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No 62,556 



TIMES 


SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


Big death toll feared as passengers flee in hail of 


<r 


commandos. Passengm 

• One "assenger had earlier been shot dead and many 

Were feared « amhnliSS 
went to the jet, hijacked by foifrAntoic-speakmg men 

SJS® ^Jj***** J“d demanded that the Pan Am 

-Mil SSIZ SE &S: — 

Gunmen fire 
on hostages 

From Michael Hamlyn, Karachi 



The hfiadced Pan Am 747 on the Ranchi tarmac, and below, Pakistani officials wheel away a victim of the shooting. 


Pakistani commandos last 
night stormed a Pan Am 
. airliner carrying about 400 
people, after four hijackers 
herded their hostages together 
in the aircraft and opened fire 
on them indiscriminately. 
First reports indicated that 
there were heavy casualties. 

The four hijackers, who had 
. demanded to be flown to 
Cyprus to free convicted ter-, 
rorisls in jail there, apparently 
threw hand grenades which 
did not explode as at least SO 
passengers fled the airliner m 
panic. 

A BBC television news re- 
porter at Karachi said pan- 
demonium broke out what 
the hijackers began firing at 
passengers on the plane. He 
said: “The four gunmen 
opened fire indiscriminately 
on the passengers with their 
automatic weapons, appar- 
ently without provocation. At 
the same time the aircraft . 
doors were opened and the 
terrified passengers began 
jumping out of the plane 
screaming and shouting for 
help. 

“At least 26 ambulances : 
raced across the tarmac to the 
aircraft, as well as the army 


Monday 


A 


i\)C 

(Sljnrdj 

CRISIS 


Abandoned ^ 
churches turned into 
discotheques; a 
vandalized Prayer 
Book; an 
unrepresentative 
leadership; has the 
established Church 
lost touch with the 
people? A three-part 
series investigates 

The New 
Fatherland 

Breadwinners or 
nappy changers? How 
do today's fathers see 
their role? 

Libby Purves reports 



- ( gM- 


_ There is £12,000 to be 
won in The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition, £8,000 in 
toe weekly competition 
and £4,000 in toe daily. 

• Yesterday's £4,000 
daily prize was won by 
Mr G N Burton of 
Ulverston, Cumbria. 
Details page 3. 

• Portfolio lists pages 
18 and 23; rules and 
how to play, page 33. 


Chess draw 

The thirteenth world chess 
championship game between 
Kasparov and Karpov ended 
in a draw in Leningrad last 
night Earlier report, page 2 

SDI boost 

The United States* Strategic 
Defence Initiative, or Star 
Wars programme, has been 
given a boost with the 
succcsful launching of a Delta 
rocket Pm 

Fatal blaze 

Fourteen guests wrc killed in 
the Norwegian city of Kns- 
liansand when flames en- 
gulfed a hotel- Pag® ** 


HwntNwf 2-5 
Overseas 6.7 
Arts 10 

Bntbs. deaths 
aurruum <7 
BridW 15 
BtaiKSS 10-3» 
Cowl 17 

fnsminb 15.18 


Leaders 
Letters 
Obituary 
Refigkni 
S ciwe 

Weather 18 




commandos who were lying in 
wait.” 

He said a colleague M 
climbed on board -one of the 
ambulances. “People scram- 
bled or crawled in with him, 
all but one of them, with bullet 
injuries. The uninjured man 
said that the army comman- 
dos had not attempted to 
storm the plane before the 
hijackers opened -fire. The 
sound of firing was still being 
beard from the aircraft 15 
minutes after it began.” 

The commandos rushed the 
plan at about 9:40 pm 
(5.40 pm BST). Witnesses 
said they heard gunfire inside 
the plane, which had been 
hijacked here earlier today as 
it was preparing to take off for 
Fmakfun and New York. 

Correspondents saw two 
Arab-Iooking- men being 
driven away under heavy 
guard A policemen identified 
them as two of the gunmen. 
One man had been shot in the 
chest. Injured people were 
being carried from the plane, 
some soaked in blood. 

The assault was carried out . 
about 80 minutes before the 
expiry of a deadline set by the 
gunmen, who had demanded a 

US ‘deep 
regret’ at 



fresh cockpit crew to fly them 
to Cyprus. 

The four Arabic-speaking 
gunmen mil) automatic weap- 
ons and grenades had stormed 
aboard the PanAmerican 747 
jumbo jet as h was loading 
here for . take-off early yes- 
terday. As they seized control 
of the plane limy killed one 
passenger and wounded three 


others, but the flight-deck 
crew managed to escape. 

The dead' passeng er was 
named as Mr. Rajesh Kumar, 
an American citizen of Indian 
origin, who died in Jinnah. 
- Hospital in Karachi. 

The hijackers, who are be- 
lieved to be linked with the 
group which carried out the. 
“marina murders” in Cyprus 
last year, had originally set a 


deadline of 7.00 pm local time 
(3.00 pm BEST) forthe authori- 
ties in Pakistan to allow them 
to go. otherwise they threat- 
ened to kill their hostages. 

The deadline passed with- 
out incident and the Pakistan 
Gvil Aviation Authority an- 
nounced that ft had been 
extended until 1 1.00 pm local 
time (7.00 pm BST). 

Two claims were earlier 


Puzzle over terrof claims 


FyomMehstn Afi 
Washington 

The State-Department yes- 
terday confirmed the death of 
a Kenya-born US citizen in 
the Karachi hijacking of the 
Pan American Boeing 747 
aircraft. 

A spokesman said the 
American had .been prelimi- 
nary identified as Mr Rajesh 
Kumar. 29; a resident of 
California. 

“We deeply regret and con- 
demn the brutal killing of this 
innocent American- in this 
callous act of terrorism”, the 
spokesman said. 

Meanwhile. American of- 
ficials said that the aircraft 
carrier Forrestal had left Na- 
ples early yesterday following 
the Karachi hijacking. They 
did not say where it was 
heading. 


- From Robert Fisk 

Nicosia - • 

• Twbapoeymousmen— one 
in Nicosia, the other in Bermt 
• — yesterday claimed 

of’theJPsn^ Am junI®*jeL 
saying pramiralidrirhag 
attacked the aircraft because 
US intelligence agents were on 
die plane. 

Respectively describing 
themselves as the repre- 
sentatives of the “Libyan 
Revolutionary' Cells” and 
“Soldiers of God”, the first 
telephoned his claim of 
responsibility to the AFP news 
agency in Cyprus while the 
second delivered a statement 
from the Muslim fun- 
damentalist and pro-Iranian 
JundidJah (Soldiers of God) to 
the Beirut newspaper An 
Nahar. It was typed m' -neat 
and flawless Arabic on a sheet 
of quarto paper and finished 
with the words “Glory ip the 
martyrs, dignity be to God, 
God is great”. 

Neither the caller nor the 


Libya said it had notions to do 
with the b ra c king and said 
attempts woe being unde' to 
justify an attack against it 
(Raster reportsX 
Socfa fabrications coaid only 
be toe ifavk of forces hastfle tn- 
’ Una nb vtolE.finkil 
Agencfnndthe : ; 
Mnssad mtdUgeace 
service, the official hews; 
agency Jana Hid. It added: 
“We—have no comectioa 
whatsoever with what has 
happened." ‘ ' 

typed statement could §e veri- 
fied. The “Libyan Revolu- 
tionary Cdls” has never been 
heard of before. Nor was any 
evidence given that there ac- 
tually were any intelligence 
men on the hijacked aircraft. 
Most incidents, of this ldnd 
generate a rash of anonymous 
Claims in Beirut and the two 
statements yesterday made no 
mention of the release of 
Palestinian prisoners in Nico- 
sia. the demand made by the 
hijackers in Karachi. 


Lebanese police suspect that, 
various intelligence organiza- 
tions in the Middle Fast are 
often behind the claims. 

On the tore of it, the 
JuruhUlah statement appeared 
to be the more serious, not 
teast because. of the familiar 
■^Hetoric in wiijfch rt' was 
couched. It ~shid the 
organization^ “Zulfikar Ali 
Bhutto squad'' 1 had carried out 
the hijacking “with great suc- 
cess and according to a 
premeditated plan”. 

in common with similar 
hijack daims issued in Beirut 
in the past, the statement said: 
“We wish to stress that we are 
not targeting American citi- 
zens or the American people, 
but we are after repressive 
tools (sic) recruited by the 
administration of the Great 
Satan, especially . President 
Reagan's - Government” -It 
also claimed that agents of the 
Israeli Mossad mtellif 
organization were on 
. the Pan Am jet 


made in connection with the 
hi-jacking. One, telephoned to 
a news agency in Nicosia, said 
that the hijackers came from 
the Libyan Revolutionary 
CelL A second claim, in a 
type- written note delivered to 
- a Beirut newspaper, claimed 
responsibility for an organiza- 
tion called Jundaflah (soldiers 
of God). 

Background, page 7 

At least 
8 Britons 
on board 

By Rodney Cowton . 

. The Foreign Office in Lon- 
don said last uight .it bad the 
vamessfftdBiy g&sl of the -.15* 
Britons believed to »be oh 
board, the hijacked airtmer. - 
Even the -figure of 15 was 
not necessarily precise. It was 
possible some Britons were 
among about 50 passengers 
who had not boarded the jet 
when the hijackers struck. 

The names- of those known 
to be on board would not .be 
released until Pan Am had 
contacted their next of kin. 

As the hijack drama en- 
folded Mr Vernon Walters, 
the US presidential envoy, left 
London after talks with -Sir' 
Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign 
Minister, at the end-of his tour 
of European, capitals. He 
made nd comment on the 
hijacking. 

. London talks, page 7 


econd deputy 
for Tebbit 
in reshuffle ; 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


TUC faces future 
united by hope 


ByOur Political Reporter 


The fragile unity of the 
labour movement has for once 
survived its annual outing to 
the seaside. 

Some 1.200 delegates and 
88 genera! secretaries left the 
Trades Union Congress con- 
ference in Brighton yesterday, 
at the end of a week in which- 
they believe that they have 
taken the first step towards 
propelling Mr Neil Kinnock 
into Downing Street. 

Togetherness and brotherly 
love was. for the most part, the. 
order of the day, with old 
rivalries only rearing their 
ugly heads in the debates on 
nuclear energy and the dispute 
between News International 
and the printworkers. 

Even Mr Arthur ScaigHL 
the ghost of conferences past, 
walked only at night 

The TUC demanded and 
got a fighting speech from Mr 
Kinnock, one that held out the 
promised land of jobs for all 
while beckoning the brothers 
back to the corridors of 
power...and beer and sand- 
wiches into the night. 


Mr Norman Willis,, the 
TUC genera] secretary, also 
came out ahead on points, 
after beginning the week with 
questions being raised about 
his capacity to go the distance 
with the likes of Mr' ScaigOJ 
and the rumbustious Mr Eric 
Hammond, leader of the 
electricians' union. 

Prompted by his autocue, as 
advertised by President 


Conference reports 4 


Reagan and Mrs Thatcher, he 
managed to belie his nick- 
name of “Ram No”, coined 
after his meanderingdebut the 
previous year in Blackpool. 

The TUC win try to keep fts. 
head down until the general 
election, although the emotive 
issue of nuclear power may 
explode again at Labour's 
gathering of- the dans at 
Blackpool later this month. 

The real lest will come 
when, and if, Mr Kinnock Is 
faced with ranslating his bold 
words into action - and the 
brothers cash in their chips. 


Clashes at 
Soweto 
funerals 

- By- Our Foreign Staff 

Further dashes broke out in 
Soweto yesterday when .se- 
curity forces confronted 
blades ’ trying to bdiy the 
victims of earlier, police ac- 
tion, residents said- . 

They said tear-gas was fired 
into; a. funeral procession for 
four of the 24 victims of last 
week's street fighting. 

According to clergymen, 15 
people were buried on Thurs- 
day after the authorities 
banneda mass funeraL 

They claimed, however, 
that the police forced under- 
takers to secretly bury at least 
four ofthe dead. . 

> Meanwhile, the South Af- 
rican Parliament yesterday 
ended its extended sitting 
amid speculation that whites 
will go- to .the polls before 
April. 

The speculation was height- 
ened when President Botha 
told a heckler at a party 
conference: “You wilf get an 
election before you are dry 
behind the ears”. • 

Reports, page 6 


More questioning 
in murder inquiry 


By Michael HorsneO 


• Police investigating five 
murders, in a New Forest 
house were granted a 24-hour 
extension by magistrates yes- 
terday to continue questioning 
George Stephenson. 

The. former servant at the 
house in Fordingbridge. 
Hampshire, where .four mem- 
bers of the Cleaver family and. 
their elderly nurse were -mur- 
dered, was -driven to 
Lymington for a 10-minute 
court appearance, - 

Stephenson, -aged 35, 
surrendered to police- at a 
camp rite at Brockenhurst, at 
1.42 am on Thursday and 


police had questioned him for 
the maximum 36 hours al- 
lowed under the Police and 
Criminal Evidence Act with- 
out a charge: 

If no charges are preferred 
by today a further application 
may have to be made. 

Police were continuing yes- 
terday to question two other 
men arrested in Coventry in 
connection with a red Rover 
car hired in the city by 
Stephenson last Monday. 

They are still searching fora 
blonde woman in her 20s who 
was seen with him in Cov- 
entry last weekend. 


Allied clinches deal 


AJlied-Lyons. the food and 
drinks group, has bought con- 
trol of Hiram Walker, the big 
Canadian wine and spirit busi- 
ness — best known, for its 
Ballan tine’s Scotch, Canadian 
Gub whisky and_ Couryoisier 
cognac brands " at'a cost of 
about £600 million (Cliff Fel- 
tham writes). . . 

The deal ends a long-run- 


ning legal dispute. It will make 
Allied a much larger group 
and therefore a more difficult 
laiget for Elders 1XL, the 
Australian Foster's lager 
group, which was this week 
given the go-ahead by the 
Monopolies 'and 'Mergers 
Commission to renew its £1.8 
billion takeover bid. 

Details, page 19 


Times man in Zimbabwe is expelled 


By Mary Dejevsky 

Jan Raalh. correspondent 
Tor The Times in Harare for 
the past two years, has-been 
expelled from Zimbabwe. He 
arrived in London yesterday 
on a one-way travel document 
supplied by the Zimbabwe 
Ministry of Home Affairs. 

Mr Raath was detained by 
security officials in Harare on 
August 27 and informed that 
iic had been stripped of his 
Zimbabwean citizenship. . 

He was held for 3'/’ hours 
and l 3 ter given 14 days to 
leave the country- Although 
Zimbabwe has statutory proc- 


edures governing deprivation 
of citizenship and deporta- 
tion. these were not observed. 

The Home Affair s Ministry 
gave no official reason for its 
action. Officials did. however, 
make clear their objections to 
some of Mr Plain’s recent 
reports from Zimbabwe, es- 
pecially those dealing with 
illegal detentions and other 
violations of human rights. 

Mr Raatb, who was born in 
South .Africa, has lived in 
Zimbabwe for 1 2 years and his 
family is -still in Harare. He 
took up Zimbabwean citizen-, 
ship a little over a year ago 


after having relinquished his 
South African citizenship, and 
had planned to settle perma- 
. nently in Zimbabwe. His po- 
sition now is not dear. 

Under Zimbabwean law, 
the authorities have no powers 
to' deprive soroconexjf citizen- 
ship if he- is thereby made 
stateless. Mr Raath's citizen- 
ship was restored when he was 
issued with his travel docu- 
ments. His passport, however, 
remains cancelled, and he left 
the country without it 

Mr Raath's lawyer in Zim- 
babwe is negotiating for. bis 
diem to be allowed to return 


to Zimababwe and con tinue to 
work as a journalist The 
British High Commission has 
. also made representations. 

•. For the time being, Mr 
Raalh has been warned that 
any attempt to contest his 
expulsion is likely to be fruit-, 
less, and could result in his 
detention or deportation. • 

• NAIROBI: Kenya has with- 
drawn its dtizenship from a 
United Nations journalist. Sa- 
lim Lone, who was detained . 
briefly on his last visit to 
Kenya in July (Reuter 
reports). 

Leading article, page 9 


Four killed in 
school bus 
collision 

Four people died and eight 
were injured in a collision 
between a car and school mini 
bus, near Insch, north-west of 
Aberdeen last nigbL 

Ambulances ferried injured 
school children to Huntley 
Hospital, six miles from the 
crash scene, but none was 
among the dead, police said. 

The accident happened 
about 5pm on the a 96 Aber- 
deen to Inverness Road as the 
children were returning from 
an outing to a swimming pooL 


The appointment of a sec- 
ond deputy chairman of the 
Conservative Fatty is likely to 
be the main feature of Mis 
Margaret Thatcher’s min- 
isterial reshuffle planned for 
this week. 

Mr David Waddington. 
Minister of State at the Home 
Office, is being tipped for the 
post, which has been created 
to ease the burden on Mr 
Norman Tebbit, the party 
chairman. 

He will take over 
responsibility for running 
Central Office while Mr 
Tebbit concentrates on his 
Cabinet role, the development 
and presentation of policy and 
strengthening links between 
Smith Square and the constit- 
uency parties. 

Mr Jeffrey Archer, the dep- 
uty gjuirnuin, will continue in 
his role of rallying the troops 
ax the grass roots. 

Mrs Thatcher will tell the 
Queen of her plans for the 
Government shake-up today 
when sire pays her annual 
informal weekend visit to 
Balmoral The changes are 
likely to be confined to the 
middle and junior ranks. 

They win be concentrated 
on the Department of Health 
and Social Security, where Mr 
Barney Hayboe, the Minister 
of State, and Mr Ray Whitney, 
one of his deputies, are seen as 
likely casualties. 


Mrs Thatcher wants a re- 
vamped team to counter crit- 
ics. of the Government’s 
stewardship of the NHS. 

Lord Elton’s resignation 
from the Department of 
Environment leaves another 
slot in the middle ranks to fie 
filled and further weakens the 
Government's presentation'm 
the Lords. 

Other junior ministers in 
the firing line include Mrs 
Peggy Fenner at agriculture 
and Mr John Lee at defence. 

Mr David Melior, a junior 
minister in the Home Office, 
may replace Mr Waddington, 
who would find it difficult to 
combine Central Office duties 
with his responsibilities for 
immigration and is likely to be 
switched to a less onerous 
post 

Mr Chris Paucn, Minister 
of State for Education, is being 
canvassed as the new Minister 
for Health where, it is said, his 
skills as a communicator 
would be a decided asset 

Mr David Hunt a junior 
minister at energy, is another 
believed to be on the way up: 

Right-wing backbenchers 
due for promotion include Mr 
Michael Forsyth. Mr Michael 
Portillo and Mr Peter Li I Icy. 
Mr Richard Luce, Minister for 
the Arts, may be switched to 
take over overseas 
development. 


Man shot 
in Tube 
after raid 

By a Staff Reporter 

A man was shot in the 1% 
and wounded last nightwben 
he was trapped by armed 
police in a London Under- 
ground tunnel after an at- 
tempted robbery on a security 
van. 

Police said it was too early 
to say how the injury had been 
caused or whether any shots 
had been fired by officers. 

The man, whohad a hand- 
gun. was carried .from the 
Bank Underground station ip 
the Gty on a stretcher and 
Said to be not seriously 
injured. 

Police said they were not 
ruling out the possibility that 
he had given himself up after 
shooting himself in the leg. 

Supt Edward Aggar, of the 
City of London police, said 
details of what had happened 
in the tunnel on the Waterloo 
and City line should be avail- 
able later last night 

About 10 armed officers 
were .thought to have ap- 
proached the empty train in 
which the man was trapped 
from either end. They were 
joined in the operation by 
ambulancemen wearing bul- 
let-proof jackets. 


Richards 

attacks 

Somerset 

Viv Richards, the dismissed 
Somerset cricketer, last night 
attacked officials of the county 
cricket club, whom he describ- 
ed as “assassins” 

He accused the club of 
reneging on promises made by 
captain Peter Roebuck, the 
cricket committee chairman, 
Mr Brian Langford, and the 
dub chairman, Mr Michael 
HilL 

He said Roebuck had writ- 
ten to him in the West Indies 
inviting him to be Somerset's 
vice captain. 

Then, after a committee 
meeting, he was told he and 
Joel Gamer had to go. “You 
don't treat animals this way,” 
Richards said. “1 was blind- 
folded. led up an alley and 
assassinated”. 

Richards said he and Gar- 
ner were happy at Somerset 
and had become pan of the 
community. He said he had 
received “emotional letters” 
from loyal tons. He dismissed 
as “insulting” a peace formula 
under which be. Gamer and 
New Zealander Martin Crowe 
would play for Somerset in 
rotation. 

He was still prepared to play 
for Somerset under different 
management. 


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) 






HOME NEWS 


JER61986 


More top graduates 
train for the Bar 
than as solicitors 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affaire Correspondent 


r : 


' More first-class honours 
a graduates are now choosing 
:jhe Bar rather than the 
^solicitors’ profession, accord- 
.*mg to the latest statistics from 
■'-universities. 

= . The figures, published in 
: this week’s Law Society Go- 
—zette. indicate a steady shift in 
favour of the Bar, compared 
vwith three years ago, at least 
^among lop university 
; -graduates. 

They show that last year 
i 6.69 per cent of all graduates 
■“entering courses for the Bar 
-'had first-class honours de- 
agrees, compared with 4.10 per 
cent entering courses for the 
: solicitors’ branch. 

- T ‘ ■ The year before, the propor- 
-i dons were 5.63 percent for the 
* 'Bar and 3.81 per cent for the 
solicitors’ branch. 

But between 1981 and 1983 


the proportions were roughly 
equal: in 1983. 3.37 percent of 
graduates opting for the Bar 
had first class degrees and 3.43 
per cent of those becoming 
solicitors. 

Commenting on the figures 
Mr D.B. Read, senior careers 
adviser for Sheffield Univer- 
sity. says that in spite of the 
belief that solicitors get the 
best graduates, the evidence 
“would seem to indicate 
otherwise". 

“Moreover, the trend is in 
the Bar’s favour”, he adds. 

He says that the figures, 
which are from the 
university’s statistical record, 
do not include upper second 
class degrees and that they 
also assume that academic 
ability can be equated with 
first class honours. 

Nor is there evidence avail- 


able whether drop out from i 
professional courses for the | 
Bar is more marked among 
the academically able, which 
might counter the figures, be 
says. 

But such statistics as there 
are do indicate a trend to- 
wards the Bar. Between 1981 
and 1985 4J6 percent (92) of 
all entrants to the Bar had first 
class honours degrees, com- 
pared with 3.58 per cent (347) 
of all entrants to the solicitors’ 
branch. 

Mr Read, who is die liaison 
officer for the graduates* ca- 
reers advisory services with 
the Law Society, calls on the 
Bar and the Law Society to 
monitor groups of graduates 
going into the profession so 
that a clear picture can be 
obtained of their progress. 








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*■?. The nations of Europe 
■"should co-operate better in 
.their aerospace projects, 
■/Conservative members of the 
European Parliament said yes- 
terday.at the Faro boro ugh Air 
Show. 

.. . The European Airbus and 
the Tornado fighter should 
: lead to the development of a 
“J range of European aircraft, 
including everything from 
'•"military transports and train- 
,^ers to small airliners and 
-.'.helicopters. Sir Peter 
Van neck, MEP for Cleveland 

; Savage to 
delay 

£ her return 

By JQl Sherman 

j t . Mrs Wendy Savage, the 
consultant obstetrician 
cleared of professional incont- 
. pete nee at The London Hos- 
pital has agreed to delay her 
- return to the hospital till 
v October 10. 

4- t Mrs Savage, who was sus- 
pended for 16 months during 
'‘‘•an inquiry into five cases o? 
■' alleged incompetence, was re- 
Instated by the health author- 
“ ily in July and originally 
-intended to return to the 
-^obstetrics department on 
September 15. 

But a second panel of 
•.■.. inquiry set up under tbe 
chairmanship of Dame Alison 
Munro to look into working I 
I: relationships within the 
department, has now asked 
ii. Mrs Savage to postpone her 
return. 

The paneL which inter- 
viewed Mrs Savage yesterday, 
told her that in view of the 
large number of professional 
people concerned they would 
need a little more time to 
consider and develop some 
new ideas emerging. 

The Tower Hamlets Health 
Authority said last night: 
“They were most anxious in 
the interests of the women of 
Tower Hamlets to find an 
enduring solution. 

“Mrs Savage agreed that 
more lime might be helpful 
and that she would delay her 
return until October 10, after 
the October meeting of the 
district health authority.” 

The new delay puts a further 
question mark on whether 
Mrs Savage will be able to 
return to her former position 
at the department of 
obstetrics. 

In the past fortnight some of 
her consultant colleagues have 
made it dear that they do not 
wish her to return 
immediately. 

Earlier this week tbe bead of 
the department. Professor 
Gcdis Grudzinskas, told the 
hospital's medical college that 
Mrs Savage should be found a 
post in another London hos- 
pital for three to five years. 

Professor Grudzinskas and 
Mr John Hartgill, senior 
consultant obstetrician, have 
seen the Munro panel twice 
within a week. 

Ulster taxi 
firm bows 
to threats 

Another Northern Ireland 
company has bowed to para- 
military threats in the growing, 
round of intimidation by ter- 
rorist groups. 

The head of an Antrim taxi 
company announced yes- 
terday that he would no longer 
transport members of the 
security forces after death- 
threats against himself and 
one of his drivers. 

Last weekend a driver from 
the firm was forced to trans- 
port a bomb 50 miles from 
Newry. Co Down, to Antrim 
and plant it outside a town 
centre ter. where it exploded 
causing extensive damage. 

The I NLA claimed 
responsibility and said that 
taxi firms had seven days to 
announce publicly that they 
would cease canying Army 
and police passengers or face 
“execution". 


By George Hill 

and Yorkshire North, said. 

“We must face up to the 
challenge of becoming in- 
volved through co-operation 
in families of aircraft with a 
tendency for long production 
runs rather than uneconomic 
attempts to go it alone in 
international markets”. Sir 
Peter said . 

The absence of American 
companies from this year’s 
Farn borough show indicated 
that, once European countries 
organized themselves in a co- 
operative spirit, “America 


cannot stand the heal of the 
competition”. Sir Peter said. 

The party of European MPs 
was visiting the air show to 
meet the heads of British 
aerospace industries, includ- 
ing Mr RJL Robbins, presi- 
dent of the Society of British 
Aerospace Companies. 

Mr Claus Toksvig, tbe Dan- 
ish MEP, unged the European 
aerospace industry to pay 
more attention to potential 
markets in the developing 
world. 


The Princess of Wales returned home 
from holiday yesterday to share the 
grief of her Highgrove Hall caretaker at 
his wife’s funeral. 

She walked arm-in-arm with Mr 
Paddy WMtefcrad, aged 73 (above), at a 
service for his wife, Nesta, who died at 
the weekend, aged 70. 

The Princess travelled back to Lon- 
don from Balmoral oa Thursday night 
so she could attend yesterday’s service 
at St Saviour’s Church Tetbury, 
Gloucestershire. 

Wearing a black sOk suit with a 
midnight Woe hat, she joined 150 
mourners, including other Highgrove 


Chernobyl and the nuclear waste industry 

Deaths ‘may reach 280,000’ Vills 


As many as 280,000 people 
throughout the Soviet Union 
and Europe, could die in tbe 
next forty years from cancers 
caused by gamma radiation 
from the Chernobyl nuclear 
accident last April an Ameri- 
can nuclear engineer c laims in 
the latest issue of The Ecolo- 
gist. 

Dr Richard Webb, who has 
been studying the “explosion 
factor” of unclear reactors for 
the past 16 yean, said in 
London yesterday that his 
estimate of more than a quar- 
ter of a motion extra cancer 
deaths was based on the best 
available information from 
commies such as the United 
; States, Sweden and West 
; Germany. 

He said that the total num- 
ber of deaths caused by all 
radiation sources from the 
Chernobyl accide nt could be 
very much higher and that a 
nuclear shutdown was argent 

Only an international mora- 
torium on nuclear energy 
would ensure a thorough re- 
view of nuclear accident haz- 
ards, be said. 

Writing in The Ecologist 
issue, which was prepared in 
conjunction with Friends of 
tbe Earth UK, Dr Webb said it 


By Trad! McIntosh 

would take a controlled experi- 
ment of a very large population 
over a very long period, to 
estahBsh the health injury rate 
of radiation exposure from 
Chernobyl or any nuclear 
accident 

He said estimates by tbe 
International Radiological 
Protection Commission 
flCRP), gave a probability of 
0.01 per cent extra cancer 
deaths per rexn (a unit id 
radiation dose) of whole body 
dose. 

“But a higher rate cannot be 
excluded. We point out in this 
issue that a 10 to 20. fold 
higher cancer mortality rate 
for low doses of radiation is 
one which more closely fits the 
facts,” Dr Webb said. 

Using computer calcula- 
tions by the Lawrence Liver- 
more Laboratory in tbe United 
States of the Chernobyl radi- 
ation dond and after examin- 
ing radiation measurement 
reports from all ova- Europe, 
he estimated that volatile fis- 
sion products, such as caesium 
seriously contaminated about 
600,000 square kilometres of 
land. 

He calculated an average 
projected 30-years dose bur- 
den . for individuals in the 


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Dr Peter Davies, curator of 
tbe museum at tbe new 
Prison Service College at 
Newbold Revel in Warwick- 
shire, demonstrating a flog- 
ging block to the press 
yesterday. 

The college, which is already 
training new entrant prison 
Officers, will be officially 
opened next Wednesday by 


Mr Douglas Hod, Home 
Secretary. 

It is intended that Newbold 
Revel which was bought by 
the Prison Service early last 
year for £2 mfllioa, will 
become the venue for semi- 
nars and conferences and 
that ft will have a central role 
in training. 

(Photograph: Peter Trieroor). 


600,000 square kilometre 
zone. 

Dr Webb said the cancer 
increase from all external and 
internal sources of radioactiv- 
ity from Chernobyl would be 
higher st3L 

“I would give a total upper 
cefffag of 780,000 deaths from 
caaca, taking into account afl 
radiation intakes.” 

He claimed the Soviet 
authorities and pro-nuclear 
scientists from the United 
States and Europe had mini- 
mfaed tbe expected death toO 

figures at the Intemarintai 

Atomic Energy Agency con- 
ference in Vienna last month. 

The conference heard that 
31 people died in the 
Chernobyl dbaster^OO suf- 
fered from acute radiation 
sickness and 135,000 were 
contaminated by radiation. 

Dr Webb, a forma nuclear 
engineer with Westiiqfoouse 
and tbe US Navy, is author of 
Tie Accident Hazards of 
Nadear Power Plans, and a 
report. Catastrophic Nadear 
Accident Hazards — A Warn- 
ing For Europe. 

The Health Consequences of 
Chernobyl (by Richard Webb, 
The Ecokigist, Vql 16 No4/5 
1986; £5). 

Branson will 
establish new 
Atlantic prize 

Mr Richard Branson, whose 
boat, Vfigin Atlantic Chal- 
lenger IL became tbe fastest to 
cross the Atlantic in June; 

! when it clipped two hours and 
nine minutes from the record 
set by the SS United States in 
I 1 952, is to unveil a new trophy 
' for the fastest Atlantic cross- 
ing early next year. 

His derision to establish a 
new contest follows the refusal 
of Mr Frank Braynard, the 
curator of tbe American Mer- 
chant Marine Museum in 
New York, where the current 
trophy is held, to acknowledge 
the eligibility of Virgin At- 
lantic Challenger’s daira to 
the Hales trophy, which Mr 
Braynard says is only open to 
passenger liners. 

The new trophy, which has 
already been commissioned, 
will be based on the award 
presented to Mr Branson and 
his seven-man crew by the 
people of the Isles of Stilly. 

The new trophy is exported 
to be ready by the end of the 
year, in time for planned 
attempts to beat Virgin At- 
lantic Challenger’s time of 
three days, eight hours and 31 
minutes. 


Villagers want quick 
start on Nirex drilling 

By a Staff Reporter 

Large numbers of villagers sub-post-master at East 


Large numbers of villagers 
near one of the proposed 
nudear dumping sites says 
they want exploratory drilling 
to go ahead as quickly as 
possible, even though they are 
opposed to tbe dumping 
scheme. 

Fanners such as Mr George 
Turner, of Baysgarth Farm, 
who leases 169 acres from the 
Central Electricity Generating 
Board's land which forms part 
of the site ai KiOicgboime, 
near East Halton, Humber- 
side, daim that the blockade 
by anti-nuclear protesters has 
reached a stalemate. 

Mr Turner's wife, Ruth, 
said last night: “Only explor- 
atory excavations win end the 
uncertainty about whether the 
site is suitable as a low level 
nuclear waste dump. 

“ We are firmly against any 
nuclear waste dump being set ' 
up at Kiilingholme, but we 
want the drilling to at least 
prove that the site is 
unsuitable.” 

Mis Turner said several 
farmers, who also leased land 
bordering the site, shared tbe 
same view. 

Mr Paul Searby, aged 33, a 


Vote to quiz Anderton 
*was unconstitutional 9 


Leading Labour members 
of the Greater Manchester 
Police Authority were chal- 
lenged yesterday ova plans to 
question Mr James Anderton, 
the Chief Constable, on allega- 
tions about his private life and 
professional conduct. 

It was claimed that Thurs- 
day night’s meeting of the 
ruling Labour group, which 
voted formally to question Mr 
Anderton, was unconstit- 
utional 

Tbe meeting, attended by 
’ only nine of the group’s 24 
members, was boycotted by 
some councillors, who said 
that it was an attempt to 
discredit the Chief Constable 
ova tbe Stalker case. 

Mr John Stalker, Mr 
Anderton’s 'deputy, was re- 
lumed to duty two weeks ago 
by tbe authority after it re- 
jected calls for him to face a 
disciplinary tribunaL 

Mr Peter Grimshaw, a 
councillor who did not attend 
Thursday’s meeting, said yes- 
terday that it was unconstitu- 
tional because, since the death 
of Mr Norman Briggs, their 
Labour leader, no one had the 
authority to call it. 

But the group chairman. Mr 


Ming god points to priceless hoard 


By Alan HumS ton 

Divers fa the Isles of Stilly 
have discovered evidence 
which, they believe, points to 
the wreck of a Dutch East 
Indfaman sunk amnng the 
treacherous rocks near the 
Bishop's Rock lighthouse fa 
1795. 

Yesterday the divas pre- 
sented their latest find to Mr 
Geoffrey Allard, senior Cos- 
toms and Excise officer and 
Receiver of Wrecks for the 
Sollies. 

The piece is a small Chinese 
porcelain de mi-god thought to 
be Ming. Its discovery lias 
fuelled speculation that the 
wreck may be hiding a price- 
less hoard of similar pieces. 

The rite, first located in 
1984 by a local diva, Mr Nick 


I > i®i 

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.'Ni’vXTv, 



A Dutch East Indfaman, similar to the Zee tiHesia 

Pine, among the islands' that the wreck appeared to be 
Western Rocks, has already that of the 1,050-ton Zee 
yielded ova 30 cannon, pot- UUesia (Sea Lily). “We are 
tery shards, and several gold not certain, but indications are 
coins. strong,” Mr Moore said. 

Further exploration work 

has been conducted on the site She was on ha way from 
fa recent weeks by a diving China to Amsterdam when she 
team from Southport, Ian- was captured by the British, 
cashire. Mr Dadd Moore, the who put a prize crew aboard . 
team leader, said yesterday They woe heading for En- 


gland when they woe ship- 
wrecked. 

Records show that ha cargo 
was chiefly spices and tea, fait 
with ballast of 200 tons of 
Chinese porcelain. There have 
also been rumours that she 
carried an tmmanifested cargo 
of gold. j 

The finds are to be exam- ; 
feed by experts, and if their 1 
report is encouraging the div- 
ing team plans to return for \ 
further excavations. 

At the Customs office fa St 
Mary's yesterday, Mr A Hard 
said: “There are hundreds of ! 
wrecks off tbe Scillies, and ■ 
new ones are found regularly. 
If this is indeed the Sea Lily it 
could prove very interesting, 
but as yet there is no proof.” j 


Tony McCaidell sakt that it 
had been property called after 
talks with the group’s sec- 
retary and treasurer, and the 
questioning of Mr Anderton 
would go ahead. 

Mr David Moffat a Labour 
councillor and acting chair- 
man of the authority, was 
instructed to draw up a list of 
questions in writing for Mr 
Anderton. 

It is understood the allega- 
tions against the Chief Con- 
stable include claims that he 
shared a holiday with a man , 
with a minor criminal record 
and that he authorized im- 
proper use of a helicopter. 

Mr McCardell said it was 
unlikely the meeting's de- 
cision could be reversed be- 
fore Mr Anderton had been 
given the list. 

Copies of tbe questions, and 
any answers from Mr Ander- 
ton. will be handed to all 45 
authority members, who will 
decide whether action should 
follow. 

The next meeting of the 
authority is on September 19, 
by which time it is expected 
that Mr Anderton will have 
received the list. 

245 knitwear 
jobs to go as 
demand drops 

Meridian, the Nottingham- 
based knitwear company, yes- 
terday announced 245 red- 
undancies fa the face of strong 
competition from cheap im- 
ports and a fall in demand. 

About 1 70 of the job losses 
will come from the closure of a 
knitwear factory at Mansfield, 
and the rest will be cut from 
two factories in Nottingham. 

Mr Bany Lockwood. Mer- 
idian personnel director, said: 
“Demand has fallen sharply 
and with strong' import com- 
petition, too much production 
capacity is chasing too few 
orders. A significant propor- 
tion of available business is 
unprofitable.” 


W orld Chess Championship 

Karpov advantage 
in thirteenth game 


Aerospace call to Europe Princess mourns staff death 


staff; at the church which is just a mile 
from her home. 

Mrs WhftelaBd, of Berrells Road, 
Tetbury, worked as a cleaner at 
Highgrove when it was owned by the 
la*»» Sir Maurice Ma cmil lan. 

She retired before the royal couple 
moved in, but kept in touch with than 
through he r husband, Highgrove Hall's 

yyndalty and hand y man. 

The Prince of Wales, who Is in 
panada, fa known to have been sad- 
dened by Mrs Whiteland’s death and 
distressed that he was enable to attend 
the Amend. 


The thirteenth game of the 
World Chess Championship 
opened quietly yesterday, with 
Anatoly Karpov, the former 
champion, employing a simi- 
lar opening to the third game 
of the series, which was played 
in Loudon last month. 

A trench warfare position 
developed, and Karpov, play- 
ing white, achieved a slight 
initiative. ... , . 

Grandmasters will explain 
moves in the Leningrad games 
at The Times commentary 

Owen tries 
to limit 
tax reform 
damage 

By George Hill 

Dr David Owen, leader of 
the Social Democratic Party, 
moved yesterday to limit the 
damage done by last month's 
launch of their radical plans 
for taxation reform, which 
were widely read as implying 
that all families with above- 
average incranes would pay 
more tax. 

“This is wholly inaccurate. 
Dr Owen said yesterday. "The 
fact is that the vast majority of 
people who pay the standard 
rate of tax . . . would be better 
off, by varying degrees, as a 
result of our proposals.” 

Tbe handling of the launch 
caused consternation among 
some party members, and was 
criticised by Mr David Steel, 
leader of the Liberal Party. 

The plan, produced by a 
working party led by Mr Dick 
Taverne, QC. a forma Labour 
Treasury minister, was in- 
troduced as “the biggest pro- 
posed redistribution to the 
poor put forward by any 
party", with its proponents 
claiming that it relied on “the 
altruism of Mr Above Av- 


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Haiton. said at least 80 per 
cent of East Halton's 645 
residents wanted engineers 
employed by Nirex. tire gov- 
ernment nuclear waste agency, 
to get through tbe blockades. 

“lam 100 pa cent opposed 
to any nuclear waste site 
coming here or anywhere in 
Britain. But we hope that the 
drilling will prove that the site 
is totally unsuitable because of 
the area’s shallow water 
table,” Mr Searby said. 

But a Humberside Against 
Nuclear Dumping group 
spokesman said last night that , 
the blockade would continue. ■ 

Nirex said last night that it 
welcomed tbe move by the 
East Halton fanners and 
villagers. 

A spokeswoman said: “We 
had always planned to elimi- 
nate three sites if one erf the 
sites proved suitable.” 

She said that High Court 
injunctions could be filed next 
week 

Nirex engineers attempted 
to gain access to only one site 
yesterday, at BradweU-on-Sea 
but protesters forced the en- 
gineers to retreat 


One sentence in the report, 
warning that “there mil be 
some extra tax burden on 
those with above average 
earnings”, had been taken out 
of context. Dr Owen said. 

Except for taxpayers above 
the £17,200 threshold, where 
the higher tax bands begin, 
only a small minority of 
taxpayers would be worse off 
he said. 

Dr Owen rejected Conser- 
vative claims that the plan 
also implied that couples with 
one income and two children 
could be as much as £24 a 
week worse off He said tbe 
position of such a couple 
earning £300 a week, approxi- 
mately 1 ft times average earn- 
ings. would be unproved by 
£2.50 pa week, while a single 
man earning £300 pa week 
would be £1 pa week better 
off! 

This confusion had arisen 
because the figures in the plan 
did not give the position of 
those earning between £200 
and £600 pa week, he said. 

Although Dr Owen 
emphasizedyesterday that he 
was on holiday when the 
document was launched, the 
incident must reflea on his 
control of the party's public 
relations. 

The adverse publicity at- 
tracted by the unveiling of this 
major item in tbe party’s 
planned election programme 
will cause heart-searching at 
next week’s party assembly, 
with a view to preventing tbe 
SDP 'from giving similar 
ammunition to its opponents 
in future. 

Picket line 
charges 

George Sands, aged 36, 
described as a traveller, of no 
fixed address, was jailed for a 
total of five months by 
Thames magistrates yesterday 
for assaulting police, and 
threatening behaviour, out- 
side the News International 
plant at Wapping, east Lon- 
don, last July. 

A former Sunday Times 
printer, Anthony Adams, aged 
42, of Grantham Road, Great 
Horkesley, Colchester, was re- 
manded on bail until Novem- 
ber 4, by the same court, 
charged with threatening 
behaviour outside the plant. 



! tri\: 

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1«]*l ' 

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In H 


From Raymond Keene. Chess Correspondent, Leninsntd 
mmr nf the room at the Great Eastern 
/orld Chess Championship Howl ^ in Liverpool Street, 
vrcu-nlav. with London. 


Thatcher 
to meet 
Queen at 
Balmoral 

By George Hill 

The Prime Minister yes- 
terday ended the public part of 
a tour of Scotland over- 
shadowed by threatening opin- 
ion polls by escaping the 
vexing issues of jobs and 
industry and presiding at a 
ceremony to celebrate the sale 
of the millionth council bouse 
in Britain. 

This morning she travels (o 
Balmoral for the traditionally 
private weekend with tbe 
Queeu. 

The visit will provide an 
opportunity for any rebuilding 
of bridges that may be nec- 
essary after tbe media furore 
of the summer over tbe 
Queen’s alleged views on the 
Commonwealth and Mrs Mar- 
garet Thatcher’s own style of 
government. 

Downing Street and 
Buckingham Palace both ap- 
pear ready to let the affair 
pass. 

The most recent of Mrs 
Thatcher's regular Tuesday 
audiences at the Palace was on 
July 22, at tbe height or the 
uproar. 

Since then she has seen the 
Queen twice: at a small dinna 
party at Holyrood House on 
July 31, after which she stayed 
the night; and at a formal 
dinner on August 2 for the 
Commonwealth leaders who 
gathered in London for the 
summit on South Africa. 

At yesterday’s ceremony, to 
hand ova foe millionth coun- 
cil house sold since 1979 under 
the Government's policy of 
encouraging home ownership, 
Mrs Tbaccha handed the 
keys of tbe house fa Forres. 
Moray, to foe sitting tenants, 
Mr Alan Young, aged 28. and 
his wife, Ann. 

The Prime Minister told the 
couple that they had made the 
right decision in buying their 
home, and she looked forward 
to foe second million of council 
tenants taking the same step. 

The Youngs, who have two 
children, are buying their 
three-bedroom, six-year-old 
terrace home for £15,360. 

The house is valued at 
£24,000. 

Mrs Thatcher rejected criti- 
cisms of the discounts avail- 
able to aspiring home-owners, 
saying: “It is no use just 
having a paper right to boy 
unless you bring foe price 
within reach of those who wish 
to do so.” 

As well as the keys of the 
house, she presented the cou- 
ple with a bottle of 12-year-old 
Prime Minister’s Reserve 
Special GlenJivet Spey side 
whisky. 

Woman hit, 
bit daughter 
in revenge 

A woman hit. bit and 
shaved ha two-year-old dau- 
ghter’s head in order to get 
back at her ex-boyfriend 
whom foe young- giri called 
“daddy” Highbury Court was 
told yesterday. 

The woman, aged 32. un- 
employed, of Finsbury Park, 
north London,, has pleaded 
guilty to assaulting the gitl and 
causing ha unnecessary suf- 
fering. She was remanded 
until September 19 on un- 
conditional bail for psychi- 
atric reports. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


HOME NEWS 


case for 
in new i 


draws up 


nse 


The Arts Conndl is ex- 
pected to seek a 20 per cent 
increase in die money it 
receives from the Government, 
rtien it publishes on Monday 
details of its grant application 
for the next financial year. 

It hopes that Mr Richard 
Lore. Minister for the Arts, 
will agree to increase -this 
year's entitlement of £135 
million to about £1(5 million 
to include a lamp snm of abort 
£20 tnUUon for things such as 
marketing and helping the arts 
to Cornish outside London. 
Other dements in the package 
include a 5 per cent proviso for 
inflation. 

. Although this year's request 
is not as ambitions as the SO 
per cent demanded last year, 
the Government is unlikely to 
meet that optimistic request in 

Hospitals 
threat to 
200 jobs 

By Jffl Shennan . 

• Nearly two hundred Lon- 
don hospital jobs may have to' 
go in a cost-cutting package 
which will affect -patient 
services. 

Lewisham and North 
Southwark Health Authority 
last week approved measures 
designed to prevent -a £3 
million shortfall this year on 
its £100 million budget 
The proposals include staff- 
ing cuts across all specialties, 
five ward-closures and a three- 
month freeze on staff recruit- 
ment The authority employs 
8.000 people. 

Cuts are being-imposed all 
over the district largely as a 
result of overspending at 
Lewisham Hospital which 
alone faces a projected £2 
million deficit this year. 

Management has already 
imposed a staff vacancy freeze 
as well as tighter controls on 
purchasing medical and sur- 
gical equipment 
Mr Peter Griffiths, district 
general manager, said that it 
would be impossible to bal- 
ance the budget by the end of 
the year at Lewisham without 
“quite unacceptable patient 
service reductions". 

The district has now agreed 
to look at ways of raising 
internal ' bridging finance to 
avoid further ward closures 
and redundancies; 

Meanwhile it has agreed to 
three temporary ward closures 
at New End Hospital, the 
closure of a children's ward at 
Sydenham Children’s Hos- 
pital and the closure of an 
infectious disease ward at 
Hither Green Hospital. 

The wand closures and other 
measures to generate savings 
will result in the immediate 
loss of 105 staff, including 
both nursing and consultant 
posts. Further cost-cutting op- 
tions could affect another 85 
posts. 

The authority yesteniay 
could not guarantee that there 
would be no compulsory 
redundancies although it 
hoped that most posts would 
be lost through natural 
wastage. 

The health authority, which 
has had its allocation from 
South East Thames Regional 
Health Authority cut by more 
than £1.4 million this year, has 
been underfunded on Na- 
tional Health Service pay 
awards to the tune of £1 
million. 

Professor Cyril Chan tier, 
unit general manager at Guy s 
Hospital, said last night: “If 
you look at ihe experience of 
the London Emergency Bed 
Service last winter any further 
reductions may be critical. 

Employee was 
stabbed for 
‘slow working’ 

The head of a company was 
jailed yesterday for stawnng 
an employee with a pair of 
scissors, for slow work. 

Anthony Seigiou. aged 41 
Of Oak Avenue. Ehfiefd, north 
London, was convicted of 
wounding Mr Philip Kaneren, 
aged 21. at Fast Plastics Ltd in 
Hornsey, north London. 

Mr Karieren told Wood 
Green Crown Court that his 
employer wrongly accused 
him of slow work and dis- 
missed him. An argument 
took place and Scrgiou at- 
tacked him with the scissors, 
causing wounds to his back, 
hand and stomach- ! 

Seigiou claimed that the ; 
victim struck the first blow 
and the' wounds must have 
been caused when he fell oyer. 
The judge said that Seigiou 

had acted “l‘ ke * ff 0 
possessed”. He was jailed for 
two years with 18 months of it 
suspended. 

Moult service 

A memorial service is to be 
held at Derby Cathedral next ■ 
Saturday fbr Ted Moult, aged , 
6a the Derbyshire former and 
• television . personality^ who 
shot himself at his home, 
Scaddows Farm. j Ticknall, 
near Derby, on Wednesday. 


ByDavidCross 

ML Last year tire council won 
a 22 per cent rise. 

The council has already 
been warned that it can expect 
no more than 2£ per cent extra 

to take account of 
Bnt Sir Wflnam Rees- 
Mogg, the coundTs chairman, 
argues that It would be a 
“disaster" if the advances 
made in the post four years 
were . “to be sabotaged by 
m arg in al cats, which would 
save little, bnt could rain the 
momentum of advance" 

Id the past four years tike 

council had greatly increased 
the value for money in arts 
spending, bringing in private 
sponsorship and an increased 
partnership with local anthori- * 

ties, he said yesterday. 

“The arts companies have 
done everything in their power 
to raise their efficiency. . 


All this depends on ade- 
quate continued funding by the 
Government." • 

To pot its case for a cash 
boost, the council is sending 
,o « st 10,000 brochures giving 
details of its good work. 

The booklet seeks to make 
the point that the teal eco- 
nomic cost to die Government 
of financing the arts Is 
substantially less. -than the 
actual value of the annual 
grant 

“Direct benefits from 
investment hi the arts arise 
from the low costs of creating 
new jobv from consequent 
savings in the costs of un- 
employment and from recycled 

tax," it says. 

Partnership: Making Arts 
Money Work Harder (Arts 
Council, 105 Piccadilly, London 
WJVQAU; free). 



;• * ■ - - 
»:>■. ; Yf*-. 




Rickshaw racers battling it orton the promenade at Great Yarmouth yesterday. Eighteen teams competed in the bizarre 
contest conceived by the town's publicity association. Last year the town had a camel race (Photograph: Jo McKeown). 


Winding up threat 
to Ovett Sports 

.. By John Goodbody, Sports News Correspondent 

The sportswear company of has said that Ovett Sports Ltd 
Steve Ovett, the Olympic ath- is now “dormant" 


Royal visit 
boycott 
threatened 

By Jill Sherman 


Car sales 


August is a record month 


lete, is plunging deeper and 
deeper into financial 
difficulties. 

A leading creditor. 


leeper and He added that the company 
financial would meet all its fin a n cia l 
commitments but- would not 
creditor, say how much money was 


!>_, T ji, oi.n , Car sales last month were 

By Jill Sherman an ad-time record, the Society 

Parents are threatening to of Motor Manufacturers and 
boycott a visit by Princess Traders said yesterday. 

Anne to their school in a Sales of the first cars with D 
dispute over health checks on registration plates were 


buildings after four pupils fell ; 
31 with meningitis. 

Another child from the area, j 


382,215, a 225 per cent in- 
crease over August 1985 and 
L05 per cent higher than the 


Stoaehart PubJkatioas, mil owed or whether the company 
send Ovett Sports Ltd a letter itself owed money to Ovett and 
on Monday demanding that his .wife, Rachel, who recently 
the company be: wound np put up their £180,000 Brigh- 
unless it receives within fire too house fbr sale. 


Stroud in Gloucestershire, has previous record of 374,599 in 
been admitted to hospital with August 1983. 
suspected meningitis four The industry is also on the 
days before Princess Anne is way to a new sales record fur 


days the £1,500 it is owed. 
Ovett Sports Ltd, which has 


This is not the first tim e that 
Overt, the Commonwealth 


due to visit the district to open 
some new classrooms. 


the year. In the first right 
months 1394,(80 cars were tween the SMMT and the 
sold, 2.6 per cent more than in Motor Agents Association, 
the same period of 1985. An representing most garages. 

Universities to reject 
fewer school-leavers 

By A Staff Reporter 

Fewer school-leavers have particularly short of school 
A-level results too poor to leavers with good A-Ievel 
guarantee them a place at the grades in physical science, but 
university of their choice this there are extremely few va- 
year, according to the Univer- cancies in popular arts sub- 
siiies Central Council on Ad- jects such as English, 
missions,, which acts as a. Those hoping to study 
dealing house. French or German may be 


By A Staff Reporter 

SMMT spokesman said how- 
ever, that the final fomr months 
of the year were never as 
predictable as August 
Bat foreign cars took nearly 
60 per cent of all sales in 
August. Their share rose to 
59.09 per cent, compared with 
58.71 per cent last 'year. 
However, during the first eight 
months of the year their share 
slipped slightly from 58.71 per 
cent in 1985 to 5639 per cent. 


over changing the vehicle year I 
“identifier" from August to ! 
October rambles on. The two 
sides met at the end of last 1 
month 

The manufacturers would 
probably accept October as a 
compromise between all the 
various new registration sys- 
tems which have been mooted. 
But the MAA and the British 
Vehicle Rental and Leasing 
Association whose members 


officially ceased trading, failed 5,000 metres champion, has 
to acknowledge service of a bad trouble in business. Ovett 


writ in the High Court on 
Tuesday and entered judge- 
ment was mitered in default. 

Another magazine publish- 
ing company, EMAP, yes- 
terday confirmed that It was 
owed £316 by Ovett Sports for 
payments for advertisements 
and that the daim was with its 
debt collectors. Mr Peter 
Stntley, the credit control 
manager, said: “We are 
expecting to take legal action 
shortly^ 


Ltd, the predecessor of Ovett 
Sports, went into voluntary 
liquidation in 1984 owing 
£37,ftNJ to 34 creditors. 

■ The new company was 
bunched the same year and in 
1985 obtained the contract to 
sandy official souvenir dott- 
ing for the London Marathon. 

But the new company has 
been the subject of complaints 
abort the quality of goods and 
punctuality of defivery. 

Mr* Sainsbary has con- 
firmed that the company has 


Mr Andrew Sainsbary, of left its Brighton premises and 
Edward Leask, a Ports mouth is now 'operating from a box 
firm of chartered accountants, number. 

Crossing Brothers 

warden jailed for 

wins case extortion 

A schools crossing warden. Two non-smoking brothers 

dismissed after allegedly hit- who tried to extort £500,000 
ting a boy aged six on the bead from the 'Gallaher tobacco 
with hter crossing pole, yes- company were jailed for four 
terday won a datra of unfair years at the Central Criminal 
dismissal. Court yesterday. 

An industrial tribunal in They wrote a letter of 

Glasgow ruled that, if Miss demand- to the company’s 
Irene K in g , aged 32, did strike headquarters in Holborn, cen- 
the child on the head, it was an traJ London, and followed ft 
“unfortunate accident" and op with telephone calls threat- 
not grounds for dismissaLThe, ening to poison stocks of 
tribunal was told that the boy cigarettes with cyanide, 
suffered an injury which After alerting Scotland 

needed 10 stitches. Yard, GaHaher’s directors 

Miss King, of Fulton Street, placed a birthday advertise- 
Amuesbnd, was employed by ment in a national newspaper 
Strathclyde Regional Council to signal that the ransom 
as nr school crossing patrol would be paid, 
officer at Temple Primary But the men. both builders. 


'Alison O'Sullivan, who sold, 2.6 per cent more than in 
lives in Stream! eaze. 12 miles the same period of 1985. An 

from Stroud, is in intensive - 

care at Southmead Hospital, . T T__* 2^-2 

Bristol undergoing tests to see (J 1 11 V vial LI 
whether she has the viral form _ 

of the illness. TDWPT CP Hi 

Doctors have confirmed XV vv iSVllt 
that she does not have the m . Qfa 

meningococcal form of the wyAara 

disease which has claimed Fewer school-leavers have 
three lives in Stroud since A-level results too poor to 
1981. guarantee them a place at the 

Princess Anne is due to university of their choice this 
open new classrooms at Park year, according to the Univer- 
Junior School in Stonehouse silies Central Council on Ad- 
on Monday afternoon. missions, . which acts as a 

. The new budding lies next clearinghouse, 
to the infant school where one 

pupil has died and three other Applications had been re- 
pupils have been affected by ceived from about 17,500 
the disease. hopeful students, compared 

Some parents have said they with about 20,500 last year. So 
will boycott the visit unless for, 1,000 sixth-formers have 
the . school allows health been found places and 3,700 
checks on the buddings to try told that they are in- 
to establish the cause of the sufficiently qualified. 

bK, Jdto no duwL at 
to school had been infected 

last Monday and will be 
completed by the end of the 
month. 

Ucca says universities are 


, 5orae parents nave sain tney 

' KrnTnPrG Will boycott the visit unless 
JJIU UI vi'3 the. school allows health 
• •-iwx* checks on the buddings to try 

failed 101* esla kli s k cause Of the 

The headmaster of. Park 

extortion Junior School Mr William 

_ , . . . Blade, said that no children at 

bi* school had been infected 
who tried to extort £500,000 by ^ 

from the Gallaher tobacco He agreed that he had been 
company were jailed forfour concerned since the start of 


the outbreak whether any of 
his children were suspected of 


___ - - ■ C »* » J VUI1UIVM VI 

They wrote a letter of or diagnosed as having the 
demand- to the company’s disease! 


Meanwhile, the dispute be- - bay more than a quarter of ail 
ten the SMMT and the new cars, want to stick with 
otor Agents Association, August or move the date 
p resenting most garages, forward to July 1. 

i to reject Flight °ff t0 a 

il-lpflvpr* P ushin s start 

li iv A T Vi 3 A pilot's pre-fhght message 
. to passengers on a flight from 

eporter Glasgow to Leeds recently 

rticulariy short of school was: “If you warn to take off, 

vers with good A-level get out and push." 
ides in physical science, but Although the passengers 
se are extremely few va- were laughing, the pilot was 
icies in popular arts sub- serious, as the 30-seal Brown 
is such as English. Aircraft did not have enough 

_. , _ , power to reverse on the run- 

Those hoping to study way. Five passengers had to 

“ffJS 9?™“^ b S jump out tc> push it into 
nsidered with a grade B and J posi g on . 

en a C if they have good , 

PPorting marks. Prospects jYLotlier £!!lU 
r candidates in classics, _ , __ , 

iflosophy and Russian are PBDy SUflOCEte 

in Deborah Wright, aged _25, 


considered with a grade B and 
even a C if they have good 
supporting marks. Prospects 
for candidates in classics, 
philosophy and Russian are 
good. 

In the pure sciences, can- 
didates with good to middling 
grades should find places. 
Some biological scientific 
departments have places for 
those with good grades who 
foiled to get medical places. 

Only a very few candidates 
with very high grades will be 
found places in medicine,, 
dentistry, pharmacy and oph- 
thalmic subjects. 


Winner in 
need of 
assurance 

Mr Geoffiy Burton, from 
inversion. Cumbria, was the 
sole winner of yesterday’s 
Portfolio CoM prize of £4,000. 

Mr Burton, aged 54, for- 
merly a technical officer for a 
pharmaceutical company, was 
overwhelmed when be discov- 
ered that he had won. 

U I bad to sit down and call 
someone to check the numbers 
for me, as I did not believe my 
luck," be said. 

Mr Burton, who is married 
with one daughter, said that he 
would probably spend his 
windfall on putting his house 
in order. 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolilo Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 

Councillor 
on cocaine 
charges 

A county councillor who is 
married to a campaigner 
against drugs was remanded in 
custody for a week by Ux- 
bridge magistrates yesterday 
charged with smuggling -co- 
caine after a police operation 
in which £500.000 worth- of 
the drug was seized at 
Heathrow Airport. 

Ross Henning, aged 33, who 
is chairman of the SDP branch 
at Chippenham, Wiltshire, 
and vice-chairman of the 
transport and highways 
committee on Wiltshire 
County Council was accused 
of importing cocaine between 
1985 and 1986. He was further 
charged with production of 
the drug between the same 
dates. 

Phoenix delay 

Pat Phoenix, the actress, 
was told yesterday to stay in 
hospital, where she is being 
treated for lung cancer. The 
former Coronation Street star 
had hoped to go home yes- 
terday from the private 
Alexandra Hospital lin 


suffocated herself and her Cheadle, Manchester, .where 
daughter, Cherrelle Walker, she has spent the past 1 1 days. 


aged seven months, at , 
Grosvenor Park, Camberwell ! 
on July 1 9, an inquest was told 
yesterday. 

Det Chief Insp Alexander 
Ross told Southwark coron- 
er's court that mother and 
daughter were found in bed 
with plastic bags taped around 
their heads 


Protest party 

Women at the Greenham 
Common peace camp lit bon- 
fires and baked birthday cakes 
yesterday to marie the fifth 
anniversary of their protest at 
the Berkshire United States 
cruise missile base. 


Researchers are still no 
nearer finding a cause for. the 


55-3=3= or 


cigarettes with cyanide. 

After alerting Scotland 
Yard, GaDaher’s directors 
.placed a birthday advertise- 
ment in a national newspaper 
to signal that the ransom 
would be paid. 

But the men. both builders. 


School in Annieslaiid, Gins- were arrested when they col- 
gow. lected suitcases stuffed with 

She said that while leading paper on a railway em bank- 
some children across the street ment outside Nottingham. ' 
in February last year a school Philip Prewett, aged 30, of 
bag knocked her hat forward. Monkton Drive, Bilbo rough. 
While adjusting it, she said and David Prewett, aged 33, of 
she might have accidentally Nottingham Road, Hucknall 


hit the boy on the head 


Nottinghamshire. 


In a written judgement, the 
tribunal stated fe tBoneof the money wrth menaces. 


people interviewed by the po- 
lice said the action was detib- ; 
erate. “An accident is not 
grounds for dismissing an 
employee," it said. 

The tribunal ruled that ' the 
conndl should discuss rein- 
statement. 


The court was told that the | 
brothers were “totally 
outclassed" by Scotland Yard 
men who posed as Gallaher 
directors and travelled, as 
arranged, on a St Pancras to 
Leeds Inter-City train to make 
the ransom “drop". 


people this year and has 
affected the Stroud area worse 
than other parts of the conn- 
tty. But a vaccine is being 
developed at Porto n Down 
which may be in use by next 
year. 

In a report published in The 
Lancet this week, doctors firon 
Worcester health authority 
say that environmental factors 
cannot be dismissed. 

The report points out that 
notified cases have been con- 
centrated in the West and 
North, particularly in Gwent, 
Gloucestershire and 
Merseyside. 

Other counties, such as 
Cleveland, Cumbria, West 
Yorkshire, Mid Glamorgan 
and West Glamorgan have 
also shown marked increases. ! 
Bui only Kent in the southern ! 
and eastern counties has 
shown an above average rate 
of notifications of the disease. 


SOME 


People trapped in lifts 
to get computer help J °ta iSy e 


By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 
Lifts are to be monitored developed by the lift man ufoo- 
continuously by computer to turers Otis has undergone 
avoid breakdowns and to three years of trials in Britain, 
summon help for people who France and the United States. 


may become trapped. 


If a lift foils, the equipment 


The total number of people sends an alarm to a control, 
trapped in lifts each year in centre, opening up two-way 
England and Wales is equiva- communication for pas- 
lent to the population of a senders. They can then be 
medium-sized town, accord- advised of help on the way, 
ing to official figures released through a hidden microphone 
for the first time this year. and loudspeaker. 

The fire service was- called Reasons for the stoppage 
to rescue people from lifts and where keys to premises j 
22,100 limes last year, al- can be found appear will 
though the total trapped may appear automatically on a , 
have been twice that figure. monitoring screen in the con- 

The computer system trol office. ■ 


jomt prize 
in Italy 

Benjamin Frith, the first 
Briton to reach the finals of 
the Busoni International Pi- 
ano Competition, gained joint 
second place in the contest; no 
first place was awarded. 

His prize is five million lire 
— about £2,400 — and a series 
of concerts. 

In 1983 Mr Frith, aged -28, 
from North Aston, near Shef- 
field, won the National 
Federation of Music Society's 
young artist award. 

The Busoni competition, i 
held in 

Bolzano. Italy, finished on 
Thurday night. 


MP’s call for action on fans 

By Peter Evans, Home Affoiis Correspondent 


NEWS 


Since its creation Teacher’s Highland Cream has always 
contained at least 45% pure malt whiskies. 

Because of the growing variation in the qualities of 
Scotch Whisky becoming available, we have decided to 
guarantee this feature of our blend. 

GUARANTEED AT LEAST 45% PURE MALT WHISKIES. 

This new guarantee does not mean that the blend of 
whiskies which make up Teacher’s Highland Cream has 
changed in any way. 

But, in a world where standards vary, we thought you 
would welcome this additional reassurance. 

From now on, the guarantee will appear on all bott> 
lings of Teacher’s Highland Cream, although it may take a 
little while before you see the new labels behind the bar or 
in your local off-licence. 

Of course, 45% is an unusually high proportion of pure 
malt whiskies, and together with carefully selected grain 
whiskies, this feature makes an important contribution to the 
unique diaracter and flavour of Teacher’s Highland Cream. . 


An MP yesterday asked Mr 
Douglas Hurd, Home Sec- 
retary, to curb violence by 
British football -hootigans 
abroad by endorsing their 
passports in tbe same way as 
driving licences. 

Mr John' Heddle, Conser- 
vative MP for Mid-Stafford- 
shire. said: "People found 
guilty of drunken and dis- 
reputable behaviour .should 
have their passports endorsed 
- with automatic confiscation 
after three endorsements. 

“If someone does something 


wrong in his car, then bis 
licence is endorsed. Sorely the 
behaviour, bring the good 
name of Britain Into 

disrepute?" 

Mr Heddle has written to 
the Home Secretary urging 
him to coasider the idea 
. A Home Office official was 
not. aware yesterday of any 
precedent whereby tbe pass- 
port was used to record 
someone's misbehaviour. 

The Home Office does- not 
regard the passport as a 
licence to trarel ‘bnt as., a 


document which establishes 
nationality and identity. 

. A British citizen does not 
need any licence to travel 
therefore a passport is not 
Deeded in the.eyes of the Home 
Office to leave the UK, so long 
as the traveller has adequate 
means of identification. The 
usefulness of a passport Is in 
m akin g a person’s identity 
acceptable to another country. 

Given that, a proposal to nse 
a passport as Mr Heddle 
suggests would change its 
concept 



; - E8TB^lfBiBBri^Q-isao 

Wm. TEACHER & SONS LTD. 

•SCOTCH WHISKY. DISTILLERS- 






■ * r 


HOME NEWS 


TUD CONFERENCE 


Media debate 

Law to confine press 
ownership to UK 
citizens is supported 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 

e • Rail closures 






j; : ' A printing union motion 
demanding legislation requir- 
. ,-ing that the owners of British 
- newspapers and of radio and 
-..television, should have 
.‘United Kingdom citizenship, 
v'was carried by Congress at 
,:1 Brighion yesterday. 

An attempt by the National 
"■Union of Journalists to re- 
_ r.Tnove the issue of citizenship 
■ from the Sogat '82 and Na- 
tional Graphical .Association 
’ J - motion and to substitute lim- 
... its on ownership, if necessary 
by compulsory divestment, 
-was rejected on a show of 
. .. hands. 

-- The printing union motion 
■ called on the next Labour 
•••■ government specifically to en- 
• . sure that ownership and exec- 
-...utive control of media and 
information services was re- 
lained in the United 

— Kingdom. 

— ^ The General Council’s 

backing for the citizenship 
requirement was given by Mr 
;..;Tony Christopher, chairman 
-of the TUC Media Working 
- . Group, who is general sec- 
: retary of the Inland Revenue 
Staff Federation. He said that 
was clearly right that those 
-- who wished to own the means 
. . of communication should at 

— least have a commitment to 
citizenship. 

_ v Multinational newspaper 
.ownership was bad for the 
^.'health of the nation and so 
T was concentration of press 
ownership. The movement 


called on the Government to 
legislate against both, as they 
had for radio and television. 

“We do not have a British 
press, wc have a foreign 
press," declared Miss Breads 


it was there to investigate. 

Mr Murdoch had given 
undertakings to the Monopo- 
lies and Mergers Commission 
and to the Secretary of State 
but had ignored them. Public 


D»n, general secretary of accountability meant nothing; 
Sogat *82. when she moved the a citizenship requirement was 
composite motion on media .needed, 
ownership. The NUJ amendment 

She said that 70 per cent of would be ineffective over the 
daily and Sunday national issue of citizenship and public 
newspapers were under the accountability was not a 
proprietorship either of for- realistic option, she said. Mr 
eign people, non-residents, John Ibbotson. National 
non-citizens or non-United Graphical Association, said 
Kingdom companies. that most decisions in news* 

The position was worse if papers were made outside the 
they looked at the whole of the United Kingdom. “It is 


m 


media. The eight individuals 
or companies publishing 19 
national newspapers between 
them also published 200 re- 
gional newspapers and had 
voting shares in eight regional 
television companies and 19 
independent radio stations. 

There were also vast 
developments coming, lead- 
ing to a race between Mr 


ownership which gives propri- 
etors not merely the economic 
influence of multinationals 
but also conaderable political 
influence and control of the 
people of this country.** 

They were beginning to 
witness a trend which would 
extend the opportunity to 
place ownership in the hands 
of fewer and fewer publishers. 


Rupert Murdoch, and a num- who would not be resident in 
ber of other well known the United Kingdom. 


individuals, for the first 
ownership of a worldwide 
communications system. 


With the further develop- 
ment of more satellites they 
would be hostages to inter- 


Mr Fred Jarvis, aged 62, 
leader of Britain's biggest 
teachers* union, who was 
elected cha irma n of the Gen- 
eral Council yesterday at the 
end of the ana sal conference. 

The general secretary of the 
National Union of Teachers 
since 1975, he succeeds Mr 
Ken Gill, the c ommun ist lead- 
er of TASS, and will preside 
over next year's congress in 
Blackpool. He is likely to be 


aligned with the moderates, 
who are now in a majority on 
the General ConndL 
Mr Jarvis, who has has 
served on the General Conncfl 
for more titan 10 years. Is 
president of the European 
Trade Union Committee for 
Education, which represents 
more than two million teachers 
and other workers in the 
education field throughout Eu- 
rope. 


A future Labour Govern- national ownership with no 
ment would also have to allegiance other than to pri- 


consider improving and 
strengthening the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission 
requirements and improving 
the Press Council. Miss Dean 


vate profit. 

Ownership and citizenship 
requirements were not new to 
the media in other countries 
and he was pleased that the 


TRANSPORT 


said. The latter got 90 per cent General Council had accepted 
of its funds from the industry the motion without the 


Substantial spending 
on railways urged 


BROADCASTING 


Proposals by Peacock 
Threat 9 , union says 


Deregulation and privatiza- 
; tion posed a threat to 

■ broadcasting. Mr John Mor- 

■ ton. general secretary of the 
. Musicians' Union, told 

• Congress. 

He was moving a composite 

■ motion, unanimously sup- 
. ported, opposing the Peacock 

- Committee proposals to 

• commercialize BBC Radio 1 
; and 2. increase indepen den tly- 

- produced programmes, and to 
[ auction IBA franchises. 

Hie problem of broadcast- 
ing, he said, was that high 
quality inevitably meant high 
cost, it was a fallacy to try to 
: compare broadcasting with 


.... amendment 

STING Mr Jacob Ecclestone, Dep- 

uty General Secretary, Na- 

__ _ lional Union of Journalists, 

■r Uaa I r moving the NUJ amendment 

J -1- VM-V-UV-JUl on citizenship, said that to 
• have a self-governing and 

IlOYl informed democracy, they 

L1U11 aaja must ^ve a press Which 

the newspaper world. In tele- existed for better than per- 
vision, imaginative, original sonal profit and private politi- 
productions called for consid- cal influence, 
erable resources. - The citizenship question 

Commercial radio had be- 2 SSSTtiffi ^*25 
come a gigantic record player 

with a continuous steam of SSf I l^SlJf in< 5^S c ^ w 
recorded music supplied by ^ 

the recording industry. Th l 

KSS t, ” usic ” ! SSSSnd 

being diminished profit out of exploiting the 

Mr John Wilson, joint gen- labour of others, 
al secretary. Broadcasting The danger of fastening on 
id Entertainment Trades citizenship was that it was an 
liance. said that modifies- easy solution. 


era! secretary. Broadcasting 
and Entertainment Trades 
Alliance, aid that modifica- 
tion to meet the market would 
not provide more choice or 
better programmes. 


The Government was urged 
yesterday to reverse rail cut- 
backs and line closures in 
favour of substantial 
investment. 

Mr Lew Adams, of the rail 
union Aslef, successfully 
moved a long composite mo- 
tion on transport policy call- 
ing on the Government to 
change its policy. He said that 
a large-scale programme of 
rail electrification was 
required 

The motion pledged resis- 
tances to privatization and 
deregulation and reaffirmed 
policy for a publicly-owned 
fully-integrated and co- 
ordinated transport system. 

Mr Adams also moved a 
resolution, carried without 
dissent, deploring the failure 
of British Coal, the Central 
Electricity Generating Board 


and BR to obtain the return of 
the coal traffic. 

(t was a national disgrace 
that a small but significant 
part of bulk coal and steel 
traffic was still not back on 
rail. It was still being carried 
by scab hauliers, who had 
driven through miners' picket 
lines and today were costing 
the jobs of railway workers. 

The motion also con- 
demned the Government for 
foiling to protea the environ- 
ment Homes were being dis- 
turbed by unnecessary lorry 
movements. 

That was government pol- 
icy, a strategy designed by Mr 
Niriiolas Ridley, Secretary of 
State for Environment, to 
break the power of organized 
unions. Lives were at nsk and 
people should not have to pul 
up with this intrusion on their 
environment 


EDUCATION 

Enforced 
cutback 
‘would be 
tragedy’ 

If there had to be cuts in 
expenditure among unions 
they should not come in the 
education programme. Mr 
Alec Smith, general secretary. 
National Union ofTailorsand 
Garment Workers, said when 
be introduced the report of the 
trade union education 
committee. 

"We have a programme that 
will stand the test of time,” he 
said. “It would be a tragedy if. 
like the present Government, 
in our need to exercise caution , 
in spending we cut the educa- 
tion programme. We need to 
do ihe opposite; we need to 1 
spend more on trade union 
education. , 

"If you think education is 
expensive", be told delegates, 
"try ignorance. Educate, agi- 
tate, organize, that was not a 
bad old slogan and we can still 
doiL” 

State support 
for research 

Industry would survive if 
enough money was spent on 
research, Mr Roy Evans, gen- 
eral Secretary of the Iron and 
Steel Trades Confederation, 
told Congress. 

He successfully moved a 
composite motion calling for 
greater emphasis on research 
and development, and sug- 
gested state backing be given 
for up to 40 per cent of the 
development cost of innova- 
tions. supported by proof of 
genuine progress. 

Car industry 
bias attacked 

Government discrimina- 
tion against the car industry 
was condemned in a motion 
proposed by Mr Roy 
G rantham, Association of 
Professional, Executive, Cleri- 
cal and Computer Staff, and 
agreed unanimously. 

It was perverse that our 
foreign competitors operated 
severe restrictions on imports 
of British cars, he said, yet 
expected unlimited access to 
our markets. The next govern- 
ment should see the abuse was 
stopped. 


Future o f broadcasting 

New coal chief to 
hold secret talks 
with NUM leader 


■*» "."SnSg Sir RoEr^rSir h, 

^SiSSS 

has arranged secret peace talks negotiations. 

with Mr Arthur Scargill. the Another key issue will be 
president of the National the setting U P a 
$5STh&*. in London conal.ation procedure for the 

‘The h NUMh!!d consistency ‘ NUMnegptiaiors hope that 
refused to enter into talks with the new chairman will sanc- 
Sir Robert's predecessor. Sir tion the n rii ° f 
Ian MacGregor, because of the more than 100 of the dis- 
presence oFthe breakaway missed miners, who sub- 
Union of Democratic scquently claimed unfair 
Mineworkers. dismissal at industrial tn- 

Sir Robert agreed to hold bunais and won their cases, 
separate talks wththe unions An ouuandiK pay daim 
to break the deadlock and will for the NUM s IOtfOOO mem- 
meet Mr Roy Lynk. leader of bers wtll elsobcraHKl. 

* the Union of Democratic Last 

Mineworkers. shortly after the stmng UDM j^eed and ac- 
mceting with the NUM on cepwd a *®y offer -of about £6, 
September 23. ■ but the NUM had an un- 

A significant conciliatory resolved question over pen- 

feature of the talks is that the sion payments, 
issue of the 460 miners sacked The National Coal Board 

during the strike, which ended wanted the miners to contnb- 
eariy last year, is high on the ute half of the outstanding 
agenda. pension payments lost during 

The decision to raise the the strike, about £60 million, 
controversial issue lured Mr through a scheme to deduct 
Scargill back to the negotiating the money overa poiod nom 
table after nearly a year and is pay packets. The NUM re- 
seen as a radical shift in the jected the proposals, but both 
style of management between sides refused to budge. 

Willis plea for better 
quality of reporting 

A plea to journalists for handled, too m uch rambling 
improved reporting was made and too few facts. 
by Mr Norman Willis, general There was the view that 
secretary of the Trades Union unless there was an onprove- 
Congress, in his wind-up meat this year a replacement 
speech yesterday. was necessary. “That was 

Journalists all over the distressing for me," Mr Willis 
world had goae to jail to assert said, “because it was true." 
and win the right of free (Laughter) 
reporting Hat existed here. Unfortunately, the press 
“We need yon to do that well; had done as t -dly this year as 
democracy needs you to do it last Each week there had been 
wdL Just buck op a bit." new prophecy of doom and 
His comments were made split. Then during this Coo- 
during his customary thanks gross each day's Apocalypse 
to the industrial correspon- was decently handled so the 
dents of the media. press turned to the next crisis, 

Mr Willis said that before and so it was every day. 
Congress there was wide He mtderstood the problem 
agreement that last year's as it was not easy for jorauaf- 
conference was appalling and ists to get in a story unless 
that ranch of the responsibility there was a drama. No split 
was put on the mumbling, was no news. Bm facts were 
bumbimg way in which it was still facts. As the movement 
■ — — moved towards more open- 

uul Mark Ellis ZMST" “ “ 

Hospital’s 
alert on 
salmonella 

Admissions to a ward at 
Shotiey Bridge General Hos- 
pital Co Durham, have been 
halted after the death from 
salmonella of a woman aged 
85. 

A woman aged 67 had been 
found to be a salmonella 
sufferer after being admitted 
to the hospital's acute medical 
ward on August 19 suffering 
from diarrhoea and sickness. 

A hospital spokesman said 
yesterday that she bad recov- 
ered, but an woman patient 
had became infected and died 
on Thursday. 

The ward has been closed to 
further admissions and 14 
patients have been tested. 

Four for trial 
in jewels case 

Four people, accused of 
stealing £250,000 of jewellery 
from the wife of the American 
head of the Grand National 
sponsors, Seagrams, on the 
eve of the race, last April were 
yesterday sent for trial by 
Southport magistrates. 

Grah-jnWaJker.aged 34, of 
More than ffSomHJiqp has 2^ ® J 5f~ 

leen offered to the CoSora- 2? 5* 

ion of the City of London for JSj* , 4S ’ p botl ? 1 ° f 

he freehold of the old meat £"£*“ .Romfley, 

rcarkeL If accepted the 13 rKlSL 
cres at Spitalfields would be fjTXSfT 
eveloped as offices, shops, Man- 

ousing and small business charged with steak* 

nits. More than 6,000 new ^ ulfa ^E^ !leiy ^ a 
>bs should be created. Southport hold. 

(Photograph: Alan Weller) n • 

~ : Cruise convoy 

2 Belgian ‘lost on plain' 

awards for cruise* missiles had to turn 

Cplrinf 

VJC.aVI.Ux on the Ridgeway fong-dis- 

Bob Gddof picked up two S3S^ tpath ' il «« 
ore awards yesterday for his y ?f ntay ' 
mine relief work and said: “I The two launchers and four 

n now Dr Dr Sir Bob Geklef control vehicles, from the US 
BE, MA. PhD." base at Greenham Common, 

He was at Ghent University a wrong turn at Redhorn 
Belgian to receive an bon- H™. near Devizes, before 
aiy degree - and then ac- realizing their mistake and 
pled "with alacrity and ^romg back, members of the 
ide" an unexpected offer to Protest group, Cruisewatch, 
come freeman of the town of cy- 
pres, where his grandfather, 

to was honoured by the Bel- Accsilllf aoca 

an king before the First «oo4Ull C8SC 
orid War for services to The England rorfnr biier- 
ttemn ovaseas, was born. national, Paul Simpson aged 
*** .5“?1 ^ 28, was remanded fera for? 

to raid being back in the night, on unconditional baiL 
cording studio was like a when he appeared before Bath 
liday after two years nut- magistrates yesterday accused 

* the femme relief appeal, of assaulting Thomas Rich- 

t food into southern Sudan, centre. 3 


A plea to journalists for 
improved reporting was made 
by Mr Norman Willis, general 
secretary of the Trades Union 
Congress, in his wind-up 
speech yesterday. 

Journalists all over the 
world had gone to jail to assert 
and win the right of free 
reporting that existed here. 
“We need yon to do that well; 
democracy needs yon to do it 
well. Just buck up a bit." 

His comments were made 
during his customary thanks 
to the industrial correspon- 
dents of the media. 

•Mr Willis raid tint before 
Congress there was wide 
agreement that last year's 
conference was appalling and 
that much of the responsibility 
was put on the nnmibimg, 
bumbimg way in which it was 


Ministry accused of 
pressure in M3 inquiry 


Reports by Alan Wood, John Winder, Nicholas Beeston, Anthony Hodges, Tim Jones and Mark Ellis 

Tower blocks l 


A senior official of Hamp- 
shire County Council warns 
; ihe recent inquiiy into the 
. route for the remainder of the 
M3 motorway to be reopened 
because, he says, a govem- 
. ment conservation agency was 
put under pressure, by the 
Department of the Environ- 
ment. not to give evidence. 

Mr Merrrick Denton- 
Thompson. Hampshire's chief 
landscape architect, accuses 
both local and central govern- 
ment of double standards 

He claims that the depart- 
ment pul pressure on English 
Heritage not to appear ai the 


inquiry and that both English 
Heritage and the Countryside 
Commission were not fully 
consulted over two alternative 
rouies. 

He says he is prepared to 
lodge an appeal in the High 
Court if the Department of 
Transport’s route — which has 
the support of the county 
council — is eventually 
approved. 

The proposed route passes 
through two ancient monu- 
menis — including the original 
Bronze Age settlement of 
Winchester. 


Explosives will be used to 
demolish Highworth Point 

By Charles Knevitt, Architecture Correspondent 



Assets exceod Ci.KX) m»on Ow 300 tyBnchw and agancMs. Member of me 
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Please send (un ‘formation afiout Town SCouniry accounts. 


At noon tomorrow 
Highworth Point, a 21-storey 
tower Mock on the Trowbridge 
estate in Hackney, east Lon- 
don, will be demolished, using 
4001b of explosives. 

It is the latest — hut by no 
means the last — casualty of 
Britain's post-war high-rise 
boosing disaster. 

When its sister block. 
Northaird Point, was given a 
similar coup de grace last 
November, 12 storeys woe left 
standing and had to be demol- 
isbed by conventional ball aad 
chain. 

Demolitioii, at a cost of 
£391,000, was favoured in 
preference to refurbishing the 
block at an estimated cost of 
£55,000 per flat. 

The blocks were built in the 
French Cebns Borey system, 
one of 224 industrialized 
boQding systems available in 
Britain from 163 developers 
and contractors by the mid- 
1960s. 

Evidence of bad workman- 
ship which has come to light 
during the “scientific'' dis- 
mantling of Roaan Point, the 
22-storey tower block in New- 
ham, east London, has raised 
new fears about the safety of 
all such system-built flats. 

The Times began to publish 
a series of allegations about 
the flats in Septan ber 1984 
when Mr Sam Webb, an 
architect, disclosed the results 
of structural surveys on Ronan 
Point. 

Inquiry on 
ambulance 
allegation 

A coroner yesterday ad- 
journed an inquest to allow 
inquiries into allegations that 
an ambulance took 20 min- 
utes to reach a man who was 
bleeding to death. 

The Southwark coroner. Sir 
Montague Levine, ordered the 
adjournment after hearing the 
allegations at the inquest into 
the death of Mr Peter Doogan, 

; aged 62. a retired electrician, 
of Kilson Road, Camberwell, 
who was fatally injured on 
July 3 

Mr David Rose told the 
court he told the ambulance 
service that a man was bleed- 
ing to death, but they took 20 
minutes to arrive. 

The coroner said- “In view 
of the inference made ! must 
adjourn for inquiries to be 
made and for the ambulance 
men to come here to give evid- 
ence." 


Other Loudon boroughs im- 
mediately started to investi- 
gate their own blocks built by 
the same Taylor Woodrow^ 
Anglian (TW-A) system, 
including Hartopp Point and 
Lannoy Point, in Fulham and 
die Morris Walk estate in 
Woolwich. 

. In Hackney, tenants of five 
19-storey blocks, built using 
the Camus system, demanded 
to be rehoused after an in- 
dependent survey commis- 
sioned fey the council. 

Investigations were also car- 
tied ont into the Reema system 
in west Kentish Town and 
Camden, where the 
Hawkridge block was sub- 
jected to a similar 
investigation. 

Other Reema blocks have 
been investigated in Sheffield 
and Portsmouth, as well as 
Glasgow which has 38 Reema 
blocks of up to 26 storeys. 

In the wake of the Ronan 
Point disaster in 1968 when 
five people were killed as the 
block partially collapsed after 
a gas explosion, the Govern- 
ment ordered 567 blocks, 
containing 38,700 fiats, to be 
strengthened, at a cost of more 
than £100 mfliion. 

But even that does not give 
an accurate indication of the 
scale of the problem no# 
lacing central and local gov- 
ernment — and tenants. 

When the BeriMing Re- 
search Establishment pub- 
lished its report on TW-A 


blocks in May 1985, It con- 
firmed the need for structura l 
checks to be carried oat on 36 
large-panel systems in En- 
gland, containing 140,000 
houses and flats, of which 
about 8,000 are of the TW-A 
design. Attention was drawn to 
low-rise blocks, of less than 
six-storeys, as well as to high- 
rise Mocks. 

The Government repeated 
its ban on the nse and storage 
of liqHified petroleum gas 
cylinders in Mocks of this type 
of construction. 

The question, which re- 
mains unanswered is, who is to 
pay for toe costly refhrMshr 
ment of the Mocks, or for their 
demolition and the construc- 
tion of new low-rise boating in 
traditional forms of 
construction? 

A survey of 140 of the 429 
blocks owned by Birmingham 
City Council last year showed 
that 80 needed repairs to loose 
cladding, at a cost of £40 
million. Bet many of the faults 
which are coming to light, 

especially those involving 
defective str u c tura l joints, in- 
dicate that demolition is the 
only practical solution in most 
cases. 

While building contractors 
generally are still going 
through a lean patch, com- 
pared with the expansive post- 
war period, the prospects for 
demolition firms have never 
looked rosier. 






Mr Allan Warner, of the 
Frtzroy Robinson Partnership 
(left), and Mr Richard 
MacCormac, of MacConnac 
Jamieson and Prichard, in 
Spitalfields Market yesterday, 
which is the centre of a £350 
million development plan. 

The two architects have 
drawn up plans for the 
Spitalfields Development 
Group, a consortium of Lon- 
don and Edinburgh Trust. 


Priests seek help for jobless 


A call to the Roman Catho- 
lic church to challenge the 
causes of unemployment and 
the suggestion that it should 
set up a think tank to analyse 
the current political and eco- 
nomic situation came from 
the National Conference of 
Priests of England and Wales 
yesterday. 

The delegates, who are 
elected by the 6,000 Roman 
Catholic priests engaged in 
pastoral work, overwhelm- 
ingly endorsed a statement 
describing Britain's continu- 
ing high level of unemploy- 
ment as an “outrage". 

They called on parishes to 
adopt new initiatives to help 
alleviate unemployment, such 
as setting up drop-in centres 
for ihe unemployed. 

They said the church was 
obliged to challenge the causes 
of unemployment and sug- 
^sted setting up an organiza- 
tion to do in the domestic field 


By Robert Nowell 

what the Catholic Institute for 
International Relations does 
overseas. 

The debate at the five>day 
annual meeting in Bir- 
mingham disclosed a wide- 
spread feeling that there must 
be a better way of ordering the 
nation's economic life. 

A society in which a group 
was in paid employment and 
the rest depended .on welfare 
benefits was no way forward. 
Father Joseph Carter, of 
Trafford Park, Manchester, 
said. 

Father John Bradley, of 
Watiington. Oxfordshire, who 
had moved from' an area with 
4S per cent unemployment to 
one where the rate was 6 per 
cent at the most, suggested 
that the few who were un- 
employed in the affluent 
South were at a greater dis- 
advantage than their fellows 
in the North. 


Father Brian O'Sullivan, of 
Englefield Green, Surrey, 
spoke of the “terrible fear” of 
redundancy in the South and 
the way it could be exploited 
by employers. 

Father Gerald Burke, of 
Doncaster, said he would like 
to see the church put aside 10 
per cent of its income to 
launch a campaign in favour 
of workers’ co-peratives. 

The conference also en- 
dorsed a statement urging the 
church to eliminate injustice 
and inequality so for as 
women were concerned. 

While it refrained from 
taking a stand on the ordina- 
tion of women, the statement 
said that any decisions, at any 
level in the church, which 
affected men and women 
equally should hot be taken 
without the views, opinions 
and feelings of women being 
sought 


mmmz- 

1 ■■ ■■ '...ii.-.v ■ *' «*■>'.' i 

‘j- « 


I H' 


Balfour Beatty, and County 1 
and District Pnmerties. j 

More than £150 milliqp has 
been offered to the Corpora- 
tion of the City of London for 
the freehold of the old meat 
market. If accepted the 13 
acres at Spitalfields would be 
developed as offices, shops, 
housing and small business 
units. More than 6,000 new 
jobs should be created 

(Photograph: Alan Weller) 

2 Belgian 
awards for 
Geldof 

Bob Geldof picked op two 
more awards yesterday for his 
famine relief work and said: “I 
am now Dr Dr Sir Bob Geldof 
KBE, MA. PhD.” 

He was at Ghent University 
in Belgium to receive an hon- 
orary degree - and then ac- 
cepted “with alacrity and 
Pride” an unexpected offer to 

become freeman of the tows iff 

Ypres, where his grandfather, 

who was honoured by the Bel- 

gmn king before the First 
World War for services to 
Betgnim overseas, was born. 

The Band Aid organizer, 
who said being back in the 
recording studio was like a 
holiday after two years run- 
ning toe famine relief appeal, 
asked the Belgian prime min- 
ister. Dr Wilfred Martens, to 
supply a Hercules transport 
aircraft to hack . up efforts to 
get food into southern Sudan, 


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■THF TTMFS SATTTftDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


HOME NEWS 


The British Association 

Healthy baby born to 
parents taking genetic 
test for cystic fibrosis 


A healthy baby ^ Bt been 
bom to parents who were the 
first in the world to - undergo a 
new genetic screening test for 
cystic fibrosis, the debilitating 
condition which shortens life 
to early adulthood. 

Another -child win be bom 
in a few weeks, who was one of 
a twin. Genetic screening at 10 
weeks into pregnancy showed 
that the other twin foetus 
carried Uni genetic defect in- 
dicating cystic fibrosis, and so 
the pregnancy for the abonnaf 
one was terminated. 

In both- cases, the parents 
believed initially that termina- 
tion of pregnancy was their 
only choice, because a pre- 
vious child had been bom 
with the disease. 

'The mother of the healthy 
boy,' Nicholas, who is fow 
weeks old, is Mrs Moira 
- Brodie, aged 32, of Swindon, 
Wiltshire. - 

The success with a new test 
developed by a team working 
-with Professor Robert 
Williamson, at St Mary's Hos- 
pital Medical School in Lon- 
don, was reported yesterday to 
a meeting of the British 
Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science in Bristol. 

The test depends on a gene 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


probe, which was developed 
in research supported by the 
Cystic Fibrosis Research 
TnisL 

The probe has been made 
available to genetic depart- 
ments at the Hospital for Sick 
Children, Great Ormond 
Street, and Guy's Hospital, in 
London, and to regional hos- 
pitals at Edinburgh, Manches- 
ter, Newcastle upon Tyne and 
Cardiff 

Professor Williamson said 
cystic fibrosis was the most 
common disease caused by 
inheritance of a angle defec- 
tive gene, affecting young 
people in the United King- 
dom. There were more than 
5,000 people with cystic 
fibrosis. 

There were no fewer ih«n 
two million carriers of the 
genetic mutation. Most were 
not aware they were at risk, as 
it was only when two carriers 
had children that the «tiwaa» 
could occur. There was a one 
in four chance. 

Professosr Williamson de- 
scribed an international re- 
search effort, involving St 
Mary's Hospital Medical 
School, and teams in Toronto 
and Salt Lake City, which 
during the past year had 


isolated the mutation ca 
cystic fibrosis to the middle _ 
human chromosome number 
7. 

There were now seven gene 
probes for testing feu carriers 
in pre-natal diagnosis when 
the risk was known. 

Research was continuing to 
isolate the gene itself When 
that was achieved. Professor 
Williamson said it should be 
possible to offer more accurate 
pre-natal diagnosis. 

Professor W illiams on said 
that people were immensely 
ignorant of genetics. “The vast 
majority of people have very 
little knowledge of inher- 
itance, and the way things are 
carried across generations. 

“Most people have 10 to 20 
lethal gene defects just sitting 
there like a time bomb waiting 
to explode: We need an educa- 
tional programme." 

Eh 1 Kay Davies, of the John 
Raddiffe Hospital, Oxford, 
reported advances on gene 
probes for Ducfaennc mus- 
cular dystrophy, an X-tinked 
recessive disorder -affecting 
one in a thousand new-born 
boys. Affected boys are nor- 
mally wheelchair-bound by 
the^eofll. 




A two-ten bronze cannon frea the Tndor sbwMp, Mary Rose, bong lowered into position at the National Maritime 
Museum at Greenwich yesterday. The 5%in-bore weapon, which had a range of one and a half miles, is in a new gallery at 
toe mnseam called Discovery and Seapower, 1450-1700, which will open on October 22 (Photograph: James Gray). 


V z^°waS e Plan to cut prison suicides , 

' « j* By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 

up for auction 


Dinosaurs were [Zfe 
-faster than Coe’ S” 


One oT the 11 Victoria 
Crosses awarded for the de- 
fence of Rorke's Drift against 
hundreds of Zuhi worriers in 
1879 is to be anctioaed in 
London on September 26. 

The medal was awarded to 
James Langley Dalton 10 
mfmjhs after l»b stand 

against the Zolas only when 
pnblic pressure was 
branghlJDaiton died in South 
Africa in 1887, aged 53. 


Measures to reduce the risk 
of suicides in prison, at four 
times the rate outside, are to 
be introduced by Mr Douglas 
Hurd, Home Secretary, later 
this year. 

The present system is 
considered to be inadequate 
for identifying potential 
suicides. 

A report published yes- 
terday recommends better 
staff training and improved 
procedures to prevent, in 


particular, suicides among 
deprcssives. the mentally dis- 
turbed, and the apparently 
rational who give no warning 
of their state of mind. 

New techniques will seek to 
discover those who are at risk 
among the 20 per cent of 
prisoners who have a psychi- 
atric history. 

The hardest to identify are 
the small group of seemingly 
intelligent and well-balanced 
people who try to commit 


suicide out of selfdisgust for 
what they have done. 

“Death by banging may 
take only two or three 
minutes," the report says. It 
recommends reviewing the 
ban on officers entering cells 
by themselves at nighL 

Resuscitation equipment 
should always be available 

Report of Working Group on 
Suicide Prevention (Stationery 
Office, on sale from the Library, 
Home Office, 50 Queen Anne's 
Gate. London SWI; £4). 


Pilger will 
head new 
Sunday 
newspaper 

Mr John Pilger. the Daily 
Mirror’s former campaigning 
journalist is to be editor-in- 
chief of Nenv on Sunday, the 
left-of-centre national paper 
planned for launch next 
spring. 

Mr Keith Sutton, a former 
journalist on The Sunday 
Times . will be the editor 
responsible for the day-to-day 
operation of the newspaper 
from its head office . in 
Manchester. 

• The Sunday' Sport news- 
paper. which is to be launched 
in nine days, took action in the 
High Court in London yes- 
terday against a ban on its 
television and radio 
advertising. 

The newspaper's publisher, 
Apollo Ltd, is seeking a court 
order against the refusal by the 
Independent Television Com- 
panies Advertising Associ- 
ation and the Independent 
Broadcasting Authority to ac- 
cept its advertising. 

The ban. on the grounds of 
public decency, came after 
bare breasts were featured in a 
32-page dummy copy of the 
newspaper. 

The newspaper claims it is not 
distinguishable from a num- 
ber of other Sunday papers 
which ore advertised on 
television. 

• A new daily paper. The 
Daily Standard, aimed at 
thousands of Britons living or 
on holiday in Spain goes on 
sale tomorrow. 




By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


Galloping dhnmnrs tout 
shook the prehistoric world 60 
mBfion years ago would have 
been able to ran fester than 
Sebastian Coe or Steve Cram, 
according to the latest scien- 
tific evidence. 

The bage beasts which 
weighed npto-50 tonnes ought 
not have been the lumbering 
-monsters, scarcely able to 
support their own bulk, that 
seme experts believe. 

The 35-tonne brontosaur 
was as agOe as a five-tonne 
elephant and up to a slow trot. 
Others could break into a ran 
and tire fearsome triceratops 
could have been able to gallop 
fester than any man can nm. 

. The evidence presented yes- 
terday by Professor McNeill 
Alexander challenges some 
established thinking on dino- 
saurs. 

One stredgtylbdd view is 
-that the beasts were so heavy 
that they were incapable of 
supporting their own weight 


on dry land and probably had 
to live in swamps. 

Bat their unexpected ogffity 
was discovered by Professor 
Alexander, professor of zo- 
ology at Leeds University, 
using engineering calculations 
that related bone strength and 
rfjwMHidAns of dimmo- skel- 
etons to body weight and by 
studying fossil footprints. 

Some widely-spaced foot- 
prints indicated that they were 
capable of speeds of to 12 
metres a second or about 
25mph. 

At Oat rate a draosaar’s 
time for the 1580 metres would 

have been two minutes and fiv^ 

seconds. The best times 
achieved by Coe and Cram 
were 339.03 and 14632. 

However, dinosaurs were 
probably unable to keep up 
their remarkable speed for 
very hm. They suffered from 
overheating because of Oku 
body size and would have 
qnddy become exhausted, the 
evidence suggests. 


New device will protect 
planes from wind shear 


By Our Science Editor 


A new device that will 
protect aircraft from sudden 
changes of wind, which are 
now believed to be responsible 
for about five crashes a year, 
was described yesterday by 
Professor Donald McLean, of 
Southampton University. 

He said 57 per cent of 
commercial airline accidents 
between 1959 and 1983 oc- 
curred during three distinct 

S * es of flight, initial climh, 
approach and landing. . 
Between 1974 and 1984 
almost two thirds of all 
commercial aircraft accidents 
occurred during those phases. 
A detailed analysis of statistics 
showed that five of those acci- 
dents each year were attrib- 
uted to : wind shear and had 
caused more than 300 deaths. 

■Wind shear occurred in a re- 
latively short space. It hap- 
pened when two masses of air, 
travelling ax different speeds, 
met and produced a “shear 
boundary", which was charac- 
terized by a rapid change ip 
wind direction. At low alti- 
tudes this rapid chaira 
specially dangerous for air- 
craft flying atlow speeds. 

One particular form of wind 
shear, called the microburst - 
a jet of air propelled rapidly 
downwards - was now recog- 
nized as very hazardous. Mic- 
robursts were particularly 
dangerous during take-op or 
landing, Professor McLean 

Telecom 

disabled 

Methods to ensure that vital 

“feline" telephones are not 
cut off without special mpi*y 
are to be improved by Bnusli 
Telecom. 

The move comes after con- 
ceroftomOfteLthcBTtratcfc- 
dog, about phone cut*® ; m 
the homes of elderly and 
disabled people for non-pay- 
ment of bills. 

One possibility is that titey 

may bo asked to name guaran- 
tors who would pay tbayhjTC* 
if they got into fimncml^ffl- 
coltiS. Tlie ST IDOV f 
in the second 

its Action for Disabled Cus- 
tomer? (ADO section, pob: 
fished yesterday. 

The report says: “Steps are 
already taken to aedrfy the 
standard baling reminder sys- 
tem to ensure that known Itfe- 
fine telephones are not a®so- 


said, because within a mi nute. 
frequently less, an aircraft 
may encounter a headwind, 
followed by a downdraft and a 4 
tailwind 

The pilot would usually 
throttle back the engines to ar- 
rest the tendency of his air- 
craft to “balloon" above the 
flight path, as a result of the 
increased airspeed, when sud- 
denly the headwind vanished 
and was followed immediately 
by the downdraft which caus- 
ed a loss of lift force. 

Not every flight which 
encountered wind shear ended 
in disaster. There were in- 
struments that gave the pilot 
some warning that his aircraft 
was flying in wind shear. 

But those instruments had 
limitations. Professor McLean 
said. He criticized the Federal 
Aviation Administration of 
the United Slates and the 
United Kingdom Air Reg- 
istration Board for lack of 
more detailed study of the 
effects of wind shear. Current 
instruments worked to stan- 
dards produced by those 
organizations. 

The device developed at 
Southampton University is 
based on a microcomputer 
which contains mathematical 
representations of what hap- 
pens in wind shears. Instru- 
ments measuring the atmos- 
phere on the outside of the air- 
craft feed data into the micro- 
computer. 

move on 
‘lifelines’ 

maticrily cut off for non-pay- 
ment without special inquiry. 
Ways of farther strengthening 
these procedures are raider 

coosideration." 

Mr Laurie Heatheringtoa, 
chairman of ADC and director 
of Telecom’s corporate ser- 
vices, said the move was in 
response to concern voiced by 
Did _ Oftel’s Disabled and 
Elderly group. 

“1 am meeting Did next 
week to talk over various 
ideas,** Mr Heatherington 
said. 

“We don't want to do any- 
tiring that seems offensive to 
disabled or elderly people. But 
we want to set ap machiner y to 
ensure these Efelines are not 
cut off. The idea is to help en- 
snre that bills are paid. We 
cannot go on forever letting 
somebody have a free trie- 
phone," he said. 


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/ 



OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE 


SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


Poll for South African 
whites rumoured as 
Parliament sitting ends 


From Michael Hornsby, Cape Town 


The South African Par- 
liament ended its extended 
1986 sitting yesterday amid a 
buzz of speculation that the 
Government is considering 
calling a general election for 
while voters before April. 

Normally the Parliament, 
which since 1984 has con- 
sisted of three bouses, for 
whiles, Indians and mixed- 
blood Coloureds, sits only 
from January to June. This 
year it was reconvened on 
August 18 and had been 
expected to continue until at 
least the end of September. 

In the event, h has gone into 
recess early because the 
weighty reform legislation 
promised by Pretoria — in 
particular, proposals for giv- 
ing the black African majority 
a say in government “at the 
highest levels” — has foiled to 
materialize. 

Since the State of Emer- 
gency was declared on June 
12, the Government has de- 
voted most of its energies to 
“restoring law and order”, and 
to stirring up a xenophobic 
response to the threat of 
economic sanctions. A mood 


of jingoistic bravado has in the 
past proved a good election 
climate for the ruling National 
Party. 


mean that the ceremony will 
not be seen outside South 
Africa. 

Anxious to preserve the 


In 1977 Mr John Vorster dignity of the occasion, the 
won the biggest virtory the diocese has barred television 
party has ever achieved, by news cameras from the Cathe- 
playing on the alleged anti- dral Church of St George and 
South Africa attitude ofthe has instead granted sole lete- 
US Administration of Presi- vision rights to a private 
dent Carter. _ _ _ South African video corn- 


video com- 


Election fever was raised by pany, Trilion. 
remarks by President Botha Foreign television networks 


and his Minister of Home 
Affairs. Mr Stofief Botha, at 
the Orange Free State party 
congress of the party in 
Bloemfontein. 

Mr Botha announced that a 
publicity campaign was being 
launched to update voters' 
rolls, and President Botha told 
a right-wing heckler who ac- 
cused him of not having a 
mandate from whites: *' You 
will get an election before you 
are dry behind the ears.” 

Meanwhile, an unchristian 
row between international 
television companies and the 
organizers of the enthrone- 
ment tomorrow of the Right 
Rev Desmond Tutu as Arch- 
bishop of Cape Town could 


will be required to buy any 
footage they want from 
Trilion at $20 (£13) a second 
for showing in Europe and $30 
a second for viewers in the 
United States. 

Foreign networks are baulk- 
ing not so much over the cost 
as over the principle of being 
asked to pay to cover a news 
event, which they claim is 
unprecedented. Several say 
they will not buy from Trilion, 
and are even threatening to 
force their way into the 
church. 

Archbishop-elect Tutu was 
said to be extremely upset 
about the ilt-wifl the issue is 
causing. 


Soweto clashes over burials 


From Bay Kennedy, Johannesburg 


Further dashes broke out 
yesterday in Soweto when 
security forces confronted 
blacks attempting to bury 
victims of earlier police ac- 
tion. according to residents. 

They said that tear gas was 
fired at a procession heading 
for a township cemetery with 
coffins of four of the 24 people 
killed last week during street 
fighting over attempts to evict 
tenants refusing to pay rents. 

According to clergymen, 13 
people were buried on Thurs- 
day after the authorities 
banned a planned mass 
funeral. 

But they claimed that at 
least four of the dead were 
buried secretly, watched by 
police, after undertakers in the 
township were compelled to 
take the coffins to cemeteries 
in an attempt to bury them 
without attracting attention. 

. Some of the coffins, it was 


claimed, were left only half 
buried and marked with pur- 
ple dye from water cannon. 

The Johannesburg Star re- 
ported yesterday that a further 
nine people had been buried. 
“Hundreds of people, includ- 
ing relatives could not attend 
the funerals. Details cannot be 
reported because of emer- 
gency regulation restrictions,” 
it said 

On the front page wasa 5 in 
blank space labelled 
“censored”. 

Workers from Soweto re- 
turned to their jobs in 
Johannesburg yesterday after 
Thursday's mass stay-away, 
which gave the normally bus- 
tling city streets an almost 
bank holiday appearance. 

Whites are now becoming 
accustomed to this, although 
nobody yet has tried to cal- 
culate the loss in man hours 
and production. 


Divers continue grim 
search for liner bodies 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


Soviet divers yesterday 
continued a dangerous opera- 
tion to bring to the surface 
more than 250 bodies still 
believed to be inside the crttise 
liner Admiral Nakhimov, 
which sank after a collision 
with a freighter in the Black 
Sea on Sunday. 

Pnzvda reported yesterday 
that the search, hampered by 
strong winds sweeping from 
. nearby mountains, was cou tin- 
ning at a depth of 165 ft 
although regulations normally 
prohibit underwater opera- 
tions in such hazardous 
conditions. 

“Divers are going under 
water in extreme conditions. 
They are at risk,” said the 
director of the rescue opera- 
tion. Mr Yuri Savelyev. 

A senior diving specialist, 
Mr V. Popov, said that the 
recovery would take at least 
another week to complete. 
Most ofthe divers were yonog 
and bad no experience of 
raising corpses from a sunken 
ship. “Such work requires 
nerves of steel,” be said. 

Jzrestia reported that false 
rumours were still cir ca la ting 
among a group of more than 
400 relatives of missing pas- 
sengers and crewmen which 

Aquino and 
rebel chief 
talk peace 
at convent 

From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

President Aquino of the 
Philippines and Mr Nur 
Misuari, the Muslim rebel 
leader, held an unprecedented 
. meeting yesterday and agreed 
to negotiate an end to the 14- 
year Muslim secessionist war. 

The meeting, in a convent 
on Jolo Island. 600 miles 
south of Manila, launched the 
first official attempt in a 
decade to solve the Muslim 
rebellion which has resulted in 
more than 60,000 deaths. 

Mrs Aquino and Mr 
Misuari, chairman of foe 
Mona National Liberation 
Front (MNLF). issued a state- 
ment in which they agreed to 
“support foe continued cessa- 
tion of hostilities” 

Before their talks, an 
MNLF-imposed ceasefire was 
in force in rebel-contested 
areas on the main island of 
Mindanao and foe Sulu chain 
further south, which includes 
Jolo. 

Each side appointed two- 
member panels to negotiate an 
end to the war. The negotia- 
tions “to be carried out in the 
future” will be under foe 
auspices of foe 48-member 
Islamic Conference. 

The southern military com- 
mander, General Jose Magno, 


has gathered in the part city of 
Novorossiyisk. 

It said that the most preva- 
lent concerned pockets of air 
inside the hull which had 
supposedly permitted some of 
tile 282 people still un- 
accousted for to survive. An- 
gry relatives accused diving 
teams of not working hard 
enough to find them before the 
oxygen ran out. 

“It is understandable tint 
people who have suddenly lost 
their dearest ones can still not 
believe it has happened,” 
Izvestia commented. 

One survivor, a driver from 
Samarkand, told the trade 
union paper Trad tow be had 
won a prize in a waltz com- 
petition on the open top deck 
of foe liner when he saw the 
approaching cargo ship loom 
on a direct collision course. 

He then had to rescue his 
two young daughters who were 
trapped in dwir cabin, by 
smashing the ventilation grid 
and crawling through. 

The paper said: “It was a 
strange, absurd collision erf 
ships which — with an their 
radars and radio equipment 
and in normal weather and 
visibility — stfll did not suc- 
ceed in missing each other.” 


Labour monitoring groups 
described Thuursday's work 
stoppage as the most signifi- 
cant and successful protest 
action in foe huge township 
since the 1976 uprising. 

But there was a confused 
picture of what actually oc- 
curred inside Soweto follow- 
ing government orders ban- 
ning news coverage and 
forbidding journalists from 
. entering the township. 

The Johannesburg morning 
newspaper. Business Day. re- 
ported that eight people had 
been killed, six of them by the 
security forces. 

But foe Bureau for Informa- 
tion, foe sole source of offidal 
news about events relating to 
the State of Emergency, said 
that it had no confirmed 
reports of fatalities. It said 
there had been a number of 
injuries, although a later state- 
ment retracted this. 

Reporters 
protest to 
Gorbachov 

Moscow (Reuter) — The 
American press corps in Mos- 
cow wrote to Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov yesterday to pro- 
test against the detention of 
the American magazine 
correspondent Nicholas Dam- 
toff, who is accused of spying. 

Soviet sources with offidal 
contacts meanwhile said that 
Moscow was “very unlikely” 
to accept a proposal under 
which Mr Daniloff would be 
sent home in exchange for the 
release of an alleged Soviet spy 
in New York into the custody 
of the Soviet Ambassador 
pending his iriaL 

Mr Daniloff aged 52, has 
been held in an annex of 
Lefortovo military prison in 
Moscow since Saturday. He 
has not formally been charged. 

His British-born wife. Ruth, 
said that the KGB had refused 
her request to make a third 
visit to the prison yesterday, 
though she hoped foe would 
be allowed to see her husband 
again on Monday. 

The US journalists said they 
had signed the letter as in- 
dividuals. It bore the names of 
all 29 accredited American 
correspondents currently in 
Moscow. . 



Hundreds 

held in 


Family of 
four swim 


Chile coup to freedom 
protests in West 

mT — An East German 





t % MgS 


M Jean Emmanuel de DoovOle, aged 70, a Second World War veteran of the French 18th 
Cavalry Regiment, riding Hidalgo m front of the Bastille column is Fans before he contin- 
ued his journey across France bearing the flame of liberty. The flame was brought on D-day 
by troops from Canada to his re gimenta l headquarters at St Avoid in eastern France. 


Non-Aligned summit 

Britain censured 
over Libya raid 

From A Correspondent, Harare 


Britain is condemned, with 
the United States, in a special 
addition to the 112-page 
declaration under consid- 
eration at the summit of foe 
Non-Aligned Movement in 
Harare. 

A paragraph approved by a 
committee of officials from 
the lOf members describes the 
American air attack in April 
on foe home near Tripoli ol 
Colonel Gadaffi, foe Libyan 
leader, as a crime that could 
not be condoned or justified. . 

In carrying out the raids, in 
retaliation for an attack alleg- 
edly sponsored by Libya on a 
Berlin night club, foe US bad 
“the support and collabora- 
tion of Britain”, which was in 
violation of international law. 

The officials have had much 
greater difficulty in finding an 
acceptable formula on foe 
Gulf War. Conference sources 
said that after two days of 
deliberations foe committee 
rejected Iranian demands for a 
direct condemnation of Iraq 
as the aggressor in the six- 
year-old conflict 

Iran was reported to have 
had the hacking of Libyan and 
Syrian representatives, while 
Pakistani delegates said that 
they could not support word- 
ing that did not have the 
approval of both sides. 

The original text drawn up 
by foe summit's Zimbabwean 
hosts, called on Iran and Iraq 
to “summon the political will* 
to negotiate a lasting peace. 


Another conflict caused 
friction in foe conference hall 
yesterday when foe Prime 
Minister of Afghanistan, Sul- 
tan Alt Kishtmand. objected 
to repeated calls for the with- 
drawal of “foreign forces” 
from his country. 

“The root cause of foe 
problems feeing our region 
lies in foe US policy of 
aggression against our coun- 
try,” be said, claiming that an 
unnamed neighbouring “pop- 
pet country” harboured 120 
US training camps for Afghan 
rebels. 

Mr Robert Mugabe, the 
Prime Minister of Zimbabwe 
and conference chairman, 
took up this obvious reference 
to Pakistan by urging dele- 
gates not to use such abusive 
terms. 

Yesterday's session began 
with a minute's silence for 
those killed on Thursday in 
the South African township of 
Soweto. 

Mr Mugabe read a state- 
ment of sympathy and sup- 
port for foe bereaved, saying 
that foe killings showed again 
Pretoria’s “utter contempt for 
human rights”. 

The final conference declar- 
ation may not be known 
before it closes tomorrow. 
Many heads of state returned 
home yesterday, including 
President Doe of Liberia, 
whose security men d ai m to 
have uncovered a coup plot in 
his absence. 


Dissident 
Basques in 
new party 

From A Correspondent • 
Madrid 

Four himdred members of 
foe Basque Nationalist Party, 
which has been foe biggest 
and most ymMliring force is 
Spain's troubled north-west 
Basque region, have launched 
their own, more na ti ona lis t 
Basque party. 

The new party, called Easko 
Abertzaleak (Basque Nation- 
alists), upsets foe balance of 


From Lake Sagans 
Santiago 

A man was shot dead, five 
people were injured and sev- 
eral hundred were arrested 
during a day of demonstra- 
tions against foe military re- 
gime ofPresident Pinochet of 
Chile, which celebrates its 
thirteenth anniversary next 
week. 

An official report said that 
Senor Rodrigo BeHo. aged 21. 
was shot by a naval patrol 
when he tried to set fire to a 
bus in the coastal city of Vina 
del Mar. Three policemen 
were injured, including one 
guarding foe home of the 
executive secretary of the 
Catholic Church's Human 
Rights organization. 

The demonstrations, foe 
fifth this year, were organized 
by foe National Assembly of 
Civil Society (Nacs) to mark a 
“day for democracy” - Sept- 
ember 4, on which Chileans 
traditionally elected their 
President until the 1973 coup. 

After a 40-day stint in jail. 
Nacs leaders were reluctant to 
call the protest a national 
strike. But groups of students, 
women, foe poor and all 
opposition parties (fid. 

While the strike was not as 
successful as that in early July, 
there were noticably fewer 
buses and cars on the streets 
and shops in many areas 
closed early, as did univer- 
sities and schools. Bombs 
destroyed the main aquaduct 
supplying the northern city of 
Calama and railway lines in 
Temuco, and electric power 
lines were cut in Osoroo. 

Students held assemblies on 
campus before moving into 
foe city centre. At one road 
junction. Catholic University 
students played ball and 
shouted anti-government slo- 
gans for more than an hour. 
Squads of riot police, water 
cannons and gas-spraying 
armoured cars were unable to 
stop them. Hundreds roared 
with laughter when a police- 
man leapt from one vehicle 
and “arrested” a rubber balL 

A French priest. Father 
Rene Dubois, stopped police 
from entering foe southern 
town of Victoria fay throwing 
himself in from of their bus. 


Bonn - An East German 
(amilv of four escaped to West 
German) yesterday by swim- 
ming the river Wakcniw. 
south ofLubcck. after making 
their wav through the border 
“death strip” (Our Correspon- 
dent writes). 

Federal border guards iden- 
tified foe four only as a 
building engineer, aged 49. his 
wife, aged 44, who is a doctor, 
a medical student son aged 25. 
and a daughter, aged 19. who 
is an architectural draughts- 
woman. . 

0 Professor Hasso Mcmert. a 
leading East German scientist, 
defected to West Germany last 
week after having attended a 
congress in Paris, it was 
disclosed here yesterday. 

Bribes charge 
militant jailed 

Melbourne (Reuter) - 
Norm Gallagher, a militant 
Australian trade unionist, has 
been jailed for 18 months and 
fined £24.000 on bribery 
charges. 

A jury found the general 
secretary' of foe Builders 
Labourers' Federation guilty 
of 1 7 counts of receiving send 
commissions from building 
firms in return for industrial 
peace. 

Top company 
chief held 

Delhi (Reuter) - A mag- 
istrate has ordered two weeks’ 
detention for one of India's 
leading five industrialists, 
who was arrested on suspicion 
of multi-million dollar foreign 
currency violations. 

Lalil Mohan Thapar. aged 
55, head of the country's fifth 
largest industrial conglom- 
erate, was held after Finance 
Ministry agents raided offices 
of his Thapar Group of In- 
dustries and residential 
premises. 

Hitler sale 

Hong Kong (Reuter) A 
three-piece silver tea set used 
by Hitler was sold to an Indian 
electronics exporter for nearly 
£9.000 at auction here. 


ai^Ln^ foTtolanoTal himself in front of their bus. ww*** — 

=£r5E2Pfl Coach tragedy 

starts a crisis in relations ‘ relreal to Ascoli Piceno. Italy (Reu- 

between foe region and k-. a ter) - Six people died and 19 

rvtoHrJH The people then began a ininnvt when a tourist 


Nurse contracts Aids 


Paris (AFP) — A French 
nurse has contracted Aids, 
probably by pricking her fin- 
ger accidentally with equip- 
ment used to drain fluid from 
foe lungs of a patient with foe 
virus, according to doctors at 
St Louis Hospital reported in 
The New England Journal oj 
Medicine. 


0 In Britain, strict safety 
measures have been in- 
troduced to protect all medical 
and laboratory staffs from foe 
risks of infection (Our Science 
Correspondent writes). 

No case of a medical or 
laboratory worker being in- 
fected with Aids has been 
reported in this country. 


starts a crisis m relations 
between foe region and 
Madrid. 

The most immediate effed 
of foe derision of foe dis- 
sidents, who are grouped 
around the figure of the former 
president of the Basque gov- 
ernment, Setor Carlos Gar- 
aflcoectxea, and include exp- 
elled members of foe original 
Basque Nationalist Party, is 
that Basque regional and 
moniripa] elections, doe next 
year, will now probably be 
brought forward. The new 
party will told its first con- 
gress m October. 

Basque politicians also be- 
lieve that with foe establish- 
ment of a new party, political 
pads between foe Basque 
Nationalist Party and foe 
central Socialist government' 
will become extremely dMficnh 
to administer. 

Relations between Madrid 
and foe region are already 
strained because of the slow 
pace of devolution. 

Unlike foe Basque Nation- 
alist Party, members of foe 
new grouping are not prepared 
to fridge historic demands for 
the self-determination of foe 
region. 

According to these, foe 
Basque area comprises not 
only the three provinces which 
officially make op foe region 
today but also the Spanish 
region of Navarra and foe 
three French Basque prov- 
inces — Xoberoa, Lapurdi and 
Nafarroa Beaherea. 


march, releasing helium bal- 
loons carrying the picture of a 
French priest killed there dur- 
ing an anti-government pro- 
test two years ago. 

While the Opposition de- 
bates its next move, the 
Government has launched an 
all-out campaign, including j 
television and newspaper ads, 
to prepare a pro-Pinochet rally 
planned for Tuesday. 

Bolivian tin 
miners widen 
hunger strike 

. La Paz (Reuter)— Some 400 
more Bolivian tin miners have 
joined a hunger strike as talks 
over government plans to 
dose up to 11 mines contin- 
ued, according to a local radio 
station, El Minero. 

Workers at the Colquechara 
and San Jose mines joined 100 
miners who began tasting this 
week at the Siglo XX (Twenti- 
eth Century) mine, one of the 
country's largest. A small 
number of miners at Siglo XX 
have been on hunger strike 
since Monday. 

Hunger strikers at the mine, 
some 190 miles south of La 
Paz, now total more than 200, 
with another 200 at nearby 
Colquechara mine and 100 at 
San Jo$£, 125 miles south of 
La Paz. 



;• • .. 7 ‘ 

mu »•*. 





Ascoli Piceno. Italy (Reu- 
ter) — Six people died and 19 
were injured when a tourist 
coach and a lorry collided on 
foe coast motorway north of 
this eastern city. All foe 
tourists were Italians. 

Rossini find 

Stockholm — The oldest 
known original manuscript of 
one of Rossini’s operas, the 
one-act La Scaia di Seta, first 
performed in 1812, has been 
found in the vaults of the 
Swedish Association for the 
Promotion of Musical Culture 
in Stockholm. 

School bullies 

Tokyo (AP) — Police han- 
dled 166 cases of school 
bullying between January and 
June this year, down from the 
274 cases during the same 
period in 1 985. 

Arianedate 

Paris (AP) — The Ariane 
rocket which had future 
launches postponed after a 
May launch failure, is to begin 
operating again in February. 

Weeded out 

Stockholm — . Police re- 
moved 14 people from a 
railway line near foe village of 
Rabbalshede in western Swe- 
den, where they had staged a 
sit-down protest against foe 
state railway company’s use of 
weed killer to stop the track 
from becoming overgrown. 


India goes to court for Base blast 
Bhopal gas victims 

■*- ” Force base south of West 

From Ktidip Nayar, Delia Berlin, injuring 33 people and 

The Indian Government compensation and other relief 
yesterday filed a suit for payments first awarded by the terronsl ,s suspected, 
unspecified damages against court. i » VI - 

Union Carbide Corporation, The Govern meat first filed oIX KliiGQ 





i .... • > V 

•' . t =* ; I.* 


"• I**' - * • 

vf **.'*'■' . 

I 


yesteraay tiled a suit for payments first awarded by the 
unspecified damages against court. 

Union Carbide Corporation. The Govern meat first filed 
the American multinational, suit in New York last year, but 
on the grounds that its plant in after 20 months of legal wran- 
Bhopal was of faulty design giing Judge John Ken nan 
and that adequate safety mea- ruled that the case should be 
sures were not taken to pro- heard in India and that the < 
vent the gas leak in December Indian judgment would be , 



1984 which killed almost bindin 
2.000 people. The 

The Government has asked are sta, 
for .damages which would than 5 1 


almost binding on Union Carbide. 

The dimensions of the case 
s asked are s tagger ing. There are more 
would than 5KJ.000 claims for dam- 


are the armed forces chief, General Fidel Kamos, foe Defer 
and the President's brotber-in- 1 973 in the bloodiest battle of 


ies), the Muslim rebel leader, after peace talks at Jolo Island. With them 
foe Defence Minister, Mr Juan Ponce Emile, and aides of Mr Misuari. 


law. Mr Agapito Aquino, who 
negotiated the meeting, were 
named to foe government 
pancL The MNLF panel will 
also comprise civilian and 
military negotiators. 

“I am happy that all went 
well in my first meeting with 
Misuari,” Mrs Aquino told 
2.000 supporters in Zam - 
boanga City, 100 miles east of 
Jolo. during a 30-minute stop- 
over on her return to Manila. 

Bv travelling to Jolo. home- 
land of the Muslim insurgency 
and an MNLF stronghold. 
Mrs Aquino broke with proto- 
col and ignored warnings of 
her military advisers that her 
safety could be in jeopardy. 

The city centre was razed in 


the war that left dead more 
than 400 government soldiers 
and MNLF irregulars. A peace 
agreement signed in 1976 
quickly collapsed but the 
fighting has become more 
sporadic. 

An island-wide ceasefire in 
force since last month allowed 


A bargaining chip for Mrs 
Aquino is the decision by a 
constitutional commission to 
include Muslim autonomy in 
a new charter which will be 
put to the people in a plebi- 
scite later this year. This 
would involve designated 
Muslim regions with their 
own legislature, judiciary and 


compensate for all persons ages as a result of death, 
and authorities which suffered injuries and losses, another 
as a result of the leak. half-million for personal inju- 

It has also sought punitive lies, and thousands more for 
damages to deter Union Car- the loss of livestock and 
bide and other multinational business. The claim forms 
companies from wilful, ma- alone occupy 3,000 ft of soace. 


Six killed 

Kampala (AFP) — Six sus- 
pected murderers were drag- 
ged from a police station at 
Budaka village in eastern 
Uganda and dubbed to death 
by a mob which accused them 
of having poisoned a. prom- 
inent trader. 

Five sacked 

Khartoum (AP) - The 
Sudanese Prime Minister. Mr 
Sadiq al-Mahdi. has dismissed 
his military commander mid 
four leading lieutenants be- 


iuilc suivt uhi Miunui ouuww tv. 

an estimated 10,000 MNLF ■ 


soldiers and supporters to 
attend a policy-making con- 
ference eight miles away in the 
town of Maimbung. 

Mr Misuari broke more 
than 10 years of sdf-imposed 


The MNLF is considered 
the most hard line of the three 
Muslim rebel forces Editing 
foe Government, It tradition- 
ally has sought secession, 
while foe more moderate 
MNLF splinter groups are 


exile in the Middle East to agreeable to autonomy. 


return for foe three-day con- 
ference which reviewed rebel 
demands he was to put to Mrs 
Aquino. 


Mrs Aquino's hope is to 
convince Mr Misuari to mod- 
ify his demands and to nego- 
tiate an end to the war. 



companies from wilful, ma- alone occupy 3,000 ft of space, cause of their failures in foe 
iicious and wanton disregard Claims for compensation of fingering war with insurgents 
of the rights and safety of about £13.5 billion have been in southern Sudan, 
people, and interest on the consolidated. r\_._ ' ,, 

rxrzr: *- ■ Drugs verdict 


0 — — 1 Tit j |\J| | 

of the rights and safety of about £1 3.5 billion have been 
people, and interest on the consolidated. 

Alfonsin urged Jakarta snub 

to resist trade strains ties 
links with UK with Canberra 

Buenos Aires (Reuter) - Sydney - Australia is again 
The Argentine Senate has trying to limit damage to 

■ ■wanimAnrltr ■« rotor! PrMn'Hpnt aJ i L 


Los Angeles (Reuter) - 
Drag tests on the air traffic 
controller on duty when an 
Aeromexieo DC-9 and private 
plane collided here on Sun- 
day, killing 90 people, were 
negative. 


m 


unanimously urged President 
Raul Alfonsin to. hold off on 
formal trade relations with 
Britain. 

A congressional spokesman 
said foal a non-binding mo- 
tion asks the Government to 
resist the move until London 
accedes to talks on the dis- 
puted Falkland Islands as 
called for in a UN resolution. 


relations with Indonesia after A rmc fa lire 
an abrupt snob from Jakarta I ™ wlllxa 


(Stephen Taylor writes). 

Mr Bill Hayden, the For- 
eign Minister, said yesterday 
that Indonesia had had no 
reason for suspending landing 
rights for military aircraft, b«t 
said it would not retaliate. No 
RAAF landings in Indonesia 
are planned until December. 


Washington - Leading US 
and Soviet experts began two- 
day talks here on crucial 
strategic, space and other arms 
control issues in preparation 
Jora possible summit meeting 
towcen President' Reagan 
and Mr Mikhail Gorbachov 
later this year. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


OVERSEAS IMhWy 


The Karachi hijack: Cyprus prisoners 


London terror focus 


The PLO Briton 


Pro-Palestinian Briton expects freedom Mysterious path 


From Robert Fisk, Nicosia 

toe centra] selves and reveal the organ- 
”J N ; TOs,a ’ .** behind a ization for whjch Davison and 
on .^ e toe lwo Palestinian gunmen 
SSf rf « r /SL, gr 5 en h " e toai were working. 
r\^™,„ Grte k ■ ^ ora Turiash A. Lebanese is also being 
cipnois. say that the pro- held at toe Nicosia central 
raiesimian Bnton and two prison after having been ar- 
ra lest i mans imprisoned there rested last month and. charged 
have always been confident of with carrying .a bagful of 
tneir early rel^se, grenades and a loaded pistol in 

Ian Michael Davison, the Laroaca. 
unemployed South Shields If Cypriot law appears to 
man who turned up to fight for deal firmly with such people, 
MrY assir Arafat 5 PLO m the however, toe Israelis have 


Lebanese city of Tripoli three 
years ago and then helped to 
murder three Israelis on a 
yacht in Larnaca harbour last 
SepiembCT, made-no secret of 
his intention to make an eariy 
departure from his jail. 

His two Palestinian col- 
leagues, Khaled Abdul Kader 
al-IChaiib, who holds a Syrian 

passport and Abdul Khalim 


always maintained, with good 
reason, that the Cypriots tend 
to yield to threats from hijack- 
ers or kidnappers. 

It was a Cypriot decision 10 
release the murderer of an 
Egyptian newspaper editor, 
Mr Yussuf Sebai, in' Nicosia 
that led President Sadat to 
send Egyptian commandos 10 
storm the plane that was 


x j , i/l. ».«• » iiiviiii uiv prnnv uiai 

Saado al-Khalifa. who is of supposed to carry the culprit 
Jordanian nationality, never from Larnaca. 


said for - whom they were 
working when they boarded 
the Israeli yacht and shot dead 
its occupants, a middle-aged 
woman and two men. 

The Israelis bombed the 
PLO's headquarters- in Tunis 
in retaliation, although Mr 
Arafat always claimed he had 
no connection with the men. 

- Throughout his trial- in 
Nicosia, Davison often smiled 
at toe judge and lawyers, and 
later told his parents that he 
was not ashamed of what he 
had done.- 

The Israelis, as well as the 
Cypriots, will be watching toe 
hijackers of toe Pan Am jet at 
Karachi with special interest 
to see if they identify thera- 


The operation ended in 
ignominy when Cypriot police 
killed several Egyptian troops 
on the tarmac. 

. And only a few weeks ago 
the Cypriots suddenly freed a 
Palestinian who had been 
convicted of trying to smuggle 
weapons aboard a Swissair 
flight from Larnaca to Am- 
man. His secret departure 
from the central prison fol- 
lowed the mysterious kidnap- 
ping of two Cypriots in Beirut 
and their own subsequent 
release. 

The Cypriot government at 
the time denied, very un- 
convincingly, that toe two 
events had anything to do 
with each other. 




A'n 

I 


Sir Geoffrey Howe 



to FLO world 
of defiant terror 


Mr Walters at the Foreign Office. Centre is Mr Charles Price, the US Ambassador. 


Walters refuses to be drawn Gadam and 


Israel rebuffs hijackers 


Jerusalem (Reuter) — Of- 
(trials said here yesterday that 
Israel opposed any concession 
to gunmen who hijacked the 
Pan Am airliner. 

An Israeli official said; “We 
would be firmly opposed to 
any government making con- 


cessions or giving in to hijack- 
ers and terrorisis, including if 
such a request were made to 
the Government of Cyprus." 

The Prime Minister, Mr 
Shimon Peres, said that the 
hijack was another sign that 
toe world must stop terrorism. 


Mr Vernon Walters, the 
American presidential envoy 
who has been visiting Euro- 
pean capitals this week, left 
London yesterday afternoon 
without commenting on the 
Karachi hijacking, after hav- 
ing had an hour of talks with 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, the For- 
eign Secretary. 

Mr Waiters said after the 
breakfast-time meeting: “All I 
know is that an aircraft has 
been hijacked. I didn't even 
hear it on the radio myself. 

“1 beard it by word of 
month, and I don't like to talk 
about thin gs I don't know 
anything about" 

The Foreign Office said that 
Sir Geoffrey had told the 
general of Britain's “deep 


Porcelain Paris bomb linked 
butterflies with earlier blasts 


butterflies 
of death 

Rabat (Reuter) — Two large 
explosive butterflies made of 
porcelain were found in the 
luggage of two Tunisian 
women suspected terrorists 
arrested in Morocco- last 
month, the official news 
agency MAP said yesterday. 

The women. also had a 
porcelain plafd filled “with 
explosives, and detonators 
hidden in a hair dryer and a 
hair brush, the agency said, 
quoting Interior Ministry 
sources. 

MAP said that toe devices 
were brought lo Morocco by • 
the two women from Tunis 
via several European capitals. 

The two were among four 
Arabs arrested on August 22 
and 27 who, according to a 
government statement issued 
on Sunday, have admitted 
belonging to a "group of 
professionals of international 
terrorism” already implicated 
in outrages in Europe and the 
Middle East. 

With two others, a Lebanese 
Palestinian and a Palestinian, 
they planned bomb attacks in 
public places in Morocco, the 
official statement said. 

The agency said that lab- 
oratory tests had shown that 
the butterflies and plate were 
made of a highly explosive 
substance called pentrite 
which could not be delected 
by conventional X-ray 
methods. . 

MAP said toe porcelain 
butterflies had sockets de- 
signed to fit electric det- 
onators and that a special 
knife to cut the porcelain plate 
in two had also been found. 

The group was arrested a 
month after a controversial 
meeting in Morocco between 
King Hassan and Mr Shimon 
Peres, the Israeli Prime Min- 
ister. which was opposed by 
radical A rabs. • 

Replica Greek 

ship to make 

symbolic trip 

From Mario Modiano ] 
Athens 

A full-size copy of an an- 
cient Greek merchant snip \ 
sets sail from Piraeus today to 
retrace part of toe last voyage 
of the original vesseL which 
was sunk by pirates on 
Kvrcnia. northern Cyprus, 
some 1200 years ago. 

The 46 ft ancient vessel and 
its cargo were retrieved by j 
American archaeologists from 
the muddy seabed, re- 
assembled to 70 per cent ofrts 
original shape, and is now 
pnltrved at Kyrenia Castle m 
Turkish-held north Cvprus- 

The modem com. 

II. was buih m a Piraeus yard 

in the tame way » the 
original- It sets off on an 

arigiiHu icianH-hOOOing 


By Rodney Cowton 

concern at the seizure of an 
American civilian aircraft at 
Karachi airport”. 

It confirmed that most of the 
meeting had been devoted to 
an exchange of views on how 
best to combat International 
terrorism. 

“They emphasized the con- 
tinuing Importance of firm, 
sustained and collective, inter- 
national action, in which co- 
operation between countries of 
the European Community and 
the United States plays a 
crucial role," a spokesman 
said. 

Mr Walters's visit to eight 
European capitals follows 
warnings by American of- 
ficials that Libya was planning 
Anther acts of international 


Israeli dies 
in raid 


terrorism. It was thought that 
he would be seeking European 
support for further measures 
against Libya. 

He said that the purpose of 
his trip was to talk to friends 
and allies on the situation in 
the Mediterranean, and on the 
struggle against terrorism and 
ways to combat it 

“I did not embark on this 
trip to make any demands on 
anybody," he said, "hot rather 
to consnlt, which we believe is 
important and as far as I am 
concerned I have had a most 
satisfactory trip." 

He said he would be calling 
in Ottawa for discussions with 
the Canadian Government on 
his way back to Washington. 


10 held on 


Zia keep 
their silence 

Harare — The two states- 
men most affected by toe Ka- 
rachi hijacking were yesterday 
reported 10 be in the Zimbab- 
we capital, but both kept 
themselves incommunicado 
(A Correspondent writes). 

President Zia ul-Haq of 
Pakistan had by late last night 
made no comment on the 
hijack, while toe whereabouts 
of the Libyan leader. Colonel 
Gadaffu remained a mystery. 

After taking a formal fare- 
well of toe Non-Aligned 
Movement summit on Thurs- 
day, he was reported to have 
left for Kampala. However, 
his presidential jet was still 
parked at Harare airport 
yesterday. 


One of the three PLO 
guerrillas whose freedom is 
being demanded by the Ka- 
rachi place hjjackvrs is said (0 
be a 28-year-old Briton. 

Ian Davison, a former 
carpenter from South Shields, 
was jailed for life in December 
by a Cyprus court for bis part 
in the murder of three Israelis 
on board their yacht in 
Larnaca marina three months 
earlier. 

The other two terrorists 
wanted by tbe hijackers are 
also serv ing life sentences. 

For Davison tbe path from 
Tyneside lo tbe world of 
international terrorism was a 
brutal but mysterious one. 

Born and raised in Sooth 
Shields with his elder brother 
and two younger sisters, he left 
school at (he age of 16. 

According (0 his father. Mr 
Sam Davison, an unemployed 
labourer aged 52 who was 
interviewed at the time of bis 
son’s arrest, the young Dav- 
ison was more interested in the 
fortunes of the local Sunder- 
land football Club than m the 
twists and turns of inter- 
national politics. 

He trained as a joiner but 
found It difficult to settle 
down. He worked for four 
years in America before 
returning home still restless. 

In 1982, shortly after arriv- 
ing in Lebanon. Davison told 
an interviewer that television 
screenings of tbe massacre of 
Palestinians in tbe refugee 
camps of Chatilla and Sabra, 
had changed his life. 

Previously, he said, he had 
been **n real thng who lived for 
football, pints of real ale and 
Friday-night pnneh-ups in 
Geordie pubs and dabs". 

Davison travelled to Athens 
where he tried and failed to 
join tbe PLO, and then went 


on to Jordan where be was 
eventually recruited. 

Within a few weeks he bad 
met Mr Yassir Arafat, tbi 
PLO leader, and was fighting 
in the battle to defend tbe 
Baddawi refugee camp against 
an attack by Syrian-backed 
Palestinian rebels. 

In December 1983, dressed 
in combat fatigues, Palestine 
ian head shawl and clutching a 
rifle, Davison was among more 
than 1.000 guerrillas evac- 
uated by liner from Bejrut to 
Yemen.' Before embarking be 
told journalists (hat be had not 
gone to Beirut for the adven- 
ture but because be shared tbe. 
PLO's political views. 

At his trial in December he 
was unrepenient about his 
involve men l in the killings cf 
the three Israelis. He said:. 
“As a fighter, 1 can feel mi 
guiir. 

Yesterday at his family's 
home in Grotto Gardens,- 
South Shields, Davison’s par- 
ents declined to comment. 


. , *1 


* j.c 

.'.-tTji&SVi 

*S 


Davison: a PLO commando 
serving life for murder. ■ 


Polish farm scheme a tactical sacrifice 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


The explosive used in a 
bomb left on a Paris Metro 
train on Thursday night was of 
toe same type as that used in 
five bomb attacks in France 
this year, for which the 
Committee of Solidarity with 
Arab and Middle Eastern 
Prisoners has claimed resp- 
onsibility- 

The group, which is de- 
manding the release of three 
Arabs in French jails con- 
victed of terrorist attacks, 
issued a statement on Mon- 
day, after several months of 
silence, warning toe French 
Government that it intended 
to renew its attacks with even 
greater vigour unless its 
"comrades” were liberated. 

The bomb, weighing about 
4 lb, was discovered in a paper 
bag under a seat on tbe RER 
express Metro line. A pas- 
senger. hearing a slight explo- 
sion followed by a puff of 
smoke, pulled the alarm cord. 

M Jacques Chirac, the 
Prime Minister, called an 
immediate meeting of his 
security ministers and police 
chiefs to decide on measures 
to reinforce security through- 
out Paris. 

He appealed to every citizen 
"to inform the police without 
delay of any 1 abnormal in- 
cident event or behaviour 
which they witness”. 

The Metro management 
however, asked ' passengers 


yesterday not to pull toe alarm 
cord if they saw a suspect 
package, as that would stop 
the train automatically. They 
should instead wait for tbe 
tram's arrival in the next 

stationto alert toe driver. 

One thousand extra police 
were called out in Paris and its 
immediate area yesterday. 

Of toe five attacks by the 
Committee in February and 
.March, four were in shopping 
centres in Paris and tbe other 
on toe Paris-LyonsTGV high- 
speed train. Two people died 
and 58 were Injured. 

The three men whose re- 
lease is demanded are Annis 
Naccache, head of a five-man 
group which tried to assas- 
sinate Mr Shapour Bakhiiar, 
toe last Iranian Prime Min- 
ister under the Shah; 
Varadjian Garbidjian, toe .Syr- 
ian-born head of tbe Arme- 
nian group which attacked 
Orly airport in July 1983. 
killing seven people and injur- 
ing 55; and Abdallah Georges 
Ibrahim, si&pected leader in 
Europe of the Lebanese 
Armed Revolutionary 
Faction. 

The release of toe same 
three men is being demanded 
by a group calling itself the 
International Anti-Imperialist 
Brigades, which claimed re- 
sponsibility for attacks against 
four Franco- Lebanese banks 
in Lebanon on Wednesday 
and on August 10. 


on village charges 


drug ring Church-state ‘war games 


From David Bernstein 
Jerusalem 

An Israeli soldier was killed 
early yesterday during a raid 
on toe southern Lebanese 
village ofZibkin. 

An Army spokesman said 
that the village, which is about 
.3 Hi miles from the Israeli 
border, was being used by 
guerrillas launching rocket at- 
tacks into IsraeL 

Four villagers were detained 
and taken back to Israel for 
questioning. 

Mr Timur Goksel, toe UN 
spokesman in southern Leba- 
non, said that a lot of shooting 
and several large explosions 
were beard from tbe direction 
of the village during the two- 
hour attack. 

He said six buildings were 
destroyed by toe Israelis, who 
left behind leaflets warning toe 
villagers not to co-operate 
with toe guerrillas. 

He said that toe Shia Mus- 
lim Amal militia was active in 
toe village, blit that the UN 
had no information that it was 
being used as a major staging 
point for hostile operations 
against IsraeL 

• BEIRUT: Amal is holding 
three people in southern Leba- 
non in connection with 
Thursday's roadside bomb 
blast that killed three French 
soldiers, Beirut's an-Nahar 
newspaper reported yesterday 
(Reuter reports). 


From Tony Samstag 
Oslo 

Norwegian police said yes- 
terday that a tip from Scotland 
Yard had led 10 the arrest of 
10 people, six of them British, 
thought to be key figures in a 
huge West European drug ring 
based in-London. 

Tbe disclosure follows a 
number of arrests by Finnish 
police on Thursday and it is 
thought that others may fol- 
low through the Nordic 
countries. 

The suspects, none of whom 
has been identified, have been 
held in several jails through- 
out Norway for some time. 

Five were arrested in toe 
Swedish city of Gothenburg at 
toe end of May after they had 
travelled separately from Oslo 
by train and hired car. They 
had 100,000 Swedish kroner 
(about £10,000) when they 1 
were arrested. 

According lo the national 
newspaper Dagbladet, the ring ; 
had operated a large "heroin 
depot” about 200 yards from i 
toe central Gothenburg police | 
station. Their heroin dealings 
in Norway alone may have 
been worth 25 million Norwe- 
gian kroner 

Estimates that toe ring may 
have handled 100 lb of heroin 
over much of western Europe 
would make their total deal- 
ings worth several -tens of 
millions of pounds. 


Bread, circuses and academic dignity 

_ n „ l . Hi ■ proceeded in much the sami 




From Paul Vallely 
Boston 

As lock would have it, the 
moment that the Prince of 
Wales "" left the School of 
Design, tbe seminar mounted 
one of his favonrite hobby 
horses. 

Mr William Alonso, Har- 
vard University's Professor of 
Population Policy, began to 
talk about “the banality, of toe 
sterile design of modern city 
centres". By that time the 
Prince was OB his way to 
Chicago. . 

For all the bread and ar- 
cuses with which Harvard has 
s m 1 0 traded its 350th anniver- 
sary celebrations, it is none- 
theless trying bard to project a 
sense of academic dignity. 

More than 100 symposia 
with titles which range from 
the elevated - “The Universe: 

The. Be ginning , Now and 
Henceforth" - to the esoteric 

— “Sources of Constitutional 

Meaning in the Process of prince Charles being greeted by Mayor Harold Washington 
Interpretation" - are being and his fiancee at Midway Airport, Chicago. 

1 tKoea feot ini hoc - 


VsjZ] 

v 


■ 1 - 

* • / 

>• ’ 


J 

■ry f\ 


Interpretation" - arebemg and his fiancee at Midway Airport, Chicago. 

chosen to a society tall that evening and Meyersoa, President EnwtK 
attend “The Future of the a polo match in Chicago the of the University of Pam- 
City" a discourse by three of next day. sylranma, talk shorn the effect 

America's roost eminent ex- He sat and listened to Mr on fntnre ates of themciease 
nerts on urban pfenning. William McNeill. Professor of in home-based mdmdnes and 
which began with toe ann- History at the University of tbe development of high-tech 
ouncemeut that an anonymous Chicago, who traced the social comranmcatioas to replace 
donor had made a 5300,000 imperatives which historically physical meetings. 

(£199.000) endowment to fond bad created cities and noted a wben professor Alonso 


mim — .. • 

onlv its square sail. . 

Miss Melina Mercoun ji^ 
Greek Minister ° r 

staS-of the foci to ds 
prototype, together with me 
city of Kyrenia, arepnsoners 
in occupied Cyprus. 


(£199.000) endowment to fond bad created cities and noted a when Professor Alonso 
a periodic prize of $254)00 to curious modern phenomenon: was only halfway through his 
the roost distinguished com- that in the West, roly eenti« thesis on the effect of ideology 
pleted urban design project wre now the province or toe aia j fashion .on design, the 
under way anywhere in the poor with tire wealthy fleeing prince was green the nod that 
world. 'to the suburbs, wherras m be ttad to leave. 

It is to be called the Prince other parts of toe world tbe 
of Wales Prize to honour the poor lived in a ring of poverty Hanard seeroeopleased to 
Prince's interest and commit- which encircled the rich m city have tom toere bm did not 
raent to the suhject-But he bad centre strongholds. seem nnd uly p nt o t by ks 

Atkar encasements, indndine He heard Professor Martin eariy departure. Tbe seminar 


of Wales Prize to honour toe 
Prince's interest and commit- 
ment to the subject JW he had 
other engagements, including 


Harvard seemed pleased to 
have him there bin did not 
seem ondnly pat out by his 
ear)}- departure. Tbe seminar 


proceeded in much the same 
tone as before. Hie faith which 
bnilt cathedrals was not dis- 
similar in social terms to the 
faith which had more recently 
created flawed turban renewal 
programmes. Professor Al- 
onso continued. 

All around the campus, as 
the Prince's silver Rolls Royce 
departed, other celebrations 
were getting underway. 

Down toe road, champagne 
was bring uncorked in toe 
Department of Anthropology 
for toe launch of an exhibition. 
In a marquee outside the 
Semitic Mnseam, the crew of a 
religions television pro- 
gramme was wandering among 
tbe glittering gnests with video 
camera rolling. 

White-haired old gentle- 
men, toe selected alumni of 
their year, wandered toe. 
streets wearing slightly quiz- 
zical expressions and badges 
which bore splendid names 
like Homer Peabody and Har- 
vey T. Keplinger. 

“He was a charming man, 
your prince,” one told me, "but 
I was a hit disappointed that 
he didn't say anything. . .well, 
more substantial." 

On the BAe 146, one of the 
two newest jets in the Queen's 
Flight, toe Prince was bound 
for the Oak Brook Polo Ball 
and an evening dedicated to 
raising funds fra- Chicago’s 
Museum of Natural History 
and for the Salisbury Cathe- 
dral Spire Trust. 

The programme Indicated 
he would make a short speech 
about the cathedral spire. No 
doubt, he was already turning 
over a few remarks in his 
mind. 

Leading article, page § 


Though they stop short of 
tracing troop movements on 
maps, church advisers in Po- 
land often describe relations 
between Roman Catholics 
and the Communist auth- 
orities in military rather than 
divine terms, more Clausewitz 
than Christ In their idiom, it 
is a war of shifting fronts: 
some sniping here, a skirmish 
there, an unexpected ceasefire. 

in recent weeks there has 
been a church assault ou a 
government plan to introduce 
compulsory religious educa- 
tion, which would be taught at 
least partly by teachers trained 
in Marxist institutes, and 
some dangerous reconnai- 
ssance missions on the subject 
of the Pope's proposed trip to 
Poland next year. 

And there has been an 
important casualty in the 
Church's plan, much favoured 
by the Pope, to .funnel West- 
ern aid to private farmers. 

But, as in war, nothing is 
what it seems. A senior 
Church adviser explains that 
by abandoning its agricultural 
scheme the Church may ac- 
tually have improved Church- 
siate relations, clearing the air 
for greater things. 

The idea, hatched after the 
martial law crackdown, was 
that the Church could mobil- 
ize Western funds from epis- 
copates and friendly gov- 
ernments to buy equipment 
for private farmers. 

They would pay a fair price 
for the machines and spare 
parts, which are not otherwise 
available, and the money 
raised would flow back in the 
form of irrigation projects or 
road building. 

The Government was never 
very keen, because it would 


From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 

strengthen Church lies with 
private agriculture (unlike 
other Soviet bloc countries, 
private farmers are in the vast 
majority), because local 
administrators of the fund 
could well be former Solidar- 
ity activists, because much of 
the money would come from 
Nato countries, and because if 
there is to be hard currency 
streaming into Poland the 
state would like its cut 

The result, says a Church 
adviser, was that "the scheme 
originally intended to be an 
instrument of co-operation 
became an instrument of 
confrontation". 

Arguments raged over whe- 
ther imported, tractors should 
be subject to duty and tax, 
whether Mr Lech Walesa, the 
Solidarity leader, should be 
allowed to contribute his No- 
bel Prize and. finally, whether, 
in the case of disagreement, 
the state or the foundation 
organizers should have the 
right of final decision. 

A vaguely embarrassed 
statement by the deputy Agri- 
culture Minister, Mr Kaz- 
imierz Grzesiak. suggested 
that the Church had mis- 
understood government in- 
tentions, but the Church is 
sure that the fund has been 
doomed for almost a year. It 
was in any case having prob- 
lems raising the finance. 

One area of battle has thus 
been removed. The major 
target for the Church leader- 
ship is now to secure a 
successful papal trip, the third 
by the Polish Pope. 

The intention is to bring the 
Pope to Poland in the eariy 
summer of next year for a 
Eucharistic congress’ The 
Government accepts the idea. 


though the official invitation 
has not been handed over, and 
it is already clear that there are 
problems ahead. 

The Pope would like to go to 
Gdansk, birthplace of Solidar- 
ity. The authorities want to 
avoid this. 

And the Pope would like to 
travel 10-Liihuania, to cele- 
brate the anniversary of 
Christianity in that Soviet 
Baltic state. r ~ 

If Moscow refuses such a 
trip, he would want to address 
the Lithuanians from Poland. 
That, too. would be political 
dynamite. 

Meanwhile, the long-stan- 
ding campaign for control of 
,the souls of the young contin- 
ues. From this month the 
authorities have introduced 
compulsory classes in re- 
ligious knowledge for what is 
cfTecthcly the upper sixth 
form in Polish grammar 
schools. 

It w ill be only an hour 'a 
week and probably only eight 
hours of the course will be 
devoted to Christianity, but 
the Church sees trouble ahead. 

There arc not enough teach- 
ers for the course, so a crash 
training scheme has been or- 
ganized. staged partly in eve- 
ning Marxist-Leninisl insti- 
tutes, partly at provincial 
Communist centres, partly at 
the Communist Academy of 
Social Sciences. 

No textbooks have been 
primed so. the Church fears, 
the overwhelmingly atheist 
instructors will have to rely cr. 
lecture notes prepared by 
Communist specialists. 

Tbe bishops say that be- 
cause the course is com- 
pulsory there will be pressure 
on Catholic pupils to toe the 
line. 


Colombo leader survives death hi 


Colombo — Sri Lankan 
police are investigating 
whether former military per- 
sonnel are responsible for two 
bombs which exploded at a 
crowded political meeting in a 
Colombo suburb on Thurs- 
day. injuring 32 people 


(Vijitha Yapa writes). 

The bombs were thrown as 
the leader of the socialist Sri 
Lanka Mahajana Pakshaya, 
Mr Vijay Kumaranatunge. ad- 
dressed his party at Mt'La- 
vinia. He was not hurt. 

A bomb was flung at a 


meeting addressed by Mr 
Kumaranatunge last month, 
but there were no 
casualties. He is a popular 
actor, married to the youngest 
daughter of Mrs Sirima 
Bandaranaike. the former 
Prime Minister. 


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_8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


Found in a dugout, five dead Huns and five live kittens 


December 1914. 

To his sister Helen, known as Whelk. 
Dear Whelk, I am faced with the 
appalling task or Christmassing my 
tropp, the Army Council having can- 
celled the subsidy they were going to 
allow us for providing cheer... Can 
Morgan (the cook) supply me with a 
couple of Xmas cakes, of that particu- 
larly solid, armour-plated variety which 
used to grace the tea-table at home from 
December 25 to early spring? 

January 15, 1915. 

To Lady Gwendolen Osborne, daughter 
of the 10th Dolce of Leeds. 

Even now 1 still can’t realize that certain 
people have gone right out of my 
oramary life for always — there's always 
akmd of feeling that , . . their absence is 
“for the duration of war only". It is when 
we come back to London again and have 
no one to take away into the country for 
^Sunday, no one to dine with all alone, 
mp one whom one tested lOyearsagoand 
hall-marked for good or bad as a friend— 
that's when we shall find out our side of 
the casualty lists. And Oxford shut to one 
Torever. because every stone in that 
■unforgettable town shouts some name. 

•hue 4. 

To Coeadolen Osborne. 

1 don't feel as if I could ever blame any 
man for being a coward in this war, do 
you? ... I suppose blind rage .is all that 
carries one through. If that's it. I'm all 
right, for l want to walk to bed over a 
staircase of dead Prussians every night of 
my life. 

In June 1915 the Bedfordshire Yeomanry 
Joined the BEF in France and. in a letter 
to his father announcing his arrival. 
Lasccilcs wrote: 

By the way. there is one thing I do want. 


that is a couple of old lawn-tennis balls 
and two lacrosse balls (solid rubber): the 
former arc invaluable for roundere and 
the latter for stump cricket Can you get 
them for me? It is really difficult to 
exercise the men. 

July 28. 

To his sister. 

Dear Whelk. Probably if anyone had said 
to me on the evening of July 27, 1914: 
“Will you bet me £500 that on this day 
twelvemonth you are not riding a fawn- 
coloured mule through the streets of a 
place called Poperingbe with a bottle of 
Bordeaux in each pocket and an assort- 
ment of vegetables round your neck?" I 
should have closed with him and lost my 

money. . 

September 3. 

To hb sister. 

Dear Whelk. I had two days' leave in 
Paris last week . . . I found a fly in my 
soup at Voisin's. which is a sign of die 
times. 

March 3- 

■To bis unde, A G C Liddell, k no wn as 
Unde Doll. 

It is a daily comfort to me that the three 
corporals 1 now have in my troop are 
called Swann. _ Peacock and 
Parrott ... Parrott is so obviously a 
parrot that it often leads to misunder- 
standing. The following den g u e ac- 
tually took place on one 
Officer What's that man's name. 
Sergeant? 

Sergeant: Parrott sir. 

Officer Yes, of course. I know that. 
But what’s his real name? 

The bird coincidence has taken my 
fancy so strongly that I am bent on 
collecting more, and whenever a new 
draft comes up from the base I scan tire 
list eagerly to see ifby any chance there is 


Alan Lascelles was known 
throughout his life as “Tommy’*. 
Bom in 1887. he was looked 
upon as one of the leading mem- 
bers of the exceptional genera- 
tion that suffered such Tosses in the 
Great War. Most of his adult 
life was spent in the service of the 
Royal Family: he died in 1981. ' 

This extract from the first vol- 
ume of his letters and journals is- 
taken from the grim years of the . 
Great War. He had tried and 
failed to become a diplomat and 
a journalist: he was studying the * 
South American railway system 
when war broke out. He wrote a 
steady stream of letters through- 
out t he war. 



LaxeUcs. by Oswald Biricy 


among them a Raven, a Gull, a Duck or a 
Gosling. It will be a great triumph if by 
the end of the war. I have the aviary 
complete. 

Jufy 16. 

To his father. 

Dear Father. I forget if I told you that 
when Benning, our squadron-leader, 
took a party up to Fricourt to bury dead 
last week, he found a live cat with five 
kittens in the same dugout as five dead 
Huns: and in the middle of No Man's 
Land, surrounded by shell holes, a lark's 
nest with not an egg broken. Tire bird, 
however, had deemed it prudent to 
abandon them. 

October 6. 

To Eric Madagan, an 
It was given out that our mission was to 
occupy the newly-captured trenches 
before Loos. About sunset . . . were 


flung unceremoniously on to a barren 
patch of mad by the side of the Lens road 
and told to wait there till dark. 

The* men instantly started to make 
fires and boil water for tea: as soon as the 
pots were beginning to simmer nicely, 
the nearest of the staff officers, who are 
paid huge salaries to create unnecessary 
annoyances, decided it was time to 
interfere and moved us to another mud 
patch a few hundred yards further on. 


Lascelles returned to England in Novem- 
ber for treat mem to afoot injury and did 
not rejoin his regiment until the spring. 


July 17, 1917. 

To Gsendokn Osborne. 

I have lately remarked a new phenom- 
enon of madness among the many that 
war slowly but surely engenders in one: it 
is a sudden, furious craving for quite 
trivial and un-get-at-able things — for 


lawn tennis, for a white shirt, for this 
view or that house, for a Beethoven 
symphony, for a certain book, for ink 
and decent notepaper. 

All these longings have lately beset me 
as furiously as the lodging to scratch 
one's ankle at dinner dunng the harvest- 
bug season — and I know no fiercer 
passion than lhaL 

November 27. 

To his father. . 

My dear father. On Sunday a 5.9 shell 
pitched just in front of a little shanty 
where four of us were eating, knocked us 
endways, and made a small hole in my 
forearm, below the right elbow. If the 
shell hadn't lit on a hard road, we must 
all have been killed: as it was. no one else 
was even hurt ... I hope to be sent over 
to England in a few days. 


It was not until March. 19/S. that 
Lascelles n as fit enough to rejoin his 
regiment. 

July 15. 

To Gaendoka Osborne. 

In the (rid days when I rolled through 
Amiens ip the Paris express. I never 
thought the night would come when I 
should sleep on the tramlines of that 
dingy town. But it did. and 1 slept well, 
too. for an hour and a half while the Bri- 
gade waited wearily for its tail, which had 
been cut off ata level-crossing . . . 

In November, as the war neared its end. 
Lascelles began again to keep the diary 
he had abandoned more than four years 
earlier. 

November 1L 

As I rode into the market square of Ath, I 
became aware .of a different note in the 
tumult of acclamation. Then I saw that 
the centre of attraction was a party of 


three German prisoners, being escorted 
' back by a single helpless cavalryman on a 
frightened horse. 

h was quite obvious that the Belgians 
did not intend these prisoners to leave 
the square alive. Men. women and boys 
were raining Nows on every' part of their 
cringing bodies that they could reach 
with their naked fists or with any.weapon 
that came to hand. I don’t know why 1 
intervened: probably because one must 
always instinctively take sides against ji 
mob. and the distress of the boy who was 
responsible for his prisoners was the 
deciding factor. 

I seized a Belgian flag, commanded 
silence and ' made the only coherent 
speech in French that has ever passed my 
lips, explaining (hat for military reasons 
the instant presence of the prisoners at 
the eiot-major was of vital importance. 
The effect was marvellous. In three and a 
half years of war I have never, so for as I 
know, actually done a German to death 
with my own hand; and it was a strange 
irony that my last act as a belligerent" 
should have been to save the lives of 
three of that accursed race. _ . 

We continued a leisurely - advance 
down the Mons road. There came riding 
down the road some man on the III. 
Corps staff who stopped and said tome: 
“I don't know whether it has come 
through to you yet. but hostilities cease 
at 1 1 o’clock" — and he rode on as if he 
had merely told me the time of day. So 
there, on. the road to Mons. it ended. It 
was oven it was won: and won as I, at any 
rate.- had never dared to dream it could 
be won. 

Adapted from End Of an Era, Letters and 
Journals of Sir Alan Lascelles. 1887- 
1920. edited by Duff Hart-Davis. pub- 
lished this week by Harnish Hamilton 
(£15). 



SPORTS 

DIARY 

Simon Barnes 


I Poor man’s 
gold 

1 These days, athletics is a world of 
‘ money and glamour. Isn't it? After 
the splendid European Athletics 
Championships, one might expect 
people to leap forward to offer 
enormous rewards and treats to 
everyone involved. But one would 
be wrong. The delightfully un- 
expected and generally glorious 
British win in the 4x400 metres 
relay was a personal triumph for 
Mike Smith, one of the leading 
coaches in the country. One of his 
men. Todd Bennett, dropped out 
through injury, but he was re- 
< placed by another Smith-trained 
, man. Kriss Akabusi. The brilliant 
anchor leg was run by Roger Black 
; — yes, a man coached by Smith. 
Black also won gold in the individ- 
ual event: more jam for Smith. 

Smith truly deserved to savour 
, his triumphs. Where was he when 
the relay boys came storming 
home? Relishing a freebie trip to 
Stuttgart for the championships? 
Living it up on athletics’ new- 
found wealth? No. He was in 
Bournemouth. He was scratching 
about for athletes to run in the 
■ 4x100 metres relay for the South- 
; ern Counties in an area repre- 
j sentative match. His pay? 

; Absolutely nothing. This new cash 
i in athletics is all very well: but it is 
| people like Smith that make 
! athletics work. The coaches de- 
i sene a share in the new wealth. 

* Key personnel 

The cricket-writing chaps have 
been holding a sweepstake on the 
composition of the touring party 
for Australia, which will be an- 
nounced on Tuesday. One of the 
more intriguing entries comes 
from Mike Brcarlcy. the former 
England captain. His own prog- 
nostication includes neither 
Gooch (entries were completed 
before the former South African 
Breweries XI captain ruled him- 
self out) nor I.T. Botham. What? 
Brcarlcy included Broad and 
Larkins instead. Brcarlcy has writ- 
ten with much vigour advocating 
Botham's inclusion, but has 
staked a fiver on his worst fears. I 
. trust they will not be made actual. 

I Like Brcarlcy. I am a Botham fen. 

I know that a lot of people are 
. hoping very much that Botham 
> will not be selected. Most of these 
. people are Australian. 

Boisterous 

• Quote of the week: from Ben 
■ Griffiths, steward of Pomypool 
i rugby club, after one of their 
. players. David Bishop, had been 
; jailed for a month for laying out an 
; opponent during a match: “As far 
{ as Dai is concerned, we're really 
j upset. When you are on the field 
; you get a little bit of nonsense, but 
! you should accept it. These boys 
; are boisterous, but not dirty 
’ players.” Bishop's punch, deliv- 
f crcd to Chris Jarman while that 

■player was on the ground. left the 
man unconscious for “three or 
four minutes". He had to go to 
hospital, and he needed two days 
off work to recover. 


Knight 


What matters most in flat racing: 
money and victory? Or sports- 
manship? Well in the spicy 
backwater of Arab horse racing, 
they are in no doubt. After a close 
finish at an Arab meeting at 
Market Rosen last week. Magic 
Knight was given the decision 
over I man. Someone promptly 
gave Iman's jockey the £5 required 
to lodge an objection. Disgruntled 
punter? Actually no. He had 
backed the winner but he felt the 
decision was wrong. In the event. 
Magic Knight kept the race. But 
for once an objection left a nice 
in people's mouths. 


ConorCruise O’Brien on the sinister implications of a British ban on visiting South African archaeologists 


A group is gathered round a camp 
fire. They are scholars, discussing 
their particular discipline. An- 
other scholar approaches the fire- 
lit circle, with the intention of 
joining it. He is received as 
follows: 

“Go away. We don’t want you.** 

“Bui you asked me to join you! “ 

“I know we did. but that was 
before we found out how unpopu- 
lar you are." 

“But what have I done? Has 
* someone challenged the integrity 
of my work?" 

“Who said anything about your 
work? Your address is what Is the 
matter with you.** 

“My addresfT 

“You live under a rotten 
government." 

“I know I do. I've often said so. 

I don't work for the government 
In feet my scholarly findings have 
been used against the govern- 
ment's unscientific ideology.” 

“So what?” 

“It is not feir to punish me, just 
because I live under a government 
which I abhor, but am powerless 
to change.” 

“You may not be able to change 
the government but you can 
always change your address." 

“But this is the place where I 
was bom and grew up — the place 
where my work is! We've made 
some important discoveries there. 
Do you want our work to stop?” 

“1 wish you would stop going on 
about work. Thai’s not where its 
at Nobody wants to know about 
your work, not any more. The 
only thing that interests us about 
you. these days, is your address, 
and that's bad news. So beat it 
brother” 

The above imaginary dia lo gue 
is based on a real transaction: the 
decision of the British organizing 
committee, under the chairman- 
ship of Professor Peter Ucko, to 
ban the participation of archaeolo- 
gists from South Africa and Na- 
mibia in the “world congress of 
archaeologists'* which is just com- 
ing to an end in Southampton. I 
put the words “world congress of 
archaeologists” in inverted com- 
mas. because this is not a proper 


Apartheid is 
wrong, but the 
rot starts here 


world congress. In banning the 
South African scholars, simply 
because of their nationality, the 
British or ganizing committee 
deliberately broke the rules of the 
parent organization, the Inter- 
national Union of Prehistoric and 
Protobistoric Sciences (IUPPS). 
In consequence, the IUPPS does 
not recognize the Southampton 
congress, and will be holding its 
own official congress at Mainz 
next year. 

Obviously, the implications of 
this affair go beyond the bound- 
aries of archaeology or any single 
discipline. They may reach into 
every branch of intellectual life in 
Britain. ... 

My former colleague, Neal 
Ascherson, last month in The 
Observer, defended the decision to 
Inn the South African archaeolo- 
gists. As Ascherson's account 
establishes, the original decision 
to ban, made by Ucko and his 
colleagues, appeared as a result, 
not of any determination to strike- 
a blow against apartheid, but of 
simple intimidation, through the 
threat of a double boycott. 

“Southampton city council, the 
Anti-Apartheid Movement, the 
local students' union and the 
Association of University Teach- 
ers declared that they would not 
accept the presence of South 
African scholars at the congress. 
They would withdraw financial 
support and accommodation. 
They would demonstrate. 

At the same lime, most African 
participants made plain that they 
would boycott the congress if the 
South Africans attended . . .“ 

So Ucko and his colleagues 


caved in. Having caved in. Ucko 
has been giving him himself 
restrospective ideological airs. Or 
as Ascherson puts it “As the row 
goes on, Ucko has given a more 
political slam to the defence of his 
action. He aigues that — with 
apartheid in crisis, and a state of 
emergency in South Africa — the 
chance of damaging the regime by 
academic boycotts maters more 
than “abstract” arguments about 
immaculate academic freedom.** 

The new Ucko argument is even 
more disreputable than the de- 
cision it is designed to defend, or 
glorify. The whole idea of“dam ag- 
ing the regime” by excluding 
archaeologists from a congress is 
ludicrous. The Afrikaner right, the 
cutting edge of the regime in 
question, generally despises egg- 
heads and looks on South African 
universities as hot-beds of treason. * 

South African scholarship — 
including archaeological and 
historical scholarship — has chal- 
lenged some of the most cherished 
myths of the Afrikaner vo/k. an 
activity which requires courage in 
South Africa. On March 28 1979, 
the Afrikaner historian, floors 
van Jahrsfeld, was tarred and . 
feathered in front of a theological 
conference he was addressing at 
the University of South Africa, 
Pretoria. His assailants were Afri- 
kaner nationalists enraged by the . 
challenge which his scholarly work 
presented to certain historic 
myths, central to the apartheid 
culture. According to Southamp- 
ton logic. Van Jahrsfeld should be 
banned from any international 
gathering of historians, to dem- 



onstrate disapproval of apart- 
heid ... r 
Non-inteflecUial Afrikaners — 
meaning most of the rulers of' 
South Africa — cannot be in the 
least imimidaied, displeased or 
“damaged” by a boycott of South 
Africa's scholars. Indeed, they 
have every reason to be pleased fay 
such a boycott. For one thing, it ' 
administers a salutary lesson to 
South Africans “wet” whites: those 
people now learn that the foreign 
friends they are always sucking up 
to have turned against them. “All 
white South Africans are in the 
same boat”, as the rulers of South 
Africa have always p reach ed.The 
rulers of South Africa are aware 
that the Southampton problem 
helps their cause in other ways. It 
compels people to associate the 


expression “anti-apartheid" with 
intolerance and know-nothingism. 

Though I respect Ascherson, I 
was dismayed to find him in such 
company, supporting such aigu- 
ments. in defence of such a 
transaction. As I read him. I came 
to feel that a certain kind of rot in 
British intellectual life has gone 
further than I would have believed 
possible, and is affecting people 
whom I would have assumed to be 
immune to it. The writer. I felt, 
was agreeing with a kind of 
intellectual mob. for fear of being 
considered an apologist of an 
abominable system if he failed to 
agree. And this pattern seems to be 
quite widespread, to judge by the 
behaviour of the Association of 
University Teachers. 

The rot appears to declare itself 


initially by an inability to pro- 
nounce the word “but”. Ascherson 
refers scornfully to “letters to The 
Times saying The apartheid sys- 
tem is abhorrent to all civilized 
men but . . ” Thai but — 
apparently irrespective of what 
may follow it — is the cloven hoot 
betraying the presence of the Devil 
of pro-apartheid, beneath the cas- 
sock of anti-apartheid. Once the 
but phobia has set in. it becomes 
impossible for the sufferer to say. 
for example, “apartheid is wrong: 
but that doesn't make -it right to 
discriminate against legitimate 
scholars, purely on grounds of 
nationality”. 

For intellectuals, the but phobia 
is not merely distressing. It is 
functionally incapacitating, ■ be- 
cause it reduces, or eliminates, the. 
ability to make distinctions. Yet 
this affliction seems quite wide- 
spread in Britain's intellectual 
community. 

I am “ami-apartheid but". I do 
not put the bur where many people 
put it. “against apartheid, but 
against sanctions”. I do not think 
the apartheid system , -care , be 
brought to an endj.withoui inter- 
national action, including «co- : 
nomic sanctions, and eventually 
Ing beyond those. My particular 
it goes against thf unnecessary, 
unjust and vindictive punishment 
of private individuals who neither 
serve the apartheid regime nor 
have any power to change it. - 

Personally. I am off to Cape 
Town, accompanied by my black 
son. now aged 18. I am going to 
teach at universities there for five 
weeks. I did not accept the 
university's invitation to dem- 
onstrate solidarity. But I shall be 
glad to have my visit taken as a 
demonstration of solidarity with 
the staff and students of the 
University of Cape Town. Also as 
a gesture of defiance against an 
intellectually-disreputable at- 
tempt to isolate what I know to be 
an honest, open and creative 
intellectual community. ■ • 

In short, a good way of showing 
that I can still. say but. 

‘ cm— n —wp— ud. 


ll 


Kinnock and the unions: can it possibly work? 



Is the press gullible 
or just lazy? On 
Tuesday, in report- 
ing Ted Willis at the 

TUC conference, 

typical headlines were “Maggie's 
ballot wins the day” (Daily Ex- 
press). “Strike ballot *yes’ gives 
Neil a boost" (Daily Mirror \ “Yes 
to secret strike votes”, with the 
text below beginning. “The prin- 
ciple of secret strike ballots In- 
troduced by the Tory government 
was accepted by the TUC 
yesterday . . (Daily Matt). 

Modem investigative journal- 
ism does not probe far. It now 
fosters the illusion that a Labour 
government would be committed 
to leaving the provisions for 
ballots in the Trade Union Act 
1984 more or less intact. Neil 
Kinnock. speaking to the TUC on 
Tuesday, made it dear for those 
who can read that Willis and he 
meant the exact opposite. We are 
back in the land of fudge- 

The right of employers to seek 
an injunction of a secret strike 
ballot is not held before a strike 
would be removed, as would the 
right of employers to sue a union 
for damages in compensation for 
the effects of calling a strike 
without a secret ballot. Kinnock 
was particularly aliphatic on that, 
saying that the next Labour gov- 
ernment would prevent employers 
from securing ex-parte injunctions 
and referred to Rupert Murdoch, 
with Wapping in mind, as a 
particular class enemy who must 
be routed along with other 
employers at present able to use 
the law against unions who act 
outside the 1984 act 

Labour proposes that the right 
of union members to a pre-strike 
ballot will not be enforceable m 
the courts at the insistence of 
either a union member or an 
employer. Instead, there is to be 


some vague independent tribunal, 
with no recourse to the courts. 
This will act only on a complaint 
from a member brave enough to 
challenge bis union. Conciliation 
is then to take place. Should 
conciliation fail the tribunal may 
ultimately require the union to 
bold a strike btilou by which time 
h will be too late to stop the strike; 
or the strike might be over. The 
employers would in every case be 
helpless. 

Even if the vague independent 
tribunal ruled against the union, 
there would be no penalties 
against any union which defied it 
No fines for contempt of court or 
seizure of a union's assets. No 
sanctions whatever are envisaged. 
At all stages the slow-moving and 
cumbersome indepen d ent tri- 
bunal would be powerless to 
protect union members. 

A Scargfll strike without a ballot 
could not be challenged in the 
courts. Even before the 1984 act 
became operative some areas were 
able to get court rulings against 
Scaigill and his executive for not 
holding strike ballots. Not- 
tinghamshire and other miners 
were able to go on working, and 
ScaigUTs capacity to wreck the 
economy was severely limited. 
Under Kinnock there would be far 
less protection for union members 
against a Scaigill than there was 
before 1984. 

Then there is the matter of 
members voting individually in a 
secret ballot for their executives. It 
is a gigantic joke that Ken Gill 
should be this year's TUC con- 
ference chairman welcoming 
Kinnock. Gill is general secretary 
of Tass. His union has refused to 
bold executive elections as set out 
in the 1984 act Even under the act 
only union members can com- 
plain to the Certification Officer 
and hope that he win cider the 


union to bold the necessary demo- 
cratic elections. I am glad to say 
that after some prompting from 
me in the News of the World 
several Tass members have com- 
plained to the Certification Offi- 
cer, who is malting the ne cessa r y 
investigation. 

Under Kinnock all that would 
be out The right of union mem- 
bers to a secret ballot to dect their 
executives would be enshrined not 
in the law but in tire rule books of 
the unions. Each union would be 
able to decade its own method of 
election, which in many cases 
would be the old system of a 
handful of members who attend a 
branch meeting determining the 
votes of all the members of the 
branch. Gill b not alone among 
union leaders in rqecting individ- 
ual secret ballots foe the dection of 
executives. These are already 
throwing out undemocratically 
elected and unrepresentative 
union leaders and replacing them 
with people like Eric Hammond, 
Bill Jordan. Gavin Laud and John 
Golding, who reflea the views of 
the majority of their members. 

If Kinnock were remotely genu-, 
ine about democracy in the unions 
he would not have announced that 
he will repeal the 1984 acL This 
has enormously increased the 
power of union members to 
control their own affairs. All the 
act needs is strengthening by 
insisting on secret home postal 
ballots (instead of allowing the 
easily manipulated workplace bal- 
lots) and by making it the duty of, 
the Certification Officer to ensure ' 
that the act’s procedures for 
conducting executive ballots are 
observed, rather than having to 
wait for a member, often under- 
standably afraid of intimidation, 
to apply to him for redress. 

Woodrow Wyatt 



If Neil Kinnock is as' 
good as his word, his 
speech at Brighton 
this week will be 

remembered after 

every vote at the TUC has been 
forgotten. I am not thinking of his 
campaign against unemployment, 
but of the new relationship he 
foreshadowed between the unions 
and a Labour government. 

No rubber stamp, no blank 
cheque. “Government exists to 
serve the wide public interest and 
not narrow vested interests”. Asa 
statement of constitutional prin- 
ciple it cannot be faulted. But is it ; 
n»lly feasible for the Labour 
leadership, whether m opposition 
or in office, to distance itself like 
that from the unions? 

Every Labour leader for years 
has found the unions to be both a 
burden and the foundation of his 
strength. As their popularity has 
declined, so they have ceased to be 
an electoral asset. They can de- 
liver at the polls nowadays only a 
declining proportion of their own 
declining membership. 

Yet in practice their support has 
been essentia] to the leader. It is 
not just that they, contribute so 
much in money and organization. 
The party was built around them. 
With their block votes they effec- 
tively control the decisions at the 
annual conference, the supreme 
policy-making body of the party. 
They dominate the elections to the 
national executive committee, 
which exercises authority in be- 
tween conferences. 

Every effective Labour leader 
has built his authority on a 
working partnership with the prin- 
cipal union bosses. When George 
Lansbury was denounced at the 
1935 conference by Ernest Bevin. 
then general secretary of the 
largest union, the Transport and 
General Workers, he tost control 
of the party and gave up as leader. 


GartskeU’s troubles began when he 
fell out with a later leader of the 
TGWU. Frank Cousins. It was 
only after GaftskeJI managed to 
win support from other unions to 
outweigh the TGWU that he was 
able to win the vote on unilateral 
nuclear disarmament in 1961. 

The obvious answer to this 
union dominance would seem to 
be to get rid of the block vote. But 
it is not as simple as that. 
Successive Labour leaders have 
required the support of the unions 
not only because they dominate 
the conference, but because their 
domination is necessary. Other- 
wise control would be left in the 
bands of the constituency parties, 
who are on the' whole less realistic 
and less moderate than the 
onions, and 'whose influence "can 
be measured most easily by their 
choice of parliamentary can- 
didates: the next Parliamentary 
Labour Party will be further to the 
left than the present one. 

So the Mode vote is both an 
offence against democracy and a 
force for stability within the party. 
Just to abolish it would not be a 
satisfactory answer. Thai would 
make Labour Party procedures 
more acceptable in principle, but 
it would leave a Labour govern- 
ment exposed to still more un- 
representative pressures from the 
constituencies. 

There could. I believe, be only 
two effective solutions. One would 
be for the Labour Party so to 
expand its membership to become 
more representative of Labour 
voters as a whole. The block vote 
could then be removed without 
the same fear of handing over 
control to extremists. But that is 
frankly an idle hope. 

The other possibility would be 
for . a Labour government ' to 
exercise a greater measure of 
independence from both unions 
and constituency parties. 


All Labour front benches have 
more freedom of manoeuvre in 
office than they have in oppo- 
sition. This freedom is forced 
upon them because the problems 
landing on their desk each day are 
so varied and so pressing that- the 
. answers could not all be fitted 
neatly into agreed doctrine' .or 
await party consultation. 

Some Labour leaders use their 
personal power more fully than 
others in drawing up the election 
manifesto. James Callaghan cer- 
tainly did in 1979 and I would not 
be surprised to see Neil Kinnock 
put hjs stamp on the next one. 

Yet Labour is traditionally 
more reluctant than the others to 
accord leadership to. the par- 
liamentary party. The importance 
attached to the party in the 
country is no acddenL It flows 
from Labour's history. The 
Conservatives, the Liberals and 
even the Social Democrats all 
began life as parliamentary parties 
which then needed to build tip a 
mass membership to support 
them outside ParitametiL But 
Labour was established as a 
movement in the country de- 
signed to secure the election of 
members to Parliament. The 
elected were seen as serving the 
purposes of the party, rather than 
the other way round. 

Much has changed since those 
early days, but not the widespread 
bcHcfthat the party in Parliament 
should be accountable to the party 
outside. Kinnock is. I am sure, 
right to have made hb decimation. 
But if he is to be able to aa upon it 
consistently for any length of time 
he will have to overcome the 
problems presented by Labour’s 
history and by its peculiar balance 
of power. 

Geoffrey Smith 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

CROSSED WIRES IN HARARE 


The unseemly pomp ac- 
companying this week’s sum- 
mu meeting of non-aligned 
countries in Zimbabwe be- 
tokened a sad misapprehen- 
sion on the part of the poorer 
countries of the world: that it 
takes wealth, grandeur and 
show to be taken seriously by 
the richer and more powerful. 
Unfortunately for them, and 
for Mr Robert Mugabe, the 
Prime Minister of Zimbabwe 
and the next chairman of the 
Non-Aligned Movement, it 
takes more than this. 

For years, the Movement 
has complained that its mem-' 
bers receive a raw deal from 
the media of the world. The 
only time the less developed 
countries — among which the 


notice of the world arid to 
report truthfully and fairly on 
an otherwise under-reported 
country. Nor will, it help 
further the cause either of 
Zimbabwe or of the non- 
aligned countries for what they 
choose to can a "new world 
information order”. 

it is possible that the Zim- 
babwe authorities were dis- 
pleased by some of Raath’s 
recent reports of human rights 
abuses in the country of his 
adoption. He had, for instance, 
drawn attention to the con- 
tinuing state of emergency in 
Zimbabwe and to the deten- 
tions. deportations, and as- 
saults being perpetrated under 
its cover. 

He had reported on the 


majority of non-aligned states- maltreatment of prisoners in 
number themselves - attract Matabeleland and on the 
world attention, they contend, continuing use of torture. And, 
is jjmen disaster strikes: an perhaps most uncomfortably, 
earthquake, a famine, a mill- he had noted the tragic irony 
tary coup or a particularly that these abuses were being 
ferocious war. The genuine carried out under the emer- 
achievements — the good har- gency provisions introduced 
vests, the improved living by Ian Smith after UDI, 
conditions, the passing of provisions which the Mugabe 
power from a minority to a government — despite its. 
majority — go unnoticed. castigation of lan Smith — has 
The past two weeks have not sought to rescind, 
provided a graphic illustration It ‘may not have been eo- 
of why this should be so. Only incidental that Raath’s recent 
days before the non-aligned critical reports on Zimbabwe 
summit opened, the cor- followed the declaration of a 
respondent for The Times in state of emergency in 
Harare, Mr Jan Raath, was neighbouring South Africa, 
detained by the security ser- South Africa’s emergency pro- 
vices for more than three visions, which included strict 
hours and given (he choice of censorship (which has since 
continued detention or de- become even stricter), aroused 
portation. He was given 14 an international outcry, to 
days in which to leave the which The Times added its 
country where he had chosen own voice. South Africa’s 
to settle. Raath is now in semi-free press. The Times 
London; his wife and family said, had often been cited by 
remain in Zimbabwe. the South African government 

The action of the authorities as evidence that South Africa 
in Zimbabwe in expelling was part of the Western world. 
Raath was arbitrary and re- With the introduction and 
inforced by threats. This was enforcement of censorship, an- 
no way to treat a citizen or a other light had gone out 
journalist who had done his In Zimbabwe, that freedom 
best to bring Zimbabwe to the was more ambiguous in its 


THE PRINCE AND THE PROFESSOR 


•The Prince of Wales cut a dash 
when he substituted for % the 
President of the United States 
at Cambridge, Massachusetts 
on Thursday. When it comes 
to brocade work on academic 
gowns, the universities on this 
side of the Atlantic (only six of 
them older than Harvard) still 
have it. 

When he spoke in Harvard 
Yard the Prince did more than 
represent an academic tra- 
dition. Deliberately addressing 
a lively theme within the 
faculties of arts and social 
studies in Britain, he expressed 
bis fear of a world, and an 
education, dominated by tech- 
nology. Better provision 
should be made for teaching 
students about “the dark 
side” — for teaching human- 
ity. 

That phrase, in the old 
Scottish tradition, used to 
mean the classics; the Prince 
favoured psychology; arts 
professors in Britain feel the 
same purpose would be served 
if government ministers and 
chairmen of grants commit- 
tees stopped harping on the 
need to increase money and 
students in applied science and 
technology at the expense of 
teaching and scholarship in 
language and literature. 

That the heir to the Throne 
should address this theme is 
perfectly proper, that he can 
with wit and distinction maJce 
a relevant contribution to the 
festivities of an institution of 


Harvard's calibre should be a 
source of some pride for the 
Queen's subjects. However, in 
the context of Britain’s eco- 
nomic prospects and the 
adaptation yet to be made by 
its own institutions of higher 
education and research, the 
Prince's message must be 
called unwelcome. 

When engineering profes- 
sors have to fight each other 
for access to scarce computer 
time, and secondary school 
pupils sue being deprived of an 
adequate education for want of 
teachers of mathematics and 
physics; when the growth of 
the information technology 
industry is stunted by a short- 
age of qualified manpower the 
nation can hardly be said to 
have sold its soul to technol- 
ogy. 

The Government tenta- 
tively, has promoted applied 
science. The universities, hesi- 
tatingly, have started to re- 
spond — some, it should 
quickly be said, never needed 
the prompting. But the dis- 
crepancy between Britain’s 
broad economic record and 
that of trade competitors, and 
the inferences that can be 
drawn about industrial needs 
and research and development 
trends, do nothing to calm the 
anxiety of those who say the 
balance of interest within 
higher education is not yet 
right. 

On the same day as the 


Prince _ spoke at. Harvard, 
Prpfessor John Astayorth of 
Salford University spoke at 
the British Association. His 
voice has been beard before, 
but the message does not suffer 
from the repetition. It says that 
the issue for universities is less 
the content of the curriculum 
than the values they imbue. 
This, surely, is also the 
Prince’s terrain. 

The professor is wrong not 
to give his vice-chancellorial 
colleagues more credit for the 
shift in attitude that has taken 
place, to the welcome now 
given on campuses to money- 
makers, whether they are 
industrial executives with a 
contribution to make to teach- 
ing, or research, or academics 
with patents or consulting 
skills moving beyond the 
university to create their own 
firms. 

The Prince is wrong, too, 
not to see that there is a deep 
connexion between British 
attitudes towards technology 
and towards money-making. 
The country needs more of 
both. A negative, suspicious 
atttiude towards one easily 
spills over into a critical or 
indifferent attitude towards 
the latter. There is no essential 
clash between the values of 
enterprise and employment 
generation and academic pur- 
suit. Harvard, 350 years old as 
a private college, testifies to 
that. 


FOURTH LEADER 


Scientists have discovered a 
heavenly body. _ a quasar, 

which they say ‘ s 
9.000 million and 18.000 mil- 
lion light-years away”. 

Wc are very fond of sci- 
entists. but we do rather feel 
that a margin of error which, m 
miles, works out at 5«775,4yo 
followed by no fewer than i * 
0s (we have just done the sum 
with our trusty calculator, 
ignoring leap years) is more 
than ample, quite apart from 
the possibility that the thing 
they saw as they peered into 
their telescopes was not a new 
star at all but the number 
bus. a belief reinforced by the 
astronomers’ claim that 
light from it "has takenm<»t 
of the age of the universe to 
arrive”. 

h would be POi"' le ® “5 
ihcm how they know. 
insensitive to ask them 
good it will do «* 
whether this week theunnww 
is believed to have Originated 
in the Big Bang or in the 
Steady Siaic. but *>«* 
week it will be the other y 
round, wc cannot reatij 
expected to get worked up 


about it The truth is that we 
have long since ceased to 
understand what scientists in 
general, and astrophysicists in 
particular, are talking about. 
We do not know whether to 
laugh or weep at the thought of 
panicles that can be in two 
places at once and of others 
which arrive before they leave, 
and we can only throw up our 
hands and plead not guilty on 
grounds of diminished 
responsibility when we learn 
that some objects were so for 
away from us when they 
decided on a visit that in onler 
to get here before dosing-time 
they would have had to set off 
before they existed. 

What we would like to know 
is what the astronomers on the 
distant quasar are at this 
moment saying about their 
discovery. Are they speculat- 
ing about the possibility that 
there is intelligent lift here? 
(Answer There is. but not 
nearly so much of it as we like 
to think.) Or are they wonder- 
ing whether the light from 
Earth has taken so long to get 
to them that our planet must 
long since have become a cold 


and darkened burnt-out case? 
(Answer To judge by the 
weather these last few weeks, 
yes.) Or are they getting cross 
at our cool assumption that we 
are at the centre of the 
universe, so that the quasar 
must therefore be on its very 
edge, rather than the other way 
round? (Answer Almost cer- 
tainly. if the little green men 
we have recently started to see 
everywhere have anything to 
do with it.) 

Long, long ago. Sir James 
Jeans wrote a book called The 
Mysterious Universe \ and few 
will deny that it has got 
steadily more mysterious ever 
since. We accept — we have no 
choice in the matter - that the 
astronomers who discovered 
the quasar have got its distance 
right, give or take nine billion 
light-years. We would only ask 
them to re-check their in- 
vestigations just once more, so 
that they can be absolutely 
certain that they have not 
mistaken for the gleam of a 
distant star that long-awaited, 
much yearned for, often pre- 
dicted. almost despaired of 
flicker in the far distance, the 
light at the end of the tunnel. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Off THIS DAY 


application. It is not easy to 
report all aspects of fife in 
newly independent states, 
which is one reason why 
foreign correspondents have 
often preferred — and even 
now prefer — to work from 
South Africa. Raath was an 
exception, and his information 
and reports were all the more 
valuable for that 

Often there has been a 
contradiction between the 
universal condemnation of 
South Africa for its abuses of 
human rights and the silence 
which greets equally heinous 
abuses elsewhere in Africa. 
Raath's reports from Zim- 
babwe ensured that this 
contradiction was lessened. 
They also exposed the persist- 
ing double standard which 
decrees one level of acceptable 
conduct for the developed 
West (and South Africa) and 
another for the newly indepen- 
dent states. 

This is the view that under- 
lies the Non-Aligned 
Movement's demand for a 
new information order. But it 
does little to attenuate in the 
developed world the dismis- 
sive and condescending atti- 
tudes the Non-Aligned are 
trying to eliminate. 

Had Jan Raath not* been 
under notice of expulsion, he 
would this week have been ; 
reporting from Harare on the 
non-aligned, summit. And 
while he too might have noted 
the dissonance between the 
poverty of many African coun- 
tries and the ostentatious 
wealth being paraded for the 
summit he would also have 
listened to the case being put 
by the delegates. He would 
have reported faithfully the 
speeches of the non-aligned 
leaden and so given them the 
wider forum they constantly 
seek. It is the loss of The 
Times, of our readers, and of 
the Non-Aligned Movement 
itself that he cannot do so. 


Iraq’s side of 
the Gulf war 

From the Ambassador of Iraq 
Sir. Robert Fisk is. of course, as 
entitled as anyone else to indulge 
in unsubstantiated prophecy, but 
the scenario outlined in "Why 
Saddam’s days could be 
numbered" (August 29) ignores 
past history and present-day re- 
ality. 

For example. Dr Fisk has 
referred to “the day. six years ago, 
when Saddam Hussein ordered 
his armies to invade Iran* 1 , with- 
out explaining that this step was 
taken only after repeated requests 
to Iran's rulers to cease xhdr 
incursions into, and attacks on. 
Iraqi territory had been ignored. 

In 1 980 Iran's rulers proclaimed 
their intention to march on Bagh- 
dad, and they announced that they 
would reach the city in a week's 
time. Since then they have uttered 
innumerable threats to mobilize 
an army of strengths which have 
varied from “one million" to “20 
million", that would breach Iraq's 
defences and destroy Iraq. 

They have attacked many times 
in the past six years, only to be 
forced to retreat, leaving behind 
tens of thousands of dead and 
injured. 

Instead of coming to the in- 
evitable conclusion that it was 
futile to attempt to settle the 
dispute with Iraq by force, the 
Iranian regime has continued to 
send hundreds of thousands of 
Iran's fighting men to their death, 
while at home Iran has diminish- 
ing oil exports and consequently 
decreased revenues, rising un- 
employment, and severe shortages 
of rood and other commodities. 

All of these factors go a long way 
towards explaining Iran's most 
recent frenzied threats concerning 
a final campaign against Iraq. 

Surprisingly. Dr Fisk has ig- 
nored the most important point of 
alL President Saddam Hussein has 
repeatedly attempted to negotiate 
a just and honourable peace 
settlement with Iran. 

As far back as September 28. 
1980. the President delivered a 
speech in which he spelled out 
Iraq's peace terms, which called 
for Iran’s recognition of Iraq’s 
rights in its land and waters, the 
return of occupied Iraqi territory, 
the adoption of a good- 
neighbourly policy by Iran, and 
the rights of both sides to be 
viewed with due regard to inter- 
national conventions and agree- 
ments. The President said: “We 
seek peace and our legitimate 
rights. We have no expansionist 
nor aggressive aims". 

In obdurately refusing to make 
peace as long as President Saddam 
Husseip remains .in . power. 
Ayatollah Khomeini makes it . 
patently obvious that he is not 
interested in negotiating a just and 
honourable peace, and he sees the 
only hope, of concluding one 
which is neither — with con- 
sequences too awful to contem- 
plate— by demanding the removal 
of President Saddam Hussein. 

Bearing in mind the intense 
suffering and deprivation being 
endured by the unfortunate 
population of Iran, one wonders 
whether Dr Fisk has asked himself 
who. in feet, it is whose days are 
numbered. 

Yours faithfully, 

A. AL-ANBARL 

Embassy of the Republic of Iraq, 

21 Queen's Gate, SW7. 

September 1 

Body-snatchers 

From Mr D. N. Donaldson 
Sir. What a pity that your 
correspondent, Mr Waller Ritchie 
(August 30). took fright at direc- 
tion signs along the Fosse (with an 
“e" please) Way, near Stow-on- 
the-WoUL 

Had be paused on his journey.- 
be might have found that the 
Slaughters (possibly derived from 
sloe tree) possess some of the . 
finest remaining stone-built 
dwellinghouses in the north Cots- 
wolds; that the proprietor of the 
Body Repair Centre will provide a 
service useful for those motorists 
who come to grief through mistak- 
ing the Fosse Way for part of a 
grand prix circuit; and that Spook 
Erections Limited arrange" the 
once- weekly open market in 
Moreton-iiHMarsh, where Pevs- 
ner (the late David Verey) much 
admired the Market Hall in the 
town. 

Yours sincerely. 

D. N. DONALDSON, 

Langdale. 

Wincheombe, Gloucestershire. 

Doing a double-take 

From Mr Haney Wood 
Sir, As Mr O. Brooke (August 27) 
sails merrily through the French 
villages with their jolly little name 
signs at both ends, he might spare 
a thought for the feet that in 
France and elsewhere these signs 
are primarily intended to mark the 
beginning and end of the built-up 
area speed limit. 

Yours faithfully, 

HARVEY WOOD. 

32 Godwin Road. 

Oiftonville. 

Margate. - Kern; 

Uncertain glories 

From Dr Jeremy M. Black 
Sir. Among, the reasons that Mr 
Alan Searte (September 1) gives 
for celebrating the Glorious 
Revolution of 1688 is that this 
revolution inspired the American 
rebellion of 1 776. He omits to note 
that the American rebellion was 
directed against the political struc- 
ture created as a result of the 
Glorious Revolution. 

Yours faithfully. 

JEREMY BLACK. 

University of Durham. 

Department of Hisiorv. 

•43/46 North Bailey, 

Durham. 

September 1. 


Theological colleges’ wider scope SEPTEMBER 6 1909 


From llic Principals of Trinity 
. Coll eye. Bristol, and Chichester 
Theological College 

Sir. We are very grateful to 
Clifford Longlcy for drawing 
attention (article. September !) to 
the strategic importance of the 
theological colleges in the Church 
of England. Whilst recognizing 
that there is truth in much of what 
he says, the actual picture is not 
hair as black as he paints. 

First. it is true that indepen- 
dency and party interests mark 
training in the Church. This is a 
fact and pan of the Church's 
history. But we do not know of a 
single college which exists to 
-perpetuate its tradition alone. 

Wc write representing the 
Evangelical and Anglo-Catholic 
wings of the Church and yet on 
our stalls and within our student 
bodies considerable differences of 
theological opinion are perpetu- 
ated and affirmed. Surely our task 
should not be to undervalue the 
truths which each tradition en- 
shrines. but to recognize that each 
has an important contribution to 
make towards an .Anglicanism in 
which comprehensiveness has al- 
ways been an important feature. 

The modem theological college, 
far from moulding people rigidly 
in a party system is helping men 
and women to grow, adapt and to 
work with others of different 
traditions. 

Second. Gifford Longley rightly 
draws attention to the importance 
of accountability. But the time has 
long gone when a college could 
ignore the rest of the Church. Any 
principal will tell you that the 
depth of accountability is quite 
strong; to our councils, to the 
Advisory Council for the Church’s 
Ministry, to General Synod, and 
in some cases to CNAA (Council 
for National Academic Awards). 

Most, importantly, we are 
accountable to the House of 
BishopsJn feet, we are only 
allowed to train students if the 
bishops, through its inspectorate, 
grant us that right. Gearly here is 
an area for the bishops to take 
more authority if they so wished 
and the colleges will not be found 
wanting in their willingness to co- 
operate. 

Third, we are charged that we 
are not preparing people for the 
“real" world. But we are really 
nothing like the upper-class en- 
clave Clifford Longley describes. 
After all. our students come from 
the “real" world. For example, the 
average age of students at our two 
colleges is about 30 years and they 
represent all sections of the social 
strata and many different types of 
employment. 

Furthermore, our teaching is 
not as “ivory-towered" as it was 

Money owed to NHS 

From Mr Harold L Sumption 
Sir, You report (August 29) that 
the Bloomsbury Health Authority 
is owed £1.18 million by private 
patients and the Opposition 
spokesman's belief that the NHS 
may be foiling to collect millions 
due each year. 

Recent personal experience 
seems to justify tha t view. My wife 
was a private patient in a weU-_ 
known London teaching hospital 
and I found the naivety of the 
financial methods in sharp con- 
trast to the superb medical and 
nursing care. 

On admission no one asked how 
the bill was to be paid, aside from 
a remark by a doctor who "sup- 
posed that my wife was covered by 
insurance. "On discharge we were 
told that telephone calls (totalling 
less than £2) must be paid before 
leaving, yet hospital and medical ' 


25 years ago. There is now a 
serious commitment to pastoral 
training, block placements and 
related studies, and although some 
of us would like to see this side of 
training greatly strengthened, 
there can be no doubting the 
colleges' desire to collaborate with 
the rest of the Church in preparing 
men and women for effective 
ministry today. 

Yours sincerely. 

GEORGE CAREY. Principal. 
Trinity College. 

Bristol. 

JOHN HIND. Principal. 
Chichester Theological College. 
Trinitv College. 

Stoke Hill. 

Bristol. Avon. 

September. 2. 

From the Reverend David Perry 
Sir. Gifford Longley is right to 
level his lance at the Anglican 
theological colleges and his criti- 
cisms are cogent. Might I venture 
a solution to the problem of 
training for the ministry? It is 
based on three premises: 

1. Today's biblical and historical 
scholarship transcends denomina- 
tion and party boundaries. 

2. Such scholarship can hold its 
own in the public domain. 

3. Existing church-based systems 
for lay training and lay reader 
training can only be described as 
naively inefficient. 

The solution is to carry out 
basic education in biblical studies. 
Church history, etc. via the secular 
education provision, especially 
adult education. When one learns 
that as many as one in four of 
London's adult population do 
some form of evening class, etc, it 
is clear that that is the setting 
where real teaching can take place. 

It requires no specific Christian 
commitment in order to partici- 
pate and provides a forum in 
which freedom of thought may 
flourish. Being secular in admin- 
istration. it will inevitably be an 
ecumenical experience for Chris- 
tian participants. 

Widespread adult Christian 
education will provide the seed- 
bed for those who are called to 
more specific Christian ministry. I 
believe it is quite feasible for all 
readers, local preachers and non- 
stipendiary 1 ministers lo be trained 
locally. Residential specialist 
training would then be confined to 
those who were entering the 
stipendiary ministry, having 
proved their vocation by a period 
of non-stipendiary ministry. 

Yours faithfully. 

DAVID PERRY, 

The Vicarage. 

Skiriaugh. - 
Hull. Humberside. 

September I. 

bills of several thousand pounds 
were seemingly left for me to pay 
as 1 chose, a casualness that almost 
invites bad debts. (In fact I 
discovered that ! could pay with 
any major credit card and did so in 
advance of insurance reimburse- 
ment). 

Medical and nursing staff 
rightly concentrate on applying 
their professional skill. But if 
troubled patients are not to post- 
pone thought of payment indefi- 
nitely the support service of 
someone combining the abilities 
of a hotel receptionist with the 
perception of an old-style almoner 
is also needed and perhaps es- 
pecially needed by the high 
proportion of patients coming . 
from overseas. 

Yours truly. 

HAROLD L. SUMPTION. 

7 View Road. 

‘ Highgate. N6. 

September l. 


For whom bell tolls Soap and the admen 


From Mrs M. HebNethwaite 
Sir. Now that a certain pronoun is 
disappearing so rapidly from our 
language has the lime not come 
when _ Who's Who should be 
renamed That’s That! • 

Yours faithfully. 

MARGARET HEBBLETHWAJTE, 
S Rowland Court. 

GreenhiU. 

Weymouth. . 

Dorset. 

September I. . 

Life and liver 

From Mrs J. S. Johnson 
Sir. Miss Han's action (Fourth 
Leader. August 30) seems totally 
suitable: what better way of insult- 
ing an archbishop, who leaches 
that “love of money is the root of 
all evil" yet supports the IMF and 
prays daily that he may be de- 
livered from evil? 

•That the anion was indeed 
insulting can hardly be doubted, 
when the Book of Common 
Prayer, in the introduction to 
Holy Communion, refers to "an 
open and notorious evil liver". It 
doesn't suggest something pleas- 
ant to receive. 

Yours faithfully. 

JUSTINE S. JOHNSON. 

25 Gain ford Rise. 

Coventry. West Midlands. 

From Professor A. T. //. Smith 
Sir. You report this morning the 
baffling case of the American lady 
fined for disorderly conduct for 
presenting liver lo an 
Archi bishop. 

Understandably, you seek 
enlightenment. By a happy co- 
incidence, help is at hand. When 
their Lordships return to the 
House of Lords after the present 
recess they will discover before 
them a proposal (in the Public 
Order Bill, clause 5). to make it an 
offence to engage in disorderly 
behaviour. 

Before ihey assent, would it not 
be wise for the Lords Temporal to 
ascertain from their Lordships 
Spiritual whether or not they 
would (as a group) object to being 
deprived of gifts of liver — or any 


From Mr M. S. Herrington 
Sir. Max Beloff closed his ex- 
cellent article (August 30) with the 
words "Margaret Thatcher is not a 
bar of soap". Alas, it is the grocer’s 
daughter herself, brought up to 
value window dressing and 
packaging, who has forgotten that 
a pretty bag won't sell broken 
biscuits! 

Sincerely. 

M. S. HERRINGTON. 

Clarewood Drive. 

Camberley. Surrey. 

other delicacies — for the sake of 
law and order? 

Yours faithfully. 

A. T. H. SMITH. 

University of Reading. 

Department of Law. 

Old Whiteknighis House. 
Whheknighis, 

P.O. Box 217. 

Reading. Berkshire. 

August 30. 

From Dr P. Hickman 
Sir. As your Fourth Leader sug- 
gests. that a woman should be 
fined $500. by a court in the 
United Slates, for presenting a 
slab of raw liver to an archbishop 
does seem unduly harsh. It may 
even be that she had the im- 
pression that he suffered from 
pernicious anaemia for which, at 
one time, such offal was consid- 
ered a sovereign, if not archi- 
cpiscopal. remedy. At worst the 
gesture might be considered sheer 
gall. 

As for the prelate, let us hope 
that, in due course, he also 
receives his desserts. 

Yours faithfully. 

PHILIP HICKMAN.. 

Sea Hard House. 

North Currey. 

Taunton. Somerset. 

From Mr Keith A. Flat hers 
Sir, I think the lady sent the 
archbishop the liver because she 
couldn't find the heart to make her 
message plain. 

Yours faithfttllv. 

KEITH A. FLATHERS. 

Pool Furlong. 

33 The Friary. 

Lichfield. Staffordshire- 
August 30. 


A seminal event in the history of 
Boy Scouts (now called Scouts). 
The movement was the concept of 
Robert Baden-PoweU (later Lord 
Baden- Powell) (185?- Ml) who in 

his army days developed scouting 

for soldiers organised in small 
units. 

His instruction book. Aids to 

Scouting (1899), was rewritten as 
Scouting for Boys (3908), and 
within weeks of its appearance 
troops of Scouts had sprung up all 
over the country 


BO Y SCOUTS' RALL Y 

MESSAGE FROM THE KING 
The first annual rally of boy 
scouts took place at the Crystal 

Palace on Saturday, and the build- 
ing and grounds on the occasion 
very much resembled a large - 
camping area. There were no fewer 
than 1 1 ,000 scouts present from all 
parts of Great Britain; and ; 
amongst them was a troop of girl ; 
scouts, who excited considerable . 
curiosity. During the day there 
were sports and competitions on 
the cycle track in the grounds, the 
latter including boxing, signalling, 
ambulan ce drill, life-saving, and . 
other contests, badges and certifi- 
cates for which were afterwards 
presented to the winners by the 
- Chief Scout, Major-General R.S.S. 
Baden-PoweU. C.B. 

One of the most attractive items 
in the day’s programme was an 
enemy’s attack upon a form where 
scouts were encamped, the display 
being intended to show the value of 
scouts as non-combatants in time 
of war. The rout, of the enemy was 
effected by members of the Terri- 
torial Forces and the Legion of 
Frontiersmen who took part in the 
demonstration by permission of 
the County of London Territorial 
Association and Colonel D.P. 
Driscoll. D.S.O. As the battle raged 
the boy scouts could be seen taking 
orders from one body of defenders ■ 
to another, tending the wounded, 
and rescuing women and children 
from a form which had been Bet on 
fire during the operations. 

When the battle was won bugles . 
rang out from all sides, whistles 
were blown, and from every direc- 
tion bodies of scouts began to . ; 
converge on the main building of .. 
the Palace for the march past, 
which, owing to a downpour of 
rain, took place in the centre - 
transept, instead of the terrace as : 
origmatty intended. 

Loud cheering greeted the an- - 
nouncement by the General that he ‘ 
bad received the following telegram • 
from Colonel Ponsonby on behalf 
of the Kintf— 

“The King fe pleased to note that 
the boy scouts are bolding their fust 
parade. TeH the boys that the King 
takes a great interest in them, and 
tefl them that, if be calls upon them 
later in Kfe to take op the defence of 
their country, the patriotic respond- -* 
bilhy and habit of discipliiiethiry are 
now acquiring as boys will enable 
them to do their duty as men. should 
any danger threaten the Empire. — 
PONSONBY." 

...MAJOR-GENERAL BADEN- ’ 
POWELL, addressing the scouts, ' 
asked t he m to remember that all - 
men belonged to one of two kinds, ' 
either workers or shirkers. He ~ 
wanted all scouts to belong to one : 
kind, and they knew which kind 
that was — the workers. Any little 
bqy could run about and play at 
“hide and seek,” and “touch,” and - 
all that sort of thing, but they did - 
not do more than that. That was • 
what the monkey patrols did. ^ 
Those were the shirkers. They - 
shirked the work which lay under- . 
neath the game of scouting. The 
true scout was a worker. He wanted 
theta to remember that and cany 
out their duty of doing a good turn - 

every day to some one, and then - 
they would be workers and not 
shirkers. Amidst cheers he men- 
tioned that that was his mother’s ■ 
birthday. She looked upon all the - 
scouts as her grandsons, and he 
was going to send her a telegram of - 
greeting from them aJL Lord 
Roberts, he added, had written ' 
regretting absence, but wishing the 
boys all success. Lord Charles 
Beresford. in the course of a long - 
letter, wrote. - — “I am pleased to see 
the scouts are becoming so splen- 
did in their discipline and in their ~ 
good conduct, which will be neces- 
sary if ever they are called upon to 
serve their country. They are . 
always cheery, no matter how bad 
the circumstances appear to be. 
Every time they go out they should 
remember that they are Awng 
something towards "mlting item- ■ 
selves handy in case they are ■ 
wanted, and they are doing a very 
useful work in defence of the 
hearths and homes. Good luck to 
you alL" 

General Baden-Powell took his ' 
stand on a platform below tlje great - 

S during the march past, 
occupied three-quarters of ' 
an hour. The girl scouts were loudly 
cheered as they passed, and so also - 
were the Scottish scouts, who were ' 
beaded by four kfited hoy 
pipers ... 

Heat of the moment 

From Mr Alan Phillips ' 

Sir. Mr Jennings (August 30) 
writes that he is able to fry an egg- 
using three pages of The Times as ■ 
fuel for his portable stove. 

1 think the question we should 
now ask is. do some pages of The 
Times bum better than others? I - 
can imagine, for example, that the. 
weighty leader page might take-, 
more to ignite than the ephemeral-; 
diary and comment page but; 
would keep the fire burning for- 
much longer. 

The from page, with its “hot- 
news" stories, might produce- 
more heat still, unless the stories . 
turn out to be flashes in the pan, or ' 

- in deference to Mr Jennings — 
under it. I- -• 

Yours faiihfultv. 

ALLAN PHILLIPS, 

British Forces Broadcasting 
Service. Radio. 

Dhckelia. BFPO 58. Cyprus. 
September I. 


THE ARTS 


Television * Alan Bennett is back with a controversial stage play. Andrew Hislop reports 

fromoz About to raise the roof again 


In tbe century of the common 
“an, heroes are supposed to 
he extinct. They flourished, of 
coarse, when demigods walked 
among men performing super- 
human feats. But as soon as h 
ps discovered that everyone 
is created equal, they became a 

logical impossibility. 

Heroes may still be em- 
ployed as a literary device, but 
If they are to accord with 
egalitarian ideas they can no 
longer possess superhuman 
powers. 

So the author of the new 
detective series Call Me Mis- 
ter (BBCl), Robert Banks 
Stewart, admits to a -liking 
for heroes who aren't super- 
men but vulnerable human 
beings''. He has made his hero 
an Australian all alone in the 
City of London, looked down 
on by bowler-hatted finan- 
ciers, by the Metropolitan 
Police and by his grand En- ! 
gtish relations. 

Jack Bartholomew, played 
by tbe Australian Steve 
Bisley, has only a man fat a 
wheelchair and a black pop 
singer, who has been swindled 
by her manager, as allies. 

Bartholomew comes to Lon- 
don to find tbe man who 
murdered his father in Syd- 
ney. Chi the face of it, his task 
is almost impossible. But de- 
spite being a vulnerable fan- 
man being, he rapidly starts to 
display heroic qualities, and a 
degree of luck which implies 
that the gods are smiling on 
him - or if not the gods, Mr 
Banks Stewart. 

Few but a hero would take 
on a Jaguar in a Mhu, and few 
whom the gods hated would 
find themselves inheriting mil- 
lions of pounds and a bar- 
onetcy. 

Sir Jack “Call Me Mister** 
Bartholomew is a worthy 
successor to this author- 
prodacer's previous creations, 
Eddie Shoestring and Jim 
Bergerac, bat his charm will 
pall if he goes on being too 
earfy successful. 

That said. Call Me Mister 
is a sublime masterpiece com- 
pared to the serial Home To 
Roost (Yorkshire Television), 
which has just returned to the 
1TV network, and has dearly 
been made on the assumption 
that third-rate situation com- 
edy is all we either want or I 
deserve on Friday nights. 

Andrew Gimson 


Radio 

Richly rewarding 


Some writers just read great 
novels, others such as Jean 
Rhys or Peter Ackroyd rewrite 
them. Playwrights, however, 
encouraged by the wish of 
television to send all literature 
down the cathode tube, are 
keener than novelists to adapt 
the work of their favourite 
authors. They also like to have 
them strutting on their stage. 

Alan Bennett, satirist, dialo- 
g's! supreme, and founder 
member of the SDP. is about 
to put one of his literary 
heroes on the Royal Court's 
stage in a new play. Kafka's 
Dick, which starts previews on 
September 18. 

Elen nett has made theatrical 
use of famous writers before — 
but at a distance in' the 
comical pastiches of the 
school play within his play 
about a school. Forty Years 
On. However, the auihors he 
has made most use of in bis 
work, particularly in his many 
delicately cadenced television 
plays, are anonymous, 
commonplace, foil of the pa- 
thetic absurdities of everyday 
muiierings — men and women 
on the Clapham omnibus, 
even if it is the Clapham in 
Yorkshire where he has a 
cottage. 

Many a throw-away line 
destined for quick extinction 
in a faulty hearing-aid has 
been rescued by Bennett, 
stored in his notebook, then 
mouthed exquisitely into life 
again by Thora Hint Hugh 
Lloyd or another of the splen- 
did regulars found in his 
television plays. 

Bennett's interest in Kafka 
was in part prompted by other 
writers who have “rewritten" 
his life. Among them is Philip 
Roth who. in a celebrated 
piece of fantasy, made the 
troubled genius become a 
poor, unknown Hebrew 
teacher in America. 

Bennett's first use of Kafka 
was in his a wand-winning 
television play. The Insurance 
Man, which portrayed in ail 
but name the great writer in a 
Kafkaesque world as though 
to suggest that his writing was 
not so much disturbed, meta- 
physical fantasy as an accurate 
reflection of his surroundings. 
Now comes the contentiously- 
titled Kafka's Dick. 

Bennett had been “in two 
minds" about the title which, 
with its echoes of Prick Up 





The rewards of eavesdropping 


Your Ears. John Lahr’s biog- 
raphy of Joe Orton now being 
filmed with a Bennett screen- 
play. does suggest a singular 
approach to literary figures. 

His doubts have been re- 
cently revived by the arrival of 
a telegram from that cele- 
brated theatrical rewriter of 
Kafka, Steven Berkoff: “I find 
your stupid title abusing 
Kafka grossly often si ve.JJo 
easy for hacks like you to 
mock the dead." “1 sent back a 
nice postcard", chuckled Ben- 
nett. “I said perhaps he should 
wait to see the play." 

Bennett insists that it is not 
a work of sacrilege, even if 
some people might think so. 
Indeed, he sees Kafka, who 
himself reacted so strongly to 
his authoritarian father, as a 
sort of father figure to ail 
modern writers, almost re- 
ligiously sacrificing everything 
to his writing; “1 fed very 
much in awe." says Bennett 

Kafka’s Dick, in which 
Geoffrey Palmer plays an 
insurance man turned ob- 
sessional biographer of Kafka, 
is intended as an examination 


of the relationship of a biog- 
rapher to his subject and a 
writer to his reputation. It is 
also about Bennett’s own re- 
action: “In a sense, Kafka's 
Dick is about writing The 
Insurance Man." 

“I don't have ‘literary 
interests'. Literature is what 
I'm made of," wrote Kafka in 
his diaiy. Bennett too writes a 
diary which, unlike Kafka, be 
intends to publish, but be is 
much more modest about his 
place in literature, joking 
about his fear of being 
“rumbled", even providing 
ammunition for wotiid-be 
ramblers by admitting he has 
never read The Castle. 

Despite critical acclaim of 
his television work and the 
farcical element in his most 
popular stage plays, he does, 
however, still believe that 
theatre is nearer to serious 
literature than telcvison. 
Though he greatly enjoys writ- 
ing television dialogue, there 
is a yearning to get away from 
the .naturalism he tends to- 
wards In his work for the small 
screen. 



THE SUNDAY TIMES 



on 

the power of 
Thatcherism 


WHAT IKE DIDN’T UKE 

Eden: the lost leader Part 2 


on 

DieTUC 
in Brighton 


PLUS FIVE PAGES OF SPORT 


Sunday isn’t Sunday without the 
Sunday Times 


Significantly, his television 
play which most called into 
question this naturalism. The 
Oid Crowd, directed by Lind- 
say Anderson, received wide- 
spread, misplaced critical 
disapproval. However. 
Kafka's Dick is his first work 
for the theatre since Enjoy 
( 1 980), which was even more 
subversive of its superficially 
realist setting and was the least 
acclaimed of his full length 
stage plays. 

Both The Old Crowd and 
Enjoy are faintly reminiscent 
of Kafka's story The Marriea 
Couple in their use of a 
socially embarrassing corpse. 
But Bennett sees no influence 
of Kafka in bis work before he 
staned writing about him. He 
does think, however, that he 
would have liked Kafka - 
. though not Joe Orton. 

It is difficult not to like 
Bennett himself. Still impishly 
spry in his early fifties, looking 
suspiciously as young as his 
self-portrait as a boy which 
hangs on his walL he lias made 
the change from satirist to 


writer of substance without 
losing a healthy talent for 
mockery and self-mockery. 

When I met him he had just 
been standing, sneajeered but 
unsporty. holding tbe tele- 
phone to his television set so 
that a friend in New York 
could hear the European 
Games 1500 metres final. He 
■ still acts, however, as a vehicle 
for lines of those less famous 
than Orton. Kafka or David 
Coleman. Recently he heard a 
would-be member of a group 
of local winos thus rejected, 
“No. no, go away, slop trying 
to get on our bandwagon." 

I'm not sure what Kafka 
himself would have made of 
Kafka's Dick. Though Kafka 
once charmingly said of a 
barmaid lover that a whole 
cavalry regiment had ridden 
over her body, he had an 
abhorrence of (fifty jokes. 
Whether the joke turns out to 
be on Kafka or Bennett him- 
self. ] feel that other writers 
already on the Kafka band- 
wagon should listen to what 
their hero says for himself at 
the Court. 


The noise you have been 
hearing on Radio 4 every 
Tuesday and again on Thurs- 
day since 1st April has been the 
sound of brains racking.. 

Each week a diminishing 
number of contestants for the 
title Brain of Britain 1986 
(producer Richard Edis) have - 
fought their way one step 
further up the pyramid, the 
top of which only one of them 
can occupy. 

Last Tuesday it was all 
decided; the four surviving 
combatants — all men: ladies, 
where were you? — gathered 
on the penultimate step and 
after due ritual interrogation, 
one Stephen Gore, internal 
auditor, was elevated ' to 'the 
pinnacle- . . 

The only thing that can 
discomfit him now' is. the' 
swingeing humiliation when 
next week he meets the Great 
Cortices of 1984 and 1985 in 
Brain of Brains 1986. What is 
not in doubt is that the 
occasion will be as irresistible 
as this show generally is. 

Brain of Britain gets its 
fascination from clever 
manipulation of the heads-l- 
win-tails-you-lose principle 
exercised in our. the listeners, 
favour, if we don't know the- 
answers. we are eager to be 
told: if we know them and the 
experts prove us right, we feel 
a little glow inside; but if we 
know them and the experts 
don’t, ourself esteem becomes 
completely incandescent. 

Last week when nobody 
knew who said “Sir. if you can 
believe, that, you can believe 
anything." and I had the 
answer before the quotation 
was out of Robert Robinson's 
mouth, my satisfaction was 
immense. Any programme 
that makes me fed so good 
can only be entirely admirable 
— a state of mind it reinforces 
by contriving to suggest that to 
do well at it is the same as 
being significantly intelligent. 

Compared with television's 
Mastermind of course the 
suggestion is pretty muted: no 
victim's chair, no stagey light- 
ing. no space odyssey music. 
But. the title is the giveaway: 
Brain of Britain— 

There are some pro- . 
grammes which dare you to 
dismiss them and Death of a 
Teenager (Radio 4. Thursday, 
director, Philip Martin) was 
one. .) 

This dramatized doct-' 
men vary by Jeremy Sandford 


and Philippa Finnis was the 
True story of Jill Hocy, a 
working class girl who in 1 977 
took her own life at the age of 

19. 

It was based on a diary kept 
by her mother who. after post- 
natal rejection of her daugh- 
ter. never found a way of 
expressing the love she even- 
tually came to feel. No doubt 
this provoked insecurity and 
the feci lhaLthc poor girl's hair 
kept falling out also did - 
nothing for her confidence. 
Then in her late teens she went -. 
to live with a young miner, . 
Tom. and things looked up f 
until he gave up his job. Life* 
on the dole quickly subjected 
the relationship to strains it 
couldn't stand. Jill went back 
to her parents, but when Tom . 
was killed she despaired and 
committed suicide. 

A11 this might have wrung a . 
listener's heart had it been . 
better done — the standard' of 
the dialogue and the tone of 
the writing was about that of a 
modest Afternoon Play — and 
had Jill herself come over as a 
more substantial character. * 
We werelokl of her promising 
talent for poetry and songwrit- 
ing, but what we heard seemed- 
unexceptional. 

Was this the truth of the 
matter or did the authors 
simply foil to convey what was 
there? Anyway, Death of a 
Teenager hardly carried more 
weight than those sad little 
reports of failure and despair 
you read in the papers, and the 
feet that wc were to an extent' 
invited to see it as something 
more profound and Jill herself 
as a contemporary tragic hero- 
ine actually made matters 
worse. 

Globe Theatre (Sundays) 
also carries an invitation. This 
time it is tQ listen to a series of 
six famous stage plays with 
“the largest English speaking 
audience in the world". Radio 
4 and the World Service are 
co-producing and . simulta- 
neously transmitting. 

Is the knowledge of a shared 
experience with listeners in 
Delhi and Rio de Janeiro 
going to bring more of us 
natives to the loudspeaker? I 
can't see why. What might do 
so. however, is the expectation 
of outstanding performance 
and if John Tydeman's open- 
ing production of Pygmalion 
was anything to go by then we 
shall be flocking. 

David Wade 


Opera: Hilary Finch 

Shaping up nicely 


Promenade concert 


The Marriage of 

Figaro 

Coliseum 


Jonathan Miller's romp of a 
Figaro has started on its 
rough-and-tumble course of 
nine more performances. 
Since April, 1985, when it was 
last seen, this Figaro has bad a 
few more corners knocked off: 
and with the merriment which 
that causes well-nigh drown- 
ing some of the recitatives, it 
turns out to be not entirely a 
bad thing. 

This has never been a 
production to pry loo closely 
into character or motivation. 
It does not confuse by its 
investigation of levels of 
perception, just as rt does ijot 
disturb by its portrayal of 
moral duplicity and emotional 
conflict. . 

Now with Jacek Strauch 
making his house debut as tbe 
Count we have a figurehead 
for the production's level of 
functioning: a bullish 
Rowlandson caricature of a 
booby and boor. His renunci- 
ation of the Countess need not 
be taken too seriously, and 
neither need nis plea for 
pardon. His lack of adequately 
focused vocal projection does, 
though, give rather more 
pause for thought. 

It all means. of course, that 
Valerie Masterson. as the 
Countess, is relieved of the 
need to suffer unduly at his 


hands. She treats her arias 
with proper seriousness, coax- 
ing each word with a 
characteristic vocal caress into 
a cosy doak of melancholy. 
Her isolation is incomplete: 
Susanna is never far away to 
have a giggle with. 

And this Susanna has not 
changed much. Cathryn Pope 
simpers away sweetly twirling 
her light soprano and her hair 
in many a" pretty moue of 
petulance or delight. Sheisibe 
sort of girt who deserves and 
will no doubt live perfectly 
happily with her sturdy, 
chauvinistic Figaro. John 
Tomlinson, his wh and re- 
sponses as heavy as his bass, 
works the role for all it is 
worth, barking and blustering 
his way through every domes- 
tic tangle. 

Ethna Robinson hra joined 
the production for the first 
time, and bubbles away as a 
Cherubino of distinctly femi- 
nine charm. Donald Adams is 
a real D'Oyly Carte of a 
Bartok). as faded and pains- 
takingly English as Edward 
Dent's translation, and nicely 
balanced in the kitchen scales 
with Stuart Kale's stalwart 
Basilio. 

Just as tbe production 
gently doses its ears to any 
trace of complexity, wit or 
emotional variegation in 
Mozart's score, so Mark Elder, 
in the pit. dutifully replies 
with orchestral playing of 
relentless and unquestioning 
energy. 


BBC SO/Wand 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 

A conducting career that al- 
ready spans five decades has 
left "Gunter Wand with a 
deceptively simple platform 
manner. Big gestures are used 
thriftJy. his beat is shorn of 
frills: a slight nod to a wood- 
wind principal is all that is 
needed to prompt the delivery 
of some well-rehearsed 
nuance. 

Yet Wand Isa conductor for 
connoisseurs, and examples of 
his seasoned communicative 
skills abounded in this perfor- 
mance of Bruckner's Fifth 
.Symphony. His shrewd and 
flexible pating of the vast 
outer movements, for in- 
stance. was epitomised right at 
the end. where he hit exactly, 
the right speed for the . great 
Chorale to unfold majes- 
tically. without jeopardising 
the urgent momentum of the 
dolled rhythms. In the Ada- 
gio. too. he found a similarly 
natural balance between the 


melody’s measured tread and 
the more fluid triplet counter 
points. Watching where he 
chose to beat twos, and where 
threes, was a lesson in itself. 

In interpretative terms one 
was struck by the unity of 
mood Wand brought to the 
whole 75-minute structure: a 
mood essentially built on the 
contrast between the un- 
complicated. rugged vigor of 
the brass outbursts and unison 
passages, and a wistful but 
always dignified approach to 
more lyrical string paragraphs. 
But this overall unity was shot 
through with many surprises: 
one thinks of the impetuous 
accelerando to the first 
movement's conclusion, or a 
bold drop in volumn half-way 
through each phrase of the 
finale's chorale — artificial, 
perhaps, but effective. 

The performance, dedicated 
lb the memory of Hans Keller • 
was notable for the quality of 
the BBC Symphony 
Orchestra's playing. 

Richard Morrison 


SADLER'S WELLS ROYAL BALLET 

First London performances of 
DAVID BINTLEY's 
highly acclaimed fairy tale ballet 

THE 


Mozartian magic 


Cosi fan tutte 

Snape Mailings 

Murray Perahia. Aide burgh's 
very own hot-line to Mozart, 
has been spending the last 
month working with students 
of the Brittcn-Fcars School 
during pan of S nape's first 
and. I hope, not last Mozart 
Festival 

The result of this period of 
intensive study is a produc- 
tion of Cosi fan tutte remark- 
able neither for the potential 
star-quality of either of its two 
castj nor even for any particu- 
larly new insights in its stag- 
ing. Rather it brings to. its 
audiences and. more im- 
portant. to its participants, a 
quality and standard of truly 
Mozartian musical under- 
standing all too rarely heard 
on the stages of London. 

This Cosi bares the distinc- 
tive Perahia fingerprints of 
buoyantly nuanccd phrasing, 
crisp, vividly animated en- 
semble. all supported by sure 
direction and keen enjoyment 
of the _ drama in Mozart's 
harmonic structure. Ivor, Bol- 


ton. director of the Glynde- 
bourne Chorus, was the man 
chosen to put PCrahia's blue- 
print into practice: he con- 
ducts with both eloquence and 
authority. 

Bolton's great strength and 
a burgeoning opera conductor ' 
is to use his orchestra to help, j 
even to. turn to advantage, a ! 
singer's weakness. . j 

The singers have also had | 
the chance to work wnh a j 
team of particularly lively 
young rcpc incurs in Nancy 
Cooley. Jonathan Darlington 
and Jonathan Dove: and this 
is where the Dorabdla and 
Gugliclmo come into their 
own. 

Rachael' HaHawclL whose 
richly coloured mezzo still 
needs stronger integration, 
strode oot boldly in recitatives 
most imaginatively stage- 
managed by Ms Cooley's 
harpsichord playing. And 
George Mosley, surely a Don 
Giovanni in The making, in- 
flected his mobile, elegant 
bass to voice a distinctive and 
.already assured stage pres- 
ence. Thcsamc cast gives a 
final performance tonight. 


Tuesday and Sept 10, 19, 22 at Z3& Sept 20 at Z30 and 730 


Swan Lake 

Sept n 12 15 at 73a 
Sept 13 at 230 and 730 


Quartet/ 

The Wand df 

Youth/ 

Tchaikovsky 

RasdeDeux/j 

Flowers j 

of the M 

Forest 

Sept 16 17 
IS St 730 



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tombs Sadi . 


Royal 

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Tickets 

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Autumn of an orderly gentleman 


signi 
of tl 


T eam season of the 
year, sees a /ate 
flowering of Mr Dirk 
van den Bogaerde. 
He has completed 'the fourth 
volume of his autobiography, 
cleverly entitled Backcloth. 

Beyond the backcloth of 
theatre experience is a brick 
wall. In front, you can legiti- 
mately parade your life under 
the raking spoflighL What is 
rather bold of this hesitant, 
reluctant and nervous gentle- 
man is that he has used the 
words “final volume” on the 
from cloth of his book. 

“It says ‘final’, because I am 
65 years old. I don’t know 
whether I’ll work again. I 
haven’t anything else of in- 
terest I want to say. Thai’s it 
I’ve done.” 

He picks up a packet of 
cigarettes, lights one. drags 


and draws, smiles, takes an- 
other swig from the can of 
beer, smiles again, but can’t let 
.the “65” go. 

“I’ve seen it all. I’ve done it 
afl. And look about you. Look 
at all that awful, sprawling, 
spreading, diseased suburbia 
crawling up these hillsides. 
There was a time, when we 
first came here, when grass, 
poppies, rosemary and lav- 
ender filled the horizon with 
colour and smclL Gone. AH 
gone” 

Anger is bom. out of 
Bogarde's impotence: the 
world turns and a film star, of 
high international standing, is 
powerless to shift its course. 
Sixty-five will become- 70. 
Suburbia wouldn't be subur- 
bia if it didn't crawl That 
same rose which blooms today 
will be dying tomorrow. 

Yet, at 65. he has written his 


Has Dirk Bogarde, still unflappable at 65, been premature in describing his 
autobiography as finished? Russell Harty meets him at home in France 



a luxury holiday 
homeinthe 
Lake District 

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Inside vouTl find every creature comfon, induding 
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And inside the Pillar Club there’s a tropical pool, squash 
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phone: Langdale (09667) 391 (24 hours). 

_ . » ■ rv A I P k.4 



first television script, an - 
adaptation of a short story by 
Graham Greene called May 
He Borrow Your Husband ?, 
with Bogarde in the leading 
role. It was filmed down the 
road, in a hotel in Cannes. 

He may. indeed, be power- 
less to control natural forces, 
but to hear the man talk and 
sec him operate is to witness a 
gentleman . very much in 
charge of the. day’s work.- Let 
no one be deceived about the 
firmness of the gentlemanly 
Bogarde's grip on the ordering 
of his affairs. 

“No. I will not walk through 
an olive grove to the sound of 
music. 

“No. I never start work 
until 10 o'clock. If you come 
before, you will have to wait 
outside.” 

You are incontrovenibly in 
the house and domaine or an 
orderly man. The third vol- 
ume of his autobiography was 
entitled An Orderly Man. His 
property proclaims II The 
house is exquisitely propor- 
tioned and furnished with the 
elegance and understatement 
characterising iris perfor- 
mances. There are pictures. 
There are large, comfortable 
chairs and sofas. There are 
pieces of Staffordshire china 
set harmoniously in the right 
place. There are books every- 
where. I am forced to the 
pragmatic, conclusion that he 

has arranged them like the 
flowers, the dustbins, the 
menu and his life. •* 

O ne afternoon, he 
left the room to 
answer the tele- 
phone. Someone 
spotted a book in a 
pile, picked it out. opened it. 
looked at h and. hearing his 
returning foot-fell, pul it back 
on top. He bad been in the 
room for less than a restless 
minute when he spotted the 
particular assault upon the 
symmetry of that table, and 
made the necessary adjust- 
ment The action, you might 
say. of an orderly man. 

This orderly man is also 
capable of larger action. What- 
ever doubts he entertains 
about films, television: books 
and the artistic nature of his 
professional activities, there 
arc none about his life as a 
soldier. It is odd, and bold, 
that he cites the Second World 
War as the single most im- 
portant event in his life. 
Before enlisting, it seemed- 
likely he would follow his 
father, Ulric van den 
Bogaerde. who was the first art 
editor of The TYmes. He would • 
have liked to have seen his son 
similarly occupied by an 
arrangement in which art. in 
any form, and commerce were 
so conveniently married. The 
war intervened, removing all 
question of choice. 

He sees this period as the 
foundation of all that fol- 
lowed. and Captain Dirk * 
Bogarde, of the Air Photo- 
graphic Reconnaissance Ser- 


vices.' comes dangerously 
close to admitting that awful 
cliche about having “a good 
war”. Much of it was bloody 
and terrible. The issues are 
now too complex for easy 
analysis. He never killed any- 
body in hand to hand combat 
but he knows he was respon- 
sible for the deaths of many 
innocent people. One of his 
duties was to . drop leaflets 
over French towns and vil- 
lages warning that there would 
be bombing raids at certain 
hours.- Sometimes the map 
readings were wrong, at others 
the wind-carried the warnings 
away. • 

“I went back, with a driver 
and a sketch book, to look at 
one village we’d bombed. I sat 
on a piece of stone, in the 
middle of new ruins: I looked 
around me for a time. Numb. I 
saw a row of footballs against a 
still-standing wall. They 
seemed odd. They looked like 
footballs.- They were 
children's heads. The class 
had been ordered out of the 
building -so that we might 
bomb it The nuns had or- 
dered the children to shelter 
against awaiL but the wail had 
fallen on them. But there were, 

I am sad to say. worse visions 
than this.” 

It demands quite a leap of 
the imagination no place, the 
young Dirk Bogarde, soon to 
be a matinfe idol with a huge 
bag of fan mail and a wide 
premiere smile, as an officer 
who had to drive into Beisen. . 
the day after it was opened to 
the world. But he can describe 
it. He can see it He can -smell 
iL It is not for the squeamish. 
It is a feet which he has 
accommodated. He lives, he 
says, with the discomfort of it 
His conclusion is that nothing 
will ever frighten or disturb 
him as much. Certainly -not 
the ravings of a mad -director, 
the rantings of a critic, the 
swill of the tide of fashion, 
gossip. malice. or 
misunderstandings. 

When he heard that the 


German Army had surren- 
dered unconditionally, he sal- 
on an upturned box and 
waited for his friend to make a 
cup of cocoa. Then he felt 
empty, lacking any joy at the 
news and. more significantly, 
lacking any purpose. 

But Mr Bogarde's own war 
drifted on. The theatre shifted 
to the Far East where he 
became ADC to General Haw- 
thorn, in Java. He painted 
pictures on the doors of the 
mess: he decided that the men. 
in their sweat and deprivation, 
should be reminded, for some 
reason, of the plump pleasures 
of Paris, so there were busty 
ooh-la-las on the lavatory 
doors: and there was a local 
newspaper for the troops, 
called The Fighting Cock, of 
which he became editor. 

It is interesting to note the 
venom he reserves for those 
Japanese who were captured, 
and put to work in his 
compound. “Ugly, abject little 
men”, he says. 

There are loathings, true. 
And there are Io rings. He says 
that bis first love swam out of 
the Indonesian depths, into 
his starved vision at the end of 
the war. She fascinated him. 
but although he wrote letters 
home, to his family, he never 
mentioned Hanri. She was a 
creature or that moment. She 
never assumed the posture of 
a “broody” — a term he uses 
with acid disparagement of 
ihosc who look at you. sin 
you up. and down, and then 
settle into a nesting position. 

“You help me lay an egg. I’ll 
put up the curtains, do the 
dusting and we'll live happily 
ever after. No thank you.” 

Ham' was no broody. 
Strong, sympathetic, intelli- 
gent and. presumably, wise. 
She disappeared a week before 
Bogarde sailed back to fame 
and just a modest fortune. She 
left, on his desk, a blue cut- 
glass bowl, holding three sun- 
flower heads and a note: 

“These two colours go well 
together. Adieu.” 



In command: Bogarde rules his domaine with precision 

SATURDAY 

Fixed price foray: 
the difficulties of 
eating a lunch 
without emptying 
your wallet — pi 3 


Arts Dfan 

16 

Garden inr 

15 

Bridge 

If 

Omand Abadl 12 

Cticv, 

If 

Opera 

16 

Conccn* 

16 

Radio 

If 

Crossword 

15 

Retint 

If 

Dance 

16 

Rock £ Jazz 

lb 

Drink 

tl 

Shopping 

1.1 

Katins Onl 

IJ 

Teleuskin 

15 

Films 

16 

limes Couk 

1.1 

Galleries 

16 

Traiel 

12 


Another cigarette, another 
swig, another world And all 
this reads like the script of a 
romantic film. You can read 
all about Bogarde's films in 
The Oxford Book Of Films. 
One paragraph says that he 
became popular as a romantic 
lead in films of “little 
substance”. Then Joseph 
Losev framed him — to reveal 
increasing skill and versatility 
— in The Servant and Ac- 
cident. His later association 
with Visconti was less happy 
(see Death In Venice) “leading 
to a degree of self indulgence”. 

“Charming”, he says. 
“Woody charming T YeL with 
that same skill and self-indul- 
gence. he includes exactly that 
paragraph in his new book, 
and adds a sentence which 
gently defuses the pomposity 
of this judgment 

T he temperature on 
the terrace is rising. 
Enough of pain, 
doubt the horrors of 
war. the sour litter of 
critics, and the envy of those 
not blessed (“or cursed 
remember”) by a handsome 
countenance. 

Exactly 10 years ago. I had 
my first meeting with 
Bogarde. We conversed reas- 
onably amicably, on a late 
night chat programme. He was 
in London to promote the film 
The Sight Porter. A part of bis 
obligation was to publicize the 
film. We met the previous day 
for lunch at his London home, 
called The Connaught Our 
first meeting, as you would 
expect in such congenial 
circumstance, went well. So 
did our subsequent con- 
versation. 

It happened that the late 
Norah Smallwood who was 
then the power upon the 
throne of Chatto and Windus, 
turned from Match of the Da .1 
to catch our conversation, by 
accident She despatched a 
rote saying that if Bogarde 
could write as well as he 
spoke, she would be happy to 
publish his work. And equally 
happily, they, both fulfilled 
their promises. 

The rest is literary history. 
Four volumes of auto- 
biography and three novels, 
all of ‘them comfortably 
accommodated in the best- 
seller lists, from the man who 
was paid to smile at a pre- 
miere of a Corn - On film in 
Hemcl Hempstead, who died 
on the Lido in Venice, crack- 
ing under four hours of inten- 
se vc make-up with an 
industrial application, who 
rails against the imposition of 
65 full years, who was loved 
by the invisible Harri. and by 
the visible and dangerous 
Judy Garland ... a man who 
can' paint draw, act write, 
annoy, disturb and entertain. 

1 have a strong impression 
that Bogarde is preparing to 
alter the circumstances of his 
life. His colleagues and 
friends. Losev, Judv Garland. 
Visconti. Cukor. Fassbinder. 


Norah Smallwood, have gone. 
“The gathering”, he says, “has 
begun.” There is no “For 
Sale” notice at the end of the 
long drive. When it happens, 
it wont happen that way. Il 
will be discreet, orderly and 
gentlemanly. He has. already, 
burnt all his letters, all the 
correspondence of long years 
with an unknown woman in 
America, all his diaries. Every- 
thing that an insensitive hand 
could turn to cheap profit 

“Those who know me will 
understand what I have 
written”, he tells me. “What 
there is of me is what 1 have 
chosen to show you. The lines 
are wide enough to read 
between.” 

I muse upon such assur- 
ance. such confidence. 1 ad- 
mire the ability to editorialise 
a life of public achievements 
and private satisfactions. 


“Come on. lad. you look 
bloody miserable. It's hair past 
five. You get the glasses. I’ll 
get the Scotch ” 

“Yes, Captain Bogarde, 
sir.” 

“I suppose you want ice. 
Come on. everybody, start 
running around. Mr Harty 
wants ice in his Scotch and Mr 
Harty must be satisfied.” 

There is a twinkle in the eye. 
There are visitors on the 
terrace and so the perfor- 
mance. polished and precise, 
must continue, even though, 
by now, we are well into 
autumn. 

©Ttaiaa Nwapapare Ltd, 1086 

Barkdoih hr Dirk Hogarth 
piihhslietl on Sepieml'cr IS h 
I ‘iking, f/’.y.v .1 Rns.sc/f II art j 
/ derision in/rrrif »• ir/7/j 
Bogarde wifi he shnini on 
September 14 ( Yorkshire. 
Itl.JOpin). 


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12 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 



JERUSALEM, from 
ndod, or a choice of two- 


30 
As 

i day excursions- including 
Jerusalem, to Bethlehem or 
Masada. 

31 NAZARETH, from 
Haifa, and to the Sea of 
Galilee to visit Capernaum, 

/ Tabgha and Tiberias. 

NOVEMBER 1 PAPHOS, 
on Cyprus, to see the 
beautiful Roman mosaics. 

; 2 PERGE in Turkey, and 
Aspendos with its magnifi- 
| cent Roman theatre. 

. 3 TELMESSOS. Unique, j 
^ rock-cut tombs, and 
Xanthos to see the famous 
! “Harpy Tomb? 

4 EPHESUS, a most 

. marvellous site, or Friene, a 
. fine Hellenistic dry, 

5 DELOS, deserted island 
of Apollo, and then on to 
Mykonos. 

! 6 EPLDAUROS, from 
: Nauplion, the most 
famous centre of healing in 
the ancient world. 

7 ATHENS. A restful 
morning before the flight 
to London, or a choice of 
excursions. 





Cruise 
through the 
sands of time 

Our Nile Cruises are 
almost as legendary as the 
river itself. Travelling in air- 
conditioned comfort aboard 
the Nile Star, you can fully 
appreciate the timeless 
beauts' of the river along 
your uQO-mile ioumey and 
visit some of the greatest 
monuments in the world. 

As with all Swan Cruises, 
a guest lecturer - .whose 
informal talks give a 
fascinating insight to all you 
will see - accompanies every 
cruise. Nile Cruises run all 
yeai;exccpi July and August. 


Ask your travel agent, 
or for full information and 
immediate availability on 
Swan Hellenic Orpheus or 
Nile Cruises, please ring us 

on (01) 831 1515, or send 
the coupon. 



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Address, 



IS AfOL JUT 



Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 


The wild game of hide and seek 

. BrimJackman 


Sail this year 
To yesteryear. 

With fewer international 
tourists this yeu; now is the 
time to take a peaceful stroll 
«ong the path of history in 
the ancient lands of the 
Mediterranean or Aegean. 

, • During a relaxing and 
P convivial two week cruise, in 
) company with like minded 
people, you can exchange 
today* world for the old, 
exploring lands rich in art 
and architecture, history and 

! legend. AU with a new-found 
insight. For whilst cruising 
in comfort aboard the 
Orpheus, you can share the 
expert knowledge of 
specialist guest lecturers, 
whose lively and informal 
talks will give you the back- 
ground to every she visited. 
Making of each excursion 
- indeed the whole cruise - 
a true ioumey of discovery. 

An itinerary of one of 
our cruises is shown here, 
i There are many to choose 
'■ from between nowand 
1 December. Fares from 
around £900 are fully indu- , 
si ve, with return flights, most ? 
excursions and all gratuities. 

I OCTOBER 25 LONDON - 
f DUBROVNIK. A morning 
c flight from Gatwick marks 
| the sran of our sea-borne 
jf ioumey through the Aegean 
land eastern Mediterranean. 

: 27 MYCENAE, 

J Agamemnon's capital, 

L; then a passage through the 
I Corinth CanaL 

28 HERAKLION, and 
Minoan Knossos. 


Brian Jackman on 
safari in Zambia 
and following the 
last footsteps of 
David Livingstone 

Stealthily, and with only the 
stars to steer by. the canoe slid 
deeper into the Bangweulu 
Swamps. Our two Zambian 
boatmen, muffled against the 
night chill in old greatcoats 
and balaclavas, alternatively 
poled and paddled us down a 
labyrinth of narrow channels. 

When at last the bows 
grounded on soft mud we got 
out and waded knee-deep 
along a drowned game trail in 
the reeds. The clear water, so 
pleasant to paddle in by day, 
was now bone-clenchingfy 
cold and we were glad to reach 
the hide. Perched on stilts set 
atop an anthill, it was a flimsy 
thing of poles and thatch; bid 
at least we could dry our feet 
and settle down with a flask of 
coffee to wait for sunrise. 

What had lured us to these 
remote wetlands in northwest- 
ern Zambia was the legendary 
sitatunga. an aquatic antelope 
so rare and so elusive that frig 
game hunters will happily pay 
£S.000 to shoot one. It is a 
creature of extraordinary shy- 
ness. Sometimes it hides deep 
in the papyrus for days on end. 
Often it will lie sub me rg e d for 
hours, its lyrale horns laid 
back over its neck and only its 
muzzle above the water. The 
sitatunga is probably the most 
secretive mammal in Africa, 
and Bangweulu is the best 
place to see one. 

Out in the darkness the 
swamp lay still, held in a 
single silence, but as the first 
red hint of dawn seeped over 
the eastern horizon, the marsh 
birds awoke. Soon the entire 
swamp seemed to throb with 
their bubblings. 



Adventure down a lazy riven canoe and crew go in search of the legendary and elusive sitatunga; below, a herd of black lechwe cross the plain 



. The sun came up fast. 
Flocks of waterfowl poured 
Overhead: knob-nosed geese, 
flumes of egrets, wavering 
streamers of sacred ibis. 
Drenched and glistening in the 
golden light, the great fen 
stretched to the skyline: 2,500 
square miles of deltas, reeds 
and floating sudd. 

I did not see the sitatunga 
appear. One moment there 
was nothing but an emptiness 
of papyrus and elephant grass. 
The next a homed apparition 
had detached itself from the 
shadows: a sleek young bull, 
his face as barbaric as an 
African mask, his chocolate 
coat set off with handsome 
white blazes. 

For fully five minutes he 
remained motionless, one 
splay-footed foreleg held off 
the ground in mid-stride as be 
sniffed the air. Then, very 


slowly, he lowered his head 
and began to feed. 

Bangweulu — “the place 
where the earth meets the sky" 
— is the deep and secret heart 
of Africa, ft is also, fittingly 
perhaps, the last resting place 
of David Livingstone, who 
died there in 1873 after seven 
long years . looking for the 
source of the Nile. 

On the long trip north from 
Lusaka to Livingstone's gave 
we drove for miles through 
green-gold miombo wood- 
lands to the lands of the Balala 
people, whose name means 
sleep. The Balala are a cheer- 
ful tribe. We passed their 
villages in the miombo and 
their cassava gardens and the 
peeled roots of manioc — their 
staple diet — left in roadside 
streams to soak in pallid heaps 
like dead men's fingers. 

The spot where Uvingstone 


met his end lies down a dusty 
track near the Lulimala River. . 
In the village nearby, a 
visitors' book was produced 
for us to sign in the bleak little 
room which serves as the local 
clinic. 

The place where Living- 
stone died is marked by a 
simple stone memorial in a 
dappled glade. He had set out 
in 1866 to find the source of 
the Nile but ended up 1,500 
miles in the wrong direction, 
struggling through the 
Bangweulu swamps. 

In April 1873. wracked by 
fever and terminally weak- 
ened by chronic dysenlenr, he 
was brought in a litter to Chief 
Chitambo's village, just be- 
yond the floodplain, where he 
died on May 1, kneeling in 
prayer at his bedside. 

Afterwards, his followers 
eviscerated his corpse and 


buried his heart in a metal box 
beneath a mupundu tree. Then 
the body was smeared with 
salt inside and out. and left 
like a catfish to dry in the sun. 

Two weeks later they wrapped 
his preserved body in calico 
and carried it, trussed in a 
shroud of bark sewn up with 
safldoth. all the way to the 
coast of Bagamoyo, more than 
900 miles away. 

Today, those who follow in 
Livingstone's footsteps do so 
in less arduous fashion with 
the benefit of anti-malaria 
pills, four-wheel drive vehicles 
and comfortable sleeping 
quarters. Our camp at 
Mandamata on the edge of the 
Chimbwi floodplain offered 
half-a-dozen thatched 
rondavefs. all with mod cons, 
including hot showers, and an 
airy dining room where each 


day began with huge eggs-and- 
bacon breakfasts. 

From here we entered the 
surrounding seas of golden 
grass, cruising by Land Rover 
through archipelagos of ter- 
mite mounds that rise above 
the flatness of the plains like 
the tumuli of a vanished race. 

Larks and plovers filled the 
air with plaintive cries. Reed- 
buck and oribi watched us 
pass by. Large herds of 
tsessebe. fastest of all plains 
antelope, would stare at us 
with long, lugubrious faces 
until the nerve broke and they 
cantered away. 

Then, suddenly, no more 
anthills, no more trees. Only 
the endless wateriands of the 
Chimbwi floodplain. Here ev- 
ery year after the long rains, 
the swollen waters of Lake 
Bangweulu pour out of the 
swamps and spill across the 



plains for nearly 20 miles. 
Now they had receded once 
more, leaving a green flush of 
grass for huge herds of black 
lechwe, an antelope found 
nowhere else in Africa. 

In places, foe retreating 
floods still lay in sun-warmed 
shallows where we paddled 
ankle-deep among congrega- 
tions of birds in numbers 
beyond counting: wauled 
cranes and saddlebill -storks, 
lumbering fleets of pelicans 
and swift squadrons of pratin- 
coles. Sometimes a distant 
flock would suddenly erupt 
tike a puff of smoke into the 
blue, only to subside in an- 
other pan of the marsh. 

And finally, the great 
swamp itself, with its dawn 
mists and heavy dews, its lily- 
ponds and Batwa fishing vil- 
lages marooned deep in the 
papyrus. Here, punting down 
Bangweulu's pellucid chan- 
nels. we came across another 
mysterious spirit of the 
swamps — the ghostly grey 
sboebill stork — and listened 
to foe -cry of foe fish eagle 
whose yelping voice sounded 
to Uvingstone as if it were 
"calling to someone in the 
other world". ' 

No wonder that even 
Uvingstone. fatally ill as he 
was, should have been moved 
by foe magic of the swamps. 
"Men were hunting", he wrote 
in his journal in late March 
1873, "and we passed near 
large herds of antelope, which 
made a rushing, plunging 
noise as they ran and sprang 
among the waters. A lion had 
wandered into this world of 
water and anthills and roared 
night and morning." 

Today, more than a century 
later, his world is still a 
pristine wilderness. The ante- 
lope still run and foe marsh 
lions still roar. Whatever hap- 
pens elsewhere in Africa, one 
feels that Bangweulu's im- 
mense horizons and huge 
marshland skies will be just 
foe same a hundred years 
from now. 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Brian Jackman of The ■ 
Sunday Timas travelled to 
Zambia with Ecosafaris, 

146 Gloucester Road London 
SW7 (01-870 5032 /Ta The 
£1,992. 17-day David 
Livingstone Safari includes 
a week's game viewing In the 
Luangwa Valley national 
park and two nights at the 
Victoria FaHs. 


OUT AND ABOUT 


Hard realities of history 


Books out, swill 
buckets in at a 
living museum 
where learning gets 
back to basics 

It was the farmyard aroma of 
pigs and muck that gave the 
first hint of a "Victorian 
experience" at Squatter Cot- 
tage being one of sights, 
sounds ana smells. Two black 
and white porkers shoved 
their snouts into a bucket of 
swill and rubbed their grubby 
sides on the muddy floor of 
their sly — a sound which 
prcsmuably would have been 
comforting to the occupant of 
the adjoining privy 100 years 
ago. 

Here at Ironbridgc Gorge 
Museum, girls of the 1st Much 
Wcnlock guide and brownie 
troops wrinkled their noses 
and managed to avoid this 
functional part of the garden 
as they gathered herbs, 
weeded the vegetables and 
collected kindling wood, in 
the manner of their great- 
great-grandmothers. Inside 
the two-bed roomed cottage, 
others cleaned oil lamps, 
made rag rugs and baked 
bread on an open range, their 
dresses protected by starched 
white pinafores. 

This practical way of reliv- 
ing history' is not intended to 
replace (he textbooks, but in a 
few hours children absorb the 
games, the daily tasks and the 
limited household appliances 
familiar to a Victorian family. 
And the setting for learning 
could not be more 
appropriate. 

Ironbridgc was the cradle of 
the Industrial Revolution. 
Here Abraham Darby, a 
Quaker pot founder, began to 
make iron, using coke as his 
fuel rather than the customary 
charcoal. Here. loo. was built 
the iron Bridge, the direct 
ancestor of our me ml -framed 




WARWICKS 
Edge HU 
Distance: 4 mBes 


It was on October 
23.1642 that the bells 
of Radway Church sonod- 
as the Royalist troops of 
Charles occupied Edge Hill 
to spy on foe forces of foe 
Earl of Essex. The King was 
anxious to do battle and left 
foe strategic position for foe 
first bloody fight of foe Civil 
War. (The actual site is out 
of bounds in an army camp.) 

The escarpment was not 
then wooded. Today at au- 
tumn time foe hanging 
beeches have a magiral 
beauty. 

Opposite foe church (re- 
stored 1866) go akn% foe "no 


through road". Nearby is 
Radway Grange occupied in 
1642 by foe Washingtons — 
foe same family as foe 
American president 

A path leads to Edge Hill 
— foe inn is in a folly 
battiemented tower (perhaps 
based by Sanderson Miller 
in 1750 on the Guy's Tower 
of Warwick Castle.) 

A good track hugs the 
escarpment south-west and 
past a farm to foe A422. 
Turn left Beyond a junction 
there is a path across fields 
and past foe 17th-century 
. Upton Hoase (National 
Trust). 

Lanes go to Radey (more 
attractive than the name 
suggests, made of Horton 



stone with a 13th-century 
church )- 

By foe road junction a 
path starts down steps — 
then yon can speed like King 
Charles's men over the pas- 
tures to Radway. 

Richard Shurrey 


Cold comfort cottage: children come lace to face with the chores of days past 


constructions. And it was 
along the surrounding net- 
work of canals and rivers that 
barges carried the bellied iron 
pots, sometimes called 
missionaries, which made 
Coalbrookdalc and its blast 
furnace famous. 

The industry later declined, 
but in abandoning the Gorge 
rather than destroying the 
buildings, there is now a 
perfectly preserved legacy of 
another age. The Ironbridgc 
Gorge Museum embraces six 
main sites but it is on ihc 50 
acres at Blists Hill that visitors 
can risen act history. 

Walk past Mr WaRey's saw 
mill, where he and his doih- 
capped apprentices handsaw 
garden migs (for Heal's). 


make garden benches and tiny 
coffins, a subtle reminder of 
the grim facts of 19th-century 
life. Buy pasties at George 
Jesse's butcher shop, costing 
rather more than the ad- 
vertised prime steak at 8d a 
pound, or take a pint at the 
New Inn. Watch candles being 
made by Mr Thomas Trevor 
and his mob-hatted wife: won- 
der at the molten metal 
poured in the jobbing foundry 
— and buy a poster primed in 
the new technology of its lime. 

Such is the atmosphere of 
Blists Hill that families arrive 
dressed for the experience. 
Others organize educational 
trips and arc met by Mr David 
Litilcmorc. lronbridge's 
education officer, attired in 


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Victorian top hat and tails as a 
school inspector. "Teachers" 
Joyce Jones and Jacqueline 
Sim moods lead the children 
in a programme of activities. 

In Squatter Cottage. Mis- 
tress Vera Traffinder allocates 
chores. Tearing up newspaper 
for the privy is regarded with 
initial disbelief by a child 
brought up on soft toilet tissue 
and modem plumbing. Chi a 
summer’s day. the secure 
charm of Blists Hill commu- 
nity is enticing. But by 
c.\pcricncii£ the cramped liv- 
ing conditions, and healing 
water for wash-day. the 
Victorian child than even the 
best history books teach, 
brownies probably learnt 
more about the fot of a 

Suzanne Greaves 

Ironbridge Gorge Museum 
is open daily ltiam-6pm. Part 
of ft is closed from Nov- 
Feb. Admission: Passports, 
costing from £2.50 
(OAP/student) to £9.95 (large 
family) are the most 
economical way of seeing all 
sites. Single site tickets: 

Blists Hill Open Air Museum 
£2.95 (adult): £8.25 (farrwty). 

For details of education 
group wsrts and winter times, 
contact Ironbridge Gorge 
Museum Trust, ironbridge. 
TeHoril Shropshire (Mon- 
Fri 095245 3522: Sat-Sun 0952 
882753). 


THAMESDAY: Numerous 
events on the river and along 
the South Bank indude 
barge, jet ski and power boat 
races, an RAF search and 
rescue display, the Red Arrows 
and Marlborough Air 
Display Team; Tree foyer music 
from T<L30-6pm at the 
Royal Festival Hall and in 
Hungerford Gardens; grand 
firework display at 8 .30pm 
followed by jazz from 9- 
1 0.15pm. Free entry to the 
Hayward Gallery from 3pm. 
South Bank, London SE1 
(further information 01-938 
3641). Today, noon- 
10.30pm. Most events free. 

SUBWAY TUESDAY: To 
mark the 50th anniversary of 
the Crystal Palace fire, a 
day of continuous 
entertainment Including 
music; dance, street theatre, 

film and video 
presentations, stalls and 
refreshments. Also a rare 
opportunity to see the subway 
of Crystal Palace, designed 
by Sir Charles Barry in 1861 to 
resemble the crypt of a . 
medieval cathedral, which 
carried visitors from the . 
railway station into the palace. 


OUTINGS 


Crystal Palace Parade, 

London SE1 9 (farther 
information 01-653 
4050/6825). To morrow. 11am- 
6pm. Adult 80p, child 50p. 

RARE BREEDS: All 42 rare 
breeds represented in over 
1 ,000 head of stock — 
cattle, pigs, sheep, goats — 
and 1,500 head of poultry. 

Here you can see — or buy — 
Gloucester Goldspots. 
White-faced Woodlands, 

British Whites or Golden 
Guernseys, and find out how to 
set about rearing and 
marketing your own rare 
breeds. 

National Agricultural 
Centre, Stoneieigh, Kenilworth, 
Warwickshire (farther 
information 0203 51141). 
Toda^ am-5 pm. Free. Car 

T2th ENGLISH VINEYARD 
WINE FESTIVAL: Displays and 
fastings of English wine and 
an opportunity to look at the 
vineyards and wine-making 
equipment. TfacfitionaJ English 
food for sale. 


Ehgfish Wfne Centre. 

Drusillas Comer, Alfriston. 
East Sussex (farther 
information 0323 870532). ■ 
Today, Tomorrow. 

COUNTRYSIDE 
CAVALCADE: 12 heavy horse 
classes, a goat and poultry 
show, thatching competition 
plus a country dance 
festival and craft fairwith items 
for sple and various crafts 
being demonstrated. 

Royal Bath & West 
Showground, Shepton Mallet 
Somerset (further 
i nfo r m a tion 0749 62211). 
Today, tomorrow, 10am- 
6pm. Adult £1.50, child 50p. 
BEAMISH STEAM DAY: 

Many of the museum's fine 
exhibits in steam — 
including locomotives, traction 
engines and tractors. Also 
50 commercial vehicles on 
display, and wherever 
possible, tai running order. 
Beamish North of England 
Open Air Museum, Beamish 
Han. Stanley. County 
Durham (0207 231811). 
Tomorrow, 10am-6pm. 

Adult £2.95. child £1 .95. 

Judy Froshaag 



thei 

the iBunrrinationsi your extra little holiday 
can continue as brifently as you wish in 
restaurant theatre, night dub or casmo. 
There are so many different attractions fay 
day tndutfing, from 16-21 September, an 
exattog Power Boat festival Choose from 


some si^serb hotels, friendly guest houses 
or seif-catering acaammodation. 

Ring 0202 291715(24 hours) forfull’ 
colour literature or write to Depi 198, 
Bournemouth' Tourism, Bournemouth 
8H12BU. 

So much more besides the sea 



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THE TIMES COOK 

Cracking open the 
poached egg and 
vinegar debate 


Diana LmJMttr 



THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1 986 


EATING OUT 

The price is right, 
but is the meal? 


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Follow the advice 
of Eliza Acton 
rather than 
Elizabeth David 

I have been having a bit of 
trouble with poached <*gp 
lately. Not home poached 
eggs, which have been fine, in 
fact rather better than before 
since farm chilled eggs came to 
town. It is poached eggs away 
that have been a disappoint- 
ment In three different hotels 
— with otherwise very decent 
standards and high gastro- 
nomic aspirations — the 
poached eggs have been 
unpalatably vinegary. 

At Craigendarrpch near 
Ballater on Deeside the eggs 
(one was ordered, but two 
arrived) had been so swirled 
about in the pan that threads 
of the white, vinegary enough 
to set your teeth on edge, 
cocooned the yolks. And they 
had not been drained property 
either, so the toast beneath 
them was soaked. 

At Little Thakeham. an 
otherwise entirely congenial 
hotel near Siorringion in Sus- 
sex. the vinegar was tarragon 
flavoured. Even at many 
splendoured Hintlesbam Hall 
not far from Bury St Edmunds 
in Suffolk, my breakfast egg 
was vinegar-tainted which was 
a particular pity because it was 
as fresh as could be. having 
been laid on the premises, so 
to speak. 

A head chefs day preparing 
lunch and dinner is a long one 
and in none of these hotels 
docs the man himself do the 
breakfasts. And giat I take to 
be the problem. But an in- 
teresting question remains. 
Why do some cooks add 
vinegar to the poaching water 
at all? 

The authorities do not 
agree. Isabella Beeion writing 
in 1861. Queen Victoria’s chef 
Francatelli (1846). Elizabeth 
David (1955). and Robert 
Carrier ( 1 974) are pro vinegar. ■ 
Hannah Glasse (1747). Eliza 
Acton (1845) and Richard 
Olney ( 1 980) don’t mention it. 
Even the cooks that prescribe 
it fail to explain why. 

The only explanation I have 
come across claims that the 
addition of vinegar helps the 
egg white to coagulate faster. 
Possibly it does. In a lab- 
oratory it might be possible to 
prove so. Under kitchen con- 
ditions — two matching pans 
and eggs from the same box — 


the only- difference I could 
spot was that the white of the 
plus vinegar egg was' more 
ragged than its no vinegar 
control. 

Eliza Acton's instructions 
for poaching eggs have not 
been bettered. “Take for this 
purpose a wide and delicately 
clean pan about half filled 
with the clearest spring-water: 
throw in a small salt-spoonful 
of salt, and place h over a fire 
quite free of smoke. * 

“Break some new-laid eggs 
into separate cups, and do this 
with care, that the yolks may 
not be injured. When the 
water boils, draw back the 
pan. glide the eggs gently into 
it. and let tbem stand until the 
whites appear -almost set, 
which will be in about a 
minute: then, without shaking 
them, move the pan over the 
fire, and just simmer them 
from two minutes and a half 
to three minutes. 

“Lift them out separately 
with a slice, trim quickly off 
the ragged edges, and serve 
them upon dressed spinach, or 
upon minced veal, turkey or 
chicken; or dish them for an 
invalid, upon delicately 
toasted bread.' sliced thick, 
and freed from crust: it is an 
improvement to have the 
bread buttered, but it is then 
less wholesome." 

In these days of muesli break- 
fasts, eggs for their own sake 
have moved to Sunday 
brunch, lunch or supper. Here 
poached eggs have a place in 
all mann er of savoury confec- 
tions. Try some of these: 

• Globe anichoke bases 
as shallow cups for poached 
eggs, topped with a light 
hollandaise sauce. 

• Smoked finnan haddock 
poached in milk and topped 
with a poached egg. Alter- 
natively the haddock may be 
flaked, lopped with a poached 
egg and a good spoonful of 
cream. 

• Puff pastry vol au vent 
cases filled with poached eggs 
and a bechamel sauce fla- 
voured with ham and 
mushrooms. 

• Poached eggs on creamed 
spinach, topped with cheese 
sauce and a little grated cheese 
and browned. 

• Poached eggs served on 
portions of Swiss rosii po- 
tatoes browned in small om- 
elette pans. 

• Big, open mushrooms 
filled with chopped bacon or 
ham and poached eggs. 

Shona 
Crawford Poole 


Memories of 
set menus abroad 
.. may lead to 
expensive bills 
at home, advises 
Jonathan Meades 

You have now been back from 
France for. let os say. a couple 
of weeks. Your resolution to 
eat nothing but undressed 
green leaves and minimal 
amounts of steamed fish for a 
' month was a natural one and 
you did well to adhere to it for 
the day that you spent unpack- 
ing. But your thoughts are now 
turning to the three toque 
■ place outride Bordeaux where 
you both ate sumptuously 
from the fixed menu and still 
had change from 400 francs, 
or the two star establishment 
in the Aveyron where an 
excellent five-course meaJ cost 
less than £30 for two. How can 
you repeat this in London? 

The answer, on paper, is 
that you can do it at lunch- 
time. in those few restaurants 
which are both fit to play in 
the major French league and 
offer a fixed-price menu which 
costs a fraction of an a la cone 
meal. 

The answer, in practice, is 
that you cannot do it at alL 
One reason is the cost of wine 
-r- fine wines are not much 
dearer in London than in 
France but the London res- 
taurateur has no opportunity 
to offer a reasonably priced 
regional petit vin. and every- 
day wines are much dearer 
than in France. 

Then there is the imagi- 
native. pricing of mineral wa- 
ter and coffee: the creatively 
dressed salad of hidden extras; 
the entirely questionable prac- 
tice of offering a “two choices 
per course" menu and having 
one of the choices in such 
short supply that it has run out 
Just after 1pm — giving no 
choice or fonnng the customer 
to choose from the carte. - 
' Such was the case at La 
Xante. Chin; you also get the 
feeling that the clientele is 
being pushed towards the 
cane by the remaining entree 
being duck with mandarins — 
or our old favourite, the mid- 
Channel “duck & rorange". 

Of course, when a chef of 
Pierre Koffinan’s reputation 
serves up a dish such as this 
you suspect that what you're 
getting is something worth 
having. One should not be 
harsh, though. — we were 
offered, and accepted, the 
impromptu alternative of the 
duck sauced in wine; and a 
salad of fore gras was provided 
for a non fish-eater. This was 
lovely, as was a ravioli the size 
of a saucer, stuffed with squid 
.But the duck's skin was 
flaccid, the subcutaneous fat 
was thick and its breast was, 
predictably, sliced, up as 
though for a child; the sauces 
were first rate, the mandarin 
one being a world away from 
the marmalade type normally 






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DRINK 

Traditional virtues 
and treasures of 
the New World 

Bargains from JSffZtZSTaleZ 
a small shop in 

1 7~l to obtain several bargain buys 

BameS and a Dig from him for the Shop at 

: : — : — ; Barnes. The best is a white Vin 

national chain de Table o)M I 985 Christo- 


rriini'c 


tfcUr tike. \ £ 
J s<r Jfartj ns id duck. . J 


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associated with this dish. The 
day’s sweet was profiteroles; 
no doubt the best ever but 
again provoking the suspicion 
that M. Koffman was being 
either “witty" again or that 
when he plans his daily spe- 
cials, he has in mind a less 
gastronomically learned clien- 
tele than dial which comes at 
night for. say, his justly ede- 
•brated pig trotters stuffed with 
morels. 

His cheeses — the same 
whether you order from the 
menu or the carte — are 
superlative and served with 
generosity. With your aperitif 
comes a tiny pissaJadifcre; with 
your coffee, truffles made in a 
suburb of heaven. 

We drank a 1983 St Joseph 
Deschants from. Chapoutier, 
this northern Rhone wine was 
at the bottom end of the fist 
and cost £13. At Jacques Pic's 
great restaurant in Valence, 20 
miles south of that denomina- 
tion. it would cost about half 
that. — this is the measure of 
Koffrnan's problem. Though I 
reckon that £5 for a Kir and 
£5.50 fora Mirabelle indicates 
another sort of problem, one 
of stiff mark-ups. M. Koffman 
is a very fine cook indeed and 




his restaurant is most hand- 
some. with its satinwood and 
chrome. It is also a lesson for 
those who go in search of a 
bargain and end up paying 
£58.50. 

The very smooth service at 
La Tante Claire is overseen by 
a couple of blaze red greeters 
who recall the comedy duo 
Hale and Pace. . 

At the Four Seasons in the 
Inn on the Park, the waiters, 
dressed in a variant of British 
Rail uniform, belong to a 
different level of popular 
entertainment. Their pressing 
keenness to sell you extras to 
the set menus is basely comic 
and suggests that they are on 
commission. Would Sir like a 
glass of champagne, perhaps a 
glass of port, some cheese? 
Yes. he would indeed. But no. 
he doesn’t want to pay £5.80, 
£5.50, £3.75 respectively. 

A half bottle of a less than 
exciting 1978 lroisdteme era 
St Jutien, Chateau Lagrange, 
was no bargain at £12.50 and 
f2.80 for a glass of a non- 
alcoholic “wine” called 
Eisberg was a little strong. 

•All this detracts from the 
unflagging excellence of the 
cooking. There’s a menu at 


£16 — the one ihal prompted 
the order of Eisbeig — which 
included an interesting salad 
of rather homogeneous 
smoked fishes. 

The £15.70 menu dem- 
onstrates indisputably that the 
chef here, Philippe Boulot, is 
of the first division. His 
“nage" of langoustines may 
have a silly name but it’s a 
dish of high quality, with the 
fish in a reduced broth littered 
with celeriac. carrot and cour- 
gette. The red mullet that 
followed was brilliantly fresh 
— literally. The scales were 
refulgent; and its sauce of 
pureed pepper had nothing of 
that fruit's aggression about it 
The sweet, a chocolate 
mousse, was all right. 

The bill was £69; both it and 
the meal it afforded were 
indicators of what you could 
eat and what you could spend 
here if you were to put your 
mind to iL 

La Tante Claire 68 Royal 
Hospital Road. SW3 (01- 
352 6045). Open Mon-Rt, 
noorv2pm and 7-1 1pm. 

Four Seasons The Inn on 
the Park, Hamilton Place W1 
(01*499 0888). Open every 
day. noon-3pm and 7-1 1pm. 


My idea of the perfect wine 
shop is one where the wines 
are first class, the selection 
eclectic and wide, the prices 
reasonable, the atmosphere 
traditional yet spacious and 
the service anenlive without 
being pushy. Too much to ask 
for? I think I may have found 
it. 

The Barnes Wine Shop at 5 1 
High Street. Barnes. London 
SW13. opened more than a 
year ago and already wine- 
loving residents from the area 
are wondering how they man- 
aged without iL On the eve- 
ning 1 visited this airy, bare- 
(loorboarded place with its 
welcoming window display of 
books and bottles, there was a 
steady stream of customers 
clamouring for cold bottles of 
Australian Chard on nay. in- 
expensive Italians and a fancy 
bottle or two of red fora smart 
dinner. 

Francis Murray, the youth- 
ful owner who came into the 
wine trade via a stint in the 
police force, was coping with 
ease. 

It is not just Mr Murray’s 
calmness and obvious good 
taste in kitting out the shop in 
a traditional yet stylish man- 
ner. complete with tasting area 
and a small but growing 
library of good wine books, 
but bis great good sense in 
hiring James Rogers as a wine 
consultant Mr Rogera, pre- 
viously with his family firm 
Cullens, is one of Britain's top 
wine buyers and he has put 
together another stunner of a 
list for the Barnes shop. 

Where else would you get 
the best Bourgogne 
Passetoutgrains I've ever 
tasted, a bargain “ChaWis" 
made from as yet unclassified 
three-year-old vines, plus a 
tremendous New World wine 
list — and much more. 

The Bourgogne Passe- 
toutgrains comes from Vallet 
Frtres and would make an 
excellent - September red. 
Made from a blend of Pinot 
Noir and Gamay grapes, its 
rich. ripe, smoky nose and 
soft, spicy fruit could cope 
easily with both the last of ihe 
warm weather and the first of 
the cold. At £5.95 a bottle, this 
Passetoutgrains is the best red 
burgundy buy I know at the 
moment and should not be 
missed. 

In the unlikely event of an 
Indian summer this year, the 
Barnes shop has a delightful 
Alsace rose on offer from the 
Turckheim co-operative, at 
£3.95. 

The label says '85 Pinot 
Noir but ignore thaL This 
wine, like most Alsace Pinot 
Noire, is more of a rose than a 
red. I much enjoyed its pale 
red hue and deliciously light, 
raspberry and strawberry fruit 
Served at room temperature 
on a cold day and slightly 
chilled on a hot one. it is one 
of the most attractive roses 
f ve tasted this year. 


Christopher Tatham is a 
well-known name in the En- 
glish wine trade and James 
Rogers has been clever enough 
to obtain several bargain buys 
from him for the shop at 
Barnes. The best is a white Vin 
de Table called 1985 Christo- 
pher Tatham Monopolc, 
made by La Chablissienne. the 
famous Chablis co-operative. 

This classy, greeny-gold 
wine with its smoky bouquet 
and delicious clean-cut. grassy 
palate, is the product of three- 
vear-old Chablis vines from a 
superb vintage that next year 
will be allowed to carry the 
official Chablis name tag and 
no doubt twice the price. 



Good taste: Francis Moray 

Australian wines are 
becoming an increasingly 
familiar sight on British wine 
shop shelves. Whether their 
sales take off in the same way 
as Californian wines will be 
interesting to watch. Cheaper 
ranges of varietal wines at 
around £3.50- £4 are being 
introduced here rapidly from 
big Australian names like 
Orlando and Tollana. 

Even so. I was surprised this 
week to taste an elegantly 
labelled Australian foursome, 
from the Hill-Smith Barossa 
valley stable, very reasonably 
priced at £2.69 each. 

All four are available from 
Oddbins who, by rights, 
should sell their stock quickly. 

How they can ship these 
wines from Australia and still 
make a profit is a mystery but 
no doubt the current South 
Australian wine glut has 
something to do with it The 
quality of two of the wines in 
the range is superb, represent- 
ing a taste for which most 
palates would pay twice the 
price. My favourite is the 1980 
Shiraz Cabernet, whose garnet 
red colour and warm, spicy- 
cedary nose backed by lots of 
soft fruit is a releva lion, 
especially since I am not 
normally enamoured of this 
Australian wine style. 

The best white is the '85 
Semillion Chen in Blanc, 
whose citric bouquet and rich, 
buttery-fruity palate is a de- 
light A crisp, antseedy almost 
Muscat-like '85 Riesling, plus 
a light juicy '84 Shiraz 
Malbec completes the range. 

Jane MacQuitty 


SHOPPING 


THE TIMES SWEATSHIRT 


Something is stirring underfoot 




Patterns emerge again as people shake 
off restricted choice of floor coverings 







and nylon range at ezo si 
stockists contact Stoddards. 











chestnut and weathered w m - 


Patterned and plain dies are being used to 
create rug effects in living areas, usually in front 
of a fireplace, where real rugs might be 
damaged by sparks. These 6in square border 
tiles m Chess design at £43.70 per square yard 
or Cherry or Deco designs at £46. are hand 
printed in a choice of 20 colours. Other designs 
include May Border . a pattern of stylised Bowers 
and crossed ribbons. Border Trail of leafy swirls 
and Border Line, a particularly elegant plain 
(■arrangement of broad and narrow bands. 
Matching wall fifes are available, all on a white 
background to mix and match with plain white 
tiles at £1.06 each or £37.95 per square yard. 
Available at Rye Trim. 


Change is afoot in interior 
decoratioiz. Pattern is making 
a comeback. 

The effect, though, is far 
removed from the bao old days 
of carpet design typified by 
splashy giant oak laves. For 
traditional rooms there are 
richly coloured authentic Per- 
sian designs, for modern ones 
there are small, neat 
geometries. 

Customers are now much 
more aware of design possibil- 
ities and their increased 
appreciation has resulted in a 
tom-round for the fl^ghg 
trade. Bill May-smith, design 
director of Stoddards, the 
Scottish carpet company 
which this year won the first 
Design Council award to a 
carpet company for many 
years, believes that giving the 
customer more choice has been 
one of the main reasons for the 
Improvement 

• Previously the retailers 
would make their choice of a 
few rolls of carpet from a wide 
range available which meant 
that in effect they were decid- 
ing what the public would 
see. Now that they can no 
longer afford to stock whole 
rolls of carpet, (he nanofac- < 
hirers are providing cot 1 
lengths and the shops are able ; 
to show the entire range - the 
customer can see everything 
that is available. Carpet < 
remains the most popular floor 
covering in this conntry with 
customers in the middle to top 
end of the market being pre- 
pared to pay extra to avoid the 
commonplace. j 

Beryl Downing ; 


Carpet Brintons Ltd, PO 
Box 16, Kidderminster, 
Worcestershire (0562 3444). 
British Carpet 
Manufacturers’ 

Association, 72 Dean Street 
London W1 (01 734 9853). 
Stoddard Carpets Ltd., 
Johnstone, Renfrewshire 
(0505 23041). 

Vinyl and simulated 
wood: Amtico. 17 St 
George Street, London W1 
(01 629 6258). 

Wrcanders Ltd., Maxwell 
Way. Crawley. Sussex 
(0293 27700). 

Tile: Elon Tiles, 8 
Clarendon Cross. London 
W11 (01 727 0884). 

Rye Tiles, Rye, Sussex 
(0797 223030) and 12 
Connaught Street, London W2 
(01 723 7278). 


COLL E»C T I o N 

THE EXCLUSIVE 
CHOICE 
IN BED LINEN 

bcautoos continent*! bed linen, 
enja Ittltfy embroidered 
or laca-*dB*4 cotton sheen, 
flue Swiss eowort damaeJ* doiwi eoeers. 
stunning umdero prints from Italy. 
Indodmg tftrf year's range of 
Mtaool bed linen in the tales adorn 
bU exclusive to my collection, 
at truly unbeatable prices. 

So browse through my catalogue. 

The choice Is ype/s, 
it's che dvUfced way n shop. 


The Karin Kinsefla Collection 
5 Manor Place. ChtsWium. 
Kent BR7 5QH Tel: 01-467 5327 



T he classic stretch-knit sweatshirt origin- 
ated in tbe U.S. A., as a comfortable easy-fit 
top for sports and leisure activities. Tbe 
design, crew-neck with deep region sleeves 
and stretch-knit neck, cuffs and hem, makes it 
a useful nmlti-pmpose garment that offers a 
practical alternative to traditional pullovers 
and sweaters for casual wear. 

M r. President has produced this range of 
high quality sweatshirts made in die the 
UK. and designed for Umes rcadere with 
*THE TIMES' flock printed on the left breast 
of each shirt. Available in a new range of 
colours; burgundy or navy (50% cotton/50 % 
polyester), or grey (50% cotton/50% acrylic) 
in a comprehensive range of sizes. 

THE TIMES 


AU orders should be sent to: 

Tbe Times Sweatshirt Offer, 

Bourne Road, Bexley, Kent DAS 1BL. 
Tel: Crayford 53316 for enquiries only. 


Price: £9.95 each. 

All prices ore inclusive of post and packing. 

If you are nor satisfied The Times hill refund your 
money without question- tot addition to our guarantee, 

you have the benefit of your full statutory rights which 
are not affected. This offer can only be despatched to 
addresses in the U.K. 

Please allow up to 21 days for delivery. 

Please send me Times Sweatshirts) @ £9.95 

each as indicated below: 



I enclose Cheqne/PO for £L. 
The Tunes Sweatshirt effet 

Or debit ngr Awess/Vrsa no. 


: payable » 


Expiry 

Send id: Times Swe«shin Offer. Boorae Road. Bexley, 
Kent DAS 1BL. ’ 


Cfqylbrd 53316 for enquiries only. 





THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


C.Cl v’EC'EUl" 12N0-5N Sk ' 1TX'*I3X \“ 


; -rs-j bfcoc f:f j- c 


Open oil day with fwMhibi How ondlundilime musk. GoBeeShonBirffa*. Bon ond R'W^JeCd}*. 

Jna proupi every Fri/Scrtfivpcvenm^. Enjoy thenwgnifkartwewnirfBg Ben ondftfffawwwromou'riwiPflB wife 


SKfi BARBICAN HALL 

B Barbican Centre, Silk St. EC2Y 8DS 
01 -635 8831/ 628 8795 
Telephone Bookings: 1Qam-8pm 7 days a week 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


FROM9MM MCGaneertOWiesea m uxtomti&nf) 
6Sqd | Saw* igu>i Angvla Rwn iWoi Ptfa R>iuai eru Dance3 

7.30 pm 


•mhu 
rani s*pt 
7.30 pm 


EOGtiiBi tuBimvv IM tW BwJ M nH »« i oiwhb.wi|»<P«w» 



OtctiMkm. LeoaM Bernstein icon® Mazrep lo he muiKM 
Bmneta Jutdes Ganw iEmo cmml. lam Fos# m"9 oi Songs 

Oienh ^vncmny No 9 1 Fnxn mr Mm woncn 

P30CI1. «■*«* wnMffPW Ml Venn nocWmnar 



Piano' Concern) lib S (Erawiwl. Svmpnory ho 3 tBac*) 
EL Cm £&£0l 090. CIS LPOLH 


QUEEN ELIZABETH FI A LI. 




SOUTH BANK CRAFTS 

1(0 • for perfect gifts 7 oe *-Son iicm-7pm 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


RAmQNDgiBBtfnTteai 

TONI GHT at 130 p.m. 

MUSIC FROM SPAIN 

IUa~. amULIBB DANCE PBOM EL AMOR BRUJO 




ROYAL PHiSaRMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

40th Anniversary 
Royal Gala Concert 

to the pmsmtce otHHH PrincosaAhxaram 

IM 

ROYAL ALBERT HALL 

Monday 15 September at 730pm 


VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: A London Symphony 
conductor 

ANDRE PREVIN 


BRAHMS: Doubta Concerto 

SIR YEHUDI MENUHIN 
PAUL TORTELIER 
ANTAL DORATI 


ROSSWK Overbna, WUSam 7W 

conductor 

YURI TEMIRKANOV 


DEUUS: Th* Walk to the Paradlso Garden 

SIR CHARLES GROVES 


•am* ttdurts *S SMB G KS 


. _ nBonkETsKoff 




ASGARD PRESENTS 


sc vvrOMCRE srerer tv.x de 

r; AH ACEH iViLLlA.V iV'M 
501 OTPiCS OT 3Jt 234 ,• MMUS-3 LIST c: 

WIGMORE HALL 

r 'f[7li v T T MSSagaiB 




Conductor BRAMWELLTOVEY 
WILLIAM STEPHENSON piano 
£5. £6-50. £8, £9.50, OO.SO.DL.50 HaU 01-428 3191 CC 01-4288800 


WEDNESDAY 17 SEPTEMBER at 7J9pjn. 

LONDON MOZART PLAYERS 
Conductor JANE GLOVER 

0 HAYDN: Symphony No. 75 'LbCIhsw’ 

MOZART: Pima Gooaeno No. 21 io C, K. 467 
SAXTON: The Rag of Emm 
| MOZART: Symphony No. J* in D"H*ffiKr'KJ85 

I RAPHAEL OROZCO pono / \ 

A British Pefrotann SposwnUp I DD 
CLSU,£S,£h.£7./A50.£WHaDv0l-928 JI91) \DI/ 
C-Ci 01-928*800 1 V' 


VICTOR HOCaMAUSER in enoc. wkh ibe LSO praam 
M the 80VAL FESTIVAL HALL 

FRIDAS’ NEXT 12tfa SEPTEMBER at 7 J0 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

SI ctpIwg Bea uty Waltz, Swan Lake Suite, 
Piano Concerto N« L, Nutcracker Suite 




WITH CANNON AND MORTAR EFFECTS 
LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Candnctor: DAVID COLEMAN Solaac PHILIP MARTIN 
£150, £4 JO, £5.50, £7, £8 JO, £9.30, £10.50 from Hall 928 31917928 8 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER presents at the RFH 
TUESDAY 16 SEPTEMBER at 7 JO 

LEONARD BERNSTEIN 

and the 

ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

BERNSTblN ..^..JUBILEE GAMES (European premiere) 

LUKAS FOSS JONG OF SONGS 

Mezzo Soprano: Sheri Grcenawald 

DVORAK SYMPHONY NO 9 (NEW WORLD) 

Plica from £7.50 (irom Hall Box Office 928 31911928 8800 


at the ROYAL. resffi'S’ALfl^LL l "’" J 

SATURDAY S7di SEPTEMBER at 7 JO 

GERSHWIN 

Introduced and conducted by ANTONY HOPKINS 

CUBAN OVERTURE. VARIATIONS ON 1 GOT RHYTHM, 
RHAPSODY IN BLUE, AN AMERICAN IN PARIS, 
POR0YAND BBSS SYMPHONIC PICTURE 
NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Soloist; ANDREW HAIGH 

£3.50, £■) 50. (5.50, £7-00. £8.50, (9.50, 00.50 fnna Hail 01-925 JL9U928 8800 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


FRIDAY NEXT 12 SEPTEMBER at 7.45 pan- 

Harriwn/ l’iinn i LwL y mtn n 

The Academy of Ancient Music 
J. S. BACH 

Coffee & Peasant Cantatas, Suite No. 2 
EMMA fURKBY soprano DAVID THOMAS bass 
CHRISTOPHER HOGWOOD director 

For lanher dasb sec Scab Bwfc panel 


FhmannF nan K BOB. Ortm: VMMS cannons ops'. Owh 
Pagne a Guerra 11315). ScMbat Fowm m P mm DM). Ma« 
Banc The® Songs Uni; Grand* Vdtsa a manna op 6. 

£4. £3. £2. Mmjhnpwnl 





WIGMORE HALL 

Manager: WBHam Lyne 

1986/1987 SUBSCRIPTION 
SERIES PART ONE 

20* DISCOUNT IF YOU BOOK FOR 6 CONCERTS 
OR MORE, OUT OF A CHOICE OF 34 

PHONE 01-935 2141 FOR FREE 
BROCHURE OR WRITE TO 
WIGMORE HALL 
Late Romantics: Austria & Germany 
1880-1930 
Britten Series 
London Pianoforte Series 
Master Concerts 

Airisb appearing mdodc 


Arisen Anger 
Beam Arts Trio 
JuKan Bream 
Shura Cherkassky 
EndriUon Quartet 
Gabrieli Quartet 
Hagen Quartet 
Gwyneth Jones 
Ralph Kirshbanm 
Ermt Kovack 


Lindsay Quartet 
FeHciry Lott 
Mischa Maisky 
Nash Ensembk 
Panocha Quartet 
Mikhail Pktnev 
Takacs Quartet 
Robert Tear 
Vkma S chu b er t Trio 
Sarah Walker 


LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA &££ 


Tomorrow 7 September 730pm 

Programme ndodes 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No I 

DVORAK Symphony No 9 

"From the New World" 
BARRY TUCKWELL conductor 
CRISTINA ORTIZ piano 
M 


Saturday 13 September 7.45pm 

DVORAK Carnival Overture 

TC HAI KOVSKY Violin Concerto in D 

R. STRAUSS Don Juan 

BARBER Adagio for Strings 

RAVEL LaValse 

STEPHANIE CHASE violin GEOFFREY SIMON ooodnetor 


Seat Prices ttLSO, £9.50. £7-50, £6, £4 JO. £3.50. 

Box Office Tel: 10-8 every day mcL Sun 01-638 8891/628 8795 


VICTOR HOCHHMUSEB «Wi A* BAHBICAN pracati 

fl/M TONIGHT at 7.45 

|£al POPULAR CLASSICS 

MENDELSSOHN Ow Fingal’s Cave 

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS JRantasiaoiiGrecaslecves 

RACHMANINOV _Phmo Concerto No 2 

SUPPE Overture Tight Cavalry 1 

MASCAGNI ^Intermezzo from *Cavallcria Rnstkaaa* 

GRIEG Peer Gym Snitc No 1 

TCHAIKOVSKY «... .^.-Caprkcio Italics 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

ComtacteR BRIAN WRIGHT Solriat: ANTON YPU2HLES 

£6-00, £7.00, £8 JO. £9.50, £10.50, fianHaD 638 889) M28 8795 


VICTOR BOCBBAUSERpmmattMdic BARBKAN 

SUNDAY 2lat SEPTEMBER at IM 

ROSSINIHANDEL 
GRBEG-BEETHOVEN 

ROSSINI Ok ‘The Thieving Magpie* 

HANDEL. — — . Jto kfar ftclbyi nu ve rt i 

GRIEG ” t -*- J 


JACK 



EDINBURGH PLAYHOUSE: 

SEPT. 26K 27 -1986 
BOX OFFICE NUMBER: 031-557 2590 


HAMMERSMITH ODEON 

LONDON 

SEPT. 29, 30, OCT 1, 3, 4, 5 - 1 986 
BOX OFFICE NUhfflER 01 -7484081 


CREDIT CARD HOTLINES (SUBJECT TO B00KH8 FEE) 
01-734 8932 
01-734 8989 


CITY OF LONDON CHOIR 

Cmdodor DONALD CASHMORE — SEASON IWt/to 
Conosrs tn ihc Barirican. GmldhoQ, Royal Festival UaH, Qocni 
EfitabethHallindilde VES3N Reifuem, MOZART Re^uietD ml Vcspees 
BACH Man in B moor and AbKmfka. DllRUFLE Rc^iacm, VW Man, 
and mb by Britten and Brucfcacr. 

PUHMnnmii, City rf London Stafada. London Bach orchalraa. 

An apandeie dvar wnh vaonoei dxielbcv id oil aecnaiB. 
Rehanih arean«hn.GllF9 near Bin St. kmimii Sept- M. 

Phone 0755 <*5WW or 01-W 79EJ Ear ftmha dnadk broshuw 
and mdmen ayuMHHua 


THE IONIAN SINGERS. 

Director; Tuaothjr Salter. 

Experienced srapen with wphtrcadinp abilities are invited 
to MmUon far this chamber cixxr. 

Repcnont: Rcnamncc to pmcau 

emphasis on con temporary — - 

1986/87: Concerts in central Lo n do n , broadcasts, 
tecordinn. South West tour. 

Rehearsals: Tuesday evening 




CONCERTS 


AMBASSMMMSOI aSoblll IT 
nSo ii7l. ritu call iza nn/r 
ano 7MO ibk« feel. 

ncoM z o c roa — 

ftm j ai Sliik.^iw roiowr** 

LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES 

-nemr for a tickxt- 

wms On 


WIGMORE BALL WEDNBSDAYM SEPTEMBER n 7 JO pm. 

NASH ENSEMBLE 

RICHARD van ALLEN bass 

HAYDN: Pimo Tno in G HXV/2S [Gipsy RondoK DENISOV: Sena tar 
Aae, oboe, dinner rod msu, tno (1st London pnCh MUSSORGSKY: 
Songs and Dmces of Death nr voice rod nae; TCHAKOVSKY: Soon 
’Souvenir dc Horence’ n D otmer Op 70. 

£4j<), £42)0, £3.00, £100, hum Box Office 0 1 -935 2M1 
A In* 6*»» of Harvey'i sherry win be uned w deket holdm bemem 
7.00 & 7.JU 

MaiUBcuienc Amdn F ree dma n 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 

at th e BARBICAN 

THURSDAY NEXT 11 SEPTEMBER at Z45 p.m. 

AS toulby 

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY piano 
LYNN HARRELL cello 



FRIDAY NEXT 12 SEPTEMBER at Z45pjn« 



Ontectoc FRASER GOUUHNG CRAIG STOPPARD psao 
£5,£6,£t£8JO, £9.50,£10JO 


TONIGHT 7J8 BBC SCOTTISH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
RETURN SEATS ONLY Worta by Sfcebm. Maart, 

John Mzmdl Cfddn & Mtuddsuho 
P i d Vom mlh by John MmwcM Gcdde* 6J5 pum. 


TOMORROW 7 JO BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

RETURN SEATS ONLYWorkx by YcnbA .Mahkr 





fiS.CB.OPJO.Ol, £12.50 



pan. 


THURSDAY II SEPTEMBER 7J0 GTY Of BIRMINGHAM 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Wjrta to Raid, Debussy, Rmhmmmm 
RETURN SEATS ONLY A Nbdwo 




Si John’s, Smith Square, SWI Monday 29 September w 7.J0 pja. 

MOZART 

Ingiepiapo GonccrKB No. 25 K. 503 & No. 20 K, 537 Coronation’ 
Symphony No. 30 K. 232 

Malcolm Bilson, forte piano 
English Baroque Soloists 
John Eliot Gardiner, Conductor 

Tickets: £7. £5.0. fan St. Jdm’i Smith Bex Office (01-222 IMU 

llaaievtidi Qm Ac (Men Lid 


ENGLISH BAROQUE CHOIR 

Musical Dbttcaar: Lean Lovett 

There ce vaca a rire in «B 
xogen who «DUld Ue d 



ROYAL ALBERT HALL, SUNDAY 14 SEPTEMBER at 7J0 pm. 
THE MALCOLM SARGJBVT SUMMER CONCERT 

VIENNESE EVENING 

CO.VCER TOZMC .MAJOR RJRFLLTE AND HARP, KS9 MOZART 
MARCH: THE GIPSY BARON tACTUI i JOHANN STRAUSS 
WALTZ: VOICES OF SPRING JOHANN STRAUSS 

MERRY WIDOW WALTZ LEHAR 

WALTZ: THE BLUE DANUBE JOHANN STRAUSS 

OTHER WORKS BY JOHANN STRAUSS. SCHUBERT, 
JOSEF STRAUSS ETC. 

MAR1SA ROBLES harp WILLIAM BENNETT flute 

MALCOLM SARGENT FESTIVAL CHOIR 

WREN ORCHESTRA OF LONDON 
Conductor VHJEM TAUSKY 

CL £LSd. £5, £7J«J, Hafl (01-599 8212) CX^ (01-589 94651 
PrQnmrre Tbe Makulm ftavp-w* fh n y»v Fond for Children 


ALBWYCH YMEAYIW Q| ast, 

040a/0b4i rr Ol J79 MSS 


5g335g5iLiS5E 


BARBICAN HALL October concerts 




LSO Ynri Simonov 

16 Oct 

Count Basie Orchestra 

1 0ct 

Puccini Gaia Night 

11 Oct 

Yehudi Menuhin with 

Anne Sophie Mutter 

20 Oct 

CBSO/Simon Battle/ 

Peter Donohoe 

2 Oct 

Gilbert and Sullivan 

Pirates of Penzance 

18 Oct 

Yuri Simonov 

Peter Donohoe 

23 Oct 

John Lill/Lunchtime 
Beethoven Series starts 

3 Oct 

Battle of lafalgar Day 
Concert 

22 Oct 

Jose Feghali plays Mozart 

Mariss Yansons conducts 
Shostakovich 

26 Oct 
30 Oct 

City of London Sintonia/ 
Barry liickweil plays Mozart 
Horn Concertos 

10 Oct 

City of London Sinfonia/ 
Cecile Ousset plays Chopin 

24 Oct 



AMD THE PIT 
George Bernard Shawls Misalflance 
Scenes from a Marriage— Feydeau 
Arthur Miller's The Archbishop’s Ceiling 


Placido Domlnge In Zeffirelli’s 
Otellofrom 17 Oct 


Call us now: confirmed telephone credit card bookings and for free October diary 01-638 8891 10am -8pm every day including Sundays 



THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A cnmrdi m- RxTufd Hdrm 
■’ rrw- dPiUHN- ol r^pdirou. 
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Hnlim ami ilMi-rln) by 
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rinicau?->ru 7dAV CC rnnifc.nw. 

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I IlMTKul Tunc-. 

1ACK LEMMON 

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BOOKS IN BRIEF 


TO* Nfc* and the Good 

Jris Muntoch (Pwtguin, &L 95 ) 
Jhe.fbrnnila'is femfiian Witty 
and successful men, .various 
-wives, a house on the Dorset 
coast Jilted . with children, 
tong-slay friends, cats, dogs, 
and sophisticated jokes. Out- 
side this circle there is a 
smade,.ihen rumours of blade 

S G a prostitute called 
n of Troy, and various 
other possible sources of sex- 
ual excitement , and menace. 
■'■Some people find all this 
delightful. Others find it 
exhausting. There are too 
-many ideas and. characters 
jostling for more attention 

• than they are ever going to get 

But when the author does 
iindutter the stage, one re- 
alizes :bow superb and how 
r varied is . her . narrative 
technique. 

Slom Virgin by Barry 
Unsworth (Penguin, EJL95) 

Simon Raises is a conserva- 
tion' expert who conies to 
Venice to repair the stonework 
of a-I5fo-cemury statue of the 
Madonna. As he dimbs up to 
examine her, he is suddenly 
aware not only of her beauty, 
but also of her strange erotic 
power, and the atmosphere of 
licence that surrounds her. He 
feels compelled to search out 
her history. It is a meticulous 
and scholarly detective story, 
using aU tiw natural menace of 
the lagoons and streets and 
stairways of Venice to 
' 'substantiate the theme of vi- 
' olence and seduction, and the 
• creative force caught up in 
them. And h is another 
celebration of Venice. 

r stray ano rTtonas py 

Anita BrooknerfTriaai Grafton, 

. £2.50) 

Anita Braokner describes here 
how family lifedistorts as wdl 
as supports the individuality 
of its members. At the centre 
of the novel is Sofka, a 
familiar matriarchal figure. 
She has named her sons after 
kings and emperors, and b$r 
daughters as if they were 
characters in a musical com- 
edy. Yet her expectations 
quickly falter. Perhaps at the 
end nothing very remarkable 
has been described, and even 
the author's usual irony is 
blurred, but the mood is 
unambiguous. Human life is 
wretched, and if the security of 
family, customs seems to 
promise ottenvfee; It is an 
empty promise. jr 

Floating Down To Canmolot 
b^D avw Benadictus (Future, 

There is something odd about 
this novel It seems tike an 
enormous word puzzle in 
which one has to find some 
hidden anagram or due that 
will suddenly make the whole 
thing meaningful. But the 
publisher's blurb insists that it 
is simply a “scabrous black 
comedy", which is full of 
verbal dexterity. It is set m 
Cambridge. There is a tot 
about philosophy, and Ten- 
nyson, and university lectures. 
The narrative style could be 
loosely described as sub-Tom 
Sharpe (without his sense of 
the absurd) with some aca- 
demic pretensions. Am- 
putated penises get carried 
around in carrier bags and a 
professor’s mother gets herself 
up as a man' to seduce a 
policewoman. There is a lot of 
other rather dull activity. De- 
spite the title, there is not 
much -floating for anybody. 
They are all drowning heavily. 

Anne Barnes 



Army life: an ffl ns f nUro n of 'Tom Rattieton receiving a report" in a leisurely fashion 

Catalyst of the regiment 


A Matter of Honour by . 

PhtHp Mason tPapermac, 
£&9S)‘ 

Fortune favours the brave; 
and the old Indian Army has 
been fortunate indeed (and 
deserves its good fortune) in 
having this splendid book as 
its memorial. It was first 
published in 1974. and Philip 
Mason was supremely well- 
qualified to. have written it. 

He had left Sallied with a 
First in 1927 and joined the 
Indian Civil Service; he held 
appointments in Garhwal, the 
nursery of soldiers, and in the 
War Department, to which he 
returned to serve throughout 
the war and until 1947 in the 
highest appointments. He 
thus saw the Indian Army 
frora-foe inside at the time of 
ns greatest trials and its 
greatest triumphs, while its 
strength increased from 
189.000 to 2JOO.OOO, all 
volunteers. 

Mason left India in 1947 


and became active in matters 
concerned with race, immigra- 
tion, and education; he wrote 
books on these subjects and 
novels of Indian life. Then 
came A Matter of Honour , ; a 
labour of love into which he 
poured all his knowledge and 
wisdom, for like Odysseus he 
bad visited many cities of men 
. (not all geographical ones) and 
got to know their thoughts. 

He describes the book mod- 
estly as an attempt to sketch 
the changing relations of offi- 
cers and men. and to answer 
certain questions about their 
behaviour, and adds: Tl is set 
against the general . back- 
ground of the history of the 
British in India, because the 
purely military aspects do not 
make sense in isolation.” 

It covers 200 years, (about 
half as long as the Romans 
were in Britain) from the 
raising of the three Presidency - 
Annies— Bengal Madras, and 
Bombay — taking in the 
mutiny of the Bengal Army 


and the reorganization of the 
Indian Army in 1895 under 
Kitchener, up to the partition 
of 1947. No existing book 
covers this span in one nar- 
rative. It will remain the 
classic account of a classic 
army. 

Mason's book is written in a 
delightful style, carrying the 
reader's attention along 
through 580 pages (for the 
index is well worth reading, 
with its indication of the 
variety of the Indian Army) 
with the right word always m 
the right place. The narrative 
is, as dear as the maps and 
plans: notable 'examples are 
“Four Ways into Turkey” in 
the 1914-1918 War, and “The 
World Front and the Central 
Bastion” in 193*45. 

The history is enlivened by 
numerous good tales . from 
diaries, memoirs, and regi- 
mental histories; most appro- 
priately so, because the 
regiment was the catalyst 
which from the beginning 


overrode culture and religion, 
and bound the group into a 
disciplined body of men, in 
which each individual mem- 
ber held fast, as a role, to his 
own high standard of personal 
honour. 

Now that A Matter of 
Honour is available in paper- 
back. it will be bought by all 
those who are connoted with 
the Indian Army, their chil- 
dren, and grandchildren. But 
that array came to an end 
nearly 40 years ago: and what 
if “that warid is all away and 
quyt brocht till aneend-”?Tn 
feet all who detest wars and 
long for peace, particularly 
those who are interested in the 
pursuit of “peace, studies” - 
should also go Out and buy it 
here is an institution of men 
bound up together in mutual 
loyally who have learned the 
rules of “economy of. force" 
and “not to shoot until youare 
shot at”. In those men is one 
due to world peace. 

Cyril Jams 


Bad man tells good tales 


GHtz by Bmore Leonard 
(Penguin, £2^0) 


A villain's fife isn't, or- 
chestrated. ft Is an amoral 
quagmire file wicked .thrash 
about in — some sutk, some 
swim. Such men are Mr 
Leonard's congregation. This 
of coarse rentes him compd- 
Hngfy sympathetic. The fris- 
son in question is that of hot 
for the grace of God..., 
-Atlantic City (nice to know tiw 
next two cities up the beach 
are Ventnor and Margate), a 
dodgy childhood, defective 
genes, and white middle Amer- 
ica — tiMte go L Teddy Magyk 
is without question a had man. 
There Isn't a kind thought in 
his head. 

How to do a bad man well? 
How did Teddy get like that? 
For a start ms Mom (who 
doesn't tolerate any suffering, 
long or otherwise) has a parrot 
called Baddy which “would 
peck the seed oat of the red 
goo of her lips and .eat it 
Without thinking twice". Even 
the parrot feds queasy in 
Teddy's company. It doesn't 
trust him. Storffllmg ap to the 
end of its perch, its eyes go. 
milky in an effort to ignore 
him, which merely serves In 
remind Teddy of the look in 
his black six-foot-six slammer 


boyfriend's eyes at moments of 
tenderness. 

In common with Keats, 
Teddy has the capacity to 
empathize with birds; however 
. in Teddy’s case onfy to the 
extent of the parrot's desire to 
peck his eyes out. 

Teddy does a lot of wicked 
things in quite a short space of 
time; and yon befieve him 
capable of every one. He 
drags, rapes, and then pushes 
.foe hero's girl-friend off a 
seventh floor balcony thinking 
“An eight-poutt-five. Nice 
exe cu tion, but 'ey, she didn't 
keep her feet together." 

He considers killing Ms 
mother on -the grounds that 
she is u boring oM bat who 
won't lend him her “big yellow 
tmd of a car" or 20 dollars, lmt 
derides instead to drop his 
lucky q natter beneath the 
■ boaidwalk so as to entice an 
old lady under there; then 
mnrders/rapes/rohs her of her 
one-anned-bandit winnings, 
thus financing Ms next at- 
tempt to kill the cop who had a 
good look into his eyes before 
locking him away for seven 
years. 4 

Now all this may sound 
beyond the boimds of credibil- 
ity, but it isn't Mr Leonard, 
understands how people can 
do very terrible things without 
twitching. “Who knows? They 


lie to yon from jump street,' 
don't know how else to talk.” 
It's not as easy as it might 
seem to come up with a 
plausibly evil criminal without 
reverting to stereotype. Teddy 
is not an om«Bd-oat psycho- 
t&th, nor is he given modi in 



Captivating: Elmore Leonard 

foe way of a motive for the 
awfal l ings be does; yet such 
is the sldll with which Leonard 
treats the wnrkhigs of Teddy V 
nasty fitde mind, one never for 
one instant questions his 
actions. 

A natural talent fin' die 
mechanisms of evO and self- 
deception is a sine pan mm of 


good crime writing. The 
marginally rh a n nfa g , un- 
scrupulous , and opp ort un is- 
tically homicidal Mr Ripley 
(Patricia Highsmith's Ripley’s 
Gemeetal)ls a case in point 
Also essential is a sense of 
humour linked to n pitch- 
perfect ear for dialogue. Leon- 
ard possesses all three 
qualities. “Wonderful things 
can happen". Vincent said, 
“when you plant seeds of 
distrust in a garden of 
assholes.” 

' Teddy is supported by a foie 
cast of bit players. Iticky “The 
Zit” Catalina who “eats like a 
goat” and the tactless younger. 
Mr Bertoia (undertaker): 
“Something yon might con- 
sider, pot foe ashes in Taino 
Indian pottery — actually what 
you're getting are aboat eight 
pounds of bone fragments, not 
ashes”; the type of gny who 
renames his funeral parlour 
Death b Things. 

It is not very often that the 
hype on a paperback cover 
bears any reiatiocr to foe 
quality of what is inside ft. 
However of this book Stephen 
King (no less) says “After 
reading GHtz I went oat to the 
bookstore and bought every- 
thing else of Elmore Leonard 1 
owl - i find”. So did L 

Adam Carr 


Punches 

and 

poetry 


FILMS ON TV 


Martin Scorsese's Raging 
Bull which gets its first show- 
ing on British television today 
(Channel 4. 10.55pm- 

1.10am), is a demonstration 
that there is more to boxing 
. movies than the Rocky series. 

Indeed the fight game is 
only the starting point for an 
examination of a man and an 
era. carried out with Scorsese's 
characteristic mixture of 
^stringency and sympathy. 

The “Bair is Jake La 
Motts, an American middle- 
weight from the Bronx who 
.briefly, in the 1940s. held the 
world championship, tost it 
and went downhill and found 
a sort of redemption reciting 
Shakespeare in a night ciuh. 

It is a boxing story that has 
been repeated many times 
over with other poor boys who 
have had their transient glory 
and been unable to cope with 
ferae. But Scorsese has given it 
a particular pungency. 

His main ally is the actor 
Robert de Niro, whose 
magnificent portrayal of La 
Motta rightly won an Oscar. 
This is a portrait m the round 
and in depth, of a violent, 
paranoid figure for whom the 
fisticuffs of the ring were often 
duplicated in his private life. 



Sounds of 
horror 


Raging Bulk Robert de Niro as 
the tirie-lwsMer Jake La Motta 

To evoke the period and 
setting, which echoes his own 
formative years in New York's 
Little Italy, Scorsese took the 
decision to defy box-office 
convention and shoot the film 
in black and while. 

De Niro apart, most of the 
cast were unknowns. Joe 
Peso, who plays the fighter's 
brother, had made only one 
film and was working as a 
restaurant manager, while 
Cathy Moriarty (La Motta's 
wife) had never acted before. 
It is a formidable film. 


RECOMMENDED 


The ICOIing (1956): Stanley 
Kubrick's gripping racetrack 
tftrifler (BBC2, today, 1 .55- 
3.15pm). 

Psycho (I960): Hitchcock 
classic of the macabre with 
Anthony Perkins (fTV, 
today, 10pm- 12. 05am). 

A Night at the Opera 
(1935): Glorious mayhem from 
the Marx Brothers (Channel 


RADIO 


Using a montage of sounds 
and voices presented without 
commentary. Not AH Blood 
and Bandages (Radio 4. 
Thurs. 7.40-8.40pm) explores 
the quiet heroism of nursing 
sisters during the Second 
World War. 

Hastened to the front lines 
and pathetically short of 
equipment, they choked back 
the horror of mutilated bodies 
and worked impossible hours. 
They coped, most of them, 
way beyond the call of duty. 

Chekhov's The Seagull is 
the second play in the Globe 
Theatre season (Radio 4. to- 
morrow. 230-4pmX with the 
anion moved to the West of 
the Ireland in the 1890s. Anna 
Massey plays the famous ac- 
tress returning to her estate 
and family intrigue. 

For the last 20 years or so 
The White Train (Radio 4, 
today. 4-4.45pm) has been 
travelling America carrying 
nuclear warheads with five 
times the fire-power of (he 
bomb that was dropped on 
Hiroshima. And everywhere it 
goes, as Margaret Horsfield's 
documentary explains, anti- 
nuclear protesters are there. 

A radio perennial. Round 
Britain Quiz, is back next 
week (Radio 4, Wed, 6.30* 
7pm) with the resident team of 
Irene Thomas and Eric Korn 
once more exercising their 
crossword puzzle minds. 


ithors (C 
4, Tues, 9-1 0.45pm). 

Black gold and liquid notes 




The trouble with oil, as a new 
Channel 4 series points out, b' 
that there is always too ranch 
of it or too little. That is the 
to fti history, 
if (Mon, 10-1 lpm) is an 
eight-prat collaboration be* 
tween. Grampian Television 
and NRK of Norway which 
traces foe black Add from 
Edwin L Drake to Sheikh 
Yaraani and Sollem Voe. 

Drake, foe American pio- 
neer, guessed wrong and went 
bust leaving the field to the 


TELEVISION 


ruthlessly successful John D. 
Rockefeller. Private archive 
film fleshes oft the Rocke- 
feller story in the Inst of what 
promises to be a strong series. 

Friday is Jessye Norman 
night H er Pro ms appearance 
in the Beethoven Ninth is 
relayed live on BBC2 (830- 
. 930p 0 and on BBC1 (1030- 
1135pm) she is profiled at 
length in Omnibus. What 


emerges is a world star who 
has never lost her roots in the 
American deep sooth. 

Fating the BBC1 Saturday 
evening slot vacated by Juliet 
Bravo b Casualty (730- 
8.40pm), yet another attempt 
to satisfy the television 
audience's insatiable craving 
for drama about matters medi- 
cal This one is set in the 
casualty department of a gen- 
eral hospital and as they used 
to say about The Nem of the 
World, all human life is there. 


IN THE GARDEN 


Trained for a fruitful crop 


Bring burgled produced noth- 
ing like the sense of violation I 
felt early this spring when my 
garden came under assault 
from some bullocks who 
broke out of a neighbouring 
field. I had not previously 
realized how attached I was to 
this small awkwardly shaped, 
often- unruly piece of land. 

We repaired the lawn and 
the brick paths, replanted the 
gaps; summer growth has 
healed the gashes and I can 
now look on my garden with 
serenity. Somewhat un- 
fashionably we maintain the 
local practice of having from 
garden vegetable plots. But l 
like the old-style main path 
with crops on one side, flowers 
on the other. In the flower 
beds, rare plants snuggle up 
alongside the lush com- 
moners: lady's mantle, 
buddlcia and ground ivy. L 
should overcome my reluc- 
tance to weed out feral plants 
but 1 don't really mind irregu- 
larity — mulleins among the 
gooseberries, vivid flames of 
crocosmia flickering among 
the alpine strawberries, and 
more than a dozen baby oaks 
which sprouted from the last 
load of manure. 

Tress can be accommodated 
in limited spaces by choosing 
trained forms. I decided to try 


my hand at training some 
espalier apples as a divide 
between the lawn and the 
vegetable garden. Training is 
.not difficult, and they come to 
maturity surprisingly quickly. 
The Ribston pippin, one of the 

Ctaro Roberts 



Inspired: chimney bellflowers 

most famous of old apples, is 
worth growing simply for its 
beautiful dark green leaves, 
silvery white beneath, but this 
year we shall discover whether 
the first fruits from our own 
tree areas finely flavoured and 
aromatic as history relates. 
Medlars and quinces are com- 
pact and delightful trees with 


pretty foliage and blossom as 
well as interesting fruit. Ours 
were planted as halfstandard 
three-year-olds; the Medlar in 
its more favoured position 
began to fruit the following 
year, the quince, usually 
slower to establish, is produc- 
ing its first really good fruit. 

Every year brings surprises. 
A fuchsia which I thought I 
had eliminated has re- 
appeared; a chimney bell- 
flower discovered dried-out 
and forgotten in a garden 
centre has responded to water 
and good soil by producing a 
beautiful spire hung with 
white bells. It is also called 
church steeples and 18th- 
century gardeners achieved 
pot-grown plants with 6ft 
spires. Patient potling-on over 
two or three years is the key to 
such tall beauties, which 
flower for weeks. 

Toad lilies have a coven, 
sinister beauty. Buds have 
begun to appear within the 
glossy, dark foliage of three 
plants of Tricyrtis Jormosana I 
recently slipped into a shady 
alcove, and I wait with enthu- 
siasm for the small blooms 
freckled purple, one of the 
strangest and most bewitching 
flowers I know. 

Francesca Greenoai 


p h h n i°n jtj 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1047 

Prizes or the New Collins 

correct solutions opened on Thursday. September 1 1. 1986. entries 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Coni- 
SStiSn. I p 555» Street. London. E 19XN. The wirre^ and 
solution will be announced on Saturday. September 13. 1 986. 

ACROSS 

1 folly fowl lail (7.4) 

9 Become too big for 
171 

10 Stage (5) 

11 Observe (3) 

13 So much (41 

16 Coalmine waste f4| 

17 Fri firmly (6) 

I* Stuff (4) 

20 Grass area (4) 

21 BilkwngctowMto 

22 European mountains 
Mr 

23 Willie Wonka author 
(41 

25 Spider's trap (31 

28 Tree plantation (51 

29 Interpretation (71 

30 Heaven's entrance 
(6i> 



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2 Loft <5 J 

3 Bound servant (4) 

4 Current events (4) 

5 Neck hack (4) 

6 Broad «iner(7) 

7 Small coins (3.6J 

8 Specialised language 
Oh 

12 foingoirt (61 

14 Over dramatic actor 

(31 

15 Liverpudlian (A) 

19 Authorise (71 

20 Cover (31 


24 Nimble (51 » HBAawM) 

25 Low dam Ml 27 Epretalc(4i 

SOLUTION TO NO 1046 . . 

ACROSS I Pariah 5 Bigwig 8 Ode 9 
Gmci i* Grams II «m 12 Inner man 14 

& ,6 Ku 7 ^ 8, " ,c “ 


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naval U'hueiry. /WuwA I'wr. Ilatep mb. 
\hddh\extmi Mr\J. Perm w Musdania Road, 
unuh nw 


SOLUTION TO NO 1«1 .3 An™ « 

ACROSS IJujimarned 22 Wind 23 Aver 25 

Br-cr |7 Incest Nullj » Jgr “ p 

Jam 28 Osage 29 4rair«e 6 Breton* 1 7 fcaacNcw* 

DOWN 2 1 Jura lSseoim 19 Linear* 20 • . 

ton 8 Peart Baric* 12 Lustre M MU - 

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Name. 

Address. 


The British Bridge League 
Trials to select the team to 
represent Great Britain in foe 
European Championships, 
which will be held in Brighton 
next year, began on August 16 
and finished on August 24. 

The field which originally 
consisted of six teams, played 
a 32 board double round 
robin, at which point foe last 
two teams dropped out. The 
remaining teams then played a 
further 32 board double round 
robin. 512 hands in nine days, 
a rigorous test of stamina. The 
final scores, with 30 victory 
points at stake in each match, 
were !: J. Armstrong. G. 
Kirby. A. Forrester. R. Brock 
149.1. 2: A Sowier. S. Lodge, 
Mrs S. Landy. Mrs S. Horton 
143.4. 3: S. Rshpool D. 
Greenwood. D. Shek. G. 
Caklerwood 138.7. 4: L Rose. 
R. SmoiskL R. Sheehan. J. 
Flint 133.4. 

With less than 16 VPs 
covering the whole field, the 
result nay appear inconclu- 
sive. . But Armstrong's team 
had built up a good lead over 
the first five days, which was 
largely whittled away by the 
stipulation that the cany for- 
ward from the qualifying stage 
should be only , a small 
percentage. On that basis, no 
one can reasonably question 
Armstrong's success, even if 
under foe conditions foe mar- 
gin of victory did not entitle 
his team to automatic 
selection. 

Wifo one round to play the 
scores were Fishpool 129.7: 
Armstrong- 128.1: Row 124.4: 
Sowtcr 123.4. 


Stamina 
stands 
on trial 


Remarkably, any of the 
four teams could win. Arm- 
strong faced Rose, leaving 
Sowier to play FishpooL In a 
low scoring first hall Arm- 
strong assumed a 17 IMP 
lead against Rose, while 
Sowier kd by 15 MPs against 
Fishpocrf. 

This band unquestionably 
decided foe Armstrong-Rose 
match. 

Internationa] Trials. Love 
all. Dealer South. 


4X10874 - 
9 AKOIO 
O 74 
* OS 


When foe dubs broke 4^1, 
12 tricks were the limiL In 
foe other room, Rose and 
Smolski were more adventur- 
ous. 


W 


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Rose 

KWiy 

SnwttH 

1* 

NO 

NO 

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This was foe bidding when 
the Armstrong team held the 
North-South cards. 


Brodt 

'S' 

3+ 

4* 

No 


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11-13 fKKKS 


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64 

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- 

- 


It was an excellent grand 
slam, doomed by the bad 
dub break. Had the dubs 
divided. Rose would have 
gained 11 IMPS instead of 
losing 14. The loss, not fetal 
in itself, was as disheartening 
as taking a ten' on the first 
hole of a medal competition. 

Armstrong required no fur- 
ther assistance from the fetes, 
beating Rose 21 VPs-9 VPs. 
Sowier beat Fishpool 20-10. 
By finishing second in these 
extensive trials. Mesdames 
Landy and Horton demon- 
strated to any doubting 
chauvinists that the womens' 
World Champions can hold 
their own with Britain's 
leading men. 

The selectors picked the 
Armstrong team en Woe, a 
decision with which few could 
cavil More controversial was 
foe selector’s decision to pre- 
fer experience in the shape of 
Sheehan and myscll to youth- 
ful promise. “Perhaps”, as one 
wit remarked unkindly, “even 
an ageing Doberman would 
prove more intimidating than 
a frisky terrier.” Grrr . . . 

Jeremy Flint 


Imagination and opportunity 


In my series on previous 
challengers for the world title 
who did not folly succeed in 
occupying the throne. David 
Bron stein has a special place. 
In 1951 he fought an heroic 
12-12 drawn match with 
Botvinik. but a tied contest 
meant that the incumbent 
retained his title. 

Bronstenr has often been 
cited as the creative precursor 
of Tal and Kasparov. But bis 
play, though deeply i magma- 
live. was loo prone to 
blunders to succeed regularly 
at the very highest level. I 
believe, loo. that Bron stein, 
even at his best did not have 
quite the flair of Tal or 
Kasparov. Take, for example, 
the following position from 
me 14 of his match with 
vinilc 


on move 66. But Bronstein 
neglected a fascinating move 
in foe diagrammed position. 
Nor did he even mention this 
possibility in his own notes 
written many years later, 
which appeared m the excel- 
lent book. David Bronstein. 
Chess impression, published 
by Pergamon Press. What 
about 


a BgSt? tog 5T a togs 

The White plan of BO plus 
Kg2 and Rhl is hard to 
parry. If Black plays 28 . . . 
Qc7 then 29 NflS+ is strong, 
while 28 ... f6 29 exffi leaves 
Black's position frill of holes. 
A tnissed opportunity. 

Raymond Keene 



B C D E F G H 

White: Bronstein: Black: 
Botvinik. 

a teas Ba6 a Hi Qc5 
30BU Q m 3 31 0*3 Rse3 

Black had no problems and 
White had to fight for a draw 

ha mimtiislln arfiiMuirf 


P p i twiU ‘Elatlor’ 

K> offer the out wttd British form, 
porn fiam turd. 


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finnnl nl will flow Spri«198?. 

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Brochure ras CtatwoodsBoodT 
EostGnnsreoa Sussex RH192HG. 
Ring 0342 28644(24 hours) 


PLANNED GARDENS 

arc troabto4ce pnfem. May ** *Ow 
wtai can be done wMi aor 


Fraii Trees and Boahec. Ctxnfen. 

Hedges and Boeder Pfeau?96-eare 

FREECOLOUR CATALOGUE 

(I7p stamp please or phone 0452 

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HIGHFIEID NURSERIES 

(16) Whitntfns&r, Gloucester GLZ 7PL 



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wtth payment TODAY! Del Z1 Days. 

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NOjTHAWTOWMBBS-TetldMMmi 















THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 



THE WEEK AHEAD 



FILMS 


REEL LIFE: Alan Alda, Hawkeye 
of television's M’A’S’H, is writer, 
director and star (with Michael 
Caine) of Sweet Liberty {PG), a 
comedy about a college teacher 
who has his book on the American 


Revolution filmed by Hollywood. 
Empire (01-437 1234). from Friday. 


P MIIIPP * ■ 



THEATRE 


LORCA REVIVED: Joan Plowright 
stars with Glenda Jackson and 
Patricia Hayes in Federico Garcia 
Lorca s tragedy The House of 
Bernards Alba, directed by the 
Spanish actress, Nuria Espert Lyric 
Hammersmith (01-741 2311), from 
Monday after previews. 




CONCERTS 

SACRED VERDI: Marek JanowsM 

makes his first appearance at the 
1986 Proms to conduct the BBC 
Symphony Orchestra and Edinburgh 
Festival Chorus in Verdi's Four 
Sacred Pieces and Mahler’s 
Symphony No 5. Royal Albert Hall 1 
11-589 8212), tomorrow, 7-30pm. 


TIMES CHOICE 


DANCE 


the Holy Land. Kate Lock. 


oly Lam 

Eileen Atkins and Michael 


FILMS 


SADLER'S WELLS ROYAL 
BALLET; A two-week Covent 
Garden season opens with 
the London premiere of The 
Snow Queen (Tues, Wed), 
then gives Swan Lake Thurs- 
Sept 15 with several 
different casts. Today, the 
company completes its 
Cambridge season with two 
performances of a mixed 
Ml including two established 
favourites. Checkmate, and 
Pineapple Poll. 

The Big Top. Jesus Green, 


Angelis star. Directed by Mike 
Bradwell. 

Theatre Royal, Stratford East 
<01-534 0310). Previews from 
Thurs. Press Night Sep 16. 


OPENINGS 


OPENINGS 


Cambridge (0223 68848). 


Covent Garden (01-240 
1066). 


HENRY V: Michael Croft and 
Graham Chinn direct the 
National Youth Theatre and 
Hakeem Kae-Kazim as the first 
Wack actor to play Henry in the 
London theatre. 

Open Air Theatre. Regent’s 
Park (01 -486 2431 ). Opens 
Tues. Until Sep 13. 


AT CLOSE RANGE (18): A 
tough tale of family 
relationships. Strong 
performances from 
Christopher Walken and Sean 
Penn; Jame 


James Foteydfrects. 


Prince Charles (01 -437 8181^ 


Cannon Oxford Street (01 ■ 
0310), Cannon HaymarketfOl- 
839 1527). From Ft 


GABY AGIS: Presents a 
new work at Riverside (T ues- 
Sept 1 4) for tiersetf and 
(our other dancers, with music 
written and played by Mark 
Springer of the band Rip, Rig 
and Panic. 

Riverside Studios. 
Hammersmith (01-748 3354). 


PRIVATE MEANS: Barbara 
Lott. Billy McColl. Mary Jo 
Randall, in the first stage play 
by W. Stephen Gilbert directed 
by Brian Stimer. 


THE FRINGE DWELLERS 
(PG): The joys and sorrows of 
an Aboriginal family living in a 
Queensland shanty town. 


Odeon Kensington (01 -602 
©nTotl 


6644), Cannon T ottenham 
Court Road (01-636 6146). 
From Fri. 


Soho Poly. 16 Riding House 
- - — i 9050). 


TOKYO BALLET: Its 
London season finishes today 
with two performances of 
Bejart s The Kabukh guest star 
Eric Vu An dances the lead 
this afternoon. 

Covent Garden (01 -240 
1066). 


Street. W1 (01-636 
Previews Wed and Thurs. 
Opens Fri. 

SINK THE BELGRANO! Steven 
Berkoff's "scathing expose" of 
the actions of the Thatcher 
government during the 
Falkiands conflict. He directs 


BETTY BLUE (18): The third 
feature of Diva director Jean- 
Jacques Beineix — a < 
tale of amour fou. wit en 


a 


cast including Maggie Steed, 
ana Edward 


Barry Stanton ar 
Tudor Pole. 

Half Moon, 213 Mile End Road, 
El (01-790 4000). Preview 
today, Mon. Opens Tues. 


CONCERTS SELECTED 


NOW, VOYAGER: J 
Maxwell Geddess Voyager, a 
sort of orchestral tribute to 
Halley's Comet, is heard from 
the BBC Scottish 
Symphony Orchestra under 
Jerzy Maksymiuk. So are 
Mendelssohn's Symphony No 
3 and Sibelius's Symphony 
No 3. 

Royal Albert Hall, 

Kensington Gore, London SW7 
(01-5898212). Today. 

7.30pm. 


I'M NOT RAPPAPORT: A rare 
chance to see Paul Scofield as 
a geriatric prankster in Herb 
Gardner s soft-edged park- 



bench whimsy. 
437 


Apollo (01-437 2663). 

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO 
NIGHT: Jonathan Miller's 
quirky production of O'Neill's 
doomy masterpiece. 
Haymarkef (01 -930 9832). 


OUT OF TOWN 


newcomer Beatrice Dalle 
(above) as the devoted lover of 
a layabout called Zorg (Jean- 
Hughes Anglade). 

Screen on the Hill (01-435 
3366). Gate Netting Hill (01-221 
0220), Cannon Tottenham 
Court Road (01-636 6146). 
From Fit 


BAVARIAN BEETHOVEN: 

Sir Colin Davis conducts the 
Bavarian Radio Symphony 
Orchestra in Beethoven's 
"Eroica" Symphony and 
Stravinsky's Symphony in 
Three Movements. 

Royal Albert Hall. Mon. 
7.30pm. 


BRISTOL: Archangels Don’t 
Play Pinbalb Roger Rees stars 
in the British premiere of a 
1959 "anarchic satire" by 
Dario Fo. directed by Glen 
Watford. 

Theatre Royal Old Vic 
(0272 24388). Previews from 
Wed. Press Night Sep 16. 


INVADERS FROM MAKSES): 


JONES THE VOICE: The 
Wtgmore Hall commences 
operations for the new 



OLDHAM: Harvest In the 
North: 1935 drama of life 
during the Lancashire cotton 
slump, by James Landale 
Hodson. directed by John 
R eta Hack. 

Coliseum (061 624 2829). 
Opens Wed. 


Erratic remake of the 
science-fiction classic. 
Directed by Tobe Hooper, with 
Hunter Carson (the boy in 
Paris, Texas), Karen Black, 
and some nightmarish 
monsters shaped like 
ostriches. 

Cannon Oxford Street (01 -636 
0310), Cannon Pant on Street 
(01-9300631). From Fri. 


SELECTED 


OSSESSIONE (PG): Visconti's 
powerful first film about lust 
and murder in provincial Italy, 
adapted from The Postman 


SHEFFIELD: Gypsy: Meg 
oy Bai 


Johnson, Roy Barractough. 
Louise English, directed by 
Clare Venables and Martin 
Duncan in the Arthur 
Laurents/Jule Styne/Stephen 
Sondheim musical based on 
the life of stripper Gypsy Rose 
Lee. 


Always Rings Twice. 
' jir(01-837 


Renoir (01 -837 B402). 

ROSA LUXEMBURG (PG y. The 
Communist revolutionary's life 
and murder, filmed by 
Margarethe von Trotta. Ever so 
worthy. 

Lumiere (01 -836 0691). 


season with a recital by Dame 
Gwyneih Jones (above) of 
songs by Wagner. Strauss. 
Schubert and Berg 


Wtgmore Hall. 36 Wigmore 
Street. London WT (01-935 
2141). Thurs. 7.30pm. 


HARRELL/ASHKENAZY: 

Beethoven's Cello Sonatas 
Opp 5 Nos 1 and 2 and 102 
No 2 are presented by Lynn 
Harrell and Vladimir 
Ashkenazy. 

Barbican Centre. Thurs. 
7.45pm. 


PENULTIMATE PROM: The 
last Friday night ol this season 
includes, of course. 

Beethoven s Symphony No 9. 
witn Sir Georg Solti 
conducting the BBC Singers. 
London Philharmonic 
Orchestra and soloists. 

Roval Albert Hall. Fn. 

7.30pm. 


STRATFORD UPON AVON: 
Richard II: Barry Kyle directs 
Jeremy Irons. Michael Kitchen, 
Brewster Mason. Bernard 
Horsfall. 

Royal Shakespeare Theatre 
(0789 295623). Previews today 
(matinee and evening). Men 
and Tues. Opens Wed. In 
repertory. Thurs (matinee and 
evening). 

The Fair Maid of the West 

Imeida Staunton plays Bess 
Bridges, a barmaid turned 
pirate captain turned 
concubine. Directed by Trevor 
Nunn. 

Swan (0789 295623). Preview 
Thurs. Sep 15-17. 19. 22. 
Opens Sep 23. In repertory. 
Worlds Apert Peter Whelan s 
adaptation of a Cuban play, by 
JoseTriana. centred on one 
woman s struggle for personal 

liberation. 

The Other Place 
(07B9 295623). Preview today. 
Mon-Wed. Opens Thurs. In 
repertory. 


GALLERIES 


OPENINGS 


MIRROR AND THE LAMP: 

international exhibition of 
recent art which uses the 
metaphors of mirror and tamps 
to recreate the world. 


ICA Gafbry, The Mall. London 
I (01-930 0493). From Wed. 


SWi (01 
MAKE OR BREAK: Nostalgia 


for 40 years ago, 
evocation of V & i 


.with 

_i A 1946 

design exhibition catted 
' Britain can make it'', with 
furniture, fashion, textiles 
ceramics and glass. 

Royal College ol Art. 
Kensmgton Gore. London SW7 
(01 -584 5020). From Tues. 


APPLES TO ATOMS: Portraits 
of scientists from Newton to 
Rutherford, in National Portrait 
Gallery tounng show. 

Science Museum, South 

l. London SW7 (01- 
3). From today. 


ALL BACH: Chnsiopher 
Hogwood conducts the 
Academy of Ancient Music 
in Bach's "Coffee" Cantata. 
"Peasant " Cantata and 
Suite No 2. 

Queen Elizabeth Hall, South 
Bank. London SE1 (01-928 
3191. credit cards 01 -928 
6800). Fn. 7.45pm. 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 


THEATRE 


IN PREVIEW 


ASK FOR THE MOON: Three 
women clothing workers in 
todav's East End and three 
rural laceworkers in 1840 are 
compared and contrasted in 
Shiriev Gee's play, directed by 
John Dover. 

Hampstead Theatre (01- 
722 9301). Previews from 
.Thurs. Opens Sep 17. 


RSC AT STRATFORD: 
Booking open for autumn 
season, with Macbeth. The 
Two Noble Kinsmen. The 
Rover. Flight. The Art Of 
Success, and Country 
Dandnc. 

Box Office. Royal 
Shakespeare Theatre. 
Stratford. Warwickshire 
(0789 295623) 


Heresies. Oct 1-Jan 3. 
Barbican Centre. Silk 
Street London EC2 (01-628 
8795/638 8891). 


last chance 


TUESDAY’S CHILD: Kate Lock 
and Terry Johnson s comedy 
about an allegedly immaculate 
conception by a girl on a trip to 


RSC AT THE BARBICAN: 
General public booking opens 
today for autumn season, 
with George Bernard Shaw's 
Mesalliance, and Richard 
Nelson's Principle Scnptoriae 
at The Pit. AJSO Feydeau s 
Scenes From A Mamage, 
Whiting's A Penny For A 
Stine, Miller s The 
Arc/ibishcp's Ceiimg. Nick 
Darke's The Dead Monkey. 
and Deborah Levy's 


CARNIVAL 

PHOTOGRAPHS: From the 
Notang Hill carnivals. 1974- 
85, by Newton Brown, with 
pictures of Peter Minshall's 
costumes for 1985 carnival in 
Tnmdad. Ends tomorrow. 
Barbican Centre, Silk 
Street London EC2 (01 -638 

4141). 

RIPON HERITAGE: From 
before the Domesday Book to 
the present day. with 
documents, old photographs. 


slides, maps. Ends today. 
aeofRi 


College of Ripon and York 
St John. 


College Road, Ripon 

(0765 2691). 


HENSEL: 19th century 
portraits by the painter of the 
Prussian court, Wilhelm, 
HenseJ. 


O Id ham Art Gallery. Union 
StreeL Oldham (061 678 4653). - 


From Thurs. 


SELECTED 


DUTCH LANDSCAPE: Major 
loan exhibition from aU over 
Europe and America, of Dutch 
landscape paintings between 
1590 and 1650. 

National Gallery, Trafalgar 
Square. London WC2 (01-839 
3321). 

JAPANESE PRINTS: 
Contemporary print show, as a 
result of enlightened collecting 
by the museum. 

British Museum, Great Russell 
StreeL London WC1 (01-636 
1555). 


ROCK AND JAZZ 


SKA ON THE COMMON: 
Desmond Dekker, of "007” 
and "Israelites'' fame, 
leads an open-air bill Including 
the Potato 5, young blue- 
beat revivalists. 

Today (2-8 pm). The 
Bandstand, Clapham 
Common, London SW4. 


LOOSE TUBES: 21 
members of Britain's 


: outstanding new generation 
% of jazz musicians. Unmissable. 


Tonight and Mon to Sat 


Sept 13, Ronnie Scott's Club, 
47 Frit 


-rith StreeL London W1 
(01-439 0747). 

NEW ORDER: The Pink 


Edinburgh Playhouse (031 
?590): Fri, T 


557 2590); Fri, Banow lands 
Ballroom, Glasgow (041 
221 0103). 


THE MEN THEY COULDN’T 
HANG: Skiffle-punk group play 
a Greenpeace benefit. 
Thurs/Fri, Mean Fiddler, 

28a Harfesden High StreeL 
London NW10(01-961 
5490). 

RUN DMC: "Walk This 
Way", their irresistible current 
single, alone justifies the 
marriage of rap and heavy 
metal. 

Fri and Sept 13, 

Hammersmith Odeon, London 
W6 (01-748 4081). 


CHRIS DE BURGH: The 
"Lady in Red" hrtmaker heads 
out on tour. 

Fri, Cornwall Coliseum, St 
Austen (072 681 4004). 


OPERA 


ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA: Tonight, Thurs and 
Sept 13 at 7pm. Jonathan 
Miller's Marriage of Figaro with 
an interestingly blended 
young cast John Tomlinson in 
the tide role. Cathryn Pope 
as his Susanna, and Jacek 
Strauch as the Count. Mark 
Elder conducts. On Wed and 
Fri at 7.30pm a revival of 
John Copley's production of U 
trovatore. James Lockhart 
conducts. 

Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 


WELSH NATIONAL 


OPERA: The company present 
their Goran Jarvefelt Ring 


at Cardiff: Valkyrie tonight at 


5pm. with Kathryn Hames. 

ana Penelope 


Anne Evans 
Walker: and. at the same 


time on Sept 13, Siegfried, with 
» Collins 


Anne Evans. Anne 
and Jeffrey Lawton. Richard 
Armstrong conducts. 

New Theatre. Park Place, 
Cardiff (0222 32446/394844). 


NEW SADLER'S WELLS: 

After a final performance at 
Aberdeen's His Majesty's 
Theatre tonight (0224 
the company 's highly 
acclaimed Mikado visits 
Birmingham with 
performances on Tues through 
to Sept 13. Barry 
Wordsworth conducts a lively 


young cast led by Ian 
Cambay,' ' 


. , Christopher Giiiett 
and Deborah Rees. Ail 
performances start at 7.30pm. 
Hippodrome. Birmimgham 
(021 622 7486). 


For ticket availability, 
performance and opening 
times, telephone the 
numbers listed- fiance: 
John Percivah Concerts: 
Max Harrison: Theatre: 
Tony Patrick and Martin 
Cropper: Films: Geoff 
Brown: Galleries: Sarah 
Jane ChecUand: Rock & 
Jazz: Richard Williams: 
Opera: Hilary Finch; 
Bookings: Anne 
Wbitehottse 



GALLERIES 


FIRST DRAFTS: Pablo Picasso 
filled 175 sketchbooks with 70,000 
drawings, even before he got 
round to wielding his brush and 
chisel. These very personal 
reference books can be seen for the 
first time at the Royal Academy 
(01 -734 9052), from Thursday. 



BOOKS 

DOWN UNDER: Howard Jacobson 

has as'the hero of his new 
comic novel, Redback, one Karl 
Leon Forfock, a Cambridge graduate 
sent to Sydney on a CIA bursary 
to stem the tide of Australian 
liberalism. It is published on 

Thursday by Bantam at £1 0.95. 


DANCE 

HANS AND LEGS: Samira Sakfi. 

tall and coolly beautiful, has herfirst 
big leading role in the title part of 
We Snow Queen, David Binttey s 
new ballet based on the Hans 
Andersen story. Sadler s Wells Royal 
BalleL Covent Garden (01-240 
1066). from Tuesday. 


When fame is a 


necessary 




K>i : . 'p 


I n America Neil Jordan's 
new film. Mom Lisa, is 
doing business as if it is 
the only movie in town. 
At Hie Cannes Film Festival it 
collared the Best Actor award 
Tor ‘its star Bob Hoskins. 
Without the deliberate and 
desperate hype which has 
surrounded the release of 
some, recent movies, it has 
generated a buzz of universal 
approval. 

Yet the film’s success seems 
to have taken everyone by 
surprise: not least Hoskins, 
who was lending his London 
garden when he was urgently 
summoned to Cannes, flown 
out in a private jet and 
received his prize with soil 
still lodged under his 
fingernails. 

Writer and director Jordan, 
at least, is no stranger to 
accolades. He won the Guard- 
ian Fiction Prize in 1979 with 
his first collection of stories. 
Night in Tunisia, and in 1982 
his firil feature film. Angpl. 
brought him the Evening 
Standard's Most Promising 
Newcopier award. 

"This is a business where 
you have to have some mea- 
sure of ‘success because other- 
wise people won't give you 
money", he says. "But fame is 
a bad thing. It turns you into 
an idiot." $o he shuns, as far 
as possible, the commercial 
side of the business, where he 
is least comfortable. "The best 
part isjusi working - shooting 
the film. J don't feel alive 
unless I'toi working." 

Jordan had just flown in 
from a suffocatingly hot New 
York and was under-dressed 
for the London summer. “It's 
great" he said of the cold 
drizzle. “I can breathe" He 
said he was jet-lagged and 
tired, and there was much eye- 
rubbing and limb-stretching to 
emphasize the point. 

He had the anxious look of 
someone j with an imminent 
dental appointment: it added 
an expression of vulnerability 
to the laige. generous features 
of his boyish face. His voice is 
soft, his accent lyrical and he 
has a habit of leaving sen- 
tences unfinished. 

He is reticent about himself. 
”1 was born in Sligo. 1 was 
brought up in Dublin. I live in 


Neil Jordan is far 


happier shooting 


a film than 


accepting awards 


for its success 


Bray now. I got into movies by 
accident — most people do.” 
He is 36. Involved in Irish 
politics and culture (he 
founded the Irish Writers Co- 
operative in 1974). he has 
made a conscious effort to stay 
in Ireland, though now thinks 
it might be more practical to 
move to London or New 
York. 

His first venture into cin- 
ema was as creative consul- 
tant to John Boorman on 
Excaiihur. He made a docu- 
mentary about it and on the 
strength of that Channel 4 and 
the British .Rim Institute fi- 
nanced Angel, a cogent black 
thriller set against the contem- 
porary Irish tragedy. He went 
on to make The Company ol 
it dives, from Uie story by. 
Angela Carter, and after two 
films was acclaimed as just 
about die most talented and 
imaginative young director 
working in the British cinema. 

“I was always obsessed by 
movies but I thought they 
were made by corporations or 
gods, not human beings. I 
never thought I would make 
them." 


A s influences he cites 
the great surrealist 
Bufiuel. and the post- 
war Italian cinema of 
Rossellini. Visconti and 
Fellini. “The landscapes are 
similar to the ones 1 grew up 
with, and there are the same 
Catholic obsessions and the 
sense of a peasant culture in 
conflict with city life." 

Mom Lisa /the title comes 
from an old Nat King Cole 
number, used as the theme 
song) originated from 
Jordan's desire to make a love 
story about an extreme situa- 
tion' “I hadn't seen. one that 
moved me for a long, long 
time — probably not since Last 
Tango in Paris.” 

Set in a brilliantly evoked, 
almost surreal (Buftuelian?) 


London of plush hotels, strip 
joints and streetwalkers, .the 
film charts the friendship 
between the squat ex-con 
(Hoskins) and the “tall thin, 
black tan” (Cathy T yson) he is 
employed to drive. 

“One thing I wanted to get 
into this film, which again 1 
haven't seen in a long time, 
was people talking to each 
other in language that was rich 
and witty and meaningful. I 
miss the kind of dialogue you 
used to get in screenplays by 
Ben Hecht" 

It is an actors' showpiece. 
, and has served to give Jordan, 
especially in the United 
States, the reputation of an 
actor’s director. He is now 
being approached by some of 
the biggest Hollywood stars to 
direct their pictures. 

"I don't know HTd like the 
relationship where an actor 
has almost a contractual right 
to govern the way he is shown 
on the screen. People like 
Clint Eastwood have more say 
than almost anyone. I’d love 
to do it but only if the 
relationship was what ! 
considered the correct one.” 

He is known to be un- 
compromising and enjoys al- 
most complete control over 
his films. “Through guile", he 
insists, "not on paper” citing 
the battle to cast Cathy Tyson, 
an unknown 20-year-old who 
had never worked in the 
cinema before. 

Despite his reputation as a 
film-maker. Jordan still 
considers himself principally a 
writer and a new novel — it 
will be his third — is on the 
way. But he has also finished 
the script of his next film. 
Ghost Tours, which starts 
shooting in the new year. 

"I like working' through 
diflerentgen res of cinema. My 
first film was a thriller. The 
Company of Wolves was a 
fantasy and. Mona Lisa I 
consider a love story.” Ghost 
Tours, set in Ireland, is a 
supernatural force about hu- 
man beings who fail in love 
with dead people. ~I hope”, he 
says gravely, “that it will be 
funns”. 


Anna Kythreotis 


. Mona Lisa (18) is at (he Odeon 
Hay market (01-9302738) 





ARTS DIARY 


A super 
market 


The future of Sutton Place is 
still shrouded in mystery. At 
the end of the month it will be 
sold for around .£10 million by 
its present owner. American 
multi-millionaire Stanley 
Seegar. He brought it in 1980 
for £8 million. Though spend- 
ing large sums on redesigning 
the grounds, he sold off one 
piece of land for a Sainsbury 
.supermarket for £6.5 million 
and another to Guildford 
Council. The Sul ton Place 
Trust, set up by Seegar to 
promote the artistic life of the 
Tudor mansion were not told 
about the house's impending 
sale and as one member. 
Viscount Norwich tells me: 
“The first 1 knew about the 
sale was what I read in the 
papers. Nobody’s told me 
anything. I am a little sur- 
prised. to say the least”. The 
trustees, who included Sir 
Hugh Casson. Nancy Balfour. 
Sir Peter Scott and Sir Roy 
Strong, met at regular inter- 
vals to discuss the house's 
artistic programme but Lord 
Norwich says he has not been 
.invited to a meeting for three 
to four years. “I expea Seegar 
just got bored", he concludes. 
Seegar will be anything but 
bored with the proceeds from 
the sale. Meanwhile, all his 
staff await their fote and new 
owner with trepidation. 


Cello peril 


Ii’sa hard life on the road fora 
classical musician. A cellist 
from the London Festival 
Orchestra, who under- 
standably prefers to remain 
anonymous, is still smarting 
from the pain and embarrass- 
ment of being knocked out by 
her own sheet music. The 
music, in a sharp cornered 
case, fell from the rack in the 
orchestra's bus as it left Aber- 
deen for Glasgow on its recent 
tour of Cathedra] ciiies.The 
LFO set off with a new concert 
tour of Cathedrals next week 
— audiences should beware 
low-flying scores. 


• Following Duncan 
Weldon of Triumph Apollo’s 
brave step into the world of 
West End sponsorship by big 
business, an unexpected 
angel has alighted in 
Shaftesbury Avenue. The 
Swiss finance bouse. Bank 
Julius Baer is planning to 
pnl a multi-million sum into a 
series of W est End shows. 


Hot casting 


While others may doubt iL 
there is still room for another 
film from the Indian sub- 
continent according to pro- 
ducer Judith de Paul, and she 
is going to make it — on the life 
of Indira Ghandi. Judith is in 
a cleft stick — choose an 
American star like Anne Ban- 
croft to play one of the most 
powerful women this century? 



Bancroft and Jaffrey 

Or rely on home-grown talent 
like Madhur Jaffrey? One 
would be good for box office, 
the other for diplomacy and 
authenticity. With the final 
script ready in a couple of 
weeks. Miss de Paul says she 
still hasn't made up her mind. 


Pricey paint 


Only a minor disappointment 
for Roger Hallett and his Bath 
Panorama, at 200 feet 
Britain's longest painting on 
anvas. as it awaits erection in 
the city's Royal Victoria Park. 
Actress Jane Seymour came to 
see it and amid much popping 
of flash bulbs indicated she’d 
hkc her face to be part of the 
mural. One snag — everyone 
who appears on the canvas 
becomes a sha re holder — for a 
pncc. In Miss Seymour's case 
sne was told it was £500. 
Hallcu is still waiting for her 
call. 


Christopher Wilson 




i) 


J) 


V, 

V 

V 


\ 


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G \ 








& 


THE 



SATURDAY SEPTE 

Mario Conti 


sMBER 6 1986 ■ 


1% 

'""in 

iN 

{a lnta 


COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT Birthdays 

CIRCF IT A T? IO,DA\ The Right Ro John 

v 1A VV- Ui^AlV Bitkcrsieib. 65 Sir Derman 
BALMORAl CASTlf Otnslopherson. 71. General Sir 

S Qu«„ K "^ «« TO Mo™ R Sg: 

§&r aSsFIs? “i e f 3 .i?- A s, y j w^ 

awl inis morning in order to ner, 78 Mr J R. C Yniinp 3T 

1W5SM-«E l’{ 

menl as Ambassador Extraor- 
dinary and Plenipotentiary from 

the Socialist Republic or Roma- TOMORROW: Sir William 
ma to the Court of Si James's. Wrixon-Becher. 71. Professor 

jj*K™S of Ibf Bdgans c*. SSS B o7 ib /S?idMd. L 7? 
brates his birthday tomorrow. Grouo Camaio I mnarrl fHwch. 


A flawed sexual ethic 


Reception 

HM Government 
Mr J. Allan Stewart. Minister 
for Industry and Education at 
the Scottish Office, was host at a 
reception held last night at 
Edinburgh Cast Ic on the occa- 
sion of the meeting of the 
European Venture Capital 
Association in Edinburgh. 


Mubniefield. 85. Miss J A; 
Trcdgold. 83, Sir Anthony Wag- 
ner, 78. Mr J R. C Young, 49; 
Sir William McEwan Younger, 
81 

TOMORROW: Sir Winiara 
Wrixon-Becher, 71. Professor 
Malcolm Bradbury, 54; Lord 
Chaneris of Amisfield, 73; 
Group Captain Leonard Chesh- 
ire, VC, OM, 69; Miss Joan 
Cross. 86; Sir Colin Crowe, 73; 
Mr Peter GilL 47; Miss Dianne 
Hay ter. ’ 37; Mr H. D. Hughes. 
72; Mr Patrick Jenkin, MP, 60; 
Sir Douglas Lovelock, 63; j 
Professor Sir Brian Pippard, 66; 
Sir Anthony Quayle. 73; Sir 
John Richmond. 77; Mr Mi- 
chael Robbins, 71; Sir Neil 
Shields. 67; Air Marshal Sir 
John Whitley. 81. 


Science report 

Hole in ozone 
layer ‘seasonal’ 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor - 


The discovery of a “hole” in 
the ozone layer over Ant- 
arctica last year by British 
scientists may be a phenom- 
enon that occurs on a seasonal 
basis. 

There were fears that the 
scientists had found the most, 
serious indication that the 
Earth's protective layer of 
oxygen, in the form of ozone in 
the stratispbere, was being 
destroyed by discharges of 
gases from industry and ve- 
hicle exhausts. 

Now American scientists 
think it may be a natural event 
which causes the layers of 
ozone to thin out at certain 
times of the year. 

Moreover, they are predict- 
ing a repetition of the event 
later this month. Special in- 
struments on the Nimbus 7 
spacecraft, which is a satellite 
that orbits over the poles, is 
monitoring that part of the 
stratispbere. 

The scientists, from the 
Laboratory for Atmospheres 
at the Goddard_Space Flight 


their work in the journal. 
Nature. 

Anxieties were caused be- 
cause of evidence that com- 
pounds, and particularly the 
halogens such as chlorine, 
have been deplea ting the ozone 
layer by chemical interactions. 
A catastrophic destruction 
would increase the amount of 
ultraviolet light reaching the 
ground, with devastating coo- 
sequences for people and 
plants. 

The revision of measure- 
ments made by the group at 
Goddard shows that most of 
the decrease, some 0.6 per cent 
of the total ozone for 40 to 50 
days, occurs during the long 
twilight as the son rises over 
the Antarctic. 

Another study by scientists 
at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology indicates that 
this could lie due, not to 
chemical interactions, bat to a 
mixing in the atmosphere or 
when air from lower levels 
dilures the stratispbere in a 
special apweiling. 

Sources .Nature^ Volume 


I he alternative moral theology which 
is being widely purveyed today lucidly 
presented by Father Kevin Kellv in his 
anide “Sexual Ethics and.tfae Vatican” 
Uhe Timer, August 30), is wanting ra 
many respects. But first let us acknowl- 
edge its qualities 

• It zs person-centred, it is com- 
passionate, and it is realistic, at least in 
the sense of facing the real situation in 
which many people find themselves 
today 

This theology would appear useful m 
the pastoral field in judging personal 
acts in the so-called “internal forum” 
Thai is where personal circumstances, 
individual lights and extenuating fac- 
tors -must be weighed in reaching 
decisions about subjective right and 
wrong, personal guilt, and in helping an 
individual, whether in the confessional 
or in some other counselling, to move 
from where they are towards where 
Christ would have them be. 

, But unless we know what is objec- 
tively right, what is the perfection to 
which the disciple is called, we have no 
dear vision and no firm principle as 
guide. Pastoral theology has tradition- 
ally looked to moral theology for such 
guidance. 

When the moral theologian abandons 
his position to become the sort of 
“consequentialist” pastoral guide that 
Father Kelly appears to be, then 
everything becomes relative - relatively 
good, relatively bad - better than this, 
better than thaL 

Bui is it best in, say, a homosexual 
relationship, that they go all out for 
genital expression of their love? And if 
not, why not, if h makes their rdation- 
- ship better, more secure, their "capacity 
for loving” more fulflfled? Then why 
not anal or oral sex in marri^e if the- 
same may be claimed? And why restrict 
it to marriage? 

Again, if it is good to become 

S am through a process of in vitro 
sation, which inevitably involves 
the destruction of any- number of 


fertilized ova, incipient human beings, 
in order to havea child to love- why is it 
not better sun to have an abortion to 
love better the child one already -has 0 
Once the intentional corrdauon of 
the unitive and procreative aspects of 
human sexuality is abandoned we enter 
a moral quagmire. Father Kelly appears 
to avoid this by the ingenious device of 
describing the procreative aspect in 
terms which more property belong to 
the unitive. 

But if genual express eta is of love 
simply, ana not ofcomugaf love (that of 
husband and wife forme ordained 
purposes of marriage), where can we 
make our stand and say “this far and ho 
farther”? Even the sexual abuse of 
-children can and has been defended, 
though dearly not by FaUher Kelly. 

But this is the road down which we 
are led. I am highly suspicious of any 
moral theology which divorces human 
sexual love from its biological base (by 
denying the relevance of its 
procreativity in the proper sense of the 
word). Sexual activity, whether or not 
inspired by love, becomes the permitted 
concomitant of any number of human 
acts without it being in any real sense a 
codeienninam of the moral quality of 
these acts. 

We are already into a dualism which 
is ultimately destructive of the integrity 
of truly human acts, and consequently 
of the dignity of man himself - 
In claiming the support of Vatican II 
Father Kelly pits the spirit of the council 
documents against the letter of its 
teaching. This' cannot be. Marriage and 
the family are dealt with in part two of 
the conciliar Pastoral Constitution, 
Gaudium el Spes. The preface explicitly 
introduces them in the context which 
**tbis council has set forth - the dignity 
of the human person.” 

The document slates: “God _ has 
conferred on men the surpassing min- 
istry of safeguarding life - a ministry 
which must be fulfilled in a manner' 
which is worthy of man. Therefore from 


the moment of its conception life most 
be guarded with the greatest care, while 
abortion and infanticide are unspeak- 
able crimes When there is question of 
harmonizing conjugal love with the 
responsible transmission of life, the 
moral aspect of any procedure does not 
depend, solely on sincere intentions or 
on an evaluation of motives. It must be 
determined by objective standards. 

“ These, based on the nature of the 
human person and his acts, preserve the 
full sense of mutual setfgtvmg and 
human procreation in the context of 
true k>ve~. Sons of the church may not 
undertake methods of regulating pro- 
creation which are found blameworthy 
by the teaching authority of the church 
m its unfolding of the divine law. 
Everyone should be persuaded that 
human life and the task of transmitting 
h are not realities bound up with this 
world alone. Hence they cannot be 
measured or perceived only in terms of 
it, but always have a bearing on the 
eternal destiny of man." • 

Here we have the virion which has a 
further horizon than that suggested in 
Father Kelly's reference to the “Good 
News”. 

Father Kelly accommodates the de- 
mands of journalism when be speaks of 
the “official” teaching of the church, 
and represents it by “the Pope and the 
Vatican.” Theology talks only of 
“authentic” teaching, that which is in 
conformity with the tradition of the 
church, taught by the bishops in consort 
with the Pope, and witnessed in the lives 
of the devout faithfiiL 

It is a parody of the real church to 
present it after the model of civil society 
as in the throes of conflict between 
“official” policy and the (moral 
theological) market place. There can be 
little doubt that many moral theolo- 
gians, now at sea, failed to recognize in 
ibe -general teaching of the encyclical. 
Humanae Vitae, the authentic voice of 
the church, and slipped their moorings. 

Mgr Conti is Roman Catholic Bishop 
of Aberdeen. 


MoretonHalL 

Shropshire JrOITfl 

Autumn Term at Moroton Hall M . T n ni«i 

b^ns today with 330 *Ms on 25 Mfcs jSl Pnrdk 

roll, of whom 103 are in the -rT * . _ 

Sal, fonn. Alison Finder is * 

bead pre fect with Victoria Sh e,- mJTnS ftof 

25 10 November 2. The Old SSJE? * 

Moreionkms Association cock- nam> 8 ale - 
tail party will' be held in the MrJ&Bnfixd 
Grand Hall of International and Mbs SJL Marks 
.House, by the Tower ofLondon, The engagement is announced 
on November 22. Term ends on between James, second son of 
December 13. the Mr J.M. Buraford and of 

• Mrs Burnfond, of Pulborongh, 

_ / _ n . Sussex, and Sharon Lisa, daugh- 

Latest WlllS ter of Mr and Mrs David 

Webster, of Copthorne, Sussex. 

Brotherly bequests Mr ejlh. cud? 

Mr Ernest Walter Kelly, of Miss PAL Goodwin 
Testwood, Hampshire, formerly The engagement b announced 
of Langley. Hampshire. left between Edmirnd, only ron of 
estate valued at £54.019 net. He Mr and Mrs Edmund Caddy, 


Forthcoming marriages 


Centre, In Maryland,' describe 322 * p 808 - 8 H, 1986 . 


left the contents ofhis garage to 
his . brother- and the residue of 
the estate to the Soviet 

government. - 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


i BIRTHS, KUHUS 55 , 

I DEATHS ad IN HEMHWM 
£4 a Bae + 15 % VAT 

(minimum 3 lines) 

Announcements. auihcmiated by the 
mini- and perm an ent address of the 
sender, may be sent MK 

THE TIMES 
P0 BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El SXS 

or lelrphmied (ty telephone juta- 
ribm only) to: Bl-481 30H 

AniHNiiH-cnK-nu can be received by 
idvphMnr Urtween ®.0 Umu and 
5.3Upm Mon&rv ro Ridav. on Sawr- 
day betwsn i.Ottam and 12 noon. 

B -M1 4000 will For mriiraiicu the 
lowing day bj I.JUpm. 

FMT3S0MMG SIMHMGES. WSWJH5S 
etc on Cmin anti Social Page E6 a n 
* 1S*i VAT. 

f oun and Soria! Pape annouermeots 
ran m*t be awpu-d bi telephone. 
Enqumes nr G 1-822 9S53 
(alter lOkbni). or send IK 

t tamtam Steel load* El SJBL 



rirasr aPo» ai leal 45 bouts before 
publication. 


A, RIM ion thirty wul. «« la flood 

inn Iron, J l.vr rnunlry- 
Proiprtat 2fi. 25 


BIRTHS 

HILAR On 4th Sortemter. al Queen 
Ctiartonr'i Hospital, to FeUcnj- (nee 
Whiii-j and I dll. a daughter. Amelia 
Aldylh Rosannagti. 

CLARKE - On SetH ember 4th. al The 
Ruial Hampshire County HoSDllaL 
Winchester, lo IUW »nre West! 
and David, a son. Timothy lain 
Marshal, a brother tor Mallhew. 

COLLETT • On 3rd September, at 
HjirUum-rr Hospital. Eye. to PMbpna 
moe KHwV.nr,> and lan. a daughter. 
CwoHiu. a uurr (or Anthony. 

HARLEY - On Auausl 50th. at SI 
ft-mir's. TOMKW. m Vimlma >nee 
Kuril and Bill. A dauOhfer. 0(1 via 

halhanne . 

DAVIES On tuoust 22nrt. at Queen 
ntartffllfs Hi-Kpilal. to Mary InW 
Oar ej and Simon, a son. Samuei 
John Trotume 

tiHJES Qu AuqtiH ?C«n. tu Clare (nco 
Nirntsan' and Howard, a son. 
Matthew Hnw.int Suiteon 

SMITH Oil 1-4 September al Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital » Janie umv Ev- 
ami and Jerome, a aauomer. Amelia 
Kow Dizahfth, a Wfler (or Sam. 

STEWART • On Wednesday. August 
27111.-. lo Serena inre Barnes' and 
Djviri. J rpn. Kathcnne Emma. 


. marriages 


MOONEY : VASTY - The mam** 
look pLare on AutniM Sfflh. al St> 
MKiuel's Churrh. FaoH. Bermuda 
« Charles CX-iard Mooney rt 
Cb-iwwMrv Co Dublin and Louse 
Poirxu Vasry of Sidney. Auslraha 
and Belfast 

PERKINS : HANDLEY The marrl W 
tool, plate between Robert James 
Pertlns and Sarah Irene Handh-y on 
HI September in Sution. Surmr. 


F®3V.'Sf COL 

^ ANN1VTI 

! - i iffgjifret rLKHnuui : osti 
' £ fin, ti M vemm-r (m.io. ,u 
33KftTi •"’**' ftytwmjiii-. Har 
Ki f? £ '| CvvemtoliiK’ OMii 

0 ,nn, LnnrtUr ' '*' t " 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


ttHTMAN : OSTHCR 0(1 e«t ««*■ 

(ember. !“.■«. al Oval PvrH.md M 
Syiw.Htpi.-. H,irotd LWhiniaii t" 
Cvverw tollin' OMier. no**- a* Linro.nai 
inn. London WCS* 


m 




DEATHS 


■ACM • Pamela in* Brier;, darling 
who and n>oiher. on Seidember 4in 
19B6. uuM-iiv at hnnu* runeral «t- 
vitt al Fen Dm on Church on 
Tuesday 9U> SeWentoer at 11. 15 am. 


BAXTER - On Aogust 29(h. suddenly a 
few days after ortebraung her 80th 
birthday. Gwen, widow of Herbert 
Barter. C.M-G-, CJ.E.. mother of 
Michael and Robin and grandmother 
of NIC*. Caroline and Peter. Sadly 
missed by her family and hundreds 
of friends. Funeral al Si Patrick* 
Church. Par* Hill Rd. WalUnpon.,- 
3pm on Monday. September 8th. 
Family dowers only; donations lo 
British Heart Foundation. 

■OMAN - Chi 31sl August after a 
tong illness. Millie aged 79 years.* 
much loved mother of Maureen 
Hlron and wire of the late Abraham 
Berman. 

BRADOCLL - On September 3rd. 
peacefully al Westbury House Nurs- 
mg Home. Wesimeon. Mugurl 
Tandy of PWersfleid. Hampshire bt 
her 99(h year. Service at St. Peter's 
Church, tvii-rsftrtd on Wednesday 
Seoientber loth al 10.30 am. En 
ouin-s io J. Edwards and Son. 
WalcrtoovUle Z62I94. 

DAVIDSON ■ On 3rd Septonber 1986. 
al Chshwben Aberdeenshire, Colonel 
David Peter. OB.E.. M.C.. T.O.. 
DL. Funeral pmalc. No letters 
pteaae. 

DRAKE - On September 2nd. 1986. In 
London, dance Emmeline, widow of 
Ernest Drake and mother of Bryan 
Drake. Service al St Marlylebane 
Crematorium. Finchley N2. on 
Monday. September 8th. at 4pm. 

GARDNER - On 3rd September. 1986. 
peacefully tn hospital. Marjorie 
much loved wife of the late John 
Kynaslon. devoted mother of Paid 
and Anne and loving gran of 
Christina. Philip. Ml chad. Rebecca 
and Annabel. Funeral Service al Si 
Cross Church. KnutsfcmL on 
Wednesday. lOUi September at 
11 30am. prior lo committal at the 
AUnnrhara Crematorium. Family 
flowers only please, donations if 
desired for the Asthma Research 
Council cVd John G Ashton A Co. 
Churrh M. Altrincham, let 061 928 
7816. 

GAUNTLETT - On 31 si August, sud- 
denly al home. Joan beloved stsler of 
John Wilson Cauntlen. Private 
eternal km with family flowers only 
please Donation if desired to 
Malcolm Sarooanl Cancer Fund for 
Children. 

HOOPER. Daryl Eobcrl - CM Sept- 
emuer 3rd. 1986. suddenly at home. 
Beloved husband of Jenny, loved 
father of Drams and Jim. w of 
Tessa and the late Max Hooper of 
Mel bourne. Australia. Director of 
GCC Him Research Centre. 
Wembley The funeral for family 
and riose friends, will be held at the 
CMUmM Cremalorhim. Amertham 
at 1 30 pm on Wednesday. 10th Sep- 
tember. Family flowers on ^- please. 
Donations lo the Asthma Research 
Connril. 300 tipper Street London 
ni 3XX. A Thanksgiving win be 
held al a later dale. 

Lormousc ■ On September 4 Ul wd- 
denli al home. Bltton Grange. BUtOB- 
in AwvJy. Vork. Nanne- 
loved and much respected wife of 
w.R i Bob) Lofthouw. Funeral ser- 
vice will be held al S. Hrien’s 
Churrh. Binofl ln-AinMy. on Mon- 
day. September t»h. 31 2-00 pm. 
lollowed by prtvale cremation. No 
letters or dowers please. Donation* 
io her piwnorv lo The Injured Jock- 
ry. Fund- p o. Ho* 9. Newmarket. 
Suffolk. CBS 8JG. A male will be 
maced in Churrh. 

(SOCCER On 4lh Sertember. 1986. 
vudilriiu al home. Derce Hubert 
jpines Awd 86 years of Holtwood 
Avenue. Avlesford. Kent- Loving 
Hnsnand of Esme Iris and dear father 
nf Unette. Valerie. Deter and Ml- 
i luirt Grandpa of 8 grandrttlldrm 
and two OreaHtrsmdchildreB. 

KCUlT On September 3rd. 1986. 
suddenly. Edward Walker ITedi 
Mouil aged 60 years of TicknalL Der- 
tn-shire. Husband of Marie, and 
rather of William. Anna. Tommy. 
Ptelnv'k. Amelia and Doocny. Funer- 
al private No now ers please. Any 
iionatuM* m hb memory may be i 
io BarTlaj's Hank PLC. St. 

Nltrei. Uerb*-- lo be divided amongd 
me Oianlirs for which he worted 
mrcuMhoui fete We, A Metndrial Sor- 
lire v.-ill be IwW « H.OO an on 
Saturday. September I3lh. IW6 u 
Deib> Cathedral. 


MdJCLLAR - On September 3rd 1986. 
peacefully at home. Mariorte aped 91 
years of Gtengannodi. CtWf. Perth- 
shire. Beloved wU* or the late J.HX. 
McLettan and very denty loved and 
loving mother of Fiona and psnd- 
mother of Ctahr. NMnias and 
Frances. Funeral Sendee at Satnl 
MfchaelY Church. CrieH at ».1S pm 
on Tuesday Sep t ember 9th followed 
by CranaUan Service In Perth 
Crematorium at 2 .30 pen. Flowers to 
Saint Mtchaers Church. Donati o ns K 
preferred to N4LP.C.C. 

MORRIS - On September and- 1 986. bt 
Queen Elisabeth Hospital. Kings 
Lynn, after a short UneM. Michael 
(TJMI.OJ Morris. Dearly loved 
husband of Naomi and father and 
grandfather of six wonderful daugh- 
ters and four graadd ib teen. Private 
cremation, followed by Tttanks- 
tfving Service al AO Saints Church. 
North Runcton. near Kings Lynn on 
Tuesday. September 9th al 2.00 pm., 
Donations, if desired, for R.N.LL 


Mr and Mrs Edmund C^ddy, 
Jnr. o f San Francisco, and 
Paula-Marie, only daughter of 
Mr* MAr Warden, ofWeflow, 
Bath. 

Mr M.CS. Horae 
and Miss AJ. Thorndike 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin, yommer son of 
the late Mr and Mrs Ronald C- 
H. Home, of Crutches Defl. 
Jordans. Buckinghamshire, and 
Amanda, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs A.R. Thorndike, of 
Farnham Royal, 

B uckinghamshire . 

Mr AXLKembaft 
and Mbs ttS. CoUmgwood 
The engagement is announced - 
between Alan, only son of 
Professor and Mrs Charles 
KembaU, of Edinburgh, and 
Heather, only daughter of Mr 
and Mis J.E. Collingwood, of 
Cambridge. 

Mr L.W.T. Soldi 
and Miss Shepherd 
The engagement is announced 
between Louis William Tudor, 


Mr DJ>. McCtare Fisher 
and Mbs KJJR. Hunt 
The engagement is announced 
between Duncan, son of Mr and 
Mrs D.A. McClure Fisher, of 
North wood, Middlesex, and 
Katherine, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs J.B. Hunt, of North wood, 
Middlesex. 

Mr SJD. Mills 
and Miss 1LM. Doherty 
The engagement is announced 
between Smart David Mills, 
Royal Navy, eldest son of Mr 
Anti Mrs D. Mills, of Hartlepool, 
Cleveland, and Karen Maria, 
eldest daughter of Major and 
Mrs J.A. Doherty, of Barton- 
upon-H umber. South 
Humberside. 

M O. Man fere 
and Miss B. Jantet 
The engagement is announced 
between Olivier, son of the 
French Ambassador to Malta 
and of the late Mme Paiil-Heary 


Manlferc. and' Bland ine, daugh- and Mbs SJ. Morgan 


ter of Mr and Mrs Georges The engagement 15 aunt 
Jantet, of Eahng, London. The between Peter, youngest 
marriage will take place in Mr and Mrs EJ. Wooil 
France. , Naseby. Northai 

. Captain G JL Orpen-SmeUie Susan. onJydaui 

iasd Miss CM JL Patterson Mrs B_RJ. Motj 

The eng^ment is announced Cardin 
between Giles Rackley Orpen- _ s 
Smellie, The Parachute Regi- t vlflm flge 

man, enn nf T MiiUknant- “ 


The engagement is announced 
between Peter, youngest son of 
Mr and Mrs EJ. Woolley, of 
Naseby. Northamptonshire, and 
Susan only daughter of Mr and 
Mis B.RJ. Morgan of Fenybn 


ment, son of Lieutenant- M n p w 2Zk* 

Colonel and Mrs RJ. Orpen- ^ k 

Smellie. of Colchester. Essex, Mackenzie - 

and Camilla Mary Rose, dawh- t . 

ter of Mr and Mis AJ[?I St 

Patterson of Partridge Green, ftr J! 


Mr RP. Wordie 
and Miss K. 


Mackenzie- 


West Sussex. 

Mr J JL. PottmKer 

and Miss SJI. wharfe 

The enga^mem is announced 


Columba's. Pont Street, Of Mr 
Roderick Wordie, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs PJ. Wordie, of The 
Row, Dunblane, Perthshire, and 
Miss Kristina Mackenzie- 


be tween Jay, eldest son of Mr Chanington elder daughter of 
and Mrs J.E Pottinger, of Mr A.K.I. Mackenzie- 
Gulfport Florida, and Susan Charrington and Mrs Jyne 
eldest daughter of Major and Mackenzie-Charrington, of 
Mrs W.H. Wharfe, 149 Barkstone Gardens. London. 
Banstead Road, Ewdl, Epsom The Very Rev Dr J. Fraser 


«£!“ » elder son of Captain and Mk 

stre«L Kings Lynn. Nwftin. let: I Louis Smith, of Manoe Lodge, 


Kings Lynn 771399. j 

nUUNKTON - On 4Ui September. I 
1986. pearefUOy at home after a 
short lUneta. Doits FleMen 
POkinglon. M.BX. Dearly loved 
taiher of Janie, grandfather of 
Samantha and Emma and fathertn- 
law of Peter. Service at Putney Vale 
Cemetery. SWI6 on Thursday. 11th 
Septonber at 13.16 pm. Flowers 
may he sent to J.H. Kenyon Lid. 49 
Marloes Rood. wa. 

POULARD. Geoffrey - Vicar of St 
Savtour-s wUh St James the Lew. 
Westminster. Superior General of 
CBS. beloved brother of Pal Perry, 
suddenly on September 3rd. Funeral 
Mow at St Saviours Thursday. 
September nth. at 11 o'clock. Fam- 
ily (lowers only, but donations "If 
desired lo SI SartoraS. No letters 
please, lust prayers. 

POWELL - On September 3mL pooee- 
ruliy at The dalraioni Nosing 
Home. Hove. Dorothea Mary, aged 
89. dearest aonUe Dot of Caroline 
and Tina. Funeral on Tuesday. 9th 
Setember. at 245pm. al Downs 
Crematorium. Brighton. Family 
(towers onty- 

ROSE - On 3rd September, after ■ brief 
Illness. GUUan Rosemary, most dear 
wife of Robert, mother of Henrietta 
and Charlotte and sister to Stephen.. 
She was the daughter of Sybil Lady 
Joseph and the late S>r MaxweU 
Joseph. Funeral Tuesday. 9th Sep- 
tember at 2.00pm at the West 
Chapel. Cowers Green Crematori- 
um. Flowers please lot W Ganttai it 
Sons Lid. 10 ChUtem Street. WX. 
WHURKO - On 4U> September, 
peacefully In rwrS90i year. Winifred 
Henrietta, beloved wtffe of the late Dr 
Bernard Schtesmper of BoxftnxL 
Berkshire, much loved mother of 
John. Roger and Hilary. 

WRJUNSON - On September 1SL while 
diving off Abu DtobL Guy aged 28. 
belov ed son of John and Efisabeth. 
brother of Tim. 

MHLSHAW - On 4th SepL 1986. peace- 
fully. at Field House. Ha s etmere. 
Lady Myn. aged 97 years, widow of 
SB- Edward wiutiaw. KCMG. Much 
loved mother of Diana and Anne. 4 
grandchildren and 11 great- 
grandchildren. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 

BLEHKM - A Memorial Service lir 
Peter BtenUn will be held on Friday. 
10th October. allUOpra at SI Maty Y 
Church. Beverley. 

SMITH - A Memorial and Thanksgiv- 
ing Service for Mary Louise, wife of 
Canon A. Eric Smilh will bo held al 
St. Mary's Church. Haves. Bromley. 
Krai on Tuesday. September 23rd al 
B.30 pm. 

STOCK ■ A Thanluglvlng Service for 
the ufe of Nigel Stoejk wffll be held on 
Sunday. September 2i« M lpm. at 
Si PauL Covenl -Garden. 

WOMERSUEY A Memorial Servira 
will be hrtd for Mike Womersiey in 
Ihr Lyiia/n Hall. Dragon SrhooL Ox- 
ford. al SJMpm on Friday. 36th 
September. 1986. No Urkets required 
all will be welcome. 

IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 

JUDD. Donald Mctdrom. who died aa 
UK* 6th September, i486. Remem- 
bered always wHh love. Jean. 


Louis Smith, of Marine Lodge, 
Driftwood Gardens, Southsea. 
and Beverly Anne, only daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs J.W. Shop- 
herd, of Hartxmon Crescent, 
Chichester. The marriage win 


Mr MiP. Swan 
and Mile C-MJ*. Loiter 
The engagement is ann 
between Malcolm, etdei 
Mis J.F. Swan, 0 ! 


Horsecroft, S 


McLuskey officiated. 

in The bride, who was given in 

IP. Laffer marriage by her father, was 

lent is announced attended by Sophie and Patrick 
Dolm, elder son of Mackenzie-Chamngion, Tessa 
Swan, of The McGarrigle, Anne Sofie Siaerk 


take place on Friday. October 
17. 1986, at St Andrew’s 
Church, Southsea. 


itorringt 

and the kite Dr J.F. Swan, and E. Edmonstone was best man. 
Prisca. youngest daughter of A reception was held at 30 
Mme R. Lai ter, of Paris and the Pavilion Road and the honey- 
late M R. Lai ter. . moon will be spent abroad. - 


on, Sussex, and Peter Bonham Christie. Mr 


e marriage win . and the kite Dr J.F. Swan, and 
Friday, October Prisca. youngest daughter of 


moon will be spent abroad. 


Fifteenth Sunday 
after Trinity 

CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL: 8 HCS 
9.30 m: 11 SuhCW. Mm Aettraa 
CnrisU- munara (RalmlriM)- Jer-- < 
adnurabUb (PatestrinaL Raw 
Mason: 3.15 E. Responses (On 
Throw awjQ^.Og^rod^'erousooj: 6JO 

-XS HCS SO. IS 
Sung Ewn. Mass for four voices 
(ByritJ. Beau auorurn via CSOrtoort" 
VeiyHev John Soutmate: 21.30M: 

E. Satvai — •* — — 

May land. 

ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL: 8. 11.30 
HC. Mme cum hMo CDun-ufKL Alma 
redctnpuuis roaur IPateslrtnaJ: 1030 
M. BMMdtccus and To Drum: The 
Short Service CByrdJ: Rev r John 
Austin: 3.16 E. Ortavl tool Qvionlcak 
A ve Ma rt a iPrid eU. Rev Peter 1 Ban. 
WESTMINSTER ABBEY 1 : 8. 11.40 
HC 1030 Greater London -Civic 
Service. Great Lord Of Lords **— — -* 
Uw Dram 3 E (Wood In EJ. 
ante tentUmnn rraiWM. Canon Trevor 
I Beeson: 630 ES. Rev Canon Ctaries 
Pinder. 

SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL: 9 HC: 
li Eucn. HM o quam . etoetosum 
(Victoria! 1 1 wm wash my hinds In 
InnoCewof fflUidow). Let all -mortal 

itesh (BanstowL Canon John Cnc 3 ' 
E. The Magdalen Sn-vire (LeRjhuiv. 
Ave mod (Parse ns>. uuwn Peter 
ppnwrde n. I 

WESTM8M5THI CATHEWtAlU 7. & 
9. 12. 6.30. 7 LM: l OJO SaaTgLaO V. 
ST GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL. S0UU»- 
warki S. IO. 12- IP. 16 LM: 11 HM. 
Very Rev James P PanoetL t 
ROYAL NAVAL COLLEGE CHAPEL. 

. &tmwlcb. SEia 11 fnch. Turn 
Thre again ^UtwoodL Ave , Verum 

wMDS 
racks. SW1: n 
Harkmss. 

TOWER OF LONDON. ECS: %16 HC: 
11 M. T> Detail (Vaughan wnuanwi 
o Lord to thy wrath (GHtxwaL 

□apten.L 

(RAF Ch 

wuc ojj. lua hO ii’ m. t» 
Drum and Jubilate (Sanford to AJ. 
Laudaie Dommum (Mexaru. O Thou 
whose sure control (MeUtaX 

k? r HLSS5’ 1 ^ »«« wh® 

Si^sb^fs^srssi 

Palace: 8 JO HC: 11 Sung^Mh. mbs 
for Three 
fTalteu. Cnnon 

(Sunaion m CL t wui im up 

.‘SSi*? 011 ““ h* ntuae 

ALL HALLOWS BY THE T^VESt 1 1 
Suoe Eucti. Rev Sam van Cmm. 

ALL SAINTS. Maruret Strata. WU 8. 

5 16 LM: li HM. O ouam vortcKum 
(Vidoryu, the Vitar. 6 rVu-B au 
BenedHIion ’Wood m DL 

iRachRianmevi. Rev 

ALL SOULS. Lantaiam Paco. .... 
9.30, HC: 11. Rev ton BmUey: 6JO 


Services tomorrow 


S Pertan: 6JO ES. Rev- Henry 
CromM. 

HOLY TRINITY. Prince Consort 
Road. SWT: 8.30 HC it Choral Eurti. 
Rev Martin Israel. 

HOLY TRINITY. Stoone Street. SWi: 
B.30. 12.10 HC: 1030 Euch. Cano n 

ST ALBAN'S. Brooke, SL EC1: 9 JO 
SM: 11 KM. .Mass for five votoee 
(Byrd). O for a closer walk (Stanford). 
Ft Baker: 530 LM- 
ST BARTHOLOMEW THE GREAT. 
SmttMleM. EC4: 9. 11 HC. MMU 
Brevis (Palestrina). Ave Verum Cor- 


jus (Byrdl. the Rertor: 6.30 E. Etway 
Bevtn (Dorian).. AlnUphre and Ever- 
lasting Cod lObbonu. ihe Rector. . 
ST lihlDE^. neeiareei. EC4: if 
Choral M and Eudi. Jubilate and 
Gloria (Stanforo in BL Canon John 
Oates: 6-30 E. Canon John Oates. 
ST CUTHBERTS. PhDbeOrti Gartens 
sws: io HC: 11 Sung Eurti (Bach 
Chorales). Never Msathcr-beaten sail 
(Campton ). Rev W J Wijpamck. 

ST GCORCETS. H»hO«r Sffwre. Wli 
-8JOHC: n Sung Euch. Mtera brevis 
(vladaW Rev o D WaUdre. • 
ST JAMES^, . OarttCfchytne. BC4: 
10.30 Euch Snch. Mean pour te Part 

i^JAMES^. Ptecaffllto. Wl: SJSO 
HO 11 Sung Euch: 6 EP. 

ST JAMES'S. Sussex Gardens. WZ& 
HCs 1030 Sung Euch iDartw In Ft 6 
• E- Short Service iCauatouL Ave Maria 

STUJKFS. Ch eBre L SW3: B. 12.19 

^Wetan Sfe ier. 
$W1: ll Sung Eucil Canon Trevor 

umou 

rj^tsfflKMva 

Jennings: 11.30 MP. Rev Stephen 
nobertfe SM Qnn«e Servw. - 4. IS 
gorai^ E: 6J» EP.. Rev Stephen 

r lWAJRY ABBOTS. Kenstogton. W8: 

1Z.30 HC. 9.30 Sung Euch. the 
VMRll.IS M. Skier Gent 6.30 E. 
the vicar. 

S r MARY'S. Bourne Street. SWi: 9. 

«&. 7 LM: 11 HM. Hb» orens 
rPNesiriitaj. 1 waited Lord 

(MendetasomiL Fr John GUttng: -6.1 A 
E and Solemn Benediction. 

ST MARYLEBONE. MarylrtXJIW 
Road. Wl. 8. 11 HC Mfesa Brevis 
(PaktaiinaL &pa cert ^iMl«miu). 

. Mrs vaiene Mafan: 6;OT httnwnrw 
Healing. Rev Christopher K Hamel 

ST^MJCHAEL’S. CornhIIL ECS:1 1 
oWStuch 'Stanford uiB nan. crux 
nbew (King John of Portugal). Jesu. 
the i«Y Inouflht (DmngL 
ST PAUL'S. WUiqn PtacCjSVYl; 8. 9 
HC 11 Solemn Euch. Conununton 
Service In D IR Vaughan WUbarrnL 
Exutuw- Dro (Herbert Howww. jeau 
Duirts Meroorta Uean LanguuL 
Canon Eric James. _ 

ST PETER’S. Eaton Snuare. SWi: 
aiS HC. 10 Family M*g: ll SM. 

■ AMonva Chnsli Munera (Pateotrina). 
O Sacrum Convlvium IMesnaraL Rev 
D 8 TUtyrr. 

ST SIMON ZELOTES. MUnor Street. 


CHLLSfcA OLD CHORAL 

cninrh .Strert, SWS; a HC IQ 
Chlldrra'a Service: n G. Pra> Lrtgb- 
ten Thomson: 6 E. Pr» Leighton 


(Darke]. Expectam to tp oc ta vl iwoodh 
6 LM and Benediction. ] 

ST 

LAND. _ 

John H Burns 6.30. 
der Cairns. 

CROWN COURT CMliRCH OF SCOT- 
LAND. Co vent Oarden. WCZ: 11.16. 
630 Rev Kenneth G Hughes: 12. IS 
HC 

THE ASSUMPTION. Warwick Street 
Wl: 8. IO. 12. a. 6 LM: ll SM.MBSS 
for four voices (Byrdl. O - magnum 
■nystertum (Byrd). Ego sum panto 
vlvus ■ Byrd) 

FARM STREET. Wl: 7.30. 830. IO. 
12.15. 4.15. 6.15 LM: 11 HM. MUR 
bn honorem Carlo Borromeo (FHke). O 
quam otAaMHs (Wotf-FerrarO. 

THE ORATORY. Bronuitan Road. 
SW7: 7. 8. 9. IO. 12-30. 43a 7 LM: 

' 1 HM. Maw Salve Regina (Victorian 
30 V. Adoramus te Chrtste (Men- 

.. lELOREDA'S. E to Place: ll 
am. AsManpta esi Marta (Puertrtna). 
Ave Maria ivictoriaL 
OI R LADY OF VTCTt 

ton Hi an street. Wl: a 9. IO. 12 

6.30 LM: 1 1 HM. Putsaue ray perdu I 
(Lassus). Adoramus Te (Lassus); 3 | 



Mr M.TJD. Lorick 
and Miss JJVL Frank 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, eldest son of 
MrTrevor Lovick. ofSl Albans, 
Hertfordshire, and Mrs Sue 
Adams, of Barnes. London, and 
Judy, eldest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Peter Frank, of 
Duntisboume Abbotts, 
Gloucestershire. 

Oberteatnant BJ. ». Maltzan, 
Freiherr zb Wartenberg mid 
PenzJhi 

and Mbs SJL Sowels 
The engagement is announced 
between Bernd Joachim, eldest 
son of fitilur Bernd v. 
Maltzan and Freifrau Gudrun v. 
Maltzan, of Ingwenya Farm, 
South Africa, and Stephanie 
Renata, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs John William Sowels, 
of Gerrards Cross, 
Buckinghamshire. 

Mr P. WooDey 


OBITUARY 

MR JOSEPH GODSON 

Determined champion of 
Anglo-American relations 

Mr Joseph (Joe) Godson, 
for many years a builder of 
bridges between Britain and 
the United Slates, died yester- 
day at the age of 73. 

For more than three de- 
cades he strove to find com- 
mon ground between 
Americans and Europeans, » 
especially Europeans of the 
democrauc left, and, when he 
found it capitalized on it. He 
had much success, and this 
continued despite the sharp- 
ening transatlantic climate. 

Boro in Poland on January 
15, 1913, he spoke relatively 
little English when he went to doing as much as it ought in 
New York at the age of 1 3, and nurturing European-Amen-; 
throughout bis life his accent can relations, he took the job 
carried a hint of Central upon himself 
Europe behind the warm and He organized conferences, 
urgent American voice. wrote articles, and was Euro- 

The same transition from pean co-ordinator of the Cen- 
Europe to America, which tre for Strategic and 
took him through Gty College International Studies of 
in New York, and then law Georgetown University in 
school at New York Universi- Washington, DC. He regularly 
ty in the 1930s, also helped to took a team of pnvAilantic 
shape his ideas about politics. Europeans to Washington - 
A Marxist in his early years, politicians, academics, busi- 
he soon decided that Stalin nessmen, both centre-left and . 
held no attraction for him; but centre-right - to argue with.- 
he rejected the romanti- Americans about the state of 
cism of the Trotskyists (and the Alliance, 
was thereby saved from the Only this week he was busy 
exaggerated swing to the right organizing a fringe meeting at 
which many Trotskyists sub- the TUC in Brighton, but ill 
sequently went through by health prevented him from 
way of over-compensation). attending. 

He belonged to that brave Godson built up a remark- 
group of Americans who con- able knowledge of European 
tinued to search for a work- politics. He was a friend of 
able, democratic form of many leading members of the 
Marxism until the Nazi -So vi- social democratic parties and 
el Pact of 1939 made them trade unions of Western Eu- 
dissolve their organization in rope. In Britain these included 
despair. Harold Wilson. George 

This led him into his first Brown, Arthur Deakin and 
jobs. In the American labour Frank Chappie, and his elder 
movement, where between son married the daughter of 
1940 and 1944 he helped to ‘ Sam Watson, the Durham 
beat off communist attempts miners' leader, 
to control two New York- He was European editor of 
based trade unions. This was The Washington Quarterly, 
followed by six years with the and the author and editor of a 
American Jewish Labour number of works, including 
Committee, where he had to Challenges to the Western 
deal with the ruination caused Alliance ( 1 984). comprising 34 
by European ami-semi tism. expanded articles from the 
Thus began the major work of Times, published to celebrate 
his career, virtually all of the 35th anniversary of Nato. 
which was spent abroad. He had a son and a daughter 

He was labour attache at the by his first wife, who died at 
American Embassy in Ottawa an early age. He married Ruth 
from 1950 to 1952, and in Perlmann in 1958, who gave 
London from 1953 to 1959. him another son. 

He then went to Belgrade as a 9 Godson's chief quality was 
first secretary from 1959 to a combination of enthusiasm - 
1961, and to Zagreb as consul and doggedness which made ’ 
general until 1964. him hard to resist His urgent 

He returned to the State and persistent approach won 
Department as labour adviser him both friends and enemies;' 
for Europe before going to but he got things done. 
Edinburgh in 1968 as consul The man who in the 1960s- 
generaL Here be remained persuaded the American trade 
until he took eariy retirement union movement not to op- 
from the American Foreign pose the Non-Proliferation 
Service in 1971, and he moved Treaty was, in the 1980s, still 
to London. charming Europeans off the 

From then on his career frees of anti-Americanism. A 
was, if anything, even more maker of coalitions and a 
distinguished. Convinced that bridge-builder, he had learned 
the foreign service was not the nature of democracy. 


DR CHRISTINE COOPER 


AMERICAN ’CHURCH 00 LONDON. 
Wl: II. Ron r AUtoon. 

CITY TEMPLE. Hoi bom. EC1: 11. 

6.30. Rev Crtr Waugh 

HINDE STREET METHODIST 
CHLRCH. Wl: 11. 6J0. Rev Leslie 
Crimths. 

KENSINGTON URC. Alten Street. 
WS: ll HC. Rev Kenneth Forrest; 

6-30. M ms Margaret William*. . 

RECENT SQUARE PRESBYTERIAN 
URC. Tavistock Place. wEi-. 11. Rev I 
G j Bakker 630. Rev J w McMiner. 1 
5T ANNE AND ST AGNES ILu- i 
Uwram. Gresham SI. EC2; 10.30. I 
ST JOHNS WOOD URC. 
ftn John Milter. 

WESLEY'S CHAPEL. CUy Road. EC2: 
11. Rev Nigel GUson. 

WESTMINSTER CENTRAL HALL | 
iMethoaisu. SWI: ll. Rev R John 
Tudor: 6 SO. Rev 
WESTMINSTER • 
ham Gair.swi; ll. 

Ton. 


ThoriHon. # 

CHRIST CHURCH. CHa» 
a HC: ll a Rev D RWi 
CROSVENOR CHAPEL, 


CHUROl OM ST SIMON ZELOTES. Mlwwr! Street. 
WS; 8 HCS IQ Sw3: B HC: 1 1 MP. JuWUtej ThalOPO- 
jl C. Pwe& Letoh- bbJIi. Hear my prayer iPureeti). D» 
E. Prao* Letgttun Angela Pearce: 6.30 EP. Mavuncat 


Angela prarce: 6.30 EP. Mavuncat 
. isianford in AL, The tord to my 
enepnera i Stanford). Preo John 

ST STEPHEN’S. Ctoumier Road. 


8.16 MS ll Sung SW7: a. 9. LM: II HM. Communion 
Eura.Tite Shan Sm Ik (BWenLAVe Swxv in E IHaroftt OariteJ. Rev 
verum corpus <Bynl). the Jtev A W Perry Butler: 6 Solenoi E nod 

■ Rev Robert Browne. 

HOLY TRJMrrY. Brenotw Road. THE ANNUNCtATTpN. Bryans! on 
SW7: 8-30 HC 11 HQ Sung. Rev p J street. Wl. 11 SM. Cottegium Regale 


Cranleigh School 

Michaelmas Term at Cranleigh 
School begins tomorrow. Sally 
Quick is senior prefect and 
Andrew Gram deputy senior 
prefect. The Cranleigh lecture 
by Dr Christopher Andrew is on 
October 14; the Gentian play. 
Romulus dor Grasse, on October 
20 and 21; the Cranleigh dinner 
on October 25: the lower school 
play. Bugsy Malone, from 
November 12 p 14; the Advent 
carol service on November 30. 
and a concert of music from the 
great shows on December 5. 
Long Leave is from October 25 
to November 2 and term ends 
on December 12. The Old 
Cranleighan dinner will take 
place at the school on Novem- 
ber 15. 


Dr Christine Cooper, OBE, 
a paediatrician who devoted 
her life to the care of neglected 
and sexually abused children, 
died on September 1. She was 
68 . 

Christine Elisabeth (Tina) 
Cooper was boro on July 21, 
1 9 1 8, the eldest da ughler of Dr 
William Francis Cooper, an 
analytical chemist and physi- 
cian. She was educated at St 
John's School, Bexhill-on-Sea, 
and spent the next two years 
qualifying as a nursery nurse. 

Like her mother, she was 
deeply interested in the wel- 
fare of children, and soon 
concluded that she needed to 
qualify in medicine in order lo 
make the contribution of 
which she knew she was 
capable. 

A student of Girton College. 
Cambridge, and the Royal 
Free Medical SchooL, London, 
she graduated in 1945 and, 
after house posts, specialized 
in child health at the Royal 
Free Hospital. 

In 1949, she was invited by 
Dr Elsie Wright to visit the 
children's department at the 
Royal Victoria Infirmary, 
Newcastle upon Tyne, and 
was flattered to receive a 
whirlwind tour conducted by 
Sir James Spence. She was 
told afterwards that this had 
been her appointment inter- 
view, and she became senior 
registrar to Sir James and to 
Dr Wright, whom she suc- 
ceeded a& consultant 
paediatrician to Newcastle 
General Hospital in 1952. 
Spence advised her that her 
future lay in improving the lot 
of deprived children. 

Her unit .was soon a centre 
of family paediarrics. Moth- 
ers, and occasionally fathers, 
were admitted with their chil- 
dren; parents were always part 
of her management plan. 
Child abuse went well beyond 
physical injury, she believed; 
bruises and fractures healed, 
but children were permanent- 


cal cruelty of their parents. 

She recognized fostering 
and adoption as vital parts or 
child care, and she was medi- 

Gresham’s School 

Mich ad mas Term at Gresham's 
SchooL Hoh. begins on Sunday. 
September 7. when. Mr N. 
Semple takes up his appoint- 
ment as Housemaster of the Old 
School House, and Mr PjV. 
Paskell takes up his appoint- 
ment as Housemaster of Tallis. 
Mr P.G. Corran has become 
director of studies on the retire- 
ment of Mr W.O. Thomas. An 
additional girls' house, to be 
named Edinburgh House, is 
being builiand will be opened in 
September 1987. Registrations 
for this, of girls aged 1 3 plus, are 
invited. There are 459 pupils in 
the senior school 175 in the 


cal adviser to the Northern 
Counties Adoption Society, 
later the Newcastle Adoption 
UniL An eariy supporter of 
the British Agencies for Adop- 
tion and Fostering, she was in 
turn secretary and chairman 
of the medical group, and a 
member of a working party on 
artificial insemination. 

In 1964, the government of 
Sierra Leone, in association 
with Durham University, in- 
vited her to* help provide 
services for the health and 
nutrition of children in that 
country. Over the next two 
years, her organizational skills 
and determination were tested 
to the fiilL She was made an 
OBE for this work. 

A friend and pupil of Anna 
Freud. Christine Cooper was 
one of a select group of child 
care workers who met regular- 
ly at the Freud house. She 
attended also the Ipswich 
courses in family psychiatry, 
doing much to encourage links 
between paediatricians and 
psychiatrists. 

With Alfred White Frank- 
lin, she was a member of the 
original T unbridge Wells 
study group in the early 1970s 
and succeeded him as the 
second president of the British 
Association for the Study and 
Prevention of Child Abuse 
and Neglect Her inspiration 
and support to workers in this 
difficult field, her teaching, 
writing and her skills as an 
expert witness, all made a 
valuable contribution. 

§he was a leading member 
of a study group on child 
sexual abuse within the fam- 
ily, and was instrumental in 
achieving recognition in this 
country of the psychological 
needs of sexually abused chil- 
dren and in breaking the 
conspiracy of silence affecting 
even the professions. 

Christine Cooper was a 
woman of immense energy 
with a talent for friendship 
who. despite never doing less 
than two full-time jobs, some- 
how found time to share her 
passion for music, especially 
the opera, and all things 
Venetian. 

preparatory school and 60 in the 
pre-preparatory school. Old 
Greshamian weekend is Decem- 
ber 6 and 7. Term ends on 
December 13. 

St Francis’ College, 
Letchworth 

Autumn Term at St Francis* 
College. Letchworth. began on 
Wednesday, September 3. Miss 
P. Neviti took up her appoint- 
ment as senior housem (stress. 
Term ends on Friday. Decem- 
ber 12. after prize giving, at 
which the guest will be Judge 
Devlin. The carol service will be 
held afterwards. 








18 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


Scientist fears 
more terror by 
animal groups 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


Violence against researchers 
who experiment on animals is 
likely to increase and more of 
them are being intimidated by 
animal liberation “terrorists", 
a scientist said yesterday. 

Professor Jeffrey Gray told 
a conference of the British 
Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science that parcel 
and car bomb attacks were 
likely (o become more fre- 
quent because animal lib- 
erationists were failing to win 
public support by argument 

Extra security was in force 
at Bristol University yesterday 
as Professor Gray and other 
scientists spoke on animal 
experiments. 

“I have taken a calculated 
risk in coming here, but I have 
a wife and children to consider 
and there are some public 
meetings that I and other col- 
leagues now refuse to aitend," 
he said. 

Professor Gray, a professor 
of psychology at London Uni- 
versity who observes animals 
under test conditions, told 
yesterday's meeting: “The 
distinctive characteristic of 
those singled out for libera- 
tionist terror is not that they 
do particular violence to ani- 
mals but that they speak out 
against liberationists." 

One scientist was the target 
of a letter bomb after writing a 
letter to The Times last year 
and another had a bomb 
placed under his car early this 



Professor Gray: predicts 
new bomb campaign 


year after appearing on 
television. 

Last February four letter 
bombs were sent simulta- 
neously to researchers in dif- 
ferent partsoflhecountiy, but 
no injuries had yet been 
caused. 

Professor Gray said that 
animal experiments had led to 
the development of drugs 
which had helped millions 
and enabled thousands of 
mental patients in Britain to 
be released from hospital and 
lead more normal lives. 

“Advances have been made 
but it is die advances stHi to 
come that are threatened by 
the liberationists," he said. 
Experimental animals would 
play a vital role in research 
into senile dementia and other 
disorders of the brain. 

“The overwhelming mqor- 
ity of scientists working with 
animals have no need tojusti- 
fy causing excessive suffering 
to animals because they do not 
cause them such suffering.” 

The liberationists had “at 
best distorted and at worst 
simply lied" about what went 
on in animal laboratories. 

He said that the liberation 
movement had been “joined 
by anarchists whose main 
purpose is to create violence 
and confusion in society at 
large." 

Professor Nicholas Mac- 
kintosh. head of the experi- 
mental psychology depart- 
ment at Cambridge Universi- 
ty, said: “There is nothing 
especially wicked about exp- 
erimenting on animals. Such 
experiments have uniquely 
enriched and informed our 
understanding of the world 
and of our place in it" 

But be said that scientists 
required policing. 

Dr Stephen Lea. head of the 
department of psychology at 
Exeter University, said: “Most 
people are willing to see some 
suffering inflicted on animals 
if sufficient benefits to people 
result. This means some expe- 
riments on animal behaviour 
can be defended but some can- 
not." 


Conference reports, page 5 



Boost 
for Star 
Wars 



project 


From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 


*tZ *■ 


iff’ * 

. ,, 






-<s 


Flames and smoke engulfing the Hotell Caledon ten. A rescuer lifts a man from a window, ri ght, before a Sea King helicopter lowers them to safety. 

14 guests killed in blaze at Norwegian hotel 


From Our Correspondent 
Oslo 


guests died yes- 
fire at an hotel in 


terday in a 
the southern Norwegian port 
of Kristiansand. 

The fire at the 1 1 -storey 
Hotell Caledonien, the city's 
largest broke out just before 
5am as most of the 135guests 


were asleep. It began on the 
pound floor near the recep- 
tion area and spread rapidly to 
envelop the next two floors. 1 

Four Swedes, a Canadian 
man and seven Norwegians 
were among the dead. The 
identities of the other twd 
dead were not known. 

As the building rapidly 


filled with smoke, some guests 
were forced towards the root 
where they were rescued by a 
Sea King helicopter from the 
Sola airfield near Stavanger, 
more than 100 miles away, 
and .by fire brigade ladders. 
One man is thought to have 
jumped to his death. 

More than 50 of those 


rescued were treated in hos- 
pital most of them for smoke 
inhalation. 

Some 200 people, including 
60 soldiers from an army 
medical company, fought the 
fire. 

One survivor, Mr Ame 
Gudem, of Stavem. said some 
guests had panicked “and 


were screaming out of open 
windows". He escaped by 
balancing on a cornice outside 
his window to reach a ladder. 


Since the 1641 founding of 
Kristiansand, which has a 
population of 60.000, -it has 
been partially or completely 
destroyed tty fire several 
times, most recently in 1892. 


The American space pro- 
gramme notched up a des- 
perately-needed triumph 
yesterday when a Delta rocket 
blasted off from Cape Canav- 
eral in Florida, propelling into 
orbit two Star Wars satellites 
intended to track a missile 
launch, and to destroy each 
other after a game of space 
pursuit. 

The exercise was a major 
lest of President Reagan's 
controversial Strategic De- 
fence Initiative, which seeks 
to devise a space-based shield 
against enemy missiles. 

An identical Delta launch 
failed in May. adding to the 
climate of crisis in the space 
programme, which has suf- 
fered three major failures this 
year. The Challenger shuttle 
was destroyed on January 28, 
and an unmanned air force 
Titan rocket exploded seconds 
after blast-off on April 18. 

Additionally, two research 
rockets have been destroyed 
and a Minuteman missile was 
blown up after a launch 
malfunction. 

The combined failures 
make it the most disastrous 
year in the space programme 
in two decades. 

Little information was 
given about the latest flight of 
the $42 million Delta before 
blast-off. Apart from a track- 
ing experiment conducted in 
orbit in June 1985. this is the 
first Star Wars experiment 
conducted in space. 

The air of gloom hanging 
over the space programme has 
been further heightened by a 
decision to lay off 1,100 
contract workers at Kennedy 
Space Centre as a direct result 
of the Challenger disaster. 

The next flight is not ex- 
pected before the beginning of 
1988. ■ 

The latest job losses are in 
addition to 1,150 lay-offs at 
Kennedy in February. Also, 
700 to 800 workers at a 
Louisiana plant where shuttle 
fuel tanks are built, will be laid 
off by October. 


3 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,144 

Solution to Pnzzie No 17,143 Solution to Puzzle No 17,138 


IToday’s events 



A prize of The Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should he addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition. PO Box 4S6. Virginia Street. London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday 's competition are: Cleveland Hood. 
A try holme Lane. Great Ayton, N Yorks: R K’ Stewart. 117 
Hampton Road, London EC7: D J Pearce, 52 Chawn Park 
Drive. Redmore. Stourbridge. 


Name. — - 


Address. 



ACROSS 

I Charge no end for Sanskrit, 
for instance (5). 

4 The meal men out East cook 
for the board (9). 

9 Hand luggage, in the case of 
women (6.31. 

10 Lchar's witch of the wood., a 
variation of love-lorn Olivia 
(5). 

]! Inclined to snap, like a spy? 
(5). 

12 No point finishing the min- 
estrone — it’s turned out 
very middling (9). 

13 He won’t thank you for 
burning mince (7). 

15 This holds the end of the 
firewood, and can’t be 
moved t7). 

18 Giving a good grip to help 
canon ski downhill (3-4). 

20 Two fellows who translated 
Homer (7). 

21 Bishop's helper in the same 
rank (9). 

23 Utter wretch, you may say 
(5k 

25 Lead got from shale (5). 

26 He produced busts, like Nel- 
son minus eve. say (9). 

27 Hazel's hanger-on. swallow- 
ing remedy, makes minor 
improvement (9). 


28 First job-finder for the un- 
employed (5). 

DOWN 

1 Bom of a marriage of neces- 
sity? It's a lie (9). 

2 One investment in rising 
foreign currency leads to an- 
other t5V 

3 Use this clipper to make 
short-tailed stun (5.4). 

4 Exemplar of the Outward 
Bound movement? (3-4). 

5 One of the colours won on 
the battlefield (7). 

6 Half Barrie's land ( 5). 

7 Message from a flasher (9). 

8 Moved quickly in field ex- 
ercise (5). 

14 Jib at slab of Italian confec- 
tionery (5,4). 

16 Curtains reduced, guar- 
anteed not to perish (9). 

17 One completely out of fa- 
vour. like Pooler (3-6). 

19 Illegal holding, linked up 
with escudos at source (7). 

20 Go round the Square with 
hoop (7). 

21 I S agents trap the Spanish 
girl (S). 

22 In France Td fighr for the 
faith (5). 

24 Cona'rninga new branch of 
medicine (5). 


The national final of the Collins Dictionaries Times Crossword 
Championship is tomorrow at ihe Park Lane IloieL London, at 
IJOpm, admission £2. 

Concise Crossword page *5 


Last chance to see 
The creation of an ideal: Neo- 
classical drawings: Festival Gal- 
lery. Afdebingh: 10 to 6. 


Music 

Concert by the Taunton 
Sinfonietta; Brew bo use Theatre. 
Taunton, 7.45. 

Organ concert by Gary 
Seiling. John Prior and Ronald 
Perrin: Ripoa Cathedral 7 JO. 

Concert by the Crispian 
Steele-Perkins brass ensemble: 
N line ham Park, Oxford, 6. 

Bolivian folk by Rumilljta; 
Third Eye Centre. 350 
Sauchiehall St, Glasgow. 7.30. 


Gardens open 


P- Plants tar Sato 


and shrubs; 

September 30: 2 to & 


<m f 


OafbyWWK C 
AB23, an N of : 


Ti ..... 

iMk Tl» Prior*, Kemenon. 
an feus* 


HE 


T ow fc e st xay 


latfi September 2S; 2 to 7. 


Talks 

Hill fanning in Lakeland, by 
Mike Davies-Shiel; Lake Dis- 
trict National Park Visitor Cen- 
tre. Brockhole, Windermere. 

I JO. 

The Worcestershire Yeo- 
manry Cavalry: City Museum 
and An Gallery. Foregate Si. 
Worcester, 2 to 3.30. 


General 

Village Sir and sale of work; 
Village Hall, Broughton, 2. 

Peebles Arts Festival: drama, 
dance, an and music workshop 
for 4 to 7 year- olds: Drill Hall, 
Peebles. 10 to 4. 

Salisbury Festival: concerts, 
theatre, dance, exhibitions, jazz, 
children's and fringe events: 
various venues, for info: (0722) 
25173. 

Birmingham Carnival '8& 
floats, costume groups, an and 
crafts, music and food of the 
Caribbean: Handswortb Park. 
Birmingham, today and tomor- 
row i io 8. 

Chichester Quilt Show; 
Bishop's Palace Kitchen. Chich- 
ester Cathedral, today 10 to 5. 
tomorrow II to 5. 


Tomorrow 


Royal engagements 


Princess Anne opens the XIV 
International Congress of 
Microbiology. Free Trade HalL. 
Manchester. 6.50; and attends a 
Reception for participants in the 
Congress. University of Man- 
chester. 8^5. 


roses, 
Surrey: 
Tennyson's 
B2131 Hat 


210 B. 
Surrey End Cotta 
Lane, nr Hotomera, 
Pel worth reed: 


The potind 


garden, 
i fruits an 


_ _ _ bees, shrubs, 

heathen, suture 
Other Osysr EasCLottton: 

Duiban 


Wednesday: Ease 
Sahng. 6m NW ot 


12 acres. ted waited 
many reusuai 


Buttons,! 
days. Thu 
17; 2IO 6. 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 


qois de Lafayette. 


of Independence. Gt 
France. 1757: John 
chemist and ph 


Watford 


Edward 


Davies, 

. Shropshin 
Appleton, 


1892. 


TOMORROW 

Births: Elizabeth l 
1558-1603. Greenwich 


gist and inventor. Bekesboun 
Kent: Gcorges-Lotris, Comte 
BufTon. naturalist. Moniba 
France. 1 707; Willis 
Butt e rf i e l d, architect (Kel 
College. Oxford). London. 18! 
Sir Henry Campbell-Baam 


Glasgow. 1836: Dame B 
Sirwetl, Scarborough, 1887. 


New exhibitions 
Work by Ursula Galloway 
and Keith Bycroft; Stable Gal- 
lery. Belchamp Walter Hall. 
Sodbnrj: Mon to Sun 10 to 6-30 
(ends Sept 133- 

Last chance to see 
Cats! Works by Louis Wain; 
York City Art Gallery. Ex- 
hibition Sq: 230 to 5. 

Music 

Concert of film themes and 
popular music by the English 
Northern Philharmouia: The 
Hexagon. Queen's Walk. Read- 
ing. 7.30. 

Violin and piano recital by 
Christine Read and Jonathan 
Hinden; Church Stretton School 
Hall. 3. 

General 

In Transpo '86: Great Central 
Railway Cavalcade, stands, dis- 
plays. sideshows and bar Qnoro 
Station, nr Loughborough, to- 
day and tomorrow 12. 

Craft fair. Pump Rooms. 
Cheltenham. 10 to S. 

Steam Day at Beamish: work- 
ing steam vehicles once used in 
the north of England: Beamish 
Open Air Museum. Stanley. Co 
Durham. 10. 

Historic and class vehicle 
rally: 400 vehicles, band, stalls 
and' refreshments: Hotkcr Hall. 
Cark-in-Cartmel, Cumbria. 
IUJOio 6. 


and educator. Bristol, 


and naturalist. An 
Massachusetts. 1892; 


Roads 


Cemgydrydion. 


on 


delays. 


tween Lesmahgow 


M80/A80: Contraflow 
junction 4 (Haggs i 
lengthy delays. 


Bank Bank 

, Buys Sets 

rf AuebaBe* 251 2.33 

Austria Sch 2240 2 120 

BctgknaFr 66.« 82X5 

Canada 8 2.14 2415 

ft warrefr Hr VL97 1127 

ratiwtaltek 778 7XM 

Franca Fr . 10X5 . 9L8S 

Genaany Dm X175 • 3-005 

Greece Dr 2044X1 19200 

Hong Kong* 11X5 11X5 

batendPt 1.153 1JB3 

Italy Lha - 2200JM 2080J00 

Japan Yan 24*00 23000 

NrttoriandiGkl 3J58 3X9 

Norway Kr 11J9 ' 1079 

Portugal Esc 22S4W 2134X1 

Socdi Africa Rd *70 *4X1 

Spate Pte 20*00 19*00 

Sweden Kr 1074 10.19 

Sftazeriaed FT 1 257 2^3 

USA* 156 1X9 

Yugoslavia Dm 77550 6754)0 

Haas tor wnaB danomlnation bwta nows 
only as stapled by Barclays sank PLC. 
HoteH Price Index: 3S4J. 

London: The FT Indax dosed up 4.1 at 
13384. 

Tower Bridge 

■ 

.Tower Bridge will be raised 
tomorrow at 1J am and 5 pm. 

Ct 

14 

u 

lers wh 
tpyofT 
repeat 
folio p 

•W Iter 

'lUo 

J 

L 

' 

For read 
missed a co 
week, we 
week's For 
^today’s an 

m MW TWs 

ct 

0 may have 
fce Tima this 
bdow the 
rice changes 
*23). 

re -W 1 

1 

+3 

43 

46 

45 

43 



2 

+8 

42 

44 

45 

44 



3 

+5 

45 

47 

47 

42 



4 

+2 

42 

45 

45 

43 



5 

+2 

44 

45 

43 

42 



6 

+1 

4t 

45 

44 

42 



7 

+5 

+3 

+4 

48 

45 



8 

+5 

44 

47 

44 

43 



9 

+6 

+1 

44 

45 

42 



10 

+1 

42 

47 

43 

44 



11 

45 

44 

48 

48 

41 



12 

+3 

43 

47 

45 

43 



13 

44 

41 

44 

43 

45 



14 

42 

43 

48 

45 

43 



15 

44 

43 

44 

45 

43 


b 

16 

41 

43 

44 

45 

44 


n 

17 

42 

42 

45 

42 

44 


/» 

18 

44 

42 

45 

43 

42 


c 

19 

42 

45 

47 

+7, 

42 



20 

46 

42 

43 

46 

45 



21 

+1 

44 

45 

43 

43 


T 

22 


43 

43 

44 

43 



23 

48 

41 

44 

45 

42 


l 

24 

42 

41 

45 

44 

43 


B 

B 

25 

44 

42 

+3 

+3 

45 


C 

. 26 

41 

42 

+8 

44 

41 


G 

27 

+1 

43 

47 

+2 

44 


- 

28 

45 

41 

+8 

+8 

£1 



29 

4? 

45 

46 

45 

42 



30 

42 

41 

44 

46 

44 


Li 

31 

45 

41 

43 

45 

43 


3 

E 

32 

44 

41 

48 

47 

43 


M 

33 

41 

42 

43 

45 




34 

42 

44 

45 

45 

42 


14 

35 

44 

42 

45 

46 

44 


a 

& 

36 

41 

+3 

47 

+3 

41 


M 

37 

43 

41 

43 

48 

43 



36 

44 

41 

45 

45 

42 


( 

39 

+1 

41 

45 

43 

+3 



40 

42 

+1 

45 

46 

44 


lr 

T 

41 

43 

+2 

45 

42 

41 


P 

42 

46 

+1 

•P4 

47 

41 



43 

44 

+3 

44 

44 

44 


.~r 

44 

+4 

+2 

+7 

_£§ 

+2_ 


r< 

«■ 


Weather 

forecast 


Northern Ireland 


slowly S in the E. 


6 am to midnight 


S Enqtend. East 
>4 Islands: Dry. 


, mmhiim, Charnel ■— ■— — ■ j • 
with some hazy stag nate: wted 
e. kght nax tamps 20C (gBF\. 

E. IE Enured: Bright Marvels, a ftUto 

an in nl im wnri uawhvfu KnM- mn 



High Tides 


sw 


it Wales, Hit, casual England: Rather 
cjx^^wotawmtorty.toht 

Uketartfct. Me el Mm. SW Sent 


Sght or 


Roles and bow to play page 33 


^ nd westerly, 

moderate: max temp 16C (61 F). 

Barte r* . CJh Ixmi t i ■ i d D m rise. Abe r 
-Mo, Morey FWIc Sunny psnods, per- 
hap s som e sho w er s, wind westerly. 


Glasgow. Central Highlands. ME, 




tered showers: wind W. becomeio NW. 
modereie or fresh; max temp 16CIS1F). 


Simny 
eta w. 


Outlook tor tom or r o w and 


from the north later, 
r father cool. 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

TOMORROW 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridge 

400 

73 

4.11 

13 

London Bridge 

43S 

73 

443 

73 


3M 

4 A 

3 39 

42 

Aberdeen 

337 

42 

414 

4.1 


325 

73.1 

63/ 

132 

AwaassMJte 

nu» 

133 10.12 

132 

Bed as* 

12.43 

341 

14)4 

32 

Btatest 

121 

3.6 

1.42 

33 

CartaH 

9.10 

12.1 

922 

124 

Cardiff 

9.45 

12 2 

92/ 

124 


739 

54 

8.10 

b4i 

Devcnport 

634 

54 

844 

52 


12X5 

8£ 

14to 

68 

Dover 

1.19 

63 

1.42 

6.7 


7^9 

62 

7 Mi 

5.4 

FabnoOBl 

604 

62 

614 

53 

Gtesgow 

Hantacb 

234 

1.46 

4.7 

4.1 

3.18 

24)2 

. 4.1 
4.0 

Gtesgow 

Hanucti 

3-10 

225 

43 

4.1 

661 

239 

43 

42 


12JK 

6.17 

57 1226 
7JS 8A7 

62 

7A 


1239 

622. 

58 

7.6 

121 

922 

6.6 

7.4 


809 

92 

824. 

94 


8.44 

92 

829 

93 

LeWi 

432- 

54i. 

500. 

62 

1 «ilh 

5-07 

52 

638 

66 

Ltoarpoot 

1.07. 

»4> 

127 

9.4 

Liverpool 

1.41 

92 

282 

93 


11.28 

2J> 



Lowestoft 

12.11 

23 1286 

2.6 

Margate 

204 

48 

2419 

49 

Margate 

238 

42 

2.41 

4.9 

■Here Haven 

621 

7.0 

63b 

72 

Mifoid Haven 

825 

73 

9.11 

72 


7.11 

7J3 

/2b 

72 

Newquay 

746 

/.0 

602 

/.I 

Oban 

7JS9 

44) 

736 

42 

Oban 

627 

42 

830 

42 


658 

S4> 

7.10 

67 

Petwancn 

735 

52 

746 

5.6 

Portland 

9-28 

22 

929 

23 

Portland 

9.59 

22 10.05 

23 


1.14 

4.6 

1 A1 

47 


122 

42 

221 

47 

Shoreham 

14)1 

62 

129 

83 


139 

62 

283 

83 

Sortarempton 

12.42 

4i 

1.08 

46 

Southampton 

1.14 

42 

1.40 

42 

‘jornira 

826 

94> 

8.40 

9 J 

Swansea 

829 

92 

9.15 

97 

Teea 

5J0 

S4> 

64)1 

64 

Tnes 

6.05 

52 

538 

5.4 

Wltoa-nn-Nze 

1.48 

43 

129 

43 

WTtorvreHtoi 

224 

43 

234 

43 



TODAY 



Sw rises: 
821 am 


7.37 pm 


TOMORROW Son rises: 

6.22 am 


Moon rises; Moon sets : 
8.46 am 847 pm 
first quarter; September 11 



Sunsets: 
7.34 pm 


Moon rises: Moon sets; 
10.09 am 8.40 pm 
Fma quartan September 11 


Around Britain 


EAST COAST 


Sun Ran 
hrs in 


Brkfingwn 8.7 
Creator 8.1 

t o ne cto H 10.1 

Oecton 11.3 

Margate 

sotmTc 


I COAST 
Fotkestone 124) 
Heating* 113 
Eastbourne IIS 




Bognorfl 


Yesterday 


Sendown 

Shanrtn 

Bo m re nta l 

Poole 

Swage 

W e ymouth 


11.3 

11.4 
10.6 
11.4 
11.1 
103 


Max 
C F 

17 63 bright 
17 83 sunny 

17 63 sunny 

18 64 surety 
IS 66 surety 

17 63 simny 

18 81 sunny 
17 63 sunny 
17 63 sunny 
17 63 sunny 

17 81 sumy 

19 66 sunny 
19 66 sunny 
19 66 sunny 

18 64 sunny 


Sun Rain I 

hrs In C 
x - 16 
Tenby IDS - 16 

CotwynBay 9.5 - 17 

Moracambe 65 - 15 

Deogtes 77 - 14 


BIGLAND AND WALES 


F 

61 sumy 
61 simny 
83 sunny 
59 bright 
57 bright 


London 11.0 
BhumAfept 11.0 
Bristol (Ctrl) 115 
Cretan (Otq 105 


Angtaeay 92 
VpoolAbpt 7.7 


5.7 

Nottingham ax 
N’clJ-n-Tyn* 75 

Cartels 1.1 


- 2D 

- 18 
- 18 

- 17 

- 16 

- 15 

- 16 

- 17 

- 15 

- 13 


68 simny 
64 sunny 
$4 sumy 
S3 sumy 
61 sunny 
59 bngm 
61 bright 
63 surety 


55 


sunny 

ctoudy 


States* 


C F 

e 1457 Cu enae y 
e 1559 hwema sa 
c 1559 Jersey 
f 1559 London 
I ISSS-Wertitaer 
11355 


C F 
s 1861 

(1559 
92088 
5 7864 
c 1355 
©1457 


Cl«57 R’nkteway ©1457 


125 
115 
11.1 
109 
11.7 

Ttagnnoutb 128 
Torquay 125 
Fatawutii 119 
Penzance 10.S 
Jersey 12.1 
Goamsey tOS 

WEST COAST 
ScOy Isles II .4 
New qua y x 


19 68 
19 66 

16 64 

18 64 

17 63 
17 63 

19 66 
16 61 
17 63 
17 63 
19 66 


sunny 

sumy 

sunny 

sunny 

surety 

sunny 

surety 

sunny 

surety 

sunny 

sunny 


SCOTLAND 

Eafcriatamuir 23 - 13 

1.6 14 


- 17 63 sunny 


Glasgow 
Ttree 
Stornow a y 
Lerwick 
Wck 
Kudos* 

Aberdeen 
St Andrews 2.7 
Etaabu rgh 07 


1.1 - 14 

05 - 14 

- .07 14 

- 58 11 

- .01 14 

- - 15 

3.6 - 16 

- 16 
- 15 


55 ctoudy 
57 taM rif 
57 cloudy 


g rain 
run 
57 ra« 

59 doudy 
64 doudy 
51 ctoudy 
69 doudy 


NORTHERN IRHAND 

**** U - 13 55 doudy 


Li ghting -up time 


Throe are Thursday's figures 


Abroad 


1 to 652 am 
5 pm to 558 am 
18 pm to 5.58 an 


MlDDAT: c. ctoud: d. drizzle: t. fair tg. tog: h, hail: r. iren: s, sure an, snow; di. dtumtor 


1 pm » 653 am 
8.23 pit to 6.00 am 
ir 8.15 pm to 650 am 
854 pm to 6.17 am 


Atocten 

Aatoui 

Atex’dria 

Algiers 

AmsCdm 

Athens 

Bate tan 

Bsrtods 


C F 

* 25 77 Cologne 

* 29 84 Cpbagn 
c 29 84 Certu 

s 30 86 Dttatei 
I 17 63 Qubrenk 
l 30 86 Fare 
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titled or 1 Virginia Street. 
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a 26 n Moscow 
s 18 64 Munich 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 33 
TELEVISION AND RADI037 


SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MARIfFT 

FT 30 Share 
1338.4 (+4.1) 

FT-SE 100 
1684.8 (+4.5) 

Bargains 

20726 

USM (Datastream) 
127.57 (+0,58) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 

1.4980 (-0.0070) 

W German mark 
3.0642 (+0.0098) 
Trade 

71.7 (SAMI 


US jobless 
rate falls 

The United States un- 
employment rate declined last 
month after a forecast of a rise, 
providing a glimmer of hope 
that the economy is beginning 
to bounce back. 

US officials said yesterday 
that the unemployment rate 
last month dropped to 6.8 per 
cent from 6.9 per cent the 
month before, largely because 
of a rebound in manufacturing 
employment, which has de- 
clined each month since last 
Fdwuary. 

Officials were surprised by 
the manufacturing figure in 
light of the July trade perfor- 
mance, which showed another 
record deficit of Si 8.04 bil- 
lion. The new figures fed to 
speculation that the Federal 
Reserve Board win not au- 
thorize another discount rate 
cut to stimulate the flagging 
economy. 

Persimmon up 

Persimmon, the York 
housebuilder, is raising £6.5 
million through a rights issue 
to finance further expansion. 
Pretax profits announced yes- 
terday for the first half of 1986 
are up 91 per cent to £2.02 
million on sales up by 46 per 
cent to £18.16 million. Profits 
of at least £5 million are 
forecast for the full year, 
compared with £3.4 million in 
1985, with a 20 per cent 
increase in dividends. 

Tempos, page 20 

Hollis ahead' 

Hollis, the educational sup- 
plies and timber company 
controlled by Mr Robert Max- 
well, made pretax profits of 
£1.02 million in the first half 
of 1986, up from £806,000. 
Sales improved from £18.8 
million to £33.2 million. 

Tempos, page 20 

£2m cash call 

Industrial Finance and 
Investment Corporation is 
raising £2 million through a 
rights issue at 75p a share, to 
provide additional working 
capital. The issue is under- 
written by APA Holdings. 

YTV success 

Investors in Yorkshire Tele- 
vision switched on to a fat 
profit yesterday when dealings' 
got underway on the stock 
markeL The shares, sold to the 

public at 125p in an issue 
which was 51 limes over- 
subscribed, hit 154p at one 
stage before closing at 150p, 
25p up on the day. 

Sketchley sale 

Sketchley has agreed to sell 
its US diaper operation for 
S8.0 million (£5.4 million) to a 
consortium led by Mr Jack 
Mogavero. the existing 
president. 


Tempos 26 
Wait Street 20 
Company 
News 20 

Stack Market 21 
Comment 21 
USM Prices 21 


Foreign Em* 21 
Traded Opts 21 
Money 

Markets 21 
Unit Treats 22 
Commodities 


Gold price jumps 
$14 to close at 
three-year high 


Ftom Bailey Morris, Washington 


The price of gold reached a 
three-year high in Europe mid 
New York yesterday, dosing 
at 542CL50 an ounce in Lon- 
don, up $14 on the previous 
close, and up $14.80 on the 
overnight dosing price on the 
New York Commodity 
. Exchange. 

Platinum also made more 
gains yesterday. Even at the 
London opening h -was al- 
ready up $17 JO at $662. 

Market observers said that 
investors were once again in 
the grip of “gold fever” after 
the precious metal's recent 
dramatic rise in value. The 
renewed interest in gold, after 
several years in which large 
investors have been pouring 
money into shares and gilts, 
reflects a rising fear of infla- 
tion as the Federal Reserve 
Board, the United States cen- 
tra] bank, continues to expand 
the money supply to counter 
the sharp economic downturn. 

Some American officials are 
concerned that the surge in 
gold buying by foreign inves- 
tors who have large do liar- 
denominated holdings could 
shrink the pool of inter- 
national buyers upon whom 


the Treasury relies to buy 
government securities to fi- 
nance the Administration's 
huge fiscal deficit. 

Analysts said yesterday that 
gold is also benefiting from the 
news . of growing . unrest in 
South Africa and an unusually 
large, number of coin mincings 
this year in the United States, 
'Japan and other countries. 

■ MrJames Baker, the Ameri- 
can Treasury Secretary, is 
scheduled next week to strike 
the first gold bullion coins 
minted in the United Stales in 
more than 50 years. 

The new coins, 
American Eagles, will be is- 
sued next week in four sizes, 
with face values ranging from 
$50 to $5. The Treasury 
. Secretary and other dignitaries 
will unveil the new coins at a 
special ceremony at the 
United States’ Mmt in New 
Yoric. 

For Japanese and West 
German investors, particu- 
larly, gold has become a more 
attractive commodity. 

Over the past year, the 
value of gold has risen about 
25 per cent against the dollar. 


At the same time it has 
become 30 per cent to 35 per 
cent cheaper against the yen 
and the mark, according to Mr 
Kenneth Tropin, vice-presi- 
dent and director of precious 
metals at Dean Witter Reyn- 
olds Inc 

The price change means 
that it is’ less expensive for 
Japanese and West -German 
investors to convert then- 
currencies into dollars and 
buy gold which is.only traded 
in dollars. 

Mr Tropin said that the 
yields on US Treasury securi- 
ties are less attractive to 
Japanese buyers who do not 
want to convert dollar-de- 
nominated assets back into 
yen, thus pushing up further 
the value of the currency 
against the dollar. Instead, 
they are looking for other 
doHar-denominated assets 
such as gold and pfatinium, be 
said. 

Over the last eight weeks, 
analysts said gold fever has 
been reflected in the volume 
of trading which has soared by 
an estimated 1 50 per cent after 
a long period of relative 
disinterest. 


California relaxes 
unitary tax law 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


Share Prices 23 


British companies are to be 
allowed to escape unitary 
taxation under legislation 
passed in California, last 
slight. The move was wel- 
comed by the Treasury and 
British businessmen. 

The governor of California, 
Mr George Deukmejian, 
signed a bill which will allow 
companies io opt oat of 
unitary taxation. The move, 
while stopping short of a 
repeal of the tax in CaEfomia, 
is regarded as significant by 
the unitary tax lobby. 

The Unitary Tax Cam- 
paign, which includes IQ, 
BAT Industries, Barclays 
Bank and Glaxo, had regarded 
California as the toughest nut 
to crack on unitary taxation — 
a system whereby companies 
are assessed for taxation -on 
the basis of their worldwide 
rather than their local 
earnings. 

Nine states of the 12 which 
had unitary taxation, have 
now taken steps to reform it 
California, which accounted 
for 90 per cent of unitary tax 
levied in the US, was by for 
the biggest 

Under the new legislation. 


companies will be able, on 
payment of an election lee, to 
have their tax assessed, not on 
the basis of worldwide earn- 
ings, but on earnings mainly 
within the state. 

Mr Refer Welch, chairman 
of the Unitary Tax PampmW 
said: “We are very pleased to 
see this law passed, which is a 
major step forward in dealing 
with this onerous and unfair 
method of taxation: 

- “It is not a perfect solution 
and’ British" industry remains 
concerned about the inclusion 
of an election fee. We shall 
continue to lobby the Califor- 
nian legislature for, among 
other things, the eradication of 
the election fee before the bill 
comes into force.” 

A Government statement, 
issued by the Treasury, said : 
“The Government welcomes 
the passage of legislation in 
California, limiting the use of 
worldwide unitary taxation. 

“This is a major step to- 
wards the complete with- 
drawal of this method of 
taxation, which both the Gov- 
ernment and representatives 
of British industry have been 
seeking for some time.” 


Guinness Peat buys 
specialist jobber 


Guinness Peat, the banking 
group, said yesterday that it 
has acquired S Jenkins, the 
specialist stock jobber, for an 
undisclosed sum. The move 
completes the group's strategy 
of becoming a niche player in 
the new securities markets 
after the big bang next month. 

S Jenkins .specializes in 
leisure and entertainment 
stocks and trades in selected 
Unlisted Securities Market 
shares. 

It will join White 
Cheesman, the jobber, which 
became a wholly-owned 
subsidiary of GP this year^ and 
Henderson Crosth waite, the 
regional broker, which has 
also been purchased by the 


By Richard Thomson 


group. 

The three companies are to 
be merged into a single unit, 
which is to be called Hender- 
son. White, Jenkins either 
before or at the time of big 
bang. 

A spokesman for GP said: 
“We derided early on that we 
could not compete with the 
large institutions in the new 
securities markets. Instead, we 
have been building up an 
ability to operate in selected 
areas of the market 

“We can now offer market 
making, research and sales 
services in specialist sectors 
such as leisure.- Australian and 
European stocks, and foreign 
bonds." 


W German 


recovery 

continues 

By Onr Economics 
Correspondent 

Farther signs that the West 
German economy is recovering 
came yesterday with die 
publication of healthy gross 
national product figures for 
the second quarter. 

German GNP rose by 2 per 
cent in the second quarter, 
accenting to dm Federal 
Statistics Office in Wies- 
baden.. It was 33 per cent 
higher than in the correspond^ 
ing period of last year. 

- The German oftthorities 
have been under pressure to 
boosttbe economy since first 
quarter data, showed a GNP 
decline of 1 par cent 

However, this fall was re- 
vised yesterday to 0.5 per cent 
and die 12-month rate of 
growth in the first quarter was 
pm at 1.7 per cent. 

The growth jpck-qi in the 
ApriKJnne period came from 
stronger domestic spending. 
Private consumption rose 2J 
per cent, to 4JJ per cent above 
its level a year earlier. 

Coastrnction investment 
rose by 11 per cent and all 
capital investment by 6J per 
cent Second quarter capital 
in vestment was 10.8 per emit 
higher than a year earlier. 

In contrast, foreign trade 
acted as a drag on growth. 
Export volume row by 6 per 
cent after a first quarter fell, 
but was only 2 per cent up on 
its second quarter 1985 level. 
Import volume was stronger, 
rising by 9 JS per cent dnnqg 
the quarto- to 8.1 per cent 
above its level a year earlier. 

The Economics Ministry 
said foreign trade had a 
contractionary effect on 
growth of I per cent in the 
second quarter. 

“West Germany is nuking a 
co n trib ut ion to an improved 
balance in international eco- 
nomic relationships,” h said. 

The German authorities are 
likely to pursue this One when 
subjected to further inter- 
national pre ss ure to relax 
policy, notably at the annual 
meetings of the International 
Monetary Fond and World 
Bank in Washington at the 
end of the month. 



Allied clinches 
Hiram Walker 
deal for £ 600 m 

By Cliff FeHham 


Sir Derrick: “We've got what we wanted at half the price.” 


Comtech reverts to 
motor industry 

By Carol Ferguson 

Combined Technologies JW in absence of un- 


Corporation (Comtech) is 
abandoning its attempts to 
develop new high-technology 
ideas and will concentrate on 
its profitable vehicle- 
distributing subsidiary. 
T rim oco. The future emphasis 
of the business will be on 
financial services in the motor 
industry. 

In a complicated package 
announced yesterday, the 
company is raising £5 million 
by way of a convertible rights 
issue, on the basis of £1 
nominal stock for every 15 
ordinary shares in Comtech. 

A review of Comtech's busi- 
ness concluded that there will 
be a considerable delay before 
any of- the high -technology 
products’ reach a stage of 
maturity when they can be 
expected to make any 
meaningful contribution to 
the company. 

Mr Roger Smith, the 
company's managing director, 
said yesterday that the new 


foreseen circumstances. 
Depending on the level of! 
profit and available cash flow, 
Mr Smith said that it was the 
company's “intention to pay 
an ordinary motor dividend” 
The company also reported 
a loss of £8 million for the year 
to March 31. 1986, compared 
with a loss of £13 million last 
year. The automotive division 
made £1.8 million after tax 
and interest, compared with 
£1.3 million last year. Mr. 
Smith said that sales for this 
year were on budget for the 
period to August. 

ft will keep 19 per cent of| 
M nemos which has developed 
a sophisticated storage and 
retrieval system, 26 per cent of. 
Plasmon which is in optical 
discs, and will retain a royalty 
in the self-diagnosis system 
Diagnosticare. 

If Laserstore goes ahead, 
Trimoco will keep 30 percent 
Mr Smith said: “Enough is 
enough. We are no longer 


AUied-Lyons, the food and 
drink conglomerate, Iasi night 
gained control of Hiram 
Walker, the big a Canadian 
wine and spirit business, for a 
little more than £600 million. 

The deal will shore up 
Allied's defences if Elders 
IXL. the Australian Fosters 
lager concern, decides to re- 
new its £1.8 billion takeover 
bid. 

Allied, the Double Di- 
amond and Skol lager group, 
had been willing to pay more 
than £1.2 billion for all of 
Hiram Walker, but after long 
and tough negotiations with 
its new owners, will end up 
with 51 per cent. 

Sir Derrick Holden-Brown, 
the -Allied chairman, said: 
“We've now got exactly what 
we wanted at half the price. So 
we have around £600 million 
spare to invest in our food 
companies. It is a very good 
deal for us. This was never 
done as a poison pill to 
frustrate Elders but if they 
want to come back we are 
going to be a lot more 
expensive.” 

But in the City there were 
some misgivings about the 
outcome of the Hiram Walker 
episode. 

Mr Eric Frankis, leading 
brewery analyst at Phillips and 
Drew, the stockbrokers, said: 
“I would have preferred Allied 
to have 100 per cent The 
flexibility to run the business 
must be impaired with 51 per 
cent” 

Allied had agreed to lake 
over the liquor division of 
Hiram Walker — which boasts 
big brand names such as 
Canadian Club and 
Ballantines — when the busi- 
ness was taken over by Gulf 
Canada, which promptly 
quashed the deal signalling 
prospects of a legal battle. 

That has now been side- 
stepped under an arrangement 


where Allied will have 51 per 
cent ownership, with Gulf 
Canada holding the balance. 
Both sides have the option to 
sell to the other party after two 
years if things do not work 
out. 

The total amount being 
paid for Hiram Walker is £784 
million, of which Allied's 
share is £400 million. On top 
or this it has to bear its share of 
£466 million of debts — taking 
its total commitment to just 
over £600 million. 

Allied said: “Control of 
Hiram Walker will enable us 
to achieve our strategic objec- 
tives or ensuring a leading 
position in the world spirits 
and wines market with the 
marketing advantages of size, 
a comprehensive portfolio of 
international brands and a 
well established international 
distribution network.” 

Allied will appoint the 
chairman and five other direc- 
tors to the 10-man board of 
Hiram Walker and will be 
responsible for the manage- 
ment Sir Derrick said the. 
agreement to enable cither 
side to pull out after two years 
was taken because this was the 
first time the group had been 
involved in a joint arrange- 
ment of this type. 

He admitted it was unfortu- 
nate that the latest nine-- 
month results for Hiram 
Walker showed a sharp fall in 
earnings, after a rise in tax and 
a dip in profits from the 
United States. 

“We could have done with- 
out that but we believe this is 
short term and so I am not too 
fussed.” he commented. 

Meanwhile, there was 
continuing speculation in the 
City last night over the future 
of the Courage brewing group, 
now owned by Hanson, which 
would not comment on talk of - 
a sale to Elders IXL 


products “were taking longer spending money on these 
to develop and more, money " developments but we may get 


than we ever believed possible 
when we started”. 

The new company, which is 
changing its name to Trimoco, 
mil retain small interests in 
three or four of its develop- 
ments, but will not bear any of 
the future costs. 

Trimoco expects to pay a 
first dividend in July 1987 in 
respect of the current financial 


a ride on the technology.” 

The convertible issue will 
be underwritten by Hambros 
bank and fully sub-under- 
written by Bracemild Limited, 
a company controlled by Mr 
JGS Longcroft, Comtech's 
chairman, three other direc- 
tors or proposed directors of 
Comtech and the Trimoco 
pension funcLTempus, page 20, 


Peat Marwick stresses 
importance of BES 

By Lawreuce Lever 


A survey published yes- 
terday by Peat Marwick 
Mitchell, the accountancy 
firm, highlights the im- 
portance of the business 
expansion scheme (BES) to 
the over-the-counter markets. 
Out of a total of 213 British 
companies seeking a flotation 
on the OTC markets by 
August 1 this year. 80 raised 
money under the BES terms 
and more than half the OTC 
entrants were BES companies. 

However, the high BES 
content reduces the level of 
liquidity, already a consid- 
erable problem with many 
OTC shares. This is because 
BES shares are rarely traded 


on tfie OTC since sellers 
would forfeit a proportion of 
their tax relief on their BES 
investment by doing so. 

. in most cases, maintaining 
an OTC quote is little more 
than a matched bargains ser- 
vice offered to investors by 
sponsors of BES companies. 

The survey, which offers no 
opinion on this liquidity prob- 
lem, pinpoints the lack of 
"upward mobility" in the- 
OTC markets. Only one com- 
pany moved to a USM listing 
during the year reviewed. At 
the same time, four OTC 
companies have gone into 
receivership. 


Clark orders 
cement review 

A full review of all possible 
steps to prevent unfair com- 
petition with the UK cement 
industry, has been ordered by 
Mr Aldn Clark, the Trade 
Minister. 

An estimated 3,000 UK jobs 
are at risk from the importa- 
tion of subsidized Greek ce- 
ment which is expected to 
start this month. The Greek 
cement price will undercut 
UK cement by 7 per cent. 

Mr Clark has written to Mr 
Peter Sutherland, .European 
Economic Community 
commissioner, to protest 
against the 18 percent subsidy 
allowed to the Greeks on 
exports of cement. 

The European Commission 
originally allowed the sub- 
sidies to help the Greek econ- 
omy. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


^wJones 1908- 04 (-11 J57)* 

NikkS Dow — 18775.08 (+21*44) 

&I87— 

p AO 1238.1 (+6.5! 


Sydney: A< 
Frankfurt 


Commerzbank 2114JB (+19.5) 
Brussels: 

SSte=3?iStKi! 

Zurich: „ 

SKA General ~ — 538 DO (SAME) 

London dosing prices Page 23 

INTEREST RATES 


e: 10% 

merbank 9 3 ^s-9^% 

tfigibte bdfeE9 8 i*-9 ,, s% 
re 

®7%% 

jnds5”i«%* 

fBOS 5-3445.22% 


CURRENCIES 


mdorc 

51.4980 

DM3.0642 

Swfr2.4837 

FFr10.0066 

Yen232.33 

lndex:71 .7 


New Yoric 
£51.4940* 

S: DM2.0475* 

S: Index: 110.4 

ECU £0.688979 
SDR £0.809110 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

BP 

Shell 

Cookson 

Steetfey 

FR Group 

Lex Service — . 

Anglia TV 

Home Counties 
Wootworth 


Reed Executive _ 

Equipu 
KteTnwort 
Mercury 

De Bears 

Thomson T-Lme 
Helical Bar 
Framfington 

FALLS: 

Brrt 

Cable & 

GRE ..... 

Bryant D 


_ 688p(+18p) 
„ 970p(+12p) 
_521p(+11pj 

— 520p (+15p) 
~.349p +I5p] 

339p +17p) 
_.271pi+11pj 

— 230p i +10pj 

— 690p i +15pj 
411p +1Bp) 

150p +I8p) 
800DI+2' 



GOLD 


London Fixing: 

AM $418.25 
Close $420. 

281.00) 

New Yoric _ 
Comex $41935-419.85- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Oct) .. S15^0pmbW(15.5Q) 
■ Denotes blast trading price 


500,000 no votes at Extel 
invalidated, says h ank 


Henry Ansbacber £ Co, die 
merchant bank, has found 
another (bar institutions and 
three individuals who daim to 
have voted against the resolu- 
tions to acquire Dealers Digest 
at the Extel extraordinary 
general meeting last Friday. 

Ansbacber now claims it 
knows of 17.78 Bullion votes 
which were cast against the 
motion, compared with the 
17.34 million coanted at the 
meeting. 

The . statement by 
Ansbacber, which challenged 
the voting figures earlier this 
week, brought a response from 
the Extel board. It said: “The 
directors wish to remind all 
shareholders that the polls 
were conducted under the 
supervision of the joint scru- 
tineers, Dekatte, Haskins and 
Sells, and the Royal Bank of 
Scotland, who have already 
confirmed that the votes val- 
idly cast at the EGM were as 
announced at the meeting. 

Ansbacfaer claimed yes- 
terday that the evidence points 


to 500,000 votes against the 
resolutions being invalidated, 
which it finds “a very high 
ratio, gjven that most of the 
votes against were of an 
institutional nature”. 

The merchant bank rec- 
ognizes that even its own total 
of votes would not have de- 
feated the resolution against 
the total of 18.24 mfliott 
announced it the meeting as 
being in favour of the 
resolution. 

Ansbacfaer added: “Daring 
the coarse of Its investigations 
the bank has been made aware 
of a curious anomaly in the 
proxy system which might in 
part explain the invalidated 
votes”. 

It pointed oat that while a 
shareholder may split his vote 
under ExteFs articles of 
association, there was no pro- 
vision for this on the proxy 
form. 

In addition, under the rales 
a later dated proxy card 
supersedes an earlier card. 
About 615,000 shares bought 


by Mr Robert MaxwelL, the 
r hah - man of Mirror Group 
Newspapers, who led oppo- 
sition to the Dealers’ Digest 
purchase, were not registered 
is time and the votes for these 
shares depended solely on 
proxy form®. 

Ansbacber said: “Herein, 
the bank believes, lie the seeds 
of considerable confusion as 
the Hank has been informed 
'that at least one major institu- 
tion, which sold a majority of 
its various portfolio boldmgs 
to Mr Maxwell and accord- 
ingly voted against the resolu- 
tions for those shares sold, 
also paradoxically, voted its 
remaining holdings in favour 
of the board. 

Ansbacher has written to 
the chairman of ExteL, 
requesting clarification of the 
position and suggesting that 
the simplest way to resolve 
this problem is to open the 
count to NM RotfaschOd, Mr 
Maxwell's merchant bank 
adviser. 



Europe: go 
for the encore. 

Following spectacular growth in 1985 
European markets have consolidated in the 
first half of this year. Many financial advisers 
are now looking again towards Europe for 
dynamic growth. 

The Oppenheimer European 
Growth Trust 

aims to capitalise on the obvious benefits of 
low interest rates, low inflation, dramatically 
reduced energy costs and the general climate of 
political stability. European markets are still 
relatively cheap. 

Currency Gains 

In addition to the healthy outlook for 
stockmarkets, clients will benefit further if the 
pound continues to weaken against major 
European currencies, for example the Swiss 
Franc has appreciated 15% against Sterling 
so far this year. 

Oppenheimer was one of the first to forecast 
the major European potential in late 1984. 
Our European fund was the top performing 
of all authorised unit trusts in 1985 and is 
currently up 59-9% over the 12 months to 
1st July. 

For a copy of our latest Euro- 1 
pean brochure call 01-489 1078 
or write to Oppenheimer at 
66 Cannon St, London EC4N 6AE. 



A mwwjr company o* «w» Moreanaa Htxsc Group. 









BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


WALL STREET 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


Oil shares help Dow 
make early headway 


New York (Agencies) — 
Wall Street shares quickly 
erased a seH-off ia early 
trading yesterday. 

The Dow Jones indnstrial 
average was op 5.07 points at 
1.924.78, after dropping about 
six points at the opening beU. 

The market was again 
helped by shares of o3 com- 
panies, whose strength gave a 
boost to the on 

Thursday. 

Advancing issues were lead- 
ing losing issues by a margin 
of six to five, on a volume of 
102.502 million shares. 

Chevron was the most active 
issue, up ft to 46 7 m while IBM 
fell ft to 139ft. Atlantic 


Richfield was unchanged at 
60ft, Sears Roebuck was np 
ft tb at 44 7 i and Schlumberger 
gained ft to reach 35. 

Occidental Petroleum rose 
ft to 30 and Fannie Mae tost 
l 7 a to32ft. 

The transportation average 
dipped 1 JO points to 788.63, 
utilities were down 1-81 points 
and stocks lost 0.28 poidts to 
745.12. 

The Standard and Foots 
100 index was down 0.40 

points at 239 J0 and the S and 
P composite index, at 253.87, 
was down 0.04 points. 

Stock index futures prices 
fell initially, to recover later to 
trade at a premium to the cash 
market. 


Jordan orders $100m 
LAE engines for airbus 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


tempus 


A Si 00 million (£66.8 mil- 
lion) order for the five-nation 
V250Q turbo fen engine, in 
which Britain’s Rolls-Royce 
has a 30 per cent stake, was 
announced yesterday by Alia, 
the Jordanian airline. 

The order, which coincided 
with a visit to the Farn- 
borough Air Show by King 
Hussein of Jordan, is for 
engines to power the airline's 
new fleet of 150-seater 
AirbusA320s. 

Alia has ordered six A32Qs. 
with delivery beginning in 
1990 and a further four, also 
powered by the V2500, are on 
option. 


Mr Ali Ghandour. chair- 
man and chief executive of 
Alia, said it was estimated the 
V2500 would save the airline 
about a million gallons of fuel 
each year compared with the 
American General Electric en- 
gine which was also evaluated. 

The order is the second 
biggest to be received by the 
International Aero Engines 
consortium for the V250Q. 

Tbe largest order was from 
Indian Airlines for 19 engines 
and 1 1 options. 

The IAE shareholders are 
Rolls-Royce and Pratt AWhit- 
ney of the US, each with 30 
per cent, MTU of West Ger- 


many. with 1 1 per cent Fiat 
Aviazione of Italy with 6 per 
cent and the Japanese Aero 
Engines Corporation, with 23 
per cent. 

(AE said yesterday that the 
total order book for the V25Q0 
was now 370 engines, includ- 
ing options. 

This was 60 per cent of the 
total market for A320 engines 
to date. 

IAE claims a significant 
lead on the General Electric 
engine and says that seven of 
the eight operators who had 
placed orders for the A320 had 
selected the V2500 engine. 


Comtech throws in the 
hiph -tech nology towel 


Sap Sep] 

* 3 


Sep Sep 

4 3 


Sep sop 

4 3 


AMH 

ASA 

Atari Signal 

Allied Stre 
AHsCMmrs 
Alcoa 
Amax Inc 
Am'rdaHs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
Am Cynrn'd 
AmBPnr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
AmSTnrd 
AmTeteph 
Amoco 
Atmco Steel 
Asarco 
AsniandOfl 
At Richfield 
Avon Prods 
BkrsTsINY 
Bankamer 
Bkof Bstan 
Bank ol NY 
Beth Steel 
Boeing 
BseCascde 
Bfden 
Bg Warner 
B«st Myers 
BP 

Buft'ionlnd 
Bunion Nin 
Burroughs 
CmptwfiSp 
Can Pacific 
CaterpAer 
Cefanese 
Central SW 
Champion 
Chase Man 
CtvnBkNY 
Chevron 
Cteysler 
Oocorp 
Clark Equip 
Coca Cola 


CBS 

Clmtxa Gas 
Cmb'tn Eng 
Comwtth Ed 
Cons Etib 
Cn Nat Gas 
Coro Power 
Cntri Data 
Corning Gi 
CPC Uni 
Crane 
Cm Zeller 
Dan A Kraft 
Deere 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
DkjnaEq 
Disney 
DowChem 
Dresser Md 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Eastern Air 
Estm Kodak 
Eaton Corp 


Rnsstone 
Fst Chicago 
FsttmBncp 
FMPennC 
Ford 

FTWachva 
GAF Corp 
I GTE Corp 
Sari Corp 
GenOy'mcs 
GanEtectrte 
Gen mat 
Gen Mn 
Gen Motors 
GnPbUtny 
Genesco 
Georgia PW 
GBtoie 
Goodrich 
Goodyear 
Gould Inc 
Grace 
GtAtt&Tac 
Gr'hrri 
GrumanCor 
Gulf & West 
Hera HJ. 
Hercules 
Hiett-Pkri 
Horoywe* 
1C tods 
Ingenod 
Wand Steel 


tot Paper 
tot T« Tel 
Irving Bank 
Jftnsn A Jhn 
K^sw Alum 
Kerr McGee 
KirtjTyOrit 
K Mart 
Kroger 
■LT.VCorp 
Litton 
Lockheed 
Lucky Stra 
ManHlwer 
ManvileCp 

Marira Mid 

Mrt Marietta 

Masco 

McOonakls 

McOonnefl 

Mead 

Merck 

MrataMng 

MoMCW 

Monsa n to 

Morgan J.P. 

Motorola 

NCR Corp 

NLtodstre 

NatDtoPrs 

Nat MedEnt 

NatSmcndt 

Norfolk SOI 

NWBanop 

OcadntPet 

Ogden 

OfinCorp 

Owena-H 

PacGasB 

Pan Am 

Penney J.C. 

PennzoO 


Pfizer 
Phelps Oge 
Philip Mrs 
philips Pet 
Poraroid 
PPG tod 
; PrctrGmM 


‘Big four’ prepare for Gatt 



Sintra, Portugal (Reuter) <— Senior officials from all four 
Trade officials from the Euro- trading partners stressed that 
pean Economic Community, the discussions were informal 
the United States, Japan and and unlikely to produce any 
Canada met in Portugal yes- specific changes, 
lerday to discuss efforts to .. Wp _ nnnt , nv 

liberaUze wortd conunerce. breXhioughs buuKtaut wc 
“We will try to narrow the h r or a 

S 5 J 554 rfU JSK 

positions," sud an American 
said, referring to a key General ^ kestI]an _ 

Agreement on Tariffs and , 


Trade conference due to be 
held in Uruguay soon. 


Agriculture, particularly 
farm export subsidies, was one 


A^culturewidexpanding of the sticking points at the 
Gatt to include service in- discussions. The EEC's i policy 
dustries, investment and of undenvnnng its fexmers 
“intellectual property", such attacked by the US and 
as registered trade marks, were Canada and other big farm 


Textron 

TmrtraCo t 

TRW Inc 

UAL Inc 

UniawNV 

Un Carbide 

UnPacCor 

Uid Brands 

USGCorp 

UtdTecnnol 

USX Corp 

Unocal 

JvnWaRor 

WmerLmbt 

Wens Fargo 

WstghsaB 

Weyerh'sar 

Whripool 

Woohworth 

Xerox Corp 

Zenith 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AtttitX 
Alcn Alum 
AlgomaSd 
Can Pacific 
Coentnco 
ConBathrst 
Hkr/SriCon 
HdsnBMm 
toiasco 
Imperial OB 
to Pipe 
Ryl Trustee 


WlkrHrtm 

WCT 

«**. i Iranea 


22% 22K 

44* 44% 

13 % 13H 

15% 151* 

13% 13% 

24% 24% 

27% 27% 
27* 27* 
33% 33% 
44* 44* 
41 41 

33% 33% 
84% 84% 

21 % 21 % 
30* 30* 
3.05 3« 
37% 37% 
13% 13% 


discussed. 


• ROBINSON BROTHERS 
(RYDERS GREEN): Half-year 
to June 28. Turnover £9.73 
million (£10.08 million). Pretax 
profit £322.000 (£730.000). In 

spite of the disappointing result, 
new business is being developed 
from which the board expects 
the company to benefit substan- 
tially in 1987 and afterwards. 

• MAYFAIR AND CITY 
PROPERTIES: Land Builders, 
a subsidiary, has bought a 
freehold site of 3.68 acres at 
Queensway Industrial Estate. 
Scunthorpe, Humberside, for 
£1 .01 million in cash. 

• ANGLO AMERICAN 
GOLD INVESTMENT CO: 
Six months to Aug. 31. Net 
pretax income R 169.7 million 
(£47.31 million), against R 149.6 
million. Interim dividend 700 
cents (625 cents), payable on 
Nov. 4. Earnings per share 768 
cents (669 cents). 

• PENNY AND GILES 
INTERNATIONAL: Professor 
Wiliiapi Penny, the chairman, 
told the annual meeting: “Order 
levels and turnover so far this 
vear are showing substantial 
increases. 


■ A- ‘ 


product exporters wanting to 


/COM P A N Ys NEWS 


• J SAINSBURY: The com- 
pany has increased its holding in 
Shaws Supermarkets, a US com- 
pany. from 2L2 to 28.5 per cent 
by the purchase of 882.213 

shares of common stock for 
about $14.7 million (£9.77 mil- 
lion) from a number of major 
shareholders. Sainsbury has 
allotted 2.35 million ordinary 
25p shares which are being 
placed with institutional clients 
of Rowe and Pitman, Mullens 
and Co. 

• HOME COUNTIES 
NEWSPAPERS: Six months to 
June 27. Interim dividend 3 J5p 
(1.5p), payable on Oct. 23. 
Turnover .£6.08 million (£6.78 
million). Pretax profit £746.000 
(£324.000). Tax £294.000 
(£141.000). Extraordinary 
items: credit £240,000 (nil). 
Earnings per share 18.1p 
(7J2p). 

• OILFIELD INSPECTION 
SERVICES: First half of 1986. 
In view of the uncertain trading 
position, the directors have 
decided not to pay an interim 
dividend (Ip). Turnover £6.63 
million (£8.43 million). Pretax 
loss £296.000 (£264.000 profit). 
Loss per share 2.8p (1.5p 
eamines). 


have such agricultural sup- 
ports abolished under the Gatt 
negotiations. 

“It is wrong to imagine we 
can attack the problem only in 
the area of export subsidies. - 
What we need to examine is 
overall agricultural policy,” an 
EEC official said. 

' The US is also determined 
that service industries, such as 
tourism and transport, trade 
investment and intellectual 
property should be included in 
Gatt and is concerned that the 
EEC is more likely to seek a 
compromise with big develop- 
ing countries who are resisting 
the move, officials said. 


• RAND LONDON CORP: 
The corporation has disposed of 
its fully-owned offshoot, Coiv 
veyorand Transmission Supply 
(Propretaiy). for cash, to a 
consortium including a former 
employee, who was the manag- 
ing director of Conveyor and 
Transmission. 

•GIBBS AND DANDY: Half- 
year to June 30. Turnover £9.22 
million (£8.62 million). Pretax 
profit £267.640 (£152.833). 

Earnings per share 1.85p 
(0.84p). The board is optimistic' 
that the results for 1986 will 
continue to follow the trend of 
the recent improvement 

• EQUIP 1): The company has 

bought Western Reprographics, 
based’ in Newquay, Cornwall, 
the largest dealer of MonoJie 
copiers in Cornwall. The Initial 
price will be £30,000 cash with 
an additional consideration of 
50 per cent of the net profit for 
the period to April 30, 1 988 and 
30 per cent for the year to April 
30, 1989. 

More company news 
on page 21 


Combined Technologies 
Corporation (Comtech) .is ; 
giving up its five-year strug- 
gle to turn itself into a high- 
technology company and wtl 
concentrate on its original 
motor business. Trimoco. 

Comtech was originally 
created in 1981 out of 
Tricentrol’s non-oil busi- 
nesses. comprising a well- 
established commercial 
division and a newer product 
development division. 

Comiech’s story has been a 
depressing series of five loss- 
making years during which 
many of its profitable busi- 
nesses were sold off to feed 
the insatiable appetite for 
cash of the products under 
development 

Some of the projects were 
doubtless good, but the time- 
frames for development were 
too long and ibe necessary 
cash resources too great for a 
company of Comtech’s size. 

It is in recognition of this 
reality that yesterday’s pack- 
age was announced. After 
another year of losses, £8 
million to March 31 com- 
pared with £13 million last 
year, Comtech is throwing in 
thetoweL - 

It will raise between £5 
million - and £7 million 
through a convertible rights 
issue, it is retaining a small 
interest in three or torn 
projects which will not entail 
spending any more money 
but which may come good 
one day, and it will con- 
centrate on vehicle sales and 
leasing. 

Renamed Trimoco,. it will 
in future be found listed in 
the motors section of the 
Stock Exchange Official List 
’ rather than in the industrial 
section. 

■ Over the years, Trimoco 
has been a steady sort of 
.business, generating £2 to 
£2.5 million of profits an- 
nually. After the restructur- 
, ing, the only debt outstanding 
will be the convertible. 

After tax, earnings will be 
about 1.4p in a normal year, 
putting the shares on a 
prospective multiple of 8.2. 

An investment in the mo- 
tor trade may not be -quite 
what investors thought they 
were buying in Comtech. and 
they may well feel reluctant 
to put in more money for the 
convertible. 

Nevertheless, the company 
was well out of its depth, and 
this way the shareholders 
have something which ap- 


Comtech 

Share price 


FT AS00 
SHAHE INDEX 
I REBASED 




1981 1982 


1 19B4 ‘ 1985 


1 ] ftp is belter than nothing. KStf 

ITnllis houses builL Last year 1 ,036 

“ _ houses were sold and the 

Life is never dull with Cup- t>uggt for 1^86 is 1.250. The 
tain Bob at the helm. The operating companies 

minority shareholders . in cover m ost of the country. 
Hollis, which is 82 per cent- except the South-east, and the 
owned by Mr Robert Max- aim is l0 build these up so 
well last year nearly found ^t each accounts for around 
themselves the owners of 50 g houses a year. At the 
Sinclair Research. moment only York has 

More recently, their com- reached this level. 

pany agreed to buy a clutch ol j n preparation for this 


Pergamon businesses for £30 
million, catapaulting their 
group into a different league. 

Although still subject to the 
whims of its master, the new 
acquisitions, combined with 
Solicitors Law, make the 
company a big supplier of 
goods and services to the 
professions and educational 
establishments. 

The lossmaking furniture 
and timber interests now look 
almost incidental, but a new 
joint managing director has 
been appointed to squire 
their future. 

Dividends are being re- 
stored this year after a five- 
year gap. Further acquisitions 
in professional services are 
clearly planned and the 
shares, up 3p at 90p, arc 
selling at a premium for 
excitemenL 

Persimmon 

Purchasers of Persimmon’s 
houses would have fared 
considerably better over the 
past year if they had invested 
instead in the company’s 
shares. The cost of a Persim- 
mon house has risen by an 
average 10 per cent. But the 
shares stand at 250p com- 
pared with the 1 lOp offer for 
sale price in April 1985. 

The sharp rise reflects the 


In preparation for this 
expansion, the company has 
been investing heavily in 
Iand.The forward land bank 
accounts for some .4,650 
plots, about a third more than 
a year ago. This has pushed 
up gearing to 1 00 per cent and 
prompted the decision to ask 
for cash which will bring 
down net debt to around 30 
per cent of shareholders’ 
fiinds by the year end. Terms 
are one for four at 215p. 

Pretax profits in the first 
half almost doubled and at 
least £5 million is forecast for 
the full year, compared with 
£3.4 million in 1985. But this 
implies much lower profits 
growth, of around 26 per 
cent, in the traditionally 
stronger second half. The 
industry is less confident 
about next year and com- 
panies are probably keeping 
something in hand in case of 
a downturn. 

Persimmon's average sell- 
ing price of £40,000 has 
increased by 20 per cent. 

The directors are backing 
the rights issue with £1.6 
million of their own money 
and will maintain their 
majority stake, presumably 
confident that the prospec- 
tive p/e multiple of 10 is 
justified by forward sales. 




R T H 




C "O M E S 


A RANGE 
FOR THE 
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n SAAB 900. C SMB 900 INJECTION. □ SAAB 900 TURBO. □ SAAB 900 TURB0 16. SAABJA37 VIGGEN. 

From £7,195. From £8,995 From £10,995 From £14,435 From £7,500,000. 

Model featuted 2 doo: Tw sceeo : 0C V-*-?’ ^xj'po 5 dxf H'-o speed >!0 MPH' Mode/ teijred 4 door Top speed 125 MFtT Mod# featured 3 door S' fop speed <30 MPM* Single seeter 

£1 195 £9 995 ~ L<ac* ,'v sun root option# erira £ -2. 750 Sun roof optional extra £T4.995 0 - 185 MPH m 6 sec a* 

N3rre 4.V«: — Present Car Pest Code Ttwj . o pp 

THE PHICES QUOTED tCOHUECT AT TIMt O* GOING TO PRESSI INCLUDE FRONT AND REAR SEAT BELTS. CAR TAX AND 'Of. BUT h'lf.UnE DFLIVERV ROAD TAX NUMBER PLATES AND OPTIONAL EXTRAS INDICATED ■MANUFACrURER'S FICURtS 


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^'0° 







STOCK MARKET REPORT 



new wave of terrorism 


By Michael Clark 


News or the Karachi brack- 
ing and fears of a another 
J*3 V £ of terrorism brought 
celebrations on the world's 
stock ■ markets to an abrupt 
end yesterday. 

Share prices w London bad 
opened in a jubilant mood 
following the overnight 
performance on Wall Street 
that had seen the Dow Jones 
industrial average bit a new 
peak. Impressive perfor- 
mances had also been re- 
corded in' Hong Kong and 
Tokyo. But- tne euphoria 
quickly evaporated and then 
gave way to a few doubts 

Someone is bunding op a 
stake Id Aquascntum, die 

quality clothing group. 

Earlier this week more rt»i| 
500,000 of the restricted 
voting ‘A’ shares (3 per cent) 
went through the market at 
72p, all to one buyer. Dealers 
hope this amid be the pre- 
Inde to a fall bid. The k A’ 
shares were unchanged at 
74p yesterday, while the aB- 
important ordinary shares 
rose 3p to 230p. * - 

among investors who had 
been- keen to dBase share 
prices sharply higher for most 
of the week. 

•The FT index of 30 share?, 
having opened 8.5 up, saw its 
lead slowly whittled away and 
afier hours it was just 1.1 
higher. It eventually closed 4.1 
up at 1.338.4. The broader- 
based FT-SE 100 achieved a 
similar gain of 4.5 at 1,684.8. 

Once again, investors were 
quick to turn to their tra- 
ditional hedges. Gold and 
platinum were both again 
sharply higher, amid renewed 
fears that the US economy was 
heading out of control and . 
that sanctions against South 
Africa could affect supplies. 
Gold reached its highest 


level for three years, touching 
S42S 50 at one stage, before 
dosing $14 up at $420.50 an 
ounce Platinum finished 
£21 1 0 dearer at £450.05 

The. big gold producers re- 
sponded positively. Among 
the heavyweights, Anglo 
American Gold jumped by $7 
. to $78, Buffel&fontem $2 to 
$25.5, Randfontein $8 to $89.5 
and Vaal Reefs $7 to $7814. 
The big platinum producers 
also sported some healthy 
gains, with Impala up 37 cents 
at 1.200 cents and Rustenburg 
70 cents at 1,238 cents. 

The firmer oil price also 
brought renewed support for 
oil shares. BP leapt I8p to 




snapped up over 3 million 
shares. 

But Government stocks 
were again in the. doldrums 
with losses ranging to £% after 
another disappointing perfor- 
mance on the New York bond 
market. 

British Aerospace went into 
a nosedive. losing 8p at 493p, 
despite the razzmatazz 
surrounding this week's 
Fam borough Air Show. In- 
terim figures are expected next 
week and may fail to please. 
Rowe & Pitman, Mullens, the 
broker, is reckoned to have 


made a last-minute 
downgrading of its petima i« 
and taken op a large number 
of pul options ip the shares. 

Yorkshire Television cer- 
tainly lived up to expectations 
in first-time dealings following 
the offer for sale of8-2 million 
shares. (25 per cent) at 125p 
which was oversubscribed 51 
times. The shares started life 
at 150p and readied J54p, 
before eventually ending the 
day at 150p — a premium of 
25p. The issue attracted a large 
number of small investors 
who were favoured in the 
allocation of shares. 

The flurry of activity in 
YTV also focused attention on 
several of its rivals. The other 
recent newcomer, Humes 
Television, finned 4p to 243p. 
That compares with the 190p 


RECENT ISSUES 


at which the shares were 
offered in July. Anglia Tele- 
vision “A" spurted lip to 
27 lp, along with TV South 3p 
to 240p, London Weekend 
Television (Holdings) 3p to 
383p. Ulster Television Ip to 
133p, while Grampian Tele- 
vision “A”, on 43p, HTV 
Group N/V, on 220p and 
Scottish TV, on 318p, were all 
unchanged. 

My report yesterday about 
talk in the property sector 
suggesting a possible rights 
issue from MEPC had an 
adverse effect Shares of 
MEPC fell I2p to 338p. 

The group has been the 
subject of numerous bid re- 
ports this year and marketmen 
remain convinced that the 
group has something up its 
sleeve to help preserve its 


independence A defensive 
bid of its own is not being 
ruled out 
Hanson Trust was a strong 
feature after hours, climbing 
8p to 20 Ip on reports emanat- 
ing from New York that it had 
sold its Courage brewing di- 
vision to Anheuser-Busch, the 
Budwetser group, for £1.7 
billion. But Hanson said it had 
no plans for 
announcement 
Mr Maruu Tailor, a direc- 
tor of Haqson, said: “We 
never comment on market 
rumour or speculation. We 
have never said that we are 
selling Courage.** 

Blit rumours about the pro- 
posed sale of Courage have 


an 


Hawley Group, based in 
Bermuda, is set to announce 
its interim figures on Tues- 
day in dollars for the first 
time. The dividends and 
share capital have been 
quoted in dollars since 
1984. America accomlts for 60 
per cent of profits, which 
should rise from $18 million 
to $24 militon. 


EQUITIES 

Angta Secs 
Ashley 


wn 


15 p) 

» 


888 Design ( 67 p) 
Beaverco (I 45 p) 


Borland (l 
Broad St 
Chelsea Man ( 125 p) 
Coated Bectrodes ( 84 p) 
Coline ( 110 p) 

Evans HaXshaw fl 20 p) 
Fletcher Dennys ( 70 p) 
GT Management ( 2 ti)p) 
Guthm Corp ( 150 p) 


163 
199-1 
68 
148 
154-3 
58 -1 
130 
113 
120 
117 
68 +1 
. 208 
171 


nfefl( 500 p) 


Harrison ( 150 p) 

Hite Ergonom ( 92 p) 
Hughes Food ( 20 p) 
Lon utd tnv ( 3 f“ * 

M 6 Cash & C 
Marina Dev . . , 
Morgan Gran Ml 
Shield ( 72 p) 

Stanley Leisure ( 110 p) 
TV-AM ( 130 p) 

Tandy fnds (I 12 p) 
Thames TV ( 190 p) 
Ttobet & Britten ( 120 p) 
Tres 2 H*(/I 2016 =«7 
Uctock ( 63 p) 


162 

90 

26 +'? 

420-1 

82 

95 

455+7 

175-5 

122 

109+3 

144 

243+4 

150 

£ 99 3 «+ 3 *. 


Wlndsmoor 

Yefcenon 


RIGHTS ISSUES 
Aid Irish Bk N/P 
BBA GO F/P 
Berkeley Tech N/P 
Boots N/P 
Brown & Tawse N/P 
Cihnnsion F/P 
Forward TfiCh F/P 
Rush & Tomkins N/P 
Sedgwick N/P 
Sutcftft, Speak N/P 

(issue price in brackets). 


105-1 


22+2 

217 

7 

219-4 

7 
28 
38 

8 

27+3 

22+1 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Unea Month S wi teg 

Sep 86 

Doc 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 ; 

Sep 87 . 

Dec 87 . 

Previous 


us day's tot al open interest 15327 

Moon EwodoMf 


ST. 

A 

Low 

90.10 

abaa 

9012 

EatVW 

257 

90 - sa 

90.69 

9057 

9059 

2113 

90.73 

90.73 

9063 

9057 

112 

9053 

9053 

9053 

9057 

10 

9037 

9037 

9037 

9023 

6 

NT 

— 

— . 

9033 

0 


Sep 86 . 

Dec 86 

MorH7 a - 

JunS 7 

USTroasoiy Bond 

Sep 88 

Dec 85 - — 

Mar 87 


Stand 
Sep 86 . 
Dec 88 . 
Mar 87 . 


MS". 

sep oo — 


Sep 

Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 

Jim 87 — 
FT-SE 100 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 


9423 

9423 

94-12 

9335 

96 - 19 

97 - 27 
NT 


101-06 

101-04 

NT 


11628 

119*4 

NT 

NT 

171.00 

17530 


. Previous day's total open Interest 23993 
9423 94.10 94.11 . 607 

9423 94.02 94.05 - 5564 

94.12 93.92 9194 601 

93 S 5 93.75 93.75 . 412 

Previous day's total open Merest 4535 
9620 . 97 -OT 97-14 383 

98-06 96-01 96-22 10370 

— — _ 95-24 0 

Previous dr/s total gpanMeraa 1469 


101-08 

101-04 


11628 

119-28 


101 - 
100-56 


■day’s! 

11825 

11824 


101-08 

100-57 

10057 


42 

330 

0 


Previous day's 
171.00 188 JSJ 

17530 17430 


15248 

118-28 8 
11900 12397 

11900 0 

11900 0 

total open Interest 2581 


■ open* 
16890 
.17250 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


24 


Aug 15 ~ Nov 6 Nov 17 

Sep 5 Nov 20 Duel 

Sep 8 Sep 19 Dec 4 . Dec 15 _ 

Cat options ware Man out o m 5 / 9/86 Amstrad. NAl KaAJJrrent&i . Gestemer. 
Stewart Naim. Secuorieor ’A‘. Canrford. AGB, Authority tnv., Barker Dob. Bryson, TV- 
AM. Raglan. BOMS. Drigety. Psrion. Hawley . 


Aug 4 

Aug 18 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


NYCric 1 + 962-15060 
Montreal 2 . 0756 - 2.0889 
Ams'dain 3 . 42693 d 4476 
BrOssob 62386329 
CTpUgen 112021-115668 
Dtibdn 1 . 1 044 - 1. 1120 
Ftankfuri 3 j 0370 - 3 jOS 54 
Lisbon 217 . 07-21951 
Madrid 19933-19965 
Mtan 209630210830 
Oslo 103080-103496 
Paris 99537-100130 
St'kHrn 102929-103396 
Tokyo 2319223334 
Vienna 21 . 40 - 21.49 
Zurich 2 . 4644-24726 


TapiwHar4 

15045-15055 
2 . 0853-29682 
344306.4476 
63.105329 
115500-11 
1 . 1105 - 1.1115 

30511-33554 

217 . 48 - 219 . 13 ' 

19950-19928 

210329-2107.70 

103347-103486 

93944-103116 

103254 - 10.3398 

23232-23320 

21 . 47 - 2 } .48 
24681 - 2 X 720 


Smfc fl lades r ca y re rt a h li 1375 va i 


052-050pram 
035326pram 
154-11* pram 
17-l3prem 
1-1/4prem 
15prem-7dte 
154-1 Harem 
IDO-ITOda 
50-85iSS 
1-6dta 
*-*db 
2V2%prem 
!4prem-%cSs 
IS-Kpreoi 
9-754 prtm 
1%-1Kpram 
M7t7(dq/sasB 



100 - 165 dSs - 

7-1 Ids 

11 S- 12 Hdb 

6 %- 5 Scram 

1 %-Sprem 

82 * pram 

2514-22* prem 

3*-3*pram 

1 715-717% 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Bahrwn<Smr__ 
Brazil cruzado* , 
Cyprus pomd _ 
Frtand marts _ 
Greece drachma 
•Hong Kong dole 
Inda rupee 
kaqcSnar _ 
KuwahdrarKO 
Ma S yssdodar, 
Mexico peso — 
NewZMviddOMr . 
Saudi Arabia riyal __ 
Singapore doter^_ 
South Africa rand _ 

UAEdfrnpn 

'UoyasBenk 


— 15483-15650 

— 2429024334 

— 0562035660 

20 . 61 - 20.74 

— 0 . 7350-07450 

— 73045-75445 

— 19937-20137 
11 . 6751 - 11.6837 

1820-1830 

13684-35986 
1060-1110 
. 3 . 1122 - 3.1241 
,5582555325 
.3236533417 
.3539055582 
,5478055180 


Skraapora, 
Malaysia _ 
Ausmte 
Canada-. 


Denmark, 

West Germany 
Switzerland _ 




SSff* 


15435-15435 

14083-14063 

42284231 

7.7990-7.7995 

14530-14620 

13350 - 133.70 

1437-1440 


I by Bredaye BmUMPEX and ExlaL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Sorias 

Oc* 

dan 

Apr 

Oct 

Jan 

Apr 



Series 


Mar 

Sap 

Doc 

Mar 


Aftad Lyons 

300 

330 

360 

45 

22 

11 

57 

38 

22 

67 

46 

32 

3 

90 

27 

7 

15 

32 

90 
• 18 
as 

Jaguar 

rstof . 


500 

550 

600 

42 

13 

2 

60 

33 

15 

TO 

47 

23 

6 

23 

63 

15 

* 

65 

25 

40 

75 

CtBomfl Banks 10 • 

Finance House 10 

BP 

fS 88 ) 

560 

600 

650 

148 

98 

58 

163 

123 

80 

175 

135 

35 

1 

2 

10 

• 3 
82 
18 

8 

14 

28 

Thom EMI 
fS 14 ) 


100 

460 

500 

550 

100 

60 

23 

4 

115 

75 

45 

17 

122 

85 

55 

1 

IS 

6 

40 

2 

7 

13 

47 

5 

■10 

22 

Ovanwgra Hlgn: 10 Low 6 
week watt TOSS 

Cons Gold 
(* 552 ) 

420 

460 

500 

135 147 
95 .112 
60 80 

152 

115 

92 

2 

4 

10 

6 

15 

20 

■91 

17 

34 

Tesco 

(■* 18 ) 


300 

330 

123 

S 3 

106 


1 

1 

~2 


Itaaaoqr BBa (Discount %) 

Buyaig Safina 

2 owan 9 * 2 hwbH 9 % 

3 mn» 9 S 3 mntft 9 K 

■ COwtautds 

260 

28 

40 

49 

4 

8 

16 

25 

12 

21 



390 

33 

50 

60 

3 

8 

15 

(• 2 62 ) 

280 

300 

16 

5 * 

17 


22 


Series 

Now 

FM 

JBL 

Now 

Fab 

May 

Prim Bank BMe (Discount %) 


330 

1 * 

8 

— 

61 

52 

— 



460 

43 

60 


10 

IS 

. 

3 ifrth 9 »«- 9 >’a 6 ntntfi 9 *^ 9 S 

Trade BM*(DtSC<xx 7 t%) 

Com Union 

1 * 303 ) 

280 

300 

28 

11 

37 

22 

44 

31 

2 

11 

. 6 
15 

9 

IB 

(* 486 ) 


500 

550 

22 

9 

38 

18 

52 

30 

35 

65 

40 

73 

45 

78 

330 

2 * 

12 

19 

32 

33 

36 

SAT kids 


360 

70 

88 


2 

7 




Catfe&WAra 

(* 327 ) 

300 

325 

350 

40 

19 

5 » 

52 

32 

20 

60 

40 

27 

6 

14 

30 

11 

18 

34 

16 

25 

40 

(* 423 ) - 


3«0 

420 

460 

45 

27 

9 

so 

38 

20 

08 

50 

32 

7 

17 

42 

12 

22 

48 

17 

2 S 

50 

brtart—kpq 

Overragnr open lOSckss 9 


375 

1 * 

8 

— 

62 

55 

— 

Barclays 

(* 507 ) 


460 

60 

75 

87 

5 

a 

13 

1 weak lO’iw-lO'ik B rnmti 9 V 0 N 

OtstiBara 
, (* 760 1 

600 

650 

177 

125 

— 

— 

4 

— ’ 

— 


500 

550 

32 

11 

47 

20 

60 

30 

17 

50 

25 

52 

32 

57 

3 imn 9 > l 3 ?' 6 »a 12 mrn 

700 

75 

— 

— 

« 

— 

— 



180 

27 

34 

40 

3 

’ 6 

9 

Local Aothority Dapoafia (%) 

2 nays 9 % 7 oays 954 

1 mwh 9 '*m 3 ninth 9 H 

GEC 

PM) 

180 

200 

14 

5 

20 

10 

26 

18 

5 

20 

8 

22 

11 

25 

( 188 ) 


200 

220 

13 20 

6 10 * 

27 

18 

11 

24 

.18 

26 

19 

28 

220 

2 

b 

— 

40 

40 

i — 


160 

25 

32 

38 

2 S 

7 

8 

6 mn 9 i 9 *i« 12 mft 9 S 

Grand Mat 
f 39 D 

327 

355 

TO 

45 

— 

z 

1 

3 

— 


(M 82 J 


180 

200 

10 

4 

19 

7 

25 

10 

20 

• 13 
_ZL 

15 

Local Authority Bonds (%) 

1 imtti 1 0 X- 1 6 2 mnth 10 S 4 K 

360 

382 

28 

52 

63 

10 

7 

10 

Guinness 

r 338 ) 


30 ° 

330 

48 - 

25 

56 

37 

68 

47 

4 

8 

7 

13 

10 

20 

3 nmh 10 K- 9 S 6 mnttt 9 N 4 IS 

9 mnth 9 S- 8 H 12 m 8 l 9 %- 9 % 

ya 

. (* 1092 ) 

900 

210 

234 


3 

5 

— 


360 

12 

20 

25 

27 

32 

35 

- 

950 

1000 

1050 

160 

110 

65 

187 

142 

100 

200 

IK 

115 

4 

5 
r 17 

9 

17 

25 

13 

20 

37 

Imperial Gr 

pan 


300 

360 

100 

70 

42 



IS 

IS 

5 

~ 

E 

1 mnth 1 OS -10 3 mnth 9 S- 9 S 

8 mnth 9 S- 9 S 12 rmh 9 »a^’ki 

Land Sec 
(* 330 ) 

300 

330 

380 

35 

12 

4 

43 

23 

11 

50 

33 

16 

2 

8 

33 

4 

11 

33 

5 

13 

34 

Ladbrofcfl 

C 366 ) 


300 

330 

360 

67 

38 

20 

TO 

52 

30 

60 

38 

1 

4 

.15 

2 

•7 

18 

12 

23 

3 mnth 500 - 5.75 

6 mnth 5 J 5 - 5 J 0 I 2 mth 5 SS &90 

Mafcs&Span 

C 217 ) 

180 

200 

220 

41 

22 

7 

46 

53 

114 

2 

4 




45 

37 

30 



3 

4 

7 




29 

14 

35 

21 

4 

10 

7 

14 

10 

17 

p 3 » 


110 

120 

42 

33 

38 

8 

11 

38 

EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 

ShaN Trans 
(* 970 ) 

750 

BOO 

650 

227 

177 

127 

242 

192 

142 

2 S 2 

202 

157 

1 

• 2 

3 

1 

4 

90 

* 

10 

17 

Midland Bank 
CS 72 > 


500 

550 

600 

87 

47 

20 

105 

65 

30 

117 

80 

45 

4 

15 

37 

7 

20 

42 

11 

25 
• < 7 ; 

Doter cal 6 X- 5 X 

7 days SN-S *w 1 mnth 5 “•-“mi 

3 mnth 6 tnmhSK- 6 * 

Trafalgar Housa 
1 * 200 ) 

260 

280 

300 

44 

28 

12 

51 

36 

22 

56 

43 

29 

3 

8 

13 

7 ‘ 

14 

21 

10 

17 

25 

PS 0 
f 54 « 


460 

500 

550 

92 

55 

20 

108 

72 

42 

83 

56 

• 2 

8 

20 

5 

12 

30 . 

14 

38 

Darasctann cat 54 

lays 4 »ia 4 't«. 1 mnth 

3 mnth 47 i* 4 »i* 6 mnth 4 'w 4 t w 











600 

• 0 

— 

" — 


— 

— 

7 days 7 >w- 7 'w 1 mnth , 7 S- 7 % 

3 mnth - Bnvtt) 7 Sr-TiL 


Sarin 

sap 

Dae 

Mar 8 eu Dec 

Mar 

Ttactf 


200 

a 

36 

44 

30 - 

10 

2 - 

6 

11 

22 

8 

16 . 
24 

Beedtam 

360 

63 

77 

48 

85 

- 5 R 

3 

5 

5 

10 

6 

15 

C 184 ) 


IS 
’ 6 

24 

14 

B 

22 

Swiss Frtnc cal 2 S- 1 S 

7 days 2 - 1 * 1 mnth 4%-4 


420 

460 

11 

5 

30 

15 

42 

25 

13 

42 

27 

50 

H 

RT 2 

(* 637 ) 


500 

140 

92 

150 

102 

57 

42 

37 

62 

3 

a 

6 

17 


3 mnth 4544 6 mnth 4 S 4-4 

Yea call - 5 S 4 S 

Boots 

(* 220 ) 

200 

220 

240 

21 

3 

IS 

31 

21 

38 

28 

2 

6 

4 

13 

6 

16 


B 00 

650 

30 

40 

G 5 

72 

Smmh 4 *t»- 4 ’ , ui 6 mnh «*- 4 * 

na 

El 

22 

25 

26 

Veal Reefs 


50 

29 

30 

— 

i 

2 S 

IS 

3 S 

7 » 

5 X 

9 


am 


42 

53 

62 

47 

2 

6 

9 

(* 78 ) 


W 

•70 

zin 


(* 320 ) 

300 

333 

7 

17 

20 

25 








GOLD - 

Baas 

(* 783 ) 

700 

750 

E 3 

110 

TO 

123 

83 

55 

1 

6 

7 

17 

12 

S 


Series 

Nov 

H* 


NOV 

Mar 

Jtan 

GofcfcS 42 CLOO-* 2 l.OO 

800 

10 

35 






TOO 

S 3 

42 

46 

4 

8 

11 

$ 4 T 7 .D 0 - 41 SL 00 (£ 27750 - 27940 ) 

Sowrwgoff nwwt 

S 99 . 7 W 00.75 (£ 6655 - 6755 ) 
*ExCUSBSVAT 

Bo* Cade 
- rSBGf 


23 

6 

1 

1 

63 

40 

23 

10 

38 

88 

40 ■ 
88 

2 S 

42 

88 

(- 22*1 


218 

236 

240 

*5 

22 

11 

5 

17 


9 

20 

38 

29 

— 

De Baers 

1 * 7 * 3 ) 

550 

600 

660 

TOO 

195 

145 

105 

65 

210 

160 

125 

95 

180 

145 

3 

4 
12 

17 

32 

30 

45 

. 

"--J- — 

Now 

Fab 

SI 

How 

** *»7 | 




no 

20 

VM 

65 

Tr lift* 1901 


106 

2 



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300 

88 

98 

106 

78 

54 

1 

1 % 

4 

2 

4 

8 

3 

6 

12 



110 

K 


1 


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. rm 

330 

360 

58 

28 

68 

42 

Tr 11 ** 03/07 

rci'T) 


114 

»■» 


- 

1 

»'.* 

3 

3 * 

8 


- 

Applets; £ 307 , 7 m atetectnOOm 

bQs~£ 97 .B 3 S% reserved: 10 % 

Last weak; £ 97 . 665 % -m»*ed:£ 16 % 

Avg* rate: £ 8 . 4444 % last wk £ 93969 % 
Next week; DOOM . raptace£ 100 M 

. GKN 

C 2 M) 

260 

260 

300 

330 

31 

16 

5 

ia 

.46 

32 

IB 

9 

53 

42 

30 

17 

15 

5 

16 
43 

b 

11 

21 

44 

9 

14 

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118 

120 

122 

124 . 

4 'l* 

1 * 

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I»1S 

3 *. 

4 * 

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4 V. 

57.4 

Quo 

n« 7 > 

900 

195 

195 

185 

6 

7 

18 

25 

35 

' Sapt 

Oct 

Nov 

Dae sapt 

Oct 

NSW 

Dan 


1000 

72 

4 ft 

115 

65 

150 

120 

17 

35 

a 

60 

70 

FT-SE 1525 .180 
Index 1550 155 

192 

187 - 

207 

183 

— 

1 

1 

2 

4 

5 

8 

- 


Hanson 

135 

61 



1 

- 

- 

(* 1685 ) 1|75 

130 

105 

142 

1?2 

160 

14 ? 

— 

1 

2 

7 - 

'10 

12 

18 


ECGO 

H 95 ) 

150 

160 

180 

200 

•36 43 

17 25 S 
4 S m 

46 

30 

18 

1 

IX 

91 

3 

4 V, 

13 

4 

8 “ 

17 

1 S 25 
. 1650 

1575 

82 

62 

42 

«2 

65 

63 

120 

110 

95 

126 

113 

5 

9 

20 

14 

21 

30 

27 

35 

45 

42 

30 

Fixed Rats Staffing Expert Finance 
Schema IV Averaga reference rata for 
Interest period August. 6 , 1986 to 
Sntember 2 . 1988 ncftjsfca 9.390 par 


SaptaeAerS, 19 B& 


Totri contracts 19542. Calls13657. FWaSSSS. •Undertytag warty price. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


been flying round the market 
all week. There has been talk 
that the group has been in 
negotiations with several in- 
terested parties, including El- 
ders IXL, die Australian 
brewer, which on Wednesday 
received the all-clear to pro- 
ceed with its bid for Allied 
Lyons. 

Allied firmed 8p to 346p 
yesterday after paying £400 
million for a 51 per cent stake 
in Hiram Walker, the Ca- 
nadian Gub and BaHanlinns 
drinks group, with an option 
to buy the rest at a later date. 
Some marketmen reckon that 
Allied is now looking too 
expensive for Elders which 
has cow turned its attention to 
Courage. 

Meanwhile,' Lord Hanson 
has made no secret of his 
desire to obtain a listing for 
Hanson's shares on the New 
York stock markeL But with 
the balance sheet in such a 
state of flux following the 
acquisitions of SCM Corpora- 
tion and Imperial Group, as 
well as recent disposals, the 
attempt has been continually 
delayed. 

However, the word is that 
the group is now ready tp push 
ahead with a quote and will be 
applying to the NYSE next 
week. Like Hawley Group, a 
large proportion of Hanson's 
profits are now earned in the 
US where the group has a large 
following. A US quote would 
be a natural move and, as in 
the case of Hawley, is likely to 
generate more interest in the 
shares which could, in turn, be 
good news for British 
shareholders. 


COMMENT 


Surging share prices 
pause for gold 


A potentially euphoric end to another 
good week on stock markets ended on 
a sour note yesterday in New York 
and, to a lesser extent, in London. 
Wall Street had surged to a new record 
overnight causing London prices to 
be marked up sharply to within 1.4 per 
cent of their April peak. Sadly, it did 
not last even before Wall Street 
despite some hopeful unemployment 
figures, retreated rapidly. 

There was something uncomfort- 
able about gold prices recovering so 
strongly at the same time as share 
prices. Gold is the traditional refuge 
from securities. The sensible explana- 
tion is that the gold price recovery, has 
been purely a function of fears over 
South African supplies. That is borne 
out by the even steeper rise in 
platinum, which is genuinely short 
supply. 

It did not work quite like that 
yesterday, when the rise in gold was 
put down to fears over the reper- 
cussions of the latest airliner hi-jack. 
But such an event would have made 
little impact on gold a year ago. The 
metal now has momentum. 

It is, however* hard to see the 
momentum of share prices being 
broken yeL The summer lull ended 
nearly a month ago and, despite a run 
of bad economic news and forecasts 
on both sides of the Atlantic, shares 
have been trying to rise ever since. 


Economic pysychology has much in 
common with British weather, gloom 
can as suddenly turn back to op- 
timism, for instance on evidence that 
the delayed benefits of cheaper oil are 
beginning to show in the German 
economy, the key to Europe. 

Share prices in Britain are more 
solidly based on forecasts of company 
profits. Phillips & Drew is expecting 
company earnings to rise 17 per cent 
over the next 12 months. De Zoeie & 
Be van expects pretax profits of indus- 
trial companies to be 19 per cent 
higher this year and a further IS per 
cent next year. Optimism among 
comfTanies Has been rising recently. 

This causes something of a problem 
for de Zoete. a broking firm justly 
famous for taking a long view of 
markets. Bull markets do not nor- 
mally last this long. Now that profit 
margins have climbed back to p re- 
197 3 levels, they question whether the 
rise in company earnings can indefi- 
nitely outpace the economy. Cer- 
tainly, there are special factors such as 
takeovers, favourable currency 
changes and savings on pension costs. 

De Zoete therefore sees the autumn 
as the last leg of the bull market, not 
doubt enlivened by the TSB. British 
Gas and, just possibly, the odd 
interest rate cut But the end of a bull 
market can be just as profitable as the 
start provided you watch for the 
turning point. 


Banking’s novelty factor 


What does it take to be a high flyer in 
the modern banking game of 
securitization, in which loans are 
packaged into tradeable securities? 
Capital backing is handy, placing 
power and trading skills important; 
innovation is cructaL 

One recent example of Euromarket 
innovation is a new issue of 
securitized US car loans, probably 
early next week, by Salomon Brothers. 
It works on a similar principle to 
mortgage-backed securities — also 
being pioneered in this country by 
Salomon — where many small loans 
are pooled together into a single 
security. In this case the issue is $276 
million, issued by General Motors 
Acceptance Corporation, the finance 
arm of Detroit's finest It is the first 
time a car loan- security has been 
offered outside North America. 

The security is relatively short term, 
with a weighted average life of only 
two years, carrying a coupon of 9.75 
percent 

The originality of the issue under- 
lines the advantages held by foreign 
institutions in the Euromarket and the 
disadvantages faced by British play- 
ers. Salomon is able to draw on a vast 
and already highly securitized domes- 
tic market Because of the legally 
enforced fragmentation of US tank- 


ing, securitization has provided an 
excellent route for the small regional 
banks to find a link with the money 
centre banks. Securitized car loans 
have been known there for more than 
two years and more than $4 billion 
was issued in the US last year. 

To the east, the Japanese banks are 
showing a big interest in the 
Euromarkets. Though generally reck- 
oned to be short on innovatory skills, 
they have huge surpluses to use in 
highly competitive pricing which 
should ensure they are among the 
biggest Euromarket players in the next 
few years, 

British banks, though some are 
large in capital terms, can - almost 
certainly not compete with the Japa- 
nese if it comes to throwing money 
around. And they have no strong and 
sophisticated domestic market to 
back them up and learn new skills in. 
In contrast to the US, banking in 
Britain is still based on the traditional 
loan funded through retail deposits 
and the interbank market 

It is hardly any wonder that a recent 
analysis of the Euromarket by 
Databank, the business strategy an- 
alysts, found only one British institu- 
tion — S G Warburg — among the top 
20 Euromarket players. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• WYNDHAM GROUP: Divi- 
dend 1.8p (lip) for the year to 
March 31. Turnover £2.22 mil- 
lion (£2.6 million). Pretax profit 
£189.000 (£111.000). Earnings 
per share 7.7p (4.98p) and after 
extraordinary item 0.86p. 

• FORD AND WESTON 
GROUP: Half-year to March 
30: Turnover £18.48 million. 


Prem profit £254,0001 Earnings 
per share 2J?p. No companions 
given. Ford has sold land (with 
planning permission to build a 
new office block) at tbe 
Mailings, St Albans, Hertford- 
shire. to - Guardian Royal Ex- 
change for £1.1 1 million. 

• CAMPBELL RED LAKE 
MINES: Agreement has been 


reached in principle for the 
acquisition, by a US subsidiary, 
of a significant equity interest in 
Silver Slate Mining of Denver, 
Colorado, with ultimate poten- 
tial to acquire control The 
agreement contemplates, as a 
fust step, an infusion of cash 
and property worth S12 million' 
(£7.97 million) which will en- 


title Campbell to an initial 
interest of about 21 percenL 
• BET: The company has re- 
ceived acceptances for 31.218 
shares in Electrical Press (99 per 
cent of those outstanding) from 
86 per cent of the shareholders. 
The offer has now become 
unconditional and has been 
extended until SepL 25. 


Cant. 


The Company - Barlow Clowes 

& Partners 

-i. ■ ‘ 

The Product - Portfolio 30 

The Objective - A Fixed Monthly 

Return From Gilts 

■ : ‘4; 

s 

The Guarantee - Security of Capital 


The Coupon 




■ To: Bariow Clowes & tamers limited 

WainfordCoi^Thrt^nKnfonStieetL)ndoiiEX^2Ar. 
Telephone 01-256 6433 or 0625-87296 
Please send me information about Ibrtfbfio 30 


«2j» 


Name. 


Address. 


Telephone. 


Amount available for investment £. 


1 

I 

L 



] bwes 


, 'Cbe Q/ill \bpeaahsis 

hawed DeeknuiStamun 












BUSINESS AND FINANCE 




TTMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 



M Qfiar <awg ym 


MHEVUMT TRUST MANAOSIS 

00. HokMnhuroi Ha. BaianamoaOi OHS 8*4. 

03J5 717373 {Unktoie) 


Ekd OMer Cmg yw 


wn Hen me 
Pi ei snare* 


Cntried 115.4 1ST* ±0.1 9S3 

NnkcEMV 870 1031 *0.7 ±00 

WMMl Bond 185.7 3094* -02 463 

Mecn GrOHOi mi 1003 -02 I« 

Awn Plane 499 536 .. 299 

«IMb 4 Evm 107 3 114 7 *03 211 

Capua Deng 662 B6£ . 'M 

Cdnrni 6 En#gy 7M S1JMI ±03 204 
Enraoean Casual 1006 1070 -06 1.19 

General 141.4 1512 *12 281 

J«Mn 91 I 08 J -02 . 

UK Grown tac 1010 1066 *05 259 

Da Accun 144.9 155.7 ±0.7 1 46 

US Entering Go's 5*8 577 -00 050 

Efluuaa Froraim 2016 2148 *1.7 3.16 

Mjqt#1ytAcc 65.6 607 -0.1 263 

ALLIED OUNSAH UNIT TRUSTS 
Ab*d Owe# Cewm Swmdon 9)1 1EI 
0733 610366 & 0793 28291 


CaU 8 Gen 
W Laura 
Prao Sham 

*onq Teen 
Mm GrSMfi 
Amer mm 
Amr Snutar Co e 
Auaanwn 
Euro Smtoxr 
FV E*W 
Hang Kong Prt 

hm &wr 

Jmm Pen 


2013 214 7 

16.1 192# 

1274 1359 
4U 6(5 
173 167 
153 162 
66 7 71 1# 
431 461* 

41.7 445# 
074 1039* 
562 822 

71.1 225 
63 JO 833 
171 162 
495 53.1# 

zs* Si 

37 4 399 

790 6*3 
ISO 169* 
652 »8 
W.7 87.7 


*12 Ui 
. 1030 
•13 256 
*02 206 
+02 229 
-0.1 058 
+01 1.03 
*05 I5« 
. OKS 
-02 320 
-0.1 510 
-02 042 
.. 1.78 
.. 019 
*0.1 054 
-ai 244 
-0.1 1.47 


Bd Otter ping Via 


bwtmu units A in w Hiaw now 

35. FpdMui St ll in dw t 
061-236 5085 

EaxmfiM n wce i 784 815 *04 111 

man meame Tnat 785 835 *® 4 tS 

GO 6 Feme W 527 50 1 . . 846 

TS Otkn TnBb 632 875* +02 1« 

Seeeel Sot Trust 769 B15e *05 254 

Mn Amer Trial 565 62.1c -15 1.71 

Tii Chuju Tint 831 685 -07 055 

Ind Growpi 515 545 .. UH 


gel OtW Cum) YU 


Bd Olm Chng 


Bus oner Oxg 


2005 2975i 
1395 1405 
2J05 2559 
2858 2628 
2195 2335 
385 2705 


.. 155 
+22 278 
+0.1 128 
-1.7 0.12 
+05 141 
♦05 154 

-22 m 


Fm True) 

Crmui & Xeome 
Cesrai Trial 
ESBMemd 
•ccun T>QU 
American n»ne 
High I ncome T it 
Eoei hcoma 
n#n Yea 
Cawi See* Trial 
e— n ro n w 
Japan Fund 
PBK Inti 
Amer Sod So 

Sea Or Amer th 
A id Asset Warn 
6* OrcMMi 
Snueer Os's 
Jim Smaeer Co * 
Rocaveiy Inn) 
Mel Mx 6 CM) 
Ohm Ejwuj 


u 2301 245.1# *1.4 345 

l mean* 140 1 1402 *09 30+ 

nai 2W5 304 *15 248 

3701 394 1 *25 309 

niM 5731 0103 *29 Z50 

> meaner 33 1 355# -01 416 

«NT« 2533 2695# *17 4 73 

coma 1422 1514 *0.7 456 

d 146.5 1901 *07 516 

s Trial 300 315 *03 920 

ne> 075 H2# -02 057 

mo ii7i 134 7 *02 am 

ntl 1640 1900 *05 091 

a So 60 s rasa -oi i36 

Amer Tx 214 0 2279 -03 032 

tVnfcje 2340 2492 *23 312 

Mi 38 1 399 *01 284 

m * 1209 1285 ±05 256 

W Co's 1555 165.0# *04 242 

i Inal 8*6 90 1 +13 

6 CflOT 529 883 *OB U* 

Aminos 190 1 9024 *1 7 293 

g» Ts 09 1 9*3 *0* 095 

funvt 1385 I36J ±09 596 


Exempt 655 £91 

Enema Manor W.7 *7-' 

BROWNSMFIJEY , 

9-17. Perrvmo u m H4 HwanM 
0444 458144 

Financial i»7 137' 

SnuSarCe i 4ce 3350 HE 

Do mconie 15'3 

H^l Income 805 71 


Man PDRHko he 
Da Ace 


1287 137 7# 
335 0 252.7 
1512 1625 
605 71 5# 
711 04 JO 
61 5 605# 
1035 H05# 
509 63« 
HO 903 


EQUITY 5 LOW 
Sr George Hsa Cc rporebow 
WO 

irxa 553231 

UK Granin Atom 1535 1 
Do income 1335 1 
Maher Me ACM* 2555 2 
as mcaae 20SJ 2 
Gdo/Fmd AArt 1005 1 
Do income 8U 

NX Amer Tal Aecxn 1324 1 
Fir East T* Attu® 1628 1 
Eure Ta Aeon 165.1 1 
General Thai 3485 2 


St Comrxy CV1 


1030 *09 228 

1421 *05 338 

2719 ’ *19 452 
2188 +1.1 02 
10570 *02 850 
075# +Q1 190 
1408 -15 022 

1732 +13 037 

1758b -22 UP 
2817 ±05 355 


Grerti EquM 20* I 2172 .. 155 

Guana* 2885 &73# +22 2.78 

N Ammon 1305 1485 +0.1 138 

Parte 2*03 2559 -1.7 0.12 

Property 9m 2658 2638 +05 t4l 

Sooier CoaoiM 2193 2333 +05 154 

E x ap aa n Trial 2595 27 05 -22 153 

(HJMM&3 MAHON UKnrTMJir 
MAMAGERS 

TO Bo* 442. 32 Si Mery-amt London fiCSP 
01423 9333 

HMi Incane 824 683 *0.1 646 

N Amer Truer ICES tt&Se S& 085 

Recovery 205.8 2185 -05 251 

« Thai 385 40.8# *ai 891 

Si toneem m 8&4 fi&i# *04 UB 

SI Wieam US Q6l 74.1 772# -05 177 

Temple Bar am CCS 1735 186.1 .. 128 

Txrade Ser U6M 8685 8015 *557 291 


BUCKMAST6R MAHAOOVfT^^^ 

The Stock E-eninge London EC2P 2JT 
01-588 2866 


Mel Mr & Coot 819 883 +06 224 

O uus Eliwji 190 1 202.4 *1 7 233 

TcdxcAMv Tx 09 1 9*9 +«« 0» 

hsemo Earns 1385 1 38 J *09 ise 

Examm Smator Co's 2353 2*93 *05 250 

USACiemsl Trial ML4 36186 -1-6 ' 14 

ARMITHNOT SBCURfTIES 
131. F rebuy Him*. London EC2A 1AY 
01 OT 9676 01-260 0540/1/2/3 
cma Gmefli Ine 584 635 ±011.84 

Da Accun 664 710 +12 154 

Estam 4 M 1409 149.7* -4.4 0 79 

Do 6% Wtt rt r jwM 73.9 779* -33 0 79 

finence 8 Pr omt 60.7 715# *04 20? 
MIBad Income 483 509* -0.4 IL» 

Do Accun 82.1 684a -04 820 

EouUV Income 78* 61 7x *a« ±57 

DO Accun 1613 183.7* ±13 487 

H# VMd Xceme 74.7 798* *05 643 
Do Accun 1993 3131* ‘ *19 0*3 

hm Inc o me 808 865 -03 211 

Da Accum 834 88.1 -0.4 2 II 

Da 5H MOiared 743 795 -04 211 

Managed Funa 656 89 1 *11 .. 

Proximo income 296 316 . . 983 

Do Accun 966 1022 .. 983 

Smeeer Co s Accun 1323 141.7 *10 156 

Worm Pewit Snare 98 102 -11 173 

Puifoto r« UK 790 818 -13 1 56 

Pwitakp Tit iKXtn 103 1 1065 -59 000 

FcnMa Tn us 702 727 -1 4 1 06 

PC-Hour Ts Europe 1237 1281 *05 a DO 

Portafco TM HK Ot 449 *09 0.10 

OAJLLJE OFFDRD 


FMMrsnp Me 
General me (41 
Do Accun (41 
Moome Fund 13) 
Do Accun ffl 
few he (2) 

Do Accun 131 
Smeeer K 15) 
CM Accun IS) 


897 541* .. 350 

ZS.6 23*2 ±75 29* 

3559 3744 *125 251 

1035 1094 .. 448 

182* W2.0 .. 440 

1325 1383* .. 141 

1762 1835 .. 1.4] 

[1144 1216 .. tm 

£1221 1295 .. 250 


reCUNTTMAHAOB 
f. UHXM POMW 
01-623 4880 
US SuHtrCtn 
Carnal FM 
hcome Futf 
f» Easom Fm 
Oeneat tacorae 
Pueo r mere et 
M anual Bes FUm 
E uropean mcome 


m. London ECtR 08A 

705 765 -05 02 

1076 U55 *05 05 

825 875 ±02 45 

7U 81.9 -02 13 

735 785 +li 14 
ESI BS3 -04 95 
425 455 ±17 35 

044 905 +05 26 


CS TOM) MANAGERS 

125. HOI HODorn. London WCIV OPT 


95.0 101.1 -19 121 


125. hoi honor 
01-242 1148 
CS Japan Fund 


CANNON RJKOMAMAGSIS 
r. ONmUc Way. Wa m pler. HA9 ONQ 
0IJ*S 8878 

Gromn 3869 3052 t 

Income 3345 5555 t 


3 Gemmas SL ElMMUb EH3 6 VY 
031 -aS 201 (DsMrsJOl-Zm 6066) 
mn El ca 4822 4775 +17.1 150 

JM». E< (43) 4+7 0 487.0 .. 020 

UK E» |31) 2397 2S50 +15 153 

Phi pens ra 4480 47! 0 . . . . 

Pul Pena UK 1960 2090 .. - . 

M America 1709 1618* -14 129 

BG Energy ISO* 1600 +17 157 

BG tteomo Grot* 195 3 207 7a *07 550 

BG Japan 1903 2009 -08 000 

BG Toomoiogy 1419 1507 *11 067 

BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25C8 Womens Sheet London W1X 4AD 

01-491 0295 

Amencan *65 496 -12 878 

Auenunn 16 1 175* -05 112 

Japan 6 Genera* 1159 i:roe -OS 017 
Hufs moome 4U 485* +11 592 

XMnueonM Trial 61 0 66.7 +05 1 63 

Income GX TX 476 512 *14 181 


Inn E+ CSS 
J «*»■ E> (43) 

UK E* l31) 

Phi Pens mo 
PU Pens UK 
BO America 
BG Energy 
BG Harms Grmh 
BG Japan 
BG Tcamoiogy 


Auenun 
Japan 6 Qenxal 
Hup moome 

XMnueonM Trial 
Income am Tx 



202 

218 

.. 9.09 

OKU Uxun 

341 

306 

±02 20* 

Saao» Sauauon* 

394 

426 

±02 103 

BARCLAYS IMCOM 



Uncoil House. 252. Raidad Rd E7 

01-534 5644 




Ameneu 

WO 

910 

-04 128 


1309 

1392 

+ 10 1*0 

DO mcome 

929 

918 

*12 1*5 


71 a 

7S0# 

*0.7 299 

Exurax Trust 

4*02 *082 

*35 396 

Ern x-caro 

772 

82.1 

*05 US 


2M0 2913 


SCO 

270 0 2870# 

*10 306 

Gwiemi 

1*26 

■51 S 

*08 30* 


Gromn 2669 3052 +1.7 251 

tncorr* 3345 3555 +16 551 

Far Earl 2214 23*4 -21 029 

rtortn Amen can M9B 1594 -12 057 

GtaOM 48 8 51.9* -51 150 

Euraeean 92J B&9* -04 iJM 

Japan 595 93.6* -19 160 

CAPCL (JAMES) HAMAQEimT 
TO a*. 651 Bawl Marta London BC3 7 JO 
01-621 0011 

CaprtM 392 1 4017 *26 1J7S 

max* 2996 3098 *24 452 

North American 2062 306.1 -15 187 

CATCH ALLS! 

1 In IMNam St EC4N 7AU 
0Mlzr«3f4 

G« Trial 101 0 1M0* *051159 

CCNTHAL BOAltD OF FWANCE OP 
CHUHCH OF ENGLAND 

2 Fore Street London EC2T SAG 
01-508 1618 

Inn FuM 4194 . . *54 

FMM 1464 .. 9 83 

D*POM 100.0 .. 170 

CHA8IMAIMATTAN FUND MANAGERS 
72/73 Bum* SoaoL London BC2V SOP 
0MW6 662? 

5 6 C Special Sds 51 4 5*5 . . 173 

CHAMTOS QmCUL IHVESTMENT FUND 
7. Fora SrraeL London EC2V 6AQ 
01-568 1815 

moms 38367 • 479 

Accum £1 1 2926 

Depovl mo .. 950 


CLERICAL MEDICAL I 
MANACKRS 
ManXM Pm Bnsact 
0900 373383 
Amer Grewdi 
Equfy regn income 
European Grawdi 


FE INVESTMENT MANAGENS 

191 wax Garage 8t Gwgex G3 SPA 
6*1-532 3132 

BMancad On he *55 *82 .. 156 

Do Accun 46.1 *80 .. . - 

mcenu OX Inc 412 439 ..591 

DoAcaan 411 455 ■■ ■ ■ 

Sence Go's hg 495 535 .. 150 

Do Accum 514 535 

FOEUTY MVCSTMENT SEHVCQ LTD 
Rnar warn. Tunramoa. ins idy 
0732 361144 

American 10*0 TllJ -12 058 

Amu Equiy mcenu 333 35.7 -02 436 

Am* spaced See 499 534 - . I* 

Far East me 352 375 -02 1TO 

1 G* 6 tad Jnr JJ4 32.3 -».? 8S« 

GnwOI S Mm 996 IMS +04 454 

Jwsan Spacol Sta 445 476 -16 .. 

JSpOl Trust 1448 1557 -13 . . 

Managed M Tu u&B 1565 -« 001 


Amancan 1040 TllJ -12 058 

Amu Equiy mcenu 333 35.7 -02 436 

Artur Spaced See 49 l9 534 . . 1* 

Far EBB me 352 375 -33 3.78 

1 G* 6 tad Jnr JJ4 32.3 -».? 85* 

GnwOI S Maw 995 IMS ^14 454 

Jwan SpaaM Su 445 476 -16 .. 

J«an Trust 1440 1557 -13 . . 

Managed H Tu H65 1562 -17 061 

Mo Xcome BMa 005 MM *12 9 18 

PreAeaeonai Gth 3*7 370* *04 231 

Souoi East As# Tal 32.7 320 -16 144 

Spec* SKa 1674 19000 -14 057 

lUHNQ (R0KRT) 

Loom BC3A 6AM 

Amencan EaenM £3690 377.1 . . 1.41 

ApmEuifl £4565 4716 .. 171 

Am Aqperiy rtf S10DOO0 • .. 5.00 
Fnpanjr Trust BOM . . 560 


2226 2270* 
2276 2420* 
2136 2272 
2218 2358 
2129 2260 
255 8 2716 
894 940 
1179 1252 
1836 17*2* 
7775 1BB0* 
1196 1262 
1250 1328 
1620 1724 
1706 1914 
894 950 
904 900 
845 894* 
137 0 1456* 
1*92 1584* 
934 674 
634 974 


3. Lemon WM Bh 
EC2M 5NQ 
01-629 5161 
Amar 8 Gan me 
DO Accum 
Amar Tumund Inc 
Do Accun 
Cap m Ts lac 


Far Ban ACC 
American ACC 


925 995* +15 Iff 
595 830 -01 1.10 

5&D 596 -OS 050 
525 $55* +16 140 


1M 



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HomncM nr MANAom 
TO Bo* 4. NonMh NR1 3NG 
0603 622200 

OBIS That £1151 1117 +067 136 

Hfrox I3UHH +18128 

OPFCNNENIEftTttUST MANAGEMENT 

66. Cinnan QWet London EC4N 6AE 
‘ mange 01-936 388W«8« 
h dx rmae ii a l Ghavdi 148.1 ISM -15 158 
SSmaaOraaOi 620 672 +14 301 

VrtrtMde Rec 889 945 -04 156 

Amancan Gaea# £4 MJ# --ISO 
Men ooufi 825 987 -15 ISO 

grtMUiGrawn 732 785* -05 007 

UKOMMdi SIS 984 •• 1-11 

MB finmfl SJ2 576 -20 12S 

Hah ROW 345 376 *04 757 

PraacN mcraw S&2 S85 +13 2M 

Do Accum «J17 1093 +16 214 


2S2 Hah Hetara, WCIV 7EB 
(TI-409BMI 


0T-4OS844I 
Grow* Fund tae 
Do Aeon 
hcran FuM 


Do Accun 
l/Mt Trux me 
Do Aocun 


SU 995 
1410 1900 
1256 1336 
1372 1400c 
1375 14fiflo 
T326 1413 
2311 2446 


PBWCTUM.UMTTMBT 
41 Han 5»m*t Harney Cm Tfcaraaa 


0*81 67686 
Maramn 


Amer GnwHi 
md Emm Oft 
Far EMlMl 
Ewopaan CM 


275.1 2892 

IN.! sue 

1933 1845 
885 745 
91.0 870 

770 832 

625 67.1 


+16174 
+10 422 
+1.1 13< 
.. 0.7Z 
-11 057 
+13 106 
+05 148 


reouncwvnflusn 
ssz2. Bahama*. Loom 
01-247 75*4/7 


362 cSw M OK 
Z85 FUr EaoHtn 
2S5 Horm AmaOCM 

S3 SSiS 


Com A GW Inc 
Do Accun 
Ema Me TU Inc 
DO Accum 
Inooae Trust 
Do Accun 
kd Growth Fd tae 
Do Accun 
Japan 6 Gan tae 
Do Accum 
INMMy XC O me Fd 
nacoiiaiy 
Do Accum 
European tac 
Do Accum 




S« 4 Hxed M Gx 
Gw t Fixed me 


Japan 4 Gen Inc 1734 


Do Ace 
Grewm Accun 
mcome Trust 
Laoue Tnai 


Spaed sauanons 1464 


1794 IMS 
1830 19* G 
3*23 364 I# 
90S BS6 


Racovarv 1975 2111 

Trustee Fins n»0 1116 

(JIM Tech Aocun 52 S 550 

Do mcome 52 1 55 * 

WartOmOa True! 1526 1825 
-S TMm+FiM ACC 335.1 3S6* 

DO Inc 2173 2310 

BAHHG FUND MANAGERS 

TO Boa 151 BadunnuL Kara BR3 . 

01-458 9002 

Auarata 676 725 - 

El Mam 60 5 m.7® ■ 

Era>ty meoeu 57 b 921 

Eurotu 1315 1*00 

Grawdi 4 Inc 64 3 69.1# 

Japan Speed 107 4 1140# 
Jauan Sunma 905 94.7 

F«M EUOD# 1140 1221 

fm Japan 99 3 954 

FM N Amar 503 517 

FM Smaller Got 640 697 


212 247 
437 485* 
300 320 
397 423# 
29 8 31**1 
257 26.6# 
25.6 270 
34.4 317 


COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 

191. cneapmoa. London ECZV 8EU 

01-7J61S9 

Energy Trull *7 3 503U 

Extra In come 169 5 1771 

Fmenosl 1693 1800# 

GN Strategy 517 58 4 

Growth it ii es anem 2930 3115 

taooraa 4 Growrti *12 UM 

Japanaae Growth 1993 210M 

NX Amu Growth 1028 1093 

me Recovery HO 1210 

Srnwar Co s 2128 2213*1 

O0M Ik Tfl 595 OUX 

Special Srts Acc 289 0 3074 


htfa m End. OtaMu, SXiay 
0306 885055 


FP Eramy DM 
Do Accun 
FP Food W D#t 
Do Accun 
S tewar dN sp Dot 
Qp Aocun 


2048 2174 
3*15 3925 
1146 121.7 
1303 1396 
1719 187.7 
1826 1938 





1993 21 1M 
1028 1093 
1145 1216 
2126 2293# 
595 633# 
289 0 3074 


El Mam 
Erawy mcome 

Euod* 

Growth 4 Inc 
Japan Spaed 
japan Sunma 
FM EuroD* 

FM Japan 
FM N Amar 
FM SmaUr Co'l 


CROWN UNIT THU8T SERVICES 
Grown Houon. WMkmg GU21 1XW 
0*062 5033 - 

Hgh Mcoma TruX 2*49 2883 +16 

Growth Trust 2281 2*40# +25 

American Trust 1285 1374 -03 

CNUBADBI UMT TRU9T MANAGERS LTD 
Hergata. Surrey RM2 894. 

07372 *30 4 


UK mama 509 542 

UK Grow*! Accun 519 513 
Do Dai 51 9 553 

European Growth 553 580 

Parte Grow* 56 0 518 


519 5*2 ±13 4.47 1 

519 553 *03 243 i 

51 9 953 +03 2*3 1 

553 580 -03 163 I 

560 586 +02 .. 


11 Fenawcn St London EC3 
01-823 8000 


Ewnoaan me 
Do Accun 
Genual hie 
Do Accun 
Gta you me 
Do accun 
Hon You me 


X Yuu me 
Accun 

Jaoan In come 2*92 2621 -27 019 

Do Accun 250 9 2640 -27 0.19 

N Amencan tae *87 31.9 -12 098 

Do Accun 54 8 601 -02 009 

Paeilie mcoma 13*5 1412 -00 02* 

Do Accun 151 4 1598 -17 12* 

Srn* Co'S XC 80 7 859 +02 162 

Du Adam OM 1016 +02 130 

BRITANNIA UNIT TRUST 
74-78 Feisbuv Pavement London EC2A 1JD 
“’«*,77rL Dl « n 7 c, - 6 » 0*«W MonayOuOa 
0601010-333 

CrowdiQat 58 7 COB# . . 0*1 

urn Rocowry 10*4 1114 *08 266 

SmaUuCoa 1415 1509# *06 129 

UK Grown 36 2 418 -03 208 

Ema me 592 599# *11 7.48 


1320 1414 *14 303 

971 1016 -00 100 

1197 1252 -II 130 
101 3 1713 +02 209 

21919 2330 *03 289 

1116 1ISD# *01 938 
1839 1895# *02 939 
893 95.1# *03 539 


G4l 

•nr I Grown 


59 7 608# . . Oil 

104 4 1114 *08 266 

1415 1509# *08 129 
362 418 +03 208 

592 59L9# *11 7+8 


26 * 779 
2025 2160 


EFM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
4. MUvOa Cratcam. Edmlutai 
031-226 3492 

Amancan ta) 738 789 -11 215 

carnal Fun 996 ioss . . 1 61 

Growth s me Fun 1313 1414# *06 427 
*±#i Dal Fun 111 7 1196 *16 50S 

xtem a i mn ai Fund 199121X0 -14 106 

nawueas Fun 230 2* 6 ±11 001 

-Snah Jap Co't FK 356 379 -01 .. 
Tokyo Fun 1779 1902a -18 060 

IE*) Amu |2I 1529 1570 .. 3.47 

(E+1 Japan (31 1140 1186 .. 0.18 

(E>1 Pacific (4) 2993 2987# +07 IS) 

lE*l Smalor Jap (4) 2094 2152 -18 110 

EuntaJ 292 301 -02 332 

EAGLE STAR UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bam Read, OnOannm Oeucaaier GL53 710 
02*2 521311 

UK Ba#ncad me 716 766 +05 2J3 

DO Accun 729 770 *06 293 

UK Grow* ACCU" 896 90* -06 1 65 

UK Man me me 678 723 +15 408 

N Amancan Accun 68* 716a -03 108 
Far Eouaro Accun 1030 1106 *04 000 

Euopaan Accun 85 1 SOW -06 175 

UK 5l 9 H me 5** 500 ±01928 

DO Accun 56.1 598 *01 903 

ENDURANCE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 
Aomm Centre. Hexagon Nous*. 28. Waatatn 
Road Romlonl RM13LB 
070 0 6 8686 

Endurance 1123 120 in ..207 


Euopaan Accun 
UK GX 6 FI me 
Do Accun 


FUNDS M COURT 

Puttc Trustee xmgsway WC2 

01-405 4300 

Capon 3495 3816 ‘ .. 261 

Crass me 1482 1489 .. 7.7* 

fflgn Ydd 215.1 2202a . . 568 

OTUNTT MANAGERS 

801 Floor. 1 Oawnanlra Sq. London EC3M 4YJ 
01-283 2575 Oaatag Oi-CQe 0431 
UK C40 FM me 1018 1070a +06 260 

Do Accum 1443 1549 +13 200 

Income Fun 917 06.4# *03 000 

Pension Exempt 1812 1817a -20 10a 

MamaaanU 172.7 1848 -18 000 

US 6 General 576 615 -11 000 

Tech 6 Growth 620 67 2 -05 120 

Japan 6 Ganaral 2SS.4 2830 -10 0.10 

Far East 8 GUI 125.1 1330 -14 1*0 

Eutipnsn Find 207 6 2013 -12 030 

Germany Fun 741 783 -1.1 090 

QAfmWOHE FUND MANAOBIS 
£ 61 Mary Aaa. London EC3A 8BP 
OJ0Z1 1212 Oaatag 01-633 5798 Dadng 01-823 

Amarcan Trun 873 M3 .. 100 

Auabaun Tran 190 214 *06 035 

•Britan Tat Acorn 819 653a *14 161 

00 Oat S20 517a +03 165 

ComnoAy Snare ran KXi +07 13* 

European Trux 553 593 -04 040 

Extra mcome TruM 499 530 +03 101 

Far Eanam Trow 1566 1606 . . 101 

tad Moan Fran 266 284 ua 

GO Trust 269 290 .. 138 

Qtooal FUM Accun 1814 1930 +12 0.19 

Do CM 1720 1839 *02 H9 

OoU Share Than 136 MI +03 162 

Hadgad Amancan 310 337 +11 1«0 

wen mcoma Dub 1*38 1540# +07 503 

Hun King 7hut 291 312 *13 1.10 

mean* Fund 717 822# *15 3.15 

mxMK* Agancm C4601 5223 +027 299 

Japan Trust 157.1 187.1 +11 o sa 

Managed Exempt 2816 2334 +15 224 

04 4 Energy Trux 349 386 +03 1.75 

Spaed BMa Thai 944 101.1# *00 177 

UKSnarCsRecTst 729 779 +12 14l 

OOVETT (JOHN) UNIT HANAOaUir 
Wncnexur Hxx. 77. London WOL LuxMn EC2N 
IDA 

01-588 5820 

me Growth 828 815 -19 168 

Amancan Graem 8*2 686 -13 191 

Amancan me M5 743# -1.1 *36 

Euopaan Growth 2399 2510 -19 023 

Gon 1 Mmara# 390 423 +13 169 

Jnnn Growth 1589 1017 -48 .. 

ONE UWT MANAGERS 
now Exchuraa. BC3P SDN 
01-688 9910 




1193 1277 

1802 18X8 
1312 ML1 
710 7636 
HU 1W9 
017 87.1 


HUbon Eqrihr 4149 4400 +26 3-12 

taped 10*6 111.1 -00 06 * 

WBcxnCUMM 830 572# +04 06* 

E5n HM mo 673 716e *02 116 

Honan WT W3 107J# -0.1 101 

Jam 1016 mm * 0.7 10 s 

NMU1 75.1 786 -03 105 

HMSOW spec aa 614 70.9 >.'4 200 

Harnom UkGrawOi 839 812# +06 200 

muon ON HUM MM 1972 -16 246 

grand MAHAMWMMYCOMRBHY 

GiHMm St IraMoo ECZV 71M 

01-600 4177 

Quadrant Gunrai *422 4715 .. W 

Ouadrara mcoma 2*16 257.T . . 5.H 

Ouxdam MW -089 «15 ■ 

Ouedram Raccnwy 2626 2/10 .. 249 


St Swteana una. London BC*P 
01-260 5466 

IK America tac 2938 WJ 

Op Accun 3067 m2 

NC Energy Rn 1200 136.1 

NC mcome 91.1 9BJ 

NC Japan 1918 2041 

NC SmMhr COS 1*3.7 151X. 

DC Smb Enron Co x 1920 206.1 

NC Exampr « £1260 1310 


2830 3019# +06 133 
3087 32B3# +17 T .33 
1200 136.1 -22 202 

91.1 919 +07 *.02 

1910 2040 +10 001 

14X7 1510# +>0 2-00 
1920 205.1 ±11 040 

3260 1310 -- 158 


NC m Pro 
NC Preputy 


SI 107 1218 
1563 1612 


ROWAN UWT TRUST 
33 BnpVMa ra SXtl 

01036*5678 


Hgn mnreB 
Far Eas 0 


ROYAL LTE FUNDI 
New HU PMc*. ux 
051-227 4422 
Erany Trust 
Ine Trust 
G* Trust 
us mat 

Psctac 8tsm Tn 


ml Lrancn EC4R SAS 

2210 2320 -105.168 

741.0 7510# .. 238 

1710 1796 .. 635 

4110 4245 .. 1.76 

1710 1720 +1.0 242 

1230 13*0 *151230 

2440 2476 .. 000 


842 812 *05 290 

730 716# -12 133 
207 28.1 .. 018 

320 3)5# -11 191 
436 413 +11 130 


20 CMlrai SL l iatarai EC2 
01-020 0311 

Equey DM 1309 127.7 

Do'Acaaa 1907 1796 

Mgh mcoma Tram 9X4 914 

00 Accun 1096 1179 

US drawn 66 6 905 

Go Aocun 579 117 






1114 1231# +1» 991 







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m 


d.4 100 
+12 060 
-18 ISO 
*17 xm 
+04 010 
-05 290 
-14 120 
*16 1.60 
+15 230 
+01 030 
-11 1.40 


rjt [y -.'l hi ■ 1 1 

■ 1 * Tn 


•1 .4 m- 1 r r w 1 w v r. 'trr 


« leFu Ik... 






Last TTiinday of month. 

Gay of monm. (3Q) IBm of month. (31) 

* onth. (32) 20th of month. 
February, May, August. 






UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1138 
High law 

Company 

Pnw 

Gnat 

0# 

Ch'gr ponce 

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A 9 u Gp 

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220 it- 

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154 




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87 



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195 

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105 

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Cm# TV 

330 




120 6* 

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107 


31 

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Checynwi Gurcce 

130 


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330 






50 


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Craion Lodge 
Crown TV Prod 

85 

60 

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ICO 115 



07 





DIE Tech 

46 


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DJ See Alarms 

105 




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DWTOB 

197 


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150 



355 138 

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FAD GO 

233 

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1533 

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>986 

Hgn Low Cunpany 


HI 81 : 
1 B 0 too 
W M 
51 38 

n» 133 
T55 196 
±« 10 
460 183'.- 
M 793 . 
145 143*. 
415 180 

m w 

91 90 


taperac* 

a w 

Ruchar Oumys 
tatadi 
Ftogas 
FbyO 04 
Ford « Wesun 
France Conn 
Frayieu-* 

Fu»er Snxm A" 
Gactrco 
G“jCecO 
Gwtai 
Cihbon Lyons 
Un *i*w 
houm 
C hco# Gp 
OCOxan vxanen 
dooonuxo Pnm 
Gome (Uuranea) 
Granyta Surtxca 
Grean lEmesti 
GranmwcJi Cap# 
GRxnxx? Sq 
Guaraxey Asxrtc 
nampoan Homacw 

Hartoni 

Hanray 6 Womp 
Hxotxh Europe 
M*«h Can 
Meawtm* 

Do A LV 
Kaneermon Prana 
regn-iMK 
HgnuuiO Fart 
Hot Ergonon 
Motxmn 
Hoogton 


Oxr Yld 

Me* Qi^ge pence % iys 


39 78113 
+'1 1.7 12 23 


36 53 180 
.. -.15 




.. 118 


43 

54 114 


rs 

50 98 


27 

38 172 


U 

13 173 


4L1 


+2 

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38 .. 


24 

10 131 


50 

SB 147 


51 

33 170 



. 910 


32 

17 1T.7 


31 

38 157 


*3 

32 130 






«B 110 

-1 

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38 140 




• . . 

10 



33 

21 SOS 


31 

30 113 


19 

30 154 


616 

31 240 

• .. 

SJ 

24210 


1.1 

30171 


Hughes Food 

Hu"trad EMC 

Hum# Star 

Hurm+qn Teen 


md Sew Energy 


ha a# (Jacx U 3*> 

JS Pamob g y 3U 
Jaouas Vert 170 

JeewK 9 

Jcnraen a jprg 130 
Jamsana Pam 10B 
Just tab# 52 

KLP 305 

Mnt UMM) 93 

"■"von S*ex 275 
*N4 Snxm 74 
Kiam-TaaiMi 65 

lfa He 80 

LMU 58 

uwane Thomsaa iCH 
Leisure imr 45 

Lawrn# 110 

Locga Cara 82 

ton 0 C+enrta 116 
Lrawi EJaa 198 

Lytjnar Pk 22 
M6 Cain 1 C*iy 87 
UMT Cm 251 
McLaugmn 6 hx 128 
Magnate UMana# 45 
Mamma! 86 

Manna Ox 95 

Manx iRcnaU) i» 
Maacxmt 19 

nwt cm 108 
Uiyh*w5 Food* 1SB 
Uneow f#b 30 
Mesa Tech 1*3 
M MuM -e 00 

Uxnery Cora 14 
Mxnscm me mjgs 30 

Uenxur^won 10 
Ma'+y mu n wm JTO 

Moot BuMhi 125 
mxhc 90 

ucnax (jcno 75 
uctmib 8G0 

MtroaaM i» 

(ACrtMec 37 

SAesurmx rn# 380 
M+w mi Bonn ID 
Mn Mtorid 305 

#nw 

MoonaN Co 133 
Mon** 8 Cm 12* 

Mcnraypa 1*0 

Me«#y iRM *3 

tern* (w#ami 20 
Mch Arfueri om g 75 
U|«X«I 183 

NthN Comp 285 
M- Cl UI Re* 15 
Do anm * 

fra* Engtand Prae* 16 
Ce 10*. E8C 


♦■j 07 27 187 

*1 04 42 *0 

*4 ae 23 715 

II 19 283 

as 18 nr 

39 214 18 
(06 


19 

» .. 110 

+1 15 

+7 

*2 13 

1*5 149 

17 
160 


10 21 114 
.. 140 70 74 

-S 40 19 41 
14 10 250 


47 29 220 

k .- O 40 22. 9 
08 06 17.1 

54 10266 

.. 53 17 110 

43 49 211 

.. 232 . 23 

.. 50 250 13 

1 16 25 14 4 

+5 80 23 199 

► 13 50 176 

15 30 112 
1.7 23 193 
+10 29 0* 687 

57 40 U 

I . 1.8 40 162 

38 09 212 
38 21 377 
I . . 75 35 109 

.. . I 

20 1 0 24 8 
35 31 156 

21 43 2«* 

.. . 10 

35 4.7 90 
43 23 150 

96 30 156 
24 110 40 

77 

0 125 .. 


1C . 

Mx-Bta 

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£2 

Vr« 

1C 

*3 

29 193 

ij 

secasi 

* 

• ID 

IT U 

83 

Noracd HrVi 

141 

-13 34 

24 155 

14 

hm Saa a Gan 

30 

.. 58 

33 

CrtKhd nooec 

33 

-a 20 

M *8 


IBS 136 
96 75 
80 60 

112 85 
217 142 
ID B'j 
3*8 307 
120 «S 


Am# TruM 
Aug Am# Sec 


irZura 

Br Emm Sac 


Oaray me 
On Cap 
Drayton Cons 
Drayton Fv East 
Crayon Japan 
Duneee Lon 
E»n Am# Aaa# 
Edinburgh 
EteoncG+n 
Enghao mi 
Eta* Sc# 

fsTaboko 
F iCRaoee 
FM Qwrtona 
FM ScU Am# 
FM Ui Gen 


117 #+1 

820 #*2 
138 #+Z 

380 +2 

«» *2 
UB +1 

IS 

36'j 

4» +2 

102 +1 
790 

234 +2 

130 

«30 

357 *3 

IBS +2 
741 *4 

203 *3 

11 a +! 

SBD -I 

s #+4 . 
1 s 

119 +1 

HO +1 
I'J 


86 31 225 
310 35 3X2 
40 32310 
15 23 810 

09 00 ena 

39b 39 411 
10b 00 .. 
30 50310 

07 19 510 

217 40 2S5 
33 32*70 

310 35 340 
00 12 .. 
126 83 115 

141 41311 

10 09 .. 
1.4a 02 . . 
86b *0 356 

09 09 076 

43 29471 
Ou* 17 0*0 
56 33411 

20 21 SU 
12b 19 8X3 
20 22 020 

21 19 81.1' 

11 12 .. 


193 145 FlxrangC#*# 

3*5 n» R**xnq Enuraroa 
129 84', ru n m u F# East 

77B 480 FUnyng Jqun 
105 123 n aning Mere#! I S* 
161 123 Hanxng Oxaraaas 
>62 140 nammg Tach 
141 107 n mwi y (d u ra# 
H» 60 Fw c3 
in 08 GBCCtal 
22 s. 110 ITT Japan 
’SB 1M Gunrai Fundi 
330 ITS Ganaral Cats 
146 115 CUsgow Such 

1*7 127 Goran A B UUQ 
232 139 damn Oneael 


mssm 


EXCHANGE 

G w Joynaon and Co (apart 
SUGAR (From C. CunOmA 


325 

• .1 

ISO 

40212 

88 


17 

99 7.4 

590 

♦3 

82 

1-5 930 

18* 

• +3 

7A 

*0 354 

306 

• *2 

128 

42 335 

127 

+2 

M 

1.1 

138 

+1 

- 39 

30 SU 

730 

*4 

*7 

08 .. 

189 

• .. 

5 S 

33 438 

100 

■*a 

39 

34 BBS 

103 

•+i 

33 

22 917 

Ml 


38 

21 819 

HU 

9* 


34b 

34 618 

317 

♦a 

30b 

09 ” 

190 

• +2 

38 

15 990 

308 

*1 

17 9b 

58 2B8 

146 

+2 

34 

33 998 

123 

_ _ 

52 

42 312 

144 


40b 

38*42 

219 


33 

15 90.1 


82 

57 

SmsSar Cos 

82 

+1 

20 

34 573 

102 

81 

TR AuxiaEx 

94 

*1 

3J 

35 33.1 

122 

9b 

TR ON Qt un Did 117 

-1 

02b 5*273 

213 

156 

tr md A Gen 

212 


SJ 


119 

MX)' 

TO Wwa-ta Res 

119 

+3 

58 


Wt 

89 

TO Nam America 

97 


20 


187 

118 

TO Parte Bun 

193 

+2 

1A 

08 .. 

10/ 

140 


187 


SJ 


119 

60 1 ; 

TO Tatar. 

108 




ISO 

139 


179 


10 


■m 

135 

TtataBar 

157 

• -1 




Thoranmnon 

301 

+3 



300 

Throo Stand Cap 355 





157*3 Tram Prune 

310 


55 





1*5 




94 

301 

79 

217 

Titauxeet me 
us Daoemae 

90 

30) 


158 

93 

175 11 
XI 603 

51 

3b 

vxma M TX 



82 

31 








70 

±2 





107 




359 


Yeomen • 

350 

• .. 

is.ib 

43 361 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47', 

■ 3±'. Amancan Exo-ess 

C43 3 * 





31 


S3 






fYw iifcj 







Ejisaffiw Arrow 





2* 

13'. 

Daly Ate* 

£23'r 


700 









15b 

131 

Been 

149 


95 




Eng Trux 







&CO 






00 




33 

13 133 




769 


151 


Fran <St 






Good* (DIM) 







Handenon AOrhi 

085 

+ 15 











300 






MAG 







Menaon, Haro. 

362 









05 

04 .. 








Snxm New Caul 

171 

*2 

TOO 

58 14 



COMMODITIES 


40 4J1M 
47 72 117 

19 32265 

29b 26 230 


SOYABEAN 

oa 

— 136.0-355 

Dec 

Feb 

1345-33J 


1355-3*4 


_ 133A-325 


Od.... 

— 1355-32J3 


GASOIL 

Sop 136903575 

OH 141 .75-5090 

NOW 146.004575 


1*45043 

14390-38 

144.00-34 


UBoffleWiNleos 
OncWTumewflgom 
Mao ia C per BMtiletaaM 
SOvor taponoo par Hoy oane# 

R o flotfWog*Gami»port 

COPPER GHADE A 

Cash $n 2100-51 3-00 

Three MorOw , 328-50-929-00 

VW 4500 

Tone Amer 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 885.00-886.00 

Throe Months . 905AM06A0 

vot hi 

Tone Idta 

LEAD 

Cash Z74flO-Z75iM 

TIkbo Months . Z76.QO-Z7fl.50 

Voi 276J0 

Tone BirMyStaoCy 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 54590-55600 

VW - Nil 

Ton# Mto 

ZMCMOHOIADE 

Cash 57150-57850 

Three Months. 5785067960 

Voi 1 — 1250 

Ton — . BonHy Study 
S0.VBI LARGE 

Cush 36050-361 JO 

Throe Months . 36&00-370 lOO 

Voi 20 

Tone — — Qaet 

S0.VB1 SMALL 
Cadi 


Three Months . 
voi 

Tone 

ALUMMUM 

,3610037000 

W 


Cash 

Throe Months . 

Vnl 

81130-81100 

7m00-7B7J» 

•osn 

TOM 

firraar 

MCXEL 


Cash 

ThraeManOa. 

vw 

— ZS3W54S 

— 2576-2580 

372 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 


Awnago tetstock pdest ai 
nBp*#n #H N Bue martnti on 
SoptaotwrS 

G^&ta.SdJSppn-kBhv 
jaaB6pi«ta*pirK(p 
Gft||;S.79,1Hppflf kglw 

• est dead carcase weight 
En g l a n d set WjIu. 

COBIBMI UB7J>%.9WL 

pneo. 54571-050) 

Sheep nosi down 12JI %, m. 
price. 1503SH-31) 
ra not. down 0.1 %.«hl 
pnee. 79.19 (+154) 


LOffflON BEAT RJTUHES 
EXCHANGE 
Pig Contract 
p.pork8o 

Month Open Oose 
Oct Unq. 10430 

Jtav Unq. 10550 

fob Unq. 9850 

Apr Unq. 9950 

Jtn Unq. 99.00 


PfgMoMwfclS 


EXCHANGE 
UwCattta Contract 
p. par Mto 

Month Open Close 
Sop Unq. 96.00 

Oct Unq. 8840 

New Unq. 10090 

Fob Unq. 9900 

Apr Unq. 100.QO 

Am Unq. 9SL30 


VotS 

LONDON (BUIN FUTURES 
Zpa r tonno 




ftrnrisnil 

Canto nos. upd15%. M. 
price. 95.74t-02y 
Sheep nos. up 1 075 %-««. 
price. 141.37 (-#28) 

Pig rtos. eve. 
prase. 



Wheat 

Beitay 

Mourn 

Ctew 

Close 

Sep 

10530 

10430 

Notr 

f 07.45 

10735 

Jen 

11030 

11005 

Mar 

112.75 

11250 

K* 

11530 

11030 

Votxna: 

17630 


Wheat — 


— 42S 

Banoy 


106 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
£ per tonne 

Month Open Close 

W50 10850 
Ffeb 126.00 121.00 

153.00 15250 
May 1E9D0 16850 

Nov 8590 6250 

Vot 737 

BEFFEX 

GJUfrafght Future* Ltd 

report S10 per tades petal 

fzb*qhtlnd«K . 
Hhgh/Low Ockm 
O ct 88 817.0-799.0 800.0 

-tan 87 820.0-803.0 8035 

Apr87 8700-8400 8409 

JJB7 780.0-755.0 7550 

Oct 87 875.0-858.0 8569 

JanSS 6575-8575 M OQ 
Apr 88 930.0-6259 035.0 
|U» 88544659 8825 

V0t6ttl0tS 

Open taurast 2003 

Prices in this section 
are based on Thursday 
TANKER REPORT 
WgtVLaw Ctoaa 


Voi. 7 lota 

Opentatare3t33 

Spot merfeet commentary: 
Tanker Index: 

10855 down 189 on <ja/a8 


7185 up 4 0 on 4/9/88 































THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 198 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Rally fades 




• 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

23 ^ 



ACCOUNT DAYS: .Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end September 1 Z Contango day September 1 5. Settlement day September 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


your card available whra dSSJ. 


-%> 

ld~ 

DAILY 

DIVIDEND 

£4,000 

Claims required 
for 

+42 points 
Claimants shook 

WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

£5,000 

Claims required 
for 

+187 points 
ring 0254-53272 


N*. Comply 


E33E3EBI 



E EJE33EM E3E23KS \ 

kmi 


EB I I I— i i | ii 

IEgggLggai^jj^*||| 

El" 1 ' 1 ' ' Wgmm/mfi7^r7%' 7 ^rmi 




l ' 1 - m > il' V ' -- 



SBV +V U i5 .. 

■«o • .. 17 J an 2tLB 

1M .- 125 87 122 

boo a+2D ma uiu 

is as 2i0 55 7Jt 

3S6 +16 -.. ,. .. 

W -1 


672a.. 3t\ 1 55 212 
iJV "1 ■ ■ . . . . 

ST +3 M M U 
cm -T GOO 54 U 
338 JSL5 4.5112 

S -2 QB UIU 

130 7.1 55 1318 

W .. 14 3 4* lag 

£B> *2* 192 28182 

883 *+S 62* 77 fM 

27*'" *'*.* 7 j 28 124 


8 5% 
894' 419 
818. 612 
77V 43>. 


[IQ HU 130 
OTSCtt 354 
. £B'. 

cum 732 




iSlgffriW9w?¥9TE?tr;rPi^» 



144 JS B cj B I WM '139 

is ggs^r ^ 

237 139 DMntrii (J A) 182 
204 185 OnmAiHw 178 

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310 223 WMtaKt-A' 281 
31 B 228 Do B 295 

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BUS 8 s?r*° s 


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18 1*26.1 
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208b 48 188 
78 48 158 
158 28198 

118 28 172 
37 1228.1 

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108 58 112 
164 42152 

11.1 40 138 

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127 23 202 

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BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



Charter Cons 


Weffromr 


W%tu Collin 


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itnninzsjMi 

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CS3EJI 

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Hi MH ESI BM KB BB lc+i 



BRITISH FUNDS 


Yeats) 


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101 V . . 

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112% -% 

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48 36% 
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158 106 
111 78% 

132 10Z 

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128 Galway 176 

83 Baudot 87' 

875 Btodktoyi 910 

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235 BnwdOQ&CtoWj H» 255 

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12* Crra.cn (DorekJ 180 -6 

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54 Do 'A' 84 

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80 .Grtford 88 ■ 

108 GUn 8 Dandy Ord T21 

254. Qtaaron (UJ) 378 

80 HAT 142 ■ *2 

56 Htfcai Bar . 256 418 

42 HMM4Stuan 68 

144 Haywood tefifflems 216 a 44 

428 Hup 1W 643 45 

126 Smock Johnson 192 ' -2 

265 Jan* (J) 8 Sons 435 

398 Lfflng ft) 420 +2 

286 Ob 'A' 420 *3 

78 Lawrence (Water) 113 

77 LJtoy (FJC) 72' -2 

30 Low* (YJJ .. 413 • .. 

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IS Mmtn 323 45 

101 MriM* 125 a .. 

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96 May&Htt&M* 145 • 


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15 15 875 
109 SI 210 
159 43129 
104 ' 18 155 

14 15 mi 

65 35 134 

15 15 265 
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32 12 213 

54 25 21.1 


152 JG Mama M2 

99 *3 /tonttt Compute* SO 

96 83 AlW) 94 

300 205 AttOBC Comp 255 

M m AKfc WM 9S SO 

220 m AUOSK 183 

3® 240 mac 250 

1» 84. I SR W 

Win DM 133 

180 OB EMM 764 

589 379 BtMttWte 5E0 

280 177 1 ? Br T4»*tnm 198 

112 75 Brown Sown km im 

19 TV, Bum (AFJ 'A- 16'.. 

152 6* CASE 87 

369 ZM Cs&te 4 Wrteas 322 

318 193 emuga Bac SO 

243 178 CAP Gp 200 

57 37 CNome 52 

228 148 Do 7'.r. CPF 215 

352 203 COncap 330 

3(3 250 Cm Baa S3l 

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79 48 Dm* Em 50 

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52 as 1 .- Oewnmn -a' 33 

365 2K Don»o 310 

50 37 Dowdng IW 39 

212 1BZ DuMar Ut 

445 380 EMnconmonama 406 
85 48 BKMak: Mch 63 

82 42 EWaronc Renmla M 

337 237 EmSBUtfang 288 

aaa 255 Ewnhara 307 

253 142 Fame* Baa leo 

1GG 102 ranWA IK 

61 a* ftwaadTach 38 

228 158 SEC 1B2 

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358 225 m Signal 8 ConMZ73 
253 175 Jonas Seoul 253 
290 85 ICON 372 

323 220 Lac RaMgawm 23i 

229 124 LOQCa Z9 

423 270 iKBki 370 

192 126 Macro 4 192 

433 205 Mamac 257 

82 51 *» Micro BS SB 

250 80 MCfO FOCUS 105 

SB 33 Munm Baa «5 
85 «3 Minay 8au 43 
313 241': Newman (Urns; 270 
108'; 81 tra 99 

49 13 Ocaonict 21 

590 363 Qxtom inawmaws 580 

186 ISO Pi Mamalonal 176 
32 18 FMeun 23V 

164 '.114 Phtrn Fn SAK. £121 

17 / 19 Pnaps Lamps mv EiG>« 
260 -180 Prtco 256 

ISO 120 00 Utl VOUig 105 

248 182 Plessay . 18* 

2*h 15'i Do ADR 25 £205 

i&8 116 Ptassac 136 

46 * 22 Quasi Auomaban 34 
23* TOO Racal Bad IB4 

488 1B8 Rodflax 483 

615 445 Senotss KJH) 616 

54 30'.- SUM DHuroi 38*4 I 

168 SB BTC 148 

216 M2 SUM mu 171 I 

134 7a ban DaMgnara 92 
18>. 12 1 ! TDK E15'j 


125 44. Ttfemabtc 
529 374 Than EU 
255 170 Thorpe (FW) 

380 225 Tuandl 

33* 208 UB 

273 178 Onkech 

235 140 Utd Lsesxn 

190 118 Uld ScHnwc 

505 320 VO tatrumaMs 

323 225 VCMs 

108 5* WasMn 5atoebon 

103 75 WHtwulti Etact 

310 230 WtUMSUB Rang 


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105 

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226 

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52 

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OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


Bonhmck 55 

CtWangem 148 

FsUn uanasi 87 

Harrison CfOtSrtJ 373 
tacbcapa 4 26 

Jacks IWmi 33 . 

Lorn no 22* 

Ocmn Wmon 47 

Paterson 20ch 223 

Do 'A 223 

Pear Peek iu 

Sam OarDy 46 

Shu Bras 56a 

Tcvei Ka mjAiy 178 

Yum Cano 218 


0.7 13 153 ■ 

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<3 258 HSU 

16 4B12S 
I *3 171 ?£ 11 0 

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1-2 75 45 2.9.. 

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4-1 575 45 . 

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75 45 90 

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183 

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7.14 15 254 

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203 


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775 


95 

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£2 

£513* 

310 

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180 

39 1*4 


FINANCE AND LAND 


.246 211 
184 126 
17B>i .71 V 
209 IM 
26 II 
283 19* 
43 16 

29'i 17: 
786 132 
IM 1S3 
78 SC 
95 80 

148 IM 
223 203 


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Antoni hum 141 

AototagBsu 147 

BuMwTacb 205 

Caman - - £20 

Cantkww 238 

Cantnmoy 28 

Etwsy A Gan 28V 
hoy A Sow . M 

Mama 198 

HU Horne Loans 67 

Do 81k £80 

M owmn/ka i 133 

TaagMan 223 


15. 05 .. 
3* 25 55 


17.1- 09 805 
87 24 375 

15 45 285 
05 5LD1B5 
85b 4.7 27.1 
15 25 . . 
900 105 .. 


Financial Tftat* appaar an Page 22 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


AKZO H/V Beaiar 
ABoOCcaoMl 
A m a nha m 
Anchor Chemical 
BTP 

Bayar-DMSO 
BbOdan 
Branl Cbm* 

Br Benzol 
Cartng (W) 

Gowk Brea 
Do -A' 

Cory (Horace) 
Croda 
*Do DM 
Efc A EwUMl 
Erode 


ttekson 
Hoactwt DM50 
imp Cham no 

\35F. 

Phnu 

Raabraak Wgs 
namoM 
SNIA BPO 
SudWa Searimu 


YuhahM Orem 


W7'» *b 400 
230 -1 35 

423 - Ittffl 

222 6.1 

139 -1 84 

El 03V +H. 700 
118 a-M 185 
193 *2 89 

89 . -1 

124 5.1 

281 +1 ie.7 

169 ... 65 

152 85 

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ISO -1 100 

122 • .. 

218 • .. 95 

■Ot • .. 47 

255 48 129 

167 42 84 

398 *« 

£92’. 44. 

nova-. «5 

393 .. 115 

10D 84 

189 28 

92 ..-2 3.6 

142 27 

279 -2 

92 .... 

22S . . 11.1 

138 • .. ‘ 45 



313 2*8 EasMfh Pres 
221 158 Eflbro 
277 21* BS 
43’. 29V EMI 
153 102’) Eject 
29’. 17V Becte&H (AB 

uu S2 Ban UB) 

28*. 18V Eotren 


16* 13* EreMna House 
I77V130V European Furies 
142 112 Bo 6% prl 

342 158 Everad 
214 121 Bwamat 
433 312 End 
55 22 FOtmn 
42 26 Fujdoa Anne M 

M3 108 Fennar yft) 

75 58 F.W Indmar 

650 408 Raoas 
67 35 fimwUon 

124 8* FMMBO C8W 

69 31V FoM 

123 94 Fogarty 
41V 27V FoShs Group NJV 


67 46 Fiwndi (Ihomasl 48 

131 64 GB Bit 97 

3(5 256 GKN 2S0 

310 260 GR 395 

118 BS anon Eng 112 

is? TOO Qaswner 111 

ISO 111 Gtows 124 

11V7S9V Oaxo EWi 

344 194 Glymma 320 

505 2M Goring Ken 200 

192 107 Grampian HMga 198 
312 206 Granuda 296 

lOV S’. GrprrBbafl 2005 

93 59V HbMI Pradstm 80 

232 134 Hall Eno 198 

162 128 Had |M) 136 

285 180 Kaffita 193 

290 USB' Hakna aa 

41 3S>> Kampson M *0 ’j 

49 20 Hanknttx 28 

201 141 hanson 201 

TM 145 DoBvCnv £194 

119 » Do SVi Pf 117 

12SV115V DO 10% £126 

280 133 Haigraaraa 283 

275 175 Hams (FTtkp) 2S5 
823 431 Hzwkar S*kMay 931 
150 00 Hawley 113 

205 61 Hay INwmn) 200 

221 140 Hapweith Cararmc 219 
■201 98 Uma r 173 

98 99 HmU) (J) 98, 

1*2 122 Eflgngatu I Job im 
90 02 HUB Bros so 

106 68 Ek>3 LkMd 55 

285 148 Hopkmtons 250 

120 91 HowdM 101 

310 234 tklMuAWOC 310 
115 88 IbtMng Group 108 
303 zu7v iWcMn Whampoa sets. 
isi 119 aa . ire 

315 210 ■ taotron 2«0 

285 245 Jadmoni Boone 2*6 
148V 96V JMna Mam 144 

615 473 Johnson Oeeners 560 
223 133 JomonMaimay 220 
44V 22V Johnson 8 FS 37 

345 235 Joansren 315 

140 99 Jonas A Sngnui 122 

132 67 Jowdan (Thomas) 123 

29 21 Katamazoo 29 

38 25 Katan 31V 

325 188 Kafeey M srn 

130 106 KamadySawa 128 

296 230 Karahtw (A) 270 

216 123 KkMto-E-Ze - 280 


303 

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47 79 



107 

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7.9 

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1.0 

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92 


66 

81 a* 

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125 

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290 

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229 177 
26 22 
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917 802 
336 236 
301 £28 
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954 701 
054 720 
708 46* 
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22* 173 
438 2S7 
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285 220 
348 223 
157. 12 
942 711 
453 391 
887 769 
415 32* 
474 346 
445 390 
772 520 
927 772 
550 12D 
474 39* 


Coni llmon 
BJUVALM. 

Gan Acedent 
Gflc 

Haim C E 
Hogg Rotwrum 
Lagu A Ban 
London A Man 

Lon UU tar 

Marm A Mctoar 


5S3* 

Gaogaatt Gp 
smarm Wrson 
Sanaa Hoga 
Son Atone* 
Sun Lie 
Trade brdommty 


-I 99 
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a-io 0£ 
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-1 204 

. 385 

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1-7 1D5n 
-5 275 

-2 338 

-5 *5 

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tnvmtmnrTrmta i 


ran Page 22 


IOD 34 01 
9* 45 94 
2.1 19 109 

4.7 39 14.1 
167 15 28* 
129 4* 160 

155 5* 11.1 
67 3918* 
109 67 134 
05 .. .. 


144 86 

220 IS 
183 9S 
58 34 

225 158 
410 325 
62V 49 
81 6® 
128 93 

131 94 

103 32 

180 137 
189 130 
391 270 
393 329 
64 43 
228 13* 
360 155 
73 51 
(05 126'-- 


LEISURE 


Mrr A WA -A' 135 

Boosay A Haarkat 155 
Brant MMMr 182 

Campari 46 

Omreate 179 

firea Lusura 368 

GRA 95 

Hanbuoar Brooks 70 
HMBMTIMi 12? • 

M Larm 117 

JUuna'B HHg» 51 

Las kW 173 

Uadmnatar wo 

Pansuama 333 •- 

RaaSy LHaful 368 

nay Unsure 47 

Saga Holden 139 • 

Sumatran Gp 190 •• 

Tanurham Hotspur 73 
zoom 185 a 


MINING 


7* 45 MJ 
19 08445 

89 35199 

S04 5415* 
OS 18 149 
.. .. 105 

10.7 34 123 
65 45 8.1 
55 45 164 
25*100 9J 

1.7 54 21* 
114 39149 
29 29 12.7 

214 78 229 

88 45 17 J 


CINEMAS AND TV 


271 

178 

AngtaTV -A' 

u 

240 

383 

27 

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283 

arp 

lwt met 

350 

1*9 

Sett IV a- 

273 

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TVS N/V 

48 

31 

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3x3 

223 

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+11 

13* 

’ 81 142 


2 * 

87 0* 


Tt.4 

62100 

+3 

£12 

5916,4 


169 

47105 

+3 

14 JO 

00 11* 


£8 

8* 12.4 


433 

336 

Grand Mat 

391 

•■A 

13* 

39 

133 

286 

208 

Kanoady Brookes 

226 


£* 

1.1 

117 

301 

312 

Lsdbroke 

385 

-a 

181 

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174 

305 

447 

Lon Park Hototo 

560 

-5 

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£8 

17.0 

180 

78V 

Moron Chadooe 

92 

a .. 

2.1 

22 

162 . 

105 

67 

Prince « W HoWl 

83 

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£1 

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79 

sav 

Oueans Moat 

78 

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£7 

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167 

■405 

388 

Savoy HoMiS A' 

368 


5* 

19 

14* 

81 

56 

sum 

65 

, ^ 

1* 

2* 

180 

209 

141 

TtuariHUM Funa 

163 

• +T 

7* 

52 

152 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


9* 


9.7 


10.7 


IOI 


®z 


6* 



UNDATED 

46.. 39V Consuls, 4** 
42 34'. Wu Ln 3 '■ 

58 •• 44'.. COM 3'. • 
34 • 29'. TrcOS 3*a 
29'. 24'. Genoa 2'.% 
29 ■ M'- TfSSS S'A 


INDEX- 

123 114V 

1W 98'. 

122 106V 
10T. 33'- 
107'. 93'. 
110' B6V 
106 V- 
HI'. B7 
« . 79V 
HO - 97'. 
99 ■ 97'- 
100- 96’. 


LINKED 
Trees L IV 1988 
Trees U. WO 
Tra* I!-- 1MB 
Tran a* .*- aw 

Trao* O 2* » ao* 
Treas 02':*» 5TO 
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Treas K*';V> M]3 
Trees *2'. *• 3*8 


i3S-a-' 

107'. 

. llSu#-' 
iM'-a-‘ 
i03v 
109 V 
102V 
107V 

w. 

96 V. -• 



1 

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125 

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525 

.150 

236 

174 

84 

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710 

99 

63 


2is 

543 

346 

100 

T3 

715 

230 

134 

274 

194 

IM 

105 

133 

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183 

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87 

84 

153 

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54 

89 

172 

16 

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307 

830 

721 

1*0 

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fc 

44 

28 


na 


78 

3b 

24 

132 

110' 


Tree* OT6 a m. 
Trots IL2 % 2030 97 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


251 

186 

J£ 


298 

185 

12. 

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173 

11 

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26D 

£30 

489 

384 

5« 

439 

4b 

32 

740 

410 

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286 

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36 

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■ 24" ■ 

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280 

Jib'. 

212 

148 

378 

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102 

B8 

251 

118 

430 

333 



4* 

2* 12.1 


39 

4*25* 



4.1 180 


3* 

£4 285 

-1 

80 


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05687 

+2 

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1.1 479 





88 

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82 

2*332 


81 

7.6 7* 


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£3147 

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17.1 

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99 

40 21* 


87 

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13 

1* T79 


4* 

1.1 274 

+3 

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1* 183 

-1 

£5 

4910*. 


139 

£3 282 

-2 

84 

£7 107 


81 

2*19.4 



£2 93 

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239 160 AGB Ra 
130 95 AM 

871 553 APV 
110 60 Aaransa 
258 172 AOMSt 


239 a*i 
192 a*G 
128 a .. 

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403 155 AcpWdOl* IK 

47 32 Amnion 39 

32 23 Armour 26 

440 359 asa A Lacey *15 

91 39 Ashley 47 

510 212 AM fr Eng 9H. 220 

83 37*.- Aurora STi 

373 283 A*n HuHv 363 

89 43 Avrshba Moral 49 

283 135 BBA 217 

4» M3 BET P* 3 4ZD 

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M6 ^VBOC 

332 237 BTR 320 

3W 148 Baoeock 190 

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210 138 Bam tod isi 

174 112 Bunun 163 

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241 139 Bonn dartre 188 

89 *7 Baautoiri 65 

BSD 151 Bearer (CH» 234 

443 319 BHicnam 419 


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132* 4.0 202 


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05 14 247 

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15 1.Y 190 
07 24 307 
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150 

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308 

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130 

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13V 3V Arrg Amer Coal 
TO >630 Ang Am 
57V 31 Are Gold 
SB 33 AAff 

40 22 Angbsaal 

41 22 Do A' 

19B 120 Avar Hare • 
425 238 Bfetoan 
*160 88 Sradran 
21V 9>. Buthto 
356 226 CRA 

S3 a Car Boyd 
SS2 409 Cons Gofertttfc 
531 314 Da Bum 
288 105 Usitanm 
9V 4V Doomtonaan 
iy. 7 DnataMn ' 

T V 2'a EXioan 
255 150 £ Daggas 
594 258 Bancfirmd 
205 129 B Ora 
195 86 Brians 
390 200 E Rand Gou 
4V 2v E Rand Prop 

9 4J, EE Cons 
213 83 FS Daa 

75 17 Gauvor Tto 

8V 4V Gmbat 

10 8 Gem Mkrag 

10V 5'a GFSA 

525 313 BU KaigDork 
S3 35 Qooong 
118 85 Grenmweft Ras 
375 105 aoowtol . 

158 91 Hampton Auras 
9V 4V Hanaorqi 
350 175 Haroaa 
Si *7 t jonmnaa 
12V 5V Ktorras 
6V V. Moot 
160 65 Luka. 

13V 6v uanon 
410 17D Lorarw 
157 04 HIM 
2B 15 Urisyw unng 
123 60 Markwak* 

47 14V MBBdk Cap 

20 5V Mhangure 
9 5'* UMto Was 

055 450 toua 
SV *v New Whs 

142 73 Mh Broken Hi 

58 V 25V HOI Klui 
Z? i TOV Oranga Fraa 
128 83 Putring Tta 

280 204 PMoVMsand 
25 6V Rand Hnaa Ud 
445 170 Fund Sanaa Prop 
69 16 Randtontokr 

32* 226 Ramon 
791 Sll R12 
B 4'. Rarianbun) 

I0V 5V Si Helena 
IK 68 SA Land 
31 14'. SouBmaal 

556 273 SWtarmrai 
138 BO Smgai Beal 
135 a Tronori 
568 300 Unoul 
MV 3iv vaai Raeb 
544 233 Vsnarapon 
105 50 Wtotoormn 

90 25 vogeis 
17 - 10V WaMae CoOeiy 
548 an wa amai 
310 128 Wretam Anas 
29V 15 Mtarern Deep 
in 114 VMtam Miung 
285 IDS ms Rano Com 
141 80 WMm Croat 

17V TV VMtcris 

56 20 WKMgai 

IS'.. IOV Zriubta Copper . 
58 3 Zan«an 


109 7.4 106 
.. .. 23 2 

7* 4* 14.1 

1A 60 123 
00 4* II* 
9* 2* I&8 
.. 402 

.. . 7* 

6* 92 69 
7.1 61 109 

4* 04 159 

79n 65 94 
11.T 3* 13.7 
161 44 161 
269 

69 4.9 11.7 
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67a 7.9 132 
7.1 35105 


.. .. B0.1 

549 62 .. 
446 64 .. 
271 62 .. 

142 44 .. 

T42 44 .. 
47* 31.7 .. 
799 204 .. 
289 185 .. 
262 166 


359 63 135 
159 37 . . 
49 29 .. 
529 124 .. 
138 11* .. 


12.0 2 * .. 
68 3*135 

MO 07 .. 
2B9 A5 .. 


.. .. 1.1 

609 67 .. 

879 8.7 .. 
460 68 .. 


549 21* .. 
64 37 325 

62B 02 .. 

17 0 60 . . 

345 47 .. 
809 9* .. 
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299 242 .. 
115 105 .. 


+15 179 16* .. 

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+V 239 64 .. 

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+10 . . . a . . 

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120 44 74 
+SV 551 9* . 

+8 .... 
+13 314 45 84 
+'* 269 3* BO* 

+ . 125 14.1 .. 

+5 169 150 . 

+2'n 110 4.7 .. 

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+85 *80 94 . 

+4 558 109 .. 

+55 549 121 .. 
+10 159 150 .. 

I .. 4* 08 69 

•IS 679 128 ;; 
+13 239 10* .. 
+7 171 74 .. 

+B 30 19 .. 

+30 120 5* .. 

+5 

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+3 1.1 20 - 

+*. 37 84 - - 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERT G 


40 

1*232- 

IG 

J.l 17 7. 

83 

36 147 


GBV 46V 
380 270 
1» 155 
320 273 
348 276 
685 358 
266 1*7 
288 218 
177 ISI 
353 288 
380 275 
126 80 
11B 105 
58 44 

215 IS 
98 60 
536 167 
10,510 
780 36* 
IK 82 
20 18V 
130 73 
91 *3 

282 255 
260 72V 

234 178 
155 107 
135 106 
13'. 8'. 
330 ISO 
645 313 
297 235 
103 78 
195 145 
18S 142 
445 260 
ire i*4 
94 68 

58 *5 

260 IS8 

148 95 

B'- 525 
885 875 
670 «75 
29 17V 
175 1*2 


PROPERTY 


: Abaco 81 

Abed Lon 81! 

Apm 85 

AXngam Secs 171 

Batfave 1S4 

BRui (P| 300 

BredtonJ a?9 

Br Lend 171 

Brumal 1G2 

Card Ml 4 Sous 41 

Cap 6 CdiriMS 233 

CanUI Prop 278 

Crt n t nm to ti m 180 

ChastarfeeU 475 

CALA 910 

darka Mdrads 155 

Conn 265 

Caraai Sacs <s 

Country A New 115 

County -ff IBS' 

Cussars 260 

4>Mpn 670 

Danes 16 

Esiares A Agency 136 

Egenon Tiusj 82 

Cmm bs OBn Itfi 

Estates Prop 184 

Evans O I Loads 107 
Ft»* cum 63 

Frorrmore 19B 

Or Purtand 182 

Greycoat 248 

fi rewood Gp C13V 

Hanaro Counaywlda325 
H a unreacn aao 

Do A 1 415 

Hanover Druse 2*0 

Hsnhngar 285 

Hong Kong Land 57V 


81 


030 04 • 

80 


30 

2 * 190 

85 


29 

34 17 9 

171 




124 


84 

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300 

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171 

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182 


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41 



233 

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278 

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17.1 

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267b 2* 13 b 

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285 


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115 

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33 580. 

260 


66 

670 

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200 

30 129 • 


4* 32 48*: 
0.7 05 
39 21 245- 

12.1 66 16 . 1 . 
67 5* 113 
.. .. 88 . 

10.1 61 124 
94 62 22.6. 

3.1 13 469 


iSSSZt 


Land Securibas 330 

Lon A Edai TO 660 

Do GV*» 2*0 

Lon A Prov Shop 2S5 
Lon 9>op Rap 173 

Lynion 333 

WEPC 338 

Mttramoy 122 

Malay Sacs i« 

MaddWMI J6 

Manvato Moore 210 

Mamorougn 96 

«»W ESI 493 

MMaree^i sso 

MOrmtvww 780 

MWMow (AAJ) 103 

Muvcpri C1B'. 

N«w CawvktA 121 

PanoJaie 88 

ftacnoy 271 

Pnasi Marians 250 

Prop A Ra* 234 

Prop Mgs 129 

Prop Secure* is* 

Raglan 11 

napun aso 


Stock Ik 
T own Cattra 
Traltord Park 
UK Land 
Uu Real 
Warner 
Wantons 
waw i Jos) 

Wes A Country 


V 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


38 17 Si 
27« ZU Sara Taney 
99 55 Samlara 

. 90 *9 Savrie Goden W 
491 1B6V SC»P*_ 

141 103 Soon Greemui 
135 12C SQOSHreitBW 
170 94 Scud A Rober so n 
164 122 Sacuncre 
154 UK Do 'A' 

164 99 Security Sara 
SC 29 6*Wor Eng 
138 75 9i*0h 
153 HQ SMaw 
990 703 Siebe 
53V 32 Sayvwm 
303 180 Sanon Eng 
M9 83V- S« Hundred 
500 368 aWBOday 
3P. 26V SKF -ff 
133 94 SMhAMHtow 
41 30 Bm*h Wnmorth 
328 22B SmOBtad 

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118 86 SOW Furmra 
108 43 Srar cam p 
Si® 3*3 SDvetoy 
SM » SwriMy 
120 98 sww« ma 
253 170 StoddAc 
98 BS Oorttm ^ ■ 
?io 1*3 aanon A Pm 
224 183 SritogntSarv 
2*8 tsa • sure _ 

28* SO Sam Pacrkc 'A' 

*3 12 Sjcanm 
221 190 Syirere 
S87 348 TT 

195 115 1HT . 

250 95 TSLTherare 
S3* 300 Tan 
98 ' 33 Tatosda Cham 
8‘- * ■ Tana* 

95 64 Tata 

ire tia Tax wm 

11* 91 TT»d M « 


a -v 

230 

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73 -I 
268 

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158 • ., 

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118 
123 

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233 

111 

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520 +15 

110 

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240 

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190 a .. 
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307 

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2*0 73 8.1 
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1.9 2* 61* 
37 £1 11* 
06 £2127 
17 34137 
4* 2.7 13* 

a* 2*168 
14 II 317 
14 1.1 32.1 
28 24 23* 
£4 4*162 
3* -03 0.1 
129 10* 7 j6 
19* 2.1 182 
14 £8 89* 
121 62 00 
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260 64 ISO 

S* 27 225 
04 1*277 

8* 2422* 
£6 4*144 
7* 46 12* 
U U 97 
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26b 47 12.1 

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19 3*28.0 
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A* 11* 8.0 
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126 68 13* 
89 24 267 


M* 7* 174 
209 4*169 

43 4* 62 
106 , 25 169 

!! I! 74 

44 4* 113 

84 4.1 1£6 
31 28 12.4 


251 138 AE 
1(8 re Apptayaid 

141 TOV Arm st rong 
53V 24V BSG 

nil anal to™ 

314 IK Bnmaa (CO) 
an 421 Br Aaraapaca 
isi 90 Br Car Aucbom 
279 169 CaXync 
2 is re courem 

133 106 Daria (Cktofray) 

2*1 172 Dowry 
115 38 ERF 

357 2S3 FRGrenp 
213 125 Ford Motor 
90 86 Caros (Fret* G) 

296 228 Genni Moor 
W 5i Gmm Laaaenca 
114 M HanwMs 
543 373 Hanoi Motor 
583 335 Jaguar 

142 72 Jbssibs 

125 55 Kwto-P# 

402 269 Ln 
20i 90 Letters 

853 470 Lucas 
141 116 Feiiy gp 

SI SB Ptaxtons (08) 

100 51 OUMAIFU} 

71 29 ROW 

77 *3 8w 

72 32 wooonead (Joibu 


107b 4* 129 
7* A3 7.0 
22 17 107 

19 53 160 
. . 1 .. . . 
W.l 4* 164 
226 4.8 104 

59 39 IS* 
79 39 .. 
57 29 03 
04 89 99 

79 33 167 

.. .. *7 

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70 37 .. 

4* 65 97 

259 10* .. 

39 4.'l 1*14 
39 07 .. 
127 24 11.1 

8.1 61 99 

3.® £4 174 
161 4* 19.1 

7.6 £8 129 
167 2* 11* 
64 64 109 
84 9.1 ft* 

•3 4*14.1 

£4 4* 14* 
14 29 119 


312'. 187 
396 238 
306 213 
94 58 

603 400 
76 54*. 
12V 5 
41 28 

2« IK 
576 428 
1G6 96 

34* 132 
380 360 


SHIPPING 


Assoc Br Ports 288 

Br Co m rao n w a a m i 273 

CalMtone 236 +1 

Ftonar (Jamas) 7i 

Grom SCO • . 

J«3« LTD 70 

Lyle a.- 

Mersey Ducks 3? 

□coan Transport 240 +1 

P A O DU 5*8 *2 

Rtmcmrai (Walter) 1*0 +2 

Ttonott 2H a .. 

T 141*14 Scot! 385 


71 £5 109 
7.1 29103 

7.1 £D 414 
49 68 125- 

31.4 4* 419 
61b 73 534 
H7 
. 34 

9B 41 11.0* 
250 46 167 
7.1 4.7 2X9 

61 21 17.7 

12* 34 S&fl- 


SHOE5 AND LEATHER 


360 290 FS 310 

a® 1*5 Omar Booat ire 
45 32 Hsatflam Bans 39 
218 im Lsatoen H ow rero 195 
82 K rnwauid £ Burton 64 
lie 62 Pared 106 

157 118 Strong A Faner 144 
273 158 Stylo 223 


... 9.8b 31 lSi 

+12 14* 66 10* 

0.7 18 r 

8* 4 8 1Q4 

6.9 IB* 
.. 63 59 7* 

114 7.9 SB 

64 £9 279 


TEXTILES 


NEWSPAPERS AND 

PUBLISHERS 


168 

164 

Accord 

168 


4* 

2*20* 

280 

1SS 

AMO 0ott 

213 


8* 

£0 13* 

358 

220 

Assoc NMSniper 

335 . 

-V 

6* 

1* 183 

315 

200 

Stack (AAG) 

310 


Id* 

48 17.1 

730 

515 

Bristol 

885 

+S 

306 

60 107 

SB 

450 

CoHns OMn) - - 

4*5 

ii* 

25 21* 

383 

286 

DO ’A' 

320 

+17 

IM 

£8 144 ' 

145 

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BUAP A' 

136 

-4 

£1 

2324* 

378 

xn 

Haynai Premng 

365 


200 

5* 106 

340 

05 

Homo Cuuntas 

230 

+10 

100 

4*14* 

44 .. 


310 

103 

kdapandM 

270 

120 


589 

404 

toJ-Thamviii 

537 

-2 

14* 

2* 143 

14% 820 

Ntt4 WinMlaMMi 

C13'r 

+5 

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1* .. 

890 

445 

Oaopw 

510 

1* iai 

138 

112 

Ptnsnouai Sand 

125 

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57 

4 *224 

455 

220 

Tftty m 

4H 


214 

5*11* 

403 

2S> 


308 

-S 

22* 

69 165 


573 206V 
300 135 

189 .07 
IM 88 
i44 m 
1ST BO 
76V 53V 

315 ISO 
182 74 
276 196 
57 42 
GO 35 
110 68 
113 88 

67 33 

210 90 
BB 47 

190 132 

191 138 

121 fit 
S3 72 
115 71 
2 ID 
158 34 
<7 30 
155 ire 
VB 133 

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140 67 
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Abed Tan 300 

Aftka am 250 

Bua (Jorm) 156 

Beckman (A) IK 

Br ktonar 135 

BUtour A Lum 91 

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Ccytnukta 282 

Crewnar (J) iai 

Daatson 248 

Dubron 51 

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Knar (John) 76 

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HBtong Pamacoat 37 
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/ntematibnof /nwesfmenf Consultants Ud 


38 Finsbury Square, Laodoo EC2A IPX 
Telephone: 01-438 2540 or 01*588 3172 

Members of the financial I nt ermed ia ries'. Managers’ and Staters’ Regulatory Association 


A SAFETY-FIRST INVESTMENT IN 

SWISS FRANCS 


■ Which currency has risen 36% against the £ and 48% against the US$ since 
July ’85? (Do you remember when you paid EBJor SFrl 00? It would now cost 
you £40). 

■ Which country's bonds (equivalent to UK Gifts) have consistently given high 
real returns because of the currency gain? 

■ Where do forward thinking people throughout the World put they money in 
times of pre-election uncertainty, fears of a slump in equity markets and the 
threat of exchange controls? 

If your answer to these questions is Switzeriand/Swiss Francs, the next question 
is, "How can I invest in this unfamiliar market where minimum investment levels 
are usually extremely high?" 


B.I.A. Bond Investments AG 

10 Baarerstrasse, 6301 Zug, Switzerland. Telex 868960 ADVOCH 


• B1A provides a good unitssed spread of first-class Swiss Franc bonds and deposits, 
and rolls up interest 

• BtA issues anonymous redeemable bearer Partidpa&on Certificates (units). The 
Bid and Offer prices are quoted daRy in the Financial Times: - 

• BIA units are large by UK standards, having increased from £2,1 00 to over £4,600 
since 1981. 

• BIA has issued an English language Prospectus which is available to investors and 
their advisers from International Investment Consultants or cfoect from BIA. 


To: David Burren, Marketing Director, int e rn a tional Investment Consuftants Ltd. 
38 Fnsbuty Square, London EC2A IPX. Tel: 01 <-638 2540, or 01 -58831 72. 
Telex 885301 EBSLDN G 


THE TIMES SA TURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


Edited by Martin Baker 


TSB fever: 
Is it all on 


the surface? 





Telephone. 

ms wtotlm^donnatainalMminHMAmto 


( SHARES ) 

How dose are we to a share- 
owning democracy? What dif- 
ference will the sales of the 
TSB and British Gas make? 
And will it all be changed after 
the Big Bang? These are the 
questions that are being asked, 
particularly this week. 

We are in clanger of being 
swamped by “people’s 
shares . The TSB issue, for 
which lucky account holders 
had to register priority by Ust 
night, chums that title, as did 
British Telecom, people's 
share of 1984. 

The TSB certainly has a 
substantial following. More 
than 2.89 million inq uirers 
have been logged by the TSB 
information office. This Is a 
huge figure when one consid- 
ers that the full prospectus and 
application form have not 
even been published 

But are we really nearer a 
wider public interest in shares, 
or is everyone simply at- 
tracted to the razzmatazz of 
bowler hats and cartoon birds? 

The publicity campaigns for 
the big issues have been 
admirable in their way. The 
TSB claims that more than 
two-thirds of the population 
knows about the safe, while 
the professionals behind Brit- 
ish Gas say they win make 98 
per cent of the population 
aware of their November 
flotation. That would prob- 
ably make British Gas the 
most popular people's share of 
alL 

We air certainly going to be 
informed about these issues, 
but shall we teaOy be informed 


about shares in general, and 
do we want to know anyway? 

Although the TSB is not 
technically a government sefl- 
offi it has the same objective 
as BT and British Gas in that 
it is supposed to promote 
wider share ownership. 

The millions who subscribe 
to the issues will undoubtedly 
be share owners, unless they 
sell immediately, a nd by the 
end of the year the TSB and 
British Gas wffl certainly have 
increased the number of share 
owners from the 23 million 
who bought BT. Whether we 
shall be a share-owning 
democracy or a nation of 
subscribers to glamorous asset 
sales is another matter. 

Some stockbrokers, banks 
and building soc ie ties have 
made brave efforts to simplify 
the business of buying and 
selling ordinary shares 
through telephon e hotlines 
and home banking. They have 
met with ameasore of success, 
but primarily thr o ugh their 
own efforts rather than as a 
result of increased public in- 
terest in shares because of lhe 
privatizations and sales. 

There has beefl no 
knock-on effect yet 9 

“There has been no knock- 
on effect from the TSB as ye£" 
said Peter Saunders, . of 
Kleinwort Grieveson, whose 
Sharecall service effects share 
deals for efients over the 
tetephone.“We’ve. seen no -se- 
cern increase in ibe number of 
clients or transactions, though 
we ran an advertising cam- 
paign in June and July which 



s to simplify 

eSk ^SSStStSSSS^S- KSWi 2 K 25 S;' , ■’ s, 




CONSISTENT INVESTMENT 

PERFORMANCE 


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Our unit trusts, pension funds and investment trusts feature 
regularly in die top quarttie of their various sectors. ‘What Investment* 
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Pension Funds need dedicated 
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Our managers always seek the best 
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It has attracted investors from more than 50 countries and its performance 
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Consistent investment performance For all investors, the only real 
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Gartmore 

GARTMORE INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT LIMITED 


yielded a' very satisfactory 
number of new diems.” 

Nicholas Hunloke, of stock- 
brokers Boare Govett, would 
agree; “There -has been no 
rtppte . effect from TSB at all, 
though I do think more people 
are becoming interested is 
dives.” 

■ Hoare Govetfs DeatercaD is 
broadly to ’Kleinwort 

Grieveson's service. But the 
efients are hardly ordinary 
folk. Moire titan half work in 
the City, according to Mr 
Hunloke. 

To /take a broader cross- 
section of the public, Barclays 
Bank has 7.8. million cus- 
tomers and offers a share-. 
Aaiing service through its 
branches. The 7.8 million 
generate between 1,000 and 
1,260 'transactions per day. 
The tSB and British Gas 
baodwmphs do not -appear to 
have > increased . demand 
significantly at Barclays, at 
tbougt interest “comes in fits 
and starts” a ccor d ing to a 
Barclays-spoke sman . 

'! “Tbere has undoubtedly 
been a Vise in the level of 
awareness^ said Gavin Old- 
ham, ;bf Bardayshare, the 
Barclays offshoot aimed at 
promoting next year's , per- 


sonal equity plans and ul- 
timately “a comprehensive 
store investment and dealing 
service”. 

Mr Oldham sees the ob- 
stacle to achieving a share- 

‘Technolqgy Is the 

real breakthrough’ 

owning democracy as “an 
altitudinal thing”. He says: 
“At the moment people see 
store investment as nothing 
else than another place where 
money goes. When they can 
identify with their investment, 
go out and shop and realize 
they actually own part of the 
shop through a shareholding, 
that will be more like a share- 
owning democracy.” 

Some see the answer in 
more practical terms — ex- 
pense. Store dealing un- 
doubtedly costs a lot and is a 
cumbersome business, involv- 
ing jobbers and brokers. When 
the Big Bang finally arrives 
this autumn fixed commis- 
sions on shares will be abol- 
ished and buying a share will 
obi automatically require the 
services of at least two 
intermediaries. 

Mr Saunders is sure that a 
reduction in costs must help 


promote the popularity ot 
shares. He looks forward 
“with refish to the automated 
settlements system which 
should offer a transaction of 
less than 1,000 shares at 
around £5. At present it costs a 
firm of brokers at least £25 to 
£30 to do any sort of 
transaction.” 

According to another bro- 
ker, the real breakthrough for 
shares will definitely come 
with a reduction m cost 
brought about by technology: 
“Big Bang isn’t the most 
important development at alL 
It is the technology to auto- 
mate dealing and settlement 
which offers the real possibil- 
ity of expanding share 
ownership.” 

But why then do we have all 
the fuss about the TSB and 
British Gas? The short answer 
might be because it is being 
made by the marketing men. 
The publicity campaigns are 
promoting the rather special 
“people’s shares”, yet a small 
holding in BT, British Gas and 
the TSB, plus possibly a few 
Jaguar share s, is hardly proof 
that we are entering an age of 
the share-owning democrat. 

Martin Baker 

• Children 's shore, page 25 



In EUROPE, 

IT TAKES EXPERIENCE 
TO PUT THINGS 
ESI PROPORTION. 


Europe Ibs got a lot going for ic. In recent 
years, European governments have became more 
concerned with boasting industry and encouraging 
die d mcl opro e m of newer; more e ffic i ent plants. 
And as-a result, European company profits have 
begun, to rise substantially. - 

Bur it stands tnceasoo that, from now on, the 
ptaSp^forsubsaimalcaph^growrh -from what- 
ever sac of company - are mote Kkefy to lie whh 
those European stares which have not yet been 

' and traded up by the average insrramooal 


In our opinion, there is substantial further 
growth srifl in the pipeline, which is why we recom- 
mend this trust as the one to invest in today. 

HOWTO INVEST 

■fou can take advantage of Henderson's 
extensive European expertise either through direct 
inve stm e n t in the Henderson European Smaller 
Companies Trust; or alternatively; in die Henderson 


Those are exactly the kind of shares which 
you wffl fcndin tbe Henderson European Smaller 
Companies Trusts portfolio. 

LONG EXPERIENCE 
IN EUROPE 

H e n d erson has been managing invest me nts 
imemad o raB y for ovq~ 50 years, wfc- have over £5.0 
faffimindcr man age men t, wfe have been nwcamgm 

Europe for over 15 yearsand now manage weD over 

gSOOrmSonaq-ossaSdre European s toc kmar kets. 

Tlwc nrm qiaHy LTii g i»» p enenty I n In ge rhp h>»n^ - 

fit of an unusmBy wtie spread. Henderson European 
Smaller Companies Trust’s portfolio is currently 
spread between 1! European countries - a wider 


ALREADY UP 102% 
SINCELAUNCH 

- Since its bondt on 23 th January 1985, die 

shown an uxreaseof 1Q2R> oo an fjSerrobid baas 
including net ro - i n vest ed iuoo Die . 


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 


•Suwld dw unk oter price mosr by mure dun 2 '^r 
(fcvio&ifae feed poet period die ofifer will be dosed and unit-. riD 
be aOoased at die prior rafing on receipt of application. 

An inhiil charge o» SVro of the assets (cqun. alan a! 5 : : 
d tbe ran pin) is nut by dttnaiugErt rim units jre hsued- 
Out of tbc initial charge, managers pav remuneration to ipuhhcJ 
hgrrmrifa riet; rags readable on requeg. 

An annul charge of IVlfc (plus VXD on the 'due ofdbe 
Trust will be deducted bom the prea i n come to cuser jAramstn- 
non eons with a provtarm in the Than Deed to increase desiot 
ttuiiiKtti oi 2*6 on giving 3 months written notice to unit holders. 

Disoibwiuis of income wffl be paidoo Bdi December. 
Thecantaaiemnited ptas annual yicM&OMS : fa/fUSf,!. 

Contract nones «riH be issued and unk cerritieaus wiU be 
provided widun eight weeks tri payment. To sell mw endorse your 
cen&cancand send it to die managers: payment based on the riding 
bid price will oomulfy hr nude wrthui 7 tsoriun^ tils a. 

Unit Than an tmu&jrct to capital gam.ua; idukava 

a unsbulder w3] nor pas this ua on 4 disposal oi units links, hn 

asal reused gams frutnaD sources irnhe ux uarjmoura to more 

dm ttrJCO (IttW). Prka and yields tan be iifiind daily in tbc 
financial Tunes, 

Thisuxs; Midland Bonk Trust LuL. II OH Irarv. 
London EC3I SDL ' 

Mamets: Henderson Unit Trust Miopinni Ltd. 
26 nmnirv Stjuire. London EC2A IDA. (Reasuml OthteL 
Kegtaminn Number: SSfa2faJ En^md. 

A meaberef die Unit That Association. 


Jar 


To: Hcndenum Lnn Tnw'Manasewert Ltd. DcaBnp Dtpamnent. 5 Rasfo-h fead. Hutton. Bremui«J, E%u:\ CMIJ IAA 

I X* «rtd» to inurtt t — — .(mutimtmi OEibi the Hcndcnun Eurupein Smaller OonpuiKs Trust at the h\cd pm nf 

Et Jbp per unit and enclose a cheque payable to Henderson Uni: Trust Maiupment Limited, ft you wish n» Ime net income 
iwmcswtf please lids. □ 

L'Se a sh to invest S per mundt (minimum £25) in the Henderson European Snralkr Cwnpank-s Trust, and einli ^ 

a cheqoe fcr tbcbrs month » mwsnjwt pit-able to Hcndcrstm Unit Trust Martawmcnt Limit cd. Details nn In .a i., make -ubst- 
Micrg pay men ts teg be sew to you 00 raagptot’ this amptn. 

Tin* otter <lo«:4» 532pm on Tuesday September lb iWb. After the ek>w ut this utter units nill be available at tin- daili quoud 

price. Joint applkania max sgo add attach ttdbuma and addrevo svporaldy. 

MrlMeUlhiTlfc (« Mil - 

Surname ; 


Ssatiturr 

Ms Pndeveona] Adviser ~ 

The. istter e, n« available to residents of ^the Kepubitciri Itvhmi 

Henderson European Smaller Companies Trust 
. Henderson Unit Trust Management Ltd. 


- - —*• . .-'.■asi— ssrredssrsr' 















t-he times Saturday September 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/2 




* 




'S’! . 
■l-RU-NC 

uv;s 

;i son. 


I litigation^ 

The oft quoted expression that 

the law is an ass” may have 
wen Charles Dickens' per- 
sonal view after various 
confrontations with the legal 
profession. However, the 
complaint would certainly 
have more general appeal 
nowadays — particularly with 
lilipntsin the United Slates - 
following some extremely 
eccentric decisions. 

For example, a man tried 
last year to commit suicide by 
jumping in front of a train in 
New York. It is not known 
whether he took this drastic 
action because of personal 
financial problems or for 
some other good reason. The 
man. no. doubt to the driver’s 
relief, feiled to kill himself but 
instead lost a limb or two. 

After recovering sufficiently 
he consulted lawyers, who 
advised him to start proceed- 
ings against the city transit 
authority for negligence. He 
was awarded $650,000 for his 
efforts. 

If you find that decision 
incredible, what about the 19- 
yea r-old cat-burglar who fell 
through a skylight while trying 
to steal from a school in 
Florida? After proceedings 
against the school authority, 
an out-of-court settlement was 
reached giving the burglar 
$260,000 together with $4,300 
a month. 

Cynics might justifiably 
point out lhaL the settlement 
was no doubt much more than 
he would have recovered had 
he been successful with his 
original objective. Who says 
crime does not pay? 

Finally, there is the case of 
an entrant in the World's. 
Strongest Man competition. 
His particular penchant was to 
try to run the race with a large 


103 % 


On 6th September 1986 Cehical 
Medical will be hunching their new 
Fedgroa Growth Unit Trust We an 
able to otter investors up to 103% 
allocation of units for investments 
made until 19th September. 1986. 

For further debits or an a p p lication 
form, please contact us at 
Baronworth (Investment 
Sendees) Limited 
370 Cranoioot Road. 

Gants IM. Mon). 

Essex. 1G2 1BR 
Tshwhone 01-518 1218 
Montxuaf F1MBRA 
licensed Dealers m Securities 


refrigerator strapped • to his 
back. He had barely warmed 
up before he fell down and 
hurt his knee. Proceedings 
were duly started. The court 
awarded him more than Si- 
million in damages saying the 
organizers had been negligent 
in accepting his entry. 

These decisions are quite 
absurd. How could it possibly 
be said that the subway 
authority was negligent? 
American courts seem to rec- 
ognize what lawyers refer to as 
an extremely wide duty of 
care, the breach of which gives 
rise io negligence claims. 

In Britain it is far more 

Sportsmen who 
are hurt have 
voluntarily . 
taken part . 

restricted. In order to bring a 
successful claim for neg- 
ligence, you have to show that 
a duty of care exists between 
the alleged wrongdoer and the 
person who has suffered dam- 
age. In other words, had the 
attempted suicide taken place 
on the Underground, you 
would have to show that 
London Transport owed a 
duty of care to the public and 
was careless if it did not 
somehow prevent you jump- 
ing in front of the train.' 

Britain also recognizes the 
concept of volens. or con sen L 
If you play a lawful game of 
spon and suffer injuries in the 
course of the game, you wall be 
deemed to have consented to 
the act which has caused you 
harm. So, for example, in a 
boxing match, it is obvious 
that each participant consents 
to the other trying to hit him. 

Criminal law is an entirely 


different matter. Consent is no 
'defence to allegations -of as- 
sault — even in a cpntad spoil 
such as rugby. 

The refrigerator man might 
well have mei-'this -argument 
had he tried to bring procced- 
ings in Britain even if it could 
be said that a duly of care 
existed between the organizers 
and the competitors. ' 

Britain . may, however, be 
going the. way of its trans- 
atlantic friends. Readers may 
have notified recent reports of 
the smoker who is planning to 
bring a claim for damages 
against a tobacco company 
' because he has been diagnosed 
as suffering from a vascular 
disease believed to have been 
caused bysmoking. 

-This case is somewhat dif- 
ferent from the negligence 
ones because h touches on 
questions of product liability, 
itwill also involve arguments 
about the: effect of the health 
warning on the cigarette pack- 
ets which tobacco companies 
argue protects them from such 
.actions. 

The social attitude to 
resolving disputes in the 
United States is vastly dif- 
ferent from that in , Britain 
where ft is much more diffi- 
cult to pursue proceedings and 
where this difficulty probably 
serves as a deterrent to all but 
very clear cases of serious 
negligence. Members of -the 
public who hope to use litiga^ 
tion of this nature to bring on 
early retirement should ' be 
carefuL 

In the United "Slates the 
situation is now extremely 
serious — particularly with the 
medical profession who are 
always being sued. No doctor 
can safely give even a prelimi- 
nary diagnosis of an illness. 
Instead doctors insist on the 
matter going to specialists. ‘ 


One ! ^year-old schoolboy 
went to a' chemist asking for 
eye drops after swimming in a 
school pool for slightly too 
long; Eventually he spent four 
days in an eye hospital before 
he was allowed home - all 
because the original- chemist 
.was wo scared, to provide him 
with eye.drbps in case he had 
got the. diagnosis wrong with 
the subsequent risk of being 
.sued: 

. What, has happened to the 
. medical profession . jn the 
United States in the past 20 
years pr so has been extremely 
worrying. If an operation 
turns out Jb be less successful 

• The American 
. .. legal system 
has become 
.. a bizarre mess 

than the patieftt'br his family 
would have wished the sur- 
geon is at risk of being sued — 
more ; likely than, not by an 
^ambulance-chaser” to whom 
anything up to 50 per cent of 
the damages recovered will be 
payable by way otitis “fees”. 

The .resulting law suit' is 
tried by a jury' which ’’decides 
the fact of liability and the 
quantum of the damages 
recoverable. 

There are other solutions 
for compensating victims of 
damage. Many would ad- 
vocate doing away with' the 
concept of negligence al- 
together in favour of a com- 
prehensive insurance system 
which would compensate the 
unlucky irrespective of 
“fault”. In that way perhaps 
Britain can. avoid the bizarre 
mess the American legal sys- 
tem seems to have become. 

Jeremy Vaughan 


Now junior will get a share 


The TSB is casting its nets, 
and the mesh is fine. Even 
tiddlers are provided for in the 
issue. 

If a child wants to apply it 
can be done through the 
medranrof Mum or Dad when 
the subscription lists open 
next week, lire holding will be 
registered in the name of the 
minor, although the parent or 
guardian will hold them on 
trust 

The allocation is likely to be 
just a few hundred shares 
each, as the enormous interest 
in TSB will require a scaling- 
down and thinning-oat of the 
shares. Perhaps there will ben . 
cut-off point, as there was with 
BT when many people re- 
ceived a maximnro of 800 


shares. It is, therefore, quite 
possible that seven, applica- 
tions of a few hundred pounds 
will bring io more shares than 
two applications of the maxi-" 
mum £10,000. 

Assuming the issue yields'' 
the large premiums,., almost" 
everyone anticipates it is un- 
necessary to. stress the wind- 
till benefits of. having a large 
family, foil of toddling !TSp_ 
shareholders. 

But no one is trying to 
suggest that the Government 
is trying to give ns hin ts on 'its 
birth rotrtroL'policyby favour- 
ing the fertile and enthusiastic 
few who have the stamina to 
bring np a huge brood. : • 

The important point is dot 
to get too carried away by the 


TSB flotation. It is a superb 
investment opportunity, 

, unique in that shareholders 
1 will still own die money they 
spend on shares. Subscrip- 
tions will belong to the TSB, 
and the shareholders will own . 
the bank. They win pay noth- 
ing for the goodwill of the 
business. It is bring given 
away. 

Unfortunately the ex- 
ceUence of the opportunity will 
, attract millions, which means 
every applicant will receive 
just a few shares unless the 
government reverses former 
-policy and ballots 
applications. 

; * Now is a good time to 
persuade the dffidren to fill in 
a few forms. MR 



OUR PROGRESS IS HAVING 
FAR REACHING EFFECTS 

i 

Since April last year when Baring . Fund Managers was 
established our funds have featured regularly amongstihe top 
performers in the industry. Funds under management now total 
£213 million and continue to grow 

We have recently introduced the Baring Global Growth 
Trust which brings together all the expertise available throughout 
the Barings Group worldwide. This new trust which is actively 
managed, will appeal to the investor who requires worldwide 
exposure through a single fund; Global Growth complements 
ourexisting range of specialist trusts, details of. which are given 

below: v 


ismesrAm wt> o?fA/fOM' 
pom semovt who is 
EETTBK WSWtfO TfffWT AM 


. ti 


Baring Australia Trust 
Baring Eastern Trust 
Baring Equity Income TVust 
Baring Europe Trust 
Baring Global Growth Trust 
Baring Growth and Income Trust 


Baring Japan Special Trust 
Baring Japan Sunrise Trust 
Baring First Europe Trust 
Baring First Japan Trust 
Baring First North America Trust 
Baring First Smaller Companies Trust 


k wrA A For further information please contact your 
professional adviser or write to Peter Hall at 

jjfcsR Baring Fund Managers Limited 

BARINGS 8 Bishopsgate. London EG2 N 4AL 



first 


pimueoffEjj: 



Nationwide gives 
next year’s news 


The Nationwide Building 
Society has revealed its plans 
lor the building societies' 
Brave New Year. It is the first 
of the top ten societies to 
let ns know what we can 
expect w ben the Building 
Societies Act comes into force 
in 1987. MARTIN 
BAKER looks ahead 

There arc few surprises in the 
Nationwide package. There 
may. however, be some 
investment opportunities over 
the longer term; 

The new services are an 
i obvious extension of the 
building societies' existing 
business. For example.' the 
facility -to make -unsecured 
loans will be exploited by 
offering a full cheque service 
with guarantee card 

Many societies already offer 
a cheque account which is 
virtually indistinguishable 
from those of the banks. 

The key difference from 
| next year onwards will be that 
account holders will be able to 
overdraw and guarantee 
cheques. At presenuthe shop- 
L.pcr with a building society 
cheque book needs a trusting 
or naive shopkeeper. 

Another use of the un- 
secured credit facility will be 
personal loans, which can be 
easily added to most societies* 
computer systems. A com- 
puter is not bothered whether 
a debt is secured against a 
house or not. 

Next year's customers can 
expect the Nationwide to offer 


a variety of alternative savings 
media. Unit trusts, personal 
equity plans and pensions will 
ail be available in branches 

They can also expea more 
competition in the high street. 
The links bewteen estate 
agents and lenders have been 
growing stronger by the year — 
the Lloyds Bank Black Horse 
agency is an obvious example 
— but the Nationwide is now 
completing the acquisition of 
20 firms of estate agents with 
260 branches throughout the 
country. The estate agents 
may not effectively be Nation- 
wide branches but their offices 
will be used to sell mortgage 
and insurance services at the 
very moment when the 
prospective purchaser is look- 
ing hard for the ideal property. 

No conveyancing will be 
done by the societies. In 
general, they think it is too 
expensive. 

Now for the investment 
opportunity. The Nationwide 
is not intending to relinquish 
its mutual status in favour of 
becoming a limited company. 
At least it is not as yet. 

Other societies, notably the 
Abbey National, have flirted 
more or less openly with the 
idea. A few pounds in the 
accounts of the Abbey Na- 
tional the Nationwide and 
perhaps the Alliancc-Lciccstcr 
societies might see today's 
depositors in the position of 
this month's TSB “priority 
status'* investors if the soci- 
eties go public. 




glpP 




The Rsdieree Growth Thisr merits special 
attention from investors. 

Its emphasis is on proven and successful 
m_imj*pment in outstanding UK companies. 

The Best Of British 

The aim of the Trust is strong capital 
growth, combined with above-average stability 
through investment in die besr of British 
business success stories. - 

Rigorous criteria will be applied to the 
selection of the “ftdigree Companies” in which 
rite Trust invests, indudings- 


nBnaggsfflfc 

♦ Continuous growth in Earnings per 
Share - ideally over 5 or more years. 

♦ O peration in an expanding market - or 
evidence O? ability to increase market share. 

♦ Sound financial and business base, on 
which future growth may be built. 

Subject to the above, companies may be. 
large or small; recent or long-standing listings 
on the stockmarkeu earning the majority of 
their profits either in the UK or from overseas. 

The Trust has the power to invest in the 
Unlisted Securities Maricet and is authorised 
to invest in Traded Options within the limits set 
out in die Trust Deed. 


lUUni i vn ii il nuLJiun 

World stockmarkets have been hitting 
successive new highs for a number of years. The 
.serious investor may consider the present time 
appropriate to adopt a lower risk profile for 
an equity portfolio. 

TneftdigreeGrowthTrust offers the dual 
advantages of stability together with continuing 
good growth prospects. For this reason it 
may be considered an ideal UK. core holding 
over the longer term. 


The Trust will- benefit from investment 
management by Clerical Medical, whose 
reputation has been buih upon an ability to con- 
sistently produce above-average results, even 
during times of adversity. On their With-Profits 
Life Assurance policies, for example, Clerical 
Medical have paid-bonuses in respect of every 
year since the Society was founded in 1824. 

A QUALITY PORTFOLIO OF ~~ 
SUCCESSFUL COMPANIES 
such as SAINSBURY, 
AMSTRAD. FIS0NS, 
HAWKER SIDDELEY, TARMAC, 
MARKS & SPENCER 
BASS and TSB. 


The concept of a portfolio of “Pedigree 
Companies'' is an attractive one, but Clerical 
Medical decided it was essential ro put the con- 
cept to the test before finalising the launch of the 
Trust. Research conducted by die Clerical 
Medical investment team Has confirmed that, 
over post years, such a portfolio would have 
satisfactorily out-performed the FT-A AD Share 
Index. 

Lower rates of interest and inflation, 
cheaper energy, and continuing growth all offer 
prospects for the next few years which we 
believe will be turned to particular advantage by 


the enterprising i 
Companies." We 


mentsofouri 


see them ‘as achieving above-average rates of 
proGt growth in the future. 

Invest NowAtA Fixed Price 

The minimum investment is £500 and, 
until Dose of Business on September 19th, 
units are on Fixed Price Offer at ZSpeach. 

Investments of £1,000 or more before 
September 19th will also benefit from a 1% Bonus 
Allocation of units. 

B y telephone; Buy units on the FREE Linkline 
0800 373393. Settlement will be required upon 
. receipt of Contract Note. 

By post: Return your cheque with the coupon 
-below. 

Remember that the price of units may go 
down as well as up. You should regard your 
investment as long term. 

Ct NERAL INFORMATION 

UltnPitLct and Vftnp Limit- Th* pnn uf uiurt and die ncldirr 
pdilnhnl ,Lrih m The Tune. jivlVimiuul Timet. II vw «,i*hm 
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fH ihr tjIuriilThr rund i. iird nurd mam ilte Trut» lumm ihe 

<-\pcntc*iil ih* Trutlcrt and Manjgerv 

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maximum jravuLhaip-'-l 2*»pkit V AT Charm tan unit Iw 

«y»c->^d jtfrf 1 month..' * mien nmur in imnnuldcn. 

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Jcvmrd io hair irtriird 

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rmriN W KUiiiMimnun, linn trrnhi-iir, Mill numulh hr H,unl 
vuilun ufkmj; iliv* nrf ftxnpl [ uvivkiii. 

MjajBcrt-Orrh.il Mnb^l l imr Tmti Minion Limited, 

Njitiim Ham. HntiulIi.S2l8H.RrBitinrdl)nhr-MSi JjmnV 
Jmiutc. LrahmSWlY -K)L RruMcml \’u IS.1Tti*t|. 
truorr - \ WLnhJ Rank font Cumpam LiainnL II Otdlmtn. 
London ti JR HDL. 



I rClYFQ PRICE OFFt '■ . >1111 AimHuiru* dtnuld otn and pic detail* ■o-ivrmrH. Thi* 

I I |UI> 1 ' ||0 dUiy ■ nmruxnlt MpmtoMunton.nn IKtcarv«U.Thi*u||nBi« 

I |/| nnYS I1HLV- H ownt<>RvJnuti«ihrKi|iutila.iittniiihL 
l 1*1 1M' 1 ** . "UilTiTital Medical Linn Tnw Mjnjctrs Limired, 

' FREEPOST (Bb20). BRISTOL BS2 0AB. 

- . l-’toif wbhtinnvevtf . fimnimum t VQOl in the 

Omtjl Medical ftdipw Gnrudi Trm ji ihe lived prv* idlet ijtMSp pta’ unit. Afwr Seftwmhrr l^th, 1986 ihe 
nifcnpprxx vtiQ apply- IVaMr wid me drcdlitil: Share Evriunjir Scheme □ Unit Tima Saving* PLu? □ 

SURNAME i.MR MRS MBS' . . . . 

Fliq FORE.YAMES • unMi nwni 

APDRESS 

POSTCODE S!G\ATIIRF DATE 


CLERICAL 

MEDICAL 

UNIT TRUSTS . 
CONSISTENCY ■ STRENGTH ■ EXPERIENCE 

( Xrval VlakjK H Into VLuuon* UnwL Rtcwnd Nat 1 1 * VI. 
.Vlrmhcrulrt* I'lm Irw 

A vltji -mvKd— 1 hodurt Ji IrruL VlvdhJl Jitj 1 .i-ivii] I A- Wtfk' 

V«ac|t.\ano« Ftun.HnuailB'OtfH. JL4x6m-tU~ZJ^i>'ir>.- 


uivKiimicni v* 


WV-VniRR 


I |l% BONUS UNITS ON 
| INVESTMENTS OF 
I. £1000 OR MORE 


a 


Manday-Fridby9am-4pm. Saturday 10am-4pm 
Sunday lQara-lpm 









I 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/3 





beats all other 

:s 

pension oians. 


In (he latest annual performance tables pub- 
lished by Planned Savings magazine. The Equitable is- 
again in the number one position, for 20 year regular 
premium with profit policies. 

This is the fourth time in nine years we’ve 
occupied this spot, and in the other years we’ve never 
come lower than fourth, an achievement not matched 
by any other company. 

The 1985 20 year result meant that a gross 
annual premium of £500 would have accumulated a 
fund of £47,142 with which to secure a pension at the 
best available rate. 

Yet half of our competitors' funds in the survey 
amounted to less than £40,000 and one as little as 
£31475. 

Of course, the past cannot guarantee the future, 
but what berter way is there of judging a company 
than by a record of such consistent excellence? 

So if you want the best return from your 
pension plan, fill in the coupon or 'phone 01-606 
6611 today; 


To: The EqtiiuMr Life, FREEPOST, -J Coleman Sirccr. London EC.2R 2JT. 
I'd wekonw further details on your Sdl- Employed ftnuon Plans with: 
□ Annual' Van a We Conmbunom; □ Month!} Carunbunom; 

O Umi-hnked based alternative*. 

(UK mdemonh) 

Name (Mr'MiVMm) 


IWcrxk 


Da real Birth 


Tel; (Office) 


W (Home I 


| mmmix BhuoL. g 

1 The Equitable Life j 

I You gain because we’re different— ■ 1 



The brakes 
are on 

house prices 

■ House price increases show 
the first signs of stabilizing, 
according to the Halifax Building 
Society. The increase in the year to 
August was 13.6 per cent 
nationally, with the South-East and 
Greater London both steady at 20 
| and 25 per cent respectively, it is a 
i good measure of how rampant 
; the market has been that the 
i Halifax's housing figures are 
greeted as a welcome easing in price 
inflation. The national average Is 
increasing at only 13.6 per cent 
annually. Perhaps we should be 
grateful that prices are not 
Increasing ever more raprtfly. 

The Halifax confines itself to 
predicting that the rate of Increase In 


prices wifi still be in double 
figures next year. At the moment the 
average price of properties is 
£40.000 - which is bad news for 
first-time buyers. 

More bank on 
their homes 

■ Those who have held property 
for some time, of course, can rejoice 
about high prices and take the 
profits if they can. Evidently some 
people have already taken the 



opportunity. According to a survey of 
mortgage funding conducted for 
the EMAP publishing house by 
•stockbrokers Quitter Goodbon, 
about £6 billion worth of mortgage 
funds were used for purposes 
other than home loans. In other 
words, home owners are taking 
the equity out of their houses and 
spending it on cars, school lees 
and other items. 

Secondary mortgages have been 
with us for a long time but the 
lenders insist that no interest be 
given. If tax relief is being claimed on 
loans not used for the purchase 
or improvement of the home the 
inland Revenue is losing a lot of 
money, perhaps as much as £1 .74 
billion. But they would know 
about that, wouldn't they? 

Lambeth launch 

■ Interest rates may be under 
pressure to fan throughout the world 
but in the British savings market 
investment accounts are being 
forced up by competition. After 
the recent moves by the bigger 
societies to recapture some 
market share the smaller societies 
are as usual leap-frogging over 
them. 

The Lambeth Building Society 
has just launched a one-year term 
share paying 9 per cent net of . . 
tax. This is about half a point better 
than most societies' top- line 


accounts. Access ls_ instant and 
penalty-free if a balance of 
£8,000 is retained. Withdrawals 
taking the sum on deposit below 
this figure require 60 days' notice or 
an interest penalty of 60 days Is 
incurred. The Interest rate is 
variable, but is guaranteed to be ' 
at least 3.5 per cent over ordinary 
share rate until the end of next 
year. The minimum deposit is £250. 
Detais: Lambeth Building 
Society, 118-120 Westminster 
Bridge Road, London SE1 7XE. 

Leamington’s 9% 

■ The Leamington Spa Buffeting 
Society has issued a new terra 
account, the Spa Bond. The 
interest rate is fixed at 9 per cent 
for one year with interest 
credited at the end of the term. The 
(funlfnum investment is £2.000 
with no additions or withdrawals 
during the year. 

Details: PO Bos 1, Leamington 
House, Milverton HM, Leamington 
Spa CV325FE. 

Offshore offer 

■ Stockbrokers John G ovett are 
launching a savings scheme 
designed to attract the British 
citizen resident abroad. Rather 
grandly titled the Govett Offshore 
Savings Programme, the plan Is a 
simple adjunct to the 
International Managed Fund, which 
itself invests in nine UK-based 
authorized unit trusts, or Govett's 
High Income Gilt Fund The 
minimum subscription is £50 per 
month, which may be suspended 
for up to six months or indefinitely if 
at least £1 ,000 has been 
subscribed. Charges on the gilt fund 
are 5.5 per cent initially and 0.75 


per cent annually, with a 7.5 and 1 
percent levy on the managed 

The company admits the 
managed fund charges are “higher 
than you would usuafly find, but 
that's because you've got someone 
else looking after your money for 
you with the full discretionary 
managed service, someone who 
can manage your money better than 
you can”. 

Details: 01 -588 5620. 

Mostly Japan 

■ Expect a thick, fast stream of 
unit trusts this autumn. The Big Bang 
is coming up soon, and the big 
generalist financial institutions want 
to be seen to offer all things to alt 
dealers. Furthermore, the marketing 
people are back from holiday, 
which is at least as good a reason 
for unit trusts to go forth and 
multiply. The latest addition to the 
herd comes from Scimitar Asset 
Management, the investment arm of 
Standard Chartered Bank. The 
Pacific Basin Trust will be largely 
invested In Japan (about 65 per 
cent), with a 15 per cent commitment 
to Singapore. Management 
stresses that tins is an ideal time for 
such a fund, despite the near- 
record strengths of the Japanese 
currency ana stock market. 

The initial charge is 5 per cent 
discounted by 7 per cent for those 
who subscribe before September 
26. The annual charges are 1 per 
cent 

Details: Scimitar Asset 
Management, Freepost. London 
EC3B3AD. 

Firm protection 

■ Without our reputations we are 
“naught but gilded loam and painted 
day". But how does one protect 
something so intangible and 
delicate? Elsewhere in this issue 
we highlight the inadequacies of 
property law in calculating a 
business's goodwill, but there are 
ways and means of safeguarding 

a business. 

A booklet produced by solicitors 
S J. Berwin & Co aims to explain the 
law relating to reputation, trade 
connections, trade secrets and 
inventions, computer software 
and the like. These assets rejoice in 
the name of “intellectual 
property", which is. accorc&ng to the 
booklet, “a grandiloquently 
sounding name for legal rights of 
some complexity". The 
intellectual content of the booklet is 
dearly and succinctly arranged. It 
is. however, a pity that they could not 
get the fines straight Our copy 
nas words slanting down the page, 


which can induce a feeling akin tx 
sea-sickness. 

Detais: S J. Berwin a Co, 236 
Gray's Inn Road, London WC1X 
8HB. 


Best of British 

■ A unit trust io Invest "in the 
best of British companies enters 

managers. 

The aim of the fund is to achieve 
strong capital growth with above 

WJKWSSffK™- 

is cited as one of the shares 

which the managers night envisage 
buying. 

The charges are 5 per cent 

initially and 0.75 per cent annuafiy, 
withal percent bonus tor those 
who subscribe £1 ,000 on more. The 
minimum investment ts £500, ana 
further subscriptions may be made 
in slices of £250 or more. 

Details: Clerical Medical, 15 1 St 
James Square. London SW1Y 4LQ. 

Cheaper still 

■ National Westminster has 

come up with the one of the oldest 
and probably best marketing 
devices of all - it has cut its pnees. 
New borrowers are to be offered 
a discount of 0.5 per cent on the 
usual nominal mortgage rate of 

11 per cent The saving on a £30.000 
repayment mortgage will be 
£7^7 a month. The offer is good for 
one year, and anyone who wants 
to transfer to NatWest wifi have 
professional fees paid by the 
bank. 

Derek Wanless. of NatWest feels 
the new deal "will be attractive to 
prospective home buyers and wifi 
strengthen our position as the 
leading UK bank for home 
Joans". Although NatWest's large 



home loan portfolio might tend to 
substantiate that darn the new move 

!“SSMfdland 3 scheap loan 

have at some stegeoffered__ 

St SiSngaMmch as they would 
have liked. 

The exciting one 

KSSSSJga?* 

EJlSBSSKHK 

emerging markets w companies 
in emerging marketed South-East 
Asia wWch maymvohrea 
greater than normal degree or risk, 
fund’s exptan^ 

memorandum 

investors canexp^^«»«J 

the usual dosago of Jgw w 
“above average vola tility . 

The fund is aimed atiratitufens 
and the larger privat e inves tor. The 

hind’s minimum subscription w 

$5,000, with charges of upto 5 per 

cent initially and no mote than 
1.5 per cent a year. 

sga-eaaa^ 

Front Street, Hamilton, Bermuda. 

All the jargon 

■ If your are the sort of person 
who is confused by City and 
investment jargon, then you are 
probably going to find life even 
tougher in the months to c ome. 
Significant items on the investment 
agenda, such as the Financial 
Services Bill and. of course, the 
Stock Exchange's Big Bang on 
October 27. are going to introduce a 
completely new and additional 
ranqe of terms. Do you know what 
FltfBRA, MIBOC. or even self- 
regulating organizations are? 
Lament's Glossary, published by 
Lament & Partners, the licensed 
dealers and investment 
managers, at £2.75, including p&p. Is 
now in its second edition. The 
revised version includes definitions 
and explanations of many of 
these new terms. It also incorporates 
a range of economic terms for 
the first time to add to the general 
body of investment terminology 
which it covers. If you want to know 
what terms such as Ml, M3, and 
£M3 actually represent, the book will 
tell you. 

It is perhaps churlish to point out 
minor mistakes, but nevertheless the 
glossary does define SRO as a 

r.u AMnni-vnliAn vialKor 


definition of an SRO does give an 
adequate account of htiw 
investment businesses can be 
authorized under the hew 
scheme. 

Lamont & Partners are at 48 
Charles Street. London WTX 7PB. 


Exclusive Adam heads south 




o? 


Not everyone likes a banker to 
be dressed in a frock coat, bat 
who can resist the attractions 
of a leather cheque book 
bolder? For those who frown 
on the sombre frock coats 
sported by employees of 
Costts & Co, the op-market 
banking arm of National 
Westminster, hot cannot resist 
leather around their cheque 
books, Adam & Co offers an 
exclusive alternative. 

Adam & Co, named after the 
18th-century Scots economist 
Adam Smith, opened for busi- 
ness in Edinbongh' fashion- 
able Charlotte Square only 
two years ago. It offers a 
discreet and exclusive hanking 
service to anyone with a high 
enough net worth. If is so 
discreet, in lad, that it is said 
yon have to take three dnrits 
of Charlotte Square before yon 
notice the restrained brass 
plaque outside the bank's 
door. 

It offers free banking for 
accounts in credit over £250 


and pays interest on current 
accounts with more than 
£1,000 in diem. There is a 
cheque card a with £250 
maximum, a Royal Bank of 
Scotland cash card, a Diners 
Card and — of course — that 
leather cheque book holder 
embossed in gold. 

The bonk offers loans and 
mortgages like other banks, 
but most of all it offers a 
personal service with your 
account handled by a human 
being, not a computer. 

Two-thirds of its customers 
are Scottish bat that may be 
charming fast as interest from 
the South of England b the 
most rapidly growing area of 
business. 

English customers wifi 
therefore be interested to learn 
that Adam b opening a branch 
in London t rough the ac- 
quisition of another private 
bank. Continental Trust, 
which has a fully staffed office 
in Pall Mafl. The principal 
customer of Continental is 


part of the Schlmnberger fam- 
ily, one of France's wealthiest 
dans, which b taking a 45 per 
cent stake in Adam. In terms 
of voting rights, however, the 
Sdtlambei'gerg will have only 
25 per cent. 

The deal doubles Adam's 
existing £22 million of gross 
assets, giving it a comfortable 
base -from which to work for 
some time to come. There had 
been rumours that the bank 
would be coming to the Stock 
Exchange at the earliest pos- 
sible opportunity, bat the link 
witfa Continental roles that oat 
as a necessity. 

The only chance of the 
public being offered shares in 
the bank, as well as an 
account, in the foreseeable 
future is an insistence on a 
notation by the existing 
shareholders — including 
Drayton Consolidated, Edin- 
burgh American Assets and 
Standard life. 

Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 


U*48 % 

GROSS EQUIVALENT 


DON’T INVEST A PENNY UNTIL YOU’VE CHECKED WITH US 

If you’ve got £10,000 to invest, then 

come to Britannia. Q1 C% 1 1 # >i Q%“ 

If you’ve got £25,000 or more, then O XJ 1 1 *TO 

1 i J NET GROSS EQUIVALENT 

QOn L waste a, SCCOnCL Minimum initial inu-ttmcni KIC.DCG. Monthly intiURiv option at 7J«r :(SJ5 : :CAJt.) 

v i -n » | f% V 1 ihn » i Raarvmav van: ■'Giwx equivalent asniminj; basic rate lax. 

Our mdentbuper Gold and indent wrvmmxrnisn mmm HP mimimwmmm 
Super Gold Plus accounts pay outstand- 

ingly high rates of interest — without any "1 1*^0% 

strings attached. net gross equivalent 

T> ’ T - Minimum initial imc*amnt EJ5J00. Monthly income option or fUXF:{S JO^C-A.R-j 

OOtil accounts 21VC you instant R»u> mji vary. 'Gn»*. equivalent owuminj; basic rate rax. 

access to all of your investment without rScIirriZIp^pril b^. I 

, a J J I'wg enclose cheque no. — — value of j 

lOSS Or penalty * to open a.*- Trident Super Gold Account (min. investment £ 10,000) □ J 

* 11* *rl Trident Super Gold Plus Account (min. investment £25 £00) □ j 

Both give you a monthly income it y-™™ '""■t™™ . , 

O J J j I would like my interest paid:-LJAnnuaJlvLJ Monthly I 

y-QU Deed It J * meTVSt w k* - " - O Added io the account □ Paid inio my/our Britannia Account j 

So take a look at the terms and 
conditions of our high interest accounts 
Then look around. 

We’re confident yoi 
won’t find a better 
all-round deal for your 
investment from any other 
national building society. 


** 



Minimum initial imestment KIC.DCG. Monthly income option at 7J«r :(SJ5 : :CAJt.) 
Ratts mat van: "G now equivalent ossumirn; basic rate tax. 


8*30 % 11*69 % 

NET GROSS EQUIVALENT 

.Minimum initial imcttmem EJ5J00. Monthly income option or 8 jOO-':(S JO-' :C-A.R-j 
ILuev mat van: -Gntss equivalent owuminj: basic rate tax . 

f "please tick appropriate box. 

I L'ws enclose cheque no. — , — value of 

to open a.*- Trident Super Gold Account (min. investment £10,000) D 
1 Trident Super Gold Plus Account (min. investment £25 £00) □ 

J Maximum investment £250000 per account. 

J I would like my interest paid:-D Annually D Monthly 
. interest tube:- U Added to the account CD Paid into mv/our Britannia Account 

| — 

If y ou re quire payment by cheque (annual interest only) or direct to a Bank 
account, please yve details in writing. 

A Please send me full details of die following alternative 
* ' instant access investment accounts^ 

□ Trident Gold Account (Z-HF: net, min. investment £250). 

, □ Trident Gold Plus Account (7.90^ net, min. investment £5,000). 
fib ' If you are not ordinarily resident in the UK for tax purposes you 
4 may bv able to receive vour interest paid gross. 

(Tick box for details) O 

Full Name(s) Mr/Mre'Miss 


larurefs). 




WK 




Whatdo 

By you need to 
P ^ucceed in your 
new business? 

c Luck?Orone 



Post to: Britannia Building Society, FRJEEP05T, i 
Newton House, Leek, Staffs. ST13 5ND. j 

If enclosing a cheque, you may wish to use first I 

class post to the address below. T6/9 J 

BRITANNIA BUILDING SOCII.TV.NLWTON HOL'51 ,LLI.K.SI\n S STD 5RG.TEUC53K 385131. ES1ABLISHLD 1X5*. a MbMBIJt U'THh BUILDING SOCIbTlhS ASSOCIATION. 

I OK BKANCHI S AND AG I. NTS M 1 UH. K LOCAL DIRFCTORil S. AUTHORISED I'OR INVESTMENTS BY TRliSTLI.S. ASSETS NOW LXCLCD £M30 MILLION. 


Britannia 

Building Society 







/ prog rammes? 

When you decide io launch a new Hranessinrotodav^ompetm vc 

tnarkeo, you have two impoctani opdons qf v«L 

You can hope that Lucfc wffl onry you through. 

Ahonanvely, yixi can capitalise more fiiDy on your own talents, vision and 


o taoeosttoyouneff. 

TheMamwtwna C4ivkgaC<mniihi\rtm has joined foroeswiih some of 


or^omocB 
son operating 


The result is a 


.ocvam DUdms! .Dwnmg programmes. Propammes at all levels and at 
venues nano nwide d ai have hdped otfag ena^renettKcreattaame 
ttf che most successful business vasures in Brimin-by vinue ofa 
va«c proposnai and mzrkerii^siraiegjf-and the oamnitmeni io 
tsatememrarfe 

^ 10 SJCtKed - fix' a copy of our spedai Traininfi for 

A Entapnse’mfonnfflkmpadb.sraptvoooi^erfieaMpon. . 



rORTOBS 


TsTraming for Ennspri^FREEPOST, London S£83BR. 



4 


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Spl’> . - x 

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bathe J :: 

oil th- 

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Advice to the unwary abroad in the City, or 

i 

WHY THE METEOROLOGICAL 

OFFICE SHOULD 
BE STAFFED BY GIRAFFES. 

jgjglgHE sun blazed down on the scorched savannah. The dry grass rustled like 
Iffil EB sandpaper in the hot breeze. Overhead, the sky was porcelain blue. But the 
**=-*■>* giraffe was donning a sea-green sou’wester. A sunbathing lion opened a 
quizzical eye and started to roar with laughter. A pack of hyenas cackled hysterically. 
Undeterred, the giraffe tugged on his wellies, one, two, three and four. 

Gnus gnudged each other, whispering and giggling. The giraffe pohed pohed 
their jibes and unfurled a sober black umbrella. Still, the other animals broiled 
in the sun. Elephants sported smart new trunks. A long-legged camel shyly adjusted 
the bikini top on her humps. But 
the giraffe was studying the skies. 

And, sure enough, a little 
black cloud came scudding in 
from the west Then another. 

Then another. Until at last the 
sky above was as black as ink. 

With a violent crack, the clouds 
split open. The sunbathers were 
bathed in a torrent of rain. 

As they scurried for cover, 
awash with mascara and suntan 
oil, the giraffe reflected on the 
advantages of being the tallest 
animal of them all. From his lofty 
vantage point, he’d been able to 
see the clouds gathering on the 
horizon. 

Like the giraffe, Mercury 
Fund Managers benefit greatly 
from their stature. With the vast 
resources of Mercury Warburg 
at their disposal, and their net- 
work of offices all over the world, 

Mercury can command a superior 

view of the international stock markets. So there is no one better equipped to detect 
the slightest shift in the economic climate. 

For watertight advice on our ten unit trusts, please write to : The Client Services 
Director, Mercury Fund Managers Ltd., FREEPOST, London EC4B 4DQ, (0L280 2800) 
or contact your usual financial adviser. 

MERCURY UNIT TRUSTS 

Investment by Mercury Warburg Investment Management Ltd. 






THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/4 


=wm '«Sea 1986 Na<%pa~ QmaaEquw*opat 

. ' . & 000° and over 

IMMEDIATE ACCESS » l»OQ 1 

WITH NO LOSS E500lrwiJ-E9fl99 

OF INTEREST 1 8.00=11.49 

.. ■ ■ (MuoKmawTO 'v. • _ ciooooanaowr 

8.30=11.93 

ONLY 1 MONTH'S esooiimu-rasss 

NOTICE REQUIRED 815=11-70 

_ . THR££ttOHmswfiER-;.v .» £ 10.000 and met 

3 MONTH’S NOTICE: Q 9^ 

NO LOSS OP INTRESl} W V M 

Ofl IMMEDIATE ACCESS £500 £9399 

WTWLOSSOF3 O nC-.11 OC 

MONTHS INTEREST. Q.^lO— I 1.00 


The hint of a turning point 


‘Stf*RacB<[M! TijiKeouialenfiaDfe'crjierMMMn mett= TiunBcyndedMUiMriviiiAa ) 

fates «v*u* 

BOLTON BUILDING SOCIETY 

235/237 BAKER STREET, LONDON NWI TEL: 01 -935 0136 
24 Hour Answering Serves 
Members ol the Bwlrtng Socrates Association 
. & investor Protection Scheme. Trustue Siaius 

V Esaortsneo raw ■ 


If you own your home its value may well be in excess of 
your mortgage. 

Ylfodd you like a cheque book mortgage facility allowing 
you to draw upon your equity value to suit your financial 
requirements? 

if 

• Your house is valued in excess of £75.000 

• You are under 55 

• Your income exceeds £25,000 p.a 

• Your mortgage represents less than 70% of the value of 
your home. 

contact 

Poltroon Financial Services Ltd 

15 Manchester Square, London W1M 5AE 

. Tel 01 486 5195 

isr LICENCED CREDIT BROKERS 


( UNIT TRUSTS) 

Unit trusts, we are almost 
incessantly told, are a long- 
term investmenL The price of 
units, it is occasionally whis- 
pered, can go down as well as 
up. 

Our table shows that over 
the long term investors in 
Japan have done rather wdL 
It does not indicate, however, 
that during the past month the 
price of many Japanese funds 
actually fell. Some were in the 
very lowest postitons during 
the past four weeks. 

Investors in gold shares and 
in Australia have had a mis- 
erable time over two and four 
years, yet it may well be that 
the turning point has come. As 
pointed out in last week's 
Family Money. Australian 
unit trusts have been improv- 
ing under the reasonably strin- 
gent economic measures taken 
by the government. 

Gold unit mists, too, have 
performed well in the short 
term, some adding 20 per cent 


on the month. The price of 
platinum has been pushed up 
to a five-year high as concern 
over the unrest in South 
Africa grows. Platinum is 
traditionally linked to gold, 
which has also been pushed 
upwards by the fact that South 
Africa is the world's biggest 
producer of that melaL 

This week gold bullion 
broke through the $400 level 
in London. 

Bui this is all short-term. As 
a long-term investment most 
gold units have been a 
disaster. To borrow another 
tried and tested clicb£ from 
the unit trust marketing in- 
dustry. past performance is 
not necessarily a guide to the 
future. It may be that the lime 
has come for both gold and 
Australia. 

In the first eight months of 
this year it would have re- 
quired a combination of bad 
luck and bad judgment to lose 
money in unit trusts. Of the 
858 funds monitored by 
Planned Savings, only 224 
managed to make a loss, while 


BEST AND WORST FUNDS 

Current Value of £100 to September 1, HUB 


County Japan Growth 
Legal & Gen Far East 
Mercury Japan 
Britannia Japan Pert 
Wardtoy Japan 
Eagle star Far Eastern 
Henderson Jap Spec Sits 
Target Japan 
CS Japan 

TR Japan Growth 

Average 


B Months 

Tyndafl Australian Secs 
Henderson American Rcvy 
BG Technology 
Target Commodrty 
Canada Growth 

Prices are offer to Otter 


THE BEST 

_ 2* Months 

227.5 FS Balanced Growth 

219.0 OppenneHner Euro Growth 

209.9 Murray European 

205.9 County Japan Growth 
200.4 MtM Japan Performance 

200.0 Baring First Europe 
1962 Baring Europe 

1969 Govett European Growth 
1949 TR Special Opps 

194.1 Gartmore Far Eastern 

127.9 Average 

THE WORST 

24 Months 

94.6 Britannia Gold 9 Gen 
94.4 8ntanma Untv Energy 
93.8 Target Energy 
93J2 Wavertey Pacific Basin 
92-9 Target Australia 


Fidefity Japan 
GT European 
HIB Samuel European 
Gartmore Japan 
Bntanrea Japan Rerf 
Bamngion European 
Henderson Japan 
Henderson European 
GT Japan & General 
EFM Tokyo 

Average 


48 Months 

69.6 Britannia Gold 8 Gen 
63.5 New Court Energy Res 
61 -5 Baltic Australia 
54.3 Britannia Untv Energy 
52X1 Target Energy 


Net Income Reinvested 
Scums Planned Savings 


LIMITED ISSUE - WOOLWICH GUARANTEED PREMIUM SHARES. 




r 

L. 







l 

|')i 



■jSAfy/ty-?- ™ 

t '/* Jn V * 





Now the Woolwich offers 
ivestors with £10,000 or more a 
jarantee of high returns with 
ur new Bmited issue of 
Guaranteed Premium Shares. 

A lump sum erf £10,000 (or 
more) invested now will earn 
85% net p-a That’s equivalent to 
1157% gross. And we guarantee 
to pay a premium of 3_25% over 
our nominal Ordinary Share rate 
for at least a yean 

You can add to your account- 
at any time and make penalty- 
bee withdrawals at 90 days’ 
notice. Naturally you can have 
instant access to your money, sub- 
to the loss of 90 days’ interest 


HMi 

*7-> El » >1 1 1 • 1 1 1 




msmmms&sm 






’A*: 


□ I/We wish (o open a Guaranteed 

“ a 

cheque for S (minimum 

investment £10,000). 

Interest should be added to the account 

yearly or paid into my/our Wootwich 

Share Account □ Bank Account Q 
I/W 2 understand that although die Orcfinaiy 
Share rale may vary, the premium of 325% 
is guaranteed for a minimum of 1 year 

□ Please send me information on 

Woolwich Guaranteed Premhim Shares. 
Tick box required. (No stamp requited). 





Postcode 

Signatures) . 




about 45 per cent achieved a 
gain of 25 per cent on the 
pricing basis shown. Offer-to- 
offer prices are rather kind to 
unit trusts. The bid price, 
normally 5 to 6 percent lower, 
is what investors actually 
receive. 

Although the yen has 
peformed very strongly on the 
foreign exchanges — around 
230 10 the pound as opposed 
lb 330 last year - thus 
bumping up the prices of 
unhedged Japanese unit 
trusts, there is still strong 
support for shares on the 
Tokyo exchange. 

Many analysts still believe 
that the full effect of lower oil 
prices — Japan imports almost 
all her oil — and the hope of 
cuts in domestic interest rates' 
has yet to be felt For British 
investors a cut in Japanese 
rates would probably weaken 
the yen despite giving an 
almost certain boost to shares. 
The question then would be 
whether more yen still meant 
more pounds. 

Martin Baker 



. . 


Frank Yantin: The goodwill value of my business over 14 years was takes from me’ 

Legacy for a landlord 


The law is frill of strange 
quirks. Fortunately, most re- 
main of interest to solicitors 
only. 

But two years ago a pharma- 
cist, Frank Yantin, suffered 
the practical financial con- 
sequences of what be claims to 
be an anomaly in the landlord 
and tenant legislation, causing 
him and other tenants to lose 
thousands of pounds for the 
goodwill of their businesses. 

in April 1971 Mr Yantin 
bought a 14-year lease and an 
existing pharmacy business 
from bis landlord. Mr Yantin 
said he built up a successful 
business and before the expiry 
of the lease applied for a new 
one under the landlord and 
tenant legislation. 

The landlord opposed the 
granting of a new lease on the 
ground that he intended to 
occupy the premises for his 
own business. If a landlord 
refuses a new lease to a tenant 
in these circumstances, a ten- 
ant is normally entitled to 
compensation. 

Legally, the formula for 
compensation is worked out 
on the basis of a strict 
arithmetical calculation and it 
does not attempt any proper 
valuation of goodwill. It is 
based on a multiplier of the 
rateable value of the property. 

Mr Yantin said: “In Janu- 
ary 1984 1 finally negotiated a 
deal with the landlord, which 
included compensation of 
about £8,000, and the landlord 
would not press for any of my 
obligations under the lease. 
The landlord immediately 
started his own retail phar- 
macy in the premises, and 
some three months later he 
sold the business to a third 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN 10.00% 

Adam & Company 10.00% 

3CCI 10m 

Cititank Sawingsf 10.75% 

ConsoMasd Crds 10.00% 

ContmenteJ Trust 10.00% 

Co-operative Bank 10.00% 

C. Hoars & Co —10.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai™. 10.00% 

LLoyds Bank. 10.00% 

Nat Westminster 1000% 

Royal Bank of Scotland 10.00% 

TSB 10.00% 

Citibank NA 10-00% 

t Mortgage Bate Rate. 


partv for a substantial sum. 

“The goodwill value of my 
business over 14 years was 
taken from me and sold by the 
landlord to a third party. The 
landlord was totally witbin his 
legal rights but the present law 
allows a landlord to take over 
a business with minimal 
compensation." 

A spokesman from the Na- 
tional Pharmaceutical Associ- 
ation highlighted the case^of 
another tenant pharmacist: "A 
landlord who was a pharma- 
cist himself decided to go 
abroad fora while. He sold his 
business but retained the 
premises, granting another 
pharmacist a lease of the shop. 

"The landlord returned say- 
ing he wanted the shop back 
for his own use, and in effect 
he got his business back 
without having to pay for any 
goodwill. 

“We do not objeet in prin- 
ciple to a landlord not renew- 
ing a lease, but what we do 
object to is the virtual total 
absence of compensation. We 
have made representations for 
change both direct to the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry and via the National 
Chamber of T rade.” 

The National Chamber of 
Trade bas been campaigning 
for reform in the compensa- 
tion provisions for about 20 
years. A spokesman said: "We 
believe the levels of 
compensation should be* 
much higher. There is a 
desperate oversight in the 
legislation by not considering 
the value of goodwill when a 
landlord takes over and car- 
ries on the same business as 
the tenanL 

“We feel that compensation 
for shop premises should be at 
a higher rate than for other 
business premises, as the 
goodwill of a shop is essen- 
tially annexed to the 
premises." 

In 1984 the Department of 
the Environment sent out a 
circular to both individuals 
and various groups asking for 
their comments with a view to 
reviewing (he compensation 
and other aspects of the 
Landlord and Tenant Act 

The department's spokes- 
woman said: “We studied all 
the responses but we did not 
fed there was a strong enough 
case 10 amend the Act at that 
stage. Generally most people 
thought that the Act was 
working well in this respect 

“In May 1985, we did 
increase the multipliers of the 



1 “* 


N 

E 

T 



GUARANTEED 1 YEAR 
BUIUMNG SOCIETY RETURN 


Folowwigttwowe^ulKcnohwiol 
ou» £3 notion TBB (fawersary 
Issue) we are debgfKed to be able 
to otter me same terms agam. 
Investors «w nave tfter money 
daudedto secure a guaranteed 
] year return at 14\ net on Iher 
accoum « 0 i one afthe biggest 
Societies and the balance 
invested n a £500 mAon 
Managed fund that has averaged 
17.6% jw. ner of charges 
smee it Started m 197 7 1 


Thi* dff®r may dose fai day*. 

Cafl 0272-276954 now 
for a Rmervation N u mb er . 

*at basic tax. 1-13.10 77 - L686 
A*n. investment £ZOOO 


TELEPHONE NO. 



Your Own 
Personal Investment Manager 
From Only £ 5 , 000 ! 

Now you con enjoy oil the benefits of professional 
investment management with from as little as £5,000. 

Lancash i re & Yorksh ire Portfolio Management will 
assign one of their experts to create and manage a 
porno I io of stocks and sha res ex pressly for you . 

Tofind out more about this, and other unique 
services from Lancashire and Yorkshire, simply fill in 
the coupon or phone 01-377 2727 between 10.00 am 
and 2.00 pm erf weekends or between 8.30 am and 
6.00 pm Monday to Friday. 

Qotest information technology 

H receive full recordsof all transactions 

B rompt withdrawal, without penalty, on 
any Stock Exchange Settlement Day 


LANCASHIRE &YORKSHTRE 


Lancashire & Yorkshire Portfolio Management Limited: 

52-54 Artillery Lone, London El 7LS. 

Please send me, without obi igation, full details of your 

•PB50NAL SiDCKMARKErSBVKB 



HOW MUCH MORE CAN YOU GET 
OUT OF A BUIUHNG SOCIETY? 




• HomewDOT 1 invest- __ . ; 

I mens are exempt BRADFORD 
fora tax. so your &BENGLEY 

I savings are free from lax. Which 

means tbw earn Tn<w-orer3IW more. I 

WOCHUIE | 

I *±fWU)S22070[24hr,) 

| — Plemewoir ref: TSO&09T2 


POSTCODE. 


FREEPOST 

nostampneeded 


MSHFSi 


V ,l,L 

■ ^ ■ 


rateable value to lake into 
account levels of inflation. We 
do monitor and look at the 
situation constantly." 

But the National Chamber 
of Trade is not leuing the 
matter drop and at present has 
a working party which is 
looking at the whole question 
of landlord and tenant. The 
spokesman said: “I con- 
fidently predict that when the 
working party report comes 
out, we will again be looking 
for compensation for 
goodwill." 

Landlords would argue that 
the present arithmetical for- 
mula can already work out 
extremely costly. A spokes- 
man for one landlord said: 
"Because it is a mere rough 
and ready average, it can work 
out unfairly expensive to a 
landlord, particularly in cases 
where the tenant is not suffer- 
ing any really serious loss 
other than removal expenses.” 

The debate will no doqbt 
continue for many, years to 
come. Meanwhile, toe prop- 
erty solicitor Peter Denley has 
a general piece of advice that 
may be helpful: "If a tenant 
wants to renew his lease,. but 
the landlord is claiming' the 
property back on the basis that 
he wants it for himself, the 
tenant should always take the 
matter to court and make the 
landlord prove his case. 

“If it subsequently turns out 
that the landlord was not 
genuine, and did not really 
intend to use the property 
himself, the tenant can then 
make use of a little known 
claim for damages, which, 
although.. qj$L . widely . appre- 
ciated, is actually set out in 
Section 35 of The Landlord 
and Tenant Act” 

Susan Fieldman 


TRIPLE BONUS BOND 
FIFTH ISSUE 


OFFBt CLOSES 
AT E2 MILLION 
OR 15TH OCTOBER 


Ti\fc 


r- i:: 

i-; 

L-Svr. .*• 

L' -r • : 

























THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/5 




andlorj 


V .•'.J... i 






Accidents will happen. 


EEC STATES OFFERING MEDICAL AID WITH E111 CERTIFICATE 


crises can 


No one warns to think about 

illness while on holiday or on 

short business trips abroad. 
Accidents do happen how- 
cycr, and useful savings can be 
j*J*dC“ indeed a large medical 
bill can be avoided — by 
knowing how to obtain recip- 
rocal health services. 

All member countries of the 
EEC ofTer emergency medical 
caTe J. n . some *°rm on the same 
conditions as for their own 
nationals. While not all ser- 
vices are free, they are cer- 
tainly cheaper than private 
care. 

Reciprocal. medical care in 
the Community applies to 
short-stay visitors, such as 
those on holiday, abroad on 
family visits, or on short 
business trips. Those intend- 
ing to live or work abroad 
should consult their local 
DHSS office or write direct to 
the DHSS. Overseas Branch 
g^-^wastle upon Tyne 

To qualify for public medi- 
cal care, you must be a 
national of the UK or another 
EEC state, or a stateless person 
or refugee, and currently live 
in the UK. Dependants — 
wife, husband, children under 
16 or under 19 if in full-time 
education - arc also eligible, 
whatever their nationality and 


whether or not they travel 
abroad alone. Someone living 
at the same address as you ana 
having care of your children 
has the same rights as a 
spouse. 

To obtain basic medical 
care abroad it is vital to toy 
hands on the El 1 1 certificate. 
You should apply through 
your local social- security of- 
fice. which has copies of leaflet 
SA30 1986. Inside the leaflet 
you will find your goal — 
application form CMI. The 

A simple statement 
may be needed 

completed form should be 
returned some weeks before 
the trip because, not surpris- 
ingly. quite a lot of paperwork 
is involved. 

The certificate, which used 
to have to be renewed for 
every foreign visit, is valid for 
two years. It is advisable to 
keep it with your passport 

If there is no time to secure 
the certificate before leaving 
and you know medical treat- 
ment will be required, contact 
the local health insurance 
authorities in the country 
being visited and ask them to' 
obtain it from the DHSS 
Overseas Branch (at the New- 


Today, you are 
what you live in 


When it cones to house 
buying, it seems there's no 
business like show business. If 
you turn out for Manchester 
United or tread the boards at 
the Palladium, it seems you 
are more likely than the rest of 
us to be able to afford the most 
desirable of residences. . 

That at least is the coudn- 
siou to can .be drawn Iran 
some fascinating statistics re- 
leased by the Natioaal A 
Provincial Building Society 
last week. 

The NatPro took the an- 
swers to all those gruelling 
questions they ask you when 
you take out a mortgage and 
fed them through the com- 
puter. The result was an 
exhaustive “who buys what 
for hour much on what loan" 
analysis of the 11,442 mort- 
gagees tofaom they gave the 
yes between April and June 
this year. 

One of the findings is that 
professional entertainers pay 
more for their houses than 
peope in other uccupatfonu — 
an avenge £71332 to be 
prec ise. Close behind were top 
managers, company directors, 
estate agents and surveyors — 
although one might bare 
thought the last two groups 
would be better than most at 
picking out a bargain. At the 
bottom of the 69 categories 
into which NatPro slices its 
mortgagess into are factory 
workers, labourers and, bot- 
tom of all, miners, who pay on 
average £17,635 for a 
dwelling. 


Perhaps not too surpris- 
ingly. the affluency rating b 
turned upside down when it 
comes to who has to borrow 
most to buy. The avenge 
miner will borrow 94.4 per 
cent of hb purchase price from 
the NatPro but professional 
entertainers need only 60 A 
per cent They get the rest 
presumably from the tele- 
vision commercial fees or the 
cup- winning bonus and die 
sale of the humble abode 
bought when they were stuck 
at tie foot of the ladder. 

Curiously, women who de- 
scribe themselves as house- 
wives heed less help from a 

mortgage than any other cate- 
gory, asking the bdMljig soci- 
ety for only 56£ percent 

Some of the other figures in 
the survey would keep a keen 
sodolgist busy for years. 
While the average person 
tends to buy a house Aat cost 
three times as much as Us or 
her salary there are great 
variations. Why, for example, 
should a post office engineer 
pay mi average 3.7 (hues his 
salary for a house when the 
figure b 1.9 for a miner? One 
answer may be that the en- 
gineer fives in a prosperous 
area and is coufideat about 
receiving a steadily rising 
salary while the miner is 
scared for hb future in an area 
already beset by high un- 
employment and stagnant 
property prices. 

Richard Lander 


Get a top 
school fees 
plan now and 
decide which 
school later. 


planning in advance for your f diikft private 

education can save you 

PorexampIe,withanEquitabIepUn^nalang8 

annual contributions totalling 

C5s3SSSSSS»? 

~SS=£SS£3=Eg: 

sdraol if yoii child moves,or era) to another child, 

“““Smore convenient, yon can vary the 
amounts and the intervals between making your 

details on Hk Equitable* ouotan- 
**E3i school fee m * e 
^orspeakto^™^^. 



Tb. V * » hem S 


KwfMrMwMgL 
Adihw* — 

ftmcofr — 

Datrtrt Birth — 



THilHnmr 


COUNTRY 


Belgium 


normally 

COMPLEMENTARY 


SOME CHARGES FOR 


1 234 


castle address above) by France 
applying on form El 07. 

The helpful leaflet SA36. 


1234 


The helpful leaflet SA36. 
which is issued with the El 1 1 
certificate, gives instructions 
on both the procedure and 
where to go in all EEC 
countries, but it has not -yet 
been updated to include Spain 
and Portugal. 

No certificate is required for 
visits 10 Denmark. Gibraltar. - 
Portugal or Ireland, but sim- 
ply a UK passport in the first 
three destinations. In Den- 
mark. if you are charged, 
present the receipts to the 
social and health department 
of the local council for a 
refund. 

In Portugal and Ireland 
indicate to the doctor or 
hospital authorities that treat- 
ment is requested under EEC 
social security regulations. 
You may be asked to complete 
a simple statement. 

The use to which the El 1 1 
certificate can be put is set out 
on the accompanying table. 
Apart from immediate medi- 
cal attention during a visit, 
pensioners and their depen- 
dants or those receiving indus- 
trial injuries benefit- may be 
able to obtain wider cover. 
Free or reduced-cost treat- 
ment applies only if under- 
taken by doctors and hospitals 


REFUNDS 


About 75% refunded 
by-Belgian sickness 
insurance fund 

70%-80% refunded by 
French sickness 
insurance office 

Refunds by Greek 
social insurance 
- foundation 


WHY ACCEPT 
LESS? 



Greece — 134 Refunds 

. . social in 

- fount 

Italy ■ .123'. 4 • - 

Luxembourg 1 234 Partial n 

- LuxembOtB 

insurant 

Netherlands 13 2 4 

Spain- 13 2 4' 

west Germany ' 2 3 14 • - 

KEY: 1 HosotaJtreatmert 2 Dental treatnwm3CKtwm«Scaitr^ metfidnas 


Partial refund by 
Uixembourg sickness 
insurance office 


6 MONTH 
TERM SHARE. 

GUARANTEED 
FIXED RATE 

With a minimum of £10,000, your money can 
earn one of the highest rates offered by any Building 
Society. And that rate is fixed for 6 months. 

Should you need your money, withdrawals can 
be made instantly, with only 30 days loss of interest. 

If you’re looking for more from your investment 
fill in the coupon — or visit one of our branches. 

• nwMunln, whnr taawr tn n 1 UK! a tor hate 


To lemUi^toa Spa Bonding Sodctv, FREEPOST. PO Box I, LEAMINGTON SPA. 

WswKtoiilrc.CV}24BR CMnuDpmpM*) 


TheEqiSableLifej 


operating under the sickness 
insurance scheme of the coun- 
try concerned. 

Not all costs are refundable 
but the local sickness office 
will pay those that are. Re- 
funds should be applied for in 
person or by post before 
leaving the country — other- 
wise, it may noi be possible to 
receive expenses returning 
home or there may be a delay. 

The DHSS makes a special 
point of warning against ra- 
bies and the immediate action 
that should be taken in case of 
a bite or scratch; 

Even in the countries listed, 
the' cover given under local 


schemes is not always as 
comprehensive as in the UK. 
Travel insurance is still a very 
useful top-up as under recip- 
rocal agreements: 

• The cost of repatriation to 
the UK is never covered 

• If visiting a listed country 
but staying in an area border- 
ing one without reciprocal 
assistance, in an emergency 
you may be sent to a hospital 
across the border 

• Some European countries 
do not give free medical 
assistance — Switzerland Tur- 
key. Andorra. Cyprus. Faroe 
Islands. Liechtenstein, Mo- 
naco. San Marino 


• Some stales give only partial 
medical coverfree 

• Complimentary medical 
help is not given- in such 
countries as Australia. Canada 
or the United States . 

• Motor accidents are not 
always covered and you 
should check with your insure ; 
a nee company or motoring ! 
organization before leaving 
the UK. 

Among EEC states. Greece 
is singled out by the DHSS as 
the one country where private 
medical insurance is 
recommended 

Conal Gregory 


□ tWceaetowicheqaelwi 

to be a n ra te d to die 6 Month Term Share Account. 

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LEAMINGTON SPA 

BUILDING SOCIETY 


MAKING MORE OF YOUR INVESTMENT 

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Imagine ordering a meal in a restaurant 
without seeing the prices. 

Never. Yet it happens with bank charges. 

And if you're running a small business 
it's the sort of unknown expense you can well 
do without. 

. So we’ve derided go publish a Standard 
Business Tariff that cells you exactly what each 
service costs. 

Thus you can esri m are . in advance what 
you’ll be paying. 

And to make control of your cash flow, 
easier still, we’re now charging monthly 
instead of quarterly. 

You may even be able to reduce your 


charges by using some of our other services. 

Direct debits, for example, are cheaper 
than standing orders, a Cashpoint card less 
expensive than a cheque for withdrawals. 

And our new Telepay service can also 
save you money and reduce paperwork. 

We may, however, handle a large amount 
of cash or cheques for you. In which case we 
will tailor our charges accordingly. 

Your Lloyds Bank manager will be more 
chan happy to discuss this with you. 

The Standard Business Tariff is just part 
of our range of services to business. 

If you'd like further details call us, free, on 
0800 444140 or cut out the coupon. 


We'll send you the information imme- 
diately. There’ll be no service charge of course. 

|" Tk Lloyds Bank Pic, Standard Business Tariff, | 
| FREEPOST, Newbury, Berkshire RG 13 2DE. j 

I Please send me details of your Standard Business Tariff J 
| and Services co Business. | 

j N «|E PC-.TTWN I 

■ M^-re&.KAMtAKDADPfl FV. , 


.m£PHOKTNlV 


NATURCOf BUHKE&. 


I I am 1 am. no* a custom of Uoyd» Bank. My bunch my mat I 
| co m*emtnl branch i, , ’ * | 



Lloyds 

Bank 


You gain because we re 


A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 

Lloyds Bank Pic, 71 Lombard Srrcrt,London EOP 3E6. . 


f 






THE. 1 1MES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY /6 



2 


if, 

mn 


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xml 


The right class of cash 


SCHOOL FEES 


children are 

Fees Loan 
Plan can give you 

access to money to help you pay the fees. 

It provides,a flexible cash fund which you can 
use to pay ail oY part of the fees due through 
each school yeac Or simply as a safety net - just 
in case... 

This really is a quick ancLeasy wayTo tafce-the 
sting out of school fees. For ‘the full facts, 
complete and return the coupon - today. 


The School Fees Loan Plan has been designed by financial 
con^uli.inis Claremont Savile jointly with National Westminster 
Bank PLC and ISIS (the Independent Schools Information Service). 

To: The ISIS Manacec National We-um inkier Bank PL C. FREEPOST, 
London EC2B 2ED. (NO STAMP REQUIRE Di. 

Mr/M ix/ Mi,-. 


PrM Code I 

'rrl'u'ii' ni«M h< IX imp. w oljn L"un. su^kxi in 4jim jn.] vnajui.xi. S.vuniv and I 

I in^uidiu.' »>ll N i MuiKiL riji.in.ini Saule itahnr.il .|.;dn hmkjr . 

$j&&- INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS | 

j INFORMATION SER l 'ICE 

{ A National Westminster Bank PLC j 

I RdirwcTcd Olficc -it Loihlmri. London K ?P2BP T 619 | 


With the new school year 
starting many parents will be 
scanning their bank state- 
ments to see how on earth they 
are going to pay the fees. 

Ideally everyone bent on 
private education should have 
been saving up for years for 
just this contingency. But 
good- financial planning re- 
quires both foresight and 
money, and many parents will 
have no option but to borrow. 
More and more lenders are 
jumping on the lucrative 
school fees bandwagon. They 
should be only too keen to 
offer you a-loan. 

Typically, such loans are 
secured by a second mortgage 
ora remortgage of the family's 
home. Simultaneously, a life 
assurance policy or a personal 
pension plan is taken out, the 
maturity value of which is 
used to repay the borrowing. 

The cost of immediate fi- 
nance schemes falls into two 
categories - the premiums 
payable on the life assurance 
or pension policy, and the 
selling-up costs, plus, of 
course, the interest on the 
loan. 

One such scheme, which 
has been on the market for a 
few years, is run by London 
Law financial Services in 
association with Security Pa- 
cific Trust and the National 
Mutual Life Assurance Soci- 
ety. Here, loans can be taken 
for five to 30 years, and can be 
for as little as £1,000 or as 
much as £100.000. How much 
you can borrow, of course, will 
depend on the value of the 
property, the size of the 
outstanding mortgage and 
your income. 

Under this scheme, there is 
a single administration fee of 


How will you pay for next term’s fees? 


Rirenis can be provided with a substantial reserve of funds. 
These funds may be drawn upon as and when required. Next 




of years. 

Parents need take only’ the minimum loan necessary at any 
one time. 

Interest is only charged on actual borrowings, not on total 
allocated funds. 

Loans are available for terms up to 30 years -this reduces 
cost 

Tax efficient arrangements are available. 


London Law Financial Services LuL, Bailey 
House. Old Seacoal Lane, Ludgate Hill, London 
EC4M7LR. 01-236 6105/8. 


P/ease send me details of The School Fees Plan. 


NAME 

ADDRESS. 


£80, and interest on the loan is 
currently 13.75 per cent This 
is debited monthly and is 
charged only on the actual 
borrowings. What is more, 
should you be in a position to 
reduce the loan, capital reduc- 
tions can be made at any time 
without penally.. 

In conjunction with the 
Independent Schools' 
Information Service (ISIS), 
the National Westminster 
Bank offers the School fees 
Loan Plan. Parents using this 
scheme can borrow up to 70 
per cent of the total value of 
the security, less any existing 
mortgage, provided the 
amount is no more than two 
and a half times one parent's 
income. 

Once the size of the loan has 
been agreed, an education 
fund is set up by the bank, 
from which drawings can be 
made over five years. Repay- 
ment of the borrowing, how- 
ever. is within 10 to 25 years, 
and is met by the proceeds of a 
low-cost endowment policy. 

There should also 
be a surplus 

The interest on the loan is 
charged at Natwest's base rate 
plus 2.5 per cenL 

To demonstrate the likely 
cost of taking out a School 
Fees Loan Plan, NalWest 
provided an illustration based 
on a father aged 45 borrowing 
£10,500 for 15 years. Assum- 
ing that £2.100 is withdrawn 
from the education fund for 
each of the first five years, and 
that the interest rate remains 
unchanged at 12.5 per cent, 
the cost of the borrowing 
would be £17,330.76. You 
would also be charged security 
and withdrawal fees amount- 
ing to £196 and £8 a year for 
ISIS membership. 


In addition, of course, there 
are the low-cost endowment 
policy premiums. NatWest 
quoted £34.83 per month 
using Gerical. Medical & 
General The projected ma- 
turity value of the policy, 
however, should provide suf- 
ficient funds to leave a surplus 
after the loan has been repaid. 

Connaught Swift has devel- 
oped a similar scheme, the 
School Fees Funding Pro- 
gramme. Loans are provided 

Both types of 
finance offered 

either by merchant bankets 
Kleinwon Benson or one of 
two. building societies, and 
borrowers can choose to pay a 

stabilized or a fluctuating rate 
of interest. With the former, 
the rate is fixed for 12 months 
at a time. It is reviewed 
annually and may be adjusted 
in line with market con- 
ditions. At present the sta- 
bilized rate is 10 per cent and 
the fluctuating rate II per 
cenL 

Using the same assump- 
tions made by NatWest, it 
would cost a 44-year-old fa- 
ther £15,015 to borrow 
£10.500 at the current rate of 
11 per cent The monthly 
premiums using a low-cost 
endowment policy with 
Friends' Provident would be 
£32.82. 

Alternatively. Connaught 
Swift suggests a personal pen- 
sion plan. Where possible, this 
is worth considering, particu- 
larly if you are a high rate 
taxpayer, as there is tax relief 
on the contributions. How- 
ever, it must be remembered 
that using part of your pension 
to pay off the school fees loan 
will reduce the amount you 
have to meet your retirement 
needs. 


Similar loan schemes are 
offered by NEL Britannia and 
Standard Life. The minimum 
loan from NEL's Flexible 
School Fees Plan is £15,001, 
and drawings can be made 
either as fees fail due or in a 
lump sum so that fees can be 
paid in advance. 

The loan can be repaid at 
any time, but a charge is levied 
if this is within the fust four 
years. The current rate of 
interest on the loan is 11 per 
cent for first mortgages and 13 
per cent for second. 

Standard Life has teamed 
up with the Bank of Scotland 
to provide its Assured School 
Fees Plan. Again, the loan can 
either be taken as a lump sum 
or withdrawn in stages. The 
loan can be for 10 to 25 years, 
and the interest rate is Bank of 
Scotland base rate, currently 
10 per cent plus 225 per cenL 

The two latest entrants to 
the market are Barclays Bank 
and Abbey Life. Barclays, 
together with Norwich Union 
offers parent schemes for both 
forward planning and im- 
mediate nuance. For the lat- 
ter, the current rate of interest 
is 12.5 per cent and there is an 
arrangement foe of £100. 

Likewise, Abbey Life offers 
both types of finance. Where a 
loan is needed, a remortgage 
or second charge is arranged 
for £100-200. The rate of 
interest for the former is 1 1 J 
per cent and for the latter, 12 
to 13.75 percent 

The long-established School 
Fees Insurance Agency (SFIA) 
also arranges loans. However, 
unlike other schemes, these 
are unsecured. A maximum of 
£25.000 can be borrowed and 
repayment is over 15 years 
using a non-profit endowment 
policy, which is less attractive 
than a with-profits policy but 
keeps the costs down. There 



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E-VX-sA,...., „ .*++ _ ... 


It’s the best but the best money must be found too 


are no administration fees, 
and interest is charged at bank 
base rate plus 3 per cenL 

Oearly. immediate finance 
is anything but cheap, and 
indeed Dennis Hulls, of SFIA, 
is quick to state that it should 
be used only as a last resort 
Bui if you do decide to take a 
loan, make sure you are fully 
aware of the commitment 
involved - ask for a full 
illustration of the likely cost 
and, if your home is the 
security, check how easy a 
house move will be. Interest-' 
ingly. many parents wbo are 


offered a loan have second 
thoughts — they would prefer 
to sell the car. or even the 
house. 

Amanda Pardoe 

Abbey life. 0202 292373; 
Barclays Bank. 01-626 1567; 
Claremont Savilie. 0990 
28787; Connaught Swift, 01 - 
250 3348; London Law Finan- 
cial Services. 01-236 6105: 
National Westminster Bank. 
01-726 1088: NEL Britannia. 
0306 887766: SFIA. 0628 
34291; Standard Life. 031-225 
2551 


How you can win and collect that bad debt 

owed money is bad have the responsibility of “They generally seem to be the comparison the county largely by result and it is 
. but being unable to recovering the money owed. unaware of the procedure," he court bailiffs found that twice therefore in their interests to 


Being owed money is bad 
enough, but being unable to 
recover the debt even after 
winning in court is worse. 
Recently published figures do 
little to restore confidence in 
some of the courts' debt 
enforcement procedures. 

The county court can deal 
with debts up to £5,000. If you 
win the case, the recovery of 
the debt is often in the hands 
of the court bailiffs. Since 
September 1. 1984, county 
court judgments of more than 
£2.000 can, in fact, be recov- 
ered in the High Court 

The High Court is desi 
to deal with large debts. It is 
often the sheriff? officers who 


have the responsibility of 
recovering the money owed. 

So, which court is most 
likely to get your money back? 

The comparison in the table 
was compiled by Andrew 
Wilson, Under Sheriff of Lan- 
cashire. “The study shows that 
if a judgment over £2,000 is 
transferred into the High 
Court from the county court, 
it is nearly twice as likely to be 
satisfied in full and over twice 
as likely to be satisfied in full 
or in part." he says. 

So why were only 141 
county court judgments trans- 
ferred during the first year of 
the scheme? According to Mr 
Wilson, it is solicitors' inertia. 


“They generally seem to be 
unaware of the procedure," he 
says. 

Keith Downing, a debt- 
collection solicitor with Sur- 
rey firm Crellins, does not fell 
into this category: “As a 
general rule, particularly 
where we think there will be 
no valid defence, we auto- 
matically issue proceedings in 


the High Court for debts over 
£600. The High Court proce- 
dure is quicker and more 
aggressive. The sheriffs’ offi- 
cers are a much more forceful 
remedy than the baliffs.” 

The study seems to sup 
Mr Downing's views. Mr _ 
son says: “In one section of 


the comparison the county 
court bailiffs found that twice 
as many debtors had left their 
last given address. Could this 
mean that the sheriffs’ officers 
have all the luck or just that 
they are better at finding 
debtors?" 

Could the reason for the 
better results from the High 
Court sheriffs be something to 
do with how they are paid? . 

Mr Wilson says: “The 
county court bailiffs are paid 
by salary. They are treated as 
having done their work by the 
numbers of warrants they deal 
with, not by how much they 
collect. The High Court 
sheriffs' officers are paid 


try to recover. 

A spokesman for the Lord 
Chancellor's Department 
says: “The bailiffs have a 
much heavier workload and 
they get the wrong end of the 
stick dealing with tiny 
amounts and with people who 
have less capacity to pay. 

“We are in the middle of a 
civil justice review looking in 
particular at the enforcement 
of debts. We hope to publish a 
consultation paper at the end 
of the year." 

In the meantime, if you are 
owed money, you should ask 
your solicitor which court he 



High 

County 


Court 

court 

Satisfied 
in full 

29% 

15£% 

Satisfied 

In part 

18% 

4.9% 

Not 

satisfied 

53% 

79.9% 


M&G SECOND GENERAL 
30 th BIRTHDAY 


The figures for the High Court are 
based on a 1 2 -month period. They 
refer to those cases tr ans fe r red 
from the county courts to the High 
Court The county court figures 
were compiled over a t hr ee- month 
period from a represe nta t iv e selec- 
tion of county courts for warrants 
ove r £2,000 

will be using, what are the 
alternative methods of enfor> 
ing a judgment, and what is 
the likelihood of recovering 
the debt There is, after all, no 
point in throwing good money 
after bad. gp 


MONTHLY 


INCOME 


ACCOUNT 



Over the last thirty years you probably could not 
have held a unit trust with a better performance than 
M&G SECOND GENERAL 

£1,000 invested at its launch in June 1956 would 
now be worth £67,208 with all income reinvested, 
compared with £8,104 from a similar investment in a 
budding society. To have maintained its purchasing 
power over the period, £1,000 would need to have 
grown to £8,748. 

The British Stockmarket has been strong for a 
number of years, which is why many investors are 
now looking at overseas markets for new investment 
opportunities. But concentration in one particular 
area can produce very volatile investment results, 
and this year's high flier can often be next year's poor 
performer. You should be wary of short-term per- 
formance claims, such as the ‘‘Over 50% growth in 
just five months" quoted recently for a European 
unit trust 

M&G has two International Funds which solve the 
problem by spreading your investment effectively among 
the major stockmarkets of the world. 

The M&G International Income Fund aims to 
provide a high income, and one that can be expected to 
increase over the years, from an international portfolio of 
equities. 

The M&G International Growth Fund aims for all-out 
capital growth by investing in the major stockmarkets of 
the world. 

If you remain optimistic about the British Stockmarket 
and want a balanced portfolio, look at M&G SECOND 
GENERAL which aims for consistent growth of income 
and capital from a wide spread of shares mainly in British 
companies. 


SECOND GENERAL PERFORMANCE TABLE 

vafce of £LOOO invested on 5th June 1956. 


Date 

M&G 

SECOND 

F.T. Ordinary 
Index 

BurWing 

Society 

5 June ’56 

£LOOO 

£1000 

£1000 

31 Dec ’66 

£2,996 

£2,472 

£1,699 

31 Dec 76 

£7,812 

£3359 

£3,437 

5 June *86 

£67,208 

£21042 

£84.04 


NOTES: AD figures include renvested income net of base -tare tax. 

Tie BuflrtngSoctetv figures are based on an extra merest account offemg 
above the average yeaity rate (source: Bulking Societies 
Association). M&G SECOND GENERAL ftgjres are realisation values. 


£1,000 or more and 2 % if you invest £10;000 or more in any 
of these three unit trusts before 31st October 1986. 

The price of units and the income from them may 
go down as well as up. This means that unit trusts are a 
long-term investment and not suitable for money you 
may need at short notice. 

INTERNATIONAL PERFORMANCE TABLE. v*ue on 1st September 1986 
cf £1.000 owes edsithe launch of M&G's two International Funds. 


Launch 

Date 

M&G 

Unit Trust 

Bunding 

Society 

International 



Income May ’85 

£1238 

£1105 

International 



Growth Dec ’67 

£12375 

£4,585 


'% 


(NET) 


NOTcS: AD figures include invested income net of base -rate lax. 

The Butting Society figures are based on an extra merest account offering 
1- above the average yearly rate (source: Bufcliyg Sooeties 
Assooalwn). MS G figiies are realisation values. 


FURTHER INFORMATION On 3 rd fr’Otenbor 05$ ottered 
P x:o AM po-,3 o/nrnr yieirfr mse 

Income Accumulation Yield 
International Income 64 3p 66 Op 5 03% 

International Growth 818 6pxd 1317 9p 1 44% 

SECOND GENERAL 774 4p 1528 6p 3 62% 

P»i>:ei and vietti .iprcir daily in the Financal Times The 
fttfetenit? btfAt'en me once tot whicn vou suv uniisi 

jno the b<d puce la! which you setl! is normally b' Ao in.hal 
thar.^r ot 5‘- n> included in the offered pnee and an annual 
c r»tj;u of ud to To death Fund*, calue-ci: newly -Me»ceot 

international Inceme. which 1 * Y -.! - plus VAT n deducted torn 
pros' income. Income lor Accumulation ‘5 reinvested to 
incifj'*.- ‘.heir . jiue jnd lot Income units it is distributed net ot 
lute rate tax on me following djt«: 

International International 

Income Growth SECOND 


IXctrlhi itiiuic 1 Ju " e 20 M3r 15 FBb 

Drstridi lions iDoc 20 Sop IS Aug 


I Ail applications far n,000 or more received by 31st October. 1986 wiifl be given an extra 
1*4 allocation of units, increasing to 2% for appficatians at £10,000 or more per Bind. 

I To; M&G SECURITIES LIMITED, THREE QUAYS, TOWER HILL LONDON EC3R 6BQ 
Please invest the sumis' instated below m the Fundls} ol my chore (minimum investment in 

I each Fund: £1,000} m ACCUMULATION/INCOME units (delete as applicable or Accumulation 
umts will be is&ued fer international Growth and SECOND and Income units wdJ be issued for 

I interna trcnal Income} at the cnce ruling or receipt of this application. 

DO NOT SENO ANY MONEY. A contraa note wdl be sent to you stating exactly tow much you owe 
and the settlement date Tour certificate will 

Rssssr- I 


you can pu> Of wh Mills or. jnv business day Conwcts 
purchase w m!c will be due tor settlement h*: ic three wee* s 
tu!c* Remuneration w pavaMe to -KGr edited agent'., rue* ji« 
available on t*juesi the trustee lor International Growth is 
Barrta-.T. &a«n* Trusi Co. Limited and for International income 
and SECOND GENERAL i; Uoyds Bank Pin T.ie Funcs are an 
wider ranee investments andareautfipnsedbytheSecrctar.of 
State lor Trade and Industry 

M&G Securities United Three Quays. Tow HSL 
London EC3R 68Q. Tel: 01-626 4588. 

Member Crf the L'ml Trust AsSCCMhon 



LL1L 


• Our now Monthly Income Account puts [ XT V ? 

interest at your fingertips every month, paying j i\ I , 

our top rate oflU5*. I \| *”*1 fl |f/ 8 

• And all you need is £1000 to open an account, j M W w I mM W \ M ^ m 

• Give us 90 days* notice of withdrawals and j J ^ 

access, aii you lose is 90 day** j National^ Provincial Building Society 

interest on tho amount withdrawn I J 

• Or leave a balance of £10,000 and there’ll be I ' * 

no loss of interest for Immediate withdrawaL \ m Poac** 

• if you'd like to cash in on our new account, j ^ l ^ iya ‘* e l ll * tar£ wiwin l « t Mi d^,H < ^ trl nc ^ 

call in at any of our branches or fill in the j xvamia — : — ^5 . ^ ***? j ^ j 

COU P° n - 

movniou BUiUKWisoa grv. rwgporfMWSKg. west vo*ia»gMK>rflm.AmHrmij,Tp<mQooTTO rower <TTPWOTcotiiie-rnt ra»c« irrTii.,.**~ 

vwfftQHi.rowwTHe*nHi»iWCQHX*cgouwTiMTTwr*CTi««awNXT.ii^orowBqunwij l irrwHn<-pixgHuo*T-n4»BScwL " OTM *" gCTTO 


. I M O N 


T H L Y 


INCOME 


ACC O U N 


THE M&G GROUP 





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THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/7 


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Higher insurance 
oh the road ahead 


C LLOYD’S .) 

Lhjyd"s of London this week 
its Global Accounts 
wr 1983, showing together the 
results of all the different 
types of insurance effected In 
the market in' that year. 

ft might seem strange to be 
wonting three years in arrears, 

but this is the system nsed by 

Lloyd's, unlike the insurance 

companies, as it considers this 

puts it in a better position to 
the results of its 
business. 

Clearly Lloyd's results will 
indicate what is likely to 
happen to insurance pre- 
miums, as well as whether 
being a member of Lloyd's is a 
good investment. Lloyd's is, 
after all, the world's largest 
insurer. 

The results showed an over- 
all profit of £36 million for the 
Lloyd’s market, which would 
hare been much belter but for 
the fact that huge losses or 
£143 million cm the troubled 
PCW syndicates were attrib- 
uted to this year. Without 


UNILEVER N.V. 

7%'MtO « PREFERENCE SUB-SHARES 
ISSUED BY 

N.U NEDERLANDSCH AOMmSTROlE- 
-ENTRUSTKANTOOfl 
.WWof 7»<FLOM| Sane No. 
KQ and 8% (R0.72) ferial No 84 nanec- 
Mv *41 be paid On and aftt r T Octobv 
1S6& To obtain Am dhadanda eaniBcasw 
man tm Mad oa Mina forms etXakulto 
from one ol Hn fshwng banks: 

■ MkfemJ Bank pic. Stock &chaaw> Sar- 
rieoa. OapartnMH. Mannar Hum 
P apvaStraM. London EC3NODA. 

■ Northern Sank. UnMud, 2 WVSrinoStraal. 
'BaHaaf HT1 ZEE. 

AUad triah Banka IMM. SacmMoa 
DaoartmaM. Stock Exdianga Bank 
Cantra. Bafebridga. DoMnAT 

Ovdaadala Bank PIC. SO St VincM 
Ptaca. Oobbow: 

Separata forma are ssaSabta tor oaa (a) 
by Bmtka. UX Bros of Stockholm, 
fefcfroi* or Charttrad Accountants (b| by 
odtar cWmanta. Notes on tbc pmoadura. In 
aacn cat*, araprkund on the forms. 

Fsfer datafe ol tba dwldanda may ba 
obtained from the aboso-nacnad btvrks on 
and altar TS Saptambar 1386. 

EXCHANGES of NedNMruat CmtMeanc 
or OffeM Sharaawhara apphcMa lor Croft, 
carts of iub-Uw*s and visa vena w* ba 
SUSPENDED FROM t2 Saptambar 1386 to 
2SfepHmHr I98S. both dam mdkana. 

Certiflcatas w * only bo accaplad for 
exctiango after ZSSottornber 1986 pnmdod ' 
that a> dh mfaiMte d adarad prior to that date 

N.V. NEDB1LAND6CH AOMINISTlMnE- 
ENTKUSTKAMTOOR 

London Ihmcfar OfHoo. Unflmor House. 
Blackfnan. London EC4P 48Q 

v 7% PREFEHENCE 
. DUTCH CBtTIRCAreS OF 
. . FL.tOOOandFL.WO 
The dMdand <m« be paid on and altar 1 
Octobw WBBagairal ■nrendor of Coupon 
No. 103. Coicena may ba oncMmd through 
Mkland Bank pic at the above addraaa or 
i through one of the paying agates in the 
Nathertamfe. Coupons meahed through 
i Mkttand Bank pic (horn wtadh hSar ftatata 
ol tha dhadand may ba obtained) must ba 
Med on a apaeW form obokubta from dm 
Bank which contain* a dedaraMn that the 
cenfUcatoa to which the colons i«Ma do 
not belong to arendantof Ihe Natherianda. 

, 4 Saptambar 1S8B. 


PCW' the profit for the Lloyd's 
members would have been 
£179 million. 

The worst of the PCW 
figures is now behind Lloyd's. 
On a worst case basis PCW 
losses will total £235 million, 
and apart from this year's 
provision, £73 million was 
allocated to PCW for the 1982 
year. 

Moreover, in assessing 
Lloyd's results it is worth 
hearing in mind that not all the 
PCW losses are due to bad 
underwriting. Accountants arc 
currently trying to disentangle 
the figures to ascertain how 
much is attributable to fraud 
■ and bow much to the ordinary 
conduct of business. 

Meanwhile, the number of' 
people becoming members of 
Lloyd's is increasing and those 
who are already members are 
increasing the amount of busi- 
ness they are prepared to 
underwrite — -referred to as 
then* capacity. 

Lloyd's capacity has grown 
from £4.2 billion in 1983 to 
£8.5 billion in 1986. Peter 
Miller, chairman of Lloyd's, 
says that, this was “the result 
not only of a . change of 
membership from 21,601 to 
28,944 hut also a vote of 
confidence by existing mem- 
bers by extending, their under- 
writing commitments, which 
accounted for much of that 
increase". 

As far as the significance for 
UK premium rates is con- 
cerned. perhaps the most in- 
teresting result is that of 
Lloyd's motor insurance busi- 
ness. The market consistently 
provides around 20 per cent of 
the insurance cover for motor 
cars, so it is a fair indicator of 
market trends. 

The news is bleak, at least 
in the short term, with Lloyd's 
premium rates forecast to have 
increased by die end of 1986 
'■by much more than the 9.4 per 
cent increase by the market in 
1985. 

Profits from Lloyd's UK 
motor insurance business fed. 
sharply from £18 million fe< 
1982 to just £4 million in 1983.' 
Moreover, the profits from 
this sector have suffered al- 
most a 90 per cent decline from 
the 1981 result of £39 mHUon. 

Lawrence Lever 


INTEREST 

RATES 

ROUND-UP 


Banks 

Current account — no interest pakt 
Deposit accounts - seven days' 
notice- required tor withdrawals. 
Barclays 4 375 per cant Lloyds 4.30 
per cent. Mid land 4.3$ per cent 
NatWest 4.375 per cent National 
Girobank 435 per cent Fixed tenrr 
deposits £10,000 to £24,999 : 1 
month 6375 per cant 3 months 
6.625 per cent 6 months 6575 per 
cent (National Westminster); 1 
month 6.354 per cent 3 months 
6.634 per cent 6 months 5.354 per 
cent (Midland). Other banks may 
differ. 

MONEY FUNDS 

Fund Net CNAR TetaptaU 

AdfconHunta 

■nonmhrinc. &91 7.13 01 6386070 

BotScattand 695 7.18 01626808) 
Barclays Higher Rub 

Deport Account 

■ tumsajw R63 B.79 D1 626 1567 
ElOOOO&OWr 7.00 7.19 0162G1587 

Cater Atoned 7.10 734 015882777 
Qfcbank 


Return tax-free and Mnked to 
changes in tire Retail prices Index. 
Supplement of 3.00 per cent in the 
first year. 3J25 per cent -in the 
second. 3£0 per cant In the third, 
440 per cent m the fourth and 6.00 
per .cant. In the film. Value of 
Retirement issue Certificates ptr- 
chasad in September 1981 , £147.38 


W 628 1587 
01 B2ET587 

015882777 


Moray MktPkn 740 723 015811422 

HFCTont 7-day 7.75 750 012368391 

Hendara on Moray - 

Chague Account 6 l 95 7.18 0163B5757 
LAGHttitnt.Dep.7_2S 7.38 013883211 

Lloyds MCA • 7 3D 740 01 B36 1500 

U&GHICA &B7 7.10 016284588 

MdbndHICA 

£2jOOO-£9£99 6J5 6.92 0742 20999 

£10000 and over 7JM 7.19 0742 20999 

NatWaatfflgh 
kx Spec Rassf «i 

££OSO-£9S99 6JB8 7U5 017261000 

minoaover 7po 7.19 01 72a 1000 

Opoentwner Moray 

Umunauntn A rm n ir tf 

IrwwCiaOOO 7.10 730 012389362 

owfmooo 729 7.49 012369362 

Royal B of Scotland 

Premaan AccouU 7.10 729 031 5570201 
S&PCafl 690 7.14 070886986 

snowma 

52^00 to 8.73 6S4 0705827733 
twerEIOJM am 7.13 0705BZ7733 

TuBet & ftaey cal 72S 1J3. 012380952 

TiR7rt,y 7^3 7^0 012360952 

Tyntelcrtf 723 7.43 0272732241 
Tynoto 7-day 7.00 7.19 0272 732241 
UoT 7-day ' 7.10 729 016264681 

Western Trust 

1 morab 7.15 739 0732261161 

CNAR - CwbookM N« Annual Rate. 
Fcurcs «e M Uteat avtatabta M Jpa tfera ot 
go ba to pws Research: D. Berm 

National Savings Bank 

Ordinary Accounts — if a minimum 
balance of £100 maintained for 
whole of 1986. 6 per cent Merest 
(xel for aach complete month where 
balance is over £500. otherwises 
per cent investment Accounts - 
10.75 per cent interest paid without 
deduction of tax, one month's 
notice of - withdrawal, maximum 
investment £100,000 

National Savings Income Bond 

Minimum investment £2,000, maxi- 
mum £100.000. Interest 11.25 per 
cant variable at six weeks' notice 
paid monthly without deduction of 
tax. Repayment at 3 months' notice. 
Penalties m first year. 

National Savings Indexed Income 
Bond 

Start rata monthly Income lor first 
year, 8 percent. Increased at end of 
each year to match increase in 
prices as measured by Retail Prices 
Index. Cash value remains the 
same. Income taxable, paid gross. ' 
Three months' notice of withdrawal 
Minimum investment of £5,000 in 
multiples of £i:000. Maximum 
£ 100 , 000 , 

National Savings 4th Index-linked 
Certificates 

Maximum investment — £SJD00 
excluding holdngs of other issues. 


016385757 
01 3883211 
016261500 
016264588 


6.73 6S4 0705827733 
&91 7.13 0705BZ7733 

7.35 7.52 012380952 

7.33 7.50 012380952 

753 7.43 0Z72 7322*1 
7.00 7.19 02727322*1 
7.10 723 01 6284681 




v-4 

















IT SEEMS THEY’RE TALKING 
OUR LANGUAGE. 


There’s one word that’s common to most 
of Europe at the moment. 

Profits. 

Because all the signs in Europe are adding 
up to excellent long-term growth prospects. 

• Underdeveloped stock markets that are 
now a t tr acting more and more investors, 
and are still cheap compared with other 
major markets, 

• Improving economies with inflation and 
interest rates under control. 

• Increasing productivity. 

• And company profits on their way up - 
and now helped by lower oil prices. 

There’s every chance of excellent returns. 

But these stock markets are relatively 
small. (Even Germany, the largest economy in 
Europe, has a stock market onJy one third the 
size of Britain.) And small markets can be vol- 
atile - which is why our experts are now recom- 
mending a new investment mix. 

THE VOICE OF EXPERIENCE . 

Our new Fund will invest primarily in the 
major markets of Continental Europe in high- 
yielding equities (mainly of larger companies), 

bonds and convertibles. . ■ 

A mix that’s different from most other 
European funds. Because it still aims for high 
growth. But also includes the high-yielding 
equities and fixed interest content for income - 


and for a degree of safety which we believe is 
sensible in these smaller markets. 

ITS DEFINITELY GOOD NEWS. 

(BELLE . . BIEN . . WUNDERBAR ) 

You can invest in the new European 
Income & Growth Fund from £250 or from £20 
a month. 

Just complete the coupon for more inform- 
ation. 

Because we believe with this new Euro- 
pean investment mix, the signs are all good. In 
anyone’s language. - 


—|CA^^UR FREE MONEYUNE 0800 282 101.^ - 

EUROPEAN INCOME 
& GROWTH' FUND' 


/©\ SAVE & 
\U PROSPER 


■ THE INVESTMENT HOUSE ■ 

To: Save & Prosper, FREEPOST, Romford RMJ 1BR. 

Pkasc scad me details OO European Income & Growth FtnuL 

Name fMr^Mrg-VMiigY 


Postcode 


.■■vvhi 


week of the following month). 
National Savfngo Cft t fl ca ta 
31st issue. Return totally bee of 
income and capital gains tax, equiv- 
alent to an annual interest rate over 
the five-year term of 735 per cent 

maximum tnrostment £1 Q.QQ0. 

General extension rate for holders 
of earner issues which have 
reached maturity is 8.01 

National Savings Yearty Ptan 
A one-year regular savings plan 
converting into tour-year savings 
ce r ti fi c at es. Minimum £20 a month, 
maxi mum £200. Return over five 
years 8.19 per cant tax-free. 

National Savings Deposit Bond 

Minimum investment £100. maxi- 
mum £100.000. Interest 1135 per 
cent variable at six weeks', notice 
credited armualy without deduction 
of lax. Repayment at three months' 
notice. Half interest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 

Local Authority YearSna Bonds 
12 months fixed rate Investments' 
interest 9' Wg per cent basic rate tax 
deducted at source (can be re- 
claimed by non-taxpayer), minimum 
Investment £1.000. purchased 
through stockbroker or bank. 

Guaranteed income Bonds 
Return paid net of basic rate tax; 
higher rate taxpayers may have a 
further tebffity on .maturity, lyr 
Credit & Commerce, 7.75 per cent; 
2yrs Credit & Commerce. 730 per 
cent; 3yrs Premium life, 7.70 per 
cent 4yrs Prov Capital 8.2S per 
cant 5yrs Pinnacle (ns, 7.75 per 
cent. 

Locei authority town hal bonds 
Fixed term, fixed rate investments. 
Interest quoted net (basic rate tax 
deducted at source non-redakn- 
abte) lyr Northampton 7.1 per cent 
2yre ruiWees 735 per cam. 3yrs 
Manchester 735 par cent min tov 
ESOO: 4yre Bristol 7 per cent min inv 
£1000: 5yrs Northampton 631 per 
cent, min inv £500: Gyre Grimsby 
630 per cent min bn £1000; 7yr 
Waltham Forest 630 per cent, iron 
irrv 630 per cent mn bw £1000: 
8yrs Taft Qy 531 per cent SAlOyrs 
Taff Ely. 631 per cant, min bw 
£1000 . 

Further details available from Char- 
tered institute of PubtiC Finance & 
Accountancy. Loans Bureau (638 
6361 between 10am and 230pm) 
see also Prestel no 24806. 

Bidding Societies' 

Ordinary share accounts — 535 per 
cent. Extra interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cent over ordinary 
share rate. Rates quoted above are 
those most commonly offered. taKft- 
vidual buitfing societies may quote 
different rates. Interest on as ac- 
counts paid net of basic rate tax. 
Not redaimaHe by nofrtexpayara. 

Foreign cwrmcy daposHs- 
Rates quoted by RothschM's Old 
Court international Reserves 0481 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for wittidrawai and no charge 
is made for switching currencies. 
Storting ftps per cent 

US dollar 53* per cunt 

Yen 334 per cent 

D Mark asffipercent 

French Franc tot par cent 

Swiss Franc 283 per cent 


Between January 28th and August 14th 1986, 
the unit price of the County Japan Growth 
Trust doubled in value In what we believe to 
be a record breaking 198days. 

It is also the top-performing authorised 
Unit Trust in the U.K. over the last twelve months 
- £1000 invested 12 months ago is now worth 
£2522. 

Nevertheless past performance can be 
regarded only as a guide to the quality of the 
fond management and should not be relied on 
to predict future returns. 

The Fund Manager is confident, however, 
that a fundamental historical change in the 
Japanese domestic economy has given the fond 
considerable long term growth potential. 

The price of units and the income from them 
can go down as well as up. 

THE PATH TO SUCCESS 

The County Japan Growth Trust aims to pro- 
vide good long term capital growth. 

We believe that traditional investment tech- 
niques are insufficient. They now need to be 
supplemented by an in-depth understanding 
of technical analysis and the demographic 
factors influencing the Japanese economy 

The Trust's performance has been enhanced 
by up to the minute local information and views 
from Courrty'is Tokyo office. 

This gives an invaluable 
edge to our experienced 
Fund Manager in London. 



TOP PERfORMING 
AUTHORISED 
UNIT TRUST IN 

f 1986 

% 


Uil IN J 


AJl prion cckuhtad on an o6ar to bid pfio> bean to 3956 widt incoeia ra inwu tad 
5cwrc»: DCCpcd 

HOW TO INVEST 

To take advantage of this offer either phone 
the direct dealing line on any business day to 
purchase units at the prevailing price 

01-726 1999 

or complete the coupon and send it to us with 
your cheque. 

Ths purchase price on 3.9.86 was 213. 5p per unit, and the 
estimated annual grass yield was 0.6%. 


COI NTY l M l Till S I S 


G&CRAL NFORMADON 
Contract nates wfl be taued wMibi 7 days 
aarifioom wihin 42 doys-Rw prices and yUd 
am pubtohed dafly in leodmg national 
imwqwpen. Ybo am ml unto bock to the 
Monogaa on any buriness day at the BW Fiku 
rating on recaipt of your batrudiore. An initial 
charge of SXeindudad tilths Offer Price of 
unite. Rrnnunoration is paid to quafiRad 
titerntodit H im-rotei ovotiabb on request The 
annual charge is 1% par rmum (+\WT) of Ihe 
lutf value which b deducted hem Ihe Ireft gats 
mmae. Ihe income dfcfrfcution wi be made 
annuatiy an 1st November to untihakfen 
re g ister e d by tire tat SepSembec 
lusteK Royd Exchange Assure noa. 

Managats County Unit lust ManognsIldL 


31 Gresham Street, London EC2V7DX. 
Raghteied Number 9073ia 
AAamber of the Unit lust Association. 


| Post to: CottartyMsMItiii^Wan^arK Udl tol Okea^lde^London BC2V 601. | 

I VVUk wish la invest G (miniraum i nw m tn tont £500) in ihn Japan OffOWth | 

IflMt at the oifar priat ruling on tha day of reaMpt of my cheque, -mocte poyobln to County Unit lust | 

I Managers li m i te d. a 

OdabjtmyMXSSaooourtlConiNo.1 — l — L_J — I — i — i — i. —I — i — l — I — I — i — i — i — I | 

I SumtxraWMr/Mfs/MKS I 

festnatMeCmMI) I 

| Address: (in futi). J 

| Date: Signaturefst : lam/Vtoareowr 18. | 

I PS«ase tidi hem lor autamahe reinvwlTnent d income d I 

Phase tkk ham for dntak of the County Shore Exchange Scheme Q UNTIM/eG | 

I c!»The NatWest Inves tm ent Bank Group I 

wmm "Till. 


If you have £3,000 to invest 
and can say ‘No’ to two simple questions . . . 


we coyklgive you back £7,786 in 10 years’time 

aretum of 10% TAX FREE* 


Making tfierigWImrestmant choice 
has never been easy, but recently. 
faUng kiterestratas coupled with a 
volatile stock market has made it more 
cfitficutt. 

We beaieve we can eimpfify your 
task. Tha new Capital Bond from 
Eocleslasticai otters you dramatic and 
l_ dapandabta growth, wfth a cartahrty 
that your tiwmtmant wffl be looked 
after by our professional investment 
management team. Whafs more, the 
Bond benefits from special tax 
advantages. 

Tax-free gr owth vrritti a 10% 
return! 

Our Capital Bond gfvas you the 
opportunity to see yow irwestment 
grow handsomely, tax free, over a 
10-year period. 

During this time, an investment of 
. E3.000eouldgrowtoE7.786-- 
represanting a tax-free yield of 10% 
per annum! 

NaturaBy this 9DWN1 depends rexm 
ourcontinuodtiwestmentsuccess- 
but if pastpertbimance is any 
measure these figures am realistic. 

Haw much can I invest? 

The mintinum 4s £2300— bat you may 
tinrest anything up to £30300. Fbr 
latgereuma, pteoM contact us for a 
personal quotation. 

Anyone over 1 8, permanently 
resident in tha UK may apply. 
Automatic incr easi ng life 
tsssuranoe cover • . . 

An important pan of your Capital Bond 
is a gsnerousamount oflife assurance 
cover which protects you and costs 
nothing extra on your Investment. * 

From the time your Capital Bond 
begins to operate you wall be intend 
for TJ5% of theamounf invested. If, tor 
example, you Invest £3, 000. your * 
assurance cover is Immediately 
£3,483. And, as the vakieol file Bond 
in creases so does your covet 


OM iBBaF 

Ma«wi Banal 

cvmr* 

tawi* 

ttatam 

2£» iasa 

i*n 

5.191 

a«3 urn 

04 17 

7.786 

SM# 3.144 

4JJJB 

1ZS77 

11JB1D 6L287 

0054 

25551 

23220 . 14574 

1S.108 

51SC2 

34JB30 10861 

M.T81 

77.652 


*T/to9ehgurBS assume contmvBBon ot our 
cunent Base ftelv or Bonus or *60hi 
CQinpauiMMflvao’ Syturs and a Capital Bonus 
o/45 ** 7JmsoaionorguaramBod rneftfluros 
ahousurmi that you pay tax at 29*» II you pay 
/npfw rata rar thva may Oe a baodav lor tat 
Owing the period 61 ma Bond Final proceeds 
m nomror. tim ot ed income or ovmtf 
pans lax 

How the Capital Bond works 

The Capital Bond is a specially 

designed combination of two policies: I 
a ‘with profit 1 endowment assurance, 
and a temporary annuity. This shrewd 
amalgamation helps iruudmtse the 
. Investment advantages of life 
assurance tor you. 

After 1 0 years, the endowment 
assurance pays you a guaranteed 
sum plus 10 years' Basic Bonuses 
plus a final Capital Bonus. 

All Bonuses at maturity are yours 
, free of income tax and capital gains tax. 

What happens if I cash in earty? 

The Capital Bond is purpose built to 
give you maximum return over 10 
years. Ybu may however redeem it at 
anytime, although your return writ be 
somewhat Iowbl particularly in the 

first few years. And, in some cases you 
' may be liable to tax on the proceeds. 

Why sel e c t e ccle s i as tic al 
Insurance? 

Quite simply, because our investment 
record is among the best in the U K and 
■ this has been confirmed by 
independent surveys over many 


years. Since 1887 we have been 
committed to insuring the various C 

properties of the Church of England ' 
and our group assets exceed £184 
million. 

Perhaps more pertinent to you ihu 
investor is the facl that Ecclesiastical 
operates a mutual Life Fund which 
means that all of the profits are 
available for distribution to you the 
poticyholder. And no comnasslon Is 
paidto Intermediaries for the 
introduction of business. 

Our guarantee to you 
When you have become a Capital 
Bond holder you have 14 days to 
examine your policies and make 
absolutely certain you are happy with 
your choice of investmenMf you are 
not -and we are pleased to say that 
this occurs rarely - you may cancel 
your Bond without tort her obligation. 

The next slap is easy 
All you need do to be guaranteed 
acceptance is in be able to say 'No' to 
two simple questions below: 

Decide the sum you wish to invest . 
complete l he application form .and 
return itto us FREEPOST (no stamp 
required) along wtth your cheaue. We 
will send you confirmation that you 
have been accepted and an atustration 
of the exact benefits available. 

Guaranteed Acceptance 
Providing you are eligible, we 
guarantee to accept you for the 
Ecclesiastical Capital Bond, so long 
as you apply by 22 Septem b er 1986. 

There is no guarantee that we win be 
able to repeat thia offer in the future, lb 
make sure of your inclusion we urge 
you to respond promptly. We are quite 
sure you wiH be glad you did. 

Ecdasrasfrtia! insurance Office pk: 
Reg Office: Beaufort House. 

Brunswick Road, Gloucester 6L1 1JZ 
Reg NO 24869 England. 

"telephone No 0452 419221. 


Ecclesiastical ^Insurance— . 

. ThoEcctewatkariCapItal BondAppflcatkm Form 

W aa w i tetoh l by223epteaib«r190fi. • >fes.lwot4d tike to invest tiianEt 

1 Are you suffering orrecovtring from ■ yes NO v (wish to invest 

anyttwte?' 

^ intti* lasts yoarfcftjn« you reoekred ' YES NO ^ 

y any watfcai treatmen t more qoooo cso.ooo 

teftoanS weeks? 

reWwatn aeweiirawahewi aeertlwiscBmiel»>rayreau»la«i> £2JM0i*lheainirnuin accepted. 

Oa ad b sla ggw i c s8 i M ttfy B U Bretete l fdB uW9 t u w teHtefa N> tanckaumy ctwqw pqpetetoBDCte 

te fen w ei ^ Ni Vfe» eet itrtiw4rftee ncl Me d toavd>* , *w«ti<M« 

J^^ptererawtetatoaadtfteraetoWtedpmura.^ T«eradFUINwra 

■wB atea aa mwirt 

lite <te i Ktw i tte ifctSM a thMteitet>ertOinwla«ele iJaa .»iihMitfWWBrs — — 

yvwinfliteOfqpoMiwatnwiaMsiwI fe rwitiwtaMisotdMcrwtract 

aat we a naiM e K wxlEcciewrlcmttwum n c s Otficapic. — — — - 


Sfenalure . — Dm — rusreooe — 

temtoCatelirttelMMitaHIBPOiriMiTnifliaacuar DmelBMi ‘UMo 

OLIteH 

Ce elral»i tte iiteita!a>mOferapteRaflOt6»;Baatiftrtl4rartLBiuiw W ichnp W i.aoy 0 nmrQt.l U2.ftsflNo24689anmxt rn 


f 





HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 


Overseas Travel 


WE)SEL^ z SUNJSHINE 


StninffSSf&gSrtstB&retDn price from 

FARO £89 GERONA £79 

MALAGA £79 ALICANTE £79 

ATHENS £99 CRETE £109 

PALMA £89 TENERIFE £129 

Bewrtares fran GitakLUtoa. Branch*". *«wk« 1 ** 

fumctlaA In BMirgvImiUMw Aid MM 

Winter from ETS on Sale Mow 


1 50% REDUCTION I 


-STAYING ATTIC LUXUROUS.' 
4-STAR STABS fl. PAfWSO 
HOTEL ON SPAffS G0L0EN 
COSTA DEL SOL 


Gefectad Doles My 


The unspoilt charm 
of the Family Islands. 

CosWm the eKtemeat ol 
NuouuidFittpMthCT 
ftfettennfl m&t&lt md histone 
mUretf with i romantic break in 
«* olthc Family binds. 

&W the ttduM. mfcmal*- 
(tyU Kcoamtodam waBum 
dotrtn] beadles, swim in cttsLI 
dear waters and o4v Uk 
fnenfly atmosphere generated 
by yow Bahamian hosts. 

You may not wart lock) Halibut 
Ift nice to know if* there. 

s« >w mui iwti oral ■lurac Hu 
IbhnutWhi </*!*,. B QM Brad M. 
LuaAmUIUlU Td O]-n.n US. 



MMCMOrlM^Munn 
minnicmnslJai hntlti 
bamtHSutnamm ■anaaaof m 



E3 WEEKENDS 


OPEN 1 0-2 


01-539 5555 


Free Flighr to .Sicily, 
.-•.<fnd back £289 


TRAVEL WORLD WIDE 

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111 A dub dasi 03727 *3559 
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01 -634 Oil I 

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Hfitrcpw U#Kr%vin 

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ttxifl hong KID CKUia CKft 
Please caa 
SUN a SAND 
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MAJOR C/CARDS ACCEPTED 


COSTCirmon on nrorvit/hoit 

lu I in «|M>. I *i.\ A mnl ortliii., 

limr> naptnm.il Trj.ri Ol 730 
23.U AH I A IATA HTCJL. 


MAUkCA. CANARIES. Ol 441 
lilt Tr.uMMlin 4nM AIM 


BARBADOS. 1 own 4 twMUllful 

ulfa A aeill.bear (Hi Ihr Ursl 

I n-iMul IWrikidm iuU> - 4 .il ml 
linn- urjnrm yrumrim 4 
Orliitvf MinimiHi rniUI iml. 
.urf.aii- fur 2 prrtom dPorm 
LI UO I ill In m mu p A pmgii 
■ll .lIlPillHMI I Jll hLl/iH S.HMUIP 
UIIm p (in 7Vi 1 300 Hocvlp u/p 
WI 414 CI"I2 


ibiiipii villus, vi m iron 
■hlln/nnnt'Ynl inrjl Hr.WNH 
■ I INI! 1.4} |IPHU ANl Rru Air 
»» .ni HiiiMn. and Pimniar 
L7.UK TpI AlkHH(»e3 55704 
ni S 4 S 40 •Lt-./Vtk Piadi I 
LATIN AMERICA. I m ml 
IKMlK a-q Bio C186 Linu 
t 4 «*& mi Alio StiLUl Croup 
IlnlNLia Uiunim <«i Peru 
Horn CJSOi JLA Ol 747 3108 


America on Sale 
Fly/drive USA 

Ftarda £295 b- Yurt 1229 
JUbata £359 Ton £358 
Cabt. on Canada £229 
Denver £359 Las VagmOSS 
Sept/Od Oepts. lacl 7 days car. 
Dinar WaiM Special £329 
HawaNw Se nwM £499 
Cayman Buduember £448 
The Big Apple E 24 S 
met m S Accom. 
more A much mom Awn 

Peregor Travel 
( 0895 } 530071 / 2/3 
A 039909 


HEW LOW FARES 



HOT TURKEY. SdpihT ji vippk rp- 
LniiN >al our private lawM-tl 
hi art llapai 4 wppk rlUPMim on 
nm v.irni lor 1.420 in* IH. 
Il/H Iipp u/iuom. oWrT rum 
huijliiun |»m. Ol -Vo 1005 


1ST A CLUB CLASS FLIGHTS; 

HairiP nisrounti Suiivvnrld 
Tut.-I .057271 20097 

/??IO«/.- T 7‘iJH 



GENERAL 


you use Magic. 

Hotels and villas vrith 
swimming pools on the 
fabulous coast of Amalfi. 
Sorrento, Lake Maggiore, 
,S-. Tuscany Beaches 
of burning gold in 
Sardinia. Venice, 
Florence and Rome in 10 
unforgettable nights Gust 
imagine the days). 

People who expect magic 
on holiday use ns. 

FREE colour brochure: 
call 01 ‘749 7449 (24 hrs). 
Magic of Italy Ltd., 

47 Shepherds Bush Green 
London W12 8PS. 


The best company when 
you're on holiday. 


SELF-CATERING 


CY*fHfS /MALTA HMPh * Ann. 
■vnptfiiirTi in-, iram 
Riihi Pan World HMKUam Op*n 
sal Ol 734' 2602 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


■WINTER SPORTS 


DORSET. HANTS- & 


Free lift pass 


k. Offer iL 

• Pay in full at tbnr of booking 
• Offer open until 1st October 86 (3 French nemm 
i Ski from £69- 9great resort* in France and Ansi nn 




SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


London: 01-699 5999 (24h^J. 

Manch: 061-8326065 (24hraL Glasgow: 041-204 -an- 


SKI WITH THE ELITE 

The chalet SKIING specialist, fantastic (bod ... 
amazing value. Brochure: Fetersfield (0730)68621 
or 01-499 1911 (24 hours) Aft]d§AN 
or call your Crave! agent 

#£T» AIQL 016 


SKI BLADON LUBES 

88/67 BROCHURES NOW OUT! 
47 Resons m Switzeri aurt 
Austria. France S Italy. 
The Biggest Chocs On sms! 
Ek GSanrt. Luton. Manchestm. 
Basgcrw A Edrtu^b 
01 7852200 
Mancfa. Oops. 0422 78721 
ABTA 16723 AT0L1232 


SKI WEST bumppr brorliiirp mrl 

UQM KMTkPfl IMlIh 4M 1 1a«- top rp 

kdOv SunUv IholUl ibp»i Inn 
(r.mir'l and anwnwv low 
pa trpi UAriiiHj *J ES9. Hina 'Oil 
7H6 9099 for your ropy 
1BTM4266 ATOLIW3. 


ACTIVITY TRAVEL ronlaMk- all 
Morniirp out now Til Ol Ml 
SI 15/031 226 9457 i24 hro. 



HOLIDAYS AFLOAT 


MOUDAY m WALES on Iran 
|ln. Kama k MinamOMIIiMiiii* Ci 

ikil uiiHluni ili w.iv ininuuh 

in.- Hi.noii Hr^roan NM Uk in 
,hii mi 4/ohrrW iuitow ikmk 

Ik-uiliikii »pfi nmp. lull n 
MllPlHian T»1 OK74 86317 

CRUISE THE BRECON BEACONS 

tv.ll mi I, il I'urk III * n.irrnwfxjjt. 
V.» .ilK HI LalP NPpt/Ch-l Col 
MualaiNP U.Hi<Hllor1t Park 
I haapa- CntknaamHi. Pnnv 
MW linn M 087S 810340 


Corfu & Paxos 

idlfl oa Corfcor JtaraT woftfi 
n w hc rof ittnclnlcn for ibcii 
(Sana tod local mo a Mdilionol 

no win 

; H cfavr (T(PY1 near land) 

Corfutilacarfcj 

' RMgkxSi|(tSB)XB7ncrta.1Sn 




l r L Oppti Sat 0753 857035. 


LOW PARES WORLDWIDE . 

IS' 1 . s AiBPrm. Mid and Tar 
Linl. S Alnra Trayiair. 48 
M-ruatPi Su-ppt. WI 01 680 
2938 ItM ACTPJHPdl 
ALL US CmU Low pit Ion-, on 
nkuor vMiiM (tmm I A 
r pI urn SrM/Url C339 01 S84 
7371 ABT4 

DISCOUNTS lii/Eronomy uefc. 
Ms Try ib lad. FUCHT 
HOOKERS Ol 5«7 9100. 

Aiipm/Iiu trrrglMl 


SWmERLJkND SrliPdulPd lllaMi 
Ol 724 2388 ABTA A rot 


CRUISE A SAIL ABROAD 


FIMUY Ian 40* yartil Inr 
w/inrt. a. /ski Stum's wi 
romp Mrd Sad 03243 674*13 


GENERAL 


Corfu 

7, 14, 21. 28 Sqit 
Buutdul Vbas by Itc Sea. Hotels 
jiso avartabic [tvouotioiii 
ScDumDec Also Oct Bargm. 

Ring Pan World 
Holidays 

Open Sat 01-734 2562 
(Son 01-736 2464) 


Ejqpkxu’s origi na l 2-3 mek 
adventures include waMng to 
B«rtMr vOagoa in Maweco. 
sailing Muocas in Egypt, 
motoring Israal. Jordan A 
Syria, and oxpUrauons in 
Rwanda, Zaira, Sahara, 
Spain, Haxku and Contra! 
Asia. Plus many more. Fran 
£325. Contact: 



ENTERTAINMENTS 



THEATRES 


LYTTELTON •%’ 928 MSI? CC 
■UrtHMMl Thrum pS paownilum 
dw rivUv ? 15 alow pnrpiThill 
A 7 45. Mura 7 45. Tup 2 OO lluw 
P nr '" mala 

THE PETITION 

f*v On. in Ojik 


•U'P “NTFNOT1C 

HCRFORMAHCES- SU1 

I up Urrf 7 45 DALLIANCE. Ptp 
a N.-M 15 Ua IN/l Srpa 22 A 
23.11 7 45 Upnn SPDI 24 al 7 OO 
Ihpaa SpW 25 la 29 THE 

INAOtSTRATE. 


MAYFAIR S Ct; «u?9 3030 Mem- 
nan H ru/Sril 5 40 A d IO 

RICHARD TODD .n 

“Tkr Bool IWhr lor r*m" S M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An uihiknhiti m uusor" !i Cop 

lirm^ 

6TH THRILLING YfAR 


MERMAID Air O'lW ?,Vi 05dM rr 
741 Tun I -jll lx.- 240 7200 

•74 lln7IUkl Mini I n N SjI f A 

H VI 

KAFKA'S 

METAMORPHOSIS 

hlJXI-l !•» 

Sk'vcn BERKOFF 

“THE MOST CaCITING 
THEATRIC AL, EV EHHW IN THE 
WEST END- t- I mult 
Ca l— d ad amUl Ocl IS 

lirra- lira jiip Inul A rtniik) 


KATMMAL THEATRE vita Ikiiak 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

Srr SEPARATE ENTRIES undPr 
OLIVIER LYTTELTON. 
COTTSSiOE. 1 xiPlV-nl flvjq 
tuk flklit •!* aa-lie .Ml Ihr.alrr-t 
ll—aa IP .nil RESTAURANT I1.Y 
7II.VM. CAST CAR PATH, lull, 
I 'b nilM AM CONO 


NEW LONDON iinut l^ir *17 
llP.iaa-.-t I- (NMIM'llt 7 45 
I IH- A V.H snn a 7 4 ‘- 

THE AMKN LLOYD WEBBER 
T.S. ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO MX OFFICE 


« .la win I !.*»*. 1 1 rt pa. I>| ISh: ng 

III NOW ROOKING TO 

MAY 30 £907. 


OLIVIER rc INJ 

|l■•l■,tl 1 i3fto n ‘•lam'i 

I'hI.ii a' 'Hi 'liiw innr irt.il* A 
- 1 1 Ml, III 7l'j 

THE THREEPENNY 
OPERA 


f iaa.It "Th# CHEAT Muck Hut 
am Uua” 6,11.1 n -Maxtal, 
If omUk.. and II— Ig ... canal*, 
mu* EXCELlENV-* *I.NI Flip 
tt.-l ' I JACOBOWSKV AND 
THE COLONLL. 


OPEN AM RE CENT'S P*HK 

■l:u .*4 ' I if *.7 • ul'. 1 

■ a II..II..M .Mr. I'l'.k 

ARMS AND THE MAN 

■ n<.ii ini a-, i .« i.ii :»* * -*:• 

Nail Wrchi Hcaarr V Nattonal 
Toad, TWalra 


palace theatre j — vi 

I I J <11 iri| M.« 

1 1! I .III .'4Hi 7n.il II . jij Ji'iXl 
tat" S*s e-1 ,!3 

THE MUSICAL SENSATION 

LFS MISER ABIES 
“IF YOU CANT GFT A 
TICKET -STEAL ONE!" -an 

Itpt 7.V> M.Hs ri'11 A Si»l 7 30 
1 pin iriia.it ,m 4 .riUHilfrd 
llillal ilW iiilirit.il 

BEAT THE TOUTS BY IMQURI- 
mC FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX 
OFFICE 


PHOENIX H3(* 2794 rr 240 9<S«.t 
741 rj LOO nm a .ill 24 tin 7 days 
240 7200 Clip SalP» '•SO 0123. 
I IPS 7 30 TTaitr nul 3. VUari A 8 

ALEC McCOWEN 
SHEILA SIMON 

GISH WARD 

RACHEL KEMPSON 
SHEILA ALLEN 
STEPIKN BOXER Mmd 
ROBERT EDDHON 

THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

hv T.S. ELIOT 

-A CRACK INC CAST- r Tfmm 


PICCADILLY TH LATHE 437 

4500 r mill ( 4ld HolkiMt 379 
0505 741 WMri (Jip sun 83o 
.Wt'/om 6135 

ZHD SCHSATHHIAL YEAR 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 


Ha-tirw UjiuniP 
I an. H O Malt Vt.-il 1 i Sal 5 
LAST THREE WEEKS 
MltM Pirn 20 SPVI print la 184 


PWHCE EDWARD Ben OTIirr 

754 MU5I 1 11M fall 74 Mr 7 Days 
at Pamkiiia H.V> Mr-4 Crp Slln 
«W eli'5 

Mini sal H M.il Thau t 4 Sal 3 OO 


“A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW" Nratstarrk 

Now baafctnt la BUrch 7L 19X7 

M\r SI \ltsuMlTIML5 
\\ All till L UN D\t 


PRWCC OF WALES 01 930 M 6 UI 
.'l» lliuluir UV.H 1 K 44 5 - C Crp 
s-ih-t sji 1 r-l.'t kp.in Piait-v 
741 irrrj/iT-'f.i v 1 uti fail 24 
In 7 ilut .’lit T.-Hri? 
TOE-TAPP IN C COOO’ (I Mail 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 
SEVEN BROTHERS" 

THE BLOCK BUSTER MUSICAL 
“I DEFY ANYONE NOT TO 
ENIOV IT" I riiias 
"SEVENTH HEAVEN- I shnrtrr 

It.-. 7 VI MjI Ifllir 4 S-ri J 

Lad aadan prkar la M tanar 


QUCEirS Ol -3J II«/'* 

C-7M,ui.n .- ihf 11 . an '.W 
lai> Slip. ■ I-I.-5 

—THE BEST MUSICAL IN 
LONDON- ■jilii 

• t ta.ii-.Iil Rll I S| til • MaH 

MAUREEN LIPMAN ha 
LEONARD BCRNSTEHTS 

WONDERFUL TOWN! 

■11 ilium-- —lira 
■ ti.H-iii. ail* s I uua- 
- lira vinnlnliil larti. 
rih.ns.il -I Vale kill L- .VI sal 5 


ROYAL COURT s ft. ?» I "45 

It.-. HIU1I aval Ift-Ori 4 pm 

OURSELVES ALONE nt 4»nr 
lK-.li.. “Thri katl Brut pia| of 
Brfri dmudri" rii ... sin. 


SAVOY n| atr, HriHri a I- i>l ?~9 

lii-l'i HV* '4—1 I '45 

M.il» Irian ' s .11 !■ ri H JO 
5 Ml t I t» Ol 
Mil II til IMtVN-s 
tH till! MlriMM: I tut I. 

I lIRlSIKHin M 1 4 II lit IS 
>MI-IatSII III I ,li 

trill P tlH.F'h 

UH II tl 1 « IX HU tSI 
mil III I IriU a7 lari 

111 I I M>S I I HI t»>N 

NOISES OFF 

In, fit rilh II tl ft III thlrilajRI 


5MAFTES8UIIV THEATRE OF 


ST MARtnrS 01-836 1443. Spr 
rhd CC IV. 379 MSS. EL93 80 
Tiu-. 3 45 Kal 5 O and 8.0 

MB yw ad ACATHA CM RIlTIE' ri 

THE MOUSETRAP 




ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY aTOFFAY 9 A 23 

Dmm St. WI Pr— ■■»■ da- 
■ ■ It 4 ri« 4100 . 


RARRKAR ART 6ALUERY, Bar 

■Win) Cmlrr. Loaom. CCS 01 . 

038 4141 UMM S Oct: 

Q i BI q d i n n t h TAOORE. Panti- 
meat and Orawmqs by 1 hr 
Indian pari. TAaorl* IMI 1* 
Oct W. EU6ENE SMITH. « rr 
nwunimn at I bn gm m 
pbafoai jiHm-tS own nrlrawr 
I IIP. will, Orirr 600 

phataqrapta. CaOrry admbnaon 
C2 and Cl Open Tun Hal 
lOini b 46pm. Sun t Bank 
HoH 12 5 46pm Cha aH Stop, 
rvrpl Bank Holt 


McbwiH Today 1 30. TorwghL 
Mai. Tup 7 3a Wrd 7 00. 
Strap Th td rr, No prh Today. 
Man. Tup. Wrd FNr HtoM 
npritri Thurt Sew inn 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

“Tltr triy bnl ol BnUdn't rtxnlr 
LdrnJ— Daily MM 
Spp vpparalp ridrln umkr 




VICTORIA PALACE 81-04 1317 

Ian 7 JO Malri Wrd 4 M 345 

CHARLIE GIRL 






Frara Imhs to Ranis 
1Ctt-19tt October 19M 

Ttko 8 4 dsr Irak nto lul (nvd m 
me inMui corij. Iran «Wdi your 
lyaduu: gwoe nil take mu 10 pins 
•am a aadtn 01 n/aea Tor sons 
and ends n Vicuna Coach Stupor 

I rt.wt |\«|^a 'hiwLain foam lauuw 

uroon ucmjuiwiiy nirni iruni. 



SELF-CATERING ITALY. 


Partnmanla UMPty t.BNtlWB- 
im 4/0/5 lax 1 fa why. Bril 
drier at ntt Irani Cd or Man 
lion (336 PP Rrwrl Villa* 
061 833 9094 A8TA/ATOL 
TUSCANY Marina » 

Pmratanla 13bnd. I 6 2 wk 
Haft m lot iSy taliav w«n flu Ir 
Man or Cal or Ml drier Y'lHa 
rasalaK Ir CldO pw Hiriofl VU 
lav Otal 83139094 ABTA ATOL 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


PRIVATE VILLAS in Algarvr 
with POOF. A staff at towrr 
pnr ps in Snpl/Orl. for 4 IO pm. 
Him uw iin Mmrr & Mrkir. 
01 493 5726. 

ALCARVE. viirat With poo l* . 
Moil Srpl/Ort dak-. Thp Villa 
■Wiarv 01 824 8474. 
ALCARVE. Lux lllLls/apts wHh 
pooK tnu/Od thru wmlrr. Ol 
409 2838. t rUa World. 



\5eaaa New Year's Day 
Coacerl 

4 nts Vienna Id Ind Die 
FledennauB on Dec 31st 
& New Years Day con- 
ceit on Jan 1st 1987. 


CBWSTIUS/IEV YEAR 
WHY MOT SPOIL WEB 
Al mir WH ('uunliy Hmw 
Hadr! oraline m II bop- «f 
tsankriH/nwarilland. HmidihM rn 
suiif Hfribiriims »iih t’ul. TV. 
Vidni. Ilunp and Tramab-r. Ia« 
rips. Kubuhua fund. Hda wi- 
nor. |5' im nuiy tmnkiiusv 
hn<ttun-> uvaiUblr. 

M *■**■ RAC 

E.T B. 4 ( mum. AjMcj 

• fuun'ni Rivmnd . 

PeaBnn CtnCry Hone 
hnbm H. Owia 

Tek (8237^ 3SS 


Kini dm hulidiv bum^ilinn. 
wilh vnwv URL Swimming 
jjaaul. lenn» cuun. imiuuix and 
mrijurl lawnri. Ural amlkinj; 
und luurinj! cmlrr. VKHY 
,JCiW HATKS SRKT 6 tXT. 
Kain dncouM fix 3 iwnmui. 
CaalMir bnarhunr Tl S. Tucker. 
ST0NELE1GH HOUDAYS. 
Wrrilcra. .SkI mouth. Devon 
E\!« KPJ: 

Telw (03955) 3619 


LYNTOR. NORTH 


irrH; 7 iTf:i7'i»rij7=i 


MORAY r mnlrilHril snaqfr Mora-v 
rollatap. rilpri 2/4 Ouwl spot on 
lit.- Mol .iv roast nr wa A imU 
amiisp Mrs R JPvanMii. ThP 
I aim. Lown AurhnimNTv Nr 
borobnrs. Morar 0345 820583 


BUMNARARHAM, Mr of Itlay 
I mar luxurv wli r.dpnmi r.ri 
U9PS wilh MOH-rtot M>wri a« rr I hr 
hound of Mat. nwo 4 o 
Upnian vim. Umi lor outdoor 
nn Mills par larular I y txrd wait It 
umi. tashimi and Malkina, whip 
im emi htarhwi* Ruiinalt.il> 
fhUli DrsllUrt v Pun -tskara. Hlr 
of Inlay Trt 04«M4 046 
SALMON FtSMNC 1ST CLASS. 
Slav ui lxitato ratlin. Rmadi'iii 
stall I uil bourn. OrlohPt I Hh 

2tdh I ItP rods plan litr trnosH 
1.4000 Trf. EJpaunt IX.l t 01 
707 7772 



■U8 81EWE nOU 379 3014/ 
8!eO>«l ROSA LUXEMRUR6 
■ PC* ram 8 I OO 3 30 « 00 
8 36. 


DEADLY NIGHTCAP 


NUCHAL THADTTHM 
A laaia* mipotlalM sMImq pxmbl 
ima, of AnUanx- cart axl lunariurp. 
ar iri.tr i. and airnrirrlual /palairt-.. 
iron, Ihf* Mauiuin Kmodoam. anal 
Unrflt. ol Muunal [mparo 7 hro 
if-nmrr l20clobPr (am 10. So 5 
i Sun 2 S> rkraa Tnumdavn only. 

C or d on 8a tori CoDor y. 
(.narmoaitMiMi North torki Trl 
Harrcrihib- '0423 1 R09214 A.t 
Strui PotlPr 


NATIONAL MRIMIT CAL- 
LENT. SI Martin's Ptorr. 
I oataHMi k(2 Ira Ol 4JO I 553. 
FACES FOR THE FUTURE Hr. 
rrrt Arqunriafim 4dm Irpr 
Mon I'rt 10 5 Sal iO-o Mam ?« 




AVEA-DEMA imartwovl pk-tur 
i—fU"- maapmavril farmhomr- 
sh—ps fl/12. rkmdlil pool. M>q. 
CanrpUauota SrpHriimPT 1311a lo 
2Tih naioaip (400 Trl 0806 
SllfauO 


NA DHEL LA Nrw nrarmadr 4 
■apflraonml tilla. tlrfpi IO. 
Ataal.ahlp 30m 4irt.nl on 
waails I ram C2CI0 la C65a pw 
PHufir 01480 2411b day or 
003H5 20743 nnmir 


UJL HOLIDAYS 


[TlieAialvem 
Hills -the 
backdrop to a 
perfect break 

Nesflmp beneath the 
western Hopes ol theUatvern 
HUs. Ihc Colwafl Part is a 
country hotel with all ttie 
condors, curane and wines to 
make any lengui of stay perfect 
The Cofwall ftirk Hotel 
. Comal Hamm. 
Worcestershire WR13 6QG 


AA* -k 

EnsuriD moots aadh colour TV |1 
towpasar). Consul taahnp. level 
caipari.. dura d mow. «ned 
urn Kt wd stocked tar 
late Sumner Breaks Z days SO, 
4 Days £M 0 JM toe ral 

Tet 0598 52279 


OUT m THE CO UHTRY yp| nnar 
Sl hrs. ran trt led an nit tJurtio. 
Slrrps 4 /o Own aimuxa Ml 
rmwatP. wariiapr/drvpr. rk 
I inn COS Cl 25 I073bi794304 


SALComc roffilorUahk- vullrri 
<M 4/5 Quirt rprioK-iilMU Wa 
Iran superb marine \m-ws Seif 
r.Hrtmq BAB or I oom only. Trt 
0&4BB4 3513 

L DEVON. Sava Spacious family 

llal Sr PI On I or 2/b. CS4 I11S4 

pvt Ol 794 0237/01 t.74 ObGO 


SOMERSET A AVON £ “«•- 




DORSET, HANTS. & 
lO.W. 


LTBWmrON. Super CoJUaoe. use 

ol laralrd poaL 3 brats, dam b. 
Srpl olh onw.irilri C90 130 

pu Trt 0590 72068 


LUX COTTAGE. At all rrOan srpl 
Olh tritUa shod M wk/nda 
hakv ear Trl 0458 2S2S57 


ANGLESEY. Holiday Collaqrs A 
up. II Inienls oirrUnkiavi sea 
Ovaii he.tlptl swimamnq pool 
leu i us mains, how is. snonkrr. 
Labtp IPIIIUV ajuH. frrsh warn A 
sr.i (Khnuj Sandy heart.. Srpl 
t .la .UK ips. Trl. 0407 BO07B9 
Plasalaruui Trmrrtdlir Bay 


MID WALES 

DOVEY VALLEY 
IVarHid uld I Hah Crptim- Kara- 
barer m Inuilul munlitsidr. kwafi 
uiat. anal tails. U'lrikulaSr and 
forarh NBawplare: tpniN. ainarr 
and Miami ejmnk 
sm LU. MINI kKKAKS 
Hrrl.tmukLM ml rsnWK ond. Lift 
I*r prruai per IVl. taibnnr. 

RHIWLAS KARM 
Tekphoae (0654) 2796 


DC ON MARBLE ARCH *723 
2011! MIENS .IB) Spp pram 
Urors api-ii Itaflv 1 15 4 30 
H OO Lrtlr Nwm Show Tn A Sal 
Ooaats OfM-11 IO 45um Reduced 
onus (or sliidpaif raid IMMns, 
l H40 hcMcis. OAP\ 


WYHDHAPT1 s M3» J02R rr 379 
esr-s/ P433/ 1st Call 24 hrs 7 days 
sva 7203/741 999 Cm 030 
."9.’ Opana 7 Odebar. 





CORNWALL & DEVON 


■ARWCAR la ol-o2ll HTaS Mu 
drill ioihs r^< .hi pawls rackets 
honkjnar THE COLOR PURPLE 
<15. 7 JO Tni.it kails Club aln 
sl.aiil NlPanlm ship) THE DARK 
CRYSTAL 'PCI 1 1 OO A 2 30 


SCREEN ON ISLINGTON GREEN 

22b 3520 saeiitt Naur Hie ni"s 
THE COLOR PlIHPUE ■ 1 51 2 05. 
500. BOS basils hOOkrtlHP in 


MARJBELLA. ImHvadb with tor 
•widen A pa i, .dr pom 3 rihar 
nedims BP4r1a IOO mlrs Atari 
now a.300 pa- 0352 8f>7«T 


— U B 1 . C*nui an mi Lue hn 2 
hriliuara null, in I he. paruir 
esaaur tilUaur superh umn 
-It rill Orl 18 onwards, from 
L 55 PW Trt 10423. B73465 
MARBCLLA Lu. tilki at .voru 
ni Pori Briiaias T/rourt. s/pool 
la eiKOpw 104031773473 


SELF-CATERING 
CANARY & MADEIRA 


GRAN CANARIA Puerto Mown 
Lux ml apt on ifiJPfri nuruai 
a am tries In OSU M>7SHI 
TENERIFE SOUTH, I Und luxury 
upl Ilia, Allonlis pimmh 1 021 
7M3 fureo 


THE OLD BLACK LION 


EfW a Id nesoved break 31 tfos etwnwng oM Welsh CiBdm km. odenoq 
really cofiftomwe acowmoaoa ID roams, a anti private shower and ■£. 
HAT B me SECONOHAND-GOOKSHOP TOWN Set in nennsuor rarahysatt 
Wve Vdfcy Ran Mcwuns am Brecon Beacons Sabnon hstkno on we Wye. 
rmsf nang and cw pxwaii toc 6 «es. Dm on Die best ol Wash and Ewooean 
uwd n om oak beamed dnm reran or heal vourseNes to snacks wth a 
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■■a (HOSTS trt Basra Irani Url 2 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


SPORT 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


RUGBY UNION: CLUBS AND SPONSORS AIM FOR PLACES IN COMPETITIVE SEASON 


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FINEST quality wool carpels. A! 
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By David Hands 
Rngby Correspondent 

C om petition, now that it is 
no longer a dirts word m 
Britain begins very early this 
season - as eari> as today, the 
first Saturday of 1986-87. 
when- the leading dubs' and 
those whose names are not so 
familiar start to consolidate 
the places tbey hope to occupy 
next season in the inaugural 
English club championship. 

There may also be some 
jostling by potential sponsors 
interested in being linked with 
the championship. One thinks 
of John Smith, the brewers 
currently backing the merit 
tables which bear their name: 
of Save and Prosper, the 
insurance company who have 
struck up a dose accord with 
the Rugby Football Union at 
international level: and of 
Thom EMI whose interest at 
the moment is in the coun^f 
championship and the di- 
visional championship. 

Whatever the merits of 
having tobacco companies 
associated with sport - and 
there are many administrators 
who dislike it - there is no 
doubt that John Player have 
served rugby well with their 
sponsorship of the knockout 
cup while, lower down the 
scale, companies like the Na- 
tional Girobank have got in 
on the ground floor by helping 
the pilot league schemes in the 
Noiib-West and the Eastern 
Counties. 

There will be others but it is 
reasonable to assume that 
those companies already in- 
volved in the game may be 
able to exert some influence. 
Of those .named, the John 
Smith merit tables feature two 
games today, the Eastern 
Counties league have eight 
and the North-West League 
one. In table A of the merit 
tables, Moseley meet Notting- 
ham while, in table B, Rich- 
mond, who enjoyed their 
outing against Streatham- 
Croydon in midweek, play 
Waterloo. 

But. as is so frequently the 
case on the first day of a new 
season, there are some in- 
teresting Anglo-Welsb en- 
counters. notably that at 
Gloucester where Swansea are 
the visitors. Malcolm Preedy, 
the prop capped by England in 
South Africa two years ago, is 
Gloucester’s new captain and 











In possession: Preedy takes over as captain over Gloucester 


his main selection problem 
this week has been at stand-off 
half where Hamlin, the occu- 
pant last season, has only just 
resumed training after damag- 
ing ankle ligaments in May. 

Evans, his norma! replace- 
ment. was injured in a club 
trial and so Gloucester call 
upon Pointon. captain of the 
United, against Swansea. 
Gloucester wanned up with a 
comfortable win over 
Cinderford in midweek, help- 
ing the Forest of Dean dub 
begin their centenary season 
with a flourish. But it will not 
be an easy season for Glouces- 
ter. 

“A lot of our games this 
season are away.** Alan Brian, 
chairman of the dub selectors - 
and an England regional selec- 
tor. said.. '"What hoped us last 
Season was that the hatanee in 
favour of home matches was 
about 60-40 and we managed 
to win at places like Leicester 
and Sale. This year we have 
difficult merit table games at 


Wasps. Bath. Nottingham and 
several others.** 

Not all is grim competition 
however. The Irish Wolf- 
hounds are in London today 
and tomorrow, helping Lon- 
don Irish and Sir Ewart Bell, 
the president of the Irish 
RFU. to open their clubhouse 
extensions while tomorrow 
they meet Metropolitan Police 
on their relaid Imber Court 
playing surface. The Wolf- 
hounds are due to bring 
internationals such as Mullin, 
Crossan. Carr and Anderson 
with them and they will bring 
more than a touch of joie de 
vivre to Sunbury and East 
Molesey. 

Tomorrow, too. the Harle- 
quins. in assodation with the 
Lord’s Taverners, hold their 
annual sevens tournament at 
the Stoop Memorial ground, 
where the final is scheduled 
for 5.30. You cannot keep the 
Irishmen away from that ei- 
ther - Old Belvedere are 
among the eight competing 
teams. 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


Moseley ▼ Nott’ham Llanelli v Pontypridd 


EMJJNMMM TUTOR*. Km- 
Nngfcui DAG OFE 01-370 6739 
■©• and 'A' Irvris. Tog re*a)R. 


Moseley have lost Smith, their 
hfidlands centre, but bring back 
Desborough, who played tor them 
last in the 1962 John Player Special 
Cup flnaL No tt ingham have ac- 
quired NetsonJNoiams, another 
wing from Durham University. 

Newport v Coventry 

Steve Thomas, the Coventry 
scrum half, misses the start of the 
season after spraining an ankle. 
Ralston is also injunct, so Lakey 
plays stand-off half, while Paul 
Thomas has a pelvic injury and is 
replaced by IVunper. 


Uaneli acquired several injuries 
overwhelming the Scottish Co-Op- 
timists in midweek. May, Hie cap- 
tain, and Buchanan, the Wales 
squad prop, are tinavaSable so 
Peter Morgan leads from centre. 
Simon Davies plays wing. 

Leicester t Bedford 

Ian Smith, the former Leicester 
captain, returns to the back row 
against Bedford, celebrating their 
centenary season. Whitcombe, the 
former Leicester prop, and Orwin, 
the Gloucester and England lock, 
have joined Bedford. 


Nor’ampton v Bristol 

Peter Smith , who spent three 
years at Newport as understudy to 
the Welsh prop. Rhys Morgan, 
makes his debut for Bnstoi. White- 
head, outstanding against Torquay 
Athletic in midweek, gives way to 
Carr, the experienced wing. 

Newbridge v Ebbw V 

Terry Shaw , capped by Wales in 
1983, has returned from New Zea- 
land to boost Newbridge's re- 
sources at lock. Bidgood and 
Jarman play in the second row 
against Ebbw Vale, who have Parry 


fit again at full back. 


Quandary 

over 

Bishop 

affair 

By David Hands 

The Welsh Rugby Union, 
whose general committee met on 
Thursday, hare deferred any 
farther action on David Bishop, 
the Poutypool scram half who 
was sentenced to four weeks 
imprisonment earlier this week 
after admitting a charge of 
common assault Instead the 
WRU's disciplinary committee 
will make recommendations 
which Win then be laid before 
the general committee. 

Bishop, who was capped by 
Wales against Australia in 1984. 
is currently oat of prison pend- 
ing an appeaL The charge of 
assault arose ont of a case 
brought by Chris Jarman, the 
Newbridge lock, who was 
knocked unconscious daring 
their match last October. 

The difficulty farina the 
WRU is one of natural justice. 
Bishop has already been tried, 
and found gntlty, by (hr law of 
the land: should be then face a 
further punishment from the 
WRU for bringing the game into 
disrepnte? It is a difficulty which 
may keep the lawyers on the 
WRU committee buy. 

The subject of discipline was 
also on (he minds of the Welsh 
selectors, who have unveiled 
their plans for the season. 
Despite the hard line taken by 
the WRU Iasi season, it has 
been agreed that players seat ofT 
in club games this season should 
not antomaticaily be suspended 
from the Webb international 
squad — as was the case with 
Richard Moriaity, now Swansea 
and Wales captain, and Robert 
Norster, of Cardiff. 

“The cases of national squad 
players who are sent off will be 
dealt with by the WRU disci- 
plinary committee,'* Rod Mor- 
gan, chairman of sriectors, sakL 
“The selectors wfll then exam- 
ine each case and act 
accordingly." 

Moriaity took over from Da- 
vid Pickering as national captain 
during the dose season tour of 
the Sooth Sea islands. He win 
wish to consolidate that position, 
both in sqnad sessions — the 
first being held this weekend — 
and at the trial game which will 
be held on December 6 at 
Cardiff Arms Park. 

Teams for the trial will be 
announced on November 28- 
Wales, nnlike England, Scot- 
land and Ireland, have no eariy- 
seasoo game though there isaB 
i nt e r nati on al at Pontypridd on 
October 25. 

Tour party 
criticised 

After the final match of the 
Australian toar ofNew Zealand, 
at Eden Park, Auckland today, 
the All Black selectors wiD torn 
to the party to tour France id 
October and November. The 
selectors have already come in 
for criticism after returning so 
swiftly to the suspended Cava- 
liers, while their colts and 
emerging players squads, have 
also been defeated heavily 
recently. 

The New Zealand selection 
panel for 1987 — World Cap year 
— wfll not be announced until 
after the French tour. 


BOXING: NORWEGIAN’S CHANCE TO EMULATE JOHANSSON RUGBY LEAGUE 


RENTALS 


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answered. MUST always 
beanswered. 

Thatts why we're making 


our own call for hefo. 

Please remember us in 

your Will. 

Please caHStough (0753) 
32713 or write to; David 

Evans, The Samartans, 

17 Uxbridge Road, Sougf 
SL1 1 SN for further detaBs. 


Winkworth 
Financial Services 

25a Motcomb Street 
London SW1 


STUDIOS. flPARTWlENTS.VILLAS, 
CHATEAUX & ISLANDS iN THE SUN 


THE TIMES 


Tangs tad 
faces up 
to Spinks 

Las Vegas- (Reuter) — The 
attempt to find one undisputed 
world heavyweight champion 
continues today when Siefian 
Tangstad. of Norway, hopes to 
defy history by dethroning the 
International Boxing Federation 
title holder, Michael Spinks. 

Tangstad. aged 27. is an 8-1 
underdog to become the first 
European to win a world heavy- 
weight title since the Swede, 
tngemar Johansson, knocked 
out Floyd Patterson in 1959, 

The three boxing bodies are 
hopeful that a series of elimina- 
tion bouts will produce a single 
heavyweight champion, a crown 
presently shared by Spinks, 
Trevor Berbick (World Boxing 
Council) and Tim Witherspoon 
(World Boxing Association). 

Tangstad, who has won 24 
and drawn one of his 27 
previous contests, is confident 
he can remain involved in the 
series. 

Spinks, unbeaten in 29 pro- 
I fessional bouts. Olympic gold 
medal winner in 1976, former 
world light-heavyweight cham- 
pion and the IBF heavyweight 
title holder since last year when 
be won the first of two derisions 
over Larry Holmes, is saying all 
the usual things about the 
lightly-regarded challenger. ” 

“He’s sneaky and seems to 

spring out when you don't 
expect it,*’ the champion said- 

On the same card, the man 
many see as the most likely to 
emerge as Lhe undisputed 
heavyweight king. 20*year-old 
Mike Tyson, meets Alfonzo 
Ratdiff. the former WBC 
cruiserweight champion, over 
10 rounds. 




Spinks: on guard against a ‘sneaky* Enropean opponent 

Aiidries awaits Hagler 

By Srikumar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 


Dennis Andries, of Hackney, 
the World Boring Council GgU- 
bearyweight champion, is al- 
ready looking forward to his 
next contest after the defence of 
his tide against Tony Sibsoa, of 
Leicester, at Alexandra Pavil- 
ion. north London, on Wednes- 
day. His opponent could be 
Marvin Hagler. the imdispoted 
world middleweight champion. 

Andries’s manager, Greg 
Steene, said yesterday that be 
has already started talks with 
the Brockton, Mass^ group and 
Bob Aram, the American pro- 
moter. They were showing 
interest 

- We have started talks with 
the Petronellis, Hagler 's people. 


and Bob Aram, - " Steene said. 
“They are interested in taking 
the fight Apart from Sugar Ray 
Leonard. Hagler has ran out of 
opponents and he thinks he can 
beat Dennis: “We don't want to 
count oor chickens about 
Dennis’s defence on Wednes- 
day; bat we don't expect any 
troable with middleweight like 
Sibsoa. We would love to fight 

middleweight everyday if we 

could.** 

Steene is also talking to 
Marris Johnson, the World 
Boxing Association champion, 
about a unification title bouL 
According to Steene, either con- 
test would be promoted by Frank 
Warren in London. 


Northern 
to rest 
Holmes 

By Keith Macklin 

With only two league fixtures 
played, four teams have 100 per 
cent records, and among those 
dubs who have already fallen 
from grace arc the premiership 
holders, Warrington, and a side 
who are strongly tipped for the 
championship, Hull Kingston 
Rovers. 

The sides who have won both 
their games are Bradford North- 
ern. Castieford. and the two 
powerful perennial challengers, 
Wigan and St Helens. 

Hull Kingston Rovers suffer- 
ing from a spate of injuries 
cannot guarantee a victory to- 
morrow against Featherstone 
Rovers, who have made a 
spirited start to the season. 

Bradford Northern look a 
different side this season from 
the dispirited team of last year. 
However, they will have to rest 
Terry Holmes. Their coach. 
Barry Sea bourne, feels he win 
benefit from the break. 
Seabourne said **l think be is 
feeling it a bit and is mentally 
tired.** Holmes is replaced by 
Andy Robinson. Bradford 
should beat Salford, who have 
losi both opening games 

heavily. 

Castieford should continue 
their rood ran at home to their 
neighbours. Wakefield Trinity . 
The fly in the ointment for 
Castieford is that their inter- 
national forward. Kevin Ward, 
has again damaged his ankle, 
and although he is expected to 
play tomorrow, there must be an 
element of doubt. 

The champions, Halifax, 
should have the edge over Hull, 
who have yet to find their form. 


rmarumm 

xniztk/nm, 




5 .i.i 


The Samaritans. 




iT i. ; ; h) ifHvv i Ty. ' i ' y. ' .i ' . 1 " iVr ' 1 ;! 


3raiSi§§l 








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h > ‘ f ' .y f d , l 1 y ! J E 'jjj 1 : i 9 * i 




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34 


SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


RACING: 14 ENGLISH RAIDERS AT PHOENIX PARK 


Consistent Triptych 
can reap rich reward 


Triptych, who has been 
running so gallantly in the top 
races both this season and last, 
appears to have a favourite's 
chance of recording her richest 
ever pay day in the £400.000 
Phoenix Champion Slakes at 
Phoenix Park tomorrow. 

At York in last month's 
Matchmaker International, 
she provided the only chal- 
lenge to the Aga Khan's 
Shardari. There was little 
enough to choose between pair 
at the furlong pole but 
Shardari found that bit extra 
to win by three-quarters of a 
length. 

Earlier in the summer she 
had failed by an even nar- 
rower margin in another 
group one race, the Corona- 


From Our Irish Racing Correspondent, Dnblin 

lion Cup at Epsom. Here the something of a disappoint- 


judge needed the camera be- 
fore determining that Trip- 
tych had failed by a short head 
to beat another French chal- 
lenger. Saint Estephe. 

In the Phoenix Champion 
Stakes a year ago. Triptych 
was a big disappointment, 
finishing last but one behind 
Commanche Run. However, 
she can be forgiven that lapse 
as she had been on the go since 
early in the spring, running in 
successive weeks in English 
and Irish classics, one of 
which - the Airlie-Coolmore 
Irish 2.000 Guineas - she 


won. 

Of last year's field, the only 
other runner today is 
Baillamom and he too was 


BIG RACE FIELD 


Televised: 3.45 

Going: good 

Draw advantage: none: 

3.45 PHOENIX CHAMPION STAKES (Group I: £309.030: 1m 2f) (13 
runners) 


1 30-3110 BAMAMONT (S Ntarenoft F Bourn ^rU-9-6 


2 133004 SUPREME LEADER (Capi M Lemos) C Brittan 4-9-6 R< 

3 331-010 DUBIAN (Mohammed Ooarta) A Stewart 493. Mi 

4 113200 RAMCH JOHN (JMcftaeQL Browne 4-M 

H (A Cure) P Btancone (ft) 4-9-3 

BEO(R Reeves) FDomwn(Fr) 3-8-11 


. F Head 11 


I 421232 TRIPTYCH! 
344021 DOUBLE ■ 


H Cochrane 2 
M Roberts 12 
C Roche 8 
A Cordero 10 
G Masses 


10 0211-32 BSBSUDA CLASSIC (P O Hnrdan) P Miifirs 3-6-8 

It 11-3414 COLORSPIN (H Spnngfietd Ltd) M Stoute 3-8-8 


N T Browne 1 
- WCM007 
Pst Eddery 5 


13 111 

13 402112 PARK 


GAYLE GAL JW I 

EXPRESS (P Burin) J Boiger 3-8-8 ... 


mP Cany 383 _ - 


B Thomson 3 
.. A Mwisy 13 
. DMacnhag 9 
J Reid 4 


3-1 Triptych, 5-1 Park Express. 6-1 Cotorsptn. 7-1 Woe Coonsedor, 81 
BaAamom. Sharrood. 


14-1 DuCxan. i6-i Supreme Leader. 20- 1 others. 


[ 19. 12 ran). MR JOHN (6-101 was bat* 


(9-6) at York 11m 
ac**n 4Cft. OOU- 


FORfifc BAILLAMONT ( 
into 4th at Lonqchamo (1m i 
JOHN (B-13) was last. TRIPT 

BLE wherTeSeibeaumte' winner from Crastalde Rodia(8 

9) (lm 2f. E2S485. good, Aug 15. ? ran). SHARflOOO (80 to 2nd to 17101 Again (8-7) at 
Goodwood (1m. £38440. good to rum. Aug 23. 8 ran). SUPREME LEADER»®was lil 
away 4th last timeout WISE COUNSELLOR (8-8) Peat MH JOHN (8-1 3) 2 at The Cur- 
ragh (im. £10044. good toyrnkfina Aug 16. 10 ran). BERMUDA CLASSIC (8-10) was 21 
further back m 3nfPAflK EXPRESS (901 ^1 2nd of 11 to Untold (90) at York (1m 4f. 
£42672. good. Aug 19). COLORSPtN (9-0) was 4V,l away dm. hannq previously 0-01 
beaten Fleur Royate (9-0] very easy 31 at The Curragh (1m 41. E82174. soft. July 12. 8 
ran). 

Setactkw: BAILLAMONT 


merit although he tints 
well in front of Triptych. This 
season Baillamont has won 
two important French races, 
the Prix Ganay and the Prix 
d'lspahan. However it was 
surprising that he could not 
get into the first four at 
Deauville recently and he may 
not now confirm his early 
season superiority over Trip- 
tych. 

Supreme Leader reached 
the first four in both the 2,000 
Guineas and the Derby last 
season, an achievement that 
would certainly be beyond the 
capacity of the majority of this 
13-borse field. His form this 
season has so far not readied 
that level, but he ran well 
enough on his latest outing to 
suggest that he is good each- 
way value. 

While Park Express alone, 
among this year’s crop of Irish 
three-year-okls. has made any 
real impact in Britain, the feet 
that Ivor’s Image finished so 
dose behind her at York 
pinpoints a weakness in her 
record. 

1 foresee an all-French fin- 
ish with Triptych holding on 
from Baillamont and Supreme 
Leader seeing to it that there is 
no Irish-trained runner in the 
first three. 

Besides the four ninnere in 
the big race, there are lOother 
English raiders at Phoenix 
Park this weekend. They are 
(today): 3.0 Mawsuffi 3.30 
Storm Warning. Marouble, - 
Regency Fille: 4.0 Live In 
Hope. Tomorrow: 2.30 Mont- 
forL Candle In The Wind. 
Simple Taste: 3.0 Luqman. 
Mummy's Favourite. 



FRENCH RACING 

Sonic Lady 
to extend 
winning run 
in Moulin 


from Our French Rating 
Correspondent, Paris 


Dihistan swoops between BakharofT and Rakaposhi King (left) to land Kemptod's September Stakes (Photo: las aw* / 


Brave Dihistan demonstrates his class 


By Michael Seely 


Dihistan emerged from the 
shadows of acting as pacemaker 
for bis more famous stable 
companions, Shahrastani . and 
Shardari, to stamp himself as a 
high class performer in his own 
right for the second time this 
season when beating BakharofT 
and Rakaposhi King in the 
Bo aa sp rin t September Stakes at 
Kempton yesterday. Back m 
June Dihistan had won the 
Hanhricke Stakes at Royal 
Ascot 

Before repeating last year's 
victory by Sberoazar for the 
same combination of the Aga 
Khan. Michael Stoute and Wal- 
ter S wiabu m. Dihistan had to 
fight his hardest in one of the 
most exciting races seen all year. 

Steve Canthen and Rakaposhi 
King were soon dictating ' a 
strong gallop. On the final turn 
both BakharofT and Dihistan 
were struggling to go the pace as 
Wylfa moved np towards the 


leader and both TremUant and 
Highland Chieftain were 
manoeuvring their way into 
challenging positions. 

A fartoog from home GreriDe 
Starkey had got the favourite 
running and BakharofT looked 
sure to prevail. However, 
Dihistan suddenly started to fly 
and finished strongest of all to 
win by a short head with 
Rakaposhi King only a head 
away in third place. 

Trembtant and Highland 
Chieftain finished fourth and 
fifth after b u mp i n g each other 
twice in the last q Barter of a 
mile. The stewards held an 
inquiry into this incident but 
decided to leave the platings 
unaltered. 

“Dihistan’s a brave horse,” 
said S win bum, “but basically be 
needs a mile and a half and soft 
ground.” Talking a boat kb de- 
risioa to go to France to partner 
Sonic Lady in tomorrow's Prix 
do Moulin in preference to 
travelling to Ireland to ride 


in the Car more valu- 
able. Phoenix Champion Stakes, 
the jockey commented: “What 
else could I do? She's done me 
prood all season aad even if I've 
got it wrong, I won’t be sorry-" 

Tcerabtant ran a highly 
satisfactory Cambridgeshire 
trial but Ron Smyth said that no 
decision would be taken about an 
attempt to repeat last year’s win 
in the first leg of the autumn 
doable until discussion had 
taken place with Khaled 
Abdulla, the owner. 

Half an hoar earlier Henry 
Cecil had shown ns a live 
candidate for next season's 
1,088 Gatneas when Steve 
Canthen had dominated the 
Bonasprint Sirenia Stakes on 
Gayane for a comfortable victory 
over Darley Knight and 
Moremwds. This was Canthen's 
first win since his success on All 
Haste at Windsor on Monday. 

Carrying the colours made 
famous by sack great horses as 
Brown Jack and Meld, Gayane 


j owned and was bred by Nicky 
Phillips. Sbe is by Narejev oat 
of that marvellous mare, 
Roassalka and therefore dosely 
rotated to last season’s-fifltes 
Triple Crown whmer. Oh So 
Sharp. 


“I bought Ronssalka as a 
yearling," said the owner, “and 
she woo this race by a short bead 

12 years ago. I think that Henry 
would now like to nm Gayane m 
the Chevdey Park Stakes. 

The Twickenham Stakes for 
three-year-old fillies saw the 
return to fora of Gesedeh, who 
had been without a victory to her 
credit since beating Santiki at 
Newmarket in the spring- Pat 
Eddery produced Michael 
Jarvis's fifty with a wetf-timed 
run to master Cocotte at the 
distance and then repelled the 
late attack of Riyda. 

The winner’s next race will be 
either the Prixde 1'Opera on Arc 
day or the San Chariot Stakes at 
Newmarket. 


Sonic Lady (Walter 
Swinburn) can make it seven 
wins from eight .outing by 
landing tomorrows £100.258 
prix du Moulin do Longchamp. 

Since her disappointment in 
the 1.000 Guineas. Michael 
Stoute 's filly has never looked 
tack and was most impressive 
when winning the Sussex Stakes 
last time out 

However she feces strong 
competition on her first visit to 
France, notably from the Ger- 
man four year-old. Lining, who 
will again be partnered by Steve 
Cauihtn. 

Cauthcn rode him to victory 
in the Prix Jacques Lc Marois ai 
Deauville three weeks ago and 
he should again account for the 
second. Regal State, and the 
fourth. Directing. , 

On a line through Ensao. there 
is noi a great deal between 
Lining and Sonic Lady. Efisio 
was beaten 3'A lengths by ihe 
filly at Goodwood and was 2 'A 
lengths behind Lining at 
Deauvilic- 

Bold Arrangement (Gary 
Moore) was fourth in the Sussex 
Stakes, just over two lengths 
behind Sonic Lady, and should 
run well as a mile seems his best 
trip. 


Apddoom. Northern Aspen 
— - first 


and Vin De France were first, 
serand and fourth in the Prix 
Quincey at Deauville 10 days 
aga That was Northern Aspen’s 
first nm For some time and she 
can prove the best of the trio on 
this occasion-Olivier Douieb 
has booked Alain Badcl to ride. 

Other interesting runners are 
the Japanese champion miler. 
Gallop Dyna. the unbeaten 
Thrill Show, and Magical Won- 
der. who is a first big race ride m 
France for Jorge Velasquez. 


Yesterday's results and 
Stratford card, page 35 


HAYDOCK PARK 


3.45 JOHN SMITH'S BREWERY HANDICAP (£5,908: 1m 40yd) (13) 

2 01-100 SANTEL1A MAC (RTaaM)G Hanmod 3*8 Q SUwy 13 


3 221-020 ORIBITAL SOLDO (USA) (B) (Shafth Mohammad) B HOs 38-7 


Televised: 2.15, 3.15, 3.45 


Draw: 6f-1m low numbers best 


2.15 FLEETWOOD CLAIMING STAKES (2-Y-O: £5,475: 6f) (24) 


113124 LADY PAT (BF) (W Beal R J Witoms 9-3 

00 MARQUEE CAFE (WGatflD La no 9-0 

0000 NATIVE PAWN [F Lee) C Brttan 9-0 

04 HOME DEVICE (R MCAJpine) B HAS B-11 

00 CRANCHETER (B)U Bus) J Bhenngton 8-9 — 
140001 DANCING DIANA (D)(G Bosley] fl rannon 8-9- 


J Reid 7 


W R Swfcdmrn 22 

M Roberts 1 

ITT 


043 


SOCTYMMUTESfr Bite) PHasian 8-0 

SPAMSH CALM (J Smith) R Sheather 8-9 


00411 DORMESTONELAD 
000010 MERE MUSIC (BUM 
000 HKHLAM LQOGE C 
422412 SPAMSH SUPPER 
303140 MU’S MAGE (I 
000400 BEAU BENZ (T 
EVERLOFT 
03 ISLANn 
042 NEEDWOQD NUT (I 

330413 REMAIN 

0 EVENBiG 


) R Suite 8-8- 
n) M Brttufi 8-7 . 


S WebstarlS 

_ GStnfcay 9 
.. G French 10 
. MRneeer 12 


000410 COME ON THE BLUES ( 

000003 YOUNG INCA (Ji 


4nC Patens) CBntam 7-93. 
|L Coma 880- 


01-0230 COMODafTALIR SangstB) M W DBU gOjl. 

^^■WISHPtajR IP HateafflHWhamn 4-8-11.^^^ 


M Roberta 7 
J Raid 1 


|034314^H 

2120M MEUH 

00-1122 LONDON BUS 


NON IA1NMJ1 4 

JHBrosap)6 


jMouttekftMHEaGtertiy 54-10 MBbchS 

'3iaaJiM(teffi>TiaflJWMWB3»rO WRSaHmIT 

- Khan) G Leans 3-S-9 J Adam* (7) 2 

R Tennant) R Harmon 98-1 — _ DNcXayi 

303101 TAY10RHADE BOY (B Robson) Denys Siteh 381 (8ax)__ LCtaanoc*12 

000243 GOLDEN ANCONA (B)(D Canon) EEkfin 87-7 G Carter (31 TO 

SowertyJ-K Sue 4-7-7 P Bute (7) 9 


003041 SWIFTS PAL (Mrs 

(Mrs F 


100000 READY Wri (ft 


000000 SHELLMAH (Q{D! 


5-1 
The Glues. 


Mshpaur. 6-1 Young mo. 132 London Bus. 7-1 IIM Rig 
as. iG-iSteffs Pal. Oriental Sofeter. 12-1 Taytormade Boy 


Rigged. 6-1 Come On 


FT IR Gottam) J Wson 8-4. 
LOCKSMITH (G Geragmy) I 
000 NUT (Needwood Ti*f / 


(R Johnston) W Haxjft 8-6.. 
GM Moore 85. ... 

M H Easwtjy 8-4 


D Nichols 13 

K Bariev U 

NON-MMNEH24 

JH Brown 6 

_ J BteeuWe 11 
MBbchO 


good 

(9-4) ai York, earlier (90) made aB to score 
( 1 m. £4885. good to ten. 


M W 
usf AcctsUd)B 


8-4. 


84 


, D McKay 16 
HMghanl5 
.BCrotMayS 
„ R Morse 4 
.AShu«s5 
. RLappin 19 


.good to ten. July 31. 15 ran' 
last (WsMngKI 3rd to Precious Mate 
1COMOOENN 


GLUES (8-12) istotexd behind Diggers Rest 
i by 1 tnxti Trufy Rare (9-7) atGoadwood 
YOUNG INCA ffl-13) relumed to form when 


at Goodwood ($*. E127D1. Good. Aug 23. 17 


VIA VERTTASiMrs A MiS^Hai1iS^81 R LaH*i IS 

MAIACANANG (Mes J Camacho) M Camacho 80 T Lucas 21 “aUce (7-lO)jy^SeSsfaury (itn. £2788. 


ran). COBlOTENrAL8ai over 1matNew&unr;prfortothat^-l1)2KiadtoStBadyEd- 
dle (8-13). with READY VHT eras baatan to Sto. at UnqHeld(7t. £2968 . Good, Aug 9. 13 
ran). M^tPOUR (8-1 1) 3Vil 4Th to AS Fair (8-4). wth SHELLilAN ■ I 


0 CAWSTDNSPHEJUttCEfJAtteyjB McMahon 7-13 

4 UME BROOK (B Morgan) B Morgan 7-13 — „ 

000 1REIZE QUAT0R2E (Roong QudOmi Gp Scottari Ltd) C Tborman 7-13 


— T Lucas 21 
G Carter 20 
— -2 


_ Good. Aug 

ruiL BBSHPOUR (8-11) 3KI 4th to A0 Fair (8-4). vrith SHELLilAN (8Q) waB baaaa « 
R<pon(1m.E6399. Good Aug 2S, 1 4 ran). LQtfflONBiS (9-2 stayed on imo ted beaten 

. . - (7-i2) beat TAYLOfMADE BOY (7-7) 1KI at York 

SWIFTS PAL (8-9) pushed out to b 

, . _ Good to soft, Jiiy 12. 14 rai). 

S ele ct ion: IN1SHPOUB 


LChamocfc23 

7-2 Everm Prayers. 9-2 Dancmg Diana. 11-2 Lady Pat 8-1 Spanish SSpper. 
10-1 Kola's Image. Spanish Cafcn. 12-1 Remain Free. 14-1 Home Device. 

FORM: LADY PAT (9-t) 4th beaten 7i toCome On Chase Me (9-2) 6 ran. Ungfleid 51 stks 
goodtohrm Aug 16. previauslv (9-2) !<l2ndo(4uMandub (80) at Chepstow (St. £1331. 
ten. July 24). lUTiVE PAWN (8-1 1) 7lh of 810 Try The Duchess (88) to Ripon («. EB038. 


good. Aug 25L HOME DEVICE (8fi) 8'41 4th to Murnmy's Luck (8-11) to Goodwood (6f. 
£1370. good. Aug 22. 8 ran). DANCING DIMfA (8-1) 2K1 Chepstow wiraiar tram Rough 
Dance (8-4) (6(7£2094. soft. Aug 26. 12 ran). SPANISH CAUf (94)) beaten heed and 
necL by Vivaldi (9-0) at Wolverhampton (5f. £763. good to soft. Aut2S. 13 ran). SPANISH 
SUPPER (8-7) Til 2rxi at 13 to FuH Ot Pnde (9-7) at Newcastle (5f. £2032. good to soft. 
Aug 23. 13 ran). ISLAND LOCKSMITH (9-0) 41 3rd of 11 to ArtSles (941) to Beverley (71 
100yds. £B79. good to soft. Aug 28). 

Selection; DANCING DIANA 


Haydock selections 

By Mandarin 

2. 1 5 Dancing Diana. 2.45 Hidden Brief. 3. IS Double Schwartz. 3.45 
Young Inca. 4.15 Great Act. 4.45 WILD HOPE (nap). 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

2.15 Lady Par. 2.45 Hidden Brief 3. 1 5 Green Desert. 3.45 Come On 
The Blues. 4.15 Great Acl 4.45 Wild Hope. 

Michael Sedy’s selection: 3.45 Inishpour. 


2.45 HOYLAKE STAKES (3-Y-O: £3.589: 7f 40yd) (11) 


4.15 EBF BIRKENHEAD MASEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £2324: 5f) (20) 


0-30100 GAELIC FLUTTER (FR)(T Clvck) K Braasey 9-S W R Swfnbum 7 

444120 BILLS AHEAD (RDrteon)GM Moore 9-2 MBteh4 

000000 EDGEWISE (O (Z Savvas) M McCormack 9-2 B Thomson 1 

120020 M00EN BRIEF fKBeOKjQH Boss 9-1 E Guest (3)5 

3-03040 MYSTICAL MAN (Mbs C McCutoch) E BPn 812 — — T Luos 9 

8 BOLD CELT (J Haggerty)C Boom 811 Jfleid2 

00- BRITWYDD (A Home) C Booth B-11 DWehofisS 

00003 THE STAMP DEALS) (J Moores) E Alston 811 GStekey3 

0-00000 TOP ROW UZocnono) AW Jones 811..- — LCharaockll 


02 BALKAN LEADER (A F Budge Ltd) Jimmy RUgarajd 94 — DMdMBsT 

00 BARNABY BENZ (TH Bennett Grots) M H Easurby 90 MBWill 

« DREAM TICKET (t Keteo) W Kawh 90 JH Brow (5) 4 

800200 BWWRRWEWIMraAHo^DTtanM WRSrriabamS 

0 FWST AVBQE(C Armsftong) K Brassey 90 NONRUNNB1 10 


020040 RAFFLES VHlGtMA(D Mato) BMcMXwn 88 O Carter (3)8 

27 413232 TATLOR OF SOHAM (Taylors of Soham LM) D Lesie 88 D McKay 10 

n-4 Gaefec Roller. 7-2 Htoden Bnei 11-2 Rjftlea Virginia. 7-1 Taylor Of Soham. 
181 Mystical Man. B*> Ahead. 12-1 Bniwydd. The Stamo Dealer. others. 


3.15 VERNONS SPRINT CUP (Group II: £51.154: 6f) (8) 


I 2-11212 DOUBLE SCHWARTZ (D)(R SangstertC Netson 89-3 JR*W« 


230000 GREY DESME (C) (D) (M BnttarD M Briton 6-9-3 KOadeyA 

* ■ ' M Perjticosl M Francs 4-83 — 


031240 POLYKRATTS (P) (M 
128213 GREEN DESEHT 


. . . C RBOtr6 

(USA) 10) (8F)(M3kRwm AI Maktoum) M Stoute 38^2 

WRSvMvn 1 

M1031 KALLGATE (D) tHpDodromo Racing) Miss S HaO 3-812 G Starkey 2 


10 

12 

13 

14 

15 
20 
21 
22 

24 

25 

26 
27 

31 

32 


HOPIWG AROUND (Raoegoars Ckrb Ownm (korp 19B5) C ThmmM ^ 

INTROVERT (PHateaM A Snrth 90 SWeteterl 

0004 MOTOR BROKER (RCteMT)0 Long 90 C Ratter (3) 9 

04 NEARLY GREAT (K FtechwIM Jar« 9-0 T taxes 18 

0020 OH YOUR PfiftCES (BHBF) (S HepOum) J Pa)te 90 GStetey19 

0 PAPARELU 1C WateteQ TBarron 90 G Carter fl) 14 

00000 TOUCH OF SPEED (B)(K Rater) RHohnshaad 9-0 SPtetaU 

UNSELFSH (A SmuaOR Johnson Houghton 90 J Reid 12 

0 WHITE OF MORN IPDiakafOM McCormack 90 BV^anS 

00 YOUNG SNU0F1T (BF) (A Greenwood) MWESStetiy 90 KDariey 15 

3 GREAT ACT (W Greclay) C Bntt» 811 MRrtens3 

03 GYPSYS BARN RAT (B Knght) W Hidden 811 R Horae (5) 2 

00 PB8UMEJ0E (khs R Sargstar) B His 811 BUeaeaoo 17 

00 VEBYAN BAY (U SA) (B Songster) MW ttefatuon 811 — NON-RUNNER 13 
WESTPARKPRU«S8gMowes)WHaigh8ll sums 20 


82 Great Act 7-2 Balkan Leader. 4-1 Unseffish. 81 Nearly Great. 81 On Your 
Princess. 12-1 P art u mene. 181 others. 


01-3118 POSSEDYNO(Densley Wood Raong Lull 0 Bsworth 38-12 G Carter 7 

00-000 HOARWGRIVA(DlfAF 


. . iFietOlWMusscn 3812. MWighna 

9 123340 BRIDESMAID (B)tC-0)(RS3ngster)BHifl5 389. „BThoatsnn5 

6-» Green Desert. 186 (toutte Schwarts. 9-2 Hatfgate. 12-1 Bndesmted. 
181 Porykraos. 20-1 Grey Desire. 25-1 Roarmg Rwa. 381 Possedyrw 


FORM. DOUBLE SCHWARTZ (961 M 2nd to Last Tycoon (92) at York (51. £49518. t»od 
to linn Aug 31. 8 ran) GREEN 06SERT (921 1 '-rl ' 


. ... .. ilt»c*ina*a.aRBJeSMAm<8l3laii. 

Other 71 a<Mv6tn. and OREY DESWE (96Horther head back m 7th Prewousty DOUBLE 
SCHWARTZ (9-51 had POLYKRATTS (9-0) 2 .1 m 4th when Goodwood winner (51. 
£17928 r»od to hrm. July 3. i4ran> GREEN DESERT (811) hod earner beaten GREY 
DE9RE (96) Mat Newmarket (6f. £39208. good to hrm. July 10. 5 ran) KALLGATE (9 
31 ' >1 Newmjrhet winner from Treasure Kay 18-81 (61. £9396. good. Aug 22. 7 ran) 
POSSEDYNO tom Oil? n France. (9-4) had beaten Seme Wooster (81) l) «r 


4.45 SOUTHPORT HANDICAP (£4,155: 1m 2f 131yd) (IQ) 

1 201118 ROYAL HALO (USA) (Mrs PCamteRG Harwood 8810 GStedcey 4 

3 3113JW SMOKEVS SEC1ST (B) (C Crewe) W Wharton 4-90 EGueeifi 

5 000484 PATD (lord Matteno) I Matthews 4-88 J Reid 2 

6 112132 SAMHAAHmj(OZ3w3wi)BHanowy 488 WRSwtafaum9 

7 402143 BALLYDWMW(C-0)|N Jaflcr)R Foher986 DNkteteB 

9 330100 CONMAYJO (C) |J Gate) O Haydn Jones 885 DW*eoa(7)3 

11 00-0042 WILO HO PE (CO) (J Wight) GHufter 87-13. G Carter (3)1 

011301 MCRERPOBir(M Baste C Tinkler 4-7-13 C Rotter (3) 5 


15 


400220 FRANGHnO(BntohThcnajghbredRABplc)R Johnson Houghton 87- 

GFraachlO 

324042 GRQS) (H Alexander) Denys Smth 87-7 LCharnock7 


Newmarket n'cap tSL £3876^ooa to lirm. Jdy 19. 9 rani. 


Selection: DOUBLE SCHWA 


11-1 Samhoan. 100-30 Royal Halo. 9-2 BaAydurrow. 81 Wild Hope. 81 Mrster 
Pom. 181 Greed. 14-1 Paw. 16-1 others. 


Amigo Sucio 
powers to 


group success 

Amigo Sucio was confidently 
ridden h> Simon Whitworth (O 
land a first group two success for 
trainer Kim Braw) in the 
£ IS. 362 Moot cl Chandon 
Zukunfts-Kennen (6f) ai Baden- 
Baden \esterda>. 


1 he French challenger. 
CrollHo. finished strongly to 
take second inside the final 
furlong wiih two of the other 
British raiders. Bag O'Rhjthm 
and MiMer Majestic third and 
fourth. The disappointing 
favour He. Polemos. finished a 
disappointing sivih. 


GcordieS Delight. Lester 
Prggolt’s first runner tn Ger- 
mans. could manage only third 
behind the French -trained 
Tripwire in Ihe Preis der Stadt 
Baden-Baden. Piggoll runs Ori- 
ental Dancer in a small race in 
NorwJv tomorrow. 


St Hilarion (Ureville Statics) 
and Phardanie (Tony Clark) 
carry British hopes at Baden- 
Baden tomorrow in ihe £4b.oli1 
Clrosser Prvis von Baden (120 
but neither is likels to pose too 
great a threat to the German 
champion. Acatenango. who is 
seeking his twelfth consecutive 
win. 


m Last Tscoon. the winner of 
the the 'William Hill Sprint 
Championship and the King's 
Stand Stakes, will bo reared 10 
stud ai the end of the season. He 
will lake up siallion dunes at 
C'oolmore. in Ireland. The coll 
will have his final race in the 
Bnvders' Cup ai Sansa Anita. 
Tale Gallon . ihe champion two- 
sear-old in Ireland last season, 
has been retired and will also 
stand at Cool more. 


THiRSK 


Going: good 
Draw: 5f-6f, high numbers best 


IJBTvny RtzgeraU 687 Tteeefi 
aartry ^94 K H edgecn • 


2.15 FALCON CLAIMING STAKES (3-Y-O: £2.442: 
1m 4f) (20 runners) 

1 0204 MlLTESCENSfS) A Janus 9-4 «RMn7 

2 801 ASTRAL P C om 91 — ._RHMe6 

3 4130 FRENCH FumSI (0) R STeamer 91 T teea 11 

4 1320 SPACE TROOPER (WtTFwtartlM -.■■ ■!* < 
6 0112 RELATIVELY EASY (BHM Presort 812GMM£ 14 
9 WINTEH HAVEN MWDcknscn 811. N0I9TONNER3 

1C 0000 TAXI HAM K Stone 83. - ^ G_ S^0H lf 

12 0010 PRINCESS AHORO MEPA O W Cnaptren 82 A Proud 19 

14 1033 ORIENTAL EXPRESS FC»r 81 .JCteT (7) JO 

15 000- RAFFLES BOGUEM Cam*J* 81 — NOwnortoolS 

19 0004 IASS LAURA L££PF£igaie 7-12 N"T5 


3.15 GOLDEN GRAIN HAMBLETON CUP 
(Handicap: £4,259: 2m) (10) 

2 0330 SPECIAL VWT AGE 

4 1300 WTTHY BANK M H E 

5 030/ GENERAL CONCORDE A Bartav 6-92 JC»t (7)1 

a 1106 AGA7MSTfUSA)GPn»are€orton3*lO WRyen4 

11 0000 S W Gtg rS THYST (USA) HHotegftead 4-82 

ACollane(7)7 

12 0410 ALLAimi (USAHO) B HAS 382 MHAa2 

13 4023 DONT RMG ME W Kastmqs-Bass 4-81 .. R Unas (3) 3 

16 2113 M QffiMlS (DKBF) M Prsscoft 87-13 — GDeffieto X) 

17 0201 SUN STREET C BnB»r 4-7- 13. J Lowe 9 

20 0000 RED DUSTBI (D) T Faaflwsi 87-7. — _ MFryS 


11-4 In Dreams. 4-1 AOaturn. 114 Special Vmoge. 13-2 
Witfiy Bank. 81 AgathBt Sun Streto. 181 afters. 


JO 


0 REDALLY vi Wharcn 7-1 2 N Certite 17 

21 0004 STANDON MftL J Wtson 7-12 All D oe tor (7)0 

Z -000 BELVEL (ITY) P Rerun 7-11 .... S Monte « 

13 -000 DOON VENTURE JEtenngtcn Ml ~ ? 

FLOATER (USA) S ?• 11 MWoMlI 


3.45 'MAIL ON SUNDAY' HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£3,516: 1m) (3) 

1 2304 CRESTAAUCT)tamGPndn8Goi<don87 

GDnffieMO 

8 0012 HALO HATCH (B) (D) K Brasny 87 — RHMa3 


rkuntcfitwoMid •••* — ■— ■■ - - - 7 , ’ 

25 04 MAftETK UHE Jremj Rrrqeralfl 7-11 ... 

:: <200 TOP DIST (B) M 7-tl — TWtanoSD 

a 0000 WAY ABOVE P Rowan 7-11 J On (5) 8 

24 0633 hmOA (Bf E Weyroes 7-9 —4 

3 i M’ it esc «ms 1083) ReUtn*ery Easy. 4-1 AstraL 81 Tap 
Duet. 182 Pnrcess AnffomeOa. 81 Ntada. 181 otoere. 


10 1444 TRtCX0RTREATffl)JWWans83_. NC0mton4 

T3 -320 PREJUDICE T Barron 81 TMKro2 

14 4213 BLUE GUTTAP (to J HnOtey 80 MMHsS 


17 0100 BOLD SEA ROVBt M H Easiarby 7-1 
20 0020 FORETOP WBsev 7-8 


22 4300 SUPREME WtGDOM B H0Bran«l7-7._ H CWSSte 1 
25 2001 EZZY GUMS) AM Robson 7-7 (fiex). ACt«aae(7)B 
10830 Create Auction. 7-2 BhmGuiter. 4-1 tzzy Gunner. 5- 
1 Halo Hatch. 81 Trick Or Treat 81 Prejudice. 181 others. 


Thirsk selections 

By Mandarin 

2. 1 s Astral. 14? Shade Of Pale. 3. 1 5 In Dreams, 
.7.45 Crest j .Auction. 4.15 L : n Bel Di. 4.45 Say 
Pardon. 

B> Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.15 Relatively Easy. 145 Spy Gift. 3.15 Sun 
Street. 3.45 Blue Guitar. 4. 1 5 Naive Charm. 4.45 
Sj> Pardon. 


4.15 HIGHFLYER STAKES (2-Y-O: £1324: 5f) (10) 

3 2012 FULL OF PRHE(0) til « EasiBrtjy 94— K Hodgson 6 
5 00 ATMKASHACXG Cohort 8tt J Lowe 4 

8 2312 CORPS RED (DUBF) P Makki 811 Tlws2 

9 3324 DANAM Ror TTomkan 811 RPatoBf 

II 0 NORTHERN SECURITY G Cohert 8l1 — 5 P Griffiths 3 

14 1223 SARMAH (USARDHBnH Thomson Jones 811 Rlflb 5 

15 000 GAME FEATHEteWVftimonM NCtefiatet 

17 120 NAIVE CHARM (D)R Boss 88 GDetfleUIO 

18 12 N08GABC (DIP Cater 84 — I* Fry I 

21 0100 UN BEL DI(USA)(D)ODoiaeb8-8 — QBntarS 


2.45 RUSH & TOMPKINS NURSERY HANDICAP 

(2-Y-O: £3.719: 71) (16) 

£ 1713 TEAM EFPCRT Ren TT^^npiCT 87 . — . R P Q*«7 

5 0324 COLWAY RALLY (B) JW Wec81C .... NCcnnortOnS 

6 033 SPY GIFT (BF) U 52SW 89.. - — MAG4M(7)11 
8 1014 IKSHIRAH(USA)(Cfl)(BF)HThO>nKn J0M3 

3 2210 AUTHENTIC (DI N Tinkter 85 — - Koa TMter T S 

10 041 GLAMGRAM FOR GRAMS S Saw 85._ GDutMkta 

11 0CH0 MUSICAL BELLS (USA) LPkjmt 84 

!3 0022 TTMESWITCT (USA)(BF) W O toman 83 - - T hea 4 
14 010 ffiLGRQVE J Etra'irtpjn 9i M Wood 3 

17 333 NORTON MELOOYMHEjaerty 7-7 JlawelO 

(S (MO KATIE SAYS JEBieimg.-on 7-7- ... "Fry 12 

20 3400 CAEHBCTTE (B1 A BfflBy 7.7 . — » 

21 12 SHADE OF PALE P Hisan 7-7 TVM5 mb5 

Ot MASTER POKEY P4 W EaSHrty 77_ A Prate 10 

23 3000 BOY SINGER X Slcne 7-7 . J ttltag lj 

320 OYSTER GRAY (BF) C W Gray 7-7 N CtoOta 13 

7-; Auihennc. 4-T Cd-wav Rally. 8T Norton Melody. 
Giamgrar. Fc- Gums 81 Team EWrt 91 cmeis. 


2-1 Ful Of Prate. 4-1 Sarihan. 81. Copper Rod. 81 

Danadn. 181 oners. 


4.45 SAXTY WAY STAKES (S-Y-O: £2^01: 6f) (15) 

1 HM1 HARRY mXLUWEassrtJy 91 G Baiter 10 

2 0010 SAY PARDON D Matey 91 TMm2 

3 3000 BON ACCUEIL |B) H WMing 810. — 5 


4 -300 BONNY LKOT rifl R Sheaftw 810 Ttwa4 

6 800 LA7RX!G UBGE N Bycraft 810 —IS 

9 80 SUPER TRUCKER Wh%ft 810-., NDwl3 

11 0330 ELSDCXO B McMaftr 87 JWMs^ll 

12 0202 ENIGMA B H4S87_ MHtes7 

13 30 FALflC u Frann 87 NCvUal 

la (W FREE CLARE MPrascofl 87 GOofitettS 

16 0 GREEK MUSIC Elncsa 87 MBeecroftS 


17 0203 IMPERIAL SUMBSE M W Eastertry 87 

DLeadbtter(S)l« 

18 2333 0fmGA(S)JEtnemgnn87 — - - M Woods 

19 MO RAAW1VB1 IB) (USaO* Thomson Jones 87... R Me 3 

20 a ZlAfTS ALBy (USA) M ASina 87 WRym12 


5-2 Say Pardon, 7-2 Ersodeo. 92 Ertgma. 11*2 Harry HuO, 
7-1 Raawgnh. 81 Ornca. 12-1 Bon Acoori. 14-1 rafters. 


Sangster 
to land 


own race 


agam 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 


It took Robert Sangster 20 
years to find a horse good 
enough to win the Vernons 
Sprint Cup, the race that his 
family’s Liverpool-based firm 
sponsors annually at nearby 
Havdock Park. That was 


Orojoya who just managed to 
squeeze home by a short head 12 


months ago. 

Today the Isle of Man-based 
millionaire will see his colours 
carried again by both Double 
Schwartz and Bridesmaid in an 
attempt to lift the coveted 
trophy a second time. Although 
Bridesmaid was a good winner 
over this course and distance in 
May. his best chance lies with 
Doable Schwartz who will be 
ridden by John Reid now that 
Pat Eddoy is needed in Ireland. 

That will be no disadvantage, 
much as I admire Eddery, 
because Reid has never ridden 
better at any stage of his career 
than he has this season — not 


even when landing the King 
lizabeth 


George VI and Queen Eli 
Diamond Slakes on lie De 
Bourbon in those heady days of 
'78. 

It 'will certainly need all of 
Reid's considerable expertise to 
get Double Schwartz home 
ahead of Green Desert - this 
afternoon as Double Schwartz is 
basically a five-furlong special- 
ist. Over the minimum trip at 
York recently he proved too 
good for Green Desert to the 
tune of 1% lengths. 

He has won over today's 
distance but with that extra 
furlong to cover it is likely to 
prove a nip and luck affair 
between the pair with diem both 
proving just too good for 
Halfgate, who was seen at his 
best again at Newmarket last 
time when be gave 91b and a 
narrow beating to Treasure Kay. 

A line through Treasury Kay 
makes Hallgate a greater threat 
than Polykratis. Only a return to 
very soft ground would give 
Grey Detire a chance of doing 
better than last year when he 
finished fourth. 

Today’s nap is Wfld Hope to 
win the Southport Handicap for 
the second year in succession, 
again in the competent bands of 
that most promising apprentice, 
Gary Carter, who has been seen 
to such good effect recently on 
Catherine’s Well. Today’s dis- 
tance will suit Wild Hope better 
than the mile over which he was 
just beaten by Afl Fair at Ripon 
last month. 

Unlike Royal Halo, Samhaan. 
Ballyduirow and Mister Point, 
Wild Hope is still relatively 
fresh and looks poised to visit 
the winner's enclosure again 
following that heartening run at 
Ripon. 

Ai Kempton 1 envisage Willie 
Carson, who has been in spar- 
kling form this week, doing well 
again and perhaps even landing 


another treble on Mighty Bold 
and Trots 


(1.50). Pubby (2^0) and Troian 
Mbs (150). 

I particularly like the chance 
of Trojan Miss in the Robert 
Fleming Fillies Stakes. Beaten 
only a short head by Mummy's 
Luck on her debut at Goodwood 
15 days ago. Trojan Miss looks 
certain to relish {his distance. 

A high draw could enable 
Mighty Bold to surprize Global 
Lady. Jaisalmer and the rest in 
the Continental Airlines 
Nursery. 

At Ripon 1 expect Tyrone 
Williams and George Duffidd 
to land doubles: the former on 
Shade Of Pale (2-45) and Say 
Pardon (4.45): the latter on Id 
D reams (3. i 5) and Orests Auc- 
tion (3.45). 


KEMPTON PARK 


250 ROBERT FLEMING STAKES (2-Y-O Fflfes: 
£2^60: 71) (11) 


Televised: 1.20, 1.50, £20, 2^0 
Going: good to firm . 

Draw: hi^i numbers best 

1.20 PRICE WATERHOUSE CHERTSEY LOCK 
STAKES (2-Y-O C & G: £3,200: 71) (20 runners) 


403 

404 

405 

406 
408 

410 

411 

414 

415 

416 

417 


CA8B4-BAS i Dunkto 88 


CASTLE HaOOY G Lea»88 


B Room 9 





A KMiaiiey 7 
SWNMttfl 


GOU»tPl£ASUHEl* 

HEAVENLY HARMONY Rl 
KENTUCKY AIR (USA) HJ 

M%rtiMU^HOCttignO|M8a- WNMMI 

■HnBMlISStniJffll 

TROJAN MBS W Hem 88 .: WCoaonS 


88— 

ft 88 SWMMM&2 

88 SCwthenA 

Pool Eddery 6 


IDT 

102 

103 

104 
106 
107 

109 

110 


Amuiisr cantata 811 

0 ARHOWtORGHrCtfam. - 

04 ARTFUL DODGER (FRfw Hem 811 W Carson 2 


811 . 


MLIkMtesA 
R Cook 7 


:CEEMFBtheretavGot8oy811- PWaMran5 

BONAFORnMEOMwiay811 R Geest 1 

3 8UCXRA MBUSUGA J Toler 8< t — P Robinson 14 
CL0PT0NM Ryan 811 R Cochran* 17 

urrofl 


2-1 Tro)an Miss. 7-2 Rare Memories. 92 Kentucky «r. 
11-2 Golden Pleasure. 91 Gate NigftL 1M Cas-6vBas. 

FOIUtelUSREMHft3e^^11)1»^<Art^toNorthShW 


111 

118 

117 

118 
121 
124 


4 FASMOMMLYrOR8E5(USA)RAmisat)ng81l 

TQuneS 

FEARLESS MAN L Pagan 811 MMHMDMER19 

JUBILEE AGAM (US4]H Harman 811 — L Janes (5) 9 

0 KARABAT D LOtog 811 WNwmasB 

0 LOROOFCAfBM)QNAMoore811 AktoGtaneS 

MAHENBOURG J CXriop 811 B Rouse IB 



125 

128 

129 

131 

133 

184 


• OPTIONAL CHOiCE (USA) JW Payne 811 

PHAETONS GLORY R anyth 811 SWMm3i2 

ROUSHAYD R jatmson Houghton 8H ~ S CauBae 20 
SKANTMOIM (USM M State 811— A KMertey 13 
TORRANCE R Hutcwson 811 — PttefcMmon($15 
3 WHfTSTABLE(USA)G Harwood 8H — — ACkrttlO 
0 ZANUSSI LINE DArtMtsiot 811 — 1_ P Wteace 11 


7-1 


5-2 Buckra MeOiauaa. 7-2 WMtnabla. 92_ArtW Dodger. 
Shantanxn. 81 Fasti 


Fastaonabiy Forties. 10-1 Rousftayd. 


FORM: BUCKRA MELLBUGA (90) tndeward when 1 Kl 3rd to 


Kempton selections 

By Mandarin 

IJ20 Buckra Mellisuga. I -SO Mighty Bold. 2.20 
Pubby. 2.50 Trojan Miss. 3.20 True Nora. 3.50 
Travel Mystery. 4.20 Spring FlighL 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
1.20 Buckra Meflisuga. 1-50 Mighty Bold. 2.20 
Pubby. 2.50 Kentucky Air. 3.20 Qleofe. 
Straight Through. 4.20 Special Guest. 

By Michael Seely 

1.50 Global Lady. 3.50 ASK MAMA (nap). 


3.50 



&20 THE TEBC STAKES (3-Y-O FDSes: 6f) (16) 


11 toHenbeka 
23). ARTFUL 
(811) 8th. 


501 0003 
582 0102 US ERA. 
504 10-0 INTO THE 


BHto! 


PC0to911- L 


®I 


M Usher 9-3. — AMcGtaaeS 
H Wernbsei 3 
ACtaritlfl 


BUCKRA MBJJSUGA 


1^0 CONTRCNTAL MRUIES NURSERY 
HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £2^60: 6f) (18) 


•WflMU 

505 0400 KMBLE BLUE M McCwrnacfc 

506 0402 TRW NORA C Nelson 83 

507 1000 KHAHRANAflJ) K ftMey 91 — 

509 4001 CLEOFE (ISA) (D) LQonani 813 

510 nnm TUMBLE 

511 0120 BROOK'S DUEiBIA (D) M A2»na 81 3__ _. A Boid 4 


SVNtworthlS 

_ _ R Cochrane 1 

M McCormack 813 N Howe 6 


512 0*01 LEFT RtGHT Mrs N Macauiey 813 PRotawntt 

1nier8lf 


201 3122 ONOOtNGSmiATKJND Mortey 97. 

2D3 3413 

2D8 Q331 
2B9 1140 

213 0222 . 

215 041 SHEER ROYALTY (D) W OGamm 82 


513 810 CORRALS JOY J W4nMr81 

514 2001 GUUAAM0U811 


BATT LEAXE (D) J Toter 810, 
BRIGADE 


RtOTL . 

OBEY WOLF Tl6tit(D}(BF)R Hannon 8-6. P Cook 14 
JAISALMER (B)DBsv«rth 83 AMcGtaaeS 


516 4400 OMANIA R Hannon 811 

517 08 PASSO FBMLE A Hide 81 1 


518 2000 PLAIHEtm R Simpson 811 

SYBB.FAWLTY (B) D Latag 811 ... 



216 10W 

217 3012 

218 21 

221 004 

222 2214 

223 0400 

224 Q20 

226 8331 

227 083 


DERRMS DEE M P Cundel 81 
MKZIO LOVE HCrNodl 80. 


ML 


519 tM42 

81 True Nora. 92 UseM. 81 Ctaofa. 81 Dream Cftasar. 
Brook's Diemma. 81 GHaaa Moo. 181 Into The Gap. 


S \§EEJ21§ 

aWBMHtnu 


GLOBAL LADY ffi)WMtsson 7-12 A Hacks? 6 

HJOHTY BOLD R Armstrong 7-11 WCanoeW 


3JS0 CHARTERHOUSE HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,070: 
1m 3f 30yd) (12) 


SHADES OF MtDfT J WWW 7-*_ 


R Pax 2 

0 


228 1200 

231 000 

232 000 


AUNTIE CYCCOIW (USA) 0 Latag 7-7 N 

HAY-AMADEUS P MitcheB 7-7 SDMon3 

SHUTTLECOCK <BRL(D)W Jarvts7-7 D a te Gta a e n (7)5 
SOtXEIADOU m R Joiroon Houghton 7-7 

LRjggio 

GRESTS GALLERY G Bbffl 7-7 J Carter - 

G Barrhegfl . . 

_ AWKtehtert 


MADAM BSLLA N Catewan 7-7-1 
MAMADORA G BakSng7-7 


m 


804 3012 ASK MAMA JH 
605 3314 BANQUEPRlVSl 
807 0210 DESSfTOFWMD 

610 3010 BASTINADO IJM 

611 330 SLANGIVAHl 
■12 1404 STRAIGHT ■ 


>97. 


W Cason 5 


. L( 
812. 


BMk84-SOMOMi2 
92. R Cochrane 10 

JMattMas7 

810 W Newness 

810 B Route E 


613 3302 1RAVB. MYSTERY PVWwwf 810 — PMEddeqU 
-01*8 88- 


10830 Riot Bngada. 92 Jateaknar. 11-2 Micro Love. 
81 Ongoing S it uatio n . 81 Grey Wbtf Tiger. Oaring Dee. 

FORM: ONGOING SITUATION (813) II 2nd Of 12 to Most 
Wefcome (97) to Nawraoritet(6IL £10316. good. Aug 2$. RIOT 
BWGAOE(9Tq short Dead Yarmouth rentier from 

fSf.E * ‘ 

8 to I _ _ 

23). SHSR ROTA 

N^^ia(91)ahaad«n^6n(8>. £3029. good. Aug 10.9 naiL 


615 2331 KnKTS CRUSADE GlJBi*8 

616 000 STB* M TWE PMM(ta8Sl 

619 2301 TEMPES T TOSSED M 

620 2300 GANOON^H^ 

822 4000 OUTOFI 


!T^ TOSSED (USA) (DR Armstrong 8 

4(USA)(g)POBte8Q Kl 

STOCK M fianManJ 7-0 : ft 


P Watonn 11 
TQeim 1 


1 82- — 4 

(PoMfeeOl 
.N Adore B 

7-2 Ask Mama. 81 Trawl Mystery. 81 Tempest Tossed. 
81 Banqua Prime. 81 Kings Crusade. 181 Desert Of Wind. 


StertflfetSfl) 


4£0 SSAFA APPRENTICE HANDICAP (£2,082: 1m 
If) (21) 


(97) DM 2nd to UrcraUf 


(5t. 


E3042, good to firm. JUy 28. 7 ram. GLOBAL LADY (8-5) beat 
Sno 'Surprise (7-13). dual winner since^ a nedc at Redear [6>. 
£2t(4,goodm5nn. Jufy2S. T1 ran). IflOHTY BOLD (90) 4541 4tft 


„ - ran). IflOHTY BOLD (90) 4541 r... 

to Safely Pm (811) to Doncaster (6f. £2139. good, July 30. 16 
ran). SWTTLECOCX (3HLJ8-7) need Cattencfc wmner from 
Clown Streaker (98) {B. El 694. good, Aug 14. 10 ran). 
SetacHorc ONGOTnO SITUATION 


220 ANDERSON HANDICAP (£6,400: 1m 4J) (7) 


301 2140 STATELY FORM <C) (D}J Tree 4-910 SCMI»2 

303 »» CONVMCS P) G Ktawood 4-98 ACtarfc5 

304 2210 tSLAM) SET (USA) (D)LCoreni 495 _R Cochrane 3 
309 3011 VSlARDt (&D) W Hasanaj^ass 389- Peel Eddery 1 

312 00-0 W«HWK2(ftfe«m)JftBnconte687. WNnmn4 

313 4110 SARYANm0)N&k^>an386--. GBardwaO(7)7 

316 0001 PUBBY (rffj ToOar siT[6ex) W Canoe 6 

5-2 Stately Form. 10830 Convinced. 7-2 Veranfi, 


__ Stately „ 

11-2 (stand Set 91 Saiyan. I 8 i PoOby. 14-1 Kmgsntck. 


1 2303 
3 008 
S 4000 
8 200 

7 0030 

8 3113 
11 0100 
12 0000 

13 44S0 

14 080 

15 -0O 

16 0320 

19 048 

20 3240 
24 0000 
26 448 

28 0030 

29 0 

30 0034 

31 -000 

32 3100 
91 

181 


FLYHOW 


C Carter (7) 11 

R Hannon 5-97 __ L Jones 20 

FAST SERVICE CHorgan 7-92 P Sfeeficn (7) Z 

DONOR Mrs C Reaver 4-9-1 — Fmasata Maddm (7) 8 

PARS TRADER J W Payne 4-91 VieM Gamer 011 

SPRBIG FLIGHT (BF) A Jams 3-813 S Meacack (7) 12 

SmLOUPMtehesiS-IO R Carter 17 

GAW^IS DREAM D A Wfison 989 -—6 

DOILY A Moore AM SMI (7) 14 


OKAADHfUSA) M Tompkins 4-88 BCooli(7)5 

RUSTL1HG D ArtxjtJvirt 4-87 J Leach (5) 3 


FMUG OSA) P Wtakryn 387 
MYDONBYE D Thom 4-83. _ 


W 

WARK.Y P Arttw 87-7 LJoimscytil 

CYGNE G Batata 4-7-7 A BMMn*@19 

CA^uiffiJAI^jToSar3. 7 . 7 _ Jackie Hereto* ffi 13 
SWSTAIfl7Y(D)GGracey 7-7-7— G Daitl a— (S) 21 
81Staou. 7-1 Rustfino. 81 



FORK CONVINCED 6di test ttrae. previously (811) awarded 

raos having finished neck 2nd to voexftsaffl (86) to Ascot (1 m 41. 
£10051. firm, June 18 iSran). STKm.YFORM (95) was betorai 


, 181 Spado) l 


.Fast 


Hfy 7th. ISLAND SET(9-0) and STATELY FORM (910) ootol 
9 to York (ItnBQ. Prevnuote island SET (81) ben waage 
(7-11) 21 to Goodwood (tm 41, £4753, firm, Aug 2/8 


Port 
, . ran). 

SARTAN 9(ft Itaststat. earfiar (810) beat Husnan (87) neck n 
Hamfton (lm 31. £1196. firm. July 18. 6 ran). PUBBY (88) to 
Windsor tenner from Min Bated (85) (lm ' 
good to soft. Aug 23. 8 ran). 


SalecM o c VPUUWR 


• John Kennedy, the Irish trainer, was fined £500 
by the Irish Turf Club yesterday and severely 
reprimanded for “gross carelessness”. Kennedy 
rail his colt. Himself, in a contest for maidens at 
starting at Tralee. The colt had won twice in 

England before joining Kennedy’s stable. Paddy 
Graffin, an amatuer rider, was fined £250 and 
suspended for a week, for punching the 
profession^ jockey. Rat Leech, after they had 
both ridden in a chase at Downpatrick. Leech was 
found guilty of dangerous riding. 


Blinkered first time 


KEMPTON: 1 SOSoUetadOu-ZZOSaryw. 
320 Tumhte Fair. 


HAYDOCK: 2.15 Crancheter. 3.45 Owotel 
Soldier. 4.15 Father Time. On Your 


Princess. Touch Ot Speed. 


THRSK 2A5 C«w#t RaBy. 

LYjttt, Qrtrca- 


Attuel, Bonny UgM. I 


4 AS Bon 


Irish tracks in 
satellite deal 


The decision by the Associ- 
ation of Irish Racecourses to 
sign a three-year contract with 
Satellite R acing Development in 
Dublin on Thursday night is 
Hkety to increase the pressure on 
the British equivalent, the Race- 
course Association, to complete 
a shafl ar deal in the very new 
. future. 

The board of the Racecourse 
Association last met 10 days 
ago, after which an announce- 
ment was expected as to which 
firm wonld receive the rights to 
broadcast raring in Britain to 
betting offices by satellite. How- 
ever, the meeting broke up 
without official comment 

SRD's new Irish agreement 
entitles them to commence op- 
eration by February 1 of neact 
year at the latest. The company 
has already signed an a^eement 
with die Turf Club TO broadcast 
from the Cmragh. the premier 
Irish coarse. 


Today’s course 
specialists 


KEMPTON 


TBANB® H CedL 21 tamm from ST 
runners. 4i w O'Gramaa B from za 

30SVWHem.7fnjai28.2a9’’*. ' 
JOCKEY&T Oum. ,3 tenners from 52 
ndes, 25.0%; S Cauihen 31 Iran 144. 
21-5^ W Carson. 22 from 160, 13«V 


HAYDOCK 

TRADERS: J Kndtey. 9 tenners from 28 
runners. 34 6%. G Harwood. 18 from 64. 
28.1V S F«s. 18 from 88. 21 M. 
JOCKEYS: 8 Tdomson. 8 winners from 26 
ndra. 30.8%; W R Srnnbwn. 11 from 72. 
153%: J Red. 14 from 1 17. 120%. 


THIRSK 

TRABtERS: M Stoute. 11 temws from 24 
runners. 45.8V H Thomson Jones. IS 
froni4S.33j3VvvO'<3ormn. I0ftom32. 
31.3V 

JOCKEYS: G Baxter. 7 miners from 28 
rales. 25 0v T hres. 20 from 109. 1&3V 
N Comotcn. 10 from 61. 1 Z3%. 


STRATFORD 


TRAWB1&: D Buidieg. 8 wrenera from 21 
runners. 38.1 V.J Fox. 12 from 46. 26 JV; 
F YJtowyn 1 1 bom 52. Zim. 

JOCKEYS: S Mom. 7 tenners from 20 
ndes. 35JA,; K Mooney, 11 from 50. 
22.0 -cl G McCovt 12 temn 65. 18«t 


All-weather 


the 


/ 



itewar! 


.; i 







plan held up 

Planners m Essex have de- 
layed a decision on whether or 
not to give the co-abend to 
Britain’s first all-weather race- 
course. The planning committee 
of Thnrrocfc Borough Council 
have asked for more information 
on the £3 mllfion plan before 
they reconvene to make a de- 
cision, probably later this 
month. 

The proposed development, af 
Otsett Heath, near Grays, 
would bring raring on a syn- 
thetic surface to Britain for the 
fust tmie. Plans for the 1 20*acre , 
sin also indude a hold and.- 
leisure complex. 

Pfenning permission is being 

sooght by a consortium led by 
Kichard Muddle, the derit of the 
coarse at Lingfield Park, who 
has raised finance lor the am- 
««»as £3 scheme in the City- 
Last winter 121 National Hoot 
meetings were lost to 
weather. 



.'Vi;- 


VI ' v 



















.Vf 


\ 

■» « 


. V. * 


» . I 

; « . i 


1 1 i 




r - 1 - 


' . 


J *<•;' 


«Mj> 


“w;n 


• * «« 





V- 


CRICKET: E NGLAND’S YOUNG PLAYERS MAK E STRONG CLAIM FOR TOUR OF AUSTRAL 

Selectors should find 

places for De Freitas 
Metcalfe and Robinson 


JA 


K J By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 

England s harassed selec- 



tors meet at Lord’s on Mon- 
day to choose the party to tour 
*■ Australia this winter. Their 16 
payers will be announced on 
Tuesday morning. The first 
match, against a Queensland 
Country XI, is at Biindabere 
on October 18. 19 and 20; the 
first of the five Tests starts at 
Brisbane on November 14. 

As is custom 
Selectors 
Sharpe, 

captain and manager o? the 
team (Mike Gauing and Peter 
Lush respectively), the chair- 
man of the Cricket Council (R 
Subba Rpw), the chairman of 
the Cricket Committee of the 
Test and County Cricket 
Board (D J Indole), Micky 
Stewart, the team's assistant 
manager, whose ' main 
responsibility win be the 
cricket, and D B Carr, (Sec- 
retary of the TCCB). Of these, 
only Gatling and Insole, be- 
sides the . four selectors have 
the power to vote. 

Of the 34 players who wore 
sent a contract to study, so 
they should know, if chosen, 
what they would be letting 
themselves in for, only Peter 
Wifiey has said that be would 
rather not be considered, and 
that was because he was afraid 
his knees, in their present 
state, might not stand up to a 
long tour. With characteristic 
perversity Edmonds made 
himself available only at the 
last moment, owing to the 
clause which will preclude 
team members from writing 
or broadcasting during the 
tour. 

There will be times when 
the selectors come to a point 
where they can either take a 
chance or play for safety. They 
could find themselves choos- 
ing between Metcalfe and 
Athey. for example, or Pringle 
and De Freitas, or French and 
Rhodes. One of the brighter 
aspects of English cricket at 
the moment is the splendid 


*254-55 yet as early as the 
third Test match he was 
playmg arauably the derisive 
innings 01 the series, and- 
certainly one of the best of bis 
life, against Lindwall, Miller, 
Archer, Benaud, Johnston, 
and Johnson. Peter May will 
not have forgotten iu 
Other than Gatting. the only 
bauir 


Africa, and the 


thought of 

in the pai 


recommends him. 

Ellison; sadly, is nowbere near 
the bowler he was when taking 
1 7 wickets in the last two Tests 
against Australia last year. The 
best thing for him might be a 
muter at home, resting Jttd 
restoring his action. 


go as a batting all-rounder. 
Vacancies remain, therefore, 
for a full set of three openers. 
Broad and Robinson may 
count it as a blessing that 
between them they played in 


could do* 
way. to 


.ihaveryUvdy 
Tiam up to the 


mark and be has already played 
with some success in Australia. 

Selectors are entitled to a 
surprise or two. so long as these 


only one of this summer’s test P5* semblance of logic. 


matches. Benson, Sack and 
Athey, who. at different times, 
were preferred to them, all 
foiled to become established. 

Robinson* however, does 
have two Test centuries 
against Australia to his credit, 
and 


They indulge themselves some- 
times by choosing one of the 
batsmen (eg: Fowler to New 
Zealand and Pakistan in 1983- 
84) to make do as the second 
wicketkeeper. This time last 
year ' they pulled Greg Thomas 
out of the hat. Before -that, for 
the tour of India, h was Chris- 



and against West Indies in intern. was enra- 

1984 Broad sWl , c«1an 
toughness. They have the 
understanding of a successful 


county opening pair and make 
a left-hand/right-hand 
combination. I should send 
Metcalfe with them in the 
hope that he might emulate 
Cowdrey. He has scored more 
runs this season, his first as a 
regular member of the York- 
shire side, than any other 
Englishman. A considerable 
achievement. 


for French 



ipjly 

of them in the team. 

If the selectors are looking 
here for an encouraging 
precedent Colin Cowdrey was 
18 months or more younger 
than Metcalfe, Bailey and 
Whitaker are now when he 
was chosen for Australia in 


83, it was Geoff Cook. This lime 
it could be the return of Parker, 
Downton. or Maries, or perhaps 
the introduction of Russell or 
Paid. 

11 is going to be difficult for 
them, unfortunately.- to fit in 
more than oq,e young batsman 
without leaving Botham behind. 
Of all die Test-playing countries 
that England visit Australia 
could be the easiest these days in 
which to take the step op io 
international cricket It used, of 
course, to be much the hardest 
T . * _ Given the chance, Whitaker and 

No place found 5S. ‘SL2J 

might well prosper there. So, 
too. might Fairbrother. 

But hoe is a team that should 
field pretty well (and very well 
in the slips), bat attractively and 
at least be balanced in bowling. 
Jast a glance at the first-class 
bowling averages, though, is 
enough to. show that the great 
match-winners of the day are of 
the wrong nationality. 

In the first eight there are five 
West Indian fast bowlers, a New 
Zealand class bowler (Hadlee) 
and an Australian (Alderman) 
who is banned from playing for 
his country because he went to 
South Africa last winter. The 
only Englishman, John fhiM* 
of. Essex, has been running riot 
in recent weeks on the sort of 
pitches be would be-unlikefy to 
find fn a- month of Sundays in 
Australia. 

SUGGESTED TEAM: Gatting 
Gower (vica-capt), Botham, 


Back' in business: Sum! Gavaskar, reinstated in the Indian 
team for the one-day international against Australia, in 
action against the visitors in a three-day match at Gwalior 

Warwickshire fall 
to Underwood 

By Ivo Tennant 


Victory is 
not 

enough to 
win title 

By Richard Streeton 

CARDIFF: Nottinghamshire (20 
points) beat Glamorgan (6) by 24 

runs. 

Though the Nottinghamshire 
spinners. Hemmings and Af- 
. fond, duly brought their team 
victory yesterday. Clive Rice, 
the captain, admitted that the 
county championship would 
probably go to Es sex , who need 
only three points to dindi the 
title. Rice said: “If we are 
realistic, it b hard to imagine 
that Essex won't take three or 
four points against us next week 
or against Glamorgan in their 
last match.** 

Nothing will be settled until 
the championship resumes next 
Wednesday when the 
programme's main match will 
be between Nottinghamshire 
and Essex at Trent Bridge. Rice 
said; “1 have aske d^ ou r 

wkkn^^he^Sex^ne. I cm 
promise you a Mood-stirring 
match. It will be, 1 hope, a real 
contesL**Rice was delighted 
with the character and 
determination that Not- 
tinghamshire showed in beating 
Glamorgan. They had to fight 
back after a first innings col- 
lapse, and setbacks in the second 
innings, before completing a 
win, which kept as candidates to 


Edmonds and Emburey have 
done enough to go and Foster 
and Dilley are currently the best 
of the fast bowlers. Small’s 
accuracy in the test two Tests 
and his showing, for South 
Australia last winter just about 
get him in. though Radford is 
hard on his heels. 1 shall 
probably be shot at by the 
admirable French's many- 
supponers. but I would take 
Richards and Rhodes to keep 
wicket, simply because we shall 
need all the runs we can gel in 
the Tests as well as the one-day 
internationals. 

Two places remain to be 
filled, preferably by afl-round- 
ers. One Of than could go to 
Pringle or Defreitas, the other to 
Ellison or On tong. I am glad to 
see one's advocacy for Ontong b 
picking up support.. He b an 
experienced and effective crick- 
eter. both here and in South 


. De Freitas, D*ey . Edmonds, 
Emburey, Foster, Lamb, M etc a lfe, 
Ontong. Rhodes, Richards, Robin- 
son and Smafl. . 



THE OVAL' Surrey ( 7pts ) drew 
with Gloucestershire (7) 

A courageous innings by Alec 
Stewart, who made an unbeaten 
86, thwarted Gloucestershire's 
valiant attempt to wring a tenth 
victory and 23 points from their 
last match in- the county 
championship programme here 

yesterday. 

In a tense last passage of IS 
overs. Stewart was admirably 
supported by Medlycott as 
Wahh and Lawrence bore 
down, intent only on the 
batsmen's destruction. Follow- 
ing a splendid hundred by 
Kevin Curran, who hit three 
sixes- and 12 fours in I2S. 
minutes and S3, from Tomims. 
Gloucestershire declared at 269 
for four. That meant that Surrey 
needed 311 to win in 47 overs. 
When Butcher then fell , to 


By Peter Marson 

Walsh's second ball, and Clin- 
ton to Lawrence- in hb second 
over. Surrey were already -on the 
back foot And when Walsh 
prised out Jesty. and brilliantly 
caught and bowled Richards. 
Walsh had taken three for five in 
, 14 balls, and Suney were sink- 
ing fast. Walsh’s match figures 
ofnine for 128 takes hb season’s 
tally in wickets lb 1 18. 

It was sunny -again -when 
Romaines ( 17) and Stovold (55) 
took guard with Gloucestershire 
at 78 for no wickets, leading by 
U9 runs. We had another 
supercharged start, iu which 
StovoldTs leg glance off the 
morning's second ball bowled, 
by Clarke finished up in 
Richards’s gloves. Athey foun- 
dered in Clarice's second over, 
swaying back oui of range but 


FOLKESTONE: Kent (22 
points) beat Warwickshire (4) by 
an innings and 30 runs 

High class attacking bowling 
by Derek Underwood, who m 
35 overs did not deliver one 
loose ball, demolished 
Warwickshire on a taming pitch 
yesterday. They were all out for 
65. Underwood's figures read 
35.5-29-1 1-7 which, even by hb 
standards, was remari t a bk. 
They were hb best of the season. 

The number of oven bowled 
easily exceeded the number of 
nms Warwickshire scored. That 
was the extent of the strangle- 
hold Underwood and, to a lesser 
degree, Davis, who took three 
wickets, imposed. 

Kent batted on in the morn- 
ing to total 362, Christopher 
Cowdrey reaching hb first cen- 
tury of the season in 167 
minutes with five fours and two 
sixes. He put on a century stand 
with Marsh, - who, having 
equalled a Kent wicketkeeping 
record the previous day, made 
70 with nine fours in 150 
minutes, the highest score of bis 
career. 

At the time, h seemed a 
ionable tactic to bat on, 
it's inning finishing just 
before lunch. The baU. though, 
was not only turning but some- 
times Spitting off a length. It was 
every bit an Underwood pitch. 
One was reminded ofBoycott’s 
description of him: “The race of 
a choir boy, the demeanour of a 
civil servant and the rethtess- 
ness of a rax catcher.'* - 
There was do escape -for 
Warwickshire, not that they 
tried to collar IrirtE Davis 
bowled Moles and Underwood 
took the next six wickets. 
Kallicbanan was caught at back- 


ward short leg. Amiss and 
Smith, who batted almost two 
hours for 14, at ally point. 

Tavare took a blinder at slip 
to remove Hum page. Ferreira 
was picked up at silly point off 
the shoulder of the bat Chris- 
topher Cowdrey took hb fifth 
catch to dismiss Arif Din. Davis 
then had Kerr taken ai short leg, 
ended Gifford’s stay of 19 overs 
and Underwood took bis sev- 
enth wicket by having Small 
well caught at backward short 

WARWICKSHIRE: First 287 A J 

Motes 82, D l Airtss 73, Baptists 4-53). 

* Second ktartgs 
A -I Mwl— h n«i«K _ g 

PA SmchcCSCowdwb Underwood U 

A I Kaficftvran c C S Cowdrey b 

Underwood : 2 

D L Amiss e C S Cowtay b Underwood 5 
G W HumpanB cTevar* b Underwood 23 
Astf Din c CS Cowdrey b Underwood _ 5 
AM Farrars cCS Cowdrey b 


Underwood. 


K J Kerr e G R Cowfcay b Davis 
NGItardb Davis 


G C Small e Aston b Undwwood 

T A Minton not out 

- Extras (nb 1) 

Total . 


.3 

.2 

.2 

.0 

1 

.65 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-11, 2-18. 3-2S. 4- 
29, 5-56. 8-56, 7-59, 8-62, 9-65.10*5. 
BOWLING: Baptiste 8-3-12-0: Underwood 
35^-23-1 1 -fTlWi 31-1 8-38-3; Tsvart 2- 
1-4-0. 

KENT: Fbst _ 

M R Benson c Ferreira b _ 
NRTsytorcMotesbSraaO 


C J Tsvart b rtimpage b Gifted . 
DGAslettb Gifted. 


G R Cowdrey c Hunpage b Gifted . 

•CS Cowdrey IbwbSrafl 

E A E Baptists bw b GWord _____ 

i A Marsh b Gifford 

MBtaop b Kerr 

DL Underwood b Karr 

RP Davis not out. 


ft 


Betas (b 12.0 21. nb 3) ; 
Total [129.5 over*) 


>10* 

>43 

-63 

7 

100 
-22 
-70 
_ 8 

1 

.0 

.35 

.382 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2. 223. 3-T14, 4- 
131,5-150; 6-224, 7-328, 8-348, 9356. 10- 
362. 

B0WLM& Sniff -4-61-3: Smith 20-13- 
fc Ferrate 94324: GWord 494-1546-0; 
Kerr 46-2-1 20-2; Munton 2-04-0. 
Umpires: A G T Whitehead andK J Lyons. 


still getting a touch, again to 
Richards,-and in tbe fourth over 
Romanes was half forward 
when Feltham bowled him, and 
then three wickets had fallen for 
. 10 runs. 

. Before lunch. when 
Gloucestershire bad taken their 
lead to 204, Bainbridge had been 
wdl beaten by one of Clarice's 
special, deliveries and be, too, 
bowed oui to a catch behind. 

That, though, was to be the 
extent of Surrey's advance as 
Outran and Tomlins settled to 
take- Gloucestershire on to all 
the runs they would need, and 
here, Lynch, Butcher and fi- 
nally. Clinton, whom Curran hit 
to mid wicket for four to. reach 
his hundred, the point at which 
Graveney declared, had offered 
a helping hand. ' 


Golf girls purged 


■Gwalior. India, (Reuter) — 
The Bombay wicketkeeper 
Chandrakant Pandit slaked his 
claim for a place in the Indian 
side with a dashing century on 
the final day's play of the drawn 
match against the Australian 
touring team yesterday. 

Pandit inspired Bombay’s 
recovery after they had resumed 
their first innings this morning 
at ISI for five m reply to 
Australia's first innings total of 


525 for eight scored off MO 
overs. 

Pandit, reserve wicketkeeper 
on the recent tour of England, 
scored 101 with 12 fours and a 
six. He shared a sixth-wicket 
stand of 137 with Sandeep PatiL 
After he had been dismissed for 
64. PatiL a former Test player, 
announced his retirement from 
first class cricket. 

Bombay were . eventually 
bowled out for 353 and in the 
time available — the two cap- 


tains had agreed to end the 
match at tea to enable players 
from both rides to reach Jaipur 
two days before the first one-day 
Internationa] between Australia 
and India — Australia made 79 
without loss in (heir second 
innings. 

David Boon, who did not bat 
in the first innings, was particu- 
larly severe on medium pace 
bowler Raja Kulkanu, scoring 
58 not out with six fonts. 


Tbe Women's Professional 
Golf Association are to in- 
troduce qualifying competitions 
for their tournaments next year 
(John Hennessy wrilesX This is. 
designed to weed out those 
players whose presence on the 
scoreboards are an embarrass- 
ment to the organisers and a 
discouragement to tbe sponsors. 

Announcing this* new 
development yesterday, Colin 
Snape. the executive director of 
the WPGA, said: “It was dasr 

Derby want action 

Derbyshire .have written to 
the Test and County Cricket 
Board calling for new. action to 
restrict short pitched bowling. 
The move follows an incident 
earlier this week when their all- 
rounder, Rajesh Shaima, had to 
go to hospital after being struck 
on the h«met by a bouncer from 
the West Indian fast bowler, 
Malcolm Marshall. Sbanna was 
able to play against North- 
amptonshire the next day but 
the incident convinced Derby-, 
shire that urgent action is 
needed. Their chief executive, 
Roger Pearraan. said: “We are 
extremely; worried that more 
batsmen are going to be seri- 
ously hurt if this- goes 
unchecked.” ' 


concerting to see scorer of +25 
and +30 when we were hardly 
through the second round. 
“There were,” he said, “To be 
brutally frank, about 20 of our 
110 members who have never 
won a penny. We are deter- 
mined to raise our standards, as 
our tour is growing fast and will 
probably be worth £1 million 
next year.” 

This is an increase of about 
one-third and re p re sents a 
spectacular recovery from only 
a few years ago when the WPGA 
stood in imminent danger of 
collapse. From next year, a 
variety of exemptions will be 
available to the more 
distinquished players, after 
which the remainder will ptay 
one round, on the Monday or 
Tuesday, in order to bring the 
field up to 80. A qualification of 
membership of the WPGA is a 
handicap of not more than 
three, but h is dear that some 
players can no longer satisfy that 
condition, if they ever could. 

CORRECTION 
The quarter-finals of tbe Mc- 
Carthy and Stone national 
mixed pairs bowls chara proa- 
ship will be bdd at tbe Bedford 
Borough Gub on Sept e mber 20 
and not Bradford 
published yesterday. 


one. It gave help to the bowlers 
and batsmen had to earn their 
ntns.”Glainoigan. needing 173 
to win. were given a promising 
start by Hopkins and Morris, 
who put on 50 together. Morris 
was then caught behind from a 
ball from Hemmings. which 
lifted and turned sharply on tbe 
dusty, worn pitch. It established 
a tense, exciting pattern, with 
the ball consistently misbehav- 
ing, leaving the clustered dose 
fieldsmen always expectant. 

Hopkins struggled on gamely 
for SI overs. When be was 
fourth out at 94, however, to a 
bat and pad catch at silly point, 
it was effectively the end of 
Glamorgan's bid to gain their 
first home win this summer. 
Ontong might have worked a 
miracle but holed out to deep 
mid-off; Maynard was briefly 
aggressive before be was 
stumped. 

Afford, the left arm spinner, 
initially conceded runs until 
after lunch, he concentrated his 
line on the middle and off 
stumps. It was the experienced 
offspinner. Hemmings, though, 
who was the constant danger 
man. A word, too. for French, 
who kept wicket immaculately 
as the ball either scuttled 
through low or soared upwards 
towaids his left shoulder. 


Poor day 
for Essex 

SCARBOROUGH: Hampshire 
beat Essex by 87 runs 
Essex had a doable dis- 
appointment when Notting- 
hamshire's victory over Gla- 
morgan meant theymusi wait to 
be confirmed as 1986 Britannic 
Assurance county champions 
and they were outplayed m the 
Asda Challenge final by Hamp- 
shire. 


C G Greanidga b Mngto 

VP Tony bwb CMtls 

CLSriraic Hardy bTumar — 
R A Smith c Hussain b Gooch . 

*M C J Nicholas b Gooch 

.KD James c Bums b 
M 0 MnhaVc Hante 
"N G Cowtoy c Gooch b . 

£RJ Paries c Hussain bTopIsy. 


I Mani notout. 


CAGomornotout — — 

ExtrasJb4.lM6.w4.nb1). 
Total (Swkta. 50 < 


_25 

250 


FAU. OF WICKETS: T-34. 2-9B, S-127, 4- 
163. 5-165. 6-179. 7-191. 8203, 9-245. 
BOWUNG: Toptey 10-1-363: PifcteB 10- 
1-62-2 Turner 106-18-1; Gooch 10060- 
Z Chids 10054-1. 


X* A Gooch bw b Marshal 
CGhdwibl 
p J Prichard bw hi 


Nassar Hussain e Parks b Marshal 

A Wtiiayc Cowtay 

BR Harms e Parks b Jamas 

DR Pringle c Parte bMaru 

""" D Burns b Connor 


■Ft 


jTwnare Parts cCLSmfch _ 
T D Toptoy c Mail b G L Smith 
JH Chads not out 

Extras (b Lb 5. nb 7) 

Total (42.1 overs) 


-13 
.163 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-54.2-55.058,4- 
71. 5-102. 6-125. 7-145. 8-153, 9-156. IO 
163. 

BOWUNG: James 8-1-17-1: Connor 7-1- 
40i;lMiaH 40-18-2: Cowtay 10305- 
3: Mam 10046-1: C L Smith 2.1002; 
Mcholaa 1-000. 

Umptras J Bfcfcanshaw and B Laadbsatar 


STRATFORD 


Going: good to firm 

£30 BLACK PRINCE CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS 
SELLING HANDICAP HlflRDlE (£661: 2m 61) (8 
runners) 


HANDICAP CHASE 


3-1 Gold Hun«r70 FBrawar^i Flori Wonder. 6-1 
SNeUaig, 8-l Mson Warrior. lOi wham. 

Stratford selections 

By Mandarin 

130 Forewarn- 3.0 Gee-A. 3.30 Swing To Smi 
4.0 Leodegrance. 4.30 Adamstown, 5.0 
Wtggb urn. 5.30 Parang. 

3J0 EARL LEOFRIC NOVICE CHASE {*1.370: 2m 
como lodge wfl Mann 9-11-0- -SJO 1 ** 

4 SE raS TOGHotto d H W- gff 

i £ 

7 m 2 KWDNCORNER P Hayward MI-0, — ajHm 

,8 j£ ss84gJBSSfe=-"SS 

2.1 Ttakana.7-2GtaA8tTSdnBffijW.^1TUnion c omar. 

8-1 Gokian Match. 10-1 CantDtoctose. 1+1 otiwre- 
130 GARRICK JUBILEE HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£1,352: 2m) (12) CBm - 

1 3S •»- 

7 OB-P AK8ITWAQE fP)G 

JSHRSBB 

» j?s 

:§ k 

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Kamat*. 6-iuato Stoop. 10-1 o8tev 


4.0 CTTY OF COVENTRY 

(£Z283: 2m 6f}{8) 

12-30 OKAZAL (BtJ Hardy 10-11-10 —8, 

2 4 12- GRATIRCAlTOH F WWW 9-11-8 MrCBt 

3 2-0t 'UOOEGRAKCE (USMD) L Kmart W-11-6 

5 422- ST ALEZANjQMTato 9-11-2 ; — PSmdMwra 

6 12P- VALLEY JUSTICE CTritoine 8-11-0 -.NDaugMy 

. 11 OP-1 0EARV8 C0U> ROUEDCWMden 9-105 

12 OFF- SMARX G HuOtwrt 7-1(M ) . N tor U obS e 

13 -OtB ASAUQHT Mra M Thomas 8-190 8 Sherwood 

7«2 aat M cation-4.1 Vsfloy Justice, M St Mean. 

430 THREE SPIRES THREE YR OLD NOVICE 
HURDLE (£685: 2m) (12) 

1 311 HADDON LAD fK Ftetten 11-6 : , Cto* 

1 AOA MSTOW N M.Pta 11-2 

CHABSRELD G Humbert 10-10 — Pta rllobt a 

COURT RULER H IMS 10-10 .JSCm W 

M GOLDEN STRAW » Mis CRoawytO-tiL GMeCota 

22 KOLSTBWRIUJjSaaing 10-10 A NjgSg 

MUBAN D Dato 10-10, — SKMpMey 

M KMlIBQlDfi 


2 . 
■ 10 
11 

14 

15 
10 
19 
22 


3 NOBLE VOW© S Major 10-10 

4 SALS PROMOTER K CvriDghaav&rwn 10-10 


24 

, 2B 

29 


SKI DOWN 0 Sherwood 10-10_; — — - 
WINNDtG DANCai Wss-LBowar 1M0. 
CSULAG P Ebdtey 105. 


. S 51 trace d 
R“ ' 


4-5 Adamstown, 100-30 8ki Down, 6-1 Ktoetartrau, 

5-0 VIRGINIA HANDICAP CHASE (£2,092 2m) (11) 
1 2P0- PBTHI AJtnfONVmjH Hcknwn 8124 - Jtoya 

4 HP DANCE Ttfc BtigS (H) IDOffH J ***** J 

7 200- WELSH OAK (D) D Gandotto &10-12 

8 M2 MARANZI Colston B-1M J8mhwn 

10 11+ W1GGMJHNfa!**AH«*t7-lM *JS5S 

a g isswaae!^=j« 
3 t sissaiwattiai^Bii 

3-1 Maranzi, 100-30 SKytBnder. 5-1 Donee The Btoaa. 

130 LADY GOOIVA NOVICE HURDLE (£795: 2m) 


iH9lL _ MDavtos 
n- KtaDMKT r emra-iu-K — 

8 0- BUNT SHADOW A Beckmora 5-10-12— Wa ttey W 

10 0*2- .TB«ra MEBCHAIfTR &rtor 5-W-12 

11 P20- UNBtOC WO Mena 7-10-12 , 

1 « OF*- U^SAUNg J Francome +1910 CWeft wi 

16 4 MR PANACHE M Ctaomw +10-10 StWc heOpj 

17 OSTENTATIOUS C WWnmn 4-10-10 — BfomM 

0- RAUC HgWCewy4.iQ.iQ RDcmraort 

1REHEW G Bwnett 4-10-10 — - SJgHe* 

90 USTAUTSCUmfl 5-10-7- g Janw 

K wujs jot un m itoancnS-iM-. a wash 

MARKET HUH J fig 6-10-7 S' 


18 
22 

25 

26 

27 

28 
31 

35 ... . . 

. 8-11 Parana, 9-2 Timber Maria m . 13-2 Moaeotois.7-1 
. New nom»y. IMT ' 


0 SPAHKV SPH OBTT ftxatar S-10-7- 
P Prferiari +IM__ 


063 Mitft WRPP 

rap- WWAAL W Charies *-1M 


±?saa 

-TOM 


> Rato CNef. 16-1 athara. 


Haydock results 


ZlSlIm 01) 1, SURE GROUND M 
Howe. 8-1J; 2. La MattonTT W*ame. it 
Ik 3. rap *am T Wee (T Lucas. 12-1). 


Tote: C14JX): £330. £240. E470. DF: 
£3730. CSR £10292. Imto 4530MC 


4v45 ffif) 1. ADROX LAO (J Reid. 11-2 
taw): 2. Pwndor Pancar (NCektalB. 12^); 


H Ceca at Ne w mark e t. Tote O3ftJ130. 
£1.70. £1.10. DF: £730. CSft £15,12. 
1minl2.48see 



... (G 

Born Free 


Maas. 25 Tancrad Sand. 50 Ohne And A 
Doner. Mart* Moon (6th\. Meraenpeed. 
14 ran. 2KI. rtk. & hd. a. P WaWi at 
Uxnboum. Tom: £1330: £2.80. DUO, 
£1.60. OF: E168L90. CSF: £13339. 2min 
0837aec, 

2.45(61)1. BREWM TIME (A MaCteK 9- 

' ‘ be fT WUtams. 10-ifc 3. 

Carr, 7-114. Clem 2nd 
25-1). ALSO RAM: 11 

{Sift). 12 Bo' aSwr. 

Bothy B mi Gtow Aa*i (Btft), Law 
Suxtoy Sport. MereSp S&. 14 Ban a 
Goid, 16 Hugo Z Kackanbusft, 20 &imer 
Green. Jon Semes, 25 Panboy. 
Partara Joy. 33 Taneau. WhMtog Won- 
der. PonOnsaw, Tootste Joy. 20 ntr. 1 Ml, 
hd.mvH.1l M H E&sterby te Greet 
Habton. Tote: E2.70: El .10, S2JBD. S8JB0. 
DF: £830. CSF: £2735. TMcese £14049. 

Imln 15.17sec. 

• 3.15 fJm 40y* 1. R80GRL fM 
Kmmer. 10- Ik X Sefie UwrfM MteSd. 
16-lfc 3, Patttos (W Newnes, 9^. ALSO 
RAM 4 toy Landing Roto (Stty, «* 
Gwynfarook (6th). 11-5 Super Gambler. 
Tyred MSnonterd. 15-2 tetaral. 11 Star 
Ptay. 16 n a tom gego. TUbeson, Victoria 
Star (4th). 33 Ontiw Mark. Tuesday 
Evwteg. 14 ran. Kt 8. 1ML «L 3L R 
SheeBwr at Newm a rttoL Tote: £3430: 
£230. £340. €300- DF: £5830. CSF: 
£16535: Iran 4843ue. Bought in 2£00 

^*5 n m 4TVL MSRULE (K Dariey, 2S- 
1t 2, Fteat Ml M Newnes, 20-lb. 3, 
HUMID Nichols; 6-1); 4,Mr Q ari fl her 
rr Ives. 33-n ALSO RAN: 1M Grand 
i tolen n a ion. 7 Dtan Bach. Stormy Pme- 

10 Loud Lanotoo. 12 otsnovd Brnnut, 




Princew Waridy. Ken SUdaL- ' 

coat H hd, kt. 


Bon Accuan. — 

Btansftard at Lanrboum. 

£230. £250. £130 DR £6490. CSR 

£7097, Tricast £48933 Imin 0136aac. 

5.10 (1m 40yd) 1. FU LU SHOU (T 

waams. a-1t t WatfBrti (M Wood. 12- 
7fc 3. Ljw pj Barrft 9-4 ALSO 
RAN: 94 |t-tav Baby Come Home (4th). 
192 Gaiwey Express (8W. 8 Miss 



iSLn at NewmarttoL Tote El 090: 

£230. £490. £1.60. Oft £8230. GSft 

£39.71. Imin 4735seC. No bid. 

- 

5-41 

teas I 



GtuTSr (4th). 10 Dome tmmobi e U 

12 Sarnpraki. 14 Record EteMte. 

Judo's Lad. 25 Pataca Rutor.RM__ 

Boteo. Roaiee Image, 13 ran. 5W.2&L a 

W, 2L G PftttbmFSoBlDn at Newmertat 

Tote £2.40; £1.40. £240. £633 Dfi 

£530. CSF: £10-12 1mm 49.44eee. 

Ptacepte not won. 


Kemp ton 


10 laud 

l4Capa. Snd aDp.16l‘mfa e amon ti .25 
Irish "Hera Swyntord Prince. 33 Cu«er. 
Boy. Galois BosoueL fiotoara. 19 rati. NR: 

M&ofa Era. a m a %l m. d 

Arbuthnot at Newberr.. Tote: £81.40; 
£1190. £730. £230. £1130, DF: wtew 
or second with any other horse £1630. 
CSR £42038. TrtcasC £3.90693 2tnta 
'li nge r 

4.15 (1m 40yd) 1. SANTELLA SAM IN 
r. 12-1): 2 firUam (J Rmd. 8-1): 3. 


Day. 12-1 V 2 Or Masco (J Rato. 8-1 1: 
Rah Tteber |M Nlrnmer. 20-11 ALSu 
RAN: 5-4 tav Angara Abyss. 94 


Prince Znraro. Rutmno Money, CeB For 
Taytor, Lack « Peart*, feoptara. lOran. 
a4L lM.nh.4L M Ryan & Newmarket 


Dftateem (Stft). OArtcft fr Bee ten). Bath. 
10 Rama* #&ckapeL 25 Shannon Vale 
ffittiL 50 Nortnern inptose. Hoi Gem. 10 
ran. x\, a. a 

Newmaritot -Tote OXX £1.70. £1-10. 

£220. Oft £630. CSF. £1344. Trteast 
.'£8332. imto 3&73sac. 

235 flm) 1 . LADY LA PA2 (N AdSTS, 9- 
i):?Ffrtng Bktdy (A Shoulta. 9-lta Ft* 

AtoteffW ALSO 11-2 
jt-tav Court Town. Friovoto.,6 Something 
&sial(41h). TopDabutarae, STau-Woog. 
10 EmeraM Wata 14 Caribbea n Sotm d 

I) 16 Cn» Latohs. 20 Hot Manana 

l I2ran. ah iSlW sft Mm 2HLP 
uteM at Newbury- Ton: £15.10: £ 2 . 80 . 
£2.12. EWM. OF: 2S42D. CSF: £7930. 
Jricasc 22307.33, Imin 38.10ae& _ 

sm 

RAN: 9 Bbe Tango, 10 Ftenboogw. 14 
Ssnwek (BW. 20^ iSindib (4W. La Pette 
Nobtoase (604. 8 ran. 2M. 1 MCMI. 4L IKL 


L 14 VWta(8th),TrBniMi#H*>. “ ^ 
Bsuery. 7 ran. ah hd. hd. A2. 5j -it 
Stouta at NewnoetaL Tots: 28.70:^-70. 
£1.10. DF: £S.ia CSF: £1334. 2mm 
1831 
4.1 
W); 

Cocotte 

6LMDU. .... .vn.^ - -~—-r — t , 
Spinnaker Lady fKh). 6 ran. U nk. 2KL 
T 5 . 10 L M Jarvis at N«wmari«. Tote 
E330; £140. £230. PF:- £19 SO. CSF: 
£22.82. 2mfri 0337 sec _ 

430(71) 1. HKUA.V HSCOIMMNKp(N 

Adams. 12-11: X StonnguMd (M L 
Thomas. 2&lk 3. Lady For Two(M A 
Gitas. 15-21 ALSO RAN: H to 
. Atmarose. UXMO Codkas. 6 Barte 

sksik 

Sewritea Girl. Hopafut Daicer. Srald 

■ Dancer, owstiin (RhLte raa 2W. H Kl 
eh hd. hd. P CuTOeh a Nastesy^tw: 
£1550: £250. £330. £2m D* £7530. 
CSR £20032. Tricest £1^28301 Iran 
ZXSisse. 

Jtekpob net wee; PtacepoC £73630. 

Hereford 

G %3^hdta)1.BarnWilAdyrrWte. 
10-11 tart 2. Aston Bm* (14-1L % 
Paddycoup (92). 12 ran. NR: Htom 
ROita^lL nk. B McMriva Trte 
£130^ £1.10. £130. DF: £5.70. CSR 

230 (teihcSe) 1. SedmaR Lady JP 
Scudamore. Evens tavtimaky Hope {&- 
IK 3. uanhaoai Boy S+L B inte 1 &L7L 
M Hot Tote: £1.»S fi.ML £15a 21. 70. 
Oft 6.10. CSF: £935. 

35 (2m chjl.NgaetoPfH Davies. 13-2); 
ZMsj TeUAp-1 tart 3. JMtcn Master 
Wa. 9 ran. 20L 1»L P O-CownTTote: 
&70; £1.70, £2.10. E1.7U Dft £39ia 
CSF: £2534, 

UD| 3 nd 4 1 . Hep* 


£130. 

DF: £6j40. CSF: £18,43. Tricas t: £18058. 

43 pm4f ch) 1. Gtaan«(R DwiwooAr. 
1003$ 3. Protaesor Pfcrtl (4-6 tavX 1 
Notes Break M-1L S ran. 25L nk. W 
Caw. Tate £210, £150. Oft 
£330, CSR E837. 

430 (2m 4t note) l. BteicM (G Landau, 
7-2); 2 Zaccto (ft-lt 3, Amanitas (7-2). 
ScoBtah Bavard 3-1 tav. Braa NR: (taro 
Wood. 15L 6L B Praace. Tote: £530: 
£130. £3.70. £140. Dft £48.70. CSF: 
£45.19. Ptacraoh E13JS 


■SPORT 


35 


GOLF 


Rafferty ready to 
makes his name 
on the continent 

From Mitchell Platts, Crans-Montana 


Reman Rafferty ruthlessly de- 
stroyed the possibility of a 
Spanish takeover in the Ebel 
European Masters by attaching 
a second round of 66 10 his 
opening 64 on the Crans-Sur- 
Sierre course here yesterday. 

For the second successive day 
Rafferty negotiated the Alpine 
course " without dropping a 
stroke and he shares the halfway 
lead with Jose-Maria Oiazabal 
(66) on 130 which is 14 under 
par. Manuel Pinero, now third. 

is two strokes funher adrift after 

a 67. 

Rafferty’s entry into the pro- 
fessional game, following a 
lively amateur career in which 
he won Walker Cup honours, 
was complicated by his initial 
failure to qualify at the Euro- 
pean Tour School. Even so he 
appeared to have successfully 
completed the transition when 
he won tiie Venezuelan Open in 
1982. 

But as contemporaries like 
Gordon Brand Junior and Paul 
Way quickly established thero- 
setves as winners in Europe so 
Rafferty snuggled to harness his 
naturally a g gre ss i ve game and 
paid the inevitable penalities for 
this adventurous approach. 

There were times when he 
became so agitated on the 
course that he once discarded 
his putter and relied upon his 
one iron on the greens. It was a 
curious answer to tbe troubles 
he was experiencing on the 
greens but it helped him to play 
his wav through that particular 
problem. 

In truth he required time to 
mature and at the age of 22 he 
still accepts that be is learning to 
master a game in which patience 
is vital lo consistent 
success." I'm not looking 10 be a 
one tournament sensation,” he 
said. “I've been frustrated with 
my game at times but never with 
my overall p repress- I've always 
felt that even ifit took longer for 
me to win in Europe than some 
people anticipated then a! least 


when it did happen I would 
hopefully be ready to keep on 
winning." 

Rafferty began his second 
round with eight successive 
regulation pars before hilling a 
sand iron approach of 80 yards 
to within six inches for a birdie 
four ai the ninth. He had five 
birdies in his last eight holes io 
come home in 31 and provide 
himself with tiie oppon unity to 
make amends for the dis- 
appointment of losing a play-off 
for the Italian Open earlier this 
season. 

OlazabaL competing in his 
first season as a professional, 
had eight birdies in his round 
which included driving the 
green at the I6ih hole which 
measures 328 yards. Oiazabal 
set his targels at (he start of the 


season at finishing in the leading 
30 in the order ofmerii buias be 
has already accomplished that 
aim. he is now more determined 
to win a title. 

Pinero, twice a winner on this 
course, has failed to maintain 
his progress oflast year when he 
won twice and helped Europe to 
overcome the United Slates in 
the Ryder Cup.For Wav. who 
has been experiencing problems 
throughout this season, it was a 
meg of missing yet another 
halfway cut but Sandy Lyle. 
Howard Clark and the Austra- 
lian Rodger Davis, who all 
safely qualified, also learned 
that they have received invita- 
tions to the Suntory World 
Match Play Championship at 
Wentworth next month. 

SECOND ROUND LEADERS: (GB unless 
staled): 130: R Rafferty 64. 66: J u 
Otozabal (Spl 64. 68. 13* M Prato (Sp) 
65. 67. 133a H Baocchi [SA) 65. 66. G J 
Brand 68. 55, 1 Baker-Fmcti (Aus] 70. 61 
ISA- G Lmnon (SA) 68. 68. C Sumer 
(US) 67. 67 135: O Cooper 64. 71. P 
Park* 


M Johnson 68, 66; S Torrance 66. 7Ck R 


(US) 68. 1 ... 

Hawkes (SA) 68. G6. 138: A Gamdo |Sp) 
70, 68: L Stephen (Aus) 71. 67; S Lyto 69. 
69: K Waters 70. 68: E Poland 71. 67 


Marshall opens up 
five-stroke lead 


By John Hennessy 


Meredith Marshall of the 
United Stales, opened up an 
astonishing five-stroke gap at 
the head of the Bowring Scottish 
women's open championship at 
Dalmahoy yesterday. She had 
led by only one stroke when the 
bleak day broke and we con- 
fidently expected that players ol 
greater repute would overhaul 
her. but the American played 
even better as the pressure grew 
and she produced her best round 
of tiie tournament so for, 69, 
three under par. 

Miss Marshall now stands on 
212, four under par. with four 
players sharing second place on 
217 — Laura Davies, of England 
(72 yesterday), Liselotie 
Neumann, of Sweden (72). Dale 
Reid, of Scotland (70) and Peggy 
Conley, also of the United Stales 
(7IX 

Miss Marshall played su- 
perbly. having been reinforced 
overnight on two fronts. A word 
with Bill Wotherspoon, her 
Scottish mentor back in Florida, 
was supplemented by a few 
more from Aunt Agnes (Jane 
Connachan's .aunt Agnes, that 
is) at a Christian fellowship 
meeting and she faced the new 
day with its blustery wind and 
its squalls of rain with total 
serenity. 

But she has never been in this 
exposed position, nor has she 
ever won a tournament on three 


seasons of the WPGA tour, so 
what of the morrow? “I'm just 
going to go with it”, she said 
afterwards. “Tomorrow is a 
brand new day and I'm going to 
have a good time”. 

Using a set of graphite dubs, 
with a 45 inch driver, given to 
her last year by Wotherspoon. 
who teaches from a wheelchair 
at the age of 84, showed little 
hint of error. She began the day 
two strokes ahead of Miss 
Neumann, one of her two 
playing partners, and had made 
that lour strokes with three 
birilies in the the first 1 1 boles. 

Then Miss Marshall suffered 
her first bogey and. with the 
Swede holiiq; a difficult eight 
foot birdie putt downhilL the 
margin shrank to two. The 
writing was surely now on the 
wall, but the roles of the two 
players were reversed at the 
1 3th. The American finished the 
stronger, for Miss Neumann 
expended three putts on the 
17th. 

LEAD MO SCORES (British uftfass stated): 
212 M MarstiaU QJSL71, 72. 69. 217: L 
Neumann (Site). 73. 72. 72 L Davies. 70, 
75. 72; D Reid, 7 
72, ~ 

70. 

Stmdwick, 70. 74. 76. 221: K Douglas. 73. 
78. 7fr. KEsprasse (Fr), 72 77.7? 222 D 
!». 77. 77. 68; A Nwwtas. 73. 76. 73. 


223c C Pamon. 78. 76. 69; N McCormack 
74. 77. 72; G Stewart, 72. 78. 73; J 
Soufcby. 71. 78. 74; K Lira (Aus). 74. 73. 
76.22* P Grice-Wft maker. 7B. 76. 70; M 
Thomson. 75. 78. 71. 



WE PLACE 
MORE STUDENTS 
IN FURTHER 
EDUCATION 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 


THE£g»TIMES 

EDUCATION COURSES REVIEW 

Education Courses Review isra special series of 
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in further education. 

If you're a student considering going on (ofuther 
education, ithad better be on your reading list. 

Especially as this year The Sunday Times Degree 
Service introduces a unique feature which lots all the 

remaining degree courses available at polytechnics. 
Alternatively, if you're a college with places to fill. 


Education Courses Review will appear in’ 

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>6 SPORT THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBBR 6 1986 ■ ■ 

FOOTBALL-THE LIBERO SYSTEM IS LATEST FAD IN ENGLAND, BUT ONLY LIVERPOOL USE IT AS A PLAN OF ATTACK 

Pleat claims sweepers can hide the dirt 


By Clive White 


Suddenly the libera defensive 
system is sweeping the country. 
What England has scorned during 
these last 40 years now seems, 
curiously, to nave found favour 
after a further four weeks watching 
the World Cup in Mexico. 

But are English defences finally 
aligning themselves with the most 
part of Europe? Do they see it as a 
progressive ploy of the strong and 
ambitious or is it being used as a 
negative tactic by the weak and 
desperate. David Pleat, one of the 
country's more tactically astute 
managers, who saw Tottenham 
frustrated for more than an hour 
last week by Manchester City's 
sweeper system, said: “Sometimes it 
can hide a deficiency in a team." 

Billy McNeill, City's manager, 
admits that he introduced it more 
by chance than by design late last 
season when injuries left him with 
iittleoplion but to defend. But Pleat 
added with reference to Liverpool's 
occasional use last season of the 
sweeper “There was no better sight 
than when watching Lawrenson, 
Hansen or Molbv coming from deep 
positions. When you have three 
players like they haye who are 
equally adept at playing the ball 
then you are in business." 

Coventry City, Oxford United 
and Leicester City, have all adopted 
the tactic on occasion this season, 
using it destructively rather than 
creatively. Coventry and Oxford 
both employed the system to snuff 


out McAvennie and Cot tee and 
Leicester used it most effectively oh 
Wednesday when laying down their 
annual banana skin for Liverpool. 

Against this upturn in its use 
Southampton, the only first di- 
vision club to operate the sweeper 
system in recent seasons with 
Agboola and then Holmes holding 
the broom, have now dropped the 
tactic. Dave Sexton, the England 
under 21 manager, does not believe 
it will become popular in the League 
because English players do not have 
the right temperament for it. “If you 
play a sweeper someone else must 
rigidly mark man for man and if you 
ore doing that you are not playing. 
We like to swap punches at (east 
Also its counter attacking. You are 
conceding something before you 
start but both zonal and sweeping 
systems have their Achilles hecL . 
Against a sweeper there is more 
room for the mid-field players and 
there is vulnerability on width. In 
theory it should be more attractive , - 
when both teams are playing sweep- ’ 
ers because you are lengthening the 
field rather than contracting it as 
with zonal." 

There have been many variations 
in the titero theme since its in- 
troduction after the Second World 
War. Karl Rappan, an Austrian, is 
believed to be the originator of the 
strategy which he called the Verrou 
system. It consisted of four defend- - 
ers in which either one of the central 
two could be free while the wingers 


came back to mark their counter- 
parts. Yet in principle they also 
attacked with seven men. 

Another system, used in France 
and known as the Beton was 
probablv closer related to the later 
ultra-defensive system made fam- 
ous in Italy and known as 
Caienaccid . This came about m the 
1952-53 season and was devised by 
Alfredo do Foni, .who as coach to 
Internationale brought the. rampant 
success of their rivals, AC Milan, to 
an abrupt halt. He did so by-using 
one free man behind three backs 
who were closely protected by four 
others; m effect one-three-four-one- 
one. The Germans have used the 
system more adventurously as a 
springboard to attack. Beckenbauer 
brought an exciting extra dimension 
to the role during the 1970s and 
Slielike has also brought distinction 
to the position. The most popular 
modern day version, which the 
English are now using is one free 
player behind two central defenders 
with the full backs marking the wide 
men tightly. 

John LyaJL, whose prolific goal- 
scoring partnership of McAvennie 
and Cottee have been bankrupted 
this season by Coventry and Oxford 
sweepers, welcomes the new chal- 
lenge. Unlike Sexton he believes 
that the idea may become more 
popular because of the advent of the 
small, quick forward. “The game is 
always evolving We used to have a 
big *un at the back partnered by a 


medium sized type, like Chariton 
and Moore. Nowadays we tend to 
have two btg'oiis.so the game has . 

- countered that with two nippy types 
like Rush and Walsh and our own . 
two. Systems simply relate to the 
availability, of playas and every 
system can be beaten. The more 
problems players are beset with the 
better they wil} become as 
individuals." 

Playing sweeper can be a way of 
prolonging a career. Certainly 
Hebbend, aged 28, whom Oxford 
used in that position most effec- 
tively against West Ham, has added 
to his talents. 

Ron Atkinson, the Manchester 
United manager, believes that 
Bryan Robson too could eventually 
play such a rale for England. Bobby 
Robson, the England manager, 
hinted last week that that role for his 
captain could be sooner than later. 
Atkinson warns that widespread use 
of the sweeper could kfll off the 
winger. In which the England man- 
ager has such frith. “You can't 
afford a winger if your asking the 
full backs to do the wide job." 
United, as the standard beams of 
attacking football in this country, 
chose not to use a sweeper to their 
cost against West Ham recently. 
Atkinson said: “We played a dif- 
ferent sort of plan altogether — we 
didn't mark anybody. We just 
thought if McAvennie gets it -five 
yards out let him shoot and he 
might miss." 


- . «— . 

•••• 

"J. '■ ^ 

, A-" >... 

ft 



X* • - - •• 



i • 


Hebberd: added to bis talents 


Injuries hit derby Allen’s mission 


TODAY’S TEAM NEWS 


By Hugh Taylor 


By Clive White 


There is a vivid contrast in 
the fortunes of Dundee and 
Dundee United who meet today 
at Dens Park in a Tayside derby 
which should be Scotland's 
match of the day. The home 
team arc beset with injury, with 
both goalkeepers struggling to be 
fiL Smith, their key man in 
defence suspended and no fewer 
than five other regulars consid- 
ered extremely doubtful. On the 
other hand, the visitors are in 
fine fettle, already leaders of the 
premier division, semi-finalists 
in the Skol Cup and boasting a 
strong defence. 

Jim McLean, the manager, is 
so pieased with the stylish play 
ofa team he has reconstructed at 
a fraction of the price paid by 
Glasgow Rangers for their im- 
ports from England that he 
handed out praise after the 
defeat of Hibernian in midweek. 

Aberdeen are another side 
who have an extensive list of 
injuries. Adding to the dis- 
appointment of their exit from 
the Skol Cup are worries about 

YACHTING 

Promising 
start by 
Dunning 

From Barry Pfckthall 
Porto Cervo 

Chris Dunning's Marionette 
headed British hopes of doting 
the points gap on the German 1 
team Iasi night after making a 
fine sum in the 145-mile short | 
off shore race, which provides a 
50 per cent points bonus to- 
wards the Sardinia Cup. 

The Humphreys-designed 
British boat, steered by David 
HowleiL passed through the 
straits of Bonifacio in second 
place behind the scratch Swed- 
ish entry. Carat, and .with 
Stephen Fein's onc-tonncr. Full 
Pelt, taking a tow on the wake of 
Martin Gibson's larger. Pocket 
Battleship, to head the German 
team on the 45-mile spinnaker 
leg down to the Stiniino light- 
house. 

However, a controversy may 
yet blow up when the yachts 
return to Porto Cervo today 
over the committee’s refusal to 
notify premature starters in this 
international series. Several 
competitors were known to 
has c crossed the line early at the 
start of yesterday’s race, but the 
Italian "crew, on Brava Lcs 
Copains, was alone in answering 
the recall signal. 


League division I 

Arsenal v Tottenham 

A Villa v Oxford 

Charlton v Norwich 

Chelsea v Luton 

Everton v OPR 

Leicester v Manchester Utd ... 

Manchester C v Coventry 

Newcastle u Sheffield Wed 

Southampton v Nottingham F 

Watford v Wimbledon — 

West Ham v Liverpool 

League tfvision II 

Barnsley v Portsmouth — 

Blackburn v Sunderland — .... 

Bradford v Oldham 

Brighton v Grimsby - — 

Derby v C Palace — 

Huddersfield v Leeds 

Hull v Plymouth 

Ipswich v Shrewsbury 

Reading v WBA — 

Sheffield Utd v Birmingham 

Stoke v Mtftwafl 

FA TROPHY: Pratontoary Round: Aecnng- 
ion Stanley v Tnmty. 

HMneslord v Sutton Town; Stevenage 
Borough v Ouroabto: Woemobgrougn v 
Surnrum and HAngdoa Andover v 
KuUM; Tanbrtdge v Doner Attdatc 
Barnstaple v Maidenhead United: 
Mewheaovuaneui 

FA VASE: Extn preBmtnary round; 
Marika Unted v AntMd Pune Station 
Comrades v Alnwick : Tees Components v 
Newton Aydiffe Fontdatfl tinted v 
Bndington Town Nunltarpa Athletic v 
Pmntae East End. Stockton v NOrthaBer- 
ton St Helens* Colne Dynamos*; Pputa" 
Victoria v Nelson. Newton v OkDwn 
Town: General CtanuaUs v Mweystte 
Pace; Ftnton v Daisy HiB: Harwcrtfi 
Ccftery Institute V WofSbOrtt Bodge MW; 
Collinoham ¥ Rossington Main; 
Michleover RSL v Jam Pl ayer, Radfo rd 
ptvmpc v Kmpton Park WMttate v 
ArnhUge: Smethwck Hqlrttold » North- 
ampton Spencer Minton Badarone v 
Ftocoswr; Cnasetovwi v Halesowen ttorrt* 
ere. Bracktoy » Btavudi; S t, Neo n v 
Baker Pattons. Sr lw» » _Qnanan * 
Raunds v Ramsey: Great StaMO fd * 
Halstead: Downham v Dos: Kempston 
Rovers v Carney Island. Rayfie** Lw v 
Bjfkingskte. Wmgito (Herts) * UMon 
Goinev, Tottemtae v Codtfosws: Rutop 
V Stalford. VWMvn Ca reen O gr ,» 
Pennant. Danson Bextoyv TtamesPoty- 
iflchrur. Portsmouth RN * Pewetawn 
and Tefecomoe; Corawnan r Mkto nd 
Bank. Besnam v Fartonh Rovers: Hay- 
wards Heath * PetBreheW IJnMt: Maun 
Craw (Poitare Bari v Mel Fokw (Hayes): 
Ramsgate v Greenwich Borough: 
Aomodcn United v Thvn* Unted: 
LydSrook Athlete v CUnttoU: PaWiway * 


their match with St Mirren at 
Paisley. Such, however, is the 
depth of the pool and the 
disappointing displays of their 
opponents, even though they 
have just secured the transferor 
Chalmers, Glasgow Celtic's re- 
serve forward that they should 
win without much trouble. 

Glasgow Celtic wiQ be 
strengthened by the return of 
Bums and a repeal of their 
convincing form against Aber- 
deen should ensure victory 
against Hamilton Academical. 
Glasgow Rangers, too, should 
continue in contention, with a 
win at Motherwell; but their 
supporters must be hoping for 
an improvement in their side's 
finishing. 

Falkirk made more use of 
their powerful forwards in win- 
ning their first- league match 
against Clydebank and a rep- 
etition of these tactics in oppo- 
sition to the fragile Hibernian 
defence will bnng them two 
more points 

the fitness of six regulars for 


Give Allen, who as Arsenal's 
£1.25 million record signing 
spent two months at Highbury 
in 19S0 without kicking a first- 
team ball, will doubtless 
endeavour to leave them kick- 
ing themselves today over that 
briefest of associations. Allen's 
game was never more finely- 
tuned to leave Arsenal defend- 
ers in his wake. 

The success of Allen, who has 
accelerated away at the start of 
the season with four goals in 
four games, is reflective of the 
modified and improved -attack- 
ing capabilities of Tottenham 
Hotspur under their new man- 
ager. David Pleat. 

Arsenal's manager, George 
Graham is taking a more pos- 
itive line than his predecessor, 
Don Howe, which was under- 
lined by the bold decision to 
attack Liverpool at Anfieid last 
week. Kenny Dalglish, the 
Liverpool manager, never one j 
to offer praise cheaply, said that 
it was the best Arsenal had 


played at Anfieid 'since he had 
arrived at the dub. 

The Nicfaolas-Ouinn partner- 
ship. which looked promising at 
'Liverpool, delivered to some 
extent against Sheffield 
Wednesday in midweek. 

Tottenham, who lost die 
leadership of the first division 
with the defeat at Southampton, 
are not too distressed by the 
performance. Ardiles, who has 
not made an appearance since 
early April having been troubled 
throughout the season by inju- 
ries. is induded in a squad of 1 3. 

Another favourite who may 
be on his way back is Pike at 
Upton Park against Liverpool, 
who wifi be anxious to make 
someone pay for the slip-up at 
Leicester, nice, who has a knee 
operation in the summmer, is in 
the West Ham squad which 
includes Kevin Keen, son of 
Mike, the former Queen's Park 
Rangers stalwart, but not 
Devonshire, who has a ham- 
string injury. 


Everton (3) v 
QPR (2) 

Everton. for whom Harper wflt 
sign a two-year contract before the 
game, are unchanged. Rangers 
decide between Robinson, Braid 
and Rosenior as to who wffl replace 
the suspended Banrister. 

’ Leicester (16) y 
M anchester U (22) 

United attempt to stem the rat by 
restoring SJvebeek and Terry Gfo- 
son. Alfiston is doubtful so Hogg 
stands by. Leicester wB probably 
be unchanged after beating Liver- 
pool. 

Manchester G (11) v 
Coventry (14) 


star City l 
in, back 


their captain, back after injury but 
watt on Simpson (anlde) and Hop- 
kins (back). Coventry fMd Bennett, 
formerly of Manchester City, in a 
central rote. 

Newcastle (20) v 
Sheffield Wed (12) 

Newcastle hope that Beardsley 
has recovered from achffles tendon 
trouble. Wharton's place may be 


under threat Pressman, a reserve i 
goalkeeper. Sterland, Marwood and 
Worthington ere included to a 
Wednesday party of 19. i 

Southampton (8) v 
Nottm Forest (4) 

Masked, an noietfteW player, aged 
18, is set to make his debut for 1 
Southampton to replace Holmes, 
who sees a specialist next week 
about tvs groin complaint Tankard, 
another teenager, may deputise for 
Demis, who has a chffl. 

Aston V (19) v 
Oxford U (21) 

VBIa. hoping to double their 
points, have learned that Cooper, 
their Aberdeen signing, is still three 
weeks away .from nis debut Oxford, 
not. disheartened by the defeat at 
Everton, are unchanged. 

West Ham (7) v 
Liverpool (5) 

- Mofby's bruised instep makes 
him doubtful for Liverpool, who wll 
be more determined after their 
midweek defeat. Pike returns after a 
knee operation to the squad which 
also indude Kevin Keen, son of 
Mire. Parris needs a test 


MOTOR RACING; ARGENTINIAN STAKES HIS CLAIW FOR POLE POSITION 

Senna far from being out of contention 


From John Blansden Monza 

Ayrton Senna's prowess as a. 
qualification specialist was 
demonstrated yet again yes- 
terday when die Aigeotianian 
staked his claim for pole po- 
sition on the starting grid for 
tomorrow's Italian Grand Print 
with his Renault-powered JPS 
Lotus. 

The hour-long qualifying pe- 
riod had been balled after 20 
minutes when the engine of 
Rene Amoux's Ugier had ex- 
pired while the Frenchman was 
on his first flying lap and the 
track surface had become 
smothered with oil on the very 
fast exit from the Lesmo corner. 
Earlier, Senna had been the first 
driver to set a competitive time, 
but this had just been beaten by 
Gerhard Berger and his 
Bcnetion-BMW before the red 
flags came out to halt 
proceedings. 

Qualifying resumed 20 min- 
utes later after most of the oil 
hod been cleared, but the track's 
surface remained slick and so it 
seemed inevitable that Berger’s 
time would suffice until, in the 
closing minutes, Senna drew on 
all his considerable resources to 
record a time less than three- 
tenths of a second slower than 
his pole position effort in ideal 
conditions last season. 


Senna needs a good result 
here- tomorrow in order to stay 
in. the World Championship 
bank, which is now down to 
just four drivers. Nigel Mansell 
still leads the table with SS 
points, two more than Alain 
rrost, seven ahead of Senna and 
eight in front of Nelson Piquet. 
The challenge of the two 
Benetton drivers, Berger and 
Too Fabi, second arid, third 
fastest yesterday, has come too 
late in the season to affect the 
title battle, but this team's 
stature as one of the front- 
runners is now firmly estab- 
lished and they have become 
Pirelli's flagship team in their 
battle with the dominant Good- 
year runners. 

Mansell and Piquet, fourth 
and sixth quickest so for, remain 
quietly confident of the Canon 
Williams team's chances for the 
race. “We had a good day 
today." said a team spokesman. 
“The fuel consumption of the 
Honda engine looks encourag- 
ing bene, we’ve done a bit of 
work on the turbos, which has 
helped us with our qualifying 
boost, and the chassis balance 
also seems good here.” 

Mansell bad been the first 
driver to hit Amoux's oil, which 
ruined his first qualifying run 
and gave him some anxious 
moments before he brought his 


car safely back to the pits. 

1 Stefan Johansson had a busy 
time as the sole Ferrari driver 
here yesterday. Michele 
Aiborew had woken early in the 
morning with violent stomach 
pains from suspected food 
poisoning and had slipped and 
badly bruised his shoulder while 
m the bathroom.’ A hospital 
check bier diagnosed no broken 
bones and he rested up yes- 
terday in the hope of bong fit 
enough to attend today’s final 
qualifying period. 

Marlin Brundle had gear 


selection problems with his 
regular Data General Tyrrefl, so 
had to set his time in a spare car, 
while Derek Warwick shared in 
the thoroughly miserable time 
endured by the Brabham team. 
Both he and Rkxando Patrese 
stopped on their first lap with 
engine and turbo failures, 
respectively, then, after Patrese 
had used the team spare to 
qualify for the race, he handed it 
over to Warwick, who drove h 
only a few hundred yards before 
it, too, blew up. 

The new. AGS-Modemi, a 

ITALIAN GP 
Monza 

52 bpsof 3.6 mBes 
Total 187.4 miles 
(including parade lap) 

Lap record:Nigel Manse H 
' 1m 28^835-146.96 mph 


START/FINISH 


tenuis 

Sukova through as 
Lloyd shows 
signs of stress 

Chris Lloyd, six umes ebam Becker said later. “I was 

MMJtog- Sfaawfsssas 

ko h ull ^ella ' i,tle5lransco,, 

them at Wimbledon - were ^ousty given one of taj deftly 

dose enough to suggest that deceptive tutorials, this umefor 

vesiextfoyQresult would not be ^ benefit of Joatara Nyarom- 

deferred for long- . . The Swedes rannot hurt Mew 

Mrs Lloyd never quite found and ihey cannot wsa his gptwt 
her range and rhythm when playing methwte are 

playing ground strokes. She also child’s play to him. TJteyjeWom 
made some errors that «*** discuss Mecjr t hl« to 

of character. But Mrs Lloyd s to |k about i t Nyst rom says, 
deficiency arose.largeiy from uw -Wc get so depressed, 
feet that she was always under Becker says of Mean “I 

stress. , . . w would say he is d* most 

Miss Sukova exploited ner guy to .play, because 

advantage In the forecourt. She never know what’s going 


served well and abo hit ensp ^ There arc days when he just 

approach shots to the comers- .j arK j the next morning 
Then she loped into the net ana . up and can beat 

competitively ' put away the anv body. He does not have any 
voUcys or smashes. She gave the and it’s difficult to 

beginning of the eleventh days ^ his shm s. He hits the ball 
tonic that was badfy needed y flal and he does not play 


tonic that was badly' needed y flal and he does not play 
after the ultimate anh-dimax ot any l0 p hS pi n .*' 

tb nS!inf y M e adow was* Bcctor^con^o™™y 
reverberating nightmare col- or another Jew®*™; 
oured in black and amber and Slovaks are a strange breen. » ne 

Electronic scoreboards. Wimbledon iritampgii 
muxiM above the rim of the to know them wen. tte win 
S eidSf RlU* probably play three in a row 

against the distonlLdieckered Srejber Mecir and, inthe final 
Sow of the vague Manhattan Ivan Lendi But Lendl, tne 
skviine. Aircrafifughts bright in United States and French cham- 
the darkness of drenighl sky, pion-a’wa^lrasa 
roared and rumbled over the with his opponent 
stadium. In the brilliantly illu- final here. Stefan Edbe^. JT>e 
minuted court below. Boris J?* 

Becker and Milan Srejber ere- lia. Edberg m£.7^in 
a led thunderous noises. seL Lendi shouldscck Mears 

Becker was tidying up the fust advice about playing Swedes. 
all-European men’s singles Edberg could nouake a set flora 
semi-final in the history of lhe Mecir at Wimbledon- 
United States championships. ^ - 10 here. 

He could not believe he tad « fitted 

progressed so for so easily- ^ floodlit 

Becker tad tad nrogrammes/The charnpion- 

beat- Even Srg^. whow nx gri^have a lola i of 23 separate 
feet seven and a half mchts tail nmoramm es — compared with 

T^at^Wimbredon and 14 in 
could not give him, a decent p ar ^ s _ ant j does not have 

of Srejber's first ser- tot of 

.vices flew out of the ^ fonn of -JSbsiS- 

°° U, ! g J5fr Ey events for older and yourv- 

looked too large, top stiff, too • -foups m order lo 

cumbersome, espaiaUy when entertainment of some 

trying to deal with shots that ^ Today by contrast the 
amved below waist leveL Every ^, men - s final will be 

point he look jjrainstsffvice ^ l ^ c f le d I g lW een the men's 
was a rare, uxriated, inad«)uaie in the main arena, 

consolation for , the hiding This second Saturday is always a 


Barfssjaw 

schoolboy playing a man. sugaestca that nothing s u cceeds 

Becker was briskly, power- - ^ 

fully flexible, smoothly blocking IlKe exoess - 
or driving his service returns ^rssaiGLEtefeiMi«HhweBMMacir 
and passing shots into areas rc^WJ Nystrom fSw«). 6-4. frZ 3-6, 6-a 
where Srejber was not These bBw ker ( wg imm S rrtbw^L Bja&a. 
formafiiies did not take long. M H Lee 

Both men looked a Irate embar- 7 ^, 6-i.i-s.6-i- 
rassed and were doubtless grate- 

fro ^L tfae IW^SSoBSSc^laS 

floodlights into the privacy of suM»taSi*imMCUay<t(US). 6 - 2 . 
the night 54. 


French-built car malting its 
debut here with Ivan Cipefli 
aboard, also ran into trouble on 
its opening lap, but newcomer 
AlexCaffi,an Italian Formula 3 
driver replacing the Canadia n 
Allen Berg in the Osefla team, 
settled in quickly and came 
dose to matching regular driver 
Piercario Ghinzani's time. 

Tomorrow's race will be over 
51 laps of the famous Parkland 
circuit 

QuafiMng Times: 1, A. Serum (Bri, JPS 
UXuv-HenauX 1rr*i 2S363s cc : 2. Q 
Berger {Austria 1, Benetton- BMW, 
125580; 3, T San (BJ, Bemtan-BMW, 
128-019: A N Manmfl (GB). Canon 
WSMams-HoMa, 126.181: 5. SJohanaoon 
fSwe). Ferrari, 1^6517; 6. N Piquet JBrt. 
Canon IMDbmaJtomto. 126514; 7. K 
RosOerg (Fat). Marttare McLaran-TAG. 
126J4Z; 8. A Prat (FrL Martnro 
McLaren-TAG. 126.885: .9. P AKot (ft). 

* er-RenauH. 1^7.287; 10, R Patrese 
OVveU Brtaham-BMW. 127548; 11. 
R Amoux Lmmr-RanaulL 127528; 
12. T Boutsen teal). Barclay Arrow*- 
BMW, 12&0S1; 13. 4 Dunfrles (G8L JPS 
LooK-Renarh.1 28557:14, A NjmnWfH), 
MdmnfrModemi, 129239; 15, PTambw 
ffrL Loto-FonL 1297*4; IS, P Street 
bate General TmaSRenautt. 150.._, 
17, C Danner (W®. Barclay Arrows^MW. 
120297; 18. M Brumfc (GBL Dm 
. General Tytreft-Henautt. 1212% 19. -A 
Da Cesaria (It). Minardr-Moctornl. 

1 -21-275; 20. J Palmer (GBL West 
ZsfapetaL 122.06*; 21. H tiottai 
(Nath). Wtost Zakweed, 1 22-726; __ 
Ghmzani (HI. Osella-AIfa Rom bo. 
128.T28; 23. A C-fj (TQ. Osatto-Aito 
Romea 12RSDO; 24. C WanMCfc — 
Olivetti Brabhafn-BMW 7s 12570: 

Jones (AusL Lota-Fort 7m 40132; 26. 
Capo* W. AG^Moderol 58at T2.143. 


ATHLETICS 


European champion 
runs Westminster 


Even if the newly crowned 
European 5,000 metres cham- 
pion, Jack Buckner, were to win 
- the Peugeot Talbot Westminster 
mile around ’ the streets of 
London tomorrow in a time 
inside Steve Cram's world track 
record of 3 minutes 46.32 
seconds, it would not make him 
the festesi road rrriler in bis own 
family. 'For Buckner’s younger 
brother. Tom, a student at 
Sheffield University, covered an 
accurately measured road mile 
in 3 minutes 40.2. seconds m 
June; to win life Sheffield 
Speedy Mile Race; The catch, 
and of course there is one, is that 
the route on that occasion 
descended 325 feet from start to 
finish. 

Tomorrow's competitors in 
the .elite men's and women's 
races will have no such assis- 
tance. as the course from White- 
hall, through Parliament: Street, 
along the Victoria Embankment 
and up Northumberland Ave- 
nue to the Gush back in 


By CliffTemple 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL AND OTHER FIXTURES 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


League division IH 

Blackpool v Carlisle 

Bolton v Darlington — 

Brentford v P Vale — 

Bristol C v Wigan 

Chester t Fulham — . 

Middlesbrough v Bury 

Newport v Swindon 

Notts Co v Bournemouth — 

Rotherham v GUHngham 

Walsall v Doncaster 

York v Bnstol R 

League division IV 

Exeter v Stockport 

Hartlepool v Ca mb ridge 

Hereford v Burnley 

Lincoln v Preston 

Peterborough v Aldershot 

Rochdale v Northampton 

Swansea v Orient 

Torquay v Wrexham 7.15 

Wolverhampton v Cardiff 


HqfMortti 12 30t Tiverton Town v 
Btmtort Unted. Sherborne Town w 
RdtUHon DRG, Si Blarey v Swamp 
Town end H a reton; Hracambe v Dawtan, 
Fannoutn * Bns&nqton. 

SOUTHERN LEAOt*: M idtoad dhtootc 
BantxxyvMfe Oak Borers; BnApiortnv 
Forest Green: Cowitry Sperm v 
Halesowen. Gloucester City « BuMta- 
ham. LoamingBjn v Sutton CaUfiekK 
Merthyr Tydhl v Grantham: Moor Green v 
VS Rupby. Rushdcn v Stour- 

bridge v Lecesier llmtu. SoeMm 
dawfiotc Chatham vTrowbndge; End and 
Betwdere v Thane* United; Greresend 
and NdriMleM y Darches nr. Pooto v 
Canterbury Gly: Sheppey UM v HKtags; 
Watotaovie v AsWord. 
VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE; hide «- 
vtotore Bishops Stonterd * Harrow 
Boreuqh: Bognor « CareWHon AMebc 
Bromley v Wycomoe Wanderers: Croydon 
v Slough Towrr. Kayes v Sartung: Hendon 
v Tooting and MUcsam. K in t p an i en • 
Vkw* St Mbmu v Femtarough: 

Walthamstow Avenue v Worthing; Wind- 
sor and Eton v Hdctwc IMotongharb v 
Duhwch. fin* div ni o n : (Mtotaay v 
Sianes: Borenen Wood v Soutewtcto 
Grays v Hampton: WqsOwy vifxwmand 
Ewe*. Leathertwafl v Fmcetoy Lewes v 
Basddon; Leymn/Wmgats v BraetoMk 
Ovtord Dry v Leytonsfono/tBord: Walton 
and Herstam v Uxbndge: W a m b tey v 
T Jewry Seeanddh«Mn,naiilECttoshuii 
v Sanron Walden; Hemel Hempsi aa d v 
Hornchurch: UMChworth v Cheshanr. 
Ramtiam v VaiwhaK Motors: Royetcn v 
Clapton. Tnrtg v Iteut ow t. Ware v Hano- 
aey Wwenhoe * BertaamStett WMrefttn 
v Heyimdge Swrits. Secon d dtotok w. 
south; Sanatead v Soutnaft Ctatare S( 


Scottish prentier division 

Cette v Hamilton 

Dundee v Dundee Utd — 

Fsfflork v Hibomian 

Hearts v Clydebank 

Mothemea v Rangers 

St Mirren v Aberdeen 

Scottish division I 

Akdrie v Parade 

Clyde v Montrose — 

D umbart on v Brechin 

E Fife v Morton 

Forfar v Queen of Sth 

Kttnamock v Dunfermbne — 

Scottish division n 

Afoton v Arbroath 

AHoa v Stenhsmuir 

Ayr v Berwick 

E Stirling v Stranraer 

Meadowbankv Queen's Park 

Raith v SbrVng 

Sot Johnstone v Cowdenbeath 


Peter * Oorkmcr Chertsay v Epham: 
Eastbourne v CautMtoy; r eto a m v 
Martow. RacfcweB Heath v Honhani: 
HareWd v Motosey. Hu 
Whytcteate: Metropolitan 
Newbrer. FWata Manor v VMdng. 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION Luton 
Town v Bhghm and How Attxn: 
Owen's fink Rangers v West Ham 
Untted: Totten ha m Hotaour w Watford 
SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: First 
dtotaoe Arsentt v GAngnarm Cnafeon v 
Mowalt FUtoaoi v Onenc Nonnch - 

TottefeteK Porsmouh v West Ham: 

. v ipswien; Southend Untod v Campndge 
UnMd: wattord v Ctabea. Second 
dMstan: Bounemomh u Swindon; Brere- 
tord u Bnstol Rorers: Brtgnson u Soutoend 
Unaed; Oo fcta aar v Rsstoig; Luton v 
Crystal Paara; Ortord urntra * WimUe- 
axr Sout ham pton vNort hamu B 
LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: 




Amnii 

emteworth. Premier dlvlskm: 
Arntrsham-M HanwHL Beddon Unted « 
Beacortofletotitata:C«rinthiffiCasuabv 
Bnmsdewn Rorers: Crown mo Manor v 
RecM; Southgate w Nonhwood; LHysm 

. u waatwn Afioay. 

GREAT HBJLS WES1BW LEAGUE; Pie- 
uner dhtotorc Onponhan v PauKon 
Rouenc Clandown v Uskaard Athletic: 
Ctovtaon « Snsttl Manot Farm: Exmoum 
s Bnstol Cdy: Plymoudt Arayta v Weston- 
super-Marc Ma n go sfew Unjiod y 
Frome: Rodstodt v ^dotorch Taunton v 
Mekshant Tormtton w Chard. 

BOUIHG SCQC EASTERN LEAGUE: 
amdHm Athletic v Great Yarmouth; 
Chanens » B rea rt ree; Ctocton v wanan 
tinted: Cokheetor Unitod v March Town 


Southern premier 

a Alvechurch y SaBsbury 

Aylesbury v Chelmsford 

CamtxWga C v Reddtch 

Dudley v Basingstoke 

Fareham v WtBenhafl 

Fisher v Shepshad 

Folkestone v Bramsgrove 

Gosport v Bedworth 

Kings Lynn v Dartfbrd 

Witney v Corby 

Worcester v Crawley 

Unted: Gortoston v Frtalniw: Htston w 
Bury: Soham Town 'Rangers « 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE SBOOR TROPHY: 
Rten te e round; Stariwood United v 
Abbotoraans. 

om$ NORTH WEST COUNTIES 

LEAGUE: Cup: thbdraiMMk**~ 

■ Qlesmare Port CHtheroa v Curzon fw 
««: Congtoio n v Ham: Cohwyn Bay v 
Bootfe: Dsmen * Droysden: Ftaatwood v 
Eastwood Hanley; Pendtti vWran Rowers; 
RossandNa UrJtod v Leak; Wfnstod 


Rossendato Uritod v Leak; Wfnstod 
CeMc. 

csacA inmue: ouwers v Eton Manor; 
Bnaniwiood v Burnham: Chebnstod v 
' htungsea; East Thurrock v 
Fort vVAham; Purtert 
‘ v caggeetaH: 


StowmarkeC Sudbury v Lowestoh: Ttwr- 
tort v Nawmsricet Tlptree United v By 
Oty: Wisbach v Harwn ch an d Paekesion. 
NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Premier ttet a to w Bourne v 
Potion; Dasborough v Stamford: 

Hoi beach v S and L Corby: 
kthtonbarough v Baldodu Long Budtty v 
Spalding; Stotfoto v RothweL Lame 
Cup: Cbdingtiam v Artosfy; ShartarooK v 
Eynestxiry: Towcseur v Irchestsr: 
Cognenoe e Burton PW; Timken Atomic « 
Newport PvgneO; Wmwortle w Ford 




rotor ttutolon: Ash United w Malden Vale: 


I ? nT^TIrt*-- - i ii 


Water Hortoy v 
Mriden Town v Frimtoy Green 
MareitniiL 
DRYBROUGHS NORTHERN LEAGUE 
HratdhnstoR: BedmgKXi Terriers v Saudi 
Sank: Brandon Uratad w Blyth Spartans: 
Chester La Street v Fetortoe: Easannn v 
Whitley Bay: FarnM AtetoUc v Crook 
Town: Nonh ShMUs v Blue Ser (3.15k 
Ryhopi- CA * Stshap Auckland; 
Spanyimor United * Haittopooi Re- 
i-rwirotf rt iCwuihlttaiTrwntfnnMnft- 


BEOFORDSHBtE SBOOR CUR: OrentWd 
Unaed v AmpttMfc Barton Bowens v 
Wootton. 

HALLS BREWOnr HELLENIC LEAGUE: 
Premier dhtaton; Bcoater * Rsnhlfc 
FairfOrd v V*mg Sports; H o u ns l o w v 
Superman* 1 , Morris Motors v wantage; 
Sharpness v Abmgdon Town; Waningfbrt 
w Pegasus Jurors; Yaw v Moraton. 




Praflnmry round: 

Sunday 

THIRD DIVISION: Mansfield v 
Chesterfield (11.30) 

FOURTH DIVlSfON: Scun- 
thorpe v Crewe Alexandra. 


Continued from facing page 

SATURDAY 

•arai^asBitt 

12-IOem Cricket (Gtomorgao v Md- 
dneexL 12.10-1215 News and Weeawd 
Ctose. SCOILANO: &25420pm 
Donald Staden appeal s on behalf olllia 
King George * Fund for SaBore. 

1US.1 IJfflNewa Hoodknes. NORTH- 
ERN IRELAND: 11.10pm-12JW Ven- 
... — -y»v Cork) 12JN>- 

... . . Pro. 1225-1240 

NawsHeadtaeA. 

CHANNEL 

920-1000 Lee ftancaa Ctaz-VOus 
120-220 Smoke on Go ... Red Arrows 
220-«20 FHncTtoa Son of 
Concfese I220ero Closedown. 

Ill fiTFP tSw Cartoon 930- 
■ ■ ■ ' C '■ 1020 Bowrly HBfc 

120pm GardenngTiroe 120-220 
Farnwg teeter ZAM20 Attack on 8w 
►on Coast 520 ‘ “ 

1220m Sports Reautts 1225 News, 
Ctosefl o wn . 

TVQ As London except 9J5a«a 
JJLS Cartoon 9204020 Smurto 120- 
220 Smoke on Go . . . Red Arrows 
220-420ftkrtTazB. Son of Cochise 520 


220 wnokere pno war noses 220-420 
FBm: Myaronr at Casda House 520 
FM Guy 620020 B>2eeye 1220aro 
CtosBdown. 

„ Tms220 

■ — Cnoed 3.15 AiLiretond Hurting Fl- 
nal 520 Cnced 620 American Foot- 
baP 72D Newyddton 720 CTOs am Gan 
&05 Pwyw'n Pentwn? 825Byd 
Certd 925 A Place fit die Sun 1025 FBm: 
Alfia 1225am Closedown. 

SCOTTISH Slffim,., 

- Fnends 920 Farming Oudook 1020 
Sunday Documentary 1030-1120 One 
God ... Three Gods l-OOpm Qton 
MidroerCameade 24X1 Songs ol Ceto- 
braoon 220-420 Him; Klonapped 
(Michael Camel 520420 Scoteport 
1220am Lata (ML Closedown. * 


i Company, 


TO PLACE YOUR 

TRAVEL 

ADVERTISEMENT IN 

THE 

TIMES 

TRADE ADVERTISERS 
TEL: 01-481 1989 
. . ADVERTISING 

FAX NO. 01-481 9313 
TELEX 925088 
PRIVATE ADVERTISERS . 
TEL: 01-481 4000 
USE YOUR ACCESS OR BARCLAY CARD 


Ftotastory 
wen Country 
Lore Lon 
Who's die 

1220am Closedown. 

HTV WALES ^ htv wee, , 

120 Gardening Time. 

TYNE TEES AsLe yk>ne» t - 
-- - cepe aasiro Mom- 


Lorttaround 

Outlook 120-Z20 

^^^GktliWsySiXlOttierwortd 
620-820 Bu fa eye — “ 

logue, Cbsedown. 

CENTRALS**** 




1 120-1220 Soudi Wen Week 120pm 
Prorectors 120420 Faimmg News 
220-420 Fane Mosniito ScSadron 420 
Gardens lor Ai 520 DHTrarn Strokes .. 
520 Cesnpasas 820-820 Bufceye 1221# 
Poatscnpt Postbag. Oosedown. 

SHAHADA^aaa^^. 

Mouse 920-1020 Age ot Miracle* 

1t20 Wbridng for a Better Life 112S Aap 
Kaa Hak 1120-1220 FMng Son 
120-220 UFO 230-420 fibre ^ The Big 
Store 520 Love Boar 620-620 
Btflseye 1220am Closedown. 

GRAMPIAN 

tOJWUJO PsrepaePves I20pre Fwm- 
rogOuttook 120-220 Sporting 
A&tets 220-420 Farctor Lewtri Berd 
520-820 Scotsport 1220am Heflee- 
txvts. OosflGDwn. '■ 

■ MB j g HS BB aaae^ 

GeniagOn 1120 Woriang tor a Sat- 

terLto 1120-1220 

.txmxe220 Smoke on Go . . . 

Arrows 220420 Rhc Where the BUAMt 
Oy 520 ftfly. FMy S2K20 BuBseye 
122Banrfiw tenures 1225 Money Box. 

SUNDAY 


ULSTER AS London ereept ■ 
i Il 20 arn- 12 JM 
Tarrahewks 4L55nro-820 Sports re- 
suns 1220 Arcacto 1225am News, 
Ctondo wn. • • 

TVS ^ London escape 1120 em- 
-LZ=l 220 TarrahawksliO 0 aro 0 e- 
cade of Black Sabbath 120am . 
Company. Closedown. 

HTVWE^,^y^ iaj0 

Terratiawfcs 1220aai James Omar* 
on - a drector antfhis work l22(Mm 
Closedown. 

mywALEs^^ 

1045 Club Huttoy: Pontypooi v 6 
Vtotes Pohce 1D45-124SHn Psyctai 

TYNE TEES to London ex- 
i f nc i cco ^ mo M]V T220 

Tarrahawfts 1220am Dionne War- 
wick m London 1250am Poetry e# the 
People ii20 OtoMODwn. 

CENTRAL ^ 

Tetobugs 1220am Rtou Caravan to 
vaccaras 140m JobOndor 240 
Oosedown. 

tarn 1220am Show Express 

1220am At the End of tn« Day. 

BORDER As London except; 

’ 11 - 30 em- 1 SLOoSptaln 

Srari eta ta tta Mystaronc 1220am 

©4C Sara 115pm Redng from . 
=^Ktmtoton320B™x*20As 
Long as You're Hesfihy&i 0 FBm: 

Yankee Doodle Dandy 728 Newjjddion 
745Tatont4au 8.15 Rosalind a 
Myrddln 845 OrttHe Da 920 Y Maes 
Cnwarae 18.15 Btagie 11.15 PSm: 
P ubkc Enemy (James CagrwyJ l 2.3Seti 
Cosadown. 

SCOT TISH *8 London ex 
Late Cfe 

122Sem Ctosstoun. 

TSW ?* Lon rion 

^^1123aro.t220 
120dm P 



428 Aliens; The Mghtntare Continues 
520 Mind Your Lmguige 520 
CampbaBs fiJKFS20feSiay« 1220am 
joMnoar LWCtosadown. 

120 pm DerertayHMiiites 125 
WeaitKa- 120-220 FamWig Diary 220- - 
420 Mfto Bureau 52O-S20 Crazy 
Like a F» 12 . 3 0a m Adam's Ctadren. 
Ooaaaowr t ’ 

BORDER As London except 
PimilPl BT I em iniW OnrdMw ig ' 
Ttate 120pm Femwig Oudook 120- - 


andSpon. 1020-1020 Sporcmane. 
18204220m fibn:RemKss(Wni ■ 
^mbcbbL 12204226 Weaher; Close.- 


Northern ketand Remits. 6. 

Northern Wand News. 1245- 
1250m Haatftnea Md waaBwr- Ctoae. 
BIGLAND. 5.15«a0pB tewoonj- 

Souto-Wt*t-Sprtflgtn sport and 
AieflmrBmBsorai 
Regional News ana Sport. 

channel 

Terrahevria 1220m Droeda or - 
BtottcStetoaMt-l- O O m Ctoeedown. 


1228015 0 1 My Way. One Voce 1228m 
nunauripLCtoMdown. 

GRANA DA As London ax- 
•ton tte Darkside 120 Closedown. 


iZiBamCtosedown. 

YORKSHIRF as London ax-- 



I ■' ■ ■- 

• .j*-* 


.S'' J - y " r ’ ,lf 


Whitehall, is mainly flat Jack 
Buckner, who ran a track mite m 
3 minutes 5I_57 seconds in 
.1984, is in sympathetic com- 
pany as his rivals include John 
Walker of New Zealand, Dave 
Moorcroft and Tim Hutchings, 
who aD, like him, were originally 
milers who moved up to 5,000 
metres; bui keep up their speed 
by reluming frequently to the 
shorter distance. / Walker is 
particnlariy experienced in the 
business of road mites, where it 
is much banter to judge pace 
than on the standard track, and 
although it is now lOjeaissintie 
he became Olympic 1.500 me- 
tres champion, he can never be 
ruled out as a possible winner 
over the younger men. 

In the women’s race. Markka 
Puica, of Romania, defends her 
title from last year and her 
opposition from Britain will 
in dude the double. Common- 
wealth Games champion. Kiisty 
Wade. • 


assji.-- 
■j %?.. 


.*—• - 
y 

*!.«• 


J > 

iW 




a- • 

4 v; 4 ’-.. 








Saturday 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBERS 198fi_. 

Weekend television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Dandle 


Sunday 


6.45 Open University. Unfl 




,/\ I' 




8*30 Th*aanflera.(r)JL407ho 

Famfly-Noss. (r) 

5-45 The Saturday Picture 
Show presented by Mark 
Curry and Cheryl Baker. 
Gary Davies drives a 
power boat in London's 
docklands; and rock star - 
Owen Paul performs his 
new single. 

10.15 Grandstand introduced by 

Desmond Lynam. The 
Hne-iais: 10.15, 115 and 
120 Cricket The NatWest 
Bank Trophy Final 
■ -between Sussex and 
Lancashire at Lord's; 

1145 Football Focus with 
Bob Wilson; 1.00 News 
summary and weather; 

1.10 Athletics: the tvo Van 
Damme Meeting from 
Brussels: 2.10, 3.10 and 
140 Racing from 

Haydodq 120-and 145 

Eventing: the Burghley 
RemyMartin Horse Trials; 
rmai score. 

505 News with Jan Leemtng. 
Weather 5.15 
Sport/Regional news. 

5^0 Rotand Rat -The Series. - 
A new series begins with 
'guests, Tim Brooke-Taytor 
and Samantha Fox.. - 

545 -Doctor Who. Colon Baker 
returns as the timeless 
doctor in an adventure 
entitled The Trial of a Time 
Lord (Ceefax) 

6.10 TeOy addicts. Noel 
Edmonds Introduces a 
spedaJ celebrity edition of 
the quiz, heralding a new 
series beginning on 
Tuesday. Members from 
. the cast of EastEnders 
challenge four from 
Howards' Way. 

645 Every Second Counts. A . 
new series of the oomedy 
quiz for couples, 
presented by Paul Daniels. 

7.20 The Russ Abbot Show. 

The versatile comedian 
begins a new senes, his 
first for the BBC^Ceefax) 

740 Casualty. A new 15-part 
' drama serial about the 
night-shift in trie Casualty 
department of a city 
hospital Tonight they 
- have to find an antidote to 
a toxic gas-(Ceefax) - 

140 Film: Saturn 3 (1980) 


tv-am 


®-55 Good Morning Britain 
introduced by Richard 
Keys. Weather at 6 £ 8 : 
news at 7JU; regional 




, 7.10. " 

7.30 The Wide Awake Ctub, 


Maltetr. Arabella Warner 
and Janies Baker. 


«UtX»l 


9-25 Get Freshl from Beamish 
Open Air Museum, 
Newcastle. This week's 
edition indudes Gian 
Sammarco interviewing 
Norman TeW«t1140 
Ptmky Brewster. Part two 
of the story about a young 
girt, living in Chicago, who 
is deserted by her parents. 

1100 News with Trevor 
McDonald. 

1105 Saint and Greavsie. Ian • 
and Jimmy look forward to 
this afternoons 
programme of League 

football 1200 Wrestling. 
Three bouts from The 
Paviyon.^kagness. 

1-20 Ahwotf. Hawke and 
Santini escort a vital - 
witness who could help . 
smash a worldwide ring : 
of corrupt businessmen. 
115 The Cuckoo Waltz. 
An episode from the 
vintage comedy series. ' 

245 Int erna tional 



TV-AM 


645 Open University. Until 


Left: lisa Bowermaa and Robert Pagfc CasaaKyflJBCl, 7-jSHrai). 
Right James Hayten The Pickwick Pnperi ( Chand 4, 3.05) 


adventure about two 
. research scientists, based 
on one of Saturn's moons, 
trying to find a way to feed 
the world's starving, who 
are menaced by a maniac 
' and 'his sex-starved 
robot'. Directed by Stanley 
Dorien. (Ceefax) 

1005 News and sport. With Jan 
-Learning. Weather. 

1020 Blot on the Landscape. 


of the serial based on the 
novel by Malcolm 
Bradbury, starring George 
Cole. Geraldine James 
and David SucheL 
(Ceefax) 

11.15 FHIK Relentless (1977) 
starring Win Sampson and 
Monte Markham. A chase 
movie about a gang of 
bank robbers being 
pursued in the Arizona - •- 
mountains by a police 

K itrol which includes a 
avajo Indian. Directed 
Lee H. Katzin. 

1145 Weather. 

FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053k 
92.5; Radio 4: 200kHz/1500m: 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 94.9; Wort 


service. 

5.00 News. 

5j05 Blockbusters. 

535 The A-Tearn. Faceman 
uncovers a counterfeiting 
racket based in a hut near 
the seventh green of an 
exclusive gon dub. 

(Oracle) 

6.30 Blind Darta presented by ' 
CiHa Black. A bghthearted 
look at what happens on a 
blind date. 

7.15 Copy Cats. Bobby Davro 
leads a team of 
impressionists in a series 
of cormc sketches. 

745 3-2-1. Ted Rogers with 
guests Wall Street-Crash, 
Aiden J Harvey, Jessica 
Martin, Stan Boardman 
and Fay Presto. (Orade) 

B45 News and sport 

9.00 Dempsey and 
Makepeace. The second 
and final part of The 
Burning. Has Dempsey's 
deep cover unhinged his 
brain? (Oracle) 

10.00 LWT News headlines 

followed by FHm: Psycho* 
(1 960) starring Anthony 
Perkins. Hitchcock's 
classic suspense thriller 
about a young woman, on 
the run with 540.000 of her 
employer's money, who 
takes overnight reluge in a 
run-down motel and 
wished she hadn't 
(Orade) 

1105 The Making of Mona Lisa. 

• A behind-the-scenes look 

• at the making of the fHm, 
Mona Lisa, which won for 
Bob Hoskms the Best 
Actor award at the Cannes 
FHm Festival. 

.1125 B 6 ss in Concert China 
..Crisis in concert 
12L50 The Baron. The Baron 
becomes involved with a 
dictator and the wife of the 
deposed president (r). 

140 Night Thoughts. 


630 Open University: Form and ' 
Function of Fossils 7.15 
Classical Greece: Games, 
Festivals 740 Head Start 
Children ol the Dream 805 
Everyday Violence 8.30 

frrtarSewSji5 ttjniabto 
Britain (2) 9-20 Santa 
Maria Dei Miracoii: Venice - 
945 Organics by the Ton 

10.10 Pure Maths: Knots 
1005 Maths: Tops and 
Gyroscopes 11.00 Maths 
Across the Curriculum 
1105 The Handicapped: 
Working Together 1140 
Introductory Electronics 
1115 Maths: Finding 
One’s Beariras 1240 
Modern Art Greenberg on 
Criticism 105 The 
Widowing of Mrs Holroyd 

1.30 Hazardous Waste 
DisposaL 

145 Fim: The KBHng* (1956) 
starring Staling Hayden, 
Elisha Code and Timothy 
Carey. An ex-convict 
hatches a plot to steal two 
million dollars from a race- 
track. His accomplices 
indude the race-track 
cashier, a barman, a 
bribed policemen, a 

former alcoholic, and a 
hired kitier who is 
contracted to shoot the 
leading horse in a top 
race. Directed by Stantey 
Kubrick 

3.15 Cricket The NatWest 
Bank Trophy final between 
Sussex aid Lancashire at 
Lord's, introduced, for the 
bust time, by Peter west 
The comment a tors are 
Richie Benaud, Tony 
Lewis, Ray Illingworth and 
Bob WIUs. 

705 NewsVww. Jan Learning 
with today's news; Moira 
Stuart reviews the week's 
news in pictures with 
subtitles. Weather. 

8.05 US Open Tennis from 
Rushing Meadow. New 
YoricThe Women's 
Singles Final and the 
Men's Singles Semifinals. 

' The commentators we 
Dan Maskeil. John Barrett, 
Gerald WHSams and Ann 
Jones. 

11.00 Cricket Highlights of 

. today's NatWest Bank 
Trophy final between 

Sussex and Lancashire 

introduced by Peter West 

1140 US Open Tennis. Further 
. .coverage of the play at 
Rushing Meadow, New 
. Yodc Ends at 1125. ... 

NB It the Cricket overruns 
News View wW be displaced 
and the rest of the 

programme times 

approximate. 


CHANNEL 4 


1.15 Channel 4 Racing from 
Kempton Park. The Price 
Waterhouse Chertsay 
Lock Stakes (1.20); the 
Continental Airlines 
Hancficap Stakes (1 40); 
the Keith Anderson 
Memorial Handicap 
Stakes (120); and the 
Robert Ranting Flies 
Stakes (150). 

305 Rtou The Pickwick 
Papers* (1952) starring 
James Hayter. The season 
of films based on novels 
by Charies Dickens 
continues with the story of 
the comical exploits of 
Samuel Pickwick and his 
three fellow members of 
The Pickwick Chib, Wbikle, 
Snodgrass, and Tupman. 
Directed by Noel Langley. 
505 Brookalde. (r) (Orade) 

600 Right to Reply. The Light, 
Kenneth Griffiths' 
biography of David Ben- 
Gun on, is accused of 
being historically 
inaccurate and racist 
600 The Faiths Next Door. The 
first of a senes of three - 
programmes, introduced 
by Prince Charles, on 
Britain's Hindu, Musfim 
and Sikh religions. - 
700 News summary and 
weather followed by A 
Place In the Sun. Tne 
story of the Wanton fairly 
of Merseyside. Now 
numbering 130, their 
ancestors cone to 
Liverpool in the last 
century as seamen from 

Sierra Leone. 

800 Newhart. American 

domestic comedy series 
starring Bob Newhart 
900 The Organization. The 
final episode of the series 
set in the public relations 
department of a large 
industrial organisation. 

1000 tfifi Street Sues. BeJker 
brings in a notorious 
waterfront heavy, only to 
incur the wrath of the 
deoutv chief. (Oracle) 


1045 Fine Raging Butt* (with 
colour sequences) (i960) 
starring Robert De Niro in 
Ns Oscar-winning role of 
" JakeLaMottainabkxtic 
tracing the rise and fail of 
the former world 

diampfor^Directed^y 
Martin Scorsese. 

. 1.10 The Twffight Zone: The 
Long Morrow* An 

astronaut training fat a . 
30-year stint in space, falls 
fora space agency 
employee ana decides to 
curtail bis mission. Ends at 
135. 


Radio 4 




On long wave. Stereo on VHF 
545 Shipping. 6.00 News Briefing. 

6.10 Prelude (s). 630 
News: Farming. 640 Prayer. 
645 weather Travel 

7.00 News 7.10 Today s 
Papers. 7.15 On Your 
Farm. 7.45 In Perspective 
740 Down to Earth. 745 
Weathen Travel. 

800 News. 8.10 Today's 
Papers. B.15Spcwton 4. 

847 Weather; TravaL 
900 News 

905 Having Fun with Goats. 

With the gang from I'm 
Sorry I Haven't a Clue (r) 

. 9.35 A Sideways Look 

At. .- by Anthony Smith. 
940 News Stand. Francis 
Wheen reviews the 
weekly magazines. 

1005 Conference Special. 

AlistairGranam. Director 
of Industrial Society, 
presents a personal view 
of the TUC conference. 

1000 Loose Ends, with Ned 
_ Sberrm and studio 



1100 From Our Own 

Correspondent Life and 
nrt1 ltics abroad. 


Living. Jearune McMu 
on the delights of living in 
rural Britain. 

1207 After Henry. Domestic 
comedy senes. Starring 
Prunella Scales as the 
widow. 1245 Weather 
100 News 

1.10 Any Questions? MPs 
Kenneth Clarke. David 
Owen and Roy H arte relay 
MP, with Denise 
Robertson, tackle issues 
raised by an audience in 

Crawley, West Sussex (r). 

2.00 New^lMTen^fouth and 

Pleasure Meet. A 

celebration of the 30 years 
work of the National 

Youth Theatre of Great 
Britain. With Michael 
Croft MS) 

300 News: Travel: 

International 
Assignment. BBC 
correspondents report. 

400 The Saturday Feature: 

The White Train. 

Margaret Horstield follows 

the tram carrying nuctear 
warheads destined tor 

Trident. . A1 . 

4,45 I Should Say So. by AHen 
Saddler, with Michael 
Williams as Robb Wilton (3) 

500 The Lrvmg World, with 
juban Hector. 

505 Delve SpeaaL Comcai 

Travel 

600 News: Sports Round-up 
605 In the Psyehffltnst s 
Chan*. Dr Anthony Clare 
• 'talks to Vladimir Ashkenazy, 
piamst and conductor. 

™ ftSSe aJSNoSt 

by Ke«i Goodali. Cast 
mdudes Soma Rmorano 
Clare Kelly. A story of hatred. 

800 taker s Dozen. Richard 
Baker with records. 

900 ThnHeri Coffin on the 
Water, by Gwendokn® 

Butler. readtoConrad 
Frumps (4). 948 Weather. 
1000 News 

10.15 Evening Service (s) 


1000 The Good Book. Brian 
Redhead continues h» 
exploration of the Bible. 

1100 Science Now- In 

Passing. Colin Tudga ■ 
visits the laboratory of the 
Hill Farming Research 
Organization. 

11.30 The Million Pound Radio 
Show (is) 

12.00 News: Weather. 1203 

VHF (avSabJe in England and 
Swales only) as above 
. except 545-6-OOam 
Weather: Travel. 145- 
100pm Programme News. 
4.00-640 Options: 400 
Never the Same Again 400 
Brainwaves 500 anh- 
Century American Writers (1) 
Edward Lewis Wallant 
S 0 O Fit for What? 

( Radio 3 ) 

On VHF/FM (in stereo) and on MW 

(Test Match) . . 

6 as Open University. A MusGm s 
testimony. Until 645am 
&55 Weather. 700 News 
705 Aubade: Offenbach 
(Orpheus in Underworld 
overture), Jacob (Suite for 
recorder and strings, 
with Michaia Petri, recorder). 






News 

905 Record Review: new 

series. Alan Bt yth 

compares recordings of Das 
Rnetngold. Pius Joan 
Chissafl on the Peart set of 
Pupils of Clara 
Schumann 

10.15 Stereo Release: 

Schumann (NoveUette. 

Op 21. No 2: Adelina de Lara, 
piano). Romance in F 

sharp. OP 28 no l 

(Eibenschutz. pianoL 
Piano Concerto (with Fanny 
Davies as sofotst), and 
Symphony No 2 
On medium wave only: 

1005 Test Match: NatWest 
BankTrophy final 

Lancashire v Sussex. 

Includes news at 1240. 

Continues on medium wave 
onfy umU70O • 

On VHF only: „ ^ 

,1JS KSSSfflr" . 


Juliet), Respighi (Pines ot 
Rome). Donizetti (Quel 
guardo D cavaliere). Befllnl 
(Oh ! Ouarrte volta). 

Gustave Charpenaer (Depuis 
te jour), Rossini (Una 
voce poco fa). 1.00 News 

105 Oboe and keyboard: 

John Anderson and 
Richard Nunn. Maconchy 
- (Three Bagatefles), 

Britten (Six Metamorphoses 
after Ovid). Dring (Three- 
. piece Suite) 

1.45 Last Chamber Works; 

Couil String Quartet 
Beethoven (Quartet In F, Op 
135. and Reger (Clarinet 
Quintet In A. Op 146, with 
Angela Malsbury. 
clarinet) 

245 The Modem Novel: 

written and read by John 
Stevenson 

3.15 Die Fledermautr. 

Strauss 's three-act 
opera, sung in German. 
Clemens Kreuss 
conducts Vienna PO and - 
' State Opera Chorus. 

Cast includes Gueden, 

. Patzak, Dermota. Upp. 

PoeH. Jaresch. Preger and 
Siegtinde Wagner 

5.00 Jazz Record Requests: 
with Peter Clayton 

5.45 Critics' Forum; topics 
include The Monodad 
Mutineer on BBC1 . and the 
Elm Rosa Luxemburg. In 
the chafe John Spurting 

605 Ravel: Kun Woo Park 
(planoX Pavane pour une 
infante defurrte: Is tombeau 
de Couperm: Vaises 
nobles et sentlmen tales 
On VH F (stereo) and MF: 

700 Proms 86 : BBC Scottish 
SO (under Jerzy 
Maksymiuk), with Maurice 
Bourgue (oboe). Sibelius 
(Symphony No 3), Mozart 
(Oboe Concerto in C.K 


(under MutiJ.With 
Kathleen Battle (sopr 
Tchaikovsky (Romeo 


805 Latter from New Guinea: 
with the poet E A 
Markham 

805 Proms 86 (comd): John 
Maxwell Geddes 
(Voyager). Mendelssohn 
(Symphony No 3) 

9.45 The Georgies; John 
Franfdyn-Robbins 
concludes his readings from 
Virgil's poem (r) 

1000 OthmarSchoedc Medici 
String Quartet play 
Quarttt No 2 in C. Op 37 

1055 Tubirv Swedish RSO 
under Jarvi play the 


Charles Fox introduces 
records by Howard Riiey and 
Keith Tippett. 1147 
News. 1200 Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 

MFjmecfium wave). Stereo on 
VHF 

News on tin hour until 100pm, 
then 300, 600, 700 and hcxirty 
from 1000 Sports Desks 
1102, 1002 pm. Cricket 
Scoreboard 700pm. 

4.00am Dave Bussey 600 
Steve Truelove 805 Dadd Jacobs 
1000 Souths of the 60s 1100 
Album Time (with Peter Crayton) 
100pm The Good Human 
Guide [new series] with the 
National Revue Company 100 
Sport on 1 Includes Cncket 
(Lancashire v Sussex). Footbal. 
(Arsenal v Tottenham and west 
Ham v Liverpool) and Racing 
from Haydock Pwk. 500 Sports 
Desk. 6.00 Sports Quiz Kid. 
Northern Inch heat 600 The Press 
Gang [New series] Glyn 
Worsnip puts questions to Roy 
Hudd. Henry Kelly, John Kettey 
and Sarah Kennedy 700 Three In a 
Row. Stuart Hail in Birkenhead 
700 The Hastings Connection. 

I Concert recorded in the White 
Rock Theatre. 805 String Sound, 
(strings of BBC Radio 
Orchestra) 9.15 134th British Open , 
Brass Band Championship 
from Manchester 1005 Martin 
Kelner 1005am Night Owts 
100 Nightride 300-400 A Little 
Night Music. 

( Radio 1 ) 

MF (medium wave).Sterao on 
VHF (see below) 

News on the half-hour until 
1200 pm, then 200; 300, 500, 

700, 900, 1100 mkJnlgtTL ’ 

6.00 Mark Page BLOOAdnan . 

John 1000 Dave Lee Travis 
I.Dfipm Adrian Juste 3.00 The 
American Chart Show; Direct from 
New York (with Cieo Rowe) 

500 Saturday Live 600 In Concert 
700 Sffhon Mayo 900-1200 
Midnight Runners Show (with Dixie 
PeachL YHF Stereo Ratio 1 & 

2>- 400 As Radio 1 1.00pm As 
Radio 1. 70O-40Oam As Racfio 
2. 

WORLD SERVICE 


Syn®honyNo6 
1100 The Jazz Pianist 



845 Pl«y School. 9.15 Articles 
of Faith. Shodd creeds be 
a necessary condition of 
being Christian? asks 
John Bowker. Dean of 
Trinity 9.30 This is the 
Day. A simple religious 
service from a viewer’s 
home in Chandler's Ford. 

10.00 Asian Magazine. Film star 
Rekfta talks to Azmat 
Bajwa about her Nfe and 
career 1000 Aristocrats. 

A profile of the Marquis de 
- Ganay. (r) ii-20 Cameo. 

. WHd geese leave Britain 
for the high Arctic, (r). 
1100 Three in the Hired. 
How Mordicus the 
buzzard survived his first 
few days, (r) . 

1200 Cartoon. Hiss and Make 
Up 1205 sign Extra. How 

Cameron Marsden saved 
the Nfe of flapper racing 
dog, Danny. For the 
hearing impaired. 1135 
- Farming. With cereal 
production under threat 
through various factors, 
Dan (Swrrington looks at 
the profitability of organic 
cereal production as an 
alternative. 1240 
Weather. 

100 News 105 Bonanza. 
Western adventures, (r) 
140 Tom and Jerry 200 
EastEnders. (r) (Ceefax) 

300 FHm: Never So Few (1959) 
starring Steve McQueen 
andFrank Sinatra. Second 
World war drama about 
Americans commanding a 
group of Burmese 
guerillas on raids against 
the Japanese. Directed by 
John Sturges. 

500 F a mborough 86. Chris 
Serie and Raymond 
Baxter have the latest 
business news from the 
International Air Show and 

static andaeria!^ displays 
ot aircraft 

545 Pet Watch. Bruce Fogle 
examines the top ten dog 
breeds in this country 
since 1925: and Wayne 
Mockett discovers how 
difficult it is to cut a burs 
toenails. 

605 Appeal by Maggie Phitoin 
on behalf of The David 
Lewis Centra for Epilepsy. 

600 News with Jan Leeming. 
Weather. 

6.40 Songs of Praise from 
Alfriston. (Ceefax) 

7.15 Ever Decreasing Circles. 
Martin represents Ns 
company at an overseas 
conference and returns 
home in moral disgrace. 


645 Good Meriting Britain 
begms with Sunday 
Comment; 700 Are You 
Awake Yet? 70S WAC 
Extra. 

800 Kelly on Sunday. News, a 
review of the day's 
newspapers, weather, and 
guests. Fatima Whitbread. 
Jeffrey Archer, and John 
Rae. 


ITV'LONDON 


905 Wake Up London. 90S 

Roger Ramjet (f) 905 

Sylvester, (f). 

1000 Morning WbreMp from 
Rochester Cathedral 
1100 Getting On. A profile 
of the Rev Albert Thomas 
Humphrey, the 100-year- 
old working vicar of 
Stretchott In Somerset 
1100 Working For a Better Lite. 
Tries peoal pressures the 

current economic climate 

puts on pupils and 
teachers, (r) 

1100 Fortune. How the rich are 
likely to fare in the coming 
years 1.00 Police 5. 1.15 
European FoBc Tales: The 

Green Mountain. A little 

S has to trick a giant 
are she can graze her 

cows on lush pasture 100 
The Smurfs. Cartoon 
series, (r) 

100' One God~Thcee Gods. In 
Cairo. Muslims and 
Christians worship 
together under the 
umbrella of The Religious 
Brotherhood. 

130 LWT News headfinas 
followed by Film: 
Genevieve (1953) starring 
John Gregson. Dinah 
Sheridan. Kenneth More 
and Kay Kendall. Vintage 
comedy about two couples 
who turn the return leg of 
the London to Brighton 
veteran car run into a race. 
Directed by Henry 
Cornelius. 

400 International Athletics. 
The Peugeot Talbot 
Westminster Mile. 

400 The Campbeta. An 

innocent treasure hunt ■ 
turns into a nightmare. 
500 Buflseye. Darts and 

general knowledge game. 




.. K< 



images of evil: The Faiths Next Door, on CM, 638pm 



705 Howards’ Way. Episode 
two of the drama serial set 
among the south of 
England boat people. 
(Ceefax) 

80S Only Fools and Horses.. 
Del decides there is 
money in miracles after 
witnessing a 'de luxe' 

' example at the local 
church. (Ceefax) 

90S The Monoctod Mutineer. 
Episode two and Percy 
TopHs, in June 1917. 
arrives at the Etapies 
training camp in northern 
France, notorious for its 
brutal-regime: (Ceefax) - 
1000 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather. 

1005 Heart of the Matter. David 
Lomax examines the 
consequences of barring 
- South Africans from the 
International 

Archaeological Congress 
fo Britain. 

11.10 Grand Prix. Highlights of 
the Italian Grand Prix. 

11.45 Weather. 

( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. Stereo on VHF 
545 Shipping. 600 News Briefing; 

Weather. 6.10 Prelude (a) 
600 News; Morning Has 
Broken (hymns). 845 
Weather Travel 
700 News. 7.10 Sunday 
Papers. 7.15 Apna Hi 
Ghar Samajhrye. 7-45 BeOS. 
740 Turning Over New 
Leaves. 745 Weather Travel 
800 News. 8.10 Sundry 
Papers. 8.15 Sunday 
(presented by Trevor. 
Barnes). 840 Bobby 
Robson appeals for the 
Charles Palmer Trust 
845 Weather Travel 
900 News. 

9.10 Sunday Papers 

9.15 Letter From America, by 
Alistair Cooke. 

900 Morning Service, from St 
Francis Church, 

Handsworth. Birmingham. 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition. 

11.15 Pick OfThe Week. 

by 


presented by Gloria 
Hunmford. The guests are 
Nigel Havers, Sir John 
Mitts. Wayne Sleep. Kate 
Robbins. Kenny Bal and 
Acker Bilk. The guest 
critics are Pamela 
Armstrong and Bob 
Carolgees. 

600 News with Trevor 
McDonald. 

6.40 Highway. Sir Harry 
Secombe is in 
Marlborough. 

7.15 Flm: Lost FBght (1989) 
starting Uoyd Bridges and 
Anne Francis. A made for 
television drama about the 
passengers and crew of 
an airliner, fighting to 
survive after their plane is 
forced by a storm to 
crash-land in an island 
jungle. Directed tty 
Leonard J Horn. 

9.00 News. 

115 West of Paradise. When a 
beachcomber dies Itis 

.... grandchttdrea arrive to .. 
claim their inheritance and 
become involved in 
voodoo vengeance. 
Starring Art Malik. (Orade) 

11.15 LWT News headlines 
followed by World 
Championship Boxing. 
The IBF Heavyweight 
Championship bout 
between Michael Spinks 
and Steffan Tangstad - 

1130 Mght Thoughts. 

10.15 The Sunday Feature. 

Walking Through Bra. 
Rosemary Harm ill teas the 


story of Christians in 
Uganda (1) 

1100 Before the Ending of the 
Day (late evening Office 
of CompUneHs) 

11.15 Music From The People. 

The 20th-century reviva] 
of the English folk song frXs) 
1105 Eye witness. Erik de 
Mauny on The Fall of 
Khrushchev. 

1100 News; Weather. 1203 


L wales onhjjasBbove 
except: 545600am 


Weathen Travel 7.00- 
900 Open University 400- 
600 Options: 4.00 
Education Roadshow. 500 
Prefaces to 

Shakespeare. (Bob Peck on 
Othello) 


Radio 3 


Director ui un iwwiu 
S ymphony, in 
conversation with Michael 
Parkinson (s). 1245 
Weather 

1.00 The world This 

Weekend: News. 145 

100 News^icnics. Susan 
Marling Jans a shooting 
party on the grouse moore In 
' wales. 

200 Globe Theatre (2) The 
Seagull. Chekhov's play. 

transferred from Russia to 

the west coast of Ireland. 
With a cast headed by Anna 
Massey. Alan Rickman, 
Donunic Guard, and Fiona 
Victory. Simultaneous 
transmission wrth BBC 
World Service (s) 

400 News: Origins. Mark 
Hassell visits Tunisia to 
tefl the story of the Roman 
coiomfcstton of North 
Africa (1) 

400 The Natural History 
Programme. What 
sharks have to fear from 
man(r) 

500 News; Travel. 

505 Down Your Way. Brian . 
Johnston visits 
Bridgwater. Somerset. 540 
Shcpuig. 545 weather 

600 News 

6.15 Weekend Woman's 
Hour. Highlights of the 
past week's programmes. 

700 Nostromo. by Joseph 
Conrad &) The Paradise 
of Snakes. With Kenneth 
Crannam in the title rote 

800 A Good Read. 

Paperbacks review with 

Brian Gear. Ronald Eyre, and 
Amanda Theumssan (r) 

800- The Maestro. Jeremy 
Siapmann s senes on the 
history ot conducting. 

9i00 News: Rambles In 
frewnd. Mike Harding 
and guest walk the west 
coast of Ireland. 

940 The Other Thief 



: Timothy West The Monoded Mutineer (BBC L. 9.85pm). 
Bight* Jan Harvey: Howards 'Way, (BBC1, 7.45pm) 


640 Open University: Calculus 
-the Directional Derivative 
. 7.15 Plant Propagation 

7.40 Man s Religious 
Quest Pilgrimage 805 
Chardin and the Female 
Image 800 Chile in the 
International System 845 
The Export of Pollution 
900 Meanings of 
Madness (4) 9.45 Maths: 
And So Or- 10.10 A 
Golden Age of Work 1005 
Quantum Theory: 
Electrons and Photons 
1100 Urban Change: 

State Intervention 11 40 
Kafka and His World 1115 
OH: Finds for the Future 
1200 Probing the 
Structure of Liquids 105 
The Optical Lens 1.30 
Shooting the Moon. 

1.55 Sunday Grandstand 
introduced tty Desmond 
Lynam. The bne-up is: 
Motor Racing: the Italian 
Grand Pnx from Monza, 
with commentary from 
Murray Walker and James 
Hunt Eventing: the 
Burghley Renw Martin 
Horse Trials. Commentary 
by Michael Tucker. Hugh 
Thomas, and Raymond 
Brooks-War ch Racing, at 
approximately 305, from 
Phoenix Park, Dublin: the 
Champion Stakes: 
followed by the Prix du 
Moulin at Longchamp 

840 Foley Square. After 

receiving a death threat in 
the middle ol a trial. 
Assistant District Attorney 
Alex Hamgan is assigned 
a bodyguard but she finds 
this interferes with her 
personal, as well as 
public, Nfe. 

7.15 Jerry Lee Lewis. A repeat 
of Arena s profile of the 
controversial singer. 

805 The White Tribe of Africa. 
Part two of the award- 
winning series traang the 
history of the Afrikaners, 
written and presented by 
. David Dimbleby. (r) 

845 US Open Tennis. The 
Men's Singles Final from 
Flushing Meadow, New 
York. Ends at 
approximately 1115. 



Reginald Tabor and Debby 
Bishop: on ITV, 9.15pm 

300 Northern Sinfonia (under 


Regional 71 on facing page 


Robin Bell. With Sill 
' Paterson. 945 Weather: 
Travel 
1Q0O News 


On VHF/FN (in stereo) and MW 
605 Open University. BorghinTs 
Rtposo. Until 605am 
645 weather. 7.00 News 
705 Vivakfi's Venice: the 
Vivaldi works include 
Concerto in B minor for four 
violins, cello and - 
orchestra. Op 3 No 10. RV 
580: and the Concerto in 
G minor, RV 577. Also a 
violin concerto by 
Pisendei 

800 Edwm Fischer: the 
pianist in recordings of 
works by Bach (Fantasia bi C 
minor, BWV 906). 

Schubert (including Auf dem 
Wssserzusingen). 

Mozart (PianoTtoncerto No 
17)_ 900 News 
905 Your Concert Choier 

Mendelssohn (Ruy Bias a 

overture). SuK (Fantasia m G 
minor .with Josef Suk. 
violin), Lawes (Amtntor's 
Wettaday). Avison (Trio 
Sonata in C. Op 5 No 2). 
Gibbons (This is the . 
record of John), Smetana 
(Scherzo from Festive 
Symphony), Brahms 
(Rhapsody in B minor, • 

Op 79 No 2, with ' 

. .Backhaus.ptano), Nowak 
(in the Tairas), and 
Beethoven (song eyrie 

Ande feme Geflfeota: 

* Shreier. tenor) 

1005 PrbmTaflc with Roger 
Wright Includes an 
interview with Sotti 

11.15 AndrasSchiffc piano 
recttaL Beethoven ' 
(Sonata m D, Op 28). Bartok 
(Dance Suite). Bach 
(Partita No 6 in E minor, 

BWV 830) 

1140 BBC PM harmonic 

Orchestra (under FuretL 
with Edith voickaen (viottn). 
Berfioz (Benvenuto 
Cellini overture). Sakit-Saens 
(Vioin Concerto No 3). 
Dvorak (Symphonic 
. Vanawns) 

140 Butt Virginal Music 
‘ played by Robert 
Woolley on a Thomas White 
virginal of 1642 

129 Syrinx: Debussy (Sonma 
(of flute, vida. harp). 

•. Frencaix (String TrioLfoert 
(Two interludes for 
flute, viotet, harpJ-Piente 
(Vanations fibres « 
finale) 


Mylslivecek (Sinfonia in D 
major), Mozart 
(Cassation No 1 hi G major. 

K 63). Haydn (Symphony 
No 61) 

4.15 Schubert Die schone 
Muttenn.OfafBaer 
(baritone). Geoffrey Parsons 

500 ^heHariequin Years: 

Roger Nichols's series 
about the musical Nfe of 
Pans in 1 922-23 (6) (r) 

6.15 Amphion String Quartet 
Mozart (Strfeg Quartet in 
B flat mapr. K 458) and 
David Matthews (String 
Quartet No 1) 

7.10 Your True Friends: 

Robert Eddtson reads 
from Book 2 of Boethius's 
The Consolation ol 
Phrtosophy 

700 Proms 86: BBC SO 

(under Marek JanowsJu) 
with Edinburgh Festival 
Chorus. Part one. Verdi 
(Four Sacred Pieces) 

8.10 The Living Poet: Herbert 
Lomas reads some of his 

own verse 

600 Proms 86: continued. . 

Mahler (Symphony No 5) 

940 The Devil's Beatitude: 
Richard Vernon reads 
the story by Conor 
Farrington 

10.10 Viola music: Nobuko 
[mai. with Roger 
Vignolas (piano). Hindemith 
(Sonata for viola. Op 11 
No 5), Shostakovich (Sonata, 
Op 147} 

11.00 Benny Goodman: the 
classical record inos. 

Morton Gould (Derivations 
tor clarinet and band), 

Nielsen (Ctannet Concerto 
Op 57). Bernstein 
(Prelude, Fugue and Riffs). 


CHANNEL 4., 


1.05 Irish Angle. With the 
tourist industry in Ireland 
hit by the Libyan crisis and 
Chernobyl with the 
consequent drop m 
visitors from the United 
States, the programme 
examines how the 
Republic's third largest 
earner of foreign revenue 
can recover. 

1.30 Ever Thought of Sport 
Camping and backpacking 
are this week's less 
expensive sports, (r) 

100 Everybody Here. 

Multicultural magazine 
series for children, (r) 

200 Musk: in the Wood. A 
documentary from Ireland 
about a village's 
preparations for a music 
festival on the shores of a 
wooded lake. 

3.00 All Ireland Hurting Final. 
From Croke Park. Dublin, 
live coverage of the game 
between Cork and 
Galway. 

500 The Wardrobe. An 
animated comedy. 

5.15 News summary and 
weather followed by We 
Also Need Fred and BtfL A 
documentary exploring 
how people are attected 
when asked to start using 
computers in their jobs. 

6.00 The Sun's Gonna Shine. 
The world ol blues singer 
and guitarist. Lightnm - 
Hopkins. 

6.15 American FootbaH. 
Highlights ot the game 
played last February in 
Hawaii between teams 
made up ol the best 
players Irom the American 
Conference and the 
National Conference. 

7.15 The Arabs. What do the 
Arabs bekeve to be the 
most potent forces in their 
society at the present 
time? (r) 

8.15 MichMangefi Ptays 
Beethoven. Arturo 
Benedetti Michelangeli 
plays Beethoven's Piano 
Concerto No 5 m E Flat 
Maior. Opus 73. at 
Vienna's Musikverein, with 
the Vienna Philharmonic 
Orchestra, conducted by 
Carlo Maria Giulmi. 

900 Just a Photograph. 

Fishmerchant and writer 
Tom Hadaway has 
memories of ms early life 
stirred by an old 
photograph. 

9.15 Country Matters: Hie Four 
Beauties, by H.E.Bates. A 
young man fe tom 
between four ladies who 
ran the local tea shop, (r) 

10.15 Rut: A Tale of Two 
Cities* (1936) starring 
Ronald Colman. Charles 
Dickens's classic story of 
adventure and self- 
sacrifice at the time of the 
French Revolution. 
Directed by Jack Conway. 
Ends at 1135. 

1147 News. 1200 
Closedown. 


Radio 2 


MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHF 

News on the hourfexcept 
800pm). Sports Desks 1202pm. 
10.02am. Cricket Scoreboard 
700pm. Tennis: US Open at 
11.02pm, 12.05am 
4.00am Dave Bussey 6.00 
Steve Truelove 700 Dana says 
Good Momma Sunday 905 
Melodies For You. (BBC Concert 
Orchestra) 11.00 John and 
Judith's Quayside Special. John 
Craven and Judith Chalmers 
take an Awayaay to Poole 1 .00pm 
A Musical Blockbuster (from St 
Holier. Jersey) 200 Stuart Hall's 
Sunday Sport 600 Charlie 
Chester with Sunday Soapbox 705 
Grand Hotel 800 Where Do 
You Go? Cmdy Kent with Cardinal 
Basil Hume 9.00 Your Hundred 
Best Tunes. (Alan Keith) 1005 
Songs From The Shows 1000 
The Gospel Truth. Bob SinfieW's 
history of Gospel and 
Inspirational music 11.00 Sounds of 
Jazz (Peter Clayton) 1 .00am 
Nigntride 300-400 A Little Night 


Radio 1 




Richard Briers Ever Decreasing 
Circles, on BBCL at 7.15pm 


MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

News on the half-hour until 
1100am, then 2.30pm. 300, 400, 
700. 9.30, 1200 Mdntqm 
600am Mark Page B0O Adrian 
John 10 . bo Mike Read 1200 pm 
Jimmy Saviles 'Old Record' 

Club (1980. 74 . 68) 200 Classic 
Concert 300 Radio 1 More 
Time (Gary Daves) 4,00 
Chart busters (Bruno Brookes) 

5.00 Top 40 (Bruno Brookes) 7.00 
Anne Nightingale Request 
Show 900 Robbe Vincent 11.00- 
1100 The Rankin' Miss P(wnh 
Culture Rock). VHF Stereo Radios 
18 2: -400am As Radio 2. 
200pm Benny Green. 300 Alan 
Deli 400 Vilem Tausky 
conducts Lang ham Orchestra. 400 
Sing Something Simple. 500 As 
Radio 1. 12 . 00-4. 00 am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 

6J» NwHteSk 600 Jazz lor me Asking 
700 News 7JJ9 TvwmyFour Hours 700 
From our own Correspondent 7 -SO wave- 
guoo 8.00 News 109 Reflections 8.15 
The Pleasures Yours 940 News 949 
Review ol Brush Press 9.15 Soence m 
Action 8 j» 5 Isumtc Fundamentalism 1040 
News 1041 Snort Story 11.15 CbssqH 
Record Review 1140 News 1149 News 
ADOUi Britan 11.15 From our own 
Correspondent 1100 The Two First 
Mams ot The SeaguD 1200 Growvig 
Pons In Science 1245 Sports Roundup 
1.00 News 149 Twenty-Four Hours 340 
Radio Newsreel 3.15 From the Proms 38 
440 Maws 449 Commentary 4.16 The 
Language of Ctothes 545 Sports Round- 
up 040 News 649 Twenty-Four Hours 

000 Where Do You GO? 940 News 9.01 
Story 9.15 The Pleasure's Youre 1040 
News 1049 Lake wooegon Days 1005 
Beak Chou 1040 Financial News 1040 
Reflections 1045 Sports Roundup 11.00 
News 11.08 Commentary 11.16 Letter 
from America 1140 The Professions 
1240 News 1Z09 News About Britain 
12.15 Radio Newsreel 1240 Qooe ihe- 

ave: Tne Seamus 240 News 248 Rawew 

of British Press 2.15 Peases’ Croce 200 
Boence m Acaon 340 News 349 News 
About Britain 3.15 Good Books 445 
Reflections 440 waveguide 540 News 
549 Twenty-Four Hours 545 Record**) 

01 the week, ao tune* in coir. 

Regional Tl on facing page m 


f 


a.?5?s7.«is5 i sjra-K* .&s.sa hw x j . # .8jt * .niw-maw 




-**41 




38 


SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1986 


THE TIMES 


FlntpaMhMlaP85 


SPORT 


Crowd are on trial 



more than the 


teams at Lord’s 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


The NatWest final at Lord's 
today brings together two of 
the most successful sides of 
the early years of one-day 
cricket, Sussex and Lan- 
cashire. Only three times be- 
tween 1963, when this 
knockout competition was 
launched under different 
sponsorship, and 1977 was 
one or the other nor in the 
final. They have been so much 
less successful since that it is 
good to see them back. 

I say that with one reserva- 
tion. Lancashire's 

^supporters" of whom thou- 
sands are expected, to come 
south, have a nasty habit of 
spoiling the enjoyment for 
other people by their behav- 
iour. Looking at and listening 
to them at the Oval last 
month, in the NatWest semi- 
final, was more than enough 
to make one want Surrey to 
win. 

This hooliganism at cricket 
matches is a growing threat 
Already the Tavern has bad to 


enough to do so for Sussex to 
fear him scarcely less than if 
he was still in his prime. On 
the evidence of bi$ 65 against 
Surrey at the Oval in the semi- 
finals, he is still, anyway, an 
outstandingly good ba tsm a n . 

Both sides bat better than 
they howl, though bowling 
first at Lord's on a dewy 
September morning can turn 
even a modest attack into a 
match-winning one. Although 
Lancashire seem marginally 
stronger, the side fielding first 


wins the G il fette/Nat West fi- 
nal more ' often than not, 
despite having to bat some- 


times in the twilight. That 
inter for to 


could be a pointer for today. 
LANCASMRE: G D Mends, G 
Fowler. J Abrahams, N H 
Fairfarother. C H Lloyd (capQ. S J 

OShaughnessy, C Maynard, J 
Simmons, A N Haynurst, M 
Watkmson, P J W ABOtt. 

SUSSEX: A M Green. R I Aftdtan, P 
WG Parker. Imran Khan, C MWeb. 
A P Weis, l j Gould jeaptt. G S La 
RouXrD A Reeve, A C S Pigott. A N 
Jones. 

Umpire*: H D BW and K PSfcnar. 


PATHS TO THE FINAL 


LANCASHIRE 

Hmt round: beat Cumberland by 8 
wickets (OM Trafford). 

Seeond round: beat Somerset by 3 
runs (Taunton). 

Quarter-finals: beat Latee s tarehifB 
by 6 wickets (Leicester). 
Semi-finals: beat Surrey by 4 runs 
(The Oval). 


First round: beet Suffofc by 7 


beat Glamorgan by 


Second 
29 runs (. 

Quarter-finals: beat Yorkshire by 88 
runs (HeadtaglayL 
Semi-finals: beat Worcestershire 
by 5 wickets (Worcester). 


RECORDS FOR THE FINAL 


be blocked off and the opening 
:up final 


hours restricted on cup 
days at Lord's; yet that was 
not enough to allow the final 
of the Benson and Hedges 
earlier this season to be fin- 
ished without the ground be- 
ing invaded before the match 
was decided. If Kent bad. 
needed fewer than the five 
runs they did to win off the 
last ball the umpires would 
have bad no option but to 
declare the ball void. Regular 
appeals for restraint were 
widely ignored. 

It will be a great shame if 
fences have to be built, at 
Lord's of all places, to hold 
sections ofthe crowd at bay, or 
if the ground capacity has to 
be reduced by having no 
spectators on the grass or extra 
police have to be hired at 
considerable expense. But it is 
going that way. The followers 
of both sides, especially 
Lancashire's, are on trial 
today. 

Now for the good news. Ian 
Gould is fit to lead Sussex and 
to keep wicket He has not 
played since August IS be- 
cause of a damaged hip. Full 
of enthusiasm and character, 
he has given Sussex quite a 
shot in the arm since injury 
forced John Barclay to give up 
the captaincy halfway through 
the season. Gould may be 
dwarfed by Give Lloyd as 
they go out to toss this 
morning, but he will not be in 
the least overawed. Sussex's 
batsmen baye made enough 
runs recently to feel in form 
today, and in Imran Khan, 
now fit again, they have, 
unlike Lancashire, a 
commanding all-rounder. 

This will be Lloyd's first 
NatWest final, though he 
played in six Gillette finals, 
the last of them in 1976, and 
he captained West Indies in 
each of their three World Cup 
finals at Lord's. What he has 
never done is to lead Lan- 
cashire to victory in a domes- 
tic competition and he is keen 


Highest total: 31 7 tor 4 Yorkshire v 
Surrey. 1965. 

Highest aggregate 559 (Essex 280 
for 2, Nottinghamshire 279 for 5), 
1985. 

Lowest aggregate: 240 (Lancashire 
1 18, Kenti22 for «, 1974. 
ffighest partnership: G A Gooch 
and B R Hardie 202 lor first wicket, 
Essex v Notting hamshire . 1985. 
Lowest total: 118 Lancashire v 
Kent 1974. 

Highest Individual score: G Boycott 
146, Yorkshire v Suney, 1965. 
Centuries have also been scored in 


Most lrirlmtr J Gamer 6 tar 29. 
Somerset v No rt hamptonshire. 
1973. 

Meet econmaleal bowttag: A G 

Nicholson 12-5-14-1, Yorkshire v 
Derbyshire, 1959; R D V Knight 12- 
3-14-2, Surrey v Warwickshire, 
1982. 


the final by: C H Uoyd 126, 
Lancashire v Warwickshire 1972: t V 


A Richards 117, Somerset v North- 
amptonshire. 1979; G Cook 111, 
Northamptonshire v Derbyshire, 
1931; B R Hardie 110, Essex v 
Nottinghamshire, 1985. . 


Most expensive bowfing: K Saxelby 
12-0-734, Nottinghamshire v Essex 
1985. 

urgftst ncnmc Yoncsrara max 

Surrey by 175 runs, 1975; Surrey 
beat Warwickshire by 9 wickets, 
1982. 

Narrowest victories: — 
beat Nort ha mpton sh ire by 

fewer wickets with scores 

1981; Essex beat Notti n ghamshire 
by one run, 1985. 


• Sussex ware the first winners 
of the competition (known as the 
Gillette Cap ontS 1980) ia 1963. 
They also woo in 1964 and 1978 
and were beaten finalists at 
1965. 1970 and 1973. 


•Lancashire defeated Sassex by 
six wickets in the 1970 final. 
Sassex won the sidert only 
other pr eviou s mee ti ng In the 
c ompetition, n wnranl at 
Hove in 1978, by 136 rwxs. 


• Lancashire achieved a nmqne 
treble of victories in 1970 to 
1972 and won again in 1975. 
They were beaten finalists k 
1974 and 1976. 


•Lancashire had 15 succe ssi ve 
wins in tbe competition, 1970- 
73 l Smwt mm their first nine 
games, 1963-65. 



Modest 

Gooch 


praises 

Fletcher 


Stylish Mendis chases century 


In his first season for Lan- 
cashire,- Gehan Mendis, who 
plays against his old county 
today, has made quite an 
impress ton. His new col- 
leagues are not sure what to 
make of him. He drives an 
open-top car with 100 on the 
number plate. He has red tints 
in his hair. He lives and 
socialises in, he says, the most 
snobbish area iff Cheshire 
while his ream 
frequent pubs in 
Manchester. 

“They do not think I am for 
real,’’ Mendis says. But he is, 
and so are his runs, more than 
1,000 of them in the Britannic 
Assurance Championship this 
season. Last year be scored 
1,756 runs for Sussex. Yet 
other openers of lesser 
achievements are pipped or 
mooted for England. It is his 
biggest disappointment One 
or two of his Lancashire team 
mates fail to comprehend why 
he has never won a Test cap. 


Mendis, now aged 31, feels the 
selectors think be is qualified 
solely for Sri !■«**, the 
country of his birth, and 
affluent upbringing. 


Snow to tefl him bow a fast 
bowler attacked a batsman. It 
helped Mendis score 1,000 
runs in a season, six times for 
Sassex. 


sticky start, has discovered be 
can bat on the slower pitches 


His parents, a father who is 
a wealthy dvfi engineer, and 
his mother, who is second 
generation Dutch, emigrated 
to England in 1968. Gehan — 
the name means *the universe' 
— followed his schooling in 
Colombo with a degree in 
mathematics at Durham 
University. In 1974 he joined 
SossexJfe soon impressed 
Tony Greig, who captained 
him and boosted his con- 
fidence. Although Mendis had 
been largely ancoacbed, and 
holds a bat incorrectly, he 
began to seme runs. Suddenly, 
he was opening for Sussex, 
although he did not, and does 
not. enjoy being fast bowling. 
Rather than concentrate on 
formulating ways of attacking 
bowlers, he would pester John 


Last season, which was his 
most prolific, Meadis came 
dose to joining the small 
number of batsmen who have 
scored five first class centuries 
ia six su ccessive innings. He 
was on 96 against Hampshire 
at .Po r t smou th when Barclay 
declared. Mendis had faced 
only four balls in the preceding 
five overs. That evening he 
decided to leave Sassex. There 
were other reasons why he 
requested to go. Some of the 
Sassex players, he says, 
tnrned against him. And he 
regarded cricket as a day time 
job, not one .which carries on 
with events in the evenings. At 
Old Trafford, be has renewed 
friendships with Allot! and 
Fowler, colleagues from 
university days, and, after a 


ofthe North. HU rans have, he 
says, been scrambled rather 
.than sawed. 

. He could still, of co u r s e, 
play for Sri Lanka. “Officials, 
have spoken loosely to me 
about making me captain but if 
I chose to play for than I 
would become an overseas 
cricketer which would com- 
plicate my comity career. 
When I was last there h»‘I980, 
some people thought J was 
snubbing them by not playing 
for Sri Lanka." 

Mendis would rather play 
for England, and, indeed , in- 
tends to remain herewhen his 
playing days are over. He 
would Uke to pursue a career in 
the City and intends to do so 
this winter — assuming, of 
course, he is not selected; to go 
to Australia. 


By I vo Tennant 

At bis own admission, Gra- 
bam Gooch is no dictator. His 
achievement in winning the 
Britannic Assurance 
Championship in his first tilt 
at captaincy owes much, . he 
will readily acknowledge, to 
the - expertise of Keith 
Fletcher, his friend, mentor 
and now vice captain. 

?r have eqjoyed captaining, 
and. 'the extra responsibility 
that, goes with it; but really, 
nothing has changed at Essex. 
1 have missed a lot of games 
through Test calls so Keith is 
stffl captaining the.side a loL 
“He is the best captain I have 
played under so it is marvel- 
ous to have him on the field 
offering advice. “We do not 
have team talks before a 
match; but discuss the game 
all the time. Keith gives me 
tips about positioning fielders 
and wifi sometimes move a 
fielder himself Captains do 
not keep books but he logs in 
bis memory batsmen's 
strengths and weaknesses. AH 
the players chip m with 
suggestions. “Cricket is now a 
15-man game; what with Test 
calls anainiuries. (Both led to 
Essex having five different 
captains in less than a month 
this season). Some of our first 
team, players have broken 
fingers or hands but we have 
Still manag ed to keep in 
contention. 

“We are very proud in Essex 
of our youth policy. Most of 
our young players were born 
and brought up locally. Tins 
season, John Stephenson, who 
will be a good batsman, has 
come through- People forget 
that Neil. Foster is still young, 
yet, already he has taken over 
the main workload of tbe 
bowling from John Lever. His 
time will come at Test leveL 
“Depsk Pringle has had a fine 
season and, although there are 
better looking wicket keepers 
than- David East, be has 
proved he has ability. Ifhecan 
score 1,000 runs a season, the 
Test selectors will look at 
him,” Gooch said. 

“Then we bave been fortu- 
nate in signing Allan Border 
and John Childs. Allan was 
the best available overseas 
player and has been a big 
influence on the pitch as in the 
dressing room. It was not easy 
succeeding Kenny McEwan, 
who was much loved in Essex. 
Essex, though, have not es- 
caped criticism, both of their 
pitches and last day collu- 
sions. “We do not prepare 
pitches to suit ourselves but all 
types of players. They are 
good cricket wickets. Players 
and spectators do not want flat 
pitches.. It is better to have 
collusion between captains. 
My response to tbe critics is 
that we have won only four 
matches on our ground and 
lost three but bave won six 


I vo Tennant 


away. 

Gooch has praise and sym- 
pathy, for Gloucestershire, 
who at one stage had a 54 
it lead over Essex. “They 
at the . wrong time. I 
know .how they fed. Essex 
used tobe runners tip.” • 

, . Notts Report, page 36 


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Our cause is very important. 

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CYCLING: TOUGH 17-LAP CIRCUIT AT ALTITUDE WILL TEST THE PROFESSIONALS 


Kelly pins hopes on his short stay in Rockies 


Much has been spoken 
about tbe high altitude of the 
road race circuit for the three 
events which dose the world 
championships this weekend. 
The 9.5-mile course, which 
the professionals will lap 17 
times today, culminates at 
7.200 feet at the base of the 
Rocky Mountains. But after 
one look at tbe circuit, Sean 
Kelly said: “This is a tough 
course, even if it was at sea 
leveL” 


From John WBcodcson, Colorado Springs . - 
arrived here only Kelly are his compatriot. Ste- 

Rocbe, Francesco 


Kelly 

three days ago, giving him 
little lime to acclimatize. The 
Irishman, who could win his 
first world championship to- 
day, is working on the theory 
that you stay at altitude for 
two weeks to become fully 
adjusted to tbe thin air.- or for 
only two days and race before 
your body reacts to tbe change 
m conditions. - 
Among those who have 
been here for as short a time as 


phen 

Moser, of Italy, and foe two 
past two world champions. 
Claude Criquidion of Bel- 
gium and the Dutchman, Joop 
Zoetemelk. 

Until he contracted .flu on 
the last day ofthe recent Coors 
race, Greg LeMond, the Tour 
de France winner, was consid- 
ered foe near certainty to win 
for a second time toil, still 
suffering from the exertions of 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Admission 


earns ban 



Docks gift 


the past two months, he 
regards Steve- Bauer, of Can- 
ada. as a more likely winner. 

- Also holding strong cards 
are 1 Bernard Hinault, the for- 
mer (foampion. who is 
competing in his final world 
title race, and Moreno 
Argentin, ofltaly. 

The amateurs' 114-mile 
championship : tomorrow is 
most. likley to go to an fast 
European. Tbe favourites are 
foe' Soviet trio of Pyotr 
Ugrumov, ’Dmitri KOnysbev 
and Vladimir Pubrikov. and 
Oleg Ludwig. - 


Botje Salming, of the To- 
ronto Maple Leafs ke hockey 
team, has been suspended for 


the fust eight games of the 
National Hockey 


1986-87 . 

League (NHL) season after 
admitting be used cocaine 
several yean ago. 

The 35-year-old Salming, 
who is Swedish and for 13 
years a veteran defenceman, 
was quoted in a Toronto 
newspaper in May as saying 
that he used cocaine “five, six 
years ago but not since, and 1 
fed good about saying no" if 
offered the drug now. John 
Ziegler, the NHL president, 
said he had no choice but to 
penalize Salming who. he 
pointed out. could bave been 
suspended for the entire 
season. 


% f 



WHanden Sitting put 


Tbe Sports Council has 
made a £500,000 grant to 
finance in part tbe building of 
a new national indoor athlet- 
ics training centre in the 
former London docklands: It 
will be used towards tbe 
second phase of a £I6miltion 
four-lane project to develop 
the Olsen food which is due 
for completion, in April, 1988. 
The first phase has already 
been completed at a cost of 
£5.7miflion, funded by private 
and public sources.. John 
Smith, council- chairman, said 
Britain's recent successes in 
the European 1 athletics 
championships must pot lead 
to complacency. Trades must 
be provided. ’ 


Westminster 
laps of honour 


for Doyle 

DnffleM 


Swiss miss 


First game 


Over at last 


John Inchmore. trito has 
taken 5 10 first dass wickets in 
14 seasons, is to make a 
farewell appearance for 
Worcestershire in their John 
Player League match against 
Derbyshire at New 1 Road to- 
morrow. Inchmore. 37. retires 
at the end of foe season. 


Mats Wilander has can- 
celled his appearance at the 
$231,000 Swiss Open tour- 
nament starting today in Ge- 
neva because he is taking a 
two-month break after playing 
the United States Open, the 
organizers announced. The 
tournament, which nuts until 
September 14, is part of the 
Grand Prix circuit Wilander, 
the number two-ranked player 
in the world, lost in last year’s 
final to Tomas Sraid of 
Czechoslovakia. 


The volleyball season gets 
under way this evening with 
foe first match between Red- 
wood Lodge and Foloqta in 
the men's division one of the 
national volleyball league at 
the Redwood Lodge Country 
Cub. Bristol. Pokrnia, the 
current first division cham- 
pions, lost only one match last 
year. Redwood Lodge., who 
finished fifth . are a strong and 
well-knit side and it will be no 
pushover. The Royal Bank of 
Scotland are again sponsoring 
the national yofleybafl leaguc. 


ByDarid 

The marauding Australians 
anr likely to be in fine form 
when the KeDoggs City centre 
champkmsbip concludes in 
West minster tomorrow 
around a 60-lap one mile 
circuit which earlier m the day 
will , have pounded to the 
sound of nmners'sfeet- 

Aflan Peiper won last week 
in . Birmingham and Danny 
Clark m Glasgow mid both 
hold the record of there event 
successes in the Kellogg?. But 
seven days ago Clark’s Ever 
Ready , team colleague, Tony 
Doyle, won foe pursuit 
championship of the world 
and he will be riding too, 
Doyle will receive plenty of 
vocal support round tbe cir- 
cuit in this his first appearance 
■ in Britain since regaining the 
pursuit crown. 

The longer finishing straight 
-up Whitehall win be a distinct 
contrast to the short 150- 
xnetre sprints that have bees 
foe feature of both of foe six 
proceeding races in the series. 
It. will’ be the first time that a 


professional dosed circuit ey- 
the 


de race has been held m 
capital. - , 


Atkinson under 
pressure to buy 
time for United 


By Clive White 

The* could hardly have The dark clouds over OW 



been a less encouraging sight 
for Ron Atkinson, the deeply 
troubled Manchester United 

manager, than that of bis 
side's next opponents defeat- 
ing the champions, Liverpool, 
on Wednesday- Leicester 
City’s 2-1 victory has only 
added to the pressures mount- 
ing defeat by defeat upon foe 


Trafford have been gathering 
for some time. Since Novem- 
ber 2 last year United have 
won only 1 1 of 40 League and 
cup games. United s duuiK of 
fortune roughly coincided 
with foe loss of Robson 
through foe first of bis shoul- 
der injuries and, of course, he 
has yet to appear this season. 
For a dub with United s 


manager and his players, who For a c« 
go toRlbert Street today wifo wealth LJous^hat 

The changit^fortunes of such a (kgrecon P)?yer; 
fcxrfoallwere never better in«pMUye of tas ment In 


illustrated. This time last sea- 
son United on their way to a 
dub record of 10 successive 
league wins and in valiant 
pursuit of Tottenham 
Hotspur’s all-time record 
start. This season United, 
after three consecutive de- 
feats, are merely looking for a 
trace of self-respect rather 
than covering' themselves in 
glory. 

Last week's home game 
with newly-promoted 
Chariton Athletic gave them 
that opportunity but they 
muffed it Today they will face 
a Leicester ride renowned for 


mitigation it has to be said 
United were abnormally un- 
lucky with injuries and were 
forced to use 26 players as 


Manchester United's record in 
League, FA Cup, Milk Cup 
and Screen Sport Super Cap 
matches since November 9, 
1985 is: Played: 40; Won 11; 
Drawn 12; Lost 17. 


cheekily tripping up foe best if 
i. Last season they 


few others. — ~-j 

beat Manchester United >0 at 
Filbert Street Atkinson, 
expecting to face the sweeper 
system which defused Rush 
and Dalglish, has chosen the 
lively little Terry Gibson, who 
has only started in two L eague 
games for United, in an effort 
to find space dswhere. 

Surprisingly, Atkinson's 
only other deliberate player 
change is to recall to right bade 
Sivebaek, tbe Dane who has 
struggled so with the pace of 
the English game. Duxbury 
moves into midfield with 
Blackmore, the Welsh inter- 
national, the likely odd man 
out. Stapleton and Davenport 
dispute the role alongside 
Gibson. Atkinson will not 
name the team until after 
fitness test on Albiston, who is 
very doubtful with a groin 
injury. Hogg, whose league 
record was probably better 
than anyone’s at Old Trafford 
last season (12 winning 
appearances in 16), could win 
a place in a rejigged defence. 


against Liverpool's 18, which , 
was high by their standards. 

For a side with United's 
commitment to attack foey . 
did not score many goals and 
defensively foey began giving . 
them away once the attack lost 
its impetus. Hughes, with 
Barcelona on his. mind, was 
If rs s prolific than before and 
Stapleton inexcusably so. 
Davenport, bought for 
£575,000 from Nottingham 
Forest, has suffered from the 
same impotence that afflicted 
Birtles when be ventured from ' 
Forest into tbe jungle. Some 
players just cannot adapt to 
foe big stage. 

After United had beaten 
Everton in the FA Cup two 
years ago it was felt by foe 
board that they bad a team to 
challenge seriously for the. 
championship. Consequently, 
they spent most available, 
money on improving ground 
facilities. Atkinson, who was ; 
believed to be well short of 
Ipswich's valuation when bid- 
ding. for Butcher, will now 
have to sell before he can buy. 
Time, though, may be against 
him despite votes of con- 
fidence unless he can buy 
some today by sweeping 
Leicester aside. 


Tomorrow 


England’s match in 
Belfast is switched 


By Clive White 


England’s European 
championship match against 
Northern Ireland next month 
has been moved from Belfast 
to Wembley in order to avoid 
a potential dash between. En- 
glish and Scottish supporters. 
Scotland are playing foe 
Republic of Ireland on tbe 
same day, October 15, and 
there were fears that trouble 
could break out in both cap- 
itals while the supporters are 
in transit. England will now 
play foe Irish in Belfast on 
April 1 next year. 

Glen Kirton, an FA spokes- 
man, said; “English support- 


ers are likely to catch ferries to 
Dublin and travel north, while 
Scottish supporters will prob- 
ably take ferries to Belfast 
The FA have had to admit 
defeat, though, in their at- 
tempt to restrict foe move- 
ment of Leeds United 
supporters. They dedded yes- 
terday to lift foe all-ticket 
restriction on Leeds's away 
matches, at the request of the 
police and second division 
clubs, because the ban was 
proving ineffective. 
Huddersfield's home game 
against Leeds today remains 
ail-ticket. 


HORSE TRIALS 


Davidson a serious 
threat to Mrs Leng 



t 


® DANGER 

sorts 


By Jenny MacArthra- 



Virginia Leng. trying for a 
fourth successive victory, has 
taken over the lead at the 
Buigbley Remy Martin Horse 
Trials after an outstanding 
dressage test on foe eight-year- 
old Murphy Himself, owned 
by British National Life 
Assurance. 

She is separated by less than 
one point from the United 
States’ dual world champion, 
Bruce Davidson, who is riding 
his old favourite, JJ Babu. a 
horse he caOs “an ideal 
partner” for bis old age. 
Davidson, a perfectionist, was 
annoyed with himself for one 
or two small errors in his test, 
but with less than a point 
■between them and with his 12- 
year-okl gelding showing, 
when winning Gatcombc last 
month, that Ire is on top form, 
Davidson poses - a consid- 
erable threat to Mrs Leng. 

Richard Walker, riding with 
his usual flair is lying in third 
place on Mr Alan BirchalPs 
Accumulator— his score being 
boosted by high marks from 
Judy Bradwell one of foe three 
fees. Thursday’s overnight 
ider, Ros Be van, who would 
have been lying fourth, has 
had . to withdraw from - tbe 
event after her horse, Horton 
Venture strained a tendon on 
Thursday night. 

Despite Murphy Himself s 
inexperience — Burghfey is Ms 
biggest test to date — he was 
relaxed and totally attentive to 
his rider throughout 
yesterday’s test, unmoved by 
the crowds who had gathered 
in foe bright early morning 
sunlight to watch the 
favourite. 

Mrs Leng is particularly 
proud of Murphy’s progress. 
He is foe first horse she has 
chosen by herselfi without foe 
aid of her mother or trainer. 
She had read that a “four-year- . 
old blue roan" was for sale in 
Sussex andas she was passing 


the spot en route to a party 
given by her sponsors she 
derided to stop and take a 
look. 

Ian Stark, who was with 
Mrs Leng in foe team which 
won the gold medal at this 
year’s world championships, 
was lucky to get as high as fifth 
place with foe Edinburgh 
Woollen Mills* eight-year-old 
G Jen humic. Always a relaxed 
competitor. Stark had misread 
his starting time and thought 
he had 10 minutes in hand. In 
feet he had less than five and 
had to ride straight into the 
dressage arena without warm- 
ing up. He lost 10 valuable 
marks during foe first part of 
foe test white the astonished 
Gtenburoie got accustomed to 
befog in the dressage arena 
after his high-speed dash from 
. the stable. 

One of foe better tests came 
from Richard Meade on 
KilcasheL The 14-year-old 
griding, winner of foe team 
gold medal in the 1981 Euro- 
pean championships and 1982 
world championship and run- 
ner-up at Buighley m 1983, is 
making . a welcome return to 
foe eventing scene after two 
: years punctuated with minor 
injuries. 

Meade is just ahead of 
Michael Tucker. Treading on 
their, heels is Helen Ogden 
with foe ma gnificen t l7bb 
Streetlighter, a horse who will 
probably relish the cross- 
country more than he did the 
dressage. With Rodney Pow- 
eU. on Pomeroy, and Loma 
Clarke, on Myross, placed in 
the middle fifties foe con 
over 28-fence cross-country 
will be fierce.6. 
^ < S^i afterdr95Sa 9 B ) : 1. 

gfty Hfrnsetf (V Lsng)4£a 2, 

Babu ffi Davidson; US) 4§ 
Accumulator (R Walker) 4*6; 
Good Value (A Tucker) 48.4; 
Gtenbumto (i Stark) 504; .. 
KifasM{RMeade)5i:2:7 Genwal 
fugle (M Wert 53J2-8. 

jden)53.6. 


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