- 
pital in Loudon, is being 
carried out in maternity 
departments to determine the 
number of deaths among pre- 
mature babies turned away 
from special rare baby units 
because of staff shortages: 

Dr Brian Spadd, consul- 
tant paediatrician : at 
Southmead General Hospital 
Bristol, said that the problem 
had worsened due to the 
success in neonatal intensive 
care- Writing in the British 
Medical Journal this week. Dr 
Spiedd said: “In the best 
centres 80 per cent of babies) 
bom at 28 weeks gestation 
survive, as do half of those 
bom at 28 weds. 


Attempts by Soweto res-. 
iriwiro to hold a mass funeral 
and burial of those killed in 
lari' .week’s police shootings 
were forcibly prevented yes- 
terday by the police and 
Army, who used tea r ga s and 
possibly other means to break 
up what they described as 
“illegal gatherings”. 

But lawyers said, that , the 
.restrictions imposed last 
Tuesday on the holding of the 
fimeral by the - Divisional 
Commissioner of Police for 
Soweto, Brigadier Gideon 
Lanbscher, were illegal be- 
cause- of. a judgement yes- 
terday morning by the Natal 
division., of the Stqxeme- 
Couit. 


were un- 
til Iotos-gI section 
(d) of the state of emergency 
Ptocfatiutena ofJunc I2-Ths 
was. ode of the douses of the 
emergenejf • ; , lreg»dati.ons-. de- 
clared invalid % the court 
lawyers the judgement 
applied omsute Natal as well 
until a court racqual standing 
in another province ' ’ 
dififerent view. 


took a 


On Wednesday ni^it, an 
Anglican Archdeacon, the Rev 
David Nkwe, failed in an 
application to the Rand Su- 
preme Court to have the 
funeral restrictions set aside. 
It would seem that, had foe 
Natal r ulin g come a day 
earfier, this application would 
have succeeded. 

In the Johannesburg area, 
about 80 per cent of workers 


from Soweto, the sprawling 
Mack ghetto to the south-west 
of the city, were estimated to 
have stayed away from work 
yesterday. The “stay-away” 
was in pan a voluntary protest 
to show solidarity with die 
bereaved families, and was in 
part enforced by mihiani 
youths. . 

Gangs of youngsters stoned 
and petrol-bombed buses and 
trains lairing people who did 

Regulations re-imposed on 
September 3 by the South 
African Government prohibit 
iH journalists from r e por ti n g 
or commenting withou t official 
authorization on oerarity force 
action, or from being ou toe 
scene, or . Sritiia mghfV of 
such action or of nay riot, 
'jdfrdttntafftnhEKe,' 
onlawM gotocriato concourse 
or processioa. Sauhr restefe- : 
tioas already aypBed to all 
fihn and soand reporters. 

not observe the “stay-away” 
to wmk. W^aesses said that a 
woman was killed at the. 
Orlando West station in 
Soweto when youths, who 
attacked commuters with 
whips, chased her and she fell 
in front of a train. 

Helicopters constantly cir- 
cled overhead and there was a 
massive police and army pres- 
ence on the ground in Soweto, 
particularly .in -the Jabavu 
district, the scene of most of 
last week’s violence, during 
which the police shot dead 20 
people, by the official count, 


and as many as 30, according 
to local residents. The trouble 
was provoked by threats to 
evict rent defaulters. 

Many streets were blocked 
by burning barricades of okl 
tyres, drums and rocks, de- 
signed to hamper the move- 
ment of police and army 
v ehic l es , and thousands of 
Sowetans milled about wait- 
ing few som ething to happen, 
witnesses said. Almost all 
shops in the township were 
dosed. 

Journalists were pre v ente d 
from covering the distur- 
bances in Soweto on the spot 
by the. newly-promulgated 
press regulations. 

• LONDON; Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, F orei g n and Common- 
wealth Sectary, will fly to 
Washington next Tuesday for 
talks with Mr George Bush, 
the Vice-President,:and senior 
ienior members of the US 
Government (Rodney Cow- 
ton writes). 

It will follow a weekend of 
informal discussions with 
EEC Foreign Ministers, which, 
are expected to be dominated 
by the possibility of imposing 
economic measures against 
South Africa. 

Sir Geoffrey, who will 
going as President of the 
Council of Ministers, will 
Temain in Washington for two 
days. 


Bon overtur n ed, page 8 
Tufa's dPcmma, page 14 
Lending artiefe, page 15 


Murder 
hunt 
man 
gives up 

By Michael Horsaell 

George Stephenson, the for- 
mer servant wanted by mur- 
der squad detectives inves- 
tigating the five Hampshire 
'country bouse killings, gave 
himself up yesterday. 

The former handyman, to 
the Cleaver family made a 999 
rail from a telephone box on a 
camp-site and surrendered to 
two uniformed officers. 

Later, as police pieced to- 
gether his movements, it em- 
erged that be had stayed with 
two women on the ramp-site 
and indulged in a four-hour 
pub crawl in the Hampshire 
town of Brockenhurst before 
giving himself up. 

Stephenson, aged 35, who 
was sacked by the retired 
London publisher Joseph 
Cleaver on August 8 for his 
drunken behaviour, was taken 
to Lyndhuist Police Station 
and later transferred to police 
headquarters at Winchester 
for questioning, after being 
aHo*ed to sleep overnight 

Two other men, who were 
detained separately during the 
day in Coventry, were also 
transferred to winchester for 
questioning about a Rover car 
which Strphenson had hired 
the day before the murders. 

Stephenson, who separated 
from his wife, Julie, last 
month after his dismissal, had 
shaved off his moustache and 
cut his hair 

The 999 call was made from 
a phone box at the Roundhill 
camp-site in Forestry 
Commission land about a 
mile from BrockenhursL 

The two arresting police- 
men who responded to the caD 
in a patrol car were later 
joined by other officers. 

A warden at the huge 700- 
unit site, which is set among 
conifers, said thatstaffhad not 
seen Stephenson at the £3-a- 
day site. Stephenson, who is 
known locally as a ladies' 
man, left for Coventry, where 
he hired the red Rover car, 
C352 YRW, on Monday. He 
; returned the car to the hire 
firm in Coventry on Tuesday. 

Dcl Chief SupL Alan 
Wheefer, fading the iqquiof 
said that Stephenson u' be- 
lieved to . have returned toe 
180 miles to the Brockenhurst 

Gsaffaned on page 20, col 5 


Disaster 
skippers 
held in 
custody 

From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

The Soviet authorities an- 
nounced Iasi night that the 
captains of both the cruise 
liner and cargo ship which 
collided in toe Black Sea hot 
Sunday night, causing nearly 
400 deaths, are now in custody 
in the port of Novorossiyisk 
where the official commission 
of inquiry is based. 

Details of the arrests were 
given at a special news con- 
ference called by Mr Albert 
Vlacov. a leading member of 
the COmmumst Party's 
propaganda department and 
followed a personal order 
from MrGorbachov, the 
Kremlin leader, that fall 
information about the disaster 
and its aftermath should be 
released. 

The two detained captains 
will be subject to an investiga- 
tion and later referred to a 
Soviet court for trial 

No oficial information was 
available about the maximum 
penalties which they might 
face, but Western sources 
believe these win be heavy. 

The two were named as 
Vadim Markov, master of the 
61 -year-old liner Admiral 
Nakhimov, and Viktor 
Tkachenko, master of the bulk 
carrier Pyotr Vasev. 

During toe televised press 
conference, the second railed 
by the Kremlin since the 
disaster, Mr Vlacev said it had 
been determined that the 
stricken liner remained afloat 
for only six to eight minutes 
before going under, rather 
than the 15 minutes originally 
thought. Both vessels had 
been moving at about 10 
knots. 

Already the investigating 
commission, headed by the 
Politburo member Mr Geidar 
Aliyev, has conducted more 
than 400 interviews, but toe 
two captains are the only 
people under arrcsL 

Mr Vlacov hinted last night 
that under Soviet maritime 
law a cargo vessel should have 
given way to a passenger liner 
whatever the circumstances. 

Details o£the commission's 
finished report would be made 
public, be said. 

Reporters were told that toe 
confirmed death toll had risen 

Continued « page 20, ert 3 


US questions Fleming 


US prosecutors investigat- 
ing a drug smuggling opera- 
tion have been given until 
next Friday to examine the 
passport of John Robert Flem- 
ing, the Briton wanted by 
Scotland Yard for questioning 
about a £26 million Brinks- 
Mat robbery. 

The court ruling in Miami 
by Judge James Kehoe has 
stalled another demanding 
that Fleming leave the US by 
midnight fat night or face 
deportation to Britain. 


Fleming's lawyers told 
yesterday's hearing that US 
authorities were trying to force 
the deportation of their client 
by confiscating his passport. 

They said Fleming had 
found a country willing to 
accept him, but declined to 
name iL 

The prosecutors are check- 
ing dates on the passport and 
have not ruled out the 
possibility that Fleming may 
be charged with drug offences. 
Report, page 10 


Prince tells of 
teaching needs 



The Prince of Wales, above, 
told an audience of 18,000 
academics- and; farmer Har- 
vard students at toe opeang 
of the celebration of the 
unrveraity r s350th anniversary 
yesterday that modem educa- 
tion has lost sight of tiie need 
to - v product balanced 
individuals. 

PageTO 


Heroin and drink mix 
killed Olivia Channon 


A. verdict, of death by mis- 
adventure was recorded 
terday' on Miss Olivia 
Channon, aged 22, daughter qf 
Mr Paul Channon, Secretary 
of State far Trade and In- 
dustry, who died from heroin 
and akofaol after celebrating 
the end of her exams at 
Oxford University. 

Jhe inquest verdict came as 
six people who were arrested 
after^her death appeared at 
Oxford Magistrates' . Court 
charged with various drug 
offences. 


The six "ibefoded. Count 
Gottfried von Bismarck, aged 
23, in whose room at Christ 
Church College the body of 
Miss Channon was found. He 
was remanded on £15.000 bail 
charged with having cocaine 
and amphetamine sulphate. 

Mr Sebastian Guinness, 
aged 22, a cousin of the dead 
undergraduate and a member 
of the brewing family, was 
remanded on £10.000 baft 
charged with supplying heroin 
to Miss Channon. 

Reports, page 3 


£115m loss at Lloyd’s 


Lloyd's of London,- the 
world's largest insurer; suf- 
fered trading losses of £115 
million on its insurance activ- 
ities, according to the .annual' 
accounts pubUsbedyesterday. 

Income and gains on insur- 
ance premiums and names' 
(members) investments con- 
vert the losses into §n overall 
profit of £36 million for the 
year. Lloyd's results are tra- 


ditionally calculated three 
years in arrears, so the figures 
relate to 1983. Heavy losses 
from the stricken PCW syn- 
dicates, asbestosis claims in 
America and toe effects of 
Hurricane Alicia also hit 
Lloyd's badly. 

' Pofits from the motor busi- 
ness dropped heavily. 

Details, page 21 
PCW blow, page 27 


unoermming oukt uwwu» ■ — ■ __ i — — Vw _~v, ■ zz 

and the Labour Party.” | bom at 28 weds. 'I ;Page^0 | year. UoytTs results are tra- PCW Mow, page 27 

Race is on to find ‘magic ballet’ cure for cancer 

Bv Pearce Wright London street with the tip of But he e mphasized dot if the part which binds to any portion was needed to get the 

r-L pjitZ an umbrella containlne a trace onfv 'one . molecule of ridn animal or Dlam cdf.: ricin- nulled into the cell to 


Research groups in Britain 
and the United- Slates are 
competing to produce a modi- 
fied form of ridn, one of toe 

most toxic substances known, 
for medical purposes . 

The prize they are chasing is 
the first ofa new type of drug, 
which scientists have pursued 
far years and refer to as the 
“magic bullet”. 

The active ingredient would 
be a genetically engineered 
variety of ricin. It would be 
targeted on cancer cells. 

The potency of the . poison 
was demonstrated when Mr 
Geoigi Maikov, the Bulgarian 
emigre was assassinated in a 


London st re e t with -toe tip of 
ah umb rella containing a trace 
of the compound. 

Research since- then has 
transformed the agent into 
potentially, the most im- 
portant anti-cancer drug. The 
work was described yesterday 
by Dr J Michael Lord, of the 
University ofWarwick, to toe 
British Association for the 
Advancement of Science, 
meeting inBristoL 

He said the possibilities had 
been demonstrated with a 
ricin preparation used to kill 
malignant ' celli in. bone mar- 
row that, had been removed 
from toe body, and replaced 
afterireaunem. 


i 


But lie emphasfad that if 
only one molecule of ridn,. 
entdtd a cell it was doomed 
within 36 boors. . k ' 

- The development of a- 
cbemothetaphy depended on 
a method of,defivenbag 'il to 
tumou r cells alone. . 

Ridn was extracted from 
the seed of toe castorofl plant, 
where it is virtually hermeti- 
cally sealed in a tiny capsule 
with a special membrane. For 
the substance ' is equally 
poisonous to - plants as to 
people. 

Two moteaUes combined to’ 
form the larger ridn prepara- 
tion. One of ibgm.is a harm- 
less sugar compoand, but it is 


X 


the part which 
animal or plant, < 

' The second portion is a 
destructive enzyme which is 
carried into a cell by the sugar 
part : ’ .■ 

Exactly how ridn “intox- 
icates*’ the cell is not fully 
understood, D^Michad Lord 
said. But it wfs essential to 
target only tumour cells: 

Compounds were made by 
replacing the sugar part by a 
genetically engineered mono- 
clonal antrbody.designed only 
to recognize specific types of 
tumour cells. 

Laboratory trials showed 
that . they were -selective in 
delivering the poison, but they 
also showed that a sugar 

■ • 


portion was needed to get the 
ricin- pulled into toe ceQ to 
cause destruction 
- Current research was testing 
modified compounds ad- 
justed for that purpose. 

At toe same time, toe gene 
which regulated the produc- 
tion of ruin in. toe castor oil 
plant had been identified. It 
had been removed from toe 
plant and inserted into yeast 
cultures, which then syn- 
thesized the toxic compound. 

They committed suicide' in 
the process, but the operation 
provided the' basis for the 
manufacturing of batches of 
the poison. 

• - Reports, page 7 . 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


> - 


Law chief is in favour 
of prosecution appeals 
for ‘lenient’ sentences 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


-The Campaign against 
Prinking and Driving has 
disclosed letters from Lord 
Cane, the Lord Chief Justice, 
saying the prosecution should 
have the right of appeal 
against sentences which seem 
to be over-lenient. 

The campaign quotes Lord 
Lane as saying Britain was one 
of the few countries in the 
Commonwealth which did 
not allow it. 

V “Until diat power is given 
to. the Court of Appeal, in- 
evitably some judges pass 
sentences which are far too 
lenient." 

_ .The letter quoted continues; 
“1 have for some time thought 
that power should be given to 
our Court of Appeal to in- 
crease sentences where the 
judge's sentence has been 
pitched manifestly too low. 
However, that is a matter for 
Parliament to decide and I am 
bound to confess I don't see 
any likelihood of the law being 
changed in the foreseeable 
future." 

In a second letter he is 
quoted as saying his entreaties 
have fallen on deaf ears. 

During the passage of the 
Prosecution of Offences Act a 
proposal to enable over-le- 
nient sentences to be referred 


by the Attorney General to the 
Court of Appeal was defeated 
in tin House of Lords. 

The Criminal Justice White 
Paper, which preceded a Bill 
expected next session, says 
that the Government consid- 
ers some arrangement is 
needed to strengthen the 
Court of Appeal in giving 
public guidance on sentencing 
policy. 

But the Government stops 
short of restoring the defeated 
proposal. Instead, the White 
Paper suggests that the Court 
of Appeal's judgements 
should be published on a more 
statutory basis. 

Mr Edward Taylor, Conser- 
vative MP for Southend East, 
who is secretary of the home 
affairs committee of the Par- 
liamentary Party and chair- 
man of the unofficial Crime 
Concern group of MPs, said 
that he would be making 
representations on the issue to 
Mr Douglas Hurd, Home 
Secretary, over the recess. Mr 
Taylor wants a proposal for 
appeal-by the prosecution to 
be included in the Criminal 
Justice Bill. 

He said yesterday that the 
inability of the prosecution to 
appeal against sentences cre- 
ated an imbalance The level 


of sentencing was set as a 
result of appeals only by the 
defence. The court was felt to 
be biased in favour of the 
accused. 

The campaign, which was 
started over 12 months ago by 
two fathers of children lulled 
by drunken drivers and now 
includes more than 300 other 
families, says in a statement 
issued before its annual meet- 
ing tomorrow that Mr Hard, 
has refused to meet concerned 
members. 

The experience of the two 
fathers “revealed a system of 
justice which showed little 
concern or sympathy for the 
victim but every consid- 
eration for the accused.” 

“CADD members are in- 
censed at the failure of the 
Government to take effective 
measures to reduce the hor- 
rific carnage caused by 
drunken and irresponsible 
drivers on the roads of Great 
Britain. 

“It is a sad reflection of our 
system of justice which makes 
it necessary Tot the innocent 
victims' families to gather in 
this way to draw to public 
attention the feet that c riminal 
"killer' drivers are 
justice for taking 
innocent people." 


Invisible MP 


Welwyn keen for 
next election 


By George Hill 

‘ Impatience for the next 
general election is growing 
among the electors at Welwyn 
Hatfield, the constituency 
with (he invisible MP. 

The sitting member, Mr 
Christopher Murphy, aged 39, 
has not been seen in his 
constituency since March, 

♦ when he announced that he 
would not be seeking re- 
election. 

’ Local Tory Party workers 
received a message yesterday 
effectively handing over his 
social duties to Mr David 
Evans, aged SI, his prospec- 
tive successor. 

In theory, Mr Murpfay could 
draw his £20,140 MPs salary 
for nearly two years before the 
pext election, although he 
seems to be doing only part of 
(lis job. Since February he has 
not held a local surgery and he 
has spoken only briefly in die 
House on four occasions. 

“We send individual mes- 
sages from constituents to his 
office at Westminster and we 
have not had any complaints 
here that he has not dealt with 


their problems'*, the local 
Tory agent, Mr Scott Chap- 
man, said yesterday. 

“It is all a storm In a 
teacup", the prospective 
Conservative candidate, Mr 
Evans, said yesterday. 

“He is on holiday some- 
where at the moment, 

Mr Murphy has given two 
different reasons for 
withdrawing from Welwyn's 
political life. 

Soon after his last surgery 
he announced that there 
would be no more until fur- 
ther notice because of illness 
in his family. 

The next month he said that 
he would not be standing 
again because of! 
“opportunities” that had 
arisen since his appointment 
to the Council of Europe and 
the Western European Union. 

In his message to local party 
workers yesterday, Mr Mur- 
phy said: “It is my intention 
until the next general election 
to continue my efforts as 
before to the best of my 
abilities.” 


Irish bar 
on Libyan 
students 

The Irish government is to 
refuse entry to Libyan stu- 
dents because of Libyan sup- 
port for the IRA. 

Government officials said 
yesterday that the decision 
was taken in July after reports 
that Libyan leaders had told 
European politicians that 
Libya was renewing support 
for the IRA. 

The Libyan leader, Colonel 
Gadaffi, said yesterday in an 
interview in Harare, Zim- 
babwe, that be supported the 
IRA but did not plan to 
provide it with arms, Irish 
radio reported. About 300 
Libyans studying in the Irish 
Republic will be allowed to 
complete their courses. Some 
are being trained by the Irish 
state airline, Aer Lingus. 

The Irish action follows a 
declaration by Colonel 
Gadaffi's deputy. Major 
Abdd-Salam JaUoud, to a 
group of West German vis- 
itors in- June that Libya sup- 
ported the IRA. 

“We received certain assur- 
ances from the Libyans but 
did not get a formal retraction 
of that statement,” an official 
source said. 



Mrs Thatcher at Lady Haig Poppy Factory, PowderhalL, Edinburgh, talking to former sol- 
diers who make poppies. 


Nuclear protest 


Scuffle at Nirex dump site 


By Trudi McIntosh 
A mao aged 61 and two 
women were involved in a 
scuffle with four security 
outside a warehouse at 
proposed endear damping 
site at Ebtow, Bedfordshire, 
yesterday. 

Mr Jim Eldridge, a member 
of Bedfordshire Against 
Nuclear Damping, said that 
foe gnards picked up the two 
women protesters and threw 
them to the ground when they 
were changing shifts before 


He also alleged that the 
guards, employed by foe con- 
tractors to protect drilling 
equipment stored at the ware- 
use, punched Mr Percy 
Cox, aged 61, who lives in the 
neighbouring village of 
Wilstead, in the stomach. 

“We believe the action by 
the security guards was un- 
called for. They outnumbered 
the protesters, and to react 
against modi older, frailer 


people is unreasonable”, Mr 
EUridge said. 

Mr Cox, who served with 
the Royal Army Medical 
Corps during the Second 
World War, said last ni g ht 
that he was stOl shaken by the 
incident, bat as soon as he 
recovered he would rejoin the 
blockade. 

He said the protesters did 
not provoke the security 
guards.“We just tried to stop 
them entering the warehouse.” 

Bedfordshire police said 
they were called to the site and 

• (bund that auni> daww had 

been done to the warehouse. 
He said grafitti had been 
daubed on the warehouse and 
foe road outside. 

A official at Nirex, foe 
government nuclear waste 
agency, said that its engineers 
made no attempts yesterday to 
gain access to foe four dump- 
ing sites at Elstow, 
Kflfingholme in Humberside, 
Folbeck in Lincolnshire, ari 


Brad w cB - o n-Sea in Essex. 

Nirex would bring High 
Court injunctions within the 
next fortnight at all sites, if 
access continued to be barred. 

Five Fsdbeck protesters 
joined others from foe Britain 
Opposed to Nuclear Damping 
(BOND) group outside foe 
Trades Lnxm Congress in 
Brighton yesterday. 

• The Government re- 
search laboratory at Harwell is 
being asked for its views over 
(dans to dump mercury- 
contaminated sludge from the 
River Yare on land at Thorpe, 
Norwich. 

It is estimated about nine 
miles of the river are contami- 
nated. Norfolk County Coun- 
cil is calling for the assessment 
because of local concern. 

The county surveyor, Mr 
Ian Corsie, said that only 
some of the material would be 
contaminated and the mer- 
cury was expected to be with in 
the EEC limits. 


Man charged 
over stolen 
US cheques 

An unemployed man has 
been charged with trying to 
cash some of several million 
dollars' worth of US Treasury 
cheques stolen in the United 
Slates. 

Jamaluddin Khan, gg**d 52, 
of -Drayton Road, Hariesden, 
north-west London, was 
bailed until Thursday ■ 
Mr Khan was charged with 
dishonestly assisting in the 
disposal of stolen and forged 
US Treasury cheques * 


Charlie Nicholas guilty 
of ‘cowardly’ assault 



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Arsenal and Scotland foot- 
baller Charlie Nicholas com- 
mitted “a nasty, arrogant and 
cowardly” assault on a young 
woman m a dispute over a bag 
of chips, a judge ruled 
yesterday. 

Miss Lori McELroy, aged 28, 
who' claimed the soccer star 
hit her twice in the face while 
on holiday in Ibiza, was 
awarded £1,331 damages by 
judge Denis McDonnell at 
Westminster County Court 
“I am a sufficiently old- 
fashioned to think that it's a 
particularly nasty thing for a 
man to strike a woman, parti- 
cularly an athletic man,” he 
told Mr Nicholas. 

The judge described as “a 
whole pack of lies” a claim by 
a witness called by Mr Nicho- 
las that be was the one who 
struck Miss McElroy, a post- 
graduate student at Glasgow 
College of Art 
Miss McElroy tokl foe court 
the incident happened after 
she and her former boy friend, 
Mr Brendan Murphy, aged 25, 
left a bar in San Antonio ami 
went to buy some chips. 

As they stood eating, Mr 
Nicholas, aged 24, of High 


Point, North HOI, Highgate, 
north London, readied over 
Mr Murphy's shoulder and 
took a chip. 

Her boy friend turned and 
said: “I might have know, it's 
Charlie Nicholas.” 

She said, that after Mr 
Murphy identified Mr Nicho- 
las she turned to him and said: 
“We are not impressed, so 
why don’t you go and pester 
someone else?” 

She said: “I was about to 
turn away thinking that was 
the end of the incident when I 
felt a hard slap on the right 
hand side of my face.” 

Counsel asked: “Who 
slapped you?” She replied: 
“Charles Nicholas.” 

She added: “Before I got a 
chance to move away I saw his 
other hand coming up to the 
other side of my face. I put my 
hand up to defend myselfbut I 
still got a'blow on the left hand 
ride of my face underneath my 
left ear.” 

She said Mr Murphy was 
also attacked in the incident 
and suffered fractured ribs, 
cuts and bruises to his face, 
and a Mack eye. 


World Chess Championship 

Russians trying to 
emulate London 


From Raymond Kteoe, Chess Correspondent, Leningrad 

western correspondents at the 
1985 Karpov- Kasparov fix- 
lure in Moscow’s Tchaikov- 
skv Theatre. 

But technology has suffered 
in foe transfer from the 
Thames to the Neva. No one 
here seems to have heard of a 
photocopier, while the move 
demonstration in the halt is 
neolithic - large wooden 
boards with metallic pieces 
moved by young pioneers 
wielding poles with hooks 
replaces London's instant 
electronic replay. 

Karpov is a Leningrader 
and may be deemed to have 
superior crowd support as a 
result of his residential 
qualifications. Nevertheless, 
everyone here realizes that the 
former champion has an up- 
hill struggle to eradicate Kas- 
parov's one-point lead. 

The match resumes today, 
with games on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. The 
Times commentary room 
continues at London's Great 
Eastern Hotel in Liverpool 
Street, with grandmasters 
lecturing on the game each 
afternoon and evening. 


After 12 rames in London 
foe World Chess Champion- 
ship has transferred to Lenin- 
grad, where the contrasts with 
London are in some ways 
extreme. _ 

In other ways great efforts 
have been made to emulate 
the innovations developed at 
the Pink Lane Hotel for the 
first half of the contest It is 
spiking, for example, that the 
whole match and facilities are 
centred in the Hotel Lenin- 
grad — a contrast with earlier 
matches in Moscow, where 
those trying to report on the 

contest or officiating at it were 
often a great distance from the 
playing venue. 

The Leningrad organizers 
have taken immense pains to 
communicate the games and 
explain the moves to the pub- 
lic. 

For the first time, emulating 
The Times commentary room 
in London, a lecture hall has 
been set up where 
grandmasters will explain the 
champions* strategies. 

The press room is a great 
leap forward from on the spare 
theatre corridor offered to 


Average Women’s 
Briton is magazine 
underpaid’ set to fold 


A British company attempt- 
ing to establish a safes office in 
Rome would have to pay its 
sales manager £47,092 a 
to equal the earnings of his 
Italian counterpart, according 
to a report published 
yesterday. 

In its report the Confedera- 
tion of British Industry says 
this makes Italy one of the 
most expensive countries in 
Western Europe in which to 
base sales operations. 

Sales Managers m France 
can expect to earn £39,354 a 
year, while in Britain a sales 
manager earning £18,000 a 
year would be considered to 
be well paid. 

In Portugal, however, sales 
rarely earn more 
420 a year, making 
the lowest paid sates 
managers in Europe. 

The report also discloses 
variations in salaries for bi- 
lingual secretarial staff 

e most highly paid sec- 
retaries are in Switzerland, 
where earnings often exceed 
£18,533 a year, about £10,000 
more than the -salaries com- 
manded by bi-lingual sec- 
retaries in London. 

Switzerland is also the most 
expensive country In which to 
buy a domestic property. 

West European Living Casts 
(CBI Publication Sales, Centre 
Point; 193 New Oxford Street, | 
London WC1 A 1DU;£2IX 


than 

them 


Working Woman, the mag- 
azine for briefcase-toting, 
whiie-wine-sipping lady exec- 
utives, suspended publication 
this week after losing more 
than £1 million. 

Its most recent proprietor, 
Mr Peter Cadbury, said he has 
lost £200.000 in five months 
and can't afford to go on 
supporting it 

Working Woman has foiled 
before. It was launched 18 
months ago by Miss Audrey 
Slaughter, and was pitched to- 
the top echelon of British 
women executives. 

At the time the idea was to 
emulate the success of the 
American magazine with the 
same name, but to do it with a 
British accent 

Circulation has fallen, from 

60.000 on launch, to just 

30.000 for the September is- 
sue. Mr Cadbury tried to 
persuade the publishers of the 
American version of Working 
Woman to come in as minor- 
ity shareholders, ^bringing new 
capital. They defined. 

Efforts to investors are 
still underway but Mr 
Cadbury said they must suc- 
:d by the end of the week or 
he will dose iL 

Students are 
cleared over 


Transplant for I iSSf.jfiSS 
girl of 10 


A South African girl aged 10 
vfoo was seriously ill with a 
rare liver disease, was yes- 
terday recovering in hospital 
after a transplant operation. 
Samantha Bunce, from Port 
Elizabeth, was given a new 
liver during a six-hour opera- 
tion at Addenbrooke's hos- 
pital in Cambridge. 

The operation will be paid 
for by a national fundraising 
campaign in South Africa. 


Putting the boots in 


Yomping test for Marines 




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APPROVEI 

tor connection 
totafasommunicatiou 
systems spe ci fied m 
Bw instructions tor 
use Subject tttlW 

conditions set out 
in them 


By Rodney Cowton 

Defence Correspondent 

Four years after the Falk- 
land! conflict, which re-in- 
trodneed trench foot to foe 
public mind as a hazard of 
war, foe Aimed Forces are still 
dying to get their boots right. 

In foe boggy groom ®fi foe 
Falklands, soldiers and Royal 
Marines fomd that their an- 
kle-high boots left their feet 
constantly wet and cold. Some 
developed trench foot, which is 
distantly related to froatbtee. 
But relief was at hand. 

The Army had been working 
on a new boot, known as foe 
combat high boot, which 
reached up to foe calf. Some 
wore shipped out to the Falk- 
lands but foe fighting ended 
before they could he issued. 

These boots are now stan- 
dard issue, but already foe 
Array has produced, though 
not yet issued, a “mark two" 
version, and the Royal Ma- 
rines suspect that foe new boot 
is giving rise to more stress 
fractures and other injuries 
among reernhs. 

So now instructors at foe 
Royal Marines base at 
Lyrapstooe, near Exmquth, 
are using four groups of Royal 
Marines, two groups wearing 
foe high boot and two groups ' 
wearing the old boot, to mon- 
itor the incidence of injury and 
see whether it is worse with 
foe high boot 

Next week Prince Edward 
trill be resuming his training 
with foe Royal Marines, and is 
expected to wear the high boot. 

The Rnyal Marines' boot is- 
tirtualljr identical to foe Army 
boot, the only difference being 
that foe Royal Marines’ boot 
has a sole that is screwed on 
and is more suitable for moun- 



Tbe Bristol University rul- 
ing council has quashed on a 
technicality sentences im- 
posed on seven students for 
violently picketing Professor 
John Vincent. „ * 

The students were disci- 
plined for breaking university 
rules by taking part in violent 
picketing last spring. 

They were objecting against 
Professor Vincent’s alleged 
racism and sexism in weekly 
articles he writes for The Sun. 

During the picketing Profes- 
sor Vincent was jeered, booed, 
and had manure thrown at 
him on his way to lectures. 

Another 11 students were 
cleared by a disciplinary panel 
set up by the Vice-Chancellor, 
Sir John Kingman. 

The seven were all found 
guilty and variously fined, 
suspended and ordered to do 
community service. But yes- 
terday the university council 
over-ruled the panel on appeal 
and quashed the sentences. 

Militant chief 
‘not member 
of Labour’ 

Mr Tony Byrne, Militant 
chairman of Liverpool City 
Council's finance committee, 
is not a paid-up member of foe 
roJing Labour Party and now 
races a ban from future local 
party meetings. 

A three-month search of 
constituency files has found 
! ?f I bis name, said Mr 

txidie Sabmo, chairman of the 
Mossley HiU constituency,., 
where Mr Byrne claimed to be 
a member. 


The Royal Marines combat high boots, with special sole for 
. ctimbmg, being pot through their paces yesterday. 


tain work than the Array's 
moulded sole. 

It was foe Army’s SohSer 
magazine that revealed just 
over a year ago that it . was 
haring trouble with foe new 
boots, with complaints of poor 
boadu® of foe sole to foe 
upper, problems over foe siz- 
ing system and mtidsms of 
the length of time it took to 
break in foe boot 

Yesterday the Ministry of 
Defence said that, apart from 
improving the sole bonding, it. 


had made only minor changes 
to the boat, which was gen- 
erally satisfactory. 

A survey te l shown that 
more titan 80 per cent of | 
soldiers preferred the new boot 
to the old one. 

The Royal Marines are also 
concerned about the general 
quality of their boot. After an 
exercise m Norway last au- 
tumn involving 3 Commando 
Brigade, it is said that about 
{0 per cent of the boots used 
had to be replaced. 


Correction 

An article on June 9 about' 
racial attitudes in the Army said 
the Army had claimed that a 
battalion criticized for dis- 
crimination had a black lieulen- 
ant, three black senior non- 
com missioned officers and 
other black NCOs and soldiers. 
The Army has acknowledged 
that (his information was out of 
date. Slightly more than half Of 
the battalion's approximately 20 
black riflemen have been pro- 
moted to corporal or lance- 
rorporal. but at present it has no 
black senior NCOs or officere. 








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THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Party cocktail 
of heroin and 
alcohol killed 

Channon girl 


which led to the death of a minister’s daughter 


: - 

m:»i Ls* 


tot StaTo!^? Couni vo n Bismprifs room. 


^arfly a drug addict but was 
TtiQ stranger” to drugs. 

Miss ; Channon, aged 22, was 

found dead on a bed in the flat 

of COunt Gottfried von Bis- 
marck at Christ Church Col- 
lege, Oxford, in June after an 
end of examinations party. 

Mr Nicholas Gardiner, the 
Oxford coroner, recorded a 
verdict of death by mis- 
adventure. 

The inquest, held shortly 
after five people arrested dur- 
ing the inquiry into her death 
had appeared in court, pieced 
together the evening on which 
Miss Channon H crashed out” 
after her final examinations. 

Mr Gardiner said: “I have 


coaching her in history. 

Mr Vmcent told the inquest 
that be was extremely drunk 
but he remembered Miss 
Channon snoring “very 
loudly". -She had not changed 
position when Count von 
Bismarck returned to the 
room at about 3am, or when 
he awoke later. 

Only when be woks for a 
third time did be turn her on 
her back and realized 
something was “dreadfully 
wrong". 

Mr Vinceaf said that he had 
originally claimed to have 
returned to' his college and 
slept in the bath because “I 



Five people arrested after tike death of Miss Chamron arrive at Oxford Magistrates’ Court yesterday to face a variety of drug charges. Left to right. Count Gottfried 
von Bismarck, in whose college flat the student died; Sebastian Guinness, her cousin; Rosie Johnston, her best friend; Paul Dunston and Nicholas Vincent 


Sasser— 

gests that Olivia Channon m side me all night. I was not in 


any sense intended her own 
death. She came om of the 
exams cheerful and apparently 
looking forward to a good 
party. 

“She was an in tellig e n t 
young woman ' and could 
hardly but be aware of the 
effect that drugs can have on 
the human body. The human 
body is capable erf' taking 
remarkable punishment, but 
there are limits." 

Mr Gardiner had been told 
dial when Miss Channon left 
the examinations centre at 
3.30pm she was met by friends 
with champagne. She bought 
more bottles on the way back 
to Count von Bismarck's 
rooms in * Christ Church, 
where they drank them before 
; to the college buttery to 
: until it dosed. 

Two witnesses said that 
•Miss Channon ordered a pint 
of sherry at the buttery, al- 
though they could not be sure 
bow much she drank. 

The inquest heard evidence 
that Miss Channon took her- 
oin in a bathroom outside 



Ofivia Channon, no 
stranger to drugs 


an altogether balanced state 
Miss Rose Johnston, the 
dead gilt's best friend, said 
that Miss Channon had inti- 
mated to her that she intended 
to celebrate the end of her 
examinations by talcing her- 
oin. She knew that Miss 
Channon bad heroin with bet. 
which had been obtained in 
London. 

Miss Johnston said that sbe 
bad been concerned about 
Miss Channon ’s drug-taking, 
and had discussed it with 
three other people. 

- When the coroner asked 
whether she had discussed it 
with Miss Channon, sbe re- 
plied: “Anyone who knew 
Olivia would know that it was 
very difficult, because she 
knew in her own mind what 
she wanted to da We talked 
about it on one occasion and 
she seemed very happy-go- 
lucky." 

Count von Bismarck said 
that he did not see Miss 
Channon take heroin, and 
would have objected if it had 
happened in his room. But he 
was aware that she bad taken 
drugs, and was not surprised 
that sbe should do so after her 
examinations. 

Dr Michael D nimill, of the 
John Raddiffe Hospital, who 
p er fo r m ed the postmortem 
examination, 'said that deatfr 
was caused * by Tespiratoiy 
arrest as a consequence of 
heroin and alcohol, .with 
amphetamines as a- possible 
contributory factor. He ruled 
out the suggestion that Miss 
Cbahhon died by swaflowing 
her own vomit. . 

Dr Dunnill agreed with Mr 
David Ledennaa, represent- 
ing Miss Johnston, that death 
had resulted from a “deathly 
cocktail of heroin and 
alcohoL" He said it was not 
possible to say bow much 
heroin Miss Channon had 
taken 


Five remanded to face 
drug charges 


Six people appeared before 
Oxford magistrates yesterday 
charged with drugs offences 
after the death of Miss 
Channon, and five win face a 
trial. _ 

The six charged were: Count 
von Gottfried von Bismarck, 
aged 23; Rosie Johnston, aged 
22; Sebastian Guinness, aged 
22. a cousin of Miss Channon; 
Nicholas Vincent, aged 24; 
Cynthia Taylor, aged 38 who 
was fined yesterday; and Paul 
Du ns tan. aged 31. 

Mr Paul Hamson, for the 
prosecution, asked for Mia 
Johnston, Mr Guinness and 
Mr Dunstan to be tned at 
crown court as they were 


was remanded on £1 0,000 bail 
until the same date. 

Mr Guinness, of Hereford 
Square, South Kensington, 
west London, who is a mem- 
ber of the brewing family, is 
charged with supplying heroin 
to Miss Channon and to Miss 
Johnston and possessing her- 
oin and cocaine: He was also 
remanded on £10,000 bail 
until the same date. 

Mr Dunstan, a songwriter, 
of Ellesmere Road, Dollis 
HilL north-west Loudon, is 
charged with supplying heroin 
to Miss Channon together 
with Miss Johnston, supplying 
heroin to Miss Johnston audio 
persons unknown, and pos- 


crown court as mey wuic persons uufuuwu, jw- 
charged with supplying drugs, sessing heroin and cocaine. He 
i D r _- j ha hail no use rpmnnded in autodvror a 


but said that he had no 
objection to Count von Bis- 
marck, Mrs Taylor and Mr 
Vincent being dealt with by 
magistrates as they only meed 

possession charges. . 

‘The magistrates decided 
that Count von Bismarck 
should also be sent to crown 
court for trial. • . . 

The count, who is charged 
with possessing cocaine and 
amphetamine sulphate, was 
remanded on £15,000 bail 
until September 25. 

Miss Johnston, of Shell- 
ingford House, near Fanng- 
don, Oxfordshire, is charged 
with supplying heroin to Miss 
Channon. and possessing 
oin, cocaine, cannabis and 
amphetamine sulphate. She 


was remanded in — 
week bat agreed to be — — 
remanded m his absence to 
appear again on -September 25. 

Mr Vincent; of Lower Farm 
Cottages, Thrnpp, Oxford- 
shire, who . is charged with 
possessing - amphetamine sul- 
phate, elected for trial at 
crown court' and was re- 
manded on £500; bail to 
appear again on September 1 8. 

Mrs Taylor/ of Green Place, 
Oxford, an American : and a 
mother of three, who runs a 
tour company,, agreed to be 
dealt with by the magistrates 
and jfleaded guilty, to possess* 
ing and supplying c ann a b is. 
She was fined £50 for pos- 
session and £50 for supplying, 
to be paid at £3 a week. ' 


Campaign 
on strokes 
launched 

The Chest, Heart and 
Stroke Association launched 
its “Stroke Prevention 
Fortnight” yesterday by call- 
ing on GPS to introduce 
widespread checks to identify 
people who have risk factors 
for heart attack or stroke. 

Stroke is the third biggest 
killer disease in Britain, with 

100.000 cases a year, yet only 

0:5 per cent of the money 
spent on research into cancer 
and 2_5 per cent of that spent 
on heart disease goes into 
researching its and 

methods of prevention, the 
association says. 

Its National Stroke Om- 
paign is hoping to raise 
£2 milfi nn to help with re- 
search and to increase public 
awareness. 

As part of its campaign to 
encourage prevention the 
association has sent about* 

5.000 psfrjtagnx to doctors all- 
over foe country to be distrib- 
uted to their patients, provid- 
ing health hints for people, 
approaching retirement. 

The project is being in- 
troduced by 18 other health 
authorities and- the Chest, 
Heart and Stroke Association 
says it is hoping that the 
scheme wifl become wide- 
spread within a few years. 


Education changes 


Drugs guide for under-lls 


The Health Education 
CcMmcfl yesterday launched its 
first teaching course aimed 
specifically at belying nine to 
ll-year-oWs cope with the 
growing drag problem. 

At a press conference in 
London, the cttnpOers of the 
balky package of notes and 
cokmr slides, aimed at teach- 
ers, parents and primary 
schoolchildren, conceded that 
(here was a risk of making 
drags attractive merely by 
faro da riaig the. subject ia the 
classroom. But theyr-argaed 
tint a bread approach, 
pvticabrly if p are n ts were 
imbed, should a ftfliaia the’ 


By David Cross 

dangers and discourage drag 
abase among children. 

“Drag abuse ia primary 
■schools ts not as big a problem 
as we are sometimes led to 
believe," Mr Jeff 'Lee, of the 
Teachers' Advisory GoancO on 
Alcohol and Ding Education, 
said. The council helped to 
compile the coarse. “But un- 
less we pm the emphasis on 
prevention and education, ft 
coaid become a big problem." 
Mr Lee added. 

The material is based on a 
saccessfnl project carried oat 
in Wirral in Merseyside — an 
area renowned for drag abase. 
All 93 primary schools in the 


area assisted ia the scheme, 
■which was heralded as a great 
success by the local education 
authority. 

The pa ck a g e, which is di- 
vided into sections so that 
young children are spared the 
gruesome details of hard-drag 
problems, also covers the dan- 
gers of akobol and nicotine 
addiction. The HEC said that 
a «wwflr project OW —wiring 
had halved experimentation 
where ft had been fefrodaced. 
Health Education: Drugs and 
the Primary School Child 
(TACADE, Furness House, 
TrafTord Road, Salford M5 2XJ; 
£33.95). 


Push industry’s image, heads told 

By a Staff Reporter 


Engineering and science stu- 
dents should be encouraged by 
paying them right times -as 
much grant as arts students, 
preparatory school heads were 
told yesterday 
A part of a teacher’s formal 
training should include a pe- 
riod working in industry, so 
that children can be en- 
couraged to enter manufac- 
ring when they leave school, 
Mr Martin Jourdan, chairman 

of the f urni t ur e manufacturers 

Parker-Knoll, added in a 


speech to the annual con- 
ference of the Incorporated 
Association of Preparatory 
Schools. 

He said he also believed 
that simple industrial 
economics should be in- 
troduced as a compulsory 
subject from primary school 
onwards. This would, alter 
“the perception of children so 
that they regard a job in 
indastry as bong a secure and 
worthwhile occupation for 
life." 


Mr Jourdan said: “We have 
to positively encourage educa- 
tion and sciences by biasing 
the polytechnic and university 
grants system in favour of 
such courses". I£ for example, 
a mavmuim annual grant was 
£2300, engineers and sci- 
entists might get£4, 000 and art 
students £500. 

Mr Jourdan said that elit- 
ism was vital for tin country’s 
future success. But this must 
not be confined to the aca- 
demic and sports field. 


Women think doctors 
are ‘unsympathetic 9 


By A Staff Reporter 


About 10 percent of women 
think that their family doctors 
are “awful” mid doe in three 
regards them as brusque, cold 
and condescending, a survey 
published yesterday said. 

The survey, based on a 
sample of 5,000 women, 
shows that many women find 
their doctors insensitive and 
unwilling to discuss their 
patients'- problems. 


Ten per cent ftlt they could 
not trust.tbeir doctor to keepa 
confidence. 

Details of the survey, pub- 
lished in the October issue of 
Company magazine, showed 
that many women favoured 
female doctors, who were 
considered more sympathetic 
than men, and likely to give 
the patient more time. 


Rail policeman lost 
sight of eye, court told 


A British Transport police- 
man lostthe. sight of one eye 
and his tenses of smell and 
taste after he was brutally 
attacked by four youths, it was 
alleged at Nottingham Down 
Court yesterday. 

Officers who found Con- 
stable Neil Harvey, aged 28, 
early on October 26 last year, 
did not realize he was a 
policeman until they found 
his blood-stained tunic. . 


Alan Richardson, aged 19, 
and his brother; Colin, aged 
18, both of Beeston Road 
Dunkirk, Nottingham, with 
their step-brothers David 
James, aged 21, and John 
Melnichenko, aged 19, of 
Gregory Street Lenton, Not- 
tingham, deny attempted 
murder and causing grievous 
bodily harm with intent and 
with intent to resist arrest 
The trial continues. 


Move to 
transfer 
Savage 

By Jill Sherman 

, Professor Gcdis 

Grudzinskas, the bead of the 
obstetrics department at The 
London Hospital, has told the 
medical college that Mrs 
Wendy Savage should be 
transferred to another hospital 
in London for the next three to 
five years. 

Speaking at a meeting of the 
hospital's academic board this 
week. Professor Grudzinskas 
made it dear that he would 
find it very difficult to work 
alongside Mis Savage both in 
the labour wands and in the 
academic department. 

“I submit that reintegration 
could only be considered after 
the implementation of an 
option which includes vital 
components of time and dis- 
tance to allow the wounds to 
heal," he told the board. “In 
this respect a position at the 
expense of the medical college 
should be found in London, if 
possible, for a period of three 
to five years with a view to full 
reintegration." 

In July, an inquiry cleared 
Mrs Savage, who is also senior 
lecturer at the hospital's medi- 
cal school, of five allegations 
of professional incompetence 
which led to a 16-month 
-suspension. The health 
authority subsequently agreed 
to immediate reinstatement. 

The academic board said it 
could come to no decisions 
about Mrs Savage's academic 
work until the Munro panel, 
which is looking into how Mrs 
Savage can resume her NHS 
work, makes it report later this 
month. 

The board derided instead 
to put forward three res- 
olutions: that it welcomed the 
reinstatement of Mrs Savage; 
that it would give full support 
to Professor Grudzinskas and 
that it would look into the 
problem of the reintegration 
of Mrs Savage within the 
medical college curriculum. 



-<gM- \ 

Three win:, 
share i 
in £4,000 

Mrs Gwendoline Hope, 
from Preston, Devon. Me 
Pnn Bheenkb, from Totten* 
ham , north London, and Mij 
Terry Screeton, from Leeds,' 
share yesterday's Portfolio 
Gold prize of £ 4 , 000 . 

Mrs Hope, aged 60, who Ins 
been playhig Portfolio Gold 
for about three months, said: 
“I coaid not believe that 1 had 
won, bat my husband helped 
me check the numbers, and I 
had." 

Mr Bheenicb, aged 43, who 
works as an executive officer 
for the Department of Health 
and Social Security, said: 

“I have been planning X 
holiday to Mauritius for som£ 
time, and the money will come 
in very bandy.** 

Mr Screeton, aged 32, a, 
computer programmer and a 
keen golfer, raid that he wflf 
be spending his share of the 
prize money on a new set df 
golf dabs. * 

Readers who wish to piay 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 1 
to: “ 

Portfolio Gold, ^ 

The rimes, 

PO Box 40, 



Mrs Gwendoline Hope. 


Tourists ‘should 
demand more 9 

By Alan Hamilton. 

■Too many dissatisfied pack- Association of British Travel 


age botidaymakers are accept- 
ing - nominal amounts * of 
compensation from tour op- 
erators instead of cfaimmg 
bigger refunds, according to 
the Cons um e r s* Association 
magazine. Holiday Which? 

Tourists Whose holidays 
have gone wrong accept 
amounts, often no more than 
£10, from some tour operators 


Agents against any of its 500 
member tour opriaiors and 
daim up to £1 ,000 a person or 
£5,000 a booking form. 

Since 1981 about 80 per 
cent of ABTA conciliations 
have found in favour of the 
customer. Amounts awarded 
if the case goes to the county 
court tend to be higher but less 
predictable. - 



whose holidays have not lived 
up to their promise either to 
use thetfree- conritiation ser- 
vice operated by. the Associ- 
ation of British Travd Agents 
or to go to court. 

A survey of 400 Holiday 
Which? readers who had 
claimed' compensation since 
January 1984 showed that 
most had simply written to the 
four operator concerned with- 
out seddflg outride help. Only 
half were satisfied with the 
outcome. . 

Standards of. accommoda- 
tion proved. the most common 
.complaint, followed' by - 
changes .to accommodation .or , 

travel arrangements promised 

in the brochure. ' 

But the magazine found that 
complaints about poor accom- 
modatiop and mis le a ding bro- 
chure descriptions were the 
least likely to reach an accept- 
able tettiemetf. 

.Dissatisfied clients can seek 
conciliation through the 


took “a dim view" of member 
companies which procras- 
tinated over cutomers* com- 
plaints, or even refused to 
reply to letters. 

Figures supplied to The 
Times by ABTA show that last 
year was a particularly bad 
year for complaints, with 
1 1,895 made fo member firms 
out erf a total of 8 JS million 
package holidays. 

In a separate admonition. 
Holiday Which? urges 
holidaymakers to beware of 
high-pressure salesmen for 
timeatare apartments at .for- 
eign resorts. - 

It says that it has received 
many letters from angry 
Consumers' Association 
members who have been ha- 
rassed by timeshare salesmen. 
Some members found them- 
selves signing on the spot only 
to realize, tire extent of their 
financial commitment when 
they arrived home. 


B uilding society widens its service 


By Christopher Warman 


tier there 
intervene. 


is no reason to 
Mr Tiro MdviUe- 


Tbe Nationwide Building 
Society yesterday annomiced 
it will establish a national net- 
work of 350 estate .agents of- 
fices as part of a plan to pro- 
vide a complete range oi 
house-buying services — ex- 
cept conveyancing - hy.”S! 
year. The new Building 
Societies’ Act is to be im- 
plemented on January i. 
1987. ’ 

“We believe that so tongas, 
the tegal profession serv« tra 
needs of our- member* ■ 
economical a nd efficient man- 


iuim — 

Ross, chief general m ana g er , 
aid. “However, if at some 
stage- in the future we beheve 
we can improve upon the ser- 
vice bring offered, then we 
shall certainly examine ways 
in which we can do so." 

The new services include 
the provision of cheque books 
and guarantee cards, foil 
insurance services, personal 
loans, unit trusts and pension 
plans, as well as estate agency. 

The Nationwide has already 
reached provisional, agree- 

JSnt to acquire 20 estate for estate agency services. 


agency firms with' 260 offices 
around tire country, and ex- 
pects the number to reach 350 
early next year. 

If approved, the network 
will be headed by Mr Donald 
Storrie, president of the Na- 
tional Association of Estate 
Agents and chairman of Don- 
ald Storrie and Company.ihe 
largest firm of estate agents in 
Scotland, with 29 offices. 


Mr Melvflfe-Rass said a re- 
cent survey 1 showed more than 
40 per cent of people would 
prefer to nse a bttikun^ society 
forcstar ‘ 


“We believe it is in die 
interest ofNationwide's mem- 
bers. for us to move towards 
pfovidu% them with a com- 
plete range of hpuse-buying 
services by . acquiring a na- 
tional network of estate 
agents. This will enable us to 
make house purchase a much 
simpler process." 

The estate agents win re- 
main autonomous under the 
Naiionwtde nmbrella, and Mr 
MeJ ville-Ross said they would 
not insist that mortg^es be 
arranged with Nationwide, or 
restrict the range of insurance 
options. i 


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HOME NEWS 


TUC CONFERENCE 


THE TIMES FRIDAY 


IER 5 1986 


* o ft * * SL- 


Energy debate • Pretoria trade ban • Schools warning • Casual labour 


Call for nuclear power halt narrowly defeated 


• By one of the narrowest card-vote majorities in 
recent years, the TUC yesterday rejected a composite 
■motion «Hing for an immediate halt to the nuclear 
jpwer programme and the phasing-oat of all existing 
iplants. The motion was rejected by 4,641,000 votes to 
4381,000, a majority of 6#, 000. 

%;A motion by the Engineers 1 and Mana gers* 
'Association, which represents workers in power 
stations, was also rejected, without a card vote. It ex- 
pressed concern that there had been no new power sta- 
tion order for seven years and said that early decisions 
iwere needed to order conventional stations over the 
3next decade. 

.•The Congress accepted only a report firom the 
^General Council calling for a thorough review before 
jny new nuclear power installations are built. 

• Some technologies had such Britain was an island of coal 


^(inherently catastrophic 
'Consequences'" if things went 
-wrong that they could not be 
allowed to remain, Mr Ken 
Cameron, general secretary of 
the Fire Brigades* Union 
(FBUL said in moving the 
composite motion calling for 
an immediate halt to the 
nuclear power programme. 

■ rr . It also asked the Labour 
*-Party to include the motion in 
■fts election manifesto and 


set in a sea of oil and had 
Europe's longest coastline 
with its potential for wind, 
wave and coastly power? 

Energy reserves 
‘envy of Europe’ 

Our energy reserves were 
the envy of Europe yet we 
imported uranium illegally 
from Namibia and, until re- 


iSS* centiy, from South Africa. 


■expansion of the nuclear in- 
dustry in the United 
-Kingdom. 

V it further proposed that the 
'jSeneral Council enter into 
urgent discussions with the 
; Labour Party to draw up an 


work for those employed in 
nuclear power and to find safe 
and environmentally accept- 
able long-term solutions to 
nuclear waste problems. 

^Horrifying 9 lesson 
of Chernobyl 

'hm.um.m . ■ ■ — ■ — — — 

The motion also demanded 
jan increase in government 
Research into alternative en- 
-tngy sources, and an inte- 
grated energy policy based on 
txwI, with increased develop- 
"ipent of natural resources. 

The Chernobyl disaster had 
been a horrifying reminder of 
the dangers of nuclear power, 
Mr Cameron said; there were 
38 nuclear reactors operating 
within Great Britain. 

“1 want to make sure that 
disaster does not happen 
'here", he said. “This compos- 
ite calls for a phasing out of 
.nuclear power in Britain. We 
4io not ask for them to be 
pulled down; this is a realistic 
motion. We want to make sure 
Britain’s fire fighters and pub- 
lic do not have to face such 
Appalling risks in the future.” 
^ The stand was not being 
.-taken in blind panic as a result 
of Chernobyl but had. been the 
jyiew of his unioikfor many 
years. 

' The risk ofa similar disaster 
here was bring taken simply to 
produce 4 per cent of total 
energy and 18 per cent of 
electricity in the United King* 
dom. 

Was that worth it when 


It was said that with the end 
of nuclear power the lights 
would go out but if all the 
nuclear stations were shut 
down there would still be 
spare energy capacity. 

Mr Arthur ScargOL general 
secretary of the National 
Union of Mineworkers, said 
the major theme of the Con- 
gress had been the need for 
unity. Delegates should be 
consistent and remain united 
in opposition to nuclear power 
and in support of the phasing 
out of all nuclear installations. 

The motion was not out of 
line with what was taking 
place throughout western Eu- 
rope. he said. “Government 
after government are changing 
their policies and trade union 
movements throughout tire 
world and the west of Europe 
are begining to adopt anti- 
nuclear positions.” 

The three arguments in 
favour of nuclear power were; 
need, its cheapness and its 
safety. Events over the past 
two years had eloquently dem- 
onstrated that argument to be 
flawed. 

Thatcher’s need 
for nuclear power 

There was no need for nuclear 
power, there was sufficient 
coal and alternative energy 
sources. The NUM was not 
suggesting dependence on coal 
alone. It had discussed oil and 
gas. solar power, wind and 
wave eneigy. If the millions of 
pounds spent on developing 
nuclear power had gone to 
those alternative fields there 
would be a different eneigy 
policy today (applause). 

“The real reason why we 
have a a nuclear programme”, 

SOUTH AFRICA 



Mr Arthur Scargfll faring supporters of nuclear power outside the conference centre at Brighton yesterday. 


he said, “is because Mrs 
Thatcher’s Government said 
it was needed in order to 
defuse and defeat the Trans- 
port and General Workers’ 
Union and the NUM in any 
industrial dispute. You saw 
that dearly during the miners* 
strike.” 

Mr John Lyons, of the 
Engineers* and Managers* 
Association, said he had no 
intention of following the false 
and hypocritical line taken by 
Mr ScargilL 

It was inconceivable to his 
members responsible for run- 


ning Britain's nuclear power, 
stations that the Chernobyl 
accident could happen here 
because Britain ured gas- 
cooled reactors, which did not 
have the same design fault and 
which, if they foiled, would 
foil safe. 

The central weakness of the 
FBU motion was that it was 
oblivious to the rest of the 
world. 

There were many more 
nuclear power stations in 
neighbouring countries than 
in Britain. They should guard 
against a nudear disaster by 


ensuring the best standards of 
safety in every country. 

Whatever was decided 
about Sizewdl, two coal-fired 
stations should be ordered 
immediately, because the . 
country would run short of 
power m the early 1990s. 

The motion was inoperable 
and there was no case for 
rushing decisions. 

Mr Gavin Laird, general 
secretary of the Amalgamated 
Engineering Union, also op- 
posed the composite motion. 
The British nuclear industry 


was the safest of its kind, he 
said. 

The motion was a proposal 


by trade unionists to decimate 
a high technology industry 
with 140,000 people employed 
in it and which could supply 
energy more cheaply than any 
other form of fiieL 
“Arthur, you will see a fight 
if anyone, thinks we shall let 
our members down in Ibis 
crucial and necessary in- 


dustry, which is part of high 
technology. It will not happen. 

Mr Frank Chapman, of the 
Electrical, Electronic and 


freeze to determine long-term policy 


The TUC report caffing for 
a moratorium In the nuclear 
power station construction 
programme was commended to 
Congress by Mr Jack Ecdes, 
of the Fire Brigades Union and 
a member of the team that 
drew it np. 

The report recommended 
that no new nuclear instaHa- 
tkms should be built until a 
most thorough review has been 
conducted into tire entire 
nuclear industry and the pub- 
lic had.renewed confidence in 
its safety. 

This would include a job 
'conversion study to see bow 
workers in the nuclear in- 
dustry would be redeployed. 


Mr Ecdes said that the 
report r e pr esented a signifi- 
cant iwiwdhfe shift in TUC 
energy policy in fuvom- of coal 
and alternative energies. 

They were recommending a 
critical review of all aspects of 
the audear industry so tint in 
1987 Confess amid decide 
what it bdieved should be 
dime in the longer term. 

Tire charge that the report 
was pro-ondear was wro^, 
indeed ludicrous, simply on 
tiw.gnmnd that they were not 
caffing at this time for the 
phasing out of all nuclear 
power. 

They were calling far a 
freeze in the nuclear pro- 


gramme. The report was nei- 
ther pro- nor anti-nuclear. In 
its review, the General Council 
would be looking in detail at 
the Chernobyl accident and 
last week’s report by the 
Soviet Government. 

The report proposed several 
immediate changes in TUC 
energy policy. The next po w e r 
stations in Britain should be 
coal-fired plus an expansion of 
coal-fired heat and power. 
They were opposing the 
pre ssurized water reactor 
(PWR^mikss the SizeweU in- 
quiry produced compelling 
reasons otherwise. They 
needed to retire the older 
Magnox stations if they foiled 


to meet modern safety 
standards. 

Calling for a calm and 
rational defeats on the issue, 
Mr Ecdes urged Congress to 
reject the composite motion 
advocating an i mmed iate halt 
to the midear power pro- 
gramme and the phasing out of 
all existing ptants. He also 
wanted the power station 
workers* motion about the 
steady ordering of stations to 
be thrown out 

He said that the composite 
motion pre-empted the review 
proposed by the General 


CoundL They had to review in 
depth all the evidence 


Plea to strengthen boycott 


Reaffirming total oppo- 
sition to apartheid, the Con- 
gress endorsed the call of the 
Commonwealth Eminent Per- 
sons Group for effective con- 
certed action against South 
Africa. 

Mr Kenneth Gill, President 
of the Congress, told the 
conference they had just heard 
Shat two members of the 
^African National Congress 
were to be executed next 
^Tuesday. He added: “You will 
'want us to demand that the 
Government immediately 
intervenes to slop this bar- 
barous act." 

The composite motion on 
‘South Africa that was carried 
^condemned the intransigence 
•of the Government in oppos- 
ing comprehensive economic, 
'Sanctions which was prolong- 
ing apartheid. 

The Congress asked the 
whole labour movement to 
strengthen the boycott against 
South African goods and to 
help achieve a complete em- 
bargo on al! trade, commer- 


cial, financial, cultural and 
sporting activities. The im- 
mediate unconditional release 
of all union and political 
prisoners, particularly Nelson 
Mandela, was also demanded. 

They should ensure, the 
motion said, that union pen- 
sion funds were not invested 
in South Africa or in British- 
based companies with South 
African connections. 

Mr Ron Todd, general sec- 
retary of the Transport and 
General Workers’ Union, 
opening the debate, said that 
in South Africa recently “ev- 
ery black person we spoke to 
unreservedly wanted the Brit- 
ish Government to apply eco- 
nomic sanctions against South 
Africa. 

“ They were not impressed 
with appeals to morality. 
They, who were suffering, saw 
it to be their right alone to 
prescribe the remedy.” 

Mr Alan Tuffin. general 
secretary of the Union of 
Communications Workers, 
said that the South African 


Government was more iso- 
lated throughout the world 
than ever before. Why was 
Mrs Thatcher almost alone 
among w-orid leaders opposed 
to sanctions? 

Some 73 companies with 73 
South African subsidiaries or 
associates, donated £1.2 mil- 
lion to Tory funds last year. 
About 71 Tory MPs were 
directors, shareholders, par- 
liamentary consultants or 
advisers to 85 companies 
which had direct or indirect 
business investments in South 
Africa. 

Mr Eric Clarke, of the 
National Union of 
Minweworkeis. said that so 
long as apartheid existed and 
the British Government gave 
the regime its backing, then 
racists in Britain gained en- 
couragement It was not 
enough to say that Mrs 
Thatcher did not represent 
Britain, that had to be proved 
to the non-aligned nations or 
alternative sanctions would be 
imposed on this country. 


PUBLIC SERVICES 

Explosion in schools 
‘if funding is denied 9 

An explosion in the schools its contempt for the jobs they 
of England and Wales was did and for the services for 
promised by Mr Fred Jams, which they worked. 

General Secretary of the Na- The workers they so treated 
tional Union of Teachers, if with contempt were those on 
the Government did not come whom the country depended 
up with money to meet a for treatment of the sick and 


satisfactory settlement. 


wtr ^ 


care of the elderly, for educa- 


There would be a renewal of tion and t raining of the rising 
the teachers* dispute on even generation and to maintain 
more bitter terms than before, the services which enhanced 
he said. the citizens' quality of life. 

Mr Jarvis was successfully Mr John Warn, General 
moving a composite motion Secretary, Association of First 
condemning the Government Division Civil Servants, sec- 1 


% 


for deliberately devaluing and onding, said that their conten- 
running down the public ser- tion was that their members 
vices as part of its discredited were paid substantially less 
economic and social policies, than the rate for the job 
The motion reaffirmed total ava ilab le in the private sector, 
support for the stand by Review bodies should be al- 
teachers against de n ia l of lowed to operate without gov- 
proper fu n di ng levels for eminent interference. 


Honest 


Lyons: 


hypocrisy 


Unions warn Kinnock 
on nuclear freeze 


GENERAL COUNCIL 


March of the moderate wing 


Continued from page 1 let our members down in this 

crucial and necessary industry 

ton we hivcTerT ^ which is W «* hn0 »- 
— Wc arc "talking about ogy. it just will not happen. 

decimating an industry, an “We should apply ourselves 
"integral part of our manufac- to learning the lessons, defend 

S iuing industry. Our manufac- the nuclear industry and I only 
uring has a’iready shrank, wish we were talking about 
J ,How many times have we expanding it, not about a 
• cried about that this week, and freeze.” 

2 correctly so? We are talking Mr j 0 h„ Lvons. general 
« about making British industry secretary of the Engineers’ and 
. less competitive, because of Managers’ Association, issued 
*■ Chernobyl. Of course there arc a warning of power cuts from 
• lessons to be learned, of course t he winter of 1992 if nuclear 
I we have to apply them. plants were phased out. 

; fact of the mattef is Whalevcr Brilain did ^ 

’Jr^ ^nddrew iSfseino die *** of the wor,d wouJd not 
1 nSd m lurn its tack on nuclear 

j Ei BC /w5 energy. Without iL millions 

Stan Orme (Labour s energy wou | d d j e f rom lack of power 

’ESlnSTnem and food in the Third World. 
i desert the trade union mem- 

’ bers in the nuclear industry of Mr ScargiH was the target of 
, this country, it will not be the jibes from pro-nuclear faction. 
\ Amalgamated Engineering Mr Frank Chapman of the 
. Union Electrical. Electronic and 

! "Nobody, but nobody is Plumbing Trades Union, said 
« going to decimate Dounreay there was no difference be- 
* or Sdlaficld...and wc have got tween Sir Ian MacGregor 
: trade union members coming . dosing down uneconomic pits 
to this rostrum who I have and shutting down nudear 


It was. said some, a brutal week's Congress has been Mr 
hatchet job, a demonstration Bin Jordan, president of the 
of the right-wing group on tin Amalgamated Engineering 


TUC at its most hard faced. 

In spite of an alleged agree- 
ment with the left, and as be 
was still recovering from a 
serious Alness, the so-called 
“new realists” ensured that 
Mr Ray Bncktoa, general 
secretary of the train drivers 
muon, was voted off the policy 
making TUC General COnnriL 

Eves as they lent their name 

to a “get weir message, the 
right were totally unapolo- 
getic. One leading member of 
the caucus said: “Even if be 
had been here, we would have 
still gone gunning for him.” 

It was a classic example of 
the “march of the moderates” 


Union. 


yonthfnl 



^fa^^weastle- Call to end ‘the lump 9 

also wins the ... ... * 


Mr John Golding 


on the TUC and a dear apearance belies the feet that 
indication that they have be- he is a grandfather, aged SO, 


come as ruthless and devious with an 
as the left in operating the new record In 


impressive track 
onion negotiation." 


pragmatism that they insist His reasoned contribution to 
must replace the dass-warfare the economic debate was an 


socialism of the old guard If 
Labour is to win the next 
election. 

One of the most Impressive 


rd if assertion of his conviction 
next towards realism rather than 
revolution. 

ssive Mr John Edmonds, aged 42, 


*to. this rostrum who l nave 
: heart say fight for jobs... 
j “Yes. Arthur, you will see a 
! fight if anvone thinks we shall 


newcomers to emerge at this making his first appearance at 


Congress as general secretary 
of the General, Municipal 
Boilermakers and Allied 
Trades Union, describes him- 
self as a “centrist”, although 
he can be expected to cast his 
vote more often with the right 
oa the General CoundL' 

Mr John - Golding, former 
Labour MP for Newcastle- 
under-Lyme, also joins the 
moderates on the General 
Council in his new role as 
general secretary of the Na- 

rionftl r n mnurairarioiK; fl nip a. 

Bat the undoubted star of 
the right is Mr Eric Ham- 
mond, who delights many 
delegates with his. attacks on 
the left wing. When be took 
over the leadership of the 
Electrical, Electronic, Tefc 
comnrankatiofl and Ptnmbing 
Union from Frank Chappie, 
the left considered they bad 
been manted a reprieve. 

He has sorely disappointed 
them. Mr Hammond is totally 
uncompromising in his stance 
and has said he Is forthright 
partly because he cannot stand 
the “hypocrisy” which he 
hears espoused. 


proper tunning levels tor 
education and for fair levels of 
teachers' pay. . 

Mr Jarvis said that the 
teachers had not let down the 
movement in their action. He 
was proud that, as a result, 
they had secured, as an in- 
terim settlement one of the 
biggest pay increases in the 
public sector, going well be- 
yond the Government cash 
limits. 

The Government had been 
party to setting up pay review 
bodies and then disregarded 
their recommendations. 

It also showed its hostility 
to those in the public sector by 


• A full-scale campaign to 
save public services from 
further cuts and pr i v atiza tion, 
was agreed by the General 
Council and conference after a 
plea by Mrs Flat Ingram, 
Nalgo, for 1987 to be des- 
ignated Public Services Year. 

A composite motion 
condemning government pro- 
posals as an assault on the 
rights of elected councils and 
on the principles of local 
democracy, resulting in deteri- 
orating standards and threats 
to pay and employment, was 
passed unanimously on a 
show of hands. 


CONSTRUCTION 


Tbe black economy was still enforce genuine fair 
flourishing ip the construction competition, 
industry and there should be a Seconding, Mr PanI 
statutory system of registra- Gallagher, Electric, Electronic 
tion for operatives and and Plumbing Trade Union, 
employers, Mr Albert W3- said that they should elimi- 
liaBS, General Secretary of the nate the biggest single obstruc- 
Union of Construction, Allied tion to apprentice training - 

Twnrlne nnri Torthnirwovie ni4 


tion for operatives and and Plumbing Trade Union, 


Trades and Technicians, said. 
He was successfully moving 


tbe “lump” 


ne was successruuy moving rwi * • , 

a motion calling for a Labour 1 OURY S ^6fluE 
policy of sustained investment 
in construction, * move to- 
warts public ownership of the ™ 

construction industry and for fSPSvJSS 

a commitment to decasualbta- t fop° n °” 

lion of ibe industry. ;B£3M&£35 

The motion also called for its determination “to avoid 
contract compliance require- the horror of the present Tory 
ments to be incoporated into Government being returned at 
all public-sector contracts to the next General Election". 


COMMENTARY 


Plumbing Trades Union, said 
that workers in the nuclear 
power industry would tw 
disastrous^ affected by clo- 
sure. Many were in remote 
rural areas whose economies 
would be devastated by clo- 
sure of the power stations. 

Mr Jim Slater, general sec- 
retary of tbe National Union 
of Seamen, said that three 
major nuclear incidents at 
Windscale, Three Mile Island 
and Chernobyl in the past 
three decades indicated , the 
probability of 3 serious 
nuclear incident every 10 
years. 

He had information tot at 
Hinkle y Point on September 
6, 1984. tbe United Kingdom 
could have been within an ace 
of its own Chernobyl. They 
should lift tbe secrecy which 
had surrounded the nuclear 
industry since its inception. 
His union was calling for a 
retreating nuclear industry, 
not overnight closure. 

Mr William McCall, gen- 
eral secretary of the Institu- 
tion of Professional Civil 
Servants, said the lesson of 
Chernobyl was that safety in 
nuclear issues recognized no 
national frontiers. No major 
industrial country had yet 
c hang ed policy on nuclear 
power and the UK should not 
be the first 

‘More jobs from 
al ternative energy* 

Mr Frank Cottam, of the 
General, Municipal, Boiler- 
makers and Allied Trades 
Union, opposing the motion, 
said there was a battery of 
pressurized water reactors 
across the Channel and on the 
coastline. “The wind will still 
Mow in our direction or are we 
going to have a motion turn- 
ing that around too?" (laugh- 
ter and applause). They 
should not be stampeded by 
some post-Chernobyl panic. 

Mr Ron Todd, general sec- 
retary of tbe Transport and 
General Workers' Union, 
backing the motion, said his 
" union would not support 
phasing out without regard to 
tiie interests of the workers in 
the nuclear industry. 

They were talking about the 
need for change in eneigy 
sources, not closure but 
replacement. They should 
stand back from emotion. As 
many as 250,000 jobs could be 
created by developing alter- 
natives to nuclear power. 
They must not frighten the 
lives of all those who worked 
in nuclear power. 

Replying to the debate, Mr 
Jack Ecdes, of the TUC 
General Council, warned the 
conference against a hasty 
condusion. Mr Scargfll should 
not be afraid of the review tbe 
TUC General Council was 
proposing hot should put for- 
ward his arguments. 


returned at 
lection". 


power stations, except tot the 
miners' leader wanted to deny 
the industry a review. 


Reports by Alan Wood, John Winder, Nicholas Beeston, Anthony Hodges, Tim Jones and Mark Ellis 





Geoffrey Smith 


The debate on nuclear 
power yesterday was in some 
ways tbe most important and 

certainly the most revealing df 
the week. That was because it 
brought into sharper relief 
some of the characteristics of 
the present TUC that have 
been evident throughout this 
conference. 

It was ne accident that the 
discussion on whether all non- 
nuclear power plants sheald* 
be phased out was conducted 
with a greater vigour and 
intensity than other debates. 
Despite all the noise generated 
by tbe quasi-political issues, it 
is when they are dealing with 
industrial questions affecting 
the livelihoods of their non- 
ben that most muon leaders of 
today become most dosdy 


The battle was fought yes- 
terday at two different levels: 
between those energy muons 
who* represent workers hi 
nuclear power plants and 
those who do not, and between 
the emotionalists and toe 
hardheads. The first of those 
contests was a simple and 
familiar contest between rival 
vested interests. Different 
anion leaders were fighting for 
the jobs of their members. 

Industry’s future 
at stake 

Bat there was much mere at 
stake than that. In the after- 
math of Chernobyl there is 
inevitably much greater anxi- 
ety about die safety of nuclear 
power. This concern is not 
confined to one country or to 
one end of the political spec- 
trum. It is a rational response 
to the catastrophe. 

For the emotionalists it is 
the only possible response. 
They base their policy on an 
instinctive repugnance to- 
wards nuclear power, often felt 
long before Chernobyl but 
intensified by the tragedy. 
They are so appalled by the 
supposed danger that they 
believe it sbOuldtjontweigfa nu 
other considerations. 

Bat the hard heads do not 
accept that the issue is so 
simple as that They do not 
betiere that the potential dan- 
ger of unclear power in Britain 
can be areasured by a disaster 
in tbe Soviet Union, where n 
different kind of reactor was in 
use and where precautions 
were less rigorous. 

They also recognize that it is 
not only tiie join of workers in 
the energy industries tot 
might he at stake. “We’re 
talking about making British 
industry less competitive”, Mr 
Gavin Laird, the general sec- 
retary of the AUEW, told dm 
conference bhwtfy. 

That must be true as long as 
nuclear power cannot be re- 
placed in sufficient quantity by 
alternative sources of energy 
that would be no more expen- 
sive, ami so long as other 
countries continue to use 
unclear energy. Both con- 
ditions seem likely to apply in 
tbe foreseeable future. 

That means tint there must 
be a conflict between an. 
instinctive, emotional re- 
sponse to Chernobyl and Mr 
Neil Kin nock’s determination 
to mab«» rhy reduction of 
mtemptoyment his first prior- 
ity. Hew swiftly soda a 
contradiction would emerge 
would depend upon the speed 
with which nadear power was 
phased out 

Tbe statement agreed by 
Labour's national executive 
committee envisages a stow 
process. But it still points in 
the op p osite direction to tire 
party's employment policy, ft 
goes further tium the TUC was 
prepared to go yesterday. '■ 

It is filcely to be strongly 
resisted by some of the most 
powerful and determined 
unions that made' up 
yesterday's very narrow 
majority, who refused to ac- 
cept the phasing oat of aB 
existing nudear power plants^ 
and there is no reason to 
suppose that it reflects pabfic 
opinion. 

An opinion poll conducted 
by Marplan and published by 
Today last week showed that 
only 29 per cent of those 
questioned wanted all 
Britain's nuclear power plants 
to be dosed, while 56 per. cent 
preferred to keep tire present 
nadear stations without bra'ltt- 
iag new ones. Hie majority 
probably reflects the un- 
certainty of to general noblic 
after Chernobyl. 

Politicians who ignore the 
anxiety that created would not 
command public confidence. 
But most people are probably 
somewhat bewildered over the 
right coarse of action. They 
are onfikeiy to be impressed 
by a snap and UkouBrnd 
response. s 

On that issue, as oa so many 
others, Labour wfff stood' a 
better chance of being in touch 
with public opinion tf it listeus 
to the hardheads rather than 
to emotionalists in its ranks. 


*'■ S 1 1 ? J 
- JU ** 

* 7 \ 

pH 1 ' . 


fillips 


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* * 













S3* 


Scheme to save £ 16 m 
on criminal injury 
pay-outs is abandoned 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 




THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 19i 


HOME NEWS 






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ue? ^ ^ ro ? _ one of the issues thrashed out cannot be processed within' 

in public the year. 

about 60 m5? p 5?7 C r^ 11 ^ take sooa between the That total also represents 
f vlcUras Home 0ffice ^ ^ Trea- only 25 per cent of victnns of 
eUrible “JT ®“y- Atty additional money violent offences reported to 

Criminal^ Tni!52V5£!L ^ “ay well be linked with a the pohee the scheme’s costs 
lion Burnt JUnW Compcrisa ' computerization programme w® nse substantially if; as 
Dttno. to make the scheme more expected, many more of these 

in an attempt to cut costs efficient. victims claim as violent crime 

Miss Helen Reeves, director continues lo.rise. 

C P!! S,d ' of Hie association victims ^ *o*mg party of go v - 
support schemes, sai± -Wc ?l5??L^2S.”rc^£2 


■ - *./ A “. . : , .;.*. : . ,. :*■ ■ J 

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tion Btarrf ^° mpcnsa " computerization programme wfll nse substantially if, as 
ow.ua. to make the scheme more expected, many more of these 

in an attempt to cut costs efficient. victims claim as violent crime 

S^ . Ul fJff.. millio lM -yoy Miss Helen Reeves, director continues lo.rise. 

S^uH^t!! C P!! S,d ' of the association rfvictitns- “ f g* 

enng aououng the qualifying suoDort -w* ernment officials now looking 

■js^asr^w 5 srss^MiJS m********* 

have the lower limit is not to be ^.scheme on a stamtory 
saved about £16 million a increased by a large amount foonn ! ^ ^ considering 
y • Bui we are saddened that the two other cost-cutting options: 

But the proposal, which was Government is to confirm pamngaceiOTgontopawanfc 
strongly attacked by the Na- that limit; we would like to see and restneung the category of 
■uonal Association of Victims’ it gradually eroded by mfLa- v,ctin,s "P 0 ^uld receive 
Support Schemes and other tion. If is kept up. laige ““Pensapon. But a resinc- 
groups, is now to be aban- numbers of victims will be P on on ^ DD ®hers would 
doned. The qualifying limit excluded." have saved most money. 

saftia i[ in <» a* • Muno? 11 ^/ 1 ^ 1 ^ 




two other cost-cutting options: I 






doned. The qualifying limit 
will be increased but only to a 
little more fom the £450 
n«ded to bring it into line 
with inflation. 

-The new limit, below which 
claims cannot be considered, 
is likely to be between £500 
and £600. 

It is also expected that a case 
■ will be put to the Treasury for 


uuiuucre oi vic tims win oe r j 

excluded." nave saved, most money. 

Th» rri. a ,.,. _ . - The lower Kmii on com- 

i 9 aS?S5* s ? ! ‘= BSSsrS&JSL! 

GowSSSrc^rS 118 - i*** was ^ to ensure that vay 
SS%m^L Cni S^iJ a ^ minor cases were excluded, ft 
KfowSJiiJ 0 tL f ub S? bed ™ was increased to £1 50 in 1977 
JJSSSS: J 1 ® 1 *5 “f kC and£250in 1981 to restore hs 
A statutory value. It is now £400, or £500 
nght father than a da - for ca^ of violence in the , 
creuonary award as at present, famil y 

The Government has been The board has paid out £220 j 


It is also expected that a case creiionary award as at present. 

J n ? Su r y for The Government has been The board has paid out £220 

P0S ” ®? ncerned about containing million to victims of violent 
ex !f a Htdhon — foe costs of the scheme in the crime who suffer personal 
«LTn„ ofwhat is expected m be a injury. The Wgfa^t award paid 


, - . . . . ««« UK 3UICU1C 1U UK 

to foe scheme, which is feceofwhatisexpectedtobea 
strugghng to cope with a big increase in foe number of 
steadily rising number of claims: applications are now 
claimants. running at ahnirt an rvw o unr 


race of what is expected to be a injury. Tlie highest award paid 
big increase in the number of out was £123,000 to a m»n 
claims: applications are now who had to have his logs 
running ax about 40,000 a year amputated after an attack in a 


, .«.m M 60 l 0 uuiivTU,UUU«YBB auiuuuuw anciaaa 

The exact amount will be but already a qnarter of those working men’s dub. 


Couple lose battle 
on home discount 


A couple who bought their 
coandl home at a discount face 
having to repay more rtnn 
£10,000 now that their mar- 
riage has broken up and the 
house has been sold. 

A judge ruled yesterday that 
foe couple were not exempt 
from a covenant in foe 
Government's “right to boy" 
legislation. 

; The rales require buyers of 
council booses to repay a 
percentage of the discounted 
purchase price if they sell foe 
property within five years. 

Mr J nstice Reeve said in the 
High Court that Thomas and 
Carol Barrett bought their 
home in Beech Road, 
Famboroflgh, Hampshire, in 
October 1984 from Rosbmoor 
Borough Council. 

They paid £12^50 below 
foe market price — a discount 

Drive on 
TV licence 
dodgers 

A lask force of 30 trained 
investigators will spearhead a 
new campaign to beat tele- 
vision licence dodgers, it was 
announced yesterday. 

The unit will travel the 
country supporting local 
teams Hundreds of extra 
temporary staff are also being 
brought in to use modernized 
computer systems and a fleet 
of vehicles with directional 
aerial finders. 

The aim is to beat last year s 
campaign record when 
144,000 dodgers were caught 
and extra licences worth £4 
million were bought 

The campaign will start in. 
Scotland and the North-west 
this month, then move on to 
foe North-east foe Midlands. 

■ East Anglia and foe South. It 
will then move to London, 
Wales and the South-west 

The number of prosecutions 
has reached 28,000 a month. 


of 44 per cent But foe 
marriage foundered and was 
dissolved In December 1985. 

Last February, a county 
coart registrar ordered, wifi 
the consent of foe couple, that 
the house be sold and the 
proceeds divided equally be- 
tween them. 

Then foe council demanded 
that £10,120, 80 per cent of the 
discount should be repaid. 

Yesterday foe couple dial- i 
lenged foe demand in the 
Queen's Beach divisional 
court on foe ground that the 
sale was ordered aider pro- 
visions of the 1973 Matri- 
monial Causes Act, which 
provided an exemption from 
foe pay back covenant. 

But the judge ruled that the 
sale was not covered by the 
exemption provision. 

Man holds 
up bus at 
gunpoint 

Police in Mitcham, south 
London, are looking fora man 
who hijacked a London Trans- 
port bus at gun point on 
Wednesday night. 

The man, described as 
heavily built, in his mid 20s, 
with fair hair, wearing jeans 
and a green jacket boarded a 
number 44 bus at Fair Green 
I in Tooling. He pulled a shot- 
i gun out of a hag and told foe 
driver to follow his directions. 

The hijacker forced foe bus 
! driver to drive in a huge circle 
before demanding foe night’s 
takings of £15. 

Del Insp Graham Gooch, 
who is leading the investiga- 
tion, said yesterday: "It is 
really going over the lop to 
pull a sawn off shotgun on a 
bus d river for foe sake of £ 1 5." 

Police have, appealed for 
witnesses to help to identify 
the gunman. 


European 
pact on 
helicopter 

By Rodney Cowton 
Defence Correspondent 

Ah agreement by four Euro- 
pean nations to begin work on 
a new anti-tank helicopter was 
signed yesterday. 

Westland, foe British heli- 
copter company, will be in- 
volved in spite of controversy 
over foe company's future, at 
the end of last year, when it 
was feared that It might be 
excluded from future Euro- 
pean collaborative ventures. 

The four countries are Brit- 
ain, Italy, The Netherlands 
and Spain, and their min- 
istries of defence have signed a 
memorandum setting out the 
arrangements for a collabo- 
rative project 
The first step is to mate a 
study of foe feasibility and 
cost of developing an Italian 
helicopter, foe Agusta A 129, 
tO:..meet their needs for a 
helicopter to carry out missile 
attacks on enemy tanks. 

During the controversy 
over whether Westland should 
seek financial help through 
links with European com- 
panies, or through the Ameri- 
can company, Sikorsky, 
supporters of foe European 
solution argued that if West- 
land made a deal with Sikor- 
sky it might be shut out of 
European projects. 

Nevertheless, it is one of the 
four companies now pan of a 
new company in Italy, Joint 
European Helicopter. Agusta 
of Italy, Fokker of West 
Germany, and Westland 
signed the agreement to set up 
the. new company, and it was 
stated that a fourth company, 
Chsa of Spain, will sign foe 
agreement as soon as its 
corporate approval proce- 
dures have been completed. 

If the project is completed, 
foe helicopter will be used by 
the armed forces of the four 
countries in the mid 1990s. It 
is estimated that Europe, re- 
quires about 600 helicopters 
in the anti-tank role. 


.%■ — - 

Unlike bead waiters In most 
hotels, Mir Raymond Arufe 
does the washing np himself at 
foe Trafalgar suite in the 
London Khz. But as his smile 
testifies only too clearly, he 
relishes the job (David Cross 
writes). 

This is because the dinner 
plate be is holding firmly in 
bis right hand is wmth at least 
£500 and its value is going np 
every day. Like another 200 or 
so pieces of china, which the 
Ritz bought for £30,000 earlier 
this year, it conies from the 
famous Nanking collection 
sold in Amsterdam. 

The Ritz has just begun to 
use the frill dinner service for 
private parties in the suite at a 
cost of £10 extra per person. It 
can serve np to 20 people with 
a tittle Mt of reshuffling. There 
are, for example, no dessert 
bowls and diners have to use 
rice dishes instead. 

(Photograph: Dod Miller) 


£150m offered for 
Spitalfields site 

By Charles Knevitt Architecture Correspondent 


The Corporation of the City 
of London was yesterday of- 
fered more than £150 million 
for foe freehold of Spitalfields 
Market, as part of a £350 
million development plan for 
foe area. 

The Spitalfields Develop- 


the meat market's traders 
three miles to Temple Mills in 
Hackney Marshes where it has 
bought a 30-acre site. 

The 13 acres at Spitalfields 
would then be developed, at a 
cost of £200 million, os offices, 
shops, housing and small busi- 


ment Group, a consortium of ness units, with an address in 
London and Edinburgh Trust. Bishopsgaie. City of London. 


Balfour Beatty and County 
and District Properties, has 
put a 56-day limit on the offer 
— October 27, the date of foe 


A Bill would have to be 
passed in Parliament to allow 
the market to be relocated. 
The group hopes this will be 


Bang" de-regulation of introduced in November and 


foe Stock Exchange. 

The offer is also conditional 
on foe consortium receiving 
planning permission* 

The group plans to move 


could be passed by June 1987. 
Construction would be com- 
pleted by foe end of 1990. 

More than 6.000 new jobs 
should be creaied. 


Call to 
repudiate 
views of 
bishop 

By Clifford Looney 
Religious Affairs 
Correspondent 

A renewed campaign 
against the Bishop of Durham, 
the Right Rev David Jenkins, 
has been launched alter his 
controversial address to the 
General Synod of foe Church 
of England last July. 

A group of clergymen in foe 
North-east of England are 
calling upon foe Archbishop 
of Canterbury, Dr Robert 
Runcie, and other bishops to 
repudiate the Bishop of 
Durham's views publicly. 

They are also critical of Dr 
Runcie's claim that belief in 
the Resurrection and Incarna- 
tion is possible without belief 
in foe "empty tomb" and the 
Virgin Birth. 

The North-east Diocesan 
Evangelical Fellowship is the 
“home base” of the Rev 
David Holloway, vicar of 
Jesmond, Newcastle, who in- 
stigated the synod's debates 
on the Bishop of Durham's 
views. 

The House of Bishops pre- 
pared foe statement. The Na- 
ture of Christian Belief* which 
was discussed by the synod 
last July. 

In his speech he deplored 
the common concept of "di- 
vine laser-beam" miracles, 
saying that those who believed 
in that sort of explanation of 
the Virgin Birth and Resurrec- 
tion did not believe in foe 
Christian God but in a cultic 
| idol or "the very devil". 

The fellowship has re- 
quested foe Archbishop of 
Canterbury "and such other 
bishops as are prepared to 
identify with foe faith of the 
universal church, publicly to 
repudiate this teaching as 
being no part of the faith of the 
Church of England". 


Reform of common land law sought 


By Hugh Clayton 
Environment Correspondent 

Public access to common 
land should be balanced by a 
new offence of criminal dam- 
age backed by “not negligible" 
penalties, the Common Land 
Fornm said yesterday. 

Mr Maurice Mendoza, 
chairman of the forum, agreed 
that it was unusual to suggest 
applying criminal law to mat- 
ters which oa other private 
land were covered by civil 
actions for trespass and 
damages. 

The fornm demanded 

V.W«Li 


quick reform of more than a 
million acres of common land 
still covered by 900-year-old 
laws based on the reciprocal 
feudal obligations between 
free men and their liege lords. 

"There are some survivin g 
courts leet that have feudal 
overtones," said Mr Mendoza, 
former director of ancient 
monuments with the Depart- 
ment of the Environment. 

He said the fornm had 
decided that common land 
needed better protection and 
should be open to the public 
and focal councils should have 


powers to prosecute anyone 

ganging dawiagg, 

Commons are private prop- 
erties over which indrriduais 
other than foe owners have 
rights. Mr Mendoza said some 
rights survived from feudal 
times. 

The right of turbary allowed 
commoners to dig tarf for their 
household fires and pannage 
enabled them to let their pigs 
forage for fallen acorns and 
beech nuts. 

Most surviving rights were 
for grazing cattle and sheep, 
and many commons needed a 


rapid reversal of years of 
neglect. 1 

"There is no point in taking 
to court somebody who has set : 
fire to pasture for fun and fine 
him £5," Mr Mendoza said 
when the forma’s report was 
published. 

It won backing from form- 
ers, ramblers, councils and the 
leaders of all national par- 
liamentary parties. 

Common Land Forum, CCP2IS 
(Countryside Commission 
Publications Despatch. 19/23 
Albert Road, Manchester M19 
2EQ; £7. SO). 


Slaughter 
ban lifted 
in more 
areas - 

Restrictions on the sale arid 
slaughter of sheep in more 
areas of North Wales affected 
by radioactivity from foe 
Chernobyl nuclear disaster jo 
the Soviet Union were tilled at 
midnight. 

A parliamentary order 
signed yesterday lifting the 
restrictions on the movement 
of sheep from a further 170 
holdings in Gwynedd and 
Owyd. 1 

But the restrictions sml • 
applv on 793 holdings ui 
North Wales compared with 
5,146 which were subject to 
the ban imposed on June 30. 

Originally two million 
sheep were affected by foe 
banning order. - 

Rugby player 
freed on bail 

The Welsh rugby inter- 
national, David Bishop, who 
was jailed for knocking out n 
, rival player with one punch 
during a match, was freed on 
bail by a High Court judge 
yesterday. 

The Pontypool scrum half, 
aged 25, was given bail by Mr 
Justice Garland pending his 
appeal against the four-week 
sentence for common assault 
imposed on Monday by Judge 
Stephens at Newport Crown 
Court. 

Man accused . 
of murder 

A man was charged at 
Horse ferry Road court. Lon- 
don, yesterday, with murder- 
ing a man in a cell at 
Rochester Row police station 
in Victoria. 

Mr Peter Holland, aged 20. 
was remanded in custody for£ 
week charged with murderim 
Peter Curry, aged 53, who died 
at Westminster Hospital op 
August 25. 13 days after being 
injured. 

Baby died in 
kitchen sink 

A baby aged one died from 
burns after scalding water 
from a washing machine rah 
into a kitchen sink where she 
was being given a bath, an 
inquest at St Pancras, central 
London, was told yesterday. 

Nicola Speck, of Firecreg, 
Letchworth, Hertfordshire, 
was staying with her aunt, Mrs 
Gillian Speck, of Meadow 
Way, Stevenage, at the time. A 
verdict of accidental death 
was recorded. 


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16 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


: IS BRITAIN ABOUT TO CHOOSE 
AN AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM 
i THAT’S ALREADY OUT OF DATE P 


■*?t • 

Of all the complicated issues involved in the 

•**f 1 • 

choice of Britain's Airborne Early Warning System, 
there's one that's especially confusing. 

.Vl". 

r, Unfortunately, in terms of making a final 
decision, it happens to be the most important 
issue of all. 

M >-'- 

V • 

Which radar frequency will give Britain the 
most effective protection, not just for the present, 

lut into the future? 

«•»*. 

#*» 

mCh 

~ There are two contenders, S-Band and UHF. 

Grumman, working with British Aerospace, 
offers the UHF solution. Its main competitors do not. 

S-BAND i UHF. 

These are the essential differences. 


1. Radar cross-sections of aircraft and missiles 
appear up to seven times larger on UHF than on 
S-Band 



2. Radar interference, or 'Clutter' especially 
from the sea, (the main area of the UK application), 
is significantly less on UHF which means that 
targets not only appear larger than on S-Band 
but are also more distinct. 

3. UHF is superior to S-Band in rejecting road 
traffic 'Clutter' 

4. Recent tests carried out by the Ministry of 
Defence have also concluded that a UHF system 
causes no discernible interference with ground 
installations. 

5. THE INABILITY OF S-BAND TO COPE WITH 
THE CONTINUING DEVELOPMENT OF 'STEALTH' 
MISSILE DESIGNS WILL MEAN THAT IN 10 YEARS 
TIME THE CURRENT RADAR CROSS-SECTION 
ADVANTAGE OF UHF WILL HAVE INCREASED 
“FROM 7:1 TO 100:1. 


Future 

UHF 


S-Band 



10C 

):1 


IS THE UHF SYSTEM COST EFFECTIVE? 

Yes. 

The system recommended by Grumman has 
been developed over the last twenty years and 
is proven, operational and available. 

It can also be installed by British Aerospace 
in the current Nimrod airframe. 

THIS WOULD MEAN THAT OVER 70% OF THE 
EXPENDITURE TO DATE WOULD BE PROTECTED 
AS WELL AS THE INVESTMENT IN BASING AND 
SUPPORT EQUIPMENT. 

THE PROTECT WOULD REMAIN BRITISH 
GENERATING CONTRACTS THAT WOULD CREATE 
OVER 30,000 MAN YEARS OF EMPLOYMENT IN 
THE UK. 

The weight of evidence in favour of a UHF 
based system is compelling. Although it can be 
claimed that S-Band is adequate in meeting 
today's requirements, its performance is surpassed 
by UHF. 

As for the future, that lies with UHF. 

A fact that has already been recognised by the 
United States Navy, Japan, Israel and, significantly, 
the USSR. 

Unless it is content with an Airborne Early 
Warning System that is already out of date, it is a 
fact that must also be recognised by Britain. 

GRUMMAN CORPORATION. 

Grumman is a £2.3 billion corporation which 
has been in the forefront of aviation and space 
technology since before World War II. 

We are the leading experts in electronic 
integration having integrated more different 
systems into more different aircraft than any other 
company in the world. 

Currently, Grumman supplies military aircraft 
such as the F-14 Tomcat, A-6 Intruder, EA-6B Prowler, 
E-2C Hawkeye and C-2 Greyhound. 


GRUMMAN 



Grumman Corporation, 1111 Stewart Avenue, Bethpage, New York 11714. 







the TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER S 1986 


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BRITISH ASSOCIATION 



to provide technical 
expertise for industry 


By Pearce Wright, Scrence Editor 


. A fundamental reorgan- ' 

SSJSL. of uni y«sitiw was The patten of indnstry is 

a fonner hy the methods used by fie 
SS.™ 1 ?®? adviser to the Ministry of Defence is spout- 
ing £83 biDioa a year on 
electronics, aerospace and 
otto high technology equip- 
ment, the British Association 
was told yesterday. 

The main benefactors were 
die so-called “sturise” h» gh 
technology industries, Mr 

Micheal Breheny, of Beading 

University, said. 

Bat these industries had 
concentrated deliberately in 
the South-east and Smith- 
west, paurticufarfy ihng the 
corridor between I^wnfoi w and 
Bristol, to have a better deuce 

Of winning contracts. 

Consequently, attempt* to 
revitalize the industrial heart- 
lands of the North were being 
undermined, he said. 

balk of the basic research that 
the country needed. 

In West Germany, France 
and Japan, industry, lining 
wih government laboratories, 
did much more of the research 
work. 

In Britain, in order to 


ouvucr io me 

S!f VJCe **aoce]Iorof 

halford Unrvershy. 

. made at a meeting of 
the Bnush Association for the 
Advancement of Science in 
tJnsioL. which discussed new 
approaches to higher educa- 
lion that would better serve 
industry's need for manpower 

with technical qualifications. 

Professor Ashworth said- 
It is difficult to exaggerate 
the extent of the defeat British 
manufacturing industry has 
suffered in highly competitive 
world markets.” 

He said that the windfall 
benefit of North Sea oil had 
been so squandered that 
m a nufa cturing industry was 
now weaker than it was 10 
years ago. He said that 
c h a n ges _ in higher education 
bad a vital role to play in a 
recovery. 

He argued that British 
universities sought the 
responsibility, not only of 
educating key professionals — 
lawyers, doctors, accoun- 
tants, scientists and en- 
gineers — but also of doing the 


identified and attracted to the 
scholarly life, universities had 
ensured that their academic 
values bad -become the domi- 
nant ones m secondary as well 
as higher education. . 

What bad not been noticed 
was that the pre ss ur e, as 
transmitted through the Uni- 
versity Grants Committee, 
and similar agencies, had 
increasingly caused them to 
concentrate on the production 
of those fitted for one very 
specific kind of vocation — 
that of research scholar. 

Professor Ashworth said: 
“One thing all industrialists 
are agreed upon is that they 
want a more highly educated 
workforce at all levels.** 

His proposal for reorganiza- 
tion was to replace the present 
three-year honours degree 
with a two-year general degree 
available to fir more than 
presently take an honours 
degree. 

He would replace tbe GCE 
A level examination with a 
.broader qualification aimed at 
a larger proportion of school 
leavers 

The new qualification 


certain that enough of the would become a genuine 
“intellectual cream** was school having certificate. 


Food aid is 
treated as 
slush fund, 
Oxfam say 

By Thomson Prentice 

Science Correspondent 

Most official food aid sent to 
the world's poorest countries 
should be stopped, because it 
is often used as a “slush fond” 
by governments and does not 
benefit the people, in offidaf 
of Oxfam said yesterday. 

Mr Tony Jackson, the food 
policy officer of the charity, 
said that food aid for disasters 
was essential but the 12 
uulliofi tons sent each year by 
American and Enropean coun- 
tries to developing nations as a 
matter of routine should be art 
to about three million tons. 

“Such aid may be morally 
and politically acceptable, bat 
it is an ineffective, even 
da m aging, form of assistance 
which benefits only the donor 
country and its recipient gov- 
ernment, not te people,” he 
said. 

“Sravtsses are omr problem 
and exporting them as food aid 
is no solution.** 

Some governments used aid 
worth more £1,000 mfl- 
lhm a year as a “slash fund” to 
keep themselves in power by 
jving the food to their armed 
wees, civfl servants and mid- 
dle classes, he said. “Very 
little may actnally reach the 
poor.” 

In some cases food aid was 



Professor Speeding (left) and Mr Jackson at yesterday's conference, which heard appeals 
for long-term food aid to develop ins conn 


developing countries in spite of political manipulations. 


counter-prod uctiie because it 
amounted to direct com- 
petition for millioas of strag- 
gling peasant farmers and 
could force them out of work. 

Food aid offered “tremen- 
dous scope for corruption”, he 
said. It was easy to steal and 
sell quickly. “Nothing falls off 
the back of a lorry faster tha n 
a bag of food.** 

Mr Jackson said food sent 
to disaster areas such as those 
in Ethiopia and Sudan usually 
did reach and help those most 
in need. 

British fund-raising projects 


which enabled help to reach 
victims of famine nr drought 
were “noble and decent things 
which we shook] be proud of 
and which should be 
supported,” be said. 

Professor Colin Speeding, 
of the Centre for Agricult ur e 
Strategy at Heading Univer- 
sity, said: “Recent experiences 
in Africa have demonstrated 
that food aid is essential for 
tbe immediate relief of famine 
but saefa crises are ulikky to 
be short term.” 

But producing more food did 
not by itself ensure that 


hungry people were fed, be 
said. “People are hungry be- 
cause they are poor. Apart 

from disasters, no one who has 
money is ever hungry." 

The need was to find ways of 
preventing crises rather than 
alleviating them. 

“But this is tbe world in 
which we have to live and 
operate. Our opportunities are 
rarely to solve problems but 
simply to help people help 
themselves, to ease hardens 
and move events in a better 
direction.” 


Teenage ■ 
girls worry 
over risk 
of divorce 

By Our Science - 
Correspondent “ • 

Teenage girls are deeply 
anxious about unemptoV- ■ 
menu childbirth and the risk 
of marriage ending in divorce. * 
according to a survey pub-* 
lishod yesterday. 

1 me views with more than* 
100 Nottingham school pupils.' 
aged IS or 16 showed unem-“ 
ploy mem as the most fre- 
quently mentioned anxiety by 
69 per cent of girls and 43 per - 
cent of boys. 

Childbirth (49 per cent), nu- 
clear war (36 per cent), unhap- 
py marriage (30 per cent) were 
their other main worries. 

“The poor expectations of 
girls of marriage and of fidelity 
in sexual relationships are not . 
in keeping with the images 
and content of popular pop 
fiction which manv young . 
women read.” Miss Pam Gif- 
lies. who conducted the study, 
said. 

Miss Gillies, a lecturer in - 
community health at Nailing- • 
ham University Medical - 
School, said; “It would appegr 
that girls hare a realistic vfowr 
of marriage in our society. The 
extent of their anxieties may 
be a cause for wider concern. - 
especially as boys expressed 
no worries at all about future * 
relationships.” 


Animals 
‘equally 
clever’ 

By Onr Science Editor 

Parrots apd pigeons are as 
intelligent as chimpanzees, 
porpoises and dolphins, 
according to Dr Euan 
MacPbail, a senior research 
psychologist at York 
University. 

In overturning some cher- 
ished beliefs of other special- 
ists, as well as most laymen, he 
said yesterday there was no 
way of testing for any dif- 
ference in intelligence between 
monkeys and goldfish. 

The results of experiments 
he recited in support of his 
thesis, that all animals had the 
same level of intelligence, 
showed that differences, 
attributed by other scientists, 
could be explained by the 
particular dexterity of the 
creatures in question. 

Humans were on a plane of 
their own. and Dr MacPbail 
doubted whether there was 
much difference between 
individuals' innate 
intelligence. 


Engineers 
pay tribute 
to Brunei 


Engineers In Bristol yes- 
terday celebrated a doable 
anniversary of one of tbefr 
most famous predecessors, 
Isambard Khupfam Brunei. 

The were talcing advantage 
of the comridence that the 
annual of the British 

Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science is taking place 
in Bristol at the same time as 
the anniversaries of two en- 
gineering projects intimately 
connected with Brand 

This week is the centenary 
of the opening of Britain's 
longest tunnel, the four-mile 
Severn tunnel which was de- 
jned to cany his Great 
Western Railway, connecting 
London and Sonth Wales. 

! It is also the 150th amriver^ 
sary of the laying of the 
foundation stone uf Bristol's 
most famous landmark, the 
250-feet-high Clifton suspen- 
sion bridge which straddles 
the Avon 


Police ‘in conflict’ 
with the public 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


British police are engaged in 
the most hostile conflict with 
laige sections of the public for 
more than 150 years, a socio- 
logist said yesterday. 

Relations are tense and 
hostile with the Mack commu- 
nity, the young, the unem- 
ployed and the lower economic 
groups, Dr Robert Reiner, of 
Bristol University, said. 

“The police have lost the 
confidence of small but crucial 
sections of the influential and 
artknbte classes,’* he said. 



Dr Robert Reims 


A gulf has developed be- 
tween police attitudes and 
educated middle class people- 
vrith opinions on issues such as 
political protest. Campaign for 
Nuclear Disarmament aid gay 
rights. 

Hie benf|p image of the 
British bobby has been re- 
placed in recent years by a 
tongher figure in a riot shield 
and military-style helmet. Dr 
Reiner said. The oM image has 
been farther dented by allega- 
tions of corruption, brutality 
and openly partisan views 
towards the Conservative 
Party. 

The stabbing to d eath of a 
constable Swing rioting in 
Tottenham last October was a 

“tragic episode that underlines 
the deep hostility felt towards 
tbe pike by. some inner city 
residents,” he said. 

The constable was the first 
Metropolitan policeman to be 
kflled in a riot since 1832, 
when the inquest jwry returned 
a verdict of : “jnstMMiIe 
homicide”, which reflected the 
deep and widespread suspicion 
of the police at that time, be 
said. 

“The wheel has tamed foil 
circle hack to those days. That 
jnry's vindication of mnrder is 
paralleled by the remarks of 
Mr Benue Grant, the black 
leader of Haringey council, 
who described the Tottenham 
riot as “a bloody good hiding” 
for the police. 



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8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES 


South Africa under pressure with court setback and sanctions build-up 

Natal judges overturn 
government powers 
to seize newspapers 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Two emergency regulations 
empowering the Minister of 
Law and Order to seize and 
ban any publications which he 
is satisfied contain subversive 
material were declared com- 
pletely invalid yesterday by a 
rail three-judge bench of the 
Natal division of the Supreme 
Court in Pietermaritzburg. 

The defendants in the case 
— President Botha, the Min- 
ister of Law and Order, Mr 
Louis Le Grange, and the 
Commissioner of Police. Gen- 
eral Johan Coetzee — were 
ordered to pay costs. 

The court declared that two 
sub-clauses of two other 
regulations were also void and 
without effect or force in law. 

One of these clauses makes 
it an offence to possess a 
subversive statement. The 
other allows the Commis- 
sioner of Police, or anyone 
authorized by him. to prohibit 
or control anything which “in 
his opinion" is a threat to the 
maintenance of public safety 
or likely to prolong the state of 
emergency. 

The latter clause was the 
one under which the Di- 
visional Commissioner of Po- 
lice lor Soweto. Brigadier 
Gideon Laubscher, issued or- 
ders last Tuesday banning 
mass funerals in the Soweto 
area, including the one which 
residents tried to hold yes- 
terday for victims of last 
week's shootings. 1 

Brigadier Jaap Venter, head 

Unity moves 
likely for 
opposition 

Johannesburg — Moves to- 
wards unity between the 
Progressive Federal Party, 
South Africa's white liberal 
official Opposition, and the 
New Republic Party are ex- 
pected following the PFP*s 
sweeping victories over NRP 
candidates in two by-elections 
in Cape Town on Wednesday. 

The NRP federal executive 
is to meet today and Mr Bill 
Sutton, the party leader, has 
said: “If we. have to make 
tongh decisions, we win do 
so." 

The by-elections followed 
the resignations from Par- 
liament of Dr Frederick van 
Zyl Slabbed, the former PFP 
leader, and of Dr Alex 
Boraine. 


of media liaison at police 
headquarters in Pretoria, con- 
firmed this, but maintained 
that as the ruling had been 
handed down in Natal it was 
not applicable automatically 
in Transvaal or other pro- 
vinces. 

But legal experts said yes- 
terday that, while the court's 
ruling was binding in Natal 
only and did not automati- 
cally have to be followed 
elsewhere, it was now the law 
of the land unless a court of 

Svendborg, Denmark (Renter) 
— A Danish shipowner was 
given a suspended prison sen- 
tence yesterday for smuggling 
French arms to South Africa. 
He said be bad received the 
arms from the Ofema com- 
pany, in which the French 
state has a majority holding. 

equal standing in another 
province took a different 
view. 

The ruling is of considerable . 
importance for South African 
newspapers, for which the 
threat of summary closure had 
been one of the most worrying 
aspects of the state of emer- 
gency under which they have 
been operating since June IZ 

But it leaves intact the 
regulations re-promulgated on 
Wednesday by the Commis- 
sioner of Police, which pro- 
hibit journalists from being on 
the scene or even “within 
sight" of unrest or security 


force action, and from report- 
ing or commenting on these 
without official permission. 

Also untouched by the Na- 
tal judgement are regulations 
banning all filming or sound 
recording of riots, distur- 
bances, disorders, strikes or 
boycotts and of any counter- 
action taken by the police or 
Army. 

In addition, it remains an 
offence to report or publish 
various kinds of subversive 
statements, which include 
those advocating economic 
sanctions. The definition of 
what constitutes a subversive 
statement was narrowed down 
by an earlier court ruling. 

The Natal judgement was in 
response to an application 
brought last month by four 
English-language newspaper 
groups — South African Asso- 
ciated Newspapers, the Argus 
Company, Natal Newspapers, 
and the Natal Witness — in 
which they challenged the 
legality of six e m erge n cy 
regulations in their entirety. 

Essentially, the court argued 
that the offending regulations 
exceeded the powers conferred 
on President Botha by the 
Public Safety Act of 1933, 
which is the basic law under 
which a state of emergency 
can be declared if the Presi- 
dent considers the ordinary 
law of the land is no longer 
adeq uate to maintain public 
order. 



■< 

&& ffop ■ 

| a ? v: 7: 

Mourners defying a ban by police carry coffins of victims of last week’s violence in Soweto to the Avalon cemetery yesterday 

DrRuncie Japan threatens more action 

to warn 
Pretoria 


Black mayor accuses 
“forces of darkness” 


By Rodney Cowton 


The mayor of an African 
Black township yesterday de- 
nounced the African National 
Congress and the “comrades" 
who stirred up trouble in 
South Africa as “forces of 
darkness". 

He said they were' intent on 
making South Africa appear 
ungovernable to prevent nego- 
tiated reform. 

Mayor Tamsanqa Linda, 
aged 40. of the township of 
ibhayi (population about 2 
million) near Port Elizabeth, 
was in London to promote the 
view that the majority of the 
population of South Africa 
was against violence and fa- 
voured a negotiated end to 
apartheid. 


He said that it was necessary 
to work with the Government 
of South Africa because it was 
legitimate, but h would be 
necessary to make it see that 
apartheid was eviL 

The ANC in Zambia saw 
itself as a governments n-exile 
and bad no interest in negotia- 
tion because what it wanted 
was to take over power, Mr 
Linda said. It sought to frus- 
trate government reforms. 

If the ANC gained power it 
would only bring communism 
into South Africa, but leaders 
of moderate black South Af- 
rican opinion were anxious to 
support Western democracy 
and free enterprise. 


By Clifford Loodey 
Religious Affairs 
Correspondent 

The Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, Dr Robert Rnnrie, leaves 
tonight for Sooth Africa to 
take part in and preach at the 
enthronement ou Sunday of 
the Rt Rev Desmond TWu as 
Archbishop of Cape Town. 

Dr Rmxde wiQ also address 
an open-air service at a Cape 
Town football stadiain later 
that day, planned as a 
spectacular pabtic demonstra- 
tion of the Chorda's opposition 
to apartheid. 

It is understood Dr Rmirie 
regards his speech, which will 
be seen as a warning to toe 
Government of Sooth Africa 
that Bishop Totn enjoys his 
total confidence • n 4 support, 
as one of his most important as 
head of flu Anglican Corn- 


Dr Ronde's attitude to toe 
bishop is said to be: “He who 
touches him, touches me.” 

He will be accompanied by 
Mr Terry Waite, his secretary 
for An glican Communion af- 
fairs, his dwplahi, the 
Rev John Wftheridge. 

Dr Rnnde's identification 
with the Mack straggle in 
Sooth Africa, and particularly 
his support for sanctums, has 
drawn approval and criticism 
in eqoal measure at Chord of 
England grassroots leveL 


Japan wil] take “additional 
measures" against South Af- 
rica if there is no further 
progress towards the removal 
of apartheid. 

When Mr R. F. “Pik" Bo- 
tha, the South African Foreign 
Minister, met his Japanese 
counterpart, Mr Tadashi Kor- 
an an, yesterday the host again 
called for the release of Mr 
Nelson Mandela and the re- 
moval of restrictions on the 
African National Congress. 

He also made known 
Japan's “strong displeasure" 
at this year's attacks by South 
Africa on its black neighbours. 

The Japanese Government 
has yet to make up its mind on 
the nature of the measures, 
which will not necessarily be 
economic, and the timing of 
their imposition. 

But they could come as soon 
as the end of this month, 
according to a Foreign Min- 
istry spokesman, depending 
on what the EEC deckles. 

“We have not decided yet 
what, if any, measures we will 
take. The contents of the 
meeting will be conveyed to 
Western countries and the 
international community be- 
cause we don't want our 
position to be misconstrued," 
a Foreign Ministry spokesman 
said. 

The last comment was a 
reference to the Government's 
sensitivity to criticism for 
having received Mr Botha at 
alL 

Before his arrival the Social- 


From David Watts, Tokyo 

isi Party called on the Govern- 
ment to cancel his permission 
to land and not arrange any 
official meetings for him be- 
cause such meetings would be 
misunderstood by other coun- 
tries. The party is critical of 
the Government for its lack of 
sensitivity on human rights 
questions. 

Mr Botha apparently did 
not appeal directly to the 
Japanese Government not to 
extend sanctions. But be pre- 
sented a three-page position 
paper on its plans for remov- 
ing apartheid and, more 

Sooth Africa and Taiwan yes- 
terday agreed to expand eco- 
nomic co-operation. The 
agreement covers banking, 
health, fishing, forestry, ship- 
ping, energy, biotechnology 
and solar energy (Renter re- 
ports from Taipei). 

significantly, a 10-page paper 
on the effect of sanctions on 
the rest of Africa and particu- 
larly on neighbouring Mack 
nations. 

He said - sanctions were be- 
ing pursued “out of ignorance, 
malice, greed, hypocrisy, mis- 
trust, guilt and in pursuance of 
a cunning political objective 
. . . White producers and 
exporters in a number of 
Western countries stand to 
gain billions if the Common- 
wealth's sanctions proposals 
are implemented." 

Though Mr Botha's only 
official appointment was with 


the Foreign Minister, he wifi 
be seeing other people pri- 
vately until he leaves for 
Taiwan on Sunday. Among 
them will be businessmen and 
Diet members, most probably 
members of the Japan-Repub- 
lic of South Africa Par- 
liamentary Friendship 
League. 

The league's prospectus 
goes to the heart of the matter 
“Just as crude oil from the 
Middle East is essential for the 
Japanese economy, which is 
based on the export of high 
technology goods, so are the 
rare .metals which are im- 
ported from the Republic of| 
South Africa." 

It also calls for full dip- 
lomatic relations with South 
Africa and the strengthening 
of trade relations. 

Japan is dependent on 
South Africa for 72 percent of | 
hs vanadium and 37 per cent 
of its chromium. Its stockpile 
of rare metals is reported to be 
less than a month. 

Trade and sanctions details: 
Japan is South Africa's second 
most important trade partner 
after the United States. 

Exports in 1985: S1.02 bil- 
lion (£680 million). Imports: 
$1.84 billion. Toyota has 27 
per cent of the South African 
car market through kits 
assembled locally. 

Direct computer sales were 
wrath about $40 million last 
year, though sales to the 
military and police are 
banned. 


Russia stays silent 
over Daniloff deal 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


The Soviet authorities yes- 
terday refused to comment 
publicly on reports from 
Washington that the US Gov- 
ernment had proposed the 
outline of a deal designed to 
secure the release of Mr 
Nicholas Daniloff, the Ameri- 
can correspondent impris- 
oned here on suspicion of 
spying. 

Mr Gennady Gerasimov, 
the chief Kremlin spokesman, 
speaking at a regular briefing 
at the Foreign Ministry, said 
that as far as he knew the 
Kremlin had received no for- 
mal offer from the White 
House about any such deal 

Under the terms of the deal, 
first publicized by unidenti- 


fied Reagan Administration 
officials, Mr Daniloff. aged 5Z 
the Moscow correspondent of 
the weekly US News & World 
• Report , would be freed and Mr 
Gennady Zakharov, a Soviet 
physicist held on spying 
charges after his arrest on the 
New York subway, transferred 
into the care of the Soviet Am- 
bassador pending trial. 

Western sources in Moscow 
thought it might prove the 
opening move in a behind- 
the-scenes bargaining process 
designed to end the Daniloff 
affair before the crucial meet- 
ing between the US and Soviet 
Foreign Ministers later this 
month. 

Leading artide, page 15 



Mr Mortimer Zuckerman, owner of the US News & World 
Report, at Heathrow Airport with Nicholas DanUofTs 
children, Miranda, aged 23, and Caleb, 16. 


Shia Muslims prove enmity 
with killing of UN soldiers 


By Our Middle East Correspondent 


The murder of three French 
United Nations soldiers and 
the wounding of a fourth in a 
roadside bomb explosion yes- 
terday has provided final 
proof that the UN forces focea 
brutal enemy within the Shia 
Muslim community as well as 
among the pro-Israeli militias 
north of the Israeli border. 

The attack, which prompted 
the French Government to 
repeat the need to “reassess” 
the UN's mission in Lebanon, 
was condemned by UN offi- 
cers as “a deliberate and 
premeditated attack". 

The French troops had been 
jogging on a routine exercise 
near the village of Jouaya. east 
of Tyre, when the bomb 
exploded by remote control. 
Two soldiers were killed in- 
stantly and a third died from 
his wounds after being taken 
to the UN's field hospital at 
Naqqoura, where doctors fo- 
und he had been hit by 
hundreds of pieces of shrap- 
nel. 

Troops recovered the equip- 
ment used to detonate the 
bomb and a Muslim radio 
station in Beirut later an- 
nounced that the French 
contingent had raided a house 
in Jouaya and arrested two 
men. There can now be no 
doubt that an organization 


within the Shia community in 
southern Lebanon is trying to 
break the UN force. 

The UN itself prefers not to 
comment on this, mainly 
because it has developed a 
warm relationship with the 
Shia Muslim Amal militia 
around Tyre and believes that 
Amal can control events. The 
painful (ruth is that the UN 
has either been unable to 
communicate with the more 
extreme Hezbollah “Party of 
God" or has chosen not to do 
so to avoid damaging its 
relations with AmaL. 

The Hezbollah last week 
declared that it opposed the 
UN force in the south of 
Lebanon, on the ground that it 
acted as a buffer for Israeli 
troops still controlling the 
Israeli occupation zone. 

The UN itself still officially 
wishes to fulfil its original 


1978 mandate by moving up 
to the Israeli border from 
which it is excluded by Israeli- 
paid militiamen. 

An anonymous telephone 
caller claiming to re p rese n t an 
extreme Shia organization this 
week told a Western news 
agency in Beirut that the UN 
had until October 3 to com- 
plete their mandate and move 
to the frontier or they would 
be treated like the Israelis. 
This has an ominous ring to it: 
the UN is already under 
attack 

The villagers of Jouaya 
yesterday protested at the 
killings of the French troops. 
Popular sentiment in the vil- 
lages is clearly still with the 
UN, but it takes only an 
unexplained shooting, an 
argument, or a deliberate 
provocation to change such 
sentiments. 


French committed to Lebanon 


Paris — President Mit- 
terrand of France yesterday 
reaffirmed his country’s com- 
mitment to Lebanon, and said 
he wanted an even stronger 
and better organized peace- 
keeping force maintained 
there, although the French 
Government would call again 
on the UN to re-examine its 


role and mission (Diana Ged- 
des writes). 

In talks with Mr Hussein 
Husseini, president of the 
Lebanese Parliament, M Mit- 
terrand said; “France has suf- 
fered some 100 deaths in 
Lebanon. There are also our 
hostages." 


Nest egg or Exocet for tanker men of the Gulf 


From Robert Fisk, off Larak Island. Iran 


They are ordinary enough 
folk, the men of the tanka- 
war. Some sail np to Kharg 
Island for the experience, a 
few — a very few — do It for the 
challenge. Bat most risk their 
lives in the Gulf for what 
Captain Falk Tddtmaim in- 
dicated by robbing his thumb 
and two fingers together: a tot 
of money. 

A small man, prematurely 
balding at 42, a freelance 
josrnaiist near Bremen when 
he is not at sea. Captain 
Tddtmaim is - like so many of 
his European colleagues - 
divorced. “My children are 
grown np and I have the 
freedom todo what I want," be 
said. “Yes, I know the risks - 
1 know what an Exocet missile 
can do. But toe money is good 
and the contract is only six 
months." . _ 

But six months is a long 
time, not least when the 
Iranian tanker shuttles be- 
tween Larak Island and Kharg 
for oil are eight-day round 

trips and the Iraqi a ttacks on 
them are growing in intensity 
by the week. 


At around £5,600 a month, a 
ship's master can earn a nest 
egg in half a year if be keeps 
his nerve, and his ship. “If you 
are going to get bit, then 
nothing you can do wffl pre- 
vent tint," Captain Tddtmaim 
said, shrugging his shoulders 
in an exaggerated, unconvinc- 
ing way. 

His fatalism, of course, 
lacks logic. If yon don't sail to 
Kharg, no missile is going to 
have your name on it But 
invariably yon hear the same 
variations on a theme. Herr 


Willy Schwerdtoer, chief en- 
gineer of toe Iranian super- 
tanker Taftan. put it in almost 
mediaeval fashion: “AO your 
life, a candle is burning. Who 
can say when the light will be 
snuffed oat?" 

Herr Schwerdtoer, a grey- 
haired man with a large 
paunch, is toe sort of seaman 
whom any fOmgoer would 
re co gn i z e polishing brass in an 
■engine room. Even off duty, be 
is a sailor on the north 
German coast, owning his own 
small boat, fishing, reading in 
the bonse he built himself on a 
misty German island. 


Moscow ship protest 


Moscow (Reuter) — The 
Soviet Union has protested to 
Tehran over the boarding of a 
Soviet freighter in the Gulf by 
the Iranian Navy, but the 
issue will soon be dosed, Mr 
Gennady Gerasimov, the For- 
eign Ministry spokesman, said 
yesterday. 

He said Iranian officers had 
been on board the 1 1. 730-ton 
Pyolr Ycmtsov after detaining 
it in international waters west 


of Dubai this week, and engine 
failure was now the only 
problem preventing it from 
continuing its journey from 
the Black Sea to Kuwait. 

Another Soviet ship, the 
Rubezhnaya, was standing by 
to tow it to an unspecified port 
for repairs. 

A senior naval official in 
Tehran said yesterday that it 
was free to go now that its 
cargo had been inspected. 


“I have all I want in life,** be 
said. “Pm long ago divorced. 
Some people are unhappy 
alone, but 1 can do whatever I 
want — work for six months 
here, then six months' holiday 
at borne.** 

Most of the European sea- 
men working with Herr Scfa- 
wenltner said they spent a lot 
of time reading. 

They are canny men, enjoy- 
ing sitting on the deck of their 
crew boat, watching the flying 
fish and the long yellow 
seasnakes that come out of toe 
green depths of toe Gulf to 
observe mere mortals pass. 

They debate why the flying 
fish land on their tails, but 
their most serious discussions 
are about the Exocet. They 
have found a flaw In the 
comfortable reasoning of die 
Iranian tanker officials and 
the shipowners. 

The Exocet will always aim 
itself at the largest area of ship 
viable to its radar. That 
means the hull, according to 
the Iranians. The seamen 
know different Retaining 
from Kharg folly loaded, bufl 
down is toe water, it is toe 
superstructure apd accom- 


modation quarters that the 
missile likes to lock on to? 
which is why toe tanker men 
have more chance of dying on 
the way home. 

There are Indian and Paki- 
stani seamen on board the 
supertankers — an entire crew 
of them left their ship at Larak 
this week because they no 
longer wished to risk their 
lives. Bnt most of the crewmen 
are FDipino, 

Yet they, too. understand 
the ExoceL Mr Richard 
Soriano from Manila left his 
wife behind him when he set 
off for the Gulf on a nine- 
moato contract — the tally way 
to get “tanker experience". - 

“I'm frightened,” he said. 
“My wife did not want me to 

come. I said ‘cross your fingers 
for me*. And I said. *if I die, 
you can marry again because 
we have no children*. She cried 
when 2 said this." 

Mr Soriano seemed to fed 
something was missing in this 
explanation. “I believe God 
will get me when be wants 
me," be went on slowly. 
“When yoar time cranes, ft 
comes. I am a Catholic.” Then 
he paused. “Born again." 


Deng looks 
to Kremlin 
for more 

Peking (Reuter) — Mr Deng 
Xiaoping, the Chinese leader, 
believes the latest initiatives 
from Mr Mikhail Gorbachov 
to improve Sino-Soviet ties do 
not go for enough, Japanese 
sources said yesterday. 

They said Mr Deng told a 
group from Japan's oppo- 
sition Komeilo party that 
China cautiously welcomed 
the initiatives, but wanted a 
.settlement in Cambodia as the 
biggest step towards better 
relations. 

Mr Deng said withdrawal of 
up to 7 per cent of Soviet 
forces in Afghanistan would 
make no fundamental dif- 
ference; troops withdrawn 
from Mongolia could return 
there in one or two days, and 
toe problem of Soviet missile 
deployments in Asia re- 
mained. 

The sources quoted Mr 
Deng, aged 82, as saying be 
wanted to retire next year, 
since he disapproved of life 
tenure for high-ranking of- 
ficials Bnt it was difficult for 
him to persuade colleagues 
who strongly opposed his 
retirement 

He said there was con- 
troversy in the Soviet Govern- 
ment over foreign policy, with 
Mr Gorbachov feeing many 
obstacles in his desire to 
change the situation. 

“It is inevitable that if 
someone wants a new policy, 
there will arise many obstacles 
— it is the same in China," he 
said. 

Mr Deng- said China re- 
jected the idea of direct nego- 
tiations with Vietnam on the 
Cambodian question; Hanoi 
had not made even a small 
concession. China wants Mos- 
cow to put pressure on Viet- 
nam to remove its forces. 

On the Soviet offer of 
border territorial concessions, 
Mr Deng welcomed Moscow's 
admission that a dispute ex- 
isted, but was dissatisfied it 
did not concede that toe 
Tsarist treaties backing Mos- 
cow's claims were unequal. 


Solution to 
border row 
in doubt 

From David Bernstein 
Jerusalem 

New difficulties have arisen 
between Israeli and Egyptian 
negotiators trying to complete 
their Taka arbitration agree- 
ment, throwing into doubt next 
week’s planned summit meet- 
ing between Mr Shimon Feres, 
toe Israeli leader, and Presi- 
dent Mubarak of Egypt. 

The date and venae for the 
summit have not been an- 
nounced officially, but It is 
understood ft was to have 
taken place at Alexandria next 
Wednesday, provided that the 
Taba artnratioa accord was 
complete. 

Dr David Khnche, the direc- 
tor-general of the Israeli For- 
eign Ministry, who is in Egypt 
trying to save the Taba nego- 
tiations, yesterday said on 
Israel radio that Egypt had 
reneged on an earlier agree- 
ment concerning the manner in 
which Israel was to mark what 
it -claimed to be the formal 
border between toe two 
countries. 

Israel’s claim rested on an 
yeement in 1906 between 
jTPt and Ottoman Turkey, 
and, as the origmal markers 
no longer ended and the 
precise location of the border 
was in doubt, it had been 
agreed that it could mark the 
border's approximate line. 

But it has new trans pi r e d 
that toe Egyptians are asking 
Israel to specify precisely 
where toe original markers 
were. 

Mr Richard Murphy, the 
US Assistant Secretary of 
State, who is is Egypt on the 
third leg of a Middle faf* 
shuttle, yesterday met Dr 
Khnche in Alexandria. It b 
likely that Dr Khnche asked 
him to find a way out of the 
latest Impasse. 

The controversy over the 
border markers c omes on top 
of toe failure so for id the 
negotiators to find t hre e nu lu - 
ally-ogreed international ar- 
bitrators tn jadge their re- 
spective claims to Taba. 


Liberians 
thwart 
dissident 
coup plot 

Harare (Reuter) - The U- 
berian Government is fully in 
control of the country after 
thwarting efforts by a group of 
dissidents to invade the coun- 
try and seize power, the 
Foreign Minister. Mr Bernard 

Blamo. said yesterday. 

He said that the security 
alert, including roadblocks, 
now in force in the capital, 
Monrovia, was merely a 
precaution. . 

“According to our intelli- 
gence reports, the Liberian . 
dissidents had set September 6 
as the day to invade Liberia, 
but the situation is calm and 
we are in charge." he saw. 

Missile fired 
by accident 

Tokyo (AFP) - A Side- 
winder air-to-air missile was 
accidentally fired from a 
parked jet fighter and ex- 
ploded in an open area at an 
air base north-east of here. 

The missile exploded 984ft 
away after a pilot hit the 
starter of a parked F IS Eagle 
jet fighter belongingto Japan's 
Air Self-Defence Force. No 
casualties or serious damage 
were reported. 

Grandmother 
back in jail 

Lisbon (Reuter) — A Portu- 
guese grandmother, charged 
with fraud after her unofficial 
banking organization col- 
lapsed in 1984, has returned to 
prison to await trial after a 
court overruled an earlier 
decision freeing her on bail. 

Maria Branca dos Samos, 
popularly known as Dona 
Branca, or the “People's 
Banker", surrendered to 
police. 

Typhoon toll 

Delhi (Reuter) — Troops 
and helicopters in India*s 
eastern Bihar state are fighting 
floods which have killed some 
300 people nationwide in the 
past two months. 

Drug swoop 

Helsinki (Reuter) - Police 
have broken a Finnish drug 
ring operating for more than 
five years from Copenhagen 
and smugging drugs to aU 
Nordic countries.. 

Egg protest 

Canberra (AP) — Student 
protesters threw eggs at the 
Australian Prime Minister, 
Mr Bob Hawke* when be 
opened a new building at the . 
Australian National Univ- 
ersity. 

Refugee list 

Bangkok (AP) - Viet- 
namese officials have given to 
an American delegation lists 
of refugees eligible to resettle 
in the United States ui 


Orderly 

gramme. 


under the 
Departure Pro- 


Fungi death 

Copenhagen (Reuter) — A 
i, aged 49, has 


died from eating poisonous 
picked in 


Thai woman. 

ating 

fongi in Denmark „ 
mistake few a particularly de- 
licious mushroom found in 
Thailand. 

Carlos talks 

Madrid — King Juan Carlos 
of Spain will hold talks with 
President Reagan during a 
visit to the United States at 
the end of this month Where 
he is due to give the opening 
speech at the UN General 
Assembly meeting on Septem- 
ber 22. 

Ship blaze 

Djibouti (Reuter) — The 
ypnot-regisxered cargo ves- 
sel Silver Sea caught fire six 
miles north-east of Djibouti 
port and all 19 crew members 
abandoned ship unhurt, port 
officials said. 

Typhoon toll 

Manila (AP) — Authorities 
said that Typhoon Wayne'S • 
death toll has risen to 13, and 
that the storm has destroyed 
large areas of crop land and 
fish ponds. 

Two expelled 

Rome (Reuter) — The Ital- 
ian Interior Ministry has re- 
vealed that two Libyans were 

ily in 1982 

tty followed 

the movements of the then 
President Sandro Pertini. 


Nakasone’s extra year 


Tokyo — Japan’s Prime 
Minister, Mr Yasuhiro Nak- 
asone, is to have an extra year 
in office (David Watts writes). 

The five factions of toe 
Libera] Democratic Party met 
in a Tokyo restaurant on 
Wednesday night and agreed 
that an exception clause be 
added to toe party rules 
allowing him to stay os until 
October next year. 

The extension was widely 


expected after the LDP's 
overwhelming victory in the 
July elections. Mr Nakasooe 
would normally have stepped 
down at toe end of his second 
two-year term at toe end of i 
next month. 


requires 
rank 


The decision 
endorsement by the rank and 
file of the party factions and 
Diet members, but this will be 
routine. 


Bhutto riding 

Karachi (Reuter) — A Pak 
siani court ruled that the jaik 
opposition leader. Mis 
Benazir Bhutto, could appea 
in court on September 9 i 
contest her detention, bi 
ordered tight securit 

measures. 

Arms talks 

Geneva (AFP) -Soviet an 

U-5. disarmament exper 
opened two separate sets < 
folks here and in Bent o 
controlling nuclear tests an 
the spread of chemia 
weapons. 

Dinghy sunk 

Colombo —A foreigner, h 
heved to be a Canadia 
journalist, is among seve 
people m a dingy sunk by a Si 
Lanlra Navy patrol off to 
s northern coast oi 
Wednesday, according to sc 
cunty sources. 




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OVERSEAS NEWS 



r V Fron » A Correspondent, Harare 

^ the means of 

Harare deai ^ c !«» **e to ibeir 

nation «#■ ^."S consier- usurpation of our ricbes. 


out on ‘traitors’ 


SEE, «>n5SS 

SiiS^s 

«#AS?Aa?s 


“I say to yon ’.there is ao 
of d is 


possibiHty of diaidgne be- 
iween ns and these ftwera.” - 
Colonel GadafETs. speech 
was pnnctuaied by 
from a group of Mhy aa 

women petitioned behind the 
lectern.; ' • 

- The cotond 'sounded a 

he cleciacrrf’Iw ihraaifinihg note when ce 

of^the bn»iiSSt5!? 1 * er ^ ip “P^^^Sed fegpt and Jordan 
WMhpatiSe^^^SJmwv 1 " Ming toSow ihctr soil to 
of used for attacks on Israel, 

adding: M Ifthey^ve me th^ 
r^Mcopho ne community, or bases tomorrow, I wffl destroy 

~ IsraeT s nuclear reactor, which 

will annihilate the whole 
region.” . 

Deflates in the audi- 
torium, and even Cotnmon- 
wealth and Eastern Woe 
journalists waiching the prt>- 
ceedings on letevisoh mon- 
hors .oiusjde, found ii in- 
creasingly difficult to take him 
seriously as he continued his 
65-minute diatribe. 

There was unrestrained 


Ron* - M r. Vane Wiltm, 
topn’s special eo- 
bad “friendly- talks on 
terr <™* yesterday with SC 
|[K6r Bettmo Crexi, the luihn 
prow Minister, in contrast to. 

S^^^^ontheeverf 

fcaaaj ^ 

with diptomadc recognition of 
the United Stales or 

Rntam * *■■!« (UHMSWWIIWU 

rwLJ» ^ iaughxer when he announced: 
m hEff ? “I SO out fiora here saying 
bjood-red robes goodbye to this tunny move- 
wim.a white cloak, be called — — ■“■ ■* — _ 

on radical states of -the Third 

World to reject the goals of 
neutrality and world peace 
laid down , by theifonnders of 
tbe movement 25 years ago, 
and instead ann themselves 
for a ^ collective fight a gai'-n^ t 

“*■ K0Den Mogaoe, tne 
hes m friis fighl to be the forces Zimbabwean Prime Minister, 


— »‘6Ut LMUU 

of the Warsaw Pact 
. **f am tbady' io form an 
intenraricma] forceL I shall 
spread the troops' of this force 
over all the continents of the 
world- scr as to spread fire 
under ifie feet of America,” he 
declared.; • 

But; he theh'acknowledfeed: 
“ Un fortunately, the backward 
im pariah’ st Vhentalrtyiias at its 


ment, frreweli to tms inter- 
national felsehood, and I raise 
the motto of a world of two 
camps, a camp of fiberadon 
and a camp of imperiahsm. 
There is no jrface for neutralist 
non-alignment.”. . 

The movement’s chairman. 

Mr' Robert Mugabe, the 
* * - - ^ 


drew greaier applause than rhe 
colonel when he commented 
that not all present would 
agree that the movement had 
ceased to have a- purpose or 
lost its validity. \ 

"We appreciate, however, . 
the deep and emotional feel- 
ings embittered by recent acts 
of the United States,” Mr 
Mugabe said. 


Interview with President Ershafl 

Army role assured 
in democratic era 

.. From Ahmed Fad, Dhaka 


General. Ershad, the miB - 
taiy^ TBler of Bangladesh, is 
po^ed to become the country’s 
third directly elected Presi- 
dent In pdb sd hr October 
15u * ' . ^ 

In a 90-mhnte hiterview 
with The Zonal at his official 
residence . inside the army 
headquarters in ^Dhaka's- nor- 
thern snbmhs, General' Er- 
shad,aged 5<v talked abonthis 
4^5-year rale and his firtnre 
plans. - -.--nlr -3 . 

-1 don’t see juxircal oppo- 
nent in die coming election,” 
General Ershad, who retired, 
from die Army last week end 
joined the official Jatiye party, 
said. 

Bangladeshis would hare 
Kked anny rale to hare been 
shorter. 1 On^ numy occasions 
they took to the streets hi 
thousands shouting for dem- 
ocracy and joined noisy oppo- 
sition rallies d e ma n d ing an 
aid to martial bur. 

Bat i divided Opposition 
which, often quarrelled among 
itself failed to cash in on the 
unrest as . General Ershad 
steadily bo9t' ap his political 
base and brought bade a 
measure of disapBue in the 
armed forces, which during the 

past regime, had staged at least 

18 ahortivecoups. 

“The Army is a disdpfined' 
force now, aesd I can assure you 
that there. adSl be no furtiier 
craps ns.Fmg a4 I an there,” 
General Ershad sahL 
The . Government; has an- 
ao^mjei plans fo lift m a ffial 
law after the presideatial elec- 



tions when the Fu&meht wOl 
be summoned to approvea Bill 
ratifying army rule. Tins is 
needed to indemnify the Go*- 
erament against afl actions' 
taken in tire past. 

Earlier efforts to get the Bill 
approved was blocked by the 
opposition affiance, led by the 
A warn! League which has lOOi 
seats in the house, saying that! 
they would not legitimize 
ntffitary Government. - 

The pro-BrshSd Jatiyo par- 
ty, Vhiclf currently has 230 
members after taking eight! 
more c on stituencies in qjm 
elections on August 26, runs 
short of a two-turds majority 
needed to carry the SOI 
through. 

Bat General Ershad said 
that efforts were under way to 
muster support among other 
smaller groups In the 
ment 

The former infantry general 
has been able to draw people 
away from opposition camps, 
most of the time su rpri sin g his 
main challengers for power — 
Sheikh Hasina Waxed, chuff 
of tire Awami League, and 
Begum Khaleda Ziajeader off 
the former ruling Bangladesh 
Nationalist party. 

The present. Prime Minister 
is a former Awami League 
member, and at least six 
senior ministers were once 
dore associates of Begnm Zia. 

General Ershad faced, his 
greatest challenge last March 
when the two women seemed 
to be dosing their ranks, 
thr ee timing dvfl disobedience 
upsetting his plans for holding 
parliamentary elections under 
martial -law. 

But General Ershad took a 
risk by adopting a tough 
stance on oppostnw protests 
which soon dissipated because 
of lack of organization. The 
. elections were, held two 
months later with the Awami 
League and about 20 other 


Even in a democratic set-up, 
tjbe Army should have some 
rale to play. General Ershad 

said. b *Tbe armed forces do not 
want the jobs of ministers, but 
they would like to be heard on 
afl yg -- Miiiim — - national issues," be said. “You 

General Ershad; plans to lift cannot leave a national Army 
^SSlbSrStiKte- isolated from life." 

Report of hidden cash 
and Second wife denied 

Fi^QnrCorresiioiid^Dtaka • 


' President Ershad said UJ his 

interview -'-with ■ The Times 
yesterday that he had never 

taken- a second-Wtfe. 

He'despribed as tota^.un- 

mie a report in the British 
newspaper The Observer on 
August 31 that in 1982 he had 
SSrtiy married a worm 
named Marium Munjt^,^ 
also claimed to be his long- 
time mistress,' . 

“If anybody can . 
that there is any mnydeed 
connecting me wth 
am going to resign, Gcnerar 

Erslrad said. . . 

He also disdaimed reports 


that he had slashed away 
millions of dollars in secret 
accounts with banks in the 
United States and Switzerland 
and that his agents were 
hunting abroad for real estate. 

General Ershad challenged 
the newspaper to prove these 
disclosures. 

“If they can prove that I 
have a single dollar or pound 
outside Bangladesh. I am 
ready to resign," he said. 

He also said that be was 
prepared to write, authoriza- 
tion letters to any foreign bank 
to reveal his accounts if he had 
money with them. 


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NAME. — 

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Colonel Gadaffi, fist raised, giving America a tongue-las hing 

to mtensify its fight in 


“1 think our brother must 
accept that this movement has 
provided him with quite a 
platform, to speak through the 
movement to the United 
States.” 

The Libyan leader disclosed 
that he had been holding talks 
here aimed at giving resources 
to the African National Con- 


1 Africa. 

After threatening repeatedly 
to walk oat of the summit and 
saying be could not sit in the 
same hall as “spies and 
traitors*'. Colonel Gadaffi 
stayed on to hear President 
Ortega of Nicaragua predict 
there would be 2,640,000 


in his Harare summit speech. 

casualties if the United States 
invaded his country in sup- 
port of the Contra rebels. 

The Libyan leader then left 
the conference centre amid the 
cheers of a group of 200 
demonstrators from the Uni- 
versity of Zimbabwe and was 
reported to have flown to 
Kampala. 


Spain’s art 
treasures 
come out 
of hiding 

From A Correspondent 
Madrid 

The incentive of ■ tax 
amnesty in Spain has brought 
to light 30,000 art treasures 
hidden for decades, if not 
centuries. 

These include 80 paintings 
presumed to be the work of the 
prolific 18th-century Spanish 
artist Goya and 31 pajntmgs 
by E3 Greco of Toledo, as web 
as works by the famous mod- 
ern Spanish artists Joan Mho 
and Salvador Dafi. 

In the Balearic Islands, 
declarations have been made 
of the existence of possible 
unknown works by Henry 
Moore, the British sculptor 
who died this week. 

The aut h e n ticity of the dif- 
ferent art works — which 
comprise fnrailnre . tapestries, 
fami ly book collections, re- 
ligions vestments and jewlkry, 
together with archaeological 
finds — wiD be verified by 
specialists. 

The works win then be 
classified, and those “of public 
cultural interest” will be listed 
In the register of Spain's 
national patrimony. 

The owner of an offidaDy- 
tisted work of art is obliged to 
keep H in good condition and is 
forbidden to export ft or to sell 
it to a oon-Spanish resident. 

Against this, an owner can 
benefit from tax advantages 
and government subsidies, for 
instance for insurance. 

The purpose of the amnesty 
b to reduce Spain's ooce- 
fiourishing black market for 
art works which has involved 
thefts and the suggling 
abroad of Spanish paintings; 


Gaullist questions 
impartiality of 
French Vise men’ 


From Diana Geddcs, Paris 


M Jacques Toubon, general 
secretary of the Gaullist RPR 
party, has questioned the 
political independence and 
impartiality of France's Coun- 
cil of State and its Constitu- 
tional Council 

His attack came only a few 
days before the Council of 
State delivers its judgement 
on the Government’s disputed 
plans for redrawing the 
constituency boundaries. 

With the apparent aim of 
discrediting in advance its 
views on the proposed constit- 
uencies. M Toubon accused it 
of being composed, in its 
upper echelons, entirely of 
“people with a strong political 
laming which is not that of the 
present majority”. 

The Council of State is a 
supposedly independent qua- 
si-judicial body, composed for 
the most pan of men and 
women of all political persua- 
sions who happen to come top 
of the final examinations of 
the Hite Ecoie Nationale 
d' Administration, though the 
government of the day has the 
right to make a small number 
of direct appointments. 

All government Bills and 
decrees must be submitted to 
it for advice. Its decisions are 
always collegiate. The Gov- 
ernment is nee to accept or 
reject its views. 

M Toubon also attacked the 
Constitutional Council “for 
trying to take Parliament's 
place as the lawmaker ... It is 
no longer what it is supposed 
to be, namely a kind of 
stimulating muse, inspiring 
the legislator, but rather a 
paralysing muse . . . 


“We must beware lest a 
kind of new legislator sets 
itself up above Parliament and 
the Government," 

The Constitutional Council, 
which acts as a Supreme Court ^ 
on all constitutional matters, 
consists of nine “wise men" 7 * 
three appointed by the Presi- # - 
dent, three by the Senate 
president and three by the ," 
National Assembly president 1 
— appointed for a non -renew- ^ 
able nine-year term. 

President Mitterrand's - 
appointment in February of M 
Robert Badinter. the former “ 
Socialist justice Minister, to 
be its president provoked a 
storm of accusations that the * 
Socialists were trying to 
undermine its political in- ' 
dependence. The majority of * 
its members, however, remain 
right-wing appointees. 

M Toubon's remarks seem 
10 echo M Jacques Chirac, the .. 
Prime Minister, who said in * 
July that he respected the 
Constitutional Council and 
did not contest any of its 
decisions, but gave a warning . ‘ 
against the development of a 
“government of judges". 

However, M Denis Bail- 
douin. the government spo- 
kesman. sought yesterday to 
play down M Toubon's re- 
marks, which were described 
by one Socialist MP as a “wild . 
and totally inadmissible di— _ 
a tribe unworthy of the sec- 
reiary-gencral of a party which . , 
claims to respect republican ' 
principles”. 

“Everyone is getting a bit on i 
edge over the new constii-' 
uency boundaries,” M Bau- 
douin said. 


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Fleming faces 
Miami drugs 
smuggling 

investigation 


Miami (Renter) — Federal 
prosecutors said yesterday 
that John Robert Fleming, 
wanted for questioning in 
connection with the multi- 
million-ponnd Brinte-Mat 
boh ion robbery in Britain, is 
being investigated by a US 
grand jury about possible drug 
smuggling links. 

US District Judge Janus 
Kehoe rave prosecutors until 
next Friday to examine Mr 
Fleming's confiscated British 
passport as part of the in- 
vestigation and then return it 
to its owner. No details of the 
secret drug probe were dis- 
closed, but prosecutors did 
not rule out the possibility 
that charges could be filed 
against Mr Fleming. 

' The decision delayed an 
earlier order by an immigra- 
tion judge giving Mr Fleming 
until midnight last night to 
leave the US for a country that 
would accept him or else face 
deportation to Britain. 

- Mr Fleming, aged 45, is 
sought for questioning by 
Scotland Yard about the 
armed theft of £26 million in 
gold bars and diamonds from 
a warehouse near London's 
Heathrow Airport on Novem- 
ber 26, 1983. 

He has been held in an 
isolation cell at a detention 
centre near Miami since he 
was detained on August 20 
after expulsion from Costa 
Rica. 

Mr Fleming's lawyers con- 
tended in a motion filed 
yesterday that the US authori- 
ties were trying to force his 
deportation to London by 
confiscating bis passport and 
blocking his efforts to leave for 
a country of his choice. 

In documents filed in the 
US District Court Mr Flem- 
ing's attorneys asked the judge 
to order the release of bis 
passport and allow him to go 
to any country that would 
. accept him. The judge allowed 


prosecutors to keep the pass- 
port for nine more days after 
arguing that they needed time 
to examine dates on it 

Mr Fleming's lawyers said 
they had learnt that the US 
State Department and British 
Government have “success- 
fully prevented” his entry to 
Panama by pressurira the 
Government there. Britain 
has not issued an arrest war- 
rant for him or requested his 
extradition. 

At a court hearing yes- 
terday. Mr Fleming's lawyers 
said they had found a country 
willing to accept him, but 
declined to name H. They said 
they objected to demands by 
immigration officials that he 
travel only on a commercial 
airline and provide written 
“assurance” in advance that 
the country of destination 
would accept him. 

The lawyers have acknowl- 
edged that he has no right to 
remain in the US because be is 
an “excludable alien”. He had 
been held in an isolation cell 
because of concent that he 
might try to escape from the 
minimum-security facility. 

Costa Rican police, acting 
on a tip from Scotland Yard, 
arrested Mr Fleming on Au- 
gust 15 at a hold in San Jos£. 
He was expelled and taken 
into custody by US authorities 
when be arrived at Miami. 

• DENVER: The Governor 
of Colorado has commuted 
the prison sentence of Stuart 
Armstrong, aged 22, a Briton 
who will be deported next 
week as part of an early- 
re lease programme for alien 
prisoners (AF reports). 

Armstrong, convicted of 
second-degree burglary in 
1985, has agreed not to return 
to the US. officials said. 

The Immigration and Natu- 
ralization Service said Colo- 
rado is the first state to 
institute an early-release pro- 
gramme for alien prisoners. 


Glare scare in Sweden 


Stockholm — A mysterious 
white light resembling a huge 
cloud, seen by hundreds of 
people over south and west 
Sweden in the early hours 
yesterday, is now believed to 
have been caused by a Soviet 
rocket test (Christopher Mo- 
sey writes). 


Police and defence estab- 
lishments received calls from 
many anxious Swedes who 
thought the light could be the 
result of a nuclear explosion. 

But the Swedish Space 
Corporation, said it coincided 
with notification of a series of 
Soviet rocket tests. 





Guerrillas of the Mere National liberation Front, left, parade in Maimbung, Joio Island, In the southern Philippines, daring a meetin g of the rebels to 
prepare for ceasefire talks with President Aquino. Nor Misuari,- right, leads the group, which has been waging a secessionist struggle for 14 years. 


Bolivia tin 
protest 
hardens 

La Paz (Reuter) — About 
100 miners and their famili es 
joined a hunger strike yes- 
terday at one of Bolivia's 
biggest tin mines, while mine 
union leaders and government 
officials continued tallm to 
resolve a week-long stand-off. 

The Church-run radio sta- 
tion Fhtes said the miners, 
their wives and children joined 
a smaller group of miners that 
has been on a hanger strike 
since Monday inside a shaft at 
the Siglo XX Mine, about 190 
miles sooth of La Paz. 

They were protesting about 
plans by President Paz 
Esteassoro to dose the mine 
and up to 10 others because of 
plummeting prices on the 
world tin market 

The government plan would 
put at least 10,000 miners out 
of work with no possibility of 
other employment, SeAor Em- 
eterio Leano,a Mine Workers' 
Confederation (FTM) official, 
said. 

• SANTIAGO: Chile's mili- 
tary Government denied accu- 
sations by Amnesty Inter- 
national that it was system- 
atically abusing human rights 
In repressing the Opposition 
and charged the human rights 
group with a lad; of object- 
ivity. 


Director 
accused of 
fatal stunt 

Los Angeles (Reuter) — The 
film director John Landis, 
striving for realism, ignored 
advice to use dolls instead of 
children in a Vietnam war 
scene that led to the deaths of 
the actor Vic Morrow and two 
child actors, a Superior Court 
here was told. 

The prosecutor said Mr 
Landis, aged 32 was reported 
to have told a casting director 
“to heU with you — we’ll get 
the children ourselves off the 
streets” when he was told that 
children should not be used 
near explosives on the set of 
Twilight Zone: The Movie 

The trial of Mr Landis and 
four associates on charges of 
involuntary manslaughter be- 
gan on Wednesday. 

The defence said it was an 
unforeseeable accident that 
should not have involved 
criminal charges. 

A helicopter spun out of 
control and crashed, killing 
Mr Morrow, aged 53, and the 
children, Renee Chen, aged 
six, and Myca Dinh Lee, aged 
seven. 

Hollywood studios are 
watching the trial closely, 
since it could have a lasting 
effect on how for directors will 
go in staging stunts. , 


One near-miss over California every two days 

Traffic jam in the US skies 


In the aftermath of the mid- 
air collision between a DC 9 
and a small aircraft last 
weekend, a chilling picture of 
the constant dangers in the 
overcrowded skies of Los An- 
geles has emerged. 

“When there's good flying 
weather in southern Califor- 
nia, there are so many aero- 
planes in the sky there's 
absolutely no way yon can 
possibly keep Crack of them 
alL,” admitted a traffic control- 
ler at tbe Federal Aviation 
Administration's Palmdale 
control centre, which handles 
the growing air traffic in Los 
Angeles. “It's a miracle there 
are not more collisions.” 

The mounting statistics 
seem to bear ont the con- 
troller’s fears, both in Califor- 
nia and many important US 
rides. In 1984 there were 589 
reported near-misses in the 
air. Last year the fi g ure 
jumped to 777 and this year it 
will be even higher. 

Yesterday the Federal Avi- 
ation Administration reported 
that near-collisions over 
Californian skies had more 
than doubled in the past five 
years and now occur at a rate 
of one every two days. 

California, the most popu- 
lous state in the nation, has the 


From I tot Daris, Los Angeles 

highest near-miss rate in 
America. Of the 709 incidents 
reported there since 1981, the 
FAA classified 155 of them as 
“criticar’ — defined as aircraft 
coming within 100 ft of each 
other. Several involved dis- 
tances of less than 10 ft 

In CaHfoniia so far this year 
there have been 114 near- 
misses. In the whole of the 
country in the first six months, 
more than 400 such incidents 
have been reported. 

Controllers and federal 
safety officials are once again 
calling for tighter controls and 
stiller regulations to prevent 
small plane pilots from stray- 
ing into big jet landing paths. 
But most agree it is an nphifl 
battle because the private 
pilots have organized them- 
selves into a powerful lobby, 
more than 250,000 strong, 
which constantly opposes any 
efforts to crab its activities. 

One weekend in late July 
there were 11 cases of planes 
penetrating jet afr lanes in. 
southern California. 

Southern Calif ornia air- 
space contains a network of 
airways and control zones of 
even greater complexity than 
the hundreds of miles of 
freeways 

At the time of last Sunday's 


collision there were at least 10 
other aircraft in the vicinity of 
the crash. Also, die air traffic 
controller handling the DC 9's 
landing was working OB two 
jobs at once, said Dr John 
Laaber, the head of the gov- 
ernment safety team probing 
the crash. Thai, however, he 
added, was not mmsuaL 

This week controllers spoke 
out about the dangers. Mr 
Dennis Cottle, a former pas- 
senger jet pflot who now works 
at Palmdale, said: “Even ff yon 
see every pissse up there, you 
can't possibly trade every one. 
It's impossible. 

What exacerbates the prob- 
lem, say controllers, is that 
many small planes are not 
equipped with transponders, 
the device that signals their 
presence to controllers. (The 
Piper Archer piloted by Los 
Angeks businessman William 
Kramer apparently did have 
one functioning at the time of 
the collision.) 

“It's almost impossible to 
sec an aeroplane net equipped 
with a transponder,” Mr 
Cottle said. “There are many 
planes out there with broken 
transponders. It costs $700 
(about £470) Go fix them and a 
lot of pilots don't warn to pay 
the repair MB.*' 


Enrile told 
to support ; 
Aquino 
or resign 

From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

A senior member of the - ' 
Aquino Government .Yes- ; 
terday accused the Defence 
Minister. Mr Juan Ptmot 
Enrile, of subverting peac* 
talks with communist rebels, 
and urged him to resign if he; 
could not support the nego- 
tiations. 

“Enough is enough,'* 

Local Governments Minister. 
Mr Aquilino Pimentel, said." 
“The sooner we get rid of 
people who do not agree with- 
the policies of the President, X, 
think the better for all of us."^ 
It is the first time a member" 
of the Cabinet has. openly.: 
challenged Mr Enrile and 
publicly questioned his loyalty.-, 
to the six-month-old Gov- 
ernment. 

“If he believes that he' 
cannot support the policies of 
Mrs Aquino, paiticufaly *s- 
regards her call for negotia-I 
tions and offer of amnesty nr 
the rebels, then the best thing., 
for him to do is quit his~ 
position,” he said. 

“The only prominent govl 
emmem official ... who ij_ 
making it difficult for the 
negotiations to succeed ii‘ 
minister Enrife." ; 

By publicly criticizing the 
way negotiations were bring 
conducted and expressing hhr 
doubts about the chances of 
success, Mr Enrile was eft-, 
cou raging a segment of Uhf 
military to oppose the peace- 
talks, and this had placed* 
President Aquino in a “very- 
embarrassing position”. z 
“I think it is folly for any; 
minister of the Cabinet- 
occupying a sensitive position: 
to exmess such doubts, be-- 
cause this would tend td! 
sabotage the negotiations,”: 
Mr Pimentel said. 

Military officials, mean-: 
while, are investigating 4$ 
officers, including 28 generals- 
and two admirals, for alleged: 
corruption during the 20-year 
Marcos regime. 

The bank accounts of all 46' 
officers have been frozen, amt 
they are banned from leaving 
the country while corruption 
charges are pending, the efutiw 
man of the Armed Forces 
Ami-Draft Board, retired 
General Manuel Flores, said*: 

Of those being investigated 
for “unexplained wealth , 17 
remain in active service, three 
fled into exile with Mr Mari 
cos, and the rest have retired: 


There is a case 
against sanctions 


The coal mining industry in South Africa employs 
about 100 000 people of whom, 86 000 are black, and 
produces 170 million tons of coal per year of which 
45 million tons are exported. Some 30 000 people are 
producing coal for export. 

Both as to its technical 
skills and in regard to its social 
policies, this industry has done 
much to improve productivity 
and living standards in 
southern Africa. 

It has participated actively 
in persuading Government to 
scrap legal barriers to the 
advancement of black people. 

It has raised the real wages 
of unskilled workers by over 


The imposition of sanctions against this 
industry would certainly 


345 per cent between 1970 and 1985. 

It has provided accommodation and other amenities 
which more than meet international mining standards. 
It helped to secure full trade union rights for its 

black workers. With many 
difficulties but also with 
considerable success, it has 
developed workable 
industrial relations. 


cause some 30 000 people, most of them 
black, to lose their jobs, with all that that 
implies 

deprive the industry of the resources it 
needs to pursue higher skills and better 
standards 


heighten political tension and aggravate 
racial polarisation in South Africa.. . 

WHOSE INTERESTS CAN THIS 
POSSIBLY SERVE? 


More recently, the coal 
mining industry has joined in 
the ongoing initiatives by the 
private business sector which 
have achieved important 
successes in securing social 
and economic improvements 
in South African society. 


Sponsored by the South African coal producers 


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SPECTRUM 


Doctor who puts one across (4,5) 


Granam Wood 



The solution to that 


headline, having won 


the CoUins/Times 


crossword contest 


Crossword championship eight times, has kindly 
1986 agreed to stay away 


from this year’s competition on Sunday. 


But he gave Pearson Phillips some relatively 
non-cryptic clues to the crafty solvers’ arts 


It seemed only proper to find the 
king of crossword puzzlers in a 
shed in an Oxford garden mulling 
over the problem of translating 
“bread-and-butter-pudding” into 
Goman. Dr John Sykes, by 
profession and inclination a 


lexicographer, will not be taking 


part in Sunday's national final 
the annual Collins 
Dictionaries/ 77JC Times cross- 
word championship. He's too 
good. Or. as he puts it himself: 
“On alternate years i now leave 
the field open to others.” 

He has entered 10 times and 
won eight of them. He would 
probably have won them all if he 
had noticed that he had slipped up 
in the spelling of “Athanasian" in 
his first year and hadn't been 
feeling “off form” in 1 979. 

The due which caught him out 
on that occasion is fixed in the 
voluminous recall system which is 
his brain. “It was ‘The end of 
Socrates as recorded by Plato'. 
Hie answer, of course, is the 
.Greek letter ‘S', sigma. But some- 
how I got on the wrong track.” 

What kind of mentality makes a 
crossword champion? What do 
those 22 finalists who will gather 
in the Park Lane Hotel on Sunday 
have that the nest of us plodding 
puzzlers lack? 

Dr Sykes, a tall 57 year old with 
domed cranium, obviously has a 
head start on most people as far as 
general cerebral experience is con- 
cerned. He is a past editor of the 
Concise Oxford Dictionary: the 
current editor of a new Oxford 
English-German Dictionary, a 


professional translator who taught 
ring So- 


himsetf Russian by studying 
viet scientific journals; a math- 
ematician by training and a doctor 
of astro-physics with 18 years at 
the Atomic Energy Research 
Establishment at Harwell. 

His love of words and his 
lexicographer's mind make con- 


versation with him a little daunt- 
ing. 1 wondered, for instance, if his 
route to being an editor of 
dictionaries, via mathematics and 
physics, was not a little odd. 
(“Extraordinary, strange, queer, 
remarkable, eccentric” Concise 
Oxford Dictionary). 

“No. Unusual.” ("Not usual; 
exceptional, remarkable.") 

He is a little hurt by the 
complaints of some of his cross- 
word rivals who claim that he has 
an unfair advantage. He points out 
that his first win was only a year 
after joining the Oxford Dic- 
tionaries department "But I think 
there is a case for saying that 
learning how to tackle crossword 
clues is like learning a language. 
You have to study the language of' 
the due-setter and train yourself 
not to be delayed by literal 
meanings. What you look for are 
the cryptic side-meanings.” 

His technique is to start at 1 
Across and then go to 1 Down, 
proceeding to the clues for which 
he has an initial letter wherever 
possible. One of his tricks is to 
give priority to solving the Down 
dues. ”1 believe that setters usu- 
ally start with the Across dues. 
They put some of their best 
subtleties into them, when their 
minds are fresh. By the time they 
have got to the Down clues some 
of their subtlety will have been 
exhausted. They are usually 
easier." 

If he finds himself spending 
more than 15 or 20 seconds on a 
due. he suspects his mind has led 
him on to a false trail. He then 
toms to another and tries to clear 
his mind before returning to the 
awkward one. In a competition, in 
which he aims to do the whole 
puzzle in five minutes or less, this 
mind-dearing exercise requires 
extraordinary mental disdpline. 

if he has an Achilles' heel, it is 
dues based on quotations or 



UNDER THE SPELL 




£ Learning how to tackle crossword clues is like learning a language, 
you have to train yourself not to be delayed by the literal meanings 9 


literary and historical references. 
But he has tymed his systematic 
brain to this matter. 

“With the help of the Oxford 
Dictionary of Quotations 1 have 
built up a working knowledge of 
the areas most commonly covered 
by The Times compilers, which 
appear to be The Bible. Shake- 
speare. Dickens and Alice In 
Wonderland. 

”1 can get caught out, though. 
Fresh from last year's victory in 
The Times competition I was 
interviewed on Radio Oxford and 
given that morning's crossword to 
solve. It included some reference 
to Nicholas Nickleby which 
floored me.” 

In his absence, the favourite for 
Sunday's contest is probably 21- 
year-old David Armitage, who has 
just finished reading English at 
Cambridge. Having collected a 
starred First, he intends to go back 


to do a doctorate on Shakespeare's 
use of classical mythology. He is a 
4'/r-minule solver who has been 
entering the competition since he 
was 15. 

The suggestion that The Times 
should carry a crossword came 
from the paper's circulation 
department after market research 
had shown that the crossword 
craze, which had spread through 
Britain in the 1920s. was particu- 
larly rife among Times readers. 
The editorial department had 
doubts about allowing such frivol- 
ity. It was considered a radical 
departure, comparable to the 
more recent launch of the Times 
Portfolio competition. 

The puzzle has even been in 
trouble with the police once, on 
October 20th 1966. when the 
words "gaol” and "artillery” were 
among the answers. Two days 
later the spy George Blake escaped 


DR JOHN SYKES 

from Wormwood Scrubs by usings 
a road alongside the prison known 
as Artillery Road. The police were 
persuaded that it was a 
coincidence. 

A certain competitive attitude' 
developed among solvers in 
messes, ministries and air raid 
shelters during the war. But it was 
not until 1968 that a Times 
reporter. Peter Hopkirk, suggested 
that a national competition should 
be run. The first took place in 
1970. sponsored by Cutty Sark 
whisky. 

Since the first Times crossword 
appeared on February I 1930. a 
whole mythology has arisen 
around the puzzle, including the 
story of a certain Provost of Eton, 
who was said to time the boiling of 
his egg every morning by how long 
it took him to do the crossword. 

If there is any truth in this tale 
then it is likely that the Provost 


had a softer egg on Mondays than 
on the rest of the week. For Times 
crossword editor John Grant con- 
firms something which puzzlers 
have long suspected, which is that 
it is not quite the strain on 
Mondays that it is on other days. 
“It s a terrible day anyway”, he 
says. “So 1 try to make it a bit eas- 
ier for people.” 

That at least is something for 
Sunday's 21 unsuccessful finalists 
to look forward to. 


Readers will he able to put their 
skills to the clock during Sunday's 
final at the Park Lane Hotel. 
Spectators will he invited to try the 
same puzzles as the finalists, with 
prizes for the fastest correct solu- 
tions. There will also be some 
quick puzzles requiring missing 
answers, as well as the solution of 
dues. Spectators are asked to be 
seated by 1.30 . Admission is £2. 


The reaction of most people to 
the winner of the CoUins/fimes 
crossword championship is: 


“How can anyone do a crossword 
— -hulk*" The ability in 


so quickly? 

complete four pozzies in __ 
average of under 10 minutes each 
is of a special order. 

The competitor is in strange 
surroundings — a bote! ballroom 
with up to 300 egg-headed rivals, 
screened from each other by 
cardboard pigeon holes. Speed 
counts, but not at the expense of 
accuracy. A dozen or so compet- 
itors will solve all the puzzles; 
bonus points, one for each minute 
saved on the JO-minute "bogey” 
time, differentiate them. But if 
they make a mistake they get no 
bonus points and their chances 
are instantly gone- 

This leads to hopeful appeals 
to the referee; if be can be 
prevailed upon to renprize swne 
unorthodox spelling or bizarre 
answer, all may yet be welL One 
of this year's national finalists 
was saved at the Birmingham 
contest when, after spelfing 
PURSUER as PERSUER, he 
unearthed the latter as an ob- 
solete spelling. 

Two young competitors nave 
been brought down by careless 
errors when they looked tike 
winning. One, at the age Of 20, 
knew such things as the name of 
the great Parisian cemetery, 
Pere-Lachaise, but spelt the 
Kentish resort WARMER, in- 
stead of WALMER: the other 
entered FUS1LAGE for 
FUSELAGE. 

In theory', only errors like that 
make it necessary to deck 
competitors' answers. Each cryp- 
tic clue normally contains two 
routes to the answer, one a 
definition, so the solver can 
check the answer for himself. 

But seasoned competitors ex- 
ploit this by solving only one half 
of the clue and, if the answer 
looks right, they risk it to gain 
time. “It was obviously so-and- 
so”, they say afterwards, “so 1 
didn't bother to work it out”. • 

Such intuitive solving depends 
on familiarity with the tricks 
compilers play. A quarrel is as 
likely to be an arrow as a row. 
one in exultation will probnMy.M 
a lark, and so on. Nothing can be 
taken at face value. 


John Grant 

Crossword Editor 




5 TIMES! 


SATURDAY 



£12,000 to be won 



Seasoned Bogarde 


Dirk Bogarde, soldier, actor, author, painter, orderly 
man, is preparing for autumn. He has published the 
final volume of his autobiography and burnt all his 
diaries — because at 65, be tells Russell Harty in an 
exclusive interview, there is nothing more to say 


Livingstone’s Blanching at 
last stand la carte 

On safari in How to fix the 

deepest Zambia fixed-price menu 


Can you always gel your copy of The Times? 



CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1046 


ACROSS 

1 Social outcast (61 
5 Important person (6) 

8 Formal poem (3) 

9 Tension (61 

10 Crape spirit (61 

11 Resolution (4) 

12 Soul mind (13) 

H Pui in pkiurc(6) 

17 Trifling (61 

19 Child-carrying (8) 

22 By mouth (4) 

24 Conakry state (6) 

25 Ammon uim/TNT 
( 6 ) 

26 Knotted whip (3) 

27 Assault (6) 

28 Come out (61 


DOWN 

2 Behind (5) 

3 .Inactivity Iri 

4 Terminal rare hos- 
pital!?) 

5 Start (51 



6 Egg while (3) 

7 Accuse (7) 

13 E^asnc man (3) 

15 Woodblock floor (7) 

16 Crcai weight (3) 


17 Filho samraciion (7) 

18 Quarantine (7) 

20 Mam Ualian port (3) 

21 Backwards (5) 

23 Forward (5) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1045 

ACROSS 8 Par excellence 9 ERA 10 interfere II Leapt 13 Wres- 
tle 16 Destroy 19 Delta 22 Chastiser 24 Rub 25 Si Bernard Pass 
noWN 1 Appeal 2 Armada 3 Expiaior 4 Bestow 5 Slur 6 In- 
sert 7Dd«c 1 2 Eve 14 Eldorado 15 Lit 16Dicasi l7Shabby 
Ycsman 20 Larvae 21 Ambush 23 Turf 


IS 


J ohn Tusa takes up his 
appointment as Manag- 
ing Director of the BBC 
External Services on Mon- 
day, carrying the final edi- 
torial responsibility for more 
than 100 hours of broadcast- 
ing around the world each 
day in 37 languages. It will be 
his duty also to represent the 
External Services’ case tc 
their paymasters (the Foreign 
Office and the Treasury) as 
well as being their front man 
in Britain and abroad. 

Tusa lakes over a troubled 
ship. Bush House, the Strand- 
based headquarters of Ex- 
ternal Services, has had years 
of indifferent management 
and budgetary restraint. Last 
year morale was damaged 
further by the Real Lives 
conflict. For the first time, 
many of the broadcasters felt 
that the BBC's editorial in- 
dependence could be justifi- 
ably called into question by 
the people to whom it broad- 
casts — many of them all too 
familiar with state-controlled 
broadcasting. 

Tusa’s first task is to 
improve morale. His 
appointment has been a pos- 
itive start since he is a self- 
professed friend of the 
External Services where he 
started his BBC career, a 
successful broadcaster, a 
journalist respected outside 
as well as within the often 
hermetic world of the BBC. 

He sees his role, at least 
initially, as primarily edi- 
torial. It is its editorial stan- 
dard which he believes sets 
the BBC External Services 
apart from other world 
broadcasting organizations-. 
This excellence provides, in 
his view, both the purpose 
and the justification for 
broadcasting overseas. 

ft was largely an historical 
accident that Britain and the 
BBC began broadcasting to 
the world. The Common- 
wealth. the spread of English 
and Britain's role in the 
Second World War provided 
the global audience. The 
broadcasts continued — and 
continue — Tusa feels, to 
fiourish because Britain was 
simply very good at iL 


A voice 
for so 


many 

tongues 





He acknowledges that the 
three-year budget (it used .to 
be set annually) agreed by his 
predecessor has eased finan- 
cial planning considerably. 
He also feels that the recent 
approval of an important 
programme of capital expen- 
diture to improve audibility, 
especially in die Far East, 
reflects a government 
commitment to the External 
Services that has not always 
been apparent 

Tusa seems to be genuinely 
shocked by the slimness of 
the shoestring on which the 
operation has been run — and 
then, he almost exclaims, to 
find the External Services 
accused of poor housekeep- 
ing! He describes its 
productivity as remarkable. 


Rural myth and reality 

Tv.;-,' > v;-****v: 


The death of Ted 


Moult highlights 


mounting pressures 


in an occupation 


normally seen as 


existing in an air 


of rural tranquility 


Can John Tusa 


restore morale to 


the shoestring 


broadcasters at 


Bush House? 


H e sees the BBCs role 
as providing more 
information, more 
fully, and more openly than 
any one else and with as much 
detachment as possible so 
that listeners can make up 
their own minds. 

If you quesuon whether it 
makes sense for Britain, a 
small and not particularly 
influential country, to con- 
tinue to provide this service, 
Tusa seems almost shocked. 
No country, he says, can 
afford noi to pul forward its 
total face - ”to be quiet is not 
an option”. 

He disagrees that this 
comes perilously close to 
propaganda. Gathering 
information, he says, present- 


ing the complete picture with 
all its contradictions, the 
maintenance of pluralist val- 
ues - these are the strengths 
of Britain and the strengths of 
the BBC. In doing what it 
does best, the corporation 
presents the best of Britain. 
He sees no conflict of interesL 

High on the agenda is the 
matter of whether, with a 
staff of so many different 
nationalities, from so many 
different backgrounds, this 
editorial tradition can be 
maintained without at the 
same time perpetuating what 
some see as patronizing or 
old colonial attitudes. It is a 
delicate problem and one of 
the first Tusa has chosen to 1 
tackle; with a comparative 
study of how the External 
Services report individual 
events to places like Africa, 
Latin America and Eastern 
Europe. 

It is the Foreign Office that 
determines the languages in 
whjch the BBC broadcasts, 
while the Treasury, in 
conjunction with the Foreign 
Office and the BBC. decides 
the budgeL Tusa — who. one 
senses, has some respect but 
little lime for the workings of 
bureaucracy’ - sees scant 
prosper! of change. 


T usa believes his case 
will have to be argued 
not so much with the 
Foreign Office as with the 
Treasury. He insists that if 
the total impression of Brit- 
ain is enhanced by broadcast- 
ing. then the External 
Services are a very cheap and 
cost-effective way of 
achieving this. He says it with 
such conviction that the 
Treasury might just believe 
him. 

After the preservation of 
editorial standards. Tusa sees 
his priorities as finding new 
audiences and then new me- 
dia. The potential in the Far 
East, especially in China, has 
been barely tapped. In Latin 
America, too. better audibil- 
ity and more hours of 
broadcasting could find a 
welcome And our friends. 
Tusa emphasizes, must not 
be neglected. The North 
American audience is grow- 
ing and Americans would 
benefit from more informa- 
tion about Britain. 

The new head of External 
1 Services, which has so far 
meant specifically radio ser- 
vices. is interested in the idea 
of World Service television, 
A feasibility study has been 
completed and two half-hour 
news programmes a day 
could be produced cheaply, 
he says. 

Of course, people will ob- 
ject that the detachment and 
comprehensiveness attain- 
able m sound-only broadcast- 
ing cannot be reproduced on 
television. Of course, people 
will object that because those 
without television sets can- 
not receive the programmes, 
the External Services should 
stick with radio. 

But lhaL in Tusa's view, is 
shortsighted and unrealistic. 
Externa! broadcasting by tele- 
vision. he says, is inevitable. 
He instances the spread of 
transistor radios — undreamt 
of when the BBC first began 
its overseas broadcasts - to 
demonstrate that inevi- 
tability. 

Mary Dejevsky 

CfTiww Ww ip upmt Ltd. T3B6 


Although it is not yet known 
why Ted Moult, the Derby- 
shire farmer, radio personality 
and actor took his life this 
week, his death highlights the 
growing stress faced by farm- 
ers and increasingly leading to 
suicide. 

The speed of the agri- 
cultural decline in thiscounuy 
has been so great that statistics 
have yet to catch up. Dr 
Anthony Russell is director of 
the Arthur Rank Centre, the 
Royal Agricultural Society's 
Socio-Economic Unit and he 
has been watching with 
increasing alarm how pressure 
has taken its tolL 

"There is a growing aware- 
ness in farming that stress, 
often leading to suicide, is 
becoming a major problem”, 
he said. “The decline in the 
industry has taken only three 
or four years — even quicker 
for livestock formers. The 
lower commodity prices and 
the sharp decline in the value 
of land has hit farmers very 
severely: some figures show an 
annual drop of as much as a 
third which suggests that in 
some rural areas it has been a 
good deal more than that.” 

Oddly, farming is officially 
way down the list for occupa- 
tions in which suicide is a 
hazard, after doctors, publish- 
ers and journalists, but 
according to Dr Russell it has 
not always been so: “Farming 
headed the .suicide list in the 
1930s and it seems that when- 
ever there is a decline and 
farming is in a bad way. 
occupational stress, quickly 

ensues.” 

Dr Peter Sainsbury. a 
psychiatrist and fonneriy of 
Graylingwel! Hospital. Chich- 
ester. and. a colleague. Dr 
Brian Barraclough. carried out 
a survey in- the 1960s and 
1970s which attempted to 
identify peoptc most at risk. A 
prominent group was the 
garrulous, apparently happy- 
go-lucky. late middle-aged 
males, sometimes with health 
problems. “The tragedy about 
Ted Moult is that on the face 
ofit he is exactly the type most 
easily treated. I could almost 
guarantee to have cured him 
in a month,” said Dr 
Sainsbury. 

“The occupational mortal- 
ity figures show that forming is 
rather the apposite of siress- 



Ted Moult on his farm: press ores of a troubled occupation '■■■' 


ful. quite a convivial occupa- 
tion. in which suicide does not 
feature greatly. But that is 
obviously a superficial view.” 

This is made dearer by 
figures from the Office of 
Population Censuses and Sur- 
veys: The league table for 
suicides from all causes is 
headed by hairdressers, fol- 
lowed by deck hands, general 
labourers, domestic staff and 
general managers. But when 
the figures arc sorted into job- 
related categories a different 
picture emerges. This list is 
headed by people or indepen- 
dent means followed by doc- 
tors and dentists, farmers and 
farm workers, pharmacists 
and therapists and judges and 
lawyers. 

The stereotype of rustic 
conviviality, according to Dr 
Russell, has given way to 
depression for many formers 
- “and it is a very lonely form 
of stress ” he said. “Farmers 
necessarily work, in isolation 
rather than, in a team as with 
other occupations and there is 
v cry little that you can do to 
diversify if the business is in 
decline, it is also a factor that 
in farming family life is very 
much tied up with working 
life: you can't escape by going 
home.” 

According to Dr Mark Wil- 
liams of the Medical Research 
Council's Applied Psychology 
Unit at Cambridge: “De- 
pression is not enough in 
itself, nor even chronic stress 
over long periods. The crucial 
element is loss of hope — 
depression compounded by 


hopelessness is very 
dangerous.” 


It is also true that formers, . 
compared with most occupa- ■ 
tions. have lethal opportu-?. 
nities. **A window of’ 
depression can pass r . said Dr . 
Williams. “It is when a win-, 
dpw of depression meets a., 
window of opportunity that ■ 
tragedy is near. If the opportu- 
nity is allowed to pass it may., 
never be sought again. 

“It was interesting that in , 
the ’sixties when non-iethaL 
North Sea gas replaced coal 
gas for domestic use. the - 
suicide and para-suicide, rate 
dropped. “But people who 
work on the land have, the . 
means at hand by which to •- 
take their own lives. Shotguns : 
are usually available. Cbcmir-- 
cals like Paraquat and other 
toxins are. too ” 


Sadly for the farming 
community, there is often 
nobody at hand to deflect the 
crucial depression when it 
strikes a farmer: According to 
Dr Russell we need to do two 
things: learn from the same 
problems overseas and bring 
pressure to bear in this 
couniryl' 

“>Ve need to make the' 
bankers and accountants see 
what the problem is and why it . 
has grown so quickly, and we, ' 
should be looking at the" 
American situation where 
banks them selves, are folding ' 
and formers are dropping like, 
flics. 


Simon Tait 






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7.1 









THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 

FRIDAY PAGE 


Onassis, a much loving man 


The Greek tycoon was 
a sexual typhoon, 
as a new book shows. 
Sally Brompton on a 
rich man’s passion 


i 

E lizabeth Taylor once de- 
scribed Aristotle Onassis 
as the sexiest and most 
attractive man she had 
ever met — with the excep- 
tion- of Richard Burton. It was a 
glowing tribute from a woman 
qualified to judge. 

These qualities unquestionably 
did much to enhance Onassis's 
social standing during his lifetime, 
and the irony is that. 1 1 years after 
his death, one of the world's most 
glamorous tycoons is still remem- 
bered. not for his business acumen 
and high-powered hustling, tail for 
the glittering array of woman with 
whom he chose to share his fortune 
and his life. 

A new book on Onassis published 
in Britain this week is already a 
bestseller in America and is almost 
certain to become one here — an 
indication of the historical benefits 
to be gained from ruthless sexual 
ambition. In his lifetime, however, 
Onassis's choice of female compan- 
ions had more to do with his 
obsession with social dimbing and a 
desire to achieve every impossible 
dream than any idea of buying 
himself an historical perspective. 

“The one thing his women had in 
common was the feci that they were 
all seemingly unobtainable**, says 
author Peter Evans, who was in- 
vited by Onasris.to write what the 
Greek shipping magnate himself 
described as “one hell of a story". 

They were certainly among the 
elite of their generation. There was 
Tina, youngest daughter of ship- 
owner Stavros Livanos. who was 
not only- arguably the most sought- 
after Greek heiress of her time but 
eminently unobtainable at the age 
of 17. when Onassis made her his 
wife after a vigorous courtship 
which included Both her mother 
and sister. 

There was Maria Callas. to all 
intents and purposes a happily 
married woman with her own 
immense operatic success when 
Onassis decided to pursue her. 

And there was Jackie Kennedy, 
with whom Onassis planned to have 
an affeir while she was still married 
to the President of the United 
States. Even after Kennedy's 
assassination when, according to 
Evans. Onassis “upped the stakes’* 
and derided to marryJackie instead 
of Callas. she appeared to come no 
further within his reach during six 
years of widowhood (“almost of 
sainthood" says Evans). 

It was the romance and sub- 
sequent disastrous marriage to 
Jackie which ensured Onassis his 
place within the pages of popular 
mythology. And it was. perhaps, his 
most remarkable achievement in a 
life filled with them. His pedigree 










mmm 








Onassis and Kennedy: for him she was the ultimate prize, and lie boasted to friends of her sexuality; for her.he represented safety for the children 


scarcely matched up to Jackie’s own 
and he was never entirely at home 
in her social circle, a situation 
summed up best by one of her 
friends, who described Onassis as 
“bestriding her world like a maiirc 
D" 

Jackie's brother-in-law and un- 
official guardian, Bobby Kennedy, 
regarded him as u a complete rogue 
on the grand scale” and un flatter- 
ingly nicknamed him “the Greek". 
It was only after Bobby’s assassina- 
tion that Onassis realized that 'the 
prize was within his grasp, that he 
could finally acquire the ultimate 
picture to hang on his wall by 

marrying America's former Hist 

Lady. 

W ithin minutes of the 
news of Bobby's 

death, Onassis was on 
the telephone to his 
oldest and closest 

friend, Constantine Gratsos. “She’s 
free of the Kennedys. the last link 
just broke" crowed Onassis, show- 
ing not a hint of regret nor surprise, 
merely “a sort of satisfaction that 
his biggest headache had been 
eliminated" according to a London 
aide. 

it had been an extraordinary 
courtship. The first time Onassis 
met Jackie with her husband, then a 
senator, aboard his own yacht, the 
$4 million Christina, he was greatly 
impressed by her and later confided 
to Gratsos: “There's something 


damned wilful, about ho*, there's 
something provocative about that 
lady. She's got a carnal souL” 

After the death of Jackie’s infant 
son. Onassis, who was at the time 
having an affeir with her sister 
Princess Lee RadriwiQ. invited the 
President’s wife for a recuperative 
cruise. It was then that the tycoon 
switched his passion from one sister 
to the other. With typical conceit he 
told Gratsos: “The President can 
have extra-marital affairs. Why not 
the First Lady?" 

He never had the opportunity to 
discover the answer before Kennedy 
was shot in 1963. By then. Onassis 
was in the midst of his stormy affair 
with Maria Callas, a relationship 
which Peter Evans describes as the 
most natural and honest of all his' 
romantic liaisons — “almost a 
brother and sister relationship". 

Evans believes that. Onassis 
would have married Callas had not 
Jackie coroe on the scene. “Jackie 
became the ultimate .goal for him 
and he couldn’t resist that" • 

Evans’s own view is that Jackie 
was not in love with Onassis but . 
married him in panic after Bobby’s 
assassination to gain security for her 
children. Her attitude was “they’re 
killing Kennedys out there; my kids 
are next in line". She felt that 
Onassis's immense wealth and his 
homes conveniently scattered 
around the world would provide 
hiding; places for her children. 

Evans supports his theory with a. 


perceptive little anecdote told .to 
him by Joan Thring, an Australian 
who shared a cruise in May 1968 
with Jackie and Onassis. Thring 
recalled Jackie's extreme 
embarrassment when she became ill 
after eating some dubious bouilla- 
baisse. “A woman who has been 
sexually involved with a man 
simply does not get that flustered 
over an ordinary human frailty tike 
an upset stomach", said Thring. 
“She was fer too distraught for . 
anything but the very mildest 
intimacies to have passed between 
them. It was rather sweet actually." 

S ays Evans: “My contention 
is that if Jackie had been in 
love with Ari in the way a 
woman would normally 
love a man she is about to 
marry, she would have slept with 
him before the wedding." 

In America, Evans discovered 
that the couple’s eventual union was 
regarded as “not so much a mar- 
riage as a merger". It was not just 
the Kennedys who disapproved. 

: Onassis's son. AlexandcT.-described 
the union as “a perfect match: my 
father loves names and Jackie loves 
money” 

Yet, despite Jackie's reputation , _ 
for being “composed, almost cold” 
according to Evans, Onassis fre- 
quently embarrassed his friends and 
acquaintances with intimate tales of 
her sexuality which he would repeat 
over and over again. . 

“I think Ari did enjoy fuuhiliaxiiig 


his women", says Evans, who spent 
many months talking to Onassis’s 
friends, relatives.' lovers and busi- 
ness contacts as well as with the 
man himself. 

“He would often dismiss them m 
public in a very cruel way. He would 
say things tike ‘shut up' or “you 
don’t know what you’re talking 
about'. In a way it was the other side 
of the coin; the reaction to years of 
being kind to them. 

“He had an obsession with all his 
women but although I think he 
-loved I don't think he was m love 
with any of .them. I don't think he 
was capable of being faithful to 
anyone — man or woman, child or 
wife. That was not within - the 
province of his make-up". 

Evans, who describes Onassis as 
“a colossal liar, cheat, 
'womanizer ... a genuine monster" 
believes that his doomed marriage 
to Jackie simply “followed the 
pattern of any relationship con- 
ceived by obsession on one side and 
capitulation on the other”. ' . 

_ And white Evans's sympathies in 
this Greek tragedy are firmly with 
Maria Callas, whom he feds Onas- 
sis destroyed “as a woman, a wife 
and an artist", of Jackie he con- 
dudes: “I think she got her come- 
uppance — if you can call a pay-off 
of $26 million a comeuppance.” 

■ ©Haim Man w im, w 

Ari — The Life and Times of Aristotle 
Socrates Onassis. by Peter Evans, 
Jonathan Cape. £12.95. 


Yes sirree, it’s a 
boost for Britain 


Divorce at marriage guidance 


The Prince of Wales today 
adds another notch to his 
Boasting Britain belt when he 
opens the tongest-running 
promotion of British goods 
ever staged by an American 
chain store. It will be held at 
Marshall Field's In Chicago 
mtfl after Christmas and is 
expected to bring nriDlons oi 
dollars to more than 100 
British companies. 

The operative word ha this 
case b “longest". The promo- 
tion is seen as the foundation 
for many rears of improved 
transatlantic trade, because 
Marshall Field's has 21 stores 
tbroagboot Illinois, Wisconsin 
and Texas and where it leads, 
others will follow. 

The State Street store where 
Prince Charles win rat the 
inangnral ribbon has cornered 
the hype market for many 
years. Harry Gordon SeUridge 
spent 25 years there helping, 
the founder, Marshall Field; 
to revolutionize retailing be- 
fore coming to Britain to open 
Selfridge's in I909Jfe would 
have enjoyed the style of thk 
promotion, called The Engle 
and The Crown, which sets oat 


ir.a 


to show tfie best of British 
goods and traditional British 
culture. 

Cedric Dickens will set the 
nostalgic theme by dem- 
onstrating recipes from die 
time of his great-grandfather, 
Charles. He will tour other 
Field's branches and in 
November will re tu rn to State 
Street to usher far a Victorian 
Christmas by taming on the 
lights on a 48ft tree. 

Under its festooned, 
branches the people of Chi- 
cago wifi be able to take 
English tea. instructed by 
Sanwd Twining. A few floors 


below, those who like to 
celebrate in stronger stylo will 1 
find ■ specially-built 
Whitbread tavern. 

Furniture fanciers wfiQ be 
able to see bow antique fur- 
niture looks In the settings for 
which it was created when the 
Duchess of Devonshire opens 
■ miniature replica of her own 
private tawing room at 
Chatsworth, Derbyshire. 

Not everything homes on 
Britain Past Britain Present 
is represented by the sort of 
style which is making its mark 
all over the world, bearing the 
designer labels of Zandra 
Rhodes, Betty Jackson. 
Wendy Dagworthy and Paul 
Smith. Stops within shops are 
being built for Lava Ashley 
and for Kent and Cornea, the 
specialists in regfanental and 
dnb ties and sportswear. 

Michael Johnson, manag- 
ing director of Kelt and 
Cnrwcn, is an e n c o u ragin g 
example of what happens 
when go-getting Briton meets 
go-seeking American. When 
he heard of the promotion he 
chased Mr Philip Miller, the 
chairman of Marshall Field's, 
halfway round* the world to 
Los Angeles to impress on him 
that a British promotion would 
be incomplete without toe 
definitive English look pro- 
duced by his company. 

The result is a place in toe 
main store with the bonus of a 
frontage on to State Street. 
Seven other Marshall Field’s 
stores will have permanent 
Kent and Cnrwen shops. 

Each Kent and Curwcn shot 
has cost Marshall Field's 
£25.000 in fixtures and fittings 
- pot the sort of money to be 
written off for a momentary 
splurge, oven when the parent 
company is the giant British- 
American Tobacco. But the 
return is expected to be trad® 
worth S2 million (about £L3 
mflUon) a yew. 

“This promotion has cer- 
tainly changed attitudes". 
Miller says. “We have found 
that British manufecnarefs 
were ranch more co-operative 
than their reputation some- 
times implies and our buyers 
are getting more confident that 
the quality and style of the 
goods are going to sdL" 

Beryl Downing 


Ending a long-term relation- 
ship is always difficult, as 
NichoiasTyndall would be the 
first to admit But he never 
expected to end 18 years as 
director of the National Mar- 
riage Guidance Council fad- 
ing— ironically — as if he had 
been through “a quickie 
divorce". 

The parting of the ways 
followed a report from a firm 
of management consultants 
which recommended, among 
other things, the appointment 
ofa new director and manage- 
ment team. Although no 
replacement was waiting in 
the wings — indeed the 
advertisement for the job bas 
yet to be drawn up — and 
although the annual general 
meeting to consider the 
report's recommendations 
does not take place until next 
month, Nick Tyndall was left 
in no doubt that the executive 
felt it was time fix' him to go. 

He says: “1 do think it rather 
ironic that we are in the 
business of endings and transi- 
tions. As a marriage guidance 
counsellor myself I know that 

one erf* the most important 
parts of the work is helping 
people to talk things through. 
Yet this affeir seems to have 
been handled very differently. 

“1 can accept that h is 
reasonable for the executive to 
want a change of style at the 
top. but what is not so clever, 
it seems to me, is the way they 
went about h. I think there 
should have been a period of 
transition, of paving the way 
for a handover. This seems 
more like revolution than 
evolution.” 

Certainly Tyndall’s depar- 
ture is likely to herald a series 
of changes for both the Na- 
tional Marriage Guidance 
Council and the affiliated 
regional councils scattered 
over England. Wales and 
Northern Ireland. Indeed the 
face of marriage guidance may- 
change altogether. 

Why is this happening? it 
seems that in the 1980s, even 
matters like counselling are 
feeling the brisk business-like 
wind of change. Last year, 
after five years of mounting 
financial problems, the Na- 
tional Marriage Guidance 
Council decided at its AGM to 
alt in the accountants Coo- 
pers and Lybrand for advice 
on how to tackle . them. 
According to . Stephen 


Rows about money and management have 
prompted the director of the Marriage 
Guidance Council to walk out after 18 years 



Saunders, information officer 
of the NMGC. their report 
calls for the development of 
professionalism at every level, 
more leadership from national 
management, better targetting 
of services and better 
evaluation programmes with 
regard to both paid staff and 
volunteers. 

“At present we can't cope 
with the increasing demand 
for our service", says 
Saunders. “The number of 
clients has doubled in the last 
ten years and shows every sign 
of doubling again in the next 
ten. It's not just a question of 
fund-raising — it’s about 
marketing our services. We 
have to be a caring organiza- 
tion — nobody denies that — 
but if we are going xo:provide 
that care effectively, we have 
to be. more professional and 
businesslike.” 

Renata CHins. director of 
the London Marriage Guid- 
ance Council and a member of 
the NMGC executive, agrees. 
“The first need is for the .. 


service to grow to meet the 
demands that are being made 
of it. But the dilemma is that 
wc cannot grow on a starva- 
tion dieL The Home Office 
grant wc get is totally inad- 
equate. We don't die. but we 
don’t develop." 

Tyndall is painfully aware 
of the problems feeing mar- 
riage guidance councils. There 
is the whole question of wbaz 
marriage guidance is supposed 
to be for. When the service 
started nearly SO years ago. the 
emphasis was on mending 
marriages. Now counsellors 
may be involved in. educating - 
young unmarried people m 
relationship skills, or helping 
married couples work towards - 
an amicable divorce. 

There is also a growing 
feeling that the unpaid volun- 
teers who make, up the bulk of 
the counsellors should be 
augmented by greater num- 
bers of paid stair. As Tyndall 
says: “Wc lose far too many 
trained people because there 
comes a time when they- warn, 


or need proper paid employ- 
ment. Bui you’ve got - to get 
bigger grams or start getting 
clients to pay more if you are 
going to do this. And that's 
another issue on which we are 
divided.” 

Part of foe problem in 
gening more money out of foe 
government, he says, is that it, 
is hard to prove to Home- 
Office officials foaia marriage 
guidance service saves foe 
taxpayer money. “They want 
to know how many families 
you are helping to keep to- 
gether. so relieving pressure 
on things like social services, 
foe housing lists, family 
doctors.” 

But measuring effectiveness 
is almost impossible, even if 
in research half of their diems 
said they had been helped 
substantially and a further 
quarter said they had been 
helped to some extent by 
counselling: . .. * 

In the tong term, will a 
different management style 
solve these problems? Tyndall 
doubts it — and accepts some- 
what ruefully that this is one 
reason why he decided not to 
fight to stay m the job. 

He says: “I don’t see any 
attempt to solve foe real issues 
facing marriage guidance. To 
. turn it aU into a ‘Nick must go' 
situation. 1 see as jejune. It’s a 
panicky response.. 

“One of the objectives ofa 
voluntary organization is to be 
innovative, to trail-blaze, and 
wc haven't been able to do 
that over the past few years 
while we’ve been desperately 
trying to make the resources 
go round. It’s tough to be in 
any organization that's wor- 
ried about money. And when 
you want to be in the business 
of helping people, teaching 
■them new skills, you think . *1 
didn't join for this*. 

“The pressures have been' 
enormous and I think we’ve 
now Mown A gasket And Tm 
foe one who’s been rico- 
cheued imo outer space.” . 

So what wSB he do out 
there? He smiles. “When you 
get to the pomt of separation 
or divorce: you always need 
quite a period of review and . 
reassessment rather than rush- 
ing into a second marriage. 
That’s what I'm doing ” 

LeeRodweU 


MEDICAL BRIEFING 


Simple hygiene 
beats drugs 


Gastroenteritis ■ is ■ still — a— 
surprisingly, common illness 
among young children. A 
study just published reveals 
that even in areas of Britain, 
with a relatively high stan- 
dard of living, about one in 
ten babies is likely to suffer a 
bout before the age of two. 

With foe help of family 
doctors. Dr David Isaacs, 
clinical lecturer in paediatrics, 
at the John RadcHfle Hos- 
pital, Oxford, monitored the 
incidence of gastroenteritis 
among 7.000 local children 
over a year.- . 

Nearly 13 per cent of 
infants under a year old were 
ill with gastroenteritis during 
foal time and just over 9 per 
cent of 1-2 year olds had one 
or more episodes of di- 
arrhoea. These figures are 
'probably an underestimate. 
Dr Isaacs says, because many' . 
parents would not bother to 
report a mild attack. . 

: In more than three quarters 
of foe cases recorded a virus 
rather than a bacterium was 
foe cause, and it was foe 
rotavirus that was most com- 
monly implicated. This 
emphasizes that antibiotics 
are not foe appropriate treat- 
ment for gastroenteritis. Dr 
Tsaacs says. * 

And Dr Isaacs, whose 
study is published in foe 
British Medical Journal, says 
foe best way to prevent foe 
spread of gastroenteritis 
within the -family is to make 
sure that everyone's hands 
are kept thoroughly dean by 
washing with soap. 

No more needles 

Injections : 
could even 
tually become 
a memory for ' 
foe millions of 
people who are 
vaccinated ev- 
fcry year,’ flu thousands of 
diabetics who need insolin 
and many other people on 
hormone treatment. Instead, 
treatment will be by tablet . 

Many vaccines and hor- 
mones, SBCh as Mwlin, 
growth hormone and the 
reproductive hormones, are 
proteins. Ordinarily, IT taken 
by month, they would be 
destroyed, hence foe need at 
present to inject them into the 
blood stream. _ 

American research workers 
think that they may have 
found the answer by coating 
the drugs with a substance 
which protects them from 
digestive chemistry bat which 
allows their eventual release 
in the . large intestine where 
they are safe from digestion.' 

The trick was to bind into 
the coating c h emi c al bonds 
which are attacked by the 
bacteria of the huge intestine, - 
a process which releases the 
drag into the bloodstream 
across the gut waJL 
The research, reported in - 
£cn»ce,'stin has a tong way to 
go and has so far been 
restricted to animal studies. 

Tentative allies 

Although the 
British- Medical 
Association 
does not favour 
alternative - 
medicine, this is 
not the case 
with other British 
institutions. When the Re- 
search Council for Contr' 
pfementary Medicines 
scientific centre opens in a few 
months it will do so with 
technical support from the 
British Lihrary and financial 
help from the DHSS. 


And when Dr David Taylor - j 
Rvilly takes up his position as£ ' , 
fellow in research methodo/agy \ 
for complementary medicine ' t 
at Vie University of Glasgow t 
next month, half -his funding ,. 
will come from the Medical - 
Research Council. 

Both moves, says the ( 

RCCM. are the first important 
stciK towards providing com- E 
plementary medicine with the _ 
infrastructure of hospitals, lab- ■* 
oratories and library support /- 
which orthodox physicians, 
and surgeons take for granted. ’ 
The scientific information £ 
Centre will provide for the first "■ 
time a computerized database . ' 6 
if research in alternative medi- ? 
cine and Dr Taylor Reilly Wifi \ 
be studying research . ( 
techniques. ‘ . .. 

The hope is that eventual, h> jj 
orthodox practitioners will 
consider investigating alter- % :jj 
native medicine and that more . v 
complementary practitioners * 
will seek to give their methods 
a sound scientific basis. ’ 

Bitten by bats * * 

European • ex.-* * 

' ' pens on rabies; Tj 

who are becorrt- 
flpa ing increasingly 

worried about ? 
foe'risk to hum-: * « 

- _^i an<s of foe dlJr-- 
case being 1 spread ' by tali, f** 
have received some welcome * 



A World. Health Cfrgaruza- f 
tion study has shown that the 
vaccines used to treat .those '. 
bitten by other rabid ; 
mammals work . against bat . T 
rabies too. _ : r t 

Sporadic eases of rabies f 
have been reported among -V 
bats in Europe since I.934and - ; 
last year a Finnish -zoologist 
died of foe disease after betng- T 
bitten by one. A concern of foe r 
scientists was that the stan- ■% 
dard rabies vaccines might nor . • 
-be effective in such cases. > 

Fortunately, work' by foe ■'r 
Rabies Unit at foe Institute * 
Pasteur in Paris has confirmed ' V 
-that five commercially avaii- c * 
able rabies vaccines will; in 
fact do the job. * 

Meanwhile scientists on ' 
both sides of the Channel app * 4 
keeping a dose watch on the " 
situation.. The. latest . news 
from Europe is that the in- ' 

- faded bats sewn to be con- * 
fined to foe maritime areas of . 

. Denmark: Finland, Germany ~Z 
and Poland. * 

A spokesman for the * 

Minslry of Agriculture said j 
that there was no evidence of 
infected bats in Britain.' “JJ 

Watch the menu : 

The notion that 8 

only fat chit- 5 

dren become * 

overweight in 3 

adulthood, is a j] 

myth- :4 MefK J 
cat Research ' . j| 
Council study , of more than • i 
5.000 people bom in 1946 has . \ H 
shown .that only 21 per cent of ' J 
those who. were overweight at . '■ C 
36 hud been so as children. . ; {} 

The study, published in the !;S 
British Medical Journal, found ■ 
that more women than • men \ 2 
who were fat Jn their 30$ had - • S 
been ovemeighl as children. . . £ 
but by contrast mett were more f . j 
likely to. put on weight later in -■ 
life. ; J 

There should be less effort . 4 
directed towards keeping { 
plump children slim and more s 
emphasis on proper eating g 
habits all round, the report g 
says. ■ ' E 

tr 

Lorraine Fraser S 





to not all in the mind. 

It affects the body and the 
hrain. 

It is a physical disease. 

It to very common. 

• .' . i 

We want to see schizophrenia] 
conquered. ■ 

Do you^ want to know more 
about this disease? 

I Do you want to help us by 
| raising money for research? 
mease contact us: 

I StanZOTHBEHIA asso ciAudm 

QFGREAr BEPEAlN 

The Crescent, Bangor LL57 2 art 

KU^ibone0a48.354048 J ... 




. I . “ 



THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 



London’s unhealthy appetite 


David Watt 


i 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Rude 
to Roy 

Roy Hatiersley. Labour's deputy 
leader has been dealt a snub in the 
agenda Tor this year's party con- 
ference. which is published on 
Monday. The nomination list for 
the ritual election of Labour's 
leader and deputy shows that only 
108 MPS — barely half the par- 
liamentary parly — have been pre- 
pared to propose his candidacy. 

When, as this year, the party 
leadership is unchallenged, the 
nomination process is reduced to 
gesture politics. Nevertheless, at a 
time when Haltersley's perfor- 
mance as economic spokesman 
has been criticized, and activists 
in his Birmingham constituency- 
have appeared bent on embarrass- 
ing him, this is one gesture he 
could have done without. 

Some 36 MPs have pointedly 
put their names to Kinnock's 
candidacy but not his. including 
parliamentary spokesmen Alf 
Dubbs, Frank Dobson and Clive 
Soley. and Neil Kinnock's own 
PPS, Kevin Barron. 

Law reform 

The attempt by solicitor Michael 
Joseph to have the Law Society 
prosecuted under the Trade 
Descriptions Act may have failed, 
as I reported in July, but his toils 
were not fruitless. The society's 
advertisement in Exchange Con- 
tracts magazine to which he 
objected has been changed. In- 
stead of depicting the society as 
"ensuring the highest standards of 
service by solicitors to the public” 
— which Joseph complained it did 
not — it now reads "the society 
welcomes Exchange Contracts' 
helpful advice to home buyers”. 
Pure coincidence, says the Law 
Society. 

Marriage vow 

A reader amplifies our obituarist's 
tribute this week to Lady Fisher of 
Lambeth's sense of humour. As 
wife of the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury. she once addressed the 
young girls of Wycombe Abbey 
School on the matter of marriage. 
During question time a thought- 
ful-looking pupil put her hand up 
to ask; "Mrs Fisher, have you ever 
thought of divorce?” She replied: 
"Of divorce, never of murder, 
frequently” 

Double trouble 

Strife at the Hampstead and 
High gate Conservative Associ- 
ation which has, for the first lime 
in its history, begun procedures to 
expel one of its members. An- 
thony Earl-Williams, a 35-year- 
old former schoolteacher, faces a 
charge of entering himself twice on 
the electoral register, and so 
bringing the association into 
disrepute. On his own admission 
he registered himself once in his 
own name and once in a nom de 
plume, a duplication which he 
describes as "a genuine accident". 
Anyway, he avers, he only voted 
once. 

Earl-Williams is no stranger 
to controversy, earlier this year 
he was the subject of press reports 
because of his home massage 
service, which he still operates. 
Local party members have since 
petitioned their finance and gen- 
eral purposes committee to start 
disciplinary procedures against 
him and to expel him from the 
party. The committee meets at the 
end of the month. 

Pirate action 

The Foreign Office at last seems to 
be getting its act together to 
combat the problem of overseas 
piracy of British intellectual prop- 
erty. After my story earlier this 
week about publishers alleging 
that the British ambassador to 
Indonesia is not taking the matter 
seriously. ! can report that the FO 
is to send a directive to all our 
embassies asking them to give 
more priority to copyright protec- 
tion of British books, tapes, videos 
and computer software. 


Taxing 


Unlike the rest of us. policemen 
like the rateable value of their 
houses to increase. The reason is 
that those who own their own 
houses arc paid a tax-free rent 
allowance based on a multiple of 
the rateable value, and the police 
authority pays the rates as well. A 
letter in' the latest Police Review. 
howe'er, demonstrates that get- 
ting your allowance raised is not as 
easy as it looks. A Humberside 
detective inspector complains that 
attempts to increase his rateable 
value by the addition of central 
heating, double-glazing, exten- 
sions and porches have all failed. 
"Every time the valuer called, his 
first comments were "Are you a 
police officer?” 

Bubbling over 

MPs returning from the summer 
recess nexi month are in for a 
shock: Commons' restaurants are 
about to face a 10 per cent price 
rise. Although Charles Irving, the 
mild-mannered chairman of the 
catering committee, insists this is 
the first major increase since 1981. 
members are still fuming over a 
list that appeared this spring, 
which hiked a bottle of champagne 
from £15.50 to £17. Irvingnotes 
that profits have fallen substan- 
tially in recent years. The price 
hike’ is necessary to forestall a 
return to its ignominous financial 
difficulties of 1 979. when it was £3 
million in debt. "The price rises 
will cause a lot of jumping up and 
down.” Irving admits. “The cater- 
ing committee chairman has the 
worst job in the whole place: being 
a minister is a sinecure by 
comparison.” PHS 


The government is under pressure 
to provide more cash for London 
health services, particularly its 
teaching hospitals. There has been 
a sustained and concerted attack 
on the formula'for the reallocation 
of resources (known as R AWP) on 
which (he distribution of NHS 
funds is based. Public attention is 
continuously drawn (unsurpris- 
ingly. given the teaching hospitals' 
easy access to the media and 
proximity to Westminster) to 
growing waiting lists, the demor- 
alized staff, restrictions on life- 
saving services', crumbling 
buildings, closure of beds and the 
queues in the accident and emer- 
gency departments. 

This pressure will almost cer- 
tainly lead to a larger share of 
NHS funds for Thames regions in 
general, and London leaching 
hospitals in particular. Health 
authorities in other parts of the 
country, with significantly fewer 
resources than London teaching 
hospitals, would then receive a. 
smaller share. 

The R AWP policy has had some 
success in reducing the grosser 
disparities in funds available to 
English regions. Yet there remains 
a long way to go. For example, 
Bloomsbury DHA (University 
College Hospital) and West Lain- 


by Stuart Haywood and John Yates 


heth (St Thomas's) have five times 
the number of doctors for the 
population they serve and five 
times as much chest medicine as 
some other English districts. 
Paddington (St Mary's) has nine 
senior surgeons and urologists per 
1 00.000 population whereas, for 
example. Dewsbury and Mid- 
Staffordshire have fewer than two 
per 100.000. 

The teaching hospitals want a 
revision of the RAWP formula to 
give a greater weight to factors 
which help them. The effect of a 
successful campaign would be a 
redistribution in their favour away 
from less well-provided hospitals. 
The teaching hospitals allege that 
inadequate allowances have been 
built into the reallocation for- 
mulas for the costs of teaching 
responsibilities and for the higher 
average costs per patient arising 
from more specialized workloads 
and more complex cases. 

Even if these facts are accepted, 
it does not automatically make the 
case fora bigger share of funds for 
teaching hospitals. There is an- 
other step in the argument. Do 
these facts merit greater weight 
than. say. likely demand arising 


from higher levels of social 
deprivation or significantly lower 
existing levels of service, for 
example, in much of the West 
Midlands and Trent regions? 

A revision of the allocation 
formula based on teaching 
responsibility and specialized 
workload would be perverse. It 
would effect a transfer of funds 
(actual or promised) away from 
more to less hard-pressed staff, in 
terms of the numbers of patients 
they treat. Given higher work- 
loads elsewhere it would seem 
reasonable to expect that existing 
services could be maintained with 
fewer professional staff. 

Teaching districts have consis- 
tently claimed resources for the 
unusually high number of com- 
plicated cases that they treat. 
Many of these come from fer 
afield. A high proportion of pa- 
tients fiow into these districts and 
many of them come from areas 
which do not suffer the ravages of 
social deprivation. The claim for 
high technology treatment and the 
need for increasing specialization 
for regional or even national 
catchment populations does not 
fit easily with the claim for more 


resources for the socially deprived 
in the immediate locality. 

it is currently suggested that 
there should be a policy change on 
allocations to health authorities, 
which will lead to a higher 
proportion of NHS spending for 
the Thames regions, and within 
them to the London teaching 
hospitals. If this occurs, provincial 
teaching hospitals should also 
expect to benefit since the 
rationalizations for the change 
apply equally to them. The losers 
- cither absolutely or relatively - 
will be health authorities and 
services which historically have 
done worse in the competition for 
resources and where staff already 
deal with a greater number of 
patients. 

There is a shallowness of debate 
within the NHS oh health issues. 
Issues of workloads, efficiency and 
effectiveness have not been seri- 
ously addressed and unrealistic 
assumptions are being made about 
the benefits of such a change on 
the problems of the inner-cities. 
Those most likely to suffer are the 
provincial, non-teaching hos- 
pitals. and it is they who lace ihe 
majority of the country's un- 
acceptable waiting- lists. 

The authors work at the Health 
Services Management Centres Bir- 
mingham University. 


Michael Hornsby on the dilemmas of Tutu’s international celebrity 


For those seeking ammunition to 
support their view that the 
phenomenon known as Desmond 
Mpilo Tutu owes more to show- 
business than to religion, the 
publicity build-up to his enthrone- 
ment on Sunday as Archbishop of 
Cape Town and head of the 
Anglican Church in southern Af- 
rica has come as manna from 
heaven. Every detail, from the 
eclectic list of those invited to 
attend — in which Robert Runcie 
jostles the likes of Lionel Richie 
and Stevie Wonder — to the 150 
litres of wine and 25.000 wafers 
ordered for the mass open-air 
celebration of the eucharist to be 
held after the cathedral ceremony, 
has been seized on with relish. 

Whether the government 
should ignore him or prosecute 
him. and thus add martyrdom to 
his other qualifications, is a matter 
for argument among his enemies. 
But one thing is certain — there is 
no greater thorn in South Africa's 
side. According to an editorial in a 
government-supporting news- 
paper. The Citizen . he strides 
through the world like a religious 
pop star. The paper was reflecting 
the intense irritation which the 
diminuitive prelate — aO 5ft 3in of 
him — stirs up among many 
whiles. 

Mere mention ofTutu's name is 
enough to send blood pressures 
soaring at dinner tables in the 
supposedly liberal white suburbs 
of northern Johannesburg. Busi- 
ness men able .to discuss with 
dispassion the prospects, say, fora 
mixed economy under a govern- 
ment led by Nelson Mandela* are 
roused to instant apoplexy by 
Tutu's calls for economic sanc- 
tions and professed abhorrence of 
capitalism. He is the ultimate 
cheeky kaffir, articulate and self- 
assertive, who refuses to be grate- 
ful for the crumbs that are cast his 
way from the white man's table. 

While much of the animus Tutu 
provokes can be attributed to 
malice or concealed racism, there 
are sympathetic whiles who also 
have doubts about his style. There 
is a feeling that he spends too 
much lime flying round the world, 
and being lionized, when he 
should be at home tending his 
flock. It's not so much the things 
he says as the times and the ways 
he chooses to say them. He doesn't 
always think before he speaks. 
“He can talk nonsense for half an 
hour and then drop pearls of the 
purest wisdom”, is how one 
church worker sums up these 
reservations. 

T utu would be the first to admit 
that he has much of the showman 
in him. It is there in his oratorical 
style, mixing real anger and emo- 
tion with impish one-liners and 
folksy parables, and in his flair for 
the headline-catching gesture, as 
when last year, apparently on the 
spur of the moment, he led a 
march by fellow clerics from the 
Anglican cathedral in central 
Johannesburg to John Vorster 
Square, the regional headquarters 
of the security police, to demand 
the release of a detained priest. He 
did not get the man out. but the in- 
cident was on television screens 
around the world that night. 

The world-wide attention lav- 
ished on Tutu since he was 
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize 
two years ago might have turned 
the head of any man. What is 
astonishing, perhaps, is that he has 
remained as approachable and 


Has the good 
bishop gone 
over the top? 








unassuming as he has. His role as 
the voice of black South Africa has 
been thrust on him as much by the 
need of the international news 
media for a spokesman who has a 
name that is pronoun cable, is 
available, speaks good English and 
can produce a vivid quote to 
order, as by any premeditated 
seeking out of the limelight. 

His present prominence. Tutu 
insists, is mainly attributable to 
the imprisonment or exile of most 
of the country's real black political 
leaders. He is firm, however, on 
the principle that the church's 
ministry must be social and 
political, as well as spiritual. All 
life belongs to God. including 
politics, he said after his enthrone- 
ment as Johannesburg's first blade 
Anglican bishop last year. If we 
want not to be involved then for 
goodness’ sake we must not 
worship the God and Father of 
Our Lord Jesus Christ Our every- 
day life is meant to be a working 
out of our life of worship . 

Did he, f asked in a Recent 
interview, sometimes find it hard 
to be a Christian, professing a faith 
that commands him to love even 
those he regards as tyrants. ” I 
would say the opposite J don’t 
know how 1 would have survived 
had I not been a Christian. Yes, 
there are moments of deep anger 
when you look at the very great 
deal of unnecessary suffering that 
has been visited on our people 
deliberately . . . WelL you kneel 


and you cry and you are angry, 
and you hope that what you are 
feeling is not hate. I do care 
enormously about all the people of 
this country, black and white.” 

Before becoming Bishop of 
Johannesburg, a diocese of which 
half the 100 or so parishes lie in ar- 
eas set aside by law for white 
occupation. Tutu had spent seven 
years as General Secretary of the 
South African Council of 
Churches (SAOC). which claims to 
represent some 13 million Chris- 
tians — most of them black — and 
had found himself in increasingly 
frequent conflict with the authori- 
ties on their behalf (The council 
was investigated by a government- 
appointed judicial commission in 
1983-84.) The new appointment 
was as much an adjustment for 
him as for many of the whites in 
the diocese. 

As Bishop of Johannesburg, 
Tutu was able to keep in touch 
with the lives of both black and 
white members of his diocese by 
shuttling between the imposing 
Bishop's House in Westclfff. a 
wealthy and. for ordinary blacks, 
whites-only suburb, and the fam- 
ily home in Soweto, the great black 
ghetto south-west of the city. 

No pacifist. Tutu believes that 
there can come a set of circum- 
stances which justify being willing 
to take up arms. He certainly finds 
the arguments in mitigation of the 
violence of the oppressed vastly 
more persuasive than those in 


On the shooting ranges of Sri Lanka 


Jaffna 

A weapons training instructor 
once told me that you could 
always tell when someone was 
shooting at you. You could hear 
the crack of tire bullet breaking the 
sound barrier close by before you 
heard the distant thump of it being 
fired. I had no opportunity to 
testify to the veracity of this until 
Sunday when, walking alone down 
a leafy lane. I heard a crack close 
by. followed by a thud, more 
distant. Bui not very. 

f plunged for cover behind a 
stoutly-built, deserted house, 
listening to the pow of a mortar 
being fired somewhere in front of 
me. and the crump of the shell 
exploding somewhere behind. It 
was not until the crump became 
an car-ringing reality on the other 
side of the garden wall that it 
occurred to me that the mortar, 
too. was perhaps intended for me. 

I had spent a day in northern Sri 
Lanka with the Liberation Tigers 
of Tamil Edam, the largest and 
most active group of separatist 
rebels operating in -the area. The 
next day 1 planned to spend with 


the Sri Lankan army. 

The army is at present bottled 
up inside its camps in the 
northernmost area, the Jaffna 
peninsula; the rebels control the 
streets of the towns and the 
countryside. The Tigers keep pick- 
ets of young men armed to the 
teeth outside each army camp to 
drive the soldiers back if they 
should try to emerge. 

From lime to lime the troops do 
emerge, to patrol or to strengthen 
their position by occupying a 
prominent building or by trying to 
drive away the Tigers' sentries. On 
Sunday the army, which had occ- 
upied a school building on the 
outskirts of its biggest camp at 
Pallaly and withdrawn to free it 
for the new school term, was rum- 
oured to be planning to reoccupy 
it. 

Perhaps it was foolish of me to 
want to enter Pallaly on that day. 
but the military police captain I 
spoke to on the telephone had said 
the sentries would be expecting 
me. I hired a taxi at an inflated 
rate, took it as near as the driver 


dared go to the camp, and asked 
him to waiL 

There was the noise of shooting 
ahead. Under a giant banyan tree 
three young men in check shirts 
manning a general purpose ma- 
chine-gun seemed alarmed to see 
me and declared that I should go 
no further. "The army is coming 
out.” they said. “We are an 

ambush." 

i regained my taxi, returned to 
Jaffna and telephoned the captain 
again. Yes. he laughed, there tad 
been a spot of bother, but it should 
be over now. Back at the banyan 
tree, the three young men tad 



disappeared. The taxi fere, already 
inflated, doubled. When I paid the 
driver 60 per cent of what he 
asked, he slammed into reverse 
and abandoned me. 

1 continued slowly down the 
road to the point where 1 .was 
reminded of the words of the 
weapons training sergeant, and sat 
and wailed for the bangs and 
whizzes to die down. 

After an hour, it seemed quiet 
enough to wander slowly on. I 
walked hesitantly until 1 spotted 
sandbags m the upper storey of a 
house; “Hall", shouted a voice. 1 
halted, was- waved forward and 
mad cto put my hands *up. Even- 
tually they did indeed seem to 
have been warned that I was 
coming, and I was allowed in. 

Later that afternoon the bangs 
and whizzes started again. Bui this 
lime I tad crossed the line and was 
able to watch with some detach- 
ment as an army helicopter gun- 
ship strafed the area where, only a 
short time earlier. I had been 
walking; 

Michael Hainlyn 


A fragile man 
talks tough 


.■ “ ■< 
■ . 


exculpation of the violence of the 
oppressor. Nonetheless, he has 
condemned terror bombings and 
Ihe barbarous necklace killings in 
the townships as wdl as the 
brutality of the state. 

Earlier this year, during the riots 
in the Alexandra township on the 
north-eastern outskirts of Johan- 
. nesburg. he was booed by local 
residents when he returned empty- 
handed from a visit to Gape Town 
to represent their -grievances to 
government ministers. 

On the advice of senior white 
members of his staff, and -appar- 
ently against his own judgement, 
he has twice sought, and-been 
granted, much-publicized meet- 
ings with President Botha since 
the state of emergency was de- 
clared on June 12 Utile under- 
standing seems to have been 
reached. Wryly, he recalls that 
Moses, too. went to see Pharoah 
even though Jrc had hardened his ' 
heart. 

Bom in Klerksdorp on the West 
Rand. Tutu is the son of a school 
teacher of the -Xhosa tribe and a 
domestic servant whose tribal 
ancestry was Tswana. In later life 
when he was refused a .South 
African passport by Pretoria, and 
declined to accept citizenship of 
either of the tribal homelands set 
aside for blacks of Xhosa .and 
Tswana origin. .Tutu travelled for 
a time on a document that 
proclaimed his nationality to be 
“undeterminable at present”. Last 
-year, his South African passport 
was restored to him. 

There must have been times, as 
on one- day -in Soweto last week, 
when the contrasting realities of 
life in South Africa have proved 
almost too stark for comfort. 

Tutu, a spry 54-year-old. was 
out for his customary early- 
morning jog when a lorry-load of 
local black police roared- up the 
hill towards him. “It was still dark, 
and suddenly 1 saw people throw- 
ing a petrol bomb, or it could have 
been a burning log. and then two 
small boys running as fast as their 
little legs could carry them away 
from the scene. The truck stopped, 
and a shot was fited in the dir- 
ection from which the missile 
came.” The archbishop-elect, 
whose desire to taste prematurely 
the joys of the life, to come is no 
greater than the next man's, found 
himself diving for cover. . 


Neil Kinnock's speech to the TUC 
has had an astonishingly good 
press. Laudatory cliches have 
flowed from the most hardened 
conservative pens — “tough ^ 
-forthright”, “uncompromising 
and all the others. But this is to 
mistake form for substance. 
Kinnock's position is actually and 
inevitably the reverse of 
“uncompromising". - 

Just how much compromise is 
involved can be seen from reading 
his words in conjunction with the 
Labour Party/TUC document. 
People at « ork: New Rights. New 
Responsibilities, which the Con- 
gress has just endorsed- Kinnock. 
we are told, was informing the 
unions in coded language that to 
bring down unemployment they 
would be obliged to accept sac- 
rifices or. to put it in less guarded 
terms, wage restraint Quire so. 
Just what Mrs Thatcher and Nigel 
Lawson have been saying — except 
that free-market theory proclaims 
that if the unions want to price 
themselves out of jobs that is their 
funeral while Kinnock was imply- 
ing rioughly") that a Labour 
government would brook no 
opposition to the absolute pnonty 
of getting people back to work. 

What does this mean? If it 
means statutory incomes policy, 
pay freezes and the like, that 
would indeed be “tough”, but it 
would be exceedingly difficult, if 
not impossible, for a Labour 
government to agree upon in the 
real world. The disastrous elec- 
toral consequences of the Winter 
of Discontent of 1978 are now 
embedded in party mythology. 

Does it mean. then, that a 
Kinnock government would be as 
prepared as a Thatcher govern- 
ment. to hold down pay in the 
public sector by sheer will-power 
and face prolonged and bitter 
industrial action if necessary? 
Perhaps, but if the possibility of a 
contest of this kind with the 
unions is envisaged, the party is 
preparing itself for it in a strange 
way. For what is the People at 
Work concordat if it is not at least 
in part, a promise to restore the 
sharp edge to those union weap- 
ons which this government’s leg- 
islation has blunted, and which 
might well be turned against a 
Labour government? 

The only other possibility is 
therefore a variation on that old 
Labour Party theme — the un- 
written bargain. The Labour gov- 
ernment will give the unions back 
their place in the sun and restore 
their okf legal immunities; in 
return. Kinnock expects them to 
behave with moderation. The 
problem, as always, is that this 
requires the unions to behave 
against their nature. The fen is 
that curing unemployment is not 
the top priority of trade unions. 

Page three of People at Work 
outlines their main objectives 
succinctly when it states, as the 
first principle of the joint ap- 
proach. that: “Collective strength 
enables workers to obtain belter 
pay and conditions than they 
would otherwise receive in the 


same set of economic and employ- 
ment circumstances.” It is true 
that Principle Four proclaims 
that: "Collective organization en- 
ables workers to exert a social and 
political influence on all issues ol 
concern to the interests of working 
people, c.g.. employment policy; 
social services; training and 
education . . ." and so forth. But 
none of the four principles states 
any duty on the part of trade 
unions to modify their traditonai 
sectional demands or exert their 
-social and political influence” in 
the wider interest- Wc arc assured 
in the blandest fashion that "of 
course, freedom brings with it 
responsibility’' (the word 
“responsibility” in the title of the 
document is intended to convey 
the same statesmanlike im- 
pression). But wc are never told in 
the 22 pages of the booklet what 
this responsibility might entail. 

It is all very well to talk in vague 
terms about industrial democracy, 
power-sharing and the rights of 
workers to consultation and 
information. These ideas arc fine 
so far as they go and are. indeed, 
mostiv stolen from the much more 
specific Alliance documents on 
the subject. But they do not go to 
the heart of Kinnock’s problem: 
the natural institutional tendency 
of trade unions to pursue — first 
and foremost - the narrow objects 
for which they were invented, that 
is the pay. conditions and job 
security of their members. 

Kinnock has dealt with the 
political and presentational side of 
this problem by implying two 
quite different things in his 
speech. To the brethren he offers 
Option Three, the “unwritten 
bargain”: to the sceptical elec- 
torate he implies that he is 
prepared if necessary, for Option 
Two — the contest of wills. What 
he really thinks is probably neither 
of these, but is indicated by a 
revealing News night interview he 
gave jusi after he sat down, in 
which he more or less admitted 
that he pinned his- hopes on the 
Thatcher treatment The unions, 
he said had failed to learn from 
the tides and were now having to 
learn from the nocks — a Delphic 
pronouncement which 1 inter- 
preted as meaning that they were 
getting their just deserts for betray- 
ing Jim Callaghan and were now 
so groggy after the Tory onslaught 
that they would know better than 
to give him trouble. 

This will probably serve as a 
substitute for a strategy for the 
moment since the public is ev- 
idently in a mood for reassurance 
rather than an invitation to peer 
hard at the real difficulties. Bui the 
fact that Kinnock dare not as a 
practical politician, tell his trade 
union colleagues straight out that 
they may have to face a two-year 
standstill or even a fall in real 
standards of living if they want 
unemployment to come down by a 
million, should suggest to him that 
if he ever comes to power he will 
have an infinitely bigger problem 
waiting for him than he admits — 
perhaps even to himself. 


moreover , , . Miles Kington 

A jazz genius up 
Sweden’s sleeve 


. As a teenager in the late 1950s. I 
had the privilege of being around 
when Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly 
etc were first making records. I 
abused this privilege terribly by 
thinking that Presley. Holly etc 
were not worth ihe black plastic 
they were recorded on. The kind 
ofstuff 1 .preferred to seek out was 
the kind of -music contained on a 
series of records called These 
. Swinging Swedes put out on the 
Mercury label and if ever some- 
body could have chosen a blunt 
weapon with which to oppose the 
rock V roll revolution, a title like 
. These Swinging Swedes was it 

J couldn’t have cared less. When 
you like jazz, you quickly get used 
to being in a small minority, and 
when you like Swedish jazz you 
move down to the bottom of the 
minority league. But 1 loved the 
stuff. It had an elegant, elegiac, 
soft-spoken toughness about it 
which seemed miles from the 
raucousness of trad or the pomp- 
ous verbosity of most modern 
jazz. Many people must have 
found it bloodless, but I thought it 
wonderfully stylish, like Swedish 
glass or Bergman films. One or 
two Swedish musicians even be- 
came quite famous, like the 
baritone saxophonist Lars Guilin, 
who won polls in America, or the 
trumpeter Rolf Ericson. who ac- 
tually played with Duke Ellington. 

The musician I loved, however, 
was Bengt Half berg, a pianist who 
in his own quid way had the finest 
rhythmic touch of any jazz pianist 
I know, as unerring as a lap- 
dancing-bauerfty. There was also a 
peculiarly song-like quality about 
; his improvizing. Critics often call 
soloists that . they like "melodic", 
and they arc almost always wrong, 
because jazz musicians seldom 
improvise new melodies, buz 
Hailberg did. exceptionally, tend 
.to play series of phrases which 
could have been taken away and 
written down as songs. 1 used to 
play those records over and over 
until 1 was sick of everything on 
them except Hallberg’s contribu- 
tions. which 1 still know by heart. 

■Wdl. all good things come to an 
end. Buddy Holly died. Elvis 
Presley got fat and’ the Swinging 
Swedes series dried up. I was 
reduced to scouring secondhand 
record shelves to feed my Hallbcrg 
addiction. I remember finding one 
record in Paris in 1958. and 


another one in Barbados (who 
liked Bengt Hailberg in Bar- 
bados?) in 1959. It wasn’t until 
1964 that 1 found another, this 
time with a sleeve note that said 
Bengt Hailberg had more or less 
given up playing in favour of 
writing film and ballet music. 

I never found many people who 
shared my pining for Hallbeig’s 
music. Even my knowledgeable 
Scottish cousin Laurence had 
never heard him. 

“Though I do remember that 
Unde Bill used to talk about him a 
lot." he told me. 

"Uncle Bilir I said. “I don’t 
remember him." 

“Nobody does," said Laurence. 
“He went off years ago to run a bar 
in Barbados.” 

Well, that explained the record 
in Barbados. Then, towards the 
end of the 1970s a Swedish lawyer 
named Anders R. Ohman con- 
ceived a passion for Hailberg — 
more important, he also started a 
record company called Phoniastic 
and began recording Hallbetg 
again. Ohman seemed even more 
addicted than I did. “We are 
fighting for a true and good 
cause.” he wrote in one sleeve 
note: “to make the world under- 
stand that Bengt Hailberg is one of 
the world’s greatest jazz pianists." 

1 bought all these new records 
dutifully, but it didn't seem to be 
enough, because on another sleeve 
Ohman complained: “There is no 
justice in music” This apparently 
was because Hailberg still tad not 
broken jazz sales records. 

And the whole point of this 
story is that last weekend Bengt 
Halltaig made his first visit to 
Britain, playing in Edinburgh 
(where cousin Laurence saw him 
on behalf of Uncle Bill) and at the 
Pizza Express in Dean Street 
London, last Sunday, where 1 
neanl him. It was a last-minute 
booking and the place wasn't 
really full, most of the audience 
being passing Swedes. (“Is there . 
anyone here who doesn't speak • 
Swedish?" asked their trumpeter 
Jan Allan, in his first announce- 
ment.) But after 30 vears I had 
finally got to hear him. 'And yes. he 
was marvellous. If I had to choose 
betw een being able to bring 
Presley. Holly and all dead rockers 
rack to life again, and hearing 
«ngl Hailberg live once more. 
Hvis would stay right where he is. 




-i 





1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-4S1 4100 


BOGUS PROSPECTUS 

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MENT 


11131 88 Prime Minister he 
, would govern. in the interests 
offlll the people and not be 
■■deflected by sectarian in- 
terests, in which he plainly 
included the unions, - and 
union leaders conceded that 
this was indeed the right 
•- approach for a would-be Prime 
. Minister. But then came the 
• cold douche of reality: the 
’ TUC proceeded to resolve that 
••the next Labour government 
' .should introduce a statutory 
minimum wage. 

• . _ Arguing against the policy, 

. Mr Ron Todd of the Transport 
Workers asserted not only that 

- it could drag down wages and 
: -undermine negotiating rights, 
. .but ' that it could even be a 
’ slippery slope to a statutory 
i incomes policy: It is certainly 
..likely that it would 

institutionalise low wages, and 
: /although it hardly seems cred- 
ible that a Labour government 

- -would once more risk a statu- 
tory policy, it would surely be 

, driven to a formulated in- 
comes policy of some sort. 

- If the statutory minimum 
wage were set as a percentage 
of the national average, then 
since the lowest wages would 
be part of that average, raising 
: the minimum would auto- 
matically raise the average. It 
would automatically lead to 
the requirement of another 
upward adjustment, even if 
the average were not also 
raised by the demand to 
preserve differentials. But, of 
course, differentials would 
also have to.be raised to avoid 
a trend to a flat-rate wages 
system, and the statutory 
minimum would also have to 
reflect that. 

Thus a government which 
would in any case be provok- 


wage attitudes" it need? from 
.the unions but with rising 
demand, especially 'from 
skilled people. It would, of 
course, wish to avoid formal 
wage controls, but it would be 
driven to bargain with the 
unions. 

Mr Kinnock may assert now 
that he would govern without 
regard to sectarian interests, 

. but he would be Jncrrasisgly 
dependent on the unions 
which would again become the 
most dominant -sectarian in- 
terest in Britain once they 
scented their renewed power 
and the government 1 s weak- 
ness. Government policy 
would again be bargained for 
pay restraint in what could be 
a re-run of the social contract 
which undermined the Wil- 
son-Callaghan governments of 
1974-99. 

A Labour, government 
would start by calling a Na- 
tional Economic Summit with 
all sides of industry to discuss 
all aspects of economic-policy, 
from public expenditure to 
pay, so as to produce a 
national assessment for the 
guidance of economic policy. 
Faced with escalating wage 
demands, the government's 
corpora tist policies would 
drive it more and more to- 
wards intervention' to keep 
wages down. ' 

It would -be in a very 
different position from the 
present government which has 
been able to avoid such inter- 
vention' by standing on the 
principle that if it controls the 
economy by monetary and 
fiscal - means, wages should 
take care of themselves. The 
practice has not quite matched 
the theory and die Chancellor 
of. the Exchequer, Mr Nigel 
Lawson, regularly rebukes . 


employers -for paying more 
than they should at the ex- 
pense of competitiveness. 
Nevertheless, untiT 'recently 
the theory has worked tol- 
erably well, aud it is only too 
easy to w wa gfaft what would 
happen to wage inflation if Mr 
Kinnock were operating a 
minimum wages policy. 

Even more devastating 
would be the impact of this 
policy on jobs. Mr Kumock 
has said that creating jobs is 
Labour’s priority, though his 
figures are curiously cautious. 
Be has a target of one million 
jobs for his mst two years. But 
compared with his 500,000 a 
year, the present government 
is already creating jobs at 
something like 300,000 a year 
(one million since 1983). Alas, 
this is not reflected hi the 
unemjfloyment figures be- 
cause of the increasing number 
of job candidates. Mr 
Kiimock's is thus a modest 
target and a statutory 
min him um wage will not help 
him to hit h. Mr Rodney 
Bidcerctaffe, of the Public 
Employees union, may force 
the government to keep on his 
members at higher pay. But 
many other employers will be 
forced to discard low-paid 
labour. 

The best approach to die 
very real problems of the low 
paid is by creating more wage 
competition, and by tax cuts 
which do not inflate industrial 
costs. That has been the aim of 
the present Oianceflor and he 
should stick to it. Labour’s 
minimum wage policy, even 
though Mr Kumock wants to 
implement it with camion, 
would not only be an engine 
for inflation. For the low paid 
themsdves, and those des- 
perately trying to find a rung 
on the work ladder it offers 
only the desperation of the 
dole queue, . 


THE SOUND OF SILENCE 


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It was a famous victory which 
the press' in South Africa won 
against the government there 
two weeks ago — but a fleeting • 
one. After a brief respite from - 
reporting ..^fictions, .the - 
country’s policel^mmissioner 
announced hew restrictive . 
measures on Wednesday 
which went even: further than 
those thrown out in court last 
month. .And this time General 
Johan Coetzee would seem to 
have made sure, he has got it 
right 

Yesterday in Pietermaritz- . 
burg, the Natal Supreme Court 
came down once more in 
favour of load newspaper 
groups, overturning a number 
of the emergency restrictions 
which would have given the 
minister of law and order more 
powers than the president 
himself Under one of them 
the minister could have closed 
down a paper for ever on the 
grounds that one issue con- 
tained what he held to be a- 
“subversive” statement How 
long it will be before Pretoria 
finds a way in which to restore' 
these measures too, remains to 
be seen. 

The judgement in Natal 
does little enough anyway to 
relieve the pressure on journal- 
ists who are trying to keep the 
world in touch with events; 
Wednesday’s new restrictions, 
imposed on the eve of the 
Soweto funerals., make it illegal 
for a reporter to be even . 
“within sight” of any distur- 


bances. This would; seeni to 
imply that a journalist, chanc- 
ing upon a riot, should shut Ins ■ ■ 
eyes and run away. —to avoid 
being: iff. breach of - the - law.~ 
.Indeefr the greatest weakness ,, 
of tSe Siw-restrictrons would: . 
seem , to • be their , com- 
prehensiveness. . This makes', 
one wonder how they .too * 
might stand up to the scrutiny .' 
of South Africa's judges, 
obliged as they are to interpret • 
from rime to time the legality . 
of Pretoria’s policies under the 
Public Safety Act. 

Whether such policies are 
constitutional is, however, al- 
most an -irrelevance. A more 
pertinent question should now 
be — are they wise? . 

The freedom of South 
Africa’s press was a beacon of 
light in an otherwise gloomy 
scene, until it was snuffed out • 
this summer. While President* 
Botha has insisted on his:, 
readiness to reform (if only at , - 
his own pace), his government . 
has further retreated behind., 
the' familiar apparatus of re-r 
action. 'Jj 

One justification in his eyes - 
is that the presence of cameras 
can have an inflammatory 
effect on a crowd. It is a 
complaint which has -been 
made in this country too, in 
the context of Northern Ire- 
land and the miners’ strike. 
But events during theiast three 
months have suggested that' 
South Africa’s, grievances are . 
more deep-seated. Even if 


cameras were the problem, 
there are more limited ways in 
which to deal with them. 

. . The-effect of the restrictions 
during ihe last few weeks has 
beeirfoniagirifynotiaimniise . 
the "events’ ^ich" have oc- 
curred. Silence can not only be 
very expressive, but it gives 
rise to speculation which can 
often dwarf foe' reality. Few 
inside or outside the country 
have been left in much doubt 
as to what is going on. - 
The emergency measures 
have only served to alienate 
still further those outside the 
country and, more important, 
those within it who still have 
hope for South Africa. They 
hardly help Pres dent Botha’s 
cause in the United States 
where Congressmen, no 
strangers to the cause of demo- 
cratic freedom, are clamouring 
still more loudly for action. 
Nor can they have done him 
much good in the Far East 
where his foreign minister is 
currently trying to ward; off 
sanctions. 

? Butit is South Africa itself 
where President Botha can 
jeast afford to lose more 
friends. He may remain deaf to, 
the . entreaties of people 
abroad. But he should at least 
listen to those at home as he 
leads his nation hack into the 
looker. If he robs than of their 
basic right to know, he can 
hardly expect to like what he 
hears. - - 


ON--" 

. ,r.d S ? P ' 


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There is a rumour abroad that 
the Soviet Union has learnt its 
..lesson from CbernoJbyL that its 
■ policy on information is. 
^changing and - that the more 
open reporting of this week’s 
shipping disaster m the Black 
Sea is the proof. Unfortu- 
nately, this otherwise pleasing 
theory has been contradicted 
.by equally conclusive evidence 
that, so for as certain variety 
of information are concerned, 
the Soviet authorities retain a 
' fondness for their old 

: Mr Nicholas Damloff, Mos- 
cow correspondent of US News 
and World Report for the past 
five years, has now been m 
Soviet custody for six days. 
The manner of his arrest was 
-classical in its crudeness and 

• its' cruelty. He was the recipr- 
: ent of restricted documents, 
.passed to him by a Soviet 
acquaintance. The secret po- 
lice were on hand to witness 
the transaction. The case was 

closed. ‘ 

There has been no sugges- 
tion that Daniloff was any- 
thing other than a bona Jiae 
journalist On the contrary, 
: many. have testified to ms 
reporting skill and integnty- 
But he spoke fluent Russian 

• and dnew his own conclusions 
from what he saw and hearct 

1 He was thus an unpredictable 


AN UNFAIR DEAL 

quantity, and had — so it is 
said — been a target of earlier 
KGB provocations. 

But the timing of Damloff s 
“felony” suggested that there 
was more to the KGB’s action 
than a desire to neutralize a 
possibly awkward correspon- 
dent After all, Damloff . had 
less than a month of his tour of 
duty stiff to serve. The pre- 
sumed ulterior motive was. 
connected with the arrest of a. 
Soviet scientist Gennadi 
Zakharov, in the United States 
for spying. ZdthatoV was in 
US custody; Daniloff had beeir 
taken hostage. . 

In the United States this 
probability -was seized on and 
justly condemned. The mes- 
sage was clean the US was not 
in the business of exchanging a 
suspected spy for a victimized 
journalist. To . do so would 
jeopardize still . further, the 
already precarious position of 
foreign correspondents- in the 
Soviet Union. If one exchange 
were granted, more would, be 
forced. . 

It was a cold verdict ana one 
which placed principle and the 
general good above the welfare 
of the individual and above 
the comfort and peace of mind 
of his fondly and friends; But it 
was, . ultimately, the correct, 
verdict On the evidence avail- 


able, Daniloff is no less a 
hostage than the US citizens 
held in Lebanon. And if 
hostage-taking of this order is 
to be discouraged, it has to be 
seen not to work. 

Which is why yesterday’s, 
admittedly sketchy, reports of 
a deal between the US and 
Soviet amhoritiesi are so 
disturbing. For if Daniloff is to 
be released and expelled from 
the Soviet Union in return for 
the release of Zakharov into 
the' custody of the Soviet 
embassy m Washington, the 
connection between the two 
rases has been conceded and. 
the principle compromised. . 

It- will be argued that this 
was a humane solution and the 
least costly for all concerned. It ' 
will be argued further that 
Zakharov's confinement to the 
Soviet embassy will not pre- 
vent his standing trial in due 
course, whereas Daniloff will 
be-spared the humiliation of a 
Soviet court But it will be all 
too easy for Zakharov, once 
out Of US jurisdiction, to 
evade 'the legal process al- 
together and all too easy for 
the KGB to claim their meth- 
-pds an unmitigated success. 
But that judgement will not be 
shared by the next foreign 
.citizen to be framed in Mos- 
cow. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Future of museum reading room 


From Lord Thomas ofSwynnerton 
and others 

Sir, The undersigned and, we 
believe, a majority of readers who 
use tbe round reading room of die 
B ritish Museum (now part of the 
reference division of the British 
Library) would prefer to go on 
doing so and would like those who 
come after them to be able to do so 
too; whether because ii is the most 
beautiful national library in Eu- 
rope, Or because of its historical 
associations, or because it func- 
tions well as a service to scholars, 
or for some other reasons, is 
unimportant The room is rarely 
crowded. 

Tbe Government continues to 
go ahead, however, with what 
seems a most expensive scheme 
for a new large British Library 
whose plans envisage a larger 
: reading room which will have 
neither the character, the 
serviceability, nor tbe beauty of 
the present room. This develop- 
ment apparently is more desired 
by librarians and Civil Servants, 
than by scholars and readers. 
These changes will be widely 
condemned if the plan is put into 
effect, in tbe late 1990s. 

A possible compromise stiD 
exists, whereby the reading room, 
the rooms now used for manu- 
scripts and the North Library 
continue to be reading rooms, all 
in the museum; the Euston site 
becomes a store,. with small read- 


ing rooms primarily for the pe- 
rusal of those books which may be 
damaged by exposure to fresh air 
involved in transit, or for other 
reasons; but most books at Euston 
would be able to be studied at 
Bloomsbury, by means of ship- 
mem by van or perhaps ter a 
custom-built underground railway 
(which we understood can be built 
for £7 million; a trifle in compari- 
son with the many minions nec- 
essary for a large reading room at 
Huston). 

This compromise could be so 
planned as to save the Govern- 
ment money and preserve for 
future generations one of our great 
institutions. 

We ask the Government why 
they cannot contemplate an econ- 
omy, and a reversal of a derision, 
which would be of long-term 
benefit to English fetters and be 
welcomed by all those scholars, 
British and international, who in 
their time have used and loved the 
reading room. 

Yours faithfully. 

HUGH THOMAS. 

ISAIAH BERLIN, 

DACRE of GLANTON, 

FRANKS. 

ERIC HOBSBAWM, 

MICHAEL HOWARD, 

KARL POPPER. 

RONALD SYME. 

A. J.P. TAYLOR, 

LAWRENCE GOWING, 

G VERONICA WEDGWOOD. 
House of Lords. 


Choices in defence 

From Rear-Admiral J. E. Dyer- 
Smith 

Sir, Sir Peter Hordern (September 
I) rightly maintains that public 
expenditure should reflect chang- 
ing priorities. likewise his conten- 
tion that research takes too much 
of the cake cannot be faulted. But I 
cannot fathom his innuendo that 
Tow educational standards do not 
warrant escalating and largely 
nugatory costs of defence equip- 
ment. 

His premiss on priorities surely 
dictates a vast increase of public 
expenditure on education. This, in 
addition to the outcry from the 
medical profession for more 
money to be pumped into the 
NHS, which has the ring of 
genuine authenticity, can only 
mean a retrenchment in total' 
defence budgets. 

In such context overseas 
procurement might become in- 
escapable. But let not your readers 


be blind to the eventual outcome: 
further unemployment and 
surrender of any vestige of an 
independent defence posture 
would be inevitable. 

The belated GEC-Nimrod solu- 
tion to air early-warning offers a 
slender chance of Britain not being 
relegated to the “Defence League" 
in which Spain and the South 
American countries bask, not 
altogether blissfully. With tbe 
alternative and nearly obsolescent 
US buy and Trident's enormous 
dollar drain, surely a growing 
sector of serious supporters of 
British selfctefeBce must increas- 
ingly be disturbed by the 
question.“Is it worth the candle?” 
Yours etc. 

JOHN E DYER-SMITH, 

Casa Gozuila, 

31 Carrer Ample, 

Cala Alcaufar, 

Sant Lhiis, Menorca, 

Bafeares, 

Spain; 


Soap and the admen 

‘From Mr James Hindhaugh 
Sir, Might I contest Lord-BdofFs 
view j^rticle, August 30) -that 
“Malgiret Thatcher is not a bar of 
soap”. Her undeniable success has 
been largely due to a marketing 
effort which has treated her as a 
brand; her brand values have been 
analysed and merchandised to 
protective customers, some 
predisposed, some not, a high 
conversion rale has been achieved 
and significant loyalty inspired. 

Call her soap, lager, or what you 
will, but the same mechanisms 
have been employed and com- 
parable. successful results 
achieved. 

The adman has played no small 
part in this, not only due to the 
skills he can bring, but also 
because his "personal 
commitment” is not and cannot 


Control of we«ds 

From Mr Mark Yonge 
Sir, MrH. St John (August 28), in 
his fetter referring to noxious 
weeds, is critical of the Depart- 
ment ofTransport for their lack of 
action in controlling weeds beside 
our motorway s and bun k roads. 


departments of county col 
would like to carry out weed- 
spraying treatments on road 
ve rges and centra l reservations. 

AT manufacturers of 'amenity 
herbicides and contractors for 


Bi rmingham racing 

From Mr Robert Lawrance 
Sir,! was saddened and alarmed to 
read Mr Skeffington’s letter 
(September 1) condemning the 
Birmingham Grand Prix (stejand 
the notion that tbe rity should 
even aspire to such an event. The . 
merits or otherwise of the Super 
Prix can be left to sponsors, 
competitors and spectators alike, 
but what concents me are his 
comments about the city itself; 
which I fear reflect a destructive, 
btfl increasingly common, attitude 
to urban life m generaL * 

I cannot deny the often dreary 
and shabby appearance of this dty 
where I too have lived all my life, 
but tike many other English erties 
it has fine buildings and leafy 
suburbs, as well as growing artistic 
facilities and leisure amenities. I 
foil to see how anyone could deny 
the laudable aspirations of the dty 
fathers to further its cultural and 
sporting reputation. I am also 
appalled at his implied criticism of 
the character of its inhabitants. 


However, I do not write merely 
to defend the good name of this, 
city and its ideals. 1 am also 
alarmed at the way in which many 
suburban people are mefined to 
thus condemn our cities which, in 
the past, have contributed to the* 
very prosperity which they now 
enjoy. Furthermore, these “rain- 
swept -scenes of urban - aridity” 
(sraely a contradiction in terms?) 
comprise the homes of hundreds 
of thousands of people who do not 
have the freedom or dunce of such 
as Mr Skeffington to live in 
pleasant suburbs such as Sutton 
Coldfield. 

Our cities have just as much 
right, if not more, to attempt to 
improve their facilities and con- 
ditions, such that all their inhab- 
itants might enjoy the fullness of 
life whteh -cUltDre ami sport can 
offer. - 

Yours faithfully. 

ROBERT LAWRANCE 
10 Strutt Close, 

Edgbaston, 

Birmingham, West Midlands. 
September 2. 


be questionable. This means liv- 
ing the soap he merchandises and 
certainly in no less a fashion than 
Central Office or co n stituency 
parties live their cause. 

He too must “take others along” 
with him so that his end product 
win always represent the local 
constituency. (iA, customers). 
Hardly a question of debating the 
allocation offimds to HQ or foe 
constituencies here. -The one is 
invested in to have an “effect on 
the. other”. 

Should the adman's effective- 
ness be questionable, a change of 
agency is an ever-pnaent option. 
The soap needs, selling and the 
adman will sell it effectively, so 
let's have a tittle recognition for 
his rote. 

Yours faithfully, 

J. A HINDHAUGH, 

23 Leamington Road Villas. W1 1. 
August 31. 


application we are caught sqngrdy 
in tbe middle. 

As soon as- we are seen spraying, 
weeds, even to a very limited 
extent, by membera-of foe public, 
tbe telephones ring profusely at 
County Hall and demands are 
made for this “destruction of 
nature to be stopped”. 

It usually is. 

Yours etc, 

MARK YONGE 
Products Marketing Manager, 
Burts & Harvey, 

Crabtree Manorway North, 
Belvedere, Kent. 


Refugees’ plight 
in Hong Kong 

From the Administrator, Oxfian 
Hong Kong 

Sir, Your reflection on the prob- 
lems of resettling refugees 
("Sharks, who offer sanctuary — at 
; a price”, August 15), was of 
particular relevance to those of us 
who are grappling with tbepnob- 
tens faced by Vietnamese refugees 
here m Hong Kong. 

There air today 8,448 Viet- 
namese refug ee s in Hoqg Kong, 
4,787 of whom air living in closed 
camps which are effectively pris- 
ons. These people, who were the 
subject of so much international 
attention a few yean ago* are 
today hugely forgotten. 

They are waiting for offers of 
resettlement overseas. Sixty two 
percent offoem have already been 
waiting for more than three years: 
17 per cent have waited for more 
than six years. This is a terrible 
waste of human life and talent, 
particularly because so many of 
tbe refugees are young children. 

As an independent group we are 
pressing the Hong Kong Govern- 
ment to improve the refugees' 
living conditions. We also 
recognise foe importance of dis- 
cussions whh the Vietnamese 
authorities about repatriation or a 
more orderly departure pro- 
gramme. 

However, for the 8,448 men, 
women and children who are here 
now the man urgent need is for 
them to be resettled overseas. 
Hoik Kong has not turned away a 
single refugee boat, but this small 
and crowded territory cannot be 
expected to absorb all comers on a 
permanent basis. 

Britain, with its longstanding 
ties with Hong Kong, study has a 
special duty to.hdp. During 1986 
Britain aaccepthv 500 so-called 
“family reunion” cases from Hong 
Kong, but that quota has almost 
been tilted and there is no commit- 
ment to lake more. 

Deqrile the strenuous efforts of 
the Hong Kong Government, the 
number of resettlement daces is ’ 
drying up. It is therefore particu- 
larly important that Britain 
should set an example to other 
nations by extending its commit- 
ment io accept refugees from 
Hong Kong through 1987. 

Yours faithfully, 

CHRIS BALE Administrator, 
Oxfem Hong Kong, 

Room 603A. - 

Hong Kong Bank Building, 

673 Nathan Road. 

Mongkok. 

Kowloon. 

Hong Kong. 

August 29. 

Buying British 

From MrM. L Kinnersly-Taylor 
Sir. I refer to your editorial “A 
leaner Rover” (August 29). I must 
agree broadly with the sentiments 
expressed regarding more realistic 
taigas. However I do not not feel 
that the company is responding to 
what we. the car-purchasing pub- 
lic, require of a Rover car. 

.There is a very strong feeling, 
for example, that the tie-up with 
Honda has done nothing to im- 
prove the image of Rover. 2 wish 
to see no more “joining hands 
with foreign companies” — the 
new 800 series “Rhonda" is 
neither Rover nor Honda in 
pedigree. 

If my tax is going to be spent m 
enabling Rover to continue 
. producing cars, and I do want it to 
continue producing Rovers, then I 
do not wish to see one penny 
involved with feathering the 
Honda or any other foreign nesL 

Very soon. Nissan will be “on 
stream” from North-east England, 
and this could prove to be the 
most ill-considered move for a 
long time: to allow our Far-East 
competitors to build vehicles on 
our doorstep. I've heard all the 
arguments about easing un- 
employment in foe region, and I 
. am not unsympathetic, because I 
was born in Newcastle upon Tyne 
and knew the area intimately for 
years, but it seems supremely ilJ- 
counsdkd to take a short-term 
measure to case unemployment 
when, in foe long term, infinitely 
greaser overall job losses in tire 
rest of the car industry could 
follow. 

If Government assistance was 
available for Nissan to build a 
factory, and I understand certain 
incentives were offered, then if 
there is spare cash available, why 
not channel it towards genuine 
asststanor for our own car in- 
dustry — perhaps set up a highly 
effective research' unit to find out . 
from the public what they want 
from Rover and then act on it 
quickly? 
yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL 

KINNERSLY-TAYLOR, 

Wester Tiflybin Cottage, 
NearKintore, 

Inverurie, 

Aberdeenshire. 

August 30. 


Hanwaymenioriial 

Fmm the General Secretary qf the 
Marine Society 

Sir, On September 5, 1786 Jonas 
Hanway. one of the greatest of the 
18th-century philanthropists, died 
in London. Born in Portsmouth in 
1712, he became a well-known 
merchant, joining the Russia 
Company in 17«. In 1754 a 
legacy aflowed him to retire and he 
devoted the rest of his life to 
alleviating foe appalling con- 
ditions which the underprivileged 
endured, . especially the un- 
employed, the sick, prostitutes 
and chimney sweep boys. 

Additionally, and significantly, 
he campaigned for the maritime 
interests of the nation, which he- 


saw as the-foundation-stoiie of its 
prosperity and compfementaxy to 
.his charitable activities. Of these 
The Marine Society, which he 
founded in 1756, was his prime 
concern, for which he devised the 
motto, “Charity and policy 
united”. 

Tbe Marine Society recruited 
and equipped men and' boys for' 
the Royal Navy. By 1815 it had 
provided 70,000, some 15 percent 
of the Navy’s manpower. Its pre- 
sea harbour training snip, 
commissioned in 1786 and the 
first is foe world, met Hallway's 
concern at the lack of adequate 
training for those going to sea. Its 
. examine was followed -by many 
others, md tiding HMS Worcester, 


HMS Conway and Arefousa in the 
mid-l9ih century. 

Such ships have now gone but 
fob year the society will 
commissison a -new seagoing 
training ship, Jonas Hanway. For- 
merly HMS Egeria, an inshore 

survey vessel, she has been lent by 

the Ministry of Defence in recog- 
nition of the society's support for 
foe Royal Navy over 230 years. 

- Jonas Hanway dearly deserves 
io be remembered and it is fitting 
thathb memorial is still to be seen 
in Westminster Abbey. 

Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD FRAMPTON, 
General Secretary^ 

■'The ; Marine Society, 

202 Lambeth Road. SE1. ' 

' August 29; - 



SEPTEMBER 517S5 

The affair of the diamond necklace 

um a scandal of such magnitude 
thtd Napoleon believed it ta be one 
of the causes of the French 
Revolution. TheComtesscdela 
Motte enticed Cardinal de Rohan, 
Grand Almoner of France to 
purchase a diamond neddace 
supposedly for Queen Marie 
Antoinette, but in reality for 
herself. The deception uxa 
discovered; Rohan iris deprived of 
all his offices: la Matte was 

flogged, branded end imprisoned. 
She escaped to England and there 

published her scandalous 

Manama. The story was a 
godsend to Tbe Times in its first 
year and it ran every detail 
throughout 1 785 to 1 787 


FOREIGN 

INTELLIGENCE 

Saturday arrived the Mails from 
H olland and Flanders 
Paris, Aug. 21. 

llir ANY people are in doubt 
1V1 whether the reasons as 
signed for the imprisonment of the 
Cardinal de Rohan. Grand Almo- 
ner of France, be the real ones; but 
as they are publicly reported at 
Versailles, they certainly merit 
some degree of credit- The fuel isos 
follows: Mr Bohmer, the King’s 
jeweller, some months ago, offered 
her Majesty a diamond necklace uf 
immense value; the price fixed was 
1,600,000 lh'res. Her Majesty is 
supposed to have replied, “that the 
state of her finances did not admit 
of her expending such a sum on so 
useless a purchase.” On her 
Majesty^ retinal, the jeweller 
endeavoured to dispose of tbe 
necklace abroad. In the interim a 
certain Lady de la Motte came to 
the jeweller's and told him, “that 
the Queen would lake the necklace 
on condition of paying for it by 
instalments and at the some time 
insisted on the purchase being kept 
a profound secret." Mr Bohmer did 
not think it proper to deliver the 
necklace on the strength of a 
supposed letter from the Queen, 
which the lady hod brought, hut 
required some better security. The 
Lady there upon assured him. that 
one of the first persons about the 
Court should be sent to finish the 
bargain. This person proved to be 
the Cardinal' de Rohan, who after 
having called on Mr Bohmer, sent 
to him and concluded the purcha.se 
for 1,400,000 livres. The necklace 
was delivered to Madame de la 
Motte, in return lor notes of her 
Majesty’s, payable at different 
times, the first of which for 400,000 
livres became due the 1st of 
August. 

The Cardinal having neglected 
to take up the bill, the jeweller, by 
means of a friend about the 
Queen’s person; laid his complaints 
before her jMajesty, together with 
his vouchers, among which was a 
letter of the Cardinal's own writ- 
ing, in which he says he has 
delivered tbe necklace. 

The Queen was so much sur- 
prised at these unaccountable pro- 
ceedings, and so unwilling to 


believe that anyone could have 
been guilty of such gross impru- 
dence, that she took ten days to 
examine into this mystery, and 
obtain the fullest proofc, before she 
would mention it to the King. 

On Sunday her Majesty herself 
informed the King of it, and on 
Monday the Cardinal was arrested. 

When the Baron Breteuil 
shewed the Cardinal the papers 
produced by the jeweller, it is said 
“his Eminence acknowledged his 
signature, and was so affected, that 
be was obliged to have a glass of 
water brought in before hie could 
recover himself, and that after he 
had signed the confession of his 
fault, he implored the King’s 
clemency, and offered to pay the 
1,400.000 Gyres in 24 hours time.” 

Hie Queen's hand is not forged; 
the notes are signed Marie Antoi- 
nette de France, which is her 
Majesty's method of signing. 

On Tuesday evening the Cardi- 
nal was sent to the Bastille, and all 

l^luHLhose of the people in* his 
service, and the Count de 
Vet&nnes, the Mondial de Cas- 
tries and the Baron de Breteuil 
appointed to examine them. The 
necklace is supposed to be taken to 
ces, and the dia m onds sent 
some to Holland and the rest to 
Portugal 

The Grand Almoner is the first 
Cardinal that has been arrested 
since Cardinal Polignac , . . His 
Eminence is attended in the Bas- 
tille by three servants, and is 
permitted to see the Prince de 
Soubise and tbe Princess de Ma- 
san; he assures his friends that he 
k the victim of an intrigue, and 
behaves with the greatest fortitude 
and resolution. 


Looking askance 

From Mrs Gilfy Cryer 
Sir, Re the return of route maps in 
trams (fetter, August 29) I am not 
sure this is such a good idea as 
suggested; 1 can remember on at 
feast two occasions standing up to 
have a better look at one of the 
route maps and. when I turned 
back to my seat, it had been taken! 
Yours faithfully, 

GiLLY CRYER. 

Oak Cottage. 

27 High Street 
Odiham, 

Hampshire. 

August 29. 

Odious comparison 

From Mr Jasper Partington 
Sir, In a pub today I ordered a 
glass of fizzy water - price, 53p. 
My companion had half a pint of 
beer— price. 47p. 

Where today, can you tell me. is 
that man, that very fat man who 
'can afford to. water the workers* 
beer?- 

.Yours faithfully. 

J. PARTINGTON. 

134 Arlington Road, NWj, 
September 1 


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“Do see THE COLOR PURPLE . . 
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“The technical mastery on hand here is of 
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- TODAY Angela Brooks 

“ . . Spielberg has never directed in 
such a classic fashion before.” 

— SUNDAY TIMES. Iain Johnstone 

“It exerts an emotional grip... 

. . .superb performances from an 
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— SUNDAY EXPRESS. Richard Barkley 

.bristling with genius. . .Spielberg 
is still magnificently Spielberg. 

— THE FINANCIAL TIMES, Nigel Andrews 

A STEVEN SPIELBERG FILM 

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THE ARTS 1 



SEE 

LISTINGS FOR DETAILS : 


Television 

A tribute 
to long 
runners 

Like the stock alien life-force 
in sci-fi thrillers, Equinox 
(Channel 4) is proving to be a 
chameleon capable of im- 
personating the weirdest by 
brids. Last night it turned into 
The Tin SnaiL a potted history 
of the Citroen 2CV. 

Cote, homely, impossible to 
modernize and perennially be- 
loved of proto-yuppies, the car 
was conceived as the French 
rival to the VW Beetle and the 
Fiat 500 — a shoestring run- 
about which even tight-wad 
farmers could afford. Its 
development was abetted by 
the German occupation, which 
promoted the conditions of 
secrecy in which research 
might nourish, and after the 
firm was taken over by 
Mkhelin, the queer Uttfe beast 
was unveiled at the Paris 
Motor Show of 1948. 

It was perhaps a pity that this 
otherwise well-researched 
documentary found no space 
for a brief rotnxFup of the 
2CV*s appearance in the mov- 
ies, nor attempted to profile 
the classic owner. 

Stephen Bayley spoke of the 
crossover between furnit ur e 
and car design (a coincidence 
of fashionable curvature), and 
extolled the 2CV as “a semi- 
nar in design theory", while an 
American academic reminded 
us that “form follows 
function" - one of those 
maddening shibboleths that 
can mMn anything or nothing. 

Dr Alex Moulton was more 
directly informative on the 
car's clever suspension sys- 
tem, and the mousey voice- 
over contributed several 
interesting variants of 
pronunciation, “douche- 
veanx" being the most imagi- 
native. Whether the 2CV is a 
snail or indeed, a shower-bath 
for calves, it will smrely run 
and run. 

The same appears to be true 
of Ik Sickness and in Health 
(BBC1), whose new series 
kicked off with Else Garnett's 
wake. It cannot have been an 
easy episode for Johnny 
Speight to write, and there 
were moments when the 
guests’ doltish insensitivity 
seemed anything but comic. 

Conversation dribbled in the 
parodic living room, while in 
the kitchen Una Stubbs and 
Eamonn Walker wondered 
how the old fellow was going to 
cope with widowerhood. Alf 
gloomed and drank and 
moaned about the blacks and 
drank some more. At the 
Cropper residence, glasses of 
Wincarnis were raised in tear- 
ful salute to the memory of 
Dandy Nichols. 

Martin Cropper 


Theatre: Irving Wardle reviews the new Ayckbourn 

Madness at the vicarage 


OonaM CoQPff 


Woman in Mind 

Vaudeville 


Previous Alan Ayckbourn 
heroines have been shown 
hilariously bungling suicide 
and withdrawing into cata- 
tonic despair, but Susan — in 
this latest Scarborough trans- 
plant - is the first to arouse 
laughter in the process of 
going mad. 

She certainly has plenty to 
pul up with, as the wife of a 
vicar who has long since 
abandoned the bedroom for 
the study and installed his 
obsessively bereaved sister in 
the house: and as a mother 
who has lost her son to a 
brain-washing cult 

Add to that the fact that the 
husband is devoting his life to 
a 60-page history of the parish 
from 1386. and that sister 
Muriel is a self-appointed 
cook specializing in Earl Grey 
omelettes, and it is no wonder 
that Susan treats them both 
with rasping derision and 
(within the 48 hours of the 
play) lakes up residence in the 
garden. 

Woman in Mind opens with 
Susan coming to after knock- 
ing herself out with a rake: a 
device that cunningly leaves 
the audience to decide 
whether the surrounding 
characters are as dreadful as 
they seem, or whether we are 
seeing them from her tor- 
mented viewpoinL When they 
return to the house. Roger 
Glossop’s cramped garden 
opens up to a neo-Gothic 
estate from which emerge 
three beautiful people wbo 
smother Susan with endear- 
ments and ply her with cham- 
pagne and alfresco banquets. 

They form her ideal family: 
and to begin with, one rather 
despises her for indulging in 
such a romantically banal 



Martin Jarvis and Julia McKenzie 

the conversion of domestic 
detail into fantasy material, so 
that Muriel's cooking or 
Gerald's book reappear 
luxuriously and flatteringly 
transformed. So, too, does 
Susan's hostility to the family 
that has imprisoned her in this 
sliding eage. Before long her 


compensation fantasy. One 
should know belter than to 
jump to premature judgments 
with this author. The ideal 
family is only the starting 
point: a blank canvas on 
which the play goes on to 
inscribe its pitiless message. 

Its ruling technical device is 


imaginary companions are 
making threatening noises and 
cocking shotguns against their 
human rivals. And by degrees, 
the id v Hie Wattcau-like group 
are seen changing into landed 
thugs. 

This process is taken a step 
further b> the fact that Susan 
is a vicar's wife with a 
spiritualist sister-in-law. Once 
the has let her fantasies loose 
they take on a life of their own 
and plunge her into another 
form of panic: she feds she is 
being possessed. One must 
repeat that this is a comedy: 
and that it rises to its greatest 
comic brilliance at the climax 
where the heroine - lying out 
in a thunderstorm at three in 
the morning — imagines ho* 
daughter's wedding. Virtually 
everv line of the dialogue and . 
every fresh entrance is a 
glamorised quotation from 
the bleak reality, until the 
bride's father arrives, resplen- 
dent in a blood-red top hat 
and tails — as the Prince of 
Darkness. 

Ayckbourn's intricate 
production would benefit 
from a deeper stage than that 
of the Vaudeville: but his cast 
are wonderful. Images 1 shall 
retain are those of Martin 
Jarvis's Gerald, poison visfltfy 
corroding his forbearing 
smiles, frenziedly cracking his 
knuckles when conversation 
turns to sex: Josephine 
Tcwson hobbling self- 
riteously down the steps with 
yet another (ray of undrink- 
able coffee: and Peter Blythe's 
Doctor, tripping over ob- 
stacles with a neighing laugh, 
as the heroine's one fraying 
lifeline to the outside world. 
Julia McKenzie's Susan de- 
picts inch by inch the descent 
of a strong-minded woman 
into hatred, panic, and col- 
lapse. She also makes you 
laugh till it hurts. 


A boundless realm of illusion 


Flies by Night 

Old Red Lion 


In 1937 a half-breed Ojibway 
Indian by the name of Grey 
Owl or. alternatively. Hies By 
Night, embarked on a lecture 
tour of Britain in order to 
promote his books (with such 
welkin-ringing titles as Men of 
the Last Frontier and Pilgrims 
of the Wild) and to publicize 
the plight of his fellow Ca- 
nadian trappers: the 
dominion's apparently limit- 
less terrain was already suffer- 
ing from the depredations of 
over-hunting. 

As a late spasm 


of the same historical moment 
that put real cowboy's on the 
silver screen, his arrival must 
have had the combined im- 
pact of ethnic chic and 
conservation credibility. 

Peter Lloyd's minimally 
conceived, slightly under- 
nourished but intelligently 
constructed piece presents 
Grey Owl (played with sober, 
not unmenacing deliberation 
by Trevor Allan) as a dignified 
backwoodsman who is con- 
tent to act the noble savage to 
his British audience while 
displaying a canny streak of 
self-interest when in the com- 
pany of his agent (Richard 
Bates). The tension between 
the two facets is achieved by 


intercutting progress reports 
on the state of the tour with 
flashbacks to his experiences 
in the bush - in particular, his 
relations with the woman who 
followed him into the wilder- 
ness and eventually became 
his common-law wife (Bar- 
bara Barnes). 

A third strand is supplied by 
the efforts of a newspaper 
reporter (David Crean) to 
discredit at least the tallest of 
Grev Owl's stories, and later 
to delve into his obscure 
origins. 

I would have to be 
handsomely bribed before 1 
revealed the outcome of this 
investigation: suffice it to say 


that Mr Lloyd has had the 
right instinct both in under- 
playing the denouement and 
in resisting the temptation to 
use the reporter's inquiry as a 
framing device from the 
beginning, which would have 
made the thing a crude detec- 
tive story. 

.As it is. Nigel Halon's even- 
tempered and largely absorb- 
ing production for the Loose 
Exchange company exem- 
plifies a 1 virtue unique to 
fringe theatre: that of using a 
small space and sketchy props 
to suggest a boundless realm 
of illusion. The acting is 
excellent. 

Martin Cropper 


Promenade concert 

Sounds of poetry 

SNO/Bamert 

Albert Hall/Radio 3 



The first thing to say is that 
John Casken's Orion Over 
Fame, first heard in 1984 and 
here receivings conspicuously 
well-delivered London pre- 
miere in the Scottish National 
Orchestra's Prom, is a thor- 
oughly lovely piece. Chiefly, 
that is because the composer's 
poetic intentions are trans- 
lated with such intuitive 
directness into pure sound. 

But that does not mean that 
the work is simply an anarchic 
stream of thought: far from it. 
for although one idea, one 
section flows naturally into 
the nexL and although its 
textures are as busy as in any 
Richard Strauss, if often more 
transparent, the piece has a 
discernible form that really 
works. Il is a symphony 
sonata four movements in 
one. d la Liszt. 

Like Liszt. Casken makes 
little attempt to convey events 
or places literally in this 
music: he takes the Greek 
legend and the Northumbrian 
location that stands side by 
side in his title only as his 
starting point 
He has fashioned instead a 
sound-world in which these 
physical images — the beauti- 
ful. blinded hunter giant the 
constellation, the vast wind- 
swept landscape — are second- 


ary to the atmosphere and 
emotions they inspire, for all 
the implications otherwise of 
the titles of the four sections 
(“Orion the Hunter.” “Sea 
Voyage Towards the Sun,” 
and so on.) That to my mind, 
makes the work a real sym- 
phonic poem. 

Mussorgsky’s rather more 
objectively descriptive Pic- 
tures At An Exhibition , heard 
as usual in Ravel’s orchestra- 
tion. gave this orchestra 
opportunity to exercise its 
skills before a more overtly 
grateful audience. Matthias 
Barren, the SNO’s principal 
guest conductor, tended to 
keep things fairly cool and 
controlled here, an attitude 
that reaped rewards in a work 
still fraught with hazards in 
matters of balance, particu- 
larly among the woodwind, 
and technique. Perhaps there 
was the odd suspicion of 
imperfect intonation, but t>y 
and large this was an at- 
mospheric performance once 
again. 

Between these pieces we 
heard Brahms's DouNe Con- 
certo. played to inhuman 
perfection and with faultlessly 
gleaming tone quality by 
Young Uck Kim and Yo Yo 
Ma. Like the impeccably laid 
oul indubitably magnificent 
gardens at Versailles, how- 
ever. it seemed utterly sterile. 

Stephen Pettitt 


jHICHAELCL 



World Premiere 
of his new post- 
punk dance 
spectacular 

Only London dates before Ufortt Tom? 

Tickets £150- £9 

17-27 September 730pm 

Sadler's Wells 
Theatre sssu 

OmovCT are lor wnloiwrut mil cUbootangs. 



BOOKING OPENS TOMORROW 

NR THE RSCS AUTUMN SEASON 
AT THE BARBICAN! 

1 HEPH 0 NE 01 628 8795/638 8891 

Box Office Open TOom-Bpm 


AT THE BARBICAN THEATRE 


THROE CLASSIC COMEDIES 

ii raptrtolit through Octotor, 
donator ml Dacaator 

Reduced price performances: 2-4, 6-9 October 

MISALLIANCE 

By Bemad Show 

Casf Includes: BrfooCax.MefcFord, Rfcfnitf Burnett, CsraOnaGooddi. 

JnBBtflpotBHa,«ctodMcCgbf.JowpNOXoBOC 

Bnteett Spriggs. Sana tans. Directed by JotmCaM 

Brffltantty comic. The play introduces someof Show's most entertointng, 
forger-thon^techorocfei& An/thing can 
happen, and does! 


Reduced pace 
performances. 

16-24 October 



SCENES 
FROM A MARRIAGE 

By Benges feydeau, adapted by Peter Bams 

Cos! includes: Susan Crtmd.Jwj Dale, Retry Heod.Grtnft Jones. 
WriamKnfa.Uia Kaye. Directed by terry Hoads 
A farcical bcae of me sens which shows that husbands 
and wives ore separated by nothing but marriage 

Reduced price performances; 1248 December 

A PENNY FOR A SONG 

ByJDtuWMAD ^ 

Cost includes: DavWBradtoy. Mae Cos, Uck Fad 
Directed by Howard Davies 

The finer lunacies of the Eng&sh at warinl804. A rich cottectton 
af Engfetj eccentricsscon the Channel for Iheflist 
Sight of Napoleon's invasion force 


AT THE PIT 


From I October KfoshPiemierePrlHcfoioScf^rtaiiBi by Richard Nefcori 
From 25 Octotwne AtetfoWtopBCaHaghy AdhurMUler 
Ftom ^December Premiere production Heresies by Deborah levy 
From I0-B October Final performancesThe Deed Monkey by Nick Darke 






Qnema: Geoff Brown welcomes Mona Lisa to London, while below 
David Robinson reports from the Venice Film Festival 

Face to face with a nightmare 



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Lost sonls seeking love: Cathy Tyson in her film dfibnt 
as Simone and Bob Hoskins as George in Mona lisa 


Cracking the code 
of mixed cultures 


Mona Lisa (18) 

Odeon, Haymarket 

Jake Speed (15) 
Cannon, Oxford Street, 
Cannon, Panton Street 

Miracles (PG) 

Cannon, Oxford Street, 
Cannon, Panton Street 

“Are you warm, are you real, Mosa 
Lisa? Or just a cold and lonely, lovely 
work of art?” So sings Nat King Cole 
in the number that cues the rueful, 
romantic mood of Neil Jordan's 
exciting new Him. 

The song pops up on the radio of 
the Jaguar car driven round London 
by Gouge, the crude but kindly 
small-time crook just out of prison, 
employed as chauffeur to Simone, a 
“tail, thin, black tan” (his own 
description). After initial hostility, 
George finds the poised lady just as 
captivating as Leonardo da Vinci's 
painting. 

At first he escorts Simone to and 
from the posher hotels and the 
Highgate fastness of a regular Arab 
dienu-then she enlists his help in her 
search for Cathy, a younger, drug- 
dependent friend. Bemused, then 
horrified, George stumbles through 
the Soho underworld and the red 
lights of King's Cross, where teenage 
girls ply their wares — submissive 


puppets of pimps and shad)- business- 
men. George, a Cockney bull in a 
china shop, is played magnificently 
by Bob Hoskins, who shared the Best 
Actor award at this year's Cannes 
Film Festival. • 

Mona Usa, Jordan's third film, is 
stamped with the same degree of 
originality and style as its distin- 
guished predecessors. They make a 
diverse trio. Jordan's debut thriller 
Angd (1982) invested the contem- 
porary Irish troubles with the emo- 
tional anguish and dark visual 
panache of the Hollywood film noir, 
while The Company of K Wr re ( 1 984) 
offered the Little Red Riding Hood 
story retold as the Gothic fantasy of a 
girl passing through puberty. 

For all its striking visuals. H’o/ve? 
sat on the screen like congealed 
porridge: in Mona Lisa, however, 
Jordan recovers his nimble feet, 
setting up the plot and establishing 
characters with elliptical wit. so that 
George's bemusement is pleasantly 
shared by the viewer. 

Mona Usa benefits too from 
location shooting. Roger Pratt's 
photography injects passion and col- 
our into both drab concrete and the 
sleazy decor of Soho sex dubs, white 
the nocturnal hunting grounds of 
King's Cross emerge with a touch of 
Frilini-esijue nightmare. As before. 
Jordan shows great flair for ripping 
away life's surface layers to reveal 
deep-rooted fantasies, longings, fear 
and poetry. 

Yet as the film wends its diverting 
way through eccentric comedy, ro- 
mance and drama, we gradually 
realize that Jordan's expertise and 


Hoskins' performance serve as 
camouflage for a basic weakness: for 
all the variations on the theme of lost 
souls seeking love, there is simply not 
enough in the story io keep' the 
characters occupied. 

Cathy Tyson, in her film debut 
admirably suggests Simone's cool 
charisma, but more steel is surely 
needed for a prostitute who prides 
herself on surviving the King’s Cross 
meat rack. The actress had the 
misfortune, though, to be up against 
Hoskins at his most inimitable, 
dressed to kill in an orange leather 
jacket and tropical shin (this is his 
idea of dressing smam. bubbling with 
repartee. And how good it is to see 
Michael Caine, cast as a manipulative 
businessman, playing his age. which 
is playing, moreover, not in some 
vacuous international fluff, but in a 
British film of quality and merit. 

It was the Disney organization who 
first realised the financial benefits of 
marrying movies with merchandise: 
now no cinema hit is complete 
without its back-up supply of books, 
dolls, models. T-shirts, playing cards, 
hats, india-rubbers, even pencil 
sharpeners. 

Now a scheme is afoot to place a 
new superhero, Jake Speed, on the 
market: if all goes well, the film 
boring his name will be the boulder 
that triggers an avalanche of books, 
comic-strips, board games and cloth- 
ing. So hopes Wayne Crawford who 
dev ised the character, acts the charac- 
ter. produced and co-wrote the script 
with the director. Andrew Lane: to 
help the merchandising process 
along, several Jake Speed paperbacks 


are displayed in the film itself. 

It is doubtful if Wayne Crawford's 
gamble will pay off. As personified 
here. Jake Speed has the lined, 
foreenable looks of a foiled B- mo vie 
acton and he seems far too cloddish 
to succeed as a champion of good 
over evil, even m a tongue-in-cheek 
romp. 

Those who care about the an of 
comedy have good reason to fear Jim 
Kouf and David Grccnwalt. Two 
years ago they wrote the script for 
American Dreamer, . in which JoBeih 
Williams and Tom Conti raced round 
Paris desperately searching for wit 
and orginality. Miracles, written and 
directed by Kouf. with Greenwali as 
executive producer, offers the same 
male star and a similar mood of 
ihreadhare frenzy. 

Wc begin with a drunken Mayan 
Indian witch doctor straining for a 
miracle to help cure the tribal chiefs 
daughter. The miracle finally arrives, 
after flat jokes galore, in the dishev- 
elled shape of Tom Conti — a New 
York doctor flown south as a hostage 
by inept crooks, in the prickly 
company of the wife he just divorced. 

Few recent films have contained so 
much shouting and shrieking from 
the leading players; Conti is also 
cursed with a token America njacceni, 
which eflecmcly obliterates the dith- 
ers British charm that first made him 
popular in America in the first place. 
Regrettably, this dingy film is one of 
the last assignments of the distin- 
guished British cameraman John 
Alcotl. who won an Oscar for Barry 
Lyndon and died suddenly in July, 
aged 55. 


A film festival sometimes feels 
like a new babel as you 
stumble from screening to 
screening and from Arabic to 
Japanese to Turkish. Greek, 
Flemish, Serbian. Russian, 
without appreciable pause. 

Or. perhaps, it is the anti- 
babel: with sub-titles and 
simultaneous translations you 
somehow struggle to penetrate ; 
exotic languages, sentiments 
'and cultures: 

. We have had Finns assauft- 
ing.Kaflca’s The Castle, and a 
Hindi film exploring the cul- 
tural gulfs of the old British 
Raj. The Finnish film, Jaako 
Pakkasviita's linoa shows 
that Kafka’s nightmares be* 
long to the mind- TJieJmages 
are ambitious but constrict the 
imagination. After all even 
Orson Welles did not bring off 
the feat 

Massey Sahib is a promis- 
ing writer-director debut for 
Pradip Krishen. It is a tragi- 
comedy about people living, 
as the director puts it, “In a 
penumbra! region between 
two cultures”. The hero is an 
innocent Indian clerk whose 
efforts to give satisfaction to 
the Colonial bosses lead him 
to imaginative initiative 
which they unfortunately can 
only perceive as crimes. 

Theo Angel opoulos’s The 
Beekeeper is a predictable 
heavyweight — 140 minutes in 
length and unremitting in 
despair, though more pene- 
trable and slightly less 
portendous than his recent 
pictures. 

Marcello Mastroianni plays 
a Greek peasant (remarkably 
convincingly) pursuing a jour- 
i ney around his far-flung bee- 
hives, which is really a 
pilgrimage in search of death. 

• Tire Italian director Pupi 
Avail remains unknown in 
Britain after 17 years of work 
and 15 feature films, each with 
its own style, attraction and 
v originality. Christmas Present 
-is an account of an all-night 
poker game which ax first 
looks like an amiable social 
affair. . Gradually, however, 
foe tensions are exposed: for 

some of the players it is a game 

of life, and death. It is a minor 
work in the Avati canon, but 
one of the best offerings in 
Venice so for. 

The Argentine director Ma- 
ria Luisa Bembeig turned to 
films late in life - she was 
already a grandmother — to 
-emerge u> worldwide success 
with Camila, which was seen 


in London last year. Miss 
Mary confirms an outstand- 
ing talent and intelligence. Set 
in 1938. it tells the story of an 
English governess (Julie 
Christie) who goes to work for 
a family of Argentine land- 
owners. immensely rich and 
politely degenerate. 

Mostly in English dialogue 
and rich in character comedy, 
the film wittily catches the 
cultural collisions, and at the 
same time provides a micro- 
cosm of the old Oligarchy in 
the last desperate days before 
Peron. 

Francesco MaseQi began his 
careerin theera of Italian, neo- 
realism, made a notable film 
d£but in 1955 with G/l 
sbandatL . but ' subsequently 
has -directed comparativiey 
few films. Storia dTaroore, his 
first for ten years, updates the 
spirit of neo-realism. 

His characters are under- 
privileged youngsters, strug- 
gling for any. sort of menial 
woik and any place to live; the 
actors who play them are 
bright, unknown feces. He 
returns to the old improvisa- 
lional style; and even his 
locations, the no-raan’s-land 
in the city's edge, recall the 
films of 40 years ago. 

The language of films these 
days seems to have little 
connection with their na- 
tionality (£be English exhibits 
in Venice have come io 
French and German). 
Henning Carlson’s Franco- 
Dan ish co-production The 
Wolf At The Door is. like Afixs 

Mary , mainly in English. Don- 
ald Sutherland plays Paul 
Gauguin in a careful, correct, 
educational biopic, recalling 
inter aiia Gauguin's unhappy 
Danish marriage. 

Comedy is rare enough to 
prize at festivals. Alex van 
Warmerdam. a young Dutch 
theatre director, plays the lead 
in his own absurdist extrava- 
ganza Abel about a young 
man and his parents living in 
claustrophobic and mutually 
destructive madness. 

Short Circuit is made by 
John Badbam (Saturday Night 
Fever. War Games)* director 
of Hollywood youth films who 
credits his audience with the 
capacity to think and feel. His 
hero here is an endearing 
robot which runs amok, in- 
puts the Encyclopaedia 
Briiannica and the Three 
Stooges, grows more human 
than the humans and rebels 
against his nuke-happy cre- 
ators in the Pentagon. 


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18 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BALMORAL CASTLE 
September 4: By command of 
The Queen, the Viscount 
Davidson (Lord in Waiting) was 
present at Heathrow AJerpon. 
London this afternoon upon the 
arrival of The King and Queen 
of the Hashemite Kingdom of 
Jordan and welcomed Their 
Majesties on behalf of Her 
Majesiy. 

By command of The Queen, 
the Viscount Davidson (Lord in 
Waiting) was present at 


Heathrow Airport, London this 
afternoon upon the departure of 
the Governor-General of Can- 
ada and the Hon Maurice Sau ve 
and bade farewell to Their 
Excellencies on behalf of Her 
Majesty. 


Princess Alexandra, to mark the 

centenary year, will visit the 

Royal Samaritan Hospital for 
Women. Glasgow, on Novem- 
ber 26. and later she win open St 
Oswald's Hospice at Regem 
.Avenue. Gosforth. Newcastle 
upon Tyne. Princess Alexandra^, 
will also visit the PD&Aanimal 
treatment centre at Newcastle. 


Memorial service 


Mrs B. Markham 
A service of thanksgiving for 
Mrs Beryl Markham was held at 
St Cement Danes. Strand, yes- 
terday. the fiftieth anniversary 
of Mrs Markham's transatlantic 
flighL 

The Ven G.R. Renowden 
officiated. Group Captain R.H 
El wig. Station Commander, 
RAF Abingdon, and Miss Fleur 
Markham, granddaughter, read 
the lessons. Judge George Bath- 
urst Norman gave an address 
and Mr Stewart Granger read 
from Wes/ with the Night by 
Beryl Markham. Among (hose 
present were: 


Mm Valerv Carol Marknam. grand- 
daughter. Mr NigrI duRertlucK. Mr 
Daml Marknam. llw Hon Mrs Doreen 

Bolhursi Norman. Mrs P Eyre. 

Gwyneth Duchess of Portland, the 
Couniesa or Enniskillen. Lady Claud 

Hamilton. Mbs A\a Gardner. Mr and 


Mrs Jack Couldrey. Mrs R H Elwtg. 

Mr and Mrs David Allen. Mrs D 


Briggs. Mr Humphrey CotterLU. Mrs D 

Graham. Mr and Mrs A J S Hart. Mrs 


R B Leopel. Mbs Jane legoel. Mrs S 
Lleweiyn. Mrs M Loved. Mtss 
erine Moore: 


Hath 


Mr Andrew Maxwell -Hisiop. Mrs D 
Smart. Mr Tony Whlltome iCenrury 
Huicninsom. Mbs Catherine Waterer. 
Ural cnani-Go lend Patrick aoden. 
Miss c Edmunds. Mr I Hughes. Miss 
Sal» Mllcheil ireprocnting the Prov- 
ince of Nova Scotia). Flight Lieutenant 


H L Thomion (RAF Officers' Society 

douqalL 


of East Africa!. Mrs V Macdouqal 

Mrs P Dent. Mr and Mrs M Keating. 
Kir william Keating. Wing Com- 
mander F W Tame (RAF Benevolent 
Society! and Mrs Tame. Mrs Malcolm 


Lvetl irepinenllng Holland and Hot- 
land. also Rowland 


Mrs Gdiagtiam. 


I Ward! and Mr and 


Penny Blacks 
fetch £80,000 

An extremely rare mint cor- 
ner block of 12 Penny Black 
stamps sold at Phillips yesterday 
for £80,000 to a private 
collector. 

Primed from the original 
plate of Penny Blacks, these 
stamps were the first prepaid 
adhesive labels introduced to 
regularize a crumbling letter- 
post service. 


Birthdays today 


Mr R. S. Alexander. QC, SO; Mr 
Johnny Briggs, 51: Mr Justice 
Bush, 61; Lord Delfont, 77; 
Professor Peter Fricker, 66: Mr 
Russell Harty. 52: Sir Francis 
Loyd. 70; Professor A. D. 
Momigliano, 78; Mr W. G. 
Nursaw. 83: Canon Peter 
Pilkington. 53: Mr G. W. 
TrcmletL 47; Sir Denys Wil- 
kinson. 64; Air Vice-Marshal B. 
C. Yarde, 81; Mr Frank Yerby, 
70. 


Receptions 

London Chamber of C omm e r ce 
Sir Anthony Jolliffe. President 
of the London Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry, Mr 
D.W. Gravell. Vice-President of 
the Malaysia, Singapore and 
Brunei Association, and Mr 
R.T. Fox, Chairman of the 
South East Asia Committee, 
were hosts at 'a reception held 
last night at 69 Cannon Street in 
honour of Mr Goh Chok Tong. 
First Deputy Prime Minister 
and Minister of Defence for 
Singapore. 

Foundation for Science and 
Technology 
Lord Lloyd of Kilgciran. QC, 
Chairman of the Foundation for 
Science and Technology, and 
Mr D.V. Ayres, board member 
of IM! pic, received guests at a 
foundation reception in the 
Meiropole Hotel Birmingham 
last night. The evening was 
sponsored by IMI pic. Among 
those present were: The Mayor 
of Solihull. Mrs Diana HoU- 
Allen. Sir Frederick Crawford, 
Dr C L Brundin. Dr T W 
Farthing, and Dr G B R Feilden. 


Belmont Abbey 
School 


Michaelmas Term at Belmont 
Abbey School, Hereford, com- 
menced on September 1. 1986, 
with Solemn Mass of the Holy 
Spirit The school numbers 270. 
Steven Bonsey is head of school. 
The new junior house known as 
Bcnet House opened ibis term 
with 46 boys. Half Term is 
October 24 to November 2. 
There will be a performance of 
the school play. Grease, on 
December 1 3. for parents. Term 
ends December !4, 1986 with a 
service of lessons and carols. 


Latest wills 


Mr John Ashley Sloeock. of 
Tilford. Surrey, left estate val- 
ued at £1.281.156 neL After 
various bequests, he left two 
fifths of the residue to the 
Nature Conservancy Council 
and three tenths to the Phyilis 
Tuckwel! Memorial Hospice at 
Famham. Surrey. 

Mr David Ronald Hugh Wal- 
ters. of Sketty. Swansea, solic- 
itor. left estate valued at 
£559.698 net 

Violet Cecilia SOver, of Sidcup, 
Kent, left estate valued at 
£449.192 neL 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr P. Dickenson 
and Miss H.E. Barnes 
The engagement is announced 
between Phillip, second son of 
Mr and Mrs Ronald Dickenson, 
and Helen Elizabeth, only 
daughter of Mr Gordon Barnes 
and Mrs Hilary Whitaker, both 
of Otiey. Yorkshire. 

Mr HM. Gore 
and Mbs D. Sflveranu 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert Gore, of Lon- 
don. and Diana Silverman, of 
London, formerly of New York. 
Mr PJL Hunt 
and Mbs JX Martin 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, only son of Mr 
and Mrs SJ. Hunt of Tftirk. and 
Joan, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
HA Martin, of Belfhst. 

Mr SJXG. Kara-South 
and Miss SjG. Craske 
The engagement is announced 
between Sluan. only son of Mr 


Mr HL Maineck 
and Miss SJL Cbehnick 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert Lance, younger 
son ofMr F.G. Meineck and the 
late Mrs AW. Meineck. of 
Chessingion. Surrey, and Sarah 
Lynne, younger daughter of 
Wing Commander E. Chelmick. 
MBE. and Mrs Chelmick, of 
Colyton. Devon. 


Mr J J. ScbonfieW 
and Mrs T. Rahman! 

The engagement is announced 
between Jeremy, youngest son 
of the late Rabbi Dr F. 
Schonfeld and Mrs Judith 
Schonfeld. and Tamar, younger 
da ughier of Dr and Mrs L.Y. 
Rahmani, of Jerusalem. 


Mr A.CX. Mullis 
and Mbs C8. McLaren 
The engagement is announced 
between Alastair, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs Cedric Mullis, of 
Great Tey, Essex, and Camilla, 
younger daughter of Mr Andrew 
McLaren, of Coughton, 
Warwickshire, and Mrs Henry 
Digby. 


Mr GJ. Slay 

and Miss K.L. Jeffreys 
The engagement is announced 
between Gregory, eldest son of 
Professor and Mrs D. Slay, of 
Aberystwyth, and Katherine, 
only daughter of the late Mr G. 
Jeffreys and of Mrs S. Jeffreys, 
of Peterborough. . 


Mr A-G.M. Wynne Morgan 
and Miss LL Grady 
The engagement is announced 
between Adrian Guy Max. son 
of Mr D. Wynne Morgan, of 
Minchinhampion, Gloucester- 
shire. and Mrs R. Wynne Mor- 

f in. of East Preston. Sussex, and 
mrna Louise, daughter of Mr 
and Mre CJ.C. Gundy, of i 
Thorpe Bay, Essex. 


on 


Mr J.S. Norton 

and Miss T.E. Marmioa 

The engagement is announced 


and Mrs D.G. Kam-Smith, of ■ between Jeremy, son ofMrRA. 


Bognor Regis. West Sussex, and 
Susan, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs D. Craske, of Guildford, 
Surrey. 

Mr SJ*. Lent 

and Mbs MJL Brooks 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon Philip, youngest 
son of Mr and Mrs Stuart Lem. 
of Kings wood. Surrey, and Me- 
lissa Louise, eldest daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Michael Brooks, of 
Chalfoni St Giles. 
Buckinghamshire. 

Dr JJEL Maitland 
and Miss C. Winters 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian, son of Dr and 
Mrs R.l. Maitland, of Plym- 
outh. and Catherine, daughter of 
Mrs J. Winters, of Belfast, and 
the late Mr J; Winters. 


Norton and Mrs AM. Norton, 
of London, and Theresa, daugh- 
ter of the late Mr C-S. Marmion 
and Mrs E.B. Marmion, of 
Berkshire. 


Mr RA. Sldnr 
and Miss A.R. Hasenson 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs Gerald Sklar. of 

London. N20. and Anne, youn- 
gest daughter of Dr and Mrs 
Alec Hasenson. of London, N2. 


Marriages 

Captain S. Moore 
and Dr A Thompson 
The marriage took place 
August 30, at the Church of the 
immaculate Conception. Farm 
Street, of Captain Simon Moore, 
son of Dr and Mrs Patrick 
Moore, of Bentley, and Dr Anna 
Thompson, daughter of Dr and 
Mrs Gilbert Thompson. 


OBITUARY 

MR DAVID 
WOODWARD 

War correspondent of 
the old school 

.... rv_ ■ j woodward, the evacuated from Greece; he 
Mr David oua ttct of flew with the RAF on opera* 
Iasi survivorof n *1 h „ ons and was in action with 

SS* %£JES3£ * T& «■« Navy, once i, , 


ro^ecourseoflhe Second 

World War from the Middle 
East across Western Europe 
into Germany, died on Sep- 
tember 3. He was 76, 

The others with whom 
Woodward regularly travelled 
- Alan Moorehead. of the 


submarine. 

On D-Day he landed in 
Normandy by glider before 
dawn and was wounded al- 
most immediately. Arriving 
back in England that same 
dav. carrying his own and his 
colleagues' despatches, be 


Drily Express. Alexander Gif- quickly- recovered and „s 
ford of SeDaily Matt, a nd *« Normandv M™. 


Mr N-JJL Pascoe 
and Mbs JL.D. Tbomasson 
The engagement is announced 
between NigeL eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs M.B. Pascoe, of St 
8 relade. Jersey, and Jane, 
daughter of Mr DJ. Spark and 
of the late Mrs M.E.D. Spark, of 
Honiton, Devon. 


Mr H. Tome 
and Miss F. Hogg 
The engagement is announced 
between Hamish. younger son 
of the Rev A.R.R. and Mrs 
Tonic of The Manse ofBirnic 
Elgin, Morayshire, and Fiona. 


gtmnjgr daughter of Mr and Mrs 


Mr G.D. Palmer 
and Miss KJ. Mosenthiemer 
The marriage took place on 
August 23. in Bteckede, Lower 
Saxony, of Mr Gyles Palmer, 
son of Mr and Mrs Oliver Evans 
Palmer, of Horsham. Sussex, 
and Miss Karin Mosenthiemer. 
daughter of Herr and Frau Kari- 
Heinz Mosenthiemer. of 
Schwarzenbek, Schleswig 
Holstein. 


logg. of Edinburgh and 
Trinidad. 


DmI. 


Lieotenaot-Com minder 
Madran, RN, 
and Miss AJ. Martin 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of the late 
Mr K. Maclean and of Mrs R. 
Maclean, of Kingston Bagpuize, 
Oxfordshire, and Anne, daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs J.B. Martin, 
of Thorncote Green, 
Bedforshire. 


Mr JJ4. Saxon 
and Miss E.C Sutcliffe 
The engagement is announced 
between John, only son of Mr 
and Mrs E. Saxon, of Wemeth 
Hall Cottages. Cowlishaw Brow. 
Gee Cross, Hyde, Cheshire, and 
Elizabeth, youngest daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Giw. Sutcliffe, of 
Green (home, Edgworth, Bolton, 
Lancashire. 


Mr S-C. Watson 
and Miss LM. Oliver 
The engagement is announced 
between Stuart, son of Mr and 
Mrs A.C. Watson, of 
Glenborrodale. Ardnamurchan, 
and Lucinda, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs 1— LM. Oliver, of 
Bury St Edmunds. Suffolk. 


Mr PJ. Tabor 
and Mrs H.E. Dimsdale 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter J. Tabor, of 
Battersea, SWI I, and Hobblette 
E. Dimsdale. of Fulham, SW6. 


MrK.C. Wooff 
and Mbs S.B. Towndrow 
The engagement is announced 
between Kevin, son of Mr C. 
Wooff of Crossford, Dunferm- 
line. and Mrs C Wooff. of 
Brighton, Sussex, and Susan, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
P.E. Towndrow, of Woodford 
Wells. Essex. 


Mr NjAG. Wangh 
■ad Miss CJVL Murray Flatter 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. August 23. in 
Maxwdton Chapel. Moniaive, 
Dumfriesshire, between Mr 
Nicholas Waugh, son of Mr and 
Mrs Antony Waugh, and Miss 
Charlotte Murray Flutter, 
daughter of Major and Mrs 
Anthony Murray Rutter. ' 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Alison 
Gouriay, Miss Emma Murray 
Rutter. Miss Tamsin Foster and 
Harry StancJifle. Mr Adam 
Waugh was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon is being spent 
abroad. 


Luncheon 


Butchers' Company 

Mr David L. Franks, Master of 
the Butchers' Company, was in 
the chair at a luncheon held at 
Butchers' Hall yesterday for the 
training and educational sec- 
tions of the meat industry. Lord 
Graham of Edmonton, Presi- 
dent of the Institute of Meat, 
and Mr Paul Robinson also 
spoke. Lord Vestey. President of 
the Meat Industry Training 
Organisation, and Dr B.W. 
Hawes, Department of Educa- 
tion and Science, were among 
those present. 


Dinner 


Birkbeck Montagu's 
The partners of Birkbeck 
Montagu's held a dinner for the 
firm in honour of Mr Ronald 
Murrell on Thursday, Septem- 
ber 4, at the Inner Temple Hall 
to celebrate the completion by 
him of 50 years' association 
with them. Mr Justice Sleyn 
proposed a toast to Mr Murrell. 


Girls’ Public Day 
School Trust 

Autumn term for the 24 schools 
of the Girls’ Public Day School 
Trust will be begin next week. 
Halfrerm will be in the week of 
October 27. Mrs K.R. Irving will 
be taking up her appointment as 
Headmistress of Birkenhead 
High School. 


University news 


Cambridge 

The following elections 
awards have been made: 


Why . SKpttw SchgteraMp (1661 k A J 


and 


MAGDALENE COLLEGE 

Elected la a Kingsley Oy^tenowjwp: 

a c rdi 

Elected lo a Stootert Dye-MlowiMn: A 


J Fleming 


Elected fo Leslie Wilson resrardi 
scholarships: N K Bowne. Magdalene 


College rnhystai. A L Letane. Dart- 
. mouth 


College. USA OnaHtemaOcs) 
October 1987. S C Rowell. 


from _ _ ... 

Magdalene College (Slavonic studies). 
JD Todd. Magdalene College (pftyv- 

Eiected to Bundy schoiarsMna: N K 
-Bourne. J Dyer. N D Hopwood. J N 
lOteon. I J KlTby. K M Stevtn. R T 
WUCOCK 

Elected to SchOfainiWrer A W Darby. C 
P Dixon. J D Hart. D A Hodges. G P 
Muza. P R H Waller. 

Rejected to scholarships: P J Ago. C 
H J Bourne. J C A Bushed. S J Bryan. 
K S Hinhemi. C J Morgan. M G 
Pearce. J S ShaUauss. N A Webb. 


Cartwright Scholarship U674fc C A 
Jewed. Hruorv. Frankiand Scholar- 
ship ii69ii: K R canatan. Law. 
Skimp Scholarship <17051: O L Rees. 
Music. SWrm Scholarship 11 746V. P J 
Francis. Natural Sciences. Skim* 
Scholarship 11705): D M Knowles. 
Natural Sciences. Sklme Scholarship. 
il74Si: G Sargen. Natural Sciences. 
Jarrell Scholarship 1 18871. 

Rejected lo Scholarships: M A 
Smallwood. Engineering. Gasilin 
Scholarship liezfii: D M 
Engineering. GoslUn 
>a*r A M 


11621 


Prizes 


Adeane prbe J D Hart: Cleary me 
J C A Bushed. Davison prize: C P 
Dhau Hart prizes: J N Kdson. K M 
Stevtn; McFarlane-Grieve p r iz es for 
music: T E Gill. R J Preston- Bell: 
Minors 8rtgh! prize: N D Hopwood: 
Nicholas Whitworth prize: T R 
Sharpe: Norah Dias prizes: S J Bryan. 
C J Morgan. J S ShaUcrosK B C 
Saunders prizes: J Dyce. ] J Ktrhy. 


Jackson. 
_ Scholarship 

David. Enqusn- Skerne 

Scholarship 1 16611; J M Gardner. 

Geography. Bamardlston ScholarsJvlp 

11633): J B Lunt. MathemaUrs. Skene 
Scholarship fl66lfc O G GanMe. 

Natural Sciences. Skemv ScnolarsMp 
416611. 

Retained Scholarships: K A Hill. 
English: K C Jones. History: C E 
Tlpmestan. Law: A Lumb. Modern 
Languages: P N Bracfcln. Natural 
Sciences: J J David. Natural Sciences. 
Retained Exhibition: C M Roberta. 

History. 

Elected m Exhibitions: R a Franks. 
Engl neertng: T M Aldrich. History: s 
K Jain. MedKai Sciences: I C 
Chippendale. Natural Sciences. 


University Prizes. 

Mrs Claude Beddtngtoa Prize: D R 


Arming*/ Engittti: wimam Vaughan 

Lrwts Prize: R J Meams. 


College prizes 


Archaeatogy and amhropoiogy: A W 
Darby: architecture: N Temple: 
economics: G P Man* e n gi ne e ring: R 
T WUcock: law: P K K Chla. L G 
McFadden. I R Siderfs: mathematics: J 
N totoon: meoictne; d A Hodges; 
modern languages: w j Hety Hutchin- 
son. R J Kilim. M G Pearce: natural 
sciences: N K Bourne. N D Hopwood. 
K M SJevln P R H Waller; Dupsler 
isny prize: J D Hart Davison essay 
Prize: S R Skldle: Pesketl essay prize: 
s C RoweU. 

Masters reading prize: J J Adams. 


Harkness Scholarship: D mM. 
Natural Sciences: WUHam Barclay 
Soulrr Prize: O L Rees. Music 
institute of Mechanical Engineers 
Prize for Ptol e c i Work: J S Topping. 
Engineering. 

Named College Prizes 
Adderiey Prise for Law; R M 
Southern: Alexandria Prize for Eh' 
Mneering: _ K Roussopouloa. J S 
Topping: 


ROBINSON COLLEGE 
SctMXarsnios 


Elected mioTHuiar Scholarships: S E 
Fenton 


Topping: Driiry-Johns Mathematical 
Prize: R S Bostock: Figgis Memori a l 
Prize: C A Jewell: Cm 

Members' Prize: R J Mean* , 

Prize lor Economics: AEG Stobart: 
Jacobson Prize for Law: K R 
Cana van: Engineering Members' 
Prize: I J Wakeman: D W Morgan 
Prize: O L Rees. Siephane Francis 
Award fVctertnary Medicln 
Baker. 


tne): s J 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and la Memoriam 


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l.wnttirLord and thrrr U none rtsr. there 
u no God bmidr w 

Null -15 C 


BIRTHS 


■ On September 3rd. al Lbler 
Hospital. Stevenage, to Paula and 
Martin, a son. Harry. 

BEAOIXV On 4ih September 1906. 
in Melbourne. Australia, lo John and 
Manila, a son. David Alan. 

BLACK - On Sew ember 3rd 1986 lo 
Diana and James al Bristol Mai entity 
Hospital, a daughter Scarlett Diana. 
CHISWELL ■ On Sw ember 3rd. at the 
Royal Berks, lo Angela (nee Hamit 
ton* and Nicholas, a son. James 
Hamilton, a brother (or Emily. 
CROOKS On Tuesday. September 
2nd. al Bnsloi Maternity Hospital, to 
Alison i nee Macieodi and Louis, a 
son. Charles Seymour, a brother (or 
Alexander. 

OELANY ■ On August 29ih. 1906. lo 
Jane mee Holman) and Gary, a 
daughter. Poppy Jane. 

COLO • On August loth, ai Queen 
Chariotlc's Hospital, to Melanie tnee 
Kltorpcl! and Andrew, a son, 
Alexander Bcnlah Francis, a brother 
for Sapphira. 

HESSIAN On August 29th lo Louise 
(nee Wei ion i and Daman, a son On 
vrr Charm. 

MINT ■ On 28th August, ai the Ipswich 
Hospital, lo Angela inee Harvey) and 
Tun. a daughter. Alice Rose, a sister 
for Helen. 

IVORY - On August 30th 1986 al llw 
Western General Hospital. EdJn- 
burnh. to Oona and Brian, a son. 
KEMPTON ■ On August 16th. 1986. al 
Penfoiiry Hospital, lo Sally (nee 
Entmerton) and Paul, a son. Nicholas 
Andrew, a brother for Christopher. 
LYDDON ■ To Susie And Jonathan, a 
daughter. Catnona Manna- Cognac. 
France. September 3rd. 
MCCLMURRAV ■ On September IsL al 
I he i wer Hospital. Dundonald. to 
Lu mee Morgan i and Frank, a 
daughter. Laura Franrnne. 

MAY - On August 29ih. Is Sarah mfe 
Brook) and Paul, a daughter. Rape 
Laura. 

McBRIDE - On August 23rd. IO Mandy 
and Gerry, a daughter. ChJoe Olivia 
Mary- a Irtend for Naomi. 
OPCNSHAW • On August SlsL 1906. 
to Caroline nice Swill and Peter, a 
son. William Henry (Henry), a 
brolher for Alexandra. 

QUIRK - On 26lh August. 1986. al i 
Pembury Hosulal. to SaUy (rrfe 
Kemp) and Piers, a son. Frederick. | 


RfCHARDS -On lSUi August 1986. tn 
New York, lo Helen inee Davies) and 
Allien MacPherson Rtchards. a son. 
Alexander MacPherson Richards, a 
brother for Adelaide. 

SCRYMGEOUR-WEDOCnURN - (to 
3rd September. 1986. at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital, to Sarah tn^e 
Sevs-Phillipsi and James, a son. 
Charles. Richard, a brother for 
Catherine 

W ALLBANK On 1st September, ai the 
Royal Shrewsbury Mai entity Hospi- 
tal- to Gail mee Coullon) and 
Andrew. Iwin sons. Thomas Robert 
and Owen Julian, brothers for 
Claire. John. Christopher, and 
Richard. 


MARRIAGES 


PETSCHt MACDONALD On August 
23rd al GuiMlord Cathedral. Alexan- 
der Michael only v>n of Captain and 
Mrs John Peiwhi lo Manon Pauline 
Sommer daughter of (he late Mr 
Call urn MacDonald and of Mis 
Calliim MacDonald 
PICKLES : MCfMAKMR) . On 23rd 
August. 1986. at King's College Cha- 
pel. Aberdeen. David Marlin ptckles 
lo Valerie Ann McDiarmid. 
VtSHWANATN : HAYNES The mar- 
riage look place on IP August 1986. 
in Kashmir. between Mr 
Vmkatraman Vhhwanath Iyer, son 
of the laie Mr* and Cotomri H 
Vtshwanalh Iyer, and Miss Pamela 
Haynes, daughter of the late Rear 
Admiral w A Haynes. C8. OBE. and 
Mrs M T Haynes. 

WKTTWORTH 


Al (he 

church of St David. Beaufort. Ebbw 
Vale, on Augus( 3tth. 1986. Dr 
James A G Whitworth to Dr DUys 
Morgan. 


DEATHS 


BfSHOP. Billy, warden of Norfolk Nat- 
uralists Trust's Bird Reserve, al Cloy 
1937-79. on September 3rd. aged 73. 
Cremation private. Service of 
Thanksgiving. Blakeney Church. 
?pm Monday. September 8th. 


BLACKBURN - On August 3 1st peace- 
fully in hospital. Zita Mary, aged 62. 
of The Albany. Kbigston-upon- 
Thames. wife of Edgar Blackburn 
(Blacky) also deceased and much 
lov cd sister of Winnie. Funeral at Si 
Simon's and SI Jude's Church. 
Llshaw Bridge. MvMMum. N. York- 
shire. on Fridas . September 5th al 
12.30. Flowers may be sent to the 
church. 


BLOXAM on September 2nd. George 
Arthur - at home after an illness cou- 
rageously and ainrtly borne. He was 
much loved and will be sadly missed 
bv Ms children and grandchildren. 

BRYSON : On August 30th. after a 
short Illness. Cathy Abre Margaret, 
of Morely Rd. Richmond, loved wid- 
ow of Harold, snaer of Claire 
Sinclair Barber and BUI Sinclair, 
mother of Peter. Andrew and Nell. 
Funeral today (Friday). MortlaJce 
crematorium. 1.30pm. 


CRISWELL - On August 13th 1966. to 
SI Mary's Hospital. Colchester. Ada 
Mary GnsweU Uiee SawL aged 86 
years, wife of the Reverend Herbert 
GnsweU and motiier of Geoffrey and 
Rosemary. Reception a t body into 
Whenhoe Parish Church at A. 30 pm 
on Tuesday 9th September 1986 foi 
lowed by Requiem Eucharist at B OO 
pm. Funeral Service at Wlvenhoe 
Parish Church at 10.16 am on 
Wednesday 10(h September fol 
lowed by the committal at Colchester 
Crematorium. Family flowers only 
please, but if desired ronin buttons 
may be made towards the reorder 
big of Wlvenhoe Parish Church 
Letters and donabons c/o W.H 
Shephard Ud. 93-94 High Street. 
Ooichester. Essex. COI ITH. 
KARRIS Wallace George. Canon 
Emeritus of Southwark Cathedral 
aged 82 years, on September 2nd at 
Cranbome. Dorset Funeral al the 
Parish Church. Cranbome .al 12.00 
noon. Saturday. September 6th. do- 
nations if desired- to Royal 
Commonwealth Society for the 
Blind, c/o Richard T Adiera. Funeral 
Director. Handetey. Salisbury. Wots, 
or flowers if preferred. 

MEMORY ■ On 3rd September. 1986 
peacefully after a short Illness. 
Dorothy, wife of the late H W 
Hembry. Enquiries to Qarabul & 
Plum be. lei Bed lord 54547. 
MARNISON. Constance Dorothy 
(Ghuggtej on September 3rd. 1986. 
aged 97 years, beloved wife of the 
late Charles, of Hathersage. Derby 
slur* and mother of Mary LampUl of 
Wynyard Park. Btilmgham. Cleve- 
land Cremation private, a Memorial 
Service win be held al Hathersage at 
a later date. 

MILNER - On 3rd September, peaceful 
ly al home, al 39 Queensway. 
MIMenhall. David, loving husband of 
Tessa. Funeral Sevice at St Mary's. 
MJUenhalL on Wednesday. I Oth 
September al 11.45am. followed by 
cremation al Cambridge. Family 
flowers only, but donations If 
desired, to The British Kean 
FoundaUon. 

PARKES - On 2nd September, peace- 
fully In Torquay. Barbara (Bardie) 
widow of Kenneth E Parkes. former- 
ly of Thevdon Bob. Eastbourne and 
HttcMn. Much loved mother, grand 
mother and great grandmother. 
Funeral Service. Torquay Cemetery 
ChapeL Barton Rd. Torquay, at 
1 lam. Thursday, llih September. 
Enquiries (Iron Torbay and District 
Funeral Service Torquay 22447. 
WOODWARD - On September 3rd In 
hosDiial after a short illness, aged 76. 
David, beloved husband of Elizabeth 
and adored father of Uz. Donations if 
desired to Royal National Lifeboat 
tnsUluUon. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


CHARLES - Suddenly whilst on holi- 
day. on 2nd September. 1986. w. 
Scott Charles. OBE-. CA, 12 
Cumlodden Ave, Edinburgh. Dearly 
loved husband of Elizabeth, loving 
father of Anne. Gillian and Alison. 
Service al wamsion Crematorium. 
Edinburgh, on Monday. Sin Septem- 
ber. al 12 noon, lo which all friends 
are Invited. Family flowers only. 


de CANbAMO - On 3rd September. 
Tony and Mark, as a result of a car 
accident In Trance- Funeral private. 

ELLIN - On September 2nd 1986. 
peacefully after a long illness, cheer- 
fully borne with great courage. 
Svlna Mary Him (nee Palles) aged 
46 years, the must dearly loved wife 
of David and mother of Nicholas and 
Caroline. Funeral Service 2pm Sep- 
tember 9th. In The Church Of The 
Holy Family. Retgaie. Flowers or do- 
nations if desired to Radiotherapy 
Research Fund, c/o J Stoneman & 
Sons Lid. Tel: RedhUI 63456. 


CHADWYCK-HEALEY - A Memorial 
Service (or Sir Ovaries Arthur 
Chadwyck-Heaiey Bart O.BJL. wiJJ 
be held on Wednesday, is! October. 
1986. at 2.30pm. at Chelsea Old 
Church. Old Church SL London 
$W3. 

BREW - A Memorial Service for 
Crahame Drew will be held in Win- 
chester College Chapel, on Saturday. 
401 October at 12.15pm. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


CULUNGTON. George Leonard. 
Loved, remembered and greatly 
rrussed by lus wife, family and 
fnends. 

CURRCY. George Ramshaw - Today 
his birthday Dearest George who 
died 25th June- » very deeply 
uussed. Joan. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


H0UJS : COLTHURST - On September 
SUi. 1936. at Hampton-in -Arden 
Church. Hugh Marcus Noel (Mark) to 
Ruth Margaret ( Peggy i. Now al 
BrambiUigs. Park Rd. OBded. Surrey. 


(Theology): N D 

(Natural Sciences): C Garnet! 
(Architecture!: N Khera) (Economics): 
raoityk ' 


Graduate Prizes. 
Archte 


M Ogbom (Geography): J Shepherd 
(Computer Science): M D Ward 
(Natural Sciences); P J whcom (Theoi- 


m>). J r worthen (Classics) 
Etecled 


_ into Scholarships: P J AbOP 

(Engineering): M R Bateman (Natural 

Sciences); w A Hart (Natural Sci- 
ences]: R S Mctnlosh (Natural Sci- 
ences): J D Mills (Medical Sciences): S 
M Phillips (Chemical Engineering): N J 
Porter iLawc M E Schofield (Natural 
Sciences!; E Scuiihorae fonenial 
Si udles i; J H Stuckey (Natural Sci- 
ences): P N Taylor (Modern Lan- 
ouagfsl: T K S Wong (Engineering). 
Reelected into Scholarships: S H 
Bin ns (Veterinary Medicine!: R J 

Evans i Modern _ Languages): R G 


„ ikcturt: A J Bryce: EconomtoK J 
E Cox. Mathematics: P FtaveB. 
COUeqe Prizes. 

D R Arm) (age. English: I D 
Bralihwaiie. Engineering: A M David. 
' ids. Natural 


(sh.PJFranOs. _ 

Geography: J M Gardner. 

: O G GamMe. Natural 

Sciences: M j Gray. Engineering: A N 
Hurley. Engineering: a J Jack. 


Geography: D M Jackson.. 


inff.b M Knowles. Natural 

A J Lloyd. Engineering: J B LunL 

Mattiemaucs: D M Pyle. Natural 
Sciences: G Sargen. Natural Sciences: 
M A Smallwood. Engineering: D 
SUrk. Engineering: C F Tjnotson. 
Computer Science: D V GunstalL 
English. 


Fellows (Natural Sciences* S L Jeffeis 
M C Leahe i 


(Natural 


Engineering). 

Sciences). 

Exhibitions 

neekcied Into ExhfbHtoas: N J 
Alderman (English): S Chesters 
■Classics): L S N George (Archaeotoqy 

‘ N J Green 

„ Leung (Medical 

_ Mathers (Natural 

ScIrnc-esK R C Murray (Veterinary 
Medlrinoj; M F. E Roe (Medical 
Sciences). 


■uAini: von uruq 

and Anlhropokmy): 
(Arctuiecturek K K P 
Sctencesr.- D R Ma 


Other CDDege Awards: 

Culhben Casoon Award: G M Reakes- 
wiiHams: Bishop Browne's Prize for 
Reading: G M Reakes-WllUams: 
Gooderson Memorial Fund: R M 
Southern: Nicholas Prize: R J Meams: 
Martin Steele Award: D V TuustaD: 
-Richard Hardy Award: A C Burden. 


Travel Awards: 

John Hamlin Travel Awards: S M 
Cope. C Sanderson: Pennell Manorial 


Award: A C Melton JarreU Award: A 
- Walker: FeUowshUz-Ei " 


Wardens Prizes: A E AcfertO (Land 
Economy K A J WhUde (Natural 
Sciences): John Lyndon Whittaker 
Prize: K Darke (Social and Political 
Sciences! S Hanen (Musicj: Trevelyan 
prize in History: M Galeotu. 


G Walker: Fellowship-Endowment 
and Tutors' Fund: M W Mutter. R s 


Ntrhot*. O L B PtilUIM. J p RenanL D 
' p S_L Yong. 


G Summerfieid. _ ^ _ 

Portway Fund Awards: A J 
Downle. K A Harris. JBB Haylcr. J 
C Hollander. A J Jack. J L J KOOS. M 


College Prizes. A E ActoHL P J Alsou. 
m r Bateman. ! ~ 


S H Blnns. D Burns. S 

C S Chun. I R Clarke. S E Oockerty. R 
J Evans. R G Fellows. N D Fenton. C 
Garnett. W A Hart S L Jeffeis. N 
Kheral. M C LedllC. R S Mclnlotfi. J D 
Mills. M J Oaborn. S M Ptitotps. N J 


J Silcock. C M Ti _ 

Engineering Members' Fund Awards: 
B J Bartram. J A Coooer. J K Davys. 
K J Freeman. A E Radda. C E G 
Spnngate. J E Suddaras. 

Robert Barnes Bursary: L J McCarthy. 


Porter. M E Schoftekl. E Scudhorpe. J 

Shepherd. J H Sluckey. P N Taylor. T 
J R Thome. M D Wand. A J Whlkte. P 
J Wilcox. T K S Wong. J F Worthen. 


ST CATHARINE'S COLLEGE 
Etecled to (he TUIe of Senior Scholars 


K Roussgpoulos. Engineering: J S 
Topping. Engineering: D R Armtiage. 
English: D M Pyle. Natural Sciences. 


Clecled to Scholarships: C F Tmotson. 
Computer Science. Mrs Payne's 
Scholarship (1610): AEG Sloban. 
Economics. Sir - John Cfeypoote'fe 
Scholarship (1613): I D Bralihwaiie. 
Engineering. Gasilin Scholarship 
<1636!: M J Gray. Engineering. 
GosUln Scholarship >1626): A J Lloyd. 


EnqUWrlM. Bamardlston Scholar- 
tMg (1635R I J* Wakeman. 


En gU iee ri ng- B ar na ni talon scholar- 
ship (1633 k D Stark. Engineering. 


Lady Cockd ScholarsMp i. 

TunstaO. English. Mr SrastowT 
Scholarship il64oj: M Candy. Geog- 


Corpus Christ! 

College 

Cambridge 

Corpus Christi College. Cam- 
bridge intends to publish this 
year a centenary edition of the 
Register of Members. Old mem- 
bers who have not received a 
copy of the 1985 Letter of the 
Corpus Association are asked to 
send iheir current address to the 
Editor of the Letter, Corpus 
Christi College, Cambridge, 
CB2 1RH. 


Appointment 



Christopher Buckley of the 
Daily Telegraph - all died 
prematurely, the last being 
killed in the Korean War. 

Woodward subsequently 
became a producer of radio 
features for the BBC and a 
writer on naval subjects. 

Bom in England of Ameri- 
can parents. Woodward opted 
for British nationality, and 
after schooling at University 
College School, Hampstead, 
joined the Press Association 
and Reuters. 

Moving to Geneva, ne 
joined the iVovy Chronicle. 
which posted him to Rome 
and finally, in 1939. to Berlin. 
He was in Copenhagen on 
September 3, and heard of the 
outbreak of war from the head 
waiter of the Hotel 
d'Angleterre, who, as it hap- 
pened. also told him nearly six 
years later that Germany had 
surrendered. 

During the intervening 
years Woodward made his 
name as a brave and shrewd 
war correspondent, first for 
the News Chronicle and, from 
1 944, for the Manchester 
Guardian, which . shared his 
despatches with The Times: 

He was often in the bailie 
areas. He was at the siege of 
Tobruk and the aerial bom- 


tumed to Normandy before 
the break-oul ai Falaise. From 
there, he and his three com- 
panions travelled together 
across Europe and were 
among the first to enter Bei- 
scn. 

In 1946. he married Eliza- 
beth Ramsboiham, the per. 
sonal assistant to the British 
Ambassador in Brussels, and 
they spent two years in Paris, 
where he worked for Unesco, 
followed by three more as 
press attache to the British 
Legation in Israel. 

He joined Laurence 
Gilliam's team of radio fea< 
tunes producers at the BBC in 
1952. where he made good us6 
of his knowledge of naval and 
military history. He was the 
author of eight books, mostly 
on naval history, the most 
successful being The Tirpiiz 
(1953k an account of the 
career of the German 
battleship. 

A big. genial man with a 
rumbling laugh and a kindly 
wit, he belonged to a genera- 
tion of newspaper correspon- 
dents who expected to stay 
with a foreign war assignment 
for months or years; the days 
of quick dashes by air and 
rapid assessments were yet to 
come. 

He is survived by his wife 


bardjjieni of Malta, and was and their daughter. 

MR PHILIP RADCLIFFE 


Mr Simon Lewis Has been 
appointed head of com- 
mnnications for the Social 
Democratic Party until 
the next election. 


Kent College for 
Girls, Pembury 

Kent College for Girls. 
Pembury. announces that this is 
its centenary year. Boarders 
return for Autumn Term on 
September 9. and school begins 
on the following day. Amanda 
Ridgeon is brad of schooL 
Speech day is October 24^ind 
open day November 15. A foil 
programme of centenary events 
can be obtained from the Sec- 
retary, Kent College, Pembury, 
Kent. TN2 4AX. 


Wellingborough 

School 


Boarders return for Michaelmas 
Term at Wellingborough School 
on Monday, September 8, and 
school starts on Tuesday with 
650 pupils, boys and girls, from 
eight to eighteen. Miss S.E. 
Cooper is appointed 
housemisiress of Marsh House. 
Speech day is on October 25 
with Professor D.C Pack, Old 
Wellingburian, as the guest of 
honour. Old Wellingburian 
weekend is November 8-9 and 
the carol services are on Decem- 
ber 14, 15 and 16. 


Wilson’s School 

Michaelmas Term at Wilson's 
School begins today and ends on 
December 19. J.S. Pay is captain 
of- school, A.G. Howard and 
M.W. Scriminger are vice-cap- 
tains. Captain of football, is AJ. 
Reeves. Founder's day service 
will be held on October 1 at the 
school, when the Rev L.C. 
Edwards. Rector of Carshalton, 
will preach the foundation ser- 
mon. Speech day will take place 
on November 13 and Professor 
MJ. Wise will present the 
prizes. The entrance examina- 
tion for governors' places for 
September 1 987 win be held on 
October 25. 


Mr Philip Radcliffe, the 
Cambridge music critic and 
composer, died with his sister, 
Susan, in a motor accident in 
France on September 2. He 
was 81. 

Philip FitzHugh Radcliffe 
was born on April 27, (90S, 
the son of A. F. Radcliffe, a 
housemaster at Charterhouse, 
where he was educated. In 
1924, he went as a Classical 
Scholar to King's College, 
Cambridge. 

He was shy and sensitive, 
but immediately began to 
make friends through his dis- 
tinction as a musician and a 
play-reader. 

After a First in Classical 
Tripos Part I. he turned 
increasingly to music, being 
elected a Fellow in this subject 
in 1931. and a university 
lecturer in 1947. King's be- 
came his home for lire. He 
never left it for more than a 
few weeks, and was one of 
those who remained to keep 
its traditions alive during the 
war. 

His main gifts were a pas- 
sion for music and a remark- 
able musical memory. His 
sympathies lay with the music 
of the eighteenth and nine- 
teenth centuries, huge 
amounts of which he memo- 
rized with apparent ease. Yet 
his curiosity was boundless 
and did not deteriorate with 
the years. 

One of the things that gave 
him most pleasure as the years 
went by, was' that he found 
himself able to respond to 
much early music that he once 
thought cold and unmoving, 
and to twentieth century mu- 
sic that had seemed discor- 
dant and unrewarding. 

To his pupils, Radcliffe was 
a wise counsellor and good 
friend, never imposing bis 
views, but always trying to 
help them to find their own; 
he was particularly successful 
in helping composers to reach 
a consistent style -which best 
suited their ideas. He regarded 
teaching (and for him that 
meant individual supervision) 
as his most important activity. 


His writings ranged over a 
wide variety of subjects - his 
fellowship dissertation on to- 
nality in die sixteenth century; 
articles on song in Grove’s 
Dictionary and Denis 
Stevens's symposium, The 
History of Song . the article on 
Brahms in Grove: chapters for 
volumes of the New Oxford 
History of Music (to mention 
but a few); and two books, 
Mendelssohn (I9S4) and 
Beethoven's Siting Quartets 
(1965). 

The writings sprang natural- 
ly from his deep love of music. 
They fall into the category of 
perceptive and sensitive, rath- 
er than analytical and scholar- 
ly, criticism. He was also a 
charming and witty writer 
about people, as may be seen 
from a memoir he wrote for 
his college on Bernhard (Bo- 
ris) Ord and his E. J. Deni : a 
Centenary Memoir ( 1 976). 

His love of music found one 
further outlet: composition. 
He never ceased to compose, 
and indeed found it hard to 
believe that anyone could be a 
true musician without pos- 
sessing this urge. His idiom 
was traditional and restrained, 
and he sometimes referred to 
it as “Vaughan-Brahms”. Yet 
those who knew him well 
found it idiosyncratic and 
highly expressive of his gentle 
personality. 

Only a few of his pieces 
(most of them are small-scale) 
have been printed - two short 
choral introits. a part-song for 
male voices, and three songs 
for voice and piano. His most 
ambitious effort was the mu- 
sic for the Cambridge Greek 
Play Society’s Oedipus Tvran- 
/iu5(1965). 

Radcliffe was steeped in 
Greek drama, and he also 
composed less extensive but . 
highly successful music for 
Aristophanes's Clouds ( 1 962). 
Euripides's Medea (1974) and 
Sophocles's Electro (1977). 
Since his talent was lyric : 
rather than dramatic, the mu- 
sic was unobtrusi ve but served 
valuable ends, especially in 


and he continued to teach long ^ more reflective moments. 


after his official retirement. 
His nature made him particu- 
larly good with the shy, sensi- 
tive, or insecure 
undergraduate. 


His warmth of nature and 
his amusing recollections en- 
deared him to all who pene- 
trated his shyness. He never 
married. 


Science report 


DR ERNEST MOSSNER 

Dr Ernest Mossner, who 


Working to simplify robot actions w^^V fhisown 


Although robots are splaying 
an increasing part in industry 
by taking over some of the 
more routine jobs previously 
carried out by man, they are 
basically slow, cumbersome 
and unsophisticated. 

Dr Tamar Flash, an Israeli 
researcher at the Weizmann 
Institute of Science, believes 
this is because they are 
wrongly designed. -She says 
the only way to create robots 
that can master human- Ilk. 
movements is to study bow 
man controls his limbs by 
obeying instructions issued by 
the brain. 

While at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, Dr 
Flash joined with experts in 
the biological control of mo- 
tion, artificial intelligence and 
mechanical engineering to 
examine the hypothesis of so- 
called “equilibrium 
targeting", which, if correct, 
could simplify the designing of 
robots and their control. 

Working with humans and 
monkeys the group concluded 
that the movement of arms and 
legs was likely to be controlled 


By Andrew Wiseman 

by a different, much simpler 
system than the one specifi- 
cally designed to solve all the 
calculations necessary for man 
or robot to work properly. 

They found new evidence 
supporting this hypothesis 
and now believe that a limb is 
motionless when two opposing 
nrasdes, the eqetal forces of 
which could pull it one way or 
another, are neutralized. This 
creates a point of equilibrium 
between them. When the brain 
wants a limb to move, all it has 
to do is to instruct that point to 
shift in the direction of the 
desired motion. 

At the Weizmann Institute 
Dr Flash carried out a series of 


brain relied on a continuous 
series of feedback signals, on 
the basis of which it issued the 
necessary corrections through 
the body's nervous system. 

New evidence suggests that 
several movements, particu- 
larly fast ones, are pre-pro- 
grammed by the brain and do 
not need feedback corrections. 
Yet modern mdnstrial robots 
perform many motions slowly 
or at only moderate speeds 
because their computers, rely- 
ing mainly on issuing such 
corrections, cannot solve 
essential calculations quickly 
enough. 

Dr Flash has established 
(hat the human hand follows 


their home in Austin, Texas, 
was ah American scholar who 
did valuable research on 
Hume, on whom he wrote a 
substantial biography. 

Bora in New York in 1907, 
be published Bishop Butler 
and the Age of Reason, when 
he was only 30. 

The Forgotten Hume fol- 
lowed in 1943, as a prelude to 
his major biography. The Life 
of David Hume ( 1 954). 


Mossner joined the English 
faculty at Texas University in 
1947. and was appointed 
Ashbel Smith Professor of 
English and Philosophy in 
1970. 

In recognition of his contri- 
bution to scholarship, in par- 
ticular for his work on Hume, 
he received an honorary doc- 
torate from Edinburgh Uni- 
versity in 1976. 

Mossner and his wife had 


He edited the letters of suffered ill-health and pain for 
David Hume and Adam some years. Their only son. 
Smith, and in 1963 he pub- David, was killed in Vietnam. 


ANNIE POWELL 


experiments designed to an- the same trajectory whether its 
alyze bow people moved their movement is fast or slow. This, 
hands both in a straight line she says, should simplify the 
and in a curved trajectory. On work of robot designers: the 
tbe face of it, the picking up of basis mathematical calcnla- 
a cup of tea is a simple acL But tions revealed by her experi- 
the human brain and tbe robot meats could lad to more 
controller must solve similar efficient and versatile robots, 
complicated problems before provided engineers con- 
all the joints involved in this centrate on new designs for 
movement do as they are told, mechanical limbs, instead of 


Annie Powell whose elec- later lost the seat, but rea med 

^^ 0fU F^ h0nnda il in 1961 and continued to 
in I v /y made ho- the Commu- represent the ward until 1 983. 
nisi Party of Great Britain's Annie Powell was active in 
first woman mayor, died on the community, taking up 

Tt SJfVS 7 r K ««« , of housing *and 
A teacher, both of whose children’s nurseries. She was 

parents were also teachers, she also vice-president of the 
taught for many years at Moriais male voice choir. 
Poniypndd Secondary School She unsuccessfully fought 

5? ur a««l Sections for Sc 
, uem Welsh speaker, she was Communist Party at Rhonnda 
alw a Methodist lay preacher. East. She was on the party's 
She first won office in 1955 national executive for 20 


that 




^As 




Previously it was thought on faster and more powerful as ‘ councillor ' for ~ Pen'ygraig yeare.^nd 6 ^ 1 ^!^ 0 ^^ ‘ 
at to ensure this tbe human computer control* ward of the Rhonnda.. She chairman for 25 years •- 





19 




AT A SQUEEZE, YOU MIGHT FIND A PERSONAL COMPUTER AS COMPACT AS SONY’S. 


ony's first personal computer is something of a feat. 
It seems no one else has comfortably compressed as 
much brain power into such a small space. 

In fact, the SMC 210 packs the memory of any personal 
computer you could mention. 

Yet it takes up only a touch more 
space than a half page in this newspaper, 
and weighs in at a mere 13 lb. 

Mobile, unobtrusive and IBM 
compatible, Sony's computer runs all 
the usual software. And, with seven standard interfaces 
built-in, it’s extremely flexible. 

Of course, we never forget you have a choice. 

You can plump for the wafer thin LCD screen, or 


Sony's Trinitron monitor, specifically designed for personal 
computers. 

Whichever way you look at it you 
won’t be hard pressed to see the advantage 
of Sony’s SMC 210. 

Pr“ : Sully C'ox. Sony (UK) Lid.. Sony Hou.se. 

South Street, Staines T\YI8 4PF. 

Please wend me* details of the S.VIC' 210. 

Name* ! 


Company. 
Address — 


Postcode 


Business Telephone No*. 


Or cull Sully C'ox or Sharon Thomas on Staines (0784) 63466. 

L tllM U«| ini« !**iiiiirk «r 1 nit-rim I i'»mi I <>rtM»n>iiunuTi-iitiin>ii i«" rrufeifivcl imilxiniirL J 

iifilii'Simv I 'urjMinilliiii. J 


J 


m&m i* * wv i \ *•» i i~»» r“s® i i~rao<a».3| 



THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 


Prince in 
call for 
balanced 
teaching 

From Paul Vallely 
Boston 

Modem education has lost 
sight of the need to produce 
balanced individuals, the 
Prince of Wales told an 
audience of 18,000 academics 
and former Harvard students 
at the opening of tine celebra- 
tion of the university's 350th 
- anniversary yesterday . 

“We have for too long and 
too dangerously rejected the., 
best and most fundamental 
traditions of our Greek, Ro- 
man and Jewish inheritance.” 
he said in the Foundation Day 
address. 

“We have been gradually 
losing sight of the Greek 
philosophers' ideal which was 
to produce a balance between 
the several subjects that ca- 
tered for a boy's moral, 
intellectual, emotional and 
physical needs. 

“While we have been right 
to demand the kind of tech- 
nical education relevant to the 
needs of the 20 th century it 
would appear that we may 
have forgotten that . -a good 
man is a nobler work than a 
good technologist.'' 

The Prince, wearing the 
black and gold robes of the 
Chancellor of the University 
of Wales, returned to several 
of his favourite themes. 

The destruction of the 
world's rain forests, the issues 
raised by the exploration of 
space, the unprecedented 
power which mankind pos- 
sessed confronted us for what 
could be a final settlement. 

“Surely it is important that 
we do not let our children slip 
away into a world dominated 
entirely by sophisticated tech- 
nology, but rather teach them 
that to live on this world is no 
easy matter without standards 
to live by.” 

The Prince's remarks were 
enthusiastically applauded 
- Faced with the “increas- 
ingly different perceptions 
i that Americans and Europe- 
ans seem to have of each 
other's attitudes and 
interests,” it was important 
that the United Kingdom 
should act as an interpreter 
and mediator between the US 
and Europe. 


Early sign of winter on the grass slopes 


... * V- •1--M w ... .. 

; v--v "■ 



• ••• 


L . . , 
r - - 





Thatchers Scottish foray 

Politics avoided in 4 
whistle-stop visit 



The absence of snow 
and mountains are no 
obstacle to a East downhill 
slalom as demonstrated' 
by Lawrence Beck 
(above), who was compet- 
ing in the European Grass 
Ski Championships at 
Bntser Hill, near 
Peters field, Hampshire, 
yesterday. 

Beck, whose sister Les- 
ley is also a leading grass 
skier, set a grass skiing 
speed record of nearly 
65mph recently. 

Grass skis are shorter 
than those used on snow 
and propelled by metal 
tracks underneath. 

The championships 
end on Sunday. 

(Photograph: Tim Bishop) 


Black Sea disaster 
skippers in custody 


Continued from page 1 

from 79 to 116 with the 
discovery of more bodies. 

The Soviet authorities hold 
out no hope for the 282 people 
still listed as missing as clivers 
have established that no air 
pocket has been left inside the 
liner. 

Of those rescued from the 
Soviet Union's worst mer- 
chant marine disaster. 559 
were passengers and 227 crew 
members. 

. The Government paper 
Izvestia repented last night 
that it would take a week to 
recover the rest of the bodies 
trapped more than 150 feet 
under the sea. 


With the Convervativc 
Party’s fortunes in Scotland at 
their lowest ebb since Mre 
Thatcher came into ortice, me 
prime Minister set out yester- 
day to show her Govern- 
ment’s flag on a whistle-stop 
tour. At a series of brief en- 
gagements in carefully chosen 
venues between Edinburgh 
and the Borders region, she 
smiled and made small talk 
throughout some distinctly 
bland encounters. 

She uttered barely a word 

that came close to being a pol- 
itical speech as die admired 
computers in a high-tech fact- 
ory, praised the efforts of dis- 
abled ex-servicemen making 
paper poppies and accepted a 
fraggis, 

It was the Prime Minister s 
first extended foray into Scot- 
land since the disastrous local 
elections last May, when the 
Tory vote plummeted. The 
omens were not exactly fav- 
ourable this time. Early this 
week an opinion poll suggest- 
ed that some 16 of the 21 Con- 
servative seats in Scotland 
could go in the next general 
election, among them those of 
Mr Malcolm Rifkind, the 
Scottish Secretary, and Mr 
George Younger, the Defence 
Secretary. On the eve of her 
arrival a major North Sea oil 
employer, Britoll, announced 
the loss of 750 jobs. 

Surrounded by intense se- 
curity the Prime Minister kept 


By Philip Jacobson 

vervativc her distance from the sparse 
■otland at crowds and was hghllv booed 
nee Mrs as she left a bake* «n Hawick 
>ffice, the (this is, after all. a Ljberal 
ut yesier- stronghold, once David Steers 
Govern- constituency)- 
istle-stop Mre Thatcher smiled broad- 

brief en- jy, then gave her bodyguards a 
ly chosen nasty turn by chatting with a 
dinburgh boy in a wheelchair in the * 
pon. she middle of a melee of journal- ’’ 
mall talk ists and spectators. Mr Denis 
distinctly Thatcher was less pleased 
when an egg thrown at the 
? a word prime Minister's party spat- 
ing a pol- icred over his jacket. Passing 
admired up the chance to look over the 
tech fact- Scottish College or Textiles in 
ts of dis- nearby Galashiels, the former 

making rugby referee took off to talk 
xepted a rugger with some of the great 
names of the local team. 

Ainiger s -j-j-y as wc would, the accom- 
nt0 panying press corps signally 

oushxai g] led lo engage the Prime 

jH-tu Minister on the issue of her 
t*®* 1 “ party’s bleak electoral pros- 
fey - pecis north of the border. 43 

f2m£Z *Tm very impressed with 
■ 2 1 Con- what's happening with the de- 
Scotland velopment of new technology 
t general here." she declared at Fcrron- 
i those of ii's fectory in Edinburgh 
ind, the Asked if she was impressed 
and Mr with the Scottish opinion 
Defence polls, she saicL “I'm here to try 
re of her and help get more jobs for 
ti Sea oil Scotland. t to help sell its 
nounced products.'* 

A sharp retort, winning 
tense se- another round on points, 
ister kept Photograph, page 2 


•in ; 

N * .‘ 


Murder hunt man surrenders to police 


The operation has been 
complicated because the 105 
sq yd bole cut in the side of the 
vessel is facing the sea bed. 

According to Izvestia, some 
400 relatives of the missing 
are now in Novorossiysk and 
are being seen twice daily by 
Mr Aliyev to give them 
information on the rescue 
operation, which has been 
hampered by stormy seas 
Earlier yesterday, the of- 
ficial Communist Party paper 
Pravda blamed both captains 
for the disaster. 

“Specialists contend the 
cause lies in the violation ofhe 
navigation safety laws by both 
captains.” 


Continued from page 1 

area by train via Euston and 

Waterloo. 

On Wednesday night, he 
visited at least four public 
bouses in the town, where he 
played several games of pool 
with a couple of holiday- 
makers at the Foresters Arms, 
before picking up two girts 
who took him back to their 
tent at the camp-site at 11 pm 
in their blue Renault 5 car. 

Later he walked nearly half- 
a-mile to the warden’s hut, 
where at 1.42am yesterdayhe 
called the police. 

DeL Chief Supt Wheeler 
said he would like to hear 
from anyone who saw 
Stephenson in the 


Brockenhurst area on 
Wednesday night 

Mr David Priest, aged 31, 
from Newbaven, who was 
with his wife, Pauline, in the 
Foresters Arms, said: “We got 
talking to this man in a green 
jumper. My wife and I were 
playing pool and be asked to 
play the winner. We played for 
ages, and then he went over to 
talk to these girts. He was a 
Q uiet sort of character. " 

Mrs Priest said: “We rec- 
ognized him from- photo- 
graphs the next day. We are 
very shocked and scared. Be- 
lieve it or not, we had even 
arranged to meet him again 
the next nighL At dosing time, 
be came back to us and said: 
Tve been invited back to their 


tent for a candlelit supper.' He 
was red-eyed and a bit tipsy, 
and he had a gleam in his eye. 
They went off in the girls* 
rusty 1 0-year-okl Renault.” 

Police later confirmed that 
Stephenson had been in their 
company shortly before be 
was arrested, and said that 
both girls were being inter- 
viewed. 

Stephenson's pub crawl is 
believed to have taken him to 
the Morant Arms near Brock- 
enhurst Railway Station. 

Police are still trying to trace 
a woman believed to have 
been with Stephenson at one 
stage earlier in the week in the 
hired red Rover. 

Joseph Geaver. aged 80, his 
.disabled wife. Hilda, 70, their 


son, Thomas, 48, his wife, 
Wendy. 46. and the couple's 
live-in nurse, Ms Margaret 
Murphy, 75 were found dead 
on Tuesday morning. 

• The two brothers wanted 
for questioning about the five 
Hampshire murders were ar- 
rested yesterday in Coventry 
after an all night operation by 
armed police (Craig Scton 
writes). 

George Daly, aged 24, and 
his brother John, aged 20, 
both unemployed of Deed- 0 
more Road, Coventry, were 
last night being driven by 
detectives to Hampshire. 

George Daly was arrested 
without trouble at about 2 am 
yesterday in Elgar Road, 
Bellgreen, in Coventry. 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 
The Prince Michael of Kent: 
visits the Ronaldsway, Aircraft 
Company, Isle of Man,. 9.50, 
departs Ronaldsway Airport, 
12. 15; arrives Heathrow, 2.40 I 
New exhibitions 

Howard Coster Celebrity 
portraits: Kodak Gallery, Na- 
tional Centre of Photography, 
The Octagon, Milsom St, Bath; 
Mon to Sat 9 JO to 5.30 (ends ; 
Sept 25). 

Twenty for today: new por- 
trait photography; Octagon Gal- 
lery. National Centre of Photo- 
graphy, The Octagon. Milsom 


St, Bath: Mon to Sat 9.30 to 5.30 
(ends Oct 25). 

Still life: 60 paintings by 12 
artists; Dower House Gallery, 
108 High St, Berkhamsted; Mon 
to Sat 1 0 to S, dosed Wed (ends 
Sept 26). 

Flowers, paintings and crafts; 
Prema Art Centre. Uley, Gkn^ 
Fri to Sun 10 to 6 (ends Sept 7). 

Prinimakers explore: tech- 
niques of exploring a printed 
image; Gawthorpe Hall, 
-Pad [ham, nr Burnley: Mon to 
Fri 10 to 5, Sat and Sun 2 to 5 
(ends Oct 1). 

Modern glass: work by 
contemporary studio glass mak- 
ers: TowneJey Hall Art Gallery, 
Towneley Hall, Burnley; Mon to 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,143 



ACROSS 

1 Measure to convert two into 

• eight, say (S). 

4 Dear, they’d have to change 
to get dry (9). 

9 Victor Norman for instance 
(9L 

10 “We are going to — you 
your bread and your butler” 
(Kipling) (5). 

11 Silly fellow appears highly 
amused by a kingfisher 
(8,7). 

12 Front features including a 
death's-head (6). 

14 Told of longing to be in 
retirement homes for ani- 
mals (8). 

17 Author takes gin — a hazard, 
of course (4,4). 

19 Shakespearian lady . in Ara- 
bian castle (6). 

22 His father, wrote Bentley, 
ought never to have oc- 
curred (6J.6). 

24 Country river in the Soviet 
Union (5). 

25 Clairvoyance and ale all 
over the place along the sea- 
front (9). 

26 Sailor with mission detailed 
to go to church, but straying 
(9). 

27 Praise former ring, say (5). 

DOWN 

1 Beds contain flock maybe - 
they're highly accommodat- 
ing (4-5). 

2 Africans tabu union (5). 

3 A little mad, being stung for 


The National final of the Collins Dictionaries Times Crossword 
Championship is on Sunday at the Park Lane Hotel, London, at 
1 JOpm. admissiofl £2. 

Doctor who pots one across, page 12 
Concise Crossword page 12 . 


a loan (7). 

4 Brave Russian's a greem ent 

to cartel (6). 1 

5 Rajah's in trouble with his 
low caste subjects (8). 

6 Last month it indudes an 
uplift and a shortfall (7). 

7 Classic stars go to caravan- 
serai to get lambswooi (9). 

8 Oriental musketeer lades a 
distinctive character (5). 

13 Gathering for study with a 
series of lectures (9). 

15 Oddly called the Iasi resting 
place (5,4). 

16 Criticize article on gods (8). 

18 Like tiles made from glue 

and tar (7). 

20 One god and goddess sepa- 
rate (7). 

21 Report about English and 
the French nation (6). 

22 French department has a 
lake (5). 

23 Cook in the right type of 
oven (5). 


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i £1035113113 0 11 - I! EB • 
IB R • •.-■SHBEHHEnilEI 


Fri 10 to 530, Sun 12 to 5 (ends 
Oct 5). 

Exhibitions in progress 
Eric Baser: Illustrator lo a 
generation; Graves An Gallery, 
Surrey St, Sheffield; Mon to Sat 
10 to 8, Sun 2 to 5 (ends Sept 
28). 

Last chance to see 
Bhimbetka Art: watercolours 
of the rock-art of the Bhimbetka 
region; Physics Building, 
Southampton University, 830 
to 7. 

Marjan Hormozi: paintings 
and drawings; Newc as tle Poly- 
technic Gallery, Library Build- 
ing, Sandyford Lane; 10 to 4. 

William Hogarth: Prints; 
Stratford-npon-Avon Town 
Hall, 10 to 8 
Music 

i Conceit by the Band of the 
'Metropolitan Police; Redoubt 
[Fortress, Eastbourne, 730. 

■ Recital by Anne Emery 
|(mezzo-cxmDako); Tewkesbury 

General 

'Antique Book Fair; The Music 
Hall, Shrewsbury, today 2 to 8, 
■tomorrow 10 to 5. 

Top Films 

The top box-office Hrae in Lon- 
don: 

1 (-1 Aliens 

2 (- ) Highlander 

3 (t ) Hannah and Hor Sisters 
4(2) A Room With A View 
5(3) Target 

6(4 The Color Purple 

7 (5 ) Pretty fri Pink 

8 (- ) Rosa Luxemburg 
9(6 i Cobra 

10(8) Desert Hearts 

The top fttma to the p ro vin ce s: 

1 Hannah and Her Sisters 

2 The Karati Kid Part U 

3 Cobra 

4 Pretty in Pink 

5 The Color Purple 
EmMd By Saorniommoamt 


Top video rentals 

' 1 ft) The Goonies 
2(35) SKverado 
3(3} Explorers 
4(8) Bfrninators 
5(2) WOird Science 
6(50) Volunteers 
7(7) The Stuff 
8(9 j Police Academy 2 
9(6) Cocoon. 

10(5 ) No Surrender 

Supplied by 

Anniversaries 

Births: Louis XIV. Kina of 
France 1643-1715. Saim-Ger- 
main-cn-Laye. 1638; Johann 
Christian Bkh. youngest son of 
Johann Sebastian Bach, Leipzig, 
1735; Robert Fergussoo, poet, 
Edinburgh, 1750; Caspar 
Friedrich, painter, Greifswold, 
Germany. 1774; Giacomo 
Meyerbeer, composer, TasdorL 
Germany, 1791; Vfclorien Sar- 
doa. playwright, Paris, 1831. 

Deaths: John Home, drama- 
tist. Edinburgh. 1808: Auguste 
Comte, philosopher, founder of 
Positivism. Puis, 18S7;-Charfes 
Peguy, poet. VaJleroy. France, 
1914. 


Food prices 


Tower Bridge 

Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 4.00 pm. 

Oor address 


Information for inclusion In Tne 
Times Intormwon servic e should be 
sen! Io: The Editor. ■ TiS. Ttie Times. 
po Bo* 7. i virwitM Street. London. 
El 9XN. 


Discovery apples, intro d u ced 
only in the last few years as an 
early English crop, are gaining 
rapidly in popularity. Crisp, 
sweet and juicy, they are recom- 
mended at around 30p a pound. 

Victoria plums are now 
becoming more widely avail- 
able, and the first of this 
season's damsons are in the 
shops at around 35p a pound. 
Italian white grapes are superb 
quality at about 75pa pound. 

For something out of the 
ordinary try fresh figs at 20-25p " 
each, very different from the 
dried variety. 

Those who have recently 
spent holidays on the Continent 
will welcome the chance to buy 
delicious * phim tomatoes at 
around 40p a pound. 

Runner beans are good qual- 
ity at 40-50p a pound, and 
cauliflowers down to 30-40p 
each are excellent value. Sweet- 
corn is still Surly dear at about 
30p a cob but as the season 1 
continues, they will get cheaper. , 

Lamb remains a tempting' 
,nieat buy: whole leg in Dewhorst | 
is £1.69 a pound and mixed 
chops £1.84. Tcsco have lamb 
chops at £1.78 and chilled 
chicken 67p a pound P resto 
whole leg of New Zealand Iamb 
is down to £138 a pound, 
boneless pork shoulder Ssp, and 
frozen ducks up to 41b 7ozs 
£2.99 each. ASDA offer topside 
and silverside at £1.89 a pound 
and stewing beef at £1.19. 
Sain&bffiry's minced beef is a 
good buy at 88p. 

In Fine Fare, Bernard Mat- 
thews 21b roasting chickens are 
99p each. Marks & Spencer 
have reduced fresh chicken by 
20p to 72p a pound. Bd» have 
made similar reductions for 
frozen topside and ramp steak 
down to £1.69 and their bone- 
less pork shoulder is 99p a 


Times Portfolio Odd rules era as 
fOHowx 

t Timet Portfolio is fro#. Purchase 
of The Times ts not a common of 
taking part. 

a Times Portfolio Usl c o mpr is e s a 
group of public companies whose 
shares are Hated on Ute Stock 
Exchange ana Quoted m The Times 
Slock Exchange prices page. The 
companies comprtsirg mat list win 
change Irani day lo daw. The IM 
(which ts numbered i -44) ts divided 
into lour randomly distributed groups 
of II shares. Every portfol i o card 
contains l wo numbers from each 
group and each card oowatia a 
unique set of numbers. 

3 Times portfolla -dividend' win be 
the figure in pence which repres e nts 
(he optimum movement in prices (Le. 
(he largest Incre a se or lowest lass) of a 
cambuuHon of eight (two tram each 
randomly dtstneuteogroup within me 
44 shares! of (he 44 snawwwdi on 
any on# day comprise The Times 
Portfolio USL 

4 The daily dividend wilt be 
announced each day and the weekly 
dividend wui be announced each 
Saturday hi The Times. 

a Times Portfolio Ha and details. of 
(he daily or weekly dividend HU afao 
be available for inspection at (he 
offices of The Times. 

6 If the overall price move me nt of 
more than one combination of shares 
equals the dividend, the Mize will be 
equally dfvMM among the claimants 
homing those combinations of shares. 

7 All claims are subteei io scrutiny 
! before payment. Any Times Portfolio 

cam uui is defaced, tampered with or 
tacorrecuy pruned In any way will be. 
declared void. 

9 Employees of News Internationa] 

B e ana its adwldbirtes ami of 
uroprlm Croup Limited (producers 
and disiribulon of tlw cardi or 
members of Uielr immediate famines 
are not allowed to play Times 
Portfolio. 

9 All oartldpanK win be Sublog to 
these Rules, AU InsUTtehons «n i “hew 
to May" and "how to claim" whether 
published fn The Times or in Tunes 
Portfolio cants will oe deemed lo be 
kuI of (hese Rules. The Editor 
reserve* me right to amend the Rules. 

10 hi any dispute. The Editor's 
derision b final and no correspon- 
dence win be entered into. 


Roods 

Wales and West: A55c 
Contraflow- either side of 
Boddwyd0an Bypass; delays be- 
tween 'Abeigele and Nortbop. 
A372: Temporary traffic lights S 
of Somertbn. MS: Lane closures 
between junctions 25 and 26 
(Taunton/ Wellington). 

The Midlands: Ml: 
Contraflow between junctions. 
20 and 21 (near Lutterworth). 
M6: Contra-flow between junc- 
tions 4A and 5 (E of 
Birmingham/M24). M5: 
Contraflow between junctions 4 
and 5 (A38/Droitwich). 

The North: M63: Roadworks 
at Barton Bridge. M6: Delays in 
both directions between junc- 
tion 32 and 33 (Preston). A54: 
Roadworks at Kdsall mil, care 
required. Scotland: M& Delays 
and diversions around 
Newbridge. A9& Single line 
traffic with stop/go boards at 
Elgin. A82: lights and single 
line traffic N of Artflui, 
Dunbartonshire. 

Information supplied by AA 

Road safety 

The Department ofTransport 
has bundled a new advertising 
campaign aimed at reducing 
casualties to pedestrians, es- 
pecially young children.' 

Parents can apply for a fine 
safety pack consisting of leaflets, 
puzzle book, stickers and a 
button badge. 

For further information tele- 
phone: 0800 234888.0 


Rail guide 


British Rail’s new bi-annual 
timetable comes into operation 
on 29 September. The rede- 
signed timetable covers the 
period up to 10 May 1987. 

Copies are available, price 
£2.95, from BR stations and 
travel centres. 


ll If Her any reason The Times 

Prices Page b not published lo (he 
normal way nines PortfOUo win be 
suspended for Dial nay. 


On each day your unMu# set of eight 
numbers win repres en t co mm ercial 
and industrial shares published In The 
Times Portfolio list which will appear 
on the Smelt E x c h ange Prices page- 
in the columns provided next lo 
your shares note the price change (* 
or in pence, as pubUHMd m that 
day's Times. 

Alter listing the price changes of 
your (Wit shares ror that day. add un 
an eight share changes to give you 
your overall focal plus or minus 1+ or ■ 

). 

Chech your overall total a gains t The 
Times Portfolio dividend published on 
Uw Stack E x change Prices ptge. 

II your overall total matches The 

Times Portfolio dividend you have 
won outrtghi or a share of the locti ; 
prize money staled for that day and i 
must claim your prize as Instructed : 
Mow. 

How N pf»> - Wnm DMdend 

Monday Saturday record your daily 
Portfolio total. 

Add Ihese tOfieuwr h> de t erm in e 
your weekly portfolio total. 

local matches Uw published 

S dividend figure you have won 
I or a share of the prize money 
or that week, and must claim 
your prize as Instructed below. 

How co data 

No «tab*s can be accepted oufskle thsse 


You mtEt have your taro with you 
when you telephone. 

If you are unable to telephone 
someone else can claim un your behalf 
but thw must have your card and call 
The Times Portfolio claims line 
between the stipulated times. 

No responsibility can be accented 
for failure to conun the dam office 
for any reason within U># stated 
hours. 

The above instructions are an- 
pfteabk- to both dally and weekly 
dividend claims. 


Weather 

forecast 

A weak trongfr of tow 
pressure over Southern 
Scotland will be slow- 
moving. 

6 am to midnight 

London, SE, cont rol S, E, SW, 
NW_ cantrte N England, Eate 
Angfia, Wdtenda, Watea, Channel 

(stands: Dry, sunny periods; wind 
variable, light max temp 20C(68F). 

Labe District, Ha of Man, SW 
Scotland, Glas gow, Central High- 
lands, AigyB, W ortham Ireland: 
Rather cloudy, a Httte rain in places; 
wind westerly moderate; max tamp 
16C(61F). 

M : Catjdnfufl BmIom • Ctebtekmuila 
. biWBlIlf UUIIM1, n —wyi 

and Dundee: Bright or sunny inter- 
vals, . mainly dry; wind south- 
westerly. flgnt or moderate; max 


Aba nte e n . Moray Rrtfc Sunny 

periods, i s ol ate d showers, wind 
westerly moderate or fresh; max 
temp 16C (61 Q. 

NE, NW Scotland, Orkney, Shet- 
land: Sunny intervals, showers: 
wind west erty fr esh or strong, max 
temp 14C (57F). 

Outlook for Saturday and Sun- 
day: rather dandy fri central and 
southern districts with rein in 
places- Brighter showery weather In 
the north. Rather cool but near 
normal fri parts ofttie S. 


SUIltMk 
6.19 am 


7.26 am 
first quarter Septtmtar 11 


SonaatK 
7.39 pm 


Lighting-up time 

London &09 pm «o5J51 am 
Bristol 8.18 pen to 600 am 
Eeficfr u rgb 828 pm go 5^6 am 
Manchester 8:20 pm to 506 am 
PanTwu p 0-29 pm to 8.14 am 

Yesterday 

Tampereiures at midday yesterday: c. 
dourtf, tafr; r. rain; s. sun. 

C F C F 

Mbnt c 1355 Soarony c 1661 
STmotam 11661 Inverness c 1355 
Ma c&ool f 1457 Jamay c 1864 
BtteCDT a 1661 London S1864 
Carcftf s 1559 HTncfntar c 1457 
Edinburgh c-1457 NuciitK 11457 
Glasgow c 1355 Rlnldowoy s 1457 



NOON TODAY 


The pound 


AtatoBaS 
Austria Sen 
BatgfcmiFr 
CanadaS 
Denmark Kr 
fintandMkk 
franc* fir 

Germany Dm 


Hong K ong* 

Inland Pt 
Italy Ua 
Japan Yen 
Mtahorto nd aQd 
Norway Kr 

flualimtel Ce# 

rannni esc 
Sooth Africa Rd 



USAS 156S 

Yugoslavia Dnr 78000 

flnes-toramaa dariommanon tank notes 
only as supplied by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers: 
cheques and after (ocean currency 
business. 

Rood Price Index: 384.7 

London: The FT index dosed up 9.7 m 
13343. 

©Times newspapers umitexl 

res*. Printed by London Pan iPrint- 
rni Limned of i Virginia Street. 
London El 9XN. FridajT S septem- 


High rides 


Abtedem 

Avonmouth 


)16c 


Dover 

FMmouOi 

Gtaogow 

Harwich 


bC 


Lett 

Liverpool 


b-ttiu» sky: be -Mur star and cloud: e- 
cloudy: o-owercasC f-fog: cMrtxsie: It- 
hall: mM-mtsC r-rafn; unow; Uv 
Uiundnstorm: p-showere. 
ftrrawi jhow wind direction, wind 
speed fmphi clrcted. Teroperaturr 
cendgnOe. 


Port sm outtt 

Sborahom 


AM 

NT 

PM 

KT 

3-23 

7.1 

337 

73 

2.30 

44 

305 

43 

8.49 

12 J 

9.01 

133 

1Z06 

34 12-29 

3.1 

8.34 

11.7 

8.46 

121 

722 

SB 

734 

55 

12.08 

6.4 12-30 

37 

&52 

5.1 

7.04 

53 

1£6 

44 

245 

4.1 

1.09 

4.1 

136 

33 

11-52 

5.4 



7.45 

7 A 

8.13 

73 

7J3B 

94 

749 

92 

480 

55 

4-28 

55 

12.33 

9.4 1253 

93 

10^0 

25 11,37 

23 

1ZB 

4.7 

138 

48 

7.48 

65 

6-02 

7.1 

6.38 

6.9 

6.52 

7.1 

732 

39 

737 

43 

6.18 

5.4 

631 

5.6 

654 

21 

854 

23 

1239 

45 

1.04 

45 

12ZB 

6.1 

1242 

63 

12.10 

4.4 1237 

45 

753 

95 

656 

95 

4-56 

5 A 

538 

5.4 

1.12 

43 

134 

43 


Around Britain 


SunRain 
hre in 

EAST COAST 
ScoAoro X JBB 

Britangten 331.01 
Craowr 23 ZB 

Lowestoft 45 ZB 

Clacton 5.1 .13 

S tt ? ffoOA g^* 

5.4 58 

Bri{pnoa 35 .09 

Wtortbfafl 7 Z JIB 

IMM 7.1 07 

BogaorR BJ JOB 


BomneMh 6 3 .14 
Poole S 2 .19 

Swono go * 85 .17 
Woymottt 8.9 .18 
ExmouHi 87 -05 
Trngmnooth 95 .06 
Toiquay 75 .06 
Pei r nottt 105 .19 

Jersey 95 M 
Guernsey 10.7 57 
WEST COAST 
ScOyWes 11.0 .10 
Nmequey 95 ZZ 


\ SunRain Max 

hra fri C F 

, . Mfmcow b e s 54 16 61 

1 OguHy Tenby 7.0 56 15 59 

. !» _, C o fwy n Bay 65 ZZ 14 57 

! SSL M e w — be 4.7 53 16 61 

J Dougin .17 14 57 

1 gaET EHGLAM) AND WALES 

London 2.7 .13 15 59 

bright WhnmMipt 7.8 59 16 61 

am BrbtoffCbfl 6 z .16 18 64 

CftmHf (CbS 75 50 17 63 

bright AngJosoy 9L2 .10 15 59 

«my Wtfoci ipt 85 56 15 69 

Sunny M o nchovte r 85 .32 15 59 

sunny WoMbtfi o i u 45 ZB 15 59 

sunny tecBw-iyiw. 1.7 150 13 55 

sunny CartWo 85 M 16 61 

SCOTLAND 

n e m i — u lr 95 A9 14 57 

Pnwteifck 105 50 14 57 

G*esgow 7 A 55 16 61 

2ES E“ 7 t 13 S5 

Stamaway 45 - 13 55 


rvtntolowir 95 A9 

Pmoteifck 105 50 

Gtesgow 7.4 55 

Tnwt 7.4 ZB 

Stamoway 45 

Lorwiefc 45 .02 

Wick 35 .01 

XMon 35 .03 

Aberdeen 7.0 55 

SL Andrews 7.7 54 

Edtabiagh 9-7 1.02 

NORTHERN IRELAM) 
BteteU 9.7 53 


sunny SSL- 

22 s 


» are Wednesday's Dgoroo 


Abroad 


M00AY: t ckMKb d, drista; f, fair, fg, loft r, rain: s. sun: an, snow: L thunder. 

'9£S ;ls§ss uliBSS' 

Alek'dria f 29 84 Cam s 29 64 Hate ^ 28 82 ^ 10 

Algien s 30 66 DuMta t 14 57 SSSroo l % £ 1 i? 


Ml* I 14 57 MefcVno s 21 70 Sjmtooo* 

f » S fSo 8 "* - s V. M***? 0 * c 19 66StaS^ 


c 24 75 Funchal s 24 75 Moscow 

- ™ * i 7 ' 83 ““"k* 

3 » 72 Gibraltar a 24 75 Nairobi 
1 16 81 H el sfriki f 14 57 Naples 
r » 75 JtagK t 27 81 NDeM 
C U 70 kn&ek c IB 61 N York* 
s 21 70 fstaobuf c 24 75 Wee 
s 15 59 Jeddah s 36 97 Oeta 
s 22 TO JoTurg" s 21 70 Peris 
1 S s 30 66 Peking 


s 29 84 tamf I 33 9t Seoul 

f 24 75 Man a 27 81 Skto’Dor 

c 14 57 Montreal- e 16 81 Stllhokn 
s 24 75 Moscow c 17 63 Sbeab-ra 
S 17 63 Munfcb eiasSMw 


C F C F 

a 27 81 Rome f 25 Tf 
S 30 86 Sabboro c 10 50 
I 28 82 S Frisco* I 19 68 
s 21 70 Santiago* s 15 59 
C T9 66 3 Paulo* s 22 72 
I 33 91 Seoul I 26 79 
* 27 81 Sbto’por I 31 68 
s If 81 SfiOioln r 13 55 
B ) 7 f3 straatfrg f 16 61 
= 13 55 Sydney f 23 73 
s 20 68 Tan** i 26 79 
1 27 81 TeMvIv 9 30 86 
i 33 91 Tenenfe s 26 79 
= g S Tokyo s 34 93 
l M 77 Torereo* 5 21 70 
| 16 61 Turns I 29 84 

16 61 Vatande I 28 82 


c 17 63 Streab’ig 

;sgi!Ss 

a 27 81 Taf-evlv 
s g 91 Tenenfe 
C 22 72 Tokyo 
5 M 77 Torenar 
* 16 61 Tiites 
I 18 61 Valencia 


1 " S f®*™ s 30 88 Peking l 27 8t VanCm* a to SB 

BAns* t 6 43 LPateat S 28 82 Pwtfi C 15 H VonEr l « « 


Cairo a 34 93 Lisbon 9 27 81 Prague 

CepeTn s 21 70 Locarno 5 24 75 Re^rik 

CJtenro s 27 B1 LAnwto* 1 21 70 Rhodes 

Chicago* e 27 81 LuMmw f 21 70 ffiodej 

WttSch S 15 56 UmMO s 30 86 ^dh 


■ “7 ww iai ihtmioi g quiuq rra 

* denotes Wettesday s 89ns ere latest avteatse 


c 15 59 Vance s 23 73 

r 13 55 Vienua f 17 63 

r 2. S Wereew I 15 50 

* 82 Wash-ton* c 24 75 

a 22 72 Wamon 9 14 57 

3 40104 Zurich t 14 57 

















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business and finance 


THE 



TIMES 


FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MARKFT 

FT 30 Share 

1334.3 (+9.7) 

FT-SE 100 

1680.3 (+9.6) 

Bargains • 

21411 

USM (Datastream) 

126.99 (- 0 . 14 ) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

1 .5050 (+ 0 . 0045 ) 

W German mark 

3.0544 (+ 0 . 0129 ) 

Trade-weighted 

71.7 (+ 0 . 3 ) 

SPP buys 
Sykes 

SPP, which supplies fire 
fighting equipment, is nearly 
doubling its size with the 
acquisition of Henry Sykes, 
one of the country's largest 
suppliers of pumps used by 
mines, quarries and water 
authorities. 

SPP is paying £4.2 million 
but will claw back most of its 
costs by rationalization, 
mainly through dosing its 
Reading plant and relocating 
to the Henry Sykes factory at 
Gloucestershire. Over 200 
jobs win go as part of the 
transfer. 

Henry Sykes, part of the 
Aico Standard group, last year 
earned pretax profits of 
£144,000 on turnover of al- i 
most £22 million. SPP, which | 
yesterday reported half time 
profits slightly down at £1.44 
million on turnover of nearly 
£18 million, is expecting to 
substantially improve the 
performance of Henry Sykes. 

Cadbury up 

The benefits of the 
restructuring of the Cadbury 
Schweppes group are begin- 
ning to show through in 
proms. The group announced 
that trading profit was up 9.7 
per cent to £48.7 million for 
the six months to June 14, 

1 986. while lower interest 
charges allowed pretax profit 
to rise 27 peT cent to £43.1 
million. Tempos, page 22 

Groveball halt 

Grovebeli, the motor dealer 
and medical equipment sup- 
plier. halted dealings in its 
shares last night after receivers 
moved in at several of its 
subsidiaries. At the suspen- 
sion price of 5p, the business is 
valued at £1.8 million. 

Rivlin in talks 

Talks between ID & S 
Rivlin and Marlborough 
Property Holdings may lead to 
a recommended offer by 
Rivlin for Marlborough. A 
further announcement will be 
made soon. 

Coalite offer 

The board of Hargreaves, 
the fuel and transport group, 
said it had noted Coalite's 
formal offer document and 
would send a detailed re- 
sponse soon. 


Renewed growth 


5* 


around corner 
says Chancellor 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


WJV- 





The Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, Mr Nigel Lawson, 
yesterday hit back at recent 
gloomy forecasts for the econ- 
omy. There were already signs 
of renewed growth, he said, 
and the prospects for a 
resumption of sustainable 
growth next year were good. 

Mr Lawson, addressing the 
annual dinner of the Scottish 
Confederation of British In- 

| dustry in Glasgow, spoke with 
confidence of the continued 
revival of enterprise in 
Britain. 

The economy had slowed 
down this year, he said, be- 
cause of the initial dampening 
impact of lower oS prices on 
world activity. 

“But the most recent 
monthly figures are more 
encouraging/* be said, “with 
signs of renewed growth. My 
best judgement remains that 
what we have experienced is 
merely a brief pause, and that 
the outlook for next year and 
beyond remains good.” 

There were also signs of a 
pick-up in activity in West 
Germany, the Chancellor said. 

Mr Lawson is on the side of 
the West German and Japa- 
nese authorities on the ques- 
tion of whether the world 
economy requires a boost to 
break into higher growth. 

Policy makers in Bonn and 
Tokyo, taking the view that 
the economic recovery is 
about to occur, naturally have 
refused to bow to pressure 
from Washington to provide 
an additional economic 
stimulus. 


Pound gains 
instrength 

The pond strengthened 
yesterday, in the wake of 
Wednesday's S4 bfltian addi- 
tion to the reserves through a 
massive fiend-raising opera- 
tion <m the Eoro-markets. 

The pound rose 45 punts to . 
$1.5050 and by nearly two 
pfennigs to DM34532. The 
sterling Index, helped by a 
firmer oil price above $15 a 
barrel, rose 03 to TL7. 

The detailed second quarter 
balance of p ay me n t s figures 
showed a current account sur- 

with £597 million in the first 
quarter.' The emulative first 
half snrp] as, of £942 arilfion, 
is well below the Treasury 
forecast of a foil-year snrpfos 
of £33 wnitii*. 

The Invisibles snrpfns was 
£136 bQiioii in the second 
quarter, down from £246 bil- 
Ifcra in the first. The visible 
trade deficit widened to £141 
biDaon from £146 bfiEon. 

Hie issue is likely to .be an 
important one at the annual 
meetings of the . International 
Monetary Fund and World 
Bank at the end of the month. 
But the Chancellor, on last 
night's showing, is unlikely to 
bade the Americans. 

In his speech last night, Mr 
Lawsouldid not directly refer 
to the . balance of payments, 
and growing fears in financial 


Biinzl in £197.4m 
rights issue 


By Teresa Poole 


Bunzi, the paper, plastics 
and transportation company, 
yesterday announced a £197.4 
million rights issue’ — a sign 
that, its mnbitious takeover 
programme still has further to 
go. 

The company said its ability 
to take advantage of attractive 
new opportunities and make 
further significant ac- 
quisitions for cash was con- 
strained by its capital base. 

In the past 18 months, 
Bunzi has bought 24 com- 
panies, including United Parr 
cels, Stewart Plastics and 
Robert Moss, at a total cost of 
£221 million, which has 
pushed borrowings up to al- 
most £100 million. 

Mr James White, managing 
director, said: “Our strategy is 
going to see a continuation of 
the pattern so far. We do not 
intend to use the proceeds for 
one blockbuster move.” The 
chosen markets for expansion 
are Britain and the United 
States. 

Bunzi also announced re- 


sults for the first half of 1986, 
which showed a 43 per cent 
increase in pretax profits .to 
£27.1 million on sales of £470. 
mJTTiqfc, up from£406 miffidn.' 
A dividend increase of at least 
20 per cent is forecast for the 
full year. ... 

Terms ofthe rights issue are 
one new share at 195p for 
every three -shares held. Net 
proceeds,- after expenses, will 
be £190.8 million. BunzTs 
shares, which al first fell to 
2l3p, closed I2p- lower at 
223pL 

Over the past five years, Mr 
White has reduced Bund's 
dependence on the manufac- 
ture of cigarette filters and 
buih up a company with -five 
strong operating divisions — 
distribution, merchanting, 
transportation, filters, and re- 
lated industrial - activities^ 
There are now more than 100 
operating companies, with 
around a quarter of profits 
arising in the US. 

Tempos, page 22 


twd buys Nationwide announces 

mentis, a subsidiary of Taylor plans for the new year 

U/>uvtmiu Dmncrlii P nmnanv X ___ . " 


Taylor Woodrow Develop- 
ments, a subsidiary of Taylor 
Woodrow Property Company, 
has bought the site of the 
former Barkers Depository in 
South Kensington, Loudon. It 
will develop 80 fiats worth 
£16.5 million on completion. 

German boost 

West German industry or- 
ders rose 0.9 per cent in July 
after a 0.9 per cent rise in 
June. 


By Martin Baker 


Tempos 22 
Win Street 22 
Company 
News 33,27 
Stock Market 23 
Comment 23 
USM Prices 23 


Forripi Kxcfa 23 
Traded Ot*s 23 
Money 

Markets 23 
Unit Trusts 34 
Commodities 24 
Share Prices 25 


Nationwide Building Soci- 
ety has revealed its plans for 
the new year of financial 
freedoms for budding soci- 
eties. 

It is the first mayor building 
society to indicate how it 
intends to exploit the opportu- 
nities available when the 
Buikhog^Societies Act 1986 
comes into force in January. 

Customers will be offered a 
measured, rather cautious 
package of services in 1987, 
although the possibility of 
more radical change in the 
future cannot be excluded. 

The most significant 


development is in estate 
agency where the society is 
concluding the acquisition of 
20 firms of estate agents with 
260 offices around the coun- 
try. 

Many societies believe the 
estate agenfs office is (be key 
point in house transactions , 
providing an ideal opportu- 
nity to market mortgage and 
ancillary services. 

Nationwide will provide a 
money transmission service, 
cheque book and guarantee 
card as well as personal loans, 
when it is allowed to offer 
unsecured credit 


markets of a substantial shift 
into deficit next year. 

But excessive pay rises 
would damage the economy, 
he said. “Taking productivity 
growth into account unit 
labour costs in British manu- 
facturing industry are increas- 
ing far faster than those of our 
major competitors — in Ger- 
many and Japan, unit labour 
costs are hardly rising at all,” 

- be said. 

- “In a highly competitive 
world, at home as well as 
abroad, there is no way in 
which British industry can 
afford to allow its costs to rise 
faster than those of its 
competitors.” ' 

Figures released yesterday 
in the annual national income 
and expenditure Blue Book 
showed a slightly stronger 
growth picture last year than 
previously thought. The econ- 
omy grew by 3.S per cent, 
based do the average measure 
of gross domestic product, 
compared with an earlier es- 
timate of 3.4 per cent. 

Real incomes rose by nearly 
3 per cent, but tins was 
exceeded by the rise in con- 
sumer spending, which 
showed a volume increase of 
3.5 per cent. 

As a result, the proportion 
that people saved out of 
income — the saving ratio — 
fell last year to its lowest level 
since the early Seventies. 

Spending on consumer 
durables was particularly 
strong last year, rising by 7.5 
per cent in volume terms. 

Deadline 
for TSB 
customers 

By Richard Thomson 
Banking Correspondent 

Today is the last day on 
which Trustee Savings Bank 
customers can apply for prior- 
ity in the flotation of the bank 
this month. 

More than one and half 
million of the bank's foar 
million -c ustomers eligibl e for 
priority have regis te red, but 
the bank is urging any who 
have not yet done so to register 
at their branches -before dose 
of banking business today. 

The IBB said yesterday 
that the total umber of people 
registering interest In baying 
shares had almost readied 
three miUioa. 

Anyone who has a TSB 
account, opened on or before 
December 17, 1984, is eligible 
for priority, which wffl ensure 
that they are allocated shares 
in the £1 hBBon pies issue, bat 
they m ost re gister the fact 
with the TSB. 

Until last Friday this could 
be dime by telephone through 
the bank's share information 
office, but it can now only be 
done through the brafich in 
which ti»e account is held. 
Most TSB branches are open 
between 9.30am and 330pm, 
although seme stay open until 
7pm. 

- Customers should produce 
prod' that they hold an ac- 
count, such as a chequebook or 
passbook, to speed up the 
process. Anyone who believes 
they have aa account, but has 
oo proof, may miss the dead- 
line at this stage. 

The share information office 
sank “They should go straight 
to their TSB branch first thmg 
in the morning and it may be 
possible to sort it out boon 
the end of the day. But if the 
account cannot be found before 
the dose of buaness the 
customer will not get his ■ 
priority status.” 



SPORT 32 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 35 


Underwriting 
loss of £ 115 m 
for Lloyd’s 

By Lawrence Lever 


Nigel Lawson: “We have experienced merely a brief pause 
and the outlook for next year and beyond remains good” 

Directors slip in 
Euro pay league 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


British managing directors 
are slipping in the European 
Economic Community pay 
league. Judged on net salary 
after tax, they are down this 
year to sixth position from 
fifth in 1985. 

In 1 2 months the net salary 
of the typical managing direc- 
tor of a company with a £10 
million turnover rose by 5.5 
per cenL if adjustment is 
made for the cost of living, the 
British managers' estimated 
£23,730 a year net just keeps 
them in fifth position. 

The figures emerge from the 
latest annual survey of tax- 
ation and living costs by 
Inbacon, the management 
consultants. 

On a broader comparison of 
all Organization for Economic 
(Zo-operation and Develop- 
ment countries, lubucon 
points out that the British 
managing director is doing 
better, moving from twelfth to 
tenth position in the league. 

However, the British- pretax 
gross salary of £36,500 is still 
less than the take home net 
pay of managing directors in 
America (£37,530). Switzer- 
land (£49,400) and France 
(£42,190). Worldwide, the 
Swiss remain the best-paid 
managers, with the French in 
second place. 

In the EEC French man- 
agers are the best paid, with 
salaries nearly double those in 
Britain, and even the Spanish 
do better than the British. 
Italian managers come second 
in the EEC with the Germans 
in third place. 

Dutch managers, who had 
been seventh, moved into fifth 

Sanctions may 
push coal up 

- World coal prices could rise 
by almost $10 a tonne if the 
European Economic Commu- 
nity applied an effective ban 
on supplies from South Africa, 
according to Mr Allen Cook, 
chairman of the collieries 
committee of the South Af- 
rican Chamber of Mines. 

The International Cod Re- 
port says Australian steaming 
coal fetched $35 a tonne. FOB 
Europe, last week, while South 
African coal of slightly inferior 
quality cost $30.50. 

The coal sector would prob- 
ably be the worst hit of all 
South Africa’s export in- 
dustries if sanctions were in- 
troduced. Coal earned the 
country about R3.1 billion 
(£832 million) last year. 


place ahead of those in Britain 
although, if adjustment is 
made for the cost of living, 
they are pushed back to sixth. 

Salaries of office staff in 
Britain have on average risen 
by 4 per cent — less than the 
rales of inflation during the 
year, according to the 1986 
office salaries analysis by the 
Institute of Administrative 
Management 

Office pay rises fell below 
the general level of wage 
settlements which have been 
between 5 and 7 per cent 

Secretaries and typists have 
seen .better increases than 
most office workers. A senior 
secretary is typically earning. 
£7,300 in London and £6,850 
in Britain as a whole. 

The two top grades of 
secretaries; typists and word 
processing staff have had pay 
increases of around 9 per cent 
to produce median salaries 
between £6,845 and £7,523. 

Secretarial salaries continue 
to be highest in the South-east 
with those in Greater London 
well above the rates in the rest 
of the country. 

A big increase in salary 
scales in Yorkshire and 
Humberside means that office 
staff in those areas are the best 
paid outside the South-east. 

International Taxation and 
Living Costs 1986 : (Inbucon, 
Kjiightsbridge House, 197 
Knightsbridge. London SW7 
IRN;£I35). 

Office Trend Report J98&. 
(Institute of Administrative 
Management, 40 Chatswonh 
Parade, Pens Wood. Orping- 
ton. Kent BR5 IRW; £20). 


m 


Lloyd's of London, the 
world's biggest insurers, yes- 
terday announced its second 
successive year of heavy 
underwriting losses on the 
back of an optimistic outlook 
for the future performance oi 
the market. 

Yesterday's underwriting 
loss of £1 15 million refers to 
the performance of the Lloyd's 
market in 1983 as Lloyd's 
traditionally calculates its ac- 
count three yearn in arrears. 
Last year Lloyd’s suffered its 
worst ever underwriting result 
— a loss of £188 million — on 
the 1982 account. 

Yesterday's figures, how- 
ever. ate distorted by losses 
allocated to the stricken PCW 
syndicates for 1983. These are 
estimated at £143 million in 
the global statmenL published 
yesterday. 

The overall result for the 
market — taking into account 
investment income — was a 
profit of £35.8 million, a 
reduction of more than £20 
million on the previous year's 
market surplus of £57 million. 

This represents a return of 
1.4 per cent on premium 
income, a result which Mr 
Peter Miller, chairman of 
Lloyd's, says in his statement 
to the accounts “cannot be 
satisfactory”. He adds: “The 
profit of7 per cent ( excluding 
the PCW syndicates) begins to 
look acceptable.” 

The worst hit sector of the 
Lloyd's market was the non- 
marine account, which turned 
in an overall loss of £231 
million after taking into ac- 
count investment earnings 


LLOYD’S 
OF LONDON 

Q total profit 

£r«HJons h underwriting 
300 ■ profit (loss) . 


POO) t 

1979 1980 1981 1982 198£j; 

Contributory factors wens 
a&besiosis claims and a nuii; 
her of catastrophes including 
Hurricane Alicia in the United 
States. 

The results of the motor 
sector were also poor, with itft 
overall profit down front 
£22.2 million to £6.8 millioif * 

Mr Peter Stilwell. chairman^ 
of Lloyd's Motor UndeN 
writers Association, said yes' 
terday that the 9.4 per cedt 
increase in premiums in 19S3£ 
was inadequate and that rat(* 
for 1986 would reveal Tg 
much higher percentage, 
producing heavy premium, 
increases." •; 

But Mr Miller, in his state- 
ment. says that Lloyd's, hav- 
ing doubled its premium 
capacity over the past three 
years, is well placed to take 
advantage of improving 
underwriting conditions. 

Profits Mow, page 27 


Vital Allied bid to buy 
Hiram still on the boil 


By Cliff Feltham 


Allied-Lyons was still 
locked in negotiations to com- 
plete the £600 million pur- 
chase of Hiram Walker, the 
Canadian drinks business, last 
night despite some reports 
suggesting the deal — seen as a 
vital defence to ward off the 
Australian group Elders- IXL 
— was already wrapped up. 

At the same time. Allied's 
share price fell sharply on the 
London stock market as 
speculation mounted that Ei- 
ders. now given the go-ahead 
by the Monopolies and Merg- 
ers Commission to bid for 
Allied, may prefer to buy the 
Courage brewing business 
instead. 

Allied remains desperately 
keen to take over the wine and 
spirit arm of Hiram Walker 
which contains top selling 
brands such as Canadian 
Club. Ballantines, and 
Courvoisier. 

Allied has been holding 
talks with Gulf Canada which 
won control of Hiram Walker 
Resources shortly after the 
previous management agreed 
io sell the business and tben 


promptly blocked the sale. 

An Allied spokesman in 
Canada was yesterday re- 
ported to have said agreement 
had been reached whereby the 
British company would as- 
sume majority control, but in 
London a spokesman said this 
was not the case 

The Allied board would fed 
a lot more comfortable once 
the deal is done in the 
knowledge that it would make 
the group much larger ami 
more difficult for Elders to 
acquire. 

However, Elders has said if 
it decided to renew its bid for 
Allied it would hand the 
Canadian business back to 
Gulf Canada at the same price 
paid by Allied. 

But there was rising specula- 
tion yesterday that Mr John 
EUiou. Elders* chief executive, 
may prefer to buy Courage 
from its new owners. Hanson 
Trust. 

Hanson and Elders yes- 
terday declined to comment 
on the possibilities but a price 
of around £1.3 billion has 
been suggested. 

*4P3;i •• V .. ■ • ■ ? 





BANKNOTE AND SECURITY PAPER • WATER TREATMENT - ENGINEERING 

Interim Report 1986 

Results for the half-year ended 30th June 1986 



STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


1Q35p(+30p) 
561 p (+8p) 


oSIjSSs 1889.48 {+8.15)* 


SwSdow 1S559-64 (+54.19) 

Svdnev: AO 12314 (+122) 


SS^bank 10954 (-84) 

SKjvGenefal — 538.00 (+3.7) 

London dosing pn eus Puge25 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 10% 

3-month Merbnk9JrJW% 
3-month ebgfcte *% 

buying rate 

Prime Rate 7%% 

Federal Funds 5%%^ 

3 -month Treasury Bitesa-MQ* 

30-year bond® 9*35-9^2 

CURRENCIES 


RISES: 

Glaxo 

•Lucas 

Vickers 

$t Ives Group — 
Lambert Howarth 

botron 

Coofcson 

Turner & NewaK - 

AE 

Costain 


— 561p(+8pi 
_ 425p (+10pj 
_ 795p (+15pj 
_ 195p (+14p) 
„.244p(+1Qp) 
_ SlOp (+20p) 
_ 212p(+15p) 
-250p(+13p) 


US blocks imports of phone 
booths in steel quota dispute 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 


Ward White 

Coasts ViyeUa — 

Ftsons 

Hanbros 

Pearson 

Standard Chart _ 


-’swa 

-iM 

-MS 

— 734p (+10p) 


Aided Lyons 
Crouch D — 

Bunzi 

1C Gas 


225p(-l0p) 

478p(-15p) 


London: 
£$1.5050 
£ DM3.0544 
E: SwFt2.47l2 
£: FFr10.0045 
£ Yen233.20 
£index:7l.7 


New York: 

£ SI .5065* 
*DM2JJ2W\ 
£ index: 110.0 

ECU £0.683555 
SDR 3L81 0726 


GOLD 

London Fixing. . 

AM $404.00 

dose $406-00-407.00 (£269.75- 
270.50) 

■Jaw Yoffc 

Comex $407.45-407 .85" 

NORTH SEA OIL 


Like soldios . who have 
fought a better war, several of 
London's famed red telephone 
booths are lined up on a Los 
Angeles customs dock, victims 
of a bureaucratic battle over 
steel quotas which can oily be 
described as a breakdown in 
communications. ' 

All 30:000 of the cast iroa 
booths, symbols as familiar to 
Americans as the British 
bobby and the Loudon cabbie, 
have beat purchased by Lon- 
don Telephone Bax Company, 
a firm which hopes to sell the 
booths fame for up to $3,000 
(£2,000) each. 

Several of the 1,500 lbs 
booths have already made 
their way on to the US market 
where they were snapped up 
by eager Americans, who plan 
to 'ose them as garden or- 
naments or household 
curiosities- . 

Suddenly the transatlantic 
i flow of bopths, s ch e d u led to 


continue over the next seven 
years as British Telecom 
phases them oat of the London 
scene, came to a grinding halt 

The long arm of US customs 
officials reached out and re- 
classified the booths as fab- 
ricated steel in a category 
called “other — other” m a 
complex agreement restricting 
European steel imports into 
the United States. 

The booths have now be- 
come an international mod eat 
with US, British and Euro* 
pean Co mm u ni ty officials 
hovering in private meetings 
and speeding telexes across 
the Atlantic in a desperate 
effort to resolve the dispute. 

A large part of the problem 
is communication, British of- 
ficials maintain ' that fay on 
stretch of the imagination can 
a cast Iron box, made also of 
wood and glass, be classified 
as steel. 

Officials said it is absurd to 


extend an agreement meant to 
cover heavy steel structural 
products such as bridges and 
oil rigs, to an “antique” which 
is being sold in the States as 
an ornament. 

However, ludicrous as it 
may sound, the incident of the 
bombs is capable of creating 
great havoc. 

If the telephone booths are 
counted against Britain's steel 
quota, other UK companies 
will lose out 

-We do not have much 
licence left for fabricated 
structures; a couple of phone 
booths could use it all up,” 
said a British embassy official. 

London Telephone Box 
Company, said yesterday if the 
dispute is not resolved quickly, 
it will be forced out of 
business. 

A US customs official said 
all- will be resolved when the 
British shippers send over new 
documents. 


Group Turnover , 

Group Profit before Taxation 

Profit attributable to 
Ordinary Shareholders 

Earnings per Ordinary Share 
Interim Dividend 


Six months to Six months to 

SOlhJune 1986 30ih June I9S5 

£ thousands £ thousands 

113,544 118,318 

10,447 9,100 

6,461 4,947 

lL76p ‘ 9.72p 

2.75p 2.50p 


* Group profit before tax up 14-8 per cent. 
is Earnings per share increased by 21 percent, 

* Current trends are expected to continue for the rest of 
the year 

■ Copies of the Interim Refxm are available from die Secretani 

4I» Ratals Holdings PLC 

’SSSS-* Laveiseoke Mill Whitchurch, Hants, RG28 7NR. Telephone; (0256-82) 2360. 


t 





22 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 


BOOTS 

The Boob Company PLC. 
Turnover m year er ding 
31 March 1986 CL 1 26. 100.000. 
Source-. Annual Report 29/5/86. 























UNDERWOOD 

Underwoods pic 
TUmouer in year ernftng' 

31 lanuary 1986: £37.570.000. 
Source. Annual Report 20/5/86. 


WHICH 

CHEMIST CHAIN 
LOOKS 

HEALTHIEST FOR 
THE PRIVATE 
INVESTOR? 

Companies, like private investors, come in aii shapes and 
sizes. Company shares which took ideal for one portfolio 
may not suit another. 

Recognising the shares which most closely meet your 
. own Investment criteria requires continual and expert 
attention - a personal service which you may not find with 
larger financial institutions. 

Afcor Investments Limited, are dedicated to providing 
. a tong term investment service exclusively for private 
; investors. 

Afcor constantly monitor companies on all tiers of the 
■ Stock Exchange, as well as overseas markets, to identify and 
advise on ideal opportunities for individual dients. 

personal Asset Review Afcor's monthly stockmarket 
; analysis, updates dients on market trends and company 
= news and reports on Afcor's Share of the Month. 

® FREE: CaD Unkline on 0800 626 171. for your 
three free issues of the Review or complete the 
Freepost coupon. 

Afcor liw m me n a Grated MO Earl Sheet London ECJA 2EE 
Lcmcd dealer m secure**. a sub**** « mumo Connote pit 



FREE: Three months' expert 
money-making advice. 

Tty. Afcor Investments Limited FirepoSL 
8-16 Earl Street London EC2A 3Efl 
Please send me the new three issues erf Ftreonal 
Asset Review at no cost or obfigaoon I would also 
be happy for you to phone me with urgent mlonnaopn 
regarding indMdual share issues. 


MCioMnnuit 

NaneMiwwL 


Address. 


Daytime No. 
Signed 


_The 


AFCOR 

INVESTMENTS limited 



WALL STREET 



Dow gains continue 
in early trading 


New York (Renter) - Wall 
Street shares continued to 
move op Id early trading 
yesterday, after die sharp 
gains in the previous day’s 
trading. 

Retailers strengthened the 
market with buoyant sales 
fignes for last month. A 
strong hood market also eo- 
couraged investors. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average was op 6.61 points at 
■ 1,887.94. Advancing issues led 


declining issues by a margin of 
six to Gve, on a volume of 26 
minion shares. 

Sears Roebuck led the ac- 
tive issues, unchanged at 44 VL 
Rorer Group, which was the 
subject of takeover specula- 
tion, rose l*s to 45&. IBM rose 
14 to 136*4. 

The transportation 
rose 3 points to 
ities added 0.49 points to 
217.17 and stocks woe np 
Z49 points at 733. 



Sep 

Sep 


SjP 

Sap 


Sap 



a 

2 


3 

2 


3 

2 

AMR 

55 ft 

ss 

Firasnne 

24% 

24% 

Pfizer 

66% 

67 

ASA 

37 

38ft 

FstCteeago 

28% 

2y% 

PtwtpsDgo 

21% 

21H 

Abed Stead 
AKedStrs 

41 

48% 

40ft 

48% 

FstMBncp 
Fat Penn C 

63V 

a 

62* 

7ft 

mop Mrs 

Fillips Pat 

74% 

10% 

75 

1DK 

AKsChtan 

3ft 

3ft 

Ford 

57ft 

58ft 

FotaroKJ 

66% 

66% 


38 

37ft 

FTWacftva 

41ft 

42 

PPG bid 

89 

67% 


14V 

14ft 

GAFCorp 

36ft 

34% 

PretrGmM 

78ft 

78% 


9W. 

20% 

GTE Carp 

69ft 

58% 

PbSESG 

44% 

44ft 


91ft 

SOV 

Gen Corp 

78% 

76* 

Raytheon 

66 

66* 

Am Can 

B7ft 

87ft 

GenDyTms 

GenBearic 

73ft 

73V 

RynidsMet 

45 

43ft 

AmCyran'd 

86* 

84ft 

76* 

75* 

Rockweaint 

42 


29ft 

sox 

Gen Inst 

21ft 

21ft 

Royal Dutch 
Sateways 

92% 

91% 


84ft 

64ft 

Gen M*s 

8S% 

88* 

81* 

60% 

Am Horn 

toft 

90ft 

Gan Motors 

70% 

70ft 

Sara Lee 

07% 

87* 


2% 

2ft 

GnPbUtny 

24 

24ft 

SFESopae 

30% 

29% 

AmStrwJ 

39ft 

38% 

Gonesco 

3% 

3% 

ScWberger 

33* 

33% 


25 

24% 

Georgia Pac 

34 

33* 

Scon Paper 

61K 

62% 


Rflft 

67* 

GUeie 

43% 

44% 

Seagram 

59% 

59* 


7ft 

7ft 

Goodrich 

40* 

39* 

Sears Rbck 

44* 

44% 

Asaroo 
Ashland Ol 

15* 

88 

IS 

59ft 

Goodyear 

Goukflnc 

34ft 

20K 

35ft 
21 . 

Shea Trans 

Sbtaar 

SmmteiBk 

57% 

56ft 

56% 

56ft 

At Richfield 

58ft 

57ft 

Grace 

50 

49* 

89% 

89% 


35 

34ft 

GtAnSTnc 

25 

23V 

Sth^alEd 

20% 

20% 

BkrsTstNY 

50 

50% 

Grlsrtd 

31% 

31ft 

36% 

36ft 

Bankamer 
BkoI Baton 

12% 

43ft 

12% 

44ft 

GrunanCor 
Gut! & West 

2SK 

70% 

25 

69V 

&SS3S 

76% 

49% 

76ft 

48K 

Banked NY 

88ft 

66% 

Heinz HJ. 

46ft 

46* 


48ft 

48% 

Baft Steal 

8% 

9% 

Hercules 

56% 

55% 

38* 

36% 

Bosom 

BseCasede 

60 

59% 

47ft 

50% 

60 

48 

HleO-Ptad 

1 IniMM ■■ri«H 

nowjwBi 

1C litas 

46* 

69ft 

28% 

46 

89ft 

27% 

Sun Comp 

Teledyne 

Temeco 

54ft 

314% 

41ft 

53% 

316* 

40% 

Bq Warner 

33ft 

75ft 

33ft 

76ft 

tngersal 
Wand Steel 

59% 

■19% 

56V 

19ft 

Texaco 
Texas E Cor 

34% 

28% 

33% 

28ft 

BP 

41 

40ft 

IBM 

136 

135ft 

Texas Inst 

121% 

121 

Button Ind 

35% 

35ft 

INCO 

13ft 

12% 

Texas Utfls 

3b* 

36V 


54ft 

58ft 

Ira Paper 
IntTelTel 

67% 

66 

Textron 

5B% 

58 

Burroughs 

CmpbeOSp 

71ft 

72ft 

53* 

53% 

Tranks Cor 

47 

47 

63ft 

63% 

In**] Bank 

54V 

56 

TRW Inc 

100 

97% 


lift 

10ft 

jmsn&Jhn 

71ft 

71 

UAL Me 

56* 

55% 


80ft 

50 

Kaiser ASura 

18 

17% 

UnaaverNV 

225% 

225* 


991 

218 

Kerr McGee 

29ft 

28% 

Un Carbide 

22ft 

22ft 


37 

37 

KntnyCkk 

K Mart 

84* 

83 

Un Pac Cor 

59 

58* 


36ft 

26 

50 

50V 

Utd Brands 

29ft 

29* 


41ft 

40% 

Kroger 

LTV. Corp 

6? 

60% 

USG Coro 

41ft 

43% 

ChmBkNY 

48ft 

48 ft 

2ft 

2ft 

UtdTechnol 

45ft 

46 


46ft 

44ft 

Litton 

77 

76% 

usx corp 

19* 

18% 

Chrysler 

38* 

38V 

Lockheed 

48% 

48* 

Unocal 

22% 

22 

CtOCOTp 

54ft 

18ft 

55 

18V 

Lucky Sire 
Man H 1 river 

24* 

46K 

24% 

46% 

Jim Walhr 
Writer UnM 

58* 

59 

51* 

59ft 

Coca Gaia 

36ft 

36% 

MamMeCp 

2 

2% 

Web Fargo 
WstghseB 

113 

112ft 

Colgate 

CSS 

39ft 

SOV 

Mapco 

50 

48% 

58 

56 

140ft 

140ft 

Marine Mid 

51* 

51* 

Weyartr'ser 

38ft 

35% 

CknbtaQas 

CmtftnEra 

41ft 

30ft 

41ft 

30K 

Mrt Marietta 
Masco 

47ft 

29% 

46ft 

28ft 

Whirlpool 

Wootwonh 

72* 

43 

71* 

42* 

34% 

34* 

McDonalds 

80V 

61ft 

Xenix Corp 

56% 

55* 


50ft 

50% 

McOomel 

84 

83 

ZeraCi 

23* 

23% 

Cn Nat Gas 

31V 

31* 

Mead 

57 

55% 





12ft 

12% 

Merck 

112 

110% 





25ft 

24V 

MnstaMng 

111V 

111% 




Corning G1 

53 

55% 

MOW Oil 

37% 

35% 

CANADIAN PRICES 

CPC lift 

86 

65V 

Monsanto 

72* 

70 


2ZH 

22ft 


28ft 

29 

Morgan JP. 

91V 

93ft 

AMU 


51 ft 

49% 

Motorola 

42% 

40ft 

AicnAhan 

44% 

42K 

Dart & Kraft 

63ft 

62% 

NCR Carp 

53V 

52V 

AlgomaSd 

13ft 

13ft 


25ft 

24* 

NLlndstra 

4ft 

4ft 

CanPadfc 

15% 

15* 


42 

41V 

NatDtsths 

38% 

38 

Cominco 

13% 

13 


18K 

18 

NatMedEnt 

25 

24ft 

Cor Batttrst 

24% 

24% 

Digital Eq 

101ft 

102% 

NarSmcndt 

10% 

10X 

Hkr/SUCan 

27% 

Z7ft 

42ft 

43ft 

Norfolk Sat 

81% 

79% 

HdsnBMM 

27* 

27% 

DowChom 

58ft 

56ft 

NWBancrp 

39V 

39* 

Mtaaco 

33V 

33* 

Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 
DuPont 

1BK 

49 

83V 

8ft 

18 

49* 

81* 

8* 

OccfcfcftPet 

Ogden 

Obi Carp 
Owans-H 

29V 

41% 

44* 

41% 

29 

41* 

43% 

43 

Imperial 06 

In Pipe 

Ryl Trustee 
Seagram 
Sara Co 

44* 

41 

33H 

84% 

43*. 

41 

33* 

82 

Esun Kodak 

55ft 

55ft 

Pac Gas El 

Z7ft 

Z7 

21% 

21% 

Eaton Com 
Emerson El 

70ft 

71* 

Pan Am 

5ft 

5ft 

■nansnN'A' 

30* 

30* 

86 

89ft 

86ft 

68 

Penney J.C. 
PonnzoK 

75% 

54ft 

76% 

52% 

Verity Corp 
WttrWtain 

3JU5 

37% 

295 

37% 

Fed dm Sts 

83K 

83% 

Peoisco 

30ft 

31 

WCT 

13% 

13 


tN tMatalO 

naneisBi 

toMMTnartyiMMftd. 


A340 to go ahead, 
says Airbus chief 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


M Jean Pierson, president 
of Airbus Industrie, yesterday 
reaffirmed the group's de- 
cision to go ahead with the 
A340 long-range airliner to 
compete with the Boeing 747 
jumbo jet 

The building of the four-, 
engine aircraft and a smaller 
version —the A3 30 — are 
expected to be given formal 1 
approval by the European 
consortium before the end of 
the year. 

But uncertainty over the 
future of the A340, for which 
British Aerospace will pro- 
duce the high technology 
wings, has surfaced at the 
Famborough Air Show. 

McDonald Douglas, the 
United Slates aircraft maker, 
has indicated its unwillingness 
to proceed with the proposed 
collaboration with Airbus on 
the ground that its new MD- 
11 airliner would compete 
directly with the A 340. Mc- 
Donald is dearly committed 
to the MD-1 1 programme. 

But 

terday that “trying 

people into believing that the 


M Pierson said yes- 
. to induce 


issue is MD-1 1 versus A340 is 
a force.” 

The A34Q would be ideal for 
use on secondary long-range 
routes and the MDI1 was not 
an obvious replacement for 
Ihe 747. 

However, M Pierson saw 
the potential co-operation be- 
tween the two companies as “a 
new modd of relationship 
between airbus partners.” 

Airbus, be said, could envis- 
age collaboration with the 
American company based on 
the idea that McDonald could 
become the US partner on 
Airbus, the American arm of 
the consortium. 

In an interview with Show 
Daily, a journal circulating at 
the Famborough show, M 
Pierson added: “I do not want 
to see co-operation based on 
the A330/MD-1 1 duo with the 
340 being abandoned, each 
company making bits and 
pieces of the other's aircraft in 
order to materialize a co- 
operative process.” 

British Aerospace is ex- 
pected to to seek substantial 
Government funding for its 
share of the A330-A340 work. 


Voice-systems planned 
for aircraft control 

By Oar Industrial Correspondent 


Pilots will be able, within 
the next decade, to control 
their aircraft simply by 
speech, according to scientists 
at the Royal Aircraft 
Establishment 

The RAE revealed at the 
Famborough Air Show that a 
BAC 1-11 airliner had been 
flown extensively by a pilot 
using a speech recognition 
svstem. Further tests have 
taken place in a Wessex 
helicopter and Buccaneer 
fighter. 

Such systems could be in 
use. by 1995 |n miliiary 
aircraft and earlier in civil 
airliners, the RAE said. 

Speech recognition systems 
free a pilot's hands during 
landing and lake-off. But a 
voice system could also be 
used by air traffic control 
operators for "talking down” 
aircraft automatically. 

One of the military applica- 
tions being studied is for the 


pilot of a reconnaisancc plane 
to describe what he sees, his 
voice then being sent by coded 
signals on a narrow radio 
frequency. 

The RAE said the main 
impetus of the development 
had come from the need to 
reduce the workload of pilots. 

Commercial pressures 
within the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organisation and the 
developing threat from the 
Warsaw Pact had driven mili- 
tary aircraft designs to incor- 
porate more flexibility and 
capability. 

It said: “This has led to 
dramatic increases in the 
number and variety of sys- 
tems withi which aircrew must 
interact. 

"Civil aircraft are 
experiencing a similar 
proliferation of on-board sys- 
tems to maximize efficiency in 
an increasingly complex and 
cosi-conscious air traffic con- 
trol environment" 


Shorts wins US orders 


Shorts of Belfast has won 
Orders for 16 of its 360 
regional and commuter air- 
liners from three United 
Stales customers. 

Simmons Airlines of Michi- 
gan. the biggest 360 operator 
in the world, has ordered 1 1, 
CC Air of North Carolina has 
ordered two and a new airline. 


Slates west of Phoenix Ari- 
zona. has ordered three. 

Sjr Philip Foreman. Shorts 
chairman, said yesterday that 
total orders and options for 
the 360 were now 140 with 
delivery of the first 100 air- 
craft achieved in less than five 
years from first flighL .. 


( TEMPUS ) 

Slim Cadbury wants to grow 

*1 -i shares, which at one p 


Cadbury Schweppes has 
slimmed itself down to its 
two main activities, confec- 
tionery .and soft drinks, hav- 
ing disposed of £120 million 
worth of assets in non-core 
businesses and after spending 
£105 million on acquisitions 
(Canada Dry). 

Hie company is now 
engaging in the battle for 
growth on two fronts: to 
sustain and increase its mar- 
ket leadership in non-cola 
carbonated drinks and to 
build up >ts market share in 
US confectionery. 

Interim results for the half 
year to June 14 show a 
27 J per cent gain in pretax 
profit to £43.1 million. An 
important source of_ this 
improvement is the foil in the 
interest charge from £14.5 
million to £8.7 million. 

The cash from disposals 
gave £2 million of this, lower 
interest rates accounted for 
£2.1 million and the rest was 
attributable both to lower 
borrowings and . exchange 
rates for once moving in the 
right direction. 

With a 26 per cent market 
share m the British chocolate 
market, Cadbury has been 
obliged to look overseas for 
growth. Confectionery sales 
in the first half were buoyant 
in most parts of the world, 
while the group's difficulties 
in the US appear to have been 
largely overcome. 

In the US, the management 
guilty of overselling to the 
trade in 1984 has been re- 
placed with a new team. 

The previous 

management's failure to. 
stimulate demand from the 
consumer was directly 
responsible for the disastrous 
performance in 1985 when 
Cadbury was unable to sell 
much chocolate to whole- 
salers who were trying to 
dear out old lines before they 
went stale. 

Stocks of chocolate in the 



trade have come down to 
normal levels, and new lines 
are being introduced with 
promotional back-up aimed 
at the consumer. 

The benefits are apparent 
in a modest profit in North 
America for the interim pe- 
riod of £800.000. compared 
with a loss of £1.8 million last 
year. 

The shares are on a 
prospective multiple of about 
13.5. The price has been 
supported by speculative in- 
terest for the last few months 
and this shows no sign of 
going away. 

Babcock 

The familiar Babcock, a de- 
signer and manufacturer of 
power generators, is in decay. 
Rising, phoenix-like, from 
the ashes is the new Babcock, 
a producer of. a range of 
engineering products, from 
automotive and furniture 
hardware to cable controls 
and chain products. 

The company has been 
spending £5 million a year on 
restructuring and this process 
will continue. The new Bab- 
cock is now responsible for 41 
per cent of group turnover 
and 55 per cent of group 
profit It accounts for 51 per 
cent of capital employed 


compared with 33 per cent m 
1980. 

Trading profit for the first 
six months of 1 986 was up by 
29 per cent to £18.3 million. 
However, the cost to the 
balance sheet has been heavy 
and the increase in the in- 
terest chars meant that the 
pretax profit rose by only 7 
per cent to £1 6 million. 

Nevertheless, by the year- 
end, the debt-equity ratio 
should be similar to its end- 
1985 level of just under 40 
per cent 

Babcock International 
should make a pretax profit 
of £36 million for 1986 as a 
whole. At the current price of 
183p, the shares are . on a 
prospective multiple of 9.9 
times. This rating takes no 
account of any orders for the 
power group, which would be 
regarded as a bonus, nor of 
the changing mix of business. 

Bund 

Bunzl has become as deft at 
issuing its own paper as at 
distributing other people's. 

Expectations of a few quiet 
months while the company 
digested purchases were 
dashed yesterday. But a 
strong set of interim results 
eased the way for the hefty 
£197 million cash call and the 


shares, which at one point 
had dropped to 213p. closed 
only lOp lower at 225p. 

The money is needed to 
finance an undiminished ap- 
petite for aquisitions. Already 
this year there have been 14. 
bringing the total to 24 - at a 
cost of £221 million - since 
the February 1985 rights 
issue, which raised £55 
million. 

Sadly for Brammer s 
shareholders, who are hardly 
thriving through indepen- 
dence. no one major takeover 
is planned. Instead, Bunzl 
will concentrate on building 
its five divisions through the 
step-by-step approach al- 
ready seen. . 

At first this is likely to 
mean purchases in the 
United States where the dis- 
tribution business needs to 
expand on the west and east 
coasts. Bunzl wants the US to 
account for 40 per cem of 
profits, compared with we 23 
per cent in the first half and. 
with tax rates coming down 
next year, it believes that now 
is the lime to buy. 

BunzI's strategy so far is 
dearly working. Of the 43 per 
cent improvement in pretax 
profits, about 16 per cent is 
represented by organic 
growth and the rest from 
acquisitions. 

This was despite currency 
movements which knocked 
about £2.2 million off profits, 
and more than accounted for 
the £1 million downturn in 
distribution. 

The new transport di- 
vision, formerly United Par- 
cels. has made almost as 
much in six months as in the 
previous full year, and the 
industrial division moved 
ahead from £1.4 million to 
£4.4 million. 

On an annualized bs&is 
BunzI's turnover is running 
at about £1.1 billion, and 
profits of £65 million look 
attainable. 


GnJiuMAf Schweppes management proven in the market place. Schweppes 


Interim Results: 24 Weeks ended 14th June 1986. 
Half Year Half Year 



1986 

1985 



£m 

£m % Change 

Sales 

787.3 

847.2 

-7.1% 

Trading Profit 

48.7 

44.4 

4-9.7% 

Profit before Tax 

43.1 

33.8 

4-27.5% 

Earnings per Share 

4.68p 

3.39p 

4-38.1% 

Dividends per Share 

1.80p 

1.60p 

+12.5% 


3 

> 

I 

h 

3 

M 

Z 

H 

to 

1 

M 

Z 


Schweppes 


• Canada Dry — World-wide rights acquired for $140m (£93m). 

• Dr. Pepper— $17.5m (£l2m) invested for 30% share. 

• These two key investments give Cadbury Schweppes 
international leadership in the non-cola carbonated soft 
drinks market. 

• Beverages & Foods Division sold for £97m. 

• Cadbury Schweppes’ New Zealand business sold to 
Cadbury Schweppes Australia in return for increased . 
shareholding. 

• Sale of the Health and Hygiene Division and other non core 
businesses will enable the company to concentrate on those 
businesses it knows best — confectionery and soft drinks. 

• Increased earnings per share and an increased dividend 
highlight significant progress in the first half of 1986. 

“I am confident that the progress made in the first six months 
will be continued throughout the year.” 


2 

> 

z 

► 

o 

to 

2 

M 

Z 

to 

§ 

Z 




Chairman 



< 

n 

z 

z 

ffi 

H 

£ 

> 

5* 

3 

to 

5 

w 

k 

> 

g 

M 

3 

M 

z 

H 


SALES AND TRADING PROFIT 


BY GEOGRAPHICAL REGION 


Half Year 

Sales Trading Profit 


1986 

1985 

1986 

1985 


£m 

£m 

£m 

£m 

United Kingdom 

351.9 

421.1 

25.0 

23.7 

Europe 

131.9 

111.2 

7.6 

5.8 

North America 

148.9 

157.5 

0.8 

(1.8) 

Australia 

109.6 

108.2 

11.7 

11.2 

Other Overseas 

45.0 

49.2 

3.6 

5.5 


787.3 

847.2 

48.7 

44.4 







The cash dividend will be paid on October 27th to shareholders on 
the Register of Members at the close of business on 25th September 1986. 
A scrip alternative is available to shareholders. 

Copies of the full statement will be sent to all shareholders 
and further copies are available from Department S, 

The Secretary Cadbury Schweppes pic, 1-4 Connaught Place, 

London W2 2EX. 


MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLAGE. 


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to 


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?« 


r, 





THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Dealers believe MEPC may 
be planning £100m ‘rights’ 


By Michael Clark 


.. UUest bout of euphoria 
at the equity market was 
reviving speculation yesterday 
laa! a big fund-raising exercise 
.may be on the. way soon from 
tneproperty sector. 

This whole sector has been 
the subject of constant bid talk 
W recent months with some of 
the big names in property 
being mentioned. The latest 
reports are suggesting that 
MEPC, the target of recent 
rad speculation,, may be plan- 
ning a £100 million -plus rights 
issue to finance a defensive 
acquisition. The experts claim 


late, overnight rally on Wall 
Street, The FT index of 30 
shares failed to hold its best 
levels of the day, but still 
closed 9.7 points up at 1,334.3. 
its broader-based counterpart, 
the FT-SE 100, rose by 9.6 
points to 1,680.3. 

Investors appeared to shrug 
off the prospect of' higher 
inflation and turned their 
attention to many of the 
consumer-related stocks. 
Foods, breweries and stores all 
met strong demand. 

Even gilts attempted to rally 
following Wednesday's shake- 


Mm 

.Share price 

Jan 1=1004 i 




li^T^TO^FT/A:'! 

£ ALL SHARE INDEX $ 


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP 


thejpTMip may have already oul Prices at the longer end of 
passed its slide-rule over the market closed with ga»n^ 


• Walker, Crips, Weddle, 
Beck& Ce, the stockbroker, 
is gearing itself np for the 
big hang. Yesterday, it an- 
nonnced anew linlrfine ser- 
vice — Investoriink — aimed at 
private investors wishing 
to buy and sen shares and unit 
(lasts. Commission 
charges range from £7 to £15 
for orders up to £9 20. 

Property Holding & Invest- 
ment Trust, Ip lighter at 129p, 
Great Portland Estate*, down 
2pat 1 84p, or even Wales CSty 
of London Properties, 2p eas- 


ranging up to £H. 

The firmer erode oil price 
also gave new heart to oil 
shares. BP stood out with a a 
jump of 7p to 670p and may 
open sharply higher when 
trading resumes today. This 
follows heavy turnover of the 
shares in New York where the 
group enjoys an American 
Depositary Receipt facility. 

During the first few hours of 
trading on Wail Street, US 
investors had picked up over 2 
million shares and dearly 
believe that the rating loots 


bumper figures, Peninsular & 
Oriental rose by 5p to 546p, 
after 550p. Sir Jeffrey Sterling, 
the chairman, met a huge 
number of fund managers at a 
seminar arranged by Hoare 
Goyett, the broker, last night 
and obviously made a 
favourable impression. “P & 
O has £6 written all- over it,” 
was the comment of one 
leading broker. 

But shares of Grovewood 
Croup, the motor distributor, 
were suspended at a fresh low 
of Sp at the company's re- 
quest, pending clarification of 


KJemwon Grieveson, the bro- 
ker, is hoping for some excit- 
ing tilings from the company 
over the next couple of years. 
He is sceptical of the scare 
stories emanating from some 
rival brokers* offices about the 
company's prospects and is 
looking for strong profits 
growth. 

The figures for the year to 
last June are due uext month. 
These should show pretax 
profits growing from £403 
million to £560 million. That 


million. That 


and is recommending them as 
a “buy” to diems. He believes 
pie price still has room for 
improvement. 

Still anxiously waiting to see 
if Elders IXL, the Australian 
brewer, will relaunch its bid 
following the all-dear from 
the Monopolies Cbmmission, 
the shares of Allied Lyons 
came in for some profit-taking 
after their recent speculative 
run. They dipped I3p to 338p. 
where the group commands a 
price lag or £7-31 billion. 

Last month. Allied's shares 
were trading at about 300p. 
Some brokers estimate that i 
Elders, weft kxioira for its 
Fosters lager, will have to bid 
about 400p a share, 

• Cowan, de Groot, the 
electrical wholesaler and toy 
importer, where Ward 
White's Mr Philip Birch owns 
a 7 per cent stake, is again 
enjoying strong in sti t ution al 
appart Fielding Newsoa- 
Sas£ab* the broker, recently 
placed 1 million shares 
with four institutions and 
other fond managers are 
now expressing interest. 


cheap compared with some of its financial position, 
their own producers. Rival Glaxo responded positively 


figure is expected to swell to 
about £725 million for the 


kr at 136p, with its highly- ' Shell scored an 8p rise at to my mention yesterday. 


prized office portfolio. 

' MEPCs share price ad- 
vanced by Sp to 350p, with 
some jobbers reported to be 
shortof stock. 

Yesterday's speculation was 
heightened by the apparent 
ease with which BtmzTs£197 
million rights issue was ab- 
sorbed by the market But last 
night, MEPC which is capital- 
ized at about £800 million, 
was keeping tight-lipped, with 
its directors unavailable for 
comment 

The rest of the equity 
market continued its advance, 
drawing strength from the 


953p. 

Still 


reflecting recent 


EQUITIES 
Anqfi a Secs ni5p} 

Beavereo (I45p) 

Borland (125p) 

Broad St (43p) 

Chelsea Man fl25p) 
Coated Bectrodes (tMpj 
Coline (iiOp) 

Evans Haflshaw (120p) 
Fletcher Dennys (70p) 

tttJtnne cofp (Isup) 
Harrison (150p) 

Hifle Ergoriom (92p) 


leaping by 37p to £10.42. Mr 
Chra Marsay, an analyst at 


RECENT ISSUES 


Hughes Food 
Lon utd lnv f 
MS Cash & C 


about £725 million for the 
current year as GlaXo’s 
penetration into the lucrative, 
US market accelerates. 

Mr Marsay is impressed 
with the rating for the shares 


,52 Manna Dev (110pt 

Stanley Leisure (llOp) 

ion ™-AM(130p) 

117 Tandy' bids (11&) 

68 Thanws TV (19Qp) 

9 +* Tbbet & Britten (120p) 

Z +2 Treas 2H%i/l 2016 *97 
90 Unlock (63(4 


95 

448 

180-10 
122 4-1 


RIGHTS ISSUES 
Aid Irish Bfc NIP 
BBA Gp F/P 
Berkeley Tech N/P 


Boots N/P 

Brown i Tawse N/P 
Crtyviswn FTP 
Fbrward Tech F/P 
Settowck N/P 
SutcfiH, Speak N/P 
Tolavision Sth F/P 

(issue price in brackets). 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


TOnwMoaOi Staffing Open 

Sep 86 9017 

Dec 06 ; 9056 

Mar 87 9072 

JunB? 9062 . 

Sep 87- 9030 

Dec B7 9012 

Previous day's total open- Interest 15085 
Three Month Eoreddar 

Sep 88 9*209 

Deeds 9*23 

Mar 87 • 0*15 

Jan 87 .... 8094 

USTmniyBond 

Sep 06 99-04 

Dec 88 98-09 

Mar 87 NT 


Sep* — 
Dec 06—4- 

Mar 87 

Jim-87 — 
FT-SE 100 
Sep 88- — 
Dec 88 — . 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AM) FORWARD RATES 


ss ss '■ Bs f ' sstiSalB 

9*26 - - 9*20 9 *21 4742 - Egg* 1 iiS.ii«d 

88 9 8ii 8S EsrSI 

mj ?». . s sssm 

— — 87-01 O FW, &9537-1 00190 

01-18 101^4 MB 260 SSf 


101-28 

101-26 

"101-1B 

101-18 . 

101-16 

101-04 

NT 

— 

— 

120-10 

Previous P«/8i 
120-11 11028 

120-18 

12040 

110-18 

NT 

— 

— 



O52-O50prem 

03S-026pram 

1%-iXpren 

17-l3prem 

1 -1/4ptain 

15pram-7(fiB 

iv4-ivtprem 

100-1 TtiSs 
30-BSm 

%-4 <te 
2X-2Kpr«n 
Kpcem^Lrfis 
1%-%prwn 


Previous day": 

moo 17000 
174.30 17090 


110-15 
119-19 
11949 
110-10 
s total open i 

moo 

. 17350 


fismt152B3 

55 

7588 

0 

0 

Interest 2508 
1 297 


SSatfcglndaatcwrewredwiai 1076 WMWItaTl.TCttey’ s renae 7*971 J). 


152-149prem 

OS74L71prem 

45t-4prem 

44-37pnwn 

5/8-1 Sdte 

Spnmaafs 

4vmk>rem 

Z7BJMsM 

100-IBSds 

7-11(18 

115-12X81 

6%-5Xprani 

ivirKpieni 

mm 

251^22% pram 
3 *-3%pnm 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT DATES 


FWtDssfings Uat D ss ta gi LutDKtattw For ItoW—nt 

Aug 4 Aug 15 Nov 8 Nov 17 

Aug 18 Sep 5 - No* 20 Dscl 

Sep 8 Sep 19 Dec 4 - Dec 15 

ftul wi fi um treie lter e w QtaciK4^»Am8traAMw8haaLmc.r»lw1o n tBlnCorwoMai-. 
ed. FreegoM, Conroy, West Coast Turter. Norton Eat Chedcpolnt Euro. Mbs Kate. 
Broad sTStewart Nerfn, GtenfieU Law. Pterion. Ptrictra. Wdodtae. Rtaon. Hetetar, 
Underwoods, Br Syphon, Sarasota, HBsdcwn Eng. China Clay, ftee l toefca. Jtedbn, 
Daw. Aujfiotronte, Bristol Chart _ .. , 

Put l Cafi; Nth Kate. Pressac, Chrystete, United Spring & Steal 


Argentina austral* — 
Ausoahedoear — - 

Bahrain dinar 

Brazil cruzado * _ 

Qiprus pound 

refandnaria 

Greece drachma — 
Hong Kong dofiar __ 

Inda rupee — 

Iraq (finer- 

Kuwait (finer KD — 

Matoysra do«ar 

Metocopeso 

New Zeatend dofiar. 
Sand Arabs rtyal - 


South Africa rand . 

UAEdHam 

TJoydsBank 


— 1^71-15628 
_ 244392.4475 
_ 06640415880 
___ 20J1-8OB4 

— BJ3KML7450 
_ 73150-75540 
__ 198.10-201-90 

11.7312-11.78n 
18S5-18JS 

Z'0A37OU4*fi 
_ 32081-39141 
10804110 

— 3101*3.1184 
_ 5^120^8520 
„ 3242332460 

35771-^5967 
SM6S&S36S 


Australia _ 
Canada — 
Sweden.. 


WN»t Germany _ 

SatoBflend 

Netherlands 

France ......j — .. 

4tevkim(Con)m|^ 

Hong Kang 

Portugal 

Spfim- 

Austria 


, 12445-1.3575 
. 2.1555-2.1585 
.25985-25005 
. 05150-06157 
. 15869-1-3874 
,6580035850 
. 72650-72700 
.75875-75725 


to Briretaye Bank HOFEXaMl EstaL 


ANed Lyons 
(*338) 


Cons Gold 
CS39) 

Cor steukte 
C283) 


Cabte&Wba 

rS37) 


DUfiers 

(763) 


Grand Met 

cm 


Lend See 
(*332) 

Marks&Spen 

r2i7) 

Shei Trans 
rss3j 

Trafalgar Hone" 

(*298) 


Briecham 

T418) 


Crifia Puts 

Sedee Oct 4an Apr Oct Jan Apr 
300 45 55 - 67 ’ 4 8 10 

330 27 37 47 10 15 20 

360 10 20 30 27 30 38 

550 123 140 150 1 6 io" 

600 73 102 115 4 12 IB 

6S0 37 60 78 18 27 37 

420 127 132 142 2 6 11 

480 87 07 107 5 17 20 

500 55 75 85 15 27 37 

260 28 40 48 5 8 \2 

290 1 G 27 36 12 IB 21 

300 8 17 — 22 25 — 

330 Hi 9 - SI 52 - 

280 28 37 44 3 6 9 

300 -12 22 31 11 15 18 

330 2 12. 19 22 33 38 

T5 60 K 2 J 11 

325 27 42 55 9 13 20 

350 0 25 35 IB 27 35 

375 TO 11 — 40 47 — 

GOO 178 — — 1% — — 

650 128 — — A — — 

700 78 — — B — — 

180 14 22 28 6 8 10 

2Q0 6 10 18 18 20. 24 

220 2 6 - 38 38 - 

327 73 - - \ ~ ~ 

355 48 — 3 — — - 

360 — 55 85 — 7 11 

382 32 — — 9 - 

900 207 232 — 3 5 — 

950 157 1B5 200 4 9 15 

1000 105 140 155 5 18 22 

1QS0 60 97 115 18 27 37 

300 ‘ 37 45 52 2 * -5 

MO 14 25 35 *7 11 13 

3M 5 13 20 30 32 33 

190 41 48 53 tK 2 4 

a 1 5 IS « « * 

8M S S S | J J 

850 107 127 140 5 10 20 

Bill f « H 

300 13 22 29 14 21 2* 


Thom EMI 
1*507) 


States Sant Oric Mar Sac Pac Mar 

500 24 57 70 6 15 » 

550 11 32 46 25 32 40 

BOO 2 15 22 BS 70 75 

420 93 107 115 1 3 6 

460 53 67 80 2 80 12 

500 18 40 50 10 17 25 

550 2 18 — 47 50 — 

300 .118 — — 1 — — 

330 88 100 — 2 2 — 

360 58 73 83 2 5 8 

390 30 45 58 4 . 8 IS 


i 


Brit Aero 
(•SOI) 

BAT Inds 
1*423) 


Brit Telecom 

P*J . 

Cadbury Scfmpps 
082) 

Guaaiai a 

(*343) 


Series Nov Fata May 

460 50 68 — 

500 30 50 60 

550 12 25 35 

360 70 «* - 

390 45 60 65 

420 25 38 45 

460 8 20 28 

400 60 75 87 

500 32 47 60 

550 11 20 32 

180 27 34 « 

200 13 20 27 

220 6 10ft 18 

ISO 25 32 38 

ISO 10 19 25 

200 4 7 - 

300 . 53 63 72 

330 28 40 50 

380 13 23 28 


28 40 50 7 

13 23 28 24 

95 — — IK 

65 — — 2 

37 - - 6 


New Fab May 

7 13 — 

80 32 40 

SB 82 67 

2 7- 
I B T7 

17 23 30 

45 58 S 
5 8 13 

17 25 -32 

50 58 57 

3 8 10 

10 -15 20 
23 25 30 

3 7 8 

10 13 15 

22 23 — 

4 7 10 

7 13 18 


MtdandBenk 

fW2) 


Oec Mar Sap Pac Mar 


2 4 6 

8 12 15 

20. 23 25 

J i , I 

20 '25 ~ 

1 7 12 

8 17 25 

25 30 43 


43 48 — 

35 40 — 

28 30 38 

87 105 117 

47 65 80 

20 30 45 

SB IBS - . 

53 70 85- 

22 40 53 


5 — 
8 — 
11 13- 


MONEY MARKET 
. AND GOLD 


Activity seldom strayed be- 
yond the short dates and the 
one month. The market was 
very snbdned as hopes of a cut 
in the banks' fease rate 
uded-Sterling certificates of 
deposit saw some issuing in 
the ones but not mnch else. 
Day-to-day rates stayed 
mainly within the boands of 
HM1 pa cent. Local anthori- 
ties still showed little 

interest. 

Baa* Rates* 

Ctearmg Banks 10 
Fnanca Home 10 
Dtecwnt MaricafLaan % 

Ovemnnt rtraa 10* Lew 10 

WMKfiMXElO 

Traaatay BBte (pboouM %) 

Buynj Sen™ 

2rrmrh9">B 2imh Pn 

Srnrari 9K 3mnh 9K 

Prina Bank BMs (Discount %) 

1 nvun 2mntti 9 ,r ia-9 ,, xi 

3mnth 6mnth 9MX 

Tkade Bifia (Discount %) 

1 rnnSi 10*31 2mnth IIPw 

3mntti I0*ia 6mnth 9 m » 

tetMt]ar*(SO 

Ownrignc opanlOK don 10K 
T week 1ff>»-10 , w 6anth gOt*-9"» . 

1 ninth 10*w-10> is Smnlh 8 n wB n n 

Smntti 9«w9X I2mdi | 

Ideal Authority DapMNap^ 

2 days 10 7oays 10 

1 mirth 10 Snmth 9X 

6 moth 9°i» ISmth 814 


• WATES OTV OF LON- 
DON PROPERTIES: Six 
months to June 30. Pret» profit 
£3.88 million (£1.6 mBtion), 
inefudine an exceptional credit 
of £625,000 (nil), which repre- 
-senis the proceeds from the 
issue-„of 25,000 wairams at £23 
each. The board is confident 
that the group wft] meet its 
forecast for the year of pretax 
profits of about £7 million, 
before the warrant proceeds. 
Interim 'dividend 0.77p (same). 
Earnings per share 2.43p (L64p 
adjusted). 

• HUGHES FOOD GROUP: 
Shetland Fish (1986X a subsid- 
iary, has acquired for £237,000 
the assets of Shetland Fish Ltd 
from the receivers and has 
beam trading from two fac- 
tories in the Snetlands. 

M WESTERN MOTOR 
HOLDINGS: Six 'months to 
June 30 (comparisons restated). 
Turnover £5.09 million (£4.8! 
milUonX. Pretax profit £419.000 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


[COMMENT] 


Treasury has second 
thoughts on sterling 

The opportunist move by the Trea- exchange rate to take the strain 
sury to borrow $4 billion to bolster instead of raising interest rates. 


Britain's foreign exchange reserves at 
favourable rates has unleashed much 


But the exchange rate became the 
prime indicator of financial con- 


speculation about Britain's exchange ditions when monetary signals grew 


rate policy. At one extreme. 


more confused than ever. Informal 


Treasury is naturally anxious to play moving targets for sterling have been 
down any significance. At the other, maintained. If sterling no longer 
Roger Bootle, chief economist at seemed to matter to the Treasury, on 
Lloyds Merchant Bank, suggests that the ground that its weakness is due to 


Britain may again be on the brink of the fear of Neil Kinnock. then markets 


full membership of the European 
Monetary System. 

Anything is possible and Mr Bootle 
makes a perfectly good case for 
aligning sterling with the mark and 
franc this autumn. Sterling has fallen 


arc sooner or later going to see the 
pound as a juicy speculative target. 
And that would 'threaten renewed 
inflation and the record of financial 
stability. 

How much better to open another 


iranc mu autumn, sterling nas i alien „ K%1 u„ c ,- _ ,u_ 

SSfflfiRitaSSSSSSta ^*&mES5ETES2n*£i 

fifth is committed to the European 
European Community -even though fund and some of ^ ^ is nol 


in for the Bui already there are whis- 
Glaxo’s pers in the market that Elders 
: lucrative, has derided to look elsewhere 
tes, in Britain to expand its in- 

impressed terests. One suggestion is that 
the shares >s in talks with Hanson 
Trust about its Courage brew- 
ery interests. Hanson acquired 
Courage earlier this year after 
bidding £2.1 billion for Ira- 
1( ^ perial-Group. 

Some, marketmen claim 
that Hanson is asking for 
between £1.3 billion and £1.5 
billion and may also be having 
7 talks with Anheuser-Busch, 
223 the US brewer of Budweiser. 
7 tl But the sale of Courage 
38 could be overshadowed by the 
28-i proposed Monopolies 
SI Commission's inquiry into 
the tiedrhotlse system for 
** pubs. Elders, which is quoted 

in London, fell 8p to I90p, 
while Hanson firmed Ip to 
193p. 

The rest of the brewery 
sector was in sparkling form. 
Scottish & Newcastle hard- 
ened 2p to 18£p as the formal 
document containing its 
agreed, £120 million offer for 
Home Brewery went ouL 
Home is forecasting pretax 
profits of £5 million for the 
year to September 30. That 
.compares with £4.4 .million 
last time. 

.Bass made a strong start, 
but dosed below its best levels 
of the day with a rise of 20p to 
785p, after 795p. There were 

also gains for Greene, King, 7p 

up at 240p, on vague bid talk, 
Vanx Sp to 39Sp, GreenaO 
AVhitky . 6p to 176p and 
Whitbread 5p.to 280p. 
tLBsawiisso But HP Buhner, the cider 
company, continued to lan- 
2H2S5-2J1265 guish at I49p — just 4p above 
,ls * ow ^ or ti*e- year — despite 
bj545o^U550o words of eaocouragement from 
Mr Esmond' Buhner, the 
L_4 i£^m chairman, at the annual meet- 

, 7.7BB07JBB& UJflL 
14520-145-70 ^ 

182.75-13235 
__ 1*24-1*27 


-. , - .j . ■ n ; iunu anu »umc ui uk i»i ■» nvi 

the mark on tests of purchasing ^™ C lh ^^ rkeI 0 P eraUons 10 

power ‘ Like the similar $2.5 billion raised a 

The pound's present state of weak- year ago, the $4 billion should not cost 
ness makes it harder for the Chan- anything much, since the proceeds are 
cellar to cut our high interest rates or invested in dollar markets. The 
follow cuts elsewhere. Joining the taxapayer might even make a profit. 
EMS exchange rate mechanism would By the same token, there is no net cf- 
give the pound the backing not just of feet on the borrowing requirement or 
the exira $4 billion, but of the whole on the money supply. Only if these 
European monetary co-operation reserves were used to support sterling 
fund. And that would, Mr Bootle — when the dollars would be con- 
believes, allow a 2 point cut in British verted into pounds — would they have 
interest rates. to be paid for and come imo the 

While the may be new, the domestic reckoning, if the new money 

case for joining has been convincing ^ thc jat *° n has rt ’ 


for years. But British governments . .... 

have fought shy and Margaret This is a good vray of building 

Thatcher personally stopped the last *?* :rve *’ w * 1,c * 1 have 111X1 
bandwagon in its trades. Otherwise, whenever the pound is 

strong there is a temptation for the 
At that time, the prime minister authorities to sell stening to bolster 
plained that, in the event of political reserves. And those operations have 
icertainty threatening the pound, sometimes given markets quite the 
e wanted the option of allowing the wrong signal. 


explained that, in the event of political 
uncertainty threatening the pound, 
she wanted the option of allowing the 


Women need direction 


A corporate woman rampaging to 
success in what appears to be less and 
less of a man's world always catches 
the headlines. The statistics are less 
encouraging, at any rate for those 
women who feel they deserve a better 
place in business. 

The number of women in top 
management has dropped 3 per cent 
in 10 years, according to Government 
statistics. In 1975, almost a tenth of 
general management were women; 
now they account for only one in 16. 

Women directors are a rarer breed 
than one might think; only 2.5 per 
cent of company directors in the UK 
are women. 

But surely among that vast popula- 
tion of small businesses, growing 
through careful tending from Royalty 
and the -Government downwards, 
there are many more women running 
their own show? Perhaps, but take 
franchising where some statistics have 
been pulled together. According to the 
British Franchise Association, there 


COMPANY NEWS 


are about 300 women franchisees — at 
best only about 5 per cent of the total. 

Women franchisors running master 
businesses can apparently just about 
be counted on one hand. 

It is clear that the cause of the 
corporate woman is a provocative 
one. The Institute of Directors ran a 
conference towards the end of last 
year on the paths to power for women. 
It was a sell-out. The IOD is now 
planning another for this autumn. 
This time top business women will be 
regaled with advice and practical help 
on how to get appointed to the board 
either as an executive or non-exec- 
utive director. 

There will be a special spotlight on 
how to get the most out of the public 
appointments system. 

Mind you, among the live speakers 
named so far only one is a woman. 
And the chairman is a chap. It sounds 
like the same old story. 


(£176.000). The' board reports 
that the group has continued to 
tirade profitably since June 30, 
but, because of (he volatile 
nature of the business, the 
directors are unwilling to fore- 
cast the outcome for lhe y ear. 

• PORTSMOUTH WATER 
CO: The company has issued an 
£8- million debenture stock, 
1 996. at £100 per cent. Dealings 
begin today, £IQ paid. The 
balance is payable on September 
25. 

• LOPEX: Two subsidanes. 
ASL and Lane Advertising and 
Marketing, are to be merged to 
create a new London agency, 
ASL Lane. Talks are also taking 
place between Lopex and the 
management of Kirkwood and 
Partners for a phased buyout of 
Lopex's.76 per cent mierest in 
Kirkwood. 

•-POWERLINE INTER- 
NATIONAL: Results for the 
half-year to June 30 include an 
intenm dividend of Ip (Q-Sp)- 


With figures in £000s, turnover solid fuels, opencast mining and 
rose to 4.841 (3,826) but trading tip-washing. Hargreaves has an 
profit fell to 567 (724) and option, exemseable within 12 
earnings per share slipped to months (subject lo extension) to 
3~2p (4. 1 p). buy the outstanding 75 per cent 

• THERMAX HOLDINGS: A for £7.75 million in cash. 

?.“■ divi-ten dof-tPinaldng-Sp „ CTTYVISION: Id rasponK 10 

recent rights issue. 6.02 

CtayirnEjSfa.StaS 


• CTTYVISION: Iq response to 
tile recent rights issue. 6.02 
million ordinary shares (87.27 
per cent) were taken up. The 
balance of 878.739 shares have 


UCCll autu HI « PUMMUIUhll UI L- 

ngs per share rose . mi|jm ^ u* ^ proceeds will 

•ms 

ividend of l.5p. • EVERED HOLDINGS: 
i £000s, turnover Wellington Polymers, an off- 
1.886), operating shoot, has agreed to acquire the 
85) and pretax rubber business of Lucas Sec- 
T tricaL a subsidiary of Lucas 

.VES GROUP: Industries. It will purchase the 
s agreed to pur- business as a going concern. 


to 4p (0.2p) 

• RICHARDS (LEICESTER): 
Results for the first half include 
an interim dividend of 1.5p. 
With figures m £000s, turnover 
was 4.209 (3.886), operating 
profit 181 (185) and pretax 
profit 143 (144). 

• HARGREAVES GROUP: 
The group has agreed to pur- 
chase. for £2.75 million cash. 25 
per cent of the capital of Reid 
Holdings, the parent company 
of a group engaged in the 
distribution of coal and other 


More company news 
on page 27 


AMEV Ahead 


Local Authority Bonds (%) 
Iranfii 1 0X-lO 2mnth 


-i- . - 80 — - 


160 

32 

40 

44 

2 

6 

8 

180 

17 

28 

32 8 

11 

13 

14 

200 

715 

18 

20 

22 

24 

— 

* 500 

127 

142 



4 

8 

— 

550 

77 

92 

. — 

10 

22 

— 

600 

48 

SO 

SZ 

25 

45 

*50 

650 

25 

38 

57 

57 

75 

80 


3mn*h lOtt-SK 

Storing CDs (%) 
1 nrntfi I0ft*l0 
6 ninth 9V-9% 


Imran 5J05.7S 
finrnth &65&60 


2mnth 1 054-9 K 
fimntti 9* -034 
ttmtfi 9YrSK 

3mnth 9544K 
ISmth SyS-M 

3mnth 565-5-60 
12rmh 5JW-5J5 


■fl.Ti 


EURO HONEY DEFOSTTS % 


5 18 - 

90 115 125 
48 75 85 


VssiRsBte 

( 7 1 ) . 


50 22H 
60 13 


2» 24 -f 

13 15 17JS 
7% B» 11W. 


Mi* Chde 
fS68) 

Ds Soars 

(*720) 


185 200 — 
135 150 170 
95 115 13S 
55 85 100 


- 3 

170 4 

t3S IS 

100 30 

108 '1 
78 1» 


Tr 11«% 1091 
f«108) 

TC UK* 03/07 
f£lf8) 


32 40 45 

20 — — 
IT — — 
— 17 — 

5 — — 


214 — — •* 

1% .114 IS* 114 


214 - 

4K ffi4 
914_J^ 

Met Jwi 

6 11 


7 ays 5 
Siramt 541-5% 


7 days 4 l, i»4*u 
3mnth 4’i*4S« 
F ran ch Franc 
7 days 5V5« 
3mrth 554-5 . 
Satan F^snc 
7 days 2-1% 
amrih 414-4 
Yen 

7 days 5'w-4 , S« 
3imth 454-4% 


cel 6*5% 

imnto 5VWS% 
6mndi5%-5% 
cal 54 

1 mmh 4 *w4 t m 
'6 mmh '4^ ib- 4® is ' 
cal" 7%JB» 

1 ninth 5*iBn5*iB 
6 ninth 514-5 
cal 214-114 

imnth 4%-4 
SnMh 4144 
cal 5)44% 

■ 1 ninth Fitj'ig 
6mnth 4«-4% 


« M « 
7 If 31 

1« 10 1g- 

110 140 175 
65 105 Mg 
37 80 HO 


teieicoriiaeM 200B2. 


116 3»hi 
118 2'.e 


% 1% 2% 3% 3>>« 

_ _ is* — — 

— 1% 2% - 
te, # 4% Z» .Mu 4% 
1% 2% 3)4 3% ”ib 5»» 

lit 2>>« — .5 — 

— -.flit — — 


Gokh50O6.<XMO7bO 


□ AMEV made a net profit ofDfl 1443m for die first six months 

• ofl9$6, an increase oTjusi over 5% compared with the same 

period in 1985. The increase would have been nearly 22% but 
for the weakness of the US dollarand other currencies against 
the Dutch guilder. 

□ Total income from fife assurance, general insurance and other 
financial activities rose by 5% to M 4,007m. Income from 
Btshopsgaie Insurance (UK), De Sier Group (Belgium) and 
VACCHoWbigs (Australia) was included for die first time. - 

O AtSOjOTeshardboHets’ funds amounted to Dfl2,462m,an 
increase of Dfl 11 6m since the end ofl985. 

□ An unchanged in terim dividend ofDfl 0.75 per ordinary share 
has been declared. 

O Baning unforeseen drcumsonccs xtd exchange iluoiodons, 
profit per ordinary share for 1986 is expected to be 
approxhnatelj‘ ffie same as for 1^5. 


AMEV Worldwide 

AMEV is an international insurance and financial services 
group based in the Netherlands and operating m 12 countries. 

Its shares are quoted on thc Amsterdam Stock Exchange. 

Total assets exceed Dfl 25bn. 

Operations in the UK are conducted by Gresham Group and 
Bishopsgate Insurance. Gresham is engaged m all aspects of life 
assurance, pensions, mortgages and unit nvists. Bishopsgate is a 
general insurance company operating in marine and non-marine 
business through the London market as wefl as in travel, motor 
and other personal insurances. 


Copies of die 1986 HalfYear Report can be obtained from: 
AMEV (UK) Limited, 

2-6 Prince ofWalcs Road, 

Bournemouth 8H4 9HD 

Telephone: 0202 760297 (£l=appmx. Dfl 3.45). 


Suet Pet Nte Dae 

1525 180 19S 207 - 

1550 155 167 183 — 

157$ 130 142 ISO — 

1600 105 122 142 . — 

1825 82 102 125 — 

1850 62 85 110 128 

•1675 43 68 97 115 


Oct Hw Dte 
~~S G ~ 


Cate 14156. Pute5038. 


8 97 115 20 35 

■UndarfjrtnOtaKwtopric*- 


Rxed Rato Storing Export Finance 
Scnwne IV Average reference rate tor 
in rarest period Augusr'6;i988 to 
Sepembef'2. 1986 iftwltera: - 9^9Q per- 
cent 


N.V.AMEV 

Utrecht 

Thc Netherlands 







BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


* ☆ * * 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


4B22 *77 X *17.1 109 


447 B 457 0 
239.7 255.0 

4400 471 0 

1990 209.6 
1708 1I1JI 
iH.4 isao 


Inn Ex (271 
J Mian (43) 

OK C> l3H 
ru P«ns mo 
rut Pans UK 
BO Amenta 
bg Energy 


BO Income Grath 1952 207 ?• +07 520 


BG JWMl 
BG Technology 


198 3 2089 
1416 150.7 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 
25126 Abermarw SMI LD* 
{71-491 0295 

Amencen 465 

Ausnaun t6i 

Japan & Gmrel 1159 I 

Hign income 4U 

Incttminonal Trust 61 0 

Income Gtfi Tal 47 B 

CMS A Fated H 202 

gkooi Karims 34 1 

Seem Sambos 395 

BARCLAYS UNICORN 
Uncon House. 232. Ronto 
01-53* 55*4 

Anwnca 860' 

Amt Attwn 1309 ' 

Do Income 52.9 

Canal 710 

Exempt Truss 4402 4 

Eara income 772 

Fnanm 2962 i 

500 2706 : 

General I42i 1 

GUI 8 FmM IK 54 0 

Japan 6 Gen Inc 173.* 1 

Do Act 1754 I 

Grcwen accuh 1835 i 

Income Trust 3422 I 

t Leeura Trust B05 

Speatf Smunons 145.4 1 

ipecowy 197 5 J 

i Trustee rune HB.B 1 

,Um» Tech Accum 526 

Do mco<m 52.1 

WartdMde Trust 1528 1 

■ B Tn mv Fund Acc 3351 3 

- DDK 2172 2 


-04 136 
415 148 
413 145 

40.7 258 
435 358 
+05 538 
- 1 OS 301 
418 306 

408 304 
402 955 
-05 UM 
-09 006 

409 233 
422 164 
40.1 129 
41 1 226 

41.8 2JS 
*0.7 281 
-02 020 
-02 020 
-04 087 
42.7 320 

415 320 


1 ' BARMG FUND MANAGERS 

.PO Box 156. BecMmhsm. Kent BR3 4XQ 


Grmm 6 Inc 
t Jason Sue cad 
Japan Sumse 
•.first Europ* 

; First japan 
'Pint N Anar 
"Fust SmaUW Co'S 


no. Fmicnurcti Si. London EC3 
‘01-823 8000 


67.8 

713 

+64 

030 

805 

64.7* 

+63 

□30 

575 

611 

*02 

580 

1316 

1400 

-05 

030 

643 

68.1* 

+09 

230 

1074 

1148* 

+ot 

030 

905 

917 


030 

1145 

122.1 

-25 

030 

892 

954 

-06 

030 

503 

517 

-03 

1.B0 

645 

667 


2.70 


j Planned few 1325 WI.4 404 353 

European me 971 1015 -08 1-30 

, Do Acoen 119.7 1252 -1.1 150 

'General me 161 J 1712 *02 209 

DO Accun 219.9 2335 402 289 

5 Cat Yaw me 1115 115.0* 40.1 628 

r Oo Aocum 1039 1895* 402 928 

,Hwft Yaw he 092 05.1* 4112 530 

, Do Accum 1780 1094 *0.7 528 

Japan Income 2482 262 1 -27 0.18 

Do Accum 2509 264.0 -27 0 19 

N American Inc 487 515 -02 058 

. Od Accum 55 6 601 -02 058 

iPacTc income 134 5 1412 -0.6 &M 

. Do Accum 1514 1650 -0 7 024 

Sm* CO S Inc 807 859 402 152 

. Du Accum 955 1015 +62 152 

BWTANNMUNTT TRUST 
74-78 Fnabury ftwunem London ECZA UD 
01-506 2777 DruAnffOI-638 047B/9 MormyGuM 
0800-010-333 

Growtn Gri 59.7 605* . . 041 

me Racoeary 104.4 1114 +0.8 £'38 

5ma*er Co s 1415 1505* 405 129 

UK Grow* 392 415 *03 208 

Earn ik 552 509* *0.1 7.48 

G* 26 4 279 .. 763 

me S Grown 2025 2 16 D *16 412 


' Smaeer Cos 
-UK Grow* 
Extra ik 
. G* 

me t Grown 


Bd oner crag vid 


60 Hoiderttiusi Hd. BownemouSi BHB SAL 
0345 717377) (UnluaiS) 

G* & Pined 115.4 i».l* *0.1 983 

H^fl IK Enoly ' 970 103 ' *07 480 

lYortdwxa Bond 135 7 209 *• -02 *» 

American Grown 1564 1982 *02 1.49 

AMr Pac*c *99 535 tr* 

Awts 8 Etmw 1073 114.7 *03 211 

Capeai BeMwe 662 866 .. 1-52 

Comm & Energy 7S9 812* *93 1W 

European Capa* 1006 1070 -08 1 19 

Genera 141.4 1512 +1* *Bi 

Japan 81.1 853 -02 . 

UK Growth Inc 101 0 1085 +05 259 

Oo Accum 14*5 i»7 *0-7 148 

US Emanpng Cos SU 577 -05 OB 

Equas tfogress 20«B 214.9 +»7 3.18 

MaabrtsLAcc 656 687 -Ol 283 

ALUa) DUNBAR UNIT TRUSTS 

Atari Butar Cmn SwwJpb 5NJ 1EL 
0793 610366 t 0793 28291 
Fra Trust 230.1 245.15 *13 346 

Grew* & Income 1401 1492 *03 304 

GaMal Trust 2*05 2564 +12 246 

BaUACM 970 1 394.1 *28 309 

Accum Trust 573 1 610.3 +M 160 

American Inc o me 33.1 365* -01 *18 

Mgn boom# Tst 2533 2885* ♦17 4 73 

EoiAtv Income 1422 151 4 *0.7 48B 

hbgn TieM 1*8.5 158 1 +0-7 5 18 

Gwt Sees Trust 300 315 *02 S20 

mre'iuaonal 87.5 632* -0+ 057 

Japan Find 117.1 124.7 +02 001 

PaaK Inia 184 0 >360 *0? 05l 

Amur SM SO 68 5 705c -0.1 IM 

S«S D1 Am* T* 2140 277.9 -03 092 

Aid Asset Verne 33« 0 2*|2 *£? +1? 

Hi Growth 38 1 365 *0.1 ZM 

Smaflar Cos 1305 1258 *06 2.66 

SnOSmier COS 1555 rM6* *0* 24§ 

D e co r o nf Trust 8* 6 SO ' *15 7.08 

Mai Un A Ondly 829 M2 *06 22* 

0 was Earrings ISO 1 20B4 +1.7 233 

TecrrntoS TsT 89.1 94.9 +04 0B5 


Pret sKiw 16.1 195 

CommaiMy 127 4 1359 

Financial 5*3 483 S15 

QddACen 173 187 

mi Lnn 15D 163 

ftu g Stem W 7 711' 

UNirEMrgy 451 *8 T 

wond Teen *r 7 44* 

Amer Grown *7* 'SJ? 

Am* income 665 £5 

Am* Serial* CdS 211 225 

auk Grown 650 663 

Emo StruAer 171 18- 

Fat East 496 S3.H 

W3 M « || 

Eaefnpi B5 j8 B9B 

Exempt Mariiat 6*7 87.7 

BRomswur 
9-17. Penyrooum Rd, HaywORb I 
0*44 458144 

Fran* 1287 137 7i 

Smaner Cos Acc 05.0 02.7 


Fra Trust 230.1 2*51* +14 3*5 

Grown & mcome 1401 1402 *33 304 

Caoaai Trust 2*08 256.* +13 

BaUACM 970 1 394.1 *28 309 

Acoan Trust 573 1 6103 +23 250 

American tnc n mo 331 965* -01 *18 
Mgll Ineome Tst 2533 2688* *17 12 
EgiXtV income 1422 151 * *8J *® 

than YteM i«5 isai *o-7 s je 

Gmt Sees Trust 300 315 +00 S20 

mre'iuaonal 87.5 B3J# -0+ 087 

Japan Fund 117.1 124.7 +C2 001 

Psohc Trust 184 0 I96 0 *08 05l 

Arner Sod So M 5 tobc - 0.1 1 » 

Secs CM AM T* 214 0 277.9 -03 092 

A43 Asset Vane 33 a 0 2497 +23 312 

G4I Growth 38 1 MLB *0.1 ZM 

SmaSar Cos 1269 <266 +06 Z.56 

SrifsSiSSr CO'S 1555 rM 6* +OJ 7A2 
n ec o r n ry Trust 94 6 90 ' +15 JM 

miiuil Ondly 829 M3 *08 024 
0 was Earrings 190 1 3E.4 +1-7 233 

TnclrotoM Tst 99-1 94.3 +IW 0S5 
nSm?S5HiM >206 1303 +0.9 556 

Exempt Smwr Co* 2352 2«3 +09 290 

USA ExSmflt Trust 3404 3605c -15 114 

ARBUTHNOT SECURITIES 
131. Fnsoury Pavement. London ECZA TAY 
01-628 9876 01-280 8S«n«3 
CwABI GrOwW rnc 59 * 635 +0.1 15* 

Do Accum 68-4 71 0 *02 15* 

Easaxn 5 IM 1400 1497* -45 0.79 

Dd 6% WWOrawM 773 77 5* -22 0.79 

Finanee 8 Pnxmrty 667 715* +04 2iB 

G41 A Fixed mam 463 505* -04 320 

Do Accent 82 1 96.4* -Ofl 820 

Eouoy mepme 76* 81.7* +08 4 Sr 

Do Accum 1812 193.7* +12 457 

Hen YeM Inccmo 74 7 7S8W +05 643 

Do Accum 199 3 2131* +19 6*3 

KtO Income 80S 860 -03 21! 

• Do Accum 824 88 1 -0.4 Hi 

•Do5“. WttfWrwl 745 79 8 -34 211 

Managed Fund 85.6 89.1 +31 

Preference income 296 3i.S .. 981 
Do Aram 956 1022 .. 983 

Smaller Co's Accum 1325 141.7 * 

worm Penny Sue SB 102 

Ponftftp Tst UK 790 818 

Portfcta Ik Japan 103t 1066 
FW1KWO Tst US 702 727 

Porttom Tst Europe 123.7 129 1 4 

PintoLo Tm HK 434 449 4 

BAILLIEtVTORD 

3. GWMB St. Edmxrgh EH3 8YY 
031-225 2561 (De*enr03l-226 6066) 


Bm Otar enng TM 


2012 2M.7 +12 *54 

161 192* ■ .1330 

127* 1359 *19 29S 

482 515 +32 2-05 

173 167 +02 228 

132 193 -01 ftS6 

G67 71 1* +0.1 103 
451 *61* +05 154 
41 7 446* . 056 

97.4 103.9* -02 328 

685 MB -31 6.19 
21 1 229 -02 042 

GSD 883 - - 1.78 

17.1 182 . . 0.19 

49 B 93-1* +01 054 
265 272 -31 2.44 

374 389 -31 147 

TOO 643 .. .. 

153 189* . . .. 

■55 895 +38 357 

642 87.7 .. *-14 


U otter Cnag YM 


BCXITABLE UNITS ADMDBSTHAT10N 
35. Ftxxiotn St Manchester 
061-238 5095 

EqdMMi Mean 764 813 *0.4 111 , p , 

Hon mama Trust 765 83.6 +0* *67 I gSS *ng5!*-_ 

tuf 6 r«ed let 50 7 561 846 j |""J?»?W«»eA 

TB 01 me Trusts 832 872* *02 158 E “ 00 "*’ T,|W 

SpeOet SAa Trust 765 9f5c +33 234 1 
Nm Amer Trust 583 62 ic -13 171 

Far Eastern Trust 83.1 665 -07 055 

HI Grown 612 545 .. 104 

Eoumrouw 

St George Hse ConxnBon St Cnury CV1 
190 

003 553231 

UK Growth AOCoffl 1568 1(35 *39 35 

Do lms» 133.8 1421 *05 326 

Holier he Acorn Z55 6 271.0 +U 492 

Da meooe 2 ®j 21 as +1 1 492 


EM ORCr Ghng 


EM ona crag YM 


Do Income 
Hgitaeome 
Income 

Man Parttaia UK 
Do Acc 

Nirt) Amman 
Oner* 


1512 1825 
889 719* 
78.1 6*.0 
612 659* 
1035 1105* 
569 86* 
84 0 933 


8UQ04ASTE H MANA OEMBtr 

Tne Stock Exa an ge Lnnoan E£2F 2JT 
01-588 2068 


FeMishp me 

Gerad me (*l 
Do Accum (4) 
Income Fund 0 
Do Accum (3) 
mb me a 
Do ficowCI 
SmMer me (51 
DO Accum (5) 


497 6*1* .. 6110 

2225 23*2 +75 294 

3SS9 374.4 +120 294 

1035 1094 .. 4j40 

182.4 182.0 .. 4*0 

1326 1363* .. I«1 

1762 1839 .. 151 

Ell *6 1216 .. 280 

El 231 1295 .. 280 


Om/Fctiw Aeon 1006 1067* *02 690 
Do Income 832 979* *01 890 
Nm Amer TM Actum 132* 1*08 +12 022 

Far East T» Accum 1825 1732 +12 037 

Ewe Tm Accum 1651 176.8c -2.7 107 

General That 2460 281-7 +05 395 


F1CUMT HAMMS 
1. Uwqnce Poumey 
81-823 4680 
US Snu4Mr Gcr» 
C*UI Fima 
mcoree Fund 
F« Eastern fund 
Overseas tnoome 

Foma trwreei 
N atural Bw FiiW 
EmtMn mou m e 


705 755 
1079 1159 
825 875 
769 819 
736 765 
59 1 633 

420 455 
84 4 902 


CS FUND HAMMERS 

125. Hign Hotnm. umdan WC1V SPY 

01-342 1148 

CS Japan Fund 960 101.1 -15 02L 

CANNON FUND HAMABCRa 
'- Otympc way. WentMy. HAS ONB 
01-002 8876 

Gowih 2869 3052 +12 253 

Income 33*5 355 B +19 358 

Far EM 2204 2344 -2.1 029 

NOrtn Amencai 1495 159 * -12 057 

OlDtMl 485 519* -01 190 

Etxopean S22 MB* -O* 1.00 

Japan 598 830* -09 050 

C*m. WES) HA NAOEHCWT 
TO Bot MI Bnm Marla London ECS 7 JO 
01-621 0011 

CepBAI ■ 382.1 4087 +65 1.75 

tnconrn 269.B 3095 +2.4 452 

Norm Amencen 2852 303.1 -35 057- 


I. Km VMan St EC+N 7AU 
01-623 6314 


F® WNESTWNT HMM6S 

ISO. west George St Otago* G2 2PA 

0*1-332 3132. 

BatanoMOmmc *53' *82 .. 150 

Do Accum' 461 *90 

mcome Gth me 412 435 .. SOI 

DO ACClAB 43.1-459 . . . . 

Service Ga'B me 498 sao .. 150 

DOAcan S04'5J5 .. .. 

raajTYMVESTMENT SERVICES LTD 
Rear Wah. Tomtidge. TM 1DY 
0732 36IM4 ^ 

Amencen' 10*5 1YI4 -02 058 

Amer Eqtfy mcome 333 352 -02 438 

Amer speMI Sts *99 53* .. 158 

Far EM me 332 375 -S3 3.30 

GM & Find Int 314 325 -0.1 83* 

Grown 6 Income' 999 1089 +04 49* 

Japta Specal 9ts *45 475 -15 . . 

Japan Trust M45 1367 -35 . . 

Managed M Tst 1«6B 1563 -1.7 051 
Mb Income Epoty 005 -MS* +02 618 

PmtM atuua l GPl 347 370* +0* 231 

South EM AM TM 327 32 B 419 044 
Specal SKI 187.4 1805c -04 057 




Lnmson EC3A SAN 


01-623 6314 
G* Trust 


1010 1060* +031158 


Amercer Enrol E3M0 3771 
Japan Exempt U56S 4715 
Am Property Tst tlOOOOO 8 

Property Trust 120210 


CENTRAL BOARO OP RMAHCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENGLAM) 

2. For* street London EC2Y SAG 
01-668 1815 

Inv Fund 4184 .. 454 

Freed mt 1*5.4 . . 853 

Deposit 1005 .. 9.70 

CHASE MANHATTAN FUND MANAGERS 
77172 Badnghnl Sneai. London EC3V GOP 
01-806 6822 

S 8 C Special Sns 51.4 545 . . 673 

CHARITIES OFFKtALKWSTHBfTFUMI 
2. Fom Serna. London EC2Y SAO 
01-588 1815 

38357 ■ ..479 




Bd OHer Chng YM 


Far EM AIK 829 989* +09 0 10 

nmenran Ace 592 835 -Oi 1.10 

Brow Acs 560 59.6 -05 050 

WorijCwde Acc 525 955* +1.9 1.40 

momrcm ur 

no B oe 4. N ormal NR1 3NG 
0603 5Z2200 

Onxm Trust tl»1 1117 +057 3W 

moTruSI 1325 1395 +05 iS 

gpFEMBMR TRUST HANAGBaENT 
66 Cannon SM. London CC4N BAE 
dtamga 01-236 3BfifiW7/8AO 
mamahomJ OrowSi 1461 194 -09 1 » 

Mama 6 Growth 625 672 +0,4 358 

ttartdHda Rec 885 915 -0* 196 

Amencen Growft 3U 347* .. 050 

JmnGrpwM 623 667 -15 050 

73 2 763* -05 007 


RH Oner Crag Yu 


Enopaan tSowth 
UK Growdi 
Ptah c Grow th 
Hgh moome 


555 595 
532 575 
349 375 
562 685 
101.7 1083 


PEARL TRUST 

252. hui Hatnm. WCTV 7EB 


939 999 

141.0 1905 
1265 1335 
1372 1460c 
1372 1469c 
1925 1*15 

230.1 2445 


.. 1.18 
-20 128 
*04 797 
+09 2.14 
+05 2.14 


OrawOi Fund Me 
Do Accum 
mcome Fund 
hi Eou#r me 
Do Accum 
ura Trust me 
Do Accum 


46 H en Sw ot Hratey on Themea 
Mi 578868 

me Growth 2761 2962 

Income 1961 2160 

vtmuwtoe Rec 1533 1645 

Amer Grown 869 745 

M Emera CtTi 81 0 870 

Far EMfewSi 775 832 

Emcpe a n Gth 625 67.1 




pmuncuNn-TRuars 
222. B U eccn M . Ltndon 
012*7784^7 


Com & GR 
Far Easssrn 
North America 
Sped*! sue 
Technology 
Extra incmna 


1163 1272 
629 873* 
980 1063* 
1802 193.8 
130 3 Hfl.1 
713 783a 
(M2 1166 
967 97.1 


DO Accum 
US Specal Feature: 

(to Accum 
Gold B PIbcol* Me 
□o Accum 
UB Specal lac 
00 Accum 
European Pert fee 
Do Accum 

HJLIMT TRUST W 
99-106 SraAng Hd. 
0622 674751 
MLA American 
mla General 
MLA mtamattonal 
MLA OBI Ifett 


4217 4464 

3333 3575 
806 865 
825 863 
1357 1447 
1363 1*63 
884 715- 
674 722 
495 535* 
512 566* 
575 rc.o* 
GZ4 S72* 

92.1 97 am 

825 960* 


-0.7 050 
-02 050 
-03 OOO 
-04 050 
-03 1 10 
-02 1.10 
-05 454 
-09 454 
-03 091 
-05 051 


242 235 -03 057 

343 363 +0.1 206 

S&a ffiJJS +0.1 057 
317 261* .. 1033 

*2.1 445* +0.1 554 
325 344* 072 


SiG«xgBSW*y. ShnunAgn Herts 

Growth Unu 765 61 A* 

GB B Ftneo tot 1138 117.8 
Hwn mcome uno 117.1 124.4 
hSi YOU G* Uni 575 595 

mb GrowDi Uiete 143.1 152-1 
N Amencen unrtx 725 775* 

FOr EM ums 99 0 1052 
Smeser C« Fund 699 743 


FBUOOCnALUMrr TR U ST HAHAOPta 
31-09. Hero m. Hon Essex. IG1 20L 
01-478 3377 

Hamorn Etnky 4145 4404 +25 3.12 

BmipMi 1045 111.1 -05 05* 

reborn COM 335 572* +04 054 

HODOffl MOB fete 873 715c +52 610 

reborn HT 1013 1077* -61 051 

jacansse im.6 iM8* +0.7 055 

NtoMm 711 HU -03 055 

Hobcn Spec Sta 864 705 +04 250 

Hobam UKGrowai 839 892* +05 259 

reborn Ob Trust 1885 1972 -15 248 

QtM-TEH HAHAaSSOtT OJHWIY 
31-43 CheshM St London BCZV 7LH 
01-600 4177 

Outdare General 4422 4765 .. 2Jf 

Qutdreni Inoome 2415 257.1 .. 512 

Quadrant Reeowry 2825 2795 . . 249 


51 Swewts Lara, London EC4P *OU 
01-280 5466 

NG America Inc 2635 3619* +05 133 
00 -Accum 3067 3283* +OJ 133 

SC Energy Be* 12tu> 1361 S3 232 

HC tnco™ 91.1 969 +07 452 

NC Japan 1913 2045 +03 OOL 

NC on 1437 1515* +15 200 

NCSmir ErmpGcr* 1925 2061 +61 040 

NCEsravtS £1260 1315 .. 656 

NC AmerProp $1157 1618 .. .. 

NC Propwly 1563 1662 .. .. 




ROWAN UMT TRUST 

33 Karg WHnm Street London BG4R SAS 
01-838 S678 


2795 2923* 
4427 4735* 
815 661* 
785 813* 
1161 1211C 
795 842. 
832 895 
567 825 
797 862* 
BSS 705 


+13 227 
+15 227 
+05 479 
-04 095 
+0.1 028 
+0.1 683 
+02 121 
+24 150 
-02 158 
+04 151 


WbtMig. W 


Mgh YWd 
Morin (31 


Mgh Merest 
far East (2) 


win w»a 
7*15 7565* 
1785 1795 
4165 4245 
1715 1725 
1215 1240 
2440 2475 


-105 158 
.. 238 
«st 

.. 1.78 
+15 242 
+951236 

77 ooo 


ROYAL UFE FUND MANAQBHy 

New KM Ptee*. LHHpaat L8B 3H8 
061-227 4422 

Eauhy Trial 6*2 882 +45 250 

MtWst 735 785* -02 133 

Git Trust 267 261 .. 618 

US Trial 325 345* -51 151 

pedfc BHto Tst 416 *85 +61 058 

20 ChfHn Sl London EC2 
01020 0311 

Beaty DM 1205 127.7 +05 148 

DoAmee 1867 1795 +1.1 148 

Mari moem That 914 994 +0.7 ^27 

bo Acoen 1095 1175 +07 427 

US Growth 985 605 -05 036 

Do Accent 679 817 -67 058 


; a- 


Do Aocum 
Exn ure a 
Do Acorn 
German Gm toe 
Oo Aeon 
mcome 
Do Accua 
MB Tech 
Do Acctan 
Japan QrawBi 
Oo Acaxn 
N Amer 8 Gen 
Do Accun 
Petrie Bam 
Do Aocum 


1684 2014 
3395 3885 
S19 545* 
■ S72 81.1* 
1597 1705 
2B82 3062 
7*5 775 
7*3 779 
2767 2955 
5445 8824 
1872 2002 
1955 208.1 
845 M5 
85.0 905 
1012 1082b 
1063 1168* 
1335 1412 
1867 1464 


SreHr Cos 8 Rec 1954 2069 
DO Accum 218.7 2335 

WartdMde Orowfi 2125 2287 
Do Aocum 2979 3185 

uk Grown Fm ear 511 


+19 103 
+25 353 
+61 245 
+02 246 
+1.1 551 
+19 654 
-12 029 
-12 029 
+6* 428 
+45 436 
.. 02B 
-04 0128 
-03 052 
-03 0.02 
-66 053 

-StJ 053 

+04 601 
+03 054 
+15 153 
+15 153 
+25 080- 
+05 050 
+64 151 






11 t ^ 'iir- V i 







■pp 

PsaTi 

P 71 









UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 




+2 

*3 

S3 193 


12 

17 65 

♦n 

14 

*7 149 



.. 68 


23 

83 62 

j' 



+2 

O 

LS263 


117 

94 

MSS 

116 


16 

61 

227 

818 

883 

Atance 

aia 

• +3 

319 

39 39.1 

MH 

125 

Amer That 

MB 


4 A 

32 

379 

388 

286 

Aog AmarSac 

388 

*2 

89 

23 

81.1 

120 

9* 

ABwriC Assets 

104 

-1 

09 

09 

794 

12/ 

98 

Sankara 

127 


390 

1 61 

477 

254 

159 


250 

+2 

lie 

1 05 


82'. 

; 53 

Br Amen 

60 

#+■» 

*0 

59 335 

33 

31 

* Empire Sac 

SB's 

+*i 

67 

19 

309 





+3 

21.7 



Ha 

60 

BruwKa- 

101 

+2 

33 

33 479 1 









250 

139 

Creecent japan 

232 


Oi 

02 


157 

108 

Darby me 

155 


129 

83 

185 

143 

36* 

110 

31* 

Do Cap 

Drayton Cora 

MS 

394 

+l" 

145 

4.'l 

348 

190 

IS* 


1B1 


19 

09 


772 

*20 

Oreytm Japm 

7*4 

-5 


62 


206 

178 

Dimdo* Lon 

IV 


89b 

49 

352 

117 

90 

Erin Anw ASM 






182 

178 

119 

28* 

Ednburgh 

Seoriettm 

161 

378 

♦1 

47 

64 

29 

1.7 

<74 

633 

165 


Engatri mt 

in 

+1 

55 

xa 

461 

9* 

80 

75 

60 

EnoHh Sect 

94 

74 

+1 

29 

12b 

61 

1 19 

579 

822 

118 

US 

F 1C Alxnc* 

118 



22 


217 

142 

F B C Paata 






10 

8 -j 

Ftat Chsmtu 

B'i 


0.1 

12 


348 

287 

Firat Soot Amsr 

825 

b+2 

159 

45 

312 

120 

U5 

FhtUnGW 

88 


67 

69 

74 

S65 

480 

FlaHng American 

582 


82 

15 

92.1 









345 

129 

284 

84'j 


1 304 
125 

b+l 

•1 

129 

14 

42 

1.1 

333 



Fbumg Hedging 

137 

+1 

35 

25 

629 - 



Hsmng Jinn 

732 

-3 

57 

05 








33 


181 

123 

Fbmtig Onarsaxs 

158 

b-i 

35 

25 

agio 



Hwang Teoi 




22 


141 

107 

Hwnmg IhXvarexl 

Ml 

+1 

29 

21 

889 









tea 

ra 

OOC CHBtBl 


+2 




22S 

118 

QT Japan 

2T4 

-1 

29b 

69 


in 

138 

Omrel Frxxtx 

188 

• +1 

29 



330 

275 

Gensiw Cons 

305 

+1 

179b 

59 

285 

144 



144 


34 

24 

885 




123 

-1 





127 

Goran Asandc 

144 


49b 

25 

449 


138 

Goran Omm 

219 

-- 

13 

15 

98.1 


Fhqh Lau Company 


102 81 
122 95 
213 198 
118 100'v 
101 89 

187 118 
187 1*0 
118 »■* 
178 138 
169 135 
SOS 237 
370 300 
210 ISTy 
146 112 
9* 79 

300 217 
51 38 

(B 33 
74 S3 
109 80'. 

358 286 


Gross 

On yb 

Price OTge pence % PJB 


TH Cay 01 Lon DM118 
TRMIGon 211 
TR Neural Rw 116 
Tn Norn America 98 
TR Pecric Basin 181 

53^ IS 

TR Trustees 178 
Temple Bw isb 
Thargmarton 298 
Throg Secured Cep 335 
Trans Ctoesmc 210 
Tibtme 146 

TiMaveM me w 
US Debennn 300 


63 26 525 
45 25 <15 

155 175 61 
93 61 861 

25b 79 204 
22 32485 
45 45805 
161b 43 361 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 



40 43 IIS 

47 72 102 
00 12 266 
25b 25 234 


GWJoynmon and Co report 

SUGAR (From C. Crarafcow) 
FOB 

116B-T4.0 

122-6-23.4 

1372^79 

142.0-425 

— 1475-493 

1 SI .4-529 


44 


COMMODITIES 


THree MonHis . 380.0^36200 

V« NM 

Tone Ua 


UnafSeMpriCH 
OfSchd Tsmawr flguree 
PrtOB In Cptrmiite toon* 
SBmr Oi puce per troy aunc* 

RudoO Waif & Co. Ltd. report 
COPPER GRADE A 

Cast! .. 902.50-903-50 

Three Months . 919^0-920.00 

Vd — ~ 10500 

Tone Steady 


Cash 

Three Months . 
Vd 

T/mh 

801.00-90X00 
785JJQ-785J50 
4350 

MCKEL 

Steadier 

Cash 

— 2535-254 0 

Three Months . 

— 2565-2570 

Vfll 

-84 

meat am) livestock 


Rvenge faMock prices at 
rapra unfrBu a ib rH Wi on 
S^dnObere 

GS: Cattle. 95J6 per kg hv 

mSnOl49uOS|MrhS- 

8091 per kg Iw 

* ast deed cstase wetght 
EngUndmtlWelMt 
Canto nee, up&3 %. avA. 


QASOO- 
Sep „ 

13650-25 

Ort 

138.50-SS 

Nov 

_ 14X75*50 


150JJ0-49.75 

Feb-I 

14&00-8LR 


I LONDON HEAT FUTURES 


EXCHANGE 


Pig Contact 


p.perkflo 

Month 

Open Ctose 

OK 

Unq. 104X0 

NOV 

lte|. KS.40 

Feb 

Unq. 99.30 


Unq. 9000 

Jun 

Uhq. 99.00 


Vob 1 

PigMutvob30 

LONDON KFAT FUTURES 


EXCHANGE 

UnCUttoContrect 


p. per Mo 

Montti 

Open Ctose 

S«P 

Una 9050 

Oct 

Unq. 97.00 

NOV 

Unq. 99.00 

Feb 

Unq. 9950 

Apr 

Unq- 99.50 

Jin 

Unq. 99X0 


Viotll 

LOMWNORA1N FUTURES 


E per tonne 


WM Btatoy 

Monttr 

Ctose Close 

Sep 

187.00 10X50 

Nov 

106.05 107.75 

Jan 

11030 11050 

Mar 

11040 112.90 

««y 

11B50 11X90 

Jut 

117.15 114.15 

VOhFTifS 


Wheat-, 

—358 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
£ per tonne 

th Open Ckwa 

110.60 110.30 
126.50 12X50 
157.00 155.50 
17X00 171-20 
8500 85.00 

VobSl5 


GJLL Freight Futures Lid 
report 810 per todu point 
frei g ht Ittde n 

HighyLow Close 
OefM 817.0-799.0 BOOJ) 
dan|7 820JM0X0 8010 

Apr Jj7 870.0-8400 8(00 

J«87 780.0-7S50 7S5.0 

OdB7 875 .0-0580 8S8J0 

8S75-BS7J 8600 

Aor88 930.0-3250 mu 
pi 88508850 8820 

Vot 049 tote 

Open ntsreet: 2000 

TANKER REPORT 
HifllVlflw Ctosa 
SepM 1000-1000 TOOOO 

OCI Bo 
Nov 86 
Dec 86 
Mar 87 

Jun87 1200-1200 1200.6 
Vol: 8 tots 
OpenlntBiest38 

Spot market commentary: 

Tankar index: 

1 1 0X6 down 75.0 on 3/9/88 

Dry cargo index. 

7165 up l4Ji on 3/9/86 


jf-JJ' 



































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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


25 


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fJjPB. your .PonfoUo card check vour 

efS^fitofrtsajs 

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1 i( Amentum 

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1 -1 Kai Aim Bk 

BanlajBcouflL 



Smk’jJDacotmi 


1 4f Helical Bar “ 

Building, Roads 


f* Sftu Sore* 

Drapery Fiores 


| 61 Bun on 

Drapcry^lores 

J_L 


DnpeyyjStons 

“ ““ 

I S| FameH Elen 

Electricals 


1 VI AB Food 

Foods 

“ ‘ 


Food* 



Indostaals A-D 


1 12l Bcazer (CHI 

hidusuiab A-D 

— 

■ 131 Avon Rubber 

induarioJ* A-D 


I 141 Dttoutto- 

Indasrial* A-D 


1 isl Redun A Coburn 

Industrial* L-R 


1 IM Plessey 

EKctricah 


| 171 Powdl [Juftryn 

Industrials L-R 

- 

1 IS| Ferrami 

Electrical 


1 191 Martarbnc 

laditnriah L-R 


I 20j Tom lint (FH) 

Indwrials S-Z 

™“ 1 

1211 HomuBsen 

Industrial* E-K 


I23I Ekco 

Industrials B-K 


1 ul HaJI (M| 

Industrials E-K 


I 24) Samuebon Gp 

Lessoic 

" 

| 25) Bummer 

InduBriah A-D 


1 26| Aramroot 

Monn^Ainnfl 


1 271 Good R da lions 

Paper. PrinuAdv 


1 28 Webb lios) 

Property 


I 2*H Billon (P) 

Properly 


| 30| LASMO 

oa 


I 311 Wedgwood 

Industrials S-Z 


| 32l Br Borneo 

oa 


I 331 OeiogtB 

NcnrspapefiPob 


1 34j Quick (HI) 

MoKmAiraift 


I 3S| Carte® Capd 

Oil 


1 361 Kwik-Fn 

MotofiAircnft 


1 37| Wagon Ind 

Industrials S-Z 


1 381 Nuidin A Peacock 

Foods 


| r>| Christies Ini 

Industrials A-D 


1 40| Hcpwortb Ccnmaic 

Industrial* E-K 


| ^il rtatm rirciymi 

Industrials E-K 


| 42| Hanson 

Industrials E-K 


I 431 Ratal Elect 

Electricals 


I 44* Syacni Dcsrgoen 

Electrical* 


1 83 Times Ntnuyayus LbL 

bnUy Tatal 1 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Advance continues 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end September 12. §Contango day September 1 5. Settlement day September . 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


Please be sare to take account , 
of any minus signs 



Weekly Dividend 

; 

Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £ 8,000 in 
tomorrow's newspaper. 


DON 

TIR 

WED 

THU 

R9 

SAT 

net** 

TdW 










BRITISH FUNDS 


1986 

mania* sac* 


J*f » ffl - 




SHORTS (Under Fm Years) 
98% wv Ext* J'/fc 1888 
IK 1 '. TOOVBtBh 14% 1888 
103 SSVExch 13VK 1887 
I00V 93 V Treat CIO’** 1967 
97V 93'. ExCS 2%%19to 

101% as’.Exch 10*4; tsar 

' 88*. 93% Fund B'a% 1983-87 
•101'. 95, Treat 10*6 1987 
97'. 90V Trees 3% 1887 
104'. 87'. Trees 12% 1987 
896 92*. HUH TVS 1985-88 
.ID*'* 98V EMU «'A 1BB8 
102% 846 Tins CffM. 1988 
84V OB'.-Tnm* 3% 197MB 
'ICC*. 92 V Tran 9'.-% 1998 
V07H S3 1 .- Tms 11'rtb 1989 
105*o 95% Tim TOV* 1998 
104'- 93'.- Excti 10% 1989 
11l'» 94VE*Ch ffA 1988 
107'.- 94 Excti 11% 1989 

8 '. 8*'? Treat 5% 198689 
'. 92 VOteS CS'!% 1989 
S3 83-SIYws 3% 1989 
T14'< 1B3 1 . Treat 13% 1900 
86*4 78'a Excti 2'.-% 1990 
1JBV 94'. Excb 11% 1980 
113'. 100 Exch 12'|V 1980 
79<Ttau 3% 1990 
09'iTfMS »'4% IBB7-B0 
108'. 02v Tran 10% 1990 
ii2'. to Tms nv% 1981 
' 64'. 84' J Fund 5Vk 1987-01 
•110*. 98'i Excti 11% 1891 
86% 83 Tran 3% 1991 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 
116% 103 Tran 126% 1fl*2 113 

1074. 91 Tram 10% 1982 103*. 

109'. 8SV Trees CTO'rti 1992 104'i 
117'.-8®r.&eti 12'.% 1933 111% 

1 23'. ■ 102’.- Each 13%". 1992 11761 

106 946 Tran 10% 1903 1026 

13161036 Tran 126% 1998 1146 

916 TBVfkmd 8% 1B33 SO 4 

120 111V Tran 136% 1993 120V 

1336 losvnan 14';% 1894 1256 

132 97% Excti 12'.% 1884 1146 

137’. 110'. ExtSi O'A 1994 119% 

105>. SB'.Tran 9% i»» 97 ■. 

120 lOO’.Traa* 12% 1995 112% 

786 68'.- Gn 3% T9KW5 786 
1106 916 Excn 106% 1995 HQ6 

126 1086 Tran 12VV T995 11W. 

1336 112'.- Tms 14% WW 124’- 

n»6 07 Trots 9% 199306 97 • 

142% 122'.- Han 15'.% 19 


88% 

25 

100% 

136 

101V 

13,1 

TOOV . 

102 

97% 

26 

1B0%» 

184 

98% 

86 

100V 

106 

98% 

11 

102'. 

117 

97V 

76 

101V 

104 

« 

97 

32 

88% 

15 

1MV 

116 

102V 

103 

101 

95 

104V -V 
103V* . 

98 


91 

56 

98V 

95 

BBV 

33 

110 

116 

B3V 

10 

104V 

105 

109 • 

115 

88 

35 

97% 

85 

101% 

107 V 

98 

109 

91 ■ 

83 

so® -v 

194 

BS 

35 


103 

1236 

1056 

946 

1336 


130'.- 1116 Ext* 13 V. 1W8 
8(6 74': Rampf 3% 1896 
10661016CWI* 1D% 1*» 

131 110 Tms I3'x% 1897 
112V S3 1 .- Excti lO'i% 199? 

101-4 796 Tran BVi 199 7 
1426 1236 Excti lS% 1997 
886 73’iim 6V% 1995-98 0Z6- 

1076 896 Excti 96% i960 100% -6 

W« 120. Trees 15':% 1998 l»6«-6 

1246 1 05 6 Excti 12% W8 W; -6 

1076 BBV Ttan 8'.>% 1899 996 -6 

ISU'.ifflvExcn 1=6% iB» 

M4 96'. Tran 10'.% 1999 1066 -6 

1136 94'. Com 1046 -6 

US'; 111% Tran M% MOO 123V -% 

98 9560011* ?% 2000 »6 -6 

111% 91% Han ,0 % 

1096 696 Con. 9V. 2OT 1016 Jr 

137'. 117 V Trees 14% 199841 138 -6 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

111% 94': con* '2* SB?,- 
124'i1(J36E*cn 1fc]9»02 

1096 90 Han 96% an 
112 1 936 Ttan 10% 2003 ■( 8-6 

199 V 1166 Tran 186% 2000-03 1296 -6 
1§':10* Tn*e» 11'/% MO1-04 1M6a-6 
1136 946 Tran IP- 2fO* -6 

60’. 486 Fund 3':% 1W W SSV -6 
TOO v SSVOOnv 9V-%20W »• -6 

1096 96’, -Cow 9':%»2?<S V* 

108*. 906 con* s.% 2005 iw. -6 
117%. 94 VExItl 106% 2005 ij* 

134%ll3%Tl«n 12V*.MTO« 'g.-i 

95*. 79*. Tran 8% rag-06 
inr. 102 Con* 9-v% 2006 in’: "7 

137 V 104 '.Tran 116% 3C^47 1176 ♦ • 

93V Tran 8'.-% 2007 . 826 


1061156 Tran 13'>. ^ 

95' * 

7?' 


M6lian "BS 3009 67%*-V 

57' Trew 5':% 2006-12 85 •-"« 
M». 786 Tran 7Ve 201M& 

136 113'jt**** 15% Mil-17 IS-- -% 


UNDATED 

46% M'.Crasoli 4%i 
43 346 ww in 3;.% 

5?V 446 Con* 3'-*» 
34. 39 . Tms 3% 
29 V 34-. Consob S'.% 
P96 246Tre» 2’-% 


43V 

386 

5061 

32'.- > 

7761 

2761 


113 9310 
90 0510 

10.1 9591 

lie Mis 

11 J 9-745 

03 9.583 

108 9584 

8.7 7«8 

n.4 

1U 9-587 
1(19 awg 
113 SJB7 
as 9502 

10.7 9.750 

08 6776 
99 B.733 

iog 

119 MW 

93 B.492 
119 9MZ 

109 9.762 

3jB — 
84 9.734 

10.8 Mil 

10.0 9730 

99 0:531 
119 9980 

89 9271 

97 9704 

117 9954 

104 9801 

BJi 9544 
104 9821 

04 9888 

94 9.687 
TOi 9038 

9881 
97 9lH» 
04 0473 
104 9447 


87 9484 

10-4 9017 

94 94® 

00 9£* 

10-6 9.038 
10.1 9705 

94 9410 
64 6413 
84 9.481 
94 9483 
94 9489 
94 9.472 

10.1 S-fiS 

9.1 9320 
94 9543 
104 94M 
92 ft395 
102 9426 
9.1 9£» 
54 0.061 
9.1 9205 
94 9408 


93 

92 

74 

82 

92 

92 


INDEX-UNKED 

123 114 * Titus H. !% '986 
107- 98’. Trees B. ?■ J990 
133 lOB’-Tran n. 3% 1WB 
107 r »6 Tran 22 :% M01 

lorv S3 - . Han 
110V 066 T*#n n. 2% 

106 * STvTraas 026% 
ur. 97 Ttets IL3V- M1> 

84 V 796 Tran J12 :%»;2 
■G2‘« 87>Tr»tS IL2‘.-^e £01® 
W. ?7v Tran U^aw* 
100*. 86 1 mi 12 - * mb 




1988 

mph Low Cprapagy 


Gran 
A vw 
tax OTga panca % P?E 


74 55 
S2D 318 
190 136 

ass sss 

m 293 
4286319 
153 120 
699 417 
321 191 
533 428 
122 00 
448 200 

80 58 
135 102 
380 280 
6 S’. 

894 410 
818 613 
77V 06 
320 220 


MK . . 

jWs 

tseferi 

uaraiyw 

Do 9% •*■ 


Nh We a 

OUDoun 

Promam 
H88 Brat 


59 -V 

m • . 

M4 

780 »4S 

467 «-5 

340 

123 -1 

6/2 •.. 
338 *4 

554 -5 

£■13 -1 

338 


4-1 


Sind Chan 
Umn 

wttoFngo 

wnnnt 


130 

354 

flflta. 

734 ««10 

678 *5 

£756 +6 

278 • .. 


U 58 .. 
17.7 30204 
124 87122 

284 2711.4 
2SJJ GLE 74 


27.1 05 212 

274 54 64 
800 S3 84 
1S5 44 114 

as a ms 

7.1 54134 

144 4JJ 10J 
192 24 12.7 
48L4 S3 8.1 
524 74 884 


7.7 28 134 


BREWERIES 



-13 04 
*20 21.7 
14 

*1 44 

.. 204b 

> 74 

.. 154 

a .. 114 

*4 % 

? iSS 

254 

24 

08 

46 64 

> .. 34 

Ol 

*3 

+2 104 


46 

46 


104 
n.t 
.. 11.1 
+5 104 

46 127 

104 


44164 
24 167 
14 201 
33 174 
44102 

6.1 154 
27103 
24T74 
14201 
45124 
33 137 
30134 
44135 
34(52 
44 04 
33 .. 
24 154 
34144 

63114 
42 152 
44 124 
44 127 
44 200 

2320.1 
3.4 214 



511 

Baagaddpo Brick 3® 
Bbran 0a*> 1® 

BajamB a® Own S 
ton 176 

Ban Broa 57 

BtockM 9T0 

Bba Ckda 



Gtoba 6 Dandy Ord 121 
CBaaran tU4 378 
HAT 1® 

wuBa a® 

Henian-Suan 68 
HayvnodTMun 212 
Mgna 6 HH 6H 
nwoex Johnaan 19* 
JaW U] S SOM 43S 
Uring (J) 418 

“TV 417 

ancajMMa) 113 

1 6 Saudi 18« 

318 

Uartoy 125 

Uanma (HaOha) trn 
May 5 ttaanB 1® 
McApna (AlkaiO 44* 
Uatar M 
Mtor (SMari 
Monk (A| 

Mowna mom) 
Mawanair 
NonnijinB net 
Mnkmon 
nrnnkc'TMBar 
FWMnt ’ • 

BMC 

R*tand 

nmereki 
r Rugby CaraaM 
stoopaa FWhar 
Smart (J) 

Tvnac 

Taws t atom 
H art 
Torn 





114 44 214 
104 34184 
Ola DJ HL5 
-2 Ol 25 lOI 
43 120 2519.1 

.. 102 34123 

-2 m 74 
.. ..a.. 52 

*2 no u«i 

4-1 -44 08 «4 

.. an 4.1 <27 

.. 300 53 OO 

.. 143 55342 

•• « “S3 

+2 33 -44308 

41 44 30 154 

+4 .. .. 00 


44 34 .. 
35 20 100 

245 4.1 104 
65 14 125 

85 Ol 120 
85 33 145 
2» 14 28.1 
47 44 107 

25 24:i17 
25 34 87 
50 35147 
54 75175 

8 2JS35 
74 21 134 

54 34 133 

.. .. 71.1 

24 35124 

KM 48143 
104 34175 

7.1 37 144 
143 53808 
1SJS 24 114 

104 24 115 
52 46 Oiffi- 

55 74 95 
102 25 148 

74 .40 214 
t14 35 132 
54 43240 
74 35 174 

ai 0.1 . . 

174 44143 
32 32(36 
14 45 .. 
03 74 1U 
220 55120 
157 14 17-2 
03 4314* 
.74 20143 

184 62 74 ■ 
200 Z9 15.1 

105 34143 
123 41 134 

9.1 65 174 
35 25 214 
85b 32174 

134 27 207 
127 44141 
74 44 127 
122 20135 
14 14 674 
(OO 01294 
154 43120 
104 34155 

14 15 07 
65 35134 

15 14 255 

07 05137 

32 12 224 
64 24 214 


*2 

+2 

♦f 

•*3 

•43 


•4-1 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 



CINEMAS AND TV 


270 176 Angle TV **’ 
27 


?« 176 HTVN/V 
300 203 LWT Hda* 
330 168 SCO! TV A' 
273 1® TVS N^V 
« 31 TSW 

2® 223 Timm TV 


280 

a 

220 


.. 134 53135 

+1 20 07 84 

4® 114 54 1O0 

.. >13 55163 

+3 13.0 47 1CL3 

.. 1430 6411-7 
25 S5T24 
42 .. .. - 


DRAPERY AND STORES 



358 _ 
174 M 

53 J? 
«ao sm 
56« 428 
388 1® 

152 116 

365 210 

99 86 
OB 216 
540 3® 
IP 73 
715 GOO 
220 ISA 
274 194 
l» 39 
179 (05 
133V 51 
303 (83 
®0 910 
178 87 
64 54 

153 89 
238 172 

16 830 
11': 721 
307 ISO 
33 25 
44 28 

182 (to 

88 70 

36 84 
132 110V 
226 >35 

m m 

250 165 
231 163 
080 283 
635 530 
297 IBS 
953 905 

130 100 

II 

g ri 

72 47 

94 ffi 
98 74 



705 
3W 

. 'A' 129 

(S3 «1 

Cnunai 965 

cun wyan 510 

Oontonad EngSati 243 
Count JFian) tt 1» 

DAKS SnpMO 'A' 320 
DHM8 |U) 33 

□Dun Grp 388 

Durr* 6® 

as GGoUmn 89 

Byl (W imawta rfl 600 

Empire Saw 20* 

Eton 272 

Exeaaax Cloinn 135 
Finn Art Da* ira 

WtMn ki) « 

Fonamsto OT 

Fraamans «* 

GaOorJAfl 

got Sh eg 

Mru s 

°Sw 

HBrtf Quaansny 2® 
Hedna Ol London 27 
Hefei *4 

Hena Ol uvan 165 
80 
35 
129 
tOl 


*2 


4® 



ss&'jsau.Ji i 

s < U Stores 38 
Se» (23 

aim iwh) -a- 284 

Sta-J 




B*‘. 15': 

SB— 

523 4T3 SuDMUgSaw 

75 33 Tern-Comma 33 

80': 5T. Time PlnfcictB 74 4-1 

193 170 T© Tbp Ontg 100 

186 158 Undanmfc ^SS •** 

374 235 Ward IMXH 374 *8 

ire as Mgaa jig 

926 *30 NOOkkOHh 675 


ELECTRICALS 


us 

99 


Apm Cononm 


38 
43 

SB m 

300 205 Anne Coop 
SO « Audto RMy 
220 I® Auto Sac 
370 2® BKC 
UB 64 BSR 

w m 
ISO 138 

580 370 

Z8D 177V Br Tatscom 
112 7S Bnwn Bowri KM 

19 11V Brian (AF) A' 

152 64 CASE 
369 284 CSkilMW 

3® tsa Camtrtm Bn 

243 T7B CAPOp 
57 37 CMDriM 
225 1 ® Do 7 1 j% CPF 

352 203 ~ , 

3® 290 Cray I 

256 MO 

79 48 - 

190 147 

52 29V Oaaflunl W 

385 262 Domino 

50 37 ©among 8 KBs 

>12 162 - - 
4® 300 

86 . « 

62 42 

337 237 

380 255 Etramann 

233 147 FmneK EMC 

136 KQ Ferranl 1 

51 9* Fomri Tach 

3M 150 GEE 1 

160 90 Graawaor 1 

IV* 80 HUttnd Beet 

183 80 BC 

im Signal l Comal 2 


03 0252,3 
OSH 1JJ 83 
.. ..38.1 

4.1 1.6 8.1 

.. . . T03 

£3 U rzi 
15.7 &4 10* 
U U 97 


-2 

+5 


• 45 

• 42 



Jam Saaxl 
Koda 


263 175 
200 OB 
323 220 
229 <21 Login 
423 270 naf Baa 
102 126 Macro 4 
433 205 ktonc 
02 51% sacra m 
250 80 MKroFocw 
56 33 UMow Elect 

65 43 More* Elect 

313 241% Nawmwk (Lorii) 
10a-r 81 MB 
49 13 OcraOcx 

580 383 (MORI Mruraa 
105 180 MEinwnatooai 
18 _ 


184*« 114 Mto* Rn 5W% 
17% T3 PMS laatpa H/v 

200 160 Prieo 

190 120 Do ‘A’ Ltd VMMg 
2® 182 PMaaay 
M 15V Do ADR 28 
158 1W 
« 22 
23* 180 



2® 211 
M4 128 
170V 71% 
209 109 

26 IB 
2S3 194 
*3 16 
29% 17 
105 132 
19* 158 
73 02 

95 80 

148 114 
223 205 


Abtagmocth 
Alton Hama 


BerMey T ech 

CMdonor 
Cwaramy 
Equity 6 uan 
My 6 Stoa 
MejirjM 

Nat Home Lorn 
Do 0% 
Harnm at tot 


216 

141 -i 

150 

205 r .. 

£19 41 

230 

>8 

28% • .. 
136 
188 

86 -1 

£80 • .. 

133 -2 

223 *43 


10J0 1.8 UL2 

107 54 115 
U 42 95 
0.1 OB Z7.7 
OB R7 73 
6.8 an t*4 

108 54 IIS 

21 1.1 25.1 

.... 124 

Z1 U 184 
3S L72U 
U U1U 

13 BJ 162 
19 00 .. 
IS 43 74 
£8 OS 214 

2.1 U 12,1 
41 U 1*2 
U 22 117 
TD 1.6 88.3 
48 BL714S 
BJK) 11 100 

06 23 183 
n 1.7 r\a 

24 23l'S 
14b 24 US 

8.1 13 114 

82m SO 94 
18 42 IIS 
17 23 *1 

Id 04 .. 

12-1 41 0S 
17.1b 84 564 
T7S 7S BS 
14a 05340 
154 42 04 

14 07 2SL3 

43 Id 119 
0.7 U 84 

11 02 33S 

am 02913 
ZDS 74 *7 
75 7S M.1 
.. .. 44 

26 05 341 

id 7S 114 
S» 41 .. 

W 29 129 
75 45 9.0 

74 39137 

3.1 24 19d 

. . . . 163 

44 24107 
7.10 15 254 

314 5.1 13d 

07 17 104 

21 14 137 
69 40 325 
07 OS 222 

105 49 100 
26 40 35 
255 4S37.1 

6.1 24 124 

25 05 195 

7 3 24 229 

84 47 MS 
57 3S 54 
11 11 135 

36 08 240 

129 11 84 

44 54 17.1 

22 25134 
125 30 111 


14 OS .. 
32 23 64 


17.1 09 767 

ir 24 ars- 
is 41284 
6* 55116 
■5b 47 27.1 
14 21 .. 

800 110 .. 


FfnmdpITmata appear on Page 24 


182 

129 

ASDA-MR 

160 

• +2 

45 

26174 

3 r 

21 

Alpin* Drak£ 

23 


26 

116 490 

306 

236 

^^Boa 

341 

318 

• +8 

11.1 

67 

35 191 
27 124 

ns 

95 

fiesoo Firtwrias 

103 

+2 

36 

45 397 

HIT 

322 

Avn 

5® 

• .. 

17.1 


400 a® 

MV 12 

8atas(Ektay Q 
Mat Dotaoo 

380 

13% 

•-10 

164 

-46 86 
.. 222 

350 

230 

Banr (AG) 

325- 


lit 

45 92 



Bhsw Poods 

188 


97 

62 191 



Bariaya 

SO 


3.1 

3.4 191 



Baton 

166 

+3 

bJ 

34 194 

HO 


ahMbfca Oort 

96 


74 

74 274 



Br tondra (EVT) 

100 


20 

201*3 



Cans Stong 

no 

+5 

86 

46 96 



CWtords Dwrlas 

225 


103 

46 125 



Do W 

216 

+7 

103 

46125 



Cttons 

175 





220 

Daa 

263 

• +2 

HL3 

35 214 


la 

R*h*r (Wmr) 

181 

+1 

32 

14 2*6 



Fxcfa Lore! 

268 

• .. 

13.0 

56195 



Ghu Gtarer 

218 

• ->2 

36 

27 186 




MB 

+8 

23 

14 212 


t- ( 

HOMs 

191 

• .. 

4./ 

25199 


n 

HBxdtMm HMgs 

310 


O 

26194 


r j. 

Honrs Farm 

» 


46 

55 95 


tT 

fassssj Frtuan 

III 


94 

16 239 


^ .■ 

KmltStoW 

2S8 


74 

28 214 


- 

Leas (Joan 6 

113 

_ . 

25 

26139 



Lo»rt(QF) 

» 

• .. 

90 

53 87 


• - 

LOm (Win) 

sm 


175 

91 190 



Manhnms (Btman 

!W3 


35 

14 2*6 



Meat TmiJo Supp 

103 


76 

74 M5 



UnreanM 

234 

+2 

15 

06 24.1 


210 

NkMIa (JM (VMa)223 

• .. 

85 

35 M6 

8Pt 52 

Nonoano 

53 

• .. 

27 

51 214 

300 

268 

Nam Food* 

296 

+2 


3514.7 

100 

152 


180 

+2 

36 

11 162 

105 

VU 

tak Foods 

150 

• .. 

66 

45122 

270 

137 

RM4 

200 


86 

35183 

332 

363 

Romraan Mac 

418 

+3 

174 

42114 

418 

163 

3M 

122 


416 

154 

+2 

76 

46 

15 342 
35 195 

za 

15* 

Gonvonax 

220 

-i 



156 

520 

HM&Lyta 

801 

+8 

321 

55 122 

115 

265 

Tas» 

415 

♦5 

85 

25 237 

m 

216 

XMgm 

311 

• +6 

135 

*5145 


216 

UufBtscur* 

2*7 

+1 

ia« 

65 134 

181 

136 

HUSonS PMp 

MS 


97 

55195 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


433 

328 

arena Mar 

396 




208 

208 

Kaonadr Brecnas 

22b 


24 

1.1 117 

391 

312 


368 


191 

44 175 

» 

447 

Lm Part Hants 

5B5 


M3 

25172 

100 

78% UontCMW 

92 

• . . 

21 

23 152 

105 

to 

1 

S 

a 

i 

83 

• .. 

21 

25 156 

T9 

»% Queans Moat 

78% 

• . . 

27 

35 185 

ns 

3GB 

Sarpy Hotas ‘A’ 

368 


55 

14 145 

81 

SB 

Staid* 

65 


14 

25 196 

aw 

141 

Humousa Font 

152 

• .. 

75 

52 15.1 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 



128 •-> 
801 e-13 


1® 

38 +1 


4® 355 Alfa £ Lacey 
91 39 A*tWv- _ 

510 212 AM Br Eng 8% 


416 

47 

230 


396 180 AS Beet 
185 120 


323 

IB 


114 16&J-1 
2.1 1.1 163 


A 4 ST"”" 


?B 5ZV BOC 


£•£ MS 

310 216 BdarVatoa 
210 12B Blare M 
174 Tt2 Btoim 
405 ISO EsVJw Rand 
57 40 Bonn* Kaplun 
305 188 Battoi Trenapor 
32 21 BajMi (Oanau 
241 138 BaacooCtott 
80 (7 Bawriora 

830 151 Boaar{CH) 

443 313 BsKTatn 


148 


IB 100 Bank 
552 2M BanoOBH 

IS 

123 78 Birin U 
19 W% BknuflOrifcM 
300 106 anim na m Sftn 
174 137 BriCkMiom 
256 178 Bkck(Mnrl 
SI 34 tsactonad Hodge 
403 IBB BMAflW* 

335 1ST BouvcMt 
385 205 Boalar 




11.1 47 132 
95 11 30.1 
82 64T35 

16d 28 11.1 
65 17 95 
112 45 145 
85 25 IBS 

121 95 105 

55 55 IS 
05 IS 7.7 
Od 12 134 
2*9 72121 
. a .. 412 
114 55 .. 
14 *1 108 
65 24129 
14 29 55 

34b IS 295 
229 K 113 
28 3d *2 

14.1 4.1 13l0 
13 26223 

106 65134 

.. .. 104 

IBS U1U 

107 4.1 07 
13 46146 
28 16 1*S 

16 76 117 
2l7o 95 13 

idb aa .. 

107 56 126 

ad Sd 86 

65 25176 

17.1 4.1 174 

.. f .. .. 

16 16375 


*% 8 % 




BE? 5, 

it* 





>12 46202 


17* 6.1 135 
32 18 92 
21 42 285 
05 14 247 

7.1 4 4 101 

74 33 17.7 
14 05 885 

11.1 37 136 
43 36 123 
110 29 146 

13 i.7 190 
07 25297 
20 55. 65 
1036 75 95 







1986 




dhr 

Yta 

Mpi Low Company 

Pnea Ch'ga ponce 

% P 18 

58 2SV Capara too 

4ft 


24 


» SS 

Cipe bid 

7B 



440 233 

Crtb Era 

<35 

• +5 

21 4 

43 105 

120 58 Castes 

38% 25% cnairai 

105 

34 


42 
1 A 

4.1 93 
4.1 153 

6 4% CMM 6 Shear 

9% 



26 13 

Centra may M 

21 




» «s 

CH M 

93 


34 

37 114 

68 83% CramMrttti Pn 

to 


SB 

M 124 

105 59 

ChamarikiE n 

to 




281 193 

Cl— rri Con* 

278 


184 



Chamrao 

550 


207 


358 283 

Cteta&m H 

773 

43 

73 


J 8 to 

Chrtny Hws 

45 

.. 127 

250 132 

Ctata (CtananQ 

Z39 


BS 

27 558 

M3 96 

CWyton San 

136 





CaTmn (A) 

Cotaro* do 





216 1*1 

207 



U 157 

29V 8 

Combhred Tadt 

1 ? 



H 2 71 

Concarac 

107 


SjB 

S3 143 

66 26 

Coot SUonary 

84 

-SS 

13 

13 213 

260 74 

cook omre 

235 

+20 


Cookara 

510 


22 OS 

80 32 

Copara « 

<3 


7.1 

33354 

111 83% Coart 

*06 




81 ® 

Comity POM 
Cowan Do GrooK 

400 

78 


128 

36 

02 ns 


Oa» NIcMton 

163 

• +6 




Onmn H0V3O 

2 ® 


113 



£141 




® 32 

DSC 

40 




DPCE 





305 208 

□tarty 

310 

+5 

179 

53 113 






Damns ■ Mat "A - 





263 178 

Danas 6 Haunt 

263 


M3 

54 84 

360 233 

ST. Rue 

129 

300 

•+i 

M 

53 7 2 

258 167 

Data 

107 




276 in 

Dartard Stampng 

278 





Oasourrar 

?® 

+3 


43 W.1 


Obare Hart 

19 





Diploma 

228 





Dobson Part 





110 33 

Dam 

03 




123 95 

OoreHon U 

115 

♦2 

72 

83 127 


Dmrt 




97 80% Dysra LUJ) 

(HI 


64 


86 71% 

Do 'A' 

75 

• .. 

6.4 

85113 

i El 1 

313 8 ® 

Ban non 

301 


MJ 

43 73 

Si 156 

east) 

188 


107 

S3 12.1 


BS 

240 

+5 

BlS 

43 132 

43% 29% BbW 

40% 


27 

67 147 

153 102 % Bacn 

138 

+3 

7A S7 138 

29V 17% QocachB ME) 9 

£29 




10* 52 

BtotllB) 

to 

-1 

4L3 

43 212 

28% 18*. Embtrt 

£24 

• -V 

138 

63 .. 

381 202 

BirtUi Cm Ctw 337 

• +7 

16.1 

43 134 

38% 19% Enoson 2 M) tr 

E 21 V 

-V 

OO 

04 .. 

16* 134 

EisUna Haasm 

1® 


05 

03 144 

177’jlM 

Eurapaan Famax 

134 

+3% 

08 

8.1 08 

142 112 

OD M Pll 

133 



S3 .. 

342 156 

Evsrao 

746 

-a 

SO 

20134 

423 312 

ExM 

388 

143 

33187 

SS 22 

Falcon 

47% 

+% 

07 

13844 

42 26 

FsadH Aoic M 
Famar (iftl 

34 


21 

62 83 

M3 106 

131 

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7.1 

54 203 

75 58 

FHa IreSmar 

no 

• .. 

SD 

03 174 

6 ® 408 

Ran 

646 

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12 287 

67 35 

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to 


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13 .. 

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FtoaMoCftW 

m 


50 

8.1 63 

88 SI 1 

FobM 

37 


03 

03 .. 

123 06 

Fa^’orerm N/V 

96 


Si 

64 125 

41% Z V 

35 

+% 

2D 

67 Ol 

191 157 

Fbmamd 4 llarvey 178 


VS 

73133 


French (Thomas) 

4ft 


4.1 

63 002 



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385 256 

GXN 

70? 

• +7 

17A 

Ol 93 

310 280 

GR 

795 


100 

34 Ol 

116 SO 

Girton Eng 

117 

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SJ) 

43 84 

157 100 

Grammar 

111 


71 

13103 

150 111 

GWs 

IM 



33141 

11V758% Otero 

no% 

♦% 

187 

13 203 

344 194 

GtyOMH) 

318 

+6 

VS 

41 153 



290 


US 

53 11.1 

182 107 

Oramp— a Hktat 

180 

+2 

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S3 162 

312 206 

Granada 

70? 

• .. 

IM 

27 132 

W. SV Gretebaa 

5V 

• -V 

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87 103 

S3 58% Hum Praoson 

79 

+1 

28 

33NL8 

232 134 

Si 

11 

im 

-2 

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64 83 

162 126 

134 

+2 

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48 M.1 

263 180 

HsMn 


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143 

74 121 

290 230 

HB»ca 


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38 

• .. 

1.0 

47 95 

43 20 

Hmn 

SB 




195 141 

Knoi 

193 

+1 

57 f SD 172 

192 1 ® 

Do ©a Cn* 

£190 

• +2 

800 

42 .. 

119 96 

Do 5V% PI 

m 

• .. 

82 

7.1 .. 

125V IIP 

Do 10% 

IT 

•+1V 

g 

OO .. 

280 133 

Hramwas 

-5 

7.8 

23163 

275 175 

Him* (Pimp) 

250 

*+12 

02 

63 123 

823 431 

1 Umar Skktaay 

533 

207 

29117 

150 to 

112 

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27 

24 83 


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221 MO 


215 

+4 

103 

43 100 

201 98 

Harter 

173 


6.1b SB 202 

■ 96 BS 

Harta (J) 

a 


SS 

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M2 IS 

HUgaM A-IBB 

liaHa ere 

130 

+5 


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to at 

to 


43n 43200 

106 66 

Hail Lloyd 

to 


57 

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285 1® 


2 ® 

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Homo 

in 

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SJ 

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Hrarag assoc 

310 


114 

37 93 

<15 88 

Hwsmg Ofoup 

105 

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290 207% Hmcbnt WhMpol 

294 



191 110 

BUB 

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43 143 

315 210 

Ixabrn 

232 

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295 2® 

Jaoson* 0 oraa* 

M5 

• .. 

83 

25102 

M 6 % 96% Jarthne Mam 

1 ® 

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a . an 

818 4>3 

Johnson Clianare 

AGO 

• .. 

+1 

304 

54 152 

223 133 

Jotraon Mrthey 

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33 

13153 

44% S% Jotxoon 6 FB 

+% 


.. 165 

3® 235 

Johnston 

315 

0 

107 

24 123 

-140 66 


120 


U 

46 03 

IS to 


IS 

• .. 

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45 164 

a 21 

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20 


23n10D 07 

38 25 

Won 

31 

-% 

1J 

55 214 

325 186 

Ub ay bid 

300 


114 

26 146 

130 105 


128 


57 

43 127 

296 230 
213 123 


2/0 

200 

• ” 

214 

08 

79 223 
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39 S 

LDH 

37 


03 

22 93 

158%120 


121 


33 

32 228 

3» ZHS 

Lwt3 

2 *i> 


63 

SS 63 

75 42 

Lawtax 

87 


33b 53 65 

78*1 41 

Lae (Arons) 

« 

■F'j 

33 

46 KLB 

116 to 

uuraira 

116 

+3 

32 

23 224 

86 6 * 

Linaad 

to 

44 

33 

43 02 

73 S3 

uoyd (Hi} 

68 % 

+ 1 % 

54 

21 77 

238 179 

\szsL 

238 

• II 

M2 

6D1S2 

Ml 95 

Do Ok) 

141 


74 


77 50% Lm A rta 

75% 

•+2 

93 122 

235 159 

Lon ta> 

235 

<3 

28 193 

273 134 

Lonspon kid 

28b 

-1 

57 

22 309 

400 319 

Liwj S Barar 

410 


153 

27 133 

41S 308 

ML Hdgs 

415 

■ .. 

114b 27 157 

115 84 

MS bn 

W7 

•+1 

29 

27 103 

40 31 

393 256 
160 121 

MV HOMfcr® 
Macaflhys Pharni 
Maclailana 

* 2 % 

333 

1 ® 

• :I 

+2 

13b 43 133 

37 

26 183 

79 43 

Mactera (PSW) 

59 


27 

48 IOlS 

208 108 

McKachnM 

222 


143 

64 107 

130 78 

Magnoka 

120 

-5 

43 

40113 

710 405 

UmtoW Shp 

890 


83 

17 2X4 

79 52 
06 61 

Bnjnti 

to 

71 

• +3 

43 

25 

64 73 
S3 OS 

1® 85 

Morsnafl (LoxHy) 

119 

-2 

52 

44 B2 

«B 10 S 

steal Bo* 

188 

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194 IS 

Mart OKfflrae 

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87 214 

91 a 

KsMrex 

79 


32 

41 U4 

78% 53% Mtahrt CoB* 

MV 


Ol 

113 53 

125 70 

Udchrt Son— x 

100 


55 

53 125 

198 163 

Marts 

183 


113 

62 95 

318 212 

Maagan Owte 

271 

+8 

121 

45 >5.1 

42 20% 



+% 

Ol 

04 M3 

216 MS 

HaM (Jl 

158 


103 

813 5.7 

41 28 

itettei bids 

34 


i.l 

22 513 

153 02 

NaMiun Tonka 

1 ® 


103 

63 124 

133 « 

Norte 6 Lund 

127 

-1 

13 

03 41.0 

« 43 

Natan 

44 


14 

22 404 

289 IBS 

Noraoo 

255 

-7 

133 

52122 

258 203 

Ota Baa Madr 

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121 

53 93 

4® 247 

part— KnoB -A- 

388 




0V52S 

Parnsh JT 

£SV 



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603 383 

1 Hmsm 

b® 

+9 

143 

27 11 

Pa* 

2019 



04 102 

1 ® 68 


i® 

■ .. 

93 

874 332 

Ptoflfli i-4 4AI—L Altoy 

821 


263 

43122 



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23 

04 252 

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£12V 


75 

03 333 

«83 311 

PWdnj^Dn 

4® 

+7o 

193 

44117 

98 51 

nmc Constr 


• .. 

4.1 

S3 120 

385 IBS 

IWtik 

325 

-5 

105 

22 M3 

323 215 

Porte Cnadtxxn 

301 

• .. 

23 

13 306 

314 238 


201 

+4 

21.7 

73 205 

16* 95 

HJ7 

+1 

13 

03 292 

1 » 119 

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17B 


64 

26122 

158 IS 

Ratten iMai 

MS 

■ .. 

33 

25 223 

889 421 

Rank Org 

517 

+3 

225 

44 143 

228 IIS 


172 



41 120 

Tffl 98 

rmtWs rot Bridge) IDS 

• .. 


17 37 

BOO 80S 


007 





Rartaam Ghss 

208 

*2 

29 

14 124 

393 200 

Raad ExaoflM 

303 

•+B 

64 

13 173 

Z7D 162V 

Raad bn 

785 

+12 

63 


173 132 


170 

• .. 

4.1 127 

91 57 

RanoM 

71 

+1 

23 

4.1 93 

108 88 

R—DTXir 

104 

■ .. 

64 

62 67 

rn 3*5 

Ramra 

ill 

• .. 

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1.1307 

» 21 


toV 

• .. 

14 

as ns 


Rcajao Eng 
nchvd {Wfe 3 
(wwnraWBit 


-1 



S3 3 

90 

«V 

-V 

53 

S3 93 
188 
28113 

152 83 

Hoowisra Rsg 

95 

8 .. 

38 

381 151 

Hobaocn (Thomas) 358 

„ , 


.. '»8 

55 30 

Sfectorare 

44 

-a 

93 

93 

.. 105 

73 06 
02 73 

HO 121 


113 


3 0% Rrtaprtit 

2V 



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S'S 

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136 

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RiBjaH (A) 

88 


23 

26 278 


s 

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□ 


(7 

214 

55 

a 

i»\ 

103 

120 

94 

122 

108 

99 

29 

75 


Sale They 
SanMni 
SMM Goman U) 


29V 


230 73 13 


Seed Greartam 
Sent Henaeta 


8acuncor 
DO A 


Senior 

5M0I1 


Saw 


230 


93 

48124 

13 


13 

25 615 

74 


37 

58 115 

268 

-2 

06 

33 127 

134 


47 

25 134 

156 


43 

27 138 

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S9 

25153 

133 

• .. 

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1.1 347 

1 » 


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116 

• .. 

23 

24 223 

50% 


24 

49 157 


|SX. 

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133 94 Snrai A NepneiH 
41 30 Snxlfa r ” ' — 


119 


111 



a -11 
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+a 


16 11 *1 
129 10* 76 
191 21 162 

14 26 863 
121 52 60 
61 7613.1 

255 54 175 

15 26227 

04 15 277 
IS 23227 
66 46144 
75 46 123 
75 M 97 
. . . . 47.1 

255 4.7 121 
196 17 1*4 
15 15 265 
17.1 75 12 

18 113 85 
. a .. 15 

125 63113 
65 24 217 


(41 76174 
200 42 157 

46 44 31 
(06 23 118 

. I ! I 74 

44. 46113 
64 41 (36 
3.1 27 127 


T966 

Lom Conyeny 


Gross 
(to TU 
pw Qigapanoa % Pyt 



986 428 Wa m tor 
84 S Wood (woaa) 

44 28 Wood (SM) 
n ®% wonmoa 6 (to 
■ 58 Wyaatom Eng 
(78 136 Vouog pt} 


INSURANCE 


226 177 Aboeyida 
20 22 takito 
28V 23 An Gan 


917 KG 

336 220 Con Uaon 
301 22S Equto 6 law 
431 213 FAI 
054 701 era Acoktoa 
98* 720 (WE 
70i 4to Heanc E 
3® rn Hoag RMMm 
2M 231 Leg3 4 Oen 
22* 173 Lonon A Man 
438 257 ion IM tar 
88V 2*V Matsu 6 MOan 
285 2Z0 MUM 
3® 223 PWS 
15% 12 Pan! 

M2 7® nuMlM 
453 361 FMuge 

2 SS S*dp 

474 3® S tam en Wr"aon 
4® 390 SugaMogs 
772 Sal Sra Adanoa 
027 772 Sim Ida 
550 T21 

474 394 WMa FM* 


198 

( 2 B 

E28V 

385 

as7 


331 

27S 


3® 

434 

417 

730 

904 

220 

422 


I .. 65 

1*3 447 

*9 174 

18 
-7 

+5 341 

+3 421 

*« 345 

>44 137 

117 
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.. aas 


♦2 
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+2 


37.1 

204 

385 

17.10 

117 

lOOn 

276 

335 

45 

125 


10 
95 
11 

23 26.7 
S3 
57 
18 

35 21 j 
45 210 
72 73 
4.1 131 
45 355 
4.1 U 
SS 124 
45 .. 

44 126 

45 205 

44 .. 
4.1 003 
55 

45 71.1 
55 113 

36 175 

24 215 

17 815 

18 .. 
21 10 
36 BOO 


on Page 28 


LEISURE 


(44 96 
220 128 
163 SO 
58 to 
225 150 
410 326 
62% 40 
61 GO 
I2B 93 
Ol 9* 
103 32 
180 137 
108 130 
381 278 
303 326 

M a 

228 134 
380 155 
73 51 
186 I2BV 


Bttr 6 KM 'A* 

inwr" 

Campan 


Flat lemma 

GRA 

Hflrrtugar Brooke 
Horizon Travel 
W 


135 

155 

183 +1 

*8 
iao 


Mnl Mags 
Lea lad 


87% +V 
70 

I 2 Z • .. 
117 
51 

167 4.7 

140 

330 *4-2 


IBS 74 106 
.. .. 232 

76 43 M.1 
14 35 123 
■5 4411.7 
93 25 111 


.. .. 76 

63 52 55 
7.1 11 109 
43 54 199 


Saga Holton 
Smmiabon Gp 
Tottenham H o tsp ur 
Zooms 


388 

® 

138 


*1 


193 •*3 

73 4-1 


75 n 55 *4 

11.1 34 136 
111 44 111 

.. .. 215 

16 45 11.7 
34 Id 114 
57a 75 133 

7.1 35 105 


MINING 


MV 3% Ang Anar cart 
1OV630 Aag Am 

57% 31 Am QaU 

56 33 AAIT 

MV 

too 

£47 

£50 

-4% 

-1 

540 

4® 

271 

.. S7.1 
65 .. 
OS .. 
64 .. 

196 VO AwrHtara 

425 238 Byyoon. 

186 80 Bmcfcaa 

21V 9% Ctobats 

£92 

£32 

UO 

22 

ISO 

OSV 

-a 

1® 

473 

700 

280 

282 

44 .. 

31.7 .. 

22.7 .. 
173 .. 
183 .. 


358 2HB CRA 
89 39 CpBoyd 
544 409 Cons OoUSaids 
531 314 OeBaara 
200 105 r i rbml 
BV 4V Dootrtohtain 
13% 7 MatohMi 
7V 2% Owtan 
255 150 EDaagn 
59* 251 Barefiramt 
205 129 g pro 

3» m EFhS.GOM 
4% 2'. E Rand Prop 
8 4% F& CfBO 

213 93 FS Da»_ 

75 17 GaawrHa 


538 

478 

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aov 

£SV 

220 

4U 


270 

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29 


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40 22 . 
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.. 128 124 . 

-10 ;; " ; 

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85 33 118 
-8 Mil 104 
-TO 286 104 
4% . . 


1.1 


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4V Gaobrt 

£6% 


600 

21 .. 


6 Bn Mrtng 

£8% 

-% 

8/0 

10.1 . . 

10% 

5% GFSA 

£8 

-V 

460 

53 .. 

498 

313 GM WgowG 

493 

+2S 

200 


83 


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113 

85 Groar— *h Has 

113 



233 II 

3» 

166 BreoMal 

230 

+2 

540 

156 

91 Hampron Areas 

M6 


34 

07 323 

9% 

4V Harmony 

£6% 

+% 

828 

22 .. 

toO 

175 Manias 

305 

-lb 

170 

53 .. 

81 

47% Johnses 

£72% 


3® 

43 .. 


V, SV Unroas 
tPm 2*1 Ktool 
180 to latoa 
OV 6** UDanort 
*10 170 Locabui 
1ST 64 MW 
28 15 Wtaytian Mlntog 

123 60 Maria*®# 

<5 m% Mania Exp 
to 5% Mhangtn 
9 S'* Mtocto MBs 

655 450 Mioorao 
:s>< 2% Nat* «n 
142 73 NBi Bohan HP 

50 25% MBiKatort 
22 'e 10V OrangaTtaa 
128 85 PKPfcg Hi 
289 20* PWo Watxand 
25 BV Rena Mnas Ud 
4® 170 Rand Hoes Prop 
SS 18 Randknwn 
322 225 Bartaon 
791 511 RTZ 
8 4V B uM ant aa g 
10% 5% Si Hatoia 8 
188 88 SA Land 
31 I4'e SouOmai 
556 273 SWcxiWti 
138 BO Sunget Baa 
138 73 Hoaoh 
509 300 IMMI . 

59% 31% Waal Raato 
5*4 233 VantorHMM 
109 50 HWdanton 
so 35 Vogeta 
17 sit v WanW* Cdtory 
545 288 WaMrt 
310 128 wwwn Area* 

• IS j k ta m Deep 

114 Wialim Minam 

265 108 WaattondOoK 
1*0 bo wta Creak 
17% 7% Wntatt 
- 23 WtMgri 
18V 10V Zamorn Copper 
88 28 Zandpan 


E8V 

04V 

MS 

£3V 

303 

79 

25 

95 


av 

90 

50 

£18% 

as 

255 

£12% 

270 

£53% 

318 

68 * 

£7V 


810 105 
*05 13 
290 27S 
115 116 


4 .® 176 175 

4.1 . . . . 

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■2 

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551 103 .. 

+14 

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125 155 


to 

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183 

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118 

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423 

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83 

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400 

103 

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558 

113 

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137 


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670 


533 

123 

210 

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230 

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152 

42 

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120 

03 

133 

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£13 


133 

to 

+5 

1.1 

SI 

13 


| 


53 


or 

70 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


291 138 AE 
1GB 78 
141 70% 

53% »% BSC 


3(4 195 
COB 421 
151 00 
273 188 
215 79 
133 106 
841 178 
115 30 
337 253 
2(3 125 
00 GB 
296 226 
TOG Gl 
IM 68 
529 373 
583 335 
M2 72 
125 55 
402 289 
SSW 90 
553 470 
Ml 115 
91 88 

09 51 

71 25 

77 4 3 

72 32 


250 

153 

128 

49 


I (CD) 281 

Bi Afnnpaca 501 

Br Car Aucnm 1 ® 

Caffyna 

107 
210 
■a 

334 
193 
IB 
235 
IBS 
9* 
517 
5® 
119 
125 
322 
198 
561 
119 
70 
99 


Dans 

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FH Groe 
Foid Motor 
Gates (Frank CO 
General Motor 


Lb 

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Lucas 
Pwry BP. 


OKkpU) 


SUpra 77 

WtxxtneM (Axus) 72 


-3 

11.1 

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226 


50 


70 

+3 

57 

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04 

• -2 

73 


46 

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70 


43 

•-a 

2S0 

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33 

♦is 

SJ 

•+12 

127 


01 

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• +2 

15.1 

•-3 

73 

+6 

15.7 


64 


04 

+2 

43 

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• +3 

S4 

• +2 

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1070 46 121 
7S «5 76 
22 Wifi 
IS 36 ISO 

.. I .. .. 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


in im 
250 IBS 
356 220 
315 290 
730 515 

SOS *» 

393 385 
1® 78 
378 330 
240 to 
380 163 

m m 

MV820 
MO 4® 
138 IIS 
4SS 220 
405 280 


Accord 

in 


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213 


93 

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910 


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460 


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11.1 

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355 


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@ Hum Nwniiapm LMdeJ 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Qaims required for 
+34 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 



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234 176 
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135 106 
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186 72 113 

214 22383 
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• i he i AJvicS hKiOAV 5 i£r' 1 civionk 5 lv&o 


buaiiNc^a ajND FINANCE 


z/ 


k». 

5 ' 


4 ; 


Heron director 
moves to Hollis 


become ^ CqBn RobinsaD 

Umber division. 

rZ 2 ! lPbse: ** N«dr». 

n <» a partner. 
MBS. Mr David Downes 

Itt" appotaed 

Joynson-Hicks: Mr An- 
®w>y Lewis las become se- 
nior partner, succeeding Miss 
Rosina Hams. 

Dwek Group: Mr Thomas 

fiS& ,madegrott p 

. Glaxo lac: Dr Ernest Mario 
is now president and chief 
operating officer. 

IBL: Mr John T Moanser 
nas been appointed mariaiane 
director of IBL (UK)! 

Gateway; Mr KW Edwards 
Das become chairman. Mr 
DM Fisher and Mr P 
'Tiustleton both become 
inanagmg directors. Mr R 
Quintor* is finance director. 
Mr MR Hepworth becomes 
operations director of 
foodmarkets. Mr M 
McKenzie is operations direc- 
tor of superstores. Mr T 
Arnold is provisions director. 
Mr RD Reeson becomes meat 
director. Mr JF RidgeweO is 
mesh produce director. Mr PG 
Petridis is property and 
development director. Mr PA 
Fisher becomes personnel 
director. Mr BMJ' Norris 
becomes distribution director. 
Mr JPToal is special projects 

director and managing tiW- 

tor of Shoppers Paradise. Mr 
MG Moloney is group buying 
director. Mr BK Simpson is 
systems director. Mr DAG 





John Turner 

Monk, Mr AB Boiler, Mr AS 
Perelman and Mr F Dee are 
non-executive directors. 

Arthur Andersen & Co: Mr 
Vernon Ellis has been. ap- 
pointed managing partner, 
succeeding Mr Martin 
Vandersteen. 

Thom EMI: Mr Ian Chris- 
tians has. become director -of 
strategic development. 

Guinness & Mahon: Mr 
Michael Murphy has been 
appoioted a director and will 
become chairman on October 
1. Mr Brace Ursell is to be 
deputy chairman. 

Appleton Holdings: Mr C 
Bentley Smith has become 
chairman and ebiefexeentive. 
Mrs Denise Orgee becomes 
sales director arid Miss Juli- 
ette Wheeler associate 
director. ■ 

Export Guarantees Ad- 
visory Council: Mr Peter Les- 
lie has been named as deputy 
chairman. ; 

Telemetrix: Mr. Roy C G 
CotteriU becomes chairman 
and chief executive. 

Turner &NewalL Mr Gren- 
ville Hampshire has joined tbe 
board of BIP Chemicals. 


£143m PCW blow to Lloyd’s profits 


Lloyd's global results for 
1983, published yesterday 
would look vastly different 
were it not for the feet that 
they include losses on the 
troubled PCW syndicates. 

; The PCW losses, for the 
1983 underwriting year were 
£143 million and converted an 
actual underwriting protilt of 
£2S million into a £1 IS mil- 
lion loss. The overall result, 
including investment income, 
would have been a £1-79 
million profit but for PCW. 
Instead h is about £36 million. 

The 1983 PCW loss is foe 
worst that will emerge from' 
the doubled syndicates and 
folllow losses of £73 million in 
the previous underwriting 
.year. The. notes to the 1983 
accounts estimate that PCW 
losses for 1984 will be less 
than flO'million. 

At the moment, Lloyd's has 
earmarked about £233 million 
from its central fund, a 
oiicyholders* protection' 
rod, to meet PCW losses, 
which result from an, as yet 
unqliantified, mixture of 
fraud and bad underwriting. 

The syndicates also insured 
a very high proportion of 
North American liability busi- 
ness, which has been very 
unprofitable in the past few 
years. 

The global figures reflect the 
total returns from all classes of 
insurance business transacted 
at Lloyd’s. The figures are 
shown three years u arrears, 
the traditional accounting 


By Lawrence Lever 
method used by Lloyd’s which 
allows time for claims to filter 
through. 

Lloyd's breaks down its 
classes of insurance into only 
four categories: marine, non- 
marine, aviation and motor. It 
is obliged by statute, however, 
to divide Its business into nine 
different types of insurance for 
its global statement, and these 
categories are shown in our 
table. 

The table shows Lloyd's 
made an overall profit (includ- 
ing investment income) in 
eight of the nine classes, the 
one exception being general 
liability which takes in mat- 
ters such as professional in- 
demnity insurance and 
product Lability. Once again, 
this suffered from very large 
asbestos's claims from the 
United States and, more gen- 
erally - from the American 
negligence and product liabil- 
ity laws which are more 
favourable towards the claim- 
ant than the English legal 
system. 

Tbe general liability sector 
accounts for approximately 12 
per cent of the total premium 
income generated at Lloyd's. 
Mr Peter Miller, the Lloyd's 
chairman, in bis statement 
included with the report, said: 
“Were the underwriting 
environment for this class of 
business not ' to have im- 
proved, it would be inconceiv- 
able that any underwriter 
would remain m the class”. 

The improvements which 


he was referring to are signs of 
increasing realism in the 
North American liability mar- 
ket where reforms in the law of 
tort ought to make recover- 
ability by claimants less easy 
than at present At the same 
time, underwriters are chang- 
ing the way in which they 
wnie policies on this sort of 
busisness as well as tbe 
charges made for it 

Mr Robin Jackson, chair- 
man of Lloyd's Underwriters 
Non-Marine Association, 
however, cautioned against 
regarding the North American 
problem as already solved. He 
said he wanted to see the 
changes to the legal system 
implemented and the results 
of those changes 10 come 
through first. “It is not yet 
time 10 give credit for the tort 
law reform," he said. 

Another sector giving cause 
for concern, although manag- 
ing 10 show an overall profit of 
£6.8 million, is the motor 
sector. Tbe 1983 profits are 
the lowest for a number of 
years, down from £22 million 
m 1982 and £40 mfllion in 
1981. This sector is not af- 
fected by the PCW results. 

Mr Peter Stihveii, chairman 
of the Lloyd's Motor Under- 
writers' Association, said in a 
statement accompanying the 
global figures that the progno- 
sis for the immediate future 
was not good. Any expectation 
of an improvement for the 
years 1984 and 1985 would be 
extremely rash," hesaid. 


TOTAL-ALL CLASSES COMBINED 

Premiums 

Underwriting profrt/Ooss) ... 

Investment Income and appreciation 

Profit including PCW syndicates 

Profit excluding PCW syndicates 


l983(Em) 

1982fEm) 

1981 (£m) 

1980(£ni) 

2,569.64 

2^92.48 

T2SAJ2S 

1^6229 

(114.69) 

(187^4) 

(43.52) 

21.75 

416.89 

441.98 

361^40 

374^3 

35.80 

57.01 

151A8 

263.82 

179.14 

131X23 

n/a 

n/a 


ACCIDENT AND HEALTH 
Premiums, 


Profit including PCW.- 
Profit excluding PCW.. 


1B&38 

13.16 

14.13 


169.75 


108.35 

15.12 

n/e 


89.04 
24 M 
n/a 


MOTOR, DAMAGE AND LIABILITY 

Premiums 

Profit including PCW. 


Profit excluding PCW 


28344 273JS9 2fi5£1 237.06 

ROT 22.25 4039 38.18 

6OT 22J25 n/a n/a 


AIRCRAFT DAMAGE AND LIABILITY 

Premiums 

Profit/Ooss) inducting PCW 

Profit excluding PCW 


18067 

23.67 

22.14 


241.96 

2093 

27.14 


17350 

7.42 

n/a 


12002 

(002) 

n/a 


SHIPS, DAMAGE AND LIABILITY 
Premiums , 


Profit including PCW 

Profit excluding PCW 


768.47 

217.22 

24052 


910.78 

189.88 

16752 


683.45 
104J28 
n fa 


52555 

105.72 

n/a 


GOODS IN TRANSIT 
Premiums. 


Profit/Ooss) including PCW. 
Profit excluding PCW 


254.28 

1BJB4 

11-94 


294,03 

38.41 

47.74 


25354 

(1959) 

n/a 


23154 

6858 

n/a 


PROPERTY DAMAGE 
Premiums. 


Profit including PCW- 
Profit excluding PCW. 


570-43 

4054 

48.70 


65348 

9552 

9320 


510.61 

112.45 

n/a 


43455 

69.15 

n/a 


GENERAL, LIABILITY 

Premiums 

Profit/ (toss) including PCW.. 
Profit/Ctoss) excluding PCW.. 


312.43 
(28550) (31459) 

(172.16) (22657) 


346.15 


26052 

(10857) 

n/a 


223.15 

(32.14) 

n/a 


PECUNIARY LOSS 
Premiums . 


i) including PCW.. 
) excluding PCW. 


055 

052 

052 


053 

(0.17) 

(0.17) 


0.42 

(0.05) 

n/a 


052 

0.08 

n/a 


LIFE 

Premiums 

Profit including PCW.. 
Profit excluding PCW. 


259 

0.78 

0.78 


253 

052 

052 


155 

0.43 

n/a 


156 

051 

n/a 


COMPANY NEWS 


Cookson rises to peak 
£43m in first half 


Pretax profits of the Lon- 
don-based Cookson Group, 
which makes specialist 
materials for industry, rose 
from £36.6 million to £43 
million in the first half of this| 
•. Sales expanded from 
1.2 million to £450 
million. 

The interim dividend is 
being raised from Z4p to 
175p. It will be paid on 
November 28. Earnings per 
share were up from 18.8p to 
19.4p. Comparative figures 
have been restated. 

The board reports that the 
results for the half-year are a 
fresh record, continuing the 
progress which the group has 
achieved in recent years. The 
further improvement in the 
operating profitability of the 
subsidiaries was mainly in the 
Fry division and the ceramics 
and antimony sections. . 

Cookson ’s materials di- 
vision experienced difficult 
conditions and was affected by 
continuing development 
expenditure, but helped by a 
.good contribution from the 
Horsell Group. 

• METAL CLOSURES: Six 
months to June 28. Interim 
dividend 2.2p (same). Turnover 
£39.25 million (£42.62 million). 
Pretax profit £2.02 million (£23 
million). Earnings per share 
4.9p (5-Sp). 

• WORLD OF LEATHER: 
Half-year to June 30. Turnover 
£5.44 million (£434 million). 
Pretax profit £551,000 
(£489,000). Earnings per share 
4.3p (3.6p). The group's balance 
shed and cash flow remain 
strong and the board looks 
forward to a continuation of 
growth in the full year. 

• JAMES FISHER: Six 
months to June 30 (compari- 
sons restated). Interim dividend 
1.6Sp (1.6p). Turnover £16.63 
million (£22.93 million). Pretax 
profit £1-12 million (£2.87 
million). 

• PHOENIX TIMBER: In a 
circular to shareholders 
concerning the results for the 
year to March 31 last, the open 
offer and the refinancing pro- 
posals announced recently, the 
board says it is not possible to 
make a dividend forecast but 
ihe directors hope to pay a 
dividend for the year ending 
March 31, 1987. 

• THEME HOLDINGS: 
Turnover for tbe six months to 
April 30 £1-65 million (£138 
million). Pretax profit £51,000 
(£15,000). The second half has 
opened strongly and the board 
expects that profits will exceed 
1985. 

• SANTOS: Six months to 
June 30. Net profit AusS41.52 
million (£17 million), against 
AusS64.61 million. .Sales 
AusS2! 8.73 . . „ 
(Aus$242.I9 million). Other in- 
come Aus$43.S3 million 
(AiisS 25.02 million). Interim 
dividend 7 cents (9 cents). 

• COLES MYEfc Year to July 
27. Net profit Aus$l81.9_ mil- 
lion (£74.46 million), against 
AusS 126.3 million. Sales 


AusS 10.41 billion (AusS6. 1 3 bit 
lion). Other income Ans$47.42 
million (Aus$32.47 million). 
Total dividend unchanged at 21 
cents. 

• TIOXEDE: Half-year to June 
30 (comparisons restated). 
Turnover -£242.69' million 
(£221.56 million). Pretax profit 
£52.11 million (£36.84 million). 
Earnings per -share .93.4p 
(71. Ip). The board reports that 
tbe firm trading conditions 
experienced throughout last 
year continued during the first 
half of 1986 and were the main 
contributor to a new record for 
the group. 

• LONDON AND MAN- 
CHESTER GROUP: Six 
months lb June 30. Premium 
income: ordinary branch £553 
million (£51.6 million), indus- 
trial branch £15.9 million (£15.3 
million)and general branch £63 
million (£5-2 million). New 
business: annual premiums 
£1 1.69 million (£1168 million), 
single premiums £25.83 million 
(£28. 18 million), together 
providing sums assured of £351 
million (£304 million). The 
figures at the half-year do not 
necessarily provide a reliable 
guide for the foil year. 

• PORTALS HOLDINGS: Six 
months fo June 30. Interim 
dividend 2.75p CL5p, adjusted). 
Turnover £113.54 million 
(£11831 million). Pretax profit 
£10.44 million (£9.1 million). 
Adjusted earnings per share, 
base, ll.76p (9.72p) and fully 
diluted J0.78p (8.9lp). 

• PENTQS: Half year to June 
30. Interim dividend 0~22p 
(0.!75p). Turnover £24.71 mil- 
lion (£21.81 million). Pretax 
profit £831,000 (£441,000). 
Earnings per share 1.36p((X91p) 
and fully diluted 1.09p (0.80p). 
The board expects a material 
improvement tn the results for 
the full year and is increasingly 
enthusiastic about tbe longer 
term potential of the business. 
In May, Pentos entered into a 
trading arrangement with a big 
US department store group for 
Athena Departments to be 
opened within its newly-estab- 
lished chain of speciality gift 
stores and it experts more than 
20 of these Athena departments 
to be in operation by the end of 
tbe year. 

• TOLLGATE HOLDINGS: 
Year to June 30. Pretax profit 
R9.59 million (£2.72 million), 
against R6.37 million. Turnover 
R12686 million (R107.75 mil- 
lion). Total dividend 29 cents 
(15 cents). Earnings per share 
28.6 cents (18 cents). Turnover 
indudes for a foil year the 
turnover of the operations pre- 
viously conducted by Asso- 
ciated Bus Holding, compared 
with six months for the previous 
year. An improvement .in 
operating results and a lower 
interest charge both contributed 
to the improvement in eamings. 

• TOR INVESTMENT 
TRUST: Year to July 31. Total 
dividend 15Jp ( 1 3.82p) on the 
income shares. Dividend lJ2p 
(1 J8p) on the capita] shares. 
Net revenue £697,055 
(£640,706). Net asset values (ex- 
dividend); Income shares 
115-20p (98.20p) and capital 
shares 83 Jp (625.46p). Earnings 
per share: income shares I7.12p 
(15.7 Ip) and capital shares 
1.71p (l-57p). 









- • r 




-• -;r • 


■ i ■* 



JOIN THE 460,000 NVESTORS 
ENJOYING A MONTHLY INCOME. 


This is wha 

Armpe 

hiwKiwcnr tvlontWy Inumae 

1 11*25% pa earns you e 

InvcMiiiaii Monihty Iwmr 

very month. 

Annyr 

luremncni Mom hty Income 

£2,000 £18-75 

£ 8,000 £ 75-00 

£ 18,000 £168-75 

£5,000 £46-88 

£10,000 £ 93-75 

£ 20,000 £187-50 

£6,000 £56-25 

£13,000 £121-88 

£ 25,000 £234-38 

£7,000 £65-63 . 

(Each additional £1,000 iovested produ 

£15,000 £140-63 

oes an xvesage of £9-37 a month— £112-. 

£100,000 £937-50 

50 a yean Marinmm holding £101X000 .) 


TO PLACE YOUR 
PERSONAL 
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IN THE TIMES 
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Over 460,000 people are enjoyinga regular monthly income from 
their investment in National Savings Income Bonds. You too could have 
something extra coming in every month. 

Currently you’ll get 11-25% pa interest on your Income Bonds, 
get it paid monthly and in full, because we don’t deduct tax. 

Eni oy life with a monthly income. 


The interest is simply credited direct to your bank or building 
society account, or we can send you a warrant through the post Either 
way it means some extra money coming in regularly to help pay the 
bills or simply to spend enjoying life. 


Ybur savings are never touched 

Youx. capital is completely safe - the cash you put in is the cash 
you’ll get back. 

Interest is calculated on a day-to-day basis. It is paid in full and 
is subject to tax if you are a taxpayer The rate paid may change from 
time to time, to keep it competitive. 

Gettin g your money out 

You need give only 3 months’ notice to have any Bond repaid. 
And there will be no loss of interest if youVe held your Bond for a year 
or more (For details of repayment, see paragraph 6 of the prospectus.) 

Invest here and now. 

"Vbu can be sure your investment will always provide a worth- 
while income - month in, month out All you have to do is complete 
the coupon below and send it with your cheque (payable to ‘National 
Savings’) to NSIB, Bonds and Stock Office, Blackpool FY3 9YE Or ask 
for an application form at your post office. The minimum purchase 
for new investors is £2,000; if you already have a Bond, it is £1,000. 

It’s probably the most enjoyable investment yoi/11 ever make. 


National Savings INCOME BONDS Sife 

SAVINGS 


PROSPECTUS 30 May 1986 

1 Tire DrecrorofSzremgtisautfaoPMKftfl the UrisGpniriB'M u iigsorHyf 
Majesty 1 ! Treasury to r«etve untrf further notice appfcaoons far MMuxW 
Swings meome Bon* fUoncM 

2 TheBoixfc area Gtwernmentsetuitv issued irttenhe National Loam AQ 
1968 They are i«j5W«ed m the-Rawnal Samps Sloe* Regoer and are 
sutiea to the Requtarans letamg ra tf>e MahOnaTsawigs Suae*. Register i« 

* ■' — "oJand 


, ... _ Sa»>gsSux*. 

Ote tm* being n force, so far as these are apotooie Thepanow 
flieees on the BonctwfH be « ch»ge on the National Loans fund 

PURCHASE 

3 1 S«i0re<uoa rnmnure nt>al pwthaseof QjOOO iseepataqraphe) a Bond 
may bepudvKWfOrfT.OfiSor a muftofeo I mat sun ftyrew Wnvse be 
made# the wne ofapotoiion TbedMe d pwchase w* forafl puposes Be 
ttedateol iecef« ol iheieni>ton(e.w«fta cw»ol*teil«**<aoon format me 
fiords and Siott Oftce BiackpoU a such whe? tne D«ector of 
S*»mgsm«5(jarfv 

32 flflmwstmeriiceftifi(aiftbe 0 nngthedaieolpifChasfti*Sbeissii«Jm 
respect o< each pu chase 

HOLDING UMIT5 

4 1 NoperMXi may txM enw^ oe(omdyw*hanyOd»er ptflonjesthan 
£2 WO a more than flDOJKO of Bonds Bonds mnwed fmm a dece«sed 
holder iwA not count ir^aantethejpeirrirnedniaortXiYi Fiovtfnnore.Bcnai 
he«J B/a penon as trustee will noi oxim towards themaamun whch he e 
oemwied to Wd m hs oermrial capacny. noi vwti Bonds htUmuust count 
Kv«fc pennneo inaumm o< a bendKiaryi peoongl hcJArg 

J2 TVTieesuviT^varvthem»»Tu^andi^¥Tirxjrriho*C*ngl(<TMtjriame 
nnmn mmal puritH? Iron tune W Mma.n«n gwmg nonce No tuch 
uaMKin mill pietudt* a*i "QN under the pKKOeaus eryayed by a 
Bondholder immeaMtely betaethe uanahon m resp«J ol a Bond iben held 
oyhm 

INTEREST 

Siwjrram^becala^tedi^aci^tod^.b^hwmbwijiedptJichase 
ai a Idle deiermmed by me KiMuyTtne Ti«*sufy ratel 

52 Werea be pauM on the 5th day of each month The ftrecw of 
Sdmnas may del e» paymemsoi aenued nterea otheiwoe due m icspeaol a 
Bond enttwilhe period ol si* meeksloioming the dale ol purchase unw the 
neM utter esi daw loiorwng the end oftnai period 

53 tfm repaying the Bondhas,b}r<BHBh pl paRwaph 61 , Aimed Ifis 

iryeiesufwune low'd* iwdy two ■niespea of the Band jnQerpdiageji)H5i 
ihetalancewa be deduced Irom the sun to be ieoaoOi>inteieu earned 
on the Bond ardnoi ahead* p*d be*o» repaymem urfbeadded do mesum 
to be repad H. in ttw case o* «p*a"wt under paopgon 62. s * not 
'easonatJtypiacK^itetojlopnirderestpaymentfroinoemginadeafMrthe 
lepayrneni date, the amount of lhai interest payment M«*t»0eaKted bom 
ihewmtobeiep*d 

54 the Treasuymaytii^ tine io nmeiwythe^ouu'yretetipongiwngHi 
meeii'not-ce 

5 5 Tfw , s««uv "W fram ft"? “ WJ ibe Metwte at and dates on 

wtith ntwii rspdvdOttutxjngwmgriOKt-. jTdmso*MngfTM)i werfv 
hoUng kmiB dtXNe cx petom m*Kh am, u* «hon inII apply Moimmi On >m4 

spiA to d Bond Blued M*ore “ana wtnuni«s UwBondholdeta^^s to 
suchdfiptediion 

56 tnicred on a Bond regawred >" Ve M*e name of a mw under wm 
,wol agetrf iwmIv bepaNBimoaNancitf Sawigi Ban* account mine' 
•wnntofihenum 

S.7lntcresiona Bond unit be pact meftoutiJKiicnonol'tncofneiociM't is 
nijecl lolxome b» and must tie mdided many ienan of miome made to 
ihe intand Revenue 


REPAYMENT 

61 a Bondholder may obam repdvrtieni of a Bond at par before redemptm 
Upongnmg 3 calendar months' nonce The Bond mi* earn merest ar tbe 
5easuy rate tam the date of purchase up to the reoapnem dare where 
repayment fafc on or after the fira anmvereaiy of purchase. Where the 
wpaymua dale falls before the Traanne re tsaty of purchase the Bond mJ 
earn merest at had the Treasury rate from the dated purcnase up to the 
repayment date 

6 2Where an apdeavon for repayment d a Bond is madeafter the death of 
the sole or sore Survwreg regstered hoMer no fired period ol nonce s 
retn«ed and tre Bond <m«> earn merest at me Aeasuv reie fram the oate of 

B Chase up to me date of lepaytnent. whether or not repayment occurs 
« the m annwriary d me purchase. 

63 Aty JBDtaMM «or repaymem of a Bond mat be madem wtiwq a the 
Bands and Stock Office. Blackpool and accomoarwd by me nwstmern 
certrtcate Tfre penod of now gnren by the Bon«ioiaw win oe caiaaaud 
• bom the date on much the antooen a rKmeo n Me Bonds anp Siodt 
Office 

60 AoqUeaWn m«r be made fcr repayment of oanofaBondmanamount of 
0.000 O' d mutnoreof mai sum provided mat thehotdwg ol fipnosremainmg 
ahn it* put repayment b not less man tne mnmm notong rent m 
p4ra9uch4ldsuarred>TomtNne»i«heufidetpard9apnd^ Tnepeceong 
suD-twM^aohs w# a c*v to the part repaid as to a whole Bond die 
reriarengiwianceyinH hove the same oare ot purchase ared ffre same mttsesi 
dates as weteapphcaaie 10 the on 9 »>al Bona immediaifitypnonioiepaynieni 

PAYMENTS 

7 friterep wi be Bayadledaeci to a Naoonal Savmgs Banh or other bant or 
fwiong society decouht or Dyoosseowattantsemoy post AfipnahokK* 
may only aesjqnateoneaaount oi method of paymenrto apply to ha enure 
hoktatg of Bonds at any time CaonalrtJl be repayable tfcett to a Iwcnai 
Savings Bar* aettuw or by crossed warant sets oy posl 

MINORS 

B A Bores neld bva nra under Iheageof Urren<«an.ftihersole*v or jormly 
ywih any oPrer persorc anil not be repayable, wept «*th me c onwre ol me 
Dwnoraf Sawngs. ■ . 

TRANSFER j 

9 Boros wA notbettansleobreeicepi wrtfi theconsem of iheDawiOiol 
Saw^Ttansferofafiorei 0> pan (sfaeonduvdonfyoeaiovvrtinan amount 
oJiWDOor/njft®fee< that sumand wdl noibeatowec if the hoBhngot the 
itatisttfo or oansfeeevvowld thereby oeOuts«ihehol(linglm«s»»ioosed 
bypreaotaphAlastwvedlrDinnmeioHneuKrerpdiagQoMj TheDneoor 
oi5av*i^i^ftc«naBy give consem in the caseoltarewrnple devolution Of 
Borebtmifre death ofahoaier but not toany preposed transfer v*idiisby 
way of sale Or Hu any cpistiecaoort 

NOTICE 

10 ThetreasufV Wdgmeany nonce r«iu«ed underparagraph aj.64.S6or 11 
o' We pTCHpectiA ai the London Echncwgh and Gazenes wm any 

otner manner wtken mey threh ht if notice is gw »m othenw ie martin the 
Oaienes-twdlassovi as n reasonably possioreihereatrertx recorded n 
IMi 

GUARANTEED UFE OF BONDS 

it lachBonOmayoefwtdtareguaianreedmii'aipewdofiOyeaisfwnihe 

fiwrnw««i»»afwffiec»teofpuithase toertaitetmteienv**nmit>tii>- 
to be patwote under me terms of ineprmpycruSunw theredemptonoi me 
Bono The Bond vyeibetedeemeifaiiparenhefarmeendotiheguiareefld 

bwiJ petmd or on any interest dare thereaftec m erther case upon the giyyig 
ol sotmqnpts'naBteby meleasury TheDuectorof Ssrensw™ wtiterothe 

Bondholder before redemption at rhe ha retorted address for (ns 
BondhcMmg, nwr of the date ol the redemption nonhed by die 
Treasury 


APPUCAHONFOR NATIONAL SAVINGS INCOME BOND 


To NSIB, Bonds andstock office; Blackpool, FY39YP 


0) 

e> 

. i 

l 

h 

l? 

|i 

*• 


LMte aepoept the ternns of the Prospectus 
and apply for a Bond to foe value of:- 


.000 


Initial mirumLra of £2.000 
and multiples ol 0,000 
to a maximum of £ 100,000 


Sumamefs) 


AH forenameis) 


Mr/MlVMos 


Address . 


. Postcode. 


Name of Thu: 
(if appiicabre) 


Daieoflnl) 

(«cp"f iai if unrtur 71 


Day Mijnir-I 


NAME AND ADDRESS FOR DESPATCH OF INVESTMENT CERTIFICATE Ol diMweni rrom above) 


104408 


I 


S) 


l L 




Name. 


Address, 


tf you already haw a National Sawngs Income Bond, insert Regtster No 


. Postcode . 


Enter full aop umd wais foc merest io be paid efirea to a Bankrauftfing Society or National Savings Bank Account, 

or name and address only if you prefer crossed wafianu by post 

Bank Sorting Codte (Shown m the «» right 
Bank • handaresa of your owi cheques ' 

BuJd&ng Society 

Name« , 


Addrefd. 


.Rjstcode. 


AfcrttoflhJo 


A*Name(s) 


natures) 
Unaioint 
ho long all 
holders 
must sign) 




.Dote. 


.19. 


'PI e*e«M* freereaisiMrnrtlnreadid^atti^Dlinear-iualrajeiaiidcjt V3fi6d the awual rate to each day maleapyew) 
llw none doei not tom pan oltfie pwpeaus 











LAW/BUSfNESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


Mergers threat as weaker 
US airlines face closure 


From Bailey Morris, 

Washington 

United Slates Government 
oFTicials. alarmed by the threat 
of higher air fares, are re- 
evaluating their merger policy 
for domestic airlines. 

They are doing so to counter 
growing industry concentra- 
tion, which is forcing weaker 
airlines into bankruptcy. 

The Department of Justice 
is concerned that the strong 
competition brought about by 
the deregulation of fares in 
1978 is coming to an abrupt 
end. 

The closure this week of 
Frontier Airlines, the continu- 
ing cash problems of People's 
Express, the speculation that 
World Airways will be forced 
to close and the $160 million 
{£106 million) cosi-cutting 
programme announced this 
week by Eastern Airlines, were 
all signs of an industry in 
trouble, officials said. 

Only a handful of big air- 
lines. fed by smaller com- 
muter lines linking major 
airports, are expected to sur- 
vive the present environment 
of virulent cost cutting. In- 
deed, industry officials es- 
timate that by the end of 1 986 
the six biggest airlines will 
control almost 80 per cent of 
the domestic market. 

Mr Alfred KJian, former 
chairman of the US Civil 
Aeronautics Board, said the 
massive closure of new air- 
lines since 1978 had raised 



Alfred Khan; doubts about deregulation 


serious questions about the 
merits or deregulation. 

He believed that the in- 
dustry might be evolving into 
an "uncomfortably tight 
oligopoly." in which a handful 
of airlines would exert their 
control over the large "hub” 
airports to raise prices 
dramatically. 

Department of Justice staff 
arrived at similar conclusions 
in challenging two recent ac- 
quisition proposals. 

The department last month 
opposed Northwest Airlines’ 
acquisition of Republic Air- 
lines which gave the surviving 
carrier 80 per cent of the gates 


at the large Minneapolis 
airport. 

And it is attempting to 
block the purchase of Ozark 
Airlines by Transworid Air- 
lines which will give TWA a 
virtual monopoly at the busy 
Lambert International Airport 
at St Louis. 

Justice Department officials 
said that in both cases the 
acquisitions would result in 
substantially higher prices to 
consumers. In Minneapolis 
passengers would pay an es- 
timated $3 million more a 
year in higher air feres in the 
first year and the figure could 


World Airways cuts services 


Oakland, California (Reuter 
aud NYT) — World Airways 
yesterday became the latest 
casualty of the airline fare 
wars with the announcement 
that it would end its scheduled 
passenger service and fire 
1,500 of its 2,600 employees. 

The airline said it would 
concentrate on its charter and 
aircraft maintenance opera- 
tions. Scheduled passenger 
flights will end on September 
15. 

"It is a question of econom- 
ics .. . We believe in the first 
six months of this year we lost 
$25 million.** said Mr Jerrold 
Scoutt, World Airways 
chairman. 

“World is financially stron- 
ger today than it has been for 
many months, and we are 
taking these actions to secure 
a more profitable future,** he 
said. 

World Airways has been 
able to narrow its losses since 
1982 but has not become 
profitable. It serves eight 
American cities, including the 
New York metropolitan area 
through Newark International 
Airport, and also flies to 
London and Frankfurt. 

The airline is largely the 
creation of Mr Edward Daly, a 
flamboyant entrepreneur, who 


fought for low fares and no- 
frill service long before 
deregulation. 

In 1979, after years of effort, 
he won government per- 
mission to charge just $99 one 
way in transcontinental mar- 
kets, touching off a fierce fare 
war among the major carriers 
which at one point brought 
fares down to $69 one way. 

Mr Daly started the carrier 
in 1950 with $50,000 won in a 
poker game. By flying troops 
and cargo for the military, be 
soon became a millionaire, 
owning 82 percent of the 
airline. World Airways has 
arranged with Pan American 
World Airways and United 
Airlines to honour tickets after 
September 15 at no additional 
cost to dyers. The airline also 
plans to establish a pro- 
gramme to help its laid -off 
workers find other jobs. 

The carrier is expected to 
announce that Mr T Coleman 
Andrews (111) will take over as 
president and that Mr Arthur 
Hutton, the current president, 
should become vice chairman. 

The news of World Airways’ 
cutback comes soon after 
Eastern Air Lines announced 
its plans to cut its work force 
by 1,534 to trim costs and 
improve efficiency. 


Last week. Frontier Airlines 
filed for protection under the 
bankruptcy . code because it 
was unable to cope with fere 
wars at its Denver hub. 

Like Frontier, World Air- 
ways has experienced severe 
pressures brought on by de- 
regulation. Still, some of the 
carrier's problems were ag- 
gravated by its own actions. 

When Mr Daly and World 
Airways were permitted to cut 
fares on the transcontinental 
market, the airline became a 
“spoiler” — undercutting other 
carriers and forcing fares 
down further. 

The strategy led to losses at 
World Airways of $58 2 mil- 
lion (£39 million) in 1982 and 
$29.4 million in 1983. 

Mr Daly, who had been a 
proponent of deregulation, 
then did an about-face on the 
issue and in 1982 petitioned 
the Civil Aeronautics Board to 
re-regalate feres, saying the 
fare wars were "disastrous and 
completely irrationaL** 

The CAB took no action, 
and Mr Daly said the situation 
looked so bleak he feared 
World Airways would go out of 
business. That same year, Mr 
Daly gave up executive control 
and Mr Brian Cooke became 
president and chief executive. 


While the airline has been 
able to restructure its debt and 
narrow its losses, it has not 
been consistently profitable. 

The cutback of its scheduled 
passenger service represents 
about 75 per cent of Its 1985 
revenue. World Airways began 
its scheduled service in 1979. 

Mr Robert Joedicke, an 
airline analyst for Shearson 
Lehman Brothers, said that 
"when yon cat back to one- 
fourth the size, there is not 
much you can do.** 

He added that with the' 
revenue that was left, it would 
be difficult to sustain its 
charter and maintenance busi- 
ness and the airline would 
probably sell some of its 
assets. 

The carrier has four DC-10- 
30s, a version that has a long 
range and would be attractive 
to such carriers as United, 
which is bnUdrag up its Pacific 
service. 

The Oakland Tribune has 
reported that World Airways 
is talking with United, but 
both carriers have refused to 
comment 

lodnstry analysts have fore- 
cast that additional shakeouts 
can be expected. Considered at 
risk is Pan Am, which lost 
$271 million in the first six. 
months of the year. 


KPC to expand European network 


Kuwait (Reuter) — Kuwait's 
state oil company yesterday 
unveiled plans to expand its 
European retail network and 
said its products would now 
be distributed under the new 
trade mark of Q8. 

The Gulf stale became the 
first Arab oil producing coun- 
try to develop a foreign down- 
stream network in 1983-84 
when it bought facilities from 
the United States-owned Gulf 
Oil in Scandinavia, the Bene- 
lux countries and Italy. 

Kuwait Petroleum Corpora- 
tion said, that as from 
yesterday, its two oil refineries 


and 2.700 service and petrol 
stations in Europe would op- 
erate under the Q8 brand 
mark instead of the former 
owner's trade name. 

It said its marketing arm. 
Kuwait Petroleum Inter- 
national (KPI). would soon 
start selling 100 new brands of 
lubricating oil in Europe. 

Mr Christiano Raminelia, 
KPI's Director in Italy, said 
Kuwait planned to buy more 
petrol stations in Italy, where 
$72 million l£48.I ’million) 
had been earmarked for 
development. 

Kuwait, a country of 1.7 


million people with one of the 
world's highest per capita 
income, currently produces 
about 900,000 barrels per day 
(bpd) of oil. 

KPC acquired from Gulf 
Oil a 75,000 bpd refinery in 
Rotterdam, a 55.000 bpd 
refinery outside Copenhagen 
and a 85,000 bpd refinery near 
Milan, earmarked for storage 
use. 

KPCs European lubricating 
oil plant and airline supply 
facilities will also operate 
under the new Q8 brand mark. 

Kuwait inaugurated a $2.36 


billion local refinery expan- 
sion on the Gulf coast last 
February which it said gave it 
the world's biggest modern 
refining complex. 

Expansion centred on its 
Mina al-Ahmadi plant, south 
of Kuwait city, which with its 
Mina al-Abdulia and Shuaiba 
refineries enable Kuwait to 
refine 675,000 bpd locally. 

It is currently refining 
around 430.000 bpd following 
cuts in crude output agreed by 
the Organisation of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries (Opec) 
for September and October. 


Law Report September 5 1986 


Repaying house discount to council 


Regina v Rush moor Borough 
Council. Ex parte Barrett and 
Another 

Before Mr Justice Reeve 
{Judgment given September 4J 

The sale of a former matri- 
m^nial home pursuant to an 
order ot lhe i court in anciHaiy 
relief proceedings following di- 
vorce was not an exempted 
disposal within the meaning of 
section 160 of the Housing Act 
mSS and consequently the ap- 
plicants were not absolved from 
the obligation to repay 80 per 
cent of the discount which they 
received on purchasing the 
house from the local authority 
in 1 084. 

Mr Justice Reeve, sitting as an 
additional judge of the Queen's 
Bench Division, so held in a 
reserved judgment, in an 
application by Mrs Caroline 
Barrett and Mr Thomas Barrett, 
of Famborough. Hampshire for 
judicial review of a decision of 

Rushmoor Borough Council. 

Section 160 of the 1985 Act 
provides: “(I) A disposal is an 
exempted disposal . . . if — . . . 
j c) it is a disposal of the whole of 
the dwelling-house in pursuance 
of an order made under section 
24 of the Matrimonial Causes 
Act 1973 (property adjustment 

orders in connection with matri- 
monial proceedings) . - .** 

Mr Nicholas Paul for the 
applicants: Mr Timothy Straker 
tor Rushmoor Borough Council. 

MR JUSTICE REEVE said 
that the applicants had married 
in March 1984. They had lived 
together in a council house For 
some years and in 1984 the 
tenancy was transferred into 
their joint names. 

In October 1 984 the ap- 
plicants availed themselves of 
the right to acquire the freehold 
of 2 Beech Road. Famborough 
from Rushmoor Borough Coun- 
cil. 

The purchase price was re- 


duced by the discount of 44 per 
cent calculated in accordance 
with the provisions of section 7 
of the Housing Act 1980. The 
discount was £1 2.0SQ. 

The conveyance of the free- 
hold to them contained the 
covenant, stipulated by section 
8 of the 1 98fl Act, to pay to the 
local authority on demand the 
amount calculated in ac- 
cordance with subsection 2 if 
thev disposed of the property 
within five years of the convey- 
ance. 

The marriage was dissolved 
by decree absolute on December 
4. 1985. 

On February 18. 1986 Mr 
Registrar Fuller, silting at Aider- 
shot and Famham County 
Court ordered that the property 
be sold and the proceeds of sale 
divided equally between the 
parries. 

The house was sold on April 
M. 1986. The local authority 
demanded repayment of 
£ 10 . 120 . 

Mr Paul submitted that the 
disposal was in pursuance or an 
order made under section 24 of 
the 1973 Acl 

His Lordship said that section 
24 did not confer expressly the 
power to order a sale of the 
property. The power to order a 
sale was conferred expressly by 
section 24A which was inserted 
in the 1973 Act by section 7 of 
the Matrimonial Homes and 
Property Act 1981. 

Mr Paul had argued 1 that 
section 24A was no more than a 
procedural section to enable 
section 24 to be implemented. 

In his Lordship's opinion 
section 24A was more than 
merely procedural as by the 
section the court was granted 
jurisdiction to order a sale of 
property, also section 24 re- 
mained intact without amend- 
ment. Section 24A stood by 
itself within the context of the 
other sections in the 1973 Acl 


it was necessary to consider 
the actual words of the order 
■'that the property known as 2 
Beech Road, Famborough be 
sold, and the proceeds of sale 
divided equally between the 
parties". 

The pan of the order which 
directed that the property be 
sold was exercising the power 
conferred by section 24A. It was 
less dear whether the equal 
division of the proceeds of sale 
was an order made under sec- 
tion 23 or under section 24. 

It appeared to be a cross-order 
for a lump sum made under 
section 23< I Xc). The sale was 
not a disposal “in pursuance of 
an order made under section 24 
of the Matrimonial Causes Act 
1973“ 

it was not difficult to under- 
stand what was in the mind of 
Parliament when enacting sec- 
tion 160 of the Housing An 
1985. None of lhe categories of 
exempt disposal contained in 


section 160. omitting for the 
moment subsection ( 1 He), 
contemplated that Lhe discount 
from the purchase price would 
be realizable in-cash. That could 
not be described as an in- 
equitable provision. 

What was contemplated by 
the provision in section 
lbOHXc) was a transfer or 
settlement of property under 
section 24 of the Matrimonial 
Causes Act 1 973 which involved 
continued occupational enjoy- 
ment of the property by a spouse 
and/or the children of the family 
and thus no liquid cash advan- 
tage gained. 

Rushmoor Borough Council 
were correct when demanding 
that the sum of £10,120 be 
repaid by the applicants. The 
application for judicial review 
was dismissed. 

Solicitors: Tanner & Taylor. 
Aldershot; Sharpe Pritchard & 
Co for Mr R. G. S. Foster, 
Famborough. 


CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


CHALFONT 


VOLVO 


H. F. EDWARDS 


rise to as high as $64 million a ; 
year. j 

Bui the department was 
overruled by the US Trans- 
portation Department in the 
Northwest case, and a final 
ruling on the TWA case is | 
pending. 

Analysts said yesterday that j 
the closure of Frontier Air- 
lines in Colorado would raise 
prices and restrict service not 
only at Denver's Stapleton 
International Aiport but in 
other big western cities. Fron- 
tier serves nearly 50 cities in 
the west. 

A fier the closure 1 2 of those 
cities would be served by only 
one airline. United Airlines, 
and eight others would have 
no direct service. The airline 
industry has mounted a strong 
campaign to counter the grow- 
ing fears of government of- 
ficials. Officials said at a 
recent hearing that com- 
petition would remain strong 
even in cities served by only a 
single airline because new 
airlines were free to operate. 

But government regulators 
countered by saying the cost of 
entry was now significantly 
higher than it was five years 
ago. 

And officials said that the 
big airlines, which had been 
free of anti-trust restraints in 
recent years, had used their 
market power to drive new 
airlines out of business by 
drastically cutting prices and 
by dominating computer 
reservations systems. 


Tci GtRRAfiOS CNO5S(07S3/M$SS9 

Amefstram Road, CTudTont si Peter, Bucks 
74 S ®- *«fo Saloon, Ot*. 1*000 mow. 1 owner . - 

I J2K 3 * 0 £*■ r « '2 .W ™m. ’ — 

1 {SM 360 &.T S-noor jntnracra. 1 Owflfr 13000 ntfM .. . 

”5 IW 760 OLE *uto saioon. tun spec. 32 000 maos - — 

1983 3*0 CL Shoot, aurananc. cars iao. 28.000 mws. i owner ... . 


OL*95 

£4.995 

ISu995 

... . QL9S5 

CUSS 


* ’W Eacotl XR3 S Speed. Mm metallic. SAKW miles. Inawllbfe eoiKMton, 

1663 VW Gotf cm issOcs, Mack, 1 owner, 2*400 -u- 

^ ^xce&nee 


.£*,495 ★ 
.CS.495 * 


LARONE 

ENGINEERING 

RANGE ROVER DIESEL 
! CONVERSION SPECIALIST 
PERKINS 4-182, 4-236. 
VM3-6 I 


Spares, Senrfdug and 
Repairs 

Range Roveis-buit to 
customer’s own 
specifications 

Tel: Pershore 
(9386)556581 


RANGE ROVER 

1982 Y reg. 4-floor, nml 
Snetlarw Beige. exceJMol 
common. 

BL50Q 

Please contact W Barber 
on 6476 7MJ77 


■MOCA GAMMA W r*g Mot. 1 
I*r. oiiaiMirw unlil Julv 1487. 
V good ran. MUM M seen 1 
Cl .400 OftnM conMdered. Td 
■08*91 40SS2/J0779. 


2 novm STOtUHGS IDT Mnmf- 
auto (Mil (Tv. AJurc Mue wtUi 

box irtin Iran Ini- 1 

Moorrafcir wfllt leather irlni - 
Ini. Deiiicretf irw* anywhere M 
l K huidUim. Phone Coward 
Leo al Borouqti Caw Otdham 
Ltd on Ool 633 1061 


VOLVO 240 CL EMM* ■ 1486 S 
mvm manual. Uual so plus 
\ oti o dm ouard and bum till / 
Bwiuimn. iwro raota / c» 
srtte. 4 xwiwtv Redwood 
meuutr. 15.000 tmar nun 
Immarulalr. one owner £7780 
T« Tnn«j .0*4 2821 6649 


VOLVO 244 OL Saloon Manual/ 
Oientnie I486 A Melanie 
Blur. 1 owner. 19.000 Per 
rmm won lull imxr hrdory. 
Mans- extras. £9 450. O-unts 
Tel Tooomqton iBrasl ■ OS2951 
3267 E\n/Weekends T 

HUMmunaouciBirf. 

June as. Id.OOO miles, red. etc 
rood- sun real, werro deck. 
rSH. genuine reason £6.399 
ChrUnslord 0246 «o 4 «4B 

RANGE coven Auto. Brown 
Low mileage 5 dr 84. Wood 
raootmn. iwaamn. stereo CO 
dirmors rar vac. C11-2SO 
TMOl 83o 7660 or 403 2569 

RS TURBO ESCORT, c red With I 
all extras tueuent condition 1 
yr warremv m run £7 460 | 
ono. Tel: >02401 418916 or i 
■07421 701870 

TOYOTA mo I486 Slier, 
20.000 mllD £7.700. Tel: Ol 
945 3720 


OTROBi a PALLAS IE 
Auto, B reg. low mileage. 

__ E6J95. 

CITROEN CX Em Auto C 
reg. 6,000 mis, as new. 
E9595. 

CITROEN CX 6T1 Turbo C 
reg. T 0.000 mis, Florentine 

_____ £10595. 

PX & finance 
arranged. 
Bordesley Garage, 
Redditeh 
(0527)63636 
Out of office his 
(0527)41112 


A Selection at our 
New Models available for 
Immediate Delivery 

505 GT| Family Estate 
585 GR Auto Estate 
305 SRD Estate 
385 Alto Saloon + Sunroof 
205 XU) 

JKimyr Mans Models 

Teh 01-349 3600 or 
01-346 9963 24 hrs 


pmfg reg ata 

mm MAKE YOU M OFFER YOU CAITT fffVSB 
Tel: Epsom (03727) 25611 
Ijnn a Church Street. Epsom. Surrey. 


“ON THE ROAD’’ 
GRANADA 2.W Q Hj * **ET PA1NT 

QRANADA 104 MgSofe* MCT PAINT 

PHONE HOW 
WHILE STOCKS LAST 

d i 1 1 > I ! te Treo i89i ~ 
JfflET- Commercial R 


(H) 


Norton Wjy Motes 
0462 878191 


MM CJUUmMXT Hl_E 1982. 
Burn, new special interior Al- 
loy wheels, new lyres. Rare 
oooon unity to arauwe such ■ 
fine example. EJ.GOOl '0*051 
731886 Day (0403) 66636 
nei/xwkrnib T 


RANGE ROVER VOQUC T? reg. 1 
1 485. Dane metaiM Shir, excel 
lent condilion. all extras j 
mnutttrxi sMixo/rnwflr Mr., 
low mileage. I owner. £19.500 
ono. Tel. 0669 370876 


RANGE ROVER Vrnetm Red A 

Reg imv 84 ’Countryman) 
22.000 Mb Condition as new. 
1 owner. 9 spd Many Him 
CS.fiOO. 07483 3574 


TOVOTA SUPRA XJH V reg. 
Red. 54.000 miles all extras, 
pristine L(k 260 Td. Ludlow 
•09841 6042 Olftre 


CABRIOLET FIAT Super Strata ! 
84 iBl Siher. alloys. 38.000 j 
mb. 1 owner £3.945 Warm. ! 
ty. P/EX. 0453 740330 I TV i 


COLT SHO GUN Turbo Diesel 
I486. 5 door. 10.000 miles. I 
owner As new £9.996. Td 
■06221 861789 T 


CONVCRTOLC CAVALIER 1 8. 

*86 C. Under 2.000 mue? al 
£8 796 Tel Ol 460 3462 or 
4o0 61 OS Open Sunday. T 

ESCORT CABRIOLET All white. 
June 86iryew Snapei All extras. 
2 000 mue*. C4.7S0 ono. 01 
S38 1821. Ret GJC 

VOLVO 340 OLE EMalr. 83 A , 
reg. O/a rue. mrt sdver. | 
CS.7SO 01-402 3214. T 


Where Venture 
. Begins 

LEX MEAD 
128 Bridge Road. Maidenhead 
Berkshire 
Tel: (0*23) 33188 
f r VK Mu 4 Layoff 


RANGE ROVER ‘V reg MetalUr | 
Blue, inov wheels, sierra m 
sene, good all round rondmon 
£6.990 Tel 0866 249122 Ol 
tirr 0844 238383 Of A wfcas , 


18.000 miles s History. Drome , 
attars £4.995. £3.000 less than ; 
a coll ram! Trl.0707 872733 


BOOCE MOTOR H O ME. 8 berth . 
All linury Iilnients. X reo . 
Good ronaibon oners around : 
£6.0 00 Tel. 0200 41531 


ESCORT 1.8 L .9 door Jul» RS 2 
yr manuianurers warrrhly 1 
lads' owner C4 800 Trt.Ol- 
603-8009 / 093264233 


VOLVO 244 OL Automatic June 
82 Pei— iratom While, stored 
svsiem. heaidKut ro million 
£3.400 Tel Ol 904 3566 


FORD ESCORT I 6 GIHa. -86 C. 
■new sjvwei Lnder 1.500 
imb-L C6.T4S.TelO! 460 2462 
or 460 6106 Open Sundo) T 

FORD FIESTA t 1 Ghla. T6 C. 
Lnder 1 .200 miles. Full ohu 
SJXf al £4.946. Ol 460 2462 
or a 60 6105 Open Sundays T 

FORD FIESTA I.i L. *86 C Ui> 
der 1.600 mites, tilled Ford 
5,1 root al £4.346. Ol 460 2462 
or 4oO 6109 Open Sunday T 

HONDA FREUIDC X June 84 
Auto wnaie 13 000 mites, t 
Owner Intrrar C6.SOO Tel.Ol 
207 443o iNW London) 

MINI TRACTORS. RKJeon mow 
erv paraen marhincrv new A 
used. We are Ine specialists 
K (Stands 0225 858288 


BAN6E ROVER 
AUTO 5 DOOR 

IR Am 0] PIXMM ' "Me 
tan mm 1 dim" mjw 

Towbdf C9.99S 

RANGE ROVER 

Bl WHeg UF> FmdM « main 
pm mri iw mt nw Moon 

mb CM 95. 

12 monks warranty. 
WHEELERS. CHIPPING 
NORTON 
0888 2014 Day 
0295 720489 Eves 


The most competitive price 
in the U.K. For ouaiaooris 
and delivery Derails 
telephone: 

METROPOLIS 
01-876 2530 
MONBAY -SATURDAY 
9 - G pm. 


roRO (XI C ABHOR. ET March 
84. While. 10 OOO miles. I own- 
er (mmaruiato rondmon FSiH. 
C6.T60 Tel 0827 SHI 22 


GRANADA GHIA ZJ XI ESTATE. 

C reg. .nmi. 12.000 mn. I ir 
Ford ti.irr.uilt 111.465 Rich 
ard Motors 021 643 3338. 


MORGAN 4 '4 2 sir B reg. Rosso 
ted. stone leainei. ‘.ins 5 700 
mb main extras imnw ulalr 
£10.750 Tel >0211 3b& 5774 


RANGE ROVER 4 DOOR. 82. 

hhilr usiui extras rngfl mile 
age CS«95 Tel 04028 S4fl 
iSl. 0708 27568/46800 tOl T 


SUZUKI EAST LONDON Main 
aoems immrduir detuerv. all 
mooeK Sales, sen ire 6 pans 
Tel 01-658 7903 T 

PEUGEOT 205 CTI * GTI Inme- 
cuale OH 1 % erv Onlral London. 
Ol 351 4330 w'davt iTI. 

PEUOCOT S85 on FAMK.V F.x 

lair I486. 6.000 miles, a, new 
raid £4.890 01-402 3214. T 

SIERRA OMA 4X4 Estate U reg 
ABS. Ww, 800 HUS L12.445 
TFT 0680 200635 iT' 

TOYOTA SUPRA 3A while, aulo 
maiir. D rog. oners mvied m« 
hsl Phone 458 3364 

VOLVO 740 OLE auto I486. I 
owner, silver, exiras. only 
£7.246 ono Tel U24648 789 


STRATTON BARA BE LTD 

B6 |C| FOOT ESCORT »» 4 
aja RBWAT h'toW 
& (OJ HWULT a 618 W.MB 

mx _ - HinD 

■i par) MW m 

e to REHAULT ta STL ESTME. 
ill MO m b ■ ttlto 

83 in MEBCsues » «nu 

jrjtrn MS - - ■ CT.« 

Gtouconter RpMI 
Clronoggtor 

(0285) 88007/8/8 
{0285) 88813 


1983 A 

VOLVO 240 GL 
ESTATE 

m shier, fitted wtn cantnf 
locking, power sieeruig. 5 
speed geartttt. 37.000 mlfll 
£5.750 

0438 354691. T 


MOTORS WANTED 


ALWAYS 

REQUIRED 

Executives. Sakxms and 
Snorts, low mueage. dean 
cats with htswy. Top 
prices, finance settled. 

Call Tonkas 
021 427 3235 


WANTED 

We are the most eager 
buyers of low mileage 

Mercedes-Benz 
BMW t Honda 
Telephone: Join Led 
061 833 B161 Men-Frl 


GO CARS. Ugru vam. Tlert or 
ungir Tel.Ol 841 0468 Cam a 
C ol led ion T 


REGISTRATION NUMBERS 


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Posting judgments looking for a registration? 


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Sand ford and Another v El 
Aribi Services (a firm) and 
Another 

A reserved judgment ought 

ordinarily to be given in open 
court and should not. save in 
exceptional circumstances, be 
delivered by posting it to the 
panics. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Nourse and Lord Justice 
Balcombe) so stated on August 
21. allowing an appeal from an 
order of Judge Siudey at West 
London County Court that the 
defendants deliver up pos- 
session of premises of which 
they had been tenants. 

LORD JUSTICE BAL- 
COMBE said that he concurred 
with Lord Justice Nourse '.in 
deprecating the practice of giv- 
ing judgment by post 


If a judge did not wish to give 
a reasoned judgment immedi- 
ately at the end of a hearing, two 
alternatives were open to him. 
He could reserve judgment, in 
which case no order could be 
made until the judgment was 
delivered, which in the ordinary 
way would be in open court 

Alternatively, if at the end of 
the hearing he had made up his 
mind he could make an order 
there and then and give his 
reasons jater. 

The judge here had done 
neither, but had sent his un- 
dated judgment to the parties by 
post and in consequence the 
true date of his order was 
unclear. 

The orcier as drawn up bore a 
date which was patently before 
judgment had been given, and it 
hacf therefore to be set aside. 


85 £& S8 BMF* 


(SW ’WJWC j4jn 
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saction will be conducted by ourselves and our commission charged to lhe £»“ ® '■* ‘23 ^ 

vendor. As DVLC. Swansea, do not offer a search service we believe this (SgS SS 5^?^ § an umber 

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example ABC & AC. Payment covers a three month period — no refunds. !S « ® §3 £$£ jg ^ ^ }^g gf j* 

Send your minimum payment £23 or more as required veto the coupon below. 25 asa ass ass ass? 

CUT .***"£ M H6AKWJN. 

To: Elite Registrations. P.O. Box 1, Bradfoid-on-Avon. Wiltshire jg=\£n [gSft ^ !S? «Vs 

I [Si.**?? iMfu wnoiffi ira Si i?. fSy.ttriix 1L 


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I My name and address 


16 MCH {fell OjF I fKQ 7 jtu «, ra Clift) WjjL DM run UQO Hy u flj 

iss? sssss Hi Us s BBB 

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cafantpui {535 fcfgi, -tn.-a rra 

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£££?£, S' 3 ” r>xi moti DO 

■HJS WEBH& (^ ^’ urn Mnn 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


22 . 


! 




ALWAYS 

require 


£ ail Toftii 

:• o:t 4275 


VtAN*£ 


Sit rpr-ftr 

Wt i tut 

,• ••.*: xa.a 
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pR 


Motoring by Clifford Webb 

locking tale of a new Alfa 

but occnsionS^ 1 company was in ibe 

Zi&SvS ESftWKS 
rssspiffi blit^s' a 

Iamnoteariiv tiift^wi SP® 1 * April this year and 
shocked is the ^ ^ importer began efleo- 

Which” "wopmiiommjSE 


Serena Tfem^of “^““ittathcrGuilietu 

kj : 2 ■el*-*?* 


only 
exj 
ase ( 

Hon 

assr^Ss 5jnss?5M= 

sutrJsvss 

Sw-SEAfflS Tf „ 

ten times betwm?* > Vf angB ‘ on ^ ^bulf a spokesman for 
andfiSSiteJS f JHW £fe Romeo GB said: “We 
probS^mtil 9 Ml^?ofthe !^ ve "ow decided to take Mrs 
dectriet r,«»j -T nJThJSJv 11 ? Thomas car to our new 
on bedy and headquarters complex at Do- 



BMW 3251 Cabriolet: Revels in fast motorway driving 


Gkctrics, rusting 
wheels, petrol 
bunn> 


filler 


cap 



work including rcspraying was 
undertaking but by June the 
rust was worse than ever, there 
was a knocking noise from the 
engiM and the central door- 
locking system was 
intermittent. 

2n October the dealer per- 
suaded Mrs Thomas that she 
would be better off pan 
exchanging the Alfe 33 for a 
hjBger and more expensive 
Gmlietta. But it too began to 
give trouble and after repair 
work it was returned with 
dents in a door and the bonnet 
whic h Mrs Thomas insists 
were not there when she 
delivered the car to the garage 

At this stage, she appealed 
direct to the manufacturer, 
but with little success because 


ROAD TEST 

BMW 325i 
Convertible. 

: given her an undertaking Manufecturers are wily 
that the car will be retur^m”? 0 ^ to realize that in oy 
100 percent condition." dunate open-top care are only 

But Mrs Thomas ha^ bad SSETJ S a JS' 

-mpfta.rilnraMibftr Th^laSS tto^ £ 
nothing less than her money cmwertible models as near the 


ver where it will be completely 
respiayed and oven-baked in 
our modern paintshop. We 
have given her an undertaking 


back. 

Which magazine yesterday re- 
ported that Alfa Romeo care 
had the worst warrantee 
claims record of the 20 dif- 
ferent makes sold in Britain. 
Knowing something of the 
problems the new British 
company inherited, I sym- 
pathize with the mess they are 
trying to dear up to restore 


start of summer as possible. I 
have just been driving the new 
BMW 3251 convertible and in 
one short week the good old 
British summer made the 
point that even this seasonal 
strategy is seriously flawed. Xt 
rained almost incessantly and 
when it was not raining it was 
threatening to do so. It was 
also cold and extremely 


The engineers at Munich 
have used a belt and braces 
approach to the old problem 
of body flexing and scuttle 
shake which so often results 
from cutting away the roof 
There is so much reinforcing 
steel and additional welding 
that the convertible weighs an 
astonishing 2Vt cwts more 
than the saloon. Despite the 
extra load, performance is 
only fractionally down. The 0 
to 60 mph time of 8.2 seconds 
is increased by only .2 and the 


Alfa’s once-proud image. But windy. As a result, the only 
in my view, the least they can time I dropped the hood was 


do now is to end this sorry 
saga and come to some form 
of financial settlement with 
Mrs Thomas. 


IN BRIEF 



• The popular Audi coopt 
range is getting a lower 
powered brother. A fad in- 
jected 1JB version, pi ct u red 
abo*e»b joining toe Coap£ 
GT 22i and the Coop* 
Qnattro. It wfll cost £11,080. 

• Car makers ire falling over 
each other to get on the tn-car 
telephone bandwagon. Volvo 
is the latest to announce that 
it will supply and festal a 
system offering hands-free 
operation, 50 number mesn- 


and time and charge displays 
• Coleman Milne, the M- 
estaMahed manufacturer of 
“stretched” traovsfees whose 
clients include the. royal 
household, hi going into ex- 
port markets. Its first success 
H a £250,000 order from 
Sweden. On September 25 it 
will open a £1 ™wi« extern 
non to its plant at Bolton, 
Lancs, which will increase 
annual production from 500 
to 800 limonsfees with most 


ory, two-day electronic locks - of the extra 300 going over-} 
to prevent unaut h orized use. seas. 


to check the folding mecha- 
nism and storage arrange- 
ments. 

Given those sort of con- 
ditions, it is not surprising 
that most of us who yearn for 
open air motoring when the 
sun shines settle for a saloon 
with a sliding sun roof panel 


Vital statistics 

Model: BMW 3251 Cabriolet 
Price: £16,495 

Engine: 2494c c six cylinder 
injected 

Performance: 0 to 60 mph 8A 
seconds, maximum speed 134 
mph 

Official consu mp tio n: Urban: 
22.6 mpg 56 mph, 44.1 mpg 
and 75 mph 34.4 mpg. 

Length: 14.2 feet 


maximum speed of 134 
mph — with the roof closed, of 
course — is only one mile an 
hour less. 

One bonus from all that 


extra weight is the car's im- 

_ _ proved nde on corrugated 

The BMW thankfully has one road surfeces such as the 
of the best hoods in the stretches of concrete which 
business. It is substantially 
constructed from three lay- 
ers — artificial fibres outside 
and cotton inside, sandwich- 
ing and vulcanized to a middle 
layer of rubber. It is in feet so 
rigid when erected that there is 
no obvious ballooning at 
speed Careful attention to 
overlap joints on the wind- 
screen and doors keeps wind 
noise down 

The ease with which you 
can erect and dismantle a 
hood ultimately governs the 
number of times you will use 
ft. The BMW is extremely 
quick and simple to use. Even 
allowing time for extra care 
with the plastic rear window, I 
erected it in three minutes and 
folded it away in four. With a 
moderately helpfiiJ passenger 
you could halve thatjime. . _ 


prove so troublesome on. 
motorways. 

Despite the extra noise from 
the hood, the BMW 3251 
convertible revels in fast 
motorway driving. It has been 
said many times but is worth 
repeating that the 2S litre 
BMW six-cylinder is one of 
the world's outstandingly 
smooth engines. It pours on 
the power with such lack of 
stress and noise that it feels 
like an engine of twice its size. 

I have to confess, however, 
that I would not pay an 
additional £4,000 over the 
price of a saloon for the 
dubious advantages of a Cab- 
riolet, however refined. That 
view is not shared by the ISO 
proud owners who have al- 
ready snapped-up this year’s 
UK. allocation. ..... 


CAR BUYERS? GUIDE 


MOTORS LEASING 


- JAGUAR ft DAIMLER AUTHORISED DEALERS 


De Riche 
Contracts Ltd 

CONTRACT HIRE & VEHICLE LEASING 


NATIONAL CONTRACT HERE— 
per noafh 


AUSTIN— ROVER 

Merc Cftjr £| KL51 
Maestro 13ML f 1 5X87 
Morocco 1600L £164.16 
Rover 2I65E £19194 
MG Morocco EH £27.51 

BMW 

51 Si 03130 
3l8i £27007 
520i £301.85 

CITROEN 

. BX (6 R5 £18135 
BX 19 RD £195.9* 
BXI6 RS Estate £201-24 
BXI9 RO Ewe £2ILK2 

FORD 

Escort 1300 User £169.46 
XK3) £191*4 
Siena L8L £195.94 
Orion irieettafl Gbit £22141 
Granada 1.8 GL £264.78 
RS Turbo £291.26 
Siena XR4x 4 O4U0 


RENAULT STL £127.10 
5TSE £169.46 
25GTS D75J7 
2SGTX £312.44 

SAAB 900 3* E48J89 
900 Mr £27537 
900 Turbo 5-dr £38L57 

GM VAUXHALL 

Ana UL £15X87 
Cavalier 1600L £174.76 
Orton UL £222.41 
CavritrSRi £23830 
Carton 2JJGL £24154 
c~..w» is r m .n 

VOLVO 740 GLCT7M7 
740 GL Estate £323.03 
740 GLT £375.98 
740 GLT Ewe 097.17 
VW/AUDI 

Polo C £!27JD 
Golf C £14X28 
Golf GTi £227.51 


Audi 90 CD £39.00 
Audi Qoatrc CoupC £397.17 

Omemtomthly psymmt for yomrmotorimg overheads 
Short farm co n tr a c t hire available 
3-6 month duration- 

telephone for details 

Tel: (0922) 614014 
or Telex 335069 

for full deuftc and a written quote oo toy Company Car 
MAINTENANCE PROGRAMME INCLUSIVE 


Be ahead of the pack.^^. 

Speak to the NEW and USED Jaguar Specialists. 

Davenport Vernon mlton keynes Teh mm imT 



JAGUAR ft DAIMLER 


HBRST PARK 

AITOMOBiLES PBESEIT 

1984(B) Jaguar XJS 3.6 Clbn .. 
n, Doe s>* nw. 


■ annum etc. 
a iflj95 


DM7 rnnatiD. 

19M (B) Jrcar Sovaev> ME 5 3 
Cbm MraDoe skn maw. M 
saap teR HH. 1 owner. 19.000 
iiries aflSy Iran new. uu H ti * 

uu a only tasa 

Td 01-MI 0440 

office tens 

SflULAR CARS WANT TO 

FOR CASH 


5 Star Treatment 

* We wil supply any make & model of 
new car or van throughout the UK 

* We can supply both the private buyer 
and the fleet user mth the 
best passible price 

* We will arrange any type of fhane* 

* Wear* JWCttifetaln 

contract hire & (earing , 

* We eon supply natienwide, to you nTIT prVT 

sacssMScr - oMihA^i 

(0773) 831 A2S end Just see whor we can de for you! 



ARE YOU LOOONG FOB THE 
QUKXEST. 

CHEAPEST. 

BUST. 

vur to mr Train caw 

CALL FBORM OO 
WE BRER THE VEHY BEST 
DB COUHTSWmi 
■MQNAiTE NKTKMMnDE 

DBJK«-3'ii K HAKES 

and moos 

oi-snan 

Not knports. tcs nw d crah 
brokara. Warranty A servicing 
earned out by your local dMter 


Autocaotracts Lbfl 

Contract Mr ej 
Leastag SpnaaTists. 

Perfar man ce ygHdee 

our ! 

MsMunance t 
'New for oar i 
PHONE NOW 
an 427 3235 


FORD 

CONTRACT 

MOTORING 


XR3I Naw modal 

ndar B4S* par i 

Pfaaaa ring tor 


ijAOUAK XH >A' re» Ormniwr 
-83. 2** .500 mm. CruHbmv 
Rnl/Btark uanoMery .mciUmI 
ranrouon C7 SOO. Tel. Day 
tune os Ml 0938 eves 
KnOCkhoH 0969 32778. 


01-441 7089 


REGISTRATION 

NUMBERS 


VTTQ (tamauM Fiesta £900 
ZUjO IdeaMne AraKner 
(0284] 710X12. 


ROLLS ROYCE ft BENTLEY AUTHORISED DEALERS 



All Warranted motor cars are offered exclusively by the authorised Rolls-Royce and Bentley dealers of Great Britain. 



Rjrthe finest used cars 
choose Mann Egerton. 


1984 Rofb-JRoyce SDver 
Spvit. Light Ocean BWEtek 
Bbc 22JS0 nAa: 143,950 

1986 (D) Bentley Mukame. 
lev ^kwn^Bdjc 1,100 nuke 
POA 

i£^vra| 1986 RoHs-Roycv SIhrer 
* VI Spirit. Deep Occxn Blue' 
jg J Magndto 43)00 mfc* £57,950 


J 198S Rolb-Royoe Silver 
Spirit, total bWBc^k 14,500 
ndcB £52^290 

1986 Bentley Mukaime. 
Brewster Given/Bdge: 9,700 
roAec £51,950 

I98S1 

Spirit. Rowli 
nalen 146,950 


1984 RoBs-Royoe JuNer 
Spirit. Forest Gtwn®dge 
22JOOO ndes; £45^00 


*8*. Georgian 
12^00 tides: 


I96S I 
Sdren'Lfefo 
£44,450 
1986 Bentley Turbo ‘B’. 
Ebooyitofc 750 irefet: £68,950 

1981 RoDriiojee Silver 
Spirit. Light Onttr orer Dark 
OwtenBdge: 26^64 mflen 
£32,950 

I960 RoOs-Royoe SDver 
Shadow IL Black with Bumatdv 
tooCBuigundr Bukertrc 2M86 
nrie& 124,950 

1976 BoSs-toyce Silver 
Shadow. Walnut over SOver 
Sand/Sage: 65,108 nates 
£13,950 



for further details please cootact us Monday Do Friday 
on 01-499 8342. 



HOOPER ft CO. 
(CflACMLDERSlLTD 

W SUra SWT. floyal Bta 
nth Magnolb nxd Dart Btae. 
Hooper oma*. nwrwal mAsapa. 
PDA 

« SUIER OTHt Bo yd «ub 
rah Paamenl pwed Out Btoe. 
Hwy abas. Bomaal.Brieaae. 

SST. U BBtUMW TCE CM- 
■CHE Ct^mrau, ke Gran. 
Gna hood. Oart Ginn, manpr. 
Ow Duran. F SJi 1&Q00 uries 


NOV. 78 sura VMUITH L 

Shah Grey. Dart Btan E write. 
Dart Hue hnamv. Dm ww. 
FS-H 7BJDD0 rales. Pita 
C1&5ML 

th iniMKnree sura 

asm H. Dart Hue over Star. 
Star Gray enran. tw» Duma. 

Mtay. Pita 




DEC. W raiav 8. taf* Gear- 
pan Star. Dart Bhte rarer. One 
0«W. F.5K Z2JM0 nrits Pita 

‘Hilt 

1 UNiniKV HOAD. 

[ IJ3NDON. NW 7SII 
•i utapj 


BMW AUTHORISED DEALERS 


(telvor Holmes s-— 

1 'mvmmimiamamMam 




MB sra ate 2 ora.2H»M> W. ra MO 

eeta nM itra Nra.A. DgWi * W 

SMCMSCAWteH^r^J 

MrMMltabWWi 111 


najK 


iMcMtMhpra 
i sputa, reraul 


05S2 576622 

r - c^nrarAx^ U**S>°*_ 


BJiW. 


so is* • 

MH/aurli iL 

ails, n pw e« 

ctmei. rtHMrftl K>C fc| n» 

rub. hrtdW* 1 
rrutw roniret. raruta 1 **! 

HD, NIK IWV. ■uftK’MMr 

»u» in** 

ovrt Cl 3.600 TrlOl W™ 

■aw raewa . h» 


»»* >^”***”5 SS 

jfw wt nre houru 

— , lW i inew imdrti Four 
mr . ”BSnwi man unmans- 

a** * 

»* A, , r S 

owl cejres OMO- 


BMW 3231 


4D0K 

Li 


Seta ISO. ABS. PAS MC*. 


m?c 


Lamp * W ConBilV. M Jach 
gssjjEaaia Ln B4J 


7wiiur J 


Stereo ID nriht Tlx. FSH Oriy 

axnota 

HMAraiATE C1MM 
Tat 01451 4709 


AVERSE MOTORS 
LTB 

M B 721 SE Mriate btae 

E9L995l 

S3 728 AUTO G0UC63B5. 
12 635 OSU Hem rad. 
tafter raonw. awrt 

niMfi 

01-390 6388 


BJH.ML saw lore V «n» Mur. 
bloH wii roo<. f locMm. quihly 
•Jarre. tflJOQO millK. FSH. OOr 
owner, want. C3730 TW. 
CaqrarMtor M52331 303900 


JZtl O ipm I 85. WH, PPM, Her 
window*. tunreoT. Alley 
wheen Prtiw me. £4.960. 
Tel: 01^61 0516 JfUkHra 


320 AUTO 1082 l\J Odd rert. 
MS. only 28. WO miles FSH. 
aev IfWNUXI £AJbBO. TH: 031 
440 3347 ern/whends 
310 1 IMS 4 door. 8«pwS.wm 
reel. Anne while. FSH. 
lOBOO nain brnnaniMr. 
C7.750 HIHhm 8 1211 S 


uts |P| ml vat wiADorar was 

Mil. B*v«F BMM. 1 owner 
30000 IWta. £1 SlSSO HenlSrt 
' of Saretany- Tri 0722 330301. 


& Roof. Barmp Sew All usual 
rcfinciMiMt- El 0000 TeL Ol- 
24843121 E30m 283 weehnys 


ROLLS ROYCE ft 
BENTLEY 


I — TYRES— 
EXHAUSTS 

Oil® 

0TCMISTMH 

Of-FTT 


CB.Vnt SPOUT 1985 v rep. Not- 
mep brown met. beeg e hide 

upne w ety. b e ig e rkgi root. 
30X00 rude* from new. 2 own- 
ers. tup Mrvkv MsWV. wtme 
wall tyres, cnairear drtiwn. 
new car forres sale. £52X00 
ono. Tel: Obi 881 0680 


1979. While with 
Wart interior- Extras - Canon 
stereo radw/camne. elec win- 
dow*. etr FSH 42X00 nriles. 
Mini comL C17.0OC Teh Ol- 
989 71M fweekenrts/eves). 


H. cardinal Red. 
While Vtren Roof. Red Leather 
Ini WUh white Puma. 2 Own- 
ers. FSH. 70000 MIT 
£16.750 Tel: 01-58&4122. 


73S Manual .1963. 

Burgundy /Pearl Lraihrr. Air 
Condu 30000 mile*. C9.BS 0 
TcL 0462 91449 or 41B280. 


BJH.W. WANTED 


■8lT.ll instani vanaikm « 
UonwKfe. call Jonsi Danes now 
on 0452 23456 m 


COLLECTORS CARS 


UR ROLLS ROTCC Suier 

Pawn. 4 U : Htrr IHM MBft net 
manual Iransmsuon. whole 
ear In superb condtnon. 
£19.760 Tel: 0798 43744 1 W 
Sunn) No dealers p lease 


E-TYPE MMIAR FWly 
printed V 12 . 48JK» 
probably the BM on the rbta 
Very new refer s around 
£16000 TH- am 841238- 


ROR CT VMt 1974. 

Bumper, immaniwie. ctfreen 
probably mebtaatta- 

able. OHen around £3X00. Tel 
i0494i 882913 


1AOUA R 8-TYP C HN S 1, 

FHC. red- lidh - restored, offers. 
01 878 BOM 

MOraSAN 4/4 2 Starr. hory. X 
reu, 14,000 mfiet only. CBjOOO 
ne ley 668069/52901 T 
MORRIS atraOR CotncfUbW. 

use. Cl. BOO 10798821 625. 


\rr. BMir nde. Extras, w/w 
tyre*. Under 4X00 
JEMdoa Tel: 0904 702872 


1979 ASTON MARTIN Vtaage 
DetnX 5340 b, red. 

1981 BftSTOL tam. 5900k. 

1948 HUEY RT2. 

1951 7WUMPH MAYROWBl 

1949 FORD PREFECT. 

F ROft JAG 340. 

1965 E TOE JAB. 

1987 DNMLER SOVEREIGN. 
HESKETH V 1 DOOO Motorcycle. 

FOR SALE BV AUCTUI 
m SBTtHBER 1906. 5PM. 

Fntirer fttris tom: 

LYM1 AND CO 


M MVnATKM 
TO A VQIY SPECIAL EVBtT 

Cbrtt Brothers ol FcfcrtKHwgb 
canhiNy anda id Ms-Royta 
BMMy red ksuy ar omwcs to 
mnd this spnra mptai u otl- 
Bdfta ttar egoBhaond re Rods- 
Royca red Bentley tatotuore H 
tog PMamvnigh ana. 

For ysor penanf mb8M 
Tttoptow Dkk Treasure 
m 01733) 81481 
- Gtsrte Triton 
Craft— Roto 


ABTOSAJLES LTV 
B 2 v sa.vst spstrr . 

28.000 (pitas, cream/hruam tada. 
ex Rolls Boyce. Fril Rota Royce 
senate hoary. 

CXL500L 

JOM BARKER. 

JIBTOSALES LTi, 
B8LYWHA, I WALES. 
0352 711838. 


I*W SHADOW Blue. Magnoda 
hide. 36X00 miles. Musi be 
newed to be amnciaiedi! 
C17.7SO TrC 07875 2314 


silver srenrr imz. iux» 
rain. iminaruMe. car Hwu. 
imcr rox. £36X00. thxtsk 
62886. 


Tri: (8778) 422888. 


MORSAM+ABivq- 11. 000 miles 
nut mown/ cnyaLhory brown 
riouhie durk heed and fcrten*. 
Brown V M. leather wUli ptpmg 
r.S.H Many extras 
iHrfutUnoanopaoe rach- nut 
prooflhB. baanri strap, one 
owner TetXSTS S4308 (Sur- 
rey) Price £12.960 o.n o 


RR MCTKO. All wtnu> special, 
inrf aranreef. tcnmitr sale. 3 
mills rid. Warranty- Radio 
alarm. 4 wrier radio. 

CS^eOWM. 01 636 0327 


w re®, an 
nirh. amine randilhm. 
C3.990 TO CbicnesKr 67Q2S9 


LOTUS • Einrant speaad. 
lOTS-Otymow Mur. 46X00 
mta. Brauwiii rontMUon. One 
owner C4.9S0. 061 4271477 
JAMAS C-TTK UMES 3. 
FHC. red. fully resume. Mien. 
OL H7T3 5048 . 


1S7I SHADOW 1 Smer/Blne. 
65X00 imlrs.. £9.900. Tel: 
0707 874 832. 


1953 B-TYPE 'BENTLEY 

Manual E7.995. 


REAITHL 
R8USMYCE 


ism ^ Gold, Mil. brawn 


not 

while piping. Managin' 
Omdors car. hnmaaibie 
anrttioiL 

£30,000. 

Tte|B322)91R21JUAYS) 
OT-tofTm (EVES) 


*73/75 both eunmino tow nMk- 
our example’s- From £23.950 
atao Bentley SI, 1956, LHD. 

£13.960. mmHar cart wanted 

for castu. John MRta. (06221 

861789b T 

M.VER SHADOW I960 I Prevl 
ou» owner. FSH. metanir 
brown, beige interior. w ce B e ri 

-condition. £16.996. Tel: 01- 

514 2815 Daytime 
ISM SR. VCR STRUT stiver with 
red leather. 26X00 miles. 1 
• owner, serviced al CTewe. FSH. 

outsundlno. VSV.960. Tel H 

0948 G74B. OH 0270 2S8806 T 

coNvnmRLC siupow . 70 . 

64X00 mto. Dark blue. Special 

numner. £25.900 retleets CO«V 

dttton. '09261 24680 ieie/w« 

LHD SHADOW D Burpundy. Tan 

Leather. Mara extras. £18JSOO. 

Tel.' LHD Centre Ol 488 1016 T 


ROUS ROYCE ft 
BENTLEY WANTED 


1950 DAMLBR, 
body, convatble. 
superb rebuto. — E73S8 


1948 ALLARD A 

convertible. 73:000 

[Tries. £8.450 

VORTmiG 
CARRIAGE CO 
TQL: 0903 38287 


DMO SmmOt Ham 1967 FWI 
30o Ferrari e wm xered Cabno- 
lei. Superrii' manual ned to 
fuwMd in Ferrari red. Perxjn- 
. ai piaie aidd. £11.930. WH1 Px 
ClTCriT or similar 228 7586 


RR3KCBCS BOO 230 SL. 196S. 
auto PAS- nanl & soft tops- 
MtdntaW Ww wiin cream tar- 
nor. good renmuon. la x an d 
MOT “■*** TS.-jS* 73 ’ 

723801 or 107731 771664 


HC UMfTED are wen- 
up to purr haw one or two low 
uileagr Hons Royce Shadow 
It’s. DHtanre no iwkl 
T el: 01 647 4475. 

XYUKTAR LRWTCD Urptaty 
Repurr An Models. Buyer Col- 
lects Any Are* Tel: oi 97T- 
4865. Weekends 0293^57192 
ALL MOBCLS Wanted tor casts. 
Aw rondUion. Travel any- 
where 106221 861789 anytime 


MGB6T 

197* 2L000 intas only. Z 
ownara. Back. Sunroof. Re- 
nfflrt*ta condbon. 
00ns n excess ol EUMB 

rating femes Ltd, 
ftustii lever Dealers 


(0703) 473773 


CAR ACCESSORIES ft 
SERVICES 


CAR CRAFT 


JENSBI MTHttEPTOR 

RESTORATIONS AND 

CONVBISIONS TO 

DROPHEAD 


24 hr Cellular 
O 836 229924 


WAKEY’S 



CAR SPARES AND REPAIRS 

JAGUARS OUR SPGCHUIY OTHER SPARES AVAILABLE 

PORTSMOUTH (0709) 830412 

W Ha— llnraedh 14 The l irtw. Nitara a l l 


CAR OF THE YEAR 

JagnrXSIc 
RwL automatic. 1963. 
genutoa iGLOOO mho. as 
nm, showroom condtoon. 
£l<450. 

Telepfene 
0492 515 400 


V12 E-TYPE 
ROADSTER 

6th produced. Regency 
red. 41,000 rnBes. recent 
profession^ chassis-tp 
res t or a t i on. £15^50. 
Teiephone evening 
038543033 


XJ6 4J 

1982 Black with beige 
hide. Auto. PAS, Air 
rood. 48.000 miles. 
Mnt condition. 

£5,995 

Tel: Bfrratadnm 
021 632 6/56 T 


Mtn i M Ut Ctabnolrt v ta. ieh 
monui DHL write. 16X00 naltas. 
Immaculate Otters orer 
£22.000. Tri. 0273 674651 


LHD XJS RS 1983. Met Mach 
£10.960. TH: Ol 485 1018 T 


1985/86. 
CtwwT of 45 whole ra» 9 ? 
O6.995-C19X00. Esl 19 years 
PX. Tel 01-664 9855 Essex m. 
84 XJS JL6 S speed , slhcr. red 
hide. PAS. FSH. alleys ric- 
£13.460 Tri Home 0948 6748 
Off 0270 258S0 Sl T 


V.W. AND AUDI 


LISTERS OF 
COVENTRY 


C AUDI 
WHO. 

c «n 

GwMe. 


so 


QUKTTK) 

.eiuai 

QUATTRO 

inni 


E JUBU COUPE QUATIBO Tonado 


C HflH BO TURBO DESEL Zannre 

Star OAB. 

D MU QUUTDO TURBO ZtomHt 
9hw PDA 

0203 56325 


KV QBAJTR8 
C08PE 

Tornado (tad, lor anrootfcitB 
ddway. £14.980 

REV 68LF fit 
C08VE8TIBLE 

Star Mnk «toi Btack 

Hmul Cm# ^nmreeVrrc 

noon. iBr araiwwtB 

E9J00 

M 

Ltt 

Harepshn's OuHtro 
Centre, SouthamptMT 

(0713) 885777 


detary. E9 

nig Brer Taylor A 

TestwMtiltofersI 


UBIHB BF 

STBATFH8 M HTH 

«M B MM HO CD SKOBN n Seta 
Skim sun re* i8»w JU& 

miWrMHTtlinnira 


IBM a W mure OL KOTO am 
son raN. 16000 whJaJ W . 


CBdttri Stow Strata 
TH 87M Z94477 


1984 B 

AUDI 90 QUATTRO 

4 rani drtw. in star 
netotic. hracd traiL Itad wBi 
ABS brakes, ndo cassette; 
2SjOOO nritas. 

£&995 

0438 354891. T 


SDLOW GARAGE 


c tin wo Jita Co aura Oca- 

•nc Btaa. AC. Odd MBttUK 
■6 D AUDI tob tbMri CC 4M> Tor- 
nado Rad. Shi Rori_ — tHW 
K C 4U0I HD CD Mb UMW 

dm nun 

Tri: 9142 315722 


Quanto TUMOi ItoS. WnUo 
red. only 8X00 mies. sotow 
■ware seats and intmor m grey 
leather, as RUed to short Quatro 
'worn, air rondHiotitno. stun 
nm car. £17.600. Tri 109061 
821269 


Aiarne CC Auto. 
Zlirmat smre. PAS. cW 
winds, factory if, c/tocfc. ws 
plied by us. C7.996. Barnaul 
Autos 675 53S3 /679 4466 
4 MOL AUDI 80 Ouattro saloon. 
22 Mre fl HebU tner lap- 
ptwro. alloys, r/tork. PAS. rim 
wmdv £7.996. Batluun Autos 
SW12 676 6365 /6TS 4466 

NCWeOLF STL 400 mile*. Met 
after, linu. P6 alloys, s/root, 
rompuirr rtr. rnurl. sale C8.7S0 
CMWUI O-SOOf. Tri (0765) 
868329 or OI 80S 2442. 

■C SBMZS VW Passat GL9 Aino. 
Mare reo. PAS. c/tock. rim 
winds, wrac k ed & serviced tv 
in. 06.996. 8anum AlllOS 
SW12 Tri 678 6365 /673 4*66 


Man 

uat. air ran. mine roniroL 
ABS. Cfl.9S0.TH 0468 SGX042 
or 261 100 

MCUunei Audi AiatMeCO Auto 
Mri Mark, alloys. H raift. Man 
Du demo. Cl 2.996. Baflum 
AIMS 678 6383 / 675 4466 
n C (MAY) Audi Asanle CC 8 
spa. PAS. m'deaia. taurnads 
red ra ws. Baihara Autos 
Audi Dlrs 6786503/ 6754466 
GOLF on COriV 1985 IBOOtT. 
VCC- 26X00 M. campagn 
model £6X90 Tel: 01794 
7913 /960 6985 

colt on or. cr. 3 «. s door 

models from stork, some at ore 
HirreBiie once 068? 872182 
,\"U dealer i. 

COHVHmBLC COLTS n*r 20 
new. unread, to Mark All mod 
eft 0982872182 A Vs dealer). 
* DOOH CTI 85 C. while. E/W. 
C/L. hradiamp wash. 1 owner 
TSH. C7.89B. 098136 467*. 
OOLF DTPS M dlutount. ritokr of 
colour & spmttrauon. awck de- 
Incn- 025126 4676. T 
HCW COLT CTPS 8 ComerllMra 
tor hnmeaiaie debs erv at d ft . 

count snrra. IOC oi 202 8596. 


PORSCHE OFFICIAL CENTRES 


HOWELLS MOTORS 

■ - x . ■ uwncD- 

NB BBS Bta M taHta. ESHASOL QH&Mi H/BadrJJOO 


M C WSu8ttR«d.»4rtD4l rerto. CflBrt. E5H. t«a.L9«l liaiajB5B 
K C 9U MtaL Buraunqr an. CH urn rata 4.a» mhflLiraraBH 
ISIIM Guwb (ta. nrt m iSR. Mv pom. ougolg 


NOW SHH.BtKkgn.ESH.CH.CAick.unO mb 

ISfflQ. C/tack. ESH. tta. < 
now nsEm. 4.600 tnhCI 


Cril 


Lan b b tm 5B3S3 
8222 781388 


7 TFTT 

I slew o r t h 


OFFICIAL PORSCHE 


MC Htt 1 WfSbaS nm <Mt 
orrVrin Wrtd W" Men* »5ie 
eta DUH 

t m TBMO Has dttn me mri 

tt'affls 

■ran. ares tuns com w wn 

pat Ha M M3B1 me . OUM 
■ e >11 CNKM mn CMMOIET 
hi m m gnn adt m tm 

id . 1861 

^CUt CMHBU rcHTTHHU bwri 
[id BUCK Hncri cM at 9 2K 

r BmcMKu Irani 

: -h* MU bhe HP at HUM 


l : 

1 

Tel: 01-5688700 1 
24 Hour [! 

01-560 ion 1 

; j 


911 CARRERA 

SPORT 84 B 

Btack/poische doth, 
warranty, FSH, 29K, 
pristine, pass PX. 

£22,758. 

0502 76234. 


PERFORMANCE CARS 


911 LUX 
rare p cure <° Gore Pin hmb 

ItaracaniDri l cmkm M ca 
6 dooe27JOO ran Hi Mtastoiy ft| 
MOT cMdtae Cllj 


PORSCHE 


PORSCHE 9118 
C/UtRBtA CABRIOLET 

1984. 28.000 ntal U 
history, bbrt Iwha. rents 
red. ronptaK sousd system. 


Ftonre 8 Wmrig 
TH: 

NITO AOWSORY S8WKES 
ON STONE «7B5) 118903 
OFFICE HOURS 


911 Turbo Ponte 

1982. Z7JJOO mltas. UgH Wue 
metric. Filly equpped vrth 
w conMnang, » rori. mb. 
WbN muiamd mth known 
history. 

KMM| lOffUllUM 

rentier SH911 
123,758 

TNt 8SS 228538 


TAROA. saver 
SpartmaUc 3. 1977. Law mlto- 
•p Black leather with electric 
Reranra seals, hranscuiate. Spe- 
cial No Plate nence price. 
£14X00. No deafer* or 
tlmewariere. 01 467 19481h>or 
Ol 691 694» BUS 


■use. Yreg. 1983 -spec. Guards 
red. full red leather ltd. Sport, 
pack- LSD. POM. 49.000 mb. 
£18.750. Tri 0575 642211 (HI 
0268 417222 (Wl. 


Ml SPOUTS TAROA Black, tm- 
maruute condition, remote 
atom. Trio so and system. P7V 
muse, full sports, spec. £13.760 
at no Tct 01-608-5084 


DM 86 Buck. P/A/5. E/S/R. 
W/W. P/D/M. Serticr hratary. 
£14800 02*3 863977 w/ends 
and after 6pm. 


*M Mayaa IB) white s«e/ rear 
skirts POM riee s / roor 25.000 
miles. £16X60 Tri. 0249 
817066 


DM Utn» Mark. Total race. 
Only 25.000 mtv As pew. 
£16.950. Tel: 0460 67286 


19*3 944 In. Prti-Ble male. Me- 
tallic arid MUM SCO. £10.760 
ono. Tri. 02302*979. 


*44 LUX t 86. I owner 6500 
miles. ESP. POM. While. 
£17.600. ByfleeL-09323 48167 


M4 TURBO Mriartr GraphUe. *■ 
the usual extras. "D" Rea- Cara 
abroad. Tel. 0B8*«21267 


POitSCISE SM LUX Guards red. 
1905. A re*, sunroof, radio/ 
rascriir stereo, rtertne wtn- 
dows. 26.000 mite*, lull wrvKe 
Ittuory. £12^*60. Tel Pa y 01- 
874 T511 X40. Cstanra 0737 
51612. Private Sale. 

•It TURBO. X re*. Guards Red. 
propbabty Ihe only one in the 
country with Whur leather tn- 
tenor. 34.000 mb. FSH. 
£50X00 oeto. Tri. 80S 0945 
(HI cr 265 2525 tBt. 

S25SZ, 86<B>. Prirol Blur metal. 
lir wtu, cream a. Blue leather 
Interior. Wide track. mamtaL 
26X00 mb. £25.000. Tri: 0376 
380432 tOL Ol 508 3566 M). 

1» LUX 1985. tmmandaie. 
alarm, s/roof, e/nnts. r/cm 
POM. FSH. £8.250 ono. Day 
02403 6886 eves 02406 5796. 

Ml TURBO U 79. stiver, beau- 
tiful rood. 49.000 mb. FSH. 
£16300. 108921 98736. 


PORSCHE M4 LUX FMsttad n 
w»«e »*a tiBBMig rarcot Eire 
mkhms fl Mhnors. Sunroof 

Gtnrara thrcunui. CMJB 

BMW 635 car AUTO Mhracits 
nth black toahei. Smoot. M 
and Eke randoms, c-todem 
TUX Wheeb & Tym.niJBS 

Nonnal Deafer 
Warranties. Service 
& Hnance. 

Tel: 01-747 1585 
Business Hrs Only 


TOYOTA MB. 1985. 10000 
mdns, red. ri usud rehre- 
pwnts. AIK. 

DAWLBI H MUUU PtAS 
HE. Y reg. rtr and. akdnc 
roof. HeoK sots, cruse an- 
ted. speed haU. »/■ 
iMritamps. alloys, on boanl 
arapunr. 1 «mer. tUfi. 

TEL 01-579 8372 T. 


MB HORIEfiO 

Turbo 85. Star, 15.000 
■MU. Loamy owned. 

BmriMktaB * NMHl 
M E639S 

VHctag Garages LU 
ftestli Rtver 
Dealer, SeoftmetMi 
(0733) 473773 


LOTUS TURBO Lsprll 16X00 
mi lev verv we hftlory. dr Condi- 
lion. Leather interior cotov 
coded sper. immarulaip bods- / 
mec names. Cl 1.760 Tri 0202 
740936 inaraev 0202 302421 
lOfltrrJ 


MOW CABRIOLET 
1984. Sifter, stereo radio cas- 
sette Higher than aieragr 
mileage hence £6.250 i04<») 
731886 Day 104051 813606 
eies/weekends. T 


JENSEN HEALEY ComerUM* N 
reg. immaculately maintained 
from new Low murage. 12 
months M O T Centime reason 
lor sale. £4X00. Tri : W. Mid- 
lands 1038*1 636082 


LOTUS EXCEL - Retaslerml 
l/B/Bd. 16.000 mNes. 1 owner. 
FSH. brunanilale. £1 1.996 (or 
otnek sale. Tri: Ol 9*0 5687 


MOHOAM 4/4. A reg. rAuflJ. Brit- 
ish raring green. Many extras. 
2 owners A 600 gen tune rats. 
£9.800. Tri: 061-924-3161. 


•, t 




ASTON MARTIN VB 1978. Fail 
history. Id clan condition, gdl 
at C9.960 WeyOridge 51 490 or 
Ol 486 6968. 


• «T4 August 1977 
S Reg. oWy 23X00 miles, guar- 
anlerd. mritdUr blue. Mack 
■Menor. wide wheeta. «r rondt- 
uonuig. immaculate condl non. 
£13X50 Tel: 0753 6S4341 
Day 06286 4944 E\e* 
KOUCAR JAGUAR Sports 3.8 H- 
ire Monaro Red. Mark leather 
interior, only 4.800 miles from 
new. personalised regtsrauon. 
lull weather eouransent. A scry 
prestigious last 'tody-toy. 
£9600. 037977 4256. 
FERRARI. 1084. 4001 Automat- 
ic. rear A/C. FSH. 22.000 
murs Metal Ur Mur. £20.950 
ono. TM: 0oB4S 3 * 06 esenlngs 
« w/ends. 

LOTUS ESPRIT TURBO 1984 Dl 
Sifter with Red leather A air 
(omUllomng. 1 ownercar in su- 
perb CMMUIon. £12X00. Tet 
051 661 1915 (TV. 

1572 JENSEN BITERCEPTOR 0 
nmstied In maroon. FSH. low 
imleage. rtlers over C2JS00 
John Hale 04264 6452 
MRZ 1988 9X00 Ms. Immaru- 
late. While. All Extras * Alarm. 
£8.996 OIU> (Ol Ol 258-3979 
rain 4421 ihi 01-882-0880 
OTUS ESPRIT TURBO 84 A 
Buck. ■? nM frather. wiry, 
FSH. £13.996. 01 878 5553. 
LOTUS ESPRIT TURBO 84 A 
Black. gold leather, wrty. 
FSH. £12.996. 01 878 5555. 
PORSCHE *24 TM* 1982 red. 
rare ear In Sunerb Condition. 
£8.995. Tri Ol 514 2816 Day 
iHomrhurefti 49167 Fie 
P CH OE 944 COUPE Guards 
red. January 84. superb roreu 
lion. £13.960. Notnngnam 
663236 or 663071. T 
BOS S (Nl. 1 owner. B reg. Full 
nisiory. sour Blue. air. roof. 
C25.995. Tel: 061 6353901 T. 


SAAB 


3j. 


SAAB DEALERS 
HAVE A NAME 
TO PROTECT 


mm 


APPROVED 
USED CARS 



The Saab “Safeguard* sign is 

ONLY APPLIED TO THE VERY BEST 
USED CARS. 

“Safeguard* is our Mechanical 
INSURANCE AWARDED TO USED 
CARS THAT PASS A SERIES OF 
RIGOROUS TESTS. 

At a Saab dealer, you receive 

THE PROFESSIONAL TOP FLIGHT 
SERVICE YOU'D EXPECT FROM THE 
ONLY CAR COMPANY IN THE JET 
AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY. OUR DEALERS 
DONT PUT THEIR NAME TO JUST ANY 
USED, CAR. THEY HAVE A REPUTATION 
TO PROTECT. 

• 

CONTACT YOUB LOCAL AUTHOUIStD SAAB DIALER 
through yellow Paces on pins in. ort IOS72* 217T77, 


t 


■ <■ 
f ‘. » 


908 TMRDD, Lair 84 mcdrl tath 
tirinreoalrr. fun Saobuort air 
How eh. FSH. immarutoh- ton- 
dHion Red with uit-inienor 
C6.7S0 Rhone 044 466 823. 


5MB 900. SU MLOOH. tnya. 
B- teg. While. 14X00 mft Su„. 
roof. wng. Web muntonM 
Co£W0 ono. TeL-Ol -9892690 * 

Coothrecd m page3l 




r; ; 


1 J* 











* K>^x 1 bifiuLiV J J170U 



BUSINESS 


IS THIS WHAT YOU 
WANT FROM A 
NEW BUSINESS? 


t FLEXIBLE INITIAL INVESTMENT 


• RAPID PAY-BACK WITH GROWTH POTENTIAL 


• TOTAL BUSINESS INDEPENDENCE 


• BIG COMPANY SUPPORT 


Tha‘swhatAIR*5efv»(affveyou.AaanAIR-serv(Jealef— nolatranchteee— you 
M have a guaranteed, protected lamtay. You can expand your buaness as last 
is you W5fi,piac>ng payair matfires on gat age foreccuj ns and coilacting a fBguJar 
rash income horn them. 


As demonstrated ftraughoul itm USA aM now in Bren, you and the garage 
profit by prowcfing a dependable arlne hUi enpenenca has proved. motorists 
are wiling lo pay for 

To find out more about a husnesswiOi real growth potensaJ. call Roger 
Grahinck ai AJR-serv Europe Limseij. _ __ 

Weybridge(0932) 57544/5 AIR?Sdlf 

EUROPEmans 

AlH-serv Europe Ltd.. 68 High Street. WeyOridge. Surrey KT13 8BL Tbc21687DrakfioG 



BASF’86 


Copies 0 / the intern report (first half-year 1966) are available 
from 


Morgan Grenfea S Co. Lid- 
23 Great Winchester Street 
London EC2P-2AX 


BASF AkbengeseRschaft 
D-S700 Ludmgshafen 


S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 
33 King Wittam Sheet 
London EC4R 9AS 



WE ARE A YOUNG COMPANY 

Successfully operating n Die provinces and West London. 
We seek hard working partners to jom us m our expansion 
throughout the Urctad Kingdom, investment from £21.000. 

Write Alan Webb, 

Banaman, 4 Bourdon Street, London W1. 

01-493 3487 


COMPLETE TELEX SYSTEM - 

£899 + VAT 

PORTEX ts a portawe/desk top telex system com- 
plete with full sized keyboard and printer ready few 
use. Call us for details: 

OWLBOND LTD 
01-582 6060 


AS SEEN ON TV 

CELLULAR MOBILE PHONES 

Car Phones from E699 

Probably me best buys In me UK with me best technical backup 
I mm e dia te defivery 
T el ephone Ipmrtch 0473 221615 
Telephone Norwich 0603 616221 

LONDON CAR PHONE COMPANY 


BUSINESS FOR SALE 


JERSEY 

Popular 70 
seater, leasehold 
restaurant for sale 
in SL Aubin. 2 
flats included in 
price. £80,000 for 
limited company. 

Phone: 

Mr. Skelley 
0534 42100 



Rt0y to BOX F16 


OLD ESTABLISHED 



bom NEC (Wea 
rwH nwnses 2 My workshop. 3 
bay warehouse min offices at- 
tached free sttndnfl area subfile 
n operate 15 vehicles. 20 haters 
Reason lor sale rebremenL Apply 
m fast nsUnce to 

OL AstaB 

Chartered Acsomtaol 
Phono 0675 81287 


COSTA 
DEL SOL 

bar for sale. The 
Royal Scot. Marbella. 
Central beach site. 

best location in 
marina, fully fitted, 
excellent business, 
high return on 
investment. 
Offers oner £105,000. 
Tel: Marbella 
010 34 52 820145. 


DRIVER 

TRAINING 

CENTRE 

Heavy goods, fork lift 
truck, car. and 
management training. 
Turnover £200.000 per 
annum, location South 
England. 

Reply to BOX J 19. 


BEACH 

COMPLEX 

5 shoos otos ciMera. Tatonre 
£100000 Iasi summer. Frew 

£ 1*000 mdbdmg teteewa «- 

teres! coveting one Of Cornwall t 
tearing (KJCKs. 

Everett Mem Fm*y 

(6872) 785W 


COMSULTM6 CMSMIZN wnlH-t 
to dmow of hr* 'Oh* projwwtor 
vt,. P »mrt* nr ha* own up 
MwrrKMuuv surma mr mm 16 

*rar-. lo o turrrfil jnHUJl Iw 

inranu* m i irw £2S0«» Thr 
buunrM tu* reeuLtr (wninO 1 
m> trom Onmnwii 
□nuronmi & loch .Xumaniiw 
loortnrr ■*«" pn» jw eli 

ml* Rrpiv «» BOX JOS 
KUCHTTUL MHH CLASS bon 
Hour mr *ule * omne 

OnuirK- riuUNi lor *JW> 0004 

Ixjunevi lawn in LtHnwr. 
Snilhrm IrHilMI. tAatXXJ H* 
alt- 10 BOX HOT 


TWO 

EXPERIENCED 

personable Edinburgh 
travel agents for 
purchase together 
with business t/o 
c£7OO,O0O ( 1 986) and 
own premises. 

Replv to 
BOX J2I. 


BUSINESS FOR SALE 

H you want ro buy a busi- 
ness venture Capital Report 
provides 500 specific oppor- 
tunities each year. For free 
sample and UM details: 
VCR, 

20 Baldwin Street, 
Bristol 1 

Tel: 0272 272250 


RETAIL TYRE BUSINESS 
FOR SALE (YORKSHIRE) 

E> ah run over Elm turnover. 
Grass praM £250000+ Very lu- 
crative Business Audited 
accounts avadabie Owner retir- 
ing Price £300.000 to rotate 
premises. Iialures a fittings 
SAV. 

Reply to BOX Ffl 


MARKET TOWN 

Much loved, wefl established 
Shop requves suitable new 
owner, lively, rvgh quatey 
stock of desiywr and clas- 
sic woollen goods. Much 
goodwdL Lease. MM E30.000 
plus S.A.V. 

Details BOX J15 


TRAVEL 

BUSINESS 

Commissii'fled 180.000 plus 
exclusive ana. ABTA held. 
I AT A uhuuuhtc. Capable 

expansion 

Run Mombv lo Fnda> only 
torn lo IZXkwn 
0222 494251 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SMALL 

HOTEL 

OPPORTUNITY 

Highly experienced 
couple required to 
manage and operate 
25 room hotel in 
Norfolk with 
restaurant and bars. 
Prefer introduction of 

some working capital 
in exchange for equity 
- but not essential. 

Might consider 
renting to operator. 
All ideas considered. 
Reply to BOX J26. 


NEW ELECTRONIC SAFE. 

I raw" Btodud (junrTH-* fw 
IMIHldr IWI [Wllm 

jpKiinlm will isirn * 0 ". on 
idcxm pure Tri Ol «V| .5747 

■iLn i Ol W) 1 WJ ■« *•* 
FANTASTIC MOBILE r.ir **j*h 
■nq innr LnIMIvv qWr 
r,r(iinqv lnv«'*ll*U“nt C4 OOO 
London anvi a Homr CounlH-* 
Phone. Ol SOS rex? wnvtiww* 
INVESTMENT OPFOB T UWn T 
CSO.OOO.md/or iu" k iji'IiH io 
Uiuih n ivvo nr*. prodiKis im 
nFdMi'-iv in ■•uiMr.nnl wilh-K 
hkf* mum*, rci. 01 w isw 
SCOTTISH COMPANY offm 
dOAK-rMup* IS SO) slort in 
, minimi Inii+i+liiio orwluri* 
lor Olliri-* Mr Trlrphom- DOTS 
5ta» 

PfHJPERTT OCVELOF«NT. Br 

in] crim'd A 'im-td "Th'- prop- 
erti Oftrlowwitl Rpuov.-. 
Camundv i(C/J' l*™' 


SUPERIOR 

PACKAGE 

A4 FULL COLOUR. 

PROMOTIONAL LEAFLETS 


INTERESTED? 

Fora SUPERIOR DEAL 
contact JANE to send derails 
and our price guide an 

022570431! 



WEST COUNTRY CABINET null- 
m Wp an 1 a firm of 
jotrmVCaMnel mafurrs work- 
ura IQ eunmoiHlIy Non 
lOMinu who imp iparc ca 
oariiy. looliini lor interesting 
and ctuUencunq worn. Proven 
mrord tor 25 yean. ReflaMNO’. 
Inhowve dem raoaMHles* 
One off IdKtiens A specMMy. 
Roabshcaity priced Prior UiUl 
Dewpn. WoodBury. Exeter 
(03951 52257. 

A TT OtnUM TAILORS Cenulive 
Hams tweed al £2 90 per yard 
del i* vied. For samMes phone 
10961811 531. 

CAN TELEPHONES - Best nuM 
Immnuitr IreaaOailon. From 
£M9. Tel : Ol 794 8882 


% 


Waltons & Morse 


Waltons & Morse are 
pleased to announce that 
they have formed an In- 
solvency Department to 
handle liquidations, 
receiverships and all other 
work in the insolvency 
field. The department will 
be managed by Mr. 
Cormac Smith who has 
joined the partnership 
with effect from the 
1st August 1986. 


Wiltons A Hone. 
P la n t a t io n Home, 

31/36 Pendnreh Street. 
London, EC3H 3NN. 


Telephone: 01 623 4265 
Telex: 884208 WALTON G 
Pan 01 626 4163 


OUTSTANDING BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITY- — 


By January 1987, AUTOSHEEN will be valeting 32£00 
vehicles per annum. And its owner-operators will be 
earning up lo £24,000 per annum. 

25 additional operators are now-required tor the most 
remnfing opportunity currently avaitabta 
The AUTDSHBEN car relating operation is totally mobile. 
We provide jaw vehicle, generator, chemicaJs, 
promotional back-up, training efc, enabling you to make 
an immedteto start. Operate in your own area in this 
proven, successful operati on . 

■ Total package £9.950 + VAT. Tefc 0604B817M 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


We are a company 
trading in the advertis- 
ing and marketing field 
and we require an in- 
vestor who would be 
int e rested in being ac- 
tive in achieving our 
goal. Initially our mar- 
ket is East wales and 
the SW of England. 
This is a genuine 
opportunity to be in at 
the beginning of this 
unique new venture. 
Prospectus available 
to interested parties. 
Only genuine/sincere 
persons need to write. 

Reply to: 
BOX H83. 


s 

REQUIRED 

Oclansorb soaks afl petro- 
leum and petroleum based 
fluids on contact whether on 
land or water. Wa, the sole 
UK dstnbutor wish to ap- 
point dealers throughout the 
UK and Ireland to market 
this inque product. 
Succesful dealers wri re- 
quire total cawtal outlay of 
£5.000. For hither informa- 
tion contact 

Walker Air 
Cenditroniag 
Limited 


Glasgow 041 8870551 
udfe Vaughan 
Slough 0753 35447 


MARKETING AGENTS' 
-REQUIRED NOW 
EARN EXTRA £‘s 
& FREE AJB FLIGHTS 


lor vouselt, your sooal dub, 
ctuch. charity or company. 
No capdri outlay, quality 
entertamnentw product. 
Conwns s an orty. Oniy laghty 
motvaced people who are 
members ol groups or 
corporanons need apply. 



Place W18 1PP. 




OPPORTUNITY 

We seek ifcsMiutors tfraughoai 
me UK to maita our range d 
hufth and beady products. 
Successful aopbeams aril need 
avaiatfe KL850 tor hMhiI stock 
purchase E*DecM eamrgs n 
ilw first year cfSOiJOG. 

Ann durng odee hows Erieoi on 
021 6*37149 tv *«ma ri 
MareO Health 
& Beauty Limited, 

Warwick Cumbers, 



Legally quafihed. seeks 
new commissions. Pifl CV 
available. Bristol based. 

0272 738667 


THE USED TOOL EkCHANOE 

Collwl lort> wiin nrokrti -OM 
m iuikuv, ana rvtvanw mem 
lut loots nrtMrtd wnh our 
iibtvgLiv. handk-. Hamrnm. 
jin wadr* Of Pmrn! ns 

lotrv-rs mrlum- Hiilrth RaiL 

mb &»». ujm Otinnfy 
Boards MurwuMilm. conlrar- 
lor-, and similar urw lool iiwn; 
Noi a Iranrmw. nnimr HTrt- 
I Oil . mi-a-iil attpunls IWidM 

mrr All imliai aallav iLlOO 
C2S0> DMmlial C50OCL0O0 
)mh urv4 qnvA pram anordmq 
lomtotl Pnoiw 07,357 «5Z Inf 

- (lulh-i ml™ nul Km 

W EEK E N D MONEY. Earn ElOO 
rM H urrkma supnlvinq run- 
i|iq w. Ifleran pradurt 
mr.illv No rat . lra> Hhm ran- 
Havana or ranUri rnund Our 
ad> hiM you manv hHjn two! it 

plionr rnouiCH-s fuH MIMKHT 

q»vn y«1 SAE now- 
Trlrrom Onlrv. Drpl. TMie. 
2 U ftasllr Boufmard. 

Pvottnamjm 

Toshiba cnsnuniTar tv- 

uuitrs iKsiirrs and MnK> u 
handJr laM mm indckMilMIlr dr 
huimlilinv adirrtmiM. imnal 
prrdiKt Uaxunq CAnfart Mar 
Millan Damn Control Ltd. Bank 
U SrolMiKl Cnambrn. SO 
Honnoun sa Bainnaip EM 08 
4LL Trt Q5Qo 632830 


DISCOTHEQUE AND RESTAURANT 
FOR SALE 

Freehold licenced dncodniUE with separate restaurant & bar. 

All year trading. Single storey budding with hnniy 
accammodauoiL Sea view. Built approx "> yean ago. Parking 
for 100 carv T/0 £173.000. Asking price £25a00a 

For ddails ring (0983) 740844 lde rf Wight 


PROMOTIONAL UMBRELLAS 


Eyecatching Golf Umbrellas 
printed and personalised with 
your Company name and logo. 

Come rain or shine your 
Company message will be there 
for all to see. 

Further details:- 

KENDREW LTD 
021 778 3260 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MAKE MONEY 




Find out ail about it, 
one day intensive rab- 
bit husbandry course. 
Sunday October 5th. 
£40 including lunch. 
Prospectus available. 
Hylyme Rabbits Ltd, 
Statham, Lymm, 
Cheshire, WA13 9BU. 

Tefc 0925 754010 


YES YOU CAN! 

A busi ness y ou can run easily 
from home, with untended 
potential, regular repeal or- 
dere, high profit margins, 
positive cash flow, mnmri 
overheads, no Sock reqwe- 
menis. no 'sailing' 
necessary, and Mr £100 per 
day Isom- (NOT steremig/ 
health). For full debb senda 
M sae Id The Marketing DL 
roan. Scorptan House. Htgb 
Street, Tucvey. Bedlord 
MK43 808- 


LOANS & 




2 M : LH 


Available for 
commercial properties. 

hotels, licenced 
premises, businesses 
etc, also building, 
development and 
protect finance. 

Call 

0803 25479/25470 
(24hr answer fdwoe) 


sxntmcNCED antque mh 

imu imntniM dmiimt. Reply 
to BOX COS 


BUILDING SUPPLIES & 
SERVICES 


ALL BULMNS SUMIU Dr 

vqn i liuiM orronMr prajrct 
irkuunnnml. 1062841 72846. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


***»W**W***W**W 

* CASH * 
5 FLOW 5 

J ROBLEMS? * 

* * 

* Surplus/redHndant? * 

* Phone * 

J Peter Jones J 

* on * 

* 061 4807497 * 


COMPANY 

PROBLEMS 

Are creddore hounding you? 
Are suppliers Insisting on 
proforma or CVMP 
Are baiiffs about lo levy the 
stock? 

Are the baids insisting you 
sign more personal 
guarantees? 

It the answer s yes to any of 
these questions you noed our 
Iwip. if tie cannot help you 
saw your company we can ad- 
vise you on liquidation. 
Contact us today. 

Ron Water ft Associates, 


Warwick, CV35 9DFL 
(0789) 841292 
or (0905) 776617 


01-500 2 500 

Inpreve yon bKteess 

Increase your cash 

flow 

Hire Bis maker 
Phone for detaBs 

01-500 2 580 



Fully serviced, 
recep/tetex/tetephone/ 
word processor/ 
photocopying 

Call K.M.S. on 
01-409 0829 


WE WILL CUT YOUR 


AND YOUR COSTS 

Confitientiti document 
shredding. Collection ser- 
vice. Certificates issued. 
Lowest rams. 

Tel: (0480) 73491 



YOUR OWN BUSINESS "J 


How to manage a consultant 



By Rodney Hobson 

When you arc ill. ihe doctor's bedside 
manner can be half the treatment. When 
your company is ill. ihe altitude of the 
business doctor is even more imponanL 

Often, if your company is in trouble 
but you wani io keep going, you will have 
to accept outside advice. Management 
consultants — “business doctors" .in 
Amcricancse - will be summoned by the 
institution that has put up the rapidly 
dwindling cash. 

Jf you have no option but to allow 
experts into your business, you should at 
least know what they should be doing 
and how they should set about iL. One 
such American who has operated in 
Britain for 25 years is Bruce Barren, a 
merchant banker who heads EMCO 
Financial. The consultant, he says, 
should be trying to work himself out of a 
job. not bring increasing numbers of 
people in. 

Mr Barren's most important piece of 
advice is to agree definite fixed fees and 
not to pay by the hour. As he puls it, “If 1 
miscalculate my fee. 1 have to work that 
much harder to gel oul" 

Paying by the. hour tends to end up 
with your paying for more hours than 
you expect The fixed fee would depend 
bn the amount of work to be done and 
how many staff need to be brought in. Mr 
Barren has charged as little as £2,000 for 
a 30-day period but a complex rescue 
could cost £20.000 to £30.000 a month. 

- While he is in your business, insist on 

You will probably view 
him with suspicion 

the consultant's providing a report every 
30 days,, assessing objectives and what 
has been accomplished. 

Check at the start whether your doctor 
works for a direct competitor. If he does, 
he should tell you — and the competitor 

- and, only if’everyone agrees, work for 
you. 

You will almost certainly view the 
consultant with suspicion the day he 
arrives. One way he can overcome this is 


BRIEFING 


■ A study of the importance of local 
networks to the development of small 
firms is being sponsored by Barclays 
Bank and English Estates, with the 
backing of the Department of 
Employment The study. Helping Small 
Firms Set Up And Grow: Creating A 
Supportive Local Environment will look at 
the role of local authorities, central 
government and local enterprise agencies 
and the local financial and business ' 
communities in helping small firms 
develop from start-up to self- 
sufficiency. Existing networks will be 
studied in Bradford, Ipswich, 

Lancaster, Newbury, Nottingham, 
Middlesbrough ana Southampton to 
find out how they can best meet the 
needs of expanding businesses. 

• Contact Roger Quince, Segal 
Quince Wicksieed, Cambridge; phone 
(0223)323735. 





Brace Barren: All you need to know about the business doctor 


to avoid berating you for qast mistakes, 
identifying them only io eliminate them 
in the -future. Mr Barren comments: 
“People are unwilling to admit they arc 
wrong, so there is no point m dwelling on 
that. Don't chastise somebody for past 
mistakes. What happened has gone: you 
should ask where do you go from here." 

Though he is American. Mr Barren 
thinks British experts are generally best 
to help solve problems in a British 
company because of their knowledge of 
how the UK operates. But you need not 
worry that the financial expert will fail to 
understand your business. Certainly he 
should stick io the financial side that he 
knows best and leave the technology io 
you. the person familiar with iL 

However. Mr Barren reckons that 70 
per cent of businesses are the same in 
that “they all have to have plans, 
organization, motivation, control 
mechanisms and management systems." 

The key ,for the consultant is not to pul 
himself on a pedestal. “We don't know 
everything." said Mr Barren, “and 
because of that we must work together 

■ Among smaB-busirwss owner- 
managers, at least three-quarters have 
had some management training and of 
those, 77 per cent found it weU 
worthwhile. This was discovered by a 
Confederation of British Industry smaller 
firms survey, which concluded that a 
key problem was gettma those in small 
business to give it a try in the first 
place. 

When they did, they not only came 
back for more training but sent their 
managers for courses, said the 
survey. Surprisingly, 82 per cent of smaH 
business heads are able to make time 
available for training, according to the 
survey. 

To explore the ramifications further, 
the CBI is setting up a workshop on 
management framing in small 
businesses. 

Copies of the survey cost £5 from CBI 
Publications. Centre Point, 103 New 
Oxford Street, London WC1A 1DU. 


with you. tapping your areas r 
specialization.” 

The business doctor should identir p 
the kev people already in your com pat- 
who can pull you round. Mr Barra 
suggest that British companies coui 
learn from Americans in providing mo* 
rewards for those who get results. 

He says: “US companies build re wars 
into contracts - dollar-rdaied rathe 
than perks. O ur philosophy is to giv.* 

The cure he effects must 
be one that is lasting 

them the dollar and let them spend it 
how they want." 

The consultant must make sure that 
the cure he effects is lasting, and that is 
done by nurturing staff. Mr Barren says: $ 
“If I motivate you as an individual to 
take over my job. you will make that 
much more effort. I'm. leaving and you're 
the heir-apparent. 1 am not there to take 
your job. I am there to enhance your 
position.'* 


MR FRIDAY 






“As I see it, the idea is that 1 pay you a 
lot of money to tell people I'm not 
incompetent** 



■ AUTHORISED DEALER ■ 


SPECIAL 

•DEALS 


■ AVAILABLE - - 
TOGETHER WITH 
FIRST CLASS 
SERVICE AND 
SUPPORT. , 

HUGE RANGE 
- ; INSTOCK.,' - 

CALL TODAY! 


GREYHOUNDS 

Is raring them your 
hobby? Are you a suc- 
cessful salesperson 
based in the South of 
England with your own 
car? Need money and 
witiing to work for it? 
Top commission rate 
paid to sell high profile 
quality product within 
the Greyhound raring 
world. Regular leads 
supplied from national 
advertising. 

Telephone 
Mike Doyle 


DISTRIBUTORS 
A AGENTS 

mix KNOWN Djntali nunuf ol 
mqn qualify W»»r and rower 
ooltsti products swta import rr/ 
dntriDuior m England, starfcne 
Pomh CO A/S. NYHrmcl 96. 
DK 2820 GmnHf. Dcnnurh- 
OWEMEHCU) SALESMAN 25+ 
lo mi air woes and inn w. own 
transport Salary /romrrrtsMati 
ncvouM*. OH63* 2721. 

OFFICE EQUIPMENT 
& FURNISHERS 



41-42 DOVB? ST 
LONDON W1 
TBL 01-408 1516 


FIRE: 

Expert advice to 
protect your 
business. Call 
RCF Limited 
0322 77455. 


P IB Nir Oi CAW VS and swllctirt 
IBM Omlrnrur* rPMe from E7 
abo Apnnx and BBC. Two way 
parallel iwllrliqs Iroro CSS. 
TcHeMtonr 0788 B220I6. 

JUfacdT XT* KMb Sin RAM 
TO * VAT Phonr Ol S89 
1874. 




Not focurtag 



and counter jmefana 
equpment for both the 
amateur a professional. 
Ring or write for pnee M$L 
RUBY ELECTRONICS 
ELECTRONICS LTD 
716. Laa Bridge Rd 
London E10 »W 
01-658 4228 


& irairmra lot drtah c4l 
BniHiwt h'n ifflOli JOeH 
U» VISA MATTERS E S OraWra 
mlwiw 17 BuiMrodrSl Lon- 
don Wl Ol 4*6 08ts 


HP7475 

type 6 Pen Platers £895 ex 
VAT. 

SiBcoaChto Computers, 
Weymouth 0305 
787592. 

MUUTTSOFT 

Accounting Software £150 
per module. 

SiScon CHp Computers, 
Weymouth 0304 
787592. 


CANON LASER teNTUI*. 

Lam A I C17J&*VAT. L STO- 
AT csrsnB+VAT. Years 
WflxTjnlv RfeL 0908 641776. 
NEW APRICOTS. 4 Epson*. FT. 
FlO FL XlA Xcn. Cwnwtdisr 
pnrii 1 j-r warranlv. tins 
BuMim* IMU Ol 349 2161. 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 


INVESTMENT 

PROPERTY(S) 

Yiektmg 9% net currently. 
Excellent covenant 6 unite 
Mly let Prime location. 
Excellent amenities. AH wnh 
20 year leases with 5 year 
rengwrts. FuUyrepanng. 
Must be seen. Phoiogranirs 
& plans available. 

Reply fo BOX J17 


e OUWTUT HOUSE, modrtulwd. 
rximUrd Mral lor retonUMnaf 
Conuunv HudOIlKF StfuaiMI 
in Ttutrtum. Btruiur*. Drtaus 
DtiMK* Cook & Company uaie 
AortiV.108351 6B222 or 48684. 
DEVELOPMENT SITE for HY. 
homr unnrovernmi A oardm 
rntlrr. for wK* Apprt«3«Trt 
04 MmIUiMK arrj Olfm in- 
HIM Rrply W BOX CM. 
KMCHTSHWCE l»l floor 
of 3 room- hwm 4TS uilim 
pmod nundmih Short Mar 
with v'jnipWr MnlmB Hr ale 
For arum applv Ol 236 37***> 
LUXURIOUS luliv nYXlrnl of 
lir<-> m LIa>-fair irnmMtutrty 
njilahlran nMIvlumDi' ar- 
ranqrmrrn. wHh nen 1 pwNf 
jnmiulv Trf; Ol 403 2322 


0604 770601 today 
or 0604 31764 
during office boars 


STORAGE 

AMD 

DISTRIBUTION 

Weal centre in Mid-Wales. 

10,000 sq ft modern 
warehouse with foridift fa- 
cilities. racking and 
computerised stock con- 
trol- Fleet at 15 vehicles. 
Large or smafl faofities 
offered to manWacturers/- 
whotesalers at keen rates. 

B&D Transport, 
Mocbdre tad Est, 
Newtown, Powys, 
SY16 4LF. 

Tel: 0686 27845. 


SALES 

PEOPLE 

Commission only ba- 
sis. Leads provided. 
Huge cash commis- 
sion. You can earn at 
least £SOO per week 
only sales people who 
can dose deals and 
sell cellular phones 
need apply. 

Tefc 0473 222231 




Raouired for Met g aH WblBd go 
ahead business as so catm An ar- 
eas Hfcgti commission. Eaeflem 
back-pp WnJe. 


JUST DESKS 

fowl and TcprahKiKMC 
FMoul desks. RarincndnLi. 
Wriima laWn. Dovcnpom 
and Desk chain 
Wrier for drtaBi ■ r 
IHra al fallen Wdearae 
“J TO DrdO^Dja UM 
It Orarch Shwfc I m*m NW« 

Tdepbme: 01-723 7976 1 


FAX UPDATE 

Portable Honda fax 
machines £900. Lim- 
ited quantities available 
now. Please phone 
Fax International 

Teh (0243) 860662 


PROMOTION, 
PUBLICITY A 
MARKETING 


PRUrrED *TTW YOU8 MESSflGC | 


tan- Pancii-K«v Tags- Clocfn 
L H *»M» ■ Hi — ■ Tnnfci 
IWu-OMBHanra-Dak Smut 
tWm of 44—tB W s 6 rrant— f 


HOTELS A UCENSED 
PREMISES 

STEAKHOUSE 

Kent/Sussex, town 
centre. 21 year lease, 70 
seater restaurant + 
cocktail bar. To 
£130,000 pa. + rent 
income £11,000 pa.. 2 
bed flat, private car park 
& 4 garages. 

Quick sale £95.000 
Ring (0892) 863137 


DERBYSHIRE 

BALES 

A 171b Conwy readme in Heart 
ol uRm bemn Aswawne and 
Bakorw. now a country muse ho- 
ld wft est carafe. Denis: 

John Sandman and Co., 
RoSaod Square. 


Derbyshire, DE4 1BZ. 


S7IW CCNTUNY FHEOKKISE. 0 

brnroorn hoM and rataurant . 
HI in bHuMul Suw> tyjumry- ■ 
udp our Br*qmon and 
Wortiilng. 4 acre* of land. Free- 
hold for sal* in mr radon or 
£S4&000. Rooty lo BOX ESI. I 


WHOLESALERS 


ATTEimm 
MAUFACTUSB3S 
CUM YOOB REJECT 
STOCK 

We irjrofty rww acten ol 9sr 
m Jnv ram SuliOIr to Stam t> 
Asuof matoti Santues mo deads ro 

B.W. Salvage Canpaay 
67 Rambnlge Streak 
Totten. 

SHhtepl SM 40T 
T* (1713) K8SM | 


BUSINESS FOR SALE 

DENTAL 

PRACTICE 

AUSTRALIA 

Busy Central Dry Denial 
Practice (or sale n Penh. 
Wesiem Australia. 

Apply n wrung tor datads 

S S CfMWRMD 
IN floor 
Ttaktens Hotel 
PeiTHtBM 
WESIHW AUSTRALIA 


CONTRACTS 
A TENDERS 


CREWE AND NANTWICH 
BOROUGH COUNCIL 

DAY TO DAY HOUSING 
MAINTENANCE WORK 

Applications are fnvKed from suitable compa- 
nies wishing to be included on a select list of 
tenderers for the Council's day to day hous- 
ing maintenance work. The Council has 


DISTRIBUTORS 
& AGENTS 


HO QUALITY Italian SUk IH-t 
and lamriufooi van n Wp arp 
srpfcrmj mil (Oiiwdrf 
dtMnJMjHx*. lor our l4loM rmw 
ruruv rnilarl BOX C5B. 


' f e te r at i oe et Cr am 
a Coonom, 

14 C It Hawkirc Terra 
Pnrtsreeete PS1 7SR. 


WE HAVE JUST launchMi prana 
lily tfw most DnHiam and 
mnlinq com -pi In promobom 
hm wn m in? lk. for iw in 
rvUilinOi dMrtbuuon. and d»- 
n«i uk Wf wtm to anwiM 
our Arra Siln AtniL wno 
mini ho an osporkiKotf vrtf rw 
iiuM praan of otnsundina 
aMiir. Thn imponani poMtion 
ol(m a tory hiyli commnaioB 
narsaqr wmnvsnauid cuir m- 
ford OO.OW hW annum. Full 
raroor Mak id' Ian Firman 
i Sales Managori .TV Trairi 
Clwnuo vournor Company. 16. 
PniMOi Cnurl. WomMoy. MM 
rtkwox H \9 7JJ. Trtophono Ol- 
200 4710 lanvopcn nncludinp 
sunkny. 


toil M-tircV «njhm 9 and 
iumIMIp rirarmilr waremnuv 
Main -unlaUr lor UxJuury and 
aqrimlluri- r«»uir« Hitwita- 
inmal and LK aqnib. HrWKl lo . 
BOS * 06 . ■ 

SCOTLAND Do \i>u MM rrpro. 
vnianon in sronand The 
i ompaiiv i uarlrd B now run 
nirw ihrtl I now hair Him 
HHiVMlnlim.Oai 887 0609. 


Ask lor Colour Caohguot 
01-446 8411 l aa hrm 7337) 
Telex: 28732 BwcpEM g 
F ax 01 -445 3347 

WpiHwd UwlonlaiW 


DO YOU TRY TO BE 
COST EFFECTIVE 

Ui >uu «»h li* get )D«r 
iuriw 

im >nur cikmikts desk 
run itai 
ih:*i mp 
For £l..1ii 

If iiiar answer is YES 
Tel: Barry Bowman 
Ill-f04 1 1642 


CHRISTMAS Ctrr OFFER UMO 

40.000 nnm suiionrry Uiv 
Pnnl vr KU RRP U> 99 13 kwi 
S5s, Trf 0772 632S1U Trlev 
677021 SOLO & 


STORAGE A 
WAREHOUSE 


ROEBHATTDMAL 


Qi-r-5 *(*u 9 nn« >n 

iLioeSil rtifiln* tetan V SCOm 
pan m re Mtr jnc liwom mu arc 
r iaa«- flouneh ol 
Mt:m kj i uoft t> 300* ucn 
d* « 0Ke , 't>» 86 

Tct are HSt tnan 
He 79851 Bit 
|-12MF2-tet 


of maintenance work is currently in the order 
of £2 million. The Contract will commence in 
April 1987 and continue until March 1988. 
Applicants must provide two technical refer- 
ees who are able to confirm their successful 
experience in this type of work, a copy of 
their latest audited accounts, an outline of 
their company and employees and the name 
and address of their bankers. 

Applications should be sent to: 

M W Houfston BA (Hons) MRTPI, 
Director of Technical Services, 
Wellington House, Detainers Street, 
Crewe CW1 2LG 

to arrive not later than 19th September 1986. 
For any further information or technical que- 
ries ring Mr M Forbes, Principal Quantity 
Surveyor, Crewe 583191, extension 552. 


NOTICE 

TO 

READERS 

Raders are advised to seek professional 
advice before entering into any form of 
agreement or pairing with any money. 
When replying to box numbers 
ao not enclose original documentation 
and mark the box number cfotriv on 
the top right hand corner of ‘ the 
envelope and return it w. 

THE BOX NUMBER 
DEPARTMENT 
P C BOX 484 
VIRSINA STREET 




DON El 9DD 
































































'»■! ^ r s p-v* u* >*■ I M l K U44 Ull IU It 111 { K 1 1 U III Iftl )f HI ] | \ 


31 





|" KtveniMintaJ 

<an be KccpKd by 

jwpubiicarioBfies.ooTOjS^ 

■any for Wedae*™?**^ 

SL,*«>»«3Sid2SS 

S^wpraWawiSS 

gfessr 

by tetephooe on 01 - 4 ai 410 a. 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5.1986 . 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MiXM PECK I bMn ^ 
raiif hump OeUMp. 


THE MULtmx SCLEBDSM 

KVwf’hM ^'S.^5* 11 - Lonaon 

”"»■ WM a «4mt cot ten Inn 

"25nin u" cjoTo* iSSSI 

Witt area on I6(h m~- ino* 

SjamwiSra^SS: 

KrtMn was c 1 . 37 a.E 6 in 

SanlSKST W J 11h *be DM 
rp^uuitom as lam down Dv toe 
9 1 ' , °f Lonoon PMcr an 
% Udllo r l » Ort titrate hu been 
Mrimnlteo to Ihc Cojnnttssinnrr 
<* Polio, lor im OtoXiSSto 
•wra 

ihf Aged to 
wo nor TENS' matMttcB lot 
ibr irtin or ran uTcorSmonl 
HLr arthritic £*> bSTarli 
mtojv Donattons Dteaw Lo Sr 
' KTOunl Tonvpjndv- Cftair- 
man. NB Ta.36. npw Brood SL. 
London EC2M 1NH. 

ball m aw or 

«ck nuMnn. in quo qnKLotis 
prwnce of hrh The DuctS 
*2!" c "£ r your 

Home, ^member lornf'ES 

asi *» 


FOR SALE 


“"MaWIKItiHFroMdoor 
Ppruros. in naiurai CtowiM 
p™*c. Woma make mu. teaturv 
mffJgR 6 avtetbte. TO 

bMETsrn«nrcvoiT.(UL 

SiWjihi Exn. cure, Ln% 
Ihraw* and sport*. 

TM: 6Sl 6616/828 OIQft. 

.Aar / \t»7otnr£ 

***** UttrthHerti 2oom / 
RjOunton ENargcmrat copfei* 
btWW M TRADE 
PRICES 01 -STB 6LS7T 

W» 10Mb Slat SAM 

»w * vat pnonr « sea 

C4T5. CHESS, Ln MO. All nr 
birr and soon. to 439 1765. 
ad mai o r credit m s. 
WPgS/rWIIIM. GdMums. 
«c Can you nuy mraorr? B ft 
8 lid Ol 229 1947/8068. 
KAMO, Lovely sraaD UDrWiL la 
flaw rand. Timed Sg Cte 

arrange del I very. 01 manias 

YORK FLA6ST0«E1 for hOosA 

ffimonr&s 


"SjjM .Ww to near (rora Au 
ihw» if vou have written a 
book tore dnenn iwnifi iinn 
Wrjt 10 . Dept: TM 1 T/I 6 The 
BOOK GUILD LTD. 25 Utah 
Siren. Lewes. Sussex BM7 ajj 

LtWD CUJLEM Of AshbOUfite 
sen- much regrets um hr wax 
onahte to Mend toe funeral of 
Mr RoiuM Alin. 

MAY toe stu-rMHrart of Jests be 
prahed. adored. Worthed and 
freed ihroughow (hr world 
no w an d forever. Amen. 

GRATEFUL thanks 10 St. Jude 


SERVICES 


BREAKAWAY. London's club for 
nratesMMuf unaitatthrcf people 
Z}450\8 200 events month* 
ly. 24 hr Info lave. 997 7994. 


curriculum vtioe __ 

Details: 01-631 3388. 

PERSONAL storage- units nrar 
Ccnlral London To let. 01-979 
809 7. 

FIHDIMMP. Love or Marriage. 
AU ages, areas. DaleUnr. Dent 
1016 1 25 Abingdon Road. Lon- 
don W8. Tel: 01-938 toil. 


FOR SALE 


DMMB TABLE AID CHARS. A 

la&utous solid mahogany hand 
waxed twin pedestal 
rfmma/boardroam table with a 
«ei of maamnernt matching ma- 
hogany Chtnpendaie style 
chairs, thirty carved. The table. 
CIIOO. will III up to lO very 
comfortably when lulty extend- 
ed. There are a Me Cham at 
LI 80 each and 2 carver chain 
at £220 each. A sgiemud 
chance lo acwMre dining room 
furniture at a fraction of todays 
price. WLU sett veperately. Tel 
Ol 736 7037. Kendal Oakley A 
Partners. 


FUR COAT Fun length Russian 
dyed femme VGC. Valued at 
£2.500. accept £1.000. 0386 
6521 


ANTIQUE OAK Dining/Snooker 
Tabte6‘x3 > . £900onoTd;Ql- 
550-5385 Even mgs 


prmUte and Sheraton' 
dining fwntture made to order. 
Over 50 dining rubles always 
avaHabte for immediaie detiv- 
rev NetUebed. near Henley on 
Thames '0*911 nuns. 
BouninnOuUl <02021 293EBO. 
Topfilwm. Devon 1039287) 
7445. Berkeley, ctoe ((MBS) 
810952 

A FULL MZE SNOOKER Tables ft 
um-ttonn to.br I ncluded I n the 
vale of contents ol MMrBitatof 
Club' cmd Street. Brutal an 
Thursday 1 1th September at 12 
man. viewing Wedn e sd a y VOth 
September i-Bp m an d day of 
vate. TetJ 0272 737201. 

FINEST ouatiiy wool carpets. At 
trade prices and under, also 
aiadabte lOffs eadra. Laipe 
room size remnants under tun 
normal price. Chancery CarpcB 
Ol 406 0453. 


RESIST* 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 

Wool mn Bertas front £335 per 


sq yd 4 VAT & many other grad 
reductions. 

ZB7 nwmmk m. 
Kaapcfead SW6 
Tel: 01-794 0139 

Me 


ANTIQUES A 
COLLECT 


ABLES 


KOYAL BOULTON Toby jugs. 
FJpurmes, aniniats. euv. want- 
ed- Ol 885 0024 


animals a birds 


— Lighthearted of 

AMerboume has an t mitai . 
red grandson. Tw Ascot 


ENGLISH SFfOHQER SMNEU 

Uv er A White, ready now. £70.1 

Te»0983) 62980. Iste a* wMilI 

■HOD EW AH WpG CT A CK K Safe 

with rhUdren/good guards. Eke 

prdfgrpe Tel: rD4S4) 843655R 


CLUBS 


RBWC. London School of 
Bridge and Ctub. 38 Kings i mu 
SW3. 01-589 7201. 


HOME A GARDEN 


tSTH CENTURY timbered prana* 
nr. ReJocate your she as, home, 
mlaurant. etc. DfSS 2516 


FLATSHARE 


o/r. share c/h flat with gdn. 
N/5. nr naUon. £200 pan. * 
bills. Tel: Ol 726 2711 Days 
223 B309 eves. 


SW7 smau teU-conained beddL 
own shone, etoce Gtoucester 
Rd. lube. £266 pern. Teh 01 
373 1915 


LUXURIOUS FLAT MuaHd Cttte 
to Ladbroke crave lube. Own 
bedroom, sitting room, shore 
bath and kitchen, non smoker. 
£68P.W. inci. Tel Ol 5886464 
lEsoen 2419). oi 969 3048 
Kill 

TONSLEYS SWU Prof F. lo 
share 2 bed house. Key access 
to west End and CUy. rzoo 
p.c.m. excl. Tel 01 225 5125 
f Unlit 6 pntl Or 874 3912 
tw/endsi. 

HNmUTEi Attractive s/c fM. 
Dot bed. Itvtno raom. K ft B. 
CH. garden. Suitable couple or 
sintfe lady. £90 pw. Tel: Ol- 
34 8-275 4 or 01-7940739. 
WANTED - Dorset born graduate, 
post world trio, now medic 
needs arrom. wdi imnoung 
people In North London. Con- 
tact : Jonathon 0747 2749 
C N M B lWCK i prof person, n/t. 23- 
33. share flat. o/r. Ch. £160 
pem excl. Tel 01-994 2798 (af- 
ter 7.00 pm. or w/endsl 
FLATMATES Selective Sharing. 
Well esub tntroOuctory service. 
Ptse let for appb 01-589 6491. 
313 Brampton Rood. SW3 
BUN 6TO H Comfortable room, 
week day M. £40 pw excL 
phone, suits Prof mature per- 
son. m 01 Z2b 4233 eves, 
m. M/F. O/R. Beaut Lux 
F urns Flat- PaUo/Cdn. £76 pw 
EXCL Tel: 01-731-7766 to) Ol- 
7356667 ihl 

TOOTING: 3 mins lone. Lux hue. 
o/r. prof. L n/s prefertd. £36 
pw ead. TMXU -3668306 CO) 
or 416-0575 (eve si 
WANDSWUMTH Prof Female, 
early 2 C\ own raom m oolet 
hostse. noo/xznqtter. fUSOjcn 
eXCl- 01-870 2896. 
BATTERSEA: 2 prof m/f 10 mpre 
bouse. O/r-S. £J6Q/£110 pem 
excl. Tet 01-3800866.- - - 
LAP COM OvcHooUng. ctvUtttd 
n/s prof epic tocare jor immac 
(Ml filOOpw. 223 4287 bT. 8pm 
KENSBKTON 2nd girt share om. 
o/r. AH (aaUltes. £36 p.w. 
exclus. TeLOl 370 5860 

NR BAKIN STREET: Ream fa' 
(ML suit young prat. n/a. £65 
pw fnd. Tel 01-979 1696 . 

WS * Second person to share 
flat. Own room. £50 p/w hack 
TO : Ol 686 1368 tevwi . 

I LO AN S . AYE Young prof F «> 
share tolly turn, tuuny 2 bedna 
Hal £125 pw : 01-589-8628 
PW1A Prof f. n/s. o/r. cottage, 
c/h. 5 nm tube. £140 pem 
rad. TO 01-874 5696 (eves) 
SWG F to share brand new Lux 
tut o/r. Nr Tube £50 p.w. Day ' 
01 940 5432 Eve 366 4637. 1 
SWA Easy going Udy person for 
newly Ore house. £4565 pw 
exc. Tff-Ol 386 1663 
URGENTLY REQUBIED flalshare 
Prof female. N/S. 23. TO: 0962 
69882 

WJKEMSDIGTON Prof M/F. 209. 
o/r. to share fM- £60 p.w.ind.- 
Tet Ol 386 2401 ieves>). 

Wl Prof F to share lux Oak O/r. 
£196 p-e.rr. rxclus. Teh Ol- 
388-4608 alirr 7 pm 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


We cant 
care for the 
victims of 
cancer unless 
you da 

ttw can h«4> us u nenlMe 
fear and despair wiih rate) and 
dandy tor so many, bf making 
a Icjpcy. covenma or domuxm. 

Please conocf us for details 
of payment ngupwnm: 

The Notwnal Sodefy for Cancer 

WrW Bnnm MB. Anchor Hmag. 

15-19 Brawn SC. London SW33TY. 
Trig phone: m -351 781L 


Macmillan fund 

Ort^terfl «ipr w» us i4 tw in W»Cax f fa** 1 
RrcatomCL' 


^ How near 
(V) we are to 
^ the cure... 
..depends on you. 


RENTALS . 


BOUNCY NEAR WBfDMNt ■ Pert 
«d form house. 4 bedrosms. s 
renpx. fabutom littod kwnen 
with ran m A me ric a n BUB. 
patio and ran room, bam A nice 
garden. UMurnMwd but with 
lovely new curtains and car 
pete, ou CH. £400 pw. find of 
rales oniyi. company let. Tet : 
06286 4038 


chelsea KnroMrtmMe. eewra- 

via. . Pimlico, westramoor- 
Luxury hgooes and Date avail- 

able tor long or. tbort tets. 
Please mg for cormt tea. 

Oootes. 69 Bucktogham PPtece 
HO. SW1 01-828 8251. 


Belgravia Rats ft houses re 

omr-d for American Comoantec 

from £200£2D00pw. High Oi 

tore properUcB also acnlUMe 

now. Burara Estate Agents 

561-5136. 


SWISS COTTAGE NWS. Easy ac« 
ecu id west DM and Oty. Uoar 
lo mops. Inkmus spw level 
furnished (laL B e droom, wing 
room, dliifflg ban. di, gas. rier- 
trtclty. colour tv. all Included ul 
£125 pw. Ol 431 3121 (Tk 


LANDLOR DS /OWNERS, tf you 
have a guattty properly to ki 
leu us about H. We offer a pro- 
fesaonai a reuaote service. 
Qu rabbi Coratantbie 01-344 
7353 


■AHNBt max Setf coatotaed 
flat lovely rerenuoa avortook- 
tng finer. Kuaien. batbnu. x 
dMe. l sew bedim. CH. Col TV. 
ctr. Co teL £125 pw. 878 7766- 


HAMPBTEAB: New taxmy house 

avtiabte now. 2 brd r oona . gar- 

den. sail couNo Ox holiday let 
or busumman on 3 mounts lo 

one year vWL Company tel 

pretend. £170 pw. Tel Oz-488 

7443 1 weekdays am) or 01-7 

0972 iw/enos) 


lux iWlmw. up to CSOOpw. 

Usual ms reo. pnintps Kay * 

Lewis. South of the Parte. Chet- 

on mure. 01-552 Bill 

Norm of toe Park. Regent'S 

Park Office. 01-686 9882. 
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 
Luxury h unla t i e d house off 
Montague Square. Wl. 3 Beds. 
2 Recent. KM ft 2 Baths. Gas CH 
ft CHW. AH amen toes. 
£350ow. 3-3 months let. Tel: 
01-629 6103 m. 

PARUMEHT MLL FIELDS / 
Hlsfwsaw. Modern Gun By boose 
m outet attractive mews. Loo 
LKMt area. 4 beds, master toe 
shower ns. patio gdn. garage. 
£820 pern TO: 01-639 1742 Or 
0046 413310 

RAYSWATER Charming 5 Bedrm 

House, nr Perk ft transport. 

Large ten*. spacious 

KDciH-n /Dining Rn onto paved 

garden. £200 pw ncg. Tet Ol* 

229-7997 or 0763-21083 

raw ra t: walk. hr. Magnff s 
bed ffai with River views. Wt ft 
porter. Epbctous drawing ran ft 
dining rm. fge mod WL 3 baihs. 
Avan now up to 6 nubs £ 1^00 
pw. Ring MaskeOs 681 2216 
OSiDOM SW1 Recently 

modernised 3 bedroom QaL Re- 
reptMn. kitchen. 2 bafltrooms. 
From October 1st. £200 P-w. 
Tel: 01 834 0431 or North wood 
2S963 

MH Attractive and. nrwty deco* 
rated furnished 4 bed bouse. 3 
bath, double recep. dining 
room, study, cloak, kitchen. *» 
machines. CH-Co let £460 pw. 
01 838 0040. 

W4 large c ha nntnp 4 bed r oom 
house. l aiMMrapfd garden and 
pa Ho. Interior design ed to a 
very hkto standanL AU ameoi- 
Ues. £500 P.w. Go Let 
prefnred. Tet 01 741 8710 


£186 pw. Spbctora unnac. 
Font fM. GCH. Lounge. Sega- 
rate- diner. 3 beds. Low 
outgoings- Rfag 286 8040 OL 
CRH LI A Good area, lovely outer 
ftdiy eaiUpped-OM to mod Mock. 
1 rec. 1 bed. kitchen A both. 
CH. £188 pw CO Let TeL 01- 
351-4KS? : No Agents 


mafeonme. attract, garden*. 2 
<XMe bests, aafeony. garage. efO- 
dent security system, company 
teL £300pw. Tet « 402 0328 
■LACKMCATH S/c OP S beds. Jr 
ft b. CH. nr Maae HH1 StsLMit 
t/sees vtouors or 2 girls. £376 
pem net. OI 868 0219. 

SELF UNTAMED Gdn ON. PUR 
nwpte. £76 pw an tncL Expresp 
Rentals 01-883 6467 
SOUTH LONDON. 2 bed tote*. 
Uds/pets Okay. £90 pw. Rental 
CuSde 01-686 7676 
12 Superb Bat in gdn sq. Obi bed. 
balb. toe rer. imed ul £130 pw 
rot Oo let Tet 0723 27144. 
ME LET FLATS AND HO WE*. 

Contact Rirhazd or Mick. Davta 

Wooffe'A Ob 403 7381. 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


RENTALS 


KAWSTEAD NR HEATH. Luxu- 
ry fun 

lounge. «mta9 ***. 
kffenen fujfy ew dppetL 
£299nw Ol 7P4 2789. 


OVERSEAS. TRAVEL 


HENRY A SAMES Contort wnow 
oei Oi 236 8861 for l*te best so 
tecuon of fianMted RW and 
bouses to retu to XMghtsnrldgr. 
Chelsea and KenMngwn 05 


WMHIMBOL FuRy eoMPtted 
flaL 1 dWe bedrm. i agtebedm. 
2 bam. KHrhen /diner. Large L 
sltltog room, terrace. 

£300 per week. Ol 58 


SUMRKNt FLATS G HOUSES 

avaH. a read, tor diptomatt. 
executives. Long A snort let* 
an areas, bpinend A CJL4&. 

Albemarte SI Wl. Ol -499 6334 


Wt KM MOUSE tong teL 2 
bed. 2 reernv lux khfh. bath, 
rtkem. nrHvde Bark £326pw 
excl. TO 01 -725 7696109 CT Ol 
402 6836 teves) 


HOLMANS. Quality properties 
avattebte and required in prime 
residential area*. TeL 01-370 
6781. 


Ewturdtety fw- 

lustted 2 bedroom fM In 
presage Mock close t o an es mxd- 
lies. £126 pw. 946 7333 


P IMLIC O smau f a 
tube and shots. £96 per week. 
TO Ol 208 3203 


Uv e. s/c flat . 2 rooms. K A 8. Nr 
shops A lube. Suit angle tody. 
£78 pw. 348 7006 or 794 0739 
PIMLICO SW1 BNMtdid tolly 
modernised i bed flat wtm se* 
chided patio. £160 nw. Day 247 
9461 ext 410. Eves 821 9104. 
Mi THEY lux modern 2 bed fun* 
flaL well maintained mock, out 
et attractive road, under cover 
narking, £150 nw. 789 8217. 
SW1 Uni our collage. 2 bed*. 2 
baths, nm. kHcben. aH ma- 
chines. patio. CD tel £300 pw. 
Ol 828 004a 
ILiLrO—PANY . 
erttes m best — — 

CA8BAN A GASELEE lusffid 
tea required). Ol S89 6481. 
M14. Scrtuded garden studio 
soitabte writer £ 80 pw. niao 
targe room £ 60 pw both end. 
26yrs + TUI JDty. 0468 60372. 
W14 BARONE COURT A Setec- 
ticm of charming may tom i 
Brdaptsin mod complex From 
£138pw Inc. 01-676 1896 TO. 
RMBLEDON VILLAGE. 2 flats to 
let. 1 bedroom A 2 bed r oom, 
dose aU ammmtks and tea lion. 
£490 pan. 01-946 1953. 
iACAMMRCl WMT ML Flats nr 
UMveraity A Brit Miweum. TO 
Helen Watson A Co. 680 6275. 

■ED s/c studio fM. £75 pw 
Uld. rales. Express Rentals OX- 
885 5467 

RLE BEDSIT Has T.V. Handy 
tube. £46 pw met. rales Express 
Reo tats 01-883 6457 
DOCKLAND! Flats and houses to 
let (itnwstootd toe DorkUmOs 
area. TeLOl-488 4862 
CUVIRAM nm - studio na. 
Own bathroom. £220pon. Id : 
01 228 9666 after 6txn- 

’Sc^Jt'TS^itea'rer. bam. 
klt/dtawr. CH. loo gw. 
£lSCBw. TO: Ol 866 2583. 

•OtNNJE BEDSIT fomWwo. avail 
now. £45 pw. Inc rales. Rental 
Guide 01-666 7S76 
UAMPITEAR VKJJMC. Earn 
Uve 1 bed s/c flat. Co let praf. 
JU80PW. Teh 794 3277 eves. 
LUXURY 1 bedroom fM. newly 
d ecorated in toe heart of PunU- 
CO. £180 pw. Ol 627 1926. 
MANIA VALE SPartaus 1 bedrm 
rtBL GCH. Lounge. MH/Dumg. 
ballt. £500 pan : 01-2860021 
MAYFAIR/ HYDE PARK. Most 
taxurfous fong/toarr lets 1/6 
bed* best prides 935 9612 (U. 
NORTH LOMMM 2 bed name, 
klds/pett OJC. £130 PW tod. 
Express Rentals 01-883 6457 


SHORT LETS 


PALACE PROPERTIES 

: We ban a upart setaGdon ol pv- 
suoliy mspecod famished and 
inbiMbed prawtin in raMjr ft* 
RtsidBntBl (fauicts, cangtag Iron 
[ £150 pw to E2JDOO pw. 
SHORT, 

MANY Hi 

AVAILABLE 

Tel: 01-480 8020 


RT7L0NQ LETS 
HOLIDAY FLATS 



W’irt 850 vckadisis. 
dociorsuul 

v icchnicunsinmir 

mvn LbniJtortes. ovw 'W-To of 
Mur ihituunn of kpur)’ 

dnvvilv mmurv-h. 

Vuilhi.no. HovUX 
Kimii rUmrohMiaiKicW*. 
I.h^.piG'CAVK. _ 

Jim era 

SENDFORYOUR 
FREE CHRISTMAS 
CARD CATALOGUE 
m. Hgni I'i.PO.Bra 4S, 
Bmbm ipi InWiUW* 31X2** 
kfcrJkHkr iffSC .WbW 



'Sbowmeyoa 
can card 

says Horry Secombe 

‘As one cf the 1 ,000,000 

tJabeiics in the UK, I am 


OiaheKs has m) knowi cute 
andean cause rarlMe^ dama^L 
flrtSi'Scnd yow Jmmm 
littixrh’tomc. 

8rHarQ‘Sttn&k\ 

PmdcnC 



BRITISH 
OlABETTCASSOOAnON 

TO Queen Amw Stiwt London 



WANTED 

Superior 


for 


short Co 


01-458 3680 or 
0836 592824 
anytime (T). 


LONG/SHORT LET 

properties from 
£100 S3, 000 pw. 
Personal Service. 

01458 3680 or 
0836-592824 
anytime (T). 


SWEBY COWAN 


CUnQN PIME WL OeerapM- 

stsaass sss 

2 DaMms. fi oi am ifl W. reap 
vtfi ige tottofly. W tot Qi H 6 
nnOB M f350 P- 
PtEC m C00RT.WC1. Mot be 
Srtflf Super ? beMi apartMH ei 
nm pozzs dRaBRiNN WP Brush 
Hasan) Me betfetn edb m sale 

Piatasstsm 

ill al £270 p» 

01-631 5313 


In 

. ON T.V. 24 hr Sw. 

Telex. Cofftogham Apartmrnt*. 
01-373 

LUXURY SPWCEP FLATS. 

central London from £326 pw. 
Ring Town Hse Apts 373 3455 


HOT TURKEY. HDcnd a week rtN 
taxing at ovr private Orach 
hotel, then a week criming on 
our yaffil (Or £420. tor to. 
H/B. tree w/eporis. other cem- 
binaUons pus. Ol 326 1005. 


.... oh nwm/iwts 
to Europe. U5A A most desima- 
ucn*. Dtotonuf Travel: 01-730 
2201 ABTA 1ATA ATOL. 


1ST A CLUB CLASS FLKHTHc 

Hogg Discounts. SunworM 
Travel. (03727) 36097 

/371 09/27838. 


CHEAP FU8UTS Europe World- 
wide. Gill-Edge Travtt: ABTA 
oi-sae BOSSJOng Angte 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


01 401 
1111 Traveiwue. AMa woL 


MO ROC CO BOUND. Regent 6L 

wi oi ?34 earn abta. 


SPAM. Portugal Owapesi fates. 
8M»m. Ol 735 8191 A70L. 


5WHI JI .H 1 AHDartte du tedniNtte 
01 724 2388 ABTA ATOL 


GENERAL 


_. . w/ 

Benz Travel. TO 01 368 6414. 


CHEAP FUGHTB warfdwMr. 
Haytnarkei 01-930 1366. 


DISCOUNT FARES WortdwMn 
01-434 0734 Jupiter Travel. 


U.T.C. open SBL 0753 857055. 


LOW COST FANES to U5A. MB- 
Mr TratfL OI 485 9237. IATA. 


vita A cottage on the West 
Cta« of Barbados. AdtyPta " ‘ 
Have vacancies Septembr 
October. Mtoknun rouu too. 

airfare for 2 persons apt. .. 

£1 .500. For brochure A person- 

al attention can Hazel Sw 

Office 021 253 1200 Home w/c 

021 454 0912 

ccntional value tate-se' 
offer. Departures MBI available 

on Tubs 30 Saw. 7.14 ft 21 Oct. 

fldly tod. Gat wick day molds. 7 

nights H/B to 3/4 star Hotels. 

airport lax A entrance I 

AIM TAORMINA from £171 

same dates. ISLAND SUN 01 

222-7462 AHTA/ATOt- 1907. 

AIRFARE SKCULVIB Sydney 

o/w £420 fin £760. Auckland 

o/w £420 rtn £770. Jotiurg 

o/w £506 rtn £499. Los Ange- 

Ic* o/w £216 tin £406- London 
FHgbl Centre 01-570 6332. 
ONE Call tor some or toe best 

deate in fURite. apartments, ho- 

tel* and cur Mrs, Tel London Ol 
6505000. Manchester 061 B32 

2000. Air Travel Advisory 

Low cost 

flights c.g. Rio £486. Luna 
£495 rtn. Also Small Group 
Holiday JaumeysJeg Peru 
Iroca £360) JLA 01-747-3108 
LOW FANES WNMUWn 
USA. S. America. Mid and Far 
East, s Africa. Trayvate, 48 
Margaret Street. Wl. Ol 880 
2928 (Visa Accepted) 

LOW FAMES TO America. Au* 
traita a New Zeeland. TO: oi 
930 2696. norms Travel 36 
wnnehaD. London, swi. 

ABTA 3485X. 

ALL US an a . Lowest tores on 
maior sched ule d carriers, la 
return Sem/Oct £539. 01-684 
7371 .ABTA 
MSCOUnrrs ist/Cconomy oefe- 
eis. Try u* Ian. flight- 
BOOKERS 01-387 9100. 

Acteas/Vtsa accepted. 


/are s on dweter /ach ed u led Ots. 

1 Fltglu 
AM 1893. 


HOLIDAY FLATS 

& houses avaDabto. 
£200 - S3J000 pw. 
PareonaJ Sendee. 

01-458 3680 or 
0836-592824 
anytime (I). 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


BARGAIN FLIGHTS 

Sydney £415 £755 

Auckland W15 £745 

JcfBuJg £306 £499 

Bangkok £209 £355 

Cairo £135 £210 

Now York £139 £285 

Lob Angeta £216 E345 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
tingle fetufl 
Jmng/Har OT £490 

Nmb £275 £390 

can m 

£36B 

£250 £350 

£220 £350 

£420 

Ataa 
II 



FLIGHT SAVERS 

ALICANTE £109 MALAGA £100 

ATHENS £149 PAWS £73 

CRETE £148 IflflflCH £79 

FHAMUHT £71 NAPLES £129 

BWO £119 «E 1119 

GEItVA £99 PALMA SW 

HAMBURG £75 MEAN £118 

ROME £134 VENHA £129 

MADRD £99 ZURCH £99 

WINGSPAN 
01-405 7082/8042 
ABTA 


LOWEST FARES 
Pam £58 N YORK 1275 

FtanUet E60 UVSF 

y>v* 


£320 


E33S 
r«o 

PeifBont £335 Rangoon Eras 
Haag Song ESTO CNWto IMS 


J6D«g £460 Bangkok 


SUN ft SAND 




HEW LOW FARES 

WOBLOWK 

AMMAN E2S0 JEDOAH £390 
BOMBAY £325 KAHMH £270 
CARO £220 KUWAIT 1345 
DAMASCUS K70 UGCS OT 

Dam oe aout om 

DUBAI E37D Stoim £7G5 
ISTANBtfl. £180 TOiffO ■ £5H0 

SKTLORD TRAVEL LID 

2 DENMAN 8TRE 
TitBMM 


avaBaUHty i0923) 
771266. Ttonway Holidays. 
ABTA ATOL 1107. 

LOW OUST FUGMTS. Most Euro- 
pean dotwiailans. Vafexandtr 
Ol -4Q2 4262/0062 ABTA 

61004 ATOL 1960 

■nae nm | i f aai taut 

magte mm. FUght* ft 
holidays. Freedom HoUdays. 
01-741 4686. ATOL 430. 
MIAMI. JAMAICA. N-YORM, 
Worldwide cheapeM tore*. 
Rkhraond TravcL 1 Duke SI 
Richreond ABTA 01-940 4073. 
TUNISIA. Perfect beaches for 
your summer noUday . Calf for 
our brochure now. TunbMn 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 
ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. 
Dknood Travel ATOL 1783. 
01-681 4641. HoTRiam 6B641 
HONS KONG £499 tor travel to 
SrpL Oct- Other FE due* 01 
684 6614 ABTA. 

LOWEST FARES USA. Canada 
also gfecounM im and CW> 
wand wide. Ol sm 1643. 
SRAM PORTUGAL GREEI 
FMbis Rafdor-Otam 0047 
ATOL 1640. Art xra/VMb. 
SVD/MEL £618 Perth JC64& AO 
matarrarrtersto Atsft NZ. 01 
684 7371 ABTA. 

L AFRICA From £466. 01-584 
7371 ABTA. 


BLADON UNES 

FkWonsScpesmfterBatBBtos 

in Bead) Hold Valines 
SAVE £20 

oo I3ih.20rt mn<>27ili 
September dcpanxiie dales 

01*785 2200 

5658 Putney High St 
li»(IOBSW15 ISF 

A ffi L ® 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi, 10*80111 Onto, Dubai. 

Istanbul. Sunapore, Dcfla. 


Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shafti'ory Avenue 
London W1V7DG. 

81-439 0182/01-439 7751 
OpnSuanlay 1M0-I2M 


SUPER HOLIDAY 
SALE 

Cm*. Cafe. RMds. Kol Smtiler 
Cnxk fcbnfe. The Mgwe. Manes 

56 7 89.10.1? 11 ^ 

t5 16.1? l920-?r.f n» t£!9 
22?aai»2jjsjaf9 trw nn 
□Cuter (kps pat M/ CIO £189 

VAl ax writeoff baa* letters will 
H|M ton GtondcLuBo wd 
Mteaes in tote an—» nd aa» Da 
Nw dus soA Bratton IZ4NH ISM 
TMegawafOaM Cad SPteags. 



Trtlaadaa 81-251 5456 
Tet SWUd 8742 mm 
TttUbtolRlNi 061 834 5833 
ATOL 2834 


IT’S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


Horn low-cost flights 
via more routes 
to more destinations 

than any other agency 
PLUS 

• Fbtt, expert, MgMcch 
service - Free worldwide 

hotel t car hire pass 

• dd to«0% dbconuts 

Open 9-6 Uon-Sat 
On-the-Spot 

bmminlntlofl, Insurance, 


Map A BookShop 


4248 Eerte Court Road 
London W8 CEJ 
iMittaDiounirai 
094375400 


TAKE TIME OFF to Fans. Am- 
sirnum. btuum*. Bruges. 
Omni, Berne. Lausaitne. The 
Hague. OobHn, Nooen. bou 
logw ft Dtepne. Time OU. 2a 
Chester Close. London. SWix 
7BQ. 01 235 B070. 

HARBELLA AND CRETE Excln 
site orach vina* and 
apartramts wnn prlvar pool, to 
secluded tocatton ov^u sept 
on. 01 724 7773. Ptaya 
Holidays AMI 2X36. 


SELPCATEKING 

BALEARTCS 


VHlas. some with 
apartments, toventas 

Sem/oci avail from £ 143 . Ceil 

r Hobday*. 01 309 7070 ft 

0622 677071 or 0622 677078 
<24 UK) Aid 1772. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


NICE. Lowest Inn tr £99. 
Biggie*. 736- 8191. AIM 1893. 


UNIQUE AUTUMN breaks La 

Ctusaz. Avail Sem/Oct. Superb 

Frenrti ctvalet ramdMUW nr 

Annecv. S/C apt 2-6 per so n*. 

Quality cuisine available. Tot 

0242 604 13Q/A02 124. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


_ w« sun have 

availability 7.14.21.28 Scm for 
2 wt* Beewurai villa* nr Uir 
beach ex Gatwtck. Pan world 
Hobday* Ol 734 2962 


IMdr prim Flights ft 
hobdays. Freedom HoUdays- 
01-741 4686. ATOL 432. 

8REBGC. Unspoilt Manda. cheap 
fhgtit*. vino rentals etc. Teas 
Hots. 01 434 1647. AIM. Alio. 

-RHO DES tux apart hols tram 
£189 00 10.13.17J20 SCM 

Stroma 0705-862814“ 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


TUSCANY- Mama Di 
PMtrasania. Lov ely viUas Neat- 
tog 4/6/3 far 1/2 wta* Seif- 

arise or fit* from OM or Man 

from £236 pp. Retort VUta* 

061-833 9094 ABTA/ ATOL. 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. The 
finest houses lor rental. 73 St 
James SL SWj. 01 491 0802. 

ALGARVE. Lux ilBm/apts with 
pools. Sept/on. toru winter. Ol 
409 2838. VfHa World, 


SELF-CATERING 


LAST NOTE VB1AS 

WBare ahreyc abta to otter 
qua&ty vNas at short notice. 
AvaiabSty during Sn4tmi- 
har/ October on Corfu. 
Crate. Paxos (Tuesday 
fight). Portuguese Algarve 
hmay vGas rnanday 
Hght). Ha)/, die magical Pa- 
lazzo Belmofne lor Oct 1 
week only. H you want the 
bast poasade hoMay at very 
compettwo prices, ask for 
our lowly vas brochtre. 
Barrtsycaro/atxess 

CV Travel (T) 

43ttetomnaUjHtoiSW32Pfl 
81 Ml B8S1/5W H83 
589 8182 (BrecWs H M 

Atflt ABTA 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI BLADON UNES 

SBftr BROCHURES NW OUT! 

4T Assorts if) SMtzsriNiA 
Austria, Ram S Mr. 
77a Biggest Choice On Sk/st 
Ex (tenick littn. Manchester. 
angMf&EdMuitfi 

01 7852200 
MHKiL Ores. 082278121 
ABTA 16723 ATOL 1232 


SKI WEST bumper brochure out 
now packed with all me lop re- 
sorts. Sunday flights roeat the 
traffic 1 1 . end amazingly tow 
prices storting at £69. rang «») 
78S 9999 for your copy. 
ABTA69266 ATOL13B3. 


SK1W0RLD Top Ski Resort*. 
Lowest Prices. ABTA. 
Brochure, 01 602 4826. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


tor Architects ft 
Deramrra. Perman e nt ft tempo- 
rary ppat tons. AMRA SaertMU 
Rec. CtJTIS. 01 734 0632 


DOMESTIC A CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


row ft REGULAR pan-thne 

Home Qramng Service by reli- 

able daily m» central am* - 
own delay another day phone 

AngfoGMiuntntoi OP. acvj 

on Ol 730 8122 now (24 HRS). 
AU-FABt 6811 nutedtairty 
avaflMte. CNfTTw Au-pUr On- 
Hf ICMP. ACYI now OO Ol 
730 8122 tor delate. 

DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 

Yowm nomcN «hh_ nwom 
Me pcrvjn. already having a 
mponMbte no. would like to 
work m a houackeepw during 
spare lime in central London. 
to oi-25i 7484 amrewoirt. 

GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 

REQUMXD - Experienced, ma- 
lure person already reskling to 
Oxforuuurr. Engopd with ex- 
penence to sate of branded 
food to toe Middle Eart and 
Arabian CUB. Proven track 
rmn and idtmw) are <«- 
vtm.il We are an crtabfahM 
Swiss Company starting a sate 
office m Oxfonl. only ouaUfied 
persotmei peed to apply wtui 
druilfd Cv, to; Freyvai Pmd- 
Vrts AG. BurestraSEd 99. 6300 
Zug. SwUzrrtand. 

COURSES 


COUJNCMAto TVIMS. Ken- 
sington BAG OFC 01-370 6739 
■O' and ‘A" levels- top ihoib. 

COMPANY NOTICES 

AVIATION ft GENERAL INSUR- 
ANCE COMPANY LIMITED 
announce dial Mr CH. (Ray) Jeffs 
wui retire a* General Manager 
and Chief underwriter on SO 
June 1987 having by then to- 
lamed Uae age of 68. However, 
toe Direr ton an phased to know 
that Mr Jeffs’ knowledge and ex- 
pertise will remain avauaMe to 
Ihe company as a nnunumg 
member of toe Board. 
■AVIATION ft GENERAL' funher 
aonounrr that by ruual agree- 
menl wire toe Mercanttte AM 
General Reinsurance Comnany 
plc Mr Peter Crawford 
F.C.LL. will be appomied Deputy 
General Manager and Deputy 
Oitef LnderwrHer of toe compa- 
ny with effect from 1 April 1987 
and win succeed Mr JeSs when 
he cellre*. 

CHELSEA A 
KENSINGTON 

QDEXM OATX SW7: 2 bed flat m 
ctegant mansion Mock. Exc or- 
der. GCH. £129.000 toC carpets 
curtains ft IH Ungs. TOXU-361- 
3113. 

REDCUFFC SQ Sob gnd n Oat. 
Penod features grand rec. n/ea 
ml Dalian bmia. 2 dM bds. 120 
yrs £179.000 ono. 370 MIL 


HAMPSTEAD & 

mGHGATE 

WMKTIAD targe brand new 
refurbisbed lsi ft Skid floor 
mafetoaeur. 3 beds, batorm en 
raUe. shower rm. double 
rvoepflon /direng rm. study, 
krtrhen- guest doak rat. Pan 
garden. Freehold £247.000 
Tet Ol -794-3638 after 7.30 pm 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 

LOMB/IHQKT U7 pnopertte 
from £100 - £3000 pw. Per- 
sonal Service. 01-468 3660 or 
0S36-S92824 anytime m. 

NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


FINCHLEY N12 

5 bote. 2 bntis. Edwanllan 
tBnrace. cofiegrtcrt to a8 
amnlHte Ml gch, ganton. 
quaity carpets and cutatos, 
otostanSng voUw to 
£129,500 

FOR QUICK SALE. 

NO AGENTS. 

TEL 01-445 2309 

CONVEY ANCaW by RVy qntot- 
ficd Soucflora. £i 80 ■* VAT and 
standard dDbuwworata rug 
0244 319396. 

W HAMMD6 3 large room*. K ft 
B. 66 yr fete. £220/300. 01 664 
1241. 

EAST ANGLIA 


TRADITIONALLY BUILT 

Hbhh A Bungalow* fma 
221^8 aod K&JOR. Sites 
available et Ltocoto, Barrow 

Off Hrenbar, Chapa! St Leon- 
ards and Mnon in Lindsay. 

WATCHLODGE LTD 
WBOflta, Kibfai Bate 

BaMagira M, 

Urate 

0522-689342 


MERCEDES 


23D Tli B teg. A* new, 7,000 
iMv i owner 6 wed- h-orr 
with Mown irun. rtertric wto- 
dgwv yen cover*, rear *pU1 
mb. rear lacing midmfs 
srai, tram arm rest, bead rc- 
vtromK ran root, burglar 
alarm. aUor wMcb. Immaru 
We rondiUon throughOVl. 
1 1 3.775 Tef t0527) 45793 


380 SLC Lair 1980. AiHhracue 
■Fir Eteriric ranrogf / wm 
dowc Cruise rontroL Alleys 
Air rondMomnu. Leainrr irim. 
Hiucfti wm. Sew tyre*. Fun 
vprrflirauan. Mint rondltton. 
MOT and tax onto March 1987 
£13.900 TO- 0696 423308. 


ZJO E June Sty. u-tuir. A 85. 8 
Sod. C/Lork. E /window*. 
EiSt. velour veils, centre ana 
ie*l*. rear net*, lumuuted vam- 
ly minors. E/door murors. 
Orctrontr RM/Can. E./ Ariel. 
, Save 0^00 an IH £10.730 
1 TO. 01-979 >8ai 


RKROEDCS3S0SLC LMD. man- 
ual. PAS. 1976. 115600 mb. 
Mciaibr Sdvrr. Black teamrr 
Ipi., central lecUnp. 
£/winmwk Air Ctmd.. Stereo. 
Superb engine. Fat. worth 
CT.GOO win acvwfH C6.SQ0 01 
439 4532 DQV 937 8516 ts<-5 


R OK EBEB 299 I (W1Z*F Ngv 

HS smoke Ulver/biw ABS. 
air cond. auto. rinliK raniout 
ft windows. R K mkianK . 
or minis. Mbnirtvl stereo 
17.000 mis £17.600. Nnoffen. 
TrUOaSHTH 7540 


288 H April 85 B Reg Elecirte 

window*, rirc v/noot. Power 

Ueeting. Alloy wheel*, true, 
radio raKtfir. more extras. 

Mini condition. F5M. Directors 
Car Cl 7-300. Ol 2S3 AlSS 
Day or 9CW 4697 eve* ft w/c 


I AUTIh while. 1962. Mue in- 


raata dealer history, knmacu- 
laie utrougboat. £5350 for 
qtucfc sale Tel: tOOO&i 271758 


380 SL 82 Y REG White with 
navy- hood ft mi. R/rtm. au. 
rear adu seat- FSH. 26-000 
antes. Cl 8, 930 Phone. 202 
3324 Day- 964 6473 W/cMh. 
980 TE Estate D reg - new. petrol 
tdue/rrram leaner upnotstery. 
a/c. ft. etc. Mode*) premium 
read oo m price. 096321 646 
(Office ) 096321 293 IHJ 
S80E -86. Snake store. Back 
noth AU exira*. 430QWkS 
£21.000 Tel. 0533 740006/- 
Hf 700069 

580 see 82 20-000 IMS. exret- 
lent cond. abs. au rand. s/r. 
topi* Mue. FSH. £19.960. TO 
Ol 221 6026/6639 
1Mb June BS. 11000 mb. mel 

btue/green. C/wows, Becker 

R/C. RemateC/L. Alarm. PAS. 

FSH. hnmaruIMP. £1 1-560. oi- 

580 3638 iCNffcet. 01-943 6438 

(Home). 

81 280 IE. wiuie/- 

Blue interior, auk), air con. elec 
tinted window*, sun roof, ste- 
reo. Ira mar con. 60.000 nd*. 1 
owner. SH £6.996. TO: Ol 241 
2B91/263I lO) OT 969 8303 (H) 

280 CE 83. Auto Coutte. Stuiv 
nijiq Btack/Cteam trim Fidi 
spec. 43.000 mis. 1 owner. FSH 
by M-B. bamaculate. £10.950. 
PX POO*. TO: 0276 681 436 T 


FRANCE 


id reDoiis - cottages 
chateaux from £10000. Fi- 
nance arvauabte. Brad 
VHtotet Lid 01-486 2733. 


LONDON PROPERTY 





Wlnkwwth=v 

MORTGAGES X 


TERMS NOW AVAILABLE 
1 3 Vi times iKome or 3 times joint 


108% owilB UW mllable bp to 
£108.000 

No evidence of toeene mpfred tor 
bans np to £250,000 for qralfying 
Appficaats 

HRAS facility evailabte over £30,000 
Re-nmfgagos for qnaUfyiiig p m po Ms 

Ring 01-235 0691 

For fall Information 
Open until 8pm today 

Winkwortfa 
Financial Services 

25a Motcomb Street 
London SWI 


230 TE 

NowtoBar 82- Thntae graaff. 
aBoys. tbvd seat, spit smiL 
FSH. Dfreaor's Car. sun* 
roof. 66.000 miles, one 
amr. ExceSant condition. 
£6,750 

Tel e phone 0928 31117 
EVES 8 WKENDS; 
09205 76011 OFFICE 


MERCEDES 

286E AuiMnapr. fttertte green. 

■Ai rpgrslrrrd |983 with mao- 
tv. raibo casartte. 39.000 mite- 
Very good rondtuon. £9.450- 
Trtpphane 0794 E12 476 evev- 

286 E B reg 198a. White, wito 
dark blue interior. Atr rowtl- 
Uonffig. ABS Dec S/«of. 
hnauump wavn wipe, afiw 
wnrrh. rmnumHafr tundfugn. 
CI2AOO Tr) (0276) 26663 

480 SC I960 Fuushed m blark 
with btew velour mm. tolov 
wheels, etectnf swraef. Ota- 
Handing rondtuon. £4.790 
Trtrphonc today 0696 624 
220 


380 SL 1976. MUD Canadian, 
run hMory Only 2 owners. - 
C9.4SO ono Aha Alta Spider. _ 
Yotady rrtaudl. £4Jfia Tel. 2 
0533 738634 daytime 417016 
nn. 

280 TE 62 X. Ivory. Auto 
BtaupimNi nrreo. Dee. aenet 2 
Sunroof Real fating veal. Soto 
teal Tow bar F.S.H. by KB 
37.000 mite. Excel lent. £7,860 

Tel ' 01 670 3184 1 office) _ 

280 E Auto. Fen 8b. 11.000 1 
miles. Ragei red. praune cornu. 
Hon. many extra*. FSH. 
£17,990. TM. 0277 3BS3BB _ 
fday/eveu 

MOKCDC8 390 SL ML 

champoipie. Hard/Seff Ten 
Btaupunkl. BMow Average 
Mileage. Superb. £12.750 Mr 

Dee. Offlre Hour* 0272 291998 

500 BSL 1986 *B- reg. Dumona 
' Bnie/Bliic Learner, full wee.. 
70.000 mite*. UK yuntdlrd. 1 
owner. £27.960 ono. Trl. 0742 
307016 anytime. 

MERCEDES 190 C 2-3 16V 1986. 
tufi wenneanon- tow murage, 
new tar arriving, best oiler 
aver £21.500. TO 0639 
720017. 

MERCEDE8 lOOC aummoHC. full 
body styling kll. every poMUde 
extra tnclumng very special reg- 
uiraiian number. Cream as 
new. £11-200. 061 3426789. 

NEW ZJO E Auto. 86 D erg MM 
Manganese. Mec S/twX. BMher 
stereo Mr. Brat offer on 
£18290. 107S3) B64661 er 01- 
674 7477. T 

500 SEC 

9hn Bbe / Dtaa veto, tfoy 
gtoels. Sunroof. 1 owner. Reo 

March 83. 24.000 miles. Air 
cond. Cfaante control. Tuited - 
otass. ABS Inkss. Sett teMteg 
fiedcr Mexico sago. Sera 
homy- faroactMe conftboo- 
PRWATE SALE £23395 

TCL : B4Z0 64178 


280SE 

1985 B reg- metallic as- j 

i tral silver. Blaupunkt f 

stereo, electric windows, l ] 

timed ^ass. only iOOO I> 

i miles, I i 

£17.950. 1 

TEL (0989) 473202 H 

| or 48S328 B 


MERCEDES 


-V tra. o3.0(X) rattey. vtereo / 
nwllr. C/romroi. elec tn c 
Hmdom dud ranruof. nr 
CIO. 500 TH 0382 77091 


(90 SL I9U2 -X' Reg. 27.000 
Mttev petrol Blue. Beige Hide. 
Ouhe. Brat Krai. Allow 
AWfitUftev mmurulaie. 

Cl 7-500 ana TO: OCTlr 34026 


39.000 mitev Metafile Mue ve- 
fare Merlnr toM / window 
Cruhr .virrra tallow £12.960. 
Tel 0483 222668 JuiVUtne 


1963. many exit av Imnaruute 
(OiKhlMn. 40.000 nwtev. 
£16.000 otm Tel AH 3113 


mv. l Owner fmnuruUie ron- 
ikimv Air raid. El J. 500 
Phone tv py only 01-864 0514 


rrwm interior. rJdn. H/S top. 
atkn wneeiv £21,500 Tor 
phone oeoj 73396. 


- July 84 ABS. allow 
real veal, radio. 19 000 min 
ChamMune Cl 4-500 Tel 
0U32h2M) 


All MOdrfc. AvaUaMr Now. CiV 
0U6 27525S. 


Iir whrr grey. Bk 
humor and rear scab. ABS. 
Air Corn), decide aerirl. PW- 
neer radio ft vtereo grain, 
imnurtuate. 23000 Miter. 
£24.760 0702 687 624. 


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SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


<r * A A ft ftSl. 


RACING: VETERAN PUERTO RICAN JOCKEY BOOKED TO PARTNER FAVOURITE IN SUNDAYS PHOENIX CHAMPION STAKES 


Fast pace may 
play into 
the hands of 
Bakharoff 

By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Twelve months ago. Lord 
Howard de Walden. Henry 
Cecil, and Steve Cauthen 
pinned their hopes of winning 
the Bonusprint September 
Stakes on Slip Anchor, who 
endeavoured to lead from 
start to finish but just failed to 
hold Shemazar's sustained 
late challenge. 

Now the same combination 
of owner, trainer, and jockey 
are banking upon Rakaposhi 
King who, ironically, was 
bought last December to act as 
Slip Anchor's pacemaker. If 
the pattern of past events is 
repeated. Rakaposhi King will 
also try to make all the 
running because that is his 
way of racing 

Again though, his connec- 
tions could be disappointed. 
For while the strong gallop 
that he invariably sets will 
probably expose the stamina 
(imitations of Trerablant and 
Wylfa, it should play into the 
hands of Greville Starkey and 
Bakharoff. who represents 
classic form, having been 
placed in both the French and 
Irish Derby. More recently, 
Bakharoff came good over a 
bit further when he beat Sirk 
to land the Geoffrey Freer 
Slakes at Newbury. 

Having been pacemaker for 
Shahrastani at Ascot and 
Shardari at York. Dihistan 
now has an opportunity to star 
in his own right again. Judged 
on the way that he won the 
Hardwicke Stakes at Royal 
Ascot, he is not out of 
contention but. at weight-for- 
age. Bakharoff is preferred. 

Morcwoods, unbeaten until 
he finished only fourth in the 
Gimcrack Stakes at York, is 


given a good chance of regain- 
ing the winning trail in the 
Bonusprint Sarenia Stakes, 
even though he is opposed by 

such a promising filly as 
Gayane, not to mention 
Dariey Knight Rum boogie 
and Sameek. 

The feeling persists in rac- 
ing circles that Morcwoods 
was not quite himself at York, 
even though he started 
favourite, and that he is 
capable of belter. Today will 
tell. 

Cocotte, fourth in the Nas- 
sau Stakes at Goodwood be- 
fore finishing second in 
another group race in Deau- 
ville, is my choice to give her 
owner. Sir Michael Sobell, 
trainer Dick Hem, and jockey 
Willie Carson their second 
taste of success in the Twick- 
enham Fillies Stakes m as 
many years, following Gay 
Hellene's win a year ago. 

The Cambridgeshire entry, 
Turfah, who is rated a 20-1 
shot at present by the William 
Hill organization, who spon- 
sor the race, is napped to draw 
further attention to his chance 
at Newmarket by winning the 
Geoffrey Hamlyn Handicap. 

His trainer, Peter WaJwyn, 
was pleased when he saw that 
Turfah had been given only 
7st 91b in the first leg of the 
autumn double, the weights 
for which were published on 
Wednesday. And victory to- 
day will not email a penalty. 

It took a while for Wahvyn 
to fathom Turfah, who ran six 
times before he won even 
though he had worked consis- 
tently like a good horse at 
home. Eventually the answer 
turned out to be chat a mile 


KEMPTON PARK 1 C4 

i V m fr* I* MU' .J 


Going: good 

Draw: high numbers best 

£5 GEOFFREY HAMLYN HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2.642: im) (10 runners) 

101 01- SHANNON VALUE (USAHSheito Mohammed) Jlkniap 88 ..G Renter (7) 2 

103 04012 AITCH NffE (D) (P Wimieid) J Dimiop 9-4 W Canon 5 

104 0310 PARK-TURF (J Pearce) GWiaogM P Robinson 3 

106 021112 TURFAH (USAXD) (Hamdan AlMMdoun) P WNwyn 9-1 PadEddmyl. 

108 030000 N0RTI&INH>UtSE (Mi GuUiy Lid) BGdby 88 CRnHor($4 

110 1 DMALffM(USAHn(Sheaft Mohammed) MSloulB 39 — WRSsMonS 

111 4-04403 RESCUE PACKAGE (hbs N Leads) G Lewis 88 P Waldron M 


116 1-0000 HOT GBI (C Bbckwel) R Hannon 8-4 AMcDfcneS 

120 00124 NORDICA (D)(MaiJ Du Burma Stewart 7-11 M Robert* 7 

122 400421 BATH (Df (Lady Artten? J Toter 7-7 JkdUe Houston ft 8 

100-30 NOrtSca. 7-2 Dhateom. 4-1 Turfah, 5-1 Bath. 13-2 Parie-Twf, 8-1 Aitch 
N'Baa. ID-1 Shannon Vale. 12-1 others. 


£4422, good to Dnn, June 28). TURFAH (8-5) 4si 2nd to Digger's Rest (9-4) at York (8f. 
£20583. good to firm. Aug 21. 14 rani ONALEEM (8-8) XI debut w i nner from Poctatoer 
(8-8) at rfewc^te (Bl m&en. £2303. good. Aug 11. 18 ran). NE9CUE PACKAGE (88) 
3»i 3rd to lad y For Two (811) at Epsom wittiNOiRTHBIN IMPULSE (9-0) behind (71 
matden. £2278, good to son. Aug 25. 13ran). NORDICA (89)4tt to Tender Type (83) el 
Yarmouth (1m2f, good. Aug 5). tartar (8-11) beet Quean Of Battle (8-1 1)55 Lon the sama 
course (Bl maiden, £1630. good to firm. July i, 15 ran). BATH (6-6) beat NicoBnl (8-0) 2MI 
ai Riper (81, £1725, soft. Aug 30. 15 ran). 

SetocttoKNOROtCA 

235 HILLFIELDS FILLIES HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £3,454: 1m) (12) 

203 012000 
205 008344 

208 30021 

209 100420 

210 4-00100 
212 000013 
216 401102 
218 0-30013 

220 043300 

221 240100 

222 04004 

223 233303 

5-2 Somettmg Casual. 3-1 Court Town. 4-1 Fmrote.11-2 Tzu Wongjop 
Debutante. 12-1 Lady La Paz. 14-1 others. 




3JS BONUSPRINT SIRENIA STAKES (2-Y-O: £7,908: 61) (8) 

301 120 DARLEY KNIGHT (TOBF) (StiaUi Mohammed) J Dunlop fi-3 W Caaba 7 

302 1 GAYANE (D) (N PMkps) H Ceci 9-0 S Cauthen 5 

303 114 WOREVfOQOS (USAXC-DMBF) (G Srawbndge) f Balding 9-C - Par 1 

307 1312 MANDUB [Hamdan Al MaMtxmj H Thomson Jones 8lT RHta4 

309 01 RUMBOOG1E (D1 (A RaSiartte) C Bftttam 8-11 M Robertas 

310 213 SAMEEK (BF)fK3fltdaiAIMafcKKi(nJRAnnsoong 811 — WR Staten T 

3i; 

H HO W 3 


9-4 Gayane, n-4 btarewoods. S-i Dariey Knight. 7-1 Samoak. 8-1 Ftumboogie. 
1 Mandub. 14-1 others. 





Bakhanff (left), seen hero beatu 
shorter trip in today's September 

was his ideal distance on good thai 
fast pound Since then, he has 4!b 
never looked bade me. 

Successive victories at to t 
Pontefract, Hamilton and Dhs 
Pontefract again were fbl- at h 
lowed by a highly commend- for 
able run at York where he was timi 
beaten only three-quarters of a a 
length by Digger's Rest in a inst 
highly-competitive valuable Nor 
handicap. revt 

Right behind him in Third. tan< 
fourth and fifth that day came Yar 
such reliable yardsticks as ing 
Truly Rare. Aventino and on 
King's Head. As a result of trac 


ating Sirk in Newbury's Geoffrey Freer Stakes, tackles a 
iberStakes at Kempton. Mamiarin expects another victory 

that run, Turfah has gone up Ahnarose will prove hard to 

4!b in future handicaps. To beat in the Euclid Handicap if 
me, all that says that he ought she runs anywhere near as well 
to be capable of giving 61b to as she did at Newmarket last 
Dhaleem, whose solitary win month when she was beaten 
at Newcastle now looks better only a length by that much- 
for Docksider winning next improved sprinter, 

time out at Chepstow. Catherine's WelL 

A greater danger is this 

instance, though, could be Finally, punters at Haydock 
Nordica. now that she is are faced with a difficult 
reverting to a mile, the dis- choice for the Jack Rubin 
lance over which she won at Trophy between Angara 
Yarmouth, after twice appear- Abyss and Wolsey. While the 
ing not to see out 10 furlongs latter is unbeaten, the former 
on the same Norfolk seaside boasts the better credentials of 
track. late and he is preferred. 


3.40 BONUSPRINT SEPTEMBER STAKES (Group III: £17,210: 
1m 3f 30yd) (7) 


402 2-11300 

404 

405 283114 

406 200033 

407 224330 

409 21-2331 

410 148121 



Mofcam5 
Roberts 4 
Ewtten6 
Eddery 1 
i Rouse 2 
Starter 3 
Canon 7 


2-1 DWatan. 8-1 Bekheraft. 5-1 RukapaM King. 188 H^tand Cttaftan. 
81 Wylfa. 181 K-Battury. 181 TrambtenL 

FORM: DIHISTAN has been a pacemaker on test 2 starts. Eartar (8-9)* I Ascoimnnar 
Tram SI Haarian (9-0)11m4f, £31412, fim, June 20. 10 ran). RAKAPOSHI KING 0-4) 51 
4th al 12 to King Luthier (84) at DeauvUa (1m 7f. £2383, good to Ann, Ain 10). TSS8 
BUWT (09) 2X1 3rt to Hadeer (83) at Newbury (7T 60 *T5l705. coo4 Aim 15. 11 


Cl 3rd to Hadeer (9-3) at 


E2383. good to Arm, Ann 10). TRSA- 
(71 60*101705. gooct Aug 15. 11 
ausly(8l2)1*13rdtp Nanas (82) at 


Setectioa: DWISTAN 

Kempton selections 

By Mandarin 

2.5 TURFAH (nap). 235 Frivole. 3.5 Morewoods. 3.40 Bakharoff 
4. 10 Cocotte. 4.40 Almarose. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.5 Nordica. 235 Something CasuaL 3.5 Gayane. 3.40 Rakaposhi 
King. 4.10 Lavender Mist. 4.40 Lady For Two. 

By Michael Sedy 

2.5 Bath. 235 Court Town. 4.40 ALMAROSE (nap). 

4.10 TWICKENHAM FHJJES STAKES (3-Y-O: £7362: 1m 2f) (6) 

501 11000 GEaEnamtStaiMr Ahmad AIMNaawqMJarta 88 PatEddery4 

502 1814 LA YOU)® WST (FR)(D) (Mriaoum Al Maktouin) M StouM M 

WR Staten 2 

503 4-00142 C OCOTT E (SkMSobetQW Hem 811 W Canon 1 

504 0081 NORPBJJt (0)(E Mote) GWregg 811 PRobfamO 

505 12230 RTTMtHH^ Khan) R Johnson HoucMon 811 S Cauthen 3 

507 000010 SPWNAKER UWY (D) (B Sunpscc) MOshor 811 AMcOone5 

7-4 Gesedeh. 10830 Cocotte. 88 Lavandar MM. 81 NorpaOa, 12-1 Riyda. 
25-1 Spenaher Lady. 





440 EUCUD HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2381: 71) (14) 

0)3 422812 tPSNAAD (U SAM PB BR (MakKMn Ai Makttmi) B Hanbwy 87 

604 810000 

605 001012 

606 022024 
608 404D21 
618 001802 

620 840000 

621 001000 

625 000000 

626 001-000 

627 0300* 

628 004 

629 0003 

630 120010 

11-4 Abnaroaa, 81 Lady For Tot, 4-1 Codices. 82 Misread, 182 Bartel 
181 Gershwm. 12-1 others. 




Future foal 
for auction 

By Phil McLennan 

A racehorse, as yet 
unconcvivcd. is to be auctioned 
at ihe Big Bang City Ball in 
London on September 26. The 
foal from a future mating be - 
tiveen Elcgam Air and Jade Ring 
will be one of the leading lots at 
the ball's charity auction, to be 
run by Christie's. 

The Elegant Air nomination 
has been donated by the Aston 
Park stud, where his covering 
fix' is normally 10.000 guineas 
By Shirley Heights out of the Sea 
Bird II mare. Elegant Tern, 
Elegant Air won six races for Ian 
Balding including two group 
races over 10 furlongs as a four- 
>ear-old. 

Jade Ring, appropriately by 
Auction Ring, was a useful 
handicapper when trained by 
James Toller and won two 
competitive Newmarket handi- 
caps over seven furlongs as a 
four-) ear-old. Brian McEIncv's 
marc* is currently in foal to 
Busted. 

Lester Piggoit has already 
agreed to train the Elegant Air- 
Jade Ring foal and the ball 
organizers are hoping to arrange 
a sponsor for insurance and 
training fees so that the new 
owner will have no bills to pay. 

Proceeds from the ball will go 
to Cancer Research. Among ihe 
other items io be auctioned are 
cars, yachts and paintings. 


HEREFORD 


330 COTSWOLD CONDITIONAL JOCKEY 
HANDICAP CHASE (£1334: 2m) (10) 


Going: firm 

2.0 VOWCHURCH NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m 41) 
(13 runners) 

2 00-1 
4 844 
7 083 
10 0-0 
11 8P0 
13 OFF- 
21 000 
2* 8 
27 U 

29 P3-3 

30 0 • “ "HnCTtatal 

31 048 DORWOODlADYPQ'Cannor 4-185 HOmtas 


wr 


Basi l 



mmm. 


15-8 Vale Chatange. 10830 Fast FSgW. 
7-1 Princely Lad. 81 Hope End. 181 
14-1 Tunzenberg. Pomposity, 181 others. 


4-1 Ring-Lou, 
Sr Lastar, 


31 M8 DORWOOO LADY P O'Connor 4-185 HDrtas 

32 P IMXAN VANITY R Fefcws 4-10-5 MtesLFcOMS 

13-8 Bantah Lady. 10830 Oinadan. 81 Aston Bar*. 

182 Paddycoup. 81 Little Rone. 181 King's Slave. 
12-1 Dowood Lady, 181 otnare. 


230 ORCOP SELLING STAKES (£604: 2m) (8) 

3 OF-3 FRISKY HOPE BCamNdge 4-11-10 AMvpteft 

« -FOB JOHNHTTS SHABBIES (USA) (B) 8 PKece 4-1 1-10 

SHettand 

7 P8P KING WOCREHteS A Ratdtff 4-11-lfl 

KrDes WSsna (7) 

8 0114 MANHATTAN BOY (BF)JF»U)-Heya 811-10^ 

13 FP-0 DONNAL DEUX Rl£C 4-11-5 BDCWWgP) 

15 228 SBKjEWEU. LADY M Pipe 4-11-5 P Cuidww 

T 23 LA CHUtA R HgMer 8185 

11-4 Mas Tufluiah. 4-1 Careen. 81 Goinga 182 Nonstop. 
8-1 Othaai Dress. 181 Much Master. 12-f Gohton Medun. 
14-1 country Spar*. 181 Indian Officer. 


3.0 CRASWELL NOVICE CHASE (£1,514: 2m) (9) 

i «=3» COUNTS Y SPARK IB) P Pnotard 8H-3 0 Chinn 

3 244- GOMGQR Brawn 7-1 1-3 J Brawn (7) 

J 2/P- INDIAN OFFICER Miss A Funass 7-11-3 

DWenMcesi(7) 

5 3-00 MATCH MASTER H O Nell 7-11-3 ft Dmoedy 

6 083 NONSTOP |B) P O'Canr 7-1 1-3 HDniM 

7 IMF OFFICIAL DRESS MOmt 8l 1-8 J Duggan 

6 11 -P CARraiMPipe811-1 MPiOnn 

11 -4F0 GOLDEN MEDINA B Foraey 81812.... — C Waiwn (U 

1? -FOF MBS TU11IJIAHB Foraey 81812. BPuvraO 

1 1-4 Miss Tufiuafi. 4-1 Careen. 81 Gongo. 13-2 Nonstop. 
81 Official Dress. 181 Match Master. i£-t Gotdan Mrttt, 
14-1 Country Spart;. 181 Indian Officer. 


Hereford selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Bemish Lady. 2.30 Manhattan Boy. 3.0 
Official Dress. 3.30 Vale Challenge. 4.0 Professor 
Hum. 4.30 Kofft. 


4.0 nhchaelchurch 
(£ 2,145: 2m 4f) (8) 

1 3P1- &SffiUEJDIWCase 

2 DP-1 PROFESSOR PLUM (0 


HANDICAP CHASE 


1 3P1- aaBUE(D )WCasay8lM0 RDuawuody 

2 0P-1 PROFEBSQN PLUM (80) T Fast* 181813 (5^^ 

10 -023 JM77VE BREAK (USAJl&DJtBF) Mrs WByfcas 8180 

SHoi^Md 

11 1- CORS.U3RDID) Mrs M Evans M88 — 

14 -4U4 CfTADB. ROCJB) J M Bnduy 11-1M G Davies 

18 480 SHOTANG (8£q H CNM 11-188 CMam 

11-8 PrtUessor Plum. 81 Gtonrae. 4-1 ftatlva Break. 
13-2 GorseiLord. 14-1 Gftadal Roc. 181 SiOBng. 

4.30 TYBERTON HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,341: 
2m 41) (9) 


1 218 ADAREDHgdnson 7-11-10 RBeggtt) 

2 U21F MUN7ISS (^G BaUra 811-8 ACMffiM(7) 

3 -03F BALUCHI BPra«* 811? G landau (7) 


12 UFO- ZACOO(D)SQo«r 7-184 H Guest ft 

16 WO RBOOEN j Spaamg 8181 A Webb 

a -Ml CARO WOOD (0) J D J Davies 810-0 

NOIHUBet 

11-4 Ainands. 4-1 Socabh Bawd. 81 Baluchi. 182 KcM. 
8i Salor Miss. 181 Adara. 12-1 fltboden. Zacdo. 


ICREFORD 

THAJNERS: Mrs w Sykes. 10 winners 
from Si runners. 19.6%; R Holder, 7 hum 
41. 17.1%; D Nicholsan. 6 from 37. 16 ^%. 
JOCKEYS: P Scudamore. 17 winners hum 
99 rides. 17.2%: R Dunwoody. 8 from 48, 
187% H Dawes. 14 horn 88. 1S8% 

York results 

Going: good 

245 (1m) 1. USFAN (W Canon, 84); 2, 
Mer fl ra ume fS Cauthen. 281); 1 No* 
Pat Eddery. 7-4 fov)- ALSO RAN: 8 
— ., JnBBne(4tW.9H|8hesfAsak0ft). 
Vtel Form (Stfi). 10 Concorde's Demon, 
12 Sure LancSng. 25 Scented SOence. 9 
ran. NR: Skaan. 2 VH. 1KL 31. 1KL 1 W. J 
Dunlop at Arundel. Tote: £250; £1 JO, 
£4.70. £1.10. OF: £6850. CSF: £4758. 
1mto4l.19sec. 

3.15 llm 1() 1. ATOKA (R Ifls, 4-1 8 
teu); 2, Gundreds (G Moore, 4-1 It-tav): 3, 
AeenltiHu (J ReU, 4-IJt-tm). Alio RAN: 

5 Exdustw North. 8 Try Harder (SOT. 10 
Romaic Unda (4m). «ary Bay. 14 
Russta Creek (Gtfi). 8 ran. 81. nk. 4L 71. SL 
John FitzGerald at NewmarteL Tots 
£4.40: £150. £1805180. DF: £7.90. CSF: 
£l882.1mfai5384sea 

850(71) 1 . BBiQAL FBtE(CAmi8Sen. 
1 ME 1 I wn de fca fS Camhaa )811 tee): 
3. CoramoeskF Sen (J Carrol. 381). 
ALSO RAN: 1 1-2 Nare«ano(4ih). 12 Pinta 
Catahonda (6m). 25 Oh Daimy Boy (5th). 
33 Hofitand UH. 50 Try HBe.fi ran. ki. 
7L y. nk. 3t C Brtaan at Newmarket. 
Tale: £380: £1.10 £1.10 £480. DF: £280. 
CSF: £584. Itntab 2588S4C. Attar a 
stewards' inquiry the raauR stood. 

485 (1m 6f) 1. WASSL REEF (W 
Carson. 81 tav); 2. Romhenie (L 
Chamock. 81): 3. nauliittWR Swfctoum. 
81) ALSO RAN: 11-2 Pam's Sister SOT. 

6 Dual Venture (4th). Treddder (6m), 7 
Wessex, 8 Lost Opportunity, Netties. 33 
Lunmats. 10 ran. NR: BactaAet. Ue to 
Wak.2L«LKl.2i. %LJ Dunlap at ArundeL 


Resilient Cordero steps in 
for plum ride on Triptych 

By Micftail Seely 


Angel Cordero will partner 
Triptych in the £400.000 Phoe- 
nix Champion Stakes on Sun- 
day. Yves Si-Martin has been 

claimed by the Aga Khaa to ride 

at Lofigrfiamp the same after- 
noon. so Patrick Biancooc has 
booked the 43-year-okl Puerto 
Rican-born jockey for Alan 
Core's gallant filly, as die seeks 
to make amends for her recent 
defeats by Dancing Brave and 
S hardari in Europe's richest 10- 

furlong event. 

The rider has certainly been in 

the wars since his last visit to 

Europe when he persuaded 
Efflbb to swoop U> that dra- 
matic victory in the Cheveley 
Park Stakes at Newmarket last 
October. After a fid! on the first 
bend at Aqueduct on March 8, 
Cordero was trampled on. His 
liver was lacerated and his left 
kg fractured in the accident. 

Aftera four-hour operation be 
spent 20 days in hospital and 
several weeks on crotches before 
showing his resilience by bounc- 
ing bade with a double on his 
return to the saddle at Belmont 
Park on July 13. 

Cordero has won nearly every 
major race in the North Ameri- 
can calendar, including three 
Kentucky Derbys and the 
Preakness Stakes twice. 

He has also claimed the 
coveted Eclipse award on three 
occasions and. together with 
Willie Shoemaker and Lafitte 
Procay. is one of only three 
jockeys to have earned their 
patrons over SI00 million in 
prize money. 

Other jockey news on the big 
race front is that Midtael Stoute 


Hcndcka in the EBF Saudi 
that Wifoc Carsmi will st.U ndc SlakcSi ^ lhc * inncr 


jin 1 

ific 

J;!} s 


5 1 c t s 

1? i * 


, n .* I 


ll S 


inui imkvwjwj ■ . Arabia Slakes. As the winner 

if Sharrood tswitM™ 1 * sla ned io hang to the nght alter 

the trainer about the n»> taking the lead 1 'b furlongs from 

finished fourth lo UnioM at ^ gSj Asmnsscn shifSl his 
Ebor meeting after winning the - . t M jhe feft to correct the 
Irish Oaks so easily. . , jgn^tency. 

As far as Shahra^ani -Steve Cauthen would have 

concerned. Stwte is thinkingof thc mount if he had not 

running the Enghsh and Ing ^ cfcliinc< j the second," 
Derby winner tar the Pnx tie ciive Brittain. “So I was 

L Arc dcT nompbe. but ^ has grab Cash as either of 

to consult the Aga Khan and the jj" j& ® , rigbl as far M Vm 

other shareholders. mfleemed." 

Ladbrokes bus? belt."* on eotroeroco 


the Champion Stakes is as 
follows: 3-1 Tnpiych. o-I 
Cotorspin. Park &tprcss and 
Wise Counsellor. On the 
Cambridgeshire front, the Lon- 
don firm reported an early 
interest in last year’s winner. 
Trent Want, who is now cear 
favourite at 12-1 after being laid 
to lost £45.000 at 16-1. 

It was also announced yes- 
terday that Ray Cochrane has 
been engaged to ride aU the 
horses owned by Terry 
Ramsden in 1987. Talking 
about his agreement with the 
nation’s most fearless punter, 
the 29-year-old jockey said: “It 
is a fairly elastic arrangement, 
which will leave me free to take 
a lot of outside mounts." 

With victories in the 1.000 
Guineas and Oaks on Midway 
Lady to his credit this year. 
Cochrane is enjoying his best- 
ever season with a total of 64 
winners already under his bdc. 

At York yesterday. Cash 
Asmussen showed us exactly 
why American jockeys are so 
much in demand and also why 
the 26-yearold rider has landed 
the coveted Bahydoyle retainer 


Bag O’Rhythm best 

4”vmt &■ 1 r ft. - " * mMarc T1 


Finally, punters at Haydock 
are faced with a difficult 
choice for the Jack Rubin 
Trophy between Angara 
Abyss and Wolsey. While the 
latter is unbeaten, the former 
boasts the better credentials of 
late and he is prefened. 

Protection 
to go 
hurdling 

By Christopher Go aiding 

Despite Jim Joel's recent 
announcement that he is to sell 
his breeding bloodstock, the 
veteran owner will continue to 
have horses in training and he 
has a particularly strong team 
for the new National Hunt 
season. 

Protection, winner of the 
, Britannia Stakes at Royal Ascot 
last year when trained by Henry 
Cecil, looks a high-class recruit 
to hurdling in the distinguished 
colours of black jacket and 
scarlet cap. 

The four-year-old gelding has 
joined Andy TurneU at East 
Hendred. TurneU, who had a 
terrible time last season dne to 
the virus, said yesterday: “I 
have only had Protection for 
three days. I hope to run him at 
Newbury on Hennessyday. IfaU 
goes to plan the Waterford 
Crystal Supreme Novices’ Hur- 
dle at Cheltenham would be his 
objective." 

The TurneU family have had a 
long association with JoeL Andy 
rode numerous winners for him 
trained by his Gather. Bob. "Mr 
Joel has been very good to me. i 
have Maori Venture, Glen 
Rover. Welsh Warrior and a 
nice young horse, Paul Pry, 
.running for him this year. 

Josh Gifford, who shares the 
training of the Joel National 
Hunt horses with TumelL has 
high hopes for Midnight Count 
who made a big impression over 
hurdles last year with victories 
at Cheltenham and Sandown 
Park. 

“I will send him straight over 
fences this year." Gifford said. 
“He is a fine big horse and will 
not seen out until late October, 
probably at one of the Park 
courses." 

Door Latch, a first fence feller 
in Iasi year's Grand National, 
will again be trained for the 
Hennessy Cognac Gold Cup in 
which he finished third last year: 

Course specialists 

KEMPTON 

TRAMERS: H Cccd. 21 «tm from 51 
runners, 41.2% W Ham. 7 from 28. 
268% G Harwood. 25 from 95. 268% 
JOCKEYS: 5 Cauthen. 31 wnnws trom 
144 hdus, 218% W R StonOwn. 22 *om 
109. 202% G Staifcey. 24 tram 121, 
198% 

HAYDOCK 


Bag OHhytluu (Michael 
Hills) has a gnat chance of 
scoring his first patten race 
victory when be contests the 
£1&362 poop tiro Moet ct 
Chandoa Zolmifts4tem>en over 
six furiosgs at B ad en-Baden 
today. 

His test two eatings have seen 
Mm jnst fail to carry top weight 
to victory in a very competitive 
nursery at Newmarket and teen 
narrowly go down to CaroTs 
Treasure at York. 

He tacts strong opposition, 
however, from the three other 


English-trained raiders. There 
is nothing between Amigo Sorio 
(Simon Whitworth) and 
Polentas (Tony Murray) op 
Coventry Slakes form but both 
were a little disappointing last 
limp out and tire fourth Engli s h 
challenger. Mister Majestic 
(Ray Cochrane), may provide 


Gem-die's Delight (Cochrane) 
wOl be aiming to maintain 
Lester Pfggott's 100 per cent 
record with hzs runners abroad 
by winning the Preis der Stadt 
Baden-Baden over 10 furlongs. 


The Newmarket trainer goes 
to Kiris, on Sunday to watch 
Gary Moore ride Bold Arrange* 
ment against Sonic Lady in the 
Prix du Moulin. Cochrane will 
have the mount on Supreme 
Leader, Brittain's runner in 
Ireland. 

Cauthen's second on 
Hendefca was the fifth time that 
the reigning champion had 
occupied the same position at 
the Two-day meeting. And on 
four occasions he has been 
runner-up to Carson who, for 
the second afternoon running, 
proceeded to show the Ameri- 
can riders examples of British 
jockeyship at its most forceful 
and determined best by landing 
a double on Usfan in the 
Kowloon Stakes and WassJ Reef 
in the Peak Handicap. 

Carson then proceeded to 
make a vigorous attempt to land 
his second consecutive treble 
with a power-packed finish on 
Our Jock in the day’s feature 
race, the Hong Kong Marlboro 
Cup. but failed by a neck to 
catch Paul Cook on Mamon 
Dan. Padre Pio finished third 
and Eastern Song fourth. George 
Dickie had a nasty-looking &B 
on Careless Whisper soon after 
halfway, but escaped unhun. 

“Mamon Dan will go for the 
Ayr Gold Cup if the ground is 
no worse than today." said Nidi 
Vigors, the successful trainer, 
who was recording his seven- 
teenth win of the season. 

~He picked up a 71b penalty 
for his previous win on the 
track, so he's reasonably treated 
and we've got to have a go.” 
Ladbrokes offer 16-1 against 
Manioc Dan for Scotland's 
richest handicap but only 14-1 
against Our Jock, who has 
always shown a liking for heavy 
going. 


Jinn 1 


HAYDOCK PARK 



Draw: 6Mm km num be rs best 

Z15 MERSEYSIDE POLICE MOUNTS) DIVISION 
CENTENARY MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £2,054: 
1m 6f) (14 runners) 

2 00 COMAZANT (USA) G Harwood 9*0 ACtak7 

4 000 DIME AW A DOLLAR AW Jams 80 Altatey2 

8 0400 LE MOULD) K Brassoy 9-0. T Win 14 

9 0 LORD CAPLANO H bandy 80 

11 0800 MR MOSS C Britain 98 

12 00 PRMCE BOLD (TO J Dunlap 80 BlMmoal 

3 J flRBHRBai£===. , ne! 

16 00- TANCRED SAND Mils S HM 80 MBM1D 

17 3MM TAP ’EM TWICE fUSAHB) M Jarvis 9-0 T Luca* 5 

18 WINTER HAVEN MWttobiwn M GDWtaM12 

20 00 DAWN LOCH ftffiUJShmi 8-11 TN*u0 

25 90 MARBLE MOON RKotastmd 811 S Part* 11 

26 40 MERSEYSPEEDJ Partus 8-11 J titan (5) 3 

4-9 Staroor, 81 Winter Haven. 81 Stn Ground, 181 La 

Moriin. 181 CoraazanL Prince BoU. 181 others. 

2.45 ST ANNE’S NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: 
£3,456:6f)(20) 

2 1120 GLOW AGAM (p) J Effieringwi 9-7 — 

7 0344 BUM Riff AGMNflBlLFwgott 811 • uww 

10 2221 MBS NLVEAGH A Baiey 88— Z J Cart 9 

12 0010 OBCn GHEBI (D) J Betty 8-7 J Cam* (7) 14 

15 0183 BtfBABBnYD HMdn Jooes87 
17 300 J0MT SERVICES rRahm 8-5 

19 0030 TALBM R HoBnshBid 8-3 PW20 

21 D3B1 PANACHE tmPHatan 82 T Wi lli 

23 0044 WKBttJOY WDBurehefl8-1 WNeiMtt 

» KB BOTHY BALLAD PCWwr 8-J WRjrS 

30 0031 BHEWMTME M H Easterly B-0(10ex)_ A Mack>7 16 

32 MOO WMSIUNG WONDER M Botin 7-8 KIWIS 

33 2234 BUtZE OF GOLD ffiR E Won 7-6 APrantflO 

3* 4041 MEWMP STAR TO R HcUbt 7-7 S Pa— on 7 

39 3300 LADY SUNDAY WORT 0F) N CMM£«n7-7 

42 0000 PANBOY (8) TFairtairat 7-7 

43 0000 PB0EUY R HoBrahuat 

48 2212 HUGO ZHACKB0USHCTHder 7-7 _ , 

49 teal OEM 8 PMM K Write 7-7^^G0»d54 

50 2400 TOOTSIE JAY G Hannan 7-7 JanEMn|7)l3 

81 Bo‘ BaWJtty, 


4.15 JACK RUBIN TROPHY (2-Y-O: £3.174: 
1m 40yd) (18) 

1 1121 ANGARA ABYSS (USA)GHenmd 81 A dart 3 

3 0131 BUJS HENRY fl Bon 81 EGuniail 

4 2134 DR BULASCO S Norton 81 J Raid 17 

8 11 WOLSEY (USA) H Cad 811 WRyanll 

10 2 CABOT WHScton 87. W Hweti l 

1( 00 GOLDEN TREE fflF) J Effieraigton 8-7 Thm7 

16 0 LBBWCKMHE*fWtjy87 KHodgaonS 

17 LORO JUSTKXUKA) M W DabUraon 8-7 G DutuM 10 

18 000 M0NTYSQUM»1R8razlngton87 — JWSBantsM 

20 000 PATHS® N BfCTOrt 87 ONktettiS 

22 FMNCEZAIMhOJ Hanson 87 JH Brava (5) 12 

23 0 RBI TUBER RStaSwr 87 MRtamwIS 

24 00 RtINNMG MONET JVWson 87 — JMn Bowker ft 4 

26 2320 SANTELLA SAM (USA) M Ryan 87. NDayS 

28 0 THE MAM MAN C Brttain 87 G Baxter 11 

30 0000 CALL FOR TAYLOR DLnslie&J M Fry 2 

33 4040 LACK OF PEARLS RWoodTuusa 84 ABourf M 

35 4 NTOOPHANA (fTY) E tocisa B-4 MBeucraB13 


Hr ^ 


- ---'■'A, 


IV -;e 

■i ■- " 


10830 Brawin Tune, 81 Miss Mftramh. 81 Bo' BabUty. 
81 Panache. Ghw Aota. 181 BoByHStad. Mandp Star. 
12-1 Bom Free Again. 16-1 otoers. 

3.15 BffiKDALE SBUN6 STAKES (Div I: 2-Y-O: 
£1^49: 1m 40yd) (14) 

1 0194 LEADBIG ROLE R Hodges 81 
9 QABJC LOVff C TMSr 811 
11 3490 GWT?«ROOKp!)M W&s*Brt>y811 — L Chamock 9 

13 0200 LATSiAL J Barry 811 

14 0(00 ONTO MARK G Hannan 811 

16 00 PATWASJ Do wtaM tame 811 

21 0009 STM PLAY KScne 811 C Dwyer 10 

23 0 TUBESONH Jones 811, GSexJoa 14 

24 000 TYRB}N> SNOOKERED CTMdar 811 MBWi5 

40 0004 RELAWEGOK Nory 88 W Woods (3) 6 

41 0000 RBOGRLR SheaBwrM MRtaraerll 

45 00 SUPBIGAIBLBITFNrtiuratM — 3 

47 090 TUESDAY EVBMGRWQotihouS* 88 APmud7 

48 00 VteTORUSrARMrsGRwelsy88 HPEM1 

11-4 Laaffing Role. 81 Gwynbroak. 81 Super Gantaer. 

182 Lateral 81 PaOTee. 181 Star Play. 181 Gaefle Low. 
181 Rtoogtn, 181 otters. 


)MH Eastortn 
f(P4))MisGi 


. LCtamock9 
JCwraB{7)2 
S Laves 4 


3y45 HEPWORTH 
(£5,039: 1m 4f) (20) 


SUPERSLEVE HANDICAP 


3 128 MBRULE0Artiuthnal«87 K Darter 9 

4 «S 0 RSH mOfUSA) (DR Shnattar486- MRteami 
B 40-1 MALAtD KJ (u) Jpmy Ftojanlfcl 7-S-5 (4ex) O Ntefaoaa 3 
7 0310 K9COQLA gVE (D)JG <OvBr 4-9-3 - MHto4)5 

10 3401 STORMY PRtKSaTT (B) M Jarrts 3-81 T Lucas 10 

13 W1 OBttOYflJ) B Stevens 4-813 RCwter(fi)l5 

15 300- it r 11 in r niiicn iff 

17 0BM STANDAfS BREAKFAST Rty (D) B HBa 4-811 

BTb on oM 14 

19 0302 DPIN BACH (R M Caraacho 489 GDuffieUZO 

» SOCKS UP BjAraonHouQMon 989 J Raid 6 

22 008 FRSrnLH Candy 38-91. WHMTMS12 

23 0009 SWW*0«>PBaiCE(B) CO) K Store 889 _ 

24 0111 GRAWI Cf) FBHAT1CIN (USAJR arapran *86j4^ 1S 

26 0000 MR GARDMER 0BW Brooks 485 ThS? 

27 -634 LOUD LANOMQ (USA) W Hastings-Bass 3-83 

R Uses {3)17 

28 -900 GALLOS BOSQUET CBOott 583 SUM 13 

29 492 CA PA RHoM ar 883- SDawonH 

32 M3 Hi EXCEPTIONAL (USA) R Hofinstned 4-7-13 

R CWh— pl« 

33 0091 RAPHANTOMH EHta 57-11 (4e»). QCwterp) 4 

34 0000 BOLDBUk 6>XBF) D Qtapnwn 87-71I A Praud W 

4-1 Loud Landng. 9-2 Stormy Proeped. 13-2 Dipjin Bach, 

81 Mtadffii. 81 Capa. 181 Grand CetetraBon. 12-1 Socks 
Up, DenOoy. 181 Mtarute. 181 Mhooia Eva. 281 otters. 


15-8 Angara AOyss. 7-2..Wobey. 11-2 Dr Butasca 
81 Cabot 181 SanMa San, 14-t'Lflrd Justice. 281 Bate 
Henry, The Mato Man. 281 otters. 

Haydock selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Sheigpr. 2.45 Brewin Tune. 3.15 Leading 
Role. 3.45 Capa. 4.15 Angara Abyss. 4.45 Lady 
Qua. 5. 10 Lyn Rae. 5.35 Trynova. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.15 Dawn Loch. 2.45 Miss Milveagh. 3.15 
Ribogiri. 3.45 Stormy Prospect. 4. 15 Wolsey. 4.45 
Princess Wendy. 5.10 Miss Precarious. 5.35 
Trynova. 

<-45 CLAUDE HARRISON MEMORIAL 
CHALLENGE TROPHY (Handicap: £3,402: 51) (17) 

2 0002 ARDROKLAD«&4))M8taWhani60-8 JNdtt 

3 0294 CHAfUIS CLUB (USA) (B)(D)D Chapman 884 

DMeMeM 

4 2Q3 BOU W B L VIBMgMH Eastarty 884.. MBMl9 

5 8434 NMGCNAH^IMMitC-O) Mis GRevotoy 7-88 

intei nurtn rnin 

6 2F00 9ACaMKBI BOV |8D)R Nichols 888 JWaOw 3 . 

8 1300 NO SEATMG HARIS (D)M McCormack 3-88 

W lienee IS 

10 3113 CELTIC BBS (80) A Baking 885, NOay7 

rf 0000 RtWAWAY ffi) (C) (D) C TlrtBBr 3-85 GDuffieU4 

12 2020 CHMA GOLD(D)Mg3 L SttdNI 78-4 MWtadl ■■ 

13 2308 BON ACCUBL H WMtog 3-82 LRgtfoftlfi J . 

IS 2411 LADY CARA rajBany 87-12 (8ex| J^NFr»6 

18 4000 Sl fftprs fe te (P)NV«inra 87-10- S Demon 13 

17 0000 BAY PRESTO (BITOT Fairfiwa 4-7-10 —11 ^ 

18 4000 PRMCES8 wadfr fa N CaS^han 4-7- 9 

S 222 SRa* m X iwvy 87-7^A«teS25 v 

22 3030 PHLSTAR (D) A Baking 5-7-7 J, GFtatettZ 

23 H00 KENSDDALLK S4one87-7_ — 17 IJ.l 

_ Lady Cara. 9-2 CeBte 8W. 81 AnJro* Led. 7-1 King 
OOTlenragnR 8T Chapter Chtt. 181 Pendor Dancer, BoBn 
Emly. 12-1 Cffina Gold, 181 ottws. -• 

5.10 BmKDALE SELLING STAKES (Div Ih 2-Y-O: ;; 

£1,240: 1m 40yd) (13) 4 !i 

7 0309 RNLUX DESIGN R HoBrahead 811 SPvfts3 

8 90 Rl U) SHOU P Hasbm 811 

10 000 GALWAY EXTOKS C Tinkler 811 

15 00 PADDY MALONEY ItessLSiddW 811 S Webster 12 

20 000 S AWDU ST JACK tBR MW Eastern* 811—. Ttuc«»5 

25 0300 WESTOALECWder 811 M Wood 10 

26 000 BABY COWE HOME P Rohan 8H ACtertS 

E 0039 DBJTEJ KUFHN Jtanqr Rtgertid 88- J tttan 6) « 

31 JOKNSOteSPWDeM James 86 AMadoyZ 

33 0403 LYN BAB M H EaMatoy &6 MBfecbll 

37 HtSS PRECARIOUS N Caftwhwi fi-8 „TIWi9 

43 00 SAPHWnWDffll R StoSteML. DMcteitel 

49 009 WILLY'S MECCA PUS 86 E Guest (3) 6 j 

.. J9P5 0 Jtak. 81 Lot Rae. 81 finfcw Design. 

IH Oome Home. 81 DeHte Muffin, 181 Weagta. 

12-1 Sanmrtoo. 181 Mss Precarious, 20-i otters. 

SELLING STAKES {Div flfc 2-Y-O: 
£1,240: 1m 40yd) (13) 

2 2JJ0 MA0TBAB MWEa stertte812- —7 «* 

2 232 J?f£i*fAm77EJSfieringion8f2_ rtueas t3 
{7 “0 ££5 ™*° p a 

a — ■— 1 

% 22JSS“ l,IOBa£RHannan M 

29 40« HOMEY PUHl M Utter 88 

34 000 MBS BOLffODCteoman88 

36 8D5E MARJPOSA DHjtfdn Jones M 

S «SS g*^*PEHUtgASnar8B 

£ 222 2£^taAGE J -*rtterson88 

46 2021 TRYNOVA G nttrttard-Gordon 88 wmb»>> 

n.i Bar. 81 Madame UfMe- ;• 

« ^ 8-1 Honey Plum. 181 Juki's Lad. 


20 1010 PEIDaR DANCER 
22 3090 PHLSTARffilABi 


Toes 23.1 Or £1.40. £280. £180. DF; 
E39J70. CSF: £42Ja. Trfcast £22801. 
3mfci042isec. 

541(81) 1, MANTON DAN (P Cook, 81 


34) (2m 




82 (b«L ALSO RAN; 81 
Song Ktt), lOManinwar. care- 


20 VMusi (StML 33 Bon Acceui, kSe 
Tfcnes. 13 ran. nk. S). 2SL 1L2L H " 

at Upper laittoum. To» E&90: 

ElioTci.60. DF: £1258 CSF: £364)1. 
Tricast £14721. Itoffl I3.04sec. 


ZL ALSO RAN 4 Battc Shore (40± 33 
Swtoy (5ttL 5 ran. Kl. 1KL »L 1& J 
Wtscn at Tarteton. TUB £450: £24)0, 
£1-30. DF: £520. CSF: E1TJ0. linn 
00.475OG. After a stewards' taqitty the 
reetet stood. 

Jackpot not non; Pfacepot £4-50 


Worcester 

Going: ten) 


Portu Irene M Coleman. 181); a 
fS Harris, 13-3. ALSO RAN: 2 tav 
Sak 10830 Seasoned &ntw y 

182 Swwy Reef. 14 Or CormBus. & 
Ramdum. 25 Mats Muaieffiirg, 33 Craven 
Boy mu), ffight Train. Modem Man. 12 
ran. NR: Comedy Princess, a. «. 5L 5L 
15H. B Patog atboMridoe. To* £5. 1 ft 
£180. £Sj 4Q. E24». CSRBM3. TVlcast 
£3342. DougM in 1 ,600 grts. 


»EPRBiaE(W Irvine. 8 in 
1 Be* (R Guest 84 a- Can 
(W Humphreys, 18 f). 2551 

s 

glfteyo. tfisr ElSS. DP £3a ** 

CSF: £7.78. 

aao ^ihdte )1.UBOPSHOT(RGuesL Pmr 
g* 1 *- Z-ttaCTto Bog (M Dwyer (11-8 tev); fpu) 

(804,16 Atte 
M» Luck. Border Gam, 

BCtto, Easter Rose Wat 
Log Cabttn. XL 8 l £1^4 

rtETinirT. n °“ 

CSF: £19.18 Tneast: £127.68. 

]■ THOMASCtXmi imgr .— 

^SSSSISiMSS! 

; 4, Foot SUck (S 6 


Lmdo (pu). Mossaul. 13 ran. NR; Gay 
Caruso. Monbergts. )m May. 1)H. 2V1L 
2X1 121 tW. M Ptaeat WMmgton. Td 
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FOOTBALL: TROUBLESOME TIES FOR FIRST DIVISION CLUBS IN LITTLEWOODS CUP 


» ■< 

r? 


’• e : Wi:, 


* Mfetav * 





Wimbledon meet old 
friends from their 
days as giantkillers 


Wimbledmi yesterday faced 

uploanunftmiliarcfellSffi 

in the second round of the 


went to the bottom of the first 
division on Wednesday night, 
have home advantage mst 


Southern League side. whfrh ^inst the third division side. 
ha s ™cp,7u S 4 e ^ Port Vale. United, without a 
lop ofUwfirK division in nSi P 010 * games, dis- 

seasons, are paSdvSSiK !"“ d of u ’= ftmota dab 
■ division leCSH ago M on 

United. Dna *’ e Aggregate at the same sta ge . 


' - As manager. Dave - 7 

; Bassett, said: “This time roles ijSSSLi?^ SE*1E£ 
■ arc revered W» H aton * *«**»■ to enforce their 


: are reversed. We are the team 

people want to beat, whereas 

• in the past we have been the 
giantkillers. And to add some 
spice it is the first time we will 
; have met Cambridge since our 
- Southern League days”. 

; Yesterday’s seeded draw, 
1 televised live on TV-AM, 
; inevitably threw up many 

** inl«Ar(i... i*. V! J 


tan on visiting supporters for 
the second round tie at KenD- 
»wtb Road on September 23. 
The fourth division dab have 
appealed to the Football Leant 
for a ruling. Luton originally 
thought then* policy of banning 
■way fans would cause them to 
forfeit' home advantage in cop- 
ties, hot then discovered a 1 
loophole in die Littlewoods com- 
petition regulations which stale 


in Gflfingham. But One oft 
Park Rangers, the beaten 
Wembley finalists, have a 
stiffer task against Blackburn 
Rovers from the second. 

Chelsea, suffering an earfy 
season confidence crisis, will 
not relish the trip to York 
City, whose cup gjanlkilHng 
exploits are part of football 
folklore. Brighton are guar- 
anteed a big gate for the arrival 
of their former manager, Brian 
Cough, and his Nottingham 
Forest learn. Newport Cooofy 
have another chance to uy 
and overcome Everton: In 
1982-83 Newport had home 
advantage first — this time 
they go to Goodison Park — 
and went out 4-2 on aggregate. 

In a 100 per cent Welsh 
turn-out sees Swansea Oty, 




- division. 

The Merseysiders know 
v they are in for fight over the 
two legs Fulham can re- 
produce the spirit they showed 
: in the dubs’ 1983-84 tie. 
Fulham were held at home, 
forced a replay draw and then 
1 went by the only goal in the 
-- third game at Craven Cottage. 


a visiting dub cm chum 25% of Wrexham and Cardiff City 
aU t i ck ers reserved or sold in play City. Ptorts- 


advance. Luton then decided, not 
to Issue any tickets m*a the day 
of the match and restrict ad- 
mission to members only. 

but 'they may not be quite so 
confident this time. 

Oxford United, who tri- 
umphed in the last Milk Cup 
— Littlewoods took over the 


mouth and Laton Town 
respectively. Arsenal got the 
better of the as for as 
North London was concerned. 
They are are home to 
Huddersfield Town first, while 
Tottenham Hotspur will have 
to battle at Barnsley. Preston 
and West Ham rake a trip 
down memory lane with a 



■ j - — •* » — < . — — — — — — uuttu utvuivt y Bsi I Iv wiui A 

lira game at Craven Cottage, sponsorship this season— also repeat of the 1964 FA Cup 
Manchester United, who encounters third division ride Final. 


DRAW FOR SECOND ROUND 


Thomas: replaces injured Norman 


Thomas nils gap 
in Welsh squad 


- Arsenal vHudersffcM Town 

- Bwnsleyv Tottenham Hotspur 
Bradford City v NawmstfsUnitod 

j Brighton v Nottingham Forest 
> Bristol Oty vShaffiMd United 

- Cambridge United v Wimbledon 
' Chariton Athtedc v Lincoln City 

Coventry c% v Rotherham United 
Crystal Palace v Bury Town 
Darby v West Bromwich Albion 
•* Everton v Newport County 
Hufl City v CariMe or Grensby 


Liverpool v Fulham 
Luton Town v CanSH City 
Manchaster United v Port Vrfe 
Middlesbrough v Bbrnfogham Ctty 
Oldham Athletic v Leeds UMtsd 
Oxford United v QUEn a ha n i 
Peterborough v Harwell City 
Preston North End v West Ham 
Queen’s Park Rangers vOackbum 
Reading v Aston Vwa 
Scunthorpe United v Ipswich Town 
Sheffield Wedn esday v Stockport 


Shrewsbury Town v Stoke CSy 
Southampton v Swindon Town 
Southend v Manchester Ctty 
Sw ana « Cftyv La i c late r City 
WateaflvMBhma 
Watford v Rochdale 


YorfcChy vCbetaee 

First legs w oe played on Septem- 

fSi^s 


Feeling the sting of Saltash 


Non-Leagne football by Nicholas Harling 


The chib most affected by the 
81 suspensions that have just 
' been dished out by the Cornish 
Football Association axe Name- 
less. And the double irony of 
Liskeard Athletic’s plight in the 
Great Mills Western League is 
that Saltash, the dub with the 
worst disciplinary record in the 
South-West, may indirectly 
benefit from their rivals* 
handicap. 

The longest bans, which start 
from tomorrow, rule out two 
players Liskeard signed from 
Saltash in the summer. Paul 
Chambers and Geoff Battams 
will miss a good port- of tbeir 
new chib’s championship chal- 
lenge. Battams. a midfield 
player formerly with Plymouth 
Argyle and Yeovil, is our until 
November 30, a total of 91 days, 
and Chambers, a promising full 
bock, previously with Torquay. 
Unitedand Plymouth Argyle, 
faces 126 days of inactivity until 
January A 

Both players, who have ap- 
pealed to the Football Associ- 
ation, woe sent ■ off while 
playing for Saltash last May in a 
six-a-side tournament, or- 
ganized by the Western Lea gu e , 
in Dawlish. Battams — who was 
said to have threatened an 
official causing a .match to be 
abandoned - appealed against 
the original sentence and bad his 
punishment reduced. Par t o f 
both suspensions is a con- 
sequence of the players - who 
had both previously been 
booked three times -suffering a 
further charge from the Cornish 

FA of bringing the game into 
disrepute. 


Chambers: 126-day ban 

Saltash. who were under 
threat of having their county 
affiliation withdrawn by the 
-Cornish FA, diplomatically let 
the miscreants go. But a disci- 
plinary commission has Still 
fined the dub £ 1 , 000 , of which 
£400 will be suspended on 
condition (hat the dub’s behav- 
iour improves. 

. “It’s air to say that we've bad 
our problems in the past,” 
Julian Chenery, the Saltash 
secretary, admitted. “Compared 
to the Football League, our 
records are not bad but in terms 
of local football we've gone over 
the limit, one reason bong that 
our players appear in so many 
games. These arc strict guide- 
lines the Cornish FA are work- 
ing under in their attempt to cut 
out indiscipline." 

Liskeard knew exactly what 
they, were doing when they 


signed the two players, although 
their manager, Brian Hodge, 
was surprised by the length of 
the bans. “Now we've got to get 
by until November and January 
without them," he said, “but to 
give the players credit, neither of 
them has even been spoken to 
by a referee since they’ve been 
with us." 

Hodge, aged 42. is the 
League’s longest-serving man- 
ager after 14 years in charge at 
Lux Park, where h is playing 
days ended through injury. His 
310 goals for Liskeard m nearly 
400 games is still a dub record. 
Last season be guided liskeard 
to tbeir highest position in the 
premier division, runners-up 
behind Exmouth, who have a 
100 per cent record after five 
games. Liskeard. who last week 
ended another 100 per cent 
record, that of Bideford, ore 
among Exmoutb's nearest chal- 
lengers _ and so are Saltash. 

• Pat Jennings started the habit, 
Peter Shilton carried it on and 
now it is goalkeepers in the 
General Motets VauxhaU Con- 
ference who are maintaining the 
goal-scoring trend with but kicks 
out of the penalty area. After the 
first-minute effort last season by 
John Jacobs that gave Dag- 
enham the point they required 
to avoid relegation in a 1-1 draw 
at Runcorn, Dave Ryan, of 
North wk* Victoria, has fol- 
lowed suit, His effort also came 
in a- 1-1 draw, against Al- 
trincham, Jeff- Wealands. for- 
merly of Birmingham City and 
Manchester United, being the 
embarrassed victim at the other 
end. 


. Martin Thomas, the New- 
castle United goalkeeper, has 
been called up by Wales for next 
week's European Championship 
match against Finland in Hel- 
sinki. Thomas replaces Tony 
Norman, of Hull City, who has 
been struggling this season with 
Norman is Wales's third 
goalkeeping casualty: Neville 
Southall, of Everton. and Eddie 
Niedzwiedd, of Chelsea, are 
both recovering from long-term 
ankle injuries. “We are very 
lucky to have an abundance of 
goalkeepers," the Wales man- 
ager, Mike England, said. “Mar- 
■ tin has started the season welL" 
The loss of Norman makes 
the Luton Town reserve, Andy 
Dibble, favourite to play in 
Finland. Dibble, who was for- 
merly with Cardiff City, first 
appeared in an international 
squad two rears ago, but had to 
wait until this summer’s tour of 
Cana da for his first appearance. 
• Mark Dennis, the Southamp- 


ton frill back, has been charged 
with bringing the game into 
disrepute by the Football 
Assooation. He was sent off 
after Iasi Saturday’s 4-3 defeat at 
Norwich and reported by the 
Coventry referee, Keren Barra tt, 
for allegedly assaulting a Nor- 
wich player as the teams left the 
field at the end of the match. 

ff he is found guilty of 
bringing the game into disrepute 
or insulting and improper 
behaviour. Dennis could be 
suspended or fined or both. He 
has 14 days to ask fora personal 
hearing. 

• Nigel Callaghan’s move from 
Watford to Charlton Athletic 
has been held up after a 
disagreement over terms. 
Charlton were hoping to have 
Callag han a former England 
Under-21 winger, in time for 
tomorrow's home game against 
Norwich Gty, but will now have 
to wail until next week. 


WEDNESDAY NIGHTS RESULTS 


FOOTBALL 

HRST DIVISION: Aston VMa Z Luton 1; 
LerastBrSL Uvwpool 1; Manchester Cfty 
2, Norwich® Newcastle 0. Queen's PM 

SE(£md OflflSXM: Bratton* 1. Crystal 
Palace Z Bnonton 2. Sarranghara 0. 
UTTLEWOOOS CHALLENGE- CUR FkM 
round, second leg: Chester 1. Derby 2 
(set egg: 2-4 score at 90 mins M: Derby 
won on away goals); Fttoam 2. Aldershot 
0(8Qir5-1k Northampton 2. GHngham 2 

S 2-3); Peterborough Z Colchester O 
24): Port Vtfe 4. Mom County 1 
7-2); Reading 4. Bristol Rovers 0 

64 

l CUP: Fourth rooneb Aberdeen 1. 
Cette 1 (mc Cette won 4-2 an penelfiee): 
Rangers 3. Dundee 1 (ML score tt 90rrons 
1-1): Httemttn 0, Guidee United Z 
Motherwel Z Forte! (set; score at 90 

rams 1 - 1 L 

Qtt VAUXHAU. CONFERENCE: Boston 
0. Barnet 3: Chetentom Z Weymouth 0; 
Gateshead 1, Altrincham 3; Kenenng 1. 
Fricttey Z Northmch a Scarborough 1; 
Maidstone 4. Waling 0. 

MULTFAHT LEAGUE: CaemarfanJL 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: Rrot dMafcm: Cov- 
entry 1 Ewanon V Leeds 4, Sheffield 
United 2: Nottttgham Forests. Newcastle 
1: Oldham 1. Hut 1; lUM te mdi 1. 


Wtaen 2. Bodon 2 Yortr 3, Rotherham 3. 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Crystal Pal- 
ace z Swindon Z Oxford United 2, 
CMseal. 

LOMBARD ULSTER CUP: Sml Brief 
Coierame D. Lame 0 (Coleraine won 4-2 
on penalties). 


SOUTHERN LEAGUE Premier dMttotc 
Alvechurch 1 , Dudtoy 0; Cambridge Qty 2. 
Shepshed Charterho u se ft Fershem 2, 
Bssin(Ktofce2. 

FA CUP: P mam lnty round replays: 
VauxhaB Motors .0. Chatham 2 (aid: 
Tunbridge WHS 1. Dover 2; Rushdan 2. 
Spektow 4; PortlMd 1 . Eastbowne United 
.ft Famnam 1. Devizes 4. 

GREAT HILLS WESTERN LEAGUE: first 
dhrishm: Ilfracombe 1. Haavttree Z 
Kaynthem 3, Beth 1; Ottery Si Mery 2. 
Elmore ft Tiverton 0. Wfctton 3. 

NALLS BREWERY HELLEMC LEAGUE: 
Premier d wtttt n - Abingdon Town 1, 
Morris Motors 1; Bkxstar ft Abmgdon 
United ft Rayners Lane 2. wattngtord 1: 
Shortwood 1. Sharpness 2; VHng Sports 
2. Houaiow 4: Yale 1. Sixier Mertw 0. 
VAUXHALL-OFEL LEAGUE: first (*-. 
vision: Souths** 3. Lewes a Second 
dvtoion sooth: Molesey 0, Metropolitan 
POica 6. AC Oetto Cue; Piuttettwy 
raeid raptey Somh afll. W are 2. 
SOUTH-EAST COUNTES LEAGUE: Fhwt 
rfivWmr ipywtch 5. Onarrt 5: Norwich Z 
OPR ft West Ham 6 Southend Z 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
STONES BITTED CHAMPIONSHIP; 
Cesfletord 1ft Hal B ; Halifax 20. Okttmm 
14; Hidl Kingston Rovers 12; Bradford 30, 
Leeds 33: femerstona 12. Salford 4; St 
Helens 38: Widncs 46. Wakefield 14; 
““ — 18. Barrow 6. 

OlvmOfE Ceribie 5, Bteckpooi 

36; York 0. Badey 30. 

RUGBY UNION 

CUm MATCHES: Torquay 3. pistol 35; 
Rugby 9. Bedford 23: Waterloo 34. 
Metropolitan Poflce 3; Aberavon 38. 
Central Giamargan 14; Canfett 22. Gtemor- 
gan Wanderers 13. 


Referee 
incurs 
the wrath 
of Hay 

David Hay. the Celtic man- 
ager, is to make a written protest 
to the Scottish FA about the 
referee's handling of Wednesday 
night's Sko! Cup tie -at Aber- 
deen. Although Celtic reached 
the semi-finals on a penalty 
shooi-oul against the cup bold- 
era, he was incensed by a 
□umber of derisions. 

Tcmy Shepherd, the Celtic 
substitute, was sent off and six 
others were booked — three 
from Celtic and three from 
Aberdeen — as the Glasgow dub 
won 4-2 in the penalty decider 
after the match had ended 1-1 at 
the end of normal time. The 
referee concerned was Bob 
Valentine. 

Hay's pleasure at a place in 
the last four was overshadowed 
by bis anger towards Valentine 
and he said: "I am going to write 
to SFa about him. I wish to say 
that 1 do not think it advisable 
that he should referee matches , 
involving Celtic — not just 
Aberdeen-Gdtic games— but all 
games involving our side." 

With Aberdeen out of tbei 
way, Celtic and their Glasgow 
rivals Rangers, who beat Dan- . 
dee 3-1 after extra time, are on 
course for a repeal of their Skol l 
Ctip final of three years ago after 
being kept apart in yesterday's 
semi-final draw. 

The prospect of Graeme 
Souness, the new Rangers' 
player-manager, making his first 
Hampden Park final appearance 
became a distinct possibility 
when bis club were drawn 
against Dundee United, who 
beat Hibernian 2-0 at Easter 
Road 

The last time the “old firm" 
clashed in a final was in the 
same competition in 1983 when 
an Ally McCoist treble earned 
Rangers the trophy after extra 
time. Celtic were drawn against 
Motherwell, who eliminated 
Forfar Athletic 2-1 after extra- 
time. 

Both semi-final ties wifi be 
played at Hampden Park. The 
Motherwell v Celtic match is 
scheduled for Tuesday. Septem- 
ber 23. with the Dundee United 
v Rangers game taking place the 
next evening. 

DRAW: Mottenral v Cette Dundee 
United v Range**. 

Liverpool 
slip lets in 
Londoners 

Bryan Hamilton, a former 
Everton player, now manager of 
first division Leicester City, 
enjoyed the euphoria which 
accompanied his side’s 2-1 vic- 
tory over the League cham- 
pions, Liverpool. It was 
Liverpool's first defeat since last 
February and caused Hamilton 
to reflect: “If we show that level 
of commitment in the rest of our 
games, then we could be in fora 
very interesting season." 

Liverpool conceded both 
goals following free -kicks. Gary 
McAllister scored direct from 
the first, and Russell Osman the 
second after the ball had been 
rolled to him by Venus. 
Liverpool's consolation goal 
came from their player-man- 
ager, Kenny Dalglish, five min- 
utes from time. That defeat 
allowed Queens Park Rangers 
to join Wimbledon as tbe table 
pace-setters. 

Rangers won 2-Oat Newcastle 
United, with goals from for- 
wards. John Byrne and' Gary 
Bannister, and gave manager, 
Jim Smith, a measure of delight: 
“It was the best away perfor- 
mance since I took over." 

Substitute, Paul Kerry, scored 
twice to help Aston Villa beat 
Laton Town 2-1 for their first 
win of the season. 


-RUGBY UNION 


‘Rebel 9 tour tops 
hectic agenda 
for home unions 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

The Welsh Rugby Union’s Iasi game for the Sydney club, 
general committee met yes- Gordon. Iasi weekend and re- 
terday and the Rugby Football turns next week hoping to play 
Union full committee meets on September 13 for one of 
today. Both must give some Wasps* lower teams, 
thought to next month's Inter- . Hall, the Bath Ibnker. played 
national Board meeting on in Brisbane and looked in 
amateurism, when the repre- excellent shape during his club's 
sentaiives of the four home 23-10 defeat of Pontypool on 
unions will expect a full ex- Wednesday. Here an apology 
position from New Zealand of may be in order to readers who, 
the Cavaliers’ tour to South not unreasonably, expect this 
Africa. paper to get its results correct. 

TL. Dcir , .,.■■■ The final score of the match was 

a penalty by Caner for Pomv- 
P°oL not a conversion, hence 
the scoreline of 23-9 which 

ssffsrtsrs >«- 

le«“orn?nHL at this 

divisional srtmion polxj and !£*£ 


tra^t' or £ -«!■ 3SL3T, 


England selectors. 


They have adopted a gradual 
build-up. an approach which 


It has been a busy summer for will be echoed by all the 
the selectors, who have been country's leading players who 
involved in two squad week- must pace themselves* for van- 
ends. at Bisham Abbey and ous international demands, and 
Warwick University; a third will wilL one hopes, be allowed to do 
be held at Loughborough so by their clubs. 


University next weekend. “We 


may prove difficult. 


have been breaking relatively however. Clubs at levels high 
new ground in trying to |n- and low will be aiming for a 
trod uce elements of athletics good season in order to try to 
into sessions.” Martin Gnat, ensure (he highest possible place 
the England coach, said. “The in the new league structure of 
British bobsleigh team attended the 1987-8$ season. There will 
our second session and it was also be. for English players, a 
interesting to see the input other variety of representative dial- 
sports can give to our sport. We icnges. the first of them on 
are trying to get the players to October 7 when a combined 
think long-term, to set them- English students' team play the 
selves personal targets. Japanese at OxfonJ. John Rolv 

Not every player in national ins. the British Lions' assistant 
squad of 40 has attended the manager in 1966 and for so long 
summer courses. Some of them a driving force in student rugby, 
were in Australia, like Andrew, chairs the committee preparing 
the stand-off half who played his for that game. 

Injury robs Ulster 
of centre Hewitt 

By George Ace 


John Hewitt; Ulster's inter- 
national centre, is not available 
for the match against the Sooth 
of Scotland at Jedburgh tomor- 
row week for which the team 
wifi be announced on Sunday. 

Carr, Rogers and Duncan 
missed the game a gnfast tbe 
International XV at Raven hill 
last Saturday because of injury 
or fflness but that trio, along 
with Rainey and Miliar, both 
not available test weekend, all 
reported fit at a midweek train- 
ing session. Afterwards, the 
chairman of selectors. Neil 
Jackson,' said: “We have do 
iqjvy problems and apart from 
Hewitt aD members of the panel 
are available for selection." 

It is not anticipated that tbe 
team will vary much from that 


originally chosen Tor last Sat- 
urday. Moles is likely to replace 
Hewitt and it » more than 
probable that either Millar or 
Brian McKibbin will oast Ken- 
nedy from the loose head spot, 
the London Irish man looking 
somewhat shod of fall fitness 
last Saturday. 

Ulster dented South of Scot- 
land pride ha the corresponding 
fixture at Ravenhili last season, 
handing out a 31-3 drubbing. It 
must not be forgotten, however, 
that the Sooth were forced to 
make no less than six changes 
from the original selection and 
were deprived of the services of 
their captain. Deans, and two 
Other Scottish internationals in 
scram half, Hunter, and Gala's 
Derek White. 


Bristol spirit lives on 

Schools' rugby by Michael Stephenson 


There is a clear line drawn 
between dubs like Coventry, 
Bath and Leicester, who face 
top-class op postion every week, 
and those who enjoy the luxury 
of occasional fixtures against 
less demanding sides. The same 
is true of schools’ rugby. 

Giles Morris has succeeded 
Roger Cox as masier-in-charge 
of Bristol CS. whose first five 
fixtures are against M illAdd, 
Monmouth, Wycliffe, St 
Brendan’s and Downside. De- 
spite question mails hanging 
over the team. Morris repons 
tbe presence of “strong half- 
backs and back row." He adds: 
“My biggest asset is un- 
doubtedly tbe excellent spirit 
and enthusiastn which Roger 
bad cultivated in the squad." 

Rugby may not enjoy com- 
parable status m some other 


RUGBY LEAGUE | SPONSORSHIP | Some acts are difficult to follow: that of octogenarian father figure Enzo Ferrari is impossible 


Salford must 
give Fulham 
players back 

Salford, who had stated two 
Fulham players, Steve Mi Its and 
Dave Bui lough, will not now be 
allowed to use them as a result 
of the London club's rescue 
from liquidation. 

The Fulham players were told 
a fortnight ago that they could 
move as free agents, but they 
must now return. David Howes, 
a Rugby League official, said: 
"Fulham have stayed Rugby 
League members and did not go 
into liquidation. 

• Draws in the county cup 
competitions are: 

RHHuKStetonher Viv^ HaSS: 
aatJtard vTSSS 

*^ I, SS l *aS , 5 

V ROOM Hornets: ww****" 
Sttnun. 


Help for the 
champions 
of the future 

Ten possible champions of 
the future' have received finan- 
cial help from a scheme to aid in 
the development of British 
sport. The youngsters will share 
in a £ 1 0.000 sponsorship to help 
them fiilfil their potential. 

The money has been guar- 
anteed by the catering firm. 
Pizza Hut. who have started^ 
“Support Sport" campaign m 
association with the §jotb Aid 
Trust, the charity formed to aid 
the development of Britain’s 
prospective amateur stars. 
Among the first award wmners 
is David Sharpe, aged 18, the 
middle distance athlete from 
J arrow, who is tipped by many 
to follow in the trades of Steve 

artoafigasa 

tJSsJ MSs^J SSS^. 

Epiilgll 

SttCTurtwr. 17. 

top j SneH.22. Easttfcflh. MteteMk* A 

Ward, 15. Epsom. 


II Commendatore is still in command 


bowls 


Line into last eight 


By Gordon Allan 


'pln (Aflwrtey) and Mcs VY Une 

^ajSSTk one of 32 compet- 
itors (16 flat green. 16 crown 
green) in the Liverpool Victoria 
Insurance superbowl indoor 
event in Manchester fiwn Octo- 
ber 13 to 18. Noel Burrows 
defends his title and among Uie 
others contestiiiw foe fust pnze 
of £ 12.000 are the iron he beat 
in last vear’s final Dtodd Bry- 
2,t. as' well as Willie Wood. 
Terry Sullivan. J* m 
Cutis. Nonna Shaw, Jeanette 
Con Ian. and Eileen Befi. 


Kilyon and hi* w* ^ l Htggottouoro * h 

Loughborough, did not enter JBSSkJMmt v t 

this season. , „ ' 8 Dt^can * H Cubs. R 

"^•?iJS.ia«ssn!SSwp BS Ktggj/agjjiagD 

sa*»sfis9S 

***■■' slifLiuSp a** 8 - 


As the McCarthy and Stone 
national mixed ^champion- 
ship. at the BradfoidBorougb 
club on September 20 and -J. 
moves into its secotKl year. 
Ptlcr Line and Tony AlWooc 
find themselves in the quaner- 
finals. Une is partnered by his 
wife. Wendy, the Common- 
wealth Games 
ner. and AUcock by Pat 
John McConnell and hts 
mother-in-law. June Measure^ 

who were beaten in the serni- 
finals last season, have 

again. Last year's winners. John 

Kilvon and bis w,fc Jean, o« 




ft£S)TR Sulton *ncr P 


Monza 

Today, while Michele Alboreto and 
Stefan Johansson set abort their task 
■of qualifying for Sunday's Italian 
Grand Prix, then every addon in the 
pit road, let alone on the racetrack, 
cheered wildly by Ferrari banner- 
waving enthusiasts fining the Monza 
circuit, the maa responsible for aB the 
euphoria will be sitting alone in his 
office 100 miles away, bat far from out 
: of touch. 

Bum Ferrari has not attended a 
world championship race since 1956, 
the year that his son Dino died of an 
iHnras af Che tragically early age of 24 
years, hot armed with television sets, 
fax machines and a telephone, he is 
kept as aware of every development of 
hh team throughout then* days at the 
circuit as if he had transported his 
office into the paddock behind the 
pits. 

At 88 years of age (he will he 89 
next Febniary> he is an under- 
standably frail man, but with a min d 
still razor-sharp and a formidable 
determination to remain fumly in 
control of his team rather than being 
merely its figurehead- . 

Ferrari (now part of the giant Fiat 
empire) is, of coarse, first and 
foremost a manufacturer of high- 
performance road care and Enzo 
Ferrari personally approves every 
new Hwig n carrying his name. But it 
is the racing team and their insatiable' 
appetite for engineering development 
which are closest to his heart and 
where his influence is still felt most 
deeply. 

- Significantly, perhaps, the impres- 
sive new racing headquarters across 
the road from roe car factory and the 
private test trade adjacent to it are 
buflt on Ferrari femOy-owned laid. 
The former fermbouse alongside the 
track is where Enzo Ferrari rests 
between morula and late afternoon 
spells in his office w-if there are 
cars being tested on the track — in the 
control room, . . 

Thera, through a battery of 10 
television sets, he can see every point 
around the track and by means iff 
sophisticated recording equipment 


can monitor car performance through- 
out every three-kilometre lap. 

Right now, Ferrari need all tbe test 
facilities at their disposal because 
their current cars are less than 
competitive and 1986 has been a 
miserable season for the team. But tbe 
commendatore (the tide was awarded 
to him by the Italian Royal family in 
1924 when he won the Coppa Acer bo 
race, and even though he declined to 
have the honour confirmed after Italy 
became a republic he has been 
addressed by it ever since) would not 
'be drawn on his plans to rectify the 
problem when I met him on Wednes- 
day in a room alongside his office. 

No believer in 
turbo-chargers 

About the suggestion that John 
Barnard,-who has just left his job as 
McLaren's chief designer, would soon 
be oo the Ferrari payroll but opmat- 
ing from a base in Britain, he would 
only say that to take advantage of 
Britain’s greater experience in aero- 
dynamics, thanks to the spin-off from 
the aerospace industry, was always a 
possibility, but that his team's 1987 
plans - including the driver fine-up — 
would not be revealed until after the 
European part of the world champion- 
ship comes to an end in Portugal later 
this month. 

He was more forthcoming, however, 
about the longer-term future and on 
nostalgic matters. He says he is a firm 
supporter of the idea that turbo- 
■ chargers should be banned when the 
present Formula One ft replaced for 
1989. "A normally aspirated engine is 
an expression of the total engineering 
efforts of all who are responsible for 
the engine design, whereas with 
turbos you are in the hands of the 
turbo suppliers". 

. He admires the business acumen of 
the FOCA (Formula One 
Constructors’ Association) chief; Ber- 
nard Ecclestone: “We have a good 


: >Y. ; ; s 



av kv i ’ ->v .«.rV 





■f 


Enzo Ferrari: frafl.yet razor-sharp 

relationship and ‘ high mutual 
respect" Nevertheless,’ be dearly 
laments tbe graduation of grand prix 
racing from an essentially sporting 
activity into one which is motivated 
largely by business interests. 

Enzo Ferrari has been- active in 
motor rating for more than 65 years, 
first as driver, then as Alfa Romeo 
team manager, before forming his 
own Scudena. Many of the world’s 
top drivers have raced for him and be 
remembers two with special affection 
— the great Tazio Nwolari ami 
Britain's Peter Collins. “He was a 
fine driver and a fine man — a true 
gentleman." And his greatest regret is 
thar Stirling Moss was never a 
Ferrari driver. “His rating career 
ended too soon with that bad accident, 
otherwise, who knows?" 


Of his ament drivers, Alboreto is 
“very sensitive to bis car and his 
racing environment, with a good 
driving style and very good fighting 
spirit". And Johansson? "Very 
consistent throughout a race, though 
not at bis best In one-lap qualifying." 
And what does be look for in 
considering a new driver? “It depends 
if our car is good or not. If it is good, 1 
want most of all consistency of 
performance. If it is not so good, a 
good testing., ability is the most 
important thing." 

Racing is suffering 
from indigestion 

And what of the crowded Id-race 
calendar? “You can die of starvation 
oriudigestioa. Now, grand prix rating 
is su ff erin g badly from indigestion." 
But he Is less worried about the 
prospect of some teams having to drop 
oat through lack of finance. u Some of 
the best rating in dm past has taken 
place with just four or five good 
teams." he recalls. 

This weekend, of comae, Enzo 
Ferrari wants to hear good news from 
the Monza circuit, but one senses that 
he is philosophical about the cars’ 
chances and perhaps consoled Oft 
week that an exciting new challenge is 
on the horizon. "Our Indianapolis 
engine — it is ready for its first test,** 
he told me with 'almost boyish 
enthusiasm, and the fact that the 
shutters of the test cell were lowered 
before I was allowed in confirmed as 
much. 

As I took my leave of this 
remarkable old man who exudes so 
much digs it)' and commands respect 
almost to a level of reverence, I 
pondered only briefly about who will 
one day take his place. Tbe answer, of 
course, is so one. Some acts are 
difficult to follow.- Enzo Ferrarfs is 
impossible.' 

John Blonsden 


schools but it is taken seriously 
nevertheless. An example- is 
Eton College, whose master-in- 
charge, James Fitzgerald, says: 
“We are going on a short tour of 
the Borders before term playing 
colts sides from Kelso, Melrose 
and Jedthistle. With only two 
old colours, both forwards, 
remaining from a disappointing 
1985 season, Ramsay will cap- 
tain a young, combative side 
eager for success." 

Geoff Blair.' who has seven 
players returning with extensive 
first XV experience, hopes that 
bis Fettes side will be further 
strengthened by the arrival of 
several new boys. Sira dial ten. 
enjoying a pre-season tour in the 
South of France, are also 
optimistic. Their masler-in- 
charge Brian Raine will coach a 
promising side, captained from 
the from row by Ken Smith. - 


HOCKEY 


Students boost 
England 
Under-21 trial 

By Joyce Whitehead 

Three players who had to 
withdraw from the international 
tournament in Mulheirn, West 
Germany, last June because of 
A-ievei examinations, are 
among the 28 players called up 
for the England Under-21 trials 
at Bedford tomorrow. England 
finished third without Jane 
Sixsmith, Lorraine Parker and 
Katharine Tilbury, aU of whom 
are now preparing for the Home 
Countries Under-21 tour- 
nament in Cork on September 
19 and 20. 

Scotland have already chosen 
their squad for Cork and this 
weekend arc taking part in the 
Hadrian's Festival of Inter- 
national Hockey, playing Com- 
bined Services tomorrow 
morning and Durham in the 
afternoon followed by Tykes 
(Yorkshire; and Mancuriaits 
(Manchester) on Sunday. Ex- 
d tided from their squad is 
Gillian Messenger, just returned 
from the World Cup • in 
Amsterdam. 

SCOTLAND: L Harrow (East), Y Edwards 

fftnilfhl A I numi (Cacti |y| £|j(nS toants m 


M Barr (Soiflb Wastf. L Howie fEastf. D 
ThortJum (SouthL S Basel (Cenrran. E 
,e “~ v S Fraser JNonh). L Gateway 
F Lotfuan (MKSanos). C 

L Hood (East). 

ENGLAND TRIALiSTS: M Allen 
(CanfflnogashlrB). S Chandler (Kant). K 
Edwards (Norfolk). M Hall (Hunungdon- 
stwe). T INfce (Suffolk), H Banted 
(Devon), J Boner* (Herefordsiwe). S 




(StBlfortteflrt). A Berq (BCHE1. A Bond 
(Wonastarsmra). j Snanum (Warwicfc- 
smre), S Wiare (Norranmnnsnir*), i 
Dale (Swansea umver&yl A Barker 
(Yorkshret, H Bfowtl (Yorkshwai. L 



Sharp makes team 

Henry Sharp, from Leeds, is 
the only British player selected 
for the world amateur student 
rugby league team, against 
New Zealand at Auckland 
tomorrow, in the final game of 
the World Student Cup 
tournament. ■ 


f 






SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1986 


CRICKET: BROAD AND ROBINSON CATCH SELECTOR’S EYE 


GOLF 


Ontong strengthens his 
case for inclusion 
in team for Australia 


Cardiff: Glamorgan, with all 
their second innings wickets in 
hand, need 173 runs to bait 
Nottinghamshire. 
Nottinghamshire, striving 
desperately to ensure second 
place at least in the champion- 
ship. redeemed a middle order 
slump with dogged late resis- 
tance yesterday on a dusty, 
turning pitch. Splendid off- 
spin bowling by Rodney 
Oniong. who bowled un- 
changed for almost five hours, 
look eight for 101, which gave 
him 13 wickets in the match. 

Oniong took the first seven 
wickets to fall, including a 
period when he claimed five 
for six. in 24 bails. Not- 
tinghamshire, 98 behind on 
first innings, had been given a 
fine start by Broad and Robin- 
son. who put on 1 14 before the 
collapse started. 

French, at No 8, was the 
chief contributor as Not- 
tinghamshire fought back and 
managed to prolong their 
innings until the dose. 
Glamorgan were handicapped 
by the absence of their left arm 
spinner North, who had a 
pulled hamstring. 

An important witness to 
this stirring cricket was A C 
Smith, an England selector. 
He ambled round the ground, 
exchanged plesantries with 
those he knew, revealing noth- 
ing but did not miss a bail. 
England's team for Australia 
is picked on Monday and 
announced next morning. 

Broad and Robinson, to my 
mind, could have booked 
their plane tickets. Ontong 
would surety win preference 
over Patel, if an off-spinning 
all rounder is wanted. Greg 
Thomas might miss oul 
It is only three years since 
Oniong was persuaded to 
switch to off-spin in pref- 
erence to routine medium 
pace. Last winter he declined 

Fit Gould 
ready to 
face Lancs 

lan Gould, the Sussex captain 
and wicketkeeper, has declared 
himself fit for the NatWest 
Trophy against Lancashire at 
Lord’s tomorrow. 

«> Gould, aged 29, who took 
over as skipper from John 
Barclay in may. has been trou- 
bled by a hip injury. but on 
Wednesday he hit SO in a dub 
match at Mitcham and yes- 
terday, successfully came 
through a vigorous practice 
session at Hove without any 
reaction. 

He said: "I did not want to 
play if 1 was less than 100 per 
cent fit. but I have successfully 
come through my fitness test 
and we are all raring to have a go 
at Lancashire." 

Gould's fitness race has in- 
cluded intensive treatment at 
Brighton and Hove Albion's 
football ground and he will lead 
Sussex in iheir seventh Lord's' 
final and first for eight years. 
Only Lancashire, with four tro- 
phy wins. have a better record in 
the competition. Gould, said 
Sussex will be at full strength 
with key all-rounder. Colin 
Wells, reporting fit after losing 
several pounds m weight follow- 
ing a gastric virus. Fast bowler, 
Adrian Jones, will also be in 
action despite a stubborn knee 
injury and a painful cracked toe. 

TEAM: A M Groan. H J Allkhan. P W G 
Parker. Imran Khan. C M Wafc. A P Wotts. 

I J Gould (caDtamL G 5 la Roux. 0 A 
Reeve. ACS Pigoa. A N Jones. Twetth 
•nan. N J Lenham or C P PtXUxMor. 


By Richard Streeton 
to play for Soriih Africa, the 
country of his birth, against 
Hughes's rebel Australians, in 
order to retain his England 
qualification. 

The conditions were all in 
Ontong's favour but nothing 
could gainsay the consistent 
control and variety he 
showed. During his first ' 12 
overs, which cost 28 runs 
before he took his first wicket, 
the openers were able to cut 
one or two balls. Near tea as he 
tired he over pitched occa- 
sionally and was hit by- Birch 
for French. Overall, though, 
he bowled in magnificent 
fashion. 

If Ontong, inevitably, lias 
stolen the headlines, there can 
be no praise high enough for 
Broad and Robinson. 
Nottinghamshire's chances 
were not rated high after the 
pitch gave an early warning 
about the problems h would 
pose. Glamorgan’s first in- 
nings lasted only smother SO 
minutes and their last five 
wickets crashed for 15 runs. 

When Nottinghamshire bat- 
ted Thomas kept a good line 
and got occasional lift. He 
found the edge of Broad's bat 
more than once but the turf 
was never conducive to raw 
speed and crumbling foot- 
holds did not help his cause. 
Broad and Robinson, by 
determined and skilful bat- 
ting, put on 63 in 18 overs 
before lunch. They battled on 
gamely against Ontong and 
had been together just over 
two hours when Robinson was 
ouL 

He moved out to drive, 
edged the ball and Holmes 
took a tumbling, low catch at 
point. In Ontong's next over 
Newell and Johnson went in 
three balls. Newell lobbed a 
catch off his glove to point; 
Johnson was held at short leg 
via a pad. 

Gavaskar is 
surprised 
at exclusion . 

Gwalior (Reuter) — Sunil 
Gavaskar. India's former cap- 
tain and the world's most 
prolific run scorer in Test 
matches, said yesterday that he 
was surprised by his exclusion 
from India's team for the first 
two one-day internationals 
against Australia. 

The Indian selectors an- 
nounced they were dropping 
Gavaskar last Sunday, the day 
be celebrated his 37th birthday, 
saying they warned to build a 
younger team to try and retain 
the World Cup next year. 

Gavaskar said: “I am sur- 
prised that l am dropped be- 
cause I am fit as a fiddle and 
have not yet called it a day.” 
However, Gavaskar would not 
discuss the merits or demerits of 
the decision. 

• KUWAIT: Viv Richards, 
the West Indies captain, will 
lead a World XI against 
Pakistan next month in two 
one-day benefit matches to be 
staged in Kuwait for the 
Pakistani leg-spinner Abdul 
Qadir (Reuter reports). Rich- 
ards replaces the New Zealand 
all-rounder Richard Hadlee, 
named earlier as caplain of the 
world side, which will indude 
Ian Botham. Hadlee withdrew 
from the festival to be played 
on October 2 to 3 to Kelp 
ojganise a benefit planned for 
himself. 

Imran Khan captains Paki- 
stan, winners of the Austral- 
asia Cup event in Sharjah 


Broad's innings ended in 
the 4 1st over when On long got 
one to “pop" and Moms at 
first slip took the catch. Rice 
moved in front of bis stumps 
to pull a short ball but it kept 
low and had him leg' before. 
Hadlee dedded aggression 
was the solution. He had 
already been dropped at wide 
mid-on against Barwick when 
he drove Ontong into deep 
mid-offs hands. 

Half an hour after tea 
Ontong tempted Birch and a 
firm stroke yielded a catch to 
long-on. Barwick, always tidy, 
ended the off spinners chance 
to take alt 10 wickets when 
Pick after 38 minutes was leg 
before half forward. Barwick 
also dismissed Finch after a 
135-minute stay before 
Ontong had Afford teg before 

HOTTMGHAMSNRE: First Innings 121 <H 
C Ontong 5 for 26). 

Second tamings 

8 C Broad c Morris b Ontong SB 

R T Robinson c Holmes b Ontong — 47 

M Newel c Holmes b Ontong 0 

P Johnson e Maynard bOntona 0 

*CEB Rice two Oniong 15 

R JHadtoec Smith b Gracing IS 

J O Birch c sub b Ontong 24 

tB N French Rw b Bannck 58 

RAPIcktowbBanwCk — 9 

E E Hemntings not out 18 

J A Afford tow b Ontong 4 

Extras (b 13, to 7. w 1 , nb 2) 23 

Total 270 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-114. 2-120, 3-120, 
4-131. 5-138. 6-156. 7-202. 6-234. *255. 

10- 270. 

BOWLING: Thomas 17-2-57-0: SmHl 2-0- 

11- 0: Barwick 31 -541-2: Ontong 40.1-13- 
101 - 8 . 

GLAMORGAN: FfcH Innings * 

J A Hopkins bAflord 21 

*H Morris c French 0 Hadlee 2 

A L Jones c French b Afford 33 

G C Hofcnas c Btacfi b Hadee 13 

M p Maynard e French b FUce 0 

R C Offlong c French b Alford 60 

J G Thomas c and b Afford 70 

IT Davies not out 2 

I Srrtthc French bAKORl 0 

S R Berwick b Pick 1 

P North b PH* 0 

Bdras (to 10, w 3, nb'2) IS 

Total (93y3 oms) 219 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-15; 2-56. S-4& 4- 
69. 5-78. 6-204. 7-216, 8-216. *217. ID- 
219. 

BOWLING: Hmflafl 15-5-19-2. Pick 153-3- 
27-2; Afford 30-7-60-5; Hammings 19-4- 
51-0: Rk* 14-5-32-1. 

Bonus points; Glamorgan 6, Nottngftam- 
shire4. 

Umpires; D J Constant and J A Jameson. 

Hampshire 
in debt 
to Smith 

SCARBOROUGH: Hamp- 
shire beat Yorkshire by three 
wickets. 

Robin Smith produced a fine 
all-round performance to help 
Hampshire into today's Asda - 
Challenge final against Essex, 
who beat Lancashire on the toss 
of a coin on Wednesday when 
no jHay was possible because of 
a waterlogged ground. 

YORKSWRE 

MDMoranc Parks bTiwnlatt 21 

A A MutcaMe c R A 5mMii b James _ 44 

K Sharp b James 52 

J D Love c Parks bCoreior. 14 

PE Robinson not out 50 

tQ L Bairatow b Connor 10 

P Garrick not out 13 

Extras (lb 12. w 2. nb 4) 16 

Total (5 e*ts. 50 overs) 222 

A Sktabattam. C Shaw. S D Ftetchor and S 
J Dennis did no: bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-40, 2-85. 3-143, 4- 
156.5^183. 

BOWLING; Marshal 10-2^0-0: James 10- 
1-55-2: TramftM 10-043-1; Connor 10-3- 
34-2; Cowley 10-1-38-0. 

HAMPSMRE 

C G Greanidge 8w b FMcher 41 

■M C J NaSotow: Bataaow 

bSidebottom 10 

CL Smith to* b Sfctebaffixn 33 

VP Terry Bwv b Si d abotlom 0 

R A Small b Fletcher 57 

K D James b Derms 20 

N G Cowley c Love b Shew 30 

T M Trenton not out 7 

M D Marshall not out 10 

Extras(bi, b10.w2.nb4) 17 

Total (7 nfcts, 483 overs) 225 

J Parks and C A Connor <M not bb. 
FAU. OF WICKETS: 1-20, 2-80. 362. 4- 
98. 5-158. 6-195. 7-213- 
BOWUNG: Dermis 10-1-43-1; Stdebottom 
10-0-40-3. Shaw 93-0-57-1: Fletcher 10- 
1-39-2; Camck 9-2-35-0. 

Umpires: J Btafcanshaw and B Lead- , 
MW. 



.'N , • r . . . 


.4’.% -Vn 


Century in sight; Richards hits another boundary 


The Oval of special variety 


THE OVAL: Gloucestershire, 
with all second-innings wickets 
in hand, are 119 runs ahead of 
Surrey. 

The preliminaries here yes- 
terday to what could well be an 
exciting finish today made for a 
fascinating day's cricket. In this. 
Jack Richards made his second 
hundred this season off 124 
balls; Mark Feltham made 76, 
which was his best performance, 
in what was an exhilarating 
stand of 154 for Surrey’s fifth 
wicket; Jack Russell held three 
catches in a row to dismiss 
Stewart, Butcher, and Lynch off 
Walsh and Lawrence to make 
him the joint holder of an 
unusual record — George 
Dawkes held three catches off 
successive balls bowled by Les 
Jackson for Derbyshire against 
Worcestershire at Kidder- 
minster in 1958 — and with the 
bat Russell made 71, which was 
his best performance, too. And 
lastly, Courtney Walsh took five 
for 61, the 12th time he has 
taken five or more wickets in an 
innings. 

In lire relative calm of a bright 
sunny morning's first 50 min- 
utes before a rumbustious half- 
all-hour’s Joust which was to 
follow, Gloucestershire had 
come tantalisingly dose to 
reaching their objective, a 
fourth bonus point Russell was 
42 and Graveney eight when 
Gloucestershire started out at 
252 for eight 

Russell soon moved past a 
well-made 50, and promptly 


By Peter Marson 

marked it in the best way by 
producing three splendid 
strokes to drive Feltham and 
Medlycott through the off-side 
field to the boundary. At 71, 
though, RussefTs griuy timings 
was ended with a catch behind 
off Bicknefl's bowling, and when 
Lawrence fell lo a nonchalant 
catch by Medlycon off his own 
bowling. Gloucestershire bad 
fallen short by three runs. 

Incident, injury, Russell's 
three catches, a possible hat- 
trick for Lawrence, and five runs 
in five overs over a period of 30 
minutes marked an extraor- 
dinary passage at the start to 
Surrey's innings. It had begun 
with Clinton's retirement after 
he had suffered a blow on ft is 
right elbow in Walsh’s opening 
over. In his second over, 
Tomlins, fielding at forward 
short-leg was hit on the knee, 
and he retired. 

Stewart was caught behind off 
the next baU, the last of the over, 
and Butcher and Lynch fell in 
the same way to the next two 
balls bowled by Lawrence. Then 
Jesty. who had the visor to his 
helmet shattered by a ball from 
Walsh, paused to reflect before 
helping Surrey regroup. Jesty 
had made seven when 
Bain bridge bowled him in the 
last over before lunch by when 
Surrey had got to 40 for four. 

In 40 overs between lunch 
and tea, Surrey's recovery was 
complete, and that, of course, 
had been due chiefly to the 
batting of Richards and Feltham 


in their partnership which, by 
the time Fehham had been 
caught in the 'deep at mid-on, 
had taken Surrey on towards 
their sixth bonus point 

GLOUCESTERSWR& Firat tartnga 

p W Romutnss b Ctartia 0 

K P Tomfins tow b Bfcknel 16 

C W J Athay c Lynch b Doughty 76 

PBafnbridgnc Jesty b Clarice 5 

AWStoioWtowbWlten — _ 20 

KMCwranb Fatten 6 

JWUoyPscSUwsflbButchar 56 

+R C Russel c Retells b BfcfcnsU - 71 

C A Walsh tow b Ctarka 0 

■OAGnwemynotout 17 

DV Lawrence e and bModycott 0 

Extras (b 6. b law 3.1101) 20 

Total (84 more) 297 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2, 241, 369. 4- 

102. 5- 114.6-138. 7-221. 9232. 9296. IQ- 
297. 

BOWLING: Oarko 26-341-3; BtcknoH 17- 
4-36-2 Feltham 22-4-75-2 Dourtty 9-1- 
49-1; Medtycoti 35-021-1: Bumf 6-0- 
17-1. 

Second Innings 

P W Romaines not out 17 

AW Stovoid not out 51 

Extras (b 1. B> 4. rii 5} 10 

Total (no wfet) 76 

SURREY: First tarings 
*AR Butcher c Russel b Lawrence 2 

G S Oiraon retired hurt 0 

A J Stewart e Russel b Watah 3 

T E Jesty b BataMdoa — — 7 

M A Lynch cRussaab Lawrence 0 

1C J Richards c Curran b WMsh 115 

MAFstthamcAlhaybLkmfc 78 

KTMedhoonc Russel bWtash 0 

HJ Doughty b Walsh 25 

ST Ctarka bWMsh 22 

MPBIcknelnotout 1 

Extras (l> 3. nb 2) 5 

Total (623 overs) — — 2SG 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-5. 2-&3-5. 44a 5- 

194. 6- 194, 7-219, 8-243. 9-256. 
BOWLMG: Walsh 203461-6; Lawrence 
17-0-792; Batabridga 9434-1; Curran 5- 
0-19-0 Lloyds 12-360-1. 

Bonus points Swrey 7, Gloucestershire 

Umpires R Palmer and N T Plows. 


Wily Gifford achieves his target 

By Ivo Tennant 


FOLKESTONE- Kent, with four 
first-innings wickets in hand are 
26 runs ahead of Warwickshire 

Norman .Gifford, now in his 
26th season, took his 2,000th 
first-class wicket yesterday, an 
achievement as rare as it is 
praiseworthy. He could not, 
though, preweni Kent from tak- 
ing a first-innings lead, largely 
through substantial scores by 
Tavare. Aslett and Christopher 
Cowdrey, who made his highest 
total of the season. 

Gifford's 2,000th wicket was 
his fourth of Kent’s innings, that 
of Baptiste, who was trying to 
sweep him against the spin. 
Gifford, who is 46, is the 33rd 
bowler to have reacted this 


landmark and the tenth since 
.the war. 

Those include Underwood, 
opposing him in this match. Tbe 
outcome today may well hinge 
on their bowling for there is 
considerable help for the spin- 
ners from this pitch. And if 
nothing else, dry pitches do 
wonders for the over-rate. 

WARWICKSMIE: First taxings 

AJ Motes b Baptiste 82 

P A Sntoi q Mcrali b C S Cowdrey 11 
A t KaBcharran c Rtatt b BapttoSp-l 2 

D L Amiss b .Doris 73 

IGWHunpogac Marsh bBapUstt -19 

Asd Din c Daws b Underwood 11 

A M Ftarreva St Mareti b Davts 26 

K J Kwtc Marsh b Baptiste 1 

GCSmalb Davis 28 

T A Munton c Marsh b Underwood — 0 

*N Gifford not out — 2 

Extras(b3.b5.w2.nb2) 12 


Total _267 

Score altar 100 orera: 234 for 7. 

FALL OF WICKETS.- 1-21.2-32. 3-146. 4- 

195. 5- 196. 7-221 , 8-346. 9247. 10-287. 
BOWLING: atson 12-1-260; Baptiste 29- 
9664; C S Cowdrey 12-149-1; Davis 28 
54-83-3; Underwood 32-18482. 

KENT: First tantags 
M R Benson c Ferreira b SnM 2 
MR Taykxc Meins bSm* 10 
CJ Tavare b Humpage b Gifford 43 
DG Aston b-GMordft 
G R Cowdrey c Hunpsoe b Gtftard 7 
X S Cowdrey not out 82 
E A E Bapdsta taw b Gtftard 22 
IS A Merst) not out 31 

Extras (b 12.0) 18. nb 3) 33 

Total (6 wks. 98 overs) 293 

RMEfisori, A P Davis and DL Underwood 
to bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 12.2-23.3-114,4- 

131. 6- 150, 8 224. 

Bonus (ubu; Kent a Worertciuiriis 4 
UmptrauA GT Whitehead and k j Lyons. 


Australians on Derbyshire labour as 
thechS^ions Capel has a field day 

■ * • AT DFfiBV- Nnrthnmnimtthir* . . 


Edmonds clears way for winter tour 


Phi! Edmonds has been told 
that he will be considered for 
selection to tour Australia with 
England this winter following 
the decision by Today news- 
paper and LBC Radio to release 
him from contractual commit- 
ments lo write and broadcast 
while on lour. 

The Middlesex spinner has 
teen informed by the Test and 
County Cricket Board that he 
will now he considered for the 
tour in Australia this coming 
winter. 

Under new TCCB regula- 
tions! which prohibit media 


work by the players chosen to 
tour. Edmonds's availability 
looked in jeopardy. But even 
though he relumed the form 
confirming his availability a day 
later than Wednesday's dead- 
line. set by the TCCB. they have 
decided to be teniem. 

The way was cleared for 
Edmonds, who was keen to tour, 
when Today and LBC decided 
to release him from his contract 
He is the second person in the 
tour parly lo be allowed such a 
release, following The Sun "J lead 
in releasing Ian Botham from 
contractual obligations. 


YACHTING 


Britain lie second 

From Barry PkkthalL Porto Cervo 


Britain's ihrce-boat team of 
Marionette. Pocket Battleship 
and Full Pelt made a promising 
start in >esicrday's opening 30- 
mi/e race in the Sardinia Cup 
scries by finishing second over- 
all to the West German 
favourites on a day which saw 
one yacht dismasted and the 
chances of four other teams 
sunk by a series of collisions 
with the weather mark. 

Martin Gibson's Pocket 
Battleship was also looking 
somewhat battle-scarred at the 
end of the day after taking a 
direct hit in the stem from 
Richard Matthews's Nadia 
Catcher in a collision two 
minutes before the starL 

The race was led from start to 
finish bv the Swedish-entered 
Beneieau 51. Carat VI. whose 
crew revelled in the 25-knot 
winds and sleep seas to build up 
a 14-minute advantage over the 
second-placed Dutch- enter ed 
Caiman to win on corrected 
time. 

Manv of the teams expected 
to shine in these conditions saw 
their chances slip away at the 
fast weather mark when at least 
six helmsmen misjudged the 
tidal stream and hit the buoy. 

Italy's Guia and the Ameri- 


can-entered Slip Slide And 
Away shared the distinction of 
hitting the mark twice to drop 
out of contention but other top 
contenders forced to go round 
again included the promising 
Brace Farr-designed Wild Oats 
from Australia, the Spanish- 
entered Anquins Too and the 
American SORC champion. 
Abracadabra. 

Britain's fine effort was led by 
Stephen Fein's one-tonner Full 
PcIl steered by Jo Richards, 
which was ahead of die larger 
Pocket Battleship for one period 
in what was effectively a big 
boat race. 

This Dubois design even- 
tually finished fifth on corrected 
time, followed by Chris 
Dunning's Marionette in eighth 
and Pocket Battleship bringing 
up the rear in fifteenth. 

FIRST INSHORE RACE (SufajBCt tB pro- 
test]: i. Carat VI |W Fares, Sweden) 
315.30. 2. Rubin (Schuomann. West 
Germany) 3.17.01: 1D«|P Wtepte- 
Lanrioh. WG1 3.1724; 4. P«ta (W Kmcfc. 
fWGT3.I7.33: 5. Fu* PW IS Fan. UK) 
3.17.56 Other British pricings: 8 Mario- 
nette iC Dunreng) 3.1905: 15. PodUB 
Battleship (Sbson) 02334. T«wn 
ptocringe l. WestGOTanwi i02pB;2;UK 
813. Netherlands. 6& 4. %HMi6Q-.agl 
5. Italy and japan 5ft 7. .Sweden 4MS! 
Equal 8. Argentina and A iatraS a 4& ID, 
SwSffWSl; H. Urerid St***. 31 ; 12. 
Ireland 2B 


Lord's received the letter 
from LBC yesterday explaining 
the position, and the Board 
reviewed their position. Today 
issued a statement saying they 
did not want to be seen to be 
standing in the way of 
Edmonds's international career 
and that they agreed by mutual 
consent to free him from their 
contract which was originally 
due to end in March. Edmonds 
wrote regular articles for the 
newspaper during last winter's 
tour to the West Indies and also 
worked for LBC in the 
Caribbean. 


CRICKET 

Brittanic Assurance 
county championship 
DERBY: Derbyshire v 

Northamptonshire. 

CARDIFF: Glamorgan v 

FOLKESTONE: Kant v 

Warwickshire. 

THE OVAL: Surrey v 

Gloucestershire. 

FOOTBALL 
(Kiek-oti 7.30 unless stated) 

Fourth division * 

Halifax Town v Southend United _. 

Tranmere Rovers v Colchester 

NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Division ons: Mgham v Otaey: 
O N Chemcks v Tbnkan Dusain. 

OTHER SPORTS 

POLO: The Guards autumn tournament (at 
Windsor. 3.15). 

Academic failure 

A shock defeat for the top 
pair. Patricia Johnson and Su- 
san Sbapcott could not stop 
England scoring a 2-1 foursomes 
victory over Wales in the 
women’s home international 
matches at Whittington Bar- 
racks yesterday. Johnson and 
Shapcon went down by three 
and two against the Welsh 
sisters, Vicki Thomas and 
Martdy Rawlings. England look 
a firm step towards the defence 
of their title by winning the next 
two foursomes by four and three 
margins. 


Gwalior (Reuter) — The 
Australians were in sight of 
victory yesterday after a splen- 
did batting and bowling display 
against Bombay on the second 
day of their three-day match. 
The Indian champions were 
struggling at 181 for five in reply 
to a huge total of 525 for eight in 
a match of 1 10 overs a side. 

McDermott plunged Bombay 
into trouble by taking two 
wickets, including Vengsarkar’s. 
in successive balls before tea to 
make the score 89 for three. The 
hat-trick was foiled by 
Gavaskar, who later fell leg- 
before to Bright for 28. 

The all-rounder : Matthews, 
was the outstanding player of 
the morning with a sparkling 99 

SCORES: AusnSans (110 aware) 525 far 
B dec G M WtaWe 124. G R J Mathews 99. 
S R Waugh 82. A R Border 75: K MokasW 
5 lor 156L Bombay (5S overs) 181 far 5 (S 
Hatlangadl 63L 


Cold start puts 
Longland 
behind dock 

Glen Longland. the 12 boors 
national tizne trial champion, 
yesterday failed in his first 
national record attempt, the 
106-mile London to Briglita 
and back classic. The Win- 
chester rider faced a coM start 
only a few degrees above freez- 
ing, when be set off sooth of 
Crawley at Sara. 

Reaching the Hyde Park Cor- 
ner tarn at 32 «»W, he was a 
mi n ute down on his schedule. 
Losing time all the way sooth to 
the Brighton Acqoarimn turn, 
Longland gave iq> soon after 
being told be was seven minutes 
down on his schedule He lad 
covered 87 miles bnt the damage 

had been done in the first two 
boors. 

• Tony Doyle arrived at 
Gatwick Airport yesterday 
rf^nung toa champagne recep- 
tion after regaining the world 
professional SJ75J metres title at 
Colorado Springs on Monday. 
The 28-year old from Woking, 
who lost his world tide in 1980, 
immed ia te ly annoopced plans to 
travel to Bogata. Colombia for 
attempts on the world records at 
4J)00 metres and 5,000 metres. 


AT DERBY: Northamptonshire resistance until the last 

^»v J 5S5iiS?y lead< * 154 wicket pair hit out 


against Derbyshire. 

. David Cape!, the North- 
amptonshire all-rounder, took 
seven for 86, his best figures of 
the season, to leave Derbyshire 
five runs short of the follow on 
total. Northamptonshire's for- 
midable total of 421 left Derby- 
shire requiring 272 to force 
them to bat again but they foiled 
despite dour half centuries from 
Hill and Maher as weD as an; 
aggressive partnership of 58 for 
the final wicket between Hold- 
ing and Jean-Jacques. 

Maher' took more than three 
hours over SO nms while Hill 
pushed and prodded his way to 
bis half century off 156 bails, the 
pair of them adding 93 in 48 dull 
overs. Capd broke' through ‘ to 
uproot them both in a spell of 
three for seven in 14 bafts and 
only Roberts, with 40, offered 


CYCLING 


NOtmiAMPTONSMRE: Ffc*tanfcws421 
(A J Lamb 156. R j Baft* 114; ATJoan- 
Jaoquas 4 tor 99). 

OERBVSHBtE: First Inntani 

■K J Barnett tow b Cape! Zi 13 

tB JM Mahore RIptoybCapM 50 

AH»KgwbCaptd 55 

JE Morris c Smith b Capo! 3 

B Roberts tow b N G B Cook 40 

A M Brown c Lamb b Harper 21 

A EWampcGC&Okb Harper 6 

R Sharma tow b Cape) ______ 4 

R J Finney c Harper b C^xH 4 

MJeaiKlocquunotout 29 

MAHddngbwbCapfll : 21 

Extras 0b 6. w 10. nb 5) — . 21 

Total 267 

Score at 100 overs; 204 tor 7. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-19,2-1 12. 3-130.4- 
J31. 5-179. 6-195, 7-199, 6208, 9209. IP- 
287. 

BOWLING: MaSendsr 22-8-572: Capet 
26-5-86-7: N G B Cook 29-1643-1: Smith 
9-0-33-0; Harper 29-14-37-ft Soyd-Moss 

2-D-5-0- 

Boras prints: Derby sh ire a North- 
anipConsroro 7. 

Umpires: P B Wight and D Lloyd. 


Wind adds to problems 
of time-trial circuit 


By John WBcockson 

The five teams from the 
Soviet bk>c were hotly tipped lo 
clinch all the medals in the 100 
kilometre team time-trial which 
opened the road racing section 
of tile world championships 
yesterday. The Soviet Union. 
East Germany, Czechoslovakia; 
Poland and Yugoslavia were all 
among the fastest starters on a 
hot sunny day. 

Most of the teams were using 
disc wheels despite the 17-knot 
northerly wind which was prov- 
ing troublesome on the main 
climb and ‘descent of the 25- 
kilomeue circuit in the grounds 
of the United States Air Force 
Academy. The start and finish 
point was outside the airforce's 
Falcons Stadium, which will be 
•filled 50,000 American football 
supporters when the season 
opens next week. 

The only similarity between 
yesterday’s competitors and the 
footballers is the helmets they 
wear, although the cyclist’s head 
gear is designed more for its 
aerodynamic properties than its 
protection. 


There was not universal ac- 
claim for the circuit used yes - 1 
terday because the first four 
teams to start — Spain, Mexico, 
Venezuela and Canada - had 
completed their first lap before 
the fast of the 20 -teams, tbe 
defending champions from the 
Soviet .union, began their ex- 
pected two-hour effort 

Arthur Campbell, the Scottish 
official who is the director of the 
world championships technical 
committee, said: “We spent a 
long time looking for the flattest 
course in the academy grounds, 
and this was the best one we 
would, find. I know it is not 
ideaLT 

His fefiow Glaswegian, Genie 
McDaid. who is m charge of the 
race officials, added: “I'm not 
entirely happy with the overlap- 
ping of the reams, but l under- 
stand'the problems.’' 

The festest section of the 
course was a five-mile section of 
interstate expressway, which 
was closed for the duration of 
the event: In car-con scions 
America, that was a major coup 
by the organisers. 


Cooper emerges 
from tunnel 
to share the lead 

From Mitchell Platts, Crans-Montana 



The rehabilitation of Derrick 
Cooper continued with a first 
round of 64 in the Ebd Euro- 
pean Masters on the Crans-Sur- 
Sierre course here yesterday. 

Cooper's eight-under -par ef- 
fort on this Alpine course, set 
5,000 feet above the Rhone 
Valley and recognized as an 
arena for low scoring, gave him 
a share of the lead with Reman 
Rafferty and the Spaniard, Jose- 
Maria Olazabal. 

More importantly it con- 
vinced the Lancashire goUcr 
that a personal trauma, follow- 
ing an abortive attempt to join 
the US tour five years ago. is 
now almost over. 

He said: “I was taken to 
America in 1981 as one of a 
group of seven golfers sponsored 
by a wealthy businessman. It 
seemed like the chance of a 
lifetime when we stepped on to 
the aeroplane. 

“But it turned out to be a 
disaster. Two of the guys, who 
both had enormous ability, quit 
golf because they lost faith in 
their games and another is now 
selling swimming pools in South 
Africa. 

“I had finished 64th in the 
European Order of Merit in 
1980 and I wanted to play over 
here again the following year. 
But 1 was locked into a deal 
which meant playing mind- 
blowing five-hour rounds in 
electric buggies on the American 
mini-tour. I fell out with the 
coach. 1 almost quit the game, 
and in the end I had to bail 
myself out and fly home.” 

Cooper's salvation came 
when he met Bob Torrance, 
father of Sam Torrance, at the 
1982 Northern open and to- 
gether they worked on re- 
organizing his swing. But it has 
taken Cooper since then to 
regain his confidence. 

Tn feet he earned a place in the 
record books by scoring a 57 in 
the Cheshire PGA pro-am at 


Wcmcth Low, Stockpon. in 
1982 but he was J47ih in the 
European money list in 1983. It 
was only la« yea r - when he 
climbed io 57th place, that be 
began to sec some light at the 
end of his dark tunnel. 

Cooper had the vision of 
achieving another sub-60 score 
when he started from the 10th 
then followed an outward 29 
with his eighth birdie of the 
round at the first hole — his 

tenth. But he was unable to 

make further progress. 

Rafferty also built lus score on 

an outstanding outward half of 

30. after also storting from the 
tenth, and the Ulsuanman, who 
thrives on competition, now has 
another chance to win for the 
first time in his career an tbe 
European tour. 

It was not until Iasi week that 
Olazabal learned that he was in 

this championship. The prob- 
lem for the young Spaniard is 
thau as the tour school winner 
from last year, be must still wail 
on the reserve list for some 
tournaments even though be is 
currently seventeenth in the 
1986 order of merit. He will 
sureiv not have such anxieties in 
the future as a flawless round of 
eight birdies emphasized. 

Peter Baker dropped no less 
. than six shots in his first three 
holes. Baker, competing in only 
his fifth professional tour- 
nament finished with a 75 
which gives him a slender 
chance of surviving the half-way 
guillotine. 

LEADING FIRST-HOW® SCORES (09 
unless stated]: 64: D Cooper, R Rafferty. J 
M Otazabol (Spf 85: R Hartmim (US). H 
BatoCdV (SAL M PBWfO (SW. 8ft 6 

^ ^D»e«Bnffl) 1 l ^L0w«w 
P Thomas. STorranca. 67: CStadar 
(USL 6ft A Charntey, A Murrey. J Hat J 
HawKas (SAL S Randolph (Ute. p Parian. 
G J Brand. R Dana (AublH Clark. N 
Crosby (USL B Johnson. « A Rusms 
(US. A Forsbrand (Swah R Onxnmond. C 
Mason. S Bonnott, M McNu&y (Zim- 
babwe). B Marchbonk, M Mackanzto. J 
Morgan. 0 Sritoaig (Sw«L N RatcMfe 
(AuSLSL yta. 


Wind turns form 
upside down 


By John Hennessy 


Opinions varied yesterday 
about the change in the con- 
ditions for the second round of 
the Bowring Women's Open 
championship at Dalmahoy. 
The strong gristing wind kd 
Laura Davies to the view that 
the course was playing four 
strokes longer. 

For Marie Wennersten, the 
overnight leader from Sweden 
however, it was “more like 14." 
That may give a cine to the tide 
of events. Miss Davies had a 
second round of 75, three over 
par, for a total of 14S. Miss 
Wennersten, on the other hand, 
ballooned to a gruesome 85 to 
add to her superb 69 of the day 
before. She cannot remember 
when she last had such a score. 

Within 10 minutes of discard- 
ing her card. Miss Wennersten 
was wreathed in smiles, ft was, 
dearly, all too ridiculous to be 
taken seriously, even a seven at 
the short 15 th, where she called 
a two-short penalty on herself 
when (he ball rebounded from 
the bank of a bunker and struck 
berdub. 

Meanwhile, up at the sharp 
end, another unexpected leader 
emerged in Meredith Marshall, 
an American player coacted 
from his whedchair by Bill 
Wotherspoon, a Scot, aged 84, 
now living at Tampa Florida, 
with a spectacular burst over the 
last four botes of birdie two, 
one-over-par five, eagle two, 
and birdie three. She recovered 
from an outward half of 38, 
three over par, to finish on 72 
for the day and 143 for tbe 
championdiip. 

She now leads by one stroke 
from another surprising con- 
tender, Suzanne Strudwfek, a 


Stafford player, who followed 
her 70 of Wednesday with a 74. 
On one shot further away on I4S 
loom two formidable chal- 
lengers in Miss Davies, who 
won the WPGA Order of Merit 
prize last season, and Liselolte 
Neumann, the Swedish leader 
for the present season. Miss 
Neumann scored 72 yesterday. 

A score of 38 to the (urn for 
Miss Marshall hardly fore- 
shadows the fireworks to come 
as she struggled mainly with her 
putter. “I never take three 
putts." die said afterwards with 
incredulity as she was reminded 
that she had done so four times 
yesterday. Her principal coup 
was, of course, that two at the 
1 7th (284 yards) where she took 
a four-iron off the tee for safety, 
and holed a pitching wedge from 
104 yards ouL 

Nor was that the end of a 
remarkable day, for Toisie Hill, 
a dusky and. shall we say, 
mature New Zealander, inserted 
a startling figure one. among a 
litter of two-over-pars. In spile 
of holing her tee-shot at the 135- 
yard 15th. she had a second 
round of 87 and a two-round 
total of 178. She comfortably 
missed the cut, but at least that 
hole in one was worth £1,000, 
tbe first lime she had won a 
prize of any description on the 
WPGA tour. 

LEADING SECOND-SOUND 
SCORES (GB nairas staled): 

143c M Marshall (USL 7L 71 144: S 
Stradwfc*. 7ft 74. 145: L Nf— CSueL 
TX 72: L Darin, 7ft 75. 146: P Comity 
(USL 72.7ft 147: D Reid. 75. 72; K Laoa 
(AasL 74. 73: B New. 72. 75. 14ft R 
GmsMctruSL 74, 74. 149: M Bartw.74. 
75c K E nan** (FrL TL 77: A Nktata. 
73. 7fcBLmsfced (USL 76. 73: J Soobhy. 
71. 7R P GsttoJcr /CoJewMaL 79. J5flt 
B Lewis. 75. 75; A Skmd (SAL 74, 76: G 
Stewart. 72. 78; F Dam (UL 74, 76; M 
BarWa. 75, 77. 


POLO 


Galvan in top form 


By John Watson 


The weather was perfect while 
the ground has never looked 
more ■ vivid and mtiliem at 
Smith’s Lawn, Windsor Great 
Park, than il did yesterday when 
the four opening duels for the 
Guards Cub's autumn tour- 
nament, sponsored by Fiat, w«re 
decided. 

The Centaurs (received Vj) 
and Brockhill were first to ride 
on for a League A match. 
Antonio Galvan was effectively 
supported by Chris Atkinson, of 
Nigeria, and Philip Elliott. They 
then put on four quick 
successive goals and the result 
was a 7-5 win for Brockhill. 

In League B Rackenford Park 
enjoyed an 8-4 victory against 
Lord Robin Innes Ker’s 
Elccirovet (received 4!&).Also in 


League B. Peter Grace's team La 
Manga defeated The Pandas 
TVi-4 on handicap (4-3 to The 
Pandas in the open). In League 
C Lord Milford Haven's Brent 
Walker beat Mill Farm 8-3 (8- 
6>A). 

BROCKMU.- 1. A Loach Mt ft P BkXt 

Aschkaf (1); 3. P Ctumftward (6); tack. P 
vwrwrsm . 

RACKENR3RD: t. M Meade (It Z G 
Wadcttng io n gfc 3. CTomlnson {*% back. 


ELECTROVET: 1. N LoM PL 2. M 
Amoore (4); 3, S LMngstone-LBannanfli 
Wtacfc. Lard R limasKeTpn 
rite PANDAS: 1. C Comga%2.JSmal 
(3L 3, R Graham |6L back. P Hunt (5) 

LAMANGA: l.v Grace nR; 2, P Grace (3K 


MU. FARM: 1. P Hawn (It ft C Sow* 
(3t 3. S Kteeyo (5L back. C Fonseca (2) 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


Continued from page 35 


Cinemas 


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| • \ 












THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER S »8S 


35 


Today’s television and radio programmes andKPeter Davalle 


' \ m. 






opes 


BBC 1 


BM Ceefax AM. 

Frank 

Bough and Guy 
IJJeJmore-Jn London and 
NJck Ross m Brighton. 
Weather at & 55 T 7 JB. 
7^8JBandts5i 
regton^newa.waather 
traffic at SJ7, 7.27, 

J^JSSi? {nattona,and 

7-30, 8.00, 840 and 9.00: 
sport at 740 and 840; pop 
- -mus« news at 742; and a 

review of the momin 
newspapers « 847. 

• advice fro... 

- Alan Titqfimareh; and the 

. weekends best food buys 
a «« cy y nn Christian. 

120 T^ e t^ ionCon 9™»« 
i a «* I 2 SW!? casing session. 

! 

1986. Further coverage of 
• • ; the closing session. 1240 

Ceetax. 

1.00 News After Noon with 

Richard Whitmpre and 
Moira Stuart indudes 
news heacWnes with 
suttiHes 145 Regional 
news and weather.140 
'r . Hokey Cokey. (r) lj *5 

Ceefax. ■ • 

34S Songs of Praise fromthe. 
■Brighton seafronttr) 
(Ceetax) 4 . 12 Regional . 
news. 

4.15 Dastanfly end MuMey. 

.. . Cartoon, (r) 

445 FBm: Friend or Fbe. 
Continuing the Children's 
Film Foundation season, 

. this story concerns two 
young London evacuees 
. who.ln .1940, are sent to 
the country. Their disfike 
of the Germans is tested 
whan an enemy plane 
crashes and they find the ’ 
injured airman. ■ 

545 The Krankles Bektronflc 
KomBc. Comedy show, (r) 
6 . 00 . News with Sue Lawley and 
Nicholas WrtcheH. 
weather. 

645 London Plus. 

740 Wogan: Tontohf e guest 
fist includes Bob Hoskins. , 
Tim Healy. Clive Jenkins, 
and, with a song ami a • 
chat Barbara Cook. 

745 Wankety Blank. Lss - 
Dawson presents the first 
ki a new series of the 
game show. His guests 
are Lionel Blair, Felix 
Bowness. Samantha Fox, 
Roy Klnnear, Maggie 
Moon, and Berttea 

" Reading. (Ceefax) 

8.10 The Cofbys. Jaff and 
Faiton are whisked away 
on a Co toy jet to a 
honeymoon in Jamaica. 
What should have been an 
. idyttic interlude is ruined 

- when Fallon has her palm 

- read by a beach woman 
•who tors ses a number of 
' unpleasant events. 

(CCfrfcKX) # 

9.00 News with John Humphrys 
and Andrew Harvey. ■ 
Regional news and 
-... weather. 

940 Call Me muster. Episode - 
one.of a new ten-part 
thrffler, Starring Steve 
Bisfey, DavWBamber and 
Dulic© Ltecfer. (Ceefax) 

(see Choice) . 

10.50 Onmjfxreatjfa Brains. , .. 
The world premiere of . 
Jonathan Harvey’s 
Madonna of. Winter and 
Sbdrijg, for orchestra and . 
electronics. 
Commtsstonedby the 
BBC, the work Involves 
100 musicians of the.BBC 
Symphony Orchestra, ’ 
conducted by Peter 
Eotvos, with the composer •' 
and four assistants 
con trotting the electronics 
which Indude three 
synthesisers and 16 
loudspeakers. 

(simultaneous broadcast 

with Radio 3 from 1 1 .05) 
11.45'FiIm: Never Love a 

Stranger* J1 957) Starring 
Steve McQueen. A Harold 
Robbins drama. Frank 
• Kane (John Drew 
Barrymore), an orphan 
who graduates from petty 
crime to be a top gangland 
boss, realises his days are 
numbered when his 
childhood friend, Martin 
Cabefl (McQueen) is 
appointed chief 

acutor with the task of 


Stevens. 

1.15 Weather. 


by Robert 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good 


Morning Brit 
itedbyAnne 


Britain 


land Adrian 
Brown. News with Gordon 


740, 840, 840 and 940; 
sport at 640 and 740; 
exercises at 645; cartoon 
at 745; and pop music at 
7-55* 

845 Wi 
Timmy 

. are pop group Amshitu. 


ITV/LONDON 


945 Thames news heacffines 
f oflowed by Wattoo 
• Wattoo. Cartoon. 

9.45 FOnc A Stitch in Time* ■ 
0963) starring Norman ■ 
Wisdom. Buttiier's 
assistant Norman Pitkin 
causes chaos in the 
hospital where fits boss ts 

taid-up after swallowing a 
watch. Directed by Robert 
Asher 1145 Home 
Cookery Club. Mackerel 
Pie. 

1140 About Britain. The hflls 
and vafleys ofthe Lake- 
District that are underthe 
supervision ot the National 
Trust 

1240 Fficks. Christopher 

- LilHcrap with a story about 
a mouse, if) 12.10 
RaMww. Learning made 
ton by puppets. 

1240 te Democracy Woriting? 
Michael Clarke examines ' 
the anatomy of a decision. 

LOO News at One wfth John 
Suchet 140 Thames 
news. 

140 FifarcThe Reluctant Bride* 
D955) starring John . 
CarroU and Virginia Bruce: 
After their parents 
disappear on a hunting 
trip, precocious 
youngsters try to make a '• 


matching their father's 
brother wfth their mother's 
sister. Directed by Henry 
Cass. 

340 Take the High Road. 

Barry makes a 
visit to the old ferry: 
Thames news headlines 
340 Sons and Daughters. . 
440. Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 

12.10 4.15 ftoadnmner. • 
Cartoon 445 Scooby Doo. 
Cartoon 440 Your Mother 
Wouldn't Lika ft. Comedy 
.and music. 

5.15 Blockbusters. General 
knowledge quiz game for 
teenagers. 

545 News with John Suchet 
640 The G O’clock Show. 

740' Bruce Forsyth's Play Your 
Cards Right Game show 
740 People Do the Funniest 
Things. Jeremy Beadte 
presents a selection of ' 
humorous out-takes from 
television 
and comi 
around the world. 

8.10 International Athletics. . 
The Ivo Van Damme 
meeting from the Heysel 
Stadium, Brussels, 
(continues on Channel 4) - 
8,30 Home to Roost The first 
Of a new series ofthe 
situation comedy starring 
John Thaw and Reece 
Dirisdale as a divorced 
fatrierand Ms son, the 
latter, tonight having 
trouble resisting tha 
temptations of a new 
credit card. (Oracle) 

940 To Have and TO Hold. 

• .Episode two ottfte drama 
series about a married 
woman having ai 
baby for her aster- 
despite the misgivings of. 
both husbands. (Oracle). 

10.00 News at Ten with Leonard 
Parkin and Martyn Lewis. 
1040 The Making of Modem . . 
London. This first 
programme of the fourth 
ana final series examines -- 
how the capital reached 
the height of its influence 
in the Fifties. Followed by 
LWT News headlines. 

1145 Night Heat O’Brien 

becomes obsessed with 
■ bringing a gun runner to 
justice. • 

1240 FBm: The Horror of 
Frankenstein (1970) 
starring Ralph Bates as 
tha evil genius who kIMs 
for the sake of his 
experiments on the dead. 
Directed by Jimmy 
Sartgster. 

145 Night Thoughts. 



DaticeLfeder and Steve 
Bislcv: BBC1, 940pm 


# Just because everything 
points to episode one of the 
crime series call me 
. MISTER (BBC1, 940pm) having 
been made by machnes and 
not men, it is wrong to assume . 
that we who are supposed to 
watch it are machine-made, too: 
we can, for example, 
appreciate emotions that are 
more than skin-deep. Wa 
have the rasfflance to bear with 
scenes that are- more titan 1 0 
seconds long. We can even Bsten 
to tangteh passages of 
inteffioentdatogue, and have 
been known notto complain 
when ID minutes goes by without 
■someone being roughed 141 
or shift down. Rest assured that 
none of these viewing 
faculties win be called upon when 
— and W- you switch onto 
CaB Me Motor, in which Stove 
Btetoy, an Austrafian actor 
with an amusfrtg face, plays the 


CHOICE 


detective who comes to 
London to find the kitter of his 
father who has c ome to a 

Dcnm Under. The^^ness 
and eventfiflness of Gaff Me 

iWtsterwHI recommend 

themselves to those devotees of 
the American-made TV thriUer 
who are not concerned about the 
continuing and rapid decfine 
in the fortunes of that once- 
itBstinguished genre, the fifoi- 
noir. 

•A major musical event on 


onBBCI, 1040, and Radio 3, 
11.05pm): a recording ofthe 
world premiere ( on August 
27) of Jonathan Harvey s new 
work tor orchestra and 
electronics. Madonna of Winter 
anti Spring. A work of 


breathtaking width and 
complexity, wrote Richard 
Morrison in The Tiroes: a 
technical and colouristic tour 
tie force. The highlight of 
tonight’s live Prom concert 
(Radio 3. 740) is Shostakovich's 
Symphony No 1 
• Best of the rest on ratio: 
tiie return of Stop Pren (Radio 
4. 8 . 20 pm), far and away the 
best radio programme about the 
newspaper industry, and the 
return df Any Questions ? (Radio 
4, 8.45pm) with a strong team 
of panellists and regular 
chairman John TImpson, who 
lulls wayward audiences into a 
false sense of camaraderie 
wfth his affable introductions. But 
beware! He has a stick for 
every carrot, and therefore he is 
the ideal chairman. 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


645 Open U ni ver si ty . 
Shoreflekte School - 
Facing Change 740 
. Weekend Outlook. Ends at 
‘ 745. • 

9.00 Ceefax. 

540 News summery with - 
subtitles. Weather. 

545 FUm: To Trap a Spy (1965) 
starring Robert Vaughn 
and David McCaltom. The 
firstof a season ofThe 
Man From UNCLE series. 
Napoleon Soto and Ilya 
Kuryakin dash Into action 
when UNCLE learn of a 


: genius, Vulcan, 
bead of the uttquitotis 
crime syndcate, WASP, to 
take overa newty- 
indBpendent African state 
- by assassinating the 
president Directed by Don 
Medford. 

645 Ebony. Vastiana Belton 
• examines some ot the . 
thriving and successful 
companies in the black 
business sector, and in the 
studio a panel of experts 
cttscuss now these benefit 
the community and give 
hope to the unemployed. - 
745 The Great Egg Race. 
Professor Heinz Wolff 
presents the second 
semifinal. Teams 
-representing JJ Barker of 
Southfteet, Kent building 
workers from Stamford; 

. and Post Office workers 
from Gloucestershire, are 
each given the problem of 
making a breakfast using 
raw wheat green coffee 
beans, beet sugar and a 
V cow. The guest judge is 
Cynthia McArthur.a 
Scottish farmer who.-with 
her husband, have 
shunned all modem ’ 
farming aids in order to 
live a Victorian lifestyle. 
745 International Athtetrcs. 

The Ivo Van Damme . 
Memorial Grand Prfx 
meeting from the Heysei 
Stadium, Brussels, 
introduced by David Icke 
with Brendan Foster. The 
commentators are David 
Coleman; Ron Pickering 
and Stuart Storey. 

940 Gardeners’ World. Geoff 
Hamilton visits the garden 
of David Reid's semi- 
detached house to 
Bade stone, 

Leicestershire, which has 
produced numerous prize- 
winning dahlias from 
various classes, and also 
Mr Reid’s aitotmenL a mile : 

from his home, which 
providesrawarttwinning "• ■ 
vegetables. 

940 Buddy HoWy. To 
celebrate the 50th 
anniversary of the 
singer's birth, a repeat of 
the Arena profile first 
shown last autumn. With 
contributions from, 
ambng others, Paul 
McCartney, the Crickets, 
and the Everty Brothers. 
1045 NewsirigM. introduced by 
tan Smith, includes a 
report from the Trades 
Union Congress in 
Brighton. 

1140 Weather. 

1145 International Athletics. 
Further action from the 
Heysel Stadium, Brussels 

11.55 The Rockford Files. Jim 
to the help of an old 
1 when he finds 
trouble with a torch singer. 
Starring James Gamer 
and Dionne Warwick. W ' 
Ends at 1240. 


CHANNEL 4 


240 Channel 4 Racing from 
Kemptou Park. Brough 
Scott Introduces coverage 
oftheHUffleldFlHtas 

V . Handicap Stakes (245); 
the BonusPrint Sirenia 
Stakes 0.05): the 
BonusPrint September 
. Stakes (3.40); and the 
Twickenham RUfes Stakes 

440 ftiTU Show. Chuck 
Barris presents another 
selection of 

embarrassingly talentless 
show business hopefuls. 

540 Car 54, Where Are You?* 
Vintage American comedy 
series. This week, the 
officers of the 53rd . 
Precinct decide to become 
'angels' for a new musical 

540 RevkL Gary Crowley and 
Jon Stephen Fink review 
the week's film and video 
releases. 

5-45 SoBdSoui, presented by 
JuSet Roberts and Chris 
Forbes. The guests are . 
Loose Ends, Ruby Turner, 
HaywoodeandMat 
Augustin. Plus, archive 
footage of James Brown 
in concert. 

6.15 The Chart Show. Pop 
music charts from this 
country, Europe and the 
Ureted States. 

740 Channel Fbur news wfth 
■ Trevor McDonald and 
Nicholas Owen. Weather. 

740 Book Choice. The . 

itor magazine's 
jhUfei_ 
lumnfsLTe 
Theodoracoputos, reviews 
Art, the Life and Times of 
Aristotle Socrates 
Onassis, by Peter Evans. 

8.00 The Cosby Show. 
American domestic 
comedy series. 

8J0 International Athletics. 
The' Ivo Van Damme 
meeting from the Heysel 
Stadium. Brussels, 
featuring the Men’s 5,000 
metres. 

940 Whatthe Papon Say. 
casting a critical eye over 
how the Press has treated 
the week’s news is the 
Guardian's Hugo Young. 

9.15 Tha Bandung Ftis-Rve 
years after the riots, ' 
□arcus Howe returns to 
Liverpool to see how 
Michael Heseitine's Task 
Force has fared. The 
programme also includes 
Interviews the deputy 
leader of the Council, 
Derek Hatton, and his race 
chief, Sam Bond, who 
answer criticism on why 
the Counts, the city's 
-fergest erhpfoyer, has less 
than one per cent black 
employees. 

1040 The Golden Girls. 

Comedy series about fbur 
middle-aged women 
sharing a house to Miami 
Beach. This week. Rose is 
invited^ and accepts, a 
romantic cruise with a 
man friend. (Oracle) 

1040 Budgie. Is Budgie on the 
straight and narrow and 
about to take up a steady 
job? Charlie EndeH thinks 
so when Budgie 

tes him for a job 
(Oracle) 

1140 Film: Asphalnacht (I960) 
starring Gerd Udo 
Hetoemarm. The stray of a 
veteran rock musician, set 
in 1980s Berlin, who is 
losing his facility to write 
hit music, and on the 
verge of being a has-been. 
Directed by Peter 
Ffatzscher. Ends at 1.10. 


( Radi o 4 ) 

On Long 

545 Shipping. 640 News: 
Weather. 6.10 Fanning 
'645 Prayer (s) 

640 Today, tool 
840 News. 

Business News. 645, 745 
Weather. 740, 840 
News. 745, 845 Sport 7.45 
T hough t for the Day. 845 
Letters. 

843 Five Hundred Mile 
WaJkies (5) South 
Cornwall. 647 Weather; 
Travel 
940 News 

945 Desert Island Discs. 

Auberon Waugh is 
Michael Parkinson* 
castaway (sXr) 

9.45 1 Should 'Say So. With 
Michael Wiliams as 
Robb Wilton (3) The Spy 
1040 News; International 
Assignment BBC 


around the world. 

1040 Monitog Stray: The 
Mallard, by jk 

Norris. Header Shirley Dixon 

10.45 Doily Service ( ' 

1140 News; Travel; 

Are Realities To Me. 
Sketches from the Rfe of 
John Constable (a) 

11-48 Natural Selecti on . 

Presented by Professor 
Michael Stoddart 
1240 News; Does He Take 
Sugar? For disabled 
listeners and their famines. 

1227 The MMon Pound Radto 
Show (s) 1255 Weather 
140 The World at One: News 
1.40 The Archers 145 

240 New^vSoman's Hour. 
Includes a feature about 
atooeda areata. 

340 News; Nostromo, by 
Joseph Conrad.' 

Dramatized In six parts by 
Jaoek LaskowBkL WWi . 
John Bennett as Charies 
Gould. (1)(s) 

440 News 

445 Around the World in 25 
Years. Johnny Morris 
recalls so me of the places he 
has visited, and people 
he has met in France. 

440 Kaleidoscope. Last 
night's edition. 

540 PM. News. 540 

Shipping. 545 Weather. 

640 News; Hnencial Report 
640 Going Places (new 
series) Clive Jacobs and 
his team monitor the world of 
travel and transport 

FREQUENCIES: Radio 

92.5; Radio 4; 200kHz/1500m: 
1458k Hz/206m: VHF 94.9 

RBfM WALES SJBpe m iT" 

-- ■ wwes Today B^S-740 Portto- 

Roi.i5m-120 News and weather 
SCOTLAND C4AW-7JN Rwmtkig Scot- 
■aiWNORTHmURBLAMOSJBpfe- 

S.40 Today's Sport S^KHLOO tnstda 
Ustor GJK-740 Tha BMycsstto ~.L' * 
Headh 1.15-140 News and weather Dl- 
QLAND GJSpw-740 Regional news 
magezem. 

As London ox- 
cepe 845em News 
9 l 50 Endless Dm 10.15 Glenroe 
10A5 European rode Teles 11.00-1140 
Gutter YotfOmms 140pm News; 

SptnaDark. 
iWho'e- 

The Boss? 1040 Fin Tenor Among Us 
1240em-&00 Music Bax. 

ULSTER AS London except • 
HhSLLtoQ 9L25em Sesame Street 
1045 Lima House on lha Prame 
1140-1140 Max 140pm Lunchtm 140 
Bad Day M Black Roar 040 Good 
Ewrtng Utater SJO Spomcart MO-740 
Advice wdh Anne HeHu 1040 Wfit- 
mss 1045 Bend Parade 1145 Bemey 
uaer llJd Sotting Image 1Z00 
News. Closedown. 

BORDER As London eacepc 
Sy U h l Fn 945— Sesame Swat 
1045 Protessor KH2d1045 snuggle 
Beneath The Sea 11.00-1140 Once Upon 
A Tkne ... Man 140pm News 140 
Regrets? 240 FamTsKer Lode S40-440 
Yoiig Doctors 540 Lookaround 
640-7-00 T*Kn The Rood 1040 

Straight from the WoodlUDOSpeeiel 
Squad 12JJ0 Llw from WSabstfs 1240 
Oosedown. 


740 News 
745 The Archers 
740 Pick of the Week. 
Margaret Howard with 


prog 

rammeson BBC 

radlc 

and i 

raevraon(s) 


840 Stop Press (new series) 
Richard Ingrams 
examines what has been in 
the newspapers this 

845 Any Questions? (new 
series) Kenneth Oarfce. 

David Owen. Roy Hsnersley. 
and Denise Robertson 
tackle issues raised by the 
audience in Crawley. 

West Sussex. 

940 Letter From America by 
Alistair Cooke. 

9.45 Kaleidoscope, incudes 
comment on toe Globe 
Theatre drama season on 
Radio 4 and World 
Service. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: 

Academic Year (10). 

Reader Michael Deacon. 
1049 weather. 

1040 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1140 Delve Special (new 
series). With David 
Lander (1) A Rocket for 
Defence 

1240 News; weather. 1243 
Shipping 

VHF (availttoie to England and 
S Wales only) as above 

except 

Weather; Travel. 145- 
240pm Listening Corner. 
540-545 PM 
(continued). 

( Radio 3 ) 


645 


tF/FM (in 
Weather. 


7.00 News 


7.05 Concert Handel 

S Concerto in F major, Op 
I No 4). Beethoven (lets 
denke dein, wenn durch 
den Hain and other songs: 
Wunderlich, tenor), Holst 
(invocation Op 19 No £ 
Uoyd Webber. ceHo). 
Weber (Symphony No 1). 
840 News 

845 Concert (oontd): 

Goldmark (to Spring 
overture). GHere (Concerto 
Op 8& with Sutherland, 
soprano). UB Boulanger 
(D'un vieux janfin; D'un 
jardin dain Parkin, piano), 
Chabrier (Boraee 
fanta&que), Schumann 
(Overture. Scherzo, 

Finale Op 52). 940 News 


9lCB Ttas Week's Composer 
Byrd. Mass for tour 
voices: Ave verum corpus. 
HttBard Ensemble, with 
Hogwood. organ 

9.45 Langham Chamber 

Orchestra (under George 
Malcolm), Haydn (Symphony 
No 12). Moort 
(Serenade in F. K 101). 
Rameau (Datdanus suite) 

1040 Canadian music fra 
violin. piano: Dennis 
Simons and Keith Swallow. 
Archer (Prelude and 
Allegro), Wdnzweig 

(Sonata). Waisgarber 
(Six mm Btyres after 
Hokusai) 

11.10 Toronto Symphony 
Youth Orchestra (under 
Zafer and Rorio). Morawatz 
(Passacaglia on Bach 
chorale). Bloch (Concerto 
GroswNol) 

11.45 Pied Piper: with the late 
David M unrow (r) 

1245 BBC PhUharmoroc (under 
Edward Downes). With 
Mischa Dlchter (piano). Part 
one. Bax (Symphony No 
7). 140 News 

1.05 Concert (eonUQtBrahms 
(Piano Concerto No 21 
145 Scarlatti Sonatas: Metvyn 
Tan (harpsichord) plays 
the Kk 134-136, the Kk 41. 

Kk 366-67. 

245 Stravinsky and CBC SO. 

With Shirley Verrett 
(mezzo), Loren Driscofi 
(tenor), John Horton 
(narrator)- Scherzo 
fantas&que; A Sermon, a 
Narrative and a Prayer; Eight 
Instrumental Miniatures; 
Scenes de battei 
340 Beethoven: Viotin Sonata 
m A Op 12 No 2; 

Venations on Icti bin der 
Schneider Kakadu. 

Frank! (piano). Pauk (viotin), 
Kirshbaum (cello) 

440 Choral Evensong: from 
Worcester Cathedral. 

445 News 

540 Mainly lor Pleasure: vrith 
Fritz Spiegl 

840 Guitar music Joszaf 
Eotvos and Gonzaio 
Salazar play works by 
Barrios. Ponce. Brouwer, 
and BaiOosa-Lima 
arrangement of Bach's 
Allegro. Violin Sonata No 2 
740 Crucible of Fire: 

Christopher Logue reads 
from Antonin Artaud's 
manifesto on the 
Balinese theatre 

740 Proms 86: BBC Scottish 
SO (under JBrzy 
Maksyrmuk). wfth Kun Woo 
Palk (piano). Part one. 

Haydn (Symphony No 79). 
Ravel (Piano Concerto to 
G) 

840 The Critic Critised: with 
Raymond Tallis (r) 

640 Proms (continued): 

Shostakovich (Symphony 
No 1) 

945 Temptation: John Hurt in 
' Nick Dear's monologue 

10.00 John Hawkins: Nexus 
play Dance Variations 
1045 Vivaldi: Purcell Quartet 
play Trio-Sonata to C 
major, RV 60. and Bach 
arrangement of Concerto 
in D major, and Trio-Sonata 
inGminor, RV74 
1145 Madonna of Winter and ’ 

Spring: by Jonathan 
Haryey(see BBCl. 10.50pm). 

11.45 Charies Griffes: National 
Phtiharmonic (under 
Charles Garhardt)) play The 


Pleasure Dome of Kubia 
Khan. 1147 News. 12.00 
Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 

On MF (medium wave). Stereo 
on VHF (see page 3) 

News on the hour (except 
840pm, 94a Sports Desks 
1.05pm. 2.02, 3.02. 442, 5.05. 

6.02. 6.45 (ml only). 945. Cricket 
Scoreboard 740pm. Tennis 
(US Open, at 1142pm, 12.05am) 
440am Colin Berry 540 Ray 
Moore 7.30 Derek Jameson 940 
Ken Bruce 1140 Jimmy Young 
md legal problems answered by 
Andrew Phillips 1.05pm Davto 
Jacobs 245 Gloria Hunniford 340 
David Hamilton 545 Selina 
Scott 740 Hubert Gregg 740 
Friday Night is Music Nk)ht from 
the Royal Festive Hall. With singers 
Jfll Gomez and Ramon 
Remodios. Also BBC Concert 
Orchestra, Band of the Royal 
Marines School of Music, Thomas 
Trotter (organ) and John 
McCarthy Singers: Introduced by 
flobm Boyle. &40-S.40 Interval. 
John Thompson on " Jazzing Up 
the Classics" 940 The Organist 
Entertains with Bryan Rodweti 945 
Sports DeskiaOOVitem 
Tausky conducts Langham 
Orchestra 1040 The Press 
Gang (new series) Glyn Wore nip 
examines the news of the 
week. With Roy Hudd. Henry Kelly. 
John Ketiey and Sarah 
Kennedy. 11.00 Peter Dickson's 
1.00am Jean ChaJIa 
A Little Night Music 


c 


Radio 1 




On medium wave. Stereo an 
VHF. 

News on the hall-hour Irom 
640am until 840pm then 10.30 and 
1200 midnight. 

540 Adrian John 740 Mike 
Smith's Breakfast Show 9.30 
Simon Bates 1240pm 
Newsbeat (fan Parkinson) 1245 
Gary Davies 3.00 Dave Lae 
Travis 540 Newsbeat (Ian 
Parkinson) 5.45 Singled Out 
(Janice Long) 7.00 Mike Ingham 
10.00-1200 The Friday Rock 
Show (featuring Motorhead) VHF 
Stereo Radios 1 & 2- 440am 
As Radio 2 10.00pm As Radio 1. 
12DO-4. 00am As Radio 2. 


.WORLD SERVICE 


U0 Newsdesk M0 Mai-xton 7.00 News 
749 Twenty-Four Hours 740 A Oecaoe of 
His 7.4S Merchant Navy Pmoramma 840 
News 849 Refiectxxis 8.15 Joan Suther- 
land 140 Music Now 940 News 949 
Review ot Brush Press 9.15 World Today 
940 Fmanoal News 9.40 Look Ahead 9.45 
Lake Wobegon Days 1040 News 1041 
New Waves on Shortwave 10.15 Mer- 
chant Navy Programme 1140 News 1149 
News Aoout Britain 11.15 in the Meantime 
1140 Mendon 1240 RaOO Newsreel 
1215 Jazz tor the Ashing 1245 Sports 
Roundup 140 News 149 Twenty-four 
Hours 140 John Peel 200 Outlook 245 A 
Ported Spy 340. Raoo Newsreel 3.15 
Tom Myan Request Show 440 nows 
449 Commentary 4.15 Science n Action 
5.45 Sports Roundup 7.45 Aoout Oman 

8.00 News 549 Twenty-Four Hours 540 
Science m Action 940 News 941 Network 
UK HBMusjc Now 945 Sports Roundup 

10.00 News 1049 World Today 1045 A 
Letter from Northern Ireland 1 040 Finan- 
cial News 1040 Reflections 10.45 Sports 
Rounuup 1140 News 1149 Commentary 
11.15 From the Weeklies 1140 Lszt 
Piano Music 1200 News 1209 News 
About Bntam 1215 RadO Newsreel 1230 
About Britain 1245 ReconSng at the 
Week 140 News i.Oi Ounook 140 New 
Waves on Shortwave 145 A Perfect Spy 
200 News 249 Review of British Press 
215 Network UK 240 PeopK and Poktics 
340 News 349 News Aoout BntWl 3.15 
World Today 445 Renecoons 440 FMan- 
ent News 540 News 549 Twenty-Four 
Hours 545 World Today. Al ttmes Is 
GMT. 



Hato yowselt140-540 

VU0 >40 Calendar 540-740 \ 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


HTVWEST^^ y-n^, 

dor F»flB 1040 The FSkcxat 
Funnies 1045-1140 Chips 14tan News 
140^40 Frtic Pesskxi 640-740 
News W40 Your Say 1046 A Bridge Too 
Few? 11.15 Mika Hammer 1215am 

Closedown. 

HTV WALES 

1040 Posoldon Fles 64000-748 
Wales at Six 1040 Festival Choice 1140 
Mike Hammer 1240-1 2 . Mein Freeze 
Frame. 

TSW ** London except 9. 26xm 
•1=21 sesame Street 1045 Mtaertwm 
1140-1140 European FWk Taies 
140pm News 1 40000 Fanx Who's * 
Mirttng the Store? 348-440 Young 
Doctors 5.15-5.45 Whose Baby? 940 To- 
day South West 640-740 
Sportsweek 1042pm Hfen: Cine of 
Frenksneten 1200 F*rc Isknd ot 
Terror 140am Postscript Closedown. 
CAT* 146pm Kattia kailwitz 200 

SMriSbn 216 marvel 230 Rap- 
ing Irom Kempton 440 Three 
Stooges 440 Cadwgan 540 Arrturww y 
Panri540 Ravw SMBoU Som 215 
Chan Snow 740 Newyddlon Sa«h 740 
Am y Corau 845 O Bedwar Ban 545 
Palu IMan B40 UAn Beni 94S Kbm and 
AMe 235 Athlencs 1045 Rocket to . 
the Moon 1240 Arctse Bunker's Place. 
1230am Closedown. 


GBAMPlAW^sar^ . 

Thing 9L30 Survhmt 255 Struggle Be- 

neath the Sea 1045 Toytovnvi 0.40 Uni- 
oom TNos tl.10-1140 Cartoon 
140pm News 140-340 FSm: Crooked 
Sky ^140-740 North Tonight 1040 

Fane The Dartr 1210am Nawe, 
Closedown. 

Scottish SUSSSrs^r. 

Street 1045 Doug Hamngg'B Magic 
on BroatMay 11.15-1140 Cartoon 
140pm News 140-340 Ftim: Too 
Many Chefs 640 Scotland Today 64- 
740 HeU in Truu 1040 Band ofthe 
Year 1148 Ute Cal 1140 T J Hooker 
1245am C losedown. 

1040 Cartoon 1045-1140 Posadon 
Files 1-30-340 Fkn: Pearl of me South 
Pacific 540-740 About Anglia 1040 
ra gBjoodBn e jAudray Hopdum) 1.10am 

CHANNEL as LMdonoKoit 

criMNNEL, B4a*m Sesame Strew 



... COUTT- 

try GP 840 CrumM Repon 64S Jane's 

Oiary 540-740 Battle of Britain -85 
1040 Kouk 1140 Taste of Entertainment 
m Closedown 


TYNE TEES 

9 3ft Sesame SpeetlOL25 
SpaceiMnch 1040 indun Legends ot 
Canada 1145-1140 Pawn Along wttfi 
Nann 140pm News 145 Lookaround 
140 Fflnr Suspect 640-740 North- 
ern Life 1042 Ftim: Comdors Ot Blood 
1210am Countryside Christian. 
Closedown. 

GSANADASKSZ-a™^ 

Repons 9L30 Little Rascals 940 
Speoeweich 1040 Mika 1040 Jayce and 
tne wtieofed Warnors 1045 Csnoon 
1140 Granada Reports 1146 About Brit- 
ain 1140-1200 Connections 140pm 
Granada Reports 140 Week m Vmw 
200-3.00 Yetiow Rose 230-440 
Young Doctors OJIO Granada Reports 
540-740 Cuckoo Waltz 1040 This 
England 1 140 V 1 245em Acker at die 
Fleece 1.15 Closedown. 

TVS A 9 L&Hbn except 945am 
J-lS sesame Street 1040-1140 Na- 
ked Fury 14 Css3ii News 140 Mr Pal- 
troyol Westminster 1404140 Mr Smxh 
S.M-440 Country GP 6JOO Coast to 
Coast 640-7.00 Country Ways 1040 
Kofsk 1140 Ftm: Taste of Excde- 
mant 140am Compony, Closedown. 
CENTRAL Lonekxi except; 

■ - rWt ~ 945am Survival 940 . 

Rooostory 1215-1140 FBm: Btonow 
Bongs Up Baby 1J20pm News 145J-&S8 
Fwn: Bad Dev at Buck Rock 640 
News 640-740 Heart of die Country 
1048 Central Weenend 1240 Hfen: 

Coora 140am JoMmder 240 Ctosectown. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


BAINDCAN NALL 628 ans/dn 
• W«1 Tom T J6 TWO- m- 
a mi COWCCTT. Ttnar 
Pmnorh dir boxnsis FNinty 
urn. arum WBUOMBB. 
nuitfwtn Dai its. Pa \jd W U- 
■ son-Jonnvxi. Proo Inc H*|WA 


HOZAJtr rentvxL <ora am 

S85i jfiM may flnm 
Pw» Srnooi Stupe Op— 
Faram ILMli Coleman. Murray 
PPWUJ. Sir D«1IS Forman. Dr 
SMdH-v Sadie 7nm Supn M 
fan latta -Trow 7pm Snap* 


OPERA it BALLET 


COLISEUM S 836 5161 

EMULm^MAWlSuL OKM 
Ton'l 7 30 0 Traa a fre, Tnroo r 
700 Tha Mardase ef Flmra^. 

ROYAL OKM HWK M> 

Oardtft W« <? 1 
i«il Siandbv mid ON>», 
oWS moo sm lOMn ftpm. »l( 
amphi snan a» ad Irom 1 w™ « 
the day TW.M Cl • ^250 
ci - £1350 (mabl. 


Lf* 


YME TOKYO BALUtT 
Torn 7 30 

Sylptudf-wTSym pngW -■ 

n/Tnm Tam « PerruMion S« 

ROYAL OAUXT Tup. Wed 
7 30 TV snow Oueen Tiiur 
7 30 Swan Lake Balm rasUDB 
Inin, o; SdO-ewS 


SAOUiirS WELLS an R910 


... Sew 17 

Crtlr*l UM K CMm 

Ort 2 tH ■ 

Ring Oi vru OOBS lof Aulu™ 
Unrr/Mki «<«*« hrertumn 


THEATRES 


JUMELMH Me 701 i or 2*0 7013 
M [T 1*1 4PM/US6 tsm/sts 

to*33 Grpsal« U5061M 

i-ju ?«hr 7 d*w CC 3*0 WOOiMfl 
Ii-r> NOV* ROD KING TO rCB 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBC1H WALK 
MUSICAL j 

NlBhttV M 7 30 XOM WPd « 2 30 
rtwiiwfiKT www 


AURMY S3* »» tcST* «« 
/MS3 croup twrtm 

f i an Tun fer _ ■ hrmlod 

COOK, 


drawn' I*** M o" 


AIAEXY 01 836 307B OC 379 
/6433 Croup Sales 836 

sees 

JOHN SHEA m 
THE NOSMAL HE^T 

in' uwav ww wra 
nuswncwn^Timw 


SENSATIONAL S.EAP 
TonX Tomor 8. 
Mol T Omor A 30 
LAST THREE MBPS 


ALOWYCH TWOTtt , _OI B36 

“EXPLOSIV E SLCCEI5S" TPdW 

ANNIE GCT YOURGUN 

SUrrlng Up QW™ 

- TlAZZUrcC WEST END 
DEBIT CATCH HER TODAY” 

“ONE or THE MOST DIZZYING 
SCORES EVER" D.MW1 
EMU 7-30 Man Wed A Sal £30 
24 hr 7 dw re boolura on Finn 
TCUI 01240 7200 lt*9 fra) 


AMBASSADORS 01-836 61 tier 

«o 1171 Fund Can IM nrl/7 
dayvl 200 7200 lbh9 ICC). 

2 OC1WKR 

RHd Matoeww CmpiRin* 

LES LIAISONS 
dangereuses 

‘flOKT FOR A TKXET’ 

wnar» on 


jUFOLLO TMEAlTNC 437 2663 

4 M J6W fir* Call 01 SMO 7200 
TkUWiMirr cc 379 0433 
MervFn 800 SU 430 4 fl 16 
■murf. mata 3.00 
PAUL sconELO 
■■MASTERLY” FT 

MOWAROROLL1IB 

‘■MACMF1CENT” O M»B - 

TM NOT RAPPAJORT 

■■toondrrtulir lunre 1 DEjcp 
WNNERWO TONY AWARD 


•OUtXVARO 437 2661 DCUdr 

tssrtsrJr^w 

s SSL- A c SVSSMSSi 

SM A Mon 730pm 


onCtoESYER Qga37« 13>g.. 

lANC EYRE ^ A FUNNY TRMO 
HAPPENED rat THE WAY TO 

THE FOftUM E%«. 7 30. MaU 
Thy * sal 2 30 


eMiraCMLL Biorntn- 460 6677 

■CHRg TO PNCT TTMOTHY m 

CHARLEY'S AUNT. 


IXWlieOYTWMraEMOaBra 

**A inner* ectodt jMPtoto—to" 
JOHN OUtoXIO*^ 

SjfSjR PENKAUCON 

t the maintenance 
MAN . 

a nomrdi or fwharit Hwrfc 

rcvoanilion D- Mf**-- M 
Mon Thu U I rt/bJl.6 30 A 8 30 


COTTESLOC 920 3SSZ CC 
•NaiMmai Theatre’s onaU auds 
lonum) Pre\iews_T*rn. Mon 
7 30. Totner 230 0-7Jjp 
Oners Tue M 7.00. Wed 7 JO 
THE R AY AT NICE and 
WRECKED tW Wtold 
Harr Ttnir 7 JO NCAFHOE. 
CKHERMH S 930 5816 OC 379 
6SOS/379 6433/741 9999. Orp* 
836 3962 Er-ps 8QO. Thu mat 
• 23 0. Sal 5.50 A 8 30 
SMTBII MKC AT ITS KST 
D MU1 

Tttr Thraue or comedy Company 

ROY KUDO RALPH RATES 


RUN FDR YOUR WIFE 

wnirni and tarerted w 
RAY COO HLY 

0\« 1.400 M dl ■ pHWtoa perB 
"SHOULD RUN FOR UFT* S. Ex 


DOMWON THEATRE £«x Office 
01 580 8845/01 036 8338/9 or 
01 SSO 95CC/S. ALL Wephone 
CC booktnm PMST CALL 94W7 
dm- on 01-836 2429 MB BOOK- 
MC PEE Orn Sol«WO 6123 
DAVE CLARK’. 

TIME 

THE ULTHBATE EXPERWHCR 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR 1 
THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKAW 

LAURENCE OUVTBR 

Motl-Ffl T 30 TRU MM 240 Sal S 

SOIHC SEATS' S TILL AYAtL ARtJ 
FOR TM»AV^ INERFORMAROL 
SPECIAL CONCESSIONS AT £7 
juA rows EXCEPT PM A SAT 
EVES FOR OJLP-S, WHO*. 
mncNTS a unot in. n~r 
■aaktol to Apr* 17. 


DOMNAR WAREHOUSE cm Cdn 

240 S230 CC 079 6565/6433 
LEWIS PATRK1A 

F1ANOCR HOOC E 

as -NOEL and GERTIE 

-You eeutd luRUy *•* for a mem 
rm'iw exemner' FT 
Until Sept 20 ■ 

8.00. Frt A SM 20 A 8.30 
No Dprf Seel a. extra mot best 10 
at II. 00 pm 


DRURY LANCtMCATtel HEAL 

■ -Bw OMire & CC 
Ol -836 8108 01-240 9066/7 
OUST CALL fl4HR T DAY CC 
BKCS an 01 240 7200 
(no toe *ert. 

Txketroasfrr 01 379 64*3 • 
(no Bkq fee) 

David Marrtak’e 

42ND STREET 

A SNOW FOR ALL YME FAMILY 
MnrilaltoM 


lOMd 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

%Med • • 

BEST MUSICAL _ 

LAURENCE OUVn AWARD 

\«S*d 

. BEST MUSICAL 

PLATS * PLAY ERS 

LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
■ AWARD 

t>» 8.0 Mats Wed &a 
'.Sat 6.0 *8 30 
Reduced price mat Weds, 
SHudmh and DAP's Stondby 
OrevP Sales 950 el25 
■SoK NOW FOR XMAS 
.Spmoi matinee. Dee 26 3pm 


DUCHESS * 836 8243 CC'24Q 
9648 CC 379 6433 A OC 84 
hi n day 240 7300 E\v* ■ Wed 
mat 3 Sal 5 a a . 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 SI 22 CC 
B36 9837/741 9999/240 7200. 
- £\M 8 Thu IKlH 830 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard p r— a Anri INI 

• STEPPING OUT 

HU Comedy by RKhard Harm 

• Otrveted tor Julia McKenzie 

“TRIUMPH - ON TAP" eu 

-UUISH YOURSELF SttLYV TO 
“A PERF EC T DPJCHI- D T« 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FORTUNE Air M 8. Of A CC S 

836 2238/9 A«y 579 6433 >7 
day. bkrev>MontoFO-8. Sa«JO 
MM Thto A SM 3.00 


in DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-I mroyed r\rrv mtnuie*' ST 

■■a classic of wnotfuniinr - n 
unorfllaUr - Tune* ES 

WE DOUBLE DARE YOU TO 
DETECT HOW ITS DONE 


OLOBC437 Mm CC ST9 6433/ 
bka lee lal Coll 24 nr 240 7200. 
ore Sam 930 6123. E\m S 
Mil* Wed 5 Sal a. 
Andrew Llovd Webber PreorhB 
B*IN» LAWSON- 
JAN mAINSt 
RONALD HOLAA1R 
JOHN BARRON 

LEN D ME A TE NOR 

“A MASTERPIECE” Times 
-TILLS THE THEATRE WITH 
THE SOUND Of LAUGHTER* 1 
5 EXP 

Ad American comedy tor 
Ken Ladwlfl 

Dtrecied w Oavia Otonore 


OR E O riVNal THEATRE Ol-SU 
7766 Etei 7. AS. Mari Sai 2 30 

FOR. KINO AMD CO UNTRY by 
Join Wilson. “A* powartai a 

plecaaHieM Bar drama aa amp 


HAMTCTEAD 7Kt 9301 Frew 
From TuuraEvea fern*,. A** 

. FDR THE MOON .by Sk ktoy 


HAVMAIMCT THEATRE ROYAL 

Box «llm and OC Ol 930 9852 
Firs Cad 24 nr 7 dwCC aodkum 
Ol 240 7200. 

Durrl from Broaoww 
-A (ubeiti London suee debut*' 
Financial T<mei * 

' JACK LEMMON 

“A* fine a nape actor as hr b a 
■erven one" Today 

LONG DAYS JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

• -By Eipxw O'Nnll 
-JbruUhan Miner’* brilluM 
production - Stoddana 
: Eit* onfir MotrSN 7 30 


HER MAJESTTS. HaymariM 
930 4029/0606 £046/2880 
.TMkeimaater 379 6i3i 
Firu can CC 240 7200 

ANDREW LLOYD WCMOrS 


THE PHANTOM OFTHE 
OPERA 

slamiM 
JCL CRAWFORD 


Sarah Sietr 

Bnehtmen * Barton 
Dtreeted by HAROLD PRINCE 
prnxwi Irom So 27 


Haws HEAD 226 1916. 9TEVE 
HARLEY to MARLOWE. A new 

MuMrai. Dor 7. 6 Now 8am. 


London palladium *37 7373 . 

741 9999 (no bug lert. FlrM Cau 
24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. Ore 
Sam 950 6123. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
A DENIS OLULLEY ' 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

"—A PALLADIUM HOAR Ol 
APPROVAL" S.TM 
Mon-rrl 7.30. Mato Wed 2.00 
Sat 2-30 & 8 00 * 

SUN conce a alo n d avab. at door 
MotvFM 6 sar mats 
■EATS AVAR AM P FROM <7 JO 
Now booking w April 1987 


LVRK HAMMERSMITH 01-741 
2311 Now pmirwinu Eves 
7 46. Wed Mata 2 JO. Sal Matt 
4 0.. .Opens Mon 7 0 THE 


by Lorc a. WWW P ptrHIe H agw, 

nunTud S pari* Tool 
awn. Tomor 4.15 A 8pm 
.ItOMM . A JULIET with 
Ho— rt h Branash. From MOO 
LORCA wU> Trader F R 

Eies Born iTue 7pm). 


LTHfC THEATRE 
Air W1 01-437 3684/7 01 . 
1660 01-434 1060. Ol 734 

5166/7 

COUN BLAKELY. 

-A orUDanl A wyously 
roentr performance" F tome 
In 

The Nallatial Thsatre'a oeetolmed 
pradurUoa of 

ALAN AVCKBOWIIFS 

A CHORUS OF 
DISA PPROVAL 

. -HranbreamnMy funnv“ can 
-HlUutouL " S Toms 
**A ran* etetuna of 
comic ncnHaralKn"’ Times 
C\6t 7 30. Mots Wed and Sit 3.0. 
Croup Sales 01-930 6123. 

Red need price mats Student 6 
OAP Stand-by ' ' ' 

FIRST CALL 24MR 7 MY 
CCMOWHS ON M MO 7200 
(HOROOKMC FEZ} - 

' . WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 198S 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL! 
APRIL *87 


LYTTELTON T 928 2282 CC 
rKauonM ThMirPY presmdum 
Maori Today 200 oow price man 

- BRIGHTON BEACH 
MEMOIRS 

by Nrfl Simon 


MVETHK PRODUCTION* 

STltlHK 
TOUT Mon 7 45. Tamar 2.1S , 
•low p rite MM 4 74fiT Tue 20O| 
IIOW price IMU 

. THE PETITION 

^^Rgninaift 

B H OMkT 


OKe 


SM 


Tuo. WM 7 46 DALLIANCE. Pre 
\len-% Seel 15 to IS A Smh 22 6 
23M .T4& Opens Sept 24 U7.00 
tnrnSeol 25 10 2» ; THE 
MAOSTRATC. 


MAYFABC 8 CC 629 3036. Mon- 
Thu 8 Fn/Sat 5.40 A 8.10 

RICHARD TODD m 


SM 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An unabaiilmi winner** S Exp 
-SnuaiiotMl'’ Timas 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


MERHUUD Air Oond 236 0068 CC 
741 9999 First Call CC 240 7200 
04 Hr* 7 Davi Mon-Frl 8.SM6& 
B-iO 

KAFKA’S 

METAMORPHOSIS 

staged by 

Steven BERKOFF 


THEATRICAL EVEMHO IN THE 
WEST DW C Limns. 

- lit„<iii mu on 18 

tPre-Uieaire food A .drlnkt 


RATION A L THEATRE SUi Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

Sea SEPARATE ENTRIES under 
OUVEK/ LYTTELTON / 
COTTESLQE- DKMMDI Cheat. 

m ad s nays of oetfa oil Iheoirrs 

mm 10 aw RESTAURANT (920 

2035L EAST CAR MM, UtfO 
633 0880. AHtCOND 


NEW LONDON Drury Lane WC2 
406 0072 CC 3796438 Eito 7M 
Tue A Sat 300 tt 7 4 5. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
ff*. ELIOT MUSICAL . 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFT ICE 


Croup Boowtwe Ol-aOS 1867 or 
Ol-?®) 0123 NOWBOMUMTO 
MAY 20 19*7> 


dUVUR *S* 920 2232 CC rN* 
banal- Theatre's open Maori 
T 00 X Ttnir 7 10. Tomor 2.00 
' itow price null A 7 16 

THE THREEPENNY 
OPERA 

by BmhL ' 
mrar by Ki *1 weM 
"IN GREAT Mask the 
•W Punch. “ Tf - Z 'N. 


EXCBLUMT" Today. **»;. Tue. 
Wed 716 MCOAOWSKY AND 


OPEN Atit RCOEKT* FAfiK 

406 2431 CC 379 6*33 
rr Htoune 486 1933 

ARMS AND THE MAN 

TDOav 7 45. SW 2 30* 7 40 n- 
Ml Prrfv Meat W aaki limy V 
MaMenN Yaulk ThaMre 


PALACE THEATRE 437 6834 
CC 437 8327 or 379 64 33. _ 
Fsl Call 24Hr 7tMrCC 2*0 7200 
Crp Sales 930 61 23. .. . 

THE MUSICAL SENSATWH 

LES MISERABLES 
“TF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL QNEj$< 

LWK 730 MOK THU & SM 3 -SO 
Latecomers not admitted 

uiuri Itv* nurrval 
■EAT THE TOUTS BY EHOliar-. 

Miroik aCTUMM at tw aax 


PHOENK 836 2894 Cc 240 9661 
741 9999. Fira rail 24 hra 7 day» 
240 7200. Crp Sale* 930 6123. 
Eve*7 30. Thur mil3,8ate4 6 8 

THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

by TJL ELIOT 

’‘PUT OUT ALL THE FLAGS FOR 


THEATRE. 437 

4606, CredU Card Horn net 379 
■6505. 741 9999. Orp Sales 836 
3962/930 6123. 


DAVID FRANK 

. ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 

-‘SPECTACULAR MUSICAL'* 

Retiew Madame . 

Evev 8 O MaH Wed 3 6 Sal G 


mux end 20 Sept-prior to USA 


P R Rie e EDWARD BOX Office 
734 8931 FirR Call 24 Hr 7 Days 
CC Booking 836 3464 CTp Sales 
930 6123 

Mdh-Sal 8. Mai Thurs 4c SM 300 

CHESS 

“A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW" 


■tow baaktap to March 2E, 3507 

MAT SCATS SOMETIMES 
AYAILAIUX ON DAY 


PRI N CE OF WALES 01-930 868! 
/ZCC Hotline 930 0844 /S/6 Grp 
Sain 930 6193. Ketfh Prow* 
741 9999/579 6435. Ftret Celt 24 
nr 7 aav 240 7200 
■TOE-TAPPrae OOO O* D. Matt 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 
SEVEN BROTHERS" 

.UK BLOCH BUSTER MUSICAL 


enjo y rr* F.rtiMa. 

•WEMTH MEAVDr’ £ GMrirr 
ElM 7 30. Mat TOUT A Sat 3. 


QUEEN'S Ol 734 1166/7/' 
0261/0120. 24hr rr 240 7200 
Cr p Sale * 930 6123. 

“THE REST. MUSICAL B 
| ttnOT* ndn 

-A WONDCRTVL STjW M«B 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

-li rmpM with 
. rarlRmrar S.Tlmei 
"Juw wendertuP OJjtp 
Mon-Bat 8 Mats Wed 2 JO Sot b\ 


ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1743 
ftw 8pm. Sal mob 4pra 
OURSELVES ALONE by Anne 
Onnn rtlw M tint Kq «f 
tofe dNHV m «a Bun 


SAVOY 01-636 8888 CC 01 379 
6219. 336 0479 Cienuw 7 4S 
Mats wed 3 . Sar 5 a bjo 

8TH YEAH OF 

MICHAEL FRAYN'S 
AWARD WINNING FARCE 
CHRISTOPHER COOWH- 
STEPHANIE HCCH 

COLE PAOOtCK . 

M ICHAE L COCHRANE - 
, COLETTE v . T1MOTHV 
Cl^tSON . 

NOISES-OFF- " - 

dr In MICHAEL BLAKEMORC 


COMEDY. 01 379 5399 cr 01 -379 
6433/741 9999. TtrU Call 24-hr 
240 7200 Utk9 feel Orp Sales 930 
6123 

Tne Theatre m. C omedy Co 
presents 


IAN 

.TTTENAY OCfLVY 

PEOCY MOUNT 
and uoicl jcmnfs 
In 


Sdlt 


ROOKERY NOOK 


Dtn-ried or Mare Kingston 
MdR-FTI 8 WM Mat 3 Sal S 00 & 
. SJO. 


SHAW THEATRE SB 8 1394 


NWHTSHRMX TbniRM 6 To 
roonO« al 7.30. LAST 2 DAI'S 


ST MARTIN'S 01-836 1443. Swr- 
ruil CC NO. 379 6433 E\g> B.O 
Turn 246. Sat 5.0 and 80 

S4Hi |T at AOATHA Wing . 

THE MOUSETRAP 


STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/5190 741 9999 FlrM Cab 
24 Hr 7 Day <C 240 7200 
Cre Sale* 930 6123 

CABARET 

“tha »harp»at. mea l »»plitaCcat 
- MbR a ‘ ‘ 
lha Waal 

Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

DfforfM 6 Omreographed by 

Men-TTI 746 Mat Wed 300 
SM 4 30 Si 8. IS 

NO SCAT FRICC INCREASE 

BEST VALUE M WEST CRD 

ROOKUM NOW TDiAN *87 


ST*ATFORD4JPON-AVON 
(07891 296623m- Tkiuetiiuaier 
Ol 379 6433 ROYAL SHAKE- 
SPCARC roMPAHY al •RET. 


Tontenu tomor. 
Men. Tue 7-30. MafSat 1JK), 

Wed 700 hto Thaatra, no 

peris IbK week Fair Maid opens 
Tlturs SCM 11th. . 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY . 

•rone t«v tost of Bntanrs nanlr 
taieni Data- Mair 
See w-naraie cnlries under 

CWTERIOR THEATRE/ 
SHAfWSft lRInr TH EATRE 
OF COMEDY/ 
WHITEMALL YHCATRE/ 


VAUDEVILLE Box OffKe A CC. 
836 9987/5646 FlM raH CC 24 

hn 240 7200 ibKg fret. Eras B.O. 

MM* Ufed 2 SO. Sal 60. a 30. 


MARTIN JARW 


ALAN AYCKBOURN'S Haw May 

WOMAN. INI MIND- / 
.fTHi sori.or twatmcal 


TENSITY WHKH KNOCKS YOU 

’ FOR .MX" D. Mad . . 

-J» COME DY TH AT RISES ttt 
■ITS 9REATE5T COM I P RRR S 
UAMCE ATTK CLIMAX” Tunes 


VICTORIA PALACE Ot-RM 1817 
ties 7.30 Mats Wed A Sal 2.45 

CHARLIE GIRL 

-Plrawarfca. Fatmtotoa R 
Fibula ai fttoD" 

PAUL NICHOLAS 

CYD CHAH1SSC 


MARK WYKTER 

CHARLIE GIRL 

. P6ia imn as f y SaeoataM 

Mb 1 ! ■■ «»■» Times 
4b6booh on FIRST CALL 24 Hn 
7 Dam. >Bbe Fee. 01-240 7200 6 
ALL LSL AL AGENTS 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY tTOFFAY 
Denm, SI. Wl Fran 
466 4100 


01-834 0283/4 

rr 834 QOae.. Fil'd ran tt 240 

7200 6 re 741 9999/379 6433 

Ores 930 6123 Ei« 7 45. Wed 

Man 3. Sat 6 * 8.16 
NYHEE DAWN PORTER 


WALSH 
to nu 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP 

—Varyj HuH ^ 

"^JNUCH BETTE R THAN 
AOATHA CHRISTIE" Wfcab On 


SW1 01- 930 

7765/839 4455 CC Ol 379 
6666/6453. 741 9999. Orba Ol 
836 3962- Mon-Frl 8 00, Wed Mat 
300. Sab 5.00 & 8JHJ 
“TIE ACTING IS SHEER JOY” 
iCUbrtUanj 
PATSY BYRNE 
JAMS GROUT 
POLLY MMCS 
HU. MAYNARD 
BRIAN MURPHY 
PATRICIA ItOUTLEDGC 
PATSY ROWLANDS 
KATHY STAFF 
JOHN STRATTON 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

By J D. Pneuiev 
Overt fd by Ronald Eyre 

HI WILL NOT FIND A DM 
PLEASURABLE EVDNMQ ANY 
LONDON - OR THE 

6. Exprew 


WVMOHAMS 836 3028/379 
. 6865/379 6433 Orpt 836 3962 
Esm a Sau 5 6 8 30 

S*a*«N mnat and 4 Oct 

• FAYE DUNAWAY 

-Elerinliiina" iD Maui in 
CIRCE M BRAVO 
_ By Donald Treed 
Dtreeted by HAROLD PBVTER 
-A HJmuialinv Olay, literate 
and witty- Time*. “FuU of 
panion. rcncern and outragr" 
< City lJrmto 


WYMDHAHrS c 83* 3028 rr 379 
6S6S/6433/1N Call 24 lira 7 oon 
240 7200/741 999 Ores B36 
9962 Open* 7 Octobe r . 


In Ute NT. produrtlMi of 

- THE PETITION 

M Brian Clark 
Dt reeled, by Peter Hall 


YOUNG VIC 928 -6363 CC 679 
6493 For -a -whs only- • 

VANESSA REDGRAVE- 

In GHOSTS by Maea from Or I 2 


■YOUNG VK STUDIO 928 6&S 
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CoiititiRed on page 34 


t 



MBER 5 1986 


THE 



TIMES 


Hr* published in >785 




US Open poised 
to settle some 
difficult questions 

From Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent, New York 


The United States 
championships, the last grand 
slam tournament of the year, 
are poised for a big finish that 
should settle the arguments 
about Ivan Lendl and Boris 
Becker on the one hand and 
Martina Navratilova, Chris 
Lloyd and Steffi Graf on the 
other. The doubles results will 
be less conclusive, partly be- 
cause Peter Fleming and John 
McEnroe were late for work 
last week and someone else 
was given the job. 

- The women's singles semi- 
finals, Miss Navratilova v 
Miss Graf and Helena Sukova 
v Mrs Lloyd, will be played 
today . Miss Graf, aged 17, is 
the most serious long-term 
threat to the joint reign of 
Miss Navratilova and Mrs 
Lloyd since Tracy Austin won 
the US title in 1979 and 1981. 

Hana Mandlikova has long 
been capable of winning an 
occasional grand slam title but 
remains inconsistent By con- 
trast Miss Graf, mentally 
tougher and technically less 
flashy, is the kind of player 
who will be hard to check once 
she breaks through. Miss 
Navratilova won the first six 
sets she played against Miss 


Graf, at a total cost of only 13 
games. But Miss Graf beat her 
6-2, 6-3 the last time they met 
in Berlin last May. “That was 
on clay, which is my best 
surface,” Miss Graf points 
out "Now we are on her 
surface. But 1 think die will be 
nervous, because she knows it 
will be a tough match.” 

Miss Navratilova must be 
favoured to win, but the 
prospect that her game may be 
inhibited by apprehension 
gives the match a spice of 
uncertainty. The hard courts 
of Rushing Meadow are 
quicker than the shale of 
Berlin and that will suit Miss 
Navratilova's formidable ser- 
vice and forecourt game. She 
may be expected to attack 
Miss Grafs backhand, which 
briefly became vulnerable 
midway through the Berlin 
match. Equally, Miss Grafs 
forehand, one of the finest 
shots to embellish the modern 
history of women's tennis, 
could blast holes in the left- 
hander's backhand defences 
and. consequently, erode Miss 
Navratilova's confidence. 

Mrs Lloyd, six times cham- 
pion and three times runner- 
up, will be playing a semi-final 


BOXING 


New weight provides Sibson 
with food for thought 


By Sriluunar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 


Putting on weight has never 
given Tony Sibson any trou- 
ble, thanks to generous help- 
ings of Mars bars, cream buns 
and pop. Yet the world-ranked 
middlewight from Leicester 
had to struggle making 12st 
for his challenge for the World 
Boxing Council light-heavy- 
weight title held by the Hack- 
ney strong man, Dennis 
Andries. 

“I went up to 12st after my 
last fight but it was not the 
right kind of 12st,” Sibson 
said yesterday. “It was a puppy 
fat and that is no use against a 
man like Dennis. “I needed 
muscle.I had to eat the right 
kind of food and that was a 
struggle." 

Thanks to Michael Spinks, 
the IBF heavyweight cham- 
pion. he made it and he looked 


good. His pectorals strained 
against his shirt buttons. 
“Spinks had to put on weight 
to meet Larry Holmes and I 
got the name of Spinks's 
nutritional expert from Don 
King and he sent Tony the 
right kind of diet." Sibson's 
promoter, Frank Warren said. 

“All protein," Sibson said. 
“1 feel great Nice and an- 
chored to the ground and so 
solid that I shall stand my 
ground and stay on top of 
Andries.'* Sibson was not 
worried about being bulled 
round the ring by the 
champion's unorthodox 
methods. He has been training 
with 13st and 14st fighters 
with rougher methods than 
Andries. “I've been doing 
some of my own bullying," 
Sibson said. 


FOOTBALL 


A pity Andries did not turn 
up to say his piece. It was the 
second time that that cham- 
pion had failed to keep an 
appointment with the press. 
The bout will be held at 
Alexandra Pavilion on 
Wednesday. The north Lon- 
don arena will be dismantled 
in 1988 and boxing will move 
into the magnificent £40m 
new sports complex of the 
Alexandra Palace. 

The Palace will have three 
halls, the Great Hall having a 
seating capacity of 7,500, a 
Palm Court and four star 
hotel. There will be facilities 
for top world events in most 
indoor sports. Warren aims to 
hold the first defence of the 
winner of the world heavy- 
weight series there in 1988. 


Hibernian trio win appeals 


Three Hibernian players 
have made history in Scotland 
by winning their appeals 
against a sentence by die 
Scottish FA. It is the first time 
(he Scottish Professional 
Footballers* Association have 
won an appeal case. 

George McClnskey, Mark 
Fulton and Mickey Weir had 


appealed against the two-point 
sentence imposed oa them by 
the SFA for their part in the 
fracas during the premier 
division match between Hiber- 
nian and Rangers on the 
opening day of the season. 

Graeme Souness, the Rang- 
ers player/manager was sent 
off and eight others booked 



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II 


and, later, the SFA added two 
points to the disciplinary 
records of the 21 players 
involved in a centre circle 
brawL 

Hay rampns, page 33. 
• The Wesl Bromwich forward, 
Stewart Evans, has been given a 1 
two-match ban after being sent 
off while playing for his pre- 
vious dub. 


FOOTBALL 


Problems 


TiTiTml 


for Villa 

Aston Villa, who dimbed off 
the bottom of the first division 
by beating Luton Wednesday 
night, have been hit by a triple 
Wow. 

Their midfield player. Andy 
Blair, is likely to be out for six 
weeks with torn knee ligaments 
after the game. Neale Cooper, 
their £350,000 signing from 
Aberdeen, who has yet to play 
for the club because of a groin 
strain, suffered a setback when 
he could only manage half of the 
reserve game at Sunderland on 
Wednesday night. Their for-, 
ward, Andy Gray, trying to fight 
bis way back after injury, feces a 
two-match suspension after be- 
ing sent off against Sunderland. 

Villa are at home to Oxford 
on Saturday and manager, Gra- 
ham Turner, has to decide 
whether to keep transfer-listed 
two-goal substitute, Paul Kerr, 
in the line up. 

• Prolific goalscortr. Tommy 
Tynan, aged 30, yesterday 
joined Plymouth for the third 
time in bis career for £35.000 
from Rotherham. The Liver- 
pool-bom forward scored 10 
goals in nine games and 
clinched promotion to the sec- 
ond division for foe Devon dub 
at the end of last season while on 
loan from Rotherham. 

Tynan was signed by his 
former manager. Bobby 
Moncur, for £55,000 from New- 
port three years ago and broke 
Plymouth's post-war League 
scoring record with 31 goals 
before he was transferred, at his 
own request, to Rotherham last 
summer. Plymouth manager, 
Dave Smith, said: “It's great to 
have him back where be belongs 
- at this dub." Tynan plays 
against Hull tomorrow. 

More football, page 33 


SHOWJUMPING 


LIEGE: Gram! priJC i. WMftjeij (J 
ScnarManboryw, US|, OfttS 36.02SOC. Z Aprs 
Son (p cnarws. GB). a. 3M& 3. Pusmne » 
|M Fuck. ShM, 8. 34-13. 


SPORT 


here for the sixteenth consec- 
utive year. These days she 
shows an increasing interest in 
keeping the rallies short and — 
having diligently practised the 
craft of putting the ball away — 
is no longer as much of a 
baseline player as she used to 
be. But Mrs Lloyd still prefers 
her opponents to come to- 
wards her, which is the way 
Miss Sukova plays. Mrs Lloyd 
has won all their 14 matches, 
but the last two. one of them a 
thrilling duel at Wimbledon, 
have been awfully tough. The 
odds against a Graf-Sukova 
final are long, but not ridicu- 
lously so. 

Yesterday's main task was 
to reduce the men's singles to 
four. Already we knew that 
Lendl, the US and French 
champion, would play Stefan 
Edberg, champion or Austra- 
lia, in one semi-final, which 
will be a repeat of their match 
at the same stage in Mel- 
bourne. That left two quarter- 
finals to be decided: Milan 
Srejber v the Wimbledon 
champion, Becker; and 
Joakim Nystrom v Miloslav 
Mecir. For the first time since 
1966 there will be no Ameri- 
can in the men's semi-finals. 


Bevan 

holds 

tenuous 

lead 

By Jenny MacArthnr 

Ros Bevan, a member ol 
last year’s gold medal winning 
Young Riders team and a 
pupil of Captain Mark Phil- 
lips. has a tenuous lead at the 
end of the first day of dressage 
at yesterday’s Buighley Remy 
Martin horse trials. 

Riding Peter Strong’s 11- 
year-old Irish bred mare, Hor- 
ton Venture, Miss Bevan, who 
spent most of last year based 
with the Range Rover team at 
Gatcombe Park, rode an ac- 
curate test which put her a 
fraction ahead of Angela 
Tucker on Good Value. The 
latter’s outstanding perfor- 
mance was marred only at the 
very end by some resistance 
going up the centre line. 

Good Value was bought two 
years ago from Robert 
Lemieux — who is himself 
lying in third place with The 
Gamesm aster — originally for 
Mrs Tucker's husband Mi- 
chael, who is competing at 
Burghley on General Bugle. 

Mr Tucker soon decided 
that the 1 1-year-old horse 
might respond better to a 
lady's touch so passed him on 
to his wife, an experienced 
competitor whose youthful 
looks belie the feet that she 
competed at Burghley as long 
ago as 1971 when she finished 
eighth on Mooncoin in the 
European championships. 
The new partnership had spe- 
cial dispensation to compete 
at this year’s Badminton (they 
were not officially qualified) 
where they had a good outing 
apart from a run out at the ski 
jump. 

Another experienced 
competitor who made a good 
start to this tough three-day 
event was Tessa Martin-Bird 
who looks to have found a 
worthy successor to her for- 
mer top horse. The Mountain- 
eer, in the nine-year-old 
Autumn Light They are lying 
fifth after a typically authori- 
tative performance but are 
separated by only a fraction of 
a mark from Mandy Jeakins, a 
local rider wiih her 12-year- 
old Woden. 

Lemieux's test on The 
Gamesmaster, the horse who 
shot him into the limelight at 
Badminton in 1983, lacked its 
usual sparkle. His rider, who 
competes on his second horse 
The Poser today, attributed it 
partly to the lack of at- 
mosphere round the dressage 
arena. “He likes the crowds 
and responds to them.” Yes- 
terday the crowds were more 
concerned with doing their 
early Christmas shopping in 
the trade stands area than in 
watching the mostly mediocre 
dressage. 

Today will be different as 
most of the top riders to their 
tests including the favourite 
Virginia Leng on Murphy 



Morag and Sarah Cotton competing at the Burghley Remy Martin horse trials yesterday. 

(Photograph: lan Stewart) . 

Himself, who is attempting row on her Dauntsey winner, with her second horse, 
her fourth successive win. The Artful Dodger, com- Myross. on whom she won 
If the order is likely to mentedon the hiUyness of the both the team gold medal and 


Himself, who is attempting 
her fourth successive win. 

If the order is likely to 
change today it will be re- 
shuffled even more violently 
by the end of Saturday’s cross- 
country, described by Mark 
Todd, New Zealand's Olym- 
pic gold medalist as “big and 
typically Buighley”. He sin- 
gled out the water, fences 23 
and 24 as being particularly 
difficult One rider likely to 
move several places by the 
end of tomorrow is Lucinda 
Green with Count de Botebec, 
currently lying in tenth place. 

Both Lemieux and Gain 
Mason, who has the unenvi- 
able task of going first tomor- 


mented on the hiUyness ol the both the team gold medal ana 
course. “You tend to think of the individual silver at last 
Burghley as being quite flat** year's European champion- 


Lemieux commented, “but 
they seem to have found and 


ships held here. 

The best of the seven for- 


made use of every available eign competitors yesterday 
hill.” was the French rider, Didier 

Hills are unlikely to hinder Stguret, on Gallium, currently 
the progress of Loma Garke, lying fourth. 


for whom Buighley has 
proved a happy stamping 
ground — she won in 1967 and 
1968. Although she is lying 
down the line with her first 
horse. GlencrooL who has 
never shone at the dressage 


Piadnga (after first day of dres- 
sage;: 1. Honan Venture (B Bevan) 
49; 2, Good value (A Tucker) 49.4; 3. 
The Gamesmaster (R Lemeux) 
55.4; 4. Gallium (D Seguret France) 
55.8; 5, Autumn Light (7 Martin-Bird) 
56: 6, Autumn Venture (E Stffibe. the 
Netherlands) 56.4; 7. Woden (M 
• 56.8; 8. " 


stage, she has a good chance of 

joining the leaders tomorrow Gondrexon) 58.2. 


Siiwerstone (M 


RACING 


Medical adviser gives sauna warning 


By John Good body. Sports News Correspondent 


Dr Ken Kingsbury, the 
medical adviser to the Sports 
Council, yesterday warned 
British jockeys that they could 
be damaging their health by 
continually having sauna 
baths to reduce weighL 

Steve Cauthen, the cham- 
pion jockey, who elected not 
to ride in the first race at York 
on Wednesday because he did 
not arrive at the course in time 
to have his customary sauna 
to help him meet the 
body weigh l limit; is only one 
rider who daily has to sweat 
oft extra pounds. 

Dr Kingsbury said: “It is 
not advisable to have saunas 
on a very regular basis to lose 
weighL A tremendous number 
of changes occur in the body 
and this could be harmfuL 


A boost for 
badminton 

British Rail are to sponsor a 
badminton series featuring 
eight of the country's leading 
players. The event takes place 
in seven venues between 
October and February — 
Hemel Hempstead, 
Tonbridge, Ipswich, Torbay, 
Macclesfield. Telford and 
Grimsby. Two teams of four 
will compete for £1.200 each 
night. The players are Steve 
Baddeley. Darren Hall, 
Gillian Gowers, Gillian Clark, 
Andy Goode, Nora Perry. 
Gillian Gilks and Mike 
Tredgett 

The British Trout Associ- 
ation will add an extra in- 
centive with an individual 
points table carrying an end- 
of-season prize of £1,000 to 
the winner. 

Leicester tour 

Leicester have announced a 
rugby union lour of New 
Zealand. Australia and Singa- 
pore before the start of next 
season. The club are expected 
to play at least five games in 
Australia before heading for 
New Zealand after leaving 
Britain on July 30. 


Loss of fluid increases the 
viscosity of the blood and 
affects the mineral content of 
the body.” 

Cauthen, tall for a jockey at 
5ft 6in, has had desperate 
trouble in the past reducing 
weighL Last year he was 
admitted to a clinic in Cin- 
cinnati for what his father said 
was an “alcohol problem'' but 
was associated with his diffi- 
culty in weight loss. 

Unlike sportsmen such as 
boxers, weigh differs, wrestlers 
and judo fighters, who may 
have to slim down a few times 
a year to compete in their 
chosen bodyweight class, lead- 
ing jockeys can race between 
500 and 700 times a year. 

Dr Kingsbury also said that 
it was important for the health 
of any competitor, who was 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



Baddeley: 400th appearnce 

Trial run 

The Olympic champions. 
Mark Todd and Lucinda 
Green, will compete in the 
Waldridge Manor Horse Tri- 
als, near Aylesbury on Tues- 
day. The event has been 
sponsored by Priest's antiques 
and fine arts for the last three 
years. 

Landmark 

The Mansfield Town de- 
fender. George Foster, will 
make his 400ih Football 
League appearance against 
Chesterfield on Sunday, 13 
years after doctors told him he 
would never play again. This 


trying to lose weight that their 
diet should be carefully bal- 
anced to include all the nec- 
essary nutriments. Lack of 
protein can lead to injuries 
and the lack of vitamins to 
osteoporosis, the thinning of 
the density of the bone. 

The Jockey Gub give an- 
nual medical checks to all Flat 
jockeys aged 45 and over and 
all jump jockeys aged 35 and 
over. Every jockey, whatever 
their age, must have a licence 
and a medical record book but 
they only need to see their 
own doctor before this licence 
is awarded. 

. Dr Norman Gordon, the 
course medical officer at As- 
cot, said that there was no 
evidence that the long-term 
use of saunas harmed 
anyone's health but agreed 


Finns fancied 

Three Finns, Markku Alen. 
Time Salonen and Juha 
Kankkunen, are strongly 
tipped to contest the top 
places in the 1,000 Lakes rally 
which begins in Jyvaskyla 
today. Kankkunen has yet to 
win at this venue but bolds a 
19-point advantage over Alen 
in the world championship. 
Salonen, the world champion, 
lies sixth. 

Coach dies 

The Brazilian coach. Otto 
Gloria,. who led Portugal to 
third place in the 1966 World 
Cup finals in England, died 
yesterday after a long illness. 
He was 69. 

Seed tumbles 

Ross Thome, of Australia, 
the top seed, was defeated in 
the Hong Kong squash Open 
by Martin Bodimeade. of 
England in a pulsating four- 
game match yesterday. 
Bodimeade won the first 
game, then Thome hit back to 
level before the 22-year-old 
Londoner took the third and 
fourth games to seal the 
Australian's fate, followed a 
serious tack injury. 


that he knew of no research on 
the problem. 

“Provided the jockey lakes 
fluid after racing, so replacing 
the electrolytes, then I do not 
think any harm will be done. I 
alsO'know of individuals who 
take' salt tablets to counterart 
the original loss.” Dr Gordon 
said. 

The minimum weight for 
jockeys was raised from 7 
stone to 7st 71b in 1984 but in 
South Australia the limit is 7st 
101b. The Jockeys* Associ- 
ation are awaiting a report 
from Professor Michael 
Preece, of the Institute of 
Child Health, who is is 
conducting a study on growth, 
before deciding whether to 
propose a new limiL 

York report, page 32 


CCPR 

Rates increase 
threaten 
sports clubs 

The Central Council of 
Physical Recreation (CCPR) 
will today lobby the four main 
political panics over sports 
clubs’ rates bills. 

The CCPR claims that 
many sports dubs will be 
forced out of business because 
of recent rates increases. The 
four parties have been asked 
to consider 100 per cent rate 
relief for all sports clubs 
without a bar, and all youth 
sections of voluntas sports 
clubs. The CCPR has also 
recommended a 50 per cent 
reduction in rates for dubs 
with a bar. 

Peter Lawson, the CCPR's 
secretary, said- “Without the 
voluntary sports dubs, there 
will be fittle opportunity to 
channel youthful energy and 
enthusiasm into sports coach- 
jngand competition. Compet- 
itive sport in schools is 
already at rock bottom. The 
British people want British 
.youngsters to be led off the 
street comers and it is the 
variety of sporting activity 
through the dub system which 
can achieve this.” 


Ronois 
here but 
not for 
the beer 

Brussels 

As if one joker in the pack 
was not enough. Said Aouita, £ 
who is as entertaining off the 
track as he is fast on it, says he 
is going for Steve Cram’s 
2.000 metres world record ol 
4min 51 J9scc here tonight - 
while Cram will have run the 
1,500 metres, at w hich Aouita 
holds the world record of 3 ruin 
29.46sec just beforehand. 

But Henry Rono, of all 
people, has turned up again 
out of the big blue yonder that 
is the Kenyan Rift Valley. 

Rono was everything that 
Aouita is, and more, both on 
and off the track. Aouita holds , 
two world records, and pos- ^ 
sibly three after tonight, but as 
John Walker, who is in the 
field tonight, and who was 
holder before Cram, knows, 
“It's not as easy as that”. 

Cram took only 0.01 sec oft 
Walker's time, set almost 10 
years ago. But Rono set four 
world records in one amazing 
summer's running in 1978. 
And, after one retirement, he 
bettered his 5.000 metres 
world record in 1981. 

Different grasp 3 
of reality 


He has subsequently lost 
the 10,000 metres record to 
Fernando Mamede, and his 
5,000 metres record, Inst to 
Dave Moor croft, and now to 
Aouita. But his steeplechase 
and 3,000 metres records still 
stand, despite two pace-made 
attempts on the latter by 
Aouita in recent weeks, which 
left the Moroccan fractious of 
a second outside Rono's time 
of 7min 32.1 sec. 

It is as impossible to get a 
straight answer out of Rono as 
of Aouita. It is not that they do 
not tell the truth but that they, 
perhaps due to their cultnres, 
have a different grasp of 
reality. 

But Rono volunteered this 
opinion yesterday: “There's 
only two ways Aouita is going 
to break my 3,000 metres 
world record: cut the corners, 
or make the pace himself.” 

That is typical Rono, half 
nonsense, hdf eminent good 
sense. Aouita has been drawn 
into the mistaken belief that 
be needs pacemakers. Rono 
proved, in his four world 
records, that they were not 
necessary. 

Beer and women, Rono 
freely admits, were his down- 
fall. Although, as he tucked 
into a few glasses in the bar 
here two nights ago, he de- 
cided it was only women. 

The last time Rono had been 
sighted was in Germany two 
years ago, when be was so 
heavy be qualified for weight- 
watchers rather than world 
records. After several nmnns 
with the authorities, be retired 
back to Kenya. 

But his farm has not been 
paying, and he decided to come 
back to what he does best He 
moved to upstate New York in 
May, started running again 
and has lost 21 kilogrammes 
in three months. He has ran 
three 10-kilometre road races 
in the last month, finishing 
31st, fourth and then, in- 
credibly, winning in Maryland 
in 28min lOsec last Sunday. 


Disappearing into 
one of the bars 


His talent cannot be denied. 
Previous experience dictates 
that, even at 34, be could still 
break a record. Or just as 
likely disappear into one of 
many bars: It is very unlikely 
that he will win the 10,008 
metres tonight hut he is the 
one that everyone's eyes wOl 
beon. 

There is widespread sorrow 
that Cram and Aouita are not 
racing against each other, as 
had been promised since the 
start of the season. And it is 
unclear why. Cram said sev- 
eral days ago that he was 
"“wing the 1,500 metres, 
“against whoever wants to 
turn up”. But, in an uncommon 
show of prevarication, Aouita 
is coming forth with aft sorts of 
reasons why be is running the 
2,000 metres, none of which 
hold water. 

Sebastian Coe has derided 
that be Is too tired after the 
European championships to 
attempt a 5,000 metres here 
out Fatima Whitbread and 
Linford Christie, two more of 
Britain ’s g old medal winners 
from Stuttgart are competing 
tonight. But, although she 
says that she thinks her better 
event will be the long jump 
tonight, the hi ghligh t of thk 
tense Ivo Van D amme Me- 
morial will be Hetke Dredisier 
against Evelyn Ashford in the 


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Pat Butcher 
Athletics 
Correspondent 


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