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No 62,564 


forces urgent 
EEC summit 


• The Home Secretary Is speeding up 
moves to introduce tougher European 
measures against terrorism 

• An emergency meeting of European 
interior and justice ministers is to be 
held in London next week 


• Hie fourth bomb attack in Paris 
during the past wed killed one person 
and injured 51, three seriously 

• An explosion d am a ged the Munich 
office of the firm g®®ferfng t he new 
Tornado multi-role combat aircraft 


By Philip Webster in Loudon and Richard Owen in Brussels 


Mr Douglas Hurd, the requirements tin 
Home Secretary, is speeding EEC after the ex 
pp moves to consider and trodnetion of v 
introduce tougher European visitors to France 
measures against terrorism nationals and the 
after the spate ofbomb attacks of security on French 
in Paris, including a Anther The series of n 
two yesterday. • by Arab-backed 

After requests from the Paris do mina ted 
French and German Govern-* yesterday's meet 
ments Mr Hurd is to chair an Foreign Ministers 
emergency meeting of Euro- The explosion 
pean ministers of the interior headquarters in 
and justice in London next ■ ■ ■ > 

... Paris in fear 

month 


requirements throughout the presage a terrorist campaign 
EEC after the emergency in- throughout Europe, despite 
trodnetion of visas- for all' existing effective measures 
visitors to France except EEC taken by many European gov- 
nationals and the stepping up emments. 


'The new visa restrictions 


The series of recent attacks under consideration are at 
by Arab-backed terrorists in odds with the EEC policy of 
Paris dominated the start of open frontiers, but this is a 
yesterday’s meeting iff EEC price most EEC governments 


Foreign Ministers in Brussels. 

The explosion at police 
headquarters in Paris came 

Paris in fear 7 


believe is worth paying. 

- The Home Secretary had 
already planned a meeting in 
London on October 20 to 
discuss wide-ranging pro- 
posals to tackle crime. 

He wants to consider ways 


pean Community io result in just as the foreign Ministers of co-ordinating the various 
the adoption of much stronger were rfisen.ggtng terrorism in systems of immigration 
measures across Europe to Eurooe over lunch. checks and controls that op- 


the adoption of much stronger were rfi«n.«mg terrorism in 
measures across Europe to Europe over lunch, 
combat terrorism, organized Sir Geoffrey noted the 
crime and drugs. . Foreign Ministers' informal 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the discussions in Britain 10 days 
Foreign Secretary, who is cur- ago had been held in the 
rent president of the EEC shadow of the. outrages at 
Council of Ministers, said in - Karachi and Istanbul. “Today 
Brussels .that the EEC was we are similarly outraged by 
determined to “drive the ter- the loss of life and injuries 
rorisl out of our 12 countries" inflicted on innocent French 
and “rid the world of this 20th citizens." he said, 
century plague". There was dismay about the 

Measures under consul- Paris attacks at the meeting 
nation indude tighter frontier and some apprehension -that 
controls and stricter visa the French outrages could 


Sir Geoffrey noted «ha* the crate in the EEC. 

Sjta,: JjJ. SS-wSfav Mr Hurd said yesterday that 

ijrassCS *■“ 


French decision on visas. - 

But Government sources 
played down suggestions that 


Tomorrow 

Who’ll bale 
us out? 



England’s cricket 
team heads for 
Australia on a wins 
and a prayer, but not 
much hope, judging 
by the past year. 
John Woodcock, the 
doyen of cricket 
writers, introduces 
a series in which 
top names speak out 
on cricket in crisis 


There was dismay about the Mr Hurd meant that Britain 
Paris attacks at the meeting was on the verge of introduc- 
and some apprehension that ing tougher rotes and visas to 
the French outrages could counter terrorism. 

Blast at Abu Nidal 

Munich link 
air firm alleged 

FtemOucCaii’espaaileitf • ByStewartTendter ' 
Bt# :•*. Crime Reporter 

A bomb explosion m Mu- Police arrested two Arabs 
nidi early yesterday damage d allegedly linked to the Abu 
the offices of a firm resjpon- Nidal terrorist group after a 
sible for production of the Libyan dissident pretended to 
Tornado multi-rote combat work for the Gaddafi regime 
aircraft being built by a Ger- and acted as acourier for hand 
man-Britisb-ItaJjan consorti- grenades brought into Britain, 
urn. No-one was hint.. the Central C riminal Court 

The explosion was outside was told yesterday, 
the offices of Panavia aircraft. At the start oftbe trial of the 

which is jointly owned by two men accused of explosives 
M esserschmitl-Bdlkow-Blo b- charges die dissident, dis- 
til, British Aerospace and guised with a beard and 
Aeritalia. glasses, appeared in court as 

The bufldingalso houses the “Mr F to describe how he 
Nato liaison office for Munich took delivery of a.bag contain- 


TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


crisis talks 

Bombers 
hit HQ 
ofParis 
police 

From Diana Geddes 
- Puis 

Bombers struck again here 
. yesterday, this time hitting a 
crowded vehicle licence office 
in the heart of the Paris police 
. headquarters on the. Be de la 
Cite, lolling one person and 
injuring 51, three seriously. 

. It was the fourth attack 
within the past week. A total 
of 112 people have been 
injured, and three killed . 

M Jacques Chirac, the 
Prime Minister, who had 
promised the previous night 
that the terrorists and their 
“manipulators" would be 
treated “without pity", im- 
mediately went to visit the 
scene of the latest explosion. 

No one has yet claimed 
responsibility, but it is thought 
almost certainly to be the 
work of the same group that 
has carried out most previous 
attacks in France this year the 
Committee for Solidarity with 
Middle Eastern and Arab. 
Political Prisoners. . 

The group, which is 
demanding the release of three 
convicted Arab terrorists 
imprisoned in France, of- 
ficially chimed responsibility 
yesterday for the Sunday night 
attack against a cafe on the 
- Champs Elysefis, in which a 
policeman was killed and a 
bead waiter and another 
policeman seriously injured. 

A second dawn raid oh 
homes of immigrants of Mid- 
dle Eastern origin resulted in a 
further 20 people being ar- 
rested and detained by the 
police yesterday. 

The French authorities still 
do not know who is behind the 
Committee for Solidarity with 
Middle Eastern and Arab 
Political Prisoners, but they 
believe it is a front for a 
Beirut-based, Marxist Maro- 



Firemen carrying out a victim of the attack on the Paris police headquarters yesterday. 


Prepare now for 
huge spending 
rise. Labour says 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 

The Labour Party has told environment spokesman, is to 
all its local authority groups to report to the party national 
prepare now for a huge expan- executive's joint policy 
sion of local authority spend- committee by the end of the 


! Tbe SDP yesterday em- 
barked on the high-risk strat- 
egy of selling to the electorate 
a tax and social security 
package which will hit the 
pockets of most of its mem- 
bers and millions of taxpayers. 

Predictions that the scheme, 
which would redistribute the 
tax burden, would be rejected 
at yesterday"s conference in 
Harrogate were so^fiur^epn- 

Taverne, a former Labour 
Treasury Minister and the 
chief architect of the package, 
was given a standing ovation. 

Dr David Owen, party lead- 
er, is pledged to fight as hard 
for the scheme as be is doing 
for a tough stance on defence: 

But there could well be 
ructions with the SDFs Lib- 
eral allies. When the plan was 
first outlined last month it 
proved a public relations 
disaster and a gift to the 
Government. It was con- 

vid SteeL > Liberal' leader, who 
headquarters yesterday. insisted that it could not 90 
into the Alliance manifesto in 

£ 60 m loss 

, ers are alarmed at the likely 

effect on their predominantly 
1 V UU1 ICU middle class voters and at the 
1 ^ sheer complexity of explaining 

f|«r Re nVAf a scheme which makes it 

"j T Li difficult 10 produce clear ta- 

bles of potential winners and 
By Derek Harris losers. 

Industrial Editor The SDP plan “Merging 

*5 ■*= » £5£ 


cars subsidiary of Rover 
Group (formerly BL), plunged 


Poverty involves the aboli- 
tion of National INsurance, 
with the present 9 per cent 


ing and manpower from day 
one of a Labour government. 
Detailed instructions have 


month. 

Since the Conservatives 
took power in 1979 local 


to a £60 million loss, pre-tax ™ 

and before interest, during the 

first half of this year. Last year merBE ^ w t t * 1 ^ per rent in- 
the rompany lo«£6 miK come tax m a new basic tax 


the Centra] Criminal Court 
was fold yesterday. 

At the start oftbe trial of the 
two men accused of exp! oaves 
charges the dissident, dis- 
guised with a beard and 
glasses, appeared, in court as 
“Mr F to describe how he 
took delivery of a.bag contain- 


Committee for Solidarity with been sent out by Mr Larry authority manpower in En- 
Middle Eastern and Arab Whitty, Labour’s general sec- gland has fallen by 0.75 per 
Political Prisoner*, but they retaiy. They range from cent and spending has been 
bdieve it is a front for a obtaining advance planning restricted to a relatively mod- 
Beintt-based, Marxist Maro- permission for building est increase of about £7 billion 
nite terrorist group, the Leba- projects and checking that over the past five years to an 
nese Aimed Revolutionary there is enough office space for expected £24 2 billion in 1986- 
Factions (FariX whose leader, the new employees to ensuring 87. 

Georges Ibrahim Abdallah, that management teams and The plans outlined in Mr 
has been ' imprisoned in .sBWMtftrvices -we “ready Whitiy's document represent 
France since (984. T . aw* abfe to cop* with a a total reversal ol*Tory policy. 

Visas for all foretgners of dramatic increase in building They are likely to give further 
non-EEC or Swiss ongin .will activity", ammunition to those critics 

become compulsory from to- Labour has promised to who seized on last month's 
day. For the next fortnight, create a million jobs within reports that Labour leaders 
they will be able to be ob- two years of taking office, had told nationalized industry 
tflinrd at international air- Local government will play a chairmen that they would 
ports on arrival in France, but key role in, that operation. have to restore thousands of 
thereafter will have to be Mr John Prescott, the jobs axed since 1980 in return 
sought from French con- party's employment spokes- for extra Hinds, 
sulates abroad. man, has been talking to local Under the heading etnploy- 


Factions (Earl), whose leader, 
Georges Ibrahim Abdallah, 
has been imprisoned in 
France since i9»4. 


sulates abroad. man, has been talking to local 

The US, whose citizens will authority leaders and in- 
also be affected by the new vestigating possib le obstacles 
visa regulations, yesterday ap- tfeit d® programme might 
proved the French 'face. 


Government's decision. 

• Libyan denunciation: 


and the Bavarian State Office ing four grenades and igniters 
for Environmental Protection, from a man in airline uniform 


Panavia, however, is seen as in the offices of the Libyan 
the bombers’ target. Arab Airlines at Heathrow last 

Dr Kurt Rebmann, the year, 
federal public prosecutor, said Earlier Rasmi A wad, aged 


Libya strongly denounced ter- bench spokesmen and local 
rorisl attacks in a commit- authority representatives met 
niqu6 published yesterday by for the first time to examine 
its mission in Paris (AFP likely problems of local gov- 
reports). The communique eminent finance and the 
said Libya energetically con- allocation of resources. 


demned 


he assumed the bomb was 
placed by left-wing terrorists. 


43 and resident in Spain, and 
Nassar Mohammed, aged 26 , 


of violence. 

mm 


m 8UU3 B vuuiu diuiu. uu M*. 

ify. _ /-/ headquarters of the West Gar 

man counter-intelligence ser 
vice in Orfognefor^d 

• Yesterday’s £4.000 terrorists dose to the Ra 

prize in The Times Army Faction claimed res 

Portfolio Gold ponsibflity. 

competition was shared • a .militant anti-nudea 
by two readers, MrsC 

fSRfLS? electricity pylon near -Hel 

and Mrs B C Rudge ot mstadt, in Baden-Wurttem 
Asp ley Guise, Milton berg, yesterday. The pyton’i 
Keynes, Bucks. Details, base supports were sawi 
page 3. through. 

• There is another 

Portfolio list page 33; Investors r 

assasasr 

P39e The Trustee Savmcs Bant 

o •, share offer started with a ban* 

summit inreai yesterday with telephone imes 

A US-Soviet summit might be “"KJ 

lime mFSS 

aid Reran, the White House mvtstors^er for copies ol 
Chief afStafT, said. P>«e7 ‘"EfinSW” ■« « 

Tn_ a. •_ TSB spokesman. “The share 

Fretona envoy office lines have been undea 
South Africa yesterday ap- bombarfm^ andto have 
pointed a law professor of Sg“ «*!“* ** 

Indian origin. Dr BhadraGahi SSSSS-SliSiStiSS 
Ranchod. as its ambassador to of London, to name just one. 

the EEC io Brussels Page 7 1 

Tr , . 0 Shares regain 
Kasparov wins «onie of th e 

Gary Kasparov, the reigning U1 

champion, won the 1 6th game OTOUnil 

of the world title chess match. V P U , U , 

. Share prices in London 

Mortgage fear ^ 

The Governor of the Batik of street 

England is concerned over the The FT index of 30 top 


The blast came only a week a student from north London, 
after a bomb attack on the both pleaded not guilty to 
headquarters of the, West Gar- charges of conspiracy to cause 
man counter-intelltoeince ser- explosions and attempting to 
vice in Cologne for which possess explosives last year, 
terrorists dose to the Red The court was told die two 
Army Faction claimed res- were arrested after Mr I kept a 


London 


ponsibflity. rendezvous at a London 

• A militant anti-nuclear Underground station watched, 
group is believed to be respon- by police, 
sible for an attack on an After taking possession of 
electricity pylon near Hel- foe bag containing the gre- 



mstadt, in Baden-Wurttem- nades the Libyan had met 
bag, yesterday. The pylon's police who substituted harm- 
base supports were sawn less devices for the grenades. 


Report, page 3 


^ • n 

-V; '4 


M Chirac: Quickly at the 
scene of the explosion. 


Investors rush for TSB prospectus 

By Richard Thomson By lunchtime, Cheapdde The issue is expected by 


tan, nas been talking to local under the heading employ- 
ithordy leaders and in- ra enl heading the document 
xtigaung possible obstacles states that local authorities 
at the programme might “have a key strategic and 

interventionist role in directly 
last week a working party creating jobs within the pn- 
com prising Labour front vale sector in their locality". 

‘ ‘neb spokesmen and local The document acknowl- 
ithority representatives met edges that the programme it < 
r the first time to examine outlines “will clearly require 
cdy problems of local gov- from central government a 
ament finance and the level of support and resources 
location of resources. which has been totally lacking 

The working party, chaired under the Tories". No figures 
r Mr Jade Straw, Labour’s arc mentioned. 

Reagan to Lord King 
enforce to reject 

drug tests BBC post 

From Mkhael Binyon By a Staff Reporter 

Washington Lord King of Wartnaby, the 

AH US Government British Ainrays chairman who 
□ployees in "sensitive J? reportedly Mrs Thatchers 
si turns” face drug tests un- ravoume candidate for BBC 
r plans announced by Presi- chairman, yesterday _ took 
nt Reagan yesterday. himself out of the running. He 

„ • • . . does not want the job and 

Mr Re a ga n , ann ouncing the believes it should be offered to 


but the first half showed a 
£600.000 profit. 

The huge decline in fortunes 
emerged yesterday as talks 
began on a demand for an 
extra £10 a week pay plus 
other benefits over one year 
for 26,000 hourly paid work- 
ers, more than two thirds of 
the workforce. - 

The . company countered 
with a two-year deal offering 
£9 a week in the first year and 
then £18 a week, of which 
about £10 would be dependent 
on bonuses linked to 
productivity and quality. The 
union response is expected 
within weeks. 

Austin Rover has been 
fighting desperately to retain 
its place as the second largest 
seller of cars in the British 
market. 


Conference reports 4 
Leading article 17 
Frank Johnson 28 

rate of 38 per cent The mar- 
ried man's allowance would 
be ended and mortgage tax 
relief above basic rate would 
be phased out. 

The plan would also involve 
the introduction of flat rate 
personal allowances and sepa- 
rate taxation for women, in 
raising £4 J billion for an anti- 
poverty programme: 

The benefits system would 
be recast, with a new basic 
benefit replacing the present 
Family Income Benefit and 
Supplementary Benefit and 
incorporating a number of 
other benefits at present paid 
separately. There would be a 


on profiwnargins^™ -ouJd teclawnd tack through 


The working party, chaired 
by Mr Jack Straw, Labour’s 

Reagan to 
enforce 
drug tests 

FromMkliael Binyon 
Washington 

AH US Government 
employees in “sensitive 
positions" face drug tests un- 
der plans announced by Presi- 
dent Reagan yesterday. 


Intnimfinaxic^ figures for 

the company, due out by the o np . 

end of Sis month, are ex- t pSTJE?®? 
peeled to show that a substan- 

mMionlnvSSient con ofihe **“«■ »■ Mr T »™ne said 
new Rover 800 executive cars. Continued on page 28, col 5 



By Richard Thomson By lunchtime 

Banking Correspondent bad run outofits L500 copies most experts to tie heavily 
Thd. Tnwtw of prospectus, while the oversubscribed and could 

stock of 4,500 at the Lombard cause disruption is some 
Street branch m the Gty had financial markets. Building 
Zf! also run out societies exjtect a big outflw 

tion office jammed and TSB The TSB announced last to^a^lv^^TSB 

branches throughout the Fnday it was issmng 1.5 to apply for TSB 

country besieged by private billion shares at lOOp each, to 

investors eager for copies of be paid in two ^50p insist- One licensed dealer mairfng 
the prospectus. ments, and made the prospec- a market in the shares before 

“It’s been hectic," said a tus . and application forms they have been issued was 
TSB spokesman. “The share available from yesterday. It is quoting up to IlOp — more 
office lines have been undear the largest share offer ever than twice the SOp initial part- 
bombardment and there have made available to the general payment, 
been queues outside the public. 

Cheapstde branch in the Gty The full prospectus is car- • Details, page 29. 

of London, to name just one." ried in The Times today. Prospectus, pages 37-48 


societies expect a big outflow 
of funds as investors withdraw 
money to apply for TSB 


been queues outside the 
Cheapstde branch in the Gty 
of London, to name just one." 

Shares regain 
some of the 
lost ground 

Share prices in London 
rallied yesterday after last 
week’s record fen on Wall 


second phase of his crusade to 
rid America of drugs, outlined 
a S3 billion .(£2.03 billion) 
plan to step up drug tests,: 
strengthen bonder patrols, in- 
crease funding for treatment 
centres and take the campaign 
to schools and offices. 

The main provision will be 
the sharp increase io drug tests 
for government employees. 
Mr Reagan said all those in 
“sensitive positions”, such as 
the police, those responsible 
for safely and anyone with 
classified information, would 
be included. Officials estimate 
that up to Z.l million may be 
involved. . . 


A hard line, page 16 


the BBCs vice-chairman. 
Lord Barnett 

Friends of Lord King made 
it plain that the Tory peer is 
□01 ready to give up his 
current job at British Airways 
or the chairmanship of Bab- 
cock International, the civil 
engineering finn. 

Lord King believes that be 
will not have completed his 
work at British Airways until 
it has become firmly estab- 
lished as a public company. 

With the Cabinet expected 
to discuss the BBC chairman- 
ship within the next two 
weeks, senior officials at the 
BBC yesterday were speculat- 
ing that the job would go to a 
retired senior civil servant. 


The expensive Soviet way of death 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 


previously regarded as taboo 
for open discussion. . 


^ Typical of the complaints 

The new policy of pasnost was that to the Moscow paper 
(openness) bang encouragtti from Mr A Gen- 


amount of money bang bor- 
rowed from building 
societies V*** 2 


shares opened confidently and 
improved gradually, dotiitg 
18.7 up at ■ 1,289.7. The 
broader based FT-SE 100 


m the official media by Mr rikson, who worked ft 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader, foxieral parlour for a 
has oramoted a stream of 1 „ 


has prompted a stream of 
letters from disgruntled titi- 


nkson, who worked for a state 
funeral parlour for a year. in 
the Ukrainian, town of Shost- 
ka. but resigned in despair 


Home News 2-5 

Ownos 

7-11 

Arts 

27 

A»p» t 26 

Swtiw, deaths 

narrtsfjes 

26 

Bridge 

11 

Business 

29-34 

Church 

25 

Court 

26 


DUnr 

Leaden 

Letters 

Obttmy 


16 With the Tokyo market 
27 closed for a national holiday, 
26 all eyes were on London, and 


rens complaining about the because he could no longer 
bribery, commucm and bu- tolerate the extortion and 
reaocratic indifference asso- shortages ' 
dated with the Soviet way of m ■■ 

Hpnth there are no grave-diggers 

at all- on the payroll, so the 


earth with crowbars, chop at it 
with axes. . .and if they are 
not constantly supplied with 
vodka, they will refuse to keep 
digging.” 

The ' former mortician . re- 
vealed that because of the lack 
of raw materials, staff were 
forced to take, apart fences and 
use rotting planks to Jknock 
together coffins “which were 
held together by the shroud 
they were wrapped in”- 

A Muscovite, Mr Yuri 


The macabre controversy) client must look for them . Kazmin, recalled that when he 


2$ I the news that share prices had I which shows every sign of himseffi" he explained. 


2 rallied came as a relief to 

fLSS? m many fund managers. 

3 On Wall Street Share prices 


gathering momentum as a winter, the relative has to find 
result of the encouragement of at least three or four people as 
newspaper editors, has re- the ground is frozen at least 




fell back slightly after a firm vested hitherto unknown de- half a yard deep. 

M I i.M. .L...,' a I* C-v .. 


Details, page 29 


about 


subject 


So they gouge out the 


arrived for the funeral of his 
only son, he discovered that it 
was scheduled for 4.30 pm but 
that the grave diggers worked . 
only until 4 ran. 

“For 25. roubles (£23) they 


stayed on,” he said. “The 
hearse driver could also only 
make it on time for SO roubles. 
All of us were crushed with 
grief, so they cheated us out of 
as much as they wanted.” 

In this week’s LUeratumaya 
Gazeta, the editors reported 
receiving hundreds of tetters 
in response to a previous 
article describing the desecra- 
tion of graveyards. Many of 
them had described “indiff- 
erent and sometimes barbaric 
attitudes to both large and 
small urban graveyards". 

The paper went on: “The 
so-called 'cemetery butiness’ 
is widespread everywhere. It 
is, of course, a secret phenom- 
enon but one which everyone 
knows about 


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.. V 




Faster inquiries among 
planning reforms 
demanded by Minister 












Mortgage 
boom 
‘may bring 
problems’ 

By Kfchflid Thomson 


By Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 

. ^°P e , fi3r local objectors to issued by the Department of edly, sometimes because of 
now up large budding projects Employment in the past 18 rowdy public bearings, and 
jnrou^h unreasonable fili- months which said the plan- the bypass round the Devon 
oostenng at inquiries must he ning system must not be town of Okehampton was 


oostenng at inquiries must be 
curtailed; Mr Nicholas Ridley, 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment, said yesterday . 

He made it dear to p lanning 
officers at a conference in 
Nott ing ham that democratic 


safeguards in the planning the proposed Channel T unn el 
system were not there to He said then that such an 


frustrate developers. 

Deep concern among min- 
isters about the slowness of 
the system lay behind the 
complex detail of a Green 
Paper on planning reform 
which the Government pub- 
lished yesterday. 

“Let us try to avoid the 
planning process itself being 
used as a form of stopping 
development”,. Mr Ridley 
said. “Some see greater ef- 
ficiency as a threat- They think 


ning system must not be town of Okehampton was 
allowed to hold up job-creat- delayed when objectors re- 
ing projects. sorted to a rare parliamentary 

Mr Ridley caused a storm procedure, 
last year when, as Secretary of Mr Ridley said yesterday 
State for Transport, he refused that he wanted to abolish the 
to allow a public inquiry into county s tr u ct u re plans now 
the proposed Channel TunneL used to set out strategic 
He said then that such an growth policies. Some county 
inquiry would be so long that planners’ jobs would be lost 


the tunnel would never be 
built.. 

Yesterday, he named three 
recent inquiries as examples 
where there had been fili- 
bustering delays by objectors. 
“Stansted and Archway Road 
are burned on my heart”, he 
said. “The Okehampton by- 
pass may be another case m 
point.” 

The Stansted inquiry into 


The structure plans would 
be replaced by a mixture of 
non-statuiory county policy 
statements and regional plan- 
ning views, put forward by 
new bodies left) and 

Mr Ridley said that some who, 60 
county structure plans were Cobham, 
for too and full of atarmad 

irrelevant items.” toAastn 

The Association of Connty path. * 
Councils has already told tire Sir AIj 


Mr Gerald Hackemer (above 
left) and Mr Don Johnson 
who, 60 years after Sir Alaa 
CObham, Britain’s pioneeravi- 
ator made a 264MKHm3e flight 
to Australia, are to retrace ids 



ficiency as a threat. They think London's third airport lasted Secretary of State that he 
that the main purpose of more than 18 months and cost should leave strategic plan- 
planning is to restrict taxpayers and ratepayers more rung to the counties, giving 
development” than £5 million. The Archway them only such guidance as is 

The new document was in Road inquiry in north London necessary to achieve national 
line with two White Papers had to be postponed repeat- objectives. 


development” 

The new document was in 
line with two White Papers 


them only such guidance as is 
necessary to achieve national 
objectives. 


Technical 
schools a 
‘gimmick’ 


Legal aid 
proposals 
criticized 


The Labour Party yesterday By Frances Gibb 
attacked Mr Kenneth Baker’s Legal Affairs Correspondent 

gK£5^"”35£ 

slfoierts Zm£ m techmcal criticized by^firm of lire*- tawi in a Tong fine of Mrs 
Mr Giles Radice Labour’s P°°l solicitors as certain to Margaret Thatcher’s former 

deprive most of the city’s half Cabinet colleagues to an- 

fSSS??#. mfltfon popotetHtt of legal nounce that he wiD not be 

scnbedthepropoaLdisdosed ^ general 

in The Times yesterday, as a 

gimmick. ‘ Under the proposals, con- 

The plan, which Mr Baker tained in the recent scrutiny 
hopes to unveil at the Conser- report on legal aid. solicitors ^nort for^t^ 

comprehensive system and is matters to advice bureaux, 
understood to be unpopular Hnt nwtifflBtf pwm 


attacked Mr Kenneth Baker’s 
plan to set up a network of 
government-funded schools 
specializing in technical 
subjects. 


Rees not 
to stand 
again 

By Our Political Staff 


Mr Peter Rees, the former 
Chief Secretary to the Trea- 
sury , last night became the 
latest in a long line of Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher’s former 


standing at the next general 
election. 

In recent months the MP for 
Dover has had difficulty in 


Sir Alaa, shown (right) with 
hit 'mechanic in 1923, was 
demonstrating a DH50 sea- 
plane to show how easy it was 
to fly long distances, took two 
wonHnf to fly from Rochester 
to Melbourne. Mr Johnson 
and Mr Hackemer will take 
just fern weeks in a 19 ft 
home-boUt two-seater Quickie 
Q2. The aircraft leaves Roch- 
ester oa Saturday, September 
20 . 

Mr Johnson, who assem- 
bled the plane from a lot 
supplied by the American 
manufacturers, is being spoor 
sored with £50,000 from ICL 
(Top photograph: John 

Manning ) 



Liverpool 
‘Tate’ 
gets the 
go-ahead 

By Gavin Bdl 
Arts Correspondent 

Victorian trade is to make 
way for modem art in a 
Liverpool dock after the 
award of a £3.5 million con- 
nect for converting a ware- 
house into a northern Tate 
Gallery. . . 

The contract announced oy 
the Government's Property 

Services Agency yesterday is 
for six aiwsondiwbned gal- 
leries, offices, a shop, educa- 
tion facilities and a workshop. 
The work is expected to. take 
18 months. 

A second phase to add more 
galleries, expected w cost a 
further £6 million* will start 
when funds are available. The 
More mstitatioas wimng «w initial project is being n- 
fead more money corid easily by the Government, 

get into trouble as . tire- Merseyside Development 

pofihMBty of tire business Corporation and by private 
dmunlsfeed, donations to (be Tate. - 

Sinele-umon 

commonplace, but borrowers 
were net necessarily better 
able to pay them off. 

iriy on high inflation to reduce 
the vatoe of thefr loan over 
time and there was bo reason 
to assume that house prices 
werid go on rising indefinitely. 


The Governor oftbe Bank of 

— d, Mr Robin Leigh-; 
Pemberton, said yesterday 
that the boom in mortgage 
leading could lead to senous 
problems for borrowers and 
leaders and was helping to foci 
the rapid expansion Of con- 
sumer spending- 

Adding bis voice to agrow- 
ag chorus of disquiet over tbe 

amerat consumers were bor- 
rowing, he told tire Inter- 
national Union of Building 
Societies and Savings Asmo- 
ations to Vienna that lending 
criteria were In danger of 
becoming tin slack. 

More institutions wilKng too 
fend more money corid easily 


donations to (be Tate. ■ 

Single-union 
deal signed 

The Japanese company 
Komatsu, which produces 
earth-moving equipment, yes- 
terday signed Bn tain’s first 
single-union deal in the heavy 
engineering industry with 
woald go on rising i ndefinit ely. I leaders of the Amalgamated 
He said Oat tire amount I Engineering Union in the 
British households spent oa I North-east. 


The Komatsu deal covets 
the company's new plant in 
Birtley, Tyne and Wear, which 


Sea link in court Remark on police 
threat on Chunnel chief sparks row 

Mr Malcolm Popperweil, the disturbances, added: 
the assistant chief constable of the assistant chief comstabl 


comprehensive system and is 
understood to be unpopular 


with some senior Civil Ser- 0 f some legal services in an 
vants within the Department area of social deprivation 
of Education. heavily dependent on the legal 


Government with constit- 
uency interests, particularly 
because of his opposition to 
the proposed Channel tunnel 
He resigned last year as 
Chief Secretary where his dry, 
right-wing views coincided 


of Education. heavily dependent oa toe legal right-wing views comdt 

The aim of the 20 or so ^ scheme, Mr David Dea- SfS, those of Mr N; 
schools would be to help cm, a partner with Deacon Lawson, the Chancellor of 
industry to meet the growing GoUrein Green, says. 


By ShcD* Gnu, Political Staff tbJLJS&SffiSl 

Seafink Ferries is preparing speed trains carrying care Avon and Somerset, was yes- 
to take the Government to the containing p as s eng e r s. terday said to be 

European Court of Human Miss Maureen Tomison, “comfortable’’ at Southmead 
Rights in protest at attempts Sealink’s director of comma- Hospital in Bristol, where he is 
to rush through parliamentary nications, said that the com- undergoing tests for a sus- 
approval for the proposed pany hoped the House of pected heart attack. 

Channel tunnel Lords would ensure objectors " " " — “- 1 — nl 

The recently privatized had a fair bearing when the 
company claims that the Gov^ Bill goes to a select committer! 


servicing debts bad nearly 

arvssfSKS? task «:■ a 

attitude to customers strng- production starts in li 
gTmg with late repayments. .months time. 

Wapping talks 
near end 

Talks between management 
and unions in the Wapping 
dispute are expected to end 

'S ssnusisl * 


suffered a heart attack because 
be was running around St 
Paul's arresting innocent peo- 
ple then the bastard deserves 
it-” 

His remarks were described 


Mr Popperweil wa$ taken ill as “grossly offensive” by Mr 
on Sunday, three days after be Lionel Broadhead, the sec- 


demand for scientists. „ T „ 

But Mr Radice said yes- ^ 

terday in a statement that the n LJ sl ? u i M S? 

objective should not be tech- 

nical education for a selected ■»* * re 8* rded “ a 
few, but the need to ensure scanaai * _ a 
that every young person got It also represented a “denial 
some technical education. of the principles of access to 
“This is really government justice and justice for all,” be 
by gimmick because the mitia- says. 


Exchequer. 

In his letter of resignation to 
bis constituency party Mr 
Rees stared: “My decision 


eminent is guilty of “one of of peers. If not, it would take 
the great travesties of par- the Government to tire Enro- 


led a series of raids in the St rotary ofthe Avon and Somer- 
PauTs area of Bristol. Two ^ brood) 0 f the Police 


liamentary democracy” by pean court 
restricting the right of objeo- * The sele 


five will affect so few people,” 
he said. “It will leave the real is served by at least 150 
issues of education, the short- solicitors' offices offering legal 
ages of teachers of key subjects aid advice bat by contrast 


nounced that they will not 

i? slBnd al ** 06x1 g encral 

12 atzzeas election. The list includes six 
advice bureaux. other former members of Mrs 

-m Thatcher’s Cabinet Sir Keith 

ltd €k I LPIDOr Joseph. Mr Francis Pyra, Sir 
wll vlviU Humphrey Atkins, Mr James 
ship left Southampton last Prior, Mr Patrick Jenkm and 


. He points act thil IivenKMll 


ton IO the £3 biffion tunnel to 

ttrsss« tfss I 

eminent and its objectives. 

But I have to recognize I shall 
be over 60 when the next 
general election comes.” 

It brings to more than 30 the 


days of rioting followed the federation, 
pean court. police attempts to crack down 

•The select committee of on drug-dealing and illegal Jt 

MPs moved down to the gamblicjanddniiking. 

Imperial Hotel in Hythe, Yesterday, there .* was- fist, aid that he had sddom 
Kent, last ni^it in an attempt 


and the shortages ofbooks and 
equipment, untouched” 


there are only 
advice bureaux. 


Canberra gets all-clear 


The cruise liner Canberra, ship lef 
which has been struck by a Friday, 
virus since May this year, has Mr Br 

been given the all dear by managi n 
health inspectors who say bena Cr 
everything possible is being staff had 
done to keep the genn at bay. lain a ck 
TheP&Oship,whichison Mr J 

a 16-night cruise to Athens, environs 
Istanbul and Lisbon, radioed taut wh< 
the its office in London yes- inspect 1 
terday and said that none of the ship, 
the 1,500 passengers had re- being d< 
ported being affected since the litile-knc 


BR shuts 
Harwich run 

British BaO announced yes- 
terday that it ' la closing toe 
Harwich-Zeebruege train 
ferry service at the end of 
January. 

A sp oke s m a n sakb*Tt is a 
purely commercial dedston 
based on rail freights need to 
concentrate on one souto coast 


ip speed up toe bearing of 
local objections to the plan to 
link toe Kent coast to France 
with two rail tunnels. 

• The Government has seri- 
ously underestimated the time 
it would take to get tire Bill 
through Parliament.- The 
Euro-Tunnd Consortium is 
prepared for the predicted six- 
month delay, buz the project 
will be threatened if the Bill 
foils to get royal assent before 
the general election, as now 


gambling and drinking. Loncervanve mm* 

Yesterday, • there .* was^ ESffS5Sr5£SSiIi^S 
universal condemnation of amoredts|nafiil aue- 

Mr Koumba Balogun. a me ? t and Mr Roger Berry, 

community teadraT^^s 

reported as saying that Mr ^ 

PopperweD deserved to have a ^ 


negotiator for News Inter- 
national, held five hours of 
discussions at the head- 
quarters of the arbitration 
service, Acas, yesterday with 
representatives of toe five 
print unions involved in the 
34-week dispute over toe 
company's newspaper plant in 
east London. 

Coal chief to 
meet NUM 

Sir Robert Haslam, British 
Coal chairman, has agreed to 
meet leaders of the National 
Union of Mioeworkers next 
Tuesday for talks on their 




heart attack. omugim* wnuucm*. His decision came as 

Mr Balogun, aged 26, the Mr Roger Berry, .leader of Yorkshire’s 38,000 miners 

rfiaiman of the Sl PauTs ' the Labour grotq) oh Avon stepped back from: taking 
Community Association, said: County Council, added: “On industrial action over his-re- 
“I hope toe bastard dies. I feel behalf of the Labour group, I fosal to backdate an fS-a-week 
no cotnuassion for the man.” condemn these comments as rise for men who took part in 


“I hope the bastard dies. I feel 
no compassion for the man.” 


Friday. 

Mr Brian MacDonald, the 


Mr Norman St John-Stevas. 
The resignations will leave 


managing director of Can- open an unexpectedly high 
bernzCmises. said that extra number of afe Conservative 

staff had been hired to main- *o he filled. 

tain a cleaning operation. Mr Rccs is to spend more 
Mr John Stokes, an 
environmental health consul- 


Mr Rees is to spend more 
time at toe bar where he 
specializes in tax cases. 


taut who was brought in to | # Mystery last night sur- Ramsgate; 


inspect hygiene standards on rounded the decision of Mr 
the ship, has praised the work John Ryman, the Labour MP, 
being done to combat the to stand down at the next 
little-known Norwalk virus, general dection. 


port. Whether that is Dover or seansTfliely. 

Ramsgate has yet to be The Government originally 
decided. promised all objectors to the 

In tbe short term British IS^right to^Sircase. 
** franrie rring toe But, ficed wito 5,000 pe- 
tak to Dover, wtolemitB^ utions, toe committee quiddy 
toe outcome of SaDylats ruled that those without a 
planning application to bald a direct, personal interest would 
rail freight termiunl at M t be heard. 

which operated toe m This led to aDgffitms of 
HmwStooS^raa that gating” from ferry com- 
XdSaSrwS “a mat - and . conservation 


Seafink, which operated toe M " auegauwa 

WcoSvS 



Mr Ryman. aged 55, who 
had been reselected to contest 
Blyth Valley, has just told his 
local party, without giving any 
reasons, that he does not 
intend to fight next time. | corammec 
Attempts by constituency Tunnel Bill 
party officials, and the press, I i» heiiftv* 


seamen's jobs at risk, a ad was 
likely to affect another 40 jobs 
onshore. 


party Commons select 
committee on toe Channel 


U believes that Mrs Mar- 

to find Mr Ryman have so for garet Thatcher had already 
«iiled. planned to back the tunnel 

Mr Ryman has never been scheme when she privafied 
popular among his colleagues Seafink. The loss of business 
at Westminster. He once upset to ferry companies is expected 
the whips by misting a key to lead to hundreds of redun- 
vote in order to attend a danries. Sealink has called for 
football match and be has £100 million compensation 
infuriated Labour MPs be- from the Government, 
cause he continues to ride to Yesterday it also released a 
hounds. He is a member of the video emphasizing tbe dan- 
committee of tbe Campaign gets of “an inferno” in the 
for Country Sport proposed tunnel wito high- 


only half of the petitions have 
so cur been dealt with. 

Mr Alex Fletcher, toe 
committee chflipp^n, win 

again tell protesters that they 
cannot argue with it since toe 
principle of the tunnel has 
already been accepted by Par- 
liament They will only be able 
to object about its effect, for 
example, on their back garden.- 

Objectors from the Kent 
villages of Sahwood,SancUing, 


F-irhinfl hiTl and Lytnmge have 

been allocated this morning to 
put their case. The committee 
moves to Dover town hall 
next week to hear objections 


Mr Balogun, who was disgraceful, and we totally 
charged with and disassociate ourselves wito 

t hreatening behaviour - after them.” . 

Spy asked Princess 
reporter woos 
‘for help’ commerce 

A journalist working for toe 

Morning Star, newspaper, was 5*^5. 

offered £80,000 to help to - 

Bulgarian secret agents, an 
indusgj tribunal heard 

Mr Graeme Atidnson, aged 

36, told the bearing that he ft*?.*,* toAammJjm. 
was approached in Sophia, 

Bulgaria, and asked to track recopto that it is up to us to 


down a Russian KGB agent. 

Mr Atkinson, of Stockport, 
Cheshire, was asked to contact 
the Bulgarian embassy in Lon- 
don if he had “useful 
information,” tbe tribunal. 


persuade you to enter into 
partnership with the find and 
this luncheon is part of the 
softening-up process.” 

She is to head a team of 
businessmen, to breathe new 


London, was told. ' spe^b tan 


But instead, be appeared on 


Mr Atkinson was later dis- 
missed from his job for tbe 


proposed tunnel wito high- 


PrivatizatioD issues 


Public courted in millions 


from local residents, business- j appearance. He claims that he 
men, ferry and dock woricers. | was unfeiriy dismissed and is 

seeking reinstatement. 

Mrs Elizabeth Andrew, for 
toe newspaper, said that the 
dismissal was fair became 
Morning Star journalists were 


children in Britain and 50 
Third World countries. But 
although in c o m e lor 1985-86 
totalled £414 million, in- 
dustry and c omme rce contrib- 
uted only 4 percent. 

The rice c h a i rm an will be 
Lord Board man, rhairamn of 
National Westmins ter Bank, 


By Robin Young 

Few people who read news- 
papers or watch Cderirion can 
be unaware of the prodigal 
spending that is being lavished 
On privatization share issues. 

The 12 page prospectus for 


British Telecom, £119 rafflum 
of which wait to shareholders 
S¥ s J? mk 5? c “ in the form of discount vonch- 

tkar telephone 

apphratioo firom bills. British Gas is expected 

to offer siuular incentives to its 

paper^as the^nmx ton 13 n ;i ]ioil domestic 
Prtptt o&ntam mwbidk f t vasmrS ' 

£13 BnUkm was spent on ^ . ... 


Hon oa the brae. 

MeanwhSe, a 40-second 
television commercial to publi- 
cize toe British Gas branch 
has received 200 showings. A 


Even so, the pnbfidty and rang the share infonnatiim 
adverti si ng costs are bet the office dealing with the sale of 
glossy veneer on the expen- British Gas. 

(fitnre underpinning the is- As wdlas travelling around 
sues. Britain to sefl the issue to 500 

The Government sprat n UK financial institutions, Brit- 
total of £263 mfllloB seflmg ish Gas directors are likely to 
British Telecom, £110 mfltion tour Europe, the United 
of which wrat to shareholders States, Japan and Ca n a da 
in the form of discount vouch- next month. Tbe prospectus, 
era against their telephone when it finally appears, will 
tolls. British Gas is expected account for n fin- bigger finest 
to offer similar incentives to its than the 1,200 trees that had 

13 million domestic to be felled eo print tbe legal 

consumers. docum e n tation for T elecom. 

There are two dozen groups Underwrites who piontoed 
of professional advisers work- to buy the shares iff «*ody 
ingot) the gas issue. As well as else did received £74 nmnoo 
toe hundreds of employees at ' from the BT issue; for nothing, 
<h. Omartnuot iirvnwn •■nl as it aDDeared to many, when 


British Gas, three merchant ti*® ^ billion issae was stb- 


not allowed to appear on who will be joined by a small 
television. group from finance, manafac- 

The case continues. tari n g and r et ailing. 


million domestic 


toe hundreds of employees at 


banks, five firms of solicitors, 
too consultancies, four foreign 
investment banks, two 
advertising agencies and a 


new series of advertisements denting bank are involved. 


will be shown no less inten- 


tly the experience 


steely during toe next fort- with Telecom, it is like ly that 
night. The Ads cost up to the companies helping with 
£^000 each. toe gas flotation will make 

No piedse figures wOl be more than £150 million from 
available until after the laonch toe launch, 
hit toe British Gas ferae is The Government aims to 
approximately half as big have fora- million shareholders 
again as tout of British in British Gas, nearly twice 
Telecom, the marketing of the 23 mfiDon who subscribed 
which cost more than £14 mil- - for Telecom. Already, mere 


Ins in the Britain alone. 


than three nuUton people have 


scribed for four times over. 

The TSB, whose issue is 
thought impossible to feB 
(unofficial dealings already 
suggest move than 100 per 
cent profit for successful ap- 
plicants when trading starts), 
has managed to wimoinae a 
littie in that field. . 

Only three quarters of the 
issue is being underwritten, 
and toe fee is reduced to 
1.175 per cent so that instead 
of £30 million, the 
underwrites’ fees wifl be re- 
duced to a fittie over 
£13 million. 


Blake, C assets & Gray don 

Barristers & Solicitors 


ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE 
THE OPENING OF THEIR 
EUROPEAN OFFICE ON 
SEPTEMBER 15, 1986 


Telephone; 01-377 6800 
Telex; 9413236 .. 
Facsimile: 01-377 2917 


Northnmbi^an House 
14 Devonshire Square 
London EC2M 4TE 
England 


' Resident P artne rs 

Timothy N. Unwin 
David G/ Gienme 


3 u^ 1 



■ n: 


industrial action over his re- 
fiisal to backdate an £8-fl-week 
rise for men who took part in 
toe pit strike. They decided to 
await the outcome of talks. 

Headmaster 

remanded 

A headmaster accused of 
assaulting a pupil aged 13 in a 
caning incident, was .re- 
manded on bail for two weeks 
by magistrates at Barnet, 
north London yesterday. 

Mr Anthony Peannan, of 
Hamlet Court Village Road, 
Enfield, is alleged to have 
assaulted the pupil at- the 
Independent Frieni Barnet 
Grammar School, north Lon- 
don, on July 17. 

Scargill to sell 

Mr Arthur ScaigflJ, presi- 
dent of toe National Union of 
Mineworkers. is selling his 
bungalow in Worsbo rough. 
Yorkshire, fuelling specula- 
tion that he is to buy a 
£125,000 house at Barn&fey, 
nearby. 


Correction 

The Dee Corporation owns 
Gateway and toe Wooloo out- 
lets, contrary to the implication 
of a paragraph in yesterday's 
Special Report on Retailing. 









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Seven factors thwarted 



£¥&£m! 


inspector’s report says 




By Peier Davenport 

Seven fectors contributed to aircraft to cany out any 
toe high loss of life in the rescues, 
sumyable” Manchester air- “If the hydrants had been 
port disaster, according to a working correctly the most 
r ®P° rt by an _ inspector of effective way to tackle the fire 
airport fire services which was inside the aircraft cabin would 


with _ the Civil Aviation 
Authority yesterday. 

In evidence to the inquest 
on the deaths of the 55 
passengers and crew, Mr Ber- 
nard Brown, the inspector, 
said that the lapfc of water at 
hydrants nearest the blazing 
British Amours Boeing 73 1 
prejudiced attempts to rescue 
survivors. 

Th e report also disdosedthe 
rear starboard exit door had 
been opened and the escape 
shute fully deployed by a 
stewardess while the plane was 
still moving. 

But as the aircraft turned off 

the runway the ■ shute was 
destroyed by flame s lirirfng 
under the fuselage before it 
could be used. 

It was a further 70 seconds, 
Mr- B rown said, before the 
front starboard door was 
opened. 

Mr Brown; now in charge of 
the authority's fire training 
school, told the jury that - 
because of the water supply 
difficulty firemen lost 13 vita] 
minutes before they could re* 
enter the aircraft to cany on 
their search for survivors. 

He was asked by Mr Leon- 
ard GorodJrin, die coroner, if 
the problems had prejudiced 
fire-fighting abilities. 

Mr Brown, said: “I dusk 
very much so. If there was no 
problem of water then the sole 
task would have been to have 
committed men inside the 


have been with hoses con- 
nected directly to them.” 

In the conclusion to his 

investigation into the han- 
dling of the disaster. Mi* 
Brown listed seven items 
which affected the fight for 
lives. They were: 

1 Discussions that were held 
to change emergency proce- 
dures at the airport were 
conducted in an unsatisfac- 
tory manner leading to the 
delays in the arrival of out- 
ride, local authority fire 
appliances. 


which carried up to 100kg of 
chemical compound and spe- 
cially effective in fighting 
funning fuel fires was not 
called in to assist. ■ 

7 When firemen first arrived 
at the jet they could not and 
would not know there was a 
serious internal fire. The Maze 


gallons a minute of fuel escap- 
• ingfrom a fractured fuel pipe. 
- The _ lack of water caused 
confusion and a waste of 
manpower among fire crews. 
The situation became so criti- 
cal, Mr Brown said, that Sub- 
Officer Mr Harold Jones, the 
officer in charge of the airport 
firemen, did not permit fur- 
ther crews to go into the 




Mr Brown said that when 


thejet was on toe runway the 
Site ^ tat ^L°5 smoke and flames were being 
Jgamsta toid-down oodeof blown backwaids firan the 
practice. Die inquest had a j ir raft but when it turned 


eartierheard that outside con- jjgfct tbe wind drove the fire 

on to the fuselage. 

Mr David King, a principal 
inspector of accidents with the 


brigade whenever the supply 
was to be turned off 

3 The final position of the 
aircraft was partially cross- 
wind and that contributed to 
the spread or the fire from port 
to starboard. 

4 The senior airport fire 
officer in charge of fire fighting 

at the plane was. not easily 
recognizable by local author- 
ity crews coming to help. 

5 An ambulance operated by 
the airport fire service went to 
a prearranged emergency ren- 
dezvous pomt instead ofhead- 
ing directly to the burning jet 

6 An apron service vehicle 


"T* accident investigation branch 
. . of the Department of Trans- ! 
uie port, the officer in charge of 
rap* the Manchester investigation, 
a “J said that evidence had been 
P°“ taken from the aircraft’s cock- 
- pit voice recorder and the 
fijght data recorder. 

“5* He said that the prat engine 
**“7 exploded at 7.13.12 and 
nor " within seven-tenths of a sec- 
ond Mr Peter Terrihgton, the 
1 by captain, had orderd a “stop” 
it to to the take-off within 25.5 
re®- seconds he had ordered an 
&d- evacuation of the aircraft. 

'.jet- The hearing continues 
tide today. 


Ms Jane Hackworth-Yon 
yesterday as 


moves books to the new premises in B 
Jy Meades offers some protection from 


it’s Park, London 
rain. 


National theatre heritage ‘dying’ 


Explosives case 


Libyan cites Abu Nidal link 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter . . 

A Libyan dissident ap- ‘ and plain passes, appeared as- serving an aeronautical en- 
peared in disguise at the the first witness against the gjneenng apprenticeship with 
Central Criminal Court yes- two men,- Mr Graham Boal, a British atrium when he was 
terday to tell how be pro- for the prosecution, told the called back to Libya in August 
tended to support the Gadaffi jury: “It will be an obvious 1984 after the shooting of 
regime and led police to a disguise and the reasons for it Woman Police Constable 
Tripoli operation bringing gre- you may readily understand Yvonne fietcher outside the 
nades into Britain fra* Arabs without further explanation.” Libyan People’s Bureau some 
linked to the Abu Nidal Mr Boal, opening the case, months eaifier. 
terrorist organization. told the court the Crown In Libya he was told by an 

Described in court only as alleged that the defendants acquaintance: “You have not 
-“Mr F\ the Libyan told of. “are or were members of or at done anything yet for your 
taking, a plastic bag from a ‘ feast supporters o$ sympatiriz- - country aodrhis is a good time 
man in the uniform of " the' -ere with an extreme Arab to start doing something.” - 


The British Theatre Associ- 
ation will collapse within the 
next three years nnless the 
Government steps In immedi- 
ately with financial backing, 
Ms Jane Hackworth-Young, 
tiie director of the association, 
said yesterday. 

She was gwHwg on the 
first day of a week-tong move 
to new rented offices and 


The BTA sold its premises 
in Fitzroy Square, which it had 
occupied since 1935, because 
of flwncial difficulties. Ms 
Hackworth-Young said that 
the association, which was 
founded in 1919, needed finan- 
cial harking amounting to 
£100,000 a year. 


“We've been 


library in Regent's Park, cen- private sector for 


serving an aeronautical en- 
gineering apprenticeship with 
a British airline when he was 
called back to Libya in August 
1984 after the shooting of 
Woman Police Constable 
Yvonne fietefcer outside the 
Libyan People’s Bureau some 
months eaifier. 

In Libya he was told by an 


Libya Arab Airase at the 
airline's office, at -Heathrow 
last year. 

The bag was passed to 
detectives, who found four , 
grenades wrapped in foil be- 
neath bare of chocolate. 

The court was told that the 
grenades were replaced by 
harmless devices which the 
dissident delivered to a man 
code-named “Mekdad" out- 
side a London Underground 
station last September. 

Yesterday Rasmi Awad, 
aged 43, a Jordanian doctor 
accused of being Mekdad, and 
Nassar Mohamed, aged 26, a 
student holding a Jordanian 
passport, of Hendon, north 
London, denied explosives 


organization which bears the 
name of the man who is 
believed.- to bis the power 
behind it Abu Nidal". 

Mr Boal said that the gre- 
nades discovered by police 
were anti-personnel grenades. 
“I win not dwell upon the 
consequences of one of those 
grenades being thrown.** 

After Dr Awad was arrested 


to start doing something." - 
After returning to Britain 
last year Mr I said he was 
telephoned by a man whom he 
called “Mr S* who he said was 
, “a wen known member of the 
Gadaffi regime, well known in 
> Libya that is". . . 

He was rung again and sent 
' to meet a flight from Tripoli at 
Heathrow auport last August 
Mr I said he waited in the 


Spanish police searched his . 1 saia he waited m roe 

home in Madrid. In a writing Libyan Arab airline office and 
desk they found a document approached a man who he 
entitled Organizational took to be an amine captain 
Assignments. . from his insignia. 

It was, Mr Boal said, “a He asked thecaptain if there 
terrorist briefing note and was anything for him on the 
code" mentioning Naio head- flight mid the officer said he' 
quarters, the BBC, Zionist knew of nothing but there was 


Mr Mohamed and Dr 
Awad, who is resident in 
Spain, deny conspiracy to 
cause explosions between Au- 
gust and September last year 
and attempting to possess 
explosives. 

Before Mr I, who wore a 
thick black beard, moustache 


groups and Arab organiza- an oxtra member oif the crew 
tions considered on the flight who might have 


“reactionary". 

As Mr Boal introduced Mr I 
to the court as his first witness, 
the man's real name was 


something for him. - 
Later an man wearing what 
Mr I took to be the insignia of 
a first i officercame into the 


passed on a piece of paper to airline office and handed him 
Mr Justice Brown and the the plastic bag. 


^Speaking in En glish, the 
dissident said he had been 


The. hearing continues 
today. , 


‘Travellers’ Manslaughter charge 
forcing firms denied by RUC officer 

lU ClOSv .... . D _n;.i um iv<»d - 


By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

Businesses have suffered so 
severely from the effects of 
“travelling people" that they 
have been forced to dose or 
move, the Association ofBrit- 
isb Chambers of Commerce 
says in a report to the Home 
Office. 

It describes the experiences 
of companies in seven areas 
which have suffered thou- 
sands of pounds in damage 
from regular thefts and 
vandalism, lost the confidence 
of visiting customers because 
of squalor, and had to protect 
women members of staff from 
sexual harassment 
Some companies have feced 
also heavy legal costs through 
trying to evict an illegal 
encampment on their land. 

The report, which springs 
from support by the associ- 
ation and its member cham- 
bers of the Government’s 
crime prevention campaign, 
lists the areas with “consid- 
erable problems" as: Glasgow, 
Edinburgh, Bradford, Shef- 
field, Luton, Ipswich and 
Reading. 

The problems are said by 
the association to be caused by 
large groups of “travelling 1 ' 
people" who have occupied, 
illegally in most cases, unsuit- 
able land 

The association says that 
amendments to the Public 
Order Acts to deal with “peace 
convoys” should include pro- 
visions to enable trespassers 
in industrial areas to be dealt 
with similarly. 

■The first priority, it adds, 
must be to accelerate the 
provision of suitable, au- 
thorized, properly equipped 
sites. 


. By Richard Ford 

An RUC officer fired a publicity-seeking appearance 
plastic bullet at dose range at a at the rally in Andersomown 
pian during an abortive, at- which led to the d e ath of Mr 
tempt to detain a Noraid Downes. 


tempt to c 
leader, it 
yesterday. 


alleged 


Crown counsel .told ■ the 
court that after Mr Galvin was 


. Reserve Constable Nigel introduced by Mr Geny Ad- 
Hegarty was much nearer the ams, PSFMP for West Belfast, 
man, who lata- died, than the police made their way through 
20 metres laid down in force a crowd- of 2,500 people in an 
instructions and later ynarie attempt to detain him. A 
several st a tements admitting ntunha* of plastic bullets were 
that he had fired his gun in an fired into the air and the 
unjustifiable maimer, Belfast reserve constable became 


Crown Court was told. ' 

Mr Hegaxty, aged 28, whose 


rated from his section, 
later interviews the court i 


address was given as RUC was told that Mr Hegarty 
Carrick Fergus, denies the alleged that he had seen a man uaaul 
manslaughter of Mr Sean melding a stick and was ^ A 
Downes, aged 22, who died certain he was going to attack 
after being hit as police at- two police officers who were 
tempted to arrest Martin struggling with a member of £ 200 . 


tral London. 

25 bailed 
at Heysel 
hearing 

By Michael HorsneD 

Extradition proceedings ; 
against" 25. 'British football 
Cubs wanted for trial in Bel- | 

! gimri iwi TMiKhug htiwdMrjtw 

after the Heysel Stadium rat I 
in Efrusseh began in London ' 
yesterday. 

AD 25 men, who are receiv- 
ing legal aid in a caseexpected 
to cost np to £500,000, were 
remanded until November 10 
at Bow Street Magistrates* 
Court. 

A twenty-sixth defendant, 
Mr Ronald O’Brien, an o3 rig 
labourer, has not been traced 
by police at his heme in 
Aberdeen and a warrant for 
his arrest was extended by Mr 
David Hopkin, the chief 
Metropolitan magistrate. 

Defence lawyers protested 
after the hearing that the case 
should never have been 
brought and could take nntfi 
1988 to complete. 

The 25 defendants sat qui- 
etly in the parked courtroom 
throughout the start of 
Britain's biggest ever extra- 
dition case. 

Miss Helen Garifck, for die 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions, fold tike court that “by 
virtue of what tbey did in joint 
enterprise and by virtue of 
individual acts they are all 
charged with manslaughter". 

Thirty-nhie people died on 
May 29, 1985, when a wall at 
the stadium collapsed daring 
rioting before the European 
Cup final match between 
Liverpool and Juventus. 

All die defendants, most of 
whom are from Liverpool, 
were arrested on the hams of 
warrants served under the 
1870 Extradition Treaty be- 
tween Britam and Belgium. 

Miss Garfick said that po- 
Ece in Liverpool, who studied 
video-film of the match in 
conjunction with inquiries If I 
the B elgian authorities, had 
not been able to identity other 
alleged rioters. 

Twenty-tar of those who 
appeared yesterday were given 
unconditional bail at the ad of 
the 45-minute hearing. An- 
thony Hogan, aged 22, was 
ordered to provide a surety of 


we can no longer survive with 


the little bits of money that 
we've been getting. 

“The association represents 
British theatre throughout the 
century and the Government 
has a responsibility to help 
preserve that,” she said. 

The BTA organised the 
move of its library, one of the 
world’s largest theatre 
liharies, containing over a 
quarter of a millio n books, in 
less than six months. 


Council concern over 
private flat repairs 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


The Government is being 
urged to bring in legislation 
enabling , councils to ensure 
that landlords of 
privatdyowned flats carry out 
repair* 

- There is concern among 
councils after a recent House 
of Lords’ ruling that thou- 
sands of leaseholders of pri- 
vately owned flats could be 
left without a means of redress 
when landlords foil to cany 
out their duties. 

Westminster City Council, 


which has the biggest angle 
concentration or privately 
owned fiats in Britain, is 
appealing to Mr Patten, Min- 
ister for Housing and 
Construction, to legislate. 


Majority 
agree with 
equal age 
for retiring 

By David Cross 

Most men and women be- 
lieve both sexes should have 
the same retirement age, 
according to a survey carried 
out by Market Opinion and 
Research International 
(MORI) for The Times. 

The poll coincides with the 
announcement by Mecca Lei- 
sure. the entertainments 
conglomerate, that il is to 
introduce a revolutionary new 
scheme for its employees 
which would give them the 
right to retire at any time aged 
between 55 and 65. 

The company said that the 
new arrangements will also 
provide identical pensions to 
men and women paying simi- 
lar contributions. 

The MORJ poll, based on 
interviews with nearly 2,000 
people aged 15 or over, shows 
that only 13 per cent of men 
and 15 per cent of women, 
believe the legal retirement 
age should be different for the 
two sexes. 

However, only a bare 
majority think it would be 
“fair? to raise the legal retire- 
ment age for women; 56 per 
cent of women and 48 per cent 
of men favour that. A majority 
of men over 55 would like to 
be able to retire, or to have 
retired, aged 60. 

The survey was carried out 
by MORI after the 
Government’s acceptance that 
it could not force women 
public-sector employees to re- 
tire earlier than men. The 
issue was also raised in the 
social security reviews under- 
taken by Mr Norman Fowler, 
Secretary of Slate for Social 
Services. 

The poll also showed strong 
support for 60. as the legal 
retirement age, with 50 per 
cent of men and 52 per cent of 
women supporting it for both 
sexes. 

Older people were slightly 
more prone to believe in 
different retirement ages for 
men and women. Only 13 per 
cent of those aged 15 to 34 
thought they should retire at 
different ages, compared with 
18 per cent of those aged over 
65. 

Only 33 per cent of men 
aged 15 to 34 would like to be 
able to retire on a frill state 
pension at 60. But that 
proportion rose to 57 per cent 
among men in the 55 to 64 age 
bracket About 62 per cent of 
women aged 15-34 thought it 
fair to raise the legal retire- 
ment age for women, com- 


— 

Solicitor 

shares 

dividend 

A part-time accounts dork 
and a solicitor share 
yesterday’s Portfolio Gold 
dividend of £4,000. 

Mrs Catherine Selby, aged 

36, a solicitor, who works from 

her home at Sutton, Surrey, 
said die felt “amazed" about 
winning. “1 thought that I was 
not having any lock." 

Sbe started playing the 
game in May when her bus- 
tosd, Peter, bought a new 
house. A mother-of-two, she 
intends to use the money to 
redecorate and refurbish the 
family's Edwardian home. 

Mrs Selby said that she and 
her husband had been regular 
readers of The Times since 
they were students. 

Mrs Betty Radge, aged 59, a 
part-time accounts clerk from 
Aspley Guise, Bedfordshire, 
said she felt “quite excited" 
about winning. 

Mrs Budge, who has five 
children, said she would use 
the money “to buy something 
for my large family". 

Readers who would like to 
pby the game can obtain a 
Portfolio Gold card by sending 
a stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, BB1 6A J. 




pared with only 49 per cent of 
The Lords ruled in a case those over 65. 
involving Croydon Borough Commenting on the poll, 
Cbonol that the authority had the Confederation of British 
n ? E? u,re 1116 owncr Industry said yesterday that 

of a block of flats to carry out was broadly in favour of equal I 
repairs. The owner was held to retirement ages for men and 


be not in control because of I women between 60 and 65, 


the low ground rents. 


but that these must be flexible. 


Mrs Selby, joint winner. 

Escaped bull 
rampaging on 
railway is shot 

Police marksmen shot dead 
a boll yesterday after it es- 
caped from Chelmsford cattle 
market, Essex, and charged on 
to the main Chichester to 
Loudon railway fine. 

As British vRall brought 
services in and out of Chelms- 
ford to a standstill, the trail's 
owner, cattle market workers 
and police spent more than an 
hour Crying to capture it 

The police said the bull 
charged hp and down the trade 
and became agitated when it 
was cornered. It then dunged 
two market workers who suf- 
fered cuts and bruises. 


\buTl need boundless 
energy and inexhaustible 

enthusiasm. 


As an Officer or Adult Instructor in the Army teenagers b 

Cadet Force therels nowhere to hide. balanced it 

You’ll be responsible for a couple of dozen map- read ir 

teenagers desperate to be involved in anything chall- Characteris 
enging and adventurous. They'll be more physically in the cade 

active than average and bursting with energy. And 

But they need it channelling in the right run along s 

direction with guidance and encouragement from you. training tec 
• And ith a real interest in their development If you 

we’re looking for rather than a service background or ed to give u 

special experience. attend an aj 

Well give you any training you need. (for which j 

. Our aim is to develop • 

confidence, self-discipline IT7| I I 

and initiative in %Of\J Ww 111 


teenagers between 13 and 18 years through a carefully 
balanced mixture of activities like rock-climbing, 
map-reading, orienteering and competition shooting. 
Characteristics that will prove invaluable to employers 
in the cadets' future working lives. 

And since we’ re sponsored by the Army were 
run along similar lines and use well tried Army 
training techniques. 

If you’re aged between about f9 and 40, prepar- 
ed to give up an evening a week, some weekends and 
attend an annual summer camp of up to two weeks 
(for which you'll be paid), we think you’ll find it really 
• W satisfying. So much so. you’ll probably 
l 7”I I I be quite happy doing more. 
w Mi Were looking for Officers, Adult 


T j . Instructors and Cadets, so send in 

f the coupon or contact vour local 

Army Cadet Force HQ or TAVR 

k. ^ ssoc ‘ ation * They're in the phone book under Army’. 


Galvin, an American, as he the public. 

a Provisional Sinn Immediately after the m- 
Fein anti-internment rally m rident Mr Hegarty allegedly 
West Belfast two years ago. ’ told a superior officer he had 
Die Noraid official had fired five times but did not 
been banned from entering know ifhe had made any hits. 
Northern Ireland and made a The trial continues today. 


Six Harry Livermore, 
representing three of the 

defendants, after the 

h earing “So for as my clients 
are con c e rne d, their co infect 
does not come within 100 

wiles of mantlanghf yy, 


Operation admission by doctors 








\ \ 9 *XtW5&ter 
-* -jpCfr . 


By Jiff Sherman 


nior Staff Committee, said complete the first stage of the 
that junior doctors with little surgery and wait until the 
experience may take on an consultant arrived to corn- 
operation only to find it is pleie the procedure. But he 
more complex than they said that the longer the opera- 
realised. tiop took, the higher the 

“A doctor in training may ? h _ an ? e of post-operative 
think he has a case of appen- infection. 


Junior doctors admitted that junior doctors with little 
yesterday that they sometimes experience may tate on an 
have to perform unsupervised °P* ranon on /y te find it is 

l'_i i _ mnro rnmnlor than thPV 


operations which they have mot® complex 
little experience of carrying realised, 
out. “A doctor in 

Most are emergency opera- think he has a c 
tions carried out during the dkitis and tin 
evening and at weekends patient has gs 
when' consultants on call are needing much n 
stretched between accident surgery. He the 
and emergency departments out of his depth, 
at more than one hospital. .A junior doct 
After the report by - the find that the con 
College of Health that trainee was covering 1 
surgeons are putting patients Health Service I 
at risk. Dr Peter Hawker, admitting emergencies^ 
chairman of the British Medi- . Dr Hawker 
cal Association’s Hospital Ju- most cases the 


1 1 for farther mfo mariog send this coupon Ino a amp l*^! 

, . required) to: FREEPOST, Captain Alan Wood, Cadet Training , 

,| Centre, Rimley ftrit. CAMBERLEY. Surrey GLTlf) 5BR. 

. I am interested in becoming an Officer or Aduk Instrunor Q gWS 
[ a Cadet □ (please tick appropriate box) [Sp 


dkitis and then finds the He blamed the lack of 
patient has gastric cancer, supervision on the shortage of 
needing much more complex consultant posts and the feet I 
surgery. He then finds he is that emergency operations I 
ouiof his depth," he said. were earned out at night 
A junior doctor could then because there was no theatre 
find that the consultant on call space the following day. 


was covering two National . He called on health authori- 
Heailh Service hospitals both ties to consider' whether it was 




& ■ -Sfe 


admitting emergencies- essential to have two hospitals 
Dr Hawker said that -in within two or three miles of 
most cases the doctor could each other taldng'tneiaendts. 


| ^ ARMY CADET FORCE 

I 1 


4 


HOME NEWS 


SDP CONFERENCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 

Energy debate • Taxation defence • Restraint on PR 


Equal rights 


Call for review of nuclear power 


TAXATION 


COMMENTARY 


Social Democrats called 
yesterday for an urgent review 
of emergency plans for nuclear 
power stations, insisting that 
the plans should be made 
available to residents and 
defined in clear and simply 
terms. 

Changes were made to the 
SDP green paper Sctfe and 
Efficient Energy. , although foe 
main motion carried by the 
Council for Social Democracy 
was to endorse its central 
mosposals as the basis for 
further discussion. 

The principal change 
backed the construction of 
new power stations, subject to 
a review of safety in foe 
aftermath of Chernobyl, 
rather than the document's 
insistence that no new nuclear 
capacity shonld be ordered 
until foe full causes and 
implications of Chernobyl 
were known. 

Removed from foe docu- 
ment was a section which 
stated that they could con- 
tinue to opefate existing 
nuclear power stations while 
reviewing them all to ensure 
that they satisfied the highest 
safety standards presently 
known. They would continue 
research and development 
into nuclear fission and foe 
safe disposal of nudear waste. 

Until the fiill causes and 
implications of the Chernobyl 
disaster were known and new 
safety designs incorporated, 
no new nuclear capacity 
would be ordered. 

This was replaced, by 117 
votes to 109, by a long 
paragraph which stated: 
“Recognizing that coal will 
remain foe principal fuel for 



Mr Tom Burke, who 
wound np the debate 


electricity generation well into 
foe twenty-first century, we 
will undertake a stringent 
safety review of current 
nuclear power station designs 
and management, taking into 
account any lessons which 
may be learnt from the 
Chernobyl accident. 

“Subject to a st 
outcome of this review we 
construct additional nudear 
power stations, if and when 
required, in order to ensure 
that our industries are able to 
obtain electricity at prices no 
greater than our competitors. 
We will continue to operate 
existing nudear power sta- 
tions while reviewing them all 
the ensure that they satisfy the 
highest safety standards 
known." 

Some representatives in the 
conference hall were dis- 
appointed when it was ruled 
that because this was carried, 
another amendment calling 
for no more nudear power 
stations automatically felL 
Another amendment 
recommending that nudear 
power should be progressively 
phased out was lost, mainly 
because it advocated a referen- 
dum on nudear power. 

An immediate investigation 
into the state of all nuclear 
power stations in Britain to 
ensure they conformed to the 
highest safety standards now 
known was advocated by Sh 
Leslie Morphy, chairman of 
the SDP energy working 
group, when he moved accep- 
tance of foe working party's 
paper. 

He said that this country 
could influence international 
opinion on nudear safety 
because of the advanced na- 
ture of our research into 
reactor design, waste manage- 
ment and reprocessing. But 
that influence would cease if 
we opted out of nudear power. 

The group also proposed 
that stations under construc- 
tion should be completed, he 
said, subject to the proviso 
about safety standards, but 
that no new stations should be 
ordered until the full causes 
and implications of the 
Chernobyl disaster had been 
carefully studied. 

That was not a policy for 
phasing out nudear power, he 
emphasized, but a mora- 



Taveme defends 
party’s attempt 
at fairer system 

The onefomg foe brouhaha Merging JwdBenefits^ 


Dr David Owen being smar te ne d by his wife Debbie before the arrival of Mr David Steel 

at the SDP conference in Harrogate yesterday (Photograph: Peter Trfevnor) 


over foe SDPs taxation policy 
document and its indication 
that .some people would pay 
more tax had done was to 
focus attention on their pro- 
posals, and Mr Dick Taveme, 
chairman of the party's tax 
and social security working 
party, told the conference foal 
■he had not come to apologise 
nor did he think they would 
wish him to. 

Dining the debate, attacks 
by Mr Norman Tebbit, 
Conservative Pasty chairman, 
on foe SDP tax plans were 
heavily criticized. 

Mr Taveme conceded there 
had been some mistakes and 
misunderstandings but they 
should not image that in any 


torium on ordering new sta- 
tions until safety standards 
had been satisfied. 

Mr Chris Clarke, prospec- 
tive parliamentary candidate 
for Bridgewater, moved an 
amendment calling for an 
urgent review of emergency 
plans for nuclear power sta- 
tions and for such plans to be 
made available to residents 
and defined in dear and 
simple terms. 

He said that Chernobyl had 
changed everything. It shook 
people's confidence and had 
made people wonder what 
could happen in Britain. 

Mrs Winifred Trunin, 
prospective parliamentary 
candidate for Wantage, 
moved an amendment 
proposing foal subject to a 
satisfactory outcome of a 
stringent safety review of cur- 
rent nudear power station 
and manag ement, tak- 
ing into account lessons from 
Chernobyl, additional nudear 
power stations would be con- 
structed, if and when required. 

Existing nudear power sta- 
tions would continue to op- 
erate while reviewed to ensure 
that they satisfied the highest 
safety standards. Research 
and development into nuclear 
fission, fusion and foe safe 


disposal of midear waste 
would continue. 

Nuclear power was needed 
and it would be mad not to 
continue with research and 
development. 

Mr Keith Smith, prospec- 
tive parliamentary ranrfirigw» 
for ' Edinburgh Pentlands, 
moved an amendment ensur- 
ing the closure of Magnox 
power stations, which had 
now completed their design 
lifespan. Research and 
de velopment into the disposal 
of nudear waste would con- 
tinue, and in view of the 
implications of the Chernobyl 
disaster no new power stations 
would-be ordered. 

Mrs Margaret Cooper, 
North Nottinghamshire, said 
she would like to see immedi- 
ately foe dosure of the Thorpe 
reprocessing plant at 
Sdlafidd. They were laying up 
a lethal legacy in nudear waste 
for future generations. She 
called for a new era of dean 
coal -fired power stations. 

Mr John Grant chairman 
of the Social Democrat trade 
unionists and a former MP, 
said understandable emotions 
about nudear power were 
being ruthlessly exploited but 
there should not be contemp- 


tuous disregard of those who 
worked in the nudear in- 
dustry. They could not brush 
aside the views of foe 
workforce, thus accusing them 

of nnrhfnlfahl^ rgllnrrera-ey 

Replying to the debate, Mr 
Tom Bsrae, candidate for 
Surbiton and a member of the 


and foe tax system there 
would not be misunderstand- 
ing, however good the public 
relations. Tory proposals had 
been a shambles and they still 
did not kwnow how much 
Labour policies would cost. 

He considered that if the 


Tory view of taxation pre- 
energy working party, urging I vailed Britain would have foe 
rejection or remissio n of the ! deepest division between rich 
ame ndments, yajd energy ef- j and poor in Europe. It would 


fidency was top priority and 
would create many jobs. La- 
bour policy was yet again a 
blank cheque for the nnimi^ 
That was marginally better 
than the Tomes who had no 
policy. 

Mr Peter Walker, Secretary 
of State for Energy, had taken 
ministerial indolence to new 
heights. Having established 
energy efficiency, the Govern- 
ment promptly cat home in- 
sulation grants. 

After Chernobyl, it could 
not be business as usual but 
prejudice must not prevail 
There was no case at present 
for ordering new nudear sta- 
tions. To treat onshore re- 
sources as a reserve would 
prevent stimulating explora- 
tion. They should not go into 
foe business of making policy 
by holding referenda. 


irmiffi Britain an increasingly 
unattractive and violent soci- 
ety, with the prospect of more 
riots, muggings, division, 
decay and despair. 

He declared to loud ap- 
plause: “I would rather we 
were criticized and attacked 
because we were honest than 
seek to bamboozle the public 
by concealing foe truth." 

Making dear that contrary 
to many press reports. Dr 
David Owen, the party leader, 
fuDysuported the proposals in 
the SDP policy document 


Attaching Poverty , 
Taveme said that when it had 
been indicated that some peo- 
ple would have to pay more 
tax, it was immediately as- 
sumed th^ everyone would be 

taxed out of existence. But the 
party wanted to make foe 
system fairer and simpler and 
remove its absurdities 
unfairness. 

When people reasonably 
asked at what point people 
lost and gained, foe anstror. 
not easy to grasp at once, was 
that there was no one such 
point. If they _ reformed _ a 
system riddled with anomalies 
and substituted a much sun- 

E ler, rational and fairer one, a 
it of people at different 
income levels who gained 
from the present unfair 
anomalies, lost, and those who 
now lost from them, gained 
There was a scattered pat- 
tern of losers and gainers. 
That was why there was no 
simple break even point. 

In addition they were not 
just distributing from the bet- 
ter off to foe worse off; but 
they were helping people at 
the time in their life cycle 
when their expenses were 
greater, namely when they had 
dependent children. One- 
earner families with children 
gained right up to £17,000 a 
year. 

Mr Taveme, who received a 
standing ovation, said few 
realized that under the present 
system a family with two 
children and a single earner 
with a family income of 
£15,000 a year paid £662 a 
year more in tax than the same 
family with two earners at 
£10,000 and £5,000. 


WHIPS’ REPORTS 


DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNMENT 

Alliance urged to ‘aim high’ 


Mr Roy Jenkins MP, one of 
the founders of foe SDP, had a 
rapturous standing ovation 
for a speech in which he told 
the Alliance to aim high. 
Nothing was certain; anything 
was possible, he declared. 

But he knew two things with 
absolute conviction. Another 
Parliament of Thatcherism 
would be devastating for the 
social cohesion of foe country. 

A Kinnock government, 
freed maybe from some of the 
excess ideological baggage of 
1983. but unsustained by 
authority, experience or 
intellectual ballast, would be a 
recipe for rash advance, 
rudderless retreat and abject 
disillusion. 

Britain deserved something 
better. It deserved a govern- 
ment of verve and zest, as 
constitutionally objective as it 
was ‘intellectually rigorous. 
That was what the Alliance 
alone could provide. 

He was winding up a debate 
on freedom, democracy and 
better government in which 
foe package of constitutional 
proposals in the Alliance 
document Partnership for 
Progress was generally 
welcomed. 

Mr Jenkins said that politi- 
cal and institutional change 
now was not only right for its 
own sake, but could also 
provide an essential pathway 
towards a better national eco- 
nomic performance. Neither 
of the old recipes showed the 
slightest sign of preventing the 
constant erosion of Britain's 
competitive position and 
manufacturing base. 


“I am convinced," be said 
“that the SDP and the Alli- 
ance must keeps its sights high 
and firmly fixed on this 
comprehensive challenge to 
foe old orthodoxy. 

“We were not created to 
seek a seal at the existing top 
table of party politics. We 
were created to overturn that 
table because it had become a 
symbol not of good govern- 
ment but of bad, not of 
constructive dialogue but of 
futile squabbling, not of open- 
ness and respect for the 
citizen's rights but of an 
ineffective obscurantism. 
Government based on leaks 
from the top and prosecution 
lower down is an unacceptable 
hypocrisy." 

The SDP did not wish to 
grow up like one of foe two 
ugly sisters of British politics. 
If they merely turned foe two- 
party sysmtem into one with 
three peas in the pod, they 
would almost inevitably be 
number three. “We must be 
an anti-party party" he de- 
clared to applause “seeting a 
different relationship with the 
electorate, and particularly tins 
non-partisan electorate, from 
that of the dreadful two. We 
exist to broaden politics and 
not to narrow them." 

They had .to show they 
could work with others, that 
they could bring out agree- 
ments rather . than 
disagreements. If they could 
not work with the Liberals 
they were not likely to con- 
vince foe electorate they could 
work with anyone else. They 
had no idea how lucky they 


were to have foe liberals to. 
work with, rather than a 
different wing to their own of 
one of the allegedly united 
Labour or Conservative par- 
ties. 

The Alliance policy docu- 
ment dealt with major and 
delicate constitutional issues 
but agreement on them be- 
tween the SDP and the Lib- 
erals had been almost 
•instinctive. In commending 
foe package of reforms, Mr 
Robert Mademum, MP for 
Caithness and Sutherland, 
and SDP spokesman on 
constitutional issues, had ear- 
lier picked out as principal 
priorities the need for a voting 
system of proportional 
representation and foe in- 
troduction of a Bill of Rights. 

He said that Britain was 
almost alone in the civilized 
developed world in lacking foe 
possibility of taking foe abus- 
ers of public power to court to 
provide a remedy. They need 
to incorporated the European 
convention of human rights 
into domestic law and estab- 
lish a strong commission of 
human rights. 

They were offering a Free- 
dom of Information BiQ, 
restoration of power to local 
govenmment which had been 
stripped from it by Labour 
and Tory Governments, re- 
moval of the monopolistic 
control of power from White- 
hall and Westminster, 
establishment of a Parliament 
for Scotland, a Welsh senate 
and regional assemblies. The 
essential task was to restore 
democracy. 


Candidate resigns 


A leading SDP member has 
decided to stand down as a 

pa rliamentar y candidate after 

clashes with local Liberals 
overdefence. 

Mr Alan Lee Williams, who 
was parliamentary private sec- 
retary to Mr Etenis Healey 
before resigning from the La- 
bour party and supports a 
British independent nudear 
deterrent, was picked by 


Havering SDP for foe Horn- 
church constituency last My. 
But local Liberals refused to 
endorse his candidature. 

In a letter to his focal 
he says his profound 
about the compromises re- 
quired on nuclear weapons 
malm it unlikely he will find 
the necessary support from 
liberals. 



Times put 
MPs in 
a ‘panic 

A story in The Times on ibt 
workrate of MPs in the Com- 
mons had thrown Conser- 
vative and Labour members 
into a panic, Mr John Cart- 
wright, MP .for Woolwich and 
SDP whip, said in his par- 
liamentary report 

The story, he said, disclosed 
that 71 per cent of Alliance 
members had a high work- 
load, compared with 44 per 
cent for Labour MPs and 27 
per cent for Conservative 
back-benchers. 

‘Fot years Labour and To- 
ries had been united in their 
cry that Alliance MPs were 
never present. 

‘Following that story they 
performed a complete and 
ingenious somersault and now 
they complain foe Alliance is 
given too much time and too 
many opportunities in the 
House of Commons" be said 
(Laughter). 

The Labour Party had fi- 
nally woken up to foe strength 
of foe Alliance and foe danger 


it posed at foe next election, 
Mr Cartwright said. 

As a result, all foe ills of foe 
left were put down to the 
Alliance by th ere delicate 
shrinking violets who accused 
the Alliance of threatening foe 
whole tone of British politics. 

Lord K3maniocfc, SDP 
whip in the House of Lords, 
said that both Houses ' were 
improperly constituted, and 
therefore at the mercy of 
particular interest groups. 

The Alliance was foe only 
political group remotely pre- 
pared to consider a whole 
packag e of constitutional 
reform. 


PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION 

Options must be kept 
open, says Rodgers 


The commitment of the 
SDP to proportional 
representation was consistent, 
sustained and would continue, 
Mr William Rodgers, vice- 
president of the party, told 
conference, but the hands of 
the parliamentary party and 
leadership should not be tied 
in advance of the unknown 
situation which would exist 
after foe next general election. 

There would be no back- 
sliding on the commitment, 
be assured the assembly, in a 
debate in which concern was 
expressed that there was un- 
ease in the party that the 
leadership's commitment to 
PR might be less than absolute 
as the election approached. 

He advised foe amendment 
of a motion which committed 
the SDP to the immediate 
introduction of PR by a 
majority Alliance govern- 
ment and to the earliest 
possible introduction as foe 
minimum price of support for 
any non-Ailiance government 
This was endorsed 
overwhelmingly. 


An amendment replacing 
the commitment with a pro- 
vision that PR would be 
introduced within the lifetime 
of the Parliament by a major- 
ity government and in the 

event of a balanced Par- 
liament progress towards PR 
at all levels of government 
would be a primary consid- 
eration is the negotiations 
which followed, was carried 
overwhelmingly. 

Mr Rodgers said that the 
SDP did not know whether it 
would be negotiating for PR or 
implementing it from a po- 
sition of power after the 
election. The hands of the 
party could not be tied when 
decisions would have to be 
made in a tense moment 

Mr Fred Hngheg, West 
Glamorgan, who moved foe 
motion for immediate in- 
troduction, urged the party 
not to listen to foe prag- 
matists, the wheelers and the 
dealers. Either they were 
committed to PR or it was just 
a desirable objective. 


Steel delivers election rallying call 


“The Alliance is fane to 
That was the 
delivered to 
David Steel leader of tire 
Liberal Party, who was ac- 
corded a prolonged standing 
ovation. 

He said that the Alliance, in 
going into the next election, 
mast posh back the clouds of 
gloom that had covered foe 
country for too many years, 
and let in vital rays of hope for 
all of its people. 

The Alliance was heading 
into election year strong, 
determined and united. “There 
is no limit to what we can 
achieve when the election 
comes," be declared. He was 
confident they would face the 
electorate with a mated and 
constructive policy on defence 
and disarmament. 

Mr Steel maintained that 
tire strength of the Alliance as 
a movement for reform was 
infinitely greater than that of 
foe Labour Party. 

MrKnmock's main rote, be 
said, was to perform as the 
aiusioflist, apparently a 
- -gainst extremism 
to reality his party 
drifted ever further to the left. 
All the analyses of foe new 
Labour parliamentary can- 



didates rep lacing re tirin g and 
deselected MPs showed this 

fimAmwnhl shift. 

He went om “A man is 
known by foe company be 
keeps and foe company he 
shuns. Mr Kmuock keeps 
company with the nrilitaiits in 
his parliamentary party while 
trying to . expel those in 
Liverpool 

“He slrans tire company i rf 
journalists employed by Times 
Newspapers because they are 
in ifefrte with the print 
onions. He shims the Union of 
Democractic Mineworkers 
with its 34,000 members, but 
appears at tire Durham 
Miners' Gala with Mr Arthur 
Scaroffl. 

“fie has used foe scrap with 
militants to divert public 
attention foam tire fact mat the 
Labour Party has s w un g ir- 
retrievable to foe left and foe 
feet that trade onion bosses 
stffl dominate Laboor by forior 
finance and blodk votes." 

It was no wonder they now 
heard so little aboat tire dream 
ticket of Kinnock and 
Hattersley. They were dream- 
ing all right, dreaming of a 
Labour vicotary. Their list of 
131 target scats they hoped to 
win even included that at 


Plymouth Devonport. 
(Laughter —Dr Owen's seat). 

“It is we," he continued, 
“who have got Labour on foe 
run in many of their seats as 
we showed at Newcastle under 
and mil show in 
North. There Is not 
a single nwmpb of foe 
Conservative Party making 
headway against Labour. The 
seats Labour win lose on 
present showing will be to os." 

While foe old parties were 
competing for the privilege of 
managing Britain's contuntina 
d ecline, foe Affi ance was 

f flnimj ttwi (0 t raimtf o niiliig th> 
political system to order to 
rebuild the shattered economy 
and reunite tire fractured 
society. 

It angered Mm to see die 
widening gulf between the 
prosperity of London and the 
South-east and tire relative 
poverty of foe rest The 
Thatcher years had been years 
of destruction. The anger he 
M made him determined that 
foe people of Britain must be 
offered a real alternative at foe 
next election, an alternative to 
foe deadening choice between 
an unreconstructed Labour 
Party and a burnt out Conser- 
vative Government 


“The ctmseqnences for Brft- 
ain of a third term of Thatcher 
administration woald be 
disastrous,” Mr Steel said, 
“and the retara of a Labour 
government with a new 
generation of ideol 
blinkered MPs would be just 
as bad. The electorate is 
desperately looking for an 
alternative and we can, and 
mast, provide it, omconring 
foe minor differences that 
remain between ns on defence 
or anything else. 

“Let us concentrate on foe 
common commitment of foe 
Liberals and Social Demo- 
crats to provide B ritain with 
an enlightened Affiance gov- 
ernment in which our highest 
priority is to talk to the people 
of this country, not to each 
other the whole time." 

They should make national 
government once again an 
instrument of intense 
to society and a focus 
common good. 

last week's government re- 
shuffle proved font foe hard 
right hajd taken over. 

“Thatcher doses are swarm- 
ing all over Whitehall" he 


WOMENS POLICY 

Concept of 
division 
ridiculed 

A separate women's policy 
was an admission of a lade of 
confidence and an idea as 
ridiculous as a men's policy, 
Mr David FanMer, Durham, 
said during a debate on 
women's policy. 

He warned of the dangers of 
counting men out, of alienat- 
ing wen-meaning parts of the 
community, and of introduc- 
ing the patronizing stereotyp- 
ing they were trying to get rid 

He said women's issues 
were society's issues: The door 
of equality was now open and 
they should stop hammering 
on it and walk through it 

The assembly endorsed the 
main principles of the Alli- 
ance policy proposal Freedom 
and Ch oice for Women: equal 
treatment of women and men 
in the tax and benefits system; 
equal opportunity for women 
in education, employment 
and public life; equal justice 
and security for women; 
recognition of the contribu- 
tion to society of women and 
men as carers; and recognition 
of women’S special needs as 
child bearers. 

Miss Anne Ludbrook, 
Grampian, challenged foe 
assumption that progress 
would be made only by 
women for women. “I ask 
you", she said, “do you think 
women's health services are 
safe in the hands of Mrs 
Edwina Currie?” 

The Labour Party was 
performing a confidence trick 
by the establishment of 
women's sections and 
commmittees, which were de- 



In one critical respect every 
Social Democratic or uwj 
conference is totally different 
from a Conservative or Laoow 
pterin* 

retires or Labour meet urey 
are talking seriously about 
their plans for the next govern- 
ment The ideas they Pj 
forward may or unf ~e 
realistic, but they mean it 
when they speak of a Couser* 
votive or Labour administra- 
tion after the next election. 

When Social Democrats or 
Liberals talk about what an 
Alliance government would do 
there is an air of unreality. 
Despite all the brave rhetoric, 
nobody truly expects foe Alli- 
ance to take office on its own. 
So foe decisions that really 
matter at a Soda! Democratic 
or Liberal conference are those 
which wonld _ affect the 
bar ga ining position of the 
Alliance if it were to bold the 
balance of power. 

That is why the most im- 
portant development at Harro- 
gate yesterday was the 
decision, in effect to give the 
party leadership a free hand in 
bargaining for PR in a hung 
Parliament The conference 
was not renouncing its demand 
for PR. This would remain “a 
primary consideration" in any 
negotiations. But it would no 
longer be an absolute con- 
dition for an agreement 

Whether foe Liberals are 
prepared to give their leader- 
ship foe same freedom of 
manoeuvre will be seen next 
week in Eastbourne. Their 
passion for electoral reform is 
of longer standing and their 
case for bargaining may be 
less highly developed. But 
yesterday's move seemed to 
me a significant step in the 
right direction. 


Significance of 
PR in any deal 


of power. 

Miss Hilary Long, can- 
didate for Bristol South, a 
member of the policy commit- 
tee, said that the document 
demonstrated the huge mea- 
sure of agreement there was 
between foe two parties in the 
Alliance on so many necessary 
reforms. 

The aim of the document 
was to give freedom of choice 
to determine the direction of 
their lives in the same way as 
men. 

plying to Mr Faultier she 
said that foe feet they had so 
many policies in the women's 
document duplicating those in 
other parts of Liberal and SDP 
policy was because they at- 
tached so much importance to 

■ them 

it was because women in the 
Liberal and SDP parties bad 
influenced the making 0 f pol- 
icy so much that they did not 
have women's ghetloes and 
women's sections. 


Today’s agenda 

The conference will debate 
industry, industrial relations, 
health and community care, 
the National Health Service, 
as well as emergency motions 
on the Manchester Police 
Authority and Mr John 
Stalker, its Deputy Chief Con- 
stable, South Africa and Brit- 
ish Coal. Mrs Shirley 
Williams. President, will ad- 
dress conference this 
afternoon. 


Conference reports by Robin Oakley, Richard Evans, Alan Wood, Amanda Haigh and Anthony Hodges 


Whenever there is dis- 
cussion of a possible deal in a 
hung parliament tire specula- 
tion Ins up to now foundered 
sooner or later on PR. CouM 
either foe Conservatives or 
labour be expected to go along 
with a fundamental constitu- 
tional change of this nature 
jnst to accommodate a smaller 
political grouping which hap- 
pened to hold foe balance of 
power? 

Could foe leaders of either 
major party persuade their 
supporters in and out of 
Parliament to accept a con- 
cession of this importance 
which most of them did not 
believe to be in the interest of 
their own party? Wonld It even 
be constitutionally seemly for 
a reform of this magnitude to 
be introduced as part of an 
exercise in haire-trading for 
office? 

The idea of a referendum 
has been introduced either to 
still constitutional qualms or, 
more frequently, as a means of 
leading another party gently 
towards the promised bud. 

If the electoral systems of 
this country were to be 
changed then it would cer- 
tainly be constitutionally 
proper to require such a 
reform to be endorsed in a 
referendum. But that would be 
at the end of the process when 
it was known exactly how the 
new system would work. 

To have a referendum as a 
first step would probably be 
unacceptable to hard-headed 
Conservative or Labour poli- 
ticians for the very reason 
it wAiMhave its attractions for 
the Affiance; approval of foe 
principle might create an ir- 
resistible momentum. 


Danger of being 
too dogmatic 


The Affiance would be 
prating itself into a corner if it 
were to insist that there would 
be no deal without a firm 
agreement either to legislate 
for PR or at least to have an 
early referendum. 

Having fought an election 
emphasizing the parlous eco- 
nomic and social condition of 
the cou ntry, it would then be 
refusing to allow any govern- 
ment to be formed to deal with 
those proble ms unless its own 
P« c onstitutional reform were 
introduced at the game time. 
That would be elevating 
constitutional above bread and 
tetter issues, which is not the 
way to win elections. 

^ Such a i stance would, there- 
fore, reduce foe Alliance's 
K®s of sharing rawer 

assure that it would be bCsied 

for foe early second election 
that would then become in- 
evitable. 

The Affiance would have an 

overriding merest in ensuring 
that a hung parliament led tea 
pen@d of stable government. 
That is, after all what it is 
oflenmg the country, and it 
™ld stand a modi better 
chra tf achieving its ohjeo 

M m aspiration, not 
an albatross ^ 






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Hurd praises 
employment 
projects that 
reduce crime 


By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 

More than 5,000 un- entrance area was redesigned, 
employed people are begin- A telephone entry system was 
ning to help win a battle created and walls and floors i 
against crime. They are paid redecorated, financed through 
by the Government under the the urban programme. 
C0 JJ^ri un i t y programme. The community pro- 

On Tyneside, school bur- gramme team provides a 24- 
glanes have been cut; in how concierge service for. the 
Cnertsey, Surrey, fearful old building.. If anyone tries to 
people have been reassured; misuse the telephone entry 
a L Kirkby, Knowsley, system or if there is and-soda] 


drug offences, criminal dam- 
age and soliciting at one tower 
block have been almost 
eliminated. 

. The successes were men- 
tioned yesterday by Mr Doug- 
las Hurd, the’ Home Secretary, 
in launching a guide to ideas 
which, he said, can be usefully 
adapted to the- needs of almost 
any community. 

Mr Hurd, speaking at a 
crime prevention conference 
in Winchester, Hampshire, 
said that Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher’s seminar at No 10 
in January and his own fol- 
low-up in June “launched a 
series of highly practical 
projects to make our streets, 
homes and workplaces safer 
for us alT. 

He said: “Now the same 
message is to be carried out of 
Loudon to the cities and 
counties." 

At Mercer Heights, 
Knowsley, more than a third 
of the flats in one block were 
unoccupied and could not be 


re-let. The entrance, lifts and chains; being- 
stairwells were affected by - make a 999 cal 
criminal damage, graffiti and ing the house wi 


Utter. Tenants complained of on doors and windows. 


drug misuse and prostitution 
in the entrances and burglaries 
to their flats. 

As with other projects in the 
guide, the Mercer Heights 
watchdog scheme combines 
community programme fund- 
ing with other resources. The 

Bomb plot 
trial start 
is delayed 

The trial of Thomas Ma- 
guire, of Milbourae Street, 
Blackpool on a charge of 
conspiring to cause an explo- 
sion in Britain, was postponed 
for 24 hours by Mr Justice 
Boreham at the Central Crim- 
inal Court in London, 
yesterday. 

The judge told a jury of 
seven women and five men; “1 
am not in a position to 
proceed with this trial at this 
moment for reasons I need not 
bother you with." 

Mr Maguire, aged 27, denies 
conspiring “unlawfully and 
maliciously with Patrick 
Magee, Patrick Murray, and 
other persons' unknown, to 
cause by explosive substances 
an explosion in the United 
Kingdom of a nature likely to 
endanger life or to cause 
serious injury to property”. 

The alleged conspiracy took 
place between January I, 
I9S2, and April 27. 1983. 

Two potential jurors were 
excused after the judge put 
questions to the jurors relating 
to bomb explosions and rel- 
atives in the armed services. 


The community pro- 
gramme initiative for crime 
prevention work was 
launched last year jointly by 
the Home Office, the Depart- 
ment of Employment and the 
Manpower Services Com- 
mission. 

£200 given 
to plucky 
schoolboy 

A schoolboy who helped to 
capture a convicted killer was 
awarded £200 by a judge at the 
Central Criminal Chart in 
London yesterday. - 
Judge Richard Lowry, QC. 
said that Gary Chambers, 
aged 14, acted with “conspicu- 
ous and repeated courage” 
when faced with a man armed; 
with a knife: 

Ron Morgan, aged 36, of 
Cambridge Road, Kflbum, 
north London, was jailed fox 
life after admitting robbing the 
boy and assaulting and 
imprisoning two women. 

The court was told that 
Morgan had been committed 
to Broadmoor indefinitely in 
1971 for stabbing a man to 
death during a fight in a public 
house. He was released in 
1984. 

A year later Morgan seized 
Gary, who was working as a 
part-time store assistant in 
Killnn, and cut him with a 
knife while rabbira* a till of 
£200. Morgan fled into a shop 
where he held two women 
hostage. Police smTOunded the 
shop and he surrendered. 


Air defence: 2 

Adaptability key 
to RAF system 

Technology is moving so fast that change is almost 
continuous. Rodney Cowton, Defence Correspondent , 
in the second of two articles, explains that the new 
ground-based elements of Britain's air defence are 
designed to make future improvements as easy as 
possible. 

One purpose of replacing withdrawn as more of the new 
radar and communication sys- becomes available, 
lems at the heart of defences An important and 
against enemy air attack is to distinguishing characteristic 
ensure that such reconstruc- of the new system is that it will 
lion will not have to be done be able to withstand a great 
again in the foreseeable future, deal of damage and continue 

The whole system has been to function, with com miraica- 
designed to permit an almost lions being automatically re- 
constant process of updating routed, or subordinate centres 
without the need for radical taking over from a command 
reconstruction. centre put out of use. 

Already.before the initial .The summit of the system 
system is in use, develop- will be, as now, the national 
ments and enhancements are air defence operations centre 
being discussed. Those in- at High Wycombe 
dude the use of radars which Buckinghamshire, which wfll 
can see over the horizon, and have an Overall picture of the 
are therefore not limited by UK Air Defence Region, 
the Earth’s curvature, and The next tier will be two 
erealer use of passive sensors sector operations centres al 
fo detect targets without roak- Neatishead, East Anglia, and 
inc emissions which give away Buchan, on the north-east 
the location of radar sites. coast of Scotland, from where 

The “core elements’* of the minute by minute control tif 
svsiem are expected to be in air taffies wotddbeexenK^ 
use within about 18 months, Wffiun-each sector there 
some way behind the original be r two commandjad 

time-table, but not surprising. «ntres responsible 

Sven Ihe system’s extreme for targets and 

controlling interceptor air- 
ro £ P nl„ i, craft. Those will also be 

wlrcther There 35fb? any quipped to do the job of 
fu^er 

25* E SMMWSS 

parl nui^r’ wSwure foo? the radar *** “mmumea- 

tion and control systems 
lest ^ operanonal should be fuliv operational, all 

standards. ihe air defence Tornados 

For some time, probably be in service, and .it 

almost up to the end of the ma y . eV en -have obtained - a 
decade, the new system mid satisfactory • airborne early 
the old will operate in parallel, warning aircraft. 
with parts of the old being _ . .Gooctaded 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 



behaviour in and around the 
entrance, staff are instructed 
to deal with it themselves, or 
call the police. 

All the flats are now occu- , 
pied, with a resulting increase 
in local authority income, and 
tenants' morale is higher. 

In North Tyneside, patrols 
with radio vehicles to enable 
them to remain in contact 
with base have been successful 
in reducing anti-social behav- 
iour at schools which the 
borough education depart- 
ment wants to have broader 
community use. More use is 
now being made of them. 

In Chertsey, many elderly 
people were worried about 
crime and howto protect their 
property: 

A team of community pro- 
gramme counsellors shows a 
police video film on crime 
prevention to elderly people at 
day centres. It then discusses 
with them such topics as 
coping with callers who may 
be bogus; proper use of door 
chains; being- prepared to. 
make a 999 rail; and defend- 
ing the house with secure locks 






% 


The omsskraary, a figure 
long associated with good 
works in die remote parts of 
Africa, has come to Britain in 
the person of the Rev Charles 
Kibicho, aged 34, a Kenyan 
minister from the Presby- 1 
terian Church of East Africa. 

’ For the next 10 months, Mr. 
Kibicho will live in a council 
boose in West Pflton, Edin- 


burgh, with his wife, Roth, and 
their two children. 

He will work as an associate 
minister at the Old Kirk 
alongside the Rev Ian Moir, 
the resident minister. He will 
help to welcome people moving 
into a renovated estate and to 
spread the faith among the 
people there. 

The final torn in the drde 
was initiated after a visit to 


West FDton by the general 
secretary of the Church of 
East Africa, a friend of Mr 
Moir, who suggested that 
money should be raised in his 
country to help church work in 
the area, one of the less well- 
off parts of Edinburgh. 

The Charch of Scotland 
thought it an even better idea if 
the money was nsed to send 
someone over. 


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HOME NEWS 


More accountants 
to help police 
fight serious fraud 


By Michael HorsneU 


i 


The Rev Charles Kibicho making friends with the children of the West Pilton estate at the start of his 10-month mission. 

The missionary who came out of Africa 


Mr Kibicho said: “It is my 
first working trip overseas, but 
-in Kenya I was trained to work 
in an urban environment. 

“My coming here is a show 
of appreciation for what the 
Church of Scotland has done 
in the past to my country. 

“I am looking forward to a 
nice time here, a time of work. 
I also hope to have seen much 
of Scotland before I leave.” 


The specialist skills of 
volunteer accountants in help- 
ing police fight serious fraud 
in London has resulted in an 
81 per cent conviction rate in 
cases brought to trial by the 
Director of Public 
Prosecutions. 

Now panels of accountants 
are expected to be established 
to help police forces in other 
parts of the country as well as 
Customs and Excise. 

That was announced yes- 
terday when the results of a 
12-month pilot scheme, in 
which accountants have given 
expert help, were disclosed by 
the Metropolitan and City 
Police Company Fraud 
Department and the Fraud 
Investigation Group of the 
DPP. 

The pilot scheme was set up 
in 1984 after talks between Mr 
Leon Brittan. then Home 
Secretary, and Mr Douglas 
Llambias, a council member 
of the Institute of Chartered 
Accountants. 

It came in the wake of 
increasing fraud allegations 
and the difficulties in conclud- 
ing prosecutions which were 
undermining the reputation of 
London as a financial centre. 

A specialist panel ofaccoun* 
lams was launched in July last 
year when 25 joined the panel. 

In the past three years 
allegations of serious fraud 
referred to the DPP have risen 
from 304 to 593 last year. 

Cases going to trial in the 
same period, once the less 
serious and disproved allega- 
tions had been weeded out. 
rose from 25 in 1983 to 93 in 
1985. 

The success of the accoun- 
tants panel in London has led 
to concentration of limited 


police resources on priority 
'investigations and increased 
investigation efficiency. 

Now talks are being held 
between Commander Mal- 
colm Campbell, head of the 
Metropolitan and City Police 
Company Fraud Squad and 
Mr Llambias for assistance to 
implement the recommenda- 
tions of the Roskill report 
relating to the improved 
presentation of complicated 
evidence in court. 

Mr Campbell said: “The 
assistance of accountants has - 
enabled us to get to the core 
issues of some of the fraud 
investigations much more 
quickly than we could ever 
have done on our own." 

Discussions will be held 
with the Association of Chief 
Police Officers to decide 
which constabularies require 
the specialist help of accoun- 
tancy 1 panels. Cases referred to 
the DPP"s office in 1985 
involved sums of money at 
risk of up to £ 1.600m and of 
the 100 cases which were 
completed during the post 18 
months about £I24m was 
involved. 

Mr Doiran Williams, con- 
troller of the fraud investiga- 
tions group in the DPP's 
office, said that 460 cases are 
now under investigation and 
he predicted an increase in 
serious fraud for the rest of the ” 
decade. 

He called for adequate 
reinforcements of manpower 
and technology to help com- 
bat the increase. 

At his suggestion the orig- 
inally free services of the 
accountants in London have 
been replaced by discounted 
fees considerably lower than 
accountants normally receive. 


4 




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THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


7 - - 


South Africa appoints 
Coloured envoy to 
European Co mmuni ty 

From Mfchad Hornsby, Johannesburg 

«i^ u fe?J a S rpr 9 fe ® or *Dr of such employment are likely here," Dr Ranchod said. 

to be small in number. 


Innocent victims caught in terror blasts 




Bhadre Galu nfiBTiH 
$-* yesterday appointed 
South Africa’s Ambassador to 
“tc European Economic 
community. He is the fa 
ambassador of Indian origin, 
and the fa of any colour 
other than white. 

..The South African Foreign 
Minister, Mr R F “Pfl^ 
tha, said it was “in line with 
the Government’s reform pro- 
gfamme that the country 

S should be represented abroad 
' any South African who has 
e qualifications for the job 
irrespective of the colour of 
his sirin'" 

For some years recruitment 
to the foreign service has been 
formally colour-blind. There 
are eight Coloured (mixed- 
race) and Indian diplomats, 
but as yet no black Africans! 
Africans with the necessary 
qualifications and willingness 
to accept the political stigma 


Foreign Ministry sources 
said yesterday it was “purely 
coinodentaT that Dr Ran- 
chorTs appointment was an- 
nounced on the same day EEC 
foreign ministers were meet- 
ing in Brussels to decide 
whether to impose limbed 
economic sanctions a gainst 
South Africa. 

Dr Ranchod has been Dean 
of the Law Faculty at the 
University of Dmban-West- 
vilie, the main institution of 
higher education for Indians, 
since 1976. Last year he was 
appointed to the board of the 
nominally independent, bat in 
practice government-con- 
trolled, South African Bread- 
casting Corporation (SABQ. 

“I wifi try to represent all 
the people of South Africa, 
and to coirrnumicate to people 
in Europe a greater under- 
standing of what is going on 



Professor Bahdra Ranchod, appointed Pretoria’s EEC 
envoy, with his wife and a daughter in Durban. , 


We are not surprised by Dr | 
Ranch od’s acceptance of tins, 
posting”, said Mr Ibrahim 
Goga, chairman of the Dur- 
ban-based Democratic 
Lawyers’ Association, which 
is active in the civil rights 
area. “He has made no 
contribution to the elevation 
of the oppressed in this coun- 
try. We regard the appoint- 
ment of black ambassadors as 
pure tokenism.” 

Bom in 1944, Dr Ranchod 
read law at the Un iversi t y of 
Cape Town and obtained bis' 
doctorate at the University of 
Leid e n in The Netherlands in 
1972 with a thesis on the 
South African law of defama- 
tion. Research for the thesis 
took him to Queen's College, 
Cambridge, to study the En- 
glish law of libeL 

He visited Britain again in 
1981 as a guest of the British 
Council and lectured at the 
universities of Edinburgh, Ab- 
erdeen, Glasgow and London. 
“One of the joys of my visit 
was meeting Lord Haflsham, 
the Lord Chancellor, who 
shares my belief in the need 
for a Bill of Human Rights,” 
be said. 

Dr Ranchod has aigned 
strongly in favour of an en- 
trenched BQl of Rights for 
South Africa. “I think that the 
European Convention, and 
the European Commission on 
Human Rights, could be a 
useful model, though it would 
have to be tailored to suit 
South Africa’s needs,” he said 
yesterday. 

He is by no means a 
political radical, and would 
not have been appointed to 
the Brussels job if he was. But 
he has also been careful not to 
come out in open support of 
the tricamera] parliament for 
whites. Coloureds and In- 
dians, which is rejected by 
most members of his own 
community. 

Dr Ranchod is married, and 
his wife, Vibha, and their two 
small daughters, aged two and 
three and a haHj will be 
moving with him to Brussels. 



One of 36 pe©pSe npred, six seriously, in a blast at police headquarters in Paris yesterday being carried to an ambulance. 

goes in fear of wanton bombers 

night spots in the 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

For the first tixoe since the 
latest wave of terrorist atfx-trs 
began in France in December 
last year, there is a widespread 
feeling of uneasiness, border- 
ing on real fear. In Puis. No 
one knows where the bombers 
might strike next 

Even at the height of the last 
serious terrorist wave in the 
capital in the sanuner of 1982, 
there was not the same gen- 
eralized feeling of insecurity 
and impotence. At that time, it 
was more a question of specific 
targets — of Arabs attaeWng 


Jews, of Armenians attacking 
Turks, or of left-wing radicals 
attacking Americans ”4 de- 
fence establishments. 

But now there are no spe- 
cific targets. For the first time, 
the aim seems to be to strike 
indiscriminately at crowded 
public places in the hope of 

Irilffe gor mahmngw nH wi i m q m 

of innocent people and of 
creating a mood of fear ami 
panic among the population. 

People are begn . ^ng to ask: 
“Wm I be next?” Many think 
twice before taking a Metro 
train, shopping m central 
Paris, or going ed in the 
evening to one of the more 


popular 
capitaL 

Paris was filled with the 
wailing of police and am- 
bulance sirens yesterday as 
hundreds of anxious people 
called police to report suspect 
pnrita^ stnuniag th> al- 
ready greatly reinforced se- 
curity forces to their limit But 
no bomb alert could afford to 
be ignored, however im- 
probable. 

Whereas only a few months 
ago, many people were grum- 
bling about the law ami order 
measures introduced by the 
right-wing Government, com- 
plaining that they constituted 


an infringement on their in- 
dividual liberties, most now 
welcome the tough attitude, 
including the latest series of 
anti-terrorist measures. 

The recent attacks have 
inevitably renewed calls for a 
return of the death penalty, 
abolished by the Socialists in 
1982. 

A recent poll showed that 
two- thirds of the French would 
like capital punishment re- 
introduced for terrorists. An 
overwhelming majority sup- 
ported the Government’s stand 
in refusing to give in to the 
terrorists’ demands for the 
release of Arab prisoners. 


CIA man’s White House ties return of 

Daniloff to summit hopes 


Police open fire in Sharpeville 


Johannesburg — Four peo- 
ple were shot yesterday, one 
fatally, in the Sharpeville 
township, some 40 miles 
south of Johannesburg, by 
police employed by the town 
council (Michael Hornsby 
reports). 

Violence erupted as groups 
of militant youths attempted 
to stop residents from going to 
work in nearby white towns. 
Residents said police used tear 


gas to disperse a crowd of 
about 800 people who march- 
ed to the municipal offices to 
protest against the eviction of 
rent boycotters. 

The deaths have not been 
confirmed by the Govern- 
ment's Bureau for Informa- 
tion, which said tear gas was 
used to disperse unlawful 
gatherings and groups of 
stone-throwers. 

At least three people died in 


Soweto daring Sunday night 
in fighting between migrant 
workers and permanent res- 
idents in the Meadowtands 
district of the sprawling town- 
ship, 10 miles south-west of 
Johannesburg. 

• DURBAN: A man aimed 
with a butcher’s knife, who 
ran into a courtroom yes- 
terday morning and tried to 
stab spectators and the mag- . 
istrate, was shot dead 


UN General Assembly 


Africans plan sanctions fight 


African countries wffl seek 
to consolidate their growing 
political advantage over the 
West on the South African 
issue, forcing Britain to face 
its most difficult United Na- 
tions General Assembly in 
recent memory, when its sanc- 
tions policy is scrutinized at 
least four separate times in 
rapid saccesshm. 

After two decades of provid- 
ing little more than a perennial 
destruction, the debates on 
South Africa’s system of 
apartheid, control of Namibia, 
and its acts of impunity 
against neighbouring states 
will go beyond rhetoric to take 
on practical significance dur- 
ing the 41st General Assembly 
session which convenes today. 

Long accustomed to ac- 
spiesoffig to the British and 
American final word on eco- 
nomic sanctions, the African 
group at the UN has stumbled 
on the secret of timing, ami is 
summoning all its me a ns of 
pressure to complement the 
intensity of the anti-apartheid 
movement which has captured 
the imagination of the West. 

Starting tomorrow, African 
foreign ministers will use the 
first of at least four debates 
throughout the coarse of the 
assembly to demand Sooth 
Africa’s economic isolation. 

It is likely that, when their 
strategy to extract concessions 
from the West shifts to the 
Security Council later this 
month or early next, the 
Reagan Administ ration will 

have been obliged by Congress 

to adopt stronger sanctions 
than it would have wanted, 
fearing Britain feeling ex- 
posed on the CtxmriL 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretory, will have 
the formidable task of defend- 
ing the Government’s position 


From Zorfana Pysariwsky, New York 

when he addresses the assem- 
bly next Tuesday. 

East-West relations, the 
Middle East peace process, 
and terrorism are also ex- 
pected to dominate the session 
as the new diplomatic season 
begins with the traditional 
New York gathering of heads 
of state ana government, as 
well as foreign mhnste ra , who 
sse the first weeks of die 
general debate for dozens of 
bilateral meetings. 

The Soviet Union, repre- 
sented by Mr Eduard Shev- 
ardnadze, the Foreign Min- 
ister, in keeping with past 
practice is expected to an- 
nounce a new disarmament 
initiative, aimed at placing the 
United States oa the defensive 
before a Thfrd World andfence 
which would Bke to see toe 
superpower relationship de- 
fine itself more dearly . 

Mr Shevardnadze is ex- 
pected to promote toe idea of 
worldwide security 


America’s commi tment to the 
orga ni za ti o n fallowing a wave 
of coneressioual budget cuts 
which toe UN Secretary-Gen- 
eral, Sefior Javier Pfirez de 
Cuellar, says are crippling the 
UN. 


sink! Accord. 

Ia his address before the 
assembly next Monday, Pres- 
ident Reaga is likely to 
provide indications of the state 
of East-West relations which 
threatened to plunge out of 
control following the arrest in 
Moscow dT Mr Nicholas 
Djuufoff, correspondent of toe 
US News A World Report. 

Mr Reagan has tradition- 
ally used toe occasion of his 
assembly address to take oa 
the role of statesman and 
employ it as a means of 
transition from a hardline 
ideologue to an unrivalled 
peacemaker. 

According to reports, Mr 
Reagan is also being urged to 
assme the UN membership of 


In addition to proposed 
deferments, toe congressional 
withholdings from the regular 
UN budget add reach $14f 
million $101 million), worth 
70 per cent of the total the US 
is required to pay. 

The situation has got so 
serious that, unless the frmds 
are forthcoming, the Sec- 
retary-General may be forced 
to cat short the assembly 
session. In recent months, he 

ha g intfrnaiW t that hw iforfri Ofl 

to accept a second five-year 
term in office wfll rest on 
guarantees that the UN will | 
remain financially solvent. 

Seikor Perez de Cu&Sar’s 
discreet brand of diplomacy is 
recognized by the five perma- 
nent members of toe Security 
Conned — Britain, France, 
China, the United States and 
the Soviet Union — as the ideal 
form of behaviour in a Sec- 
retary-General, bat it is not 
dear whether they can meet 
life condition for staying ml 

Diplomatic observers will be 
forking out for new moves in 
the Middle East peace process 
following toe Egyptmn-lsraeli 
summit, n particular bilateral 
meetings between Israel and 
the Soviet Union. 

The UN wffi be enjoined to 
give practical meanings to the 
pronouncements it has made 
against terrorism, but it is not 
dear whether a mooted initia- 
tive for setting up an anti- 
terrorist network to include a 
cross-section of governments 
will emerge. 


interview a 
KGB coup 

From Christopher WaDcer 
Moscow 

The dramatic reappearance 
of Mr Edward Lee Howard, 
the Central Intelligence 
Agency defector, on Soviet 
television on Sunday night 
was seen by senior Western 
diplomats as a highly un- 
welcome propaganda coup for 
the KGB. 

Now living in a Moscow 
suburb, Mr Howard dis- 
appeared from a housing es- 
tate 16 miles from Santa Fe, 
New Mexico, last September 
using counter-surveillance te- 
chniques originally taught to 
him by US spymasters as part 
of his training for a never- 
realized undercover role on 
the staff of toe large US 
Embassy in Moscow. 

At the time of his escape, be 
was under round-the-dock 
surveillance by the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation after 
being exposed as a Soviet 
“mole” by Mr Vitaly Yurch- 
enko, the mysterious on-off 
defector who is now bade in 
the Soviet Union and is 
regarded by intelligence ex- 
perts as having been a KGB 
agent deliberately planted in 
the West. 

The experts believe that the 
“fingering” of Mr Howard 
may have been part of the 
price that Mr Yurchenko paid 
to try to prove his bona Jides 
to the CIA. But the whole 
story of toe affeir may never 
be told accurately. 

According to Western sou- 
rces, Mr Yurchenko knew Mr 
Howard only by the code 
name “Roger”, but his 
description of him simply as a 
former CIA employee who 
had been scheduled for Mos- 
cow was enough to enable Mr 
Yurchenko’s then CIA de- 
briefers to identify the suspect. 

Speaking English with 
Russian translation that was 
not always word perfect, Mr 
Howard told Soviet viewers 
that he had escaped his FBI 
pursuers by “leaping from a 
speeding car into an empty 
space . . . With my training, I 
knew how to get away. I brat 
them at their own game.” 

In a report of his interview 
given by Tass, it was daimed 
that the former CIA agent — 
believed to be the first to flee 
to the Soviet Union — had 
actually worked in the US 
Embassy here. But Mr How- 
ard said that he had never 
taken up toe assignment for 
which he was trained, a claim 
supported by US officials. 

During ms training in the 
US, MrHoward and his wife 
Mary, whom he has left in the 
US with their young son. Lee; 
both trained together for the 
Moscow posting. 

On television, Mr Howard 
used ungrammatical Russian, 
delivered with a heavy Ameri- 
can. accent, to tell his 
andience: u I want to thank yon 

for the help that you have 
given me at a difficult time. I 
want to thank the Soviet 
people and the Soviet Go- 
vernment.” Earlier, he 
damned that about a quarter 
of the recruits in his CIA 
training class were women. 


Washington (AP) — A US- 
Soviet summit might be put in 
jeopardy unless Mr Nicholas 
Daniloff the American jour- 
nalist, was allowed to return 
home, the White House chief 
of staff Mr Donald Regan, 
said yesterday. 

Mr Regan said the Reagan 
Administration would con- 
tinue to keep negotiations for 
Mr DanilofTs foil release “on 
a different track” from talks 
about a superpower summit. 

“But if Daniloff isn’t set- 
tled, it may put the summit in 
jeopardy ” Mr Regan said. 

Mr Regan was reacting to 
calls by senators for tough 
measures against the Soviet 
Union unless Mr Daniloff is 
released, including a halt in 
discussions of a superp ow er 
summit, a cut-off of sub- 
sidized grain sales, and expul- 
sion of Soviet spies. 

Senator Richard Lugar, call- 
ing for “retaliatory action” 
against the Russians, said on 
Sunday that the Reagan 
Administration should refuse 
to discuss anything but the 
Daniloff case at a pre-summit 
planning meeting with the 


Russians this week, unless 
Moscow freed Mr Daniloff 

Mr Regan refused to com- 
ment on negotiations for Mr 
Daniloff s release, or the 
possibility that a Soviet dis- 
sident could be included in a 
possible exchange. 

He sard the meeting be- 
tween Mr George Shultz, toe 
Secretary of State, and Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the So- 
viet Foreign Minister, would 
go on, “but we will take that 
opportunity to emphasize to 
them the seriousness that we 
view the Daniloff situation”. 

Mr Shevardnadze is sched- 
uled to meet in a pre-summit 
pfenning session with Mr 
Shultz in New York on Friday 
and Saturday. 

• MOSCOW: The Kremlin 
stepped up its propaganda 
campaign against Mr Daniloff 
by authorizing reports on Tass 
claiming that be was an agent 
working for toe Central Intelli- 
gence Agency in Moscow and 
another alleging that many 
other American newsmen 
maintained links with the CIA 
(Christopher Walker writes). 

The latest round in toe war 


of words between the two 
superpowers over the sen- 
sitive issue of espionage has 
convinced Western diplomats 
that, unless a quick solution to 
the complex Daniloff affair 
can be found, it will dominate 
the meeting in Washington 
later this week. 

The harshly worded Tass 
story, headlined “Rejoinder”, 
attempted to discredit all the 
claims of innocence made by 
Mr Daniloff at his crowded 
press conference here on Sun- 
day. It also criticized toe 100 
or more Western journalists 
who attended for foiling to 
prevent what it claimed was 
the expulsion of a Soviet 
reporter from the room. 

Yesterday’s attack has 
added to the conviction of 
many Moscow correspon- 
dents that one of toe KGB's 
intentions In its vigorous pur- 
suit of the Daniloff affair has 
been to try to weaken contacts 
between Western journalists 
and ordinary Soviet citizen^ 

Mr Daniloff left the Ameri- 
can Embassy yesterday to 
return to his home and office 
in toe Lenin Hills. 


Reagan’s 
daughter 
to get 
party post 

Washington — President 
Reagan's daughter. Maureen, 
is to be named co-chairman of 
the Republican Party because 
her father intervened on her 
behalf. Republican sources 
say (Michael Binyon writes). 

Mr Reagan told Mr Frank 
Fahrenkopf, the chairman of 
the Republican National 
Committee, at a White House 
meeting last week that he 
would like to see his daughter 
lake over the party when Mis 
Betty Heitmann. the incum- 
bent'. retires in January. 

The post of co-chairman is 
largely ceremonial, but it is 
still the highest-level party- 
post available to a woman 
until Mr Fahrenkopf leaves. 

Nazi charges 

Jerusalem (Reuter) — Israeli 
justice officials have prepared 
an indictment accusing the 
Ukrainian-born American, 
John Dcmjanjuk, of murder- 
ing thousands of Jews as a 
Nazi death camp guard known 
as “Ivan the Terrible". 

Gold denial 

Jakarta (Reuter) - Michael 
Hatcher, a British treasure 
hunter whose haul of gold bars 
and porcelain from a sunken 
Dutch ship fetched £10 mil- 
lion at auction, has denied 
that the Indonesian Govern- 
ment has any claim on iL 

Hidden boats 

Stockholm (AP) — A Swed- 
ish reconnaissance plane has 
photographed what appeared 
to be a Soviet merchant ship 
in the Baltic Sea with four 
hidden torpedo boats. 

Aids child 

Wellington (Reuter) - Eve 
van Gralhorst a four-year-old 
Sydney girl with Aids who was 
banned from child care in 
Australia, began kindergarten 
classes in New Zealand, 

Blaze anger 

Delhi (Reuter) — Enraged 
survivors of a bus fire that 
killed four people attacked a 
police station to protest 
against the slowness of fire- 
men and slopped only when 
police used tear gas. 

Torture claim 

Peking (Reuter) - A village 
Communist Party chief has 
been charged with illegally 
detaining 72 of his neighbours 
and torturing 1 7 of them after 
his bicycle bell was- stolen. 

Police killed 

Lima (Reuter) — Peruvian 
left-wing guerrillas killed three 
policemen in Lima and stole 
92,000 sticks of dynamite in 
the Andes. 


MmNGSJUIIu 

THE WOUNDS. 


' % 


Uphill task 
for Peres in 
peace search 

Washington — Mr Shimon 
Peres, toe Israeli Prime Min- 
ister. sought yesterday to per- 
suade President Reagan to 
support an internatio nal p eace 
conference in toe search for 
peace in toe Midd le .E ast 
(Christopher Thomas writes). 

Bui even before the White 
House talks got under way, a 
senior American official said: 
“We sec no breakthroughs on 
toe horizon." 


Cuba lets 70 political 
prisoners go to US 


Miami (Reuter) — Seventy 
former Cuban political pris- 
oners arrived at Miami airport 
yesterday in a release arranged 
in part by M Jacques Cous- 
teau, toe French underwater 
explorer, and a delegation of 
American Roman Catholic 
bishops. 

All of the prisoners on the 
release fist have served at feast 
10 years in Cuban jails and 
some were imprisoned for up 


to 25 years, US immigration 
officials said. 

Most of the new immigrants 
are in their 60s and 70s, and 
some had to be taken off toe 
plane in wheelchairs. 

Among the former pris- 
oners was Senor Ramdn Pe- 
dro Gran Alsina, aged 62, 
nephew of a former Cuban 
President, Ram6n Gran San 
Martin, who headed toe gov- 
ernment from 1944 to 1948. 



Mr Howard: left his wife and 
son -behind in the US. 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


US targets government 

staff in $3 bn boost 
to anti-drugs campaign 

From Michael Binvon. Washington 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 

688 b* 0 ™* most being preached fortissimo 
se ™ nd ' Pb? 56 pressing pohtical issue in the from pulpits, political podi- 
1° ™ America run-up to the mid-tom . ums and the press, has spurred 

agrewingnSrfSS 

SfiS 10 BJ* p . *** devastating sta- to turn in their drug-taking 

^ug tests, strengthen border tisbcsof dreg use, Mr Reagan parents. 

Fmpis, increase funding for ^ve a forthright warning; The latest is a Californian 
^ “Drugs are menacing our girt aged 12, who called the 

campaign to schools and society, they're threatening police to report her suspicions 


* ----- 1V1 

treatment centres and take the 
campaign to schools and 
offices. 

The main provision will be 

the sharp increase in drug tests 
for government employees. 
Mr Reagan said all those in 
“sensitive positions” such as 
die police, those responsible 
for safety and anyone with 
classified information, would 
be included. Officials estimate 
that up to I.l million may be 
involved. 

Mr Reagan also allocated an 
extra $500 million to patrol 
the Mexican border and an 
extra $100 million to improve 
treatment centres. He said the 
total of $3.2 billion would be 
redirected from other govern- 
ment projects, and no new 
appropriations would be nee- 
ded 

His emotional broadcast, 
one of the most forceful and 
effective of his presidency, has 
been warmly received in 
America, where the drugs 


our values mid undercutting 
our institutions- They’re kill- 
ing our children.” 

Mrs Reagan, who has trav- 
elled more than 100,000 miles 
in her campaign to urge 
children to “say no”, said 
there was no moral middle 
ground. “Indifference is not 
an option. We want yon to 
help us create an outspoken 
intolerance for dreg use.” 

In an effort to take the 


The latest is a Californian 
girt aged 12, who called the 
police to report her suspicions 
that her parents were “ doi ng 
cocaine”. Investigations 
found no cocaine, but six 
marijuana plants up to 4 ft tall 
in the back garden. 

Indoors police discovered 
marijuana cigarettes and half a 
gramme of methampbeta- 
mines. The parents were ar- 
rested and released on bail. 
Their daughter and her sister 
are in protective custody. 


In an effort to take the “She did the right thing,” a 
m e ssa g e to schools, the Educa- police spokesman said. “We 
tion Department has distrib- don't see this as turning in the 
uted one million copies of a parents.” 


78-page handbook giving 
guidelines to “help Americans 
slam the schoolhouse door” 
cm drugs. They are bring sent 
.to every school, parent 
organization, police force and 
local authority in the country. 

Mr W illiam Bennett, the 
Education Secretary, said “we 
have to get tough and we have 
to do it now”. The message. 


Canadian crusade 

From John Best, Ottawa 

Mr Brian Muhtmey, the mufly on fflegaBy sold drags, 


• The President’s measures 
are clearly intended to wrest 
the initiative from Congress, 
which is proposing draconian 
laws to fight the drug epi- 
demic. Last Thursday the 
House of Representatives 
voted to impose the death 
penalty m drug-related mur- 
der cases, 

A sweeping Bill authorizes 
more than $4 billion for anti- 
drug measures over the next 
three years. The House also 
voted to allow illegally ob- 
tained evidence to be admis- 



Paris concentrates 
on deficit and tax 
cuts in budget plan 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


President and Mrs Reagan relaxing at the White House before announcing their drugs plan. 

sible in drug trials, prompting The Senate Democrats are the more controversial pro- 
fears by dvil libertarians that proposing to spend $1.6 bfl- visions on the death penalty — 
Congress was being swept lion on similar measures. on >y the second federally- 
aiong m a wave of national authorized instance — and the 

hysteria. But the Senate may reject use of illegal evidence. 


Canadian Prime Minister, has 
committed his Conservative 
Government to a to 

eradicate drag abase in Can- 
ada which, be says, has 


Redaction of both taxes and 
the budget deficit are given top 
priority in the French Govern- 
ment’s budget plans for next 
year, which were approved by 
the Cabinet yesterday. For the 
first time in 28 years, govern- 
ment spending is dne to be 
reduced in real terms. 

Total government spending 
is dne to rise by jnst 1-8 per 
cent next year to 1,054 billion 
francs (£105 bOUon), while 
inflation is expected to go ap 
by 2 per cent. The inflation 
rate for the past 12 months is 
already running at 2 per cent 

On the basis of a forecast 
growth rate of 2J1 percent, the 
Government plans to bring 
down the budget deficit to 
128U> billion francs or 2^5 per 
cent of the grass domestic 
product. That represents a 16 
billion franc cat in the deficit 
originally planned by the 
Socialists in their 1986 bud- 
get, though since reduced by 
the right-wing Government. 

As already announced by M 
Edouard Bandar, the Finance 
Minister, taxes are to be 
reduced by 27 billion francs — 
a far cry from the Gaullists* 
election promise to reduce 
taxes by 40 billion francs a 
year. But it is a snhstaotial 
effort which will result in 
average income-tax cuts of 3 to 
4 per cent next year, with a 
further 5 per cent cut already 
promised for 1988, presiden- 
tial election year. 


Of the 27 billion francs tax 
cuts, 15 billion francs will go in 
cuts in personal taxes, includ- 
ing abolition of the wealth tax; 
a cot in the top income tax rate 
from 65 per cent to 58 per cent; 
total tax exemption for two 
million low-paid workers, 
bringing the total who pay no 
income tax to 11 million out of 
a workforce of 245 million; 
and a 30 per cent cut in income 
tax for another two milli on. 

Those ents will be almost 
exactly oflset by tbe 15 billion 
franc increase in social se- 
curity and pension fund 
contributions. 

Business taxes are to be 
reduced by just over 11 billHm 
francs, including a cut in the 
tax rate on company profits, . 
from 50 per cent to 45 per centT ■ 
and a 5 billion francs reduction 1 
in tbe so-called taxt profess - 
ioaclle, a form of pay-roll tax. 
That, with other measures 
previously announced, should 
mean that levies on companies 
are reduced by 25 billion 
francs between now and thc[ 
end of 1987. 

The tax and deficit cuts have 
Inevitably meant that some 
reductions have had to be 
made in government spending. 
Bnt the boost from the fall in 
the dollar rate with the ex- 
pected extra revenue from the 
Government’s privatization 
programme, has meant that 
the cuts are not so deep as 
originally feared. 


according to die Royal Ca- 
nadian Mounted Police. 

Mr Mahoney said he did 
not wish to be alarmist, bnt a 
weekend radio 


i jz tj it. i r; >y 


Talking to reporters in 
Vancouver at the weekend, Mr 
Mulroney said tbe campaign 
would embrace both education 
and new measures under tbe 
criminal code. He did not go 
into details. 

The move dearly mfrrors 
the crusade against drag abuse 
in the United States bring led 
by President and Mrs Reagan. 

r a mu! »on* spend an es- 
timated $Can 10 trillion an- 


“serious dimension” of tbe 
problem of heroin nse in 
MontreaL . 

Tbe Prime Munster made 
his comments after a speech in 
which hedescribed drag abase 
as “an epidemic which under- 
mines our economic as well as 
onr social fabric.” The present 
Par liam e nt , which reconvenes 
on October 1, will enact 
“important legislation” to deal 
with this and other social ilk, 


Greek earthquake 


g 


Experts expecting 
more shocks soon 

From Mario Modiano, Athens j 


Greek seismologists were 
worried yesterday that last 
Saturday's earthquake which 
ravaged the coastal town of 
Kalamata was a sign that the 
Hellenic Arc, a seismic belt 
around southern Greece 
which fans been unusually 
quiet this century, has become 
active again. 

Dr Yiannis Drakopoulos, 
the seismology professor who 
heads the State Agency for 
Earthquake Protection and 
Planning, flew to Kalamata 
yesterday to set up portable 
seismographs to record post- 
earthquake activity, which he 
found to be unusually low. 

He has been urging Kalamar 
la’s 42,000 inhabitants to keep 
away from their homes for at 
least 10 to 15 more days. His 
point was proved yesterday 
when three strong tremors 
caused buildings, weakened 
by the first shock, to collapse. 

Nearly 70 per cent of the 
houses in the city sustained 
serious damage from Satur- 
day's shock, which measured 
62. on the Richter scale. What 
appears to be worrying Dr 
Drakopoulos is that a great 
deal of subterranean energy 
lias been accumulating in tbe 
region for several decades 
waiting to be released. 

“Another major quake can- 
not be ruled out,” be said. 

Seismologists say the re- 
gion's high seismicity is due to 
a collision beneath the Earth’s 
crust of the land mass of 
Africa with that of Europe and 
Asia five million years ago. 

Briton is 
sacked by 
Somalia 

From Charles Harrison 
Nairobi 

Professor Richard Great- 
field. a Briton, aged 55. who 
has had a close relationship 
with the Government of So- 
malia for the past nine years. 



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Sainsbury s Muscadet de Sevre 
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SsefefiSI 


acting as a high-level political 
adviser, has been sacked be- 
cause he relayed die concern 
of many Somalis about politi- 
al detentions in their country. 

Professor Greenfield ex- 
pressed regret at the Somalis’ 
actions, which he said con- 
trasted strangely with Som- 
alia’s views on political 
prisoners in South Africa ex- 
pressed at the non-aligned 
summit in Harare. 

Last May he attended an 
international conference in 
Rome. As chairman of the 
British group, he read out a 
resolution from that group, 
pleading for the release of 
intellectuals now held as 
political prisoners in Somalia. 

The conference chairman, a 
Somali Government consult- 
ant. ruled tbe resolution out of 
order and Professor Green- 
field was recently summoned 
to Mogadishu and questioned 
before being dismissed. 


They expect a powerful earth- 
quake of a Richter magnitude 
of more than 7 points to occur 
in southern Greece or Crete by 
the year 2000. 

Dr Drakopoulos said: “This 
area lies on the Hellenic Arc 
which begins in the Ionian 
Sea, swings cast under the Fe- 
loponnese, then turns to the 
Dodecanese islands. This is 
where the African lithosphere 
is dinring under the Euro- 
Asian plate at the rate of 25 
centimetres a year.” 

The result of this displace- 
ment is geological deforma- 
tions along the axis, building 
up pressures which can only 
be released through, earth- 
quakes. The Fdoponnese is 
regularly jolted by tremors. 

The earliest one on record was 
in 464 BC. It razed Sparta and 
gave the helots, the local serfs, 
a chance to revolt and escape, 
touching off the sequence of 
events that led to the Pelopon- 
nesian War. . Between 1867 
and (947 the region suffered 
hundreds of earthquake 
shocks, six of them above 7 
points on the Richter scale. 

Scientists have suggested 
that tbe collision of the two 
lithospheres, some 60 miles 
below the Earth's surface, has 
been causing tbe island of 
Crete to be uplifted at both 
ends, while the centre of the 
Feloponnese appears to be 
doming upwards. The proph- 
ecy is that the Aegean Sea will 
disappear in the course of the 
next 10 million years. 

Hungary 
waits for 
a Primate 

From Richard Bassett 
Vienna 

The future of relations be- 
tween the Roman Catholic 
Church and the state in H an- 
gary is expected to be derided 
this week when a new Primate 
is appointed to succeed Cardi- 
nal Lazio Lekaj who died 
earlier this, summer. 

Doing his office, relations 

between the Church and state 

were on the whole harmonious, 
partly because of his support 
of the state ova such conten- 
tions issues as conscientious 
objectors. 

In partkalar, the cardinal’s 
opposition to the base commu- 
nities of Father Gyorgy 
Bubmyi, which preach oppo- 
sition to military service and 
some of whose members have 
been imprisoned, was criti- 
cized by some Vatican circles. 

Rome h known to favour as 
Lekafs successor someone 
prepared to be more critical of 
the regime. 

The candidate most fa- 
voured by the Government is 

the Bishop of Pec, Mgr Josef , „_ amK „ 

CserhatL But Rome is fikely to O A I MCtPI IDX/’O i 

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ER 16 1986 


Socialists seek 
a November 
poll as Vienna 
coalition splits 

From Richard Bassett, Vienna 


Dr Franz Vranitsky, the 
Austrian Chancellor, yes- 
terday called fora new general 
election in November after the 
promotion of the extreme 
right-wing nationalist, Herr 
Jdrg Haider, to the leadership 
of the Freedom Party, the 
junior partner in Austria's 
coalition Government 

Herr Haider, whose pan- 
German right-wing views 
have made him something of 
an enfant terrible in Austrian 
politics, was voted the new 
leader at the party congress in 
Innsbruck at the weekend. 

Amid unprecedented scenes 
of emotional support, Herr 
Haider's victory was seen to 
herald a new era for his party, 
which for yean has been an 
uneasy alliance of liberals and 
German nationalists. 

But for Dr Vinnitsky's 
Socialist-Freedom Party co- 
alition Government, the 
elevation of Herr Haider 
spells the end of the partner- 
ship which has ruled Austria 
since 1983. 

While the Freedom Party 


was led by Herr Noibert Sieg- 
er. a colourless, unpopular but 
moderate politician, the .ex- 
treme right-wing element of 
the party could be ignored by 
the Socialists. But Dr Vinnit- 
sky. though on the right of his 
Socialist Party, has never con- 
cealed his loathing for the 
nationalist element in the 
Freedom Party. Long before 
Herr Haider's win, the Chan- 
cellor had observed that 
“worlds separate us”. 

Yesterday Dr Vranitsky in- 
sisted that Herr Haider’s vic- 
tory bad pushed the liberal 
tendencies of his party into 
“the background". 

‘Whatever Haider says now, 
what he has said before pre- 
vents any close working rela- 
tionship with Austria's Social- 
ists in the future," be said. 

Herr Vranitsky matte it 
clear that, if his Socialist Party 
did not obtain an overall 
majority at the next election, 
he would prefer to work with 
the conservative People's 
Party rather than with Herr 
Haider. 


Italian court overturns 
TV host’s conviction 



Mexican economy in crisis 

Question mark hangs over 
independence from US 

.. mi- XT 


From Alas Robinson, Mexico City 


Naples (AP) — An appeal 
court yesterday overturned 
the conviction of a former TV 
talk show host, whose case 
raised questions about the use 
of testimony from gangsters 
who turn informers. 

Signor Enzo Tortora was 
sentenced to 10 years' jail in 
September 1 985 on charges of 
drug trafficking and member- 


ship of the Camorra crime 
organization in Naples. 

The tiny Radical Party took 
up Signor Tortora's defence 
after bus arrest in June 1983. 

The Radicals and other civil 
rights groups had questioned 
the state's use of alleged 
repentant criminals as wit- 
nesses. on the ground that they 
could not be trusted. 


President Aquino of the Phfl- 
ippioes waring as she leaves 
for the US to bald talks with 
President Reagan and to lobby 
international tankers to ease 
the “unfair" financial debt she 
inherited from the ousted lead- 
er, Mr Ferdinand Marcos. 

After full military honours, 
Mrs Aquino and her official 
11 -member party left on a 
commercial ftigMfor an eight- 
day visit which includes 
speeches to a joint session of 
Congress and the United Na- 
tions General Assembly 


(Keith Dalton writes from 
Manila). 

Security forces wffl remain 
on full alert during her ab- 
sence, bat Mrs Aquino 
brushed aside widespread ru- 
mours of a military coup 

General Fidel Ramos, the 
armed forces’ chief, pledged 
full military support for Mrs 
Aquino. 

• Rebel Mb Ten people, 
inefuding a police commander 
and a village chief, were killed 
in rebel attacks in three 
provinces (AP reports). 


Mexico today celebrates the 
176th anniversary of its 
Proclamation of Indepen- 
dence from Spain, but many 
Mexicans are wondering if the 
nation is truly independent 
from the United States. 

Tonight President Miguel 
<te la Madrid wiQ repeal the 
words of Father Miguel Hi- 
dalgo, the parish pries who 
rang the beD of his church in 
Dolores Hidalgo in 1810 to 
call the Mexican people to 
arms against the Spaniards. 

When Setter de la Madrid 
rings the Bell of Dolores more 
titan 500,000 Mexicans jam- 
ming the great Constitution 
Plaza wzD join the nationwide 
chores of Viva Mexico”. 

But when the shouting fades 
and the fireworks die, the 
doubts will remain. Has Senor 
de la Madrid reversed decades 
of Mexican economic policy 
because he feels bis Institu- 
tional -Revolutionary Party 
(PRJ) and its seemingly 
interminable governments 
have been walking the wrong 
path? Or has he merely buck- 
led under some very dear 
pressure from the Reagan 
Administration? 

The truth probably lies 
between the two extremes. 
“The US is pushing Mexico 
into the last third of the 20th 
century," one foreign banker 
believes. “Bui Mexico is not 
going without a struggle." 

The agreement recently 


signed with the International 
Monetary Fund is being view- 
ed in Mexico as a victory; for 
the Reagan Administration. 
Mexican political analysts say 
that in returo for persuading 
the IMF to depan very slightly 
from its traditional prescrip- 
tion for ailing Third World 
economies, the US has won 
from Mexico changes it has 
been urging for years. 

Although the Government 
has cloaked the IMF agree- 
ment in the usual rhetoric of 
sovereignty, there is no hiding 
the feet that it has had to 
swallow the Reagan recipe for 
Third World success: pru- 
dence, privatization, nee 
trade and foreign investment 

Asa conservative, Setter de 
la Madrid has some sympathy 
for such polities. But Mexican 
presidents are above all na- 
tionalists who cannot be seen 
to bow supinely before the 
pressures of their powerful 
neighbour to the north. 

Weakened by its worst eco- 
nomic crisis since revolution- 
ary times. Mexico has agreed 
to get rid of some 300 state- 
owned companies in short 
order. 

It will continue to cut sub- 
sidies for food, transport and 
the parastate sector. It has be- 
come a member of the Gener- 
al Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade (Gan), has already low- 
ered import barriers con- 
siderably. and has undertaken 


not to subsidize its expons m 
any way. 

All these moves would have 
been politically impossible 
and were energetically op- 
posed during the past tworKl 
administrations. While Pi®* - 
dent de la Madrid is tacitly 
condemning the work of h» 
immediate predecessors, be 
will never be able to say so. 

Mexico's left-wing opposi- 
tion never tires of pointing out 

that, although Mexico Still 
supports the peace efforts of 
the Contadora Group in Cen- 
tral America, its support of 
■Nicaragua is less enthusiastic 
than before. 

Mexico's instinctive rejec- 
tion of foreign interference has 
deep historical roots. . One 
prominent Mexican business- 
man privately admits that 
“US pressure could be work- 
ing in Mexico’s favour this 
time”, but also confesses: “I 
can’t be completely happy 
about it." 

Tonight the “Vivas” will be 
as resounding as ever and no 
one will suggest that Mexico's 
hard-won independence is not 
quite what it seems. But the 
fiMfl remains that when Mexi- 
can football fens rioted during 
the recent World Cup, they 
chose to destroy the Indepen- 
dence Monument, whose 
symbols are supposed to pro- 
duce deep vibrations in the 
Mexican psyche. 


NZ may delay anti-nuclear law 


From Richard Long 

WdfiBgtDD 

Final approval of the New 
Zealand’s Government’s con- 
troversial anti-nuclear legisla- 
tion, which is aimed at 
formalizing the ban on visits 
by nuclear-armed or powered 


warships, may be delayed 
until next year, Mr David 
Lange, the Prime Minister, 
said yesterday. 

But he emphasized that the 
delay was likely only berause 
of pressure of business on the 


parliamentary Order Paper 

The Nuclear-Free Zone, 
Disarmament and Arms Con- 
trol Bill is to be reported back 
to Parliament this month 
following consideration by a 
parliamentary select commit- 
tee. 


Student 
shot dead 
in Sudan 
protest 

Khartoum (AFP) - Police 
opened fire in southern Darter 
province during protects 
about shortages at staple 
goods, killing a student and 
bounding a number of other 
people, the Communist Party 
newspaper al-Meidn said >cs- 

lerday. . 

It said tear-gas vollevs in the 

provincial capital of Nyala 
failed to disperse the dem- 
onstrators before the police 
opened fire. 

I Drugs haul 

Baario. Netherlands (Reu- 
ter) - Dutch police seized 
1,584 lb of hashish on a 
convened wanime torpedo 
boat in a lock on the border 
with West Germany and ar- 
rested two West Germans. 

Fake fish eye 

Brussels (Reuter) — A tropi- 
cal fish belonging to a rare 
species has been given a glass 
eve bv university zoologists at 
Ijege University after going 
partially blind. 

Body in flat 

Paris - (AFP) The naked 
bodv of a murdered man. a 
domestic servant, was found 
in the flat of M Yves 
Mourousi. France's highest- 
paid television newscaster. 

Etna lava 

Catania (Reuter) — Molten 
lava oozed down the north- 
eastern slope of Mount Etna 
into a deserted area after an 
eruption near the summit. 

Bomb deaths 

Dhaka (Reuter) - At least 
two people died and seven 
were injured when home- 
made bombs exploded in a 
clandestine manufacturing 
plant 


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By Caroline Moorehead 

A foil investigation into 
reports of torture of prisoners 
in Israeli-occupied terrority 
and under Israeli supervision 
in sooth Lebanon, is being 
called for by Amnesty Inter- 
nationa] which reveals today 
that it has already appealed, 
without success, to the Israeli 
authorities to set op indepen- 
dent inquiries. 

Detailed accounts of torture 
come from former prisoners 
held in Khiam prison in south 
Lebanon in the “security 
zone” established by Israeli 

An anonymous appointee yes- 
terday replaced Mr Avraham 
Shalom as head of the Israel 
general security service. Shin 
Bet (David Bernstein writes). 

Mr Shalom was implicated 
in the killing of two Arab 
guerrillas more than two years 
ago and in ' the subsequent 
cover-up of the affair. 

forces adjoining the Israeli 
border. 

There Christian mffitfaunett, 
Huder Israeli supervision, are 
said to have beaten and burnt 
detainees; electric shocks have 
been used on prisoners who 
also report being snspended by 
their wrists from a crossbar. 

More than 200 people, some 
of them teenagers, women and 
old men, are thought to beheld 
at Khiam. They have not been 
formally charged and have 
been deeded the right to see 
lawyers. The International 
Committee of the Red Cross 

Criticized chief 
of Unifil cuts 
short holiday 

Helsinki (Reuter) - The 
Finnish commander of the 
UN peacekeeping troops in 
Lebanon (Unifil), Major-Gen- 
eral Gustav Haegglund (right), 
criticized by M Jacques 
Chirac, the French Pnme 
Minister, for taking leave 
while his troops - were under 
fire, is returning to his post 
immediately. 

Military officials here said 
the general, who went on leave 
last Friday to Lapland, would 
fly back to the Middle East 
M Chirac violently ’ criri- 


I PRISONERS 
OF CONSCIENCE 


Israel 


has not been allowed to see 
them. 

The story of a Palestinian 
arrested in Ramailafa on the 
occupied West Bank of the 
Jordan River is typical, says 
Amnesty, of the steady flow of 
tmtare allegations. 

Adnan Mansovr Ghanem 
was arrested in December 
1985 on suspicion of renewing 
activity in the Palestine Lib- 
eration Organization, having 
been freed only seven months 
earlier after spending 17V} 
years in detention for armed 
infiltration into occupied 
territory. 

Taken to Gaza Prison, he 
was beaten, forced to stand for 
long periods hooded and hand- 
cuffed, prevented from sleep- 
ing and subjected to long tee- 
cold showers. 

Later, he claimed that his 
interrogators held him down 
on the floor and allowed him to 
breathe only long enough to 
answer when they ordered him 
to confess to offences. 

The right to legal rep- 
resentation and to visits by the 
ICBC is designed to prevent 
the torture of prisoners in the 
occupied territories. Accord- 
ing to Amnesty International, 
these procedural safeguards 
are not working. 







tin. Ihi^lN fet allotting 
General Haegglund to go on 
leave despite a series of attacks 
on French soldiers in Unifil, 
and demanded his return. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


Shadow cast over Seoul Olympics 


Blast ends hope for Korean conciliation 


By David Watts 

The bodies and broken glass 
at -Seoul airport at the week- 
end signified the death of the 
wst hopes for conciliation on 
rite Korean peninsula in de- 
• cycles and cast an ominous 
shadow over the 1988 Olym- 
pics.' 

Though hard evidence has 
yet to be found, there is little 
doubt that the North Koreans 
'or their extremist student 
allies in Seoul were behind the 
attack. 

Either way it makes little 
difference: it is clear that the 
North is not willing to give 
sports diplomacy, a chance of 
easing tensions at the Asian 
Games, beginning .on Sat- 
urday, or give up iisattemptto 1 
rob South Korea of the su- : 
preme diplomatic coup which 
the Olympics represent. 

It is also a pointed personal 
rejection of President Chun . 
Doo H wan's attempt to get 
talks going between North and 
South at the highest level. 

Answering' questions from 
The Times in the spring before 
his visit to Britain, President 
Chun said he hoped to meet 
President Kim 11 Sung of 
North Korea before the end of 
this year. 

■ The. Kimpo airport blast 
puts paid to any hope of that 
meeting taking place for the 
present or any of the lower- 
level meetings on economic or 
other subjects- which - have 
been in abeyance since last 
year. 

The bomb was most prob- 
ably both a crude attempt to 
stop visitors going to the 
Asian Games and also an 
unmistakable threat to the 
South over the Olympics, 
illustrating that unless the 



i.- **"••• 




V **• 

■:W-6 


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President Chun Doo Hwan checking security at the Asian Games village in Seoul, while 


South yields to Northern de- 
mands on the naming, co- 
hosting and revenues from the 
Games, Pyongyang is able to 
frighten away enough poten- 
tial visitors to make .the 
Olympics an extremely expen- 
sive pyrrhic victory for the 
South. 

The Northerners appear to 
have already prepared some 
facilities for the 1988 Games, 
as though their co-hosting of 
them, were a foregone .con- 
clusion. 

They have also been driving 
a hard bargain in talks with 


Security tightened 
for Asian Games 


Seoul (Reuter)— Sehor Juan 
Antonio Samaranch, the In- 
ternational Olympic Commit- 
tee (IOC) president said 
yesterday be was sure the 
Asian Games in Seoul would 
be a success despite the bomb 
, blast at Seoul airport 

He said at the airport “I 
deplore the fact that terrorism 
threatens people not only in 
Seoul but in many pans of the 
world. But I am sure it (the 
Games) will be a success.” 

Sehor Samaranch arrived 
amicT tight security to attend 
an IOC executive board meet- 
ing today and the opening 
ceremony next Saturday. 

South.Korea said it had put 
its 100.000-sirong police on 
yet higher alert. 

Mr Kang Min Chang, the 
national police chief, said 
investigators believed they 
saw North Korea's hand be- 
hind the bombing 
President Chun Doo Hwan, 
who has frequently said com- 
munist North Korea might 
send agents to sabotage the 
Games, yesterday ordered the 


Foreign Ministry to issue 
assurances to participating 
countries that the bombing 
would not affect the Games. 

About 6,000 players and 
officials from 28 countries are 
expected to attend. Mr Chun 
inspected the damage at the 
airport yesterday and visited 
the athletes' village. 

Police said a number of 
foreign embassies and news 
organizations had received 
. anonymous calls claiming 
responsibility for the blast.- 

But the police said they bad 
discounted the claims, appar- 
ently made by young left-wing 
militants, alter investigations. 
• TOKYO; President Onega 
of Nicaragua "has said his 
country will boycott the 1988 
Seoul Olympics unless North 
Korea is made co-host of the 
Games (Reuter reports). 

President Onega was speak- 
ing at a banquet in his honour 


hosted by President Kim D 
Sung of North Korea in 


Sung of North Korea in 
Pyongyang on Sunday, accor- 
ding to the North Korean 
Central News Agency. .- 


Roadblock 
protest by 
Gurkhas 


From Our Correspondent 
Delhi 

The Gurkha National Lib- 
eration Front (GNLF) has be- 


Cambodia 
orphans 
get revenge 


From NeO Kelly 
Bangkok 


ber trucks as the latest step in 
its campaign for more autono- 
my in northern India. 

Front members Mocked sev- 
eral roads near Darjeeling in 
West Bengal state on Satur- 
day and removed timber from 
six tracks before allowing 
them to proceed. The GNLF 
argues that timber merchants 
are stripping the district of its 
forests and damaging the envi- 
ronment, 

In recent weeks the Gur- 
khas, who are Indians of Nep- 
alese descent, have clashed 
with Marxist unions controll- 
ing the tea gardens in an effort 
to hah harvesting. They have 

also blockaded roads round 
Darjeeling, the tea capital, to 
interfere with the tourist trade. 

Hotel occupancy in recent 
weeks has fallen to less than 
20 per cent. 

The GNLF says the state 
government neglects die dis- 
trict and has called for cre- 
ation of a Giirkhaland state. It 
Is also demanding citizenship 
rights for Nepalis who have 
settled in India. At least 25 
people have been killed ami 50 
injured in dashes since May. 


The Vietnamese-supported 
Government of Cambodia has 
mobilized young men orphan- 1 
ed by the former Khmer 
Rouge regime into “revenge” 
battalions to fight resistance 
guerrillas, according to offi- 
cials of the anti- Vietnamese 
coalition based on the Thai 
border. 

•They say 200 youngsters, 
aged between 14 and 20, are 
fighting guerrillas and that 
1,000 more are being trained 
in Vietnam. 

Resistance officials say the 
new units have shown hatred 
and courage in dashes with 
guerrillas in western and cen- 
tral Cambodia. Although mili- 
. tary activity is at a low level 
because of monsoon rains, the 
young soldiers are reported to 
be inflicting significant casual- 
ties on guerrillas of the Kinrier 
Rouge, which they blame for 
the loss of their famibes. 

The Khmer Rouge under 
Pol -Pot has been accused of 
the mass slaughter of huge 
numbers of Cambodians 

Foreign diplomats in Viet- 
nam say the authorities there 
appear to be looking to the 
“Pol Pot orphans” as the fu- 
ture leaders of their country. 


World Bridge 


British pair beat odds 


From A Bridge Correspondent, Miami Beach, Florida 


Britain with only_fliree pairs 
in a field of 420 pairs took 
fourth place behind three pans 
from the US in. .the world 
mixed pairs championship. 

Kitty Bethe, an Amen can 
living in London, was part- 
nered by Barry RigaL also of 
London, and one of our 

leading young playere. , 

Rigal first made his mane m 
the Oxfoid University team 
went on to represent Britain at 
junior level and promises to 
go even further. 

The winners. Jon and Pam- 
ela Wittes from Los AJamitos, 
play Little bridge outside their 
own region though two years 
ago they won a nauonal 
championship. 


In the final session they held 
off a strong challenge from 
Kerry Shuman and Bob 
Hamman. 

The leaders and their scores 
were: 

1) Jon and Pamela Wittes 
(US), 23, 124; -2) Kerry Shu- 
man and Bob Hamman (US), 
22,474; 3) Rozanhe and Bill 
Pollack (US). 22,410; 4) Kitty 
Bethe and Barry Rigal (Brit- 


ain). 22J108. 
Other Bri 


Other British places were 
Fiona Brickwood and Lovis 
Kaplan (251), Olive and Keith 
Russell (386). 

Play began yesterday m the 
World KO Tearro champion- 
ship, a long tournament with a 
top class field. 


the South, seeking not only 
half the events but half the 
revenues from lucrative tele- 
vision contracts. 

They are unlikely to be 
bought off with such gestures 
as the renaming of the Games 
as the Seoul-Pyongyang Olym- 
pics, even if the Olympic rules 
permitted it. 

The holding of the Olym- 
pics in Seoul is much more 
than the world's premier 
sporting event to the North. 

• It will represent the ultimate 
expression of the world’s ap- 
proval of the Southern success 


story. Equally dramatically, it 
will illustrate the manifest 
failure of the North to find 
acceptance of itself or its 
system outside the communist 
world and the non-aligned 
movement 

When the Olympic Games 
start in Seoul, the North will 
find itself not only isolated 
from the non-communist 
world but most of the Eastern 
bloc as welL 

These countries can hardly 
be expected to keep their 
athletes away from yet an- 
other Olympics over an issue 


riot police Mock entry to the capital’s Hanyang University, 
which is scarcely at the top of with important new Asian 
their agenda. links. 


North Korea's two big- 
power friends are the Soviet 
Union and China, in that 
order, with Moscow seeming 
to have the preponderant 
influence in Pyongyang at the 
moment. 

China is sending a large 
squad to the Asian Games and 
is showing every intention of 
being represented at the 
Olympics. China’s interests lie 
not in disruption on the 
Korean peninsula but in the 
building up of its economy 



OVERSEAS NEWS 


Russia set 


to update 
plants built 
in China 


Duarte’s 
hopes of 
peace talks 
look slim 


Peking (AFP) - The Soviet 
First Deputy Prime Minister, 
Mr Nikolai Talyrin, left here 
yesterday after a week-long 
i visit which sources said could 
! lead to modernization by the 
Soviet Union of about 100 
Chinese enterprises. 

Mr Talyzin, the highest- 
ranking Soviet official to visit 
China in 17 years, met several 
senior Chinese officials in- 
d offing the Prune Minister, 


Mr Zhao Ziyang. 

The visit put fund touches to 


links. 

New military equipment 
from the Soviet Union to 
match deliveries to South 
Korea of sophisticated Ameri- 
can FI 6 jets coincides with the 
need of Mr Kim Jong II, 
President Kim's son and des- 
ignated successor, to prove he 
has the right stuff to succeed 
his father. 

International sports gather- 
ings make choice targets for a 
son needing to prove his spurs 
in a society where the normal 
rules do not apply. 


The visit put fund touches to 
a programme for modernizing 
17 Chinese plants built with 
Soviet aid daring the 1 950s 
which would involve the send- 
ing of more than 100 Soviet 
experts to China for the first 
time in 26 years. 

As many as 100 Chinese 
enterprises across the country 
canid be brought up to date 
with the help of Soviet tech- 
nology and experts, the 
sources added. 

• Nuclear deal: China and 
Pakistan yesterday signed an 
agreement in Peking on co- 
operation in nuclear energy, 
the Chinese Foreign Ministry 
announced. It was signed by 
the Pakistani Foreign Min- 
ister. Mr Yaqub Khan, and his 
Chinese counterpart, Mr Wu . 
Xneqian. Mr Zhao attended I 
the ceremony. 

The official New China 
News Agency said agreement 
concerned co-operation in the 
peaceful use of nuclear energy, i 

India and the Soviet Union 
accused China late last year of 
allowing Pakistan to cany out 
its first nuclear test in a remote 
region in north-west China, a 
charge denied by both Peking 
and Islamabad. 


Panama City (Reuter) - 
Negotiations aimed at laying 
the groundwork for peace 
talks on Friday in El Salvador 
have collapsed. _ . 

Salvadorean officials and 
rebel leaders, meeting here for 
three days last week, said they 
wanted the talks to proceed as 
scheduled in the town of 
Sesori. El Salvador. 

The officials blamed the 
left-wing rebels for scuttling 
the Scsori talks because of 
guerrilla objections to govern- 
ment-proposed security meas- 
ures. 

In another news conference, 
ihe rebels said they had of- 
fered to meet ibe government 
delegation again within 10 
days to try to remove ob- 
stacles to new peace talks. 

The rebels have been fight- 
ing the US-backed Govern- 
ment for nearly seven years. 
Two rounds of peace talks 
were held in October and 
November 1984. but they 
ended in stalemate with each 
side accusing the other of 
exploiting the talks solely for 
propaganda value. 

Ihe government team said 
President Duane and other 
officials would go to Scsori 
anyway, hoping for a late 
change of heart by the 
guerrillas. 

The Minister of Commu- 
nications and Culture, Sehor 
Julio Adolfo Rev Prendcs. 
said the disagreement ccmred 
on the rebels* call for u 
nationwide truce while peace 
talks were under way, and 
their demand that a de- 
militarized zone be created in 
and around Scsori. 95 miles 
north-east of San Salvador. 


A small sign of the times 

for British Rail. 


. In the financial year 1985/86, British Rail 
made a profit of just over £lm.The size of the 
profit is not particularly significant but the 
fact of it is, when compared with a loss of 
£420m in the previous y eat 

Because that profit; small though it may 
is just one example of the new spirit invig- 
orating British Rail 

It means that British Rail was able to 
reduce its call on government support (and that 
means money from you, the tax payer) for the 
second year in succession while launching a 
£2bn renewal programme - the biggest 
investment in the railways for over a quarter 
ofacentury 


What this means for BRs customers was 
spelt out by Sir Robert Reid Chairman of British 
Rail when he said “As we earn more money 
as a business we can afford to put more back 
into improving servicer 

Last yeac British Rail did earn a lot more 
Rassenger volume was higher than at any 
time since 1979. InterGty services earned more 
than they have for ten years. Both Network 
South East and Provincial earnings increased. 
Both Railfreight and Red Star grew 

But it was hot just a matter of earning 
more, we also delivered more. Over 200 brand- 
new fecer and Sprinter trains, new tollman 
services,twiceasmanychartertrain5,andnew 


stations as well as improved facilities at existing 
stations. 

Today, British Rail's finances are firmly 
under control and both passenger and freight 
traffic are increasing. 

The huge investment in the renewal of 
our railways is enabling more new eq ui pment 
and improved services to come into operation 
than at any time in the last 30 y ears 





12 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


SPECTRUM 



That Geoffrey Chaucer 
couldn’t ’arf tell a tale 


I d the shadows of Poets' 
Corner, in Westminster 
Abbey, are monuments to 
some of the most famous 
names in English literature. If 
they could be brought together 
at some celestial literary party, 
a gatecrasher would be struck 
hy the immense variety of 
their speech: the Warwick- 
shire burr of Shakespeare, the 
Lakeland murmur of Words- 
worth, the Wessex Rs of 
Thomas Hardy, the Welsh 
sing-song of Dylan Thomas, 
the Midlands accent of Dr 
Johnson, the cockney of 
Keats, the Anglo-American of 
T. S. Eliot ana so on. 

But the man whose grey 


London language 
was established 


as pre-eminent 
by the great 


poet Part two 


of our series 


traces its growth 


EricBMUiOTt 


memorial is set slij^hti^ apart. 


Familiar new faces: Joe Kennedy presses the flesh, Kathleen Townsend jogs from door to door, pursuing votes that could send them both to Washington 


All the way with JPK? 


It is a wet weekday evening, but the 
hospital auditorium is packed, the 
overflow stretching 50 yards down 
the corridor. Seared centre stage in a 
row of political candidates is a stocky, 
curly-haired figure whose face, or 
rather grin, seems oddly familiar. The 
place is Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
and the grin belongs to Joseph P. 
Kennedy II. the 33-year-old eldest 
son of the late Bobby Kennedy. 

Further away from the Kennedy 
heartland, but nearer to the magic 
white Washington dome, his sister 
Kathleen has just gone through much 
the same routine. Last week she won 
the Democratic primary for a Repub- 
lican-held congressional seat in 
Maryland. 

If Joe Kennedy wins his Boston 
primary today and both succeed in 
the November elections, they could 
be the first brother and sister team at 
the Capitol. 

As a contender for his late unde 
J.F. Kennedy's old seat — safely held 
for the Democrats for 34 years by 
Speaker Thomas “Tip” O’Neill — 
Joe's path to power looks by for the 
smoother. The founder of Citizen's 
Energy, a non-profit-making com- 
pany which provides low-cost fuel to 
the needy, he has well-established 
philanthropic credentials to back up 
the Kennedy name. 

But he foces a formidable array of 
opponents — one bearing an equally 
famous name. Roosevelt — in what 
has so for been the most expensive 
congressional race in the country. 
One candidate spent $400,000 on 
establishing the all-important “name 
recognition” before dropping out in 
March. Even before the crucial six- 
week run-up to the primaries, dose to 
$2 million had been spent opposing 
Kennedy. 

Before Joe's candidacy was an- 
nounced. it looked as if the political 
torch would be carried in Massachu- 
setts by his cousin Ted, Senator 
Edward Kennedy's 23-year-old son. 
But Ted, who lost a leg to bone cancer 
at the age of 12 . decided to con- 
centrate his efforts on campaigning 
for the handicapped, and the family's 


Joseph Kennedy is running for his Uncle Jack’s 


old seat iri Congress, Kathleen is hoping to 
make it a family twosome. Sally Dugan reports . 


weight was thrown behind Joe's 
campaign. Large families being a 
Kennedy tradition — Bobby had 1 1 
children — manpower has never been 
a problem. 

“We were always encouraged to 
believe that each one of us can. and 
does, make a difference,” says 27- 
y ear-old Kerry, one of five sibling 
backroom campaigners. “Whether 
it's working in the Government, or 
just being a brother or sister . . . One 
way or another, you've got to get 
involved.” 

Kerry has her own interests in 
international human rights, further 
developed during a spell with Am- 
nesty International She earned her 
political stripes when she travelled 
round the country speaking on her 
uncle Ted's behalf in his abortive 
1980 presidential campaign, and has 
now taken a year off from law school 
in Boston to Help her brother. She and 
her sister Rory, 18, have canvassed 
door-to-door and visited virtually 
every old people's hot-lunch pro- 
gramme in the area in a bid for the el- 
derly vote. 

Brothers Max. 21. and Christopher, 
23. have each been assigned a district 
to organize. And 28-year-old Michael 
who also works at Citizen’s Energy, is 
Joe’s chief fund-raiser. Events such as 
a $250-a-ticket clambake for 800 al 
the family compound in Hyannis 
Port have helped the campaign 
towards its $ 1.2 million target 

Politics plays an essential part in 
the Kennedy family memories, and 
Michael remembers his mother Ethel 
barely turning a hair when Kathleen 
asked if 30 high school classmates 
could stay overnight at the height of 
the anti-Vietnam war protests. Even 
if they were not politically active, the 
junior Kennedys were expected to be 
able to give an intelligent account of 
the stories of the day at the dinner 


table each night. Every Sunday, the 
ritual also included the recital of a 
poem and the biography of a famous 
person. 

For some the burden of expecta- 
tions proved too much. David, the 
third son. died a drug addict at the age 
of 28 and Bobby Kennedy jun, the 
second son. has been convicted of 
possession of heroin — though he has 
also qualified as a ^lawyer an d wri tten 

Kennedy has also bad lus^wilder 
moments — most disastrously when 
he overturned a Jeep, leaving a 
teenaged girl passenger paralysed for 
life. 

Joe's school and college record was 
marked only by its lack of distinction, 
but as a businessman he bas dearly 
inherited his grandfather's en- 
trepreneurial flair. Joseph Patrick 
Kennedy L who died in 1969. left 


sons. 


Embarrassing 
attacks on 
big business 


trust funds from a lifetime of Holly- 
wood deals and property speculations 
producing an estimated annual in- 
come of $25 million. Joseph P. 
Kennedy II heads a billion-dollar 
enterprise, but it’s geared towards 
public rather than private profit 
As campaign manager for Senator 
Edward Kennedy in 1976, Joe helped 
to put his uncle Ted back in office, 
but his own political aspirations only 
really surfoced at the dedication of 
the John F. Kennedy Library in 
Boston, built to house Kennedy 
memorabilia. Much to the discomfort 
of those present, including the then 
President Jimmy Carter, he used the 
occasion to launch a biting attack on 


the power of the coal and oil giants. 

Citizen's Energy, which Joe 
founded in 1979, was designed as a 
practical and politically exemplary 
solution to the energy crisis. By 
buying crude oil and natural gas 
direct from the producers, then 
selling part of the refined product, tire 
company has been able to provide 
heating ofl for the elderly and needy 
at a 40 per cent discount 

The seat Joe is pursuing was won 
by Jack Kennedy in his first election 
to Congress in 1946. It is so much a 
Democratic stronghold that little 
attention is being paid to the Repub- 
lican primary. By contrast Kathleen, 
a 34-year-old lawyer, will face a tough 
fight in November. 

Like Joe. who has twin 
Kathleen is married with 
children. Her husband, David 
Townsend, is a liberal arts professor 
and shares the care of their three 
daughters (Meaghan. eight Maeve, 
six; and Kate. two). The selfrap- 
pointed custodian of the family 
ideals, she was the prime mover 
behind the establishment of an 
international Robert F. Kennedy 
human rights award. 

But she is also a pragmatist During 
a spell in the Massachusetts State 
Office of Human Resources, her pet 
project was the police corps plan, 
which paid college fees for people 
willing to serve time as police offi c er s 
after graduation. In Maryland, she 
bas run a grassroots door-to-door 
campaign, putting more emphasis on 
her husband's family, which is local 
than her own. 

Meanwhile, the tourists flock to the 
modest two-storey house in a leafy 
Boston suburb where John F. Ken- 
nedy was bom. Here, a taped tour by 
matriarch Rose Kennedy gives in- 
sights into family rituals. And at the 
J F Kennedy Memorial Library, an 
entry in the visitors book says, 
simply: “We still love him.” 

Whether that love extends to the 
next generation will be tested at the 
polls this autumn. 


© Tfcww Newspapers Lid IS 


the “Father of English 
Literature” Geoffrey Chaucer, 
was a Londoner. And no one 
did more to establish tire 
English of London and tire 
south-east as the prestige vari- 
ety of the language. 

Together with his publisher. 
Caxton (who printed the En- 
glish he heard on the streets of 
London 1 it was Chaucer’s 
achievement that made Lon- 
don English tire p refer r ed 
literary form, then and since. 

Chaucer spent much of bis 
career at court, so it is fair to 
assume that be spoke crown 
English. But then, as now, 
most Londoners spoke a 
different English. Just as 
Chaucer's English marked out 
literature, it was this “London 
language” that was to have a 
dramatic influence on the 
evolution of spoken English. 

A keen-eared contemporary 
of Shakespeare, George 
Puttenham. wrote that “any 
speach used beyond the river 
of Trent ... is not so courtly 
nor so currant as our 
Southeme English is”. And he 
identified the prestige London 
accent as “a true kynde of 
pronunciation”. 

There is controversy about 
how this pronunciation would 
have sounded, but we have 
good dues. Before dies 
tionaries. people tended to 
write as they spoke. So we find 
dark for “derk” coffe for 
“cough”, and varmint for 
“vermin”. And Shakespeare 
himself offers evidence for the 
sound ofLondon English. His 
love of word-play has him 
punning raising with reason , a 
word which was then much 
closer in sound to its French 
original raison. 

In the 18tb century Thomas 
Sheridan's “pronunciation 
dictionary” caused con- . 
troversjrbnt his ear is~iiot in 
doubt. His summary of spo- 
ken English in London at the 
end of the century said: “Two 
different modes of pronunci- 
ation prevail by which the 
inhabitants of one pan of the 
town are distinguished from 
those of the other. One is 
current in the City, and is 
called cockney; the other at 
the Court end. and' is called 
the polite pronunciation”. 
That “polite pronunciation” 
was coming much closer to the 
Home Counties middle-class 
English of today. 

But what of cockney? De- 
rived from coken-ay, a cock's 
egg, an inferior or worthless 
thing, cockney is as old as 



Chaucer. It had. originally, 
nothing to do with “bad” or 


“classless" 1960s has now 
become widespread through- 
out middle-class (especially 
teenage) society. 

Professor John Wells, of 
London University, has stud- 
ied the influence of cockney 
on Standard English. “I think 
that many features of cockney 
do move up-market," he says. 
“One notices today the 
spreading out of what 1 caB the 
T vocalization. Now this is 
the use of a kind of‘w* sound, 
instead of an T in the middle 
of words like ‘milk* or 
‘middle’. In this case, wc have 
clear evidence that these 
pronunciations arc spreading 
out geographically and so- 
cially from the south-east of 
England.” 

Even more famous is the 
rise of the glottal stop, as in 
lotto for “lot of*. The Milk 
Marketing Board, which pio- 
neered the identification of a 
cockney slogan with brood 
popular appeal in its slogan 
“Drinka Praia Milfca Day” 
has taken tire next logical step 
with a line based on the 
rhyming slang and the emer- 
gent glottal stop: “Gotta Lena 
Bottle”. The glottal stop is 
essentially a cockney feature. 


slovenly 

ech. 


or “inferior” spe- 


:kneys. ini 
i City of 


or all the forces of 
standardization on tele- 
vision and radio, the 
English language remains 
fluid, various 


and unstable. 


of the old City of London, 
were often dispossessed agri- 
cultural workers from East 
Anglia and Kent. Codcney’s consunti) c^pngXompme 

rural roots are betrayed in the 3 PjJJ® ^SJtoschool 
missing g in words like eat in' **■** a P**™ .S®: 


and drinkirC — the “huntin’ 
and shootin'” talk of Squire 
Western and his heirs. And the 
cockney pronundation of 
“gone” “off” and “cough" 
(gom. orf and corfi is still used 
by upper-class country 
speakers. 

It was Only in the late 1 9th 
century that the City became 
the Square Mile of finance and 
international trade and its 
working-class inhabitants 
were driven east. 

Isolated in the poverty- 
stricken East End. untouched 
by many Victorian educa- 
tional reforms with their 
emphasis on “correct 
English”, the “London 
language” had become, by the 
turn of the century, the cock- 
ney of stereotype. By the time 
Shaw was researching what he 
called the “kerbstone English" 
of Eliza Doolittle (flars and 
garni), it had become a de- 
spised (and misunderstood) 
caricature. 


accent of today, and lire older 
version sounds astonishingly 
“polite”, the contemporary 
surprisingly “cockney”. These 
changes come not from news- 
papers like The Times, nor 
even from Radio One or News 
at Ten . The dynamo of change 
sociaL Predictions about 


is 


Y- 

sur 


today the influence 
cockney not only 
survives, it flourishes. 
Precisely because it is identi- 
fied as the voice of working- 
class London, it has become 
widely imitated — the finest 
form of flattery. If it has 
become chic to go down- 
market in style and dress, it 
has also become chic to do so 
with speech. A trend that 
began with MickJagger affect- 
ing a cockney accent in the 


language are dangerous but, if 
precedent is any guide, the 
Queen's great-great-grandchil- 
dren may well sound like 
walk-on characters from Min- 
der or EastEnders. 

The influence of cockney 
abroad has been profound. 
Exported throughout the Em- 
pire. tire language of London 
became the basis of all the 
19th-century colonial vari- 
eties. From 1788 and the first 
landings in Botany Bay on- 
wards. it was the refugees from 
the East End (and the South- 
East) who provided the first 
generations of Britain^ colo- 
nists in Australia, New Zea- 
land and South Africa. Today, 
there is a ghostly echo of the 
cockney a (in. a word like 
“mate”) in the distinctive a 
vowel of Aussies, Kiwis and 
South Africans. 

Barry Humphries may not 
make it to Poets' Corner, but 
his bawdy humour and com- 
mand of the vernacular would 
have delighted the author ol 
the Canterbury Tales. 


Robert McCram 


Ud- 


( TOMORROW ) 


A new English 
as the empire 
strikes bade 


©i 

The Story of English, by 
Robert McCrum, William 
Cron and Robert Macneil, is 
published on Thursday by 
BBC/Faber at £IS. The tele- 
vision series on which the book 
is basal starts on September 22 
(BBC 2. 8.05} 



THE 
OAK ROOM 

SSMERIDIEN^W^ 

Introduces Michel Lorain 
France’s Newest 3-Star Chef 


Michel Lorain has recently been awarded 
three Michel in ^tars to add to his four 
Cauli el illilluu Red Toques, and Le 
Meridien Piccadilly are proud to 
announce he has lieen retained . to 

recreate for The Oak Room restaurant his 
unique style of cuisine that delights his 
customers ul his famous restaurant in the 
Iteart nf France. La Cole Saint-Jacques a! 
Juigm. Burgundy. 

TV Oak R»H«n is already enjoying a 


growing reputation through Chef David 
Chambers, and now with the two chefs 
working together it will achieve even 
greater gastronomic heights. 

They will be presenting original and 
highly in veu the dishes like Gazpacho de 
Languustine a la Creme de Courgettes, 
Les Ris de Veau au Citron Vai sur 
Endives Braisees and Soupe de R*ches 
Glacees et son Granite au Rjivre \feri, 
and uf course wonderful French wines. 


from SEPTEMBER 16 M. LORAIN 16 LAUNCHING HIS NEW MENU IN THE OAK 
ROOM \T LE MERIDIEN. PLEASE CALL 734 8000 TO MAKE \UjJR RESERVATION. 


Tire Oak Room Restaurant, Le Meridien Piccadilly. Piccadilly, London W1V 0BH. 

(Rmncrlv Tin- Nrw Piri-uilill> Hiilrlj 


Interruptions like Oedipus make life complex 

Sir Anthony Quayle 


talks of tomorrow’s 


return to television 


Sir Anthony Quayle is anxioas 
to finish bis autobiography bat 
fears be may be running oat of 
time. “I'm 73 next birthday, so 
I haven't got that long. I'll be 
senile and stupid soon. But my 
wife keeps chasing me to do 
this book.” 

It is, primarily, for his four 
grandchildren. The youngest 
is three and he fears that, 
without the book, they may 
remember nothing tangible 
about him. Unfortunately, the 
Quajle career has been 
conspiring effectively against 
the book. He started h 10 
years ago, while making a 
television series in Israel He 
had days with nothing to do in 
the desert and tapped away at 
his typewriter, completing 
about a quarter of the story. 
Then the typewriter arm 
broke, and he ground lo a halt 
He has not written a word 
since. 

The main problem is die 
Compass theatre company, a 
touring group which has doml- 
nated his last six years. He 
founded it ami is the "»«»" 
artistic, and organ izh^. driv- 
ing force. Now he knows it is 
time to phase ft out of hi$ life— 
but a military discipline de- 
mands he must do-so correctly. 

Quayle has always been 
consaeqtioits, a man to get the 
job done. Born in Ainsdale, 
between Liverpool and South- 
port. he was the son of a 
solicitor and a mother who 
was “very keen that her little 
sprig should have the best 
education she could manage”. 
That meant Rugby and 
RADA. In 1930 he had seen 
Gielgud and Richardson al the 
Old Vic — and decided acting' 
was the life for him. 

He stayed only a year at 
RADA, preferring to go round 
the musk halls as a feed to “a 
big, fat, Jewish comic”, Sub- 



Time to 


writer Sir Anthony Qttayie gets dawn to the paperwork, but not for long 


against this play written 2£00 
years ago, where the entire 
question which is torn at with 
daws of steel is "how one 
behaves decently with respect 
to the gods and to other human 
beings. There is no question of 
materia] gain at all” 

Qoayle lives in a sm^n, 

rather cluttered boose in Chel- 
sea. He looks his age but talks 
fluently and rapidly. He is 
dressed in a vaguely rural 
manner with a thick, woollen 
tartan jacket and corduroy 
trou sers. After we spoke he 
was_ expected for a Compass 
mathke of Dandy Dick at 
Guildford, yet another day not 
spent on the autobiography. 


seq Bendy, Tyrone Guthrie of- 
fered him work at the 
Cambridge Arts Theatre — 
and be found himself playing 
the Elephant and Castle with, 
Fl an agan and Allen, and 
rehearsing Troilus and Cres- 
sidn at Cambridge. 

By wartime; he had made ft 
to the Old Vic, with Alec 
Guinness. He was in the 
artillery, was dropped into 
Albania for undercover work 
and was a military assistant to 
the Governor of Gibraltar. 

It was in administration that 
be made his name in the post- 
war world as the father of the 
Royal Shakespeare Company. 
He spent 10 years at the 
Stratford Memorial Theatre, 
discovering the generation 
which was to succeed Gielgud, 
Olivier and Richardson — 
Richard Barton, Laurence 
Harvey and Robert Shaw. 

Blit be left in 1956, hav ing 
decided that enough was 
enough and determined to 
concentrate on acting. 

Qoayle later became in- 
volved both with Triumph and 
Prospect — companies 
committed to touring. It was a 
cause for which be felt little 
sympathy until he actually' 
took part and realised the 
need. 

But Triumph changed direc- 


tion and Prospect folded be- 
fore Quayle alighted on the. 
idea of Compass. 

Perhaps his oddest role is as 
Old, blind Oedipus in Oedipus 
at Colonas, the second of 
Sophocles's three Theban 
plays, which BBC- 2 is to 
screen starting tomorrow. He 
was approached by Louis 
Marks, the producer, and Don 
Taylor, the writer and direc- 
tor, ami agreed because ft was 
such an extraordinary one-off 
opportunity. The part is 
among the biggest in all 
drama, and Taylor insisted on 
shooting all 135 minotes of the 
play in one. take. 

“We rehearsed for six 
■ weels and then did ft In one 
take; The day after J had to fly 
to Hong Kong to do The 
Tempest with Compass. It was 
crazy — Prospers had gone 
completely out of my bead 
while 1 was stock on this sort 
of north fooe of the Eiger. I 
spent die entire flight being 
fed Prospero by all 1 these 
people and then on the first 
night in Hong Kong I dried.” 

He had never read nor seen 
Sophocles before — his sight of 


about Pieter Hall at the Na- 
ti<w*! Theatre. There is afl 
this talk about money — bow 

much yon make or don’t make. 

r find k fairly curious to set 
that degree of materialism 


Blyan Appleyard 

<&mnM UftanpapM Ud IMS ' 


The Tbefiao Plays fry Sopko- 
•gS®* /0 .*f transmitted on 

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ft was Taylor's script arriving 
learsals 


before rebc 


the day 
started. 

“Yon took at these plays 
and then yon read all tiu$ fuss 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1055 


ACROSS 
' 1 Torment (6) 

0 Taunt (4) 

8 Rowed (5) 

9 Weapon store (7) 
11 Ungainly (8) 

13 Diesel oil fueU4) 
IS Joystick (7.6) 

17 Curse (4) 

18 Cabbage sabd (8) 
21 Brother, si Her (7) 
ZZ Holdfast (5) 

23 FoQowing(4) 

24 Gobaekon(6) 


DOWN 

2 Dan (5) 

3 Help (3) 

4 Gossip spreader (13) 

5 Slash (4) 

6 Head ribbon (7) 

7 Talkative (10) 

10 Reasonable salary 
' (6.4) 

12 Viscount's senior (4) 



14 Manage (4) 

16 Distinguished (7) 
19 Speaking untruth- 


SOLUTION TO NO 1054 

ACROSS: . . ,0 


■ fully (5) 

20 Ordered reeort (4) 

22 Defraud (j) 


Pang 13 
ber 23Gi 


21 Auditor 22' 
DOWN: I Morose 2 Death 3Cammkn *- ■ - . 

Rung fiCtapati 7 Ensign 12JodhtS^i4^Sf rai ° 8,ani 
Dearth' 19 Umbra 2® Utah « Ramadan 15S 


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If you’re tempted to play spot-the-difference, 
save your eyesight The big difference between these 
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You can buy the Publishing System right 
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lAkfl'l /• y. ---K. •• 


~ “ ■ * -v :.r Cixv *zr- 

w"i "I 'V.vc 






If you can’t wait to see it in action, you can 
attend the AppleWorld exhibition. It takes place 
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For farther information, post the coupon, dial 
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• Send to; Apple Computer UK Ltd., FREEPOST Information ‘ * 

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•.Apple 

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Apple and to© Apple Logo are trademarks of Apple Computer Inc. 











































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WMM 


■ * ■j:-« 



FASHION by Suzy Menkes 






It' .W / *.* ''■• :Tfc 


a strong move 


elegance of the 


Fifties and the 


urban chic of 


the Chanel suit. 


left Check out 


the new tweeds 


the teeth' of 


both dog 


T he mascot of this fashion season is 
a French poodle. The star fabric is 
houndVtooth check. In these dog 
days of autumn, suits are in any 
fabric as long as it is black and 
white check, and the ultimate accessory 
comes on the end of a lead. 

For the first time since the Fifties, when 
pooches and high fashion last went paw. in 
glove, die tweed suit has been given an 
urban chic And the separates which have 
had such a long run as the basis of die winter 
wardrobe are being jostled on the pave- 
ments by more sophisticated styles. 

Coco Chanel made the giant dog-tooth 
check tweeds her signature. Today's Chanel 
suit, redrawn with its padded shoulders, 
deeper armholes arid short sassy skirt, is the 
new pedigree breed sported by top fashion 
dogs like Jerry Hall and Princess Caroline. 

The New Couture look has been taken up 
with gusto by the fashion industry. The suit 
— Chanel-inspired, fitted to the body or 
even a revived trouser suit — is the key buy 
for this winter; Leading designers, from 
Alistair Blair to Jasper Conran, through all : 
the French and Italian houses, are using the 
dog-tooth checked fabrics. They range from - 
the neat worsteds* used for gentleman's 
suitings, to larger wool checks, and the bold 
houndT s-tooth tweeds that may be coloured 
navy arid red. or coffee and cream, rather 
than the graphic blade and white. 

Smart money is on the outfits which 
combine sharp tailoring with a sense of fiin: - 
a shapely jacket with a flirty peplum frill 
over a plain straight skirt, or narrow pants 
cut like leggings under an ultra-long jacket. 
Although the body has swung back into 
focus after seasons of oversize, there are still 
no fashion diktats and proportion remains 
the key to fashion. The fret that the newest 
clothes this season are being sold as outfits, 
rather than do-it-yourself separates, should 
help uncertain shoppers find a style. 

The New Couture look came as much 
from the street as from the designers, as a 
generation brought up on denim rediscov- 
ered the pleasure of dressing up. How 
seriously you take the return to tailoring 
depends on your lifestyle, which may not 
include the pin-heeled shoes, seamed stock- 
ings and tight skirts indispensable to the re- 
vamped Pariaenne. Alternatives include 
the longer straight skirts; which look equally 
good with the short collariess jacket and 

Chanel suit from 26 Ok! Bond Street and 
31 Stoane Street 
Hair byMario at Schumi 
Make-up by nnk using Chanel’s Les 
Irrbsistanes collection 
Photographs by CHRIS DAWES 


team with flatter heels, or the straight 


trousers. 

Accessories are all witty, inspired by Kart 
Lagerfeld who sent up his own Chanel chic 
with thefhmous quilted chain-handled begs 
as dangfy gilt earrings. The ultimate 
accessory must be his genuine dog lead 
made of gDt-Hnked Chanel drain. The 
poodle and the scottie dog, glittering in 
paste, are canine accessories from designer 
Monty ' Don who opens a shop in 
Beauchamp Place at the end of the month. 

The retnrn of the trouser suit — in its more 
feminine and less androgynous form 
suggests a rangier dog than the pam p ered 
or poodle. The Inn and hungry long- 
id greyhound has not yet appeared as a 
totem accessory. But from Erte’s dongated 
Thirties fashion drawings to the stalking 
fashion models of the Fifties, the greyhound 
has a superior fashion pedigree 



Above: Paristenne pug. Hound's-tooth check wool jacket £236. straight black 
wool crepe skirt £90, both by Caroline Charles, 11 Beauchamp Place, SW3. 
Polar bear beret £14.99 by Graham Smith for Kangol, from House of Fraser 
stores. Gilt and pearl jewellery from Chanet Leather gloves from Fenwick. 
Sheer black seamed stockings by Bruce Oldfield for Chamos. Shoes £145 from 
Stephane Kaian, 49 Sloane Street, SW1 


Above left Poodle 
matching slim skirt. 


both from Hobbs, South Molt on Street W1 and 


PEOPLE IN FASHION 


|\ Jf 1 \ 

■ttys / mr* 1 . .! 


Swirling wool chaffis I 
impeccably cut in a \ 
soft flowing skirt with 
matching shawl. AH .] 
thebrffliara jewelled li 

cotouisof'Fehi’. ft 
shades of scarlet IS 

hot pink Parma w 
and jade, sharpen- K 
ed with -black to / 1 
create one of our/ n I 
most stunning j S J 
cotourways. J |L 





WO 


Big guns 
go for it 

! Betfy Jackson aad Jasper 

j Conran have conspired to take 
New York by storm duriag the 
American fashion season. 
They will bead a six-stroag. 
British fashion team planning 
to “go for It", Amerfcan-rtyle, 
as an image-making and big 
bocks exercise. 

Betty, currently in Chicago 
for a Marshall Fields promo- 
tion. and Jasper, fuming over 
the delay in opening his new 
shop until the end of the 
mouth, will be joined by 
Katharine (“Say No To 
Nukes") Hamnett, Alistair 
Blair, Wendy Dagworthy and 
John Galliano, founding fa- 
ther of the Les Mis4raWes 
fashion look. 

They all hit the Big Apple nt 
the hyper fashionable Lowell 
Hotel on November 6 for a 
fashion presentation and 
party. Apart from the free 
flights, courtesy of British 
Airways, the six fashion 
troubles hooters are investing 
in themselves. The powers- 
that-be give sahmdies only to 
“official bodies'*, and no one 
would dare to call the de- 
signers that 

Meanwhile, the British 
Fashion Establishment, which . 


& *srfj 


.CD) 



lor men & vomen 
re. tail and iaigt 

ham £28.25 

<pSp£Z) 

tub my rm) A 

9 The Pram 
Bnnboute 

Hats. 9* 


44274/463947 — 

WALK, CYCLE, FISH, SAIL? 

Send stamp (or 
colour brocbm and samples.- 
(Proya. JAJ Jennato) 


Image-maker Betty Jackson 

already has support and en- 
couragement from Princess 
Anne, has netted our royal 
image-maker for the grand 
Fashion Week Banquet at the 
Fishmongers Hall. The Prin- 
cess of Wales will present the 
British Designer of the Year 
Award on October 111, and 
herself with the knottiest dress 
problem of the season. 

Italian job 

The decorations (tomato 
molehills growing out of postal 
were colour-matched to Keith 
Yarty’s hair at the Homy 
Nichols Italian launch last 
week. The glitterati party wel- 
comed back British fashion’s 
prodigal sons — I ’any and his 
partner Alan Clearer, ex-pal 
designers for Byhlos. Their 
show was the linchpin of the 
Italian promotion which 
turned out to be the swansong 
of high fashion's guru, Clare 
Stubbs. She is off" to the rolling 
acres of Harrods. as Fashion 
Director. / asked Keith, sitting, 
at my taNc along with Joanne 
Broaden, his former professor 
at the Royal College of Art. if 
he would ever conxc home. 
Moist-eyed front walking 
down the Kings Road in the 
hazy September sunshine. 
Keith and Alan both told me 
that the, y would love to “do an 
Alistair Blair" and come hack 
to work in England. Bui then, 
of course, there’.s the 
money — 


Quiet mob rule 

The Italian mob hit town last 
week, headed by Milan's qrrirt 
man of fashion, Luciano 
Soprani That Great Dane 
Peder Bertelson, who already 
has Armani, Valentino and 
Krms in his empire, hosted a 
party for Soprani at the new 
Sloane Street shop. 

Luciano, stroking his beard 
nervously, announced himself 
promt to be behind plate glass 
in London. Doretta Palazzi, 
elegant former right-hand of 
Giorgio Armani, interpreted 
Soprani's thoughts to the 
gathering, which included 
Rosa Monckton, who is about 
to launch Tiffany's on London 
with a breakfast and a fittie 
help from Bertelson. 

• Alistair Blair. Karl 
Lagerfeld’s best-publicised 
protcgC. has weaned away 
from Paris and KL the delec- 
table Mia Marauis. who joins 
a team already headed by Lord 
Li nicy’s pretty constant 
companion, Susannah Con- 
stantine. With such inspiring 
• company, it is no « vnder that 
Scois-born Alistair, who was 

launching his tailored autumn 
collection at Gallery’ 28 in 
Brook Street last week, de- 
scribes his range for next 
spring as "very feminine”. 

Undie-tones 

The androgynous undies 
launched by Calvin Klein on a 
wave of female Y-fronts have 
receded from the shores of 
M & &. Joan CoHins and 
Linda Evans were the moving 
’ spirits behind the store's 

glamorous lingerie show held 

last week at their Baker Street 

headquarter^ Lashings of 
lace, slithers of jewel-coloured 
satin and such boudoir lux- 
uries as the peignoir and the 
silk slip, threaten to create a 
scandal among the seafood 
pancakes in Britain's whole- 
some high street store; Even 
the teen range of chirpy night-, 
shirts for the Benetton genera- 
tion have as their logo the 
Sebastian Flyte Brideshead 
teddy bear. 


branches. Ruffle blouse by George Recti Synonyms and gloves, both from 
Fenwick, New Bond Street, W1 . Poodle brooch, £95 ty Monty Don from 58 
Beauchamp Place from September 27 and Harrods, Knightsbridge, SW1. 
Jersey bandeau by Kangol £4.99 from House of Fraser 


Left Long-legged lurcher. Dog-tooth double-breasted wool jacket £1 84, 
narrow trousers. £125, both by David Chambers. Spot silk blouse by 
Emmanuel le Khanh, ail from the Beauchamp Place Shop, SW3. Scottie 1 
kennel brooch. £1 60 by Monte Don from 
trimmed leather gloves, £19.95 from Fenwicks, New Bond Street, W1 . Spotted 
socks from Sock Shop branches. Patent leather shoes with gold link trim, 
£42.99 from Hobbs, South MoKon Street, Wi and branches 


76 

NEW BOND 
STREET 



Discover the World of Nino Cerruti at 
a new address in Bond Street His first 
London Shop, at the comer of Dering 
Street, has the exclusive Cerruti 1881 
Autumn Collections of Gentlemen and 
Ladies clothing and accessories. 


CERRUTI 1881 


FOR BSiUHlRE WL1 TO 7h \E* BUM) STREET LOMUS IM\ HiB TEt Bl-fO JSK 


















THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Riding 

roughshod 

A last-minute change to David 
Steel’s address to the SDP con- 
ference yesterday saved the Lib- 
eral leader from an own goal. In a 
harangue against “the prosperity 
of London and the South East and 
the poverty of the rest", the text of 
SteeFs speech expressed sorrow 
that the SDP was meeting in 
Harrogate — “one of the 
pleasantest towns in the North of 
England" - rather than in "Brad- 
ford or Sheffield". Wise counsels 
prevailed in time, so that when 
Steel reached the podium he 
chastised also his own party's 
choice next week of the hardly 
more street credible Eastbourne. 
What Steel did .not see fit to 
mention — but which I happily 
reveal - is where the Liberals 
intend to meet next year. Harro- 
gate. I am assured, 
t An SDP organizer demanded an 
explanation from a barman at the 
Old Swan, the conference hotel, of 
why the bitter had run ont by 
Sunday night. He got the straight 
answer: “We didn't think yon'd 
drink so much." 

Polaris Roger 

Ever-conscious of the image he 
projects into the living room, 
David Owen, 1 hear, was not 
altogether happy with Channel 4 
News the other day. With the 
Alliance leaders having been 
struck by the answer to their 
differences over defence not, as it 
were, on the road to Damascus but 
on a trip to Paris, ITN filmed 
diem on the train back from their 
meeting with Mitterrand, discuss- 
ing the new minimum European 
deterrent while sipping a modest 
glass of wine. The cameras still 
whined as they left the table and 
Owen, on the point of toppling 
over, graspeda seat for support — 
the result, I hasten to add, of a 
bump on the track. Afraid that it 
looked as if he bad imbibed too 
freely, Owen has had a word with 
ITN, pointing out how unfortu- 
nate it would be if the shot were re- 
shown every time the “historic" 
deal was mentioned. 

• The top-selling Spitting Image 
toy at the SDP conference in 
Harrogate? The robber effigy of 
David Owen with David Steel as 
his pocket hankerchief. More than 
130 had gone by yesterday. 

Firm stand 

A disgruntled SDP activist at the 
Harrogate conference asked from 
the floor why the Liberal publica- 
tions stand was placed prom- 
inently outside the main hall while 
the SDFs languished in an annexe 
for below. “We'U switch them,” 
announced Shirley Williams, the 
party president Tills, not surpris- 
ingly. went down badly with 
Hebdon Royd. the publishing 
company owned by Liberal mem- 
bers, who forked out close on £200 
for its pre-eminent site. “We won’t 
be moving." David Clamp, the 
stand organizer, told me. Nor, it 
seemed, did the SDP stand- 
holders wish to move. “We 
wanted to be here because we’re 
near the coffee stall" their badge- 
seller explained. Makes a change 
from claret I suppose. 

Cleaned out 

Nicholas Baker, Tory MP for 
North Dorset is no longer a 
walking wardrobe. He recently 
deposited several suits with a dry- 
cleaner in Maida Vale. London. 
Soon after the business suspended 
operations, and the suits are now 
nowhere to be found. 


BARRY FANTONI 



TERRDRISM- 

IviSAS 
FDR __ 
FRANCE 

X 




‘But win they stop F- Ills? 

Flush of youth 

A thorny issue of sex discrimina- 
tion threatens to divide Western 
Australian politics into macho 
men and - dare I say it - wets. 
The State School Teachers' Union 
is about to discuss the proposal 
that urinals should be replaced by 
cubicles in all schools in order to 
“remove unhygienic conditions, 
unpleasant odours and detri- 
mental psychological and sexual 
situations from boys’ toilet 
blocks". The motion has enraged 
the state's health minister who. 
dearly unscarred by his own 
childhood experiences, bluntly de- 
scries the idea as “bloody 
.mculous”. 

Double vision 

Television viewers in the Irish 
Republic might be forgiven for 
thinking they are seeing double at 
the end of this month when more 
than half the sets in the country 
will carry not one but two Wogan 
shows. Radio Television Eire tells 
me that, though more than 50 per 
cent of sets in the republic can pack 
up the BBC direct, it has .just 
clinched a deal with the Becb 
allowing it to record the Evening 
Extra chatshow and replay it later 
in the evening. PHS 


New York 

The war Ronald Reagan has 
declared on the so-called hard 
drugs has almost universal sup- 
port here in the United States. 
Heroin, so for as I can tell, has no 
defenders. It inspires horror even 
among people who take a gen- 
erally relaxed view of cocaine. But 
the defenders of cocaine, who 
regard it as a benign 
"recreational" drug, are them- 
selves now on the defensive. Like 
LSD before it, which also enjoyed 
a period of glamorizatkm, cocaine 
is finally getting a bad press. 

Nor do the many varieties of 
"uppers" and "downers" com- 
mand much support 
pills has never been glamoi 
in the way cocaine was until 
practically yesterday, when its 
spectacular spread in the form of 
“crack" begin setting off the 
loudest drug alarm in living 
memory. 

By contrast for a long time now, 
marijuana has been hotly de- 
fended by those who use it and 
calmly tolerated by the rest of ns. 

Nowadays, to be sure, we rarely 
bear marijuana actually celebrated 
in the terms that were so common 
as recently as 10 or 15 years ago. 
Then the propagandists for mari- 
juana were telling us that “turning 
on" or getting “stoned” was great 
fun, that it sharpened the senses, 
and that it expanded one’s, 
consciousness. 

For example, the regular user, 
wrote one such propagandist in 
language, that is as typical and as 
redolent of the late 1960s as the 
sickly sweet smell of marijuana 
itself “acquires a new sensitivity 
for the ’realness' and ’wonder- 
fulness’ of thing s ... He is also 
less dulled to other people and 
recognizes them as noble creatures 
no Iks real than himself. ” 

No wonder (it is Norman 
Mailer speaking now) that “good 
sex had to be awfully good before 
it was better than on pot.” 

In the same breath as be said 
that, Mailer admitted that pot had 


Norman Podhoretz charts the change 
in attitude to marijuana as its dangers 
as a gateway to heroin are perceived 

Now let’s have 
a hard line 
on soft drugs 


also hampered the workings of his 
brain. But in the upper reaches of 
American culture in the late ’60s, 
he was almost alone in acknow- 
ledging that any harm whatever 
could come from the habitual use 
of marijuana. 

Though he would no longer be 
quite so alone today, tbe reputa- 
tion of marijuana as a harmless 
indulgence remains largely intact 
Indeed, at a time when it is 
universally > proclaimed that to- 
bacco and alcohol are bad for 
one's health, and when the very air 
we breathe and the very food we 
eat are under suspicion of causing 
earner and other dread diseases, 
only marijuana is still being 
declared innocent of any ill- 
effects. 

Thus it continues to be widely 
pll ggp d that marijuana is not 
habit-forming or addictive, yet I 
myself am acquainted with people 
who, if they are not addicted to 
marijuana, are certainly giving a 
good imitation of being in pre- 
cisely that condition. They smoke 
h several times a day, and they 
would be in great distress n 
deprived of their supply. Such 
people are known as “pofoeads” 
and they are addicts. 

It is true that, like alcohol but 


unlike tobacco and still less Gke 
heroin or crack, marijuana can be 
tried without necessarily creating 
an addiction. But that does not 
mean that it is never habit- 
forming. In many in s tan ce s, it 
dearly and demonstrably is. 

Futhermore, this very un- 
certainty makes marijuana all the 
more dangerous to the young. For 
if it were as inexorably addictive 
as heroin, it would inspire as 
much fear as heroin does. As 
thing s stand, however, ih miring 
they can try marijuana with 
impunity, untold numbers of 
schoolchildren and university stu- 
dents are drawn into dependence 
on it 

Of these, a certain percentage go 
. on to heroin or cocaine or crack. 
Again, it is true that marij uana 
does not necessarily lead to the 
harder drugs. But rt is safe to say 
that most, if not aQ, cocaine and 
heroin addicts starred with mari- 
juana. That is why marijuana has 
sometimes been called a 
“gateway” drug or even a kind of 
loss leader for dealers in heroin 
and cocaine. 

Yet even if m ari juana neither 
posed the risk of addiction nor 
lowered the barriers to harder 
drugs, it would still remain harm- 


ful in itself Despite what its 
apologists (some of them dis- 
guised as scientists) keep assuring 
12 $, there can be little question that 
marijuana does psychological and 
intellectual dam age to those who 
smoke ft regularly. 

Fortunately, after more than a 
decade of turning a deaf ear to the 
arguments against marijuana, 
public opinion is beginning to 
shift Only six years ago, accordi 
to a Newsweek poll, a majority of 
Americans opposed treating the 
possession of small amounts of 
marijuana (in other words, mari- 
juana for use, not for safe) as a 
criminal offence. Today, in a 
dramatic reversal, only 27 percent 
oppose such a policy and an 
astounding 67 per cent fevour it 
Of course, trying to enforce so 
draconian an anti-marijuana law 
would create some of the same 
problems as Prohibition did with 
respect to alcohoL It is also 
doubtful that we could build 
enough jails to bold the millions 
who would have to be imprisoned. 
Besides, as we are afl coming to 
recognize where crack is con- 
cerned, law enforcement can only 
do so much to contain the. spread 
of drugs. Attitudes need to be 
changed. 

Therefore, even if jailing all 
users of marijuana is not a good 
idea, nothing but gopd can come 
of the newly censorious attit u de 
towards marijuana which lies 
behind that idea. Chances are that 
ifthe use of marijuana comes to be 
regarded with the disgust it so 
richly deserves, tbe demand for it 
win decrease. That would not only 
be desirable in itself, it would also 
put downward pressure on the 
demand for the even worse drugs 
to which marijuana is all loo often 
an introduction and a bridges 
Meanwhile, die war agaii 
these worse drugs has become the 
most popular political cause 
America has seen in living mem- 
ory, and there is no telling to what 
level it will rise before it finally 
runs its course. 


niffhv Anderson 

Experiments 

that stick 


One disturbing aspect of the 
pronouncements of some C&urcn 
of England leaders during tnc 
minerastrike was an indulgence 
in a rhetoric of compassion m 
which frequent incantation or in- 
defined but “caring" terms such as 
“community” ana "need was 
substituted for a precisely rea- 
soned analysis based on theology 
and economics. Some, at least, ol 
the offence given by the Bishop of 
Durham has been m a deliberate 
rhetoric of a rather different kind. 

Such lapses are serious precisely 
because the modem church ac- 
cords such a central role to debate 
and argument It is not that 
rhetorical manoeuvres should 
have no part in that debate but 


not 

do 


genuine 
not take 


S2ri£mts They do not one 
^if^niroUed «ndmo« » 
Sere is arrays a hand> IJSf&a. 

rive education can 
away their schools , 
by reference to md 
ables, unemployment, or cuts. 

Had the advocates of the m« 
liturgies agreed to take . 
sociological measures as 
^tendance as foe entena offowr 
experiment, they couK 
have explained any 
by a host of other 
they were even more adept. Ukc 

most social expenmenttt^tl^ 

never spelled out tfaecntcrrafoc 


foafpaiticipams would do weflto vS^douMtavc 

difficult to establish precise cn- 


On May 2 last year, when voters 
went to tbe polls in the shire 
elections, David Heath was an 
optician working in the sleepy 
Somerset town of Frome. Within 
weeks of the Alliance emerging as 
foe single largest party he had 
become leader of the county 
council, responsible for a budget 
of about £] 80 million a year and a 
workforce of more than 10,000. 

“I suppose the change was 
somewhat meteoric," says the 31- 
year-old Heath. “Ray Lancaster, 
the then Liberal group leader, is a 
vet and just couldn’t afford the 
time to do what, is a full-time job. 
So, although I had only just been 
elected to the council — I had ran 
the Liberal campaign — they 
turned to me." 

The Alliance formed a minority 
administration with tacit Labour 
support ending a century of 
unbroken Conservative control 
And not only in Somerset The 
May 1 985 version of the Peasants’ 
Revolt dealt a similar blow to foe 
Tory citadels of Devon, Cam- 
bridgeshire, Gloucestershire and 
Wiltshire. Today, their councils 
are “hung", or “balanced”, as foie 
rustic revolutionaries prefer. 
Across the country, only 21 of the ■ 
46 counties show a dear majority 
for any one party. 

Back in the heady days of 1981, 
the Gang of Four promised to 
break foe mould of British poli- 
tics. David Owen, Roy Jenkins, 
Shirley Williams and Bill Rodgers, 
all household names, bathed in the 
media spotlight: Westminster 
seemed destined to be their anvil. 
Yet, after the 1983 Tory landslide, 
now threatened by Labour's mod- 
est revival, it is In the shires that 
foe Alliance has not so much 
broken the mould as dashed it to 
smithereens. 

The firm smack of local govern- 
ment, wielded once by the Tory 
squirearchy or. in a more limited 
number of cases. Labour-machine 
politicians, has dissolved in transi- 
tory. shifting alliances; never for- 
malized, never predictable. 

Oxfordshire (31 Conservatives, 
20 Labour. 1 8 Alliance, 1 other) is 
case in point. The Tories, 
realizing they, would need the 
support of one other party to get 
their policies through, resigned. 
Now, no one is in control. 


Council meetings 
no longer a mere 
rubber stamp 


The chairmanship of the coun- 
cil and its committees rotates 
among the three parties on a 
meeting-by-meeting basis. And 
such posts have been stripped of 
their former power. No longer can 
committee chairmen reach a de- 
cision in private talks with their 
officers, safe in foe knowledge that 
the meeting ahead is little more 
.than a rubber stamp. Under this 
regime, which also operates in 
Bedfordshire, representatives of 
all three parties take part in the 
briefings and a series of policy 
options are presented to the 
committee meetings. 

Graham El son. leader of the 
Oxfordshire Alliance group, in- 
sists that this greater openness is 
all to the good, giving the full-time 
officers the scope to exercise tbe 
full range of their professional 
skills in drawing up the various 
options. No longer are viable 
alternatives removed from policy 
documents because they do not 
square with the political prej- 
udices of the ruling group. 

Elton freely admits a 
“convergence" between Alliance 
and Labour politicians over the 
central questions of council spend- 
ing, with his party acting as a 
brake on Labour's more fanciful 
notions. The Tories cannot decide 
how to come to terms with foe 
new order, preferring to snipe 
from the sidelines. 

“They see it as a straggle 
between the Alliance and them- 
selves for ultimate control of the 
council.” says Elson.“It's like 
gening into bed with your worst 
enemy. They are torn between 
wanting io support us. while at the 
same time fearing that if they do 
foey’H be seen to be 
Alliance initiatives." 


Nicholas Wood assesses the Alliance impact 
on local government and its implications 
for Tories and Labour as the election nears 

Beating out a 
new order 
in the shires 



David Walden, the leader of the 
Conservative group, speaks for 
many fellow members of his party 
when he says that only now are 
they coming to terms with tire 
shock of losing power. He is 
distinctly unimpressed with the 
Alliance's new Jerusalem: “The 
result is that there is no power to 
be shared. There is a vacuum and 
little sense of direction. It works 
somehow, but it's like having 
three opposition parties.” 

Conservative Central Office in 
London is even less enamoured of 
the shareouL It is monitoring the 
activities of tbe hung councils with 
a view to stepping up its propa- 
ganda war against the Alliance as 
Labour's Trojan horse. 

It dismisses as bogus foe 
Alliance's widely-trumpeted claim 
to be a moderating force on 
Labour, especially at budget time. 
The price of hs winning support in 
the round] chamber is to pay 
unwarranted attention to foe de- 
mands of its minority partner, 
says Central Office. 


Oxfordshire was plunged into 
“total confusion”, said a Central 
Office local government spokes- 
man, adding: “A fourth party has 
emerged in Oxfordshire — the 
officers. And they are really foe 
strongest of the lot." 

Central Office is not alone in 
viewing the latest local govern- 
ment carve-up with unease. 
Walworth Road, foe Labour Party 
headquarters, reacted to the 1985 
upheaval by instructing local 
groups not to form pacts with foe 
Alliance. This was accepted, 
though reluctantly in some cases, 
but an accompanying edict not to 
support Alliance nominations for 
tbe chairmanship of council 
committees has been overwhelm- 
ingly rejected. 

Streets have to be cleaned, 
children taught and buildings 
repaired. Council business teas to 
go on no matter what foe dis- 
positions of the parties. Practical 
considerations tike these have 
weighed heaviest with Labour 
councillors, especially where the 


alliance power and influence 

ON THE 46 COUNTY COUNCILS 


Majority control 
Thereof Wight 

Minority administrations 
Klgesnire 


(Labour supp 
(Labour suf 
(Labour suf 



Cam bridges 
Devon 
Gloucestershire 
Somerset 
Wiltshire 


Affiance holding some conurfittee 
chairmanships 

Cornwall (with Independents) 

Rotating chairs or panels 
Avon Alliance and Conservatives 
rotating dhalrs 

Oxfordshire Three-party rotating 
chairs 

Leicestershire Chairs for the day 
mostly Labour and Affiance 


No overall control wfth other 
parties holding chairs 
Bedfordshire in effect Conservative 
chairs with All support 
Cheshire Labour with Alliance 

_ support 

Cumbria Labour with Alliance 

support 

Essex Conservative with 

Alliance support 
Hertfordshire Conservative with 

Alliance support 
Humberside Labour with 

Alliance support 
Lancashire Labour with Affiance 
support 

Northumberland Labour with 

Conservative support 
Shropshire Labour with Alliance 
support 

Warwickshire Labour wfth Alliance 
support 


advent of foe Alliance has prised 
open a door that seemed forever 
dosed. 

Bill le Breton is a Liberal 
councillor on tbe isle ofWight and 
full-time political adviser to foe 
Alliance county councillors. He 
travels foe country guiding his 
flock in foe arcane arts of building 
the fragile coalitions necessary to 
seize and retain the levers of 
power. To begin with, he says, the 
two main parties were content to 
sit back and let the Alliance make 
a hash of things. Now. as they see 
the Alliance flourishing in Cam- 
bridgeshire, Wiltshire. Somerset, 
Devon and Oxfordshire, they are 
having second thoughts and seek- 
ing to muscle in. 

In Cambridgeshire, for instance, 
the Conservatives have agreed on 
a spending programme with foe 
Alliance for next year. Now the 
onus is on Labour, which, backed 
Alliance nominations for the 
committee chairmanships, to de- 
cide whether it will enter a three- 
way coalition. 

Le Breton says: “Our two 
opponents have been a bit fazed 
by our success and. more im- 
portantly, by the fret that the local 
newspapers constantly go on 
about foe 'Alliance counriT. 
Nationally, he says. Alliance con- 
trol has pushed up spending by 
between 2 and 3 per cent in real 
terms, mostly on education and 
social services. 

Budget time is usually crunch 
time in this uncertain world. In 
Cumbria and Leicestershire, the 
Tories resigned their chairman- 
ships when they were unable to get 
their proposals through. And in 
Humberside they were voted ouL 
In Avon, the Alliance’s flirtation 
with Labour rule proved short- 
lived. Now the Alliance and foe 
Tories operate the dizzy system of 
rotating chains 

Paving the way for 
an election assault 
on Westminster 

But, says Je Breton, foe “old 
pals’ act” lives on. In Warwick- 
shire, for instance, tbe two older 
parties combined to support the 
election of a Labour left-winger, 
who had rebelled against his own 
party's budget proposals, to the 
chairmanship of the powerful 
schools sub-committee. 

Neil Carter of Bath University, 
in his survey of three AUiance-ran 
minority councils — Wiltshire, 
Somerset and Devon — gives one 
of tbe few independent verdicts on 
hung councils. He concludes that 
against afl the. odds they do work, 
although whether they will do so 
for much longer depends on wider 
political developments. The 
approaching general election may 
compel both Labour and the 
Conservatives to stop co-operat- 
ing with their n§w rival for power. 

Perhaps they will have little 
option given the way foe Alliance, 
especially its metropolitan-bred 
5DP wing, is exploiting its new- 
found power bases for national 
political ends. The number of SDP 
councillors has risien from 100 in 
1982 to 524 today. 

John Cartwright MP for Wool- 
wich and foe party's local govern- 
ment spokesman, spelled out the 
way forward: “Because we are a 
new political force, largely without 
geographic or class concentrations 
of support we need to build at 
local government level if we are to 
succeed in parliamentary elec- 
tions. 

“Ifthe voters first learn to trust 
us at ward level then see us 
succeeding in control of their 
councils, they will be more likely 
to trust us when it comes to 
national elections. Our councillors 
are in many ways the vanguard of 
our movement They are carving 
out foe political territory which 
\ the rest of the party can then build 
on. They are but to prove foal 
Alliance government works.” 

About a quarter of the 202 SDP 
prospective parliamentary can-' 
didates are councillors or have 
had council experience. For 'many, 
pavement politics could stretch all 
foe way to Westminster. 

. The author is political reporter of 
The Times.- . - - 


expose their ecclesiastical authors 
with no more quarter than they 
would give a politician. 

Charles Moore offers another 
example of ecclesiastical use of 
rhetoric — tike the rhetoric of care, 
of quite worldly origins — that of 
experiment. In The Church in 
Crisis, written with AJ^J. Wilson 
and Gavin Stamp, he explains 
bow those wanting to change the 
Church's liturgy learned — 
through the experience of the 1928 
Revised Prayer Book being re- 
jected by Parliament — “that 
attempts, at liturgical change 
should not be so straightforwardly 
presented to Parliament; they 
should be introduced piecemeal”, 
that is u nstraigh tforwaidl y. More- 
over they should not be in- 
troduced as a change, with all the 
threats entailed for devotees of the 
1662 Prayer Book, but as an 
“experiment”. 

The “experiment” is one of foe 
great manoeuvres in tire social 
manipulator’s handbook. It was 
used to great effect by advocates of 
comprehensive schools. It has 
been used to justify tbe govern- 
ment’s current propaganda on 
drug abuse. It works best on the 
middle classes, which warm to its 
suggestion of tolerance — those 
who dislike the experiment can 
continue, meanwhile, with their 
preferred practice- coupled with 
rationality: an "experiment”. Just 
the right sound — “positive”, 
“constructive” an attempt to “do 
something” about a problem, 
without, of course, forcing anyone. 
It is also humble the proposer 
does not suggest he knows the 
answer.- - 

In the case of liturgical change. 
Dr Ramsey, the then Archbishop 
of Canterbury, intoned the magic 
speU. “Parliament was only being 
asked to allow a limited, indeed a 
modest, degree of automony 
..to sanction new forms of 
worship. . . for limited experi- 
mental periods.” Bat the word 
does not have to be used for tbe 
spell to work. The rhetoric of 
experiment works wherever 
apparently moderate change is 
valued- 

Genuine experiments are a good 
thing: that is the source of tbe 
rhetoric's power. But most social 


leria of success or frilure. 

Indeed That is why such sooti 
manipulations are not ge n uine 
exnenments but hunches ana 
preferences clothed in the fhetonc 
of experimentation. Rhetorically 
secure, they are al so sociall y 
secure for, during the experiment, 
foe experimenters establish them- 
selves in powerful positions. They 
become the vested interest. 

What is the reverse manoeuvre? 
How can an opponent of social 
/• frany advanced under foe rh eto- 
ric of experimentation defeat the 
undefeatable? By placing the 
(impossible) burden of proof on 
those advocating change. “You 
may have your experiment but 
after a fixed time you must prove, 
conclusively, that it has worked; 
not we that it hasn't” — foe 
measures of success to be staled 
explicitly before foe experiment. 
Any failure must be admitted as 
publicly as the reform was can- 
vassed and anyone who suffers 
from the failure compensated. 
Advocates of change should abo 
be required to explain bow, in the 
event of failure, they would wind 
up the institutions and pacify and 
compensate the interests the 
experiment has created. 

Such conditions were not ex- 
acted in the case of lituigical 
reform or indeed in tbe case of 
many of foe targets of The Church 
in Crair such as synodical govern- 
ment itseffi surely an experiment 
at least in the sense that no one 
knew bow or even if it would 
work. One would not have ex- 
pected the reformers to accept 
such a burden of proof; but had 
the challenge been vigorously 
made, “experiment” might have 
been exposed for the rhetorical 
manoeuvre it appears to have 
been. 

Oh, and when you challenge a 
rhetorical experimenter, try using 
a tittle integrity rhetoric “Fm sure 
you are very sincere in your 
proposed experiment so you mil 
want It to meet all the conditions 
of a genuine experiment . . .” 

The author is Director of theSocuA 
Affairs unit The Church in Crisis 
is published by Hodder&Stougi* . 
ton (£635). 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Almost another 
bluebell line 


Having helped make television 
programmes about railways, and 
being cursed with a penchant for 
trains and stations generally, I foul 
myself accused from time to time 
of being a train buffi which is one 
of those deadly accusations tike 
being called a jazz fan, or opera 
enthusiast, or sports follower, that 
anyone in their right mind should 
reject, even when true. And yet it 
is certainly true that I spent years, 
of my youth beside a railway line 
in Wales, and who but a train buff 
in the making would do that? 

HI tell you who. A botanist I 
realize now, looking back, that for 
98 per cent of that time there was 
never a train to be seen. The 
spitting of steam was a luxury; 
most of foe time you wouldn’t 
have foe faintest idea you were 
anywhere near a railway line, 
because all you could bear was the 
ringing of birds and the sighing of 
the wind in foe trees. (It was a very 
I»etty stretch of tine, just where 
the Cheshire plains stop and the 
Welsh hills start.) So to stave off 
boredom I used to ramble up 
through the woods or down to the 
valley of the River Alyn. idly 
studying what lay beneath my feet 
and- even, eventually, buying a 
flower guide to go along with foe 
train-spotting manua ls. 

Yes, if it hadn't been for the 
Great Western Railway. I prob- 
ably wouldn't have picked up a 
working knowledge of wild flow- 
ers. Up in the woods there were 
great acres of bluebells at the right 
time of year, and celandines, and 
wood anenomes, and blackberries 
later on. Down in the wetter, land 
by tbe river there were kingcups, 
which for a while I though were 
buttercups that had done some 
weight-lifting; there were cowslips, 

there were primroses and, the ones 
1 liked best, foe pale lady's smock 
which I used to pick to take home 
to Mum, until I realized that 
nothing wilts as fast as a freshly 
picked lady’s smock. Except a 
violet 

I'd forgotten about all this until 
a couple of months ago, when idle 
curiosity took me down to tbe 
latest ImerCity railway station in 
London. At long last British Rail 
has just started making use of the 
line which goes right through 
London, north to south, so you 
can now go direct from. Brighton 
to Liverpool, or is it Dover to 
Manchester? Anyway, if you want 
to get off in London, you stop at 
Kensington Olympia; . It’s .not 


exactly Euston or Victoria, facil- 
ity-wise; in fret, it’s more like an 
old-style country station, es- 
pecially if you look north into the 
mysterious green cutting which 
heads up to WDfesden, Watford 
and the north. 

It’s also like a country station in 
that trains pull through only every 
hajfhour or so, stopping briefly for 
an exchange of hostages and then 
sliding off again. Waiting aim- 
lessly for a train to arrive, I 
wandered curiously up through 
foe large car park which now 
occupies most of foe old station, 
and bingo! I found myself in..a 
nature reserve again. There’s a 
large patch there of what devel- 
opers call waste land or what you 
and I would call a wild-flower 
sanctuary, so isolated foal you 
ran’t hear any noise of traffic, only ■ 
the singing of birds and tbe sighing 
of wind in the trees ... 

It was childhood revisited. 
Mark you, they haven’t got foe 
range of flowers that was on offer 
in my childhood, but they have, 
got some very handsome speed- 
weu, and flourishing buddfeia 
with foe accompanying butterflies, 
and herb robot, and the classy 
purple and yellow blooms of the 
woody nightshade, which I always 
thought a most under-rated 
flower, probably because it was 
poisonous, and old man's beard, 
and something which I think is 
ailed stimulus, though I shall 
have to look that up. And what 
Jhey. have got most of is black- 
bttnes, great sheaves of juicy. 

•SJasSSiW 

sssgessae 

riutable for taking home and 
converting mto black lustrous 
Syrup hke North Sea oil 
4u}~L yo ' 1 ' v>hcn I'fcst found 

2*? until they had ripened. Now 
22 ¥, ve s fil 1 teve picked as 

^yhtedfoemttasIcMhandS . 

M * don't min/f 


I don't mind mentioning my 
print, even MtherisJ 

of fining, No Jounudhisor 

gTKwyar/i-' 

mnidleotWesSjo 6 ™ m 




Cj 








F 


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K *-Vr.- 

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1 Pen nington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-4S1 4100 

CORDON SANTTAIRE 


J* 11 - 24 hours after 
Prune Minister Jacques Chirac 
declared war on terrorism, the 
terrorists .demonstrated their 
contempt for GaulHst resolve 
by Wowing up . police head- 
quarters in Paris. For a govern- 
ment dedicated to the 
enforcement of law and order 
this was perhaps the cnfellest 
blow of a deeply embar rassing 
campaign.. 

In- recent; years the French 
have reacted to international 
terrorism in much the same 
way. as has everyone else, in 
shocked ' bewilderment — 
Wondering from conciliation 
to confrontation and back 
again. In 1982 the government 
oflhe day did a deal with Abu 
NkM when it released two 
prisoners on parole at the 
earliest opportunity. A year 
later it retaliated after the 
horrific slaughter of French 
troops iir Lebanon, by. bomb- 
ing the Bekaa : Valley. But 
earlier this year American F- 
1 11s raiding Libya had to fly in 
an' expensive arc across the 
Atlantic to avoid French air 
space — a lack -of hospitality 
which they bitterly resented. 

Now an extremist group 
demanding the release of a 
jailed Lebanese, serving four 
years on an arms charge (while 
awaiting, trial for murde-X 
inflicts almost daily carnage in 
the\ streets' of the French 
capital. What should the 
Chirac government do? 

One thing it should not do, 
of bourse, is to givein. For the 


government to treat with the 
terrorists would win it only 
temporary respite — until the 
next lime that they wanted its 
“cooperation.” (Surprising . 
though it might be, there have 
been reports that some weeks 
ago M. Chirac was on the point 
of giving in by freeing the 
imprisoned Georges Abdallah, 
and had to be restrained by 
President Mitterrand himself) 

Nor should the government 
-allow French policy in die 
- Levant to be dictated byShi'ite 
Arab extremists who continue 
to exact a toll on French and 
other troops stationed there 
with the UN. 

So far the French counter- 
terrorist forces have been less 
than impressive. Internal 
rivalries and a preoccupation 
with public image-making 
have misdirected their efforts, 
leading too often to abortive 
operations. But the Chirac 
government’ s measures an- 
nounced on Sunday should 
strengthen their hand. 

These measures will admit- 
tedly impose inconvenience 
on those entering France and 
those who move around the 
country. That it is a small price 
to pay for greater public safety, 
and the steps taken have been 
generally welcomed. But they 
will need to be accompanied 
by better intelligence than has 
so far been evident, and exe- 
cuted by a patient and vigilant 
police force. In these respects 
the French could learn from 
this country, whose public and 


police — particularly in Ulster 
— have learnt by hard experi- 
ence. 

There is no panacea, as Sir 
Geoffrey Howe rightly pointed 
out in Brussels yesterday while 
co nfir ming that European in- 
ternal ministers, at the special 
behest of France, would hold a 
special “Trevi Group” meet- 
ing on counter-terrorism on 
September 25. But the mea- 
sures announced by M Chirac, 
restricting entry to France 
from all except EC countries, 
will be of limited value unless 
other Community countries 
implement something similar. 

Until comparatively re- 
cently, ext remis t groups acted 
directly, so that foe men who 
laid foe plans then planted the 
bombs themselves. This 
meant that when forces cap- 
tured foe guilty men they cut 
out foe cancer altogether — at 
least for a time. But the 
experience of recent years has 
led to a greater sophistication 
among foe pursued as well as 
foe pursuers. The men behind 
the atrocities of today are 
many miles away from the 
scene of the crime, surviving 
to plan the next one. 

Such men cannot be conclu- 
sively beaten by one country 
alone — not even by the Euro- 
pean Community. But EC 
collaboration is a pre-requisite 
which the French are now 
learning to appreciate. It is one 
for all and all for one — in a 
French tradition. 


BURYING THE HATCHETS 


The warm reception which foe 
Social Democrats gave to Mr 
David Steel yesterday was 
morea response to his careful 
concern ' to. diminish con- 
troversy between the Alliance 
parties than to his self-con- 
fident affability. There is gen- 
eral agreement within foe SDP 
thar foe sharper edges of 
difference between themselves 
and foe ..Liberals : must be 
softened in preparation for the - 
general election.' and the Lib- * 
era! leader showed once more 
that 1 he intends to lact as .an- 
emollient within the Alliance 
relationship, which' is riot . ex- ; 
actly the fonctionfor which Dr 
Owen is best known. . 

Mr Steel spoke in unremark- 
able. and. for Alliance 
consumption, unexcep- 
tionable terms of the two 
parties' future as an in- 
strnmenffor “intense change 
in our society.” He also sen- 
sibly avoided any direct ref- 
erence to' the still simmering 
question of a possible future 
merger between the allies. A 
merger .will not -happen this 
side of foe election and may 
never happen afterwards. Yet 
to merge or not to merge 
remains foe fundamental issue 
within the parties and -Mr Steel 
could not refrain from one 
phrase which reveals him as an 
unrepentant merger! st. 

Ttae Alliance was “here to 
stay,” he said, and its strength 
was that it was “an alloy 
superior to the sum of its 
original parts.” But what is an 


alloy but a kind of merger of 
substances which are for prac- 
tical purposes thereafter in- 
separable? Still, poetic imagery 
in politics does not give hos- 
tages to fortune and on the' 
more immediate question 
which bedevils foe Liberal- 
SDP relationship, defence pol- 
icy, he certainly said what 
most of his Social Democratic 
audience wanted to hear. - 

At the weekend, the SDP 
conference had defused the 
row between -Dr. Owen’s 
jsupporters on foe one hand, 
and. on the other Mr William 
Rodgers and bis friends who 
had agreed (in a policy 
consultation with foe Liberals) 
in seeing no need for a pre- 
election commitment to re- 
place' Polaris. But the 
Conference has now decisively 
glossed foe policy Dr Owen’s 
way by a commitment (agreed 
with Mr Steel) to seek a 
replacement for Polaris in foe 
shape of a “minimum Euro- 
pean deterrent” This may well 
prove impractical, if only on 
grounds of expense. It is a 
policy devoid of details and as 
the election nears it could look 
less and less credible. 

Still, what matters to Dr 
Owen is that the idea is a way 
of keeping the'British commit- 
ment to nuclear defence alive, 
and what matters to Mr Steel is 
that it is a way of defusing a ’ 
potentially dangerous Liberal- 
SDP quarrel. He therefore 
specifically underwrote it yes- 


terday, together with an ab- 
solute commitment to a united 
Alliance defence policy. To 
make this the more palatable 
to those in his party who want 
nothing at all to do with 
nuclear defence, be stressed 
that the European defence 
pillar within Nato would free 
Britain from dependence on 
the White House. Indeed he 
was spealdng as much to his 
own Liberal Party (part of 
whose Assembly wd] challenge 
his approach hard next week) 
as to his SDP audience. 

Mr Steel looks confident — 
and understandably so. In 
party terms he is inn stronger 
position than Dr Owen. Mr 
Steel not only has his own 
party behind him; he eqjoys 
foe support of the Jenlonsite 
SDP mergerists. Dr Owen has 
no comparable Liberal friction 
behind him and is under stress 
in his party. He knows too that 
since the Liberals are likely to 
get the larger number of seats, 
Mr Steel would be Alliance 
leader if there were a merger. 
But though Mr Steel’s position 
is the more comfortable in 
party terms. Dr Owen’s 
strength is as a politician able 
to understand and respond to 
the public’s instincts and to 
political reality in a manner 
hardly within Mr Steel’s grasp. 
Yesterday Mr Steel again 
showed himself as a skilled 
manager of party politics, but 
there is more to political 
success than that. 


POLAND’S SPRING BY INSTALMENTS 

leges has undoubtedly afflicted 


Poland’s amnesty for political 
prisoners announced at the 
end of last week has been 
welcomed by many, not least 
by foe families of those who 
have been released. It is a sign 
of hope for. Poland that the 
regime has brought itself to 
return to freedom people 
whose only crime was to 
express public opposition to 
foe self-appointed communist 
party. . . . 

But the amnesty is distinctly 
doubled-edged- It also has 
propaganda value for General 
Jaruzeiski. Not only is he now 
in a position to say that Poland 
has no. political prisoners. He 
can also boast that the present 
stale of the country is such that 
there is no need to hold 
political prisoners. His task — ■ 
foe pacification of post- 
Solidarity Poland — will seem 

to have been achieved. 

To the surprise of some, 
those symbols of the Polish 
opposition who did not benefit 
from the earlier amnesty - 
Zbigniew Bujak ana 
Wladyslaw Frasyniuk — have 
now been released. For them, 
the new amnesty is something 
of a moral victory: they have 
gained their freedom without 
renouncing their opposition to 
the regime. At foe same time, 
by ceasing to be prisoners, 
their status as Solidarity sym- 
bols may be diminished. 

Nor will they have any 
illusions about the Perma- 
nence of their freeedotn. while 
foe amnesty was being an- 
nounced, police were warning 
the hundreds of underground 

activists still at liberty to be 
careful: church leaders were 


warned to watch their step. 
Given these restraints, the 
situation of those now freed is 
more akin to bail. The release 
of 225 political prisoners lays 
2 25 people open to arrest 
again. 

The whole exercise served to 
reinforce foe unspoken bar- 
gain that emerged from the 
Polish Communist Party Con- 
gress earlier this yean if foe 
Party is allowed its primacy, 
the people wifi be allowed their 
liberty, and the possibility of 
better living standards. Yet 
underground representatives 
have already indicated that 
they will not halt their activ- 
ities. The bargain is unlikely to 
be kept — by either side. 

The amnesty, however, is 
more than the striking of a 
domestic bargain. It is also a 
gesture towards world opin- 
ion, particularly opinion in the 
United States. As such, it is a 
reflection of the Polish 
regimes need to retrieve foe 
international favour it enjoyed 
before martial law five years 
ago and to recover foe eco- 
nomic advantages which ac- 
crued from it. 

Just over a week ago, Poland 
received foe most senior 
American official to have vis- 
ited since martial law: 
Congressman Stephen Solaiz. 
He was in Warsaw to assess 
whether Poland had made any 
progress towards dismantling 
the accoutrements of martial 
law, and if it had, whether it 
had done enough to justify foe 
restoration of Poland's trading 
privileges. 

The removal of these privi- 


foe Polish economy. Poland’s 
foreign debts have grown; all 
its hard currency revenue is 
now taken up servicing debts. 
The restrictions on Polish food 
exports after Chernobyl came 
as a further Now to foe Polish 
exchequer and Polish national 
pride. And foe zloty has just 
been devalued by another 17 
per cent against foe dollar in 
an attempt to make remaining 
exports more competitive. 

The release of all political 
prisoners was one of the 
original conditions set by foe 
.United States for restoring 
Poland’s Most Favoured Na- 
tion Status. But it was not foe 
only condition. There was also 
a reference to the restoration 
of normality in Poland. And 
one recent development sug- 
gests that is some way off 

Immediately before Mr 
Solarz’s visit, the Polish 
authorities announced that a 
scheme to provide Western 
financial support for Poland’s 
private fanners, a . scheme 
much cherished by the Polish 
church and by Solidarity, bad 
been abandoned after four 
years of negotiations. 

That imaginative plans of 
this kind proved impossible to 
realize illustrates foe still lim- 
ited capacity of the Polish 
economy, and the Polish sys- 
tem in general, for change. The 
authorities in Warsaw may 
have hoped that their amnesty 
would offset this failure. 
Whether Mr Solaiz and his 
American colleagues will — or- 
should - see progress in that 
hope is quite another matter. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Fighting terrorism 

From Mr Lionel Bloch 
Sir, Mr Robert Fisk cfaims 
(September 8) that the latest 
terrorist outrages in Karachi and 
Istanbul are mere episodes in an 
unending cycle of violence, fuelled 
by a natural emotion to call for 
revenge. This argument is com- 
pletely unconvincing. 

Far from proving that retali- 
ation won't work, it merely con- 
firms that half-hearted ami- 
terrorist measures .are ineffective. 
International terrorism has flour- 
ished in open societies precisely 
because the killers knew that they 
had a fair chance of survival We 
allowed Leila Khaled to leave this 
country unpunished, just as later 
on we allowed the assassins of the 
Libyan Embassy who killed WPC 
Fletcher to return to their country 
under the cloak of diplomatic 

immunity 

The Greek. Turkish, Italian and 
other governments have entered 
into unofficial understanding with 
terrorist groups and released qui- 
etly a number of murderers in the 
hope of gaining some peace in 
tbeir cities, without much success. 
Even the Israelis released last year 
over 1.000 Palestinian prisoners 
including some 400 condemned 
terrorists in exchange for three of 
their captured soldiers, hoping 
that this may lead to a better 
atmosphere in the Middle EasL 

Mr Fisk wants us to believe that 


in open societies 

because the Palestinians were 
defeated in the field, the emer- 
gence of suicidal killers was an 
inevitable development. He for- 
gets that in this context 
“inevitable” merely means that 
which is not avoided. 

The Poles have many reasons to 
be and are in fact as desperate as 
the Palestinians will ever be. So 
are many other East Europeans 
living in the shadow of the Red 
Army. How comes it that there are 
no suicidal killers on ihe other side 
of the Iron Curtain? The standard 
liberal reply to this question is. 
“do you want us to be as ruthless 
as a communist?” This reaction 
concedes that terrorism is in feet 
avoidable. 

More important perhaps, it 
should be dear feat terrorism 
could be decisively defeated 
within the framework of our 
democratic institutions. Unlike 
totalitarian regimes, our govern- 
ments have the mandate to defend 
our way of life. The alternative 
implicit in Mr Fisk's analysis is to 
allow the terrorists, and those who 
organise and harbour them, to 
escape unpunished and thus 
encourage the proliferation of this 
deadly form of warfare. 

Yours faithfully. 

LIONEL BLOCH, 

9 Wimpole Street. W]. 

September 10. 


Salisbury’s past 

From Mrs L. Kinder 
Sir, Along with Milton Keynes 
and Telford, Salisbury is one of 
this country's new towns. It differs 
from other new developments in 
that it was established some 7 00 
years ago with much of its former 
life and times still to be revealed. 
A once-and-for-all-tim e opportu- 
nity to discover how our new- 
town ancestors lived is to hand but 
can only be realised if all con- 
cerned are prepared to make this 
possible. 

When the city's open sewer 
system was made hygienic in the 
1850s the throw-away artefacts of 
600 years were gathered together 
and can now be seen in the toe re- 
housed Salisbury and South Wilt- 
shire Museum. There is every 
reason to believe the excavation of 
house and trade sites in the same 
area will be equally rewarding. Yet 
there is every danger that this 
history from the ground will be 
lost for ever: 

Some developers show every 
interest, making available time on 
site and money for the work. 
Unfortunately, this cannot be said 
of alL . 

English;- Heritage has Hnufed 
funding .for rescue archaeology- 


and it therefore concentrates on 
projects of national ' significance; 
The Historic Buildings and Monu- 
ments Commission us declared 
the archaeology of Salisbury to be 
of national importance yet recent 
applications for funding have been 
turned down. The Urban Rescue- 
Committee of the Council for 
British Archaeology has identified 
medieval Salisbury as bring wor- 
thy of designation as an area of 
archaeological importance under 
the Ancient Monuments and 
Archaeological Areas Act. 

Salisbury is one of our most 
visited tourist centres and those 
who live or work there and have 
its future in their care expect more 
responsibility to be shown than 
this. The county and district 
councils have played their part 
and some developers have 
contributed towards a recording of 
the city’s pasL 

Is it too late erven now to induce 
those who are saying “no” to be 
more constructive about our her- 
itage and say “yes”? 

Yours faithfully. 

LINDA KINDER (Chairman, 
Salisbury Archaeological Steering 
Group), 

67 Marlborough Road, 

Wooton Bassett, 

Swindon. Wiltshire. 


Control of design 

From Mr John S. Anderson 
Sir, I am pleased that Michad 
Manser shows some concern 
about the erosion of our planning 
system (article, August 30) but his 
argument for change is mis- 
directed. I believe his case should 
rest not upon the planning process 
itself but on the way in which, in 
some instances, it is operated. 

This country has one of the 
fin«a planning systems in the 
world, if not the best Few people 
relish the thought of returning to 
the conditions of the 1950s, when 
we lost so many of our historic 
buildings because of inadequate 
protection; a loss which, setting 
aside aesthetic considerations, 
represents a serious depletion of 
the stock in trade of the economi- 
cally vital tourist industry. 

Control is needed, and must 
include control of design. Un- 
fortunately planning shares the 
weakness of other decision-mak- 
ing processes: ir is always easiest to 
maintain the status qua 

Today there is much talk: all 
possible options may be aired, but 
effective decisions are often put 
off until expediency dictates and 
the element of the choice is lost. 
Tinkering with decision-making 
machinery avoids the real issue, 
which is of people being prepared 
to accept the responsibility of 
making a decision. Reluctance to 
do so may be the result of our 


allowing loss of popularity to 
become the ultimate offence in 
public life. 

To act upon bold and more 
positive decisions may be to risk 
public criticism —even the terrify- 
ing possibility of academic ridi- 
cule: but to preserve the status quo 
is, in plain terms, to do nothing, 
and possibly to lose the opportu- 
nity of regeneration. 

In planning terms it should be 
remembered that many valued 
buildings owe their continuing 
existence and cumulative interest 
to the ongoing metamorphosis 
deriving from the enterprise of 
successive generations merely liv- 
ing and working and adapting to 
circumstances. The planning sys- 
tem, as it exists at present, 
recognises that to halt this process 
is to admit that we have nothing 
worth adding to the achievements 
of the past 

Nevertheless, where confidence 
and vision are lacking it may be 
used mistakenly, invoking stagna- 
tion by prohibiting change. 

The answer to the problem may 
lie in the direction of expanded 
dialogue among the interested 
professions, and a greater liberal- 
ity in tbeir respective training 
programmes and continuing pro- 
fessional development. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN S. ANDERSON, 

The Old Stables. 

Harston. Grantham. Lincolnshire. 


Killing of Cossacks 


From Dr Robert Knight 
Sir, John Grigg’s support (feature, 
August 23) of Nikolai Tolstoy's 
argument about the forced repatri- 
ation of Cossack prisoners at the 
end of the war misread my 
argument I never claimed that. 
** Macmillan did not necessarily 
kooW'it would be against Anglo- 
American policy to hand over 
Cossacks who were not Soviet 
citizens." 

I argued, first, that there had 
been no discussion of the Cossack 
emigres before Macmillan arrived 
in Klagenfuru secondly, that he 
was not informed of a Soviet 
request to hand over leading 
Cossacks including some frnigr&s; 
and thirdly, that, as his diary 
shows.' he thought he had agreed to 
no more- than “scrupulous 
adherence” of the Yalta agree- 
ment. 

finally, if the handovers were 
immoral — as Tolstoy (letter, 
September 8) no doubt believes — 
then ibe blame lies with the British 
Government of the time and the 
point about the 3.000 emigres is 
rrrievanL To hand over 42,000 
people to death or imprisonment 
is not conspicuously less immoral 
than to hand over 45.000, what- 
ever their nationality may be. 
Yours sincerely. 

R. KNIGHT. 

10 Hever Place, 

Canterbury. Kent 


The final paragraph of yesterday's 
letter from Mr raul Ashton and Miss 
Baksho Sandhu should have read: 
“We feel sure that £100 million 
spent in this way would save many 
more babies than the net 70-80 lives 
that might be saved by mass neo- 
natal screening for MCAD 
deficiency". 


Sight-singing 

From Mr Tim Friendship HiU 
Sir. I note with interest the report 
in today's Times that all foreign 
songs shown on French televirion 
must carry French sub-titles. 

When ( worked in Brussels a few 
years ago I used occasionally to go 
to the cinema, where foreign 
language films were shown with 
the original sound track, but sub- 
titled in French and Dutch. 

One film I saw was set in small- 
town America in the late 1950s 
and the sound track included pop 
songs of the period. The song 
lyrics were also translated as well 
as ibe dialogue. 

One song contained the line, 
“Now we are breaking up". This 
was rendered, memorably if un- 
romanti tally, on the sub-title as 
Mointenant . nous axons une rup- 
ture. 

Yours faithfully. 

TIM FRIENDSHIP HILL. 

30 Franklin Avenue. 

Tadley. 

Basingstoke. Hampshire. 
September 5. 

Forms of address 

From Mr William Rodney 
Sir, Now that The Times is 
published in two parts, how do 
your readers address themselves 
to the paper? 

I always scan the headlines, then 
proceed to read die first section in 
reverse order, starting, of course, 
with its last page. 

Yours feithfullv, 

WILLIAM RODNEY, Dean, 
Faculty of Arts, 

Royal Roads Military College, 
FMO Victoria, 

BC, Canada. 

September! 


Credit transfer 
delay by banks 

From Mr G. C. Hurst 
Sir. When banks depended upon 
post and rail transport to pass 
information from one brand) to 
another or to another bank, it was 
reasonable that they should re- 
quire some days for each trans- 
action —although they did seem to 
take their tune over n. 

It is less forgivable that they still 
require the same time to elapse 
between a debit occurring at one 
account and a credit anting at 
another, even with the informa- 
tion moving at the speed of light 
When we receive a transfer of 
funds from overseas banks by 
cable they arrive at a London 
branch of our bank on the day the 
customer pays, but although the 
only operation is deduction of 
charges the bank still finds it 
necessary to take two or three days 
to credit. 

Paying staff by transfer, even to 
local banks, has to be arranged 
three days in advance of their pay 
day. as they will not see their 
money until two full days after h 
has been debited from our ac- 
count. 

I am (eft with the thought that 
having increased the speed of 
information handling by use of 
computers, the banks’ directors 
realised with horror that they were 
about to lose three days' unearned 
interest on every movement of 
funds. The easy answer was not to 
move them around too quickly 
and to stick together. 

Yours faithfully, 

G. C HURST. 

Surrey Roll Leaf Limited, 
Castleham Road. 

St Leonards-on-Sea, 

Sussex. 

September 2. 

Anti-apartheid film 

From Professor R. J. Fitzpatrick 
Sr, The TUC has chosen unwisely 
ihe theme of its short anti- 
apartheid propaganda film, 
namely the discrepancy in doctor- 
patient ratio for black as against 
white South Africans. 

By coincidence the film was 
released a few days after I had 
returned from an academic busi- 
ness trip, which included a visit to 
Medunsa (the Medical University 
of Southern Africa), near Pretoria, 
a new medical school. Govern- 
ment-funded on a generous scale 
and concerned, predominantly, 
with the training of black doctors, 
thereby improving the 
doctor/patient ratio. 

Medunsa was established 10 
years ago and is stiff growing; its 
dental school was completed this 
month and it is an impressive 
institute to British eyes. Whatever 
their other fenlfs, white South 
Africans must be given credit for 
providing a first-class medical 
school for black students, with 
facilities comparable to those of 
British equivalents, with a dedi- 
cated multi-racial staff under the 
leadership of a most enlightened 
chancellor. 

Yours feithfully. 

R. J. FITZPATRICK, 

The University of Liverpool. 
Veterinary Faculty, 

Leahurst, 

Neston. 

WirraL 

Merseyside. 

Sepiember5. 

Delius premiere 

From Mr Eric Fenby 
Sir. Your announcement (some 
editions. September 10) of the 
forthcoming premiere of Delius’s 
“American Rhapsody" calls for 
brief comment 

This work, written in 1896, was 
ihe composer’s first version of his 
well known “Appalachia", which 
be completed in 1901 
Remembering his fearless musi- 
cal integrity, f am in hononr 
bound to state that Delius rejected 
bis “American Rhapsody" out- 
right during an intense and 
exhausting scrutiny of all his 
unpublished MSS carried out 
scrupulously with my help over 
several months in 1931 
Yours faithfully, 

ERIC FENBY, 

35 Brookfield. 

Highgate West H3L N6. 

September 11 

The Battle of Britain 

From Dr Brian Porter 
Sir, In only four years* time we 
shall be commemorating, with its 
fiftieth anniversary, victory in the 
Battle of Britain. It seems in- 
credible, and inexcusable, that 
there is no national monument, 
such as a London statue, to the 
chief architect of that victory, a 
man who. many would bold, 
stands compare only with Nelson 
in the saving of this country in the 
field of arms. 

If Dowding and his Few are to 
receive due if belated honour in 
this form, now is the time to make 
and discuss proposals. 

Yours faithfully, 

BRIAN PORTER, 

Merville, 

Allan Road, 

Seasafter, 

Whitstable, 

Kent 

September 9. 

From Air Commodore RJe. Chis- 
holm (retd) 

Sir. How can the great victory in 
the Battle of Britain be commemo- 
rated for all times? it was an air 
victory and its commemoration 
should be so related. One idealist 
sees an emphatic memorial, a 
contemporary Arc de Triomphe, 
an archway spanning the entrance 
to our neatest airport. 

Yours feiibfully, 

R. .-fc. CHISHOLM, 

Ladywdl House, 

Alresford, 

Hampshire. 

Septembers. 


17 


ON THIS DAY 

SEPTEMBER 16, 1863 

A few letters from a typical issue of 
The Times in the second naif of 
last century - scattered about the 
pages at die whim of the printer. 

Not until Lord Northdiffe became 
proprietor in 1908 and brought 
some order to the make-up ana 
layout did “Letters to the Editor” 
appear in the form, we know them 
today 


FEES TO RAILWAY PORTERS 

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES 
Sir,— Your correspondent “A 
Clergyman," feels at a loss how to 
acquiesce in the rules of the railway 
c ompanies forbidding tees, when 
he. having a large family of 
children, experiences what he erro- 
neously considers extra attention 
and civility from the porters. 

It should be remembered that 
the porters are paid, and, consider- 
ing the nature of their duties, 
liberally paid by the company, not 
only for their time and labour, but 
for all the civility and attention 
they can show to passengers — that 
it is the especial doty of station 
porters to render every facility to 
these customers of the company, 
and that f eeing in any of that 
civility or attention which they are 
hired to give, they are liable to 

If your correspondent goes into a 
shop does be fee the shopman who 
serves him so obsequiously, or the 
porter who so civilly takes the 
purchases to the carriage? 

Civility and attention are in feet 
a portion of the value the customer 
is entitled to receive with his 
railway ticket, and in default of 
which he has good ground of 
complaint against the company, 
unless, indeed, be be a 

party to a system that must lead to 
the porters losing sight of their 
duty to the company, or perform- 
ing it only when expecting a fee. 

The best mode in which your 
correspondent can exercise his 
liberality is by subscribing to the 
Railway Benevolent Fund, as has 
been already suggested in your 
columns. 

I am. Sir, your obedient servant, 
Sept-15. 

ANOTHER RAILWAY DIRECTOR . 

A BRITISH COLONY 
I N DISTRESS 

70 THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES 
Sir,— Will you permit me, with 
your usual generosity, to make an 
appeal through your cdhimns on 
behalf of the people of the Red 
River Settlement? The mail just 
delivered brings the sad news that 
not only the crops of wheat, barley, 
lye, and oats have been wholly 
destroyed throughout the entire 
settlement by a plague of grasshop- 
pers. but that the supplies of 
buffalo have been cut off, for the 
season at all events, as there are 
none of these animals (the hunters 
had just returned from the prairies 
at the date of our last letters from 
Red River, -viz, the 7th of August) 
at present north of the Missouri 
River. These two calamities mean, 
unless assistance be at once 
forwarded, the absolute starvation 
of hundreds, and it may be 
thousands, of our fellow subjects at 
Red River during the coining 
winter. The present population of 
the settlement is about 14,000 
souls, and the nearest source of j 
supply is 450 miles distant from 
Fort Garry, so that speed in 
sending out relief is all important. 
The Hudson’s Bay Company and 
the banks connected with British 
North America win, 1 doubt not, 
readily receive subscriptions in aid 
of those for whom I am now 
making this appeal. 

I am, Sir, your obedi ent se rvant. 

THE EDITOR OF THE 

CAS ADI AS NEWS 

II CleroentVlane, 

L ombard-street, E.C. 

TO THE HJITOR OP THE TIMES. 
Sir.— 7 hope the public will now 
take the opportunity of giving the 
cabdrivexs a wholesome . lesson 
against a .threatened repetition of 
the cab strike by following my 
example. 

On returning last night from the 
theatre to my residence, a distance 
of three miles within a few yards, 1 
banded the cabdriver eighteen 
pence, and on receiving his warm 
remonstrance reminded him that if 
he could afford to strike he could 
afford to drive for his exact fare. 

The only visible effect of my 
observation was a reply in language 
consisting principally of what, I 
believe, one of our legislators calls 
■strong Saxon English”, but I 
question whether strikes would be 
frequent if the general public would 
show, as I did, that the inconve- 
nience caused by them is not 
immediately forgiven. 

I am. Sir, your obedient servant. 
Sept. 12. J. H. H. 


Identity crisis rr 

From the Reverend M. R. Kemp 
Sir, I don't seek to allow to fell into :: - 
disuse the many (delightful?) 
archaisms in our language:, or to 
threaten the continued usage of 
our “one-con text” words (the 
possibility of which was - 
humourously suggested by Miles 
Kington on September 4), but I 
am 'meeting, with increasing fire- 
quency, an objection from young “”i 
ladies who come to marry in my 
church, to the use of the word 
“spinster” to describe their 
“condition” when I write out the 
certificate of marriage. I have to 
say that brides are bridling at 
being called spinsters. . “ 

I expect I should need official *y 
consent to the use ofan alternative 
word, but 1 cannot myself think of 
what would be acceptable to the 
modem young bride. Can your 
readers, especially the young la- ;• 

dies who are themselves Il 

contemplating matrimony, please 
suggest an acceptable word? , .... 
Yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL KEMP. 

St Chad’s Vicarage. 

Linden Avenue. ? -• 

Norton Woodseats. . ., 

Sheffield. South Yorkshire. 


THE 


TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


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. FOR personal computer manu- 
. facturers, the 386 represents “a 
major step up in performance 
! capability, without sacrificing 
compatibility,” says Mike 
Swavely, marketing viee presi- 
' dent of Compaq Computer, the 
leading US manufacturer of 
IBM-compatible personal com- 
puters. 

Compaq is expected to be one 
of the first major personal com- 
puter vendors to introduce a 
386-based system. Although the 
company will not say exactly 
when it will launch the new 
computer, industry reports 
. suggest that it may come as 
early as next month. This 
would give Compaq an easy lead 
over IBM, which is not expected 
to introduce a 386-based com- 
puter until next year. 

The' 386 is ideally suited to the 
personal computer market 
because it can run the wealth 
of . software . applications 
designed forthe IBM PC, but 
IBM’s tardiness ^ak 


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Oh well, people were bound to talk. The 386 
microchip is big news. 

it has the potential to address an awesome 
4,000,000,000 bytes of working memory 

It can also run your present industry-standard 
software two to three times faster than today's 
fastest desktops. 

So we weren't surprised when the Rnancial Times 
came sleuthing round to see if we really were 
building a 386 based machine. 


We hemmed, we hawed, we beat about the bush, 

but they wouldn't take 'no comment' for an answer 
As you can see, they drew their awn conclusions. 

Now, while we would dispute that a tortoise is 
an apt symbol for a company that made the fastest 
ever entry into the Fortune 500, we can no longer 
deny the rumours. 

You see, this week we launched the most 
advanced personal computer ever made, the 
COMPAQ Deskpro 386“ CO/HPAamM 


We'll never cease to amaze you. 


reFFPOST COMPAQ FREEPOST iBS 333) BRISTOL BSl 4YP TELEPHONE 0830444 123 COM fflQ* ISA REGISTERED TRADEMARK AND COM RAQDESKPRO 386™ ISA TRADEMARK OF COMPAQ C0MPUIB21JD 




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THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 








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COMPUTER HORIZONS/1 


Edited by Matthew May 


Publish 
desk-top 
and be 
saved 

By Claire Tyerman 
In just over a year, desk-top 


a luxury for the few to a reality 
in many offices throughout the 
world. 

The users vary from “one 
man and his dog" publications 
to mnlti-national corporati o n* ?. 

Desk-top publishing cannot 
be defined merely in terms ol 
equipment It is really an 
extension of word processing; 
a publishing process suitable 
for individuals or «wmli 
groups, bat which does not 
need unique skills nor cost the 
earth to set up. 

Until now the leader in n»wf 
last-moving field has been 
Apple. The Apple Macintosh 
with appropriate software and 
a laser printer can be used to 
make up pages for reports, 
mannals and magazines; IBM 
is now starting to take a place 
in the market, although the 
real explosion amid happen 
next year when firms such as 
Rank Xerox and Wang make 
their debut into desk-top 

The US computer magazine, 
PC World, has just brought 
out a supplement which 
specifically covers the topic of 
desk-top publishing. Natu- 
rally, the technology itself is 
used to write, edit and produce 
the supplement. Called Pub- 
lish, it will soon be a magazine 
in its own right 

In Britain several in-house 
magazines are starting to use 
desk-top systems for produc- 
tion from copy input to layout 
The number of desk-top 
publishers will increase as the 
price of the equipment tolls 
from the present cost of about 
£ 6 , 000 . 

Already the days of the 
traditional typed parish magar 
zinc or community newsletter 
appear nnmbered. The 
possibility of home publishing 
could herald the age of a new 
breed of publication: a maga- 
zine or newspaper which tolls 
somewhere between die typed 



Apple's desk-fop publishing 
system in use for a student 
newspaper daring the Edin- 
burgh Games 

newsletter and the glossy 
magazine. 

It will give community 
groups and specialist societies 
with low budgets the chance to 
bring out publications of a 
professional standard. 

The quality is such that a 
desk-lop publication, in tech- 
nical terms at least, could be 
sold commercially. 

At present there is no real 
threat to the local papers, 
weekly publications and 
glossy monthlies from desk- 
top publishing. Though the 
quality of text is good, the 
incorporation of photographs 
still has to be done pro- 
fessionally to get an accept- 
able result and desk-top 
publishing does not provide a 
facility for colour. 

‘ It may be necessary to spend 
some time for users to get to 
know the system before good, 
clear and readable page lay- 
outs can be made. 

But how long will desk-top 
publishing sit in this niche 
between the typed newsletter 
and professional publications? 

Changes in the computer 
industry tend to be rapid. Tfeis 
year it is possible to produce a 
magazine with a limited num- 
ber of pages and typefaces in 
Mack and white. By the end of 
the year the number of type- 
faces available will have in- 
creased, as will the maximum 
number of pages which can be 
printed. 

There will be more systems 
with more “special" features 
to choose from . 

One dissenting voice m all 
this is Steve Jobs, the former 
chairman of Apple, who says 
that desk-top publishing as a 
specific new market will 
disappear in less than two 
years as new features are 
added to ordinary word- 
processing packages that can 
do exactly the same. 


New power 



boosts the PCs 


The next generation of business 
computers based on a powerful new 
chip have started to pul in an 
appearance with the claim that they 
will yet again revolutionize parts of 
the business world and the work of 
computer stafffay the beginning of the 

Both the successful makers of IBM 
clones. Compaq and the British 
company Rain have launched the 
first models to use the innovative 366 
processor manufactured by Intel. 

Unlike current 16-bit personal 
com puters they will process 32 bits of 
data at a time allowing desktop 
computers to run much fester and 
handle far greater volumes of com- 
puter memory and storage. 

Compaq says its two new models, 
the Desk pro 386/40 and 130. can run 
current industry-standard programs 
two to three times fester than current 
personal computers, but admit that 
the appeal is somewhat limited until 



I 


THE WEEK 




By Matthew May 


future operating systems and com- 
puter applications are developed to 
take full advantage of the new 
technology. 

It has a 16-megaherz processing 
speed, compared to eight for the IBM 
PC. up to 14 megabytes of random 
access memory and up to 130 
megabytes of fixed disc storage. 


Joe McNally: Replacing 
minicomputers 

Prices for the Compaq micros start at 
about £6.000 while for Rair, which 
announced a machine that can handle 
several users at once, prices start from 
£19.000. 

“It will extend the range of personal 
computers to applications previously 
requiring the power of a 
minicomputer," predicted Joe 
McNally, the managing director of 
Compaq. 

And there is some support for his 
view with Hambredi & Quist the 
Californian research consultants; al- 
ready referring to machines based on 
a 386 chip as potential Vax killers — a 
reference to Digital Equipment's 
current minicomputer range believ- 
ing “downsizing" will become popu- 
lar once the 386 becomes established. 


How many of the millions or 
customers tor existing personal 
computers will require such extra 
power and speed is arguable. 

Early purchasers are expected to be 
businesses running large databases, 
spreadsheets or sophisticated inte- 
grated software packages, who have 
managed to overload their personal 
computers at the top end of the range, 
such as the IBM PC/AT. 

One customer for such machines 
could be the City. John Parker, a 
director of ISG.daia sales, is one of 
several people selling equipment to 
the City in preparation for the Big 
Bang who believe that some com- 
panies using personal com put ere are 
in for a nasty shock. 

“Once stockbrokers and banks go 
on-line the limitations of their exist- 
ing PC systems will become 
apparent." he said. “Many will be 
found inadequate for the tasks in 
hand and these customers will have 
to go for upgrading in a big way." 



Intel's 386 chip: New era 


Equally, those specialist applica- 
tions such as computer-aided design, 
engineering and other fields where 
manipulating computer images re- 
quires huge amounts of power, are 
seen as a ripe field for development 
using the new chip. 

And powerful but relatively cheap 
systems based on the 386 could give a 
much-needed boost to the idea of 
expert systems and artificial intelli- 
gence as commercial products. 

To exploit the possibilities for 
proriding a system that can handle 
multi-user and multi-tasking opera- 
tions. Compaq announced plans to 
introduce a Xenix operating system 
for ihe new machines by the middle 
of next year. 

Or particular piquancy to the 
computer industry is that IBM. the 
leader and originator of the whole PC 
boom, has yet to launch such an 
advanced product. Compaq which 
has previously made its money from 
cloning IBM computers has. assum- 
ing IBM eventually follows hi the 
same path, launched an IBM-compat- 
ible machine before the computer 
giant itself 

Some argue that IBM's slowness 
with the technology is because it 
could harm sales of its current 
machines if it came out with a more 
advanced model too soon. 

By 1990. machines based on a 386 
chip, argue its advocates, will be the 
mainstream business computers as 
the extra power will have been 
exploited to make PC s easier to use. 


Commodore starts 
to trim its sails 

By Geof Wheelwright 

The worst should be over at animation abilities. 


Commodore UK. Jobs have 
been cut, unpopular models 
have been discontinued and 
the company has started try- 
ing to think a lot smaller. 

Last week, it took the very 
telling step of finally vacating 
its vast man ufa cturing and 
management bnilding in 
Corby to smaller offices in 
Maidenhead. 

UK managing director 
Chris Kaday said: “It's obvi- 
ously not been achieved easily. 
It's a lot more difficult to scale 
something down that it is to 
scale it up." 

The change from being a 
manufacturing entity that pro- 
vided up to 600 jobs at its peak 
to a management and distribu- 
tion firm with fewer than 100 
employees has changed 
Commodore's outlook consid- 
erably. 

To start with, the company 
has realized that much of its 
future business with the pos- 
sible exception of the Com- 
modore 64 and 128 computers 
is not going to be in the high- 
volnme box-shifting market. 

With the advent of the low- 
cost, small-business PC, 
Commodore's Amiga com- 
puter has not been able to 
compete on price — and is thus 
trying to make the most of its 
unique sound, graphics and 


Those 

abilities have — despite many 
industry critics who believe 
the Amiga cannot find a 
market — bad some appeal in 
the education, business 
presentation, scientific and 
technical fields. 

One archeological .group, 
for example, has found a way 
to marry 1 the Amiga’s state-of- 
the-art computer technology 
with the filing and cataloguing 
of centuries-old fossils. 

The Amiga can score de- 
tailed digitalized pictures of 
each fossil, along with 
information about what it is, 
where it was found and how 
old it is, using a picture- 
oriented com pater-filing 
system. 

In the age of the £500 PC, 
the £1,500 Amiga could also 
provide computer dealers with 
a way of making money. Mr 
Kaday said: “The mainstream 
PC market has moved on to 
Ihe high street Dealers are 
looking fur high-value prod- 
ucts on which they can make a 
reasonable margin." 

Unlike the Commodore of 
old, where the company moved 
at such a pace that few could 
keep track of it. the new 
Commodore will move a lor 
more slowly. Mr Kaday says: 
“Our approach is not a fast 
approach." 


Apple 
looks for 
anew 
windfall 


On the eve of its 10th birth- 
day, Apple yesterday gave its 
aging Apple II computer a new 
lease of life with the 
announcement of a new ver- 
sion, Geof Wheelwright writes . 

The original Apple II is 
credited with starting the so- 
called PC revolution when h 
was launched as the first 
successful small business 
microcomputer in 1977. 

Until recently it still 
counted for 50 per cent of the 
company’s sales, yet Apple’s 
efforts during the past two 
years have almost entirely 
been directed toward selling 
the Macintosh tine. That is 
said to have, caused consid- 
erable consternation among 
those responsible for the Ap- 
ple 11, especially daring the 
Mac's first year when the 
Apple H was earning all the 
company’s money and the 
Mac was getting aU the press. 

Apple hopes that the new 
£1.000 computer will bolster 
its position in the UK’s small 
business market, where the 
existing Macintosh products 
are considered too expensive 
and the Apple n products too 
old. 

The new Apple IIGS isa 16- 
bit version of the original with 
a minimum of 256K of com- 
puter memory, a computer 
monitor, a “mouse" pointing 
device and an 800K disc drive 
with enough room for about 
1 60.000 words of text 

Apple is to drop the current 
lie and 11c computers in 
Britain jfiihough they will still 
be sold in the US. Thai may be 
something of a blow to exist- 
ing Apple II users who will not 
be able to upgrade from die 
old machine to the new. 

In the US. whore the new 
machine seems to have gained 
something of a reputation as a 
cut-price Macintosh, picture- 
teed software is being devel- 
oped and the company claims 
that about 40 software pack- 
ages will be available when the 
machine arrives in the shops 
next January. 

Apple has said the machine 
wQl run most of the software 
written for the existing range 
of Apple 11 computers and 
that third party manufacturers 
wiD produce MS-DOS add-on 
cards which should allow the 
new machine to nm some 
software written for the IBM 
PC ’ . 

But m the UK in particular 
the machine will be in heavy 
price competition with the 
likes ofAmkrad and the many 
low-cost IBM clone manufac- 
turers which are filling the 
£500 to £1,000 price range 
with a wide range of of PC 
compatible computers. 



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COMPUTER HORIZONS/2 


The not so friendly system 


3 Equir 

series this Thursday turns its 
attention to the computer 
industry and finds little 
favourable to say about it 
Software specialist Malcolm 
Lewis Jones, for example, 
says: "Most so-caned user- 
friendly systems are about 
as user friendly as a cornered 
rat I'll bet you never heard 
a user calling a system 
friendly." One chief 
executive of a computer retail 
chain believes the indust 
is peopled largely by 
while, Eddy Shah is 
Interviewed on how ter early 
problems at Today were the 
fault ot computers. Equinox is 
on at 8pm. 

■ Something of a bible for 
those programmers using 
advanced assembly 
language and the language C 
has been published by 
Microsoft through Penguin In 
the UK. Advanced MS- 
DOS, written by Ray Duncan, is 
a 450 page manual which 
aims to give sufficient detailed 
information on the various 
versions of the operating 
system to help 



*It’s a sdf-perpetnafiag system. 
The garbage-ont goes in tesre and 
powers tbe c«np liter’ 

subcommittee on Patents, 
Copyrights and 
Trademarks. "In too many 
fields we are losing our 
competitive edge to foreign 
nationals who are 
increasingly taking advantage 
of our patent system and 
beating us at our own game." 


' COMPUTER 
BRIEFING > 


I 




■ A desktop publishing 
program, Newswriter, for IBM 
PCs and compatibles is 

now on sale in the UK for £767. 
Designed to produce 
newsletters and reports, the 
program, from the London- 
based Cognita Software, can 
handle laser printers and 
cheaper dot matrix printers for 
proofing, headlining, 
artwork and editing. A multi- 
user version using the 
Xenix operating system is also 
available. 

■ Last year, nearly half of 

ail United States patents went 
to foreign inventors. During 
the past 25 years, the number 
of US patents granted to 
foreigners has grown four-fold 
from 11 per cent of total 
patents awarded in 1961 to 44 
per cent in 1985. "There 
are signs that today invention 
is on the wane in America," 
said Senator Charles Mathias, 
chairman of a Senate 


■ The Tokyo-based 
Mitsubishi Metal has said it wiD 
acquire Siltec Corp, 
manufacturers of silicon 
wafers and other electronic 
equipment, for an estimated 
$33 million (about £22 
million). The acquisition, which 
was described as a "cash 
merger", was announced in a 
letter of intent issued jointly 
by officials of Mitsubishi and 
Siltec. 

■ A data bank which lists 
several thousand incidents 
involving chemicals during 
the past 25 years has been set 
up in the wake of disasters 
like that at Bhopal in India. 
Users can ask the 
computer for details of 
particular incidents to find 

out what caused them and 
whether there are any 
lessons to be learned. 

The Major Hazard Incident 
Data Service has been set up 
by the Health and Safety 
Executive and pan of the UK 
Atomic Energy Authority. 


Payments of between £220 
and £800 will be needed, 
depending on the use made of 
the service. Nuclear 
accidents have not been 
included because these are 
already logged by the 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency In Vienna. 

■ An Atlanta housewife 
says she will have to mortgage 
her home if she has to pay 
her latest phone bill totalling 
more than $90,000 
(£60.000). The 400-page bill 
was two inches thick and 
arrived after computer hackers 
discovered her personal 
code and used it to make long 
distance calls around the 

, US. When she called the phone 
company, Jessica Barnett 
said: "They asked how much 
and when [fold them they 
laughed." It was not Mrs 
Barnett's first problem with 
the phone company. She got a 

517.000 bill in July but 
thought it was straightened out 
when she didn't get a bill 

last month. But trie bill that 
arrived this week included 

570.000 in past-due charges. 

■ China has released its 
first government "white 
paper,” a 323-page volume 
outlining its science and 
technology policies. The 
report, which has not been 
translated Into English, is 
divided into seven parts — 
historical transition, policies 
and legislation, research and 
development 
commercialization of 
technotogicaJ 

achievements, environment 
and resources, statistical 
indicators and important 
documents. It includes 
background on programmes 
crucial to the government's 
modernization drive. 

These include the transfer 
of technology from the military 
to civilian sectors and 
setting up of venture capita! 
organizations to spur high- 
technofogy and the space and 
nuclear programs. The five- 
year plan outlines 76 key 
projects in the science and 
technology field, with 
“several billion yuan (£1 
equals £24 yuan) budgeted for 
the period. 


Why Britain 
needs more 
professionals 

• Britain has an excellent reputation for the quality of 
the people working in information technology. But 
GEOFF SHINGLES, managing director of Digital 
Equipment in the UK, argues here that the chronic 
shortage of experienced professionals will prevent 
Britain from succeeding 

Were ft not for information ful exploitation of IT could 


technology the City institu- 
tions would not be preparing 
for the impending challenge of 
the Big Bang. Access to tbe 
products ana skills of the IT 
industry is vital for success in 
the tester, more competitive 
environment that deregula- 
tion will encourage. 

Few sectors of industry and 
commerce have been un- 
affected by what has become 
the fastest-growing industrial 
sector in the world economy. 
Overall growth is at a rate of 
IS per cent a year. Areas such 
as semiconductors and data 
communications have a world 
annual growth rate as high as 
20 per cent. The effects of this 
expansion can be judged by 
the fact that hair the IT 
products available today did 
not exist three years ago. 

Currently, the UK's IT in- 
dustry is achieving a growth 
rate of only 8 per cent a year. 
The Alvey Committee re- 
ported that our “basic eco- 
nomic situation dictates that 
we must become a net ex- 
porter of high technology, high 
value-added products". It also 
suggested that by 1990 the UK 
could have an adverse halanrg 
of trade in IT products of £1 
billion a year. 

If we are to reverse the trend 
of industrial decline we must 
substantially increase our 
share of toe IT market A 
world-class technology base is 
essential for a nation to com- 
pete successfully in world 
markets. For the UK, success- 


mean the difference between 
an economy equipped to face 
the 21st century and a steady 
economic decline. 

The principal constraints 
affecting the UK industry ate 
a lade of collaboration be- 
tween organizations involved 
with IT and, more im- 
portantly, a chronic shortage 
of properly trained personnel. 

The UK's IT industry em- 
ploys around one million 
people, of whom 70,000 to 
100,000 are graduates in an 
IT-related discipline. Most are 
employed by suppliers and 
manufacturers: as electronics, 
software and equipment sys- 
tems engineers. The rest are 
employed by organizations 
that use IT products to im- 
prove efficiency and 
performance. 

Our IT expertise and re- 
sources are widely scattered 
throughout industry, research 
companies and the academic 
sector. Compared with other 
countries, the relationship be- 
tween the UK's IT industry 
and its research and academic 

Excellent reputation 
for research quality 


institutions is neither as dose 
nor as fruitful as it could be. 

There is a definite correla- 
tion between education, the 
skilled manpower base and 
above-average economic 
performance. West Germany, 



Geoff Shingles: Industry can not solve problem alone 



him.Free. 


Two more days worked per 
year for every employee would make 
a healthy difference to a company's 
bottom line. 

Would you be surprised to learn 
that your mainframe computer can 
help make it happen in your business 
simply by monitoring absenteeism? 

The mail order company 
Grattans use Unisystems from 
Peterborough Software for an over- 
view of the record of each of their 
employees, broken down into 
number of days 
lost for factors 
such as illness, 


UNISYSTEMS 


care and maternity leave. 

Even perfectly genuine reasons 
can hide individual problems, and the 
records help managers to spot them. 
As a result, Giartaiis^xliave 

fiOOOinayea^^®^^ 
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When you consider that human 
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for example, invests £5.5 bil- 
lion a year in in-house nam- 
ing, ami all skilled workers 
must have qualifications. The 
UK, with a similar-sized 
population, invests only £2.5 
billion a year, and many 
organizations have cut back 
on apprenticeships and 
training. 

The UK enjoys an excellent 
reputation for the quality of its 
IT manpower resources and 
its research — regarded as 
second only to the US. The 
great difficulty is in quantity: 
our supply of skilled personnel 
is extremely limited. This 
problem must be addressed if 
we are to remain a competitor 
in tbe world IT marketplace. 

The rapid growth of tbe 
industry has demanded a 
corresponding growth in the 
number of IT graduates. This 
is expected to continue over 
the next tew years as more 
organizations implement IT 
solutions and IT becomes the 
economy's leading sector. 

The Butcher Committee re- 
ported that most IT producers 
in the UK were planning an 
output increasing at 20 per 
cent a year for the rest of the 
decade. In consequence, de- 
mand for graduates will in- 
crease by 8 to 10 per cent a 
year. This year, however, 
universities lave reported a 
decrease in the number of 
science students to the extent 
that there are even vacancies. 

In practice, graduate de- 
mand is likely to increase 
tester. The Alvey Directorate 
estimates a shortage of 5,000 
IT graduates by 1988. The 
Manpower Services Commis- 
sion puts the figure at between 
7,000 and 10,000. 

In 1984, the House of 
Lords' Science and Technol- 
ogy Committee recommended 
that the Government set up an 


agency to take on manpower 
planning for the IT industry. 
The Government, like most of 
the population, has a fairly 
jaundiced view of quangos 
and suggested this was 
industry's task. 

I believe that industry can- 
not solve this problem alone. 
The skills shortage is directly 
related to such issues as 
education policy and Govern- 
ment spending. The establish- 
ment of the CBTs IT Skills 
Agency is welcomed, but the 
issue requires direct collabora- 
tion between industry and 

Government. 

Each year some 8,000 stu- 
dents graduate from UK 
universities and polytechnics 
with first degrees in electrical 

University cuts have 
taken their toll 


or electronic engineering, 
mathematics, physics and 
computer science. About 
6,000 enter the IT industry. 
(Japan produces 75,000 gradu- 
ate engineers of all disciplines, 
the US 72,000.) 

Post-graduate conversion 
courses equip graduates from 
other disciplines for employ- 
ment in the IT industry, and 
the industry itself devotes 
considerable energy to up- 
grading its manpower re- 
sources, including staff with 
non-IT backgrounds. Invest- 
ment in training is an essential 
component of corporate man- 
power planning. 

The industry could absorb 
significantly more graduates 
than are cunentty available to 
it The 1981 cuts in university 
education seem to have af- 
fected IT-oriented first degree 
courses more than some oth- 
ers. The Government's initia- 


tive in reallocating *« 
million ofihccducatumbud- 
m* io IT course* is welcomed, 
but the planned reduction in 
student numbers is cause lor 

“ESc. some £7 million is 
spent on staff training an- 
nualiv. At 1.5 per cent of our 
turnover, this is equal to that 
of Japan, where ma.ior 
corporations invest heavily. 
We view this spending as 
being an essential component 
of our corporate manpower 

planning. . 

The move to increase if* 
supplv of properly qualified 
graduates should begin in 
schools, with an improvement 
in the quality and quantity of 
computer science teaching. 
Teachers must be property 
trained and able to keep up 
with a constantly evolving 
area. In addition, computer 
languages taught to the next 
generation must be chosen 
with foresight. 

More girls should be en- 
couraged to study science A- 
Icvels. A recent Equal 
Opportunities Commission 
found that boys dominate 
classes in computer studies. 

Higher education establish- 
ments must increase the sup- 
ply of IT graduates and offer 
courses that equip students for 
IT careers. First degree 
courses should seek to develop 
skilled engineers and provide 
fixture researchers. . 

Business skills are also vital 
to the IT industry — skills that 
include communication, de- 
cision-making. problem-solv- 
ing, presentation skills and 
commercial awareness. Sci- 
ence students at Hatfield Poly- 
technic have the benefits of 
the college's Communications 
Unit More students should 
have access to such facilities. 

The UK needs to offer more 
incentive for its IT academics 
to remain in the country 
rather than join the flow to the 
USA. 

There must also be tighter 
links between industry and 
academic establishments: 
some technical-level com- 
puter science courses fail to 
produce graduates with tbe 
right skills. Commercial 
organizations should 
encourage staff to become 
visiting lecturers and “dis- 
tance learning" should be 
exploited as a fruitful point of 
contact between academics 
and industrialists. 

Industry should sponsor 
suitably qualified young peo- 
ple to read IT-related subjects 
at university or polytechnic 
and offer work experience 
opportunities to local fifth and 
sixth formers. 

Though industry can help 
with resources and finance, 
the Government must take 
the initiative and co-ordinate 
efforts. 


Septemi 

727192 


Events 

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New Technologies in Training, 
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IBM System User Show, Ol 
1 2, London, October 1-3 (01- 
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Electronic Point of Sale Ex- 
hibition, Barbican, London, 
October 7-10. 

DEC User Show, Barbican, 
London, October 14-16. 

Electronic Message Syste ms 
Conference, Tara Hotel, Lon- 
don, October Z7-29, 
tion fee £570, (01 8684466) 
Compec, Olympia, London, 
November 11-14 (01-821 5555) 

CfMAP — Factory automation, 
National Exhibition Centre, Bir- 
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891 


Overseas 

EuroOec 88, Intercontinental 
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West G 

25 (01-403 1473) 

Artificial Intelligence and Par- 
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Renta Hotel, West Germany, 
September 23-24 (01-489 0849) 


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MORSE COMPUTERS 78 H &h HoibofirLw^m^i iT ^ A s 

— - TT Telephone 01-831 0644. Tafac ag2S46 


Amstrad P.C. revealed! 


This month’s arrival of the 
Amstrad PC is already having a 
profound effect on the whole of 
desktop computing in Britain. 

Software prices are dramatic- 
ally tumbling and significant 
changes are taking place in 
both the marketing of personal 
computers and their sub- 
sequent support One aspect 
of the sweeping changes now 
well under way is that many 
more executives and 
managers are being intro- 
duced to the mysteries of 
.personal computing forthe 
firsttime. 

The role of the Amstrad 
PC and its effect on British 
business stall levels is chronicled in 
Amstrad Professional Computing - the 
Official Amstrad PC monthly magazine 

- which is now on sale at leading 
newsagents. 

- It is also available on subscription of 
£15 for the next 12 issues. Write to: 



Amstrad Professional Comoutinn 
FREEPOST; 36 St Petfirsgate 

Stockport SKI 1HL ’ 

Subscribers will ^receive a 

deluxe binder with their first issue 


0 








v,o 





to 





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THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


21 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/3 


Big Bang could be a whimper for some 

big noise surrounding the . .. Tiwebsiwp 





The big noise surrounding the 
financial dentation of the 
City next month is still tempt- 
ing many people, from youth- 
ful .programmers to 
experienced analysts, into 
City computing. But it may 
not be the grand dream for 
some that the current pub- 
licity would have us believe. 

Some computer recruit- 
ment experts say the Big Bang 
has little to offer in long-term 
career progression. Inside the 
City, they argue, major banks, 
insurance companies and the 
Stock Exchange need people 

with expertise and experience 
to contra longer-term projects 
than the Big Bang, which is 
based solely on the compet- 
itive need to cope with pro- 
jected future technological 
financial systems. 

The need to extend comput- 
ing power is phenomenal — 
speed of transaction and ser- 
vice is what the financial 
institutions are alter. That 
means expertise of a special 
nature. 



rttv 

Barrie Frost of Afimand: ‘We will soon start to see redundancies of non-essential staff 1 


• “AH the Big Bang has done 5111115 * F? re 

•- * * ■ - than £70,000 a year are being 

offered to the right people and 
that’s before the perks, averag- 


es to push people in the City to rSLSf a - ^ 
think about their place in the 
market,” said Barrie Frost, thatshefiw>fh, “ TV ’ 1 
director of Alimand Com- 
puter Resources, a recruit- 
ment organization for City 




i 


By Eddie Coulter 1 

computing personnel “There 
is suU a strong demand for 
programmers and analysts to 
work in the City— and there is 
no' doubt that they are needed. 

But it implies there are 
more career jobs than there 
are. Big Bang is only short 
term for most of these people. 
Yet there is big money to be 
made. The UK. generally, and 
the City in particular, has a 
shortage of specific skills es- 
pecially in senior management 
decison makers' with City 
knowledge and computing 
awareness in specific areas. 

Most of the requirements 
focus o° those with long- 
developed skills, particularly 
in areas such as communica- 
tions. But such talent needs to 
be supported by management 
expertise and that can only 
come with age. It appears that 
market attitudes to being fin- 
■ished at 40 are changing. 

. Away from the £10,000 'tp 
£25,000 salaries now on offer, 
the;, high salaries ^-are not 
usually to be found advertised 
— only discussed through 


ing another £10,uuu a year. 

Future computing 
for the City are those who can 
lay down adventurous plans 
in areas such as communica- 
tions — especially local and 
wide area networking. A feel 
for technology and knowledge 
of how the City operates and 
bow international business is 
managed, are keys to the large 
incomes. 

At Lloyds Bank, as with 
many others, management 
skills are constantly sought 
among data processing pro- 
fessionals for work in the 
international departments. 
There is a high demand for 
managers experienced in tong- 
tenn planning, especially with 
money-market systems. 

“Finding data processing 
professionals with a working 
knowledge of the City is not 
easy” said John 
recruitment officer for foe 
bulk's management services. 
“There is shortage of manage- 
ment skills at the higher level 
and a lack of technical skills 
among many of the systems 
programmers and analysts 
who approach us. There are 
plenty of applicants who are 
knowledgeable on micro- 
compaters, but finding sys- 
tems programmers with, say, 
two years* relevant experience 
is difficult 

, “The real- problem is . foe 
need to produce high quality 
user-friendly systems that run 


on large mainframe comput- 
ers but which have to 
commimciale with numerous 
other machines. People 
needed for this type of work 
most be experienced. The 
successful ones will have the 
opportunity to move into 
management.” 

Shortage of management 
expertise, both now ana in the 
.future, is being met at Llpyds 
with a “grow your own" 


policy. This summer Lloyds 
has taken on 100 trainees in 
data processing — 40 of them 
in applications research and 
development. At first they 
learn, in addition to computer 
training, skills in personnel 
management, supervision, 
writing and presentation. 
Later, with promotion, further 
management techniques, such 
as interviewing and 
Detonating, are taught- 


But while programmers and 
analysis are potentially high 
salaried future managers, and . 
thousands of jobs are avail- 
able in connection with foe 
Big Bang, outside the banks 
and large insurance com- - 
panies many of the posts could 
be short-lived. 

Some of the work on offer 
for systems and prog r a mming 
people is either for small 


banks that want to catch up on 
technology, or for those who 
fed they should have some 
son of systems ready by 
October 27. But most of the 
work is in developing package 
systems often within systems 
houses. Soon the only need 
will be for those aiming at the 
heights of data processing 
management. Youthful 
experience will not be enough. 

“I think that we wfll soon 
start to see redundancies of 
non-essential staff” said Mr 
Frost. “There will not be as 
much call fix 1 further develop- 
ment work in connection with 
the Big Bang. Far less people 
will be needed and then only 
to provide package support on 
the systems already 
developed.” 

Typical of the jobs on offer, 
but not advertised, include: a 
manager of administration for 
database management sys- 
tems at a starting pa c kage of 
£45.000, customer support 
managers with a £50,000- 
£60,000 package and head of 
marketing software services 
with an £80,000 deal. The 
posts have little connection 
with Big Bang, more with 
future technology needs for 
other Gty activities. 

Skilled professional systems 
programmers can get a good 
deal out of the City now. The 
£100,000 a year data process- 
ing job is not far away. 


IBM spots way to 
smaller chips 


The alchemists' dreams of 
transmuting metals has 
moved a small step nearer 
reality with an announcement 
by IBM that it has taken the 
world’s first pictures of surface 
atoms and the bonds that hold 
them in place — the driving 
forces which shape and distin- 
guish different materials. 

It should increase the 
possibilities for research into 
creating new materials and 
understanding how biological 



Atomic surface 

processes occur at the atomic 
level. 

The bonds have been pic- 
tured using an instrument 
rafted 3 cranning tunnelling 
microscope, which IBM in- 
vented in 1981. It is the first 
microscope to show how at- 
oms are arranged on the 
surface of a material and the 
electrons responsible for 
bonding. 

Up to now the location of 
chemical bonds has had to be 
inferred approximately, be- 


By Frank Brown 

cause only the electron clouds 
around atoms could be 
studied. 

Using the new techniques, 
IBM scientists have deter- 
mined the location and the 
characteristics of a variety of 
bonds on the surface of sili- 
con, widely used 10 make 
microchips and therefore of 
critical importance to the 
computer industry. 

Minute defects in silicon 
can create problems in the 
febrication and operation of 
semiconductor devices and as 
these devices get smaller and 
fester the ability 10 find and 
eliminate such defects will 
become more important 
The complex rearrange- 
ment of atoms on surfaces, 
particularly on the surface of 
silicon, has been the focus of 
scientific attention for more 
than a quarter of a century, 
because the electronic prop- 
erties of surfaces differ from 
those of the interior. 

The computers of the future 
will need fester and denser 
circuitry that will be made 
from smaller and thinner 
semiconductor structures. As 
these structures become thin- 
ner, a greater proportion of 
their substance will be on their 
surface and therefore gov- 
erned by surface properties. 


The threat to 
UK software 

By Darrell luce 
Academics and industrialists more serious troubles. The 


rarely agree on anj 
are unanimous that in the next 
decade the way we produce 
software will change radically. 
It is the nature of this change 


first is that the British soft- 
ware tools in the US and 
Japan have normally arisen 
from such departments whose 
proportions dwarf those of 


a a id uiv uhmmv wj VIP* » r „ — ~ — 

that threatens the viability of their British counterparts. Tne 
many software companies second trouble is that foe 
operating in Britain. British software industry has 

The change involves the not really been interested m 
considerable amount of selling _ products. A large 
automation that win occur in proportion of its revenue has 
software development soon, been generated by construct- 
More specifically, it involves ing one-off pieces, 
the increased use of auto- A software company will 
mated software tools. These normally tender for a software 
are sophisticated computer contract, to be awarded ij, hire 
programs which can produce or poach the staff required and 
considerable labour savings then use the customers hara- 


for many software activities. 

Now the production of a 
complex software system in- 
volves such activities as 
requirements analysis, 
specification, design, 
programming and testing. 
Requirements analysis is the 
process of eliciting a 
customer's requirements for a 
piece of software. .Specifica- 
tion is c o ncerned with clearly 
describing the function of a 
software system. 

Design, is the process of 
defining the architecture of a 


ware for development. It is an 
attractive strategy. It involves 
little risk, little capital outlay 
is required before being 
awarded a contract, no long- 
term investment in people is 
needed and a clever manager 


can ensure that staff resources 
are fully used. 

But it is dear that nugor 
changes are about, to occur. 
Government strategy in both 
the US and Japan is aimed at 
the development and promo- 
tion of software tools. The 
British software industry is, in 


software system and testing is many res ?*^’ 
the process of checking that 

system for correctness. ’ ” 

There is now 
idence from com 


ware projects that of these 
activities, programming is the 
easiest and it is foe other 
activities that are critical For 
example; errors in require- 
ments analysis have led u> foe 
cancellation of multi-million 
dollars projects while 
programming errors usually 

only add man-hours to the 
elapsed time of a software 
project. 

A major bottleneck m soft- 
ware projects involves these 
activities. They are normally 
performed manually and are 
highly labour intensive. They 
are also complex activities 
which are error-prone. 
Enough research has now been 
carried out in the United 
Slates to suggest that foe 
automation ofthese activities 
can lead to huge savings and 
that these savings can be 
achieved by software tools. 

For example, it is dear that 
effective tools for software 
specification can now be con- 
structed which check _ a 
requirements specification 
and software designs .for 
completeness, feck ofambigu- 
iiy and internal consistency. 



The problem for the British 
software industry is that it has 
in the past taken little interest — 
iw the development of soft- tomers to ^ 
ware tools. This is a system of software at relatively low cost. 


high quality. However, 
mechanization and man- 
made fibres ensured that the 
business fell to a small propor- 
tion of its peak. 

The British industry pro- 
duces high-standard one-off 
systems but has had a poor 
track record in developing and 
selling off-the-shelf products. 
A start has been made in that 
foe Department of Trade's 
Alvey strategy has as its main 
aim the production of soft- 
ware tools. The prospect of 50 
per cent funding has at least 
persuaded some software 
companies to start work in 
this area. It may be too late. 
US companies have been 
active in the area since the 
mid-1970s. . 

One thing is clear. British 
software companies cannot 
depend on one-off software to 
keep them afloat. The major 
aim of software tools is to 
reduce the resources required 
on software projects. There 
tools, which include rapid 
development systems, fourth 
generation languages and 
prototyping environments, 
will pui more development 
power into a customer's 
hands. It could well lead to the 
situation where it will be 
economically feasible for cus- 
tomers to produce tbeir own 


Business begins at 40 



The new £2,995 Tandon PCA-40 


The new PCA-40 makes a total of seven 
Thndnn models to choose from. 

So wherever your business begins, 
Tandon. has the right personal computer 
Tor you. 

The PCA-40 is our new flagship 
computer. 

With 40 Megabytes of fast access disk 
storage it has the capacity to handle the 
largest, most demanding tasks. 

And like our other models, the PCA-40 


Typically our computers are priced 
around 40% below the equivalent offering 
from IBM. 

But with the PCA-40 there is no 
equivalent Because IBM doesn’t offer a 
40 Mbyte system. 

Shouldn’t your business begin with a 

Thndon? 

For further information on the Tandon 
PCA-40, and the full Thndon range, send 
off the coupon or phone Thndon on: 


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tea tndcmaifc of InKnutfmn] DWfmW Marjifafit C or por a tion- Prices quoted Includ e roopeefamme monitor and arc rcCOmmenflKl retail prices excluding VAT. 
ICttour Monitor is adtidoual price option for £285. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1 986 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 

Data 

Communications 

Programmers 

IBM United Kingdom Laboratories Limited requires Data 
Communications Programmers to join the company’s Workstation 
Development Group at its new offices in Basingstoke. 

This is an exciting opportunity to work on the development 
of leading- edge data communications software and to meet the 
networking and connectivity requirements of our European 
customers. 

Ybu should have experience in the following?— 

• Communications softw are development supporting 
OSI, including CCITT X.25 protocols; 

• Personal Computer operating systems and multi-tasking 
environments; 

•Programming languages such as l C\ Pascal and Assembler. 
You should also be able to combine a desire to work on data 
communications with IBM’s Local Area Networks and public 
Wide Area Networks, with an understanding of communications 
and hardware/software interfaces. 

In return we can offer you an excellent salary, highly 
attractive career prospects, and a package of benefits to include 
free life assurance, contributory pension scheme and BUPA 
membership. 

Write with full career details to Barrie Rogers, Personnel 
Officer, IBM United Kingdom Laboratories Limited, 
FREEPOST, Hursley Park, / — 


FREEPOST, Hursley Park, 
Wi nchester, Hants. 

S021 2BR. Please quote 
reference T/329. 


• lH.nnOj.ilH. in imTW [IK WatnittM 

* Uni mamifarlitrin^ plant. 
n™4..|.nn>m lolwnlnry nrar Vlnrlmqrr 

• An i*«|iial umntfpnitjF cmpL y r 

• tl.5R2 million in l*WS 

• 12(17 million iiivmlol in UK in IWS 



What’s in a name — the danger 
of those designer job titles 


Ilf 


By Richard Sarson 

To be Just a computer pro- 
grammer or systems analyst is 
not enough in the design- 
conscious 1980s. It sounds 
both more creative and trendy 
to be a systems designer, 
which goes rather better with 
the Gucci shoes, Armani suits 
and lie designer furniture. 

' Even more up-market is to 
be a database architect; it 
sounds as if the holder has 
been io college for at least five 
years to qualify. 

But the reality is that if the 
computer language used is at 
aU "user friendly" the job will 
be less demanding and prob- 
ably belter paid than an old- 
fashioned Cobol or Fortran 
programmer. So. you gel both 
the impressive title and less 
technical hassle. 

One Gty firm is currently 
advertising for someone with 
the glorious title of network 
centre support manager whose 
task trill be to "devise and 
implement problem-manage- 
ment procedures". This is 
jaigonspeak for clearing op 
disasters. Such people may 
well be necessary in the Square 
Mile during the next few 
months after October’s dereg- 
ulation of financial services. 

job titles for sales people 
seem to give particular trou- 
ble, perhaps because in some 
1 fields the words salesman or 
saleswoman still lack any aura 
of professionalism. 

The first computer sales 
people I came across were 


I’ffMi its- xt-c 








m 


m 


called investigators.- They 
were qualified accountants 
who investigated the client's — 
not customer’s — accounting 
procedures and would put in a 
report on the possibility of 
mechanizing them. 

Very few computer sales 
people actually have the 
words salesman or saleswom- 
an on their cards. It is more 
likely to be sales engineer or 
sales executive. 

In feet, there is a whole 
hierarchy of account persons, 
ranging from an account exec- 
utive who sells computers io 
small businesses, an account 
manager who sells to mid- 
dling-sized firms, to an ac- 
count director who wheels and 
deals with big corporations. 

Internationa] account direc- 


tors tend to talk only to the 
global information services 
managers of the multination- 
als. 

Misl eading and meaning- 
less titles can be dangerous. In 
one firm a manager hired a 
team of progress chasers for a 
new computer product. 

In choosing titles for these 
people, he permutated the 
words programme, schedule, 
control and system. So one 
progress diaser was the system 
schedule controller, another 
the program control scheduler 
and a third the control sched- 
ule programmer. 

As no one knew what any of 
these people were really re-' 
sponsible for, the product not 
surprisingly missed all its 
deadlines and nearly brought 


the company to a halt. 

So those thinking of chang- 
ing jobs should he wary of 
some designer job titles il they 
just look like sloppy thinking 
by management. 

i two n 

EXPERIENCED 

SYSTEM 

ANALYSTS 

required for 
consultancy & 
svstems development 
’ in computerised 
Japanese financial 
institutions. Must 
speak fluent Japanese 
& English. Salary 
negotiable. 

Phone Mrs. Page on: 

01-928 3551. 










PROGRAMMERS/SENIOR PROGS CENTRAL & S.W. £1 1-16K 

TO MOVE INTO ANALYSIS LONDON + BENEFITS 

One of the largest and most successful Computer Service Companies dealing with oommercial/Rnancial 
applications are currently seeking competent and dynamic professional Programmers who wish to progress 
Into analysis. To take advantage of these opportunities you should have at least 18 months OOBOL 
etpertence gained on ICL Mainframes from utftWna conn nero a l or financial environment: at the more senior 
level experience with IDM5and TPMS would be advantageous but is not essential. After initial training 
in analysis, candidates will be working on a variety of projects playing an integral part in a small team, from 
analysis through to Implementation. These opportunities must be carefully considered by Candidates with 
Hardware&ppHcatfon experience. limited to one or even two users as this type of person has benefited 
considerably in the past. The variety of hardware employed and the scope of applications coupled with 
excellent traWng should lead to fast promcttlon. higher salaries and a certain prosperous future. REF TM 230 

TECHNICAL SALES SUPPORT CITY TO £20K +CAR 

To cope with the increasingly heavy demand for rapid information within the City, this company has 
bunched a major new sya&n and is now seeking technical Sales Support staff. Applicants should have drea 
4 years experience of high level customer liaison on multiple IBM PC networks and have undertaken 
proposal writing and demonstrations Any experience of workkigin the Financial Sector would be of benefit. 
There are no age or educational limitations, but the successful candidates wiO be highly presentable and 
be able to demonstrate the ability to work on their own initiative. Although most of the time willbe spent 
in the City, applicants must be prepared to travel to the home counties as necessary. The superb salary on 
offer wBI be complemented by a company car for high-caJfore people. REFTH 14556 

PROJECT LEADERS CITY OF £25K 

LONDON 

This International Bank Is recognised as one of the leading developers of sophisticated systems to meet 
the requirements of today's international banking applications. The successful applicants should have 
experience of Financial Futures. Dealer Support Market Making, [quoted securities!. Eurobonds and 
Foreign Exchange Areas including sev era l years experience in an IBM Mainframe or DEC VAX environment 
Project Leaders appointed wfll be responsible for first level discussions with users, ascertaining their 
requirements and faHcwing these through to implementation and subsequentsuppoct. TWs wig also involve 
leading project teams, extensive overseas travel and the setting up of local expertise. REF TR 14627 


AN AIYSTfPROG RAMMER CITY OF LONDON TO 17K 

(BIG BANG) -f-SUB MORTGAGE 

+ BANKING BENEFITS 

In preparation for the Deregulation of the Stock Exchange, this major city-based Merchant Bank require 
self-motivated and professional individuals with FORTRAN or BASIC experience gained within a DEC POP 
environment Applicants wW be initially involved with the develop me nt of major Big Bang related projects 
within the foflowmg applications areas: Foreign Exchange. Accounting far Principal and Broking Oper a tio n s, 
Eurobond-Market Making and Treasury Trading Systems No previous banking experience is necessary, as 
full training wiO be provided: however, a solid commerc ia l background will be to your advantage The 
successful applicant will enjoy an excellent salary, indudmg a subsidised mortgage and generous 
benefits package- REFIT 14630 

PROGS TO TEAM LEADERS CITY TOC £15.000 

The Increasing demand for rapid information distribution within the Gty has resulted In several new 
vacancies within this highly accomplished operation. Successful candidates wiO join established teams 
working ona variety of exdting projects Appirants are required to haue sound ecperience of C. UNIX and 
MS- DOS and should possess an interest in Graphics and MSWndows Any exposure to Ftnanoal/Bankmg 
packages would be a distinct advantage Important a ttrib utes are enthusiasm, personality and potential, 
all of which are recognised by excellent opportunities for career progression. Competitive salaries are 
offered depending on age qualifications and experience. REF TC 14195 

GRADUATE PROGRAMMERS CITY lb £15.000 

IBM - BANKING 4-BANKING BENEFITS 

To cater for the mcreaslng demands placed on theMIS department one oftbe top International Banks has 
an urgent requirement for Graduate Propammers of the highest ca fibre Applicants wfll ideally have 
attalnedagood degree and havea minimum of 18 months Commercial Programming experience utifising 
COBOL, with preferably CCSTDL/I on fBM Mainframes. andforRPGIIon system 34/36‘s. Working In project 
teams of varying sizes the successful candidates will assist in the development I mp lement a tion and 
subsequent support of many varied and interesting i n te rna tional banking products. Rewards are high with 
dear career paths for the ambitious Complementing the excellent salutes on offer are comprehensive 
banking benefits REF TC 14233 


CITY OF LONDON 


SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER CITY GUARANTEE £35.000 

FINANCIAL MARKETS BASIC £25.000 + 

UNLIMITED EARNINGS 

A leading supplier of advanced information systems for Foreign Exchange and other dealing activities IS 
setting up a new division. They-are seeking a Senior Account Manager to sell software and services to Major 
Banks Brokers, etc. In thelteasury area. The new division will run in parallel with, and complement their 
very successful Dealing Room Switching area which has written substantial business with leading Financial 
Institutions Protected revenue levels for this new area over the next three yeaisare in excess of £50 million 
providing unlimited earnings potential for the Sales Consultants The successful applicant should have 
detailed knowledge of the Gty and have a proven sales record in Financial Solutions ata senior level. This 
is an excellent chance to join one of the largest companies in this field and to reap the benefits of major 
sales opportunities which will result from the imminent deregulation of the Stock Market. REF TL 14273 


SALES 

000 COMMS SALES SPECIALISTS 


COMMS SALES SPECIALISTS SOUTH £40.000 OTE 

LUXURY CAR 

A leading US. technology development company has set up a new European Communications division. 
Due io this expansion they require top Communications Sales Specialist who wifl join a professional team 
at the outset of this tremendous business opportunity. The European Communications Division sells a 
revolutionary software package which Is recognised as a world first Drive, enthusiasm, com m itme nt and 
an impeccable ales track record are all prerequisites In order to maintain the worlds Na I market 
leadership in this Communications area. A foreign language would be a great advantage as extensive 
Europ ean travel would be involved. The successful appfcant wfll have experience of the following protocols: 
GGTTx400 Message Handling. X25 IBM BSC and SNA Modules, in return this organisation offers a superb 
remuneration package, which indudes £40.000 on target earnings.- private health scheme and 
luxury car. REF TX 14583 


We have many other National and International vacancies, please contact one of our Consultants for details. 


BUSINESS PEOPLE IN THE PEOPLE BUSINESS 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS . 

21 CORK STREET LONDON W1X 1HB 





5 




4 - *•*.*»? *-•***•' 

■ii ■ 

& ’ ' * ' ; £ 


IBM FINANCIAL SYSTEMS 

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT AND CONSULTANCY 
LONDON AND EUROPE C1EK-CZZK 

Wa have been retained by a prestigious financial systems consultancy based m the City of 
London to recruit further top flight professional Staff to work on IBM bonking sysiema pniinct.. 
m design, development end consultancy roles. 

Your initial responsibilities will be m systems design and development in a variety of advanced 
protects both UK end o ve rsees baaed. Only candidates who are able and willing to progieur. 
into consultancy and management should apply. 

Our diont requires 

* A good degree 

* At least 2 yearn IBM systems experience 143**. 30**, 34/38. 88) 

* A high level of enthusiasm and commitment 

Our cUent offers 

* First class formalised training and proiect experience in 
banking and expert systems applications 

u-. p» * Outstanding career prospects including Eurooran 

rVl management positions 

rY “ if | — | ] • Opportunities to lead » group m your specialisation 

fjppccrnNAL S " Commitment to invest m your ideas 


CITY a 0 
PROFESSIONAL 
SELECTION 

92 Fleet Sneer 
London EC4V IDH 
Tel 01-353 5830 


PleeM mh « wrong guotrxj Ret CT9 enctosmg bmf «ducjlx>na> ml 
career detarts winch wrU no! be forwarded tt> our el«nl wilhoul you nr-v 
xppnwat. 


24 HRS (10 LINES) 

01 439 8302 

01 437 5994 

EVENINGS 8c WEEKENDS 

(6892) 28736 


01 451 1682 


Programmer ^ 

pembr ° ke S& 

We are currently looking for a Programmer/Analyst to 
assist with developing applications/systems on behalf 
of our refinery. This position would involve locating in 
Pembroke for 3 years then relocating to our Central 
London Office. 

Programming will be done using FORTRAN on multiple 
Data General MV/ 10000 computers. Applications will 
include busines systems as well as process control and 
data acquisition. Applicants must have a BSc, ideally in 
computer science, maths or chemical engineering and 
have had a minimum of 3 years related DP experience. 
A good knowledge of FORTRAN and systems analysis/ 
design is essential. Exposure to development using 
Data General or other mini computers would be an 
advantage. 

A salary commensurate with age, experience and 
qualifications will be offered along with benefits 
generally associated with any large organisation. 

Please write giving full career details to: 

Mr. M. J. Blinkhom, 

Employee and Public Relations Department 
Texaco Limited, Pembroke Refinery, 
Pembroke, Dyfed SA71 5SJ. 

We are an equal opportunity employer 


EXCEPTIONAL PEOPLE 

£15K— £25K Packages inc. car and bonus 




Aii 

PI; 

fu 


ORACLE UK is the principal supplier of relational database software, fourth 
generation application development tools, and consultancy services based on 
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23 


l<> : 




4 


© 


THE 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 
AIRPORTS 




TIMES 


FOCUS 


September 16 , 1986 

By Arthur Reed 



The flight 

to private 
ownership 


* 


Pettr Tn**nor 







The structure customers, the passengers and 
and manage- freight-shippers, a better and 
raent of more economic HmI 

Britain's air- c - . , . . 

DOrts are ahnut ^ A^n Thomson, chair- 
of Br ^ sh CaledoiMn 
daroental Airways, said recently that 
ch a n g es after the passing on to JiL® 



immer A 


q* the statute book last July of 
the Airports BilL The Govern- 
ment hopes it will provide a 
new stimulus to efficiency and 
innovation from which all 
airport users will benefit 

According to the timetable 
to which the Department of 
Transport is working, the 
British Airports Authority, 
with its seven airports at 
Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted, 
Glasgow, Edinburgh, Prest- 
wick and Aberdeen, should be 
privatized in the first half of 
1987, The larger local-author- 
ity airports should be estab- 
. fished as public airport 
5 companies by next April. 

The new Act retains wide 
powers for the Government 
over the way air traffic is 
distributed between Britain's 
airports. The Secretary of 
Slate for the Environment can 
direct airports to ensure fulfil- 
ment of Britain's international 
aviation obligations. 

He can make rules govern- 
ing the distribution of traffic 
between airports serving the 
same area. He can set limits 
on air-transport movements. 

The Civil Aviation Author- 
'' ity is empowered to impose 
conditions on any airport to 
make them disclose cross- 
subsidization. trading prac- 
tices or pricing policies which 
discriminate unfairly against 
users, abuses of an airport 
operator's monopoly position 
and predatory pricing against 
other airports. 

Not everybody.is impressed... 
with this effort to make the 
airport industry more dy- 
namic, and to have it give its 


•eu:: > 1( 


* 


privatized British Airports 
Authority, the airports prob- 
lem would remain with gov- 
ernment, and it would be they 
who had “to pm on the oven 
gloves and deal with that 
particular hot potato". 

The Government would 
have to decide whether any 
privately owned airport op- 
erator could bring forward 
plans to place a new airport 
“in some voter's backyard". 

Sir Adam continued: “The 
provision of adequate airport 
capacity is right at the heart of 
our industry. What this means 
is that if government has a 
policy of encouraging the air* 
line industry to develop, it 
must accept the twin 
responsibility of ensuring that 
feci lilies are available to meet 
that requirement". ,. 

Facilities to meet 
the requirement 

Sir Adam's comments are 
particularly apposite at 
Heathrow and Gatwick which 
are now full at certain peak 
hours during the j amm er 
months, and where the Min- 
ister of Aviation, Michael 
Spicer, has recently ordered a 
ban on freighter aircraft and 
executive aviation flights at 
such times, to the fury of these 
sectors of the industry. 

Captain David Antrobus, 
chairman of the Air Transport- 
Operators . Association, 
representing 65 air-taxi com- 
panies.- saidL -The-. decision 
leaves London with a major 
dearth of suitable space for 
business aviation. 


3 * 


msw&s 




F^-asssst 





iOSSfcS 33H8B R 



Terminal 4 at London Heathrow: watching the jmnbos loading, and above, a security officer shows Michael Spicer, the aviation minister, a new baggage search system 


Breathing space in the con- 
gested South-East of the coun- 
try is provided by Stansted, 
now officially designated 
London's third airport after a 
series of governmental 
changes of mind ami public 
inquiries- 

Work has begun on a new 
terminal to take ei ght million 
passengers a year by 1991, 
with scope for expansion to 1 5 
million passengers a year, 
-while the existing terminal at 
Stansted is handling only half 
a million passengers a year, 
although designed for two 
milli on. 

Airports in the provinces 
are eager to take any traffic 
with which London and the 
South-East cannot cope. Man- 
chester is the classic case 
which, through a combination 
of unused resources and 
aggressive marketing, has suc- 
ceeded in attracting an 
impressive range of airline 
services. 

The provincial airports are 
also active in promoting pack- 
age holidays to sunshine or ski 
resorts. Many of them report 
booming business in the sec- 
tor this year in direct contrast 
to the virtual diying-up of 
traffic from across the North 
Atlantic into the main airports 
after the US bombing of . 
targets in Libya and the 
Chernobyl nuclear power sta- 
tion disaster. 


Airports remain big busi- 
ness for Britain. A total of 70 
million passengers will use 
them this year, although the 
vast majority will continue to 
be concentrated at Heathrow 
and Gatwick, which last year 
handled 31 million and 15 
million respectively. They are 
major employers at a time of 
high unemployment — 
Heathrow has a working 
population of 50,000. Daring 
1985 Heathrow came top in 
the league table for exports 
and imports through all ports 
— both airports and seaports — 

A trend likely to 
continue upwards 

moving a total of £21.2 billion 
worth of goods, or 74.9 per 
cent of the trade through all 
airports, and 13 per cent 
through ports in general. 

Against the other UK air- 
ports, Heathrow was far in 
front, Gatwick coming second 
with £1.8 billion, Manchester 
third with £1.1 billion. Glas- 
gow fourth with £623 milli on 
and Prestwick fifth with £508 
million. 

Overall, the airports of Brit- 
ain daring 1985 dealt with 
goods worth £28 3 billion, 
which was 7.7 per cent up on 
the previous year. These fig- 







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ures do not take account of the 
invisible earnings to which the 
airports provide the key, 
paniculartytourist spending. 

Most forecasters believe 
that the trend of such results; 
wall continue upwards, al- 
though crystal-ball gazing is 
notoriously difficult in the 
airports business, as it is in 
aviation generally, as the in- 
dustry is so prone to economic 
upturns and downturns, 
political pressures, the price of 
aviation fuel even the 
weather. 

This point is brought home 
by the latest figures from the 
British Airports Authority, for 
its seven airports for this July. 
Though passenger traffic over- 
all rose 0.8 per cent compared 
with the same month of 1985, 
traffic - from the US at 
Heathrow was down 20 per 
cent (down 27 per cent in 
May). 

US traffic at Gatwick was 
down 27 per cent and domes- 
tic traffic dropped 15 per cent, 
largely because of the with- 
drawal by government order 
of the helicopter link with 
Heathrow after it had pro- 
duced environmental 
protests. 

But there was an upsurge in 
traffic to destinations around 
the Mediterranean, as Britons 
fled the rain of a bad summer. 


Despite the cyclical nature of 
the cnil aviation business, 
airport operators continue to 
spend vast amounts of money 
on hniMfiig new te rminals or 
on the extension and 
refurbishing of existing 
buildings. 

A conservative estimate 
puts the total being spent 
during this decade at £800 
million — most of it at 
Heathrow, Gatwick and 
Stansted, althongh a number 
of the provincial airports also 
have ambitions schemes in 
hand or recently completed. 

Fashions in airport design 
change rapidly and Britain's 
latest aviation te rminal, which 
will soon begin to rise at 
Stansted, bears as much 
resemblance to the circular 
beehive ba3t in the 1930s at 
the old Gatwick airport, and 
still standing today, as does a 
Boeing 747 to a de Havffland 
Rapide, 

Because of the numbers 
which they have to accom- 
modate, today's terminals 
have become monolithic; the 
trick of the designers is to 
disguise this talk. 

Heathrow's Terminal 4 last 
April is mi several storeys, 
with departures on the top 
level and arrivals below. Its 
departures concourse is one 
vast tall, with passengers 


Howto 

spend 

£ 800 m 

boarding their plane through a 
series of gates leading directly 
from it, rather than being 
herded into a series of gate 
rooms, as at the other 
Heathrow terminals and at 
Gatwick. 

This is a modern, high-tech 
terminal, tat it has already 
gained a reputation as being 
the place for long walks. 

At Stansted, by contrast, the 
new terminal will be on one 
main level, with roof panels 
which will let the outside light 
in. 

As at the second terminal 
nearing completion at 
Gatwick, driverless “peopte- 
mover" trains will be used. 
The concept has snoceeeded at 
Gatwick, where such a system 
connects the south terminal 
with a circular satellite build- 
ing. and at airports in the 
United States, including Mi- 
ami, Atlanta and Seattle. 

With improved comput- 
erized air traffic control tech- 
niques, runway capacity will 
not be tiie main problem as air 


traffic grows in the remaining 

S ears of this century. The 
ritish Airports Authority has 
given commitments that both 
Gatwick and Stansted will 
operate with only one nmvray 
each, however busy they 
become. 

The limiting factors to air- 
port expansion in future are 
more likely to be terminal 
accommodation and the 
surrounding transport infra- 
structure — the methods of 
moving passengers and freight 
to and from the airports. 

Rail transport into or near 
the centre of airport terminals, 
as at Heathrow-, Gatwick, 
Manchester and Stansted 
(planned), and Birmingham, 
appears to be one of the most 
attractive options. 

Another is to move the 
airport nearer the centre of the 
conurbation which it serves, as 
is happening at London's City 
Stolport (short-take-off-and- 
landmg facility) in Docklands. 

Unfortunately for the air- 
port planners, the scope for 
such developments elsewhere 
in Great Britain is small and, 
as was proved by the sagas of 
the Stansted, Gatwick and 
London City public inquiries, 
any plans to build big new 
facilities in Britain will be 
subject to fierce scrutiny on 
environmental and economic 
grounds. 


Sedgwick 

The word for service in 
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24 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


AIRPORTS/2 



Before the flight, a traveller sizes up some Scotch at Gatwick's duty-free shop, and behind the screens at Heathrow's Terminal 4 as passengers are checked in by the £17 million computer system 


Making the most of good buys 


* 


Commercial 
activities that 
range from 
the leasing of 
advertising 
sites to run- 
ning shops, 
restaurants and bars, have 
become increasingly im- 
portant for airport operators 
in Britain and the proceeds are 
making a significant contribu- 
tion towards funding airport 
building, extensions and 
refurbishing. 

The Government's recent 
relaxation of rules for the 
establishment of duty-free 
shops has meant that several 
of the smaller provincial air- 
ports. previously barred, have 
been able to set them up to the 
benefit of their balance sheets. 
In the case of the British 
Airports Authority, half of its 
1985-86 income of £395.6 
million came from commer- 
cial activities, an increase of 
iO per cent over the previous 
financial year. 

Does the passenger really 
obtain a good deal when he or 
she buys duty-free goods? The 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission investigated the 
commercial activities of BAA 


last year over a six-month 
period and found, in its report 
published in December, “that 
these arc conducted in a 
generally satisfactory 
manner." 

Despite this, passengers are 
heard to complain that the 
price differential between bot- 
tles of alcohol in the airport 
shops and high street super- 
markets is insufficient to war- 
rant carrying bottles on air 
journeys. 

Many in the aviation busi- 
ness have looked at ways of 
selling duty-free goods to pas- 
sengers at the airport of amval 
rather than departure, but 
though the practice has been 
introduced at some places 
abroad, the concept founders 
in Britain on two objections. 

First, Customs and Excise 
continues to aigue that duty- 
free supplies are traditionally 
sold to sustain travellers on 
their journeys, rather than to 
take home. Second, airports 
would have to be heavily 
remodelled at enormous ex- 
pense if the shops selling such 
goods wdte to be moved from 
the departures areas to the 
arrivals. 

Duty-free goods are, in feet. 


being displayed to departing 
passengers in Terminal 2 ar 
Heathrow before they pass 
through immigration and se- 
curity. But the goods can be 
picked up only when these 
barriers have been passed. The 
scheme has been introduced 
to reduce congestion. 

With privatization due for 
British airports next year, 
competition between the trad- 
ing activities at various air- 
ports, and especially those 
situated dose together, will 
become more intense. 

There is no doubt that the 
aggressive marketing of those 
who run British airports has 
resulted in a marked improve- 
ment of the commercial facil- 
ities offered to airport users in 
recent years. 

Gone is the tired sandwich 
in the aiiport snack bar, as is 
the grandiose five-course feast 
in the airport five-star res- 
taurant. Passenger tastes 
change and the aiiport 
marketeers ignore such 
changes at their commercial 
peril. 

Most airport eating places 
now are run on cafeteria lines. 
Airport bars still exist, but 
alongside them are stands 


sell rag nothing bat orangs 
juice. Shops that opened when 
the home computer craze was 
at its height are now closing, to 
be replaced by others selling 
sports clothes, shirts, ties and 
socks. 

Airport operators keep a 
keen eye on the performance . 
of their shop and restaurant 
tenants, setting price limits, 
checking on food standards, 
noting how many times a day 
a restaurant floor is swept and 
the tables cleaned. Contracts 
are keenly contested by the big 
catering houses of Britain, 
Europe and the United States 
when they come up fin- 
renewal. 

Though airports' main role 
is obviously to process pas- 
sengers to and from air jour- 
neys, the commercial side is 
vital to their financial well- 
being and is likely to become 
even more so in the future as 
the other main source of 
income, landing and parking 
charges remain largely pegged. 

In the case of the British 
Airports Authority they in- 
creased by only 3.6 per cent m 
1985-86, a decline of 23 per 
cent in real terms. 


The super-jumbos that never came 


Four of the aircraft stands 
designed into the new fourth 
terminal at Heathrow are big 
enough to accommodate 800- 
seater jumbos, bat no such 
airliner is being contemplated 
by any of the world's manufac- 
turers — which demonstrates 


some of fee planning problems 
that face airport operators. 

Instead of the monster air- 
liners confidently forecast only 
a few years age, the airlines 
have opted for improvements 
In contemporary planes to 
make them fly further, more 


quietly, and more efficiently, 
so returning reduced operating 
costs. 

Those numing airports look 
on this trend with mixed 
feelings. Though the arrival of 
800 passengers in one airliner 
would place a heavy strain on 


Since 1 April 1986 Highlands & Islands Airports Ltd has 
operated the eight aerodromes in the Scottish Highlands 
and Islands The aerodromes and their associated air rP 
services provide vital social, business and welfare 
links between the Highlands and Islands and 
the more populous centres of the country. 

Sumbui 


4' 

& 







Highlands & Islands 
Airports Limited 
Aviation House, 1A Traquair Park East, 
Edinburgh EHI2 7BD 
Telephone: 031-334 0333 

A subsidiary of the Civil Aviation Authority 



terminal facilities, it would 
reduce the number of move- 
ments on the runways. 

The trend at British airports 
has, in feet, been in the 
opposite direction, as die ele- 
ment of liberalization of air- 
route licensing introduced by 
the Civil Aviation Authority 
has resulted in more of the 
smaller airlines operating 
more comparitvely small 
planes. 

British Airports Authority 
figures show that at Heathrow 
the average number of pas- 
sengers aboard each plane 
landing in 1985-86 was 114, 
whereas it was 115 in die 
financial year 1981-82. 

Communities around air- 
ports in Britain may pcpect a 
lessening of the noise nui- 
sance, which they suffer as die 
new-geoeration jet engines 
roar in and out on the wings of 
such aircraft as the Airbus 
A310, Boeing 757 and the 
British Aerospace 146. 

New jet-props such as die 
BAe ATP and the French- 
Italian ATR 42 win brim e?en 
lower levels of intrnsioii, while 


A squeeze on the 
business sector 


many of the older 
of noisy airliners have been 
scrapped since the introduc- 
tion of new noise rales in 
Britain at the shut of this year. 

This trend has, however, 
already brought a move by the 
aviation industry to introduce 
more night flights within the 
hours of curfew at airports 
such as Heathrow and 
Galwick as a way of making 
more efficient use of the 
runways and terminals. It is a 
cause which will probably 
produce the next big 
confrontation between aviation 
and the environmentalists. 

One sector which is being 
badly squeezed as pressure on 
facilities at the two main 

London airports increases is 
business aviation. 

Such flights have been 
banned at peak hours, and 
promises from the Govern- 
ment of a discrete bos mess 
aviation terminal at Stansted, 
and more use of airfields such 
as Northolt, Biggin Hill, ami 
Faraborongh, have done little 
to soothe the anger of those 
who make their living from 
this sector of the business. 


I 

in. 


The most powerful vehicle at 
any British airport has an 
average altitude of five feet. 

for advertising targetted at International and Domestic passengers, contact lan Bohn on 01-499 8146 or at 
More O’Ferrall Adshel, 19 Curran Street, London Wl. Sole advertising sales agents for Heathrow; Gatwick, 
Stansted, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Prestwick, Aberdeen, Manchestec Southampton, Southend, Exeter and Belfast. 


' MORE “CTFERRAL. L ■ ADSHFI . • AIRPORTS DIVISION 


Nobody in the aviation in- 
dustry has been able to es- 
timate the cost of security at 
British airports. But with Brit- 
ain in the front line for 
possible terrorist attacks, the 
figure is high - not only in 
salaries for security workers 
and the cost of the equipment 
which they operate, but in 
losses to the airline from 
High is delayed, and from pas- 
sengers who were dissuaded 
from travelling. 

Pictures of London police 
officers carrying guns at 
Heathrow went around the 
world and were said to have 
been one of the biggest reasons 
why so many Americans de- 
cided to spend their vacations 


The rising cost 
of security 


More machines to 
back up humans 


at home this year instead of 
touring Europe. 

But increased security at 
British and other European 
airports did help to reduce the 
number of terrorist incidents 
this summer. In 1985 there 
were no fewer than 28 hijacks, 
nine incidents of sabotage in 
the air. and eight of sabotage 
at airports world-wide, and 
the type of incident was 
becoming more severe 

Keeping up the level of 
security staff commitment in 
checking passengers and their 
luggage during long days when 
nothing untoward happens is 
a continuing problem for 
those who run airports, which 
is why they are looking to- 
wards' increasingly sophis- 
ticated machines to back up 
the humans. 

British Aerospace is now 
marketing a device which, 
when introduced into a con- 


tai ner fun of luggage or freight, 
will detect hidden explosives, 
drugs, alcohol, or any other 
substance for -which it is 
programmed. Unlike human 
beings or sniffer dogs doing 
the same task, the Condor 
system, as it is called, does not 
become bored or distracted as 
meal times approach. 

Magnetic gates through 
which all air passengers have 
to pass before boarding are 
now available with the ability 
to indicate not only whether a 
person is carrying metal, but 
on which part of the anatomy 
it is concealed. This device 
can also deal with for more 
passengers within a given 
time, so cutting down the 
queues which cause frustra- 
tion and delayed aircraft 
departures at some terminals. 

Given unlimited human, 
equipment and financial re- 
sources. and an acceptance 
that no plane would ever leave 
to timetable, it is certain that 
every proscribed object being 
carried by passengers could be 
detected. 

But this level of search is 
obviously impractical and the 
airport operators and others 
who specialize in the relatively 
new science of aviation se- 
curity have the unenviable 
task of settingsiandards which 
will deter the criminal, while 
not bringing world aviation to 
a halt. 

In terms of other equipment 
at airports, the main thrust 
now is to update items which 
were installed as the last word 


in modernity when the jets 
first came in in the early 
1 960s. to the more demanding 
standards of today's aviation 
era dominated by the 450-seat 
Boeing 747 and other widc- 
bodied airliners. 

Baggage carousels on which 
passengers' cases are depos- 
ited for collection at the end of 
a flight were designed in the 
early 1 960s to cope with 180 
bags from a Boeing 707. but 
are swamped by the two-and- 
a-half times that number 
which emerge from the holds 
of a jumbo. Freight sheds 
which could, when originally 
built, keep abreast of a modi- 
cum of cargo through muscle 
power, helped by the ubiq- 
uitous fork-lift truck, arc hav- 
ing to be automated to keep up 
with the flood of parcels. 

Up to r.000 million people 
will travel by air throughout 
the world this ycar.Kceping 
track of them and their 
reservations — and their fre- 
quent changes of plans — can 
only be a task for the com- 
puter. a business tool with 
wide-ranging capabilities 
which arrived just in time to 
save the airlines from total 
chaos, but which is expensive 
to install and maintain. 

(British Airways spent £17 
million installing computer 
terminals and other equip- 
ment in Terminal 4 at 
Heathrow, on top of the £200 
million which it had cost the 
British Airports Authority to 
build the place.) 

Airlines have fer-neaching 


plans for further uses of ; 
computers to keep p? 1 *' *1*" 7 
the increases in their traffic • 
which are forecast, expen- , 
meats arc already going on W 
which passengers select a 
flight from details on their 
home or office television 

screens, pay for it by credit • 

card, are issued wtih a ticket 4 
from an automatic machine 
and receive a boarding card 
from another machine which 
opens the correct gate to admit 
them to their aircraft. 

Through a combination of 
the fear of terrorism, and the 
aftermath of one of the worst 
Years for air disasters in 1983. ’ 
there is increased emphasis on 
safeiv at airports. 

Control towers, radars and ; 

Standards are 
being raised 

instrument landing systems 
arc being upgraded to make 
the movement of aircraft 
more precise, both on the ti\w 
ways and runways, and in the ‘ 
air." 

Firefighting equipment is 
being renewed and crews con- 
stantly re-trained so that inter- 
vention at incidents is reduced , 
by vital seconds. Snow-clear- 
ing and dcricing equipment, 
has to be maintained every 
war. and ice-warning and 
detection systems installed. 

The Civil Aviation Author- 
ity lays down standards for the 
safe and efficient operation of 
Britain's airports, and these 
standards are continually be- 
ing raised. As a result equip- 
ment budgets now form a 
significant pan of the total 
annual expenditure of those 
who run the airports, and will 
continue to rise in the future. 


£• 


41 


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'vO 




THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 1 6 1986 


((FOCI IS 1) 

We have lift-off, say the North 


AIRPORTS/3 


Jetstream 31 of 
a service from the 


Heathrow-and Gatwick handle 
more than 45 milH^ POT" 
sengers a year and it is 
inevitable that they over- 
shadow all the otlmr airports 
in the south of the cou n try . 

They attract the- greatest 
level of investment of all UK 
airports — a £200 millinw 
? terminal capable of handling 
eight million passengers a 
year was opened at Heathrow 
this year and a similar &dhty 
at Gatwick is doe for commis- 
sion in 1988. 

Other major works at 
Heathrow include a £7004)00 
e xt ension of the check-in area 
at Terminal 2 and a refarbbb- 
ment and extension of Termi- 
nal 3 which will eventnally 
cost £70 millioa. 

Consultants for the British 
Airports Authority have teen 
looking for alternative sites for 
. the sludge works at the west- 
* era end of Heathrow so that 
the area may, in time, be used, 
as an airport exte n sion. 

Stansted traffic is 

tO Indld np as fHwy holiday 


Stansted traffic 
is building up 




flights move there and work on 
a big new terminal is expected 
to be comptetedin 1991. 

Binmngham’s new £60 mil- 
lion terminal, linked h> the BR 
mainline station and the Na- 
tional Exhibition Centre by a 
drivertess tram, handled L6 
million passengers in 1985, 
down 23 per cent on 1984. 

East Midlands, which last 
year saw its passenger traffic 
fall 1435 per cent to 926,000, 
reports a dramatic upturn in 
business this sranmer with 
147,000 p a ss e ng e r s using the 
airport in Jaly, an increase of 
30J per cent over the same 
month last year. Air cargo for 
July totalled 1^77 tonnes, np 
68.4 per «*■*- 

Netherlines, the Dutch 
covmmter carrier, introduced 
a service from East Mi d la nds 
to Amsterdam In Angnst, 
Terry Lovett, (he airport* new 
general manager, has become 
<tan adviser to the Join* Air- 


Rising 
stars 
of the 
South 


puts Committee of Local 
Authorities. 

Norwich, with a network of 
scheduled services operated by 
Air UK, which has Its en- 
gineering base there, is meet- 
ing a growing demand for 
inclusive torn- flights. 

The airport handled 
174,000 pa sse nge r s in 1965, a 
drop of 0.1 per cent on the 
previous year. 

Coventry, with improve- 
ments and extensions to its 
passenger faritfties, plans to 
increase sdD further its pack- 
age holiday services to the 
Mediterranean. 

Southend, managed by Brit- 
ish Airports International, a 
joint ventme between the Brit- 
ish Airports Authority and 
International AeradSt^ saw a 
loss tamed into a profit 
in 1985 and a passenge r 
increase of SS per centre 
196,000, the biggest growth at 
any UK regional airport 

Spending of £700,000 has 
teen authorized for ter mina l 
improv ement s, anew duty-free 
step and catering fadSoes. 

Southampton, by 

BAL saw Channel Islands 
traffic drop 2S per cent last, 
year and total traffic went , 
down 4.1 per cent to 276^00. 
New services this year udade 
British Air Ferries to Jersey 
and Guernsey, British Air- 
ways to Bmnmgham and 
NetherKines to Holland. 

Exeter, another BAI-man- 
aged airport, has had £5 
nflfioa invested in recent 
years in new facilities by its 
owners, Devon County Conn- 
ed. Jersey European Airways 
recently chose Enter as its 
main base and is operating a 
network of services from there 


to dm Channel Islands and (he 
North of England. 

Jersey continues to be one of 
rite busiest of the UK provin- 
cial airports with IS minion 
passengers in 1985, np 10.2 
per cent. 

Guernsey also showed 
healthy Increase in traffic, up 
11.8 per cent to 656^K)0. 

Bouraemouth-Hnm, along 
with Southampton one of the 
main points cm the mainland to 
the Channel Islands, saw a 9A 
per cent drop in traffic in 1985 
to 139,000. 

Cardiff with its njpway 
extended, is ready to handle 
tong-distance flights. Reflect- 
ing the economic stamp in its 
catchment area, the airport 
had a poor yearm 1985: traffic 
was down by 10.8 per cent to 
383^00. 

Bristol, Cardiff's traditional 
competitor, also suffered in 
1985 with a 7J per cent toll to 
410,000. The airport has re- 
cently invested £2 in 

improvements. 

Plymouth, owned by 


Luton is a leader 
; in package flights 


Brymim Airways, has air talks 
tO flie tilanik, the 

Isle of Scilly, both main 
London airports, Aberdeen 
and other UK provincial cen- 
tres. Brymon ptons to be one of 
the first operators into the new 
London City airport m dock- 
lands with its de Havffland 
Dash 7 airliners when the 
facility opens in late 1987. 

Luton, down 11.7 per cent in 
1985 with IS ntiDien pas- 
sengers, continues to he one of 
Britain's main package holi- 
day airports, and sane sched- 
uled services have opened 
from there recently. Its new 
£11 imDton terminal is tally 
operational and time are 
plans to expand its capacity 
from 35 million to 5 mfllton. 

Mansion, being promoted 
as Kent International Airport 
by Seabonrne Aviation , offers 
a 24-boor hand imp service 
with tall Customs facilities to 
operators of aircraft. 


Like many 
UK, provin- 
cial airports. 
Manchester 
had a fairly 
static year in 
1986, largely 
because of a drop m package 
holiday traffic, but has re- 
corded big gains this summer 
as the market boomed. In 
July, . Manchester handled a 
record 966.500 passengers, 
looking set to exceed its 1985 
total of six million. 

Compared with July, 1985, 
passengers to Spain increased 1 
by 56 per cent: to Portugal by 
35 per cent; and to Greece by 
25 per cent. 

A total of £200 million has 
been earmarked for future 
developments. Recent 
improvements include tbe 
opening of a new terminal 
satellite building with space 
for 1,000 passengers. 

The airport continues to be 
profitable. Ii has recently 
changed ownership with the 
demise of tbe Greater Man- 
chester Council. 

A group of local authorities 
now controls it as a pic. 

Newcastle, which in 1985 
saw its traffic drop 9.6 percent 
to just over one million pas- 
sengers. is spending £3 million 
on improvements. The airport 
expects to benefit from relax- 
ations in air service licensing 
between the UK, the Nether- 
lands and Scandinavia. 

Ronaldsway, Isle of Man, 
has suffered from changing . 
British holiday habits and has 
seen its traffic decline to . 
around 250,000 passengers a 
year. 

But the numbers look set to 
improve as the island in- 
creases in importance as an 
industrial and financial cen- 
tre. Low air fares are drawing 
traffic away from the sea ferry 
route to LiverpooL 
Blackpool's traffic rose 12.4 
per cent to 177,000 in 1985, 
and £1.2 million has been 
invested in new helicopter 
terminal facilities to serve the 
British Gas Morecarabe field 
25 miles offshore. 

Liverpool terminal, built 
in 1938, has recently been 
superseded by a new facility 
costing £3.5 million, built by 
Wimpey Construction.’ ^ ■ 

The airport had a good year 
in 1985 with passenger traffic 
up 15.3 per cent to 259,000. 
Liverpool is one of eight 
provincial airports qualifying 
for duty-free -shops- - under 
recent changes in legislation. 

Leeds/Bradford's traffic 
rose by 14.9 per cent in 1985 
to 464,000 on its network of 
scheduled and charter ser- 
vices. 

The airport has recently had 
a £23 million improvement 
programme, including a run- 
way extension and terminal 
building development 


Ene Thortoum 


John Lomas 


commuter services from its 
site near the centre of the city. 

In Scotland, Glasgow had 
2.6 million passengers in 
1985. but this was a drop of 
1.8 per cent largely due to a 14 
per cent decrease in inter- 
national charter traffic. Opera- 
tions were affected by runway 
resurfacing, a project costing 
£3.5 million. Terminal Un- 
ities came under heavy pres- 
sure and extensions have been 
built to ease the problem. 

The British Airports 
Authority is drawing up a 
long-term plan for tbe 
airport's development 

Attempt to win 
more business 


Edinburgh's passenger traf- 
fic increased 3.4 per cent to a 
record 1.6 million in 1985, 
largely due to a 5.8 per cent 
increase on the Heathrow 
route. It also benefited by 
night diversions from Glas- 
gow while resurfacing -was 
taking place. 

A proposal for an airport 
hotel linked to the passenger 
terminal is being considered. 

Prestwick, with its role as 
Scotland's long-haul gateway 
confirmed in the Government 
White Paper on airports pol- 
icy, saw an 8 per cent increase 
in North Atlantic traffic in 
1985. Overall, its passenger 


Northern lights: 
small airports such as 
Sanday in the 
Orkneys, above, stSU 
have a role to play 
serving the Highlands 
and the islands despite 
the basic levd of their 
facilities; others, such 
as Blackpool, have 
increased their 
business. At Blackpool 
traffic rose by 124 per 
cent to 177,000 
passengers last year. 
And a helicopter . 
terminal, right, has 
been built to serve the 
British Gas 
Morecambe field 25 
miles offshore 


Manchester had 
record numbers 


what do 
all these 

aerodromes 
have in 
common? 


ABERDEEN BEDFORD 


BELFAST’ BENBECULA 


BIRMINGHAM 


BOSCOMBE DOWN • CARDIFF 
EDINBURGH - FARNBOROUGH 


CATWICK GLASGOW 


HEATHROW* INVERNESS 


ISLAf* KIRKWALL 


MANCHESTER PRESTWICK 


STANSTED • STORNOww 


SUMBURGH ■ TIREE • WICK 


Ar fr-=fic control at ail these united Kingdom aeredrer^ is proved 


National Air Traffic Services 


nf neeratiens =-e acknowledges v/cridw 


Humberside airport's 
growth has been aided by the 
opening of the Humber bridge 
in 1981. 

In that year, tbe airport 
handled 47,000 passengers. 
Last year the figure had risen 
to 125.000. A £200,000 apron 
development scheme is com- 
plete and plans are in hand for 
a £600,000 terminal building 
extension. 

A duty-free shop was 
opened in July. An expanding 
list of scheduled destinations 
includes Amsterdam. Aber- 
deen, Edinburgh, Glasgow 
■and Gatwick. 

Teesside is another airport 
which now qualifies for a 
duty-free shop. A £750,000 
extension programme ■ has 
been completed. Last year, the 
airport handled 278,000 pas- 
sengers, a 1.3 per cent drop on 
1984. 

Belfast International with 
its new terminal buildings 
completed as part of a £25 
million expansion pro- 
gramme. dealt with 1.6 mil- 
lion passengers last year, an 
increase of 43 per cent over 
1984. 

Belfast Harbour, owned by 
Short Brothers, continues to 
provide competition with 


numbers rose 1.7 per cent to 

238.000. 

Promotional activities con- 
tinue in the US and Canada in 
an attempt to attract more 
business. 

Aberdeen, with its heli- 
copter activity, has been hit by 
the reduction in North Sea oil 
and gas exploration. Heli- 
copter passengers were down 
8.6 per cent in 1985 to 

608.000. while those on fixed- 
wing flights declined 0.5 per 
cent to just over one million. 

Apron reconstruction ha 
been completed and a new tax 
and duty-free shop opened in 
the international lounge. 

The Highlands and Islands 
aerodromes — Benbecula, 
Inverness. Islay. Kirkwall 
Stornoway, Sumburgh, Tiree 
and Wick — are now under 
separate ownership and 
management as a result of the 
Government's airports policy. 

Highlands and Islands Air- 
ports Ltd was formed as a 
wholly-owned subsidiary of 
the Civil Aviation Authority 
to start operations on April I 
this year, with air-traffic con- 
trol and engineering support 
staff provided by the CAA on 
a secondment or service con- 
tract basis. 

; The eight airports handled a 
total of 66.500 passengers in 
1985-86. a 1.34 per cent 
increase over the- previous 
financial year. 


More than a 
guiding light? 


v » i t 


. o* *, .. v ■■ ■ tJ - 

Tr.t? Ahpch Division o! GEC Elwdnca! Projects Limited 
has extensive experience in the design manufacture- acc 
installation of 2 wide variety of airfield lighting and 
electrification systems. GEG have developed £ nev: Tange of 
Airfield Lighting fittings specifically for use at STOLPORT's. 
GEC will be supplying, installing and cpmnvss'onmc these 
new fittings in s configuration Ce.'picped to rr.ee- 1 the CAA 
requirements at “he new Lonoon City Airport • 

GEC ELECTRICAL PROJECTS LIMITED. 


•• •- 

Ts'eoh o-.i- 


GEC Electrical Projects Limited 


STANDBY 

FOR 

TAKE OF! 


Primesight is the advertising 
contractor for 20 regional 
airports and is sales agent for 
over 200 airports worldwide. 

Recently we have invested in 
more sales power. In fact our 
field force is now 60 strong 
operating out of London and six 
regional offices covering most 
local and national markets. 

Part of this investment has 
gone into a new Airport Sales 
Division headed up by our 
Sales Development Manager - 
Lynne Ronayne. 

In short this means more 
advertising in the airport and 
more income for the airport ‘ 
authorities. 

PRIMESIGHT IS INDEED 
READY FOR TAKE OFF! 


PRIMESIGHT 

The New Force In Airport Advertising 

01 - 834 9801 


C 















I 

in. 


- - - 1 — — J •» w -t •" -4* a ijtm>i- 


AO l>i>J 



Science report 


COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Anti-pollution role for deep bugs 


COURT 
CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
September 15: The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, Presi- 
dent of the Save the Children 
Fund, today attended the 


sions, Barnwell Road, and 
Cbapleton House, Jelf Road, 
London SW2. 

Mrs Michael Wigtey was in 
attendance. 


YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
September 15: The Duke of 

Kent, Patron of the British 

Launch of New Industry and Computer Society, this after- 
Commercc Initiative Luncheon * noon chaired the final Judging 
at the Mansion House where Meeting for the BCS A 


Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Right Hon the 
Lord Mayor (Sir Allan Davis). 

Mrs Timothy HoWemess 
Roddam was in attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
September IS: The Duchess of 
Gloucester, Patron-in-Cbief of 
the Brixton Neighbourhood 
Community Association, this 
afternoon] opened sheltered 
accommodation for the West 
Indian elderly ai Hanover Man- 


The Royal Society. Cariton 
House Terrace, London SWi. 

Sir Richard Buckley was in 
attendance. 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
September IS: Princess Alexan- 
dra was present this evening at 
the 4Qlh Anniversary Gala Con- 
cert of the Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra at the Royal Albert 
Hall. 

Lady Mary Mumford was in 
attendance: 


Marriages 


MrCEJVL Gilbertson 
and Miss NXJB. Ltoyd-PMBpps 
A service ofbtessing was held on 
Saturday, September 6, at the 
parish church of St Nicholas, 
Pembrokeshire, after the mar- 
riage of Mr Edward Gilbertson 
to Miss Nicola LLoyd-Pbiiipps. 

Mr Graham Thompson was 
best man. 

A reception was faekl at 
Llangwarrea and the honey- 
moon is being spent abroad. 

Mr CJ. North way 
and Miss H-S. Spar Ices 
The marriage took place on 
September 14, at the West- 
minster Synagogue, 

Knightsbridge, of Mr Colin 
North way, son of Mrs J-G. 
Northway and the late' Group 
Captain EG. North way. and 
Miss Henrietta Sparkes, daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs J. A Sparkes. 
Rabbi Albert Friedlander 
officiated. 

Mr RJ). Oldfield 
and Miss WJX Wallis 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, September 6, at the 
parish church of St Andrew, 
Bishopstone. Sussex, between 
Mr Richard David Oldfield, 
eldest son of Mr and Mrs P.D. 


Oldfield, of Laughton, and Miss 
Wendy Dawn Wallis, eldest 
daughter of the Rev R.C and 
Mis Wallis, of The Vicarage, 
Bishopstone. Nuptial Mass was 
celebrated by Father R-C. 
Wallis. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by Mr Mark Wallis, 
was attended by Miss Adele- 
Louise Wallis, Miss Nicola 
Gerring, Miss Fleur Reece and 
Michael Barnes Wallis. Mr M. 
Oldfield was best man. 

The reception was at The 
Oaks, Laughton, and the honey- 
moon is being spent in Spain. 

Mr AJHL Ritchie 
and Miss NJL Harris 
The marriage look place on 
Saturday, September 13, at St 
Edmund's Church, Castieton. 
between Mr Andrew Ritchie, 
younger son of Mr and Mrs 
Alexander Ritchie, of 
Thomfield House, Vine Road, 
London, SWI 3, and Miss 
Nicola Harris, youngest daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs J.G. Harris, of 
Rushap Hall, Chapd-en-Ie- 
Frith. 

The bride was attended by 
Emily and Chloe Constantinidi. 
Mr William Mines was best 
man. 


Latest wills 

Mr Leslie Marie Slot, of Mary le- 
bone. London, left estate valued 
at £1,170.540 neL 
Mr Jeremy David Howe,, of 
Winchester. Hampshire, who 
was piloting a helicopter when it 
crashed near Banbury, left estate 
valued at £78,000 net 
Mr James O'Bmrke, publican, 
of the Ramble Inn, Dublin, left 
estate in England, Wales and the 
Republic of Ireland valued at 
£508,137 nee 

Mr George Colin Crompton, of 
Didsbury, Greater Manchester, 
comedian, left estate valued at 
£76.844 neL 

Mr John Lindsay Wood, of 
Swtihland, Leicestershire, left 
estate valued at £1.309,682 neL 
Mrs Constance Leonora Selllck, 
of Burwash, East Sussex, left 
estate valued at £607,631 neL 


Allen, formerly Bishop of 
Derby, left estate valued at 
£475.858 neL After various 
bequests she left the residue 1 
equally between the Children's 
Society, Friends of the Geigy 
Corporation. Christian Aid, and. 
the Distressed Gentlefolk's Aid 
Association. 

Mr Edgar Norman Gladden, of 
New Barnet, Hertfordshire, left 
estate valued at £136,369 neL 
He left bis collection of photo- 
graphs to the National Museum 
of Photography at Bradford, and 
the residue to the National 
TrusL 

Mr Frederick South Morse, of 
Yoxford, Suffolk, left estate 
valued at £643,604 neL 
Mrs Constance Mary Pinckney, 
of Exeter, Devon, left estate 
valued at £640.468 neL 


Mr Philip Henry Clough, of 

w _ Fordingbridge, Hampshire, left 

Mrs Madeline Frances Allen, of testate valued at £961,930 neL- 
Deddington, Oxfordshire, 4IHe left £50,000 to the British 
widow of the Right Rev G. F. Diabetic Association. 


Forthcoming 
marriages 

MrS-J. Crowther 
and Miss PJL Summers 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, son of the late 
Mr Geoffrey Crowther and Mrs 
Jill Crowther, of Barnstaple, and 
Pippa. daughter of Mr Denis 
Summers and Mis Brenda Sum- 
mers, of North wood. 

MrJLELF. McCKntock 
and Miss JA. Lucfcock 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander Edward 
Fianklin (Frank), elder son of 
Mr N.C McClintock, CBE, and 
Mis McClintock, of Lower 
Westport, Wareham, Dorset, 
and Julia Adeline (Lulu), youn- 
ger daughter of Mr Thomas 
Lutikock, of Flint House, 
Barkway, Royston, Hertford- 
shire, and Mrs James Noble, of 
25 Portugal Place, Cambridge. 
Mir P.G. MOkr 
and Miss J-A. Downs 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, son of George 
and Sally M flier, of Ottawa, 
Canad a, and Jennepher, daugh- 
ter of Allan and June Downs, of 
Attadale, Western Anstraha. 

Mr W.A. Morley 
and Miss SJL Hncker 
The engagement is announced 
between William, elder son of 
Dr and Mrs GJE. Morley. and 
Sally, daughter of Mr and Mis 
Michael Hucker, both of Win- 
chester, Hampshire: 

Mr TJXJ. Syder 
and Miss CX. Ayrton-Grime 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy Dominic 
James, third son of Mr and Mrs 
Russell Syder, of Tunbridge 
Wens, Kent and Charlotte Lou- 
ise, eldest daughter of Mr Philip 
Ayrton-Grime, CVO, and Mrs 
Ayrton-Grime, of Windsor, 
Berkshire. 


It has been generally accepted by scientists feu 
life exists only on or dose to the sorface of the 
earth. Organisms in soil were thought to Sourish 
down about as Cur as die penetration of fie 
deepest plant roots. 

That limit was thought to be about 25 feet bed 
research sponsored by Do Pont, the chemical 
company, and the US Depa rtm ent of Energy has 
found an incredlbe range of organisms m soil 
down to depths of 850 feet. 

The joint groan, from six American research 
centres, have found bogs so nameroos that they 
most affect die chemistry of the soflanmnd them. 

“The diversity we found deep down ts 
astonishing”, said Dr Gnl FUttnaas, of Do 
Port's Savannah River Labo ra tory in Aiken, 
South Carotins. “Some of oar deepest samples 
contain as many as 20 million (organisms hi **^h 
gramme of sofl- There are many types of bacteria 
and fungi and dear evidence of amoeba”. 

The next surprise was that below 50 feet, the 
numbers and diversity of tile remains nnd c n g prf 
for 800 feet “Everybody thought tint the 
en v i r onm ent in deep soil became harsher the 
deeper you went and that must qufckfy reduce the ■ 
organisms present”, said Dr Fbomtans. 


By Keith Hindley 


SIR T SIW Y LEY CLAYTON 

infl uential obstetrician 

and gynaecologist 


"The inescapable conclusion Is that the 
environment going down there simply is not 
getting severe stair*. 

These fiading g will radically alter Ideas about 
what goes on at depth between surface sous and 
bedrock. Above aU, it will force a complete re-ap- 
praisal of fresh water bearing rocks and how 
pollutants affect them. 

“We never that «pf®s had 

bkdogkal presence , said Dr David BalkwdL A 
biolegist at Florida Stole University ai Talla- 
hassee. “These deep organisms may well be 
purifying the aquifer- If not, then we may be able 
to persuade them to do just that, possibly ' ~ 
of genetic engineering." 

., Th e ^ V 1 ISC sitltfllt 30 OHM* tHT flCM 

these levels and rtmay eventoally be possibfoto I Hcwaskaishtedin 


s . 


****?&£* 00 
Se ^^UyTnflnenced medi- 
cine, With nationally and 

sssgAsSa 


from 1963-1972 *** «*“*S* 
lant editorship from 19/-- 
1975. During this period uk 
journal achieved high aca- 
demic sianding. 

In addition, he served on 
numerous college committees 


■'WJS £!’ tSSS * n ffitei* 
“MESaffiS S2£X% edte.he.Ud 


use organisms to help to dean up aquifers 
man has already polluted. 

“It will be better if genetic engineer* can get 
specific organisms that already live at these 
depths to digest specific poUuteafs rather dan 
trying to persuade sorface bugs to adapt to a new 
environment and adopt a new food source**, said 
Dr BalkwelL “These finds open up entirely new 
p os sibilities in and UP 

f gromKlwater resources'*. 


Committee 
Awards. 
Clayton 


was 


University news 


Cambridge 

Elections and awards 

ST JOHN'S 

Elected or n. 

N Anionlou _ 
(Townsend;, M 




to 

(Baylia). C J 

AW Baser OteyUa^s 

- S ffBarretf (RoItertooL D C 

(BayliaX 

CemponlesX J E J Sotlomtey (United 

Stun Own panics). R Boyle CBaylia). C 

A Bryant OMloton X H K Ocrasay 
(RoUestonX J D Boston rrownsendXE 
G Cftetm CRoUerton*. D J F CUncn 
(Wby left tad). N P _ Douglas 
fwitytmeadL J H H Drummond 
(Townsend*. □ G nuraate CMcAUMyX 
E M Esealee (Rone® on). G m Fteftpool 


N AOUIMIL R . 

.. Biswas. C C J KOgour. R A Wastou 

itor Medical - 

C Oiean. k 




(United Steel Companiesl. C 


(Mayor). R M E Fowler 
G T Francis (BaytisX 
(United Steel ~ 

.United steel 

(Listen s J Hmer 
Companies V J Ham 
Hussey (United Steel 

T M mao (United 


tX 8_M Gray 


paniesx R A Jarvis (HorneX C E J 

Kilgdur (Baulls). D Konstam 

(WhyidieadX H S Komar (TowmendX 
R A Leese (HomeL C R Le Sueur 
(United Steel Companies). KCL Laura 
(Rolleslon). RAH Lewis (Wtartetwad). 
P J McSrlen (GununerX ON Mason 
(Townsend). K j Mercer (Townsend). 
N A Moden CMcAuleyX Tl M MorUnwr 
(Home). J F p Murptar (wnytenodL 


(Townsend). D J Palmer (Homo. E J Simons (Corflek 


Panden (WhytebcadX M J Pickard 
(Henry Arthur ThonmsA P J puts 
(BaylBX A N Rtnorose (WhyutauO. D 
E Rourke (Unuedsuet Cocnwnles). c 
J Simons (TownseDd). G J 


Memorial service 

Mr RJL Freeman 
A memorial service for Mr 
Richard Broke Freeman, was 
held on September 12, 1986, at 
the University Church of Christ 
the King, Gordon Square. The 
Rev Dr Malcolm Rush ton 
officiated. 

Professor RJ. Berry read the 
lesson. Sir Randolph Quirk read 

poems by Robert Herrick and 

Dr RC. Fisher read from John 

Ray’s Wisdom of God Dr Eric 

Kom gave an address. Among 

those present were: 

Or M Wtiltear rwtdowX Mr F Freeman 
and Mr P Freeman (Mas). Mr ' 
wnuear OxuOier-tn-iawXSr Jan 
UtfatiO) (Provost). Str Peter Meda- 


wastt rwnyieheadX J R western 
(Townsend). R A Weston (BsyllaX R J 
' (united Steel ConuNtmes). M 
ns (Bayusx A W woods 
M T Yas 


Arcliaeolony and AntbnvolQgy: R M 
E FOwtvTM r Ya^cSmrmier 
Srtenoe: C J Slade Economics: S 
BaUga. N p Douqtas. D Konstam. R a 
wami Engmeenra: j o Buston. j mm 
Dronanood. K J Mercer. O F Pa&ta. C 
J Stmmom: Enolbtc J F P Murptiy: 
land Economy: D C Berm 
Mathematics: iwTw Baker. X J Ban 
GT Francis: R A Jarvis. R A Lee»- - 
M Mortimer. D J Palmer. P J Pom. D 
I Slater. J D Slater. G A Taylor. N P 

s m r iuxm 

M ode rn Languages: N a Modem 

dfiott Veterinary Memcme: J Huns. 

_ . . SELWYN COLLEGE 

Eected or nsetected in sctwlnstitoc 
CUeralcH Engtoeertog: P J H«Mn (JR 
Selwyn): Engineering: a J Harrison (J 
R SelwynL EngUsh: C WilttS U R 
Sefwynj: Medical Sciences: R m 
amain (Btelwn AOratamX K M 
SJmldns OHsMD Abrahams): Modem 
and Medieval Languages: GAL law« 

* — - I SddiCfS: D J 

„ Hum (CorfieidX B 

(Corfleld) J J TUman 

(Ooroeld) A PtiUnoa (CorBeUX T 
Young (COrneka 
Eiened to me Title of Scbolar: 

Law: c EconomkJes: Modern and 
Medieval Lang uages: I R Sanders 
Elected to an Dtfdwnon. 

Archaeology and Auhnopology: A A 
SCbwMn (W BctwyiO. 

College Prizes on Examination Re- 
sults. 

Archaeology and. An t hro pology: a a 


Capo (WhytebcadX 


H WHO 
(Hamel 

Prizes: 

Cutters: J F P Murphy: Constable: a 
W Bolt. C R Le Sueur: Diver: H K 
Earle-. R Boyle. H K Bungay; 
— . A N Rtngrose: Craves: A J 
PfckeanL HocUn: C J Atkin. D C 
Duagate. C M Warwick, r j. 
Wheatley. A W Woods: Drattnahead- 
Howies: D E Rourke: Hughes: S M 
Ena lee. H S Kumar. A N Rhvgrose. c 
M Warwick. A w Woods: Johnston: c 
E JaKUgour. D E Rourke: Peter Ralph 

SSEJ 

AngioSaxan. Norse and Cemex RAH 
Lewis; (for Chemical EhWneenng): H 
S Kumar: Uor Comnuier Sdenceh P J 
MGBrten: ClUr EconamtcaTcOFoni: 
(for Engmeertngle o N Mason (for 


Wallis: Caw: C Economldes: 
Mathematics: N p Byott: Medical 
Science s : R M CwtuiCK M SUSdra: 
Modern and Medieval Languages: I R 
Sanderson: J B C Stnadwlck. GAL 
low: Natural Sciences: O J Drake. N 
Hunt. B J Simons. J J TUman. A 
PhUnotL T Young: Veterinary CHMcal 
saeaces: B WPmy. 

Baxter Chemical Prtze: P j HoUiu 
Forster Prize lor German: GAL 
Lowe: Frast Prize for Mathematics: N 
P Bycat: Howartn-Cray Prize far 
Thnlonr- M G Tanner. Law prise: C 
EconouMies: Seraphim Prize for Bio- 

chemistry: a h Davies: whlthead 

History Prize: D A Jarvis: Scruby 
Pna for Veterinary Clinical Science: 
B W Parry. 


war. OM. CH. and Lady Medawar. 
Professor R J AudJaTprofessor C 


Meeting 

Royal Over-Seas League 
Mr David Underdo wn was the 
guest speaker at the opening 


profeSSrT com. profi^wF^ meeting of the Autumn session 

Heymann- Proteppr M j_ McQaahan. of the DisCUSSl 


Professor A P Mathias. ProMnor W R 

Meade. Professor D H Michael, 
Professor O SKutsdi. processor and 
Mn E w Handley. Malor-General I H 

Baker Cnawaiy of the coUegeX Mrs C 

Barlow. Mrs N A MUctuson. Mr R 

Gaskin. Mr and Mrs J Page. Mr j 

Graham-Cam pbdL Mr S Sam ana 

many former colleagues at University 

College. London. 


ion Circle of the 
Royal Over-Seas League held 
yesterday evening at Over-Seas 
House, St James’s. Mrs Eliza- 
beth Cresswell presided. 


Batchers’ Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Butchos' Com- 
pany for the ensuing yean 
Master Mr Norman Cedi 
Poultney; Wardens: Mr R.W. 
Baker, Mr P. Moore, Mr GJ. 
Sharp, Mr R.WJL Coveil and 
Mr R.E Stedman. 


Reception 


Instkotioa of Crvfl Engineers 
The President of the Institution 
of Civil Engineers held a recep- 
tion last night at the institution's 
headquarters at Great George 
StrecL Members and their 
guests were received by the 
president. Mr. Donald Reeve, 
and the secretary, Mr John 
McKenzie; and their ladies. 


Birthdays today 

Miss Lauren Bacall, 62; Sir 
Alexander Giles, 71; Lord 
Grimtborpe, 71; Lord Hender- 
son of Brompton, 64; Mr Andy 
Irvine, 3.5; the Very Rev W.B. 
Johnston. 65; Mr Kenneth Lind- 
say. 89; Sir John Megaw, 77; Sir 
Andrew Noble, 82; Singeon 
Rear-Admiral L.B. Osborne, 86; 
Sir Jolm Page. MP. 67; Baroness 
Pike, 68; Miss Sheila Quinn, 66; 
Mr B.R. Roberts, 80; Lord 
Ryder of Eaton Hastings, 70; Sir 
John Saint, 89; Mrs Steve 
Shirley, 53; Mr MJ. Stewart, 54; 
Professor Sir John Walton, 64. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BBITHS, WU9UAGES, 
HEATHS mi IM HBHMUK 
*4 a toe + t» VAT 

(minima ro 3 lines) 

Announcements, autheniicaicd by Ibe 
name and permanent addra of the 
semter. may be sent ux 

THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 

S sia Street 
on El 9XS 

or tefephooed (bv telephone wtat- 
cibers only) 10 : tl-tSl 382* 

Announcements can be received by 
vtephone between TOOam and 
5.30pm Monday u Friday, on Salirr- 

S r between « 00 am and 12 noon. 

481 4088 00*1 Far puHkuion ihe 
Mkraing day by I -30pm. 

F0RTHC0HHG MARDUIGES. W&NMfiS 
cw on Court and Social Page to a Rm 
+ 15* VET. 

Court and Social Page annouccmcals 
can wn be aeenwed by idcpbonc. 
Enquiries he 01-822 9953 
I after IQJOamL or send he 
1 F mnliiB t .il SareoL Lmdm El 9XM. 


Phase allow at least 48 hows before 
pnMkaiion. 


TTv Uonr winch DM* IMiMni r q w tm B 
hnrumr the hna of Uie carnet: TUB wn 
Ihe Lord-* wng and H to norwHoui In 
nur <m. 

SI. Mark 12. SO and 11 


DEATHS 


BIRTHS 


ABLER - On August 31sL at Pembay 
HcanttaL Tunbndgn Wells, lo 8i®rM 
and Michael, a son Ralph MaxUnWan 
BARNARD - On September llth. to 
Elizabeth (nfe Legal) and RoberL- a 
son. Hugh Dennis Richard. 
■ASKERVnXE - On September XOtti 
to JudKh (nee PtcKles) and Neu. a son 
Other John, a brother far Alex. 
Nicola and Jenny. 

CAMPBELL - On September 13Ui to 
Carolyn and Robert at Princess 
Mary’s. Newcastle, a daughter. Alex- 
andra Jane. 

ELLISON - On September 13lti. to 
Catherine (itee van Scheme!) and 
Jonathan, a son. Benjamin GteanL 
HARRY • To David and Jennifer into 
Keene) of Chelsea. Quebec Canada, 
a daughter. Rebecca Jade, on Sep- 
tember 10 th al Ottawa General 
HtoPOM. 

IACMSON - On September 9th. to 
Nkky toto 8rs«nt) and Dktk. a sox 

Nicholas Edwin. 

KERR-W1LSON - On September 13th. 
ai St PauTs. Cheltenham, to Joey and 
Richard, a daughter. Catrtona Oftvta. 
PMSMEH • On September 10th. to 
Susan and Martin, a daughter, a 

atolar to Vldd. Nicholas. Valerie and 

Beniamin. 

SANDERS • On September 130i. to 
Benlta and Nlntan. a daughter. 
TAYLOR - On September 13th. at 
Pembuiy HcopnaL » Nicky m to 

MctU and rim. a nausfttcr. Jtsstca. 
a sister tor RmsuL 
THORNTON - On September 140. to 
Michael and Mavts (nee Bragg) a son. 
Janies Christopher Patrick Uamto). a 
brother tor Ben. 

WESTON • On Septembe* llth. ai the 
Portland Hospital, to Sarah <nte 
Fafttornsi and Ctsvld. a daughter. 
Georgina FUtpa. 


MARRIAGES 


IHJKH : CAMVELL - The marw 
took Place on September fith. 1986. 
at St Martins. Epsom, between David 
wescott. elder son of Mr and Mrs W 
W FOmer. or undfteld. Sussex and 
Evelyn MargareL daughter of Mr 
and Mrs C A CampbelL of Epsom. 
Surrey 


All A RB - On 13th September 1986. 
peacefully M Watford General Hospi- 
tal. Geoffrey Higginson. aged 90 
years, loving husband of Sylvia 
Mary. 

■AINBIUMiC - On September 15th. 
Robert John, aged 87. fonneriy of 
Apole TIee Farm. Great PI umpneod. 
Norfolk, peacefully al SUfGkey Old 
Han. Norfolk NR23 1QJ. Funeral al 
SUfTkey SI John, al 3.15pm on 
Wednesday. September 17th. 

BASS - On 12 th September. 1906. 
Eunice Louise, at GBUtts. Natal wid- 
ow of Hb Honour Judge John Ra m 
mother of Richard, pfichad and 
Sarah. Donations If desired to Canoo- 

. Research. Memorial service at SL 
James the Greater. London Road. 
Leicester on Friday. I9tit September. 
1986. al 11 JO am 

BENNETT. OecSy Ynys (Gugs) - On 
September 13 Ul peacefully in Mount 
Alvemia Hospital. Guildford. Funer- 
al strictly private, family oowero 
only. 

BOWER - On 15th Se pte mbe r , at home 
tn Btnlaratx. Majorca. Marie-Thercae 
(Tessa) aged 84. Mother of Jane 
Bembach and gnmamotnerof Mark. 
Angus. John Paul. Christina. Alexan- 
dra and Emma. Funeral took place to 
seller on Monday lath September. 

CLAYTON - On September 1 2th. to 
Kings College HospttaL Sir Stanley, 
past president RCOG. Professor 
Emeritus University of London. 
Much loved Gather of Richard and 
ntzabetit. Private cremation, no 
flowers please. Donations if desired 
to Birthright RCOG. or Medical 
Research TrusL KCH. Memorial Ser- 
vice io be announced taler, enoniriea 
to L Hawtdns & Sans Ltd. tel 
Lmiherheud 37243S. 


„ - On September 14th 
1986. after a prolonged Utoem to 
Spain and at BUPA Hospital to Nor- 
wich. Dorothy, beloved wife of 
George and dear moths' of Timothy. 
Andrew mid Penelope. FUnsai ser- 
vice at SL Marys Church. Mount 
DIsb. Norfolk on Friday Sep- 
tember 19th al 11.00 am. Flowera 
ino wreaths please) may be sent to 
Rackhams Funeral Sendee. Stanley 
Road. Dtes. Norfolk 


On September 12th. sud- 
denly al Shtrenewton. Chepstow, 
Thomas Preston aged 77 of 
Sumtystde. htynyddbach. 

Shlrenewlon. Beloved husband of 
the late EUa. Dear father of Basil and 

Mary. Beloved grandfather of Aman- 
da- Emma and Sarah. Funeral 
Service 11-00 am. Friday. Septem- 
ber 19th. at SL Thomas a Beckett 
Church. Shtrenewton. Followed by 
cremation at Cmford Crematorium. 
Bristol at 12.40 pm. Flowers may be 
sent to J. James Funeral Directors. 
Chepstow. Tel: 2571 or 3341. 

GAUU Peacefully In bospftaL Antho- 
ny, Beloved husband of Mabel (BeO. 
lather of Philippa and Paddy, step- 
father of David, grandfather of 
Amanda. P«er aid Robert. Late of 
Nylon Houle. Wester-gate. West Sus- 
sex. Service to Chichester 
Crematorium. No Qowera ptease. 

OMACH - On August 30th peacefully 
al home, uiy Ann aged 99 years or 
Cherry Trees. Wood Green. The fu- 
neral took place September on. 
Much loved by family and friends. 
Donations Mea s e to The R- N.i i 

HAN - Suddenly white fumhing m 
Pakistan, lan Malcolm Haig. MA. 

MSc aged 4S yearn, only swi or Mr 
H Hafo. 6 Cue Vale Road. Exeter and 
the late Rev C A Haig. Memorial Ser- 
vice to be announced. Donations to 
Urn's memory. If desired, to a charity 
of your choice. 

HONS. John McAdeo - On September 
14th, peaoefidty In hospital al Chicii- 
esbr. aged 76. much totvd husband 
of Reeve and father of Marriott. Fu- 
nmt at Chichester Cramatortan on 
Thursday September 18th at 3J0pm 


MMKKM. Dr - On September I2th 
1986. peac e fully, aged 76 yean at 
hb daughter's home. John or Oaten 
HUL Canterbury. Kent rormerty or 
29 Grange Rd. Edinburgh. Beloved 
father, gramuaaier and friend of 
many. Funeral Sendee tekn piaoe at 
Crundale Church, on Wednesday. 
September I7tto al 3^S0pm. folpwed 
by a private committal service. Fam 
By flowers only, donations, 
desired, to the Asthma Research 
OoundL via MR J S J Mount Chapel 
Farm House. Pelham. Nr Canter- 
bury. KenL 

imsusm - cm ism September. 
Joyce, wonderful wife of Guy. 
adored mother of Gemma. Charles. 
Elizabeth. Lavtnfa and Andrew. Dot- 
ing grandmother and beloved aunt of 
Jo » far Nelson. Funeral private. No 
tenets. 

MLL Mary Woodroflfe - On September 
llth. aged 83. Cremation 12 noon 
on Wednesday. September 17th. at 
Chichester. No Bowers please, but 
donations to Radiotherapy Research 
Fund. St Luke's HosptteL GuUdtonl. 

LADD* . On September 12th. 1986. 
peacefully in twsvttaL Mariorte 
Doudney (nto Gate) widow of LLOoL 
C.W.V. Ladds, aged 88. Much loved 
mother and grandmother. Funeral 
Service at St PrierD Church. Exton. 
SoroeraeL on Thursday. September 
18th. 2.30pm. Donations if desired to 
Extan Church c/o H Hawkes & San 
Funeral Otrectoia. Mtoehead. (el 
6123. 

LLOYMtWTOCK - On September 
14th. after a long mneas. which he 
bore with the greatest courage. Dr 
Phtop A UoviFBoatack. MA. D PhfL 
Fellow of Wadhztxn OoUege. Oxford. 
Dearly loved son of Peter ml 
Etizabeth. 


• On Sentanber iSBl 
peacefully at wtntfti on. LLCdr 
Thomas Lee of the Old Pars ona ge. 
Uffcutme. Devon. Beloved husband 
of the late Eito. and tovtng tether and 
grandfather. Funeral Savlce at 
Ken tis h eai e Parish Church. 
Thursday. September 18th. at 2*30 
pm CWtih Christ which is far bettoX 


- On September 10th. 1986. 
peacefully at home. 42 Gmai Cum- 
berland Place. Marjorie Crain, aged 
89 years, loved wife of the late 
James Kiigour Mkfate. Cremation al 
West London Crematorhan. Hamiw 
Rd. Kenud Green, on Sunday. Sep- 
tember 21 sL at 3pm. No nowers 


NCUBERG • Peacefully on Sunday. 
September 14th. Herta. much loved 
wire of Klaus, mother of Roger and 
ftobtn. mother-in-law of Ruth and 
Tony and grandmother of Guy. Kbn 
and Tristan. 

PALMAS . On September laih. 1986. 
In hospital Greta Palmas, of 
AWerbourne Manor. Garartts Cross 
Bucks. 


_ On September loth. 

EMrabeih. widow of LLCoLLorestt 
Rathbone. Rifle Brigade, dearly 
loved Sister of Parker Bryant and 
HaraMUne Pastey-TyJer. much loved 
aunt of Bentta Trihkte. LesUe Hume, 
lan and Robert Pastey-TyJer and 
Henrietta Pearson, Funeral private, 
family flowers only. Memorial Ser- 
vice at winchester Cathedral on 
Wednesday. September i7lh at 
3.46pm. 

MUBWN - On September llth. 
Dorothy EDeu Marla, peacefully at St 
Stepbeno Hoapbal. Qieisea. aged 90. 
Funeral service at 10.00 am at 
Putney vale Crematorium. Friday. 
September 19th. Flowers to PW 
Batiard and Son. 308 Old Brraapton 
Road. Carts Court SW5- 

WANSTALL.(n8e GoUOn) - On Septem- 
ber inn. 1986. peacefully at home. 
Kathleen Loutte. widow of Leopold 
Wanstaft. and mother of Audrey 
Ellis. Daphne Pareonsra David and 
Hugo. No mourning at her reoumL- 
Prirat* cremation at Qtaring. on 
Tuesday. September 16th. 


WALLERS - On September 9th. peace- 
r ully to SI Augustine's Home. 
Addlesione. C3ce(y Walters aged 92. 
late of Hook Heath. Woking, much 
loved mother of Tony and RkSHRL 
Deeply loved by Paote- Timothy. 
Julian and Victoria. Funeral Service 
to be held at SlJohn's Crematorium. 
Waking, on Monday, Septe mb ei 
22nd. at ZJOan. Flowers to Walter 
G Wort. Funeral Directors. 204 
Station Rd. Addtestone. Surrey. 

WATNEY - On Sep te mber 13th. 1986. 
suddenly. Antony Stephen Pope, 
aged SO y ears, of Yule Cottage. 
Wargrave. Berkshire. Dearly loved 
husband of Katherine, tether or 
Michael aid son of Peggy and the 
late John L Wataey. Funeral Service 
at St Mary's Church. Wargrave. an 
Saturday. September 20 th. at 11.00 
ana. Ftenfiy flowers only, but dona- 
tions. if desired, for the West Berks 
Asthma Care Fund, may be sent to 
the Vicarage. Wargrave. Berks. 

WEBSTER. Flunk Martin. Free ma n of 
the Oty of London, al Lea House. 
Lymtngion. on 14th September, aged 
86. Husband of Kathleen, fattier of 
John and Sally. Private funeral. 
Bournemouth Crematorium. 

3J0pra. Friday 19th September 
Service of Thanksgiving. Boktre 
Churth. 12 noon. Friday 17th Octo- 
ber. No flowers. Donations, if desired 
to Friends of lymtngton HoapftaL or 
King George's Fund fix- Sailors. 


- On September 12th. 
suddenly at home. Dr Charlotte. MD. 
FBPsS. peardtoatrM. author, pioneer 
research worker. Funeral Service al 
Poflney Vale Cemetery, on Thurs- 
day. September 18th. al 11.18am. 
Flowers to WHttam . Buckle. 246 
Fidham Rd. by lOsm. 

WlunroUK - On S arta nbe r lath. 
peaceOdly at hum. Old Whttstane. 
Bovey Tracey. Rhoda Eleanor, aged 
91 years, wife of the late Charles 
EdwanL and dearly loved by us ati. 
Mather of Ray. Prue. Chris and 
Rosemary, grandmother to Julia. 
NkhaeL Sara. dare. Sue. Mary 
Anne and Charles, and great grand- 
mother to Haratsh. Funeral Service 
at the Parish Church. Ooambe Cross. 
Bovey Tracey. Friday Septe mb er 
19th. at 230 ool Family flowers 
only, with donations, if desired, to 
the Dartmoor Preservation Associa- 
tion. Crossings Cottage. Doutiand. 
Yelvenon. PL20 6LU. 


MEMORIAL SERVKES 


ALLXH- A Service of Thanksghdng tor 
the life of Sam Allen will bo beu on 
Wednesday. 17th September at 
12-00 noon at St Ootumba's Church. 
Pont Street London. $W1. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


waiiam Henry, 
tAMervrasiey Dabvshtrek Rnmem- 
bered on bis birthday and always. 
Devoted husband, tether and 
graodfiUMr. 


- to memory of John Webb 
CM.O. CAE- M.C. and Us wife 
Florence Etizabeth. always lovtogty 
remembered by their dut^tto- Gwen 

UNMAT. Rtehard Sinclair Martin, 
born to Sherborne, on May 12th. 
1936. died to the RadcUK Infirma- 
ry. Oxford, on Se ptemb er 14th. 
1961: of Sherborne Preparatory 
School. St Dunsun'k. BurnhanMm- 
Sea. CUfton College. Russian 
Interpreter^ Course, and Trinity 
HalL Cambridge. Hb sister. Mary. 
and brothers. Robin and Jack, would 
be delighted to hear from hb friends, 
please write c/o. The Preparatory 
School Shcrttome. Doreet CTT 3NY, 


Luncheon 

HM Government 
The Hon George Younger, Sec- 
retary of State for Defence, was 
host yesterday at a luncheon 
held at Admiralty House in 
honour of M Andre Gbaud, 
Bench Minister of Defence. 


Church news 

The Right Rev Ronald Gordon, 
Bishop at Lambeth, has. been 
appointed Visitor of the Society 
of St John the Evangelist, in 
succession to the Right Rev 
Patrick Rodger. 


Other app oin t me nts 
TV Rev M CSC Caddy. Vicar. AH , 
Salnti. Shard End. dloocM of I 
minotiam. to be Team Rector. 
James me Great. SbfTtey. same | 

d «w M M C amp . Curate. St 
Peter and Si Paul. OttogfoM. diocese 
of Chdmotard. to be Vicar. NonMIctL 
diocese of Rocnester. ; 

The Ven F C Carpenter, until 
recently Archdeaoon of m e Isle Of 
wight, diocese or Portsmouth, was 
appointed Archdeacon Emeritus on 
ms re ti reme nt on August 51. 

The Rev j Chart. Team Vicar. 
Banbury Team Ministry, diocese Of 
Oxford, to be Chaplain to Agriculture, 
industry and Rural Affairs In North 
Oxfordshire, and Priest-ln-Chargr. 
Clay don witii MolHnawm. same (fl- 

° C The Rev P F Qnles. 

Curate. Warden Has Group, diocese of 
Lincoln, to be Rector. The Waumaets 
and Cron, same diocese. 

Th Rev J G Cote. Priest -In -Charge. 
Pendleton. All saints, and Diocesan 
Comm uni cations Officer, diocese of 
Blackburn, lo be St Hutto's Mtmaner 
for South Humberside, diocese of 

1 Inrofri. 

The Rev D j Cutover. Honorary 


In- 
born on His high standing was rcc- 

“*5? SaSKrt KiS S and Honorary Fellow 
College Hospital Medical of the American Association 
I sK mduaring in 1934. of Obsteinctans and Gynaej 
^ teaSr“^>w of the coltsists. Honorary Fdlow of 
nSySoSkaior Surgeons in the lou.h .African College of 


1936 and a Member of the 
Royal College of Obstctriaans 
and Gynaecologists in 1939, 
becoming a Fellow of that 
college in 1951. 


Medicine and Honorary 
Memberof the Belgian Society 
of Obstetricians and Gynae- 
cologists. 

Clayton was _ a prolific 
During the war he served writer. Among his nunwrwKi^ 
with distinction as a major in publications were A ratter 
the Royal Army Medical Gynaecology and A t’ocket 
Corot Obstetrics, each of which was 

Afterwards he resumed his published in nine editions. He 
practice of obstetrics and edited Queen C ftarhwt'sTc.’a- 
gynae co logy, and hdd consul- Book of Obstetrics (Mth edi- 


tant appointments, at King's 
College Hospital (1947-1963) 
and Queen Charlotte's Hos- 
pital and Chelsea Hospital for 
Women over a similar period. 

Clayton was a dear thinker 
and an excellent teacher. In 
1963 he became the Professor 
of Obstetrics and Gynae- 
cology in the Institute of 
Obstetrics and Gynaecology at 
Queen Charlotte's Hospital 
and Chelsea Hospital for 
Women, a post he held until 
1967 when he returned to 


tion); fen Teachers Obstetrics 
and Ten Teachers Gynae* 
cotogv. (13th editions of both); 
and British Obstetric and 
Gynaecological Practice (third 
edition). 

On retirement, Clayton 
took up the chairmanship of 
the Committee of Distinction 
Awards, where his attention to 
detail his scrupulous sense of 
fairness and his indefatigable 
energy came into full play. 

Clayton was a man with 
many attributes. After his 


Curate St George EOVustoo. <noccsc 170/ wnen uc reuuucu iu many auriraio. mia uu 

g King’s College Hospital Medi- slightly formal manner was 


Tno Rev J A CrusL VMar. CM Le«M 
with wrantoe. diocese of Lincoln, to 
be Rector, atndanf. same diocese. 

The Rev R F Duboni. Chaplain. 
Grey .and CoWngwaod Collages. 


university of Durham, to be Vicar. 
Lapicy with Wheaton 


Aston, diocese 

^TTte^TO-v r e Otektij oow. Team 
Vicar. St Bride. LIvemoL In the St 
Luke in the cay Tran* Ministry, 
diocese of Liverpool, to be Chaplain to 
Liverpool Polytechnic, same diocese. 

The Rev E J P Howwih. vicar. 
Barton -ou-Huznber. g wa o f Lin- 
coln. to be also Rural Dean of 
Yarborough, same diocese. _ 

The Rev D J Museon. Prtest-tn- 
charge. Thurtoy. dtoceae of Ltocoln. to 
be Rector, Quarrington with SOU 


Vicar. 

Lincoln 

group. 


same diocese. 

Canon D w Prue. Rector, the 
Thettond Team Ministry, dtooese of 
Norwich, to bo vicar . Castle Acre 
with Newton. Rougnam and 
Soutttacre. same diocese. 

The Rey m Ppiiieston. Teem 
Rector. SI Maty and SI John's. 
Kkningtatv. Oxford, diocese of Oxford, 
to be chaplain. Hoiy Trinity. Geneva. 
Swazertand. diocese of Europe. 

The Rev B R Roberts, AaMtant 
You in Officer, dtocesc of Norwich, to 

be Rector, united benefice of Not 

creaxr wtm south Ow w 
wawrden. and also Priest-uvcharge. 

East with North and West Baraham. 

same diocese. 

The ven R V Scntoy. Archdeacon 
of Portsmouth, diocese or Portsmomn. 

was appointed Archdeacon Emeritus 

on his retirement. 

The Rev P P Welsh, vicar. Maiden. 
St John, dtocese of Southwark, to be 
Ministry Officer, diocese of Lincoln. 

The Rev J a widdas. Rector. St 
Chad. UcMMd, dtocesc of Lichfield, 
to be Vicar, hunwwtn, same dtocese. 
The Rev B A V»w. tohaa 

Curate. Lotah Team Ministry, dtocese 

ai Lincoln, to be Team Vicar. Louth 

Team Ministry, same diocese. 


Resignatims and retirements 

The Rev I S Beckwith. Chaplain' 

(NSMX Lincoln Cathedral, moceee of 

Lincoln, resigned on February 5. . 

_ The Rev J H Btotay. Rector. Moreion 
Say , djoce se Qf OdtOeld. to nan on 
November 15. 

Canon o V Eva. Team Rector. 
Haiewood Taamj Mmtshy. diocese of 
Liverpool, to retire on November 30. 
-Canon S Jackson, Rector. 
RusMngton. dtocese of Lincoln. la 
rettre on October Si. He remains 
Canon of Uncotn Cathedral. 

Herman 

of Salisbury, lo retire on September 
30. 


cal School as Professor of 
Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 

In addition to the teaching 
of undergraduates and post- 
graduates, he was active in the 
affairs of the Royal College of 
Obstetricians and Gynae- 
cologists. 

Of particular merit was his 
editorship of the Journal oj 
Obstetrics and Gynaecology of 
the British Commonwealth 


overcome he emerged as a 
delightful humorist, an ex- 
cellent conversationalist and a 
man whose company it was a 
great pleasure to share. 

He was a knowledgeable 
and keen gardener, and he was 
also interested in embroidery, 
at which he was very skilled. 

He married in 1936, Kath- 
leen Maty Wiilsbire, who died 
in 1983. He leaves cute son. 


PROF JOSIP TORBARINA 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include 
Sk Absob Bide to be Chairman 
of the Adam Smith. Institute. 
Mai Joan Gregory to be Direc- 
tor of the Centre for the Study of 
Comprehensive Schools for a 
year, in succession to Mr Chris 
Spivey. 

Mr Bernard Wells to be Presi- 
dent of the Veterinary 
Association. 

Legal 

The. following to be tirenh 
judges: 

Mr D. A. Smith, QC (Western 
Circuit); Mr G-FJL Harkins 
(North Eastern Circuit); Mir J. 
Hall (Northern Circuit); and Mr 
NX. Beddard (South Eastern 
Circuit). 

Appointments in 
the Forces 

Royal Navy 

CAPT AINS : R H_C 
Naval Draf 
NOIL MOD . . 

Ptrowne. Boar m __ 

" Vow*. NA Madrid 
RGEON CAPTAIN 
>D t London). IS. 
ik or Sure Can 
Lan a nU na n. RNH Ha 
INS*. 12.1 1J 


Sbne. for dmy wito , Caul MMIO. 
ft.1.87: R M V %'SHIs. MOD (Loodoa). 

EdseD. RNH Haster. 14.1086. 


Professor Josip Torbarina, 
Shakespearean scholar and 
Professor ofEnglish Literature 
at the University of Zagreb for 
forty years, died on August 22 
in Stratford-upon-Avon, 
where be was attending the 
22nd International Shake- 
speare Conference. He was 83. 
Some of his British friends 
write 

The son of a schoolmaster, 
he was boro on the island of 
Korcula in Dalmatia, on Sep- 
tember 19, 1901 He was 
brought up and educated in 
Dubrovnik, where his family 
had its roots. 

Throughout his life he re- 
mained immensely proud of 
these origins, and his beloved 
Dubrovmk was often to fea- 
ture in his scholarly works: 
first, on the influence of 
Italian Renaissance literature 
on Ragusan (Dubrovnik) po- 
ets and, later, in such papers as 
“Dubrovnik’s Relations with 
England" (1977) and “Alexan- 
der Pope on the Sea-Monster 
ofDubrovnikin I716'"(l978). 

Although at school he was 
taught It ali a n , not En g li s h, 
Torbarina was, after the First 
World War, among the first 


Yugoslavia to study abroad, 
and was sent to London to 
learn Fn gikh 


COMMANDERS: j E Nash. 6.11.86. 

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He matriculated in 1923 
and went on to Queens' 
College, Cambridge, where be 
took his degree in English in 
1926. The affection he felt for 
his old college lasted all his 
life. He gained his PhD at 
London University in 1930. 

After a short spell at Bel- 
grade University, he founded 
the department of English at 
Zagreb in 1934. For the next 
four decades he was to inspire 
generations of students with 
his deep love and knowledge 
of the English language and of 
English literature, particularly 
the works of Shakespeare, 
many of which he translated * 
into Croatian. At the time of P 
his death Romeo and Juliet in 
his translation was being per- 
formed at the Dubrovnik 
Festival and he was engaged in 
translating Richard II. 

He wore his erudition light- 
ly, and his wit made him a 
sought-after companion, not 
least by his former students," 
who had been won by his 
infectious enthusiasm. He was 
a gentleman and scholar, and 
will be sorely missed by all 
who knew him. 

He was appointed honorary a 
OBE in 1981 for bis contribu- * 
tion to Anglo-Yugoslav 
understanding. 


MR R.A.G. HENDERSON 




•UP s . -forte**!. Ja» RA. 

22 9-8*: Colonel C L Tarver. • Me 
Queens. 18.946. 


Royal Air Force 


Broughton fiJI 

CTOUP CAPTflM 







Mr Rupert Albert Geary 
“Rags” Henderson, who died 
on September 9, in Sydney, at 
the. age of 90, was a news- 
paperman who helped build 
up the' John Fairfax Group 
from a small family business 
into one of Australia's prin- 
cipal newspaper, publishing 
and broacasting c o rpo ratio ns. 

Henderson joined the Fair- 
fax-owned Sydney Morning 
Herald at the age of 19 and 
| was involved in many brisk 
L I journalistic camnaieiK in a 


wick Fairfex to turn the small 
business into a multi-media, 
million-dollar concern, 
Henderson was also in- 
strumental in the develop- 
ment of Australia’s firat 
national news agency, Austra- 
lian Associated Press (AAP). 

He also became the first 
Australian director of Reuters 
of which he was elected a 
trustee in 1952. From 196] to 
1978 he was chairman of the 
trust, a body established to 
gu arant ee the agency's 


in- £ 


Uj&R 


iMr***** 1 


1-87- ■■ 

2*.4_87: N J**?*?'" HI 
29.1.87: J Hartley. 

HoWm. MOEKLomon). 24.7.87: W K 
HovraL MOD£ondmX 172.87: A R 
!P*5«SS. iW5D J L L 


Prtcfiara. 

R*cxard-_ 


Active. 


5: H 






jaexsau fo mod cAFb) "l 8 r 7 journalistic campaigns in a 

T'M&nSl carecr which spanned sixty dependence and integrity. 

mbSlboc years. Henderson’s success on the 

Nolable among tfaoe was J?-"? “"Wn 

foe one during the Second 


was firmly rooted in his years 
asa journalist, and he was able 
to transfete journalistic acu- 
men into a shrewd grasp of 
““lagement and financial 
principles. 



CMvHior. I5.9JB6: A^K ^^Rusocll. [o 


regulations. 

Besides helping Sir War- 


School announcements 


Cfeyesmore School 
Term at Ctayesmore School 
starts on Tuesday, September 16 
mth the new headmaster, Mr 
DJ. Beeby. and 340 senior 
school prafls enrolled. The head 
boy is Kristoff Huhschmann 
and the head girl is Susannah 
Clements. The Old 
Clayesmorian day is Saturday, 
November 15. 

Cobhuq Hail 

Autumn Term at Cobbam Hall 
begins today and the guardian is 
Natasha Gordon- Dean. The 
carol service will be hdd at the 
school on December 16 . Term 
ends on Wednesday, December 


taken over as Housemaster of 
Wellesley House, the sixth form 
girls’ house, and Mr CJ. Jones 
as director . of studies. ■ The 
refurbishment of Lyon House 
was completed in the holidays. 
The Appeal , campaign for a, new 
an, craft, design and technology 
building started with a meeting 
of vice-presidents in July, and 
wiTfl continue over this 
demk year. 


Leeds Grammar School 
Michaelmas Term at Leeds 
G rammar School began on 
September 10 with Mr RW. 
Collins as the new. headmaster 
Mr P. Dunn succeeds Mr J.W.’ 
Sunderland as third master. 
Head of school is Anthony K. 
Manning. Th e Old Leodiensian 
Association dinner (Leeds) will 
be held on October 10. Speech 
day is on November 3. 


Eng's School, 1 
Autumn term at King's : 
Canterbury, . begins . today. 
Canon Dr Anthony Phillips 


**. H *Wa Craig and Chp- 

The VIffiffil Conni,e Simmers, 
i tie vith form entrance scholar- 

uZJ l TL W0 P by Susmnah 
(Mornsons AcademS 
12^1 scholarship m 

^Blfield^ tK ■SSrtE 

^J«schoferahip ^35 won by 
Watson (Cellardykc 

St^SnK-^ 35 been completed 
a«d wiU be in use this tenk 


The Lady 
School 


Eleanor Holies 


Princess Helena College 
Autumn Term at The Princess 
Helena College begins today. 

umua ri ekuuMMiy rmuqa The head of sdbool is Lucuxfe Te™‘ 
succeeds . Canon Peter Orr and the deputy is Kerry at The Lady 

PiUdngton as headmaster. The Harte. Mrs Elizabeth Boddy School, Hamp- 

BrwuBton School captain of school is TJ*. Briggs, takes up her appointment as school 78 0 in the 

S^^ISSSwfllbegiving DJ t L Vi^U s of JePutyWandMisEBzabeS. ^ «.»^n 

a reunion luncheon fbTpast h= a J n ^^ wer Stewan-Malir succeeds her as HizaS Gill gw** are 

— ^ rnsaar and Kina’s gAotafi m Housemistrcss of Gloucester Lavers 

' ’ ' ~ InaZU - mi f s,c and drama 

bE* stdl » m 
^ s. a*. Sfftaavgasigj- 


pupfls of ihe period 1928 to 
1945 on Saturday, October 18. 
Any Old Bryansumians of that 
period who have not received an 
invitation are asked to write to 
the Headmaster's Secretary, 
Bryanston School, Bfendforo. 
Dorset, DTI 1 OPX. 

King’s School, Broton 
Christmas Term at King ’s 
School. Bruton, started on 
September 9 with 310 pupils in 
the school. Mr RA. Dunlop has 


master and King’s scholars, as 
members of the' Cathedra] 
Foundation, wiU take part in the 
installation of the Dean, the 
Very Rev John A_ Sampson, on 
Saturday, September 20 . The 
half-terra exeat will be from 
October 30 to November 4. The 


The Independant School 
Information Service east dinner 
lakes place in the Princess Alice 
HaD on Friday. October 3. 


St Leonards 

ucioocr jo w novonoex'h J nt . draws, Fife Hral rm -fiT.rjj ■'* J^ui's Vatlw- 

Threepenny Opera will be per- Autumn Term at St Leonards Dm«iK^«r , ^ day ’ O^obcrSand 
formed on December- 17,13 and School, St Andrews, Fife, be»ios wberorKl^.^ ^ October 22 
14. The carol service will be' in today and ends on Wednesday, the ST** ^honour will be 

■the nave of the cathedral an. December 1 7. Half-term is from London. Half 

Wednesday, Decembm- 17. Friday, October 31 until Tues- indusiw nA° ber *0 31 
Term ends on December 18. . day, November 4. Head of Decemiw ib Teim *»ds on 


- - 








N 







THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 1 6 1986 


27 


THE ARTS 


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Television 

Elusive 
states of 
jnind 

“It doesn't matter what is 
wntten on your tombstone", 
said Dr Timothy Leary. “It's 
the state of mimi when yon 
-said ft." He was talking to 
Peter France after watching 
• his own short obituary — “that 
clip", he called it — and was In 
a very different state of mind 

- to the one depicted early on in 
Famous Last Words (BBC2). 

It might seem, on the face of 
it, a good idea to evaluate a 
person's life and then ask him 
to comment with perhaps a 
chance to set the record 
straight. The dang^ is of 
course that be will use this 
splendid opportunity to pot his 
best foot forward and nraddy 
the waters. Which is precisely 
what happened last night. 

“Timothy Leary's dead", 
went the famous song. The 
programme began win this 
assumption ana a short snm- 
, mary of a life lived in the fast 
lane. In ten minutes he went 
from dentist's son to Harvard 
lecturer, to the discovery aged 
40 of magic mushrooms and 
his manga ration as high priest 
of the youth cuHnre. With 
LSD as his sacrament and a 
10-acre. estate, he invited the 
young to “turn on, tone in and 
drop oat". Then came prison — 
40 different penitentiaries in 
10 years - escape with a Black 

- Panther to Algeria and finally 
a fife spent with his computers 
and fourth wife in die suburbs 
of Los Angeles. An ending, 
concluded fiance, “as Innocu- 
ous to all as American apple- 
pie." 

Confronted by this innocn- 
oussess, Leary looked, dare 
one say it a trifle bored. “It's 
certainly fair", he said, but 
then added the last 10 yean 
had been the most productive, 
sanest and happiest of alL 
Gamely trying to find out why, 
Peter France entered an oil 
slick. With growing puzzle- 
ment and frustration he slith- 
ered all over the place in 
pursuit of a quarry that was 
not so much alive as incapable 
of standing stDL 

“Think for yourself. Ques- 
tion authority" Leary ad vised. 
Do not follow the Bible. That 
“shepherd gangster script". 
(Eve's plucking of the apple 
had resulted in “the first 
narcotics bust In history".) 
Whenever France attempted 
to be more precise about his 
hopes and regrets, Leary 
hopped again. “The score is 
different from the perspective 
you have." By the aid, with 
Leary manipulating the cam- 
era and warning the viewer not 
to listen to Mr GnOt, Peter 
France resembled a man who 
has just loosed off both barrels 
at a charging elephant to no 
effect whatever. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Galleries: new exhibitions in London 



«?V P* 4 '•'".'■■A ■ 


latter-day saints 


Anselm . Kiefer/ 
Richard Serra 
Saatchi Collection 

Francesco Clemente 

Anthony d’Offay . 

Lucas Samaras 

Mayor 


Lucas Samaras: 
Polaroid 
Photographs 
Serpentine 


Revolutionary newcomers become 
modem classics very quickly these 
days — and sometimes feu from 
that not entirely enviable stains 
almost as fast. One of the great 
advantages of such institutions as 
the Saatchi Collection and the 
Anthony d'Offay Gallery is that 
they regularly keep us up to date 
with the comings .and goings of the 
recently canonized: d'Offay be- 
cause he deals m them, and the 
Saatchis because' they represent, 
most spectacularly in this country, 
the punters who are willing and 
able to put their money where their 
tasie is. 

With that taste, of course, one 
can argue. As we work our way 
gradually through the Saatchis* 
holdings, it is likely to be a 
switchback ride of approval and 
disapproval.* The latest show, on 
for the next few months, brings out 
their collections of the Goman 
painter Anselm Kiefer and the 
American sculptor Richard Serra. 
The first and most obvious thing to 
be grateful for is that the Saatchis' 


amazing space in Boundary Road 
is perfectly suited to the showing of 
such enormous works — particu- 
larly the Senas, which tend to look 
cramped in even the most lavish 
indoor space. One can be sure that 
the enormous Olson, for example, 
two great curved pieces of steel 
placed separate but together like 
the prow of Noah's Ark. has never 
shown to more advantage, as one 
can not only walk through it and 
around it. but one can back off a^d 
actually take h all in at a distance. 
That said. I find myself that Sena 
rarely does very much for me. 
Olson is undeniably impressive, 
though I wonder now much it 
would expand in the mind if one 
were able to five with it. But the 
other- works, for all their size and 
confidence, do not seem to have 
about them any of the mystery 
which .makes David Smith so 
special. 

Kiefer, on the other hand, is 

S on mystery. His paintings, 
y, are of a size to need a very 
special space, and here they get h. 
The works of the early Eighties. ' 
when be was piling straw on to the 
wet paint and fixing it with some 
very unappetizing plastic sub- 
stance, seem arbitrary and even 
self-destructive: one can just about 
glimpse the powerful painting be- 
neath the mess, but the main result 
is frustration that one cannot see 
more of h. Certainly in the 
paintings and large-scale woodcuts - 
Kiefer has done before and since, it 
is a great relief not to have such 
obstructions io contend with. 

For Kiefer is above all a maker of 
strong, dear-cut. haunting images: 
the great wooden halls, sometimes, 
as in HeliogdbaL, ablaze, or the 
vast, grey expanses of stubbled 
field, or the limitless sea with its 
abandoned boats, all create a 
repertoire of images which, in their 
desolation and ambiguity, are very 
much of our own time. Even the 


lead accretions of the Wdiundlied 
paintings (“lead object attached", 
the catalogue says darkly) cany 
further the Icarus-imagery which 
seems to have possessed Kiefer for 
a while, and work well enough, 
though evqn here it is possible to' 
feel that in his work painting and 
sculpture are best kept apart. But, 
despite such occasional reserva- 
tions. Kiefer seems about the most 
likely of his generation to survive 
and grow in stature. 

Fnmceso Clemente is a very 
different matter, though he has 
often been thrust into the same 
galere of Neo-Expressionism. He, 
also goes m, at times, for very large 
works, and in the last few years we 
have seen a number of them in 
London, at d’Offay and. vacation- 
ing from the Saatchi Collection, at 
the Whitechapel An Gallery, where 
all 14 of h is Stations of the Cross 
were shown. On that giant scale his 
art often seems hit-or-miss. But on 
the smaller scale represented by his 
new show at d'Offay (until Septem- 
ber 30) his skill is much more 
consistently in evidence. 
t- The show marks the publication 
of two hefty and ambitious illus- 
trated books. The Pondicherry 
Pastels, a set of reproductions, and 
The Departure of the Argonaut , in 
which be is decorating an auto- 
biographical writing by De Chir- 
ico's brother Alberto Savinio. The 
samples of both volumes are 
impressive, if a trifle overwhelm- 
ing. But the 11 moderate-sized 
paintings which accompany them 
are wholly fetching Clemente lives 
half in New York and half in India, 
and these paintings refer obliquely 
to his Indian experience — not so 
much in the imagery (a tiger 
prominent in one is about the 
nearest we come to local colour), 
but m the subtle and intricate 
paim-textures and the scattered 
blobs of colour which remind one 
somewhat of Howairi Hodgkin's 


-• r ‘ M —*■ 

. *.• '’TAPVt 



A puzzling fascination with India, albeit in oblique reference, in the work of Francesco Clemente; the tiger 
as local colour in Geometrical List (1985, oil on wood) at Anthony d'Offay 


“Indian" series. Why India seems 
to take western artists this way I am 
not quite sure, but the results are 
undeniably appealing. 

Lucas Samaras. Greek- Ameri- 
can, is a survivor from a slightly 
earlier generation of wunderkinder. 
The catalogue for his last London 
show, in 1982. referred a little 
alarmingly to the “Byzantine 
aulobiographicality" of his art, but 
you can see what was meant in 
both of the current shows, the 
Spectators. Pastels and Panoramas 
at the Mayor Gallery until October 
3 and the Polaroids 1969-1983 at 
the Serpentine until October 12. 
His subject is certainly, nearly 
always, himselC if he is not 
painting or photographing self- 
portraits. he is enshrining the 
features of friends or pressing 
people into the very special 


surroundings of his own cluttered 
apartment so as to tell us not what 
they mean to themselves but just 
what they mean to him. There are 
also some of his. at the moment 
rather scary, fantasies: the hid- 
eously grinning blue free endlessly 
repeated against what appears to be 
a background of flames; the several 
colour variations on a Chair with 
Figures which in fact float 
ectoplasmically in a void just 
above. 

The photographs at the Ser- 
pentine (there are also some at the 
Mayor) extend the world of his 
paintings without essentially chan- 
ging it. If polaroids suggest the 
undoctored actuality of Warhol's 
essays in the genre, we are in for a 
rude awakening. Alt Samaras's 
photographs are staged up to the 
hilt with bizarre theatrical effects 


of lighting and colour, and quite a 
bit of manipulation of the image, 
presumably in the process of 
development. The more recent 
pictures, described as "pano- 
ramas". take large-scale polaroids 
and cut them into strips which are 
then assembled in a curiously 
strung-out form. so that the people 
in them - most frequently Samaras 
himself - appear weirdly elongated 
and abstracted. Compared with the 
agonies and ecstacies (mostly ag- 
onies) of Kiefer and Clemente. 
Samaras's work must seem rather 
camp and peripheral. But then, as 
the irritated producer in Sunset 
Boulevard observes to a brace of 
cowering script-writers, who wants 
moving, who wants true? - or at 
least, who is so lofty as to want 
nothing else? 

John Russell Taylor 


Concerts 

Enjoyable breaks for coffee 


AAM/Hogwood 

Elizabeth Hall 


It is well known that the main 
reason for programming 
Bach's “Coffee"- and “Pea- 
sant" Cantatas is. that it gives 
music critics the excuse - to 
speculate what an opera by old 
Seb might have been like. But 
here we were saved our 
hypotheses, because Chris- 
topher Hogwood and the 
Academy of Ancient Music 
offered a neat theory of their 
own: that the “Coffee" Can- 
tata was possibly performed in 
one of downtown Leipzig's 
coffee-houses, where it might 
have had its movements in- 
geniously interspersed with 
those from the Suite , in B 


minor (since the keys match). 
It sounds plausible, though 
one does wonder whether 
Bad) had- much time for 
lengthy coffee breaks, what 
with producing those 200 
cantatas and 20 children. But. 
with the Academy (reduced. to 
single strings) in lively form, 
the scheme worked happily 
enough in performance. 

Lisa Beznoriuk was the 
supple flute soloist in the 
Suite, while in the “Coffee" 
Cantata Emma Kirkby made a 
pert Lieschen, demurely sip- 
ping the eponymous Squid 
and delivering that equally 
delicious aria “Hcute Nodi" 
liltmgly. David Thomas por- 
trayed crusty old Schlendrin 
with all his customary sub- 
tlety. and Rogers. Covey- 


Crump chipped in neatly as 
the narrator. The Cantata was 
given minima] staging — the 
“minimal" part frilling short 
of the requirement that the 
singers relinquish their scores. 

After the interval came the 
“Peasant” Cantata. Here 
Kirkby put on what (me must 
presume was an authentic 
18th-century Upper-Saxon 
rustic accent, while Thomas 
(with less historical justifica- 
tion) put oh a pair of red 
plimsolls. Anthony Halstead 
made a splendidly, robust, if 
necessarily brief contribution 
on two natural horns; for 
some reason the audience 
seemed to find his entrance 
bearing these imposing in- 
struments very funny. 

Richard Morrison 



Hausmusik 

St John’s 


Christopher Hogwood: neat 
and persuasive theory 


Perhaps the spacious sur- 
roundings did not quite reflect 
the implications of Haus- 
musik’s name, but otherwise 
this chamber group, which 
plays on period-style in- 
struments. gave a charming 
small-scale tribute to Weber, 
bom 200 years ago this 
November. To claim that the 
music achieves foe same 
profundities as Beethoven's 
would be absurd. But the 
romantic movement was not 
built exclusively upon one 
man's visions, and Weber’s 
contributons to the new aes- 
thetic were to do with freedom 
in both gesture and form, as 
well as the cultivation of the 
idea of performer as hero. 

That much was evident in 
the first two works. Melvyn 
Tan played Invitation to the 
Dance : on an expressive, res- 


A Slight Hitch 

Jackson’s Lane 

I was mightily struck by foe 
Trestle Theatre Company 
when I saw them in Edinburgh 
last yean and their new show 
— coming briefly to roost in 
Highgate in the midst of 
touring from Inverness to 
Exmouih — is an irresistibly 
funny piece of work. 

They are a mask-and-mhne 
group who specialize in what 
you might call the commedia ... 

of everyday life, if that phrase- carousel (with a real carousel 


Theatre 

honeymoon where they con- features perk np into greedy Tor It 
summate their union under appetite, or romantic ardour 
the pink satin counterpane of into bashful retreat, all thanks Royal Exchange, 
a half-completed Spanish to the performers’ skill in Manchester 
hoteL ■ diversifying fecial expression 

The feet that this banal 
scenario becomes spellbind- 
ingly comic says something 
fundamental about what the 
theatre is for. First, there is the 
pleasure of seeing the maxi- 
mum effect extracted from 
minimal resources as where 
tombstones revolve lb be- 
come armchairs, or luggage on 
wheels creates the illusion of a 


did not suggest a kind of 
cultisl entertainment utterly 
remote from their down-to- 
earth Farcical observation of 
how people carry on in pubs, 
hospitals or — in the present 
case — marriage. A Slight 
Hitch opens on the wedding 
day. follows foe- couple 
through scenes of churchyard 
back-slapping and domestic 
panic, and despatches them on 


Private Means 

Soho Poly 


W. Stephen Gilbert is perhaps 
best known as the television 
producer whom the BBC fired 
over the furore arising from 
Ian McEwan's Solid Geome- 
try. Priveue Means, his fust 
stage play to be produced, is 
unlikely to arouse any such 
controversy. 

Mr Gilbert's apparent 
theme is the lack of commu- 
nication betwen foe classes, a 
schism made ever wider by 
the progressively unequal dis- 
tribution of wealth. His chief 
protagonists arc a decent, 
concerned old widow of 
means (Barbara Lott) and an 


there would be no theatrical 
effect). Fourteen strongly de- 
fined characters are played by 
four actors, with instant cos- 
tume-changings and wonder- 
fully expressive fibreglass 
masks. On first view, the 
masks seem to convey a single 
ruling attitude pushed -to a 
grotesquely unchangeable 
limit. Then foe magic hap- 
pens, and dolefully resigned 


unemployed young father of 
two (Billy McColi). 

They first meet on an ocean 
cruise — although we soon 
learn that this was his fantasy 
as he sits, impotent through 
idleness, at his kitchen table. 
Their second encounter comes 
when be breaks into her 
bouse, and she responds with 
brandy and sympathy — which 
is a clich6. . Thor final 
confrontation (again, presum- 
ably. a fantasy) takes us back 
to the cruise liner, where his 
bitterness finds expression in 
leftist claptrap and resolution 
in violence, 

Since both characters are 
ideal prototypes rather than 
credible individuals, not 
much can be made of their, 
sketchy relationship (natu- 


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with body language. 

. As for comic invention, 
they invite you to expect an 
evening of basic farce, and 
then repeatedly take you by 
surprise: They promise old 
gags, and then resist than: if a 
plate of scrambled eggs is left 
on a chair, nobody sits on it; if 
a champagne bottle is gingerly 
uncorked, first there is no pop 
and then it sprays the front 
row. Simultaneously, there are 
long-running original jokes — 
such as. the adventures, of a 
packet of breakfast cereal, 
filched by granny as confetti 
and sucked out of dad's bowl 
by a Hoover which later 
returns to claim a viator’s 
Pekinese. See them if yon get 
the chance. 

Irving Wardle 

ralistic or otherwise), and, 
since the bulk of the play 
consists of similarly idealized 
cartoons, the suspicion grows 
that Mr Gilbert has gleaned 
his material at second band. 

. David Lyon and John For- 
tune turn in a succession of 
parodic cameos as business- 
men (a Muzak baron and an 
asset stripper), as the widow’s 
brokers lamenting her char- 
itable impulses and as a pair of show us this zest bring good 
traditionalist derics who are| 
content to accept her dona- 
tions while despising her lib- 
eral politics. 

As an intended satire on 
upper-middle-class values, 
these scenes are neither acute 
enough to be funny, nor suf- 
ficiently informed to further 
the script's serious purpose, 
and when a quartet of theatre- 
goers assemble to discuss foe 
play they have just seen 
(wfoch bears a rib-nudging 
resemWence to the work in 
which they appear) the piece 
seam merely to have run out 
of ideas, 

Brian Stimer’s production 
reinforces one's view of the 
Soho Poly as a venue where 
fine companies are assembled 
to perform works which do 
not deserve their talents. 


In good-natured comedies the 
worm of the first act will 
always turn in foe last, the 
tongue-tied swain finds his 
voice and a kiss doses all. The 
interest lies in seeing if foe 
author nukes us feel the worm 
is worth it. 

Harold Brighouse’s most 
famous Lancashire play, is 
Hobson's Choice bat be cre- 
ated scores of others. When 
Zack was given, a Sunday 
evening performance in Lon- 
don in foe early Twenties, our 
critic mentioned the reluc- 
tance of audiences to be 
enthusiastic about a hero they 
had an impulse to shake. 
Today's audience may share 
that same impulse but without 
the' reluctance to enthuse — 
even though the author makes 
his eponymous hero virtually 
simple-minded in Older to 
delay foe happy outcome. 

Zack’s mother wants to 
catch a wealthy young niece 
for her elder son. a penny- 
pinching snob in the days 
when pennies were worth 
pinching. Zack is a social 
embarrassment but his 
“knack for jollification" is the 
star attraction of his mother's 
catering business. The au- 
thor's mistake is never to 


cheer to the customers. 

Even though the. gaps in 
probability yawn wider as the 
play proceeds there is no 
denying that James Maxwell’s 
tactic as director is the right 
one: let the villains be laugh- 
able andhave Tim Healy play 
Zack as the untidy pony every 
little girl wants to comfort He 
shuffles, he retreats, but the 
hint that there is some method 
in bis slow-wittedness gathers 
the audience's affection. 


Mr Faulkner presents a 
thoughtfully structured pro- 
gramme of poems, letters and 
essays. linked together, as far 
as possible, by Lorca's own 
comments about himself 
These remarks define his 
view of himself as poet and 
dramatist, as Spaniard and 
above all as an Andalusian 
and a native of Granada. 
Always serious about bis art, 
he is serious too about foe 


stimulus of Grenadine tra- 

Jeremy Kingston 

-pop in. 

Intense and surrealist po- 
etry is virtually untranslat- 
able. Shorn of tonal asso- 
ciations. lutes that must catch 
at the heart in foe original 
often come across as arbi- 
trarily assembled images. 
Fishes, horses and golden 
knives tumble over each other 
in a landscape peopled by 
gypsies and girls tossing their 
hair. 

But Mr Faulkner’s passion 


Lorca 
Lyric Studio, 
Hammersmith 


onant, if naturally percussive, 
fortepiano. He also added, in 
English, a running com- 
mentary. which demonstrated 
how naively foe music at the 
beginning matches foe action. 
As far as his performance was 
concerned, there could be no 
complaints. His natural ebul- 
lience and technical facility 
combined to make the work 
sparkle just as it should 

Then came something of 
more sustained invention, in 
the form of the Clarinet 
Quintet. Sustained, that is. in 
terms of its length, for again 
this is a work in which the 
composer is at pains to dis- 
guise any creative agonies 
which he might have experi- 
enced (it took four years to 
complete). The closest he gets 
to expressing Angst is in the 
beautiful but sull predomi- 
nantly easygoing, lyricism of 
the slow movement. Antony 
Ray's playing of the principal 
part in this intimate concerto 
was not without the odd 
squeak, but in general he 
negotiated its embellishments 
with cool aplomb. 

To round off the party, 
Nancy Argenta sang with the 
vital innocent touch four Scot- 
tish folk-song settings, before 
Tan returned with a mixed 
ensemble to play the am- 
bitious Op 74 Septet of 
Hummel Weber's spiritual 
brother if there ever was. 


string quartet and a handful of 
intriguingly little-known com- 
posers, looked on the due of it 
a tempting proposition. Dan- 
iel Smith, who is at present 
recording all Vivaldi's bas- 
soon concertos, had dug deep 
for every second of music for 
bassoon and strings he could 
find in the archives. It was. on 
paper, a formidably long and 
varied programme. 

We were well into the first 
half, though, when it became 
clear that Mr Smith was not 
over-impatient to reveal ei- 
ther the personality of foe 
instrument or the character of 
his own virtuosity. A Quartet 
in B flat by Franz Danzi and a 
Suite by Gordon Jacob were 
little more than prototype 
studies, putting a bassoon 
with a somewhat recalcitrant 
reed through its customary 
paces in leisurely converse 
with some casual string play- 
ing. A song-wi ihout-words 
Adagio by Julius Weissenbom 
and a Sonata by William 
Hurlstone were bland even by 
foe standards of foe dingiest 
Victorian drawing room. 

So we wailed, hungrily, for 
Vivaldi Elgar and Reicha 
after foe interval. Antony 
Saunders, who had been doing 
his best to turn dross into gold 
at the piano, brought all the 
pointing, grace and sweetness 
of lone which were lacking in 
Mr Smith's performance of 


Stephen Pettitt 

maintain in Elgar’s Romance. 
Smith's bulging bassoon line 
was no substitute for truly 
lyrical phrasing, while foe 
Reicha Quintet was given a 
murky, patchily prepared 
performance by Mr Smith and 
the Coull Quartet. 

Hilary Finch 


Coull Quartet/ 
Smith 

Wigmore Hall 


An evening with the bassoon, 
in company with a young 


Lorca and Kafka were identi- 
fied by Stephen Potter many 
years ago as OK-names for 
earning maximum points in 
any conversation. Both re- 
main to this day widely un- 
known and. with a tragedy by ^ c - - , 

Lorca and a comedy about ^rhssvoetand foeSpam that 
Kafka opening in the same nourished him carries us over 


week, it is shrewd timing by 
the Lyric to complement its 
production of The House of 
Bermuda Alba in the main 
house with Trader Faulkner’s 
biographical account of the 
author in the Studio. 


these uncertain areas. Danc- 
ing. tapping heels, briefly 
flashing a smile as broad as 
Gene Kelly's, he does succeed 
in conveying the intoxication 
of being Lorca the poet. Of 
Lorca the left-wing homosex- 
ual we learn less, though h was 


taS *«««—*«* Civil 
except for three cane-seated “• 
chairs and a bullfighter's cape. J.K. 


Martin Cropper 


Rock 

Harvey & The 
Wallbangers 

Ronnie Scott’s 

Formed initially for a one-off 
performance at the Edinburgh 
fringe in 1981. Harvey & The 
Wallbangers gained a reputa- 
tion as a light comic 
music/ftheatrica] turn, am) 
have since staged a number of 
touring shows: they are some- 
times wheeled on to liven up 
television programmes. They 
are currently anxious to secure 
a recording contract, and to 
this end. for their show at 
Ronnie Scott's, they eschewed 
much of foe' “nutty" behav- 
iour and comedy “business" 
which used to be their stock in 


trade and concentrated on 
- offering a broad but irredeem- 
ably shallow sweep of a vari- 
ety of musical styles. 

Dressed in a white drape 
coat and baggy trousers. Har- 
vey Brough led the six 
colourfitlly attired. Wall- 
bangers through their ener- 
getic and cheerful paces to the 
defight of a packed audience, 
some of whom could never- 
theless .be heard, during the 
quieter passages, animatedly 
discussing their holidays in 
Portugal 

For all their theatrical back- 


plished musician, and his 
boogie-woogie piano-playing 
during a souped-up version of 
“Nut Rocker" provided the 
best moment of the night A 
lighthearted funk rap pastiche 
about a dance called “The 
Concept", which can be done 
while sitting immobile, was a 
rare moment of wit 
But for foe most part the 
constant flitting of the mu- 
sicians from one instrument 
to another and their whimsical 
dabbling in so many different 
genres resulted in a superficial 
performance. The gone was 
truly up when, with Prescott 


ground, the only member of now playing guitar, they took 


foe group to emerge as a 
personality was foe keyboard 
player. Reg Prescott who 
looked like an engaging par- 
ody of an ageing Teddy boy. 
He was jdso foe most accom- 


a stab at a soft pop rock 
composition entitled “Who’s 
Fooling Who" Back to foe 
boards, lads. 

David Sinclair 


CHRISTIES 


at 


Callaly Castle 

Alnwick, Northumberland 

The Property of The Trustees of 
The Callaly Chattels Settlement 

Sale on the Premises 
Monday 22 to Wednesday 24 September 
1986 

On view 

Thursday 18 & Friday 19 September 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Saturday 20 September 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Catalogues available from (01) 582 1282 and from 
Callaly Castle on view and sale days or from the 
addresses below: Price on request. 

Dunng the time of this sale, Christies specialists 
will be available by appointment to visit clients 
requiring advice on the sale or valuation 
of works of art. 



Aidan Cuthbert, Christie^, Eastfield House, 
Main Street, Cartridge, Northumberland. 
Tel: (043471) 3181 

Christiefe Scotland, 164/166 Bath Street, 
Glasgow. 

Tel: (041)332 8134/7 
Christiefc, 8 King Street, St. James's, 
London SWIY 6QT. Tfel: (01) 839 9060 







i m jui/fli i i.iti m ,i \ id i ?O0 


Greek 
port hit 
by new 
tremor 

FroraACon-espondent 

Athens 

The death toll from Satur- 
day's earthquake in southern 
Grace rose to 19 yesterday 
and a second strong tremor 
toppled two al ready-blocks of 
flats in the port of Katomata. 

Eighty-two people remained 
in hospital with injuries su s- 


l* : UiT.< ■M'lili; 7. 


which levelled 1 12 bouses and 
two churches in Kalamataand 
damaged 1,450 houses. Thir- 
ty-seven people were treated 
lor minor usuries sustained 
during the second tremor, 
which occurred as residents 
were collecting valuables from 
their damaged homes. 

Police reported no looting 
although display windows 
were shattered in the city's 
main shopping district. 


the slopes of Mount Taygetos 
east of Kalamata also suffered 
heavy damage. A total of 134 
houses and one church col- 
lapsed and nearly 2,000 homes 
sustained cracks. In the village 
of ElaJochori all but three of 
the 120 bouses feU 

On Sunday night two 
French-trained rescue dogs 
found a baby girl aged 10 
days, apparently uninjured, in 
the wreckage of a five-storey 
block of flats which collapsed 
in the original quake. 

The. hunt lor other survi- 
vors of Saturday night’s earth- 
quake, which measured 62 on 
the Richter scale, continued 
yesterday but officials said 
they doubled that anyone else 
would be found alive. Three 
people remained unac counted 

The bodies of two victims 
were recovered yesterday. Mr 
Stathis Zoumas, aged 21. was 
pulled from a collapsed house 
as was an unidentified wo- 
man. 

• NICOSIA: A group of Cyp- 
riot doctors has left for the site 
of the Greek earthquake, a 
Cyprus Health Ministry offi- 
cial said yesterday (Reuter re- 
ports). 

Experts expect more shacks, 
page 9 





| ' Frank Johnson at the SPP 

A happy party, fit 
for all factions 

Broadly speaking, ^ ^^S fB JaSl e 525l£ 

SS&SfeS SOP had to f _ 

that compnse the SDP arc as ^ 10 help Mr Sued with hi* 

follows: . he without denying Dr 

The . 0w f 1 " ,le ^ l2a i l b Owen his nussi les. Bm the 

Jenkmntes; *e ».r!Snf SDP was committed to a 
Davidites; those who want a agreed upon fed 

successor to Palm : which and thtt the 

wlwwantasucre«orto dKir Drinocflfls wn*WK 

Volvo; m ‘l 1 1 TuLan v 3 for atandon nuclear wcaprfBtnd 

supporters of Tuscany » were willing to replace Polam, 
August as afford Jp*® sJSlay. the SDP re- 
Dordogne; members ofd« " ^ p^ycm by voting 

“ jrt£2*SLE!£ ? too £ K. amendment 


of SDP 


SttSSSSiS Sts.***-*** 

s&gsws- 


SSSS KSai"Sr e— *-» 

S*** 4 * 2 SSssi« 

This was because they had present ,n 

Ji a snlit on defence the brought-up children were an- 




For the good of the party: Mr Jeffrey Archer (right) with Mr Grabame Waterman (Photograph: Dod Miller) 

Gifts for Tories with everything | SDP backs higher tax 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

So what do you give tbe 
fully-paid up Conservative 
party member who has 
everything? 

How about an official Tory 
brooch for Her. and for 
Him — well, a Conservative 
silk tie. perhaps, or a golfing 
umbrella in party colours, a 
long-sleeved pullover bearing 
the party motif or a bottle erf 
fine port? Even, at a stretch, a 
signed copy of tbe latest 


thriller from Jeffrey Archer, 
the party's deputy chairman? 

All these are now available 
to any Conservative Party 
member under a new promo- 
tional scheme called Blue 
Rosette which was launched 
yesterday by party chairman 
Norman Tebbit to boost 
membership and party funds 
in tbe run-up to the next 
election. 

In addition, members who 
pay an extra £20 will be able 
to join the Membership Pius 


subscription scheme, entitling 
them to a special discount 
shopping card, cheap health 
insurance and newsletters 
from Mr Tebbit. 

The scheme, the first of its 
kind to be run by any political 
party in this country, is befog 
masterminded by Mr Gra- 
hame Waterman, a Milk 
Marketing Board executive 

Mr Waterman said most of 
-the items cost less than £20 
and those less affluent Tories 
could plump for a tea towel or 
Archer novel 


Orntmned from page 1 
that Britain was the most 
socially divided country in 
Europe and that “it will only 
get worse if we concentrate on 
tax cuts and say ‘Let the poor 
rot'.” 

Policy committee member 
Miss Polly Toynbee, introduc- 
ing the White Paper, said: 
“Any party that is serious 
about dealing with poverty 
has to face ap to Idling quite a 
broad section of taxpayers 
they win have to pay more." 


There were other problems 
yesterday for Alliance co- 
operation. Against the wishes 
of the party leadership, which 
has bom keen to make con- 
cessions to Liberal sensibil- 
ities on the issue, the 
conference passed an amend- 
ment calling for tbe building 
of new nuclear power stations. 
The Liberals, who have their 
conference in Eastbourne next 
week, are expected to go for 
the phasing out of nuclear 
power. 


.«^KWMstenlav morning, bled — was nappy. aimuugu 
all ofiheseSons were in an since a ' were 

exceptionally good mood. nation s car pool 

This was because they had present ,n 
had a split on defence the broughMip 
previous day and, so com- < *p ub ^ y f SlfS. raB 
plicated were the accounts of . throughout Britain, 
the dispute in yesterday Happily lhc 
morning's newspapers, it was to debate ,J )0 .^LS' 

possible for all the factions to irons, things which uberab, 
saythey were satisfied with on the w J ole '. 
the outcome, and for the Being the Sensible Party. the 
country to be so confused as to Social Democrats voted in 

be completely unaware of any favour of them. By next year it 
split in the first place. will be time for another 

So, broadly speaking, and amendment . 
allowing for inevitable over- Mr Steel arrived to deliver 
simplification, what the split fraternal greetings. He said 
was about was as follows: that, in a sense, he was sorry 

Dr Owen warns a successor SDPwsn^ £ 
to Polaris - possibly 

Cbe valine, perhaps even Tn- order to eel me oe^ur « 
dent -in order to deter the une ] 2 P 
Soviet Union and the Liberal 
Party, both of which want 

Britain not to be a nuclear mC S!HEwJ ISS nr 

power once Polaris becomes Sheffield. Huddersfield or 

Barnsley. 

Mr David Steel the leader , M - i 6 " *212- Tore! 

of the Liberal Party, probably ZJpZSJt 

does not mind whether we 

have Polaris. Chevalfoe or Democracy and Baler Gov- 
Trident. although he is almost !?Ste^^2 r S|,eech 


i ndent, atthougn ne is almost “ .I £ “ 

certainty partial to a new -of the conference so far. 

ir.f l niir nncnrt nfmnlalin 


Volvo. All he is concerned 
about is to keep satisfied the 
huge number of members of 
his party who want to get rid 
of Polaris and keep Saab. 

Mr Roy Jenkins's position 
is confined to trying to find 
where, amid all this tedium. 


Our prison population was 
now so fog that “the Turks 
have given up tbe race in 
despair." he drawled. Collec- 
tors of Royisms also had a 
chance to pick up pahrwak 
That means patois to the likes 
of you. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 

Princess Anne opens' the new 
container terminal. The Trinity 
Terminal Felixstowe, Suffolk, 
12; then, as President of Tbe 
Missions to Seamen, visits the 
Felixstowe Seafarers’ Centre, 
3-55. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
attends the Harley Street Ball, 
Grosvenor House Hotel Wl, 
7.40. 

The Duchess of Kent, Patron 
of the British Epilepsy Associ- 
ation, attends the Golden Ju- 
bilee Conference and Northern 
European Epilepsy Meeting, 
York University, l€h and later, 


lays a Foundation Stone for 
Martin House Children's Hos- 
pice, The Vicarage, Boston Spa. 
12.20; then visits the Yorkshire 
Electricity Board, Gdderd Rd, 
Leeds, Z35. 

New exhibitions 

World War I Postcards; Vis- 
itor and Heritage Centre, Ban- 
gar Casde; Tues to Sat 1! to 
4.30, Sun 2 lo 4230 (ends Oct 
2 61 

Harry Holland: recent paint- 
ings and drawings; Andrew 
Knight Gallery, 31 Charles St, 
Cardiff, Tues to Sat lO to 5 (ends 
Oct 31) 

2087: Industry year from the 
Scottish Museum Council; 
Glasgow Art Gallery and Mu- 
seum, Kdvingrove; Mon to Sat 


The Times Crossword puzzle No 17,152 


10 to 5. Sun 2 to 5 (ends Oct 12). 
Exhibitions in progress 
Harvest time; Church Farm 
Museum, Skegness; Mon to Sun 
10 JO to 5 JO foods October 26). 

Charms for summoning spir- 
its: artwork and performance by 
Kim Creighton, collages by 
Carlyle Reedy; New British 
featberwork; South HOI Park 
Arts Centre, Bracknell, Berks; 
Mon to Fri 9 to 12.30, IJOto 5, 
7 to 10, Sat 1 to 4,7 lo 10, Sun I 
to 4 (ends Sept 27). 

A Rediscovery: paintings by 
Kathleen Walne; Salford Art 
Gallery, Ordsdall Hall, 
Taykxson St; Mon to Fri 10 to 
5, Sun 2 to 6 (ends Sept 21) 
Mike Exall, Elizabeth 
Howled, Marcia Ley: painting s 
and prints; Limon Court Gal- 
lery, Duke St, Settle; Tues, Fri 
and Sat II to 5, Sun 2 to 5 (ends 


TV top ten 




iilsiMl 




Sept 28). 
Julia P 




Julia Parry: The old and the 
derelict; Fo s t e rngatc Gallery, 6 
Fosterngate, Hull; Tues to Sat 
10 to 5 JO (ends Sept 27). 

Echoes of name and nature: 
pai n ti n gs and photographs by 
Herbert Spencer; The Okl 
School, Bleddfa, Knighton, 
Powys; Wed to Sun 2 to 6 (ends 
Sept 28). 

The Art of Lepenski Vin 
Neolithic Sculpture; Southamp- 
ton Art Gallery, Civic Centre: 
Tues to Fri 10 to 5, Sat 10 lo 4, 
Sun 2 to 5 (ends Oct 5). 

David Drew: Basket maker; 
Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 
The Strand; Mon to Fri 9 to 5, 
Sat 9 to 4 JO (ends Sept 27). 
Music 

Piano recital by Allan Laugh- 
ton; St Mary’s Church HaD, 
Sprotbroogh, 7 JO. 

Organ recital by Simon Lind- 
ley: Leeds Town HaD, 1.05. 

Con ctrt by the Central Band 
of the Royal Air Force; Romsey 
Abbey.8. 





Breakfast f u i m i al o n t The Bwr a ga 
wMkly figures for audfences atjpeafc 
(wttfi figures in 


This puzzle was completed within 30 minutes by 26 per cent of the I The DOBIld 
competitors at the 1986 London B regional final of the Collins Dio- | r 
tionaries Times Crossword Championship. 


tbnss (with figures in parenthesis 
showing Die raadi - lha number of peopto ■ 
who mewed for at least thras minutes): 1 
BBC1: Brmkfast Time: Mon to Fri 
1.4m (7 An) I 

TV-am: Good Morning BrMn Mon to fit , 
2.4m (106m) Sat 2Xm(££m) 

Sun L5m flieL6m) 

Broadcasters 1 Audience Research Board, i 


Wales and West: A30: Surfac- 
ing work between Bodmin and 
Fraddon, temporary traffic 
lights. M4: Contraflow <m west- 
bound carriageway ax junctions 
1 6 and 1 7 

(Swindon/Chippenham); lane 
closures in both directions at 
junction 46 (Swansea! 

The North: M62: Contraflow 
between junctions 19 (Hey- 
wood) and 22 (A672). Al: 
Roadworks on northbound 
carriageway between Felton and 
Harecrag. M6: Reconstruction 
on both carriageways at juno- 
tions 32 (M55) and 33 

(Garstang). 

Scotland: A75: Resmfocmg 
between Eastriggs and Domodk, 
near Arran; Al: Resurfacing 
work at Gladsmuir in the Lo- 
thian region. M!fc Bridge works 
between junctions 10 (Stirling) 
and 9 (Doune). 

InfararatkB supplied by the AA 


Food additives 


A new report published by tbe 
Food Policy Research Unit at 
the University at Bradford says 
that too much emphasis is being 
put on the safety of food 
additives. More attention 
Should be paid to other basic 
problems connected with food, 
such as food hygiene, poor 
nutrition and the toxicity of 
many natural substance in 
foods. 

More information should be 
made available so that people 
am put food additives into 
perspective along with other 
food-rdated health Issues such 
as obesity and heart disease. 

The report. Food Additives in 
Perspective, is available from 
Food Policy Research, School of 
Biomedical Sciences, University 
of Bradford, Richmond Road, 
Bradford, BD7 1DP, price £? JO 
inc p&p. 


Weather 

forecast 

Anticyclone over central 
Atlantic with a ridge of 
high pressure over the 
UK 


6 am tn midnight 







NOON TODAY 


High Tides 





jj ‘m-Vi j 1 'MA'mf 







1 • 1 3t'-iT -4id 







p t’nTTr 

n* 

il'iS 1 1 




ACROSS 

I Drug bar at wild party for 
Indians (8). 

5 Rarely producing new mod- 
els (6). 

10 Right filling for tooth, one 
son of canine (51 

11 State of some Americans 
just off the Needles? (3,6). 

12 Desolate region explored by 
Biot (5,4). 

13 Crowd in Channel port 
moving right to left (5). 

14 Room for audience for this 
son of music (7). 

16 Inform of liny adjustment 

( 6 ). 

19 Old saw that's lost its cut- 
ting edge (6). 

21 Diet rich enough for so- 
called film star? (7). 

23 Blackbirds in woods, for 
example (5). 

25 Villainous crimes upset so- 
cial worker (91 

27 Letter or card (9). 

28 Essential fora showgirl with 
no capital left (S). 

29 More down South, 
summer’s not so sunny (6). 

30 Butter more evenly spread 
to fry at the end (8). 


DOWN 

1 Gubman’s quick thymes 

( 8 ). 

2 Depends on follower for 
runs (5,4). 

3 Quick article, as it happens 

(ll 

Concise Crossword page 12 


4 Stars horseman, so to speak 

(7) . 

6 One who improves parts of 
None Dame (9). 

7 Circular objects in place of 
entertainment (5). 

8 Disorder for a month on tbe 
border (6). 

9 Editor’s put in news that's 
upset this country (6). 

15 Cast off here for second part 
of journey (9). 

17 Allowed, say, the part below 
the crust of this port (91 

18 Chaps keep score in mind 

( 8 ) . 

20 Opposition makes two 
points in my case it appears 
( 6 ). 

21 Kind of valve in heart gets 
second wind (7). 

22 Airman in a kite can be 
counted on (61 

24 Said to apphr in this pari of 
South-East (5y 

26 Strive to fix immovably in- 
side (5 i 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,151 


KHlIRfflEMBignisB 

fH (S ■ S D IS' S3 • 

Hf3SEHC«n 
sHEffsmsi 
m r n hi ? tz 

rKfflQEE fc3fit-!!HEnEEI3 

H n 13 -ra 

13? s d 31 £3 n p 

i2GI=3!Pnii5 .. MSBiisraH!! 
IS E C! P .. 15 • -m H K 
iiHir^IlEtSC EjutUHSiM!^ 

■ n e pi ra 13 e e 


uftiTntSrmn, 


Sun Rain 
tra in . 

EAST COAST 
Sc w feoro x 

BrtOogkM 102 - 

Cnw &8 .12 

oiSan 4 1 80 - 
aSSwcOAST * 

Wownw 75 - 

HMhgi *S - 
E aa fto u ma 42 


Ip 

1 





ii 


i-Ct 







Senior savings 


[ •w Z i ■ . 7 . 








Worthing 42 
L iH fai aia< i BJS 
gognorfc 42 
Souths** 62 
Sa n do m 4.1 
ShmMta 22 
BoumanOi 3J 

Pool* 4.1 

S— nig * 12 

WqmouUi &5 
EnMCfih - 22 
TWgnHxA 22 

T “W ™ 

ranom . 


15 S9 aunm 

14 57 sunny 

16 61 sunny 

15 59 sunny 
15 G9 cloudy 

15 5S'8tamw 

17 BS.brigti 

16 61 doudy 

17 63 bright 

18 64 bright 
17 63 tumy 

17 63 SUM 
16 61 bright 


Anniversaries 


Births: Henry V, reigned 
1413-22, Monmouth. 1387; An- 
drew Booar Law, prime minister 
1922-23. Kingston, New Bruns- 
wick. 1858. 

Deaths: John Cofet theolo- 
gian, Sheen, Surrey, 1519; Ga- 
briel Fahrenheit, physicist. Tbe 
Hague, 1736; Edward 
Whymper. wood-engraver and 
mountaineer. Chamonix, 1911; 
Sir Ronald Ross, bacteriologist, 
Nobel laureate 1902, London, 
1932; John McCormack, tenor, 
Dublin, 1945; Sir James Jeans, 
physicist. Dorking. Surrey, 
1946; Mara Callas, opera 
singer, Paris, 1977. 


fri ' i'f,' ' j 1 , 








The booklet deals with all 
aspects of savings, taxes and 
investment options, and is 
available from the Marketing 
Department, (PR26), Age Con- 
cern England, 60 Pitcairn Road, 
Mitcham, Surrey, price £1,90 
inc p&p. 


Flying stamps 


The Post Office is today 
issuing a special set of stamps to 
marie the 50th anniversary of 
the RAF being formed into 
operational Commands. 

The stamps depict five fam- 
ous RAF commanders and the 
aircraft most dosely associated 
with them and are available at 
PostOffices. 


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business and finance 


THE 



TIMES 


29 

SPORT 52 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 55 


TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


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Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fle et 

stock market 

FT 30 Share 
1289.6 (+18.7) 

FT-SE 100 
1628.3 (+19.7) 
Bargains 
23927 

MEssr 1 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4820 (+0.0065) 

W German mark 
3.0374 (+0.0001) 

Trade-weighted 
71.1 (+o:i) 

T&N profits 
soarfo£21m 

Turner & NewaH, the en- 
gineering group which last 
week narrowly failed in its 
£260 million takeover bid for 
AE, the motor components 
group, has reported a big 
increase in profits for the first 
sax months. 

: Earnings are up from £14.9 
million to almost £21 million 
on turnover slightly down at 
£266 million. 

The group, which has paid ' 
out more than £40 milli on on j 
asbestosis claims in recent I 
years, is much healthier now. 

Mr Colin Hope, ma waging 
director, said the group had no 
plans for its near 30 per cent 
shareholding left in AE. 

Last night T&N shares 
dosed at I94p,np JOp. 

Dalgety up 4% 

Dalgety, the food and agri- 
culture conglomerate, an- 
nounced pretax profits up 4 
per cent to £75 million for the 
year to June 30 1986 on 
turnoverup 25 percent to £4.9 
billion. The dividend was 
increasedby Ipto 13p. 

Tempos, page 34 

Myson surge 

Myson Group, which earlier 
this year bought Thom EMTs 
heating division, increased 
profits from £3.84 milli on to 
£6.06 million in the first half 
of 1986. Turnover improved 
from £70.4 million to £75.5 
million and the interim divi- 
dend is-up by a fifth to l.52p. 

, Tempos, page 34 

Suter advance 

Suter, the manufacturing 
and distribution conglom- 
erate, reported pretax profits 
for the six months to June 30 
of £6.7 million (£42 million) 
on turnover op 46 per beat to 
£74.6 million. An interim 
dividend of 1 .4p was declared. 

Tempos, page 34 

Dew talks 

Discussions that may lead 
to an offer for the whole of the 
share capital of George Dew 
are-now in progress. If success- 
ful it is likely that there will be 
an all-share offer at a value 
close to the current market 
price, with a partial cash 
alternative at a level materi- 
ally Iks than the current 
market price of the shares. 

Evershed offer 

HiQsdown Holdings has de- 
clared its offer for J Evershed 
and Sons wholly uncondi- 
tional. The offer will remain 
open for acceptance until fur- 
ther notice. 

Webber move 

Andrew Lloyd Webber, the 
composer, has become a non- 
executive director of Really 
Useful Group. He feels his 
commitments make it impos- 
sible, for him to continue in an 
executive capacity. 


By Michael dark. Stock Market Correspondent 
The London stock market and finished 19.7 up at In London, however, there 
sterday . mana g e d to shrug .. 1,628.3. " • was a growing mood of op- 


yesterday managed to shrug 
off some of the effects of last 
week’s collapse in share prices 
around the world with a 
confident start to - Aafinp 
after the weekend break. - 

Dealers reported that a 
sense of reality haH returned 
to the market a nd that last 
week’s sell-off — resulting in 
Wall Street’s biggest ever one- 
day points fell —had beat 
overdone. 

With the Tokyo stock mar- 
ket closed for a national 
holiday, all eyes in the invest- 
ment world were focused on 
London to see which way 
juices would react. 

Fund managers, who bad 
spent an anxious weekend 
after seeing billions of pounds 
wiped off their investments, 
breathed a sigh of relief as 
early indicators showed the 
FT index of top 30 shares 
opening 13.5 up dining the 
first hour’s trading. 

It ended the first day of the - 
new account 18.7 up at 
1,289.6. The broader FT-SE 
100 also responded positively 


But despite the confident 
appearance, conditions re- 
mained extremely volatile. 
Turnover was down to a 
trickle noth most of the- big 
fond managers remaining on 
the sidelines waiting for the 
position to became clearer. 

One leading stockbroker 
commented: “This is no place 
for those investors of a- ner- 
vous disposition. It’s clear 
that last week’s shakeout was 
led by panic, but the position 
here could change at any 
time.” 

But dealers appeared to take 
the view that the worst of the 
storm was now over and were 
.hoping for a gradual rally over 
the next few days. 

Wall Street also made a firm 
start in eariy trade with the 
Dow Jones industrial average, 
which tumbled more than 14] 
points in just two days ' last 
week, opening 10.95 higher 
bat the rally soon ran out of 
steam. By eariy afternoon the 
index was six points down on 
Friday’s close. 


Retail sales leap 
1.7% to record 


By David Smith and Derek Harris 
Retail sales bounced up to TLl-'.jj 
record levels last month, beat- HETAIL 

ing City expectations. The SALES 

volume of sales rose by 1.7 per volume Index 

cent to 4.6 per cent higher than 1980=100 

in August last year. - snmx ,/gV 

The value of sales during mpioiTwm jp|p 
the four-week period was £7 J|||| 

billion, or £1.75 billion a 
week, 7 per cent cent up on a 

In the latest three months, 1^11111111111! 
' June to August, were 25 SONDJ FMA 
percent up on tire previous 
three months, and 4.5 percent thp weather 
higher than in the correspond- 


Volume Index 
1980=100 a 

SourcK . | 
Daptof Trwte 


SONDJ FMAMJ JA 


ingperiod last year. - . . ■ 

The index of retail rales 
volume last month was pro- 
visionally estimated at 122.9 
<1980 - 100), compared with 
1 20.9 in July, and the previous 
high of 122.4 in June. 

Spending, which continues 
to be boosted by strong growth 
in real incomes, is expected to 
remain at high levels in the 
coming months. Officials at 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry said that sales vol- 
ume could be expected- to 
maintainits4 to 5 percent 12- 
month growth rate for some 
time. 

Sales of consumer durables 
are running ahead strongly, in 
tandem r.ith record August 
new car sales, which are not 
included in the retail sales 
figures. 

Mr Tom McNhfly, director 
general of the Retail Con- 


sortium, . said: “Considering 
the bleak weather and the still 
uncert ain factors affecting 
tourism, retailers find the 
August figures encouraging. 

“The year-on-year growth is 
still firmly in the 4 to 5 per 
cent range anticipated by the 
Retail Consortium at the 


September selling has 
started welL Rumbdows, one 
of the biggest chains in the 
domestic electrical and elec- 
tronic goods sector, said safes 
so fer this month were up to 
targeted increases over last 
year. 

In the first week of Septem- 
ber, sales at the John Lewis 
Partnership’s 21 i triient 
stores rose 12.1 percent in 
value compared with the same 
week last year. This was 2.8 
per cent above targeted 
expectations. 

• The volume increase during 
the week in real terms was 
approaching 10 per cent 


EIS profits up for 25th 
successive half year 

By Laurence Lever 

EIS Group, the engineering included talks about the ac- 
zompany, yesterday an- quisition of a public 


Wail Street 38 
CwasKnJ 31 
Stock Market 31 
FerdpiExck 31 
Money Mrfcti 31 
Traded Opts 31 


Opts 31 Tempns 


Co News 31 J4 
Unit Trusts 32; 
GMunoditks 32 
USM Prices 32 
Stone Prices 33 
Temjms 34 


company, yesterday an- 
nounced its 25th consecutive 
increase in half-year profits. 

The company reported an 
increase of 22 per cent — from 
£2.65 minion to £3-25 million 
— in the pretax figure for the 
ax months to June 30. 

EIS is sitting on £1 1 mUfion 
cash. About £9 J million of 
this was raised from a rights 
issue earlier this year. 

Mr Dick Reed, deputy 
chairman and chief executive 
of EIS, said yesterday that the 
company was holding “ami- 
cable discussions” on three 
potential acquisitions. These 


quisition of a public 
company’s engineering di- 
vision, which was -the same 
size as EIS. 

Mr Reed, who moved into 
EIS in 1971 when the 
company's shares were 
lan guishing around 4 old 
pence — compared with the 
present price of 250p — said 
that EIS would be resistant to 
any takeover bid, “although ft 
would be quite fun really.” 

Sales at the half-year stage 
were up from £343 million to 
£38.9 million. Hie dividend is 
being raised to 2p a share 
(1.85p). 


was a growing mood of op- 
L timism among dealers as they 
• left their offices last night. 

Most were convinced that 
i sentiment would take a turn 
: for the better in the run up to 
l first-time dealings in Trustee 
: Savings Bank due for October 
8 . 

Most of the big institutions 
: " have already put aside funds 
> for TSB and now have spare 
’ funds available to invest 
i Bhie chip shares ted the way 

higher yesterday with double 
figures gains among those with 
a transatlantic flavour. Glaxo 
finned lOp to 940p, IC1 8p to 
: £10.39 and Jaguar 14p to 
5I3p. 

Government securities also 
staged a welcome rally with 
gains stretching to £fc at the 
longer end of the market, as 1 

• prospects of a further cut in 
interest rates continued to slip 
further into the background. 

On foreign exchange mar- 
kets the pound gained ground 
a gainst a weak dollar rising 63 
points to $1.4820 but it lost Vi 
pfennig against the mark. 

Accountants 

insure 

themselves 

By Alison Eadie 
Seven of the world’s top 

eight armnnting firms have 

joined forces to set up a 
captive company to insure 
themselves against a rising 
tide of big lawsuits filed 
against them, particularly in 
the United States. 

They have done so because 
insnrers have been unwilling 
to gram cover against claims 
of more than £50 million. 

Mr Don Hanson, managing 
partner of Arthur Andersen, 
said yesterday that pro- 
fessional indemnity insurance 
! cover for larger had 

become so expensive' that it 
was not wmlh having. , 

• The insurance industry was 
trying to maximize its returns, 
so buyers -had to find an 
alternative. 

• Speaking on “litigation 
and the auditor” at a business 
conference in London, Mr 
Hanson drew attention to the 
rising costs of professional 
indemnity insurance, and he 
stressed that directors of a 
company had . primary 
responsibility. 

“Bad management caused 
business to fefi. but it was the 
auditor who was sued,” he 
raid. 

Most of the big accounting 
firms are feeing multi-million 
I pound lawsuits either here or 
I in the US. Arthur Andersen 
| feces a $270 million (£183.05 
million) lawsuit over its audit- 
ing of De Lorean and Arthur 
Young is being sued for its role 
in the Johnson Matthey affair. 

The move to captive insur- 
ance companies is becoming 
more widespread as insurance 
costs rise. Arthur Andersen is 
also seff-inraring — earmark- 
ing money internally to meet 
potential claims. 

The seven accounting firms 
are Arthur Andersen, Arthur 
Young, Coopers & Lybrand, 
Ernst & Whinney, Ddoitte 
Haskins & Sells, Touche Ross 
and Peat Marwick. 

Rover loss 

Rover Group says it wfl] 
almost certainly have incurred i 
a loss of more than £60 
million before interest and tax 
in the first half of 1986. I 
Results will be issued soon. 






The new BHP directors: Robert Holmes a Court and John EUfott 

Holmes a Court and Elliott 
given places on BHP board 

t- L nr » C..J 


Australia’s biggest and 
longest-running corporate 
poker game, for control of the 
Broken Hill Proprietary com- 
pany, is over. 

Under a plan announced 
yesterday by Sir James 
Bafakfsttme, the chairman of 
BHP. places on the BHP 
board have been given to Mr 
Robert Hoboes a Court, chair- 
man of Bell group, and Mr 

John FlffoH-, rliairm a n of Fl- 

ders-IXL, the two corporate 
raiders who were vying for 
control of Anstralia’s biggest 
company. 

As part ' of the plan, both 
have agreed not to increase 
their holding in BHP without 
malting a fell takeover bid 
milem an o th er party maWw a 
takeover offer or acquires 
more than 20 per emit of BHP. 

Sir James said it had beat 
agreed that BeD and Elders 
would not sell BHP shares 
withou t consulting the BHP 
board, and had agreed to act in 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

“a manner designed to protect 
the interests of BHP share- 
holders generally.* 1 
An additional component of 
the a g re emen t is tint Mr 
Brian Loton, chief executive of 
BHP, has been invited to join 
the Elders board. 

The deal follows more than 

18 months of manoeovering 
and bidding by Mr Holmes ft 
Court, during which he ac- 
quired 28 per cent of BHP, but 
was never able to secure a 

pHwrhing bold. 

Elders, a more recent bid- 
der, gained a holding of almost 

19 per cent 

In a letter accepting a place 
on the BHP bond, Mr 
Holmes i Court gave assur- 
ances that Bell had no inten- 
tion of “substantial share 
trading activities in KIP.** 

He said BeiTs activities in 
BHP would be confined to a 
band of about 2 per cent and 
would be conducte d “with 
great sensitivity to the prin- 


riples of insider trading and 
with fell disclosure to BHP in 
advance.” 

Mr Holmes a Court said he 
had always believed that both 
groups of shareholders would 
be best served by BHP 
recogmziflg the significance of 
Bell’s investment, and by Bell 
having the opportunity to in- 
fluence BHP policy. 

“I am now quite satisfied 
that this position can be 
achieved in a genuine at- 
mosphere of goodwill and 
mutuality of interest” be 
added. 

Mr Elliott said he was 
committed to making a pos- 
itive contribution to the board, 
and that Elders was pleased 
that, an accommodation had 
been reached with “the other 
major shareholder.” 

Sr James said aO legal 
proceedings between the three 
companies over the takeover 
would be ended immediately. 


Chicago eyes UK options 


The Chicago Board Options 
Exchange, the largest Ameri- 
can market fra* equity and 
share index options, has held 
exploratory talks with the 
Securities and Investments 
Board (SIB) about introducing 
options on British shares 
heavily traded by American 
investors. 

The chairman of the CBOE, 
Mr Walter Audi, said the 
discussions with Sir Kenneth 
BerriU, the SIB*s chairman , 
covered the undertakings it 
would have to make to be- 
come a Recognized Invest- 
ment Exchange under the 
financial services legislation if 

Sandell ballot 

The share offer by SandeD 
Perkins was subscribed 16 
times. Applications for up to 
900 shares go into a ballot for 
100 shares; 1,000-4,500 shares 
ballot for 200: 5,000-9,000 
shares ballot for 500; and 
applications for 10,000 shares 
or more will be allocated 6.4 
per cent of the amount for 
which was applied. . 


St John offer 

Companhia Auxilia de 
Empresas de Mineracao, a 
leading Brazilian holding 
company in the fields of 
minerals and natural re- 
sources, is to make an offer of 
$27 a share for St John d’El 
Rey Mining. 


By Richard Lander 
it forged a link on such options 
with the London Stock Ex- 
change or the London Inter- 
national financial Futures 
Exchange. 

Preliminary talks with the 
two London markets had also 
covered the possibility of in- 
troducing to Britain the Stan- 
dard & Poors- 100 share index 
options, the most heavily- 
traded contract on American 
futures and options exchr 
anges. 

Exchange officials said the 
introduction of British op- 
tions into America was still 
some years off and would 


have to wait for greater turn- 
over there in the shares them- 
selves. The first contract to be 
introduced would probably be 
based on a tailor-made index 
of the 50 or so British shares 
tradeable in American Dep- 
ositary Receipt form. 

Mr Audi also announced 
yesterday that the CBOE had 
reached agreement to pay $2 
million for the Cincinnati 
Stock Exchange, the world's 
only exchange where listed 
shares are traded etectroni- I 
cally through computers with | 
no market floor. 

Commodities Review, page 30 | 


Britain’s 
warning 
to Oatt 
nations 

From Bailey Morris 
Punfadel Este, Uruguay 

The world's future prosper- 
ity depends on the launching 
of a new round of world trade 
talks that will allow a critical 
economic transition into new 
service and high-technology 
industries, Mr Paul Channon, 
the Trade and Industry Sec- 
retary yesterday told world 
trade ministers. 

Mr Channon, speaking in 
his role as the president of the 
European Economic Commu- 
nity industry Council, said 
ministers must move with “a 
sense of urgency" to remove 
the threat posed by growing 
protectionism. 

He spoke at the opening 
plenary session here of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade (Gati). 

Mr Channon made his re- 
marks on a day in which a 
serious North-South debate 
erupted between rich and poor 
countries over the crucial 
issue of trade in investment 
and services. 

In addition, momentum 
grew for a proposal, initiated 
by Britain, for strong language 
in the final communique 
requiring Japan to share the 
benefits of its large trade 
surplus. 

The campaign to force Ja- 
pan to use its great wealth to 
benefit countries which have 
been prevented from entering 
its markets was pan of a 
complicated negotiating strat- 
egy, pitting rich countries 
against poorer nations and the 
US against Europe on agri- 
cultural issues. 

Ministers spent much of 
yesterday and Sunday build- 
ing support for their priority 
issues in the new trade round 
and attempting to arrange 
complex trade-offs which wffi, 
in the end, produce a commit- 
ment from the 92 Gan mem- 
ber countries to have a new 
round. 

Mr Channon said failure to 
do so would not only deter- 
mine the future of dan — a 
trade liberalizing organization 
which Britain helped to found 
in 1947 — but also prospects 
for continued world growth. 

He said protectionism was 
an attempt by rich and poor 
countries to put off “unpalat- 
able economic adjustments”. 

For this reason, liberaliza- 
tion of trade in services was of 
primary importance and 
should not be fought by 
developing countries, be said 
There appeared to be some 
movement yesterday in easing 
the fierce dispute between the 
US and Europe over agri- 
cultural subsidies. Officials 
said that France may in the 
end yield to pressure from 
other EECgations to agree to 
language innhe final commu- 
nique which will allow a 
gradual phase-down of farm 
subsidies. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


New Yoik 
Dow Jones . 
Tokyo 

NMtel Dow . 
Hong Kong: 


Amster da m Gan 

gS3££° — 

Commerzbank — 
Brussels: 

General ... — — 

Paris: CAC 

Zurich: 

SKA General — 


1751.12 C-TJOr 
Closed 


194254 (-33 


2805 (-104 

1224.6 (-145) 
2035i» (-4X7) 


RISES: 

Beecham 

Grand Met — 
BowtfKxpe. — 
Burmatex — _ 

HMsckay 

CD Mramal 


Paris: CAC 3SSJ(~2Jb 

SKA General 640.3 f-Z-9) 

London dosing prices Peg* 33 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 10% . _ 

3-month Interbank 
3-monthefigWebrte^"i9^ 9 t«^ 
buying rate 

Prime Rate 7M% 

Federal Funds 5 ,s idV 
3<mnth Treasury Buis 

30-year bonds BS’ie-SiiK* 

CURRENCIES 


Wooiwwth 

Gamar Booth 

Pflnttand 

Brit Vita 

1C Gas 

T&S Stores . 


— 413p +13p 

-a:® 

2380 4-1 8p 

115p +14p 

— 294p +1 Op 
518b +17p 

151p 4-IOp 


TSB shares trade at 100% 
premium in grey market 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 
A Mg premium on Trustee from professional investors — Investors will be to buy out 
trines Bank shares has al- individuals who know what private shareholders. A large 


HeficalBar ; 

Keflock Trust — 
Pairitee Boats — 

FAILS; 

International 

Suter 

Memec 


1B4p 4-241 

368p +1(> 
483p +20t 
250p +10f 
_76p +1lf 
290p +27f 
113p +25t 
195p +17t 


"JSpfSopj 


London: 

E: $1.4820 
£; DM3,0374 
£SwFr2^549 
£: FFr93405 
£Yen229.78 
E: lretec71.1 


New York: 
£$1.4805- 
& DM2.0515 
$: index: 110.6 

ECU £0.690402 
SDR £0813499 


GOLD 

London Fixing: 

AM S416.Q0 pm-$413.D0 
dose S412.MM13JX) (E27&00- 
278.75) 

New-Yortc - ■ 

Gomex 5411.9041^40* 


NORTH SEA OIL 

t(Oct) pm$14v40bbi ($14.55) 

totes Must trading pries. 


Savings Bank shares has al- 
ready emerged in “grey 
market 9 * trading before die 
shares have even been issued, 
with one dealer quoting prices 
up to UOp per share — more 
than 100 per cent above the 
50p partly paid offer price. 
The felly paid price was set 
last Friday at 100p. 

But City stockbrokers were 
sceptical yesterday about the 
validity of the price, and there 
were sharp di visions about 
how the price would move once 
trading in TSB shares started 
on the Stock Exchange oa 
October &. One broker said: 
“We believe this grey market 
price is exafflerated- The pre- 
mfui seemsfer too large.” 

The only operator appar- 
ently wiAig prices so fer is 
Cleveland, a l icen se d dealer 
bid not a member of the Stock 
Exchange. Mr Harvey Law- 
rence, a director of Oevelaad, 
—id- “The demand is e arn ing 


they are doing in the stock 
market. We opened the grey 
market price last week at 88p, 
but strong demand quickly 
pushed hap. 

“It is a very active market 
We have already bought and 
sold 27<M»0 TSB shares. We 
are mainly dealmg in amo unts 
of up to 10,006 shares,** he 
added. 


Prospectus 

Application 

form 


P37-48 


Anyone selling shares in the 
grey market Is assuming he 
will receive shares when they 
are issued so he can meet his 
obligations. 

Experts agree that the 
shares wiD rise to a premium 
once Stock Exchange trading 
begins but the crucial question 
is bow eager institutiofial 


private shareholders. A large 
demand from institutions 
amid send the shires soaring 
to a very big premium, as 
happened with British Tele- 
communications shares. 

Tbe TSB is keen to allot the 
bulk of its shares to private 
investors and may give as little 
as 10 per cent to the instttn- 
tions, such as pension fends 
and insurance companies. 
Applications must be in by 
10.0 am on Wednesday, 
September 24, hot the TSB is 
urging applicants to hand m 
their forms at TSB branches 
before they dose oa tbe pre- 
vious evening. Applicants may 
have their cheques cashed as 
early as September 24, but the 
bank hopes that nnsnccessfel 
applicants will have their 
cheques returned u nc as he d . 

Those who aip allotted 
fewer shares than they applied 
bar will receive a cheque for the 
unused amount. 


XIFF ORD-TURNER 

announce 
the opening of 
their Hong Kong office 

at 

2705 Gloucester Tower 
The Landmark 
1 1 Pedder Street 
Hong Kong 

Telephone: 5-810 5668 
Telex: 81352 LEGIS HX - Fax: 5-810 4743 

Resident Partners: 

R.K.L. Brown • L.L. Boshoff ■ I.C. Starr 


CLIFFORD-TURNER 

London, Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam and Singapore. 
Associated firms in Riyadh, Tokyo and Madrid. 


J 





BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 11MES TUESDAY SEPTEMBE1 


Neddy link 


nsk capital 

By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 


Nine out of 10 high-growih 
companies succeed in raising 
risk-capital finance tat en- 
counter problems on the way 
because of inexperience, a 
study by the finance for 
industry committee of the 
National Economic Develop- 
ment Council says. 

Neddy is joining Coopers 
and Ly brand, the accountants, 
and Pearce Associates, the 
small business consultants, to 
launch the Erst of several 
initiatives to help smaller 
businesses. 


The three are to run a series 
of workshops for high-growth 
businesses although others, in- 
cluding start-up companies, 
may also take part. The course, 
which lasts for two and a half 


companychairmen and chief 
executives £500 for help 
onhow best to raise between 
£250,000 and £1 .5 million of 
risk capital. 

Another idea being consid- 
ered is a series of one-day 
conferences, which would aim 
to bring together the prin- 
cipals of small businesses, 
providers of finance including 
venture capital companies, 
and the banks. 


Many managers of smaller 
companies do not appreciate 
the variety of sources of 
finance, the study showed. 

Some younger companies, 
fearful of losing control of 
their business,tended to use 
bank loans. 


If there was a theme to this 
year's Bnrgenstock con- 
ference, the talking shop of 
the world's futures and op- 
tions markets, it was “hands 
across the water”. Not the 
mOl-pond variety hi Lake 
Lucerne that stretched below 
the tranquil Swiss conference 
site, but the great oceans 
which separate the markets of 
Europe, America and the 
Asian-Pacific basin. 

Where the hands meet, the 
exchanges form “link-ups" - 
agreements to develop jointly 
an identical contract in two 
places with some form of 
arrangement for common 
execution and deartim. In its 
purest form, a fnlly-Magible 
linked contract would enable 
an investor to boy an option or 
future on exchange A, sell it 

D __ J L.4L 


deals cleared by the same 
dealing house. 

link-ups are seen as a good 
in the industry and 
there seemed to be scarcely an 
exchange at Bnrgenstock that 
was not contemplating one or 
more. For the past two years, 
the Chicago Mercantile Ex- 
change M its Euro- 

dollar, yen and mark futures 
with the Singapore Inter- 
national Monetary Ex- 
change, while the European 
Options Exchange has tie- 
sps in Montreal, Vancouver 
and Sydney so that the sun 
barely sets on its gold options 
contract 

Many more snch deals are 
on the way. The Sydney 
Futures Exetenge will soon . 
join np in gold with the New 
York Comex and in US 
Treasury bonds with our own 
London International Finan- 


( COMMODITIES REVIEW ) 

Hands across 
the waters for 
futures and 
options traders 


dal Fntures Exchange. In 
turn, liffe is looking at a 
number of contracts to take 
down die aisle with dm 
Chicago Board of Trade. 

The logic that gives link- 
ups their good status is 


markets are growing more 
and ^ say, the 
mark slumps on the cash 
market in the Far East, a 
futures position holder sboald 
be able to react as quickly as 
possible. That link-ops work 
to the benefit of aD parties is a 
Car harder question to answer, 
if only because any proof is so 
inconclusive. 

Of. afl the exchange of- 
ficials asked at Burgenstock, 
only one, Mr Aug Swee Tian 
of Simex. unequivocally ap- 
proved of link-ups. Simex's 
links with the CME were 
struck at its inception and 
undoubtedly kelpgst the ex- 
change to establish itself as 
the financial futures centre 
far South-east Asia where 
Hong Kong bad failed. It was 
for harder for Mr Bill 
Brodsky of the CME to be so 
certain — after all the Simex 


link was only one factor 
contributing to the 
. exchange's dramatic volume 
growth over the past two 
years. 

Those who stand on the 
edge of the link-up s wimming 


showed signs of ancertainty. 
Mr Michael Jenkins,' chief 
executive of Liffe, even de- 
scribed them as “acts of 
faith— people believe fungible 
contracts are good hi prin- 
ciple, bat we don't know the 
effects until they Ye put into 
practice". What worried the 
e x ch an ge officials appeared 
to be the possibility of coming 
under siege from discontented 
people above and below them. 

Trading members per- 
suaded to approve link-nps on 
tbe promise of increased turn- 
over will not be anrased if all 
that volume shifts to the other 
exchange, talcing their exist- 
ing customers with them. Nor 
will the arbitrageurs when 
such formal lines of commu- 
nication redace the scope for 
inter-exchange basis trading. 

From above, the exchanges 
also shudder at the thought of 


regulatory authorities agree- 
ing to differ on how things 
should be settled if a dispute 
arises. If the exchanges them- 
selves are the happy bride 
and groom enuring married 
fife with the hem; of in- 
tentions, the regulators may 
often be reluctant and Hi- 
matched in-laws, suspicious 
of their new relatives. 

A strident call for greater 
co-operation between regu- 
latory authorities — a parallel 
hands across the water pro- 
cess — was made at the 
conference by Mr Chris- 
topher Farrow, an assistant 
director of tbe Bank of En- 
gland. 

With Britain and tbe 
United States about to sign an 
accord covering tbe exchange 
of infonnation between their 


JTMfVW WKH 

for governments to harmonize 
business conduct rules to deal 
with the growth in linked 
contracts and the consequent 
problems of capital adequacy 
for firms which trade the 
markets around the world. 

So next time you see two 
exchange chairmen in- 
augurating a link-up amid 
modi back-slapping and 
rW ipiimip. Jq not be sur- 
prised to see some slightly 
forced grins and some crossed 
fingers. But do not lose too 
much sle ep . With the excep- 
tion of the markets that rely 
on non-ferrous metals for 
theft main business, the ex- 
change mngnlfi could barely 
restrain mmmehies from 
boasting about bow good 
business was and how much 
better it was going to become. 


Richard Lander 


1 Regulatory 
riddle for 
IG Index 

By Lawrence Lever 

IG Index, the specialist city 
bookmaker, is having prob- 
lems discovering just where it 
fits in, if at all, in the self- 
regulatory system being cre- 
ated for investment i 
businesses. 

Mr Stuart Wheeler, chair- 
man of IG, estimates that the 
company, which yesterday be- 
gan dealing for the clients of 
the recently-acquired 
Ladbroke Index, has spent 
about £20,000 in trying to 
discover how the regulators 
should 1 regard - or disregard 
-it 

It is by no means certain 
that IG s activities, which 
centre around taking bets on 
movements in financial and 
commodity indexes, make it 
an investment business, and 
therefore require authoriza- 
tion under the terms of the 
Financial Services Bill 

If it does require authoriza- 
tion the distinctive nature of 
IGY business makes it diffi- 
cult to determine into which 
self-regulating organization it 
should be pigeoned-holed. 

One possibility is the 
Association of Futures Bro- 
kers and Dealers, but the 
question has been referred for 
a derision to the Securities 
and Investments Board. 

IG’s takeover of Ladbroke 
last month means that it will 
increase the number of its 
active clients from 3,000 to 
7,000. 


WALL STREET 


Shares stage rally 
in early trading 

asSSSES SEK3K 

a brief reversal looking to tm some 

opening surge yesterday |0 long when they 

J?n£ industrial saw the bond market open np 
lSminnfiMrfwdu^Iata-a; tanned rally, not tue ims, 

0J9 toJ99.Iv. _ — General Motors was np kat 




54% 56% 
56% 56% 

42 % 43 % 



42% 43% 

37% 38% 


30% 30% 
32% 46% 

45% 46% 





W) 


How much money will 
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_ctmwi tjreueof^New^lssue Share Guide. 

To: New tomwSws Guide Ud.1 Rwwt ^»i"uwd«iic4Y'l AU ” ’ 
Name 


Address .... 


Postcode. 


Heorver 
worries aboot 




debts 


handle tbe cash flow 


problems that always 


Our patch 


When you're trading round the world 
for 24 hours a day it's not enough to stay 
wide awake. Though we do. 


Nor is it enough to invest in up-to-the 


minute technology. Though we have. 


It's not even enough to pick bright 


people. Though we ve spent years gathering 
the brightest bunch in the business. 

You have to be at home in all the major 
markets. 

Not just knowledgeable about them, 
but familiar with them. 


As members of the London and the 


New York Stock Exchanges, and proud 
owners of a licence to trade securities in 
Tokyo, the Kleinwort Benson Group is a 


permanent resident of the Big Three. 

We have offices and subsidiaries through- 
out America, the Pacific Basin and Europe. 
By almost any yardstick, we're the 


biggest of Britain's merchant banks, so 


we’ve plenty of financial muscle. 

We underwrote over a third of the equity 
capital raised in the UK last year, more than 
any other firm. In the first half of this year 
we advised on over 30 UK takeover and 
merger transactions worth £8 billion. 

But we’d rather you loved us for our 


brains than our brawn. 


Did you know, for example, that 
many of the most sophisticated 'swaps' now 


in use were invented by our people in 


Los Angeles? 


Or that Kleinwort Benson Government 
Securities in Chicago is a well-established 


primary dealer in the US Treasury market? 


We believe that, by merging with leading 
brokers Grieveson Grant/ we've established 
a major world financial group. 

Banking, corporate finance, investment 
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And wherever we meet, well be on our 


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The bright people in the right places. 


AraeH*erof*eUoy<teaBJkCtTwp 


Jp-U'cr 











































5!S 


* ' 9 


* 


>N 


much money 
i make in 1 






_ THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 

STOCKMARKETREPORT i— 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


IS 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 


OATASIREAU 


r Ooc * ed stockbroker struggle between the two 
J^Mve was yesterday reck- groups. ■ 

^ 0051 of Last night, a spokesman for 

successful defence of AE, Turner confirmed that he had 
me motor components group, heard the reports from the 
nrorn the unwanted attentions market -and stressed that the 
ox 1 Krner & NewalL company had.no intention of 

There were reports in the Placing its 29 per cent stakein 
market after hours yesterday AE. He said: “We are k e e ping 
that Cazenove was trying to our options open." 
place a total of II million AJE .Some dealers said the de- 
shares (H per cent) with cision to sell the shares could 
various institutions at 20 lp. result in some big losses for 
The shares were bought by discretionary - clients of 

Cazenove and Hill SamueL Chzenove: 

the merchant banir on hghfljf AE rose 5p to 208p on the 
of AE to support it in its news, while Turner advanced 
struggle against Turner. The 1 01310 ,94 P- 


FT A ALL 
SHARE 
INDEX 


FTA LIFE IMSURAHCE INDEX 


• MrNickOppenlieiiii, 
she City financier *ho is ex- 
pected to announce an 
agreed deal soon to jare Lon- 
don & Edinburgh Trust 
uwtrd of KeHoclt, is also be- 
lieved to be looking Cor & 
buyer for his 17 per cent boid- 
g in Argyle Trust, where 
he b deputy chairman. “Notb- 
^ is even being contem- 


AE rose 5p to 208p on the The Trustee Savicgs Rank 
news, while Turner advanced - bandwagon swept up both the 
lGpto 194p. '• h a nkin g and life insurance 

The rest of the equity 'sectors in _ its wake, with 
’ market was looking a frit more ' analysts dazming that the size 
like its old self folfowinglast of the premium on TSB 
week’s dump arid die biggest shares, when dealings begin on 
one-day foil on Wall Street October 8, will make the 
since 1929. clearing banks appear cheap 

Dealers decided over the and that the TSB is already 
weekend that the foil had been planning the acquisition of a 


overdone and anticipated that lug insurance firm. 


Wall Street wou 
when dealings 


Pearl Assurance is thought 
to be the likely take-over 


I^OpD^Sr E ?l v SliyS prices marked higher find tag of about £20 a share, 
pert dSS'todbSire the to hold on to valuing £at some £700 mfl- 

vmtwuI uc «we me their best gains. lion. A leading analyst said: 

- ' The FT index, of 30 shares “It would empty the TSB’s 

pair are believed to have paid riie day 18.7 points up coffers of its uutial slog of 

about 242p a share for the at 1*289.6 as the new account £600 million, but it wfll have 
stalff and ma y now be mftmg gut under way. The broader- ' the same amount coming in 
on a loss of £4.5 mfnmn based FT-SE 100 also pot up a again in September, 1987." 

. . . bettor performance and fin- The mighty Prudential 

“bed 19.7 points higher at Corporation dimbed 13p to 
mgwas^paedwthastmn^ 1,628-3. - 862p, Son life put on I0p to 


New York. Tbeir calculations target. It gained 20p to l,5l3p. 
turned out to he correct and Pearl would have a bid price- 


stake and may now be rifting 
On a loss Of£4-5 miTIin n . 

News of the attempted plac- 
ing was greeted with astonish- 
ment by Turner and its 
financial advisers which nar- 
rowly missed gaining control 
of AE following the bid of 
£260 million. At the final 
count on Friday, it was re- 
vealed that Turner had re- 
ceived acceptances totalling 
49 per cent of AFs shares. 

This meant that the 11 
million shares held by HU] 
Samuel and clients of 
Cazenove had proved crucial 
in averting defeat for AE 
following the acrimonious 


ink 894p, Legal & General was Sp 
the higher at 263p and London & 
nee Manchester firmed 8p to 
nth 196p. 

rize Composites were also en- 
"SB couraged with Commercial 
on Union 7p higher to 29Sp and 
the both General Accident and 
*ap GRE gaining I Op apiece to 
tdy 849p and 827p respectively, 
fa Banks to do better were 
Lloyds 12p to 454p, Barclays 
ght lOp to 504p, National West- 
rer nrinster 10p to 542p and 
3p. Midland Sp to the good at 
ce- 57Sbcx. 

tre, Merchant banks also did 
ul- well on the back of the TSB, 
id: with some sector-watchers 
B's sayiqg it might also look 
of acquisitively at Hambros, 
ive which rose lOp to 21 5p. 
in The London US Bond Mar- 
ket, which opened a point up 
ial on Friday’s dose, steadied 
to gihs which were £% higher in 
to the longer end and about £3/10 


RECENT ISSUES 


EourrtES 



Baaverco 
Borland (1 
Broad St ( 

Chelsea Man (1250 
Creighton Lata ftSjp) 
Euro Home p6Qp) 
Evans Haflshaw 
Fletcher Dennys 
GT Management 
Guthrie Carp (15 
Harrison (I50p) 


156+2 
68 
145-5 
142-1 
52+2 
130 -+1 
196+13 
143 
117 
68+5 


HKe Ergorom (5 
Hughes Food (a 
■ Lon utd Im Q3t 
MB Cash & C? 
Marina Dev (110 
Morgan Grantei 
Nawage Trans f 
ScotMtge IKK 
Stanley Latara i 
TV-AM (130p) 
Tandy bids nia 
Thames TV (190 


191-5 Z55*“i 


88 

23*2 +’j 
428+5 
93 
88-5 
453 +5 
75 
E22 5 * 
129 
196+3 
138-4 
243+3 
135-7 
£97*2 4^, 
■ 68 


wmsmoor 
Yeherton C 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Aid Irish Bk N/P 
BBA Gp F/P 
Berkeley Tech N/P 
Boots M/P 
Brown & Tawsa F/P 
Cambium Ventura N/P 
Cttyvtoion F/P 
Rush :« Tomkins- N/P 
Sedgwick N/P 
(Issue price in brackets). 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three HenitaSMiM 

Sap 86 ZZ 

DecBS 

Mar 87 

JunB7 

Sep 87 : 

Dec 87 

Previous dafB total open 
Three Morta EwedJer 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 ________ 

Mwe 7 

Jun87 


USTieestvy Bond 

Sep 86 _ __ 

•neM -- „„ 

Mar 87 


9&05 

JSS 

Low 

• 9002 

CtOM 

mm 

EstVaf 

200 

90.12 

mm 

90.12 

90.17 

1508 

9028 

9028 

9023 

9028 

287 

9024 

9027 

9024- 

9025 

160 

90.13 

90.15 

90.10 

90.10 

33 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


NT 

tamest 14653 


9027 9024 - 9025 160 dW'trwm 

9015 9010 9010 33 SaptwefeerlS 

— — 89.85 0 NYotk ijtfeQAMttS 

Montreal 22525^2680 

assess 0 

9096 9321 9096 2715 . , CTplwon 11.4925-11.525S 

8384 9079 9384 414 EJotofa 00328-00460 

9062 9069 9084 171 FhmkMtl.1024-1.1007 

Lisbon 215.7021 8.10 
_ Madrid 19085-199.70 

Previous dayVioral open bnsrast 6286 Mian 209075-210135 
' — ' — 95-16 0 . Oslo 102443-102788 

-9*38 • 94-08 94-19 - 5088- Paris 99221-9^613 

— — 9321 0 SrkNm 103463-102775 


Short OR 

Sep 88 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 


LomGR 

Sop 88 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 — 

Jun 87 

FT-SE 100 

Sep 86 

Dec 88 — 


Previooedqrs total open lmere« 1401 
- — • 100-06 0 
1004M 99-66 10045 S3 

— — 100-05 0 

Previous (toy's total open Interest 14811 

115- 31 11531 11006 5 

116- 10 11521 110-13 100B5 

— — 11009 0 

— — 11849 0 

Previous days total open imarest 2172 

18440 . 161.50 liRTs 386 

16720 1B5J0 16820 . 142 


Petto 99221-9^813 
StlMn 104483-102775 
Tokyo 22947-23026 
Vienna . 2147 - 2147 . 
Zurich .2450644865 ' 



mmm 


046444prsm 

029-0.19pram 

1%-IKpnmi 

16-11ptem 

Xpram-Kdls 

1 Vi 14 prom 

15pram-17dto 

100-160dto 

m-ms* 

34* 

3X-4Kdto 

2X-1kpmm 

%parpm« 

I^Cprom 

8K-7Kprem 

1 k- 1 prom 


142-13Bpran 

OL754J0prm 

4-3Xpram 

47-38pram 

K-1Kdto 

4X-3Kprom 

14prem-OTcfls 

255430(Ss ' 

8f-130dto 

sads 

12-12%ds 

SV-5knwn 

IX-Kpiani 


24S-2f*pnra 

3%4kpram 


Stadtag leriaw onegiaieri wllti IWBweay etTf.1 (mytoraaBsTLI -712J. 

I, OTHER STERLING RATES DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


First Deatege taalDa eto^ a t ee in atM U aa 

Sep B Sop 19 Dec 4 

Sep 22 Oct 3 Dec 18 ■ 

Oct 5 Oct 17 Jan 8 

Caa opflms veie taken oat or 16/9/88 Marahd Usxtoy, R 
BOMS. Sound Diffusion. Barker Dobeon. Orooie. Abacs. Brih 
QBibs Dandy 'A', Nottm, BBC. BT, Ranald, Pofy Peek, Premier. 
FHit Amstrad. 


Dec 16 
Jan 5* 

Jan 19 

Loxtoy, Rnrioni, Hans o n Truat, 
toco. Britamta Secs. Amatred, 


ArganttaaBBtrar _ 

Auatrafadoiar 

Bahrain dnar 

Brazil cruzado * 

Cyprus pound 

Friend marka 

Greece drachma __ 
HongKongdotar _ 

India rupee 

kaqdtaar 

Kuwait Anar KD — . 

Matoyatodotar 

Mexico paao_ 

NawZeamtdoBar. 
Saudi Arabia riyal — 
Stagaporadolv __ 
South Africa rand — 

UAEdbtm 

'Lloyds Bank 


— 15478-15534 
_ 23647-23880 
__ 0558045620 
2043-2056 

— 074804.7630 

— 72BBD-72B40 

— 198L7B-200J57 
11^49-115643 

1875-1895 

_ a432S44a£i 
— - 3J0B9488BI 
1070-1120 

— 348964.1048 

— 5L5500-55000 
_ 32040-3_207B 

— 3429344477 


Ailed Lyons 
f333) 


Cons Gold 
(*5*2) 


Sartas Oct Jan Jtgr 

300 37 SO 68 

330 17 32 45 

360 8 20 30 

560 119 138 147 
GOO 69 100 113 
650 40 63 TB 


Mind 12430-12400 

Australia 

-2625022280 

02258-02285 

.8215022200 

.7217972226 


7J575-7.7825 





.8710047150 

BaJgfcaafConwn) 

HongKewQ 

PWtagrt 

14132-14142 
— 4228-4223 
7.7990-7 7995 
T4&20-14&7D 

Audita 

s Burit HOFEX and EMaL 

— 1426-1441 

r MONEY MARKEfl 
L and GOLD J 


Thom EMI 

(*494) 


500 20 48 60 

650 4 27 36 

600 2 12 23 

420 77 80 100 

*60 40 55 65 

GOO 6 30 42 

550 1 10 20 

300 118 — — 

330 88 100 — 

380 SB 70 83 

390 28 43 57 


1 — — 

1 2 ■ — , 
18 9 

3 B IS 


Cheap money was the feature 
of the day la a market adjust- 
ing to the idea that an early ad 
iu br isk base rate* is now most 
anfikdy. However, there was a 
marked firming with the dose 
coming at 12 per cent 
yestereday. The period rates 
opened cantionsfy on a very 
flat yield curve. 

Baa* Katas % 

Ctearing Banks 10 
Finance Houaa 10 


(Discount «) 
SaUtag 
2 ninth 9% 
Srantfi S*n 



• RANS OM ES SIMS A 
JEFFERIES: Interim dividend 
I.6Sp (Up) for the half-year to 
June, payable <m Nov. 10. 
Turnover £38JM million (£312 
milKon). Pretax profit £3.45 
million (£3.04 million). Earn- 
ings per share &6p (7.0p). 
Because firm machinery contin- 
ues to be disappointing, group 
pro g res s in the second half will 
not be at the level of the first 
bal£; the board warns. 

• T AS STORES: Results for 
the 25 weeks to June 28. Interim 
dividend l-.4p(l.2pX payable on 
Nov. 28. Turnover £30.74 mil- 
lion (£22.14 million). Pretax 
profit £U1 million (£704,000). 
Earning^ per share 8-Slp 
(5.19pX Wbue the second-halfs 
figures will not contain a repeal 
of the windfall Budget profit, the 
underlying trend of business 
continues to increase and pros- 
pects remain solidity on coarse 
for another record year, the 

board veils shareholders. 

• MANDERS (HOLDINGS): 
Interim dividend 2.8p (2Jp) for 
the first 1 half of. 1986. The board 
expains that while the dividend 
increase is partly to reduce the 
disparity between payments, it 
also reflects the trading perfor- 
mance as well as Manders? 
strong financial position and the 
expectation of a continued 
improvement in performance. 
Turnover: UK £24.29 million 
(£22.56 million) and overseas 
£2J2 million (£2.13 million). 
Pretax profit £2-28 milli on 
(£2.03 million ). Earnings per 
share 93p (7.6pX The second 
half has started well. . 

• JOHN HAGGA& No divi- 
dend for the year to June 30 l Net 
turnover £26.02 million (£21.51 
million). Pretax profit £3-23 
million (£1.77 million). Earn- 
ings per share 10.1 lp (5.4Spl 
The board says that, at tins early 
stage, it appears that the current 
year's profits are unlikely to be 
less than last year. 


More company news 
on page 34 * 


.BASE 



Gitihaik HA 1000% 

t Monpge Bk Bate 


[COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


| up in the mediums and shorts. 
Mr Stephen Lewis, gilts expen 
ai Phillips & Drew, the broker, 
said that traders were in a 
cautious mood ahead of 
today’s PSBR figures. 

Things are certainty looking 
up for Britain's cider-makers 
which have been staggering 
under the weight of higher 
duty and a downturn in 
demand over the past year. 
Latest surveys from the in- : 
dustry are showing an increase 1 
in demand and some experts 
are forecasting a 2 per cent rise 
in sales this year. 

This should come as good 
news for such as HP BaLroer, 
down 3p at 164p, the shares of 

WeUcotae was up 12p at 
I93p yesterday after n 
mention in the American 
press at the weekend. 
Apparently, analysts are 
excited by the group's efforts 
at finding a cure for the 
Acquired Immune Deficiency ’ 
Syndrome. Qirucal trials 
in the US are encounmn^ and 
are scuppoing fears that 
the drag was a failure. 

which have been a dull market 
of late. The first him of an 
upturn came last month from 
Mr Esmond Buhner, the 
chairman. He cheered 
shareholders by announcing 
that sales during (he first three 
months of the year were up on 
the corresponding period and 
that he was looking for an 
increase in pretax profits for 
the full year. 

Confirmation that better 
times were just around the 
corner came last week from 
Showerings, a subsidiary of 
Allied Lyons, which also re- 
ported an increase in sales. 

The rest of the brewers 
showed signs of recovery after 
last week’s shakeout Dealers 
reported selective support 
with Blass up 3p at 743p, 
Boddingtons' Breweries 3p to 
138p, Grand Metropolitan, 
the Truman and Watney 
Mann group, lOp to.403p, 
Greene, Enqr3p to 256p and 
Hardys & Hansons Sp to 
569p. Bid speculation was 
good for another 4p on 
Belhaven at 72p- 

About I2J per cent of the 
shares were reckoned to have 
changed hands last week. This 
has increased speculation that 
a bid may be on the way At' 
the last count, Mr Nazmu 
Virani, the chainiian, held 10 
per cent of the equity with a 
further 15.5 percent owned by 
the mysterious Shohet family 
from Liechtenstein. 

'Barmatex, the Ossett carpet 
manufacturer, spurted 18p to 
a fresh peak of 23 8p. Earlier 


The Governor queries 
house price boom 

Words of warning on housing finance deed crea tes a dangerous social and 
from the Governor of- the Bank of political situation in which borrowers 
England are unsurprising as they are become over-extended and have diffi- 
timely. It will take more than words to culty in meeting their mortgage 


persuade 


British public that repayments. 


buying their own home, and borrow- For the time being, however, the 
ing up to the hilt and beyond, if watchwords to the lenders from the 
necessary, is not the best Bank of England are “caution and 
“investment** decision they can make self-restraint.” 

followed a course, with the two great Home sides winning 

b ?°E“ of *L I970s r ^ ucin , s the j?? 0 Yet another home team has chalked 

of the mortgage to the value of the up maximum points. 

property mid showering houseowners ^ ^ latest match in ^ city 

stadium, AE, the engineering group, 
■ . 1 j 35 . Kobm Lejgh-Pwnberton withstood some determined attacking 
intoned at thewprfd congress ofthe play by Xumer ^ Ncw ^] _ which 
Intemation^Umon of Budding Soa- has'shVugged off injuries caused by 
ebes an d Saru ngsAssocrations m asbestosisdaims - to sneak a victory 
Vienna yesttrdajc'Jhere is no eco- ^ Ae c ] osest possible margin: Turner 
nomic law that dictates that house and Newall’s £260 million bid failed 
pnees will necessarily travel m an ever after reaching acceptances of 49 per 
upward direction....While house cenL 

prices remain buoyant in the UK^ The result is another example ofthe 

lendmg pohoes should not be based rem arkable resilience of home teams 
on the prenuse thatjiouse pnee rises playing in the engineering sector ofthe 
will continue apace. stock market league. Within recent 

One wonders what the a dvent of a weeks , the up 2d coming Evered 
taxmg l^bonr Government ought do Holdings — which once nursed plans 
tothe housmg mmkeL Other than m for r^iam-killing act over the 
Are short term the answer trn^n very congio^te n - missed out in its 
weU nim on its record m controllmg bid ^ or McKechnie Holdings. Siebe. 

inflation. . . . the acquisitive safety products and 

The Governor's stertng point rn his engineering company, fell short of 
speech was really mflanon. In the first waning control of VPV, the process 
pteo^budihng socienes and ofiier engineS.in another upseL 
mortgage lenders had relaxed their record suggests drat playing in 

IS: this di^sion poS sorts of anack- 
“8 Problems for the away side. The 
S! ma i n difficulty lies in the attitude of 
mo re exacting ^ officiaIs: the city institutions, 
con dition s shoul d be ap plied. _ Engineering companies which have 

Despire much lower rates of mfla- fought long and hard to survive the 
bon, lenders anxious to compete have recession, pruning lactones and staff, 
m ^* e ^-F rT- c eDt m ° rt sge^ t i 1 e norm daring p, tackle new markets, and 
and raised from two to three the rano showing a willingness to invest in new 
<rf loans-to-incomgavail abl e tonew produ^ arebdng rewarded with a 
borrowers. Household sector debt has loyalty and commitment from their 

~ major shareholders. Not before time 
ThatcheYs coming, from 40per cent the predators are having to dem- 
ofdiqiosable maime to 70 per cent onst ^ te , hey have something 
In the Governor s view “i t would mor e to offer than Li ability to spotln 
certainty seem unwise, m Ike Present undervalued situation. A company 
economic climate, for mortage bor- -m-rein® from the rosnatlv ward Xrn£ 


.. an d *eir ereditors _ to rely the threshold of a new era’is no longer 
on infiatum to reduce the real, cost of easy prey because fund managers no 
servicing the mortgage. This rings 


Home sides winning 

Yet another home team has chalked 
up maximum points. 

In the latest match in the City 
stadium, AE, the engineering group, 
withstood some determined attacking 
play by Turner and New-all — which 
has shrugged off injuries caused by 
asbestosis claims — to sneak a victory 
by the closest possible margin: Turner 
and Newall's £260 million bid failed 
after reaching acceptances of 49 per 
cent. 

The result is another example of the 
remarkable resilience of home teams 
playing in the engineering sector of the 
stock market league. Within recent 
weeks, the up and coming Evered 
Holdings — which once nursed plans 
for a giant-killing act over the 
conglomerate TI — missed out in its 
bid for McKechnie Holdings. Siebe, 
the acquisitive safety products and 
engineering company, fell short of 
winning control of APV, the process 
engineer, in another upseL 

The record suggests that playing in 
this division poses all sorts of attack- 
ing problems for the away side. The 
main difficulty lies in the attitude of 
the officials: the City institutions. 

Engineering companies which have 
fought long and hard to survive the 
recession, pruning factories and staff, 
daring to tackle new markets, and 
showing a willingness to invest in new 
products, are being rewarded with a 
loyalty and commitment from their 
major shareholders. Not before time 
the predators are having to dem- 
onstrate that they have something 
more to offer than an ability to spot an 
undervalued situation. A company 
emerging from the casualty ward or on 


CnSw ,on 8 er seem prepared to think only of 
true because authorities in the major a short-term gain. 

industrialized countrosi have set their n, e presenTspkte of failed bids in 
6ce against ^accommodating mone- the engineering sator is not however 

^ a cast iron indication that the 

But would that be true of a industry’s fortunes have recovered. 
Kmnock-Ha^ey r^mie? I hope The underlying trend remains sen- 

k 6 quesl1011 sitive and exposed to the motor 

oas to be asked. industry’s performance. The target 

For this and a future Tory Govern- companies which have escaped the 
ment, the question arises in a different clutches of others will now have to 


Kinnock-Hattersley regime? I hope 
we never find out, but the question 
has to be asked. 


context As the Governor reminded perform to prove that the allegiance of 
his audience, rapidly rising house their shareholders has not been 
prices themselves can pose an infla- misplaced, 
tionary threat, as can the strength of 

"Sg'X private sector, for City cllld CMM 
house-buying in particular, is fuelling By courtesy of Lord Boi 


City and children 

By courtesy of Lord Boardman. the 


excessive growth in the supply of National Westminster Bank and the 
money. In certain conditions this Lord Mayor, Princess Anne was at the 
could continue for a long time: there Mansion House yesterday to address a 


are plenty of unencumbered prop- 
erties to use as security for loans and a 
swelling army of building societies, 


City and business audience. Her cause 
— Save the Children — touches every 
human heart. But if that is not 


banks and other intermediaries will- enough, and in practical terms it isn't. 


ing to do the lending. 


two statistics should stir the City and 


Suffice to say, as the Governor did industrial companies into action, 
yesterday, that the authorities are Of the Fund's income of £43.4 
watching the game very closely and million in 1985-86, a mere 4 per cent 
would not hesistate to blow the came from industry and commerce, 
whistle if it makes their money while from every pound raised barely 
management problems worse, or in- more than 2p goes in adminst ration. 


Issued on behalf of The Dee Corporation PLC 
fay Lazard Brothers & Co., Limited 


Notice to Holders of Partly Paid 
Shares in The Dee Corporation PLC 


Holders of shares in partly paid form in The Dee 
Corporation PLC are reminded thatthe second and final 
instalment of 1 37p per share is due on 26th September, 
1986. 

Holders of such shares should therefore ensure that 
payment arrives not later than 3.00 p.m. (London time) 
on 26th September^ 1986. If the payment is for £10,000 
or more, it must arrive sufficiently early to be cleared by 
that time. All cheques or bankers' drafts should be made 
payable to 'National Westminster Bank PLC 7 and should 


L*U WIil* L*j I L* L*J l - 1 


The payment and the letter of accepfance for the 
shares should be sent to the address shown on the front 
of the letter of acceptance — National Westminster 
Bank PLC, New Issues Department, PO Box 79, 
2 Princes Street, London EC2P 2BD. 

It should be remembered that failure to pay the 
final instalment may result in the allocation of shares 
being cancelled. 



The Dee Corporation PLC 

Silbury Court, 418 Silbury Boulevard, 

Milton Keynes MK9 2NB. 























■*4. 


-bUmNwS AND i-iNANt:e 


TriE TAMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1966 



THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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Eaaam 814 osa* -as asa 

fOWY mcome 574 517 +05 550 

Europe 1297 1399 -15 030 

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^mO-SanUtaB Rd. Maktnon* K*nt ME14 1XX 

0622 674751 


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232 130 


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23 2* 01.1 

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17 M U 
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120 40843 
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30 £7 S17 
17 M .. 
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30 £207* 
20 £1 070 
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20b 10 :: 
29 10 970 

170b 50X0 
£4 20 883 

32 4* XI 
40b 30 41+ 

33 10X0 


ran 

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on yw 

Mm CWB* potroa % P/E 


282 184 
306 244 
320 215 
184 158 
330 263 
100 IM 
620 540 
284 244 
ias 132 
S3 45 
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130 110 


Oomt Strategy 
Gnrontriu 
fMntora House 


tow ns ! M 
wory a > 



Uw Dabarora 
Lon Mwchwaf 
Lm Trow 


Man* Lyncb 
Matts 

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246 -1 

355 

315 

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320 #-3 

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130 * .. 

290 • 

233 #+1 

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119 • .. 

£234, -J. 

216 +1 
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Prica Ca gu pence ■. P/E 


STO Second AJtoxa 
X Sacs Tst or 
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61 TO Auabala 


m 

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70 

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3T8S& » 

aS5sw ,l “ 2 

JTSiSsr 

™ jraptaBw 148 

237 Tborpnorton 200 
8X Throo Sacumd Cap 366 

IfSS. 0 — SS 
Jf STSSA & 

3S Vahja Inc TM +? 


63B 
+4 6.7 


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-3 33 30320 

H b 37 250 
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20 £8430 
90 3+307 

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110b 4.1 34.7 


+2 
• +1 
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+5 

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40 £8 410 

150 17.4 32 
93 33X1 


If IF 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 



i* 

80 

TOO 

700 

50 

40 

71 

33 

120 


20 293 
■ ■ 757 
47 173 

3.1 150 
80 130 

4.1 330 
32 193 
3.0 15+ 
54 120 
17 200 


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7.1 

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-3 

25 

10 370 

+3 

170 

2.0 17.1 

1200 

75 71 


220 

92 37 

-6 

91 

£2 340 

-1 

-2 

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7.4 91 

00 

0.4 


COMMODITIES 


51 51 


UOMXM COMMODITY 

EXCHANGE 

Q W Joynaw and Co npait 

SUGAR (Fmm 0. CamtikoHl 

FOB 

1174MRD 

12&XJ-26* 


Ok. 


Mar 

May 

W0W04 

14&04&2 

r& 


Vote _ 

it^S 

COCOA 


Sep 

15X43 

Dec ...... 

Mar 

1530-89 

Hay 

1654-61 

-h4 

1669-57 

Sep 




Vot 

36GQ 


COTOi 

Sep' 


Now- 

Jsn 

Mar 

May 

Juf.. 


23S0-37S 

S40J33S 

2275470 


■ §!J5-£60 
2250-345 
.2245-225 
2579 


SOYABEAN 
Oa. 


Dec. 

P6b . 


Jun . 


SS: 


vot 


134A3SL5 

. 130.7-305 
.132^3101 
13£5-33.>; 
13£M15 
1315-3118 
134*31.5 
412 


MTSMATXMAL 
PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 

GASOIL 

Oct 11875-iaSO 

124J2W4JM 

D0C— — 128JO-29W 


Fob . 
Mar . 

Sl 

VOt . 


. 131.00-9CLOO 

13050-2900 

1 2550-21 JM 
130^)0-1550 
13000-1500 
2833 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
UnolHetoi pried# 
Official Tummmr flgurM 
Pric# in Spar metric toon# 
Stoor kipaoc# par taoy otRNM 
Rudolf Wolf AOol Ltd. mpoN 
CWERQfUDEA 

Cosh — 91250-81350 

Threg Months. 93T5M3£00 
V«l - 3175 


STANDARD CATHOOES 

cash aotwmm 

ThTOB Months. 90&0041(M)D 

Vof .. Ml 

Tone IdM 

LEAD 

Cush 

Thrae Months . 

Vd 

Dana - 


7JXW7750 
1.0048150 
.425 


Stoady 


ZMC STANDARD 

Cash 9655057850 

Vot Ml 

Tent idta 

ZINC MGH GRADE 

— .58&D049&OQ 

TTnra Months. 5975050950 
Vtf 102s 


Tons 


Steady 


SILVER LARGE 

Cash : 386Jta8750 

Three Month*. 386503B&50 
vat— HI 


■ CUM 


Tone 

SILVER SMALL 
BPl t t— r. — 38850-38750 
TJmn Months. 3965059950 

Vrt nb 

Tone. — ide 

AUMNRM 

Cash - „ 82550-82850 

Jirea Month#. 7m5W9850 

VO - #«e« 

Tea* — . - 


NCKEL 

SiiSSZImSo 

■TO* — 00 

Tone - 00 


■EAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMBStON 

Aveng* futatock prices at 
raprMaultttv# nwkata an 


f®^3««6. ®57p par kg tar 
: Sheep I37.21p per leg* 



8077pporkglw 
■ wtdaaficBRaaa wei^n 

bfittonlWNiK 

GUM 008. Up 215%, mnL 

prlca 94.loTl88) 

Shoop nos. up 23.7 %, are. 
X 137 JB(“1 1.71) ■ 
nos.imll.6ifa.av9 
--^(+0*2) 



Catena* up 15 %,aV9 
prtce.SS54ffl.17) 


SBBShtaf 1 * 

LQND »!WMTnmnE8 

exchange 

-PJOKWp.pXkfa 

J™ op" Close 

S* unq. 1045 

urn*. 105.0 
unq. 865 
unfl- 935 
■ftro unq. 895 


Ho Meat who 


Vot 7 


uwKggjmnmEs 


Month 

ra 

toporkko 


Open 

Ctase 

0? 

unq. 

98.0 

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Nov 

Fab 

4* 

Jun 

unq. 

unq. 


unq. 

***?■ 

unq. 

100.0 

a 



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Month 

Sop 

Nw 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

jm 

volume; 

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•"wwirunma 

6 per tome 

Barley 
Ctaw Oom 
] “-TO IO 6.15 
W.15 10750 

11050 

—*———290 


POTATO FUTU 

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Month 


NOV 

Fob 

ft 

NOV 


Open 

109. 

120 . 

161. 

179: 


Vot 1361 

BffFEX 

Ef^l^flMFutunHiLW 
"PWWPr 


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Jar 87 q 
A pr 87 a 
Jui87 7 
Oct 87 
Jan 88 
Apr 88 
Jut 68 
Vtotl88to< 


9045 

6025 

8435 

760.0 

855.0 

855.0 
#S5 

860.0 


SepBB n 
Oct 86 in 

JJov 88 
EtooSB 

Mar 87 
Jun 87 
VoL-ISkw 

Open ln»r M 
Spotmarke} 





















STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



up to eye you your overall xonL Check 


on this page. IF it rnatrhr* you 
ave won ou trigjit or a share of the iota] 
daily pnze money stateiU - yoTaea 
winner follow the riaim procedure oo the 
" ?L*? Ur Von must always have 
your card available when 


Confident start to account 

• i . . 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began yesterday. Dralings end September 26. gContango day September 29. Settlement day October 6. 

§Forwaru bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


-%Jd- 

@ TIbks NcMpspns LniKd 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+52 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 



123 >o "nnirMi 
«• Mf gwmra 

■OS toe RotnKrtkl u 

"S*k&£.' St 

B94 419 SIM CM 
MS BIS Unoo 
77V 43'. Wan Famo 
S2D 230 Mtnm 


mo boo 55 as 

m a-a iijib ss ma 

63 +3 0* 1U 144 

+i 7.i u taa 

340 14.3 4.1 UU 

O 1U 22134 

714 a +2 464 B£ U 

a* +s sza 77003 
m -zv .. .. .. 

am a+a 73 zb 132 


I M || i'i M| 1 1 .Ml 

E 

B 
E 




312 29147 
S.l 38 14 j0 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Please be sore lo take account 
of any wifwns signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8,000 in 
Saturday’s newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


V&eb 

BV% 

. Excti 

14% 

lExeti 


■ TTOmCIOVa 

. Excn 

2'r% 


10’i% 

■ Fund 

6V% 

.Trmm 

10% 

■Tima 

3% 


12% 

iTnes 

7V% 

Exdi 

10'1% 

Tffff 

HV% 


a% 

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9'i% 

T TrdAM 

11V% 

iTVttt 

IQ 4% 

■ Etab 

10% 

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End) 

11% 


5% 

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13% 

■ Exeb 

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11% 

Each 

12'r% 

Tr+K 

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10 % 

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VFiod 

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210 

207 

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74 

82 

211 

125 

550 

331 

300 

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114 

32 

22 

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796 

626 

276 

235 

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29 

16 

78 

37 

132 

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27 

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138 

160 

126 

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60 

SIO 

440 

486 

296 

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134 

134 

64 

137 

72 

106 

83 

S3 

75 

71 

64 

172 

51 

79 

54 

94 

SO 

131 

106 

385 

354 

.143 

86 

2 ® 

85 

256 

196 

79 

42 

244 

T44 

643 

429 

44 

28V 

TH 

126 

460 

265 

488 

296 

484 

288 

122. 

79 

1 01 

71 

429 

290 

198 

126 

3 

178 

IDT 

210 

161 

151 

90 

446 

304 

304 

226 

272 

171 

38 

23 

130 

109 

444 

306 

920 

7*6 

2U 

163 

249 

116 

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86 

39 5 

2*5 

888 

440 


340 

323 
191 
M2 
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516 ; 

166 

mv 

87 

70 

MZ 

'348 236V 

180 ' 

140 

434 : 

9211 

101 

75 

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138 

301 

195 

290 : 

846 

88 

5* 

■m 

172 

85 

67 

154 

«t 

290 

157 

225 

120 


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5*20* 

180 

41 M* 

01 a 0 * 9* 

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12* 

2014* 

102 

109 

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10* 

27 107 
7* .. 
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5*19.4 

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306 

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30* 

5* 78 

14.1 

5*242 

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5* 14* 


.. SU 

0* 

60 340 

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.. 1* 

4* 

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3* 

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300 

47 9* 

05 

1*100 

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6*11* 

88 

7*100 

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47 

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2* 

20112 

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50 

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03 

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76 

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7* 

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100 

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74 

3*100 

101 

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194 

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70 

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02 93* 

107 

20114 

107 

08114 

5 2 

47 6* 

5* 

77 *2 

102 

2*144 

7* 

3*22* 

11* 

3*106 

60 

4*220 

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37148 

01 

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101 

42 107 

41 

1*207 

07 

03 103 



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7*160 

27* 

5*126 

167 

1BT70 

03 

47 140 

aob &0 9 * 

104 

.. 30 
5* 7* 

KLO 

01 144 

16* 

07141 

12* 

4010* 

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ft. 

05 212 
03174 

04 

va 

00 

122 

sc5 

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2*204 
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01 11* 
2*17* 
1*507 
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3*160 

8 

17 9* 
3*102 
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07 

0*187 

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60 

25 204 




.. ft* 

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05 100 

60 

60 124 


52 105 

104 

59 13* 

207 

36120 


3*17.7 


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10* 

72 92 

164 

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54 142 

1* 

1.7 105 

11* 

24 134 



48 

42 17* 


32120 

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6016* 

80 

43120 

11* 

54 12* 

375 

29 .. 



23 

00363 

170 

6* 114 

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53 00 

0* 

02 74 


41 140 




42130 

104 

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27 217 

7 * 

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74 


7.1 

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67 101 

21 


64 

7.7 153 

64 

6*103 


Atfcay Ua 

Aim a Ate 


II 4 V 

S* 22 

39 «v 

29 11 

243 » 

308 130 
31 9 

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11D 2* 

143 81 

3? 1 . 1 31 

c. 43 

970 653 
IBS 133 
97 IB 
29*/ 11T 
14 6 V 

1S3 41 
280 80 
218 129 


KCA DH*ng 

LA6UP 
do ms 

New Court 
nh imm Oi 
Orttncra 
04 Swell 


naval ouch 

Sort 

SUVOWW 

Sswmh 
TH Energy 

Tng« 

TrcanM 

Tim Europe 
Wtfliv 


43 3SH 4-0 
174 141 42 
1C. 84* . 

. . . . 4.0 


+a 21 49 37 

88 104 10 4 
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• -1V 226 39 . 

•+1DV 51 4 U 97 

88 S3 24 0 

*2 .. .. 21 

11 * 

*4 7.14131 34 

17.6 

• +5 7* 34 4J 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


913 248 Eastern Prod 303 -2 

2Z1 1SB Edtro TB3 

277 214 EK 253 +5 

435 295 Boat 395 • . . 

1S3 1025 Baca 133 -2 

295 175 Becbafua (Me] -0 £235 
104 62 Ebon IB) 05 +3 

29* 1B4> B4*t 2225 4-1'a 

381 3G2 Est&rn CNra cay 328 a+2 

28V T9V Ercsaon (U4) V £22% 

164 134 Ersklnr Houaa 190 


14* 4.7 7* 
10 7 &* 11* 

98 a* 13* 
£7 80 M4 
7*0 SS 13* 


1775126 EuJOjKBsn Ferries 127 


149 112 DoWM 
342 158 Emd 
214 124 Expanat 
423 312 EM 
56 22 Falcon 


131 410 

234 44 

170 
353 
39 


FINANCE AND LAND 


248 208 AbmgMMl 210 -3 

184 126 MBan Hunt iao -2 

171P« 715 AUDkgaan -iss -9 
208 108 MridwTSCtl 208 r -2 

26 IB CarnMa 2195 -5 

M m (Mow '237 

43 16 Canuamay 94 -2 

295 17 Equity B M 28 # 

185 132 Very A tea 138 

194 153 Uriade. 168, 44 

78 62 Naf Horn EDM 6B 

85 78 Oo 8% era • .. 

UB 114 Mswaa u l ut 132 

223 2SS TantotM- 2U 8-4 


FOODS 


128 ASOA-MB 1M *44 

21 AM Drink* 24 49 

801 ArmA 33B a+S 

236 AfTFood 318 42 

85 AOKlWMN » -1 

*99 AMM . _■ 544 • .. 

240 Banks JSkbwy Q 370 • . . 

■if Bariur A Dotnon 14V 


1* 0* .. 
a* 23 as 


17.1 09 76* 
SJ 24 374 

1* 4*984 
OB 5*18* 
896 4.7 26* 
1 * 2 * .. 
BOO mi .. 


42 28 Fneoax Sole tad 34 ♦ 1 

143 jos Fanner (jfi) T29 +2 

n U FA KMer SB • . . 

650 406 Foots 891 

87 35 «CT*OT 90 

124 84 FMM63C8W 92 

GB 315 Fbbel 35 

123 88 FOatny 98 -3 

415 275 F«km Group N/V 35 45 

199 167 FMtainU A Harvey ITS 
67 48 Fnnefi (Thomae) SS 

131 94 SB Inc 92 -1 

385 2G6 GKN 272 *44 

310 260 GR 290 

119 80 Ganon Eng 112 

156 985 GMMMf 1JB +55 

150 111 Om 120 -2 

1157585 Gtoxo 850 410 

344 194 Ghmmd 310 42 

505 250 Suing Kbit 300 

182 107 Gnanpan HUBS 158 

312 SOS Granada 286 *44 

10V 5V GTOWOMI 2005V 

93 695 ItaH Proemlon 78 +1 

232 134 Hal Erin 179 42 

182 128 HM (Mf 130 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


























< L F , 1 



1 T 



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ill 


I’Ti 



[ 1 u - 

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|i ~1A 

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40 365 

236 160 
42B 291 
247 It® 
158 106 
111 7B5 

132 102 

169 112 
100 575 
136 82 

306 245 
169 135 
160 112 
225 15 
183 127 
131 100 
246 172 

133 111 
299 218 
171 112 
45B 330 
101V 72V 
106 SS 
11 734 

410 333 
118 89 . 
185 11V 
169 lit 
it 62 
176 129 
330 216 
73 36 
233 178 
IBB 67 


AKZO HJV Baa 

AMdCoaudi 

Amman 

Anchor Qmta 

BTP 

BeyarDUEO . 


K Band 

CanntaBW 


Do W 

Coay (Horace) 
Croat - 
Do DM 

EDS A D M 


Hoecbat DM60 
MC* Uoyd 
tap Own tad 

ssr 

Nonk Hydra 


400 

3* 

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+2 01 
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4* a* 


YDriuHm Cham 


120 41 5.1 

274 43 187 

167 a* 

150 0* 

225 42V as 

161 40 mo 

IM *42 
21* 6-1 B* 

W 644 47 

2*0-41 12* 

171 46 BA 

385 *45 SI* 

£88 

00 41 07 

C10V • .. 40* 

375 . . 11* 

103 ..BA 

PCS -V 03 
1B7 41 2* 

90 *42 3.7 

130 37 

264 -1 

56 *2 . .. 

223 • .. 11.1 

134 *43 4* 


230 Barr (M3) 

146 Bemad Foods 


228 Buriaiard (B 0 W) 248 

73 Oueblrd Con* 118 

64 Sr Vanin (BVfl • 100 

142 Cadbuy-fi ctu uppB a 'CBI 

145 CarraMMu 176 

160 OBtanl* Dms 2*0 

142 Da ‘K Z& 

163 Critana 1® 

220 Dea 205 

151 Ftabar (AfcedJ 1B4 

238 Ffch LMI 251 

HSU GvtuiM 124 

168 Glass Gtamr 215 

126 Hauamod Foods 152 

168 HHmdi 183 

181 HAsdoMI HUBS 308 

75 HmfWia 112 

HuMrSaoHr « 

fcatafldFnw 534 

K«K Saw 270 

Lms ponn j) 113 

2 

Monnana 62 5 

NOn FboA 278 

Nudn A Paacodt 18a 

Park FMd» «0 


' gw Bt a 

TMnr Ruttadg* 09 
Tasoo 413 

ISCskS a 

namiRMp M7 


a .ms 48* 

a* iao 
07 £812* 
00 0.12*5 
17.1 • 3.1 173 
184 4A- 04 
■v.- . . 23* 

mi 4* 9* 
97 5* 101 
01 0AUL1 
57 3*109 

7A -07 31 J8 
00 £0105 
07 00 20* 
B0 4* 07 
103 4*130 
103 40129 

108 3* 214 
32 1.7840 
16* 00 104 
1* 1* 17* 
5* 27104 

£0 1*21* 
47 2*102 

6* 2*19* 
4* 4.1 11* 
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94 IS 23* 
74 27 19* 
£9 2*13* 
00 G* 87 
IT* 3217* 
09 14 2«* 
7* 7*130 
IB 0023* 
60 3*140 
27 6.121* 
114 41 13* 
03 34 100 
6* 4* 122 
B* 00130 
II* 47 m* 
7* 1*240 
4* 01 109 

321 52 12* 
.. .. 00 
33 2*230 
109 47142 
1000 00101 
07 5* 104 


162 128 Hal (Mf 130 

086 180 HaSa IBS ■ .. 

2S0 230 HlkM 270 -3 

4iv 235 H ampto n tad 385 

49 20 ll ta iM K 25 

201 141 danaon . . 1B2 *5 

196 145 Do B*Cn» 2168 • .. 

119 98 Do 5V% Pf 115 •+•> 

1275115V Do 100 £1245 »+5 

280 183 Harpaava* 253 40 

275 175 Hama (Pn*p1 260 -5 

.823 431 I taakar SMdUay 4B7 +4 

150 90 (May 103 *+& 

205 81 Hay (Human! 230 

221 140 HapMnBCMHC 208 -1 

201 88 KBttar 163 +10 

96 65 Hw4B (J) 95 

122 HghgmlMi %m +a o 

91 62 Hob* Brat IB -1 

106 68 HotUojd 90 +1 

285 148 HopUnaom 252 

120 87 HowJen 88 «+1 

i320 234 Hutftag Aaoc 315 ' 

115 80 Hunting Group 103 -3 

304 2075 Hufchoi mwnpaa 298 
191 119 IMI 163 ta+5 

3!H sra taonon ' im •+! 
296 246 Jackson* BoomO 245 • .. 

1*65 985 Jnjna Mam 1405 

616 473 Johnson Ckmqani 550 • . . 

231 133 Jonnaon Uasnay 230 *2 

445 22': Johnson a FB 3» ■ +5 

SS5 235 Joanstut 310 

140 66 JonaaSSHpraan 110 
132 67 JOUdM (TllunM) 113 »+2 

29 21 Katautanm 27 

31 26 Kllon 30 -1 

325 iee Kataay tad 285 

130 105 Kaimady 9nb 120 -3 

288 230 KaniwuU] 272 •*€ 

215 123 KM&Z* 200 • 


5.7 [ 00 17.1 
800 43 .. ^ 
02 7.1 .. 
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70 01 170 

102 01 0.1 

20.7 42100 

27 2* 02 
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01b 07 19* 
09 41 64 
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07 03 130 . 
107 43 8* 
05 03 72 
114 06 97 
80 8* 70 

7* 40130 . 
21 1.1 224 

6* 3*192 

804 05149 
0* 1*106 
.. .. 105 

107 06 121 
05 47 7* 
05 4*100 
2*0107 9* 

1.7 07 807 
114 4*13* 

57 4*120 
«4 7*227 
00 40 17* 


301 22B 
431 213 
95* 701 
954 720 
70S 464 
,349 257 
VBS 231 
22* 173 
430 37 
6BV 28V 
205 220 
348 223 
1SV 12 
942 710 
453 361 
967 768 
416 3M 
474 348 
445 390 

TT2 520 

927 772 
560 120 
474 394 


144 96 

220 126 
184 98 
58 34 
225 156 
410 325 
62V 49 
01 60 
136 93 

131 94 

183 32 
180 137 
169 130 
391 276 
393 326 
64 42 
22B 134 
360 155 
74 51 

165 iatr> 


Cam Uxm 
EgutyAL- 

Gan Ac o dan i 
ORE 

Haath c E 
Haag BaMnao n 
Laaai 8 Gan 
London 6 Man 
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M um 6 MOM 


SMOMCk Gp 
Swaan Wi'ion 
Sturga Httga 
Sot Aumca 
Sun LA* 

Trao* Indemnity 
MBs Faoar 


44 99 5.1 .. 

»-•* 100. 4* .. 

-iv Bio 34 ”• 
I .. 00 20242 

I +5 44.7 52 .. 

♦7 174 5* .. 

+6 90 3* .. 

+10 342 4* 21* 
+10 420 61 24* 

-3 34* 7.4 7.1 

»+1 13.7 40 120 

+5 11.7 44 330 

+3 05 4* 7.6 

I+4V 940b 03 124 
+V 220 01 .. 

114 4*120 
+5 129 44 101 

»+<• 601 44 .. 

+13 300 4* 86* 
+3 20.4 01 .. 

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1-1 17 IB 01 101 

+3 107 30 170 

-1 10 *n 20 200 

+10 270 30 64 J 

+10 33* 30 .. 

46 22 70 
42 125 2090* 


CMMon 

FHay utaatM 

Hamaon CrontaVI 

Inchcapa 
JBCU (VWK) 
Luvno 

Ooaan W*SOT 
Pamon ZOcn 
Do A* 

Pt*y Pack 
San* Daray 
SkM Bras 
Tatar Haim lay 
YutoCaso 


59 07 

151 . . 1O0 

94 +2 6* 

378 +2 206 

420 +3 239 

34 10 

SIB • .. 171 

40 38 

220 .. SB 

270 0B 

161 ta+10 7* 

45'j 

555 ..229 

IBB 

216 .. 100 


LEISURE 


Barr 5 WA -A- 135 

Booaay S Haulm 170 
Bran Walker 1B2 

Campan 4B 

Cnrynkn 175 

FWLwn 366 

GflA 50V 

H artM o ar Brooks 70 
Hpnzan Trawl 120 

ka Letscrs no 

Jtamt Mags 45 

Laa tna 190 

Mao nu wtar 130 

PMasmma 310 . 

Raaay UanM 375 

FUm Urn 44 

Sags HohOMS 135 

Samuotaon Op 170 

Toca OTa m hotspur 74 
ZnOKB 184 


10* 74 10* 
. . . . 254 

7* 4* 141 
14 3*123 
an 4 * ii4 
9* 25 18* 
.. .. 424 

.. -. 7 * 

6* 03 07 
71 60 m2 

4* 9* 17* 

7*H 6.1 07 
11.1 05 131 
101 4* 104 

.. .. 243 

09 4*114 
34 20 10.1 
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7.1 3* 10* 



1 


CINEMAS AND TV 


260 170 AagPkIV'A' 


.. 130 0114* 

-1 2* 07 02 

. . 114 5.1 Ml 

+0 21* . 5* 104 

+3 16* 4*100 

.. M30 6*110 

+1 Z* 0712* 

40 

01 ft* W.7 







BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


+5 00b 4* 09 
+2 .. 9 .. 309 . 
-10 100b 09 .. 

-At 

40 17* 01 .. 




HOTELS AND CATERERS 


159 83 AM* Kora* wz -- i* S-2H3 

433 32B Grand Mat «□ «+10 195 30 13* 

286 208 Kannady BraokM 219 24 1.1 11* 

991 312 IS 353 *+BV 18* 4*100 

565 447 ion Park HoM* 550 S 143 Z* ?6J 

IDO 76V Mount Ctwtotw 89 • . . 2.1 24 147 

KG 67 PMca Of W Hotata 62 . .. 2.1 8* 140 

78 5BV Quaant Moat • 75 • 2.7 30104 

405 363 Ssotof tkMS ’A 383 .. 0* 14 14* 

81 88 Sltadi 03 ... >* 20109 

208 109 TbratmiM Ram M3 • . . 7* 5* M2 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


396 180 ABBta 318 +3 114 30 07 

333 120. Nphtanuto 213 +2 £1 1*21 

• m 36 Amtnd 140 +« oi 02 51* 

99 a Apdm Ooneunra « +2 OJb 1.1 70 

96 63 Aden 90 as* 

m 205 Marne Coora 240 • . . 4.1 t-7 7.7 

61 46 Audta FkMMy 57 +1 .. .. 192 

I7*s 4 A u dBaai ki 15*. +*» .. .. •• 

220 140 Auta 6«C 160 +2 23 1*123 

370 2*0 B1CC ‘ » *« 107 5*15* 

139 64 BM .78 2* M 92 


260 178 AAH 


10S M4 Akmaac 164 

275 130 Anbar tad 2*9 

403 150 Apptadon 200 

47 32 Anniai 42 

X! 23 Amew 29 

**0 3S5 Asti A Lacey 415 

91 39 AM ey « 

510 200 An Or Eng 0ft 200 

S3 37V Aaron » 

373 2B3 Avon FfepMr 363 

69 . 43 Awraka Mata « 

233 135 DUA 207 

«6 368 Pei (W 410 

SS 62 BETB3 94 

368 277V BOG 32* 


£*£ sya, oJS 

010 216 BaMr p+kka 264 


57 40 Bam* Human 40 

305 180 BanufRuaput 260 
32 20 taynaa (Cnana*) 21 

241 138 BMHM Ctaika 189 
89 47 Baudot! 66 

630 131 Baezar (CH) 212 
443 31B Baaoifm *06 

.. .. BMtar Countbes 

48 19 Bsakn 43 

3(9 229 Henstanl (SSW1 2*8 
148 35 Barista* 106 

MS 05 Bertstantt WB 

MB B5 Bantada K» 

Soffit g . 

SS aa H s 

123 70 001*1 U] 111 

193 B*V Bkmtd Quatcau 126 
200 105 Bnnanian Hot 173 
174 137 Buck A/raw 137 
2K 170 BHPk (PBM 243 
01 34 Bxfcmooa HodM .45 

403 189 Oku Amur Ms 
335 167 BodtaOM 335 

385 295 Boater 341 

5M 206 Boat* 223 

2«v Vi Boraan (Mta) 1BV 

353 266 BOMtar 328 

22V 16V Bam* toe £18*» 

130 73 Btadimanp is 

30 293 Braauar 263 

97 82 EMswey *0 

SI 33V Brano ra an ED 

IB* « Branfwtaar 102 

50 35 BndQand Op » 

IS 110 Mm 157 

VO IS BMporFGuntty 210 

205 115 &K5) & Big AppMS 
308 1GB BSSGffwp 275 

143 97 » Syphon 112 

390 190 BrVta 368 

423 296 Bratanm 318 

MS 34 BaamM 10* 

34 15 Bran fen Bov 

49 26 ttoeko lam 31 

190 143 BraraiATam M8 

31 19 Britain (Jonn) IT 

74 48 bruntena (Mu*) 71 

303 200 Bukxjgn m 

262 TH Burgam 33 

66 a BdriWAHtanon Of 

106 36 Camtad Eng . .91 

a zs'i capara M « 

90 a cam nd 79 

445 853 Ow* Eng 40 

128 56 crangs «5 

HV 25V Cetaeni 92 ■ 

6 4V Canni & Snav - 6 


• ti.i 4*101 

• .. 9* &6Z72 

• .. 02 05J20 

• -8 2570 4.7 101 

• -2 00 7* 9* 

-2 11* 01 141 

-5 08 2*19* 

+18 mi 4*11* 
+13 80 4*11*. 

06 14 06 

+1 03 1* M* 

.. 099 7*0.1 

.. .. a .. 30* 

• .. 114 07 .. 

+3 14 01 103 

+3 06 24 0.1 

• .. 14 2* 6* 

+6 046 1*26* 

■ 42 22* 5* 14* 

20 01 11* 
•+1 M.1 44 120 

40 08 02 21* 

• +fi 114 00 127 
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+3 18* *0 120 

+2 10.7 4.1 87 

+10 03 4*141 

+3 30 24 17* 

-6 

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-20 25.7a 9* 9* 
.. 1*0 RB .. 

+3 107 60 12* 

-2 06 5* 9* 

+4 070 02 103 

40 17.1 *2 109 

U-3'i 10 37 S’* 

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• +2 03 06 00 

• +2 9*0 60 B* 

• +2 03(1 0* 06 

• - - 01 11 300 

06n 1*14* 
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9* 4* 107 
44 34 1* 35* 

5* 4*127 
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*+5 2* 1.120* 

• . . 14b 01 72 

47 29 0* 201 

00 26 13* 
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40 70 43 141 

-1 0* 14 84* 

.. 7.1 4* B* 

74 06 164 
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+2 4* 08 110 

a+£2 11 * 3*i&8 

» .. i* 10172 
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3* 14 24.1 
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.. 2*« 17 16* 

-3 24 4*40* 

41 206 07 122 

. . 214 4* 107 

. . 43 4.1 09 

-2 14 44100 

+v ..a .. uu 



13V 3V Ang Anar Ota 
TOV888 Ang An 

63 31 Am Gold 

a 33 AAir 

40 32 AiKjtonal 

41 22 Do-A- 

isa 120 Mar Httan 
425 238 Btywora 
190 BO Brackan 

21V 9V BudUt 
358 226 CRA 
89 3S Cur Bead 
552 4(S Cons Boratak ta 
531 314 Da Baara 
218 105 DaaUraal 
9V 4V Dacmtontaai 
13V 7 Dradoniafei 
7V Fb Durban 
258 IM E Dunax 
594 256 Etat&JssiJ 
205 1» a Ora 
1S5 65 Bkbwg 

390 200 E Rand QoM 
. 4V 2V E Rano Prop 
' B «V FS Cons 
213 93 FS Da» 

79 17 Gamar Tin 
8V 4V Cental 
1ft 6 Ban Mtena 
iOV 5V GFSA 
603 313 GM Ktagotai 
83 35 Gop«ng 

123 85 Qaanutaiftai 

375 IB Ornmvta 
158 91 Hmawi Areas 
SV 4V Hamrany 
358 175 Haram 
81 47', Jonpraas 

17V 5V «nro» 

6V 2*. MOO I 
160 65 Lada 
13V BV Ltanon 
410 170 Loralna . 

157 84 HIM 
26 15 Mu s y a ta n Uotag 
123 60 ManovaU 

48 14V Moats Cap 

26 5V Uongura 
9V 4V MkUa Wtts 
655 *50 Mkavoo 
SV 2V Naw Wtt 
142 73 Wh Brakan Hd 
56V 25V m Katate 
22V 10V OMtHN 
138 65 Panang Tta 

289 2M FMrattaaaand 
25 0V Rand Mnes Ud 
44S 170 Rond Mnaa Prop 

69 15 mw w a n 

351 225 Ronton 
791 511 HTZ 
8V 4’* Rustantug 
10V 5=1 Si Hatana 
166 68 SA Land 

31 14V SouVwnsJ 

556 273 Staentua 
138 BO Sungu Ben 
138 73 Tronon 
56B 300 uneei 
59V 31V Van Rasta 
544 233 WfltaSPCW 
10 s 50 VUtdentaas 

SO 35 vogttt 

17 10'r War*ta Corianr 

566 260 Wahom 
3W 128 mom Aram 
2£Fv 15 waatarn Daap 
196 114 Wasam Maang 
266 106 Was Rand Cana 
151 80 wnmeraak 
17V 7V WWufc 
56 20 vn Mgal 

16V IOV Zamba Cooper 
60 26 Zandpan 


-V .. ..601 

.. 64* 03 .. 

.. 440 04 .. 

-IV 271 01 .. 

.. 142 41 .. 

.. 142 41 .. 

.. 47* 31.7 .. 

-IS 79* 21* .. 
-10 260 17* .. 
-V 262 10* .. 

A SS* 

-10 4J0 1* .. 

-V 82® 124 .. 
-V 126 11.0 .. 


12 * 2 * .. 
00 3*100 
w* ®fl .. 
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8BV 24V Abooo 75 

B4 68 AbadLon 70 

93 70 Apei SS 

183 155 Artngkxi Gaea 173 

3SS 216 Aada 355 

139 » Beigraue 128 

302 218 a«OT (P) 296 

*96 387 BtlClOTj *40 

186 144 Br Land 166 

170 138 Brawn 157 

48 38 Cum (A) &Son 41 

233 216 Cap S Cotmnea 233 

290 ZOO CtmSiff Prop 260 

196 188 Oamrowic M 178 

465 410 Dmtarkaid *70 

920 7B0 GALA 920 

171 131 Ctariu Ikckoai 150 

260 16* COMUM 278 

20 14 Control Sacs 16 

140 99 Corny 6 Naw ill 

100 117 Goumy ‘BT 173 

280 175 Cuuka 250 

755 470 Daeian 660 

19 6 Daraa 14 

175 is Eawaa A Aganey 135 

120 47 Epriwi That 74 

120 105 Eantaa dan 11 B 

184 140 Entatas Prop 170 

112 S3 Evana Of Lands 104 

TO 36 Fkro Oaks 50 


i98 188 Cantrof tncla l 
465 410 OwMartald 
920 760 GALA 


.. .. 12 
GO* 00 .. 
07.0 92 .. 
40* 03 .. 


54* SO* . . 
54 07 32* 
820 73 . . 

17.0 4* . . 
3*5 4* .. 

80.0 90 .. 
40* 72 .. 
29* 27* .. 
115 101 .. 


Fregmore 
Or Portland 
Greycoat 
H ata ood Op 


-5 17* 17* .. 


100 1* .. 

200 01 .. 


.. 12* 34 9* 

.. 551 05 .. 

-35 

314 6.1 01 
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-V 125 107 .. 
.. 180 159 .. 

-V 116 4* .. 


-os aab* 94 II 
-V 556 10* .. 
+30 $4* 103 .. 
.. 16* 1*2 .. 
» .. 4* 06 6* 

-5 670 11* II 

+5 ZS* 08 .. 
.. 171 06 .. 

.. 30 1.7 .. 

+22 12* 40 .. 

+6 

-1 178 120 .. 

+2 1-1 2* 


400 204 Harnbro CaanrywXMXS 

495 425 Hananaraon 435 

485 *00 DO A' 4D5 

42V 34': Htanplon Tat 39V 

wa 130 Humor once zas 

325 233 Hardpncw 310 

62V 46V Hong Kbng Land 57 
380 Z70 lay 360 

200 156 Jrmtyn 200 

320 273 Lamg Prop 280 

340 278 Land Socundas 316 

695 356 Lon A Edln Tu G*D 

266 147 DO 8V*i 2*0 

260 218 Lon A Prow Shop 260 

177 151 Lon snap Prop 168 

353 238 Lynnn 320 

380 275 MEPC 320 

140 90 Mtfnanwy 1*0 

118 105 McKay Sacs 116 

56 44 MartMaei 46 

225 125 Manvue Moorn 225 

103 60 Uarfearaugh 100 

656 167 Martor Ew 5*5 

. 10V5I0 Mounitepi £10 'j 

780 364 ItamwWw 760 

100 82 Mtedou |4AJ) 99 

20 1BV MunctM E1BV 

>30 73 Naw Cnarabdi 115 

91 *3 Panraan BO 

282 255 Paadiay 267 

260 72V Prow Martens 250 

234 176 Prop A Raw 228 

155 107 Prop ledQ* 130 

137 106 Prop Sooaity 13S 

13 v 0v Raroui 11 v 

355 teo Ragaban 345 


03b 04 . 

-2 20 26 185 

20 02 100 

+3 

43 12 443 

+1 64 60 13* 

-2 17.1 5.B 150 

. . 12* 20 179 

43 2*130 
-I 01 52 105 

• '.! 70 33 21 * 

• .. 2* ia .. 

• .. 86 4040* 

17.1 36195 
+5 207b 28 106 

. . 9* BO 22.7 

+3 0* 22283 

2* 

27 24 25* 

•-7 06 32 5* 

60 04 507 
200 20 13.1 

4* 02 406 
-1 07 00 .. 

30 01 345 

• +3V IZI 06 14* 

.. 07 05 110 

II 101 02 121 

94 54 21.6 

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•+4 66 2*232 

+5 106 01*70 

+5 120 04 276 

• -V 14 05 850 

50 2.1 227 
+5 15.1 40 11.7 

•+10 01 23 58* 

20 1*981 
100 36 142 

+6 14 0 44 21.1 

-5 10.7 1 7 33* 

-3 03 3* 

G.7 2*229 

• . 7.9 4 7 17.1 

-« 104 0323 7 

+7 107 49 205 

• II 52 44 107 

• . . 01 07 163 

+5 30 1 0 223 

+1 00 00 512 

•+10 57 1*544 

■ . . 143 1 4 126 

. . 7.1 fi® 11 B 

74 7* 152 
.. 17* 00 363 

•+1 12 1*542 

• -3 2* 20 124 

-1 121 4* 35* 


(03 70 Seel MM 
195 146 9MKI Go 
IBS 142 Stand Estate* 
««5 260 Spaynawk 
173 M4 Stand Saea 
9* 66 Stockley 

58 48 Toun Cantra 

3S9 IBB Traftad Part 
148 85 UK Land 
S’. 525 UM Rail 
885 675 Wwnar 
870 475 Wamferd 
156 130 warn 
31 I7v vwta ua) 

175 142 M A Country 


-2 04 

42 

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+10 20 

11 

• . . 122 
-1 50 

+10 20 

• +1 A3 

-. 136 

6* 

+1 

14 

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MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


II 


SHIPPING 


Btenal an* 
Drama* (CD) 
a Aeroepaca 
Br Car Aucnone 
Caffyns 

Dm? [Sontray) 


FR droop 
Ford Motor 
Gam (Pm G) 
Ganarar Motor 
GlankaU La wane 


m 17 a 

274 214 Gal 


90 49 

481 186V i 


IBS 120 ScntHenMM 
170 94 Sasi A-Aotartsoo 

164 122 Sacmor 
154 SOS Do A 

m SB Saaany tew 
53'.- 29 Sana Eng 
136 75 SMOO 
153 103 Skftu 
990 703 Sata 
53v 32 nraroninM 
303 160 Sknon&B 
149 83V Six Hinnd 
600 388 SheKHay 
35>. 36V EKF -S' 

133 94 Standi A Mpdaw 
41 30 3mdh khMrffl 


258 +3 

142 +1 

158 

158 

12 s • .. 
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126 «+3 

iS'v :: 

123 

910 • 


225 163 
194 12B 
116 06 
190 119 
in 43 

613 345 
HP 354 
120 98 
253 170 
96 66 
210 163 
234 163 
248 ISO 

S ?§ 

135 115 
SSO 94 
535 320 
»'• 33 
8V 5V 
96 64 
170 118 
116 91 
HE E9 
338 203 
349 348 
243 200 
IK 124 

e £ : 

M4 78 

3(1 73 


I ML 


R:. 


TNT 

TSL Ttarmri 
Taca 

Triads Om 
Triom 
Tram 
Tm HUB 
nud tm 
Thomsor T4JM 
Tomtom tf HJ 
Trablger HOUU 
Trsrttconknental 
TranapM Da* 
I7*iwca 
Tnefia 
Trptm 

Tumor A Nanai 


iao +2 

460 - .. 

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126 a +3 
40 . • .. 
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94 +1. 

129 

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110 

245 

73 • .. 

173 

221 

219 -9 

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192 •-* 
467 a+2 

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133 • .. 

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281 +3 

220 *+a 

170 a+2 
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133 

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23a 82 09 
Bl3 42 120 
10 £0 571 
07 5 4 11.1 

B* 03 123 
47 33 143 

A3 3J 130 
30 2*10* 
IA 1 1 334 
14 1*300 

20 20344 
26b 01 144 
09 03 6* 
12* 10* 7* 
IB* 21 159 
1A 02 766 
121 S3 70 
A3 83110 
25* 50 17* 

05 20 21* 
00 1*27* 
00 25 212 
00 4* 14.1 
7* 4*123 
74 00 9* 

i.4 10 84 

25* 49110 
1A0 07 154 

30 3*20* 
17.1 7* 5* 

6* 11* 76 
.. a .. 51 

129 SJ 102 
00 2-7 220 


14* 74 175 

SO* 40 15.1 

4* 44 51 

10* 33 MB 

II II 74 

40 40 TOJ 

64 4*117 

01 07 107 

52 i.6 2&3 
100 07 77 
107 AO IQ* 
93 5*M6 
.. • 22* 
01 01 SA2 
2* 22M0 
107 5* 7* 


Outek (HJ) 

Rowra 

Supra 

wassano 

WtoMtwad (Jonas) 


B*ta 50 6* 
22 1.7 17.1 

1* 03M.7 
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11.1 00 101 
230 01 07 

9* 00 150 
7* 3* .. 

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6.4 6* 95 

74 07 14* 
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4.6 10 224 
7* 40 .. 

42 5* 97 

25* 10* .. 

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01 62 84 
00 26 160 
101 4* 101 

7* 08 120 
157 00 105 
64 07 100 
U 14 U 
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04 47 M* 

43 54 276 

10 21 113 


312V197 Aanoe Br Pena 
396 239 Br Gommonweakn 
306 213 CatadOrat 
400 305 Church 
94 56 Fisnar (Jamas) 

603 480 Grata 
70 54V Jacobs un 
12V 5 LM 
41 28 Ueraav Docks 

340 160 Oman Tranmvl 
|S7B 428 PlOBd 
165 86 Runoman [Watarl 

349 132 Taaiow 
390 360 Turnaa Sena 


a +2 7.7 2 * i84 

'-2 71 2*190 

7.1 3140* 

a .. 12.1 05M.I 

• -. 40 77 113 

214 47423 
•+'-■ 01b 70 527 

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• *1 98 42 10.7 

+2 200 47 153 

71 4.7 235 

• .. 61 21 184 

129 3* 51.1 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


360 

290 

FD 

295 


90b 13 11 * 

206 

145 

denar Boon 

IBS 

+28 

143 

7 6 11.7 

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216 

166 

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196 

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114 

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108 

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157 

118 

Strong A FMar 

148 

+6 

114 

7.7 50 

273 

166 

S>yk> 

214 

•-1 

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0*205 


TEXTILES 




NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBUSHERS 


I 


Accord 168 

Ante Book 213 
Assoc Nu mp a p ar 335 
Wck|AAC) 310 
Bristol 665 

Cttans |Wm) 450 
DO 'A' 313 

EMAP 'A' - 1ST 

Haynes PutMng 325 
Hm Count** 210 


H tuenaon 614 
Naws tatanmonri EM 
Octopus 4» 

Pansmauth Sima 125 
Tnriv tad 413 

ute Na+apapan 078 


-1 40 

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+8 14* 
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•-0 20 * 

a -17 12* 

+10 12 * 
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-10 9 * 
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+3 22* 


56 26 

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nOmm 


i+7 4A0 7* 7* 

•6 206 7* 130 

+14 

I+S &3 7* 04 
-1 107 4* 110 

09 7*100 
+2 7.1 6* 87 

+*J . . ..657 

+1 21 5* 4.S 

+6 121 90 5* 


10 4*10* 
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+18 29* 00 12* 


St 3 206V 
300 13S 

in 97 

108 BG 
31 IB 
144 123 

127 a 
76V 68V 
315 190 
182 74 

276 196 
57 42 

60 25 
110 68 
113 99 
57 33 
137 67 
270 90 
88 47 

190 13? 

191 138 
124 94 
93 72 

115 71 
22 10 
159 94 
47 30 
ISS 109 
136 72V 
IBS 1W 
70 46 
»V 11 
140 67 

168 as 

205 05 
100V 75': 
350 295 


Br Moftrir 
Buknar 8 Lump 


Dm Ml 
Foraw (John] 


■bngwarUi 
taflmm iHarak* 
•Mrama (S) 
Lkmopl 


Mmon 

Panama A 

Roafflcut 

SEET 

Satan 

Sndai 

Smile nan (Hj 

Stoddara A 

Stroud fttay 

TaaundJanay 

Tomtanaons 

.TOOBI 

Yortayoe 


ID? 3* 196 
100 42 14* 
60 43 6* 
02 7.7 120 
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08n 84 03 
71 7423* 

07 79 

93 08 05 

21 12 143 

A* 36 13* 
07 13 40* 
07 IP 7 tl 
5* 67 65 
7* 79 73 

50 42 10* 
«* 2.7 30* 
43 54 7 7 

0.4 09 106 
A* 42 123 

14 12 100 

92 91 isa 
06 5 7 107 
..a.. 6.9 
6* 50 17 T 
23 53 1Q1 
70 61 71 
38 31 9* 
74 0010* 

15 06 04 

43 04 7.4 
06 57 07 

06 4* 14* 

07 5 7 100 

10* 09 0* 


I 


TOBACCOS 


469 300 BAT 
190 HO Carroll 
180 110 Cairo* 

187 127 Romnana a 


436 a+1V 100 42110 

116 

116 - 

153 • >1 9* 63 50 


■ 6x OMdond a Ex as * Forecast dtnfend ■ Intonm 

E em passed ( Prtra M suspension 9 Dhridend and 
exclude a special payment* Pre-roger figuras n 
as) earnings o Ex other r Ex rights s Ex senp or 
shone spft t Tax-free . . Mo significant data. . 








































































Half-Yearly 

Statement 

The premium income and new business figures of the 
Insurance subsidiaries for the half-year ended 30 June 1888 
are as follows [the corresponding figures for the six months 
to 30 June 1985 are shown in brackets). 


1 PREMIUM INCOME 


£m 

Ordinary Branch 

553 

(516) 

Industrial Branch 

15-9 

(15-3) 

General Branch 

6-3 

(52) 

2 NEW BUSINESS FIGURES 


Aimnal Premiums 

117 

(126) 

Single Premiums 

258 

(281) 

Sums Assured 

351 

(304 ) 


The new business figures ere net of reassurances. 

It should be noted that the figures at the half-year do not 
necessarily provide a reliable guide to those for (he full 
year. 

London and Manchester 
Group pic 


year. 

$ 


f 

Mley*! TAX GUIDE 1986-87 

Practical tax advice for the non-expert 
Fully revised and updated to 
include the new Inheritance 

Tax and the Finance Act 1986. 
Hardback 416pp £13.95. 

l -Tolley's 

TAX GUIDE ise6-57 

I V 

WHIS 

Available from W H Smith 
and all good bookshops. 


Two FREE services available to 
purchasers of Tolley's Tax Guide 
Year- end Tax Planning 
Memorandum 

1987 Budget Summary 



i i Qj^>L>a I QCiXf 


Memec first half 
profits decline 


By Our City Staff 

Memec does not expect 
trading conditions to improve 
significantly in the near fu- 
ture, and h is looking to 1987 
and beyond for significant 
growth m sales and profits. 

The electronics components 
distributor reported profits 
down at £2.52 million in the 
half year to June 30 compared 
with £331 million in the 
corresponding period. Turn- 
over fell to £25.52 milli on 
from £2623 million. 

The interim dividend, how- 
ever, goes up to 0.9p from 
0.875p. 

Memec said that, as prod- 
ucts become more complex 


and as more integration is 
achieved at silicon level, it 
sees an increasing demand for 
its products and for the 
marketing and sales service it 
provides for manufacturers. 

Growth prospects in the 
immediate future look best 
outside Britain, and the com- 
pany is looking for opportu- 
nities to extend operations to 
more overseas markets. 

• Trading conditions in Brit- 
' ain remained difficult in the 
half year. The company, how- 
ever, maintained gross mar- 
gins on sales and added 
several product lines with 
goodgrowth potential. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• DSC HOLDINGS; Dividend • BRUNTONS 

(MUSSELBURGH); Carclo 
Engineering now owns, or has 
received acceptances for, 7.38 
million ordinary shares (9228 
percent). Its offer remains open 
until further notice. 

• BOASE MASSIMX 
POLL1TT: Interi m dividend 
I.7Sp ( l.SpX payable on Oct 31, 
for the six months to June 30. 
Turnover £43.12 million 
(£34.18 million): Pretax profit 
£1.68 million (£1.47 million). 
Earnings per share 7.30p 

(6.06p). 

• SHARNA WARE: First half 
of 1986. No interim dividend 
(0.9p). Turnover £10.51 million 
(£11.59 million). Pretax loss 
£514,843 Goss £96,084). Loss 
per share 10.94p (1.72p). Bear- 
ing in mind the seasonal nature 
of the group's business, the 
board says, there should be an 
improvement in the trading 
performance in the second hall 

• RYAN HOTELS: Half-year 
to May 1. Pretax loss Ir£556,000 
(£502,000), against a kiss of 
lr£382,00Q. Turnover Ir£5.03 
million ((r£4.27 million). In- 
terim dividend 0.5p (same). 
Loss per share 1.61p floss 
l.I2p). 


■ uai- nuLULUA 
0.5p (same), payable on Oct. 28, 
for the year to March 31. 
Turnover £2.17 million (£1.89 
million). Pretax loss £81,818 
oss £11,767). Loss per share 
■06p floss 1.78pX DSC and 
Habit Precision Engineering 
have agreed terms, subject to 
contract and DSC shareholders' 
approval, for the sale to Habit of 
DSCs industrial diamond and 
vitrified * grinding-wheel busi- 
nesses for £1 .25 million. Habit 
will also acquire DSCs freehold 
premises at Cotwyn Bay, North 
Wales, for £250,000. 

• ACCORD PUBLICA- 
TIONS: No interim dividend, 
as stated in the pros p ectus. The 
directors confirm their forecast 
of a pretax profit of not less than 
£800,000 for 1986. Six months 
to June 30, compared with the 
svious 12 months. Turnover 
.49 million (£4.17 million). 


Pretax profit 
(£351,000). Ea 


£43,001 


. linings per share 

(weighted average) 0.5p (2.9p). 
• BENCHMARK GROUP: 
Total dividend raised to 1.62p 
(Up) for the year to June 30. 
Pretax profit £1 .42 million (£1 J 
million). Famiiwt per share 3p 

(2.8p). 




BESPOKE ELECTRONICS 
BESPEAKS SUCCESS. 


By any standards, these are 
impressive growth statistics. In comparison 
with the electronics sector, they are even 
more dramatic. 

Overthe past five years, Alphameric 
has proved its ability time and again to 
achieve solid profit growth by carefully 
selecting new markets for custom-made 


PRE-TAX PROFIT £000 


2,129 


1312 



•\ : 'ii v 

,\ 

* O 1 ;•»’ 

. I . .< 

■v'w&.jt; 

.... 

U> '*■ * 

' i'i 

mm 

b> *4 

IWV < * 
FCVAXX4 

t.XJy.MOW'CW 

If* 

ISti 



TURNOVER £000 

□ Highspeed 

Information Systems 


fjn Terminals 


12,576 


Keyboards 


4,327 



i 






2*450. 





lilS5 



■82 -83 


■84 


■85 W 


■82 *83 *5 ■86 

computer products and moving into 

them quickly and successfully. 

And nov\j after two successful years 

on the USM, we are proud to announce 

our admission by the Council of The Stock 

Exchange to the Official List 

To make sure you have the full 

facts on Alphameric, please contact Roger 

Hatfield on 04862 26663 for a copy 

of our 1986 Annual Report and Accounts. 


alphameric]*: 


Simon ‘unable 
to forecast 
profit growth’ 

Simon Engineering says it 
cannot forecast prom growth 
with any certainty this year 
because trading improve- 
ments arc still awaited from 
some sections 
Simon yesterday reported 
operating profit of £8. 11 mil- 
lion in the first half to June, 
against £7.95 million a year 
earlier, on turnover down 
from £27234 million to 
£225.03 milli on- pretax profit 
was £10.06 million against 
£9.67 million. 

The interim dividend is 
2.7p, up from 2.5p last time. 

The group says engineering 
services arc producing good 
results, as arc manufacturing 
interests, especially in the US. 


• AUTOMOTIVE PROD- 
UCTS: (subsidiary of BBA 
Group): Six months to July 5. 
Sales £144.4 miltion (£138.7 
million). Pretax profit £3.9 mil- 
lion (£33 million). 

• ARBUTHNOT DOLLAR 
INCOME TRUST: Gross rev- 
enue $54 1.297 (£367,000), 
against $5 10,604 for the year to 
June 30. Net revenue, after all 
charges. $466,462 ($436,421). 

• WYNDHAM GROUP: 
Following the acquisition of a 
freehold, two-acre retail site at 
Culvcrhouse Cross, Cardiff; 
Wyndham has accepted (subject 
to contract) the BMW vehicle 
franchise to operate from this 
development, opening at the 
end of this year. 

• CONTINUOUS STA- 
TIONERY: Agreement has 
been reached ftw the purchase of 
T Blackburn (Printers), a Bol- 
ton-based business forms pro- 
ducer. The initial price of 
£940,000 will be satisfied by 
136 miltion new ordinary 
shares. A further £450,000 may 
be payable over the next three 
years, depending on profits. 
Following completion of the 
purchase, CS has agreed to 
purchase from the trustees ofMr 
Gary Blackburn, the managing 
director of Blackburn, the lease- 
hold interest in a property used 
by Blackburn for £60,000 cash. 
The acquisition is conditional 
on the approval of CS 
shareholders. 

• SOUTHAMPTON. ISLE 
OF WIGHT AND SOUTH OF 
ENGLAND ROYAL MAIL 
STEAM PACKET: Interim 
dividend 4p (same). First half of 
1986. Turnover £4.73 million 
(£4.13 minion). Pretax profit 
£656,000 (£239,000). Earnings 
per share \Z22p (4.06p). 

• PIFCO HOLDINGS: Total 
payment lifted to 5.76p (5_28p) 
for the year to April 30. Turn- 
over £19.01 million (£1239 
mQlioh). Pretax profit £137 
million (£1.4 million). Earnings 
per share 22.4p (I9.4p). 


transfer to 
attributable 


banking 


inner 
to stu 


Home has been bought fi 
£340.000 in cash. In a full yes 
Fitzroy is expected to have 
significant impact on Lodj 
Care’s results. 

• BULMER & LUMB: 
subsidiary has entered into 
contract with the Yorkshii 


m 


Buttershaw continues to 
occupied by the coloured- 
division for its dyeing : 
recombing operations. The 


in cash is exi 
the end 


this mouth 


of £566,000. 

EXCALIBUR 
JEWELLERY: Year to 
30. Dividend 0.06p. (0 
Turnover £4.64 million I 
million). Pretax loss £25 
(loss £236, 103X 
• HOLMES PROTEC] 
GROUP: Interim dividend 0.95 
cents (0.85 cents) for the six 
months to June 30. Pretax profit 
$6 __ million (£4.06 miltion), 
against $4.65 million. Earnings 
per share 9.1 cents (7.0 cents). 
The 30 per cent increase in 
ear nin gs per share is in line with 
tire company’s expectations and 
it expects progress to be main- 
tained for the rest of this year 
and beyond. 

ROBERT M DOUGLAS 
HOLDINGS: Total payment 
raised to 235p (1.75p) for tire 
year to March 31. Turnover 
£146.46 million (£142.55 mil- 
lion). Pretax profit £1.77 milli on 
(£990.000). Earni 


per share: 


net basis 53p (9.6p) and nil- 
distribution basis S3p (10.6p). 
Asset value per ordinaiy share 
156p (146p). 

WEBBER ELECTRO 
COMPONENTS: The agreed 
offer by IM3 is J lOp in casta for 
each ordinary share and values 
Webber’s capital at about £5 
million. IM1 has irrevocable 
undertakings from Webber 
directors to accept for ibdr 
combined holdings of 1.43 mil- 
lion ordinaries (31.1 per cent). 


f TEMPUS ) 

Dalgety’s small step 
towards better times 


In last year's annual report 
and accounts, the food and 
agricultural group Dalgety 
promised that The eurrenl 
vear following the acquisition 
of Gill & Du fibs will see 
another step forward in our 
growth". 

The results for the year to 
June 30 show that it was a 
very small step indeed. Pre- 
tax profit was up by under 4 
per cent to £75 million. 
Turnover was up 25 per cent 
to £4.9 billion. 

The £38 J million trading 
profit contribution from GiU 
& Dufius, (he soft commod- 
ity trader acquired in July 
1985, was offset by a £21 
million decline in the 
contribution from Australia 
- due to the change in status 
of Dalgety Farmers to minor- 
ity status and the Australian 
dollar - and interest chares 
higher by £20 million to £53 
million. 

The trading background of 
bad weather, the poor UK 
harvest and adverse exchange 
rate movements has been less 
than ideal. Even in the US, 
where Martin Brower, the 
fast food distributor, is the 
largest profit centre, a 15 per 
cent rise in sales resulted in 
only a modest improvement 
in trading profit. Canadian 
lumber appears to be the 
brightest spot where a late 
rise in lumber prices gave 
profits a much-needed boost 
Looking below the line, the 
news is still not especially 
good. Of extraordinary write- 
offs of £383 million, £27.9 
million were attributable to 
the tin crisis. Dalgety expects 
to recover some of this 
through legal action, and the 
company has now pulled out 
of metals trading altogether. 
Another £8 million of 
extraordinaries was due to 
closure of a confirming busi- 
ness. 

For next year, the outlook 
is somewhat brighter, as the 
wheat and barley harvest in 
the UK was much better. 
Analysts arc forecasting pre- 
tax profit of £88 million to 
£90 million, giving earnings 
per share of 28p. Historically, 
Dalgety has always been on a 
low rating, and while the 
prospective multiple of 10.5 


anticipates the improve- 
ments to come as a result M 
the rationalization of Oiii & 
Duflus. there is some pre- 
mium for bid speculation in 
there too. , 

Meanwhile, the 6.4 per 
cent yield is attractive. 


Myson 


Mysons saviours. Messrs 
Wheeler and SatkeW, arc 
boring and cautious - and 
proud of it Having proved 
their style with the successful 
turn-round of Myson in the 
early eighties, the tried and 
tested formula has now been 
put to work on the Thom- 
EMI business, . 

Much is already in hand: 
redundancies knocked more 
than £1 million ofT first-half 
profits, extravagant expenses 
have been curtailed and the 
iwo sales forces have been 
amalgamated and retrained. 
The next step is a rigorous 
appraisal of product lines, 
management efficiency and 
working practices to bring 
margins at the acquired busi- 
ness nearer to those in the 
Myson domestic heating 
companies. 

Yesterday's (merger-ac- 
counted) figures suggest that, 
if the market on the domestic 
side remains buoyant, profits 
could rise to £12.5 million for 
the full year with the original 
Myson companies maintain- 
ing their first-half 1 5 per cent 
profits improvement. 

Myson has both the means 
and the method for a steady 
improvement in earnings 
over the next few years as the 
Thom business is sharpened 
up. A prospective multiple of 
14, with the shares up 4p at 
145p. is, nevertheless, gen- 
erous — the product of a 
market displaying rather less 
caution than the company in 
question. 

Suter 

What Mr David Abell and his 
management team at Suter 
have managed to get out of an 
unpromising portfolio of 
businesses should be held up 
as an example to the more 
pusillanimous of British 
industrialists. 

Mr Abell’s formula is to 


combine stringent linannaj 
controls with a strong market 

position and devolved 
management. Results over 
the last few years suggest ilut 
this approach works well. 

Since 1983. turnover has 
morc than doubled to £1 10 
million and profits nave 
crown from £2.2 million to 
fo5 million. Acquisitions 
have plaved a strategic part, 
but the underlying growth 
remains impress!' e. 

In the firet half of WS6. 
turnover from distribution 
and light engineering rose by 
17 per cent and 2 per cent 
respective!', while profits 
rose by a spectacular 44 per 
cent and 50 per cent. 

Suter aims to cam a 25 per 
cent pre-interest return on 
capital. Some businesses are 
not yet achieving this but 
some high fliers are earning a 
freakish 90 per cent return on 
capital- 

The performance of less 
satisfactory packaging and 
specialist engineering di- 
visions should improve 
following the proposed clo- 
sures of Shorn icc Packaging, 
Swinncy Engineering and the 
acquisition of Hindlc 
Cockbums, part of the US 
group. General Valve. 

It is taking longer than 
expected to destock I'KO’s 
opthalmic manufacturing op- 
eration. But. on the whole, 
Suter is pleased with its 
newest acquisition. UKO 
should provide the impetus 
for next year’s growth. 

Capital expenditure in the 
first half of 1986 was higher 
than in the whole of 19S5. 
Gearing at the year-end is 
liidcy to be modesL 

A change of policy led to 
the recent sale of a 27.7 per 
cent stake in FH Lloyd. Suter 
still holds around 14 per cent 
of Thermax Holdings 3od 
about 9 per cent of Newman 
Industries. These are strategic 
investments. 

In the current year, Suter 
should easily make about £14 
million (earnings per share of 
1 3.SpL The shares arc fairly 
valued on fundamentals but 
the skill of the management 
should take them quite a lot 
ftirther. 


d 

T 

d 

NOTICE TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF 

». 

5, 

S 

z 

Akzo N.V 

l 

established at Arnhem 

’ issue of 

1,999,681 warrants to bearer. 

B issue price 

Hfl 48 per warrant. 

i each warrant 

i 

B 

f 

entitles the holder thereof to obtain, at the price of 

Hfl 120, one common bearer sharefcommon registered 
share in the capital of Akzo N.V. from May 1, 1988 until 
September 30, 1991. 

rights 

subscription will only be open to holders of rightsderived 
from the outstanding common shares. The possession 
of 20 claims entitles the holder to subscribe to 1 warrant. 

As evidence of their rights to subscribe, holders will have 
to surrender dividend coupon No. 26. Each share entities 
the holder to 1 claim. 

dealing in rights 

will commence in Amsterdam on Tuesday, September 

16t 1986 and finish on Friday, September 26, 1986 at 

1.15 p.m. (Amsterdam time). 

subscription 

■ 

until Friday, September 26, 1986 at 300 p.m. (Amsterdam 
time) on the basis of the conditions mentioned in the 
prospectus of September 12, 19861 Banks and brokers 
can only subscribe at the head office of Amsterdam- 
Rotterdam Bank N.V. in Amsterdam. 

payment 

Thursday, October 16, 198a 

prospectuses 

copies of the prospectus in the Dutch language may 
be inspected and summaries containing an application 
form are available at ail subscription offices. Copies of 
the prospectus in the Dutch and English language as 
well as a limited number of copies of the Articles of 
Association and the 1985 Annual Report of Akzo N.V. 
may be obtained from the head offices of the manaaina 
underwriters. 

Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank N.V. Afgemene Bank Nederland N.V 

Pierson, Hetdring & Pierson N.V. 

Bank Mees & Hope NV 

Cooperative Centraie Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank B.A. 
Nederfandsche Middenstandsbank NV 

F. van Lanschot Bankiers N.V. 

In particular, at the offices of the Paying Agents: 

Midland Bank pic Barclays Bank PLC 

54 LombaKl street 

London EC4N6AA London EC 3 P 3AH 

September 12, 198G 


?■ r 


LONDON 


FRANKFURT 



NOW OUR SMILE SPREADS 

TO FRANKFURT 


EVERY FRIDAY AND SUNDAY AT 70AM. 

ENJOY 6ULF AIR'S BOLDEN FALCON SERVICE TO FRANKFURT. 

. WHETHER YOU CHOOSE FIRST CLASS, FALCON BUSINESS CLASS 
OR GOLDEN ECONOMY YOU'LL FIND OUR STANDARD OFSERVICE SUPERB. 
FLY WITH GULF AIR TO FRANKFURT 
DISCOVER THE 6ULF AIR SMILE FOR YOURSELF. 
tFROM JUNE 1ST EVERY WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY) 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT 
OR GULF AIR, 73 PICCADILLY, LONDON W1V SHF. 
TELEPHONE: 01-409 1951. BIRMINGHAM: 021-632 5931. 
MANCHESTER: 061-832 9677/8. GLASGOW: 041-248 6381. 

OR KEY PRESTEL 223913. 


WAR 


ONCE FLOWN, NEVER FORGOTTEN' 


L 

in. 


ABU DHABI AMMAN ATHENS - 8 A H R 
ISTANBUL JEDDAH KARACHI - KHARTOUM 


AIN BANGKOK - BOMBAY • CAIRO ■ COLOMBO 
. KUWAIT • LARNACA ■ LONDON • MANILA * MUSCAT 


DELHI 

PARIS 


DHAHRAN - DHAKA - DOHA - DUBAI 
RAS AL KHAIMAH • RIYADH • SALALAH 




• "0N0 KONG 

SANAA • S H A R J A-H 



V 









IVill 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


li % 


* . \ ? 
* » , 

• \i l • 


n >' 


«(S 


HORIZONS 


A guide to job 
opportunities 


Society’s diplomatic corps 


Race relations industry" is a feintly 
mockjng term, not liked by its employ- 

2w« La S* ,ni ® a* **s combustible oul- 
POSIS. where words are weighed for 
P rcj “J ,cc - Jey prefer to see themselves 
as more akin to the diplomatic corps, 
diplomacy was once defined as "the art 
°Ljy~ ,n ® °^ er fellow have your own 

■ Nevertheless. if race relations were an 
""ffi an >body taking out shares in, 
spy 1 964. would by now be making a 

• handsome profit 

.q J_ aaked Birmingham's town derk in 

• tor permission to speak to the 
council haison officer for coloured 
people. The permission was refused. The 
only person nationally doing anything 
much for communities was Nadine 
Feppard. advisory officer to the National 
Committee for Commonwealth Im- 
migrants. The one civil servant in die 
Home Office who knew anything worth- 
while about race was immediately 
transferred to another post something to 
do with licensing. 

Now any town with an ethnic minority 
from the new Commonwealth is hardly 
respectable unless it has an officer 
seeking to ensure what the churches 
cannot by themselves achieve, “peace 
and goodwill to ail men" (and these days 
to women also). 

Nor, of course, can the race relations 
ad viser or officer. He can only argue that 
things might be much worse if was not 
there, and that is no doubt tree. But it isa 
delicate line to draw — between sticking 

Conciliation can lead to 
attack from both sides 

up for minorities and inflaming opinion; 
and seeking to look after both sides and 
being accused by one or the other of not 
properly representing their interests. It 
was Martin Luther King who said riots 
are the voice of the unheard. 

Being in the middle conciliating can 
sometimes to lead to attack from both 
sides. The best asset is realism. Amateur 
idealists, faced with black people who 
think they are being patronized, may be 
looked down upon as do-goodiqg lib- 
erals. One church person with mission- 
ary zeal who invited an Indian to church 
"to meet God" was told politely that 
God was in India and the immigration 
people would not let him in. 

Governments over the years, bring 
realistic, have known they have had to 
balance clamps on immigration with 
assurances that they will fight for racial 
equality. 

One result is the Commission for 
Racial Equality with 200 staff at a cost of 
£3.1 million (London has 144, Leicester . 
seven. Leeds eight. Birmingham 14 and 
Manchester 15). The commission also- 
provides gram aid for the employment of 
full-time staff to 85 community relations 
councils out of a total of 103. 

Because of Section 71 of the Race 
Relations Act. local authorities have a 
specific duty to eliminate unlawful racial 
discrimination, to promote equality of 
opportunity and good relations between 


There is an ideal job 
today for those with 
a talent for healing 
the wounds of racial . 

strife, writes Peter Evans 

persons of different racial groups. To do 
this, they can create posts. One increas- 
ingly popular type of appointment is that 
of race relations adviser. The Home 
Office is able to pay 75 per cent of the 
cost of salaries for such posts. 

Special race relations staff are being 
appointed with increasing frequency in 
housing, social services, libraries, 
recreation, and other departments of 
■ local authorities. 

There are 33 London boroughs. Eigh- 
teen of them have personnel involved in 
race relations. The job titles range from 
"principal race relations adviser” to 
"translation and interpreting services co- 
ordinator". There are about 100 person- 
nel in these posts. Race ■ relations 
advisers are found throughout the 
system — education, housing, social 
services, leisure, and black business 
development. 

There are about 32 personnel in eight 
county councils with jobs ranging from 
the head of an equal opportunities unit 
to an ethnic minorities adviser in a chief 
executive's department. 

Eighteen metropolitan districts have 
about 68 personnel involved, with jobs 
ranging from head of a race relations and 
equal opportunities unit to a multi- 
cultural amirs officer. Fourteen districts 
have 32 personnel involved. 

The local authorities Race Relations 
Information Exchange was established in 
September 1984 as a result of a pilot 
study carried out by the Policy Studies 
Institute. The study had been commis- 
sioned by the Local Government Train- 
ing Board, the Department of the 
Environment and the Home Office. One 
of the recommendations of the report. 
Local Authorities and Racial Dis- 
advantage, published by the Department 
of the Environment, was to establish a 
means of ensuring effective exchange of 
information between local authorities 
about race relations matters. 

It is funded by the Local Government 
Training Board. the Department of the 
Environment, the Home Office and the 
Community Relations CoundL The 
information exchange receives docu- 
ments from local authorities and other 
sources, analyses and summarizes them 
for computer storage, then answers 
queries received from local authorities 
and other bodies by sending copies of 
appropriate documents and other 
information to the inquirers. 

The private sector has become ex- 
tremely active. The commission is 
involved primarily in promotional work, 
trying to get large well-known companies 
to adopt the code of practice for the 
elimination of discrimination from 
empJoymenL 


Two banks have full-time managers 
for equal opportunities at a senior level 
with salaries of £20.000. Two other 
banks have equal opportunities units. 
They are mostly internal appointments. 
Building societies may have an equal 
opportunities manager who reports to 
the general manager. 

The commission says British Airways 
has more than 35.000 personnel, and one 
full-time equal opportunities officer; BP 
has an equal opportunities officer at 
senior personnel level for more than 
60.000 people; Whitbread has a two-year , 
appointment for an equal opportunities 
adviser, Liulewoods has one for sex 1 
equality and one for race equality. , 

In the public sector, the commission 
lists London Regional Transport, British 
Rail and British Gas as each having an 
equal opportunities officer. All these 
appointments are full-time. 

There are 43 police forces in the UK. 
Each one has a community relations 
branch with a liaison officer, the 
commission says. The numbers of 
personnel vary, but there are between 
four and twelve. 

There are 56 probation areas. Every 
one of them has an ethnic liaison officer 
at senior or assistant chief grade. 


*r>-. 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 

[Samoa Legal OnwosSotra 



Most people are surprised to ieam that Barnet, is. in fact, the second largest borough of 
the capital. 

Not surprisingly, therefore, the borough’s size is reflected in the complexity and variety of the 
workload of the Legal Division. And, over the years, the professionalism and dedication of the 
Division has been recognised and valued. 

Currently, we are seeking experienced professionals for two key posts in the Litigation and 
Financial Services Section of the recently re-organised Division. People who will see their 
appointment as an important step in their career. 

PRINCIPAL SOLICITOR PRINCIPAL ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 


PRINCIPAL SOLICITOR 
Litigation and Financial Services 
Ret 600/PS 

Heading a team of fourteen staff - both admitted and 
unadmitted - you will be responsible for the Council’s 
Litigation, Local Government and GLC abolition work, 
dealing personally with major litigation and financial 
matters. 

An experienced Litigator with a particular interest in. and 
knowledge of. Local Government Law. you must also 
possess the considerable management skills required to 
direct and motivate your team. 

Salary is on a scale up to £19,461 p.a. inclusive which wilt 
increase to over £20,000 p.a . with the 1386 pay award. 


Litigation 
Ref: 600/PAS 

Working directly under the Principal Solicitor, you will be 
managing a team of seven responsible (or a wide and 
interesting range of Litigation matters. 

You will be a solicitor with a lively, enthusiastic approach 
and a confident personality unafraid of management 
responsibility. A commitment to public service is 
essential. 

Salary is on a scale to £17,601 p.a. inclusive, with a pay 
award pending. 


To discuss these positions with Leonie Cowen, Barnet's Chief Solicitor, please contact, in the first 
instance. 01 202 8282 Ext 418. 

Or, for application forms and further particulars 
Square, 

Telephone 01 202 8282. Ext 424 (01 202 6602 ^ 

outside office hours. ■■flj 

Closing date 1st October 1986 * T Mm 


J 


*52 


lonoon BOROUGH 


•I-ViTi 


Martin Luther King ; reason for riots 

There are 192 regional district health 1 
authorities in the UK. The commission 
believes that at present there could be no I 
more than six with any sort of race 
relations adviser or personnel liaising 
with ethnic minorities to do with 
community health. One authority with 
an ethnic minority health adviser is 
Haringey. 

Among the unions, the Association of 
Cinematograph. Television and Allied 
Technicians, the National Union of 
Journalists, and the General Municipal 
Boilermakers and Allied Trades Union 
have full-time equality organizers, the 
commission says. The Society of Civil 
and Public Servants has given the deputy 
general secretary race relations duties. 
The National and Local Government 
Officers' Association has a full-time 
officer and so has the National Union of 
Tailors and Garment Workers. 

Race relations has become a career for 
some and part of a career for others as 
they assume its duties. Given the 
potentially explosive nature of relation- 
ships. or the lack of them, which the riots 
have shown, a touch ofhedling is needed. 






HEALTH & HOUSING DEPARTMENT 

PRINCIPAL BUILDING 
SURVEYOR 

POST NO. 8/136 GRADE: PO 2-5 
SALARY: £11604 - £12513 
(pay award penefing) 

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f Shropshire 

COUNTY COUNCIL 

SOCIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

Social Workers 

(non-accideiital injuries unit) 
SW3 £8,979 - £10,638 
(salary award pending) 

Required to join a specialist team based in 
Shrewsbury dealing with physical and 
sexual abuse of children. Excellent oppor- 
tunity for specialisation with a small 
caseload. Applicants should ideally have 
experience in chBd abuse procedures, in- 
formal enquiries to Mr C Brennan (0743- 
253984). Car loan or lease car facilities 
and relocation allowances paid m ap- 
proved cases. 

Application forms and job descriptions 
from the Director of Social Services. 
ShirehaH, Abbey Foregate, Shrewsbury 
SY2 6ND (0743-253712). Closing date 
30th September 1986. 


TRAINING UNIT 
MANAGER 

( Tb-advertisement-promas appSants need not apply) 
Manager required to head a unit of 7, organising 
vocational new technology training and Egnlish 
language support for 500 staff, mainly refugees, 
emptojrecJ on a community placement. scheme. 
Extensive experience In tainfog (preferably m 
London) and administration, inducting budget 
control essential. Experience of working with 
refugees and/or ethnic minorities desirable. 
Salary: £ 11 , 625-El 2, 597 inc. L.W. (subject to 
qualifications and experience). 

Closing date: 24th September, 1986. 

Job description and application tom from 
Nuala McAufey, BBC, Bondway House, 
3/9 Bondway, London SE8 1SJ. 

BRC is an Equal Opportunities Employer. 
BMTBH REFUGEE COtWIL 


FAREHAM BOROUGH COUNCIL 
DEPARTMENT OF LEGAL AND 
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

LEGAL ASSISTANT 
POST NO. L14 

Salary: Scale 5/6 £7,92D-£9,591 
(Pay Award Pending) 

A vacancy has arisen for a Legal Assistant to 
deal primarily with conveyancing work in the 
Department The ability to do some common 
law work would be desirable. Applicants should 
preferably be Members of the Institute of Legal 
Executives. Benefits Include 100% removal ex- 
penses and up to £2.000 payable towards legal 
and estate agents fees plus generous distur- 
bance and separation allowance. 6enerous 
Housing Support/Mortgage Scheme/Housing 
accommodation may also be available. 

Closing date for receipt of completed applica- 
tions : 30th September 1986. 

For appScafien forms and farter details write 
(b or tefephoBs:- 

Tbe Department of Management Services, 
Farefaam Borough Coned, 

Crate Offices, Civic Way, 
FAREHAM. Hants, P016 7PZ. 

let Fareham 238 108 Ext 232. 


★ LEGAL ★ 

★ SECRETARY* 

Salary range £7000-£8200 

Our Assistant Solicitor is looking for an accurate 
shorthand/audio secretary using a Word 
Processor to hdp with ibe full range of secretarial 


This bah ideal opportunity for someone with a 
Riinamura of one year's secret aria l experience to 
develop their career in the legal world at oar Head 
Office near St James's Park. 

Please write for an application form and more 
details, enclosing a SAE to: 

Nicola Tyler, Assistant Personnel Offices, 
THE NATIONAL TRUST 
36 Qaeen Anne's Gate, London SW1H 9AS 
Closing date: 24ih September, 1986. 


PUBLIC RELATIONS EXECUTIVE 

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emoonraenta wnprwwneffl. 

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ConuwMJtwB at we Bngtrtw based moral ntfne. toptarts Would t me 
proven npenentt me iMy tn afl of mm ol tfte PR fcnaom i 

Javtuialc stalls, meat tasn n u rto n mc e Ml dnetaomeol ol promoters, 
land rssaq. non wga rfca po n. riomoten wfiecam and dteandnun. earn- 
rani mnpgr ptfucteR. nqtang msmwm. mating flflfcys and 
odfcttniB. as aefl as twog pepaiea to iwtotate da rare A 
nutbna iu oaflOl desk ad® 

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Contnouoi) penuo* sehem BUPA nwrtwslw. mi l 

Ajppfy wth w tnr 30 September 1«6 fo-onMor. Km i fttti ttffi VV 
T«ty Gioub. Hostel Haiae. 37 West Snot. Bffptoo BOT 2RE If I 


THE TIMES 


PART-TIME 

ADMINISTRATOR/ 

SECRETARY 

tartte Wind and WatenrtW 
Section old* Society tar me 
Peojocttoft at Afldant BuMngs. 
Typing MsenouL Detafe from 
The Sftratey. SPaB. 37 Spttai 
Square, London El. 


FAREHAM BOROUGH COUNCIL 
Department of Legal and Administrative Services 

Principal Assistant Solicitor 

Post No. L11 

Salary P03 E12£13-£1 3,662 
(subject to National & Local Review) 

Pay Award Pending 

Applications are invited from SoBdtors with post admission experience for 
this senior post in the Council’s Legal Section. The postholder wifi deputise 
for an Assistant Director in the day to day management of the section 
co mp rising 10 staff. 

Candidates should be capable of dealing with a wide range of District 
Councfi affairs. Duties wtt include general legal advice to Committees and 
to other Departments, and advocacy both in Court and at Public Inquiries. 
Appropriate car users allowance will be payable. 

Benefits include 100% removal expenses and up to £3,000 payable to- 
wards legal and estate agents tees plus generous disturbance and 
separation allowance. Generous Housing Support/Mortgage Subsidy 
Scheme/Temporary Housing Accommodation may also be available. 
Closing date for receipt of completed appfication: 26 September 1986. 

For appfication forms and further detaBs write or telephone: The Director . 
off Management Service, Box. No. 17, Fareham Borough Council, CMc , 
Offices, Civic Way, Fareham, Hants P016 7XP. Telephone: Fareham I 
236100 ext 232. 


fTT* 


DIRECTORATE OF FINANCE AND 
ADMINISTRATION 

SOLICITORS 

Salary (*> to £1435 (Pay award pendng) 

We are seeking to recruit two enthusiastic solicitors wflfing 
to undertake a varied workload including a significant 
amount of child care work. Applicants should have at least 
two years practical post-admission experience in the 
personal social services area of tire law, and be able to 
work with the minimum ol supervision. 

Removals and disturbance expenses up to £3,000 in 
appropriate cases, car-leasing scheme, flexible working 
hours. 

For an application form and further details, please *pbone 
A&son Kemp on (0223 317283) or write to: Director of 
Finance and Administration, Shire Hall, Castle H1IJ, 
Cambridge C83 0AP. For an informal discussion about 
these posts please ’phone John Atkinson on 01223 
317154). 

Closing date for applic a tions: Wednesday 24 September 
1986. 32D-LE/C10/305 


EQUAL 


OPPORTUNITY 


EMPLOYER 


F.TECTTTTVE CRPMK 

APPEARS EVERY THURSDA Y 
from 11th September 1986 
For further details 
TEL.: 01-481 4481 


EEC LIAISON 
OFFICER 

AnawposlolEECUasonOffi- 

» s u be esnttetan for nwe 
yeas n tt* fas nsance u as- 
sa wtb tt* dnetapmen! a 
adtheonal support fro m Conw 
bt» sources Tt* ereangvmft 
of Inis between the 
and tteCanntesm « testes 
wane a pnw tespojsttSJy A 
tueibitnr pt the EC nsatu- 
dons and d al tea o re 
Eunnean tanuaoe o atnuon to 
Entfteh wtriTbi an aiwrtagL 
SaWy eMtan the rune W22Sa 
■ £15.700 A* rewl 
phe wsvmsm benews. 
Funnel panadas n» t» on- 

Yoftofrke. HP IV |DOT - 
733486 Ed. 3mU tt Hhon 
laws ri apptenan ncumg * 
C V art a*mnp Bum ta&ets 
short] u sea by 20 tarter 
1866. fa equU oopcftuwy 
emptayer 


ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 

Saiafy up to £11,604 (award pending) 

An opportunity exists for an able and enthusiastic Solicitor to join our 
busy Legal Section and handle a varied and interesting range of work, 
including advocacy In the Courts and at Inquiries. 

The post offers excellent working conditions in the attractive town of 
Cirencester. Removal expenses and re-settlement allowance are payable 
in approved cases. 

For further inf or ma tion and an appfication form please 
contact Mrs. Hoftam at Conned Offices, Trinity Road, 
Cirencester, Bios. GL7 IPX. 

TM: (0285) 5757 Ext 3201. 

The closing dale for applications 
is 24th September. 1986. S 


■ ASSISTANT ■ 
SOLICITOR 

£13,473 - £14,688 
(inclusive) 

Required at the Civic Centre, Hemel Hempstead. Duties 
will include giving legal advice on the whole range of 
functions of the Borough Council, drafting legal docu- 
ments and reports, representation at inquiries and 
Court. Applicants must be capable of carrying out advo- 
cacy, litigation and conveyancing of considerable 
weight and complexity. 

Generous relocation allowances are available. The 
Council operates a flexible working hours scheme. 

The Borough of Dacorum contains the towns of Hemel 
Hempstead, Berkhamsted and Tring, has a population 
of 135,000 and is pleasantly situated in delightful Chil- 
tem countryside. The Ml and M25 pass through the 
Borough and London is only 30 minutes away by train. 

An application form and details may be obtained from, 
and should be returned to the Borough Secretary, 
Civic Centre, Hemel Hempstead, Herts. HP1 1HH. Tel. 
(0442) 60161 extension 2250 or 2214. 

Closing date: 29 September 1986. 

We are an Equal opportunities employer and welcome 
applications from registered disabled persons. 



Dacorum 
Borough j 
Council 


COUNTY 
SECRETARY'S 
DEPARTMENT 

POLICE, PROPERTY East Sussex 
AND COMMON LAW 
SECTION 

SENIOR SOLICITOR 

c£1 7,500 

To head a team of six providing direct legal services 
to ail County Departments, Sussex Police and the 
East Sussex Probation Service with special empha- 
sis on licensing. Police discipline, property, 
commercial, contract, litigation and Common Law. 

ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 

c£1 4,000 

To advise and act for the Sussex Police in all licens- 
ing matters, and the Probation Service on matters 
arising from breaches of Probation Orders. 

Generous relocation grants and car loan or leasing 
scheme available. 

For further details and application form please tele- 
phone Pat Weller/David Panniter on Lewes (0273) 
475400, Ext 573 or write to the County Secretary, 
Pelham House, St Andrews Lane, Lewes, BN7 1 UN. 

East Sussex is committed to equal opportunities. 


KENSINGTON HOUSING TRUST 

seeks a 

FINANCE MANAGER 

Salary: f 17, 000-f 18,500 p.a. 
depending on qualifications and experience 

K e nsi ng ton Housing Trust is a major London housing association, provid- 
es more than 2,000 homes in West and Central London. It seeks a Finance 
Manager to head a department ©C six staff, based at the Trust's offices in 
North Kensington. The Finance Manager also advises the Trust’s Director 
and Committee of Management on financial issues and is a member of the 
management team. 

Suitable c an dida t es will have considerable experience in accounting and 
finance, and possibly a relevant professional qualification. They will also 
have expenence of man a gin g staff, and must be good communicators, 
willing to. work with senior managers from other professional disciplines. 

For further details and an application form please contact:- 

HACAS Recruitment 
2 Hertslet Road 
London N7 6PL 
Telephone: 01-609 9491 


Completed 
are advisin 
1986. 


ications should be returned to HACAS Recruitment, who 
i Trust on this appointment, by Monday 29th September 



36 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


CHIEF INTERNAL 
AUDITOR 

SOUTH COAST LOCATION 
POlO-13 £14385-£15,453 plus Car Allowance 

Arising from the appointment of the present holder to the post of Audit 
Manager, Norwich Health Authority, the above post becomes vacant on 
20 October 1986. 

Applications are invited from appropriately qualified and experienced 
persons (CIPFA qualification preferred), who will need to be able to 
demonstrate their ability to actively lead a small audit section. 

Farther partknhus and application Fora available 
- front the Personnel Section, Town Hall, Gosport, 

Hants PQ12 1ER TeL (0705) 504242 
223. 

U A Closing date: 26 September 1986. 


G 


Gosport Borough Council is an 
Equal Opportunity Employer. 



SOLICITOR 

(SOCIAL SERVICES) 

Grade POD/E 

£14,391 - £16,759 p.a. inclusive 
(Pay award pending) 

Someone with an inexhaustible supply of energy, 
knowledge and wisdom is requred to take on a sub- 
stantial workload arising mainly in the Social Service 
field. Such a person is likely to have been admitted for 
at (east three years and be able to demonstrate experi- 
ence in juvenile, family and social welfare matters. As 
well as the giving of advice, attendance at court, case 
conferences, committees and tribunals will be required. 

ASSISTANT 

SOLICITORS 

Grade POB/E 

£12,690 - £14,391 p.a. inclusive 
(Pay award pending) 

Excellent opportunities to oakt experience await the 
two people chosen to join Bexley’s Legal Service. As 
successful people they will be able to indulge them- 
selves in dealing with the range of Services provided 
by an outer London Borough. It is taken for granted 
i they will possess the necessary legal skills and be able 
to express themselves with clarity. Starting salary will 
depend upon ability and experience. Applications wel- 
come from those who have newly qualified. 

The above posts offer the benefits of a generous 
relocation package in approved cases, flexible working 
hows and a subsidised staff restaruanL 

Further details and application forms available from 
Personnel Section, Room 320, Civic Offices. Broadway, 
Bexleyheath, Kent, DAS 7LB. Telephone 01^303 7777 


oms - awn M. IK 
name* tend Cone*. ■Manna 
n>M gonmaM «an Inf Oa pHRMoa 



UNIT 

ACCOUNTANTS 

£13.880 - £17,400 

We are revising 
our management 
arrangements to 
mea the chal- 
lenge of 
providing better 
health care for 
the people of 
South Essex. 

Each of our two 
large units re- 
quires a qualified 
accountant with 

good communi- 
cation skills and 
the ambition to 
become a Gen- 
eral Manager or 
France Director. 

For farther de- 
tags costed 


*n E«* OfvoniMr EaWo»«. 



Bexley 


Closing dale 13th October 1986. 


Army 

Legal Corps 

Hie Army^s legal service wifl recruit 
up to 5 qualified lawyers, in the rank of 
Captain, towards the end of 1986. 

A Selection Board will be held in October 
Applicants should, preferably be 
between 24 and 30 years of age, apd may 
be of either sex and from either branch of 
the legal profession. Same experience of 
advocacy would be an advantage. 

Die starting salary is £13,154. Further 
details of the terms and conditions of 
service and of the warkof the Army Legal 
Corps both at home and overseas, may be 
obtained by those interested from: 

Lieutenant Colonel A. E Norris QBE, 
MA, Directorate of Army Legal Services, 
Ministry of Defence (ALS1), Empress 
State Building, London SW6 1TR. 

TeL- 01-385 1244 Ext 3382. 

4 4 »} ALCOfficer 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 

Career opportunities for young 

LAWYERS 


As a large and rapidly expanding firm, based in die heart of the Midlands, we 
provide a full range of legal services for our corporate and private clients. We 
need able and ambitious lawyers to further our expansion in the following 

areas:- 

COMPANY & COMMERCIAL 

The work involved is stimulating, extremely varied and will provide scope for 
applicants to broaden their experience, exercise their responsibility and develop 
their careers. The type of work involved ranges from general advice to clients on 
company and commercial matters through to dealing with full Stock Exchange 
listings and U.S.M. flotations. Thee will be opportunities to deal with takeovers 
and acquisitions, management buy-outs, banking and corporate finance, 
institutional and venture capital funding joint ventures and advising Receivers 

and Liquidators. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

Our commercial property department has a heavy bias towards develo p ment 
work acting for a number of substantial developers and institutional investors, 
as well as providing property services and advice to our other corporate and 
business clients. A wide range of work is involved including development 
agreements, joint ventures, funding and project management in addition to the 
usual acquisitions, sales and lettings. 

PENSIONS AND TRUSTS 

An exciting opportunity exists for a solicitor with some knowledge and 
experience of trust matters to augment and develop an expertise in company 
pension schemes, including not only establishing pension schemes but also 
advising corporate clients on pension matters in relation to acquisitions and 
takeovers and related areas. 

EMPLOYMENT LAW 

An increasing and varied number of employment cases means that our team of 
employment lawyers requires support from an applicant who is able and 
prepared to develop an expertise in this field, with particular reference to 
tribunal and litigation work- Some advocacy vriH be involved are! there will be 
an opportunity for the applicant also to maintain and develop an interest in 
other areas of commercial litigation. 

PRIVATE PROPERTY CONVEYANCING 

A solicitor is required to join our private property conveyancing department to 
add support to our existing team who handle a volume of good quality private 
property conveyancing generated by our broad client base. Excellent 
opportunities with considerable responsibility are available for the selected 

applicant. 

While ideally applicants should haoe at least one year's relevant post 
qualification experience in private practice , newly qualified solicitors should not 
be deterred from applying. We offer very attractive salaries with excellent 
prospects and will assist with relocation expenses, if appropriate. 

If you wish to meet us for an initial bffomud discussion, please write , with career 
details and current salary, to:- 

C.W. Hughes, Wragge & Co., Bank House, 8 Cherry Street, Birm ing ham B2 5JY. - 

021-6324131 


A challenging appointment focusing on 

the effective ‘management of change 

in working pra ctices 


HEAD OF FINANCIAL SERVICES 


£15,453 - £16,551 
plus mortgage 
assistance and 
relocation expenses 
of up to £3,750 


Borough of — 


Brighton 

Brighton ts a nuclear free zone. 




Brighton is the premier resort ofthe E^nttaUy fanST looking in 

« ated a pro ^ e 

environment in which to Kve and work. 

This third tier post, 

acting. 

The section is preparing for the T^he^steml^aran^ad- 

management information system (GL MiUenium). Sorinc *S7. 

vanced state of development and should be functioning y P P 

The system will brine considerable 

changes in work practices. The most challenging aspect . ^ H^vptooed 

SchSges in human and technical tenns. This w,« require 
SvSand inter-personal skills as well as the ability to establish total 

credibility with staff; peers and senior officers. 

You must be CIPFA qualified with at least five years’ ex P e jJ* | "5f ^idlvbe 
level. Adear understanding of local authority accountancy should ideall> be 

complemented by a knowledge of the GL ©stem. 

To discuss this appointment in more detail please telephone 
(Principal Assis^STreasurer) or Mr R. Jones goro^hT^u^rionBn^ 
ton (0273) 29801. Application forms and further details of the post are 
D^lMeLmthe number - ert. 466. Completed fonus should be 

retard to the Borough Treasurer, P.OBox 4, Town Hall. Bnghton. BN1 
1 JR by 30 September 1986. 

Brighton Council is committed to equal opportunities and is 
currently developing an Equal Opportunity Policy. 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


CHELTENHAM 

AND 

GLOUCESTER 

JUSTICES 9 CLERKS* OFFICES 

COURT CLERKS £9042-£13,545 

Barristers, sotators, tfiplomer holders and other 
qualified staff are Invited to apply. 

Salary according to qualifications and expe rienc e. 
Further details from: Mr ELHoJden - Cheltenham 
(0242^532323 or Mr C.Beard - Gloucester (0452) 

Closing date for receipt of applications 8th October 
1986. 


Wagge&Co 


PRIVATE SOLICITOR 
OVERSEAS COMPANY 
BASED IN MAYFAIR 

We require a private Solicitor who is fully 
experienced in Company Law and Fi- 
nance to work from our Mayfair office on 
a full time basis. Usual company benefits 
including car. Salary Negotiable. Full CV 
and please Contact Desmond Cruise on 
01 629 0577. 


“But Westaard look, da land is bright 1 '!! 
Commercial Property - W.L From £20,000 
Min. 3 yis P/AdJExp - currently billing at least 
£22,000. Real opportunity to grow. 

“That is ahoayt room at da ton'll 
Commercial Property - Chy to £25,000 aae 
Several vacancies, min 2 yn exp through to 
Senior Assistants. 

J&r mm dun son to nap.” 
Agricultural land conveyancing - City to £12,000 
Legal Executive, min 3yn experience. 3% Mortgage 
-l- good package. 

“Far from the madding axmfs ignoble strife.” 
Vacancies outside London: Litigation 
(including criminal) etc 

Phone Peter Mantell 01-236 1661 
Temple Associates, 

37 Ludgate Hill, London EC4M 7JN 


CORPORATE LAWYER 
EDINBURGH 

We are seeking an enthusiastic and ambitious 
lawyer with City experi e n c e to undertake de- 
manding work in the company and 
commensal areas of our firms business. This is 
an important position and the successful appli- 
cant will be expected to take responsibility for 
complex aspects of this area of our business for 
commercial and institutional clients. 

This is a definite career oppo r t un ity for the 
right person and will suit someone with 2-4 
years post qualifying experience. 

Please apply in writing with full c.v. to: 

J N FERGUSSON, ESQ. 
EXECUTIVE PARTNER 
DUNDAS & WILSON, CS 
25 CHARLOTTE SQUARE 
EDINBURGH EH2 4EZ 


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

HALLIWELL LANDAU 

MANCHESTER 

Doe to cwtQUBBg cxpuBfc* we trirt id recruit fin- oar 
Conmorial Property Depardacst 

PROSPECTIVE EQUITY PARTNER 

You stionM be non than five yen qualified and mist fagve 
wide ftp erime of aB aspects of major com menial property 
work preferably in a City. Wore End or nfaoonaal prormrial 
predict An cufy and meanin gf u l equity partnosfaip will be 
offered to tbe right appficant. who can look forward to 
becoming an integral pan of tbe Sim's Ainme. 

SENIOR SOLICITOR 

You should be mart than two yean qualified with a conumr- 
tial property background since admission, a substantial salary 
win be offered and then: are good p r o spects for pamwishtp . 

ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 

You must hare relevant experience during Articles and know 
yoor way round a commercial lease. A substantial salary will 
be offered according to experience. 

Please write with yoor cares' details to: 

The Partners hip Secretary, HaHfrrefi T*™ 1 "", 
Barnet Home, S3 Fountain Street, 
Manchester. M2 2AN. 


The Institute of Chartered 
Accountants in England & Wales 

We are seeking to appoint a 1 

SOLICITOR 
or BARRISTER 

to deal with the implications to the accoun- 
tancy profession of the Financial Services Bill 

The successful candidate wilt be aged about 30 
preferably with company taw or financial back- 
ground and the post will be based in our 
Milton Keynes Office. 

Salary circa £20.000 p.2. and other benefits 
indude free medical insurance and contribu- 
tory pension scheme. Please apply enclosing 
current c.v. to: 



grBUHAIIDkWUXS 


Brian Weston 
Personnel Manager 
The Institute of 
Chartered Accounts 
in England & Wales 
Chartered 
Accountants* Hall 
Moorgate Place 
London EC2P 2BJ 


/ Meredith Scott v 

COMKRCfAL PROPERTY Ta cSZOfiQO 

WOst End practice with highly regarded property de- 
partments seeks solicitors at al levels with London 
or good provincial experience. 

BANKING Ta c£30,000 

Solcitor, at least 1 year admitted and under 35, 
sought by EC2 practice tor wide range of corpor a te 
work. 

PEISMRS Ta c£28,000 

Leading City practice, specialists in Otis Held seeks 
lawyer with minimum 2 years comprehensive 
experience. 

NEVLY/BECEVTLY ADM. Ta c£15,B00 

MIXED CONVEYANCING, medium sized WC1 practice. 
PRIVATE CUBIT Law. Major EC3 practice. 
COMMERCIAL/TAX with web-known Ins firm. 
MTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, with major City font 
COMMERCIAL LITIGATION, at Strand practice. 

Meredith Scott Recruitment 

v 17 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1AA ^ 
\ "01-583 BOSS or 01-541 3807 (after office hrs) f 


IDS EmploymeRt Law Services | 

LABOUR LAW RESEARCH f 

Opportunity for a lawyer to Join a team 
researching and writing on Employment 


researching and writing 
Law for a major fortmj 
research bulletins used 
fleers and lawyers. Api 
professionally qualified 
ates they should 


on Employment 
thtiy journal and 
by personnel of- 
>ifcarrts must be 
and as gradu- 
have studied 


Employment Law as a speciality . 

Starting salary not less than £9,145 pa 
plus 5 weeks holiday. 

Apply in writing giving full details of edu- 
cation and career to date to: 

Mrs. H Howard 
INCOMES DATA 
SERVICES LIMITED 
193 St Johns St, 

London EC1V 4LS 


id Duffy 


EXCELLENT PARTNERSHIP 
PROSPECTS Ts £30,0Q0 

Mots are currency reenteng: (a) A senior sofcftor *»> r 
test 2 yrors p eje ts tarafio a fri caseload of Nob cafibro- 
conunercial cgnwyyiong inducting devatapmem vyorit. Therei 
S MBty^oUfty of a parinetshp in the neirbjbn and the 

owortunftji la there to pby an important rate in the further 


fied assistant* to hands broad caseload of comme ns al 
conveyancing matte rs. 

h both cases, candidates should have an «a*ent acadanfc 
taetoraund. sound oommerda! experience (gaineti enter Ag- 
ing Articles or shoe gratification) and the rtifity to 
Gommunicm at the highest tew*. Above market rata admfes 
«re offe red together with exeeiont career progression 
potential. 

For further Ka rr w to n qn these and otter Legal recancte. 
Coated cure Wnaun. 

GABRIEL BUFFY CONSULTANCY 

2nd Floor 

31 Southampton Row 
London WC1B5HJ 
Daytime tel eph o n e number 831 2288 
Evenings and Weekends 740 0289 


■£& I THE ROYAL 

INSTITUTION OF 
g/M CHARTERED 

SURVEYORS 

wish to appoint a Welsh -speaking 

LAW GRADUATE 

for its London Headquarters 

to assist the Arbitrations Officer in providing 
administrative support to the President in the 
appointment of arbitrators, predominately un- 
der the Agricultural Holdings legislation but 
also in other cases. 

Applicants should be not less than 25 years of 
age and preferably bi-Iingual in English and 
Welsh. 

SALARY ant less than £9,200 p-a. 

Applications with c.v. and daytime telephone 
number to: 

The Personnel Officer, 

RIOS, 12 Great George Street, 
Parliament Square, 

London SW1P 3 AD. 



wishes to appoint a 

COMMERCIAL 

SOLICITOR 

to join its legal team in High Hoibum. 

A candidate of above average ability and 
potential is sought preferably with a 
good degree and in the 25-30 age group. 

The work is wide-ranging and challeng- 
ing. The salary Is competitive and the 
fringe benefits are substantial. 

Please write with C.V. to:- 

Miss l.M. Lee, 

Recruitment & Training Officer, 
Pearl Assurance PLC, 

252 High Hoibum, 

London, WC1V 7EB. 


'.ourt Judges, no. 
l egal secretaries, yes. 


LEGAL AUDIO 

(£11,000 

PwaaasaaaaaaigtaBMi 

round maSEi ** 

If this Is too opwtutiy you've ben welting (or. contact: 

•fettle KUte er Aina Cm NOW 
01 «S1 1134 

JLfi 01 <31 1134 


litigation 

SOLICITOR 

S Si'S Water 8 ?; 

WS^sisESSA 

pkase reply to Box No. B43 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 
ALSO APPEAR ON 
PAGES 49 & 50 


JfpiJ'u-UAa 















































A copy of this document, which comprises the listing particulars relating » T5B Group pic as required by The Stock Exchange (listing} Regulations 1984. has been deli v errd r ft! r'the^frrc to employees! ul 

in Scotland as required by those Regulations. Application has been made to the CounciJ of The Stock Exchange for aH of the ordinary shares (other than the ordinary shares to Demai 

TS8 Group pic to be admined to the Official lit. . in this document. 

The Directors of T5B Group pic and the mem bars ofthe Trustee Savings Banks Centra] Board, whose names appear in Part H of this document, are the persons responsible for the . Jhe (joes not omit 

To the best of the knowledge and belief of such persons (who have taken all reasonable care to ensure that such is the case} the information contained in this document is in accordance 

anything likely to affect the import of such information. Each of such persons accepts responsibility accordingly. 

TSB GROUP pic 

Offer for Sale 

by 

Lazard Brothers & Co., Limited 

on behalf of the 

Trustee Savings Banks Central Board 


A 


of up to 1,495,830,450 ordinary shares of 25p each at lOOp per share of which 50p is payable now 

and 50p is payable on 8th Septembei; 1987 
underwritten as to 1,050,000,000 shares by 

LAZARD BROTHERS & CO., LIMITED HILL SAMUEL & CO. LIMITED KLEINWORT BENSON LIMITED 


S.G. WARBURG & CO. LTD. 


NOBLE GROSS ART LIMITED 


Up to 75 0,000, 000 shares are reserved for priority applications 5om eligible customers who 
have registered for priority, employees and pensioners ofthe Group ana for theFree Offer to 
employees. Of these shares, up to 75,000,000 shares are reserved initially for priority 
applications bora eligible employees and pensioners of die Group and for the Free Offer 
whatever the demand for shares, each person who makes a valid priority application will 
receive at least some of the shares for which application is made. 


A public application form is provided at the end of this document, together with notes on 
how to complete it. The application list forthe shares now offered for sale will open at 10.00 
a.m. on Wednesday, 24tn September, 1986 and may be dosed at any time thereafter It is 
expected that the shares offered forsale will be admitted to listing on 8th October; 1986 and 
that dealings will com mence on that date. 


Authorised 


£ 

505,263,158 

19.736,842 

525,000.000 


Share Capital 


ordinary shares of 25p each 
limited voting ordinary shares of 25p each 


Maximum 
to be issued, 
fully paid 

375,000,000 

19.736,842 

394.736.S4 2 


The shares new offered forsale carry therigjhuo receive all dividends and other distributions 
hereafter declared, paid or made in respect of the ordinary shares of TSB Group pic. The 
limirwi voting shares can be held only by the TSB Foundations. 

12 th September; 1986 


A ) 


Message from sir John Read, Chairman 

25, Milk Street, 
London EC2. 

12th September, 1986 

To customers, employees and pensioners 
of the Group and others who are interested 
in applying for shares in the Company 

I welcome the opportunity to introduce this 
document, which contains an offer for sale of shares in 
TSB Group pic. 

The offer for sale is a very important step for the 
Group. The sale proceeds will be received by the 
Group and so provide substantial additional resources 
for future expansion and development. The Group 
will therefore be in a strong position to compete in the 
banking and personal financial services sector. 

One ofthe Group’s greatest strengths is its customer 
base and the offer for sale will enable us to extend and 
improve the services we provide. 

I hope that a large number of existing customers will 
take advantage of this opportunity to acquire shares in 
TSB Group pic, and that other members ofthe public 
will learn more about us and will also become 
shareholders and customers. I have already made clear 
our aim of attracting over one million shareholders. 

In the following pages you will find information 
about the Group’s businesses — and about the team of 
people running them. We look forward to welcoming 
our new shareholders, who join us in exciting and 
challenging times. 



This Part should be read in conjunction with the full text of this 
document. 


1. Offer for Sale 

TSB Group pic is the newly established holding company of the Group. 

All the ordinary shares of the Company, both issued and to be issued, 
other than the shares to be retained for the Free Offer, are being offered 
for sale by Lazard Brothers on behalf of TSB Central Board. Following the 
offer for sale, TSB Central Board will retain sufficient ordinary shares to 
satisfy' the loyalty bonus arrangements referred to in Section 8 below. The 
shares are being offered for sale at a price of lOQp per share, of which 50p 
is payable now and 50p on 8th September, 1987. 


2. Priority Arrangements for Eligible Customers, 
Employees and Pensioners 

Up to 750,000.000 shares, being 50 per cent, of the maximum number of 
shares offered for sale and the shares to be retained for the Free Offer, 
are reserved for priority applications from eligible customers who have 
registered for priority, employees and pensioners of the Group and for 
the Free Offer. 

Of these shares, up to 75,000,000 shares are reserved initially for priority 
applications from eligible employees and pensioners of the Group and 
for the Free Offer. Under the Free Offer, TSB Central Board is offering 
150 shares free of charge to each qualifying employee. The total number 
of shares to be retained For the Free Offer is 4,169,550. 

Priority applications may be made for a minimum of 200 shares and a 
maximum of 10,000 shares. Whatever the demand for shares, each person 
who makes a valid priority application will receive at least some of the 
shares for which application is made. Each person who is eligible to 
apply for shares under the priority arrangements may also make a single 
application on a public application form. 

Anv shares not taken up under the priority arrangementswH! be available 
to satisfy applications on public application forms. 

Further details of the priority arrangements are set out in Section 1 of Part 
XII. 


3. business and use of Proceeds 

The Group is one of the largest personal financial sendees groups in the 
UK. Its main activities are: 

■ a major personal banking business, with a network of some 1,600 
branches throughout the UK, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man, 
and a developing commercial banking business 

■ one of the leading UK unit- linked life companies, a growing general 
insurance agency business, and the seventh largest unit trust 
management group in the UK 

■ TSB Trustcard, with a 12 per cent, share ofthe bank-issued credit card 
market in the UK 

■ UDT, a major finance bouse 

■ Swan National, a major UK vehicle rental and leasing business, and 
Valkyrie, a substantial vehicle distribution group. 

The offer for sale proceeds will be received by the Group and so 
strengthen its capital resources for future development. As well as using 
the new capital to support the growth of its existing businesses, the Group 
intends to expand its range 6f services, including commercial services, 
.although .the emphasis will remain on personal financial services in the 
UK. There will be further investment in the branch network, and in 
technology to exploit the full potential of the Group's existing 
sophisticated computer systems. Furthermore, the Group will have capital 
available to make acquisitions In related fields when suitable 
opportunities arise. 


4. OFFER FOR SALE STATISTICS 

Offer for sale price (payable by instalments) 

Number of ordinary shares < n 

Market capital isation at the offer for sale price ( 2 ) 

Proceeds of the offer forsale ( 2 > 

Pro forma forecast profit after taxation for the year 
to 20th November, 1986 13) 

Pro forma forecast earnings per ordinary share «> 

Price/eamings multiple on pro forma forecast 
earnings per ordinary share 

Notional dividend per ordinary share in respect of 
the year to 20th November, 1986 (5) 

Notional gross dividend yield at the offer For sale 
price 

Notional dividend cover 

Pro forma net tangible assets at 2 1st May, 1986 (6) 

: — per ordinary share and limited voting share 


NWW: 

(1 ) The maximum number of ordinary shares In issue following the offer forsaJe. 

(2) The difference between A. 1,500 million and £1,27-1 million represents (a) the value, 21 the 
offer lor .vale price, of the maximum entitlement to loyalty bonus shares (J35.984.5SS shares) 
under ihe arranRemems referred to in Section 8 below and of the 4. J6p,550shan?s 10 be retained 
for ihe Free Offer and < b) the estimated expenses of the offer for sale OiWi million L'To the 
extent that shares are not requited ro be retained under the loyalty bonus arrangem cn ts, they 
will be included in the offer for sale and the proceeds will accordingly increase. 

(3) Details of the pro forma forecast profit after taxation are set out in Section 5 below. 

t-»J Pro forma forecast earnings per ordinary share are calculated by dividing the pro forma 
forecast profit after taxation by the maximum number of ordinary shares in Issue following the 
offer for sale. They do not reflect the dilution which would result from conversion of the limited 
voting shares in the circumstances referred to in Section 6(d) of Ran XI. 

(5* The notional dividend is the dividend the Directors would hare expected to recommend 
had the proceeds of the offer for sale been available to the Group for the whole of the year to 
2ffth November. 1986. 

(6i Pro inmut net tangible assets are calculated on the basis of the net tangible assets of the 

■ Group at 21st May. adjusted for the proceeds of the offer for sale. They exclude the surplus 

over hook value of million, before taxation, shown by ihe appraisal of the value of the 
Group's life insurance and pension subsidiaries referred to in Section 1 of Pan VL 

The statistics set out above are based on the maximum number of 
ordinary shares in issue following the offer for sale. Of the ordinary 
shares offered for sale, only 1,050,000,000 ordinary shares have been 
underwritten. If the offer for saJe were not folly subscribed, the 
maximum number of shares would not be issued and the market 
capitalisation at the offer for sale price and the proceeds of the offer 
for sale would fall; the pro forma forecast profit after taxation for the 
year to 20th November, 1986 and the pro forma net tangible assets at 
2lst May, 1986 would be reduced, but the pro forma forecast earnings 
per ordinary share and the pro forma net tangible assets per share 
would be higher. If the underwritten shares only were to.be sold and, 
in addition, TSB Central Board were to retain 105.000,000 ordinary 

■ shares to satisfy the maximum potential entitlement to extra shares 
under the- loyalty bonus arrangements, the pro forma forecast earnings 
per ordinarv share would rise to 15.2p and the pro forma net tangible 
assets per share to I51p. 


lOOp 

.1,500,000,000 
£1,500 million 
£1,274 million 

£196 million 
13.1p 

7.63 times 

4.26p 

6;o% 

3.1 times 
£2,148 million 
136p 


5. FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 


Consolidated profit and loss accounts 

Years 10 20th November. 



1981 

1982 

1983 

198-4 

1985 

1986 1986 

Forecast! 11 Pro 
forma 
fnrecasit?) 

Operating profit before 
surplus on disposal of 

&m 

JLra 

S>m 

Am 

Am 

im xm 

investments 

Surplus on disposal of 

83 

78 

127 

hi 

159 

193 303 

investments 

2 

52 

23 

13 

10 

8 8 


Operating profit 

85 

130 

150 

154 

169 

201 

31! 

Exceptional charges(3) 

— 

52 

51 

10 

— 

— — 

— 

Profit before taxation 

85 

78 

99 

144 

169 

201 

311 

Taxation 

36 

23 

38 

57 

60 

7b 

115 

Profit after taxation 

■i9 

55 

61 

87 

109 

125 

19b 


- Consolidated balance sheets 




At 20th November, 


At 21st May. 


1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

198b 







Actual 

Pro 








form an I 


<£m 


£ra 

Am 

£m 

i,m 

Am 

Short-term assets 
listed investments and 

807 

685 

1,055 

1,280 

2,044 

1,915 

3.189 

notice and fixed 
loans(5) 

5371 

5,354 

4,839 

4.831 

4,132 

4.684 

4.684 

Advances to customers 

1,237 

1,839 

2,698 

3,406 

4,651 

4.867 

4.867 

Total assets 

7,884 

8J27 

9,137 

10,148 

11,498 

12,135 

13.409 

Current and deposit 

' 







accounts 

7,246 

7,574 

8.278 

9,070 

10,258 

10.762 

10.-62 

Net tangible assets 

Net assets ofthe life 

486 

550 

624 

712 

821 

874 

2,148 

insurance and pension 
business funds 

243 

345 

476 

654 

788 

1.04H 

1.0*4 


Notes: 

(1) The forecast indudes the interest expected 10 be earned up to 20th November, 1986 on (be 
first instalme n t of the offer forsale proc e eds (net of the estimated expenses of the offer for sale) 
and a provision for covenanted payments to the TSB Foundations under the arrangement* referred 
to In Section 3 of Pair ULThe forecast indudes results shown by the audited consolidated accounts 
for the six months to 21st May, 1986. 

(2} The pto forma forecast is based on the forecast of actual profits for the year to 20th November, 
1986, adjusted as follows. It is assumed that the proceeds of the offer for sale were available 
throughout the year to 20th November, 1986 and were invested to yield 9.9375 per cent., being 
three months LIBOR on 5th September. 1986. The pro forma forecast also Indudes provision fora 
fiiU year's covenanted payments to the TSB Foundations and the esdmate dannuil coat of maintaining 
the Company’s share register following the offer for sale. Consequential amendments to the tax 
cfaar B g ” a nodonal rare of 35 per cent have been made In respect of the foregoing adjustments. 
Pro forma forecast profits are shown far guidance only and do not represent cither actual 
or forecast profits. ' 

(3) The exceptional charges represent. In 1982 and 1983, special contributions to pension schemes 
and, in 1984, the setting up of in-bouse customer account servicing by TSB Trustcard. 

(4) Pro forma amounts at 2 1 st May, 1986 represent the actual amounts at that date adjusted to reflect 

tbe proceeds of the offer for sale. 

C5) Including deposits with the National Debt Commissioners. 

Historical figures are derived from the Accountants’ Report in Pan IX. 

6. Interim Results and Profit and Dividend Forecasts 

The Group’s audited profit before taxation for the six months to 2 1st May, 
3986 amounted to £96.0 million. 

The Directors consider that, in the absence of unforeseen circumstances, 

.;,? efiore 13X311011 for the year to 20th November, 3986 
will be *201 million. Further details of the profit forecast and ihe 
assumption on which it is based are set out in Pan VII. 

The Directors expea to pay, in March 1987, a single dividend of 3.065p 
net per ordinary share for the year to 20th November, 1986. This dividend 
reflects the fact that only the first instalment of the offer for saJe price will 
have been paid. 


# I 



V* 1 




x-uaii A HONS ON ORDINARY SHAREHOLDINGS 

The Company’s memorandum and articles of association restrict the 
maamum proportion of the Company* issued ordinatv shareTin wh ch 
any person may be .merited to 5 per cent, undl the fifth an^vetsOT of 
the date on which the basis of allocation under the offer foS K 

announced and to 15 per cent, thereafter. The« pSvSoS are 
summarised in Section 5 of Pan XI. provisions are 

8. loyalty bonus 

Successful applicant forshares will be entitled to receive free of chaote 
a loyalty bonus of one extra share, ud to a maximum l! cnar ? e ’ 

every 10 shares continuously held from allocation under thVolTe^fer'Jfe 
» 30* September. 19». Further demils are iTomtseaion" ofTan 

9- Special dealing Arrangements 

. Arrangements have been made for investors to deal in tm ,n . c 

shares at special agreed rates until 30 th September 19 sfT n °f 
out in Section 5 of Part XU. ^ Der ' 1988 . Details are set 

10. Trustee Investments act 1961 

By virtue ofthe provisions ofthe 1985 Act, the shirpRta-: n _ . . , 

to listing on The Stock Exchange, be “wider range investmenffi^hin 
the meaning of the Trustee Investments Act 196 1. ments w ithin 


* i 



L 

in. 


t 


\ 

\ 

\ 





THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


39 



«C- T u Directors 

Sir John Read Chairman 

Sir Ian Fraser Deputy Chairman 
D. M. Backhouse 
N. R. Barkes TD 
L. Bolton 

The Lord Bruce-Gardyne 
*M. Chalcraft 
*P- Charlton 
G. B. Corser 
*R.T. Ellis OBE DL 
J. D. Hamilton CBE 
V- P- R. Holt JP 
"G. L. Hughes 

all of 25, Milk Street, London EC2V8LU. 
‘the members of TSB Central Board. 


The Earl of IddesJeigh DL 
*K. R. Jeune OBE 
T. H. Macdonald OBE 
J. H. F. Macpherson CBE 
A. D. Martineau 
•K.A. Milllchap 
P. C. Paisley 
L. W. G. Priestley TD 
Mrs. J. P. G. Prior JP 
*J. S. Rainey 
N. J. Robson 
D. M. Stevens 
D. B. Thom 


Secretary: _ 

Peter William Smart Rowland, Barrister 


Registered Office: 

16, Hope Street, 

Charlotte Square, 

Edinburgh EH2 4DD. 

Issuing House: 

Lazard Brothers & Co., Limited, 
21,Moorfields, 

London EC2P 2HT. 
assisted by 

Noble Grossart Limited, 

48, Queen Street, 

Edinburgh EH2 3NR. 

Auditors: 

Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co", 
Chartered Accountants, 

1, Puddle Dock, 

London EC4V3PD. 

Reporting Accountants: 

Deloitte Haskins & Sells, 
Chartered Accountants, 

1 28, Queen Victoria Street, 
London EC4P4JX. 

Registrars and Custodian Bank: 
Lloyds Bank Pic, 

Registrar's Department, 
Goring-by-Sea, 

Worthing, 

West Sussex BN 12 6DA. 


Group Head Office: 

25, Milk Street, 
London EC2V8LU. 


Stockbrokers to the Offer: 
Rowe & Pitman Ltd, 

1 , Finsbury Avenue, 
London EC2M2PA. 

assisted by ' 

Wood Mackenzie & Co. 
Limited, . 
funtore House, 

74/77, Queen Street, 
Edinburgh EH2 4 NS. 

Solicitors to the Company^ 
Theodore Goddard 
16, St. Martin ’s-le-Grand, 
London E CIA 4 EJ. 

W &J Bumess W.S., 

1 6, Hope Street, 
Charlotte Square, 
Edinburgh EH24DD. 

Sol icitors to the Offer: 
Linklaters & Paines, 
Barrington House, 

59-67, Gresham Street, 
London EC2V7JA. 



1. Historical Background - 

The origins of the Group lie In the local savings banks established in 
the early nineteenth century to encourage thrift ancl self-help among 
■wage-earners. The first of these was opened in Ruthwell, Scotland in 1810. . 
These savings banks were run as an act of public sendee by trustees, who 
were often local businessmen, landowners or clergymen. 

From 1 817 in England and Wales and Ireland, 1833 in the Channel Islands 
and 1835 in Scotland, successive Acts of Parliament established astamtory 
framework for the savings banks, under which the trustees were required 
to invest deposits with -the Government and, later, in Government 
securities and with local authorities. The TSBs were subject to 
governmental supervision and came to operate under the umbrella of 
National Savings. ' ' ' 

By 1860 there were over 600 separate TSBs. From that time their number 
fell to 100 just before the Second World War as TSBs transferred their 
operations to the Post Office Savings Bank, closed or amalgamated. The 
trend continued with further amalgamations, and from the early 1970s the 
level of co-operation between the TSBs developed significantly when 
they began to share computer facilities. Increasingly the TSBs felt the 
need to offer their customers a wider range of banking and otherfinandal 
services beyond their traditional role as savings institutions. Current 
account facilities began to be introduced by the TSBs in England, Scotland 
and Wales in 1965, in Northern Ireland in 1967 and in the Channel Islands 
in 1969. A unit trust management company empowered to transact life 
insurance business launched its first authorised unit trust in 1968. 
Nevertheless, the statutory controls to which the TSBs were subject, 
particularly with regard to the nature of the investments which the TSBs 
could make with deposits and the return which could be paid to 
depositors, were seriously restricting the development of their business. 

In 1971. a committee chaired by Sir Harry Page was appointed by the 
Government to consider the future role and development of National . 
Savings and of the TSBs in the provision to the public of savings, money 
transmission and other financial services. The Page Committee 
recommendations prompted The enactment of the Trustee Savings Banks 
Acts 1976 and 1978 which removed many of the restrictions on the 
activities of the TSBs arid enabled them to make radical changes to their 
structure and services and to compete on a more equal footing with the 
major clearing banks. TSB Central Board was established in 1976 to 
improve central co-ordination 3nd, in the same. year, amalgamations 
reduced the number of TSBs to 20. Further mergers subsequently took 
place and by the end of 1983 there were only four TSBs — TSB England 
& Wales, TSB Scotland, TSB Northern Ireland and TSB Channel Islands. 


In the meantime CTSB had been set up in 1973 to act as the central bank 
and clearing agent for the TSBs and two years later it joined the London 
central clearing system. Since the 1976 Act the range of financial services 
offered by the Group has been expanded significantly, and the Group is 
now one of the largest personal financial services groups in the UK. The 
scope of its present activities is described in Part IV. 

2. restructuring 

- The 1985 Act represented the final step In the legislative process under 

.which the Group has completed its evolution into a conventional 
corporate structure. The former system of supervision of the TSB banks 
by the Treasury and .government agencies has come to an end, and the 
TSB banks-now operate within the same regulatory framework as their 
main ban k ing competitors. Under the 1985 Act the assets and obligations 
of the TSBs have been vested in new TSB banking companies, while 
shares in the non-banking subsidiaries in which the four TSBs were jointly 
interested with TSB Central Board have been transferred to the Company. 
Further details of the restructuring under the 1985 Act are set out in 
Section 2 of Part XI. 


The present structure of the Group is shown in the diagram below. 



Notes - 

<1} It 'is intended dm the Company will. In November 1986. offer for sole up to 49 per cent, of (be 
issued share capital of TSB Channel Islands and that permission from the Council of The Stock 
Exchange will be sought for dealings In those shares on the Unlisted Securities Matfaet. 

Following the enactment of the 1985 Act, it was claimed in legal 
proceedings brought in both Scotland and England that the depositors 
owned the assets of the TSBs. These claims were rejected by a unanimous 
decision of the House of Lords in July 1986. Following that decision the 
vesting provisions of- the 1985 Act were implemented to restructure the 
Group and to enable this offer for sale to proceed. 

At present TSB Central Board owns all the issued and allotted ordinary 
shares of the Company. All the ordinary shares of the Company, issued 
and tp be issued, other than the shares to be retained for the Free Offer, 
are now befog offered for sale. The proceeds will be paid over by TSB 
Central Board to the Company. 

3- TSB FOUNDATIONS 

For many years the TSB banks have sought to maintain a dose assodation 
with their local communities,, contributing to the life of the community 
by assisting local needs of many different kinds. To enhance this 
traditional role and to preserve it in a permanent framework, four regional 
TSB Foundations have been created, covering England and Wales, 
Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands .respectively. 

Each TSB Foundation has been established with the aim of supporting 
general charitable objectives, principally widiin its own territoiy. The 
policy of each foundation will be determined by its own board oJ: trustees. 

The TSB Foundations will derive their revenue from the Company, which 
has entered info covenants to' make annual payments to the TSB 
Foundations of a total amount equal to one per cent, of one-third of the 
aggregate pre-tax profits (less pre-tax losses) of the Group for the three 
years ended on 31st October in the year preceding the year of payment, 
adjusted as provided in the deeds of covenant. Payments will be made 
■ quarterly, the first, amounting to some £>340#00in aggregate, to be made 
on 31st October, 1986. 

The TSB Foundations will hold all the limited voting shares, representing 
five per cent, of the issued share capi tal of the Company following the offer 
for sale. These shares carry no dividend rights and a limited entitlement to 
vote, blit are convertible into ordinary shares in certain circumstances. 

The limited voting shares will be held by the TSB Foundations in 
proportion to the reserves of the TSB banks as at 21st May, 1986, and the 
covenanted payments will be made in the same proportions. 

A summary of the rights conferred by the limited voting shares and further 
information about these arrangements are set out In Sections 6 and 14 of 
Pan XI. 



1. INTRODUCTION 


The Group is one of the largest personal financial services groups in the 
UK. Its main activities are a major personal banking business, with a 
network of some 1,600 branches throughout the UK, the Channel Islands 
and the Isle of Man, and a developing commercial banking business-, one 
' of the leading UK unit-linked life companies; a growing general insurance 
agency business; the seventh largest unit-crust management group in the 
UK,- TSB Trusrcard, with a 12 per cent, share of the bank-issued credit 
card market in the UK; UDT, a major finance house; and Swan National, 
a major UK vehicle rental and leasing business, and Valkyrie, a substantial 
vehicle distribution group. 

While banking still accounts for the major part of the Group's profits, the 
development of a broadly based personal financial services organisation 
is demonstrated by the growing profits from the Group's other activities, 
which contributed 28 per cent, of Group opera png profit in 1985 
compared with only 7 per cent, in 1981. The table set out below shows 
the sources of the Group’s operating profit: 


Banking <i> 

— before surplus on 
disposal of 
investments 
— surplus on 
disposal of 
investments 


Other activities 
Insurance and unit 
trust services (2) 
Credit card 
operations 
Finance house 
services 
Vehicle rental, 
leasing and 
distribution 


Group operating 
profit 


Year* to 20th November, 


1981 

im 

1982 

im 

77.5 

68.9 

1.7 

52.1 

79-2 

121.0 

73 

10.1 

(5.6) 

(2.6) 

3.3 

(0.7) 

l.l 

1.9 

6.1 

8.7 

85.3 

129.7 


1983 

ini 

MRt 

Jim 

98.2 

104.0 

22.9 

12.7 

121.1 

116.7 

15.8 

23.6 

(0.2) 

6.7 

8.4 

2.0 

5.1 

- 1.8 

29.1 

37.1 

150.2 

155.8 


n rnnnth.- to 
2: 1m Mjv. 


1SW5 

Am 

I'WII 

Am 

112.7 

62 .- 

9.7 

6.7 

122.-1 

69.4 

26.5 

16.5 

6.0 

3-5 

7.0 

-1.5 

-.-t 

2.1 

40.9 

26.6 

169.3 

96.0 


Note*: 

tit Including inre-ameni managemeni 

(2) including commission* jnd dividends received hv the T*B Kink* and LOT limn T*B Tn:si 
Company and its subsidiaries 


2. BANKING 

The Group offers its banking services nationwide through four hanking 
companies, TSB England & Wales. TSB Scotland. TSB Northern Ireland 
and TSB Channel Islands. They have one of the largest customer bases in 
the UK personal banking sector, with about " million customers holding 
well over 13 million accounts. The Group's 1.600 hank branches are 
spread throughout the UK, the Channel Islands and the isle of Man 
although, for historical reasons, the concentration of branches is heaviest 
outside the south of England. 


The table below gives summarised information about the TSB banks at 
2lst May, 1986: 



TSB 

TnB 

TSB 

TSB 

Total 

Number of: 

England 
& W.-Ues(l) 

Scotland 

Northern 

Ireland 

Channel 

Islands 


Branches 

1,246 

2"*6 

56 

9 

1.58- 

Accounts (000's) 
Employees 

10,904 

2,102 

679 

94 

13.7-9 

— full time 

15,242 

2,626 

593 

158 

18.599 

— pan time 

3,027 

845 

177 

24 

4 , 9—3 


£-m 

£m 

£m 

£tn 

£111 

Deposits 

7,861 

1,423 

394 

190 

9.86S 

Advances^) 

3,054 

608 

116 

32 

3.810 

Total assets 

Notes: 

(1) Including CTSB. 

8,784 

1,647 

455 

219 

11,105 

(2) Including investment in leased assets and alter deducting pruviMiue. lor h.td 
debts. 

.nut di>iiht!ul 


Until 1976 the TSBs were severely limited in the services which they 
could offer and the manner in which they could invest their customers’ 
deposits. The 1976 Act initiated a progressive relaxation of those 
limitations and the TSBs moved quickly to introduce new services. The 
TSB banks now offer a comprehensive range of banking services, 
including offshore services, although the specific products vary from bank 
to bank. 

The Group has been invited to join the Committee of London and Scottish 
Bankers after the offer for sale. 

PERSONAL BANKING SERVICES 

The TSB banks offer cheque and deposit accounts to personal customers 
which are similar to the' products offered by the other clearing banks. 
Personal cheque accounts remaining in credit are free of bank charges. 
In addition, the TSB banks provide service accounts which are demand 
deposit accounts with transmission services, a low rate of interest and an 
individual passbook providing a record of deposits and withdrawals. 

The TSB banks offer personal customers a range of other deposit-related 
services, many of which are directed to specific market segments. These 
include: 

Premium deposit — a deposit account for larger sums of money 
account offering higher rates of interest 

Term deposit — a fixed term deposit at a fixed rate of interest 


Monthly income 
bond 


— a two year bond paying interest monthly into a 
nominated account 


Moneybuild — a contractual savings scheme at a variable rate of 

interest (including life cover for persons under 
60 ) 


Moneyplan — a cheque account with a loan facility and interest 

on credit balances (also including life cover for 
persons under 60) 


Jeans Scheme — a passbook deposit account, primarily for 7 to 15 
year-olds 

Magic Bank — a passbook deposit account for under 8 year-olds. 

The TSB banks’ personal lending, which has increased rapidly since its 
introduction in 1977, is principally in the form of mortgages and personal 
loans. Mortgage loans may be on eitiier a repayment or an endowment 
basis, and are normally repayable over 25 years. Personal loans are 
normally unsecured and for sums from £400 to £.7,500 for terms of up to 
five years, at a fixed rate of interest determined at the commencement of 
the loan and added to the amount of the loan. Other services include 
overdrafts, secured loans, bridging facilities in connection with the 
purchase of property, probate loans and home improvement loans. 


“the Company" 

‘the Directors' 

“the Group' 

TSBs' 

-TSB Central Board" 
-CTSB" 

“the TSB Foundations" 
“TSB England & Wales" 


"TSB Scotland" 

‘TSB Northern Ireland" 


‘TSB Channel Islands" 


•the TSB banks" 

“TSB Holdings" 

“TSB Investment Management' 
“TSB Trust card* 

‘TSB Trust Company" 

“TSB Insurance Brokers’ 
‘TSB Insurance Services" 
•TSB Life" 


Definitions 

TSB Group pic 

the directors of the Company 

the Company and its subsidiaries or, as the context 

may require, ebeir respective predecessors in business 

trustee savings banks 

the Trustee Savings Banks Central Board 

Central Trustee ’Savings tool- Limited 

the four regional foundations referred to in Section 3 

of Pan HI 

TSB England & Wales pic (Incorporating the 
operations of Trustee Savings Bank England and Wales 
and CTSB) or, as the context may require, the trustee 
savings banks which preceded it 
TSB Scotland pic or, as the context may require, the 
trustee savings banks which preceded it 
TSB Northern Ireland pic or, as the context may 
require, the trustee savings banks wfaidi 
preceded it 

TSB Channel Islands limited or, as the context may 
require, the trustee savings banks which, 
preceded!! 

TSB England & Wales, TSB Scotland, TSB Northern 
Ireland and TSB Channel Islands 
Trustee Savings Banks (Holdings) Limited 
TSB Investment Management limited 
TSB Trusrcard Limited 
TSB Trust Company Limited 
TSB Insurance Brokers Limited 
TSB Insurance Services Limited 
TSB Life Limited 


“TSB Pensions' 

“TSB Unit ThiStS" 

“UDT Holdings" 

“UDT" 

“UDTBank" 

“Swan National" 

“Swan National Leasing" 
“Swan Notional Rentals’ 
•Valkyrie" 

’shares" or “ordinary shares" 
’limited voting shares” 

“the 1976 Act" 

"the 1985 Act’ 

"the Custodian Bank" 


"Free Offer" 


"Instalment Agreement" 

“interim certificates" 


’Lazard Brothers" 
"LIBOR" 


TSB Pensions Li mited 
TSB Unit Trusts Limited 
UDT Holdings Limited 
United Dominions Trust Limited 
UDT Bank limited 

Swan National Limited and its subsidiaries - 


Swan National Leasing Limited 

Swan National Rentals Limited 

Valkyrie Motor Holdings Limited and its 

subsidiaries 


ordinary shares of 25p each of the Company 
limited voting ordinary shares of 25p each of the 
Company 

the Trustee Savings Banks Act 1976 
the Trustee Savings Banks Act 1985 


Lloyds Bank Pic or such other person as may be 
appointed to act as custodian bank pursuant to the 
Instalment Agreement 


.the offer to employees of the Group of participation 
in the TSB Group Staff Share Scheme or, in the case of 
employees of UDT Bank, in the TSB Group Irish Staff 
Share Scheme, under the arrangements described 10 
Section 8 of Part XI 


the agreement summarised in Section 3 of 
Part XU 

* the Interim certificates (Including, where the context 
requires, letters of acceptance or pages I and 2 
thereof) evidencing rights to and obligations in 
respect of ordinary shares pending payment in full of 
the offer for sale price, to be issued pursuant to the 
Instalment Agreement 


Lazard Brothers & Co.. Limited 
London inter-bank offered rate 


‘proceeds of the the proceeds of the offer for sale, after deducting the 

offer for sale' estimated expenses of the offer for sale, on the basis 

tint the offer for sale is folly subscribed and that TSB 
Central Board retains 135,984,586 shares 
(approximately 9.1 percent, of the m a x i mum number 
of ordinary shares offered for sale), being the 
maximum potential entitlement of investors to receive 
extra shares under the loyalty bonus arrangements 
referred to in Section 8 of Part 1 

Loan Capital 

The outstanding Joan capital of the Group at 22nd August, 1986 was as follows: " 

Am 

8.75 percent subordinated capital bonds 1988(1) 5.4 

Floating rate subordinated loan 1991 50.n 

Floating rate subordinated loan 1993 30.0 

Note: 

fll These bonds are denominated in U.S. dollars and hare been translated at a rate of 
j£1 = *Ih9. 

It is intended to repay the subordinated Joans out of the proceeds of the offer for sale. 
Financial Year Ends 

The financial year end of each principal member ot the Group is 20th November, except 
in the case of T5B Trust Company and UDT Holdings and their respective subsidiaries, 
the year ends of which are either 30th September or 31st October. Financial information 
given in relation to the Group as at (or for the period to) 20th November in any year 
incorporates information in relation to TSB Trust Company and UDT Holdings and 
their respective subsidiaries as at (or for the period to) their respective year ends 
felling immediately before 20th November in that year (subject to adjustment, where 
appropriate). 

In 1987, the Group's year end will be changed to 31st October, the results for the 
financial year to 31st October, 1987 therefore being in respect of a period of just over 
1 1 months. The year ends of TSB Trust Company and UDT Holdings and their respective 
subsidiaries will not be changed. 



















*-» X 



I 


l 

in. 


The TSB banks continue to introduce automation both at the counter and 
in the back office, in order to provide a more efficient service and to 
enable staff to devote more time to other activities. 

Corporate Banking services 

The TSB banks have also developed a range of services for commercial 
customers. In addition to the normal current and deposit accounts, more 
sophisticated products include deposits offering money market related 
rates; Marketlink, a high interest deposit scheme aimed primarily at the 
legal and other professions; Managed Account (Business Plus in 
Scotland), an account paying interest on credit balances with an overdraft 
facility, designed for the business and professional markets; and 
Speeds end, an instant money transmission service aimed primarily at 
solicitors. 

The TSB banks are developing commercial lending through loans and 
overdrafts to professional practices and small and medium-sized 
companies. Lending to large corporate borrowers commenced in 1981. 
Initially this was mainly by participation in syndicated loans managed by 
other banks but, beginning in 1 982, corporate lending was marketed more 
actively by the establishment of direct contacts with quality borrowers at 
a senior level. At 21st May, 1986 nearly half of the 200 largest listed UK 
companies had money market lines or loan facilities with the Group. The 
Group’s commercial lending is not confined to the UK. In 1983 the 
Group assumed lead manager status for the first time in a £500 million 
loan to the Kingdom of Sweden. In 1984 it funded a £50 million loan 
(since repaid) to the Kingdom of Denmark. The Group has, however, a 
very low exposure to international debt. 

Expertise in commercial leading is being concentrated at head offices, 
regional offices and other specially designated branches and offices. Staff 
with commercial lending experience have been recruited from other 
banks to supplement the TSB banks' own resources. Counter services, 
supported by the TSB banks' advanced on-line real-time computer 
systems, are available to commercial and professional customers at all 
branches, giving such customers a comprehensive service whilst making 
the best use of experienced personnel. 

The asset finance divisions of the TSB banks in the UK carry out industrial 
and commercial leasing, financing a wide range of assets such as aircraft, 
ships and computers. Their leasing business grew rapidly after the Finance 
Act 1984 enabled the TSB banks, which were not themselves permitted 
to undertake leasing business, to obtain the benefits of group relief. The 
phased reduction in corporation tax rates and withdrawal of first year 
allowances, also following from that Act, led to a short-term increase in 
the amounts of leasing business being written in the industry as a whole 
by creating a two year “window" during which leasing continued to 
attract favourable fiscal treatment. Leasing now relies on its merits as an 
alternative form of finance. 

FOREIGN SERVICES ■ 

Foreign services were originally offered to meet the retail foreign banking 
requirements of personal customers. Foreign exchange activity has 
increased, partly as a result of the substantial increase in the number of 
commercial customers, and the Group now has correspondent banks in 
most parts of the world. The TSB banks offer a full range of foreign 
banking services to both personal and commercial customers, including 
documentary credits, bill collection and foreign note facilities, and 
foreign payments and collections, in addition to a comprehensive foreign 
exchange service. The Group has issued TSB sterling travellers' cheques 
within the VISA system since 1980. 

PROPERTY SERVICES 

In April 2986 TSB Scotland acquired Slater Hogg & Howison, a leading 
Scottish estate agency' with 21 offices, which sold over 5,000 properties 
in 2985. 

3. Insurance and Unit Trusts 

The Group’s insurance and unit trust business, which began in 1968, is 
carried on by subsidiaries of TSB Trust Company. 

A range of unit trusts, offshore funds and insurance and pension products* 
has been developed. TSB bank customers represent the main source of 
business but marketing has been expanded in recent years to attract a 
wider customer base. 

TSB Trust Company and Its UK subsidiaries are based in Andover, 
Hampshire. At 31st March, 1986, 1,096 staff were employed at the head 
office with a further 521 sales staff working throughout the UK and the 
Channel Islands. The sales staff has more than doubled in size over the 
last three and a half years. 

Unit Trusts 

TSB UnitTrusts manages ten general and specialist authorised unit trusts. 
Total funds invested in these trusts at 31st March, 1986 amounted to 
approximately £1 billion. At 31st July, 1986 TSB Unit Trusts was the 
seventh largest unit trust manager in the UK in terras of size of funds, and 
its General and international unit trusts were respectively the fourth and 
sixth largest authorised unit trusts in the UK. The most recent unit trust, 
the European, launched in March 1986, attracted some £17 million in its 
initial offer period. The Group's unit trust management business is larger 
than that of all bur one of the other clearing banks. TSB Unit Trusts plans 
to launch further trusts as market opportunities arise. 

Although the life insurance fund of TSB Life has for some years been the 
major unitholder, emphasis is now placed on attracting direct holdings 
of units through TSB bank branches, advertising, direct mail and, 
increasingly, through intermediaries and institutional investors. Various 
facilities have been introduced to encourage unit acquisition such as TSB 
Unirbuilder, a regular monthly savings scheme for the purchase of units. 
Skandin Life Insurance Company, Merchant Investors Assurance Company 
and Royal Heritage Life have recently begun to market policies which can 
be linked to TSB unit trusts. The success of this marketing policy is 
reflected in the growth of external sales of units from £0.3 million in 
1981 to £.2™.7 million in 1985. 

Offshore funds 

TSB Fund Managers l Channel Islands) Limited, which is based in Jersey, 
manages two quoted gilt funds, two unauthorised unit trusts and a 
currency fund. At 31st March, 1986 funds under management were £12-1.2 
million of which £108.3 million was held in TSB Gilt Fund Limited. 

life insurance 

Since commencing business in 1968, TSB Life has grown rapidly, being 
notably successful in the single and regular premium unit-linked markets. 
The average volume of sales of these products persalesman is substantially 
in excess of that produced by any direct competitor. 

The regular premium policies (the Flexible Savings Plan and the High 
Investment Plan) and the single premium policy <the Investment Bond) 
now offered are linked to units in five TSB internal funds which at 31st 
March. 1986 had a net asset value of £317.-t million. The funds have a 
large investment in TSB unit trusts; at 31$i March. 1986 the life insurance 
fund of TSB Life held some 86 percent, by value of the total units in issue. 

Other products include four types of term assurance contract, an 
immediate annuity contract, with profits and low-cost endowment 
policies for mortgage repayment and \nrious life assurances, such as 
mortgage and personal loan protection, provided with other Group 
products. TSB Life also offers from time to time a Guaranteed Bonus 
Bond and a Guaranteed Growth Bond, which are wjthout-profits single 
premium endowment contracts. 


PENSIONS 

TSB Pensions Introduced its first pension -plan, the Flexible Pension 
Plan (“FPP’), in November 1984. FPP is a.unit-Unked retirement annuity- 
contract designed for those who are not members of a company pension 
scheme and for the self-employed. A range of term policies has also been 
introduced in conjunction with FPP. New premium income, net of early 
terminations, in the period to 30th September, 1985 and in the six months 
to 31st March, 1986 amounted to £4.8 million and £3-5 million 
respectively, and the number of policies in force at the latter date 
exceeded 14,250. 

General Insurance 

TSB Insurance Services markets a range of general insurance products 
which complement banking and financial services offered by the Group. 
The policies are underwritten by insurance companies outside the Group 
but are designed by TSB Insurance Services and marketed under the TSB 
name. 

The principal products cover personal loan repayments by borrowers from 
the Group In the event of accident, sickness or unemployment. Other 
products include home contents and buildings insurance as well as motor 
and travel insurance. 

In the five years to 30th September, 1985 annuaL premiums on policies 
marketed by TSB insurance Services increased from £11.6 million to 
£42.1 million. 

TSB Insurance Services expects the majority of its future business to 
continue to be generated from products developed in support of the 
Group’s banking and financial services. It also markets through direct 
mail and media advertising and through the direct sales force. 

Insurance broking 

TSB Insurance Brokers offers insurance broking services, primarily to 
small and medium-sized businesses, and also arranges the greater part of 
the Group's insurance cover. 

4. INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 

The Group’s investment management services are provided principally by 
TSB Investment Management. It manages the investments of the Group's 
three principal UKpension schemes, aU but one of the unit trusts operated 
by TSB Unit Trusts, four of the five internal funds of TSB Life and the 
managed pension fund operated by TSB Pensions. Total funds under 
management at the end of May 1986 amounted to £ 1 ,769 million. 

TSB Investment Management also acts as investment adviser to the 
offshore funds managed by TSB Fund Managers (Channel Islands) 
Limited and to the TSB Channel Islands pension scheme. 

TSB Investment Management is now beginning to market externally, 
particularly in the pensions sector, the considerable expertise built up in 
handling the Group’s own substantial funds. 

5. Credit Card Operations 

TSB Trustcard was established in 1978 to provide a TSB personal credit 
card — Trustcard — as an extension of the TSBs’ services to their customers. 
Trustcard is also being marketed successfully to non-TSB customers. A 
company card scheme was introduced in 1981. 

TSB Trustcard is a member of the worldwide VISA network. Trustcard is 
therefore accepted in over 240,000 outlets in the UK and some 5 million 
worldwide. It can be used to pay for goods and services at any retail outlet 
where the VISA sign is displayed, to obtain cash advances from banks 
affiliated to VISA, both in the UK and abroad, and as a flexible credit 
facility. Trustcard also operates as a cheque guarantee card for TSB bank 
customers. 

TSB Trustcard had 2.4 million cards in issue at 21st May, 1986, giving it a 
12 per cent, share of the bank-issued credit card market in the UK. It is 
one of the largest issuers of VISA cards itrEurope. 

Initially, the day to day servicing of customers' accounts was undertaken 
outside the Group but TSB Trustcard retained responsiblliry for., 
marketing, financial control and policymaking. In May 1984the company' 
began co cake over account servicing itself and this transfer was 
successfully completed in March 1986. TSB Trustcard now employs over 
900 staff at its locations in Sussex. 

In developing its business, TSB Trustcard’s strategy has been to build up 
a large account base and to promote card usage. Cardholder balances, 
increased in the four years to 20th November, 1985 from £95 million to 
£365 million. 


6. Finance house Services 

The Group’s finance house activities are undertaken through UDT, which 
was acquired in 1981. UDT, a subsidiary of UDT Holdings, is a licensed 
deposit taker and funds its activities through its money market operations. 

In January 1984 UDTs UK activities were substantially reorganised and 
are now carried on through three divisions. 

The point of sale division concentrates on fixed rate lending to consumers 
for the purchase of cars, commercial vehicles and caravans, through a 
network of 55 branches. It has 290,000 customers, largely introduced by 
motor dealers to some 2,000 of whom it offers support through variable 
rate mortgage and working capital finance on terms often linked to the 
consumer business generated. It also, increasingly, enters into finance 
leases with business users for the purchase of vehicles. At 30th April, 1986 
it had outstanding advances of £773 million. 

Advances are growing In real terms, although competition in the vehicle 
credit market has also been growing, as direct loans from banks, finance 
houses and other lenders become increasingly available. 

The personal Joans division makes direct loans, which are predominantly 
at variable rates, on both a secured and unsecured basis. The unsecured 
loans are marketed through home improvement suppliers and by 
advertising and direct mail directed towards the professional and 
executive sector and existing customers. Secured loans, which are 
principally second mortgages, are promoted by advertising, by direct mail 
and through brokers. At 30th April, 1986 the division hart outstanding 
advances of £ 1 47 million. 

Direct consumer lending in the UK is increasing rapidly and UDT is 
actively developing this area of its business, with increased emphasis on 
secured lending. - . 

The corporate loans division provides corporate customers with secured 
variable rate loans for residential property development or purchase of 
plant and equipment and mortgages on commercial and industrial 
property. Outstanding loans at 30th April, 1986 were £156 million. 

UDT also owns 75 per cent, of UDT Bank, which has its head office in 
Dublin and nine branch offices in the Republic of Ireland- The remaining 
shares are owned by Irish Life Assurance pic. UDT Bank's main business 
is consumer lending. Most of the business is unsecured and at variable 
rates of interesL Ar 31st March, 1986 UDT Bank had outstanding loans 
totalling I R£98 million, some 60 per cent, of which represented business 
obtained through motor dealers. 

7. vehicle Rental, leasing and Distribution 

The vehicle rental and leasing activities are carried out through Swan 
National, a subsidiary of UDT Holdings. 



with a number ot larger op«aiw^ ^ Swa n National s snares oi • 

smaller local operators- At peak lew ^ ce approximately 8 per 

the UK car rental and contract to expand its 

cent and 4 per cent respeedve^ d joint ventures. 

market share, partly through acquisitions ai j 

. ■ v*iinrrte which is also a subsidiary 

The vehicle distribution of ,• .^'ps, inc luding five Ford, 

of UDT Holdings, operates elewn car deai^ dealerships . m the 

rwo Mercedes and two General Motors, ^ 

12 months to 31st March, 1986 it sold over 23.0UU vemci^ 

8. TECHNOLOGY . " 

. __ .1 ,^ tsrs in the introduction of 

There has been co-operation bei ween ; strate «y has been centrally 

technology since the 1960s and techn SY S? the TSBs in the 
controlled since 1982. The limited m tQ ^ in the forefront 

early 1960s meant that it was not necessar* ^ of different systems 
of computerisation, but they did introduce a manner o. 
based on their regional centres. 

In the late 1960s a number of the ras '“jk * ‘sSch'^'hose'rtwn ' being 
to develop an overnight processing i* immediately for 

developed by the other higlvstreet banks, but to opt immeu , 

on-line real-time systems. 

On the formation of TSB England & Wales j» Redded b^nThe 
common, on-line real-time system throughout that bar “ v ’ w rnmnuu?c 
system then operating at ^^erahawe Manchesten ^ 

centre at Milton Keynes, opened in 1985. .fS^lfSmdWalSwhich 
Wvtherishawe an integrated system throughout England » . 

not only allows nansactions to be made, but also 
up-to-date information about customers’ accounts, at any branen. ibo 
Channel Islands is also linked to this system. 

At present TSB Scotland and TSB Northern Ireland 
. real-time computer systems, but TSB Scotland is scheduled to join the 

common system in 1987. 

By the end of 1985, the TSB banks had installed 716 through-the-wall 
Speedbank automated teller machines (“ATMs"). They plan to instal a 
further 113 by the end of 1986. Those in Scotland and in Northern Ireland- 
provide a 24 hour, 7 day-a-week service with the facility to undertake, 
transactions at any branch within those two banks for immediate 
processing. It is planned that the 18 hour, 6 day-a-week service m England 
and Wales and the Channel Islands will be extended to a 7 day-a-week 
service by the end of the year. By 1987 TSB bank customers and Trustcard 
holders will be able to draw cash from any TSB bank ATM in. the UK. The 
first -reciprocal arrangement allowing TSB customers to. use the ATMs of 
another UK clearing bank to make, cash withdrawals .will be introduced 
in October 1986 and a further reciprocal arrangement with two. other 
banks, expected to come into operation in early 1988, wilt allow customers 
to niak-p rash withdrawals from over 4,000 through-the-wall ATMs in the 
UK. 

In addition to these services provided through-the-wall, TSB England & 
Wales is installing customer operated terminals in a number of branches. 
There are different types of terminal which provide a variety of services 
including, uansfer of funds, acceptance of deposits and the issue of 
up-to-the-minute statements of account, in addition to allowing /rash' 
withdrawals and baJance enquiries. 

The English and Scottish clearing banks, together with their credit card 
companies, are involved In arrangements to introduce a national system 
for electronic funds transfer at point of sale (‘EFT-POS"). The on-line 
real-time computer system developed by the Group will be able to handle 
EFT-POS transactions with only modest modifications, which should give 
an advantage to the TSB banks. Trustcard and Speedbank cards will be 
acceptable within the network, providing Group customers with air 
electronic credit card and debit card point of sale facility. 

Other Group companies have made significant investments -in : 
technology. TSB Trustcard installed a credit card processing system- 
during 1984 to handle account seryidng.;This is linked directly, to the 
international VISA network. Group companies have, developed a; 
capability in computerised credit scoring and monitoring which-,is- 
extensively used by die TSB banks, TSB Trustcard and UDT. The loan 
administration system for UDirs point of sale and personal loans divisions 
is being redeveloped to provide greater flexibility, and Swan National 
Rentals is planning to instal an on-line system throughout its branch 
network, 



Directors and senior Management 


One of the principal objectives of the current restructuring is to complete- 
a process of organisational change which commenced in 1976. Prior to 
that date the TSBs co-operated through an association which represented- 
them on matters of common interest In that year, however, TSB Central 
Board was created to exercise supervision and control over the TSBs, 
which wer e oth erwise managed by -their own boards of trustees. It also 
controlled CTSB and the non-banking operating companies within the 
Group. ...•■• 

A management team was developed to assist TSB Central Board in the 
management of the Group, to advise it on policy and to .co-ordiqate 
business development, finance, strategic planning, personnel' and 
industrial relations, technology and legal and taxation matters throughout 
the Group,. Responsibility for the management of the central functions of 
the new Group has been assumed by the Group Managing Director. ' , 

The Directors exercise ultimate control over the development of the 
Group’s activities mid have responsibility for the formulation of Group- 
policy and for providing the organisation and management structure to 
meet the Group’s needs. The Group's main activities are carried but by 
the principal subsidiary companies, each with its own board comprising 
a mixture of executive and other directors, who are listed in Section 5 of 
Part XI. The Group’s management philosophy is to allow the operating 
companies freedom to manage within Group policy guidelines, enabling 
them to meet customer needs and to compete effectively. This was 
reflected in assurances given to H.M. Government by TSB Central Board 
dunng the passage of the 1985 Act through Parli a ment, which are referred 
to in Section 4 of Part XL . 

COMPOSITION OF THE BOARD . 

The board of the Company consists of the Chairman a Deputy Chairman, : 
five executive directors, including the Group Managing Director, and 

?id e ^Sri^r^1 ir H a0rS i’ SCVen a f poinc ^ d for cheir special 1st knowledge 

twe ve , raembers or former associate members of the 
Central Board with regional connections. - 


0f * e h?? * responsible for advising. the board o. 

policies and development of the Group. Members of this committee: an 

S ,Uow j Q 8 paragraphs. An audit comJnittei 

5 ? h “ “ dimed «* 1116 *»■» 

In addition, regional boards have been appointed in Ensland and Wale 
to mmntam the Group's strohg iocai involvement S 

o^deve^opmene and opportunities in their regions. 
each regional board is a Director of the Company . emurman a\ 


4 










v.v' 



# 


.-pniii 1 ."V 


I 



it ; 


AB «Cr :.V C , 




* 



■<:-> 7 



-i - 



TSB Life's sales of life insurance, particularly unit-linked regular premium 
business, successfully overcame the removal of life assurance premium 
relief in March 1984. New premium income on unit-linked business, net 
of early terminations, increased from £28.7 million in the year to 30th 
September, 19SJ to £102.2 million in die year to 30th September, 1985. 
In 1985 TSB Life wrote -the largest volume of new unit-linked regular 
premium business of any life office in the UK. At 3lst March, 1986 there 
were over 550,000 TSB Life policies in force or paid up of which some 
380,000 were unit-linked regular premium policies. 

The Group's customer base provides a large market for TSB Life at which 
its marketing will continue to be directed, primarily through the sales 
force operating in conjunction with TSB branches. It also intends to 
continue to develop its sales to the non-TSB customer market through 
direct mail and other methods. 


Swan National Rentals provide^ short-term car rental facilities to personal 
and corporate customers. It has a fleet of over 5,500 cars, rising to over 
7,000 during the summer holiday season, and about 550 vans. Swan 
National Rentals has 97 branches in the UK. of which 45 are located at 
forecourts from which It also sells petrol. It also uses overseas'agems and 
isa member of InterRent.an association of car hire companies represented 
in 42 countries throughout the world, which.enables the company to 
offer its customers an. international service similar to that offered by its 
multinational competitors. 

Swan National Leasing provides cars to corporate customers on contract 
hire, a leasing arrangement under which it generally retains responsibility 
for maintenance and ultimate disposal. It manages over 9,500 vehicles. 
Contract hire facilities provided to the Group account for about 19 per 
cenr. of Swan National Leasing’s fleet. 


The Directors of the Company are: 
Chairman 



j* Chen 

deputy chairman of Thames Television, a governor offfie AHmiS 
Staff College, Henley, and a member of the Council of the CbT^ 

Deputy Chairman 

Junes Enter, bather, aged 63. was formerly fi nanciai 
to TSB Central Board, and was appointed Deputv ChJrrn™ i 
Company in 1985. He was chainnan ofLazard Brother from wan m 
and of the Accepting Houses Committee from 1981 iock » 
director of Vickers and of Pearson. S' 5. He 



f 



,vf 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


41 


Executive Directors 

F f B> ^® 0< * 56 . Group Managin g Director, joined the 
General Manchester, Writam and 
“ Z 66 Md Manager, TSB ofSfales and Border 

iQfi^wI! i 975 ' ^appointed Chief Officer of TSB Central Board 

memh^ n£h ° f **** Co “ ncil of The Institute of Bankers and a 

ofthe Boardof. Administration ofthe International Savings 

®*?P e Thom, BSc(Econ), FEB, ACMA, aged 49, Deputy Group 
*^e Group in 1975, became General Manager, 
rSw?- Board in 1978, and was appointed Deputy Chief 

omcCT in 1979- His previous experience included senior appointments 
m data processing, and with management consultants and stockbrokers. 
Heis currently a council member of the Association for Payment Clearing 
services and chairman of its Money Transmiss ion Policy Committee. 

i^Hamish Macdonald, FIB (Scot), aged 59, joined the Group in 1983 
as ctuex General Manager of TSB Scotland. He was formerly an executive 
director of The Hongkong and Shanghai -Banking Corporation where, 
follo wing a- senes of senior executive appointments, he held overall 
JJWnsibiUty for the Americas, based in New York. He is a member ofthe 
Counci i of the Industrial Society, the Scottish Council for Development 
“ Industry and the Design Council and a director of Crescent J apan 
Investment Trust. 

teslie William George Priestley, FIB, aged 52, joined the Group in 
1985 as Chief General Manager of TSB England & Wales. He was formerly 
with Barclays Bank where , he held' a series of senior executive 
appointments, most recently regional general manager. Northern Region. 
From 1979 to 1983 he was secretary-general ofthe Committee of London 
Glaring Bankers. He is also a director of the London Electricity Board. 

Derek Maurice Stems, BSc (Econ), MBA, FCA, aged 47, Finance 
Director, became General Manager, Finance, TSB Central Board, in 1981 
following the acquisition of UDT where he was finance director of UDT 
Industries. Before joining UDT in 1971 he had been with PA Management 
Consultants, Touche Ross and ShelL 

Other Directors 

David Miles Backhouse, company director, aged 47, was appointed 
C h a ir man of TSB Trust Company in 1985. He was formerly a director and 
member of the executive committee of Allied Dunbar /Life Assurance. 
He is chairman of Authority Investments and Cfaartfield Holdings and a 
director of Witan Investment Company znd other companies. 

Neville Rogerson Barites, company director, aged 62, is Chairman of 
the .Group’s Tyne Tees Regional Board and a director of TSB England & 
Wales. He was appointed a trustee of the TSB of Newcastle upon Tyne in 
1968. and became Chairman of TSB North East and a member of TSB 
Central Board In 1980. He Is a director of The British Electrical and 
Manufacturing Company. 

•Lyndon Bolton, investment manager, aged 49, is Chairman of TSB 
Investment Management, Deputy c hairman of UDT Holdings and a 
director of TSB Scotland. He was appointed a trustee of the Dundee TSB 
in 1969 and became Chairman of TSB Tayside and Central Scotland in 
1978 and a member of TSB Central Board in 197 9- He is a director and 
joint manager of Alliance Trust and Second Alliance Trust and a director 
of General Accident. 

f The Lord Brnce-Gardyne, financial journalist, aged 56, was appointed 
a . director of CTSB in 1983 and is a director of TSB England & Wales. He 
was a Member of Par liam ent and, from 1981 to 1983, was Economic 
Secretary to the Treasury. He was made a life peer in 1983. He is a director 
of London and Northern Group. 

Michael Chalcraft, company director, aged 51, Chairman of the Group’s 
South East Regional Board, was appointed a trustee of Thames Valley TSB 
in 1965. He became a trustee of TSB South East in 1976 and a member of 
TSB Central Board in 1985. He is managing director of WH Brakspear & 
Sons. 

George Bryan Goner, solicitor, aged 6l, Chairman ofthe Groups Wales 
Regional Board and a director of TSB Trust Company, was appointed a 
trustee of West Midlands TSB in 1956.-He became Chairman of TSB- of 
Wales and Border Counties and a member of TSB Central Board in 1981. 

•Richard Tonstall Ellis, solicitor, aged 68, Chairman of TSB Scotland, 
was appointed a trustee of Aberdeen Savings Bank in 1959 and Ch a irm a n 
in 1970, and became a member of TSB Central Board in 1976. He was 
formerly senior partner of Pauli and Williamsons, Aberdeen. He was a 
member of the Scottish boardof Norwich Union from 1973' to I980 and 
the Aberdeen board of Bank of Scotland from 1972 to 1982. 

Junes Dnndas Hamilton, former stockbroker, aged 67, Chairman of 
UDT Holdings, was appointed a director of UDT Holdings in 1983. From 
1977 to 1985 he was senior partner of Fielding, Newson-Smith & Co. and 
is a former deputy chairman of the Council of The Stock Exchange. He is 
chairman of Wares City of London Properties, deputy chairman of the 
British Invisible Exports Council and a director of LWT Holdings and a 
number of other companies. 

jam** Peter Holt, chartered surveyor, aged 56, Chairman of the 
Group’s Yorkshire Regional Board and a director of UDT Holdings, was 
appointed a trustee of TSB-ofYorkshlre and Lincoln in 1978 and a member 
of TSB Central Board in 1985. He is senior partner of Eadon, Lockwood 
& Riddle. 

Geoffrey Leonard Hughes, former engineering company director, aged 
64, is Chairman of the Group’s Eastern England Regional Board and of 
the Regional Chairmen’s Group. He was appointed a trustee of Cambridge 
TSB in 1966 and became Chairman of TSB of Eastern England and a . 
member of‘TSB Central Board in 1979. He is also a member of the board 
of administration of the EEC Savings Banks Group. 

The Earl of Iddesleigh, farmer and landowner; aged 54. is C h air m an of 
the Group’s South West Regional Board and a director of UDT Holdings. 
He was appointed a trustee of Devon and Exeter Savings Bank in 1970 
and became Chairman of South West TSB and a member of TSB Central 
Board in 1980. He is also a director of TSW Television South West. 

Reginald Robert Jeune, solicitor, aged ^5, Chairman of TSB Channel 
Islands since 1975 and a director of TSB Trust Company, was appointed 
a trustee of Jersey Savings Bank in 1955 and a member of TSB Central 
Board in 1976. He was formerly senior partner of Motuantdu Feu & Jeune, 
and is a consultant to that firm. He is a senator of the States of Jersey and 
president of their Finance and Economics Committee. 

f John Forbes Macpherson, chartered, accountant, aged 60, 

Deputy Chairman of TSB Scotland, was appointed a trustee of TSB 
Scotland in 1984. He was formerly senior partner of Touche Ross in. 
Scotland and chairman, of the Scottish Mutual Assurance Society. He is, a 
director of Brownlee and of Scottish-Metropolitan Property. 

Aian Denis Maf rineaiL solicitor, aged 66,. Chairman of the Group’s 
West Midlands Regional Board, was appointed a trustee of Birmingham 
Municipal TSB in 1976 and Chairman in 1977. He became a member of 
TSB Central Board in 1977 and Vice-Chairman of TSB of Birmingham and 
the Midlands in 1979. He was formerly senior partner of Ryland,Martiiieau 
& Co. and is currently Lord Mayor of B irmingham . 

Kenneth Andrews MilHchap, chartered accountant, aged 62. 
Chairman of the Group’s North West Regional Board and a Deputy 
Chairman of TSB England & Wales, was appointed a trustee of Manchester 
and Salford TSB in 1965 and became Chairman of TSB North West and a 
member of TSB Central Board in 1982. He was formerly a partner of Arthur 
Young. 

Peter Craig Paisley, former retailing company director, aged 56, 
Chairman of TSB Trustcard, was previously Chairman of West of Scotland 
TSB. He is chairman of Glasgow Stockholders Trust and a past chairman 
ofthe Scottish Retail Drapers Association. 

Mrs. Jane PrimwweGifford Prior, company director, aged 55, 
appointed a director of TSB Trustcard in 1984, is also a director of Tate & 
Lyle and chairman of the board of governors of Sr. Felix School for Girls, 
Southwold, Suffolk. 

John Stanle y Rainey, engineer and company director, aged 63, 
Chairman of TSB Northern Ireland and a director of TSB Trustcard, was 
appointed an honorary manager of Belfast Savings Bank in 1976, a trustee 
of TSB Northern Ireland in 1976 and a member of TSB Central Board in 
1983. He is chairman of John Rainey & Son. I ' . 


Nigel John Robson, banker, aged 59, Chairman of TSB England & Wales, 
was appointed a director of CTSB in 1984. He was chairman of Grindlays 
Bank from 1977 to 1983. He is a member ofthe Bank of England Board 
of Banking Supervision, chairman of Alexander Howden & Beck and of 
The- Royal Trust Company of Canady deputy chairman of Ottoman Bank 
and London adviser to the Bank of Tokyo. 

; - OTHER SENIOR MANAGEMENT 

Other members of the senior management of the Group include: 

CoHxt W, Baker, MA, aged 51, General Manager, Technology, joined the 
Group in 1984 as Controller, Computer and Management Services at UDT 
• Holdings and was appointed General Manager, Technology, TSB Central 
Board In 1986. He was formerly with Dun & Bradstreet International and 
Coopers & Lybrand Associates. 

BrimM. J.JBrown, FIB, aged 49, Managing Director, TSB Trust Company, " 
joined the Group in 1959 and became Marketing- Manager, TSB Trust 
Company in 1967, General Manager in 1971, a director in 1976 and 
Managing Director in 1983. 

Kenneth W. G. Chenrett, FIB, FCIS, aged 43, General Manager, Business 
Policy, joined the Group in 1959, became General Manager and a director 
of TSB Trustcard in 1978. and was appointed General Manager, Marketing, 
TSB Central Board in 1982 and General Manager, Business Policy in 1984. 

Moore Harvey, AIB, aged 56, Director and General Manager, TSB 
Channel Islands, joined the Group in 1947, became Accountant, Jersey 
Savings Bank In 1967 and Deputy General Manager in 1972. He was 
appointed General Manager, TSB Channel Islands in 1981. 

Nod Jenkins, FA3I, aged 56, Director and General Manager, TSB 
Trustcard, joined tfre Group in 1945 and became Deputy General Manager 
of CTSB in 1980. He was appointed General Manager and a director of 
TSB Trustcard in 1982. He is a director of the Europe, Middle East and 
Africa regional board of VISA International. 

Bryan R_ Johnston. BSc (Econ), FIB, aged 48, Director and General 
Manager, TSB Northern Ireland, joined the Group in 1955, was appointed 
Assistant General Manager, TSB Northern Ireland in 1974, Deputy General 
Manager in 1975 and General Manager in 1976. 

Ian Marshall, MA, FCA, aged 39, Group Strategic Planner, joined the 
Group In 1976, became Head of Finance, TSB Central Board in 1978 and 
was appointed Group Strategic Planne r in 1981. He was formerly with 
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Thomas Tilling. 

Donald C McCrickard, aged 49, Managing Director, UDT Holdings, 
joined the Group in 1983. He was formerly with American Express where 
he held the positions of Chief Executive UK and Vice President Far East. 

Roger D. McSweeney, BA, aged 37, General Manager, Personnel, joined 
the Group in 1986. He formerly held personnel appointments at GEC, De 
La Rue, Coles Cranes and Triumph Motors. 

Peter W. S. Rowland, MA, aged 45, Group Secretary, joined the Group 
in 1981 as Secretary, TSB Central Board. He was formerly with UDT where 
he held the position of Secretary from 1973 to 1983. 

Michael J. SedUari, aged 53, Group Legal Adviser, joined the Group in 
1981 and was appointed Group Legal Adviser in 1983. He was formerly 
with UDT where he held the position of Head of Legal Department from 
1965 to. 1983- 


2. Employees 

The following table shows the number of employees at 20th November, 
1983, 1984 and 1985: 

At 20th November, 


specified minimum return on net assets is achieved. Under a 
management element of the schemes, approximately 170 executh 


Banking, including 
investment 
management (1) 
Insurance and unit 
mist services 
Credit card .. 

operations (2) 
Finance house 
services 
Vehicle rental, 
leasing and 
distribution 
Group head office 
and management 
college (3) 


Nces: 


1983 


1984 


1985 


.. Full.. . 

.Part 

. Full . 

Pan . 

Full 

Part 

time 

time 

•time “ 

time 

rime 

. time 

16,626 

3,693. 

16,729 

3,678 

18,485 ' 

3,929 

948 

— 

1,035 

18 

1,466 

24 

34 

— 

254 

61 

588 

102 

1,951 

103 

1,689 

76 ■ 

1,680 

75 

1,839 

174 

1,982 

178 

2,022 

332 

218 

15 

225 

22 

265 

28 

21,616 

3,985 

21,914 

4,033 

24,506 

4,490 


(1) In common with other dealing banks, the TSB banks employ a significant number of put-time 
staff as counter staff and in ocher clerical posts. The numbers of both full and pan-time banking staff 
increased during 1985 as a result of increased personal business volumes, Saturday opening and 
nVlitinmi co— octal lending opeiations. 

(2) The 1984 and 1985 increases were p rin c ip ally anribmable to the transfer of customer account 
servicing activities to TSB-Tmstcard. 

( 3 ) The 1984 and 1985 increases principally reflect add i t ion al Group technology and management 
college/training staBL 

The Group is committed to employee involvement and uses a variety of 
methods, appropriate to the organisation concerned, to inform and 
consult its employees. There are extensive negotiating and consultative 
arrangements which enable the views of employees to be taken into 
account in reaching decisions on matters affecting them. 

The great majority of staff are covered by collective bargaining machinery 
and, among the five unions' recognised within the Group, The Banking, 
Insurance and Finance Union (“BIFU") is predominant, representing 
over 80 per cent, of all staff. Procedural agreements provide for matters 
which cannot be resolved by negotiation to be referred , to binding 
arbitration. 

Union consultation also takes place on technological developments and 
operational change. 

. 3- Training and management development 

In. order that the Group should be appropriately staffed for its hew and 
more demanding activities, there has been a policy of external recruitment 
at senior levels. In addition, the Group operates an extensive programme 
of kaff training and management development, and a graduate 
recruitment programme. 

Hie Group’s training department is responsible for the development of 
the training function, and the training departments within subsidiary 
companies provide a wide range of courses to management and staff, 
enabling the Group to raise its standards and to extend its services. 

The Group has a newly enlarged Group management college at Solihull, 
which provides development courses for middle and senior management, 
and has close links with Ashridge Management College and Cranfield 
School of Management. 

New residential training centres are being built for TSB England & Wales 
at Telford and for TSB Trust Company at Andover. 

, 4. Employee benefits and incentive Schemes 

Group companies offer staff remuneration packages comparable to those 
offered by their major competitors In the market sectors in which they 
operate. These packages generally include mortgage subsidy schemes. 

Profit sharing cash schemes have been in operation since 1981. These 
will be superseded by new schemes in similar terms for 1986. Under the 
schemes, eligible employees of those companies which participate in the 
schemes may receive a cash bonus, rehred to profit, net assets and staff 
costs, not exceeding in aggregate 5 per cent, of the combined pre-tax 
profit of ihe participating companies. This cash bonus Is only paid if a' 


senior 

management element of the schemes, approximately 170 executives are 
also eligible, on a discretionary basis, for cash payments on a formula 
linked to Group profits subject to a maximum of 7.5 per cent, of the 
aggregate salaries of eligible management. 

The Directors intend that, subject to shareholders’ approval at the annual 
general meeting in 1987, the Company will introduce a profit sharing 
share scheme complying with the provisions of the Finance Ad 1978 and 
a senior executive share option scheme complying with the provisions of 
the Finance Act 1984. H is proposed that eligible employees will then 
participate in profit sharing cash schemes only to the extent that they 
choose not to participate in the profit sharing share scheme, and that the 
new executive share option scheme will replace the senior management 
element of the profit sharing cash schemes. 

5. Pension Arrangements 

The Group has four principal pension schemes, of which the TSB Group 
Pension Scheme l “the Pension Scheme") is substantially the largest. 

Those who were members of the Pension Scheme in May 1983 quality' for 
index-linked pension increases in line with increases in public sector 
pensions. Employees joining the Pension Scheme after May 1983 are 
entitled to pension increases on a discretionary basis, but with a 
guaranteed increase of 5 per cent, per annum or the increase in public 
sector pensions, if less. 

The TSB Group Senior Executive Pension Scheme provides senior 
employees with similar but augmented benefits to those provided by the 
Pension Scheme. Its purpose is to enable the Group to recruit and retain 
employees of high calibre by providing benefits appropriate to senior 
executives in the financial services sector. 

TSB Channel Islands has a separate pension scheme which is similar 
to the Pension Scheme. The UDT Group Retirement Benefits Scheme 
provides pensions for the majority of retired UDT employees but is now 
open only to the Group’s non-financial services employees. 

The UDT Group Retirement Benefits Scheme is a contributory scheme 
for the majority of its members but the other three principal schemes are 
non-contributory. Ofthe Group’s 9,800 present and deferred pensioners, 
approximately 77 per cent, have index linked pensions. 73 per cent, 
of current pensionable employees will be entitled to an index linked 
pension. 

Valuations of these pension schemes were made as at dates in 19S4 or 
1985 by R. Watson & Sons, Consulting Actuaries, which showed that the 
past service liabilities of the schemes were covered by the accumulated 
assets. The actuaries advised that rates of contribution averaging 22 S per 
cent, of pensionable salaries would be sufficient to finance future accruals 
of benefit. Account was taken in these valuations of the potential effect 
of inflation, having regard particularly to the provisions for index-linking 
of pensions. 

R. Watson & Sons made a general assessment of the solvency of the 
Pension Scheme as at 31st March, 1986, and have confirmed that the 
financial strength of the scheme had been maintained at that date. 


i 




l. balance Sheet 

The Group's consolidated balance sheets at 20tli Novembei in each of 
the years 1981 to 1 985 and at 2 1st May, 1986 are set out in the Accountants’ 
Report contained in Part IX. 

Prior to the 1976 Act the TSBs were prohibited from making loans. 
Customer cheque and service account balances were principally invested 
with the National Debt Commissioners (“NDC") and a large proportion 
of other deposits was invested in long-term fixed rate gilts and local 
authority loans. The proportion of the Group’s assets in listed investments, 
notice and fixed loans and NDC deposits has reduced from 68 per cent, 
to 39 per cent, over the four and a half years to 21st May, 1986 while char 
represented by advances to customers has increased from 16 per cent, to 
40 per cent. Whilst fixed rate investments are still substantial, most of the 
long-term holdings have been replaced by shorter-term gilts and other 
investments more closely matched to .the TSB banks’ variable rate 
liabilities. This has reduced the exposure of the Group to rapidly rising 
interest rates. 

Advances have grown at an average annual rate of 36 per cent, over the 
. four and a half years to 21st May, 1986. At that date some 68 per cent, of 
the Group’s total advances of *4,997 million were in the personal sector, 
of which 33 per cent, comprised conventional first mortgages which are 
relatively low margin but low risk. The remainder of the Group's personal 
lending portfolio was a mix of higher margin fixed and variable rate 
business. The commercial lending and leasing portfolio at 21st May, 1986, 
the majority of which was at variable rates of interest, amounted to i 1 ,600 
million, of which only some *7V million (net of provisions) was lent to 
overseas sovereign and corporate borrowers. Overseas lending 
considered by management to cam' a greater than normal risk was only 
some 0.3 per cent, of total assets. In the Directors’ opinion the Group has 
adopted a prudent policy in respect of bad and' doubtful debts, and the 
Directors are satisfied that adequate provision has been made. 

Retail deposits have traditionally been the principal source of the TSB 
banks' funds and at 21st May, 1986 represented 70 per cent, of the Group’s 
total deposits. The higher interest bearing account, the premium deposit 
account. Introduced in 1983 has shown significant growth and at 21 si May, 
1986 had attracted *1.1 billion of deposits. 

In the four and a half years to 21st May, 1986 the TSB banks increased 
their wholesale and other commercial deposits from *425 million to 
*2,060 million, reflecting the development of banking relationships with 
commercial customers and other banks. The Group has not had to rely 
heavily on wholesale deposits to fund lending activities and these 
deposits constituted only 30 per cent, of total deposits at 21st May, 1986. 

Despite the significant changes which have been made in recent years, 
the structure of the Group's balance sheet is still different from that of 
the other clearing banks. In particular, the Group’s investment portfolio 
(both fixed and variable rate) still represents a much higher proportion 
(39 per cent, at 21st May, 1986) of total assets; and the proportion of 
lending made at fixed rates (35 per cent, at 21st May, 1986) is also greater. 
Unlike those of its principal competitors, the Group's fixed rate assets are 
financed partly by variable rate liabilities. The initial impact of interest 
rate changes has therefore tended to be the converse of that on other 
clearing banks: rising interest rates reduced profits whereas falling rates 
increased them. Foil owing the initial impact, higher interest rates resulted 
in increased profits and lower interest rates in reduced profits, as fixed 
rate assets matured and were reinvested. The investment of the proceeds 
of the offer for sale, predominantly in short to medium-term financial 
instruments, wiil reduce the initial effect of interest rate changes, bringing 
the Group more into line with the other clearing banks. 

At 21st May, 1986 the Group’s gearing ratio and risk asset ratio, calculated 
on the basis of the Bank of England’s current definitions, were 5.7 per 
cent, and 11.6 per cent, respectively. Even before receiving the proceeds 
of the offer for sale these ratios are within the requirements of the Bank 
of England, although the risk asset ratio, which relates capital to varying 
levels of risk, has been declining as the amount of lending has increased. 

The net assets attributable to the policyholders of the life insurance and 
pension business funds of TSB Life and TSB Pensions have increased at 
an average annual rate of 38 per cent, over the four and a half years to 31st 
March, 1986. at which date they were *1.044 miilion. The value ofthe 
Group’s life insurance and pension subsidiaries at 3lsi March, 1986 has 
been appraised at *195 million, as set out in the report by Tillinghasr, 
Nelson & Warren Ltd, Consulting Actuaries, dated 12th September, 1986, 
a copy of which is included in Section 11 of Part XI. This value represents 
a surplus of *187 million, before taxation, over the book value in the 
Group's consolidated balance sheet at 21st May, 1986. 

2. Trading Record 

The Group’s consolidated profit and loss accounts for the five and a half 
years to 21st May, 1986 are set out in the Accountants' Report contained 
in Pan IX. Ari analysis of the Group's operating profit by activity is set out 
in the table in Section 1 of Pan IV. 


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Banking profits before investment surpluses fell In 1982 as a substantial 
increase in staff and other costs, partly due to bringing salary levels into 
line with other clearing banks, more than offset the benefit to net interest 
income of favourable movements in interest rates. The strong gilts market 
in that year enabled the TSB banks to realise surpluses of £52.1 million 
on sales of gilt-edged and other investments. The further substantial fall 
in interest rates in 1983, together with the continued growth in advances, 
contributed to a significant increase in banking profits before investment 
surpluses in that year. Since then, these profits have continued to grow 
steadily. 

Operating profits from insurance and unit trust services, which include 
commissions and dividends received by the TSB banks and UDT from 
TSB Trust Company and its subsidiaries, have grown at an average annual 
rate of 37 per cent, over the five and a half years to 21st May, 1986. This 
reflects the successful development of the Group’s life insurance and 
general insurance businesses. 

The trend of improving profits from credit card operations reflects the 
success achieved in expanding card usage and customer indebtedness 
whilst maintaining prudent lending policies. 

Results from finance house services were unsatisfactory in 1981 and 1982, 
largely due to high interest rates and, in the latter year, increased bad 
debt provisions. A new management team was appointed in 1984 
following which the business was substantially reorganised. The 1984 
results were affected by the costs of the reorganisation, which amounted 
to £3.3 million. Profits from finance house services are now improving. 

Profits from vehicle rental, leasing and distribution activities were 
adversely affected by weaknesses in the used car market in 1981 and 1982 
but the contribution has increased significantly since then. The vehicle 
rental and distribution activities are affected by seasonal trends which 
generally give rise to lower results in the first half of the financial year. 


iNTESias x&smzs, jCussevt 
xm-m QSJT SORECAST 


The Group’s audited profit before taxation for the six months to 21st 
May, 19S6 was £96.0 million. Net interest income benefited from the 
movements in interest rates during the period and other operating income 
grew strongly. Costs, particularly staff costs, continued to' increase in real 
terms, reflecting growth in activity' levels and continuing heavy investment 
in staff, systems and facilities. 


Since 21st May. 1986 the Group has continued to trade satisfactorily. 


On the assumption that there will be no material change in interest rates 
in the UK in the period to 20th November, 1986 the Directors consider 
that, in the absence of unforeseen circumstances, the Group's profit 
before taxation for the year to that date will be £201 million. The forecast . 
profit before taxation comprises the forecast profit before taxation of 
the existing business bf £193 million (including a forecast surplus on 
disposal of investments of £8 million) and £8 million, being the forecast 
income from the investment of the first instalment of the proceeds of the 
offer for sale. Profit after taxation is forecast to be £125 million. 


Plastic cards will play an increasingly important role in the money 
transmission field. With the development of point of sale systems, an 
organisation's competitive position in the plastic card market will become 
a key factor for success. Competitors, apart from the other clearing banks, 
will include retailers and, increasingly, building societies. 

Life Insurance and pensions 

The UK life market comprises approximately 120 companies actively 
writing life insuran ce business. Over the last five years life insurance and 
pensions business has absorbed an increasing proportion of the personal 
sector’s financial assets. Estimated annualised new premium income for 
1985 was £5,1 billion compared with £1.6 billion In 1980. The two fastest 
growing areas of business are linked life business and pensions. 

TSB Life’s principal product is unit-linked insurance and in 1985 it wrote 
the largest volume of new unit-linked regular premium business of any 
life office in the UK. The Group. has also begun to enter the pensions 
market. In 1985 TSB Life arid TSB Pensions together had .approximately 
2.3 pet cent, of total new life and pensions business. Their successful 
performance in the life insurance market has primarily been due to selling 
to the Group’s existing customer base. 

COMPETITIVE STRENGTHS 

The Directors believe that the Group is well placed to build on its present 
position for the following reasons: 

■ it has a large customer base mainly drawn from sections of the 
’ community in which the Directors expea demand for banking, 

insurance and investment services to grow rapidly 

■ it has successfully developed insurance and investment products 
for marketing alongside banking, finance house and credit card 
services 

■ it has already shown the ability to use its extensive network of 
bank branches and other marketing outlets in selling the Group’s 
investment, insurance and other services 

■ the high degree of automation of the TSB banks will assist TSB 
bank staff in devoting more time to personal service 

■ it is developing both its customer information facilities and a 
communications network which will give it the technological 
support to market an extensive range of services across the whole 
of the Group’s customer base 

■ .it will have increased capital resources to develop its existing 
business and new services. 

2. Use of Proceeds 

The proceeds of the offer for sale are estimated to be £1,274 million. The 
injection of additional capital will provide the Group with a very strong 
balance sheet and will help it to continue to develop as a major financial 
services organisation in markets in which there are a number of larger 
competitors. 




The Directors, 

TSB Group pic 
and 

Lazard Brothers & Co., Limited 


1 28. Queen Victoria street, 
London 

I2ih September. 1°S6 


Gentlemen, 


INTRODUCTION 

TSB Group pic (“the Company’') was incorporated on 21 J*jj**J*; 
July. 1986, by virtue of the Trustee Savings Banks 


The balance sheets or tne Company M shivm 

are set out in the last section of this report. In our opinion, these tyihinci sheas 

give a true and fair view of the Company's state of affairs at those om-.v 

The remaining financial information set out in this report js taseti on jj* 
pro forma consolidated accounts ("the pro forma accounts ) of T. ■ , ; 

the TSB banks and TSB Holdings and its subsidiaries ( the Group ». i h.iu 
for some yearn been prepared and published in order ro present tniwlM 
financial information for the Group, and is after niaking such idiustnic ms .Lsw t 
consider necessary. The accounts of two subsidiaries. T>B Lile and TSB 
have been prepared on the basis applicable io file insurance companies under the 


We have examined the pro forma accounts of the Group lor the live tears to -.uh 
November, 1985 and the six months to 21st May. 198b. The accounts uert- audited 
in accordance with approved Auditing Standards by outsell e> lor the three venrs 
to 20th November. 1983 and by Peat. Marwick. Mitchell it Co. for the two years to 
20th November, 1985 and the six months to 21st May, 198b. for each accounting 
period the accounts of certain group entities were examined by other auditors. 


In our opinion the financial information set out in this report, except tor the effect 
thereon of preparing the accounts of TSB Lite and TSB Pensions oil the basis 
applicable to life insurance companies referred to above, gives a true and fair \ tew 
of the profit and source and application of funds of the Group lor each of the live 
years to 20th November. 1985 arid the six months to 21st May, 1986 and of its state 
of affairs as at each balance sheet dare within that period. In our opinion, the 
accounts of TSB Life and TSB Pensions used for consolidation were properly 
prepared in accordance with the legislation referred to above. 


Our work has been carried out in accordance with rhe Auditing Guideline: 
Prospectuses and the Reporting Accountant. No accounts of the Company or ol 
the Group have been prepared in respect of any period subsequent to 2J.st Mai . 
1986. Except where the context otherwise requires or where otherw ise defined 
herein, terms defined in the listing particulars dated 12th September, 1986 l “the 
listing particulars") have the same meaning in this report. 


4 


* 



f 


* 


The forecast includes results shown by the audited consolidated accounts 
for the six months to 21st May. 1986 and unaudited management accounts 
for the three months to 20th August, 1986. 


CoOTEnrioN'j .Use ©si 





1. COMPETITION 

The financial services market in the UK is undergoing rapid change 
and becoming increasingly competitive. Customers are becoming more 
financially aware, the traditional demarcation lines between banks, 
building societies and insurance companies 3re breaking down, new 
organisations such as retailers are entering the market and new 
competitively priced products are being introduced . 

The Group competes across a broad range of UK retail financial services. 
Its competitive position in the key areas is summarised below. 

SAVINGS AND DEPOSITS 

Over the five years io 31st December, 1985, UK personal seaor liquid 
assets grew at an overall rate of 13 per cent, per annum. The growth in 
liquid assets held with the banking sector during the period was about 8 
per cent, per annum, which was substantially lower than that for the 
building societies and the National Savings movement. As a result rhe 
banking sector s share of these assets fell from around 40 per cent, at the 
beginning of 1981 to an estimated 32 per cent, at the end of 1985. 

The growth in the TSB banks' deposits was somewhat below the banking 
sector average, with their share of liquid assets falling from 5.4 per cent, 
to some 4.0 per cent, over the same period. This was partly due to the TSB 
banks’ uncompetitive interest rates resulting from the nature of their 
underlying investments, particularly in the early part of that period, and 
rhe higher levels of unemployment amongst the TSB banks' customer 
base in the early lysns. The TSB banks are now paying competitive interest 
rale*. 

More aggressive marketing by UK hanks over the last 18 months has 
reMiised in a reduction in the hjnki ng sector s. rate ofloss of market share. 
Tiie tanks have shared in ibis improvement, with strong growth in 
premium deposit accounts and. to a lesser extent, cheque accounts. 

The market foro Mnincrcial deposits i.> dominated by the other UK clearing 
banks, hi.; she T*E banks are making some progress. In particular they 
have begun to penetrate specific market segments, such as the professions 
and smali and medium ti/ed businesses. 

LOANS 

The bulk o! the Group’s ivrv mal lending is in the mortgage and consumer 
credit markets. The mortgage market is at present undergoing 
c-.i:v-.der.ih!c c.unpeiuhe changes, having traditionally been dominated 
b*. the building .*.« >c ie: ies. which still hold over ”5 per cent, of loans 
mu :M. ind;.-’g. 1 1 on ever, over the last live years, the UK commercial banks, 
i::. lij.hng the T s 3 hanks, h sve entered the market, and, more recently, 
o-mpe;j:.on from nun UK banks and other institutions has increased. At 
tiie end iff i*»85 the TsB banks' mortgage lending amounted to £1.5 
bdl.i-n. which represented approximately l .2 per cent, of total UK house 
p> rcb.jse io.n> i.-ur.- -landing. 

Tin* principal competitor* in the consumer credit market (excluding 
U-ar.- 'or house purchase \ are other hanks, credit card organisations, 
finance houses and rcia'ler*. Building societies are planning to move into 
i.::’M.v::red oonsuTivr finance hut it is likely to uke considerable time for 
them to develop appropriate expertise and systems. At the end of 1985 
the Group'-- personal lending, excluding loans for house purchase, 
amounted io £1.” biiiion. This represented approximately 6.5 per 
cent. o! low! UK consumer credit lending. 

Commercial lending and leasing in the UK i* dominated by the UK 
clearing banks. lr addition, many foreign hanks have developed 
rebi.-oiiships with UK commercial borrowers. The Group’s commercial 
lending is principally directed at small and medium -sized businesses. 
The Group has also recently developed its larger scale corporate lending, 
particularly to U K customers. 

Unlike many of its competitors, the Group has minimal exposure to 
international debt problems. 

MONEY TRANSMISSION 


To date the growth in the Group’s reserves has provided the capital base 
to support the development of its business although in the last two years 
the capital base has been strengthened by £80 million of subordinated 
loans. The financial services sector in which the Group operates is rapidly 
changing and becoming increasingly competitive and to continue to 
compete effectively it is essential for the Group to develop its product 
range and services, to modernise and, where appropriate, expand its 
branch network, and to be amongst the leaders in die introduction of new 
technology. 

The Group’s services will continue to be expanded to keep pace with the 
needs of its existing customers and to attract new customers. While the 
emphasis will remain on the provision of personal finan cial services 
within the UK, the Directors expect to build steadily on the commercial 
services provided at the head offices, regional offices and other specially 
designated branches and offices of the TSB h anks and through UDT. 

Substantial capital resources will also be invested in the retail distribution 
network. The existing branch banking network will be enhanced by 
establishing new and better branches, particularly in the south of England 
where coverage is considered to be insufficient. Across the country, a 
number of branches are poorly sited or ill equipped for today’s 
requirements or do not reflea the style of service which the Group seeks 
to provide. These branches will be upgraded or relocated. 

While the TSB banks have advanced on-line real-time computer systems, 
there is still a need for substantial further investment to exploit the 
full potential of these systems to provide new services to personal and 
commercial customers. It is intended to increase the availability of 
automated teller machines and customer operated te rminals offering a 
comprehensive range of services both inside and outside bank branch 
premises and at other convenient sites. Furthermore, data transmission 
links between the various operating units will be improved, to enable the 
Group to provide a wide range of financial services swiftly and 
cost-effectively. Processing and communication capacities will be 
augmented to support the continuing growth of transaction volumes in 
the Group’s activities. 

Some £300 million of additional capital expenditure is expected to be 
incurred over the next three years, principally on the retail distribution 
network and technology development, compared with so’me £200 million 
spent during the three years to November 1985. 

Capital will also be needed to support balance sheet growth. This is 
required for bank and finance house lend ing growth, where it is necessary 
to maintain a prudent risk asset ratio, and to support growth and che 
introduaion of new products in the life insurance and pension 
businesses. 

In addition to the internal developments outlined above, it is likely that 
some expansion, in finance and ocher related services and in geographical 
coverage, will best be achieved through acquisitions, although no specific 
material acquisition is currently planned. In due course overseas 
investment will be considered, particularly in Europe, when the Group 
has developed the management capabilities necessary for success in 
overseas markets. The Group’s policy towards acquisitions will be 
cautious. Where there is a choice between internal development and 
acquisition, the price paid for an acquisition — which may well include a 
substantial sum for goodwill — will have to be justified in terms of 
enhanced business and profit growth expectations. 

It will take time to deploy the offer for sale proceeds for the purposes 
identified above. In the meantime part will be used to repay existing 
subordinated loans, while the majority of the funds will be invesred in 
money market deposits, listed investments (principally UK government 
and other fixed interest stocks), notice and fixed loans and other 
instruments. 

3. Dividends 

If the proceeds of the offer for sale had been available to the Group in 
full for the whole of the year to 20th November, 1986 the Direaois would 
have expected to recommend total dividends for the year of 4226p net per 
ordinary share, representing a gross yield of 6.0 per cent, on the full offer 
for sale’price. This would have been covered 3.1 times by the pro forma 
forecast earnings per ordinary share for the year to 20th November, 1986. 

The Directors consider, however, that the dividend for the year to 20th 
November, 1986, and the interim dividend for the following period, 
should reflea the faa that the second instalment of the offer for sale price 
will not be paid until September 1987. In the absence of unforeseen 
circumstances, the Direaors expea to pay, in March 1987, a single 
dividend of 1.065p net per ordinary share for the year to 20th November, 
1986. • 


ACCOUNTING POLICIES 

The si gnificant accounting policies adopted in arriving at the financial information 
areas follows: 

ACCOUNTING CONVENTION 

The pro forma accounts have been prepared under the historical cost convention 
modified by the revaluation of certain assets. 

BASIS OF CONSOLIDATION 

The pro forma accounts include the accounts of TSB Central Board, the TSB banks 
and TSB Holdings and its subsidiaries, .til significant balances and transactions 
between the entitles are eliminated. The financial year end of each of the entities 
is 20th November, except for TSB Trust Company and UDT Holdings and their 
respective subsidiaries, for which the year ends are either 30th September or 3 1st 
October. 

SECURITIES 

Marketable securities held for the short term are included in the balance sheet at 
market value. Other securides held for the short terra are included at the lower of 
cost and market value. 

Listed investments held for the long term which are redeemable at fixed dates 3 re 
stated in the balancesheet on the basis of cost adjusted to give effect to amortisation 
on a straight line basis of premiums and discounts on purchase. No provision is 
made for any shortfall of market Value below the book value of investments as they 
are capable of being held to redemption. Profits and losses on the realisation of 
these investments are dealt with in the profit and loss account as they arise. 

PROVISION FOR BAD AND DOUBTFUL DEBTS 

Specific provisions are made for advances, including Instalment credit balances, 
which are recognised to be bad or doubtful. In addition, general provisions are 
maint ai n ed to cover losses that, although not yet specifically identified, are known 
from experience to be present at the balance sheet date in any portfolio of advances 
and Instalment credit balances. In the case of Instalment credit agreements entered 
into by UDT, general provisions are maintained on advances not in arrears by 
providing for estimates of bad debt risk which are charged to the profit and Joss 
account over the period In which repayments are due in proportion to the reducing 
balances outstanding. The aggregate provisions made during the financial period, 
less amounts released and recoveries of debts previously written off, are charged 
in che profit and loss account. 


INSTALMENT FINANCE AND PERSONAL LOANS 

Income from instalment finance business and personal loans is credited to the 
profit and loss account in proportion to the reducing balance of funds outsemding. 

DEPRECIATION 

Depreciation on freehold buildings and on leaseholds with more than fifty years 
unexpired is provided on a straight line basis at 2 per cent, per annum. Other 
leasehold interests are written off by equal instalments over the unexpired terra 
of the lease. No depreciation is provided on freehold land. 

Computers and other equipment are depredated on a straight line basis over their 
estimated lives of generally between three and ten years. 


ASSETS LEASED TO CUSTOMERS 

Income from finance leases is credited to the profit and loss account in proportion 
to the net funds invested using the investment period method. The net leasing 
income before taxation includes the benefit of declining rates of corporation tax 
passed on to lessees. This is offset by including an amount equal to the tax benefit 
so passed on as part of the deferred taxation charge in the period in which the 
income is brought into account. Finance leases are included in the balance sheet 
as part of advances to customers 3nd other accounts at amounts based on the 
discounted value of future rentals. 




. o — iiyas duuoum on : 

accruals basis. The leased assets concerned are included in the balance sheet 
part of advances to customers and other accounts at net book value. 











. “*Y auvice or tne appointed actuary, dete 

the propomon of the actuarial surplus to be transferred from each fund 
profit and loss account. The balances of rhe actuarial stiluses are erredfe 
m the hfe insurance and pension business fends. 0 


PENSION SCHEMES 


Based on actuarial advice, contributions are made to oension . . 

for recent benefits related to projected final salati« in tespea ofSiitinS 
and for post-retiremettmoeases in pensions, and are charged to heprofK 
loss account as incurred. The actuaries undertake foil vatations TiS ctot 
three years with interim reviews in the intervening years. 617 


DEFERRED TAXATION 


#' 


f 





*L!l 



II.,. 




The cheque account is still rhe principal money transmission facility'. 
Over the last three years competition in the cheque account market has 
been characterised by the move to “free banking" and the rapid growth, 
from a lower base, of smaller competitors. In December 1985 the TSB 
banks had 4.2 million cheque accounts 1 1980 2.S million). On the basis 
of nririiei research, the TSB tanks had 13 per cent, of current account 
holders in England and Wales. 21 per cent, in Scotland and 2-1 per cent, 
in Northern Ireland. 


The interim dividend in respect of the period to 31st October, 1987 
will be paid in Oaober 1987 and the final dividend in March 1988. 
Commencing with the final dividend for that period, dividends will reflea 
the fact that both instalments of the offer for sale price will have been 
paid. The Direaors expect that, in respect of each financial year of rhe 
Company following that period, an interim dividend and a final dividend, 
of approximately equal amount, will be paid in September and March 
respectively. 


— (■iwvuvu wu uu luoiciiii UUling QiUerencPS nhm> rhiM. V „ 

reasonable probability that taxation will become pairable in fee foreseShte^m^ 
The rates of oration used are those which are Sjxtcted to apply tn^he v^Tn 
which the riming differences are anticipated to reverse. ' J 

GOODWILL 

Goodwill arising on acquisitions, being the excess of cost over the fair value of 
the net assets acquired, is charged against reserves in the year of acquisition 

->■ ■ ■■ ■ ■ 








ic 


A 

in. 




*i bib, i iwtcA i 1 1 i •N»*.t* t i~-l.l I .i'.^x ijj' 1 'Ju\J 


CONSOLIDATED PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNTS 


Interest Income 
Interest expense 

Net interest income 
Other operating income 


Six months 

Yeses to 20tfa November, to 21st May, 
1981 1982 19® 1984 1985 1986 

4m 4m 4m 4m 4m 4m 

1 821.9 950.2 9574 1,025.5 1,2534 708 2 

2 4793 5554 491.6 5214 6923 399-5 

3424 394.4 4664 503.7 560.7 .308.7 

3 324 52A 70.5 924 1193 784 


Total income 


375.4 

4463 

536.7 

596.5 

680.0 

387.5 

Operating expenses 








Staff costs 

4 

167.9 

200.2 

212.4 

23425 

2643 

155.1 

Provisions for bad and doubtful 








debts 

13 

12 JO 

36.9 

38.1 

434 

49.0 

293 

Other costs 

5 

111.9 

132.1 

' 158.9 

1772 

206.5 - 

114.1 

Total expenses 


291.8 

369.2 

409 A 

455.4 

520.4 

298.2 

Operating profit before surplus 








ooi&potal of investments 


83-6 

77 JS 

1273 

141:1 

159-6 

893 

Surplus on disposal of investments 


1.7 

52.1 

22.9 

12.7* 

9.7 

6.7 

Operating profit 


853 

129-7 

1502 

1533 

1693 

96.0 

Exceptional charges 

6 

— 

523 

50 B 

10.0 

— 

— 

Profit before ttxation 


853 

77 A 

99A 

1433 

1693 

96.0 

Taxation 

7 

36.1 

22.6 

38-6 

563 

593 

36.0 

Profit after taxation 


49.2 

54.8 

60.8 

872 

109-5 

60.0 

Extraordinary charges 

8 

7.1 

— 

24.0 

— 

— 

— 

Profit transferred to reserves 

18 

42.1 

543 

363 

872 

109-5 

60.0 


Earnings per share are not shown as neither TSB Central Board nor the TSB banks had share capital 
during the above periods. 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEEESv 


Assets 

Cash and short term funds 
Cheques in the course of collection 
Marketable securities held for the 
short term 


Notice and fixed loans 
Listed investments 
Deposits with National Debt 
Commissioners ("NDC") 
Advances to customers and other 
accounts 

Interest in companies held for sale 


Premises and equipment 


Net assets of the life insurance and 
pension business funds 


Liabilities and reserves 
Current and deposit accounts 
Creditont and accrued expenses 
Deferred taxation 
Long term loans 

Reserves 


Life insurance and pension 
business funds 


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SOURCE AND APPLICATION OF FUNDS 

Years to 20th November, 


Source of funds 
Operating profit 
Depreciation 
Exceptional charges 


Funds from other sources: 

Net movement In long term loans 
Disposal of companies held for sale 20 
Disposal of fixed assets 
Taxation recovered 


Application of Hands 
Acquisitions of companies 
Additions 10 fixed assets 
Taxation paid 

Special tax on banking deposits 


Net movement 

Represented by taere*se* (decreases) im 
Advances to customers and other 
accounts 

Other banking assets 
Interest in companies held for sale 




20th November, 


21st May, 

Notes 

1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


4m 

4m 

4m 

4m 

4m 

4m 

9 

323 

231 

139 

423 

771 

640 


39 

53 

83 

110 

121 

121 

10 

445 

401 

833 

747 

1452 

1454 


807 

685 

1,055 

1480 

2344 

1315 

11 

1311 

2382 

2464 

2,420 

2405 

2390 

12 

2394 

2392 

2309 

1361 

1.700 

1,794 


1,066 

880 

. 666 

450 

227 

' — 

13 

1,510 

72 

2.126 

1 

3302 

3,763 

5,003 

5491 


7,760 

8466 

8396 

9374 

11,179 

11490 

14 

124 

161 

241 

274 

319 

345 


7,884 

8327 

9,137 

10,148 

11.498 

12,135 

19 

243 

345 

476 

654 

788 

1,044 

m 

8.127 

8j672 

9.613 

10302 

12486 

13,179 

15 

7346 

7,574 

8478 

9,070 

10458 

10,762 


84 

151 

173 

251 

246 

286 

16 

56 

40 

5l' 

58 

118 

128 

17 

12 

12 

11 

57 

55 

85 


7398 

7,777 

8313 

9.436 

10377 

11461 

18 

486 

550 

624 

712 

821 

874 


7384 

8327 

9437 

10,148 

11.498 

12,135 

19 

243 

345 

476 

654 

788 

1,044 

m 

8,127 

8,672 

9.613 

10302 

12486 

13.179 


Less: 

Current and deposit accounts and 
other liabilities 


NOTES 

1. Ihtewy Income 
D eposits with NDC 
Listed investments 
Advances to customers 
Other Interest 


Notes 1981 

1982 

1983 

1964 

1985 

4m 

4m 

4m 

4m 

4m 

85-3' 

129.7 

150-2 

1533 

1693 

10.5 

16.7 

21.4 

273 

33.6 

— 

(523) 

(50.8) 

(10.0) 

■ — 

95.8 

944 

120.8 

1713 

202.9 

— 

— 

(0.7) 

46.0 

(IB) 

20 22 

81.1 

J2 

— 

— 

IB 

3B 

2.9 

43 

173 

— 

— 

— 

— 

■ — 

998 

179-0 

. 1242 

221.6 

218.6 

20 109-2 





32.6 

51.1 

53.7 

64.6 

96.5 

253 

' 1&8 

462 

49.7 

15.9 

6.1 

1.0 


— 

— 

172.9 

70.9 

994) 

1143 

112.4 

C73.D 

108.1 

. 243 

1073 

1062 

ses>bn 





366.8 

638 A 

887-2 

760.6 

1.224.4 

2323 

(1390) 

(144.9) 

2183 

64.7 

113 

— 

— 

— 

— 

610.4 

499.4 

7423 

9783 

1.2891 

683.5 

3913 

71 80 

871.6 

1,1819 

(73.0 

108.1 

243 

J073 

10 62. 

803 

68.4 

56.4 

552 

322 

2824 

Z76B 

236.1 

239.7 

228B 

174.6 

2633 

328.4 

. 429.1 

610.9 

284.6 

341.5 

336.9 

301.5 

381.1 

8213 

9504 

957B 

1,0253 

1,253.0 


six months 
to 21st May, 
1986 
4m 

96.0 
20.5 


29.6 

2.5 


48.9 


58.0 


656.0 


74 

874 

3593 

254.1 







Six months 



Years to 20th November, 

to 2lst May, 


1981 

.1982 

1983 

. .1984 

1985 

1986 


4a> 


4m . 

4m 

S.m 

J>ffl 

2_!SSSEfiffi3. 

Customers' deposits 







Service accounts 

50.0 

45.5 

48.6 

48.6 

30.9 

13.7 

Other retail deposits 
. Wholesale and other 

367.0 

404.9 

325.7 

317:5 

430.7 

206.7 

commercial deposits 

60.1 

1039 

114.6 

149.9 

223 9 

175.7 


477.1 

554.3 

4889 

516.0 

685.5 

396.1 

Long term loans 

22 

1.5 

2.7 

5B 

68 

3-4 

- 

479.3 

555.8 

491.6 

521.8 

692.3. 

399.5 

3. Other Opwutmg Income 

Money transmission charges 

13-4 

20.9 

235 

28.9 

39.7 

29.1 

Insurance and unit mist income 

Commissioos arising from credit 

8.9 

13.2 

20.9 

29B 

36.5 

22.9 

card activity 

4.1 

6.6 

9.6 

123 

15 8 

92 

Vehicle rental, leasing and 







distribution operating profit 

1.1 

1.9 

5.1 

' 4.8 

7.4 

2.1 

Other 

5.3 

9B 

11.4 

17.0 

199 

15.5 


32B 

52.4 

70.5 

92B 

1193 

78.8 

4. St aw Costs 







Salaries 

135.5 

1S9B 

167 J! 

187.7 

2)3-0 

126.2 

TSB Central Board members* 







remuneration 

0.4 

0.5 

0.4 

0.4 

0.5 

03 

Normal contributions to pension 







schemes 

28.5 

32-0 

34.6 

363 

354 

19.1 

Staff profit sharing scheme 

— 

32 

4.1 

4.0 

i3 

2.6 

Other employee costs 

3-5 

4.7 

6.1 

6.2 

11.7 

6.9 


167.9 

■nrafeMi ■ 

200.2 

212.4 

234.6 

26h.9 

155.1 


20th November, 


2 ia May. 


12. Lima iN'VEVTMt-vT'. 

Book value 

Securities Of. or guaranteed by, the 
British Government 
Other investments listed in the UK 
Investments listed elsew here 


Market valuation 

Redemption value 

Book value of listed investments 
maturing in less than one year 


1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

4m 

Xm 

Xm 

xm 

Xm 

£ a 

2,166 

1B97 

1.875 

1313 

1,672 - 

1,781 

211 

190 

132 

48 

28 

13 

17 

5 

"> 

— 

— 

— 

2394 

■Mrenm 

2,092 

2,009 

lS6l 

1.700 

1.7W 

2711 

2,157 

2,019 

14)74 

1,693 

1348 

2.4h0 

2B87 

1.994 

1.955 

1,688 

1.769 

492 

578 

2b6 

274 

289 

397 


All investments are redeemable at fixed dates and market valuation is at mid market prices. 
13. Advances td Ci/sTOMut* andOthu Accouktv 
TSB banks 

Mortgages 2?3 507 

Personal lending 269 3-iH 

Commercial lending 3-1 IT) 

Finance house services 534 630 

TSB Ttusicard lending 95 153 

Net investment in leased assets 8n 


912 

1.078 

1,513 

1,632 

466 

586 


803 

323 

530 

Thfl 

676 

7h9 

Hb9 

978 

1.042 

224 

290 

365 

396 

101 

1 h 8 

389 

448 


Total advances 
Less: provisions for bad and 
doubtful debts 


1,2-8 

Hi 


1.900 

til 


2,775 


3.501 

95 


1.769 

118 


4.997 

130 


Other amounts receivable 
Stock, work in progress and l-ind held 
for development (ai the lower of 
cost and net realisable value! 


1,510 2.12u 3,002 3.T«3 5.003 5.191 


The TSB Central Board members’ remuneration has been disclosed as being the nearest' equivalent 
to directors' remuneration. Information about the current remuneration of the directors of the 
Company is contained in Section 7 of Pan XI of the listing particulars. 


5. Other Costs 
Other costs includ e: 

Depredation of premises and 

equipment 

Anditoa' remuneration 

6. ExctpnoNAi. Changes 
S pecial contributions to pension 

schemes 

Setting up of in-house customs 
account servicing in TSBTrustcard 


1981 

Jim 


Yeats 10 20th November, 
I9K2 1983 19 Hh 

Xin Ji-m 4m 


Six months 
io21»t May. 
1985 1986 

4m Xm 


The movements in provisions (or bad and doubtful debts were as follows; 

Provisions at beginning of period 
Companies acquired 
Amounts written ofT 
Provisions made, less released 


103 

1.0 

16.7 

12 

21.4 

12 

27.5 

0.6 

33.6 

0.7 

-20.5 

0.3 

— 

523 

50.8 

— 

— 

— 

i — 

— 

— 

10.0 

— 

— 

— 

52.3 

503 

10.0 

_ — 

— 


Provisions at end of period 


The analysis of provisions at each period end was as follows: 


Special contributions were made 10 the Group's pension schemes following actuarial valuations in 
1982 and the subsequent harmonisation of certain of these schemes into the TSB Group Pension 
Scheme In 1983. 


7. Taxation 
United Kingdom 
Corporation tax 
Deferred taxation 
Tax bn life Insurance fund releases — 
Tax credit on hanked investment 


Specific 

General 


1 4. PaEMiMtMUnD Equipment 


Cost or valuation 
Accumulated depredation 

Net book value 


30 

11 


43 

18 


52 

25 


68 

27 


82 

36 


91 

39 


41 


61 


77 


95 


118 


130 


21st May. 1986 
Premises Equipment 

4m 4m 

238 207 

17 83 


Tout 

4m 

445 

100 


221 


124 


345 


24.6 

11.0 


40.4 

119.8) 


48.2 

(13.3) 


34-2 

14.4 

27.7 

15.8 

39.7 

5.9 

33 

4.7 

2.4 


Net hook value of premises comprises: 
Freeholds 

Long leaseholds (more than 50 years unespired) 
Short leaseholds! less than 50 years unexpired 1 


183 

14 

24 


221 


income 

. 0.1 

02 

2.0 

— 

— 

— 


35.7 

20.8 

36.9 

53.6 

58B 

36.0 

Overseas taxes 

0.4 

1.8 

1.7 

3.0 . 

1.0 

— 


. 36.1 

22.6 

38.6 

56.6 

59B 

36.0 

Reconciliation of tax charge: 

% 

% 

% 

% 

% 

% 

Standard rate of tax 

52 

52 

51 

47 

42 

37 

Capital allowances Tor which no 
deferred taxation provided . 

(2) 

(ID 

(9) 


. .. 


NDC deposit Income, net of attributable 
expenses, which is not liable to taxation 

(It) 

(10) 

(8) 

(5) 

(3) 



Other items 

3 

(2) 

5 

(3) 

(4) 

1 

Effective rare of tax 

42 

29 

39 

39 

35 

38 


At valuation 


At cost 


— 1983 

— previous years 


110 

28 


138 

83 


221 


8. Bni»8«DW«rggaa» 

Special tax on banking deposits 
Provision for additional deferred 
taxation as a result of the finance 
Act 1984 


4m 


7.1 


4m 


4m 


4m 


4m • 4m 


— — 24.0 — 


15. CURsrvTANDDEPOMTACCPL-MT’- 
Cheque accounts 
Service accounts 
Other retail deposits 
Wholesale and other commercial 
deposits 


16. DefebkuTaxatio'm 
Accelerated capital allowances 
Pension contributions 
Investments 
Interest receivable 
Other Items 




20ih November, 


21m May, 

1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

Xm 

Xm 

Xm 

Xm 

Xm 

Xm 

623 

725 

850 

959 

1.185 

1.3WJ 

1.325 

1.230 

U35 

1,297 

1,180 

1,088 

4,175 

4,475 

4,562 

4,608 

1.987 

5,177 

1.123 

1.144 

1.531 

2,206 

2,906 

3.197 

•7,246 

7.574 

8J78 

9.070 

10 .258 

10,762 


10 

(3» 

4 

46 

11) 


11 

115) 

( 6 ) 

48 

2 


41 

( 21 ) 

( 12 ) 

40 

3 


53 

( 6 ) 

(15) 

25 

1 


no 


9 

(i) 


119 

( 10 ) 

18 

1 


7.1 


— 24.0 


56 


40 


51 


58 


118 


128 




20th November, 


21sr May, 


1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 1986 

9. Cash wo Short Term Fund* 

Xm 

Xm 

Xm 

Xm 

Xm Xm 

Cash in hand and with bankets 

116 

121 

11! 

111 

105 127 

Money at call and overnight p lacings 

Notice and fixed loans due within 

106 

19 

9 

150 

2 23 280 

seven days 

101 

91 

19 

162 

413 233 

1 

323 

231 

139 

423 

771 640 


Deferred taxation not provided in respect of the above categories of timing differences amounted 
to 417 million at 2fkh November, 1981, 43 i million at 20th November, 1982 and nil at subsequent 
balance sheet dates. 

In addition, no provision has been made For the potential liability for taxation which might arise in 
the event of any of the Group's properties being realised at balance sheet values, since the likelihood 
of any material liability arising in this respect is remote. Most of the Group's properties are occupied 
for the purposes of the Group's trade and consequently any gains arising on disposal are normally 
eligible Tor rollover relief. 

17, Lowe Teem Loans 
Floating rate subordinated loan 1991 
Floating rate subordinated loan 1993 
8.75% subordinated capita] bonds 
1988 

Loans from NDC 


10. Marketable Security enHeid foe the Short Term 






Treasury bills 

90 - 

120 

llH 

54 

136 

184 

Certificates of deposit 

207 

212 

595 

387 

650 

566 

Ocher bills 

128 

51 

98 

296 

269 

265 

British Government stocks 

12 

10 

16 

— 

95 

136 

Overseas Government stocks 

8 

8 

10 

10 

2 

3 


445 

401 

833 

747 

wmmm—m m 

1,152 

.' 1.154 



■ 


50 

50 

50 

30 

8 

8 

8 

7 

5 

5 

4 

4 

3 

— 

— 

— 

12 

12 ■ 

11 

57 

55 

85 


11. Nonce wo Fmaa Loams 
Consisting of secured and unsecured 
loans, with a maturity beyond seven 
days, to UK local authorities and 
public corporations, discount houses, 
recognised banks and licensed 
deposit taking institutions and 
including loans which mature beyond 
70&2 one year of 


The subordinated loans are repayable in full in 1991 and 1993 respectively, or earlier at the Group’s 
option, and carry interest at rates related to LIBOR. 

The 8.75 per cent, subordinated capital bonds 1988 are denominated in U.S. dollars and are 
repayable as 10 41 million mi 1st December, 1987 and 44 million on 1st December, 1988. 

18. Rfravr* 

The movements on reserves were as 
follows: 


737 


769 


622 


411 


390 


372 


At beginning of period 

446 

486 

550 

624 

712 

821 

Retained profit for the period 

42 

55 

37 

87 

309 

60 

Currency realignment 

— 

— 

— 

1 

— 



Surplus 00 revaluation of premises 

2 

9 

37 

— 

— 

— 

Goodwill written off 

(4> 

— 

— 

— 

— 

(7) 

Ar end of period 

wi 

486 

550 

624 

712 

821 

874 



♦jr' ■r-jr : -T-'* van 

’ .-1 ' \ i 5 ik . " ; *• ' 


The reserves at Zlst May, 1986 indude a surplus on the revaluation or premises of 456 million. 



8} 

Ik 

K 

T 

3. 

O ’ 

0 

e 

if 

x 

D! 

01 

k 

li- 

re 

tf 

K 

41 

1C 

li 

SI 

c- 


1.23- 

1B39 

2.69H 

3.h«6 

h.651 

4 ,867 

S- 

245 

_*b0 

J— 

328 

336 

305 

i- 

1 






n 







n 

28 

r* 

27 

29 

16 

19 

V- 

IC 


- 

41 

61 

77 

95 

118 

C 

28 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

% 

(6) 

(17) 

(22) 

(26) 

(26) 

cm 

ir 

12 

37 

38 _ 

44 

49 

29 

e 

41 

61 

77 

95 

118 

I3«) 

r 

e 






^ 44 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986_ 




I 

i 

i 


£• 


£ 

.in, 


i 


19. toiltfroHA^AwnPEwtowBcawTOrWr 

The financial year end of TSB ilfoand TSB Pens kray and nfriirirjnnga™ harctiiaca fiifu*!, kjflth • 




30rb September; 


3lsi March. 


1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


£m 

£m 

£m 

£m 

. £m 

£m 

The net assets of the funds were as fallow* 






Property at valuation 

2 

2 

2 

12 

‘ 27 

■ 30 

Equity abates at market value 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

2 

6 

Accumulation units at hid pr^ 







In authorised unit trusts 

177 

252 

372 

489 

599 

839 

tn unauthorised «*«»«• qn«y 

1 

1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

Fixed Interest securities at market 







value 

8 

24 

50 

82 

126 

144 

Debut? 

5 

7 

9 

9 

10 

11 

Term deposits 

48 

42 

26 

58 

38 

25 

Guh at bank and on deposit 

10 

23 

28 

19 

1 

1 


251 

351 

489 

672 

807 

1.062 

Creditors 

(8) 

(6) 

(13) 

(18) 

(19) 

(18) 


243 

345 

476 

654 

788 ' 

1,044 


Actuarial valuations of the assets and liabilities of die life insurance fund revested: 

Yeats to 30th September, 



1981 

1982 

1983 

19»f 

1985 


£m 

Jam 

Am 

£m • 

■ £m 

Accumulated surpluses brought forward 

— . 

2JB 

2.9 

5.6 

3.1 

Underlying surplus in yea 

3D 

6.9 

63 

14.5 

18.6 

Amount set aside for solvency margin and 
closed fond expense reserves 

0.1) 

(6£) 

C3.6) 

(5-4) 

(4.4) 

Amount released to profit and lass account 

— 

— 

— 

(11.6) 

(15.6) 

Accumulated surpluses carried forward 

Z8 

2.9 

5j6 

3-1 

1.7 


The underlying surpluses in 1984 and 1985 reflect the &a that, from 1st October, 1983, the fund 
did not pay introduction commissions to the TSB banks. If commissions had been paid on the same 
basis as in the three yearn to 30th September, 1983, the commissions paid to die TSB b a n ks for 3984 
and 1 98S would have been £7.6 milli on and £9.6 million respectively. 

The actuarial valuation of the pension business fund at 30th September. 1985 showed that the 
transf e r s Grom the profit and loss account to the fund amounting in total to £3-8 million (1984 nil), 
of which £1.7 million had been set aside for solvency margin and dosed fond expense reserves, 
we/e adequate to provide for the liabilities of the fund at that date. 

Mo actuarial valuations of the life insurance and pension business funds base been carried out 
subsequent to 30th September, 1985. Included In other operating income in the proforma accounts 
for the six months to 21st May, 1986 is an amount of £8.1 million which the Directors, with the 
advice of the appointed actuary, believe it is appropriate to recognise, based on die ner transfer of 
surplus which is currently projected to be node from the life insurance and pension business funds 
for the year to 30th September, 1986. 

An appraisal of the value of TSB Life and TSB Pensions at 31st March, 1986 by TUlinghast, Nelson & 
Warren Ltd, which is set out in Section 11 of Part XI of the listing particulars, shows an aggregate 
valuation of £195 million compared with the net assets of those subsidiaries of £8 million at that 
date. 


20. Acomsmoes oc Companies 



Year to 

Six mouths to 


20ch November, 1961 

2 1st May. 1986 

Net assets acquired.- 

£co 

£m 

Fixed assets 

30.6 

1.5 

Goodwill 

4.7 

7 £ 

Assets out on hire or lease 

56.3 

— 

Interest in companies held for sale 

63.5 

— 

Advances to customers and other accounts 

499.4 

— 

Other assets 

93-8 

2.1 


’ 7483 

11.2 

Current and deposit accounts and 



other liabilities 

(639-1) 

(2.1) 

Purchase consideration 

109.2 

9-1 . 


We have reviewed the accounting policies and calculations used in preparing the profit 
forecast. In our opinion the profit forecast, so Car as the accounting policies and 
calculations are concerned, has been properly compiled on the basis of the assumption 
made by the Directors as set out In die listing particulars and Is presented on a basis 
consistent with the accounting policies normally adopted by die Group, which are set 
out in the Accountants' Report in Pan IX of the listing particulars. 


Yours faithfully. 

DELOITTE HASKINS & SELLS 

Chartered Accountants 

21, Modrffelds, 


London EC2P 2HT. 

The Direcrois. 

TSB Group pic 

22th September, 1986 

Dear Sirs, 

• 


We refer to the profit forecast for the year to 20th November, 1986 which Is set out in 
Part VII of the listing particulars dated 12th September, 1986. We have discussed this 
forecast and the assumption oo which it is made with you and officials of the Company 
and we have considered the letter dated 1 2th September, 1986 ro yourselves 

by Deloitte Haskins & Sells regarding the accounting policies and calculations used In 
preparing the forecast. 

As a result of these discussions and in the iig hr of the letter horn Deloitte Haskins & 
Sells, we consider that the forecast (for which you as Direcrois are solely responsible) 
has been made after due and careful enquiry. 

Yours fahhfully. 

For Lazaid Brothers *Co., Limited 
J. R. S. Bryant 
Director . t 



1. SHARE CAPITAL 


(a) The .Company was .incorporated in Scotland under the Companies Act 1985 on 
21st October, 1985 (registered number 95000) as a public limited company with an 
authorised share capital of £100,000, divided Into 380,000 ordinary shares of 25p each, 
of which 200,000 were subscribed for cash at par by, or on behalf <£, TSB Central Board, 
and 20,000 limited voting shares of 25p each. 

(b) On 11th September, 1986, conditionally upon the underwriting agreement 
referred to in Section 15 below becoming unconditional: 

(i) the authorised share capital of the Company was increased from £100,000 to 
£525.000,000 by the creation of 2,020,672,632 ordinary shares and 78,927368 
limited voting shares; 

(ii) the authority of the Directors so allot securities of the Company, for the purposes 
of Section 80 of the Companies Act 1985, contained in the articles of association 
of the Company, was varied by increasing the maximum amount of securities which 
the Directors were then authorised to allot up to die amount of the unissued 
authorised share capital following the increase in capital, such authority to expire 
at the conclusion of the next annual general meeting of the Company unless 
previously revoked, varied or renewed; ' 

(iii) there were allotted, credited as fully paid, by way of capitalisation of reserves of 
the Company, 1,054,169,550 ordinary shares to TSB Central Board, being the 
number of shares to be underwritten pursuant to the underwriting agreement and 
to be retained for the Free Offer, and, at the direction of TSB Central Board, 
55,482,608 limited voting shares to the TSB Foundations in the proportions referred 
to in Section 14 below; and 

0v) it was resolved that there should be allotted, credited as fully paid, by way of 
capitalisation of reserves of the Company, up to a further 445,630.450 ordinary 
shares to TSB Central Board, being, together with the existing issued and allotted 
ordinary shares, the number of further shares determined by the Directors to be 
required to satisfy the terms of the offer for sale (including shares to be retained 
under the loyalty bonus arrangements), and up to a further 23,464,760 limited 
voting shares to the TSB Foundations in proportion to their holdings of limited 
voting shares, the resulting number of issued limited voting shares do represent 5 
per cent, of the issued share capital of the Company following the offer for sale. 

It is intended, if necessary by cancellation of unissued ordinary shares and unissued 
limited voting shares, that following the offer for sale the authorised unissued share 
capital of the Company will comprise only ordinary shares representing not more than 
25 per cent, of the authorised share capitaL The Directors’ authority for die purposes 
of Section 80 of the Companies Act 1985 will, if necessary, be varied to provide that die 
maximum amount of securities which the Directors are then authorised to allot should 
be an amount equal to the ordinary shares remaining unissued. 


The amounts shown in respect of companies held for sale relate to certain subsidiaries of UDT 
that were identified for divestment at the date of acquisition of UDT in 1981. 

21. Cahtac Commitments ’ . 

Capital expenditure not provided for ai 21a May, 1986 comprised £29 million contracted and £41 
million authorised but not contracted. 


22. CONTINQLNT LlABUtTies 

Contingent liabilities at 2 1st May. 1986 comprised acceptances of £H5 million and guarantees and 
other obligations of £32 million, in addition there were outstanding contracts for the sale and 
purchase of foreign currencies. 


Balance Sheets of tse company 




20rb November, 

21st May. 



Notes 

1985 

1986 




£ 

£ 

A-SstTS 





Investment in subsidiary 



50.000 

50.000 

Capital 





Called up share capital 


1 

50.000 

50,000 

NOTTS 





1 CunrurSiiuLCuiru. 






20th November, toss 

2 Is* May. 1986 



Issued and 


Issued and 


Authorised 

fully paid 

Authorised 

folly pnd 


A 

£ 

£ 

£ 

Ordinary shares of 24p each 

Limited \ oiing ordinary stuses of 

95.000 

50.000 

95.000 

50.000 

25peach 

5,000 

— 

5.000 

— 


100.000 

40.000 

100.000 • 

50.000 


2. Phipi no*. 

The Company has not paid any dividends. 

3. Fr*: Bjwa Shut Evl*ts 

On 1 Ith September, |4«i, conditionally upon the underwriting agreement referred to m Section 
15 of Pan XI of the listing particulars becoming unconditional 

fil tlie .mitionsed share capital of (he Company was increased from a-ino.nnn to £525.099,000 
by the creation of 2/Ui >.6~2.632 ordinary shares and ~8.92~.3tjS limited voting shares: 
iii i there were allotted, credited as fully paid, hv way of capita] Lsaiavn of reserves of (be Company 
arising on vesting and created by the revaluation of investments in subsidiaries;. 1.05-4.169.550 
ordinary shares in TSB Central Board and. at the direction of TSB Central Board, 55.-4 82.608 
limned voting shares to the TSB Foundations, and 

(iii) It was resolved that there should be allotted, credited as fully paid, by way of capitalisation 

of reserves of the Company, up to a further 445.630,4 50 ordioary shares to TSB Cenuai Board 
and up to a further 23,464,760 limited voting shares to the TSB Foundations. 

Yours, faithfully, 

DELOITTE HASKINS & SELLS 
Chartered Accountants 


‘ PAKT.X-' - - "O' '.2~j 

iJmXRSREGARDlNG PROm FORECAST j'J-lj 


The following are copies of letters relating to the profit forecast of the Group for 
the war to 20th November, 1986: 

1 28. Queen Victoria Street, 
London EC4P4JX. 

12th September, 1986 

The Directors, 

TSB Group pic 

Gentlemen, 

The profit forecast of TSB Group pic and to subsidiaries f “the Group"), for which the 
Directors are solely responsible, set out in Part VII of the listing particulars dated 12th 
September, 1986 includes results shown by the audited pro forma consolidated accounts 
for the six months to 21sr May. 1986 and the unaudited management accounts for the 
three months ro 20rh August. 1966. 


(c) Under the Company's articles of association, Section 89(1) of the Companies Act 
1985 (which confers on shareholders rights of pre-emption in respect of the allotment 
of equity securities which are, or are to be, paid up in cash) has been disapplied. The 
disapplication will cease to have effect unless renewed by special resolution at the next 
annual general’ meeting of the Company and will in any event cease to have effect -when . 
the authority for the allotment ‘of securities for the purposes of Section 80 of the 
Companies Act 1985 referred to above is revoked or would expire if not renewed, 
but, if such authority is renewed, the disapplication may also be renewed by special 
resolution for a period not exceeding that for which the authority is renewed. Except 
for allotments made under an employees’ share scheme, while the disapplication is in 
force, the Directors may allot equity securities for cash only with the authority of a 
special resolution or pursuant to a rights issue or if the equity securities to be allotted, 
together with any other equity securities allotted during the same year (other chan those 
aliened under an employees' share scheme or rights issue), do not in aggregate exceed 
5 percent, in nominal value of the aggregate of the amount of the ordinary share capital 
which the Direcrois have authority to al lot pursuant to Section 80 of the Companies Act 
1985 and the issued ordinary share capital (other than the limited voting shares). For. 
this purpose, the allotment of securities as folly paid up pursuant to a capitalisation of 
reserves does not constitute an allotment for cash. 

(d) Save as disclosed above or in Section 4 below, no share capital of the Company 
or of any of its subsidiaries has, within the three years before the dare of this document 
(or since the date of incorporation if later), been issued or agreed to be issued or is 
now proposed to be issued (in any such case other than by way of intra-group issues by 
wholly-owned subsidiaries) folly or partly paid, either for cash or for a consideration 
other than cash. 

(e) No share capital of the Company or of any of its subsidiaries is under option or 
agreed conditionally or unconditional ly to be put under option. 

(f) Save as referred to above, no capitalisation issue or rights issue will be made before 
25th November. 1987 and no other material issue of shares of the Company (other than 
to shareholders pro rata to their existing holdings) will be made within one year after 
the date of this document without the prior approval of shareholders of the Company 
in general meeting. 

2. VESTING OF ASSETS IN TH £ GROUP UNDER THE 1985 ACT 

The relationship between the principal bodies in the Group prior to vesting is shown 
in the diagram below; 



On 2 1st July, 1986, by virtue of the 1985 Act and of The Trustee Savings Banks Act 1985 
(Appointed Day! ( No3) Order 1986, there were vested: 

(a) first, in the Company: 

(i ) all the property, rights! liabilities and obligations of T5B Central Board, except 
for its shares in the Company: 

(ii) all theshares held by the T5B banks in TSB Holdings, for a total consideration • 
of £201 million; 

l iii ) all the property, rights, liabilities and obligations of TSB Holdings; and then 


(b) 


and Wales; and 


(c) iarSBSco^dpKTSBSorthemlre^Ap^^^^^^^^^^ 

** ** TrUSlCC ^ ^ ^ 
Channel Islands respectively. ^ 

■rte resulting shading reirrf^jpof 

Group Is shown in the diagram hi section -of Pan - ^ 

The 1985 Act provides rliar the refers snd «stidg of sssers desenbed do no, 

themselves give rise to any rax liability. 

is expected that TSB Central Board -11. of^. 

sharesunder the loyalty bonus arrangements described in seen 

3. subsidiary Companies 

Details of the Company's principal subsidiaries are as follows: 

Activity 


Name ant) country cf incorporation , *T" 

(except where Incorporated in England and wales > 

T5B England & Wales pic 
TSB Scotland pic (Scotland) 

TSB Northern Ireland pic (Northern Ireland) 

TSB channe l islands Limited (Jersey) 

TSB Investment Management Limited 

TSB Trust Company Limited 

TSB Insurance Brokers Limited 
TSB Insurance Services Limited 

TSB Life Limited 
TSB Tensions limited 
TSB Unit Trusts limited 
TSB Fund Managers (Channel Islands) 
Limited (Jersey) 

TSBTiustcard Limited 

UDT Holdings Limited 

United Dominions Trust Limited 
UDT ftanlc Limited (Republic of 
Ireland) 

Swan National Rentals Limited 
Swan National Leasing Limited 
Valkyrie Motor Holdings Limited 


Share capital 
(issued and fully ptid) 


Banking 

Banking 

Banking 

Banking 

Investment management 
intermediate holding company 
Insurance broking 
General insurance business 
Life insurance business 
Pensions business 
Unit trust management 
i 

Offshore fond management 
Credit card operations 

Intermediate holding company 
Finance bouse 


Finance house 
Shon-ierm vehicle rental 
Vehicle contract hire 
Intermediate hoi ding company for 
vehicle distribution companies 


i 300 . 000.001 

£75.00W»1 
£20,000,001 
£7,5002)00 
- £150.000 

£6.558.100 

£1.000 

£1.000 

£6,55&000 

£ 10 . 000.100 

£50,000 

£25400 
. £100 
£100 

£60.000.000 

IR£6, 000.000 
£ 1.000 
£ 100.000 

£796.292 


tch of the above companies is a wholly-owned subsidiary with the exception of UDT 
ink, 75 per cent, of the issued share capital of which is owned by UDT. 

te directors of the Company's principal subsidiaries are as follows: 


TSB England & Wales 

TSB Scotland 

T5B Northern 

w__l -M 

ircuno 

TSB channel Mauds 

N-J Rohson 

RT Ellis ow dl 

J S Rainey 

R RJeuneore 

Chairman 

Chairman 

Chairman 

Chairman 

G D Burnett can td 

J H F Macnheccon esc 
Deputy Chairman 

W M Carson 

DGCreasey 

Deputy Chairman 

Deputy Chairman 

Deputy Chairman 

K A Mllli chap 

Deputy Chairman 

•1 H Macdonald o m 
Chief General Manager 

•BRJohrwoa 
General Manager 

•M Harvey 

General Manager 

•LWG Priestley to. 

t Bolton 

P Charlton 

PG Bkimpied 

Chief General Manager 

P Chariton 

•H FCushnahan 

p Chariton 

NR Barites to 

J WCradock 

J N D Fawcett dl 

*D Gibson 

•A K Boyd 

E Cunningham 

•R W Green 

PA Harwood 

The Lord Bruce- Gardyue 

1 “A B Davidson 

El Johnston 

D E Le Boutillier 

P Charlton 

•AC Dempster 

TQKInp 

RAPkrot 

•D B Cooper 

ADFouIlsid 

AH Martin esc 

R A de Putron 

•LWCorp 

Mrs M Hook 

EW McDowell ere 

H Taylor 

G E K Foster 

•DA McLean 

AM Russell ere 

*G McDThain 

a KG Mills 

RTS Macpherson ere mc R GTolandjr 


Sir John Read 

TDDL 

JE Wilson ora dl 


WT Robinson td 

JAASpeirs 



Sir Jack Stewart -Clark met 



•E Wilson 



TSB Investment 

TSB Trust Company 

TSS Trust card 

UDT Holdings 

Management 


• 

• ■ . 

L Bolton 

■ DM Backhouse 

P C Paisley 

J D Hamilton cm 

Chairman 

Chairman 

Chairman 

Chairman 


DM Backhouse 
RTEUisoram. 

J D Hamilton cm 
•M L Pearce 
DB Thorn 


JN H Hay 
Deputy Chairman 
•BMJ BroWn 
Managing Director 
PB Bell 
-PA Brooks 
. G B Confer 
MH Field cue 
•RNHeydon 
RRJeuneosc 
-MC Ramsay 
AC Richards 
D B Thorn 


®N Jenkins 
General Manager 

■ PHBagnall 
•CJCheadle 
•DN Cooper . 

Lord Edward FitzRoy 
I.H Macdonald ora 
DCMcCrickard 
IWG Priestley to . 
Mis. J P G Prior jp 
JS Rainey 
•C I Robinson 
D B Tbom 


L Bolton .. 

Deputy Chairman 

•DCMcCrickard 
Managing Director 
-FHAldous 
•p F Clark • 

J PR Holtjr ‘ 

The Earl of 
Iddesleigh dl . 

•FJ Randall 
D B Thorn 


‘Executive directors 


4. ASSURANCES TO H.M. GOVERNMENT IN RELATION TO THE TSB BANKS 

Certain assurances as to the maintenance of the separate identity and independent 
management of the TSB banks were given during thepassage of the 1985 A a through 
Parliament. These were set out in a letter dated 16th May. 1985 from Sir John Read, 
Chairman of TSB Central Board, to the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The arrangements 
made in fulfilment of those assurances ate described below. 

The letter recorded the view of TSB Central Board and the trustees of T58 Scotland that 
TSB Scotland should continue to function as an independently-managed Scottish bank 
within the Group. The Company has confirmed to TSB England & Wales, TSB Northern 
Ireland and T5B Channel Islands, as well as to TSB Scotland, that each of those banks 
will continue to function as an independently-managed bank within the Group, based 
in’ the territory In which it is incorporated. 

The Company has also confirmed to each of the four TSB banks the undertaking 
contained in the letter that the head office of each of those banks would remain in the 
territory in which the bank is incorporated. 

In accordance with the assurances, the articles of association of the Company provide 
that the Direcrois will, within two months after any person takes office as rh-atrm^ n or 
senior executive officer of TSB England & Wales or TSB Scotland or as chairman of TSB 
Northern Ireland or TSB Channel Islands, appoint such person robe a Director of die 
Company. 

In relation to TSB England & Wales, TSB Scotland and TSB Northern Ireland, the 
following further arrangements have been made: 

(a) Eachof those bante has issued a special rights redeemable preference share to 
the TSB Foundation for the territory in which it is incorporated. This special share 
cames the tight to appoint up to two direcrons of the bank, subject to the approval 
of the existing directors of the bank. These special directors are not eligible to 
hold any executive office, or the office of chairman, deputy chairman or 
vice-c hairman, m the bank, and are undera responsibility to represent the interests 
of the territory concerned. The special share carries no voting rights except on a 
resolution for the removal of a special director, in relation to which it carrSwSng 
rights sufficient ro eoablethe holder of the special share ro prevent Sysucb 
sp eaals, »f* Knot transferable, carries no rightro dividends orother 
do^nbunOTSjs repayable at ns nominal value of £1 in a winding-up of the’ bank 
and will be redeemed at par if the TSB Foundation is wound upor dfcsohS. 

fb) te to the J*eda! direcrois referred to above, the boards of those 

tatties hareffiepow^ofappomtingihelrown membera^ofeleSMtireir^ 

. chairman, deputy chairman and vice-chairmen, subject to the 

(c) The articles of association of each of tiiose banks provide for the special dim«M 

ab0ve ’ ** 1* 351 I hr«e-<iuaners of the remaining direao^indudiM 

the chairman), to be persons who are normally resident 
that bank is incorporarod- The article of association also pro^St^ dliSSs 
of the tank are to give consideration (so far as material) n«v 3* - “ a0B 

Of the Company as the owner of the bank’s Ordmary s har^ ^t a£) to tile taSSa 
of the bank s customers and employees and of the terriuwv 
.hey are entitled to take atxo™ ^ 

management of the business of the bank. m ** 


(d) 


stall not exceed the higher of one-talftf the 

tax, extraordinary items and minority interests) for that oerindee) 

aggregate ooosoUdated profits, less losses, on the same 

under the 1985 Act. The anicles of association of each of the banics^SjST 
provide that the agreement is not ro be varied without the roncurrenl^,!!!^^ 
of the directors of the bank. ^currwceoftwo-ihirds 


v: 
v ;, 

. n 







5. Me morandum of association 

Sto^^rffcote 111 ofassocialion Company contains, inter alia, provisions to the 


(a)' PRINCIPAL OBJECTS 

C^tise 4 of the memorandum of association, 

(b> LIMITATIONS ON SHAREHOLDINGS 

The limitations on the proportion of the voting shares (“voirog shares' meaning, fra 
tne^e purp oses, the issued ordinary shares and the issued shares of any other future 
class normally carrying full voting rights) of die Company in which any person maybe 
interested, set out in Clause 7 of the memorandum of association, are described in 
outline below: 


(J> For*is purpose, the expression 'interest' is widely defined and extends beyond 
mose interests required to be taken into account in deciding whether a 
notification to the Company would be required under Pan VI of the Companies 
m 1985 to include die interests referred to in Section 209(l)(a), (b) and (e) 
and. with limited exceptions and except as otherwise determined by ordinary 
resolution of the Company in general meeting, the interests referred to in Section 
. . 209(1 Xj) of the. Companies Act 1985 (other ihatu those of a bare or custodian 
trustee under the laws of England or of a simple trustee under the laws of 
Scotland). An interest in interim rights under the Instalment Agreement is to be 
treated for this purpose as an interest in the shares to which such interim rig ht* 
■■ relate. 


(if)- The provisions of Part VI of the Companies Act 3985 are applied with the effect 
that members and other persons are obliged to disclose to the Company, as 
... provided in that Act, inter alia. Interests in 5 per rent-, or more of any class of 
voting shares. Registers of all interests so disclosed are to be kept by the Company. 

(ifi) Anypetsonmay be required by the Directors to disclose his interests and, so Ear 
as known to him, others’ interests in voting shares of the Company and, nmti the 
Directors confirm that they are satisfied with the disclosures marie , any voting 
shares held by that person, or in which that person is determined by the Directors 
. ta be interested, will confer no right to receive notice of, or to attend or vote at, 
' any general meeting of the Company or of any class of members of the Company. 


(iv) Without prejudice to (iii) above, and unless the information contained in the 
registers referred to In (ii) above indicates otherwise, the Directors may assume 
that aperson does not have an interest in more than 5 per cent, of a class of voting 
shares of the Company. likewise, they may on reasonable grounds deem a person 
to have such an Interest and determine the shares in which he is interested, in 
which event the restrictions set out below will apply. 

(v) If any person has an interest, or is. deemed by the Directors to be interested, in 
more than 5 .per cent, of any class of voting shares of the Company, the Directors ' 
are required to serve a written notice on all persons (other than persons referred 
to in (vili) below) who appear to the Directors to have interests In, and, if different, 
on the registered holder(s) of, theshares concerned. The notice must set out the 
restrictions referred to in (vi) below and call for the interest concerned to be. 
reduced topper cent, or less by disposal of shares or of interests in shares of the 
class concerned within 21 days of service of the notice (or such ocher period as 
the Directors consider reasonable). A disposal of shares otherwise than on The. 
Stock Exchange ora disposal by a put-through transaction on The Stock Exchange 
will not, in the absence of further evidence, be regarded as a sufficient disposal 
for this purpose and registration of any transfer on such a disposal will be withheld. 

If such a disposal notice is not complied with to rhe satisfaction of the Directors 
and is not withdrawn (in whole or in pan), the Company may, while the 
corresponding provisions of the Instalment Agreement continue to operate, and 
thereafter shall make such a disposal on behalf of the shareholder on such teems 
as may be' determined by the Directors to be appropriate, based upon advice' 
obtained by them for the purpose. Hie Directors will not be liable to any person 
fot the consequences of reliance on such advice. Where,-on such a disposal, the 
shares in-question are held by more than one regist er ed holder (treating joint 
holders of any such shares as a single bolder) as nearly as practicable the same 

• proportion of each identified bolding will be sold. In order to effect such a 
disposal, die Directors may authorise any officer or employee of the Company to 

-execute the necessary transfers and may issue a new certificate to the purchaser. 

In such circumstances, the net proceeds of any disposal will be received by .the 
Company, whose receipt will discharge the purchaser, and will be paid (without 
interest and after deduction of costs) to the former registered holder upon 
surrender by him of any certificate in respect of the shares sold. 


A share comprised in the interest of a person who is, or who is deemed by the 
Directors to be, interested in more than 5 per cent, of any class of voting shares 
is referred to as a “qualifying share' and, whether or not notice has been served 
under the provisions described above, the registered holder of that share is not 
entitled in respect of that share to receive notice of. or to attend or vote at, any 
general meeting of the Company or of any class of members of the Company while 
that share continues to be a qualifying share. ... 


(vir) Foj- this purpose the interests in voting shares of SEPON Limited, orany successor 
, thereof acting as a stock exchange nominee, any organisation acknowledged by 
' ' the Directors to be carrying on a similar function in relation to any other stock 
exchange on which the Company’s shares may be listed (acting In that capacity), 
a trustee (acting in that capacity) of any employees’ share scheme of any company 
within the Group, TSB Central Board, ot any person acting on its behalf, and the 
Custodian Bank (acting in that capacity) are to be ignored. In addition, provision 
is made to release an underwriter or sub- underwriter of an offer of voting shares 
of the Company frpro obligations which would otherwise be Imposed to make a 
disposal rfshaxes where that person’s interest has exceeded the 5 per cem. level 
only by virtue of his participation in the underwriting or sub-underwriting. S imilar 
■’ provision is made as regards a person whose interest exceeds the 5 per cent level 
by reason only of his subscription for shares to which be is entitled on a rights 
issue. In any such circumstances, during such period as such person remains 
interested in more than 5 per cent, of the issued voting shares of any class, the 
- excess over 5 per cent, will be treated as qualifying shares only for the purposes 
mentioned in paragraph (vi) above but his entire interest will be taken into 
account in determining whether he should be required to dispose of 
; after-acquired interests in voting shares. 

(viii) The Directors are not obliged to serve notice on any person ff they do not know 
-• either his identity or address or the nature or extent Of his interest In voting shares. 
The absence of service of such a notice and any accidental error in or failure to 
give any notice to any person upon whom notice is requited to be served will not 
v prevent the ‘implementation of or invalidate any procedure under the relevant 
provision. Any determination of or decision or exercise of any discretion or power 
. -bv the Directors or the chairman of any meeting of the Company under these 
previsions will be final and conclusive and binding on all petsoos concerned and 
will .not be open to challenge. 

(ix) The provisions summarised above may not be altered by resolution of the 
Company until rhe fifth anniversary of the date on which the basis of allocation 
under this Offer for sale is announced. Any alteration of the application of the 
provisions during that period would constitute a variation of the rights of the 

• holders of limited voting shares requiring their consent asa class. Thereafter, die 

■ j provisions will apply as If references In (iv), (v). (vi) and fvii) above to a 5 per 
cent, interest in voting shares were to a 15 percent, interest, and may be altered 
: In any’ Aspect bv special resolution of the Company in general meeting and 
generally shall have effect as if incorporated in the articles of association. ’ 

(x) ■ while interests in shares acquired under this offer for sale are represented by 

interim rights, the provisions of the' Instalment Agreement which give rise to 
: ’ simitar obligations, limitations, restrictions and powers of investigation and 
disposal in relation to interests in interim rights will operate In addition to the 
provisions of Clause 7 of the memorandum of association. 

6. ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION. 

The articles of association of the Company contain, inter alia, provisions to the following 

effect 


(a). VOTING 

Subject to the rights and restrictions as to voting referred to in Section 5 above, every 
holder of ordinary shares who is present in person (including any corporation by us 
dulv authorised representative) at a general meeting of the Company will have one vote 
on a show of hands and, on a poll, if present in person or by proxy, will have one vote 
to ew^qchltoe held by hi*, save dm a member will not be entitled ^ eaerdse 
tile rich! to vote carried by such shares If he or any person appearing to be interested 
in the ordinary shares held by him has been duly served with a notice under Section 
232 of the Companies A a 1985 (requiring disclosure of interests in shares) and is in 
default in supplying the Company with information required by the notice. 

The limited voting shares confer the right to receive notice of and to anend and speak 
at any general meeting of the Company but do not coffer a right to vote unless the 
business of the meeting includes the consideration of a resolution to approve an 
acquisition or disposal by the Company or any of its subsidiaries^ cfrcumstances in 
which the approwdof shareholders In general meeting is required, or sought by the 
Directors, due to the significance of the transaction, or to approve any amendment of 
the provisions of the memorandum of association of the Company relating to the 


limitations on shareholdings referred to in Section 5 above, or for the winding-up of 
die Co mpan y, or to vary the rights of the limited voting shares. In any such case, the 
shareholder may vote those shares only in respect of such resolution and will have the 
same rights as regards the number and e xe rci se of votes as an mrUnaty sharehoMec, 

(b) General Meetings 

After consultation with die Quotations Department of The Stock Exchan ge the 
Directors may m a ke arrangements to control the level of attendance at any place 
specified for the holding of a general meeting and, in any such case, *hai! ritr ^ rhaf 
the meeting be held at a specified place, where the chairman of the meeting «fe»i| 
preside, and make arra ngements for simultaneous attendance and participation by 
membersaotherlocati o ns.'niec hflinTW i n ffageneialmeeringhas aiithnriiy rn arijrntro 

the meeting if, in his opinion, it appears impracticable to bold or continue the meeting 
because of weight of numbers. Annual general meetings of the Company will be held 
in Edinburgh or such other place in Scotland as die Directors may approve. 

(c) DIVIDENDS AND OTHER DISTRIBUTIONS AND RETURN OF CAPITAL 

The Company in genera] meeting may declare dividends to be paid to members of the 
Company, but no dividend shall be declared in excess of the amount recommended by 
the Directors. Except in so Ear as the rights anaHiing to, or the of issue of, anv 

shares otherwise provide (no such shares currently being in Issue), all dividends shall 

be apportioned and paid pro rata according to the amounts paid up tbereon. Tlie limited 

voting shares do not confer a right to participate in any distribution of profits by way of 
divi den d bur rank pari passu with the ordinary shares In respect of any ocher distribution. 

On any distribution by way of capitalisation, the amount to be distributed will be 
appropriated pro rata amongst the holders of ordinary shares and limited voting shares 
according to the amounts paid up on their shares respectively: if the amnnnr £ D ^ 
distributed t5 applied in paying up in full unissued sharps nf rhf» C omp any, a chaw-hnl At 
will be entitled to receive bonus shares of the same class as the shares giving rise to his 
entitlement to participate in the capitalisation. 

The Directors may, in their discretion, fix any date as the record date for any dividend 
or distribution. Any dividend unclaimed after a period of twelve years from the date of 
declaration thereof will be forfeited and revert to the Company. No dividends or other 
moneys payable on or in respect (ff a share shall bear interest against the Company. 

On a return of capital, whether in a winding-up or otherwise, the ordinary shares and 
the limited voting shares will rank pari passu in all respects. 

(d) CONVERSION OF LIMITED VOTING SHARES TO ORDINARY SHARES 
Each limited voting share will be convened into an ordinary share: 

(i) following the last date on which an amount could become due and payable to a 
bolder of limited voting shares under a deed of covenant entered into under the 
arrangements described in Section 14 below; or 

(ii) if an offer is made to ordinary shareholders of the Company to acquire the whole 
or any pan of the issued ordinary share capital of the Company and the right to 
cast more than 50 per cent, of the votes which may ordinarily be cast on a poll at 
a general meeting becomes or will become vested in the offeror and/or persons 
controlled by and/or acting in concert with the offeror. 

The shares so converted will carry the right to receive dividends and other distributions 
declared, made or paid on the ordinary share capital of the Company by reference to a 
record date on or after the conversion date and will rank pari passu in all other respects 
with the then existing fully paid ordinary shares. 

Holders of limited voting shares will be entitled to participate in any offer made by way 
of rights to ordinary shareholders as if the limited voting shares had been converted at 
the relevant record date. 

(e) VARIATION OF RIGHTS AND ALTERATION OF CAPITAL 

Subject to the provisions of the statures and as stared in paragraphs (a) and (b) above, 
the rights attached to any cfass of shares fix the time being in issue may (subject to 
their terms of issue) be varied, modified or abrogated with the consent in writing of 
the holders of not less than three-fourths in nominal value of the issued shares of that 
class or with the sanction of an extraordinary resolution passed at a separate meeting 
of the holders of shares of that class. At any such separate meeting, the provisions of 
the articles of association relating to general meetings will apply, but the necessary 
quorum at any such meeting (except an adjourned meeting at which the quorum shall 
be one person holding or representing as proxy shares of the class) will be two persons 
holding or re pres en ting as proxy at least one-third in nominal value of the issued shares 
of that class and any such person may demand a polL 

The Company may, by ordinary resolution, increase its share capital, consolidate and 
divide all or any of its shares into shares of larger amount, subdivide all or any of its 
shares into shares of smaller amount and cancel any shares not taken or agreed to be 
relw»n by any person. Any consolidation or subdivision of the ordinary shares may be 
made only if die limited voting shares are consolidated or sub-divided in like manner. 

For so long as tbc limited voting shares have not been convened, the Company is 
prohibited Grom creating any new class of equity share capital (other than under an 
employees' share scheme approved by the Company or shares carrying restricted or no 
TOtingrights and no greater rights as regards dividends or capital) or varying the rights 
of the ordinary shares drpurchasing its own shares, in any case, without the consent of 
holders of limited voting shares as a class. 

The Company may, subject to any confirmation or consent required by law, by special 
resolution reduce its share capital, any capital redemption reserve and any share 
premium account in any way. 

(0 TRANSFER OF SHARES 

An instrument of transfer of a share must be in writing in any usual or common form or 
other form approved by the Directors and must be executed by or on behalf of the 
transferor and, if the shares thereby transferred are not folly paid, by the transferee. 
Every instrument of transfer must be duly stamped. The transferor will be deemed to 
remain the holder of the shares transferred until the name of the transferee is entered 
in the register of members of the Company in respect thereof. 

The Directors may, in their absolute discretion and without assigning any reason 
therefor, refuse to register any transfer of a share (not being a folly paid share) to any 
person of whom they do not approve and any transfer of a share on which the Company 
has a lien. The Directors may also decline to register* transfer unless the instrument 
of transfer complies with the requirements of the articles of association. The articles of 
association contain no restrictions on free transferability of fully paid ordinary shares. 

The transfer of limited voting shares is restricted. Such shares may be transferred only 
(i) between existing holders thereof or (ii) under a scheme established or order made 
by the Charity Commissioners or by tbc Court to a transferee having charitable objects 
or (iii) in the course of a winding-up to an institution having charitable objects which 
prohibit distributions of Income and property to members to at least the same extent as 
the memorandum of association of the transferor or (iv) at the direction of the Crown 
to another charity having similar objects. 

The Company’s shares are in registered form and the articles of association do not 
provide for bearer shares. 

(g) UNTRACED MEMBERS 

The Company is empowered to sell, as the agent of a member, at the best price 
reasonably obtainable, any share registered in the name of a member remaining untraoed 
for twelve years who fells ro comm uni care with the Company following advertisement 
of an intention to make such a disposal. Until the Company can account to the member, 
the net proceeds of sale will be available for use in the business of die Company or for 
investment, in either case at the discretion of the Directors. The net proceeds will not 
carry interest. 

(h) DIRECTORS 

Directors' remuneration (other than the remuneration referred to in the following 
paragraphs) shall be determined from time to time by the Company In general meeting 
and, unless otherwise resolved by the shareholders, will be divided between the 
Directors as they agree or, failing agreement, equally. The current maximum aggregate 
amount of such remuneration is fixed at £250,000 per annum. 

The Directors will be entitled to be repaid all travelling, hotel and other expenses 
reasonably incurred by them in connection with the business of the Company. 

The Direct ore may gram special remuneration to any Director who renders any 
executive, special or extra services to the Company or who goes or resides abroad in 
connection with the Company’s affaire. Any special remuneration will take such form 
as the Directors determine. 

The Directors may establish and maintain or procure the participation of the Company 
in pension or superannuation or similar schemes, and may pay pensions, gratuities or 
similar allowances or benefits to persons who are or were directors, officers, or 
employees of any company in the Group, including Directors and former Directors, or 
their relatives or dependants. 

The Directors may make provision, out of profits available for distribution, for the 
benefit of any employee or framer employee of any company in the Group, in connection 
with the cessation or transfer of any part of the Group’s tindetzaking. 

The Directors shall appoint one of their number to be the senior executive officer of 
the Company and may Grom time to time appoint any of their number to any other 
executive office or any other employment or office within the Group on such terms as 
they think fit. A Director so appointed may receive such remuneration (whether by way 
of salary, commission, participation in profits or otherwise) as the Directors determine. 
Any such appointment wifi terminate automatically if the appointee ceases to be a 
Director otherwise than by resignation or by retirement by rotation at a meeting at 
which he is, or is deemed to be, reappointed Any revocation or t erm i n a tio n of such 
appointment will be without prejudice ro any claim for breach of any contract of service 
or appointment between the Director and the Company. A Director holding office 
under a contract of service will not be subject to retire m ent by rotation and will not be 
taken into account in determining the rotation of Directors. 

A Director may bold any other office or place of profit under the Company except that 
of auditor and may provide professional services to the Company, In any such case on 
such terms as to remuneration and otherwise as the Directors determine. 

Subject to the provisions of the Companies Act 1985, no Director is disqualified by his 
office from contracting with the Company either with regard to his tenure of any such 
other office or place of profit or as vendor, purchaser, or otherwise and no such contract, 
nor any contract, transaction or arrangement entered inro by or on behalf of the Company 
in which any Director or any person connected with him is in any way interested, will 


be liable to be avoided, nor will any Director so contracting or being so interested be 
liable by reason of his office to account to the Company or the members for anypronc 
or other benefits realised under any such eomract. transaction or arrangement but the 
interest of the Director shall be disclosed at a meeting of the Directors in accordance 
with Section 317 of the Companies Act 1985. 

Any Director may be interested in any capacity in or in any arrangement with a company 

in which the Company is interested and will be entitled to retain any remuneration or 
other benefits received by him by virtue of his interest in or in any arrangement with 
that other company. 

The Directors may exercise votes carried by shares in another company held or owned 
by the Company as they think fit, including such exercise in favour erf a resolution to 

appoint one or more of their number toa remunerative position in that other company. 

Save as otherwise provided in the articles of association, a Director may not vote as a 
Director on any resolution concerning a matter in which he has any material interest 
(other than by virtue of his interest in shares or debentures or other securities of or 
otherwise in or through the Company) and will not be counted In the quorum at a 
Directors’ meeting in relation to airy resolution on which be is debarred from voting. 
This prohibition will not apply, inter alia, to: 

(I) the giving of any security or indemnity to a Director In respect of money lent or 
obligations incurred by him at the request of or for the benefit of the Company or 
any of its subsidiaries; 

(Ii) the giving of any security or indemnity to a third party in respect of a debt or 
obligation of the Company or any (ff its subsidiaries for which the Director has 
assumed responsibility in whole or in pan under a guarantee or indemnity or by 
giving security; 

(iii) any proposal concerning an offer of shares or debentures or other securities of or 
by the Company or any of its subsidiaries for subscription or purchase in which 
offer the Director is to be interested as a participant in the underwriting or 
sub-underwriting thereof; 

(hr) any proposal concerning any other company in which the Director is interested 
whether as an officer or shareholder or otherwise provided that he is not the holder 
(other than as bare trustee) of or beneficially Interested in one per cent, or more 
of any riaats of die issued share capital of the company (or of any third company 
through which his interest is derived) or of the voting rights of such company-, 

(v) any proposal for a retirement or other benefits scheme which has been approved, 
or is conditional upon approval by, the Board of Inland Revenue for taxation 
purposes; 

(vi) any arrangement for the benefit of employees of the Company or any of Its 
subsidiaries under which the Director benefits in a similar manner to the 
employees and which does not accord to the Director as such any privilege or 
advamstge not generally accorded to the employees to whom the arrangement 
relates. 

The Company may, subject ro the Companies Art 1985, by ordinary resolution, suspend, 
vary or relax the provisions relating to declaration by a Director of an interest in any 
contract, transaction or arrangement or affecting a Director's right to vote and be 
counted in the quorum on resolutions in which he is interested to any extent or ratify 
any particular contract, transaction or arrangement made in contravention of those 
provisions. 

At each annual general meeting of the Company, one-quarter of the Directors (other 
than any Directors holding office under a contract of service) for the time being (or. if 
tbeir number is not a multiple of four, the number nearest to but not grearer than 
one-quarter) will retire from office by rotation. For the purpose of determining the 
number of Directors to retire by rotation, no account will be taken of Directors not 
otherwise required to retire who do so voluntarily or of Directors required to retire or 
vacate office by virtue of other provisions of the articles of association. The Directors 
to retire will be determined by seniority as provided for In the articles and will be 
eligible for re-election. 

A Directorappoimed by the Directors to fill a casual vacancy or as an additional Director 
will hold office only until the next following annual general meeting but will be eligible 
for re-election. 

A Director may be removed Grom that office by resolution approved by not less than 
three-fourths of the Directors. 

The provisions of Section 293 of the Companies Act 1985, which re lore ro the 
appointment and retirement as Directors of persons who are aged 70 or more, are not 
varied or excluded by the articles of association. 

(i) BORROWING POWERS 

The Directors may exercise all powers of the Company to borrow or raise money on 
such terms and on such security as they consider to be expedient, in particular by the 
issue of debentures or ocher securities; borrowings may be secured in any manner the 
Directors dunk expedient and in particular by mortgage, charge or lien on all or part 
of the Company’s undertaking, property, assets, present and future, and uncalled capital. 

7. DIRECTORS’ AND OTHER INTERESTS 

(a) The aggregate remuneration and benefits in kind of the 10 members of TSB Central 
Board from the Group during the year to 20th November, 1985 amounted to £472,000. 
The aggregate remuneration and benefits in kind of the 26 Directors from the Group 
during the year to 20th November, 1986. under arrangements in force at the date of this 
document, would, if they had been receivable in respect of the whole of chat year, have 
amounted to £1,095,000. 

(b) Sir John Read has an agreement with the Company, expiring on 30th September, 
1988, relating to his appointment as Chairman of the Company, under which he is 
entitled to receive £100,000 per annum ‘and the use of accommodation in London 
necessary for the performance of his duties as Chairman at the Company’s expense. 

(c) P. Chariton, L. W. G. Priestley, D. M. Stevens and D. B. Thom have sconce 
agreements with the Company, terminable by thirty-sbc months’ notice by the Company 
and by six months' notice by the Director, under which they receive annual salaries at 
the current rate of £92,000, £87,000, £62,500 and £70,000 respectively. 

(d) Save as disclosed in paragraph (c), there are no existing or proposed service 
agreements between any Director and the Company or any of its subsidiaries which are 
not determinable by the employing company without payment of compensation (other 
than statutory compensation) within one year. 

(e) Loans granted and guarantees provided by members of the Group to Directors of 
the Company at 5ih September, 1986 amounted to £294,187. 

Certain Directors have personal Tiustcards issued to them In the normal course of 
business of TSB Trustcard. The amount outstanding from Directors at 5ih September, 
1986 in respect of Trustcard balances was £5,913. 

(f) Sir Ian Fraser is a non-executive director of Lazard Brothers, which will receive a 
fee and commission in connection with the offer for sale. 

(g) Save as disclosed in paragraph (f) above, no Director has any interest in any 
transaction which isofan unusual nature, contains unusual terms or which is significant 
to the business of the Group and which was effected by the Company or its predecessor 
in title during the current or immediately preceding financial year of the Company or 
any predecessor, or during any earlier flnanrial year and which remains in any respect 
outstanding or unperformed. 

(h) None of the Direct ore has any beneficial interest in the share capital of the 
Company or any of its subsidiaries. Any Director may apply for shares under the 
offer for sale on a public application form and, if eligible, participate in the priori!}' 
arrangements for eligible customers, employees and pensioners of the Group and in 
the Free Offer. 

(i) Ail the issued and allotted ordinary shares of the Company are owned by TSB 
Central Board. Following the offer for sale and the Free Offer. TSB Central Board will 
retain such number of shares as is necessary to satisfy the potential entitlement of 
investors to receive extra shares under the loyalty bonus arrangements described in 
Section 2 of Pan XII. 

8. FREE OFFER 

On 17th July, 1986 the Company in general meeting authorised the introduction of a 
profit sharing sch em e, which has been approved by the Inland Revenue pursuant to 
Schedule 9 ro the Finance Act 1978 (as amended). The scheme, known as the TSB 
Group Staff Share Scheme, will be used wily for the purpose of the Free Offer. 
Participation under the scheme has been offered to each employee of the Group on 2nd 
June. 1986 (other than employees of TSB Channel Islands and UDT Bank) contracted to 
work at least eight hours per week. Each such employee in the employment of the 
Group on 5ih September, 1986 who had accepted the Free Offer by that will be 
allocated, free of charge. 150 folly paid ordinary shares worth £150 at the offer for sale 
price. Such shares will be held by the trustees of the scheme fra- a minimum of two ■ 
years, during which time they may not be dealt with in any way except where a 

participant reaches statutory pensionable age or a participant's employment ceases as 
a result of death, injury, disability or redundancy. For the following three years, the 
trustees will retain a participant's shares unless the participant requests them to do 
otherwise. After five years, the trustees will transfer any remaining shares into the 
participant's name as soon as practicable. While shares are held by the trustees, the 
respective participants will be the beneficial owners of the shares and will be entitled 
to receive dividends, direct the exercise of voting rights and participate in rights issues 
and capi t a l isa tion issues and certain other transactions concerning the issued ordinary 
shares in the same way as other ordinary shareholders. In the absence of voting 
directions, the trustees may not exercise the votes In respect of the shares. Separate but 
similar arrangements have been made for persons on maternity leave who return to 
employment and remain for a minimum qualifying period. 

On 1 1th August, 1986 die Company in general meeting authorised the introduction of 
a profit sharing scheme for approval by the Irish Revenue Commissioners under the . 
Finance Act 1982 of the Republic of Ireland. The scheme, ro be known as the TSB 
Group Irish Staff Share Scheme, will only be used for the purpose of extending the Free 
Offer to employees of UDT Bank, who will, following Irish Revenue approval, be 
offered participation on substantially the same terms as employees under the TSB Group 
Staff Share Scheme. Subject to the requirements of Irish law and of the Irish revenue 
authorities, the T5B Group Irish Staff Share Scheme will be the same in all material 
respects as the TSB Group Staff Share Scheme. 



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46 


THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


i 

9. material contracts 

.Save for the underwriting agreement, details of which are given in Section 15 below, 
no member of the Group has, within the two years immediately preceding the date of 
this document, entered into any contract (not being a contract entered into In the 
ordinary course of business) which is, or may be, material. 


10. PREMISES 

The Group has 2,074 properties, of which 1,260 arc freehold (or the equivalent), 138 
are on long leases and 676 are on short leases. Most of these arc branch banking 
premises. At 2 1st May, 1986 the total net book value of the Group's properties was £221 
million. Total rents paid in the year to 20th November, 1985 amounted to some £8.2 
million. 

A large proportion of the Group's properties, apart from short leaseholds considered to 
have a value of less chan £25,000, were valued az open market value in 1983 by 
independent firms of surveyors or valuers, the majority of the remai n d e r of the freehold 
and long leasehold properties having been professionally valued in 1981 and 1982 on 
the same basis. Those properties are shown in the Group's books at those valuations, 
subject to a provision of £5 million for possible future diminution in market values 
arising from adverse changes in market conditions, less subsequent depredation. Other 
properties, including subsequent acquisitions or developments, are shown at historical 
cost less depredation. 


U. APPRAISAL OF VALUE OF TSB LIFE AND TSB PENSIONS 

The following Ls a copy of the report by Tillinghast, Nelson & Warren ltd. Consulting 
Actuaries, referred to in Section 1 of Part VI above: 

Chesterfield House. 
15-19, Bloomsbury Way, 
London WC1A 2TP. 

12th September, 1986 

The Directors, 

TSB Group pic 

Dear Sirs, 

As instructed, we have appraised the values, on a going concern basis, of TSB Life 
Limited (“TSB Life") and of TSB Pensions Limited (“TSB Pensions'). 

In our appraisal we proceeded by considering the following elements of value: 

(i) existing business, being business already on the books of each company; 

(ii) shareholders' assets and other related inner reserves not reflected in the 
publ Ished balance sheets prepared under the provisions of the Companies 
Act 1985 relating to insurance companies; and 

(Hi) goodwill or “existing structure value", being each company’s proven 
ability to make profitable use of its assets as evidenced by continuing new 
business sold on profitable terms. 

In each case the values attributed are net of all taxes to be borne within each company. 

As indicated in Note 19 to the Accountants' Report in Pan IX of the listing particulars 
dared 12th September. 1986, the life insurance fund of TSB Life ceased paying 
introduction commissions ro the TSB banks from 1st October, 1983. In order 
appropriately to recognise the economic value to the TSB Group of TSB Life, our 
appraised value assumes that commissions to the TSB banks continued on the same 
basis as those paid In respect of periods up to 30th September, 1983. These commissions, 
which are slightly below the normal level for introducers of business, are an economic 
reflection or the service performed. 

The values have been calculated on the basis of a continuing relationship between the 
TSB banks and TSB Life and TSB Pensions respectively. 

No part of the value of TSB Unit Trusts Limited arising from current holdings and future 
purchases by TSB Life or TSB Pensions of units in unit trusts managed by that company 
has been included in our appraised values. 

The values appraised as at 31st March, 1986 are £181 million in respect of TSB Life and 
£U million in respect of TSB Pensions, a total of £195 million. Corresponding total 
values at 30th September, 1984 and 30th September, 1985 were £123 million and £165 
million respectively. In arriving at our value of TSB Life we have deducted half of the 
forecast dividend, payable to TSB Trust Company Limited, for the year to 30th 
September, 1986. 

These values have been computed on the same basis as chat used by us in our annual 
report to the directors of TSB Trust Company Limited. The basis, which Is consistent 
from year to year, is intended to be conservative. 

In our work we have relied on audited and unaudited information supplied to us by 
each company as at 30th September, 1985 supplemented by unaudited information 
supplied covering the period to 31st March, 1986. We have not catried out independent 
checks of the data and other information supplied to us by each company. 

Yours faithfully, 

l.C. Smart, FIA 

TILLINGHAST, NELSON & WARREN LTD 
Consultants and Actuaries 


12. LITIGATION 

The Group has been engaged in litigation during ihe last twelve months in which 
certai n depositors claimed that depositors had an interest in die assets of the TSBs. The 
House of Lords held in July 1986 that the depositors had no present or future, actual or 
contingent, right, tirle or interest to or in the assets of the TSBs beyond the right to 
repayment of their deposits and, in the case of interest bearing accounts, ro the periodic 
payment of interest thereon at the rates from time to time applicable thereto. There 
has been speculation that depositors might proceed with a petition to the European 
Commission of Human Rights in Strasbourg. The Directors have been advised that, 
even if a claim by rhe petitioners was ultimately upheld by rhe European Court of 
Human Rights, there would be no liability on rhe pan of the Group and that any such 
liability, if it were ro arise, would rest with H. M. Government. 

There are no legal or arbitration proceedi ngs pending or threatened agai nst any member 
of the Group which may have or have had, during the twelve months preceding the 
date of this document, a significant effect on the Group's financial position. 


13. Taxation of dividends 

when paying a dividend, the Company has to remit to the Inland Revenue an amount 
of advance corporation tax t "ACT" ) at a rate which is related to the basic rate of income 
tax. The ACT related to a dividend currently equals 29/7 Isis of the dividend paid. 


15. Underwriting and offer for Sale arrangements 

By an underwriting agreement dated 12th September, 1986 and made between the 
Company. TSB Central Board, the Directors and Lazard Brothers and the underwriters 
named therein (Lazard Brothers and such other underwriters being referred to below 
as The Underwriters’). Lazard Brothers has agreed to act as agent for TSB Central Board 
and the Company in making the offer for sale and the Underwriters have agreed to 
underwrite the sale of 1,050,000,000 shares under the offer for sale ('the underwritten 
shares'). The agreement is conditional, inter alia, upon the ordinary shares (other than 
the ordinary shares to be retained for tire Free Offer) being admitted to the Official List 
by oot later than dose of business on 10th November, 1986. 

Lazard Brothers (on behalf of the Underwriters) will receive a commission at the rate 
of 1.175 per cent, of the offer for sale price of the underwritten shares, out of which it 
will pay to each sub- underwriter a commission of 0.75 per cent in respect of the 
underwritten shares for which that sub-underwriter has accepted a sub-underwriting 
commitment and to each of Rowe & Pitman Ltd. and Wood Mackenzie & Co. Limited a 
commission of 0.125 per cent, in respect of the underwritten shares for which such 
broker has arranged a sub- underwriting commitment 

The costs and expenses of the application to the Council of The Stock Exchange for 
admission of the ordinary shares being offered for sale to the Offidai List and the 
ocher costs and expenses incurred in connection with the offer for sale, induding the 
commissions referred to above and the legal and ocher reasonable expenses of Lazard 
Brothers, (together with value added tax, where applicable) will be borne by the 
Company. 

The underwriting agreement also contains: 

(i) certain warranties, undertakings and hide amides by the Company, TSB Central 
Board and the Directors in relation to the offer fbrsale in favour of the Underwriters; 

(li) provisions which permit the termination of the agreemen t in certain circumstances 
prior to the announcement of the basis of al location under the offer for sale. 

In addition to the underwriting commissions described above, commissions wiH be 
paid by the Company to stockbrokers in the UK, the Channel Islands and the Isle of 
Man and recognised banks (within the meaning of the Banking Act 1979) to the extent 
char applications on public application forms bearing their stamps and their VAT 
registration number, if any, are successful, on the following basis: 

STOCKBROKERS 

(D on tbe fust £10,000 of each successful application, i4 per cent. of rhe offer for sale 
price (li per cent, in the case of Regional Co-orcfinatois), of which 4 per cent, of 
the offer for sale price will be reallowable to the intermediaries mentioned below; 

(ii) on the excess over £10,000 of each successful application, 1 per cent, of the offer 
for sale price, of which 4 per cent of the offer for sale price will be reallowable to 
the intermediaries mentioned below; 

RECOGNISED BANKS 

(0 on the R rsi £ 10.000 of each successful application, £ per cent, of the offer for sale 
price, none of which will be reallowable; 

(ii) on the excess over £ 10,000 of each successful application, ± per cent, of the offer 
for sale price, none of which will be reallowable. 

The intermediaries mentioned below will also be eligible to receive commissions at 
the reallowance rates of ± or ± per cent., as the case may be, in respect of applications 
submitted by them through a TSB bank. 

The following intermediaries within the UK, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man 
are eligible for the reallowance of such commissions: recognised hanks and licensed 
deposit takers (in each case within the meaning of the Banking Act 1979), the National 
' Girobank, solicitors, members of the Institutes of Chartered Accountants, members of 
the Chartered Association of Certified Accountants, insurance brokers registered under 
the Insurance Brokers Registration Act 1977, licensed dealers, members of rhe Financial 
Intermediaries, Managers and Brokers Association, members of the Linked Life 
Assurance Group, members of the Association of British Insurers and members of the 
Life Insurance Association. In each case, intermediaries should stamp applications, 
which roust be on behalf of others, as described above. Unless submitted through a 
TSB bank, the application must also bear the stamp of tbe stockbroker by whom 
commission will be reaiiowed. 

The right is reserved not to pay commissions in respect of applications which are 
suspected by TSB Central Board to be multiple applications. Those claiming 
commission will be required to keep records sufficient to identify the applicants and 
the numbers of shares for which applications are made. They will also be asked to 
give an assurance that all reasonable steps have been taken to eliminate multiple 
applications. The right is reserved to audit any commissions that may be payable and, 
further, for payment of commissions to any person to be withheld where T5B Central 
Board is not satisfied as to compliance with the foregoing. 

Peat, Marwick. Mitchell & Co., Chartered Accountants, have been appointed by TSB 
Central Board and the Company to oversee and co-ordinate the monitoring of share 
applications in the offer for sale. Their role will include the policing of suspected 
multiple applications and an audit of the commissions payable to stockbrokers and 
other intermediaries. 

No commission will be payable to any person who would otherwise be entitled to a 
payment of less than £50. No commission will be paid on applications made on priority 
application forms. 

16. MISCELLANEOUS 

(a) The expenses of the offer for sale, payable out of the offer for sale proceeds, which 
include advertising and marketing costs, receiving banks' and professional advisers’ 
fees and commissions payable to underwriters, sub-underwriters and stockbrokers, are 
estimated to amount to £86 million (exclusive of value added tax). These expenses 
include the total remuneration of the financial intermediaries, including underwriting 
commissions, which is estimated to amount to £18 million (exclusive of value added 
tax). 

(b) Lazard Brothers and Noble Grossart Limited will receive fees for their services In 
connection with the offer for sale which are included in the expenses of the offer for 
sale and in the total remuneration of the financial intermediaries referred to in (a) 
above. Rowe & Pitman Ltd, will receive a fee for its services in connection with the offer 
for sale, which is also included in (a) above. 

(c) The names and addresses of the Underwriters (each of which is a member of the 
Issuing Houses Association ) are as follows: 

Lazard Brothers & Co., Limited Hill Samuel & Co. Kleinwort Benson limited 

21,Moorfields, Limited 20, Fenchurch Street, 

London EC2P 2HT. 100, Wood Street, London EC3P 3DB. 

London EC2P 2AJ. 

S. G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. Noble Grossart Limited 
33, King William Street, 48, Queen Street, 

London EC4R 9 AS. Edinburgh EH2 3 NR. 

(d) The principal place of business of the Company is at 25, Milk Street, London EC2V 
8LU. 


(V) A newspaper report In July 1936 sugge^ed iha^^f 1 inter alia, 

considered^ the hSme policy of tbeTruStee Savings 

sraasaBMsag-saasss^isss 

front bench spokesman on ^reasuj ^ ukTthe TSB into public ownership. 

“S banfcwi.h otor -or.! *_• 

..dxorfdH fiHf fn nt* 3 C lost* 


17. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE F OR INSPECTION . - 

CopiesofffiefoUowingdocumentsn^be S ' 

at 16, St. Martin's-Ie-Grand, LondonEC al . jJ* ^ business houra on any weekday 
HopeStreet, Charlotte Square, Ed.nb.ugh 2 dmngwg 1 business 
(Saturdays and public holidays excepted) until 30th September, 

(a) ' tbe memorandum and articles of association of the Company and of each of the 

TSB banks; . 

(b> the 1985 Act and che relevant statutory instruments and otders made thereunder, 

* 

the Company as at 20th November, 1985 and 21st May, 1980, 
the report; 

(e) the Ieners regarding the profit forecast set out in Part X; 

(0 the letter Iron. Sir John Read .0 the Chancellor of the Exchequer dated 16th May, 
1985 referred to in Section 4 above; 

(g) the agreements between the Company and each of the TSB banks referred to in 
Section 4 above; 

(h> the agreements referred to in Section 7 above; 

(I) the trust deed of the TSB Group Staff Share Scheme and a draft, subieetio 
modification, of the TSB Group Irish Staff Share Scheme referred to in Section 8 
above; 

(J) the report by Tillinghast, Nelson & Warren Ltd set out in Section 1 1 above: 

(k) the deeds of covenant referred to in Section 14 above; 

(l) the underwriting agreement referred to in Section 15 above; 

(m-> the written consents referred to In Section 16(e) above; 



L priority arrangements for eligible customers, 
EMPLOYEES AND PENSIONERS 


Up to 750,000,000 shares, being 50 per cent, of the maximum number of shares offered 
for sale and the shares ro be retained for the Free Offer, are reserved for priority' 
applications from eligible customers who have registered for priority, employees and 
pensioners of the Group and for the Free Offer. 

Of these shares, up to 75,000.000 shares are reserved initially for priority applications 
from eligible employees and pensioners of the Group and for the Free Offer. Under 
the Free Offer, TSB Central Board is offeri ng 1 50 shares free of charge to each qua I i lying 
employee. The total number of shares to be retained for the Free Offer is 4.169,550. 

Customers of the Group who are eligible for priority number some 1,958,000. An eligible 
customer means a person who: ^ 

(a) had a cheque, deposit or service account or loan facility < Including a mortgage) 
with a TSB bank (excluding CTSB) at the close of business on 17th December, 
1984; and 

(b) had duly registered for a priority appl ication form by the close of business on 5th 
September, 1986 and remains a customer. 

The employees and pensioners of the Group who are eligible for priority number some 
32,500, being any person who, on 23rd September, 1986 is: 

(a) a full-time employee of a member of the Group (other than an employee of TSB 
Channel Islands who elects fora priority entitlement in the proposed offer for sale 

■ of shares in TSB Channel Islands); or 

(b) a part-time employee of any member of the Group (other- than as aforesaid), 
provided that he is then contracted to work for not less than 15 hours per week; 

or ....... . ... 

(c) receiving a pension under the TSB Group Pension Scheme, the TSB Group Senior 
Executive Pension Scheme, the TSB Channel Islands Pension Scheme (other than 

■ a pensioner who elects as referred to in (a) above) or, with certain exceptions, the 
UDT Group Retirement Benefits Scheme, or is receiving one of certain other types 
ofpension. 

Priority applications may be made for -a minimum of 200 shares and a maximum of 
10,000 shares. With certain limited exceptions, for example in the case of trustees, 7 
each eligible customer, employee or pensioner will be permitted to make only one 
application on a priority application form. Whatever the demand for shares, each person 
who makes a vaJidpriority appl ication will receive at least some of the shares for which 
application Is made. Each person who is eligible to apply for shares under the priority 
arrangements is being sent a personalised priority application form and may also make 
a single -application on a public application form. 

Any shares not taken up under the priority arrangements will be available to satisfy 
applications made on public application forms. Any shares not taken up alter satisfying 
all applications on public application forms will be available to satisfy excess 
applications on priority application forms. 

2. loyalty bonus arrangements 

ENTITLEMENT TO LOYALTY BONUS 

If an application for shares is successful In whole or in pan, the shareholder will be 
eligible- to receive a loyalty bonus of extra shares, free of charge, from TSB Central f 
Board. The shareholder will be entitled to receive one extra share, up to a maximum 
of 500 shares, for every ten shares continuously held from allocation under the offer for 
sale to the qualifying date, 30th September, 1989. There will be no right to receive 
fractions of shares. 

The extra shares will be transferred as soon as practicable after the qualifying date, and 
will rank pari passu in all respects with ordinary shares already held except for any 
rights attaching thereto by reference to a record date prior to the qualifying date. Any 
stamp duty on the transfer will be paid by the Company on behalf of TSB Central Board 
our of the proceeds of the offer for sale. 


For .".hart- holders resident in the UK, the ACT paid is available as a tax credit, which 
individn.il shareholders who are so resident may set off against their total income tax 
liability or, in appropriate cases, reclaim in cash. A UK resident corporate shareholder 
will not he liable to UK corporation tax on any dividend received. 

Whether shareholders who are resident in countries other than the UK are entitled to 
a payment from the Inland Revenue of any part of the tax credit in respect of dividends 
on *>hares held by them depends in general upon the provisions of any double tax 
convention or agreement which exists between such countries and the UK. Persons 
who .ire not resident in the UK should consult their own tax advisers on the possible 
applicability of such provisions, any procedure for claiming repayment and the relief 
or credit which may be claimed for such tax credit in the country in which they are 
resident. 


14. TSB FOUNDATIONS 

Each of the four TSB Foundations. TSB Foundation for England and Wales, TSB 
Foundation for Scotland. TSB Foundation for Northern Ireland and TSB Foundation for 
the Channel Islands, is a company limited by guarantee incorporated in the territory 
reflected in its name, except that TSB Foundation for the Channel Islands is 
incorporated in EngLind and Wales. Each of the TSB Foundations will be managed by 
a hojrd of directors, or ■trustees’, of whom one-quarter are appointed by the Company 

and, subject to the Company’s approval, three quarters by the TSB bank for the territory’ 
concerned. The trustees of each TSB Foundation will have discretion as to the 
application of the covenanted payments referred to below for general charitable 
purposes, principally within its territory. 

Following the offer for sale the TSB Foundations will hold I in the same proportions in 
which they receive the covenanted payments referred to below) all the Company's 
limited voting shares, which have the rights summarised in Section 6 above. 

Each of the TSB Foundations for England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland 
also holds a special rights redeemable preference share in the TSB bank in that territory. 
The rights attaching to these special shares are summarised in Section 4 above. 

By four deeds of covenant which come into force on the announcement of the basis of 
allocation under the offer for sale, the Company has covenanted with TSB Foundation 
for England and Wales, TSB Foundation for Scotland, TSB Foundation for Norrhem 
Ireland and TSB Foundation for the Channel Islands to make annual payments equal 
to 0.7212 per cent., 0.1946 percent., 0.0535 per cent, and 0.0307 per cent, respectively 
< making a total of 1 per cent.) of one-third of the aggregate pretax profits ( less pretax 
losses) of the Group for the three years ended on 31st October in the year preceding 
the vear of payment (calculated as provided in the deeds of •covenant) and subject to 
aggregate minimum annual payments totalling £200,000. Equal payments will be made 
in January. April, July and October of each year. 

Each deed of covenant will continue until whichever is the Fust to occur of rhe expiration 
of at least 9 years' notice of termination given by the Company, the date of the 
commencement of the winding-up of the Company or the date which is one year after 
conversion Of the limited voting shares into ordinary shares, if the event giving rise ro 
the conversion Is an offer to shareholders which has been successful as to at least 50 
per cent, of the voting shares in the manner described in Section 6td) above. 


(e) Deloitte Haskins & Sells have given and have not withdrawn their written consent 
to the issue of this document with the inclusion of their report and their letter and the 
references thereto and to their name in the form and context in which the same are 
included. Tillinghast, Nelson & Warren Ltd has given and has not withdrawn its written 
consent to the issue of this document with the inclusion of its report and the references 
thereto and to its name in the form and context in which the same are included. 
R. Watson & Sons have given and have not withdrawn their written consent to the issue 
of this document with the references ro their name in the form and context in which 
the same are included. 

(f) There has been no significant change in the financial or trading position of the 
Group since 21st May. 1986. 

(g) The financial information relating to the Company and its subsidiaries published 
In this document does nor constitute full accounts within the meaning of section 254( 1) 
of che Companies Act 1985. D ue to the statqs of the T5B banks and of TSB Central Board 
before the restructuring under the 1985 Act, no such full accounts for those bodies have 
been prepared or were required to be or were delivered to the Registrar of Companies. 
In respect of those companies in the Group referred to in this document which, before 
ihe restructuring under the 1985 Act, were limited companies incorporated in the UK, 
full individual or group accounts as appropriate, for each of the five relevant financial 
yean ended on or before 20th November, 1985 (or, in the case of limited companies 
incorporated in the UK which, by virtue of their dare of incorporation, have not had 
five financial years ended on or before 20ib November, 1985, their relevant financial 
years ended on or before that date), on which the auditors gave unqualified reports, 
have been delivered to the Registrar of Companies. 

(h) The Directors are of the opinion that the Group carries reasonable insurance 
cover for all major risks facing the Group which would be expected to be the subject 
of insurance cover, raking account of the feet that the capacity of the insurance market 
for certain commercial risks Is limited. 

(i) The consent of the Finance and Economics Committee of the States of Jersey has 
been obtained for the circulation of this offer for sale in Jersey. It must be distinctly 
understood that, in giving this consent, the Committee does not rake any responsibility 
for the financial soundness of any schemes or for the correctness of any statements 
made or opinions expressed with regard to them. 

( j) The Directors believe thar all members of the Group have the approvals, consents, 
licences, registrations and memberships required to conduct their businesses in their 
respective territories. In particular, TSB England & Wales, TSB Scotland, and TSB 
Northern Ireland are recognised banks under the Banking Act 1979 and appropriate 
banking authorisations have been granted in che Channel islands and the Isle of Man, 
where the Banking Act does not apply. 

(k) Qualifying full-time and part-time employees and pensioners of the Group have 
been permitted since 21st May, 1985 to open special deposit accounts and to save fixed 
monthly amounts of between £10 and £10Q, together with an optional initial lump 
sum payment of up to eight times the monthly payment if they opened such an account 
before 21st July, 1985. Funds deposited In these accounts and used to apply for shares 
in the offer for side earn a preferential rate of interest which, net of the appropriate rate 
of tax in the relevant territory, is equal to TSB base rate. 


1 sumswui ^uuiuwu us nuac on a customer priority application form in respect 
of a child under 16, a partnership (other than a Scottish partnership), club, society or 
other unincorporated body or a trust or deceased person's estate, and the name of that 
child, body, trust or estate has been duly entered in Box 7 of the application form, the 
shares allocated on that application and shares allocated on any other application made 
by the same person will be treated separately in calculating the entitlement to extra 
shares. This dso applies if a sucossful application is made on a public application form 
5“ ^ ene ^ t 16 the cMd's name has been duly entered in Box 3 

of that form) and in other crees where a successful application is made on a public 4 
application form for the benefit of a third party and an appropriate designation has been 1 
included to the form and accepted Shares allocated to persons jointly will be treated 
s^rardyfrom any other shares allocated to any of those persons alone or jointly with 

DISPOSALS OF SHARES AND LOSS OF, AND CHANGES IN, ENTITLEMENT 

on the lowest number ofshares 
Same . na ^? ) 1 &om avocation under the offer for sale to the 
mennoned below, if shares are transferred into another nathe 
or thsposed of during that period and the shareholding fells below iIS i nitial leveitS 
entitlement to extra shares will be reduced accordingly (whether or nm additiomd 
■""* ue subsequently acquired). This is sub)ea ro to Mlowtage^otS! 

(a) If a sole shareholder (Including a survivor of joint shareholders) dies, havina held 
shares continuously from allocation under the offer for sale to the date of htod25i te 
personal representatives will be entitled to extra shares in resoect of 
provided they remain registered in the nanre of the d^s?d,^^ re L^i ^ 
nama of the pejsoml represem^vcs and held by them, until tbe quS^d^ftf 
any shares so held by the deceased are transferred by his personal d 

graon entitled to tiwm under the deceased’s will of on ^ 

to be held by such transfereefe). until thequalifying rfoy “ansfer and continue 

(c) Subject to prior confirmation on behalf of TSB Central Rnarri t™ • , 
receiving bank, the Custodian Bank or to the «>™“ 

Mn5fe “ s ‘““ “ ™?w oim^Soui^Sange “to'taEl 

ownership of those shares, or to the person for whom it holds rbose<h«« ben “ idaJ 
the transferee will be entitled to extrasbares in reSeL of 5™!™ =* 25 nomme<? ’ 
are held by the first-mentioned nominee company and by any transfe ireenr''* ded f 

transferees in respect of whom such confirmation was SU£ S?S! re * 

allocation unefertheoffer for sale to the qualifyingcfett! ^ continuously from 

All tight to extra shares will be lost on failure by a shareholder m ’ , 



L 

in. 



ordinary share S^t^befc^the^ 5utHfivision rf d* Company's 
* qualifyLthel^^S 1 ^?*^^ dare, number of shares wtodTSll 

pro rata (ignoring fr£dcS> 5h f CS> ^ ** ******* 

circumstances. provision is made for adjustment in other 

Taxation 

dealnvta* 'Sn'I^S™ 6 * 8 * ^' forshar =lK> I <tera other than 
“n^shmhoIto^S^^,^ «*•<*. to d* c* of 

ssss* 

SdJ?S?S 1 nn U ^ ir I? S i “ ^ 1 esscy ’ Guernsey and the Isle of Man hare wnflm.^ ihat, 
MISCELLANEOUS 

TSB Central Board will retain such number of shares as will be necessary to sadsiy the 

maximum ag^e^ie potential entitlement to extra shares untoSltSSyboam 
““S*?*" ® described above. TSB Central Board will not exercise any voting rights 
attached to shares retained by it under these arrangements, and will waive its 
entitlement, to aU but a minimal extent, to dividends and many other distributions 

OT made * re 5 ?®* of such stares forso long 
” c eP Q ajBoard. Where any person loses his entMement to receive 

CTa stares, TSB Central Board may sell that number of shares on the open marker 

Tneumingof any suc± sale will be at the discretion c?f TSB Cemral Board in ccmsuliadon 

with the Directors. Retained shares which would otherwise represent ftarrinnai 
entitlements will be treated similarly. Alternatively, the Company may seek 
shareholders authority to repurchase from TSB Central Board some or all of such shares. 
TSB^Central Board will pay ewer the net proceeds of any snrii salt* nr rept whaw* m rh y 

INTERPRETATION 

Where the context requires, references to shares include references to entitlements 
* 10 snares represented or evidenced by letters of acceptance or interim certificates. 
References to "shareholder” mean a person who (during the renunciation period) is 
die addressee of a letter of acceptance relating to shares and thereafter is the registered 
bolder in respect thereof in the register maintained by the Custodian rtantr under the 
Instalment Agreement or in the register of members of the Company and references to 
holding shares shall be construed accordingly. Entitlements will be determined by 
reference to the register of members of the Company as at 3.00 pan. on the qualifying 

3 . INSTALMENT ARRANGEMENTS 

Since the shares are to be paid for over a period of 12 months, special provision iw« 
been made to enable purchasers to sell freely and without prejudicing the interests of 
TSB Central Board as seller. Accordingly, an agreement Hatwi 12th September, 1986 
(the Instalment Agreement) has been entered into between the Company, TSB Central 
Board and Lloyds Bank Pic as Custodian Bank to which every purchaser will also be a 
party. The expression "purchaser" means (i) a person whose application to purchase 
fh shares is accepted or (ii) a person to whom a letter of acceptance has been renounced 
in accordance with its terms and whose application for registration of renunciation is 
submitted before 3.00 p.m. on 14th November, 1986 and is registered or (iii) aft*»r 3.00 
p-m on 14di November, 1986 a person (a "Registered Holder”) who is registered by 
the Custodian Bank as the holder of interim rights (as defined below). Successful 
applicants for shares who do not renounce their lettets of acceptance before 3.00 
p.m. on 14th November, 1986 and renouncees whose applications for registration are 
submitted before 3-00 pm. on 14th November, 1986 and are registered will become 
Registered Holders. 

Set out below is a summary of the Instalment Ag reemen t. If there is any Inconsistency 
between this summary and the Instalment Agreement, the Instalment Agreement shall 
prevail. A copy of the Instalment Agreement is available for inspection as noted in 
Section 17 of Pan XI. A copy of the instalment Agreement will also be available for 
Inspection until 30th November, 1987 at the registered office of the Company, at the 
office of the Custodian Bank at Goring-by-Sea, Worthing, West Sussex BN12 6DA and 
at die offices of the Regional Co-ordinators listed in Section 5 below. A copy of the 
t Instalment Agreement may be obtained on application to the Custodian Rank at the 
above address and on payment of a reasonable fee. 

SUMMARY OF INSTALMENT AGREEMENT 

1. The stares which are the subject of the Instalment Agreement will be registered in 
the name of and retained by the Custodian Bank until the second instalment has been 
paid. Pending payment of the second instalment, purchasers will enjoy substantially 
similar rights and be subject to substantially similar obligations in relation 10 the shares 
which they have agreed to purchase as if those shares were registered in their names. 

A purchaser's rights and obligations (including the obligation to pay the second 
instalment) in relation to each share (a “related share”) are together referred to as an 
“interim right". 

2. Initially, entitlements will be evidenced by letters of acceptance. Letters of 
acceptance (or pages land 2 thereof if renunciation of a letter of acceptance has been 
submitted for registration before 3.00 p.m. on 14th November, 1986) will be valid as 
documents of title for transfer purposes until 3.00 pjn. on 15th July, 1987. Upon 
registration of any transfer of Interim rights submitted for registration up to 3-QQ p.m. 
on 15th July, 1987, the Custodian Bank will Issue to the transferee an initial interim 
certificate for his related shares. This initial interim certificate will also be valid as a 

'» document of tide for transfer purposes until 3:00 pjn. on 15th July, 1987. 

On, or soon after, 30th July, 1987 the Custodian Bank will despatch to Registered 
Holders as at 3.00 pjn. on 15th July, 1987 a combined interim certificate and call notice 
for the second instalment, which must be paid by, and for value not later than, 3-00 p jn. 
on 8th September, 1987. After 3-00 p.m. on 15th July, 1987 no transfer of interim rights 
otherwise than in favour of a Stock Exchange Nominee (as defined in the Instalment 
Agreement) will be accepted forregistration unless accompanied bya combined Interim 
certificate and call notice either duly receipted as to payment of the second instalment 
or accompanied by payment of the second instalment and, if so demanded, default 
interest if late payment is accepted. Upon registration erf any transfer of interim rights 
following payment of the second instalment which is submitted for registration before 
3.00 p.m. on 1 1th November, 1987, the Custodian Bank will issue to the transferee a 
final interim certificate for his related shares. Final interim certificates will cease to be 
valid for transfer purposes at 3-00 pan. on 11th November, 1987. Definitive share 
certificates will be despatched on, or soon after, 25th November, 1987. 

at 

“ 3. if a Registered Holder fails to pay the second instalment for any related share by, 
and for value not later than, 3.00 pmj. on 8th September, 1987, the agreement by TSB 
Central Board to sell rhairelaiedsharetothe Registered Holder may (without prejudice 
to TSB Central Board’s other rights) be avoided and the related stare sold to someone 
else as set out in the Instalment Agreement. Time oF payment by the purchaser is of the 
essence of the agreement by TSB Central Board to sell each related share. The Registered 
Holder will be paid a sum equal to the amount of the first instalment paid for that 
related share without interest, after deduction of the expenses of sale and any loss or 
damage sustained by TSB Central Board. If some only of a Registered Holder’s related 
shares are so sold, he will be entitled to a transfer of the balance. If TSB Central Board 
in its discretion accepts late payment of the second instalment, it may do soon the basis 
that the Registered Holder is liable to pay interest on the amount due for the period of 
the default, calculated on a daily basis at 2 per cent, over LIBOR for seven day deposits 
in sterling. Such rate will be determined by the Custodian Bank as set out in the 
Instalment Agreement If the amount tendered by a Registered Holder is insufficient 
to nay the second instalment in respect of all his related shares, that amount will be 
applied so that the second instalment is fully paid in respect of as many related shares 
as possible. 

I 4. Only the purchaser of an interim right is entitled to be recognised by the Company, 
TSB Central Board and the Custodian Bank as the owner of that interim right, and no 
trust need be recognised, subject to any court order to the contrary and to the provisions 
referred to in paragraph 15 below. After 3-00 p.m. on 14th November, 1986, interim 
rights must be transferred in the same way as if they were folly paid shares. No transfer 
of interim rights will be registered without delivery to the Custodian Bank of a duly 
completed and stamped instrument of transfer supported, by the relevant interim 
certificate or other temporary document of tide, which, after 3-00 pjn. on 15th July, 
1987 must be either duly receipted as to the payment of the second instalment or 
accompanied by payment of the second instalment and. If so demanded, default interest 
if late payment is accepted. 

The Custod&n Bank may call for further evidence to prove tide or the right to transfer. 
Fractions of an interim right cannot be transferred. 

5 Upon registration of a renunciation or a transfer, the renouncee or transferee will 
become the new Registered Holder of the interim rights renounced or transferred and 
a party to the Instalment Agreement and will be entitled to the rights conferred by the 
Instalment Agreement and subject to the obligations imposed thereby including the 
| obligation to pay the second instalment for the related shares 10 the exclusion of any 
predecessor in title. 

Bv applying for registration the renouncee or transferee shall be . deemed to. have 
accepted all the obligations inherent in the interim rights renounced or transferred. 
The person renderings renounced letter of acceptance orthe documents referred to in 
paragraphs above for registration shall be deemed to warrant .his authority redo so as, 
or onbehalf of. the renouncee(s) or transferee^) named therein. Folkwingregistnuaon 
of a transfer, the transferee, will receive a new interim certificate. If some only of his 
interim rightsare transferred, the transferorwill also receive a further interim oemficaie 
for the balance. 

The instalment Agreement contains further provisions dealing with the roaster of 
interim rights and the transmission of interim rights on death, bankruptcy and mental 
incapacity and prohibiting transfers to persons who are not of foU capacity or to more 
^ than four persons jointly. 

6. On, or soon after, 11th Norember, 1987 the Custodian Bank and the Company will 

arrange for Registered Holders oF interim rights to be registered, wj thorn my cost to 

the Registered Holders, as the holders of the related shares for vt-hich the second 

instalment has been paid. For this purpose holdings by the same person which are not 

separately designated may be consolidated. 


7. Provision has been made in the Instalment Agreement for Registered Holders as ar 
the relevant record date to receive the benefit of any cash dividends declared by the 
Company in respect of their related shares and certain other rights to which the 
Custodian Bank nay be entitled as holder of the shares. Cash dividends will be sent by 
cheque or warrant to Registered Holders (to the address erf the first-named in the 
register, if more than one) at their risk. The Company has agreed in the Instalment 
Agreement that it will not make any capitalisation issue (other than any capitalisation 
issue referred to in Section 1 of Part XI) or rights issue or distribute any non-cash 

■ dividend before 25th November, 1987. 

8. Provision has also been made in the Instalment Agreement for the holding of 
meetings of Registered Holders, which may be convened by the Custodian Bank, the 
Company or TSB Central Board and which must be convened by (he Custodian Bank 
upon a requisition in writing by Registered Holders who between them are registered 

as holding one -tenth or more of all the interim rights provided that It receives such 
funds, indemnity and/or security against the costs of summoning and holding the 
meeting ^ it may reasonably require. Any resolution passed at such a meeting will bind 
all Registered Holders. Rights and restrictions similar to those applicable in the case 
of meetings of shareholders of the Company apply In relation to meetings of Registered 
Holders. 

9. Registered Holders (or the first-named in the register, in tire case of joint holders) 
will receive notices of meetings of shareholders of the Company and will be enabled 
under the terms of the Instalment Agreement to attend, speak and vote at such meetings 
to the same extent and subject to the same restrictions as if they were shareholders of 
the Company. 

10. A Registered Holder whose registered address is outside the British Islands (as 
defined in the articles of association of the Company) and who wishes to receive notices 
of meetings of Registered Holders or of the Company must give the Custodian Bank an 
address within the British Islands to which such notices may be sent. 

11. Registered Holders (or the first-named in the register, in the case of joint holders) 
wiJIl receive copies of aU reports, accounts and circulars relating to the Company which 
the Company sends to its shareholders generally. Registered Holders will have the right 
to inspect tire register maintained by the Custodian Bank but will not have the right to 
obtain copies thereof. 

12. The instalment Agreement contains limitations on the liabilities and duties of the 
Custodian Rank, foe Company and TSB Central Board and provisions indemnifying the 
Custodian Bank and relieving iL from responsibility in certain circumstances. 

13. The Custodian Bank, the Company and TSB Central Beard may, if they deem it 
necessary or desirable to do so, amend the Instalment Agreement without the consent 
of the purchasers in order to cure any ambiguity, defect or manifest error or to make 
any formal, minor or technical modification or in any manner (including, without 
limitation, to facilitate dealings and/or settlement on The Stock Exchange) which 
would not in their opinion materially prejudice the interests of purchasers. 

14. Purchasers may be required to execute or furnish documents in order to comply 
with tax or other requirements in respect of their interim rights and/or the related 
shares. Except as specified in the Instalment Agreement, each purchaser is responsible 
forall taxes, duties and governmental charges and expenses which may become payable 
in respect of his interim rights or related shares. Therefore, if any of the same are paid 

' or payable in the first instance by the Custodian Bank as holder of the shares, the 
purchaser must pay the same to the Custodian Bank upon request. Failure to do so may 
result in the sale of some or all of the purchaser's interim rights or related shares. 

15. Provisions equivalent to those contained in Clause 7 of the memorandum of 
association of the Company described in outline in Section 5 of Part XI, which generally 
seek to prevent any person from being interested in more than 5 per cent, of the voting 
share capital of the Company, are incorporated in the Instalment Agreement and apply 
to interests in interim rights. Consequently, if any person believed to be interested or 
deemed to be interested in interim rights does not provide information about, or reduce 
his interests in, interim rights in accordance with chose provisions, the Registered 
Holder of those interim rights may be prevented from receiving the related stares, or 
exercising voting rights in respect of or transferring chose interim rights (otherwise 
than for the purpose of reducing his interests in accordance with those provisions) r or 
some or all of his interim rights may be sold on his behalf as set out in the Instalment 
Agreement. If interim rights are so sold, the proceeds of sale, without interest and ' 
following deduction of the costs and expenses of sale, will be paid to the former 
Registered Holder upon surrender to the Custodian Bank of the relevant interim 
certificate or other temporary document of tide in respect of the interim rights so sold. 

16. Registered Holders will receive notice of any change of Custodian Bank. 

4. AVAILABILITY OF THE LISTING PARTICULARS 

Copies of this document, which comprises the listing particulars relating to the 
Company, may be obtained from, or inspected at 

All branches in the UK, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man of the TSB bonks 
and Lloyds Bank Pic, all branches In Scotland of Bank of Scotland and all branches 
In Northern Ireland of Northern Bank limited. 

The stockbrokers to the offer for sale listed in Part IL 
The underwriters listed in Section 16(c) of Part XI. 

. . The Regional Co-ordinators listed in Section 5 below. 

The local stockbrokers listed in Section 5 below. 

The listing particulars will be published in full in the Financial Times, The 7¥mesand 
die Dotty Telegraph on Tuesday, 16th September, 1986. 

5. Maxing and settlement arrangements 

Applicants allocated shares under the offer for sale will be sent a renounceable letter 
of acceptance, which is a temporary document of title, in respect of those stares. It is 
expected that dealings on The Stock Exchange will begin on Wednesday, 8th October, 
the dealing day following that on which letters of acceptance are expected to be posted. 
Dealings in letters of acceptance will be for settlement on the next dealing day. Dealing 
instructions will be set out in the letter of acceptance. Applicants who deal before 
receipt ofa letter of acceptance wfll do so at their own risk. They must recognise 
that their application may not have been accepted to the extent they expected or at all. 

The timetable for dealing and settlement arrangements on The Stock Exchange and for 
paying the second instalment is expected to be as follows: 


SPECIAL DEALING ARRANGEMENTS 

The Regional Co-ordinators and other local stockbrokers listed below will effect Mies 
and purchases of shares or entitlements thereto on instructions given at any of theft 
offices at not more than the following races of commission until 39th September, 198& 


8th October, 1986 


Dealings commence. 


3.00p.m. on 12th November, 1986 Latest time for splitting of letters of 

' acceptance. 


3.00 pan. on 14th November, 1986 


After 3.00 pan. on 

14th November, 1986 


10th July, 1987 


After 10th July, 1987 


15rhjuly,1987 

30th July, 1987 

3rd September, 1987 
. 4th September, 1987 
3-00 p jn. on 8th September, 1987 

31th November, 1987 

25th November, 1987 


Latest time for registration of 
renunciation of letters of acceptance. 

Entitlements to stares will be 
transferable by delivery of a completed 
Instrument of transfer, together with the 
original letter of acceptance, a 
renounced letter of acceptance which 
has been receipted by the receiving bank 
or an initial interim certificate. 

Last day for dealing in ienexs of 
acceptance and initial interim 
certificates. 

Settlement of bargains will be by 
delivery of a combined interim 
certificate and call notice to pay the 
second instalment 

Record date for despatch of combined 
interim certificates and call notices to 
pay the second instalment 

Despatch of combined interim 
certificates and call notices to pay the 
second instalment commences. 

Last day for dealing partly paid. 

First day for dealing folly paid. 

Latest time for payment of second 
instalment 

Record date for despatch of definitive 
certificates. 

Despatch of- definitive certificates 
commences. 


STAMP DUTY AND STAMP D UTY RESERVE TAX 

TSB Central Board Is advised, and the Inland Revenue has confirmed, that: 

(a) no stamp duty or stamp duty reserve tax will be payable on the issue of 
renounceable letters of acceptance? 

(b) no stamp duty or stamp duty reserve tax will be payable on a transfer of such a 
letter of acceptance pursuant to an agreement entered into before the date on 
which the rule of The Stock Exchange that prohibits a person from carrying on 
business as both a broker and a jobber is abolished (expected to be 27th October, 
1986); 

(c) the purchaser of rights to shares represented by a letter of acceptance on or 
before the latest time for registration of renunciation pursuant to an agreement 
entered into on or after the date referred to in (b) above will be liable to stamp 
duty reserve rax at the rate of i per cent, of the actual consideration paid; and 

(d) - the transfer on sale of a letter oF acceptance or interim certificate after the last 

dare for registration of renunciation will be subject to ad valorem stamp duty (or, 
if an unconditional agreement to transfer such a document is not completed by 

' a duly stamped transfer within two months, stamp duty reserve tax) at the rate of 
i per cent, of the consideration paid, without regard to the liability assumed in 
respect of the second instalment. 

No stamp duty or stamp duty reserve rax will be payable on the registration of renounced 
letters of acceptance. 

Any stamp duty on the transfer of shares by the Custodian Bank 10 the persons entitled 
thereto under the Instalment Agreement will be paid by the Company on behalf of TSB 
Central Board .out of the proceeds of the offer for sale. 


SALES 

Value 

Below £300 
£300 to £424 
£425 10 £7,000 


PURCHASES 

Commission Value Commission 

1.65% Below £300 1.65% 

£7 £300 to £606 £10 

1.65% £607 to £7.000 1.65% 


WV «UU. lUAl.VW « 

plus value added tax, and, on purchases, stamp duty or stamp duty reserve tax (if 
applicable). Dealings in larger amounts will not be subject to ‘these special 
arrangements. 


REGIONAL CO-ORDINATORS 

BELFAST 

josias Cunningham & Co. 

2 Bridge Sum. 

Belfast BTl I NX. 

Tel: (0232) 246005 
BIRMINGHAM 
Albert E. Sharp & Co. 

Edmund House. 

12 New hall Street, 

Birmingham B3 3ER. 

Tel: 021 -236 5801 
Smith Keen Cutler limited 
Exchange Buildings, 

Stephenson Place, 

Birmingham B2 4NN. 

Tel: 021-643 9977 
BRISTOL 

Stock Beech & Co Lid. 

The Bristol & West Building, 

Broad Quav. 

Bristol BS14DD. 

Tel: (0272) 20051 
CARDIFF 
Lyddon & Co. 

113 Bute Street, 

Cardiff CF1 IQS. 

Tel: (0222) 480000 
EDINBURGH 

Wood Mackenzie & Co. Limit 
Kintoie House. 

74 77 Queen Street, 

Edinburgh EH2 4XS. 

Tei: 031-225 8525 


Bell Lawrie Limited 

LIVERPOOL 

PO Box 8. 

Charterhouse Tilney 

Etskine House, 

385 Set ton House. 

68 Queen Suwt. 

Exchange Buildings. 

Edinburgh EH24AE. 

Liverpool L2 3RT. 

Tel: 031-225 2566 

Tel 051-230 6600 

GLASGOW 

LONDON 

EParons&Co Ltd. 

Rowe & Pitman. 

PO BOX 113. 

Mullens & Co. Ltd. 

100 West Nile Street. 

PO Box 2-3. 

Glasgow Gl 2QU. 

l Finsbury Avenue, 

Tel: 041-332 8791 

London EC2M 2QU. 

Pennev Easton & Co Ltd 

Tel. 01 3"" 5*>9 

PO Box 112, 

MANCHESTER 

24 George Square, 

Henn Cooke, Lumsden Ltd 

Glasgow G2 1 EB. - 

PO Box 369. 

Tel. (Hi 2911 

1 King .^reet. 

lfgns 

Manchester M66 3AH. 

Suncliffe Ltd. 

Tel- 061 8.Vj 2332 

PO Bo* 

NEWCASTLE 

Town Centre House. 

Wise Speke A Co 

The Menton Centre, 

Com mere iJl Union House, 

Leeds LS2 SNA. 

39 Pilgrim Street. 

Tel: (0532) 420303 

Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 6RQ. 

r yirtA iVjt 

Tel- 091 26 1 I26t>" 

Hill Osborne & Co 

PLYMOUTH 

Permanent House. 

Wcsil.iKe & Co. 

Horsefair Street. 

Princess House, 

H Leicester LEI 5BU. 

East lake Walk. 

Tel: (05331 29185 

Plymouth PL I 1HG. 

Tel tn-52) 22 no-| 


LOCAL STOCKBROKERS 
ABERDEEN 
Home A Maddnnon 
60 Union Street, 

Aberdeen AB9 1DH. 

Tel: (0224) 640222 
William Murray 
One Albyn Terrace. 
Aberdeen AB9 1RU. 

Tel: (02241 641307 
BIRMINGHAM 
Chambers & Remington 
Canterbury House, 

85 Newhall Street. 
Birmingham B3 1LS. 

Tel: 021 236 2577 
Harris Allday Lea & Brooks 
33 Great Charles Street, 
Birmingham B3 3JN. 

Tel: 021-253 1222 
Marge tts & Addenbrooke 
York House. 

38 Great Charles Street, 
Queensway. 

Birmingham B3 3JU. 

Tel: 021 236 1365 
BLACKPOOL 
James Brearley&Sons 
PO Box 34. 

31 King Street, 

Blackpool FY1 3DQ. 

Tel: (0253) 21474 
Marsden W. Hargreave, Hale 
and Company 
PO Box 7, 

8-10 Springfield Road, 
Blackpool FY1 )QN. 

Tel: (0253) 21575 
BOURNEMOUTH 
Farley & Thompson 
Pine Grange, 

Bath Road. 

Bournemouth BH1 2NU. 

Tel: (0202) 26277 
DUNDEE 

Stirling, Hendry & Co. 

PO Box 11, 

10 Panmure Street. 

Dundee DD1 9BA. 

Tel: (0382) 26282 
EDINBURGH 
Tome & Co. 

6 Hope Street. 

Edinburgh EH24DB. 

Tel: 031-225 1766 
lalng A Ciuickshank 
Investment Ma n ag em ent 
Services Ltd 
43 Charlotte Square, 
Edinburgh EH2 4HL 
Tel: 031 225 2813 
EXETER 

Milton Mortimer & Go. 

21 Southernhay West, 

Exeter, 

Devon EX1 1PR. 

Tel: (0392) 76244 
GLASGOW 
Campbell Neill & Co 
Stock Exchange House. 

69 St. George’s Place. 

Glasgow G2 ijn. 

Tel: 04 1248 6271 
Carswell & Co. 

Stock Exchange House, 

69 Sr. George’s Place, 
Glasgow G21BU. 

Tel: 041 221 3402 
Greig. Middleton & Co. 

139 Sl Vincent Street, 
Glasgow G2 5JP. 

Tel: 04 1-221 8103 


Laing & Ciuickshank 
investment Management 
Services Ud 
De Quinary House. 

*8 West Regent Street, 
Glasgow G2 2RB. 

Tel: 04 1 333 9323 
Speirs & Jeffrey ltd. 

36 Renfield Street. 

Glasgow G2 IN A. 

Tel: 04) -248 h 31 I 
Stirling. Hendry & Co. 
Exchange House. 

16 Roral Exchange Square. 
Glasgow Gl 3AD. 

Tel: 04 1-248 6033 
GLO UCESTER 
Heseltine. Mass & Co. 

2 Beaufort Buildings. 

Spa Road. 

Gloucester GLl 1XB. 

Tel: (0452) 254+4 
GUERNSEY 
Hoare Goven (Channel 
Islands) Limited 
POBoxS. 

Hirzell House. 

Smith Street, 

St. Peter Pott, 

Guernsey. 

Channel Islands. 

Tel: (0481)26511 
HULL 

Fowler Sutton & Co. Lid. 
POBOXlO, 

35 Bishop Lane. 

Hull HUl 1NZ. 

Tel: (0482) 25750 
IPSWICH 

Charles Stanley & Co 
l6Nonhgate Street, 
Ipswich IP1 3DB. 

Tel: (0473) 210264 

JERSEY 

Hoare Gown 

(Channel Islands) Limited 

POBncl. 

35 Don Street. 

Sl Helier, 

Jersey. 

Channel Islands. 

Tel: (0534 ) 73311 
Le Masurier. James & C^inn 
PO Box 16. 

29 Broad Street, 

Si. Helier, 

Jersey. 

Channel Islands. 

Tel: (0534 ) 72825 
LEEDS 

Redmayne -Bentley 
Men on House, 

84 Albion Street, 

Leeds LSI 6AG. 

Tel: 10532) 436941 
LEICESTER 

Wilshere, Baldwin & Co. 

19 The Crescent. 

King Street, 

Leicester LEI 6RX. 

Tel: 10533) 541344 
LIVERPOOL 
Ashton Tod McLaren 
13 Castle Street, 

Liverpool L2 4SU. 

Tel: 051-236 8281 
Milnes Lumby Bustard 
Martins Building, 

4 Water Street, 

Liverpool L2 3UF. 

Tel: 051-236 9891 


Rensburg 
Si Ik house Court. 

Tulieham Street. 

Liverpool L2 2NH. 

Tel- 1151 22" 2».W 
LONDON 

Eamshow. H.u-« S Son* 
I’Tokenhoitse Y.mi. 

London EC2K "LB. 

Tel- ill -588 5W!>» 

Henry J. Gamin 41 Co. 

Bourne Huusc, 

54 Coptlull Avenue. 

London EC2R "BB. 

Tel 01 6289545 

Morgan Grenfell Securities 

Limited 

20 Finsbury Circu>>. 

London EC2M "BB. 

Tel: 01 256 62-8 

Panmure Gordon & Co. Limited 

9 Moorfields Highwjlk. 

London EC2Y9D.5. 

Tel: 01-6.48 4010 

Paul E. Schweder, Miller & Co 

46-50 Sun Street. 

London EC2M 2PX. 

Tel: 01 588 560(1 
Vivian. Gray & Co. 

Ling House. 

10-13 Dominion Street, 

London EC2M 2UX. 

TehUl 63H288H 
MANCHESTER 
Charlton Seal Dim mock & Co 
PO Box 512, 

76 Cross Street. 

Manchester M60 2EP. 

Tel: 061-832 3488 
NORTHAMPTON 
Cave & Sons 
POBox32. 

9/12 Hazelwood Road. 
Northampton NN1 1LQ. 
Tel:(06Ot> 21421 
NORWICH 
Barren & Cooke 
5C»pfe Street, 

Norwich NR] 3DW. 

Tel: (0603) 624236 
NOTTINGHAM 
William Chapman. Trease 
& Co. Ltd. 

Norwich Union House, 

South Parade, 

Nottingham NG1 2 IN. 

Tel: (0602) 476772 
SHEFFIELD 
Nicholson Barber & Co. 

PO Box 132. 

Fargate Court, 

Sheffield Sl 1LE. 

Tel: 1(17^2) 755 Hit) 

TAUNTON 
Laing & Ciuickshank 
Investment Management 
Services Ltd 
4 Mendip House, 

High Street, 

Taumon. 

Somerset TA1 3SX. 

Tel: (08231 54351 

WINCHESTER 
Cobbold Roach & Co.. 

Calpe House. 

St. Thomas Street, 

Winchester S023 8BJ. 

Tel; (0962 J 52302 
YORK 

Hanson & Co. 

4 Lendal. 

York YOl 2AD. 

Tel: 1 0904 1 22085 



A. Terms and Conditions 

(a) Acceptance of applications will be conditional upon fi) ordinary’ shares in TSB 
Group pic being admitted 10 the Official List of The Stock Exchange and listing 
becoming effective in accordance with ‘Admission of Securities to Listing" by not later 
than close of business on 10th November, 1986 and CJi) the underwriting agreement 
referred 10 in Section 15 of Pan XI of the listing paniculars relating 10 the Company 
dated 12th September, 1986 ("the listing particulars") not being terminated in 
accordance with its terms prior to notification to The Stock Exchange of the basis of 
allocation. Application moneys wilJ be returned (without interest) if either of these 
conditions is not satisfied and. in the meantime, if presented for payment, will be kept 
by a receiving bank in a separate account. The right is reserved to present all cheques 
and bankers’ drafts for payment on receipt bya receiving bank. 

(b) Save where the context otherwise requires, terms defined in the listing paniculars 
bear the same meaning when used herein or in the application forms. 

(c) References (i) to rights being effectively renounced mean the renouncee(s) being 
registered by a receiving bank in relation to the rights concerned and (ii) to rights 
being effectively transferred mean the transfer eels) being registered in the register 
maintained by the Custodian Bank under the Instalment Agreement, 

(d ) By completing and delivering an application form, you: 

(i) offer to purchase the number of shares specified in your application form (or 
such smaller number for which your application is accepted) on the terms of and 
subject to the conditions set out in the listing particulars, including these terms 
and conditions, the notes or guide accompanying the application form and die 
Instalment Agreement (and, in due course, subject to the memorandum and 
articles of association of the Company) and agree to become a party to and be 
bound by all the provisions of the Instalment Agreement; 

(ii) agree that, in' consideration of TSB Central Board agreeing that it will not, prior 
to 10th November, 1986, sell any of the ordinary shares being offered for sale to 
any person other than by means of the procedures referred to in the listing 
particulars, your application may not be revoked until after 10th November, 1986 
and that tills paragraph stall constitute a collateral contract between you and 
TSB Central Board which will become binding upon despatch by post to or, in 
the case of delivery by hand, on receipt by a receiving bank or TSB bank branch 
of your application form-, 

(iii) warrant that the remittance accompanying your application form will be 
honoured on first presentation; 


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(iv) agree i hat, in rcspea of those shares for which your application has been reoenred 
and is not rejected, acceptance of your application shall be constituted, at the 
election of TSB Central Board, either (a) by notification to .Hus Stock Exchange 
of the basis of allocation (in which case acceptances shall be on that basis) or 
(b) by notification of acceptance thereof to the relevant receiving hank ; 

(v) agree that any letter of acceptance and any money returnable to you may be 
retained by a receiving bank pending clearance of your remittance-, 

(vi) authorise the relevant receiving bank or the Custodian Bank (as the case may 
be) to send on behalf of TSB Central Board a letter of acceptance for the number 
of shares for which your application is accepted and/ora crossed cheque for any 
money returnable by post to the address of the person (or the first-named person) 
named In the application form and to procure that your name (and the name(s) 
of any other joint applicants)) is/are placed on the register maintained by the 
Custodian Bank under the Instalment Agreement in respect of such shares the 
right to which has not been effectively renounced in accordance with the terms 
of the Instalment Agreement, and, thereafter, to procure that your name (and the 
namefs) of any other joint applicant (s)) is/are placed on the register of members 
of the Company in respect of such shares, the entitlement to which is then 
evidenced by interim certificates and the right to which has not been effectively 
transferred; 

(vii) agree that time of payment by you shall be of the essence of the contract 
constituted by acceptance of your application-, 

(viii) agree to pay or procure to be paid by, and for value not later than, 3.00 pun. on 
Sih September. 1987, the second instalment of 50p per share payable in respect 
of those shares for which your application is accepted and the right to which has 
not been effectively renounced or transferred by you prior to that time; 

(ix) warrant that, if your application is made on a priority application form, you are 
an eligible customer, employee or pensioner (as the case may be) of the Group 
and that your application is made solely for the benefit of the applicant(s) named 
therein, or. in the case of a customer priority application form, if applicable, for 
the benefit of the person, body, trust or estate designated in Box A on that form; 

(x) warrant that not more rhan one application has been made by you (or on your 
behalf) and for your benefit on a public application form; 

(xi) warrant that, if you sign the application form on behalf of somebody else or on 
behalf of a corporation, you have due authority to do so; 

(xii) agree that failure to pay or procure the payment of the second instalment as 
provided in sub-paragraph (viii) and/or a breach of any of the warranties set out 
in sub -paragraphs (iii), (ix), t'x) and (xi) will constitute a breach of a fundamental 
term and repudiation of the contract constituted by acceptance of your 
application and TSB Central Board will be entitled ( bur not bound) to treat itself 
as discharged from its obligations under the contract; 

(xiii) agree that all documents in connection with the loyalty bonus arrangements may 
he sent by post to the person (or the first-named person) named as an applicant 
in the application form to the address of such person for first-named person) set 
out [herein or to such other address as may from time to time appear in the 
register of members of the Company against the name of such person(s); 

(jtiv) agree that all applications, acceptances of applications and contracts resulting 
therefrom under this offer for sale shall be governed by and construed in 
accordance with English law; 

(xv) agree that, having had the opportunity to read the listing particulars, you shall 
be deemed to have notice of all information and representations in relation to 
the Company and the Group contained therein; and 

(xvi) confirm that in making your application you are not relying on any information 
or representations in relation to the Company or the Group other than such as 
may be contained In the listing particulars os in the mini prospectus taken 
together with the listing particulars and, accordingly, you agree that no person 
shall have any liability for any such other information or representations (other 
than as aforesaid). 

(e) The Instalment Agreement provides that any contract made by acceptance 
(whether in whole or in pan) of any application shall constitute a separate contract for 
the purchase of each of the shares agreed to be sold, and these terms and conditions 
shall be construed accordingly. 

(0 The basis of allocation will be determined by TSB Central Board in consultation 
with Lazard Brothers. The right is reserved, notwithstanding the basis so determined, 
to reject in whole or in pan and/or to scale down any application and, in particular, 
multiple or suspected multiple applications. Any application which (alone or together 
with any other application made or believed to. be made by or on behalf of the same 
applicant or another person associated with him) is for more than five per cent, of the 
ordinary shares in issue following the offer for sale will be rejected to the extent it 
(either alone or together with any other such application) exceeds that percentage and 
may also be scaled down thereafter. TSB Central Board reserves the right to treat as 
valid any application not in all respects completed in accordance with the instructions 
accompanying the relevant application form. 


(g) No person receiving a copy of die listing particulars or the mini prospectus or an 

application form in any territory other than the UK, the Channel Islands or the Isle of 
Man may treat the same as constituting an Invitation or offer to him, nor should be in 
any event use such form unless, in the relevant territory, such an invitation or offer could 
lawfully be made to him or such form could lawfully be used without contravention of 
any registration or other requirement. It is the responsibility of any person outside the 
UK, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man wishing to make an application hereunder 
to satisfy himself as to lull observance of the laws of any relevant territory in connection 
therewith, including obtaining any requisite governmental or other consents, observing 
any ocher requisite formalities, and paying any Issue, transferor other taxes due In such 
territory. 

(h) The ordinary shares have not been, and will not be, registered under the United 
States Securities Act of 1933, as amended. Accordingly, such shares may not be offered, 
sold, renounced or transferred, directly or Indirectly, in the United States or to, or for 
the benefit of, any U.S. person or to any person purchasing such shares for re-offer, sale, 
renunciation or transfer in the United States or to, or for the benefit of, any U-S. person 
as part of the distribution of such shares. For this purpose, “U-S- person” means any 
national, citizen or resident of the United States or the estate or trust of any such person, 
any corporation, partnership or other entity created or organised In or under the laws 
of the United Stares, or any political sub-division thereof, and any United States branch 
of a nan-U.S. person and 'United States” means the United States of America, Its 
territories and possessions and ail other areas subject to Its jurisdiction. 

(1) All documents and cheques sent by post by or on behalf ofTSB Central Board, the 
Company or the Custodian Bank will be seat at the risk of the person entitled thereto. 


B. Application, Dealing and Instalment Arrangements 

If you wish to apply for shares, you must complete and return an application form in 
accordance with the Instructions accompanying the form. 

* Only one application can be made by you (or on your behalf) and for your benefit on 
a public application form. Criminal proceedings may be instituted if more than one 
such application is made. Multiple applications or suspected multiple applications are 
liable to be rejected. Photocopies of application forms will not be accepted In any 
circumstances. 

Your application will be made on the Terms and Conditions set out in this Part and on 
the terms of the Instalment Agreement summarised In Section 3 of Pan XII and, once 
delivered, cannot be withdrawn. The basis of allocation of shares will be announced 
on or as soon as possible after 29th September, 1986. If there has been heavy demand 
for shares, you may not receive all or (except in the case of a valid priority application) 
any of the shares for which you have applied. 

If your application is successful, in whole or in part, you will be sent a renounceable 
document called a letter of acceptance on, or as soon as possible after, 7th October, 
1986 which will tell you the number of shares allocated to you. If you are unsuccessful 
or are allocated only some of the shares for which you have applied, any unused money 
paid by you on application will be returned (withouc interest). 

It is expected that dealings on The Stock Exchange will begin on the dealing day after 
letters of acceptance are posted to successful applicants. If yon deal before you receive 
a letter of acceptance, this will be at your own risk. You must recognise the risk that your 
application may not have been accepted to the extent expected or at all. Instructions fix 
deeding will be printed on your letter of acceptance. 

If you wish to keep the shares allocated to you, you need not do anything until you 
have to pay the second instalment, due not later than 3.00 pjn. on 8th September, 1987. 
You will be reminded about the second instalment before It becomes payable. 

Under the Instalment Agreement, shares sold under the offer fix sale will be registered 
in the name of the Custodian Bank until they have been fully paid for. However, the 
Instalment Agreement is designed to confer upon you or any subsequent purchaser of 
shares substantially the same tights and privileges (and to impose substantially the same 
obligations, restrictions and limitations) as are conferred or imposed on shareholders of 
the Company. In particular, you will be entitled to receive dividends and vote at 
meetings. 

If you do not pay the second instalment in respect of any share, you could lose your 
right to that share and to all extra shares under the loyalty bonus arrangements. In that 
case, you will be repaid a sum equal to the amount of the first Instalment, without 
interest, less any loss (including expenses) which TSB Central Board may have suffered 
as a result of your failure to pay. TSB Central Board may instead accept late payment of 
the second Instalment and is entitled to demand interest on the overdue amount. 

A final share certificate will be sent to you after payment of the second instalment. 



SEND YOUR COMPLETED 


APPLICATION FORM BY POST 


TO ARRIVE NOT LATER THAN 
10 .00 AJL ON WEDNESDAY, 24™ 

TO TOT APPROPRIATE address immediately 

according to the first letters of your s ur " am ‘ : 
(^corporate name) inserted by you to Box 3. , 

For example. If yonr surname te Jones, 
you should send It to Lloyds Bank pic (G *°J). 


AtoCg 

Bank of Scotland 
New Issues Department, 
Apex House, 

9 Haddington Place, 
Edinburgh EH7 4AL. 


ChtoF 

Barclays Bank PLC 

New Issues. 

p.a Box 123, Fleetway House. 
25 Farri ogdon Street, 

London EC4A 4 HD. 



* 


G to J 

Lloyds Bank Pic 

Registrar's Department, 
Goring-by-Sea, 

Worthing, 

West Sussex BN12 6DA- 


KtoM 

Midland Bank pic 
Stock Exchange Services Department, 
Mariner House, 
pepys Street, 

London EC3N 4DA. 


N to SI SktoZ , ■ , 

National Westminster Bank PLC The Royal Bank of Scotland pic 

New Issues Department, Reg^rar's 

P.O- Box 79, 2 Princes Street, P.O. Box *85, 34 Taxes Row, 

London EC2P 2BD. Edinburgh EH3 oUZ. 

PLEASE USE FIRST CLASS POST AND ALLOW 
AT LEAST TWO DAYS FOR DELIVE RY. 

OR TAKE IT BY HAND TO ARRIVE NOT LATER 
THAN 10.00 A.M. ON WEDNESDAY, 24TH SEPTEMBER, 1986 
according to the first letters of your surname 
(or corporate name) inserted by you in Box 3 to: 

Ch toF 

Barclays Bank PLC 
New Issues, 

Fleetway House. 

25 Farringckm Street, 

London EC4. 

KtoM 

Midland Bank pic 
Stock Exchange Services Department, 
Mariner House, 

Pepys Street, 

London EC3- 


A to Cg 
Bank of Scotland 
38 T hr ea dn eedle Street, 
London EC2. 


G to J 

Lloyds Bank Pic 

Registrar’s Department, 

Issue Section, 

II Bishopsgate, 

London EG2. 

NtoSJ 

National Westminster Bank PLC 

New Issues Deportment, 

2 Princes Street, 

London EC2. 


SktoZ 

The Royal Bank of Scotland pic 

New Issues Department. 

24 Lombard Street, 

London EC3- 


or to any of: 


Bank of Scotland 
New Issues Department, 

Apex House, 

9 Haddington Place, 
E dinb urgh 7 

TSB En g land & Wales pic 
62 Lombard Street, 

London EC3- 


The Royal Bank of Scotland pic 

Registrar's Deportment, 

34 Fetus Row, 

Edinburgh 3. 


TSB Scotland pic 

- 28 Hanover Street, 

Edinburgh 2. 

OR TAKE IT BY HAND TO ARRIVE NOT LATER 
THAN CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON TUESDAY, 23RD SEPTEMBER, 1986 

to any TSB branch. 





4- 


> 





: • j- ■ « 




YOU MAY APPLY ONLY ONCE ON A PUBLIC APPLICATION FORM 




Fill in (in figures) the number of shares for which yon wish to apply. 

Your application must be for a minimum of 400 shares or for one of the other 
numbers of shares indicated In the table below. 

Applications for any other nnmber of shares will be rejected. 


Number of 
shares 

Amount 

now 
payable 
(50p per 
share) 

Second 

instalment 

(50pper 

share) 

Your total 
investment 
(loop per 
* share) 

Number of 
shares 

Amount 

now 
payable 
(50p per 
share) 

Second 

instalment 

(50pper 

share) 

Your total 
investment 
(loop per 
share) 

m00 

£200 

£200 

£400 

4,000 

£2,000 

£2,000 

£4.000 

600 

£300 

£300 

£600 

4.500 

£2^50 

£2.250 

£4,500 

800 

£400 

£400 

£800 

5,000 

£2,500 

£2,500 

£5,000 

1.000 

£500 

£500 

£1,000 

6,000 

£3,000 

£3,000 

£6,000 

1.500 

£750 

£750 

£1,500 

7,000 

£3,500 

£3,500 

£7,000 

2.000 

£1,000 

£1,000 

£2,000 

8,000 

£4,000 

£4,000 

£8,000 

2.500 

£1,250 

£1.250 

£2,500 

9,000 

£4,500 

£4.500 

£9.000 

3.000 

£1,500 

£1,500 

£3,000 

10,000 

£5,000 

£5.000 

£10,000 

3,500 

£1.750 

£1.750 

£3.500 



An application for more than 10,000 shares up to 100,000 shares must be for a multiple of 5,000 
shares and an application for more than 100,000 shares must be for a multiple of 50,000 shares. 


Fill In (In figures) the amount now payable at 50p per share. The table above 
/ 1 shows the amount now payable for applications for up to 10,000 shares. 

* The second instalment is payable by 3.00 p.m. on 8th September, 1987. You 

will be reminded about the second instalment before it becomes payable. 

s-m j Fill In (In block capitals) the full name and address of the person applying 
1 for shares. 

1 If this application is being made jointly with other persons, please read 
Note 6 before completing Box 3. 

Applications must not be made by children under 16. A parent may apply for 
the benefit of his/her child under 16 by inserting after the parent’s surname in Box 
3 the word "for' followed by the full names of the child. A parent who makes such 
an application is not thereby precluded from making a single application on a Public 
Application Form For his/her own benefit. 



The applicant named In Box 3 most date and sign Box 4. 

The Application Form may be signed by another person on your behalf if that 
person is duly authorised to do so under a power of attorney. The power of attorney 
must be enclosed for inspection. 

A corporation should sign under the hand of a duly authorised official, whose 
representative capacity must be stated. 


Warning: 

The right is reserved to reject multiple or suspected multiple applications. 
Criminal proceedings may be instituted if more than one application is 
made by you (or on vour behalf) and for your benefit on a Public Application Form. 


a 


Pin a cheque or bankers’ draft for the exact amount shown In Box 2 to your 
completed Application Form. Your cheque or bankers* draft must be made 
payable to “TSB Share Offer” and crossed “Not Negotiable”. 

Your payment must relate solely to this application. No receipt will be issued. 

Your cheque or bankers’ draft must be drawn in sterling on an account at a 
bank branch in the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man and must 
bear a United Kingdom bank son code number in the top right hand comer. If you 
do not have a cheque account, you can obtain a cheque from your building society 
or bank branch. 


An application may be accompanied by a cheque drawn by someone other 
than the applicants), but any moneys returned will be sene by cheque crossed “Not 
Negotiable" in favour of the applicant^). 

| - •• • 

You ma y apply jointly with up to three other persons provided each 
applicant 2 s 16 or over. Boxes 3 and 4 must be completed by one applicant. 

All other persons who wish to Join in the application most complete and 

sign Box 6. 

Another person may sign on behalf of any joint applicant if that other person 
is duly authorised to do so under a power of attorney. The power of attorney must be 
enclosed for inspection. 

Letters of acceptance, cheques and other correspondence will be sent to the 
address in Box 3. 


t 



H 


GROUP 







TSB bank customers who registered for priority by 5 th September, 1986 are eligible to apply on a pink 

Customer Priority Application Form. 


I/We offer to purchase 


ShNotx 1 

ordinary shares 



in TSB Group pic at lOOp per share on and subject to the Terms and Conditions set out 
in the Prospectus dated 12th September, 1986 

and I/we attach a cheque 
or bankers' draft for the 
amount now payable of 

AuaUaBuciOwt 


S« Non 2 


Mi Mk Mbs o* Title 

Subname 


FORBUMEp) (IN HU) 


See Note 3 


ADDJUSS(JNHJU) 



Postcode 


I/We hereby declare that this is the only application for shares made by me/us (or on 
my/our behalf) and for my/our benefit on a Public Application Form. 


Dated 


September, 1986 


SMawTvm 


So Note 4 



rwomcuiw 

Only 

L ACCmWKENO. 


ii. SHAMES ACCEPTED 



t. Amount retokned 


YL Cheqceno. 


□ Pin here your cheque/bankers’ draft for the exact amount shown in Box 2 

MADE PAYABLE TO “TSB SHARE OFFER" AND CROSSED ‘NOT NEGOTIABLE" 





PitASL Use Bcock Cawta is 
Mk Mm Mas o* Title 


Foknaneisi (nrai) 
Subnam 


Adobes (in ru) 


Postcode 


Signature 


M* Mm Miss o* Title 

Fo*HtAME(Si (n nni) 


Adobes cm had 


Siaunns 


Postcode 


Mb Mhs MmosTmi 


Pmenamb(s> rm fuu.) 
SUBNAMS 


M. ijfj M 


ADDH5S (IN TOLL) 


Skhstoe 


Postcode 


Fbc Official Use Only. Stockbrokers, banks or intermediaries claiming commission or reallowance commission should sramn ho*, 

aoolicahle to them fr-rti m n i*S nfPm yt « ,h. P UUUI °oxes 


stamp OF IS BUNCH tract CH WHICH 
APPUCATTW B LODGED 0B STOCKBROKER OB 
BANC OAD4INC COMMISSION AND VAT 
KECJ5TBA310N NUMBER 

STAMC Of BANK OR OTHER HTHMSOUKr 
aAUflNG REAIUfKNKX OF COMMUSON AND 
VATKBaSJBATKM NUMBER 

fir NOTE! OTTERED FOB vaV. PUT -NOWD 

(ir NornsemED for vat. pot ■nohbi 

Acceptance no. 

Shakes accepted 



COMMISSIONS CALCULATED 


SOW OF m BRANCH THROUGH WHICH 
APPUCmON SUttGEDORSlOCmOKBtOR 

HANK CLUIBM5 COMMISSION AM) VAT 
BEQSTIUTONMJHIER 

STAMP OF BANK OK OTHE1 WTWSDMv 
OADIJNC REAHOWamcB OF OuEaffittn 
■vATia»nTwnQ»NSnra 

(IF NOT HKKTOSIFOK W. IOT TtOKE*» 

f? NOT RSGOTEJKD K* v*r. PUT 

agcepeanceno. ‘ 

^accepted ^ 2 “ 



*^QMMB5IOnS CALCULATED 



Conn 





Sv,-. 


s ^ '♦ 1 


•r . .■ 


- 'C 












A . 


v : r A 


■* ^ 


% 




THE liMBS TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 




r 


Freshfields are looking for able and vigorous 
young lawyers tojoin their busy and expanding 
Property Department. ' 

. The work involves a substantial amount of 
high level commercial conveyancing and rails for 
considerable client responsibility at an early stage. 

There are very good career prospects for 
" people of ability and drive who are looking for 
the sort of work that will make demands on both. 

Applicants, who should be graduates and 
able to demonstrate a successful academic record 
should wntCj in the first instance, to David Ranee 
at Freshfields, Grindall House, 25 Newgate Street, 
London EC1A7LH. 


PROPERTY 


PARTNERSHIP 


sfondk am ££§= 


o 


Major practice, located City, wants to satisfy experienced 
solicitors or partners whose potential and amhiHnn axe frustrated. 
The posts are open to solicitors aged under 40 years with excellent 
technical skills who feel ' able to contribute to the practice's 
substantial, planned growth. Solicitors earning £25-45.000 who can 
Justify a substantial Increase in rewards should contact Ashley 
Balls at Reuter Sfrnkln todiscuss the appointment In detail. ' 

All conversations will be treated In the strictest confidence and no 
disclosure will be made to our client without specific consent 

To dtocnw your career In the context of thf» advert is e m ent 
contact Ashley Balls, Director. Renter Shnkm Limited 
26-28 Bedford Row London WC1R4HE. TeLOl-405 6852 


REUTER SIMKIN 


LONDON • LEEDS • WINCHESTER 

IXBCftOITMBVT AMD MANAGEMENT CONSULTS NTCMI 


' - T *. _ 


Commercially-minded, young 


for international commerce 
from j£20,000+car 


This outstanding career opportunity will 
appeal to a business-oriented solicitor who 
seeks challenge, autonomy and 
responsibiliiy in a dynamic, intern at ional 
environment. It arises within the European 

headquarters of one of the world’s largest 

private corporations whose interests are 
diverse and whose growth record is 
spectacular. 

As deputy to ihe Head of the Legal 
Department — and after induction training 
in me USA and Switzerland 
you will be a key member of the 
corporate team and will be 
involved in a broad spectrum of 
commercial matters with a 



strongfymtenmtionalbias. 

Tb qualify, you must have an - - 
outstanding academic record with at least 

qna^rommcrdalpractia^^S^Lnihe . 
City. Sdfmotivatea ■ with above-average 
communicat ion skills, you have the self- 
confidence and marunty to work effectively 

at all levels in the organisation. 

The salary will be geared to attract ] 
calibre candidates and w3Lbe supported! 
excellent benefits. 


Please rad fuHcv, in confidence, 

-to A4A Stoddard, - 

Ref; PF57/10Z3/TT. 


PA Personnel Services 


■ ■ Sslertimt ■ Psvcfwmancs ■Rammemtion &FlxsomudGmsuhamy - — 

Hyde Park House, 60a Knigfatsbridge, London SW1X 7LE. 

Tel: 01-235 6060 Telex: 27874 


Third Man 


Aged around 30 


Initially c ; £30 ,000 


-o 

Mv client is an unusual 2-man professional jtiartnexship which . .. 
advises an important and international clientele on commercial 
law. The present partners have the unique advantage of youth as- - 
thev are both under 35 and a flexible yet commercially 
pragmatic approach which their size and philosophy allows. As " 
they are now popular and profitable they seek a potential third 
partner, a qualified solicitor who- will combine City skills, an 
international approach, strengths in commercial work and 
possibly, although not essentially, experience in litigation. 
Personality will be very important. The attraction will be the 
idea of working as part of a small and livdy team . 

Male and female candidates should apply in confidence, with 

foil written details, quoting reference 2155 to Mrs I. Brown, 
Corporate Resourcing Group Limited, 6 Westminster Palace 
Gardens, Artillery Row, London SW1P 1RL. 

Corporate Resourcing Group 

Management Consultants * Executive Search 

Pan of Bemdtson International 

BRUSSELS ■ COPENHAGEN ■ FRANKFURT ■ GENEVA ■ LONDON • MADRID -MILAN - NEW YORK • PARIS 


Waltons & Morse 

COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 


Waltons & Morse, a 21 -partner City firm, seek 
a solicitor for their commercial property de- 
partment The work is demanding and diverse 
and involves the acquisition, development and 
letting of substantial schemes. 

A good salary and prospects are offered to a 
successful applicant with a good academic 
background and preferably two years’ first 
class experience. Will applicants please send 
their C.V. to the Partnership Secretary. 


Waltons & Morse 
Plantation House, 

31-35 Fenchurch Street, 
London, EC3M 3NN 


Telephone: 01-623 4255 
Telex: 884209 WALTON G 
Fax: 01-626 4153 


British Steel Corporation 


COMMERCIAL 

LAWYER 

We seek a young commercial lawyer to join our well-established 
Legal Department in London. 

This challenging post offers the opportunity to gain extensive 
professional experience with a demanding workload covering all 
aspects of commercial and company matters with some 
international content Some travel will be required. 

The successful candidate will be a barrister or solicitor with one to 
five years' relevant experience in either private practice or in a 
company legal department 

Salary wifi be commensurate with age and experience and 
supported by a range of large-company benefits. 

Please send full details of qualifications, career and current salary 
to Miss E M ChaJlier, Senior Personnd Officer, British Seel 
Corporation, 9 Albert Embankment London SE1 7SN. 


STEPHENS & SCOWN 

ARE YOU ORDER THE ILLUSION THAT A MEAHIKFQL CAREER 
CAR ONLY BE PERSBED M A MAJOR CENTRE? 

Before yon commit yourself why rat think of an environment where commuting can be minimal, 
housing costs are resooable. local education is excellent and the working environment is pleasant 

We, at one of the hading firms in the west country with offices in St Austell. Exeter. Looe, Torquay 
and Truro, are committed to further major expansion in this area. We have recently appointed a 
partnership administrator and are persuing a significant development programme for our staff. As 
part -of Dm we are offering a lumber of exciting opportunities to applicants at the right caibre. 

Openings exist at ail our offices in the following fieids:- 

1. (M Litigation at both SL Austen and Exeter. 

— 2. Commercial and/or Agricultural Law at Exeter. 

3. Matrimonial at Exeter. 

4. Articled clerks at all offices. 

For the right applicants career propects are good (Over the last 20 years there has been a net gem of 
14 partners in the Arm) in the meantime we pay first class salaries. 

Why not make further enquires? 

Please apply in writing tax 

Mr D L Denton, 

Partnership Administrator, 

Stephens & Scown, 

3 Cross Lane, SL AustelL PL25 4AX 
Telephone 0726-74433. 


If-- - • - 

HAMPSHIRE MAGISTRATES’ 
COURTS COMMITTEE 

CLERK TO THE COMMITTEE 

£27,105 - £29,958 

Applications are invited for ibis newly-created past which will come 
into being on 1 April 1987. Hampshire, with nearly 900 Magistrates and 
eighteen PSDs. is grouped under seven Justices’ Clerks. The Clerk to the 
Committee, with the assistance of five staff; jvill be the Committee's 
Professional Adviser responsible for the adminstration of all Committee 
business including Finance, Premises, Personnel, Computer Develop- 
ment and the Training of Magistrates and Staff 

The Committee seeks a full-time officer, professionally qualified, with 
not less than five years experience as a Justices' Clerk. Re-organisation 
of die administration of Magistrates’ Courts is in progress, as is 
Computerisation and the creation of a Professionally Qualified Court 
Service. Applicants should be able to plan, direct and control an effec- 
tive and emrioit Magistrates’ Courts Service in the County. 

Relocation expenses up to £3,000 phis removal and disturbance allow- 
ances are payable. Closing date for applications is 8 October 1986 and 
interviews will be held on 28 and/or 29 October. The job Description 
and -further details are available from; 

The Deputy Clerk, Hampshire Magistrates’ Courts Committee 
The Law Courts, Winston Churchill Avenue, 
Portsmouth, Hants, POl 2DQ 
Telephone (0705) 864914 


MERTON MAGISTRATES COURTS COMMITTEE 
WIMBLEDON MAGISTRATES COURT 
TRAINEE COURT CLERK 

(Salary nptn £7,848 inc. for professionally qualified applicants) 

Applications are invited from Barristers, Solicitors or those who have passed the 
appropriate professional examinations, wishing toperene a career in tire magiste- 
rial service and who are willing io undertake a wide range of duties in 2 justices 
derks office. 

The person appointed MU be based at Wimbledon i 
looking and professional team. Commencing salary will be 
qualifications and experience. The appointment will be supenmimaUe i 
to the JNC conditions of service fix' magistrates court staff 


subject 


Application forms may be obtained from the address below and should be re- 
lumed to the undersigned by the 26th September 1986. 

E. Pucker 

Clerk to the Committee 
Kings House 
1A Kings Road 
London SW19 8LW 

Telephone 01-543 4145 


Secretary 
and Legal Advisor 

Beecham Research International is an operating unit of the 
International Division of Beecham Pharmaceuticals engaged in the 
manufacture and marketing of ethical pharmaceuticals in Asia, Africa 
and certain other territories. 

Based in Brentford, the International Division Secretariat provides 
legal, secretarial and some administrative support services to BRI's 
operations. 

In this key appointment which requires some overseas travel, you will 
have wide-ranging responsibilities Including negotiating and drafting 
commercial agreements, providing a general advisory service, 
liaising on trademark, patent and insurance matters, and servicing 
committees. 

A solicitor or barrister with several years' relevant experience gained 
preferably, but not essentially, in the pharmaceutical or an allied 
industry, you should possess the personality and stature to establish 
your credibility quickly and play a valuable role in our success. You 
should be used to working in a multidisciplinary team and your ability 
to analyse problems and provide dear, constructive and practical 
guidance is more important than encyclopaedic legal knowledge. 

' We wiD provide an attractive salary and benefits package including 
car and nan-contributory pension. 

Please write with full personal, salary and career details and 
indicating how you can meet these requirements to the Personnel 
Controller. International Division, Beecham Pharmaceuticals, 
Beecham House, Great West Road, Brentford, Middlesex TW8 9BD. 

Beecham 

Pharmaceuticals 




Philip Morris has been established in Lausanne since 1964 and curreotiy employs 
approximately MM) people. Our Regional Headquarters, covering mainly the 
rigarew business Tor die EEC Region, is looking for a 

LAWYER 

10 provide legal services in the field of trademarks and other areas of law. 

Reporting 10 a senior attorney in the Legal department, his main r es ponsib il ities 
will consul ot 


- assisting in legal activities, particularly in tbc area of trademark 
infringements; 

. coordinating trademark application and opposition activities with other units 
of the Philip Morris Group; 

- pmidpuing in our trademark clearance process far new brand 
development; 

- handling marten of a non -trademark nature. 

Aged between 25-40, our ideal can didate has a Law Degree 2 nd at lease 2-3 years' 
experience in dealing with legal matters. Previous exposure to trademark law and 
practice is an asset but is not essential Fluency m English required and a 
Knowledge of French and especially German is highly desirable. 

This position offers you a real opportunity to practice law in a dynamic Jrurioes 



environment. We are a large and successful company which provides fust-class 
employment conditions. If you are holder of a valid Swiss work permit or Swiss 
ririren, please send your curriculum viue in confidence to J.-D. Monas, 
Personnel Department. 

PHILIP MORRIS EUROPE SJL 
EEC REGION 
BriHauout 4 
Cast Postale _ 

1001 Lansamu / Ssoitzerlemd 

PHILIP MORRIS 
EUROPE SLA. 

EEC REGION 

Bnllancourt 4, case postals 
1001 Lausanne 



DEACONS 

LITIGATION SOLICITOR 

We need a recently qualified solicitor to join our large and expanding Litigation 
Department. 

The postcalls for someone who is prepared to handle all forms of civil litigation 
(excluding matrimonial) and who is prepared 10 work under pressure. 

Salary will be according 10 experience but will be highly competitive. Additional 
benefits include medical insurance, annual return flights to lire U.K_ and a 
substantial gratuity. 

It is expected that interviews will take place in London in earty October 1986. 
Please apply with full cv. giving telephone number tec 
Partnership Secretary 
Deacons. 3rd-7th Floors 
Alexandra House, Hang Knag 


ROYAL AIR FORCE LEGAL OFFICERS 


A Selection Board will be held 
shortly to recruit officers far the 
RAF Legal Brandi. 

Applications are invited from 
barristers or solicitors aged be- 
tween 26-32 who have experience 
in criminal and family tew and in 
advocacy. 

Successful candidates will be 
commissioned in the rank of Flight 
Lieut enant at a galflr y r wyrrm ianrfng 
at £13455!* Subject to satisfactory 
service, officers on a permanent 
commission wiD normally have a 
career to age 60 with time pro- 
motion to the rank of Wing 
Commander: Promotion beyond 
that rank is by selection. 

Initially officers will serve in 


L<mdon but opportunities will occur 
for service abroad an tours of duty 
far up to three years. 

Fbr further information and 
details of career prospects, write 
with comprehensive cv to 
Air Commodore R. T Dawson, RAF, 
Directorate of Legal Services CLCX 
(P8/I5/0S1 Lacon House, Theobalds 
Road, London weax 9BY 

9.1886.87 par seated 



RAFomcm 


Opportunities for 
ARTICLED CLERKS 

in Shropshire and West Sussex 

COUNTY COUNCILS 

Trie above each have an immediate 
vacancy for an articled clerk to commence 
in Autumn 1986, in Shrewsbury and 
Chichester respectively. Starting salary 
around £6,200. 

For further details, please contact 
either of the undersigned. 

Closing date 10th October, 1986. 


County Secretary 
(FAQ Kalblea JomsL 
Tbs ShlrebaH, 

Abbey Foremte, 
Shrewsbury, SY2 6ND 
or fcfephoflft 
0743-252703 


Comfy 

(FAQ DsvM Evan] 
County 
Cbfctester, P019 IRQ 

or Wephoae 
0243-777901 


WANTED 

URGENTLY 

Conveyancer with 
agricultural and commerce! 
experience tor Peak District 
practice. 

Salary negotiable. 

Phone Robert Wright on 
BUM (8298)2741 or write 
to 4 The Quadrant Bsrtra. 

Derbyshire SX17 SAW. 


LE4UL ASSISTANT. French Her 

LumiM a the antotooal homing 

romMny ot the cMUtrurijon In- 

tacta of CH. Bearer tHotdincti 
W.C. operating In Uw UK ana 

ueruws from ut head office ji 

Trrareioni KaU In rural Beo- 

lontsmre. The Company 
Secretary now ui«net in ap- 

POttU a young wlicilar lo tore 

the department which protkh* 

a legal secretarial service to the 

tom name* in the divfeion. The 

candidair win he expected » 

deal wire a broad range ot lecai 

tow* including contract, com- 

pany. commercial, progeny 
j ndfw tw ureal am WeMta-M 

allracthe ratary. company 

*M imw bmflK together 

wire evccumi anpoRuMbeafar 
wvrenai development. Toappw 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


U&T\ 


LAWYER 

International oil industry London 

Mobil North Sea Limited istheUKsubsidiaryofoneofthe woricfls leading Oil 
companies, responsible for the exploration and production of hydrocarbons in the 
UK. It has substantial interests (both In an operating and non-operating capacity) in 
the UK including the Beryl field, and Is committed to continuing its extensive 
exploration and production activities in the UK 

The company wishes to appoint a lawyer (who may be a solicitor or barrister, 
qualified in England or Scotland) to work in the Office of General Counsel, which is 
responsible for advising the company on all matters Involving the application of taw, 
whether English, Scottish, US or International Having an unusually wide portfolio, 
the Office of General Counsel is also involved in the drafting and negotiation of 
agreements to which the company is party, and contributes to the development of 
company policies and strategies. Opportunities to work abroad may develop. 

Candidates should either have between 4-6 years’ broadly-based 
commercial experience in industry or private practice, and want to develop their 
careers in the international oil and gas business, or already have experience as oil 
and gas lawyers, probably in their 30s, and be keen to move to one of the UKfc largest 
and most successful oil companies. Professional excellence, the capacity for hard 
work and an ability to relate to people with diverse backgrounds are essential. 

The right candidate will be offered a highly competitive salary package with 
attractive large-company benefits including an excellent company car scheme and, 
if appropriate, assistance with relocation. 

Applications, enclosing detailed cv, should 
be sent in confidence to Miss E Farrelly, ■ MM ■ ■ ■ 

Employee Relations Department, ' MtHM M ■ 

Mobil North Sea Limited, I (fj) I ■ 

Mobil Court Clements Ann, London WC2A2EB. I V I WMMF ■ I 



SOLICITORS WITH A 
COMMERCIAL APPROACH 

£ 17,000 to £ 26,000 


One of the UK’s largest companies seeks to recruit two 
City HQ. The recniinneni is as a result of controlling e 

There is a wide range of high quality and interesting wc 


to work in its 




compg ririnn and fair trading and mtffWnifll jp ir ^ ieit y law. 

The car kh’drites win enjoy c onadac aMe inrt 4 *TH iit kk T>T tBponsbilhfe consequently applications are 

sought from lawyetsliaving ideally 2 years or more qualified esperience gained in a leading practice or in 
industry. 


" I B <~Vf1 1 1 *- 1 1 1 if': * i V ■ Cl. 


thwir^Ppntpr ^ifflfcwT jmi^ j Bflgj I ^mdem WfllR 4 HE- Ref: FW/C 220 . 


REUTER SIMKIN 


RECRUITMENT 6c MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 


Clyde & Co 


Commercial Conveyancing 

We are a medium-sized firm, whose clients include a wide range of 
“ foreign and UK companies engaged in shipping, insurance and a 
variety of other commercial activities. Our conveyancing department 
handles the property affairs of these clients. It also acts for companies 
engaged in the development of commercial and residential property 
and for private individuals. As a result of expansion we need to recruit a 
solicitor to assist in this type of work in our London office. 

Applicants should be newly qualified or have been qualified for up to 
3 years with experience of conveyancing preferably acquired in a 
substantial practice. 

We offer stimulating work in a friendly office with a competitive salary 
and exceptionally good prospects. If you have a-good academic record, 
commercial flair, an appetite for hard work and a sense of humour, 
telephone our Consultant, Mrs Indira Brown, with details of your back- 
ground, Corporate Resourcing Group, 6 Westminster Palace Gardens, 
Artillery Row, London SW1P 1RL, quoting reference 2157. 
Telephone 01-222 5555, or, if you prefer, at home between 8 p.m. and 
9 p.m. 01-480 6666. 



COMMERCIAL PROPERTY - CONVEYANCING 


Newly Qualified Solicitor-to join a team 


At Rowe & Maw we have a very personal 
approach to our diems' needs. We have therefore 
created in our property department a number of 
snail partner-led teams to provide the service 
and a congenial working environment 
One of these teams has a vacancy for a young 
solititoc 

The position will ideally suit a newly qualified 


solicitor who would like to specialise in this area 
and to develop an expertise in all aspects of 
commercial property work. 

Terms and conditions are those you expect from 
a progressive firm. 

To arrange an early discussion, please write 
with a CV. to: Graham Tumeq Rowe & Maw, 

20 Black Friars Lane, London EC4V 6HD. 


Rowe & Maw 


TITMUSS, SAINER & WEBB 
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

We need to recruit as soon as posable several Solicitors to assist in our 
rapidly expanding Commercial Property Department Candidates should 
have ai least two years admitted experience, senior assistants of greater 
experience are also required. 

We offer a wide variety of work and a friendly working atmosphere. j 

Salaries are competitive and supported by an excellent benefits package. 

Apply in strict confidence to Michael Garland either in writing or by tele- 
phone on 01-353-5242. 

TITMUSS, SAINER & WEBB 
2, Serjeants’ Inn 
London EC4Y 1LT 


r Commercially-minded, young 

Solicitor 

for international commerce 
from £20,000+ car 

This outstanding career opportunity will strongly international bias, 
appeal to a business-oriented solicitor who To qualify you must have an 



seeks challenge, autonomy and 
responsibility in a dynamic, international 
environment It arises within the European 
headquarters of one of the world's largest 
private corporations whose interests are 
diverse ana whose growth record is 
spectacular. 

As deputy to the Head of the Legal 
Department — and after induction training 
in the USA and Switzerland — 
you will be a key member of the ■ 
corporate (com and will be H mJ 

involved in a broad spectrum of ■ 
commercial matters with a JRLm 


E¥ 


strongly international bias. 

To qualify, you must have an 
outstanding academic record with at least 
one year’s post-qualification experience in a 
quality commercial practice, ideally in the 
City. Self-motivated with above-average 
communication skills, you have the self- 
confidence and maturity to work effectively 
at all levels in the organisation. 

The salaxy will be geared to attract high- 
calibre candidates and will be supported by 
vb excellent benefits. 


Commercial 

Litigation 

London 


Newly qualified Solicitor with good litigation 
experience to join the legal department of a well- ' 
known construction company. Previous const- 
ruction experience useful but not essential 

Please send peraona! details to Michael Chambers, 
Chambers & Partners. Recr uitm ent Consultants, 
74 Long Lane, London EC1A 9ET. 


- iV.’i if y 0 ' ^ 


Please send full cv, in confidence, 
to M A Stockford, 

Kef: PF57/ 1023 /TT. 


PA Personnel Services 


ExeauhxScaith-ScIcakvi-P^iometTKS'RimuTusrauon&PmomidConsidtaiKy 


Hyde Park House, 60a Knights bridge, London SW1X 7LE. 
Tel: 01-235 6060 Telex: 27874 


Badenoch & Clark 


COMMERCIAL LITIGATION 

CITY 

Our client, a major City firm u-ith a continually 
expanding dient base ts seeking a number of first rate 
solicitors to augment die current team of lawyers. 
Candidates unll be bright ambitious and must demon- 
strate the ability to undertake a demanding caseload 
and work well under pessure. Good academic tuck- 
grounds and proven experience are essential. 

MERCHANT BANKING 

U.K. Merchant Bank seeks highly qualified solicitors, 
keen to make a career move into one of the following 
areas: Capital Markets; Corporate Finance; Corporate 
Banking Applicants must have excellent academic 
credentials and have served Articles with a substantial 
London practice. Post-quali hca non experience in the 
company/banking department of a top aty firm is an 
obvious advantage. 


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

ECl 

This leading city him is currently seeking to recruit a 

young solicitor to the busy property department ideally 
candidates will have up to IS months post admission 
experience, although bright newfy qualified solicitors 
with enthusiasm and a good academic background will 
be considered Highly c om petitive salary. 

CORPORATE TAX 
ASSISTANTS 

Central London £17,000-£19,000 

Our client is a small legal firm with two vacancies for 
enthusiastic and creative young Solicitors. Candidates 
must have one to two years' post admission experience 
and must wish to specialise in tax planning and related 
work, handling Truss, capital taxation and drafting. For 
more experien»d candidates, there will be partnership 
prospecs. (Re£S941 


LEGAL/TAX 

EDITOR 

Croner Publications Limited, members of a 
dynamic European group in the forefront 
of information publishing and training, 
seek a legally or accountancy trained 
person who can edit tax and law looseleaf 
publications aimed at business people. 

A strightforward and practical approach to 
the law and tax matters is required, 
together with an ability to write simply and 
clearly to tight deadlines. 

The person appointed must enjoy working 
as a meticulous desk editor in a highly 
motivated commercial environment and be 
able to cut through to the heart of a 
problem unaided. 

Previous publishing experience Is 
desirable but not essential. 

A competitive salary and benefits package 
will be offered. 

Please apply in writing with a full cv to: 
Janet Addis, Personnel Officer. 


REYNOLDS PORTER 




PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY 
LITIGATION 

One of our partners specialising in 
professional indemnity work needs 
an assistant. 

If you have been admitted for up to 3 
years, have good academic qualifica- 
tions, an outgoing personality and an 
interest in this type of work, please 
submit a detailed curriculum vitae. 

Colin P. Ellis, 
Partnership Secretary, 
Reynolds Porter Chamberlain, 
Chichester House, 
278/282 High Holbom, 
London, WC1V 7HA 


PRIVATE CLIENT 


practise.] 

lawyers. 


Conveyancing 
London W1 


TAX TO £22K 

Corporate Taxation opportunity for ambitious lawyer 
or ip fe three years post Qualification experience at 
major Centra) London practice. 

CONVEYANCING TO £20K 

ConmierOTl/Residentlal mixture at well respected 
Cay practice for calibre Conveyancer of up to two 
yeas post Qualification experience. Good prospects. 

INSURANCE LITIGATION TO £18K 

a sss t « 

1 ‘SrTYnntiirf g| 

Staff specialists to the legal profession worldwide 
95 Aldmych. London WC2B 4JF. Tel: 01-242 1281 
(awaphone after office hours) 


Wright Webb Syren require energetic 
possibly someone about to quai 
Conveyanring/Probate Depi 


mug solicitor or 
r , fbrihdr 
meuL 


Good salary, demanding and varied workload. 

TEL: 01 439 3111 

Ref: MA 


Croner Publications Ltd, glSA . 

Croner bouse, q Im 

173 Kingston Road, 

New Maiden, Surrey, 

KT3 3SS. 

Croner Publications Ltd 


HEMW QUES 
GRIFFITHS & CO 
BRISTOL 

Young expaixSng firm re- 
quires Solicitor able to 
undertake an increasing: 

commercial conveyancing 

workload (with small 

amount of probate). 
Competitive salary pack- 
age and partnership 
prospects tor person witn 
at least two years' post- 

qualification experience. 
Please apply with CV ta- 
Mr MJLW. Griffiths 
The Ott Vicarage 
18 Portend Sqnim 
Bristol BS2 8SJ 
Tet 0272 428257 


^OPPORTUNITY 



For details of these and other positions, please contact JmUth Farmer or John Cullen. 


Legal and Financial Recruitment Specialists 
16-18 New Bridge St, London EC4V 6AU Telephone: 01-583 0073 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS ALSO APPEAR ON PAGE 36 


LUCAS AND CO. 

Twickenham and Battersea 

seek an ambitious young Solicitor with at 
least 1 years post qualification experience or 
an experienced Legal executive to assist in a 
substantial domestic conveyancing practice 
incorporating property sales centres of an E&- 
.tate Agency nature. Ability to work under 
pressure and an interest in this new dimen- 
sion of legal practice can be rewarded with 
attractive salary and excellent prospects. 

Please apply 01-924 3020 
Ref: PHB. 


cmnnwHs mummer 
SflUU office. FVoty o( ropontt 
Mill! £i2L5*t mWtaaBI 
GonsuKants 0936 26185. 

NMuawTDmous spkwm xsmstawt swore* aim- 
much or under 5a Kent Saw nous 27-32. Bedford General 
corporate and rontmtrctal con- prarttcr want £15K. wkh 

wamitt- To CISK. Win* Gnturftant* MSS 26183 
. LCOALCXXCUTTVE Avon Cam*. 

ALL ROUNUA under 30. Dt* try Town office General 

JSXUSSF SEE* 10 ? fs- 

Wttiwgi m. pre wem. £13K. ftmi. fill*. Weaanc Coraoi- 

Wessex . OmunuB 0936 un& 0055 26181 

25185. 

CONVEYANCER under 38. Su*- AWttTJUTT lOLIOTOK 88/86 


. MUCtTWIifljga OtKiith-n 

Md Articled amtrTSSKi? 
WthainscaiKiejonodfrtas. 
ter covering KnL Sunk^ 
gwy Atom. Asnfc£ray£S 
- Stiff Manao-mwt, 7 Ashdown 
Arcade. Crownoroooh fin 

SW«. Tel: «9a6rgS699r“ 


TOT WAWp ro t Voung SoUo- 
Mrs rftKSrud for a vanoty of 
Qmvtnnang neats tn avm 
soo»w%»f um* Personnel 
M M2 1281 (Ars. aner Bn 


•mown firm, wonemganown 
In Hume £12K. W es sex Con- 
sul lam, 0055 25185. 

OmMIHV SOUCXTO* MJWl*. 
sex with some Otll ElZOt. 
Wnw Consultants 0935 
35183. 

UTMATlON MANAGER CMs 

.-66 Tfiimes valley firm. 

■ C12SK. Wessex Consattanb 
0855 28185. 


Bumngnam. MMnmoniai and 
Conveyance wtfta small gne- 
oce. EiOKJMMBx consunams 

0936 26185. 

OONVEYAMBaM wtm some Pro- 
hare M4 CerrMor £124K. 
WfMex Consotumi .0956 
25185. 

YOUNG imOATOR Devon. Ad 
soney statable. OM 
oroavos CISK. UtaMtt COiv 
•MUUntt 0935 26183. 
CONVEYANCER under 56- WSW 
Town firm C12J5X. Wessex 
CosmiUnnb 0935 25185. 
PROBATE SOLICITOR Under 30. 
Avon Ann U2K. Worn Con- 
suflaats, 0936 2SSSS. 


locum service 

Lfiwn Sokcaors & Laaal 
Avariabie 

COUNTRVV)ffl£ 

01-24* nag 

ASA LAW 

If* 8 Nrieonu anounet 

Ml tma n- pan tn» 

“CUM SERVICE 


UHNUN OUI 7AS 


HARBOTTLE 

& 

LEWIS 

We are seeking a new solicitor to 
join our litigation department 
The work is varied although 
mainly commercial with an enter- 
tainment bias. The ideal 
candidate will be newly qualified, 
have a. good academic back- 
ground and some experience of 
commercial litigation during arti- 
cles, and enjoy personal client 
contact If you are interested, 
please write to: 

G Tyrrell 
Harbottie & Lewis 
34 South Molton Street 
LONDON W1Y 2BP 


CSipfficant 

matters at leading Private 
snt prospects for inteJIec- 














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A-Ea/ Vw76KS* ' 
“■"WAV DUE T Gn* someone- 
""fw" Thn» N.S 




PERsem columns 



mm 


CHEAT RJBHTS Enron* Wort*. 
vnite.Oltt.Cdvr Train: ABTA 
01-839 5033JUng AodM 


OKArar fubhtb w/wmc - 

Bewuairt. Td Oi &»6atd. 


*?_ ?***?__ tmuusn ewnutt/BmiT* hokb * aw. 

Y y t .f? a9 *-* CW9. Tto- SrtudWM Ob Am HYow. 

Tartu* £2/4. htelmhi rw*> Rim Ban Unru UkHiiwh Omm 


ARCTIC CxMMnnv OroifD 
tuffuaino maiar paiv 
end rm our urpmity rooutrra 

mwffom offtre/surr gun- 
or how any ronniuon London 
' am lor oa* you. WouU km 
squanrr* unlilt away Trl, 

OI W9 0157 

■MOLANomwM.Tsii.niau> 

bom 1907. ho of Jotm En- 
glander and Louisa Johnson. 
Pteoar roman your daugnter. 

ESyJlg Ensfandor-Bamcrr. 

07iOONreii Aimuf. Drarborn 
Hrtghu. Mir moan 48126 or 
Trl: 15131 SOS 8910. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


DMCA* Mrs Edith (Lucy) 
Klnncarof JaveA- Snln. thanks 

uw many frtentK and nUraoueo 

of Mw for Uirtr kind letters 
and card*. These were so me 
merous stir b unabte to reoty to 
them personally, hut hoods this 
announcement win serve as a 
token of her deep appreciation. 


■ ‘untlUme tor sate. SPAM. Portoom. Cheapest fans. 
Bw ~ w 

— — 

Mm and s piece cottage coup. I jjlU H D Sclwailted fnmus 
Prhaie morers onbr. Tel 01-236 °* -7M 3388 ABTA ATOL 

7068 (Dayj. Mho Casey. 

kauhful VicnaM manw 
hwstores, Adn or dccoraftva. 
nmusucany pOfM-OlMi 
SMI anytime. 

LfONO. DWVANbtt rtneofl pMor- 
Jnolorsate nowon ejkhlhftion in 
LoMon. Ena umes leL OB2I2 

Earn. DOULTOM TMy Jugs, 

K« s *S^* tt - wanl ' 


LOW COST PAMS to USA. Mo 
tat Travel. OI ASS 9337. 1ATA. 


MACAQA. CAW AMTS. OI Ml 

lUl. Travetwbe. AM*. AM. 


DncOUKT PANS* WorWwfthr. 
01«M 0734 JujMIcr TraveL 


HtCOUHTID A HOW PANEL 

C-T.C Open SaL 07S38B7036. 


nolo £379. Naurou C 3 S 9 
SSSSf Awhlma £749. 
to^iMJerrhyparem. 


Ring Pm world HoMays Open 
Sal 01 734 2062 





Wl. OI 734 5307, 


Meno rca. Tenertte. vittteABt 
PWate ns Tavemas. HoUtays 
/THflhts. Brochures/ Instant 
bMMigs. venrora Mondays. 
Tel 01-260 13BB. 


W Otn a OR WEEKS. Homy, 
or 2 nd Honeymoons ._ 
cucotfT m* Magic tar Italy*# ro. 
mantle duo B Aottann or 
Winter- can 01-749 7449 tar 
vonr TREE colour Qroature. 
Matfc of Bay pem T. 47Shem 

Sl?aT ^ u> ™ ta " 


TAKE ifltt OFF KJ Paris. Am- 
sxcfdam. Brussels. Bruges. 

<teneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dttalln. Rouen. Bou- 
logne * Dieppe. Tone Off. 2a. 

Chester Ctoa*. London, &W 1 X 
7BO. 01-238 8070. , 

CRETE A MARBEUA Seven I 

*■«»»*" ■>* MW*. Lowest fanes tr £89. 
£■££ ABdeiaS 78, PWy ^ H0H ‘ BROteA 755 8191. Atol 1893. 



KDBTBH OA Grand. Warir 

HWTocTl P MOU dltHUlML 

Easoa Trt3O63®3L084^ 


«*«* Canaria. Sept/DeL 
svm u>w prtoss tram iwk 
UM. awtajU89. Tdnopon 
771266. Ttaway Holidays. 
ABTA/ATOL 1107. 








SCMESMAYCR Grand Plano. 
M146486 excellent 7 £El 
£ 1.680. TefcOl 670 2629. 



RENTALS 


KENSDMrOH very sunny nign 
mimg unman unuiultv lur- 
IMM 3 floor ftaL Ideal lor 
erueruuuna Imptessno um 
raw M* bedrooms. 2 bath 
roams, kitchen, large rrrenmn 
room with oirrci stress 10 brau- 
Util oar den. ko agents. 
AtMlUr DOW £600 pw Lonq 
company let preferred 01 727 
7371 9-11 am or n« 08 pm 


WEST MM O L Beauuluifv lur 
UHhed ptetanwour 3 bed 
lakeiMte cottage etnloofcma 
waterfall. Osmeiuenl fee 
Gatwlct /London 6/12 moMM 
let to uiriuae trout intung and 
shoolino. £700prm. Phone 

0542 715466. 


CHELSEA Cardan not with sen 
rnuranrrln pm air house near 
Bottom SWia Patio. 1 reep. 1 
able nrd- during area, k/b «n 
th. mktnual parkins. Hers » 
enured. 1 s-rar mm £130 p.w 
ftmo 01-582 0855 


HOLLAND PARK Wll owners 
own Irani ana spacious 2 bed 
(ML o/lookino comm gardens, 
recep. IU lut phis Ml ajwbaocev. 

hath Asial now. £190 pw. F 
W Gasp OI 221 8858 


BAWSSAN/Jamtcg. Lux 
vUtss/aMS wtttl poeb. Anfl Oct 
thru winter. OI 409 2858. 




ftf r* 


MM 





FUgnts FTBdor 01-471 0047 
ATOL 164a ACC CSS/VUSL 
SVD/BHL £635 Perth £865- AB 
major carriers to Aus/KZ. Ol- 
384 7371 ABTA. 

%. AFRICA Front £468. 01-584 
7371 ABTA. 


SELF-CATERING 


BRISK ISLANDS . beautiful vil- 
la* and apartments close to 
gtarkm benches. Free 
windsurfing on Crete. Sept/Oct 
mil. Tel: Honham tosoaj 
89788. Ulos MaM HdlUays 
ABTA/ATOL/IATO 


don 10 uunBamtai £510. 
London to Nairobi £850. Top 
Deck Travel. OI 373 8406. 


AMDGKA AND AUSTRIA. QUIttty 
Ski hobdays at Budget Prices. 
Top Deck Travel. 133. Earn 
Court Rend. SW5. Tet 01 373 
8406/8096. 


IUPME un QUM beta. 
Argenuere Fr. £200 SUDerO 
Sto mg. toaab) 20632J24hm. 


KCRETARRS far A lUUWl W & 
Drugnert. Puiu ancnf It tempo- 
rary posfUoitk. AMSA Spectated 
Rec. Con. OI 734 0552 


DOMESTIC ft CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


DRAKES M r O W PLACE The 

English Restaurant In CMns 
S/S WaUrett** <M/n Evening 
Cashier reotdreO for Immediate 
start. S a l ar i es Ui excom of 
£ 10 . 000 . call for an Intervlewt 
CampoeB Porter on OI S84 


CONVEY ANCtMO by luHy email 
fled Solknors. £180 * VAT and 1 
standard dMxirscnienu ring I RAFFLES ciaxnr CMMUon cards. 
0244 319598. I Exchange dupUcaies. Reply to 

BOX B25. 


2 PROF FEMALES seek s/e I . 

accom.. r vr pw each, ref . Td I SEIPOett shoes sms sae for 
Ttida 01 841 1248. I ttetolte. OonldB dark. 178 Mar- 

kef Street. Hyde. Cheshire. 


A BOX AT THE 

ALBERT HALL 

SOUGHT BY LEADING 


Any company or 
individual interested in 
seffing a wefl located 
box at the RAH is 
ffwtted to contact 

BOX J47 


19S4 PP rs nhe 944. Burgundy 
metallic. POM. EFR. Fog and 
snot iam», 215/60 tyres. 4 
new Cassette/coln holder. Fil- 
led carpets, one owner, ssh. 
£12.730. Smith Ol 734 7244 
exl 239 day 01 893 1439 eves. 



FOR HMC Stiver Splrtt. Self -drive 
or chauffeur. Other vchkfes 
available. 01 >540 9280/7902 T 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


THE SALISBURY 
REVIEW 

Ikied N Rueer Strum- w«n« !** 
»■ Mrtvnfic- w i pcnnl of nac > w. 
rvknd «*r nadilnov' The Uhl » 
me kni* lum nor hn of 

vahwntmv A ion ititatnpuoa 
«<xh |uu Him Svnd a cheque 

Sk^FSlk 

asfsK 




together we can beat it 

We fund over one third or 
ell research into ihe preven- 
tion and cun? of cancer in 
the UK 

Help us by sending 4 dona 1 - 
lion or make a legato. 

Cancer Gl 
Research V* 
Campaign 

i fothurt Hntivr Trrritr. ■ 

irt«Tin ifi-flj t undim SWIY 5L» 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


102 Gloucester Pface, 
London W1H4DH 






SKI WI1T Exdtnag colour ben- 
enure om Nowi <aus«c prices tr 
£159. Ol 570 0999. 
SKIWORLO Top 8M Reoesfa. 
Lowell Prices from £59. 
ABTA. Brochure; 01 6034826. 


W 1CRCO — . Aiacuma Bnah 
avau. Period character cot- 
tages. Meal centre muring. Sto* 
4-4L Tel 0342 602 124/604 150 



87 Rrgmi SlrerL London Wl. 
TN 439 6534 UK/Ovmm. 
Ate m. helps/ dom» temp/perm 


LEGAL 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


Fly Savely 
September 

flighty (0 

WO BMCELONA BMORC 
IBOA UMA6A AUCANTE- 
ATHENS RHODES HBUKUCM 
am -OALAMMI ANTALYA 
PUIS HANY DTMB OESTHATUWS 

91-995 3^83/4/5 


■RHUfT*. Or HETTLEBCD. The 
ullliiiate replica furniture spe- 
cialist*. One of England* largest 
dnolaypof 17U> and 18th centu- 
ry period style nuHKu*- 
NrtUtbcd. near Hailey on 
Thames (049 li 641 HE. 

BotmemouHi <02021 395680. ■ . m .575 gym 

ZajSS 1 CtaMOACSl BloSS I LUXURY Soweto PLATS, 
‘ I central Lnndon from £526 pw. 

^^S' V ^ST ^dST*ite2| Rlng TOwm Hie AMP 5735455 
available lOCTS extra, large 
room sOr remnants under half 
^normal price. Chancery Carpets 
•JOl 406 0465. 

dblTTMDCm. Befl tickets for 
all soktout events. Our rilentt 
Include most major comnanM 
Credit canto accepted. 01-828 
1678. 

THE TIMES 1 785-1*8*. Other 
lilies avail. Hand bound ready 


"Sundays”. £12 50. Remember 
When. 01-688 6323. 


A BEAIVTIFN. 
CM FLOOR 

UficmhR CortopUt Natural 
Ties, factory saM. low mart*- 
nanc#. ean to Dm my Nra 

vtaang. ranted d*(tt 

OL5& par if yi -t- VAT 

RESISTA 

CARPETS 

i\ 54S Mbn Road. 

1 P m— Greek. SWG 

T«fc 01-736 7551 

Fim EHtaRteHEipMt Rtofl 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER of GEORGE 

SPENCER DECOR ATIONS 
LIMITED 

AND IN THE MATTER of THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1988 

NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN 
-mai the creditors of the above- 
named Company, wiwcti is being 
voluntarily wound up. are re- 
autned. on or before the 9th day 
of October. 1986. to send in their 
full ChrttUan and surnames, their 
addreuec and descriptions, run 
partlcutan at their debts or 
cMms. and the names mid ad- 
dresses of Uieh- SottcHora Of anyL 
to tbe undersigned PHHJP 
MONJACK- FCA of 50 EAST- 
BOLfRNE TERRACE. LONDON. 
W2 6LF. the Ltouldator of Ihe 
said Company, and U so required 
hy notice tn writing from the sold 
LUnddaior. are. personally or by 
metr Sand tors, to come in and 
prove their debts or claims M 
nidi tone and Mace as shall be 
m ec tfl sd in such noun, or in de- 
ftudl thereof they wtD be 
excluded from the benefU of any 
dLruibuiion made before such 
dcMs are proved. 


P. MONJACK 
U guklator 


FINCHLEY N12 

Law lanfly bone. S beds. 2 
bafts, Edwamon terrace, coow- 
mnt id 81 aneoms. mi gch. 
small ipdai, qiawy capus aid 
curtams, uubimiW ib sake a 

M2 M 
FOB QUICK SALE 


TR 01-445 


UU—Mh — If you 
have a duality property to let 
tea us about u. We otter a as 
fesucmal 6 letuhte service. 
Ourotoh) Comupune 01244 
7355 


HENRYK JAMES Contact ui now 
on 01-235 8861 lor me tun se- 
lection of lurmuied ruts and 
houses to rent In KNomuxidgr. 
Cnetsra ana Knungug 1 T 1 


PARLJAMOfT WLL FIELDS / 
Higngdte Modem family house 
tn tnitet attractive mrvrv Lee 
living area. 4 beds, master inr 
shower fin. nano gun. garage. 
£820 D«n Trt: Ol 559 1742 or 
0343 41 3310 


A—H1CAH BANK urgently rr- 
otam I train tuts/ houses. 
Chelsea. KntgntsbniHe, Befgra 
vu areas- £200 £ 2.000 pw 

Properties also avauabte Bur- 
gess Estate Agents 581 5156 


KENttNCVOM Senudotul Del. 
Mews-Hse- 4 Beds. Huge Recep. 
2 Baths. Kll <all marhv Lge Stu 
dm Dm with 1 Bout e/s. Pretty 
MM can Cgr £500 pw. 
Ben ham * Reeves 958 5522. 
WEST WIMBLEDON. InTUI 
mshed modern 5 bed Muir. 2 
teiw. double aspect receoUon. 
Intty eautaned knrhen. garden. 

garage £250 pw Company lev. 
Home rrom Home. 946 9447. 


erttes la best London areas 
CABBAN * CASELEE ■ usual 
lee* nwllMV Ol 689 5481 

WIMBLEDON/ PUTNEY Borders, 
mnv egunmed 2 bedroom oh. 
£160 pw. 6 - 12 months. Home 
From Home. 946 9447. 

WBNBLCDOH. Modem 4 1 bed- 
room lolly lum. mwn house. 
Company lei. £275pw. 01 947 
5902. 

WIMBLEDON. Modem 3 bed fur- 
nished IUI near show and 
underground. Company let. 
£lZ5pw. 01 947 6902. 


THE VERT BEST 
Lasdhrds & Tesaits 
cone to ns ter 



RENTALS 


COUNCIL FOR LICENSED 
CONVEYANCERS 

- - Notice-of examination 

AH who wish to appiy for licences in April 1957 must apply to sit or obtain 
=xcmptioii from special transhional examinations on December 5lh. The dosiiw 
Ian forapplKaiWM ii lOctober 17th 1986. Transitional examinations will behek 
again m July 1987. Other candidates may be eligible to »ai« Pirn I or Pan ll 
ex aminat ions to be held in July 1987. 

All enquiries and reqoests for application forms 
should be made to 

The Secretory, The Cotmril for Licensed Con 


lULlSJSK'^-* * j,i, vM.I, I iKfTT: 


The telephone number is 01 210 4604. 


RENTALS 

Long/Short All best 
seas. Personal Service 
tram 

£120pw-£3.000pw. 
458 3880 
Anytime (T). 


WANTED 

High Quality flats 
& houses for 
Companies. 

458 3680 
Anytime. (T). 


128 Mend Ptefc Am. W11 

HOllAND VUAS ROAD. W14 
Mott atncuvi tts n supvb nl i 
DUs Bed. Rkhl Ktf. Baft en-sutt. 
Cg/Ws. 6 mas-1 jar. EMteg. 

POliCto SQUARE, M2 
Smdob & bngta fttl tn aatt l wn 
dac order 2 Mb Beds. Rboegwdi 
Upper 6tttey. FF Kit 4 BtttL 
Co /Vs. 6radB-l V. E195p» 
CMDEN HtLL GDlS. MB 
BeaoU psKtase utth ma^tteem 
me. 3 Beds. 2 Bate, flebsp. Ff 
Kc. Hn TOL £300p*. Co Wl yr. 
Of 20 9966 


PALACE PROPERTIES 

We law a apart) salactran of p«- 
sunny inspected funstvd and 
unfumtrtKd propeftw m many fine 
FtesKteajfal dfstncB. rangmo bom 
£150 p* to E2JD0 p*. 

SHORT/LONG LETS 
MANY HOLIDAY FLATS 
AVAILABLE 

Tel: 01-486 8926 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 



COURTFIELO GARDENS, SW5 

Began spacious cottage wHi exposed beans. 1 dtfe & 1 twin bMm, 
reespeon. *nnn lad. study, ttchen. btttam. sep star m. Mi newty 
done. Co Let 1 ^ -f. E400 pw neg. 

GAYVUXE RD, SW11 

Weal lam** tea Mb 2 duo, tafei & sgfe bedrm. Dtte memm lge 
betel OT b'tast ana. iaOim, sep sftwr nn. ate A adractnn 
garden. Co Let 1 yr +. £250 pw nag. 

MAJENDIE & CO 01-225 0433 


LEGAL LA CREME 


RENT.ALS 


putney Knnw garom not 

Sirrpv UP 10 6 GCH £250 pw 

Co irt prof 01 339 3488 « 01 

788 8591 


ROttZRT OIVttM ♦ BURNS 

Quality protxYiK* avadahir and 
mnurod m all junk. Td Ol 
bJT W»1 


WESmaBBIER, SWX liteal PM 
a hTTr supnb Ttvimrv v utv* 
C]50pw inrl CH/CHW Oooln 
838 8251 


WIMBLEDON 1W11. xuriHK 3 
brd nuiwnMIr iiKinirl ir«lm 
tul toad (mV la vhoP* A 
IldUMHHlN Lur Irtrp rfret [luibKj 
im. kii P lull* ■Mill 4 umm 

1 IM C I WO pw M4 7£i9 


A SUPERB HarapMrad £iS5pw 
tmmjrulolp lum rKtdMirr 
■nan Largr Rmn JBnh Dm 
rr. Cat CH/Lpw OglbOUW 
Rradl now 286 8040 lT< 


CAWOM8URY Ml DrHghtlul 5 
brd mat in Georgian Irrfocr. 
lO mim Cilir UDO p.w inr 
raln. Co Lrl onnlv- TM Ol 456 
2042 iwlarp 6pm 


CHELSEA. Smckmi* 3 bnf flat 
rkw 9uw Sa lube Avail im 
ntMidhii Suit 5 shams al £oO 
pw Nrh (Cl 80 phi Bur Ivin 
ant 551 7767 


Z Fimwillini rveruiivp wit 
with twunmura pool, mm & 
Minu 5 mmt form Bruton 
North Motion £560 PCM Ol 
460 86IB / Ol 640 4551 


HAMPSTEAD HEATH iCnMCTs 
Own umr *H1< I double brdnn 
1 living rm. pmrrlui manon 
rfle. £99 pw inr CH 1 jrjr t 
tel No lturtog Ol 455 1406 


MF.MSIHBTOW Pirtty cuiv 1 Brd 
an m Rrornry hu Ugr wrrp. 
Lor Twin BM. Bath A UC. Kit 
Wah/Dcvrr. £126 pw 
Brnham A RrriM 958 55?? 



RENTALS 


HAMPSTEAD and ■■niiiorn For 
J trtn'lnn ol vtr wfd aM ^ 
omm^ixlrd nal* and fiowt 
avoiiamcfar tana ,rTm 
Norm Londnn's Pf 
rnplarl l hr vprrUlKN 
rtfri iiumrrmr. 1|™ 

C ISO la ci.sooauwk CWIP 
knwnt Tim Lrtuito Awnt- 
i train sum. H4"'««d 
kvgr NWS 6TP M 794 


RIVERSIDE rum IUII Chrtwirk 
Mall Sunnt ipartous 2«d Hoar 
wcurubi Rivrr newt IS 
murk Harrait 4 HnllWnH Lgr 

I rr Vlud). ML 3 Dbto h«t». 2 

hamv iHiwn firr guiknrn 
tin Pham- k30O P“ -m 
ram Trt- Ol 9us ifXJC* 


\MERKAM EXECUTIVE Swlt 
lut ilai/lmra* up to OWO#» 

l Vtul Im rnj philUm Kav A 
LrHis. SHilti of I hr Piirk Owl 

6 i mini-. Ol M? Bill nr 
votlh nt I hr Park Rrornlt 
lark oflu P. Ol 5H6 9H»U 


FULMaml La roc n/D Sludin fkil 
PnHnuuul Icmalc Cfitupanv 
Li- 1 £70 pw PK1 Pat abin 
cdk-ndor month in od'oncr 6 
monltn fc-osr i mrw Jbfi- Mimth 
rtrn<-4i Rriv Call Mm Rod 
01 751 5631 iDavhmc' 


ACADEMICS VtSfTDflB. FISK nr 
l nivrrvuv & l)nl khiu-uni Trt 
Hrtf-n W.iKnn A Co SBO 0375. 
ARCHITECTURAL ASSOC UI 
omllv tfrlv »t«™ lor Mu 
dmlv Trt Jrumirt tv!6 0974 V" 

ARCHWAY: Spurtuu-- 3 trt linn 
flat in aUM-l ilrrd tout Nr 
luhr L|4U pw Trt 757 3471 
3 BEDRM South London IKnlw 3 
Rrtrp Sun DTLHIP £140 pw 
Ri-nLiJ Cuidr OI pHii 6S5k? 
CHELSEA tmnuc lux bah on V 
(Lit. light rnrp HHi’hrtl liiL 
Pdf Irt Long Irt 01 5BI-5 

DOCKLANDS riaK and hutraw to 

in llwnughnul ttH- Docklands 
orr.t Trl Ol 790 95bO 
CDOCWAWC 3 DM houw- Chi I 
OTrn t prlv w rfnnmr L140pw 
Evptrw RrttUlx 01 8M3 S457 
HAMPSTEAD t Prtl C/h ILU 
runcti fuhr T v I-JO p vv Ex 
Pfi-A R.-nLlh Ol l*H3 6457 
N LONDON Hrd-wt pnvjir park 
mu £50 p w Hull-* inr Lxpcrwv 
fh-hlah Ol HU* 6407 
PIMLICO, tnr.fr flat I dbfr bra. I 
iv-d-p sml mwiI brd/vludv k A 
b Crt TV. CI?f.pw ILW -17J3 
STM LONDON SHARES. Avail 
inimnl LJO pw H.UU) lum 
no n Re ntal GunV nblw- 
WANTED Oimponv rrouirrs Mu 
dm iui in t xnii.il l-Hidni lor I 
Ol JH6 4H64 

WE LET FLATS AMD HOUSES 

CniiUtl Ruluril ill Mirk Djvk 
W ooUr A Cn 402 ?3HI 
WEST KEN A M-ln lira ut charm 
inqf/r 1 tV-vlapac Intents tram 
tlLXtow inr Ol n' 1 ?* |H*«> iTi 
WIMBLEDON 5 fl.il .’/A Rrx 
CH H-.L Cdn LJUipw Av.ul 
In 51/3/HT Trt rfl 947 147U 
W LONDON 2 brd s/r flat CTul 
dim w.-lrnitH- £KO pw 
CXPira HrnlaLv 01 UH3 0457 


Quraishi 
i Constantine 


QOEEMS CT. Wl 

brnnacubtely newly deco- 
rated & furnished 4th floor 
flat in PBB. 1 bed. bath S 
shower, lge recept H kiL 
2/0 Earts Com Road. SWS 


01-244 7353 




HOLLAND PARK. Preny Itse. Nn 
decor and cps. 3 bedims, lge rtwi. 
Mi im. nw kn M. nod turn. w.C. 
Wt.gota Vttygnad name BSQp* 
NW3. Ottnang mws tae Nm dK 
2 ftEfcns. bnohi recep. Mi na. soeerti 
new tat baft. WL gBe.hte.E250 

pa 

GflSHUflCH. Smer Use. Conurva- 
wn area. Bun ton a dole tadrms. 2 
tdtte 3 fecep. lowly U. goa £iB5 
pw. 

NCI. UH smt 2 bedrm H 
Lounge/ M l K & B. bale, dose Bffl 
Ms and Umv. El 65 pw. 
01-489 5334 


LEGAL LA CREME 


CHANCERY LAIS Legal Seen* 
lanes Temps £630 ph. 
Permanent* up In CIO 500 39. 

4KS0045 1 " l0ndOn W1 °>- 


TRUST/PROBATE 
AND PRIVATE 
CLIENT EXPERIENCE? 

Senior Partners secretary, based in AJdwych. 
(18 Partner office with 6 UK offices in total). 
Mature and self confident organiser with 100 wpm 
shorthand and some audio ability. 

Plenty of contact with prestige cBents and oppor- 
tunity to use Initiative. High level of confidentiality 
is essential. 

Salary level CJEIO.OOO, plus review after 3 months. 
Interested? 

Please telephone inltiaBy Ian Howarth (Office Man- 
ager) at Penningtons Ward Bowls 01-242 4422 
No Agencies, please. 


EXPERIENCED LEGAL SECRETARY 

required for small busy West End firm of Solicitors. 
Accuracy, speed and ability to use IBM 


Salary £11,500 

Contact Mr Kyraikides on 
01-637-3289. 


99 

Save with Swissalrfs 
Super Apex. - 
LondontoZurichor 
Geneva daily on con- 
venientaftemoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 


**-H »;*»:< \yt t ■ Vfi } 


Book and pay 14days 
before departure. 
Slay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday afteranivaL 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-4379573 


NEW ZEALAND 




Our clients require a wide variety of computer professionals. If you 
have a good educational background and two or more years 
experience, we can find you a suitable position in New Zealand. 
Experienced systems analysis and programmers are in great 
demand and there are excellent opportunities for database admin- 
istrators, account managers and software engineers. 

New Zealand is one of the highest users of computers per head 
of population. VWe continually have a wide variety of openings for 
people. 

Own your own house on a quarter-acre section just fifteen minutes 
from work. We can offer fresh air, blue sides and sunshine, beauti- 
ful beaches and mountains for all possible recreations. Absolutely 
NUCLEAR FREE. A great place to bring up children. 

We have very good remuneration packages for qualified people. 
Most international firms have offices here and . 
most computer manufacturers are wefl established. 

Excellent promotional opportunities are available. ^ 

NO CROWDS NO QUEUES Wf 

NO TRAFFIC JAMS NO POLLUTION ^ 

Only three million people tk * 


,IBS 



PhD Scott (64-4) 720-996. Wellington 
Sally Barton 741-8553. London 
Or write: 

J P Scott & Associates Limited 
Marac House 105-109 The Terrace 
‘ PO Box 10-282 Wellington New Zealand 


/ 


BUILDING 

EMPLOYERS 

CONFEDERATION 



The BuMing Employers Confederation is the largest and most influential trade organisation represent- 
ing building employers in Great Britain. 

The BEC has been working in the interests of buflding employers for over 100 years. Its membership of 
over 9,000 firms ranges from the smallest local builder through specialist contractors, housebuilders and 
woodworking manufacturers to the largest international contractors. 

BEC members account for over two-thirds of total building industry output and the building sector 
accounts for some 85 per cent of total construction industry output. 

LEGAL ADVISER 

Applications are invited from solicitors and banisters for this post in the Legal Services Directorate 
of the BEC. 

The position involves many aspeetsof the Confederation's work with a particular emphasis upon 
the provision of advice and information to its membership and the development of new contractural 
systems for use in the building industry. The successful applicant, who must have initiative and be 
able to deal with representatives of the industry and central eovemmenL at the highest level, should 
be willing to specialise in building contract law and post qualification experience in this field would 
be helpfuL Other duties would include assisting with the preparation of papers, reports, agendas and 
minutes for committees, together with undertaking the negotiation of contract terms. 

The salaiy for this interesting opporftmfiy, with prospects for career advancement will depend upon 
age, qualifications and experience. Other benefits would include participation in a contributory 
pension scheme, and private medical aid. 

Written applications with a curriculum vitae should be sent, in confidence, to: 

. Mr. R. Wakefield, 

_ Director of Legal Services, 

Building Employers Confederation, 

S 2 New Cavendish Street, 

LONDON W1M SAD 






OF 








MONDAY 

Edaczrin: University 
Appointments. Prep A PabUc 
School Apporaunaiu. 
Educational Courses, 
Scholarships and Fellowships. 

La Crime de E> CHow and other 
secretarial appointments. 

TUESDAY 

CuMpttftr Horizons: Computer 
Appointments with cditonaL 
Legs! Appofateeats Solicitors. 
Commercial Lawyers, Legal 
Officers. Private A Public 
Practice. 

Legal La Crime for lop legal 
secretaries. 

P ttMc Sector A pp a inm i en . 


WEDNESDAY 

La Criaw da la Crime and other 
secretarial appointments. 
P rupe i ty . Residential. Town A 
Country. Ovtneas. Rentals, with 
editorial. 

Antique* and CMkctaUes. 

THURSDAY 

General Appofttlittttr 
Management and Executive 
appointments with editorial 
La Crime de h Creme and other 
secretarial appointments. 


FRIDAY 

Motors: a complete car buyer's 
guide with editorial, 
ptts iar g to Basttss: Business 
opportunities, franchises etc. . 
with editoriaL 

Reftamat Gride. (Monthly) 


SATURDAY 

Overseas and UK HaOdm: 

Villas/Cottages, Holds, tfiffats 
eic. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN, INCLUDING 
RENTALS, APPEARS EVERY DAY. 


Fill in the coupon and'atiach it to your advertisement, written on a separate 
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SPORT 


THE 


TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16 1986 


RACING: CECIL’S IMPRESSIVE NEWMARKET WINNER CAN UNDERUNE HIS POTENTIAL WITH ANOTHER FLUENT VICTORY 


Suhailie looks 
in different 
league to Burr 
Stakes rivals 



Turf Club uphold 
appeal against 
Curragh stewards 




By Mandarin 


Few two-year-olds this sea- 
son have created a more 
favourable impression on 
their debuts than Suhailie at 
Newmarket in July and this 
highly-promising colt is 
napped to beat more experi- 
enced rivals in the £7,000 
Cellaraan Butt Slakes at 
Lingfield Park this afternoon. 

Word had gotaround before 
- his first appearance in the 
Bernard Van Cuisem Stakes 
that this $310,000 purchase 
was a colt of exceptional 
promise and he fulfilled ail 
expectations by beating Ome. 
with two other previous win- 
ners, Wuzo and Sanaxn, 
among those behind. 

Suhailie was unveiling like a 
.winner throughout the race 
and although he won by only 
three parts of a length, the 
official margin gave no indica- 
tion of his superiority as Steve 
Cauthen was clearly at pains 
to give the son of Nodouble no 
harder race than necessary. 

Ome. who has since fin- 
ished a fair fourth to Deputy 
Governor in Newbury's 
Washington Singer Stakes, re- 
opposes on 101b better terms 
and strictly on the book this 
should be more than enough 
for him to turn the tables. 
However, my selection has the 
greater scope and should have 
derived sufficient benefit from 
his Newmarket experience to 
confirm the form, even on 
today's unfavourable terms. 

The rest of the afternoon is- 


likely to belong to Fat Eddery, 
who can ride a treble on 
Cboriteo (2.0), No Stopping 

(2.30) and Northers Amethyst 

(3.30) . I particularly like the 
chance of Choritzo, whose 
first run behind Tahflla at 
Bath 13 days ago was foil of 
promise. 

Three of the four runners in 
Yarmouth's Brian Taylor Me- 
morial EBF Stakes are entered ■ 
for the Cambridgeshire and, of 
this trio, Navarzato meets 
Chief Pal and Liam on better 
terms today than he would at 
Newmarket However. I still 
prefer the fourth member of 
the party, Verdant Boy, who 
did not aavea hard race when 
winning at Doncaster on Sat- 
urday and is not penalized for 
that ladies' race success. 

Richard Hannon, enjoying 
an excellent season, sends a 
strong team to the Norfolk 
course and has bright pros- 
pects of a double wnh High- 
falutin Lymey (2.45) and 
Mummy's Lock (3.45). The 
latter’s Goodwood victory 
over Trojan Miss has been 
franked by the subsequent 
Kempton victory of the run- 
ner-up. 

Quantity rather than quality 
is the order of the day at 
Redcar, where my principal 
fancy is Kafarmo in the 
Mulgrave Maiden Stakes. 
This High Line colt shaped 
well on his debut behind 
Bedhead at Wolverhampton 
and is sure to have improved. 



■ • • -.r 




. '~u; "• •, 

*• ••• ■ «; ■ ~ • -V 

•n- 


... • 

■!> 

v v • .ur 

S . : 








From Ora* Irish Rating 

A pan# of acting stewards at 
the Curragh, the headquarters of 
Irish racing, have had their 
controversial Anglesea Stakes 
decision overturned by ihc stew- 
ards of the Turf Club. 

After Fat Eddery’s mount, 
Darcy's Thatcher, the k4 
favourite, had finished first in 
the group three race on August 
30, the local stewards, who 
included the former Irish cham- 
pion jockey, Liam Ward, initi- 
ated an inquiry and disqualified 
the colt, relegating him to third 
place. 

The decision astonished most 
racegoers. Indeed, bookmakers 
had been so convinced that the 
result would be left unchanged 
that they bad not bothered to bet 
upon the outcome. 

What had happened was that 
the challenge of Darcy's 
Thatcher had been cut offby the 
hangin g English challenger. 
Quel esprit, as he attempted .to 
come between him and Island 
Reef, who was racing under the 
stand rails. 

Eddery has to snatch his 
mount up and switch to the 
outside. As he ranged alongside 
Quel Esprit he momentarily 


ducked to the left and Quel 
Esprit in turn swerved in on top 
of Island Reef. 

The acting stewards cameio 
the conclusion that Dan^s 
Thatcher and Quel Esprit 
both equally at fault and 
awarded the race 1 ® the Kevin 
Prendegast trained outsider, is- 
land Reef . 

When the stewards yesterday 
reviewed the film patrol pictures 
after trainer Michael Kauntze 
had lodged an appeal, they came 
to the conclusion that the inter- 
ference occasioned by owcy s 
Thatcher was -unintentional 
and accidental and did not affect 

They also decided that Quel 
Esprit had likewise occasioned 
accidental interference but that 
in bis case the result had been 
affected. Taking these view- > 
points into consideration, they 
placed Darcy's Thatcher first. \ 
island Reef second and Quel 1 
Esprit third. 

• Park Express will miss the 
Prix de PArc de Triomphe and 
wait for the Dubai Champion 
Stakes at Newmarket on Octo- 
ber 18, Jim Boiger. the GUys 
trainer, said yesterday. 


*- 

•>* * 

■ ' 




Satellite decision soon 

A result u the prolonged month we should be in, : 


, A -,.r 





Sheikh Mohammed's promise 
The combination should still 


two-year-old, Suhailie, with Steve Ca rt htn in the saddle, 
unbeaten after the Barr Stakes at lingfield Park today 


negotiations for the. right to 
screen televised racing by sat- 
ellite is expected by the end of 
the month (Michael . Seely 
writes). 

Referring to the complexities 
of the issues to be resolved, Sir 
Peter Leng,. chairman of the 
Racecourse Association said: 
“The RCA is determined to 
protect the integrity of racing, to 
do its best for independent 
bookmakers and punters and to 
have regard to the quality and 
fairness of the charges made for 
the services to betting shops. 

“All is now reaching a conclu- 
sion and by the end of the 


month we should be in a 
position to produce a solution 
giving satisfaction and proper 
safeguards to all concerned, as 
well as a reasonable income for 
Racecourses." 

General Leng emphasized the 
need individual racecourses 
have for additional finance. “A 
third of all courses made less 
than £5,000 a year profit which 
made refurbishment and 
redevelopment almost 
impossible," he said. However, 
with the prospect of additional 
income from satellite TV and 
RacecaU, be forecast significant 
improvements on racecourses 
in the 1990s. 


LINGFIELD PARK 


Going: good Draw advantage: doubtful 

Z0EBF NUTHELO MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (Div: 1 2-Y-O: £1,337: 

SI) [14 runners) 

2 
340 


330 RON ASHDOWN HALF CENTURY STAKES (3-Y-O: ££547: 
1m 41) (11) 

2 0-4237 


YARMOUTH 


Draw: Sf-lm, high numbers best 

2.15 BROOKE SELLING STAKES (Div t 2-Y-O: 



U 4330 CURVACEOUS M SUM B-11 WR Sukhum 6 

15 300 CYNQNIKS WHattncp-BsttS-ll PRoWmobI 

16 004 DAWN LOCH (USMJ Shaw 8-11 RHBbS 

18 030 LA OUSE (BFtLCumani 8-11 BCndirma 

18 3230 imreTDKS ALADY PKoOewayB-lt 

QeylQ— w yfflg 

tl-4 Ambassador. 100-30 nracaous, 5-1 Cynomfc. Orey 
Salute. 8-1 Throe Times A Lady, 8-1 Tap 'Em Ttoca. 

3-45 JACK LEADER MEMORIAL CHALLENGE 
TROPHY (Nursery Handicap: 2-Y-O: £5,799: 7f) 
( 10 ) 








;S. la 




- : *■>■ ■ TVT7W7rr77?rT7T7. 

I r 










3.0 CEUAMAN BURR STAKES (2-Y-O: £5,972: 7f 140yd) (8) 



7-2 Annaba BiBi u 9-2 HopsM Katie. 5-1 Pointed Lady. 6-1 Lucky StericM. 
154 Mansadoa. 10-1 Solo Singer. 12-1 fndbm Summer. Maiden Odder. 14-1 others. 


7-4 Suhatee. 3-1 Just A Flutter. 5-1 Laurtes Warrior. 11-2 Ome. 8-1 Psetaxxft. 
10-1 omen. 




Edinburgh results 

Going: good to firm 
2.15(im4n 1. ADMRALS ALLfA Uactay. 
1-3 ta»h 2. Treysmon (J Lowe. 6-lfc 3. 
Boynton |K Djttey. 7-1) ALSO HAN: 16 
Efcrchgrow Lad l«n. Umder's Mon rsthj, 75 
Pratlaas. 33 LocT A wrch |6tri). 7rart 3, 37. 0L 
I'.L 4L J Wrter at NewmwkM. Tote: £1.20: 
Cl 10 ET B0 OF £1.70. CSF. £354. 

2^5 <1m» 1 . MSS ZOLA (M Bocn. 68-1); 2. 
Trompe VOofl (A Mscaay. 50-lfc 2. 
“ — - W (Paul Btsaerf. 7-2 iM*r). ALSO 
? (t-tfl* Waifc&a (GttiL 4 A1 Mahamry 
(Stftl 8 Friendly Ftom*. 10 Come On Oysron. 
i2 Winged Horan. 14 Daman. 33 
Horoyway l*M, MntaBte Amy. The London- 
derry. 66 Starve* Bay. Fbntog («mt 
U<edup Milan. Anglian. 16 tan. nk. 5il ”,L 
■'I 41 Jtfnmv FcgaraM at MattOn Totr 
£84 50; £15.40, £77 00.E1 JO.DF.JwnnaTW 
second untn any Other tune) £34.70. CSF: 
£1.43045. 

115 fTTJ 1. MOLLY PAHinOGE (A Proud. 
10-1). 2 Ctoudtess Sky (M Bnte 7-1). a 
King Cola (DNcncus, 8-1). ALSO RAN: 64 
tav Solyyaat (4m), 5 Last Jewel. 7 Bucks 
BOB. 8 Trameo. 9 swuqrd Rose. 12 


WtiDum Tow £11.00; 020. £1.40. £4.10. 
OF. £1660 CSF. £85.48. iMnnv bougnt m 
tor irfSOgrn. 

145(511 1.CHMAOOLO{M Wood >2-1); 
2. Lady Cn (J Canon. ML 1 Pander 
uncar(N Caritsto, 7-2 lav) ALSO RAN: 8 
Lodi Form. 9 King CMriemagna. 10 
Tobeimwv Bov (Smf- Paigooa MthL 12 
L&ndcfc Adventure. 14 tesnan SOUL 16 
Saacemriter Boy (6diL 20 Tradesman. 33 
aiessd. 12 ran. NR: Left Right Caotatn's 
Britt, nk. V.-L nk. 3L a Mas LSd« at 
COton. ToW £9.«fc £420. £1.4fl. £1.M. OF: 
£52.00. CSF: £70 9?. TUCMt 071.04. 

4.15(1m 7Q 1, MMOLE NATIVE (J Lowe. 
8-lfc 2. Snn Jag (M Bred. 2-t tev). 3. 
Hamr CHi <D NtStm. 9-1L ALSO RAN: 3 
Lakste. 7 Patnosc (5tti). 10 Qas (Bth) 14 
.Mwol* 14th). 100 Mown Epwaan. Bran. nk. 
I2t. n. nk. 31. S Norton at Samstoy. Wk 
£ 9.50: r?sn El.io. £160. OF; EB.80. CSF; 
£21 94. 

4.45 (50 1. PETHTS BLUE BtrtfL 4*lt 

2. Ltopec worth Moor (K o^tey. iMfcl 


Wolverhampton 

Oolng: good to Oral 
ZO&l 1. MALIBU TOAST If) Cochrane, 

5- 2V 2. PuaiKtff (7 Ives. 4-ijra. Hazel flee 
ALSO RAN: 15-8 lav Act Of 

7 Batatas. 8 Kept wamng 
.... ids House. 20 Just Class 

utM. 50 Rlttenss Park. HoB A Cab. Park 
Fro&cs. 1 1 ran. NR: Haraatt Parti. 2‘il 2L 
1'il, 2L nk. L Cumam at Newmarttei Tote: 
Z*2&. £1.401 £1.10, £2090. DF: £170 
CSF: £13.17. 

030 dm 41) 1 . USAKATY {R Wenftam. 

6- 4 lav): 2, RedaOy (Q DuffieM. 10-U 1 
Countess Carton (J Reid 2-1). ALSO 
RAN: 4 Ewart Witness (5th). 10 Tiber 
Gate (6Bi). 33 Go Fbmmgo (4thL 6 ran. VA 
4L 2>iL ii. 20 L m McCawi at wantage. 
Toto:£1 Wh£1.10,£*50.0F.£B91CSF; 
£14^9. No Old. 

10 (2m IQ 1, PACTOLUS(J RtwL 8-1k 
1 Pflawaod in Adams. UMt 1 
SMpbeome (G Starkey. 2-1 fav). ALSO 
HAN: 4 Orange ho (5th). g Rostheme. 11 
McMOansChowe. 14 Tom Sharp. iSBtfct 
Champ (4th). 20 M la RttOeM mi 
Hartwur Bazaar. 25 Jackdaw. 33 Janus. 
Puget. 66 Wanoowp Lad 14 ran. NR 
ClS* Reaction- a ftt, nk. YA. 41. G 
KHKttnjw at Newbqy. TOte: £1118; 
£2.40. £3.10. £110 DF: £23 J)0. CSF: 
£80-25. Tricast £204.09. 

130 18) V WLMAV (R Lappm. 10-lfc 2. 


• Benng has been heavily backed with HDte for the Prix de TArc de 
Triomphe and is now 2-1. having been laid to lose £100,000 at 5-2 
and 9-4. Bn tain’s main hope. Dancing Brave, is 3-1 from 11-4 but 
Shaxdari has been cut to lt-2 from 7-1 with Shahrastani 6-1. 

Kingdom ( Coarse specialists 


fWi fisher (5thL 33 
(68i), Hot mm. Rret 
KewmO. Aspara. ” 


£58d OF: £13