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No 62,559 



TIMES 


.WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 



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Political row 
after Bedford 
cuts 



By Edward Townsend and Richard Evans 

j£? ffi, S >sal,er ^ t ^ eover 

ous blow yesterday with the FnS^l3 in lv eT;buttliel S ks 
decision by Bedford, which is ’° undere ^ tbs year 


American-owned, to end all 
production of lorry and bus 
chassis in Britain with the loss 
of 1.450 jobs. 

The news which comes after 
Bedford’s decision in June to 
call for 1 ,700 voluntary redun- 
dancies, will reduce the 
workforce at the company’s 
Luton and Dunstable subsid- 
iaries in Bedfordshire to 4,1 50 
by the end of the year. 

With Bedford losing £! mil- 
lion a week, further measures 
were expected, but the severity 
of the new round of cuts last 
night threatened to create a 
renewed political storm over 
the previous abortive at- 
tempts by General Motors, 
which owns Bedford, to take 
over the Land-Rover Leyland 
subsidiary of the Rover 
Group. 

Mr Eric Fountain. General 
Motors' public affairs direc- 
tor. said: “The merger talks 
with Leyland earlier this year 
rave us an opportunity to 
form a very strong commer- 
cial base for Europe, but we 
lost that and that has caused 
the problem for us now”. 

when the talks with the 
Government broke down, he 
said, the company searched 
europe for another commer- 
cial vehicle manufacturing 
partner. “But unfortunately 
we could not find anyone 
suitable.” 

General Motors, began 


foundered this year when 
pressure from Tory backbench 
MPs forced the Government 
to withdraw Land-Rover from 
the sale. General Motors had 
hoped to phase out its ageing 
truck range and concentrate 
on the more modern Leyland 
vehicles. 



Mr Carlisle: ‘Blame lies 
with Opposition'. 

Yesterday, Mr Paul Tosch, 
Bedford’s chief executive and 
general manager; said the cuts 
decision had been reached 
with “the greatest reluctance” 
because toe company reo- 
ognized the impact on 
employees and the surround- 
ing community. 

Mr Tosch said that, with 
22,000 workers in 12 opera- 
tions throughout the country, 
built up over 60 yean. Gen- 
eral Motors had a continuing 
presence 'in and a heavy 
commitment to Britain. 


Union leaders last 
reacted angrily at GMs 
cision and accused the com- 
pany of starving Bedford of 
investment. Mass meetings 
are to be held today, but 
officials said they were not 
optimistic of persuading Gen- 
eral Motors to change its 
mind. 

The cuts win leave the 
Dunstable plant with about 
1.000 workers and Luton with 
3,ooa - 

Conservative MPS last night 
saw the decision as a vindica- 
tion of the Prime Minister's 
determined ' but unsuccessful 
attempt to push through die 
merger of General Motors and 
much of British Leyland. 

Mr John Carlisle, MP for 
Liiton, North, said: * “The 
blame ties directly at the door 
of Mr John Smith, the Oppo- 
sition spokesman on trade, 
whose relentless campaign to 
persuade the Government 
against the GM/BL merger 
has resulted in the decimation 
of the trade industry of this 
country. 

“I do not know how be can 
sleep at night. 

“Mr Paul Channoa, the 
Trade and Industry Secretary, 
must also take some 
responsibility because he per- 
suaded the Cabinet to block 
the merger”. 

Mr Smith last night de- 
fended his opposition to the 
proposed deal involving GM 
and BL. 


Tomorrow 


Cop of the 
North. 



Times Profile of 
James Anderton, 
Manchester’s 
controversial 
Chief Constable 


Fans face 
Heysel 
charges 





• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize was won by two 
readers yesterday. 
They share £12,000, 
treble the usual amount 
because there were 

no winners on two 
previous days. 

Details page 3. 

• Portfolio list, page 
25; rules and howto 
play, information 
service, page 20. 


Editor shot 

Setter. Jose Carrasco, inter- 
national editor of the Chilean 
magazine Andlisis who was 
arrested on Monday by men 
who said they were police, was 
found shot ten times in the 
head Army hope, page 7 

On This Day 

Benin, formerly Dahomey, 
was once a J perpetual 
disgrace of humanity*’ with its 
slave hunts from which me 
. captured were shipped to 
co astal villages for an export 
duty of 22s 6d Page 13 

Young money 

Clearing banks, building soci- 
eties and assurance companies 
are competing hard for the 
custom of students and 
children ' Pages 26 to 30 

Degree results 

Degrees awarded by the 
University of Glasgow are 
published today and tomor- 
row. Page 8 


jjwNwj 2-5 

Cncreos 6-8 

Appts 22 

Am 19 

%nHdnahs 

18 
21-25 
Okjh 2 

Own , 18 
CnvssunkUUO 
Dtey 12 


Fcsim* 

Leaders 

Letters 

Obituary 

Property 

Science 


10-12 
13 
13 
18 
14,15 
18 


Sport 35-38,40 
TtatfKMfC 2 
TV & Radio 39 
Unb«catirt 8 
Weather 20 


*0* 0 ft * 


Twenty-six British football 
supporters, linked to the 
Heysel Stadium disaster m 
Belgium last year were yes- 
terday formally accused of 
manslaughter at Bow Street 
magistrates court. 

Extradition warrants for the 
26 were signed at the court 
and today police will start 
making arrests. The support- 
ers, mostly from the Liverpool 
area, will be given police bail 

The warrants follow an 
investigation by Belgian po- 
lice and the serious crime 
squad on Merseyside into 
events during the European 
Cup Final last year when 38 
people died after Liverpool 
fens set upon Juventus 
supporters. 

Yesterday’s issue of war- 
rants is the first step in a long 
legal process before the 
supporters can be sent formal 
in Belgium , where a number 
of "supporters have been tried 
on incidents linked to the Oxp 
Final last year. Next , week 
dates will be set for the hearing 
of the evidence against the 
supporters. 

England's test, page 3 


Pretoria 
hangs 3 
men 


Jfeietjp&riF 

members of. .the 
banned African National Con- 
gress (ANQ were banged 
along with three other con- 
victed murderers in Pretoria 
Central Prison yesterday. 

Die controversial execu- 
tions created a furore and Mrs 
Coretta Scott King, widow of 
the late US civil rights leader. 
Dr Martin Luther King, can- 
celled a- meeting with Presi- 
dent Botha due to coincide 
with the hangings after pres- 
sure from black opponents of 
the Government. 

Dr Robert Runcie, the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, re- 
peated the Anglican Church's 
opposition to apartheid on his 
return to Britain yesterday 
from his first visit to Sonth 
Africa. . " 

The weekend visit was to 
attend a service enthroning 
Bishop Desmond Tutu as 
Archbishop of Cape Town and 
to make a stand against 
apartheid. 

Dr Runcie said he saw little 
hope for optimism for the 
future -and supported the case 
for escalating selective 
sanctions. Reports, page 5 


Lawson 
warning 
on pay 
rises 

By Edward Townsend 

The Government's aim of 
cutting income tax to 25 per 
cent will not be achieved 
unless pay rises are halved in 
the coming year, Mr Nigel 
Lawson, Chancellor of the 
Exchequer, said yesterday. 

Mr Lawson, issuing one of 
bis toughest warnings on the 
effects of what the Govern- 
ment sees as the main enemy 
in the fight to restore Britain’s 
international competitive- 
ness, said that wage increases 
must at least match or fell 
below the level of inflation. 

The Chancellor's pay warn- 
ing came as official fi gures. 
released by the Bank of En- 
gland, hit hopes of an early cut 
in . base- rates. A surge in 
borrowing by individuals, 
some of it reflecting the Au- 
gust new car sales boom, 
pushed up bank lending by 
£2.5 billion last month. 

There is concern at the Bank 
of England about the st re n gt h 
ofbank lending— it rose by £3 
billion in July and has av- 
eraged a record £2.3 billion 
over the past six months — 
which could signal an upturn 
in inflation. 

Mr Lawson, speaking to 
journalists in London, said 
inflation had been cut to 2.5 
percent and a'reduction in the 
rate of pay rises to 3 .5 per cent 
would be “a considerable 
improvement” 

Mr Lawson placed full 
responsibility for curbing pay 
on employers. Managements 
are no longer caught between 


Rate cut ruled out 


21 


powerful 

Govemm 


trade unions and 
ivemment income policies. 
He declined to set a pay norm 
either for public or private 
sector workers. 

But if pay rises did come 
down to the level of inflation, 
it would still enable living 
standards to rise because tax- 
ation would also be reduced. 

Details of the strong rise in 
bank lending came in the 
monthly money supply f _ 
dies, published by the Bank. of, 
TTwjgandy.. The- stetSag* 'M3 
money measure rose by r L2J 
percent in August, to L8.5 per 
cent, above its leveL a year 
earlier. This is wdl in excess of 
the official target range of 11 
to 15 percent. 

Sterling was steady against 
the dollar yesterday at $1.4870 
but lost ground against the 
European currencies, ftfefl 1.5 
pfennigs to DM3.0630 against 
the mark; and the sterling 
index fell 0.4 to 71.4. 

Mr Lawson also delivered a 
sideswipe -at the Labour 
Partyfs plans for creating one 
million jobs and the TUCs 
demand for a ; a national 
minimum wage. . The main 
economic problem firing foe 
country was that industryfs 
unit labour costs were higher 
than Britain's . main 
competitors. - 
In advance of the annual 
meeting of the International 
Monetary Fund in Wash- 
ington later this month, Mr 
Lawson said he was confident 
that the UK economy would 
see a resurgence .of growth; 
next year. The three per cent 
growth expected this year 
dearly would not be achieved 
hut 1987 would be better. 


American kidnapped in west Beirut 


From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

In one of the most ominous 
developments to have taken 
place in west Beirut since the 
arrival of the Syrian Army 
here two months ago. the 
extremist pro-Iranian Islamic 
Jihad movement yesterday 
kidnapped another American 
- only 100 yards from the 
Syrian Army’s intelligence 
headquarters. ' 

The victim .was Mr Frame _ 
Herbert Reed, the director of 
the new Lebanese Inter- 
national School who has lived 
in the Muslim sector of west 
Beirut for eight years. Appar- 
ently reassured by the pres- 
ence of the Syrian Army and 
the apparent end of kidnap 
attempts on foreigners here, 
he was blandly travelling to 


handle- the two men into the 
Volvo— the kidnappers strode 
a deeply embarrassing blow at 
the Syrians who had promised 
to’ end such abductions in west 
Beirut and focused American 
attention upon Lebanon ax the 
very moment when US public 
opinion is already angry at the 
Karachi airport murders. 

Islamic Jihad, which still 
holds three Americans captive - 
in Lebanon, issued a state- 
ment to a Western news 
agency in Beirut four hours 
after the kidnapping, claiming ■ 

. » that Mr Reed, who comes 

M* teed- Abducted near Malden in Massadm- 

Synan Army HQ setts and wbo is married to a 

play gplfurar ™ e Syrian woman, was ‘’a new . 
national airport wbemgmmiM for lfje aAr 

in a Volvo forced bis cnaut- The victim, the oxganiza- 

minute - the time it took to . Coatinwd on page 20, ad 8 




Miss Joanna Toff, a stewardess on the ill-fated jet, who told 
yesterday how she rescued passengers «nM the panic 

Brave air hostess 
praised at inquest 

By Peter Davenport 


A stewardess on the holiday 
jet in which 55 passengers and 
crew died at Manchester air- 
port last summer was praised 
for 


‘or her courage yesterday at 
the inquest on the victims. 

Miss Joanna Tof£ aged 27, 
who lost two of her colleagues 
when flames engulfed the 
British Airtours Boring 737 
after an engine explosion, told 
bow she helped to evacuate 
the jet 

Under questioning by the 
coroner the story ofberhmv- ...Mi 
^ry emerged. She resened 
small girl wfee’ was being, f 00 
train pled, pulled abto from a . 
melee Of passengers, dragged a 
man from his seat by his collar 
to push him down the escape 
chute, rescued an unconscious 
woman and finally crawled 
along the floor of the cabin in 
a six-inch air tunnel beneath 
clouds of black smoke to 
check for survivors. 

Mr Leonard Gorodkin, the 
coroner, said: “You acted 
magnificently on that day. It is 
dear- that a good number of 
the people who are alive today 
probably owe their lives to 
your actions." 

On the second day of the 
inquest at Manchester Town 
Hall 12 passengers also de- 
scribed the panic and confu- 
sion in the smoke- filled jeL 


Miss Toff said ihat the 
purser, Mr Arthur Bradbury, 
had difficulty trying to open 
the starboard front exit door 
to begin the evacuation after 
an order from the captain.He 
went instead to the port exit 
opened that door and de- 
ployed the escape chute. 

The inquest beard that the 
starboard door was then 
successfully opened and pas- 
senger? evacuated from both 
sides. ; 

Toff said the cabin 
ugbtibfr Initial expto- 
the port engine was a 
and therefore 
were told to remain 
sealed with safety belts fas- 
tened,; the correct procedure 
for such an incident 

However, the captain then 
used the public address system 
to order an evacuation from 
the starboard side. 

There was panic on board 
and a bottle-neck of pas- 
sengers built up in the aisle. 
Miss Toff said that she pulled 
a young boy from the group of 
passengers to start the escape 
flow. 

She finally escaped herself 
after a fireman yelled at her to 
jump. Once on the ground she 
revived an unconscious man 
who was lying in -the foam' 
sprayed from fire appliances. 

Full report, page 3 


Motorists face 
fixed penalties 
of £12 and £24 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


Drivers face a revolution in 
the enforcement of the traffic 
law with the introduction on 
October 1 of fixed penalty 
tickets for most offences. 

They range from spreding 
to lighting offences, haring an 
insecure load or carrying more 
than one passenger on a 
motorcycle — about 250 of- 
fences. of which 50 are endors- 
aUe. 

The Government is deter- 
mined that in future all tick- 
ets. including those for 
parking, will be enforced. That 
is expreied to have dramatic 
effect in London. 

If tickets for offences are 
ignored, the penalty will be 
increased by 50 per cem. The 
sum outstanding will be 
“registered" in the driver’s 
local court which means it 
will be treated just like a fine, 
with the court able to use its 
powers to ensure payment. 

A ticket will cost £12 for a 
non-endorsable offence and 
£24 for an endonsable offence. 

The latter offences are those 
for which the driving licence 
will be endorsed with penalty 
points, their number depend- 
ing on the offence. A total of 
12 penalty points normally 
brings disqualification from 
driving. 

Among the endorsable of- 
fences canying three points, 
for which a £24 ticket could be 
issued, will be the following: 

• Speeding (though the court 
remains an option for bad 
cases); 

• Driving a vehicle in a 
dangerous or defective 
condition: 

• Motorway offences such as 
reversing or stopping in the 
carriageway: 

• Contravening a constable or 
warden on traffic duty: 

• Contravening an automatic 
level crossing. 


lfa motorist receives a fixed 
penally he or she will have the 
choice of paying within 28 
days or contesting the case in 
court 

The purpose of fixed pen- 
alties is to save lime and 
money in handling over six 
million of the less serious 
motoring offences a year, tints 
enabling other criminal of- 
fences to be dealt with 
promptly. 

The number of fixed pen- 
alty notices issued in 1984 was 
4.2 million, most for parking 
and wailing offences. 

In the case of fixed penalty 
notices, the police will deride 
whether to warn, give a ticket 
or prosccute.Only a police 
officer will have the discretion 

Legal change page 2 

to issue the new fixed penalty 
notices. Traffic wardens will 
continue to deal with parking 

The Home Office says it is 
not a more towards the 
continental system of on-the- 
spot fine but adding to tile 
options available to the police, 
who retain the right to pros- 
ecute in all serious cases. 

The RAC and AA gave a 
broad welcome to the scheme 
but the AA thought the new 
system would be complicated 
and confusing for many driv- 
ers and could also lead to 
police Kiting tougher with 
minor offences. 

Mr John Over, Chief Con- 
stable of Gwent and secretary 
of the Traffic Committee of 
the Association of Chief Po- 
lice Officers, thought warnings 
should be given for the same 
sort of behaviour as in the 
past: dangerousness should be 
prosecuted as at present and 
for the offences in between the 
fixed penalty ticket would be 
suitable. • 


Reagan spy case 
warning ignored 




From Christopher Walker, Moscow 

A warning about the im- 


The Soviet authorities yes- 
terday ignored President 
agon's warning that a fail- 
ure to release the imprisoned 
US journalist Mr Nicholas 
Daniloff would become a 
major obstacle to US Soviet 
relations, and chose instead to 
accuse Washington of using 
the ten-day affair as a pretext 
for avoiding talks on arms 
controL 

The uncompromising tone 
of the response, and the 
Kremlin's continued insis- 
tence that Mr Daniloff was 
caught “red-handed” in the 
act of spying, increased con- 
cern .among .Western dip- 
lomats that the incident will 
have serious repercussions for 
the chances of a second super- 
power sumit this year. 


plications was passed out of 
his cell by Mr Daniloff. who 
told his wife to inform report-' 
era of his concern that if his 
case was not resolved quickly, 
it could torpedo both the 
summit and the whole at-' 
mosphere of US-Soviet 
relations. 

Mrs Ruth Daniloff said that 
her husband had been interro- 
gated for a total of 28 hoc 
since his arrest on August 3 
“He said that the same thin* 
could happen to any one of 
you," she told Western report- 
ers being closely observed by 
KGB agents who had sealed 
off the street near the prison 
where Mr Daniloff is held. 

A five-page commentary 

Continued on page 20, col 6 


Gatting spells out 
terms to Botham 


Mike Gattrng, the 
cricket captain, has spell out 
the conditions under which 
Tan' Botham was picked to 
tour Australia with the squad 
announced yesterday. 

He bad sought and received 
assurances that the Somerset 
all-rounder would “conform 
with our set-up” and maintain 
satisfactory Conduct, on and 
off the field. 

Botham had managed this 
“magnificently" in the last 
Test match against New Zea- 
land. be added. Ganing had. 
previously told him that “ifhe 
didn’t like die arrangements,- 
we would have to manage 
without him". • 

The tour management is to 
fey down a tour polity that 
“projects the English game of 
cricket in the right way”, said 
The tour’s assistant manager, 
Micky Stewart. He accepted a 
special responsibility to en- 
sure firm control after- criti- 
cisms of England's conduct 
during the West Indian tour 
last winter. 


By Rani Martin 
d 


All training and net sessions 
would be compulsory, the tour 
manager, Peter Lush, said, but 
there would be no set bed- 
times, on the grounds that 
“they are grown men who 
have 'different sleeping 
habits”. Mr Lush added that 
the handling of Botham was 
“a matter that will be dealt 
with privately — between the 
management team and the 
player himself." 

Gatting said all players 
would be treated equally and 
“I am confident they will all 
be sensible”. 



occupied making inquiries of a large aircraft .the jet was 
airline officials. The boy, sens- immediately declared unfit to. 
mg a brief opportunity., for proceed, and its 400 pas- 
freedom and curiosity, scam- sengers had to be found hotel 
pered off and began to play accommodation in the Shao- 
with the controls of - the non area • • 

afttmd^ ihe nfovable A spokesman for Northwest 

way which is positioned oy tne 0,^.^ “We had to bring 
aircraft door to allow- pas- ttoce engitieers from the 
sengers to disembark. - ^United States, who sealed the 
What happened next atThd door. For safety reasons we 
airport near limerick on Sun- could not let the 
from Prestwick day evening can only be tinue umB ? evejyihiDE was m 
i ,r c n “3 .o New York, gue ssed M. tnan appeal? - Enter. agSaniagelSB tea 

the bov»r«sed the tip out- . 
ton; twPridge shot upwards, 
caught ‘fee aircraft's open a 

main door. ‘ and made a . T ‘v-- ‘;; r n . l T - n - 

considerable mess of it- The pasS^rawpto-miie to 

As properlv Suing dooraare, continue lnar journey _ on 
essential to the safe progress of Monday night, and yesterday 


By Ahui Hamilton 
\ child’s natural compul- 
sion w press butlons ■■?2 
fiddle with levers sanded 
400 passengers at ShmtoWJ 
Airport in Ireland and caused 
Climated £50a000wmjh 

of damage to a Boeing 747 

a *The boy, an American, aged 
eight was travelling 
father an a Northwtsi Orient 


made its 

Star call at 
Hmv-free shopping and pas-. 
dul> relearahee for entry into 
tailed States. ; 

the pair dis- 
ihe rather was 


could not let the plane con- 
jnue unljjei 

"amagehas 
£500,000. and 
y for who pajs is 
rfo^egotiation:” 


ability 


sen 
the 
When 
embarked. 


various authorities were busy 
disclaiming responsibility. 

The Irish Airports Anthor- 
iry admitted 1 that it owiied the 
■; airbridge, but said that it was 
operated and maintained by 
Aer Lingus, the Irish 
Republic's national airline: ' 
But a- spokesman for Aer 
Lingus retorted: “As fir as we 
are concerned it is a matter 
.between - Northwest Orient 
and the airport authority.” 

..The- airline and the airport 
' authority are now conducting 
their owii internal inquiries to 
discover, how. the incident was 
allowed to happen. The small 
boy iS;beKeved to be safely at 
home in New York. 




- The previous tour ma n age r . 
Tray ‘ Brown, was sceptical 
thai tour rules would cure all 
the.ifls- “You cannot make a 
rule to punish a bad attitude,” 
hesaid. 

' England’s tour party in- 
cludes three new caps — Philip 
de Freitas and James 
Whitaker, of Leicestershire, 
and the Suney wicket-keeper. 
Jack Richards. 

- Tom party reports, page 40 

Resignation 
pufe Kasparov] 
2 games clear 

Anatoly Karpov, toe chal- 
lenger in the world chess 
championship in Leningrad, 
decided overnight that his 
position in ■ the, fourteenth 
garnet adjourned on Monday, 
was hopeless. 

His resignation yesterday 
gave. Gary Kasparov, the 
champion, an 8-6. 

Kasparov now needs only 
four points from the remain- 
ing! 0 games to keep his.titie. 

The fourteenth game has 
been widely praised as the 
most profound strategic. 
achievement of the match so 
far. 

' Details, page 2 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


SDP warned 
by Liberals 
not to rock 
nuclear boat 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 

Liberal leaders are giving Wallace, the Liberal defence 
warning that the careful efforts spokesman, will move that the 


to resolve the differences with .policy be changed to stop the 
their Alliance partners over deployment of new missiles 


nuclear defence could be se- 
verely set back if Dr David 
Owen and the SDP takes too 
aggressive a line at its con- 
ference next week over the 


but. crucially, to allow those 
missiles already in Britain to 
remain. 

Although the change win be 
bitterly opposed by the Liberal 



f v 

<*.:y«VxV iF 


pfe itliPSli 


future of the Polaris nuclear J an *J olher ‘ 


deterrent. 


activists. Mr 


oups of 
is fairly 


Concessions which the Lib- confident that he can carry the 
erals have already made oyer ^ 


WPC Carol Andrews standing between banner-waving protesters and the Saadi Arabian Embassy in London 

yesterday (Photograph: Harry Kerr). ^ 

Libyan protesters back on the streets 


the deployment of cruise mis- 
siles. in an attempt to move 


However, it was pointed out 


nearer to the SDP, could be yestwday. Liberals wiU be less 
overturned if it appears that inclined to back the change if 


By David Sapsted 
yan opponents of the 


wards a compromise on 
Polaris. 

The implied threat was 
being made privately yes- 
terday by several senior Lib- 
eral figures close to Mr David 
Steel, as it was confirmed that 
the Liberal assembly, in two 
weeks, will be asked to change 
the party's policy on defence 
to enable cruise missiles al- 
ready stationed in Britain to 
remain. 

Mr Steel was defeated on 
the issue in 1984 when the 
assembly voted for the re- 
moval of all cruise missiles, a 
decision which angered the 
SDP. 

Lasi year Mr Steel put 
forward the proposal that 
those cruise missiles already 
stationed in Britain should be 
allowed to remain, and in an 
astonishing about-turn. Mr 
Paddy Ashdown, the MP for 
Yeovil who led the revolt 
against Mr Steel in 1984, went 
to the SDP conference and 
announced that he supported 
the change. 

Nuclear defence was kept 
off the Libera] assembly 
agenda last year, but in East- 
bourne in two weeks Mr Jim 


Journalist Pay rise 
has appeal angers 

rejected miners 

Mr Clifford Longley, a By D»vid Cross 

journalist on The Times, Leaders of the National 
failed in his Court of Afipeal Union of Mioewprkers' 
attempt yesterday to prevent 13,600 members in South 
union disciplinary proceed- Wales yesterday reacted an- 
ings being taken against him. grily to British Coal's offer to 
The appeal coincided with pay them an immediate £8 a 
the third day of talks aimed at week wage rise by refusing to 
resolving the eight-month dis- call off a five-week-old over- 
pute between News Inter- time ban. 
national and the prim unions. Mr Les Outfield, the local 

The three appeal judges, NUM leader, said his mem- 
Lord Justice Nourse, Lord bers were furious at the de- 
Justice Ralph Gibson and cision by Sir Robert Haslam. 
Lord Justice Woolf, unani- the new chairman, not to 
mously dismissed his appeal backdate the increase for min- 
against the High Court de- ers who took part in the year- 
rision to refuse him an injunc- long strike. “We will keep up 
lion against the National our ban until the money which 
Union of Journalists. we have been denied is 

The judges will give their agreed.” 
full reasons on Friday. Mr Dutfield, an ardent sup- 

Mr Longley, the Religious porter of Mr Arthur Scaigill, 
Affairs Correspondent of The NUM president, said that be 
Times and an NUJ member believed the union’s support- 


y ester day. Liberals will be less Gadam regime yesterday 

' " n inclined to back the change if staged their first demoustra- 

Dr' OwetTand his^ colleagues the wrong message on Polaris turn outside a London embassy 
are unprepared to work to- comes from the SDP Harro- since Woman Police Con- 
k gate conference . stable Yvonne Fletcher was 

The parties' differences on shot dead more than two years 
the independent deterrent re- *8®- - 

mained unresolved by the About fifty demonstrators, 
work of the joint commission many of them hiding their 
on defence, which sat for 18 &ces behu,d scarves and bala-. 

months. It reached a com- 

promise which left open the '|7 1 vrnlc nf 
question of whether Polaris ivVIl^ fJJL 
should be replaced, but Dr » 

Owen promptly angered the I O \ 

Liberals, and many of his own JLAV-fi. ILF 

colleagues, by restating his i . ■* . 

commitment to the principle npi TOllOrtlT 
of an independent deterrenL 

Dr Owen and Mr John Cart- By Kichanl Ford 
wrighL the SDP defence rucniun rum 

spokesman, have constantly A directive from the Irish 
made dear that they have Republic's education minister , 
been advocating SDP policy, Edging teachers to lecture pe- 
as agreed last year at Torquay. pB® on the “evils of die IRA” 

Thai staled that' “the Soda! 

Democrats would not aban- tSSS^uniiSr^ 
don Britain s existing nuclear Mr Patrick Coouev a senior 

replace Polans . scribed the IRA as the “most 

At Harrogate on Sunday the appalling bunch of hoodlums” 
SDP will be debating a motion who were not within the 
from its policy committee political process, 
which reaffirms the Torquay Mr Cooney said that aware- 
policy. but at the same time ness of the IRA was probably 
welcomes the joint hi g h among most pupils in 
commission's report as a secondary schools, but be- 
contri billion. cause it had been around for so 

long people were inclined to 

T| •_ _ forget the sheer horror per- 

' K2 Y riSe petrated by the organization. 

J But the controversy in- 

OflfTDrC dkates how delicate is the 

illlEvi Ij teaching of history on both 

sides of the border, with die 
minors different interpretations of 
R Ma IIl vl 3 events leading to the fouuidiiqg 

taSS. ^ **' 

Leaders of the National Leaders of Provisional Sinn 
Union of Minewprkers' Fein, the political win« of the 
13,(500 members- in South Provisional IRA, argue Oat 
Wales yesterday reacted an- they; are inheritors ®f!a ira- 
grily to British Coal's offer to ditiou'that led to th# 1916 


on Sate conference . 

The parties' differences on 
ras the independent deterrent re- 
es- mained unresolved by the 
ib- work of the joint commission 
rid on defence, which sat for 18 
iat months. It reached a com- 
*o promise which left open the 
ige question of whether Polaris 
tee should be replaced, but Dr 
aI - Owen promptly angered the 
to Liberals, and many of his own 
colleagues, by restating his 
on commitment to the principle 
he of an independent deterrenL 
re- Dr Owen and Mr John Cart- 
. a wrighL the SDP defence 
he spokesman, have constantly 
made dear that they have 
tut been advocating SDP policy, 
>ai as agreed last year at Torquay. 

^ That staled that “the Social 
an Democrats would not aban- 
Ar don Britain's existing nuclear 
- or capability and are willing to 
jIt replace Polaris”. 

nt At Harrogate on Sunday the 
id SDP will be debating a motion 
id from its policy committee 
which reaffirms the Torquay 
pt policy, but at the same time 
ly welcomes the joint 
st- commission's report as a 
m contribution. 


davas, chanted anfi-Gadaffi 
slogans outside the embassy in 
Betgrave Square of Saudi Ara- 
bia, which now represents 
Libyan interests in Britum. 

The organizers of the 
demonstration, the National 
Front for the Salvation of 
Libya, last took to the streets 
on April 17, 1984, for a 
demonstration outside the Lib- 
yan People's Bureau in St 
James's Square. WPC 


Fletcher was killed by an 
unknown gunman who fired 
from inside the building. 

Another policewoman. Miss 
Carol Andrews, was on duty 
yesterday, standing between 
the protesters and the em- 
bassy, just as Miss Fletcher 
did. The demonstration passed 
off without incident. 

The protesters, many of 
them students, chanted slo- 
gans in Arabic and English. 


Bedford track job cuts 


GM shake-up spelt trouble 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 
The writing was on the wall the culmination of a process GM refused and on the 


pay them an immediate £8 a 
week wage rise by refusing to 
call off a five-week-old over- 
time ban. 

Mr Les Dutfield, the local 
NUM leader, said his mem- 
bers were furious at the de- 
cision by Sir Robert Haslam, 
the new chairman, not to 
backdate the increase for min- 
ers who took part in the year- 
long strike. “We will keep up 
our ban until the money which 
we have been denied is 
agreed." 

Mr Dutfield, an ardent sup- 
porter of Mr Arthur Scaigill, 
NUM presidenu said that he 


for 25 years, disobeyed a 
union instruction not to work 
at News International’s plant 
or cross picket lines. 

He said that while the 
union's national executive 
committee decided not to rake 
disciplinary action against 
members who disobeyed 
instructions and continued to 
work at Wapping. a complaint 
had been made by an individ- 
ual member against four 
FOCs. including Mr Longley. 

No final agreement was 
expected to be reached last 
night between News Inter- 
national and the prim unions 
and it is likely that they will 
hold further meetings at a later 
date. 

The talks, being held at the 
offices of the Advisory 
Conciliation and Arbitration 
Service, revolve around in- 
creased compensation, jobs 
for dismissed workers and 
recognition for traditional 
print unions within the 
company's plant in east 
London.' 


ers in other coalfields would 
read equally strongly because 
they also thought that they 
had been deprived of tbeir 
“just rewards”. 

British Coal said that the 
overtime ban, which had cost 
about £1 million, was causing 
“self-inflicted” wounds. It was 
damaging miners’ earnings 
and harming the coalfield's 
recovery programme and fu- 
ture prospects. 

• About 12.000 miners in Co 
Durham could be thrown into 
conflict with British Coal if a 
disputed pit closure went 
ahead. Mr David Guy. the 
union's area president said 
yesterday. The coal board 
plans to cease operations in 
the Seaham area with ensuing 
redundancies and transfers of 
men. 

• British Coal announced the 
closure yesterday of Comric 
colliery in Fife, where produc- 
tion was hailed two years ago 
after a main roof fell at the pi l 

British Coal said that there 
would be no compulsory 
redundancies. 


rising and . the fight ftp the 
independence of the ' Irish 
Republic. 

Mr Cooney's advice to pri- 
mary schools was part of a 
circular on the International 
Year of Peace. It said teachers 
should promote the ideas of 
international co-operation, 
harmony and peace. 

As criticism grew of his 
comments, Mr Cooney said be 
was horrified and that it was 
time to “stop pussy-footing 
around” and tell pupils the 
IRA was an evil organization : 
whose aims included the over- 
throw of the republic's con- 
stitution. 

But teachers' organizations 
believe the circular will 
encourage a revival of Pro- 
visional IRA sympathies 
within schools. 

The teaching of history on 
both sides of the border has 
developed along similar lines 
during the past 20 years, with 
greater emphasis on themes, 
European and US history 
rather than on dates and 
purely domestic events. 

In Roman Catholic and 
Protestant schools in the 
North teaching emphasizes 
the interdependence of the 
British Ides. 

The Irish National Teach- 
ers Organization said that 
history was always a delicate 
matter. “It is not so long ago 
that Robert Mugabe was a 
terrorist,” 

• Sinn Fein's leader in 
Londonderry, Mr Martin 
McGninness. was released 
from custody yesterday after a 
£80 fine for assaulting a police 
officer was paid anonymously 
on his behalf (the Press 
Association reports). 


for Bedford-General Motors' 
UK truck business-from 
early this year, when the 
American corporation began a 
shake-up of its European op- 
erations that clearly was de- 
signed to weed out the loss- 
makers. 

With the European truck 
industry suffering from over 
capacity which some observ- 
ers put as high as 25 per cent, 
and Bedford badly in need of 
new investment and new 
models, it became obvious to 
union leaders and ministers 
that the “crunch” had arrived. 

In March, GM announced 
that its net losses in Europe 
from its Opel subsidiary in 
West Germany and VauxhaD 
and Bedford operations in 
Britain had risen from 
£198 million in 1984 to 
£253 million. 

More significantly. GM*s 
indebtedness in Europe, plus 
other liabilities, amounted to 
S765.7 million (£517 mil- 
lion). Meanwhile. Ford was 
increasing its profits in 
Europe. 

GM executives, mindful of 
a previous decision to use 
Britain as the company's 
European truck headquarters, 
derided to make a bid for 
Leyland, the commercial ve- 
hicles subsidiary of BL. It was 


that began in 1984 when talk 
of cooperation between Bed- 
ford and leyland had led to 
consideration of a merger. 

By the summer of 1985, a 
plan had been formed to 
replace Bedford’s heavy truck 
range with Ley land’s newer 
models. GM thought that the 
Freight Rover business was 
especially. attractive, particu- 
larly as Ley land's Sheipa vans 
and Bedford vans were soon 
to be in need of replacement 
and because it would be 
possible to combine invest- 
ment costs. 

Knowing that the Govern- 
ment was keen to privatize as 
much of BL as possible, GM 
slapped in a bid for Leyland 
and Land-Rover combined — 
a move that was to prove fetal 
for the negotiations. 

By March 18, it was clear 
that the BL board preferred 
the GM bid to any other, but 
within a few days the talks 
were in difficulty. 

Strong pressure from Mid- 
lands ministers and Conser- 
vative MPs opposed to a US 
takeover of Land-Rover 
forced Mr Paul Channon, 
Secretary of State for Trade 
and Industry, to seek a com- 
promise deal, with GM not 
assuming fuD control of Land- 
Rover Leyland. 

fixed penalties 


night of Friday, March 21, the 
Government withdrew Land- 
Rover from the auction. 

The previous month, Mr 
Bob Price, executive vice 
president of GWs overseas 
group, had warned of the 
inevitable .consolidation that 
would occur, if the bid was 
successful and hinted that 
Bedford would be in dire 
straits if the bid foiled. 

Mr Price, having unsuccess- 
fully scoured Europe for a 
partner, had derided that a 
merger in Britain was the best 
way of ensuring a strong 
commercial vehicle base. 

By June, MPs were fully 
expecting an announcement 
of redundancies and possible’ 
closures and Bedford warned 
of the need for “drastic 
action”. On June 23, it an- 
nounced 1,700 voluntary 
redudanries from the 7,200 
workforce, 

Bedford's fete was signalled 
in a recent report from DRI 
Europe, the forecasting group, 
which said that Europe’s 
small, independent truck 
makers would continue to be 
vulnerable. Companies such 
as Bedford. Leyland and 
ENASA pf Spain were strate-- 
gjcally ill-equipped to cope 
with expected rise in demand 
for trucks. 


Revolution in motoring law 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 



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The change in the law on 
October 1 which will revolu- 
tionize the handling of traffic 
offences by the criminal jus- 
tice system will have the 
biggest impact on motorists 
since the breathalyser lesL 

For the first time, the of 
“conviction by inertia” will be 
brought into the English legal 
system, in that motorists rail- 
ing to respond to the new fixed 
penalty notices may be pre- 
sumed to be guilty and be 
convicted without benefit of 
any court hearing. 

Under the new provisions, 
contained in the Transport 
AcL 1982. the number of road 
traffic offences covered by the 
fixed penalty procedure will 
be widened beyond parking 
offences and will for the first 
time cover endorsable 
offences. 

The Act will also introduce 
radical changes in the way that 
fixed penalties are enforced. 
The police will have the 
power, when a fixed penalty is 
not paid, to increase it by half 
as much again. 

Mr James Mathers, a solic- 
itor. and author of The Motor- 
ists Guide to the Law, said 
yesterday that the new system 
had advantages and 
disadvantages. 

"The motorist who pays the 
penally within the time limit 
could escape with less to pay 
than if taken before the courts, 
where the offence is an endors- 
able one such as speeding. But 
there are disadvantages for 
any motorist who wants to 
argue the toss.” 

The system introduces a 
financial deterrent to the. 
motorist who wants to dispute 
whether, for instance, he 


TRANSPORT ACT 1982 

Summary of endorsable 
fixed penalty offences 

Category Pt* 

Learner driven! 

Unaccompanied 2 

With unqualified passenger 2 

No L plates 2 

Towing trailer 2 

Defective vehicle contition: 

Tyres 3 

Brakes 3 

Steering 3 

Dangerous parts 3 

U ns uilabl e/dange rous use 3 


Exceeding limits 3 

Motorway offences: 

Use by excluded traffic 3 

Stopping on carriageway 3 

Reversing 3 

Central reservation/verge use 3 

Driving on hard shoulder 3 

Prohibited traffic in offside lane 3 

Driving in wrong direction 3 

U-turn 3 

Neglect of Traffic Directions: 
Contravening: 

Red light 3 

Stop sign 3 

Automatic level crossing 3 

Doubta wtrtra lines 3 

Traffic duty instructions 3 

No entry sign 3 

Neglect of Pedestrian Rights: 

Drive in designated play area 2 

Stop in zebra crossing area 3 

Stop in peHcan crossing area 3 

Obstruction: 

Vehicle m dangerous position 3 

Loads: 

Dangerous 3 

Insecure 3 

Mo t orcy c l e s: 

More than one passenger f 

Passenger not sitting astride 1 

crossed traffic lights on red or 
amber. 

If he derides not to pay the 
fixed penalty but to go to 
court, and is then convicted, 
he will fece not just the usual 
fine imposed by magistrates, 
as at present, but also the 


prosecution's costs. That 
could a amount to a further 
£60 or £70. 

Under the system, there is 
also provision for making car 
owners liable for minor pen- 
alties incurred by drivers of 
their vehicles if the police are 
unable to find the offender. 
That could lead to injustice, 
Mr Mather said. 

The new system is aimed at 
relieving magistrates' courts 
of much routine traffic work 
and could — according to Mr 
C.E BazeU, clerk to the 1 
Tynedale justices — dear the 
way for the Government to 
transfer some Crown court 
business to magistrates' courts 
in the Criminal Justice BilL 

Even though the vast major- 
ity of the lift million motoring 
offences prosecuted annually 
are dealt with by post and a 
guilty' -plea, the courts are 
under considerable strain cop- 
ing with the paper work. 

The new system is also 
aimed at encouraging motor- 
ists to pay more promptly for 
tbeir mistakes. It is estimated 
that of the 4 'A million parking 
tickets issued each year, only 
1% million are paid. 

“What is new for the or- 
dinary motorist who finds he 
has a parking ticket”, Mr 
Mathers said, “is that be must 
pay within 21 days or find the 
penalty increased to £1 8. 

“If he still foils to pay, the 
courts may issue a warrant for 
his arrest and he could fold 
himself before the court, 
obliged to give a good reason 
why he should not face 
im prison mcnL That is not 
something the ordinary mot- 
orist usually contemplates 
when parking illegally.” 


. . f 

World Chess Championships 

Karpov yields and 
slips to 8-6 deficit 

By Raymond Keene, Chess Correspondent 


10> 

& 


branding Colonel Gadaffi a 

terrorist and a murderer and 
handed in a letter demanding 
that the Saudis should end 
tbeir diplomatic representa- 
tion of Libya in Britan. 

The front, which has its 
headquarters in Chicago, is 
based mainly on university 
campuses in Britain. It urges 
the overthrow of Colonel 
Gadaffi and the establishment 
of democratic rale in Libya 


The challenger Anatoly 
Karpov came to the conclu- 
sion overnight that his po- 
sition in the fdfouroed 
fourteenth game of his title 
match with Gary Kasparov 
was hopeless. . 

At 10am Leningrad time 
yesterday rumours were rife 
that Karpov would resign 
without resumption. At '4pm 
Karpov’s resignation was an- 
nounced. 

The result brings the score 
in the 24-game senes to 8-6 in 
fovour of Kasparov, who 
needs only four points from 10 
games to keep his title. 

During the pause for 
adjournment experts assem- 
bled in Leningrad had reached 
the view that Karpov would 
probably abandon the game 
without appearing for a use- 
less struggle. . 

Grandmaster Yun Aver- 
bach, the world’s leading ex- 
pert on chess endgames, 
sounded the death knell for 
Karpov's position when he 
pronounced that black was 
helpless. 

The game has been widely 
praised as the most profound 
strategic achievement of the 
match so for. 

Some experts have even 
described it as the most cor- 
rect win Kasparov has ever 
managed against Karpov. 

This game brought back 
memories of Bobby Fischer at 
his best. Observers were im- 
pressed by the apparent ease 
with which Kasparov rewrote 
hallowed strategic precepts. 

The opening, the first Ruy 
Lopez of the championship, 
led to extremely complex play. 
Karpov seemed surprised by 
Kasparov’s twenty-second 
move, whereby the champion 
declined a pawn sacrifice that 


evidently hod been prepared 
by Karpov. 

The subsequent manoeu- 
vres by both players virtually 
defied comprehension. In 
particular, the toing and froing 
of White’s Rook left, experts . 
baffled. 

White's Rook manoeuvres ', 
also seem to have baffl ed _ 
Karpov, and in a time scram- ’ 
ble. in the dying minutes of. 
the first session, he blundered 
with 31... Q d6. That move’., 
permitted Kasparov to play an . 
exchanging combination'’ 

which led by force to an^ 

advantageous ending. 

Kasparov (White) 

t e4 e5 21 Bxd3 cxd3 ■ 

2 M3 Nc6 22 BU2 Qs5 1 

3 BbS a6 23 NS Ne5 • 

4 Ba4 Nffi 24 Bxb 5 dxs5 r 

5 (HI Be7 25 Nb3 QbS , . 

6 Rat to 26QwJ3 RaB 

7 Bb3 (16 27 Rcl q6 „ 


1 

e4 

e5 

2 

m 

Nc6 

3 

BbS 

a6 

4 

Ba4 

W6 

5 

0-0 

Be7 

6 

Rat 

to 

7 

8b3 

06 

8 

c3 

0-0 

9 

h3 

8b7 

10 

d4 

ReB 

11 

NM2 

BB 

12 

a4 

M 

13 

Bc2 

8x44 

14 

cxd4 

NM 

15 

Bbl 

g5 

16 

d5 

Nd7 

17 

Ra3 

04 

IB 

axbS 

axto 

19 

Nd4 

Rxa3 

2D 

bxa3 

Nd3 


28 Ne3 8xa3 

29 flat Ra4 

30 Ng4 Bffi 

31 Rcl Qd6 
32NC5 Rc4 

33 Rxc4 tttc4 

34 Nxb7 cxd3 
35Nw» Bxd6 
36 KH Kg7 
3713 f? 


Game adjourned 





Geoffrey Smith 


When a particular, reform 
attracts the support of NeO 
Kianock; the two Davids; the 
first head of Mrs Thatcher’s 
Policy Unit, Sir John 
Hoskyns; and the Treasury 
and Civil Service Select 
Committee, something un- 
usual is happening. Either this 
is an idea whose time is come 
or it is a fashionable notion 
which needs to be examined a 
little more dosely before it is 
pot into practice. 

An adaptation of the French 
cabinet system for British 
ministers was the centrepiece 
of a paper which Sir John 
presented to a seminar on 
Monday at the Institute of 
Directors on overhauling die 
machinery of government 

The, attractions of the pro- 
posal are dear. It offers 
ministers the prospect of a 
high-powered policy unit com- 
posed of outside experts, 
political appointees and the 
more dynamic Civil Servants; 
it is reputed to work well in 
France; and it is a bold 
response to a genuine problem. 

Ministers need 
better advice 


British ministers do need 
readier access to a wider range 
of advice and experience than 
is available among the estab- 
lished Civil Servants in tbeir 
departments. They need alter- 
native expat opinions on the 
work of the department, better 
briefing on proposals from 
other ministers and to be kept 
more dosely in tonch with 
party and political opinion. 

But, to my surprise and 
approval, this seminar of poli- 
ticians, Civil Servants, 
academics and commentators 
was not persuaded that such a 
formal arrangement would be 
wise. 

There are two principal 
reasons why a more flexible 
approach wonM seem better. 
Hie key objection is that the 
number of outsiders with the 
necessary qualifications who 
are ready to do a stint In 
government is not unlimited. 
We do not have the same 
professional culture as in the 


Aircraft ban for Tories 

By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 


United States where the in- 
and-outer, the person who 
moves readily between govern- 
ment and academic or business 
life or one of the professions, is 
a familiar figure. 

It is no nse basing hard 
proposals on unsubstantiated 
hopes. As it is, not all min- 
isters have found it easy to 
attract special advisers of the 
right calibre. To set up policy 
units which would require the 
recruitment of many more 
outsiders, without knowing 
where they would come from, 
might simply had to a 
proliferation of the second 
class. 

Also the more formal a new 
arrangement the more likely it 
wonM be to provoke conflict, 
with the established Civil 
Service. There are some who 
would disregard this consid- 
eration because they would 
prefer all the principal posts iu 
a department to be filled by 
political appointees, as in foe 
United States. 


Positive sign 
of imagination 


But that is surely one of the 
features of American govern- 
ment that we ought not to 
copy. Every fresh American 
administration wastes so ranch 
time and causes so much 
confusion while it comes to 
terms with itself, establishes 
its lines of communication and 
learns about the job. 

The challenge in Britain is 
to open up the processes of 
government without politiciz- 
ing the Civil Service. This 
should mean increasing the 
number of special advisers 
according to the requirements 
of individual ministers. 

The Prime Minister has 
become less cautious about 
special advisers, but it would 
be better still if she were to 
indicate that she would regard i 
it as a positive sign of min- : 
isterial imagination to wigage ’ 
a number of the right quality. ; 

More movement in and out 
of the Civil Service should be 
encouraged, whether- on a 
long-term basis or for short " 
periods of secondment. 

The Central Policy Review 
Staff— the oM government ; 
Think Tank, which Mrs 
Thatcher abotished-should ' 
be restored. Sir John's paper • 
s eems to favour this as a ' 
contribution to more strategic 
thinking. So it would be, 
provided that it saw its task in 
terms of tire original idea: to 
help ministers stand back and 
see the general direction in 
which tbeir individual policies - 
were leading. 

Altogether I would favour a 
rather less dramatic approach ' 
than that taken by Sir John. 
But effective reform generally 
depends upon the modification 
of daring proposals, without 
which fewer people would be 
thinking of moving at alL 


JL. . 


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Aircraft will be restricted 
from flying over Bournemouth 
during the Conservative Party 
conference next month as part 
of a security dampdown to 
protect the Prime Minister 
and the Cabinet 

After the bombing of the 
Gram! Hotel in Brighton two 
years ago Dorset police chiefs 
are to impose a flying ban in 
order to prevent a possible 
airborne rocket attack oo the 
Tories. 

Only police helicopters and 
aircraft with written per- 
mission wfll be allowed within 


one-and-a-half miles of 
Bournemouth's International 
Centre where the annual party 
conference is taking, place. 

Mr Tony Pointer, assistant 
chief constable of Dorset, said 
the flying restrictions were 
being introduced after last 
year’s Labour Party con- 
ference at Bournemouth at- 
tracted many aircraft, used 
mostly by broadcasting or- 
ganizations. 

The Department of Trans- j 
port canfinned that it was the 
first time such a. ban had been 
approved. 


Shipbuilders accept two-year deal 

?° m 4300 sections, will add a total of II ! 

S^n workforce have volunteered^ per cent to the company's 

bwan Hunter, accepted a two- take redundancy. - wanes bilL The firm has 

yarto^MMHy and con- M r Alan WilldMOn. the f^mDIion wo* on 

- shop stewards' chairman, said order. 

foSwSeSf? 7 V S he believed the cteal would • Members ofNalgo. the local 

®^ d tom in “good stead for government union, have- 

foree sraeesiiD S* ft £ ure v,ab »*»Y of voted against striking in sup- d 
tnree stages up to next AugusL Swan Hunter”. xxm oftheir 1 ^ ner rant nav ’ i * 

KffST J? Ate*. Marah. Swan's Sf ft ^ "ZSSS 1 

acc epted. joint managing director, said yesterday 

mrat’S'it^firaTtes?^ would ^ nab,e 10 ^^orefost week’s balloL the 

ment races its nrst test next company to continue the union had rejected the 

week when the m a na gement overhaul of its operations “so employers’ offer of a 5 9 ner 

and unions are to meet for that jt increases its compeT- Sltnw risk Demote 5£ 

[^inho^aexpoit »lt Vateo leadmaiH hope. 

last June that, ft planned to cut The latest " rfraL ■"'and th* ^ be improved 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Inquest on 55 deaths is told of fireball and choking smoke 


Survivors relive horror and panic 
as holiday jet burst into flames 


By Peter Davenport 

The desperate fight for sur- 
vival by passengers trapped 
aboard a burning, smoke- 
niled holiday jet was relived 
yesterday at the inquest on the 
55 victims of the Manchester 
airport disaster. 

Survivors described theiio^ 
ment at about 7.15am -on 
August 22 last year, when their 
thoughts of a holiday in Corfu 
were transformed into horror. 

The jury of six men and five 
women heard accounts of 
bravery, panic, fear and sheer 
helplessness as flames and 
smoke engulfed the cabin of 
the British Amours Boeing 
737, KT328 as it was about to 
take off from Manchester 
International Airport. 

It began with a noise which 
sounded like a shotgun blast 
or a bursting tyre, but was the 

C engine exploding into 
es. One woman passenger 
screa m ed: “Ob my God, the 
plane’s on fire". 

There was a scramble to 
leave the burning aircraft 
through blinding smoke, with 
passengers trying to open 
emergency exits and with a 
steward struggling to open one 
door and then having to 
correct the deployment of an 
escape chute before it could be 
used. 

On the second day of the 
inquest at Manchester Town 
Hall into a disaster which 
some experts have called “a 
survi yable accident", the most 
graphic account came from 
Mr Royston Metcalf, aged 50, 
a dental technician, of Long 
Edge Lane, Chesterfield, 
Derbyshire, who lost his fian- 
cee in the disaster. 



He said that the jet 
almost at take-ofi; with its 
nose up, when be heard a bang 
like a shotgun blast on the left 
side. Someone shouted that a 
tyre bad burst. One and a half 
seconds later the nose went 
down, and the duty-free bot- 
tles rattled in their bins as the 
jet veered from side to side 
under extreme braking. 

Mr Metcalfs told bow his 
fiancee said: ‘Oh, look the 
engine's on fire'. He looked 
and realized it was more 
serious. “There was a tremen- 
dous fireball, 15ft high, it was 
too big for just an engine”. 

As the jet came to a stand- 
still be looked back in the 
cabin to see “tongues of flame, 
like fingers" coming through 
windows and shooting to the 
ceiling- Smoke was pouring in 
with the flames. 

"It was absolute chaos, 
some people were screaming 
and jumping about. People 
appeared to be on fire try the 


windows, their clothes 
smoking." 

He said that he heard no 
announcements over the 
aircraft's intercom. 

Mr Leonard Gortxflrin, the 
coroner, asked Mr Metcalf 
about the conditions on 
board. He repUed^Oh God, it 
was really bad. You could feel 
your skin creeping with the 
heat." 

As the jet stopped con- 
ditions for the 131 passengers 
on board deteriorated badly, 
he said. "Within four seconds 
it was as black as night. The 
smoke was so thick it was 
drowning the noise of the 
flames roaring across the ceil- 
ing. It was mandible. 

"I turned to get my fiancee 
out She said: ‘what about ray 
handbag?* I told her to forget 
the blessed thing." 

Arm in arm they struggled 
to move forward along the 
aisle to the front exit doors. 
"People on fire were running 
forward," be said. 



Passengers who lived to tell the tele of the British Ahrtonrs jet disaster at die inquest 
yesteniay. Left to right, Mr Boystan Metcalf, M* Michael Mather and Miss Aunt Findlay . 


"I passed out at some stage: 
I woke aware of a burning in 
my mouth. 1 put my finger in 
and brought this filth out, it 
was like an Oxo cube. Chunks 
of black muck were in my 
eyes, nose and ears too. I lost 
my glasses and took a hand- 
kerchief out of my shirt 
pocket, dragged it across my 
eyes and saw a chink of light, 
like a postage stamp down to 
the left, and I went for ft. I 
managed to get out". 

Mr John Beardmore. of 
Holmes Chapel Road, Con- 
gieton, Cheshire, was travel- 
ling with his wife. He thought 
Ihe Initial explosion was a 
burst tyre. 

However, screaming fr om 
the back section of the jet and 
black smoke pouring into the 
cabin made him quickly re- 
alize ft was more serious. 

He sai± “The expression on 
the face of the stewardess was 
one of horror. It quickly 
became obvious to me and my 
wife that as passengers we 
were on our own. The cabin 
crew couldn't assist us 
greatly." 

He found ft difficult to get 
into the aisle from his seat to 
move forward as the jet taxied 
off the runway-He checked an 
emergency over-wing exit but 
realized ft was next to the 
burning engine and of no use. 
As he tried to return he found 
he could not breathe in the 
dense smoke. 

He fell into a row of seats 
but glimpsed daylight through 
the smoke and manap-d to 
s tagg e r towards an open exit 
door and escape down the 
chute. 

The survivors told of confu- 
sion about what they, should 
do in the emergency. Some 


said they instinctively un- 
fastened their seat belt and 
stood up, only to hear instruc- 
tions from the cabin crew to 
remain seated and with belt 
fastened. 

Mr Michael Mather, of 
North wich, Cheshire, was 
travelling with his girl friend 
and two other couples. He told 
the coroner that the accelera- 
tion on take-off had not been 
as smooth as that which be 
had experienced in previous 
flights. 

On the first day of the 
inquest the jury had heard that 
the jet's technical I<« had 
recorded problems of slow 
acceleration on an earlier 
flight, which could be caused 
by engine combustion cham- 
ber problems, and that the 
aircraft had been due for a 
detailed engine examination 
the day after Ihe accident. 

Another survivor. Miss 
Anna Louise Cutler Findlay, 
aged 21, a student of Bingley, 
West Yorkshire, told of the 
panic to escape: She had to 
fight her way towards the exit 
doors, climbing over seats. 

She said that she noticed a 
woman standing holding a 
little girl by the hand. She was 
saying: ‘Push, Becky, push'. 
Miss Findlay said tint with 
the crush of people behind her 
she knocked the little girl's 
hand away from her mother’s. 
The mother got out, she said, 
but she saw that the little girl 
did not. 

She then lost consciousness, 
collapsed in the doorway and 
the momentum of the people 
behind her pushed her out 
onto the wing and to safety. 

The inquest was adjourned 
until today. * 


Discounts report 
clears way for 
cheaper holidays 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


More price competition in 
foreign package holidays was 
signalled yesterday *w!fen the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission condemned 
agreements by which many 
tour operators restricted 
agents from. giving induce- 
ments to sell holidays. 

The commission recom- 
mended that Sir Gordon 
Borne,- Director General of 
Fair Trading, should open 
con sultati ons with the Associ- 
ation of British Travel Agents 
to change its code of practice 
so that travel agents would in 
future be free to offer induce- 
ments. 

However, it recommended 
that tour operators should be 
protected so that they could 
control the price of their 
holidays. 

The likely result is that 
travel agents would not di- 
rectly cut the price of a holiday 
but would offer inducements 
of their own, some involving 
cash benefits, which would 
produce a better deal for 
hoiidayittakers. 

There should be "significant 
benefits" for holidaymakers, 
according to the commission. 
But the scope for inducements 
has limitations because of 


tight margins in the industry. 

Profit margins for large tour 
operators in 1984 were less 
than 1 per cent the commis- 
sion found. The average 
commission for travel agents 
was 10 percent. 

Until now agreements be- 
tween tour operators and 
travel agents have precluded 
discounts and restricted other 
inducements. 

The commission had been 
asked to investigate by the 
Office of Flair Trading after the 
refusal by some leading tour 
operators to supply holidays 
to the Ilkeston Consumer Co- 
operative Society in Derby- 
shire. The society operated a 
voucher scheme that allowed 
those booking holidays to get a 
discount on goods sold in the 
society's store. 

The commission decided 
that the tour operator agree- 
ments with retail agents hod 
restricted competition be- 
tween travel agents, discour- 
aging innovation, and had 
deprived customers of an 
advantageous mix of prices 
and services. 

Foreign Package Holidays: 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission report (Command 
9879. Siationeiy Office: £5.80). 


Acne tests 
‘aid young 
sufferers’ 

A vaccine to relieve acne has 
been developed, the Inter- 
national Congress of Micro- 
biology In Manchester heard 
yesterday. 

Tests on yoang people re- 
sulted in 60 per cent showing 
an improvement compared 
with 30 per cent using stan- 
dard treatments, Mr A K 
Kasprowkz, of the Institute of 
Microbiology in Krakow, Po- 
land, said. 

Dr Stephen Anion told 
yesterday's session that re- 
search pointed to a possible 
link in the United Stales 
between infant botulism — a 
type of food poisoning — and 
cot deaths. In California, 
where Dr Arnon is a senior 
investigator with the depart- 
ment of health, the disease 
orgmated in sod and dost. 

“We advise mothers to 
breast feed babies to avoid the 
disease and ask teem not to 
give honey to babies under 12 
months. 


Wine firm 
fined oyer 
chemicals 

A wine wholesaler that sold 
Italian wines laced with an 
illegal chemical was fined 
£500 with £369 costs in a 
Warwickshire magistrates' 
court yesterday. 

Magistrates in Leamington 
Spa were told that bottles of 
Lambnisco and Chianti at 
Mojo Ltd contained between 
34 and 42 milligrams of 
diethydene glycoL The chemi- 
cal was not considered dan- 
gerous in its diluted form. 

Mr Lawrence Messling, for 
Warwickshire Trading Stan- 
dards Deportment, said the 
contaminated bottles were 
discovered during an in- 
vestigation after an alert last 
year. 

Mojo, of Leamington Spa. 
pleaded guilty under the Food 
Act, 1984, to selling wine 
containing illegal additives. 

It was the first prosecution 
under the Act involving wine 
to be brought by trading 
standards officers. 



— S old — 

Two share 
the treble 
prize fund 

Mis Anne Hulbert. from 
Manacom in Cornwall, and 
Mr Richard Haigh. from 
Bams Green in West Sussex, 
share yesterday's Portfolio 
Gold prize of £12.000, three 
times the normal amount be- 
cause there was no winner on 
Monday and Saturday. 

Mrs Halbert, a mother of 
three children and tee author 
of eight books on handicrafts 
and needlework, has been 
playing Portfolio on and off 
since it started. 

"I'm not normally a winner 
of money, so I'm absolutely 
delighted with my good 
fortune", she said. 

Mr Haigh, aged 27, who is a 
research technician for a lead- 
ing pharmaceutical company, 
has been playing the game 
since it was launched. 

“Of course I'm excited 
about the news, though I'm not 
yet sure what I'll spend it on", 
he said. 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BBI 6AJ. 



Mrs Anne Hulbert, author of 
handicraft books. 


Gun deaths 
remand 

A man aged 21 was yes- 
terday remanded in custody 
until Friday accused of 
murdering two girls by shoot- 
ing them last Monday. 

Dean Westwood, of Beach 
Road, Weston-super-Mare, is 
charged with murdering Miss 
Karen Hastings, aged 19, an 
auxiliary nurse, of Worie. and 
her friend. Miss Mandy 
Cottom, aged 18, a part-time 
barmaid, of Locking. 


Auction 
record 
for mascot 

A glass car mascot bought 
from a junk shop in 1953 for 
7s 6d (37fcp) was sold for a 
record £6,600 at Sotheby's 
Chester yesterday. 

Made by the French glass 
craftsman Rene Lalique in the 
1920s, the mascot was mod- 
elled as a girl's head, her hair 
streaming behind her to give 
the impression of speed. 

Called Victoire, or, as 
collectors know it, “Spirit of 
the Wind", ft was sent for sale 
by an anonymous couple from 
Colwyn Bay, North Wales, 
who had no idea of its value. 

They found it in a junk shop 
in Gloucester, having remem- 
bered it from the days when 
they drove around in an open- 
top Sunbeam sports car which 
had one on its bonnet 

Princess tops 
style survey 

The Princess of Wales is 
Britain’s undisputed queen of 
style and sophistication, and 
her husband is the country's 
most elegant male, according 
to a Gallup opinion poll 
commissioned by Polaroid 
and published yesterday. 

The Princess topped the list 
of the country’s 50 most 
stylish people and led seven 
members of the Royal Family 
who were placed in the top 1 0. 

Court fracas 

Shirley Reid, wife of Mike 
Reid, the comedian, was 
bound over to keep the peace 
in the sum of £50 yesterday 
after being arrested on Sep- 
tember 2 during a_ fracas 
outside Croydon Magistrates’ 
Court, south London. She was 
charged with threatening be- 
haviour. 

Swan warning 

Markers are to be hung on 
overhead power lines in the 
Ouse Valley between Tarring 
Neville and Beddingham, East 
Sussex, by the South Eastern 
Electricity Board after 14 
swans were killed last year 
flying into the lines. 

jury out 

The jury in the trial at 
Birmingham Crown Court of 
James HazeH, °f Wmron 
Green, an alleged petrol 
bomber inihe Handsworth ri- 
ots last year, retired yesterday 
to consider its verdict 




disabled children 


County councillors yes- 
terday warned the Govern- 
ment not to renege on its 
commitment to provide extra 
resources to implement the 
Disabled Persons Act, 1986. 

The Association of County 
Councils’ social services com- 
mittee called for the immedi- 
ate allocation of funds to 
implement the first phase of 
the Act which will apply to 
disabled children leaving spe- 
cial education. . 

That phase, due to be 
implemented next April, is 
alone expected to cost op to 
£50 million. The total cost 
could be £1 50 million. 

Mr Tony Du Sautoy, the 
association's under-secretary 
for social services, said the 
cost of assessing up to 15,000 
children and providing the 
extra services for about half of 
them had not been fUOy 
realized when the Bill was 
debated in Parliament earlier 
this year. 

The costs would include 
more day care centres for the 
mentally handicapped and ill, 
further employment opportu- 
nities at adult training centres 
and extra health ana social 
service provisions. 

Mr Du Sautoy said that 
because of this unforeseen 
need for resources, the associ- 
ation should ask the Govern- 
ment to defer the 
implementation of this phase 
for a further year. 


"It will be very difficult to 
physically undertake all the 
work necessary before the next 
school-leaving date in 1987", 
he said. 

But coonty councillors from 
all parties have said that the 
phase should be implemented 
as soon as practicably possible 
to avoid a whole school year 
missing the added provision. 

Mr Tony Greaves, the Alli- 
ance spokesman for the 
association and a former 
chairman of the social services 
committee, said: “The Gov- 
ernment gave a commitment 
to give extra resources. We 
want those resources now." 

To implement the first 
phase, local authorities will 
need to identify all children 
aged between 14 and 19 who 
might be eligible for as- 
sessment. 

Mr Du Sautoy estimated 
that between £100 million and 
£1 50 million would be needed 
to cover the cost of employing 
social workers and occupa- 
tional therapists to undertake 
the assessment, and to provide 
the extra services for disabled 
people. 

The Department of Health 
and Social Security said yes- 
terday that the Government 
had said that it would im- 
plemenz the provisions when 
it could secure the money to 
do so. 


BBC chief 
attacks 
radio plan 

The managing director of 
BBC radio yesterday '-de- 
nounced the Peacock com- 
mittee's proposal to privatize 
Radios One and Two and 
branded the idea "a phony bill 
of goods". 

Mr Brian Wenham, in his 
first public comments on the 
Peacock report since he took 
over the post nine weeks ago, 
said ft was a fraud to suggest 
that the two radio stations 
could be turned into commer- 
cial stations and retain their 
present character. 

Speaking at the Glasgow 
Radio Festival, Mr Wenham 
said that a reduction of BBC 
networks would inevitably 
change the nature of those that 
are retained. 

Public service programmes 
now carried on Radios One 
and Two would have to be 
rescheduled on Radios Three 
and Four and would in- 
evitably displace something 

He said the BBC did not 
oppose the creation of new 
commercial and community 
radio stations because it was 
believed that fresh com- 
petition "will surely be good 
for both the future and the 
flavour of radio". 

The Government's forth- 
coming Green Paper on radio 
will be examined by the BBC 
with an open mind. Mr 
Wenham promised. But no- 
body should mistake an open 
mind for a lack of resolve. 


Football violence 


English fans put to the test 


England's infamous football 
fens will fece their latest trial 
today when several hundred 
are expected to watch' the 
national squad take on Swe- 
den in a friendly match in 
Stockholm. 

It win be the first inter- 
national for the England side 
since clubs were banned from 
competition by UEFA after 
the Brussels disaster in 1985. 

The match has already at- 
tracted adverse publicity with 
the crew of one British ferry 
refusing to transport fens and 
a Danish company banning 
English supporters for fear of 
vandalism. 

The Swedish police have 
drafted reinforcements into 
the capital to control any 
outbroke of unruly behaviour 
by fans. 

The Department of the' 
Environment ..which has over- 
all responsibility for the 
Government's drive against 
soccer thugs, said last night 
that the fixture - and tee nsk 


By David Sapsted 

of crowd trouble — had bom 
discussed at an inter-min- 
isterial meeting earlier this 
summer and with the police, 
the Football Association and 
the Association of British 
Travel Agents. 

“We have drawn up our 
plans with the Swedish 
authorities according to the 
European Convention on 
Football Spectator Violence” 
the department said. 

Last month Manchester 
United and West Ham 
supporters dashed in knife 
fights on a Sealink ferry from 
Harwich to The Hook of 
Holland. 

The fernf was forced to 
return to Harwich half way 
through its journey. 

As a result of that Woody 
dash the Danish line. DFDS 
Torline, said yesterday that it 
had been refusing group book- 
ings from English fens -op its 
route from Harwich to Goth- 
enburg, Sweden. 


On Monday, British seamen 
on the Sealink ferry St Nicho- 
las, refused to set sail with a 
group , of 14 English fens on 
board, although all the 
supporters bad bad their pass- 
ports taken away for the 
voyage and British Transport 
police were accompanying the 
group: 

Mr Bin Collins. Sealink 
ferry manager on the Har- 
wicb-Hook route, aid yes- 
terday that 11 of tee group had 
travelled later on the 
Koningin Beatrix — the vessel 
in which tee hooligans fought 
last month -and there had 
been no problems. 

Mr Ben Millichip, the FA 
chairman, said tee behaviour 
of English fans at today's 
match was critical. 

“If there is trouble, we can 
expect very little sympathy 
from UEFA”, he said. 

Birch hooligans, page 5 







Information and 
Entertainment 


Engineering 


Investment 

Banking 


Fine China 


Oil and 
Oil Services 


Group Results for the half year to 30 June 1986 


JEmtilions (unaudited) 


1986 
Half year 


1985 
Half year 


1985 
Full year 


Tli mover 

455.0 

450.5 

970.1 

Profit before interest 

50.6 

49-0 

124.6 

Profit before taxation 

44.1 

41.7 

109-3 

Profit after taxation and minority interests 

24.3 

20.7 

57.6 

Earnings per ordinary share 

I2.4p 

U.Op 

30.0p 


I version of the foil accounts which received an 
unqualified report by rhe auditors and have been likrd with the Registrar of Companies. 


Statement by the Chairman, Lord Blakenham 


The Group’s pro- tax profits for the first half 
of 1986 were up on last year increasing from £4 1.7 
million to £44.1 million and earnings per share 
improredfrora lLOp to 12.4p, an increase of 13 percent 
These gains were achieved despite the weakening of 
the dollar against sterling which affected die figures 
adversely since a significant part erf the Group’s 
profits arises in North America. 

Two sectors, investment banking and informa- 
tion and entertainment, produced excellent results 
with the maui improvement in the latter coming 
from the financial Times. The lower contribution 
from the oil and oil services sector was due to 
the effect of lower oil prices but Cameo's was 
nonetheless an outstanding performance as many 
comparable US companies made losses during this 
period Profits of the fine china sector remained 
about the same as last year; not helped by the 
strength of sterling and die smaller number of 
American tourists. 

In May we raised USS75 million through a 
convertible eurobond issue. Pearson has also started 
to use the US commercial paper market, following 
ihe award of high crete t ratings, as a means of raising 
short term finance on attractive terms. On the home 
front the most inqtortam news was the announcement 
ofa£55 raflllon two year development plan by 
the Financial Times to strengthen its competitive 
portion by setting up a new printing and 

publishing plant. have sold a number 
of engine®*^ businesses and provincial 


newspapers the lower oil price provided art attractive 
opportunity to increase our oil holdings in the North 
Sea and the United Stares. 

Mr John Hale retired as managing director 
on 1 September and we are grateful for the major 
contribution he has made in focussing the Group 
and strengthening our structure and organisation. 

I am continuing as chief executive and Mr Frank 
Barlow, who is the chief executive of the Financial 
Times and oFttfestminster Press, and Mr Mark Burrell, 
who is a managing diretor of Lazard Brothers and 
has been a non-executive director since 1977, 
have both become executive directors of Pcarsoa 
They have joined myself jbunesjofl, group finance 
director; and David \feit, who is in charge of our US 
business, in forming a new executive team. Vfe shall 
continue the straregy of concentrating our activities 
on businesses where we see long-term competitive 
advantage. 

^bur directors have declared an interim 
dividend of 5-Op per ordinary share (4.25p in 1985) 
which will be paw on 3 November 1986 to share- 
holders on the register on 3 October 1986. This 
reflects our policy of paying an interim equal to 
half tiie dividend of the previous year 


^ L+M. 


9 September 1986 


A copy of the 6iD announcement, winch has been sent to all sharehokitts. is available from the 
Secretary Pearson pic MUlbank Tbwec London SW1P -iQZ. Telephone 01 -828 9020. 


f 

















THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 



Oh well, people were bound to talk. The 386 
microchip is big news. 

It has the potential to address an awesome 
4,000,000,000 bytes of working memory. 

It can also run your present industry-standard 
software two to three times faster than today's 
fastest desktops. 

So we weren't surprised when the Financial Times 
came sleuthing round to see if we really were 
building a 386 based machine. 


We hemmed, we hawed, we beat about the bush, 
but they wouldn't take 'no comment' for an answer 
As you can see, they drew their own conclusions 

Now, while we would dispute that a tortoise is an 
apt symbol for a company that made the fastest ever 
entry into the Fortune 500, we can no longer deny 
the rumours. 

You see, last, night we launched the most 
advanced personal computer ever made, the 
Compaq Deskpro 386“ COMPAQ. 386 ~ 

w©*!! never cease to amaze you. 


FREEPOST C0MFAQ, FREEPOST IBS 3331. BRISTOL BSl -OT TELEPHONE 0800444 123 COMfWJ® S A REGISTERED TRADEMARK AND C0HBV3 DESKPRO 386* S A TRADEMARK OF CQMftQ COMPUTER UD 


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1 1 * 


Lawyers asked 
for shorter 
speeches to 
ease delays 

By Fiances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

*7 wofined to a brief and an-' 

dSJET"* of wnttcn controversial summary of the 
SSI 2L."* a “? ng rnea “ commercial story, the issues 
s“r« urged yesterday m a and oral evidence he will 
£^ med ““!?«« s^ere adduce, withering reference 
congesuon at the Commercial only to the molt central 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 i986 


rjix/ivub iND w o 


m r — — - wmmw VWI1U4IW1VUU 

t-Ourt in London. 

The court, which handles 


documents. 

Disclosure of evidence from 


large commerml . uisciosure or evidence from 

anfons. is sSS nl , 0 ™£ ™ e ra s J^ “ is en- 

wilh a huge rise in business°In shouId 

four years its workload hac ^ sum- 

aldsonf Masier*o/the Rolls! «**' To^STfi ■ 

sassw^-i 

• strangled by rts own success . ** 


The reforms are put forward 
_ the wake of a re Don 


“Throughout the hearing 
every effort must be made to 


. m me wake or a report ? clIOIT ransi “ m«te to 
■ published in January by mem- a , vo, f Prolonged reading 
. bers of the Commercial Court aI °“ d . °* documents and 
• Committee, under Mr Nicho- aulhor| fces", the guide says. 

S±i? i, !K! "! hich caUed r ° r The document also draws 
„^SL“ £aSures “ attention to certain 


speed procedures. SB tf tT^whicT.^ 

The guide, aimed at users of to be overlooked . 
the court, rays changes are The court rf~= 
needed to promote greater “d^utwlSiin^ 

E* ecooomy and tf - an international 
Uciency.. was described by 

They include shorter open- niercial Court Cc 
ing speeches by lawyers, an “an invisible exj 


The court, described as a 
“disput&setiling service with 
an international clientele" 
was described by the Com- 
mercial Court Committee as 
“an invisible export of int- 


end to protracted reading porta nee". 

aloud from documents and it «« th» rw** 

legal authorities, and more use inijS?/? 

' of vntten, rather than oral, “ if®? 01 *. a ? d 

• lists of issues, propositions, ^tating 10 banking, 

events and persons. 

. . lli es, carriage of goods, mler- 

in many cases, the guide national markets and ex- 
says, it will be desirable for a changes, arbitration appeals 
counsel s opening speech to be and mercantile contracts. 

Data bank set up 
to beat hazards 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

A catalogue of the world's torate, and the. Health and 
worst chemical disasters over Safety Executive, 
the past 25 years is being It will be able to cany more 
offered to help experts and than 10,000 items of informa- 
rcsearchers to prevent further tion about incidents. 


Moves to 
help 

conviction 
for fraud 

By OurLegal Affairs 
Correspondent 

The Government is to take 
steps to end an anomaly in the 
law which is enabling 
fraudsters to escape convic- 
tion or to get away with lighter 
penalties than they deserve. 

It intends to include a clause 
in the forthcoming Criminal 
Justice Bill to reverse the 
effect of a House of Lords 
ruling in 19S4 which is 
preventing those guilty of 
conspiracy to defraud being 
charged with the appropriate 
offence. 

In a report published yes- 
terday, the Criminal Law Re- 
vision Committee, a group of 
judges and lawyers who mon- 
itor the working of the crim- 
inal law, said that the Lords' 
ruling has “on occasion led to 
justice not being done". 

It cites cases showing how 
“rogues can escape punish- 
ment, or adequate punish- 
ment." 

The appeals were brought, 
not on the basis that the 
charge was unfair or produced 
a wrong verdict, but “on 
technical grounds". 

The effect of the Law Lords’ 
ruling in 1984 in a case called 
Ayres ( was that prosecuting 
authorities must charge a 
defendant with conspiracy to 
commit a statutory offence, 
however trivial, in preference 
to the common law charge 
with hs open-ended penalties. 


'■■■■■a 



Farmer I Football 


Dr Martm TatnaU, of Salford University, demonstrating his “clip-on" engine designed to 
take the work out of cycling. The 21 cc motor powers the hack wheel, allowing the bicyde to 
reach a speed of 20 mph. It will do about 300 miles to the gallon. 


killed 
wife and 
himself 

A wealthy farmer who was 
dying of cancer killed his 
young wife with a sawn-off 
shotgun and then shot himself, 
an inquest at Diss, Norfolk, 
was told yesterday. 

The estranged couple’s 
child, Victoria, aged two, was 
saved by her grandmother, 
Mrs Sally Goodier, who es- 
caped from the cottage at 
Upper BUlingford when Mr 
James Bell confronted her 
daughter, Augusta, aged 22, in 
July. 

Mrs Goodier told the coro- 
ner that Mr BelL, a former day 
pigeon shooting champion, 
forced his way into the cottage 
and said: “I’m going to kill you 
air. 

The coroner was told that 
the couple married in 1983. Id 
May this year they separated 
and Mrs Bell returned to live 
with her parents at Upper 
BUlingford. She gained an 

injunction preventing Mr Bell, 
who farmed at Coggeshall, 
Essex from seeing her. 

After the separation, the 
inquest was told, he had made 
many threats to kill himself, 
his wife and the child. The 
coroner. Mr Ernest Clark, 
said: “The real tragedy is that 
no one took them seriously". 

He recorded a verdict that 
Mr Bell had killed himself 
while the balance of his mind 
was disturbed, after unlaw- 
fully killing his wife. 


hooligans 
‘should be 
birched’ 

A judge who jailed a gang of 
soccer thugs yesterday told 
them: “If it was up to me I 
would order you all to be 
birched". 

The six youths — one a 
policeman's son — had kicked 
and punched a young man on 
his way to work before crash- 
ing a beer bottle over his head 
and leaving him as the bottom 
of escalators in a London 
Underground station. Snares- 
book Crown Court, east Lon- 
don. was told. 

Judge Stable, QC, attacked 
soccer violence saying: “You 
have driven English football 
out of Europe. 

“The public no longer 
wishes to go to grounds any 
more. For a year taw-abiding 
citizens have called for stron- 
ger sentences against maraud- 
ing gangs and bunches of 
savages like yourselves. 

Mark Lee. 20, of Inga!. Pres- 
ton. Lancashire, was sentenced 
to three years youth custody: 
Mark Forshaw. IS, of Ley land. 
Lancashire, to 12 months: and 
Mark Helmn. 16. of Bamber 
Bridge. Preston, to eight months 
after they each admitted assault 
with intent to rob. 

Gary McGrath. 20. of Bamber 
Bridge. Lancashire, and Ronald 
Tavlor. IS. were sentenced to 12 
months' youth custody after 
admitting ’ attempted robbery . 
John Dixon. 22. of Bamber 
Bridge, was jailed for 10 months 
after admitting assault causing 
actual bodily harm. 


catastrophes. 


Mr John Clifton, head of the 


Detailed “flashbacks" of ac- 1 ■“ 

cidents, such as those at gJJJf S/LSt 

Bhopal in India two years ago 

when about ifion wen* killed incidents a year which are 
fumes, have been gathered in a 


mines, uave oecn gamerca in a - - r. 

cOTjpuKrtrad sum* by safety about 

specKllJ515 ' enable us to identify possible 

The chemical plant in Mex- dangers and give more precise 
ico City which exploded two risk assessments to industry, 
years ago, killing more than This should make installa- 
500 and injuring 2300, and tions safer and more reliable, 
the blast at Flixborough, and so protect the public." 
Lincolnshire, in June 1974, Users of the service will be 
when 28 workers were killed able to get information by 
and 89 hurt, may offer dues to joining a “club" paying an 


stop more disasters. 


annual subscription, or by 
paying for data as it is needed. 


More than 200 serious or on a “swopping- system, in 
chemical industry ^codents which details can be obtained 
happen throughout the world on a gjve^nd-take basis, 
annually and details of their individual* nr id- 


ealises and effects are to be 
added to the system. 


Individuals 
groups camp: 
viron mental s 


pressure 
ig for en- 
on specific 


The international data issues may also apply for 
bank, known as the Major background information, of- 
Hazard Incident Data Service finals said yesterday. 
(MHIDAS), has been set up by The system is being based at 
the United Kingdom Atomic the UKAEA Directorate at 
Energy Reliability Direc- Culcheth, Warrington. 


Man’s suicide 
feast of 
yew leaves 

Colin Murray, an architect 
who also did research into 
trees, gorged himself to death 
on yew free leaves because he 
was worried about his failing 
business, an inquest was told- 
yesterday. . 

Mrs Jane Murray, his wife, 
told the inquest in Hammer- 
smith, west london, that she 
found her husband, aged 43, 
dead at their home in 
Antrobus Road, Acton, on 
August 12. 

There were some yew tree 
leaves near his body. 

Dr Margaret Lot a patholo- 
gisL told the inquest that Mr 
Murray’s stomach was swol- 
len beta use of the vast amount 
ofleaves he had eaten. 

**1 first thought they were 
grass cuttings but I later 
identified them as yew tree 
leaves", she said. 

Dr Lot said death would 
have occurred witiiin four 
hours and gave toxin poison- 
ing as the cause of death. 

A verdict of suicide was 
recorded. 


NUTs court 
move on 
teacher ban 

The National Union of 
Teachers won approval in the 
High Court yesterday to seek 
to stop a disciplinary hearing 
against Miss Maureen Mo 
Goldrick, headmistress of 
Sudbuiy Infants School who 
was suspended by Brent 
Council after allegations of 
racialism. 

At a 15-minute private 
hearing, Mr Justice Garland 
said the application for an 
injunction Should be heard on 
Friday morning, immediately 
before the council intends to 
start the disciplinary hearing. 

Teachers at the school 
walked out after the 
suspension. 

Mira McGoIdrick, aged 39, 
denies the allegation that she 
told a junior official of the 
Labour controlled authority 
that sbe did not want any 
more coloured staff at her 
schooL 

Sbe maintained that she 
simply said she did not want 
any more unqualified staff 



Old-fashioned limes 
for Hampton Court 

By Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 

Tradition has won the battle ontmy to a design by Sir 

of the Hampton Court Kme Oinrtopl^ Wren, who tob 
£ eeT with the Government comnuraloned hy Ring WO- 

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deciding to replant the famous 
tree avenues with oW-rasn- 

ioned limes and not a tougher, 

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The decision was one of me 
tost by L«d Elton, who w 
the Prime Minister last week 
that be was resigning as 
Minister of State at _ the 
Department of the Enwron- 
menL which is responsible tor 
historic monuments. 

Id June Lord Elton an- 
nounced that the symmetrical 
partem of tree avenues needed 
compete restoration. He 
wanted a fall set of new trees to 
be growing “ tune 
300th anniversary o f *** 
Glorious Revolution m 1988. 

Almost 200 lime trees were 
planted in tie seventeenth 


liam III to extend die Tudor 
palace. 

A few at the original trees 
survive, hot most have been 
replaced with several varieties 
of lime. 

The result is a mixture of 
different sizes and varieties 
and a few depressions where, 
trees have not been replaced. 

Lord Elton said public com- 
ment aboat his plans had been 
Strongly in ’favour of complete 
replanting, which would even- 
tually give a consistent pattern 
of mature frees. 

He said they would be 
traditional limes and not be a 
proposed new variety with 
pater leaves that was more 
resistant to attack by greenfly. 


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<r 




OVERSEAS NEWS 


Botha snubbed as three African National Congress men go to gallows 

King cancels meeting 
after warning from 
leading black activists 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Mrs Coretia Scott Ki 


a 


rights leader. Dr Martin Luth- 
er King, kept President Botha 
wailing for 20 minutes before 
she cancelled a meeting with 
him yesterday, after she came 
under pressure from black op* 
ponents of the Government 

President Botha said last 
night that Mrs King's “frust- 
rated attempt" to call on him 
and to be “informed of the 
positive socio-economic and 
political reform in South Afri- 
ca" was “yet again a sad reflec- 
tion on those who find them- 
selves in a make-believe world 
of political fraud". 

Mrs King, who was among 
scores of foreign guests at the 
enthronement of Archbishop 
Tutu in Cape Town last Sun- 
day, said she felt she needed 
“more time to acquire a better 
understanding of the complex 
problems here". 

She said she would like to 
meet Mr Botha “at a later 
date", but she did not suggest 
when that might be. She had 
come to South Africa, Mrs 
King maintained, in a Christ- 
like spirit to gather informa- 
tion about the human suffer- 
ing here and to pursue dia- 
logue with as many people as 
possible. 

Government sources said 
Mrs King had also failed to 
keep an appointment on Mon- 
day with Mr Barend du 
Plessis, the Minister of Fi- 
nance, who is Acting Foreign 
Minister in the absence of Mr 


R. F. “Pik” Botha, who is 
abroad. 

Trouble over Mre King's 
schedule of appointments be- 
gan last weekend when Mrs 
Winnie Mandela and Dr Allan 
Boesak, a senior figure in the 
coloured branch of the Dutch 
Reformed Church and an 
outspoken opponent of the 
Government, said they would 

The UN Security Comal on 
Monday privately decided 
agains t a plea to halt die 
execution of the two ANC 
members in Pretoria, because 
Britain and the United States 
said that it was inappropriate 
to intervene, according to a 
council sonrce (Renter reports 
from New York. 

not see her if she met Mr 
Botha. 

Dr Boesak and Mrs Mande- 
la said Mr Botha's hands were 
“dripping with the blood of 
our children". They also urged 
Mrs King not to meet Chief 
Galsha Butheiezi the conser- 
vative Zulu leader, who is 
anathema to most politically 
militant blacks. 

In an apparent allusion to 
Dr Boesak and Mrs Mandela, 
Mr Botha last night said Mrs 
King had been pressured by 
people who “fear that the 
truth about South Africa may 
influence influential but un- 
informed persons to be less 
gullible and better equipped to 
act objectively". 

Had Mrs King's meeting 


with Mr Botha taken place, it 
would have coincided with the 
hanging of three members of 
the African National Congress 
(ANC), along with three other 
convicted murderers, all 
blacks, in Pretoria Central 
Prison, which has gallows de- 
signed for multiple execu- 
tions. 

The executions were carried 
out despite pleas from Amnes- 
ty Internationa] and local anti- 
apartheid organizations here 
to Mr Botha to gram the three 
ANC men clemency and ac- 
cord them prisoner-of-war sta- 
tus. It seems this might also 
have influenced Mrs King's 
decision to cancel her meet- 
ing. 

One of the ANC men, And- 
rew Sibusiso Zondo, aged 20, 
was sentenced to death for 
planting the limpet mine 
which killed five people and 
irijured many others in a shop- 
ping centre south of Durban 
last December. 

The other two. Sipho Brid- 
get Xulu, aged 25, and Clar- 
ence Lucky Payi aged 20, 
were convicted of kifflng Mr 
Benjamin Langa, a former 
associate of Mr Steve Biko, 
the black leader who died 
from injuries sustained in 
police detention in 1977. 

Gvil rights groups here 
pointed out that Mr Botha 
used his powers of clemency 
in July to quash the trial of 
four white South African sol- 
diers accused of murdering a 
black man in northern Nami- 
bia. 


Warning that sanctions may 
hamper action on apartheid 


By Rodney Cowton 

Sanctions could prevent 
South Africa from moving 
away from apartheid and to- 
wards an acceptable system of 
power-sharing, Mr Gavin 
Relly, chairman of the Anglo- 
American Corporation of 
South Africa, told The Times 
m an exclusive interview in 
London. 

He also said that the release 
of Mr Nelson Mandela and 
lifting of the ban on the 
African National Congress 
were essential before a proper 
process of negotiation on 
political change could begin. 

His comments came a few 
days after President Reagan 
renewed a limited programme 


deprivation of the people who 
currently eqjoy a better way of 
life that it becomes impossible 
to fnlfiL" 

Mr Relly advocates- almost 
the reverse of sanctions, al- 
though he realizes that in the 
present international political 
climate his ideas will not have 
universal appeaL 

He says the international 
community should see south- 
ern Africa as a whole; should 
provide development funds for 
those countries that need 
them; and should allow South 
Africa to resume its normal 
international banking 
arrangements. 

This would help to prevent 
southern Africa from sinking 
into a morass of poverty, and 


of economic measures against assist Sonth Africa to achieve 
South Africa and a week be- die economic vitality neces- 
fore EEC foreign ministers de- sary for political re- 


cide whether to adopt a pack- 
age of sanctions. 

Speaking of the “unwis- 
dom” of sanctions, Mr Relly 
said there could be no doubt 
that over the longer term the 
effect of them would be “to 
debilitate air economy that is 
already failing to cope with the 
socio-economic demands of its 
people". 

Bat “it is not possible to talk 
about reform under a process 
of declining national wealth. 
Reform is an extremely expen- 
sive business. If it is to be 
effective and catch hold it most 
compromise, giving more and 
more of the people a better and 
better way of life. But that b 
not possible in a declining 
economy without such radical 


form. 

But would there be any 
genuine political progress 



Mr Gavin Relly; Release of 
Nelson Mandela essentiaL 


without the duress provided by 
sanctions? Mr Relly says the 
changes already made are 
considerable as a preliminary 
to negotiations about the fix- 
ture. 

“I think there has been a 
change in the Afrikaner's view 
of the conntry, and I believe he 
does not see himself as being 
able to sustain for ever the sort 
of hegemony be has enjoyed 
for the last 38 years." 

Mr Relly sees an interim 
stage of political change with- 
in the next few years, with uni- 
versal voting at the lowest 
level of administration. High- 
er levels would probably in- 
volve indirect voting, at least 
in the early stages “so that yon 
get a filtering process which 
will throw up a leadership 
which may be black or may be 
white, and it should not under 
those circumstances be a mat- 
ter of concern to black or white 
who it is." 

He visualizes “a rather rigid 
constitution" to start with and 
an extremely strong Supreme 
Court as guardian of the cons- 
titution, which would contain a 
bill of individual rights. Ide- 
ally he would aim for a system 
where power was greatly de- 
volved and the central govern- 
ment was relatively weak. 

However, Mr Kelly ac- 
knowledges that constitutional 
change will not eliminate ra- 
cial discrimination. “I don't 
think any of us are so unrealis- 
tic as to believe that the dis- 
crimination in men's minds 
can be as easily expunged as 
the discrimination in the law." 


Hazards for the unwary visitor 

Pretoria’s treacherous reefs 


From Michael Hornsby, 
Johannesburg 

The shoals of black South 
African politics, with their 
hidden reefs and treacherous 
cross-currents, can be hazard- 
ous for the inexperienced 
navigator, as Mrs Coreita 
Scott King, widow of the 
assassinated American civil 
rights leader. Dr Martin Lu- 
ther King, discovered in Cape 
Town this week. 

She came to South Africa, as 
she put it, “in a Christ-like 
spirit", determined to play the 
saleswoman by seeing a 
“broad spectrum" of South 
African leaders, including 
President Botha, and then to 
report to President Reagan. 

Now, after being warned by 
Mrs Winnie Mandela, wife of 
the jailed African National 
Congress (.ANC) leader, Mr 
Nelson Mandela, and Dr Al- 
lan Boesak, the turbulent Col- 
oured Dutch Reformed 
Church priest, that they would 
not meet her if she saw Mr 
Botha, she has stood the South 
African President up. 


It remains to be seen if the 
Zulu leader. Chief Gatsha 
Butheiezi. whose conservative 
and Zulu-dominated inkatha 
organization is a deadly rival 
of more radical groups, will 
also be struck from her list of 
appointments. 

Mrs King is not the first 
American visitor to have mis- 
judged the complexity of the 
black political scene. Senator 
Edward Kennedy had an un- 
expectedly rough ride when he 
came here in 1985 at the 
invitation of the then Bishop 
Tutu, who failed to brief his 
guest properly. 

Senator Kennedy was 
repeatedly heckled by a small 
but vociferous group of blacks 
belonging to the black 
consciousness-oriented 
Azanian People's 

Organisation (Azapo), which 
sees no role for white liberal 
allies in the struggle for black 
liberation. 

On the last day of his visit. 
Senator Kennedy, who had 
apparently not heard of black 
consciousness before coming 


to South Africa, abandoned a 
meeting he was to have ad- 
dressed in a Soweto church 
when he was shouted down by 
a well-drilled Azapo faction in 
the audience. 

The South African security 
police could hardly believe 
their luck, and allowed the 
Azapo protesters a leeway 
seldom granted to black dem- 
onstrators here, even, it is 
reliably said, giving them 
precise details of the senator's 
movements. 

Some years earlier, the Rev- 
erend Jesse Jackson also paid 
a visit to South Africa. Think- 
ing that there were no dif- 
ferences that talks over good 
wine and food could not iron 
out. he invited Chief Butheiezi 
and Dr Ntbato Motlana, lead- 
er of the ANC-leaning Soweto 
Gvic Association, to dinner. 

As Dr Motlana recalls, he 
and the Zulu chief were soon 
within an ace of trading 
punches across the table, and 
Mr Jackson was left wonder- 
ing what he bad let himself in 
for. 


Howe and Shultz discuss policy 


Washington — Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
held talks yesterday with Mr 
George Shultz, die US Sec- 
retary of Slate, on inter- 
national terrorism, the dims 
in Sooth Africa and the grow- 
ing tensions in superpower 
relations (Christopher 
Thomas writes). 

He also saw Mr Caspar 
Weinberger, the Defence Sec- 
retary, and Mr James Baker, 
the Treasury Secretary, and 
discussedgrowing pressure in 


western Europe for tougher 
sanctions against Pretoria. 

His two-day visit is in bis 
capacity as chairman of the 
Conndl of Ministers of the 
European Community, which 
is putting together a package 
of tougher sanctions expected 
to be completed at a formal 
session in Brussels next week. 

President Reagan remains 
staunchly opposed to punitive 
sanctions, even though be is 
trader pressure from both 
Houses of Congress to lake a 


more derisive stand against 
the Pretoria Government He 
has just extended a year-old 
package of limited sanctions 
for another 12 months. 

Sir Geoffrey was particu- 
larly anxious to hear Mr 
Shultz's assessment of why 
the Kremlin has endangered 
superpower relations by the 
imprisonment in Moscow of 
Nicholas DanDafE, the Ameri- 
can journalist, on a charge of 
spying, which the US rejects 
as trumped up. 



Relatives of the hanged ANC men at a prayer service in Pretoria Roman Catholic Cathedral after the execution. At left, 
Mrs Eugenia Payi and Mrs Leanorah Swartbool, aunts of Lucky Payi; and Mrs Johanna Xulu, mother of Sipho Xuin. 


Reform at 
Unesco 
falls short 
of target 

From Diana Geddes 

Paris 

The 49-member executive 
board of Unesco begins its 
month-long autumn session 
today, with little sign of the 
fundamental reforms taking 
place, which would be needed 
to tempt Britain and the US 
back into the troubled organ- 
ization. 

The withdrawal of the US in 
December 1983, followed by 
Britain last December, de- 
prived Unesco of 30 per cent 
of its income and the two 
main leaders pressing for re- 
form. Several of those still in 
the organization feel that the 
reform movement has now 
come to a virtual halt. 

There is also deep gloom 
among Western members 
about the prospect of the re- 
election for a third six-year 
term of the organization's 
much-criticized director gen- 
eral Mr Amadou M'Bow. 

Some feel that he is the 
main source of Unesco's prob- 
lems and talk privately of 
having to reconsider their 
membership if he is re-elected. 

Mr M'Bow has not yet said 
whether be will stand again, 
but he has been lobbying hard 
and sent delegations to the 
recent summits of the Non 
Aligned Movement and the 
Organization of African Un- 
ity. He is thought to be assured 
of the majority of votes from 
Third World and Soviet Woe 
countries. 

Mr Richard Miller, head of 
the US observer mission to 
Unesco, said he was feeling 
“unhappy and depressed" 
about the organization. 

"The withdrawal of the US 
and Britain led to some cos- 
metic changes, but for us to 
rejoin would require some 
very fundamental reforms, 
and nothing even approaching 
that is happening right now. 

“All the other Western 
countries seem completely 
taken up with the issue of Mr 
M’Bow's re-election, and the 
poll isn't due to take place 
until next fell Reform has 
gone on to a back burner, if 
indeed the burner is on at alL 

“In terms of programme 
execution, there’s probably 
even been a regression, largely 
due to the tremendous loss of 
staff. Morale here is terrible 
compared with anywhere else 
in the UN. It's a really sad 
state of affairs". 

Several western European 
countries are astonished at the 
insensitive and autocratic way 
in which Mr M'Bow continues 
to behave. In drawing up the 
critical draft programme for 
1988-89, for example, be ap- 
pears to have ignored totally 
the priorities recommended 
by Western states and to have 
bowed to the wishes of the 
Soviet bloc. 

“The draft programme pro- 
vides an illuminating insight 
into the way the USSR and the 
Eastern bloc are seeking to 
manipulate the oiganization 
and to use it for their own 
propaganda purposes," one 
Western diplomat said. 
“There has been no change in 
such highly-politicked activ- 
ities as tne new world inform- 
ation order or the peace educ- 
ation programme." 

Another point of continuing 
irritation i$ the high-handed 
way in which the last session 
of the executive board, which 
is dominated by the Soviet 
bloc and Third World coun- 
tries. dismissed the indepen- 
dent British auditors, who 
have bran auditing Unesco's 
accounts for the past 36 years. 

It was agreed that Mr 
M'Bow should ask the UN if 
Unesco could use its auditors, . 
but that request has been 
refused. 

Only a full general con- 
ference of the oiganization has 
the power to appoint new aud- 
itors. and the next general con- 
ference is not due to be held 
for another year. 

The only way out of the 
dilemma is to call an extraor- 
dinary general conference or 
to call back the British audi- 
tor. Sir John Downey, neither 
of which is going to be 
attractive to members. 


Infringement accusations 
mar weapons conference 


The United States and -the 
Soviet Union yesterday traded 
accusations here, alleging that 
each was violating the 1972 
convention on biological and 
chemical weapons. 

The American Ambassador, 
Mr Donald Lowitz, told the 
review conference of the 1972 
convention that Washington 
believed Moscow was not 
living up to its commitments. 

"The US believes that the 
Soviet Union, in violation of 
the convention, has continued 
to maintain an offensive bio- 
logical warfare programme 
and capability, and has been 
involved in the production 
and use of toxins for hostile 
purposes in Laos, Cambodia 
and Afghanistan." he said. 

The Soviet delegate. Mr 
Viktor Israelyan. did not reply 
in the meeting itself. But at a 


From A Correspondent, Geneva 

press conference later he ac- 
cused the US “and others" of 
trying to undermine the 
convention over the past six 
years. 

“I would not be surprised to 
hear again false stories that the 
Soviet Union is not abiding by 
this convention," he said. 
“Bui this will not provoke us. 
We shall go on working for the 
complete enforcement of this 
convention". 

The 1972 convention was 
signed by 55 countries and 
covers prohibition of the 
development, production and 
stockpiling of bacteriological 
and toxic weapons and the 
destruction of existing ones. 

In recent years. Western 
scientists have served warning 
that advances in genetic en- 
gineering and other fields of 
bio-technology have opened 


the way towards abuses of the 
convention in the future. 

Both Mr Israelyan and Mr 
Lowitz said yesterday that 
they intended to work to 
ensure that this did not hap- 
pen. Both cautioned, however, 
that they did not see any real 
progress being made on revis- 
ing the convention to make it 
foolproof even though both 
the US and the Soviet Union 
saw this as their main aim. 

Mr Israelyan, asked at his 
press conference whether be 
saw the arrest of American 
journalist, Nicholas Daniioff 
in Moscow emerging as an 
issue at the talks, said: “This is 
not on the agenda.” 

Mr Lowitz said it was not 
the intention of the US Gov- 
ernment to raise the issue in 
the talks. 


Russia back at disarmament talks 


Stockholm (Reuter) — The 
Soviet Union's two senior ne- 
gotiators at the European Dis- 
armament Conference return- 
ed from Moscow yesterday 
with instructions on Kremlin 
strategy after the 35-nation 
talks end in nine days' time. 

Nato remains confident that 
an agreement on how to avoid 
an accidental war in Europe 
can be reached by the time the 
conference ends on September 
19, but the Warsaw Pact has 
recently been more pessimis- 
tic. The talks began in January 
1984. 

The Soviet Union and the 
United States appear deter- 
mined not to let recent strains 
in other spheres of the super- 
power relationship affect the 
work of the conference. 

"We have not heard the 
slightest whisper in Stockholm 


about Daniloff,” a Soviet 
diplomat said, referring to the 
American reporter charged 
with spying in Moscow. 

President Reagan warned 
Moscow on Monday that the 
case could damage US-Soviet 
relations, and the White 
House spokesman, Mr Larry 
Speakes. said: “We will raise 
the Daniloff issue in every 
appropriate forum in which 
we meet the Soviets." 

But Nato diplomats said 
that Washington had far too 
much at stake in Stockholm to 
raise anything that could jeop- 
ardize the talks at this crucial 
stage. The United States, Can- 
ada and all European states 
except Albania are taking part. 

The Stockholm conference 
deals mainly with the notificar 
non, inspection and observa- 
tion of military exercises. 


In Western eyes, the added 
publicity to be given to such 
activities if agreement is 
reached in Stockholm would 
make it politically impossible 
for the Warsaw Pact to repeat 
such events as the 1968 So- 
viet-led invasion of Czecho- 
slovakia. 

Nato is expecting a Soviet 
concession on a Nato-spon- 
sored plan to give neutral 
countries a role in monitoring 
any arms control agreements 
reached in Stockholm. 

Switzerland quoted the So- 
viet Foreign Minister, Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, as say- 
ing that be could accept the 
idea. 

Five neutral countries — 
Austria, Finland, Ireland, 
Sweden and Switzerland - 
plus non-aligned Yugoslavia 
are expected to take part. 


Computer check speaks volumes 
as sacked editor brought to book 


From Paul Vallely 
New York 

It was a peculiarly booldsh 
form of revenge. There were, if 
we are to believe the privy 
reports, no dramatic scenes. 
Only a quiet retribution, as 
silent almost as that of a pen. 

It was in July that a certain 
editor at the Encyclopaedia 
Britannica received his redun- 
dancy notice. A month later be 
left Some days ago it was 
discovered that the disaffected 
former employee had left a 
hidden legacy. 

He had rewritten sections of 
the world’s most respected 
reference book in a most 
disrespectful fashion. Taking 
advantage of the computer 

technology which the 218- 
y ear-o Id encyclopaedia new 
employs, he had mis- 
chievously deleted the name of 
Jesus Christ throughout cru- 
cial passages and replaced it 
with the embarrassing alter- 
native of Allah. 


He had also inserted the 
names of certain Britannica 
executives as historical figures 
in unflattering area instances 
in other articles not due to 
have been changed between 
the 1986 and 1987 editions. 

The alterations were discov- 
ered daring a routine proof- 
reading: tbe technology which 
made such illicit amendments 
possible also enabled a reader 
with a higher level of access to 
tbe system to see that changes 
had been made. 

“Over tbe years we have 
developed a programme called 
the integrated publishing sys- 
tem to protect the integrity of 
tbe date base", Mr Norman 
Braum, a vice-president of the 
Enydopaedm said at tbe bead- 
q carters of the august institu- 
tion in Chicago. “As a result, 
within six boors of the discov- 
ery the system had revealed 
not only who made the 
changes but the date and even 
the time be did ft. 


“We were not amused", he 
said, refusing to identify the 
man or to elaborate on tbe 
number of illegaJ substitutions 
made. “When be was con- 
fronted he confessed, and co- 
operated by confirming the 
number of changes which the 
system had in any case already 
identified." 

An arrangement has also 
been made whereby the sacked 
man, who had worked on the 
Encyclopaedia for some years, 
would make financial 
compensation for the extra 
work be had caused, be said. 

The dismissed man was one 
of ISO editors who prepare the 
44 million-odd words in the 32 
volumes published at the 
University of Chicago. 

“We have a very low turn- 
over of staff here", Mr Braum 
said. “A few people have been 
made redundant before, bat 
nothing like this has ever 
happened." 


100 die 
in Death 
Zone 
collision 

LagOS (AP) - About 100 
people are feared dead after a 
collision between two vessels 
off Pott Harcoun in southern 
Nigeria. 

Two motor vessels, the 
Nembe and the Assei. collided 
while irving u> navigate 
around a dangerous area off 
the Niger River delta known 
as the “Death Zone”. 

The Nembe was carrying 
about 400 passengers, mostly 
women taking produce to 
markets, while 300 people 
were on board the Asset. 

Some passengers managed 
to swim ashore. Rescue opera- 
tions were still going on 
yesterday for other survivors. 

Confession 
wins release 

Warsaw (Reuter) - Mr 
Zbigniew Wroniak. the senior 
Polish Foreign Ministry of- 
ficial accused of hiding Mr 
Zbigniew Bujak. Solidarity's 
underground leader from po- 
lice, has been released from 
jaiL 

He appeared on television a 
week ago to confess his crime 
and ask for pardon. 

Demand fails 

Cairo (Reuter) - An Egyp- 
tian gunman holding the Ital- 
ian consul and three emp- 
loyees hostage and demanding 
ransom surrendered after a 
two-hour siege of tbe Italian 
consulate. 

Officers free 

Abidjan (Reuter) — The 
Liberian leader. General Sam- 
uel Doe. has ordered the 
release of Brigadier Emman- 
uel Seyon and Major Ernest 
Wreh. former presidential 
guard officers held after an 
attempt on his life last year. 

Tough justice 

Peking (Reuter) — China's 
Supreme People's Court has 
sentenced 14 people to death 
for corruption, fraud and tax 
evasion and prosecuted 120 
government officials, includ- 
ing some in high positions. 

Ottawa talks 

Ottawa — Mr Eduard 
Shevardnadze, the Soviet For- 
eign Minister, will visit Ot- 
tawa from September 30 to 
October 3 for talks with 
Canada's External Affairs 
Minister, Mr Joe Clark. 

Suspect held 

Chandigarh (Reuter) — 
Baljit Singh, a 19-year-old 
Sikh extremist suspected of 
murdering 14 Hindus, was 
captured by police after a car 
chase and shoot-out in the 
centre of Chandigarh. 

Canal clear 

Brussels (Reuter) — Traffic 
on the main Brussels canal 
returned to normal after 
firefighters siphoned off 
440,000 gallons of petrol from 
a stricken barge, hdding up 
traffic for 10 hours. 

Crack haul 

Sydney (AP) — Australian 
police have seized the first 
shipment in this country of 
crack, the cocaine-based drug 
causing concern in the US. 

Up in smoke 

Belgrade (AP) — Eleven 
West German tourists have 
been sentenced or fined this 
summer for publicly burning 
Yugoslav bank notes. 

Camper killed 

Darwin (Reuter) — A croco- 
dile ate a sleeping camper 
beside a river outside a north 
Australian fishing village, 
leaving only his severed legs 
behind. 

Road hazard 

Bahrain (Reuter) — Health 
officials who rounded up 1 14 
stray goats in the capital 
Manama, will fine their own- 
ers for endangering road traf- 
fic safety. 


Kohl sees 
Chirac on 
Paris trip 

From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

Chancellor Kohl of West 
Germany flew to Paris yes- 
terday for talks with M Jac- 
ques Chirac, the French Prime 
Minister, barely two weeks 
after a meeting in Heidelbeig 
with President MitterrancL 
M Chirac, who feds that he 
and his right-wing Govern- 
ment now control foreign 
policy, has been irritated by 
Herr Kohl’s apparent pref- 
erence to do business with a 
Socialist president rather than 
a Gaul list prime minis ter. 

Before yesterday, he had 
met M Mitterrand three times 
for private talks since the 
French election in March, and 
M Chirac only once. 

Nor did he miss the chance 
to visit M Mitterrand last 
night before going on. 

On the agenda were terror- 
ism. industrial co-operation, 
German interest rates and 
nuclear power safety. 


Another plague follows the locust swarms 

Rats destroy African grain 


From Charles Harrison, Yamoussoukro, Ivory Coast 

The threat to African food Senegalese grasshopper are be- 
production from widespread ing stepped up. 

With up to half a million 
grasshoppers to the acre in 
some places, they are eating 
vast quantities of food crops. 

Intensive spraying from the 
air and on the ground is being 
undertaken across the Sahel 


locust swarms is being added 
to by an explosion of the rat 
population in the Sahel region 
of West Africa. The rodents 
are thriving on a diet of 
millions of dead Senegalese 
grasshoppers. 


desert locust in northern 
Qhiopia and the Sudan, from 
the red locust in western 
Tanzania and eastern Zaire, 
mid from the brown locust in 
Botswana and parts of South 
Africa. 

AH these species are breed- 


Millions of rals are destroy- 

ing stocks of stored grain £ ainSft tausT .. e ? mnl ofthe rains. 

Niger. Mali, Burkina Fbso and The FAQ has set up an 


Chad. "Tbe rats have learnt to 
avoid the poison we put down 
for them. We are trying to 
organize night bunts to con- 
trol the rats, but this is not 
enough." a Niger delegate told 
the conference of African food 
ministers taking place here. 

Experts say the insecticides 
used to kill the grasshoppers 
are at such a low concentra- 
tion that they do not effect the 
rats. 

Dr Lukas Brader, director of 
the UN Food and Agriculture 
Oiganization’s plant protec- 
tion division and an inter- 
national expert on locusts, 
said operations against the 


emergency centre in Rome to 
co-ordinate locust operations 
throughout Africa. 

, "The essential task is now to 
direct spraying aircraft to 
where they are most urgently 
needed," Dr Brader said. 

He said the rat threat under- 
lined the need to launch ami- 
locust operations at the 
earliest stage so that the 
locusts do not hatch out to 
provide food for the rats. 

While foe Senegalese grass- 
hopper is threatening foe 
Sahel there are further serious 
threats from foe African 
migratory locust in the Sudan, 
Ethiopia and Chad, from foe 


Mr Edouard Saouma, direc- 
tor general of foe FAO, told 
the regional conference: “The 
ending ofthe drought has been 
amixed blessing. The threat 
from locusts and grasshoppers 
is now threatening to assume 
catastrophic proportions." 

He said there had been a 
gratifying response to the ap- 
peals for aid to combat the 
locusts, but international co- 
operation must be strength- 
ened further to co-ordinate the 
fight. 

More than £30 million has 
peen raised from donors 
including i he Europeen 
Community and foe United 
States in response to appeals - 
from the FAO. 


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Ottawa tails 


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r.u'k haul 


Karachi deaths reach 2ft 

Leader of 747 
hijack gunmen 
fails in attempt 
to flee hospital 

Fftnn Michael Haunfyn, Karachi 


OVfcKSfcAS INfcWS 


The leader of the four 
Palestinian gunmen held after 
uie Karachi hijack of a Pan 
American Airways jumbo 
made an unsuccessful attempt 
to escape from hospital, 
according to Pakistani police 
sources yesterday. 


I m. in s ^‘ 






s 




daily reported 'that the hi- 
jacker, known variously as 
Boomar Husain or Mustafo, 

w 5- se fH! il y at Jinnah 
Medical Centre, where he was 
being treated for gunshot 
wounds suffered at the time of 
hisarresL 

Weakened by his wounds, 
he was not able to strike with 
sufficient force, and the guard 
raised the alarm. A second 
guard grabbed him, and be- 
tween them they fastened him 
to his bed. The report said he 
had been moved to a more 
secure place of detention. 

All four hijackers have now 
been formally identified by 
passengers and other wit- 
nesses before a local 
magistrate. 

Criminal proceedings have 
been officially launched 
against the four and their 
unknown accomplices for 
conspiracy, air piracy, mul- 
tiple murder, attempted mur- 
der, possession of unauth- 
orized arms and explosives 
and wrongful confinement of 
the passengers. 

It was also disclosed yes- 
terday that the death toD in the 
incident had risen to 20 with 
the death of a Mexican who 
had been critically ill with 
bullets lodged in his head and 
neck. 

The initial questioning of 
the group is reported to have 
brought hints of a link with the 
Abu Nidal group of Palestin- 


ian commandos, and the Paki- 
stan authorities have now 
asked their Western counter- 
parts for information on the 
Abu Nidal network. 

Raids have been continuing 
on the homes of Arab students 
in Karachi, although they are 

4m L. ‘ 1 J . . « . . r 


A j aimougn mey are 

^J^klangu^e ^ ^ have yielded nothing of 
renortwt ihat *h- substance. Many students raid 

they wen* fbm PLO sup- 
porters. 

Local magistrates have been 
made available to supervise a 
senes of raids by four teams of 
detectives. So for about 50 
• people have been questioned, 
and other investigators have 
gathered weapons, empty car- 
tridge cases, bullets and splin- 
ters of shrapnel to try to 
ascertain where the gang's 
arsenal came from. 

Detectives have revealed 
that, in addition to Airport 
Security Force uniforms, the 
gang also had ASF identity 
cards. 

Pan Am is reported here to 
have suspended its flights to 
Karachi until assurances of 
“better” security arrange- 
ments are made 

Meanwhile, Miss Naija 
Mishra, the flight stewardess 
who took advantage of the 
darkness when the lights failed 
on the aircraft to open the 
emergency door and chute, 
and was shot dead by the 
hijackers for her com 
yesterday given the first o_ 
what will no doubt be many 
posthumous bravery awards. 

The Prisoners’ Aid Society 
said that its humane award 
would be given through the 
Indian consul-general in Ka- 
rachi to Miss Mishra, who, 
like all the cabin crew, was 
Indian. 


Chile’s united opposition pins hopes on Army moderates 


From Lake Sagans 
Santiago 

* As President Pinochet an- 
nounced hash measures in 
response to an attempt on his 
fife on Sunday night, oppo- 
sition grasps here signed a 
new accord, based on the hope 
that someone within the armed 
forces would be wfifing to 
negotiate a return to 
democracy. 

The opposition groups, 
cove rin g a broad spe c inm that 
indaded the Christian Demo- 
cratic Party, the conservative 
National Party and several 
moderate left-wing parties, say 
the agreement lays the founda- 
tion for a stable democracy 
that could replace the military 
Government, which celebrates 
its 13th annrrersary tomorrow. 

However, judging from 
declarations by high-ranking 
military officers, the attack on 
General Pinochet 1ms left 
them more muted than ever 
behind their Conunaader-in- 
ChteC, and he is speaking of 
war not negotiations. 

“Now the war is going to 
begin on our side ami we are 
to be very harsh,” 

I Pinochet said. “All 
those people involved in hn- 
man rights will have to be 
expelled.” 

. News bnlletiBS throughout 
Monday and yesterday re- 
ported the arrest of more and 
more opposition leaders. Four 
foreign priests were also re- 
ported to be under arrest 
There are unconfirmed re- 
ports that the Interior Min- 
istry has ordered the arrest of 
more than 50 people, and it is 



Secret policemen forcing four 

rumoured that some may be 
expelled from Chile or exiled 
to remote villages. 

Arguments are raging in 
Chile over whether the attack 
on President Pinochet was 
really the work of an aimed 
opposition group or a Govern- 
ment “show” to shore np his 
support in the armed forces. 

One of the attackers is 
believed to have been C£sar 


Chilean students at gunpoint from a Dutch Embassy car into 
Booster, son of a former 
Chilean Ambassador to 
Britain. 

He is accused of renting the 
house where the ambush was 


planned, and several of the 
vehicles nsed in the attack 
were also hired in his n*«*w . 
Senor Burster returned to 
Chile last March after living 
in exile in England. 

Police estimate that 12 to 15 


well-trained men carried out 
the attack on the President, 
with support from another 50 
people. 

According to official re- 
ports, General Pinochet es- 
caped with his life because the 
attackers bad left the road 
behind jhis car uncovered. 

President Reagan was re- 
ported to have condemned the 
attack on General Pinochet 


police vehicles in Santiago. 

bat added that the incrod ac- 
tion of a state of siege was for 
too “extreme” a measure. 

Meanwhile. Mr Rene 
Aqnarone, the Cnftnral Atta- 
che at the Dutch Embassy 
here, an nounced that he would 
protest against the treatment 
received when he tried to drive 
four Chilean university stu- 
dents out of the embassy on 
Monday. 


The four entered the em- 
bassy apparently to bring 
Student problems to the atten- 
tion of the inter nation a l 
community. However, they 
were suspected by polite of 
involvement in the attack on 
General Pinochet. 

When they left the embassy 
in two -diplomatic cars they 
-were surrounded by armed 
police and secret police, who 
forced the car doors open and 
dragged the students out kick- 
ing and punching them. They 
were eventually bundled into 
vehicles without licence plates. 

Four other students, who 
were apparently on a similar 
znissiou, spent the night hi the 
Peruvian Embassy. 

• THE HAGUE: The 
Netherlands yesterday pro- 
tested strongly to Chile over 
the incident involving the four 
Chilean students, in which 
armed police also threatened 
Dntch diplomats (Renter 
reports). 

• MADRID: Police arrested 
21 left-wing demonstrators 
who occupied the Chilean 
consulate here yesterday in 
protest against the state of 
siege imposed by President 
Pinochet (Renter reports). 

They left the building after 
painting anti-Pinocbet slogans 
around the consulate door and 
banging a Chilean flag from 
the window. 

• BUENOS AIRES: Some 30 
Chilean exiles will try to 
return home despite the state 
of siege in Chile to mark the 
13th anniversary of the mili- 
tary coup, a spokesman for the 
exiles said here yesterday 
(Reuter reports) 


Another US air strike 
might be less precise 

From Nicholas Beeston, Valletta 


A future US raid against a 
h a rdlin e Arab state suspected 
of supporting terrorism would 
be “more destructive** and 
could cost more Ifre£-if Europe 
refused to co-operate in tie 
attack, a senior Western dip- 
lomatic source warned here. 

The diplomat said that the 
US Sixth Fleet in the Medi- 
terranean was capable of a 
punitive strike, but that air- 
craft available had less sophis- 
ticated weaponry than that 
used on the raid against Libya, 

“The last strike was very 
small and surgical because the 
planes carried very precise, 


sophisticated missiles,** said 
the source. “It would be much 
more difficult to limit the 
da m a ge If they nsed aircraft 
from the carriers.” 

In the last raid, US bombers 
flew from bases in Britain. If 
Britain was to Tefuse a second 
request, the planes would most 
probably come from two US 
carriers. 

• Rome: A small bomb found 
in a bag with a stolen pistol 
outside a building inhabited by 
several Libyan exile families 
here was defused after anony- 
mous telephone calls (Renter 
reports). 


Summit hinges on 
Taba agreement 

From David Bernstein, Jerusalem 
Negotiators from Israel, the effort to save the situation. 


Egypt and the United Stales 
were yesterday trying to sal- 
vage this week's planned sum- 
mit meeting between the 
Israeli Prime Minister, Mr 
Shimon Peres, and President 
Mubarak of Egypt. 

No official date has been 
announced for the meeting, 
pending a final agreement be- 
tween the two sides on the Ta- 
ba arbitration dispute. But Is- 
rael has been acting on the as- 
sumption that it would take 
place today or at the latest 
tomorrow. 

Weeks of intensive work to 
complete the arbitration ag- 
reement appeared to have 
gone up in smoke yesterday 
morning when Mr Peres or- 
dered the Israeli negotiating 
team to return home after 
Egypt refused to accept Israel’s 


which threatened to precip- 
itate a serious crisis in Israeli- 
Egyptian relations. 

He was back in Cairo yes- 
lenday after a brief visit to 
Saudi Arabia, where it was 
speculated that he had tried to 
persuade the Saudis to lend ax 
least their tadt support to the 
planned meeting between Mr 
Peres and Mr Mubarak. 

One possible outcome __ 
any failure to reach agreement 
could be an Israeli military 
strike against the Palestinian 
terrorists it believes were 
responsible for Saturday's 
massacre in the Istanbul syna- 
gogue. This has been consid- 
ered here to be less likely as 
long as the summit was in the 
offing, for fear of embarrass- 
ing Mr Mubarak. 


Egypt nefi f scd l ° • Ship intercepted: An Army 

demarcation of what it claims wp JS„ mn confirmed yester- 
be the in terna u onaltorder day jjj at ^ israeK naval patrol 
nMwi lb;- two countries. - -j i 


between the two countries. 

The dispute involves 75 
square yards of desert sand at 
border stone 91. just north of 
Taba. Israel claims that agree- 
ment has already been reached 


intercepted a ship midway be- 
tween Cyprus and the Leban- 
ese coast nine days ago which 
was carrying arms and am- 
munition for Mr Yassir Ara- 
fat'S Fatah guerrillas in Leb- 


11 . . — j' rats raian guemuas xu uco- 

and Egypt has anon. The arms were seized 

Despite the breakdown m ^ ^ ^ ^ CftvJ 
the Taba talfeeffo^ wCTe mined l0 proceed, the spoke* 
being made yesterday to find a ^ said /' 
wav out of the impasse and tf . . . 

iSjmsssta Minister arrives: 


ler. Mr Esmat . - . 
met the two negotiating teams 
the early afternoon and 


in 


scheduled another meeting 

18 The US Assistant Secretary 
of State. Mr Richard Murphy, 
was also said to be involved in 


Oitidftez. arrived in Israel yes- 
terday to start a ihree-day offi- 
cial visit, the first ever by a 
Spanish minister to Israel. 
The countries established dip- 
lomatic relations in February 
this year. 


Australian link opened 


Svdney - The final link of a 
road around Australia has 
been completed, making it 
possible 10 drive around the 
country on a tarmac surface 
(Stephen Taylor writes). 

The last stretch, about J 70 
miles, was sealed in the Kim- 

scheduled completion date - 
the I9S8 bicentenary of Euro- 
pean settlement. mnn n 
A road more than 10,000 
miles long now runs north 
from Sydney along the 


Queensland coast, across the 
tropical top of the continent 
through the Northern Terri- 
tory. down the Indian Ocean 
coast of Western Australia to 
Perth and directly east to the 
Pacific Ocean and Sydney. 

The Government believes 
completion of the road will 
stimulate tourism to the 
north-west and make it easier I 
to keep the region supplied. 
During the wet season, from 
December to . March, many 
outlying cattle stations in the I 
Kimberley region were cut oil 



On the 25th of July the new Social Security 
Act 1986 became law. Beforming Social Security is 
. under way. 

The basic state retirement pension- the ‘old 
age pension’ -goes on as before, and will be in- 
creased regularly to cover price rises. 

But in addition there will be important new 
opportunities for occupational and personal pen- 
sions. Child benefit too win continue for every bium 
. in every family- 

But many other benefits, such as PIS, Supple- 
mentary Benefit, Housing Benefit, Maternity Allow- 


ance, will either change or be replaced by new ones. 

The aim is to make them simpler, «nd belp 
social security do a better job for those in greatest 
need. 

The reforms will start coming in from the 
6th April 1987. 

If you are receiving one of the benefits that 
are going to change, there will be more information 
for you later. 

In the meantime, there are two general leaflets 
which you can get now from social security offices, 
or by sending off this coupon. 


the social SECtrarry act Q 

| SAVIHG P0B RSnBEMENT: PKNSI0IS Q 


Address and Postcode. 


ITJ 

■5>bLj Bv The DEPARTMENT OF H£AL t h AND SOCIAL SECURITY 


















I 



8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Praise for British minister’s role 


Snags remain despite 
tactical success on 
EEC’s 1987 budget 


After all-night talks ending 
early yesterday morning, Mr 
Peter Brooke, Minister of 
State at the Treasury, 
achieved his second tactical 
success as President of the 
EEC Budget Council by secur- 
ing majority agreement on a 
draft budget for 1987 and 
managing to have the crisis on 
this year's budget put on one 
side. 

Bui at least three remaining 
snags could unravel Mr 
Brooke's budget plans by the 
end of the British presidency 
of the ECC in December the 
growing EEC north-south di- 
vision on how Europe's lim- 
ited resources should be spent; 
the £500 million revenue 
shortfall which has arisen in 
this year’s amended budget, 
and which threatens to spill 
over into 1987 spending; and 
the postponement of an extra 
£240 million which should 
have been paid to Britain as 
additional budget rebate this 
year because of increased Brit- 
ish VAT payments into EEC 
coffers. 

Mr Brooke, who in July 
achieved a belated 1986 bud- 
get despite national dif- 
ferences, won praise yesterday 
from officials who had been 
steeling themselves for a sec- 
ond sleepless night as argu- 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 

men is continued between 
north and south over agri- 
cultural spending — the bulk 
of the budget - and social and 
regional funds for 1987, from 
which the southern states 
stand to benefit most. 

The final draft budget for 
1987 of nearly £25 billion 
includes a special reserve fund 
of £70 million for Spain and 
Portugal, to compensate the 
EEC's newcomers for the ad- 
verse affects of EEC enlarge- 
ment, and £35 million for 
Greece under the Integrated 
Mediterranean Programme. 

As a result, Spain and 
Greece reluctantly agreed to 
the draft budget, although 
Portugal and Ireland voted 
against and Italy abstained. 

Officials said there would be 
further dispute over the 1987 
budget and the 1986 shortfall 
when the European Par- 
liament discusses the proposal 
in Strasbourg. 

The budget gives rise to an 
annual tussle between the 
Parliament and the Council, 
which has to give a second and 
final reading. 

Unlike the 1986 budget, 
which exhausted and ex- 
ceeded revenues limited by 
the 1.4 per cent ceiling on 
national contributions to EEC 
finances, the proposed 1987 


budget is within the limits of 
anticipated income, with 
some £430 million left for 
unexpected factors. 

But this is a slim margin, 
and the tell of the dollar and 
declining ofl prices have al- 
ready caused a gaping hole in 
the 1986 budget, which was so 
painstakingly arrived at two 
months ago. 

The budget ministers re- 
ferred the 1986 shortfall to the 
Commission, saying that, al- 
though it amounted to “a 
serious situation", it was still 
too early to say what the final | 
revenue loss for 1986 would 1 
be. 

They asked Mr Henning 
Cbistophersen, the Budget 
Commissioner, to “take all 
possible measures to ensure a 
balanced budget while avoid- 
ing slippage of expenditure to 
1987”. 

A spokesman for Mr 
Chistophersen described this 
as a vote of confidence in the 
Commission, and said the 
Budget Council had observed 
the principle of budget 
discipline. 

Mrs Thatcher has vowed to 
make budget discipline a hall- 
mark of Britain's handling of 
EEC finances during its six- 
month presidency. 


Amnesty focus on 
missing Tamils 


By Caroline Moorehead 


Linos Aloysios Franklin, 
aged 30, a technical officer 
working for the Sri Lankan 
Immigration Department at 
Chenuunadn, was last seen on 
December 2, 1984, when mem- 
bers of die security forces, 
arriving at his camp in a 
convoy of vehicles, herded 
together 11 men working there 
and drove them away. 

In villages and camps near 
by a farther 90 were similarly 
arrested. Neither Mr Franklin 
nor any of die others has been 
seen again. The authorities 
deny all knowledge of the 
arrests. 

That day marked a peak in 
the number of people taken 
away by security forces and 
who have since disappeared. 
According to a report pub- 
lished today by Amnesty 
International, Sri Laakaz 
"DisappearancexT a pattern of 
human rights violations began 
to emerge in late 1984, with 
frequent disappearances since. 

It was then that armed 
Tamil groups, seeking to bring 
pressure on the Government to 
set op a separate Tamil state, 
stepped np their attacks on 
security forces, politicians and 
Sinhalese tivilians. 

In response, the Govern- 
L; 


meat began arresting hun- 
dreds of young Tamil men, 
especially those aged between 
18 and 30, and on occasion 
even the entire adult male 
population of villages. 

Amnesty International be- 
lieves it is important to clarify 
every "disappearance” as 
quickly as possible, while 
there is still a chance that the 
"disappeared” person will be 
located in detention and a 
campaign can be moulted for 
his release. 

It seems unlikely that Mr 
Franklin will be as fortunate. 


PRISONERSI 


OF CONSCIENCE 


SRI LANKA 



Mr Franklin: taken away 
by the security forces. 


His arrest came shortly after 
Tamil separatists attacked 
and killed 65 Sinhalese Chil- 
ians living in Kent and DoQar 
farms, a rehabilitation settle- 
ment for mostly Sinhalese 
former convicts. 

The two farms had earlier 
housed Tamil refugees and the 
Government's takeover of 
them had been opposed by 
Tamil groups. Kent and Dollar 
farms lie dose to Chenuunadn 
and it was in this exact area 
that the 100 or so 
"disappearances" took place. 

Mr Franklin's father has 
been seeking news of his son. 
The most reliable account of 
the day's events comes from 
two men, working nearby, wbo 
witnessed a namber of young 
men guarded by Army officers 
being led away to be shot, and 
later saw fires in a clearing in 
the jungle. 

Sri Lanka : “ Disappearances ' \ 
Amnesty International. 5 Rob- 
erts Place. Loudon. EC1R OEJ. 
£2.50. 


Denmark 
to limit 
refugees 

From Christopher Follett 
Copenhagen 

Denmark's Conservative- 
led minority Government is 
to seek urgent parliamentary 
backing for one-year trial leg- 
islation banning refugees from 
entering the country. 

Faced with a record influx 
of Lebanese, stateless Palestin- 
ian and Tamil political asy- 
lum-seekers in recent months, 
refugee reception facilities 
have been swamped. 

August was a record month, 
with 1,600 refugees pouring 
into the country, bringing the 
total asylum-seekers so far this 
year to 5,600. 

Mr Poul Schluter, the 
Conservative Prime Minister, 
yesterday said that the situa- 
tion was approaching "mass 
migration”, and that a one- 
year block on refugees could 
allow authorities to catch up 
with a rising backlog of 
applications. 

The number of refugees 
entering Denmark has risen 
from a few hundred in 1 983 to 
8.600 last year. Of this total. 
6,000 were granted political 
asylum after a liberalization of 
Danish refugee laws which 
allowed asylum-seekers to 
stay in the country until their 
cases were heard - which 
often takes up to a year. 


Pakistan 
opposition 
movement 
in disarray 

From Micbael Hamlyn 
Karachi 

The Pakistan Government 
assuming, no doubt correctly, 
dut it is in no immediate 
danger from the fractious 
opposition, has freed afl the 
leaders of political parties who 
were locked up last month. 
The best known of them is 
Miss Benazir Bhutto, but they 
also include the first and 
second rank leaders of almost 
all the other parties trim 
combined in the Movement for 
the Restoration of Democracy 
(MRD). 

Miss Bhutto went to court 
yesterday despite the fact that 
she had been released from 
jail, to spend five minutes 
withdrawing her petition 
against her detention, and a 
few minutes more addressioga 
welcoming crowd of opposition 
enthusiasts outside. "This is a 
peaceful agitation, this is a 
non-violent protest," she said. 

The movement is now suf- 
fering from a considerable toss 
- of face following its failure to 
make any serious dent on tire 
regime after the arrests, and 
political observers believe a 
large question mark must 
hang over the planned agita- 
tion due to be^n on September 
20 . 

Miss Bhutto, asked about 
the September 20 nl ti mafniw — 
the date by which the Govern- 
ment of President Zfa most 
announce new elections — said 
it was np to the MRD to decide 
what to do, but sbe implied 
that all these plans are op for 
reconsideration. A number of 
meetings of MRD leaders are 
planned before September 20. 

The political scene has 
changed somewhat since the 
mass arrests, and it is now 
likely that there will be a big 

realignment of forces within 
the opposition movement. The 
main change has been the 
launching of a party led by Mr 
G. M. Jatoi a dose associate 
of the former prime minister, 
Mr Znlfikar Ali Bhutto, Miss 
Bhutto's martyred father. 

Thao is a widespread belief 
that Mr Jatoi may be offered 
(for die third time) the job of 
prime minister under Presi- 
dent Zia and the indications 
are that if it is offered again he 
could well take ft. 

There would be a powerful 
attraction for other MRD 
parties to pall out and join 
him, to obtain a share of 
power. Many of the smaller 
parties within the MRD are 
increasingly disenchanted 



Miss Benazir Bhutto embracing a supporter outside the High Court in Karachi yesterday. 


with Miss Bhutto's leader- 
ship, which they see as likely 
to bring power only to her 
Pakistan People's Party 
(PPP). 

Members of the smaller 
parties fed they have had to 
suffer the pnin and humili- 
ation of die anti-government 
cam p ai gn, but when it comes 
to elections the PPP may well 
sweep the board. They are 
therefore highly anxious to 
enter into a genuine electoral 
alliance with Miss Bhutto so 
that they may be guaranteed 
seats. An alliance or nothing is 
how they see it. 

The Tehrik Istiqlal Party of 
Air Marshall Asgar Khan has 
already divorced itself from 
the MRD, believing die Aug- 
ust agitation was Hi-timed and 
iD-concefred. At the other end 
of the political spectrum the 
left-oriented alliance of the 


Awami National Party, led by 
Mr Wali Khan, has been 
keeping well out of the firing 
line. 

Mr Wali Khan left in mid- 
August for a 10-day visit to 
Moscow, saying his party was 
not yet wefl enough organized 
to take part m the agitation. 
The visit extended and be is 
not doe to return to his head- 
quarters in die North-West 
Frontier province until Friday, 
after a visit to the Afghan 
capital, KabaL 

The MRD agitation has 
meanwhile been suspended for 
the religions celebrations 
surrounding the tenth day of 
the holy month of Moharrnm, 
although MRD activists have 
been arrested during the past 
few days in the interior of Sind 
province, where the opposition 
was making itself felt during a 
tour by Mr Muhammad Khan 


June jo, the Prime Minister. 
He is a Sindhi, but that did not 
stop the crowds from giving 
his retinue a hard time. 

In Larkana welcome arches 
of leaves and flowers were torn 
down by demonstrators, and 
the next day he was greeted by 
strikes in Dado, More and 
Qazi Ahmed. On the national 
highway outside Qazi Ahmed 
a 5,000-strong mob yelled 
"Long Live Bhutto". 

They tore the official (fag off 
an accompanying minister’s 
car and slapped the private 
secretary of die chief official of 
the Mas lira League, the Prune 
Minister's party, who had not 
wound up his window. 

Anti-government rallies 
were held in more than two 
dozen towns in the province, 
and police resorted to baton 
charges in Hyderabad, Suk- 
kor, Ubauro and Moro. 


Japan to 
join US 
Star Wars 
project 

From A Correspondent 
Tokyo 

Japan is to join the 
America's Star Wan space 
defence research programme, 
overcoming any qualms u 
might have had about dealing 
wifi nuclear weapons technol- 
ogy for the sake of the 
scientific benefits, the pro- 
gramme could bring to its in- 
dustry and economy. 

Mr Masaharu Goioda. the 
Chief Cabinet Secretary, an- 
nounced the decision yes- 
terday, ending months of 
debate over how best to take 
part in the Strategic Defence 
Initiative. 

He said Japan was joining 
in the hope that its substantial 

technological knowledge 
would help to strengthen 
Western defences against nuc- 
lear attack, and that it would 
bring new ideas into its own 
research and development 
programmes. 

Washington has now per- 
suaded Tokyo, London, Bonn 
and Tel Aviv to pool their 
scientific talents to develop 
the as yet untested technology, 
which would deploy laser and 
nuclear anti-missile weapons 
in space. 

Many Japanese scientists 
are, however, still suspicious 
that the US plan would allow 
Washington too much control 
over the most advanced elec- 
tronic and laser research of its 
allies. Others believe that 
Japan has more to gain by co- 
operating with the US. 

Mr Yasubiro Nakasone, the 
Prime Minister, effectively ig- 
nored Opposition accusations 
that its decision to join the 
SDI was in violation of 
Japan's anti-nuclear policies 
and its 1969 resolution on the 
peaceful development of 
space. 

Japanese industries are keen 
on the SDI programme, which 
promises billions of dollars in 
research funds at a time when 
the slowing Japanese economy 
is squeezing their finances. 

• SEOUL: South Korea yes- 
terday reversed an earlier 
decision and said it would 
attend a foreign ministers’ 
meeting with Japan today as 
scheduled (Reuter reports). 

The sudden change came 
after Tokyo reports that Mr 
Nakasone had dismissed his 
outspoken nationalist Educa- 
tion Minister, Mr Masayuki 
Fujio, whose controversial re- 
marks about Tokyo’s 
colonization of Korea sparked 
a diplomatic row with Seoul 


Threat to yachtsman 


Perth (AP) — Extortionists 
have threatened to destroy a 
luxury yacht owned by the 
Australian millionaire, Mr 
Alan Bond, right unless he 
pays more than £40.000. 

Southern Cross UL a £10 
million, 165 ft yacht is being 
built in a Japanese shipyard. 

Police said Mr Bond, who 
won the America's Cup in 
1983, had received a letter ‘ 
saying: “Your new craft is 
most impressive. A pity that it 
was built outside Australia.” 



Britons’ case 
adjourned 
in Emirates 

Dubai (Reuter) — The trial 
of two Britons accused of 
murdering an Indian security 
guard was adjourned until 
September 22 yesterday. 

Mark SpaJduy*, aged 19, of 
Jarrow, and Michael Brown, 
aged 22, of Sutton Coldfield, 
deny premeditated murder by 
running the guard over in 
their car. The charge carries 
the death penalty. 


Enrile says Army may stop supporting Aquino 


From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

The Philippine Defence 
Minister, Mr Juan Ponce 
Enrile, has warned that he is 
losing patience with “certain 
officials in the Government” 
for being biased against the 
military, and has broadly 
hinted that he and the military 
could withdraw support from 


the Aquino administration. 

“By keeping quiet about 
Communist atrocities these 
officials are allowing them- 
selves to be used by the rebels 
to discredit the military,” Mr 
Enrile told 1,000 officers and 
men at the Army's weekly 
flag-raising ceremony at a sub- 
urban military camp. 

He said the silence was 
tantamount to aiding the 


insurgent propaganda war 
against the armed forces. 

“If this trend continues, 
wherein the military is always 
put in a bad light while the in- 
surgents are pictured as saints, 
I might lose my patience.” 

His speech was bannered 
across the front pages of Mani- 
la's newspapers, with some de- 
scribing it as the strongest sign 


yet of Mr Enrile’s disaffection 
from tbe Aquino 
Government's peace negotia- 
tions with Communist rebels, 
in an attempt to end the 17- 
year-old insurgency. 

Mr Enrile. who is excluded 
from the peace talks, last week 
accused Communist negotia- 
tors of presenting “tricky” de- 
mands, and warned that they 
could not be trusted. 


Afghan rebels hit by 
big Soviet offensive 


Islamabad (AP) — Soviet 
and Afghan jets blasted hills 
north of ■ Kabul while 
armoured columns and in- 
fantry launched ground at- 
tacks against guerrilla pos- 
itions, Western diplomatic 
sources said yesterday. 

The sources said Soviet and 
Afghan forces launched a big 
offensive last Thursday ag- 
ainst guerrilla units in the 
Paghman area north of the 
capital. 

The offensive was designed 
to drive the guerrillas out of 
Paghman and end frequent 
insurgent attacks on Kabul, 
they said. 

The diplomatic sources also 
said yesterday that there had 
been fighting south of Kabul, 
in Loghar and Kabul prov- 
inces. Soviet jets bad bombed 
the town of Qarabagh. near 
Kabul in retaliatory actions. 

Soviet and Afghan air and 
ground forces began the opera- 
tion in Paghman, in hills 


about 12 miles north of Kabul 
with artillery and rocket 
bombardments that lasted 
more than four hours, the 
sources said. Artillery units in 
the capital had joined the 
bombardment 

Soviet jets blasted the 
Paghman hills in waves of up 
to six planes at a time as the 
fighting continued for two 
days, and helicopter gun ships 
and troop 'camera were 
sighted flying from Kabul air 
base toward Paghman, the 
sources said. 

Paghman city was bombed 
in the fighting and there were 
civilian casualties, but no 
figures were available, the 
sources said. 

Details on Soviet and Af- 
ghan losses were sketchy, but 
some reports said that up to 50 
Soviet soldiers had either been 
killed or captured. The West- 
ern sources said they had no; 
information on guerrillas- 
losses. ’ 






Degrees awarded by the University of Glasgow 


Loughborough University' 


The following degrees are an- 
nounced by the University of 
Glasgow: 

BA Planning 

Ona tOH Addison: M J Alllnm: K D 
Brown: D H Campbell: RJM Cook; M 
Frawr: J. E Cunt, □ a gukoic a r 
H mdrv: L A K Hllk-y: A Hutchison: C 
M MiCoiTttlon: A M McDonald: R A 
Mac Mar; M Mahon: J A MHchdl: H 
O'Hanlon: J Sanderson. R K Watson. 
Ctau *CJF Mammon: D J Moore. 

MBCfaB 

Hook A D Macrae. 

CMi—mtartnir R l Bauantyne: D o 
Dodds; A J Marshall. 

Ordtaanr dmm J H Bambcr: A D 
Barr. PF Bnuiin W A BnL J Boyce: 
C M Boyd: E Branldn: M C Brims: S K 
Bryan: K G Buchan: J A Burley: H J 
Cameron: A M Campbell; P Campbell; 
J H Chalmers: P Clark: J C Clasper. G 
C ColIKfcrr: J A OpnneUy: L CrMgmile: 

I A S Cullen: D A Cummins J G 
DalrympH>: C A Datm: w J D Doans: 

J J Devlin: G J Dots: J K CUM. a 
D onaldson; V I P Daman: V m 
D uqgan: G M Dunn: R A Dunsmutn V 
A Fakhourv: J P FarreU: C I Fellown: 
K M Ferguson: C K Foo: M P 
Foxworthy. G M Fraser. M M E 
GaUowav. M M CniKUU: D S Gardi- 
ner: A Gardner; M E K Garth wane: j 
E Geualiy: I E J Gray: RD Hall: G C 
Kalin . K G Mamie: M C Hepburn: e 
M Holltoan; C Howai: M A Hume: I A 
Husain. B M Huicmson: J f Hutton: 

A J A Hvde: H M Ireland: K £ James: 
E A Johnson: M P Kelly: D J C 
Kennedy: G M Kino: W R Kirkwood: 
C B K«: C K Koh. P F KOnff S H 
Lakha. 4 P .Leach: w K Llfsocu B K 
Lira: 6 H Lim: T C Lint: S M K 
Ungaro: w L Loo: J McDevut; A G 
MacDonald: A c McDonald: I □ 
Macdonald: O McConfeaJ: P G 
MrGreoor. m m M Mctnnes: P B 
Mclnm-i. E A McIntosh: S M Macken- 
zie: C MeKlmton: K R McLacnian: M F 
McLaudhiin: A MrLrtlan: L S 
McMencmin: E R McR«w. A J 
MaUocri: A J Marker: J C Moran; H E 
J Miner: J M Muter. J G Mills: m c a 
motto. C A Morion: H MoudnU: L J 
Mudie: KKNnCM NKoteonfjE OB 
\er; F A Partes: R U Patel; F J B 
Pearsall: S E Peebles; A E Penny: a M 
Pert no c L Plan: E A Quinn: □ A 
Rantae: R M Richmond; A N Ritchie: 

S H Roberson: P D Roebuck'. C 
Raney: N C N Sdlmond. M R 
Sampson. D L Sandler: M Segwagwe: 

K L Snernr: A I Sim: R J Suite: J 
Smell. A J Smith. E A Smith; M A 
smiin: L H boo: K Sawerbuttt: A W 
Slnriwn. S A Slcw-ark I S Tail: R 
Tierney; J M Tiller J A Tobias: K w 
T Tbiroj: D Walker A J Warren; E G 
Watson: J M Watson: G J White; N W 
V» tills. R J Wilson: M K Worm: P K 
Won* V M Yap. 

Bachelor of Dental Surgery 
CgwuMUlw J Gibson: G D smart. 
Ordinary Bmw E F Balkln: C W 
Barclay: G M BeOtune: M N Bouicoti: 

A w Boyd. J W Boyle: P C Brash: W 
H Brown: M Sums: T F Burns: C K 
Churn. K F Chung;. J M .Cowan; O M 
Cumuiw W p CtnhJey: J C Devine; p 


R DO Rrqo. H G Gillies: B D Haimllon: 
M A Hoqyjn: N Khan: K H Lee: C E 
LocNtcoa. J w Lyon: K C McDonald: 


G O "Toole: J M Paion: 

Rankin: M A Reilly: G M Robertson; K 
J scon: R M p seeker S 8 Sharma: N 
l Sturts; T Sunderland: F Tatt; D 
Taylor: D H Tondson; E W Wales: R 
G wan; n f wtshart: a m Wright w 
A Yeudall. 

BSc Science 

Ordhnnr d me D WAIttm: A Allan: 
p AngrtliG Atmos: M c Borne A S 
Bell: J H Berry: D Btckentaff: A 
Busoorough. A Bole: M Brander M C 
Brogan. C M Brown: G A J Brown: M 
j Bwqoynv: M R Cameron: R J 

~andUn: p j i 


Connell: I A Christie: R 


col rain: J Connelly: C L G Coooer: s 
Cowan; A J Docherty W IV 
Donaldson: A P Ouffy: J S Duncan; K 
" Ferguson: _G .Ferine: A Pern a: N 


Fitzsimmons: M A Fogoo: H L Forrest: 
SChafur: S M GUUes. D C Craham: J 
M era rum: M A Hayden: W J 
Henu>hlU. J P Hughes: V A Jackson: J 
B LUley: W M lo: T J Lynch: K J 
Lyon: F MaeAlllster: E McAnernev. A 
E Macaulay: J S McCulloch: c J 
MrCrral: a m McGuire: S M 
Mentally: S Machines, D G Madvcr. 1 
J McKay: A M Macxenzte: A R 
McKenzie: C McKernan: F A Madde. 


itunro: K w T No: J M O'Donnell: M 
. O'Mailley: G Otieill. K H CTNetU. L 
‘eiwnan: S Pickering: C A Pollock. J L 


McMahon: ~F A Moctvetl: G A 
MacPhmon: F J Marker; C K 

MarMull: GG H Millar; R C Miller J 
B Moauer: n R Morgan; J Moms F B 
Munro- K W 

Penman; s' Picketing; ' _ 

Rktdec S M Rodger. J A Sowar N a 
S mttn: w S Sneddon: T Sommers llle: 
T SteeditUn: C J StirunojG J Tear D 
C Thomson: P w Thorbufn: J 
Tray nor E L Underwood: I D M 
Wallace: C L warreoder H S 
While* ord: N C WUeatofrtte: C wiuam* 
son: A M Wilson: B M woman: E L 
woods; J B woods: A S Y wic A P 
Young; J D Young: R G Young. 

Bacbctor of Veterinary 
Medicine and Surgery 

Hoot; O L Donahjhotu J Dubes. 
CemmeodHtaa: A D Gctncnce. M P 
Fogden: J K French: G S LaOa: A T 
Taylor 

Ordinary Degree: P G AflotL J F M 
Berendr. A Brown: A Bruce. F A 
But I nr A G Cochrane: K Darroch: M 
C Duncan; D M Forrester: J A 
Gentleu M A Hunter: S r Jackson: J J 
Jefferson: C R Jeschke; A M Jones: W 
C S Kennedy: N C Lanoworthy: W k 
L auqMin: J M Lee. A M MtAlindin: S 
M McLaughlin: J M Martin: M J 
Mile hell. P J Molinon: C L Monk: I A 
Nam lam: K J Nelson: |W A Paterson: P 
J Hating G B Rtrhardson: D T Robb: 
C M Rom. A M RumcU; J C Shrtgh. J D 
Tharme C A Vencft; M p i Watson w 
P weaver. D J Wlbon. P A WooU. 

Bachelor of Music 

Clast t J Cowan: C J Murdoch. 
Ordinary Deeres: G J Rankin; F M 
Young 

Bachelor of Education 

Cun 7s J C Doyle. 


Bachelor of Architectural 
Studies 

Din t: E M Tuson. 

Ctau b AG Bow: S M R Clow: L J 
HaraUMn: M S IngOs: P H Johnston: F 
J V Lyon. F McColL R K McLean: R S 

PWaiu j a Smith. 


_i Dumb Baird: L Bryce: D j 
C rawford: TP Grade: N M M CrnOr: 
w R Grubb: A T Klrtt: MH Lee: P S 
Manasseh. M R M Milled DR Nlmmo: 
C A Raso: V I Thomson: H T Wolf. 

BA i Royal Scottish Academy of Music 
and Drama) 

. d u r st G A Bad: A J Baxter: 

: A J Botger: C A Bonnyman; 

A Brodte: G M Brown: S M Brown: Y 
K Burnett R A CamffliBS L A 
CoCkranu D G Crwttn: A M Davidson: 
N G Davies: H Deacon: H Oemsersy: H 
Draw: J R Dunsmora: V Eme ry: L 

A rtetoes: A W Jaap; M Kern S D E 
Long: J M McAusian: A M 
Mactmnon: J C MdacMar: G M 
MsNetU: B A MaskaU: L A Muinvw: p 
T Nardone: J R Nlchatson: S H Paine: 
K PraotHi; J R Songster: F M Sc mu C 
R Skinner: M C Spenn.T Bow.les: P H 
Stephen. K Stevenson; B Sturgeon: C 
Trowcr: D S Vance: J P ward: H H 
Watson: Y Wheeler: J A w demon: D 
F Wright; L WyUe. 

BSc 

Speech Pathology 
and Therapeutics 
Ctes U A Stark. 

Cten fcK L Anderson: K E Barr, A M 
Bryce: p Campbell. C a Dick; j 
Docherty; S Farquhan D I Galbraith; 
M McGonnaeiue! C M Matthews- Lane: 

C J M1KMI; L Moron: F M Morrison: 

E C Spivey: L C Taylor: A Thomas: □ 
t Thomson: F J Tyers: J A While. 
Oldb u ry Hictme J m Balfour: S H 
Booth. C A Eaadon; J M Goa ten F H 
Martin; c M J Waddell: A c Watson: 
A wrtghL BD 

wHantoh. GKIrtcwood: P l KUHUa: F 
M LtodsayrA D McCall urn: G A 
McCracken: I McFhdzean: N B McKee; 
D Macteod: R H McNwoer. D M Ntoot 
A J T Rennie: D £ Stewart: R F 
Walker: M A wnyie. 

BSc Science 

Class 1: S J AlKTtesor: E BartM: G 
Bathgate: O M Blake: C Blower-, a M 
Browu A M Burgoyne: A M Byth: H 
Coley: J E Curry; DO* Border R 
□Ktumofi: J A Donaldson: W R Dunn: 
M O Fwzpa trick: M W FOflbery: S 
GaUacher: M Garnett: D Gatherer: E 
M cisbey: F 1 Gordon: A Graham: C 
M Graham. J L Hearns'. S H 
MrPMnon Hood. A Lockhart John- 
ston; R H Johnston: C w Kelly; F W 
Kerr: A L Kindness: K B Kas; □ A 
Law: A LWdle; C McAtetand: D C 
MrCaffrey: M McCreath: A D 
McGowan: D McGumnrss: I Mdnnes: 
M J MacLeod: S A MacNeUl: W R 
MacPnaUiFJ Martin: SM Pender: ID 
Penman: R E Perry: D ! Robertson: M 
Rodger. M Rodgers: a Rogers; G 
Rowan; C J Shearer: c J Sinclair: F M 
Stalker. D Steele: j N Stewart I G 
Thpyne: A J Thomson: A W*l«« _L J 
woodtsunt: J G wngnt G w wyliw. 


Cbm 2: J Adams: Y D am I A K 
Amoa-AwuaiK J Andrews: A A 
Armstrong: A B Hamilton Ameli: M 
M Bain: CM Barrowman: S F Baxter: 
T Baxter: S Beg: HA BeO: W R 
Bennett: R K Blade G E Blass: D L 
Boveu: S P Boyle: K N Brown: K L 
Bryce: J E Buchanan: G S BuDsr: D 
Bums □ C Burrows; J P Byrne: E J 


MMuwirt: E McCuirefJB^utrw E C 
Mrindoe: C MacKenzie: E A 

MCKenzte: D D McKInby: E J 

McLaren: D p McLaugh'in. E M H 
McLaughlin; H McLourtau C J 

McLean: M Maclean; M j McLean: J S 
McLeUan: k Mcuntand. R Mac- 

Lennan' J McLeod: J C McLeod; P 
MacLeod. R MacLeod. F MCLOiighlin. 
C McMahon. E MacMillan. M MCNab: 
M McNeill S McOutston: R M Macrae: 
L A McTaggart; c MrWtlhama: S 
Madden: P hbiarkey: R A Mollocn: S 
P Maney: B J Martin: F M Martin: M 
W Mason: C I Maxwell; H Maxwell; G 
A MMlan: A T Meney; T MtflBw: C 
W N Minarr J R MBCheU: K R 
Mitchell: M E Module: G J Moffat: K 
J Moffat- J M Moomoo. J Morran: C 
w Morrtson: E O Mormon: E Morton: 
F Morton: E A MwUens A DMunro: A 
Murdoch: A J Murdoch: F 


Murdoch: G Murray; S T Murray: D 
T New green: C N NSchot: J Odher: H 
O'Donnell: N CFHaoan: S A O'Hagan: 
H Oban: A J Paxton: D J Pettigrew: £ 
A Pollock: S J Pawls; J K Proudlock: 
A D Rentes: K N JTamoMs: J M Robb: 
G C Robertson: J L Robertson: P K 




D J Carter: a T caabners: _ _ 
Chalmers: G H dark: I T OcJBte A 
Comfle: S H Copland: C H Oossar: J C 


Dtckaon; C C Dodd: H A Danadty; H 
M Donald.' J A Donaldson: SM Doran: 
G Dowlas: M E Doyle: I J Dreweth D 
R Ducfcen H K Duff: A Duncan: J M 
Duncan: s R Dumhi M S EddJ*: C C 
Ban: E M A-G EhOanan P G EOU: L 
M Evans: M C Ewing; A H Faulk: E C 
W Ferguson: E L Findlay: H Findlay: 
P Finn: J G Fleicben C S Foneat G 
Forrest; N c w Forsythe:!. Foaer: M 
Frame: H Fraser l Fraser S 
CaiUgher. G Galloway: J Genun-0: j 
gemtneh: MS GUbert: W Ate t a 

GUtespie: D M J Clackln; V S 

gassfordj T a Omconx. A M s 
Gordon: A Cough: R Grant: D F Gray: 
F C Gray: L Gray: C E Grierson; JTf 
Haddow: □ Hoggany: P Halfpenny: M 
A HadL N M Hamilton: J W H Sdfe M 
S Harkin: f A Harley; J J Harter D 
Harm; A Hatey; A Hay; E J Currans 
Henderson; M HernxiTW J Herron: A 

^: C L P ft H « LlWEG 

A Hosey: o 0 Houston: THOUrtam c 
A Howac A Howie: D M Hughes: M 
Hughes: A A Hunter: D R Inrise: 1 J 
Irvine: O R Jaap: R A Jackson: K A 
Jain: K A Johnstone: D E Katienhom: 
P M K Uy: ATM Kerr: R W Keys: M 
A KiRxide: J KUgannon: P King: W 
KOTObtowska: VMKuk P A Kyle: R F 
Lamb: G j Law; G Lawrle: S W 
Lighibody; I N umond: E M Uad : J 
Linskev; G L Logan: D M MeAdam: E 
McAlHne: J McAdey: M A McAuley: 

McCulloch: I R McCulloch: J 
McCulloch: A H McDonald; a t 
M ocDonaW; E E Macdonald: N 
McDonald: A A McDougaU: N R 
McEwan: C C J Macfadyen; D K 
Mctamr. P 4 a McGowam A M 
McGregor: W M McGregor; A 



W Feme: 
D E Nlrot 
J Topping: 


s Cameron; G 
- JkJ R w canon: 

j. -.—a.- >; R H Conner; 

If A Cumratno; G“P Dagiobh: M - 
Dowdies: F EcdM P A Perrier: K K 
FUnn: J Forrest: j Fester L M 
Gardner: O ROte 5 C Gtilon; T M 
dim: M L Graham: M Greta; R 

Hutchison: p _r Keunan: m G 


Htrt! R E HU: H Hughes:' 
Huicnison: p R Kfeunan: i. _ 
McAuley: P McGowan: R a McKean; 
L McKinnon: MAM MtiaughUm^N 
McMurtriei l McY MtTgKSYK M 
Marshall: h g Meechan; l r 
K oFrtwn!. A-Monon: F a Munro: A E 
Orr. E C paion: C-M Peters; N S 


J S Rjmnle. j Rebenon:i D L 
B; S M Robertson: P D Russell: 

L Staler; A 


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O Walker: F A Weaver: S B W, 
Znaranl. 

A Radleys J Banllry; 
J Devine: F M Fl&matnck: C W Hay. 
MS Kenny: J A TtcCuskrr. M E A 
Meehan: D Mitchell: M B Quinn; L 
Sioddart; J wuide. 

Bachelor of Accountancy 

Ctau is K R Cochrane: I R J 
McLennan. 

Cbm 7s | D Beattie; J A » 
Camnoell: □ A Greoson: K J 
P WMacLean; S Macnab. 


a wul l/ mi Latm; v j Hauuigv i, 

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B McFartane; F I 


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Soence: A Stephenson; A C Stewart: A 
N Stewart: L S Siewarl; R J Stirling: 
A A SUrrah j M Stonctey-. K StruUk; D 
N Sutherland: A SwmTL V Talt w J 
Thrteton: R J Tate: D Tay lor: P G 
Taylor: M C Tenamc D S Thomas: P 
Thomas: M J Thompson: A Thonaon: 
C M Thomson; 1 Thomson; J M 
Thomson: N j Todd: B R Tonnen S A 
R Twoedle: J R Tw&aaJs; A Valenle: F 
Watson: S M West: F Whtaham: C A 
wight; J M wiffidnson: L M wiuiam- 
s®n: W L WUsotx: L R Wiseman: D 
wood; N Woods: D M Wright N a 
Yeomans: D J Yule. 

Cbm 3> G Alexander? D M BresUn; R 
Cant: A Cotnrle: C_M Dunn: R D 
Grant: S A Gray; G M Law: T P 
McAvay: A McCarrey: G R A 
McFartane: I Menzles: C Milch ell: V. 
Scott: M Sirabolu; 5 A V Sharkey. K 
Struihera: C H M TempMon; A G 
Walker: J S Wahon: A WesL 
Ham M cairn ey: r Kalwa. 

BudKlorof Laws 


McFetndbe; W McGUt L A fcteKeiv 
JkJtA Madde; J W A McKmght I M 
Maclean, l MKLean: C MacCurK R I 


BSc E ngmceiu ag 

Cbw UH EG lArnobj KBMiMor: A A 
Brown: Y M Cha n; R M K Cheung: K 
pghl gi: B A Graham; RKHetmeraon: 
D LHokJj: G R jenotapK D J Leith: 
T H Matvlte M V Pattram: R M 
Rankin: L S Y mm H D Tan: W M To: 
c c wan: c Fwmara. 

Ob A H Aarabukt: J O Askautrud: 
F C Beagan: S S Bstaasem: A Blordal: 
A Botaad; D J Berth wick: A S 
Buchan: J Bute A M Carte: D R 
Chalmers: D A Orawy L it Ch'i^; $ 



D GaUacher: M . 

Crtnstead: N R Hannan; G Hendry: <_ 
P Hendry: J Hickey: P HOartonos: P T 
Hornby; D G Hotchkiss: D j Keeucy: 
X J Kenlsion: H C Koh: S A Urate E 
Lange; C A umrtWK Lee: M C W 
Leung: N A Logan; T Lesvllc I S 
Mcdui: R C MacDonald: F H 
McoaBu KMcfh-aney; P A McIntyre: 
J MacKay: D R McKw: J N McKenzie: 
S Mackenzie: R MCLauchlan: J w 
McLean: C J McNab: A N MacftW. G 
McVle: K K Mate K B Mahmood: M J 
Minin: I Mastenpn: JW Metbley: A 
H Mirate D MORkb H Otfegard: J E 
O'Keeffe: H Omar: TWP OTuetn; D J 
OiR R M Om S KD Pang: M J Pom: 
M A PunriK O Rtmau 1 A ROMHHn: R 
Saiani: E SaliwoST S Sharma: C G B 
Sharp: T RSm uster a SkogMaonkj K 
SJoveren: R J Snnth: SASuUj: T a 
Stdalman: A J TMosh; J S Tan: B A 
ThorkUdsm; G A vegio: C M wofla; M 
J Waugh; V Wong: A A Yaacota Z 
Yaeob. 

Cbea 3: O Ekmc K tbrahim: c J 
McNeflk O C Milker: WRO Ro bin so n; 
O M Ronnotad: W C Woo#; M W 
woodcock; M M Yusoff. 

Ordhmra iRfir A HA BdonAS B 
Aiunad: M A JOurr SEAmutiR 
Barbour: D L Calder; G G CakHR J W 
B clack: A W F curie .1 DOerom P 
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GaBKa^r* A Gaiioway: JBHerWn: N 
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Miller: I M Nasair MMmfcNMNN 
Ismail; C O'Neill; E A Ong: J P 
Robeneon: W SlwfWrGSSmmu R A 
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feractno: I P SySeK Y S Tan: A D 
Townley-Freeman: S Tran: w 
vramn<w»:GP wSb; C W Wong; N B 
Yunus: Z M 2am- 


The list of MA 
graduates will be 
published tomorrow 


The fbDowing names were either 
omitted or wrongly classified in 
the list of degrees from Lough- 
borough University; 

C^vl gg W < &° * ! M ■> Smith « 

— 

BSc, ag e ttun b and ElesMeal „ 
WAC TWteycu; B Aihweu 

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p“rt«1l_fa.iftM- A Jones 


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A J raw tifSi M 

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p Te*, H e thM i ic ef Biejne er i rai t c 

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G J Ubrai SR S F 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 




.t 



Jatir- 


i rebels hitlr 
\ id offonsfo 


.’ll l niU '' 




in Britain. 





At Ryton in Warwickshire to 
be precise. 

And it may also surprise you 
to know that they’re being built 
on some of the most efficient 
production lines, not just in 
Britain, but in Europe. 

As you would expect from a 
car built in Britain, servicing, 
parts, and consequently insur- 
ance, are all that much more 
economical. 

And thanks to our Ryton 
workforce, were also happy to 
report that the quality of the 
British built 309s is amongst 
the highest in the entire 
Peugeot Group. 

Its not surprising then, that 
the Peugeot 309 is becoming a 
great success. 

So much so that we’ve in- 
creased production, and are 
exporting British built cars to 
Germany Holland and Belgium. 

Which means that 
\ now were pleased 
to announce that 
|F/ not every Peugeot 
309 built in Britain is 
being bought in Britain. 

__ PEUGEOT 

THE LION GOES FROM STRENGTH 
TO. STRENGTH. 

PEUCEOTTALBOT. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. P.O. BOX 712. B1CKENHILL 
LAKE. MARSTON GREEN, Bl RMIXCHAM B37 7 HZ- TELEPHONE 021-779 6565. 


pCUCfOT TALBOT 


'wSSWOHlDBAiCf CHAMPIONS 


* ^ 








I 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 

SPECTRUM 


The vanishing 
faces of 


ro'iiufd) 

IN 

CRISIS 


The Church of England is fading 
as a physical presence. Demolition 
and conversion, often over fierce 
protests by priests and parishioners, 
are now an obsession. Gavin Stamp 
charts causes and consequences 



M any 1 modern clergy- 
men regard tbe tra- 
ditional concept of 
ecclesiastical 
architecture as at 
best an irrelevance. A prominent 
site and auspicious monumental 
character are not seen as assets in 
the work of the Church of England; 
the existence of large church build- 
ings is looked upon rather as a 
liability, for they involve mainte- 
nance and repair costs that the 
parish does not consider should be 
its responsibility. 

Churchmen are heard to speak of 
"ecclesiastical plant" and to eval- 
uate the usefulness of buildings 
purely in terms of cost-effective- 
ness. The result of this attitude, 
apparently justified by declining 
congregations and an increasingly 
secular society, has been more and 
more redundant churches, many of 
which are demolished — to the 
bewilderment and distress of 
parishioners who still regard 
church buildings as the visible and 
reassuring symbol of the place of 
religion in the world. 

Since 1958. nearly 2.000 of the 
16.000 parish churches in England 
have been made redundant, and a 
quarter of those demolished. If the 
church is still in use. it may no 
longer be a "parish church" in the 
accepted sense, with its own vicar 
or rector looking after the souls of 
those living in a precisely defined 
geographical area. 

There are many who would like 
to see the extinction of the parish as 
such. The establishment of team 
ministries and the uniting of 
parishes tends towards this end, an 
outcome which would confirm that 
the Church of England is no longer 
national, no longer established. 
Without a parish and a public 
church building, a clergyman 
merely becomes a minister to an 
introverted and exclusive flock. 
The Church of England today — at 
parish level just as at Synodical or 
episcopal level — presents no 
unified, consistent face to an 
outside, but not wholly indifferent, 
secular world. 

The Archbishop of Canterbury. 
Dr Runrie. said in July 1985 dial 

Main feature extracted from The 
Church In Crisis, by Charles 
Moore, A. N. Wilson and Gavin 
Stamp, published by Hodder A 
Stoughton on September IS at 
£6.50 


"we attach too little importance 
individual diocese nor the Church 
today to die significance of build- 
ings and of sacred associations". 
Such words are rare from the 
episcopate. To judge by their 
policies towards church buildings 
in recent decades, neither most 
Commisioners seem to attach 
much importance to the signifi- 
cance of sacred and historic 
architecture. Buildings are re- 
garded as secondary, trivial. 

This attitude is responsible for 
one of the most serious problems 
the Church of England feces today 
in its relationship with the nation 
and with a wider public. All over 
England people see abandoned, 
mutilated, or demolished churches, 
the legacies of optimism, sacrifice 
and love, and draw their own 
conclusions about the real state of 
die church. 

Buildings have a powerful effect 
on people, both within and without 
tbe Anglican communion. Tbe 
destruction of ftmfliar, heanti fiil or 
ancient landmarks makes parish- 
ioners and others extremely angry. 
Yet, in its increasingly introverted 
and defeatist obsession with itself 
at tbe expense of its wider estab- 
lished responsibilities, the church 
persists in re garding buildings as 
unimportant 

I n 1983, while the Church 
Commissioners spent 6 per 
cent of their income of 
£114.4 million on 

“administ ration”, a mere 1 

per cent was spent on church 
buddings. 

It is not a joke that many 
clergymen refer to church buddings 
as "plant", in tbe language of the 
chartered accountant Indeed, 
there is a wealth of literature 
available advising clergymen how 
to deal with or dispense with old 
buddings. 

A typical and tellingly-titled 
example is Centres for the Servants: 
Parish Plant Up-Dated by Kenneth 
White. It begins with such senti- 
ments as: “Propagating the Gospel 
is difficult enough without the 
■ frustration of buddings which 
hamstring our progress. Holy 
stones have beome millstones.” 

There are of course, good rea- 
sons for declaring churches redun- 
dant Some parts of the country, 
like Norfolk, are embarrassingly 
well-endowed with village 
churches or, because of Victorian 




I 3 * * 


p:. - 


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--WVir^s a 

v*r— I* 





munificence . and social concern, 
inner-city parishes may have large 
churches with poor congregations, 
depleted by "urban renewal” 
which they cannot maintain. 

Despite all the talk of the 
church's response to inner-city 
problems, working-dass city areas 
have suffered the most closures. 
Areas desperately needing an 
architectural focus and landmark 
have often been deprived of a 
monumental church which per- 
formed that function. The result is 
usually disillusionment, bitterness 
and the disappearance altogether of 
a Christian presence. 

The. pattern of church closure 
varies. Few have gone in Truro or 
Carlisle, yet in Wakefield, since 
1968. 12 out of 25 redundant 
churches have been pulled down 
and, in Liverpoool 16 out of 27. 


What this pattern of redundancies 
and closure suggests is that there is 
no such thing, per re as a 
redundant church; what there is, 
often, is a redundant clergyman. 

In 1968, the Church of England 
established the Pastoral Measure to 
deal with redundant churches. By 
the end of 1983, 1,043 had been 
dosed. Of these, 238 have been 
demolished and 187, considered to 
be of exceptional architectural 
quality, have been vested in the 
Redundant Churches Fund.' 

The shortcomings of the Pastoral 
Measure are painfully highlighted 
by the case of St Alban's, 
Teddington. This vast and o ace- 
magnificent Anglo-Catholic 
church, built on a cathedral scale, 
was closed by the diocese of 
London in 1977, even though tbe 
Coundl for the Care of Churches 


ST MARK’S 


The plastic hamburger sign 
glows bright yellow over the 
well-stocked bar where mace 
there was an altar (Michael 
Imeson writes). A waitress 
zips out from behind the pulpit, 
now a repository for leafy 
house plants ... 

St Mark’s chach in May- 
fair, left, is not yd a GarfsnkeTs 
restaurant But if die Diocese 
-of London sets its way, this 
Splendid early 19th century 
building in Greek Revival style 
wfl] become just that. 

The scheme is being 
strenuously opposed. Opponents 
say that it is not compatible 
with the dignity of the church, 
which was built in 1828 to a 
design by John Peter Gandy- 
Deenng and is now Grade I 
listed. Westminster city council 
. has refused pfenning per- 
mission. But the diocese and 
Garfunkd's have appealed to 
the Department of the Envirou- 
- ment and a public inquiry be- 
gan last week. 

Archdeacon Derek Hay- 
ward, general secretary of the di- 
ocese, and the designers, 

defend tttvir tfhww, w ahnm . 

ing that it wdl be a "high 
class" Mayfair restaurant with 
the atmosphere of a 
gentleman's dob. “A restaurant 
is not a bad nse" says Hay- . 
ward. “Very little m tbe church 
will be altered." 

recommended the dosure of St 
Mary's. Teddington, instead. 

St Alban's was the more 
architecturally distinguished of the 
two and one for which an alter- 
native use could not easily be 
found. Despite this, the Church 
Commissioners pursued a totally 
impractical scheme to convert the 
building into squash courts and 
flats while, during the "waiting 
period", the diocese allowed the 
building to be seriously vandalised. 
Today every window is smashed, 
copper has been stolen from the 
roof and the furnishings damaged 
or dispersed. 

An odd aspect of the case is that 
in 1983 a still-unknown person 
hired a demolition company to pull 
the building down, although the 
police stopped this work before 
much damage was done. More 


ST CLEMENTS 


Sc Clements in Barasbury, 
north London, above, is cur- 
rently being tastefully con- 
verted into 23 luxury flats. It is a 

awanififwif parly Fjt gfre h 

Gothic-style chinch, built in 
1865 by George Gilbert Scott 
and now Grade n listed. 

The Oats are nttra-modern 
and “ritzy" with Osborne and 
little wallpaper, central 
heating and video entry-phones. 

The roof of the nave has been 
removed to provide patio gar- 
dens bekm for some of the 
flats. But typical features like as - 
. arches, row trusses and pil- 
lars have been retained. Most of 
the flats in phase one have 
been sold, and work on the sec- 
ond phase starts next month 
with prices ranging from 
£79,500 to £132,000. Berkley 
Honse, the developer, stands to 
make huge profits, since the 
dwellings are selling at almost 
doobte what was expected 
when tbe scheme was approved 
less than two years ago. 

Happily, St Clements is an 
example of bow both the diocese 
and conservationists can 
agree on the suitable re-ase of a 
rednndant chinch. But after 
its closure in 1977 it fell into dis- 
repair, became vandalised, 
and the Diocese of London 
wanted to demolish it The 
Greater London Council stopped - 
that happening. 

recently, the diocese has been 
markedly unco-operative in letting 
people with a serious interest in- 
using the building even have a key 
to inspect it The present state of St 
Alban's is a disgrace. 

Canon David Wyatt who fought 
successfully to save St Paul's, 
Salford, from demolition, believes: 
“Our response to God cannot be 
less than physical tangible and 
costly. People believe what they 
see: beauty is truth." 

The Church ofEngland would do 
wdl to contemplate this truth as it 
plans further retreat further 
change, further disposal of its 
potent legacy from the past and the 
dosure of at least another thousand 
churches before tbe end of this 
century. 

© CtariM Mom A. N. WHmh nd Garin 


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The film Salvador 
had the wrong 
message for US 
studios, but its 
director found 
British backing 

| If s not easy making an anti- 
I war film in America these 
days: all the big money wants 
to outgun Rambo. So Ameri- 
can film maker Oliver Stone 
has had to rely on British 
funding for his latest venture. 

The irony has not been lost on • . .. . . — 

Stone, whose script credits Stone: ‘cowardice of Arne 

indude Midnight Express, for Communist rhetoric; Unde 
which he won an Oscar Al Sam as tutor and patron of 
Pacino's Scarface and Year qf death squads - and all in a. 
the Dragon. country the size of Massacfau- 

“I guess I'm one American **!!?. a population of 4.5 
who depends on British 

money to make it in America. sentiments, ra the age 

And that's a pretty unique jL- Ke 5 gan aw * *^fpho. are 
situation." The 39-year-old of" ne « as subversive, says 
New Yorker was speaking Stone, and studio after studio 
before the screening of Sat- ^ ccte ^, PJ 5 ?eci until Lon- 

J ■ • 9 • Hnnflr Inhn TV].,'. *.r l.T 



9*r 

.<-■ !«•' .V I 


. ■ '^y. 

Stone: ‘cowardice of American studios is staggering* 


The two men drink their 
way through Central America, 
oblivious to the political mael- 
strom set to break about them. 
But they are arrested by 
national guardsmen and only 
an old military acquaintance 
of Boyle's saves them from 
execution . . . and the full 
tragedy of H Salvador begins. 

Salvador has been savaged 
by some conservative Ameri- 
can commentators as “politi - 1 
cal propaganda and claptrap", 
rays Stone. But he is adamant 
in its defence. "Based oh my 
own experiences in Vietnam I 
would like to move ray coun- 
try away, .from militarism. 
Films like Rambo and Top 
Gun are only messages for 
war. They glorify nationalism 


Silent 

city 

writes 

That book you would 
have written but for 
the kids yelling and 
the phone ringing? 
Now you had better 
find another excuse 

C lerkemrell is an un- 
likely part of London 
for a writer to find 
complete peace and serenity. 
But since April, when' Nick 
Dnbrnle, a 29 -year-old film 
maker, opened the London 
Writing Rooms In a converted 
warehouse, it has become a 
haven for any writer wrestling 
with deadlines, distractions, 
noise and what one author 
has called "the true enemy of 
promise" — tbe pram in the 
hall. 

The London Writing 
Rooms are open 24 boors a 
day, 365 days a year. Once 
yon have paid £100 for a - 
month’s rental, yon have the 
key to creative freedom. Or, 
to be precise, a key that will 
let yon, at any time of tbe day 
or night into a large, bright 
soundproofed room with 29 
desks. Once in service with ■ 
the Ministry of Agriculture 
and Fisheries, the desks are 
separated from each other by 
a partition covered in green 
baize that looks as though it 
might have formerly adorned 
expensive casino tables. 



Nick Dubrale calb tbe 
atmosphere "deliberately 
monastic”. There are no 
distractions, not even a dic- 
tionary or a reference book. 
No talking is allowed, and the 
only sound ever heard is the 
tapping of typewriter (or 
word-processor) keys. Lux- 
uries are confined to a power 
point at each desk, a locker 
and a kitchenette with a 
coffee machine. A single pay 
phone will accept only outgo- 
ing calls. 

J ustin Connolly, who is 
writing a symphony for 
tire BBC Scottish Or- 
chestra, Is a regular user of 
the rooms; he found too many 
distractions at home: “The 
beauty of this place is the' 
complete silence: sometimes I 
need eight hems of that. And 
I like its brfeht starkness. I 
don't need a piano to help me 
to compose, so I just sit at the 
desk and knock it oat.” 

To tiie relief of Dnbrnle, 
Connolly has recommended 
the rooms to other composers. 
"It has been a quiet start, 
partly because writers in Lon- 
don don't seem to talk to each 
other as much as in New 
York”, Dnbrnle says. “New 
York has two sets of writing 
rooms, but their atmosphere 
is less g e n tlema nly than ours. 
It's more like a high- pressure 
working office over there, 
with exercise mats in the 
corridor.” 

As a film producer and 
writer, Dnbrnle is famaiw 
with all the problems «nd 
excuses writers have: “They 
all seem to hate the actual 
business of getting down to 
Writing, To get some space 
and peace, they disappear to 
country cottages, rent hotel 
rooms or even on 

board oD tankers. It seemed 
s ensi ble to offer writers some 
permanent peace in a conve- 
nient part of London." 


his beh before he goes out of “d. as the man said, national- 
office." >sm is die greatest curse of 


New Yorker was speaking Stone, and studio after studio 

before the screening of Sad- ^ Cclec l *5* PJ3IF* Lon- 
rador. a tough, uncompromis- doner John Dalys Hem dale 
ing expose of US involvement. Corporation came to the 

in Central America, which he 

directed and co-authored with - A vary 
San Franciscan photojournai- V1 J 

ist Richard Boyle. Small piCtUTe 


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directed and co-authored with 
San Franciscan photojournai- 
ist Richard Boyle. 

“In the States it's easy to get 
the money to make a film that 
glorifies war. But when you 
warn to make a film that 
shows the reality of war you 
can't get it. I find it rally 
hilarious and sad. The 
cowardice of American stu- 
i dios is staggering." says Stone, 
a highly decorated, twice- 
wounded Vietnam veteran, 
who gives a Guardian lecture 
ai the National Film Theatre 
today. 

The similarities between 
Vietnam and America's sup- 
port of right-wing dictator- 
ships in its “back-yard", as 
Interpreted by Stone, are strik- 
ing: saturation bombing. nnti- 


rescue. Hemdale is also 
financing Stone's next picture, 
a Vietnam story called 
Platoon. 

"People tend to stay away 
from the issue of American 
involvement in Central Amer- 
ica because it smacks of the 
early 1960s debate on Viet- 
nam." says Slone. “I think 
that Americans sense that 
something is going to happen 
and they would rather not 
know about it. 

"The United States — at 
least tinder Reagan — seems 
determined to overthrow the 
Sandinisias. I think Reagan 
wants one more notch under 


Stone calls the making and 
release of Salvador, which is 
scheduled to open here 
around the end of the year, "a 
miracle and major victory”. 
Starring James Woods —prob- 
ably best known to film 
audiences as tbe violent cop 
killer in The Onion Field — 
and John Savag: of Deer- 
hunter feme; its shooting in 
Mexico and Nevada on a tight 
$4_5m budget was plagued 
with production problems. 

But with a crew of 200. 40 
locations. 93 speaking roles, 
over 1.000 extras and a 
spectacular battle scene featur- 
ing a cavalry charge, tanks, 
aircraft and helicopter gun- 
ships. it is a very "teg" small 
picture indeed. 

The film is based' on the 
real-life experiences of Rich- 
ard Boyle, who has covered 
wars and revolutions all over 
the world in a distinguished 
but chequered 20-year career. 

Boyle, played, by Woods, 
leaves San Francisco and sms 


war. They glorify nationalism -ijv 

and. as the man said, national- becaiS^ri2 y ^£L l ? ,ay 
ism is the greatest curse of VnagUn.bm 

mankind. ' are wntfeg is longhand." 


David Browne 

6 Ttaw Newspapers Ud ISM 


Richard Gilbert 

© Tto “ tampapws Ud ISM 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1050 

ACROSS 

i Two-skied vehicle (6) 

4 Empty (6) 

7 Argue violently (4) 

8 5masbing(8) 

9 One of three rulers 
(«) 

13 Incapacity of (3) 

16 German literary anti- 
rationalism (5j_5) 

17 Dread (3) 

19 Representative (g) 

24 London dub street 
(4.4) 

25 Wander (4) 

2 6 Warning (6) 

27 Avmn garde (3J) 


DOWN 

1 Ride wave crest (4) 

2 Tyre inflatable (3.4) 

3 Muslim widow (3) 

4 Rigoteno composer 
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5 Master Cook (4) 

6 Pleasant Island (5) . 


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intensity by James Beiushu 1 Huic. 20 Sob 22 Sm 


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14 Water growth (4) 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 



In the second par t 
of her series, 
Libby Pares 
explores society’s 
vague ideas about 
what a good father 
should be and d o 

!*Out concept of good father- 
ing is almost non-existent”, 
said a feminist writer. “At 
present, a good father is one 
who does not drink all the 
housekeeping and does not 
scar the children.” 

Even today, when we are 
addicted to social analysis, 
fatherhood is a vague area. 
Defining paternal duties is 
hard: almost the only consen- 
sus of opinion is that he 
should be “a good provider” 
and keep a roof over the 
family's head — a dry, merce- 
nary-sort of qualification for 
so momentous a job. The 
psychologist Tom Crabtree 
reckoned that, above all. “a 
father should 'be a friend; 
someone to have, fun with”; 
but again, that felt like 
oversimplification. 

And despite the vogue for 
“new fatherhood”, wrth ’ its 
emphasis on birth and bond- 
ing and baby baths, few people 
would dare to stereotype a 
good lather in the same way 
they do a good mother: one of 
the kindest family men I 
know, a father of three, has 
only changed a nappy once (be 
was sicfcj. 

In feet, if you think about it, 
a father does not even need to 
be a playmate: a romping, 
cuddling daddy is definitely 
an asset, yet it is hand to ignore 
the fact that in cultures and 
classes where fathers are al- 
most godlike in their remote- 
ness and grandeur, plenty of 
perfectly well-adjusted and 
loving citizens manage to 
grow up. 

Successful styles of father- 
hood vary, far more widely 
than motherhood ever can 
(somewhat to the rage of 
mothers). You .can even, with, 
a pinch of salt embrace Nancy 
Mitford’s comforting theory 
about nature's own balancing 
mechanism: - that, children of 
roaring, raging, whacking fa- 
thers like her otfir ; “have • 
enough of their father in them 
to enable them to weather 
storms in which ordinary 
children would lose their 
nerve completely”. 

Men do not on the whole, 
agonize like women about the 
“right age” to have children. 
There is little research on the 
subject although there is some 
doubt about the desirability of 
being a very young father: 
Zefda West-Meads of !he Mar- 
riage Guidance Council says 
that when boys are from 
unhappy homes themselves, 
they often foil to cope with the 
reality of their new life. But in 
a survey of young fathers by 
Madeleine Simms- and Chris- 
topher Smith of the Institute 
for Social Studies and Medical 



Rock me, daddy: Mick Jagger lets girlfriend Jesry Hall hold the baby but the McCartney infant is firmly under Paul's wing 


Care, it entered that although 
over half had married (hiring 
the pregnancy, (he majority 
were pleased about the baby, 
and helped look after it 
The NSPCC, while it finds 
that early parenthood coupled 
with unemployment is cer- 
tainly a factor in child abuse, 
observes that young parents, 
having grown up with the idea 
of help agencies, approach the 
NSPCC more readily before 
disasters actually happen. 

There is, in fact, a slight 
drift towards older father- 
hood. The only -guide to 
desirable age is the adoption 

‘The strict hither, 
it seems, is slowly 
on the way hack 9 

agencies’ general preference 
for fathers to be no more than 
40 years older than their 
children. , . m . 

■ Zelda West-Meads again 
sees snags about having a 
delighted, doting, supportive 
father in middle life “They 
can be over-protective. They 
worry if the child goes out on 
his bike, and that 'child' could 
be 20. And they may become 
rigid in -discipline, especially 
in adolescence, as the genera- 
tion gap shows up.” 

Actually the strict father, it 
seems, is slowly on the way 
bade. According to the Mar- 
riage Guidance Council those 
who led permissive lives in the 
early sixties now go all out for 
security and family rules; one 
only has to observe the 
fiercely blimpish public 
pronouncements of Mick J ag- 
ger on the subject of his 
relationship with his children; 
or the austerely “normal” 


family life preached and prac- 
tised by Paul McCartney. 

“Normal” family life how- 
ever. is itself a bone of 
contention. A small row blew 
up recently when the Social 
Affairs Unit published an 
opinion that children from 
fatherless families — especially 
-those brought about by di- 
vorce. desertion, or feminist 
choice — were more likely to 
suffer in development and 
become criminal Sue Slipman 
of the National Council for 
One- Pa rent Families reacted 
angrily, pointing out that there 
was insufficient research to 
prove this, and quotinga 1985 
Home Office Study which 
found no evidence that chil- 
dren brought up by one parent 
become more disturbed or 
delinquent 

Trevor Berry of the fathers’ 
pressure group Families Need 
Fathers promptly stepped in 
to defend the other’s role, 
which the one-parent family 
lobby, he considers, “con- 
stantly seeks to dispute”. 
Berry regrets the public argu- 
ment: “1 had hoped, m the 
early days of this organization, 
that the feminists who com- 
plained that men don't do 
enough at home would be 
natural allies for us, since we 
are fathers who warn to be 
allowed to be involved in our 
children's lives.” But -they are 
not allies: relations remain 
“cool”. 

• Trevor Beny — himself a 
divorced father — not only 
champions the. importance of 
fathers as models of affec- 
tionate maleness: he is also 
prepared to support the theory 
about fatherless delinquents. 
“It's common sense. Like it or 
not, a father's love tends to be 
conditional on performance. 


or behaviour. A mother’s love 
is all-pervading.” Children, he 
says, need rules and limits 
which they are more likely to 
get from.a father “I had many 
arguments about behaviour 
with my. own father, and I am 
grateful to him for putting his 
root down.” 

It is a very traditional view 
of ifie father’s role: at first 
sight a slightly chilling one. 
But beyond the discipline, 
Berry's memories are warmer. 
“He took me to Shooter's Hill 
on the crossbarofhisInk&We 
bad a train scl He taught me 
tennis; and do. you know. I’ve 

Good lathers 
cannot be 
blneprinted 

played a lot of sports, but I've 
had most enjoyment from 
tennis.” 

Human behaviour and hu- 
man love, as usual, crumble a , 
lot of social theories. Thegbod 
father cannot be blueprinted; 
sons and daughters down the 
ages have acknowledged love 
and debt to fairly unlikely 
progenitors. One of the most 
moving statements by a son in 
our time is John Mortimer's 
play A Voyage Around My 
Father; although on the face of 
ft the eccentric, self-willed and 
bmisingly ironic old barrister, 
who would never admit that 
he was quite blind and told his 
son that sex was overrated, is 
not an obvious soda) worker’s 
profile of perfect fatherhood. 

Nor is James Morris, who 
actually changed sex when his 
children were in their late 
teens, and became Jan: yet she 
has written movingly of the 
love and faith within the 


family, “which can bridge 
chasms .and reconcile 
opposites”. Morris has re- 
mained well-loved and 
fiercely defended by her chil- 
dren. 

Given - the right family 
chemistry, fatherhood can 
work - by bolstering and 
protecting, or by energizing. In 
later - years fathers can be 
remembered with amused 
affection, as the Mitford g iris 
remember their roaring Fa, or 
with awed reverence, as when 
Margaret Thatcher speaks of 
Alderman Roberts of 
Grantham. 

In a way. the vagueness of 
our ideal of fatherhood may 
be* no bad thing; actually, it 
might be a good thing if 
society's ideal of motherhood 
were a bit vaguer, too, and less 
concerned with soft voices 
and constant ironing. Perhaps 
a good-father is simply a good 
man, whose love commits 
him to your welfare; mistakes 
and failings and eccentricities 
and aU. At the end of his play, 
at his father’s deathbed, John - 
Mortimer says: 

“I’ve been told of all the 
things you’re meant to feeL 
Sudden freedom — growing up 
- the end of dependence. You 
step into the -sunlight where 
no-one is taDer than you and 
you're in no one’s shadow. 
And I know what I fell. 
Lonely” 


© 


us ins 


( FRIDAY ) 

The fathers 
who failed 
to grow up 


From Jane Castor-Perry, 
Oakwood Avenue. 

Beckenham, Kent 
I am relieved that Wendy 
Savage is to be reinstated. Not 
all is lost in the fight for choice 
in the way we have our babies. 
But not everyone finds birth a 
thrilling experience. 

J went into hospital hoping 
that I would only have to 
resort to gas rather than the 
more intrusive forms of pain 
relief. After 10 hours of pain 
and exhaustion, salvation 
came in the form of an 


TALKBACK 


anaesthetist and an epidural. I 
am worried that Dr Savage's 
vision might find new friends 
among the people anxious to 
cut childbirth costs. 

From N Alien, 

Maple Road, 

Surbiton, Surrey 
So Diana Duggan and Heather 
Kirby consider the boss/ 
secretary partnership ana- 
logous to a marriage, do they? 
(Friday Page, August 22) I can 


assure them, and all sec- 
retaries. that the immaculately 
groomed, well-breakfasted, 
executive, briefcase and lunch 
box in hand, who beams good 
morning and exchanges good- 
humoured sallies' wrth them 
each morning bears no resem- 
blance whatsoever to the man 
who has grumbled and 
grunted his way through 
breakfast departed bestowing 
a reluctant connubial kiss and 
who arrives home in the 
eveningto lake out the frustra- 
tions of the day on his wife. 


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Stepper at the 
Cordon Bleu 

Tbs Autumn Programme of 
Evening Demonstrations 
with Supper at the Cordon 
Bleu starts on TUesday, 23rd 
September- 

Each demonstrate n epvs rs 
approximately Sweating 
recipes suitabteforseaepnaj 
entertaining of family, mends 
and business colleagues. 

Demonstrations ore held on 
Tuesday evenings with 
supper bebig served from 
&00-&30pjT)L followed by the 
demonstration lasting 
approximately IVfe hours. 

Ticket price EUXK) wrth supper 
andfree raffle of cooked . 
dbhea. For mon deteHs and a 

programme please contact: 

TkrGotdouBJtu C oe kwry Sduv i, 
IMJlapM— turn, I rmrfrmWl. 


Women: there’s a 
lot of them about 


I abandoned my lifelong quest 
for the perfect size lft whea I 
read in an interview with Britt 
VH«wl that tD mai ntain her 

measurements necessitated a 
constantly ram hi fug tammy 
and permanent lunger pangs. 
Britt’s metabolism and my 
own are obviously similar, hot 
as my career is not founded on 
my waistline, I cast aside the 
notion that slenderness is next 
to godliness, and invested in 
hall a dozen pairs of Dynasty 
Eke shoulder pads to distract 
artfidly from Bubenesqoe m- 
i still have them, 
bat 1 am no huger afraid to 
show my arras in public; nor do 
1 suck my stomach in wheal 
watt: into a crowded room. 
Believe me, times must have 


s me year 
Body, the female form m ail its 
statuesque glory. Hie cam- 
paign for real women — with 
the generous hips and ample 
bosom nature designed — was, 
of course, pioneered by the 
Duchess of York. Her refusal 
to starve bereeff to reed- 
sfimness was welcomed by 
hungry women whose anato- 
mies have been out of step with 
fashion for 30 years. 

Suddenly, it is aO right not 
to be sfim. More than ail ris 
this autumn's aipped-in 
require curves above and be- 
low for proportion. For years 
95 per cot of women, whose 
bask anatomical structure 
precluded theft- ach i evement of 
a model gfri shape, have 
believed that a 34-24-34 body 
was the only way to be. Ffnmp 
arms have been hidden under 
shirts and rba fmlii g 
Marilyn Monroe tom- 
mies — of the kind women are 
su p posed to have — have been 
concealed under loose, long- 
line clothing. 

Season after season, women 
with real bodies have been 
practising stylish deception. 
Thea along came a plump 

Sarah Feignstev whose large- 


ness -of personality as wen as 
' form — unde her friend the 
Princess of Waites look, in 

every sense, lightweight. 

And, because it is no longer 
necessary to be skinny, it is 
now possible to eat shame- 
lessly in public. The Duke of 
York did ns all a favour when 
be challenged his bride-to-be 
to another profiterole. 

Women with generous 
curves are coming out of the 
huder and dedaring their 
appetite, not jnst for fife, but 
for paddings. “I don't fed like 
anyone's staring at me if I 
order cripe snzette”, con- 
fessed a friend. 

Fashion buyers are swift to 
respond to demand, and mafor 
department stores report an 
increase in the sales of cfotbes 
in sizes 12, 14 and upwards. 
One of the must soccessfiri 
additions to the Harvey 
Nichols' range is the Marina 
Rinaldi range Ity Spartmax. 
The am-hogging garments, 
sized 16-24, are a far cry from 
the marqaee-Gke clothes from 
which larger women had to 
choose in the past. 

An ironing-board shape is 
no longer the prerequisite of a 
top mannequin. In many fash- 
ion houses, the androgynous 
model has been replaced by 
the girl who looks less Eke a 
coat hanger and more like a 
well-upholstered tailors* 
dummy. And several highly 
paid models have even visited 
plastic surgeons for breast 
implants. 

Such extreme tactics are 
unnecessary for most of ns, 
^jnrii n a ture , rather than the 
surgeon’s knife, has already 
■given os the basks. 

So (his autumu 1 shall he 
slipping into my dinging cash- 
mere umtegarment, knotting 
my sarong mart, and sallying 
forth, knowing that I look, n 
not perfect then reaL 

Josephine Fairley 

© TtaM ilia ipmm ua ises . 


The little girl who 
laughed at death 


I n the middle of the fawn 
at Elizabeth Hart's home 
in West Sussex stands an 
old apple tree. It is gnarled 
and unsightly, but Elizabeth 
trill never cui it down. For in 
her miners eye. she can still 
see her daughter Victoria 
climbing it 

When, in August 1982. 10- 
year-old Victoria came into 
the house and announced 
that her left knee hurt, her 
mother was not particularly 
concerned. Suffering knocks 
and bruises is a part of 
childhood, and soon Victoria 
and her younger sister Joanna 
were back out in the garden 
doing hand-stands. 

But a few days later Vic- 
toria was still complaining of 
pain and after a visit to their 
GP. who ordered X-rays. 
Elizabeth and her husband 
Alan had to face the terrible 
news: their daughter was 
suffering from osteogenic sar- 
coma, a virulent form of 
cancer, particularly in chil- 
dren. In an effort to stop the 
spread of the cancer 
Victoria's left leg was am- 
putated. but 10 months later, 
on June 27. 1983. she died. 

Elizabeth , remembers: “At 
first ft seemed as though the 
pain and heartache would 
never diminish. We could not 
think of how we were going to 
cope without her.” 

But for Elizabeth, 
Victoria's death provided the 
impetus for starting some- 
thing she had talked about for 
ages — writing a book Now. 
three years later, that book is 
being published. 

B ut Victoria, My Daugh- 
ter is not m erely an 
account of the tragedy 
oflosing a child, it is a tribute 
to a girl whose courage has 
lessons for us all. 

It wasn't an easy book to 
write. There were times when 
Elizabeth broke down at hav- 
ing to recall incidents she had 
pushed to the back of her 
mind. But she says: “I have 
no regrets about doing ft. I 
wanted other people to know 
what Victoria was like. I 
wanted to show that what 
happened to us doesn't have 
to be the end of the world, 
which was what Victoria 
showed us. We learned an 
awful lot from her.” 

. Victoria constantly sur- 
prised her parents, the medi- 
cal profession . and her 
teachers with her courage and 
determination. When she was 
to Id she was going to lose a leg 
Elizabeth expected hysterics. 
Instead, Victoria asked if she 
would be able to run and 
swim with an artificial teg. 

In feet, Victoria’s achieve- 
ments. with or without her 
artificial teg (which was too 
heavy to wear for any sport), 
were quite remarkable. Not' 
only did she swim, but she 
rode her bike, climbed trees, 
played netball, took part in 
the school Nativity play and 
joined the gymnastic club. 

“It never occured to me," 
Elizabeth says, “that she 
would want to attempt gym 
and games. But she took to 
heart what the doctor told her 


It took 10 months 
for cancer to kill 
Victoria Holt, but 
in that time she 
taught all who 
knew her about 
life, and living 

at the beginning, that if there 
was anything she really 
wanted to do. she would be 
able to do iL” 

One of Elizabeth's most 
treasured memories is of 
Victoria taking part in the 
end of term gymnastics dis- 
play. By this time she was 
having chemotherapy treat- 
ment because the cancer had 
spread to her lungs. As Eliza- 
beth sat in the hall waiting for 
the display to start she felt 
very nervous, on her 
daughter's behalf. But Vic- 
toria performed just like the 
other girls. forward 
somersaulting, exercising on 
the box. bare and ropes. 

At the end of the display 
Victoria's gym mistress pre- 
sented her with a special 
medal. Elizabeth says: “1 felt 
so proud of her. It wasn't just 
us. the family, saying she was 
marvellous. Somehow the 
moment summed up her 
spirit.” 

The end. when it came, was 
sudden. Three days after 
what Elizabeth calls a 
“fabulous” family holiday in 
Spain, when Victoria seemed 
better than she had for some 
time, tite was taken to hos- 
pital with a collapsed lung 


and died shortly after being 
admitted. 

Elizabeth says: “Victoria 
had such a zest for living that 
the one thing I was thankful 
for was that she didn’t spend 
any lime bedridden. She 
would have hated that. She 
was probably more energetic 
in the Iasi 10 months than 
most of us are in a lifetime. 
Even when she was in pain 
she tried to hide it from 
others. 

“She made you feel hum- 
ble. She was never depressed 
or angry. She taught us how 
to live for today and she will 
always be pan of our lives." 

V ictoria's bedroom is 
now used as a spare 
room, but it will al- 
ways be referred to as 
••Victoria’s room". And 
Victoria's memory will live 
on. too. in the cancer research 
fund set up after her death 
and named after her. Pro- 
ceeds from Elizabeth's book 
will go to this fund. 

After accidents, cancer is 
the biggest kilter of children. 
Although some forms of the 
disease respond quite well to 
modem methods of treat- 
ment — fewer children now- 
die of leukaemia, for example 
— there is still much research 
that needs to be carried out. 

As Elizabeth says: “Vic- 
toria has left us with much to 
be grateful for. not least the 
great courage she showed. 
But she left us. too. with a 
legacy of hope for the future.” 

Lee Rodwell 

Victoria, My Daughter by 
Elizabeth Hart is published 
tomorrow by The Bodley 
Head. 

© TIoim NwspaiMn LM 1M6 



-“Tv 

«*3m 

Courage at play; Victoria did not let cancer slow her down 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


The booze 
in blue 


Sir Kennefo Newman, the Metro- 
politan police commissioner, is 
cracking down on officers con- 
victed of drinking and driving, off 
or on duty. I understand that he is 
alarmed at the growing number of 
offending coppers and is feeing 
pressure from other forces who 
take a harder line. Geoffrey Dear, 
chief constable of West Midlands, 
who is tipped as his successor, is 
particularly strict it is pointed 
oul Although not in favour of 
automatic dismissal as in other 
forces. Newman has ordered that a 
senior police officer will attend 
each court hearing involving a 
policeman on a drink-drive charge 
and file a report to the Complaints 
Investigation Bureau. It will con- 
sider disriplinai}- action, includ- 
ing dismissal, if there are any 
-aggravating factors". These in- 
clude: a previous drink convic- 
tion. an attempt to evade 
detection, lack of car tax or 
insurance, being on duty at the 
time, being outrageously over the 
top on the breath-test — or having 
a bad attitude to arresting officers. 


Knives out 


Homecoming 


Bad news for Transport minister. 
Peter Bouomley when he arrives 
back from Australia this week. His 
colleague. David Mitchell has just 
approved the route for the new 
bypass around Milford in Surrey. 
It will run about 30 feet from the 
bottom of the Bouomleys' garden. 


BARRY FANTONI 


NISSAN 

Z,3aa 

JOBS 

BY 

19 gi 


"Great! Unemployment will be 
solved by the year 3290' 


Bishop’s move 

Father Pat Buckley, who refuses to 
give up his County Antrim curacy 
after being sacked for criticizing 
the Roman Catholic hierarchy, 
has returned a £1 .000 cheque from 
his bishop. In a letter accompany- 
ing the cheque, Bishop Cahal Daly, 
said: “I send it on the assumption 
that you will in good faith make 
alternative arrangements for your 
residence and an appointment 
elsewhere". He also offered to help 
find Buckley another appoint- , 
ment. Although facing eviction ; 
from his church house, Buckley is i 
standing firm and applies to the I 
Belfast High Court soon for , 
judicial review of his dismissal. 
An attempt to take his case to an 
industrial tribunal failed when it 
was ruled that a priest was 
technically self-employed. "This is 
not a personal vendetta," says 
Buckley, “but an attempt on 
behalf of the cburch rank and file 
to introduce justice by making the 
bishops properly accountable." 
The bishop was not available for 
comment. 


Just friends 


Tory MP Eldon Griffiths speaks in 
Belfast tonight at the Friends of 
the Union's first public gathering 
since it was formed in June to 
maintain the union between Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland. 
Also speaking is Mrs Thatcher's 
former PPS. Ian Gow. who re- 
signed as Treasury minister last 
year because he could not stomach 
the Anglo-Irish agreement. 1 Won- 
der if Griffiths, a patron of the 
750-member body, will admit to 
the resentful Prois in the audience 
thau love the union though he 
may. he voted for the agreement 


Not as sweet 


I 


Whom should I espy at the Royal 
National Rose Society's autumn 
show but Michael Hcsdtine. 
whose interest in landscape 
gardening is of course well known. 
He was sniffing every rose in sight 
until he came to a small pink one 
labelled “Margaret Thatcher". He 
walked past without a second 
glance, let alone a sniff. PHS 


"The world must unite in taking 
decisive acu'on against terrorists, 
against nations which sponsor 
terrorism and against nations 
which offer terrorists safe haven ” 
said President Reagan last year 
after the release of the TWA flight 
hostages held captive in Beirut 
But since that * t declaration, 
progress in international coopera- 
tion has been slow and the 
bombings and hijackings have 
continued. 

.As well as the physical casualties 
and financial losses caused by 
terrorism there are now many 
millions of psychological victims 
— terrorist incidents have in- 
fluenced. for example, almost 
every airline passenger in some 
way.' Too often the reaction to an 
incident is an increase in visible 
security because ti satisfies the 
political requirement that some- 
thing be seen to be done. 

But there is a hidden danger in 
this type of ill-lhought-out re- 
sponse. ti can.be counter-produc- 
tive and may lead to the alienation 
of the public from familiar institu- 
tions. such as the police: Some- 
times there may be a need for a 
temporary show of strength, but 
there is always the danger that 
“temporary" measures become 
permanent and have significant 
social consequences. 

All but the least sophisticated 
terrorist campaigns are designed 
io foster alienation and loss of- 
faith. The terrorist or those behind 
him want to goad governments 
into introducing measures which 
will disrupt normal life and lower 
the morale of the target popula- 
tion. It is always easy to be pushed 
into hasty action that plays into 
the enemv’s hands. 


What we must 
do to curb 
the terrorists 

by Michael Yardley 


Security systems should be de- 
signed to be as unobtrusive as 
possible and should always 
present a human face when they 
come into contact with the public. 
A bullying, arrogant security guard 
is rarely effective and does the 
terrorists’ work for them by 
increasing the general level of 
anxiety. In the British context a 
policeman with a machinegun at 
Heathrow is a visible sign of 
insecurity and hence a victory for 
the terrorists. 


There is clearly room for 
improvement in some specific 
areas. It is still far too easy to 
achieve access to the airside area 
of most airports (many pilots tell 
one that they frequently wander 
into these areas - without any 
checks at all). It is still too easy to 
secrete weapons and explosives 
and get them through most airport 
security screens. 

What can be done? One might 
ask why the Israelis have been so 
successful. The simple answer is 
motivation of people. One crucial 


factor is that an El A1 officer 
checking passengers before they 
get on an aircraft may well be 
flying on the same aircraft himself 

There is an mgent need for 
action to promote a display of 
unity .and confidence to boost 
public morale. This could begin 
with an international conference 
at which, terrori sm and the re- 
sponse to it is the sole issue. Such a 
conference would tie a statement 
of will It would also be extremely 
useful as a forum where politicians 
and- the right exports from the 
parti ci pa ti ng countries could ham - 
mer out standardized procedures. 

Terrorism sometimes seems to 
be perceived far too narrowly by 
decision-makers. Trade em- 
bargoes against countries that 
sponsor terrorism may have 
significant consequences. 

Consensus is going to be diffi- 
cult to achieve, but there are some 
areas where real progress is likely. 
Aerial piracy is condemned by all 
responsible nations. There is ev- 
idence that at last the will is 


building up to tackle this particu- 
lar problem at least 

An international civil aviation 
hostage rescue unit has been 
suggested in some quarters. There 
has already been successful co- 
operation between special units 
such as the British SAS. the 
German GSG9 and the American 
Delta force. These groups, which 
have accumulated enormous 
expertise, are known to exchange 
both information and personnel. 
The rescue operation at Moga- 
dishu in 2977 was carried out by a 
GSG9 unit with assistance 
(including the provision of stun- 
grenades) from SAS officers. 

The problem at the moment is 
that when a terrorist incident 
occurs the host country is often I 
reluctant to call in experts of 
another nation who coukl prob- 
ably act far more efficiently than 
their own people. The terrorists 
are of course aware of this and 
plan their operations accordingly. 

A truly international unit cre- 
ated within either the 'Inter- 
nationa] Civil Aviation Organ- 
ization or the International Air 
‘Transport Association might seem , 
an attractive option. Such a unit 
need not be large. It would offer an 
acceptable alternative to countries 

without an adequately trained and 
equipped unit of their own. It 
would avoid the political prob- 
lems that might arise from caning 
in the forces of a foreign power. 

The fight against terrorism 
necessitates action that is both 
practical and symbolic. At the 
moment we are failing at both 
levels. 


Ian Bradley 


Time to spread 
that tenderness 


Does the Social Democratic Party 
have the political will and foe 

courage to stand unequivocally wr 

the redistribution of income at foe 
risk of upsetting foe middle-class 
voters on whom its support has so 

fer largely rested? That, perhaps, is 


the key question which the party 
will race at its assembly m 
Harrogate next week. 

Five years ago, on the train 
which took journalists and dele- 
gates the length of Britain as the 
SDP held its first touring con- 
ference, there was much talk of 
how the new party would turn out. 
Would it be a Mark-2 Labour 
Party offering socialism in a 
slightly less statist and centralized 
form or foe vehicle of what Roy 
Jenkins called foe radical centre 
with a firm commitment to foe 
mixed economy? It was dear that 
there was also a third direction 
which foe SDP might take. 

Given its overwhelmingly mid- 
dle-class membership, its metro- 
politan bias and courtship by the 
media, it seemed quite likely to 
become a party of progressive 

Sprial and political ideas but 
without a real commitment to 
alter the economic status quo and 
re-order foe distribution of wealth 
in a society which was becoming 
poorer and more polarized be- 
tween haves and have-nots. 

In the event, foe SDP has 
managed to steer a broad middle 
course between these three alter- 
natives. Under David Owen’s 
leadership the style may seem to 
have become more abrasive and 
less middle-of-the-road, indeed 
more Thatcherite, according to 
some of his critics within foe party 
and among the Liberals. 

But foe party is still generally 
careful to avoid radical departures 
in policy of either a free market or 
a socialist kind, to stre ss values of 
consensus and common sense, 
and, in Owen's words, to combine 
toughness and tenderness. There 
has always been a distinct fuzrs- 


The author is a security consul- 
tant. 


Plots are afoot to avert the 
prospect of Dennis Skinner, foe 
far-left MP for Bolsovcr, becom- 
ing chairman of the Labour Party. 
Under the time-honoured system 
of Buggins's turn, the current vice- 
chairman. Sid Tierney, succeeds 
Neville Hough as chairman after 
this year's party conference. The 
next longest-serving members of 
the national executive, in line to 
become vice-chairman and thence 
chairman, are Skinner and Neil 
Kin nock, exact equals in seniority. 
The fooughl of having a man who 
has difficulty in applauding the 
present party leader's speeches 
banging foe gavel at a future 
Labour conference is apparently 
proving too much for the Kinnock 
faction. So. unusual though it 
would be. when the national 
executive meets after next 
month's conference to elect a new 
vice-chairman, they might well 
propose that Kinnock himself 
should stand for the job. 

• Sign over a caged parrot in a 
Manchester pet shop: “Mother's 
Whistler." 


David Watts on opportunities lost in a resurgent South Korea 

The ne w 


boom 

Britain 

has 

missed 


Seoul 

Tae Hwan Kwak, head of a big 
textile firm, waves a wad of new 
testing procedures from Marks & 
Spencer. "They check everything 
meticulously," he says. “Then- 
standards are very hard to follow, 
but we manage it" 

Nearby a computer is helping to 
sketch out new designs for foe one 
million yards of textiles which his 
company produces every month. 
When he is not sitting impatiently 
on foe edge of his office chair, 
Kwak is walking round foe plant 
Each worker pauses briefly to bow 
deeply before resuming his 12- 
hour shift. Soon the night shift will 
be coming on, again for 12 hours, 
with a one-hour meal break 

li is companies like this, typical 
of foe energy flowing through all 
South Korean society, that pro-, 
duced a trade surplus of $761 mil- 
lion in the first eight months of 
this year — in sharp contrast to last 
year's deficit of SI billion. 

Hu's achievement is the result 
not only of workers tackling foe 
task in hand as though their very 
existence depends on it but also of 
increasingly ambitious high-qual- 
ity exports which should over- 
come South Korea's reputation for 
ruthlessly competitive pricing 
with quality a secondary consid- 
eration. 

This year foe economy could 
grow by 10 per cent, a rate that 
other industrial countries can. only 
dream about, but South Korea has 
to maintain that sort of pace: 
growth of less than 7 per cent 
would not provide enough jobs for 
each year’s school-leavers. 

South Korea's quality goods 
range from Tae Hwan Kwak's 
intricate textiles for Marks & 
Spencer to parts for British 
Aerospace's Hawk ground attack 
aircraft. It also exports hundreds 
of millions of pounds worth of 
personal computers — including 
Alan Sugar's Amstrads — to 
Britain and foe US. 

Last week the Daewoo car 
company opened a $425 million 
extension .to its plant outside 
Seoul which will make a version of 
the Opel Kadett to be sold by 
General Motors in America as the 
Pontiac Lc Mans. Daewoo's chair- 
man. Kim Woo Chong, con- 


The decision to pay the 1985 pay 
rises across the mining industry 
has been widely interpreted as a 
snub to Arthur Scargill of foe 
National Union of Mineworkers. 
While it may have been done 
without thai union's formal ap- 
proval the real losers are the 
beleaguered Union of Democratic 
Mineworkers. 

The UDM was set up at foe end 
of the 1 984 coal strike on a wave of 
optimism and confidence — and 
amid denunciations of it by 
Scargill as “a bosses' union". The 
breakaway miners were well aware 
how important it was for them to 
go on winning members. In foe 
coalfields everyone knew what 
had happened to foe independent 
Nottinghamshire union set up 
under the presidency of George 
Spcn«r after the general strike of 
1926. It lasted barely 10 years 
before remetging with the NUM. 

So the UDM’s leaders knew 
from the start that they had to 
appeal to more than Nottingham- 
shire. By last January they fad 
offshoots in Lancashire. Warwick- 
shire. Staffordshire and Derby- 
shire. Recruiting was going so well 
that Roy Lynk. foe general sec- 
retary. boasted. “Arthur ScargiH is 
finished." 

Then things began to go wrong. 
The membership drive almost 
ground to a halL Since then the 
union has achieved a majority in 
only one more colliery — and then 
b> a mere seven voles. In other 
areas where it was in a minority it 
is now in danger of disappearing. 

For the UDM. the reason is 




fidentiy expects sales in foe US to 
reach 200.000 in 1990. 

South Korea's success — to be 
crowned by Seoul staging foe 1988 
Olympics — is all foe more 
remarkable considering its history 
of the past 50 years: Japanese 
colonialism, followed in foe early 
1950s by the war against foe 
communist North which reduced 
foe people to starvation level and 
left their capital in ruins. There 
was nowhere to go but up. In 1961 
per capita gross national product 
was $82 a year. Now it is about 
SZ000, still below that of Japan 
and Singapore but well ahead of 
most other Asian countries. 

Bui such figures can be mislead- 
ing. Life is harsh in a country with 
few natural resources aside from 
the sweat and ingenuity of its 
people. Working hours are long, 
holidays almost unknown and 
there is always reason to try harder 
than yesterday. 

Fifty-six per cent of blue-collar 
workers earn so little that they pay 
no income tax: company presi- 
dents do not pay themselves fat 
bonuses. There are no Rolls- 
Royces, Mercedes or Jaguars out- 
side company offices and even 
many well educated Koreans re- 
gard the external debt of $47 bil- 
lion as a national disgrace. 

South Korea is enjoying a 
second takeoff because of the 
happy combination of cheaper oil 
low interest rates and the high yen, 
which makes Japanese goods less 
competitive in foreign markets. 
How long this situation will 
continue Koreans do not know, 
but they are working flat out to 
capitalize on it. 

The cloud of optimism on 


which they now ride nevertheless 
has a dark side: The United Stales 
takes 40 per cent of South Korea’s 
exports and these could be threat- 
ened by America's growing mood 
of protectionism. America’s chief 
concern is Japan, but it is common 
knowledge in the US that Korean 
video-recorders and cars have 
Japanese components. The cost of 
importing them has risen with the 
value of the yen. so that South 
Korea’s deficit with foe Japanese 
this year could reach $6 billion. 

The government recognizes the 
danger of over-dependence on 
Japanese technology. Mrs Thatch- 
er’s visit in May — following 
President Chun Doo Hwan’s visit 
to Britain — was in response to 
Korean appeals for Europe to 
become more involved in South 
Korea at this crucial stage in its 
development. When Japan was at 
the same point in foe 1960s, 
Britain and other European coun- 
tries missed their chance. 

Mrs Thatcher’s powerful ad- 


vocacy was crucial in winning two 
big contracts in steel and defence 
technology. Britain is poised to 
win another big defence contract, 
but although President Chun’s 
government has drawn up a list of 
things it would like Britain to 
supply. British industry has foiled 
to make the most of opportunities 
virtually there for the taking. 

Few British companies appre- 
ciate the value of appointing a 
permanent representative who 
would build the kind of contacts 
essential to doing business in foe 
Far EasL GEC did well to win 
contracts for the Seoul under- 


ground railway, but it too has 
failed to instal a fuH-iime repre- 


Is the Coal Board 
dumping the 
breakaway miners? 


simple. The pay rise ft negotiated 
last year was paid only to its 
members where they were in a 
majority — leaving 6.000 in other 
areas without an increase and still 
subject to NUM harassment. It is 
in these areas that the UDM had 
to expand, but as Grange Hunter, 
the viec-presidenL conceded 
“There:® no point in joining if you 
cannot gel the rise." 

Initially relations between the 
UDM and the Coal Board were 
good. As soon as the new union 
was granted its certificate of 
independence the board invited 
all the unions in foe industry for 
talks to establish a new concili- 
ation agreement The NUM. 
claiming exclusive recognition, 
refused to have anything to do 
with it. Although the board 
wanted to deal with the NUM and 
foe UDM together, iv gave in to 
foe new union's, wish for separate 
negotiations. 

The problems over pay began 
when the board derided' that it 
would pay the increase only to 
members who constituted a clear 
majority in any given pit. The 
UDM served a wni on the board 
compelling it to pay all the 
members. The NUM then won a 


court action against foe board.' 
arguing that such payments dis- 
couraged* membership of the 
established union. 

The board appealed to the High 
Court, which ruled that differen- 
tial rates were not unlawfoL By 
August 14 the way was finally 
open- for all UDM members to 
receive their pay increase. But foe 
board continued to drag its feet. 

Last Thursday night. Dick Em- 
ery. the new secretary of South 
Derbyshire UDM. addressed a 
bitter and frustrated meeting in 
Stoke-on-Trent. “The lads felt 
they have been fobbed off," he 
said. “They had not been paid a 
penny of their wage increase and 
they couldn’t understand why." 

For the moment, however, his 
members were staying loyal. 
There is no such consolation for 
John Bla'ctely. president of the 
UDM iii Scotland. He says: “Our 
members are asking. 'What has 
foe union done for me? — and the 
answer is not much." Betty Wad- 
dle. chairman of the Scottish 
Conservative Trade Unionists, 
says; “ft's ridiculous, they're 
strangling the union at birth." 

Although all UDM members 
will now receive their increase — 


along with the NUM — they still 
have no separate conriUation 
agreement. Some UDM officials 
are not ruling out strike action. 

But why should foe Coal Board 
not want to help foe UDM? One 
senior trade unionist said: "The 
UDM has served, its purpose. At 
foe moment foe board doesn't 
have to worry much about the 
NUM and so has no incentive to 
help the. UDM. But if foe NUM 
started to flex its muscles, it would 
be forced into action. The UDM is 
fighting for its life: the board is 
being hypocritical and stupid to 
act like this.”' 

It is difficult not to feel that Sir 
Robert Haslam. foe new chairman 
of British CoaL is looking forward 

10 negotiating with one de- 
ScaigUlizcd union. 

In its defence, the board points 
- Out that it has settled foe issue of 
pay. has held discussions with the 
UDM on conciliation agreements, 
and is fully aware of foe need to 
reach a conclusion. "They must be 
bloody joking." says Emery. 
"They haven’t given us ah inch in 
the last 12 months. Everything we 
have achieved is by the court". 

There can be few unions so 
disgusted and bitter towards their 
management There are not many 
unions that have to expand to 
guarantee their long-term 
survival. If foe board continues to 
stall on the demands of foe UDM. 

11 fears that -history could repeat 
iiscffi the spectre of Sgencerism 
looms again. 

Roland Rudd 


proposals in the policy paper fora 
merging of foe tax and social 
security systems and for a re- 
distributive package paving foe 
way for a national minimum 
income scheme offer a practical 
way of tackling foe great inequal- 
ities which are emerging in Britain 
as a result of changing industrial 
patterns and the spread of mass, 
long-term unemployment They 
are also* more radical than foe 
policies of any other party, includ- 
ing Labour. Some at Harrogate 
will feel they go too &r and will 
want to water them down. 

The SDP has a habit of jettison- 
ing foe more radical proposals to 
emerge from its plethora of policy 



ness when it comes to establishing 
whether the party is in favour of 


sentative to pave foe way for 
future business. 

The importance of personal 
contacts was illustrated recently 
by foe. decision of foe Goldstar 
electronics company to build a 
plant in West Germany. It went 
there principally because Siemens 
bad patiently built a 20-year 
relationship with Goldstar when 
an immediate return on foe 
investment was not always appar- 
ent A similar British commitment 
might have won foe Goldstar 
factory, especially as many Kore- 
ans 'speak English, giving Britain a 
communication advantage. 

Lack of British interest is also 
apparent in the small and medium 
enterprises which South Korea is 
hying to build up. Both France 
and West Germany have ap- 
pointed full-time officials to help 
in their development. Both coun- 
tries have signed a number of ' 
contracts, and others are pending, j 
It is especially ironic that Britain 1 
figures nowhere in these plans 
since it was foe British example 
that inspired the concept of small 
and medium-sized industries. 

There are British success sto- 
ries. among them insurance, 
financial dealings and chemicals, 
but they are vastly 1 outnumbered 
by the missed opportunities. With 
only two years to go to foe _ 
Olympics, British Airways has not 
taken up its right to serve Seoul 
No doubt fone would be few 
passengers at present, but once the 
Olympics are over foe South 
Korean government will find it 
increasingly difficult to maintain 
foe present foreign travel restric- 
tions on its citizens, and a new 
tourist market will open up. 


whether the party is in favour of 
real changes to the existing bal- 
ance of income and property in 
Britain. 

This fuzziness is well displayed 
in foe consultative paper Partner- 
ship for Progress issued jointly 
with the Liberals in July ana 
which is to form the basis of many 
of the scheduled debates at Harro- 
gate. It makes virtually no men- 
tion of foe need for redistribution. 
Rather it seems to support foe 
status quo with the repeated 
assertion that taxation will form a 
stable proportion of national 
wealth and it looks to economic 
growth, rather than redistribution 
of existing resources, to finance 
any increases in public spending. 

By contrsu foe SDFs policy 
paper on tax and benefits reforms 
published last month adopts an 
uncompromisingly redistribution- 
ist stance. It proposes a new deal 
which would make the un- 
employed and low earners better 
off at the expense of those earning 
more than £10,000 a year. The 


Owen: a move at last to 
greater equality? 

groups and working parties when 
it fears that they might alienate its 
middle-class supporters. One re- 
calls the hasty burial early on in 
foe party's history of a bold 
proposal that tax relief on mort- 
gage interest payments should be 
abolished. All that is left; of that 
particular suggestion now, as set 
out in Partnership for Progress, is a 
call to limit relief to the basic rale 
of tax, a commendable enough 
policy but considerably less effec- 
tive as a way of ending foe present 
over-subsidization of foe better off 
than the original proposaL 

There are other instances where 
Partnership for Progress waters 
down policy initiatives which 
have come up from some of the 
more radical elements in foe SDP, 
for example in the section devoted 
to reviving foe rural economy 
where it fights shy of taxing land 
values and taking land into public 
ownership for letting out as 
smallholdings and allotments. 

The substance and tone of foe 
policy paper on taxation and 
benefits suggests that the SDP may 
at last be prepared u> grasp foe 
nettle of redistribution and show 
not only that it stands dearly for 
creating a fairer and more equal 
society, but is also prepared to act 
by taking away money from 
middle and higher income earn- 
ers. Harrogate seems an unlikely 
place in which to cast off a middle- 
class man tie, but it may be foe last 
opportunity for the Social Demo- 
crats to do so before the next 
election and to show that they do 
have something to offer to that 
large and growing section of the 
British electorate which is fast 
losing hope and which has so far 
seen little to choose between foe 
Alliance and the Conservatives. 
Ian Bradley is the author of The 
Strange Rebirth of Liberal Britain 
(Chatto & Windus). 


moreover , . . Miles Kington 

Greenscreen was 
my delight... 


Oh. once I worked for IBM. 

Once l was the crime de la crime. 
But now I work no more for them. 
Not since the Big Bang came : boys. 
Not since the Big Bang came. 


The City of London is rich in 
traditional folksong, but this' 
year's drastic change of regula- 
tions at the Stock Exchange seems 
to have produced a new burst of 
creativity. The tape recorders of 
our musical field researchers have 
caught many a new variant on old 
themes, such as this folksong 
recorded in a wine-bar near the 
Bank. 


Young Jeremy was a Jobber. 

'E ran around the floor. 

Buying shares below their worth. 
And selling ’em for more. 

E ’ad a house in Epping. 

And a Volvo painted green. 

But now heain V got nothing at all. 
’Gas his work 's done by machine. 
Young Jeremy’s a cleaner now. 
Sweeping the Stock Exchange 
floor. ■ 

And all around, the machines go 
“dick” 

Doing what he done before. 

The full version runs to many 
more verses than that, of course, 
detailing how Jeremy made a 
fortune before foe collapse came, 
and spent most of it on valuable 
wines as an investment, and there 
are some poignant verses which 
depict him. penniless and debt- 
ridden, getting pitifully drunk on 
some of the greatest clarets known 
to man. This feeling of impending 
doom, of the end of a golden y 
runs through all current folksongs 
sung in foe City, including this one 
beard in a first-class carriage on a 
train to Guildford. 


As I walked out one midsummer’s 
day. 

/ met a fair maiden aborning my 

Trying to cany a large cardboard 
entte. 

And bending and Straining be- 
neath its weight. 


matter how pretty. 

Who comes with a large card- 
board box to your floor; 
Pretend to be out. and lode up your 
door! 

Quite why love and the Big 
Bang should be mixed together is 
not certain, but lots of folksongs 
bring them together, as this brief 
fragment illustrates: 

Oh. I loved a girl who worked next 
door. 

And we strolled arm in arm on the 
Stock Exchange floor. 

But now her work's all done by 
machine. 

And I’m in love with a flickering 
screen. 

All these, of course, are urban 
folksongs. The idea of a rural City 
of London folksong is almost a 
contradiction in terms, but we did 
come across one 'very iinnanid 
exception, brought about by the 
short-lived involvement of some 
investors in agriculture, the Ballad 
of the Pension Fund. Here’s just a 
taste: 

It was a great big pension fluid 
And they .bought a farm in the 
Lincoln Wold. 

For jo grow tke wheat for the folk to 

But now they’re gone and the farm 
issold. ■ 

Chorus 

We don't want ’ee. pension man. 
Go on back to Lumon again! 

Your hair's too short and you don't 
talk proper— 

Get 'ee on bade, and buy and sell 
copper! 

We consider it a vital task to 
gather this traditional material 
before it is all lost, and many of 
these songs can be bard on our 
new LP, The Moreover City 


Folksong Sampler Vol 23. the Big 
Bang. Of them ail perhaps the 


"Tell me. fair maiden, can 1 be of 
aid?” J 


“Oh yes. you can. sir.” replied the 
fair maid. 

And so unsuspecting I bore to my 
room. 

The Amstrad computer which 
■ promised my doom. 

So listen, all brokers who work Jn 
the Chy,. 

Don't trust a young maiden, no 


most poignant is this last one, 
heard sung in a City tube station 

on “ reputed to earn 
£20,000 a week. 

I sing a song of Guinness. 

And a song of ITT. 

But 1 sing no thanks to the 
merchant banks 
Who brought me penury. 

I sing a song of dollars, 

And the odd commodity, 
twill sing about anything, 
if you throw me 20p. . 

{sing here in the station. 

For a busker now I be.- 


Singing away rhe livelong day. 
Since the Big Bang dune to me. 


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Pennington Street, Lon don El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

THE LABOUR EXCHANGE 


In .the light of Labour re- 

nationalisation (alias social 
ownership) plans, is British 

,! e oi? a ■ share to sell or to 
keep. That is the question now 
being asked by both the many 
small investors whose first 
experience of share-ownership 
was their stake in British 
Telecom, and by the l&ige 
financial institutions whose 
judgment will be decisive in 
the market 

. Labour’s plan gives the 
investor more choice than the 
original confiscatory proposal 
of simply taking the shares 
back at the issue price. The 
investor now knows that, in 
the event of a Labour victory, 
he could alternatively choose 
participating certificates which 
offer a share in the company’s 
capita] growth, or interest- 
bearing securities linked to 
market interest rates (which 
would in effect be a floating- 
rate gilt-edged stock.) By these 
devices Labour seeks to escape 
damage to its electoral pros- 
pects from those with whom 
nationalisation is deeply un- 
popular. In narrowly political 
terms. Labour’s scheme for 
British Telecom and the still- 
to-be privatized British Gas, 
does not lack ingenuity. 

But there is a more im- 
portant question to be asked 
than what the plan would 
mean to shareholders: how 
would it affect the national 
interest? There is only one 
answer to that badly. 


British Telecom was pri- 
vatized to benefit the economy 
and the company’s customers. 
It was to be subjected to 
improved financial discipline 
from having to respond more 
to market forces and by being 
freed from state direction. 

The public purse was like- 
wise liberated from hs obliga- 
tion to feed the state-owned 
giant's appetite for capital 
Competition is the heart of the 
matter and although the fnitigl 
provisions for this * were 
weaker than they should have 
been, there is real prospect of 

BT is free fromstate control 

Labour's plan would put an 
end to that British Telecom 
would remain a public limited 
company, but owners of the 
new securities would be de- 
prived of all voting rights. 
Control would again fell to 
government Moreover, com- 
petition would be extinguished 
by reintegrating Mercury (BTs 
competitor for business calls 
in a number of major cities) 
into a single national network. 

Yet Mercury has already 
had a beneficial impact on 
British Telecom’s business 
charges, and a liberated tele- 
communications system offers 
the prospect of independent 
cable companies, linked with 
the main network, which could 
offer a rival service to. the 
consumer. All this would be 


A TALE OF TWO UNIONS 


Sir Robert Haslam’s first ma- 
jor decision as chairman of 
British Coal is a shrewd but 
short-term response to the 
complicated set of problems 
about pay that he inherited 
from Sir Ian MacGregor. The 
complications themselves 
arise essentially from the new 
but fundamental feet of two 
unions in the mining industry 
— the National Union of 
Mineworkers, still led by Mr 
Arthur Scargill but apparently 
in' a tamer mood, and the 
breakaway Union of .Demo- 
cratic Miners, drawn very 
largely from miners who 
worked during the 1984-85 
strike. 

Locked in hostile com- 
petition, the two unions re- 
fused to negotiate jointly with 
British Coal. The NUM hoped 
to freeze the new union out of 
pay negotiations altogether 
and thus to destroy it by 
degrees. And the UDM, in 
order to retain and expand its 
membership, sought to nego- 
tiate an attractive (and sepa- 
rate) pay deal with British 
CoaL A deal giving 5.9 percent 
more to UDM members was 
duly signed and survived court 
challenges from the NUM. 

British Coal, however, re- 
fused to pay the extra money 
to UDM members in those 
pits where they happened to be 
in a minority. That may have 
been a management decision 
to minimise conflict at the 
pithead, but it naturally infuri- 
ated the UDM whose mem- 
bers in those same pits had 
risked violence and intimida- 
tion to cany on working 
during the dispute. 

The Coal Board sought, 
secondly, to negotiate a s imil a r 
5.9 per cent pay increase with 
the NUM, but to dock from 


their pay the money needed to 
cover strikers’ contributions to 
the miners’ pension fund. 
(These had been paid in by the 
working miners, and simple 
justice requires that if people 
receive equal benefits, they 
must pay equal contributions.) 
The pension fund payments 
would have been modest and 
gradual — one per cent of 
earnings over five years. But 
the NUM, under Mr Scargill, 
rejected a deal which would 
seem to show that UDM 
members had gained even a 
slight advantage. 

There matters stood when 
Sir Robert, without consulting 
the NUM, announced on 
Monday that all miners would 
receive 5.9 per cent extra. But 
UDM members and NUM 
members who had worked 
during the strike would receive 
the award backdated to 
November 1985, whereas 
strikers would forfeit the back- 
dated increase to the pension 
fund. This diktat seems to 
solve all the Coal Board’s 
problems. It ingeniously com- 
bines an equal pay award for 
both the NUM and the UDM 
with an immediate, and jus- 
tified, benefit to most UDM 
members over most NUM 
members. And despite the 
opposition of Mr Scargill and 
the decision of the South 
Wales miners to continue their 
overtime ban, it may succeed 
in the short term. 

Viewed in a longer perspec- 
tive, however, the Boanfs 
decision suggests that it is 
determined to avoid striking a 
better bargain with the UDM 
than with the NUM. It is, 
indeed, the latest of several 
signals that British Coal does 
not wish to encourage the 
UDM. Other such portents 


include the Board’s early at- 
tempt to hold joint negotia- 
tions with both unions, and 
the continuing reluctance to 
establish UDM— British Coal 
conciliation procedures. 
Would British Coal really 
prefer to negotiate with a 
single union representing all 
miners? The UDM must 
sometimes th ink so. 

It is easy to sympathise with 
managers who see the every- 
day advantages of dealing with 
a single union covering all 
their employees — even when 
these advantages are pur- 
chased with uion greater 
bargaining power. In many 
Industries the gains will out- 
weigh this central dis- 
advantage. But the recent 
history of coal disputes, their 
political significance, die eco- 
nomic importance of the coal 
industry, and the possibility, 
however remote it now seems, 
of a Scaigillite resurgence in 
the NUM all argue against 
encouraging its revival and 
reunion. Sir Robert would 
probably not free so tentative 
a challenge from the NUM if 
the UDM did not offer a silent 
warning against militancy. 

la the long term, moreover, 
the coal industry will need to 
be re-structured and split into 
financially independent parts 
which might subsequently be 
transferred to private, possibly 
employee, ownership. The pit 
closures and British Coal’s 
plans for a movement from 
national pay negotiations to 
smaller “bargaining units” 
both fit into this partem. A 
single national union, likely to 
be committed to the tra- 
ditional structure of 
nationalisation for some time 
to come, could only obstruct ; 
this. ] 


MAO WITHOUT MAOISM 


Rarely can a country have 
experienced so profound a 
change of direction as China 
has done in the 10 years since 
the death of Mao Tse-tung. 
When Khrushchev denounced 
Stalin, he revised only the 
Soviet past China’s leaders 
since Mao have set out to 
revise the future as well. 

Their success can be gauged 
by the degree to which the race 
of China has been transformed 
since 1976. When Mao died, 
the country was in turmoil. Its 
social order had been wracked 
by the Cultural Revolution. 
Egalitarianism ruled: the pov- 
erty of all was preferable to tne 
wealth of a few: high culture 
and higher edurauon were 
rejected: the intellectual 
classes were suspect Rural 
living was the paradigm ot 
Chinese life, the standard by 
which all China was to be 
judged- The Mainland had 
barricaded itself againsi L. 1 *? 
world, and those who ined to 
penetrate its wall were brand- 
ed spies and subversives. 

A decade later it is tne 
values that have changed quite 
as much as the appearance, a 
limited reintroduction of mar- 
ket mechanisms has revital- 
ized most cities and many 
rural areas. Prosperity is now 
regarded as the model lor 
China's future. Education for 
the twenty-first century is 


creating a new technical and 
cultural elite. 

There remain, of course, 
many vestiges of the past — 
two sorts of past: the weight of 
Chinese tradition, with its 
established hierarchies and 
attitudes, and the years of Mao 
Tse-tung. The harshest 
sufferings of the Mao era are 
now blamed on the wickedness 
of Mao's last wife. Jiang Qing 
(still languishing, unrefonned, 
in a Chinese prison), and the 
“Gang of Four” 

The retention of Mao’s im- 
age as revolutionary, soldier 
and unifier of a Communist 
China — flawed but almost 
intact - has allowed the 
present leadership of Deng 
Xiaoping to accomplish its 
reorientation of values with- 
out undue damage to the 
mythology from which it 
draws its power. But the 
consequences of economic and 
cultural change have recently 
provoked questions of a more 
overtly political nature which 
challenge the existing ruling 
structure. 

If the legacy of Mao Tse- 
tung is to be foresworn com- 
pletely, as it might eventually 
be. it is the political structure 
which will have to change. 
Mao. like most totalitarian 
leaders, took power by virtue 
of his military strength and 
capacity for leadership. He 


ruled partly by committee and 
partly by diktat There was no 
provision for elections other 
than within the Communist 
Party organizations; appoint- 
ments and dismissals, fevour 
and disgrace, were distributed 
arbitrarily — at the behest of 
the Party. 

To a large extent that is still 
the order in China today, 

. which is why it is so difficult 
for Deng Xiaoping to retire, 
even at 82. There is no 
constitutional guarantee that 
the years of relative stability 
Deng has brought to China 
will survive him. There is no 
mechanism for the transition 
of power. There is no certainty 
that the changes, above all the 
Change in economic attitudes, 
wrought in China over the past 
10 years will continue. 

That the mood and opportu- 
nities available in China today 
are more palatable to the 
majority of Chinese than the 
chaos of the Cultural Revolu- 
tion goes without saying. But 
the speed with which they 
have come imo being calls for 
apprehension. Without politi- 
cal change in the direction of 
democratic forms more appro- 
priate to a decentralized econ- 
omy. there is always the 
possibility that China's post- 
Mao transformation will .be 
just as swiftly reversed. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


sacrificed to Labour's faith in 
sate control. 

That, of course, fits logically 
into Labour's strategy as a 
whole, reaffirmed in the Na- 
tional Executive Committee's 
statement for the Labour con- 
ference. It would be a heavily 
directed society in which 
Whitehall and its agents (hav- 
ing listened politely to the 
private sector’s opinion) 
would know best. 

The renationalisation plans 
for British Telecom and Brit- 
ish Gas reflect the dilemma of 
a party which knows that the 
old socialist model of straight- 
forward state ownership is 
deeply unpopular but which 
relies on activists who see state 
control as the hallmark of 
virtue. And as Labour’s in- 
dustry spokesman, Mr John 
Smith, has reaffirmed, these 
plans are only part of a wider 
plan for taking a strategic 
interest in key industries 
(potentially an open-ended 
definition) by various govern- 
ment shareholding devices. 

Labour has no forth in 
competition and much in 
bureaucracy. .Its compromise 
for British Telecom is only the 
appearance of something new. 
There is not the slightest 
reason to believe that a “so- 
cially owned” British Telecom 
would be any more responsive 
to the public or economically 
efficient than the old-style 
nationalised industries were. 


: Oxygen and the 
K2 disaster 

From Dr&L Holt 
Sir. As the doctor with the British 
K2 expedition, I wish to reply to 
the letter of Messrs Lloyd, Ward 
and Warren (August 30). 
Throughout the British attempt 
on the north-west ridge of K 2 this 
summer all the team members 
were well briefed and well aware of 
the hazards of high altitude and 
there was always support from 
lower camps when the lead climb- 
ers were going high. The whole 
team was never committed to 
going high on the mountain at the 
same tuna 

The use of oxygen is debatable - 
the cost of using it is now 
prohibitive in itselfT To rely on it 
at high altitude is worth while only 
if there is no danger of failure of 
supply. If there is a failure then the 
chances of pulmonary or cerebral 
oedema are very much increased. 
It was shown by the American 
Scientific Expedition to Everest 
that it is possible to exist on the 
very low pressures of oxygen 
available at 28,000ft. 

The modem method of climb- 
ing can be compared with divers 
who make “bounce” dives to great 
depth, spending only a very short 
time before returning to the 
surface. The high-altitude climber 
makes only short trips to extreme 
altittude and spends only the 
minimum time establishing 
camps and fixing ropes before 
descending to base camp. Once all 
the facilities are in place, a rapid 
ascent to the summit is made. 

This is exactly what happened 
on the Abruzzi ridge of K2 and 
most of an international team, 
including Alan Rouse, made a 
very fast ascent through camps 
previously established. Unfortu- 
nately two climbers considerably 
older than any of the others also 
attempted the climb. 

They subsequently spent the 
night of August 4 high on the 
mountain. TTiey then descended 
to camp IV, where the other 
climbers were waiting, and all 
seven were trapped by a storm. 
Five subsequently died. 

Most of tiie deaths that occurred 
on K2 this summer were the result 
of avalanches and falls and the 
very poor weather conditions. 

The use of oxygen would have 
had no effect on the outcome 
because it would have run out long 
before the climbers were able to 
descend. 

Yours faithfully 
BEV HOLT, 

DeerBield, 

Stores Park, 

Windermere, Cfimbria. 

September 3. 

Prison design . 

From the Director General qf HM 
Prison Service 

Sir. I have not had the benefit of 
hearing from the Prison Reform 
Trust about their criticisms of 
prison design, which Peter Evans 
reports in your issue of Monday, 
September 8. However, the article 
contains one specific and mislead- 
ing reference which purportedly 
relies upon a letter from me to the 
trust. I am writing to set matters 
straight immediately. 

The new prison at Full Sutton 
will be used for the purpose for 
which it was designed, as a 
dispersal prison. 1 should add that 
it will not repeat the shortcomings 
which experience revealed at 
HMP Frankland and which have 
been corrected there. 

As to the other points, the 
Government has already re- 
sponded fully to the report of the 
Public Accounts Committee on 
the prison building programme, 
upon which the Prison Reform 
Trust's cbmmenis appear largely 
to be based. 

Yours faithfully, 

C. J. TRAIN, Director General, 

HM Prison Service, 

Cleland House, 

Page Street, SW1. 

September 9. 

Soap and the admen 

i From Mr Winston Fletcher 
Sir. Lord BelofTs attack on politi- 
cal advertising (article, August 30) 
seems strangely naive. Political 
advertising is certainly not — as its 
over-zealous protagonists and 
detractors imply — irresistibly 
powerful. But it has a marginal 
influence on some undecided 
voters, and bolsters the enthu- 
siasm and commitment of the 
party workers, upon whom Lord 
Bel off pins so much faith. 

The tone of his article, however, 
suggests that it is not just the 

efficacy of political advertising 
which Lord Beloff questions, it is 
its very existence — which he 
dislikes. 

He may nostalgically prefer 
traditional oratory and doorstep 
canvassing to party political 
broadcasts and media advertising, 
but that does not make the former 
innately superior to (or any more 
truthful titan) the laiter. 

Yours faithfully, 

WINSTON FLETCHER. 

Delaney Fletcher Delaney, 

4042 King Street. WC2. 

September I. 

Looking askance 

From Mr S. A. Cotton 
Sir. If the illuminated sign show- 
ing that a taxi is free was visible 
from behind as well as in front I 
would know that the taxi held up 
at the lights ahead was worthy of a 
quick . sprint. At present 1 am 
usually out of luck as well as out of 
breath. 

Yours faiihfullv. 

S. A COTTON. 

28 Saunccy Avenue. 

Harpendcn. 

Hertfordshire. 

September 4. 


Home fit for the British Library 


From the Chairman of the British 
Library Board 

Sir, . Lord Thomas of Swyrmerton 
(September 5) has revived his 
counter-proposals for the use of 
the British Libiaxy's new building 
now being constructed at St 
Panaas. 

The purpose of this building is 
to house the British Library’s 
reference collections (now occupy- 
ing abut 250 miles of shelving in 
Loudon) in the dean, controlled 
atmosphere needed for their 
protection and in one place, where 
research can proceed unhindered 
by their present dispersion (cut- 
ting across many fields of study) in 
15 storage buildings. 

Virtually all the books, manu- 
scripts and microfilms win need to 
remain in the protective environ- 
ment of the St Panaas bmhfing to 
arrest the demonstrable environ- 
mental damage to Much they are 
still exposed. The greater part will 
be accommodated in those stages 
of the building now being con- 
structed. 

There could be no logic in a 
long-term policy of transporting 
them to and from the round 
reading room at the British Mu- 
seum or any other of the library’s 
present 12 reading rooms in 
London. 

The round reading room must 
continue as one of the humanities 
reading rooms of the British 
Library until the turn of the 
century. Thereafter, it will revert 
to the Trustees of the British 
Museum, who are already plan- 
ning for the preservation both of 
its appearance and of its scholarly 
associations and use. 


What would not be secure for 
future generations without the St 
Pan eras building is the intellectual 
unity and indeed the very survival 
of the British Library's London 
collections, now eight times 
greater than the one-and-a-half 
million books foreseen when 
Smirke’s round reading room first 
opened. 

The British Library Board, 
comprising both scholars and 
others eminent in public life, is in 
no doubt that investment in a new 
building designed for the preserva- 
tion and consultation of the 
totality of these great and growing 
collections is an urgent and nec- 
essary response to the investment 
over more than two centuries 
which the collections represent. 
The artificial prolongation of 
arrangements designed to service 
a fraction of the present stock 
would be ineffectual, as successive 
ministers have recognised. 

That architectural fitness has 
not been neglected, however, will 
become apparent when the St 
Panaas building, designed by 
Professor Colin St John Wilson, is 
opened. To elevate affection for 
Smirke's celebrated room, how- 
ever noble, above the responsibil- 
ity for preserving and making 
available the contents of one of the 
world's supreme libraries would 
be a curiously misguided 
mterpretaiton of the board’s du- 
ties and priorities. 

Yours faithfully, 

QUINTON. Chairman 
The British Library Board, 

2 Sheraton Street. Wl. 
Seplember8. 


Art treasures in EEC 

From Mr Norman St John-Stevas, 
MPfor Chelmtford (Conservative) 
Sir, 1 know that August is the “silly 
season” for newspapers but the 
recent item (August 29) in the 
diary of your newspaper about 
myself and the Royal Fine Art and 
Museum and Galleries Commis- 
sions encouraging freer movement 
of art treasures across EEC bound- 
aries is more than usually absurd. 

What is happening is that a 
seminar organised jointly by the 
European Movement and the 
Royal Fine Art Commission to 
discuss the topic of “Freedom for 
the arts” is to be held at St James's 
Square on October 21. There will 
be discussions on “Freedom and 
culture”: “Exhibiting Europe’s 
heritage”: “Trade in works of art”: 
“Freedom of movement for 
musicians” and “Music 
broadcasting in Europe” And why 
not? No doubt export restrictions 
on export of works of art may 

Alliance nuclear fear 

From Mrs Elisabeth Young 
Sir, George Hill's report, “Alliance 
fears laid to rest” (September 3) 
could be read to imply that the 
Joint SDP/liberal Commission 
on Defence and Disarmament had 
advocated "closing Britain's 
nuclear option”. It did not do that, 
and h would be pity if anyone 
thought it did. 

May L as member of that 
commission, quote the relevant 
passage in our unanimously 
adopted report? We said (para- 
graph 68f. 

No derision on whether and if so 
how British nudear weapons should 
be maintained beyond Polaris can 
properly be made except in the light 
ofi 

1. The progress of arms control and 
disarmament. 

2. The balance of relationships 

Treating cancer 

From DrS. B. Field 
Sir. Your Science Report (August 
30) described a new method of 
treating cancer being tried in the 
United States. The technique in- 
volves raising the temperature of a 
tumour, often by microwaves 
including application by insertion 
of antennae into the lesion, and 
the treatment is usually combined 
with radiotherapy. The article 
states that the method is not 
available in Britain. 

For several years the Medical 
Research Council, Cancer Re- 
search Campaign and other Brit- 
ish organisations have supported 
research into the potential use of 
hyperthermia in cancer therapy. 
As pointed out in The Times 
article, the method is still very 
much in the early stages of 
development, but selected pa- 
tients are being treated at a 
number of centres in the UK, 
including the use of interstitial 
antennae for application of the 
hyperthermia. 

Yours faithfully, 

STANLEY B. FIELD, 

Medical Research Council Cyclo- 
tron Unit. 

Hammersmith Hospital 
Ducane Road, W12. 

September 1. 

Getting on terms 

From Mr Leslie Dunkling 
Sir. Digby Anderson (September 
2) is disconcerted by the casual 
and immediate use of Christian 
names in modern times. He 
should perhaps lake note of a 
comment made by Charles Lamb, 
in one of the Essays qf Elia 
(“Mockery End. in 
Hertfordshire”): 

In five minutes we were as thor- 
oughly acquainted as if wc had been 
horn and bred up together, were 
familiar, even to the calling each 
other by our Christian names. So 
Christians should call one another. 
Yours sincerely. 

LESLIE DUNKLING. 

32 Speer Road. 

Thames Dillon. 

Surrey. 

September 3. 


come into the matter but why 
should they not be discussed? 

The Royal Fine Art Commis- 
sion is now playing a more active 
role in the arts world and along 
with all other arts bodies, official 
or unofficial, wants to promote 
freedom for arts and artists. The 
need for such freedom was 
brought home to me when I led 
the British delegation to the 
Cultural Forum held at Budapest 
last autumn under the Helsinki 
agreements. You made the forum 
the subject of an insighted and 
encouraging leading article. 

There is one further point The 
London art market is the most 
important in the world: it may 
well be affected in future by EEC 
raulations especially m the field 
of VAT. We need to be prepared 
and a seminar is an important 
means of becoming so. 

Yours faithfully, 

NORMAN St JOHN-STEVAS, 
House of Commons. 

August 31. 

within Nato between Europe and the 
United States. 

3. The range and costs of the 
technical alternatives which might 
be available to maintain a European 
minimum deterrent. 

4 The views of our European allies 
on whether new British nuclear 
capabilities are required for Euro- 
pean defence. 

These are matters which have not 
been fully taken imo account by the 
present Government in coming to 
its decisions on the Trident 
programme. 

Elsewhere in the report we 
recommended that a “stronger 
European Pillar” should be devel- 
oped within Nato. 

All these matters are now being 
followed up. 

Youreetc, 

ELIZABETH YOUNG. 

100 Bayswater Road, W2. 
September 4. 

Heart transplants 

From Mr F. G. Rose 
Sir. The Community Health 
Council shares the concern of 
Professor Yacoub (report. 
September 3) regarding the short- 
age of donor hearts. How can we 
encourage more people to volun- 
teer as donors? 

The CHC believes that our 
.present NHS number could help 
'as a key means of identifying 
willing donors. Move anywhere in 
the country, even change your 
name, your NHS number remains 
the same. Every number is held on 
computer records. It would be 
possible to write to everyone over 
1 8 years of age to ask if they would 
like to become a donor. 

By returning a signed authority, 
their agreement could be reg- 
istered centrally. Doctors would 
then be able to make immediate 
reference to the computer records, 
they would also be able to inform 
distressed relatives that it was a 
personal decision in the event of 
your death that you did want to 
help someone to live. 

Yours faithfully. 

FRANK G. ROSE. Secretary. 
Liverpool Eastern Community 
Health Council. 

648 Prescot Road, 

Liverpool. 

September 4. 

In the belfry? 

From Mr H. R. M. Porter 
Sir. A retired clergyman kindly 
keeps our 'church dean and tidy. 
His job is being made difficult, 
nay. almost impossible, by bats, 
who shower the pews with drop- 
pings. So he has asked the PCC 
(parochial church council) to pur- 
chase a stuffed owl to scare them 
away. 

Pace David Bellamy, can any of 
your readers suggest which species 
of owl is likely to be most effective 
and where we should site it? 

Yours faithfully. 

HARRY PORTER 
(Churchwarden, 

St James’s Church), 

Brockham, 

■Biriingham. 

Pershore. Worcestershire. 
September 5. 



SEPTEMBER 10 1863 

The colonization of this part of 
Africa by the major Powers had 
not yet begun tn earnest a few 
settlements inland, coastal forts, 
and men-of-mtr tying offshore in 
the hope qf intercepting slave 
ships, uahamey was occupied by 
France in tS92 and became fully 
independent in I960, taking the 
name of Benin in December 1975 


[SLA VE TRADE IN 
DAHOMEY] 

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES 

Sir, — Of all the Princes in western 
Africa, Baridahiing, King of Daho- 
mey. is in local power and signifi- 
cance inferior only to the King of 
Ashantee. With us at home, who 
seek the weft-being of that corner 
of the Gulf of Guinea, he should 
stand, perhaps, more prominently 
forth in our sight than stands his 
brother and cousin at Coomassie. 
The King of Ashantee is partly 
restrained by us from general and 
outrageous wrong because the 
Asbantees cany on a brisk trade 
with our people. . . . Between his 
kingdom and the sea our settle- 
ments stretch. 

With the King of Dahomey the 
case is widely (Efferent ... He 
commands a seaboard and converts 
it to the perpetual disgrace of 
humanity . . . 

The average number of slaves 
exported from Dahomey in 12 
months is 6,000. In addition to 
these 6.000 another 1,000 may be 
safely stated to be brought from the 
interior and kept in servitude in 
the villages which fringe the coast. 
When well behaved this batch of 
1,000 can enjoy some share of 
freedom, and can partake in seem- 
ing comfort and abundance of the 
native necessaries of life. The poor 
creatures are nevertheless amena- 
ble to the caprice of their masters, 
and may be shipped across the seas 
for acts of disobedience as well as 
for aggravated social offences. 

The annual supply of the 6,000 
slaves is chiefly drawn from a 
systematic course of slave- 
huntings. The slave-hunts are 
something like the fashionable 
European "battues'\ They are 
attended by the King in person. He 
goes forth with his army, and he 
pursues the sport for two or three 
months in every year. His wretched 
prey are the detached and feeble 
tribes living on the borders of his 
dominion. He works in detail; he 
assaults and captures each tribe 
one by one, and when he has 
sacked the hamlets contiguous to 
his State of their human treasure, 
his feats of spoliation will be 
extended to distances varying be- 
tween 12 and 24 days* march from 
his capital of Abomey. A battle is 
rarely fought- In truth, the African 
is no warrior. War is not his 
vein ... 

The slave-bunts are managed in 
this fashion. - — Traders, who are 
blacks, are sent out to act as spies. 
The spies bear their petty mer- 
chandise upon their heads to the 
Grooms in the midst of the jungle. 
They make their observations and 
they scan and master the means of 
defence possessed by each Croom- 
After a lapse of some months the 
spies return to the King, report by 
word of mouth the gleanings of 
their journey, and assume the 
guidance of the army. They in- 
struct the chiefs how the unsus- 
pecting Grooms can be surrounded 
and how the inhabitants can be 
surprized — Only on occasions 
when African Kings of strength 
and mettle nearly poised are 
emulous of trying their muscle and 
their prowess, those slaughters 
occur which close in the extermi- 
nation of an entire tribe. 

When a Croom has surrendered 
the captives are presented to the 
King by their captors. The captors 
aw rewarded with a payment of 
cowries, a kind of shell picked up 
upon the coast of Zanzibar: and the 
sum of cowries thus paid does not 
exceed the value of a couple of 
dollars, or nine shillings sterling, 
for each captive. The captive is 
thenceforth the King's slave. 
Those who are not selected for 
employment and for sacrifice are 
sent down to the slave merchant. 
The slave merchant frequently 
anticipates the consignment and 
sells the goods on credit 

An export duty of 15 or 22s. fid 
sterling is paid on each slave who is 


AN AFRICAN 


Sept. 8. 


Question for Labour 

From Professor Robert Skidplsky 
Sir. Amid the general acclamation 
which greeted Mr Kinnock's 
speech to the TUC conference, 
one point seems not lo have been 
noticed. 

Mr Kinnock. as reported by 
your correspondent (September 
3). called for “government with 
agreement. Shared objectives. 
Consensus”. The Labour Party is 
committed by its constitution to 
the "common ownership” of “the 
means of production, distribution 
and exchange”. 

How does Mr Kinnock rec- 
oncile his quest for consensus with 
his party's commitment to abolish 
the private enterprise system? 
Yours faithfully. 

ROBERT SKIDELSKY. 

Warwick University. 

Department of International 
Studies. 

Coventry. West Midlands. 
Scptembcr5. 

Tainted revenue 

Front Mrs P. K. Walker 
Sir. I wonder what my grand- 
mother would have thought about 
five newspapers whose revenue 
depends on advertisements? I 
remember so well her instructions 
to us as children in the thirties, 
delivered in a solemn tone of 
voice: -You can’t buy that, it has 
been advertised”. 

Yours faiihfullv, 

JEAN WALKER. 

The Bishop's House. 

Ely. Cambridgeshire. 


t 


14 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTKMBER 10 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


FIRST VIEWING OF SHOW FLATS ON 
SUNDAY 10am to 6pm 
GEORGE LEYBOURNE HOUSE 


CITY PADS TO CITY STANDARDS 

Five minute's walk from Tower Hill Station or 
St Katherine's Dock 

Site bounded by Cable Street, Fletcher Street and 
Wellciose Square 

58 NEW BALCONY FLATS AND STUDIO 
BALCONY FLATS FOR END YEAR OCCUPATION 
RESERVATION NOW SECURES FIXED PRICE, 
from £75,900 - £180,000 
40 ft indoor heated swimming pool. 
Sauna Solarium, 

Sun Terrace Open Leafy Outlook 



For Brochure and Viewing ring 


Sole Agent Stephen Morgan 
Tel; 01-403 


6200 


10am to 6pm Weekdays and Sunday (not Saturday) 


MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 






• MORTGAGES ■ 10096 advanced up to 
i 120,000 • toixmain Income plus- ixsecondary 
Income • 54 x Joint Incomes taken • non status 

• REMORTGAGES For any reason, eg: 

• Home improvements* Business Reasons 

• Educational Expenses* large Leisure Purchase, 
moat; caravan, etcj- Second House, (UJC or 

Overseas* MatrirnonalSeaJentent 

• consolidate Existing Borrowings 

• COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

• Shops, Factories, Etc. 

• PROPBOY DEVELOPMENT 
AND BUS/NESS FINANCE 




6 LoVSILjnf:, 
London 

£C3 


Robson 




Limited - 

01-623 3495 Pi’:. 


LAST RELEASE ON 
LONDON YARD 
15th SEPTEMBER 1986 


DON’T MISS THE BOAT! 


With this final release in Little Holland of blocks 1 & 5B. A chance 
to live on this stunning Riverside Development set ami&t -beautiful 
landscaped water-gardens, many with direct views across the 
Thames. 


SELLING FROM 15th SEPTEMBER 1986 


View today; London Yard Show complex open I0am-6pm Wkdays 
Manchester Road lDam-5pm Saturdays 

Isle of Dogs 12J0pm-5pm Sundays 

E14 PARRIS QUIRK 01-987 4473 

CHARTERED SURVEYORS 


Humberts 


Seal Severnaia 2 tufts (UR. Charing Cross 40 mnces). M325. 
MZGl M20 4 cries Gahnch 20 mawtes 


An to po rta nt sod historic Grade I EfeeJMOtM manor 
house rstth outstandfag vim. 

IWfnrhml llnunni 

moapf* notoci 

MagnAcent oaierted Great Ha*. 2 ckmkrooma, 3 reception 
rooms, Smalbona farm house kitchen, utOty room, large 
ceter. sauna & shower room. Principal bedroom with an 
suite bathroom and dressing room/study. 6 further bed- 
rooms. 3 bathrooms ( 1 en aupe). 

Stall Ftete 


Recaption room. 2 bedrooms, en suite bathroom and 
Mchon. 


Oast Hook 


Convened to gbe 3 rooms, kitchen and ba throom. 
Extensive garaging, stable and further outbu Mings. Beau- 
btul walled garden and grands with swimming pool and 
En Tout Cas tarns court. 


in afl about g acres. 


our 


Mn (J. Duin Slid Bssimiatm 


6 St Meharis TenatA London NZ2 43 
TeL- 01-881 8227 


PRESENTS A WEST END HIT 


FOR A VIEW OF HYDE PARK, YOURS, FROM £300.000 TO £750,000 AND BEYOND! 
FOR SALE: 4 PENTHOUSES (Isokf) 

COMPLETION - CHRISTMAS 1988 


LOCATION - LANCASTER TERRACE, BAYSWATBt, LONDON W2 
Discerning Purchasers Only 

Accommodation comprises: 


ling F 

Superb Uvmg/Dtning Rooms. Fabulous Kitchens. Largs Terraces. Car Parkingl 
Resident Porter. Passenger Lift. Video Entrance Phone. Central Heating. 
Double Glazing. 


Abo avalabte a deflghtful detached principal cottage with 3 
becSooms and large reception room secluded m a own 
grounds on approximately 1 acre. 

For Sale Freehold. 


Joint Sole Agents: H amp t o n 4 Sons, London Office, 
Tab 01-483 8222. 

Humberts, London Office, 

Tab 01-029 6700. 


NEW WATERSIDE HOMES 

I WALKING DISTANCE FR OM T HE CITY 


GLOUCESTER 

SQUARE 

Whisfon Rood E2 


1 bed fiats, 2 and 3 bedroom 
houses on the bants of the 
Regents CanaL 



Prices from £55,000 -£1 10,000 

Site Safes Office 01-729 6377 Saturday & Sunday 


PILOT PROPERTIES LIMITED 
30 Oval Rood London NW1 


OPEN 2-5 

01-267 5681 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/1 


Prestige attracts the investors 



terraces 

Ian 


Beverly House, now raider construction in Paifc Road, London NW1, has been ™ — r- ^ f _, 
planned to overlook Regents Part The scheme, being marketed by Hampton & Sons, dlnstrates tte Dnendfor off-pta 
purchasing — particularly by overseas investors. Most flats have bee® sold and completion is towards the end of l W7 


Confidence in the central London prop- 
erly market is still high as overseas 
investors, and increasingly the British 
buyer, continue to buy expensive flats for 
long-term capital investment with the 
added attraction of a high-rental income 
through company lets. 

Over the past six months, top quality 
units in the right location, which 
includes Regents Park, Belgravia and 
Kensington, have seen a capital 
appreciation, of some 20 per cent 
following an average increase of 27 per 
cent during 1985. 

This summer, however, there has been 
a downturn in the short-term lettings 
market as Americans, who overall 
account for some 80 per cent of this 
section of London's rental market, 
stayed at home because of security fears. 
In addition, the hoped-for surge of rental 
inquiries before to the Big Bang hasn't as 
yet materialized. 


Despite the sky-high prices, 
artaeeofbir 


there’s no shortage of buyers 
for central London’s smarter 
homes, says Diana Wildman 


Buyers seek security and 
a high-standard finish 


These two factors have caused a slight 
levelling in the rental market but seems 
not to have affected the sales side: 

Indeed, the continuing trend of off- 
plan purchasing is illustrated by the feet 
that Beverly House, a block of apart- 
ments overlooking Regents Park, has 
only seven apartments unsold out of 66 
which bad a price range of £90,000 to 
£590.000. Construction has just begun 
and the homes will not be ready to live in 
until November, 1987. 

Says Linda Beaney, a partner of 
Hampton & Sons, the selling agents: 
‘'Beverly House is attractive as an 
investment not least because the only 
financial commitment now is a 10 per 
cent deposit — the balance on 
completion. 

“What the overseas, and indeed the 
UK, investor requires is a prestige 
location, a well presented and security- 
effective apartment block and a very, 
very high standard of finish. And he is 
prepared to pay well for it." 


The .seven flats still available include 
the folly-fitted, two-bedroom show flat at 
£275,000; one other two-bedroom unit at 
£330.000 and five three-bedroom units 
from £385,000 to £460,000 for the 999- 
year leases. With the exception of the 
show flat, all have balconies and most 
have views over Regents Park. 

All are double-glazed have fuUy^fitted 
kitchens, video entry phones and there is 
an underground garage with security 
grille and access by lift to the entrance 
hall. Linda Beaney says they have been 
well thought out for letting, and long- 
term rents at today's value would be 
between £500-£600 a week for a three- 
bedroom/three-bathroom unit. 

Another factor which influences the 
international purchaser is the range of 
services, as the recent success of Richard 
Collins's Palace Court scheme in 
Bayswater illustrates. 

By offering a businessman's service, 
including secretarial telex and fox 
facilities, this mansion block of 25 flats, 
being marketed through joint agents 
Ayfesford and Savills, has just eight 
unsold priced between £200,000 and 
£650,000 for the 125-year leases. Most of 
those already sold have either been let at 
an average of £800 a week or are used as 
company flats. 

Bolebec House in Belgravia is the 
latest scheme to offer a full range of 
facilities geared to the businessman, 
including a laundry and valeting service 
and a cook. Domestic help and porterage 
can also be provided. 

The builcting is a 1960s purpose-built 
Mock of 1 1 flats now undergoing total 
refurbishment and there are three mod- 
enacted units for sale through joint 
agents Lassmans and W A Ellis. Each 
has one bedroom, a second 
bedroom/study, bathroom with whirl- 
pool bath and a double reception room 


with west-feeing terrace. Priced at 
£395,000, £425,000 and £435,000 for the 
125-year leases, the flats are fully 
carpeted, curtained and decorated. 

The agents are also prepared to sell 
some of the unmodemized units and 
arrange to refurbish them completely to 
the purchaser’s specification, within 
three months. These include a three- 
bedroo m/th ree-baih room sixth floor 
penthouse which would cost £900,000 
fully refurbished and a larger three- 
bedroom flat which was previously two 
units, priced at £910.000 once fully 
updated. 

Says Sheila Hyams of Lassmans: "l 
would expea the one/iwo-bedroom 
homes to shon-leL say for a two-month 
period, for between £1,500 and £2,000 a 
week.* 1 

Phillips, Kay & Lewis rent, on average, 
more than 700 units a year with a total 
income of around £9 million for their 


Some owners never even 
see their properties 


clients. The units have a current capital 
value of £100 million. Many of their 
clients are ex-pat investors. 

Says director Harold Phillips: "Sev- 
enty per cent of our business is done by 
us on behalf of clients. The properties are 
bought, financed, furnished, managed, 
let and often resold without the client 
ever having seen them, so there is a real 
need for an understanding of both the 
rental market's peculiar requirements 
and the ideal unit for capital growth." 

His firm has noted a softening in 
demand for rented one and two- 
bedroom units. But there is a great 
demand for three and four-bedroom 
properties to rent and direaor Mr Gerald 
Kay believes one such is a three- 
bedroom/two-bathroom second floor 
flat at 35. Onslow Gardens, SW7, priced 
at £260,000 for the 62-year lease. 

Says Mr Kay: "The price reflects the 
feet that to achieve a rent of £550 a week 
some £30,000 needs to be spent on 
refurbishment" 


In one of the finest residential locations in the Royal Borough — 


GATE 


KENSINGTON, LONDON SW7 

A selection of well presented new apartments in a 
magnificent Victorian house, dose to Hyde Park: 
One Hat of 2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, etc @£199,500 
Flats of 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, etc from £239,000 
Splendid duplex Penthouse of 3 Bedrooms &. 2 Bathrooms, 
with 35fr Reception Room, @ £385,000 
•Balamy m Terrace with 7nost flats *Fiitty equipped kitchens 
•Luxurious Bathrooms •Gas-fired Central Heating •Lift 
•Audio-Visual Entry System •New decorations & carpets 
Leases 125 years For Sale 





SHOW FLAT BY KINGCOME DESIGN OPEN SUNDAY 7th SEPT 1986 12 noon-6pm* 

WA.ELLIS Nelson Hearn 


174 Brampton Rood 
London SW31HP 
tales 23661 WAE 

01-581 7654 



96 Earls Court Road 
Kensington 
London W8 
Tel: 01-937 3811 
01-937 4408 


Winkwarth=x 

MORTGAGES X 


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Ring 01-235 0691 
For fall Information 
Open, until 8pm today 


HOUSE HUNTING!! 

CONVEYANCING £145! 

(pins VAT and dubaraements) 

Wl.\ IliVT.K niH I’KlCh OK T1IE HOUSE on any nmdfntuJ ok 
or purctuic. Smuo included in our oomjrteic fixcdfpncr package 

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MI-7W 9520 
Quote Ref CRUS 

5fc Bor? New Road, t Voiwic h . Manchester M2S 8JU. 

Vim 71 hr pmtMlIv lurprunlH 


WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
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V 


Winkworth 
Financial Services 

25a Moteomb Street 
London SW| 


Eduiord 

Erdman 


/ 


* 


THE % 

FLEETWOOD 

PARTNERSHIP 


W MMthrac lg> 1 bed terns* to pare CUM. 

2 R "" old m*" 

SUWCUSIUi ML Soli M 2 tad. ncty rood. tUflst, ML yb*. nSUML 


Tdi p iM IHU 


IttfWM 


IMGHTS8HDGE, SW1 

£ 121 ,800. MapilfiaW pted-a- 
tere ctass to Hvrods. 7th floor. 
Bed. Bath. Rerap. Ktthen. VW. 
C H. UH, Porter. Lie figyra. 

DORSET SQUARE, Uni 
C145JM. Bright fourth floor flat 
overtook! [W attractive gardens, 
dose to Baker Street Sotot 2 


Beds. Bath. Ode Rerap. Utahan. 

L Dhto Glazed. 


Balcony. Uft. £31 
Foiw. Lae 9 7 yts. 

GUMKCTH TffiUCE, K2 
£75JM. 2nd floor flat to stucco 
(ranted cn wwu r t . Bed, Bath. 
Recap. Kt. Clkrm. Hafl, Ut Bal- 

I?EBtsIk¥| SW7 
£2754)00. Unusual detached 
twogatow nth pmqte ganlen. 2 
Bath. 2 Recap. Knchen. 
Qtom. Ut*y Rm. Sdt contaemt 
studio flaL Large ABk. Otters con- 
satend. Use 7lw5. 

MAYFAIR R0ffAL 

Betwean Berfcetoy and Grasvenur 
Soares. 4th Floor rkjpten flat in 
hret class order. 3 Beds. 2 Baths. 
DWe Recap with views oner Berite- 
Jw Soisire. Large kiteften. UL 
Porter. CH. Lse 9 yrs from Seth 
84. 3 yrty RR. Rem E12.440 Inc. 
SC. Prenum EISMO me f 1 1. 

01-629 8191 

24 HOUB AHSWBBKG SOUKS 
SGnmenor Street Lawton W1X0AD 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


MALVEMS 


L 


Sales 


raeonKLsm * am «r< m*mta nu an im jw n oi emPSBUo 

mlhc. I Bin Jl k*jl>n |uu ul Ilk; FuOum Ra char Si# Ken We HeaeMn im 
wen « (Jcmq tuirai, kn#m . Ords. turner Mcp an CM Lse III JUS. 
In# .i mwai*. Lme VJur ji ISO 500 

BHUMH RIMS. SW7. *n iwtfnajdlr hqW bn*1 « swckh MUUn 
mu <trc DtOCf u iltn wWI manlnnK) pwue MO) uralf UCIM tor all no 
rwiOnu -Anmj a nonsocn rao& oi swi Ken a Gtoure. Re ftecepnnM/ 


hl.rtnn bedi. tuUrni ndep CM lse 9S pri CIJSJXD r*QWy 

HTY (to I mu mill 


01-589 8122 


RENSONQ 

ESTATE AGENTS * WAJEK^ ^ 


1B6 Honcfeny Road. Wesmlaster, London SW1P 2EF 
Telephone 01-222 7020 

WESTNMSItR. SWI. Sum. 


“Me remoiMea Voonm Comei OiMra Bug™ HMnHeoevtsng 
in manly Zarosa coup 


2 Bros 2 Bares n en sue). Goal Reom. I8n 
“ irta 


Value » me 


Ll<vts 5 ^ 


BMS 2 Bams. WC Lqe ATtoeak. CH. La. Potter X 


200. 


A HOUSE IN 
PIMLICO 


Qutetl 

Sound 


> Central Location. 
3Uod order. Admirable 
family house lefartriflh- 
ment propoemon. 
£350.000, tty ceffisrs- 
RinK 01-638 60T9 
Austin Lindon. 


Conveyancing 

£280 by City Solicitors 

(+ VAT aid disbursements) for buying or sefling ytxr home 
n the usual way on prices up to £60,000. Fhng fir quotes on 
higher figures. 

BARRETTS SOLICITORS, 

49 wra VKT0RM ST. LM»H 04 
IBUEPHOMb 01448 flSSI 


NL A stunning penthouse set in a presbgousluxurydevti- 
opment n nrenaatate onler throughout 23 ft * ZD ft receotton 
wrtn23R«iDfisouflrtangroori6i«ca Lwuy wngnmn fi«y 
fitted totrten with 27 ft x K ft rod terrace. Master 
bedroom/ensute bathroom. Guest bedmom/ensude bathroom. 


Bedroom 3/sady. Lift. 3 underground car spams. Double gfaz- 
taker. 124 yea lease. E285JD00. 


mg. Camoker, 

Hew today n-M9 7661 BotMack. 

Monday 01-326 0160. 


BUYING FOR 
INVESTMENT? 

Discuss it with the 


458 3680 

Anytime (T). 


•AMHMN. EH. Tower flM 
wm, 5>uruuoq eoutn-ractno 
iiWM»rram 571 h floor ova* Otv 
of London. 3 Beds me new 
Elr 126 yr to*. <226.000. 
Frank Ham a Co Ol 5B7 
0077 


CONVEYANCING 
£230+ VAT & DISBURSEMENTS 
ON REGISTERED FREEHOLD CONVEYANCING 

IY£ CAM ALSO SELL YOUR HOME THROUGH OUT ESTATE AGENCY 
DEPARTMENT 

WRITTEN QUOTATIONS « DETAILS SUPPLIED UPON REQUEST. 
CORNILUE 6 CO 
SOLICITORS 
01-729 4360 


HOLLAND PARK 

EffiajBmtarqadale. 

Joint Agents Boston Gilmore 
01-730 2152 or 
Farrar Stead & Glyn 
01-6031221 


PUUMH: Lovely rutty mod ftoi 
froMKt I«T roe OVI loot doors 
wiui irqr «rdn 3'oasnv dtOKK. 
2 hwiitt ■! enuuilri. UMr mtg. 

I ror cttnino rut. lbfl tut/ brkM 
rm nuay. £187.500. Trt oi- 
381 6691 or Ol 899 7788 (O) 


FULHAM Luxury 2 M nuteon- 
mio. utqv aouHo rremuan. 
nnwd Kilctwn lovny baUiroetii. 
EtnrenwHy Wil Shocnb. Br- 
rniny imMnwd. In sumth 
dproratu* order South laang 
TOM UHrraro Cl 10.000 oi set 
9688 w«mto/98fi S992 work 


Building better homes 
for Londoners 

Contact us on 04862-70818 






ONStOW GMDOS. S.W.7. 

it 2 M& yon. t 
AWHWRE B0. W.V*. 
juiffiw E roV 
lUlja he 


LW.7. Oamoo nsmt ok <ta Ml 
W US tit 1*. tMMr spa 
L Sums dtMDti « DBffd 
ne. 3ua.mniupKH.iM*. 


Mh hv tot* looms c un 
;« aim 

ffWfl & EW QfDC vdR Iqi 

■ OfthM. i 


■■jure. 6 inry i 
Lear “ utara. 

SOUTH RBOMCm. 

W arn E eta ret: 
SDps 


nod gmdA Iwr an Ur nas nan ico 
I reams, umt. S*9**S W C 

nsuaoL 

ico ib. tatkm. need on hues w go cti isa 

tWH 

Q 1-244 7441 


COMNAUOHT ST MT2 
unmodrmnm 3 bedroom fUL 
prmur ouddina 46 ycirt 

Cl 44.000 244 aim 


EUJHC - Huqr. 2 bedroomed. 
iiftur* not Fitted kitchm. nc. 

or »ren kw se tmoo. t« . 

OI Wfl S70» 


MUM C r ro w. NL. Lb* 2 bed iwr 
M"4 *foi ui aims roM. Hirer 
r«>r maims twsts. ham. Oa 
£h. 1*" Oda £68.940 111. 

sunurv & Kmi 359 0961. 


WESTCR0FT 
SQUARE, V6 


witti good gangs BUS off 
ing. built Stout 


strsat parking. 

I960, an easy a rtn 3 Baton 
tausB. Lge Stfng Rm/Bawg 
Area. tot. Bam. Sariton, G» 

Oi Freeftokf EiTO.fflM. Sm- 

tiay Viewng 741 0OT2. Astnn 
Seete & Set 602 8611. 


HOLLYWOOD ROAD, 
SW10 


Beautifully mamtaned period 
house. 3 Reaps, 4 Beds, 2 
Bate, IM/BreaWast Rm. Util- 

Siwii' "■ 

Chesterfield & Cfl 

01 581 5234. 


C0LVIUE TERR 
W11 


outgoings. Z125JXQ. 
Herri ngt on Green. 
01-229 4344 
Open today 10-2pn. 


CRAWFORDS 

reao i 

0P» 


CHISWICK 

W^. 


BASSETT ROAD, W10 


■wot moon SteJo no « ^ato 


MkM md Wjh npamtoi 
Wi 


95 YEABS £49^08 H ms. 3 beds 


ST UJUin in. Fandy house. 
2 maps, 3 beds £105.000 
ALKEUSI IB. Excepoored 2 
_3eI29JK» 


■KBSUKrON, ¥M4 ■ 

gettaot peWyeoamtM lOl Stnto 


3 belts. 


BI.S(d)santaf2recs. 
£129.500 


ito n «m re^tonajMi m- 


m’y&rs 


Fired Cps. Lur 

U9JOSO 
WEST KENSIIGTOII. WM 

MyimnsKlBarereMto* 

s , &r* 0Mai stf 


BDVE PI BL Vary athaefave 
lufly mod fomdy hae. 2 recs. 3 
beds, tgs Nt £162500 

low unw PUS) n. 


|bmiato rswrade lanriy hotne. 


superb 


BARONS COURT, WM 

mfaie 1* C 2 m Brer mm 


tamimiretfMM 2 Btds. t>o«Q 
to, Jo BHhn. Sure Lre BUcbb». Fo- 


E188JO0 

PBUROKE MEWS, W11 
Cftrau raw ns to Hmlr 
■nodanrad awreremrog nvnft dt- 




YEARS n55jOSa 
totormna rerend hr m rmw 
ai ov awvdnised rum 

, r - iw DM nns a oa 

IK BW Blt 

01-584 5334 


LENNOX 6ARDENS, 
SWI 

-terra 


Ideal Cmtnd 
wftfi 

Recap, Rit, Bed, _ 
Caretaker. 29 years, 
esssooo 

Chesterfield & Co 
01-581 5234 




LANDS 


r frMfal 


3 h w kuu wB^ batkreotM, 4 
bafcairv flangfe flordra. 

QUICK SALE. 
£125 < 00a 


TEL- 01-223-1246 


WAND0N ROAD, 

SW6 


BdUSVIELL MU. rHMhBOV ber- 
rtrri). Edwantian doutMe 
rraniPd tmnlly l>MW Ul nol- 
Iml rondmon « Ims. a imu 
l uiH uaitiu nanny suttei. nuay. 
35» Uiroutm founMAttchen. 

£175.000. PhonrOl 883 7438. 


I Superb Kite fronted house in 
Ithfar c ha mtow cul-cto-sac on 
I b or der^ 

Udfty. Pa&o, FH. £295,000. 


Chesterfield ft Co 
01-561 5234 


ST. JOHN'S WOOD MM - Super* 
cwnoruon m sAMantiai Vie- 
lonan MUa. S OM DeffiL 

hrehroom. wow^ruom. rmn, ni- 
trd kiicnpn. in, l««w. own 
parumn «m. gas en. irry low 
outqonrea | km imro 
£1 lO.OOO. T« : 01CS4 S«a 


•Wrawntssreni rutnam bonier, 
roomy family hw. claw riv- 
er. easy xm Wni Fntiyaty. 
ft >** WH*' Wttp.. Mhragm. 
toy 2 nd natti. patio ana «oum 


ELSwmrntY ■umikhmii- 
cent lot da mars wtttt ran* 
pmate garden S.W. racing. 
Snrcuruiar renpuen/diMng 
room wim carmnffCMUMi 4M 
dranuBc brack martftr flro- 
Haces. 5 nood stre brew. 2 Irar 
baths, guest eih. superb u 
wnue cel-in MKhcn. CM C/H. 
75 yr lease £328.000. View ». 
day 289 0685/328 90*6 07. 


I^c »9 9fln ^Gounfry syt# tuny 


Hi kirenen/breukiast £147« 
Tel. Oi 748 6909 viewing. 


DMnMM-nusii. very 

pretty, nny studio ccoage. new- 
ly bum. Fined kitchen, hath, 
carpers, pane garden. Fit reotan 
46&000. TeL. 01-422 2280. 


wggmant houjimd 

r?w mansion 
J"* 4 * 3 bens. 2 Balhs. long 
Otters oier £180.000 
Tr 41 0 ’ 258 7528 a^. 
tone Mr HmvtMid- 


LEMHOX OAMMEMS - New 
return. Super deror. 2 bed * 2 
bathroom flat with patio. 29 
years. £ 180 . 000 . view today. 
Tel ; Ol 602 5941 


^ 4 bed 

house. hnetv area- 

(.ounge/nan. 2 teceps. dbtr 

hut h> need 
hence knv once 
£159.950 Te|:Oi-9M 1941 


PIMLICO swi superb ttiMlor 

6eenaa Lame bed. SiBUvgrni. 

bath. German kit. Hau/Sutrs 
Long Kate, nwpt to viewed. 
CB6500. TW 04024 86826. 


PVLH4K - very attractive i bed 
mtotohMie Tube. CCH.9I 

ULifol MaJMOono. met. nr 


■MM VALE We. Attracthe UP 
floor, ppai/mel flat Converted 
Hse. In mure «. 2 bads. HU. bariL 
stnmgrrn. brer, vwa dec. catpet- 
M. 91 years Lease. 

Ter. s Rowland an 
IWi 966 1234. 


SOLD 

OUT 


Good investment prop- 
erties required for 
waiting applicants. 
458 3680 anytime (TJ. 


CAD0GAH PLACE, 
S«1 

Smwfog gnui flr mabonatte *mi 
moms and own prime 

J&SSSffiiSSg 

at lam as. 60 years. 

Mistral 
01-22S 2577 


BCHMl CADOCAN SQUARE - 

Very pretty, bur deceptively 
MKUu». 3 bedrodmM bouae bi 
tmnunirate cotrtauan. with 
mesm/inm dgitor recopuon 
roan. 5 baths ts en suiter, rutty 
HUM kuctren/dimnfl 

S2? p 4, U *' wnjen/wmta 

court. 72 yoar lease. C *05,000 
T«. 01735 0627 Or 937 «^~ 


Ml LNhl qtacl F ftt 
house m sonant after Georgian 
Snrre. wgh standard comer- 
smb 17ft master bed im wm, 
■tow And terrace Barden. 2 
f lather oedfras. batbroom. 280 
recenurei. 2SH taxman 
duhagnn. South west (aans 
tordm. OCH Ear portal* 
access city. Nr all a i wm 
£ 17fl_SOO. TeJrOl 378 8311 


NAYFABb HUI StroeL rnree 2nd 
floor pan wo d w rased flat, z 


r ceres. 3 dm. 2 bam. balcony. 
ML porter, ymge- CH. Long 
lease. £330.000. Tet iWoek- 

naysi Oi-zto sees 


Holland 
Para. An naraardmaniy m- 
oouf A eteganr Obl newly 
rpodenused. • Dbw beds. 2 
boms *1 err suite). Owns. Lux 

mod tor 19x1?. tna cm. sa 
years. £320.000 to include 
esc Sunday 8704705. Week- 
days 499 9901 m. 


•HMDUXRD.Itt4.aadMB 
& eteyani l bedrm, 7 rrcepOOP 
garden flat on gnwi A M fin 
with magntf date rrcen retain- 
log orttl Features. S3* pdn. rrd 
ut/dttw. 2 bathnn. pedrm. 
ubUty rm A cellar. Cpt. fth. 
93 vrs CTOjOOO. Leslie March 
603 5181 


beds. kfl. 2 Mb, ggs. 
gdn. For qredt sdt 
IMKUJDO 
beds. 3 
AS 


I TON W. Unqoe W7 
bate. 2/3 naps, doe 
set m 1 acre d seduded g* 
indaar swnnmg pool £450.0 

01-995 8904 



ISUNGTON, N1 

Gads ■ toot tawe b pramy gaPm 
SgMU-Wttm* kept tnsdy kcdkw o> 4 
rerers A dsoHs tots - res reft Mrere 


ga-sm tatraML cML drangh non. 
iM. M. tom tom Mttonmreft- 


«sta d oft. gre eh E3E5W f/r 

★ ** 



bB sbto ppttng to ndc S beds 3 
i «*•«<»■ to M to gto rinrer nan 
ton neon « EBOJtt) F/K 
* * * 

SOLE AGENTS 
COPPWG JOYCE 
226 4221 


John spacer 


I SHALL H00ERHSEDI 
VtCTWUAN TOWRflQBSE 

in qtset road near Regents foli/l 
Baka strasUn need of|«H a bma 
are and decoration to become 


| someones pampered datoa. Thro' 
Si motf usts. 


ADJ 

BEDFORD SQUARE 
LONDON W.C.1. 

Ordst mews setting: 2 flats 
In small mansion block 
Heal as pled a tore. Both 
flats offer reception, 

Wtchen, 2 bedrooms, 
bathnn/W.C. Own prwHtn 
gdne. Service charge He 
CHWSpartCH. ten 23 
years- £70000 ft £76^300. 

01 482 4488 


lge/ sum. M, *rth 

smafl patm and outada too. 2 due 
beds. 1 ssigfe bed an widi fitssd 
cunbods and vatty units. Bath- 
saturate «.c, CH and dUe gfe. 
Readems p e r ki n g . 

msjaat imMd 


Photo 01-935 1079 dm 
ta 81-724 3914 me. 



drab rm. |/| 
. - tfa jn; ° >am 

— WHT srffin HAT pgs. 


HAMMERSMITH. 

Spac ground floor i 


flat Dec to high s 

abed. Recap 


OCH. DUe ! 
room. Kit/break room. 
Bath. Cloakroom. 20 ft 

s ‘Sj£"?,r- 


01-735 


BraaMupwawt aijattnanaua^ 
STJyto CTW ir f tp, i-i bi aad 
<*"# Long to 



GLOUCESTER PUCE 
NW1 

ties® 

Raker 


Qflrdt sale £99358 
Tel: 04024 56526 


SWB/MOORE PARK EST. 


SitoDe ta i 5 to/rn noa to U| U 

asaasa 

wkdays 


WOODFORD GREEN 


. - ^FrantoSttodtoreei 

towgt Uflwum red hHctocn 
anfl cnoB btofc FtorapM 


W1 Ffrffy 

oudoft Pins car qor» nwa 
toft bsy icpOi lor cut tsn 


>Uat - S.w.1 
» S. oaln f m 0raw thg room wun 

35SSSSS 

Wk floor*. nSSfcSS 
building. UTL 

«lflo.naL A27BJ0O0 -rwST 
Ml 3654 tuvor «21 
Avartaue furnished If rwr'M** 


E523B 

Tel: 01-986 3210 
axt 272 





S5tts-an=-s5 


WES I WUCITIW 3 Bed FlaL Buu- 
roftiTOBtira u mgnest 
S® 41 ®- new Kitchen & beuv 
room. m tenor- decorated 

deigned throughout, new car- 
4 „ furtsins. Wnuerty 
[lohi moms. I wiih 

E2^S!«ny^ Prooabty fforet 

^ aitalaWe lo- 

ffJFi'J'OO®. To \ tew leteptione 
Nigel Tyne on Ol 588 55 1 0 


fiasnoo^So r£ >u £. — 

5™<o*y« » »n Svral ' 




«« Pbbuwus 
,ourtri »swr na in 
ftueeo house. 2 n«b, 
"wire rm. 24fr wewwn wrm 
NUer V; kflc nen/ainwr. tutn- 
room.. wrong uig roo< terrace. 

he rieaSSSTW **"■ 134 ** 
to Cl 78.000 Tetan 289 4069 


flat Sthfge. 

Kfg” dch. close tu S5 , 


MU; Best pan. Sun- 
W^T nutMwtw with potto 
knetien raid 
rlainiS^V ® wn entrance. 
C12&0OQ. TM-.01-886O4I6 


wsraoiMME Mm ■& I 

“""woftxiMd houw far ^ ' 

FreehoM- filTStaCiaMAalaS. 


■asttstarsss 


*T NATIUjuncs dock. Cl. 

® tod 1 rerett house w«h 

ttl'aCMUfl 125 VT he Off eel 

1 40X100 

A CO 01-587 0037 




roor twr. ccas. F/<s 
T« 01559 1601. 9-T^ 2 ® 00 




Sffl7iafSfas“- 



: : i £ 'i 


'411 S #5 


* a:-; 



SSLii-. 





V' 


s 


#.. N 




. to 

V 


■V, 



.tesJ*,YU&^ 


.*oii 

■"M 


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! c < 




lK,ni ; and6| 


( ,|f Wrsf[{j 


ouuhjmiB 


OlSaHaialfc 


Vis wet he 


( ;ina! d«r 


r.iik haul 


i in *111^ 


c .impt’rlifc 


K.Mdh^ 


L-iin u 


of$ 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/2 ] 


Cotswold 
dream built 
by Wren’s man 

■ 2^^ t ^ CotawoId town of 
5saR°!S built In 

i???J^5? n ui2P r P r Kempster, Sir 
Christopher Wren s master mason, who 
was responsible far work on St Paul's 

camedrat Including the donw. At the rear 

of the house are the ancient quarries 
which provided much of the stone tor the 
rebuilding of the City churches. 

The house was buBt on to an older 


stone-tiled roof, has four reception 
rooms and four bedrooms, with spacious 
atnes. Adjoining it is a medieval bam 
and a three- bedroomed cottage. The 
nine-acre grounds also contain a 
granary converted to a sturfio. 

The property is to be auctioned in 

^I^? n «%£ tef P l,er 25- Jackson-Stops 
and Staff of Chipping Campden and 

Cirencester expect more than £250.000. 

■ The Romsey office of Jackson and 
Jackson » setting Keepers Cottage, at 
Brook in the New Forest, a restored 
farmhouse dating from the mid-17th 
century. The cottage has five 
bedrooms and four reception rooms, 
with outbuildings inducting stables 
and a thatched goat house, and stands 
m about 11 acres. The price is r a m /M O. 

Old beamed bam 

Beldam Lake House at Chobham. 

Surrey, is a re-sited and converted former 
timber-frame bam standing in 17 
acres of park-like grounds, Including two 
stream-fed lakes, this secluded 
property, dating from the 16th century, 
has four bedrooms and a living area 
52 feet by 20 feet which was the original 
bam. with fine beams and a central 
ingfenoofc fireplace, and a massive 
m ah agony table costing £1 0,000. 

The house has various outbuildings 
and a summer house. McCartney Estates 
of Odiham and Messenger May and 
Baver stock’s Guildford office are seeking 
offers over £400,000. 
ft Tucked away in London's 
Docklands Is a medieval house bitift as 
part of a gatehouse to Bermondsey 
Abbey, which was demolished during 
the Reformation. Numbers, Grange 
Wade, SE1, built between 1480 and 1540, 
has three bedrooms, two reception 
rooms— and a Norman wall in the cedar. 
Chestertons* Docklands office Is 
asking £225,000 for this unusual 
property, close to the City. 

Anyone for trout? 

■ The White House, Donnlngton, 
Newbury, Berkshire, is a Grade II fisted 

aholrtorte acrefwtt^sedude^wafied 
garden leading down to the-River 
Lam bourn and 70 yards of single-bank 
trout fishing. 

The house, dating from the 18th 
century, with later additions, has a 
reception hall, drawing-room, dining- 
room and fan% room, four bedrooms, 
and a converted stable block 
adjoining, which has a bedroom and 
study. Built of brick under a slate roof, 
the house Is within the Donnlngton Vtitage 
conservation area, two miles from 
Newbury, and three miles from the M4. 
Knight Frank and Rutiey's Hungerford 
office is asking £275,000. 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 



■ The Old Rectory at Saxfingfaam Ne&ergtfe, a village seven miles from Nor- 
wich, was built by Sir John Soane in 1784 for the Reverend John Gooch. Ifis one 
of the only two country bosses designed by him stfll surviving in their original 
form. After baying the property, the present owner commissioned a restoration 
project winch gained a Civic Tnst award in 1971. listed Grade H% the house 
stands in grounds of nearly nine acres within a conservation area. It has a main 
hall, three reception rooms and a MlBard room, with seven bedrooms, and a guest 
pavilion and staff cottage. The gardens have poods and a lake, with an obelisk 
from a French chateau as a focal point. This fine cotmtiy house, for which the 
plans and drawings are kept at die Soane Museum in London, is for sale at 
£400,000 through Smith- Woolley of Norwich 

Racing certainties 


By Christopher Wannan 

Property Correspondent 

“TheyWoff” always signals the start of a 
horse race, but it seems equally appro- 
priate for racing establishments at 
present. Suddenly, perhaps indicating 
the approaching end of the English flat 
racing classics this year (the St Leger is 
on Saturday), there ts a positive race card 
of studs and training stables awaiting 
interest from shrewd punters. 

The favourite, at almost prohibitive 
odds, is the Warren Hill Stud, which 
combines one of the most — the estate 
agents say the most — beautiful homes at 
Newmarket, headquarters of racing, whb 
its own private and public stud farms. 
Owned by the owner-breeder. Captain 
Marcus Lem os, it is undoubtedly one of 
the finest stud complexes in Europe. 

Warren Hill, adjoining the Jockey 
Club gallops, was founded nearly 60 
years ago by the Earl of Durham, and its 
public stud has bred many classic 
winners, the most famous being Pebbles, 
winner of the 1,000 Guineas in 1984. The 
private stud, formed in 1968 when 
Captain Lem os acquired the properly, 
stands in about 300 acres, and has 40 
loose boxes and six staff cottages. The 
public stud has 69 loose boxes, a 
manager’s bouse and five staff cottages. 

Warren Hill House, built in the style of 
a Bench chateau, has four main recep- 
tion rooms and five bedrooms, with an 
indoor swimming pooL The whole 
property is likely to attract interest from 
home and abroad, and Knight Frank and 
Rutley, in association with Christopher 
Stephenson International, are raving a 
guide price of more than £10 million. 


Another fancied runner is the 
Sweoenham Stud and Swettenbam HaU, 
Congleton, Cheshire, part of the 
Swettenham Stud organization, which is 
brine sold by Robert Sangster, who 
established it in 1968, and 
RJ.McAlpine, largely because their 
invest m ent in the 2,300-acre establish- 
ment at Manlon in Wiltshire has left it 
surplus to requirements. 

Swettenham HaO is a Grade n listed 
18th-century house with four or five 
reception rooms, eight bedrooms, a 
detached cottage, swimming pool, cha- 
pel, trout pool and paddocks set in about 
10 acres. 'Hie stud has a fine range of 
17th-century buildings, SO boxes, and 
167 acres. In 1985 it won the Goffs 
Thoroughbred Breeders Award for win- 
ners bred there, achieving the best 
aggregate prize money in England. 

Jackson-Stops and Staffs Chester 
office is airing more than £1 million for 
the whole property, or offers over 
£400,000 for the Hall and over £500,000 
for the Stud. 

Geoffrey van Culsem of SaviDs lays 
odds on Dulbngfaam House, three miles 
from Newmarket, being one of four top 
quality country houses in the area. 

Surrounded by 100 acres of parkland, 
the house was built in about 1700 and 
landscaped in 1799 by Humphrey 
Repton, and has three reception rooms 
and six bedrooms. There are two 
cottages and stabling and planning 
permission for buildings which could 
establish a stud. Savins' London and 
Cambridge offies expect more than £1 
million for Dullingham House. By 
coincidence, a 50-acre block of stud land 
adjacent to Dullingham House is also for 
sale through the same agents. 



Omrai EMBRS. WQl 2 M Bfl. 29 
•nr (tea £135.000. 

kjehihu mews tern. 2 Bats, 
jt low bn EteUm 

ehh s5«?82«bs&w *u 

01-730 9253 


FULHAH SW6. 

A superb 1 baton flat Sim- 
ian 21‘ rec m» with (fining 
area. FtH k ft b. Gas eft. 
Opts, own street entrance. 
Lovely secfeHM waited grin 

£69, 95a 

Vanstons 736 9822. 


PIMLICO 

Superb 1st floor balcony 
flat. £215,000. Upper 
Maisonette 4 Beds 
£169.500. Luxury 2 Bed, 

2 Bath Ground floor flat- 

£146400. try offers. 
01 638 5079 
Austin Lindoaa. 


swi KfoucsD row nun* 
SALE - Newly qewoy 2/a 
(Mill IT1. 1 /2 IMM. 7I1> floor Pa* 
Wllh niagnUlfam «*** Jiff 

Park. £264.000. Ol 78S i 

■JMimailWT HI .Owntang «"»*- 
= douWe beds, siody- 
arrfniert design 
del alia. garden. XBSMO. oi 
6B9 6988 

wis studio. Stunning y** *- 
E/PHK* B- Cam- g yM*- 
jwzSsO Teh 01 .321-8083 

BLOOMSBURY, WCf A WM 

^ESSLwms 

lens Good 6362736. 

"REWfcg* 

BrampMn EalalM 68 w 
DOOttAWW-a ^ bed "g® 

3 

SSSiSe^ eTStSSoESj* 

SE&’&VTPW 13 446. 

nrunnM MUM. tiP fl° or IUI .V' 

Ban* 

0104/6656. 1« 

fir Itol in + 

Lit. 2 

ftwiWSw- 2 

MUUOA 

6ed im ****•££ Zf porter. 

.saMvsrtss 
SK'lS ssr 

£££•“£££ « 

0244 319S*W 

CALMS 3 oed IW. 

jb&SZSh 

»/r rial Lor rwo. .®rv«, 

Sin CBS OPO Tel oM 

Si . 230 twx»3 «ev« «*?“■ 

■mUYLE H OH C- «*» 4 

TS&sasF 

mw *m%00 wag 

bTiJSSiA Jfc 

corner ta*ta ,[ “; ,*25 rrhM 
mm l. SJIJjTSI. 

£90000 OdNIs Ol-W*-*™' 


FULHAM 

PROPERTIES: 

Free money vouchers up to 8750 
lor HI ou buyers & Htai 
□dials tan Bdfen 

01-381 0112. . 


PARSONS SHEER, I 
SV6 

DefightM 1 Bab ftt on tew 
JOngs Rood. n*n« ton 
Tuba. Stops AWMrtih 
Root Pat& Eaaiant tocw* 
6as CH. 92 yre tease. £72£0Q. 

Adand A U«W 
I 01-738 1368. 


CHELSEA SW10 

Superb FreeltoldhouM. 
Modernised and bit de- 
signed id ragka bnudous 
famUy noma. 2 rsceoa. 4 
dMe mite. Rt ml Tfiafta. 
LKSty rm. 30 ft gito. 

ea s pffl w 
HOLMANS 
01-370 6781 


WEST KENSINGTON 
W14 

Spadou* am> M floor ranoi 
IM. Totally mutated tab bn 

CKBOUNaE 

cESg. aqS 

ftrpUQL 


VERT LARGE 
4 BED FLAT 
S0HH KB B M S TOI 



Vacant resMeace 
by aactiaa. 

“fTWitimiln UU|” 

08, Fg ^oms A«noc, 
Haapstoad. MW3 


(7 bad fcpgyy 
detached how) 

Harman Hasty 6 Co 
01-405 3581/4 


81-437 2222 
Office fas Wcstabys 
or 11-437 2195 Em 

i 8/Mt JtoryHito) 


CmVAU EAUBB 


H1GHGATE 

Stamort tad, Ktamod. Bnp- 
twal bouse tab MutM In 
gwikn gtaaeh ratal ba end for 
redBwknnenfor for a same 
sAfleonl pnaerty. FncML 
Vd ie t a ri M offers only 
mu tw PM. Bn 174, 
MMN4N 
fw aapflMmat to vto*. 


FULHAM. 

Mag famfl y tone. M od with 
can and uiapkndion, no n- 

^res. me'/S? room 

"-aawr* 


WAPPING. 
Gan Place. 

BraRdnewfuflyfumtafiadlux- 
W 1 bedroom Hat Smtauag 
walk from Tow Bridge md 
St Katharine's Da*- Security 
underground parktog. 
£116^)00 

Tel 0702 334840 


wum VALE. Good 2 tadraoot 

fSToirnloriaWe a iteM 

to tuM. Wng Ltete. »*• 

crrjooo- Tdoi 623217a on 

UVEWOOL ST. 20 
rtrTe oed Kiwtetouje. 2 
CM. son 

courw * eewtua it*®- 
A.n tosgft 

ET07.S00. Tet Ol 888 *408. 
i actn i tay H&.itooeaMd g aga 


HOLLAND PARK VII 

fWL Estata dora tata oqte 2 

barms, tega aep t, oon w/tayg 

ajRttnvs 


gad dum p room. Mod fjf fefl- 
Otea. To Kfado Babdns rad 
carpets. SOL CQnwnfeitt Ttaa. 
Lav lease, reduced to aw* 


FarrepM nto * cdrepkfl 

Tat 8628-25878 


nee. SpMtouo 3rd fir tan level 
run. 1 dM* bed. w c wl ta, 
Kll/dfiter m tawm, PototUM 
for roof ternce. FoCy fw 


mam iummtm vno 

nduratabed 4 bta 
family Iww. «ta» MtaW 
kKehoi gtataf mjn tata 
s/(actPU tfn vflu’ rapero nw, 
OH(Sc«»0O0 lor aulck tae. 
T*fc Ol 960 1339 


iutwob mo R**« **■ 

Sntendld Victorian mwae so- 
SoSeSta PTO Vldlnt! _U 

SSSTSaten. btenroo ov ■ tar- 
dent from and rear. 1 roomlet. 
£22*000 FtH. AIHJHW HD A 
Co. 01-229 0072- 


nsrAoo. 

Tel: B732 75257 


KENSINGTON 
COURT, W8 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


THE CHASE, SS4 



(S^BURY as- HOOP 2 bed _^5S mflWonrtle 4 Md. sa recu. 
nrfltetaUitemtB.i tcai .gdMe ^ utfdMr. Wh. doaj nm. 
beds. mm. gaa eta. OombijJ«. CCH. bbUo. ldn ww 
S rt In KSS*— X16IWO0O OIW- 01-3732972 


<m In pmae ro- 

HMdmry news. srrxooO l/h. 
Sc KOit 3*9 0961. 
•ULYFAHL Off lark Lane. 2 M6 
rtom a partm ent 
dratano ro om. WMJS5S 
m, SB yam. £310.000 Jp 

fessnsk 1 *-” 

"fit 552?2. 

mti ail niuiiir opts A etna. Lit 
fStlfBOrSTO 7 442- 

JSoiuawtr. wet sckcwo 

mauSnfWa taWn P jtagf 

.oo&CAS-OcO.'^Batty SP. 
SmOOOd «6 2736. 

am— w m fly 

& 

iMr mala LflfQP ltl«ri 

BffaSSSffSf 4 

zSjSaa Ol 994 1238- 

S-Bl 

TrTFSafiiF* 


SSS-JL-ra 

TTOSoT 01AZ2270I 


-QUEEMMATE MK «taT. Djf. ! 
lightfuL Wroe 2 bed. rec. *>«». 
up. kH In cowed mew. Latee. . 
cia&oao lv w*ek Me. 

H^flTs CS 684 6863. 


HOLUtak VMM. Siwteb tatan 

n In a lined ml. Ztadj* 

wokU.naUv93yrlte.CJMW 

ono. HrymO A Ok 584 6863. - 


QUEENS CATS - bMmtadate Nfr 
^SotaOi paua Lena mc-Uw 
outeomra- «** 

sale. Tel : 01 88* 090* 


1 rnewmr ino/ms jwn* 
uSb 00 T» 01-937-1499 
, twteicend/evea) 

KENSMSTON WV- BcteillflH ista- 
nout 5 ream HU taUi Imc 
EotUb (adiiB n*ar wind®*** to* 
dastaai wtH kept VfWjnl;- 
race. 32 year me. S226.00Q. 

anartmema ta WOar 

ton gft eta-* 1 ?* and Hanra«eta 

■a csooooa Unnm Lid- Ol 

002 0664- 

sw7 itininmrnw rm uti ~rn 
^vitaimenSr downed IWLi Z 
iwMi i baths, prong r onnu 

Nrff hU«i«n. dinmg arc a- OVer- 
tooling wffh ana I® *“*"■ 

Ki 6S.OOO [o Lnc ronwtt *«a 

rurtaim. 01-370 2096 tday) 
-««ea HR. Ctawmirtg 3rd 

*5fnS»- 2**^ 

i/m fuuh, Hid COl. “ 

^S.5^HOLMANS Ol 
370 6781 

fl.ewiMraH - Pronaoi- 

laie and apaowas. ibevoomta. 

garden nte. Meal fin* 

SSs-^SSSS 

lined utetten. **nay 

ZS1790*. 


Ctoaks, 32 ysaro. 
£1304)00 

a— tutoM a co 
01-501 5234 


HAMPSTEAD ft 
HICHGATE 


Hto9*VWto.N6 

^SUirt&Tivendale 
Am onotudW to ecqure a db- 
| frarH iwia mi. waonra res 
i in prune toctaon aidi Bhtrady 
; spaoous aecom n wta tec or- 
der. maspsnang s/e pet ltd 
Kd retaraio penod tenures. 

, These sin externa grim tab 
! open asm! 5 beds. 2 tads, 
elegant drew iron, (tang room, 
enposng hdl UL ctoWm pta 
to tab 2 beds, hun.ira ra, 1st 

£"S* e OT"” 3 

01-341 njl 


sonene. clew to Hearn. Large 
nmatMo. i am. l angle bod- 
room. kitchen. battarootn. 
wiiatr roof garden, ta yr lonw. 
Cfll.COO Tel: 267-4906 OT 274- • 
7268 (HI / 3800971 (WL No 

wnts. 


WEST nmmtcjib oh mb, 

Lane. £i4aooo bun you an 
arcMHctuaHy destatrd 3 Bed 
Hotse tattilux bath & KH + *a 
room wUh a vteu/‘ • sunaoaked 
| Srt ywo. ret Ol-Tfl^BWO 

HJUWSTEAD QAtalEN, SUW. 4 

Bed semi aer now. 2B- nro 
lounge. Klt/BMM. gunt 

nsrsi ssstsossF 


MNHGMS Vlliata Z t ain*. 
SUinmng 2 bed- 2 teeafc as. 
noth, g ro u nd Dear fBL 99 yr 
oe. £85^X30. Heycort A Cfc 
384 6063. 


HMHPfTUD mm BW« one 
ben g/i flu. Soaooua ncreta. 
nued kit, bath, comm gdoo. 
OSP. C/C/H. 95 iw tease. 
I-72L500, THi Ol *» 1269 

W. H M 8 LI« D Bta-~Pnm 
vicienan Cmfly Mute. Many 
orimnal feature*- 3 bad*. 26 R 
thru loonge. fm im, «» bl 
weu stocked _.Stag*- 
£182.000 Tel; 01-794 3482. 

iuuw i rraii ■ angtn. mom. 
2 room. IS* floor nm puis 
kH/dmerakbOi. Brand aew can- 
version. 99 yr». £68.780. Tel ; 
Ol 794 3CT9 

NEW *9 TEAR LEASO Highgate 
■ stieUon Avenue. Luxury 3 
bed IM. 004. Own 
£1291800. TW: 01-341 1341. 

HW3/MWS. Supers selection of 
fbb/lman All a rlceo. P|»m 
O tata Doer 01-794 6601 


unum Marcus 
81-720 SS32 


SQUTHRELDS 

SWI 8 



rents owra 
si-snzaspft 


taw of river. 


1 bedroom 
tab pav 


^JNi pa 



PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


Enter the World 
of Gracious Livim 



iPS’s i\ 

aBR 





This magniBoent Pm eta. Colonial style hooac. remodelled 
«nd tatcrior designed to the higher pcMdflste standards of 
excellence, ta now Open for hwpmion. With haemy 
carpets and fitttogs thrmriiteit. tta six bedreoms. four 
bathrooms, a superbly darignrri Inlcgralcd kitchen/ 
diner, a mote attractive area stocked shrub, tree and 
Scan- gardens wUh views over the sub fairway of the 
Hantpteirar l Cotf dub, the house ofera a tamfly home fiar 
truly gradoualMng. 

VIEWING STOlCTUfinr APPOINTMENT 
PRICE ON APPLICATION 

SUckJey & Kent. 

Heath Street. Hampstead 
itoJWSBpAj London NW3 6L/G. 

\ Tel: 01 -794 8254 r 


VIEW NEXT SUNDAY 
14th SEPTEMBER 2-5pm 

133 Sutherland Ave 

Little Venice W9 



Brochure on rsquast Iron) Sola Apart* 

ASHLEY MILTON 01-286 6565 


Exquisite 4 bedrm fiat 3 en suite batfams & 
shwr rm. Dbte reception, bar, dfoing rm, new 
fully fit kit Just decorated & cptd. All 
amenities. 

£285,000 
01-221 2221 


an.Ttfc hpassln Menr 


m bja Ik ds- 


cneOrattLom State S ate imqrs; 4 due Dais’ i tots, lstnu. atraot 

PP. ton* fcreraSv. 67 V to £«3o3oo. 


l5SePPLI^^»lta^wbiMliwltoiteM«r ^.ro«ta9».tote 

vote rad oflttaK 2 bads. 2 b& « II nngi tort tt. tetany, pwhng. 

fl 95.000. LdW WS 

MVHUR WLStte Atafe. Bnrtsriig luuy ia INi rangto taw Hock btaad 
m Lrtl Tta naplM M (k» Wbfd taanc 4 tetej! brts. 2 

01-431 0184 


STURGIS 

KHOK PMK. SM. Spaddus jmmd floor flat Brtrwia. rram. 

tags btefaen/teetdast room. 2Cr gwikn. R rt d— drt. ESR950 

tataoH 

tOUNOMe. rn. Oppoitofty to tear * nrai modortad team 
dose to HurtinfilHm. prwidteg 4 beds. 2 bats, recap, kto. 2T gta. 
WWW, fl— . 3 stm 4 ftUBBB tana tafi ratal town wot 
tenaca. P*io gatao. t a um andad. £12RS0a Frertdd. 

•1-734 2223 


Latere SW17 
rewrerere ^ 
woEBwoBTH rti ww re . am. 

Sbtaa art Mpa Rrt-Vkarap 
laded hOuM ia m d WM rU t uU i 
Ccthtcc s most dcuraMe bcaom. to- 
QBWSiy gtortd Lanwritd « 
pratae rtgua. but pracbcd My ic- 


CUPRAH 
OLD TOWN SW4 

Posttoy to finest period 
renovaion to be oftaed to 
stainomatCtatomM 
Tom's roortan ght dto 

OmbUw 5 .pupost buB 


taomrs 2 tetter Mm: W tnftra: 
atdwJBil ret Otafl rm Wblsst mt 
w iif i rt d— d mi Mb dta w*- 
*g otto W WtaMl flta. «5si 


EUniM CtHMOH. 



tormmHa ocam to stee W 
doer d Bn rtgn rt tafc -flaart 
base. 2 bates; tannic «/btoi me 
ivgi note n» Mh paw waMBrtc 
lil ted mol gda te Ratett 
campoter rtacwg inntata 3®’ 
VMS. K TrTija/rrWJIB. 

WMDSmmi COHMON. 
to goal area amr CraanoB i tap 
aemodsosrt Maonai (anaert fsma 
n ate of bl mMBan C rta praa 
poeitte tor BMiMD/itoMii. OoH 
pamda 4/s teoinez batons. 2 re- 
cnaea imr M/btM mr cetoc X 


l bad auasHto wtotaga 
gardea 

1 bad nortrartqr W rfi 

pan. 

M Hate are spadops tab 
. denbie bte. « aa 
cupboads/Mdais - grey on 
rtto,Btocown.p*shob. 
ntraeto tan esc. /ntfi/oc - 
pWi on te a, gad colour 
fitbngs/fttod capats/QB d) 


tlUJML 

aadswam caaaowEMurBA 
in te m l -knwm ran. Una a 
wmatu kaiy imSwnBrt 6 rammad 
bourn adb a aab-sacMed SO' jarien 

u to mar. 3 btes bMtoar dbl rccro- 
bofl mr jm/otta me SO' ode gs dc 
na* rod. 

Haa today l«M SC2. OSJBE 

01-767 0088 


POTKT LtiXHBY 
PEH1R00SE 

In modarn pJ> block. 3 DUa 
Bads, 2 Bathrms, Sraai SU- 
dre martalB rtaba to splliouai 
<L4’ founao/dlnlng room. 
KHchsn/ Breakfast Rm. All 
rooms open onto sunwatang 

tenses, immediately waf 
able. 2155.000. 

Tafc 01-789 4237 (I) 


PUTNEY 
VEST OF HILL 

Itoy attoettoo sfd house 
wHti s ec* rin d west teng 
gdn. 6 beds. 2 beihs. 2 igs 
iwcep nes. ka/ teK dfc, cal- 
W. gas oh. 6237^00. 

Warren & Co 
01-785 6222 


ForjnSteg^ri^i 
1*350 0772 
teteto* 223 7849 


CLAPHAM 

PARK 

Stunning maisonette. 2 
Ale bedrooms, iga recap, 
lovely root terrace, integ. 
gvaga, private crasoart. 
ES7^00 

E. Hugh Henry ft Co 
01-720 law 


EAST SHEEN 



bed Teen House te Djwsoo 

W> !!»*"■ 

garage. £130000- 
CJWBSNfBJ. Eseflcnt PB. 
mate u imotacUWe coretoon. 
GAS CH. carpets. 2 rec. kt 2 

b^. bat an gvden. 


In one of the finest residential locations in the Royal Borough 

55 QUEENS GATE 

KENSINGTON, LONDON SW7 

A selection of well presented new apartments in a 
ma gnific ent Victorian hous&dose to Hyde Park: 


ma gnific ent Victorian hous&close to Hyde Park: 

One Flat of 2 Bedrooms, 2 
Bathrooms, etc- @ £199,500 

Be di oo m s &. 2 Bathrooms, with 35ft 

•Billy equipped kitchens •Luxurious 
Btdmom •Gas-find Central Heating 
•Lift •Audio-Visual Entry System StH B 

Leases 125 years For Sale 

WAJELUS Nelson Hearn 

T » Ea* Coun Road 

^ Iff Kensington 
^ London W8 

ftfwJSd K □ Tel: 01-937 sail 

01-581 7654 l\ HI 01-937 440 s 


mBrOMadoaRoart 
LondoaSWSlHP 
tckx 23661 WAE 

01-581 7654 


KaSJXGTON SW7 Dltang Atorl KM. mcaoibr sfU ievei pcal- 
msE Lgr mag. bfly aomte W. 3 uads. 2 bass, state mow. Rad 
Terra*. Z37SJM. 

RB6METM BOMBS SNSSrtsartai grate a mteMinltaireacM 
aB anaimes. tar beds. 2 to rtota. W/tosattK mm. bate jdoaar mt 
dbteim. tt Ute 

KBBWEire >■ tacos 2nd nr wabMrt at apena raston block. 
Fm mto bids. 2 rotas htdm/tetaUiBt rm. 2 bates, pmaa 
Patog OteJOL 

KBBM6T0N toy sraoous 4tt floor (top) vamanL to «d tom - 
30 air. Gas Oi 2 dbto Mam. It raonboo. ratanoy irtnrt 
kacteo. «57JM 

wan vumsum swi. m,nisn 
GODDARD A SMITH 01-S30 7321 


RARE FREEHOLD 
HOUSE 

Krw v; re tain, WS. 3 Ekfam Reccp Ritas. S Bedims. S Bathrms. 
South tores Gardes. Hipfa Secomy. TV Eauy system. Totally 
reftnbisbed & interior designed to escdleM standard. Ready to 
immediate octupaura. 

£956,000. 

To view td ephao e today 435 9178. Mr Raiea. 


APPLEGABTH RD, W14 

Quiet St Nr Brook Green. Family hse with 80* south 
faring garden. 4 bods, 2 batha 1 ensuite, dblc recep rm. 
Mtehea withpbnning for wiwinii, dkrm, cellar/ 
piayrm, gas CH- 

F*hold £280,000. 

Marlowe Hunting & Worsley 
01-603 0281 


BELfiMVIfL A (tee pond tousa. Anp. ML study, item room, 
3 bate. 2 bate, do ream. tot. pin. C/H. 64 yre. E495JJOB. 
ECCLBSIDN SO SWI. 1st flom bdeony IteL Begat nraobm 
raam. date bedroom, lap bah, tags cloakroom. H. C/H. 120 its. 
£135/100. 

SOUTH KBSWETON «W7. Dafafctt 3rd ItoorlteL Lcwly nop. 
date bad. ntartte hath. Mt Ht. C/H. 87 yre. 027 SM. 

KING WOOD 
01-730 6191 


WINKWORTHS 

8W9 StiMling gmd floor IM. 
Lob drawing rm, 14' recap 
Hal & (fining area. Fully fit 
Wt 2 bedrms. ba ftmt. an 
auto tawr im, roof tanr. Ggo. 
Gotqoous at* r A oanr 



SE17 Attracfhw 2 bed house 
In gd rood. DUa recap. 
kh/Mudy. patio gda Quick 


■romartbybaBteteB 


l 228 7474 \ 

14tmQgfHCOTCKQADSWIl 

I STURGIS H 


THE CHASE 
CLAPHAM COMMON 

Bngu md sarnma te WdacM ste- 
M mob oi 4 ton. S babooes, 
baton izn rocapao. Mean mml 
ampm Dm. Ltay gadm s ofl aaa 
taro Ck m caanao an dm. 

OFFSTS BflffTH) 
0VB1 £200 JOB 

Tel: 01-728 1130 


BERMONDSEY SEI Sab- 
stantial bomc os 3 Boors. 3 
mspe. kiL 4 beds. bath. 2 
we'a. garden. £72J00 
KENNINCTON Sdectkm 

refdib P.R fiats. 1/2/3 beds. 
Gas CH, carpos. lux fined 
kits, ftom C52L950 

ALAN FRASER 
01-587 1004 


01-587 0600 


BARNES 

- Lonsdale Road. 

(ten opp id pmbre iterant Vlc 
tab Sue to St Pad's School. 
Rraoras doc and fate touches. 5 
bads. 2 bate Sbower. 22V x 
1510" drams mom. Drang 
mom. Btaa/ at. 2 cloaks. Fan 
mom. Study. OouHo garage 
OSP. fiadens. Freehold. Was 
bi the region ol E450JI0Q. 

Tel IGtson ft King 
01-878 4942. 


CLAPHAM 

COMMON 

Soatbsde. Beautiful landy 
home. 4/5 beds/stody. reel 
tanaca. 2 baft. 2 ntx fron 
playroom, tochan. wx.. utrty 
room. GCH.PWty50« garden. 
Recently decorated, immac 
c ooteDOfl. Capets & oatans 
negooMe. 

E265J08 


sovrancLM os' mu. 

Orod floor (UL 1/2 beta. 1/2 
recta, refuibabcd uj tiign Kao- 
Hard, own garten. CCH. Off a 
rorure. Long tease. £*9.960. 
Tateobene 01470 496& 


■mi. Close OoretM. Mad shd- 
1 ny terraced town bouse ia good 
i dec order. S bade. 2 recaps, utfii- 
(v rm, larpe Utotoen leading 
i onto garden, ecu. Qarape. 
£86.000. oi 8TI 2785 


IAMO cou rt n te MM r/A ML 

« Bad. 3 rec. UU9USL ctt. turn 
Gdn and aaraoe- C1B&000. 6TB 
9070 or STS 392ft 


Beaudfta Gcortaan terraced Tare 
wttti very pretty A b mwb ia uvo 
Id Khan aaemton. Ttreraaobiy 
moderauad wtth many n rta m al 
r eatore. Dbte reren rtn. fabu- 
loas pu/BTasL 1st flr 
drawrm/maetar bad. 3 (unbar 
beds. bath, a/c Itaitet - bad & 
btab. utnuy. eat ia-. dntghtfui 
tty west «dn. pa rage. £186.000 
Morgan ouite 01-720 6361 


PUTNEY HEATRi TOW* Hbusa. 
PreaHgHua davatopananL Sa- 
cured grotsds: dec gtac-gatr 
man. VWro entry. Surrounded 
ay heaibland. Superb tndMd- 
ute interior design. Carpets, 
curtatna. 0g« R«ng* (ml 5 
beta, ensutie 2nd oam. 
rtoakrra. thing rm, lounge, din- 
ing no. maantfiemu Vr ul 
uumv rm. gge. Urgent sale. 
SSOOXOO. TtbOl -94001 06 


KCW BARDENS Coat ante con- 
version PM*«nt 5.,'SS 
(rare Tube. Sep IJ6Q 

l/HoULOi 9d8-LSB7 taler Tare 


PWMEtr VteMrran tefrata fltate. 
near au arern dtes. 4 /6 bta-b^ 
mediate potecoon. £152.000, 

KSteSate. Oi-746 91 IS. 


Superb 2 bad rutty moo (ten 

£49,000. oi 63S 9770 

ROCNWHWTIM VALE, SW15 B- 

agart « Bad aKiu-dei Houaa. 
Rn /Diner (SSkiSL KH/Brk. S 
Bares a Shower. Sanaa. Coe- 
Back Con 160K30L From oan 
00*30). £123.750 Freehold. 
Ol 678 1096 (TJ. 1 

■AlWIgfl stats (eASTVANAU) 
Stoteous (IM floor flat, recap, 
double bedroom. hoH/dttttng, 
Uktien & bunroom, beat view 
in London. £79.960. Call Sue 
Lock on oi 746 1609 eve. 
BLACKHEATH garden flat, 
tremor. Co u rtyard. mUclGCM. 
D/H3ZT. 2 beds, tenge, large 
bath. UMn otttttv- room, 
many otoer extras, rasmi 
COO. 01-686 8381 anytime. 


■ATTmrera aptema jgsig 
hse wun 46- gdn. EWiOOO. 
Soamn * Op oerrr. 


1 1 inUW ftl — — — *~* immara. 
iSTtS- roodemtaed S bed 
lown Me. 2 both, u eMd» 
eSnrvgwrv. (Wad UL, 60n soi 
taring odn. vacant booutoL 
JBSSOOO ono. TA 622 6669. 
WANDSWORTH M* SWfl 

F/H. 01-501 B9F7 ft). 
ratoia a a Ot nr g tur terrace 
how. 4 beta. 2 bains. 2 pkup- 
Hes. kucfrao + S/C basement 
(BL pre tty gar d en , y 
stadon. £390000. 69l 2133. 


01-987 1004 


CPawiCiTOW OVALs/c 1st floor 
maaoneoa aouth (bdn» 2 beds. 
2 WOL 9®. K a B. terreertar- 
dcn. small fli4et Grortaea 
comervaltaa aauara. 89 yeear 
•rose. Easy parldag. 2 atos 
OvtaUnd. leremseiWWinfl- 
E97SXO. 01-882 0122 


OVEHLOOfUNG oapbam Com- 
mon. Luc. 1st flr l bed flat, to 
ovr om Mock with communal 
gdta. Lea tnga/dinar. mod. lil- 
ted UL bam/wc. CCH. tasare 

wstenu Good dewraave ewjdl- 

Itoit Carpets (WIW. 96yr 
£61X100 Ol 627 8037. MS. 


DBAHCmLO WOAD, witart* 
teeny reooi'aM vtctanao 
Camuy homo. Soaetoaa recep- 
tion rooms, -im aecres to 
garden. 6 beds. 2 bubs. 
£172X100. Tel; Ol 672 7832 or 
0286 53577 


Sim ■ 2 bed o/b IW. F/F kk. 

bah. carpet*, gym. teeusL sau- 
na and por te rage . 124 year 
itate. £55500 nr oufrt sale. 
01-286 2188 tod) 01-585 0438 
cnotnei No area wasters. 


CLAPHAM COMM0H SHI At- 
tractive Fuuv Mod 3 bad More, 
prtty garden, aidet mad. 
£108800. Most be seen. Tefc 
Ol 3EO 0846 eves, 
wiiiimi coa w wi Mod - a 
db( ned. sst nr Rat. sm far mge 

wire otar. niM.QUettocalMn. 
Ext dec order. Parking space 
£78.000. Ol 947 TOM. 

MU Putney, bufflac. 9 bed hae. 
3 bath re an auiirL 2 recap. Hr 
kfichan/brenkai rm, uUUty rm. 
&IBOJX3Q- Tel 870 3663 Mv«L 
qumsun, sw7. om or. 2 
1 Be bed. 2 reccp. 2 bath. 
O««M0. Mte 01-881 8S8S 
RECCE MEWS. SW7. 3 bed. 2 
bare, tee kn /diner, roof Mr. 
£30aooO. Mak 01-381 8G86 



KACKHEKTII Gonsmntton 
area. Renovated cottage ai ouiei 
mews, centre of vutaoe Pram- 
nonalty d s slg n ea. 1 oed. bath, 
kilrhen. dining. 21 a X UftflP 
immi opening onto roof garden. 
Fun CCH. rrectHU. Rare op- 
porhmfly El lOJOOO. 318 60SS 
or 348 6SS4. 


A B1C CtoOTTY aSRZSrCUnr 
Ctepham Part. Detached 7 bed. 
Victorian house 2 ige r«m 
huge m/duer. 2 wc-s bath, tun 
W c/heta. garage ,90' sntah 
IMM garden. Conv ert 3/4 
flats. £128X)00 raid. Tel: Rob 
01-3464989 


LONDON /KENT Lee SEI? 3 bad 
tournhsp. dkrra. ktt/dtner. 
lounge, ppm, srt. gdn. CCH 
DWe taee.ua 80 >TS.E62,000. 
T«un 86i 2886 lev'es-wkenau 


sntEATHAbf, sara. tawaraun 
AI* fron te d ta house. 6 
bedrms. 4 reception rm IDO 1 
gun. na Cl 70000 ana. 

Vtahor A Volker Ol 761 6223. 

m PB U MB re w R c fletore t ea 4 bed 
Town Houm in Dhfsum Bea 
pro. CH. ( i n*, gnrdm. ga- 
rage. CI3OJ000 Alan F«aer 
887 lOOa 

PUTNET FLAT 2 bed, 1 rm. Ml/ 

MBI. Mrt dtata. OCH. 40- Off V 

gdn w nano, low rates/ outgo- 
lags. C73h red. for Lam s ate/ 
cam. 839 8040/ 871 3673. 
STRCATMAK Hanreame family 
lunar. Ciosr Taamg Co mm on- 
3 rereps. 3 bBUH. 6 beta. Ige 
gardea. Comment dor. 
£180.000 TVKH47T 1028 


Barnes 
Large Victorian 
House 

6 bads. 3 rooeps. 2 baths (one 
to be fitted). Snower room. 
Very big tocnan. 2 car garage. 
Many original tortures. 
E450xKD ona View today. 

01-748 B21S 


DCSOtABUE m ode m 2 bedroom 
ground floor rnaaonetto In 
sougM after area to Putney 1 
targe gpanous tounge/duung 
room wllh bW wtndowo. rood 
rm kudmi wflh waste A eye 
level unite. spare (or 

irutpe/freewT & washing MJ 

uunr wire floor tending u 
garden. baUwoom/wC in good 
decorative order, centrally 
heated 6 rnrpned throughout i 
wllh 24ft cellar. CTfeSOO. Tel I 
01-788 9843. 


DOCKLANDS 

LIVE IN 
LONDON 
DOCKLANDS 

Take the opportunity to 
move closer to the City in 
this unique environment. 
This much sought after 
area will shortly be con- 
nected to the Ufldeigroimd 
System via the new Light 
Railway. For mote deoils 
on flats, houses and mai- 
sonettes, from £fi(L000 - 
Telephone Pams* Quirk - 
01-987 4473. 


bochuuim - erry - sow. 
Selection ta Period 6 New 
Houses * Flab taoar City and 
River. £38 - £280.000. Phone 
Me Down) is Residential: 01 790 
9632 or 0860 711664. 

DOCKLANDS 2 bed. apUl level 
dal in L«tnchouse with view ta 
Thames, off street car aarUng, 
122 year leave £69.960 one lor 
uutrk ute. Oi 515 6070 . 


THINKING OF 
MOVING IN 
DOCKLANDS? 

THINK... 

Residential 

WAPPING 

South Quay £110,000 

A «|wem<M» 3 bad llOUM. Mm* 
Cay. Overlooking Canal. 

ISLE OF DOGS 
Cuppers Quay £150.000 
Supeft 3 bed property sati- 
ated on this exceiem manna 
davp'l. The (meat location on 
me lato ol Dog*. 

a large sneenoN of 

PROPERTIES CURRENTLY 
AVAILABLE T/OUT 
DOCKLANDS 

dr Open 7 dm a weak * 
01-538 1823 


DULWICH 


COURT LANEi 5 beds. 2 rrceoi 
sunrm. l/f ku. bain and wr 
shower /wt. I3S - real 4tr 
from guns. drHe in C1BS.OOO 
near Ml taler. 

EAST Oulwtrn. 3 bed AM. C/H. 
Fully fH kurtim. bflirm. lounge, 
dining rm. garden. h/S tar car. 
L/H 996 ITS. E67AOO OO MUR 
be seen. 2990033. 


RICHMOND A 
KINGSTON 


KEW PARK, 
KEW GREEN 

EMBJloa Swb 4 Mfln. 3 Bath 3 


oprewL Seaxtiy ifstot. 6W 
keetaf. ChbuuI area (sots, 
ggi Tranertna «*t 

Pboae WfeOmaa PWter 
81-940 3000 


PETERSHAM 

Superb 4/5 Bed det resi- 
dence. 2 Receps. Dble 
Gge. Urge S. Facing Gdn. 
£295,800 
Anttony Bryant 
Estates 
01-541 4454 


1 SPACIOUS Edw 3 bed terr. 25 fl 
lounge. Playroom. fined 
ku/brfcM rm. Oiiginta feature,. 
Prefly garden. CXSOjOOO TcL 
01 876 9868 


WIMBLEDON 


WIMBLEDOH-OFF 

HILL 

Lore* Ewpiwi reotata tame 
■ei mnw * tat r mere 
Hies* otateta ta* mol k 
bums m an tonge. GCH 
Litre pin and Gangs Om 
0HWUB9 4 Utojon U OKV 

9k 

TEL 91-546 1233 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


W1 

NEWLY DECORATED 

Lux, 3 bed, 2 bath 
(1 en-sutte with 
Jacuzzi), fully 
equipped Co let 
£550 pw. No agents. 
Teh 01-262 0502. 


nNORJET. Attractively fun 
naWd 6 dbte bedroom bow 
wuh mature garden. Separate 
dining room. Large Italy rated 
Mtrhen. CH. AvalLabte m m wO t- 
alcly £280 pw oi 536 0971 

toWDOk iruoorr ataopw 
Are you tooteng lor a Central. 
Serine and p< reunify run sto- 
denl iwoenre? Rates from cav 
per week. Cnniaci The RetK- 
Irar. Bryanuon Student 
Refldrnce. 16 Bryanston 
Swrare. London wi. Teto- 
phone: 01402 8606. 

HAftM VALE. Luxurious 2 bed 
(tel. Large remmon. gas mural 
healing, near wancK Avenue 
tube. Ct as pw. 402 06257.286 
8873 


COUNTRY PROPERTY 

asttramw " 


TMAMESOK: (NEADMO): UMOIte 
modern. Ige. t*c opartmenL 
Rreep/dinuiD khu met uuo 
ny. MKheo/b/(asi. 2 bras. 2 
bam. Paddington 30 min,. M4 
10 mins. £89.980. Teiro734- 
686408 IE> Ol 6624640 ID}. 


WDKNMHAM XxrottKe dr- 
larhed haute. 4 beds, engufle 
bdUi. dH asprci lounge, sep tun- 
ing rm. landscaped garden. 
Hnnunuair decorauve order. S 
mms M4. cteoe M3 & Mas, 
C87.90a TtaJ0734} T76l3a^ 

BEEDOA Cteiotc. laird Georqhm 
tootin’ Newbury 7. Ma U13J 3. 
P»w(4l » eweM/moderntH*. 
2 rec. 4 beds, bath, garaging. 
oulbuUdlngs. gardert 

SSSbooVSS.aSK 
JoSS SSSs”* 01 ^ Biew * w 
"S5H2KSSW / mh 

nwjf, Emv acnen Md 

SSK" 

Lit Clow Kfe BR Pad Mm? 
, MaaM ^000-06^7^ 

CdBtiiiBn} to next page 


/ 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES “ RKS . H, “ 


SAVILLS 


WILTSHIRE About 107 ACRES 
Caine 

Cliippen/iamfimila. Lcmdan/Ihddhtgm^numtes. 

Swimion IrimiLa. LonijnSfmile. 

Classic Georgian house with garden sloping 
down to the River Marden surrounded by 
paddocks and parkland at die ibotof the 
Marlborough Dcrwns. 

Lot! — Main House, hall 4 reception rooms, 
conservatory. 8 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms. Cellars. 

Gas centra] heating. 

Couch house, stables, annexe ( with outline planning 
consent for conversion toa staff flat). 

Gardens, '■i mile of traut fishing. 

Lot 2 — Fisherman's Cottage, 3 bedrooms. 

About 4Vi acres. 

Gardens, bige paddock. Trout fishing. 

JomlAflsnXs: 

TIM BATES, 94 High Street Hungerford, 

BeAshim RG17 ONB. Tel:(£M88)843S6. 

SAVILLS. Roiies House. 60 Milford Street. Salisbury, j 
Wiltshire SP1 2BP Tel (0722) 20422 &. SAVULS. London. 



Newbury 5 mites. M4 Junction 132 miles. 
London 60 miles. Paddington 35 minutes. 

An elegant Queen Anne house with well 
proportioned rooms and large mature 
walled garden. 

Reception Han. 3 Reception Rooms, 
Kitchen, Conservatory, Master suite. 6 fur- 
ther Bedrooms, 2 further Bathrooms and 2 
Shower rooms. 

Price Guide £325,000 

Also available as separate Lots; 

18th century village house - 2 Reception 
Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, Gar- 
den with tennis court Price guide: 
2160,000. 

Attractive cottage recently modernised - 2 
Reception Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, Bath- 
room. Pretty garden. Price guide: 
£126,000. 

For Sale by Auction on 23rd October 1986 
(unless previously sold}. 


Strutt ft Parker New 

brook Street Tel: (( 


tr Office, 5 North- 

5) 34763b 

(Ref: 14AB/118). 



SUFFOLK About 103 ACRES 

Newmarket 

l4euinin1ta3miks.Mll D miles, 

AudkyEndSummr7hmile^Umdon67miIes- 

Deligbriul Queen Anne house, close to 

Newmarket, overlooking beautiful parkland And 

ideal for owner-breeders private stud. 

Hal 3 reception rooms. 4 principal bedroom suites, 

2 further bedrooms, further bathroom, 4 further rooms. 

Oil central hearing, 

2 cottages. Stabling. Garaging. Farm buildings- 

Planning consent tor stud manager's home and range of boxes. 

Planning consent for substantial new andQtary house. 

70 acres of parkland. 

SAVILLS, St Mary 's House. 47 High Street, Trumpington, 
Cambridge CS22HZ- Tel: (0223)844371. 

SAVILLS, London. 


KENT — Plaxtol About 43'/: ACRES 

SeuauxdaSiudbnonuls. Cannon Screa/Ch^ring Cross ^2 hour, 

M2D4mila. 

Fine Queen Anne house with beautiful grounds and views 
on the edge of this popular village. 

GaQericd hal 3 reception rooms, playroom, kitchen. 

master bedroom suite, guest bedroom suite, further 3 bedrooms and 

2 bathrooms, V4 secondary bedrooms. Oil central heating. 

V4 bedroom cottage, period bam, hand tennis court, swimming pooL 
garden, pasture and wndland. 

SAVILLS. London 


BERKSHIRE About 17 ACRES 

Brodfidd 2 miles, Hauftru u- Airport 32miloi M4amss 5 mil*. 

Imposing country house set in s ec lu ded wooded gro unds 
and within easy reach of central London. 

Hal 3 reception rooms, study, billiard room. 4 bedroom suites, 

4 further bedrooms and bathroom. Oil^rcd central heating, 

Cottage. Outbuilding Hard tcnniscowt. Swimming pooL Paddocks. 


SAVILLS, London. 


SUFFOLK About 53 ACRES 
Newmarket 
Neu7mari{a3m^es. MU 13 miles, 
AudlejEndStationJiyimiles, London 67 miles. 

Newly created tend farm with first class 
b uildi n gs and planning consent for a stod 
groom's house. 

2 American bams comprising 28 boxes. 

Dutch bam. 


Planning consent fora bungalow. 

Rut and rail paddocks. 

SAVILLS. St Mary's House. 47 High Street, 
Trumpington. Cambridge CB2 2 HZ. 

Td: 102231844371. 

SAVILLS, London. 


20 Giosvenor Hill, Berkeley Square, London W1X 0HQ. 

01*4998644 


FOR SALE BY AUCTION 

- Ooktoa taw, 23* Ctovwton Road, 
Tlckonham, devotion, Avon. 

a suponor madam AHM tausa stanona nod back tram tea iau ta a 
WuintMy pciMnn «nh vmim to tM Uanaps. 2 tpmM raoepwns. KiUiaa 
Utatv <0Mwns Bathroom Dorata garage, Parra* gardens. Tint propoly a 
« present m a mduenva true (aim amounting tn aTio 9S acres. Aucttoa 
tlmneqr M onotar USE at r pm (man? previously mid) at tec 

Estate Salesrooms, 64* Owens Road, Clifton, Bristol. 
Auctioneers Lafonde Bros & Parham, 64, Queens Road, 
Cfiflon. BristoL Tet (0272} 290731. 


BATH 

Urtiqus opportunity to acquire Med Qooigtan 3 story town 
houses. City contra, ha restoration under arcfttoc&xaj 
supervision, central heating fully equipped, carpeted 
throutpxxjL on street partong. 

Price guide £90,000 to £100400 

Contact 0225 339405 (Office hours). 
0749 812380 (After hours). 


BERKSHIRE 

Newbury 5 mites. M4 Junction 139 miles. 
Paddington 55 minutes. 

A fine and well proportioned grade II 
fisted late Georgian Rectory. 

4 Reception Rooms, oak fitted Kitchen, 
Breakfast Room, 5 Bedrooms, 2 Bath- 
rooms (one en suite). 

Lovely garden, grounds and Paddock with 
views over the Glebe. Separate annexe. 

About 2 Acres. 

Newbury Office: 55 Northbrook Street 
Teh (0635) 34763, 

(Ref 14AA 126) 


SsJackson-Stops 

5 ruth regional kitunlcdySG & Staff 

CHESHIRE Manchester 21 miles. M66 miles. 

By Direction of R.J- McAIpine Esq. and R. £ Sangaer Esq. 

Swettenham Hall and Swettenham 
Stud, Congleton. 

Saatothtan HolL An 18th cenmrv Country House 
beautifully appointed with hall. 4 entertaining rooms, 
kitchen, playroom, 8/10 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. 

Swimming n»L Cottage. ChapeL Lawned gardens. Trout 
pool and paddodcs ironung the River Dane. About 10 acres. 
Swtoenhnm Stud. Rot of the world famous Swettenham 
Stud Organisation. 1S7 acres railed paddocks and 
postures. 50 boxes. Manager's Flat- 2 bungalows. 

For sale hs a whole or in 2 lots. Rrf: l SOL j 

Apply! Jacta«*-Stgpa&StaiL 25 Nteholaa Street, 1 
Qirater CHI ZNZ. Telephone: (0244) 2836L , 


LAND/INVEST 

Norfolk 

A rare opportunity to invest to * England's 
green and pleasant land'. A portfolio of agricul- 
tural properties for sale by auction, including 
part of walled park with old paviUion (planning 
possibility). 20 lots, some with river frontage. 
Acreages 5 - 125. Fufl detafls from: 

Irelands Hall & Palmer 

2 UPPER KING STREET, NORWICH NR3 1HD 
Tel: Norwich (0603) 610271. 


HAMPSHIRE - 403 ACHES 

Atom 2 mSes. Otfitiam 8 fnifes. 

Basingstoke 10 miles. London 46 mites 
AN EXCEPTIONAL COUNTRY ESTATE 
Standing in a totally unspoilt rural poswffl 
fine Georgian Family House - very wil maMnined 
4 Reception Rooms. 6/7 Bedroom 3 Bathrooms. 

7 Attractive Cottages 

Excellent OutburWincs. Extensive Farmbuildings. 

Valuable and productive Arable and Stock Land 

FOR SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY AS A WHOLE OR IN LOTS 

Jaiat Agedts: Welter Eogar Farm Agewy, 
Fanhan Tel: 0252 715221. Laae Fax & Ratt- 
lers with Rytaoris Tel: 01-499 4785 

HAMPSHfflE - HR HARTLEY WIRTHEY 

YifincMteW Staton 1 mite. M3 Motorway 3 mites. 

Basingstoke 10 miles. London 40 miles 

AN EXCELLENT FAMILY HOUSE 

Conveniently arranged and mil mantanad, 
deiigtilully situated on edge of village 
3 Reception Rooms, Playroom, fully fitted Kitchen /Breakfast 
Room. 5/6 Bedrooms, Dressing Room, 2 Bathrooms 
| Attractive Garden and Terrace 
Heated Summing Pool 
: About 1 Acre 

Loadoa Office: 01-499 4785 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE - 25 ACHES 

Cirencester IS miles. Cheltenham 8 miles, 

Andoversfbrd 2 miles. MS 9 mites I 

AN EXCEPTIONAL LISTED GEORGIAN HOUSE 
In a superb rural position 

3/4 Reception Rooms. Garden Room. 6 Bedrooms, 2 Secondary 
Bedrooms. 4 Bathrooms 

New Swimming Pool Sauna. 

Hard Terms Court. StabJinn. 

Outbuildings. Paddocks. - 
3 Bedroom Cottage. 

About 25 Acres 

Cfreaceste^ffiee^28^101^^^^^ 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE - CIRENCESTER 

Town Centre 1 mile, Swindon 15 miles, 

Cheltenham 16 mites. 

M4 & M5 25 minutes drive 

ATTRACTIVE GEORGIAN FARMHOUSE WITH 7 
ACRES 

Unspoilt setting on the edge of the Town 
3 Reception Rooms, 5 Bedrooms. 5 Attic Rooms. 

Tradmonasl CotswoW stone buildings including a stone tarn 
Garden. Orchard. Paddock. 

About 7 acres 

Joint Agents: Cooke & Arkwright, Hereford 
(0432) 267213. Laae Fox A Partners with 
Hylands, Cirencester 0285 3101 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE - HR TETBHRY 

Tetbury 3 miles. Circencester 9 miles, 

Kemble Station 9 mfles 

IMMACULATE LISTED COTSWOLD HOUSE 
In secluded grounds 

3 Reception Rooms. Playroom. 5 Principal Bedrooms. 

3 Bathrooms. 3 Secondary Bedrooms, Slower Roam. 

Oil Central Heating. 

Outbuildings. 

Garden and Grounds with Mill Stream. • 

About 1 Acre 

Also available: 3 Bedroom Cottage 

JHreneesteMtfflc£j285^10L__^^^__ 

HEREFORDSHIRE - 33 ACRES 

Ross on wye 3 miles. Hereford 13 miles, 

Gloucester 16 mites, M50 2 miles 
DELIGHTFUL. REGENCY HOUSE WITH 16th 
CENTURY WING 
to a wry private situation 

4 Reception Rooms, 7 Bedrooms. 3 Bathrooms. 

Cottage. 

Attractive Garden. Terns Court Garaging. 

_ Bam with planning permis si o n. Lodge. 

'About 33 Acres m afl. 

■As a whole or in 3 Lots. 

.Cirencester Office: 0285 3101. 


HAMPSHIRE - HR STRATFIELD SATE 

Hartley Whitney 2 >* mites, B asingsto ke 8 miles. 

Reading 9 miles, London 45 miles 

WN EXCELLENT family house 

Ser fdeligWul mature grounds adKWimg open tarmtoid 

viuun Rooms Study, modem Krtcheo/Breakfast Room. 
1 Km aShStown- 2 Mtwxx. Sama/Showef 
Room. 

Oil fired central testing 

Good Mm. SWftVSLS-o*! 


Attractive barton- Heaied Swimming Pod. 

Had Tennis Court 3 Paddocks. 

About 10 Acres 

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE - HR TRWS 

Tring 4 miles. Wendawr 4 mrtes, 

Amersham 6 mites. London 33 miles 
A MOST ATTRACTIVE SMALL PERIOD HOUSE 
until an exceptional mature garden 
3 JiSdon the edge tit a defaghlful CtoUem Village 
3 Reception Rooms, Conservatory 

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms. 

OH fired central heating 
Outstanding Garden. Garaging. 

ABOUT ivt ACRES 

Lomtaa Of fice: 01-499 4785 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE 

Cirencester 5 mdes. Cheltenham 10 miles 

AN IMPOSING COTSWOLD HOUSE 
In a magnificent posraon with tor reachmg views 
across a valley 

4 Reception Rooms. 8 Bedrooms (2 stales). 

4 Bathrooms. 

Garagmg. Stabfang. 

Excellent Cottage. 

About 14 acres 

CIreac ester Office: 0285 3101 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE - ABOUT 26 ACRES 

Cirencester 14 miles. Gloucester 14 miles. 

M5 Motorway 8 miles 

A DELIGHTFUL PERIOD PROPERTY 
Quietly situated m glorious open countryside 

In need of some modernisation. 

2 Reception Rooms. 6 Bedrooms, Bathroom. 

Adjoining Cottage: 

2 Reception Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, Bathroom. 

Outbuildings. Garaging. Gardens. 

4 Excellent Paddodcs. Pond. Woodland. 

ABOUT 26 ACRES 

Cirencester Office: 0285 3101 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE - WITHIHGT0M 

Cheltenham 7 miles, Cirencester 9 mites 

CHARMING PERIOD VILLAGE HOUSE 

3 Reception Rooms. 4 Bedrooms. 

Dressing Boren, Bathroom. 

Garage. Secluded Garden. 

ABOUT N ACRE 

| FOR SALE BY AUCTION (Unless previously SON) 

Cfreecester Office: 0285 3101 

NORTH OXFORDSHIRE 

Bicester 4 mites. London 64 mdes 

AN EARLY EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

VILLAGE HOUSE 

With many delightful period features 

now in need of complete renovation 

Hail & 3 Ground Floor Rooms (ora 51ft tong) 

7 Rooms on the First Floor 

3 further Rooms on the Second Floor 

ABOUT » ACRE j 

FDR SALE BY AUCTION - 2nd October 1986 ' 

Baabnry Office: 0295 710592 A 




MORTGAGES 
NEEDING HOMES: 
APPLY NOW 


At Midland, we’ve plenty 
of funds and they’re available 
now. We won’t keep you hang- 
ing around for a mortgage. 
Our rate is currently 11.0% 
(APR 11.5%), whatever the 
size of your mortgage. Call in 


endowment and repayment 
mortgages, and well give you 
a mortgage certificate to 
prove you’ve got the funds on 
tap. It all adds up to a better 
mortgage. 

Written details available from 


to your local branch, and you’ll r, :rr uc t “T 
geudedacmvilhi" a couple 


We also lend up to 90% of 
valuation, and up to three times 
your income (or double joint 
applicants’ combined income). 
And you don't even have to be 
a Midland customer 

We offer the same rate for 

® MIDLAND 
MORTGAGES 

<' Midland Kink pic ItiUS. 


Nr PANGBOURNE 

Superb Period kflfl House. 2 acres of grounds, divided by 
RWw Pang. Panettod drawing room, dong room. E*g 
room, 2 kitchens, 3 bed suites, 4/S further bate. 3 further 
bams, sun llat 4-car garage. 

£450,000 

Giddy & Giddy 
(0491) 34788 


^^^ABUdtHoneABeow^ 

DOAKMfG. Easy access to Town Centre S Man Una Staton/ 
1125. Impresstva. detached tartly rsadencu of great charac- 
ter. built around 1913 & situated m e hwhiy sought after 
location. Reception haL 2 recep rooms. Tutohan/tautedast 
room, cloakroom, 5 beds. 2 baths. Gas CH. garage. 20 ff 
South bang gardens. £190.000 F/hdd. Contact Sole Agent 
tasrign raw (0386] M4G99 Opes Suriays 10 ns to 1 pn 


VVe ll make you feel 
more at home.” 


Berkshire 

A limited edition of new 
2 & 3 bedroom cottages at 
Wokingham Without. 

Set in woodlands and by the lake, Laing’snew 
2 & 3 bedroom cottage style homes have all the 
features of a traditional engtish cottage, but all 
the modern benefits. The windows are leaded 
and double glazed. The ceilings are beamed, but 
the insulation throughout is superb. 

Prices from £58,950 - -■ 

HEATHLAKEPARK 

off Nine Mile Ride, rueinc si 

Wokingham Without ° I 

Berkshire. Telephone - — STAr '%- 

Crowthome 779018 Kofa*tk= ^ 

Sales office open CROwntfttNE^**^ J 

daily. » 




WSMtolWWlMta 

By Direction of Pieroth (UK) Ltd 

BARNSGATE MANOR, 

. HR UCKFiELD, SUSSEX 

(ME OF EKUUOS IMHEST VMEYMDS with (Mr 20 roes ta Ital 
production. Modern Winery. Shops, Miseum. Tasting Room, Manager’s 
HaL Offices ale. 

On the edge of Malawi Forest with t— tnt a ti ln g view and total 81 
acres. Earing Commercial Vermin (20.000 vi si tors mually). 

For Safe Uv eaulDOod 2 % a ocxno concom. 

ntostrtert tentaretoun Sole Agents: 3T MM VAUGHU, Cwatry 

DWtiM WftSt High jMwL Ucnifd, Ead teen (Tel {M25) 4111). 

WOODMANCOTE 


JEWELS IN THE CONVENT III NORTH COTSWOLDS 


MAGNIFICENT^ LUXURIOUS WING of The 

OM Convant, East Grinstead. 5/6 bedrooms, separate 
apartment, gallery, studio. AvaRabte with entire contents. 
Heals furnishings, antiques. Offers £225,000. 

NUNS REFECTORY for codling conversion, with 
approved plans. Stunning features include pulpit, stained 
glass windows. E92£0a excluding conversion costs. 

TUDOR STYLE CONVENT GUESTHOUSE 

Beautiful exterior elegant interior. Designer kitchen, gal- 
teried landing, spacious 5 bed accommodation. £150.000 
Early exchange. 

Ati set in 11 acres private grounds, with swimming pod, 
tennis courts. 15 nans Gatwick, MJ25, 30 miles Cite/West 
End. 

Viewing and details 0342 311299. 




m 


ESHER 


BEDFORDSHIRE 


cotnmnr house wun okmuiui 
rural » im in SunbrUw. Com- 
rtMWV rNmMM ttiru*ow 
£■ • MH Dunctablr and LngMon 
Bujaarti EJW Jeers* Mi. ea 
Mun Custon. Emrancr hall. 
Hunw Oumn mi. sudy. tgr 
“H^uipch Uirtien mmow- 
um 65 ri Miden A Urmund a 
Iwk Mmvm hauirtn & shun- 
nw Swap ur. Od CH. Lw« 
storage bant. Quck 
M«>iln<rrd Offer* in tncrrgion 
0fEIdZ.CXX> TW. 0S26 31029*, 


BUCKS 

Mt AamSNMS, 17C t»m Ustr- 
lull v rant mm 6 6m&.2baUS. 
2 rrrrp kjimn. ailin’, unhtv. 
Miqt ijarata. UiWiut ni- 
ra powuan. Aonrax a oan 
Paddocks. 40 k 40 Cmtdon 

n*m ana outer ou muuam gs. 

waidMr uaun and anamv an 
nnr isumccj n ptaoranoj. 
OTfm in mHn of £300000. 
Amnsfiam 3954 i Weekend): 
SS2? lUccfcl iTt. 


WEST TYTHERLEY 

Between Winchester & Salisbury 

Offers around £120,000 

Aujw Gniwanjate house n an outsorting nral haMU set m h ape 
utMbi rnfaig onntantr & otmlane 2 bedims, fiattim. song im_ dawn na. 
kudicn Ewedem onto Fid CH Srt beond » iqnsM ptiaied gatMay 
21 So ut hga te Strew, Wancfaester 0962 80300 01-491 7868 


ABOVE WEST WYCOUBE. 
Modernised brick and ffint 
cottage n seduded hriEside 
pnaban convnandng won- 
derful views. 10 mins M40 
3 Receps, fittad tatefan, uH- 


UH. um one. neatly an 
acre. Offers over £135.000. 
VIEW TODAY 024 027 515. 

ej. mssansL Rne ch»- 
acter tame Off High St. 
dose station and shops. 
Hail, Irvmg-nn, Jdtdtsn/- 
dlning-fni, 2 dble bedrms, 
bativm. CH. Dbte gge. Po- 
tential tor furttw accomm- 
odation. Secluded garden 
and coftyard. £145^00. 

Baffety Baddand 

08444 4422 


ecnuRDs atoss. v. ratio to 

stiOM. ExrvmtanaUv wed MN 

mod a bM del 2500 Hvtro 
arre. acre wditdtd gdns. 5 
r«w 2 fuu barrios, swwr to. 
Lbltty no. Dble «e. £179^00. 
Tel 07SJ 882006 

MLTOM KCVMBS ThomBoreu^i 
villa# 12 mb. 4 bed. dtch 
bouse. CH. D/flUto. Lounge, 
din no. rot rm. gw. gdns . for 
Oulck Wde. £74.000. TH.-02ao 
815277 nn 


DEVON & CORNWALL 


SOUTH DEVON COAST: 2 bed. 
drtached bungalow. Ml CCR 
Cardens 5 garage. I bL dm 
decor am e order. BMaatKUl sun- 
ny POttttan. £44^00. Td; 
■08041 34000. 


CALSTOCK, OMMOMUj 

ModemuM 2 bed collage, nr 
R-Taymar. Ideal w/end break. 
C51JS00 IXSOtWII 3301 


Spaaous farety fwne r rnaorafican postion wrto ewspboral oaniens. 
Butt to 1939 on 3 storeys toong south wosL overiuonng tremficent 
tnabiu garierw. HiH. drawing room, dating room, sitting room, p&ynwm. 
tomfr Mrtwn. 5 tiedreona. 2 bathrooms. Partita garage, beand swtin- 
irwg pooL gBdmaad grounds extending m about 3 m acres. Ofl feed 
central tisataw. Otters in the repot of £275.000. 

» 1fee Etta Oflcs. Wgb Start. HartML Tet (BZ73) 403822. 
Sate Agorti wtth Khg * Cta— IW . KartWW. 

NORTH LAMCIIIQ 

Britten 7 miles. Worthing 3 mfles. London 52 miles 
Aa unusual superbly appointed Architect designed centempo ra y ini' 
dence with panoramic waws over the cfotneL 


Lower eromd Hook Central Reception area 25 x Iff. 3 hither Bed- 
room. Bathroom. Sauna. Changing Rums. Utility Boon. Meant double 
garage. Boter house, boated swimming pool X x Iff. Samm Garden 
0.70 acre. 

Apply Extrte Otlai. State, HertkidM590£ Teh (BZ73)493B22. 


THE PERIOD PROPERTY 
REGISTER 

Cottages. Castles, Manors or Mansions. Each month 
hundreds of period homes far safe nationwide. 
Buying or sateng contact 

The Historic BuOcttmn Co, 

PO Box 150, Chobham GU24 8JD 
Tol 09905-7983/61 28 


WYLYE W IUS Furnished 2 bed old daily codafto ® 
country bouse. Rem inclusive of aB heating and tieondiy. 
Use of swnmrung pool and tennis court possible. No pets. 
Professional Couple or ideal tor weekends. Initial taw one 

CHAPMANSLADE (Bath 14 miles. Westtmiy 3 mOo). 4 
bed det ac he d (urnnhed period house. I acre garden with 
swimming pooL 2 acre paddock. Initial lease 6 nmnrtw Might 
be encoded tor several years. 

Jolly Property Services, Wytye, (09856) 317 


SOUTH DEVON. TOPSHAM. 

ipeetty situated fronting the River Exe wttfi panoramic 
iws over the estuary, detached femfly house, cksks, 3 



Superbly situated fronting the Riv 
views over the estuary, detached : 
reception. Wtchen. 4 beds. bath, gs 
37 acres. Auction 26th September 

71 Fora Street, 
Topsham. 

Tet (039287) 5057 


TORQUAY 

bj^datol gwton pi I ane b atiaisd n Ovl prewc reacsrtu 

toa-wiWdann: IT HOP It* rttosSre rarttoi rrns. B OKtans. S baOmes, 
iltawl «*««W taOng to tint swmmna pool S ft 

Optoi to aant to Urt lately tars - actAnt pbns waUte 

FRBEHOLO I29B J G I 

Tat 61-581 8887/8/9 - Hazel Beswick 


WINGRAVE 

(Ltegf^n Buzzard 5 m3es. Euston 40 min 


aagjgsftgsaaaausas 

Bath, Sep WC, OaCH. Dble Goa. RmWated 
Gdn. For Sale by Auction if not sold previously. GiKte 
iflpon TBquflst 

Brown & Merry, Country Houses (0S25) 372021. 


West End Village. Lge femily house I of a pur. of 
j Historical Iniensa. Drawing room, dining room, comser- 
I vatory. morning room, kitchen / breakfast room, 
laundry room. 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Gas CH, gge. 
Summer house, greenhouse. V* acre of mature gdns. 
£250,000 FH. Goodman & Man (0372) 65401 


UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

Areas ter a tow srteet mMdurts (mavnun of to) to Oke 
pmagnua snare in synaeua to tsiy SoottWi Sporting Estate. 
Fsrtng. shooting, suiting. 

Write tar datafis: 

McOrttty SdcJtara 

90 Crassgate Cupar, Rta. 

Or tolapftona. 0fB4 2E0S 


1 ~ ^1 N. gornmmil. 8 roues Buds. HI 

CHEAT M BM IHiat i ml .11 Cracungton Hmm. 9 bM «m- 

U».&mK SHERBWBTtM Quwf vlltow ««, 52^*?* ** * ** mL 

rrw. uu gap. MrauoKisU' aan , ua S*: c ¥ sr OP,p [or unoergma nous». 

Zfrsut.'sur 

rand smtu rural eon- .IlrS?**' or In mtsw tupertirinkiraceor 

nJ-K* C8B ' oeb ™ <w “ ^‘SSo^rnuf'iw aw 

O.I.R CJ 23.000 IO2400< ”” Slralloil & Haoonw 

, “” on — — — — Clurptodown, 51 A retell PtM 

3NJ. Trt < 0726V 6601 1 

AMtercSHAMsQtuitty. IMSUM. irooeww COAIMON. Qiarrmnn COfnrVfALL. DM Tt* o/VooMno 
3 r«tvv 2 (Mon. Il rmuiKi. rounio r«tuqr. 2 dauUF dm- m hip. odn, daublr 

IU ifAHoak l.ltprfkJtrMn. uUt- UtOwo/dlning MLMUimm/Hiwn 

l(V rm GCH. go? mm rm tn rr. [JJJJ- vliung room u,iui owi m w r Mn renu/oinrr 

■- drrv. nn\ air rcud. rosy w«ik l lropU ff . “**??. 9***".? Easy rikm. kikhrn. CH With B/C 

Bn A Indnywra £230. 000. J tTW "*M4.M40 ana a main- naj . porrti l bed. I *U no. 

. 6885 MOMo a TW^Sas n M^! ,or ItaWhKSr * ** JttWOOB. 

umc GWUMNn Burton KWUOO ™ * ass 28879 Downdmrv 47*. 


SHOBHenM Ouirt image, easy , 
rantmutins. raodm Unit dr 
UrtiH homr on man ewnunr 
dn«rapenMmfc. 3 beds, s 
r*tm. ckokroom. uuaty area 
m oarage, well uoehed small 
garden. . Mrasenl outlook 
C8S.000 TN-om 6136777^ 


lit rtaM oak lilted Utmen. utlt rooms. U 
m tm CCH. one won rm over. rwtorii. ■saiui 
’■ artv, pni ale road, rau want nrepu re 
. m A LMeiground. £350000. 

Tel >02403' 6883 SSS.’SESSf**? 

UfTU CHALFOMTS Buram WOOO ° 1 

Uw 4 fmr detached Muk in 

eitetteni ordn- a rtem. S 

be*, drnema rm. 2 bairn ana 
gas CH. gar jang and 1/2 acre (42.500 3 
A4f*v Heiwaia Sen & Gwen. tun inig 
1020051 90S l <Suaday» II Ji Straifard E 

OLD AMCHStUUN Luxury mod- 

era botnr 4 bedrooms. 2 CHCSHAM Lt 
baUiroonh. 2 garage*, garden. mr a m 
CTI« T S over CJtXLOOO 02005 im* ClS 


OUTSKIRTS. MUum Keyon 
£42.500 3 DM senu. SAG for 
(un *nto LB OonHs Slow 
Stratford Burls MKt l 1HB. 

(MESHAM Lge del we. annrme 
*•" a J*!5- 3 w. OCH- OM 

garage £104.000- oi -319-2602 


wo. tun*, balcony, gdn. double 
garage 3 bed. MUtraom/Hiwr. 
MS w.r.. tun. rrcst/diner. 
Hfcrm. Idlchen. CH WIU> B/C 
nat . Dorra. 1 bed. I at rm. 
baih/utwr. £78.000 

□oumderry 478. 

SWOlte HOD SET HK nandy 
Plvmoutn Cnlr j rccra. lux 
kll/bhftl rut. ubl rm. 4 Igedfale 
boi. z tnnrtm. dw gge cuch. 
Dl* rt* Seel. gdn. wooded XI 
IH tg.£l2Q DOa <07521 7BOZ89 

CfxmsTOH ■ Ctutrratng MduM 
5 b*d h». 3 ree, 2 bath, lge Ml- 
tVlau. dbi gar. ul/rm. c/p n. 
mature gdn. £140.000. Tet: 
0803 843494. 


SOUTH 

DEVON 

1.3 acre site on 
edge of National 
Park suttabte for 
single dwelling. 

TO AUCTION 

17 October 1386 


20 Softwrabay West 
Exeter. EX11 1PR 
Tet (0392) 55441 




| ROCK COMNWALL Lax ra. 3 rtU to U wb>. m? m b 
tad. 2 bath. our ootr io7 * 

count- A «uwg enuary am a 

arm met gaiwn A Wddoefc. xltejMl. 

£115.000. 000 895 STT*. TEL: (0353) 777S96 

DEVON Mod £ tad 2 t*C waited f • t 

garden, ullage cenrer. jnrage. 

Sea iKM £66.000 Hcrira ge _ 

Coast, sioke Fleming 770QS6. "V ff* 1 01 ,* °" hw - vtetortan in 

UHCVOM. Country nouse in 1.1 Cbaraibip 

&JkrsABS?- 

NR EXCTDt UBUryFlMMntinig ,,,'mnmi .r~ . — 

upper girt of omlod Iwree. “■*«*». ta- 

crow to MB. A secure and ***■“" «™w ■ updatM. 7 


■W1CN 7 mi leg. victortn in 
U*f now In rfunhiM 

CWMNMmm. 3 Beds. tS. a ! 
recen. kHctien. garden. CH, Ex 
reUral remteion. KAtsxKO. R c I 
KragiU and Sens 0449 612384 


BftERTWOOB 

j Paactad tangaiow m vprm S 

aott. Lovely son- n#te postoqo 

tiadono 00 wansSs, Dose tn nnM 
«™ and M25 Minins to ra- 
and twm centre. tempTEM 

3brtrooms toongg. Kt / ante ! 

teftrooni2 totes. WCH. dw- 

gestote,** and root 

iraaoHnon. Low npHnag a irf 

“s»- s™«w«.srs? 

bgjings. gate, frurf 

and fetipmfe. terty 


DBen arand MBSJMB. 

Tel 0277 911387. 


ESSEX/SUFFOLK 
■ BORDERS ■ 


You need Comwans Property 
Mb* OeMto. 0637 870963. 
TORRAV Devon New luxury oat, 
uniq ue p osition, waters odoe 
C96.O0O. IMw 0805 606100 


home. SSi.OOO : 039287 7^33 


EAST ANGLIA 


SUFFOLK 

flfc tosmeft. AScftw araft«itB«w 
Hr. The fer flnrafl 
7 Parted Cotbgn 
sadt Mri S nr 3 badrooro and nastly 
reguraa renanban 
«X> 

3 Am d tiurtna tad wrti ourtre 
ptowno pw ratMj n tor a OraBnpt 
Far nil to Aodtat fat S tots sa 
Mb Icatratac 1M 
tanka oacc it MBsaum StiM 
Tte(M73) 21041 lfleLS0B84tfl 


tato. a tatta. study, studio 

S98DOO Trt:tQ8651 7a)»S 


ESSEX 

NR PMGHMCnELDi HafNead 9 j 
mis. Braintree 12 m« tDirect I 
line Uienxxu Siresu. Sudbury 1 
12 rate. CarnbrKtge/Oorrtvnier , 
2 S rate. Rmmtm i 4 th muuar 
nouae. s tads. 2 bamroonia. : 
taswwd hilcfien. Approx 1 acre- 
mire of ifflage. Offer* In it- > 
gllto jot £180.000. Tel»0787i 
61019 rOtnnei or f07B7l 
257901 lEio/W-esidU 

aBNSPMU - Ftatng EOBtoQ For. 
Ml Luxury s/A tad Imagatow. 

□otem watMoxrden.snum 

UNiMt & SIMP*. ArcMKl Or 
Signed UTSjQOa Al 629 4368 

nuonCAY moo on houw are 
CarmlaM 6 bed 4 rec htd s /coot 
-«xw Qtr. m» Htgn si tendon. 

C16&O0O IQ2774) S8499. 


r5rwBa.“"* 

OORSCT DHIIncm-f new house. 
T«t maul am kumo natural wmr. net 3 tad. Min. 
*£15? 4J ™] 3 f »• yura. 2 IW. hitcnra. WC- 

jK^ltll 8487 237901 utility. CH. houinp oarage. W- 

d ra* C76.600 Tel: OMSOT J93 

Pact nc nur^ulir" ABJtKJFOlio Harbour slew 
CAM Ur ENGLAND Luxury houie/rattata. lounge. 

— , — »it/dinef. a taoroom*. 2 mm 

. ...... romnt. oarage a garden 

u ***ra OefX^uful CIS Canute tn *T7-WSO rnokt it>J2S2l 0620 
“**2? are ® 4 tiearoonn teOtll*NS*gremi Beautiful *"» 


Wtithand retrea n Stow-CTHfic- 
WokL 1st Roar Oaf havmg 2 Dtee 
Beds, being pan of an ropresswe 
tetao irianaan house ttevefopmera 

S ooty 4 mies from Moreton- 
irah mainline railway to 
London (Paddngun). Price repon 
£59^99 

Gutted Agent far Detafls 
Rearing 723336 

OOTWAUDS - NAILS WOWTH 

DeMghiful 17in century raluge. 
(Ine gnrden and views,, a bed 
rooms, landing room, dining 
roomAounge. tamroom and 
fully filled Idirnen. £39.950 
OJLO . Tet 045383 4428 
COTSWOLD VILLAGE close 
M4/MS Oet OpnwoM cottage 
I with !•» acres land. River A 
hsWna rlgius, 4 beds. 2 tatftv a 
raceptlon. study, fun CH. 
£145.000. Clones 770313 ITI 
COTSWOLD COTTAGE. Super 
sir/ Hews. Meal 2nd nm. a 
bed*, a rec. M acre gdn. gge. 
village Mr 11 mis Qrm. 
C49.9SO Tel: 0336 83362b. 

FI W OVE Riverside 3 tad Col 
lage Mnue slle. Planning 
permission Gram available. 
£49.000 ONO 0433 720738 
®LOS 16th Cent Crack cottage 
Restored. Inunac. Prop /garden 
® main services. frwnoM 
_£S7K. Ntywetd 931819 eie 

HANTSJXJRSETT, & 
LQ.W. 

HEART OF 
NEW FOREST 

Detached cottage. 4 beds. 2 

receoa. Kitchen. Badtroom. Cen- 
tral teamg Owtife oarage. 1 
am osnsaa. Further 10 aorgs id 

rem-TisaOM. 

r jte*« ^dftdry A Son, 

TafctulS) 


NR TOWCESTER 

Romantic Grads 1 Storm 
Manor 3/4 Racap. 7 Beds. 3 
Baths. Gas C.H. Age. Approx 
4 Acres. Comtmita London/ 
Bttrrtngham. 2nd tima on 
markat In 400 yre. 

GET M WHILE STONES 
LAST1 . 

Ring 0804 858 239 

HAttPSMIte. STEXP Village. 
Fines! iimn south Down 
ciaie Bedaies. Modem bvmga- 
law. 5 bedrooms. 4 arm. 
tarnen /paddock- £ 180 . 000 . 
Further 13 arm gllerrd. 
RMORfMd 64913 


CANPORD CUm /Poole Superb 
bungalow ranunefely relur 
bribed, 4 beds. 4 baths. 3 rets. 
Ms r/h. ioihv garden. OM oar 
£189.750 Tel: 0202 293172 

MAPYESBUItY. Decacnra Ooor. 
sun House with line views vn 
FtOM> to BhopL Schools. 
Churrhes. Slone brtll sla to mot. 
UUeiuiiy restored- S Beds. 2 
Baths. 3 fiecep modem Kii. Ga- 
rage. tmery Garden On Cent 
Htg £147.000. Possession 
Chapman. Moore A Muqfnrd. 
Awnli tor West Country prop- 
erty Tel: 0747-2400 
•OURMOMHim or Querns 
Park 1927 4 bedroom house. 2 
ear guragr under sunny nano- 
Some redN-orauitg needed. 
£98.000 0277 2lS 844 
■OtHIMJCMOirrH ourm wi 
1968 seaetoui eirv aied bunga 
low. Det. 3 tied, garage- ur rear 
«n. £76.980. Trt. tCC02) 

324616 

OOftStT DHIIneuve neur now. 
naliirai -uone. dot 3 bed. bain. 
ro« Huee a ree. krtflKn. WC. 
Wilily. CH. doubio oarage, oar- 
aert» £76,800 Trt: D93S89-M3 
"“OEITOIIO Harbour view 
Luxury tmrte/cMtata- lounge, 
kii/dmcf. 3 brorooire. 2 tatn 
room s, garage A garden 
£77.980 rnokl it»2S2l 8620 


sunny raurtyartL stable . small 
omura C30.9S0 04427 4^! 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE 

H 5J omc u "“timrr 

22 ?* 

SSSL"***- 


tt. sea me. small '•»» designer rtal Ip pastel 
0-04427 4837 JJMdfL 2 dole tad*. £65.960 
0202 76600Q/ 923 79902 
— ' ■- new roaesr Anrat Lfttvuwte 6 

TBSHIBV 2*? fu«v mrn drt tret noraf 

mon im. Potential Income £700+ 

F/H. Cl 47.000 0496 621448 
ILWa lHW dr teprtlHAWlrSe V.lge. 3 tad. ta 
* Nbuso AJitiey lamed house. '» actv rerden- 
i SEBS-ftam. gy Myunming pool dM «*- 
I 292066. ca&ooa Tel: Corby 304fl3»- 











tisisimMyiMiaroiatam 



^ >■-» w -M ■ 1 k«J a a « a vm 



“r^h^Pir#! 


SWITZERLAND 

SKI RESORT - VTLLARS 

Studios sad Apartments from £69.000 & £100,000 Cha- 
lets on the Pisie from £275,000: 

LAKE GENEVA - VILLENEUVE 

Prestigious Properties with own fiomage on bloMborc 
Near Mbotrcaox soon to be authorised tor sale to for- 
eigners. From 1 Million SFr. 

INVESTMENT 

Mortgages of up to 70% at approx. 7-25% interest. Meet 

the Devdopcre at our offices 24th &. 25th Sept Inspec- 
tion Weekend - 10th October. 

OSBORNES SOLICITORS 
93, PARKWAY, LONDON, NW1 
TEL: 01-485 8811 


SPAIN & CYPRUS 



Beadies International Property LrcL, 3/4 The Mews, 
Hagky Hall, Stourbridge, West Midlands DY9 9LQ. 



MAH 0 H, HEHOBCA 


Luxury apartmant 4 dou- 
ble beds, 3 bathrooms 1 
en state, large modem 
kitchen, dining area, 
long drawing room, sep- 
arate dining room, 2 
balconies. Fine view of 
harbour. FuBy furnished 
£70,000: unfurnished 
£65,000. Coloured 
brochure tat: 

0252 722 251. 



CANARY ISLANDS 


UUtZAHOTC. Luxury vtua In 
protfcpous Casta Tellies*. 

Steeps 6. 2 bufiroara. n ests rt 
swtnnnlag Met too yds to se- 

audtd private hewn. 

immediate nie ■ ones*. Tit 
1029667) 265. 

TIHH WUti a BUIIll.ua- 

urtous residence. Own post 
/garden- Fine* pos Utonta UUs 
meted resort. 0386 B7062Q- 


CYPRUS 


LIMASSOL. FUQy tom Hied. 3 
bedroom ab a w iu em Air sale. 
CC3ljOOO. negotiable lor mdek 
sate. Tel 0306 40368. 


Baba. Brazil 5.000 HecL Top 
quality. 400.000 US DOLLARS 


Bahia. Brazil. 560 Heel. 
200,000 producing plants. 
Model phrtatmn wiitti an ame- 
nities: house, depot, new 
machinery. 1.100.000 US 
DOLLARS 

NEW SEA FRONT HOTEL 
BaNa. Brazi. 5-Star, with all 
l adftes : pool tennis, restau- 
rant. bar. Capacdy: 50 guests. 
Ail rooms feature TV and 
.kitchen. Possibilities for 
expanson. 

Enquiries IK 

World Gale loratmeat, 

19 Academy Street, 
Inverness. (VI 1JNL 


INTERNATIONAL BANKING 

£12/100+ MORTGAGE ADMIN 

JNs cost nwlros working toe the Director of Admm/Perscnnei 
tor a edrtased Bank. Tms American Executive needs a Sharp, 
dynamic secretory write bardung background. aWls 100/65. ex- 
ceflent proaentston Aged 25-32. Free trawl bowses otc. 


£11*000 + MORTGAGE 


MARKETING 


Piasbgous ArnMcan Bank * roentteg a secretary lor tear 
sonar Exacutiwe. McrkeMig Area. Good CM> of aoiren and com- 
pwer work. Skdb 100/65. flextfe approach lor oreer-fflmcM 
gnAbio, 

£10.000 4- IMMEDIATE MORTGAGE 

Sec/PA aged 23* lor Executive Dnenr, prestigious aty Bank. 
A post watt a great deal at scope tieahng wnn New Yoik oiUca 
mng aamnstretme and numerical skfl*. Audn/snonnand 
essential. 


Tel: 430 1551/2653 


Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Lid 


RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST 

to g£ 7,000 plus good benefits 
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 
OXFORD CIRCUS 


Intsrestng and lively Job for imefagem and sman 

perasn aged 17+ with *6' levels. A1 telephone manner 
and 50 WPM typing plus switehboarcl experience. Reg- 
ular salary reviews, bonuses, clothes aflowancs, LV.'s. 
season befcet loan, medical insurance. 


Phone Shirley Griffiths today on 
01-631 3780 



u3£jP G£fE33E 

^ Tj. ,171-, 





to either Mr. Bernard Parker or Mr. 
Meletiou to arrange Appointment 







IS 



PA SEC 

£8,000 + benefits 

S/H secretary for 


sates co- In Kensing- 
ton. This position 
requires good admin 
+ sec smHs . Extro- 
vert personality prof. 

Calk 




OF OVERSEAS 
HOMES-. 

• ALL UNDER * 
ONE 
ROOF— 

JWtMNtfCIn 

Dept SLUM Horn** 
Ovcraen. 10 Eat Road. 
London N I lor die btcK da 
PLUS TWO F US E 
TICKETS. 



COSTA DEL SOL 

GARDBi APARTMENTS 




FRANCE 




tAm»u i roUc from Port or 
Sania Tirhl van wm* a dau- 
ur bedroom, bathroom * 
shower room, rating room. 
kUcImi. b acre gdn. £67.50Oar 
Uff 145.1XXJ.OOO. 01-834 6688 


PORTUGAL 


NOQMAMHY lenrty Xvn Cmtaiy 
manor how. 30 km Deau- 
ville. 6 bed*. Many 
ouibuiidlng&. from Mrcam. 6 
acre. Offers aro and £110.000. 
TotapIKXW OlO 33 43 oe 66 30. 


u mau mo c. as im irom war- 
bonne & MM. Stone imraod 
ifltagp use. 2 beds A rt ten- po- 
lenliaL Cdn 6 views. £11.000. 
01-346 3289 (after 4pm) 


MIDDLESEX 


SH Ate r ca raw. 

lav 3 bpd ninL Md wtoaowi. 

parqtK* noor. touyru LILCW. 
/* r c H i vrl qjuden. 
£«.0«> TO 0933 787038. 


midlands 


hamkx. 9 milrt m™™ 

1/Parrr odn C**S 

Inq S .vrr Baddorh ovatiaw*. 
TO 0004 7t»M» 




ftft 


nrii 


■525 



NORTH EAST 


TEESIDE: 

Stockton 

bamrwjm. aipsW 

pornfad. 30ft lounge. douMe 

garage. 

OFFERS RHOW®^ 008 
TCL (B6«) W8350 


nun vA *. 17,1 .^V5j.OOa 
TO D743 CoO+OS 



KNUNG: Desirable family 

house. 6 mins walk to mm tine 
station and town centre. 4 b#d». 
3 bairo. dressing room, study, 
large drawing room.. AHng 
room. uteMn. minor room. Dbi 
garage. Pretty garden. 
£165000. Tel: .Oal»62) 71309 
/ 10264) 61771 OT 89911. 


AHfTEADb WHMP <W feOM Of 
M25 * AS. 3 yroM d rtagwl 
nous* w on gleamnt wnero. 
Study, mrougn lounge/dmec. 
downstairs cloak. 4 beds. «n 
suite shwr + lama yb a inroo m. 
£112000. Ten 03722 78202 


UttnrCMtD - Bungalow, 4 mo. 

2 ncHE. 2 bains, bimuniinir 
IfutNJafKHtf . in prhaM rtM . w- 
SSSroJSSnon OnyJlSfrOOO 
immediaw vamrsttaD. TtS i 
OuUdford 31542 or 306313 


FARMWH- Nearly romMcted 
NHBC 3 brdrm luxjay cooage. 

Village seUMO. M3 Accwss (MW. 
£85.000. Conuci builder 
ei m/wkentte 0306 730611 


WOKING Detached house . 4 beds. 

2 rrcepk turnin' xachfn md 
bathroom •«.. *i acre secluded 

South facing garden roefcmg 
goto woodlands. £153X00 
100863) 68806 Yf/E Jr W/Dwi 
After 6oro 

iaMM Ull nr Surrey. 3 wte m3 
or e«y ran. saitiln. to*. 4 beets 

3 batn/snr. Annexe. 1/ 2 ac 
WMni CISSuOOa 0376 
61489 

CAftSNALTON UEOKI LM 
DM Hsr in tree Uned Kd. 4 BeW. 
8 Banns. 3 Bee. cl fa. IKUUL 
OCH. fuB ms. CG£ for 3. Gdn. 
Nr BA £152000 .01-642-3679 
CHOYDON STK ■ Easy town 4C 
ce*» Mod. F.H nee. Prham 
plot. 3 dMr beds. Lounge. 
Kli/dmer. OCH. Gdn. Garage & 
Miras C6&500. Ol 681 0884 
M U B UB TOB ■ FmeEdirtn. 
del. Use. 4 bed. 3 rrc- COl. ■£. 
nr «t4i.£i44^oaoi 6S7 8ioi 


DOMMHGMCi Conversed wind- 
mill. 2 beds. Bathroom, lounge. 
kHcnrn/dinrr. Superb «iwv 
f^ nnn- TWXOA59) 738828 


Humberts 





Lunmig. Mgh tWIy 2 Ml 3 
bodroom spanma n ts In two 
ptwftffous locations. Swim- 
mmg pooL Ml maimainad 
gardsra. gx c ali m t amemne*. 
wakaq diwance from bench. 
Maiaga anport 30 minuag. 
30% MM. fi na n ci ng avatabig. 

FREE INSPECTION 
FLIGHTS 

TO OUAUHED BUYERS 

CALL 01-708 4908 


FOR FOBTHBI DETAILS 


SpnoiB Mty modemisea 
apHTOert. 3 beds. 2 lute. (1 
en SAri. fitted tattfen. tanig 
rm. Seataw postal a twoO- 
ful n. 

E99.0O0 ooo 

0308 22987 Dm 
or 0308 85526 Evee 



PTO 

01*351 3668. 


COSTA DEL SOL 

Luxury Via. for safe. FuDy 
turmsned. 2 double bed- 
rooms. very targe dMng 
room/kxinge. Large patio. 
£50,000 

For details phone: 

01 -SI 9 7760 


PW/ADVKKTHING £10.000 
Lae. Malar imcmatmnai co. 
seek upmarket PA/Scc. for 
ihrtr consumer and advertising 
dept. Lots of natron with press, 
ad. agencies and cltabsoappll 
rants must Be well-spoken with 
Mctuy of initiative and be high- 
ly organised. Super- yastnon 
wuldn very friendly CO. Must 
have gd. sec. skills and mm. a 
years* exp. Aged 22-35. Call 
KMr 01831 7372 Klngsland 
Pm. cons. 


W WAW a fraettpn rusty but u» 
able? Create a new role In an 
iniernaUenal bank, which Is Of- 
fering luti rewards to an 
experienced Secretary i2S*l 
who will provide good an round 
hack-up for a recently arrived 
server executive. Skins needed 
In UKludr English shorthand, 
and Engttsh must be of mother 
longue standard- Munmngual 
Services • HecTulBmfnl 
Cmnunnats I Ol 836 3794/6. 


nnn«Y. angtn muivMuai 
wtu, flair and tainunve to work 
m West End office for I wo roar 
or ! it young executives inv otied 
m property and sport. AbUHy to 
organise and Qood sense of ntr- 
mour vaiuaMr assets Solary 
£9.000. Tel. 01-639 3026 Ref. 
AB. 


ADOmOM £10.000. Opoortn- 
nuy to involve m UUs absorbing 
work tor young legal audio see 
with n UgaUan exp. Friendly of- 
fice m Homa n . Caohal Pewde 
340 9384. 


UNIVERSITY 

COLLEGE 

LONDON 

SECRETARY 

required far tha Main 
Registrar's Office. 
Duties include typing 
committee papers, 
statistical fables, 
general 

correspondence and 
fUe maintenance. 
Salary on scale £6370- 
E7661 pJL inclusive. 
Applications forms and 
further delate from 
Mark Pickeril, 

Registrar's Division, 
Urtivorsity Coflege 
London, Gower Street. 
LONDON WC1E68T. 
Tel 397 7050 
ext 2043. 


TEMPORARY 
CONTROLLOR 
OR TRAINEE 
£KMHMNk la £20, 000k 
PACKAGE 

HVc wifl rewted yCHI with as 
ever Urol basic, a possible 
directorship and caring nun- 
agemetn when >w cwitrol ihc 
umponty secnon Experience 
prcfciccd but with sales tuck- 
ground. Uatwag gives. 

CaU Lynn Laic 

01 486 6951 


PA. Kcicun nerded far 
Director of Intenutmoal 
PnUuhing Co. Somroiw to 
deal with mrcunci concs> 
poodener crc. fcauovrn 
pcmialiiy with phfd 
□rgroiiaTiarol rialliTCO. 


01-370 1562. 


Needed tar Medta/T.v. 
company. Someone 
with good w.P. 
experience + good 
personality and 
Mtiative £9,000.+ 

C8B: 

MUNROERECCON 
01-370 1562 


Efll 




ROYAL COtunr. micdical Sec 
tort. We are looking tor a 
Secretary/ Amman! of graduate 
calibre (Ideally second job) M 
work wHh man Mam servicing 
the Hon. President. Registrar 
and General Secretary. I he pool 
w(U appeal to comxienL for- 
mally auaimed aecretanes wtm 
rone previous experience look 
Ing for an imeresUngaad varied 
POM providing opportunity lor 

lalcr dn'ritwmnl In admlnto- 
■radon In the non-commercial 
sector, scale £7.689-£9J»Q. 
Write or telephone Managing 
Director. Masseys Executive 
Selection. LOO -Baker Snect. 
London Wl. 01-935 6651. 


■eccrnoMST - Bf uu n mcfi 
CDnsuUancy - CX6.7SO + profit 
ttiare. MM By SL Pauls Cathe- 
dral we iprctatfee In execuuve 
search and seiecuon m the fields 
of PR ana me caty. we need a 
well spoken, unflappable racep- 
uoitnL wttn Ofiung to great our 
cltrnts charmingly, answer our 
twHcnboard efncenlly and help 
oat wttn various admmhiraUvr 
tasks, v you would like to re- 
place Sue. who is being 
promo l e d and tom a young 
minded professional company, 
of rase contact Juua Rutty ooOt 
336 7307. 


ASSISTANT TO HLD. £1 0.000 
iMayhe more*). This Ha top lev- 
el super secretarial post with 
executive head-hunter who has 
a great sense ot humour Saw 
skins are called for 1 80/601 out 
there n much more to II Plenty 
of rontoct won cUentv and can- 
didurs. Bwiuiif oukcv non- 
smoker. To find out more ram 
434 0030 Sarah Hodge 

Rccnidment. 


UNUSUAL PA /SEC. £7JS00. A 
very Interesting and i mutual 
job helping in organise nation- 
wide cxhiMUoiB. Some navel 
involved. A mue iysNngf80/46> 
but good PA back-up is Uie mo- 
tor responsibility. STL. 8UPA. 
Xmas bonus. 6 room ho salary 
review. 18-20. Phone 4340030 
tor details. Sarah Hodoe 
RemiKnaefit. 


envlronmem are looking for 
com petrol secretory wuh exert- 
lenl skins, able to start 
Bniaediaiehf. Salary negotiable. 
Please send C.V to Barren 
Lloyd Davis Associates. 134 
Lots Road. SWIO orj. No 
Agencies. 


QEKMAM IKANK3 Secretary, 
wiui good Engbsh rrouned lor 
export sales olfice wealed Hyde 
Park Corner. Capable of work- 
ing on own Inlliauve wun 
Audio and telex ex p erience. 
Knowledge of IBM PC Useful. 
Salary by arrangement. Rtmv 
wtlh CV to BOX J24. no 


WTENffAmONAL Bon new Cen- 
tre in Mayfair needs secretary 
fiOOfeOi/adiMiustrator. wide 
variety, constant carol contact, 
and promotion prospects m a 
luxury sening for ambsuous 
20 * Up to £9300 paw start. 
Phone 01-437 3306 mo 

agencies) 


’MJMHnxns Expmenred M- 
bnoual wcirlaj < Engbsn 
SnorthamJ ) wnn flueni IMian 
to 05SM Managing nrenor. try 
lerrsung Post with wide range 
of duues Including cHem con- 
tort 4 PW Multilingual Sen m 
■Rerruimenl Cbnsuttaiusi Of 

B36 3T94/S 


PR SEC 1*-XX- £8.000 ♦ bonut + 
dress aliw nee. Orginue events, 
allrod sporting rhamptonships 
and enraurt roily support tour 
boss. Skills 80(50. Capital Peo- 
ple 240 9384 


P R OPE R TY CP Mayfau- Sec/PA 
iwpi Good '«ne(y. 0:9.000. 
CV. to. PJD. 15 Dover SL Wl. 

01-495 324a 


Humberts 



semi very oti !**T 




WEHBURY: Lux bungalow on 
odor ol w Wilts downs. 0 beds, 
sun lounge. CCH. '.-acre gdn. 4 
mb Infer city train. £92.600- 
TO inw Id (0380) 830446 


WESTWOOD rtiarmfogd tmfcDf- 

law ui Witts v Wage. 8 rah Bate. 
Loe lounge, ui/nrkfa CCH. off 
si perking + hie gam. £63000. 
ono 10701) 418060 dpmflpra. 


LAND FOR SALE 


WORTHING 

OUTSTANDING FREEHOLD 

DEVELOPMENT SITE 

FACING THE SEA 

DETAILED 
PLANNING 
PERMISSION FOR 

118 FLATS & 
APARTMENTS 

For Sale by Tender 
Apply: 


40 HIGH ST 
LYMINGTON 
HAMPSHIRE S041 9ZE 
Tel: (0590) 77222 



tmm 





FLORIDA: Nr Tampa, spaeieut 
modem detached lakeside 
hour. 3 double bedrooms, ft 
bathroom* Central air coivh- 
uonlno. Own swunramg pool m 
tmenea tndasure. Doubt* gw 
rage; Fully furnished and 
ro itinera to Irigh standard. 
£43 j 000 Tel Mr Mutch on 
10843) 34640 






TMESHAM; COWTACT. Tener- 
ife _ For sale: Weeks 

14/10/32/33 tstpa 61 . earner 
weeks available. Also, owner* 
wishing id sen. regrarr wuh us. 
Details. i0323t 647403 


UilKI M.'IJ 


BOOK MIHJCnrV £7CX» e oenr 
Ills. A young PA Is sort to carry 
out a PRonenlaled rale wunm 
Uhs major pubihMnB hour? 
wnn mb of roman won well, 
known authors, you will gam 
ext exp. Typing al 00 wpn, 
rag'd. Sh an asses. Synergy, 
the rtSTUlmenl OHUuttancv 
01-637 9533. 


w 






GB 
































































































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 
I Science report 


court and social Otters back in Welsh rivers 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


visited the Burrell Collection in. 
Pollok Park. 

Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother subsequently launched 
the P & O Cniisefeny. MV 
Norsea, at Go van Shipbuilders 
Limited. 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE Limited. 

September 9: The Princess Her Majesty travelled in as 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, Presi- Aircraft of The Queen’s Flight, 
dent The Missions to Seamen, Mrs Patrick CampbeH-Pres- 
was represented by Lieutenant- ton and SirAlastair And were in 
Colonel Peter Gibbs at a Service attendance, 
of Thanksgiving for the lift Of KENSINGTON PALACE 

Rear-Admiral Andrew Miller o- Prim«« 

in-Chief. Royal Austr 
mS JT h olJ Corps of Transport, this 

fSSES pS mosKr RoyaL noon received Major Br 

London, fc* ~,„' nn rmiimOannuE 


CLARENCE HOUSE 3041 "P® Ma J° r 

September 9: Queen Elizabeth 

The Queen Mother this morn- Princess Anne will open the new 
ing opened Pollok Leisure Cen- unit of L and K Fertilisers in 
trc. Glasgow. Sharpness, Gloucestershire, on 

In the afternoon Her Majesty October I. I 

Forthcoming Mr nji carter 

iwuivuimiig and Mrs RJ J. Chapman 

marriages The engagement is announced 

Mr N Prior between Nicholas, son of the 

T hr enj Ofcmcn. ■> rSE Wfa 

of Squadron Leader and Mrs 

?"l?^ 0r27CanMh 

Sir Leon Radzmowicz. of Gardens, SWI 5. 

Philadelphia, United States, and 
Lady (Mary Anne) MrAJP-W.Dan 
Radzinowicz, of Baliyvaughan, and Miss &CM 
Republic of Ireland. The engagemeni 

Captain TJ.O. Cannkfasd between Andrew 
and Miss EJ. Stuart son of Major and 

The engagement is announced of Bayswater, Lc 


September 9: Princess Alice 
Duchess of Gloucester, ColoneT 
in-Chief. Royal Australian 
Corps of Transport, this after- 
noon received Major Bradley 
Keating. Captain George Friend 
and Pipe Major Gordon Body. 


A memorial service for Mr 
Clifford Mollison will be held at 
St Paul’s, Covent Garden, at 
noon today. 


Birthdays today 

MrThomas Allen. 42; Mrs Beryl 
! Cook. 60: Major-General Sir 
Maurice Dowse. 87; the Earl of 
Enniskillen, 68: Mr John 
Entwistle, 42; Miss Judy 
Geeson. 38: Professor C.HJMJ. 
G files, 65; Mr David Hamilton, 
47: Mr Niail Macdermot, QC 
70: Mr Justice Nolan. 58: Lord 
O’Neill of the Maine. 72: Mr 
Arnold Palmer, 57; General Sir 
Antony Read, 73; Sir Peter 
Reynolds, 57; Dame Betty Rid- 
ley, 77; Sir Nonnan Skelhora, 
QC. 77; Sir Rupert Spdr, 76; 
Miss Gwen Watford. 59; Profes- 
sor Card Weight, 78; Sir Gra- 
ham Wilson, 91. 

Mr RJP, Dowding 

and Mias AJ. Bodes 

Hie engagement is announced 


By HnghCiayttm,£jivirQiiinQitCwrespoiidait 

a ran The Wind in tie WUIowsm creatures like the peregrine 
’ Welsh an otter, bat it is years since falcon, 
lie latest one of die animal* hag beat The otter, one of die most 
the Vin- fond on the stretch of the intelligent and elusive of riH 
The tr- - Thames which Grahame used animals, has shown itself to be 

an indicator of cfean, pot 
water in an mdistarbed wild 
habitat. It wiD not snvive for 


Otters are malmra a small lie Wind in tie Willow. 
come back on a few Webb an otter, bat it is years 
rivers, accordmg to the latest one of the ■"■—»« has 
b y ^ fimnd on the stretch 03 

cent Wildlife Trust. The ev- - Thames wh ich Grahame 
Menc^- based on sightings of as a setting for the book, 
droppings and trades in the . 
mod, wm excite naturalists The otter is thought to be 
even though the improvement ***** T*"***? *° aton ? 

in umbers is awn *h« whole of the Thames and 


OBITUARY 

MR JAMES COLTART 
Influential figure in newspapers 
and television 

Mr James Coltart, who died 
on September 6. at the age of 
82. had an active and mfluen- 


on September 6, at the age of 
82. had an active and influen- 
tial career on the management 
side of the communications 
Industry, as the first managing 
director of Thomson News- 


ratnalhrso along long m polluted streamswfaere FJPf^ ^ ^i^^omsoa 
fttelWS C tonym of_.tl* , Thonsoo 


The Webb stsrrey pres farther tc 
almost the first dear Indies- owntry o 
turn for years that there is any Border Cc 
part of inland Britain where there are i 
the pepnbtioa of wild otters nmw thx 
has stopped faffing. Earlier years ago. 
investigations suggested tint 
there were few safe havens for I "*“ 
the animals away from the sgT ffi * 
remotest Scottish isles. searching 


all of its tributaries. Bnt Organisation Ltd, ip decisive 

farther to the west, in the years of its growth in this 


farther to the west, in the 
ctum try once famed by the 
Boarder Comities Otterhomds. 
there are more otters on some 
liras yfcgri there woe eight 


Lady (Mary Anne) Mr AJ*.W. Daw 

Radzinowicz. of Baliyvaughan, and Miss &CM. P or ter 

Republic of Ireland. The engagement is announced 

Captain TJ.O. Carnriduwl between Andrew Paul W illiam . dauefatm-nfMra 

and Miss EJ. Stuart son of Major and Mrs A_F. Daw, of R„X n , 

The engagement is announced of Bayswater, London, W2, and Hamnshire. 

between Timothy Carmichael, Sara Catherine Maty, daughter -« w » 

The Black Watch (Royal High- of Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs iViBITTHge 
land Regiment), middle son of GJ. Porter, of Milton Keynes, Sir Christopher 
Mr and Mrs D.G.O. Car- Buckinghamshire. and Miss S- A- 1 


Reynolds, 57; Dame Betty Rid- The nean>r a riwr ic tn tha 

■awssrspa taf-BESS-t 

mSs G wen Wat^S 5^Profes- J® ffowded smith, the less 
sor Caret Weight, 78; Sir Cra- ““V ft b to shelter ottos, 
ham Wilson. 91. One of the cast of animals fa 

Mr RJP, Dewdlug l.nndlPflTI 

and Mias AJ. Bodes -L-UnCUeOO 

Hie engagement is announced HM Govern airnt 
between Roger, elder son of Mr Viscount Whndaw, CH. was. 
and Mrs R.H. Dowding, of St host at a luncheon held yes- 
Mary's Road, Benfleet, Essex, terday at 1 Carlton Gardens in 
and Amanda, daughter of Mr honour of the Egyptian Prime 
and Mrs RJS. Baden, of Arthur Minister. 

Road, Wimbledon, SWI 9. — { 

Christening 

The engagement is announced mfent son of the Hon 
between Andrew, son of Mr and AntopnyMd Mis Russel] was 
Mrs W.P. Havers, of Mflfonl christened WiffiarnOdo Aleran- 
Haven. Dyfed, and Bronwen, ^ 1 by tto; Rev Dr Chn^pber 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J. Pugh,. P“ l Saturday m the' Chapd, 
of Rowlands, Castle, Le ffi 
Hampshire. parents are Mr William Qms- 


The compilers of fee Welsh 
sarvey, who spent months 
searching more than 1,000 
sites on Wdsh rivers Car signs 
of otters, 'found tint an in- 
crease m numbers of the 
an im al s often went hand-in- 
hand with growth in numbers 
of other huge wild flesh-eating 


results in the Welsh survey 
woe on famous salmon rivers 
and thefe tribntaries. 

The Dyfi, Y stwyth , Wye 
and the appemost stretches of 
the Sevan scored weB, hot the 
improvement was not aniver- 
saL Although there were dear 

signs of otter in Anglesey in 
tire late 1970s, the new survey 
produced no evidence feat they 
were still there. 

Otter Survey of Woles* Vin- 
cent Wildlife Trust ( 21x Bury 
Street. London EC3A 5AU; £2). 


School announcements 


michael, of Boxted, Colchester, 
Essex, and Bspeth. younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Alan 
Stuart, of Woodlands, 
Milqgavie, Glasgow. 

Colonel GJ. Rawlins 
and Miss M-A. Ravenscroft 
The engagement is announced 
between Gordon Rawlins, OBE. 
of London. SW4, and Maigaret 
(Meg), daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Janies Ravenscroft, of Beamed, 
Kent 

Mr I. Rnshbrook 
and Miss AJ. Many 
The engagement is announced 
between Iain, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs T.E. Rush brook, of 
Horton Heath. Hampshire, and 
Anna, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs D.G. Macey, ofWinch ester. 


Mr A.V. Mannent 
and Miss VJ JP. Waind 
The engagement is announced 
between Arthur Verriour, elder 
son of Mr and Mrs Arthur 
MarmenL of LlandafL Cardiff 
and Vanessa Jane Penelope, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs 
John Waind, of Doncaster, 
Yorkshire. 

Mr N. Paterson 
and MGssJJ.V. Cooke 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, younger son 
of Mr W.M. Paterson and Mrs 
G. Mathews, of FrilfbnJ Heath, 
Oxford, and Joanna, younger 
daughter of Dr and Mrs John 
Cooke, of Cornwall, formerly of 


Sir Christopher Wateriew, Bt 
and Miss S- A. Bitten 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, September 6, at the 
Church of Our Lady, Help of 
Christians, Mottin^uun, be- 
tween Sir Christopher 
Waterlow, Bt only son of tbe 
late Mr and Mrs Rupert 
Waterlow and stepson of Lady 
Norrington, of Grenville and 
the late Sir Arthur Norrington, 
of Grenville Manor, 
Hadden ham, Buckinghamshire, 
and Miss Sally- Ann Bitten, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Mau- 
rice Bitten, of Abbey Wood. 
London, SE2. Nuptial Mass was 
celebrated by Father Arthur 
McCormack. 

The reception was held at the 
Marlow Rooms, Sidcup, and the 


Is CastTe k*** 5 Castle, Kent. Tbe God- 
’ parents are Mr William Chris- 
tie, Mr Anatoly Da vidov, Mr 
Richard Starkey (for whom the 
Wateriew, Bt, Hon David Russell stood 
Sttea proxy), the Hon Mrs Nicholas 

look place on Howard, Mrs Eric Clapton, Mrs 
uter 6, at the Robin Gibb, and Miss Isabel 
Lady. Help of Goldsmith. 


Ir and Cooke, of Cornwall, formerly of honeymoon is bring spent in I Seer* 
i ester, Oxford. California, United States. I Sean 

Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


Memorial service 

Rear-Admiral AJ. Miller 
Princess Anne, President of the 
Missions to Sami, was repre- 
sented by Lieutenant-Colonel 
Peter Gibbs at a service of 
thanksgiving for the life of Rear- 
Admiral AJ. Miller hdd yes- 
terday at the Church of St 
Michael, Paternoster Royal, 
EC4. The Rev G. Jones offici- 
ated. assisted by the Rev G 
CoMison. Captain L.H. 
Oliphante read the lesson and 
Canon WJ.D. Down, General- 
Secretary of the Missions to 
Seamen, gave an address. 


BHIHS. HARRUGES, 
DEATHS ad IN HBKM1H 
£4 a fae + 15* VAT 

(minimum 3 lines) 

Announcements, mnbciuicaicd by tbe 
name and p ertinent address of tbe 
sender, ma? be sent ux 

THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 9XS 


or telephoned (by ideptonc subs- 
cibcre only) Kc BUtI 3R24 

Announcements can be received by 
telephone between 9.00am and 
5J0pm Monday to Friday, oo Satur- 
day between 9.00am ana 12 noon. 
(Q1-4S1 4000 Mb). For pubtkaiioo the 
■ollawinc day by 1.30pm. 


RMIHCOIMS UmUGES. WEDOWBS 
etc on Court and Social Page IS a tee 
+ 15% VMT. 

Conn and Social Pa*c annoocements 
can not be *ccmcd by idcphoae. 
Enquiries w 01-122 9953 
(afler lOJflamL or send la 
t Pr a ri islBa Sbret, LMdan El BW. 


Please a Bow at leas 48 boon before 
puUicauon. 


«*. won. jnd no* «#. Uiot y» may l«\« 
amt w the lord, uw Goa m imb. sluU 
Ur with voo 

Amoi S. 1* 


BIRTHS 

■MOLOSS-TOOH ■ On 6 th September, 
in Lekvslcr. to Lucy and Robert, a 
daughter. Prances Victoria. 
BOYCOTT • On September 7lh. at The 
Royal Free Hospital. London, to 
Michelle and Peter, a son. Janies 
Warwick, a brother for Rosalind. 
BROWN ■ On September 6 Uu at Mount 
Anemia, Guildford, to Pamela and 
Stephen, a daughter. Cabriella 
Louisa. 

CANNON - On September 7th. to 
StieUoh (nee Tituici and Stuart, a 
son. Edward Jonathan Goeffrey. a 
brother lor Charles and Andrew, 
who sadly Used for one day. 

CPU - on September 8 th. In Singa- 
pore. (o Jill tnee Dawson) and James, 
a daughter. Jessica Alice. 

DEANE ■ On August Z7Th. at Queen 
Chartone's Hospital, to Karen tnee 
Wallace) and Geoffrey, a daughter. 
Kireteen Lama, a sister for Emma 
and Zoe. 

DC STACPOOLC - On September 6 th. i 
198b. at Caiway Regional Hospital, 
to Anne and Richard, a daughter. 
EACAR Kate, on September a. 1986 to 
Clump tnee KeenleysMe) and DavM 
iKtmt at Birmingham MH. 

ECCLES - On Sep t ember 7. at 8 MH 
Munster to Fiona <nec Bates) and 
Oat id. a daughter. Sophie Charlotte. 
GANT ■ On September 6 th. at Princess 
Mary's RAF Hospital. Han on. to 
Jane inw Milne) and Ian. a son (Wil- 
liam Norman), a brother for 
Jennifer. 

GOODWIN ■ On S e pt emb er 4th. at 
Arrowe Park Hospital. Wlrral. to 
Katharine inee Street) and David, a 
daughter. Jennifer Kale, a shier for 
Sarah. 

GRADE - On 8 th September, to 
Amelia tnee Bowyer-Smyth) and 
James, a son. Luke. 

HAMPTON - On August 28th. at St. 
Thomas' Htnotial. lo Marlon (nee 
Meh lniand Marcus, a son. Jonathan 
Bene dict Melvin. 

KERR ■ On din September, to Serena 
■nee Vernon) and PM Up. a son. 
william Roger Bounce?. 

KUEAN - On September 9th. at St 
Teresa's. Wimbledon, la Patricia and 
Qirtstojmer, a daughter. Susannah 
Zoe. a sister to Jdysn. 

MILLER MUNDY- On September 7th. 
1986. at St Mary's Hospital. New- 
port. file of Wight, to Miranda inee 
BeUilllet and Mark, a daughter. 
MORGAN ■ On 7th September. toOare 
tnee Egan) and Charles, a daughter. 
Catherine Mary. 

O'KELLY . On September 7th to Julia 
and Martyn. a da u ghter, uuan 
Carol ine, a sister for Jessica. 

POTTS ■ On Tuesday. 9th September 
1986. at Ctos. Rwai Hospital, safely 
delivered to Anthony and tmbeL a 
daughter. Sarah Nichole. 

PUmUS - On September Sth- at 
Prmbury Hospital, to CharMOe urfe 
Carnegte) and Rfchard. a daughter. 
Annabel Diana. 

SEBASTIAN On September 2nd. to 
•\li-iamlia nice Crainerti and 
Miilmir. a daughter. ,\nna Slefanla 
Ionise 

SMITH - On September 9th. to Fiona 
and Julian, a son. 

TUCZNDHAT ■ On September Sth. to 
Siandine and Michael, a son. Henry, 
a brother lo Charles. Thomas and 
Gregory. 

WELLS - On September 9Ui. 1986. in 
London, to Terri utfe Nolan) and 
Ho), a son. Dan Matthew. 

WOOD • On September 8 th. In Braner- 
lon. USA. u Joanne utee Little) and 
Cnr. a daughter. Tiffany Ray. a 
sister for William and Thomas. 


MARRIAGES 


FIUHER r CAMPBELL - The marriage 
took Place on September 6 th. 1986. 
at St Martin's. Epsom, between 
David Wescott eider son of Mr and 
Mrs W w Flmcr. and Evelyn i 
Margaret, daughter of Mr and Mrs C 
A CampbeO. or E^scun. Sumy. 

LE FOCI POWER : COOK - Tbe mar- 
riage took place on August 16th. in 
■he Church of Our Lady and the Qi- 
gUsh Martyrs. Cambridge, between 
Dominic le Peer Power and Judy 
Cook Cformgty S im roonsl. Mr James 
WDsen was the best man and Mrs 
Alison Pa)ce the matron^f^ton otn -: 
Mr Daniel Simmons, with Miss cm 
Kenney and Mr Oliver Shnmons. 
wttb Mbs Naucha White, attended 
the bride. A reception was beM at 
Orchard Street C am bridge. 

MACDONALD i CRAWFORD - At SL 

Leonards Chinch. Ayr. on Friday. 
6 th September. 1986. by Rev. a 
Saunders. AUsdalrLamonL elder son 
of U- CoL and Mis R. P. MacDonald. 
Pulrossie. Rosemoum. Bairgowrte. 
to Catrtona Burns aSc.. younger 
daughter of Mrs E. Crawford. 7 
Longlands Park. Ayr and tbe late Mr 
David Crawford. Lynnhurst HoteL 
Johnstone. 

MACHM : LUNMN - The marriage 
took Place on September 6 th. 1986. 
at si Oswald's church. Durham Ctty. 
between Nigel Stuart, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs Derick Machta and 
Katherine Elizabeth, only daughter 
of Dr and Mrs Clifford Ltmraan of 
Durham City. 

WOODLEY : VDNtO - On September 
6 th. Quentin Nash Woodley, eldest 
son of Mr and Mrs R J Woodley of 
NortttwooCL Mkklletex to Carol 
Lucinda Virgo, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs O V Virgo of WhNNtfe. 
Kent. 


CUTTB. (teed Harder - On September 
3rd. 1986. tat Atlanta. USA. Huebond 
of Trudy and father of Syttoey. 
Charles and John, son of wnma 
Cuts. A Memorial Sendee was held 
oo September 6 th. at AH 
Ananta. 

do BLANBY- On 71h September. 1986. 
Kay. much loved wire of Rktad and 
loved by aU the family. peacefUty to 

her deep after long months of ffiness. 
Cremation at Haycombe. Bath, on 
Thursday, lift Septe m ber at S.40 
pra. Famfiy flowers only, but dona- 
boas. please. Mr impertai Cancer 
Ifes e areb Fata to E Hooper A Son. 
13 St J ames Parade. Bath. 

FRENCH . Frederick George DJ£. 
suddenly at borne, on September 6 th. 
1986. Modi loved husband of KHty 
and beloved father of Margaret and 
Christine. Donations to Cardiac 
Ward. Mayday Hospital or RJLF. 
Association Benevolent Fund. 

**AY - on September ah. peacefully 
In hospital at Cheltenham, after a 
tong mness. George Gray L.GJL. 
Rasi Master. Siockwel) Lodge. Fu- 
neral Shurdtogton Church. 
September lith. at 11.15 am. 


HAMUTON - CM September 6 th. 
peacefully at Ms home in Haywards 
Heath. Charles Hammert on . to Ms 
83rd year. Beloved husband of VMN 
and father of Desmond. MichaaL 
Karla and Gauan. Cremation mtvate. 
no flowers please. 


BUBO. 6 tr Edward Percy, aged SO 
years, sudd at ty and peacefUSy on 
September 7th. 1986. atSaodwich. 
A loving and much loved husband, 
father and granriteiher. Humorous to 
the end. Funeral Service on Friday. 
September 12 th. at the Parish 
• Church of SL dement. Sandwich at 
2.00 pra. fbOowad by private cram- ; 
Hon. FamBy Bowen onlF. but | 
donatioro. If d esired, to The POgrtms 
Ho s pi c e . CM ut ay. c/o Tbe Wat 
FUnerai Service. 20 HJgb Street- 
Sandwich. A Memorial Service to be 


****** - On September 6 Uu 1986. 
Peacefully. HRT (Harry) Sanaa, 
aged 72 years, formerly of Stabler 
Drive. Hove. Sussex. A beloved bus- 
baid. other. Mber-Maw- and 
vandOther. Funeral on Thuiaday. 
Sqdmber lllta. at The Downs Oe- 
roatorttnn. Bear Rd. Brighton, at 
11 JOanv. Flowers and enqxarie i 
p tenre. to Baba- A Sons. 82 Station 
AL Portdade. tel Brighton 418464. 

TBEVAN- On September 70t. sudden- 
ly to hospttaL David John Trevan 
B3. Bsc., aged 69 years of 
l iarpaiden. Hats. Husband of the 
late Wynna Elsie Tlrevan and dealy 
toved father of Christopher and 
Michael and grandfather of Cerian. 
Luke. Justin and Gavin. Beloved hus- 
band of Audrey and stepfather of 
Susan and Janet. FUnerai Service at 
the United Reformed Church. 
Harpender on Friday. September 
12 th at 12-30 sen. Famfly flowers 
«ly please DooaUona. if derired. to 
St Ftancto Hoaptce. Bafcharated. 


Brentwood School 
Michaelmas Term at Brent- 
wood School begins today. Mr 
J-R- Brown succeeds Mr JJ. 
Meadmore as bead of the junior 
school and Mr DJ. Edwards 
becomes Housemaster of Otway 
House. KJ>. Morton becomes 
head of school. Half-term is 
from October 24 to November 
2. Old Brentwoods Day is on 
November IS and Winter 
theatricals win be performed 
from December 1 1 to December 
13. Term ends on December 17. 
Desstone College 
Michaelmas Term at Denstone 
College begins today and ends 
on December 17. J-SJ. Cash is 
captain of schooL The Cantata 
Choir will perform Orffs 
Carmirm Burana on October 22, 
the Old Denstoflian a""»»i 
reunion is on October 25, and 
the 'Shakespeare play wfll be 
presented oo December 12 and 
13. 

Eton College 

Eton College opens today (Weds 
10th) for the Michaelmas Half 
with 251 new boys. The total in 
the school is 1,273. MLN. 
Wilkinson, KS, is captain of the 
school and W.J.C. 
Chrisiopberson, OS, captain of 
the Oppidans. The Eton Action 
Fair will be held on Saturday. 
September 27. There will be four 
performances of O What A 
Lovely War in the Farrer The- 
atre from October 20 to 23 and 
long leave will be from October 
25 to November 2. The Bishop 
of Buckingham will offi ciat e at 
services of confirmation in tbe 
college chapel on November IS 
and 16. St Andrew’s Day will be 
celebrated on Saturday, Novem- 
ber 29, and tbe carol service will 
be on December 7. School closes 
on December 13. 

Fettes College 

Autumn Term at Fettes College 


Hmstpierpotot College, Sassex 
Michaelmas Term at 
Hurstpierpoint College* Sussex, 
begins today and ends on Sat- 
urday, December 13. Mr Simon 
Watson, a housemaster from 
Hailey bury, takes over as head- 
master from Mr Roger Griffiths 
who has left to become deputy 
secretary of HMC. The school 
play. Savages, by Christopher 
Hampton, w31 be performed in 
the theatre on November 1 3. 14, 
and 15. St Etheldreda Sunday 
(old boys* day) will be on 
October 19. 

Kelly College 

Christmas Term at Kelly Col- 1 
lege bqgins today. Mr E.B. Halse 
has taken over as Housemaster 
of Courtenay House. Jonathan 
Kay is head of schooL The new 
chaplain, the Rev Keith Wyer. 
wilt be licensed by tbe Bishop of 
Exeter on Thuredary, October 
16. The confirmation service 
will be conducted by tbe Bishop 
of Plymouth on Saturday, 
November 22, and die Kelly 
Orchestr a and Choral Society 
‘will give a performance of 
Haydn's Imperial Mass and 
Vivaldi's Gloria on Saturday, 
December 6. 

Kfanbotam School 
Autumn Term at Kimbolton 
School begins today and ends on 
December 1 6. Old 
Kimbohonians* annual meeting 
dinner will be held on October 
25. Tbe preacher at die 
founder’s day service on Octo- 
ber 29, win be the Bishop of 
Winchester. 

Khpvoad College 
Autumn Term begins at 
Kmgswood College today with 
238 boys and 180 girls, and ends 
on December 1Z Half term is 
from October 22 to 29. Dr 
Judith McClure assumes 
responsibilities as director of 


years oi ns growm m uu» 
country. 

He was managing director 
(1957-61) and chairman 
(1969-75) of Scottish Tele- 
vision, and his influence 
abroad was also considerable 
through his chairmanship of 
the Thomson Foundation, 
with its role in the training of 
overseas journalists. 

James Milne Coltart was 
bom in Glasgow on Novem- 
ber 2. 1903. He left school at 
the age of 14 to become an 
apprentice coppersmith in a 
Clydeside shipyard. Mean- 
while, at night school he 
qualified as an accountant and 
before he was 21 secured a job 
as a cost and works accoun- 
tant in a Vickers subsidiary. 
Later he was chief accountant 
with the Weir Housing 
Corporation. 

At 32 be broke into commu- 
nications with his appoint- 
ment to the board ofa printing 
company, and from there 
joined Beaverbrook News- 
papers in Glasgow where be 
managed the Evening Citizen 
and the Scottish Daily 
Express. 

When Roy (later Lord) 
Thomson came to Britain in 
1955 and bought The Scots- 
man he sought out Coltart, 
whom be hired as his manag- 
ing director, charging him 



His retirement from these 
posts however did not signal 
the end of his involvement or 
influence in communications. 
From 1969 he was chairman 
of the the Trustees of the 
Thomson Foundation which 
has been responsible for the 
training, at its centres in this 
country, of countless journal- 
ists from developing coun- 
tries. in addition to starting an 
English language national 
newspaper in China, The 
Ch ina Daily : 

This influence in commu- 
nications industries overseas 
was underpinned by his 
chairmanship of Thomson 
Television International, and 
he was responsible for build- 
ing TV networks for the 
governments of Trinidad. Ja- 
maica, Kenya, Pakistan and 
several other emergent coun- 
tries. He was also a director of 
Thomson Press (India) Ltd, 
which created tbe large 
circulation Indian news maga- 
zine. India Today ; and was a 


with the task of restoring tbe director and chairman of Ai- 


paper to its position as lied Primers, Ba: 
Scotland’s national morning prints the Bangk 
newspaper. Cohart was 

Intheexpandingoperanons broug ht an exufc 
of the Thomson Organisation, mm approach 
Coltart was soon to become ^undertook, w 
Thomson’s nght-hand man. M $ca ^ sh TeUr 
Like Thomson, he had come k*. was as much 


begins today with 132 new studies. The senior literary 
Fettesians in the schooL Mr association play wfll be per- 
Christopber Ash, Mr Richard formed on November 27, 28 
Befl, Mr Peter Clarke, Mr and 29. The senior prefect is 
Nicholas McMahon, Mr Lynne Hutchings and the dep- 
Denbam Mather and Mr Jona- aty is Steven Wasawo. The 
than Tapp (on a one-year ex- Kmgswood Association annual 
change from Trinity Grammar dinner will be at the Beaufort 
School' Victoria) have joined Hotel, Bath, on Saturday, 
the staff! Mr A.N. Ridley has November 1. 


DEATHS 


ANDERSON - On Sqitem ta er 9th. 
1986. at home. Helen veronica, wife 
of Sir Kenneth Anderson KBE. CB. 
She wished her body to be offered 
for medical purposes and to be cre- 
mated without ceremony. Please no 
letters. Donations, a desired, to Che 
Imperial Cancer Research Fund. PO 
Box 123. Lincoln's Inn Ftetds. WC2A 
3PX. 

ATKINSON - On 6 th September. 1986. 
Peter WflJiam. dearly beloved hus- 
band of Laura, and fattier of Tony, 
after a long fitness. Funeral at 
Randalls Park Crematorium on 12 th 
September at 4.30pm. Donations to 
The Multiple Sclerosis Society. 

BOND-MOTH - After a short Qtaess to 
Hindi tngbrooke HospttaL Hunting- 
don. William Philip. Beloved brother 
of Max Bond-Smttb. and tong term 
friend of CJtve Huckie and many 
years cashier at Barclay's Bank. St 
Neds. HuntuxKton. Funeral Service 
at Cambridge CUy Crematorium. Fri- 
day. 1 2 th September at SJnvm. 
Flowers may be sent to Dank 
Easton Funeral Sender. The Lodge. 
Broad Leas. St Ives. Cantos. 

ROOCOCK • On September 8 th. 1966. 
suddenly but peacefully to hospital. 
Audrey de Maine Boocack (nee 
WlttofleML of High Croft. Hale. 
Cheshire. Beloved wtre of Brian, 
much loved mother of Beverley and 
Murray and devoted sister to Hilary 
and family- Funeral Service at the 
Manchester Crematorium- on Fri- 
day. September 12th. at 3.45 pm. 
Rowers If wished and enquiries to 
Messrs John G Ashton A Co. Church 
SL Altrincham, tei 061 928 7B16 l 
BROOKES - On August 6 th. Gordon 
Bertram, peacefully to hospttaL Hus- 
band of Joan and beloved father of 
□avid. Malcolm and Timothy, broth- 
er of Madge and unde of Heather. 
Cremation w» at Southern Ceme- 
tery. Manchester on Augsst XTOl 


4ttLB»lrara : aged 96 years, in Harpenden on Friday. September 
Zurich. Switzerland- 120 , at 12-50 cm. Ftandty Bowen 

HU - On September 7th. 1986. sad- only please. Donations, if derfred. to 
deniy tn Eastbourne. Commando- St Franc* Hoapice. Bofchamted. 
Janes Gordon Duke RJ* retired. 

Dear unde a t Gedda and AntbeS. VAMAS - On 60t September, tragically 
Funeral service at Holy Trinity In a car accfdail to cape Town. 

Onpdu Eastbomne on Monday. Marina, beloved daughter of Eugene 

September 16 th. at 2A6 pm. fok and GOim. 
lowed by cremation. No P owers. 

jjZT?**** . a . a y rcMl 1 ' WEAVE* - On September 6th. Mtfor I 

HOtT : 9° *? September. 1986. (retd) John R. A brave man. Funeral I 
Peacefully at ho me alto - a ioog at- has taken place. No letters ptesse. , 
ness. Edward Hariand. aged 79 

years- MUch loved by Ms vM 

Marcefla and an the Amity. No - On X 01 Serteraber. EBeen 


tetters please. Enquiries: Tapper ^oule. aged 74. peacefully to ha- 
Funeral Service. Tel: Poole. (02023 £"*'’• Widow of the late Alfred 
673X64. Durham WeUs <19773. mother of ten. 

HOWARD - On 8tfa September, peace- SSfEES; 

ftdly at LyndbutsL Moira, to her £ 

84th year, widow or Hubert and be- gyn^fandiyand^wbo knew ter. 

loved mother of David and Lyn. ?} g*^A**^ ^Sa5? h ?3«; 

Requiem Mass at 11.30am at St- 

Maty* RC Church. Alton on Mon- H*** 

day. 16th Septem b er. Flowers to 

AJH. Cheater A Son. Romsey. 734g ^,. 1 ,° opaac ? , 

HUFFBUMANM - On Sth September. “*•“* Socle * V 

Albert Edward Jack of Ratfamtoea. ^ 

84 Martdon Road. Patent nn. passed 

peaMftdly away aged 76 yeam._ U»v- WWT AKER. Lake -On September 8th. 


than Tapp (on a one-year ex- 
change from Trinity Grammar 
SchooL Victoria) have joined 
the staff! Mr A.N. Ridley has 
taken over as Head of 
| Carrington. Stephen Baker is 
bead of school and captain of 
rugby. Andrew Waddell and. 
Alison Hannah are deputy 
heads of school and Emma 
Watson is captain of hockey. 
Commemoration is on October 
4 and term ends on December 
16. 

denafanaad College 
Michaelmas Term at 
Glenalmond begins today and 
ends on Friday, December 12, 
when the carol service wfll be 
held. HaiPtenn will be from 
October 30 until November 4. 
Tbe new design and technology 
centre win be formally opened 
by the Hon Alick Bnchanaa- 
Smitfa. Minister for Energy, on 
Saturday, October 4. On rnday, 
October 3, there will be a dinner 
in Perth for OGs and their ladies 
and the London OG dinner wfll 
be held on Tuesday* December 
2. Tbe Bishop of St Andrews wfll 
officiate ax tbe confirmation 


up from nowhere, and a bond 
of trust and friendship soon 
developed between the two 
men. 

Coltart also helped set up 
Scottish Television of which 
he became managing director 
in 1957. And when, in 1959, 
Thomson bought the Kemsley 
newspaper group, which in- 
cluded The Sunday Times* 
Coltart moved to London to 
become managing director of 
Thomson Newspapers Ltd, 
tbe hub of the Thomson 
communications empire in 
this countxy. When this group 
also acquired The Times* fae 
was for ten years a director of 
this paper, too. 

From 1964 until 1967 
Collar! was deputy chairman 
and managing director of the 
Thomson Orcmisati on- 


lied Primers, Bangkok, which 
prints the Bangkok Post. 

Coltart was a man who 
brought an exuberant, almost 
gleeful, approach to every task 
he undertook, whether it was 
at Scottish Television, where 
he was as much impresario as 
organiser, or in his travels 
throughout the world to im- 
press on those in influence in 
developing countries the im- 
portance of sound journalistic 
and technical training in their 
own nascent mass media. 

His public utterances on 
these and cognate matters had 
a strangely attractive in- 
formality which was apt to 
give his hearers the im- 
pression that their problems 
had been diminished. 

In 1967 he was made an 
Hon LLD by Strathclyde 
University. 

Coltart married, in 1927, 
Margaret Shepherd, by whom 
he had one son. She died in 
1956 and he married in 1961, 
Mary Fryer. They had one son 
and one daughter. 


MR RICHARD FREEMAN 


Madrinri P re pa r ator y Srhii o l 
Moulsford Preparatory School 
celebrates its silver jubilee dur- 
ing the coining academic year. 
Autumn Term begins on 
Wednesday. September 10. 
Adam Westcott is bead boy and 
Marcus Day is captain of soccer. 
Prize giving is on Thursday, 
September 25, when the prin- 
cipal guest will be Sir Ashley 
Ponsonby. Lord lieutenant of 
Oxfordshire. The jubilee ball 


Mir Richard Broke Free- 
man, MBE, the eminent zool- 
ogist and Darwinian scholar, 
died on September 1, aged 71. 

Richard Freeman was born 
in London on April 1, 1915, 
and educated at BradfieJd 
College and Magdalen Col- 
lege, Oxford, where he took a 
First Class Honours degree in 
Zoology. 

During tbe war he served in 
the Ministry of Agriculture 


and die London OG dinner wfll P*agboun»e College 
be hdd on Tuesday* December Michaelmas Term • at 
2. The Bishop ofSt Andrews will Pangboume College begins to- 
officiate at tbe confirmation day. The board of governors has 
service on Saturday, November been joined by Mr RP. Wright 
22, and the preparatory schools (OP). The Old Pangbounnan 
dioral evensong wflj take place match will be on Saturday. 


--Ml r.-j... ■ -»-r ITIUUJUJ ruuil-uiiuic 

3nd Fisheries as Pest Control 
the cabaret Halfterm is from 9™“^ “ . *** appointed 
October 24 to November 3 and MBE for his services as a 
the assessment for 1987 entry major in the Home Guard, 
will take place on Saturday, In 1 947 be became a Jectur- 
November 8. The senior carol er in the Department of 

fSSh^iTSdiSSSS Zoology at University College 
D«^M 7, an ends on London, eventuafly being ap- 

3 pointed Reader Emeritus m 


an. scientist or mere collector 
can foil to refer to it continual- 
ly. Charles Darwin — A Com- 
panion (1978) was a Darwin 
encyclopaedia: a prodigy of 
detail, but wonderfully read- 
able and amiable. 

As a man to whom family 
connections were a source of 
interest and entertainment, be 
devoted much effort, despite 
the effects of a stroke, to 
producing an absorbing gene- 
alogy, Darwin Pedigrees 
(1984), disentangling the rela- 
tionships of several centuries 
of eminent or obscure Dar- 
wins and Wedgwoods. 

P.H.Gosser-A Bibliogra- 
phy (with Douglas Wert- 
heimer, 1980) brought the 
same meticulousness to a 


Plllilll 


UtiiL \ 


BULLA RD - On 260) August, tn 
Tampa. New Zealand. RtctianI H M 
Bullard OBE. TD. formerly erf 
Slabbing. Essex and Head of 
Overseas Department. London 
Chamber of Commerce. 

MINE ■ On September 3rd- al the 
Cheshire Home. Hydan Heath. 
Godalmuig. Stuart (Bob), peacefully 
alter a «lnUy We. 

BURROWS - On September Stti. 1986. 
peacefully to a mining home. Ruse 
Gladys Burrows, formerly of 
Wimbome. Dorset. Cremation 
Service private. 

GABOON ■ On 4 Uj September. 1986. 
James Maurice Cabom. 4 The Limes. 
Napier Rood. Edinburgh, and at The 
Department of Forestry add Natural 
Resources. University or Edinburgh. 
Much loved husband, father and 

grandfather. 

CARLTON - On August 31sL in an air- 
craft accident in Zimbabwe. Michael 
Richard and Kaihryn May of 
westerham. Kent Creraattoc at 
Beckenham Crematorium on Mon- 
day. September 15th. at 340 pm. 
Famuy Dowers only and cnquMes lo 
Francis Chappell and Sons. 552 
Crofton Road. F amb orough. Kent. 
Tei (0689) 53277 or donaztons to 
Game Conservancy or Cancer 
Research. 


tog husband of Dorothy and beloved 
tether of Michael and Paul. Funeral 
Service at Christ Church. Paignton 
on Monday. 15th September at 2L30 
pm. followed by private cremation. 
Family flowers only please. Dana- 
t tons. tf desire d, to MuscuW 
Dystrop hy Grow- 

■0GNES. Dorottv Grace - On 7lh Sep- 
tember. aped 89. beloved wtte of me 
tele 8 C Hughes, mother of Michael 
pad Virginia, much toved Mm to her 
grandchildren. Cremation on 12m 
Septem ber, at 2-00 pn at 
Easthampstead Crematorium. Enqui- 
ries to M es s rs Lo v egre ro. 4 Town 
Square. Btadutefl. Series. 

MACLEOD SHTII - On September 
6th. peacefully. Katherine bene 
<Ktm) aged 62. Dearly beloved moth- 
er of Felicity. Funeral Sendee at 
Hyde Parish Church. Winchester, on 
Monday. September 15th. al 2.00 
pm. Flowers to Jno Steal & Son Ltd. 
Chestl House, Chesll Street 
Winchester. 

t m cOMSON • On September 8th, 
1986. Peacefully In Ct an Mdt. Sur- 
iey. Donald Joeqrti. Dearly toved 
father or Alan and Josle and much 
loved grand£atber of Cure and 
, Broca. The Service wffl take ptace at 
1 Guildford Crematorium, on Friday. 
September 12th. at 2.00 pm. Flowed 
to CranMSh Funerals. Qrantetti 
0*85 278 786. 

MJtEMlH - on sth September, very 
peacefully at her home. Helen May. 
aped 88. formerly of toe CWS. 
Leman s uveL London. 

Mcmat Omen D. aged 77 yean, 
of PhfUddptUa PA. USA. peacefully 
al 4am Co September 6th. 1986. In 
Warminster PA. USA. Beloved ra- 
ther of wtniam and Margaret and 

much loved nmtttlher of Camada. 

Alea nda- and James. 

MXON - On Septenber 8th. 1966. 
Joyce, peaceftdty at Addenbrookei 
HOSPltaL Cambridge. Beloved wife of 
WUUam and dearest mother erf 
Andrea Wd Douglas. Funeral pri- 
vate. No Powers please, tan 

donaueoa. s desired, nuar be sent to 
Addenbrookes HOSPRBI MRI Scanner 
ApueaL 

PURSER. Oaoerty Raymerj - On Sep- 
tember 8th. peaceftdly to hospttaL 
Maty Ctaesmo-. aged 95 years. Wid- 
ow of the Rev H J Rayroer and 
formerly of toe Rev W C B Purser 
M-A.. KJ^I.. and dear mother of B81. 
Dorothy. Ruth. Mike and Carol. Fu- 
neiai Service at St Andrew's 
Qnreh. Burnt Ash Lane. Bromley, 
on Thursday. September 18th at 
2 - 00 pni. followed IV enmtxbn -ax 
Lewisham Crematorium. Rowers to 
57 Welbeck Avenue. Brantley, ordo- 
natloos to The Church to Burma. 
C/D Mr A H Archer. Francis Chap- 
pell * Sous. 468 Bromley Road. 
Downitam. Bromley. Kent Bfti 4PP. 


aged 9 months, dearty loved second 
son of Chris and Sue. and brother or 
Afaaander. Private tenfly Ansel in 
Ombtiara. on Thursday. Our special 
thanks to Dr Frances Howard and afl 
her team on Ward FI at Frtodey 
Park HospttaL to Frankie vero 
(Luke's Godmother) and to afl our 
family and many Mends for their 
tremendous love and support tMs 
year. Family flowers only please, but 
donations tf desired, to the teasdlatrlc 
Research Fund, c/o Frimley Park 
HospttaL Nr Casnbertey. Surrey. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 

■ntXXY ■ A Thanksgiving- Sendee for 
toe life of Rupert Btriey wtfl be held 
at St James* Church. Piccadilly at 
noon on Monday. 22nd September. 

DOUGHTY - A Memorial Service for 
Dame Adelaide Ba&teu Doughty, 
wtd be held on Thursday. October 
2nd. 12.00 noon, at Holy Trinity. 
Brampton. 


IN MEMORIAM - WAR 

VMMHAM, C and UMR, M - RJLSC. 
Died when P.O.W. September 10th. 
1944. Remembered Forever. 


on Sunday, October 19. 
Haberdashers’ Aske’s School 
for Girls, Ehtree 
Term at Haberdashers’ Aske’s 
School for Girls, Elstree, begins 
today with Susan Warren as 
bead girl and Rachel Hoey as 
her deputy. Tbe autumn concert 
will be bud on October 23 and 
the Haberdashers’ Schools’ mu- 
se festival on November 10, 
both in tbe Prevett HalL St 
Catherine's day wfll be cele- 
brated on Friday, November 28; 
tbe Bishop of Stepney wfll give 
the address at the commemora- 
tion service. The carol service 
will take place ax St Martm-in- 
the-Ftelds on Thursday, Decem- 
ber I! and term ends on 
December 12. 

Harrogate College 
Harrogate College reopens to- 
day for tbe Autumn Term with 
400 girls, 97 in the sixth form. 
Anna-Rosa Calvert is bead of 
school, Judith Baxter and Hel- 
ena Graham are lacrosse, swim- 
ming and athletics captains. The 
confirmation service, to be 
taken by the Right Rev R. 
Emmerson in the school chapeL 


Fangboorne College begins to- residence and was acting head 
SSt^fnS^Mf^wriiS of department in 1971-fe. 

(OP) J The Sid Pangbounnan 

match win be on Saturday. ^niraJist Iron) childhood, 
November 15 f and the music published papers on a 


Taxonomy. For many years he notoriously difficult subject 
was warden of a hall of British Natural History Books 
residence and was acting head 1495-1900: A Handlist record- 


competition on Saturday, diversity of creatures; but 
November 22. The major drama gradually his interest in oatu- 

ninHiminn Hmtoitt trim. * nf ml - — • r>. 


produenott. Hengist, King qf rai history, especially in Dar- 
tihn rwS win \ became the dominant 

uecemoer lu to 1 j id E/nuoe mtsinn nFhit liA 
Hall and term ends with the pa ^_ J&S “??«. , n 
carol service on Sunday, 7™ of Charles I)ar- 

December 14. w,n (1965) formed the founda- 

cuim.xu .1 i H on - 9 f man y modern 

editmnof each of the luUu?s 
Lyon Fbck-Hezm is deputy. The P 00 ^ 5 *. m a J' 8 )' tiial had never 
school play is on Friday, ® een done for a scientist and 


December 12 and Saturday, 
December 1 3. The Old 
Queenswoodians’ and 


day. only rarely fora literary figure. 
Old he created new standards of 
and precision and focussed atten- 


parents’ carol services are on the °,. eve ^ . textuaI 


ed more than 4,000 titles: 
here, too. “Freeman 
numbers” are coming to be 
cited as an essential part of the 
description ofa book. 

Above alt he became a sort 
of one-man international 
clearing-house for Darwinian 
research. Any query, even an 
idle one, would bring a mirac- 
ulously prompt and thorough- 
ly researched reply, even when 
this had become a labour to 
him. 

Richard Freeman will be 
keenly missed at his college 
and 1 around the world. His 
friends — and this must in- 
clude anyone who had occa- 
sion to consult him about 
books or natural history-— 
will remember his punctili- 
ous accuracy, his sharp wit, 
and his luminous kindness. 

He leaves a widow, tiie 
zoologist Dr Mary W hi tear, 
and two sons. 


iwcuu wjoiwviaaareonue (.kaMM ># j j — . — — — — i*«».uiusi 

last day of terra, Tuesday, ^nanges. it needed, perhaps, a ous accuracy, h 
December 16. zoologist s eye for detail. and his luminou 

_ , _ _ The second edition (1977) He leaves a 

tod Ghhu SchooL jras SUl| more formidable: no zoologist Dr M 

MdSLiTta.'ateteN -<),«> sons. 

SIR SPENCER 

Uaesborough. Nicholas CsJ le MARCHANT 

cuauTof rugS. Sp^davk Marchant, this time to tile 


is on Sunday. December 7. Half- caprain of rugby. Speech day is up friTtHe- 
term is from October 22 to on October 1 6 and the guest of I c HighPeak district 

October 29. Term ends on honour at prizegiyidg wm be Sir I tLV 6 ™?' "Offi 1970 to 

Austin Pearce. The new 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 

S ALAZAR. Atrffon Manta - Historian. . 
Special Lecturer. King's College, 
London. Lift Feflow Intennoonai 
Btagraptucat AwocfaUon. Fowder 
Member Bmtsh SoOety ReuBtssaoce 
Judies. Assoc l aatefi raspsiM* or 
Great Britain and Inland, bt con- 
stant krvtng menxjry of my beloved 
husband. Candida Cute An an 
Pufg). 


GOUSN 

ANNIVERSARIES 

W* t URCHANT - On Sentember 
10th. 1936. al B c rt wc Jl Parish 
Church. Warwickshire. Stanley 
Rotaert to Kbthleai. Now at 
Huhrerstone. We of Wight. 

MMCHimr a EADC . On Sestember 
10th 1936. at Bertcswefl Parish 
Church. Warwickshire. ■ Stanley 
Robert to Kathleen, now of 
Hidrerstone. We of WlgltL 


October 29. Term ends on 
Wednesday. December 17. 
Howell's SchooL Denbigh 
Autumn Term begins today at 
Howdrs School. Denbigh. Miss 
Penelope Hughes (St Andrew’s) 
is prime warden and Miss Carol 
Had wen (St George’s} is deputy 
prime warden. Half term will be 
from October 25 to November 
2. There will be a school open 
day on Saturday. October II. 
Old Howelltans who have lost 
contact with school are invited 
to write to the headmaster. 

Reed's School 

Autumn Term at Reed’s School 
began on September 9 and ends 


honour at pnzegrving will be Sir 
Austin Pearce. The new sports 
ground at Bradstone Brook wfll 
be officially opened by Mr Bob 
Hiller on October 4. Any (Rd 
. Guikifordians who have not 
received an invitation should 
contact the school office as soon 
as possible: 

St Aadries School 

Term begins ai St Audries 

School today and . ends on 


this time to ihe Leader of the 
nf T. — “.SST"* House, Mr Francis Pym. until 

mSSvSa? fo^dbyiUtea.O.u.^ignin 

fled on Tailer than most MPs. he 
f° u,d have been a domineer- 
icVf IS . I ZL 0n J ?! luar y 1 ^ w hip, but it was in his 

i™ 1 ' -^ Jcate r . ai aoi L and nature to win co-operation 


- — 2. atUn ? *9 wm co-operation 

contaa the school office as soon *n ihe Sher- from back-benchers by. charm 

as possible: roresiere. becoming a His ability to get on with 

Sc Aadries Scbool . 32ft. in £ 

Sdlool ft mkT 60*“"™ -SKteSreSi!-^ Pantes. 

December 10. Helen Case win ?Svr5f S u Westminster would never have believed 
be head girl and Elaine Cheng be ??® e MP that such a high Tory would be 

deputy head girl. The sixih-fora) ^ ^igfa Pak . in 1970 and On friendly terms with the left- 


wilJbe held on October 15. 7216 Secretary in 1972 under 
Musical events loci ude a violin three Treasury Ministers, 
recital by Elizabeth Collins on He was appointed Cnmn. 

NMMnhw Hi mil MWhmmnrM _ _a^uucu _ L.Omp- 


w»n ger, Mr Dennis Skinner. 

Apart from politics, he was 
a racehorse owner and. a 



on Deottfiber 17.Diechemtoy iS^TfiSdSrSSS * Md — 

and computer building and by the St John MiliSy Band at Househohf in H )^ 07- Ma i esly s wi* ffiejnbarg of the Royal 

electronics workshop wiU be St Bartholomew’s Hospital, family dunqg his period as 


opened on September 26 by Mr 
Geoffrey Patue. MP. The school 
carol service will be in 
Guildford Cathedral on Decem- 
ber 14. 


London, on December 2, and ' 
the choir ax the National Trust 
carol concert at Dnnster Castle 
on De c ember 7. Tbe carol party 
will be on December 9- 


appointed Opposition Whip, Comptroller 

Gave jg 5 

government. survivJfh^? S 0 ^: ho 

In 1981 he reverted 10 PPS, SSSSn lbear ,w0 













THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 


19 


THE ARTS 



* Television 

Xi Tartan 
; ?s! earns its 


Acofrions of an anti-Scot- 
tish f bias In the BBC's 
jnvjamming always seem a 
Hitt^F unfair in light of the base 
fact that the balk of its 
awKtence is Sassenach. Mean- 
*bil le, it is left to the regional 
ind&endent company, STV, 
to /scoop the pool by 
forking its flagship d rama 

British standards, 

Is commercial hot 
j. Its fast (rating at- 
a domestic asdience in 
excess of 14 million and was 
sold to 20 countries — al- 
though one wonders bow many 
(non- Anglophone) viewers 
who have inherited a misty 
of Billy Connolly, 
shortbread and Ibrox 
Park toappreciate the 
( programme's Scottisimess. 

As the first victim of the 
present series had timp to 
observe before she was turned 
into floating carrion, 
“Glasgow's a bit like 
Chicago". With its blend of 
magnificence and squalor, not 
to mention its tradition of 
hellish violence, it is certainly 
no mean city in which to set a 
police procedural. 

The actual feel it gives of 
Glasgow —even the brave new 
PR's dream of glowing pink 
? fa tenements— is decidedly thin- 
* ” ner, and it can be no accident 
that Glenn Chandler's sedu- 
lously viewer-friendly script 
eschews all but the most 
intelligible dements of dialect, 
Jimmy. 

The drama itself follows the 
well-tried formula of craggy, 
antagonistic older cop (Mark 
‘ McManus) and handsome, 
perkier younger cop (NeO 
Duncan), with a coeval brute 
(Stuart Hepburn) thrown in 
far good measure. There is 
also a brace of glossy bru- 
nettes and a misunderstood 
tiponog man (Alan Camming) 
whom we saw last night leap- 
ing into the river to evade the 
flatties: they will keep trying 
to pin this nasty doable mur- 
der on him. Stiffs proliferate. 

The strengths of the pro- 
gramme are its clear 
characterization and (mostly) 
careful plotting. One simply 
cannot wait to discover' 
whodunnit. 





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Theatre 


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SkdSwSr 



Power and the passion: Glenda Jackson (left), Patricia Hayes (centre) and Joan Plowright 

Maternal tyrant’s iron rule 


The House of 
Bernarda Alba 

Lyric, Hammersmith 


The Lorca trail after two 
superb Spanish-language 
productions in Edinburgh, 
now leads to Ha mm er sm ith 
for the last of bis three rural 
tragedies played in a new 
translation (by Robert David 
Macdonald) which ax last 
breaks the stranglehold of the 
Lorca Estate. 

The production, resplen- 
dency cast and directed by 
Nuria Espert, could sport no 
more impressive credentials; 
and it is, perhaps, only the 
memory of the Edinburgh 
shows that leaves you feeling 
that English actors still have 
some way to go. 

It is reported of Lorca that, 
during a reading of Bernarda 
Alba, he proudly declared after 
every scene: “Not one drop of 
poetry- Reality." Instead of 
putting poetry into the lines he 
put it into the structure and 


setting: the waterless village, 
the invasion of the young men 
at harvest time, the stamping 
stallion in the yard, and the 
impenetrable walls of the 
house itself all dynamic sym- 
bols. reinforcing the unnatural 
seclusion which Bermuda's 
class and bigotry enforce upon 
her wretched children. 

The piece is Lorca's most 
complete and controlled ex- 
pression of the plight of 
Spanish womanhood, also 
forecasting the long silence of 
fascism. 

In essence, however, the 
I^ay comes down to the image 
of Bernarda the maternal ty- 
rant holding absolute sway 
over her five daughters; 
plunged into mourning at the 
start, and finally locked into 
perpetual captivity by the 
suicide of the youngest ghl If 
ever a play demanded a 
coherent playing style to 
match the decorum of the 
writing thisis ft. And ft is here 
that Espert’s version fails to 
deliver. - - 

From Ezio' Frigerio’s sfct. a 


massive white-washed wall 
with grilled windows suggest- 
ing a prison yard, you expect a 
severe spectacle conveying the 
unvarying routines of the 
inmates. In fad. once the 
initial mourning ceremonies 
are over, the girls lose the 
sense of group identity. Some 
are hardly characterized at all; 
others, like Deborah Findlay's 
jealous hunchback, and Julie 
‘Legrand as the marriageable 
eldest, are played in depth. 

What is missing is any sense 
of shared choreography, in- 
stead, Espert takes refuge in 
busy work routines and in 
sending the group scampering 
over the stage whenever there 
is any gossip going. For 
frustration and desire to work 
in Lorca's terms, they need to 
penetrate a barrier of iron 
reserve. 

Overseeing this squabbling 
brood is Glenda Jackson’s 
Bernarda, a ram-rod backed 
martinet leaning on an ebony 
cane, who seems to come from 
an utterly different world. 
Surrounded by naturalistic 


Concert 

Crisp, 

German 

efficiency 

Bavarian RSO/ 
Davis 

Albert Hall/Radio 3 


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With the massiveness of 
Bruckner and the novelty of 
Hartmann reserved for their 
later Prom, you might have 
thought that the Bavarian 
a Radio Symphony Orchestra 
* would be tempted to use their 
first one as something of a 
limbering-up exercise. What 
bcuer combination than a 
good dose of neo-classical 
Stravinsky to sharpen the wits 
and some reliable, well-known 
Beethoven to acclimatize to 
the surroundings? 

Actually, it was not like that 
at all. for the Bavarians were 
marvellously responsive, re- 
laying every subtlety in Sir 
Colin Davis’s beat. In 
Stravinsky's Symphony in 
Three Movements the result 
was a performance which was 
pugnacious where it needed to 
be but always absolutely crisp, 
is. The strings never hinted at the 
- scratch i ness that can bedevil 
such music, while the in- 
disputably Germanic charac- 
ter of both brass and 
woodwind was no impedi- 
ment to the work's underlying 
expressivity. 

Yet even this music-making 
was capped by Sir Colin's 
reading of Beethoven's 
"Eroica" Symphony. His 
broad tempo at the outset 
seemed even a little too daring 
at first, but the orchestra 
sustained and shaped the line 
beautifully, lending the woric a 
not inapposite Brahmsian 
quality. More importantly, it 
also restored all the tragic 
3l nobility so often lost in the 
' workaday performance. 

Stephen Pettitt 

• Scottish Opera opens its 
1986-87 season at the Theatre 
Royal. Glasgow, on Septem- 
ber 30. with its first produc- 
tion of Carmen . Graham Vick 
directs and John Maucen 
conducts. 


Festival,where the prizes are announced today 



speech, she delivers long arcs 
of classically sustained lines. 

She leaves you feeling that 
anyone with such un- 
questioned authority would 
have no need to raise her voice 
so much. But if harsh egoism, 
social pride, and voluptuous 
fascination with suffering and 
death are Spanish qualities, 
Jackson is Spanish as much in 
her courteous hospitality to a 
respectable neighbour as in 
ho- ecstatic caB for the village 
mob to slaughter an un- 
married mother. 

Another side of Spain ap- 
pears in Joan Plowright's 
performance as the bawdy old 
servant Foncia, who has 
sharper eyes than her vigilant 
mistress for what is happening 
under her roof but who still 
breathes the air of the field s 
and olive groves. 

To see Plowright imparting 
a tasty bit of scandal to. 
Bernarda, so that it changes 
from a healthy joke into a 
prurient secret, takes you to 
the heart of the play. Left 
alone together, they play 
marvellously. So, too, does 
Patricia Hayes in themnazing 
role of Bermuda's mad old 
■mother, last seen cradling 1 a 
toy lamb while the act of 
darkness is taking place under 
the stars. 

Irving Wardle 


Caroline Moorhead talks 
to Booker Prize w in ner 
Penelope Fitzgerald 
(right), whose new 
book, Innocence, is 
published this week 

A modest 
mistress 


of words v 


Graham < 



Penelope Fitzgerald is not the 
lucky kind of writer to whom 
subjects come naturally, head- 
on. without ambiguity. 
Rather, they crop up un- 
expectedly. sneak up on her 
out of other matters, arrive 
when least expected. Inno- 
cence* published this week, 
might never have come to her 
at all had she not decided to 
spend a few spring weeks in 
Florence, with the idea of 
identifying the flowers in 
Botticelli's Primavera. and 
found herself instead absorbed 
in the marital squabbling of a 
comessa with whom she was 
lodging and her doctor hus- 
band from the south of Italy. 

. The flowers turned out dis- 
appointing: Botticelli had left 
them to assistants with no 
keen eye for botany — though 
the absence from the painting 
of the wild iris, now to be 
found all over the place, made 
her speculate, with a true 
scholar's curiosity, about the 
date it was introduced to Italy 

— and she discovered that the 
university gardens, supposed 
to contain an example of every 
Tuscan plant, had been given 
over to vegetables instead. 
However, the conlessa's quar- 
rels provided her with another 
sort of thread, and Innocence 
came to be written about 
“people who don't fit too well 

— as many don\ I suppose". 

Though convincingly Ital- 
ian in reeling. Innocence is not 
based on detailed research, 
over-attention to such mat- 
ters. “I don't think novels are 
about information" she says. 
“If you wanted to know about 
Florence, you'd read a guide 
book." She was more worried 
about getting the Iialians right, 
as people, not comic charac- 
ters with funny accents. 

Penelope Fitzgerald is one 
of those rare people who 
discovers a real talent only 
when well into middle age. In 
the Fifties she helped edit a 
literary magazine called 
World Review, but it was not 
until her husband fell ill 10 
years ago that she thought to 
entertain Him by writing 
“what, in my opinion, men 
most like reading: thrillers and 
history". The first two books 


were a biography of Burne- 
Jones — whose red and pink 
glass windows at Birmingham 
Cathedral were the first things 
in her life that bad struck her 
as beautiful - and what she 
insists on calling a “mystery", 
as if the word “thriller" were 
to give it too much dignity, 
centred around the 
Tutankhamun exhibition, 
which she has always sus- 
pected was made up not of 
original objects but or fakes. 
Thinking she stood more 
chance with a publisher not 
known for its crime list, she 
took it to Duckworth, who 
had not got one. but who 
accepted her book. 

Then she moved towards 
straight fiction. "In spite of 
being so old and of such a 
literary family. 1 was very 
green. I didn't know you were 
supposed to write five thrillers 
before readers knew you. Any- 
way. 1 couldn't think of four 
more." 

Among the literary family 
was her father. E G. V. Knox, 
editor of Punch . and the 
Catholic priest and writer 
Ronald Knox, and later she 
turned to a biography of the 
family. She wonders now why 
literature did not seem ob- 
vious to her earlier, instead of 
a somewhat haphazard pro- 
gression from Somerville Col- 
lege to wartime work in the 
Ministry of Food and then the 
BBC. After the war, married 
and soon mother of three 
children, she stayed at home, 
living at Chelsea Reach on a 
houseboat until it sank. 

In 1979. Penelope Fitz- 
gerald won the Booker Prize 
for fiction, with her second 
novel Offshore. It has altered 
her life considerably. It was 
the year the prize money 
reached £10.000. awarded free 
of tax. and though she was 
embarrassed to find herself 
lined up in a row at the prize- 
giving as if still at school, with 
Kingsley Amis in the queue 
nearby, it has made her life as 
a novelist more possible. But 
she has not given up the 
coaching at Westminster Tu- 
tors. to which she says she is 
addicted: "Perhaps I ought to 


slop. I'm an impostor, you 
know. I have no certificate. 
Anyway, l'm like w-ine in a 
bottle: I think I'm 
deteriorating." 

About her plans and about 
the future she is. as on all 
topics, modest. Penelope Fitz- 
gerald has that endearing 
combination of extreme self- 
deprecation and tbc natural 
sharpness of someone whose 
entire life has revolved around 
intelligence and the use of the 
mind. She has just completed 
a number of introductions for 
Virago books and says that, 
while she pictures other writ- 
ers dashing theirs off between 
coming back from the theatre 
and going to bed. she takes 
ages to do hers and worries 
incessantly about whether 
they are good enough. A plan 
to write a biography of 
L. B. Hanley, who was a 
friend, may be abandoned as 
may all biography, which she 
says has become alarmingly 
competitive. 

What there will be. though, 
is another novel. To get going, 
she needs a title, a first 
paragraph and a feeling about 
how the book will end. After 
that, it is endless work, on old 
envelopes, losing bits, enjoy- 
ing best of all the dialogue, 
which she sees as the moment 
in a novel when "you feel 
dose to the people and hear 
their voices". Not. however, 
conversation, which she finds 
hard, and for which she ad- 
mires Lawrence, who made it 
sound easy to do. 

Penelope Fitzgerald divides 
her time between three rooms 
at the top of a friend's house 
near St John's Wood, with an 
old-fashioned gas-fire and 
postcards pinned to the walls, 
and her older daughter's house 
in Somerset. “I don't realty 
know where I live. It doesn’t 
worry me. I know it's become 
immoral not to be busy, but I 
think I like pottering." In 
Somerset, she is in charge of 
the garden. “Gardening, ! 
think, is even worse than 
writing. There's all that worry 
about things not being out and 
vegetables not doing what 
they ought to do." 


Parity of black and white: Kaizfi HayashTs To Sleep As If To Dream 

Tributes and nostalgia 


The signs are that we are on 
the verge of a wave of nostal- 
gia among film-makers for the 
cinema's own past. The 
Taviani Brothers have moved 
away from their familiar Ital- 
ian pastures to locations in 
Holywood, for Good Morning 
Babylon, a tribute to the 
pioneer days of D W Griffith. 
The Japanese evidently have 
the nostalgia craze badly: both 
Japanese films in Venice were 
tributes to movie history. 

Yoji Yamada's Land of the 
Cinema is frankly a piece 
d 'occasion made to celebrate 
the SOth anniversary of the 
Shochiku Rim Company. (As 
director of the “Tora-San" 
comedies, the longest-running 
film scries in history. Yamada 
is the company's current star 
director). The film takes some 
pains to reproduce the phys- 
ical ambiance of, the film 
studios and urban movie 
houses of the Thirties: the 
problem is that the scenario of 
the film also seems rooted in 
the cornier commercial 
conventions of half a century 
ago, as it mixed sentiment and 
farce in the saga of a poor gift's 

rocky road to stardom. 

Kaizo Hayashi's To Sleep 
As If To Dream is more 
eccentric and more sympa- 
thetic. ft is clearly made with 
minimal financial resources, 
and by a director uncorrupied 


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by any studio experience 
whatsoever. Hayashi is, 
though, clearly passionate 
about old films, and looks 
back longingly to the purity of 
the days of black and white 
and silence and of “a dis- 
cretion which excluded any- 
thing that was not pleasing”. 

He lakes one historical fact 

- that the first time an actress 
played a female role in a 
Japanese film was in 191 8 — 
and around this weaves a 
fantastic detective story 
involving a kidnapping and an 
ancient diva. For the histori- 
ans the film has a special 
charm: Hayashi has found one 
of the last surviving “benshi" 

— the performers who stood 
by the screen in Japanese 
cinemas, accompanying the 
film with colourful verbal 
descriptions, not only in silent 
days. Sul right into the early 
years of sound — and permits 
him once more to dem- 
onstrate this lost an. 

Massimo Mazzucco is a 32- 
year-old Italian director who 
began bis career as a fashion 
photographer, but turned .to 
film direction three years ago 
with a minimal-budget film- 
Summertime* which was seen 
at a number of festivals. This 
year a second film, with more 
substantial resources, was one 
of the more notable films in a 
generally disappointing Ven- 
ice competition. 

Mazzucco s Romance seems 
characteristic of a new spirit in 
Italian films, involving a less 
formal approach to structure 
and performance and. 
concomitantly, a rebellion 
against the long-established 
Italian practice .of post-syn- 
chronism. The credit title for 
“direct, sound recording*' is 
given great prominence on . 
Romance as on another Ital- 
ian compeiiton. entry, Pupi 


Avati’s The Christmas 
Present. 

The new style is obviously 
stimulating to the actors. Wal- 
ter Cbiari returns to the screen 
in what is perhaps bis best 
performance, worthily 
partnered by a stage actor, 
Luca BarbareSchi. They play a 
father and son who meet after 
a long period of estrangement 
and a lifetime of suspicion. 
The relationship which grows 
between them in their three- 
day meeting is not so much 
liking or even sympathy (the 
son is a low-grade yuppie, the 
father a drop-out: both are 
moral cowards) but tolerance. 

The selection of the Venice 
competition films is tradition- 
ally eratic. Invariably and 
inexplicably some' of ine best 
films (this year for example 
Maria Luisa Bern berg’s fas- 
cinating Miss Mary, from 
Argentina) are relegated to 
non-competitive sections with 
queer names like “Spazio 
Libero Degli Aulori" or “Ve- 
nezia Giovani"; while films 
appear in competition that are 
quite unworthy of entry. This 
year, for example. France 
accounted for five out of the 
28 competition films. Four of 
them — Rohmer's Le Rayon 
vert, Resnais's Melo, 
Tavernier's Round Midnight 
and Angdopoulos's The Bee- 
keeper — certainly merited a 
place, as the awards ev- 
idenced: the fifth, however. 
Jacques Do i I Ion's La 
Pnritaine would have been 
best left in obscurity. Modish 
and pretentious in casting and 
concept, it has Michel Piccoli 
as a crazed iheatre director. 
Sandrine Bonnaire as his 
returning prodigal daughter 
and a lot of dispensable lit- 
erary talk. La Pnritaine had 
the single distinction of the 
most hostile reception from 
the Venice audience. 


66 Pop stars are just spoiled brats 
surrounded by sycophants who get 
drunk and behave appallingly in 
nightclubs .. .W john blake of the 

DAHY MIRROR 

66 He was one great guy but pan of 
his greatness was that he was not a 
saint. V McCartney on Lennon 

66 A tree impressionist. 9 ? on 

CHARLES BRONSON 

66 If your father was failed by a pig 
faffing on his head it is certain that 
whatever fame you earned you would 
always be announced in terms connec- 
ted with your fathers demise 99 on 

GRAHAM GREENES SHORT STORIES 

66. HoISs Brown? Thais cough 
medicine isn't it? 99 RONNIE WOOD ON 
DYLAN 

66 He warned me offYokooncelLook. 
thisismychickf Just because he knew 
my reputation. 99 McCartney 

66 Blacks got the blues through being 
kicked around and subjected to the 
horrors of slavery and whites got 'em by 
listening m records, homing, taking 
drugs and not washing 99 on janis 
J0PUN 


66 in the notebooks 
of New Yorks agents 
Lenny Henry is now a 
name next to which 
manydollarsignscanbe 
doodled Won ienny 

HENRY 


66 Vie ought to be 
grateful m the Russians, 
rather than trying to blow 
them off the 

planet! W BOB DYLAN 


66 And at number three. 
Metamorphosis of Narcissus 
by Dali 99 on the wes 1 

BESTSELLING POSTCARDS 


66 The state of the nation viewed 
through a suburban parlour window. \ 
Mather in the kitchen Britain in the 
drizzle. 99 onbiuybragg 

66 At fast Alexander The Great can 
stop wandering around Mount 
Olympus am! moaning at the other 
Greek immortals that hes never had a 
song written about him. 99 on iron 

MAIDENS NEW RECORD 

66 Perfectly balanced -chips on both 
shoulders. 99 on billy joel 

66 An LP so rampantly bulging with 
barechested virility that people got 
pregnant just by reading the sleeve 
notes. 99 onwhaml 

66 As the old Peruvian folk 
song so movingly says. I'd 
rather be a jukebox than a 
fifing cabinet iionrycooder. 

660/7 which album sleeve 
do binoculars hang from the 
head of the mule. 99 

Q QUIZ. 

66 Written! Is that London! 

SINGER TED HAWKINS ON HIS 
FORTHCOMING TOUR. 


66 The world they inhabits notable 
for unfriendly animals and sluggish 
rivers. 99 onrem. 

66 ff someone took one of your 
wedding pictures and wrote 'funeraf on 
it. you'd tend to feel a bit sorry for the 
guy 99 McCartney on lennon 

66 If evera country neededscaringitb 
America. 99 author alan moore 

66 Half the stuff I dob someone eises 
idea 99 bob Dylan 

66 Joe (Strummer) and! usedm write 
everything together. Then we wrote 
sitting in separate parts of the same 
room. Then we got to the stage where 
m were sending lyrics over to each 
other thmugh our manager 99 mux 
JONES 

66 We are to Virgin what the ravens 
are to the Tower of London, nobody 
knows what good we do -but if we 
weren’t there is just wouldn’t be 
right 99 andy partridge on xrc 

66 Q magazine is the modem guide to 
music and more. This months issue is 
available at your newsagents now 99 

DAVE HEPW0RTR 


OVER 100 LFs REVIEWED AND RATED. 



**, PVK.'S* • :* 


J”*: ! -i' V '^3 P C.vy •/. ' 



FREE INSIDE: 56 PAGE REVIEW OF THE BEST MUSIC ON COMPACT DISC! 


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20 


Kinnock 
appeal 
for more 
peers 

By Sbeilfl Gunn 
Political Staff 

Mr Neil Kinnock, the La- 
bour leader, is pressing Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher to create 
more Labour peers to help to 
deal with the extra workload 
in the House of Lords. 

Labour’s fiontbencb peers 
are sa Rering, like the Conser- 
vatives, from the long hours 
and complex nature of the 
Government’s heavy leg- 
islative programme. 

Mr Kinnock is campaigning 
for the creation of more peers 
with expertise in particular 
subjects rather than peerages 
given as a reward for long and 
loyal service in the Commons 
or trade unions. 

Experts are needed to scruti- 
nize the redrafting .of Bills 
during the committee stage. 

Lord Cledwyn of Penrhos, 
leader of the Opposition in the 
Lords, yesterday blamed the 
Government for the shortage 
of talented peers. 

“The House of Lords can 
only justify its existence if it 
does its job as a revising 
chamber effectively," he said. 

Mrs Thatcher is said to be 
sympathetic to the problems 
of Labour peers. 

But she is freed with the 
more pressing problem of 
finding effective Government 
spokesmen in the Lords after 
the resignations of two of her 
most valued Ministers, Lord 
Elton of Headington and Lord 
Swinion. 

Some of her most highly- 
regarded spokesmen in the 
Lords have come from outside 
Westminster. But most of the 
spokesmen are hereditary 
peers. 

There also has been irrita- 
tion in Government circles at 
the growing influence of the 
Lords on important Bills 
which has led to a series of 
embarrassing defeats. 

Government ministers and 
several backbench MPs were 
learning their fate last night as 
Mrs Thatcher and Mr John 
Wakeham, her chief whip, 
began reshuffling the middle 
and lower ministerial ranks. 

An announcement from 
Downing Street of all the main 
changes is expected later 
today. 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY XFPTFMBFK 10 1986 




Collector’s 
reluctant 
auction 

Britain's only collection of 
antique tradesmen's handcarts 
wiD be reluctantly sold at an 
auction of unique flavour in 
Cambridge this Sateday. 

More than 30 carts are to be 
sold by Mr Gerry Backhouse, 
including these examples of 
distinctive commercial ve- 
hicles dating from about 1800, 
which he is displaying above. 

Mr Backhouse, who has 
been collecting and restoring 
the carts for 15 years, no 
longer has the space to keep 
them at his home in Ipswich. 

He has beat desperately 
frying to avoid despexsing his 
collection, believing they 
shonkl be housed in a museum 
bat has been unable to find ore 
interested. 

“There will never be an- 
other collection like it, because 
tbey are Just disappearing," he 
said. “I'm distressed and 
rather angry that no one has 
shown the interest." 
(Photograph: Chris Harris) 


Russian at centre of Daniloff row 

Spy case legal moves open 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 

Mr Gennady Zakharov, the 
Soviet spy the Russians appar- 
ently wish to exchange for Mr 
Nicholas Daniloff, was in- 
dicted on espionage charges in 


New York yesterday. 

In a few days he will be 
arraigned, the legal procedure 
under which a defendant and 
his lawyer appear before a 
judge who can then deride 
whether to grant bail The 
Reagan Administration want- 
ed to use that occasion as a 
free-saving way to allow the 
judge to release Mr Zakharo v 
into the custody of the Soviet 
Ambassador in Washington 
pending triaL 

The Administration last 
week proposed that in return 
the Russians release Mr Dani- 
loff immediately and uncondi- 
tionally and allow him to 
return to the US. The Admin- 
istration maintains this would 
not amount to a swap, as Mr 
Zakharov would still stand 
triaL 

The affair began with Mr 


Zakharov's arrest on August 
23 when be was caught by 
agents of the Federal Bureau 
or Investigation after meeting 
an employee of a military 
contractor and accepting das- 



WmM 

Gennardy Zakharov: Indict- 
ed on spy charges. 

sified US defence documents. 
Mr Zakharov tried to recruit 
the man when he was a stu- 
dent three years ago, but he 
bad instead agreed to work 
with the FBL 


By arresting Mr Daniloff 
Washington believes Moscow 
did its best to concoct an 
equivalent Neither man has 
diplomatic immunity, and 
both have been charged with 
accepting classified docu- 
ments. Intelligence sources 
say the KGB would be anx- 
ious to obtain the return of Mr 
Zakharov as swiftly as poss- 
ible. 

Little is known about the 
previous background of Mr 
Zakharov, aged 39, a physicist 
who was working for the 
United Nations Centre for 
Science and Technology for 
Development The centre's 
activities are ill-defined and 

The FBI said he had paid 
the student thousands of dol- 
lar for unclassified informa- 
tion. After the student gra- 
duated in 1985 Mr Zakharo v 
offered to pay for his graduate 
education mid en-couraged 
him to find a job with a high 
technology company. 


Reagan ‘spy’ warning 
ignored by Kremlin 

Continued from page 1 


released by Tass alleged that a 
hysterical anti-Soviet cam- 
paign had been whipped in 
Washington over the case of 
Mr Daniloff whom the agency 
dismissed as a spy “caught 
red-handed in Moscow." 

Tass, whose commentaries 
reflect the view of the Krem- 
lin, asked why Washington 
had made such a fuss over 
what it claimed was the “banal 
failure" of an agent 

“The powers that be in the 
United States badly want any 
pretext to evade, for the 
umpteenth time, a discussion 
of what really is the 
centrepiece issue not only of 
the Soviet-US relationship, 
but of international life m 
general — we need to end the 
arms race, keep it out of space 
and deliver mankind from the 
threat of a nuclear 
Armageddon,", it said. 

Earlier, Mr Gennady 
Gerasimov, the chief Kremlin 
spokesman, alleged that the 
row in Washington over the 


affair was being used as a 
“pretext" by those in the US 
Administration who wanted 
to - spoil Soviet-American 
relations. 

Yesterday afternoon, Mr 
Daniloff aged 52, was allowed 
his first visit by his wife and 
an American consular official, 
Mr Roger Daley, since being 
formerly charged with spying 
on Sunday under Article 65 of 
the Soviet Criminal Code 
which lays down a maximum 
sentence of death by firing 
squad. 

Mr Daley said- he had told 
Mr Daniloff correspondent of 
US News & World Report, of 
“the deep concern" of the 
American Government, and 
of the personal letter sent to 
Mikhail Goibachov. the So- 
viet leader, by President 
Reagan. 

• BONN: The Soviet Em- 
bassy in Bonn said yesterday 
that Moscow regarded the 
arrest of Mr Daniloff as a 
“routine case" and did not 
want it to hinder preparations 
for a superpower summit 


Muslims 
abduct 
American 
in Beirut / 

Continued from page 1 t 

lance, “was arrested (sieg 
noon-time ioda> IslaW 
Beirut.. We found oul’the'Sl 
educational mission 
mere disguise for hi 
pionage efforts. We dr)ng 
ered Reed’s game." 

In fret Mr Reed is 
founder and director 0 
privately-financed Lebaifc- 
Zniernaiional School in te 
Muslim Sanayah district ty 
converted to Islam in ordeal 
marry his Syrian fiancee. \ 

It is standard practice on L 
part of Islamic Jihad to cl£ 
that its victims are spiesandt 
west Beirut the mere present 
of a Westerner can still pro** 
voke suspicion, however inno- \ 
cent his reason for being here. \ 
But the Americans are going ; 
to view this kidnapping; with 
foe gravest concern. With the 
release of the Rev Lawrence 
jenco by Islamic Jihad in Jul>>. 
after 19 months of secrer*' 
imprisonment the US Gov- 
ernment had hoped that the 
remaining three kidnap vic- 
tims known to be alive, 
including Mr Teny Anderson, 
foe AP bureau chief here, 
might soon be released.' 

If the Lebanese could grasp 
at any optimism for their 
future yesterday, their hopes 
lay behind foe 10 ft of sand- 
bags that surround the offices 
of foe Beirut race-course on 
the city's frontline. For H was 
in these inauspicious .head- 
quarters- ttat the Lebanese 
Cabinet - naif -of whose f 
members are Christian and 
the other half Mu Mm - met 
for a second 'round of 
reconciliation talks 
The ministers agreed that 
all the illegal ports\held by 
Christian and Muslira\mlitias 
should be closed douita and 
that the nation's pr ticuml 
harbours should be L.Viaedf 
back to Government control 
by the various militia groups 
now in charge of them. 

For 1 1 years, the Lebanese 
Government has' been de- 
prived of income from port 
taxation, while the Christian^* 
Phalange, the Druze 'Progres- 
sive Socialist Party, the Shia 
Muslim Araal movement and, 
for three years, the Israeli-paid 
South Lebanon Army col- 
lected millions of Lebanese 
pounds in illegal taxes. 


< 


T- 

i- 


a 

.-■j 

*1 


J4 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 

Princess Anne attends one 
day of the Olympic Yachting, 
organised by the Royal Yachting 
Association. Weymouth Col- 
lege. Dorset. 9, 1 5. 

The Duke of Kent opens a 
new tractor plant for CASE IH, 
Doncaster. 1 1.05; and. as Vice 
Chairman, the British Overseas 
Trade Board, attends the In- 
dustry Year Exhibition, Cutlets’ 
Hall. Sheffield, 1225; later he 
visits Endeavour Training, 
Glen brook Lodge, Bamford, 
Derbyshire. 2255. 

New exhibitions 

Aberdeen Ideal Home Ex- 
hibition; Aberdeen Exhibition 


and Conference Centre. 

of Don; today until Sat 12 to 
Sun- 12 to 8 (ends Sept 14). 

John Farieigb; wood en- 
gravings; Asiun clean Museum, 
Beaumont St, Oxford; Tues to 
Sat 10 to 4, Sun 2 to 4 (ends Oct 
19 ). 

Embroidery 77: embroidered 
pictures by Sari Byrne. Phyl 
Evans, Dora Lockyer. Rita Risk. 
Pat Mummery and Angela 
Weeler, Alpha Gallery. Burton 
Cottage Farm. Higher Burton, 
East Colter Wed to Sat 10 to 1 
and 2 to 4 (ends Sept 20). 

Artists 303; Butlin Gallery. 
Dtllingion College, flmmster, 
Somerset; Mon to Sun 2 to 5 
(ends Oct 2) 

Fourth Reading Business ex- 
hibition: The Hexagon, Queen's 
Walk, Reading; today and to- 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,147 


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ACROSS 

i Sharper needle-pusher 
needed by sail-filicr (7-6 V. 

9 Possibly logical way for a 
picture assembler (9). 

10 They sound bright Muslims 
(5). 

11 State how fesl the maiden 
appears ( S). 

12 Vetch container's net weight 
(41 

13 Put up whh nuisance (4). 

IS Eccentric device, say. for 
repelling insects (7). 

17 Eating away foe last of the 
cheese, the rat! (7). 

18 Accommodation for cattle 
for about, say. a lOQ dinars 
(7k 

20 The Venerable’s back is 
trapped, moreover (7J. 

21 The Prince tnRuddigbre (4). 

22 One's sphere of operation 
that is included in the 
following pages (4). 

23 In retracing Norse poetry, 
student gets muddled <5>. 

26 Younger son working for 
commission? (5). 

27 Swing is awkward — no elas- 
tic left (9). 

28 As a one-afT sort of plane, 
foe Jumbo is on its own 
(5.S). 


DOWN 

1 A failure, in foe stria legal 
sense, to many (9,5). 

2 The whole Muslim world is 
on strike (5). 

3 Via which Chesterton went 


to Birmingham one night 
16.4). 

4 Bouncer is eye-opener to 

champion (7). 

5 American houseman sounds 
to be in a whirl (7). 

6 Well up in extravagant 
sentiment (4). 

7 Good player gets one to go 
downhill (3J2.4). 

8 Set terms in dive variable 
for a bit of entertainment 
(14). 

14 Nonsense from fools on the 
beer ( 10 ). 

16 This brings things home to 
the customer (4,5), 

19 Abstract sculpture's base 

propped up by religious 
book (7). 

20 The son of visual aid to 
make you see double? (7). 

24 American prosecutor re- 
ceives the push — what a 
situation! (5). 

25 The guns swivd to sight foe 
deer (4). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17J46 



Condse Crossword page 10 


Sept 12). 

Exhibitions u progress 

Work by John Beilany; See 
tisfa National GaDery of Model 
Art. Bdford Rd. fdnbatg 
Mon to Sat JO to 5, Sun 2 to 
(ends Sept 21 )l 

Landscape watercolours l 
James Taylor Towneley Hi 
Art Galleiy, Burnley; Mon to F 
IQ to 5.30. Sun 12 to 5 (eru 
Sept 14), 

The Danish Show; painrin 
and sculpture by eight Danii 
artists; Cartwright Hall, List 
Park. Bradford; Tues to Sun 1 
to 6 (ends Sept 28). 

The Danish Show; work by ] 
Danish sculptors; Yoricshii 


6 (ends Nov 2) 


Oct 18) 

History of C 
archaeological finds, 
and prints; Art 
James s Rd. Dudley; M 
10 to 5 (ends Sept 20). 
Last chance to see 


photographs by James 
ilious; Oxford Gallery, 23 
St. Oxford. 10 to 5. 
Music 

Recital by Susan F 
(cello) and students of Hi 
High School; Museum an 
Gallery. Chequer Rd, 
caster, I. 

Talks, lectures 

You. your camera a» 
Lake District, by John B 
Lake District National 
Visitor Centre, Brockhote, 
dermere. 1 . 


ter, 1.15. 

General 

Antiques Fain Brighton Cen 
ire. Kings’ Rd. Brighton. 10 to 5 
Antiques Fain De Grey 
Rooms. St Leonard's Place, 
York. 3 to 9. 


' New books — hardback | 



iiwmBreyEfflCTsswiujmiraKiMraaMTXxrapuDBBneaoiBUfflUK: 

1- Another Voice, by Auberon Waocfh (Fkeihom, £a95) 

rtf ~ Going Sotoi by Roald Dahl (Cape, £7,95) - . ...... ^ ■>. 

k; Lomnnnrm, by Nicholas Shakespeare (Sidgwick & Jackson,- £1 235) 

5 No End nla Lennon. Leading Articles from^ Tte Timas under Charles Doug- 
las-Home, edttd by Gerakf Frost (Alliance for the irntitute for European 
Defence & Strategic Studies. £7.95) 

toegMed Swoon fetferalo Hex Danrtwhni. and a few answers, edhed by 
fo Rupert Hart- Davis (Faber, £935) 

ri The Old Devls, by Kingsley Anas (Century Hutchinson, £9-95} 
is Ja Sills Le Carter, 1716 Sketchbooks of Picasso (Thames & Hudson, £36) 
Tfto ®*®el Bonnets, The Story of the Angfo-Scotbsh Border Reivers, by 
gs Georro MacDonrtd Fraser (Coffins HarvU, E1Z95) ' 
h The virtues of Aristotle, by D.S. Hutchinson (Houttodge & Kagan Paul, 

1. £1235) 

0 TlssoL by Christopher Wood (Wektenfeld & Nfcdson, £3J) PH 

l Best wines 

The pound 

to . In a blind tasting of S 8 dry 
white Bordeaux wines, the 
* following wines which are still 
> available, were judged excellent 
» value: _ 

Bank Bank 

Buys Stos 

AusMtoS 2 JSk 2385 

Austria Sch 2245 21 

BafokaaFr 6000 63.00 

Canadas 2.115 ZS25 

OanmartcKr 1202 11.42 

Trots Man line SunruuOfl, 

“ Tanners of Shrewbury (0743- 

FMandMhk 7J6 72b 

Franca Ft 1036 088 

F 52421). £3.15. or Peailing & 
« Cawdron (0284-5948), £3J5; 
t Foacaad Saertgoon Sec, Vio- 
loria Wine Co. (04862-5066), 
£2.69; Chateau Cafllou 1983, 
Champagne de Villages (0473- 
i 56922). £4.83: “R" 1983 Cha- 
_ teau Rieassec, Peter Dominic 
b and Bottoms Up (0279-26801), 
£6.15; Pavilion Blanc 1981 Cha- 
teau Mareane, Comey & Bar- 
row (01-251 405 IX £20.70; 
s Doauune de Chevalier 1980 
i Graves, Champagne de Villages 
t (0473-56922X £24.95. 
r Source: Wine, September 1986. 

Germany Dm 3.1B 0015 

Gtmc&Dt 20000 19300 

HoogKongS 1105 11 J 6 

Maori Pt 1.155 14B5 

Italy Lka ‘ 220000 2000JH 

Japan Van 24400 230.00 

NsthsriandsGM X59 040 

Norway Kr 1140 1080 

Portugal Esc 226 00 21440 

South Africa Rd 470 400 

Spain Pta 20600 i96J» 

SwadonKr 1072 1017 

SwteartaariFr 239 ZAS 

USAS 135 136 

Yugoslavia Dor 60000 70000 

Rttai Mca bxtac 384J 

London; Tha FT tndax dosed up 74 at 
1331.1. 

Travel information 

. Anniversaries 

British Telecom’s pre-re- - 
corded Travelinc service gives 
regularly updated information 
on travel in Britain and on the - 
Continent, including details of 
.weaiher conditions, strikes or e 
other problems likely to affect * 
travellers. Balk 01-246 8030; 
Road (including coach services): 
01-246 8031: Sea: 01-246 8032; - 
Ain 01-246 8033. 

Births: Sir John Soane, archi- 
tect. Goring-on-Tbames, 1753; 
Mango Park, explorer, Fowl- 
shieis, Scotland, 1771; Franz 
WerfeL, writer. Prague 189a 
Deaths: Ugo Foscolo, poo, 
Tumham Green. Middlesex, 
1827; Mary WoOstonecaft God- 
win. feminist London. 1 797. 


Weather 
forecast 

A ridge of high pressure 
extends southeastwards 
over much of the United 
Kingdom. 


6 am to midnight 


London. SE, central S, SW. NW, 
mtrai N England, MkRands, 
Channel Islands, S Wales: Mainly 
dry, sunny periods, early fog 
patches; watertight and variable; 
max temp 16C (BtF). 

East Angfea, E E ngland: Sumy 
nervate, isolated showers: wind 


N Wales, Lake District, Me of 
Ian, SW Seattand, Glasgow. Ar- 
vfl. Northern Iraiand: Mainly dry, 
intervals, early fog patches; 
TNW; max temp 15C(59F). 

NE England, Borders, EdMurgh, 



Orkney, S hetl a n d: 
ds. showers, some 


Sunny 


Outlook for to morrow and Friday: 


m 


02 7 am 


Son sate 
723 pen 


231 pin 947 pm 



High Tides 


Lighting-op time 


b-btue sxy: bc-Mue sky and cloud: c- 
aotiayz o ovw-casc r tog: d-drtzzle: b- 
haQ: raist-rafet: r-raln: mdow; £t>- 
tbunderstorm: p-showers. 

Arrows show wtiuJ direction. wtnd 
a unwi) circled. Temocrature 
grade. 


AM 

HT 

PM 

i 622 

05 

030 

5.45 

4.1 

025 

1145 

11.8 


327 

05 

388 

11-30 

108 

1181 

1005 

5.0 

1024 

3.18 

02 

329 

9^ 

48 

984 

5.05 

43 

526 

420 

3/ 

423 

237 

5 3 

006 

10-49 

64 

1120 

1034 

02 

10.55 

7.16 

S3 

/A7 

332 

H-9 

388 

2-02 

23 

007 

4 27 

4 A 

429 

1049 

63 

11.12 

9A4 

63 

O.UB 

10.08 

3 A 

027 

9.12 

5.1 

923 

1131 

12 

147 

3jS9 

4A 

427 


58 

384 

3.14 

43 

042 

1 050 

88 11.14 

8.16 

5.1 

8.48 

4.17 

42 

429 


Teas 

Wttonhon-Nzs 
Tide measured In metres: 1m=32808fL 


HT 

06 

3.7 

32 

105 

42 
6.1 - 
4.7(1 

4.6 - 
a8 a 

5.0 \ 
63 

ao 

43 
83 
2A 
43 

6.1 
62 
32 
43 
12 
4.4 
53 
43 
BA 

4.7 
4.1 


f ’em to tOB am 
8T5pmtt606am 
it 838 pm to 635 am 
8.18 pm io 621 am 


Around Britain 


Sun Ram 
tvs in 


Roads 


Wales and West M4: Inter- 
mittent lane closures on E and 
westbound carriageways be- 
tween junctions 46 and 47 
(Swansea). MSe Various lane 
closures between junctions 24 
and 26 near Taunton. A43b 
British Telecom work at Bittou 
(die A420 junction); temporary 
lights at Will abridge HilL Avon. 

The North: A 1 (M): Various 
lane closures on southbound 
carriageway between Buriree(W 
of Darlington) and Sinderby (W 
of ThirskL M63: Major widen- 
ing scheme -at Barton Bridge; 
various traffic restrictions and 
lane closures operating. A49: 
Roadworks at Tiverton. S of 
Tarporiey, Cheshire: single line 
traffic. 

Scotland: A803: Patching] 
work causing long delays be-J 
tween Glasgow and 
Kirkintilloch, between 8 am and 
4 pnu avoid if possible. M9: 
Surt rag-bound slip road dosed 
at junction 4 (Latballan) and thej 
Edinburgh-bound carriageway 
is dosed due to resurfacing work 
between junctions 5 (Cad® 
Brae) and junction 4 
(LathallanL A822: Single line 
traffic in North Bridge Street 
Crieff Perthshire, with lights; 
debus likely. 

Information supplied by AA 


Yesterday 



Times Portfolio Cold rules are as 
follows: 

1 Thw» Portfolio Is tree. Porchase 
of The Times is not a coodiuoa o t 
UUnt pan. 

2 Times Portfolio na comprises a 
croon of puttuc companies whom 
■wares are mart on me Sock 
Eaaum and Quoted bi The Times 
stock Exctunoe prices paoe. The 
companies co mm m no that a» wtn 
change from day (o day. The IH 
twnwi is numbered l - 44) ts divided 

into four r an do mly dbnbuied mourn 

of It shares, event Portfolio cart 
contains two numbers from each 

• 


3 Time* portfolio >dfridcud' wffl be 

the figure in peace wtuai represent* 

me optimum movement ta priest (Le. 

the largest incre as e or lowest toss) of a 

conujtaanon of eight (two from 


randomly dtstnbcaragroup within the 
44 snareu of the 44 shares wncfi an 
agtfSE djy eompro. The T 1 n« 

o The dans r dividend wm be 
announced each day ana (he weekly 
dividend wui be announced each 
Saturday In The Times. 

s Tunes Portfolio ns aoa deans of 
the dady or weekly dividend wnt aba 
be avoUaote (or inspection at me 
offices of The Times. 

6 If the overall price movement of 
more than one ranrnmatKxi of shares 
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TeUpfisss Tha TtM PorttaHo caws 
■a# utMim sy usM SmTsu 




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but they oust nave your card and call 
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far failure lo contaa the cleans ocnce 
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pheaue to both datty and weekly 
ahtornd anims. 


Temperat u res « tndoay yermthnr c, 
cloud; I, far; r, rain: a, son. 

C F C F 

*13 a Qu a macy s 14 57 
S 15 S9 tn ren ms <1152 
s 15 59 Jersey S IB 61 
a 15 59 London 1 14 57 
S 14 57 RTnchstar * 14 5 7 
Bfinburgb c lS 90 None u B e cli 57 
~ T 13 55 Mton * 14 57 


Cardiff 


Cucumber alert 


Cucumber growers are raged 
to be on the alert following the 
discovery of a virulent disease 
which attacks cucumbers and 
makes the crop immnrketable. 

Several cases of cucumber 
downy mildew have been found 
in foe Lea Valley area of Essex 
and Hertfordshire^ The disease, 
which attacks foe skin of the 
plant, can spread quickly, and 
Ministry of Agriculture sci- 
entists urge growers to report 
any suspicious symptoms 
immediately. 

‘ The disease is believed to 
have been introduced through 
grafted plants imported from 
foe Continent m July. It is foe 
first outbreak of foe disease in 
Britain since 1977. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge win be raised 
today at 1 1.45 am. 12.10 pm. 
3 JO pm and 6 JO pm 


cnM^NEwsPAPEjts Lagan. 

nSLAMNO UmOpn Post {Print. 
■» Umusd- or x VMnia Stmt. 

fcy’To 0 w iS£gii Sr £r; 

towgypg « the PMOKlOr. 


EAST COAST 
Sc ai ho m x 

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62 
73 

s SShcoa st x 

FoBcastofto 6.1 

33 

42 
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Bogoor ft 3.6 

Southpsa 33 

Samtoasi 13 

Shabkin 13 

43 
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Exmoufb 33 

Tsj gm a outh 25 

Toitof 2.1 


09 

08 

3.5 


WE5TL .. . 
ScSyMas 
Mawquay 


12 


Max 
C F 

12 54 sumy 
14 57 sonny - 

14 57 sunny 

15 59 sunny 

16 61 aumy 

16 61 sunny 

17 63 sunny 
17 63 bright 
17 63 bright 

16 61 bright 

17 63 bright 
17 63 bright 
17 63 cloudy 
17 63 gaudy 
17 63 Clou* 
17 63 cloudy 
17 83 bnght 

17 63 cloudy 

18 64 bright 
x x sunny 

17 63 bright 
.17 63 douAr 
17 S3 ctawS 

17 63 Cloudy 

18 64 dus 

19 66 bright 
17 63 cloudy 

17 63 A* 

17 63 dto 


Tanby 

CofarynBay 


Sun Rain 
bra in 
x 

5j0 - 

9.0 - 

9.7 - 

73 - 

ENGLAND AND WALES 

4.1 

SlS - 
13 - 

€3 - 

8.3 - 

73 .01 
52 21 
4.0 


BtoaMpt 

Bristol 
CwiSffl 


B*poo( Adpt 


WcU-o-Tyna 


93 

93 


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17 63 bright 

16 61 bright 

14 57 sunny 

17 83 stray 

15 59 sunny 

17 S3 bright 

16 61 sunny 
16 61 sunny 

16 61 sunny 
15 59 sunny 
IS 59 sunny 

17 63 sunny 
IS 59 bright 

14 57 sunny 

15 59 sunny 


SCOTLAND 


Than 
Stornoway 


102 

S3 

103 

mo 

43 


14 57 sunny 

15 59 sunny 

16 61 Miny 

13 55 scanty 

14 57 doun 

|2 27 13 55 showsrs 

66 .11 13 55 showarg 

13 - 14 57 cloudy 

72 22 14 57 showers 

SL Andrew* 7A 22 16 Si showers 

EAbugh 104 - 16 61 sJSP 

NORTHERN ffELAM) 

M - 15 59 sunny 


Wick 

KMoaa 


Tbaaa are Monday's ftgorec 


Abroad 


AjKdo 

Mrnfi ri 

Atec'dck 

Aigter 

AnsTdra 

Athens 


■emit 

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a 32 90 DuMto 
? qf « gntow* 

» 28 82 Para 
s 36 97 Remce 

th 22 72 Ponchtf* 


- C F 
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r . I 3 55 

f 24 75 


MDOAIft C. doutt a, drizzle; r. tor; * fog; h. haft r. Min: s. auc en. snow; ft. thunder. 
C F c F . C F 

! S H ^togn* F 14 57 Majorca i 26 78 Roma 

— f 14 57 Mates* « 14 57 Sat ring 

5 27 61 Mato f 27 81 SPukr 

f 15 59 BMVma C 13 55 SPrtsco 

s 24 75 Modes IT f 21 70 Seatte^ 1 
c 22 72 Kzn~* lb 31 88 Saoul 

t 27 81 Mftan- 3 25 77 ~ 

b 15 59 Monbeaf* 

6 25 77 Moscow* 
c 17 63 Munich 
$ 27 81 Nabob ! 
f 12 54 Nnlea 
T30 86 NDeM 
r 14 57 N Yoder 
a 26 79 Mca 
S 36 97 Mo 
a 25 77 Paris . 

8 30 86 Pak%! 

• 24 75 Parity 
e 22 72 
e 17 83 
s 13 


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Bocrm- 

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Capa 7b 


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» 2 £ Gknter 
HaMokt 
c 73 81 Hong K 

IZiBi 

1 24 75.. 

S 29 84 J 

t 31 68 Lisbon 
s g§| Locarno 
4 25 77 bBmiw _ _ 

* 21 70 LAo&g- c 22 72 
C 8 48ltogri f 2i 7E 


da J* 


& IS 59 sa&Sn 
f 27 81 

8 26 79 T«S 

b 35 95 Taitarife 
C 19 86 Tokyo 
e 21 TOTerantn* 

1 13 55 Tunfa* 

® if ValandB 
1 kanc*w»» 

* 21 70 Venicar 

M3 35«Snm 

* 8 *6 Wntsaw 
*»« WtohW 
S 42108 
0 23 73 


‘ Cento* Monday’s figurante iatntanhbto 


s 23 77 
I 28 79 
! 30 88 
> 13 55 
e 16 81 g* 

» 16 61 V 

s 26 79 
1 29 8 « 

* 25 77 
c 27 81 
S 18 84 
3 30 06 
r 28 79 
r 15 59 

* 24 75 
J 19 66 
« 16 59 
a 20 68 ■ 

C 7 45 
C 18 61 






i 












BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 35 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 39 


WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


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Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


TuVXliLr.i 


FT 30 Share 
1331.1 (+7.4) 

FT-SE 100 
1673.4 (+6.8) 

Bargains 

21,711 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4860 (-0.0010) 

W German mark ; 

3.0604 (-0.0191) 

Trade-weighted 

71.4 (-0.4) 

Profits up 
at Savoy 

The Savoy Hotel reported a 
pretax profit of £5.03 million 
for the first six months of this 
year, up from £4.73 million a 
year earlier. Trading profit 
rose from £4.51 million to 
£4.73 million. 

The company said that, 
; after a bad August, bookings 
■ - for the remainder of the year 
■looked satisfactory. Directors 
would be disappointed if re- 
sults for 1986 fell short of 
those for 1985. Mr Donald 
1 Main, Trusthouse Forte's 
finance director, said if THF 
gained control it would aim to 
double earnings. 

Chalker attack 

Mrs Lynda Chalker, Min- 
ister of Slate at the Foreign 
Office, yesterday attacked 
Japanese trade surpluses and 
warned the European Par- 
liament that the EEC must 
seek redress in the forthcom- 
ing negotiations under the 
General Agreement on Tarifis 
and Trade (GATT). Mrs 
Clialker said at the end of a 
debate on trade with Japan 
that the volume of the EECs 
trade deficit was "quite 
staggering.'* 

Booker up 21% 

The agriculture and food 
distribution group, Booker, 
yesterday announced interim 
pretax profits up21 percent to 
£21.4 million for the six 
months to June 30 on turn- 
over up 63 per cent to £564 
million. The interim dividend 
was raised by 0J5p to 4.75p 
net 

Tempos, page 22 

Pearson rise 

Pearson's pretax profits for 
the first half of 1986 rose from 
£41.7 million to £44. 1 million 
on turnover of £455 million. 
The interim dividend was 
raised from 4.2 5p to 5p. 

Tempos, page 22 

Profits jump 

Willis Faber, the Lloyd's 
insurance broker, made in- 
terim pretax profits of £48 
million, a rise of 47 per cent. 
The dividend was raised to 
3.5p from 25p. 

Tempos, page 22 

WA expands 

WA Holdings is expanding 
the range of its distribution 
business with the acquisition 
of KD Thermoplastics, the 
plastic stockists and distrib- 
utors, for an initial £1 million 
and three further profit-re- 
lated payments of up to 
£715.000. 

£2.23m rights 

Leisuretime International 
proposes to exercise its option 
to acquire 90 per cent of 
Worldwide Diners and to 
raise £2J>3 million by a rights 


out UK rate cut 


Maxwell Grand Met 
backs to reduce 
Risk-less pension 
Guinness surplus 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

Bank lending rose strongly way which could set off higher were slightly firmer last night 
d month. Bank of England inflation. *■ after the money supply figures 

;ures showed yesterday. The The sterling M3 rise of 1.25 and government stocks fell by 

riing M3 measure of the per cent came after a 0.1 per up to a point. 


last month. Bank of England 
figures showed yesterday. The 
sterling M3 measure of the 
money supplyrose by 1.25 per cent rise m July, when the 
cent, enough to rule out an Bank of England sold more 
independent interest rate cut gilt-edged stocks than were 
by the British authorities. needed to fund the public 
The bank Tending increase se^orborrowing requirement, 
of £2.5 billion in the August continued last 

banking month was the main S 1 l ^ ma 2* r exl * nL 

expansionary influence on the Uf -P U ^ 3C . secl0 ^. 
money supply. It followed an re ^ u ^Sf, nt V 35 ^’»«.5F!e2 I V 
increase of£3 billion in July. 5& 1 3pftijP* 1 

Over the past six months, bdll0 n - of which £1-5 bflhon 
lending has risen at an un- 10 * e n <>n-tank private 

precedented rale of £L3 bO- ~ , 

lion a month. ^ The over funding of £0.6 


The figures, which reflect 


were to the non-bank private 
sector. 

The over funding of £0.6 
billion last month, followed 
£1.17 billion of overfunding in 


particularly buoyant tending July. In the first five months 
to individuals, reinforce Bank of this financial year the 


of England concern about the 
build-up of liquidity in tin. 
economy. The Bank has given 
a warning that this could be 
released into the economy in a 


authorities have sold £350 
million net more gfits than 
needed to fund the public 
sector borrowing requirement. 

Money market interest rates 


4500-1 £ matron 


THE MONEY SUPPLY 
AND BANK LENDING 

STERLING M3 Vi 


IBANK LENDING | 


Builders hold back 
Expamet profits 

By Carol Fergnsoh 

Interim profits at Expamet Mr Jeremy Beasley, is opti- 


International, the building, mistic about the second half 
expanded metal and security The budding trade is season- 
company, were adversely at- ally buoyant and he expects 
fecied by poor perfo rm a n ce s Expamet 's building division 
from its budding subsidiaries, to make up the ground lost in 
BAT and IBC, it was revealed the first half ’ 
yesterday. _ 

The company blamed the if? 
bad weather in the find six S"" " 
months of the year which 
reduced the number of new , 

housing starts. into the grout 

As a result the pretax profit . . 

to June 30 was virtually . The mtenn 
unchanged from last year, np increased by n 
only 1 per cent to £12 million to 2.7p neL Tb 


Yesterday's figures will en- 
sure that the official approach 
to lower interest rates in 
Britain remains highly cau- 
tious. Taken together with 
. recent indications that the 
scope for rale falls internation- 
ally has diminished, this may 
mean that base rates stay at or 
about present levels for the 
rest of the year. 

However, traders said that 
interest rate cuts in the United 
Slates, Japan and Germany 
could still open the way for 
lower interest rates here. 

Over the past 12 months, 
sterling M3 has risen by 18.5 
per cent, against the official 
target range of 1 1 to 15 per 
cent 

Narrow money, MO, rose by 
QA per cent, to 4 per cent 
above its level a year earlier. 
Its target range is 2 to 6 per 
cenL 

There was some evidence in 
the detailed figures for the 
clearing banks that the ap- 
proach to the City's big bang 
could be boosting bank 
lending. 

Banks look on additional 
gilt holdings of £278 million 
last month, which could re- 
flect action by the gilt market- 
making subsidiaries of the 
banks. 

The main mass a g e from the 
detailed dearmg bank figures, 
however, was that personal 
sector lending was strong last 
month. 

AE chief 
criticized 
by Panel 

By Cliff Feltham 

The Takeover Panel test 
night delivered a mild rap to 
Sir John Collyear, chairman of 
AE, the engineering group, 
which is fighting off a £260 
million takeover bid from 
Turner & NewalL 





Mr Brian Beazer, chairman of CFLBeazer, 
at the time of the French Kier takeover 

Beazer pays £190m 
for US company 


By Lawrence Lever 

C.H. Beazer, the rapidly business 
growing building company, construe 
yesterday announced terms including 


By Alison Eadie 

Battle lines hardened in the 
Guinness dispute yesterday 
ahead of tomorrow's crucial 
vote, with shareholders declar- 
ing publicly for different 
camps. 

Mr Robert Maxwell, pub- 
lisher of the Daily Mirror ; 
rallied to the cause of Mr 
Ernest Stennders, chief exec- 
utive of Guinness, saying that 
it was not in the interests of 
the company, its workers and 
shareholders that Sir Thomas 
Risk should be chairman. 

Mr Maxwell, through com- 
panies nnrf pension funds he 
chairs, controls 4.5 million 
shares. 

The Co-operative Insurance 
Society, however, declared 
that it would be voting against 
the Guinness board. 

The Manchester- based 
society said there bad not been 
the kmd of radical change in 
circumstances which would 
have been needed to justify the 
departure from the original 
proposals for a two-tier board 
structure. “Either the original 
proposals should not have 
been made or, once they had 
been made, they should have 
hero adhered to." 

The society added: 
“Shareholders are entitled to 
expect that statements made 
and undertakings given in a 
takeover document win be 
carefully thought out in ad- 
vance and duly honoured." 

. Mr Maxwell, in his singular 
business is the production of style, said he intended no 


k 


for the S283 million (£190 
million) purchase of Gifford- 
Hill & Co, a Texas construc- 
tion materials company , 
which wiU be Bearer’s largest 
acquisiton to date. 

Beazer intends to finance 
the purchase mainly through a 
two-for-three rights issue at 
1 80p to raise £1 83 million.Tbe 
180p price is a 21.7 per cent 
discount on the company's 
share price of 230p immedi- 
ately following the 
announcementThe shares 
dropped 30p on the news 
yesterday to dose at 200p. 

Yesterday's deal follows 
Beazer’s £144 million hotly 
contested takeover .of the 
construction group, French - 
Kier, in January and more 


construction materials , 
including cement, concrete 
products, ready mixed con- 
crete and aggregates.lt is the 
sixth largest cement producer 
in the united States with 
approximately 4.4 per cent of 
the US market 

In early 1985 the director 
of Gi fford-HilLfaced with 
large losses attempted un- 
successfully to sell the 
company.il has subsequently 
been rationalised with the loss 
malting subsidiaries sold or 
closed down. 

Losses for the year to June 
30,1986. before extraordinary 
items, were $21 .6 million . But 
in the second half of that year 
the company showed a pretax 
profit of $12.9 miUion.il has 
net assets of$ 164 mUliOD . 

Mr Brian Beazer, the chair- 


Sir John had questioned 
SSSh Turner & NevraU had not 

EJ? commented on trading in the 

fin.* monte S?Sy«. 

into thegroupi But the panel says that Sir 


recently its purchase of part of man of Beazer, which cur- 
the housebuilding division of rently has a market 


on turnover up 11 per cent to the forecast of a 6.75p divi- 


£27.5 million. 


dend made at the time of last 


to thegroupi But the panel says that Sir 

_ . . . .. . . . John and his advisers were 

. The interim dividend was aware that Turner & Newall 
increased by nearly 15 per cent was not permitted to disclose 
to 2.7p net. This is in fine with the information under the 
e forecast of a 6.75p divi- code. 

aid made at the time of last * xw*ii i„ct 

ine's ritthts issue. Turner & Newall last night 

inesngnts issue. said it had been surprised that 

_ „ Sir John had raised the matter 

, cnao If f At* because three weeks ago he 
1U1. had sought assurances that 
• • 1 release of the figures would 

PCCinilR K not be permitted before the 
C391UUOX9 offer dosed this Friday. 


The executive chainnee, June's right, ixsue. JUKSiEfi 

_ _ - * j 1 Sir John had raised the n 

New body to speak for ssJrjEUf 

A j* • 1 release of the figures v 

futures professionals 

By Our City Staff ITG IllCCtS OB 

An association was formally funds in the United Kingdom a 
launched yesterday to repre- to allow them to compete on WITtfl-llTl Pall 
sent the interests of those an equitable basis with 
using the futures markets for straightforward investments Officials tram the 1 
investment. inequities. national Tin Council 


Tempts 22 Money Mrfcfs 23 
Wall Street 22 Traded Opts 23 
Co News 22 UmtTnjst* 24 
Comnent 23 OHomodities 24 
Stock Market 23 USM Prices 24 
Foreign Em* 23 Share Pncea 25 


mvestmenL 

The Association for Futures 
Investment is composed of 
about 30 investment man- 
agers. trading advisers and 
brokers specializing in the 
management and promotion 
of collective investment 
schemes which use inter- 
national futures and options. 

Members include the broker 
L Messel. the American finan- 
cial conglomerate Drexel 
Burnham Lambert and the 
fond manager Foreign & 
Colonial 


It will be seeking changes to 
the fiscal treatment of futures 
so that dealings in them 
should be regarded as an 
investment activity subject to 
capital gains rather than in- 
come tax. 

The AFI is also hoping to 
persuade the Government to 
alter some of the proposals 
contained in its recent consul- 
tative paper on unit trusts. It 
wants the Government to 
drop the proposed £1 million 
minimum size limit on unit 


The AFI intends to provide trusts, arguing that it is pos- with its acquisition of Zales 
a voice for professional users sibte to have a successful jewellers attracted applica- 


Officials from the Inter- 
national Tin Council met 
officials from the Department 
of Trade and Industry all 
yesterday. 

The meeting was to discuss 
the position of the ITC in the 
light of the decision by a group 
of 1 1 metal brokers to daim 
up to £400 million losses and 
seek to wind up the ITG 

No one at ITC was available 
for comment last night 

CES success 

The offer of shares to exist- 
ing shareholders by Combined 
English Stores in connection 
with its acquisition of Zales 


of the futures market and to 
secure promotion for futures 


Salvesen (Chrislian)last 
month for £12.6 million. 

The purchase of Gifford- 
Hill will create an enlarged 
group with annual sales of 
£1 .2 billion and an extra 4000 
employees . 

The proposed aquisition is 
in the form of a lender offer 
for Gifford-Hill's shares, 
reccommended by Gifford- 
Hill’s board who already have 
accepted in respect of 5.S per 
cent of the company and given 
Beazer an option over a 
further 15.6 per cenLBeazer 
requires total acceptances in 
respect of 51 per cent of the 
shares. 

Giffond-Hill is currently 
quoted on the New York 
Stock Exchange where it has a 
market capitalisation of 
approximately $200 million. 

The company’s main area of 

24-hour trade 
in Barclays 
Bank shares 

Sir Timothy Bevan, the 
chairman of Barclays Bank, 
made the first New York stock 
market transaction in the 
bank’s shares yesterday. 

The trade was made in a 
ceremony on the floor of the 
New York exchange at which 
itbecame the first British bank i 
to have a share listing there: 

Barclays also recently 
gained a listing in Tokyo and 
is the first British bank with 24 
hour dealing in its shares. 


capitalisation of £318 million, 
and existing US interests 
through its US housebuilding 
subsidiary, said yesterday: 

"I wanted greater 
representation in the United 
Siates.For the past three years 
I have been saying that we 
wanted to stay within the 
building insdustry, that we 
wanted the widest spread of 
activity within that industry, 
to include buildiag 
materialsjand that we wanted 
a base in aggregates,”. 

The intention is lhai 
Gifford-Hill win operate as an 
autonomous and independent 
company, with Beazer provid- 
ing appropriate strategic and 
financial support 

“The management of our 
investment in Gifford-Hill 
will be mine,” Mr Beazer 
stressed. 






criticism of Sir Thomas. He 
simply believed that the orig- 
inal proposed structure iff 
Guinness would have been 
unsound. 

“The real boss would always 
have been Mr Ernest 
Saunders. The company would 
have been a house divided. 
There cannot be two com- 
manders during the 
reconstruction and reorganiza- 
tion period.” 

Mr Maxwell added : “Mr 
Saunders must abide by his 
pledge to move the head office 
to Edinburgh. He has jus- 
tification for breaking one 
promise. Any farther breach of 
the conditions mi which the 
sale iff Distillers was made 
would be intolerable. Bat 
Riskless Guinness is good for 
yon.” 

Tom morrow’s extraor- 
dinary meeting of sharehold- 
ers will be at the Mount Royal 
Hotel, MarMe Arch, London 
(10am). 

Kenneth Fleet, page 23 


pension 

surplus 

By Richard Lander 

Grand Metropolitan, the 
breweries, hotels and leisure 
group, is taking steps to reduce 
the actuarial surplus of its 
£700 million employees’ pen- 
sion fund by more ihan £100 
million through a reduction in 
its contributions over the next 
five vears and an increase in 
benefits to present and future 
pensioners. 

The company is to reduce 
its pension contributions by 
£10 million a year starting in 
the current financial year 
which expires at the end of 
this month. Last year it paid 
£36.3 million in pension costs, 
or just over 10 per cent of 
pretax profits of £347.3 
million. 

Mr Michael Orr. the finance 
director, confirmed yesterday 
that the contribution reduc- 
tions would be taken as a 
reduction in costs in the 
group's profit and loss ac- 
counts. 

Under this year's Finance 
Act, companies are required 
to reduce the surplus of their 
pension funds' assets over 
liabilities to 5 per cent by the 
first revaluation after 'next 
April. The two methods cho- 
sen by Grand Met are both 
non-taxable, although a third 
way of refunding surpluses to 
the company itself is taxed at 
40 per cent. 

Mr Orr said Grand Met was 
aiming to reduce its surplus in 
line with the aims of the Act 
by the next revaluation in 
September 1988. 

The improved benefits for 
past and present employees 
include higher widows' pen- 
sions. equal terms for widow- 
ers of Grand Met employees, 
who previously received less 
than widows, and a reduction 
in the pension discounts for 
employees who retire early. 

In addition, employees who 
retired before 1982, will re- 
ceive an improvement in the 
pensions to make up for the 
ravages of inflation in the 
1970s. 

The increases will be paid 
on a sliding scale with 
pensioners who retired in 
1975 having their retirement 
cheques doubled. The im- 
proved benefits are estimated 
to cost slightly more than the 
£50 million contributions sav- 
ings. 

Grand Met is also anticipat- 
ing another piece of pensions 
legislation b^ making 
membership of its schemes 
voluntary for new employees 
from next April. 


Another Salvesen sale 

By Our City Staff 

West bury, the Cheltenham business last year were £1.48 
housebuilder, is paying £126 million on turnover of almost 
million for the Midlands £13 million, 
homebuilding division of The Midlands division is 
Salvesen (Christian), the Edin- the second of the company's 
burgh food distribution group, five housebuilding operations 


which is pulling out of the to be sold. They are expected 
business. to raise a total of about £50 

The operation builds more ra »!/£?■ .... ..... 
expensive homes mainly in M f an * h ^ Westbury es- 
Northamptonshire. Cam- 

bridgeshire and Buckingham- P/ ofi V for ,he °?5 n, 1 2& ta,f °f 
shire, and has a land tank of 

almost 1300 plots on 21 sites, f 1 ^-66 mjlljoiL Profits before 


Operating profits of the 


lax are estimated to have been 
£2.80 million, up 44 per cent. 


‘ -pubic Med dcro pony 


Half year Report 30 June 1986 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


New Yw* 

Dow Jones 1893.42 (+4.78) 

Nikkei Dow 18474.18 (-78X7) 

Hong Kong; * eta 

Hang Seng — 1966JJ2 (-&96I 
Amsterdam: Got — .. 298.3 H-u 
Syd ne y: AO — — 1220.9 (-145) 

Commerzbank 2064.6 (-24.4) 

3634.33(4-13^) 

Parte: CAC 400.4 (-42) 

Zurich: 

SKA General — .... 504.70 (same) 
London dostag pricoa Pag«25 

INTEREST RATES 

BankBase: i 0 *fe 

taking rate 

Prime Rate 71 *?' . 

Federal Funds 516% 


RISES: 

Boots 228p (+7p) 

Grand Met. 406p +8p) 

National West. 559p (+7p) 

Baggeridge Brick — 360p (+I5p) 

Groavernr Group 125p (+7p) 

VG Instruments 490p (+17p) 

Cliffords Dairy 240p (+12p) 

Rainers 232p (+8p) 

Lae Cooper 218p (+7pl 

Good Relations 120p (4-1 2p) 

Lowe Howard ... — 388p (+8pi 

Wiffis Faber 442p (4-18pi 

Mountteigh 985p(+25p) 

Checkpoint Europe — I43p (4-i3p) 

Marter Estates 5l0p(+l2p) 

Really Useful 375p (4-7pJ 


FALLS; 

C.H. Beazer 

Bunnatax 

Keep Trust 

British Vita 

Provident Find. — 


futures fond operating with as turns for more than twice the 
little as £250,000. | number of shares on offer. 

Bullish future poses threat 
to buyouts, warns survey 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

Management buyouts are a buyouts was four times higher helped create 34 millionaires 
£1 billion financial market but Iasi year than the previous through its funding of 14 
a warning yesterday said it year. buyouts, 

may become more difficult to The number of funds Barclays Development Cap. 
finance this method of re- specialising in buyouts is ris- ital said: “The rate of failures 
forming businesses. ing. Three have nearly £500 in management buyouts has 

The warning was issued by million available for invest- been impressively low.” Buy- 
the Centre for Buy-out Re- ment between now and 1988. outs have performed better 
search. Tbe centre which was As much as £5 billion in funds than average for venture cap- 


1 'nuuitiicd 6 months 

enttaf JO June 


Turnover 

Profit before taxation 
Profit after taxation 
Earnings per ordinary share 
Dividend per share 


1986 

£000 

53.719 

1.505 

930 

4.95p 

1.8p 


1955 

£000 

49.950 

1.204 

778 

4.54p 

l.Sp 


•Unfrrrrfft'ir 
cniA.'d Jl Dtv 

1985 

£000 

100.109 

2.320 
1.406 
7.72p 
4. Op 


a warning yesterday said it year, 
may become more difficult to The number of funds 
finance this method of re- specialising in buyouts is ris- 
forming businesses. ing. Three have nearly £500 

The warning was issued by million available for invest- 
the Centre for Buy-out Re- ment between now and 1988. 
search The centre, which was As much as £5 billion in funds 
set up at the University of is likely to be available during 
Nottingham with the tacking next year, although some 


21 bp (-9p) 

223p -7p) 

371p(-9p) 

— 303p(-25p 


GOLD 


of Barclays Development 
Capital and Spicer and Pegler, 
dairas that its research is the 
most comprehensive on 
management buyouts. 

financing could become a 
problem because the rise in 
share prices and bullish 


buyouts might be frustrated by 
a high level of takeover activ- 
ity, according to Spicer and 
Peglcr. 

The survey warns: 
“Availability of funds might 
foel vendors’ price expecta- 
tions rather than permit ftind- 


l-eoerai ruro j « •» , _ c „ . 

3-month Treasury Bills 5.21-5^0% London Fixing: 
30-year bonds 96> i«-86 ,s » AM S41SL50 pirv$409. 

dose $41 1.50-412.50 1 


CURRENCIES 


London: 

£: Si .4860 
£: DM3.0604 


New Yoric 

£: 51-4845' 

$: DM2.0605* 


London Rxing: 

AM $41250 pm-$409.25 
dose $411.50412.50 (£277.00- 
277.75) 

New Yoric 

Comex $410.45-410.95* 


predictions fuel the price ing of a larger number of buy- 
expectations of companies ouis. Buyouts of about £2 
considering the sale of subsid- million to £3 million may 
iavy operations to groups of become^ more difficult to fi- 


£: 5wFr2.487B $: Index: 110.9 

£: FFr9. S896 M 


E:Yen231.15 

£: lndex:7lA 


ECU £0.685326 

SDR £0.809329 


Brent (Oct 
'Denotes 


NORTH SEA OIL 

(Oct) - pm 14.706M (1535) 


managers. “If -the vendor ex- 
pects too high a premium on 
the business it may mean that 
a buy-out is not supportable.” 
the survey says. 

The report reveals that 
funding of management 


nance if these funds con- 
cern rate on the larger 
transactions.” 

There have been more than 
1.000 buyouts since 1980, the 
survey discloses. One venture 
capita] investor said it had 


through its funding of 14, 
buyouts. 

Barclays Development Cap- 
ital said: “The rate of failures 
in management buyouts has 
been impressively low.” Buy- 
outs have performed better 
than average for venture cap- 
ital mvestmenL 

Key elements for the 
successful deal are low invest- 
ment needs, developed niche 
markets and good cash genera- 
tion possibilities. 

Last year there were 245 
buyouts. Many have been 
considered choices rather than 
forced sales 

The size of transactions is 
increasing. Last year two 
transactions totalled more 
than £250.000. more than all 
the funds committed to 
buyouts in the previous year. 

Review of Management 
Buvouis IQS5 by Mr John 
Coyne and Dr Mike Wright 
(published by Venture Eco- 
nomics). 


$ Record half year trading results 
$ Pre-tax profits up 25% on first half of 1985 
•8" Group on target to achieve forecast record pre-tax 
profits of £3,200,000 and earnings per share of 
9.35p for the current year 


/ aumniNG \ 

K SERVICES ,1 

C ONSUME S \ * RESEARCH \ 

ADVEHTONG A f. BATA SERVICES 4 -1 

S / iopecpicx^^:.*' 


nsuc 

KlMMnS 


f v 

' S«*EC«liSr V 
.COMMUMCATICWS,^ 


CBpioaTliKlialficarKtwrtareatiiiUlrEintlKAxnuiT.t^Mrlc. Uftm 

TdkftieiK: UUtAo U3M 


c Hnotc. hJM. Uania\Lt^.La H { aa ne2X4IUi 


f 1 

l.VJKs;r.j < * 

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n mnre ? ■■ zm ^ - •‘ J - r • ; - ■ .vi 




22 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


WALL STREET 


IBM leads blue chips . 
in early trading surge 


New York (Agencies) - Wall 
Street stocks surged higher in 
early trading yesterday with 
IBM leading the blue chips. 

Airlines provided signifi- 
cant support and drugs, which 
have been taking a poanding 
in the past week, recouped 
some of their losses. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average, which crossed the 
1J00 level by jumping 13 

points to 1902 at one early 
stage, was np 1 3 .25 at 1 ,899.89 
around raid-mornin g. 

The transport average rose 
5.00 to 782.75 whOe the 
■utilities average was np 1.05 at 
.211.74 and the 65 stocks 
average up 432 at 735.16. 






AMR 

ASA 

A«lod Stand 
ABedsirs 
A*sCt*m 
Alcoa 

Aram Inc 

Am'rdaHs 

Are Brands 

Am Cm 

AmCymn'd 

Am ei Pm- 

Am Express 

Am Home 

Am Molars 

AreSTnrd 

AmTotapti 

Amoco 

AmcoSttsI 

Assrco 

AsMandOB 

AtRfcMWd 
Avon Prods 
BkrsTstNY 
Bankamer 
BkofBston 
Bank of NY 
Betti Sasl 


Bowanw 

BfetMyara 

BP 

Burton ind 
BurftonNtn 


Can Pacific 

Caterpita- 

CstantM 

Central SW 

Champion 

Chase Man 

CftmSfcNY 

Chevron 

Chryalar 


CknMGaa 
CmbtnEna 
ComwOhEd 
Cons Eds 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
CntrlOsta 
Coming 01 
CPCInS 
Crans 
OmZotter 
Dart& Kraft 
Osara 
Dam Air 
DatroitEd 
Driest Eq 
Olsney 
DowQism 
Drassarlnd 
Duka Power 
od pom 

Eastern Air 
Estn Kodak 
Eaton Coro 
Emerson 0 
Exxon Carp 
Fad Dpt Sts 

• [■Cm M. 


S4% 55% 

38* 38% 

41 41% 

58% 58% 

3 % 3 % 

39% 39% 

14% 1S% 

89% 91 
86 88 
81% 83% 

28% 28 
63% 64% 
85% 88% 

2% W 
38% 40 

25 24% 
70% 71% 

6% 7% 

16% 17% 
60% 60% 
59% 61% 
34% 34% 

47% 49% 

13% 13% 
40% 42 
64 85% 

9 9% 

58% 59% 
60% 61 
4&% 46% 

33% 33% 
75% 75% 
41% 42% 
38% 38 
56% 57% 
72% 72% 

62 82 
11 % 11 % 
49% 49% 
222 220 
35% 36% 
28% 27 

38% 39% 
46 SS 47% 
46% 47 

39% 39% 
52% 54% 
21 20 % 
36% 35% 
37% 39 
143% 144 
42% 41% 

32 32 

33% 33% 
48% 48% 
33% 34 
11 % 11 % 
26% 25% 
54% 54 

62% 63 
29 28% 

52% 53% 
61% 63% 

26 25% 

42% 41% 
18 18 
99% 101% 
41 40% 

58% 57% 
17% 18 

46% 47% 
88 % 88 % 

8 % 8 % 
56% 57 
70 70% 

87 86% 

70 70% 

85 88% 

wad ib 


The broader New York 
Stock Exchange composite in- 
dex rose 0.77 to 143.19 while 
Standard & Poor's 500 stock 
index dim bed 0.84 to 163.85. 

Among New York Stock 
Exchange leaders* IBM rose 
I J « to 144*8 in early deals. 

Illinois Power slipped '« to 
30*4. Phillips Petroleum was 
unchanged at 11 while Mobil 
rose -*8 to 3T 3 *. 

AT&T was up Vt to 25% and 
Syntex rose 1%. to 64. Pepsico 
gained K to 29 J s. 

Among American Stock Ex- 
change shares, WickessCpped 
x h to 4% while BAT Industries 
was unchanged at 6%. 


1" 




Firestone 
ftt Chicago 
FstMBncp 
Fat Pam C 
Ford 

FTWactwa 
GAFCorp 
GTCf^rp 
Gen Corn 
GonDyrnes 

Gen Electric 

Gan Inst 

Gen Mb 

Gan Motors 

GnPbUtnv 

Ganesco 

Georgia Pac 

Gtttoto 

Goodrich 

Goodyear 

GoreJnc 

Grace 

Gt Att&Tac 

Gr-hno 

□roman Cor 

GUI 8 West 

Heinz HJ. 

Hercules 

HTett-Pkrd 

Honeywel 

1 C torn 

togewsoli 

InBnd Stool 

IBM 

INCO 

tot Paper 

trtfTefTW 

Inring Bonk 

Jhnen&jtm 

Kaiser Akan 

Kerr McGee 

KmbiyCM 

KMart 

Kroger 

i_rvTcorp 

LRton 
Lockheed 
Lucky Stre 
ManH'nver 
MewileCp 
Mapco 
Marina MU 
Mrt Mortem 


McDonalds 

McOomoB 


Merck 
MtataMng 
MobUOU 
Monsanto 
Morgan J.P. 
Motorola 
NCR Coro 
NLlndotra 
Not Otars 
Nat Med Em 
Nat Snort 
NortotttStti 

WW DWMp 

OcddntPot 

Ogdon 

OSnCorp 

OvwnsJ 

PKteB 

Ran Am 

Penney J.C. 

Pennzoa 


25 

28% 

63% 

7% 

57% 

41% 

35 % 

96% 

75% 

74% 

78% 

21 % 

81% 

70% 

22% 

3% 

35% 

42% 

40% 

34% 

20% 

50 

25 % 

31% 

25% 

66% 

42% 

57% 

49K 

71% 

27 

60 % 

19% 

143% 

13% 

69% 

52% 

54 

68 % 

17% 

29% 

83 

50% 

62% 

2% 

76% 

48% 

26% 

44% 

2% 

49% 

51 % 

46% 

29 

60% 

87% 

58% 

105 

113% 

37 

76 

87 % 

43 % 

55 % 

5 

40 

24% 

10 % 

83 % 

39% 

29 % 

40% 

44% 

41 % 

28 % 

5 % 

76% 

56% 

28% 


24% 

27% 

63 % 

8 

56% 

41% 

38 % 

57% 

76% 

74% 

77% 

21 % 

84% 

70% 

22 % 

3% 

38% 

43% 

40 

34% 

20 % 

50% 

25% 

31% 

25% 

68% 

45% 

58% 

47% 

70% 

27% 

60% 

19% 

140 

13% 

89% 

53% 

53% 

89% 

17% 

30% 

84% 

52% 

62% 

2% 

78% 

48% 

25% 

45% 

2* 

50 

51% 

47% 

29 % 

81 

87% 

57% 

110 % 

112 % 

38% 

76 

90% 

43% 

66 % 

5 

40% 

25% 

10 % 

81% 

40% 

30 

41% 

44% 

42% 

2fi% 

5% 

78% 

56 % 

m% 


The Hong Kong Stock Ex- 
change plans to cut the spread 
of its share prices in a bid to 
increase trading. The ex- 
change is starting an experi- 
ment next month when it will 
cut the spread in Hongkong 
and Shanghai Bank shares 
from five cents to one cent. 

The exchange’s vice-chair- 
man. Mr Kenneth Wong, says 
turnover of the bank's shares 
— the most heavily traded 
stock in Hong Kong — could 
double once die spread is . 
reduced. Recently the shares 
have been trading between ' 
HKS5 and HK510. 

If the experiment is a sue- 


*? 




Pfizer 

pt53p»p« 

Polaroid 
PPG tod 

PictrGmH 

PbSESG 
Raytheon 
Ryrtids Mat 

*a«lm 

Dutch 


Sara toe ■ 
SFESopac 
ScrtUargar 
Scott Paper 
Seagram 
Sears Ftock 
She* Trane 


Sony 

SthCafEd 

irass 

Sun comp 
Teledyne 
Termeoo 
Texaco 
Texes E Cor 
Texas Irat 
Texas Utfls 
Textron 
TrariraCor 
TRW Inc 
UAL toe 
Unlever NV 
Un Carbide 

UnPacCor 
Uld Brands 
USGCorp 
UMTecftnaf 
USX Corp 
Unocal 
j*n water 
WmerLrabt 


Wotgnse 


Xerox Coro 
Zenith 


63% 

22 % 

70% 

11 

64 % 

70 

76% 

42% 

64% 

47% 

43% 

91% 

61% 

87 

31% 

33% 

62% 

61% 

44% 

58% 

56% 

85% 

20% 

34% 

78% 

49% 

47 

36% 

56% 

327% 

41% 

34 

29% 

121 

34% 

68 % 

41% 

100 % 

57% 

222 

22 % 

60 

29% 

43% 

40% 

20 % 

23% 

51 

58% 

108% 

58% 

37% 

72% 

44% 

57% 

23% 


64% 

23 

73 % 

11 % 

66 

89 % 

76% 

42% 

65% 

47% 

42% 

93% 

81% 

68 % 

31 

34% 

64 

61% 

44% 

58 

55 % 

87% 

20 % 

36% 

76% 

50% 

47% 

36% 

58 % 

325 

41% 

34% 

29% 

122 

35% 

59* 

46% 

100 

57 

224% 

22 % 

60% 

29% 

42% 

45 * 

20 % 

23% 

S3 

58% 

111 % 

57% 

38 % 

73% 

44% 

57% 

23 % 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AtxSx 

AtaiAJum 

AtoomaSS 

Can Pacific 

Cominco 

GonBaflnc 

Hkr/SfcJCan 

HdsnBMh 


iwSm aSwT 


SK7" 

RyfTrtatoo 
Seagram 
Steel CD 
ThmsnN'A* 

verity Corp 
WftrMram 

W CT 

ismsE 


23% 23% 
45% 45% 
13% 13% 
16% 18% 
13% 13% 
25% 25 
27% 27% 
27 27% 

34% 34% 
45% 46 
41 % 41 % 

33% 34% 
86% 85% 
24% 22% 
29 30% 

250 290 
37% 38 
13% 13% 


Hong Kong cuts shares 
spread to boost trading 


Fran Steve Leather, Hong Kong 


cess the exchange plans to cut 
the spread on other shares. 

Mr David Tung, chairman 
of the Hongkong Stockbrokers 
Association, said the move 
should mean more business 
for the crown colony's bro- 
kers, many of whom are 
finding it tough to make a 
living in the new unified 

exchange. 

The current spread of five 
cents is equivalent to 
HKJ 50,000 (£4,350) on the 
difference between the buying 
and filing price of one mil- 
lion shares. By cutting the 
spread from five cents to one 


to HK$ 10,000 and the ex- 
change hopes this wiO boost 
turnover. 

“If the Hongkong Bank test 
is a success then we might do 
the same with a full range of 
shares," said the spokesman 
for the exchange, Dr Anita 
Leung. 

At the moment the spread 
for shares trading between 50 
cts and HKS l . is one cent, it is 
Z5 cents from HK52 to 
HKS5, 5 cts from HKSS to 
HK5HU0 cis from HKSlO to 
HKS30. 25 cts from HKS30 to 
HKS50, and 50 cts from 


emit the difference is slashed HKSSO to HKSIOO. 


COMPANY NEWS 


Buyout at paintbrush fir] 


One of the country’s leading 

paintbrush manufacturers is 
being taken over by its 
management. Hamilton & Co, 
which was founded 1 75 years 
ago, has been part of the 
Blundell-Permoglaze group, 
which is now controlled by the 
Dutch Akzo Coatings organ- 
ization. 

Hamilton, which is based in 
Harrow, Middlesex, has about 
10 per cent of the British 
paintbrush market. Itshowed 
an £83,000 profit on sales of 
£3.8 million last year after 
suffering substantial losses in 
the early 1980s. 

The management buyout 
team, backed by County 
Development Capital and Le- 
gal and General Venture and 
Development Capital Fund, is 
paying about £2 million for 
the business. 

In Brief 

• BLACKWOOD HODGE: 
Interim dividend 0.5p. The 
board intends to recommend a 
final dividend of OJp for 1986. 
making Ip (nil). Figures in £000 
for six months to Jane 30. 
Turnover 102,556 (103,627), 
profit on ordinary activities 
before tax 2.717 (2.192L profit 
attributable 1,607(1,126). Earn- 
ings per share 1.60p <1.36). The 
board remains confident of the 
group's prospects for 1986. 

• MORGAN CRUCIBLE: The 
company has taken a substantial 
minority shareholding in Archer 
Technicoat. A new company. 
Morgan Archer, has been 
formed for the exploitation of 
chemical vapour deposition 
technology. 

• HESTAIR: Interim dividend 
1.7p ( 1 .5). Figures in £000 for six 
months to July 31. Turnover 
65,907 (60,908), profit 3,108 
(1.555). tax 273 (183), earnings 


• GERMAN SMALLER 
COMPANIES INVEST- 
MENT TRUST: The unaudited 
net asset value of the company 
at August 31 was 177-93p. 

• NEWMAN INDUSTRIES: 
Interim dividend 0.5p 
(comparisons . restated). Divi- 
dend payments for the two years 
are not comparable because of 
ttie variation of the rights 
attaching to the shares and tbe 
rights issue made in 1985. 
Figures in £000 for six months 
to June 30. -Turnover 44,662 
(44,418), pretax profit- 2357 
(2,143k tax 1.068 (1.139), 
extraordinary debit 5(7 (113). 
Earnings per share (L8p (0.6). 

• POLYPIPE: Final dividend 





Hawley Group Is one of the world's largest international service 
groups with substantial operations hi the United States, the United 
Kingdom and Australasia, with annualised sales in excess of 
$1 billion and over 100,000 employees. 

The Group's major areas of activities are Cleaning and Budding 
Services, Hospital Housekeeping and Maintenance, Security and 
Home Improvements. 

Extracts from Chairman’s Statement 

*ITie results for the six months to dune 30 1986 are significantly 
ahead of the record results for the comparable period last yeac” 

“Earnings from operations increased to $25L2m on sales of $280m 
and earnings per common share have again improved significantly 
to 6.6 cents, an increase of 29%." 

*The acquisition of Pritchard has been the major event of tfro first 
half of the year and has doubled the size of the Group." 

“The Group’s priorities continue to be the profitable expansion of 
the core businesses, market leadership of our chosen sectors and 
consistently improved earnings per share.” 


2,835 (1.372). Earnings per 

share 8.5 p adjusted (4.5 ad- 
justed). Tbe results of tbe 
Hestair group and JSD Com- 
puter Group International have 
been combined for the whole of 
the six months. The chairman 
says that the company is well 
positioned for further growth. 

The successful rights issue has 
corrected tbe strain on the 
balance sheet 

• GOLIATH GOLD MINES: 

Figures in S for three months to 
June 30. Loss before tax 97,915 
<128.163 profit), net loss 97,915 
(65.163 profit). 

• DWEK GROUP: In view of 
the continuing successful trad- 

l.lpon increased capitaL Added 

dends, and it is proposed to pay represents a total dividend for 

the year of I.65p net, adjusted in 
respect of the increase in share 
capital. Figures in £000 for year 

to June 30. Sales 16.331 
(1 1,794), profit before tax 2^02 
(1.351), profit after tax 1.332 
(811). Earnings per share S.SOp 
(4.02 adjusted). Tbe chairman 
looks forward with confidence 
to an exciting and rewarding 
year. The directors intend that 
an application for a full listing 
win be made in tbe fast week of 
September. 

• ALPHAMERIC The chair- 
man says that that application is 
to be made for admission to the 
official list, and it is expected 
that the ordinary will be admit- 
ted on Friday and that main 
’market dealings win begin on 
Monday. Since the USM flota- 
tion the company has more than 
doubled its turnover and pretax 
profits when many companies 
in the electronics sector suffered 
downturns. Tbe company is 
poised for further expansion not 
only . in Britain - but 
internationally. 

• SIGMEX INTER- 
NATIONAL: Dividend 0J3p 
(nil). Figures in £000 for year to 
June 30. Turnover 11,837 
(1 1.858). pretax profit 236 
(1,155), tax 76 (381). learnings 
per share 125p <12.60- The 
board says that difficult market 
conditions in the second half 
have i nte r r upted the co m pany’s 
12-year record of cootinuous 
growth, resulting in a static 
turnover of £12 minion. This 
■was coupled with increased 
operating costs. 

• RUSTENBURG PLAT- 
INUM HOLDINGS: The 
chairman told the annual meet- 
ing that, as a result of the rand 
prices received in July and 
August, the company has earned 
profils substantially above those 
for the comparable period. This 
is likely to continue for as long 
as company receives current 
rand prices and maintains its 
volume of sales at a level similar 
to that of last year. 


an interim for this year of l-5p 
per share. Figures in £000 for six 
months to June 30. Turnover 
10310 (7,768k pretax profit 51 1 
(103), tax 1 53 (nil). Earnings per 
share undiluted 4.3p (1.22), 
diluted 2.8p(U2) 

• LOWE HOWARD-SPINK 
AND BELL: Interim dividend 
2.7p (2). Figures in £000 for six 
months to June 30. Turnover 
72309 (23,954), pretax profit 
1206 (1,404), tax 1,379 (628). 
profit attributable to sharehold- 
ers 1,827 (776). Earnings per 
share 11.46p (735). The results 
of Allen Brady and Marsh 
(Holding) are included from 
June 2. Tbe chairman is “highly 
confident" of the outcome for 
the* full year, and he looks 
forward to continued growth. 

• LOPEX: Interim dividend 
1.8p (same). Figures in £000 for 
six months to June 30. Turn- 
over 53.719 (49.950X pretax 
profit 1,505 (1304). tax 575 
(426). Earnings per share 4.9Sp 
(4.54). The board is confident 
that the group will continue its 
progress in the second half and 
that it will achieve record pretax 
profits of not less than 
£3300.000. 


( TEMPUS ) 

Pearson profit unlikely 
to reverse share retreat 


The Pearson share price 
has been ail the way up to the 
top of tbe hill this year on the 
back of some fairly heavy bid 
speculation. The market- 
chatter having faded, the 
shares have retreated more 
than 10 per cent They look 
unlikely to stage a resurgence 
on yesterday’s interim 
figures. 

Pretax profits, up from 
£41.7 million to £44.1 mil- 
lion, reflected a classic 
conglomerate mix of vari- 
ably-performing interests. 

The chief winners were foe 
information and entertain- 
ment division and Lazards, 
the merchant bank, while foe 
oil and oil services division 
was tbe victim of the de- 
pressed energy sector. En- 
gineering and fine china 
provided htile cheer. 

Just to add to the prob- 
lems, the dollar’s nosedive is 
affecting earnings from North 
America, which accounted 
for more than one-third of 
profits last year. -The cost to 
pretax profits was probably 
about £2J million. 

For the moment, the 
Financial Times is proving to 
be Pearson's star performer, 
contributing a significant part 
of tbe 47 per cent profits 
improvement in foe informa- 
tion and entertainment 
sector. 

Its role could increase fur- 
ther as it develops its- inter- 
national sales side and makes 
foe £55 mxUion move to the 
London Docklands, which 
will free it from the con- 
straints of outmoded printing 
methods. 

Westminster Press has also 
performed strongly, with a 
cost-cutting pro g r am me help- 
ing to reverse foe trend of 
falling profits in the compet- 
itive regional press. 

The book interests have 
been mixed with the trade 
book'side depressed and 
overseas sales by Longman 
hurt by foe strong pound and 
reduced-spending in tbe Gulf 

Growth in the short term at 
Pearson looks to be decidedly 
limited and the company 
seems to have most of its 
hopes pinned a little nearer 
foe horizon where lie a higher 
oil price, a hi-tech FT and a 


possible expansion into di- 
rect broadcasting by satellite. 
It also intends to trim more 
dead wood, continuing foe 
policy which saw Eairey en- 
gineering sold off in April. 

Whh prospects of £U8 
million pretax profits for the 
full year, less than 10 percent 
up on last year, foe shares at 
533p stand on a p/e multiple 
of 15'h. which looks pretty 
full value. 

Booker 

Booker is pnhaps best known 
as the originator of the 
Booker prize for literature. It 
also owns foe copyrights of 
certain authois, notably 
Agatha Christie, but these 
generate only 5 per cent of 
profits. 

. Booker’s main sources of 
income are agriculture (it is 
the market leader in poultry 
and turkey breeding in the 
United States), health prod- 
ucts fit controls 185 health 
food outlets and 95 chemists 
drops in foe United King- 
dom), and food distribution. 

AD three mam divisions 
did well in tbe half-year to 
June 30. Interim results re- 
leased yesterday showed 
turnover up 6 per cent to. 
£564 million and pretax 
profit np 21 per cent to £21 
million. 

Of £85 mfilioD of disposals 
in the first half only £35 
million has been reinvested 
so the interest charge should 
come down in the second 
half. 

There is still some seasonal 
bias towards foe second hall 
and analysts are looking for 
profit of £52J million 
whole year. This puts 
foe shares on a prospective 
multiple of 13. The rating 
looks about right. 

Willis Faber 

Sparkling interim profits and 
a 40 percent rise in dividend 
from Willis Faber sent foe 
shares 23p higher at one stage 
before they dosed up 15p at 
439p. 

Taxable profit»^f7 per cent 
ahead at £48 million out- 
stripped tbe most optimistic 
analyst's forecast by about £6 
million. The main reason was 


strong brokerage growth - up 
27 per cent in underlying 
terms — achieved in a diffi- 
cult market. Willis, which has 
long held a premium rating in 
foe stock market, again seems 
to have kept its nose in front 
of the competition. 

The company was exuding 
caution about expecting simi- 
lar levels of growth or similar 
dividend increases in the 
second half. The £4 million 
benefit seen in the first half 
from selling forward foreign 

currency income will begin to 
diminish. 

Tbe £11.1 million 
contribution from the asso- 
ciate. Morgan Grenfell, is 
also not expected to be 
equalled after a period of 
exceptional corporate finance 
activity. A full-year contribu- 
tion of around £19 million 
seems likely. 

Brokerage growth is 
managing to keep comfort- 
ably ahead of expenses 
growth, but the 23 per cent 
rise in underlying expenses in 

ihe first. half was a hefty jump 
on last yeart 15 percent The 
reasons were the addition of 
150 staff systems develop- 
ment costs and a nasty in- 
crease in professional 
indemnity cover. 

Willis is not alone in feeing 
rising PI costs, but foe in- 
crease over the past three 
years — . from premiums of 
£800,000 to £4 million for 
less comprehensive cover — 
has meant that PI is now a 
-sizeable item in a broker's 
expenses. 

The growth in expenses is 
expected to stabilize in the 
second half and, although PI 
cover will remain costly, ft is 
hoped that the pace of in- 
crease will begin to level off. 

Full year profits, assuming 
Willis makes a little more in 
ihe second half than in last 
year's second half, should 
come out around £7 8 million. 
Tbe prospective p/e is just 
under 16 and foe yield, if 
Willis pays an 8p final, is 3.7 
percent 

The shares are down from a 
high this year of 474p. Capac- 
ity problems in the world 
market will continue to 
dominate foe sector, limiting 
any strong advances. 


■ yJ.'. y ■■ ;• 



Mehael A Ashcroft 
Chairman and President 



Unaudited 

8 months to 
June 30 1080 

*wo 

Unaudited 

6 months to 
June 30 1985 
5*000 

Aucfited 
12 months to 
Dacambar31 
1985 
SHOO 

J 

: 

279,948 

231,334 

511,316 

Earnings from oporafioats 
bafotoincomutuus 25,248 

13,778 

43^11 

Not earnings from 
operations 

21,388 

11,201 

36,019 

N«t •amlngs p«r 
common share 

6.6c 

5.1c 

16.9c 



Food Concepts, Inc. 



Mfididean Limited 


If you wcMild Oka a copy of the 1986 Interim Report, apply to: 
Prospect House, Th* Broadway Famham Common, Slough, 
Berkshire 5L2 3PCLTM (02814) 6223 




Pritchard Services 


# 


§2BjrfniH*T 


HeatihServInc. 


Hawley 




APPOINTMENTS 


Dairy Crest Foods; Mr 
Tony Hanuaford becomes 
production director. 

Burlington Publishing 
Company; Mr John Fletcher 
becomes editorial director. 

Michael Kelly Associates: 
Sir Kenneth Alexander be- 
comes chair man . 

Kellogg Company of Great 
Britain: Mr Ross Auckland 
becomes' chairman, Mr David 
Kenner managing director 
and Mr Geoff Lord dt 

managing director. 

Mowlem Group: Mr Cam- 
eron Craig has been made 
deputy chairman. Soil 
Mechanics and Mr John 
Scarnm joins the boards of 
Rock Mechanics and Meacon 
Systems. 

Simmons & Simmons: Mr 
Peter Keuneriey is to become 
joint secretary of the Takeover 
Panel 

Valor Heating: Mr Michael 
Perkins succeeds Mr RM 
Batkin as financial director. 

Pretty Polly: Mr Clive 
Cooke becomes group sales 
director from October 1. Mr 
David Yarnnll takes over as 
finance director and company 
secretary from October 1. 

Regency Life: Mr Glyn 
Hedgers is assigned foe po- 
sition of marketing director. 

Financial i: Mr John Her- 
bert becomes an executive 
director. 

IMP Europe: Mr Larry 
Sargent becomes director, fi- 
nance and administration. 


LMS 


London 

Merchant 

Securities 

pic 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 

Adam & Congoiy 
BCC1 


Ctibank 
-Consolidated 
Gonfaertai Trust 



1 ( 100 % 
1000 % 
1000 % 
10.75% 
10X0% 
10 . 00 % 

CMperata Sank™ — __10.0Q% 

C. Hon & Co 10.00% 

Kong Kong & Soogtai 1(100% 

Lloyds Back 


Hat Westmstsr. 


.10130% 
.100(7% 

Royal Bank of Scotland 1000% 

TSfl 1000% 

O&ank HA LlQ.00% 

t MatiKt BueKw. 


Highlights of the year 

1986 

£000 

1985 

£000 

Profit before tax 

17,211 

16,493 

Profit attributable to 
shareholders 

7,719 

9,337 

Shareholders 1 funds 

167,392 

173,538 

Earnings per Ordinary share 

4.83p 

5.84p 

Dividends per Ordinary share 

2.55p 

2.20p 


Record pre-tax profits achieved, but earnings per share reduced by 
£2.1 million tax increase. Appreciation in market value of listed 
investments greatly exceeds reduction in shareholders' funds. 

Report and Accounts available from the Secretary, (after 16Sept.) 

Carlton House, 33 Robert Adam Street, London W1M 5AH. 


The Laird Group 

PUBLIC UMITED COMPANY - A 

j I Interim Results 1986 



flJnunStBdl 

Hatf'ibarto 

ftWM barn 

tear 


30 Jane 7986 
£VOO 

30 June J38S 
£000 

1985 

£000 

Turnover 

165,000 

203,000 

374589 

Profit before taxation 

13^425 

13,110 

28,979 

Taxation 

(5,100) 

(<k320) 

(9364) 

Profit after taxation 

8,325 

8,790 

19,615 

Extraordinary items 

— 

. — 

(378) 

Profit avaOahfe for 
Ortfinary Stockholders 

8,325 

8,790 

19,237 

Dividends 

0299) 

(1,880) 

(4.742) 

Retained profit 

6,026 

6,910 

14/95 

Earning* par Ordinary 
Stock Unit 

10-Sp 

TL2p 

24.9p 

Notes 




j interim dirideod of 2-9pna par Ordhaiy Stock Unit (1985 2.4p net) wffl be paid 

oo 1 December 1986. 

2L The tax charge for die half year tsd&des orcneas 

tar of 0.6 onSion {1985 £2J nriflaan). 

Hash an tmaafhmdafi&annouiiccmm of lieiraerim results fof&akdfyear to 30 7azel9g6iiikich 
■ ThtLnTdGrtBtpPubbcLmiUalC&nparw, SSc.Jaasa’s Square, LombmSVnY'jfC.- 
; • 



h 


1 Jr 


3' E. 


- ; 

! 1 


*:• 


c 






i-* 







r 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


* 


Marler Estates jumps 32p on 
Glen stake speculation 


By Michael Clark 

Sbarcs of Mario- Estates, now worth at least 625p a 

share, including the Chelsea 


the property developer; 
jumped 32p to 530p after 
hours yesterday amid specula- 
tion that Mr Terry Kamsden, 
the racehorse owner apd 
owner of Walsall Football 
pub. had again lifted his stake 
in the company. 

At the last count Mr 
Ramsden's privately owned 
investment company Gkn 
International held IS per cent 
of Marler, but looks to have 
now raised its stake to just 
over 20 per cent. 

Dealers in the market Harm 
Mr Ramsden has made a 
shrewd investment in Marler, 
which laid, month rgfo»H 
nearly £1 1 million to buy 

• Consolidated Gold Fields is 
still finding favour with an- 
alysts ahead of next week's 
final results, despite the politi- 
cal tnrmoQ in South Africa. 
Mr Jeff Ware and Mr Robot 
Sassoon at Credit Snisse 
Bnckmaster & Moore see 
pretax profits at £144 milfioa 
in 1986-&7 after a slight dip to 
£110.9 million this year. The 
shares eased 3p to 539p. 

Fulham Football Club’s Cra- 
ven Cottage stadium. 

Yesterday the group an- 
nounced that 98 per cent of 
rights issue bad been taken up. 
Marler already owns Stamford 
Bridge home of Chelsea Foot- 
ball Club and has just received 
planning permission for a 
residential development on 
the site. 

Marler seems to have simi- 
lar plans for Craven Cottage. 
Football fans are now worried 
that both clubs will eventually 
be forced to find new venues 
and a plans to share a ground 
have not been ruled out 

Close observers estimate 
that Mailers’ asset value is 


and Fulham grounds and the 
Wembley Plaza shopping cen- 
tre, and should continue to 
ve. We could hear news 
rtber acquisitions by the 
group soon.. 

The rest of the equity 
market made a firm start 
following a better overnight 
performance cm Wall Street- 

Early attempts by the job- 
bers to mark prices lower 
ended in failure with the 
appearance of a few buyers on 
the scene. Investors' con- 
fidence strengthened as the 
day wore on and even the 
latest disappointing set of 
money supply figures foiled to 
much impact 

The FT 30 share index 
dosed 7.4 up at 1,331.1, while 
the FT-SE 100 share index . 
advanced 6.8 to 1,673.4. 

Gilts were left out in the 
cold by the money supply 
figures which were worse than 
the market had feared and 
once again scuppered any 
eariy hopes of a cut in interest 
rates. 

Prices at the longer end of 
the market opened with losses 
stretching to £Vfc, but these 
were extended to over £% by 
the dose. 

Dee Corporation, which ear- 
lier this year paid more than 
£600 million to Associated 
British Foods for the Fine 



SHARE PRICE 

I I j 1 


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG 


EQUITIES 

■"MB* 

BBS tiesfari (CT p) 
Beaverco 
Borland (11 
Broad St (4 
Chelsea Man' (12 
Creighton Labs (l30p) 
Evans HalWww (imp) 
Hatcher Dennys (7Qp) 
GT Management (2i0p) 
Guthrie Corn (150p) 
Harrison (150p) 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Mortal Sterling Open 

Sop 06 955? 

Dec 86 90-53 

Mar 07 90.61 

JW107 : 90.50 

Sep 87 0021 

Dec 87 89.90 

Previous day's total open interest 15304 
Month Eurodollar 


Three 
Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 : 

Jim 87 

US Treasury Bond. 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


Sep 88. 
Dec 86. 
Mar 87. 


Long Qtt 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 

Jun87 — 
FT-SE 100 
Sep 86 — 
Dec 88 — 


8402 
8-UH 
93k 87 
93.65 

87-15 

96-06 

NT 


10028 
100-20 
' NT 


117- 28 

118- 11 
NT 
NT 

167.50 
171 .75 


163 
199+2 
68 
150+2 
150-2 
54-3 
130 
173+3 
' 117 
69 
206 
171 
162 


Mgh - Uw dose EstVoi 

9010 Stun 80.01 706 

9056 9039 9040 3111 

9061 90.40 9050 191 

9050 90.47 90.42 28 

90.21 - 9021 90.15 - 8 

89.90 8920 0090 6 

Previous day’s total open interest 24815 
9409 04.02 94.07 521 

94.07 9400 94.C6- 4044 

9091 93.67 99.93 952 

9359 9355 9066 413 _ 

Previous da/s total open Intere s t 4 4 80 
97-15 97-13 97-06 7 

96*28 96-06 96-13 5541 

— — 95-15 0 


Fare supermarket chain, rose 
8p to 26 8p following a major 
seminar for the company with 
institutions ar the offices of 
Rowe & Pitman, Mullens, the 
broker. 

The second call of I37p for 
its partly paid vendor placing, 
which was made to finance the 
acquisition of Fine Fare, is 
doe later this month. Appar- 
ently the institutions were told 
that the group is now better 
placed for growth than ever 
before. 

Some brokers reckon Dee is 
second to rival J. Sainsbury 
among the high street food 
retailors, but does not have the 
same exposure. 

Ftm international, the 
money broker and financial 
services group, was steady at 
237p despite the news First 
City Financial Corporation of 


RECENT ISSUES 


Wo Ergonom 
Hughes Food 
Lon utd In* f 
M6 Cash & C 
Marina Dev (11 
Morgan G rentes 
Newage Trans ( 
Scot tttoe 1001 


Vancouver had again been 
buying shares in the company. 
‘ It has now raised its holding 
from 6.5 per cent to 8.9 per 
cent FCFC is the bolding 
company for the wealthy Ca- 
nadian Belzberg family. Mr 
William Matthews, managing 
director of Exco, said he had 
not been in touch with the 
Belzbeig’s. But be may be 
wondering what the reaction 
of Tan Sri Khoo Phoat, the 
Malaysian businessman who 
already owns 27.3 per cent of 
Exco. is to the latest 
purchases. 

He has already given an 
undertaking not to bay, or sell 
any more Exco shares for at 
least a year — unless someone 
else builds up a stake of more 
than 10 percent 

Boots, the high street chem- 
jst advanced 8p to 22Sp in 



(130p) 

Tandy bids (112p) 
Thames TV (190p) 
Tibbat A Britten (120p) 
Ties 2H %iK 2016 *97 
Unlock (Kp) 



Wmdsjnoor (106p) 
Yehrerton (38p) . 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

AM Irish Bk N/P 
BBA Gp F/P 
Berkeley Tech N/P 
Bods N/P 
Brown A Tame N/P 
Cttyirhiion F/P 
Forward Tech F/P 
Rush A Tomldns N/P 
Sedgwick N/P 
SutcHf. Speak N/P 
(Issue price in brackets). 


107+2 

»4 


25-2 

218+1 

7 

229 +8 
Sh+'z 
27+2 
39+1 

8 

30+4 

20-1 


100-26 

100-20 


117- 28 

118- 14 


us day’s 
10815 


2081 


10810 


14 
186 

— 99-82 0 


ctay’s total open tamest 14108 
117-05 117-05 21 

117-00 117-09 102S5 

— — • 117-03 0 

— — 117-03 0 

frevious day's tote! qpan Interest 2437 

16930 187.50 16840 260 

17230 17130 17175 82 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


RmtOteBngs Lest Hei n e* UM P a ttHwi For S sMtamsta 

Sep 8 Sap 19 Dec 4 Dec is 

Sep 22 OdS Dec 18 

OclB Oct 17 Jan B Jan 19 

d opSons ware taken out ore 3/9/M Amstrad Consumer Bectronks. Audjotranlc 

Dobson. North Kalgurf bunas. Nationwide Leisure. 

PutBCI. 

Put A Cat North KatgurilMnoe. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's moe 
Seri ilier 9 

N York 1^56-1^885 
Montreal Z0607-ZQ593 
Ams’dem3.451 B-3A692 
Brussels 6833-63.75 
Cphgan 11.5754-11.6387 
Dub* 1.1102-1.1171 
FfBnkfirt3.0609-3.0781 
Lisbon 2173821863 
Madrid 20031-20135 
M8an 210738212333 
Oslo 103184-103554 
Paris 83971-103600 
STWam 103998103414 
Tokyo 231.07-23130 
Vieira 2131-2134 
Zurich. 24867-23081 


0344)31 prem 
O.4043Oprttn 
1ft-1ftpram 
1814pram 


September! 

1A855-.1468S 

23507-23538 

3.4516-3.4561 

63386332 
1137B7-113B40 Xpram-Ktae 
1.1117-1.1127 6-1pram 
3360833652 ' 

2173821636 

2003920038 
210738211232 1 

103184-103332 
103028-103198 254-2)4 pram 

103898103133 K-Xpram 
231 37-231 AS Ift-ftprem 
2131-2134 . 189prsm 

24867-24906 IX-IXpram 
(era down at 71^4 (daytare 


1.4«-143prem 

038038pram 

4X-4prem 


1%-1ftprarn 

80-145d* 

30-70dt5 


1pcwn-14dta 
4'4-4prwn 
27tM65c*s 
95-165dcs 
4-10dta 
lift-12* dis 
6%-SXpnwi 
■Db-Xpram . 
3-2ftpram 
25*22ftp ram 
3Xri»iprani- 
I7U7I4' 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


nraanomsnca 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



response to recent reports that 
Hanson Trust may now own 
about 4 per cent of the equity. 

Boots, is just above its low 
for the year at 209p and has 

consistently underperformed 

the rest of the market There is 
speculation that a bid for the 
company may be on the cards. 

Marketmen claim that the 
group’s property portfolio has 
attracted a number of admir- 
ers and the low share price 
makes Boots vulnerable. 

De Zoete St Bevan, the, 
broker, seem to agree with 
Hanson’s decision to top up 
its holding and regard Boots as 
a short-term buy, but reckon 
its size and diversity makes it 
safe from a bid. 

De Zoete claims that the 

• Interim figures from BTI^ 
due out today, will make 
pleasant reading. Analysts 
have beat foresting pret a x 
profits of between £190 mil Ron 
and £200 mlllioa compared 
with £151 milium last time, 
but the final figure could be a 
lot hither. Some marketmen 
were talking It as high as £220 
mllli oa yester da y as the 
shares rose 5p to 320p. 

group has run out of ideas on 
retail and has no new drugs to 
• boost profits, which last year 
rose from £181.4 million to 
£210.4 million. Hanson, un- 
changed at 197p, favours the 
VS Tor seeking future ac- 
quisitions and is still involved 
in the SCM Corporation and 
Imperial Group acquisitions. 

Meanwhile, marketmen 
think that Hanson is dose to 
agreeing a price for its Courage 
brewery division, Much it 
inherited with Imperial 
Group. The race seems to be 
between Anhenser Busch and 
Elders JXL. the Australian 
brewer. This rives little com- 
fort to speculators who are 
hoping that Elders wifi renew 
its bid for Allied Lyons after 
last week’s all-dear from the 
Government 

Allied met further nervous 
selling, but managed to dose 
above its worse levels of the 
day, 3p cheaper at 345p. 

Elsewhere in the drinks 
sector, Guinness recovered 
some of its poise finning 2p to 
333p. after 328p. This was 
ahead of tomorrow’s general 
meeting to vote on the pro- 
posed new management 
structure. 

If approved by sharehold- 
ers, Mr Ernest Saunders, the 
Guinness chief will be ap- 
pointed chairman and chief 
executive. This .move has 
attracted strong criticism from 
some of Guinness's institu- 
tional supporters. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


The risk no Guinness 
shareholder can take 


A clever, finely orchestrated cam- 
paign by the Scotish commercial 
establishment will reach its crescendo 
in the Mount Royal hotel, London, 
tomorrow when shareholders in 
Guinness are to vote on the structure 
of the board and the appointment of 
four new non-executive directors. 

The new structure is unitary, not 
two-tiered, and the chairman, Ernest 
Saunders, is also chief executive. Both 
are radical departures from state- 
ments made in documents issued by 
Guinness (hiring its bid for Distillers 
(DCL) earlier this year, which pro- 
posed a two-tier board for the merged 
group with Sir Thomas Risk, Gov- 
ernor (chairman) of the Bank of 
Scotland, a non-executive chairman. 

This change in direction has led to 
accusations that Guinness has broken 
a solemn commitment to Distillers 
shareholders whom it persuaded to 
suport the Guinness cause against that 
of Argyll; and has cast an unforgi veable 
slur on a distinguished and honour- 
able Scot. Guinness statements at the 
height of the bid about making 
Scotland “the decision-making 
centre” of the group also have a 
hollow ring north of the Border. The 
clans in Glasgow and Charlotte- 
square are baying for blood and the 
Scottish media bath daily in mass 
hysteria. 

The blood in particular they want is 
Ernest Saunders* who has been sub- 
jected to malign and racist insults of a 
despicable kind. “Deadly Ernest** is 
not without his fault: Ms ambition has 
a hard edge and his judgement and 
sensitivity in dealing with the issues 
now confronting Mm have fallen 
short. But he is not the first great 
manager to make mistakes either in 
the heat of a takeover battle or in the 
haste with wMch he has to get to grips 
with the real management problems 
suddenly confronting a successful 
bidder. 

The Scottish institutions, which did 
no more than sell their Distillers 
shares as they watched Scotland’s 
leading company sink steadily into the 
mire, have now decided to take a 
stand. As the total Scottish 
shareholding in Guinness is probably 
nearer five than 10 per cent, they need 
the support of English institutions. 

As the latter are afl too familiar with 
the vagaries and hypocrisies of Scot- 
tish commercial nationalism, the 
Guinness debate has been focused on 
two other issues. First, the way 
Guinness, and presumably its prin- 
cipal City advisers (Moigan Grenfell, 
Lazards and Cazenove), by wilfully 
breaking commitments made in for- 
mal documents, is undermining the 
system of self-regulation to which the 
City is wedded. Secondly, not only the 
apparently shabby treatment of Sir 
Thomas Risk but the case this makes 


for shareholders, in their company s 
and their own interest, to curb the 
arrogance of a man who would be 
both chairman and chief executive. 

The first issue I am prepared to 
argue any time: sufficient perhaps on 
this occasion to quote the Financial 
Times leader writer, who found it “far 
from clear” that the Guinness case fc a 
major challenge to self-regulation.* 4 If 
one accepts that it is a minor 
challenge, then the City, and the Scots, 
would do far better to devise a simple 
process whereby management's desire 
to depart from an undertaking could 
be vetted. 

The second issue is more immedi- 
ate and more telling. It is important 
for Guinness shareholders to realize 
frilly what the Scottish clique, in 
alliance with Kleinwort Benson, the 
closely related M&G and other south- 
ern supporters, are asking them to do 
when they vote tommorow. They are 
being urged to undermine the position 
of Ernest Saunders and the Guinness 
board and senior management to the 
point where the group would become 
unmanageable. 

No one may be irreplaceable but at 
risk here is an enure board and 
management team capable of welding 
Guinness with Distillers and turning 
Distillers from the disaster it is to the 
success it clearly can become. The 
Guinness share price if shareholders 
were to reject the first resolution on 
tomorrow’s agenda would be painful. 
For that reason alone it would be 
inexcusable if any investing institu- 
tion did not consider its obligation to 
those whose savings it holds and 
voted for the Guinness board. 

The voting ought, and I believe will, 
go in Guinness's favour. This game 
however, is not just about winning. 

One of Guinness's difficulties in 
defending its comer is the contrast 
that has been skilfully drawn between 
the ambitious and abrasive Saunders 
and the dignified and constructive 
Risk, who has wanted “to keep away 
from personalities** but has been 
astute in the timing of Ms interven- 
tions — and even in his use of a 
professionbal public relations adviser. 

Though Sir Thomas has seemed to 
keep a low profile, leaving much of the 
campaign against Guinness to Ms 
close aides. Raymond Jonhstone, 
chairman of Murray Johnstone, and 
Charles Fraser, the Scottish solicitor 
who left Morgan Grenfell with a great 
flourish on Monday, Ms role has been 
crucial 

For the chairman of a major bank 
he has taken an extraordinary chance. 
It is quite clear that there are gaps in 
Sir Thomas’s version which if re- 
vealed might shake some of the 
confidence placed in his account of 
events. 


Hong Kong doitar 
mda ni pM 
Iraq dinar _ 

Kuwait (finer KD 
Malaysia dollar 

Mexico peeo 1060.08111030 

Now Zealand doflar 3.1196-3.1349 

Saudi Aiataartyal 5352M3920 

Singapore doitar 82301-32330 

South Africa rand 
UAEdrtam 
"Lloyds Bank 





Hong Kong 
Portugal. 
Spain - 
Austria 


by Barclays Bank HORX and EstaL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Stare Oct Jan Apr Oct dee Apr 


ABad Lyons 
(*345) 


300 

51 

63 

330 

30 

42 

360 

12 

25 


72 3 

50 8 

33 23 


6 9 

13- 15 
28 30 


BP 

C678) 


550 

600 

650 


130 147 
80 105 
45 65 


160 1 
120 2 
82 16 


5 9 

10 18 
25 SB 


Sedas Bapt Dac Mur Bap Ore 


500 38 55 65 6 13 25 

550 10 30 48 28 38 43 

600 2 13 22 70 77 80 


Thom EMI 420 100 115 122 1 2 & 

{•514) 460 60 77 85 1% 7 10 

1 1 500 22 45 55 5 15 23 


Cons Gold 
(-539) 

500 

550 

600 

53 

23 

9 

75 

45 

20 

87 

57 

32 

11 

37 

70 

25 

47 

80 

35 

52 

85 

a 


300 

330 

125 

9S 

106 


1 

1 

2 


Courtatads 

260 

29 

41 

49 

3 

7 

11 



390 

35 

50 

82 

2 

_8_ 

15 

(*283) 

»0 

6 

17 

23 

20 

25 

28 


Series 

Nov 

Fab 

May 

Now 

Feb 

Hay 


330 

1% 

8 











12 

17 


Com Union 

(-302) 

280 

300 

26 

10 

36 

21 

43 

30 

2 

10 

6 

16 

10 

19 

cm 


500 

650 

23 

10 

38 

20 

53 

32 

33 

70 

40 

73 

45 

77 

330 



18 






360 

390 

420 

460 



- 




Cabto&Wna 

(*327) 

300 

325 

350 

37 

18 

5 

50 

34 

18 

60 

45 

27 

6 

13 

27 

10 

20 

35 

17 

27 

40 

cm 


45 

24 

10 

60 

38 

20 

67 

50 

30 

7 

18 

42 

12 

22 

46 

17 

25 

50 


375 












87 

4 

7 

10 

Drawers 

(*745) 

600 

650 

160 

110 

— 


1* 

4 

— 

— 

<*S09) 


SCO 

550 

35 

10 

52 

23 

65 

33 

18 

47 

22 

47 

25 

50 

700 


— 




~~ 





36 

42 

7% 

5 

8 

GEC 

POO) 

100 

200 

10 

4 

20 

9 

26 

16 

8 

22 

11 

24 

14 

28 

raw 


200 

220 

14 

5* 

19 

11 

27 

17 

91 

20 

13 

24 

17 

28 

220 

2 









23 

31 

8ft 

7* 

7 

8 

Grand Met 
(*406) 

327 

355 

82 

55 

— 

— 

1 

1 

— 



P80J 


180 

200 

9 

4 

16 

7 

25 

11 

21 

14 

22 

15 

380 

382 

33 

65 




8 

Guinness 


300 

47 

22 

57 

35 

67 

45 

3 

ft? 

6 

IS 

10 

70 

ICI 

950 

137 

IK 

175 

132 

95 

65 

3 

9 

14 



360 

11 

17 

27 

30 

as 

88 

(1072) 

1000 

1050 

1100 

52 

25 

85 

57 

22 

47 

34 

55 

45 

67 

Imperial Or 
(*3S7) 


300 

330 

360 

100 

70 

42 



1%. 

1* 

5 



Land Sec 
(*321) 

300 

330 

380 

27 

8 

2 

3b 

19 

8 

43 

26 

14 

2* 

13 

40 

5 

16 

41 

7 

17 

41 

Udtaoke 

C385) 


300 

330 

360 

68 

40 

20 

80 

52 

31 

62 

42 

1 

4 

13 

2 

7 

15 

12 

22 

Marks* Span 
(*215) 

180 

200 

220 

37 

19 

6 

44 

26 

13 

bl 

33 

19 

1* 

4 

12 

2 

7 

15 

' 4 

10 

17 

LASMO 

P30) 


100 

110 

120 

33 

25 

18 

42 

33 

25 

S 

2 

3* 

7 

5 

9 

12 

15 

She* Trans 

1*945) 

750 

800 

850 

190 

140 

92 

SO/ 

157 

112 

220 

172 

127 

1 

2 

4 

1 

4 

15 

5 

11 

22 

MOtandBark 

(•579) 


500 

550 

800 

32 

50 

22 

110 

72 

32 

120 

85 

50 

a 

10 

30 

7 

IB 

37 

10 

22 

42 

Trafalgar House 
(-295) 

250 

280 

300 

38 

23 

10 

4b 

31 

18_ 

63 

38 

26 

3 

8 

15 

8 

15 

24 

11 

20 

29 

P&O 

C543) 


460 

500 

590 

B8 

48 

16 

102 

67 

38 

88 

50 

2 

8 

20 

5 

IS 

32 

17 

3B 




Pec 







600 

6 



60 

— 



Scries 

_®2- 

Uar 

sap UBG 




160 

30 

38 

47 

2 

5 

6 

eoodwm 

360 

390 

55 

25 

67 

42 

re 

50 

3 

5 

5 

11 

9 

17 

PM) 


180 

200 

15 

6 

24 

14 

30 

18 

7 *10 
18 20 

14 

22 


420 

460 

S 

3 

23 

13 

35 

20 

52 

57 

32 

58 

R7Z 

(*632) 


500 

550 

140 

90 

147 

100 

— 

2 

7 

5 

17 

z 

BOOH 

200 

230 

30 

13 

37 

2* 

4b 

32 

1 

4 

3 

10 

5 

13 



GOO 

650 

50 

23 

65 

40 

85 

62_ 

18 

38 

87 

82 

40 

72 


240 

3 

IS 

20 






60 

18 

a> 

22 

2* 

5 

5 

BTR 

280 

300 

42 

53 

62 

48 

2 

b 

9 

16 

f74) 


70 

so 

9* 

5 

12* 

7* 

14 8 9 10* 

9* 10* 13* 15* 


333 

4 

16 

— 





— 

— 







Bass 

700 

750 

800 

75 

950 

105 

1 

7 

12 


series 

Nov 

Mar 

Jon 

Nav 

Mar 

Jmb 

(*773) 

8 

28 

48 

38 

43 

48 

Loreho 

cm • 


200 

218 

238 

240 

255 

32 

21 

11 

"i 

42 

47 

4 

8 

10 

Blue Cade 

r»i) 

550 

600 

650 

20 

5 

1 

43 

20 

8 

60 

37 

20 

12 

43 

93 

22 

45 

93 

28 

45 

93 


18 

— 

21 

37 

29 

arere 

De Beers 

550 

000 

650 

700 

175 

125 

65 

48 

195 

170 

3 

4 

6 

17 

30 


Setae 

Nov 

Fab 

“BL 

Nov 

Ftab Way 

1*713) 

110 

80 

130 

100 

12 

25 

32 

50 

50 

70 

TY 11M 1991 
(*£107) 


106 

106 

"iM 

>»* 


« 

lire 

it 

“re 

3* 

2* 

“re 

2ft 

On 

Dixons 

1*382) 

300 

330 

360 

86 

56 

2fi_ 

48 

42 

76 

50 

1 

4 

4- 

8 

6 

12 

Trim* 03/07 
(*£115) 


114 

116 

“re 

3 


1* 

2* 

"re 

4ft 

GKN 

(*288) 

260 

280 

300 

330 

28 

1428 

4 

* 

43 

31 

16 

8 

bl 

38 

28 

15 

1* 

6 

17 

45 

b 

13 

23 

46 

9 

16 

27 

48 



118 
120 
122 
12 4^ 

1* 

W 

* 

1* 

1* 


5* 

7% 

SlL, 

6ft 

6 

6ft 


900 

130 

165 

— 

5 

25 

— ' 


Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec Sap! 

Oct 

Nev 

Dec 

(1020) 

1050 

8b 

45 

22 

125 

95 

70 

130 

IIS 

25 

50 

60 

80 

68 

96 

FT-SE 1525 
index 1550 

165 

140 

115 

180 

155 

133 

193 

170 

150 


1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
5 

5 

.9 

12 


Hanson 

PS7) 

135 

150 

160 

180 

200 

64 

49 

39 

19 

4% 

44 

26 

15% 

47 

31 

19* 

1 

1 

1 

1 

7* 

1* 

4 

12 

3* 

7 

18 . 

. ' 1600 
1625 
1650 
1675 
1700 

« 

TO 

50 

35 

17 

112 

90 

70 

53 

40 

128 

118 

100 

83 

65 

113 

98 

8S 

2 

4 

10 

23 

40 

10 

17 

23 

33 

45 

20 

27 

33 

42 

53 

41 

57 

70 


Jilifiiifinrlf 1— Total conbacta 18638. Gala 15361. Puls 3279. Ua dertyfag aanwfr priCfc 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


Most people seem to bare 
come to the coal nsion that 
West Germany, Japan, or the 
US win hare to provide the 
impetus for another round of 
base rate cats, so the British, 
money supply figures hardly 
caused a ripple in the period 
rates. They were occasionally 
marked up 1-16 but a few 
buyers then emerged in 6 to 12 
■oaths paper to bring rates 
beck to earlier levels. Local 
authorities stayed on the side- 
lines. 

RwRataS 

Clearing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 
Macon* Marirat Loans % 

Overnight Hfigtt9 ,5 i* Low 8 
We o fc TBre dTfa 

2mntfi 9"re 


2mnS 

3 natal 


9* . . 

9»re 3 moth 

Ink BOa (Discount %) 

1 ninth 9*sia0*» 2mntt fPs-S”* 

Smrtai 6mnth fPt+Q’hn 

Trade BHa (Discount %) 

1 natal 10’re 2 moth 10”* 

Smrtai 10*32 Biratai 10’re 

(%) 

10 dose 9% 

IK 6 mntti 954-9X 
1M*a 9mtai9ft-9* 
189% 12ntti9%4* 


1 

1 moth 
Smrtai 


2 days 9K 
1 natal 9* 
Smrtai SK 


Smrtai 9K 
12mtn 9 Si 

Authority Bonds (%) 

1 natfi Ittw-luSt 2 natal 10K-10 
3 moth IOiS-10 6 matt 10X-1D 
9 natal 10K-10 12 ntai SK-9H 



1 rontt 5.85-5-90 3mnm 5.8S-SJM 
6 natal 5U5580 12 mth 6.18605 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days S»tfr5K 
Smrtai 5®w-5°w 


7 days 4 ”w-4»hi 
3natai4K-4% 


7 stays 7X-7X 
Smith 7 7 ir7*re 


7 days 2-1* 

3 nattt 4X-4X 

Tm 

7 days s-4* 

3 natal 40*4”* 


GOLD 


Gol&Sm -5841 250 
Krugerrand' (par gait 
S 4765)841 SUB (£274082775(8 

WO) 


ECfiD 


fixed Rate Sterling export' finance 
Schema IV AveraM iterance rate (or 
Interest periodAugust 6, 1986 M 
September 2. 1986 ttCMtae: 9590 per 
cut 






ai>i> ijuim'ivx 


IJtifc l iM£S WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 **36 


Bj Oiw Ci"M ™ 


Od Oner Qmg TO 


ABBEY UNIT TRUST HAHAGERS 




131. Fntwi Pram. teusa BG2A 1AY 
01-631 9876 01-200 85*0/1/5/3 
Craoi Ora-vi he 595 83b -02 is* 

Do Mom 065 71. 1 -Ob 1.6* 

Edam 8 Mfl 1367 1*24# -68 678 

00 8*- WWMi l 725 77b« -6* 0.78 

Finance » Proportf 67 8 725* +05 20* 
«6 Fra* Income 47.8 M3* -0.1 828 
Do Maim 81.4 06M -0.1 828 

Eui mom 76 a szie -0.3 tas 
DO Man 1E2.0 1945* -08 4b5 

WlYMUCtm 733 807* -62 636 

Do Accum 5015 2165* -03 636 

M Income 798 85 4 -09 212 

□0 Mom BZD B7.7 -68 2.19 

Da 54* vmndnrf 74. i 792 -os 2.1Z 
Managed Find 85.8 892 +02 . . 

Pivaoranca tnccmo 29.7 31.7 +0.1 ft BO 

Do Acorn 961 102.7 +04 950 

Sraaaer Go's Aeon 135.1 1445 +1.5 1-81 

wou Penny snm 97 163 . . D.71 

PontaM Tin UK 78.9 81.7 -0.4 155 

POrtOHJ Tel Jam 184 S 1068 -63 fiBO 

Pantoko Tn US 71 1 718 -0.1 167 

PatUO TM Euapo 1218 1260 -19 600 

PontofcO T« HK 418 <5.1 -02 D.1P 

BMLueauFRXia 

KMelMMSi Emwrfi EH3 6YY 
031-225 2581 <De*anrt31-22G 80881 
M Ex (221 4622 4778 189 

JVM 6* 1*3) 4470 4S7.® 026 

UK E* (31) 33S.7 2560 122 

Pm pans ma 44&0 4718 

PM Pens UK 1998 2026 . . 

DO Amerce 10.7 inte -1.7 026 

bo Energy 151.1 1608 -1.4 127 


M E* 122) 4622 4776 189 

JVM 6*1*3) 4475 4S7.® OJO 

UK E* (31) 330.7 2560 182 

PM Pans 016 4460 4718 

PM pens UK 1998 2026 . . 

DO Amerce 10.7 1866* -1.7 026 

BO Energy 151.1 1668 -18 127 

dq means Gram is&s a.4» +oa 5.is 

BQJeoen 194.6 207.1 -08 0 00 

BG TeCUntfogy 1398 I486 -22 20 

BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 
25/26 ABermerls Snm. Union HnX 4AD 
01-491 0295 

American *6.4 *67 -06 077 

AM****! 165 17.7C -0.1 386 

Japan 8 General 1128 1205* +02 0.17 
Hsh Income 451 *6M +02 553 

mnuwne Tnnt M7 664 -64 18* 

income Qn TM 47.7 51.1 +02 3.B2 

am 5 fixed Ire 263 2180 .. BOO 

Cterae Mertnu 338 362 -61 286 

SpsdN Samara *09 418 +lb 1.49 

BARCLAYS IMCMI 
Uracsm Hows. 252. Romford Rd E7 
01-534 9844 


Amend 
Men Accun 
Do mease 
Cam 

Erempi Treat 
Em Income 
Fauna* 

300 


ON 6 PMd me 632 3584 

Jhbi 6 Gan hie 1713 1812 

00 ACC 1742 1B63 

Grown Aceun 1818 193.4 

mean* Trus 3417 36*6* 

insure Trust 066 85.7 

Special Snuakona 1458 154.7a 

Reconn 1978 2102 

Thom Fimd Ml 116b 

Urn Teen Accum 51.7 54.9 

Do Uioonw 812 54.4 

Wartdmtt Trust 151.7 1612 

B' Til rnv Fund Acc 334A 356 7 

Da me 2167 2366 


865 908 -18 129 

1329 M12 +0.1 123 

043 1063 +61 1,43 

70.7 76.3ft -0.5 287 
4392 4672 -19 397 

773 822 -03 537 

2360 209 -12 383 

2712 2865* -02 105 

1424 181.4 -67 384 

832 519ft -68 980 

1723 1812 -28 086 

1742 1863 -2.7 606 

1819 1914 -19 22* 

3427 3645* -08 383 

066 067 -61 128 

1458 15*.7c -0.1 224 
1976 2102 -13 225 





4. ilnMa Crescent. Eortxmn 
031-228 3482 

M nawc a n Rev 732 ' 789 -18 217 

CaMN am 08 1067 +05 10 

Growth 6 Inc Fwd 1318 140.7N +118 426 
High Dm Fund 1110 1189 +02 583 

taMnahauU Raid 109 Zil* -09 1 05 

Resources Raid 235 25.1 -03 0*0 

3*ar JOP Cos Fna 352 37.8 -01 . 

Tauyo Fund 1761 IftfiAft -19 080 

®d Amsr (3 1461 1539 -39 155 

(E*) Japan p) 114 B 1189 .. 618 

IE*) Pacfc (4) 202 2967 e ' .. 023 

teg Sower Jip (4) 20&4 2152 . . 610 

Euoheid 279 S3 -02 328 

EAGLE STAR UNIT TRUST HUNAOO« 

Bam Road. CMMmam. GtaucMer OL83 710 
0242 521311 

UK Balanced me 720 789 +02 277 

Do Accum 711 788 +63 Z72 

UK Gtowlf Accum 87.0 SZO +61 10 


UK 6 Gen 

3l UNIT TRUST MANAGER® 

J s> tvv Ana Laeim El-JA Be? 

01 9ZB-JJ30 

SnsPa Coe ss: 03 01,1 

BSSTmi duck Law-, scav 

3AT 


01 2*9 1250 

Ammcon Gra»*n 40 

Ooneml Growth 53 

Gtoo+i Tech *5 

Income Grcunrh 6? 

IpcpMi iswany 49 

.cijvTr Grorttn ** 

Mon EduMV Inc 25 

Do Accum S> 

0 s*ws Grown 

Snueof Co* W 

SpOM> Opps 76' 

tmdall managers 
12 Canyngc R6 Branal 
0272 r32Si 

Ausrraaon £5 

DO Acc 

336 

To Aeeum w 

Etttrar 300 

Do Accum 690 

Fa Ess ran 

Do Accum I61 

Fin 5 prop 55 

Do Acrum 0- 

G4ICWU> *» 

Do Accum 1*3 

GN income 105 

Da Accum »»■ 

Hon View 55 

Do Aacun 121 

MOW 241 1 

Do Accum >55 

M Esnw*js 165 


407 

43 4# 

U3» 

57 9 

450 

4'9 

627 

oSB 

49 5 

5J0S 

Jrt L ’ 

S?7 

rs* 

• 1 

ht 

27 1 


SC 7 

649 

690 

7&* 

BQ.'e 


-06 1* ^ 
-Cl 141 
-01 inO 
*0l *M 

«il I led.' 

-u.r 0.1.' 


-0 7 148 
-or ihd 
*0 7 3DJ 
*( I 1 UJ 
*62 4*7 
-D5 5.47 
-02 421 

-03 an 

*62 JO.' 
*04 JO? 
-61 644 
644 
<1 *71 
-01 371 
U» 
6.04 
+0 4 493 
+14 4 63 
*02 219 


UK PROVIDENT UT MANAGERS 

UK Hcuan i>Jc St. SASCvry SP1 3SH 
0722 335242 

UK Epuey 1155 1227 +62 

PaattBJS-n 169? 179 7 -1 8 

N Amur 1173 1246 -03 


VANGUARD TRUST 
65 H um an Vddua ECia 3EU 
Gerarsi Btourm 01-238 3053 DeaMig Line 01- 
23fi 2468 

Growth Ira I960 20&6N +61 1 16 

DoACCun 268 5 307 on +02 2 IB 

T vSr •• ?« 

ACCum 2197 2336 *75 

Smwsa *27 *55 -01 237 

8oAeaim *38 4M -01 ZJ7 

Timing 1428 1516c 378 

Do Accum 2173 2313 . 378 

AirarBQen 81 7 0.7 -04 147 

Do Aco*n 617 07 -0.4 147 

Mesrar Pontoeo E632H 6--'®]p+63M 2*3 

Do Accum 1834* 6517 *«J.M 2« 

Atnng Fiatn Asts (51 11B3 1259* .. 10 

Do Accum 1163 12S9 •• 1® 

Far East & Gen Me 4*0 578 +07 on 

Do Accum 540 57 5 +07 00 

WAHOLEV UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
WanMy House, 7. Denmlxa Sq. London EC2 
01-929 1532 

Amencan Trust 01 71.1 -65 10 

FarEastKOnn 10941184* -0* 0*0 

M Giaaei 74.0 76B -66 050 

inca« Tran 864 330 . . 520 

Japan Growth 1302 140 0 -15 010 

Sown Companies 107 7 1159 +03 200 

Technology 3*2 387 -02 0 10 

Australia 40 0 431 -05 150 

UK Trust 1365 1463 . 230 

EurOMMI Growth 511 819 +0.4 OJO 

Hong Kong 21* 2*9 -0 1 i.«Q 

WAVERLEY ASSET MAMAOENEHT 
II Cnartan Sq- Ed noun* 

031-225 101 

AusmUn GMd 19 B 21 1 -0 8 015 

Pacrftt Basal 158 16B -61020 

Canaan BM 0* 58 3 823 -02 097 

Gunn Mse Fna «1D1 3 H&5* -02 700 



• Ex cMdend. c Dim dividend- k Cum 
stack spltt. ■ Ex stock spot m Cum al 
(any two or more of above), a Ex all (any 
two or more of above). Dealing or 
valuation days: (1) Monday. (2) Tuesday. 
(3) Wednesday. (4) Thursday. (5 Friday. 
(20) 25th of month. (2t) 2nd Thursday of 
month. (22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday of 


UNLISTED. SECURITIES 


■irlniliEjESE 


month. (22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday of 
month. (23) 20th of month. (24) 3rd 
Tuesday m month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursdayof month. (26) 4th Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1st Wednesday of month. (28) 
Last Thursday of month. (29) 3rd working 
day of month. (30) 16th of month. (31) in 
working day of month. (32) 20lh ot month. 
(33) in day of February. May, August. 
November. 04) Last wofkmq day of 
month. (35) 15th of month. (36) 14th of 
month. 07) 21st of mqnth._J38) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2nd 
Wednesday of month. (40) Valued 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday of Stock 
Exchange account (42) Last day of 
month. 743) 2nd and 4th Wednesday of 
mrmtH iAA\ Quarterly. (45) 6th of month 
esday of month. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1908 

Kfcgn L0«r Company 


«*v TO 

Puce CtiQB pence % P/E 


M 

45 

13ti 

(» 

w 

XI 

1*3 

45 

10 

32 

21 

a- 

=2 

10 

2TS 

10 

iM 

IDS 



164 

152 

121 

W 

1SI 

Ul 

7SC 

215 

2M 

10 

JM 

IBJ 


131 

ft t 

44J 

Ml 

ia 

ill 

10 

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77 73 103 
43 14*31 
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29 27 34.1 

7.1 54 139 
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29 0804 

1.1 17 569 

7.9 * i 04 
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17 8 , 410 * 



1986 

Wgtl Low Conpany 


Grass 

— oar TO 

Pnce Cn ge panes % P/E 


82 « 

82 87 

102 81 
122 96 
213 155 
118 10V 
101 86 

167 118 

168 10 

118 BOV 
10 139 
10 195 
305 237 
370 300 
213 157V 
146 112 
94 79 

902 217 
51 35 

62 33 

74 53 

109 «V 
356 20 


Sues Tsl CX Scottand 0 

a 

TH Dry Of Lon DU11G 
TTJ Jxf 8 Qon 209 
JR Natural Rm 118 
TR North Anwrica 94 
TR PocffiC BMP 170 
IS Pmpony 186 

TR Ttai 106 

in TnuSM* 178 
T4"W* Bar 150 

Thorgmorton 29B 

prog Secured Op 363 
Jrana Oceanic 213 

TWmW 146 

299 

raw he Tn 44 

522S^ ourc ** S 

105 

Yaaauui 352 


*7>* 34V 
71 31 

4 21 

154 lie 
24 13V 

»'• 12 'a 
156 1» 
10 OT 

3*7 m 

106 OC 

70 379 
B4 77 
151 73 

60 490 
21B 10 
4*0 320 
20 190 
362 252 
127 76 

38V 16 
06 152 


HniaMa* 

Bdonnta Arrow 
Du*y Mra 
Da A' 

Baeta 
Eng Trust 
ExBO 

E*t*»aaan 



28 

43 325 


2b 

2b 56b 


3b 

35 32.7 

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-2 

17 

27 411 

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50 213 

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1L9D 4b 326 

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86 

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♦ 1 

4.0 

27 41.6 


15 8 

17.6 81 

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S3 

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+1 



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76 117 


22 

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Kffll M] 
Hejdarion Arudn 
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Marrantia Houm 
PraAc aw Tat 
Do WBnijti 
SnVm New Court 


COMMODITIES 


Mar 138-OW3.M TTwm M onths. 389ittd91b0 

Apr 14Q.00-30.00 Vot ........ .... put 

Mgr TonB * — “*» 

ALU86UWJM 



13S.Q-33J' 

13S.2-34.7 

13*.0KaJ! 

133.0-31,0 

13 STKJ 2 J ) 


Unofficial prices 
OWctalTuyoaerfiguras 

Pries In £ per metric mh 
S fcsr in panes per troy ounce 

Rudolf Wolf A Co- Ltd. report 
COPPER GRADE A 

Cash 907JSOS8Q.Q0 

Three Months . 327JJOS27J50 

Vol 4800 

Tone ; Steady 

STAMMRD CATHODES 

Cash 883DO-684.00 

ThreoMonthS. 904JX)-906.00 

vof m 

Tone Mto 

LEAD 

Cash Z7"l -00-272.00 

Three Months. 274J50-27&00 

W0» i 875 

Tone Ssiaay 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 545.00-555 

Vol Nfl 

Tone -idle 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash 576^0-577.00 

Three Months . 58i.00-582b0 

Vol , 675 

Tone Steady 


Cash 816.0061 6.00 

Three Months . 78&00-789.00 

VOl 3400 

Tone ; Steady 


SILVER LARGE 

Cate 380.00-382DO 

Three mows. 

Vtt Nfl 

Tone OaM 

SB.VER SMALL 

Cash 3SJ.00-382.00 



LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Kg Contract 
p. parkflo 

Month Open Close 

Oct Uno- Unq. 

Ww Unq. 105.7(1 

Ufiq. 9SJ0 
Apr Unq. Unq. 

«hm Unq, unq. 


Pig Meat vofcO 


LONDON MEAT niTURES 
EXCHANGE 
UveCatu* contract 
P-Perkio 

•onlh Open Clou 
tap ; Unq. 95.00 

Unq. Unq. 
toy Unq. 101.00 

•*> Unq. Unq. 

W . Unq. Una 

M Unq. 100.00 


VofcO 

LONDON GRAM FUTURES 
Epertonrie 

lAnnth US!? 

Close Ckue 

>*P 10725 105.75 

10820 107b0 

1”^ 110.80 
riar 113TO 113JJ0 

^ 11825 116.00 

Ml 117.75 _ 


LONDON 

POTATO RJTURES 

Eper tonne 

Month Open Close 

Noy 11050 11350 

Peb 12300 127.50 

Apr 155.50 161.80 

May 160.50 176.00 

NOV 85.00 85.00 

Vot 1272 

®FFEX 

GJLL Freight Future* LM 1 
“Port S10 per index point 
freight index 

High/Low Close 

0«8$ 800-764 764.0 

Jan 67 792-753 763.0 

Apr» B34-810 8C8.0 

Ail 87 7*5-745 732^ 

Oct 87 8P0.D 


VO* 276 MS 
Open Interest 22« 

TANKER REPORT 
High/Low Close 


Oct 86 

Nov 86 +S 

Dec 86 I* 

Mar 87 

June? i» 

Vol; Nil lots 

Open interest 35 

Spounarlret commentary; 
Tenkerindait; 

1111b up 32.0 on 8/9/86 
cargo mdejc 

733-Sup 55 on 8(9(88 






























Lr» 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



up 10 give you your overall total. Cheek 

ouhlisiSirt^L dai ^ ,i J i Y *^ end figure 

pubUdicd on this page. If it matches you 

*£-!£ ou,n & h ' or a- share of the total 
SnLPftSf “wno If you are a 

*5 ^P 10 Procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your rani available when claiming. 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Equities rally 



ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began September I. Dealings end on Friday. §Contango day next Monday. Settlement day September 22. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


— ( §<dd~~ 


© Time Nnwpapm Limilrd 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Gaims required for 
+38 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 



c imcaB izrziai 

KIKljuggcni^MBilSlSZSSSEll 



122 80 Osman £110 -2 DO U U 

*2 aw nmxdMi ara -a iu uiu 

00 SB Ra* Sms BS OB 1JJ M4 

135 102 RomdriSUMd 129 7.1 SlSSSJ 

sm mi floyi ft* or Scot aso 4* . 1*3 uiu 

B 5"* SdwofMra O' +% 192 23 134 

mu n 0 sand cun i» •-& «j u il 

BIS fil3 Unton SbS -4 52S 7.7 68JJ 

77'. 43'. UW| FU# £73 -1% 

30) 220 Natron 27S • .. 78 28 U 4 


AJtao L y o ns 349 

Ban 773 

B arn au l a 

Be iMr pern wo 

BnnmliMnmt 05 

SS5J2LTW— . & 

"■WWW PI" 

QK (UMMw) SOD 

Oeuanuh p A) 182 

GnMM* Wbtaey 178 

Onm Kina 253 





kwaraardo n PM 155 
fetfi'Gw MS 

Hnui ThoaipKn 112 


Do "B 283 

W WKWB kw MB 

Wottmmntn 8 D Ml 
Young vF 306 


-3 «8 . 

-« 217 : 

.. 12 
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W4 : 
B .. 114 : 

.. 37 

-1 78 , 

+2 ij) : 
46 m3 : 
.. 350 - 

28 i 

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.. 32 ; 

9.1 : 


100 5-2 110 
IM 4-2 ISO 
11.1 *0 130 

11.1 38 13.1 
108 48 288 
UL7 28101 
104 34 210 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


a banta m Cam 230 


teara. 8 "* 

I)»ariinin) m-nrr 


IQKSaBSEinSBiKSIHHl 

is mass ■ m ■ 1 1 1 1 m ifr E?sa =§ :« i 

EDI 
ES 
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mm 


Br OMM 78 

Braun* jschaon 23 
BVMlN 78 

Brunt 120 

Dienau 1 Ua 9V 
Cakatnod Bob#* 150 
Caaam-floaiMoaa 107 
Concur Qip 131 

Cowan 656 

Couaryttda 485 

Crouch (Data*! ISO 
Daw (Gaoraa) iw 

SS?™ 3 ss 

Fab BS 

Do -A’ sa 

Fadorawd Hag OS 
Ri*n Gp GS 

GaBBM 08 

(San & Dandy Old 121 

s 

mesa Bar 2E0 

HewtatvStuan 68 
Haywood WBtama 2TB 
[QpAMi 643 

tens* Johrean ISO 
Jan* (0* Bona «0 

ss 



mmm 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £16.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 



MOMS Sou*) 184 


114 
-4 164 

Ola 

-3 11 

+1 us 
+15 107 
100 


*20 37.1 
1-2 300 

.. MS 

+1 48 


I 138 Btttand ISO 

l 379 Bwncrpa 585 

I 177’j Br TatocOOl 202 

75 Bam Bam KM 104 

rnggniAFTA- « 

284 CM 8 MB aim 327 

CDntmdga EMC 20G 

17B CAP Gp 198 

37 encraa 53 

H9 Do 7'.*fc CPF 213 
203 Co m ae 333 

250 Cay Baa 341 

MO CiyWBM 2SS 

49 DM BM 50 

147 Oman IS 

DBwaiBM 'A* 33 

29Z Dome 317 

37 Doastaig i MU 39 

102 War 1® 

46 Elactronc Math 63 

«z Oa am ca c Ranees 54 

237 BwaUgowg m 

2 » Eunmna 301 

147 Fame! Beta 183 

107 Parana 1(C 

24 r oa ci d Togo 39 

150 DEC If© 

B0 QroiwnO 125 

00 Hrentand Ena as 

30 IK 33 

225 m SM C 008801206 

175 Jonas Stroud 253 

BS KOOO 279 

220 Lee RotngerBtoi 233 

t24 Looks 219 

270 BSBs a 368 

128 Macro 4 192 


Micro BS 05 

«***> Focus 105 

IMHona Baa 45 

Mwiay Sm 43 

NawaarB (U**s) 270 

m at 

Ooeoncs 23 

OMOrd to M Biwna 558 
M liaamatawal in 
Ptmai 24 

PMaa Bn 5Vfc £118 
Piwp* Lamps N/V EiS'a 
PHeo 255 

Do A' LH Voting 165 

29 E19% 

Pia asac 130 


BRITISH FUNDS 


5S V 

04 70 

£*£% 
180 140 
434 320 


Mnarb 256 

Essr* a 
ssrr^ ss 
ESSS'** 38 
ass™"' & 

BMC 570 


lUetoM 

Rugby Cament 


I A FKhar M2 

W « 


ass- a 

Trmt A Arnold 434 

3S iS 

Sss. m I 


AM 3.7 . . 
30 2.7100 
243 4.4 10-3 

95 10 13.1 

00 as 110 

00 7S18.1 
20D 10 23.1 
4.7 40 187 
20 20 117 
20 38 87 
SO 37 143 
5l4 70 170 

S3 73 140 
28 2.1 330 

70 2.1 130 
M 38 13-5 
.. .. 702 

24 80 120 
10.1 4.7 140 

188 3017.6 
7.1 07143' 
143 02 038 
KM) 23 121 
100 23 12.1 
50 40 80 
58 70 03 
102 28 148 
7.4 40 218 

113 33 19.6 
58 48233 
73 00 178 
M Ol .. 
170 40 144 
82 32107 
18 07 .. 
93 73153 
223 53 107 
15.7 10 172 

03 40143 
98b 08 98 
.. ..05 

104 52 70 
200 20 ISO 
183 08 145 
123 81 107 

01 S7 173 

33 25 213 

03b 82 173 
138 27 207 

127 30143 
73 45 123 
122 20173 
13 13 673 
1O0 01290 
150 43120 

108 07 160 
18 13 IOI 
85 05104 
10 10 253 

07 05107 

02 12 212 
58 25207 


05 43 

313 241V 
100V 01 
*B 13 
560 303 

100 in 

32 10 

104 '*114 
17V 13 
ISO 180 
196 120 
245 M2 
24V 15V 
156 110 
45 22 

234 ISO 
486 158 
015 445 
54 30V 

108 SB 
210 M2 

o« re 

10V 12V 
259 170 
12S 44 
529 374 
2SS 170 
350 225 
342 206 
273 170 
295 140 
ISO 115 
505 320 
3ZS 22S 
108 54 

103 75 

310 230 


Santa [CHI 615 
Sound Mutton 37 
BTC 148 

snno M IBS 

Sgwa Dasgnom » 

Tttaphon# Rmu 200 
TH w n Mim 80 

Ttam EMI 514 

THOrp* (FW) 255 
Timm 280 

US 342 

Unaach 185 

Ud LaMno 158 
lltd Savntc igo 
VO nanuaanM 490 
VD*K 250 

Vftsttm n ab o on 74 

a— 1 » U 

iiniwonn dhq do 

Wtnwtt fiamg 305 


100 13 195 

1D.7 53 113 
43 41 97 
01 07 288 

06 02 08 
B0 21 179 
106 52 123 

2.1 1.1 25 1 
. .. 128 

21 0.0 105 
55 13 240 

55 02 125 

43 83186 
10 07 . 

1.B 40 78 
23 09 21.4 
21 04 124 

4.1 25 11 0 

59 22 193 
1 0 1.8 833 

43 85145 
83b 3.1 100 
88 23 102 
01 1.7 180 

28 28 170 

10b 20 103 
01 34 IU 

02a 00108 
36 82 110 
17 01 70 
10 08 .. 
121 85 93 

17.10 02 574 
173 77 90 

1 4a 00 237 
158 82 184 
1.4 07 295 

43 10 205 

07a 1.1 103 

oi 02 300 
0 In 02 915 
20.0 74 07 
75 7.7 181 
.. 47 

23 05 281 


75 09 159 

75 45 90 
72 80 104 

31 22 20. 1 

. . .160 
85 23197 
71a 15254 
31.4 51 130 

07 15 92 

21 1 4 117 

89 33 306 
07 00 21.7 

100 58187 
25 42 88 

250 89 370 

81 28 120 
25 00 193 

79 23 23.8 

93 80144 
57 10 03 
■T 01102 
3.8 07 209 

123 52 83 
83 S3 173 

22 25 135 
120 05 121 


CQrlis [Oamenri 239 

Clayton Son 138 

Cohen IAI 430 

COfcyMCo rt& 

Comanm Teed 10 

Contemn: 104 

Com Smonarv 80 

Coo. IVWni *35 

Ctok»fl MB 

Comm |F| 55 

coun <15 

Cumav Pope M6 

Cowan Da GrOCT 72 

Dea Mcnoteon 183 

Crown House 21s 

Cummins 3 v rwi 

DSC 47 

OPCE 350 

ao 

Dana £30 

Dmk IIHI 58 

Davm A Nawman 268 
Dan 137 

Off [0 Bve 375 

Den* 19? 

Donwna Eaaam 278 
DffWumr 243 

(Mue HM 19 

DM*IB 223 

Dooaon Pan sr 

COn 93 

Damon M 11a 

DwrH 130 

Dl^n H00 83 


85 27 553 
iO0 72 U 
154 31 

71 35153 

* 56 58 142 

13 15 203 

TIE 73138 
4 25 39 234 

*1 46 40 176 

-2 125 32 130 

t 36 50 100 
► 95 42 133 

» 113 S3 122 

375 27 

*3 07e 15 

23 03 37 H 

+5 175 55 11 6 

)*'■ 

1-2 02 55 . 

*5 143 53 85 

l«5 85 55 76 

157 4 2 13B 

-5 93 49 95 

114 41 140 

104 43 101 

06 32 213 

-2 75 34 130 

74 61 131 

71 76 103 

-4 79 67 131 


341 75 

125 75 
19‘» 13V 
90V 56V 
206 212 
540 293 
130 102 
IBS 120 
2D4V134.- 
163 154 
205 116 
K5 Ufl 
245 1S6 
66V 29 
144 63 

196 161 
375 239 
154 m 
SSI 174 
SOV MV 
IK) 55 
110 78 
29S 2K) 

124 e 

2E3 177 
189 12S 
740 393 
160 130 
SM 420 
04 M 
44 26 

93 <3*1 

89 SO 

ire 135 


Tumor 5 IMM0 

uSm 

umi|KV) 

vm 

yottt 

Vcxor Pimj cn 

Vtam 

wamagm 

USEL 

WSL 

Urada Peoanaa 
Waoen M 
WttW |UW) 
vtmW 01m 


wnaa uamaa) 
WWarn Hon 
wa* gp 
iwattai 
wood iAi«aa) 
wood (SW) 
MBCtteon 6 Ra 
Wyaanm Eng 
VBuigiH) 


204 -1 

109 • 

no 1 , -v 

QBi -V 
260 •+« 
433 

US **2 
141 a«2 

nts'j -iv 

IBS 

175 

130 

245 • . 

S6V *‘s 

122 -I 

171 

305 -1 

109 -1 

179 
44 
SJ 
IQS 

seo 

106 

231 -3 

147 

670 


10 7 5 2 70 
1C 15713 
502 £0 173 

73 2.7 180 
106 43 125 
71 ID 92 
£3 10285 

01 i0 73 

44 34 132 

12.1 49 127 

21 36220 
15 16101 
61 10 216 
183 3 9 119 

45 41 05 
30 1.7 235 

19 D 

43 53 280 
7j 72 150 
30 13 197 
79 75 93 
143b 62 12> 
90 05 95 
SQOb 30 203 
It 63 
ISO 20 100 

06 85 165 
1 4a 05 142 
09 87 116 

07 82 92 
87 30 159 


GUNN Bn 
Gobi pm 
d Maim Has 
£ Go 
ICC o n 
bow 

ACA Drang 
LASMO 
Do Unas 
taw Ionian 04 
Penned" 

Pramer 
B«al Dutch 
SIW 
Sttttene 

Snenfi 

ZJZ3 1 

Tman Empa 

WHBW 


14 43 11.7 
25 43 
230 51 123 
. f .. 

” 43 387 47 

_Z 174 100 43 
|42 040 . 

88 100 10 B 
202 

328 11 

-12 500 50 93 

00 5 7 235 

; no 

*1 7 lei- 7 24 

185 

1-1 75 80 86 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


FINANCE AND LAND 


240 211 
IM 126 
17SV 71'. 
209 109 
26 19 
263 194 
43 16 

29V 17 
IBS 132 
194 153 
78 B2 
' 93 BO 
148 IM 
223 205 


Atmwartfi 21B 

Aflan Hum 145 

Ai aattfla Ma 147 

gsa™* s 

Caadovar 236 

Oanmway as 

EouKv A San 29 

ha>V 1 S4M 137 

Mapatta 168 

Nat Noma Loans 57 

Do 8% £81 

mwtnra ljD 

TampMon 223 


10 00 .. 
02 23 01 


17.1 05 003 
07 28 370 

13 40 268 
0B 80 ISO 
09b 87 209 
15 20 .. 

000 95 .. 


ftundoJ TmstB appaar on Pag* 24 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 



4B 38V 
JB5 180 
429 291 
247 100 
150 IM 
111 79V 

132 « 

100 112 
» 57V 
T38 62 

306 045 

109 135 
MO 112 

21V IS 

169 127 
131 100 
2*5 172 

133 111 
296 215 
160 113 
4GB 390 
101V 72V 

11 734 
410 333 

110 59 

105 119 

91 62 

170 129 

330 216 
73 30 

233 178 

153 67 


Anchor Omriral 
RTF 

Bayer DM50 


Br Bantf 
SE BW 
Comm Brea 
Dow 

Cwy |Horec«t 
Grata 
Do DM 

Bh A Evwartf 


HoacftM 0*450 
bap Chare bid 

ST 

Piy™ 

BaMwgU|L 4 MrlflB 
nmwN mn 

namou 
SNM BPD 

SotcttHSpaa fanan 

Wobaanhoana HMt 
YorkaMna Cbttb 


C40V +V 
226 
410 
229 
130 

2101V .. 

no m -2 
153 +0 

69 

123 +1 

are 

105 
152 

21 .'a 

150 +1 

122 • .. 
210 a.. 
123 «+1 

867 -1 

106 -2 

300 • 

£90% +% 

El OS • .. 
390 +1 

IB8 +4 
MB 

B3 

Ml +2 
289 +1 



391 312 Ladbnfca 365 

661 *47 Lon Pen Hreao goo 


406 •+« 130 33109 
223 -3 04 1 1 116 


+2 181 48 174 

. . 143 15 1TO 


CINEMAS AND TV 


100 7SV Mount Cnarioba 91V tt-V 01 23101 

101 67 Prtnee 01 W NOW* 82 • . . 01 00 18B 

TB 58V Quam Mare 76 • .. 07 00 187 

405 3GB Savoy Hotel* 'A' 300 ..SO 18 185 

61 SO SUAtt 04 .. 18 08185 

209 Ml TtUtfKMW Rare 149 a-1 75 53 188 


273 170 ApgBa TV ‘A’ 
52 27 Sfannlan 

240 176 KTvfijV 
390 2B3 LWT Kkto* 
3G0 IBB SOM TV A' 

273 149 TVS N/V 
46 01 TSW 
245 223 Thamaa TV 


2TB ..105 55 185 

46 44 05 83 85 

22S .. 118 01103 

390 *2 7U 5J«7 

318 .. 155 87 105 

3*0 .. 7836 55101 
48 44 25 87 125 

244 +1 . . . . 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


OVER FIFTEEN 

111H 
Dtv 
109 < 

112 . 

139 ■ 

123'.- 
112 '* 


YEARS 

iOi% a 

113% 
100 
102 
127% 
112% 4 
HE 
5* 
97% 
BS% 
90% 
106% a 
121 % 
es%< 
100% 
115% 
90% 
i30% a 


95 9515 

105 10057 
93 9796 

95 9-757 

105 ID. 008 
100 9929 

80 9.757 

85 8.486 

9.7 9.748 

9.7 9719 

97 8719 

98 0744 

103 959* 

95 9586 

97 9.757 

102 9588 

98 9639 

103 9351 

93 9817 

07 9079 

83 9.<38 

9J 9322 


UNDATED 

40-. 38 •Cenattt «% 

42 34 1 War Ln 3V% 

52% 44 ’.Corn, 3\% 

34* Z9-*Trew 3V 
29% 24 : Concerts 2 '.^« 

29-- 2* iTrtttt Z :*% 

INDEX-LINKED 

123 f Traa* IL 2% * j?9? 
10r- 96 . T7Ba* H. 2% 1990 
122 100% Treat IL 2% 1996 
107% 95 ■ Treat B0%% aw i 
107 • 83-iT>«lll0V%aM 
no . 96 - Trees i f% 2006 
106 : «£■£»• 

11 r. 97 Ti« 02'i% 

34 79'- Trees A2\y »13 
,02 . 97%1M6 82;r%an9 
Bfr- 97 . Treat, 110 :% MM A 

100 - 08 : Iren 02’ A 20M 


01 0237 

20 2640 

24 0512 

09 0535 

00 3886 

03 3*33 

m *a£i 

00 0300 

38 30E5 

31 3012 

00 21B9 

38 1161 


banks DISCOUNT HP 


%'S 

260 173 

590 ^ 
46 32 
7*0 410 
430 588 
SB 1 : 86 

S% MV 
if. 80'. 

280%215% 
212 146 
37B 2« 
102 66 
251 W 
430 2M 

520 310 
iM 136 
856 m 
484 293 
4S6V3IB 
133 120 
099 417 

m m 


Bam pr Ireland 
HMlaWW* 
tank Laura UK 
Bank Ol SaoOand 
Sarottyi 


cmee Muaunan 

gUy 

ssss^. 

FWNamra 

Oernad NH 
Gnameaa IW 
Manama . 

HM Samuel 

Km AfinnjEWn 
KMMH1 Banaon 

uxavo 

NX Audi Bk 

WWW 


I t 

E9 +% 

109 -* 

£11 

IS ^ 

SOS •+« 

*c£ -5 

320 -’0 

52-1 •-] 

A i 

370 -1 

500 +19 

A ^ 

4*9 tt+7 

3*6 +3 

g B*7 


ftOb 45 58 

. . a 81* 
109b 85 -■ 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


*e 

40 

£312.1 

-i 


40 260 

+2 

20 

15 31.7 

+1 


4.1 130 


3L3 

24 205 

-i 



+« 

30 

04 5*2 


07 

1.1 4U 


10.1 

2.1 2*9 

+4 

0* 

£2 215 

+« 

9l2 

24 9*0 


3.1 

75 78 

+a 

12.1 

33 147 

17.1 

04 15.1 

+i 

88 

40 21.0 


*7 

50 98 





13 

15 175 


43 

1.1 272 


73 

15185 


35 

48108 


130 

25 232 



£7 19.7 



23192 


78 

£2 07 


5.7 

02 210 


88 

47 105 

+2 

100 

2.1 207 



45 1*2 


1.4 

£8 38.1 


07 

08188 



4-/502 


300 

28 208 


300 

25 15.1 





73 

85 88 

, 

3.1 

70135 




ELECTRICALS 


XT . 1 M 015 
27.6 09 55 


398 

ISO 

AB EMO 

323 


11.4 

33 24' 

198 

120 

Afchamanc 

196 

• +fi 

2.1 

1 1 192 

152 

36 

Amsrrad 

140 


05 

O03M 

» 

43- 

Apron Ceraeitare 

«8 

-2 

05b 

10 81 

-96 

63 

Ann - - 

94 



X9 

300 

205 

AnnaeOomp 

2S2 

• 

4.1 

15 *1 

61 

46 

Autto FaJakty 

ST 


28 

195 

2Z0 

140 

Auto Sac 

108 

-2 

18 118 

370 

m 

sice 

268 

*3 

1*7 

SS 163 

138 

6* 

B8H 

80 


25 

3.1 S3 

M7 

128 

Bbck 

138 





260 

17* 

239 

160 

130 

95 

671 

550 

110 

BO 

29) 

172 

3*3 

207 

IM 

144 

275 

130 

403 

150 

47 

32 

32 

23 

440 

355 

91 

39 

510 

212 


37 

373 

393 

89 

*3 


12S 


363 

85 

S 

-•are 

Z77 

332 

2JT 

202 

148 

20 

18 

423 

280 

310 

216 

210 

128 

17* 

T12 

495 

180 

57 

40 

305 

in 

32 

21 

HI 

138 

09 

47 

G30 

151 

443 

310 

09 

19 

249 

229 

148 

85 

148 

85 

1d| 

85 

139 

100 

552 

214 


aio 

335 235 

205 

140 

133 

76 

(53 

84 

200 

IM 

174 

137 

258 

176 

8) 

3* 

403 

1» 

395 

167 

385 

tg 

209 

208 

H 

B 

353 

256 

22 

!§’ 

130 

75 

383 273 

97 

62 

50 

33 


35 

199 

no 

2^0 

139 

gpg 

115 


T0B 

143 

97 

380 

166 

423 

296 

145 

3* 

3* 

15 

49 

25 

190 

VS? 

31 

19 

7* 


303 

300 

262 

'38 

85 

59 

106 

M 

58 

» 

90 

56 

440 

253 

120 

56 

as 

25 

a 

4 

25 

13 

99 

45 

BS 

65 

105 

59 

293 

193 


38 22 

156V120 
323 216 
79 42 

78V 41 
116 BB 
00 0* 

73 53 

35 23 

« 179 
1*5 95 

7BV 59V 
238 159 
283 134 
480 319 
423 3!® 
110 84 

49 31 
393 255 
•aeo 121 

re 4s 

200 IBS 
T3S TS 
710 485 

re st 

96 01 

143 65 
193 105 

im in 

91 56 

78V 53': 
12G 70 

199 183 
310 213 
48 20V 

216 148 
4i a 
153 92 

133 68 

GS 43 
289 m 
250 203 
448 3*7 
9% 825 
G03 383 
27 11 

143 88 

874 332 
520 140 
14 775 
483 311 
S6 51 
365 195 
323 215 
314 238 
104 95 
no 119 
in ia 

589 421 
228 115 
13B 99 

900 605 
245 118 
411 200 I 

173 iST ! 

iSi 

a 21 i 
IM 110 J 

1 4 

150 118 
MS 111 

i"£ 



0* 

£1 100 

-a 

38 

32 233 

*8 

38 98 


3*b 58 68 


33 

48 10.1 


32 

28 224 

+1 

38b 48 03 

+2 

54 

80 78 

• -B 

10 

70 98 

1*2 

51 120 


74 

95 130 

• -3 

08 

20194 


57 

203*2 

+2 

148 

3214.4 

• +3 

114b 2.7 160 


20 

28 110 


10b 40138 

• -3 

168 

50 1*1 


3.7 

28 190 


27 

5* 9.1 


148 

82 11.1 



45 110 


*8 

18 225 


*8 

64 70 

■ .. 

28 

38 9.1 

-1 

52 

45 90 

-3 

68 

17 .. 
60 210 

-1 

9* 


32 

*2 111 


*1 

112 55 

-2 

5A 

50 1£5 

118 

62 95 


12-1 

44 158 

♦1 

0.1 

08 188 

-2 

100 

04 55 

-1 

1.1 

38 800 


103 

08128 


10 

08 410 


14 

U*a4 


138 

58 12.1 

+3 

12.1 

54 91 

+2 

150 

3.7 M2 


INSURANCE 


Com Utot 
E quty A Law 
FAI 

Gan Acodanl 
GRE 

Heard C E 
Hogg Roomum 
Lngtt 8 G*n 
London 8 Man 
Lon lira Btw 
March 6 Moan 


Saagwck Op 
Saun Wraon 
Sturga Htags 
Sun ilanai 

Sun Lttt 

Trade maaranay 
Wlta Faber 


-1 99 

e-i% too 
-iv as a 
■ +10 65 

• 447 

*1 17* 

•2 96 

+5 

•8 349 

+3 40S 

+5 3*9 

e .. 137 
117 
85 

+2 2*0 
-2% M 
-3 114 

•09 

‘ • $?! 

+1 204 

+10 38 6 

+5 17.1b 

+5 IS 7 
10 On 
+10 27 5 
MB 
40 . 
*15 105 . 


Lonmo 

Ocean (Moon 

Pawrton tDCh 
Do A 
Poay Pack 
Sana Darby 
Star* Brea 
Twar MDUy 


50 *1 07 

148 I OB 

a? +4 39 

378 ..206 

426 25.9 

34 IS 

224 tt+2 171 
47 3.G 

220 -1 SI 

??a .? 88 

153 **7 73 

45 

565 +9 223 

1*4 -2 

218 100 


.Investment Tnt*ts^v»ar on Pag* 04 


LEISURE 


Barr 4 WA 'A' 
Boose* I Hankax 
Bran 9mm 
Campan 
ChryiaW 
F«s Laam 
GRA 

Hanbuqur Buols 
Honzon Travel 

ire Lereura 
Jutoma s Mdgt 
Lae M 
M a i> i tt M tt 
Pweaurama 
Really uiefia 
Huey Lhui 

iSWSW 


MINING 


13% 3V Ang Amar Cott 
10*630 Ang Am 
63 31 Am GoM 
SB 33 AATT 
40 22 Anttonal 

*1 22 DO 'A' 

190 126 Ayer Haem 
425 238 B%voon 
160 90 Bracken 

21% .9% Button 
358 226 CRA 
89 39 Out Boyd 
552 409 Cana GokMda 
S3i 3M DeBeare 
208 105 Dea h r a al 
9% 4% Doomtattiuyi 
13% 7 Dna ton um 
7% 2% Duben 
2S5 150 E Daggas 
694 258 BmxSim} 
as 13 BOD 
IBS 85 BUxag 
380 200 E Rand CkW 
*% 2% 6 Rare Prep 

9 4% FS Con* 

213 BS FS Dav 

75 17 Geevnr Ha 

8% 4% Gsnoal 

10 6 Gan Muting 

10% 6% GFSA 

538 318 GMKttgmb 
83 35 Gocwng 

123 85 Gnwnwdi Has 

375 166 GroOMar 
158 9i Hampton Areas 
M 4% Hannaiy 
350 175 rtartra* 

81 47% Jormes 

12% 5% Kinross 
9% 2% Ktaaf 
160 65 LHM 

13 3 - 9% LOamn 
4io 170 Loreare 
157 G4 MM 
29 15 Mttayaan Mong 

123 HO Kanereia 
48 14V Mann Exp 
26 6V Uangn, 

9 5% MddW WB 

655 450 Memo 
5% 2% taw mi 
142 73 NSI Bronan HP 

57 2SV NVI KamorG 

22v 1D>. OrangaFraa 
120 85 Pmo&g Tki 

289 20* PBkbWBWand 

25 8% Rand Mmaa Ud 

4*6 170 Rand Mates Prep 
99 16 Rannonnai 

325 225 Reman 
781 511 RT2 
BV 4% R un enp u re 
10V 5% S, Helena 
150 68 SALIM 
31 M% Sommaai 
55G 273 Stttanba 
138 00 Sung* On 
138 73 TTonon 
569 300 Umitt 
58V 31V Vatt Rada 
544 23* Itanununft 
105 50 VMitorattn 

90 35 vogm 

17 10% WM Cohary 

563 288 WUren 
310 128 Wacom Areas 
29% 15 wanara Daap 
108 114 motm Mning 

2S5 106 West Rand Cone 
Mi 80 wren Craw 
17>. 7 V W wktti 

58 20 W* Mgal 

lev 10'. zarrem copper 
60 20 Zanapan 


100 74 106 
. 232 
TO 43 14 1 
14 30123 
80 43113 

93 23 189 
.. .. 454 

. .. 73 

63 82 53 

7.1 82 107 

43 94 189 

>2n 53 9 4 
11 1 34 135 

10.1 O 154 
. 254 
03 43117 

1 4 13113 
7a 73 131 
7.1 38 103 


♦■b ... 01.6 

.. 5*3 31 .. 

-10% 4*8 36 . 

-1 771 31 .. 

.. M2 4.1 .. 
.. M2 4.1 .. 
.. 473 31.7 .. 

-IS 790 213 .. 
-5 230 13* .. 

-% 202 130 .. 

-a :: :: " 

-S 353 03132 
-19 183 33 .. 
-IS 43 31 .. 
.. 92.0 123 .. 

-% 120 11.1 .. 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERT'G 


40 

10222 

IS 

31 17 7 

09 

3 0 1*0 


PROPERTY 


120 

20 .. 

88 

38 130 

1*0 

98 .. 

2B0 

00 .. 

•- 

“ ij 

To 

91 .. 
07 .. 

4U1 

55 .. 


-is 

_£■ 203 523 . . 

-5 843 200 " 

34 37 323 
-% B£3 83 .. 

-13 170 33 .. 

-2 345 46 .. 

-% 890 93 .. 

I .. «ao 74 .. 
-5 29.0 204 .. 

-V IIS 10.7 .. 
“5 a a a . •• 


-S <73 173 
-2 .. . . 


.. 120 34 SS 

-1 551 SLO .. 

♦1 

-2 31.4 53 34 

-% 260 32 613 

-% IB 14.1 .. 
-5 IBB 137 .. 
-V 118 43 .. 
♦ 15 


480 94.. 
■2 560 10.9 .. 

343 lf.7 .. 
*2 150 150 

I .. 43 93 39 

-23 073 123 
-15 233 110 .. 
-V 171 30 .. 

-2 30 1* .. 

-13 123 36 .. 


SHIPPING 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 



SI 138 AE 
168 78 Appuyvd 

141 70'-- Amtnrarg 

53% 24V BSG 

But* Bnm 
314 185 Bra man (CD) 
eoo *21 Br Aareapara 
i»i 90 ft Car Aitcbaoa 
173 168 Cattyne 
215 79 Cowte m 

133 »6S Saw (Godfrey) 
2*1 172 Dewy 
115 3B BV 
357 253 FR Group 
213 ia Fore Motor 
90 K San* (Frank G) 
296 228 Oantttt Motor 
IDG 51 GttnMd Laurranc 
IM 88 HVMh 
573 373 Honda Motor 


142 73 JK5UK TIB 

IS BS KMh-F« 121 

402 209 bn 342 

205 90 Lookers 203 

6S3 470 Luces 550 

141 114 Puny gp 114 

91 68 PUansKSB) 70 

102 51 Out* pu) 99 

71 39 Rover 37 

77 43 SuM 77 

72 32 Woocmao Uonas) 68 


-5 107b 44 11.7 

■ .. 73 43 71 

+2 23 1.7 IS7 

13 33 150 
.. f .. .. 
... 11.1 4.0 184 

+5 22-6 40 103 

-3 50 3.7 1*3 

+2 70 33 .. 

57 ZB 94 

.. 6.4 00 93 

• .. 73 33 153 

5.7 

.. «6 i*a< 

7.0 33 .. 
43 S3 9J 

4» -. 250 103 .. 

-V ia ij lij 
*47 33 07 .. 

• +7 07 U 113 

6.1 5.1 93 
-1 U 25 17 1 

• +5 15 1 44 194 

•S 73 17 123 
.. 15.7 £3112 

-1 04 S3 104 

04 9.1 93 
-1 43 43 110 

• ■ ■ 3* 4.4 147 

• -Z ia 2.1 113 


312V167 Assoc ft Porta 290 +1 

39S 238 ft CtttmenaaaRi 271 

366 213 Cttadoraa 238 

9* 58 f imer (jamas) 57 

603 480 Gran 515 • .. 

76 54% Jaeoes (J* Ta 

12% 5 Lyle 8% 

*1 a Mersey Docks *2 

2*0 100 Ocean Transport 236 

578 *20 P * O Did S*6 +1 

185 BS Rimomjft (wanar) iso 

3*8 132 Tipnook 291 

390 350 Tunwi# Scott 385 


7.1 S3 153 
7 1 23 190 

71 33410 

4 0 72 122 

214 42*2.7 

51b 73 504 
.. .. 07 

■ . . . 34 

90 41 110 
ao 4.8 153 
7.1 4.7 203 

01 2.1 186 
129 OA 503 


f 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


300 290 Fll 300 

206 id5 Gamer Boon 172 

45 32 h aatta m Sans a 

210 108 Umdtti Howrth 21® 

82 62 H behold 8 Burton 04 

114 B2 Pntara IM 

157 118 Strong A Fatter 1*0 

273 158 Stye 230 


-10 98b 02 11.7 

143 83 10.7 

07 18 . 

+5 09 *5107 

44 63193 
82 50 73 
114 81 58 

> ■■ S4 29273 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


*2 83 

+2 83 



Stack (ABC) 310 

ra- -«-■ PTP 

P*W* TO 

Coens OWn) 480 
Do 'A 320 

BUAP m A 19 

Hams PUMtham 355 
Hama Counsel £40 
inOBnendani 275 

« Thoraacn S3* 
MMRttnMnar £13'.- 
oappm 510 

ftDiumMh Sued i£& 
Trwuty «« 413 

Uta N eir s pa pare OK 


126 82 Airpei M -2 .. .. 

30 9 Aran Erargy 14 

31 io Aaarec ntiw'f e i 15 

688 615 Br PodDHian CTO •■* 429 73 73 

17% 5 BhSUI 04 17V . 

385 323 Br Borneo 383 2*6 75 130 

210 98 B*t* 131 B-2 93 71 33 

419 2M Burreas «D 4 IU 43124 

HO 4* Ctatasc Caoai 58 09 6.7 108 

150 0* CaniiaY 1*0 -T 7.1 Si 103 

33 10 CrenamaS 20% 602 

13S » E ma rpr a e rt* -4 !2i so U 

68 £* Garear Enaigy 61-2 



































































26 


THE 



TIMES 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 
FINANCE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 


fFOCUSl 


From the 
cradle to 

the bank 


DodMOer 


Y oung people are in 
fashion with the 
banks as never be- 
fore. The pon- 
derous. tradition- 
bound cleaners have suddenly 
started publishing trendy 
magazines, giving away piggy 
banks, offering discounts m 
record stores, handing out 
cash — generality trying to 
present a "young” image. 

Judging from recent 
advertising, some would like 
their fusty, oak-panelled bank- 
ing halls to look like disco- 
theques. The problem for the 
young customer is to sort out 
the gimmicks from the genu- 
inely useful offers. 

The banks have become 
ultra imagtsconscious for a 
simple reason. After a sleep of 
many years, they have woken 
up to the potential of their 
. own domestic markets. 

Having taken the personal 
customer for granted for de- 
. cades, the clearers now realize 
how profitable the ordinary 
account-holder can be. This 
has resulted in competition 
with good ^results for the 
' consumer it brought us free- 
if-in-credit banking, for 
example. 

But a crucial element in 
attracting new customers is 
getting them young. Though 


people switch banks more 
readily than in the past, there 
is still enormous inertia 
among bank customers and 
the banks calculate, correctly, 
that a customer picked up 
early on is likely to be a 
customer for life. 

SLudems are the main field 
in which the banks aim to 
harvest these "seed-corn” ac- 
counts. 

John Wilson, of National 
Westminster, the bank that 
claims to lead in the student 
market says: "It is a long-term 
investment for us. The 
relationship with the bank 
that starts at that age will 
continue through later life 
when we will be able to sell the 
customer many of our other 
products.” 

With any luck the student 
will eventually become a 
wealthy professional person, 
the sort of customer bank 
managers dream about. 

After six or seven years 
experimenting in this market, 
the banks have each evolved 
student "packages” designed 
to make the standard cheque 
account look just a little more 
tempting than that of the bank 
next door. 

They all. of course, include 
a cheque book, cheque card 
and cash-point card. Many 



September 10, 1986 

STUDENT PACKAGES FROM CLEARING BANKS 


Services 

Barclays 

Uoyds 

Midland 

NatWest 

Free banking 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

Cheque card 

on receipt 
of grant 

on receipt 
of grant 

on receipt 
of grant 

on receipt 
of grant 

Cashpoint card 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

Credit card 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

Overdraft 

£200 

£200 

£200 

. £200 

Covenant forms 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

Extras 

microliie 
£7 cash after 
1st term 

loans for 
parents 
£10 cash 

£6 cash or 
dock 
discount 
travel 

£10 cash 


TSB 

yes 

on receipt 
of grant 

yes 

yes 

£200 

yes 

special 

insurance 

terms 

shop 

discounts 


On his own accomrt: Joe Jen Id ns, 14, is assisted by Mwhiw Marion 

Lloyds Bank in Oxford Street, London. Getting diem young is crucial in modern 
include straightforward cash banks such as Barclays and 


gifts, overdraft facilities at 
preferential rates, discounts in 
certain shops and even insur- 
ance policies (see table for 
details). 

All of them include deed of 
covenant forms that enable 
parents to contribute tax-free 
to their childrens' education. 

What counts as important 
will naturally differ from stu- 
dent to student Many stu- 
dents own nothing worth 
stealing except a bicycle, so 
the oner of cheap personal 
property insurance cover from 


Trustee Savings will be of 
limited value. A free offer of 
cash — the £10 from NatWest 
and Lloyds is the most gen- 
erous — might seem more 
useful. 

Midland's package provides 
one of the most varied range 
of offers. You can choose a gift 
of either £6 cash or an alarm 
clock on opening the account. 

You get a free National 
Express Coach student card 
and potentially handy services 
such as travellers' cheques 
provided commission-free 


and Eurocheque cards at half- 
price. 

Not all banks go for the 
youth market in the same way, 
however. One banker said: 
"We believe that if you have a 
loyal parent client base, they 
will open accounts for their 
children with the need for 
fancy gimmicks.” 

Most important are the 
basic banking facilities. 
Barclays gives you virtually 
automatically a Barclaycard 
with a £100 limit, which can 


be used on top of a £200 limit 
overdraft. 

Uoyds offers an Access card 
with a £200 limiL Most banks 
do not offer a credit card so 
freely, although the facility is 
somewhat double-edged since 
it is an expensive way to go 
into debL 

Overdraft facilities vary. 
While NatWest and TSB offer 
a preferential rate up to £200 
of 1 per cent over base rate. 
Barclays charges 2 per cent 
over base rate. 

Some banks offer ftee-if-in- 
credit services, others do not 
charge even when the account 
is overdrawn within the speci- 
fied limiL 

It is also worth checking on 
poten dally useful services 
such as a guaranteed loan at 
preferential rates to tide the 
student over between the time 
he leaves university or poly- 
technic and starts his first job. 

He or she will not get one 
from most unless a definite 
job offer has been received. 
Useful to parents, Lloyds 
Bank offers its higher educa- 
tional loan scheme at special 
rates to help parents supple- 
ment the student granL 

Barclays, which suffers an 
image problem among stu- 
dents because of its South 


African involvement, tries 
harder by providing student 
business officers in some 
branches. They are specially 
available to advise students. 


’o'? 


Buy a Young Persons Railcard now 
and get money off money off. 




Don't suppose there’s any chance you could splash 
out £12 before the end of October is there? 

If so, you won’t only get a Young Persons Railcard 
and be able to travel for at least a third (often a half) off 
the normal fare for Iwelve whole months . . .Wow. 


You'll also be able to take advantage of a voucher 
which gives you another £5 off any rail journey you like 
within the first month. 

For the full fascinating facts, ask for our special offer 
leaflet. Off off down the station then. 


WeYe getting there 


elements or an account is 
probably pure convenience. 
NatWest almost certainly 
wins on the sheer number of 
branches located on or near 
university campuses — it 
claims to have 300. 

Some banks . though, make 

A family of little 
porcelain porkers 
was a success 

less strenuous efforts to attract 
the young. 

According to one clearing 
banker, “branches on campus- 
es tend to be unprofitable.” 
Hence some banks, such as the 
TSB, have no on-campus 
branches at all, which makes 
access to your money inconve- 
nient and difficult if you are a 
student 

One word of warning. Par- 
ents are sometimes on the 
receiving end of reckless stu- 
dents who spend far more 
than they have. 

Unfortunately, most of the 
clearers have a record of 
allowing some students to 
borrow hundreds, and some- 
times thousands of pounds, 
which they cannot pay back. 

Instead, tbeir parents are 
expected to bail them out. The 
banks generally claim to keep 
a closer watch on student 
accounts than most others, 
but sometimes the checks 
appear to be minimal. 

Apart from students, the 
banks have lately been pursu- 
ing an even younger clientele. 
The package is based on a 
deposit account with the usual 
bells and bows added 

NatWest has scored a nota- 
ble success with its Piggy Bank 
account, which allows the 

S depositor to collect a 
_ r of quality porcelain 
pigs. 

Since its launch in Decem- 
ber 1983, 750,000 accounts 
have been opened and more 
than a million pigs given 
away. “The sty’s the limit” 
quips the NatWest brochure 
advertising the account. 

Another successful one is 
the Midland’s Griffin Saver, 
which has attracted more than 
a million accounts. These 
schemes include a ragbag of 
statement holders, pencils. 


birthday cards and other bits 
and pieces that tend to come 
with children's accounts. 

TSB is rather more sophisti- 
cated aiming at a slightly 
older age group. For the over- 
1 3s. there is the offer of a cash- 
point card as part of its Jeans 
Scheme account. The bank 
also operates a school bank 
scheme where the children at 
schools which run the scheme 
keep the bank books, with 
TSB help, and in the process 
learn how basic banking 
works. 

Midland runs a similar 
scheme, now used in more 
than 800 schools. 

But while children concen- 
trate on the giveaways, par- 
ents are likely to look more at 
the rate of interest. 

Here NatWest seems the 
obvious winner. Its net rate of 
7.0 per cent comfortably out- 
strips 6 per cent from Lloyds. 
5.7 percent from Midland and 
a miserly 5.5 per cent from 
Barclays. 

One problem the banks face 
on childrens's accounts, how- 
ever. is that the difference 
between what attracts a three- 
year-old and and 15-year-old 
is enormous. Somehow, they 
have to make their accounts 
interesting to both. So for the 
younger groups, where the 
decision to open an account 
comes from the parents, banks 
content themselves generally 
with handing out toys related 
to banking. They do not 
seriously expect to make 
money on children's accounts. 

The appeal to older groups 
— generally 13 to 17 — has to 
be more subtle. An important 
part of this are the regular 
magazines sent by most of the 
banks to their teenage account 
holders, containing articles on 
subjects considered relevant 
to the audience, such as pop 
music and clothes. 

It is. of course, hard to gauge 
how successful this image- 
building is. But the banks are 
almost certain to find that 
they can count less and less on 
the traditional loyalty and 
inertia of their account hold- 
ers. 

Partly through their own 
efforts to educate a new 
generation to ‘hold bank ac- 
counts, each clearer is already 
finding it harder to hold on to 
personal clients without offer- 
ing more and more compet- 
itive terms in comparison 
with its rivals. 

Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 


Get a top 
school fees 
plan nowand 
decide which 
school later. 


Hanning in advance for your child's private 
edu ca t ion can save you thousands of pr ymd s. 

Forexample,with an Equitable plar^making 8 
annual contributions totalling £14,991, you could 
provideforseboo! feesof £50,301 overthe following 
10 years.* On if you’d rather, you can pay monthly 

With The Equitable, you need not specify the 
school until a month before the first payment is due. 

And you can transfer the payments to another 
school if your child moves, or even to another child, 
if necessary 

Even more convenient, you can vary the 
amounts and the intervals between making your 
contributions. 

Ear more details on The Equitable’s outstan- 
drngly flexible school fee trust plans, send the 
coupon or speak to redirect on 01-606 661L 

mdodnMWfiiMAil boom mr 


Rewnmtndcdb* National ISIS 


Name (Mr’Mn.'Mmi 


Address 


Fbacode 
DaceofBinh 



Tel: iOffioei 


TjftfHomc) 


KwikWi - ** 


bkved 


The Equitable Life 

— — You gain because we’re different. «« _ , 


- j 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


27 


(( FOCUS D 


FINANCE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE/2 


The scramble 
to catch 
school savers 


To death and taxes add a third 
inevitability of life: financial 
services. TTic Building Soci- 
eties Act. which comes into 
effect next year, will make a 
huge difference to the scale 
and the marketing of the 
financial services we are 
ofTercdL 

Building societies and 
banks arc set to scramble for 
our business as never before. 
There seem to be two basic 

■ routes to capturing a 
customer's loyalty and keep- 
ing it- An institution must 
cither be different (and good) 
enough to attract business 
from its competitors, or it 

■ must catch its customers 
1 young and. hope they will stay. 

Building societies have lra- 
’ ditionally been keener than 
banks to attract young savers 
as opposed to school-leavers 
and students. According to 
Building Societies Association 
estimates, they have had some 
success: 40 per cent of children 
in the UK now have a building 
society account- Three years 
ago only a third of Britain's 
children saved with building 
societies. 

The predominance of build- 
ing societies in the battle for 
young savers is all the more 
surprising in the light of the 
relatively unfavourable tax 
treatment their money used to 
receive in building society 
coffers. 

Until the Government de- 
cided jo impose Composite 
Rate Tax (CRT) on bank 
deposit accounts, a child's 
money would be taxed at 
source in a building society 
account, but not in a bank 
deposit account. 

In the name of fiscal neu- 
trality the Government inter- 
vened. The even-handed 
decision was. unfortunately 
but not really surprisingly, to 
treat taxation of deposits alike 
by. deducting tax at source 
from both bank and building 
society. 

As the vast majority of 
children do not have enough 
income to qualify as tax- 
payers. it can be argued that 
they are at a distinct dis- 
advantage when compared 
with adults. CRT is set at a 
lower rate than income tax — 
25 as opposed to 29 per cent - 
but it cannot be reclaimed 
from the Revenue. Thus, an 
adult basic rate taxpayer re- 
ceives a 4 per cent discount on 
taxed income, while a non- 
tax paying child has to lose one 
quarter of the cash due. 


The lower rate is supposedly 
justified fry the fact that many 
savers do not pay tax. Yet it 
was set ai 25 per cent when 
income tax was levied at a 
basic 30 percent. Children did 
not benefit from the reduction 
in income tax in the I9S6 
Budget by a similar reduction 
in CRT. 

Whatever the de-merits of 
the tax position the habit of 
saving is one which many 
parents wish to encourage. 
Some building societies have 
made a special effort to pro- 
duce attractive rates of in- 
terest for special children's 
accounts, although many 
children's accounts have 
restrictions on the maximum 
amounts which can be saved 
or the number of withdrawals. 

Nor should one forget the 

Children at a 
disadvantage 

gimmickry which goes with 
young savers* accounts. Build- 
ing societies use a variety of 
inducements — some serious 
and worthy, some less so. The 
majority are rather frivolous: 
most societies sport children's 
accounts with symbols akin to 
Roland Rat with a slot in his 
back. 

But some manage to com- 
bine levity with attractions of 
a more serious nature. The 
Peckham Building Society, for 
example, hasa Jumbo Savings 
Gub for anyone up to the age 
of 18. A variety of balloons, 
badges and Jumbo para- 
phernalia is available to sus- 
tain the interest of the younger 
savers. 

For the older or more sober- 
minded — the Peckham offers 
a year's free membership to 
the Panda Gub (the junior 
section of the World Wildlife 
Fund), or the Young 
Ornithologists' Gub. or 
Watch, the nature conserva- 
tion organization. After the 
first year of saving the Jumbo 
Gub member will have to pay 
at least half the costs of 
continued membership. 

Some societies aim their 
gimmickry at a wider audi- 
ence: the Bristol & West has a 
Snoopy account which is 
-popular with children^ But 
adults, if they join, are also 
eligible for a free Snoopy toy. 

After the animals the most 
popular accessory is un- 
doubtedly the money box. 



Baby bonds reborn 


dly societies were 
simple savings clubs, 
have now become 
slicaied financial in- 
ions play fog cat and 
e with the taxman. 

TIN BAKER looks 
battle over one product 
cial interest to the 
r the baby bond 
always tempting to cast 
land Revenue in the role 
:ked uncle. Almost al- 
ibis is unfair- But the 
of the baby bond, first 
Med last September by 
f unbridge Wells Eq- 
e Society, makes the 
uison all the more 

ig. 

it of all the ReTenue took 
tax-free savings for chil- 
by imposing composite 
ix on bank accounts. The 
>s industry dearly felt 
was a bigger market for 
Ticient savings than the 
nmenfs National Sav- 
rertificales could cater 
nd responded with the 
(rand. This was a cterer 
nation of tax breaks and 
a a huge response from 
ibtic. 

bond is aimed at adults 
s for the benefit of 
hi. More than 10,000 
old in the first few weeks 
i bonds being on the 

way the first version of 
nd worked was to use the 
num tax-free contribo- 
n hich may be made to a 
lv society in conjunction 
he tax reliefs available 
renamed in come. _ 

■ maximum contribonon 
i mi ted to £9 a month, 
i vear for 10 years, or a 
siim of £80 0. Since the 
were specially designed 
e young, they could be 
i 'in one transaction 
could be set ofT against 
e tax and given *° 
en. . , 

•ugh the baby bond 
not appear revolu- 
v, it was dynamic 
fa to cause the Revenue 
■D in and ban farther 


There were several basic tax 
breaks available. First, the 
investment fund of the friendly 
society was allowed to grow 
without tax on income. Sec- 
ond, the gift of the bond coaid 
be made out of pre-tax income. 
Benefit would arise for the 
recipient if the gift of the bond 
were made by .deed of 
covenant 

In this case, the young 
recipient would be able to 
claim back any tax paid by the 
donor as part of his or her 
personal tax allowance. 

. To qualify ' for exemption 
from capital gains and income 
tax, the bond had to be left 
untouched for 10 years, after 
which ft could be redeemed at 
wilL 

The original baby bond was 
an ingenious mixture of or- 
dinary covenanting for tax 
relief out of Income, where the 
obligation to pay mast con- 
tinue for a minimum of seven 
vears (covenants are covered 
in detail elsewhere in the 
survey) pins the tax breaks on 
investment which accompany 
friendly societies. 

Though the Revenue did not 
strangle the bonds at birth, it 
did partially asphyxiate them. 
After a hmried withdrawal 
from the market, they re- 
appeared this spring min u s 
their fully tax-exempt status. 
The practical effect is that the 
CGT and income tax might 
just apply at the end of the 10- 
year term. 

The baby bond still repre- 
sents a worthwhile long-term 
investment made by an adult 
for the benefit of a child- The 
institutions selling the bonds 
say they are still popular, 
although the public appetite is 
perhaps not quite so voracious. 

• Derails: Tunbridge Wells 
Equitable Friendly Society. 
Abbey Court. Si John's Road. 
Tunbridge Wells. Kent TW4 
QTE (0892-41466): Dominion 
Growth. 120- Church Street 
Brighton BN I IWD (0273* 
696000). 



BUILDING SOCIETIES: HIGHEST-PAYING 
CHILDREN’S ACCOUNTS 


Society 


Account 


Rate 
(Annual 
% rate) 


Restrictions 


many of which come in ani- 
mal shapes. 

But accessories should not 
mask the importance of the 
rates and terms offered child 
savers. Our table shows some 
of the best on the market now. 
The returns are reasonable, 
but the restrictions on some of 
the accounts amount, perhaps 
not surprisingly, to financial 
paternalism. 

The Harpenden 18 Gub 
will not permit closure or 
withdrawal before the age of 
18. The llkesion's Child Save 
allows withdrawal at 16, white 
Market Harbo rough permits 


closure of the account but no 
withdrawals before 18. In 
addition, many societies do 
not seem to trust in the 
acquisition of a regular sav- 
ings habit Most have strict 
rules on the frequency and size 
of payments. 

The latest move from soci- 
eties such as the Leeds. Cam- 
bridge and Ipswich, is to bring 
the high street into the class- 
room. Building societies are 
taking their services into 
schools in an attempt to 
interest children in saving as 
well as educating them in 
managing their finances. 


Some societies let the children 
run their own branch, with 
help from teachers, parents 
and. of course, building soci- 
ety staff 

The Building Societies 
Association admits that soci- 
eties are divided in their 
approach between education, 
an exercise in public relations 
among the young and a 
straightforward attempt to 
garner custom at an early 
stage. Whatever the motives, 
they are well ahead of the 
banks when it comes to catch- 
ing them white they're young. 

Martin Baker 


Sheffield 
(0742 25588) 

Frame Sehvood 
(037364367) 

Peckham 

(01-6587221) 

flkaston 
(06062 325350) 


Harpenden 
(05827 4904) 


Portman 
(01-935 0981) 
Gainsborough 
(0427 2956) 


Clay Cross 
(0247 862120) 
Market Harborough 
(0858 63244) 


Chelsea 
(0242 521391) 


High Interest 

Gold Minors 
Jumbo Savings 

Child Save 


18 Club 

Young Generation 
Junior Savers 


Young People's 
Own Share 
Junior Savers 


Kids 


9-25 

(9.46) 

8.75 

(8.94) 

8.25 

(855) 

8.25 

(8J25) 


8.0 

(8.16) 


7.5 

(7.5) 

7.25 

(7-25) 


7.0* 

(7.12) 

6.75 

( 6 . 86 ) 


6.75 

( 6 . 86 ) 


Max deposit £500 
Ctffidren/grandchildren of 
existing members 
Two withdrawals a year 


(£1750 a month) 
cannot miss payments 

Regular savings 
(Ei.lOe mtn) 
can only miss 
one payment No 
withdrawals 
until 16 

Max. deposit 
£5.000. No 
closure or 
withdrawal until 18 


Max. deposit 
£1,000. Two 
days' notice 
for withdrawal 

Max. ' 

£2.( 

Regular savings 
(£220 a mth). 
No withdrawals 
before 18, but 
closure possible 

Under 14s only 


• Bonus or 1 per cant II balance doss not decrease in first six months 

Source; BuSding Society Choice 


mo. 




ementfor 



We have a most persuasive argument for 
choosing a Lloyds Bank Student Account. 

We’ll automatically credit £10 to your 
account, for starters, i 



And should you find yourself perilously 
low on cash later on, we can let you have an 
overdraft of up to £200 at the special rate of 
1% a month. 

That’s equivalent to an effective annual 
rate of 12~6%. 


We’ll also spare you expense by waiving 
normal account charges, providing you stay 
within that £200 limit. 

And we’ll issue you with a cheque car d, 
an Access card and a Cashpoint card for use 
at over 1700 cash dispensers, the length and 
breadth of the country. 

We can even provide your parents with 
something to ease the burden. 

Namely a Higher Education Loan on 
very favourable terms. 

And a Deed of Covenant form to help 
them make the most of tax concessions, 
should they wish to help supplement 
your grant. 

All in all, we can help make the task of 
managing your financial affairs a much less 
onerous one. 

And we’ll always be on hand to discuss a 
personal loan, for instance, or simply to lend 
you advice. 

If you’d like to open an account with us, 
all you need to do is write to Lloyds Bank Pic, 
Freepost T3, London N4 1BR. 

Alternatively, you can pay a visit to your 
local branch. 

Where you could well learn something 
to your advantage. 


Lloyds 

Bank 



A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 


£10 credit available only to first-year, full-time students commencing a course of 1 year or more. Offer applies only to accounts opened on or before J1 October 1986. Written derails of our c A~~ 
terms available from branches of Lloyds Bank Pic, 71 Lombard Street, London EG5P ?BS- Lending is at the Bank's discretion and you musr be 18 or over to borrow. ** C 





28 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


finance FOR YOUNG PEOPLE/3 


(( F(x:usn 


■» \ 


v.-: 


.« . . ■:% .. A ■.*■ * * 


| • ■,_>■.: «>"" •'• • '■ > 

L <s :.}* : *%*:■ : . .'. ■■ - 

.“Aj • '..'.£iia+**K*2£ 



It might seem a little morbid do 
take oat a life-assurance pol- 
icy for a child for whom your 
natural hopes are that be or 
she will live to a ripe old age. 

However, life assurance has 
more to do with saving up 
money than fearing for the 
worst, and an endowment pol- 
icy can be an effective way for 
parents, grandparents or dot- 
ing nodes and aunts to provide 
a lump sum as a wonderful 
18th birthday nest egg. 

Most of the children's plans 
offered by the established life 
assurance companies are 
adaptations of the normal 
with-profits endowment poli- 
cies that they sell to adults by 
the million every year. 

As it is the adult, rather 
than the child that is being 
wooed, the companies offer 
little in the way of piggy 
banks, magazines and other 
goodies which building soci- 
eties and banks use to entice 
junior investors across their 
portals. 

The life insured, in fact, is 
usually that of the adult 
establishing the nest egg, 
rather than the child. Once a 
policy is taken out, the adult 
then contributes a regular 
monthly premium, perhaps 
£10 to £20. for a period of at 
least 10 years. 

The size of the 
cash sum depends 
on bonuses paid 

As with all endowment poli- 
cies, the size of the cash sum at 
the end of the day depends on 
the bonuses paid by the life 
assurance company each year 
and at the time the policy 
matures. 

There is a guaranteed cash 
sum. but this is usually less 
than the total contributions 
made over the years. Life 
companies can of course only 
project these bonuses based on 
past payouts and have now 

accepted the criticism that 
they are probably too high for 
an era of low inflation and 
high stock-market prices. 

As a result, the companies 
are changing their methods of 
projecting the final payout 
from November 1, from when 
they will use a system based on 
an assumed rate of investment 

K b, similar to one already 
i for unit-linked policies. 
Thus it is difficult to com- 
pare companies and make a 
choice on which will fare 
belter. To complicate matters, 
the life companies often have 
different rules on when they 
will pay the money. 

Norwich Union, for in- 
stance. will let the policy 
tnature on the child's 13rh, 
18th, or 21st birthday, while 
Friends* Provident and Cleri- 
cal Medical give the option of 
anv birthday between the 18th 
and 25lh. 

To give two examples of 
what the companies are quot- 
ing, the Norwich Union es- 
timates that a 30-year-old man 
investing £10 a month from 
when his son is four might be 
able to hand over a cheque for 
£3.450 to go with the key of the 
door when he gets out the 
I8th-birthday champagne. 

Over at Friends* Provident, 
the same amount saved by a 
40-year-old when her daughter 
is six might bring £4.708 on 
her 25th birthday by the 


Friends' estimates. 

There are two other features 
about these children's policies. 
They usually provide an op- 
tion for the child to take out a 
policy on his or her own life op 
10 a certain limit, without 
medical reference, when die 
first policy matures. 

In some cases, the cash 
hunp sum can be transferred 
into the new policy. 

Second, if the unthinkable 
happens and the paying adult 
dies, the policy fulfils its other 
function as a life-assurance 
scheme. 

The Norwich, for instance, 
pays oat the original sum 
insured and keeps the policy 
going without further pre- 
miums to pay until the ma- 
turity date, when the sum 
assured is paid oat again along 
with all the bonuses. 

A variation on a theme is 
offered by the Friends' Prov- 
ident, which is allowed 
through a special Act of 
Parliament to insure the life of 
the actual child. 

As a result. Friends' can 
offer the same policies to 
children as it does to adults — 
□nit-tin ked or with profits — 
with the exception that the 
amount payable if a child dies 
before the age of 12 is limited 
to the return rtf premiums. 

The big question is whether 
life-assurance plans are 
worthwhile for children, or 
indeed, for the adults who pay 
for them. One must remember 
that such plans suffer the 
same disadvantages as life 
policies for adults. 

These include high admin- 
istrative charges in the early 
years of the policy, which 
reduce the sums available for 
investment, and poor surren- 
der values if they need to be 
cashed in before maturity, 
perhaps because the adult 
paying the premiums becomes 
unemployed. 

Some experts are 
sceptical about 
value for children 

In addition, life premiums 
no longer enjoy tax relief, a 
privilege taken away ip 1984, 
although the cash payouts are 
tax-free. 

Relatives, so long as they 
are not parents, can also enjoy 
tax breaks by arranging the 
policy through a deed of 
covenant 

Some financial intermedi- 
aries are frankly sceptical 
about tbe value of life policies 
for children and recommend 
other avenues for helping a 
youngster get a financial leg- 
up in later life. 

Stephen Lansdown, of a 
Bristol firm of investment 
advisers, Hargreaves 
Lansdown, said: “I would 
prefer to use a unit-trust 
savings plan because you get a 
much cleaner investment ami 
don't get creamed for charges 
early on." 

\ 

He would also favour look- 
ing at the National Savings | 
Bank investment account 

However, he said a life! 
policy might help spread the j 
risk if a unit-trust plan has 
already been taken out 


School-fees plans pass the parent test 


New-born, but perhaps their parents should already be 
investigating the possibility of assurance, particularly as a 
way of saving money for the child 

How to fulfil 
your life’s 
ambitions 


Struggling to pay school fees 
out of taxed earnings rather 
than making financial pro- 
vision well in advance is how 
most parents educating their 
children privately meet the 
bills. Yet it has long been a 
tradition for children's names 
to be entered at birth at a 
chosen school. 

But there are signs that this 
cavalier attitude is giving way 
to a new mood of realism, 
especially among parents of 
children below school age. 

Organizations working out 
school-fees schemes, includ- 
ing banks, building societies, 
insurance companies and 
specialist planners, are 
experiencing a dramatic in- 
crease in the number of 
inquiries. 

Interest in lightening the 
load of school fees has co- 
incided with the steady growth 
of the number of people 
choosing private education for 
their children. For the year 
ended January 1986, the In- 
dependent Schools Informa- 
tion Service reported a 1.2 per 
cent increase in the number of 
children attending more than 
1,350 independent schools. 

Isis figures based on Janu- 
ary 1985 put the percentage of 
the school-age population be- 
ing educated at these schools 
at 6.5 per cenL Independent 
schools are attracting more 
than 550.000 pupils from a 
wide variety of backgrounds. 

Fees range from £360 a term 
for a day place at a small 
preparatory school to more 
than £2.000 a term for board- 
ing places at top schools. 


School fees last year we nt up 
by 9 percent. 

Isis publishes a forward- 
planning leaflet and a list of 
recommended brokers and 
agencies with good track 
records in developing school 
fees plans. 

Specialists in school-fees- 
savings schemes, usually 
linked to insurance or to 
covenants made by grand- 
parents for grandchildren, 
work out tailor-made plans 
based on individual 
circumstances. 

Parents approaching Invest 
for School Fees, based in 
Hemel Hempstead, Hertford- 
shire,are sent an example of a 
school-fees-plan based on 
information supplied about 
where they plan to send their 
child to school, the age of the 
child and the preferred 
method of payment: from 
income, income and lump 
sum or lump sum. 

Graham Smith, a director of 
Invest for School Fees, said: 
“If a scheme is entered into 
with us, we manage it from 
beginning to end. We advise 
each year about the state of the 
scheme, warn about projected 
rises in school fees, and update 
the plan. 

“We are finding that more 
and more people are taking 
action earlier, particularly par- . 
ents with young children. The 
younger the child the better. 
You can make huge savings. 

“There are families pre- 
pared to make a sacrifice to 
make certain their children 
have the opportunity to go to 
independent schools should 
the need arise. It is a means of 



Private education: new ways to pay 


safeguarding their children's 
future.” 

Grandparents wanting to 
help financially with their 
grandchildren's education are 
wooed by insurance com- 
panies ana building societies 
pointing out the tax advan- 
tages of covenanting money. 

Cannon Assurance, based at 
Wembley in north-west Lon- 
don, puts the case in its leaflet. 
The Children’s Savings Plan, 
for covenanting to pay for, 
among other things, a good 
education, its plan combines 
the lax benefits of a deed of 


covenant trust with invest- 
ments in stocks, shares, prop- 
erty and gilts. 

A package based on what is 
described as a “unique policy” 
for planning ahead for crip- 
pling school fees and making 
money go further has been 
devised by a Somerset build- 
ing society. Grandparents cov- 
enant money into a Frame 
Selwood Building Society 
Gold Minor Account in the 
name of the child concerned, 
with a parent as trustee. 

As well as the tax benefit 
reclaimable on the 


covenanted money — re- 
stricted under the plan to 
£1,500 a year — the account, 
on which interest at 8.75 per 
cent is paid on balance of 
monies, is used to fund a fire- 
insurance policy. 

Respite for parents already- 
stretched paying school. fees 
out of income, came m a 
scheme launched last year, the 
school fees loan plan, run by 
the National Westminster 
Bank and Isis. 

Claire Austin of Isis said: 
“The scheme was set up in 
response to the feedback we 
were getting that though there 
were many places parents 
could turn to for advice on 
forward planning for school 
fees, there was a gap in the 
market in relation to parents 
with children already at an age 
when they could go to private 
schools who were looking for 
financial assistance.” 

Designed to help the es- 
timated 75 percent of parents 
who had not made advance 
provision for school fees, the 
plan was taken up to the tune 
of more than £6 million in its 
first year of operation (1985- 
86 ). 

By the end of last month, 
total loans approved to date 
since the scheme was 
launched in April last year 
lopped £9 million. During the 
20 working days of August, 
applications to borrow money 
for school fees were received 
at the rate of nearly 10 a day. 

The amount of the loans 
applied for totalled nearly £2 
million. This compares with 
requests to borrow that were 


initially running ai ?" w 
of £1 million monthly, which 
climbed to £IJ ***** 
monthly in June and July this 

year. 

Of the 1.288 applications 
received from the launch. 240 
JSe withdrawn by the aj£ 

piicanis or turned down by the 
bank The average require 
ment is now£15,?00. 

Loan applic ants must have 
equity. An applicant offering 
as security a house worth 
£80.000. with a mortgage ol 
£25,000 outstanding, could 
qualify (subject to the income 
criterion and bank approval) 
for a maximum school tees 
fund of £3 1.000. 

Interest is charged at 2.5 per 
cent over NaiWcst base rate 
and is paid quarterly by the 
borrower. 

NatWesl claims the plan is 
now firmly established as 
market leader among schemes 
designed to provide immedi- 
ate uinds for school fees. 

The appeal of the scheme, 
NatWest and Isis believe, is 
the certainly of knowing that 
money is available to meet 
school fees each term, that the 
facility can be for the full 
amount of future fees but the 
parents draw only what they 
actually need through each 
school year and that the 
repayment period can range 
from 10 to 25 years to suit 
parents' circumstances. 

A low-cost endowment pol- 
icy is required to repay the 
loan and provide life 
coverage. 

Irene Farnsworth 




.Li 



IF YOU WANT TO CASH YOUR 0 


GRANT CHEQUE AS SOON AS UBC 


YOU GET TO COLLEGE, 

THEN BUY A TICKET FOR THE 




FRESHER’S BALL 




JOIN THE to 



ROCK CLIMBING CLUB 


RAY THE DEPOSIT ON YOUR 




kv 


Whatever your choice of college, there's only 
one bank you should decide on -NatWest 
At least, that was the conclusion over one- 
third of all students came to last year. 

This year, the deal is even better: you open 
an account now and we give you a cheque book 
andServicecard.* 

As soon as you have a place confirmed, we 
rush you a £50 cheque card** and make immedi- 
ate arrangements to have your account t ransf erred 




^ 5 

to where you'll be studying 

We've more branches on or near rampn^ 
8,ad more 24-hour Cash Dispensers than any 

other bank, so wefe never far away 

Next we give you preferential interest rates 
on overdrafts up to £200*** and run your 
personal current account free of normal 
account charges. 

And finally we’ll credit your account with 
an extra £10. 


Richard Lander | The 1986 student package «nns apply in those entering fuU-rtroe further education tn 19S6 for the first time, and who win beta reenpv ol an LEA award -Provided you fill in d Servicecaid application f 


31 your local branch. **Cbeque 






- V 



29 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


(( FOTIJSD 


FINANCE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE/4 


Covenants: easier, but still take care 


» V. 

- ' IV 


iy. 






v , L - 


. . % 
• -A 




lhe financial hardship that 
jnany parents experience in 
funding their children's higher 
education has been trade 
simpler by the availability of 
prepared forms and explana- 
tory notes for deeds of 
covenant. 

pic Inland Revenue, banks 
and companies specializing iri 
convenants now supply forms. 
Helpful information khs are 
also on the market, either free 
or for a modest charge This 
has removed some of the 
“pink siring and scaling wax" 
mystique which in the past 
tended to make covenants the 

province of the well-off and 

well-informed. 

A deed of covenant is 
nevertheless a legally binding 
agreement, signed sealed and 
delivered in the presence of a 
witness and one cannot be too 
careful in the wording of it nor 
in the way it is administered. 

Students whose parents 
made up their college grants 
through a covenant ran into 
trouble with the Department 
of Health and Social Security 
in Oxford last year when 
applying for supplementary 
benefit during foe summer 
vacation. 

The DHSS interpreted of- 
ficial regulations to the letter 
and cm benefits on the basis 
that a covenant was intended 
to cover a foil 52-week year. 

Though this was technically 
correct the DHSS was over- 
ruled on the grounds that the 
Government never intended 
covenant-holders to be penal- 
ized. Assurances were given 
that they would be treated on 
an “extra-statutory basis" un~ 



On campus: costlier than at first sight; deeds of covenant could have helped 
til foe rules were changed and 


be eligible for supplementary 

benefiL But it highlighted the 
need for covenants to be 
watertight and foe wording 
specific 

The ’reason the Revenue 
produced a student pack 
which includes a covenant 
form — and the form for 
claiming ihe lax benefit on 
covenanted money — is that 
people were getting covenants 
wrong, creating a lot of work 
for the Inland Revenue, the 
covenantors and covenantees. 
• Covenants are a perfectly 
legitimate way of recouping 
tax paid so the Inland Rev- 
enue thought it sensible to set 
out the requirements on a 
form acceptable to them. The 


student tax pack was first 
produced in 1 983 and as well 
as being available at Intend 
Revenue offices, has also been 
distributed to colleges through 
the National Union of 
Students: 

Unco vena nted money can 
. be used for any purpose but its 
most common application 
where parents are foe givers is 
to take advantage of tax relief 
during the costly years when a 
child is at university. This 
above-board -means of taking 
sonie of foe sting out of 
maintaining foU-iime students 
aged 18 to 25 is possible if the 
parent pays tax and the stu- 
dent does noL 

A child has to be over foe 
age of 18 before a parent can 


covenant money on which tax 
can be reclaimed at the basic 
rate of 29 per cent, although a 
grandparent can make cash 
gifts by covenant to grand- 
children regardless of age. 

The covenant must be ca- 
pable of running for more 
than six years but can be 
terminated at any time by 
mutual agreement. 

The fact that university and 
polytechnic courses run for 
three or four years is irrelevant 
because studies could con- 
tinue for foe length of time the 
covenant is required to cover. 

Every £100 covenanted 
costs foe parent £71. the 
student being able to claim 
£29 tax per £100 covenanted 
up to lhe single peison'5 


allowance of £2.335. provided 
he or she has no other income 
liable for tax. The student's 
income dictates the level of 
foe covenant. 

The balance in relation to 
the personal allowance is foe 
amount worth covenanting. 
There is no benefit in making 
covenanted payments for 
. more because foe student 
would then have income in 
excess of the personal tax 
allowance and would be taxed 
on this. 

The starting point for most 
parents considering making a 
deed of covenant is foe 
amount of foe full university 
-grant and how much their 
child fells short of iL The 
parental contribution towards 
foe maintenance grant is 
means-tested and calculated 
by foe education authority 
dealing with foe application 
for a gram. 

Bearing in mind foe amount 
of foe singkr person's allow- 
ance. the biggest headache in 
working out the sum to cov- 
enant is estimating what foe 
student's holiday earnings are 
jikely to be. 

People who overlook this 
and covenant up to foe full 
amount of the single person's 
allowance, if only to meet foe 
student's living costs, are of- 
ten quite put out when holiday 
earnings become liable to tax. 

It is equally frustrating to 
find that casual earnings in foe 
tax year before foe covenant is 
taken out dictate foe sum on 
which tax is reclaimable. the 
personal allowance having 
been eaten into. Bui do not 
discourage your children from 
taking paid employment dur- 


ing vacations, urging them 
instead to do voluntary work. 

This is not a good idea, 
because in the eyes of prospec- 
tive employers it docs not 
seem to count for as much as 
having bad work experience in 
a “proper job". 

A covenant docs not have to 
be for topping up a gram to 
fund higher education. It can 
be for buying clothes or spend- 
ing on the general mainte- 
nance of a child which would 
especially - apply to money 
covenanted by grandparents 
to grandchildren under foe age 

or 18. 

The minimum period of a 
covenant is seven years. It is 
advisable that every payment 
under covenant goes through a 
building society or bank be- 
cause foe Intend Revenue 
must be satisfied that each 
covenanted payment has been 
made. 

As well as the benefit of 
reclaiming tax. a deed of 
covenant in favour of a child 
under 18. either by a grand- 
parent godparent other rel- 
ative or friend, enables a fund 
to be created that can be 
invested for foe child's 
benefit 

In case mention of “friend** 
sets minds working, note the 
law does not permit reciprocal 
arrangements where one tax- 
payer covenants another's 
child and vice-versa. 

A comprehensive guide to 
the ins and outs of 
covenanting is available free 
from the Allied Dunbar Cen- 
tre. Swindon. Wiltshire SNI 
1EL. 

IF 



Oliver Barron, aged four, deposits money at Horsham PO 

Child’s play if you 
bank on it early 


YOU! GO ON THE THREE-LEGGED 



PUB CRAWL 


f i * 1 > 

NO**.-/*. * ... , 

It;:- 





fe-v 








SOMETHING TO WRITE ON AT 


YOUR FIRST LECTURE, 


AND NIP BACK HOME 


THE WEEKEND TO GET YOUR 


WASHING DONE 


PRESS FOR ACTION 


The impulse to save is not one 
of childhood's most noted 
characteristics. To parents' 
despair, children are rarely 
willing to wait for anything, so 
ft is hardly surprising that 
many parents start early to 
teach the principle of thrift. 

At the same time there is a 
natural inclination to want the 
best return from the invest- 
ment In most cases, it is not 
easy to combine both of these 
aims. 

By Ear the best choices from 
most points of view are prod- 
ucts from the Department of 
National Savings, the 
Government's retail-savings 
operation. As a result of 
developing government policy, 
National Savings products are 
now the only method of saving 
within maiwland Britain where 
yon can get the interest paid 
gross — that is, without tax 
deductions. 

More than a year ago the 
Government obliged banks to 
start paying interest on all 
their accounts net of composite 
rate tax, at 29 per cent. This 
brought them into line with 
SjmMlng societies, which al» 
ready did so. 

Because everyone has to pay 
composite rate tax, whether a 
taxpayer or not, those who are 
not normally liable to tax lose 
out. Children and old people 
are’ foe most obvious group 
affected. 

A look at savings rates 
shows why. The National 
Savings Investment Account, 
probably the best choice, pays 
a gross interest rate of 10.75 
per cent It needs only a £5 
minimum investment and re- 
quires one month's notice of 
withdrawals. 

A National Savings official 
said: “We don't go in for free 
teddy-bears surf whatnot to 
attract youngsters. We just 
give an bonest-to-goodness 
good rate of return." 

Besides that, the child is 


officially responsible for his ' 
own account from the age of 
seven. 

Other appropriate NS prod- 
ucts are the Deposit Bond 
paying 21.25 per cent grass 
and the Income Bond paying 
1125 per cent. But their 
investment levels are consis- 
tently higher and may not be 
appropriate for the average 
children's account The De- 
posit Bond requires a £100 

minimum investment while 

the Income Bond needs £200. 

Compare that with 7 per 
cent net of tax from Nat West 
the most generons of the 
clearing banks. The building 
societies are also eager to 
court children's accounts but 
the best yon are likely to get is 
5.25 per cent on ordinary 
share accounts, which nor- 
mally have a £1 minimum 
investment leveL 

You can get a better rate 
from the societies, bat only if 
you invest larger amounts. At 
the Halifax, for instance, yon 
can get 125 per cent net, hut 
only if yon invest a minim am ' 
of £1,000 for your child. Some' 
smaller societies may offer a 
high rate for a smaller sum: 
the Paddington's seven-day 
notice account pays 7.75 per 
cent for a £100 investment, 
giving a compound annual rate 
of 7.9 percent. 

These high interest ac- 
counts can be useful as a way ~ 
of investing large sums left to 
children, for example, by 
grandparents. 

Quite obviously, for pure 
rate of return the National 
Savings products mast be foe 
best for non-taxpayers. But 
parents may of coarse want to 
give their children an account 
at a bank or buQding society 
mainly to get them accustomed 
to using these institutions 
which du>y will certainly need 
when they grow older. 

RT 



i. * 


f 


NatWest Student Service Application Form. 


■r * 


Surname Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms. 

Other names 

Home address. 


Name and address of CoUege/University 



Length of course — 
Tferm-time address. 


Tick if statements and other correspondence to be sent 
to term-time address □ 



Signature. 


Ttw Baby Bond has bam devised for any 
caring adult, especially parents and grandparents, with an 

B eye on a child’s future. Highly acclaimed. flexible, tax-efficient and 
badcad by Britain's most prestigious traditional Friendly Sooetv thn 
Tunbridge Weils Equitable, lhe Baby Bond is the first affordable steu 
on the road to secure a child's future. 

If you would like to find out more about the Baby Bond lust fitl in the 
coupon below, ring ua on our Hotline number Brighton (02731 BTsifw 
or ask your usual financial adviser. 061 


N.B For your convenience your account will be opened 
at the branch nearest to your college address. 


Extra specimen signature. 
Date of birth 


.Grant p.a,5L 


NatWest 

-r-, * If any of the above details are not available please write 

The Action Bank -notknownr 

account opening form receives the prompt.attention it deserves, post it first class to; The Student Service Manager, National Westminster Bank PLC, PO Box 46, 
tnatyour Hounslow TW4 6NF- We will drop you a line within one week of receiving your application. 

yeaikbte those who are eighteen yeorsofAge or qwr and are ip receipi of an award “Overdraftsxubjea to status and conditions. Written credit details available from any branch of NatWten or 41 Lothbur^ London EC2P2BR 


Course. 


To ensure 


1 — — — — — — — — — — — — 

" Send to: Dominion Financial Management ltd., *— ™ 


| ISO Church Street Brighton. Sort Sussex BAM TWD. £ 

I 
il 
I 

— — i-il 


Nome 


Address 


“0 address «f HnancU MMsor (tf appScabts) 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


finance for YOUNG PEOPLE/5 



The £600 million that 
goes in pocket money 


Recent reports of children 
getting £30 a week pocket 
money are greatly exag- 
gerated. Parents who nearly 
died when they read this w31 
be relieved to know that £30 
plus was the maximum weekly 
holiday spending . money 
thrown up in a survey on 
children's holiday pursuits 
commissioned by Fomin's 
Holidays. 

Wail’s Pocket Money Mon- 
itor, 1986, the twelfth annual 
publication of a survey re- 
garded as the authority on the 
spending power of Britain's 10 
miDion five to 16 year olds 
puts the average weekly 
pocket money at £1 . 1 7. This is 
8p higher than last year but 5p 
less than 1983's record £1.21 

Even so, pocket money now 
lops £600 million a year and 
children's total income, 
including gifts and earnings 
from paper rounds, Saturday 
jobs and the tike, is estimated 
to be worth more than £1 
billion a year. 

Where does it go? A survey 
of the buying habits of chil- 
dren agpd between seven and 
14 last year pinpointed sweets 
and chocolates (£1 13 million), 
clothes (£69 million), crisps 
and soft drinks (£62 million), 
records and books (£54 mil- 
lion) and comics and maga- 


zines (£41 million) as major 
items of pocket mosey 
expenditure. 

The Cairick Janies Market 
Research Annual Income and 
Spending Survey 1985 also 
singled out expenditure on 
ice-cream, sports goods, take 
away food, stationery, cosmet- 
ics and hair products and the 
cinema as “noteworthy" bat 
found that buying toys came 
fairly low down on the list 

Research by Mintd for a 
report on the toy market in 
January this year, which also 
looked at the seven to 14 a^e 
group, showed that £35 mil- 
lion pocket money was spent 
on toys and games. 

Action figures arc 

a growth area 

Kate Stevens of the British 
Toy and Hobby Manufac- 
turers Association said: “Kids 
are becoming more sophis- 
ticated earlier.” 

The cut-off age for toys in 
the UK is 10 or 1 1 but in the 
US it is still 14 as it used to be 
here." 

Because the sire of the 
British toy market was worth 
£840 million at retail last year 
and is expected to grow to 


£850 million this year, toys are 
dearly looked for as gifts as 
well as being bought for 
toddlers not yet gening pocket 
money. 

The increase is expected to 
come from a buoyant pre- 
school market and the 
popularity of character soft 
toys and action figures. This is 
seen as a growth area and at 
least one chain store is qua- 
drupling the size of its “pocket 
money section" specializing in 
inexpensive hems. 

Walls's Pocket Money Mon- 
itor — fieldwork for the latest 
issue was conducted from 
January 8 to 21, 1986 — 
reveals that despite the wealth 
of the region, children in 
London and the south of 
England have in recent years 
seen their pocket money lag- 
ging behind the national 
average. 

A jump of 18 per cent 
weekly now puts the region 
second in the national stakes, 
only Ip behind Scotland 
where parents are Britain's 
most generous. Pocket money 
in Scotland now averages 
£lJ8p weekly, a 13 per cent 
increase on last year. There 
has also been a massive 4] per 
cent rise in cash gifts from 
relatives and friends, WalTs 
report. 



Last year, children in the 
North-west came top in the 
pocket money league but this 
year they have slipped to joint 
third position, equal with die 
Midlands and East Anglia. 
The poor relations are chil- 
dren in Wales and the South- 
West who have suffered a 6 
per cent decrease in their 
pocket money which averages 
91pr die only region where 
children get less than £1 a 
week. 

More than 200 sampl in g 


points were used for this year's 
Monitor for which 978 parents 
and 4,558 children were inter- 
viewed. For the first time, 
Wall's looked at the difference 
in pocket money, earnings and 
gifts between children with 
employed and unemployed 
parents. 

Ft was found that children of 
unemployed parents were 
given slightly less (7 per cent) 
pocket money than those 
whose parents w ere in work. \ 




Even under-fives are allo- 
cated money by Dr Bamardo's 
bur it is carefully controlled. 
The amount of weekly pocket 
money distributed- to 
Bamardo children — 14,000 in 
the U K — is at the lower end of 
the rate local authorities are 
giving children in care. 

Under-fives have 70p a 
week to can on and pocket 
money goes up approximately 
10 per cent every birthday 
after that. Nine-year-olds get 


£1 15. Pocket money stops at 
16 and is replaced by a 
clothing and personal allow- 
ance oi£15 a week. 

“We are trying to make 
them more independent and 
responsible, explaining to 
them about bank accounts and 
credit cards and getting them 
to have a senableatwude to 

spending money." said Dr 
William Beaver, the chanty s 
director of publicity- 

More than 70 per cent of 
Bamardo children live in the 
community in family groups 
or with foster parents — the 
philosophy is that “children 
belong in families not in 
institutions" — and the way 
they $pend their money ts 
watched as ft would be in a 
normal family. 

Parents of children at 
boarding school took to the 
school for guidance on the 
amount of pocket money to 
pay. At one boarding school in 
Hertfordshire the going rate 
for boys aged 10 to 13 is £1.50 
a week but this is banded over 
only in the amount needed for 
particular purchases. 

“We tell parents that £18 a 
term, 12 weeks, should be 
adequate." said George Pit- 
man. head of the junior school 
at Berkhamsted School. “The 
money is banked with the 
house tutor and given out 
once or twice a week for 
sweets, pens, cards to send 
home and that sort of thing. 

“We stipulate an amount 
for pocket money because 
what we don't want is some 



AlARM CIOCK 

\bu can haw a free Remington 
Multi-Oaartz Alarm Clock 
(normal price around £8) or 
on the other hand you can A 
have £6 paid directly into Bt 
your account. IS 





►AT: .£1 




mm 


UHMEI 

m 



CARD 






r j 


As soon as you open 
your account we’ll 
order them. The Card 
not only guarantees 
your cheques up to 
£50. but lets you draw 
cash from 2500 Auto- 
Banks and NatWest 
Servicetills. . 


u- 


You can have £6 paid directly 
into your account or on the 
other hand, you can have an 
alarm clock. 



Ml DIA 

n 

PACKAGE 


HODENT COACH CARD 

There’s also a free • 
discount card (normally 
£5.50) which cuts a third 
off National Express and 
Scottish Citytink fares, 
including Raplde luxury 
services. 


As. part of our student service we’re 
offering a package that could come in 
rather handy 

If you’re going to be a full-time student 
all you've got to do is go into an y Midland 
branch. We’ll open an account for W/THL . 
you close to home or where you’ll 1 I 

be studying. Wherever you prefer. ^ * 

® Midland 

”1^6^ 1— 


low INTEREST KATE 
OVERDRAFT! 

Your grant might be late or 
you may need an advance 
over the holidays, if this 
happens overdrafts are 
available at a special low 
interest rate. Just come in 
and talk to us and well work 
IL0UL 


Banks usually charge you 
commission when you're 
overdrawn. Wfe wont charge 
you a penny for operating 
your account 


ftoir&f 


The^tt8w8abletf^openy»iHtatMidbndStudentGinwtAcnintand«gaaij^^ 

ary Mtfand branch or Gugomer Wormaoon Savne Freepost Mcfland Bank pfc. Marketing Depanmera. EQ Bax 2, Sheffidd si wz: CMidtandBankpfcT986. : 


It could be time 
to put your faith 
in a trust fund 


What do you do if you want to 
give a substantial amount of 
money to your child, but do 
not trust his or her financial 
wisdom? 

It would seem sensible to 
retain control of your money 
until you fed the child can be 
trusted with it Then ft would 
simply be a question of mak- 
ing a gift. 

There are several problems 
with the straight gift most of 
them related to rather thorny 
inoome and inheritance tax 
points. The simple fact is that 
yon might die before the gift 
can be made, in which case the 
child may not benefit as you 
intended , or there may be a 
Si gnifi cantly higher charge to 
inheritance tax than anyone, 
except the Inland Revenue, 
might wish. 

One solution many parents 
adopt is to set up a trust for 
offspring. Even if you die, the 
trust will live on, and in 
addition to control, certain 
types of trust, notably 
accumulation and mainte- 
nance trusts, offer some 
tempting tax advantages. 

To set up the trust a legal 
animal is created, by deed and 
money transferred to it This 
is' then managed by trustees 
(often the concerned parents 
plus a professional adviser) 
who will look after the money 
and distribute such parts of it 
as The law permits. 

Benefit could be 
construed to have 
a wide meaning 

To hold on to the tax breaks 
which go with accumulation 
and maintenance trusts the 
ultimate recipients of the 
money, the beneficiaries, can 
be paid only in respect of their 
education, maiplftnancp or 
benefit. 

Once the trust matures, or 
in legal jargon, the interest of 
the beneficiaries vests, more 
money can be paid. Mean- 
while, the body of the trust is 
protected by the three mainte- 
nance concepts with a wealth 
of case law and lawyers' 
interpretation behind them. 

“ Benefit”, for example, 
could be construed to have a 
wide meaning, but in practice 
this has not been the case. 
Trustees can be sure that they 
are within the terms of the 
trust if they pay out men n^ 
for such stolid purposes as 
school fees and clothing. 

- The law provides for farther 
control in the inheritance tax 
provisions. Accumulation and ■ 
maintenance trusts Were spe- 
cially exempted from the tax 
in the- last Budget, but to 
qualify for exemption they 
must be constituted so that at 
least one or more of the 1 


possible to make an unborn or 
not yet conceived child the 
beneficiary of an accumula- 
tion and maintenance trust 
And the trust can be used to 
stipulate the occurrence of 
some neatly defined contin- 
gency as foe event which will 
allow the beneficiary into his 
or her money. 

It is acceptable, for exam- 
ple, that a beneficiary may not 
be allowed to gain access to 
the capital until he or she is 
married. 

An accumulation and main- 
tenance trust will still qualify 
for exemption from mheri- 
. ranee tax even if the capital of 
--the trust-fund is not available 
to the beneficiary after the age 
of 23. The beneficiary could 
easily be kept waiting for 
another 10 years or more. 

Why foe person creating the 
trust might want to do this, 
apart pemaps from sheer vin- 
dictiveness, is not entirely 
dear. 

The prime practical benefit 
of the trust is that it allows its 
creator to make a gift (thus 
reducing the value of the 
estate for inheritance-tax pur- 
poses) while retaining effec- 
tive control of the assets in the 
trust to a great extent 
The “managers” of the trust 
are of course the trustees, but 
most parents or grandparents 
who set up the trusts see to it 
that they are also trustees. 
These trusts are particularly 
popular in the case of the 
family company where the 
next generation is to inherit, 
while the older wishes to 
retain day-to-day manage- 
ment of the company. 

The tax benefits are sub- 
stantial Apart from diminish- 
ing the value of the estate of 
foe donor and so lowering the 
inheritance tax band, the accu- 
mulation and maintenance 
trust can. help a basic rate 
income tax-paying beneficiary 
use up the foil amount of tire 
lower rate allowance. 

Any income accumulated 
within foe trust is charged to 
income tax ax an effective rate 
of 45 per cent. If the income is 
paid out rather than allowed 
to accumulate, foe beneficiary 
wfll be able to reclaim the tax 
if his or her marginal tax rate 
is less than 45 per cent 
But if the beneficiary is 
under 18, the payment may 
need to be deferred; the Inland 
Revenue does not like non- 
working children riaiming tax 
advantages. 

So how do you go about 
setting up your own trust, and 
are there any pitfalls? 

The settmg-up 
method is simple 
but expensive 


L 


bo'S having more to spend 
than others. %Ve have been 
known to send money back to 
parents!" 

For children living at home 
with their parents the level of 
pocket money is usually dic- 
(awd by what is already 
provided - comics on the 
paper bill for instance - and 

what it is needed for. 

Some children settle fortes 
than their peers 
know they can look forward to 

a super holiday. Grandparents 

and aunts and , unclcs . 
usually be counted on to boost 
pocket money. 

The top rate was 
over £30 a week 

Pontin's survey on holidav 
pocket money revealed that 16 
percent of children claimed to 
receive £!0a week followed by 
1 3 per cent getting £5. Among 
the 12-15 year olds. 10 per 
cent of the children got £20 a 
week with children from the 
North doing better through 
the generosity of their parents 
than those from the South. 

The figure that rocked the 
nation when it was publicized 
as being weekly pocket money 
was the top figure of£30 plusa 
week to spend on holiday, a 
figure gleaned from some of 
foe 14 to 15 year-olds can- 
vassed, They were among foe 
531 children aged between 
eight and 15 interviewed in 
the Pontin's survey, which 
was carried out by an indepen- 
dent research company. 


V * 


25, become entitled to at least 
an interest in the income of 
the trust. 

Thus a potentially irrespon- 
sible beneficiary might be kept 
out of the income from the 
trust until the age of 25. or 
imer in special circumstances 
I . er * are several 
beneficiaries. ' 

Accumulation and mainte- 
nance trusts must have benefi- 
ci a*T c s who are either 
grandchildren of a common 
parent, or the children, wid- 
ows or widowers of a benefi- 
ciary who would have been 
emitted to a share in the trust 
but died before coming into 
the money. 

The definition of a benefi- 
ciary must be reasonably tight 
ortbe courts win declare foe 
trust, void, for uncertainty, 
Nevertheless,’ ft is perfectly 


. The method of setting up is 
simple but expensive: see a 
solicitor. Lawyers vary, but 
the charge for setting up a trust 
could easily run to £350 or 
more. The complexity of the 
case, the amount of tax plan- 
ning and the volume of money 
involved are all factors in" 
deciding how much it will 
cost. 

On top of that, the trustees, 
usually including the solicitor, 
may make a charge for run- 
ning the trust In general, it is 
not worth it unless you have 
about £10,000 to give away. 

* One final point: these trusts 
are foe financial equivalent of 
a va sectomy. Once you have 
matte up your mind .to- go-, 
ahead, rt is not normally 
possible to reverse the 
decision. 


Martin Baker 


:* \ V i 


'IVhvsutih 

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in the I h ^ 


jus* 

spon-H, 

5fetdri* : s 


■^KtNCYVAU 


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^ •» . 






LA CREME DE LA CR 




. A';::.,- 




'\t .M 

'■> Wi 

’ , £u 




iU be time 1 


our 


ns st fund 


; lV 

: W.r.-T 


'■ Vf 


Executive Secretary 

Central London 


c £11,500 


< * n T ofacoounanisand^ taxconsultamswtfo 

arepuiaUonforernplcyirigonlythebestatai] levels. 
^ares«king w recraft an experienced PA for oneofour most 
F^^ous^reoral pcsts-thaofE^cmiveSecreiaryioEhe 
rarmer-m-Charge of the Tax Practice in London. 

asp f : ^ d »' Provide i an ewepdonalseivioe-aWch 

s^^BsaKawr* 


^ waes^d^lirara wiU beaged 26+, educated to'O' level 

hx>e _, prevJous organisational md administratrix? 

skuj&a^ aarufard of shorthandA>ping( ] 00/65) is required 
opponunliyio train on the latest Ufang 


Previous experience at a senior lew! in a large professional 
or commercial orsancanon is essential. You should also have 
excellent presentation and comraunicadon skills and the abitift- 
to work underpressure. 

TOs believe thar this isan excellent pppommitv fora really first- 
das. executive secretary to rtKne to one of the most prestigious 
and demanding jobs available. 

Ifyouwould like to apply, please send a deoiled curriculum \1iae 
(enclosing a daytime telephone number) to; 

MrsMHennessy, . 

Recrumng Officer, A tvtt tt m 

Arthur Andersen & Ox, i/ \ |\ . I iIUIa 

isbs * Andersen 




Tte&ectirinctit&oftvTanmsajnxswitttfia 

no^Gfynmbi^cagan sa tionfieedsan 

exceptio nal p &so/ui assistant 

AdrwKtTatiWHtifwthcmsproaitcftte mrfc 

aklux& test shorttxxJ anti tyj^ tenable the 

success^ app6cant to dear ratine tasks racdly. 

Areas of respons&^inchxje the o*mp^c3rarri 
teM schemes the persmiiqua^ needed 

am the ab&yto anticipate the (factor's 
reqifamcffcandtDdea!^ 
arxiwihaXtheaxwmvtactksfyanOi^ctumL 
A busfcsPfcappeaiaKe is 3 must together wth 


Secretaries 


frgnfefg pffifwpncg and an A tawrffdbcrtffi The 

exceit&ti salary includes such benefits as a 

mortgage subsidy and bonus. Age mdcator 25-32. 

Please telephone 01-4396477 


Central London 


£7-10.500 p.a. 


-26.9.06. 


&& 


i CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS i 


BIG BANG - OCTOBER 27th 
What It Means to Secretaries 

Deregulation, or *Big Bans’ as it has become known, is 
bringing about explosive growth in the City with a race for 
talented top-flight professionals Within the corporate 
finance, banking and securities sectors. 

Inevitably this expansion is spreading across all levels and, 
accordingly, we are urgently looking for first-class PAs 
and secretaries with excellent shorthand and WP skills. 

The environment is often demanding and pressurised 
requiring long hours of bard work; however; for the 
_ ambitious ana committed secretary, the rewards are hi gh 
and the work varied and s timulating 

you would like to discuss your next career move, or hear 
about some of our current vacancies, please telephone for 
an appointment on 588 3535. 

Our skilled temps are now paid £7.00 p. h. (£12, 740 pa) plus 
a no-strings holiday bonus for senior secretarial 
assignments. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

Why settle for less 
than the best agency? 

At MacBlctin Nash^r^rarySeaetaries we offer: . 

• irmmdiatework 

• competitive rates and a holiday pay scheme 
throughout the winter . 

+thepkkjjfthe hestiis^mehls inLondon . 

After aB, we couldn't settle for less than the best, 
so why should you? 

Call Liz Barratt today for thelgtest 

assignments on 01-439 060b«^tek. ) 


Advertising 

£9,000 

In te rnational AcL Agency needs an admin, asst to 
work in the mada planning dept Mute have some 
a d vert isi ng experience, knowledge of 2 European 
languages and WP skOs. 

Govern Garden 

c£ 10,000 

Our tetern a Ho nal cfionta need 2 secJPAs (2 
friends?) to join their busy London office. There wR 
be variety and total Invotvement If you era flexfiito, 1 
enthusiastic and erfey team work. Skate 90/50/WP. 


Tlgune-orienratetr - 'Stuffy, middle-agpdfmvtromnou'- * min in the 

'Quill 'pens *. . . and so cm. - lock no fun hi 

’W? hate no doubt that these :tre some i »f ihe images conjured up Successful canc 

in the minds of mam- secretaries alien Accountancy Finn' is level MJiiilird. i 

mentioned. However; the real situation couldn't be further from preferably with 

the truth! ev«niulwiihtf 

As you are no doubt aware, throughout the world there is a where no pwin 

rapidly increasing .shift from low- technology to high-technology V e lute a reput 

industries. When you walk into the offices ofAnhur Andersen & lime walvpri 

Cayou immediately enter a h igh -t echnnlogv ermronmen i satisucuon. SiL 

which functions at the very heart of this change. An imemationai be a prohibiting 

firm of accountants whose dynamic growth means that we are if thechallenge 

able to offer opportunities to secretaries at a rarieiy of levels, please send a di 

from college leavers to highly-experienced people for the most telephone num 

senior positions- Mrs mmol- Her 

If you wish- Recruiting Offic 

* to work in a busy stimulating environment for .small teams Arthur An dersei 

of executives i Surrey Street. 

* useyour proven organisational and technical .skiDs 1 60 wpm London Mi C2R 2 

audio) 

Appointments oiuzkit' of. nomuri imrbnjjthjim ip. siarc cutuLMc. 

Please uuiicatea tanepnjercncvonyviirc r 


* train in ihe Laest office auiomaiion technology (TCing l 
-look no fun her. 

Successful candidates will be aged 18-35 and educated to O' 
level MJiiilird. A num mum of 2 y ears' expenuii. c*. gamed 
preferably within a financial or technical emvonna'nt. is .ils' 
esvcTUul with the excepuon erf our junior secret an j! jh isinuns 
w here no previous commercial experience is required. 

VX'e luve a reputation for employing i mly die ivst -At the same 
lime wvalsi:> provide the hest in terms of rewards jud i* ih 
satisfaction. Salary within the guidelines indicated above will not 
be a prohibiting factor l> it the nglit candiiLik-s. 
lithe challenge ui working for .Anhur.Andi'rsen \ Co. .ifipeals. 
please send a detailed curriculum vdae ( including a dav time 
telephone number » to: 

Mrs Maggie Hennessi , - 

Recruiting Officer, /\ n r PTTT TT> 

Anhur .Andersen SCcl, a/vJVI XiLJIa. 

Andersen 

&& 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 


Television Soufii, the successfal ITV programme company serving 
tte Sooth and South-East, has a vacancy at its London office nr 
Victoria for a: 

Secretary to Director of 
Sales and Marketing 

Candidates should be capable of working at Directorate levd and 
witting sometimes to^ work long and arduous hours. 

Applicants should have experience in a similar environment and 
have excellent liaison abilities at all levels, phis strength in 


Suitably qualified and esperienced candufates should appfyin 
writing (dosing dale 24 September) giving background ririails and 
quoting reference 53/SE/86T to: 

Personnel Manager, ^ 

TVS, 

Television Centre, 

Vinters Paris, U M 

Makfetone, 

Kent MEM 5NZ. ■ H V M 


Ware an equal opportunities 

employer. ' ■ 


ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITY 
£ 8,500 NEG 

We are a leading advertising agency in the Wert End looking foi 
young experienced secretary to work for one of our Client Servit 
Directors h» 


in the Wert End looking for a 
for one of our CKent Services 


Temporary 

Secretaries 


3rd Floors Carrington House. 

130 Regent Street London W1R5EE. ! w ' 
(Entrance in Regent PL above Iberia Airways.) 


S1AFF AGENCY MANAGER 

_ £17000 package North Bucks , 

The company tsaweH estabtehed enwkwrneraagen^^^ 
wWi aiT categories of staff i*> to mkkHe management fcveL 


Yon mil need excellent skills, including shorthand, enthusiasm and 
lots of common sense together with the ability to get on withpeopk at 
all levds. As well as the nsnal secretarial tasks the job will offer plenty 
of opportunity to become involved with the wont of the group. 

If yon have an interest in advertising and are looking for a new 
challenge enjoying all the benefits of being part of a team within a 
large agency please telephone: 

Susannah Jacobson on 01-629 9496. 


with sSi categories of staff up to mkkDe management level. 

A new position has been oerad for a manager id assume 
control erf the pemanent staffaedvity. Ttejob wffl invoke 
sopenrtston ofJconsuhantfc maintaining aiw MkBngcomaas 

exceflent prospects for appointment to the Board erf die 
company » .'! eoufty pardclpadon in due ceme. 

The successful candkJamwlS ptob^rfy be aged 30ro rfOwfeha 
good nack recotd h ream and peoonal adrfevemsu m the tew 
of permanent staff eautarjeiK. 

A satey of ctea £1ZOOO wIB be paid brftiafot togrtig wWi a 
bonus based on turnover amoumta to abojK of safant 
A company car, or at allowance, will be provided Jouri weeks 


COMMODITIES 

£11^00+ 

Dm to BunHkM B» nw pmSoa 
fa» m ge to r "A Ru ff m«r sm- 
mn Id rou t Uv tel nvny ten 
at Forap Entew and Commed- 
ty Btomvs. Lob nl m» S 
Htetel tor pmnmtei ■ net M 
Id ■! Goed UlliSIla 
to as* am inHKM- knplr- 
nmaUEa qatm c & gnuflr 
nungi Ox onto. 

<01-481 2345 


INVESTMEVT 

£10,000 

Are yw owr 257 WH to «nrt « 
i pn of a tern - vmtea to <ted- 
S*t? Id tte teSe ann-iite 
offica d on taL taMnnl Hum 
do mMpn nw> » niteted 
campoBnl PA. Sb/1>|MS. WP - 
wfl X Mo BD Tate. Lot* oMil 
Urftan. Md owtea. 

! 01-481 2345 


THERE’S ROOM FOR YOORS AS 
ORE OF OUR CONSULTANTS 


jribanlaliMdt 



Role Management 


SECRE1ARY TO THE 
GARDENING EDITOR 
AND THE EDITORIAL 
CONSULTANT OF COUNTRY LIFE 

Good typing skflb and fast efficient shorthand 
are essential plus accurate spelfing. 

You must atobeabteto use yourwm 
initiative; an interest in gardening helpful! as you 
wi be Saising with garden owners, contnbutore 

help with the Country Life Farming and VWdme 

OxnpetitionaridtheShoot^ 

PW write 

2238, Country life, IPCMagazvia^i^s^ 

Reach Tbwec Stamford Streetr London^ SE191& 

Wttatt^apporiunto&EniP t V re ' 


factuer. hs^ fw bto Mje fash- 

sRsOsgigSnsKNS 

ness sense and 100/6S wpm ANDfr« niH3r f nn 
handy tor WCi - ygure effJJOVeiUin 
cnoooo to start tme PPP A mg *% 

per Mure. Fling qq 0]-734 12tU 

lllarv(te^^l^Plin^M^IXlL351tae«Sb•l x>at ^^^^ , ^!. 


MUSIC 

£10,500 

H Itak fes te bod ritea. pte 
aa" ~ ! So Had on - V you n 
vsnOta. can Mkon ten dm 
tteg ■ * tea ■ tow# on nan ■ 
an people onontaM S ten 
nAM a fttwonel ic i stttory 
Wtare. ten fate ite l u lo rott o ni 
Itak Ca tens at tenon ■ ant 
- SH i pte OUtwin. 

01-481 2345 


PROPERTY 

£18,000 


There Is ptenty of roam tor the itofd peopto to grow 
afKingsway necruHment Consirfants, based af our 
new Hounsow branch. 

On the one hand you w* be meeting clients, getting 
to understand filter businesses and their needs ana 
devetoping a rapport with them. 

On the other hand you'R be ass es sing file sMte and 
potential erf temporary and permanent Job seekers. 

Natural the promotion prospects are excellent 
Within two yaars you coukJ become a branch office 
manager. You wont necessariy need to have re- 
cruitment experience although this will be an 



You w9, however have a successful commercial 
background, preferably gained in a test mown 
sales environment and nave a proven abfiy to deal 
with people. 


01*481 2345 


albatt aUbatt 


Junior Secretary 

Fine Arts 

Leading histirotion seeksbright. well- educated 
seatfon to mirk dasdj 1 with .Senior adminis- 
traux; This bra role of exceptional ^wleiy and 
interest, ctwering orgaiiLsamin of evena*. 
liaison with VIP trustees and sponsors Rind 
raising: imematkonal pronKition and (txra- 
sitmal ) navel ami anen dance a gjla functions. 
A-levd education preferred. Accurate skflLc 
<90 W) ewentiaL Safan- fJJOO. Please 
telephone 01-»93 T’fT 

GORDON-YATES 


You wll receive an oifistantfing eatery package, then 
it’s up to you. 

Please sand a fuff CV to Paul Jacobs at 

Kingsway Recruitment Consultants 
1, Kingsway 
London 
WC2B 6XF 

or call us on 01-681 1114 


ADVERTISING 
TO £9,500 

The Chief Executive of this West End advertising 
agency is looking for a PA, who can turn her 
hand from P.R. to Personnel on top of providing 
a fufl secretarial back-143. Duties will include bom 
general and your own correspondence, supervis- 
ing .secretarial staff, assisting with presentations 
and lunches plus the administratiOiT of personnel 
records. Sound secretarial skRs (90/60/WP) and 
good educational background required. Age 24- 
28. Please telephone: 

437 6032 

HobstoneS 

A A RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


RecruttfMnT Cntdoe 



icfarii 


FASHION FLAIR? 

Un* ud mbn scariznet ntt good 0 & rMU red ftr W jntewai 
FisMb Dm me Wt imm u o ppow stew , i wwhnt UmM, 
Satinas to tiflfflO. 

Ptam teMphoM oi «b wsr p irt Ptec Cmwj. 


tight Job ter you ting Fiona NOWt! 

LEGAL SEC TO PARTNER* 

. £9000 phis 

LaoWng for rasooasUtty and m cteoanga? Bmortonca In 
company and c o n i mar ria l law. Qood auoo and WP satis 
essential Varied duties with wondoti career prospects. 
MereetedT Costed Jan on 01431 m&. 

FUTURES srecwLBre^ 

Futures Ltd. SI Great Portland Stmet, London WIN SOH" 


Temps — £12,740 p.a. 

The best hourly rate in London for shorthand temps with WP skills 


TVS 


MUINE WATCH LT» 



M Fte 12* Wonm a. W1 

RECEPTION 

£9,000 

U. Co. irgeotiy needs a smart 
woll-sresoiaed parson 2J+ to 
took ate a Herald S/B Ssriccto- 
bnnL do some typng and grea 
i tete 

Tel: 01-935 1235 
(Rk C obs) 

SECRETARY/ 

PA 

to Soogwtltar /Com poser. 
Should Ce aett motiv a ted 
organiser wttii immaculate 
speeds. Salary neg. 
Apply in writing with CV 
id JOS The Times 


iH«| Weoffer: 

^ AR our silled temps the same rote 
* Regular temporary work 
^ organised and interesting as^ignmen/s 

£200 hohdny bonus — no strings attached 
W ☆ Free WP cmss-btdmng on selected machines 

I You need: 

'te 100 wpm shorthand 
* 60 Wpm typing 

■fr Two years ’ Director level secretarial experience 
in London 

& Proficient WP skills on at least one machine 
& Enthushsmcmdapmfessioncdapproach 

Please telephone 01-434 4512 nowfor an 
appointment. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


P.A. TO CHAIRMAN 

Are you professional, personable and patient, a para- 
gon, in feet, of those secretarial virtues required by the 
Chairman of this international, expanding public com- 
pany? He is looking for a protective, imperturbable 
personal assistant with an outgoing, pleasant personal- 
ity, who will pamper to his idiosyncracies and make 
sure his requirements are of paramount importance. 

This is a demanding and important position for some- 
one of senior level who is prepared to take whatever 
comes, will not panic under pressure and enjoys work- 
ing to sometimes unreasonable limits. Whoever 
succeeds will play an essential part in the efficient 
organisation of the company. 

The offices are in Central London and the salary 
offered is £15,750 p.a. plus binges. 

Please send a resume to Box No. J57, The Tunes, 
Virginia Street, London El 9DD, giving full personal 
details. 


RECRUITING 

ENTHUSIAST? 

£15,000+ 

Yoo alien recruiting and have gamed vovr 2 year's + experience 
either as a pcnonncl offict/tnaMRr in a reasonable sized com- 
pany or ahcrnairvcly. far our WP dmsoo, as a Rccnuuncni 
('orauhoni in a WP Agency Vour expense is coupled with an 
energy Icvd ihai makes normal nunaTs quail and a Strong desire 


I have a pcnonncl manaunneu hackgmuod. and WotdPlin - The 
I* recnmmcni spcctalisL Salary parf*©- £ 1 5.000++ acconbot io 
your expense, energy and comtnuniem. 

CaCTLyn Crc3 «a 01-09 7D0I 

City 8778600 WestEnd 439 7001 | j 

Secretaries Plus 

to TheSecretarialConsultantsl B 


LOTS OF FUN! 
£10,500 - HARROW 

Charming Managing Director c£ a leisure divi- 
sion of tbis famous company needs a capable 
secretary to assist him- In his frequent absence 
from the office, jaa will be relied uppn to deal 
with correspondence and paperwoife on his be- 
half and keep him in touch with management 
mattrrv Good skills (100/60) and sound office 
experience necessary. Age 25-45. Benefits ix»- 
•etude holiday discounL Please ring 454 4512. 
Our dotted temps are ram paid £7M pk. 
(£12,740 pa) (ha a no-strings holiday bomu for 
senior secretarial assignments. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


—THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR 

PA/SECRETARY 

The Society is IooUik fix’ an experienced seactary lor die 
Regional Child Can: Director (South V. 

Based in the city, you wilt enjoy the challenge of organising 
and running all aspects of her office. You win possess accurate 
shorthand and audio typing shills and be able io conduct your 
own correspondence. Personal attributes will include the abil- 
ity io wort on you own initiative excellent organisational 
skills and methodical approach to your work. 

Salary c. £8400. 22 days holiday and LVs. 

Phase write with fob career details and day (bar itinhnw 
number, to Personnel DepL NSFCC 47 Safina HfiL London 
EC IN 8RS- Tefc 01-242 1626 Ext. 147. 

77 k* A 'SKX' u an Equal Opportunities Emptmrr. 


PA - RECRUITMENT 
£10,500 


Tlw is a key position to join a 
national recruitment consultancy 
Managing Associates, who are i 


xestiteous intar- 
as PA to two 
sen to delegate. 


Blue Chip £10,000 

The young Chairman of fins Ow tend ptfi*c rdxtions 
comdiucy needs a PA/teamnal aantant with office ad- 
mimstnlkxi skills. As port of the m a n agement team, you 
wifl be involved in bine drip accounts si a senior lewd and 
wiB have flu o p p ortu nity to organise and attend press brief, 
togs aad conferences. A good education is cnem ial and 
financial or PR experience will be an advantage. 

Age 22-28 SKiHs StyfiO. 

^ RECRUITMENT 

i-C 0-M PAW Y TEL- 01-831 1220 


working to a ve/y high level of confidentiality. They 
w B awo tve you m research work, setting up office 
systems, and ax&ifinating meetings, travel and in- 
teniiawing anamements. Exceflem sec skifis (100/ 
60) wauid be St much demand, as well as an 
organised and ftextoiB attitude to an often hectic 
workload. Contact Metafile Latog. . 

01631 fSfl'Rec Cons' 

Price Oavyiie50n 

Rainers 


TOP PA?...THEN... 
JOIN TOP DESIGN CO i 

***£9,000++*** 

! Get involved in ihe film shoots! Whiz out and 
SM “ S“ channing. Gentleman D.K 
right haud/PA. The last girl was swjftfy 
to stylist Provided you have a goSj^SS^r 
humour and are mcga-organised you will on 
Super typing. ShorSTtolS.^^g^ 


- ' V 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


21-25 PA FOR INTERNATIONAL HOTEL GROUP £9,500 


This leading hotel group known world- 
wide, has an excellent opening to work at 
Director level in their prestigious Mayfair 
offices. The Director is involved in the 
developement of new hotels in the UK 
and Europe so subsequently travels a fair 
amount. The position would ideally suit a 

SpeoioUdxprtfe 18-25 year olds 


confident Secretary who enjoys admin, 
and is seeking an interesting position 
where using initiative and handling re- 
sponsibility are key requisites. Excellent 
benefits include discount 01-489 9175 
on hotels in the UK and 
abroad. Skills 80/50. 

APPOINTMENTS LID 


01-5848931 

awi eoasea ft 

DBfflTSWOGt 

UMQM5W1 


EXECUTIVE CREME 

APPEARS EVERY THURSDAY 
from 11th September 1986 
For further details 
TEL.: 01-481 4481 


01-5849033 /nTT%^\ 01-5848931 

m miehmiioml I I IVI 1 if 

SEHETAfSUL m -■ if 1 M DKHTSnra 

HOTWTIIBIT AT y UMW5WI 

[PROJECTS wXTiiioOO] 

I Wri are looking far a P.Ajsecretary to join one of our * 
I clients, a small company in tovety offices in Mayfair. I 
I Someone who wants to pet totally invoked m their 1 
lawn projects would he ideal Eurpoean languages I 
1 are useful as you wiU be deaEng with Inter nati onal 1 
| cfients on a day to day basis as wel as organising I 
[trips and conferences on tne continent j 

[ Good secretarial background is essential 'although I 
I the job is much more involving than the average] 
I se cretar ia l job. Age c24. 100/60. I 

| INTERNATIONAL { 

MARKETING £10,500 

I A large fashion house in the City Is desperately seek- ■ 
) fng a first-class PA/secretary to assist their] 
I International Marketing Director. ■ 

I Yoir day to daydutiaswBmaMy include dealing with | 
. advertising and P.R. agencies, making sure that the . 
| press is relevant to the specific country In which the J 
■ puMcation w 1 appear. This wH most Beaty include i 

| attending ' some "shoots" to supervise the briefing | 
j and fibmng of commercials. Age &22 100/80. j 

j Ploaso call us tor an interview until 6.30pm. | 


Personnel 

Assistant 


This is an unusual and exciting opportunity for an 
experienced secretary to develop a career in 
Personnel work within a leading international firm. 
This is a new position in a recently established 
Personnel function and offers the scope to 
implement new systems, including a computerised 
database A key responsibility of this position is the 
co-ordination of secretariat services across the Tax 
(Division. There is substantia] scope for persona) 
development within the role. 

This extremely demanding post requires the highest 
personal standards and technical secretarial skills 
including word-processing. The successful 
candidate, probably aged 30+ and educated to ‘A’ 
level standard will be a first-class administrator with 
self-confidence and good inter-personal skills. 
Previous experience of organising secretarial 
services would be particularly relevant 
In addition to a real opportunity for personal 
development we offer an attractive salary and good 
working conditions. 

Interested applicants should send their toil 
curriculum vitae to Pat Horrocks at the address 
below quoting PC-664. 

Coopers B 

Plumtree Court 

&LyDrana London EC4A 4HT. 


DIREC TORS’ SECRETARIES 


Top Jobs tor Top People 

£16,000 + CAR + BENEFITS 

The chief executive of a leading City Finance House needs a 
dedicated professional who will thrive in the pressurised front 
line of his international operations. 

£14,000 

The Ma n agin g Director of a company in the Leisure Industry 
needs a FA. par excellence. Good secretarial and excellent 
communication skills required for this challenging role. 


01-629 9323 


Records and Music 

to £ 11,000 

High quality folk labd seeks hard-grafting Sec/1% to MD. He is a leading 

pprfnrmpr In hifl nwn right fringU- jiHtt nnw Tmmagingn 

of new talent- Gorgeous NW1 offices. Lots of excitement and pace- You should 
have definite ‘people- Bair’, excellent drills ( 100/60) and ideally a background in 
music/ entertainment industry Age 23+ 

Public Relations 

£10-£11,000 

Background in PR or media? Go straight to the top, as Pfc to Chairman of this real 
‘blue chip' outfit. They work with some of the leading names in fineg and the 
fast-growing field of City finance. Ybur role wiU involve key events and 
promotions, in addition to high profile work on acquisitions and corporate 
development A levels + accurate drills (80/60) requested. 

College Leavers 

to £7,500 

life have lots of super openings — for instance, in the Wfest End HQ of this 
dynamic young fashion chain. Their need is for a young secretary to help them 
oiganise personnel training and admin for over 100 stores nationwide- Benefits 
include STL, D&. hig discounts on clothes and help with formal EPM training 
should you want it Accurate typing needed. Age 18+. 

For details on these and many other excellent new openings call 01-409 
1232. Or come and eee us at 35 Old Bond Street, Wl. 

■■■■■■■■■■Mi Rec r ui tm ent Consultants ■■■■■■■■■■■ 


Secretary to Chairman 

Our client, a majorBritish Contractor is seeking an experienced 
Senior Seaetary/RV to work for the Chairman of the Engineering 
Division Companies based in modem offices at Hammersmith. 

The position requires someone who wishes to be foDy involved 
and become the "ngfet-haacr to their boss, as well as the normal 
administration and secretarial duties. 

Candidates aged 25+ should be well organised, lively and highly 
presentable with at least 5 years experience erf working at Board 
level. 

An excellent remuneration package wiU be offered to the 
successful applicant. 

Please write with career details in the first instance, quoting 
ref: 219/T, and listingseparately any companies to which 
your application should not be forwarded, to: JEmm 

Louise Lee, Riley Advertising (London) Limited, 

Rex Stewart House, 

159 H amm ersmith Road, 

London W68BS. ARg ■ 

CWUmW B<pljSer*fc* 




cnRDunc wno 

PR ACCOUNT DIRECTORS SEC. 

Variety, scope anti involvement am three tilings that 
you'll definitely find a] tins exciting, young PR Co. Based 
m their beautiful Covert Garden offices, you will be 
organising and attending parties, press launches as weN 
as wuamg through the typing. Speeds 80/50. £8,500 + 
exc. perks. 

SENIOR CITY SECRETARY 

The corporate development manager of this international 
holding company appreciates an efficient secret ay and 
will involve you m all protects. Lots ot scope to use your 
mitialive and develop the brand new job. Skills 100/60, 
WP. £10,000. 

please telephone: 01-499 8070 
46 Old Bond StreetLontfon W.1 . 

CAROLINE KBfG SECRETARIAL APPOUfTMBTrS 


PA to Chairman 

£12,000 

This is an excellent tipenins ft >r a tup 
Executive PA. within the Mtiyiiiir HQ « if this 
renowned pic. An inspirjrion:il force. their 
Cl u in mil linshcen theyiiidins; .spirit behind 
recent uniurcilleled growth and meienric 
••uccess. Your role Is pivttfal — to .suppon. 
o »•« infinaie, anikip.ite :uid pr> K'lvct — learn- 
iitjt In mi him while dealing oil his Muilf! 
li MJii leuH eNivrieikv cweiltuL Skills 40 to. 
Age 2S 3S. Ple.-Lse telephone 01 --*93 


GORDON-YATHS 



’T7TTT7TT 


French/German 

Anderson, Squires Ltd. is a leading city recruit- 
ment company serving the- international 
banking community. Our overseas recruitment 
activities are expanding rapidly and we can 
therefore offer an interesting opportunity to a 
young Clerk-typist, wtio will act as secretarial 
support to our International Division. In addition 
to sound typing skills you should have at feast 
A level knowledge of French and German, a 
good telephone manner and the personality to 
fit into a hectic multi-lingual environment 
For further details please contact Laila Rafique. 

Anderson, Squires Ltd., 

Bank Recruitment Specialists, 
127, Cheapside, 

London EC2V 6BU. 

Tel: 01-606 1706 


•HEAD-HUNTERS* 

Secrctary/RA. London S.W.l. 

£11,000-£14,000 

We area wen established firm of hcad-huntere 
spetialiaiur in the computer business. Weneeda 
top calibre Secretary/RA. with a wide range of 

skills tnduding: 


PA/OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR 



'/ 1 ' : tdr* 


General Manager of a newly tarred Marketing 
Company, in presttigious new offices in Wimbledon, 
requires an expe rie nced secretary looking for total 
invotvmnent 

If you are enthusiastic, organised an have good al- 
round office experience, indudfeg some basic figure 
work, pleasa reply wftii fufl C.V. and day-time tele- 
phone na to: 

Brim Cain, General Manager, 
Cooling Energy Control United, 
Trinity Place, 

247 the Broadway, - 
Wimbledon SW19 ISO. 


Salary drea £3,500. 
tn-house lunch and 


benefits indude BUPA, 


UNIVERSITY 
OF OXFORD 

Uoiwttaly Offices 




ASSISTANT/ 

SECRETARY 

Fw The Registrar of 
the University 
Salary in fin range . 
£7,000 - £8,400. 

Applications owing fus 
career marts to Mr. JJ3. 

Brown. UiMnoty Offices, 
wasmaon Square, Oxford. 
OX1 2JO by 17 September. 




Consultants 

(Veirwittdaj'aibnwflKatsol 
das experience retttwe to pun- 
S* tejtog Consutoxv. 
Ewepwiwi (ciruncrann wd 
to patl as the vwrt « demand- 
mi] reoannfl a h*jh lad of 
orateaiotesm. Total con- 
fidentiality restated. 

Pisan wifb to 
27 0U Road Steel 
imtoe W1 


DIRECTORS'’ 

SECRETARIES 

Ri'i'Ki'L I s': v •• isv i : »v; 


01-629 9323 




q yOu am today commit* 
led to a earner in the warm 
of 8ms than flas s your 
teg day. TMs NgMy we- 
cessta. I teH gpant Sn g 


UmsurgenOy rsqursa top 
PA to assia their dynamc 
Prestoent You wit be 
given m tp on aM tty and a 
chafleetoacianyourQwn- 
H you have axeOtaK 88b 

nchidng shorthand pleasa 




mm - £i4,ooo 

Iri tenHCwtr Par PerstsmeJ Dept 
of titgfi unde Agenoy. Respon- 
sftte ta seoetenl and denial 
s^. Retevw exp on adverfc- 
ng or recraitraem amsutants 

tsstfl. 

arts, mm 

Top M/Snr Sec (33k-) raqured 
by W. A d >gency. a axporeb 
tmano pntesoral mho ell 
eombre sound tnowtedge ot 
toe bnsre ss nidi a social 
uyuasing triwit. 

CM Mm* or Tckte 

Advnd Rus, 31 Percy 
Steal London WL 
01-83# 2116 


•] : 7 • 1 [4 


reRSONNCL 






SECRETARY 

required lor ti» Secre- 
tary of a Gentlemans 
Club in St James's, 
near Green Park. Fast 
accurate typing and 
shorthand essential 


W e tbink you will 
be tempted by 
the highest rates in 
London for top 
temporary secretaries. 

Please telephone Fiona or Susie 
nowon 01-2403511 

for more information. 

• Elizabeth Hunt * 

— Recruitment Consultants 



^ 4 


USE YOUR 
GERMAN 
IN MARKETING 
W1 to £10,000 

This enthusiastic young 
company specialises In 
presentations, videos and 
design. You wN need to be 
se tf -motivated, organised 
and enjoy using the tele- 
phone. Helping to expand 
their European and U.K. 
markets, you wto bo re- 
warded tatoi a share In the 
company's success and tha 
possibility of progressing 
your career. Age 21-26. 
Sk*s 80/60. Fluent German. 
Knowl e dge o( Bench and 
Spanish very usefUL 


WEMBLEY 

PERSONNEL 

Tlis busy dnetnr oThnnsn 
resources needs an experi- 
enced secretary to amst won 
RodUKDi a ■ senior le*d 
and be totally involved with 
an coutks kk! ddepics’ >r- 
raree m c iiB . The department 
is novim Iram the wen End 
to WeniWcy to run these 
connea. ThesacxeHflri candi- 
date w ill be wen presented, 
ouuoing and able to mix 
with senior executives. Skills 
required. 100/65. »n experi- 
ence and an exccflwt- 
tdcpIxMe manner. Salary 
EIQjOOOL Ate 25-dOL 

01-499 '0492 j 

Senior | 
Secretaries ; 


SUMMER 

TEMPORARIES 

We need yea 
Yea need a* 

We DON'T oiler holiday 
(mil mine) attached) I 
We DO dftn 

* Toj^raiet to maidi your 

v Regular essqnfnens 

* PmfesaioaaJ advice and 

* U^Mandinq 

Oar dienu Mrocnbriy need 
ae cte ur i a mo are akined era 
Wana. Wordstar and Olivetti 
word processors. Come and 
meet our busy, coerpaic 
team who wtB cater to year 
needs with a variety of 
booking*. 

•1-499 0092 

Senior. 

Secretaries 


property 
£11,000 
West End 

The aewty appointed Direc- 
tor of a successful and well- 
established commer c i al prop- 
trty development company a 
looking for an efficient . P.A. 
with good ctanmunicaiioni 
and npsiani skids, prefera- 
bly with experience of 
property or chartered survey- 
ors or any related field. 
Friendly wonunftaunospbett 
and attractive offices ptas ex- 
cellent benefits. Age 25-40 
SkOb IflO/ML 

•1-499 8092 

Senior 

Secretaries 




THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR 
MEDICAL RESEARCH 

ONE FULL TIME AND ONE PART- | 
TIME PERSONAL SECRETARY 

IN THE LABORATORY OP 
EUKARYOTIC MOLECULAR GENETICS 

Wfr require one full time and one paruime (20 houra 
per week) personal secretary in the Laboratory of 
.Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics to work for the Head 
of Laboraionr and Research Scientists 'within the 
Laboratory. The work, including preparing scientific 
papers for publication and handling confidential 
records, makes the posts interesting and responsible 
positions. 

The successful applicants wQ} have attained high 
standards of typewriting with either audio or short- 
hand skills. A knowledge or experience of word 
processing though not essential, would be an 
advantage. 

The full time post win be a permanent position (Job 


£7.390 - £8.664 per annum, inclusive of London 
Weighting and pension supplement depending on 
age and experience. (Pro-rata for the part-rime posi- 
tion). Proficiency payments are awarded on passing 


J OSBORNE RKH/UWSOU 

TRADING PLACES £12,000 

This Na ma tlonaf tredfoa company Is seeking a 
PA to run their amaU Condon office. Organise 
recaptions and social functions and deal with al 
■office admin. A chaRonging and involving rote with 
n x ca l on t prospect s for development. 90/50/WP 
sklls needed. 

DESIGN £10,000 « 

iMUwurit your tine wl be secretary most of your 
iday wifl be spent jugging a variety of aebnin du- 
Ities: Organise temps and studio supples, make 
i a* travel arrangements and organise tin cUent 
Christmas Party. If you ten a creative environ- 
ment and a varied workload, this cotid be your 
next step. 60 typtag/audto and WP needed 

(Pleasa cafi Debbie BartovKch, Anna Mend, Judi 
,Oaboma or Bean Richardson. 


I ton). Profidencypaymenis are awarded on passing 
the recognised Civil Service tests in typing plus 
shorthand or audio (up to £1.240 per annuinXrtTjeir 
is an annual leave entitlement erf 22 days. 

The Institute is situated in pleasant rural surround- 
ings and is dose to MiD Hill East Tube station. A 
Staff association offers good recreational sports and 
social facilities. 

Please telephone for an application form on 01-959- 
3666 extension 218 ar write to Mr. NJ. Bowry. 
Personn el Offices', N1MR, The Ridgeway, Mill Hm, 
Loudon. NW7 IAA, Please mute reference 
PS/EMG or PT/PS/EMG. 

Am epuf opport amit k t oqAoyer. 


LITIGATION 

PA/SECRETARIES 

£8,000 - £11,000 MEG 

For pa rtner ot modwn expanding fern of go Wwad sofiefovs 
5^* >" °te*» h w»- CwKtffito w* be of tha 



PWW to pnMMgl oua officaa In Wl. CandWato wfl be of tha 
fxghesi stwidard, haw rorentont skSs and foe atetty to tea 
^onalbaty and oganize foe partner to tin ML WP preferable. 
Thaaupert package is ideal tor My cnftudaattep«oR.Age 

LEGAL AUDIO SECRETARY 

isssz 

vancereent 

Please app^i whti c.v. toe 

Ret MS 




Henrietta Houm, 9 Henrietta Place 
London Witt SAG . 
01-629 5878 


GENERAL 

MEDICAL COUNCIL 
London WI 
Audio Secretary (wp) 

An aufio secretary isieqoned (bra senior offider of the 
CouadL 

The sacassfid appliaai wifl have 1st ckss qnli&atiotn and 

sewml yean caqperience at secnnrikl ImL Mute Of foe mA 
is confidentrel aod a hjgb staadwd of sernacy and 
presewariou is rwq t al . w*E*er with a aodatee anrtude 

to a variay rfdariei 

Eudlent adrey. acooRling u age and experience, 

If yoa are interested, phase ceotact Mrs 
DJVfaDboflaad, General Medical CtatiL 
44 Haffare St, Laotdn W1A 6 AE. 61588 7642. 


Secretary 

TO HEAD OF 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Wa are looking for a poised and professional 
secretary to assist the Public Affairs Manager of 
an International group headquarters, based in the 
Wrist End of London. You wfl] need to have a high 
standard of personal presentation, together with 
proven organisational skills, an ability to work on 
your own and apply tout own initiative, a friendly 
helpful manner, parficulaity on the telephone Is 
essential. Excellent shorthand and word- 
processing skills are expected as wefi. • 

Salary will not be less than £10,000, other 
benefits include free luncheons, 21 days holiday 
and contributory pension scheme. 

Please apply with fufl cv to Miss P. L&we. 
Consolidated Gold Fields PLC, 31 Charles II 
Street, London SW1Y 4AG. 


COLLEGE LEAVERS 

IN EXHIBITIONS 

are looking for someone 
to provide a fufl secretanal back-up to tire head of a 
Wl* 1 **” dealing^S, foe 

03ml P&?tS$3£* Uaisi ny with clients. 


EXPERIENCED 
SECRETARY 
AUDIO/WP, Wl 


experieRoed xcmary <23 
umll professooal mm. 




FERSONNEL 

marketinq/pr 



to utarani Mxyftk foofion reqrwcs 
■35) <*nh the fletibafty to woti for a 

rcxpcncnccoKntiaL 
tty from £9J00. ' 


PA TO MANAGING 
DIRECTOR 
£ 10,000 

TTiis vwy busy and demandria 
Managinq Director is inraiwS 
writti a unde variay c£ ca maf 
ran. Ha tbwefixe nesds a Tip 
Top PA wto. wants fogttin- 
vowed m Bis work - you wd be 
raquInBlIoknowasranctiashe 
does m that yon can cope on 
year tma Traveling wtl* vari- 
ous offices in tbe UK. WB gat 
own Sea tad up. 

SH: 90WPM Typing: S0WPM 

01-930 8207 
CALL TODAY 


Td: 01-629 6831 (Mir Moms after 9 JO am) 


EXEC PA. 

£12,000 

A derakteui lanmnlofnl 
Barit rem a.top-f&gtq PA 
witfi prana nek recant, » 
fuly support foe Hud of Mar- 
kefire- Outios will intitule 
European trend, efiem n- 
searek and febrin preiess and 
canutim must tew oeri* 
IW stalls, tanguages Wt wi 
Gw) aed daw trewtan to 
Bate. For detans ptonm 
Lm Ratwrisaq oc 
01-031 9040 
CRAWFORD 
RECRUITMENT 
SERVICES . 


1 

mm ij 


























1HE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


M| ^'ili 
<l 'l liy 
'■'> in' 

lojl 

•'liirios. 

>U 

lunt • 



•sMG PLACES £12,1 

; • ~i*-» r »■ 

'.v .t: 

. . hi- ?3in 

. - ,£■ , ■. y- 

-*• V‘. ; 

DES’SH £ 10,000 ! 

■ - • t *“ 

- - ,r s*i r L->'0 

• • ■ • . " 

, * r it* ^ 


,„S? 


* ; !;'!»■ X 1 

I UJV-P 


LA CREME DE LA CR 




b)&dd if&A, te, a*i A*we/ 


0 


Offlo 



And call for temporary assignments and full time career openings -in the WEST END 01-629 0777 CITY 01-621 9363 HOLBORN 01-430 2531 VICTORIA 01-630 0844 wn R K I H 6 — 7 HI 0 II C E H S 


linguistics. 
SECRETARIES 
german, FRENCH 

Spanish: italmn 

WHERE ARE YOU? 

We need your excellent secretarial 
affi?? 1,ons ^ vibrant person- 

PA/Secretanal positions, 
(rermaneru or temporary). AD ar- 


PA SECRETARY WITH 
GERMAN 
c£1 0-11,000 

Corporate designers need help for 
a dynamic executive. Most nave 
excellent shorthand A typing A 
WP experience and be prepared 
to work as part of a friendly, busy ! 
team while be travels extensively. 
Imernational, hectic environment 
in beautiful Mayfair offices. 


£12,000 PLUS FOR 
SWISS BANK 

4f you think on your ftet four 
steps ahead of your boss if you 
can keep a cook professional head 
m a crisis; if you nave an excellent 
education and superb skills with 
fluent French - you art worth 
£IZOOO + to a dynamic Swiss 
banker who needs you now to 
organise him and his magnificent 

offices in the West End. 


PA/ADMIN WITH 
DANISH 
C-£1 1.000 

Your Danish at mother tongue stan- 
dard. and great uwumkwal 
abilities plus personal com pater 
knowledge are required for West 
End Office Systems Group A rare 
opportunity to keep your language 
up t o scratch telephoning ana cor- 

nunKXMe^u^sh sbortband^uMd^ 

vantage. 


HEADING EAST? 1 1 ™ E W,LD W^™ 



Fiira 





01-491 7100 


01-491 7100 


01-491 7100 


01-491 7100 


■I 

A 

* 5 

>•<& 


SECRETARY 
Well value your independence 
c£10,500pa 

If you're the sort of secretary who relishes being left in 
charge - youH find working for our local Director of 
Overseas Investment a challenge. 

He's abroad quite a bit — leaving you to organise and manage 
the office in his absence - and the right schedules of his 
appointments and travel arrangements while here. 

There's a lot of general support work hell leave to you 
-responsibilities which will mean you must be of A* level 
standard with good secretarial experience apd strong 
communication skills. Experience of using a Word Processor 
(preferably Wang) is essential and shorthand would be 
advantageous. 

In addition to an attractive salary, we offer a large range of 
benefits, including concessionary mortgage facilities, non- 
con crib u to ry pension and medical 
health insurance. 

Interested? Please contact Ann Goldie 
for an application form on 01 -928 7822. 

Investors in Industry pic, 91 Waterloo 
Road, London SE1 8XP. 


STEIN SWEDE JAT & BIBRING 
- SOLICITORS - 

We are an expanding law firm and require staff for our luxurious 
new West End Offices. 

Two Senior Legal Secretaries. 

The successful candidates will have at least 5 years legal experience 
and wQl be personable, well presented and self-motivated with 
excellent secretarial skills to work for senior partner. 

One Junior Secretary. 

We require mi enthusiastic person with some experience and good 
secretarial skills, willing to involve themselves in this new post. 

One Receptionist 

We are searching for a well spoken, well dressed person with an 
outgoing personality with some previous reception experience to 
greet our clients, and look after switch board and maintain our 
efficient image. 

All salaries according to age and experience. 

Contact Mrs. Kilb&ne or Mr. Swede on 01-493 0998. 

No Agencies 


The creative use of money. 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT 
TO DIRECTOR 

LEADING CHRISTIAN CHARITY-lONDON Up To £10,000 

We are looking for a mature person with an interest in current affairs, to 
provide effective and efficient administrative support to our Director. 

You win need to have several years senior secretarial and administrative 
experience, preferably in the public or voluntary sector, to cope with this 
exciting and challenging post. 

As well as providing the Director with a full P A/Secretarial service you 
would also need to keep abreast of government policies and social issues 
which impinge on our work. 

This is a unique opportunity to contribute to the work of a progressive 
charity which works with children and their families who are under stress, 
handicapped young people and which provides alternatives to custody for 
young offenders. We offer attractive terms and conditions of employment 
and opportunities for training and development. 

For more information ring: 

Betty Clark on 01-837 4299, Ext. 202. 


OIL COMANY W.l. 

RECEPTIONIST 

Over 25 and weH-preserrted. Must be familiar with 
IBM 3750 switchboard. Hours 9.00 a_m. - 5 JO 
p.m. Luncheon vouchers and private health 
scheme. SALARY £7,500 - 8,000. 

Write with fu8 c.v. tec 

Sandra Mew, 

Kerr-Mcfiee Oil (OK) PLC H 
75 Davies Street, London W1. 

Or telephone: 493 6080. 


SECRETARY 

c £9,500 
City 

We urgently seek a younow^edut^eda^^ 
to join our small energetic team of commercial 
property developers. ^ irato 


g Natives m a hectic i^vkomwt 
SkSSTs all tevetearid^oaggata^tsoof 
humour then we would be delighted to hear irom 
you. 

Please cafl Sue Harris on 01-606 0618. 


NEW YORK 
NEW YORK 
£12,500 + Bonus 

h tMs unusual position, you 
wrtl realty be (he “right-hand 
person" ol the Senior 
Parmer fn a young, dynamic 
fora of American Lawyers. 
As he also has ■ secretary. 

your rota wM Jnwolre 
■onuuoweBon or n® wucty, 
arranging Ixs hectic 
schedule, tatetng with 
dents and dufing with his 

personal work. 

BcoaBent or rp mi Q S l k M ul 
sMUs and s sound business 
background combined wfcti 
(he 8b*iy to remain cool 
under pressure are 
eeaentM lor this 
demandhg position 
Age: 25-35 SUB*: 90/50 


clizobeth Hunt 

INTERESTED IN MARKETING 
to £11,500 

Join this famous City company dosety tinted to the stock . 
market as seoBtary/aiirrai&tmlor to their head of sales and . 
marketing. You will enjoy a prat deal of WP contact Excel- 
lent prospects to move up into an administrative rale. 
Previous sates/rrarkHtmg backpotmd with 100/55 driUs and 
WP experience needed. 


£ 10,000 

Based in sumptuous Wi offices, join this leading investment 
company as secretary to their branch manager. He is young, 
very pleasant and needs at efficient person to talk to clients, 
supervise the office and pnwida fra PA support Excellent 
benefits include large cash fejich abonanca. 60 wpm audio 
ability needed. 

EKzobelhHurtiRacn^moniGNisuttQnb. 

23 College HS London EC4 0H290 3551 J 


SECRETARIES 

We are a major Arm at ShWmtarc and -am looting tor the fallowing 

Konnc 

1. Secndary n 6 rxjp Ranee Director. Mrkmm age 25. (General year*' 
oqxnenca at Senw tensor level assenttt). TSood shorthand and 
typno speeds. It b a busy dBmaMflng fob which wfl sat a quick 
caune person who warns h be mSy imntved and who cat stand up 
a pressure. 

Z Secnwy to work tor Ptreonret/Wmsiteralxin Manager md Assistant 
Company Sacnay/PmamU Ottaar. Mrerun are 18 - good codece 
leaver lift ft*. Good grow d V levels defiwdy Mth EnoMi 
language. Good toe hone mariner and must be dscraoL Good snort- 
hind and typng speeds. 

HouraaSO- 530 ttfnuMbaflRltfe New UrepodStisrt Staton. Srisy 

tu plus guaranteed bonus and LV&. 

a ■tlnn I 

MfJfMLBUUII HMun HVOUlDm 1TOHE- 

Mn. NL Pwr - 283 8955 . 



STOCKBROKERS £12£00 

A high degree of admin is involved as a top level PA 
tor the CMwf Executive of major City stockbrokers. 
Age 25+, benefits include mortgage subsidy. 

UNDERWRITERS £11,000+ 

Your admin skMs wfll be fidty utitised keeping the ; 
accounts, paying bMs and org an i sin g the stationery, 
the office and your boss fm reverse order) plus a 1 
PA/secretarial rota for him. Shortha n d, WP sidRs + 
strong persona&ty needed 

FOOD + TRAVEL £10,000 

A view of the Thames + the fun of organising menu's 
and afl the company travel is yours as secretary to 
the MD of a targe City firm of underwriters. 

INTERNATIONAL 

BANKING £10-£1 2.000+ 

You are mid 20*s + aid have presence, shorthand, 
audio and admin sfcffis as PA to Deputy Chief Execu- 
tive. Profit shore + mortgage subsidy. 

CHAIRMAN £11,000 

Undertake a ful se cret ari al rota using your 
shorChand/WP shames tor trie Chairman ol Chy Loss 
Adjusters. 

NO SHORTHAND £10,000 

You wifl also handle some personal - horses, country 
estaes etd, for the senior partner of City stockbro- 
kers. Audio skflta. drive and M&ativa coidd earn you a 
generous 30K profit share. 

City 377 8600 West End 4397001 [ 

Secretaries Plus 


TTw Secretarial Consultants 


SECRETARY 

We are seeking an experienced Secre- 
tary, with word processing experience 
- preferably IBM Displaywriter Sys- 
tem, to work in our busy Supply, 
Transportation and Manufacturing 
department. 

If you are aged 25-35, enjoy working 
for several people, have good secre- 
tarial skills and an ability to work 
under pressure, then we would like to 
bear from you. 

We offer an attractive salary plus 
benefits which includes l/v’s at £2 per 
working day. 

Please write to: 

The Personnel Manager, 
Marco Petroleum limited, 
Winston House, 

Dollis Park, 

Finchley N3 1HZ 

(adj. to Finchley Central Tube on die 
Northern Line). 


SLOANE RANGE E™* 0 ?* 

Publishing experience advantageous waking as a 
puOScstions essistant/office manager with Wa cre- 
■thw team in a chaotic environment You «■ hanato 
your own correspondence. 

FILM/TV PRODUCTION £7.5 - WOO 

A college leaver or 2nd Jobber with SH/typing + 
computmg skifis is cast as secretary for this produc- 
tion Co. r, Fun. Interesting work”. 

PUBLISHERS £8,000 

Meet authors, TV and radto personalities wifii these 
dynamic Covent Garden pubUahere/titerary agents. 
An entri mropubtisning.pvtiaitariy tor granwtes. if 
you have 100 shorthand. 

MARKET REASEARCH £8,500 

Secnrtary/recepttontst 24+ with shorthand and WP 
for 2 Directors in Covert Garden. 

COLLEGE LEAVER £7.000 

You wB baa We to use your French extensively on 
the tele ph one + your aucHo/WP lor theses Covert 
Garden Management Consultants. 

PROPERTY £11,500 

Temp into a permanent job H you wish, with these 
SW1 surveyors it you have ‘A* or degree level Ehgtisft 
+ shorthand and WP skBs. 

THE ROYAL WEDDING £7 - £8,500 

Extra special ceremonies + day to day admm lor 
coflage leaver or order with good shorthand typing. 


PERSONNEL 





JOHI ME - £10,000 RISING TO £14,000 

i have my own Financial Management Practice 
within an International pubic company and need 
someone to take absolute responsibility tor my 
c om p tola personal backup covering ■■ aspects of a 
personal assistant - ultimately managing a small 
backup teem. Knowledge of Wp esserifiaL The suc- 
cessful applicant wi be academically bright - strong 
personality, responsible outlook, professional ap- 
pearance, able to wofk under pressure without 
supervision. Age Immaterial. Jf you would Bee to 
know more about this unusual opportunity please 
tetap ho n o today (aH day) or tomorrow (upto 12.00 
noon). 

01-637 0090 or send your C.V. to BOX J65. 





experienced 

SECRETARY 

nmrired (shorthind/typing): 


RECEPTIONIST/ 

TYPIST 

Computer Co. In WS 
seeks well presented, 

| articulate & intelligent 
receptionist for a busy & 
varied position. 
Switchboard & typing 
experience essential, must 
be flexible & able to work 
cm own initiative. 

SALARY. c£7,S00 

Phone Sarah on 

01 938 2244 



£7278-£8632p*F 
tads available non 

The Admiaistrative 

Factitty^clkcai 

Sciences, 

sia 

M whom wriaan ap^cations 
should te sent 





SECRETARY/PA 

Salary by M ego to t w i 

FOR MANAGING 


Of rapMy expandbig LtoytTo 
managing agency. Real oppor; 
tunity to pamapaB na» 
contribute to tlw maiagement 
of the Conxuny. 


A' level education, and 
tant shorthand tywn and WP 
state, together *tth atl«Bt5 
wars experwnw A sanior o- 
rector or Partner level in 

Lloyd's market/Banking/ 



famous fa s h io n House la West 
End. 

pAysB^DMoaiiwiarL 
£9500 + Aseoums. 




Famous Frmdi Cosnxbe Co n 
wi. Auto Sac tor small young 
Hem. £7.500 + pens. 

Late a uooirn tnanfa Mtoome. 

FLAIR 

RECRUITMENT 
01-938 2222 




PERSONNEL 

BUILD A 
FUTURE 
£9,000 

•mtaGreaK ti Vn a Bo nal 
company need you noiNl 

Enjoy Ihe WWW o* morinB 
around ttwomEM,takiiig 


EXPERIENCED LEGAL AUDIO SECRETARY 
(with ssaie word pracesshg) 

Required for Senior Partner of Solicitors dealing with 
Ccmpany/Commercial Law. New City Offices near Liver- 
pool Streei/Moorgate tubes. 

Salary £9^00. 

Tel: 01 247 0004 - Ref: KATE. 



yiiarmm 


Mi.mcuui Hfelyrviw 
ICftSulUtXIS 

Career PA i»SW3 
m £11,000 + hews 

ktyScady situated in 
toe heat of Chelsea, 
tftis avarrt garde tech- 
nological company 
can orfar you genuine . 
career prospects. Al- 
ready they have 
grown considerably, 
put further expansion 
is currently taking 
place. Whilst there Is 
no room for a prima 
donna, you need to 
be both firm and dip- 
lomatic. In addition to 
lots of diem liaison 
there is toe opportu- 
nity for you to 
become a truly in- 
volved and essential 
member of toe team. 
NaruraUy good secre- 
tarial skills are da 
rigueur, end an inter- 
est in technology 
together with a de- 
gree of numBracy 
essential- You are 
Bcety to be ami be- 
tween 25 and 30. For 
further information 
please contact 
GBIbn Bwood. 

01-491 1868m 



ARCHITECT’S PA 


We are looking tor a wefl 
trained ucreuiy with 
good audio skills who 
could handle al *e office 

ad min ist r ati on lor the se- 
nior partner of or tire y 
architectural practice. 

It you have an outgoing 


Secretary 

Classical Music 
£7,500-£9,000 p.m. aae 

An experienced and well organised Secre- 
tary is needed to work with the production 
Manager and Chief Editor, International Clas- 
sical Division, on releases of our classical 
records. 

The job involves shorthand, typing, sending 
out telexes, filing, handling general office ad- 
ministration and answering enquiries. 

The right app&cant should have good stan- 
dard of general education and secretarial 
skills, an ability to work accurately and with 
minimum supervision, as well as a pleasant 
personafity. Some knowledge of German 
and/or French plus an interest in classical 
music will be required. 

To apply, please write to me, with full details 
of your background and experience. 

Barbara K. Rotterova 
Senior Personnel Officer, 

EMI Music in te r na tional, 

20 Manchester Square, 

London, WI A 1ES. a thorn emi company 


1 Ctty S77 8500 Wesf End 4397001 [ 1 

Secretaries Plus 


TheSecretarialConsultants 


PARTICULAR 

PROSPECTS! 

Temporary Temporary Temporary, 

If you join our professional learn of Secretaries 
wc can offer immediate bookings with the most 
prestigious companies. Whether you have; 
SHORTHAND. AUDIO. COPY TYPING or 
WP skills, you'll find our placements arc dis- 
tinctly different! Ring or drop into any of our 
offices TODAY. 

Permanent Permanent Permanent 
NATURAL! £10,750 

If there arc business events to arrange, lots of 
high powered people will depend on your un- 

S blc nature and Secretarial skills. The 
ential post working for a Senior Partner is 
Ref: (Al) SSI/36002 

FRESH! £10,250 

A good educational background and administra- 
tion skills will equip the flexible Secretary who 
wants to organize on an International scale. Out 
of sight executives will not be out of mind 

% r A? ity ® vcrscas *‘ aison - (Ai) 

POLISHED! £9,500 

Use your polished approach to shine with all 
levels of management. This is an Administra- 
tion role requiring a mature approach and the 
intelligence to appreciate how easy life is with 
advanced office systems. Re£ (Fi) 551/36025 

Phone or call in NOW! 

19/23 Oxford St, WI Tet 437 9030 
131/133 Cannon SL EC4 Tel: 626 8315 
185 Victoria SL SW1 TeL 828 3845 
22 Wormwood SL EC2 Tek 638 3846 

II Kn-runntmi ('lOfeullam* 


■sure 


ers 


BILINGUAL SECRETARY FOR 
L0N00H REPRESENTATIVE OF 
MAJOR EUROPEAN MAGAZINES 

Gsrram/Engtah tolaIN bMngul Memory to oraanta Man- 
gmopwecior of tauM and fimfly tail sxtrenwtybuay tmm 
« ImomononM puMonwr reprosemw-rta In WBri End. 


Good ra n w e d t . in 
years' expermnes. Sense ol humow end uHtaptwbtty b£ 
senttaL Salary negotiable depondng on ago and axperienco. 
Write wU> (XV. toe 

Barbara Engebnaim, 

IGP UdL 

6 WetbetSstset, 

London W1M 7PB. 


■atowfedge ot WP. w«h mtn. 2 


EMI 


WORD PROCESSING/ 
AUDIO SECRETARY 

Required lor busy Govern Garten Surreyore end Estate Agwits. 
We ora kxMng Iw m kaeMgant. weN eoicaM person who can 
cope with a busy agency oepanment. 

Teiephoae Eileen Kenny 

0D 01-240 2255 




PUBLIC RELATIONS 

£10,000 - Rear Sloane Sqnare 

PA/seeretary required for PR Consultancy. Graduate or 
*A‘ levels preferred - excellent secretarial skUs (110/50) 
essential. Please send CV to: 

Miss Tina Morgan, 

Paul Winner Consultants Ltd, 

140 Sloane Street, SW1X 4AY 




RECEFnONIST/SECRETARY 

Required for Chancred Sorvryon Office in Mayfinr. Must 
be compctam swiichbomi operator and audio typist. Good 
salary win be paid to succesdu! applicant 

Phone Ftod Crpwsoa on 01-499 5281 for interview. 
No Ageades. 




i: J .. Jpii; am 


SECRETARTY/PA 
To Chairman/Managlng Director 
To £11,000 

Rsaiwd far Mrratiwial firai of Artritv* in WCZ. Beerilun ncrvonsl 
kuS mn) MOMOlng onMtare BsssnroL Jteponstto nMd 
nqwma Mil stfaatal mton «M tafl and awy b work «ea inter 
pressura. Coma wHi cflmts. confidmte band maen rod ntaanuti 
PA nspaiBlilMlei Age sppm 29 - 35 ym. 

Pteasa write enclosing C.V. to BOX J70. 


Outstanding 


SECRETARY PA 

tdfared by devs loping 
Assurance Brokers in 

FEMCHIHICH STREET 

Advanced educafioral stsv 
band essential and previous 
emriunce (referred. Modem 
office acttftunodatnn aid at- 
tractive terms of employment 

Apply to: 
B.A. Jones 
01-480 6351 


SECRETARY TO 

Senior Tory MP raqdreG 
«reU organised, experienced 
Secretary id dad with con- 
stituency end personal work 
for 7 months write perma- 
nent secretary to emy. To 
work Cram hta own hone In 
SWiO. 6Q/100 wpm. 

Phone PMIppe ByfM on 
01-351 0293 
No Agendas 


i ’ I 


SW1 

Raquune See far one ot ttetr 
Oractora. MuM hare feet ac- 
curate typmg Si pleasent 
tel ephone manner. Salary 
acconflng to age a experi- 
ence to £ 10000 . 

Tel 81-821 8345 
tar aa tatannai chat 

































All classified advenisemcms 
ran fie accepted bj telephone 
rcx«pi Aninmn cc n m iii). Tfie 
oeadiine a S.OOpra 1 days prior 
to publication fle SDOpm Mon- 
day for Wednesday L Should 
yon wsfa to send an advemae- 
nteni m willing please include 
your daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SStWCES DE- 
PARTMENT. |f you have any 
queries or problems relating to 
your advertisement wee u has 
appeared, please cont a ct our 
Customer Sendees Department 
by tdephonc on 01-481 4100. 


SEFiunustvAM soiw: us 

m» (taws or inMDwiHe v- 
wrr Him at Tom T.Vs rr 
CM. Video* fr C60 «r. 91 Low 
(T StOene SL SWI 7300953 


■MW* OF NETTLEBED CWP- 
Praoate and ghmlm style 
(fining furniture made lo order. 
Over SO dm mg suites always 
(vubHv for mmeal* detlv- 
cry. Nvtikbed. near Henley on 
Thames i Oavl i Mi 1 16 . 

Bournemouth ,02021 393580. 
Teptham. Devon (059207) 
7443. Berkeley. Ora KW&Si 
0(0952. 

FM0T ouallly wool carpets. At 
trade ««n and under, also 
available loot raira. Large 
room air mnnaius undrr hair 
normal onr* Chancery Canetr 
.. .... I Ot 405 0453. 

SPRATT amsMoherSprattand SEATFMDER3. Best udeets far 


' T j 1 =t f 1 a »)CI XI »*{re55 B^- v: 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


FLA15HARE 


CUMAH COMMON Female, 
own room, snare c/h rial with 
qarnen. S/S. near station. £200 
pan. * mitt M 01726 2711 
iDayl 223 8509 mm 


PARSONS BUN, Prof. I. n/s 
tar o/r in wacious mated house 
wm CH and gdn AD mod. 
runs. £40 me TeL 01736 0900 
after 7pm 


afl Sharon's family wnn lo 
thank all thrtr (ntM for the 
uraiddid floral tnouiec and M 
too of ronownrr wturn were 
all \rey morn appreciated. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 



an ffMeu merits. Our clients 
Include most maier companies. 

Credit earns accented 01-828 
1678. 

IK TOMS 17K-ISK Other 
lilies avail. Kami bound ready 
for pmemauon atte 

•Sundays". cia.oo. Remember 
When. 01488 6323. 

TICKETS FOR AHV EVENT, Cats- I OjVMAJB SWI X Lage. comfort 


W1 non smoking re sp onsible fa- 
male W share 3 bedrognwd, 
rmraity heated, modem nai. 
References nwmd .4874997 

pi ramp* 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


COSTCUrmtS ON moMs/riofs 
lo Elrwf. LSA it most desuna 
lions, Diplomat Travel: 01 730 
2201 A0TA IATA ATOL. 


HOT TIMET offtr noways on 
land & afloat from £3900r 
2wfcs bn m. H/B & 

wamsorti. oi 326 ioos. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Worldwide. 
HaymancM 01-950 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SELF-CATERING 



STEPPING 


LEGAL NOTICES 


DORR! VILLAS. We vtttl have , IN THE MATT ER Of 

avadamiuy 21.28 Sent for 2 Rn*P»WNMT. CAm Leaver CHAfiEFAR M UMfT EP 

ww. BeOuUftti mbs nr me 9d Nmm- t Wag nee and in the matter of the 

hraai ex Cuiwtck. Pan World Kn»N*eaoooe. Friendly other. COMPANIES ACT 1906 

Ho&days. at 734 25« m 24B 906i Notice a hnrbr given nm m 

LAC«C CREEK auums at cTVPUors of the abmc-immed 

(H*r Dives. Flfgms A Company, whlcti b bdn g vo Um- 

PART TIME VACANCIES i «-°* C "“LJT Z 


UT.C Open Sal. 0763 867056. 


LOW COST FARE* to U^. A W» 
»r Travel CM 485 9257. IATA. 


dAUlEA. CAHARKS. Ot 441 
till Travel wee. Abu. Aim. 


MO RO CCO BOUND. Regent SL 
Wl . Ol 734 6307 ABTA/AIOL 


««■ BePutital rtnas nr B* 
omen ex cbiwmse. Ran World 
Hobdays. Ot 734 2562 
MACtC GREEK — at 

roamr Dives Fbsma A 
hoiubn. Freedom Holiday*. 
0I-74J 4686. ATOL *S2. 


9d phonr f typing nee 
KnWKbnoge. Friendly office. 
Ol 24S 9061 


beocnTS PARR= ruth- 
hKhed flal k> 
tianaard ln ,u * ury 

DMck with portewoe. hH. era 

US? heaUM DouM ^5^ 'hSh' 
Mimf/ thnlng. 
room, hall- •**?"» L175 Dw 
Available Immediately Tri ei 
441 8733 ! 


HOtoOI 434 J647. AWL Alio. 
"MOMS lux anon note from 


ano r u a ei and deaowttpm. fun 
parttcutar* of Uidr debt* or 
fimn w and the name* and 30- 


SurogM Exp. Qm Us Mtt. 
All l beat re and spans. 

Tel: 821 6616/8280495. 

A. Ex / Vba / Diners 

POOL TABLE pub type. COW Ote 
rr aied, 6*3. knmandaie. Wnal 

offers? 0932 47136. 

CortOtt - Loimi M-tecti Zoom / 
Reduction Enlargement Copra* 
from the SuraUer al TRADE 
PRICES Ol 778 6127. 

THE (DCAL CRT Name a star for 
a loved One. Far a tartMay. 
rtinstmino ex- any soeoa occa- 
sion. Dial Ol 482 0919. 
AfmQUC OAK Otetog /Snooker 
Tame 6-x 3'. £900 OOO Tefc 01- 
5305585 Evenings 
CATS. CtKSS. Le* Mb. All toe- 
alre »M mart. T<t 439 1763. 
AU major credit cds. 


aMe nn.an duel CH well enuiB 
Me Prof male £226 son Inc. 
Ol 223 9166 


HW10 GUI. very large own dou- 
ble room in Rat. tv. £A2pwr 
aba anaU room £28 pw.Ot 961 
7879 


TRAVEL WORLD WRSC SewWI 

«ur JSPSftsA <-&*—****-** 



W2 female to ma* mwq> Am- 
venro MMimH run Pauo. o/r 
& (jam room. £60 pw rxn. Tel: 
Ol 221 7024 after 6 go. 


LAME* FULL LENGTH Lynx! PARR o/r ha JtaL 


coat, as new. stte 8 10. £2.960. 
Tel 564 6232 or 501 1666. 




LEGAL SERVICES 


US VISA MATTERS E 8 Gudeon 


snare kn/batn. Coo pw md «i 
cbw let 01 722 2076 eves. 
FHPI9EAJ 3rd prof M/F 25e 
NoiMraokn own rm £i23pcm 
4 (uU* Tel. 362 2466 after 7 
DULWICH. 1 M/F.praf pref 
share rtcganl house. 13 nuns 
city. C31PW Tel Ol 693 8616. 
FULHAM O/R shr lux flat In eon. 
vement kx-auoo Cl 80 p.m. 
eeel. 736 6HO or 736 9626. i 


MUSICAL 


FREE MOOROK . See BakwK 
Properties For Sale. 


PLEASE HELP The National Be- 
nevolent Fund for Ihr Aunt lo 
proixte -tens- macrunes far 
trie relief at pain in co nddlu rb 
like prlhrila £60 buys a ma- 
chine Oonauons please to The 
Vncounl Tonypandy. Cttair- 
man. nbfa. 35. New Broad sr.. 
London EC2M 1NH. 

NARLET STREET BALL m aid of 
sick children (n the gracious 
presence a HRH The Duchess 
ol CMuccMer. Wr ask lor vow 
vupoort at Ihr Oesvmor 
House. September lfiUi, 7.30 
pm 2 30 am. Tickets. «si 
6172/469 2149. 

1ST CLASS Hons English studies. 
lerluniM A edilonai expmenev. 
AporeciMp mponsItHUiy. oterv 
ty oi mniiMtive it 
oroannalMnal talent. Can any- 
one employ me? 01 609 8626. 
STOP CANCER. Early detection h 
first step Support. Qurvl for a 
Test (or cancer. Woodbury. 
Harlow Road. Roydon. Can. 
IP2 7979- 22 331. 

JOHN PETER formerly of Geneva 
Weave get in touch wttb Maxim 
or Ulle 2030 5763 OUlce hours 
PLEASE HELP SID JENKINS of 
the RSPCA toy phoning your da 
nation through On 040361 133. 


US lawyer 17 Bufedrodr SL I t»rof F.26+-. Sharr tte- 

London wi oi 486 0813 I oaninoioe wtuisame.£76p.w. 

Lonoon wi ui -no uo.a. | 0 , 73, jg*, unerSDOU 

■SUNGTHN, dose city. Lpe room, 
own hautroom. Prof M/f. Mou- 
FK £46 tnc. 226 2466. 
PIMUCOu (hoc N/S. 2635 dure 
toe nan O/R + en suite bath. 
£78 pw. 01-382 0389 alter 2 . 
PROF M/P Lux House to Cam- 
berwell. DM room £66 pw. SH 
£dQ pw exd.TM: 01 701 8190 
KITHtY. PTOf F. 30*. N/S. Obi 
room hi lux house £46 per 
week tor Ol 788 4981. 
PUINET • Male 26*. Own fur 
mshed room Shared hse. £186 
px- m. excl. 989 9470 
SW2 Young prof r to share BaL 
O/R. all amembea £185 pent 
excl. 831 7766 6 671 7239 h. 
SW6 r o/r beauftodty appoinud 
luxury 2 Bra nai £ss pw. Ter. 
01-731 6639 after 7.300m 
SWI » Prof M/F n/s. to share 
romforlable naL o/r. c/h. £136 
pm exrliHfve THS47 2264 
SW12PM. F. pref 25* Ol/vlFor 
own roam to srvwed rauus 
pem exd. 01-673 6987 


Mutir I us haw. awn room, su 
mad ram A «nn. £68 per 
»w*k Tel iwk, 380 1S6« ml 
134 tau. home 996 6790. 

WANTED Friendly ouTgotop prof 
r 26 n/s. seeks coafartaMc 
Itai/house share from beg Oct. 
SWI.3.5.7.IO; W2AS.II.U. 
Up lo C75 PW Tel: Kalhy Ol- 
991 2200 iw> Ol 7470400 Oil 

CLAPHAM COMMON, pro/ m/f 
1“ 0/1 to lux hsn wHh gdn. rfi. 
Wmac^r .uhe. css m ex«. 

W Aro N ' T**- WH r 28* N/S. 
0/H nmnv/gtfn. £60 pw 
•nrl Ol 74S 3S82 eves 


Co Canada. USA 03727 43550. 
All other deal 03727 42739. 
C olum n u al Account utodw. 
01634 0711. Travel World. 
ABTA 72102. Member of Hie 
liblihrf e o f Tra vel & Tourtsm. 
winter nr scar - Ttv cmiw- 
al Expenenee. 7-day Grand 
Tour from £298: SkUV a La 
Carte iFly/Dnve/Howy*) from 
£189: TMmng 7 mgpls from 
£159. Pay flights GsiWttfc ev. 
cry Wed. Phone Cor broenure. 
I5LANP StN 01222 7432 
ABTA/ATOL 1907. 

USA. Fammm tow fares We IMP 
you Man. book moiNs & aj 
your nentt. Our umoue nrm 
plans make It all easy A fun. 
Round the world Inc AuMrtola 
fr £900. write Holden Travel 
Ltd London SW8. 2LG or Ol- 
582 6861 ABTA 
KENVA-aULRRM Beautiful 
vaffcd vvDaa. set m iron 
ganv/poob/ar coral peaches 
tromCWkMw AUoBnlAw. 
ways ibglML and exclusive 
safaris. Tel AUlns 0362 55704 
or 99540 (Evs/Wk ends J 
ABtFARC SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w £420 rm £760 Auckland 
o/w £420 nn £770. Jo'burg 
o/w £306 On £499. lxa Ange- 
les o/w £216 rtn £40S umaoo 
Fbobl Centre 01-370 6332- 


Suma **** I 9000 * n nB IMIt fWAOB arewes o f UMr SoU cUprs [M any L 

caianta 070&»638i4 | peevnguxa private toveptmaii l* I he undcn*te>cd Mr ««« Lto- 

bank Wllh superb dike to MB Coodman FCA of 30 
Berkeley Square regime* a Eastbourne Terrace. London W2 
parr-rime recraaontu to e* to 6 lf the Uouidaror ol m* u d 
soiled In a variety of duties company, and. if ao mured ny 
including handling swScn- nonce In willing from the »*l 
board- Reeling Otemt and Uquldauir. are penonany or ay 
organttlng boardroom Bone their Soucunre. 10 come to and 
experience and a friendly pro- prove lhe«r 4*S or owm at 
remonal approach ewmttol. «ueh time and place as shall be 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


omaiir eniranre. W- M 
KreSton weal cnU-rtJtolng 
MMfr brdroom w4h 
whirlpool to*. -■ .yJHlJKT 

oedrsil*. «» ,hlw - 1 1 

en. new MFBeWtunaM' 

MltoA C395 pw 01 248-0673 


S35T MATtorrh-ku-. to- e. 

WMH' ritotoie.UHi . uni h™ 

innnr. to««l •("""■ 

miMi i.NW^nl all JWfUIKi^ 

!S*'. a .ssSi4Ni 

fSS.CWriP-. 

■ihvIkUiIi mvw.mrtvol 7« 
;i.7i> jnvUi'x- up •" 


mwi ffoter nufnld** HiXUl \ flWi 

’^LST-K- « “SIX 

iligj fn M ? DlHtV a 
uur itTW VkiW KMhMtv •jjjy 
riiii-d Mi/nrkiavi tm v-a’ Ct« 

In. cpiva- 111 «IM>PV A lulr Hel 

0,7,1 U fMM 

Tel Ol 37«* vffUL 1 ctivuiiie 


Uimi kenSINCTON »'«*» 
lube «*'l" fjWh T**j52J 
.mil lull Iriiulh wiiHtowv • dtoe 
nrrtv rnep HI .‘SUL 

room LiM- I*rlw _'**5 
dmir.inri 1 PfMtiw 1 L(tm Co In 
U»45 pw GodUaM A Will* Ol 
450 7A21 


UHFUEm S H E P FLAT. StM ««■ I W2. Lwn-Y 


*M|| FHH.AHD Scheduled fuohb 
01-724 2588 ABTA AT0L 



UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Buis. Cairo. Dubai. 
Istanbul. Singapore. 1CL Ddhi. 
Bangkok. HoTO Kopg. Sydney. 
Europe. A toe Americas. 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London WlV TUG. 

81-09 9182/01-09 7751 
Opea Sotted*? U48-I3J8 


CLUBS 


TRAVEL WORLD WIDE 

ScuK Mm and taMmo. 

IS & cMi class QTO743559. 
Xiras to Canada. USA 
0372743550 

Al otiier destmallons 03727 4Z7» 
Gonurcrcal Acooim sgeadst 
01-634 0711. 

TRAVEL WORLD. 
ACTA 72102. Member of Sw 
iBS&tB of Trwrt ATowtaB. 



With pool mutts courts. 18/21 
Sep. 1/2 wkp • £96 P.P.P.W. 

nttnfcman 6 sna r in g . Fttgflts 

£139. Ocy TTavoL Ol 580 
8191. ABTA. ATOL. 

AL6AHVE. VUlav with pools, i 
MOM SCM/Da. sues. The Vila | HAPPY MCW YEAR - Maternity 


Aflei noons only. 01-434 4S12 spccuied in such notice, or In de- 
crone Comuj ftooidtmeni 1 fault thereof they win be 


Agency Ol 824 3474. 

ALBARVE ALTERNATIVE. The 
One* houses tor rental 73 Si 
■fame's SL SWi. Q\ 491 0802. 

A l . C A R VE. Lux vfllas/bpts wlQI 
poett. Sepi/Oci. thru winter. Ol 
409 2S38. viBaWortd- 


SKI WEST burner brochure ota 
now backed with ail tto too re- 
sorte. Sunday fbghte ibaM the 
Iraflldi and amazingly mw 
gweauartiog at £89. Rtop (Oil 
785 9999 tor your ropy. 
A8TA692S6 ATOL1383. 


exduded from the benem of any 
dtttrlbuOon made before such 
debts are proved. 

AmW*YlM.M W |g5 1 ™'“ !W4w#,S,-m - 
cover until January 87. For a I to GOODMAN 


LoiPly orwht 1 bed fiat. rjreP; 
nd Ul A bath CPI* A 
tort. Company HI only £150 
pw. AvaiteMr 1 vt- BWW 
House PTOPP 01937 3710 


new ly i .gurblWrt totlldPiwj. 
law- kjuuw wdh klei.MUineuji 
IO tony bdl .If.i iveu kilrhen 
Jam in iMinroom \ro open A 

i ram l:sOp» i,dJ 


UNfUltNUlim - RICHMOND. QuLwtCM. Soaoouv lurnimrd 
Del 6 bedrm hse wiih 2 tuihv- nv . Wlln ? rrcfP. rrerwi » r We 

a-l If O PAPaM. WPd (ltd kf(. JM . .1 a Kate. ..to fft Otflll. !*Ull J 


rlk. 2 receP*. wed (ltd krl. oM 
nuchlnev Alarm, gge Cm ch 
C575 pw Tel JW Lid 949 2482 
Company let preferred 


H THE MATTEROF RABLITE i |MaLC V SWEE T Furattbed 1 I HAMPSTEAD NWS. I 

___ LtVP TED I bed flat, very large reception I \ irlortui garden (l.d 3 ("*. . 


AND IN THE MATTER OF T*4E 

COMPANIES ACT 1985 

PART TIME Secretary £5.000 tor CREDITORS' VOLUNTARY 

3 day week To hem run friend WINDING UP 

- SrSrt*E£OTi£E WTKE * HEREBY OVEN 
tram Ihe above matter, to pursuance oi 

g^^as‘ssss n r rsr 

937 1266. don SWT tQJ on toe 19m day of od conversion with long rrrarh 

S eptember 1986 at 10.30 o'clock windows & eormred cevinto 
In toe forenoon or so toon there- Dhte bed olooktog WiPf 
aiwe as toe Extraordinary n» courts, rere p with ortg jrre 

General Meeting of toe sharehoid- Blare. kilaUrnachinesCotong 

ere of the rompany convened lor lei £196 pw Goddard 5 »utn 
(he same day and place snau have 01930 7321 

been concluded or adjourned, for 
NE B OT1ATOH. 27-W Braidewl I PtoPOSOS Set oul Ml Section 
byEKKe Ag^uTswTsS 1 SB9 and 590.01 toe above Act 


bed flal. very large 
room. MKhen/auung foom. 
balh/WC. CHW and CH. £7300 
na. Mm t year Rrtcrcncej re- 
oul red SuH prof couNr Tel. Ol 

936 0220 weekdays between 
10.50 and 4 50. 


FUGHT SAVERS 

ALIGAOTE HOB MALAGA E119 

ATHEKS fteg PUBS £73 

CFffTE nS9 ULIiCOi £79 

FMMOiRT £71 NAPLES £122 

FARO £119 MCE £119 

GENEVA £99 PMJtt £119 

HAMBURG £75 IMMi ESS 

ROW £119 Vtm* £124 

UAORO £99 ZUfKH £98 

WINGSPAN 
01-405 7082/8042 
ABTA 


temporary secretary who 
would Uke security and variety 
and £10000 na salary, tor a 
small international firm in 
Green Park. 439-7001 -Secre- 
tartre Plus - The Sccxetonai 


Kil. 4 neuv !*»* m o<ii». 

careful slurcr* vlbO pw ’■ 

JW Lid Ml i’4»‘ 


od conversion wito longjrrarh 
windows & corniced ceMlnto 
DMe bed olooktog private ten- 


rreilK. » Dtilhs Inirrtm de 
sMHied throuqhoill US to 
Naihun k .ivui 4 Co Tua i tbl 


kCKSIMCTON. FuHv lunttshed 
new lauiihouve J beilrms. « 
bjinrmv NTOidll qge r uni OUn 
C600 pwCblfler * N- 

non o muifT- h.o HOio 


NON-SECRET ARIAL 


I •«2MSMraa s? 


m £195 pw Goddard 5 Smith 
Ol 930 7321 


li grace, tnmauve and ctrtvtng 
licence required. Tel: Coote* 

828 1457. 


t »w i this 28th day of August 
By order to me Board 

B BotwcO 
Regtotered Omrr 5 Prmre's 
Gate. London SW7 IOJ 


Hr luvurv convcreKsi »™ “ 
caled lor simp* A ir.inspoii 1 
dWe bed. I reteD pw Tel 

Nallwn vvihon * Co 744 I lot 

KEXSINCTON SWS 2 spacious 

faintly homes, all machs. new- ■ ... . _ i1m m conuui us now 

ty deeoraicd. Nr Tube^ Duptex *«*» pmpKi tor the SuV 



3/4 bedrm* A living, dining, 
study, b/bkfsl. 2 1 .- bains J 
«dns £330. Flal 1 bedim. In 
Ing. 2 luddeo beds, patmc nuge 
k/oin. £150 inc gas. 370-1352 


on Ol 236 Wtol lor the bed w 
lerlion ol furnnhed rials and 
homes lo renl in knighlUfito-. 
Cnebea and heiwirerton iT 1 


UWUMSteP - KINOSTON. 

Modern del me with open plan 
recep ms. Well fOd Ul A unmy 
rm All machine* a bedrm*. 2 
nalhma <1 en suriei. Ok. dole 
gge. Gas ch Long M. £400 pw. 
Tel JW Ltd. 949 2482 Go let 


RENTALS 


Bridge and Club. 38 Kings PL *?"2f* !lo * #w# "»r*i«arr 
SW3. 01-589 7201. I 2 hprtm ' >»• SW18. Cl 90 

I hrm e\rl CH to CarKfleM BR. 
Phone: 01 986 1017 net 
C1USWICM a Prof Males 7VVI 
yre 10 share lpe hse £36-40 pw. 
Ph Scot 747 4980 6-epra cwedl 
Mu M/F. own room, spacious 
Hal. note lube. 20*. £ioO pern. 
Ol «7S 7766 Ewes. 

•AMKAH - Own room tor ma- 
ture QLDii prof. £300 pem inc. 1 
monin dep. req. 01508 4587. 


SW3. 01-589 7201. 


health a beauty 


STOP METRIC 6 sUtt losing 
w eight. Free 32 page 

PUbUcalion. 0674-72670. 


BIRTHDAYS 


HAPPY MRTWDATTT Says bto 
ot give me a butz. Beaune and I 
win give you a ring Tony. 


SERVICES 


purlh: speakmq cdao mc 

& Speech writing by award 
wtoning Pubbc Speaker 01-46! 
2292. 

CAPITAL CVs prepare high auan- 
!»• curriculum viiaes. 01607 
7906. 


win kml patterns, adapt them or 
design to your rrquiremenls. 
Mrs Farmer. 27 Madmgley Rd. 
Cambridge 0223 357762. 


Fust dan nidRUmoual lady 
guide 8 escort, any rime to as- 
sna business executives in Pans 
and airports. Would iraveL Call 
Pans 42 2a ot 32. 

CALIBR E CVS Ltd professional 
cumcuium vitae documents. 
Dr tails: 01631 3588 

MAHHUeC « ADVICE Bureau 
Kauiannc Aden lex foreign or- 
firei personal mierviews.7 
SrdVw PI. Wl. Ol 499 26S6 



lOBH BHOCK1EHIIBST the 
rountrymans oulflltfr an- 
nounces toe piddicatian of ha 
caiMogue of country daitung 
nee on request from Bndgr 
. Sw«. BPkewell. DrrPyshire. 

or lei Bakeweu (0629811 2089. 
WOOHER TABUS brand new. 
Nate bed. Full vrar £1500. 6 
stee £475. size £176. 0793 
6 1 6096/hi 5900 anytime. 


SHORT LETS 


WO MOlU f PARK, SURREY - 

1 1 Mis Marine Arch. DenoUfid 
del furnished roach bar lo leL 
Beautifully reJurhotied to In. 
corporate an mod cons. whUst 
retaining OM Wand charm A 
character. Own gdn. gge. 3dbte 
beds, batorm. cloak, ige, dlnuig 
rm. IUL Access to private pool & 
tennis cru. Outstanding coun- 
try location. Ideal for company 
let. £1.000 pem. 0202-296393 


HOLLAND PARK lovely flu on 
communal gardens. 1 reept. 
dble bedrm. K A 8. CH. £176 
pw Company Lei /Oversea 
v tutor only. Tel: 01 777-7611 
8ERVKED APARTMENTS to 
Kensington. Col T.V 24 br Sw. 
Telex. Cotunglum Apartments. 
01-375 6506. 


oeos. sit rm. K * B. tv. hoi or 
Cntel. £360 pw 01361 4813 
CHELSEA easy run exert flu. 
avail 3 week*. 1 bed. 1 recep. 
KAB. £180 pw. 584 6597 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
central London from £325 pw. 
Rmg Town Hse Apts 373 3433 
F14 quel home avail Sept 15- 
Dec 20 Sips 3. gen. cal. Ote CM. 
£150 pw evci 01603 0410 


GENERAL 


RANGE ROVER, tonal. Green. 
2 door X Reg. 50000 MOes. 
Radio Cassette Very good con- 
dition. S6J00 cool 01 525 
4476 to) or Ol 440 0868 <hl 


924 LUX: A reg. automatic- dec 
sun roof. Guards red. 1 owner, 
as new conduxan. fun service 
history, tow m lteooe . £9.750. 
Tel Potters Bpr»O707) 45699 or 


JAGUAR A DAIMLER 



MERCEDES 


MERCED** 190 1. 1986. White. 
3000 miles. E SR. t /w. healed 
washer wipes. ETC 7" alloys A 
towered fui vendor kfL 
£14.960. Tel: 0579 20652 


AUTUMN A WINTER IN 




Tlie Cultural Experience* 

Spnmv 8BSNMV MteSBIMI 





* SVDMY 

* PBriH 

* HOBART 

* JOBUHG 

* AUOCUW 

* FU 

* BHKAOK 


*W«K * * MRU* 

* * mmw* 
* * * IM « ai * 

* * * WW*K * 

* WMBTO * 6 WUICtXJWR * 

* L AWSfLES * * MM* * 

*CKMB£MI * »8fflWQ5C0 * 

,** SOUTH MCKA ** 

* US** USA * USA *UM * 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL 

„„ (EsTd 1969) 

«H727)2ralS53wf7l^ 

2531 J/241LE/26097 


* * MHJOURE -k 

* * Busan* * 

* * ADELAIDE * 

* * _S AmCA * 

* RBELLMsIDN * 

* *PT HOHESBr * 

* * iwno * 


* DUBAI * * 

* UD EAST 4 * 

* LUSAKA 6 * 


FOR SALE 


MARKSON'S PIANO 
SALE IS NOT ON ! 

wnn prices rhedper Ihao orb 
rr idle pore* who need* 4 *4le 
7 lOO v ol Lnrettll 6 Craitds 
for vilr/Mrr with opflon to 
purrluv plan from sioom 

MARKSON PIANOS 

Albany si. NW I 
Ol 936 8682 
ARiiterv Pi. se ta. 

□I BS4 4517 


FUTSHARE 



IT’S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


BARGAIN FUGHTS 

Syrtooy £415 £755 

Auckland £415 £745 

JoBi>rg £306 £499 

Bangkok E209 £355 

Caro El 35 E210 

New York £139 £278 

Los Angeles El 68 £345 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01*370 6237 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
4nfa mn 
Jo’lMN/Hv £3X £450 

Ntertv £275 E33G 

Caro £150 £230 

a OS £240 £360 

/Ben £250 £360 

Batata* £220 £350 

NU £43) 



SSU BLADON LINES 

«V>7 BROCHURES MOW 0CT1 
47 Has ana in SKMntl 
Austria, Franca & tu 
The Biggest Choice On 
Ex G&wcfc. Law. Mndnster. 
GtosgowA EOiXxigfi 

01 7852200 

MoacfL Deps. 0422 71121 
ABTA 16723 ATCH. 1232 


BSTAMT required for Jane. 

Norman rasfuon group Oxford I 

St. No typing. Would suit sto- 1 NW2 hamncuiate tot. dec. send 
deni (awaiting University | detached bouse to quel tree 


•AMPSIEAD GARDEN suburb. 
DeughUul 3 bed roomed (ally 
furnished well equipped col- 
lage. Ideal family house. Pref 
company let. £195 pw. 03316 
3653 


entrance 19871. £f00 pw. 
Please phone OI 437 0132. 


HOLIDAYS AFLOAT 


LEARN TO SAA. Thts Septernber 
wtto i he Kent Salting SchooL 
mi pvaBaole aboard Ranogate 
Bara. Luxury Yacht. 6 Day 
Course (R Y.A. approved) to 
Franrr & Brignan. an inclusive 
Pnc* £166.00. lor Brochure 
Tel: 0043 564477. 


BIG BANG BALL 

HELP WANTED 
NOW 

01-8341002 

69 Ecdesou Square. SWi I 


CAN YOU 
MANAGE? 
FARRAR STEAD & 
GLYN 

require Aocoinm AxwJScc fct 


lined si reel near GMdssooc 
Parv 3 newly rated oedrms. 
batorm. brand new fitted kitch- 
en. Oiarmma sitting rm-dnung 
area. New carnets, curtains, run 
OCH garden. Long M preferred 
£200+ pw. Tel: 01-253 0099. 



OUCEKSGATE SWT. Brand new 
ronverston. Large reception, 
two double Bedroom, two baih- 
rooms. Unfurmsbed except for 
caroPM and oaratos. 
Company /embassy let only. 
£290 pw. Mr James: Ol 588 
1049 <day). 


LOWEST FARES 
Rrn 889 N CORK £275 
Frankfort - EDO LAiSF CMS 
Lagos £320 UWn £320 
Wss o K £325 SngspOte £420 
Jo'tasg £+60 Bangkok £335 
Caro 005 Katmandu E**J 
OsVBom £335 Rangoon £35o 
Hong Kong ESiO CKcuoi £425 
W g w call 
SUN A SAND 
21 Bsrslkro SL uadsn Wl 
01-439 21B0/437 0537 

MAXM qcaros accepted 



ARKRSCMI EXECUTIVE Seeks 
lux flat/house: up to £ 800 pw. 
Usual fees req. Ptnntos Kay A 
Lewie, south of toe Park. Chei- ■ 


LAWSON A HERMAN niptotiMlv 
A pxnruiivev uroi-nllv Wk 

quali is properties in ail cenlral 
/west London area* For alten- 
don please ring Oi 938 3429 


swto. LOirtv qrrd Hr rial 1 dttte 
bedrm.- 1 rereo. KAB Available 
1 vr Companv lei onlv El» 
pw Peoenry House Props 01 
937 3710 


HOLM Ales. Oujitlv properties 
available and required in prim e 
reudrabal arras- Tel 01 370 


KENSDNSTON MTS. Light and spa 
CKMV rial rerp- bed kil A bath 
c/h. garden. C145 pw Tel 01 
937 3954 iDayl 


XCNStNCTON MALL W8a Bf-antl . _ 

fullv furnished, sunny fourth I ROBERT MVUM + BURNS 
floor flat. 1 dbfe bdrm. i recep. I OuaNlv properties aia.iahie and 
fined krirhen and bathroom. | required in ail areas Tel Ol 
hall, funaphone. £500 pem. Trt I 657 0B2I 
(079751 270 Or 01-229 734T 


CHELSEA SW3 Cturminq LGF. 
dim rial Dble bod. rer. KAB. 
CH CUOpw Inc Ol 362 1930 


COBHAM Superb house In pro 
mier road, rtoy lo siadon 
Cl. BOO pem Tel 01 947 1566 


ST JOHNS WOOD. Super i bed 
flat in luxury ink. Cl 50 pw inrl 
GCH/HW Co tel. 937 9681 




wntnaiBKcn - idrai pied a 

terre Interior d — grad . OMe 
bedrm. 2 receps. Amencan ML 
batorm. Serviced balcony rial. 
Avail now ■ long/ short tel. Tel 
Angela W imams oi 268 3659 


Karl office. 01-586 9882. 


and central flat, reception, dou- 
ble bedroom. K A 8. ch. 2 non* 
Hyde Park and lube. £120 pw. 
Trt 01-402 1901 or 01-369 
2042 frvett 


UfNHTSBBfDGE: Luv 2 bed 

amtt. 2 bath, recep/ dining, mod 
kHrhen all machines. 2d hour 
porterage, opposite Hamids 
£360 pw UK Tot Oi 370 525S 


AVAILABLE —MEDIATELY For 

2-3 months Luxury furnished 

borne on Momagoe square, i _ ____ 

Wl. 3 Beds. 2 Receps. Kit A 2 MAYFIELD, EAST Brim . Oul- 


domestic a catering 

SITUATIONS 



STURGEON* Stoned ttmUed ecu- 
non prints Trea din g The 
Graoer. £200 ono. Trt 01-658 
8774 i eves* 


MATURE YOUHC Professional 
woman learfv 30si rvaiares rial 
share situation with one Other. I 

or whi -bouse nr to or near I MEW TURKISH RUG • Top quart 


ty Taonmar 6*4 reel. Deep red 
4 navy £500. TeL 0594 43737 


Lonoon Comolrtely trvrttwor- 
toy refs avail. Pleura Tel Sarah 
Ol 385 *308 (After 6pmi 

SW17 Nr Northern Line 1 Ode I nrct/j <* me Lady Anne dui 


£1 34 earn prm excl. avail 28/9 
A ! Single £168 pem net avail 
12/9. M/F SHU young CU> 
Proto. Lux CH Hse All mod 
cons Tel. Ol 223-3549 


ner sort ire by SPOdef Mansard 
Coortand- Oilers wm a «»• 
gently hv- i von bimow. oem. 
or Systems. University of Lan- 
caster. LAI «YX 



A BEAUTIFUL 
CORK FLOOR 

ttitjfliiffi CotknpUu BKural 
Tim 1-Hliey vened ta rspnte 
w« cjsv to iTan my bad 
ocaag Ltndcd slocks 

n* pa si rf + vat 

TK Upper HtfeBRK Bod 
UdiH SW14 
Tet 01*876 2089 

Fire EiarrutR From Fmng 


CHtSVnCX ■ prof M. N/s Share jeoYAL DOULTOH Tohv Jura. 

mans lule £40 p w excl. Trt m oi 883 OO0*. 
PUihUT^Srt^iivt P retartna ' ,uart ***" ARwnis and prods 

^SSS^toSSSSSS- y^S. 5^ l &d5S. a to,SS?Ss; 

PNe M for pppe Ol 589 S491. 

313 Brompfdn Road. SWS 
BUMOTON MU Prof 23 ♦ lo shr 
lux hse 4-6 months. £220 
prm. inrl Please tel 01-628 
6080 exl 386 alter 9.50 am. 

PARSONS GREEN INC Prof. F. 
to share house wHh garden. 

O/R CH Near lube. £160 pem 

Trl 01 736 5931 
PROF Female 23 N/S reaim* 

O/R tn snared nat/houre pref 
near lube TeL Wrk 580 3637/ 

Home (09081 50! 875 after 7pm 
SWI - LMM. space and 9 -andear. 

A really nutomHcem futshare 
£110 per week inclusive Trt: 

01 689 0910 


JJLJ: 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


(1690’s- logo’s) 

• Origirwf * 

* BesuUfuRy F»r B3 acvod * 

FROM CISlOO EACH. 

0492 - 31303 

E JONES 

43 DUN DONALD TOAD 
OOLVNVN BAY 
CLWTD LL29 7RE 


Sir John Betjeman 
General MacArthur 
Kenneth More • Doris Smith 

What do they have in common? 




5nnptybfraf dlOBl 
|gr lend to mowed po u i 
rpdxgwligheyoagraeRkD 
ffTKcs for pxpeon lews Hen 
tod VHneUwig rWiI oof a Jot* 
fontoadrulirtwUrty 





£3 00. 6 8 pw mi offered to ma- 
nor Norland or Prtnces* 
enrtshan uwnruie trained nan- 
ny. October poWton for remote 
beaonide esuie narthern 
Greece. Fufl chaige. exceUem 
condiuoro taOudlng lour wtoo 
annual leave with nay. Fre- 
quent cravrt aa mother M 
mternaHonal linger. We also 
have numerals smttlair poK- 
Uon throughout the wtrrtd for 
top calibre appdcanis Contact 
Myra al Ihe Aagto Conimental 
Agency on Ol 730 8122 124 
hourra . 

RAIBIT MSB. Age 22* with 
working knowledge of German 
required ay matar low operator 
for December to Apr*. Tel Ms 
M j To man on Waltham Crass 
(0992) 87211 C9I1 3607 Or Mrs 
P SUfteck ext 3611. 

FOR A REGULAR part-time 
Home Cleaning Sendee ny rcll- 
abir dally helps central arras - 
don't delay another day phone 
Anglo Continental (EMP. ACT.) 
on 01 730 8122 now (24 HRS). 
CHALET GIRLS - over 21. cook- 
ing experience eeranuaL French 
tang reef. Please apply w«h CV 
Snow Place Outers. 10 cirve 
land Way . El . OL 790 8*24. 
AU P AIR MPLS immemniely 
avaHabte. Caa The Ateftair Oen- 
Bre (EMP, AGY.I now on 01 
730 8122 (34 HRS! for (Malls. 
UVE4H experienced Cook's and 
Bar Smr. for run new «*/- 
reuaurani tn Oirtora. Can 01- 
352 2908 Oefore 8pm. 
ENTHUSIASTIC CHALET ORLS 
needed Winter 86/87. Ring 
SKIWHEZ 01 570 0256 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


•wtidue shop cmelsca 

Sprcvauswg in fine Eogush lor- 
nitwe requires mate areretanl 
A good driver essential. Excel, 
twu oTspomiru ty ana prospects. 
O! 373 3040/01 373 3636. 


THE CHELSEA DOWN Co seek 


Baths. Gan CH A CHW. All ame- 
nities. £3S0nw. Trt: 01-629 
6103 ITL 


nerQ TaJLrJSP"^!* CMEFPEM SQUARE (Jnronttshed 

SSRUmWMB: 

Mons (Agy>. 


AN UMJSUAL bright mlmor de- 
stqned town house. S minutes 

walk from Stoanc bquare Tube. 

sundlng country residence. Mlh sunny (irsi floor drawing 
part of a ige manor house b roam, tuning room, kitchen, 
beds. 2 baths. 2 toe receps. Ige master bedroom suite. 2 further 
modem kuchm. Spectacular bedrooms and both room, into 
gardens of 2 acres mato lamed oral garage £475 pw Long tel. 
by greener. Avail (ram October Phtbp Andrew* ol 4*, S99i 

ralr^P^^ T^T'J MUNGWH. Owners period spa- 
3S ‘'rwrty "«rai ctouvhsenrlube 3/4 dntebedfr. 

urea 2 receps. superb vtuflm whU 

MLMMEMT BRA FIELDS / tevety views. Ige tiling area- 
Htghgaie. Modem (bmUy house CH. TV. S/laong gdn. gge. 
In a met aurardve mews. Lae E2S0 pw. 0580 712806 
tiling area. 4 beds, master me BERKELEY SQUARE WL. Writ 
shower rm papo gdn. garage rr* ist/2nd floor mao ol great 
£820 prm Tel: 01-539 17*2 or character. 2/3 beds, loiley re- 
cranon. k & b. Details 01-935 
9512. (Ti 

CHELSEA. Superb I doubte bed- 
room flat on *Cheyne Walk’ 
Newly interior decorated Large 
kitchen breakfast room. CH. 
£165 per week. 01 352 8458 
CLAPMAM 1 Min tune. 2 bed flal. 
recpL K * B. lu floor Every 
amenity Clio pw. Tel. 01-634- 
IOOO Exin- 2221 Day or Ol- 
7206531 Eves 

FLAT 3 bedroom modern Fully 
furnished from 15 Sept for 6 
monriis Surrey BO mins Water- 
loo £400 p.m Tct 0428 2273 
Before 11 a.m 

GQLOERS GREEN. Hampstead. 
Drtignttul. 1 dbt bedroom. 1 riv- 
ing room, peaceful maisonette 
£99 pw UK CH 1 yr + tel No 
shannq. Tel. 01-4551406. 
HAMPSTEAD VILLAGE. Spa- 
«*» garden HaL own enL 2 
Dedm*v. recep. hali/dincr. 
bainrm. GCH Avail now £200 
pwjvtane Carter 01 -435 5329 
Kwniminnu Ovtnqum Gdn 
ydk Irom Harroda. lux flat. 3 
bens. 2 receps. 2 baths, ul re 
dec.. £550 p w Long Go Let 
Tel: Kltgour Ol 581 0573. 

HAMPSTEAD Stunning 2 DMe 
Bed. elegant Recep- KAB with 
views. C27Spw CCS Estates 

MWMGATE. NG. dose Htghgaie 
Tube. Luxury 3 bedrm rial, 
kuiitqe. kitrtc £175 pw 6mths 
+ Tel. 281 1281 IT) 
HENSINOTOIL Superb Rat. 
£i 2 Spw 1 dbt bed. ige recep- 
tion. KAO. new furntlurv.Ol 
603 9466 

KEHSINCTOH Ml Quirt newly 
dec (urn flat 1 bed. rec. kit. bath 
Be shower. CH MmdmmhsLrt 
£140 pw 01 834 6636 (96). 
m— r nBH HC Lux 2 bedrm 
apt om Harroda, 2 bam ensuile. 
ree/dlner. ni kil. Ufl. porter 
£350 pw 01 581 5828 (T> 
MAYFAHt HYDE PARK. The 
most luxurious tong/shon lets 
1/* «wds b«« pnera 01 935 

9512 fll 

HWll. Luxurious 3/5 bedioom 
house dose to tube. £220 ner 
week Inclusive etectnclty Tel: 
O! 607 9381 IT). 

ST MUM'S WOOD. Extravagam- 
V Spartous-luxurious matt- 
«teat Oachrtor/coupie. £296pw 
neg Ol 289 9399. 

SOT SBBI The number to reme m - 
ber when seeking best rental 
jTOtenim In cemnii and pmne 
Lond on areas £13Q/£2J)OOpw 
■SHN Bedsti NW London. 
Handy lube. New dec. £47 p w 
(tv^expeera Rentals Ol 8B3 

“^COMPART seeks rum prop, 
ertie* In best london areas. 
CA8BAN A OASELEE (usual 
fees reqilhedi. Ol 589 5081 
m« BARONS COUNT A Srtec 

RM SU* ,uay t««! 1 
Hfdaws in mod romplcx From 

s+iSE LS * wS. 1- * 76 1896 m - 

.VISfTMc. Flats nr 
Muteum Trt 
- !^ - WaBo ri * CO. 6B0 627B. 
■ARHES 5 Bed Hse. C/H 2 Bath- 
rbrtns^Oge E.BOpw OI^S 

■**H»WpiOBto D6LT« Ol 
VbO 2726 Event ngs. 


POtSC. POLfSM and personality - 
rreepuomst with swIKbboaitf 
e x pertencr reqidred lo lorn ore* 
elite temporary team. Top rales. 
hoUday. Bank holiday pay. 

Ring Moira on 01229 9244. 

Drake Office Overtoad Agency. 

TOP S/H PA* read for ongoing HOLLAND PK. Newly com I bed 
raN gnmnW In presugtous sr ,im FuHv rouawed Co Ipl £185 
roundings. lOOwpm S/H. For pw Trl: O] 741 9S77 
(he br«i rates of gay caU vu- or 

Janet on 242-1223. OfDce CENTRAL LONDON 1. 2 a 3 Bed 


Overload A9V- 

EMOB SEC. C/T lo £10.000 


flatter houses sutlabte lor exec- 
utives A visitors. 937 4999 (TX 


AAE to- re-tns. co EC3. IBM I CMU D> Immar lux balcony 


WP exp ♦ gd organiser, 
woodhoura Rec Cons orao* 


Tew* - Pena 
c£1 1,000 

JJe Pttgjrtof this 
tenaa Wl basad *- 
needs a 
ncfiM 


IttL light recep. dble bed Jin. 
porter. Long tec 01602 8825. 
CHELSEA. B bed family hre. Cdn. 
Car age. case pw. Andre 
Lana uvre ot^9i 7822. 
CHELSEA KINGS RD luxury fttrn 
1 bed flat. £98 gw. excl Rug 
Diana 01 549 8933 Ota 
CHFisg A Pretty on nr furn rtaL 
dH bedrm. rec. k*b. sunny 
pm-e d gdn. £12Spw 362 2775 
BOCKLAHDS Flats and houses to 
lei throughout the Docklands 
area. TcLOi 488 *882 
MCMGATE VUXACE trarty 2 
bed itaL Quirt roan. CCH. £150 
P W. Tel jvoitbwood (68)21195 


PARUAMEMT BRA FIELDS / 
Htghgaie. Modem family house 
In outer attractive mews, toe 
riving area. 4 beds, master me 
shower rm. pano gdn. garage. 
£820 ncm Trt: 01-539 1742 or 
02*6 413310 

MOWTO I PARK SWSs luxury 
4th floor: 2 bed. 2 batromed 
ftaL overlooking private 2 acre 
park. Gym. sauna, sotartum. 
pool. Prti parking- £195 pw 
toe. Tel 01-874 1050 

CENTRAL LONDON with off 
street parking. Lux flal. Uv rm. 
Ml. bath * shower, upstairs 
open bed/dms rm. Everything 
provided. £160 p w. company 
ret Tel: 01 385 0919 

HOLLAND PARK Spacious su- 
perb furnnhed ft*, garden. 2 
bedrooms. 2 baths, fully fined 
kn/breakfast room, dining 
room, large recep- Co Let. Musi 
be seen £360 pw. 362 8458 



Save with Swissairt 
Super Apex. 
London toZurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basic 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 
Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday afterarrivaL 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-437 9573 



MENORCA Votes, s o m e with 
pools, apartraeore. tovemad. 
Sen 1/ On i vast from £120 
Celtic Hobdays. Ol 309 7070 & 
0622 677OT1 or 0622 677076 
(2« hrs] MM 1772. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


NICE. Lowest (ares ft- £99. 
Biggies. 796 8191. AMI 1893. 


ISLANDS IN THE SUN 

lETOfi fi MflO W 

HY CWECT fOCOWi CHMSlCMA 
iWYhTHOS. CTETE MOSkWlHOS 

BRNriSMSMBi 
ClB»8|8— fMKW 
Mtk, um ra m 

mofeisAAM> 

IKHJD4YS 




EXPERIENCED 

LETTINGS 

NEGOTIATOR/ 




HU) 

OUN KENSINGTON OFFICE 

tf you tiave a proven track 
record, are dynamic, setf 
motivafEd & toofong fora 
tfafieng iiig & hrfhty 
reNanftfig position, 
ring no*. 

Excellent remuneration 

package & Company car. 

COKTACT 
STUART GOLD 

AISCOIBElinKUin 

88 St Johns Wood 
High Street, NW8 
01-586 3111 


BIG BANG 

Where will you be 
when it happens? 
Trainee position in 
Europe's leading bro- 
kerage for individual 
25+ with ambition 

jinri flair 

John Kilbiirn-Toppin 
01-499 7800 


HOUDAY?! 

Temporary assignments 
with famous companies 
ottering top rales. H you 
have good sncnrtarfal 
skOs and/or WP, 

PLEASE CONTACT 
JOl ROBOTS 


kil/ diner XU 40 p*??sirT5 
01-886 2382 

Large dble bed roomed 2 bed flal 
North London. £125 p w, ex- 
press Rentals Ol B83 5*67 
HOOTHLONDON S/c garden flat. 
H*» phone £70 p.~ Express 
Rentals T«:01 883 5467 
FW M J Ca Altrac (Ul 1 dbiebed. 1 
rerap. srol M aed/Audy. k 5 
b.Oot TV. £125 pw. 834 9723. 
SOUTH LONDON. S/coalalnM. 
cn SitofO flat. £75 pw Ind 
rote s. Rental Guide 686 6652 
***** COTTAGE Superb, spa- 
ciosb flat. 1 dbfe bra. I Ige ttv. 
KAB. CH. £>08pw. 821 0417 
TWO » MAM. Gdn. 2 recepL 
kK»/pete considered £ioopw. 
Rental Ouide 686 6SS2 

Brand new ground floor 1 
bedroom n« Longco tel. £i2s 
pw. Heycock A Co: 564 6663. 
W* Luxury pfed-6-ierre on the 
rtver^rjoo pan 01-748 7366 
eves/Ol-669 2299 day. 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


V v5E. "**"**» COWLES, 
Cook /Housekeeper*. Button. 
ChauUeure & Nannias ivaigHt 
now. An ret* checke d . Ouraan- 
JrtG lor 12 nifMhg. TeL. 
Be^wa Bureau {Led. Agv.t 


PUBLIC 


PASTORAL MEASURE I9S3 
TIW Chureh fniiiidmiiiin 1 1 
hate prepared draft pastoral 
schemes providing for dertaro- 
taro of redundancy In respect or 
the churtn of si Saviour, betns a 
rttaprt of ease to toe nansn of 
RMdtng sr cues (Oxfero otocraec 
ana in resnect of toe church of 
Fyimgaam Od Church to to* 
pansh of FVlmgdafn and tor its 
care and mamicnaoce by the Re 
duodail Charrtrcs Fund (York 
niocrtei: and m respect of toe pan 
tsn citarai or Christ aivexh, 
Todinordett m nr me suoatBa- 
hon of Si Mary. Tftfcaorden as 
the new p a ns n chinch or 
Todmorran. (WanefleM atoce a ei 
Cones or toe orafl gcfitoBH may 
hr obtained from me ChtuYh 
OMnnusuouere, 1 ion. 
don SWiP sjz io whom any 
resrrtt^oons swum be gem 

wwiui 28 days of tlte pubheabon 
Of Ora nonce. 



(CHELSEA) 
01-946 9447 
(WIMBLEDON) 


SOBFIPS BEST- EniOV a OUlrt 
nouay in unspoilt iCa mteaM 
Gorgraus pniwnns. J Sutero 
views, vitua for 2-5. Scheduled 
fbgnu fr Hraihrow on Th«. 
Jdui toe few surocppe HOM- 
dm Qi 948 5747 ABTA ■ 


A WINNING PERSONALFTY 

coukl earn you £12.000 tn your first year plus 
an excellanr naming, £7.000 (negotiable 
regulated eammgs scheme), early management 
opponunmes and the backing of a C4bHbon 
international group. If you have drive, mroaove. 
good commumcaWB skills, it’s an excellent 
career move — take ft Phone fordexatfs. 

01-930 2492 



BRITTON POOLE 
& BURNS 
01-581 2987 

. KENSWGTOH, W11 

Atfisttwe 2nd floor ~ 

west Hong R*_ „ .... 

ScaonteLlOUa. 


Co Is. £400or. 


ASHLEIGH 

ESTATES 

speciaSss m renting & let- 
ting in the West Bid & 
Central London, from sim- 
ple studios to luxurious , 
apartments. 1 

Contact 489 B3S< (1) 


*************** 

S NR LONDON * 

| BRIDGE i 

t * 

Z 7 new flats. £35400 * 

* pa. Substantial * 

* company required, * 

* . TefcOI-524 3922 * 

* * 

*************** 


THE VERY BEST 
Laodlaris ft Toasts 
cane fa as far 

BBffww. hawpstead. 
KBiStNfiTtM. WIMBU9MW 
and simCar arsis. 

none sow. 

BIRCH a CO 
01-734 7432 


SOtfTti KBBlNSTQfl SW7 

jftfigSSfBSlt 

wsewtfan 


-f. Tttew . Igal/f im, 
ansans, tothrm & hg. en 
SW Sto ner rm A bc, guest 

*cJi NwNralecofstKl. New 
oqsb A tumiDim. High man- 
nwtoLttSepjtLTetBdto 


PAUCE PflOPEKTIES 

a avetta satoon w per- 
•PpflOBtl lunstiaiS m 
^^■idpfOpBt zsiinanyfiii; 


AVAILABLE 

Teh 01-486 8926 


RENTALS 

Long/Slnirt 

All best areas, 
ftraonal Service tram 
£l20pw - £3,00Qpw. 

01-458 3680 
Anytime (I) 



1 J 






























































































































i=lZllYMiilji 


LUXURIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

• TO LET • 


in this famous London building 
for the international businessman 


Quraishi Constantine 


mm 





Soane Avenue, London SW3 

Offered to companies for die first tim» 
a selection of 

Studios, 2 &3 room 
apartments* 

All have been individually furnished 
and decorated to the highest standards 
and are available for periods from 

3 months to 1 year. 


Full colour brochure and letting details on request. 


Letting Office Open Daily MON^FRL 

01-589 5100 SAI&SUN. 

Tdec 937067 ha 01-225 2286 10 iuil- 12 noon 






' : . ; = > 11*, *>4 


|'L I, 


01-244 7353 


JOH N D WOOD 


ESSEX - EPPING 
TO LET 

London 15 rnOea, Epping 1 mile. 

Mil 3 miles, MBS 3 miles, 

A CHARMING RESIDENCE TO LET. CENTRALLY 
SITUATED ON A LARGE AGRICULTURAL ESTATE. 
HaH. 3 racepnon moms, titcben. breakfast room. butter's pantry, 
nursery, gunroom. 9 onnccal bedrooms. A bathrooms 0 « ™0. 
sett cantoned I bL Lamlsc^ed gvdsn of & acres, 
healed swunming pooL 

AD iinather bans cart, gsung tor 2 cere, shelter for 
a farther 4. Greenbaoe. Orchard and kernels. 

WeD stated will fast rood and rad Ms lo London. 

Utai lor company or private radermal ose. 

23 Berkeley Snare, Leaden W1X ML 
Teh 81-629 9950 . 


(iEORGK KNIGHT - I ht l otting \ 12 em 


HOUSES AND APARTMENTS 
TO LET 

Wc have an extensive portfolio of personally inspected 
properties in all of London's finer residential districts, 
ranging from one bedroom flats at £175 a week to 
five/six bedroomed houses at £1,500 a week fix- terms 
of six months or longer. Company tenancies are 
generally . required. 

For immediate and professional attention. 
Telephone either our 

Hampstead Office: 01 794 1125 
Or Knightsbridge Office: 01 589 2133 


- MANAGEMENT EXPKR I ISI 


FURNISHED RENTALS 
0RSL0W raws WEST. LONDON SWT WETHEB8Y HOUSE, AS88UHN PLACE, 
Eaxptnrafly taadne mem house n Dm new LONDON SW7 

mews d ewJ opm a B dose a Sooth Keasamtan Each Asrfection rt 1-2 twtaom oats intki batatal period 
has a garage wd most tore batanes. Accomnoda- aw run. AD tte am manor fltapntd. hm Mean 
too retries: doubts aa&m roam. sattrPtf u arararat ae ta a. nay tore anas or tress 
bedroom. 2 doohle bedrooms. 2 taihroons. ml mtm . There s a ragdent porta, ttand w hodaWs 
Uy tiled hsttai. C47S/E558 %m. fcaopelwBiuuWpx 

SUUUC COURT WEST, LONDON SW3 CA DOSAH SQUARE, LONDON S W1 
Supati amor desunad Hats n in efeaam oansan An erceflen Rat wnhuw d Square gvdtre and 
brick, omntes tram Sloane Square conssWQ 2 or 3 nsta rt poita ■ Ha s W lo at ta Manor rfe; 
beoeor^ ? u 3 reetoMn nms 2^noo^ ripwd g»"pnta»_P» 3 

sepxaa W.C, fatten. use ot coransta gadem btaooras. tow tatae iwftm mom and Ufr 
Ham ON pju. fined htchan. DSt ma 

A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 

St James’s Office 01-493 8222 wL’SSSb 



Homer Hill 


LIMITED 


INCORPORATING 



RENTALS 


For rentals in Sussex, Surrey, Berkshire and S.W London, 
Homer Hill Ltd incorporating Mays Rentals offer the widest 
range of quality houses and flab. 

Telephone: 037284 3811. Telex: 89551 12. 




nViri n'Jrir.l 


BRUCE 




CLABON MEWS 

Delightful Mews house consisting of 3 Beds, Sitting Room. 
Fanny Kit, Battvoom, Available for long let £375pw. 

ADAM A EVE MEWS 

Charming period detached Mews house Sitting ran with 
double doors onto private Gdn. DMng Rm. Fitted Kit 4 
Beds, Bath. Studo room with additional bethroom. 
esoQpw. 

GADOOAN SQUARE 

Seiecbon o( 1 Bert (Ms Bvtfabto for long lets. Sitting 
Room. Kitchen & Bet hr oom. Prices range born £170 - 
E200pw. 


ST JAMES HOUSE IS KF^JSU.OTwS 
'LONDON V/fi 3:-??? VS-tr * s 3“ V 


MALVEMS 


Rentals 


MjBear hme bo. am. rmt a p*k views. 6® n tw wa » i 

2 beta raetpt lot A toft W/M Bssn i MMt Ava# ne at 

STAmSoK MEWS, aW. Chamang 3rd H W. AD new. 2 beds, recapr 
with meg area. U wnh W/M and win. Arad now lot long lei a £175 

OVMt&ON SO, M3. Very centra 3rd ft fttt. Needy decorated. 2 bads, 
reewpt with doing area. Inland Oath. And now tor a ring eo let at £210 


iruStO RS, HAMOB8R.VB.Vriy spacious fbl in esc. bkxA. 3 
dUe beds. 2 1 seeps, tang no. bq kx wtfi ah mactmes. 2 baths & efts. 
W« decorafart and turimed. Awd bow tar a loeg co let a £<610 pc 



JEAN williams ltd 

KENSINGTON. Newly refurbished 3 bed flat .in wefl 
maintained block. Spacious recep. kit, ell m a ch i nes . 2 
bath, porter. Lone k*- P- w - *** cJt * t 

CLOSE MARBLE ARCH, WL Spacious 3 bed Sal on 
2 levels. 2 mens. 2 baths, use of pnvsie » ins. Avail end 
June *87. Family only. £260 p.w. 

HAMPTON HILL, MIDDX. Pretty mews bo«tu New 
decs. 3 beds. Inne/dinin* rm. tit, alt msdmes. Ggp. Gas 
ch. Easy access Heathrow & stations. £185 p.w. 

EAST MOLESEY. Qose Hampton Court an. Supob 
dbie fronted det cottage. Beautifully dec & furo, 2 beds, 
dressing rm. spacious bnge/dining nn. £120 p.w. 

01-949 2482 


cope place, wa 

Ideal house for fanriy wim mKaidM 

dewg trn. targe studio tm. 3 CUt/fsfr bedrms. 2 bafluras. Co W I 

yr +. E450 pw- 

ELM PARK R 9 , SW 3 

Spaoous unfunsted housejrith 3*ri A todrire. targe 
reception, tarig cm. SrMftme ' htetan, * t*®"™ * Mmr m - 
garage & p ano garden. Co let 1 yr Et^OD pw- 

MAJENDIE & CO 01-225 0433 


LANDLORDS and 
TENANTS!! 

Wfoffau efficient. proftsskwaL tat 

well managed properties mail ar ms qfCe MglaodSg^o^o^ 
Our new Brandi covers North Uwdoo, Bens aaa 
RING US NOW 

MAR VEEN SMITH A^OQATES 
01-937 9801/01-727 7957 


CHESTERTONs 


BARBICAN, 

EC2 

Delightful 2 bed flat om- 
toowng oomrmiMl gardens 
A canmal fountains. Balcony. 

underground parking- 6 
months +- *226 p.w. 
DoJdanta Office: 
CH-53S 4921 


01-589 8122 

(V1ARLER & MARLER 


ASHBURN PLACE, SW7 

tou WittM degg ped frit n exeeieot location. AB needy ra tanriad 
to excertaorady sunrl enL 

2 bedouins, i meptan ntrin. 2 bathrooms, access b comnraf garden* 
Avafelfe now COM. £425 par week. 1 ymr +. 

BRISTOL HOUSE, SW1 

llagnificsa stuta *wy Sgltt and blight it reemtiy Interior derivwd, 
s— > ■ ! irinetH tram Storne Square. 

Avobhte now cnlri. £175 pw week I year +. 

M0T00MB STREET, SW1 . 

Ma&oretta in heart ot Bdpwla sri dose In an da fadtoes of 

Ka^tUmdge. 

3 Bemoans, 2 Reception noms, 1 Stamm. 2 dnatonoms. 

QMeL £400 per week. 1 year +. 


KLSmE NUK, Mn 

Smetn ^ twewhed 
groond floor ^wtiotnt compns~ 
3 Beds, 2 Stths. Lge tap 
Rta TirWini Xt $ pretty Gdn. 

zvSpv. 

01-722 7101. 
CARLS COURT, SWS 

Sawn neWr |t * f " i irrt A fnr- 
ntttd tot m qwei sheet t But. 
t Bab. I (ricap. ElSOpw- 

oisas n \ tz. 
kensrcston, «a 


CHESTER ROW, SW1 BUTTON COURT, SW3 
Famdy hae. 5 beds. 2 baths. Attractive 4th flr Rat. 2 beds. 
3 recap, xsfls tast cSom. bath, rit raesp, use of Sq 
gdn. £900 pw gdns. £325 pw 

EMBANKMENT GONS.SW3 PALACE GDNS TERR. W8 
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Nicklaus 
aims to 
stifle 
top two 




ibIS I 




i B ■■■Ail 1 1 i l ^ im i fi i >il 












-OSt- 



ing "Burma Road" course 

n what are often misty, early 
Dming starts. 

Nicklaus, aged 46. will obvi- 
tously be among tbe four players 
Iseeded directly into tbe second 
round, but he will need to win 
his opening encounter in order 
to set up a match the public will 
demand; against either 
Ballesteros or Norman. 
Ballesteros, seeking to equal 
Gary Player’s record of five 
world matdi play championship 
wins, is resided as the world 
number one today while Nor- 
man has threatened the 
Spaniard's position by winning 
the open championship and a 
record S633.296 on the US 
circuit this season. The 
Australian’s victories in 1980 
and 1983, and Wentworth, 
interrupted Ballesteros's 
extraordinary ran of success in 
the championship with wins in 
1981, 1982, 1984 and 1985. 

Nicklaus. however, is rec- 
ognized as arguably the finest 
golfer in the game's history and 
bis victory m the 50th US 
.masters in April, when he was 
six shots behind Ballesteros with 
10 holes to play, gave him his 
20th major championship suc- 
cess during an illustrious career. 
There was not a dry eye in tbe 
gallery at Augusta as America's 
sporting hero captured his first 
irajor title since 1980, though 
adulation for Nicklaus was slow 
coming in his early days when 
he was regarded as an intruder 
into tbe private grief of Arnold 
Palmer, who was losing his 
touch. 

Nicklaus . hardly endeared 
himself to the Wentworth gal- 
lery in 1966 when, in the final 
against Player, be was refused a 
drop for line of sight by Colonel 
Tony Duncan, wbo was referee- 
ing tbe match. Nicklaus queried 
the decision, and asked for a 
copy of the local rales but 
Colonel Duncan strode 
purposefully down the fairway. 
Nicklaus, after conceding the 
hole, was asked by Colonel 
Duncan on tbe next tee if be 
would like another referee. He 
replied that he would (ike one 
fully conversant with the game's 
rules and Gerald Micklem, for- 
mer chairman of the R and A 
championship committee, 
stepped in. 

Nicklaus, however, soon en- 
deared himself to British spec- 
tators, especially with his Open 
Championship victory at St 
Andrew’s in 1970, where he 
removed his sweater then drove 
the last green to beat Doug 
Sanders in a play-off. Nicklaus's 
only victory at Wentworth came 
later that year against Lee 
Trevino. 

Sandy Lyle and Howard Clark 
-will between them attempt to 
provide the first British winner 
in 23 years when the champion- 
ship unfolds on October 2-5. 
Rodger Davis (Australia) and 
Tommy Nakajima, of Japan, 
have also been invited, but 
Raymond Floyd and Bob Tway, 
the US Open and PGA cham- 
pions respectively, are unlikely 
to compete, leaving the door 
open for other Americans and 
possibly one more British 
player. 





liMSS 




Not often known at this address: Severiano Ballesteros performs a trick shot during 
his ‘dime* at Wentworth Golf Clob (Photograph: Stuart Nicoi). 


Man with a fire to 
warm non-golfers 


It always seems to me that 
golf pm msn a slightly subar- 
ban ethos. Not a oitidsm, this, 
honestly. Bat right at the very 
highest level, die game seems to 
be played by extremely nice 
chops who wear woollies and 
spend their time pottering about 
on trim lawns snrroonded by 
rhododendrons. The greatest 
names in the game ail seem to be 
men who amid be played on 
television by Richard Briers. 

Too Watson, one of tbe finest 
champions tbe game has known, 
is a prime example of the type. 
Let me repeat not a crit ici sm. 
The top golf priyen are splendid 
men. No question of it- There 
was an eaonnons raw, yon may 
recall, seme months ago, when a 
player was caught “incorrectly 
marking his baH”. 

What he did was to take Ms 
shot from places other than 
where his ball had landed, 
something footballers do with 
throw-ins and free kicks two 
dozen times a match. But golf 
was shocked to the core. The 
nan was thrown ost of the game 
for 25 years. To golfers, cheating 
is not so much immoral as 
blasphemous. The attitude 
makes a nice change, to say the 
very least. 

The pros* dedication to prac- 
tice, to the ab st r usitie s of the 
game, to the infinite number of 
mints variations of the mystical 
concept of the holy swing; the 
way in which players assist each 
other and treat each ether as 
gentlemen and their spectators 
in the same way. 

All this is wholly admirable, 
and one wishes other sports 
conk) behave the same way. 

But none of this is enough 
alone to make the men in the 
woollies fire tike Imagination of 
tbe mm-geller. To most people, 
golf is a dosed world. Golfers all 
fed a real sense of privilege of 
being inride It, and able to 
possess a swing at afi, no matter 
how flawed. But bow much do 
non-golfing outsiders care? 
What golfer can actually excite 
the m ilK oas who will never play 
tbe game? 

WeU, he landed at Wentwort h 
os Monday hi a helicopter. The 
aura of greatness around him 
was almost visible. A man wbo is 
about as suburban as the prime- 
val forest. A chap called 
Severiano Ballesteros. His 






Simon 


Barnes 

A 


woolly coaid no more disguise 
the massiveness of his personal- 
ity than a couple of scatter 
cushions could make an electric 
chair look cosy. 

He was dropping in to play a 
round with a bunch of influential 
duffers, part of his contract with 
La Manga dab. (Such a day 
would normally cost £25,000 for 
a one-off, by tbe way). He also 
gave a golf 4 dinic', talking about 
the left heel and the V of the 
thumb and index filler and how 
to think tempo. 

He made jokes, which pro- 
voked lots of sycophantic laugh- 
ter. Bat he also treated the 
duffers' adoring questions about 
slices and hookings with real 
interest, and a genuine desire to 
help. Golfing sins were not 
things he would ever be frivolous 
about But at tbe end. he played 
his trick shots, and dropped to 
his knees with his driver in his 
hands to hit the ball Into die 
next county. Duffers all around 
him gaped and sighed and vowed 
to play all those drives on their 
knees if it meant hitting that 
land of distance. 

Golf is getting a bigger and 


bigger one, like practically all 
games. The reason — like tint in 
all ing games — is the same 
television. Televised golf is now 
done so well it brings in noo- 
getifers, people wbo don't know 
their swing from their round- 
about. The game therefore re- 
quires stars who wfll fire the 
im agina t ion of the non-aligned 
sports watchers. 

Only a golfer would want to 
watch a Tom Watson clinic, but 
anyone who enjoys any sport 
would want to watdi Ballesteros 
OB his chosen subject, not for tbe 
technicalities, bot simply to 
enjoy the immensity of the man. 
“What would you like to be if 
you weren't a golfer. Sere?” 

“I can choose anything?.** 

“Anything.*' 

“Then 1 would like to be 
God." 

Ba* he has already gone aboat 
as Car in that direction as a 
mortal "M" can. 


Neumann 

under 

pressure 

By John Hennessy 

The Women's Professional 
Golf Association Tour has 
shown such a refreshing spread 
of the honours this season that 
the combined influences of a 
crystal ball, a pack of tarot cards 
and a gift of palmistry will 
probably still leave us without a 
clue to the winner of the Greater 
Manchester tournament at 
Haigh Hall this week. 

The tournament so far has 
yielded 13 different winners 
from five different countries. 
Only Muriel Thomson, of Scot- 
land. and Corinne Dibnah. of 
Australia, have won twice. Five 
of the 13 won for the first time, 
stretching a point in the case of 
Jane Forrest, who won a 36-hole 
tournament at a match-play 
event in the exploratory year of 
1979 but wbo had to wail until 
this year for her first full 
blooded 72-hole victory. 

G early, the tour carries so 
much talent at the top now that 
there is no question of cynically 
wondering wbo is going to finish 
second, as is the case with a 
men's tour dominated by 
Ballesteros. Lisefotte Neumann, 
a gifted Swede, aged 20, may be 
running away with the Ring & 
Bryiner order of merit with prize 
money exceeding, for the first 
time, £30.000. but even she has 
won only once. 

Miss Neumann must always 
be the favourite but then such a 
proposition from Dalmahoy in 
this same column a week ago 
was totally confounded by the 
maiden victory of Meredith 
Marshall, an American in her 
third season. 

Two obvious candidates (in' 
first-time victories this season 
are Gillian Stewart (Scotland) 
and Alison Nicholas (England) 
both with three second places 
and Peggy Conley (US) with 
two. But. true to the now 
cosmopolitan character of the 
WPGA. a Gallic whisper in the 
trees recurs with the name of 
Karine Espinassc. 

Haigh Hall is on emerald 
delight in a former stately home 
a few miles out of Wigan, or at 
least it was under yesterday's 
beaming sunshine. It seems to 
have won the universal ap- 
proval of the players. 


SPEEDWAY 


CYCLING 


Youngsters are the key 
to a brighter future 


Americans are given 
the frozen shoulder 


By Keith Macktin 
There is a strange aur of renewed cbampioi 
optimism in British circles, Neil Evil 
despite what appears at first ofbeatin 
glance to have been a grim Erik Gut 
season. A crushing defeat at the heats, 
hands of the Danes appeared lo 
have plunged British riders and In the 
managers into the depths of England 
despair but events since then comforts 
have pumped hope and spirit te gm cup 
into Britain's flagging challenge 
confidence. evitable t 


By John WDcockson 


championship in Poland and 
Neil Evitts had the satisfaction 
of beating the world champion 
Erik G undersea, in one of the 
heats. 


Amid the pall of gloom that 
surrounded the home scene 
after Denmark had run away 
with the mternational series, 
everyone predicted that worse 
would follow. 

English riders would be 
edipsed in the world champion- 
ship. England would straggle to 
beat even the injury hit and 
weakened United States squad 
in the second international se- 
ries of the summer, and, direst 
of alL disaster would overtake 
tbe home squad in tbe world 
team cup. 

The pessimists claimed that 
England would suffer tbe ul- 
timate humiliation of being 
relegated into what was effec- 
tively the second division of 
world speedway, a terrible fete 
for the nation which once 
bestrode the world m this sport. 

In the event, Kelvin Tatum 
pul up a magnificent challenge 
in the world individual 


In the international series 
England beat the United Slates 
comfortably and in tbe world 
team cup England survived the 
challenge of Denmark, the in- 
evitable group winners. Sweden 
and the United States to stay in 
the top group of nations. 


Thus, the England team man-* 
agers, Eric Boocock and Colin 
Pratt, are not, after all. such 
obvious and punch-drunk mas- 
ochists. Both have stated that 
they want to stay on next year 
and they seem remarkably con- 
fident and unscathed despite tbe 
traumas of the early part of tbe 
season. 

Boocock believes that the 
changing cycle of success and 
failure in all sports must favour 
an England revival soon, and he 
and Pratt are looking to young 
National League stars like Paul 
Thorp and Andrew Silver, to set 
the English scene alight next 
season. 

On the British League scene, 
it is sad to see Belle Vue again 
straggling. The Aces have been 
one of the top standard bearers 
of the sport for so long that even 
opponents are staggered az their 
decent into the doldrums. 


American cycling received 
something of a setback at the 
world championships which 
closed on Sunday at the US Air 
Force Academy, near Colorado 
Springs. Besides winning only 
five medals against the pre- 
dicted 10. with ro golds, the 
huge crowds that were forecast 
did not materialize. .. 

Fewer than 10.000 spectators 
attended on the final day. One 
reason for the shortfall was the 
weather over the weekend. Both 
days were the coldest for the 
lime of year since meteorologi- 
cal records began. 

The final event, the amateur 
men's road race, was held in a 
temperature of 43 degrees 
Fareohcit, with thick fog on the 
upper pan of the course and a 
thundery cloudburst moments 
after Uwc Ampler crossed the 
fine to win the last of the 
championships* 16 gold medals. 
It was a symbolic success for 
Ampler, aged 22. from East 


1 - - * ■ 1 >*•- - III-. • 


country s tally of medals to 10. 
four of them gold, the highest of 
any nation. 

Earlier in the day, Jeannie 
Longo. aged 27. from Grenoble. 


ish League scene, France second -in the unofficial 
: Belle Vue again medals table. 

faeen . Tlianks to Tony Doyle. Bril- 
stapdard bearers am were one of only 1 1 coun- 
solong Uiat even ines to produce a world 
staggered az their champion. Doyle's victory over 
IC doldrums. Hans-Hrnrik Oersted, of Den- 


mark. in tbe professional 5.000 
metres pursuit, was one of the 
highlights of the past two weeks, 
and it will further increase the 
prestige of the rider from 
Woking, Surrey, on the winter 
six-day racing circuit in Europe. 

For once, Doyle's perfor- 
mance was not the only one 
worthy of note by the British 
team. In the damp, depressing 
conditions of Sunday afternoon, 
Paul Curran and Deno Davie 
showed considerable class and 
astute tactics to join the only 
real breakaway of the amateur 
race and although they were 
caught by the main pack four 
miles from the finish, their 
efforts did not go unnoticed. 

Only one of the six British 
amateurs. Alan Go mail Med 

to complete the 1 1 laps, with the 

best finishers being Phil 
Bateman and Jon Clay in 19th 
and 21st places respectively out 
Of the 162 starters. 

There were promising perfor- 


1IVC- 

strong women s team. Lisa 
Bram bam. in 20th place, and 
Sue Thompson, in 23id. were 
both with the leading 
until Longo made her 


rom®! Ibk * ~o 

saKaa-jsrjss 

antPv** 0, at ft LmP®i >n 1960 
and Yvonne Reymtes, of BeL 

sum, at Doughs. iS^of VS" 

the following yea? ““ of 





















36 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


RACING: WEATHER WILL DECIDE WHO RIDES CUMANl’S LEGER CONTENDER 


Startino has the right 
breeding to continue 
her winning sequence 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Following that heartening 
display at York last month 
when she won the Galtres 
Stakes by three lengths from 
her stable companion 
Kenanga, Startino is a con- 
fident selection to extend her 
winning sequence at Don- 
caster today by landing the 
coveted Park Hill Stakes. 

For Startino, this is a step 
up in class into group com- 
pany for the first time. The 
way that she won the Galtres 
Stakes, which is a listed race, 
suggested to me that she 
would be more than equal to 
the task. Today's test also 
represents a step up in dis- 
tance from a mile and a half to 
just over a mile and three 
quarters. 

My feeling is that with the Si 
Leger winners, Bustino and 
Alcide, prominent in her pedi- 
gree on either side, Startino 
will not fail for lack of stamina 
even though there is some fast 
blood in the bottom half of 
that pedigree. 

It was about this time last 
year that Startino began her 
raring career by splitting 
Entrancing and Ivor's Image 
in a tight finish at Goodwood. 
In hindsight, even that perfor- 
mance now looks good with 
Entrancing winning the 
Strensali Stakes at York re- 
cently, and Ivor’s Image 
finishing a very close third in 
the Yorkshire Oaks. 

Siartino’s first two races this 
season were at Leicester. In 
the second of those, she totally 
outclassed Daarkom, who 
went on to pay her a com- 
pliment by finishing a highly 
creditable third in the Ebor the 
day before she herself won the 
Galtres. 

At York, Startino had 
Kenanga. Bonshamile, and 
Aitiyna in her wake, and I find 
it impossible to envisage them 


beating her now. She also has 
the measure of Broken Wave 
judged on how they ran 
against one another at 
Leicester. 

Rejuvenate and Salchow 
would each stand a chance at 
their best having won the 
Musidora Stakes and the 
Cheshire Oaks respectively in 
the Spring But that was a long 
while ago. Much more recent 
form points to Startino rating 
a confident nap. 

By the time that she goes to 
post. Daarkom could have 
paid her another compliment 

& f at least running well in the 
nipart Handicap even if he 
does just fail to beat Chauve 
Souris, which be might if they 
reproduce their Ebor form to 
the letter. However, ridden 
closer to the pace, Daarkom 
could get his revenge. 

Treasure Kay, beaten only 
half-a-length by Hallgate over 
six furlongs at Newmarket last 
time out, can return to win- 
ning form in the Scarborough 
Slakes now that he is reverting 
to five fijrlongs which appears 
to be his right distance. Even 
allowing for the fact that he 
was getting nine pounds from 
Hallgate that day, it was still 
not a bad performance be- 
cause his conqueror has since 
run the race of his life against 
Green Desert at Haydock 
Park only last Saturday. Welsh 
Note, at her best, would be my 
idea of Treasure Kay's main 
danger. 

Twelve months ago, the 
Electrocopy Ubix Handicap 
pointed to Tremblant being 
capable of winning the 
Cambridgeshire at New- 
market a little over three 
weeks later. This afternoon, 
many will be looking to A1 
Rasiiaama to provide a simi- 
lar hint in the hands of Pat 
Eddery. 


Luca Cumani's three-year- 
old was earmarked for Royal 
Ascot after winning the Cecil 
Frail Handicap at Haydock in 
the Spring. But that ambitious 
plan had to be shelved after he 
struck into himself on the 
gallops. The inflammation 
which developed necessitated 
a long rest, and it was nearly 
three months before he even- 
tually reappeared again at 
Newbury, midway through 
August Considering that be 
looked as though a race would 
do him a power of good that 
day. I thought that he ran 
pretty well to finish sixth 
behind Pasticcio, whom be 
will be meeting on six pounds 
better terms now. 

The EBF Queen's Own 
Yorkshire Dragoons Stakes 
looks to lie between Kalgoor- 
lie and Young Judge, troth 
second last time out, with a 
high draw perhaps just favour- 
ing Kalgoorfie who was pipped 
by Russian Steppe at 
Yarmouth. 

At Salisbury. Geoff Wragg 
and Philip Robinson look to 
have a good chance of landing 
a double with Percy's 
(2.45) and Street Party (3.45). 

- In the unexpected absence 
of Cry For The Clown, the 
Hursiboume Nursery now 
seems ripe for Percy's Lass 
who was such an impressive 
winner at Lingfield first time 
out. 

Following that promising 
run behind Tahilla at 
Newbury, stable companion 
Street Party can win the 
Second Division of the EBF 
Quidhampton Maiden Fillies 
Stakes at the expense of 
SanaabeU. The earlier division 
going to Quelle Fille (1.45), 
who also performed well on 
her debut at Newbury when 
she finished third behind Sea 
Dara and Simple Taste. 



Stoute prepares 
Shahrastani for 

the Arc attempt 


By Michael Seely 

War Hero by a short head in the 
one mile seven furlong Grand 
Prix dc Paris. 

Talking about the winner of 

Goodwood's Alvcidon Slakes 



Know 


< AA " 


Startino and Steve Cauthea team op again in the Park Hill Stakes at Doncaster 


A royal show 
from Eddery 


Princess Anne, who rode WeO 
Wisher in the Windsor Hotel 
Amateur Stakes at Folkestone 
yesterday, finishing sixth to 
Amanda Harwood on Cap Del 
Mond, arrived at the course 20 
minutes before the first race and 
wem straight out with the 
horse's trainer, David Nichol- 
son. and two security men, to 
walk the mikt-and-a-quarter 
circuit. 

The party had just reached the 
final furlong when the first race' 
started and the Princess ducked 
under the running rail to enjoy a 
close-up of the 20 runners 
Ishjng the Reed Corrugated 
ies Stakes. She saw the 
leading jockey, Pat Eddery, push 
the favourite. Days Like These, 
in front approaching the final 
furlong to win by three-quarters 


of a length with less than two 
lengths covering the first six 
home. 

This was a welcome success 
for the Salisbury-based Peter 
Bailey, who is better known as a 
trainer of jumpers. In fact, this 
was Bailey's first Flat winner for 
1 1 years. He said; “I’ve got only 
half a dozen Flat horses. Days 
Like These will stick to five 
furlongs and may now go for a 
Nursery. My jumpers haven't 
done much yet and it's getting a 
bit too hard for them again.' 1 

On To Glory, the 43rd winner 
of the season for Brent Thom- 
son, is trained by John Dunlop 
whose assistant, Tony Crouch, 
commented: “They went very 
fast earhr on and she indeed 
them off readily.” 


TV rights 
undecided 

The battle for the rights to 
screen the Prix de FArc de 
Triomphe between the BBC and 
Channel 4 was continuing yes- 
terday. (Michael Seely writes) 
Last night. 

In some newspapers on Tues- 
day it was announced that the 
deal was almost concluded and 
that it was only awaiting 
ratification by Louis Roman et, 
the president of the Socidtd 
d'Encouragement, before Chan- 
nel 4 were granted the right to 
screen a one-hour pr og ramme. 

However, yesterday Peter 
Lorenzo, the press relations 
officer for BBC sport and out- 
side broadcasting, commented: 
“We know nothing about it. As 
usual the race is being screened 
on Channel I of French tele- 
vision. And we are only await- 
ing confirmation. 


Shahrastani is to attempt to 
give the Aga Khan a second 
victory in the Prix de l'Arc de 
Triomphe at Longchamp on 
Sunday. October 5, provided 
that Michael Sioute's English 
and Irish Derby winner gives 

every satisfaction in a race- •*«? Paul 

course gallop before the big day. Stakes. M'Chocl - 
“The horse is really well and assistant trains, sa d- 

lord. Bui wc fed **>ai 
quickened up well and then Iht. 
couldn't catch him. Hes in 
tremendous form and the tasu.r 
they go the better.” 

Allcz Milord finished fifth in 
the York race after beating 
Bonhomie, and Guy Harwood s 
stable have been adamant inai 
he was unlucky not to have been 
involved in the finish. “1 m not 
taking anything away. irom 
Nisn as. ” said Christy Kinanc, 
one of the Pulborough trainers 
assistants. “But Allcz Milord 
was hemmed in on the jar rails 
all the way up the straight. He s 
a horse who has to get out there 
and attack and stretch hts rivals. 
As for Dancing Brave. I can only- 
say he’s in awesome condition, 
he concluded about Khalcd 
Abulia’s champion, who has his 
warm-up race for the Prix de 
l'Arc de Triomphe at 
Goodwood on Friday. 

Michael Stoute said. “Untold 
is very, very well. Of course, 
sbe's venturing into unknown 
territory as far as stamina is 
concerned, but Grevitle Starkey, 
who rode her at York, says she's 
sure to stay. And I've always 
pinned a lot of faith in his 
judgement.*’ Provided that the 
rain stays away from the Town 
Moor, it will be difficult to look 
beyond Untold on Saturday. 

Finally, Luca Cumani is con- 
fident of obtaining a top-flight 
jockey for Celestial Storm. “If 
the ground is soft and Untold 
comes out. Waller Swinbum 
will ride. If it is firm, and 
Merano is withdrawn. Steve 
Cauthen will be available. But if 
both those horses run. Ray 
Cochrane will have the mount." 
As always, whatever the detrac- 
tors may say, our oldest classic 
once again looks sure to provide 
a high class and demanding race 
and a magnificent spectacle. 


has . 

record-breaking trainer said yes- 
terday. “So, after discussions 
with the Aga Khan and Robert 
Clay, I am now going to train 
him for the Arc.” 

After looking a racehorse of 
the highest possible calibre 
when slamming Bonhomie by 
eight lengths at The Curragh, the 
Nqinsky colt started favourite 
for the King George VI and 
Queen Elizabeth Diamond 
Stakes, but ran disappointingly 
behind Dancing Brave, finishing 
fifth beaten by nine and 

ihreequaner lengths. 

Paddock watchers had ob- 
served beforehand that 
Shahrastani had started to sweat 
and become uneasy. However, 
as Stoute said: “I could have 
accepted that defeat if the horse 
had been beaten a couple of 
lengths. But be took double the 
normal time to recover after- 
wards. His heartbeat was rapid,' 
and he was making choking 
noises." 

Brent Thomson will ride 
Rosedale as pacemaker for 
Swink in the St Leger at Don- 
caster on Saturday as Cash 
Asmussen’s big race partner 
attempts to become the first 
French-trained winner of the 
final Classic since Son Of Love 
in 1979. 

The fact that Rosedale is in 
the same sable as the strongly- 
fancied Moon Madness makes 
this something of a unique 
jening. “They both belong 
to Nelson Bunker Hunt," said 
John Dunlop. “And although it 
seems a bit odd. I'm here to 
serve the interests of all my 
owners impartially. As far as 
Moon Madness is concerned. I 
don't mind, as I'm sure he'll be 
suited by a strong gallop.” 

With only 10 acceptors at 
yesterday’s four-day stage of 
declarations, Jonathan Prase is 
eager to ensure a truly ran 
contest for the colt, who beat 


DONCASTER 


Televised: 2.35, 3.10, &40, 4.10 

Going; good 

Draw: low numbers may have an advantage on soft going 

2 JO PRINCE OF WALES' NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £4,084; 1m) 
(6 runners) 


(8-12) with BACKCHAT Q-7) 4W1 back 5<h and TRAPEZE ARTIST 
£22725. firm. June 23). TRAPEZE 


AflTIST 18-131 31 2nd to 


11) 14th of 15 ( 
at< 



Selection: 


IB KM (7-13) at Ayr (1m 
CHAUVE SOURIS 


21 MY NOBLE LORD (USA) (Ffehd Sa*nan)P Cole 9-7. 
411 TOLUCA LAKE (J Votensft) L Pogofl 9-0 (Box). 

M4 PUtOUEOTtATS(RHesk0h)R ' " 

304 WtCMTA SHtMGS (A Budm) J 
40004 ALBION PLACE 
030003 SOMEONE 



5-2 My Noble Lord. 7-2 


13-2 Wfctwa Springs. 12-i amoopScL 
FORM: MY NOBLE LORD 
firm. Aug 7. 12 ran), 
firm, Aug 24. 5 
Sundown flm. £< 

to Get on Garagtity (35) at Newcastte'ftN, £1427, good, 
beaten 101 into 3th behind Rio ffedras (8-1 1) at Chester ‘ 
10 rant SOMEONE ELSE (8-4) 2X1 3rd to Great Aspect 
soft. Sept 3. 8 rant 

C&oa: SOMEOtE ELSE 


JMH Easterly 7-8_J Lowe 2 

) fl Hannan 7-7 W Canon 5 

OHats, Someone Sse. 9-2 Toluca Lain, 


Aug m, ALBION PLACE (9-0) 
r(7f. £1781. gooa to soft . Aug 29. 
(9-7) at YorX (1m. £5709. good » 


3.40 SCARBROUGH STAKES (£9,224: 5f) (8) 

1 000021 ARDROX LAD (D) ( Shefcti Hazza AINatayanJMBIaiishard 89-13 

NON nUNNOl A 

2 332321 PERFECT TIMING 0 (R Vkuss) D Bsworttl 4-9-10 SCaatfMflS 

3 loam ALL IS FORGTVENjD) (Mrs INormar) D Thom 6-3-9 G Sexton 2 

8 0-14232 TREASURE KAY nn(G Yates) PMafcn 38-5 

32 5H22 SSSLASHfl# nMh mot*™*® i 3*3 — tnms 
12 2 E322 ( P) |W Jones] G PrttchardGonlon39-i WRyanl 

14 200033 W HIPPET (O) (BF) [A Retards) C Brittain 2-30 M Roberts 3 

15 00000 SHMS tH3Mmdins)J Hwdgar g.7. 7-_ . nM^fyp 

15-8 Treasure Kay. 5-2 Perfect Timing. 7-2 Whippet 5-1 Web* Note. 1 0-1 Ffieor. 

12-1 otbere- 
FORK AROROX LAD 
good. Sept 6. 

King (8-12) (5fh'eap. 

1984 whe n ( 9-1 0 ) asm to Jonacria (931) at 
I h cap, £8537, good to firm. Aug 11, 13 ran] 


-5=- .. . MEnt TREASURE KAY (8-8) KI2nd to HaUgatel 

(9-3) at Newmart<et(8f, £9396, good, Aug 22, 9 ran). HLLEQR (M) a away Sthtnen, 
wanton (8-7) to to 7W4to to Premiere Cuvee (8-1 3) at Baden-Baden (6 (,£l 2ft ■■■■ 
Sept 3. 10 ran). WELSH l«mE{843)6Mr4th to Last Tycoon (8-9) at RovN Ascot oJ 


Doncaster selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 My Noble Lord- 2.35 Kalgoorfie. 3.10 Daarkom. 3.40 Treasure 
Kay. 4.10 STARTINO (nap). 4.40 AJ Bashaama. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Toluca Lake. 2.35 Kalgoorfie. 3.10 Daarkom. 3.40 Whippet 

4.10 Startino. 4.40 A1 Bashaama 

By Michael Seely 

3.10 BACKCHAT (nap). 4.10 Startino. 4.40 A1 Bashaama. 

235 EBF QUEEN'S OWN YORKSHIRE DRAGOONS STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£7.408:7f)(15) 


Selection: TREASURE KAY 


4.10 PARK HILL STAKES (Group II: 3-Y-O FflJtes: £28,194: 1m 6f 
127yd) (12) 


2 

3 

5 

7 

a 

10 

12 

13 

14 
16 
17 

IB 

19 

21 

22 


0 BRENTANOICSt 
02 KALGOOHUE |Sh 
4 MOORE 

0 SURF BOARD (pike of RosdMOta) J Wn® 

2 YOUNG JUDGE (Sir K Bud) JWWoBS 8-11. 

CHARUE IULORO(E QBnjE Betel 8-7 

DUCKHGT0N (Lady Murtess) M H Easjartw8-7 
FWAGLE (Lend Derby) G PntchanJ-Gordon 6-7. 
HOME TO TARA (N SwoeneyIR Hatewhead 8-7_ 
LAHLOCH (A Lagnafl Jenmy fit 
LOVE THE GHO«*CUSA) (Mrs 


1 1-22040 AUTW fH HA™ Khan) M Stoute 8-9. 

2 1-103 BONSHAMU (Cfip Turn} A Hate 89- 

3 1031 BB0KEH W AVE (L HdidaylH Candy 

4 00-0421 DBBtJED (USA) (W Du Pont 111) G Pritchard-Gordon 6-9. 

5 110223 FLBDNG AFFAR (Mrs S U ^ - r»"— 

6 01112 KENANGA (Lord Howard de 

J YTonfiD Etewortfi 84. 

10 3-10 PJLOT BRDJSkJ AsM WHem 88 

11 3100 REJUVENATE (KAb(U&)B Hite 8-9 

12 1112-10 SMCHOWj%Mra WHem) WHem 8-9. 

14 2-111 5TAHTW0 (Mrs J McAlister) H Cere 99 

_ 9-4 Startino. 4-1 Rejuvenate, 11-2 
Bonstamite. PM BM. 12-1 Heetng Affair. 1 


WRSwfabumlO 
R Gonna 


GSMwyll 
— WRnn12 

J Raid 4 

MEditeqrS 



.0McMte7 


PITCHFORK (A | 
STAR NORTH (E 


APPEALING 


[HH Agj Kha> 
~OAKER(l 


Gaucd del Bono) J Dunlop 6-7 

Pat Eddery 13 

P Watwyn 8-7 NHcaweS 

■ L Plggod 8-7 EGwtfi 


na 

a3-ru>- 
iO (8-7) 31 York 
.13ran).BONSfUUSl^ 

I 6m. At Royal Ascot 

last of 12 behind Gii! 

beat Kabiyla (9-1^21 at 
. M« 18. 10 ran). SALCHOW CM) tad beaten 
(1m 4f 65yds. 215686. good to soft, May 7. 9 ran). 


M Stoute 8-7 — . 
WfconJM Jarws 84 — 


WRSwtabom4 
— W Canon fl 


Mil) neck 

good. May 13, 7 ran 

ner race at Warwick 

aramer from 

£ 71 was II back in 3rd aid ALTTYNA (8-7) (urttar 10M 

T1YNA (88) 61 6ft. SALCHOW (8-8) 8ttl end IRLOT BOD 

Nook (1 m 41. £37948. firm, Juw 1 9). Prevtously PBjOT ORD 
Ns«riaur^(im a. ^^6. good » sort, Majrfe.10 ran); 


W Zareel. 7-2 Kal 
10-1 Lowe The Groom, 1 


j. 9-2 Brentano, 8-1 Young Judge. 8-1 Moore Brass. 
1 Surf Board, 14-1 orfws. 


Thun 12 


IASS (8- 
YOUNG 


ill S’, 1 4tti to Genghiz (M) ai Newmarkei |6f. £3399. good. Aug 22. 7 ran). 

JUDGE (9-0) >41 2nd of 14 to Bafi Mage (9-0) at York (Gf . £5353. good to firm. Aug 21). 
Selection: YOUNG . 


I JUDGE 


3.10 UNIPART HANDICAP (£20,105: 1m 6f 127yd) (IQ) 

2 0-02012 

6 212224 

7 411-400 BACKCHAT (USA) 

9 02-2230 RUSSIAN NOBLE ( 

10 22123 DAARKOM (SheMi Aimed AIMakKUffl) A Stewart 3-9-3- 

11 383430 CADMIUM (BUSiwteft Hasted AHOdBWP COW 4-9-1 


. S Cauthen 1 
Pat Eddery 7 
- G Starkey 4 


4.40 ELECTRO COPY UBIX HANDICAP (E4.Z72: 7f) (14) 

322211 PASTICCIO <D)(T Warner) MJarvte38-tO 

MM20 TlRfit (USA) iBn (Hamdan Al Maknun) A Stewart 3-88 M Roberts 3 

01310 AL BA SHAAMA (CAN) OTQwMi Mohammed) LCunani 3-8-3 Pat Eddery B 

400000 CORK STREET (D) (M Wdin) J Boday 89-0 J Retel 

3114-03 SKEEBRtSA)(BF)(MaiaauniAIMakt0<m4M Stoute 34-13 W H Saknfcuni 4 

014300 (MXAGERU Berry) W Whanon 4-8-7 HCaritae7 

000202 AIR COMMAND (C-D1 (Mrs I Ryles) Mrs G Revetey 88-7 
221100 THE MA2ALL (C-O) (ws J FUton) Msa L SWal M4 - 

4Q3404 KNIGHTS SECRET 

101000 EAST DA Y (D Roaj 
3400-40 RJkYTEX (W CUB 

203000 NO CREDOHJIY (D) (M Stewart) B Fhctanond 4-7-11 


= (USA) (Sheddi Mohammed) M Stoute SOS 

WRSwtabomS 
.... M Roberta 10 

... . T Quinn 6 

100222 TRAPEZE ARTIST fitwogroup HoWngs L«) N Wgore 50-13 ...SDmwl 
0343*3 REVISIT (R Green) JWinw40-l3 Tte*»2 

14 320000 LHASA (J Wynne) J Rowlands 4-8-S — DN8dW»5 

15 0-23214 SPARTAN VAU£Y (USA) (StaMi MaftamnMd) B Hfts 34-4 .. B Thomson 3 
3-1 Chauve Souris. 7-3 Daarkom, 11-2 Russian Nobis. 7-1 Spartan VaBey. 

8-1 BackctaL 10-1 Cadmium. 12-1 Trapeze Artist. Newsefe Park. 14-1 others. 

FORM: CHAUVE SOURIS (8-3) 4) Ebor runner-up to Primary (8-7)wlth DAARKOM (8-11) 
til back in 3rd place. NEWSELLS PARK (9-1) S away 4th and RUSSIAN NOBLE (9-0) 

™k"!9 9°!M faw headway to be a head and a neck behind aiftft (1m 6f. £42860. good to 

firm. Aug 20. 22 ran). Earlier NEWSELLS PARK (9-1) 21 Newcastle 2nd to Sneak Review 


{Westbrook) M H Easterby 5-8-2 


30-0023 MGHtAND IMAGE ( 



| R Hutchinson 4-7-10. 
14-7-7 At 


■13 


020004 PAWLEYS GHL (Mrsj Lowe) R Hodnshsail 4-7-7 ACaBww(7)8 

4-1 Stowb. 9-2 Tuft*. 5-1 Pasbccio. ii-3 The Mazsll. 6-1 Al Bashaama. 10-1 Air 
Command. Hrgteand Image. Knights Secret, 14-1 others. 

FORM: PASTICCIO (9-5) beat Eastern House (8-2) a neck at Nawbury(7f, £4253, good to 

firm. Aua.16. 16 ran). AL BASHAAMA (9^)8ih ttare. earter (7-10) treat Resourceful Fal- 

con (6-13) II *t Haydock (5f. E17220. good to soft May 24, 13 ran). TUFUH (9-81 55 1 2nd 
toTussacO-8) at “ 


7) 1 mi over course and (Usance wen kmghts secret l 

firm. July 30). HtGUAMJ IMAGE 3rd at Ostend last tens, | 

Steady Eddie (8-1) at LingfieW (71. EZ868. good, Aug 9. 13n 
4th to Merdon MetodyKfT) at Chester (fiCgood » soft. Ac 
2nd » Stifles Owce (S-vy (61. E2755, good to soft May 1 


Pontefract results 

Going: good to firm 

2.45 (1m| 1. DAWN LOVE (S Perks, 16- 
1): 2. Irish Passage (S Wetsor. 14-1) : 3. 
jus (W Woods. 14-11: 4. hoi 
_ . Moms. 14-1). ALSO RAN: 7-3 
lev Are You GuAy. 5 Run By Jove. 8 
Colonial Kmg. Nicain (6th). 10 Gbcier 
Lass. 12 Goto Chip. 14 Quite A Quest. See 
No-EmL Soxoph. 16 Moel fammau. 20 
35 Danesmoor. Opal R ower 


(5m). 33 Tomggia, Super SMouette. Herb 
Robert. Feather 0rl.3t ran. SL 1 ML sh 
htt 3L R Hoflnshead at Upper Longdon. 
Tote: El 9.40; £300. E6.40. £420. $40. 
DP: £81.60. CSP: £33523. Tncasb 
£2.954.83. 

3u1S(1nt2f) 1 . NORTHERN GUNNER (R 
Cochrane. Evens lav): 2. Just Camfid (T 
WAams,5-lk3,Ke«pCool(ACi#iane.6- 
1). ALSO RAN; 1 1-2 RamAe (5th). 12 MoOy 
Partridge (40il Musical WB (6th). 20 
Vintage Lady. 33 Empre Sands. Eastern 
Heignts, 50 TTmsolo. 10 ran. NR: Re- 
tormed Habit. 611 Krl.7L5L 31 W Jarvis at 
NewmarkeL Tote: £1.90: £121 £120. 
£2.30 DP; £320. CSF: £7.08. Winner 
bou^tf si tor &800 gns. 

345 (2m 21) 1. KUDZ (S Cauthen. 4-5 
fav): 2. safe Riw (R Cochrane. 9-4t 3. 

_... . -.^.alSOrauPso 

n. m 101. ost. H 
.Tote: wtn£1. 7a DF: 

£1.7a CSF: £2.81. 

4.15 (6f)1.0NTAP(MBreh, Evens fayh 
2. Tough N Gentte (T wee. 1*-1)-. £ 
UnMrmy (W R Swlntmm. 9-2V ALSO 
RAN: 6 Sameek (6th). 9 Kaw is Best r 
11 Smctefl- Lady (5tn), 50 Miami . 
Upjgfy YeUow, 100 Campeggto, Freddie 
Ashton, Honeyway MW. Noafimbe, 
Raymonds Star, Express Groupage. 14 
ran. 7t nk. 2L l’'>L £m H Eastaby at Gt 
Hatton. Tore: £230: £1 4a £2.40. £1.50. 
DF: £11.60. CSF: £14^5 
4.45 (1m) 1. ROUMELJfN Carfiste. 9-1): 
2. Avkiaanah (P Bwke. 20-T}: 3. Pototaca 
(T hies. 2-1 fnV ALSO RAN; 4 Thank 
Hevon (4th). 11-2 Black Mans B^r, 12 


Captem. 15 ran. NR Herr Ffiek. 1 hi. hd. ah 
hd. hd. 31. John fttzGerald at NewnarkiK. 
Tote: £750: £1.90. £8.80. £1.60. DP: 
£178-70. CSF: £17202. Tncasc £459.12 
5.15 (6f) 1. DUFFER'S DANCSt (N 
Conoorton. 4-1) jt-favT: 2, MaravOta (M 
Wood. 16-1): 3. Throne Of Gttxy (D 
NchoRs. 9-2); 4. Bay Bazaar (G Baxter. 
20-1). also RAN: 4 jt-fav Pomwd Lady 
(5th). 7 Thatcharad (Bthj. 12 Ptastar. 
Ouskair King- 1* Wanted Lady. 16 
Pommes Chateau. Bubs Boy. 20 James 
Pal. Genttescte. Beta Of Budapest. Simj 
Out Loud. Jersey Mato. Skytn. 17 ran. NFC 
Maoermseto Magna. M. *6 L VM. B.V. 21. 
W Pearce at HantoWon. Tote: £4^0; 
£150. £5.10. £1.70, £520. Of: £5590. 
CSF: £6125. Tncasc £26921 Result 
stands after a stewards nqury. 
PHeepob £sam 

Folkestone 

Going: firm 

1.45 (5n 1. DAYS LIKE THESE (Pat 
Eddery. 11-4 fav); 2 Kept Waiting (A 
Mackay, 33-1): 3. lather (P Tufc. 14-1). 
ALSO RAN: 9-2 Sitorame Rase (5th). 
Oazmg High (4th). 5 Vivakk, 10 Frank The 
Bank. Voryan Say. 14 Mor Balzar{6tti).20 
Feasible. Treble Top. 25 SttfStgn. 33 
Kandawgyr. Revefina. 50 Lantern Boy. 
Mister wnsard. Auction Groupie. 


OF: £50920 CSF; E90.IXL 
21511m 21) 1. PAUSE FOR APPLAUSE 


Winnie. St James's Risk (4th). IB 


Comedy (4m), Cals Now, Faane, 16 Cool 
Gales; Nauuta, 25 Gem Mart Tremen- 
dous Jot 15 ran. 1L hd. U iht tec. J 
Dunlop at Arundel. Tote: £520: £1.80. 
£2.00. £1.70. DFi £4052 CSF; f7048. 
Tncasc £55025. After a Stewards' inquiry 
the result stood. 

3.15 (lm 7f 100yd) 1. CAP DEL MONO 
(Amanda Harwood. 11 -8 fav); 2 Tamstour 
(Maxine Juster. 9-4t 3, Tares Chariot (Mr 
O Benneywortte. 33-1). ALSO RAN: 11-4 
Osnc (»ik 25 Well Wisher ffitti), 33 
Vaguely Artstt 50 Al Mok. Boca West 
Daisdfe. Solar Light Farm Lane. 
Kabmpong. RendHflay Got, Tears Of 
Goto. Spartdug Perfotma (404. 15 ran. 
nk. 2L TAi. 8L 2L G Harwood at 
PuHxvough. Tote: £220; £130, £1.60, 
£280. DP £220. CSF: £476. 

145 (BA 1. GYPSYS PROPHECY (A 
Clark. »4):2 Zulo Xi^M(Paul Eddery. 8r 
11 fav): a 2BeWre£Reto. 11-1). AtSO 
HAN: 6 Fort's Far fithl. 50 Tom s Nap 
Hand m. Vitee (Gtti). San Juan Song. 
Just E n c han ting- ® ran. 1RL SHI. 9, Hi, 
IVil. G Harwood al ~ _ 

£24a £1.10. £1.10. £13a 
CSF: £426. 





lerence 


2U S Woodman at Ctechestar. Tow 
£5.10: £130. £1.80. £200. DF: £020. 
CSF: £1282 Winner bought in lor 3£00 
gns. 

245 (1m 2f) 1. ON TO GLORY (B 
Thomson. 6-1); 2, Tern Forrester (C 
Rutter. 12-1): 2 Deehteo LMtt (B Rouse. 
8-1). ALSO RAN: 9-2 Sv Dark Heritage 
1, 5 River Gam Star. 7 Marsh Hamer. 9 
(Sth). 10 Lord it Over. 14 Black 


4.15(6 

5-1]; 2 1 

H0B4 (M HAS, ... 

16-1) ALSO HAN: 9-2 lav Throe Bafts, 
Lonely Street (BA). Steer Fonn. 10 Roysla 
BayTatoraMBte. 12 Mteter March. 16 
D'firtgny . Cfawna v iow. 20 Ada. Mutnans 
15th). Maiden Btoder. M EaoxTacfwon 

ssM'stfsmrilS 

a 

CSF: £105.04. Tifcast E71SL83. 

4.46 (1m 4#) 1. MSS SMRLEY (Pat 
Eddery. 11 -2k Z Airorefta (B Thomson. 
16-1): 3. Prinemre Bma (A tpmberiey, 4- 
1). ALSO RAN: 3 tar La Duse (Sth), 4 
Suniey (4th), 5 Gone Overboard, 12 

L HromJeta. 14 Joke PWouse. 16 Be So 
Bold. The fir* Sisters. 20 La Muscode. 
On The Agenda (5th). 33 Armour Of timt. 
La Seranato. 14 ran. 6L rtt. 1KL SI. 2nL J 
Dunlop at AiuideL Tote: £4^0; £1.30. 
SSrei SO. DF; £4im CSF: £95.01. 
fiteeepofc C14J5. 


Sedgefield 

Going: firm 

2D (2m heta) 1. Scots* Green (P 
CDormeU. 11-3; 2 MounUMree(3-1):3, 
Curmn (7-1). What A Line 2-1 tav. 12 rwt. 
51. hd. R F%acock. Tote: e650: £1.90. 
£230. £300. DF; £1822 CSF: £24.16. 

230 (2m 41 hde) 1. MiUwa (P Nlvan. 
11-2); 2 Galawood (lO-ti: 3. Ftovigo (6-4 
fav). 17 ran. NFL NorthumMa Lo»l «. 
1*L Mrs G Revetoy. TotK ElJft £2ta 
E8.40. £1.70. DF: ESJ.ia CSF: £70.19. 

20 pm 41 Mta) 1. TtwnteMjpQrartj 
54 fayl ; 2 Pounereas (7-1); 3, Batflofled 
Band (9.2). 10 ran. NR Luqto. 2L 3Lf 
Wateon. TotK £250; £1-20. hJZpM. 
DF: £520. CSF: £1225. Tncwb £3242 
3D0 (2m hdte) 1. Did* OMteBte (Mm 
y. 9-21:2. 


Fkma Storey. » 
Absonant (114 


to). 12 ran. 4i. KL W 

DF: £^4OC^'S)SLTrM£140.m 
4D (2m 4f ch) 1. Pamrtaa (P Ntvan. 12- 
1): Z Mossy Cones ^ French 
ftephew(2-ll Hold Off 13-8 to^Bimir, 
diEL Mrs G Hawley. Tote: £13.70; £230. 
£1.70. DF: E&40. CSF: £3938. 

430 (3m 600yd Ch) 1. PofY* M (B 
Storey, 5-ifc 2 Warak (4-1); ^ Pnnca 
Santtam (9-irBteektBwk Star 7-2 to. 9 
ran. 8^*1. S Payne. TotK £520: £1 Ja 
£1.90. £212 DF: £032 CSF: £24.82 
5J) (2m hdte) 1. Pates secratjGOram. 
54 to); 2 Banal BusWJ3-1):3. Punfle 
Creak (3-1). 8 ran. 1JM. 3L Danya Siredi. 
Tow &.TO-. Ct.10, £1.10. tlM. Dft 
£5.72 CSF: £7.12 After a stewards 
inquiry me result stood. 

Placaipat: E55JB. 

• Brooke Sanders, the trainer 
and amateur rider, has been 
voted the Lanson lady of the 
Month. Miss Sanders received 
the award after becoming the 
first lady amateur to win a race 
against male proflesionals. at 
Newmarket. Miss Sanders 
gained her first success os a 
trainer when Soft Shoe Shuffle 
won at Nottingham on Monday. 


Carabineer 
reigns at 
Kempton 

By Christopher Gonlding 

Carabineer established him- 
self as the champion Arab 
racehorse at the International 
Meeting at Kempton Park on 
Monday, where he won the 
coveted Dubia Stakes from 
Cherifa. 

Carabineer, ridden by Kim 
Bradley, finished third to the 
Cherifa, the French runner, in 
last year’s contest Bat on this 
occasion Cherifa was firmly put 
in her place, finishing a well 
beaten second- 

Crosstng the finishing line. 
Miss Bradley punched the air 
with a victory salute. “If Jonjo 
O’Neill can do it so can I,” said a 
jubilant Miss Bradley. “I have 
never bad him better. It was all 
down to the knitter elastic, 
which we used to help him with 
the starting gate. Last year he 
was frightened by the elastic 
tape start.” 

Woodlands Court Magician, 
the grand old war horse of the 
Arab racing circuit, won the 
Raynhaxn Stakes for the third 
year running. In doing so he 
showed all his battling qualities 
as he beat off the favourite, 
Edmond Dante, inside the final 
furlong and roared home like a 
lion. He is trained and owned by 
Alan Kirkhaxn and ridden by 
Kevin Gray. This pair later 
teamed up to win the Kwai 
Bridge Stakes with Suntal 
Golden Token. 

Mrs Joan Ratcliff, who plays a 
vital role in the organization of 
the racing, had a well deserved 
victory with Dane, a half- 
brother to Carabineer, in the 
Guinness Stakes. 

The French did not have 
afruitless journey, as they won 
the Dunhill Champion Stakes 
with QjameL The other French 
runner In the contest, Djou- 
Said, ridden by the British 
champion amateur rider Tim 
Thomson Jones, was a well- 
beaten lasL 

The other overseas runners 
from Norway and The Nether- 
lands, failed to be serious chal- 
lengers. The best of them was 
Dakar, from Norway, who fin- 
ished fourth 10 Carabineer in the 
Dubai Stakes. This suggests that 
despite the short period that 
Arab racing has been taking 
place in England, the British 
have some of the best racing 
Arabs in the world. 

Whakflyric looks the likely 
winner of the Group 1H Prix 
d'Arenberg at Longchamp to- 
day. although he will encounter 
very different conditions to 
when he ran away with the Prix 
du Calvados at Deauville on 
August 30. Thai race was run 
over seven furlongs on heavy 
ground, while today's race is 
over five furfongs on probable 
good to firm going. 


SALISBURY 


Going: firm 

Draw: high numbers best 

1.45 EBF QUIDHAMPTON MAIDEN FILLIES 

STAKES (Div 1: 2-Y-O: £3,088: 7Q (20 runners) 

G Harwood 8-11 — ACtaftIB 
RCuontll 

CAMILLA’S GHL M Usher S-11 M Wtetera 5 


7 0000 OCEAN TRA0B)(B1< 

8 1000 GLEN KOLA MANX ( 


0 AMAMM JANE (USA) ( _ . 

ANSWBtS PLEASE M Satyly 8-11 . 

Char &11 ■ 

6 CUBBY HOLE BHBs 8-11. 


■ 0 DEEP RAPTURES 0 Lain 8-11- 
060 HARTS LA NE P WcfieO 8-11M 

MisnDAAH^mmiin^H 


B Procter « 


JoteiCma7 

H Ttwnaon Jams 8-1 1 — A Many 6 


0 IVORY HaJW$KA)M Stoute 8-11 AKkatatay& 

MEN Can! 


KNOWN UNENCudy 8-11. 


6 LAGTAJ Dunlop 8-11 
KXETM 


Jarvis 8-11. 


4 

5 
8 

10 
13 
21 
22 
24 
26 
28 

34 

35 

36 
38 
40 
43 
47 

49 

56 
58 

94 Quota file. 3-1 Amanda Jane, 4-1 Musical Review, 
B-1 Ivory fields. 8-1 TEuateft. 1(M Lagta. 12-1 Mklaar. 


MAIN ROCKET ) 

0 MEADOWBANCM W0fcknS0n8-11. 

MBJXMHU.DBSwortti8-11 

423 MUSICAL REVCWJUSW I Batokiu 8-11 
00 NATURALLY Aunawc Brittain 8-11- 

0 OMAAERE N Vigors 8-11. 

3 QUEUE HLLEPCoie 8-11 


00 REGAL RHYTHM WWkMmen 8-11. 

0 TAHGRHJAR Hannon 5-11 

0 TAUSTAFFP Wakvyn 8-11 


TWtaaoslO 
- BRousatt 
_ T Lucas 19 
. GDnfftaU2 
AMcOoml 
.JHaUUmS 
G Baxters 

— PRoktaaonA 
_ PWakfroa17 

- Jfte nn 13 
. RCoda»14 

Paul Eddwy 20 


) G Lewis 3-9-0.... P Waldron 3 
)J Fax 5-6-12 AMcGtem5 

11 -000 STOCK MLL LASS (C) L Coflrel 4-8-1 1 RHft? 

12 2000 N0R1HBRN TRUST (B)(D)C Nelson 34-9_ A dark 2 

15 0020 aMLARTOQEffi) A Hide 4-8-8 G Baxter 4 

18 4020 SNAP DECISION (B) m) R Hannan 3-7-12 R Fax 1 

17 3900 DUBUNAMEM Ape 3-7-8 TWHtaknsS 

94 Simla Ridge, 7-2 Snap Daoaion. 11-2 Axe Vatay. 
8-1 Glen Kata Manx, WoocffoM. 10-1 Northern Trust Oh Boyar. 
3.45 EBF QUIDHAMPTON MAIDEN FILLIES 
STAKES (Div II: 2-Y-O: £3,065: 71) (30) 

1 02 AO«iAHUAlGHPWaJwyn8-11 Eddwy 11 

2 AGLOWNGG Harwood B-1 1 ACtark16 

7 0000 BLEU CELESTE R HuttJXnson 8-11. PHutekroon (3) 8 
9 0 C0LDWA1ER CANTON 0 Lang 8-tl — R Cochrane S 

11 DANCE A JW Mfiwcott 8-11 G DufHeto 19 

12 4 DAIIM ROMP MSmvfy 8-11 TWi*ans13 

14 DREAM OCklAR M MCConnack 8-11 „. fl We*nham7 

15 EMPLOY FORCE (USA) JDuntap 8-1 1— R Fox 18 

17 FATAL CHARM ABAIM WDKkkiEOn 8-11. A Mway4 

25 0 KALAD«umg6HaraqqdB-1l TFaheyS 

32 LUR2X Glffi-K BfBSSey 8-11 SWfWtwortt 14 

88 004 NAJABACBenneadCMl B Rouse 17 

42 


51 

52 

53 

54 
80 
61 


7-2 


Salisbury selections 

By Mandarin 

1.45 Quelle Fille. 2. 15 Mubarak Of Kuwait. 

2.45 Percy’s Lass. 3.15 Axe Valley. 3.45 Street 
Party. 4.15 Hooked Bid. 4.45 Up To Unde. 5.15 
Lowara. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

1.45 Ivory Fields. 2.45 Percy’s Lass. 3.15 
Woodfold. 3.45 Street Party. 4.15 Maiyaasah. 

4.45 Polynor. 


0 NORTH PAOHC (USA) P Cate 8-11 P Watonw 9 

0 OH MY JOY M LAeShrar 8-11 MWighan15 

2 SANAABHJ. (MM Steuls 8-11 A KMberiay « 

SARETTA (GER) C BrWam 8-11 G Baxter 20 

0 SCATTERED SHOWERS D Ssworth 8-11 AMcQkm2 

3 STREET PARTY G Wragg 8-11 P RofainsMi 12 

TtQUEGREAN J Dte8op8-11 NON-RUN NH1 3 

HUVUPWalwynB-11 POookl 

Agtowiog. 4-1 Sanaafaefl. 8-1 Achnahualgh. Street 
Party, 8-1 Trivia, fO-1 Dmm Romp, Employ Force, Faiaf Charm. 

4.15 FLEET MAIDEN STAKES (Div I: 3-Y-O: 
£1,387: 1m) (15) 

1 0000 AlMUTANABBlCBenswadS-O BRowwS 

2 43 AUCHNATEG Harwood 80 A Oak 13 

3 0000 QALSAAN BAY PM Mkhal 9-0 PBradwel9 

10 0 MR PASTRY G Wragg 90 PRoMoson4 

13 0090 OUT YONDER (H) WWgtrtman 9-0 JW9tans10 

16 2300 RHJRfVStBay MR Hodges 90 A Dicks (7)2 

2B 0000 CHERRY GLORY WWtotnmanB-ll AMcGtone15 

i J Dunlap 8 


32 #303 HOOKED BED (CAN) 

35 3003 t8(EHEBS (HI W Hero 8-11 

36 0000 LOST M FRANCE MHH 


18-11. 


39 

42 


8 HRs 8-11 . 
MAIYAASAH L Cumara 8-1 1 . 


G Baxter 8 
.J Matthias 12 

R HRs 7 

.RCodranel 


2.15 DANEBURY ‘ SELLING 
1m4f)(1?) 


STAKES (£1,149: « 


30 NEEDLE SHARP (RF) R Johnson Houghton 8-11 

R Fax 14 

000 VELVET PEARL P Makin B-1 1 RWentan3 


A Staten (5)4 
NDw 10 
Has 5 


I Mrs B Mating 44-2 JWm12 
CEDBuchrt 54-11 TWMstenll 


__ a7-94 _ R 

74004 S YMBOLIC (D) R Stubbs 
9 0000 DEERFBDffiACH 

13 402 1 CONNAUGHT PRINCE D 

16 400 HGH FOREST (mMHkKMOB 44-11 B Procter 1 

18 00 MOLYBDENUM (H) J BratSey 64-11 9 

20 401 MIST OVER POOLE D Gondofo 544_. R Wanton 3 

23 004 OAKDALE E Wheeler 344 RFox2 

21 ami CLEVELAND BOND B Stems 3-B4 G Carter (3) 8 

26 0000 LAST POLONAISE (B) M Btansturd 344. N Adams 13 

27 840 SOLENT DAWN WGII Turner 344 6 

1-2 Mubarak Of Kuwait. 4-1 Mr Music Man. 6-1 Symbolic. 

10-1 Dick Knight 12-1 Lost Polonaise. 1&-1 others. 

2.45 HURSTBOURNE NURSERY 
(2-Y-O: £2,505: 61) (14) 

1 241 GEL15EH (D) J Ttee fl-7 S Rayrnonl 4 

2 0100 LUCJANAGA JD) P Walwyit 8-7 PadEtfateylS 

4 1 PERCY'S LASS (D)G Wragg 9-' “ 

7 010 STATE BALLET 

10 003 

12 «B HAD MAX P Hi . 

14 0130 LAZW(B)C Senstcad 8-5, 


HANDICAP 


Pauli 

9-* PRoMmon 12 

1BaWng94. JMatttas7 

■ID S Wbttwonh 5 

TVMnaaa 

«. B Rome 6 

15 0440 TH£STOm(US<UG Harwood 84 — ___ACtak3 
18 040 LADY LUCMM DQM Smyfy 7-13 R Fox 11 


19 OTOO MTTFUL MAD R StubbsT-13 GDvfltadlO 

20 0001 WMrSZOOMN 1 WHO (DIG Lewis 7-10 __ P KB (7)1 

21 3030 KEEN HXSE P MttGhSl 7-10. 


, G Carter (3) 9 

23 0410 GLORY BEE (DIJHoA 7-8 NAdneiS 

I COUNTRY n Hodges 7-7 — 2 

8-1 State 


24 0303 SETTER! 

4-1 GeJtser, 5-1 Mad Max. 11-2 Percy's 

Bates. 13-2 Teteao. 8-1 Who's Zoouta VWw. ID-1 

3.15 HUNTSMAN ALES HANDICAP (£3,128: 51) 
( 10 ) 

4 0100 AXE VALLEY (» mj P Cota 4-9-7 QDteWdt 

5 3000 OH BOYAR (bfj SutdDta 3-9-6L. P Cook 9 

10 


50 040 VBMJS SAGA Mrs JRaavay 8-11 

Rowmata Madden (7) 11 

51 0000 WBSH PAGEANTRY M Janris 8-11 — B 

94 Likeness. 4-1 Auchinate. 8-1 Maiyaasah. NeetSe Sharp. 

8-1 Mr Itactry. Red River Boy. 10-1 Hooked Bid. 14-1 others. 
4.45 WOODFORD APPRENTICE HANDICAP 
(£1,269: 1m 20 (13) 

1 4004 THE FOOTMAN (OO) R Stubbs 44-10 —1 

2 2233 UP TO UNCLE R Hannan 3-9-3 LJoaesZ 

5 004 MAM STARS Dow 44-13 P Stains (3)6 

8 1030 PULSMGH (CO) C Bensteed 44-10 J Adams (3) 3 

9 3040 DANCMG BARRON (B) (D) M Btanshard 5-8-B 

10 0004 WUlOWanGEG Lewis 344™ R J GrowtanTOtt 

It 3001 ARTISTIC CHAMPION M Pipe 344 J Can (3) 5 

12 2002 PEARL PET P Malta 444 □ J WJBafana (3)11 

16 1100 BOM DART (USA) T HaUaB 744 P McEntee (3) 9 

18 404 POLYNOR (Rl) M Ryan 544 PBtenmt(3)7 

20 000 RODISTYLE P Cole 87-13 G Thompson (7) 4 

22 0000 HOKUSANBStavans 4-7-11 SWMtSm(7)13 

26 0000 TARTS PfWJE I VYanfc 4-7-7 G Bartteea (3) 10 

3-1 Up To Undo. 7-2 Artistic C/iBtnptofi, 8-2 Peart PaL 
11-2 Piisrogri, 7-1 Dancing Barren. 10-1 Isom Dart. 

5.15 FLEET MAIDEN STAKES (Div H: 3-Y-O: 
21^75: 1m) (14) 

6 ELBURY PARK G HanvOOd 94 AOoifcl 

7 HELLO SAM M McCormack 94 R Wemham S 

8 0020 (JGHTNMG WIND M Usher 9-0 RC»ant13 

9 000- LOST ISLAND D Ssworth 94 A McGtorw 2 

14 0040 PORO BOV C N MManu 94.. 


5 3000 ON BOYAR (D)J SutcMe 3-94 

6 3000 ROOORXJ9 (u) J Winter 54-1 . 


Course specialists 

DONCASTER 

TRAMERS: W Hem. 24 winners from 78 

runners. 30.8%; H Geek 23 from 80. 

288%: L Cumani. 17 from 02, 274%. 
JOCKEYS: G Starkey, 23 winners from 

129ndos. 1 7^%; W Carson. 40 from 232. 

17.2%: S CButhon. 34 from 220, 15 lS%. • 

SALISBURY 

TT1AINERS: L Cumani, 9 wlnnera ftoffl 24 
runners. 37^%: G Harwood. 43 trorn 157. 
27.4%; J Tree, 14 from 71. ISJTfc. 
JOCKEYS: A Murray, 7 winners torn 62 
rides, 135%; J Matthias. 14 from 171. 
82%; R Cochrane, 8 Irom B9, 21%. 

FONTWHJ. 

TRAINERS: R Annytage. 7 winners from 
27 ramers, 253%; J afford. 29 from 159. 

122%: J Jenkins. 18 Irom 102 1&7%. 

JOCKEYS: SSnsthECdes. 8 mnnerskon) 
42 ndes. 19.0V. £ Murphy. 7 firm 42, 
127%; R Rowe. 26 from 171. 122%- 


Blinkered first time 

DONCASnsi: 20 Afeton Pteee, Someone 
Sse. 3.10 Cadmium. 

SALISBURY: 2-75 MoMldemim. Last 
Potonafn. 245 9te» SsiM. Later Luge. 
215 Sup Decision. 4.15 Red fwer Boy. 
5.15 RoyaJ Troubadour. Starmast 


FONTWELL PARK 


Going: firm 

Z0 BOW WLL NOVICE HURDLE (£1,158: 2m 2f) 
(8 runners) 

3 FI1 DREAM IffiKHAHr R J (TSNIran 4-11-2_ MKbraro 

6 MH- NBMESSY HOUSE Gfbtay 9-18-12 — MnN Ladgor 

7 230/ MR «T ffilK Bsiay 8-1 (M2 A Joan 

8 430 NAMOOSJS) A Moore 5-10-12 KssCUoan(7) 

10 /OO- TEXAS TlMCEYMaDOughtnn 6-10-12_^. P Double 

13 BEL OSCAR (USA) C Mttnan 4-10-10 VMcKevBt 

14 0F4 BOSWORTH BAY O Maris 4-10-10 OBront 

15 EHSIEY MAHER Hosd 4-125- M Hoad (7) 

10-11 Dream Merchant. 7*2 Namoos, 5-1 Henrwssy House, 

8-1 Mr Jet, 12-1 Bel Oscar, 14-1 ottare. 


P WtedronB 

19 400 ROYAL ^ TROUMDOR (B}(UBA) B HHe 94 „ RHMs 12 

20 3000 STARMAST PR WHamSh TSpnkemB 

» mis BEUEMBtmtanl Ml ----- 

2B -430 EASTERN COMMAND (USA) JDuniOO 8-11 B Rouse 4 

29 04 EVSTYOTCHALADY WWlnhUnan 8-11 J W8Ben»7 

33 4000 LADY WlNDi«i.Krvwy 8-11 A Sboofts (51 Id 

37 0 LOWARA R Houghton 0rt1 etal 

41 400 NATUA P Maton 8-1 1 RCactewSS 

43 PAHUOUN Mrs JReavey 8-11 Ntteyll 

2-1 Lowara. n-4 Bbury Park, 9-2 Starmast 13-2 Eastern 
Command. 8-1 Royal Troubadou 1 , 10-1 Heta Sam, 14-r ottars. 

>.1 

3M FONS SELLING HURDLE (C808: 2m 2f) (10) 


] s esiar 

5 140 FIRE CMEFTAM (C-O) M 


C Warren (7) 


■wu HiyumBinteWtaiW 1-8 I 9 


Fontwell selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Dream Merchant. 230 Great Topic. 

3.0 Captain Dawn. 3.30 Fire Chieftain. 4.0 
Hopeful Kybo. 4.30 Ogden York 


1 Mp U BSTTY WALKG flracay 7-11-fl. 

* St ^TBiGomeiA 

12 404 ^ 

II 5-11-1 "Wtam 

Wtecras 

MEMOflIAL NOVICE CHASE 
(£1,454: 2m 2f 110yd) (10) 

2 ™ J tWtod d(w_ 

2 ts 


2.30 HSH BOURNE NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: 
£685: 2m 2f) (7) 


31 MR WHATS-HIS-NAME G Enright It- 


MPenvtt 

, CBrawu 

8 CUCKOO IN THE NEST DBnrtrti 10-10 R Amort 


12 S2CA CWAW D BswortT ' 


8 

7 

10 


GREAT TOPIC G FWanTOardon 10-10 

SSMOiEcdes 

F KUWAIT STAR (8F1 T Forster 10-10 KDeries 

2 RBOVHOPJ Jones 18-10 CMmai 

TROJAN SPLASH? Haynus 18-12 A Webb 

542 Scfca Chiavi. 7-2 Kuwait Star. 4-1 Ribovino. 8>1 Mr 
Wtat’s-Hij-Namo.8-1 Groat Topic, 10-1 Cuckoo In The Neat 

3J HARRY DUFFEY CHALLENGE TROPHY 

(£2,435: 2m 2f 110yd) (9) 

1 -301 W SR TIMES W Kemp 9-12-7 NON-RUNNER 

2 4-11 CAPTAIN DAWN (C-O) J Gltfcnl 10-114 Bad R Rowe 

3 124 TAKEAFBNCE (C4) M Hamquea 8-1 84-1-7 JSuttem 

4 -432 OONAGKMOYNE (C-D) Mss LBnwr 9-185 

MrTGrantteBn (4) 

9 FU-U (XLUC WAY K) G Waraham 10>104 Peter Hoten 

10 -223 EMUN BOLIVAR JFRtoNeyes 7-104 

12 F43 S TRAIGHT LBIE H VlflieNtr la-lW^Ti^liKwtfl 

13 P/P4 WESTERNS HOME D GriassB R GMdatein 

14 -2U0 JOHNNY TARQUM r Ledger 13-r 04_ Mr* N Ledger 


4 ^ WTWH«EDTfiBWW*8-11-8^.j:_ uH 

| 80J; ROOtCTSWG TumarB-114 CWamJTm 

B 4PM SAlLDKJBYroJJarlaMB-llTfiT: CWa 7SL0 

l PM SfflMR&«GGB3 (Bl PBirtw £lTfi“ VoESS 

I »- THE ROYAL COMRE MttRmjl DiT 1 5 S?— g 

■■ ss as&sT-iS 

rar hurdu •*«— 

I S SS^ J ,g(s?s;™ T — 

“^BOOATumefl9-104 r7 T»Wttgn J 00 M 

r? £3? S^A Mrs N SmiOt fr- 10 -i nttoi IftS S 

It 080- GIFTED GMT raj Long 5-104 (3 

J* SffiPJKPO^JDJDawee 5-104 fflexl***** 1 ******* 

ii is vssuta 

8.1 fttaSw 






f 

* 5 


'i"K i? 


• i 








THK TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER iu i>oo 


S>JT 0*\. * 


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*1.-. 
’ * 

e-.-j-. 

K..V 


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Defying death is all in the day’s work 


The Danger Sports: Dav 
Two. John Francome was 
the great star of the high-risk 
excitement of National 
Hunt raci ng: Then. 
suddenly, he quit His thrill 
had turned to terror. Why? 
He talks to Simon Barnes 

P erhaps it is the Jump jockeys 
who are the bravest -people m 
sport* They do not, tike some, 
race the real possibility of death 
from their chosen game. That 
possibility is remote, indeed: the last 
National Hunt death was a rfWadr mn 
when Doug Barrett was killed. 

What they do face is the total oertainty 
that they win get badly hurt. Last season 
the Professional Riders* insurance 
Scheme received an average of 23 h» im« 
a week. Sooner or later, and again and 
again, absolutely no one escapes. 

They carry on in the face of these 
appalling risks simply by not thinking 
about them. But broken bones and 
concussion are part of the day's work and 
it happens to everyone. Absolutely 
everyone. 

John Francome was luckier than most. 
Also, despite being champion an d un- 
disputed master of the sport, he gave up. 
Horses' names are always important, as 
everyone who has ever had a bet will 
reluctantly admit Francome's last horse 
was called The Reject. “It was one of 
only two occasions I have ever been 
terrified on a horse,” he said. The other 
was an insane hotter that carried him fiat 
out over fences without any vestige of 
control. 

But it was The Reject that ended 
Francome's career. In a bizarre and 
freakish accident his 1% got entangled 
with the stirrup leather as he fell: die 
horse was set to continue his race with 
Francome pendant beneath. 

H e wrote in his book Bom 
Lucky. “Geoff Capes 
wouldn't have been able to 
prise my fingers off the reins 
at that point I knew that if 
the horse galloped Off it would kin me— 
The thought of what would have 
happened if he jumped a fence didn't 
bear thinking about” 

After an eternity or two people came to 
his aid and got him disentangled. “I 
walked far enough away from The Reject 
so he wouldn't walk on me and fell to my 
knees in the grass. I didn't know whether 
to laugh or cry and settled for swearing 
out loud that I’d had enough of riding." 

This was at the 1985 Cheltenham 
Festival -The next race was the Cham- 
pion Hurdle: Francome surrendered his 
ride: the horse won by 10 lengths. “1 
didn't feel the slightest pang of envy or 
jealousy. I was just thanidul to be in one 
piece.” 

He didn't give up then, not quite, but 
he did not forget it, and a short while 
later he had another fell: again on The 
Reject This time he picked himself up 
and decided enough was enough.. ... 




f ... ■•’‘‘i. -J/.s i ’ . . • V; O • 


Total rejection: Francome, leg entangled, body dangling, parts company with The Reject — and racing 


He has not ridden a race since, nor wfll 
ba Now, at 35, he is exploring other 
dangers instead, training Flat racehorses 
and jumpers from his newly established 
yard at Lamboum.'Tve never been 
superstitious but I fell then that h would 
be tempting fate to go on,”he said. 

He went into raring in the beginning 
with the usual sportsman's blind faith 
that it would all be all right and had a 
winner with his first ride. With his 
second he broke his wrisL 
“But it'sa fact of life that you can't re- .. 


call pain. At the time it’s hurting you say 
you'll never ride again but as yon heal 
you forget You don't even think about 
iL Even when 1 gave up it wasn't that I'd 
lost my nerve. I couldn't have done it at 
all if I'd been frightened. 

“But I know jockeys who are fright- 
ened. You see it every day. They've lost 
their nerve but they are still there 
because there's nothing else they can do. 
They don't give their horses a ride, they 
just go round. Win if they have to. 
Horses are funny things and they know. 


“But it works the other way, too: when 
everything is in your favour and you are 
full of confidence it transfers to the 
horse. Always follow the jockey in 
form.” 

Simply following Francome was al- 
ways a good way of keeping ahead of the 
game. He collected a number of fells, 
broken bones and the rest, but somehow 
never received his feir share. A dis- 
located shoulder was the most painfuL 
By the standards of jump jockeys this is 
nothing. He has been immensely lucky 


and knows it A friend of his. Bob 
Woolley, is paralysed from the neck 
down after a raring felL 
“If you finish a race in one piece then 
the money is good,” Francome said. 
“£50 fora race, for Four minutes' work, is 
good money; £50 for a broken leg is not. 
And the trouble is that there are too 
many jockeys, and many will go to a 
meeting for just one ride. They are taking 
all the risks but doing it for about £15 
profit on the day. And they've got to do 
it, they've got to get their names up on 


Francome: master of the sport of kings 

the numbers-boards. accept rides on bad 
horses. 

“I'd let a son of mine do it. Certainly. 
But not a daughter. I didn't let my wife, 
Miriam, ride in point-to-points. The 
reason is that for some reason women do 
not curl up in a ball and roll when they 
fell. So they get hurt." 

It is the Grand National that frightens 
outsiders the most with its monstrous 
fences and enormous fields. It is not 
quite as terrifying for the jockeys as 
spectators imagine: “You get geed up for 
it but it's OK. after the first half circuit, 
after everything has settled down. The 
start is suicide: some of them set off 
faster than they would in a two-mile 
chase. 

“But when the blood is up you'll do 
anything, any stupid thing. Some owners 
are wonderful: as you go out. they say, 
'Good luck, look after yourself, look after 
the horse’. A few. mostly enormous 
punters, are different. 

“But, you see, jumping is a sport, 
unlike the Flat. The atmosphere is quite 
different at Newbury on Flat racing days. 
The parade ring is like a dentist's waiting 
room. On a jumping day everyone wifi 
be laughing and joking.” 

P erhaps you can risk your own 
neck with a laugh and a quip 
but when it comes to other 
people's money you must as- 
sume an edgy silence as a 
matter of respect. “Race riding would be 
a perfect job if you never fell but it is the 
risks that add to the excitement.” 
Francome says. 

“And a jockey really docs control his 
level of risk: watch Peter Scudamore. He 
is always in controL Other jockeys 
wrestle their horses to the ground, can’t 
see a stride, can't anticipate the horse in 
front can't find the room to see a fence... 
the lesser jockeys run the greater risks 
and that is compounded because they get 
given the worst horses. 

“But risk is a part of the game you ac- 
cept You don't think about it You 
might ride six races every day of a six- 
day week and you can't spend all the 
time thinking about the risks. But every 
time you leave the ground you're taking 
a risk. You know that but you don't 
think about it You really don’L” 
Tomorrow: the fears and fortunes 
of grand prix racing and the lonely 
exhilaration of rock climbing 


* 

i 


LACROSSE 

England in 
coaching 
turmoil 

By Peter TatJow 

The Ail- England Women's 
Lacrosse Association is in pre- 
season turmoil following the 
dismissal by the committee of 
officers of the three coaches who 
assisted (he team at the world 
cup in Philadelphia. 

Celia Bracken ridge, Katb 
Howarth and Gillian Randall 
were not invited to the England 
squad training at Crystal Palace 
last weekend, despite their wish 
to retire from the job in favour 
of acting in an advisory 
capacity. 

The standard and attitudes of 
England's play in Philadelphia 
drew considerable _ comment 
and criticism, particularly of 
slick work, although the results 
showed a defeat by only one goal 
• against Scotland and Canada, 
and only a three goal defiat 
against the United States. 

Possibly a cooling-off period 
was needed, but instead they 
rushed into their future pro- 
gramme at Crystal Palace m the 
shadow of the controversial 
decision to nominate new 
coaches just for diat session. 
Permanent coaches will be de- 
cided upon later, as mdeed wiU 
be the Scottish and Welsh staff 
in due course. Scotland won the 
first women's World Cup medal 
when they took bronze in 
Philadelphia. 

In their 75th year, theAU- 
En gland Women SjUo-osse 
Association have ® 

scheme for broademogthehaw 

of the game - pop lacrosse- 
sounds like musical gam<=M>ui 
is in fact a flexible 
to the sport Ji can be played fry 

any number of players 0 f\* fl 5S 
sex indoors or out with the 
minimum of rules. 

The introduction is bclpedby 
a generous £34,000 sponsorship 
over three years by Nalio^ 
Westminster Bank. Janet 
O’Neill, development officer, 
said: “Wc are most grateful w 
NatWesi and we aim to 
lacrosse going JJ 
community and sports Knu^ 
particularly m non-lacrosse 

playing areas. 

“It is a stepping stone to the 
field game, and the 
Luton football g to™* 
the Luton Town v Manchester 
City match on Sepiember -7. 

English men’s bcngejjjj 
also returned fo tiw dra* 8 
board following flnhuH ® “J 
mens World Cup 
They suffered severe defeats^ 
the hands of AietraUa. Canada 
and the United State* although 
there were illness problems. 

Now -a need is seen for more 
international competition, two 

American university teams haw 
been invited in January, aw* 

seven American coaching assisr- 
tams have been appointed tor 
the season. ■ 


RUGBY UNION 

Gauntlet is thrown 
down to Cavaliers 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

The Rugby Football Union 
have formally expressed their 
concern over the unofficial New 
Zealand Cavaliers tour to South 
.Africa earlier this year. In a 
statement yesterday, which fol- 
lows last Friday's meeting of the 
lull RFU Committee, the Union 
refers to “alleged breaches of the 
regulations relating to 
amateurism. 

“The RFU looks forward to 
receiving an explanation from 
New Zealand at the meeting of 
the International Rugby Foot- 
ball Board in October.” 

It is not difficult to imagine a 
warm discussion developing at 


that meeting between repre- 
sentatives oi the northern and 
southern hemispheres, with die 
French standing mildly on the 
sidelines keeping their counseL 
At the moment common ground 
between the protagonists seems 
limited. 

Certainty the representatives 
of Australia and South Africa 
will put their heads together on 
the subject of the invitation to 
Australia, extended last May. to 
make a 13-match tour of the 
republic next July and August. 
The Australian Rugby Union 
are due to discuss that invitation 
at their October meeting and the 
success of the Wallabies in New 
Zealand will strengthen South 
African determination to host 
them. 

For those players who took 
part in Australia's _ 1984 
grandslam tour of Britain and 
have now assisted in a 2-1 senes 
win against the Ail Blacks, the 
Springboks remain the only 
hurdle. That they could also 
tour as winners of the inaugural 
World Cup - for which they 
must surely start favourites - 
will not have escaped South 
African notice. 

Alan Jones, whose place in 
rugby's coaching annals » as- 
sured, has already expressed his 
willingness io lake an official 
tour party to South Afhca. If the 
ARU choose to follow the line of 
the Australian Government and 
turn down the tour invitation, 
the Cavaliers have shown ti»t 
piavers these days pray be 
prepared to make their own 
decisions without reference to 
governing bodies. 

Representatives front all 
constituent 

the RFU gathered at Twick- 


enham on the eve of the new 
season for a refereeing seminar. 
Previously such seminars havr 
not been arranged until deep 
into the season when refereeing 
attitudes have already taken 
shape. 

The aim was to discuss 
changes in law and interpreta- 
tion and involved referees on 
the A list and above. Talks were 
riven by Fred Howard, who 
handled France’s games ag ain st 
Australia and New Zealand 
during the summer, and Laurie 
Prideaux — both internatina! 
panel re f erees — who attended 
the French, Irish and Scottish 
refereeing conventions this year. 

“The main thrust of the 
seminar,” Jim Crowe, president 
of the London Society, said, 
“was that players should play 
the game on their feet. They 
should carry on what they were 
doing last season, only better ” 

The maul law has been re- 
vised to feD in line with, broadly 
speaking, last season's Welsh 
interpretation in which a maul 
may continue if a player goes to 
ground and the ball b immedi- 
ately available. 

With the emphasis this season 
firmly on disciplinary matters — 
and the spotlight inevitably 
felling on referees — the hard- 
pressed officials may be in- 
terested to know that the RFU 
are preparing two videos aimed 
at improving standards. Red 
Howard was “wired” for sound 
at last season’s John Player 
Special Cup final and his com- 
ments and explanations of de- 
cisions made during that game, 
between Bath and wasps, will 
form part of zhe videos. 

Another great 
day perhaps 

Nigel Pomphrey. the Bristol 
captain, will make his 300th 
appearance for tire club against 
Cardiff this evening and if the 
match maintains the standard of 
the equivalent game at tbe 
Memorial Ground two years 
ago. it will be an occasion worth 
celebrating (David Hands 
writes). • .... 

Cardiff are without Phillips, 
their captain, and thre e of th eir 
other international forwards are 
rested. Donovan will lead the 
side from centre. 


rugby league 


Fulham ready to start again 


JSS5A5RSS.B; 

rin at Whitehaven. “We are 

SSaJs&S 

vjd Howes, a spokesman, sam- 


Fulham withdrew from the 
League shortly before tbe start 
of the new season becaase of 
debts reportedly totalling 
£70,000. Bus tbe League hare 
given two London b usinessm en 
approval to re-launch the dab 
and they are now awaiting 
confirmation that the 
mw venture is to go ahead- 


ATHLETICS 


Another world record can 
earn Whitbread $35,000 

From Fat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent, Some 


If Fatima Whitbread has con- 
served .any of her forces after 
haviog the two longest javelin 
throws ever, at the European 
Championships, then she could 
be within reach of winning 
■$35,000 in the Mobil Grand 
Prix final here tonight. 

Throwing a world record is 9 
long shot in any circumstances, 
but, under the complicated tie- 
break system introduced this 
year — since so many athletes 
are potential overall winners, iu 
both the men’s and women’s 
grand prix — another world 
record for Miss Whitbread 
would secure her the overall 
prize of $25,000, plus the event 
prize of $10,000. 

On the other hand. Miss 
WhilbreacPs great rival from 
East Germany, Petra Felke, who 
won the silver medal in Stutt- 
gart, could do the same thing, 
and reduce Miss Whitbread’s 
earnings to $8,000 before finish- 
ing second in their event 

Permutations such as these, 
though grossly simplified, help 


make this grand prix fecial a 
hybrid event that rails “ 

)f beit 


far short 
of being the sum of its parts, 
which are the IS meetings 
throughout the season leading 
up to it. 

Although the grand prix has 
more credibility in this, hs 
second year, many of the top 
athletes we have seen on the 
circuit. Idee Steve Gram; Sebas- 
tian Coe and Ed Moses have 
simply decided not to compete 
here for a. variety of reasons, all 
of which detracts from tbe 
seriousness of the enterprise. 

But the credibility of the 
event is consistently being 
undermined by the governing 


body, the International Ama- 
teur Athletic Federation itself, 
or rather its president, Primo 
Nebiolo. It was Nebiolo who 
insisted that the final be here 
again this year after it was 
originally awarded to Brussels. 
And the hand of Nebiolo was 
certainly involved in the de- 
cision to include Marita Koch io 
tonight's 400ra final, when there 
are half a dozen women who 
have qualified ahead of her. 

The rules have been framed 

Coe to run 800m 
at Crystal Palace 

Rome — Sebastian Coe, who is 
here on tbe athletes commissioa, 
has decided that he wants to 
have one last big race at 800 
metres before retiring from that 
distance, having now wow the 
European tide (Pat Batcher 
writes). 

Coe has asked that the 1,000 
metres at Ctystal Palace on 
Friday night be changed to an 
800 metres, and Andy Norman, 

the promoter, has agreed. Coe 

said: “1 thought it woaid be nice 
to have my swansong ia 
Britain.” 

by the IAAF. and here they are 
blatantly breaking them. What 
is worse, the women’s 400m is a 
dose run contest for tbe $10,000 
prize, with Lillie Leatherwood 
and Diane Dixon tied on 41 
points, with Valerie Briscoe- 
Hooks four points behind. Miss 
Koch is not going to get any 
points but it is unfair to tbe 
other women, since she is likely 
to affect the result. 

Tbe excuse given by Nebiolo 


at yesterday's press confere n ce 
is that Miss Koch, who is here 
for a concurrent IAAF athletes' 
commission, is going to retire, 
and they wanted to honour a 
great champion. Miss Koch is 
arguably the best woman athlete 
in history but she has been 
retiring for the past two years 
and this indulgence does noth- 
ing for the administration but 
increase tbe athletes' distrust of 
it. 

Similarly a pacemaker is be- 
ing supplied for Said Aouita in 
the 5,000 metres with a view to 
him breaking the world record, 
which would ensure him tbe 
overall prize. But Danny Hams 
in the 400 metres hurdles and 
Jim Howard in the high jump, 
both on the same points as 
Aouita at tbe moment, cannot 
avail of such assistance, leaving 
another dereliction of duty to 
the majority. 

Other British athletes in- 
volved in the Olympic stadium 
include Linford Christie and 
Ernie Obeng in tbe 100 metres, 
Sally Gunnell in (he high hur- 
dles, Geoff Parsons in tbe 
jump, Peter Elliott in tbe 
metres, Yvonne Murray and 
Khsty Wade in the 1.500 me- 
tres. and Colin Reitz in the 
steeplechase. 


TODAY'S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 

Britannic Assoranca 

Cointy Championship 

OLD ITtAFFORD: Lancashire v Somerset 

TRENT BRIDGE; Nottngfuirnhlra v 

Essax 

HOVE: Sussex v Hampshire 
WORCESTER: Worcestershire v 
Glamorgan 

SCARBOROUGH: Yorkshire v 

N o rth a mptonshire 

VI . If iiMlInfHln 
-J8LI1UU « 

THE OVAL; Surrey v Sussex 

FOOTBALL 

7.30 unfess stated 

European Championship 
Group Six 

Finland v Wales (Helsinki, 5.0) 

Group Seven 

Belgium v RapubSc of Ireland 
(Haysel Stadium. Brussels, 7.0) 
•Scotland v Bulgaria (Hampden 
Park, 8.00) 

Inter na tional 

Sweden v England (Stockholm, 6.0) 

GU VAUXHALL CONFERENCE: Scar- 

borough v Northmen: Waning v EnIMd; 
Wayrrouth v Cheltenham. 

VAUXHALL -OPEt. LEAGUE; Premier Di- 

vision: Wormng v Wngsionton (at 
Bognor). Rot dMtten: Leytonstone and 

Word v Epsom and Ewefl (ai Leyton). 

Second DtvMorc South: FaHhem v nUstp 

Manor: Horsham v Chertsev; Molasey * 

Cnattom St Penr, PMersfield v Metropot- 

tanPolce. 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Bang 

Manna; Burton v Buaon: 

South Liverpool. 

SOUTHERN PREMIER: Premier dMatoK 

King's Lynn v Dudley; Shepshad v 

Faraham. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: Frst dMlion: Btack- 

bum V Noam. Foratt (70); Everton v 

Oldham r?.0); Hufl v Sheffield Wed (7.0- 
Newcastte v Sundertand (7 STf. StteBm, 
Uid vUvorsooL 

CEMTHAL LEAGUE: Second ifivUoic 

BamsJey v Tor* {7-0; Bedon v Port Vale 

■VOn Hudderatetd v Preston; Notts 

County v Gnmsby, Somthorpe v Don- 

caster. Postponed: Stoke v MtoNer- 
hampton (7.0). 


FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Arsenal v 

OxftjnUM(7.0^BngMonv6rMOl Rovers 

(2.0): Chariton v Mwiral &30); Chelsea v 


Reeding v Luton (ZflJ; West Ham v 
Totte n ham £30). 

ESSEX LEAGUE: Woodford v 
SawtmdgeMorlh. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
STONES BfTnEK Second dhdaiOR; Roch- 

dale v Whitehaven; Workington v Carfisle 
t6J0) 

RUGBY UNION 

CUm MATCHES: Bedford v wasps 
(7.15): Bristol v Cardiff (7.0): Liverpool St 
Helene v Widnes 16.15): Mosetoy v Rugby: 
One* v Sate (7.1% Stroud v Gloucesrer. 
Swansea v Cross Kays (7.00): Waterloo v 
HulftER. 

JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL CUP: Ptey-oH: 
Grasshoppers » Metro po li t a n Peace. 

ATHLETICS 

Southern Cowrites AAA open Meeting 
(Crystal Patece NSC) 

BOXING 

British Light H e a vy weight ChamplonsfHp: 
Derm® Andnes (holder) v Tony SAun 
(AtexamTa Pataca). 

BOWLS 

Saga Singles & Pairs Championships - 
Final Rounds (Torquay). 

GOLF 

Home Internationals (Royal St DavnTs. 
HarireM 

Women's Area Championships: Gtr Man- 

chester (Haag Hall): Midlands (Sherwood 
Forest): South East (Ashridge); South 
West (Henbury. Bristol). 

SAILING 
Weymouth Otympc Week. 

In the can 

Neil Foster, the Essex and 
England fast bowler, has won 

the Webster's Yorkshire Bitter 

award for August. His nine 
wickets for 107 nuts against 
Middlesex was adjudged the 
best, performance and Foster 
receives the “Silver Can' Trophy 
and a cheque for £500. 


Tough going 

Ross Thome, of Australia, the 
top seed, made a nervous start 
in the Singapore squash open 
yesterday. He lost the first game 
9-3 to Cenyg Jones, before the 
Briton, nailing 5-3 in the second 
game, was forced io retire with a 
pulled muscle. 


Coach accuses track cheats 


I tali a n long distance nnmfog, 
dominant at the recent Enropean 
Championships in Stuttgart, has 
been smeared with allegations 
by their former coach of ‘Hood 
doping' and drag caking. As the 
athletics season comes to ft 
(Umax tonight with the Grand 
Prix final in Rone, the Italian 
Federation and Attorney 
General's Office ate refusing to 

investigate tbe scandaL 

The allegations have been 
made by Professor Romano 
Tordelii, responsible for all of 
Italian middle distance mantas 
for the last 15 years. Despire 
documents, tapes and 
invoieessabstantiating the state- 
ments, Primo Nebiolo, president 
of both die Italian Federation 
and the I n t e rn a tional Amateur 
Athletic Federation, has avoided 
any inquiry. Nebiolo says: “The 
problem exists all over the world 
and we are clearing it np. 
However, onr athletes are very 
honest and in this rasped we 
deny everything.” 


By John Good body 

Professor TordeUi accuses 
some of tbe most femous names 
in athletics, mdndina Alberto 
ptc 10.000 


Cora, Olympic 

champion and second last week 
in Stnttgart only to Ms compa- 
triot Stefano Met. According to 
TordeUi. Cora, Gabriefia Dario, 
the Olympic 1,500 metres cham- 
pion, and Mariano ScartezaiM, 
the 1981 Enropa Cap steeple- 
chase winner, are among those 
to have been ‘bind doped', the 
forbidden practice of withdraw^ 
tug a litre of Mood from an 
athlete's body ia training, 
refrigerating it and then inject- 
ing tbe Wood back into the 
athlete's body immediately be- 
fore a major competition. 

Since the competitor has 
made np the litre of blood in the 
intervening period, be now has 
an extra litre ht the body and can 
cope more easily with fatigue. 
The theory m simple. Muscles 
heed oxygen which is canned by 
rad Mood cells- The more red 
cells there are, the more oxygen. 


and tbe longer mnsdes can go on 
working after they have reached 
the normal point of exhanstion. 
Thera bare been rmnonra of the 
practice for years. 

In 1984, ofUdafs of the 
American cycling team admitted 
they had 'Mood doped* seven of 
their team, indufmg four medal 
winners. Professor Tordelli 
say s: “The practice of Mood 
transfusions and anabofic ste- 
roids by the Athletics Federa- 
tion has now reached such a 
serious level as to create the 
assumption that real, ponisb- 
aWe crimes are bring committed 
against the community and the 
athletes subjected to treatment” 
Professor TordeUTs dossier, 
which also includes details of 
which athletes have been given 
Steroids, the mnsde-boMing 
drag, has bees examined by an 
Italian member of Parliament 
Dr Adrians Ced Bemhwj who 
has bees seek i ng a government 
inquiry. Bat so fir this has been 
without success. 





SOUTHAMPTON 

INTERNATIONAL 



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38 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 


FOOTBALL: HOME NATIONS RETURN TO ACTION AS EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP BEGINS 


YACHTING 


Hopes of Hampden and 
Roxburgh pinned on 
artistry of Strachan 


The foot soldiers in 
Scotland's tartan army are 
more cynical nowadays but 
they remain cheerfully 
optimistic and they will Ml in 
at Hampden tonight with 
hopes high that a new and 
more successful international 
era is about to start 

Although the national team 
failed to earn distinction in 
the World Cup and their 
record in the European 
championship makes dire 
reading, with only 1 1 won out 
of 30 qualifying matches, the 
supporters are betting on the 
charismatic Andy Roxburgh, 
the newly appointed manager, 
making the best of starts by 
beating Bulgaria in the open- 
ing tie. 

Roxburgh, who has a world- 
wide reputation as a coach, is 
happy with his players. “But.” 
said the former headmaster 
whose academic demeanour 
hides an iron determination, 
“I do not make predictions 
and never will. I am, however, 
hopeful that the players and 1 
have found the right formula, 
and hoping too that we will 
have that little bit of luck 
every side needs." 

Despite several cal l-offs, the 
loss of Hansen being a severe 
blow, as it was thought the 
elegant Liverpool captain 
would play a key role in the 
new tactical plan, Roxburgh 
says he has a well-balanced 


By Hugh Taylor 

team in terms of age and 
experience. 

His plan of campaign re- 
mains a secret but, as a leading 
advocate of entertaining and 
attacking football, he has 
asked his team for a style 
which is more creative and he 
would dearly love to see a 
performance graced with 
French flair. That is why, 
although Miller has been 


Emphasising that Strachan 
would be the lynch-pin of 
what he hopes will be a more 
fluent pattern, Roxburgh said 
the player is happy to accept 
new responsibility. The abid- 
ing problem though is that of 
strikers who turn into paper 
tigers when they appear in the 
blue of their country. But 
Dalglish has bad Liverpool 

. supporters cheering splendid 

made captain in the absence of goals in recent matches, and if 
Souness, be is hoping that he is on the mark tonight 


Strachan will be Scotland's 
most influential player. 

The face of the man who has 
coached and trained at every 


perhaps that will shame youn- 
ger colleagues into emulating 
the master. 

Dalglish, the Liverpool 

player manager, will be given 

TEAM: J Ltftfflon (AMrdwrft R his 101B cap I for Scotland in 
Gough (Tottenham Hotspur). D the Opening tie Of the EurO- 
Narey (Dundee United), w NHer pean Championship with Bul- 
(captfr (Aberdeen) M M«paa (Dun- g ar j a gj Hampden toni gh t. But 


dee UnitBd); G Strachan 
ter United), P McStsy 
Aitken (Cette), D Cooper . _ .. 

C Nicholas (Arsenal), M Johnston 
(Cette). Subs: A Goran (Oldham 
Athletic), R Stewart (West Ham 
United). M Msdeod (CettcL K 
Dalglish (Liverpool), A UcCotst 
(Range ra). 

level, including the World 


he will not play from the start 
when the attacking battleship 
will consist of Nicholas and 
Johnston. “Dalglish will come 
on as he does for Liverpool as 
a substitute," said the man- 
ager when he announced his 
learn last night. 

Bulgaria, like Scotland, did 
Cup, lights up when he talks of not impress in Mexico and 
the little mid-field artist. “For they come to Hampden with 


creativity, there are few play- 
ers in Britain to match him. 
Why, you could fire shells at 
him and be would bring them 
under control. At the age of 
29, he has reached his peak 
and how he thrives on the big 
occasion.” 


fresh faces in their squad. 
They will prove difficult, ca- 
gey opponents; but playing at 
home in front of their fervent 
followers, the Soots should 
win and allow the new man- 
ager to lead them into a more 
consistent and exciting future. 



Strachan: Roxburgh’s lynch-pm of a more fluent pattern 


Heysel ready for 
‘high-risk’ Irish 


France go in for 
bridge building 


Brussels (Renter) — Police 
will be at the Heysel stadium hi 
force today when Bekhm phy 
the Republic of Ireland in a 
European championship gro up 
seven qualifying tie. It will be 
the first big international match 

at the groond since the riot 
before last year’s European Cop 
final between Liverpool and 
Joventns, which claimed 39 
lives. 

Authorities said 400 police 
would be on patrol inside the 
stadimn, some on horseback and 
some with dogs, with extra 
police outside the groand. The 
police said there were ocher 
precantions they would not 
disclose. 

Officials said they did not 
expect , violence bom the Irish 
followers on the scale of that of 
UverpooTs supporter s in May 
1985 which led to an indefinite 
ban on afi English chibs from 
European dub competitions. 

The police said they had 
increased their security plans 
after international football 
authorities decided that the 
fixture with Ireland had “high 
risk" potential. Pierre Van 
Doorslaer, a police spokesman, 
said that Irish supporters were 
“an unknown entity" and police 
were taking precantions 
accordingly. 


Albert Roossess, the Belgian 
football rniion secretary, was 
q noted as saying it was only last 
week that the government gave 
clearance for the match to be 
played at the Heysel stadium. 

Football sotHces said the Bel- 
gian authorities were likely to 
fake a different view of a match 
against Scotland in April as the 
Scots are British and considered 
a serious risk. 

Belgium, despite being with- 
out Michel Renqazn and Eric 
Gerets, key defenders who are 
injured, hope to revive the spirit 
Of their S UC Cei Sfi ll finpatgn m 
the World Cap fimh in Medea, 
in which they reached the semi- 
finals before being beaten by 
Argentina, the eventual winners. 

“We have to keep oar World 
Cap momentum going," Gay 
Thyss, the Belgian coach, said. 
“We’re not the shy Belgian 
team, the underdogs, we once 
were. In Mexico we started a 
new chapter." 

Stephan Denial, a defender, 
who has recovered from a throat 
ailmmf, and Jean-Marie Pfaff, 
the goalkeeper, two of the heroes 
in Mexico, are expected to 
provide a formidable defensive 
barrier against the Irish, who 
play their first competitive 
match tinder Jack Charlton, 
their new manager. 


Paris (Reuter) — France, with 
a new-iook, embark on the 
defence of their European foot- 
ball championship title in Ice- 
land today without the heroes 
who served them fix- a decade. 

Michel Platini absent this 
time, will play again for France 
but he seems to believe his time 
is pot, while Alain Giresse and 
Maxi me Bossis have retired 
from the international scene 
since the World Cup in Mexico. 
The dashing Dominique 
Rocheteau is also out of the 
picture. 

But Henri Michel team man- 
ager, managed to diswndc Jean 
Tigana from joining the exodus. 
The tenacious little man's skills, 
harnessed in midfield to the 
drive of Luis Fernandez, will 
build a bridge between the old 
era and the new, with the bdp of 
other seasoned players, such as 
Panick Battiston, defender, and 
Joel Bats, the goalkeeper. 

Platini, who visited his team- 
mates before they flew to Ice- 
land, will be available for next 
month's group three encounter 
here against the Soviet Union. 

But the triple European Foot- 
baller of the Year made dear in 
a weekend radio programme 
that the country he led to two 
World Cup semi-finals and the 
1984 European championship 
title could not expea too much 
more from him. 

“1 have no ambition in the 
French team because I've had 


my time m it Now. if the 
national team chief asks me to 
come and lend a hand, m come. 
But I certainly won't go to the 
World Cup or the European 
championship either. If be 
needs a hand, it is all I can give." 

But Michel who played the 
last time France met Iceland in a 
30 European championship 
van in Nantes in 1975, knows he 
has begun a new journey. “We 
can't live on our good mem- 
ories. We are tackling a new 
competition with new amw and 
a slightly-modified squad which 
has already shown enth usiasm, 
motivation and energy. Our 
sights are turned towards Euro 
88. This first match against 
Iceland is of very great 
importance.” he said. 

France will be strengthened 
by the return of Tigana, Fernan- 
dez, fellow midfielder Bernard 
Genghini, a fellow midfield 
player and William Ayacfae, a 
defender.who all missed last 
month's embarrassing 2-0 beat- 
ing by Switzerland. 

Michel was forced to make 
one change m bis 16-strong 
squad when Jean-Marc Ferreri, 
bis versatile attacker, pulled out 
with an injured knee. He drafted 
Philippe Anzianl giving him 
four out-and-out strikers. 

FRANCE: J Bats W Ayacta. B So*, P 
Battiston (captain), M Amorem, L, Ferran- 
daz. J Tigana. B GanghH, P VWcnjyssa, 
Y Stopyra. S Pails. Q&u&UIbs. B MwtW. 
J-F Domergue, F PouUn, P Armani; G 
Buschar% 


Meteoric 
' leap by 
Thomas to 
the top 

From Clive White, Helsinki 

Martin Thomas, the New- 
castle United goalkeeper, who 
was not even in the Wales squad 
for the game here against Fin- 
land today when it was an- 
nounced last week, has been 
awarded bis first cap. Called up 
as replacement for the injured 
Norman, of Hull City, Thomas 
has now leap-frogged over Dib- 
ble. who was originally selected 
and who bad kept goal in 
Wales'S last two internationals 
in the absence of Southall and 
Niedzwiedti, the first and sec- 
ond choice. 

Explaining his change of 1 
mind, Mike England, the wales 
manager, said; “Thomas has 
come on in the last few weeks, 
and 1 had to name the squad 
three weeks ago fora Welsh FA 
meeting. Dibble has not estab- 
lished himself in the first team, 
while Thomas has looked sharp 
for Newcastle." However, En- 
gland added: “I think Dibble's 
got more potential than 
Thomas.” 

It is a pleasant reversal of 
fortunes for the 26-year-old 
Thomas. Six years ago, he was 
called into the squad as deputy 
to Davies, but just when poised 
to succeed the Swansea veteran, 
he suffered a chronic dislocation 
of a finger which required a 
series of three operations and 
kept him out of the game for a 
year. 

In the meantime, Southall 
emerged as Davies's successor, 
while Thomas's career me- 
andered by the River Severn at 
Bristol Rovers. Thomas, who 
made his league debut at 17, was 
loaned out to Cardiff, Totten- 
ham, and Southend before New- 
castle bought him three years 
ago. Rovers will be as pleasantly 
surprised as Thomas by his 
international award which earns 
the Third Division dub a 
£10,000 bonus as part of the deal 
agreed with Newcastle. 

For someone who was fifth 
choice until recently for his 
country, Thomas is not having a 
bad season even if his dub are. 
He has stood between Newcastle 
and heavy defeats at Tottenham 
and Luton in recent weeks. 
Health withstanding, Wales are 
remarkably well off for goal- 
keepers for such a small nation. 
Presumably, it is the inherent 
good handling ability of this 
rugby-playing nation. 

„ w , A dean shea today would be 

Romania will be relying on of great help as Wales attempt to 
the speed and aggression of then- clamber to the top of a European 
star forward, Gheorghe Hagl champi onshi p group which in- 
aged 21, and the long-distance eludes Denmark and Czech o- 


Fighting Gibson 
leads the field 

- r “ sgJ'sfSsSS 

wards the first hcad ^]!?’ m 0 c 
Snanish one-ton nor. AmtlaO*. 
3 Tft » * 8 * clear ol the 


Martin Gibson s 
Battleship revelled in 
yesterday's light sea breeze ax 
the start of five 380-mile long 

offshore race from Pono Gervo 

across the Mediterranean to closely followed by P ,nW - 

Hyeres and back, and withm 10. j**. 'withinan hour and one 
miks, was leading the Sardinia * er had been eclipsed 
Cup fleet, both on a lapsed and Battleship's devasiai- 

corrected time. . _ 

The 45-ft Dubois dmigo bad 

its I Khl weather performance 
transformed over the winter 
when modifications were made 
to the yacht, reducing her 
displacement by 2,0001b, and 
with Andrew Hurst at her wheel 

the British yacht moved in- 

extricably ahead to leave a half- 
mile gap over Willi fllbnick’s 
West German entry. Pints, at 
the entrance of the Bonifacio 

straight between Corsica and 

Sardinia. 


This race, which carries a 


by Pocket Battleship: 

Full Pell, skippered 
hy Jo Richards in the abscn ‘J ” 
the owner, who has returncdjo 
London, also made a good sua 
and last night was lyins 
corrected time. Britain s overall 
SStioTin this team event was 
brought down behind bpain and 
West Germany by Marionette s 
unexpectedly slow start, which 
placed the team leader Cnns 
Dunning, and his crew.. tack 
3lst place. However, with light 
winds forecast for the next three 
ibis race remains wide 


double points bonus, finally got aays. inis raw « . 

under Sy 33 mirm.ee tale. |>P™ “ d S" £ MS 
Setting spinnakers as the gun last 20 nulttL 
fired, those who chose the weekend's short offshore race. 


Nauck takes the lead 

From a Special Correspondent 


Romania 
rely on 
Steaua 

Bucharest (Reuter) — Roma- 
nia, buoyed by Steaua 
Bucharest's European Cup vic- 
tory last May. will draw on this 
success in tonight's European 
championship qualifying match 
against Austria. Eight Steaua 
players are in the squad for the 
opening game in group one, 
which a fen includes Spain and 
Albania. 


Helmar Nauck. from East 
Germany, took the overall lead 
at the half-way stage of the 
Soling world championships af- 
ter two races were sailed yes- 
terday in the Bay of Quiberon, 
Britanny. 

The 78-strong flea was re- 
warded with two excellent races 
in steady wind conditions. In 
the first race Nauck led at the 
first windward marie and 
steadily increased his lead as his 
East German team mate, the 
European champion, Jochen 
Schumann, worked bis way 
forward into second place by the 
finish. 

At one siage of the second 


race it appeared that Nauck 
might repeat his victory as he 
tussled with the West German. 
Thomas Jungblut. and Tom 
Jungell. from Finland, but a 
wind shift on the last bear 
dumped him to ninth, a position 
that improved by one place as 
Jungblut learned of his dis- 
qualification for a premature 
start. 

race 2: 1. H Nauck (EG): 2. J Schumann 

(EG* 3. L Pareson (Swe) 4. J Henrnann 
(rat 5. P Thomson (Can): 6 . M Patsson 
(Swe). British ptaongs: 16.G Barty:47. W 
Handarson; S3, T Fon. 

RACE 1 1, T JungeH (Fin): 2. J tejW; 
(USt 3, P Spangs (Swat 4. P 
Den); 5. B Abbott (Cant 6 L Duboo 
(Sw*zt British Oiactas: 40. G Baflay: 54. 
W Henderson: & TRxt 


FOR THE RECORD 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


SNOOKER 


UNTIED STATES: Ntefonal League (NFL); 

Cowboys 31. New Yoik &ana». 

BASEBALL 


NORTH. 


I — g— ! Kan- 


ShOlS of the veteran, Ladislau 
Bolonl one of the Steaua stars. 
Austria will also have to watch 
the rightwinger,Marius 
aged 22, whose centres have 
been a big weapon in Steaua's 
armoury. 

Bui Helmuth Ducadam, the 
goalkeeper who saved four pen- 
alties in the shootout which 
decided the European Cup in 
Steaua’s favour against Barce- 
lona, will be absent after an 
operation on his right arm 
which had developed blood 
dots. 

Tmmn (tank ROMANIA: S Luna D 
Momu. S town. N BetodedcT A 
Buntoescu, I Bartxteseu, N Movia. N 
Unonanu. G torjM — cu. M Rednic, | 
Andana. L Bctoni, YStofca, M Kioto. D 
Mtteut G Hag), M Laottus, V Ptturca. R 
Gamctanj. 

AUSTRIA: K Lktoonbwpar. F Hfcttfart H 
Weber, L Latoar, G Mesatendar. K 
Brainector, E Turraor. J Oagaorgi, G 
VWHUrth. M Ltozmafer. R Ktenatt J 
Warner. E Baunmstar, W Sdiadner, T 
Potttor, p~ ^ 


Slovakia. England says he would 
be happy with a draw against a 
side which defeated East Ger- 
many last month, and which has 
such a good record here in the 
Olympic Stadium. Finland have 
played twice in the last month, 
whereas Wales have not played 
together since May when they 
toured Canada without nine of 
their regulars. 

Wales, who are still without 
Hughes. Van den Hanwe. and 
Phillips, not to mention three 
goalkeepers, field an original 
back four of James. Charles, 
Raidiffe. and Jadcen. 

TEAM: M Theresa (Newcastle United); R 
James (Quean* Park Rangers). J Charles 
K Ratdtto (Emrton), 
C BtackmoreJMan- 
. P Nicnotos (Luton Town). 
•D WHame (Nonwtcti City), M Aizehvood 
tChertton Atototig . D Sounder* (Brighten). 

Up front Rush and Saunters wff be 
playing the* first U game together 



CRICKET 


Guide to England’s men for tour of Australia 


M W Gaffing (Middlesex) 
Age: 29 
Tests: 48 

Gattfng matte his Test debut in 
1978, but tfld not become an 
England regular until the tour 
to IncSa two years ago when he 
was made vice-captain. He 
had been dropped many times, 

' i David 


but repaid captain I 

‘ ' ymatongnianr 
Test century and foBowing this 


with two more in the winning 
Ashes series last summer. Re 
played only one Test hi the Wert 
Inches after another setback 
when his nose was broken. 
Re silience h as alway s been 
his strmroth and he demonstrated 
this quawy by becoming 
England's captain when Gower 
was sacked a fter one Teat this 
season. He to stn without a victory 
ss leader of Ns country, 
though Middlesex have won a 
trophy in each of his four years 
in charge. A fierce striker of the 
baH, he stai has surprisingly 
vulnerable areas in defence. 

J E Embursy (Middlesex) 

Age: 34 
Tests: 37 

in 1977 Em bu ray waked 
straight into the Middlesex off- 
spmner slot that had been 
occopted by Titmus for 28 seasons 
and settled in so effectively mat 
Ihe county continued winning 
trophies. He made his England 
debut in 1978 but missed three 
years’ Teste by being 
suspended after the unofficial Tour 
to South Africa. An unorthodox 
teie-on 3 er batsman and safe slip 
field, he e prepared to work tor 
his wickets, but is a particularly 
restrictive bowler in one-day 
games. 

D I Gower (Leicestershire) 

Age: 29 
Tests: 86 

Gower it Engtsmfs best and 
classiest batsman. Kb 13th Test 
century in the final Test of the 
summer against New Zealand at 
the Oval was a triumph tar Ms 
raaiNaiee in a year In which he 
had lost the England captaincy 
after 26 Teats hi charge fodowmg 
the dtoasftous tour of West 
Indies last winter. Lest week he 
was also relieved of the 
Leices te r shire captaincy, and so 
now moves into a position in 
which he b an elder statesman of 
the side. During the summer 
he also became onfy the sixth 
Endbh betsman to reach 
6j0u0 Teat runs. If batting alone 
can keep Ms interest, Gower, 
aH grace and timing, couki yet 
become the heavi es t-scoring 
Engttshman of afl time. Boycott, on 
8,1 14, is the ewmnt leader. 

Gower made Ms Tost debut In 
1978 , Ntttag his first baH for 
four off Pakistan's Ltaquat Afi. 

I T Botham (Somerset) 

Age: 30 
Tests; 85 

Botham is by for the most gifted 
and controv er sial cricketer in 


England. Clashes wtth the 
authorities are mingled with unique 
(eats of batting, bowing or 
fielding. He was suspended for nine 
weeks In May for his drug- 
taking confessions, and on his 
England return he became the 
top Test wicket- taker of aB time 
within two overs of being given 
the baB. He emphassadthat he rs 
the most techntcafly correct and 
powerful batsman in the country 
wtth a spectacular half century. 
These performances were mere 
reminders of what he has 
achieved since he made an instant 
impact on his Test debut in 
1977 wtth the first of 26 five-wreket. 
or better, hauls. The highlights 
of his extraorefinary career were 
centuries at Headaigtoy and Old 
Trafford, and five wickets at 
saston fat 1981 that won the 


t. Off the field his troubles 
continue, for he fo threatening 
to leave Somerset in protest at the 
dismissal of Richards and 
Gamer. 

P H Edmonds (Middlesex) 
Age: 35 
Tests: 41 

Edmonds has pfoyed for fewe r 
Teste than expect e d when he 
burst into the England side 
whh five wickets against Austreta 
in 1975. Derek Underwood, 
lapses of form at crucial moments 
and setf-confesaed problems 
at getting on with the people who 
matter mean that this is onfy 
h« fifth trip with England. At hte 
best he Is an accurate, 
penetr a tive left-arm spinner, a 
capable number etaht type 
batsman and excellent dose 
fielder. Zambian-bom, he <a 
the most experienced player in the 
party, having been on the 
scene for 16 seasons. 

A J Lamb (Northamptonshire) 
Tests: 46 

South African-born Lamb had 
to wait until 1 962 to qualify fo - 

Engla nd- TKn^ierarcf-hitiing, 

mfekfle order, playing many 
vaJuaWa innings both in Testa 
and In onatiay internationals where 
his record is especnRy good. 

His finest series to Test cricket was 


against the West taffies in 1984. 
when he tamed their fast bowling 
attack to score three fine 
hundreds. But earlier this summer, 
after 45 consecutive Tests, 

Lamb was dropped following a run 
of low scores. His rehabilitation 
in county cricket was startling. 
Runs flawed and by popular 
demand he was ranstand for the 
season 's final Test against New 
Zealand. 

N A Foster (Essex) 

Age: 24 
Tests: 14 

Foster should by now be an 
es t ablish ed member of the 
Engtand sktis. After making hto 
debut whan Just 21 in 1 983, Foster 
has oftan shown that Ms 
deceptively fast rigid arm sesm 
and swing bowfing can trouble 
the woritrs bast batsman, in tnctia, 
cm David Gower's triumphant 
1984-85 tour, Foster seem ed to 
have made Mabta 
breakthrough wttn a match- 
winning 11 tar 163 at Madras. 

But since then be has bean in and 
out of the side. This summer 
continued the t h em e -In county 
cricket Foster h as he l p ed to 
bowl Esses to the cham pio n stri p 
title wtth 89 first-class wakns. 
yet in bts two Tests he could ctaim 
only five. A steel plate in Ms 
back enabled Fdater to overcome 
ba d infra y proble ms tarty In 

GRD^y (Kent) 

Age: 27 
Tests: 22 

DMey was halted as a great fast 

bowUngtSscovery when picked to 
ftxr Australia to 1979-80 at the 
age of 20. He pfsvBd 18 Tests 
between titan and 1983-84 
when he suffered a bad neck injury 
in Pakistan. He missed the 
whole of the 1984 summer, and 
firthar injury hanmered a 
comeback in 1985. But this season 

he found fitness and form and 
was rewarded with a recall for the 
first Test against Irxfia. During 

the summer he re-established 

himseif as England's number 

one fast bowur. and off a shorter 
run looked more controlled. 

B N French (Nottinghamshire) 
Age: 27 
Tests: 5 


French 
fi rat -choics 


Downton m Ame and playing in 
five Taste. It was a natural 
succession as French 
imdaratudfod Downton in the 
West Indies fast winter. A sound, 
unobtrusive tehoidan behind 
the stumps, French needs to 
improve hte batting if ha is to 
fanida long Teat care er . Ha first 
ptoyed county cricket at the 
age of 16 in 1976. 

G C Smati (Warwickshire) 

Age:24 

Tests: 2 

Small made a fine impres si on 
when cafledtx) for Ms Test debut 
against New Zealand at 
fifottJngham this summer, taking 
four Mckets in the match and 
bow&ig with pace and accuracy. 
Bom in Barbados but raised in 
Birmingham, Small has been a vital 
member of Warwickshire 1 * 
attack for several years. He was 
near Test recognition in 1982 
before suffering bad run-up and no- 
baH problems which he has now 

overcome. 

B C Broad (Nottinghamshire) 
Age: 28 
Tests: 5 

Left-handad opening batemai 
Broad played five Teste in 1984. 
and was unluckily left out of 
the India tour party after Mtting 86 
against Sri Lanka at Lenfs In 
Ms test Test inning*. Scored 55 on 
debut against West ladtes In 
that summer's second Taat TaB 
ana nanHioiM own jnuii 
arta through mto-wi cko t, ho joined 
Notts from Gloucestershire in 
198 4.ge has scored 281 Test runs 

w N Sack (Middlesex) 

Age: 31 
Tests: 3 

Stock was hurried from 
England 1 s B tour of Sri Lanka to 
re pecs Mike Gaiting in the 
Wsst Indies test winter. After, 
scores of 2 and 0 in the second 
Test on Ms debut, he made a half- 
century in me fifth Test Though 
bom in St Vincent in the Wrist 
Indies, Stack has none of the 
flamboyant s hots of most 
Caribbean players. He is a 


ENGLAND PARTY’S AVERAGES 


MWGaUng 
DIOow 
A J Lamti 
BN French 
JEEmtwey 
PHEdmonds 
GRDrttey 
I T Botham 
CWfJ- 
CJI 

GCSnnll 
B C Broad 

N A Foster 

J JVWutafcer 
PAJdaFroftss 
W N Slack 


TEST MATCH BATTING 

Tests km N.a US. 
48 83 12 


88 

46 

5 

37 

41 

22 

83 

e 

2 

5 

15 


148 

79 

7 

56 

53 

33 

138 

15 

2 

9 

21 


11 

6 

2 

12 

10 

9 

4 

0 

1 

0 

3 


207 

215 

137* 

21 

75 

64 

58 

148* 

55 

12 

86 

18- 


A«K 

2725 

6149 

2500 

55 

686 

765 

365 

4636 

233 

14 

281 

127 


Avge 

3838 

4488 

3424 

11.00 

1558 

17.79 

1520 

35.12 

15l53 

14.00 

31-22 

7.05 


52 8 f 1350 


MW Gattfng 
0 ! Goner 

A J Unto 
B N French 
JEEmtxrey 
PH Edmonds 
GRDfcy 
I T Bertram 
CWJAtfxw 
CJ Bboards 
GC 5ms* 

BC Broad 
JJ Whitaker 
N A Foster 
P A Jfls Frartas 
WN Stock 


TEST BOWLING 
Hfrm fkns 
2 177 


1 

1 

97 

106 

89 

357 


20 

23 

2970 

2073 

9674 


Arge 

8850 

2000 

2300 

3081 

33.18 

3004 

27.09 


1-14 

1-1 

1-6 

833 

7-66 

4-24 

884 


4 134 3300 388 


38 1480 370* 


6-W 


patient, totHanded accumulator, 
who was one of five Test 
opening partners for Graham 
Gooch this season. 

PAJde Freitas 
(Leicestershire) 

Age: 20 
Tests: 0 

De Freitas is the brightest 
young aB-mndar In English 
Cricket and many judges rate 
him the natural successor to 
Botham fa the England side. 

He is onto 20 and Ms summer was 
his Bret M asaenn in county 
cricket. A whippy tast-meduB, he 
is among Hie top wfc fa rttelter s 
to the cham p i on s hi p this su mm e r, 
with 91. He also contributed 
several h a rd ba ting tower-order 
fantans. He was born fa 
Donmica, bat brought up to North 
London. 

C W J Attiey (Glouce s tershi re ). 
Age: 28 
Tests: 8 

Athey owed his five Tests this 
summer makfiy to a brilliant 
unbeaten 142 which won 
England a one-day international 
against New Zealand at Old 
Trafford in mid-season. He 

pro mis ed much in several fluent 
Innings but hie Test average, after 
16 innings, is slffl only IS. 

Athe/s career was revi ta li se d by 
his move to Gloucestershire in 
1684 from his native Yorkshire. He 
made hfo Tea deiwt in the 1980 
Centenary Test at Lord’s against 
Australia, and then had two 
unhappy Tests against Wrist Indies 
when flown fossa replacement 
the foSowing winter. 

JJ^Wttteker (Leicestershire) 
Tests: 0 

Whitaker is one of England's 
present c rop of promang young 
stiufccu takers, and some 
judges would say tha most 
complete. Plays weR off front 
and MCfc foot Not riven a bad 
double fracture of Ihe hand, 
caused when tricing Mafcofai 
Hantaan, interrupted 
Whtt a ka fa flow of runs titfa 
summer. The injury ruled Mm 
out for a month when ha seemed 
certain to become file first 
1 En g lis h ma n to reach 1000 ren*. 

But Whitaker then came back ' 
witii a century and spent tin rest 
of the s umm er re l ntardng bis 
defats to a toor spa. Bom to 
Yorkshire. 

C J R ichar ds (Surrey) 

Age: 28 
Tests: 0 

Richards has already made one 
tour with England, understudying 
Bob Taylor si Indto fo 1981 . 

Since making his Swrey debut 10 
years ago he has always been 
m the top Quartet of English wicket- 
keepers. His useful batting and 
athletic work be fond the stumps 
gained hfoi more England 
recognition when ha ptoyed in the 
one-day internationals against 
New Zealand.' 


Border 
takes 
charge 

Srinagar, India, (Reuter) 
Allan Border played a captain's 
innings of 90 not out to lead 
Australia to a thrilling threo- 
wicket victory against India in 
the second one-day inter- 
national here yesterday. The 
Australian win also levelled the 
six-match series at 1-1. 

Chastngan Indian total of 222 
for eight, Border took Australia 
to 226 for seven with six tells to 
spare in a match reduced by 
three ovets to 47 overs per side. 

More than 1,500 members of 
the security forces guarded the 
stadium here, the capital of 
Jammu and Kashmir. India's 
most northern state bordering 
Pakistan, against a feared out- 
break of separatist protests 
among the predominantly Mus- 
lim population. Barbed wire 
fences kept back a crowd of! 
about 25,000 spectators cfaiBed 
by low temperatures. 

Border, who won the man-of- 
the-match award, kept the 
crowd entertained with a series 
of superbly timed strokes and a 
six off spinner Ravi Sbastri. 


City Rons 5. Mtnmsoa iwns 0 (lit 
non Red Sox 9. BaKtoni* Orioles a 

tonal Uuk CNcaoo Cubs 7. PMtodte- 

a mues 7; Prtffijurnn Pirstes 3, St Louis 

kiafc 2: Monvoal^ios 9. New Vorit 

Mats 1 ; Houston Astros a. GtonM Rads 1 : 

San ftwdseo Gants 4. San onoo Padres 3: 

Los Angelos Dodgers 7, Adana Brews 0. 

FOOTBALL 7 

FOOTBALL COMBMATtOft IpaWdi Res X 

Portsmoudi Res 1 . 

CAPITAL LEAGUE: OHM 2. WfrrUedon 3 
CENTRAL LEAGUE: DMaien 

Otv Res 5. Leeds IM Res 1. 

SCOTTISH RESERVE LEA0UE: PmaWr dhri- 
_ _ -i Dwvfoa UtdRen 0, Dmdee Res 1 . 
GMVAUXHALL CONFERENCE: Degonhem 3. 
Soeton Utd 2 . 

MULhP ART LEAGUE Mosstoy 1. Rhyl 1 . 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Plant* dMekHC 

Cnetnstord 2 . BedNortti 0; Corby 2. 

Ahrerturdi 0. 

VAUXHALL OPEL LEAGUE; PrenlerdMsioe: 

■Uirich Hmtot 2 Bremtey a Second 

tAri riue north: Veuxftai Meters 0 , Woherwn 

1 . 

MAC 8 AR SOUTH WEST COUNTIES 
UEAOUe Hanaro 4. ShremtMV «. 
SOUTHERN JUMOR FUXSUTCUP: net 

: Brighton 2 , CMaee 2; Oolc h aster 3. 

O Ma tf mua. 


GOLF 

YOBK: BrtWi Ainoeys CU> TaM Cfcanpi- 
owlfo c Rea red flnri; 1 . WhtfbyJW: 2 . 
Putort. 291: a Berwick on Tweed. 291. 

LPGA LEADING EARNNGS: (US 

stetedL 1. P Bradley. M3.14B 
£3&LWXfc 2, J Inkster, S271M92: 3. 
tone. S26T.C81: 4. A AkatL $224531: 5. 3 
Gaddea.si88.744; B. C Johnson, $194^02:7. 
M B Zimmerman. $133.811: 1 A Otaunoto 

Sheehan. SIS4J31; 10. 

EUROPEAN HONEYW1NNERS: 1. S 

BSttoStMOS fip). £198585: 2. H Ctok (GB). 

3SSS 3. GJ BnmdfGBL £33470; 4. J-M 
Ota r atai ffire. C9i,is7: 5. R Deris (AusL 
289054; O Ungr (WQL £8X6*5; j/i 
Wooanam (G 8 L otSk* 8 .M McNuS* tSAL 
278.160:9, 1 Bak»4%ichtAus).£7MJ«; 10 . A 
Foisbrend (Swe). 274^61 

F=ord Oafr Dp ie a 


HONG KONG MASTBtS: Swri-flnta ; W 

Thome M S Daws 5* Drnns Taylor M T 

GntWfw 5-4. Ftaak Thome bt Taytor M. 
DStBY: BCE totametfanal: Second round: M 

Gaurreau (Canada) W G jerecr»s(A«). 5-1: S 

Netrixay (WN) bt J Dunning (Eng). 5-4. M 

Bennett <Wai) i> ““ ' “ 


FoliMn (> 

(Scot) Ml 


M P Browne (ReO at fra). 5-1: R 

U B Harm (Eng), 5-0: J Rea 

(Ausf.5-1. 


TENNIS 


ATP RAW0NGS: 1. 1 Lendl (CzL 2. B Becker 
(WO). 3, M WlandertSwe). 4. S Edberg |SweL 
5.YMoah(Frt8.JConnorstUS):7.jNjretnvn 
gw^ 8.MMeOr(Cx);9.H Leconte IFty 10. A 

mw-w kw ts: 1 . M 
S 1.309, 884 (about 
(US). S833.TS& 3. H 

^ t 4. P Shower (US). 

S. S Grto (WGL S399JHB: 6. H 

$348^0. 7. C KotKtoKIsch 



MandBkowa (CzJ, 


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Twnbui 

*171 


.48S; 8. G Sabatni (Are). *i9Sj0l I: 
MltAuS). ST88J18: ID. K Jordan 
TJM: 11. Z Gamson |U^.. 


K Rmtodi 0)S). *142,615^1% A Tameswart 
(Hung). SI 26549: 15. E Burgjn (USL 
5125351; 16. R ftortenk (SAL 597.672: 17. E 

SmyW lAusL *89877; 1 & C Undqwist <SweL 

589,488: 19, B Gadusek (USL 588^28: 20. B 


Pons (USL *l 

STUTTCAHT: 


585381. 


i grand pttc Brat 

btGMa 


.2-5,7- 


H Siiktonm Owe) U G Mayer (USL62.4^ 

6-3; J Bates (GB) bt R Oatettwi (WGL S 
6 . 6 - 1 . 

FUI1SAWA, Jure 

MtFMl 




..62.44.1 
IGBL 64. 7-5; T Scheuer- 


Twrier (FOWL Tanner (B sl67. 7^. 6£ K 

Ma)ee«a (Bui) M E Inoua (Japan). 62. 61; T 

Rwtp* OJS) bt N Itttter (dSL 62. 63: B 
Bunge (W3)M C MontororBrez). 7-6. 63; P L 

MGwney fliSltt ACrotlffi8L6T. 46. 63; H 
Kaiesi (Can) M VNetooibwher (US). 64. 6 
Z G Kim (US) M C Kulsson (SweL 63 63. 

SHOOTING 


bt M Y; 

(US) M A 


SDHu r aa t Gaiwa ny! 

WareettAJrpistofrl.AVOSter ( 

2 M Dofanmchova (USSR). 480; 2 H Liu 


Mk i. K Matthews [Thames VNtov). 99pts 

(new leoard): 2 I MecOonakl (Lancs). 98 (on 

count-tiw*); 3. B Camtxey (Dawn and 

Comwef). &. Rapid Sre « ’ ’ 

579; 2. 1 Palmer j 
,574. 


Rapid Are pteiofc' I. T Turner 
2. 1 Palmer (Cante). 575; 3, P 


-idkEMctototfi 


(TumhouoaV 74.89. 151:0 
terik 74. Tt, I ftyce(Soutn 


SPEEDWAY 



. 76. ifaiR 

. 78. 79. me D Stevens 
80. 80- 151: J Donachto 
. 78. 83: J Grtmdy (St MeddaraL 
81. 80: PBoBonfChoreDrwaaWlariJy), 85,76. 
16ftGPhOps<Henley| a 81.85. 


* VOLLEYBALL 

PRAGUE: Wo m an's world dteteptoretitote 

S o nd to m la - Brezfl M Czschodovalda. 1613. 

1614. 1614; East Germany bt Uratod States. 

1612.615. 1610, 1615, 1612 


BRITISH LEAGUE: Waives 33. Oxtatt 45; 
ReefaM 38. Ipewtch 39. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE: Exeter 53, Bomn^ren 
25: NewcatPe <3. Boston 35. 


ICE HOCKEY 


CHALLENGE MATCHES: Cleveland Bombers 

17. Blackpool Seagiris 1; Hte Flyers 14. 

SoOsJ Barons 3; Nottinciiain Panthers 12 
P sto ronm imh Pveas 5;Te«ort Tou* 20. 
Aknntfiam Aess 3; Altmchain Aces €. Tettora 

Tigers 15: SoMuN Barons 7. Petotiorough 

Pirates & Btreatham Redskins 12 Skajgh 

Jots 6: Bristol Phanaoma I, Swindon Wtorate 

25. 


KafidretthcZoatirarb Matthews _ 24 

SM Gavaskar nm out _ — 52 

R LMLsmbaeZoefrerb Davis 1 

DBVengsarfcw retrod* 12 1 

MAzfranxftSneMnhbWaugh IS 

R J Shastn b RoW - 37 

fCS Parxfrtb Rek) 24 

ICapi Dove Marsh b Doris IS 

CSharmahWnirih 17 

R M H BSxiv not out 11 

ManindBr Sfricdi not out 2 

Extras (to 5, nb 2 w 3) 10 


Keuh Oakes, Gillin^iam’s 
central defender, previously 
with Newport County and 
Peterborough, is considering a 
move to Fulham. 

* Midi Kearns, who played 
382 games for Coventry City, 
has been appointed reserve 
team coach at the dub. Me links 
u p. whh former 60s team-males 
George Curtis, now managing 
director. John SIDett (chief coa- 
ch) and Mick Coop (youth 
coach). 

A knee Injury has forced 
Eanion O’Keefe, a Blackpool 
forward and a former Republic 
of Ireland international and 
Everton player, to retire from 
the game at the age of 31. 

• Crystal Palace, who lost their 
100. per cent record when they 
weft beaten 1-0 at derijy on 
Saturday, have also lost the 
entire first-team's footwear. 
Thieves broke into the dub’s 
training ground at Mitcham and 
stole mote than 20 pairs of 
boots. 


• Port^ Vale are to make next 
month's Linlewood's Challenge 
Cup tie against Manchester 
United all-ticket because capac- 
ity at the third division dub's 
ground has been restricted to 
17,000 to comply with safety 
regulations. 

• Gillingham completed the 
signing of Colin Greenall. a 22- 
year-okl Blackpool defender, 
yesterday. The transfer fee is in 
dispute as Gillingham disagree 
with Blackpool's £100,000 
valuation for the player. 

• Oxford United's managing 
director, Brian Dalton, has re- 
signed just IS months after 
being appointed. He spoke to 
Robert Maxwell.the club's 
chairman, over the weekend, 
but gave no reason for his 
sudden departure. 

• Buckley, the former 
Walsall manager, has joined 
Stourbridge as a player to assist 
the injury-bit Southern League 
dub over the next few weeks. 


Tafcri (8 wkls. 47 overs) . 


-228 


FAJJL OF VnCKETS 1-50. 251. 9-10B, 4- 
12L 5-181, 6192. 7-192, 6216. 
BOmjwa McDermott 61-37-0. Davis 
10-1-51-2, Matthews 6662-1. ReU 104- 
37-2, Wzogft 9-0-4Q-Z 


AUSTRALIA 

0 C Boon c Lambs b Kapd Dsv . 
G R Mareit c pwxjK b Hnny — 

DM Jones c Pan* tiSrtiy. 

"A R Batter not out . 


O M Ritdmi st Pan* b Staafo . 
GR J Matthews nn out. 


S P Waugh « Perefit b SMstif . 
ft Zoetror c end b Kepi Dsv _ 

GJ McDermott not out _ 


Bcaaa 1. to 12 . ob 6, w ij 
Total (7«fcts. 46 ovei^ 


— 0 
_ 17 
- 12 

- 90 

- 28 

- 31 

- 20 
— 1 
— 7 
-_2Q 
.228 


8 A Reid and S Deris cfldnoi bet ■ 
FALL OF WICKETS; 1-0 2-19 339 4-102 
61728-2137-216 

BOWUNG: Kmi D*v 62-37-2. Bkmy 60- 
25-2, ShenTte6641-0. SMttri 166662. 
frtoeMerSingh 10-0-50-0. 


• Luton Town have completed 
the £$5,000 signing of midfield 
player Darren McDonough 
from Oldham Athletic. The 
Luton dub's coach Ray Harford 
said . McDonough had been 
signed as cover and would have 
locompo*. fora place. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


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39 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1986 



’s television and radio programmes aad^Peter Davalle 


>t . 1” 
'{v 


>. r yj 


■ • ■ 

'>.•> . <■ 

* 

^ L** w 

•■>5 i 

-..r'v 

. 

' - * sssiTi 


BBC 1 


MO Ceefax AM. News 

headlines, weather, travel 
and sports bulletins. 

&50 Breakfast Tnne with Frank 
Bough and Debbie 

Greenwood. Weather at 

M5; regional news, 
weatherand traffic at&57, 
7-27, 7.57 and &27; 

national ffiid Internationa) 

news at 7.00, 7 JO. 8J»> 

8^0 and 100; StaT 
7.20 and 8J20jahda 
review of the morning 
newspapers at M7, 
Among other items is 

Beverly Alt’s fashion 
ad vice. 

9-20 Ceefax m30 Play School 
presented by Fred Harris 
with guest, Sheelaah 
Giibey 10£0 Ceefax. 

1-00 News After Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and Sue 
Carpenter, includes news 
headfines with subtitles. 
1-25 Regional news. The 
weather details come from 
Michael fish 1.30 Chocfc- 
a- Block. A See-Saw 
programme for the very 
young presented by Carol 
Leader, (r) 1.45 Ceefax 
IL52 Regional news. 
a55 Whizz, (r) 4.10 The 

Adventures of BuUwtnkle 
and Rocky. The beerinning 
of an 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good 


MomkigBrft 

itedbyArme 


Britain 


series. Treasure of Monte 
Zoom 4.15 The BisJdtts. 
Cartoon series about a 


'‘<i)ii 


'•Hj 


■r*& 

- 

. p 
' oflap 

* «iS. 


".’V'^oai 
' at 

: : 

•J “ 

: ' ,,: V-«53 
■ i,t;p 
•'■J air 

• 

• 5 '“is; 

• •• •’ 

• '• r 




mr I .tr 

» 'tre 


; moo 


Tony 

with the first of a new 
series on the art of making 
pictures. 

5JJ0 John Craven’s 

Newsround 5.10 Eureka. 

A fighthsartsd lock at the 
Inventing of everyday 
objects. TWs week - 
Worcestershire sauce, 
mustard, and saccharin, (rt 
535 The Fin t a to nes . 

Cartoon series about a 
modem Stone Age family. 

&00 News wfto Nicholas 
Wttchefi and Andrew 
Harvey. Weather. 

635 London Plus presented by 
John Stapleton, Linda 
Mitchell and CaroOne 
Rigtiton. 

730 Wogan. Tonight's guests 
are Tim Brooke-Taytor, 
talking about hfs love of 
cricket; actress Sheila 
Gish; and, via sateTits 
from Los Angeles, WIBam 
Shatner who is celebrating 
two decades of Star Trek. 
Music comes from Dead 
orAfive. 

735 The Muppet Show. The 
puppets’ guest this week 
Is Glenda Jackson. 

830 Dallas. Matt at last strikes 
it rich in the Colombian 

« ; J.R. retrieves the 
as shares; Clayton 
and Ray encourage Jack 
to stay h Dallas; and a 
lady arrives in the country, 
her heart set on revenge. 
Starring Larry Hagman, 
Marc Singer, Howard Keel 
and Barbara Carrera. 
(Ceefax) 

830 Points of View. Anne 
Robinson selects missives 
from the BBC’s postbag. 
930 News with Julia Somerville 
and John Humphtys. 
Regional news and 
weather. ** 

930 Animal Squad. The 

second programme in the 
series folowing the work 
of RSPCA Chief Inspector 
Sid Jenkins and Ms team. 
This evening they inspect 
the house of a’witah 
following complaints; 
check cattle lorries on the 
Al; rescue a fox from a 
cramped cage; and fail to 
capture a giant terrapin in 
a power station reservoir. 


‘i 1 ’? 


Steve Rider. Highlights 
this evening's football 
friendly in Stockholm 
between Sweden and 
England, and news of the 
Scotland/Bulgaria and 
Wales and Finland games; 
and the IAAF Mobil Grand 
Prtx athletics meeting in 
Rome, the last of the 
season. 

1135 Rhoda. Rhoda and her 
sister, Brenda, find that 
pressures at work lead to 
doubts about trusting best 
friends. Starring Valerie 
Harper, Julie Kavner, and 
the irrepressible Nancy 

WalkeriO 

1230 Weather. 


land Adrian 
Brawn. News with Gordon 
Honeycombs at 630, 730, 
730, 830, 830 and 930; 
financial news at 635; 
sport at &40 and 7,40; 
exercises at 635 and 9.17; 
cartoon at 735; pop music 
at 735; video review at 
835; a discussion on 
cancer at 9.12. 


ITV. LONDON 


935 Thames news headfines 
followed by W3d. WBd ' 
World of Animals. Sea 
Otters, (r) 930 The ftefian 
Connection. The Santo 
family of Naples who 
provide shelter tor 
underprivileged chadren 
1030 Frogs: An _ . 
Investigation. 

1030 Herita ge of IratancL The 
Irish civilisation formed 
after the Norman invasion 
of 1 169. m 1130 Watted 
Watloo. Cartoon series 
11.25 Home Cookery 
Club. Cheshire Soup, (ri 

1130 About Britain. Perthshire, 
the first of three films on 
theTay. This fikn won a 
bronze award at New 
York's Television Festival. 

1230 Jamie and hie Magic 
Torch, (r) 12.10 Our 
Backyard, (r) 1230 
Treasure Islands. In tills 
first of six programmes 
Robert Erskine 
investigates the different 
ways to which treasure is 
discovered and reminds 
amateur metal detector 
users that they could be 
bad news for the serious 


130 News at One wrtii Leonard 
Farida 130 Thames 
news. 130 Man in a 
Suitcase. A village boy . 
disappears and McGill Is 
called to to investigate. CD 

230 Dining in France. A new 
series begins with Pierre 

^uS^tocx^^SooTaiu 1 
the High Rood. Drama 
serial 335 Thames news 
headlines 330 Sons and 
Daughters: 

430 The Little Green Man. (r) 
4.10 Bugs Bunny. 

Cartoon, (r) 430 T-Bag 
Strikes Again. Debbie 
hides from T-Bag on a 
desert island. 

435 Hold Tight Inter-school 
quiz from Alton Towers. 
The g uests are Bucks 
Fizz, Hollywood Beyond, 
and two Japanese kite 
masters. 

5.15 Blockbusters. 

535 News with Afastafr 
Stewart 630 Thames 
news* 

635 Help! Lone Parents. Viv 
Taylor Gee and the launch 
of a campaign - Facing Up 
to the One- Parent FirnBy. 

635 Crossroads. 

7.00 The Buckman T reatm e n t 
Dr Rob Buckman is in 
Chicago where among 
those ne meets are 
weekend solders. 

730 Coronation Street Brian 
is urged to reconsider his . 
responsibilities. (Oracle) - 
830 Pass the Buck. George 
' 'Layton presents another 
edition of the quiz game 
for couples. 

830 Stager's Day. Comedy 
series starring Brace 
Forsyth as a supermarket 
manager. (Oracle) : • 

930 King and Casthu The 
Manor Debt Collecting 
Agency is hired to find 
tffzaOO which 
disappeared when a man 
died after crashing Ms car 
into a wafl. (Oracle) 

1030 News at Ten with Absteir 
Burnet and Carol Bames. 
Weather followed I 
Thames news I 

1030 Midweek Snort Special 

introduced by Nick Owen. 
Live coverage of the world 
light-heavyweight bout at 
the Alexandra Pavfllon 
between Tony Slbson and 
Dennis Andries; athletics 
from Rome; and news of 
the football matches 
concerning England, 
Scotland, Wales, and the 
Republic of Ireland. 

12.15 Worid Chess 

Championship. The latest 
news from Leningrad. • 
1235 Night Thoughts. . 



JESkae Human as KasaDoeoa 
ChaimH Four at 930pm 


• BLOOD, SWEAT AND 
TEARS (BBC2. 935pm) is awe B- 
deserved opportunity for the 
Haywright John Goober and his 
M Trade Theatre Company 
to bring their work to a wider 
audience. Now that Play For 
Today ana its- ilk seem to have 
quit the screen, h is good to 
welcome drama whteh is 
fas h ioned from the realities of 
contemporary Britain rather than . 
the mytrecai drawtog rooms 
of Shaftesbury Avenue. Godber’s 
play was inspired by a local 
girl made good, Hub’s world judo 
champion, Karen Br&js, and 
is about dreams and ambWons 
and trying to find a role to a 
iworfCL Louise 
ed by Jane 

i is a wide-eyed rectoead 
who decides there ts more to 
fife that working in a fast food 
joint and takes her paJ along 


CHOICE 


to the local judo dub. To start 

with. It Is just a dggte but 
Louise is soon determined to wto 
her black belt and avenge 
humiliation by a domineering 
woman cop. Dialogue is 
sparse and plotting mtafcna! but 
the strength of Blood. S*aat 
and Tears lies elsewhere, in its 
freshness, immediacy and 
emotional truth. 

• RU&ALKA (Channel 4, 

9pm) Is another example of 
transcription from stage to 
small screen, in this case David 

Pountney's much-praised 

prediction for the English 
National Opera first seen in 

of 


dutch of fins performances. 

The nymph, Rusatica, is sung by 
foe Austral* soprano, 

EBena Hannan, with John 
Treteaven as toe prince. 

• SOME LIKE THEM COLD 
(Radio 4, 8.1 5pm) is an evocation 
of Broadway in the 1520s 
through the songwriting career of 
Ring Gardner. Though best 
known tor Ms stories about 
baseball. Lankier was heavily 
stagestruck as was and Mark 
Steyn's programme is based 
on an autotoograpNcai short 
story about a Chicago 
songsmrtti's amWtion to make it 
in the Big Appteu Lardner is 
played by Stubby Kaye, himself 
no stranger to the I J 


a water nymph who falls 1 
(ovewith a prince inspired 
f to some potent 
I magic and drew a 



Peter Waymark 


(H an d icap : 
is for Living. 

3 the mentally 


BBC 2 


635 Open University: Data on 
Cars. Ends at 730 

930 Ceefax. 

1245 Women Into 

Management An Open 
University production 
examining why only one 
manager m five in Britain 
Is female. 

1.10 Mental 

Patterns for 
Helping the 
handicapped to speak for 
themselves. 

135 The Physics of Matter. 
The technology of semi- 
conductor lasers which 
turn signals into tight 

200 Ceefax. 

530 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

535 What on Eaittk.? Michael 
Jordan chairs this wikane 
quiz in which Johnny 
Morris has to answer a 
battery of questions with 
the help of Sheila 
Anderson and Michael 
StoddarL(r) 

630 Masada. Parttwo of the 
four-episode series about 
the Romans' siege of the 
impenetrable fortress of 
Masada, held by a small 
number of Jews. General 
Sfiva (Peter O'Toole) is 
six months to end 
le siege and he calls on 


breaker Rubnus GaUus 


r, his more 


of toe 

Roman troops through the 
heat the thirst, and toe 
psychological warfare of 
the rebels. With Peter 
Strauss, Barbara Carrera, 
Anthony Valentine. David 
Warner and Denis Qirilley. 
W 

730 Sotitowpton 

International Boat Show. 
Paul Heiney is the guide 
round the Show which has 
more than 400 (Afferent 
. crafton diarlay. He talks 
to two families with a 
nautical shopping Hsb and 


sea without owning a boat 
735 Internatio na l Athletics 
from Rome. David idee 
and Brendan Foster 
introduce coverage of the 
tastMoWGrandPrixof 
the season: The 
■ commentators are Ror> 
Pickering and Stuart 
• Storey. 

935 Screenplay. Blood, Samat 
and Tears, by John 
Godber. Louse works ina 
fast-food restaurant and 
decides toot there is more 
to Bfe than working aB day 
and discomg at rrightShe 
and her friend Michele join 
the local judo ckib in order 
to dp something different 
But they findit Isn't as 
easy at it seems And at . 
first they donttoink they ' 
win last the course. 
Starring Jane Clifford and 
Gillian Tompkins. Directed 
Nicholas Renton, (see 


by Nidi 
Choice' 


1035 Jack High. The Gateway 
Masters Bowts 
Tournament from Beech 
House Park. Worthing. 

1035 NewsntohL The latest 
national and international 
news including extended 
coverage of one of the 
main stories of the day. 

1130 Weather. 

1135 Open Un i ver si ty: A 

Golden Age of Work 1210 
Chardin and the Female 
Imaga. Ends at 1240. 


CHANNEL 4 


230 Channel 4 Racing from 
Doncaster. Brough Scott 
introduces coverage of the 
EBF Queen's Own 
Yorkshire Dragoons 
Stakes (235); the Unipart 
Handicap (3. 10): the 
Scarborough Stakes - 
(240): and the Park HUt 
Stakes (4.10). 

430 The Gong Show. Chuck 
Bants introduces another 
selection of talentless acts 
fncbxtag a young man 
who puns ugly faces; and 
Gene. Gene toe Dancing 
Machine. 

5.00 ABce. Part one of a story 
in which a famous country 
singer visits Mel's dmer 
ana falls tor Alice. After 
hearing her sing he Invites 
her to join him in a 
professional and romantic 


630 


and Kip NiveoT 
530 The Abbott and Costello 
Show*. Bud and Lou try to 
■ smuggle a pet chimp into 
their apartment 
630 Flashback. This sixth 
programme in the series 
explores the way in which 
feature films were 
designed to boost morale 
duringlhe Second world 
War. The programme 
contains dips from They 
Also Served, MMons lice 
Us, and Waterloo Road. 
i)(r) 

ing Times. The final 
programme of the 

documentary series on 

five museums features 
The People's Palace, buffi 
on Glasgow Green In toe 
. 19th century. (Oracle) 

7.00 Channel Four news 

lissons g?«lA!astair 
Stewart 

730 Comment With her views 
on a matter of topical 
Importance is Doreen 
Miller, National Chair of 
the 300 Group. Weather. 
830 International Athletics. 
The final meeting of the 
Grand Prix series. The 
com me ntators at the 
Olympic Stadum in Rome 
are Alan Parry, Peter 
Matthews and Steve 
Ovett 
'S.OOHusatica. David 
Pountney’s 1983 - 
production ofOvorak's” 
fairy tale performed by 
English National Opera 
The Australian soprano - 
EBene Hannan sings the 
title note, that of a water 
who fails in love 
a human prince. With 
John Treteaven (tenor), 
Alin Howard (mezzo- 
soprano), and the 
Orchestra and chorus of 
the Engfish National 
conducted by Mark' 

(see Choice) 

1130 F3n* Murder Anonymous* 
(1 955) starring Peter Arne, 
Ewen Solon and dU 
Bennett Inspector 
Conway of Scotland Yard 
investigates the miaider of 
a lades' man. His first 
suspects are the women 
in ms Rfe but then 
suspicion falls on the blind 
husband of an unfaithful 
wife. Although he would 
not know what was going 
on behind Ms back he 
could be informed of an 
affair by a jealous third 


land/ 

b^ Ken Hughes. Bids at 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave, (s) Stereo on VHF 
535 Shipping. 630 News; 
Weather. 6.10 Farming. ' 


630 Today ind 630. 730, 

830 News 635 Business 
News. 5-55, 735 Weather. 
730, 8.00 News. 735, 

835 Sport 7*5 Thought tor 
the Day. 

&43 Five Hundred MBs 

WaHdes (8) Dorset 837 

Weather Travel. 

9.00 News. 

935 In the Psychiatrist's 
Chair. Dr Anthony Clara 
tabs to Ashkenazy, the 
pianist and conductor. 

9.40 AU One in Keswick. Nigel 
Holmes teBs the story of 
the Keswick Convention. 

1030 News; Picnics. Susan 
Marting Joins a shooting 
party on the grouse moors, 
(r) 

1030 Morning Story; Murder In 
the Mom 
L Sayers. 

Beevers. 1035 Oaky 
service (New Every Morning. 

1130 SmRTnSl; The White 
Train. Margaret HorsfieU 
s the White Tram on its 


follows the 
journey across America; 
its cargo— nuclear 
warheads, (r) 

Wit hin (new 


11.48 


1200 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice. 

1237 Having Fun with Goats. 

An optional title for I'm 
Sorry I Haven't a Clue, (s) 
1235 weather. 

130 The Worid At One: News. 

1-40 The Archers. 135 
Shipping. 

230 News; Woman's Hour. 
Includes an interview 
whh photographer Jane 
Bown. 

330 News; The Afternoon 
Play. The Chid, by Otwen 
Wymark. With Minam 
Maraotyes. Mary 
Wimoush and Jane 

WenhanMs) 

3.47 One Man and His Log 
(new series) by Barry 
Pffton, read by David Roper. 

430 News. 

435 Dancing a Hornpipe in 
Fetters. Suzanne Burden 
reads from the journals and' 
tetters of Fanny 
Kembto^i) 

4.15 Str B qn&tne Serpent* s 
Head. Eberhard Bethge 
talcs to Keith Ctemente. 
abouta group of German 
(fssidents who, in 1945b 


were executed tor 
plotting to a ssass inate Hitter. 
4.45 Kaleidoscope Extra. 
Chri st opher Cook 
reports on Czech Theatre. 
530 PM. Newsmagazine. 

530 Shipping 535 
Weather. 

630 Round Britain Quiz. Irene 
Thomas and Eric Kom 


and Patrick Nuttgens. 
730 News. 

735 The Archers. 

730 On The Day 1 Was Bom. 
Larry Haros talks to The 
Countess of Mar. 

7.45 Never the Same Agan. 
Jenm Mflfs traces critical 
periods of family life. 

8.15 Some Lika Them Cold: 
The story of Ring 
Lardner on Broadway by 
Mark Steyn, with Stubby 
Kaye as Lardner. 

930 Thirty Minute Theatre: 
Friends, by Lakviar Sing. 
Neil Coker heads the cast- 

930 ¥)» Engfish Garden. 
Anthology of poetry and 


945 kaleidoscope. Includes 
comment on the film 
Betty Sue. 

10.15 A Boot at Bedtime: An 
LHstsrChiUhood43) 


Hawthorne. It 

weathBf. 

1030 The World Tonight 
11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 The Troglodytes of 
CWnon. How this 
primitive "tribe" survives in a 
civilized soootv. 

1200 News; Weather. 1233 
Shipping. 

VHF (available in England and 
S Wales onM as above 
except 535630am Weather; 
Travel 138200pm 
Listening Comer 1130- 
1210em Open University. 
1130 Introduction to 
Calculus. 1130 
Technology: Values tor 
Money. 

( . Radio 3 ) 


On VHF/FM (h stereo). Also on MW 
635 Open university. Open 
Forum: Students' 

Magazine. Unta 835am 
635 Weather. 730 News 
735 Concert Elgar (Six 
Promenades), Handel 
(Suite In F, Water Music). 
830 News 

835 Concert (contcf): Dowtand 


(John Langton s Pbvan, 
"QngorDe 


and King 
Gailiard). 


Denmark's 
JCBach ' 


(Qumret in D), Tippett 
(Concetto for double 
smng orchestra). Purcell 
(First Musk and Second 
Music. The Indian Queen). 
930 News 

935 This week's Composer 
Beethoven Overture and 
modems! music: Rums ot 
Athens (with soloists 
Auger. Hirte and Crass/RIAS 
Chamber Choir/Berlin 
PO). and A Knightly Ballet, 
WoOl 

1030 Jerusalem Oekvered: 
Gemmiani (La foret 
enchantee). and Momeverdi 
(ComD a m m e w odi 
Tancredi e Ctorinda (with 
soloists Rogers, Kwbiib. 
DawJ Thomas/Musica 
Anbqua, Cologne 
1130 Britten and WebenSusie 
Mezaros (viola). Eleanor 

.Bntien 


(Andante e rondo ungarase) 

1135 City of London Sinfonta 
(under Richard Htckox). 

With Bracha Eden and 
Alexander Tarmr (pianos) 
and soJcwxs Walmsiey-Ciark, 
Hill and Varcoe. Haydn 
(Symphony No 8), Poulenc 
(Concerto in D mmor.for 
two pianos, orchestra), 
Stravinsky (Pulcinefla 
ballet ireaic). 130 News 

135 Concert Hall: Ehsabeih 
Perry (viobn), Rohan de 
Saram (cevo). Pam Gregory 
(guitar). Francois de 
Fossa (Trio Doncertanie in 
A.. Op 18 No 1). Kodaly 
(Duo. Op 7) 

230 El Barbenllo da Lavapies: 
Gerardo Monreal smgs 
me title role m excerpts from 
the Zarzuela by 
Francisco Barbwl With 
Teresa Beraanzi 

230 Record Review: wrtii Paid 
Vaughan, tedudas Alan 
Btyth's recommended 
recordings of Wagner's 
Das Rhemgold (r) 

430 Choral Evensong: from 
St Paul 's Church. 
Birmingham. A live 
transmission. 435 News 

530 Midweek 

ChboceiMendelssotm 
(Piano Concerto No 1: 
Oodon/LSO). Liszt 
(Missa choralis: Choir of St 
John'&College. 
CamtmdgeLireiKid 
(Concertino pastorale for 
strmg orchestra), Arensky 
(Tnom □ mmor). 

Wembergar (PoBca and 
Fugue. Sch wanda tha 
BaatXoer) 

730 Choral Vorces: Beta 
Banok Chou- of Eotvos 
Rorand University. Works by 
Kodaly. Szokotey, Bartok 
(T wo Hungarian rofli songs), 
and Bardos 


730 Proms 86: BBC SO 
(under Leppard), with 
Felicity Lott (soprano) and 
Rodney Friend (violin}. 

Part one. Beriioz (Roman 
Carnival overture, and 
Reverie and Caprice) and 
Du pare songs including 
Limitation au voyage, and 
Aupeysousefanla 
guerre 


8.10 Six Continents: foreign 
radiobroadcasts, 
monitored by the BBC 


830 Proms (continued): 
Brahms (Symphony No 


935 The theatre-going public: 
Documentary.presentsd 
by Tom Lubbock.Confrib 
utors indude David Hara 


Howard Bren ton and Michael 
Frayn (r) 

10.10 EndeOion String Quartet: 
Colin Matthews (Quartet 
No 2) and Berg’s Lync Suite 

1035 Mozart Viotei Concenos: 
Oscar Shumsky with 
Scottish Chamber Orchestra 

(under Yan Pascal m 

Twteter). The No4 m D. K 
218. and the No 5 m A, K 
219. 1137 News. 1200 
Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 

On MF (medium wave). Stereo 
on VHF. 


(mt only), 93& Cncket Scoreboard 
730pm. 

4.00am Charles Nove 530 
Cokn Berry 730 Derek Jameson 
930 Ken Bruce 1130 Jimmy 
Young 135pm Dand Jacobs 205 
Gloria Hunmtord 230 David 
Hamilton 5.05 Chris Serte 730 
Sports Special Football 
lEngtand v Sweden and Scotland v 
Bulgaria); Athletics (Final of 
Mobd AMetics Grand Pnx m Rome) 
935 Sports Desk 1030 
Fletcher's 50. Cyte Fletdiar dials 

to a live audience 10.15 Earl 
Okm and Co 1030 The Bn Fight 
Special: Dennis Andnes v Tony 
Sibson from Alexandra Palace. 
London 1130 Round Midnight 
1030am tWghtnde 200-430 A 
Little Night Music. 


c 


Radio 1 


On MF (medium wave). Stereo 
on VHF (see below) 

News on the hart-hour from 
530am until 830pm then at 1030 
and 1230 midnight. 

530 Simon Mayo 730 Mike 
Smith's Breakfast Snow 930 
Andy Peebles 1230 Newsbeal 
(Frank Partridge) 1235 Gary Da- 
vies 200 Steve Wright 530 
Newsbeal (Frank Partridge) 5.45 
Bruno Brookes (me Top 30 album 
chan) 730 Janice Long 1030- 
12.00 John Peel. VHF stereo Ra- 
dios 1 & 2 430am As Radio 2 
730pm Folk on 2 230 Jim Mac- 
Leod 9.00 Listen to the Band 935 
Sports Desk 1030 As Rateo 1 
12.00-4.00am As Rada 2. 




WORLD SERVICE 


UO Newsdesk 830 Marxian 7.00 News 
7.09 Twenty-Few Hours 730 DeMoo- 
nwnt 36 830 News 839 Raflacwxts 8.15 
Claasicxl Record runrtaw 830 Brem of 
Britan 1908 930 News 930 Review ot 
British Press 9.15 World Today 830 
Financial New* 930 Look Aiwad 945 A 
Land or Sore 1030 Nawe 1031 Ommtius 
1130 News 1139 News About Britain 
11.15 On Tha Box 1135 A Letter From 
Wales 1130 Mandlan 1830 Radio News- 
reel 12.15 Nature Notebook 1235 Farm- 
ing World 1235 Sports Roundup 130 
News 139 Twenty-Fax Hours 13S 
Development 'B6 2 j6o Outlook 235 Re- 
ton AaHglon 330 Rada Newsreel 21 5 
me Fundaraentaksm 330 Patterson 
4.00 News 439 Commentary 4.15 Coun- 
terpoint 535 Sports Roundup 735 Good 
Books 830 News 839 Twenty-Four 
Hours 830 State ot the Nation 930 News 
901 Network UK 915 International Soc- 
cer Special 1030 News 1030 The Wortd 
Today 1035 A Latter From Wales 1030 
Financial News 1030 Reflections 1035 
Sports Roundup 1130 News 1139 Com- 
mentary 11.15 Good Books 1130 Top 
Twenty 1230 News 1239 News About 
Britain 12.15 Radio Newsreel 1230 
Patterson 130 News 1.01 Outlook 130 
Wavepikto 130 Book Cmxe 135 Grow- 
ing Points In Science 230 News 239 
Review of Bntish Press 2.15 Network UK 
230 State ot the Nation 830 News 339 
News About Brnem215 The world Today 
435 Reflacaona 450 Financial News 530 
News 539 TWenty-Four Hours 536 World 
Today. Al times fa OMT. 


BBC1 WALES: 535-830 Wales 
Today 835-730 The 
Fftitstones 11&1230 Rugby 


1230 Rugby 

Union. Swansea v Craea Keys 1230- 
1235 News and weather. SCOT- 
LAND: 535-730 Reporting Sootisnd 
1030-1 138 1 ntomsdonel 
Sport9Cene. NORTHERN IRELAND: 535- 
530 Today’s Sport530-B30 hside . 

v 635-730 The Vktoo Picture Show 
1230-1235 News and weather. EW- 
GLAND; 635-730 Regional news 
magazinas. 

CHANNEL 

1035-1130pm Spitfire 1230pny130 

Sea bi Their Blood 130 News 130-230 

Short Store 330-4 m Voung Doaors 

830435 Channel Report U.t5am 


TYNE TEES 


935m News 930 Sesame r 
1035 Spacewatch 1030 PSlm Alona WRh 
Nancy (105-1130 British Achleve- 
ments 12-30pm-T30 Orphans Of The 
Wld 130 News 135 Where The Jobs 

Are 1J0-23P Country Practice 8.004 85 

Northern life 12.1Gawi Rlpon JubHee. 
Closedown. 

TVS As London except 
-i-2-2 93Sem Sesame Street 1035- 
1130 Spitfire 123Qpn»-130Coest 
To Coast People iJQ Nwa 130-230 
Short Store 330330 Young Doctors 
5.00435 CoastTo Coast 12.15am Com- 
pany. Closedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


ULSIMceg^&ame 
Street 1035 Little Houe On The 

•Prairie 1139-1130 Max The Mouse 

1Z30pm-130 Prtwwkmers 130 
Lunchtime 130330 Cou ntr y Pr a c ti ce 
330430 Wld World Of AniraNs 
&0O&3S Good Evening tester 12.15010 
News, Closedown. 

HTV WEST ,£}f7*ZL 

Bafil ^ 

1035-11301 
Gkmroe130l 
Tucker's Witch 630435 News 1215am 
Closadown. 

HTV WALES 


93Sam-1Q30 BaS Mystique £30pn>- 

835 Wales At Six. 

GRM^A^^drenada 

Reports 930 European FWk Tales 

9i55 Northern Lakes 10.10 WWartoo 

Bridge Handcap 1030 Wtnztes 
1130 Granada Haporta 11 35 About Brit- 
ain 1130-1230 Connections 
l230pm-l30Tan Green Bottles 130 

Granada Reports 130-239 Randafl 
and Hophirk (Deceased) 330-430 Young 
Doctor* 900 GrenadnReporta 830- 

635 This Is Yoiv Right 121 Sam 
C tos edown. 


SCOTTISH 


Seeanie Street 1035 1 

TL20-1130 Cartoon ■ 

Or Hofcfay 130 News 1 

■unry Practice WM 


Rider 
1.00 JuS 


County Practice 330 That 1 s Hollywood 
330430 Survival S3043S Scot- 

land Today l215n Late CM, 

Closedown. 

As London ex- 
cept 93Sam Sesame 


ANGLIA 


GRAMPIAN 


Street 1030 Cartoon Time 1940- 

1130 Roseidan Fin 1230p»-13Q 

Whose Baby? 130 News 130-230 
Country Practice 530435 About Anglia 
12.15am l stall Always Remember, 

Closedown. 

As London 
Kcept 82Sam 

Rret Thing 930 Tarzan ia2icfc- 
sons 11-15-1130 Cartoon I230pm-130 
Thafa Kotivwood 130-230 Cwxmy 
Practca 130435 Norm Tonight 
12.15MB News, Closedown. 

CENTRAL JjftgSL 

SsaSght 940 Once Upon A 
Time. -Man HUB Rooossory 1030-1130 
Air Supper hi Hawati 1230pm-130 
Ten Green Botties 130 News 130430 

Scarecrow and Mrs King 630 Crase- 

roads 635-730 News 12.15am New 

Avengers L15 JobfindarZIS 

Closadown. 


CAC Starts 130pm Gong 
Show 130 Bco 230 


FMatnism 230 Racing Rom Don- 
caster 430 Stums Please 530 Tndau 
Trevor 530 PWs In Particular 830 
BreokUde 630 Famihr T«S 730 
Newyridion Satih 730 Pa Le. Pa 
Food 830 Parti Bare 830 Halan Yn Y 
Gwaed 935 Fane A Ncht At The Op- 
era’ 10^0 ABtietics 1130 Commoortias 
1250am Closadown. 

Street 1035 Professor Kitzol 1035 
Groovy GhouBea 1130-1130 Once Upon 
A Time- Aten 1230pm-130 Spice Of 

Life 130 News 13&230 Country Prac- 

tice 330430 Young Doctors 030- 
635 Lookaroinf I£l5am Ctosedown. 


TCUf As London except 

928am Sesame Street 1035 

Riptide 11.15-1130 Max The Mouse 
1230nm-1.00 Gardens For A1I130 News 
130-230 Country Practice 5.15 Gus 
Honeybun 530-945 Croesrouds 630 To- 
day South West 830-730 
Emmerdata Farm 12.15am PostScript 
Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

DOfl BXCDpi 

935am Starfleet 950 Tvne Travel 
1035 Short store 1055 Fblk Tales 1136- 
1130 Short Stoma 1230pm-130 

Lunchtime Live 130430 The Baron 

800435 Calendar 12.15am That's 

HoPywood l24S am 4J00 Musw Box. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 



CONCERTS 


BMHHCAN HALL 038 B795/6S8 
8891. No prrfo TOoX Tomor 
7 JS. — TWw RmBM by Vla- 
dimir Asnkcnazy and Lynn 
Home. 


Group 


OPERA & BALLET 

COLISEUM S 836 3161 

CC 240 8ZS8 

SMOLIfiH HATHJHAL OPERA 
Tofl'l 7.30 H Tomor 

-■ 7.00 Th Mt h w »l WWW. 
"ROYAL OPERA HOUSE. CoiWJ 
Cardm. WC2 01-240-1066/ 
1911 CC S Standby Info Ol- 
83&A90& Mon-Sal loam - 
Bum. 65 amptn at-mi irem 
roam on Uw day. Tki«« £l - 

£22.50 In-re). £1 - *1330 

§Sft 7.30 wuri lwd 

BaBri The snow Quern. Tomor 
7.50 Swan Lake BUM casting 
Into: 01 240-9Bie. 

SADLER'S WELLS 278 0916 

1 Oaf* S c 

St* 17 27 


ona-ia 
Ring 01 278 0855 for Autumn 
dancWbalM colour brochures 


theatres 

MOM1 056 7611 «■ 3*0 7 913 
/« CC 741 9999/836 73M«79 
6«U care Sales 930 6123 I First 
Call 24 nr 7 day CC 2*0 7200 itwa 
IW NOW BOOKING TO FEB 
1987 

■v ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALJC 
MUSICAL 

Nightly al 730 MaN W*T at 2 30 
4. SOI AM* 800 

—TH E HW PlOT MOW 
bi towit* s unmi 


ALBERT B36 3878 CC SW 4966 

/6U3 Grp SalM 836 3962. For 
a umUM unun Tue-fri gm. 

•eta 4 Son* Sam * 830 

BARBARA COOK. 

Tiaa a ,ifc » you caeM 
Arowa ht*' M. on Sun- 
ALDWYCH THEATRE 01-836 
6404/0041 K 01-579 6»3 


-EXPLOSIVE SUCCESS** T«tty 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

Swmno sun Q UAT RO 
. **. DAZZLING WEST END 
^BLT - CATCH HER TODAY” 
■l D TpI 

“ONE OF THE MOST DIZZYING 

SCORES EVER - D.MdU 

Evqa 7.30 Mala Wrd A Sal B.30 
Mhr 7 t»-i v cc bookino on om 
Caa 01 240 7200 IMS f**> 
LM 4 »u la 


i 01-636 61 11 cc 

836 1171 Furu Coll (34 hn/7 
daj" 240 7200 I MS IreL 

FROM 2 OCTO*** 


LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES 

-FWHT RR A TICKET* 
wmim On 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 2663 

434 3608 FliSI CaU 01-2*0 7300 
TTcMtnuStrr (C 379 6435 
MOA-Fri BOO Sal AJSO A 8J5 
Tran mat t 30 0 

PAUL SCOFIELD 
-MASTERLY- FT. 


“MAGNIFICENT" DJMaU 

I’M NOT RAPPAPORT 

-WondrrfuOy run ny** DIM 
TONY AWARD BEST PLAY 


APOLLO VICTORIA SS 828 8666 

CC 630 6262 Party Bhm 828 

6188 TKIrinusM' cr 379 6433 

Urs Call cc (24nr) 240 7900 iBJcg 

Frei Cre Sak* 930 6123 Eire 

7 45 Matt Tue A- Sat 3.0 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

**A MUSICAL THATJHWr AMES 

ANYTWMS AHOUMD M EVERY 

BMn e iM r o exp 

STARUGHT EXPRESS 

Mieic by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyric* By RICHARD STO.GOE 
Directed by TREVOR NUNN 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OPFICC 


NOW BOOKING TO MAKM1BS7 


BARBICAN 01 6» 8795/638 

8891 CC iMon-Sun 10am- 
Bomi ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 
COMPANY 


bw,— T ion*t, 

tomor 7 30 M8PWSTO {final 

perft 17. IB. 26. 37 8Wrt Ong 

rwris 12-16. 24-26 Sep THE 

«tRT WIVES WtMHDMHL 

Book now rorlMUUJUUiCE 

from 2 Ort. SCENES PROM A 

MAiatiwr irom I 16 on. 

THE prr lonl 7 30. wraor 2.00 
A 7 JO IL CAMDELAtO Mr 

Gmidano Bruno (final p*rf* 26- 

27 Sepl. jwal PWftj a 16. 2A- 

26 Sn PMUSTMU. 


BOULEVARD 437 2661 Beside 
Raymond SarWaiyire 

court. Brcwr S. Wi. THE 
SWAP Marti Mi C r— t*s Come- 
dy 8pm. tS/O 


CHI CH E S TER 0243 781312 

happened on the wav to 

1HE FORUM Eire. 7 JO. Mats 

Tlui * sal 2JO 

CHURCHILL Bremley 460 6677 

ouasranffR timothv .» 
Sjarlet-s aunt. 


•2TSE: JSSJISS® 


JOHN ALBERTO* 


CWEN 
TAYLOR 

the maintenance 

MAN 

-{sntffla. D jaM» 

COTTESLOC *5* 2^2 OC 

“ SEg egg; 

Sr ohm Hare. Tomer, m 

Mon. Tur 7.30. Sal 2.30 4 7 JO 

HEAPTRXE. 


C R ITER ION S 930 3816,00 379 

6666/379 6433/741 9999. Crps 

as* 3962. Eire 8.00. Thu mat 

2JO. Sol 830 4 . 8JO 
-‘BRITISH FARCE AT ITS REST" 
D Man 

The Ttwaueor Comedy Cong uny 

ROY HUOO RALPH RATES 



RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 


Over 1.400 ill ■ > » «■ » nwft 
“SHOULD RUN FOR Unf* S. Ex 


_ . . Box OHlce 

Ol 680 8846/01 636 8638/9 or 

Ol 680 9362/3- ALL Wleptione 

CC DOOhinre FIRST CALL 24n«_7 

day o n 01 -836 2428 NO BOOK- 

MC FEE Crn Sates 930 6123 
DAVE CUUHC'« 

TIME 


CUFF RICHARD 

AS "THE ROCK STAR* 
THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKAST 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Mon-Frl 730 Thu MM ZJO 
SeiSA&ML ' 

_J OTAL U IN C mA O NS AT E7. 

ALL PERFS EXCEPT FIN 1 SAT 

EVES mr OLTA, MMOa, 
STUDENTS « UNDER IF* tUm 
RaahtoR la April *87. 
rrom on 9 ai Tlun meb *T» 

Doric Star win be performed by 

John Christie. From on 4 sal 

MTA 4 ft 8.15 


PONMAH WAREHOUSE Cos Grin 

2408230 OC 379 6565/6433 
LEWES PATRICIA 

FTANDCR HODGE 

n NOEL and GERTIE 

—You could hardly osa for a more 
mjwaole reenlrar F.T, 

Until an 20 
E Its 8.00. Frl & Sal 6.0 * 8JO 

Extra pert ranitfii ea. it Atom 


DMNIV LANE THEATRE ROTAL 

BOH Office 4 CC 01-836 81 08. Ol- 

240 9066/7. Flrai Call 24hr T day 

et Mere 01 340 7200 £JU> bkg 
Ire). Ttcketmener Ol 579 6433 
(no bits f*el 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW mi ALL THE FAMR.V 
Whwar *f all the bat 


ioud 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS- 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE outran AWARD 

• \ tried 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLAYS A PLAY ERS 
LOMDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD - 

Eta 8.0- Mats Wrfl .5.0. SN 60 A 

8.30 Reduced price mu Weds. 

Students and OAPi aunduy. 
Group Sam 930 6IZ3 


Special nuinn Dec 26 3nm 


OUCHES* S 836 8243 CC 240 

9648 CC 379 6433 A OC 24 

W/7 day 340 7200 EXTH 8 WM 

mat 5 SN 6 11 

NO SIX PLEASE 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 3122 CC 

836 9*37/741 9999/240 7200. 

Ei« 8 Thu 3 Sal S A 030 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard DrM, Am* 1SS4 

STEPPING OUT. 

Hit Comedy by Richard Harris 
Directed W Jutn McKenzie 

“TRIUMPH ON TAP" »n 

-LAU6N YOUKSSLT WLLY” T O 
“A PERFECT DEUOHT" D Tel 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FOMIHEAlrCwlLOIACCS 
836 2238/9 A«y 379.6433 (7 

day.uk/eriMoniaFri8.Sai 8 JO 

Mai Thurs It Sal 3.00 


in DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-I entreed rtery maur~ ST 

-A ciacstc of whodunit ry - w 

unbeaunie** Tunes ES 

WE DOUBLE OABC YOU TO 
DETECT HOW ITS DOME 


lOBE 437 1692-OC 3T9 6433/ 

uko Ire la CaU » nr 240 7200. 

era Solve 930 6123. Eves a 

Mats Wed 3 SM 4. 
Andrew Lloyd Webber Presents 


IAN FRANCIS 
RONALD HOLCATT 


LEND ME A TENOR 

“A MARVELLOUS COMHNA 
TfON OF HtoNOCRFUL 
FARCICAL MOMENTS. FUNNY 
LINES AND FRENETIC 
PERFORMANCES - T Old 
An American Comedy by 
Kan Ludwig 

Dtrecied tty David Otimore 


GREENWICH THEATRE 01-836 

7765. Eves 7.46. Mats Sal SJO 

FOR MHO AND COUNTRY OF 

John WUson. “As pew ari i ri a 
piaaeall nu l fce d ra ma re Bay 

an U» Enctish stoia Aireewt 


HAMPSTEAD 722 9301. Pf*£ 

From Tomor. Ev.es Spot ASK 

FOR THE MOON by SUrta 


HAYWAHKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Bov o Otoe Md CC 01 930 9632. 
FirKCNl 24 hr 7 dayCC bookings 
Ol 240 T20a 
□Urn from Broadway 
“A Suberb London Mage MOut“ 
ruuncu Times 

JACK LEMMON 

-As fine a stage actor as be Is a 
screen one'* Today 

LONG DAY’S- JOURNEY 
INTONIGHT 

, By Eugene D*NMD 
-Jonathan Mina'S oritilanl 
production" SUmdred 
Eire only Moo-Sai 7 JO 


HER. MAJESTY*. IWjMjJt 

930 4026/6606 2046/2656 
■ncmmatier 379 6131 
First Can CC 24 0 7300 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Starring 


Saran . Sieve 

Brtmuman . barton 
□meted W HAROLD PRINCE 
‘Opens 9 Oct. 
PrihTrws Own Sep 27 


KUOS HEAD 226 1916. STEVE 

HARLEY to MARLOWE. A Dew 
Mineral. Dnr 7. snow Bum. 


LO NDON P ALLADNH I 437 7373J 

741 9999 uw bfcg ire), nm Cart 

24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. (NO) 

RKI RE) Ore Sates 930 6183. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 

-COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 

A DENIS QUO-LEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 


S-TH 

Mon-Fri 7 JO. Matt Wed Z OO 
sa 2 30 a B OO 
Si dm concessions avail, al door 

MoreFri a Sat man 
BRATS AVAR-ABLE FROM SI J 

Now boobing ro April 1987 


_ 01-741 

231 1 * aB a— nrt«». Eire 7 43. 

Wed Matt 2 JO. Sat 



LYRK TMKATME SbafHsbury 

Ave Wl 01-457 3686/7 01434 

1660 01-434 1060. 01-734 

5166/7 

COLIN BLAKELY 
-a bra Ham a torexaty 
comic performance” F. Times 

... ■ 18 

The National Theatre's acrialmed 

PTOdnrtkm of 


A CHORUS OF 
disapproval 

MtraUngly funny** Odn 


“Hilarious.-.” S. tuns 
“A rare cvenbM of 
comic grill laraUon” Times 
Eire 7 Jo. Mats Wfd and Sal 30. 
Grow Sale* 01-930 6123. 

Reduced Drier mots Student It 
OAR Suno-by 

FBtt.1 CALL 2BR 7 DAY 

CC ROOMNOS ONB1 240 7208 
(NO SOOKRIS FEE] 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL ‘87 


LYTTELTON **• 928 2282 CC 

tNauonai There's Protce nUi n 

stage) Tom 7 as • 

DALLIANCE 

by uhntttier. 

ignton tty TWn Srooba no 


ja Leadaa T * S.ToL 

-HV M m e Hii ada g ** DJdalL 

Mpn- Tue * Sew 17 & 

18 6- See 22 Mi 23 ai 7 AS, Open* 
S«X24 « Sew 28 U 

29 THE BUQISTRATE. 


MAYFAIR S CC 629 3036. Mon 

Thu 8 Frt/Sar 640 It 8.10 

RJGWRD TODDm 

Tlw Baal TTirMar hr yaaeil" B M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

■An unaOMhea wianeri* S Exp 
“Senmugnai- Time* 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


MERMAID Air Cond 236 . 

741 9999 Fire* Call CC 240 

124 H» 7 Day I Men m fl. Sat 6 4 

BJO ^ 


METAMORPHOSIS 

staged by 

Steven BERKOFF 


theatrical evknbm imtnc 

WEST EMD" CJUlWtt. 
Extended mall Oct >• 

|Pre theatre food A drink) 


NATIONAL THEATRE SOi Sank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

See SEPARAT E ENTR IES und 
OUV MH/ LYTTELTON/ 
Co m SLOE. ExneUenl Chew 
eeeos day* a I peri * all theatre* 
from 10 am. RESTAURANT (928 

2033). EAST CAR FARM, r ' 

633 0880. ARI COND 


NEW LONDON Drury Lane WC2 

405 0072 CC 379 6433 EV*S 7>1B 

Tue & Sat 3-00 A 7.46. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD ~ 

/T. 

CATS 

APFLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 


Grow Booking, 01-406 1S67 or 
01-930 6123- HOW BOO “ 

HAY 80 1BB7. 


OUVKR -V 928 2262 OC INa 

uonal Theatre's open mge) 

Toni 7.16 

JACXOBOWSKY AND 
THE COLONEL 

ramady tty Wrtfd. 
imtan by SN Behrman 


rea red hr MWC 

A OEOFFRCT 


i MkmaitM 

HAWTHORNE 


D Man 

Tomor. Fri. Mon 7.15. S«l Tue 
2.00 flow price mat) A 7.16 

THE THREEPENNY 
OPERA 


OFEN ARI 486 2431 N e* l»aa l 


HENRY V 

Dany ai 2J0 & 7m 


PALACE THEATRE 4J7 6834 

CC 437 8327 or 379 6453 
FM CMI 24Hr 7D«r CC 240 7200 
Grp Sale* 930 6123 . 

THE MUSICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLES 

“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ONETsw 

be* 730 Man Tnii A 5tt 2J0 
LarecwneR not adnuned 

_ Lom t thr itw mi. _■ 

BEAT THE TOUT* « 

INC FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX 


PARAMOUNT CmrTHEATK Cl 

WlndimH St- Wl. Ol 437 

63)2/8380. 


tn THE NEWS 

Rd. pnn* grei* unW Sew 17. 

open* Sew 10 M 8pm f-hjhuy 

9 . 000 CH- Fri a sai 6 JO* n.cxtom 


FHOEMtX 836 2294 CC 240 9661 

741 9999- Fi ret eau 24 hr* 7 days 

240 7200 Ora Sales 930 6123. 

E» e* 7.30. Thur mat 3. Sals 4 A 8. 


THE COCKTAIL PARTY 


“A CHAO U HR CA ST" F .TUnea 
LAST TWO WEEKS 


PR*m 836 2294 cc 240 9661 

741 9999. Finn call 24 hreT days 

240 7200. Gra Sales 930 6123. 

Eire 7 JO. Thur mat 3. Sat* 46 8 

THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

by TA Eunr 

TUT CUT ALL THE FLACS FOR 

KTW AND UK NEW 

■ COMPANY" S-TUnea 


PICCADILLY THEATRE. 4X7 
4806. Credfl cam HotUnts 379 

6565. 741 9999. Gra Sale* 836 

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40 


WEDNESDAY SEPTFMBFR 10 1986 


THE TIMES 


First pw Wished in 1785 




Broad and Slack to 
open for England 


SPORT 



At the end of a meeting 
which lasted for three hours, 
Peter May and his fellow 
selectors came up with a 
touring party of 16 players to 
Australia this winter that in- 
cludes, to quote the chairman, 
"two exciting young men,”. 
Phillip De Freitas and James 
Whitaker. 

The specialist opening bats- 
men - there are only two of 
them — are not Broad and 
Robinson, as was generally 
expected, but Broad and 
Slack. For the fiisi time in all 
England's tours of Australia 
neither Yorkshire nor Lan- 
cashire is represented, except 
indirectly by Athey, who be- 
gan his career with Yorkshire, 
and Whitaker who was bom 
there. 

Only three of the party — 
Gower, Lamb and Botham — 
survive from the last tour to 
Australia in 1982-83. and only 
right from the side that went 
to West Indies last winter. 
Three others, De Freitas 
(Dominica), Slack (St Vin- 
cent) and Small (Barbados) 
come from the West Indies. 
Gatling's vice-captain will be 
Emburey. 

De Freitas came to England 
as a boy and from the Willes- 
den High School Joined the 
Lord's ground staff Now 20, 
his rise in the last year has 
been meteoric. He is an ath- 
letic all-rounder — versatile in 
the field, a crisp striker of the 
ball and a lively medium- 
paced bowler. De Freitas is an 
enterprising choice. 

Whitaker, too, has leapt to 
prominence. To be averaging 
73. even after having a bone in 
both hands broken by Mar- 
shall in mid-season, is a 
remarkable achievement! He 
plays the ball late, which is a 
good sign, and hits it hand, like 
the previous Uppinghamian 
to go on a mil tour of 
Australia. A. P. F. Chapman. 

Botham 
gives 
his word 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 
Whitaker is 24 and a good West Indies last winter are 


back-foot player (this helps in 
Australia). Robert Bailey, who 
was vying for the same place, 
plays more off the front foot; 
but he, too, had they chosen 
him, would have been a 
worthwhile gamble. As things 
are, Bailey will go only if an 
exploratory operation Lamb is 
having on a knee reveals 
serious damage. 

Much time was taken up 
deciding who should open the 
innings. In the event, neither 
of those chosen played in any 
of this season's six Test 
matches, though Athey, who 
supports Broad and Slack, 
went in first in the last of 


being held against him. 

The choice of right bats- 
men, including Botham, ruled 
out the chances of taking an 
all-rounder who could have 
provided some additional 
spin, such as Ontong or Patel. 
It has also left the tour 
selection committee (captain, 
vice-captain, manager and 
assistant manager) with the 
problem of having to provide 
enough cricket Tor anyone 
searching for form. Attempts 
are to be made to find outside 
games for those not otherwise 
engaged; but that mil not be 
easily done. There is no good 
dub (other than in the Grades) 


England tour party 


M.W. 

J IE. 

C.WJ. Athey 
LT. Botham 
bJc. Broad 
PJU. De Freitas 

GJL Dfflejr 
PJi Edmonds 


NLA. Foster 
B.N. French 

DL Gower 

A-L Lamb 
CJ. Richards 
WJlStack 
GlCjSouB 
JJ.WHtaker 


Averages and other details on page 38 


them. Slack let it be known 
earlier this summer that he 
would rather not be consid- 
ered for Test selection, his 
form was so bad. But he had a 
very good August. 

Sack is fortunate, 1 think, to 
have got in ahead of Robin- 
son. So for that matter is 
Athey, though in his case the 
selectors took into account a 
couple of poor decisions in the 
recent Test matches. They 
professed great faith in 
Athey’s technique, although at 
29 his career average is no 
better than 32 and his Test 
average a mere IS. I can't 
honestly 'say that I look for- 
ward with great relish to 
seeing Broad and Slack, two 
dourish left-handers, opening 
England's innings in Sydney; 
but they may still do a very 
fair job. No doubt Robinson's 
horrendous experiences in the 


in 


or Second XI cricket 
Australia, as there is here. 

Foster. Dilley and Small are 
the fast bowlers. Ellison and 
Thomas are to be referred to 
Ken Higgs, Geoff Arnold or 
Fred Trueman, to sort out 
their technical problems. Ed- 
monds and Emburey, at 35 
and 34 respectively, the two 
oldest members of the party, 
aie the spinners, in preference 
to Childs, Hemmings, Nick 
Cook and Ontong who were 
all considered. Although 
Emburey’s experience of cap- 
taincy is slender, he was 
preferred as vice-captain to 
the two previous England 
captains in the ream (Botham 
and Gower). French makes his 
third- tour as wicketkeeper, 
though this time as the theo- 
retical number one. Richards 
was preferred to Rhodes or 
Russell as the number two. 


mainly on grounds of batting. 

And then there is Botham. 
“We hope he's going to work 
on his bowling, and we are 
looking for full participation,'' 
Peter May said. I wonder 
whether it has ever before 
been considered necessary to 
say that of someone just 
chosen for an F.ngland tour. 
What had not occurred to the 
chairman was the unhappy 
similarity between the po- 
sition of Johnny Wardle in 
1958-59 and Botham today. ' 
As a result of a row with 
Yorkshire which led to his 
being sacked by -them, and 
subsequently to a series of 
public criticisms of the kind 
that Botham is making of 
Somerset now, WarcUe’s in- 
vitation to go to Australia was 
withdrawn. A great loss he 
was, too. Botham is fortunate, 
perhaps, that this is a more 
permissive age and that the 
standards of the TCCB may 
not be quite what MCCs were 
when they were in charge 30 
years ago. Even so, he needs to 
be on his guard or he may, like 
Waidle, find himself left be- 
hind, and that would be a pity. 

Something like 30 En glish 
first-class cricketers will be in 
Australasia this winter, coach- 
ing or playing, should an 
emergency arise. From among 
them it would be possible to 
choose the following very 
decent side: Roebuck (Somer- 
set), Terry (Hampshire), 
Prichard (Essex), Robin Smith 
(Hampshire), Stewart (Sur- 
rey). Reeve (Sussex), Lloyds 
(Gloucestershire), Rhodes 
(Worcestershire). Greg 
Thomas (Glamorgan), and 
Nick Cook (Northampton- 
shire), Illingworth (Worcester- 
shire) or Mortensen 
(Derbyshire). Getting on for 
60 registered players will be 
spending the winter away, a 
dozen or so of them in South 
Africa. 



Celebration day: Whitaker (left) and De Freitas, who were chosen for the tour party 


De Freitas and Whitaker 
exemplify modem trends 


By Paul Martin 

Ian Botham's ret ur n to the 
England Test squad came 
about after he gave assurances 
that he would adhere firmly to 
team discipline and maintain 
satisfactory conduct on and off 
the field, Mike Getting, the 
tour captain, said yesterday. 

Gatting said Botham had 
been asked to “conform with 
our set-up” and he had shown 
he could do so “magnificently” 
on and off the field during the 
last Test match against New 
Zealand. He had previously 
been told that “if be didn't like 
the arrangements we would 
have to manage without him,” 
Gatting said. 

“There was nothing aggres- 
sive about it,” he continued. 
The team would hold a lnnch 
before departure at which 
“everything will be covered” 
and all players would then be 
treated on the same footing. “I 
am confident they will all be 
sensible,” Gatting added. 

The management are deter- 
mined that tour discipline be 
rigorous enough to avert the 
sort of rancorous Press 
accusations that bedevilled the 
Carribean tour. Peter Lash, 
the tour manager, said the 
handling of Botham was “a 
matter that will be dealt with 
privately — between the 
management team and the 
player, himself”. 

Micky Stewart, who as 
assistant ma n a ger will have 
the main responsibility for 
team discipline, along with the 
captain, was at pains to stress 
that “every player without 
exception will comply with a 
tour policy that projects the 
English game of cricket in die 
right way both on and off the 
field.” 

Dedaring that the West 
Indies tour controversies were 
“gone and past”, Stewart said 
the players carried a “special 
responsibility” to the cricket 
public in view of past criti- 
cisms. "All that will be 
eliminated,” he added, and 
players would be disciplined if 
they broke the rules. 

Stress would be laid on the 
16 cricketers playing as a unit, 
he said. “I expect every player 
to respond to the potides laid 
down." 

All training and net practice 
would be compulsory but there 
would be no set bed-tunes, as, 
according to Lash, “they are 
grown men who have different 
sleeping habits”. 

Tony Brown, of Somerset, 
the manag er Of the last 01- 
fated tour to the West Indies 
and the happier tour to India, 
was dubious that any set of 
rules could provide a panacea. 
“Yon cannot devise a tour rale 
that punishes attitudes. 
Botham was not unco-op- 
erative on tour but he can be a 
bad influence. The crucial 
issue is whether a captain and 
manager can get the most out 
of people” 

He could not imagine 
Gatting being able or willing to 
enforce a rigid set of rales, as 
“be is not that sort of a 
fellow". • 


Two contemporary trends 
in English cricket are mirrored 
to perfection by 
Leicestershire's newcomers to 
the England party, De Freitas 
and Whitaker, who have trav- 
elled contrasting routes to win 
places on the Australian tour. 

De Freitas is one of seven 
brothers whose parents left 
Dominica to seek a better 
future for the family. He 
represents the many first- 
generation immigrants now 
making such an impact on the 
county game. 

Whitaker has the comfort- 
ing background of a family 
firm behind him: the York- 
shire confectioners of the 
same name. Like numerous 
other public school boys at the 
present time, he has found 
county cricket a rewarding 
occupation in every sense. 

Phillip Anthony Jason De 
Freitas, who was 20 in Feb-, 
ruaryand whose nickname is 
"Daffy”, had played only nine 
first-class matches before this 
summer, so his selection is a 
romantic one as well as being 
fully deserved. 

His all-round ability had 
already been noted before he 
leapt into prominence by 
destroying Essex inside two 
days in July at Southend, with 
six wickets for 42 in the first 
innings and seven for 44 in the 
second. He has also scored a 
maiden century this- year, 
against Kent, who give little 
away. 

De Freitas is six feet tall, 
weighs 1 2 stone, and his brisk, 
seam bowling comes onto the 
bat fester than it would appear 
from the boundary. His ap- 
proach run is spring-heeled 
and his action supple and 
whippy. 


By Richard Streeton 

. He trains hard and keeps fit 
and has not missed a game 
this year. Ken Higgs, the 
Leicestershire coachi says: 
"He is not happy unless he has 
a ball in his hand. When he's 
finished bowling be wants to 
bat and when he’s out he 
wants to bowL” 

The family left Dominica 
when De Freitas was nine and 
he remembers little about the 
Windward Island. Willesden 
High School in north-west 
London fired his enthusiasm 
for the game and a brother 
introduced him to local dub 
cricket. Hany Sharp, the for- 
mer Middlesex player, spotted 
him and he Joined the Lord's 
ground staff. Middlesex of- 
fered him a contract but be felt 

More cricket 
on page 38 

the opportunities would be 
greater at Leicester. 

He heard of his selection 
when be arrived at Grace 
Road yesterday to play a 
benefit match for Paddy Clift 
and said: “When I started the 
season, 1 had no idea how it 
would go. 1 am just nine 
wickets away from a 100 and ( 
have passed 700 runs, so 
everything now is a bonus. It 
is really quite incredible, I still 
can't believe that 1 am in the 
side for Australia. 

“I thought my prospects 
would be better at Leicester- 
shire and so it has proved. I’m 
really looking forward to play- 
ing in Australia. 1 played 
Grade cricket there for Port 
Adelaide last year and had a 
good season.” 

John James Whitaker, who 


was born in Skipton in May 
1962, was cradled at school 
by Maurice Hallam and later 
helped by Brian Davison, two 
former Leicestershire bats- 
men, both of whose preference 
for driving can be seen in 
Whitaker’s own style. 

He is six feet and 13 stone 
and hits the ball hard, whether 
on the back or front foot. 
Boycott and Amiss are among 
two of his idols and their 
determination to make big 
scores has rubbed off on him. 

Whitaker also says that 
Gower's relaxed approach 
helped him as he worked his 
way through the lower 
Leicestershire levels to the 
first team. He recently told 
one interviewer “You get to 
the stage when once you 
realize you can play, it is 
mainly a case of maintaining a 
stable mental state.” 

After three winters playing 
club cricket in Australia and 
South Africa, Whitaker de- 
cided last autumn to take a 
complete break. From the 
start of this season be has 
scored heavily and continues 
to do so after an enforced rest 
when he had a bone broken in 
each band. 

The news of Whitaker’s 
selection reached him as he 
prepared for an exhibition 
match at Scarborough yes- 
terday between Yorkshire and 
a Yorkshire Expatriates XI. 
He said: ” It was a sickening 
blow from Marshall which put 
me out for five weeks. But I 
was determined to get back 
and did a lot of running and 
stayed in training. I made a 
difficult start but that century 
against Yorkshire got me go- 
ing again.” 


COMMONWEALTH 

GAMES 

Maxwell 
told he 
must go it 
alone 

By Paul Martin 

Robert Maxwell's demands 
that the Government help baft 
out the Commonwealth Games. 
Company which has admitted 
a £4 mftDon debt, have met 
with a crashing rebuff. 

The Scottish Secretary, Mr 
Malcolm BHL-SpA, said yes- 
terday that his position — that 
the Games most Stick to their 
original promise to be self- 
financing — had not altered 


BOXING 


Storm clouds over 
the Pavilion 


By Srikmnar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 

Thunder and lightning in 
the shape of Dennis Anodes 
and Tony Sibson are expected 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Pont short 
of record 

The world cricket ball 
throwing record remains in- 
tact after yesterday's attempt 
to break it at March Town 
Cricket Club. Cambridgeshire 
(Marcus Williams writes). The 
event was won by Don 
Topley. the Essex bowler, with 
a throw of 10235m ( 1 1 lyd 2ft 
Ittin). and he beat lan Pom, 
who had been favoured to beat 
the record mark of 128.6m 
(140yd 2ft) attributed to Rob- 
ert Percival in the 188%, into 
second place. 

In perfect conditions POnt's 
best throw in four attempts 
was 1 09yd Oft 4%u. which 
was well short of the 138 yards 
that he threw in Cape Town in 
1981. Darren Cook, of 
Hunstanton CC, finished 
third yesterday with 92.70m. 

Pont said afterwards that a 
large television and media 
presence in expectation of a 
new record had made him 
“extremely nervous" and be 
never approached his true 
form. "But the worst thing was 
being beaten by one of my 
team-mates — I'll never hear 
the end of it.” he said. 



Pont: extremely nervous 


Graham date 

Herol Graham, the British 
and European middleweight 
champion, of Sheffield, is 
expected to meet Mark 
Kaylor. of West Ham, later 
this year in a final eliminator 
for World Boxing Association 
title. The winner is likely to 
meet the champion, Marvin 
Hagler. in March or April. 

Graham, who recently 
underwent hospital tests for 
headaches, was instructed by 
the British Boxing Board of 
Control on Monday to with- 
draw from his contest with 
Tony Harrison, of the United 
States, at the Albert Hall in 
September 17. 


Boycott back 


The British Gliding Associ- 
ation team of six pilots to 
represent. Britain at the world 
championships in Australia in 
January next year will be: 
Andrew Davis. Christopher 
Garton, Brian Spreckley, Da- 
vid Wan, Martyn Wells. Jus- 
tin Wills. 

Spreckley. the 1986 15- 
metre champion, rejoins the 
team, white Wells, the 1986 
standard class champion, was 
the highest-placed British pi- 
lot in Italy in 1985. 


Geoff Boycott has been 
included in the Yorkshire 
squad fof the final champion- 
ship match of the season 
against Northamptonshire 
beginning at Scarborough to- 
day. The 45-year-old opener 
has been out of the first team 
since breaking a bone in his 
left hand two months ago. 
Boycott, who will be looking 
for a new contract for next 
season, needs a further 69 runs 
to complete 1,000 first class 
runs this summer. 


despite the announcement of 
the deficit and a letter from Mr 
Maxwell asking for mo- 
tion. 

Government sources said 
that Mrs Thatcher, the Prime 
Minister, who discussed the 
matter during a visit to Scot- 
land last week, was equally 
adamant 

A Cabinet sonree suggested 
that Mr Maxwell should use 
his own resources to rescae the 
creditors. “If Mr Maxwell 
really is concerned about his 
creditors,” the Cabinet source 
said, “he and his Mirror 
Group should make good the 
losses in recognition of the 
huge publicity he's got It's a 
flea-bite to him.” 

Games sources disclosed 
yesterday that the Mirror 
nop would pay £250, OOC 
all its trackside advertising, its 
displays on the main electronic 
scoreboard and its hospitality 
suite. “A very good bargain for 
them,” one Games Company 
director said. “But then at that 
late stage we were in no 
position for tough 
bargaining.” Mr Maxwell and 
the Mirror Group had rejected 
requests for advertising or 
sponsorship 15 months before- 
hand, be noted. 

Mr Arthur Campbell, a 
Games Company director and 
Scottish Commonwealth 
Games Council rhaimmn, 
urged the Government at least 
to pay the security costs, 
which at over £700,000 bad 
been several times higher than 
original estimates. 

The Cabinet source main- 
tained that the Government 
had no moral or political 
incentive to act: the African- 
led boycott had made little 
financial difference, contrary 
to Mr Maxwell's chums. 

The creditors, he said, 
should deal with any failure to 
pay in the normal manner 
available through the law. 
Edinburgh District CoonciL, 
which met Mr Maxwell this 
week, has given him another 
three weeks to finalize his 
fund-raising efforts. 

MrMaxweD said last month 
that if the Scottish Office 
would not budge “the company- 
will certainly dose down and 
let the Government pick up the 
pieces”. He now maintains 
that he still has further 
sources to tap, including the 
Japanese benefactor, Mr 
Ryicfai Sasakawa — though he 
has said that he could cover 
only a part of the deficit 
One director aigned yes- 
terday that Mr Maxwell 
would himself have to bail out 
the company to avoid possible 
penalties under the Insolvency 
Act because be had caused the 
Games to continue naming up 
debts when many directors 
had felt legally obliged to 
liquidate .-the company. And 
Mr Maxwell's decision to pay 
out all creditors owed less than 
£5,000 in foil while paying the 
rest only one third constituted 
preferential treatment that 
contravened proper insolvency 
practice, he argued. 

Several directors fear that 
unless Mr Maxwell himself 
comes up with the money they 
will all be pilloried by a 
financial investigation by the 
liquidator. 


to hit Alexandra Pavilion. 
London, tonight, when they 
meet for the woiid tight 
heavyweight championship. 
The bout so fer has not 
generated enough energy to 
make a sleeping dog's tail 
twitch. But it could all change 
as Sibson, by moving up from 
middleweight, tries to succeed 
where Sugar Ray Robinson 
failed. 

The evening’s proceedings 
promise to be every bit as 
exciting as Bruno's world 
championship challenge 
against Tim Witherspoon, of 
the United States, in July. 
How will the heavier, taller 
Andries tackle the shorter, 
more experienced Sibson? 
How will Sibson .avoid the 
bull-tike rushes’ and wild 
swings of the champion that 
could send him out of the ring 
and into next year? 

It says much for Sibson's 
stature that the Andries camp 
believe that victory tonight 
will make Andries as well- 
known as Bruno. The cham- 
pion may be too shy to shout 
his own praises from the 
rooftops of Stoke Newington 
High Street, but Greg 
Steenejiis manager, says that 
a spectacular destruction of 
Sibson will work wonders for 
Andries's popularity. 

Even though the champion 
does not have the vaguest idea 
about the finer points of 
boxing, and is almost 33 years 
old, against Sibson's 29, he is 
the toughest, fittest, and most 
determined fighter in the 
game, and Steene believes that 
by the middle rounds his 
strength will tdl against the 
biown-up, world-ranked 
middleweight. “While Sibson 
will not be able to hurt 
Dennis, Dennis will hurt him 
because be cannot take a 
punch any more. He is the 
most experienced fighter in 
Britain, but he has had too 
many' wars and is on the 
decline. Dennis will stop 
him,” Steene says. 

Sibson. however, with 60 
contests behind him against 
Andries’s 35, thinks he will 
know too much for the cham- 


pion. Sibson has very fast 
hands, and he is clever at 
inside work, while the cham- 
pion has no idea of how to 
score in the close encounters. 
He relies on keeping his 
distance and rushing in tnro 
ing punches from crazy angles, 
even felling over his own feet 
with the impetus of his blows. 
. Though experts give Sibson 
tittle chance of going against 
tradition and history, the 
chunky challenger can take 
heart from the feet that he has 
always had to box taller 
middleweights like Kaylor, 
Collins, Mutti, and Davison, 
who was six feet tall. Sibson 
just went in and threw them 
off their stride. Apart from his 
one round knock-out by the 
world-class Lotte Mwale, of 
Zambia. Sibson has always 
been successful in seeing off 
middleweights who later grew 
into light-heavies. One such 
was Bonny McKenzie. While 
Sibson stopped McKenzie in 
1976 and 77, the Welshman 
had been Andries's first defeat 
in 77. Though Andries 
avenged this defeat in 1978, he 
was unable to stop McKenzie. 
Yet another opponent of 
Sibson, Mutti, went on to box 
for the world cruiserweight 
title. 

But this is all pre-Hagler. 
After his dramatic six-round 
defeat by the world champion 
four years ago, Sibson has 
never been the same, and as 
years went by looked unsteady 
on his feet and unhappy about 
taking a shot on the chin. He 
was shaken by Sanda and 
floored by Rivera not long 
ago. Andries on the other 
hand, in spite of bis years, is 
stronger and fresher, having 
had 25 fewer contests. 

If Sibson can stay dose and 
on top of the champion all the 
way and not allow him to 
disengage and rash him, he 
should be able to survive and 
lift the title on points. How- 
ever, everything will depend 
not so much on strength as on 
whether Sibson's chin can rake 
an Andries special, or whether 
his legs, which have served 
him well in 10 years' 
campaigning can see him out 
of trouble for 1 2 torrid rounds. 


GOLF 

Norman risks 
$500,000 
sacrifice 

Greg Norman plays in the 
Panasonic European Open, 
starting at Sunningdale tomor- 
row. well aware that he could 
forfeit a $500,000 bonus to US 
PGA champion Bob Tway 
(Mitchell Platts writes). 

Norman has concluded his 
US tour programme, in pref- 
erence to playing in Europe 
and his native Australia, with 
winnings of $653,296; so 
Tway ($630,116) is likely to 
overhaul him and collect the 
bonus for being number one m 
the money-list. 

Norman, who has averaged 
$9,073 for each of his 72 
rounds in' the United States 
this season, said: “Bob plans 
to see the season out so he’ll 
have to break a leg not to 
move past me. 

"But if he has played 38 
events to my 19 then I 
consider that I will have 
scored a moral win. 

“The US PGA told me that 
if I played one more event 
over there then I would prob- 
ably get the ‘Player of the 
Year’ Award. It would be nice, 
but I don't mind sacrificing it 
so that 1 can play in Europe 
and Australia. I enjoy playing 
the world tour - travelling is 
in my blood." 

More golfi page 35 


TENNIS 

German team 
gets boost 
with Becker 

Bonn (Reuter) - Boris 
Becker, the Wimbledon 
champion, was named yes- 
terday in the West German 
team to face Ecuador in the 
world group play-off tie in 
Essen from October 3-5. 

- His colleagues will be Eric 
Jden, Damir Keretic and 
Ricla Osterthun. Becker and 
Jden will play the singles 
matches. 

Mexico beat West Ger- 
many, last year's Davis Cud 
firaiists. 3-2 in Mexico City in 
a first round world group tie 
last March and the Ger many 
must defeat Ecuador to avoid 
relegation to the European 
zone of the competition. 

i-isa Bonder, 
of the United States, seeded 
seventh, was eliminated by 
Denmark s top player. Tine 
Scheuer-Larsen, 6-3 3-6 7-5 in 
foe firet round of the $300,000 
Pan Pacific Open women's 
tennis tournament here yes- 
terday. 3 


Dixon’s 
name 
in neon 
lights 

From Stuart Jones 
Football Correspondent 
Stockholm 

The room was being 
hoovered as Bobby Robson 
walked in to announce bp 
England side for the only 
practice match — against Swe- 
den here this evening - before 
entering the qualifying stages 
of the European champion- 
ship. “I could do with that”, he 
said, as the machine was 
switched off. "I tuxd a 
sweeper”. 

The spontaneous comment 
illustrated that Robson is re- 
laxed. So is his squad, who 
trained under a doudkss sky 
yesterday. But all that is about 
to and particularly for 

Dixon. Had it not been for a 
lengthy list of casualties, he 
would not have been chosen to 
lead die attack. 

He stands in the quene of 
forwards behind Lineker, 
Beardsley and Hateley. all of 
whom are injured, and Barnes, 
who has been invited to come 
in from the wing and share the 
centre of the stage. Even 
though Dixon has previously 
made only four full appear- 
ances, the match represents a 
final audition. 

Robson conveyed the mes- 
sage as dearly as if he was 
displaying it in neon lights. 
“He scored twice on his full 
debut in Mexico against West 
Germany last year and two 
more in his next game in Los 
Angeles against the United 
States which, without wishir 
to be disrespectful, 
mean very ranch. 


X" 


)\ 
‘ **, 


Anke V6lker. of East Ger- 
many. equalled the women’s 
air pistol world record of 387 
prams w win the gold medal at 
SET* champion- 

fey. S'* 1 ' ^ B?r,in - 


England team 

P SMton (Southampton), V Ander- 
son (ArsenafL K Sansom (Arsenal). 
G Hoddle (Tottenham). A Martin 
(West Ham). T Butcher (Rangers), T 
Steven (Everton). R WBklns (AC 
Milan), K Dixon (Cheteea), J Bamea 
(Watford), S Hodge (Aston VMl 
Substitutes: D Seaman (OPR), G 
Stevens (Tottenham). S Robson 
(Arsenal), A Cottee (West Ham). C 
Waddle (Tottenham). 

“In his last game, in Israel, 
he didn't play that well. That 
was partly my fault because he 
was rusty. His opportunities 
have been limited bnthe has to 
show os that he can make it at 
international level. This is his 
chance and, if be doesn't take 
it, be can have no complaints.” 

Dixon himself would have 
complained if he bad not been 
selected. He had said that he 
would have felt that he was 
wasting his time. Now, as he 
steps into a vacancy that may 
be only temporary, anyway, he 
takes with him a record that is 
fer from encouraging. This 
yeftr he has scored a mere 
three goals. 

The striking rate, overall 
ability and current form of 
Cottee suggested that he might 
be Barnes's partner. Doubt- 
less he wftl be in the future and 
possibly even during the later 
stages tonight Robson pointed 
out that West Ham United's 
representative has “time on 
his side, more so than Dixon.” 

The other member of the 
team with an individual, albeit 
lighter, harden to carry is 
Hodge. He has retained his 
place on the left of midfield 
but, unlike Steven on the other 5 
Bank, he has yet to confirm 
that he is comfortable there 
outside Hod die and Wilkins. 

The two wide players will at 
least have the benefit of an 
eves snrfece. The middle of 
the pitch in the Raasunda 
Stadium, where rock concerts 
were staged under driving rain 
last week, is so rutted and 
humpy in parts that. Robson 
was prompted to describe it as 
"dreadful.” 

Shilton is given the cap- 
taincy that he held during the 
last three World Cap ties, 
although Wilkins roll be the 
natural leader. Any suggestion 
that he is being punished for 
being sent off in Mexico were 
dismissed instantly by Rob- 
son. "If that was the case, he 
wouldn't even be in the 
squad,” he said. “I just wanted 
to dear np a messy situation.” 

He would also prefer the two 
men that he has left out in the 
cold to be brought back into 
contention. He has asked per- 
mission for Watson, who is 
unfortunate to be omitted, and 
Thomas, one of his three 
newcomers, to join the other 
five substitutes and to be 
smtably dressed in case of 
emergency. 

Stewart Robson will he on 
the bench even thongb be 
experienced a slight leatf-i* 
rente of a groin strain yes- * 
ferday. The others, a nd 
especially Barnes, confirmed 
their sharpness during train- 
ing and all are fit That is more 
than can be said for the 
Swedes, who lost Torteo 
Nielssoo, one of their most 
exp erienced internationals, 
before the season started. He 
retired. 

Four others - Petassna, 
Helstrom, Ma gnusso n arid 
Cornelias soo - who could be 
considered forwards are alsotl 
unavailable, as is their goaF 
keeper, RaveHL His unlikely 
replacement is MoUer, once of 
"isfol City. He has not been 
chosttj since a World Cup 
qualifying tie against No rtir 
ern Irelan d seven years ago- _ 

More football 
— page 38 






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Wall Street 22 
OKopaaT Nras 


Coameat 23 
Stock Market 23 
Foreign Esccb 23 
XratelOirts 23 
MewyMrkta23 


Unit Trasts 24 
Commodities 24 
USM Prion 24 
Share Prices 25 
Commcrcini- 
Pxoperty 26 
Teapn 27 



TIMES 


THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 11 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


FT 30 Share 

- 1317.9 (—13.2) 

FT-$E 100 

1663.5 (-9.9) 

Bargains 

21609 

USM (Datastream) * 

.127.35 (+0.02) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4810 (-0.0005) 

- W German mark 
3.0531 (-0.0073) 

Trade-weighted 
71 .4 (same) 

Norway 
oil cut 

Norway said yesterday it 
wooid cut crude oU expons by 
10 per cent in November ana 
December to try to boost 
world oil prices. 

The Oil and Energy Min- 
istry said in a statement that 
' Norway would refine royalty 
crude — oil produced for the 
government - and store it for, 
“permanent emergency pre- 
paredpess reserves” 

The ministry added it was 
woridng on plans to im- 
plement new measures after 
■ tbe two-montb curb ended. 
Norway produces about 
880,000 barrels of oil a day. 

Attention will now focus on 
Britain, which produces about 
25 million barrels of North 
Sea oil a day. 

So for Britain has resisted 
OPECs calls for curbs on 
output 

Course maintained, page 22 

Blow for T&N 
takeover bid 

The hotly contested £260 
million bid by the asbestos 
group Turner and Newall for 
the engineering group AE 
suffered a blow last night 
when some institutions 
changed their mind and de- 
cided not to support the 
takeover. 

Sir John CoIIyear, the AE 
chairman, saidTmlders of 2.7 
per cent of the shares had 
withdrawn their acceptances 
of the offer, which was about a 
quarter of total ac ceptan ces 

Nicholas to go 

Mi- Tom Nicholas wiH-rer 
sign as chairman and manag- 
ing director of Columbia 
Pictures. Corporation on 
Jariuiary I to return to Austra- 
lia. He will become a director 
of Columbia Pictures 
Proprietary, 

BAT ahead 

BAT Industries, the to- 
bacco,, financial services and 
retailing group; raised pretax 
profits from £438 million to 
£539 million in the first six 
months of this year. The 
interim dividend is raised 
from 4.75p a share to 5.5p. 

Tempos, page 27 

BTR up 34% 

1 BTR lifted its interim pre- 
tax profits by 34 per cent to 
£203 million in the six months 
to June 28 on turnover up 10 
per cent to £1.8 billion. The 
interim dividend was raised a 
penny to 3.5p net 

Tempos, page 27 

Profits jump 

Prudential Corporation, the 
life and general Insurance 
company, made pretax profits 
in the six months to June 30 of 
£64.7 million, an increase of 
43 per cent. The dividend was 
raised 16.3 per cent to 1 Op net 
Tempws, page 27 


deals secure 


Gazenove, London's pre- 
eminent stockbroking .firm, 
has taken two decisive steps to 
secure its independence after 
big bang — the City’s pyro- 
technic metaphor for October 
27 when' the Stock- Exchang e 
practice of chargin g minimum 
commissions for broking ser- 
vices ends. 

It has arranged a syndicate 
of eight companies, six from 
outside its immediate orbit, 
which wifi make available to 
the firm “adequate resources 
to underwrite issues when 
required.” 

It is also raising about £32 
million of additional capital 
through a 15-year variable- 
rate subordinated loan, the 
interest on which is geared to 
Cazenove's profits subject to a 
minim am rate of 8 per cent. 

Mr John Kemp-Welch, one 
of the joint senior p ar tner s , 
who like all 36 Gazenove 
partners prizes the firm's in- 
dependence for practical as 
wen as famil y and historical 
reasons, has drawn strength 
from the strong support given 
to the .firm's decision by its 
corporate and institutional 
cIient$.“We are confident that 
we will be able to remain 
competitive and maint ain our 
position in the market place 
after October,” he said. 

The syndicate, which is 
making available a facility, to 
quote the other senior partner, 
Mr Anthony Forbes, “of some 
hundreds of millions”, is 
made up of the Bank of. 
Scotland, whose detailed ad- 
vice and guidance has been 
especially valuable; Whan 

Reed pays 
£170m for 
US papers 

ByLawreace Lever 

Reed • JaternationaV the - ' 
publishing,' paints and paper 
group; is to bolster its US 
magazines ' publishing, in- 
terests through theacqiusition 
Of : a subsidiary of Dun ; & 
Bradstreet Corporation udiich 
publishes 20 trade and pro- 
fessional magazines, fin- $250 
million (£17u minion). 

Cahners' - Publishing Com- 
pany, Reed's US publishing 
subsidiary, has reached agree- 
ment in principle to buy 
Technical Publishing Com- 
pany, the publisher of the 
titles. 

Technical . Publishing pro- 
duced an operating profit of 
$24 million, before deduction 
of unquantified overhead ex- 
penses, on sales of $105 
million in its last financial 
year. Final agreement is ex- 
pected within 30 days. 

At June 30, 1986, Technical 
Publishing was valued at $41 
million, including net tangible 
assets of approximately $22 
million. 

The titles indude specialist 
market leaders such as the 
American Journal of Medicine 
and the American Journal of 
Surgery. 

“We have been wanting to 
acquire Technical Publishing 
for some time ” Mr Leslie 
Car penter. Reed chairman 
and chief executive, said. 

“It is consistent with our 
aim of -developing- our 
publishing activities and fur- 
ther extending our interests m 
the US.” . - 

Cahners will take oyer the 
management of the titles. It 
already publishes 36 titles in 
the US, of which 26 are leaders 
in their industry sectors, 
according to Reed 
International's 1986 annual 
report. 


By Kenneth Fleet 

Investment, which is part of 
Henderson Administration 
and thus one of die family ; 
Cazenove Securities Ltd; and 
five top drawer insurance 
companies, whore status and 
cash flows leave nothing to be 
desired: Legal & General, 
Norwich Union, Royal Insur- 
ance group companies, Scot- 
tish Equitable and Standard 
Life.' 

At a stroke, any fears that 
Cazenove would lack suf- 
ficient resources to- art as a 
principal in the new issue 
market have been Temoved. 
The firm not only has a 
consider able sum avtlable to 
use at its discretion, it also has 

Comment 23 

the knowledge that it could go 
bade to the syndicate “if a 
particular deal stretched this 
sum.” 

The subscribers of the new 
fixed capital, in addition to 
the five insurance companies 
in the syndicate and Witan, 
include the no less lustrous 
Commercial Union, Equity & 
Law, Friends* Provident, 
Peart and Sun life. 

Mr Kemp-Welch described 
the two arrangements as 
“arm's length deals. No fa- 
vours are expected on either 
side, but we are most excited 
that such quality nam es are 
prepared to back us. The 
arrangements are adequate to 
ott needs, bearing in mind 
that we are not hankers and we 
shall not be in the gilt-edged 
market as a market maker”. 

Cazenove has scarcely wa- 


vered in fts belief that“there is 
3 major role for a strong 
independent broker able to 
provide independent advice.” 
Flexibility is also important — 
“not having to refer back” 
Like the wise owls they are, 
the Cazenove partners rec- 
ognize that “being distinctive 
in the market place is no bad 
thing.” 

Both senior partners 
emphasized the importance of 
“continuity” in service to 
cheats and the high value 
placed on personal 
relationships. 

“It takes decades to put 
down roots in international 
business and to achieve the 
personal relationships we like 
to have.” 

Cazenove. which employs 
more than 500 people world- 
wide, has undergone consid- 
erable changes in recent years. 
In the last two years it has 
invested £10 million in a 
development programme. 

It believes it is well estab- 
lished in all five sectors of its 
business: corporate finance, 
institutional broking, inter- 
national activities, investment 
management and money 
broking. It is now confident 
that it has the resources as well 
as the expertise to act as 
principal in new issue under- 
writing and in block hading 
and make r making in the 
secondary market 

Mr Kemp-Welch saidTIn 
these two areas we are build- 
ing on existing strength. But 
we recognize that we stand or 
foil by the practical virtues of 
our independence.” 





a* 

■>V. 



Partners who prize independence: John Kemp-Welch and Anthony Forbes 


Strong growth in calls helps 
lift Telecom profits 12% 


Channon cautious 
on Gatt talks 

By Derek Harris^ Industrial Editor 


British Telecom is continu- 
ing to benefit from strong 
volume growth in telephone 
calls, it was revealed 
yesterday. 

Stripped of the effect of 
price changes, inland caD turn- 
over was up 6 per cent in the 
three months to June 30, whDe 
international calls were 10 per 
cent higher than the corr- 
esponding period last year, 
which was also a strong 
quarter. 

Telephone calk accounted 
for 52 per cent of turnover in 
the first quarter, when total 
turnover rose 12 per cent to 
£23 Union. 

Pretax profit was also up 12 
per cent, to £502 million while 
operating profit rose 10 per 
cMrf to £573 million- Exclud- 
ing the effects of the the Mitel 
acquisition, which was com- 
pleted in March, the operating 


By Carol Ferguson 
profit increase would have 
been eves higher at 13 per 
cent. The consolidated loss in 
Mitel was £3 mOfion for the 
quarter. 

British Telecom has bene- 
fited from the na up to the 
City's big barm through a 
higher level of mstaHation of 
private c ircui t s. Rental in- 
come, accounting for 33 per 
cart of turnover, improved by 
1 4 pa cat in the quarter of 
which 2 percentage points was 
attributable to new private 

circuits installed. 

New exchange fines ac- 
counted for 4 per cent of the 
growth in rentals and the 
temammg 8 per cat was the 
effect of JMfiusting prices. 

Mitel is on a ckarty improv- 
ing trend after two years. of 
substantial losses. In the year 
to March, the losses were 
increased by ence-for-oll bal- 


Next week’s meeting to 
-establish an agenda for- the 
new round of General Agree- 
ment or Tariffs and Trade 
negotiations J could ran into 
problemvand success is “by 
no means a certainty.” 

.This warning came yes- 
terday from Mr Paul 
Channon, Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry, as he 
prepared to leave tomorrow 
for the meeting at Punta del 
Erie, Uruguay, where he will 
not only be speaking for 
Britain but playing a key 
European Economic Commu- 
nity role because of Britain's 
presidency of the EEC 
Mr Channon said: “There 
are serious issues to be ad- 
dressed and there is quite a lot 
of disagreement around But I 
remain cautiously 

optimistic.” 

Next week’s talks are crucial 
because they will set the 
bounds for the negotiations, 
which are expected to go on 
for several years. Among 


controversial issues are 
whether financial, pro- 
fessional and other services 
should be covered in the new 
Gatt round with form export 
subsidies and the Japanese 
trade surplus.' 

The indusion of services for 
the first time in Gatt is being 
pursued by the United States, 
and Mr Channon made it dear 
that Britain will be supporting 
thatcalL 

The British team is nnlikely 
to support an idea floated by 
Argentina that a separate 
committee should be set up by 
the international community 
to deal with the lifting of 
national restrictions on pro- 
vision of services. 

Mr Channon, who had talks 
with French ministers earlier 
this week on Gatt issues, was 
optimistic about co-ordinat- 
ing European Community 
views even though there were 
bound to be what he described 
as “some differences of 
emphasis.” 


BAe sets aside half of £80m 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


British Aerospace, which 
yesterday reported pretax 
profits of £803 motion for the 
first half has set aside just 
over half of it — £44 million — 
to cover the cost 6f dosing its 
factory at Weybridge, Surrey. 

The cost, covering mainly 
redundancy payments for tire 
2,500 workers, will not be 
incurred until 1987 and 1988, 
bat has been included in the 
current year’s six-month ac- 
counts as an extraordinary 
item. 

Sir Austin Rsarce, the chair- 
man, stressed that the cost did 
not take account of the in- 
creased efficiency of BAe that 
would occur after the closure, 
nor of the proceeds from the 
sale of the site, expected to be 
around £100 mfllion. 

The company's trading 


profit of £95.6 .million was 
slightly lower than a year ago 
because of the cost of a strike 
at its Tornado fighter plant at 
Warton near Manchester. But 
product sales for the six 
months at £1,443 milium were 
up by 10 per cent. 

Military aircraft and guided 
weapon systems continue to 
be BAe's chief source of profit, 
but avU aircraft sales, hit by 
strong competition, two small 
airline defaults and adverse 
exchange rate movements, 
produced a deficit of £53 
million. 

Sir Austin said that pro- 
vision had been made for 
anticipated future losses on 
sales contracts over the next 
few years. The 125 business jet 
was now in profit, the 
Jetstream was breaking even 


SPORT 35 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 39 


Institutions 

lineup 

behind 

Guinness 

% Alison Eadie 

The chances of Guinness 
winning support in its crucial 
shareholder meeting today 
were greatly enhanced yes- 
terday when three of its big- 
gest institutional shareholders 
declared for the board. 

The Prudential Corporation 
(with 4.8 per cent), the Nor- 
wich Union (4.04 per cent) 
and Atlantic Nominees (3.5 
percent) said they would vote 
in favour of the board's 
resolution. The Prudential 
and Norwich, however, ex- 
pressed strong reservations 
about the happenings of the 
post few weeks. 

Prudential Portfolio Man- 
agers, the Prudential's invest- 
ment arm. said its decision 
was made “notwithstanding 
great concern over the changes 
in the board structure at 
Guinness.” 

It pointed out that the 
decision was heavily in- 
fluenced by the formation of 
the non-executive committee 
and the appointment of four 
non-executive directors. 

“The management of 
Guinness would have a suf- 
ficiently demanding task with- 
out also having to cope with 
significant changes in the 
management at this lime,” it 
added. 

A spokesman for Norwich 
Union said: “We don't like 
what happened or the way it 
happened, but our primary 
interest now is the future of 
Guinness." 

Atlantic Nominees said it 
strongly supported the leader- 
ship of the chief executive, Mr 
Ernest Saunders. 

Today's extraordinary 
meeting of shareholders, at the 
Mount Royal Hotel, London, 
will vote on the new board 
structure proposed by 
Guinness. 

Mr Saunders wishes to 
scrap the two-tier structure, 
promised during the bid for 
Distillers, and replace it with a 
single structure, including a 
non-executive committee. 
The board has proposed that 
he should become chairman 
instead of Sir Thomas Risk. 
Governor of the Bank of 
Scotland. . 

-Four new non-executive 
directors — Mr Ian Mac- 
Laurin, chairman ofTesco, Sir 
David Pfestow, chief exec- 
utive of Vickers, Mr Anthony 
Greener, managing director of 
Dunhill, and Sir Norman 
Mac far lane, chairman of 
Macforiane — have also been 
nominated. 

Several Scottish fund man- 
agers and Mr Paddy Unaker, 
deputy managing director of 
the M&G group, intend to 
speak and vote against the 
Guinness resolution. 


ante sheet ad justm en ts and 
the effects of rationalization. 

British Telecom shed SjOOO 
staff in the last year, continu- 
ing the trend of the last four 
years. It ts negotiating a pay 
package which includes 
changes in work practices to 
allow more efficient and cost 
effective working. In return, it 
is offering a pay award signifi- 
cantly ahead of the rate of 
Inflation. 

British Telecom is in the 
midst of n big renewal pro- 
gramme and the company said 
that depredation is growing 

Depredation charges for the 
quarter were £315 million, £64 
million more than the same 
quarter last year. Mncfa of the 
increase was attributed to 
foster writing off of analogue 
wr h» iy « which an being 
replaced with System X. 

Ship Canal stake page 27 


and the 146 regional airliner 
was expected to be in profit by 
1989. 

The group's order book has 
been boosted by the recent 
military aircraft order from 
Saudi Arabia, the largest ever 
defence contract won by Brit- 
ain for which BAe is the prime 
contractor. Sir Austin said- 
that five of the 1 3 memoranda 
of undemanding covering the 
deal bad now been im- 
plemented andthe contract 
was “in very good shape.” 

The company was continu- 
ing to put together a proposal 
for the Government's launch 
aid for the A330 and A340, the 
new long-range airliners being 
planned by Airbus Industrie. 

The BAe board has declared 
an interim dividend of 6.4p, 
up 10 per cent. j 


Deal lapses 

Sime Darby's agreement to 
sell IT International to Dun- 
lop Malaysian Industries so 
SD Holdings, a Sime subsid- 
iary. could acquire Dunlop 
shares, has lapsed because 
official approvals have not 
been received. 


BICC profit fall disappoints 
despite cost base reduction 


STOCK MARKETS MAIM PRICE CHANGES 


MniYoik 

Dow Jones 188076 (-338T 

tSS DOW 1661 9.33 (+145-24) 


Heng Kong: 


1976.16 (+10.14) 

lan — 296J9HM 


Sydney. AO 1232-2 (+117) 

SSfeank 2070.6 (+6.0) 

gSSS®! 3626.00 (-8^ 

Paris: CAC 402-3 (+1-9) 

Zurich: 

London dosing prices Page 25 

interest rates 

.London: 

Bank Bass: 10% 

3-month 

3-month eligible biteS" >+**% 


RISES: 

Tate & Lyle 
Baggeridge Brick — 

VG Instruments 

Bemaven Brewery — 
Lee International — 
Scottish TV — * — 
AuttA Wftxxg — — 

DRG - — r ~ — 

Combined English — 

FALLS! 

BtCC 1 

British Telecom 

GKN 

Lucas — 

Costaln Group : 

APV 

DavyCorp. , — ; 

Aurora — 

British Aerospace — 

Laird Grow 

Simon Engineering - 
LeisureTsno Intrri -~- 


.623p +130 
. 390p+30p 
. 512p +22p 


A weak Australian dollar 
and foiling oil revenues had a 
damaging effect on BICCs 
first half results. Profits before 
interest, even after the help of 
a £5.8 mfllion pension fund 
“holiday," were slightly lower 
at £54.4 million compared 
with £55.7 million last year. 

At the pretax level, profits 
increased from £45.5 million 
to. £47 million. Turnover fell 
from £1047 million to £977 
mflli on. The interim dividend 
was maintained at 3^p. 

Of the divisions, Balfour 
Beatty, the construction com- 
pany, increased its profits by a 
third. Elimination of loss at 
BICC Technologies gave it a 
sixfold increase. 

However, the larger di- 


By Alexandra Jackson 
visions did not fore as well 
Competition from Europe and 
lack of Middle East work 
depressed BICC Cables’ prof- 
its, while the foil in the 
Australian dollar depressed 
the contribution from BICC 
International. 

• COMMENT: It would be 
difficult to fault the intentions 
of the new management at 
BICC It is working hard to get 
the coDossus moving but it is 
taking' rather longer than the 
bulls who have been buying 
the shares over the last year 
might have hoped. 

The business has been 
rationalized and pension fund 
write backs are being used 
further to reduce the group's 
cost base. BICCs inter- 


national balance has chanjpH, 
reducing exposure to the vol- 
atile Australian economy 

Although a lower tax charge 
and a smaller minority will 
push earnings up at least 10 
per cent this year, profits are 
unlikley to exceed £100 mil- 
lion. This is disappointing 
since estimates were 20 per 
cent higher than this at the 
beginning of the year. Over 1 6 
million shares were placed last 
month, following the purchase 
of Ha den Building Services 
Division. 

This, and the feci that 
forecasts are coming down, is 
likely to leave the shares dull 
in the short term unless a 
predator starts sniffing 
around. 


British 

TELECOM 


'i .V* v- < v • . ' ■ i .. 1 

v . • • . .• _;•* - - : x . ; . 4 .• •• . 

i S X/ •- • ■•••'<' ;■ > v V Vv- . 

-\>v; >.C v A * 

' t v£ l-V-> 5 

w., W;* *i» ; - V 


quarter 

3 months e«CtetT30June 


* J, r ' ‘ • 




519' 






F 'fCi-li . r- v / v v: 

i w, s ; *; . 

ix) . . ■'.si;'-..' 


rjgsa 

is 


27Qp(-1f 

-Jzpm 

27Bp-1C 

540p(-1E 


Coslain profits down 20% 


J 




lW 

178p 1-IOp 
229p -13p 


■ ■ $ 


Prime fists ' 

Federal Funds 5%% w 

.1 

.; CURRENCIES 

London 

*e $14810 fcSlJgHjL,. 

fc DM3.0531 S: DM20635 

fcSwFrZ.4762 & Wex: 111-0 

ECU £0-690216 

£ (ndex-71.4 SDR £0.810473 


, GOLD 

London Fixing: „ ■ 

282-25 ) 

NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Oct 
* Denote* 


(Oct) pm S14.60bbl (514.90) 
mbs fetes* trading price 


• An uneven incidence of 
property profits led Contain to 
report yesterday interim pre- 
tax profits to June 30 down 20 
per cot on 1985 to £21-2 
million. 

' Trading profits rose 10 per 
cent to £23 million and turn- 
over fell, from £449 million to 
£375 minio n. The diridcad, 
payable on a share capital 
increased after last June’s 
rights issue, rose from 63p to 
7p. 

Mining profits maided last 
year’s first half, helped by the 
Dolet Hals joint venture Ip 
-L opsfana. Housing was ahead 
while engineering and 
contracting held their own In a 
competitive market. 

Property should redress the 
balance in the second half 
a lthough profits will foil short 
of last year's £1&8 ntilEon. 

Costain should handle 18 


By Onr City Staff 

nuOkm tonnes of coal in 
America and Australia this 
year. Excluding the 25-year 
contract at Dole* Hills, about 
40 pm cent of CostainV coal 
operation is exposed to the 
spot market 

• COMMENT; In the past 
five years Costain has worked 
bard- to bn3d -a balanced 
business, encompassing tra- 
ditional buOdhig and contact- 
ing, process engineering, 
private honsebiilding and the 
mining of cb&l and other 
minerals as a contractor and 
owner. This strategy has done 
much to fill the gap left when 
the lucrative Middle Eastern 
work, which characterised 
Costem's portfolio of work in 
the 1970s, ended. Moreover, 
the group is becoming more 
marketing oriented. It's initi- 
ating work by being in* 
stramentel in ttufi—nring - 


• The City is not entirely 1 
fa mil hi r with toe new shape of | 
Costain, particularly viz-*- viz 
the incidence of property prof- 
its. As a consequence, analysts 
were taka fay snprise this 
week by the modest contribu- 
tion from property. 

In the US, the group is an 
exceptionally low-cost pro- 
ducer of coal which enables it 
to remain competitive. This 
activity should account for 40 
pa cent id trading profits in 
1986. 

Although expectations may 
be tempered slightly after 
these results. Costain should 
make £65 mfllion this year. 
The shares are selling on a 
prospective p/e for less than 
10 t imp* earnings, and appear 
to offer better value for money 
than Wimpey or Taylor 
Woodrow. 


I Turnover up 12% 


■ Profit before taxation up 12% 

■ Earnings per ordinary share up 21% 

Investing for growth 


ESSSSKSSSSCSSIgiS L ~ fc< ° s * 8ra 




BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


WALL STREET 


THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 1 1 1986 


NEWS ANALYSIS 




Thatcher maintains course on N Sea oil 


New York (Renter) — Wall 1,880.62 at one stage, with the 
Street stocks were quick to transport average np 0.38 at 
retreat id moderately active 782.88 and the utilities in- 
early trading yesterday. Trad- dicator up 083 at 21130. The 
era said investors were in a 65 stocks average was down 
mood to take profits alter the 032 at 730.68. 
recent highs. The broader New York 

TSse Dow Jones industrial Stock Exchange composite in- 
average slipped 332 to dex lost 030 to 141.77 


*? ? 

AMH 54% 54% 

ASA 37% 38% 

AUed Signal 4i% 41 
AUfldSirs 58K 58% 
ABsCWmrs 3K 8% 

Alan 38% 39% 
Ama»lne 14% 14% 
Am'fda Ha 21% 21% 
Am Brands 45 89% 

Am Can 85 86 

AmCynm'd 80% 81% 
AmEIPwr 28% 28% 
Am Express 63 63% 

Am Home 85K 85% 
Am Motors 2% 2% 

AmSt'nnd 39% 38% 
AmTefeph 25% 25 
Amoco 159% 70% 
AnmcoStaal G% 6% 

Asarco 15% 16% 
Ashland Ol 81% 60 K 

AlRfcnhrtd 58% 59% 
Avon Prods 34% 34% 
BkrsTRNY 47% 47% 




T t* 



Bankamer 

13% 


Bkof Dston 

4(]% 


Bank of NY 

62% 


Both Stool 

a% 


Boeing 

BwCMrtft 

as% 

58% 


Broen 

45% 


Bg Warner 
Bnst Myers 

33% 

75% 


BP 

A0K 


Burton md 

37% 


Burton Nm 

Burroughs 

CmpboHSp 

m 

61% 


Can Pacific 

11% 


Cattrptfer 

49% 


Cetanaso 

?sa 


Central SW 

35% 


QniroJon 

xm 


Chase Man 

3»% 


ChmSkNY 

45% 


Chevron 

AW. 


Chrystar 

39 


Citicorp 

Qark&mip 

53 

30 


Coca Cola 

37% 


cat" 

38 

143% 


ChnMaGas 

42 


Cmb'tnEng 

ComwWiEa 

32% 


33% 


Cans Edis 

4£% 


Cn Nat Gas 

33% 


Cmrt Data 
Corning G1 
CPC lift 
Cram 
CmZeler 
Dan & Kraft 
Deem 
Delta Air 

Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
DowChem 
Dresser Ind 
Dute Power 
DuPont 
Eastern Air 
Estm Kodak 
Eaton Corp 
Emerson B 
Exxon Carp 


26% 28% 
54 54% 

62% 62% 
29% 29 
52% 52% 
59% 61% 
26 26 
42% 42% 
17% 18 

100% 99% 
41% 41 

58% 58% 
17% 17% 

47 46% 

86% 88% 
8 % 8 % 
57 56% 

72 70 

87% 87 

69% 70 

UlMCfiASKM 


FstChfcBoo 28% 
FstbttBrcp 63% 
PstPWnC 7% 
Fbrd 57% 

PTWacfivn 39% 
GAP Coni 35 
GTECorp 56% 
GenCorp 78% 
6000/11113 75% 
6on Electric 78% 
Genlrast 20% 
Gen ms 81% 
Gan Motors 71% 
Grt PbUtny 21% 
Genesco 3% 
Georgia R* 38% 
GHSM 41% 
Goodricti 40% 
Goodyear 34% 
Gotiahc 20% 
Owe 50% 
GtAtt&Tac 25 
GrTmd 30% 
QramanGor 25% 
Grt & West 66 
Heinz HJ. 41% 
HaraAfiS SB 
tfen-Ptad 47tt 
Hanmwef 70% 
1C tods 26% 
inoerec* 61% 
Inland Steel 19% 
IBM 143% 

INCO 13% 

M Paper 66% 
lntToTfe) 53 
kvkigBa* 53% 
jnnsnSjnn 67% 
Kaiser Alum 16 
Kerr McGee 29 
Krrt'ly Ctrk 82% 
K Mart 50% 

Kroger 62% 
LTVXorp 2% 
Litton 76% 

Lockheed 48% 
Lucky Sirs 27% 
MenHVner 44% 
MenvtaeCp 2% 
Mapco 49% 
Marine Mid 51% 
Ml Marietta 46% 
Masco 28% 
McDonalds 60% 
McDonnaB 86% 
Mead 58% 

Monk 104% 
MinsWMng 114% 
MobflOa 37% 
Monsanto 76% 
Morgan J.P. 66% 
Mtrtarcda 44% 
NCflCwp 55% 
NLMdstrs 4% 
Nat Distirs 40% 
NatMedEnt 25 
NatSmcndt 10% 
Norfolk Stti 84% 
NWBancrp 39% 
OcddntPBt 28% 
Ogden 40% 
Owi Coni 44% 
Owens-UI 40% 
PacGasS 25% 
Pan Am 5% 
Penney JX. 75% 
Panama 56% 


PDter 62% 

PlWpsDge 22% 
PMfipRftT 70% 
PhHpsPflt 10% 
Polaroid 64% 
PPG Ind 69% 
PretrGmbl 76% 
PbSEAG 41% 
Raytheon . 64% 
RynkfsMet 46% 
Rockwei inr 44 
Royal Dutch 90% 
Safamys 61 
Sara Lee 65 
SPESopac 31% 
ScHDeiger 33% 
Scott Paper 63% 
Seagram 61% 
Sears Rbck 44% 
Shall Hm 55% 
Singer 55 

SnSSkhiBk 85% 
Sony 20% 

StbCitEd 35% 
Sperry Ccrp 76% 
SttOIONo 49% 
Stafogfrg 46% 
Stevens Jp 36 
Sun Comp 55% 
Tetedyno 329% 
Tenneco 42% 
Texaco 33% 
Texas E Cor 30K 
Testes Inst 121% 
Texas UtOs 34% 
Textron 58% 
TravtrsCor *T 

trw me 100% 

UAL me 58% 
IJaiiawrNV 220 
UnCaiUda 22% 
UnPacCor 60 
Utd Brands 29% 
USGCorp 44% 
UtdTectmol 46% 
USXCorp 20% 
Unocal 22% 
Jm Walter 49% 
Wmer Lmht 57% 
WeOs Fargo 107% 
Wstgftsea 58% 
WOmirser 37% 
Whfcmool 72% 
WMtwoflh 43% 
Xerox Coq) 57% 
Zenith 23% 


CANADIAN PRICES 

Abtfibi 23% 23% 
AkanMum 45% 45% 
Atoms Sti 13% 13% 
Can Pacific 15% 16% 

Commoo 13% 13% 

Con Enthral 25% 25% 
Hkr/SMCan 27% 27% 
HdsnBMIn 27% Z7 
imasco 33% 34% 
fenperialOD 47% 45% 
InPipa 41% 41% 

RyffiuMco 33% 33% 
Seagram 04% 85% 

Stan Co 21% 24% 
ThmsnN'A* 29 29 

Verity Corp 285 2M 
Wfkr Warn 37% 37% 

WCT 13% 13% 

Stack HIM. I T33 1 UHMH 


By David Young, Energy Correspondent 
When Mrs Thatcher arrives price has risen to nearer $1 5 a 
in Oslo today for her series of barred, hugely because non- ^ 
talks with Mrs Gro Hariem member nations like Norway 
Brand tland, the Norwegian agreed to co-operate. Some 
Prime Minister, one topic analysts are predicting it will 
above all will cause difficulty, end the year at $20. 

It is the dispute over whether By refusing to move from 
output in the North Sea, the its policy ofleaving North Sea 
life blood of both the Norwe- production levels in the bands 
gian and British economies, of the operating oil com- 
should be cut panies, the British Govern- 

This issue, even more diffi- raent has seen its revenues * 
cult Than Britain’s alleged from oQ start to climb back 
creation of acid rain, has been upwards, 
made even mote acute by They are unlikely to reach 
Norway’sdecision yesterday the peak achieved mid-way 
to cut output by 10 per cent, through last year when oQ was 
The move to co-operate priced at $30 a barrel but the . 

with the Organization of increase is welcome news for Mrs Thatchen she does not 
Petroleum Exporting Goun- the Chancellor as he works to give way on policies 
tries (Opec) by ordering the make room for the promised to OpecA reduction in the 
reduction has helped the 13- cuts in personal taxation. pace of development does not 
members of the cartel in their The Secretary of State for necessarily mean a reduction 
efforts to send prices upwards. Energy, Mr Peter Walker, and in ofl output but there may be 
Ironically, Britain, which his opposite number in Oslo changes to the long-term plans 
has steadfastly refused to are now working out a for- for re-equipping and up- 
make similar concessions to mula which will allow Norway grading the facilities on the 
Opec, will benefit more than to trim .production from the production platforms. 

Norway from the decision two oilfields which straddle Opec had harboured some 



informal talks wi J Mr Walker 'J[|£ ll - on wou | d continue to 
later in the month. develop at the then current 

Inevitably they win emerge major new 

smiling from tas omo^ jg^ elopm enis being ap- 
reassured that he shares nroved. with a production 

concern that prices haw W en P. Qf m j|j ion bpd being 
too quickly m the past nine peak o ^ lhal po 1)C> -. 
months, but ^ey wti "ot ™j^ m lhat 

production hasfellen .from 
co-operauonfrom Bnain, p and Opec'sacnon in 

Opec ministers have com .rv ^ Qwn has given 
plained that the Oiancello, «harrf shock to the North Sea 
Mr Nigel Uwron.iakesmore f/J^J^Opec is back in 
in lax from a barrel of oil tha driving scat and inicnt on 

they receive for produang .« upwards, 

from their oilfields- Am one those who feel that 

rteT’oSaA be achieved 
emerged as the man Opec tne ^ Mr John Toa ] ster 

and Mr T am Miskell. analysts 


Mis Brnndtland: she is CO- blame for b^ting Brilish oil andMrTom MiSKM ^^ 
operating irith Opec e^ anTafang market at the stockbroker Hoare 

firmly by Downinl Street that share from them- ®2!2h .ua-i. the October 

Mm Thatcher dS not “give Several fictions »mbn iS, 0 ndwhhadc- 

way” on her policies. _ Opec are.ada^nt that Bntam gj 1 * agreement 


Norway from the decision two oilfields which straddle ~ Opec had harboured some 
taken in Oslo and from the the border tine in the North hope that Mis Brnndtland 
decisions which Opec is likely Sea. could persuade Mrs Thatcher 

to take in Geneva early next Norway wants to reduce the to change her policy on oil 
month. pace of development of the production when they met, 

Since Opec announced its Stratijord and the Murchisson but the cartel’s officials in 
new quota system, the oil fields as part of its concessions Vienna have been told very 


firmly by Downing Street that share from them- 
Mrs Thaicber did not “give Several factions within 
way” on her policies. • Opec are adamant that Britain 

Relations between Opec promised to limit output to 
countries and Britain will 2.2 million barrels a day 
remain soured and criticism during its meeting in London 
of Britain will re-emeTge at the in March 1983. 
next Geneva meeting, al- When British North Sen 
though animoaty is limited to production reached 2-7 mu- 
oil issues. lion barrels a day the protests 

Opec’s new president, Mr started. In feet, the Depart- 


“> “SiuTdi? STrnit duriig 


Hawley profits double Turner takes 
after internal growth pkstfcf® 


Hawley, the services group, suits were “significantly ahead 
has boosted its net sales in the of the record 'results for the 
first six months of the year by comparable period” and add- 
$48.6 million. Sales to to June ed that most of this improve- 
30 were $279.95 million com- ment had been achieved by 
pared with $231.33 million a the internal growth of main- 
year earlier. stream trading companies. 

Hawley's earnings before However, they did not ex- 
tax were $25.25 million, up pect the rate of increase in 
from $13.78 million. Their net earnings to continue for the 
earnings of $20.26 million full year, due to the issue of 
more than doubled the 1985 convertible preference stocks 
figure of $9.87 million. and the short-term effect of 

Hawley is to make a one- the acquisition of the Pritch- 
for-ten bonus issue with a cash and Services Group. 


or tin rain win re-emerge at in Marco tyoj. r . it c 1-^^- out- 

next Geneva meeting, al- When British North Sea 

though animosity is limited to production p j^'add- “Wc anticipate 

oil issues. lion barrels a day the protests i irey *\ uu :. 

Opec’s new president, Mr started. In feet, the pep 211 - fJnMMMement begins to bite, 

Rilwani Lu kman . the Ni- ment of Energy — Mr tawson anc i & 

geriano'd minister, and Sheikh was then Energy Secretary — oil changes to 

Si Khalife Al Sabtah, the did not promise to limit general p«xcpi>on changes to 
Kuwait oil minister, will have production, an optimistic 

Founder sells in £42m offer 
for Marlborough Property 


Turner & Newall has ac- 
quired the business of Moore jd & S Rivlin, the USM- 

PiaS 5^S’’ SrslSf quoted property investment 

and development company, 
yesterday aSnounced a £42 
million recommended offer 
Marlborough Property 
and NewalTs act assets. Holdings, whirls almost four 

TAC manufactures and w8« times its size, 
a range of engineering The terms are 21 new Rivlin 

composites and produces the shares for every 29 shares in 
Cerafine range of engineering Marlborough, valuing the 
ceramics. The composite company at £42.06 million, 
materials made by Moore wQl and its shares at 122jx 
complement TACs products. This compares with the 

shares' 79p price on August 
Moore will continue to op- 29 — the business day before 
erase from its plant at Slade Marlborough announced that 
Green, Kent. it had received a bid approach. 


alternative of 2.1 cents. At the 
same time last year they made 
an interim dividend of 1.75 
cents. 

The company said the re- 


No contribution has been 
included for the period from 
Pritchard, which will be 
consolidated for the first time 
in the second half of the year. 


By Lawrence Lever 

There is also a cash alternative amount of paper” for his 6.8 
of I05p per Marlborough million sharts. 
share. He said that when Mari- 

Marfborough rose 4p on the borough boamea public conir. 

announcement to 1 03p whilst PajjY unties” 

lUvfin fefl back fiom I7 Sp » 

n r v > a j worth about lip.” 

Rivhn has already secured ^ Marlborough board is 
acceptances from sharehold- bacirinc Rivlin's bid. 

S?SS 2Z7pert * m 

w . , _ . level which gives us no 

Mr Martin Lange, chairman alternative,” said Mr Lange, 
of Marlborough, who founded - .. 

the company in 1 972 as a £100 Rivhn. which started out as 

private company, said yes- a - l S x ^ f e ? nd ^ ^ r0U i > ‘ 

terday he would be “taking ^4 to become a 

mainly cash and a certain major property company.” 


erate from its plant at Slade 
Green, Kent. 


with Chown Securities, “the 
balance sheet showed assets 
worth about 1 Ip.” 

The Marlborough board is 
backing Rivlin's bid. 

“It is an attractive offer, at a 
level which gives us no 
alternative,” said Mr Lange. 

Rivlin. which started out as 
a textile and clothing group, 
said it aims to become “a 
major property company.” 


A BAT INDUSTRIES REPORT 

Extracts from the interim results for the six months to 30th June 1986 


“TheG 



PATRICK SHEEHY Chairman 



• WOOLWOBTH: Results of 
the Australian company for the 
26 weeks ended August 3 in- 
clude an interim dividend of 
Aus6.0c (Aus6.0c). Sales rose to 
A us$2. 64 billion' (Aus$2.07 
billion). 

•FLETCHER CHALLENGE: 
Results of the New Zealand 
company for the year to June 30 
show a dividend of NZ$21 .25c 
(NZI7.0C) and net profit of 
NZS24I.9 million (£77.7 
million). 

• APV HOLDINGS: An in- 
.terim dividend of.7p (4.5p) is 
being paid for the -six months to 
June 30. Turnover was down to 


pretax profit rose to £10.8 
million (£63 million). Earnings 
per share were 20.9p (S.9p). 

• VG INSTRUMENTS: The 
company- has declared an in- 
terim dividend of l.2p (a7p) for 
the six months to June 30. With 
figures in £000, turnover rose to 
39.007 (2M32X trading profit 
to 6,829 (3,804), profit before 
tax to 7,532 (4,374) and earnings 
per share to 9 JOp (&27pV 

• HARTONS GROUP: An in- 
terim dividend of G.53p (0.44pJ 
is being paid for the six months 
to June 30. With figures in £000, 
total pretax profit was 803 
(1.080). tax 309 (384) minority 


• BLACKWOOD HODGE 


COMPANY NEWS 


• LONDON MERCHANT 
SECURmESrFor the year to 
Match 31, a final dividend of 


(£000V total income 20^:10 
(1 8,693V profit before tax 
17,211 (16,493) tax 7,607 

(5,477) profit after tax 9,604 
(11,016) minority interests 
1,885 (1,679) profit attrib 7,719 
(9,337) earnings per ordainary 
share - basic 4.83p (5.84p) fully 
diluted 3.4Ip (3.98p). . 

• INTEREUROPE TECH- 
NICAL SERVICES: Final divi- 
dend 4p (3.7p) making 5.8p 
(5.4p) for the year to June 30. 


(8,963) trading profit . 1,530 
(1,480), profit before tax 1,633 
(1,623), tax 633 (598) profit 
attributable I,00Q( 991), earn- 
ings per share 20.00p (20.50p). 
The current year has started 
with a healthy order book. 

• PACIFIC SALES 

ORGANISATION: For the 
year to June 30, a final dividend 
of 2p (2p) is being paid making 
3p (3p). Figures in £000, turn- 
over 3,529 (3,733), trading 
profit 521 (600). interest payable 
168.51 ! (140X profit before tax 
353 (460V tax 1 1 7 (46V earnings 
per share 4.71p (8.28p). 

• ALFRED MCALPCVE: In- 
terim dividend 4p (3.8p) for the 


six months ended April 30. 
Figures in £000. group turnover 
193,001 (154,765V profit before 
rax 7.004 (6,798V profit after tax 
4.623 (4.248), earnings per share 
12-Sp ( 1 1.7p). The figures do not 
include the surplus of £14.8m 
from the disposal of the group's 
South African interests which 
will be treaied as an 
extraordaiiiary item in the ac- 
counts for the year. 

• CHECKPOINT EUROPE: 
For the year to March 31, no 
dividend will be paid. Figures in 
£000. sales 7,705 (5,199). profit 
before tax 602 (116), tax 152 
(95). earnings per share 11.2p 


moved in the company's favour 
and if this situation is main- 
tained. profitability will show 
further improvement this year. 
The group has acquired the 
outstanding 50% shareholding 
of Automated Security Holdings 
in Checkpoint UK. 

• FORWARD TECHNOL- 
OGY INDUSTRIES: Accep- 
tances of rights have been 
received totalling 6,900,508 
shares \91%V the balance of 
shares not taken up were sold in 
the market yesterday. 

More company news 
on pages 26 and 28 



Tolleys 

TAX GUIDE new? 


per share rose 





Tolley’S TAX GUIDE 198&37 

Practical lax advice for file non-expeit 
Fully revised and updated to 
include the new Inheritance 
Tax and the Finance Act 1986. 
Hardback 416pp ■ £13.95 


Available from W H Smith 
and all good bookshops. 


Two FREE services available to 
purchasers of Tolley's Tax Guide 
. Year-end Tax Planning . 
Memorandum 
HK7 Budget Summary 


Earnings per share up 33 per cent to 21.84p. 
Pre-tax profit for six months rose 23 per cent 
to £539 million. 


Interim dividend increased by 16 per cent to 
5.50p (last year 4.75p). 


Profits from paper rose 35 per cent to £111 
million. 

Tobacco volume increased although profit 
reduced. 


Ongoing retail businesses show healthy 
growth in sales and profits, as US disposals 
near completion. 


Strong growth in financial services with 
higher premiums and much belter 
investment return. 


Ar Prospects for full year attractively ahead of 

1985. 


agent for the facility. 

• WELLCOME: The Genetics 

Institute and Wellcome Bio- 
technology. a subsidiary of 
Wellcome, have agreed to form 
a 50-50 joint venture for the 
manufacture of biotechnology- 
based “human’*’ 

pharmaceuticals. 

• SEDGWICK GROUP; Mr 
Alton Irby has decided to resign 
from the boards of Sedgwick 
Group, Sedgwick Ltd and Fred 
S. James and Co Inc from 
October 31. 

• CONCORD LEASING: The 

company, which is the UK asset 
finance subsidiary of the Hong 
Kong and Shanghai Banking 
Corporation, has signed an 
agreement with a group of banks 
led by Schraders, for a £50 
million revolving 

acceptance/advance facility 
with lender panel A total of £34 
million will be underwritten. - - 


B AT INDUSTRIES 


The full Interim report is being posted to shareholders and copies are available from 
the Company Secretary RAT Industries p.l.o, Windsor House, 50 Victoria Street London SW1H 0NL 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 10:00% 

Adam & Company, 10.00% 

BCGJ iom 

C^baok Savingst. 1075* 

Consoblated Crds 1000% 

Gontinemal Trust 1 QjOQ% 

Cooperative Bank 1000% 

C. Hoare & Co 1000% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai .10.00* 

LLoyds Bank ID-OOS 

Nat Westminster lOJXft 

Royal Baft Of Scotland 10.00% 

TS8 iom 

Citibank HA IQJQM 

t Mortgage Hast Kate. 


r//Avv 

SIRD AR 


Continued 
growth in 
sales and profits 

^Sirdar s uninterrupted, growth continued — 
profits and sales increased for the twelfth 
consecutive year. 

^Final dividend of 3.5p proposed - up 25%. 

^ High level of capital expenditure _ 
maintained. 

^New Autumn range well received. 

^Diverafkanon strategy reflected in the 
acquisition of Eversure Textiles, 
manufacturers of ready made curtains. 


Summary of Results 

Year ended 30 th June 

Turnover 
Profit before tax 
Shareholders' Rinds 


1986 1985 

fi’ooo rooo 

58.735 36,495 

10,262 9,533 

32,356 28.253 



_ Copies dw Annual Report available, 
from 29th September 1986. fiom The Secretary 

Sirdar PLC 

RanshawLane.AlvenhoTpe, Wakefield WF2 9ND 











THE TIMES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER II 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Saatchi loses $ 60 m slice of its 
Procter & Gamble account 


By Michael Clark 

& Saatchi, which created a conflict of interest so 


. _ , « m , wnjcn 

«as Deen built up over the past 
few years into one of the 
biggest advertising agencies in 
the world, has lost a chunk of 
one . of its most profitable 
accounts. 

Shares & Saatchi fell 22p to 
693p yesterday as word went 
round the stock market that 
“e group had lost the Procter 
& Gamble account which was 
thought to have been worth 
millions of dollars to the 
group. 

• ^t t he true version which 
emerged late last night was 
that Procter & Gamble, one of 

• W Canning, the 
chemicals group, has 
shrugged off the effects of 
recent heavy selling by one 
broker and yesterday an- 
nounced the acquisition of 10 
US dental laboratories for 
£2 million. But there is tdk 
the gronp could soon be- 
come the target of a bid itself 
and this has aronsed re- 
newed interest among the in* 
stitntions. Word is that 
Burgess Products has been 
casting its eye over the 
company. 


it is “reasigning” a number of 
accounts, including Crisco 
cooking oil, Lnvs diapers or 
nappies and Bounty paper 
towels. 

The Saatchi & Saatchi view 
of the affair.— and last night 

the Company was maintaining 

a firm no comment — is that 
thedecision to lake away the 
food business wiD ironically 
place it in a stronger position 
now to go out and try and 
obtain similar business from 
other leading clients in the US, 
which it has been unable to do 
while locked into Procter & 
Gamble. 

Saatchi & Saatchi has been 
expecting such a move since 
its acquisition earlier this year 
of DF5 which had valuable 
accounts with Procter & Gam- 
ble rivals such as Nabisco and 
Johnson and Johnson. 

The rest of the equity fared 
badly from a flood of trading 
from some of our biggest 
companies. Figures mom 
BAT, British Telecom and 
British Aerospace were all 
well received, but the market 
gave a coo l reception to those 
from BTR and Prud en tial. 

It all provided for an un- 
America’s biggest household day am ong inv estors 

products group, is taking away *7° .P 63 * a J iast y retreat to the 
a number of food accounts «delmes. Some deafer* feud 
from Saatchi worth about $60 finnI y 00 %d»oid- 


FTA ALLSHARE 
INDEX 



■*130 


-M20 


111®!*” 

ERSKINE HOUSER 
Share priced 

W5ESSG&i' i 

r““l 1 1 i 1 — r* 

OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP 


100 


million (£40.5 million). 
. Saatchi & Saatchi will still be 
iefi with about $200 million 
1 worth of business. 

The market will see this as 
the latest in series of bad news 
to hit the Saatchi twins, 
Charles and Maurice; since 
their acquisition of the big US 
advertising agency Ted Bates 
for $400 million in May. 

Procter & Gamble appar- 
ently feels that the big take- 
overs in the United States 
made by the British group has 


ders of City analysis who, they 


EQUITIES 
Anglia Secs (11 Sp) 



Chelsea Man (125p) 
Creighton Labs (130p) 
Evans Haflshaw (I20p) 
Fletcher Dennys (7Dp) 
GT Management (21 Op) 
Guthrie Cora (I50p) 
Harrison (I50p) 

HiOe Ergonom (92p) 


161-2 
198-1 
68 
150 
150 
53-1 
129-1 
195-4-22 
117 
68-1 
206 
171 
161 -1 
90 


complained, bad pitched their 
expectations too high. Most of 
the companies produced a 
solid performance, but the 
City had been led to believe 
they could do even better. 

The FT 30 share index lost 
ground throughout the day 
finishing 13.2 down at 
1,317.9. The FT-SE 100 share 
index lost 9.9 at 1,663.5. 

Wiih the prospect ofa cut in 
bank base rates drifting even 
further away, gilts spent an- 
other dull session. Losses at 
the longer end of the market 
ranged to £!&. 

Among the leaders Tate & 
Lyle rose 13p to 623p follow- 
ing a bullish circular from 
Phillips & Drew, the broker. 

Elsewhere in foods Ran Ire 
Horis McDongall slipped 2p 
to 268p. But it is beginning to 


RECENT ISSUES 


Hughes Food 
Lon utd Inv 
M6 Cash & _ , 

Marina Dev pi. 
Morgan Grenfell 
Newage Trans ( 

Sc« Mtoe 10Q% .. 

TV-AM (1300 

Tendy bids (112p i 
Thames TV (i90p) 
Tibbet & Britten ^120p) 





look as if someone is building 
up a holding designed lo block 
any bid from Goodman 
Fielder, the Australian food 
manufacturer which recently 
bought a 16 per cent stake in 
RHM and has been tipped as 
an eventual bidder. 

BBA Group; which recently 
announced details of a rights 
issue, fen 3p to 21Sp after 
Cazenove, the broker placed 2 
million shares with several 
institutions inb the market. 

Ersldue House, the office 
equipment and pest control 
group, slipped 3p to 150p after 
announcing that it was break- 
ing into the US photocopier 
and distribution market with 
the acquisition of Zeno 
Group, a privately-owned 
Dallas-based group selling. 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

AW Irish Bk N/P 25 

BSA Go F IP 215-3 

Tech N/P 9 +2 

4/P 229 

Brown & Tawsa N/P 9 +'a 

CityvWon F/P 27 

Forward Tech F/P 39 

Rush 6 Tomkins N/P 8 

Sedgwick N/P 29-1 

Sutatff. Speak N/P 20 

' (issue price in brackets). 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three MorthStarflng 

SepBS -- 90.00 

Dec BE 90-39 

Mar 87 9050 

.km 87 90/40 

Sep 87 ; 90.25 

Dec 87 NfT 


Previous day's «ktd men 
Three Month Eurodollar 


interest 15075 


Sep 86. 
Dec 86. 
Mar 87. 


94.11 

94.09 

9398 


Mgb Low Ctaae ErtVol 

90J» 90.00 9090 273 

90/15 • 9094 90.37 2127 

9053 90.46 90.48 197 

9048 9039 90.43 38 

902S 9025 9023 5 

8923 0 

Previous day's total open intarget 24424 
94.11 9428 9408 938 


94.11 

9306 


94.01 

93.88 


94.03 4098 

9308 641 


-» V 

US Treasury Bond 

N/T 

Previous day’s tote) open Interest 4977 

Win o 


Dec 86 . _ 

97-04 

97-10 96-10 96-13 

7418 

■*. 

MarB7.„ 

N/T 




Short GW 

Sep 86 


ftevious day's trtrt ogi^mrast2077 

8" 

Mar 87... 

__ N/T 

100-13 

O 

•ft . i 

Long G8t 

<taplW 

118-27 

Prmtaus da/tt total open Iraanst 14824 
117-25' 116«7 T17it9. 61 

“ , ■ 

ndr.KR 

117-18 

117-30 116-23 117-452 

13386 




117-18 

0 


JunB7 _ 

N/T 

• 117-1 B 

0 ~ 


FT-SE 100 

_ 168.65 

Previous day’s total open Monwtzw 
170.00 167J0 188.00 283 

.. - 


173J30 

17320 17080 171.55 

68 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FMDeaKnss Lm Dealings LMtUectaeSon For Sotttatneut 

Sep 8 Sep 19 Doc 4 Doc 15 

Sep 22 Oct 3 Dec 18 Jan 5 

Oct 6 Oct 17 Jan 8 Jan 19 

Call options were taken not ok 10/9/98 Arostrad. Barker g Dobson. Abaca Invest- 
ments, Bronx Engineering. Boas, Grand Met, Partotale HoWngs, Nationwide Leisure. 
Marshal Loxley.Nortti telgurt Mines. Ponttand Industries. Lonrtw. Morgen GrenM. 
Dale Bectric. rely Peck, 
rtn & Calk Abaco Investments. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


dayfenage 

SeptertberlO September 10 

N York 13S65T4815- 1*45-1.4815 


Montreal 2236622555 
Ams'dara3>4320G4515 
6Z9M340 


2-0498-2.0528 

3u4486-3u4512 

63.11-6330 


Smooths 
053-O52prem 1.481 .44pram 

p-35-026pram O93-0.7Bpreni 


IK-lftprem 

18-15prem 


115110-11-5795 113627-113779 ftprom-Xd* 


par-5pram 

m-1%prooi 

95-l50dto 

30-7048 


4ft-3Kprem 
47-37prem 
K-IKdts 
1pren>-11db 


C'phgen 1.1057-1.1135 1.1105-1.1115 

Dubin .3-0371-33)610 32528331571 

Frankhat21525-21BJn 2182821822 

Lisbon 1992820025 1S9.72200.00 

Madrid 209845-211125 210525210988 1-4dte 

Milan 108705-189215 “ 108002-1 08150 4-4>vdis 
Oslo 98377-108182 98991-1081B2 2V2Xpnm 

Peris 102456-108088 102925-108088 pOr-Xptem 

Sfkhftn 22880-22980 2298422942 Ift-Kpmm 

Tokyo 21852185 218021-53 9X-8Xpreni 

Vienna 2481824848 2480924848 IX-lftpram 

Stsrihigiwctas twup ws d eBli 1975 was wi— st 7T4 (day's reago 718-71^- 


95-165dis 

5-6di8 

12ft-12Kdb 

flMKprra 

IK-ftpram 

3-2ftprofn 

24ftr£iftprom 

3ft-3ftprem 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


Brazti cruzado] 
Cyprus pound | 

Grand marfca 

Greece drad intel 
Hong Kong doNar 
India rupee mmm 

traqdinarrt 


wi» 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



Kuwait dmar KD 
Malaysia doltor 

Mexico peso ; 104080-109080 

New Zealand drttar 3.1297-3.1452 

Saudi Aretnriyal 5813058530 

Singapore dofiar 32229-32266 

South Africa rand 3819538388 

UAEdsham 5405084450 

-Lloyds Bat* 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Series Oct Jan Apr Oct Jan Apr 


ABed Lyons 
(-345) 


300 

330 

360 


51 63 

30 42 
12 28 


72 3 

50 8 

33 23 


6 S. 
13 15 

28 30 


* . 


BP 

<*«3) 


580 

600 

650 


120 137 

72 955 
38 60 


150 1 

110 1 
75 22 


5 10 

18 20 
32 43 


Cons Gold 
("544) 


500 

550 

600 


53 75 

24 45 
9 21 


67 11 

ST 37 
34 70 


23 35 

47 52 
80 85 


Courtaukto 

C284) 


260 

280 

300 

330 


29 42 
16 27 

7 18 

IK B 


50 3 

38 10 

23 29 
— 48 


6 10 
14 18 

24 27 

50 — 


Com Union 
C3021 


280 

300 

330 


26 36 
10 21 
2K 11 


43 IK 
30 10 

18 33 


6 10 
16 19 
34 37 


Cable X Wire 
(*324) 


300 

325 

350 

375 


33 47 

17 32 

5 17 

1ft 6 


SO S 
45 1* 
27 30 
— • 55 


10 17 

20 27 

37 42 

80 — 


Distillers 

C745) 


600 

650 

700 


160 — 
no — 
60 — 


— IS 

— 4 

— 8 


GEG 

(174) 


180 

200 

220 


818 20 
3 7 

2 3 


24 10 

14 26 

— 46 


12 IS 
26 28 
48 — 


Grand Met 
<■41 0) 


327 

355 

360 


90 — 
62 — 
— 72 
38 — 


— 1 

— 1 

80 — 

— 5 


ICI 

n<*4) 


950 

1000 

1050 

1100 


132 160 

85 115 
47 80 

22 54 


172 3 

130 6 

92 22 

65 50 


8 13 

18 23 

34 45 

57 67 


Land See 
(*322) 


300 

330 

380 


27 35 

8 19 

2 7 


43 2ft 
26 13 

14 40 


5 7 

18 17 
41 41 


Marks & Spen 

(*215) 


180 

200 

220 


37 44 

19 26 
6 13 


51 1 

34 4 

19 12 


2 4 

7 10 
15 17 


Shea Tmns 
(*923) 


750 

800 

850 


180 195 
130 145 
83 102 


212 1 
164 2 

112 B 


1 5 

5 10 

13 27 


Trafalgar House 

raw) 


260 

260 

300 


32 40 

18 26 
9 16 


48 8 

34 10 

24 17 


8 12 
17 23 
26 31 


Series Sep Pec Mar Sep Dec Mar 


Beecham 

(*408) 


380 

390 

420 

460 


52 65 72 

23 40 48 

7 22 33 

3 11 18 


1 6 10 
2 12 18 
4 30 35 

20 62 63 


Boots 

cm 


200 

220 

240 


30 37 45 

12 26 32 
3 16 20 


1 3 5 

31 8 13 

14 19 21 


BTR 
(*31 8) 


280 

300 


40 SO 60 
_ — 45 

4 15 - 


1» 7 10 

— — 17 

22 28 — 


(V66) _ 


700 

750 

800 


73 900 100 

35 57 70 

8 a 48 


1 7 12 

12 » 30 
40 45 SO 


Blue Qrcte 
(-56D 


550 

600 

650 


17 40 57 
4 IS 35 
1 7 20 


10 22 27 
43 45 45 


Oe Gears 

(-710) 


550 

600 

650 

700 


180 200 — 
iso iso ire 

90 115 135 
53 85 105 


3 6- 

4 17 30 

12 32 45 
20 55 70 


Dixons 

(1382) 


GKN 

CZ79) 


♦ c 


300 

330 

350 

260 

230 

300 


84 98 104 

64 64 74 

24 40 48 


2 3 

4 6 

8 12 


19 37 46 

8 22 S3 

2 11 22 
V I 12 


1ft 8 12 
9 18 20 

25 29 33 
55 55 55 


Saxo 

pOOO) 


900 

950 

1000 

1050 


110 160 — 
87 110 145 
30 BO 115 
15 60 95 


5 30 - 

12 42 60 
30 60 70 
60 90 100 


Hansori 

(*198) 


135 

150 

160 

ISO 

200 


B4 - - 

49 - - 

39 45 47 

18ft a 30 
5 14 19ft 


1 - 
1 - 
1 1ft 
1 3ft 


3 

. 7 

11 16 


Series 81 Dee Her Sep Dec Mar 


500 30 50 60 6 15 27 

550 9 27 35 35 40 43 

600 2 12 20 80 82 87 


Thorn EMI 
CSV* 


420 97 125 120 1 2 5 

460 60 75 82 1ft 7 12 

500 20 43 52 5 17 25 

550 3 15 — 42 45 — 


Tasco 

T41S) 


300 122 - — 1 — - 

330 92 105 — 1 2 — 

360 6B 75 87 1 5 7 

390 32 47 60 2 8 15 


Series Nov Feb May Nov Fsb Hey 


Brit Aero 

C478) 


460 32 48 — 

500 18 32 45 

650 6» 13 25 


17 25 - 

43 50 55 

83 87 90 


BATEnds 

f453) 


380 95 112 — 

390 65 S3 92 

420 43 60 70 

480 19 32 42 


2 5 — 

£ 10 15 

7ft 15 20 

25 32 35 


Barclays 

CS12) 


460 65 80 90 

500 35 55 70 

550 10 23 35 


4 7 10 

15 IB 28 
45 45 50 


Brit Telecom 
P96) 


180 24 

200 12 
220 4ft 


32 38 

18 26 
Sft 17 


2ft . 7 9 

11 . 18 19 

25 28 32 


Cadbury Schwpps 

078) ’ 


160 22 
180 8 
200 Sft 


31 38 

16 25 
7 — 


2ft 7 8 

11 14 15 

23 .24 — 


C336) 


300 

330 

360 


48 

23 

ID 


58 68 
35 45 

18 30 


4 6 10 

8 15 18 

30 35 38 


300 102 
330 70 

360 43 


1» — — 
1ft — — 

S — — 


Ledbiufce 


300 63 

330 33 

360 17 


75 — 

48 58 

30 40 


1 1» — 
3 7 12 

15 18 23 


LASMO 

f120) 


120 16 
130 11 

140 6 


22 28 
16 18 
11 14 


10 14 18 

2D 22 25 
Z7 32 45 


Midland Bank 

(-582) 


500 95 

560 SO 
600 24 


110 122 

72 87 

33 52 


3 7 10 

7 17 22 

30 37 42 


P&O 

(•5431 


460 88 

500 48 

550 16 

600 5 


102 — 
67 80 

35 50 


2 5 — 

B 15 17 
20 32 38 
60 — — 


Racai 

(*182) 


160 28 
180 14 

200 6 


34 42 

22 30 

13 18 


2 5 8. 

a w u 
20 20 22 


RTZ 

(*832) 


500 140 
550 90 

600 SO 
650 24 


147 — 

100 — 
65 £ 
4Q 82 


2 6 — 

7 17 — 

18 -37 4 0 

38 62 72 


VtatiRaefa 

(*77) 


60 19ft 
70 12 

80 7ft 


22ft 24ft 
14ft 16ft 

9 11 


5 6 10 

5 8 10 

8 12 14ft 


Series Nw Mar Am Nc» Mar -k» 


Loreto 

cm 


200 

218 


240 

255 


32 42 47 4 8 10 

21 — — “ — 

10 — — 19 — — 

- 17 24 - 29 33 

5 — — 36 — — 


Series Now 


Trllftft 1991 

(■2107) 


108 

108 

110 


IK 


Trllftft 03/07 
f£115) 


114 

116 

ne 

120 

122 

124 


RM> Mae Nee Fab May 

»« 2’ie “» 1"ia 2 

1*,, 1ft 2ft “«■ 3ft 

* 3 , ,l a B s ,4ft 4ft 

4 4ft 3K 

2ft Sft 4 » 

1ft 2ft 3 3ft 5% 

ft”* 2ft Sft 5ft 7’ii 

"» Vs — 7ft 8 — 

— — 9 — ~ 


qSEL°S- 


FT-SE 1525 160 172 160 

index 1550 135 147 162 

(*1664) 1575 110 123 142 

' 1600 86 103 125 

1625 63 83 108 
1650 46 65 930 
1675 30 50 78 

1700 15 35 62 


Dec Seal Oct Now Pec 

- 1 2 5 - 

3 9 ■ 


B 13 — 

— 3 13 20 — 

— 5 20 30 — 

108 13 27 40 48 

93 28 40 52 57 

80 45 65 65 70 


lumber 10 1888. Totat contracts Z7956. Cals 9139. Prt»8859. *Uadnrtying 4S 6 ti ri* y pri e s. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


With the mooey supp|ty figures 
proving disappointing, there 
was little expectation In the 
market of a downward move in 
mterest rates in the foresee- 
able future. Reflecting this 
uncertain backdrop, the yield 
carve on period rates from one 
mouth to one year was virtu- 
ally flat. Short dales tended to 
soften in response to comfort- 
able day-to-day money con- 
ditions. 

Base Rates'* 
aeamg Banks 10 
Finance House 10 
Discount Market Loan* % 

OwsnigM High: 10Low7 
Week fixed: 9 "m 

i (Discount ft) 


Oft 2mnft 9K 

Srnrrth g" n 3mntn 9"t» 

Prime Bank Bfta (Discount ft) 

1 mrnh 2 nstih 9*-9»» 

3mnthS"i»9K 6mnth9ft-9ft 
Trade B*s (Discount %) 

imnsh 10*.6 2mnth 10ft 

3 moth 10 »m Smntti 10ft 

Interbank r%) 

Overnight open 9ft dose Sft 
1 wmF 9K-3« Brnmh 9 l!t i*8ft 

1 rrmth 9»»-9K 9 ninth 9 lfc w«K 

3 mrnh 10-9ft 12 mih 9<»i»4K 

Local ArtbotSy Deposits (ft) 

2 days 9ft 7 days 9ft 

1 mn&4 9ft 3ras®9ft 

8 mrnh g» 12mth 9ft 


1 mrnh 10K-10K 2mnm 10ft-10 
3mrth 1014-10 6 moth 10X-9X 

Smnlh iow-10 12mth 9ft-3ft 

3mntti 9 ,k »-9 ,J n 
Brnnth 9 l3 irf l 'ifl 12mtti 9 ll wd ,, n 
Dollar CDs (ft) 

1 mnth 595-590 3mrth 5.85^80 
Bmnth 5-65590 12mth 5.05-6.00 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days S'**** 
3 mnth 5ft-5ft 
D w Wchuia r fc 
7 days 4K-4K 
Smntti 4K4K 
French Franc 
7 days 7*vt^Pn 
3 mnth 7ft-7ft 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 2*-2 
Smntti 4U-4H 
Yon 

7 days 454-4ft 
3mmn 4ft-4ft 


cm 

1 mnth 
Smntti 

CM 

1 mnth 
6 mnth 

oa 
l ninth 
Smntti 
caa 
Imran 
6 mnth 
cal 
1 ninth 
6mntti 


6ft-5ft 

5 rt w- ,3 *« 

5®w- u i* 

64 

4»ie4T|« 

4K-4K 

7S5-6K 

7ft-7ft 

7 , *r7 i ia 

2K-1K 

4K-4 

4K-4K 

5K-4K* 

5ft-5 

4'»»."is 


GOLD 


GottS418JKM18.75 
Sovereigns* (newk 

sse.oc^Too.oo pfejs-ez^o ) 
"Excludes VAT 


ECGD 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average re fe rence rata lor 
interest period August 5, 1986 to 
5t**Bmfaer2, 1885 inckshn&SSO per 

cant 


leasing and servicing Sharp 
photocopiers. 

Erskine is paving an initial 
$5 million (£3J8 million) for 
Zeno with a cash payment of 
$700,000 and the issue of 1.9 
million new shares. Zeno has 
guaranteed that it will earn not 
less than 51. 18 million for the 
10 months to September 30, 
after which it will be entitled 
to an extra $2.85 million. 

The deal once again under- 
lines Mr Brian McGillivray’s 
talent for making attractive 
acquisitions. Mr McGillivray. 
was formerly managing direc- 
tor of Rentokil before joining 
Erskine House in 1982. Since 
then pretax profits have grown 


• Bid hopes were re- 
vived in BeLhaven Brewery 
Group yesterday as the 
price j iraped 9p to a new peak 
of 72p. Fbke & Co, the 
broker, placed a line of 3J2 
million shares (115 per 
cent) at 75p. It may have gone 
to Somportex, often tipped 
as a bidder. At the last count 
Nazmn Virani, chairman, 
had 10 per cent of the shares 
and the Sbohet family had 
1558 per cent. 


from £179,000 to £177 mil- 
lion with around half a dozen 
acquisitions to his credit this 
year alone, and not even a 
glimpse of dilution in the 
share price: 

This latest deal will enable 
him to boost Erskine's earn- 
ings and establish the group iu 
the lucrative US market He 
has also managed to retain the 
experienced Zeno manage- 
ment team, who win continue 
to boost profits in return for a 
share of the action over the 
next three years. This will 
have the twofold effect of 
boosting Erskine's own earn- 
ings while reducing Zeno's 
p/e. All this has all been 
achieved without stretching 
Erskine's own financial mus- 
cle and leaving the bulk of the 
proceeds from its recent £10 
million rights in tacL 

But the ambitious Mr 
McGillivray is unlikely to 
leave it there. Further ac- 
quisitions are already planned 
before the end of the year. 

Hillsdown Holdings, the 
fast growing group: lost an 
early lead to dose unchanged 
at 315p following this week’s 
announcement that it was 
seeking an American deposi- 
tary receipt facility for its 
shares in the US. The group 
hopes this will create renewed 
support for the shares among 
overseas investors, but says it 
will not be taking the opportu- 
nity to raise extra funds with 
the listing. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Almost the complete 
stockbroking service 


There is no doubt that Cazenove has 
done a marvellous stroke of business 
in arranging to have available the kind 
of huge sums that a major player in 
the London new issue market will 
need after the dust of big bang has set- 
tled Not surprisingly Cazenove found 
no shortage of leading insurance 
companies eager to help secure in- 
dependence of a firm that is unique 
among London brokers in its connec- 
tions and unrivalled in its abilities to 
place, and also to find stock. 

Cazenove has its critics, though 
they are far outnumbered by those 
who envy the firm, and there are some 
aspects of the business better done by 
others. But if there is one broker 
before all others that companies 
would like to have act for them in 
most situations, capital raising and 
contested takeover bids especially, it 
is Cazenove. The firm's strengths and 
practical virtues are worth preserving 
within an independent framework — 
of that there is no doubt. The 
syndicate arrangement and the injec- 
tion of £32 million of fixed capital — 
without parting with a penny of 
equity nor impairing the partnership 
principle which is the centre of the 
structure — achieves that for as far 
ahead as anyone would want to look. 

Few partnerships are like Cazenove: 
the family nature of the business has 
been preserved but without the loss of 
ambition, intelligence and pro- 
fessionalism that usually seep away 
with the generations. John Kemp- 


Welch, joint senior partner, believes 
that partnership has both enabled the 
firm to grow and has created the best 
possible background of harmony and 
team spirit. But Cazenove was faced 
with a problem after big bang, notably 
in the area of new issues where its 
placing and distributive talents are 
perhaps most widely appreciated. In a 
market where the American “bought 
deal” might become the norm for 
equity issues as well as for fixed 
interest loans, Cazenove's capital 
resources might well have been too 
small to enable it lo compete for the 
business. That is no longer a 
possibility. 

For its part Cazenove has some 
reservations about the bought deal “it 
would look hard to see which com- 
panies and for what purpose the 
bought deal would be an advantage”. 
Elsewhere the firm would provide 
liquidity in stocks where it was needed 
and only make a market in stocks 
where it had the research capability. It 
would not make markets either in gilts 
or in the alpha equities unless a client 
required the firm to do so. 

Cazenove is clearly set on providing 
a wide-ranging stockbroking service 
but not to be all things to all men, or 
even, in the new issue market, to rival 
merchant banks and other issuing 
houses for whom it will be happy to 
act in alliance or in its customary role 
as an agent. It is a recipe for the future 
no other broking firm could have 
devised. 


Bonn dashes rates hope 


After Tuesday's money supply dis- 
appointments in Britain, yesterday's 
figures from the Bundesbank have put 
paid to remaining interest rate hopes. 
The money market yield curve points 
to steady base rates a year ahead. 

The German figures, showing the 
central bank money stock growing at a 
7.1 per cent rate last month, effec- 
tively removed the need for the 
Bundesbank council to get together 
today. But it will meet though an 
announcement of an easing of policy 
looks beyond the realms of possibility. 

Over the past six months, the 
central bank money stock in Germany 
has grown at an annual rate of 6.9 per 
cent The target range, and the 
Germans tend to believe in such 
things, is 3.5 to 5.5 per cent 

To show that not all the pressure on 
the Bundesbank is from overseas, 
former Chancellor Helmut Schmidt 
called for a reduction in rates at 
today’s meeting. The money figures, 
published soon after his comments, 
were thus both convenient and 
disturbing for the German authorities. 

In Tokyo, Satoshi Sumita, the 
Governor of the Bank of Japan, 
appears ever bolder in dismissing 


suggestions that Japan should lead 
rates down. Fast money growth and 
the historically low level of the 
discount rate (3.5 per cent) provided 
the justification. 

The gilt-edged market actually 
picked up a little in the afternoon, 
after a poor start. Punch drunk after 
the blows inflicted upon it from home 
and abroad in recent days, traders 
decided it was time for prices to 
stagger upwards. 

Just as it was on the way down, the 
10 per cent yield level is proving an 
important one as the yields have risen. 
Double-figure yields do look absurd 
with another set of inflation figures of 
under 2.5 per cent out on Friday. 

The domestic numbers too. could 
have been worse. Half a billion or so 
on bank lending more than expected 
was bad but, rather against expecta- 
tions, narrow money, M0, continued 
to behave itself. 

If the expected mini-surge in M0 
had occurred, then narrow money, 
broad money and the exchange rate 
could all be said to be misbehaving. 
The only way for base rates to go 
would have been upwards. We have 
not yet reached that stage. 


OUR PERFORMANCE, 
LIKE OUR 

SCAFFOLDING, KEEPS 
GOING UP 

W>rk with Palmers Kwilcstage System 
scaffolding has been on the up and up. And 
so have the results. 

Large and small, each of our BTR com- 
panies strive to reach the top. 

So everyone can continue looking up 

to BTR. 



i 





























THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


BkI Oder Omg YVI 


£j*Y IBRT TRUST MAHAGEM 


BO (Star Qrfi 


M 0 Htr Chng YU 


Od Offer Chng YU 


aggrT^mniBw mm q ewB ff 

Mnenaaar Hm. 77. unon YM. UMon BC» 
IDA 

01-988 8820 

H Cfeoash B2J SB_2 -07 1M 

feMn ftowill MO 684 -09 091 

Jmanoan fee Be 7 740# -07 MO 

BTCpean Grown Z3t 4 2543 -16 033 

QM9 8 l*arM 413 4*0 +0.7 133 

Japan Grown 1S&7 1183 319 

GREUNn'KAIUGSIS 
ftwjl Urn BSP SON 
01488 8003 

SttFMM 1189 i3l.4* .. 8.13 

ttortHSquiy 2062 2184 .. 10* 

OenM 284.1 29i,4* .. 281 

M AiWffcan 140.1 148.1 137 

Paofic 2407 2901 .. 012 

"UParSr 2as 28*8 2813 . . 142 

Sn*fer Cwaprtaa 3189 2329 18* 

Cn rcpa en Thai 2578 2704 .. TO* 


Bd Off* Chng YU 


84 Off* Cwg yw 


HAnOfULPfKMOGKTWVESTHBfr 

mtunns 

48. Gr»cmjn* fc EC3P3HH 
01-823 4200 EM 289 


NPI UK 
Do Accun 
NPI Owraea* 
Do Accum 
Far Em Act 
A ndean Act 
E uppaan Acc 
WctfcfMda An 


3088 2203 -08 280 

3342 3563 -13 230 

048 6323* -63 080 
7274 7739* -10.1 000 
928 989* -09 0.10 
582 GOB -08 1.10 
550 503 -18 030 

08 BS9* -44 140 


NORWICH UT MANAG08 

PO B ar 4. N wiWCT NPI 3MS 

an* Trust 31281 13.17 -060 28* 
too Trust 133.7 1403 -03 187 

an— u— raw—ir 

65 Cnun ShkUsUct EC4N 9AE 

sattnga 01-238 38aW7ffm 

Ha nH arw l Grew* 1*79 1942 -48 188 

Income & Grow# 823 672 . . 389 


waumoe Rsc 
A mWiOeffi 
Japan Group 
EWCTSCT Ourfl 
UK Growth 
Paoflc Grown 


907 949 -03 188 

328 348* -020911 

82.1 883 -OS 030 

733 701* -03 007 
857 998 -Ol 1.19 
SIS 57 J -02 I2E 
3*8 373 ..737 

66.1 59.7« -02 2.14 

1013 108.1c -03 2.14 


to+I 

i '' 1 b~iref 

RW 




T# ' 

1- 


r\wpni 

•i# 

-wnr 



252. Man Hotoom. WCIV 7GB 
(H -*053441 


01-405 o*4i 
om Rant toe 
Da Acorn 

fncoma Rnd 

MBUtytoC 

Do noun 
Una Dual toe 
Do Acorn 


998 893 -03 209 

1403 1493 -07 209 

124 1334 -07 0 82 

1388 1498B -13 121 
1308 1403C -09 121 
1324 141.1 -07 279 

2207 2*44 -18 278 


G* income 
data Ytxr* 

Do Ace