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• EEC ministers broke the deadlock on 
sanctions against Sonth Africa and 
adopted a package of limited measures 

f Imports of South African steel and 
iron wiU he banned, but a proposed 
similar ban on coal was rejected 


• The Sonth African Foreign Minister 
said “appropriate measures ’ 1 would be 
taken to protect the sectors affected 

• Two Sonth African diplomats 
“gatecrashed” a private reception at the 
SDP conference in Harrogate . 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 

age was not as effective as it 
would have been if a ban on 
coal had been included. 

But the sanctions which had 
been adopted would send a 
stronger signal to Pretoria 
than no package at alL 
The Ministers expressed 
anxiety over new tensions in 
South Africa and the con- 
ditions in winch detainees 
were held. 

Sir Geoffrey, who reported 
to the two-day Foreign 
Ministers’ meeting on his two 
A proposed ban on Sonth ' visits to southern Africa in the 

summer and his talks, in 


After two days of intensive 
talks, including arguments late 
into Monday night, EEC For- 
eign Ministers yesterday broke 
the deadlock over sanctions 
against South Africa and 
adopted a modest package of 
limited measures, headed by a 
ban on South African iron and 
steel imports. 

But the implementation of a 
ban on gold coins and a hah to 
new investments are to be 
delayed pending study by a 
group of experts.. 


African coal — by far the most 
potent sanction under consid- 
eration — was abandoned in 
the free of West German and 
Portuguese opposition. 

The Danes - who led the 
campaign for full sanctions as 
provisionally agreed three 
months ago — described the 
EEC package as “amputated", 
and said it could cause severe 
damage to Common Market 
co-operation. 

The sanctions agreed, ex- 
cluding coal, only amount to a 
very small proportion of 
South Africa's £6 billion of- 
exports to the EEC 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary and Presi- 
dent of the EEC Council of 
Ministers, said the EEC pack- 


Coal lifeline 
Rnncie letter 


t only took a trumpet blast — 
“even by 12 trumpeters" — to 
bring down the walls of 
apartheid. 

The EEC summit in The 
Hague in June undertook to 
consider a range of sanctions 
by September 27 if Sir 
Geoffrey’s peace mission 
foiled. 

But faced with a decision 
EEC Foreign Ministers found 
little common ground, with 
West Germany and Portugal 
— which have strong ties with 
South Africa — backing away 
from The Hague commitment 
and The Netherlands, Den- 
mark and Ireland 


Washington last week, said 
the EEC would have to sustain 
pressure on Pretoria, “sadly 
for longer than we wouldiiave 
wished". 

But diplomats said-no fur- 
ther visits were in prospect, 
ly because of Sir Geof- 
f's busy schedule, begin- 
ning with tire immin ent 
United Nations General As- 
sembly, at which the weak 
nature of the EEC package is 
likely tocome undo- fire. 

Sir Geoffrey warned against 
the .“Jericho School of Diplo- 
macy^.!! was wrong to bdieve 


to be implemented in full or 
not at all. 

Britain, taking a neutral role 
in the chair despite Mrs 
Thatcher's known scepticism 
over sanctions, presided over 
a compromise under , which 
the ban on iron and steel goes 
into effect from September 27, 
while legal experts wrangle 
over whether the ban on gold 
coins and investments should 
take the form of national 
measures or Community mea- 
sures enforced by the Com- 
mission. 

Britain already operates a 

Continued on page 20, co! 2 


WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


S Africa 
at centre 
of SDP 
storm 

By Richard Evans 
Political Correspondent 

South Africa’s embassy in 
London was embroiled in an 
embarrassing row at the SDP 
conference in Harrogate yes- 
terday after two of its dip- 
lomats “gatecrashed” a 
private reception, and their 
ambassador intervened totry 
and change the party's stance 
onapartbekL 
By last night it seem 

S the SDP would refuse 
African diplomats ob- 
server status at future con- 
ferences after the attempted 
publicity exercise dramati- 
cally backfired. 

SDP leaders, are angered 
over the way a first and third 
secretary from the embassy 
attended a ticket only meeting 
organized by the Association 
of Social Democrats for Eu- 
rope although apparently un- 
invited, became incensed by a 
letter sent to “delegates" by 
Mr Denis WorraU, South 
Africa's ambassador, in which 
be urged them to amend party 
policy. 

Mrs. Shirley W illiams was 
applauded during her 
presidential address when she 
told conference the party took 
“strong exception” to the 
behaviour of Mr Worrall and 
his two aides. 

“The violation of human 
rights in South Africa, the 
unwillingness to release Nel- 



Conference reports 


Tomorrow 


Peace on a 
tightrope 



On the eve of yet 
another bid to get 
peace talks going 
with the rebels in 
El Salvador, a 
profile of President 
Duarte, a man on a 
political high-wire 



— c §c/sd—~ 

• The £4,000 daily prize 
in The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition was 
shared yesterday by 
four readers, Mr L 
Ecdeston of Burnley, 
Lancs, Mr S A 
Cheetham of Chester, 

Mr -J B Oliphant of 
Chippenham, Wilts, and 
Mr J Johnston of 
Ventnor, Isle of Wight 

• There is a further 

£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list page 25; 
rules and how to play, 
information service, 
page 20. ' 

Exchange link 

The Stock Exchange and the 
International Securities Regu- 
latory Organisation nave 
agreed to form a body which 
will regulate dealings in gov- 
ernment securities, domestic 
and foreign shares and 
options. 

T unn el tactics 

toral opponents of the Chan- 
nel Tunnel intend to make 
their objections felt in 
Lords after being given only 
six days to put their case to a 
Commons committee Page 2 

Back at work 

Mr Nicholas Daniloffi the 
US journalist freed into his 
Ambassador's safe keeping, 
started work in Moscow again 
amid fears of death threats to a 
dissident witness *“8^ 7 


Pretoria threatens 
sanctions 



Fnm.Midhaei Hornsby, Johannesburg 


con- 
demned the sanctions mea- 
sures agreed yesterday by EEC 
foreign ministers, but the 
package is, in fact, much less 
damaging than had been 
feared here. 

In a statement issued late on 
Monday, Mr R.F. “Pik” Bo- 
foa, the South African Foreign 
Minister, said . “ap p rop ria te 
measures” would have to be 
taken “in defence of the 
sectors affected and in the 
interests of the country as a' 
whole. . .we cannot stand idly 
by while the livelihood of our 
workforce is jeopardised”. 

Mr Botha did not say what 
the measures would be, 
though the Government has 
said several times that the 
repatriation of foreign Macks 
working here' might be nec- 
essary if jobs were lost as a 
result of sanctions. Priority, it 
is said, would then have to be 
given to the employment of 
local blacks. 

The. exclusion of coal ex- 
ports — the sector on which an 
EEC ban would havie had by 
far the biggest impact - from rimnufent n 

the Community's i»ckagp of g&ef l oI?foe 
measures has undoubtedly 
come' as a great relief to both 
the Government and the in- 
dustry, even if they will not 
say so publicly. . 

The EECs inability to reach 
full agreement will, reinforce 
Pretoria's belief that the threat 


of sanctions is likely to be 
much worse ibah the reality, 
and that the ride of com- 
prehensive and mandatory 
sanctions remains remote. 

To that extent, the EECs 
indecision has probably de- 
stroyed whatever efficacy 
sanctions, or the threat of 

13 die in mine fire 

Thirteen Sonth African min- 
ers died in a fire in die Kinross 
gold mine, Transvaal, yes- 
terday. Sixty others required 
hospital treatment Another 
400 miners were still trapped. 

them, may still have possessed 
as a means of prodding Pre- 
toria to move foster along the 
road of political reform. 

Pretoria has decided that it 
can live with sanctions, and 
possibly have turned them to. 
domestic electoral advantage. 

An effective ban on coal 
would have been serious. The 
South African coal industry, 
which accounts for about one 
sixth of non-gold export rev- 
enues, has become increase. 

on foreign 
past 10 
years. In 1985, 44 million tons 
ware exported, of which 22 
million tons went to the EECs 
markets. 

Had the EEC banned coal, 
Japan, which last year iro- 

Continned on page 20, col l 


son Mandela, and the failure 
to attempt any negotiation on 
political rights with those who 
speak for the blade majority 
are matters to which the South 
African ambassador should 
address himself; not this 
conference.” 

In his four page letter to 
SDP supporters attending die 
conference, Mr Worrall said 
that while the Botha govern- 
ment would not “quarrel too 
seriously” with the goal of the 
SDPs policy to dismantle 
apartheid, it .was diampoaafc- 
mg the party leaders bad not 
Tecqgniseg it, should be- 
achieved ‘Through; a process 
of peaceful negotiation." He 
urged die conference to add 
tire “crucially important 
rider” to their policy. 

The “gatecrashing” incident 
involved Mr Richard Davies, 
a coloured South African, and 
Mr AQen Shaxddow who 
claimed they had been invited 
to the private reception held 
- in the mam c onference hold. 

But Mr Robert MacLexman, 
MP for Caithness and Suther- 
land who hosted the event, 
insisted.'Tliey were not in- 
vited. They gatecrashed. I saw 
the invitation list and had they 
been on it I would have asked 
for : their names to be 
removed." 

Mrs Williams told 
reporters:”! think it is appall- 
ing to attempt to intervene in 
our proceedings and policy 
nuking. We shall have to 
reconsider whether to have 
South African diplomats as 
observers next year.” 

In her speech to conference 
die SDP president followed up 
Dr Owen's election alert, say- 
ing the lime for further policy 
making had come to an end. 
We now have a more crucial 
job to do. Now 1 want you to 
be senisible, rational, reason- 
able and impassioned on the 
doorstep.” 

“We now have to take our 
message, the Alliance mes-. 
sage, to every last citizen of 
these islands. 


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Bridge 7 

Business 2I-2A 

Chw* 2 

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rruvmurds M*2° 

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I.CTUTS *2 

Ubiiuan >S 
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Scienrr _ I" 
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I \ & Radio 39 
Wttilher 20 


* * tr it it A 


Massive gas 
finds under 
ocean floors 

Undersea exploration has 
unlocked gas that experts say 
will service world needs fen* 
hundreds, possibly thousands, 
of years. Supplies of natural 
gas bad been expected to run 
out early in foe-next century." 

But American, Panartian 

and Soviet scientists have 
found gas in solid, methane 
hydrate, a crystalline mix of 
methane and water; under the 
Canadian and Siberian Arctic.. 
More has been found, across 
the world from foe Caribbean 
to the Far East: 

Spectrum, Page 10 


Tip-off warned police 
of bomb plot by IRA 


By Stewart Tendler 


A petty criminal involved in 
a Provisional IRA plan -to 
blow up a public bouse tipped 
off the police, the Central 
Criminal Court was told 
yesterday. 

Raymond O'Connor, gave 
evidence yesterday at the start 
of the trial of a Blackpool man 
accused of plotting the explo- 
sion with Patrick Magee and 
Patrick Murray. 


Mr Roy Amlot, tor the 
prosecution, said . Mr 
O'Connor bad been involved, 
in a bomb {riot aimed orig- 
inally at an Army camp at 
Weeton, near Blackpool and 
then at the Eagle and Child at 
Weeton. In January, 1983, be 
“could no longer bear what 
was going on” and went to the 
police. 

He then acted under their 



Herr Kohl helps Mrs Thatcher open a bottle of mmwral water during their press conference. 

Sanctions line is resisted 


From Our Correspondent 
Bom 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher and 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
West Germany yesterday dis- 
tanced themselves from the 
EEC decisions on sanctions 
against South Africa. 

Speaking at a joint press 
conference in Bonn during 
talks with Heir Kohl Mrs 
Thatcher said she did not 


help bripg apartheid to an end. 

On the contrary, she added, 
they would probably lead to 
more unemployment and 
hunger among the blacks in 
South Africa and neigh- 
bouring lands. This was why 
she and Herr Kohl had re- 
jected many recent proposals 
for action against South 
Africa. 

She was much more of the 

believe that sanctions would ’ opinion that the positive mea- 


sures referred to in foe Brus- 
sels communique and that 
following the EEC ministers* 
meeting in The Hague last 
June, combined with political 
steps, had better prospects of 
ending apartheid. 

Heir Kohl said he contin- 
ued to be sceptical about 
sanctions, and added that they 
were an opportunity for some 
to do good business by evad- 
ing them. 


Sellafield pay-out 
for cancer victims 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


The families .of three men 
who contracted cancer after 
working at the SeDafidd 
nacfcuf vftifll 

plant, ' in Coinbria, were 
'awarded compensation total-; 
ling . more than £100,000 
yesterday. 

The laigest amount of 
£75,000 went for an employee 
who died of lung cancer in 
1969. 

An award described by Brit- 
ish Nuclear Fuels as “a part 
payment” of £31,500 was 
made for an employee who 
died of liver cancer in 1973. 
Details of the third settlement 
were not released. None of the 
workers was named. 

More than £600,000 has 
been paid since a compensa- 
tion scheme was agreed three 
years ago between the four 
unions on the site. 

British Nuclear Fuels said 
yesterday that agreement bad 
.been readied in principle to 
extend foe scheme to cover 
employees who were still 
working or retired. 

There were more than 100 


claims outstanding. It was 
hoped . that~wlrh“ttft>rc srrin- 
gent safety standards and 
greater awareness, of -recent 
years, the number of cases 
Would decrease. 

However,' the a wa r d s were 
not an acceptance of liability. 
The company said it was 
impossible to distinguish be- 
tween cancers that occurred 
naturally and those that might 
have been induced by 
radiation. 

Dependants of the victims 
could take cases to court. But 
foe company said that would 
be on an “all or nothing 
basis”, whereas foe compensa- 
tion scheme allowed for “part 
payment”. 

The secrecy which sur- 
rounds the method of award- 
ing compensation has been 
criticized by the environment 
group, Cumbrians Against a 
Radioactive Environment. 
Core. 

Miss Jean Emery said if a 
claim for compensation was 
rejected, there was nowhere 
for the relatives to appeal. 


Paris offers 
reward for 
bombers 

Paris (AJrjP, Reuter) — 
French police yesterday of- 
fered a reward of one million 
francs (£10Q;000) for. informa- 
tion on two Lebanese sought 
in connection with the bomb 
attacks foal have killed six 
people and injured more than 
200 since December. 

They named the suspects as 
Robert Ibrahim Abdallah and 
Maurice Ibrahim Abdallah 
and said that notice of the 
reward, foe first of its kind 
ever offered by the police 
directorate, would be posted 
across France from today. 

Police gave three Paris tele- 
phone numbers for infor- 
mants to calk 42-65-10-58, 45- 
54-81-43 and 45-54-13-32. 

Meanwhile, Mr Jacques 
Chirac, the Prime Minister, 
postponed a three-day visit to 
Canada next week 

He will fly to New York 
next Wednesday, however, to 
address the United Nations 
New terror threat, page 7 


Tories 
ready to 
privatize 
airports 

By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

The Government is close to 
announcing that the privatiza- 
tion of Britain's main airports 
is to take place in the middle 
of next year. 

The flotation of foe British 
Airports Authority, which 
runs Heathrow, Gatwick, 
Stansted and four Scottish 
aitpons. and about 20 of the 
larger local authority airports 
is now expected next June or 
July. 

The anticipated announce- 
ment follows the long-delayed 
decision last week to float 
British Airways eariy next 
year. 

The airports sdl-offis likely 
to raise well over £500 million 
for the Government, on lop of 
the £750 million to £1,000 
million likely to accrue from 
the airline sale. 

In between the two the 
Government is hoping to find 
a slot in the market for the sale 
of Rolls Royce. which min- 
isiere hope will bring in a 
further £1 billion. 

The series of sales next year, 
on top of the £5.5 billion 
British Gas flotation in 
November, will increase the 
scope of Mr Nigel Lawson, the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer, 
to move towards his declared 
aim in the next Budgei and 
the one after if an election is 
delayed into 1988, to reduce 
the standard rate of income 
tax to 25p. 

Under the airport plans the 
three big south-east airports 
will be separate entities under 
the control of a British Air- 
ports Authority PLC in Lon- 
don and the four Scottish 
airports, Prestwick. Glasgow. 
Edinburgh and Aberdeen, will 
be run by a Scottish area head 
office. 

The Bill paving the way to 
the privatization received the 
royal assent hist July. 

With the £1.5 billion 
Trustee Savings Bank flota- 
tion underway and the date at 
last set for the British Airways 
privatization, ministers like 
Mr John Moore, the Secretary 
of Stale for Transport, are 
being urged by the Treasury to 
go out and reall the privatiza- 
tion case. 

There appears to be con- 
fidence among ministers that 
the British Gas flotation will 
not .be badly banned by the 
recently published Labour 
Party plans for taking back 
British Telecom into “social 
ownership.” 

Telecom shareholders will 
have the choice of exchanging 
their voting shares for two 
types of non-voting securities 
or receiving cash in return for 
their shares - but only at the 
original flotation price. La*- 
bour spokesmen have in- 
dicated that a similar 
procedure win be followed for 
British Gas. 


Thomas Maguire, aged 27, a .instructions pretending to go 
Dubliner living at Milbourae along with the plot. But Magee 
Street, Blackpool, denies anti Murray escaped after a car 
conspiring to cause chase, 

explosions: ' ; ' 


Report, page 3 


Decline in 
shares 
continues 

Shares .fell heavily again in 
London yesterday, with an- 
other 27.4 points knocked off 
the FT-3Q index. The drop 
followed a record fall in 
Tokyo, where the Nikkei-Dow 
Jones Index closed 637.33 
points lower at 1 7,463.1 9. 

Prices also fell at the open- 
ing on Wall Street before 
losses .steadied to single fig- 
ures. A steadier tone cut the 
loss on the Dow Jones Av- 
erage to single figures. 

A rumour that Bankamerica 
was in financial difficulties 
was dismissed by the bank and 
the US Federal Reserve, but 
not before it had given inves- 
tors .on both sides of the 
Atlantic the jitters. 

The UK public sector 
borrowing requirement was 
£1.8 billion last month, well 
above , City expectations. 

The US current account 
deficit was a record S34.73 
billion (£23.43 billion) in foe 
Anrti-June quarter 

Details, page 21 
Market report page 23 


New offer 
likely at 
Wapping 

News International were ex- 
pected to offer print union 
leaders a new settlement pack- 
age to end the 8-monlh dis- 
pute over Wapping as the 
latest round of talks ended Iasi 
night. 

The leaders of foe two print 
unions, representing 5.5001 
members dismissed after go- 
ing on strike last January are 
expected to discuss foe .new 
offer with their national exec- 
utive committees later this 
week. If they approve foe deal 
the dismissed members will 
then be balloted. 

News Internationa] has 
made it clear that unless the 
union leaders. Mr Tony Dub- 
bins of the NGA arid Miss 
Brenda Dean of Segal 82, 
recommend the proposals 
they will be withdrawn. 

Neither foe unions nor the 
company would give details of- 
the offer, which is expected to 
concentrate on compensation. 

Last June foe company 

'Continued on page 211 coll 


When butterflies lose on 



By Alan Hamilton 

Thoughts of kindness were 
all that occupied foe mind of 
Mr Robert Thomas, a 'process 
worker, when he look an axe 
in hand and felled 34 trees in 
foe back garden of his home at 
Aldwych Close, Norroanby, 
near • Middlesbrough, 
Cleveland. 


wort, thistles and other deli- 
cacies which attract the 
creatures. But when the trees 
blossomed into full leaf they 
hid foe ragwort from the 
butterflies; so foe trees had to 
go. 


he 


. He did it, . his 
explained in court yesterday, 
for the. butterflies. 


Mr Thomas, a self-con- 
fessed nature' lover, had 
planted his garden wifo.rag- 


Unfortunaiely his act of 
Jepidopteral charity took no 
account of foe Town and 
solicitor . Country Planning Act which. 
' in any confliei between butter- 
flies and trees, is weighted 
heavily in favour of the Latter. 
Mr Thomas’ trees were the 
sulyect of a preservation or- 


der. a matter on which 
professed ignorance. 

His troubles began when a 
neighbour complained to 
Langbauigh Borough Council 
about Mr Thomas' 34 stumps 
of varying height; soon three 
council officials were bn his 
doorstep to enumerate the 34 
errors of his ways. 

Middlesbrough magistrates, 
wbo in any dispute between 
butterflies and -trees * are 
weighted heavily m favour of 
foe law. told Mr., Thomas 
yesterday that they had power 
to fine him £68JD00,atthe rate 


of £2.000 per tree, when he 
pleaded guilty to 34 offences 
under the Act, at the rate of 
one per tree. 

But foe magistrates took a 
charitable view; they fined 
him a mere £500 and ordered 
him to plant 20 new trees in- 
ti is garden. 

Mr Thomas, aged 41. whose 
garden also houses 10 aviaries, 
where he breeds British birds, 
was not entirely .repentant 
after yesterday’s hearing, 
particularly when he revealed 
that while feflmg one of the 


trees, he had managed to 
break his leg. 

”1 thought that was punish- 
ment enough without being 
fined. 

“I am a nature lover. I still 
have plenty of trees; ifl have 
to buy another 20. I suggest 
the council plants them where 
they will do more good,” Mr 
Thomas said. 

In a public park, for exam- 
ple, , where they would not get 
between a Red Admiral and 
its ragwort. 


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HOME NEWS 


Objectors to 
Channel 
plan inquiry 
walk-out 

By Sheila Gunn and Martin Fletcher, Political Staff 
Local opponents to the objections to the project. 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY 




HER 17 1986 


Local opponents to the 
proposed £3,000 million 
Channel Tunnel will look to 
the House of Lords to ensure 
they get a fair hearing, they 
said last night. 

If not, they are prepared to 
join Seal ink, the ferry com- 
pany, in considering an appeal 


In an unexpected twist, Mr 
Peter Snape, a Labour mem- 
ber of the committee and a 
champion of the Channel 
Tunnel, accused agents acting : 
on behalf of the objectors of j 
being paid employees of : 
Seahnk, one of the unsuccess- ; 


to the European Court of fu) bidders for the Channel 


Human Rights in Strasbourg. 

Mr Nicholas Ridley, the 
former transport secretary, 
originally promised that all 
local objectors to the£3 billion 
channel project would be 
given the right to pul their 
case. ■ 

Bnt even though more than 
4,000 petitions were sub- 
sequently submitted, the 
committee has decided to 
restrict its hearings in Kent to 
six days. 

Mr David Crowhurst, a 
Sheppey district councillor, 
described yesterday's hearings 
before the all-party Commons 
select committee on the Chan- 
nel Tunnel Bill as a force and a 
shambles. 

He is due to put the 
objections of Cheriton villag- 
ers today whose homes will 
overlook the railway terminal 
for tunnel traffic. Instead, he 
said, he would lead a walk-out 


project. 

Interviewed on BBC radio, 
he said- “We have evidence 
that Sealink has gone around 
the towns, Dover in particu- 
lar, collecting names of people 
who wanted u> protest. 

Further embarrassment for 
the committee chairman, Mr 
Alex Fletcher came when one 
of bis own committee, Labour 
MP Mr Nicholas Raynsfbrd, 
broke ranks at the end of an 
acrimonious morning session , 
in which few of those who had . 
hoped to speak bad been able ■ 
to. 

Siding with those who' , 
claimed they had been denied 
a hearing, Mr Raynsfbrd said ; 
he believed the committee 
should give “full opportunity 
to local people to put their 
case". He was later 
reprimanded 

Among those unable to 



\ ~ - 

•w' - , ■ * ■* ■* 








to protest at the “gagging*' of swak was Mr JimEgerafL 
objectors. who had. flown back from San 

After the Bill has passed Francisco to attend 
through all its stages in the Mr Robbie Browne-Oay- 
Coramons it will go through ton, a London parliamentary 
the same procedure in the consultant who has been co- 
House of Lords. Mr ordinating opposition claimed < 
Crowhurst, and many other that the committee was under , 
petitioners, hope a select government orders to com- j 
committee of pern will allow plete considerations of the Bill 
them more time to put their by the end of October. | 


By Tradi McIntosh 

A diiM peers thrash a gate 
leading to foe field at 
Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex, 
where anti-unclear protesters 
were yesterday caught oa the 
hop by a dawn convoy of 
lorries. 

Hundreds of villagers, who 
have been bl ockading foe site, 
were asleep when the 10 
lorries, escorted by up to 100 


police, delivered drilling 
e q u ipm e n t to foe she. Con- 
tractors employed by Nirex, 
foe Government's nuclear 
waste agency, had assembled 
at a secret rendezvous near foe 
village and moved off at dam. 

Angry villagers claimed foe 
police had overreacted. Mr 
Les Pipe, chairman of foe 
LOOO-strong Essex Against 
Nodear Draping Group, yes- 
terday said: “There was ab- 


solutely no need for nearly 100 
police to tine the roads and 
escort foe convoy. Local peo- 
ple feel incensed by foe pres- 
ence of so many police.” 

Nirex said foe. High Court 
fojmcfoms against prot e st ers 
blockading foe three other 
proposed dumping sites — hi 
Bedfordshire, Lincolnshire 
and Htonberside — would be 
served “sometime this week”. 

(Photograph: Leslie Lee) 


Ulster jobs equality drive 


By Richard Ford 

Big changes to strengthen allies are proposed to ensure 
laws, on discrimination in greater compliance from both 
Northern Ireland, including sections of industry with anti- 


Fees help is supported 

By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 
Nearly three out of four people support assisted places, 
people support the Mr David Woodhead, 
Government's assisted places director of ISIS who released 
scheme which enables chil- the figures at the SDP con- 


measures to penalize com- discrimination measures, 
panies tendering for govern- The changes would mean 
ment contracts, were public-sector employers had a 
proposed yesterday. statutory duty to practice 

They are designed to pro- equality of opportunity in- 
mote greater equality of stead of the present system 
employment between Prot- where they declare their mten- 
estant and Roman Catholic don to follow such a policy. 


dren from poor families to 
attend independent schools, a 
survey disclosed yesterday. 

The Labour Party has 
promised to abolish the 
scheme, but the poll carried 
out by MORI for the Indepen- 
dent Schools Information Ser- 


ference in Harrogate, said 
public support for the scheme 
was the highest yet and 10 per 
cent more than three years 
ago. 

He said: “The Labour Party 
should take note that support 
among its voters has grown 


workers in the private and 
public sectors. 


They would be required to 
introduce monitoring systems 


The proposals, introduced giving reliable and up-to-date 
in a government consultative information about foe make- 
paper, are an admission that up of their workforce; those 
despite efforts made since refusing to do so, would free 
direct rule was imposed in legal action resulting in fines 
1972 there, are still serious and surcharges. 


vice, shows that 72 percent of from SI percent to 60 percent 


employment differences be- 
tween the two communities. 
Financial and legal pen- 


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'Private-sector employers 
would be granted a certificate 
for sevefal yeare after signing a 

Increase 
in single 
parents 

The number of single-par- 
ent families continues to rise 
and an increasing number are 
headed by the mother. About 
1.S million children live with 
one parent 

The latest figures from the j 
Office of Population Censuses ; 
and Surveys show that in 1984 
there were 940,000 one-parent 
families, an increase of 12 per 
cent since 1979. 

In the early 1970s one in 
seven single-parent families 
was beaded by a father. That is 
now one in 11. 

The rise in families headed 
by mothers is because of the 
increase in divorce and the 
decline in rates of remarriage, 
lower in women. It is es- 
timated that one in five 
children will be affected by 
divorce before 16. 

Move than half of un- 
married mothers are aged 
under 25. 

Population Trends (Office of 
Population Censuses and Sur- 
veys, Stationery Office. £5). 


Children 
aged 12 
homeless 
in London 

By Robin Young 

Children aged as yonng as 
12, and one aged eight, have 
been found wandering home- 
less fat London, supporters of 
the Cfcarch of England 
Children's Society heard at 
their annual meeting 


declaration on equality of 
opportunity, but their 
progress would be monitored. 
The Government plans to 
fake powers to enable it to 
deny grants, including gen- 
erous aid available from the 
province's industrial develop- 
ment bond, to any company 
refusing to sign. 

Introducing the proposals, 
Mr Tom King* Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, 
insisted that the status quo 
was no longer an option. It 
was vital to improve employ- 
ment prospects. “If we don't 
succeed, it will be very damag- 
ing indeed mid there win be 
greater problems in attracting 
investment, particularly from 
the United Stales.” 

Tax bonus 
for profit 
sharing 

Amended proposals de- 
signed to attract companies 
and their employees to the 
idea of linking pay to profits 
were hunched by Mr Nigel 
Lawson, Chancellor of the 
Exchequer, yesterday (David 
Smith writes). 

The proposals, announced 
in a Green Paper, Profit 
Related Pay ; offer the possibil- 
ity oftax relief of £12 a month 
for participating workers on 
average earnings, at a prob- 
able cost to the Exchequer of 
£150 million a year. 

Mr Lawson said that relat- 
ing pay directly to profits gives 
employees a direct stake in the 
success of their company and 
should promote employment 
and discourage lay-offs. 

Schemes will have to in- 
clude 80 per cent of workers, 
and so cannot be for manage- 
ment only. The Chancellor 
will discuss the plan with 
industry and the unions and 
legislation could be included 
in next year's Finance B0L 

War on drag traffic 


One of foe society's 150 
projects last year provided a 
“safe bouse” for young run- 
aways in London. 

The house, whose address is 
kept secret to prefect young 
people sheltered there from 
nndae pressure, has provided 
refuge for more than 250 
children under 17 since open- 
ing to May 1985. 

Most are seat there after 
being picked up by police 
patrols late al right, or after 
contacting the serial services 
departments of Westminster 
awl r.mJn. 

“The eight year old was 
exceptional”, ■ admitted the 
society's director, Mr lan 
Sparks. “He was one of a 
vagrant family of children. Brt 
at 12 it is quite common and at 
14 very common for children to 
ran away from home.” 

In fact, 2£82 children aged 
under 17 were reported miss- 
ing to foe Metropolitan police 
to 1985. Many more leave 
heme to live oa the streets 
throughout Britain. The Lon- 
don boroughs alone accepted 
27,000 families as homeless to 
1984-85, inctodtog an es- 
timated 39,000 children and 
young people. 

Of the 250 harboured by foe 
society's central London Teen- 
age Project, mere than 40 per 
cent were runaways from Lon- 
don and the Sooth-east. 

More alarmingly, 40 per 
cent off foe children haisSkd by 
tire project to its first six 
months had been to foe care of 
local au tho riti e s before run- 
ning away to Loudon. Of foe 
girls, more than a quarter had 
been sexually or physically 
assaulted at home before flee- 
ing, and 6 per cent of foe boys 
had suffered similar abuse. 

The society believes that 
thousands of young people run 
away to London every year. 

They are easily drawn into 
the city's subculture of ing% 
crime and prostitut ion. They 
steep to doorways, hanut aff- 
right cafes, or sleep on the 
Ctrdeline. 

If they do come to foe 
attention of helping agencies 
■ or the police, all -that can 
usually be done is to return 
them hesse,, 

The . society's safe house 
telephone number is pvtn to 
parents or those who have 
responsibility for the young 
people who arrive there, but 
otherwise the children are 
protected while negotiations 
for their return are carried out 
info foeir fuQ knowledge and 
participation. 

The society, which has 800 
employees to its social work 
department, believes foal foe 
project is unique to Britain. 

It plans to torid a seminar to 
explain the project's work 
later this year, and also aims 
to pabtish a safes of booklets 
and leaflets aimed at helping 
parents and others to rec- 
ognize danger signs to the 
young and assist them to, 
p re venti n g greater numbers of 
runaways in future. 

The society does not claim 
100 pa cart success. 

Karen, a girl of 14, had 
absconded from a local author- 
ity assessment centre, and had 
already taken to prostitution 
and drugs before being taken 
to foe society's teenage project 
for a male p ro st i tu te who was 
concerned for her safety. 

It took several weeks to win 
ha confidence because police 
had escorted her borne several 
times previously, and she was 
afraid of bring “locked up”. 


Europe eyes US nightmare 


A 


ii 

XI 

ii 

\ 

HOTELS*RE SORTS 


By Stewart Tendler 
Grime Reporter 

Drug trafficking to foe 
United Stales alone is now 
worth an estimated $100 bil- 
lion (£670 bilfibn) a year. 
Worldwide the trade to heroin, 
cocaine, canqabb and syn- 
thetic dregs is easily foe most 
lucrative — and de structive — 
criminal occapatios. 

American experts say tint 
the illegal use of drags is 
costing foe country $46 billion 
(£313 hiHfon) a year to had 
health, low productivity and 
crime. 

In Europe, governments and 
police watch anxiously to see if 
cocaine; the current scourge of 
the US. win have the same 
effect in their countries. 

Mr Ronald Reagan, US 
President, and his wife Nancy 
this week launched a fresh 
campaign against drugs in the 
United States, while Mr David 
MeMor. Minister of State at 
foe Home Office, visited a 
South American jungle to 
explore fresh ways of prevent- 
ing cocaine reaching Britain. 

Mr Colin Hewitt, heading 
foe country's national drags 
intelligence operation, has 
said that foe police hare not 
stemmed the flood of drags 
and Mr Mellor's department 
is soon to issue figures show- 
ing that foe number of reg- 
istered drag addicts has risen 
again. 

Britain is estimated to have 


Heroin fears 
‘overplayed’ 

Fears and allegations about 
heroin abuse have been over- 
played by foe media, claims a 
report by the Health Educa- 
tion Cooncil published today. 

The report, based on a 
survey in the north of En- 
gland. says that typical Heroin 
users are most likely to be 
young men and women in 
their late teens and twenties. 
Younger age groups are more 
likely to abuse alcohol and 
solvents. It provides evidence 
that heroin abuse is con- 
centrated in areas of high 
unemployment and social 
deprivation. 


cannabis and there are 

500.000 heroin users. 

Pakistan, which has become 
a major centre for heroin, has 
an addict population of 

300.000 and Thailand, border- 
ing on the heroin Golden 
Triangle region of South-east 
Asia, may have up to 500,000 
addicts. 

These are among the coun- 
tries where the war against 
drug trafficking is being 
fought. A United Nations 
agency has been trying to 
persuade peasant fanners 
growing the opium poppy or 
the coca leaf to turn to other 
crops, while their governments 
are taught modem methods of 
drug detection. 

In 1986-7 foe overall Ameri- 
can budget for foe anti-drug 
campaign will total 


mSSp e!i Britain has recently opened 
serves no useful purpose for „ n .^ nma i M 


serves no useful purpose tor anmt j oaa j 
foe public to be informed only r;«iitoenr 
by foe demonic mythology of mSar** 
heroin misuse, or the highly aricine i 
self-dramatized accounts of ojemlcri] 
wealthy pop stars." have 

officers w 

up to §9,000 addicts. The restigatiou 
Netherlands estimated earlier produced 
this year that it has 15,000 to * .after year. 


lion). 

Britain has recently opened 
a national centre to coordinate 
intelligence foe 

number of drug Squad officers 
working with forces or re- 
gional crime sqB&d&Cttstoms 
also have several hundred 
officers working in an- in- 
vestigation section which has 
produced major hauls year 


20,000. Figures from Italy 
show 30.000 registered heroin 
addicts two years ago. 

The United States is foe 
single largest market for 
drugs. The Latest figures show 

five million people are cocaine 
users. 19 milfioa have used 


Bof the dregs keep flowing. 
Some investigators believe yet 
more officers are needed whSe 
others pin . foeir hopes on new 
legislation like that passed to 
Britain this year allowing for 
foe seizure of assets from 
convicted drag traffickers. 


World Chess Championship 

Tables turned by 
brilliant Kasparov 


9 t <^££{53; 


Gary Kasparov, the world 
chess champion, has moved 
into a three-point lead 'after 
-amazing scenes on Monday in 
the concert hall of the Lenin- 
grad Hotel 

The score is now 9‘h to 6 n 
and Kasparov needs 2!£ 
points from foe remaining 
eight games to retain his title. 

jFor much of the sixteenth 
game experts saw Karpov as 
having a decisive advantage. 
Indeed, after Black's thirty- 
first move —Rb3, Kasparov’s 
resignation appeared im- 
minent. His king's side attack 
seemed stillborn and on the 
quebn's flank White's forces 
were shattered. Kasparov's 
knight on a3 was also obvi- 
ously doomed. ■ 

Then, on move 32, 
Kasparov captured a Black 
knight and Karpov went into a 
trance. For more than 40 
minutes the former champion 
pondered which way to re- 
take. He nearly lost on lime 
forfeit and clearly became 
increasingly agitated. 

When Karpov finally 
played 32_cxd3 Kasparov 
launched a sudden and dev- 
astating attack which blasted 
his incredulous opponent off 
foe board. At the dose 
Karpov’s position had been 
destroyed — his queen gone 
and ms king exposed to a 
mating attack. 

After White's fortieth move 
the packed hall burst into 
applause. 

On move 41 Karpov finally 

Miners on 
strike for 
more work 

By Tim Jones 

■ More than 400 miners went 
on strike yesterday to get more 
overtime only days after set- 
ting production records. 

The stoppage happened at 
the Prince of Wales Colliery, 
Pontefract, whose 1,200 min- 
ers last wedc produced 34,489 
tonnes. Only a few miners 
were told they could work 
overtime at the weekend. 

The pit is one of six in 
North Yorkshire producing 
more than five tonnes a 
manshift, compared with the 
national average of just over 
three tonnes. 

However, talks were being 
held last night and production 
is expected to resume today. 

Mr Arthur Scargill, presi- 
dent of the National Union of 
Mineworkers, who is due to 
meet Sir Robert Haslam, Brit- 
ish Coal’s new chairman, will 
be unhappy that men who 
backed him during foe strike 
are firmly wedded to the 
productivity scheme. 

Losses caused by the South 
Wales miners ban on coal 
production during overtime 
are nearing £2 minion. The 
action by 12,000 miners is in 
protest about delays in the 
implementation of a pay 
award. 

• British Coal yesterday an- 
nounced plans to close foe 
124-year-okl HocknaD colliery 
near Nottingham, which lost 
£15 million last year. AH 1,300 
men wifi be offered voluntary 
redundancy or transfers. 


capitulated and humed from 
foe stage. Kasparov at once 
returned from backstage to be 
greeted by a tumult of ap- 
plause. . 

Grandmasters were dazed 
by Kasparov's performance. It -; 
was acclaimed as. the most ■ 
exciting of the match. 

OM guard, page 12 • 
White Kasparov 

Wats Bart WWe „ 

1 e4 eS "2 Mu3 Ba6 
2Nf3 Nc6 23 Ro3 Rb8_ ; . 


Wats Sack 
1 e4 eS 
2Nf3 Nc6 

3 Bb5 afi 

4 Ba4 NS 

5 0-0 Be7 

6 Rel b5 

7 Bb3 d6 
8c3 CM) 

9 h3 BB7 

10 d4 Re8 
It NM2 BB 

12 34 h6 

13 Bc2 extU 

14 cxd4 Nb4 
ISBbl <5 

16 d5 Nd7 

17 Ra3 c4 

18 Nd4 OS 

19 N(2)Q NcS 

20 axt)5 axb5 

21 NxD5 Bxa3 


24 e5 dxe5 

25 NxsS NM3 

26 Nq 4 Qb6 

27 Ro3 o6 


29 013 W7 

30 BxfB KxfB 

31 Kh2 RU3 

32 Bxd3 cxd3 

33 CM Qxa3 
34M6 Qe7 

35 Rxg6 Qe5 

36 Rg§chKs7 

37 doefi Ke8 

38 Reach Kd5 

39 Rxe5 

ch Nxe5 

40 d7 Rb8 

41 Nxf7 
Sack resigned 



Hattersley 

promises 

efficiency 

By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

Rigorous checks to ensure 
increased public expenditure 
under a labour government 
was efficiently distributed and 
earmarked for high priorities 
was outlined last night by Mr 
Roy Hattersley, Labour's 
shadow Chancellor. 

He said that members of 
Labour’s Shadow Cabinet are 
reviewing public expenditure. 

Under Mr Hattersiey's 
plans, which have been put to 
the Shadow Cabinet- but are 
not Labour policy, a new 
system" of cash planning will 
monitor spending 

departments. ‘ 

But even more radically, Mr 
Hattersley wants a system.’: 
where each department will be 
asked periodically to justify . 
expenditure, starting from 
scratch. 

That would change the ten- . 
dency for increases agreed for 
a particular expenditure to be 
I added to existing spending 
and programmes, thus 
continuing existing un- 
bearable programmes at the 
expense of potentially more 
valuable ones. 

In a speech to a British 
Institute of Management din- 
ing club, Mr Hattersley de- 
scribed bis proposed, new 
system as “zero-based 
budgeting” and said that it 
was aimed at putting public 
expenditure on a more sen-' 
sible footing. 















x 


Fire-proof plastics 
and smoke hoods 
ahead for airliners 


By Harvey Elliott and Peter Davenport 


y- ] ' 

i!}r promises 
’-"k cffician 


_ Tough new regufcttions 
aimed at preventing aircraft 
'^4 fires, including a ban cm the 
* the use of flammable plastics 
in. cabins, are being in- 
troduced by aviation 
authorities. 

The move comes as the 
inquest into the Manchester 
airport disaster was told yes- 
terday that investigators con- 
sider it “imperative'’ ' that 
commercial airlines fit pas- 
senger smoke hoods to pre- 
vent the needless loss of life in 
similar accidents. 

The new safety rules, which, 
will be mandatory on all new 
aircraft and eventually im- 
posed on all existing fleets, 
ban the use of flammable 
p plastics on the walls of aircraft 
cabins. Existing regulations 
' cover only the use of flam- 
mable materials in seats. 

Aviation authorities have 
for years been concerned at 
the use of plastic which burns 
easily, gives off toxic fumes 
and drips on to people trapped 
in the cabin. But until now no 
suitable replacement has been 
available. 

Tests in America, under the 
control of the Federal Avi- 
ation Administration (FAA), 
have shown that it is possible 
to produce a plastic which can 
^ be moulded to an aicraft 
shape, which looks similar to 
that now in use but which can 
resist a fierce fire. 

The FAA has. already or- 
dered airlines to meet the new 
cabin safety standards within 
the next four years. Newly 
registered US aircraft win 
have to comply with an in- 
terim standard of cabin wall 
materials within two years. All 
existing fleets will have to 
comply within four years from 


became law. 

■ The Civil Aviation Author- 
ity (CAA) in Britain is prepar- 
ing us own rules which will be 
as tough as those from the 
FAA. They will be published 






summer was told 
that a report issued 


Investigation Branch (AlB), 
who carried out research into 
evacuation procedures and 
survivability in the disaster, 


was asked by the coroner. Mr disaster. They include the 
Leonard Gorodkin, if aircraft strengthening of seals near 


would soon be equipped with 
hoods. 


over-wing exits to prevent 
their collapse, an improve- 


He said: “I sincerely hope ment to the public address 
so. We think it is imperative system to counter the loss of 


before any further lives are power on engine failure, and. 
lost needlessly in these the repositioning of seats to 
situations.” give improved access to emer- 

The jury was told yesterday ge ncy exits, 
that the provision of smoke The hearing continues. 


Disappointment 
on slow learners 


By David Cross 


Many children taking part 
in a new government scheme 
to help slow learners have 
achieved disappointingly low 
standards in English and 
mathematics, according to 
schools inspectors. 

Their generally poor perfor- 
mance was in spite of strong 
emphasis on improving the 
basic skills of literacy and 
numeracy, the schools inspec- 
torate said in a report on the 
lower-attaining pupils pro- 
gramme. 

The scheme, which was 


worst features of the scheme, 
the inspectors criticized the 
extent to which the reading of 
literature had been neglected 
in many schools. 

In one, for example, what 
literature was taught consisted 
of short stories, often ghost 
stories, and the teacher had 
not considered himself brave 
enough to study poetry. 

In another school, some of 
the pupils’ folders had little 
work in Lfyem, and what there 
was concentrated on 
“monotonous” subjects such 


introduced by Sir Keith Jo- as alcoholism, deprivation 
seph. the former Secretary of and nuclear war. 


State for Education, in 1 983. is 
designed to make schooling 
more relevant for children in 
the bottom 40 per cent of the 
ability range in the fourth and 
fifth years of secondary 
school. 

Nevertheless, the inspectors 
said, the success of the scheme 
was “likely to be seen long- 
term rather than short-term”, 
when the better- attitudes it 
stimulated towards schooling 
could be translated into aca- 


In mathematics classes, 
there was little work involving 
practical measurement to be 
seen, the inspectors discov- 
ered. There was also little 
evidence of pupils having the 
confidence ■ to combine ele- 
mentary skills to perform a 
complex task. 

“It was depressing that in 
several schools pupils were 


Diseased 
smokers 
set to sue 

By Frances G3>b 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

More than a dozen victims 
of an arterial disease linked 
with smoking, which leads to 
the amputation of limbs, have 
come forward as potential 
daimaints for what would be 
the first legal proceedings in 
Britain for compensation, 
against a tobacco company. ! 

The sufferers of the periph- 
eral vascular disorder, known 
as Buerger’s Disease, have 
contacted ASH, the. anti- 
smoking group, after recent 
publicity of the qare ofMr Bob 
Taylor, aged 30, a Liverpool 
community worker, who feces 
losing a leg because of the 
disease. 

His case and the 12 new 
cases will form the core from 
which a test case is likely to be 
selected to claim compensa- 
tion from a tobacco company. 
ASH hopes to obtain legal aid. 

The organization is dosely 
watching the progress of a test 


demic performance. lors expressed “their seric 

One of the positive features concern" at the quality 
to emerge from their study of reaching in some instances. 
y,50° pupils m about 100 A Surwy of[he 
ahools who took ^rtin foe p up n s Programme, report 
Qlst stage of foe programme Inspectors (Department 
was foal they became more Education and Science, Publii 
articulate, confident and so- tions Despatch Cent 
aa}ly aware. Honeypot Lane, Stannic 

' Describing some of foe Middlesex HA7 1AZ). 


not taught to use a calculator case in Melbourne, Australia, 
efficiently", they said. where Mrs Ruth Scanlon, aged 

In science, too, the inspec- 38, jvbp is. dying of lung 


tors expressed “their serious cancer, is suing two cigarette 
concern" at foe quality of companies for damages. She _ 


has been granted legal aid. 

In parallel with the product 
liability proceedings, ASH is 


Pupils Programme, report by 

HM Inspectors (Department of aIsQ feunchmga concerted 
Education and Science, Publics- campaign on benaJi or pon- 


tions Despatch 
Honeypot Lane, S 
Middlesex HA7 IA2). 


Centre, smokers with a view to legal 
Stamm ore, action against employers over 
i- smoky offices. 

This will be the first time 


Ilea urged to withdraw fore” e ^ D ^idustrial tribunal 

^ o against employers for failing 

j ‘homosexual book’ 

By Sheila Gunn, Political Staff m that 


■ Two government ministers 
yesterday condemned the use 
of a book in London schools 
depicting a young girl in bed 
with her lather and his homo- 
sexual lover. 

In an unprecedented move ■ 
Mr Kenneth Baker. Secretary 
6 f State for Education and 
Science, and Mr Richard 
Luce. Minister for the Arts, 
appealed to the Inner London 
Education Authority to with- 
draw Jennie fives with Eric 
and Martin from all school 
libraries. They do not have foe 
power to order its withdrawal. 

■ The book was part of the 
Controversial literature used 
in Labour-controlled schools 
Wtich led many parents to 
demand government control 
Of the way sex is taughL 

. Mr Baker yesterday de- 
scribed the Ilea book as 
"pretty blatant homosexual 
propaganda". 

! He added: “There are many 
good books op sex education 


_ ~ n against employers for failing 

11 Cl I hnn IT " in fo eir duty to provide a safe 

U-41JI UUUn. and healthy working environ- 

.Political Staff - "ffSSTKtetb* 

but I do not think this is one of within a year, with the backing 
them." of a trades union, such a case 

Ilea declared foe book was could be successful. 

not. considered suitable for • 

open library use but was Warning over 

willing to lend it on request , “ . 

and make it available to nflllffeFOnS lOV 
individual pupils in excep- ° " 

tional circumstances under Trading Standards officers 
adult guidance. are warning shoppers about a 

Mr Luce said: “The book’s potentially dangerous' new 
message to young and possibly toy — an electric oven made 
impressionable children is of plastic. They say it appears 
conveyed through foe un- to break all electrical and toy 
ashamed use of photographic safety regulations, 
portrayals which could be read Called the “Super Homo 
as possibly advocating Magico Lily", it has instruo- 
bomosexuahty." tions in Soanish and there are 


WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 19K6 


. '■#> 


lUMfc INbWS 



, \ ;■ ‘ ' w.ji 

. . v . • . "■ '. ".r# ■ v -4' >!. : . 


August 20, when the ruling hoods had been under constd- ? 


eration since 1965. Four years 
later foe FAA had proposed 
amendments to include foe 
use of hoods, but they were 
later withdrawn. 

Mr Trimble said that three 


as a mandatory airworthiness reasons had been pm forward: 
notice early next year and that foe time taken to put on i 
airlines will begiven up to two foe hoods would affect 
years to install the equipment, evacuation time; that the 
The cost of installing the prototypes, “a simple bag of 
new material will be enor- air", could lead to passengers 
mous and will worry airlines collapsing from carbon di- 
still suffering from a big oxide poisoning, and that on 
reduction in profits. long overnight flights, chil- 

They are still installing new dren might play with foe 
“fire blocked" seals, enter- hoods and suffocate, 
gency floor lighting, better exit Etui since then research into 


» ~ v C.| 



Wife and 
son tried 
to protect 
Ted Moult 

Ted Moult the farmer, 
broadcaster and television 
personality, shot himself dur- 
ing a bout of depression, in 
spite of his family's attempts 
ro protect him from himself, 
an inquest was told yesterday. 

Mr Moult aged 60, who 
died at his farm in Ticknail,' 
Derbyshire, on September 3, 
had been worrying unduly 
about his crops, the bad 
weather and alro a planned 
appearance in a Christinas 
pantomime. 

The inquest at Derby was 
told that Mr Moult, known 
most recently for his double 
glazing advertisements on 
television, had been receiving 
medical treatment for de- 


doors and smoke detectors in smoke hoods had developed 
lavatories — work which is ex- rapidly to foe point where the 
peeled to cost British airlines accident investigation branch 
£1 1.4 million this year alone, had made recommendations 
The inquest on foe 55 about their use to foe CAA. 
passengers and crew who died Mr Trimble said that the 
in the British Airtours Boeing provision of hoods would 
737 at Manchester airport last enable passengers trapped in a 


erday smoke filled cabin to maintain - 
years consciousness and thus avoid 


r.J.'H:' 


'MM 


ago said that the provision of the serious problem caused by 
smoke hoods would not only people collapsing and block- 
save more lives than other mg exit routes, as happened at 
improvements, but would also Manchester, 
cost less. Hoods, he said, would take 

Mr Edward Trimble, an only a few seconds to put on, 
inspector with the Depart- but would buy minutes of 
ment of Transport's Accident evacuation time. i 


The inquest was also told of 1 
other recommendations that i 
foe accident investigation 
branch had proposed after foe j 


Mr Chay Blyth, round-the- 
world yachtsman (left), and 
Mr Richard Branson, hud of 
the Virgin groom chose the 
Cutty Sark yesterday to 
launch a new trade and tour- 
ism venture (AngeUa Johnson 
writes). 

The £3 millio n scheme will 
take the best of British coltnre 
and products to America on 
two coasters converted into 
dipper ships similar to the 
Cutty Sark. 

British Clippers will create 
more than 100 jobs and the 


conversion work win be done 10 -mouth session along the 
in British dockyards. eastern and western coasts of 

Sixty jobs wfld go to on- America and Canada, 
employed people aged 18 to 26. At each port of call the 
who will be “ambassadors", exhibition will sptD over on to 
They will be riven four months, the waterfront where visitors 
training on how to safl the will be entertained by street 


ships, run exhibitions and 
carry out “diplomatic" duties. 

Up to 35 companies, includ- 
ing Bnrbenys and Data Gen- 
eral, will be able to nm shops 
on the vessels. 

The first voyage wfll be next 


theatre, a Beefeater, flower 
girls and other forms of Brit- 
ish pageantry. Inside the clip- 
pers they wfll be able to buy 
British goods. * 

The original British dippers 
opened np the New Workl in 


year when the dippers set off return for goods such as 
for Miami in tiie first leg of a tobacco and. cotton. 

IRA terror trial 


On foe morning of his spend 
death. Mr Moult was at Mr 
Scaddows Farm when his Veutn 
eldest son, William, said that been 
he became aware of him trying Gold , 
to shut foe door in Mis 3 m g 0 
M Quit's* face. She called him maU 
across foe farmyard to come the ho 
and help her because she was aim 
afraid he might do something Cheetl 
stupid. vant f 

Together they took foe of- holida 
fice keys from his father. 10 would 
prevent him from locking the mothc 
door and then he noticed that Rea 
his fether was dressed only in play f 
shirt and underpants. Portfo 

He and his mother finished a stan 
dressing Mr Mouh and left f 0; 
him sitting on a chair in the Pon 
office. At foal point his The 
mother noticed a wood saw pQ 
lying on the floor. They picked 
it up and took it to an adjacent 
room. .4s they were leaving 
that room they heard a . . / 
gunshot. . / 

Mr William Moult told Mr : 

Alan Moore, the Derby coro- 
ner, foal he and his mother * asg 
rushed into the office and jgll 
found Mr Moult on the floor 
with blood coming from his -!&■ 
head. 

He said he knew that his 
lather had been receiving 
medical treatment and was p|||: 
taking sleeping and anti- 
depressant tablets. He had 
also been visited by a psychi- 
atrist . . 

The coroner recorded a 
verdict that Mr Moult killed 
himself while suffering from ' K» 
depression. 


—% old 

Prize will 
pay for 
holiday 

A retired teacher, a sales 
manager and a radio officer at 
a ship-to-sbore coastal station 
are amo ng the winners ®f 
yesterday's Portfolio Gold 
dividend of £4,000. 

Mr Leslie Ecc lesion, aged 
56, of RougUee, Burnley, foe 
retired teacher, has not had a 
holiday for two years. “1 think 
I'll use foe money to go on a 
fishing holiday in Scotland," 
he said. 

Mr Jonathan Oliphaut. the 
sales manager, from Stanley, 
Chippenham, Wiltshire, has 
been playing the game for the 
past six months. He said he 
would “wait and see" how to 
spend his share. 

Mr John Johnston, from 
Veutnor, the radio officer, has 
been playing the Portfolio 
Gold game since it started. “I 
am going 10 use (he money to 
make some improvements to 
the house," he said. 

Another winner, Mr Stanley 
Cheetham. a retired Civil Ser- 
vant from Chester, who is on 
holiday in Wales, said he 
would spend his winnings on 
another holiday. 

Readers who would like to 
play the game can obtain a 
Portfolio Gold card by sending 
a stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn. BB1 6 AJ. 


w 


Mr Jonathon Oliphaut 


Informer ‘tipped off bomb police 


A tip-off from an IRA 
informer helped police to foil 
bomb attacks- on an Army 
camp and a public house used 
by soldiers and their fiimtlies,a 
jury at the Central Criminal 
Court was told yesterday. 

Raymond O'Connor, aged 
50, a petty ‘ criminal, had 
become "actively involved” 
in plotting the raids on the 
Weeton Army camp at Black- 
pool and foe nearby Eagle and 
Child Inn, where h was in- 
tended to cause “enormous 
devastation", Mr Roy Amlot, 
for the prosecution, raid. 

But Mr O'Connor went to 
the police because “he could 
no longer bear what was going 
on". From then on, he acted 
under police instructions. 

He pretended to go along 
with the planning for the 
bombings and travelled to 
Dublin, where he met IRA 
men. including Mr Brendan 

Reporter 
was fairly 


Swords, .and another man 
whom urn described as a 
“Gerry Adams look-alike". 

On trial is Thomas Maguire, 
aged 27, from Dublin with an 
address at Milbourne Street, 
Blackpool, who, Mr Amlot 
said, was a Provisional IRA 
intelligence -officer and go- 
between. 

Maguire denies conspiring 
between January 1, 1982, and 
April 27, 1983, with Patrick 
Magee, Patrick Murray and 
others to cause explosions in 
the United Kingdom. 

On foe first day of foe trial, 
Mr Amlot told foe jury that 
Weeton camp housed foe 
Second Battalion, The Light 
Infantry, which had a dose 
connection with Northern Ire- 
land and was a likely IRA 
target. 

“The plot reached its dimax 
in April 1983, when Magee 
and Murray appeared in ■ 

Doctor in 
Arab case 


Blackpool to cany out the 
bombing," Mr Amlot said. 

Nine -months earlier- Mr 
O’Connor bad approached 
Lancashire police and told 
officers of foe plot, but he also 
told many lies, Mr Amlot said. 

He said: “I tell you all this 
about O’Connor because he is 
a crown witness. He must be 
treated as an accomplice. 

In February 1982, Mr 
O'Connor was arrested in 
Blackpool for shoplifting. Po- 
lice found a letter from Ma- 
guire which was hidden in a 
police van. 

In other letters Maguire 
gave Mr O'Connor the code 
name “Judy” for the Weetcn 
camp and asked him to “look 
al Judy at night time to see 
how she looks." 

On April 12, Murray and 
Magee arrived in Blackpool 
Mr O'Connor took Magee - 
whom he knew as “the 


. . „ ~ mm . „ lUCUIMUCUUICUKlIVllUl 

mechanic -fora drink at the of the fond, set 

n^LShUd. Then they after 56 people died and m 
waited past the mam gates of tban m wre fayoroj &, , 

tbecamp fire at the Bradford C 

1 The. was foP /®*. 8 football ground in May 1 
bomb insideavan outside foe yeaT% sued yesterday. 


Bradford fire 
fund to help 
young players 

Young footballers will bene- 
fit from the small surplus of 
the Bradford Disaster AppeaL 
The first detailed report of the 
I trustees .of the fond, set up 
after 56 people died and more 
than 300 were injured in the 
fire at foe Bradford City 
football ground in May last 


Eagle and Child. 

“In a crowded pub foe 
devastation would be 
enormous," Mr Amlot said. 

Mr O’Connor was escorted 
into court by plainclothes 
police officers and described 
bow Maguire asked if he was 
interested in “helping foe 
cause". He agreed and went 
with Maguire on a five-hour 
reconnaissance of the Army 
camp. 

Mr O'Connor told the jury 
he became worried when. he 
started receiving letters from 
Maguire. “Anybody could see 
from foe letters what implica- 
tions that might mean. I didn’t 
warn to get involved," he said. 

The case continues today. 


It showed that donations 
and Interest totalled £4.25 
million and that administra- 
tion bad cost only £45.000. 

Bereaved and injured people 
have been paid a total of £331 
million and about £92,000 has 
been paid in income tax, 
leaving a surplus at the end of 
Jone of £176,000. 

The trustees say they have 
already made donations to 
support two ventures for young 
footballers and they have set 
up a charitable trust. 

Polytechnic firsts 

First-class honours degrees 
awarded by polytechnics will 
be published tomorrow. 


dismissed denies plot 


A reporter dismissed by foe 
Morning Star, the communist 
newspaper, after disclosing on 
television how a Bulgarian 
agent offered him £80,000 to 
- trace a KGB defector, has lost 
his claim for unfair dismissal 
Mr Graeme Atkinson, aged 
36, told an industrial tribunal- 
how he went behind his 
newpaper’s back because he 
believed they wonld kill his 
story for polictical reasons. 

He gave an exclusive telo 


By A Staff Reporter 

A Jordanian doctor accused 
of plotting a terrorist bombing 
campaig n in the United King- 
dom denies beings member of 
- the extreme Abu Nidal 
organization, the Central 
Criminal Court was told 
yesterday. 

Mr Jeffrey Thomas, QC, his 
counsel told foe jury foal Dr 
Rasmi A wad “completely de- 
nies being a member of Abu 
Nidal and has no involvement 


We re looking 
for people with the 
following degrees. 


he believed the_ Bulgarian nroani7atinn - 


Secret ■ Police had tried to 
recruit him after his news- 
paper sent him to the East 
The reporter was dismissed 
after foe Channel 4 20/20 
Vision documentary. Spying 


homosexuality. tions in Spanish and there are 

• Special teams of inspectors fears that children's fingers 
will start operating in Inner could easily reach electrically 
London schools later this term live ports of foe toy or that foe 
in an attempt to raise foe level whole toy could become live, 
of education. Dr David Har- . Jan Welch of Hertford- 
greaves, Ilea's chief inspector, shire Trading Standards, says 


Magico Lily", it has instnxc- for the comrades, about East, 
cm blocks mtelliecnce aeen- 


con finned yesterday. 


foe oven, which sells for about 


The teams wfll pay special £ 5 , is heated by two 100 watt 
attention to language and buIbs.Tests carried out by 
literacy problems m primary another authority have shown 
schools and under achieve- that the oven's temperature 
ment in secondary schools. can rise to-at least 145 degC 


cm blocks’ intelligence agen- 
cies, featuring Mr Atkinson’s 
vist to Sofia, was shown in 
May this year. 

After the bearing Mr Atkinson 
said: “There is no doubt in my 
mind that the Bulgarian’s 
wanted me to spy for them 
and because of my paper’s 
well known polftcal views. I 
felt I had -to take foe story 
elsewhere to be treated with 
the importance it deserved." 


Electricity cuts will mean up to 7 % price fall 


By David Young 
1 Energy Correspondent 

I Electricity prices are to be 
cut next month with con- 
sumers in some areas paying 

as much as 7 per cent less than 

they did a year ago. 

* The price reductions mean 
that the industry will remain 
highly competitive with Brit- 
ish Gas, which is soon to be 
privatized. . 

. The 12 area electricity 
boards in England and Wales 
are to meet next Toesday to 


complete the tariff schedules, 
which they will announce on 
October L 

In South Wales, the cut has 
already been' confirmed as 2 


per cent redaction by foe end 
of tin* year. 

The Electricity Council 
which oversees the operation 
of the area boards and the 


per cent In addition to the 3 per Central Electricity Generating 
cent already ordered because Board, stud it planned' to make 


of lower cod prices negotiate.! 
In foe wake of the JaB in the 
world oil twice. . . 

The largest of foe boards, 
foe London Etertridty Board, 
which has more than IB 
mflGoa customers, is expected . 
to announce cuts in domestic 
tariffs which will amount to a 7, 


an announcement on the issue 
later fobs month. 

The dectricity supply in- 
dustry, which has seen its 
market share rise by 4 per cent 
a year daring the 1980s, has 
niade it dear that _ ft wiB- 
remain competitive 

ish Gas or-*''' 


public sector. 

British Gas, which is likely 
to be floated in the City on 
November 21 at a price iff 
about £55 billion, b expected 
to spend its first year in foe 
private sector stepping up 
efforts to win customers from 
electricity. 

The new price arts could be. 
reflected in MBs $ep*' ^ 
before Chrisfro— 

averpne 


organization . 

Counsel made his remarks 
as a Spanish police inspector 
described finding documents 
about terrorist targets in the 
doctor’s flat in Spain.- He 
searched it after Dr Awad was 
arrested in England. 

The Spanish detective, 
whose name was not dis- 
closed , was giving evidence at 
the trial of Dr Awad and 
Nassar Muhammad, an Iraqi 
Dr Awad, aged 43. and Mr 
Muhammad, aged 28, a stu- 
dent. deny conspiring with 
others to cause explosions in 
the UK last year. The prosecu- 
tion alleges they collected four 
high explosive grenades from 
a Libyan known as Mr L 
Earlier, the court was told 
that Mr I bad received -fob 
grenades from a Libya Arab 
Airline officer , at Heathrow 
Airport He had informed foe 
police who substituted harm- 
less items. 

Mr 1, who was heavily 
disguised when he gave ev- 
idence on Monday, arranged 
to meet foe two defendants 
and handed over the 
while police 
two men were 
’ arrested by 
near Regent's 

continues 


A 


No amount of ‘O' levels 
ill help- you disarm a man 
dthaknife. 

That’s why we look for 
people with die right blend 
af personal qualities rather 
tan the right qualifications. 

To help police London, 
ill need plenty of common 
a degree of composure, sense, courage, a strong sense 
of fair play, a genuine concern for others, a degree 
of composure, plus the ability to think for yourself 
and express yourself clearly If you have these 
qualities, our intensive training will help you develop 
into a first class police officer. 

The rewards,both personal and finanrial,of under- 
taking such a demanding and often AP E G reg 

dangerousjob are well worthwhile. 

To apply youll need to be at 
least I 8 V 2 , and 172 centimetres tall if- 
yoifre a man, 162 centi- 
metres tall for a woman, 

of the right stu^wed like to 

FDR MORE WORMATBN CONTACT THE APPOINTMENTS OfFm CAREERS llWORHAnON CENTRE. 
DEPT.IC62DiWWSCCniAWM^.LDNDONSWlHOK OR "PHONE 01-725 4492. (ANSAPH0NE 725 4575 ) 


1 


WnfcKfSlH & O o >« K gr» 


HOME NEWS 


SDP CONFERENCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 



Incomes policy 

Immediate pay freeze 
‘will not be needed’ 
in programme on jobs 


Role of unions 


Sanctions call 


The Alliance did hot ad- 
vocate a pay freeze, Mr Ian 
Hrigglesworth, spokesman on 
economic affairs, industry and 
energy, made dear to con- 
ference at Harrogate yes- 
terday, but it did believe 
should be an earnings limit 
based on average productivity 
growth 

Mr Wnggleswonh. MP for 
Stockton South, said that he 
accepted a pay freeze might be 
necessary at some stage, but he 
did not agree they should be 
calling for an immediate statu- 
tory one They had to achieve 
a change in people's minds 
and persuade diem they could 
increase iheir own prosperity 
by having regard to their own 
company and how it was 
performing. 

He was replying to the 
debate on the section on jobs 
in industry of the SDP-LiberaJ 
Alliance consultative docu- 
ment, Partnership for 
Progress He maintained that 
the programme outlined there, 
and spelt out in the Alliance 
budget priorities, could cut 
unemployment from more 
than three million to below 
two million in the lifetime of a 
Parliament 

The Alliance alternative 
could cut unemployment 
without pushing borrowing 
through the roof and without a 
new upward inflationary 
spiral 

A motion was earned 
condemning the present poli- 
cies of the Government It 
called for early implementa- 
tion of Alliance policies for 
controlling inflation, reducing 
unemployment and establish- 
ing greater equity in pay 
bargaining. 

Mr Wnggjesworth con- 
ceded that the Alliance pro- 
gramme would mean more 
borrowing, but a carefully 
targeted expansion meant that 
this would be modest about 
£3,500 million or 1 per cent of 
national income 

For both Labour and the 
Tones, pay was the achilles 
beel of their economic policy 
Whatever semblance Mr Roy 
Ha tiers ley, the shadow Chan- 
cellor, had of a strategy for 
incomes was dashed at Brigh- 
ton when the TUC voted for a 
minimum wage, but one that 
allowed the higher paid to 
maintain their differentials 


The Government offered spent to restore Britain's run- 
only windy rhetoric, exhorta- down housing, crumbling sew- 
uons to people to keep wage ers and congested road 
settlements down The Chan- system New capital spending 
cellor was running scared of that kind would cut un- 
about pay and should heed the employment by 286,000 by 
advice of the CB1 who knew 1988 A cut m income tax was 
that settlements must be cut in the least effective measure to 
half The Alliance alone of the create employment 
political parties advocated an \ realistic view on uo- 
incomes strategy “We do so employment was a reduction 
because if we are to channel ofa million over five years if a 
expansion into new jobs here modest I per cent a year 
and not into imports or higher improvement in industry and 
prices, if we are to keep exports could be achieved, Mr 
industry competitive and if we parid Sainsbury, trustee of 
are to encourage our com- the SDP, said when be opened 
panics to seek out new mar- the debate 

“Not only does increased 
competitiveness create more 
a slrale8y jobs in the industries con- 
tor incomes cerned, but the extra wealth 

He said that the earnings that is generated can be used 
limit proposal would be to create additional jobs m 
backed by a payroll incentive both the public and private 
of up to a quarter of sectors,” be said 
emplmras-nanonaJmsiranK That corapetmveness could 
contributions, to encourage ^ mcreased by encouraging 
ihemio keep their labour costs nv alry between companies at 



Mrs Shirley William 
speech to the SDP 


rence at Harrogate yesterday (Photoj 

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 


the ovation after her 
« Peter Trievnor). 


Restricted role for unions 


competitive 

That would be supported by 
new tax concessions to 
employees permitting in- 
creases above the earnings 
limit through genuine ex ten- 


home and abroad and that 


The SDP was making the 
trade unions an offer which if 
they were wise (hey would not 
refuse. Miss Sue Slipem, a 
member of the group which 


meant raising the standard of drew up the SOP'S consul- 
education mid train mg^ and tative paper Industrial Beta- 


Wat**** 



Mr Ian Wrigglesworth, 
replying to roe debate 
sions of profit-sharing and 
wider share ownership 
If companies continued to 
award increases out of tine 
with productivity, then they 
would use the mechanism of 
an inflation tax to tax away the 
increases. “This suck and 
carrot approach is unlike any- 
thing tried m the country 
before It i&our lifeline to the 
unemployed” 

Mr Wnggleswonh said that 
£2 billion more would be 


improving the way the finan- 
cial markets worked. “Above 
all we need a massive effort to 
improve the skills of British 
management” “The only 
solution to our problems is to 
create a high dulled, high 
productivity, high wage econ- 
omy But, equally, we must 
make certain that wages are 
kept -in line with increasing 
productivity and one of the 
best ways to do that is a 
mixture of profit-sharing and, 
if necessary, an inflation tax ” 
Mr Nick Bosanqnet, York- 
shire and Humberside re- 
gional council, said that on 
present policies there were 
likely to be four million 
unemployed by the early 
1990s. 


tiomas A Fresh look, told 
conference. 

She said that the relation- 
ship between the unions ami 
the Labour Party was a big 
problem for the unions. It was 
oik of the things which 
stopped unions from overcom- 
ing their schizophrenia and 
taking on a new role. 

If unions wanted to repre- 
sent their members, they most 
represent them across the 
spectrum of politics. Miss 
SUpmaa. the candidate for 
Hayes and Hariington, said. 

“We say the onions will 
never have a role in a Mock 
way in government. We will 
consult than but there will be 
no seat in an Alliance cabinet 


He called for a dramatic I for the President of tie HIC, 5 ’ 


shift away from labour tax- 
ation. for Britain to join the 
European Monetary System, 
and for encouragement for 
new small and medium 
businesses. 

The conference earned 
amendments requesting the 
policy committee to look at 
norms of fair pay based on job 
evaluation, at co-operatives 
and at fiscal measures which 


Miss Slipman said that the 
unions had a role within the 
industries, in which they 
worked, industries with which 
they must begin to identify 
their needs and interests more 
closely. 


They also proposed better 
rights for indrodnais at work 
pus tax deductions for ration 
dues, jnst as members of 
professional bodies had. They 
would set up a trade union 
fund so unions could stream- 
line and take on a new role in 
industry. There would be pos- 
itive rights in law, including 
the right to strike. 

Unlike Labour, they would 
not puMSdy extol the cosmetic 
acceptance of ballots as a main 
change and haMnd the scenes 
restore the old destructive 
powers to trade umbos. ■ 

Mr John Grant, SDP Trade 
Unions, said that (he pro- 
posals on industrial relations 
would kOl off the myth that the 
SDP was an anti-trade union 
party. If interested organiza- 
tions did not see that they were 
very foolish. 

“If the trade muons spurn it 
I hope they do not come 
whingeing to ns after the 
general election asking to be 
brought In from the Thatcher 
cold. They ought to have' 
learned the bitter lesson of the 
post, that government with the 
unions as outcasts is perfectly 
possible,” he said. 

The SDP did not want to 
carry on that approach, believ- 


The SDP offered positive, ing democratic unionism had 
rights in return for greater an important rote to play. But 


responsibility. They wanted a 
statutory framework of indus- 
trial democracy and would 


favour the recruitment of new .guarantee union recognition 
'workers and discourage where employees .wanted 


overtime 


onions to represent them. 


the ball was now in the unions’ 
court and k was for than to 
make a positive response. If 
ration leaders, chose to turn 
away they wouM not take their 
members with them. 


Mr John Sewell, Chelten- 
ham, said that Mrs Thatcher's 
attitude towards the trade 
unionists at GCHQ Chelten- 
ham was entirely bogus and 
caused by pm spite. 

Trade unionists were still 
working at GCHQ and na- 
tional security was net under 
threat. A general election was 
coining and he urged them to 
hang on, it would not be long. 

Mr Kenneth ‘Horne, Ket- 
tering, proposed the issuing of 
free shares to employees. In 
his small operation this had 
revolutionized the attitude of 
the union members. 

Mr Stephen Brooks, 
prospective parliamentary 
candidate, for Ealing and Ac- 
ton, said that from reading the 
paper one would think indus- 
trial relations was only about 
nni/mg amt employers and 
employees hardly existed. The 
unionized environment was the 
minority of cases of 
employment. 

Mr Richard Layard, Gam- 
den, said that the only way to 
get the support of the unions 
was to be seen as the anti- 
employment party. An effec- 
tive incomes policy was 
needed, but not a pay freeze. 

The party should reaffirm 
its objective of reducing un- 
employment by one million in 
five years, and persuade the 
country it was willing to 
borrow more money. This was 
perfectly legitimate for a coun- 
try to do. . 


POLICE 

Judicial 
inquiry 
urged on 
Stalker 

Unanimous support was 
raven to an emergency motion 
that Mr John Stalker, Deputy 
Chief Constable of Greater 
Manchester, be allowed to 
complete his inquiry into the 
Royal Ulster Constabulary, 
mid demanding a full judicial 
inquiry into the matter 

Blame for the confusion and 
public disquiet surrounding 
the affair was placed firmly on 
the Home Secretary, Mr 
Douglas Hurd, by Mr Robert 
Madennan, MP for Caithness 
and Sutherland, SDP spokes- 
man On Home Office matters. 

He told the conference that 
after an interview with Mr 
Hurd he was convinced the 
Home Secretary had grossly 
mishandled events. 

It had been an act of high 
folly for Mr Stalker, an emi- 
nent, able and outstanding 
officer, to have been asked to 


Payb 


COMMENT 



CO 

P’ 



Mr Robert MacLennan 

conduct dual inquies which 
could have a relationship with 
each other 

An inquiry was inevitable 
and necessary 


Geoffrey Smith 


The discussions of economic 

polio at Harrogate yesterday 
illustrated both the weakness 
and the strength of (he SDP at 
this stage in its development. 
Once again the general im- 
pression that emerged was 
that of the party in between. 

Ir is more determined than 
the Conservatives to do some- 
thing about unemployment 
and it would, therefore, favoor 
a more expansionist strategy** 
with particular attention to 
programmes designed to cre- 
ate jobs. But it is also more 
alert than Labour to the 
danger of renewed inflation. 

So tUe increase in public 
borrowing that it wants is 
more modest. 

-\U parties are speaking of 
the need for competitive ef- 
ficiency these days: that is one 
of the side effects of seven 
years of Thatcherite rule. But 
David Sainsbury pur the point 
with unusual emphasis for a 
non-Conservative conference 
when opening the economic 
debate: “He will only be able t 
to put a large number of people 
back to work if w* can improve 
the performance of British 
industry in all markets.” 


Wedded to an 
incomes policy 


Moving the emergency mo- 
tion Mr Paul Beaty, candidate 
for Cedes, said that Mt 
S talker’s reinstatement was 
welcomed but did nothing to 
allay suspicions that he had 
been nobbled by the RUC or 
that the Masons were in- 
volved. Public confidence 
could only be restored by an 
independent inquiry 


Today’s agenda 

Dr David Owen, leader of 
the party, will wind up the 
conference with his keynote 
speedi this morning. There 
will also be debates on bousing 
and the need for a comprehen- 
sive test ban treaty 


HEALTHCARE 


Return to policy 
of phasing ont 
NHS pay beds 


PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS 


Labour decline to political margins foreseen 


A return to the gradual 
phasing out of private beds m 
the National Health Service 
was deeded by the conference 
in its policy-making role as the 
Council for Social 
Democracy 

A long 'motion, promoted 
by the SDP Council for Scot- 
land, was earned, calling for 
an end to the exploitation of 
the National Health Service 
by the private sector 

The motion sought the re- 
peal of the Health Services Act 
1980 to restore the full-time 
consultant contract with no 
provision for additional pri- 
vate practice, and a return to 
gradual phasing out of private 

Part-time consultant con- 
tracts should ensure that the 
consultant spent an appro- 
priate part of his time working 
for the NHS. with the in- 
troduction of added in- 
centives financial and 
otherwise for those consul 
rants who chose full-time 
contracts 

Other demands were the 
removal of private out-patten i 
facilities from NHS premises 
and the gradual phasing out of 
the use of NHS laboratories 
and diagnostic facilities by the 
private sector with m the 
meantime guidelines to en- 
sure that facilities were only 
used for private patients un- 
der certain circumstances 


that the Alliance was deter- 
mined not to fall into the trap 
of using the term community 
support as a euphemism for 
inadequate arrangements for 
the poor, while everyone who 
could afford it opted for better 
treatment elsewhere 

The motion also called for 
improvements in neglected 
specialities and greater decen- 
tralization of managerial con- 
trol 

Mr Thomas said that the 
document Partnership for 
Progress covered all aspects of 
social policy, housing, trans- 
port. education, and social, 
health, environmental and 
voluntary services 

Problems in these areas 
could not be solved without 
collective action and public 
funding as the Conservatives 
claimed, and financial restric- 
tions would noi allow them to 
be solved all at once as the 
Labour Party wanted 

The Government's ap- 
proach to* the health service 
was essentially dishonest It 
had made increases in fund- 
ing. but these had not kept up 
with the pressures of the 
service 

The Alliance was pledged to 
finance the caring services to 
meet the demands on them 
and to sustain their quality 
That was one of the best ways 
of dealing with the problem of 


The Labour Party could be 
relegated to permanent mar- 
ginal status after the next 
general election but the Alli- 
ance was certain to survive 
whatever the outcome. Mrs 
Shirley Williams, President 
said in her address to the 
conference which won a pro- 
longed standing ovation 
The opinion polls were 
rubbish she said In par- 
liamentary and local by-el ec- 
nons the Alliance consistently 
performed at around 36 per 
cent and she advised punters 
to bet on the Alliance can- 
didate m the forthcoming 
know-slcy North by-election 
The constarii phrase “the 
next Labour government" hid 
a v awn mg gap in con fidence as 
deep as the Channel and she 
doubted very much whether 
Roy Hattcrslcy believed it 


She condemned the hypoc- 
risy of Labour's pledges on 
unemployment and the aboli- 
tion of poverty The Alliance 
had shown -how ns pledges 
would be earned out but 
Labour had not and went on 
pretending that by some 
sleight of hand those on 
£100 000 a year could finance 
their promises It was rubbish, 
it could not be done and 
Labour knew it could not be 
done 

“The first priority must be 
to those without work, and 
only then can the rest of us 
decide to get richer We have 
no nghl to make ourselves 
better off at a time when so 
many of our fellow citizens do 
not have jobs." she said 

The Alliance was strong and 
healthy The commitment of 
the party to a twin-track policy 


Mrs Williams whose on defence and disarmament 
speech won a prolonged stand- was what the public wanted 
mg ovation said "We look and understood The pursuit 
forward to the challenge of the of both goals did not conflict. 


next election with confidence 
He will survive whatever the 
outcome 1 believe the out- 
come will be good The Alli- 
ance is here to stay I am much 
less sure that Labour will 


they bound the SDP and ns 
Liberal partners together in a 
common purpose The reason 
to believe the Prime Minister 
might favour an early election 
was stark the real economy 





the C ity had become increas- 

.. .... ingly nervous 

Three disastrous elections in a was in deep trouble and it was The cold reality was the 
row could relegate Labour jo getting more and more diffl- emergence ofa new recession 
permanent marginal status ~ cult to conceal that fact Even l nemplovmenl was going up 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Thatcher stance condemned 


three times fester than in 1985 
and if unemployment were 


The Government looked to 
“low tech” service jobs to 
absorb the unemployed It was 
a prospectus for a third world 
economy Britain was heading 
for a future which could not 
man a high technology econ- 
omy and accepted the in- 
evitability of technological 
and economic decline 

Mrs Hilliams called for 
greater participation in higher 
education and attacked gov- 
ernment cuts when industry 
needed more graduates .She 
said also that she was not very 
pleased with some of the 
conference speeches on the 
issues, which were all too 
redolent of the old phrase I 
“Pull up the ladder Jack I’m 
all right ” 

The Alliance must be cau- 
tious in budgeting for expan- 
sion and for new jobs It was 
hypocritical of Labour to 
speak of reducing unemploy- 
ment by a million over two 
years when the party was 
unwilling to commit itself to 
any kind of serious incomes 
policy 

In town halls and county 
halls Alliance groups worked 
together as one Labour had 


mrasured by the yardstick of never believed in the devolu- 
9 the true number would non of power to ordinarv 


approach 4 million 


people 

BRITISH COAL 


Dr John Bancroft, on behalf pnvate health treatment 


of the SDP Council for Scot- 
land. said that the whole issue 
was a running sore to the NHS 
and caused deep resentment 
They should not give special 
privileges which invited 
abuse Pay beds were a source 
of queue jumping. 

The majority of doctors 
were deeply committied to the 
NHS and u they knew the 
SDP was deeply commuted 
and not doctrinaire in us 
attitude to pnvate medicine in 
its proper place the majority 
of doctors would be with the 
party 

The conference discussed 
policy papers on health and 
community care and changing 
and renewing the health ser- 
vices A motion was earned 
endorsing their central pro- 
posals including a patients 
charter and a call for a realistic 
increase in spending 

Mr Mike Thomas for the 
Alliance pohev committee 
said in moving that motion 


Miss Sheila Hells { Edin- 
burgh). moving on behalf of 
ihg SDP Council for Scotland 
the motion on pnvate medi- 
cine that was eventually ear- 
ned. called on the party to end 
the exploitation of the NHS 
She said that they rejected 
outright die Government's en- 
couragement of pnvate medi- 
cine The NHS should be 
separated from the private 
sector Pnvate beds should be 
gradually phased out 

Mr Roger Fox (Ealing) said 
he did not want pnvate beds 
phased out His health author- 
ity made £2 million from 
them which went towards 
more NHS work Phasing out 
private beds would be the best 
news the private sector ever 
had giving them more work 

More pnvate hospitals 
would be built and they would 
be built by the American 
hospital groups moving into 
this country and who wanted 
more profit from health care 


An emergency motion 
condemning the Government's 
lack of any principled stand 
against apartheid and calling 
on (he Conservatives to reach 
agreement on measures 
against South Africa with 
(^mmonwealtb, European 
and American partners, was 
agreed unanimously by the 
conference. 

i utfl there was one-person, 
one-vote in Sooth Africa 
President Botha and his re- 
gime cohM look forward in 
fear to the arrival of an 
Alliance government Mrs 
Sian Mathias, for the national 
committee, said in reply to a 
debate in which protests were 
made about die presence of 
representatives of the Sooth 
African embassy. 

She said that the SDP 
demanded the unconditional 
release of Mr Nelson 
Mandela, the legitimizing of 
die African National Con- 
gress, and the end of the state 
of emergency and repeal of the 
sweeping powers granted to 
the security forces. I util then 
they would continue to demand 
in opposition, and would In- 
stitute in government, a series 


of selective and effective eco- 
nomic sanctions against South 
Africa. 

“As die heat of the fire in 
South Africa burns, as South 
Africa suffers the paralysis of 
a police state, as the list of the 
dead grows the British Gov- 
ernment has reacted with a 
mixture of irresponsibility, ob- 
stinacy and evasion,” she said. 
“Mrs Thatcher must stand 
condemned by this party." 

The argument used by the 
Government against sanctions 
was die effect on jobs in 
Britain, which was a cynical, 
irresponsible and deliberately 
exaggerated argument. The 
SDP at least was prepared to 
pay die price for holding moral 
principles. 

Mr Peter Leighton, par- 
liamentary candidate for 
H althamstow, movingthe mo- 
tion, said that Mrs Thatcher 
had taken no stand whatever 
On this issue. Britain was 
isolated In the Commonwealth 
and had forfeited its moral 
authority in the 
Commonwealth. 

lie message to the black 
community in Britain was that 
nothing was being done. Mb* 


Mandela was the only person 
whose wisdom and vision 
could ensure the killing and 
bloodshed ended. 

Mr Humphry Berkeley, 
candidate for Southend East, 
said that Mr Mandela was a 
man of moderation, and his 
im conditional release was ab- 
solutely essential. There was 
terrorism taking place in 
South Africa, entirely on the 
part of the South African 
police. * 

The Rev Dr Frauds Brid- 
get; Sooth Nottinghamshire, 
said that the two repre- , 
sentatives from dm Smith 
African embassy in the hall 
should team what the SDP 
was doing, understand what 
democracy was about and take 
it home with dram. Apartheid 
was evQ and the British Gov- 
ernment was perceived by 
blacks in South Africa and 
elsewhere not as its enemy hm 
its friend. 

Mr David Ecdeg, candidate 
for Bolton West, said it was 
not a question of whether 
economic sanctions would 
woife ft was a question of 
taking a moral stance. 


Bargaining rights for 
UDM members urged 


*An e m e r gency motion was 
earned expressing concern at 
the attitude wmcb British 
Coal was adopting to the 
Union of Democratic Miners, 
strongly implied by the im- 
posed wage award announced 
on September 9 

The motion recalled the 
courage of the Nottingham- 
shire and other miners who 
attended the 1984 SDP con- 
ference m .Buxton in the 
middle of the strike, and their 
commitment to genuine union 
democracy baaed on the secret 
ballot 

In recognition of their stand 
then and their present 
strength, the conference urged 
the Government to press Brit- 
ish Coal to enter into 
meaningful collective bargain- 
ing with the UDM and to 
grant the union foil access to 
the conciliation and consulta- 
tion procedures 
• Dr Dickson Mahon. for the 
policy committee said that 
the 'Nauonal l mon of 
Mmeworkers had at one time 
been the most 'democratic 
union in the country It should 


get nd of Mr Arthur Scargill 
and other revolutionary 
Marxists 

It was said at one time that 
the UDM was a bosses union 
but for a bosses union they 
ted had a dreadful time 
fighting their sponsors. British 
Coal should not be allowed an 
alibi for fading to enter into 
nil! discussions with the union 
because legislation prevented 
them There should be a coal 
industry BiH introduced for 
me next session to oblige 
British Coal to enter into 
discussions with both unions 

Moving the motion, Mr 
Stuart Thompson, North 
Notts, said that it was an 
illusion to think the UDM had 
been receiving privileged 
treatment The reality was 
that die managers of British 
Coal and the Government 
were engaged in a cynical 
operation that would end with 
the liquidation of the UDM 

By awarding pay. to UDM 
workers only in pits where it 
had a majority the board had 
left 6 000 loya] miners m the 


Conference reports by Robin Oakley, Richard Evans, Alan Wood, Amanda Haigh and Anthony Hodges 

jSmaied to have ‘ . . 


But while alt this is sound 
enough, it is scarce!) riveting. 
Hhat economic policy does 
(he SDP have to offer that is 
distinctive? It wants Britain to 
join die European monetary 
system and it remains wedded p 
to the concept of an incomes 
policy. H hatever view one 
may take of British member- 
ship of EMS, it seems to me 
healthy that at least one party 
should be arguing for this at 
the next election. 

The issue is important, and 
it has the rare attribute for an 
opposition policy that it might 
well win the assent of the 
Cabinet in a secret ballot But 
I find it hard to believe that 
this is an argument that will 
capture the electorate's 
imagination. 

. There is much more likely to 
be dispute over an incomes 
policy. That applies Inside the 
SDP as well as in the country, 
as became evident at an in- 
teresting meeting held by the & 
Tawney Society. ' 

; The objections put by John 
| Honun, the former MP and 
| junior minister, struck me as 
1 convincing. Although the SDP 
is putting forward a new and 
more imaginative version of an 
incomes policy, many of the 
old criticisms remain valid. 

The idea not* is to use the 
tax system to restrict pay 
increases to a limit based on 
average productivity growth. 
Beyond that there could be 
increases above the limit, with 
the sweetener of tax con- 
cessions, if these were paid # 
through profit-sharing or " 
wider share ownership. 

Bat, ingenious though this 
may seem, the effect would 
probably be either to impose 
too many restrictions on what 
ought to be a flexible economy, 
or to provide an unnecessarily 
burea ucratic and complicated 
form of encouragement for 
profit-sharing. 

Hithout an incomes policy 
the rest of the package may 
seem worthy but rather dull, 
i et this may not be so much of 
a disadvantage for the SDP at 
this time as political com- 
mentators are inclined to sup- 
pose. 

Sensible attitude 
most important 

t J**re is a temptation for 
inose of ns who move around 
from one party conference to 
anothm- to judge the proceed- 
ings by the standards of 
«™maiic criticism. H e can too 
imagine that what is 
good theatre is good politics. 

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Research cuts 
could hamper 
projects vital 
for industry 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


HE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Universities have been told 

Uiat there will be less money 
*9 r research m future. Strate- 
& c projects vital to industry in 
the next decade are likely to be 
affected. 

The warning comes from 
the Science and Engineering 
Research Council, which 
awards more than £200 mil- 
lion a year in government 
grants for fundamental 
research. 

The council has already had 
its gram allocation for next 
year reduced by £17 million, 
before the process of assessing 
research applications has 
started.. The deficit, comes 
after rising costs of collabora- 
tion in international research 
at centres such as the Euro- 
pean Laboratory for Particle 
Physics in Geneva, and in 
sharing costs of the new 
telescopes at observatories on 
La Palma in the Canaries 
Hawaii. 

The cost of international 
collaboration is now £60 mil- 
lion a year. 

In addition, a review of the 
advanced equipment needed 
to keep British universities 
abreast with research in the 
United States, West Germany 
and Japan shows a shor tfall of 
£40 million. 

According to Dr Ashley 
CaneraU. secretary of the 
council, universities in Bri tain 
cannot give proper support for 
research of strategic im- 
portance to the future of 
industry. 


The areas affected include 
the application of advanced 
computers to manufacturing, 
the development of the next 
generation of electronic 
materials, and work on optical 
computers and on the bio- 
technology needed for new 
approaches to the production 
of fine chemicals, 
pharmaceuticals and 
foodstuffs. 

The rise in costs of inter- 
national research has been 
exacerbated by fluctuations in 
currency rates. Between July 1 
and 14, the council lost £7 
million from its budget be- 
cause of currency variations. 

Such losses were a penalty < 
of the rigid application of 
annual cash limits by the 
Treasury. The council is not 
allowed to put aside money to 
meet such a contingency. 

The only way to com- 
pensate for the consequences 
of sudden fluctuations is to 
reduce grants for new re- 
search. Applications for new 
grants used to be divided 
between first-class proposals, 
or alpha projects, winch would 
bp funded, and beta and 
gamma proposals which 
would be considered next. 

Under present conditions, 
almost one third of alpha 
projects will be rejected. The 
average grant is about 
£100,000. A shortage of £17 
million means that 170 
projects will be refined 
support. 


Denial of Corsets 
‘death’ ‘concealed 
comment heroin’ 


A community leader who 
was reported to have said he 
hoped a sick police chief 
would die denied yesterday 
that he made the remark. 

Mr Malcolm PopperweO, 
aged 52. assistant chid* con- 
stable of Avon and Somerset 
police, was admitted to hos- 
pital with chest pains on 
Sunday after the police drugs 
raids and subsequent riots m 
the St Paul's area of Bristol 
last week. He was- still in 
intensive care yesterday. 

Mr Kuomba Balogun, aged 
24, chairman of the St Paul's 
Community Association, was 
reported as saying: “On behalf 
of the community, I say we 
hope the bastard dies. I feel no 
compassion for the man and 1 
will not be the only person in 
St Paul’s who feds that way 
about him.” 

At the community 
association's headquarters 
yesterday Mr Balogun said: “I 
categorically deny making any 
such statement about Mr 
Popperwell.” He added that 
he was taking legal advice. 

Mr Ian Beales, editor of the 
Western Daily Press, which 
first reported the alleged re- 
marks, said yesterday: “We 
stand by our story. We spoke 
to Mr Balogun twice and 1 am 
satisfied that what we quoted 
was totally within context” 


An international t«m of 
drg g t raffi ckers smuggled mfl- 
lions of ponds of heroin from 
Pakistan through Heathrow 
Airport hidden in corsets, tire 
Central Criminal Comt was 
told yesterday. 

Mr Derek Spencer, QC, for 
the prosecution, said that hid- 
den in a woman’s corset worn 
by a Pakistani cornier, tire 
heroin was smelted by air on 
the first kg of its journey to a 
transit lounge hi a west Euro- 
pean airport, usually 
Heathrow. 

In the transit lounge the 
heroin was transferred to a 
British courier who took It on 
die second leg of tire journey, 
which usually ended at Sou 
Francisco. 

Mr Spencer alleged that the 
mastermind la Britain was 
Peter Dye, aged 40ji company 
director, of Ritchings Park, 

lver, Buckhwhamslr 

He and CGve Williamson, 
ued 29, aa electrician, of the 
Farmlands, Nortbolt, Peter Da- 
vies, aged 40, a salesman, of 
Glynfietd Road, Waksden, 
north London, and Paul Mor- 
phy, aged 29, a decorator, of AO 
Sods Road, Wfflesdea, all deny 
conspiracy to snaggle herein. 

David Millard, aged 37, a 
lorry driver, erf Bretton estate, 
Peterborough, and Naseer Ah- 
med, aged 27, mwmpleyed, from 
Pakistan, deny smuggling. 

The trial costumes today. 



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Better health care Mentally 
for inner cities ! 

urged by Liberals t0 sJUces : 




Lesley Garrett (Yuro-Yum) and Bonaventura Bottom (Nanlo-Poo) aiMnw; a 1930s gloss to 
The Mikado, by Gilbert and Sullivan, at yesterday's dress rehearsal of Jonathan Miller’s 
production firr English National Opera, opening at the London Coliseum on September 27. 


Health service resources 
should be reallocated to reflect 
social deprivation in inner 
cities, the Liberal Party says. 

In a paper published yes- 
terday the party claims that 
the present distribution sys- 
tem fails to take account of the 
extent of social deprivation in 
cities and the draining effects 
of teaching hospitals and other 
specialized units. 

“Inner city residents are 
emitted to receive as good a 
service to meet their individ- 
ual needs as any other group 
in the country,” Mr Archie 
Kirkwood, Liberal health 
spokesman, said. 

The party admits that some 
inner city health authorities 
are more efficient than others 
but inefficiencies could be 
caused by falling populations 
resulting in an over provision 
of services, and inherited out- 
dated and expensive build- 
ings, which need to be 
replaced. 

The paper calls for new 
ways of injecting funds into 
urban areas, both through a 
more sensitive sub-regional 
allocation of health service 
funds and through forms of 
urban aid. 

Inner cities often foiled to 
attract health service staff, 
because of the high cost of 
living and poor working con- 
ditions. the paper said. 

It outlines new plans for 


By JB1 Sherman 

sources staff training and says that 
> reflect lower levels of training should 
i inner be available for some stu- 
i ' says. dents. Those students could be 

xi yes- trained to undertake a wide 
ns that range of duties which would 
re sys- release staff with the highest 
it of the qualifications, 
nion in Primai)’ health care also 
effects suffered in inner cities. Cities 
d other were peppered with old. lock- 
up surgeries. 

• Patients should be allowed 
EESh access to their own medical 
Prjjl records, the Liberal Party said 
in a separate paper published 
heaJrh 3**iCTdby. Mr Kirkwood said 
patients should be able to 
t some n,a ^ ce infbrorcd choices on the 
basis of all information avail- 

*225 able. 

,h l, Mr Kirkwood, who in- 
larionc troduced a 10-minute Bill on 
n.-icinn tiiis, subject last year, is work- 
ing with the Campaign for 
build' Freedom of Information to 
£ persuade MPs to introduce a 
private member’s Bill on the 

r new san,e ,ines - 
Is into Tlie paper admits that in 
»iBh a certain cases information 1 
disclosure would need to be 
restricted such as when it 
infringed the right to 
confidentiality of other peo- 


Health care in the inner cities. 
Liberal Party health pane! paper 

Access by patients to health care 
records. Liberal Party Health 
panel paper 14. 


By a Staff Reporter 

Mental health officers 
should be appointed in all 
health authorities to ensure 
that the menially ill are gening 
the community services they 
need, LadyTnunpington, said 
yesterday. 

Speaking at a conference in 
London. Lady Trumpingion. 
Linder Secretary of Slate for 
Health and Social Security, 
said she was concerned that 
schizophrenic patients in 
particular sometimes fell 
through the care gap because 
they or their relatives were 
una ware of existing services. 

“What seems to be called 
for is a person who can act as a 
channel between families and 
services. My own term for 
such a person is a ‘responsible 
mental health officer' and I 
would like to see this idea 
developed further,” Lady 
Trumpingion said. 

Members of the National 
Schizophrenia Fellowship had 
complained that when a mem- 
ber of their family became 
mentally ill the initial reaction 
from doctors and social work- 
ers was that they did not want 
to know, she said. 

Although the Government 
was keen to continue its policy 
of closing large institutions for , 
the mentally ill. Lady 
Trumpingion conceded there 
was a need for some long term 
hospital care but it needed to 
be local and accessible. 


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■ &■ . 



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^ W A charming flight attendant offers 
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See your 


Leading the way to the USA 












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Plea from hostage in Lebanon 

Jihad prisoner’s letter 
raises questions over 
US deal with Moscow 


The letter carried Monday’s 
date, three pages of scrawled 
hand-writing signed by one of 
the three American hostages 
known to be in the hands of 
the pro-Iranian Islamii* Jihad 
organization. 

“1 David Jacobsen and my 
"tends Anderson and Suther- 
land, we feel homesick and 
our bodies are sick and our 
psychological state is bad,” it 
said-. . . What are you 
waiiingfbr? For us to die one 
by one?” 

Sometimes almost illegible, 
often ungrammatical it was a 
carefully-limed piece of work, 
released by the organization 
with the specific purpose of 
asking the American Govern- 
ment a potentially embarrass- 
ing question: if it will 
negotiate with the Russians 
for the release of Nicholas 
Daniloff the US journalist 
who was imprisoned in Mos- 
cow, why will Washington not 
negotiate with Islamic Jihad 
for the freedom of the three 
American hostages held pris- 
oner in Beirut? 

David Jacobsen's signature 
on the end of the letter was 
identical with that appended 
to a genuine note sent by the 
American hostages last 
October. 

But the language was curi- 


FrOm Robert Fisk, Beirut 
ousty stilted and lacking in 
fluency. One sentence lacked a 
'verb. The names of two 
former American hostages 
were misspelt. 

Indeed, it was as if Jacobsen 
had been told what to write; 
the contents having pre- 
viously beet translated from 
Arabic. 

That is not what Islamic 
Jihad said. Their own state- 
ment. a single page of typed 
Arabic, insisted that Mr 
Jacobsen had written his letter 
“at his own free will" and that 
the American Government 
“gave concessions in the 
Daniloff case which provoked 
many questions in the hos- 
tages' minds” as they com- 
pared the release of Nicholas 
DanOoff in Moscow with 
America's failure to negotiate 
for their own freedom. 

The statement and letter 
were accompanied, like all 
recent I slamic Jihad commu- 
nications, by a photograph of 
a glum, unsmiling Jacobsen in 
pyjamas. 

He is director of the Ameri- 
can University hospital and 
his colleagues there yesterday 
said the hand-writing was 
probably genuine although 
they suspected be had been 
instructed what to say. 


Since Mr Jacobsen was 
kidnapped 16 months ago, ii is 
unlikely that his 
would have deteriorated and 
their is no obvious explana- 
tion in the letter for the 
strange inaccuracies. 

The letter asks, for example, 
“why doesn’t the Congress act 
and request to solve our 
problem which has been (si 
for more than 17 m 
Why has the Congress kept 
stem about the bad problems 
like Danilofl? 

. . Your gambling on time 
is the death for us and will not 
make our captors be less in 
their demands but they will be 
increased. That would be a big 
danger.” The next half line of 
hand-written text was heavily 
inked out. 

Mr Jacobsen — and it seems 
most likely that be did write 
the letter even if he was not 
always the author — sent 
greetings to his family in 
California and to the families 
of Mr Terry Anderson, the 
Associated Press bureau chief 
in Beirut, and Mr Tom 
Sutherland, the acting Dean of 
Agriculture at the American 
University, both of whom 
have been captives in the 
hands of Islamic Jihad since 
the late spring of last year. 


Son fears for life of dissident 
witness in the Daniloff case 


From Michael Binyoo, Washington 
The son of a Soviet dissident, where the KGB 


who refused a KGB order to 
compromise Mr Nicholas 
Daniloff, the American 
journalist, said yesterday he 
was afraid the Raasfans would 
kill his father to sOence him. 

Mr Alex GofaUarb repeated 
the fears he outlined in a letter 
to The New York Times last 
week that his father, who is 
critically ill in a Soviet hos- 
pital, may not be allowed to 
leave alive. His father, he 
added, could be a .possible 
defence witness for Mr 
Daniloff. 

Dr David Goldforh, a 
geneticist, has diabetes and is 
being treated for gangrene. 
His sou said Soviet doctors 
were considering amputating 
his leg. It would look “per- 
fectly natural” if his father, 
who has a heart condition, 
died during the operation. 

The Soviet press, he said, 
was attributing false state- 
ments to his father, and he 
went on to demand that Mos- 
cow produce him alive 
immediately. 

He said in his letter last 
week that in 1984 the KGB 
interrogated his lather, who 
had been granted an emigra- 
tion permit, and wanted him to 
invite Mr DanOoff to his flat 


would be 


waiting. 

When he refused to co- 
operate, they searched his flat, 
confiscated his research 

matprkk t afiCDSed him of 
trying to take state secrets oat 
of the coimtry, conducted a 
year-long investigation and 
took away his exit visa. 

He said he was making 
public the incident becanse his 
father’s story would be useful 
to Mr Daniloff if the Rnssians 
put him on trial and allowed an 
independent lawyer to defaid 
him. 

• MOSCOW: Mr Daniloff 
foiled to read yesterday the 
KGB cokmel h andling his case 
to learnif he would face farther 
questioning (AP reports). 

Mr Douglas Stanglin, also a 
carresp3M&nt for US News 
and World Report news maga- 
zine, said Mr DanOoff had 
telephoned every 15 minutes to 
the KGB investigator. Colonel 
Vakry Seigodeyev. 

His release from prison was 
conditional on not leaving the 
Moscow area and being avail- 
able for questioning any time. 

Mr Daniloff said on Mon- 
day be agreed to call Colonel 
Sergodeyev every morning. He 
was working yesterday at the 
magazine office and would 
spend most of the day there. 



Mr DanOoff going back to. 
work in Moscow yesterday. 


Positive 
note in 
arms talks 

From Alan McGregor 
Geneva 

A studiously positive note 
was sounded by both Ameri- 
can and Soviet negotiators as 
they returned to Geneva yes- 
terday for the sixth round, 
since March last year, of their 
negotiations on controlling 
nuclear and space weapons. 

Since they recessed in late 
June, there have been further 
discussions between members 
of the delegations and other 
senior officials in both Mos- 
cow and Washington. The 
negotiations have been drawn 
in some measure into the 
general current of prepara- 
tions for a possible Reagan- 
Gorbachov summit. 

Describing the interim talks 
in the capitals as “serious and 
substantive”, the chief Ameri- 
can delegate, Mr Max Kara- 
pel man, said the US was 
holding to “an unconditional 
50 per cent reduction in inter- 
continental range offensive 
nuclear weapons, as well as the 
complete and worldwide elim- 
ination of intermediate range 
nuclear forces”. 

He was careful to add, 
however “We are prepared to 
consider interim steps in both 
these areas and have addi- 
tional ideas to propose toward 
that end." 

Similar aims were men- 
tioned in the Soviet side’s 
arrival statement, given by the 
acting delegation head Mr 
Alexei Oboukhov — the chief 
delegate, Mr Viktor Karpov, is 
with his Foreign Minister, Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, for the 
meeting later this week wth 
the US Secretary of State, Mr 
George Shultz. . 0 

He underlined that the So- 
viet Union also was definitely 
not taking an “ail or nothing” 
attitude to these issues. They 
had returned to the negotia- 
tions with instructions to con- 
tinue searching for “ways 
leading out of the impasses . 

But he also linked a 50 per 
cent cut in strategic weapons 
with “a total ban in space- 
strike arms” - those envis- 
aged in President Reagans 
Star Wars Initiative, 


Income crisis fuels 
UN reform hopes 

From Zoriana Pysariwsky, New York 


The United Nations began a 
new session of its General 
Assembly yesterday with the 
world organization in severe 
financial distress and its 
political credibility as peace- 
maker under attack as seldom 
before. The financial crisis 
was triggered by the failure of 
many states to pay their dues. 

The main theme of the 
session, which may be cut 
from 13 weeks to 10 because 
of the cash crisis, is expected 
to be the need to improve UN 
efficiency and restore the 
world body to something 
closer to what the founding 
fathers intended when it was 
created in 1945. 

The newly-elected president 
for the session. Mr Humayun 
Rashccd Choudury. the For- 
eign Minister of Bangladesh, 
picked up this theme in his 
acceptance speech, urging the 
Assembly to make a conscious 
effort to break with its past. 

Referring to debates which 
have become ever longer and 
windier and the avalanche of 
documents, he said: “No one 
has decreed that we must 
adopt several hundred resolu- 
tions at every Assembly ses- 
sion. just as no one has 
decreed that we must generate 


mountains of paper every year 
which no one can possibly 
read, let alone act upon.” 

Last year alone, the Assem- 
bly adopted about 300 resolu- 
tions. few of which — 
including those calling for 
Soviet withdrawal from 
Afghanistan and sanctions 
against South Africa — have 
been implemented. 

“Must we perpetuate a ten- 
dency to act as though the 
passage of a resolution ab- 
solves us of further 
responsibility for the subject 
in question?” he asked. 

In a statement marking the 
UN-designated International 
Day of Peace, coinciding with 
the opening of the session, 
Schor Javier Perez De Cuellar, 
the Secretary-General, 
acknowledged that the 
organization faced “challenges 
lo it’s viability and 
effectiveness". 

President Reagan is due to 
address the UN on Monday. 

• BANGKOK: More than 
85.000 Indo-Chinese refugees 
in Thailand are getting less 
food because the UN High 
Commission for Refugees is 
running short of money as it 
nears the end of its financial 
vear (Neil Kelly writes). 


World bridge 

Knock-out for Britons 

By A Bridge Correspondent, Miami Beach 


One hundred and thirty-two 
teams started on the long trail 
to the final of the world knock- 
out championship. The final 
will end next Monday. 

The teams began in three 
pools of 44, and the afternoon 
session reduced the pools to 
32 with all five British teams 
surviving. 

One of these, led by Irving 
Rose, was responsible for the 
early departure of the wo- 
men's Olympic team cham- 
pions led by Kathy Wei. The 
joy in the British camp was 


r 


shortlived, however, when all 
five teams were defeated in 
round two. 

Tom Sowter, Paul Hackett 
and Justin and James Hackett, 
twins aged 16, were heavily 
defeated by a strong Danish 
team, and the Rose team went 
down to a French team after 
leading at halftime. 

The London quartet, Cecil 
and Maurice Leighton. Nick 
Elliott and Trevor Barrett, 
were unlucky to lose by only 
three points to the French 
national women’s team. 



A policewoman using plastic gloves to check a woman’s baby basket at the police headquarters in Paris yesterday. 

Bomb alert in Europe 


Danes win 
good life 
accolades 

From Christopher Follett 
Copenhagen 

Although foreigners living 
in Denmark often complain 
that the place is little more 
than a tiny Lutheran back- 
water and a provincial boring 
if perfectionist Noddy land 
with nine months of winter 
and 12 months of high tax- 
ation, a survey of 124 nations 
conducted by the University 
of Pensylvania, ranks the 
country first in the world for 
quality of life. 

This has come as something 
of a surprise to most of 
Denmark’s five million inhab- 
itants. who see their country's 
once sophisticated and liberal 
image threatened by mount- 
ing economic problems, .racial 
tension caused by a growing 
influx of refugees from the 
Middle East and social unrest 
which has triggered serious 
dashes between squatters and 
poiice in the capital this week. 

Recent European Commu- 
nity polls see the Danes, 
though, as the most happy of 
all people in the EEC, albeit 
the most irreligious. 

The standard of living is 
about the highest in the EEC — 
but then so is the suicide rate 
— and for alcoholism and Aids 
Denmark is near the top, too; 
although this probably reflects 
more the superior precision of 
Danish statistics. 

Denmark is on the surface a 
seemingly godless country, 
then, with a high material 
standard ofllving — much of it 
on the 'never-never. The 
Danes are staunch belie vers in 
bank loans, which are cur- 
rently fuelling a domestic 
consumer boom, which is 
threatening the country’s bal- 
ance of payments. 

Denmark is, however, bea- 
utiful geographically speaking 
with more than 400 islands 
clustered around the mouth of 
the Baltic. 

With proportional rep- 
resentation rampant, the Da- 
nes enjoy an excess of 
democracy, some maintain, 
with consensus politics and 
coalition governments the or- 
der of the day. 

No one single political party 
has been able on its own to 
form a majority government 
in Denmark since 1914. Fif- 
teen squabbling factions exist 
today, nine of them repre- 
sented in the 179-seat Folkc- 
ling (Parliament). 

Short conscription and 
declining military budgets 
(only 2 per cent of gross 
national product at present) 
have also given Denmark a 
reputation for being a mav- 
erick member of Nato. 

According to Mr Erik 
Kjersgaard, one of Denmark's 
leading historians, today's 
typical Dane resembles Dic- 
kens's Mr Micawber, who 
meets every defeat that comes 
his way with an optimistic 
certainty that “something will 
turn up”. 

The archetypal Danish Mic- 
awber knows that nothing is 
completely hopeless. He lives 
in a democracy and is utieily 
convinced that his country is 
the best of all possible coun- 
tries in a for from perfect 
world. 

He believes in the welfare 
state, free schooling, libraries, 
medical treatment, old peo- 
ple's homes and state-subsid- 
ised funerals and be is 
convinced that a detached 
home, car, colour TV and 
annual package holiday to 
Majorca are among his 
constitutional rights. 

Leading article, page 13 


French police hint at lead as 
new terror threat emerges 


French police, embarrassed 
by their total lack of success in 
hunting down France's terror- 
ist bombers, were hinting 
yesterday that they might 
finally have a tentative lead 
after interrogating 25 people 
of Middle East origin who 
were rounded up during a 
dawn raid on their homes on 
Monday. 

But there is still little sign of 
any charges actually being 
brought- The police still do 
not (mow who is behind the 
committee for solidarity with 
Middle-Eastern and Arab 
political prisoners, which is 
held responsible for 1 4 attacks 
in Paris since last December, 
including three which foiled. 

The group, which has just 
officially admitted respon- 
sibility for Monday’s bomb 
attack on the headquarters of 
the Paris police, in which one 
person was killed and 51 were 
injured, has now announced 
that “our next operation will 
be against the EtysSe”, the 
official residence and office of 
President Mitterrand. 

Far-fetched though it may 
sound, such a threat cannot 
afford to be taken lightly. 

After all have not the 
terrorists successfully attacked 
within the past week two of 
the supposedly best-protected 
buildings in Paris, the Paris 
police's own headquarters and 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 

the Hotel de Ville, where M 
Jacques Chirac, the Prime 
Minister, has his home and 
headquarters as Mayor of the 
capital? 

The Paris police continued 
to be inundated with sus- 
pected bombs calls yesterday. 
Among the many buildings 
evacuated was the Pans 
Bourse or stock exchange, the 
object of several previous 
bomb alerts. It has now de- 
cided to close its doors indefi- 
nitely to the public: 

Similar fears of terrorist 
attacks have led the organizers 
of the Fifth International Jew- 
ish Film Festival which was 
due to open in Paris today and 
run until September 30, to 
cancel all but the inaugural 
evening of the festival. 

Meanwhile, Lyons, the sec- 
ond biggest metropolitan area 
after Paris, has greatly stepped 
up its security operations, 
fearing that it might become 
the next target for terrorist 
attacks, and also in prepara- 
tion for the Pope's visit from 
October 4 to 7. 

The first day of visa require- 
ments for all foreigners, save 
those of EEC and Swiss origin, 
passed off reasonably well 
yesterday, though with delays 
of up to an hour reported in 
some airports. 

“This is not an anti-terrorist 
but an anti-tourist measure ” 


one American commented 
caustically. 

Yesterday also saw the ar- 
rival of the first French troops 
on the Fran co-Swiss border to 
help patrol the thousands of 
miles of France's frontiers 
with seven foreign countries. 
But it will be several days 
before all 1.000 soldiers, 
promised by M Chirac, are 
deployed. 

• VIENNA: Austria has ap- 
pealed to Paris to reconsider 
its decision for Austrians to be 
included among those who 
will have to apply for visas to 
visit France, a Foreign Min- 
istry spokesman said(Reuter 
reports). 

• MUNICH: Left-wing West 
German urban guerrillas have 
claimed responsibility for a 
bomb blast on Monday at the 
offices in Munich of the 
makers of the West European 
Tornado combat plane, police 
said (Reuter reports). 

• MADRID: Eta, the Basque 
armed separatist organization, 
has now taken responsibility 
for the car bomb attack in 
Barcelona last Saturday which 
injured four civil guards 
(Richard Wigg writes). It 
brushed aside the previous 
claim of Terra Lliuie, a Cat- 
alan independence group. 

• AMSTERDAM: Two 
small bombs caused minor 
damage to two civic buildings 


Coal lifeline vital 
to South Africa 

By David Young, Energy Correspondent 


Despite sitting on the 
world’s largest stockpile — 
enough for 10 years at present 
consumption rates and increa- 
sing daily — South Africa is 
also the greatest user of coal 
and the world's fourth biggest 
exporter. 

Its coal reserves have been 
identified for the past 100 
years and as well as having 
deep-mined deposits it also 
has substantial open-cast re- 
serves. In both cases, the coal 
can be cheaply produced be- 
cause of a combination of 
geological conditions and 
cheap Inborn rates. 

The reserves are of high 
quality, whether it be coking 
coal for the steel indnstry or 
steam coal for use at power 
stations. 

South Africa, because if has 
bo tdl fields of Ms own and 
because it has a sophisticated 
power distribution system in 
all Ms cities catering for mdns- 
trial and domestic users — the 
demand placed mi power by air 
conditioning in the summer 
months is substantial — bums 
more than 75 per cent of 
production at borne. 

Total production is around 
170 million tons a year, with 


five million tons of coking coal 
and 40 million tons of steam 
coal sent abroad each year. It 
has 34 per cent of the world 
market for exported steam 
coal although coal as a 
commodity is difficult to move. 

Much of that goes across 
the border to neighbouring 
stales and only very large 
shipments — above 100,000 
tonnes — are exported by »eau 
Becanse of the size of ship- 
ments as well as political 

considerations, Britain has not 

been a traditional market 

Imports made by the power 
industry in the early 1980s 
came from Australia and any 
.future imports are nicely lobe 
sourced from there. The ports 
in Britain which can handle 
shipments of that size are 
owned and operated by British 
SteeL Its need is for coking 
coal which it buys from the 
United States or Australia. 

The talk of South Africa's 
steam coal is sent to the coal 
handling ports in the south- 
east Mediterranean or into 
Rotterdam and Antwerp where 
it is transhipped to the power 
statiou Of the Rhine and Ruhr 
Valley. 


Runde seeks tough line 

By Clifford Longley, Religious Affairs Correspondent 


,pc 

bury. Dr Robert Rimcie, has 
criticized the Government for 
“appearing to temporize” 
with the Pretoria Govern- 
ment, and seeks a tougher 
British line on sanctions. 

In a letter to Mrs Thatcher, 
Dr Runcie, writing as Presi- 
dent of the British Council of 
Churches, says that they are 
gravely concerned that South 
Africa is continuing in its 


“denial of basic human rights 
to the majority of its people” 
on the basis of race. 

His letter is supported by 
leaders of the Church of 
Scotland, the Baptist Union, 
the Methodist Church, the 
Church of England, the 
United Reformed Church, the 
Moravian Church, the Scot- 
tish Episcopal Church, the 
Quakers, and Presbyterians 
and Independents in Wales. 


Russian is 
shot dead 
in Pakistan 

From Hasan Akhtor 
Islamabad 

The naval attach^ at the 
Soviet Embassy in Islamabad, 
Mr Fyodor Gorenkov, was 
shot dead yesterday by a man 
named as Zafor Ahmedam, 
who was said to be mentally 
deranged. 

The killing was the second 
of a diplomat within three 
days; police are still hunting 
the assassin of the Iraqi vice- 
counsul in Karachi who died 
in a car bomb explosion. 

An official statement said 
Ahmedam was overpowered 
and handed over to police 
about one mile from the 
Soviet Embassy. 

Pakistan's official news 
agency said the alleged killer, 
presumed to be a Pakistani, 
had sought a migration visa 
from the Soviet Embassy in 
Islamabad and for this pur- 
pose had secured a letter of 
recommendation from Bang- 
ladesh. 

The government statement 
said he flagged down Mr 
Gorenkov’s car at an intersec- 
tion near the embassy and 
after a brief conversation with 
the diplomat shot him dead at 
dose range. 

Feeling against the Soviet 
Union has been running high 
with several Islamic fun- 
damentalist parties and the 
Government itself accusing 
Moscow of repeated un- 
friendly acts against Pakistan 
and its neighbour, Afghan- 
istan. 

MOSCOW: The official 
news agency Toss condemned 
the killing of Mr Gorenkov 
with “two shots at point-blank 
range” as a “villainous crime 
committed when he was driv- 
ing home from the embassy”. 
An official investigation into 
the incident was under way 


Germans 

drop 

refugee 

inquiry 

Hamburg (Reuter) — The 
public prosecutor investigat- 
ing Herr Wolfgang Bindel the 
West German captain sus- 
pected of smuggling 155 
Tamil refugees to Canada last 
month, plans to drop the case 
within the next feu- days, a 
spokesman said yesterday. 

The spokesman for the 
prosecutor's office said the 
case would be dropped be- 
cause there was little legal 
ground for charges. 

Soldier in 
death fall 

London — A British soldier. 
Corporal Paul Connell, from 
Cornwall, became the elev- 
enth fatality of the Nato 
exercise “Nonhem Wedding” 
when he died in a Norwegian 
hospital six days after foiling 
down a 60ft chasm and suffer- 
ing severe head injuries (Tim 
Jones writes). 

He was attached to the 59 
Commando Engineers based 
in Plymouth. 

MP accused 

Bonn — Herr Waller 
Kolbow. a Social Democrat 
MP, has cone on trial . in 
DusseldorF charged with 
breaching national security by 
giving a copy of the West 
German armed services’ plan 
for 1985-1997 to a television 
documentary department. 

Casino strike 

Atlantic Gty (AP) - Union 
leaders vowed to shut down 
eight of this resort city’s II 
casinos as 13,000 workers 
demanding more money went 
on strike. 

Envoy moves 

Jerusalem (Reuter) — Israel 
and Poland have exchanged 
technical staffs to arrange for 
restoring limited diplomatic 
lies severed by Warsaw 19 
years ago. 

Moose shot 

Stockholm (AP) — A stray 
moose that got into a social 
insurance office and chased 
employees into the archives 
room was shot dead by police. 

Oilfield blaze 

Peking (Reuter) — A fire has 
been burning out of control at 
one of China’s largest oilfields 
since August 31 and is 
destroying more than £60.000 
of crude oil daily. 

Blast claim 

Beirut (Reuter) — An un- 
known Muslim fundamental- 
ist group admitted 
responsibility for killing an 
Iraqi diplomat blown up by a 
car bomb in Pakistan. 

Hotel attack - 

Paris (AP) — Pasha Taj- 
Jamil a Syrian businessman 
from the United Slates, is in 
hospital with serious bullet 
wounds in the chest and back 
after being shot at the Plaza- 
Athenee Hotel here. A man 
has been arrested. 

Tanker docks 

Dubai (Reuter) - The 
French supertanker Brissac, 
hit in an Iranian air attack on 
Saturday, entered Dubai dry- 
dock for inspection and re- 
pairs after two unexploded 
missiles were defused by 
French naval experts. 

Revolt averted 

Sydney (AP) — The Austra- 
lian Prime Minister. Mr Bob 
Hawke, has dropped pro- 
posals for mineral exploita- 
tion of Kakadu National Park, 
heading off a revolt within his 
Labor Party. 

Tamil swoop 

Colombo (AFP) - More 
than 200 Tamil separatists 
have been taken into custody 
after what security sources 
described as a clean-up opera- 
tion in eastern Sri Lanka. 

Unifil backed 

Beirut (AP) - The Shia 
Muslim Amal militia has 
called for a general strike and 
parades throughout south 
Lebanon to demonstrate sup- 
port for the United Nations 
peacekeeping force. UnifiL 


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Royal standard heralds end of Kremlin bugbear 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

For the first time since the 
1917 Bolshevik revolution, the 
personal standard of a mem- 
ber of the Royal Family was 
fluttering proudly last night 
outside the British Embassy, 
which — to the chagrin of 
successive Soviet regimes — 
stands in full view of the 
Kremlin across the Moscow 
river. 

Ironically, the flag signifies 
the presence of the Duke of 
Gloucester, chairman of the 
committee that is charged with 
approving the design of a new 
embassy to be built on a for 
less distinguished site more 
than a mfle from Red Square. 

it will also fly for die next 
two day 5 in place of the Union 
Jack on the Ambassador’s 
Rolls-Royce. 


A British spokesman told 
The Times that, according to 
diplomatic records, the Duke 
is the first member of the 
Royal Family to stay in the 
building, which has been both 
embassy and residence since 
the arrival of the first British 
Ambassador to the Soviet 
Union in 1929. 

During his stay the Duke 
will be meeting Moscow’s city 
architect. 

Ever since Josef Stalin, 
Soviet leaders have made re- 
peated attempts to oust the 
British from die imposing 
embassy premises. It was 
reportedly the unavoidable 
sight of die Union Jack from 
the Kremlin windows that 
most upset them. 

The building was originally 
a private home built by a 
Ukrainian sugar mfltionaire in 
■*b 


1893. In May this year a 
protocol was finally signed 
agreeing to the move aim to 
- reciprocal plans for moderniz- 
ing and expanding the Soviet 
Embassy in London. 

The British spokesman said 
yesterday that the derision to 
leave foe building, with its 
opulent wood-panelled interior 
and unmatched views of the 
Kremlin, had been taken with 
mixed feelings. 

He said that foe first of 
three other agreements with 
the Soviet Government over 
the move was to be signed 
within the next two mouths. 

According to British sour- 
ces. the move was acceded to 
primarily because the building 
had become hopelessly 
cramped for the staff.- - - 

In addition, the Soviet 
authorities had resorted to 


some tough bargaining when 
they Informed Whitehall that 
the choice of sites for the new 
embassy would be withdrawn 
and a new site “imposed” if a 
decision was not made quickly. 

The Foreign Office then 
plumped for another riverside 
site, where the new building is 
expected to be completed some 
time in the 1990s. 

The present building has a 
rich history and the rare 
ability, amid the drabness of 
modern-day Moscow, to con- 
jure op some of the style of the 
l9th century, when it was 
frequently foe scene of lavish 
entertainment and elaborate 
musical evenings. 

The spot on the broad main 
staircase has changed little 
from the memorable night in 
2912 when, according to foe 
then British Vice-Consul Mr 

« 


Robert Brace Lockhart a 
Russian naval officer acting as 
aide-de-camp for Lord Charles 
Beresford was summoned to 
the telephone. 

It was a call from his 
mistress in St Petersburg 
breaking off the affair. 

According to Lockhart 
without even replacing the 
receiver the officer drew his 
pistol and shot himself 
through tbe head. 

Later, the author H.G. 
Wells stayed in the building 
during his visit to Lenin. He 
recalls in his book Russia in 
tie Shadom a lunch with a 
number of strangely assorted 
guests waited on by one elderly 
servant whom he describes as 
“morosely conscious of tbe 
meagreuess of our entertain- 
ment and reminiscent of the 
great days of the past”. 


■OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


L 

in 


Howe signals return to 
Conununity political 
relations with Turkey 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary and Presi- 
dent of the European Council 
of Ministers, yesterday said 
Turkey had been given “the 
green light" for a resumption 
of political relations with the 
EEC which have been frozen 
since martial law was in- 
troduced in Turkey six years 
ago. 

But Greece blocked im- 
mediate restoration of the 
suspended Association Agree- 
ment between Turkey and the 
EEC, which requires the 
unanimous decision by the 
Twelve. Work on the agree- 
ment is to be referred to EEC 
working groups .and the 
Commission. 

Mr Vahit Halefoglu, the 
Turkish Foreign Minister, 
said after the first high-level 
Turkish -EEC meeting since 
1 980 that the way was open for 
closer co-operation between 
Turkey and the EEC and it 
was Turkey's “inalienable 
right" to apply for full integra- 
tion, a reference to EEC 
membership. 

Sir Geoffrey was more cau- 
tious. however, noting that a 
Turkish application to be- 
come the 13th EEC member 
was far off and the present 
process was one of normaliza- 
tion. M Claude Cheysson, the 
EEC Commissioner for Nor- 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 

th-South Relations, who took 
part in yesterday’s talks, began 
the process in July with a visit 
to Ankara. 

The Association Council — 
made up of foreign ministers 
from Turkey and the Twelve 
— was surrounded by con- 
troversy, with critics aiguing 
that Turkey’s human rights 
record disqualified it from 
association with the EEC, let 
alone, eventual membership. 

As Sir Geoffrey and Mr 
Halefoglu spoke, a small but 
vocal band of demonstrators 
chanted anti-Turkish slogans 
outside. Mr Halefoglu insisted 
that Turkey was an integrated 
part of the Western world and 
shared the moral values of 
Western civilization. 

Mr Theodoras Pangaloa, 
the Greek Foreign Minister, 
poured scorn on Turkey's 
claims that it had restored 
democracy, that there were no 
political prisoners in Turkey, 
and that torture was forbidden 
under Turkish law. 

He also dismissed the 
suggestion advanced by Sir 
Geoffrey Howe that Greece 
and Turkey should embark on 
a dialogue to resolve bilateral 
problems in the wake of the 
Association Council. 

He later conceded that the 
path was open to a renewal of 


Turkish-EEC relations, but 
the path was “strewn with 
obstacles" including Turkish 
occupation of the north of 
Cypms as well as Turkey’s 
aggression towards Greece. 

Sir Geoffrey said the 
Twelve had made clear to 
Turkey their concern over 
Cyprus, and supported UN 
efforts to restore the indepen- 
dence and unity of Cyprus. 

Diplomats said that al- 
though Tinkey had not yet 
gained access to the £3S0 
million of EEC aid frozen 
since 1980, and had not 
succeeded in extending the 
rights of Turkish migrant 
workers in Europe, Ankara 
could claim that a start had 
been made. 

The EEC now has greater 
leverage for persuading Tur- 
key to reduce tariffs against 
imports from the EEC 

• EAST BERLIN: President 
Christos Sartzetakis of Greece 
accused Turkey of trying to 
expand its hold on occupied 
northern Cyprus in a speech 
reported here yesterday (Reu- 
ter reports). 

Mr Erich Hooecker, the 
East German bead of state, 
condemned the division of the 
island and called for the 
withdrawal of Turkish troops. 





A Greek Orthodox priest with people from an old people's home in KaJaruata waiting calmly for aid after being eradiated. 

Quake victims flee Greek disaster dty 


From Mario Modiaao 
Athens 

Nearly two-fifths of the 
42,000 inhabitants of Kala- 
mata, the southern coastal 
town ravaged by earthquakes, 
have fled the city, alarmed by 
forecasts of stronger tremors 
to come and the prospect of a 
prolonged stay under canvas. 

The weather has been dem- 
ent, however, and the authori- 
ties promised that 2,300 tents 
would be pitched by last night 
in open spaces to shelter the 
remaining 25,000 people. A 
military airlift from Athens 
has secured adequate supplies 


of bread, milk and tinned 
food. 

A government spokesman 
announced that 20 people 
were killed in Saturday’s 
earthquake. Although no peo- 
ple were no known to be 
missing , the search through 
the ruins continued all 
yesterday. 

- A total of 116 people were 
still in hospitals, 37 of them 
injured in Monday’s second 
shock, which caused wide- 
spread panic and intensified 
the exodus. - 

The Government last night 
deplored “irresponsible 


speculation” that earthquakes 
to come would be more than 7 
on the Richter scale. But 
Greek seismologists are con- 
cerned by the unusual absence 
of after-shock tremors, in- 
dicating a dangerous b uild -up 
of energy. 

Professor Ytannis Drako- 
poulos, head of the State 
Agency for Earthquake Pro- 
tection, said die danger was 
even greater because Kaia- 
tnata was on soft alluvial 
ground, and its buildings were 
unsafe. The people have been 
advised to stay away from 
than until further notice. 


The Government has de- 
clined offers of help from 
foreign countries, but said it 
had asked the European 
Community to provide eco- 
nomic aid from its reserve 
fund for emergencies. Bank 
accounts were open for local 
contributions. 

• MOSCOW: An earthquake 
measuring five points on the 
12-point Soviet scale shook 
die Soviet central Asian 
republic of Tadjikistan early 
yesterday, Tass reported (Reu- 
ter reports). No details of 
casualties or ffrimagr were 
given. 


American 
prisons 
stretched 
for space 

From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

The number of prisoners in 
American jails is at a record 
level after a 5 per cent rise 
brought the total in the first 
half of this year to 528,945. 

The increase of 25.630, an 
even sharper rise than last 
year, means that 1.000 new 
prison beds are needed each 

At June 30, North Dakota 
had the lowest prison popula- 
tion with 411 inmates, and 
California the highest with 
55.238. 

Four western states had the 
largest percentage increase: 
Wyoming, up 14.2 per cent, 
Nevada (13.6 per cent), Utah 
(10.4 per cent) and California 
(10.2 percent). 

The prison population grew 
by 7.9 per cent in the west, 
compared with 3.1 percent in 
the south, 4.5 per cent in the 
mid-west and 5.1 per cent io 
the north-east. 

The reason for the steady 
increase is the imposition of 
longer sentences by many 
judges, who have been in- 
structed by the Justice Depart- 
ment to deal harshly with 
those convicted. 

The crime rate is also 
confining to rise. Some 
authorities, as in Washington 
DC have filled their prisons, 
and are being forced by court 
order to release many inmates 
to prevent overcrowding. 



JOIN THE 460,000 INVESTORS 
ENJOYING A MONTHLY INCOME. 


Over 460,000 people are enjoyinga regular monthly income from 
theirinvestment in National Savings IncomeBonds. You too could have 
something extra coining in every month. 

Currently you’ll get 11*25% pa interest on your Income Bonds. 
You’ll get it paid monthly and in full, because we don’t deduct tax. 

Enjo y life with a monthly income. 

The interest is simply credited direct to your bank or building 
society account, or we can send you a warrant through the post Either 
way it means some extra money coining in regularly to help pay the 
bills or simply to spend enjoying life. 


This is wha 

A>ru)tr 

ImrumriH Mourhlv Iruomr 

it 11*25% pa cams you c 

Antoft 

Irrwrumerrt Monibrl* income 

very month. 

fcujfr 

IinwRiuent Monthly Income 

£2,000 £18-75 

£ 8,000 £ 75 00 

£ 18,000 £168-75 

£5,000 £46-88 

£10,000 £ 93-75 

£ 20,000 £187-50 

£6,000 £56-25 

£13,000 £121-88 

£ 25,000 £234-38 

£7,000 £65-63 

£15,000 £140-63 

£100,000 £937-50 

(Each additional £1.000 invested produces an average oi'£9 -37 a month— £112-50 a yea* Maximum bolding £10(U>004 


Your sayings are never touched 

Your capital is completely safe - the cash you put in is the cash 
you’ll get bade 

Interest is calculated on a day-to-day basis. It is paid in full and 
is subject to tax if you are a taxpayer The rate paid may change from 
time to time, to keep it competitive. 

Gettin g your money out, 

Y>u need give only 3 months’ notice to have any Bond repaid. 
And there will be no loss of interest if youVe held your Bond for a year 
or more. (For details of repayment, see paragraph 6 of the prospectus.) 

Invest here and now. 

You can be sure your investment will always provide a worth 
while income - month in, month out All you have to do is complete 
the coupon below and send it with your cheque (payable to ‘National 
Savings’) to NSIB, Bonds and Stock Office, Blackpool FY3 9YP Or ask 
for an application form at your post office. The minimum purchase 
for new investors is £2,000; if you already have a Bond, it is £1,000. 

It’s probably the most enjoyable investment you’ll ever make. 


National Savings INCOME BONDS 



APPLICATION FOR NATIONAL SAVINGS INCOME BOND 

7b NSIB, Bonds and Stock Office, Bladqpool FY3 9YP 
l/We accept the terms of the ftospectus 


Q> 


and apply for a Bond to (he value of:- £ 






s> 


.000 


Initial minimum of £2,000 
and multiples of £1,000 

to a maximum of £100.000 


Sumjmets) 


All forenamets) 


Mr/Mrs/Mos 


Addms. 


. Postcode. 


Name of Trust 
(if applicable) 


Daieof Blnh 
(essential it under 71 


Day Month Vtear 


NAME AND ADDRESS FOR DESPATCH OF INVESTMENT CERTIFICATE (if different from above) 


104411 


Name. 


Address. 


X vou already have a Natrona) Savings income Bond men Register No 

h 

n 

r 


n 

□ 

n 

Enter fuB account detaih far interest to be paid ckea tc a Bank/Buldmg S 
or name jnd aotSess only if you prefer crossed warrants by post. 

Bonk 

Building Society 

ociety 9 Notional Savings BanfcAocoum. J 

Bank Sorting COde{Shawnm the tap tight 1 
bond area o> you own cheques) J 

i i i n 


ftxtmrip | 


Ait /Rod No 


a* wanrels) 


Signatured) 

Qnatomt 
holding all 
holder? 

must sign) 




.Date. 


19. 


PROSPECTUS 30 May 1986 

I The [>!«WrtS*nngsisaullHjn*«! by the Logs Cormrewcrwri ot Her 
Mates* V' frwsurv IO reserve unN Utter notice apptuwons lor ttoonaJ 
Sawmgs income Bonoi CVondjl 

l The Bonds are a Government secwtK sued infer the National loans Act 
1968 They are reggered in the rvananal Saregi Stott Reaswr and a>e 
su&ea io me Regulations retaftng to me Nauona' Wigs Stott Register lot 
the tine being in force, solar as rhese are aopKame The sroopal a( and 
■merest omte Bonds ««> Be a cha^e on the Nahonai Uwris fijnd 

PURCHASE 

3 1 Sobim toa mnnigre wl ouchase ol £?j000 (se,cwaqraob a) a Bond 
maybeputnaseo £1.000 orannihoteo* mat s*n fapwrmfidmisUie 
maoeat the nme o» aowsaiwn The oaie oi oumase Jrti 'oi all ojmses t» 
tte date oi retMHotmeremra'ice aflthetompwaacioiicaiior.itwrtatite 
Banos and Scott Ohtx. Buopoot a so oi otter puce as me Dwcror o> 
Savings may soeo'y 

32 Anauestmen! certificate, bearing the dele at purchase, mi he issued n 
respect ot eacn pi« nase 

HOLDING LIMITS 

4 1 ho person ma» luo eater Mteh o> tomvvMhanv oilier penooleu than 
U 000 or more than £100.000 01 Bonds Boras mtented IromaaeiMWd 
hataerttal not mum TrMdrasihft permitted maurrun heltermore. Bonds 
heuovapersonasmaxeewe'noicoom touwasmenwoiTMnvvtxiiheis 
peimeted io hold m hq cenatei cmMuiv. rcr wi Bonos heia m truu coun 

rmwas rhe Demurred matanun of a uenefioary\ personal no Wing 
« 3 The Treasury may rar>-!terte«imunianonvw?iyiiryy<^irfT^s^^ 
"*"«m*n owtuse hum wne to rme upon gmnq none nao smji 
vaMwn vrfl Onsuttce any rejtn order the proeetius enpwd by a 
Bondholder rmwiateh tehxe the nanaiem m rspeci oi a Bond tneo held 
by ten 

INTEREST 

51 interest nrf be cotcutetedoneda* today basis han iheoaieoipmuiase 
at a ia*e detemmea oy me freasrfv ilhe , has*»v wieT 
5? interest be tuiableoh the 5t« flay of each momh The Director ol 
5penqs may aeler Ommentiot acoued mreresi omeryydedueei lespeo a< a 
Bone tte tenod ol w we« toscwHio tte date at (wch«c imiii me 

nen mterest oate louonmg me end oi mat penod 

5 3 it on reoament me Bond nas. by reason of oaogcaon 61. earned less 
mtereu man irwiouiateiafli oaa mresoeno* me Bona MferoaraqraphS 2 
tnetwanwiiinnoeoeoijCteoirommesunMDereojiO Any miens* earned 
ontheBomiandnoiaaeadi Dactworereoaymem wt* oeaflaediothesum 
to be iqM it m ine case of reoaenem urn* oaratyatti 62. it is not 
remcnaoh oratKatnerasuo an nweH paymem from oemg maOrtrherthe 
rewymem oate me ansjunt ot that mreresi Mtnrent «w bedMucteo hom 
ihesmnrooer^H'd 

6 a the ^eassay may from tree to tm>e<fl<V me Treasoy rate Upon on ngsw 
■cels' notee 

55 The treasury may (run Nre to time nary me imenais at and dales on 
wn«h inw eu n payable upon gmng notice, and in » dang may specify 
hitong fcmits above or MUM vuhcti any variation red dppytao mo> km J 
aoch to a Bona asuwJ oetoe tne vanaicn unless tne Boncmovt* jam rg 
sucnaapircabon 

5 6 interest on a Bond repraered m the sole name of a mmerunae* mu 
yearso* aqeumii nomta4y bepad nitoa NalcnaiSa«*^s3ar*accouni *i the 
name ol mem*** 

5 7 mures on a Bond md be paid mthttit deduction of income Iai.but ir is 
subiea >o income b* and must be included m any rewn ol income maoe to 
the Hand Rnenue 


REPAYMENT 

61 a Bondholder may oixamnsiaynifnT o*a Bond *i par before redftnmon 

Kxm 9 vmg 3 calendar months' notice The 8ond wfl earn meres * the 
Veasiay rate frem the date of purchase up uthe repayment date where 
repa^nent WJs on or aher ite hrsi avwtmry of purchase Where the 
repayment date laRsbetae the first anniversary ot purchase me Bond vri) 
earn reerest at hail me Tierney rate from the date ot purchase up to the 
repayment dare 

62 Where an app f eabon lor repayment of a Bond ismade after the death of 
the sote or sole swmng repstem holder no fan penod of no«e a 
reoured and the Bond reil earn rnteresiat me ireauay race hum rte date of 

putnase up to me oate ol repayment whether or noc repapnm ocein 
before me t«H enmvereary ot the puenase 

63 Ai> aepkewon tpr repayment of a Bond must be made m wrong is the 
Bonds and Stock Office. BtaCcpool and accomoareed by the m main eni 
cemncare ThepenodotnoiiceqMenBytheBondnaioerwdioecaicuMed- 
lipm me date On wtnch the apfAcanon is recewed m tne Bonds and Stoch 
Office 

6HAppScanon may be m*de for repayment of pan ofaBoteiinanainoiirROl 

£1.000 a a munoeot mat sunpraMteo mat mencfovig ot Borehmnamsig 
after me pm repayment rs not less nan the rranreum hoping km m 
paragraph A tasvatedfromtnnetotaTieiaide'Oart^apha 2 Thepreceding 
suo-Mucpam re* 1 apply w me am repae as to a vmafe Bond me 
remaneng paiance art nave the antedate a* pocnase and the sam e atterest 
dates as MreappkcatHetotrvanginaiBondiiftiieSiuefypcartoiepajimenL 
PAYMENTS 

7 mmesi will be payable dren leawoenal Savmgs Bank or otter bate or 
bu*»nq usoery account w by erosseo Mattant sent py post A BonOKMer 
may only oesgnateoteacCOunt 0 « method Otparmetetoapply to hd enwe 
Wang or Bonds at any tone Capital be repayable area »a Newmaf 
Savings Bank account or by oossed wmnt sent by poa 

MINORS 

B A Bona ngdbyarnnorinder the age of seven years, ether soMyvfandjr 
«m any other pnoic wdi nqt tje repayable, except «reh tne consent of me 
(Vector Ot Sauuigs 

TRANSFER 

9 Bonm not oe transferable e*cepiw«!i me ament of meDrector of 
Savings Vanslpota Bandca oaitotaBondvwnorty DeaSonednan amount 
of ft OOOormufioeol mat turcano vunnot oedtoweo n tne naongol the 
r tarsi erot or rransrereenouia (heteoy beouaoe me no*ingirr«s imposed 
bypw^apha t«s^rearrcimcreeiabineunoerp*«agracrta 2TheOreaor 
of SdvngsyWlnamiasygnieconsentin ihecaseof.rtt aampfe devolution of 
Bonos on me death of a name* pm not to any proposed BanderaMi o by 
vMy of sate Ol tor any conaoerauon 

NOTICE 

i0The9easurvwngiveany'4hcerett*redundppMgapha2.SA5Svn 

of the ptospedusai me London, EttattaghanoBeBast Gazettes nr maty 
otter manner urtveh they tteik fit !| rk?Ke S ^>en otnavwsemanvrthe 
Gazettes s nail as soon as u reasonably possate mereute Oe recorded m 
mem 

GUARANTSD UFE OF BONDS 

it Eacn Bono may DeneKtoragudHnreeamuipenQdofiOyeareton the 
hrsi interest oate atre me date o' oudiase TtereaSermeresiwdcDonnBe 
to bepandCie under the remaf iteprosaefluiiMWKMMpwratae 
Bona TneBanamaibereoeefteaatoaieiBietaimeereiaiihegimnieed 
miUil period or on any reernt date iterrafretm ectenasemrebregremg 
of snmorens'nonceby the Treasm The Orector of Savings me 

BdndWder b^gre redemption, at the last recanted address for w 
Bpadhoim^ vriormng hre of the date of the redarephen attired by the 
feaMy 


KMSenow tnierest aevned tar eadi dayai t-’36S Of the annul rate [and at i<366 of the amiatiatefca- each day n a leap year] 
£ TVs note does not form part of the prospectus 


US impeachment 


Jailed judge faces 
Senate hearing 

From Michael Binyon, Washington 


For the first time in 50 
jesus, the Senate has began <ui 
impeachment proceeding to 
consider the removal of a 
Nevada judge who is serving a 
two-year sentence for tax eva- 
sion and has refased to resign. 

A special commission of 12 
senators has been set up to 
bear charges ajmmst US Dis- 
trict Court Judge Harry 
Claiborne, who maintains he 
is innocent and continues to 
draw his salary of $78,700 
(£53,100) while in prison. He 
has lifetime tenure, and in- 
tends to return to his judicial 
post when he completes his 
sentence. 

Judge daiborne, looking 
tanned and wearing a pin- 
striped suit, attended the 
opening of the impeachment 
proceeding on Monday. 

Mr Peter Rodino, a Demo- 
cratic representative from 
New Jersey who is acting as 
chief prosecutor, said in his 
opening statement: “We sim- 
ply cannot permit a convicted 
felon to sit on the federal 
bench and make judgements 
about others. 

“A jod$e must be a symbol 
of integrity, and beyond re- 
proach, in the eyes of onr legal 
system, he is a criminal, a 
convicted felon/* 

_ Judge Claiborne's defence 
counsel said that -federal 
agents “wanted Harry 
Claiborne’s head on a silver 
platter”, and had improperly 
broken into his home and 
opened his mafl. 

The proceedings, held in the 


ornate room where the late 
Senator Sam Ervin conducted 
tiie Watergate hearings in 
1973, will be reported to the 
fall Senate for an impeach- 
ment vote by the end of the 
month. 

This is the only way a 
federal judge can be removed 
from office. Judge Claiborne b 
the first sitting federal jndge to 
serve time In a US jafl. 

The last impeachment case 
was in 193d, when a judge was 
convicted by the Senate of 
prescribing exorbitant law- 
yer’s fees for a Conner law 
partner; 

Proceedings were begun 
agaipst President Nixon over 
Watergate in 1974, but never 
got as Car as die Senate. A 
conviction requires a two- 
thirds majority in die Senate. 

Judge Claiborne is accused 
of evading S106J100 in income 
tax. Prosecutors said that after 
being named to the bench in 
1978, be began to cash his 
legal fee cheques in casinos, 
making them difficult to trace. 

Meanwhile the Senate was 
preparing to vote today on the 
nomination of Justice W illiam 
Rehnqmst to be the US Chief 
Justice. He is certain of 
confirmation, bat his oppo- 
nents have maintained a lively 

fampajgn a gainst him. 

They have continued to 
make embarrassing accusa- 
tions about his earner record 
on civil rights and his role in a 
1972 case involving military 
surveillance of domotk politi- 
cal groups. 



Dutch increase taxe 
a s gas bonanza wane 

From Robert Sdmil, Amsterdam 

anT'wm/fn *>. °nier to cope wub 

lands. That was the somrotat 2^"“® J he 
perplexing message delivered a of ^ 

yesterday by qS BearTb^n W. expenditure and 
her Speech fromfiie^^ne L l* j^LI! Xatio , n “ ™ 
and by Mr Onno Rudin&the 1? to oTSf ° f VAT 1 
Finance Minister, whm he li&mnP* Ce H l - w 
presented his 1987 bwteet to t£? ^ hon 
Parliament. ^ 10 M J“ e Iow er pnee of nai 

Both the good and the bad T 6805 

pews are the result of the fell levels of 1 

in oil prices earlier this year P ^ 9° nsu mer 

Although not an oil-producing SeaSd KJ TC - J h f ,0 S POwei 
country like Britain, Thl ^- 5 ** «« ' 

Netherlands finds itself in a Rudmgsaid. 

amUar position because it biew 7Lif arkcr . si<Je - 
produces considerable quanti- GoSStmi^* 1 * 86 6cil W 
ues of tmtural gas whose price remains the 

is linked to that of oiL moreSSS k 59 nem which 

more than 15 per cent is 


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Ferraro’s fall falls to stop female advance to high office 

Primary victories a watershed 
for women in US politics 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


From Michael Binyon 


When Ms Geraldine Fter- 
raro, Mr Walter Mondale’s 
nmmjjg mate in the last 
presidential election, was de- 
feated and then forced out of 
the mainstream of the Demo- 
cratic Party, h was said that 
women in American politics 
were on the retreat, that a 
more conservative mood had 
strangled their hopes of a 
political breakthrough. 

Only two years later, their 
prospects look very different. 
Not for a long time have so 
many women done so well in 
pnmary elections. Whoever 
^ins, the mid-term elections 
in November wiU pm more 
women into office as gov- 
ernors, senators and con- 
gressional representatives 
than ever before. 

The primaries on Tuesday 
proved to be the watershed. 
Women won two Senate nom- 
inations, three for governor, 

1 5 for Ho use seats and a dozen 
for various state offices. In 
Nebraska, both Democratic 
and Republican nominees for 
Governor are women; in 
Maryland so are both can- 
didates for the Senate. 

And Mis Kathleen Ken- 
nedy Townsend, daughter of 
the fate Robert Kennedy, feres 
a woman Republican oppo- 
nent to represent a Baltimore 
suburb in the House of 
Representatives. 

What has surprised Ameri- 
cans is how quickly people 
have adjusted to. the- novelty. 
Indeed, perhaps the women's 
success has been because most 
did not make gender a feature 
of their candidacy. They ran 


because they were the hardest- 
hitting candidates, with a 
better command of the issues 
and broader support than 
their male opponents. 

Their successes were the 
more telling in areas where 
they faced seasoned oppo- 
-silion. In Maryland, there was 
a fierce race to inherit the 
mantle of Senator Charles 
Mathias, a widely respected 
Republican liberal who is 
retiring this session. 

Miss Barbara Miluslri from 
Baltimore, for the Democrats, 
raced both a popular feDow- 
congressman, Mr Michael 
Barnes, and the Governor of 
the stale, Mr Many Hughes. 
Mr Barnes, a prominent lib-' 
eral, had resigned his safe seat 
in the Washington suburbs; 
Governor Hughes had all the 
advantages of statewide recog- 
nition. ret Miss MiiusJri won 
handsomely. 

She feces Mis Linda Cha- 
vez, a former White Home 
aide and one of a growing 
number of women- Repub- 


licans achieving high office. 

They are only the second 
pair of women to contest a 
Senate seat (the first being in 
Maine in I960). If Miss 
Miiuski wins in November 
she wiH be the first female 
Democrat elected to the Sen- 
ate who did not fin a vacancy 
left by-her husband. 

In Nebraska, Mrs Helen 
Boosalis for the Democrats is 
campaigning hard against Mrs 
Kay Orr for the Republicans. 
If Mrs Orr wins she will be the 
first Republican ever elected a 
governor in the US. 

The all-women races have 
been as vigorous as any. As the 
.Nebraska candidates pul it 
“This is no bake-off” They 
may agree on contentious 
issues luce abortion — both 
oppose it — but they have not 
felled to exploit each other's 
weak points. 

The voters dearly do not see 
gender as an issue. When a 
Baptist pastor, Mr Everett 
Sfieven. tried to capture the 
Republican primary, saying 



Mrs Helen Boosafis and Mrs Kay Orr. squaring up to do 
ba tt l e for the Governor’s j®I» in Nebraska. 


female leadership was a “sure 
sign of God's curse”, be 
finished fourth with only 2 per 
cent of the vole. 

Nevertheless, some, women 
have made women's rights a 

S eminent part of their plat- 
pn. Miss Miiuski, a feisty 

populist, has campaigned, long 
in Congress for the Equal 
Rights Amendment, affir- 
mative action and a woman's 
right to an abortion. Mrs 
Chavez, however, while derid- 
ing her opponent’s liberalism, 
made her name m the civil 
'rights field by taking a more 
conservative tine whue at the 
White House. 

Mrs Townsend ra me from 
behind to win her nomination 
partly because she cam- 
paigned on the needs of 
working couples with chil- 
dren, an important issue to 
many women. 

One outspoken and familiar 
feminist who now returns 
after a 10-year break is Ms 
Bella Abzug, the former New 
York congresswoman, who is 
a Democratic candidate for a 
New York City suburb. ■ 

Altogether this year, women 
have won six nominations for 
the Senate, 53 fin* House seats, 
nine for governor, and 19. for 
lieutenant-governor. In the 
remaining four primaries; an 
additional 1 1 women are 
standing for these offices. 
Nothing has changed par- 
ticularly to encourage this 
female success now. Ms Ann 
Lewis, national director of a 
liberal Democrats’ lobby, said 
the result simply reflected 15 
years of steady progress that 
has been gathering steam. 



Swing to Right sparks 
early Austrian election 

From Richard Bassett, Vienna 

Austrians win elect a new 
government on November 23, 
five months earlier than ex- 
pected - a move precipitated 
by a sharp swing to the right 
within die Freedom Party 
which elected at the weekend 
Herr Jorg Haider as its leader. 


As the Austrian Chancellor, 
Dr Franz Vranitsky, yesterday 
met with die President, Dr 
Knrt Waldheim, so that Par- 
liament could be dissolved 
next week, a bitter wrangle 
broke out betwee»3he; Cliaii- 
cellor and Herr Haider on the 


fete of Henr Norbert Steger, 
the Vke Chancellor. 

Dr Vranitsky m keen on 
Herr Steger remaining in the 
coalition nwrti the efect- 
iomHeir Haider, however, has 
made it dear that Henr- 
Steger’s presence wiD mean 
only “another Socialist 
minister” in the Government. 

As the Austrian constitution 
allows only the president to 
accept a mi nis ter i al resigns-' 
don, Dr Waldheim may have 
to exercise for the first time Ms, 
powers to settle the dispute. | 


Bolivia extends stay of 
US troops in drug figiit 


La Paz (Reuter) — The 
Bolivian Government has au- 
thorized 170 US troops back- 
ing an anti-cocaine drive to 
remain in the country until 
mid-November. 

Senor Guillermo Bedregal, 
the Foreign Minister, said the 
Government decided to per- 
mit. tire troops to stay for 60 
more days because the na- 
tion’s police force needed 
more communications and 
transport equipment before it 
could .contnrae to fight the 
' ug traffickers alone. 

The American 'froops ar- 
rived with six Hade Hawk 


helicopters on July 14 to | 
provide logistical support fora 
police drive against the co- 
caine trade. The offensive! 
destroyed about eight cocaine 
processing laboratories. 

Bolivia asked Washing ton 
last month fra $80 million 
(£54 million) in annual aid 
over the next three to five 
years to eradicate the illicit 
coca leaf crop, which serves as 
raw material for cocaine. 

It also sought Si 00 million 
in emergency assistance to 
sustain its faltering economy 
after a'&arp <lrop in dollar'! 
income from the drug trade! 


President Mitterrand of 
France, with his wife Danielle, 
being welcomed with a earla 
of flowers at the start ofa four- 
day visit to Indonesia. 

The emphasis- of M Mitter- 
rand’s trip, the first by a 
French president to the former 
Dutch colony of 13,700 is- 
lands, will be mi tasting 
isiness o pp o rt uni ties s®# 
ilitary sales (Renter 1 
reports). 

But Indonesia, which has 
just been forced into the fonrth 
big devaluation of President 
Saharto’s 20-year rale, wflJ be- 
long for (heap credits and 
ways of closing the large trade 
gap between Paris and! 
Jakarta. 

French exports in 1985 were 
3458 million francs (£368 
motion) against imports of 
1^48 nriffiffia francs. 

French officials say the 
main thrust of his tonr win be 
commercial, to promote 
French contracts and possible 
sates of French weaponry. 

Jfranee sees good oppor- 
tnmtesin airpoatconstruction, 
tekcoQimunicatflias, heavy eq- 
mpmentaad tourism. 


Errant Soviet missile 
‘crashes in China’ 

From Mofasin ALL, Washington 


A Soviet submarine- 
launched missile aimed to- 
wards a testing range on the 
Kamchatka Pe ninsula, north- 
east Siberia, misfired and 
landed near the Sino-Soviet 
border last Thursday, accord- 
ing to defence and congres- 
sional sources here. 

The unarmed missile 
landed in Chinese territory 
near the Manchurian border 
about 180 miles west of the 
Soviet dry of Khabarovsk, 
according to a Washington 
Post report. 

A Pentagon spokesman de- 
clined to comment on the 
report which said that Chinese 
and American officials had 
discussed the incident 

One official familiar with 
the incident said he believed 
the missil e -came down in 
China in the area of the Amur 
River, but he added he could 


not be absolutely sure. 

The sources said that the 
missile, which apparently car- 
ried a single dummy warhead 
and has a range of over 3,000 
miles, was fired from a Delta 2 
submarine in the Barents Sea. 

The misfiring took place 
during extensive Soviet test- 
ing of intercontinental ballis- 
tic missiles. 

Errant Soviet missiles are 
usually destroyed in flight but 
the sources did not know why 
that had not happened in this 
case. There was speculation 
here that a short-circuit or 
other malfunction of the 
missile's electronic guidance 
system may have prevented 
actuation of the flight centre's 
destruction command. 

On January 2, 1985, another 
misfired Soviet missile cre- 
ated an international uproar, 
when it crashed in Finland. 


Arrests for 
new trial 
on murder 
of Aquino 

From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

A special court yesterda; 
ordered the arrest of tht 
Philippines former armet 
forces chief and 25 other 
whose acquittal of the 198.' 
assassination of Presktav 
Aquino's husband, Benigno 
was overturned last week bj 
the Supreme Court. 

Additional evidence is be- 
ing gathered into the killini 
which precipitated the over- 
throw of the 20-year Marco: 
regime, new witnesses will lx 
called and other people couk 
be charged, court official* 
said. 

Police last night arrestee 
two soldiers who were among 
those originally acquitted. The 
two were in a group of foui 
escorting Benigno Aquinc 
from an aircraft when he was 
shot. 

The Supreme Court las: 
Friday ordered the case re- 
opened after finding that for- 
mer President Marcos, orches- 
trated a “sham” trial. 

Mr Marcos's former mili- 
tary chief. General Fabian 
Ver, and an Air Force captain 
could escape prosecution how- 
ever. because both are in the 
US with which the Philippines 
has no extradition treaty. 

General Ver fled to Hawaii 
in February with Mr Marcos. 
Captain Felipe Valerio went 
absent without leave and fled 
to the US in April. 

Meanwhile, the Philippine 
Government, threatened with 
a “holy war” by disgruntled 
Muslim rebels, has included 
two more rebel factions in the 
peace negotiations it is under- 
taking to try io end a 14-year 
rebellion. 

A government emissary, the 
deputy Foreign Minister, Mr 
Mamintal Tamano, will leave 
on Thursday for Saudi Arabia 
to begin peace talks with two 
Muslim rebel leaders excluded 
from earlier peace talks Mrs 
Aquino had with Mr Nur 
Misuari, chairman of the 
More National Liberation 
Front, a rival Muslim guerrilla 
organization. 

WASHINGTON: Presi- 
dent Aquino was to meet 
international lenders as part of 
a drive to ease payments on 
her country's $26 billion 
(£17.5 million) foreign debt 
Her first meetings in a 
three-day Washington visit 
were to be with senior Inter- 
national Monetary Fund and 
Wdrid Bank officials. 

Leading article, page 13 


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i 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


SPECTRUM 




- Arctic surface 
deposit s" 

^ Drilling rig. 

Frozen surface fpfcj 
kJV ground 


Solid methane hydrate 
- ice forms in hands 
and lenses close to 
Utterly cold surface 


Artie > 
Circle 4| 

CANADA 


Slow seepage 
of methane gas 
from below 


EHesmere li 


ISLANDS 


Largest deposits 
cover several hundred 
square miles and 
may be 1000ft thick 
at the centre 


BAFFIN BAY 


Devon Is 


100 miles 


Prince of 
Wales Is 


Baffin: 

Island 


Slow seepage 
of methane gas 
from below 




The hiss that unlocked a sea of power 

OiMdHan 


The future has finally 
arrived and it looks, 
left, like nothing on 
earth. It lies under 
the seabedanditis 
manna from below 
— a huge, perhaps 
even infinite, source 
of gas. Keith Hindley tells the story of a 
blessing that once looked more like a curse 


!n the frozen wastes of the 
Canadian and Siberian Arctic, 
crews drilling for oil were mys- 
tified. It was the late 1 970s and the 
everlasting search for new sources 
of energy was being hampered by 
sudden, and sometimes violent, 
action far beneath the seabed. 
Wells mysteriously sealed up; in 
some cases they blew out with 
huge amounts of methane 
sometimes fires started; on oi 
occasions the sudden surge blew 
the drill bit straight out of the 
ocean floor. 

The culprit was a bluish, ice-like 
substance that hissed menacingly 
as it melted. Today that substance 
has unlocked its secret and with it 
enough energy to supply the world 
for perhaps 5000 years. The doud 
of a few years ago has turned out 
to have a silver lining of staggering 
potential. 

The source of ft, solid methane 
hydrate, represents an entirely 
new kind of gas deposit So large 
and so widespread are the recent 
finds that a sharp upward revision 
of the world's known gas reserves 
is necessary. Canadian and Rus- 
sian experts believe the solid gas 
totals many times the world's 
known conventional gas deposits. 

Until now, scientists had 
thought the world would run out 
of natural gas— used in everything 
from domestic cooking to the 
manufacture of drugs and plastics 
— early next century. Now the 
prognosis is dramatically 
different 

Solid methane hydrate is a 
chemically bound mixture of 
methane gas and water that occurs 
as vast sheets or lenses. It looks 
like and is as stable as water ice 
when kept very cold but it readily 
decomposes on wanning to give 
methane gas and water. The 
amount of gas inside the solid is 
staggering. A cubic yard of hydrate 
yields 5.050 cubic feet of natural 

gas 

Geologists have found the hy- 
drate at more than 80 sites in the 
Canadian and Siberian Arctic. 
More deposits have turned up on 


the deep ocean floor off the coasts 
of north and south America, 
Africa. Australia and the Far East, 
in the Pacific, Atlantic and the 
Caribbean. Some of the deposits 
are vast. 

**!n one region off the coast of 
Guatemala we drilled nine 
successive holes stretched over 
200 miles and found the same 12 ft 
thick hydrate zone", says Dr 
Rodney Malone, project manager 
for the gas hydrate programme at 
the Morgantown Energy Technol- 
ogy Center in Morgantown, West 
Virginia. Another deposit, off 
California, covers several hundred 
square miles and is 1.000 ft thick 
at the centre. 

Dr Don Davidson, a chemist at 
the National Research Council of 
Canada in Ottawa, has made the 
hydrate in the laboratory and 
found that it forms, very easily 
provided it is kept stable. More 
importantly, Davidson found it as 
easy to melt as water ice. and on 
melting it instantly decomposes to 
release its gas burden. 

Gas hydrates are ward ices 
made up from any one of nearly 
200 gases trapped in a framework 
of water molecules. The first was 
made by British chemist Hum- 
phrey Davy more than 150 years 
ago. but nobody understood their 
structure until the 1950s. 

Davidson's work showed that 
methane hydrates could also form 
on the ocean floor more than two 
thirds of a mile down. There, 
pressure rather than low tem-, 
perature renders the solid stable. 
Samples of the hissing ice have 
turned up in mud and sediments 
excavated as part of the inter- 
national deep sea drilling project, 
which has sampled the sea floor all 
over the world, using the drill ship 
Glamor Challenger. 

The hydrate also explains 
anomalies found by geologise 
studying the sea bed using dock 
waves from small explosions. 
Bright "bottom simulating 
reflectors" usually indicate large 
deposits of gas but these should 
never form in weak sediments 


Deep oca 
deposit 


Methane hydrate forms sold 
ice-like masses composed of 
crystals with six and five 
sided faces. 

Crystal Is made up from 

methane molecules surrounded 


by a shell of loosely bound 
water molecules. 


Harvest of die sea, challenge of the scientists: where the gas is. what the gas is and how the seabed stores it. Glomar Challenger's pioneering has opened the door to security 

gas evolving to beat enough ai: 
keep up a steady flow of gas. 


without an impermeable rock cap 
to trap them. But a thick layer of 
frozen methane hydrate provides 
just such a trap, and it is a self- 
perpetuating and selfsealing cap. 
As gas slowly percolates upwards 
it forms solid hydrate close to the 
surface and spreads outwards as 
long as the gas source from below 
continues. 

This gas could come from 
bacteria dose to the surface or 
from decomposing organic ma- 
terial deeper down, but Professor 


Thomas Gold at Cornell Univer- 
sity believes that the deep rocks of 
the earth are rich in methane and 
this almost inexhaustible source 
could explain the sheer size of the 
methane hydrate deposits. 

■ Hydrate will form anywhere 
where the temperature is low 
enough or the pressure high 
enough. Russian geologists es- 
timate that at least 85 per cent of 
the deep ocean floor is suitable 
territory and they think reserves 
are at least 30 million billion cubic 


feet of gas — six times the world’s 1 
current known conventional 
deposits, which would last for 300 
years at present consumption 
rates. But some Americanauthori- 
ties say the total could be as high 
as S00 billion billion cubic feet, 
enough for 5000 years. 

Surface sea water at just 20 
degrees Centigrade would be 
warm enough to melt the hydrate 
if it was pumped down to the sea 
bed. Even in the Arctic, one would 
only have to bum 7 percent of the 


air to 


PROVEN - THE BRITISH THEORY THEY ALL LAUGHED AT 


The one man who was not surprised to lean that 
there are prodigious deposits of methaf gas deep 
below die earth's surface is Professor Thomas Gold, 
an expatriate Briton working at Cornell U ni v er s it y 
in Ithaca, New York state. He predicted more than a 
decade ago that rest quantities of methane would be 
found saturating the earth’s deep rocks. At the time, 
the notion was ridiculed by geologists. He believes 
that many phenomena such as gas leakages before 
earthquakes and mud volcanoes aad then* inflam- 
mable gases all laid support to the idea. Pro fe s so r 
Gold had been hoping for vindication from a 


Swedish expedition which is driving a deep wefl 
beneath an ancient meteorite aster bat he may get it 
sooner than he thought from methane hydrate 
deposits if they turn oat to be as extensive as they ap- 
pear. Professor Gold- has developed a number of 
highly co n trovers ia l ideas ova the years. With 
Herman Bondi and Fred Hoyle, he proposed the 
now-defunct steady state theory of the universe. He 
put op the correct explanation for the steady 
bleeping of pulsar radio sou rces hit got it wrong 
when be suggested that the moon might be deeply 
covered in dust 


The Russians have already car- 
ried out preliminary experiments 
using steam and hot gases to melt 
and extract the solid methane, but 
the first serious attempts to re- 
cover the gas will be made at sea 
using warm water to release the 
gas and giant underwater umbrel- 
las to gather it and pipe it ashore. 
Either way there are currently too 
many conventional gas deposits to 
exploit for hydrate to be commer- 
cially viable yet. The oil and gas 
industries still regard it as a 
nuisance and are anxious only- to' 
drill through it and seal off the 
deposits they find by lining the 
holes. 

Serious commercial exploita- 
tion will come in 50 to 60 years 
when conventional gas deposits 
begin to give out The Russians 
may be first to try. but the offshore 
Californian deposits would be 
equally attractive. Alternatively, 
industrialized countries with lim- 
ited oil and gas deposits - like 
Australia, Ireland or Spain — 
‘r- could exploit the reserves that 


undoubtedly lie in deep water just 
off their shores. The deposits 
could also prove vital to nations 
. with no fossil fuel reserves at all. 

And Britain's action in defence 
of the Falkland Islands could 
prove to have been a canny 
decision economically for the vast 
areas of prime methane hydrate 
real estate that surround the 
islands. Initial interest may centre 
on the natural gas that is always 
trapped beneath the frozen- hy- 
. drate layers. Either way, the new 
finds will give the world a fresh 
energy source for the next century. 

The finds could even explain a 
maritime mystery or two. The 
disappearance, with no apparent 
cause, of sturdy ships could have 
; been brought about by volcanic 
activity on the sea floor releasing. 

; from methaife hydrate deposits, 
huge volumes of gas that would 
expand rapidly as they rose. The 
resultant waves could easily 
swamp a ship. 

So we may have not only an 
infinite source of power but an end 
to the infinite speculation over the 
- Bermuda Triangle: 






A 

in. 




Mi come, mi seh, mi conquer 


P rolessor P. Lai is an 
Indian writer and pub- 
lisher who runs a regular 
writers' workshop at his home 
in Calcutta. Philip Larkin 
called him "my contact and 
my pal", and his circle has 
also included the novelist 
Anita Desai. He works - not 
in Hindi. Urdu, or any of the 
languages that make up the 
subcontinent's linguistic 
patchwork — but in Indian 
English. 

In the 1960s. his efforts on 
behalf of an Indian English 
were considered laughable. 
Today, he is widely respected. 
"English." he says, making a 
crucial distinction, "is not my 
mother's tongue, but it is my 
mother tongue." 

The single most important 
foci about English today is 
that the “mother's longue" 
speakers of the language are in 
a clear minority. Con- 
centrated in Britain, the 
United States and the white 
Commonwealth, they total 
some 350 million. But they are 
dramatically outnumbered by 
those - like Professor Lai — 
for whom English is a 
•■national" or even a “second” 
language. 

In this empire, far vaster 
than that on which the sun 
would never set. it has been 
calculated thai perhaps as 
many as a thousand million 
arc using English as the essen- 
tial lingua franca of our times. 


In the words of the novelist 
Salman Rushdie. “English, no 
longer an English language, 
now grows from many roots; 
and those whom it colonized 
arc carving out larger terri- 
tories within the language for 
themselves. The Empire is 
striking back." 

India offers a textbook 
illustration of the argument 
that it's the periphery and not 
the centre that is influencing 
English today. Dr M.P. Jain of 
the Indian Institute of Tech- 
nology is collecting Indian 
Englishisms; words borrowed 
from Indian languages like 
bheri (a fish farm), aacoit (a 
bandit) and crores (a million), 
.together with fascinating hy- 
brids such as mixygrinacr (a 
-food blender), and eye-teaser 
(a man who harasses women). 

To illustrate the distinctive- 
ness of this "new English" Dr 
Jain cites the example of 
Indian students who can no 
longer understand the Stan- 
dard English of their text- 
books. “We now have a very 
interesting industry in India." 
he says, “in which books, 
written by American or Brit- 
ish authors are rehashed into a 
kind of Indian English." 

For Professor Lai. the emer- 
gence of an Indian expression 
to English is a cause for 
celebration. “In 15 or 20 years 
wc might have evolved a 
language which is so truly and 
richly and uniquely and indig- 


Toda/s Third 
World patois could 
become tomorrow’s 
standard English 
if the language 
develops along 
its present lines 


Enc Boaumont 



cnously our own that you will 
need to carry a tourist guide, 
with footnotes, to know what 
these words mean." 

The development of such a 
language may take longer than 
that. After alL there are the 
Indian mother tongues, in 
which the vast majority of the 
population finds self- 
expression. 


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But in the Caribbean — 
another “new English" society 
— there are no such alter- 
natives. The English-speaking 
Caribbean has always enjoyed 
a speech continuum from the 
deepest creole to a virtual 
Standard English. In the past, 
Caribbean talk might be called 
“the dialect", or “patois”. 
Now Caribbean nationalism 
suggests a more sophisticated 
approach. The poet Eddie 
Brathwaite prefers to talk of 
“nation language — the word 
'dialect' has so many pejora- 
tive overtones. It is broken 
English. 'Nation language* 
suggests the kind of authentic- 
ity which is now becoming 
part of our expression". 

In the 1970s. that ex- 
pression found voice in reggae 
and the dub poems. One ofthe 
most famous begins: “Mi seh 
mi cyaan believe it”— a far cry 
from the English of Oxford. 
Fowler and Webster. Today, 
language radicals are fighting 
for the recognition of “nation 
language" at government 
level. Dr Hubert Devonish. of 
the University of the West 
Indies, is pruning street talk on 
to street signs. In his experi- 
ments “No right turn" be- 
comes “No ton rail": “No 
overtaking or passing" be- 
comes “No uovaiek naar 
pass": “No parking between 
these signs" becomes "No 
paak betwiin dem sain ya". 

In Sierra Leone, there's 
Krio. a folly-fledged local 
creole, recently codified by the 
Oxford University Pres in A 
Krio-Engfish Dictionary. Krio 
is an official language of 
government, spoken by Presi- 
dent Siaka Stevens and many 
of his people, a means of news 
broadcasting and a literary 
form much favoured by play- 
wrights. Eighty per cent of 
Krio is derived from English, 
but it appeals in a form that is 
barely recognizable. So “May I 
go with you?" becomes “A 
kam falu you?" In the Krio 
transcriptions of Shakespeare. 

. Is You Like It becomes U Di 
Kiap Fit. 

I t is not hard to imagine a 
new generation of West 
African writers — the heirs 
of Amos Tutuola and Chinua 
Achcbc — turning, with gov- 
ernment encouragement, to 
Krio as a form of English at 
once locally authentic and yet 
widely recognized throughout 
West Africa. 

What's more, the Krio of 
Siena Leone and the creole of 
the Caribbean arc. with some 
slight adjustment, immially 


intelligible. It's this, some 
have suggested, that could 
mark the beginning of an 
alternative network of “new 
English" communication. The 
creolist Loreto Todd has al- 
ready argued that it is the 
world's pidgins and creoles 
that make up the genuinely 
global, democratic language. 

Enter Dr Robert Burchfield, 
the retiring ChiefEditor of the 
Oxford English Dictionary. In 
1 978 Burchfield gave a lecture 
in Chicago which bit the 
world's headlines. His thesis 
was that British and American 
English were slowly but in- 
exorably diverging towards 
mutual un intelligibility. He 
has since enlarged the argu- 
ment to include world English 
in all its varieties. 

Comparing the emergence 
of the “New Englishes" to the 
spread (and subsequent break- 
up) of Latin. Burchfield's 
argument has been that, just as 
Latin became French. Span- 
ish. Italian, and other Euro- 
pean langauages. so — over a 
period of centuries — will 
English disintegrate into sepa- 
rate languages. 

F aced with some forms of 
“new English", one 
might be tempted to 
agree. But this is to ignore the 
immense forces of| 
standardization. The world of 
international communica- 
tions. science and technology, 
trade and finance speaks and 
writes Standard English, ei- 
ther British or American. 

Beneath this thin crust of 
uniformity there are indeed 
powerful local energies finding 
local authenticity and mean- 
ing in literary as well as oral 
modes, but these varieties do 
not necessarily threaten a new 
Babel Recognizing a plurality 
of English today we get closer 
to the world's view of English. . 
The result of the imperial 
export of language and culture 
throughout the 1 9th century is 
that the language of that 
process is now beginning to 
transcend its imperial origins 
and find an expression which, 
though rooted in the past, is 
not crippled by iL 

Robert McCrum 

© Time* Newspaper* Ltd 1986 

The Story of English, hy 
Robert McCrum. William 
('ran and Rolvrt MacNcil. is 
published tomorrow by 
BBC/Fahcr.at £15. The tele- 
vision series on which the book 
is based starts on September 22 
(BBC 2. 8.05 pm). 




In the early hours of a cold 
October morning in I960, a 
tired Presidential candidate, 
John F Kennedy, spoke from 
the steps of the University of 
Michigan's student union. 
“How many of you are willing 
to spend lO years in Africa or 
Latin America or Asia work- 
ing for the US and working for 
freedom?" he challenged the 
audience of 10,000 students. 

In September of the follow- 
ing year, with Kennedy in the 
White House, the Peace Corps 
‘was bom. Now it 25 years old. 
There are 6.000 volunteers in 
61 countries, people whose 
work, is unsung, forgotten — 
and unwanted by much of a 
deeply-suspicious Third 
World. 

Most of South America will 
have nothing to.do with h and 
.the extreme right in the US 
ceaselessly fires pot-shots at ft. 
Nevertheless the Peace Corps 
survives in the grubby, fly- 
blown outbacks of the world, 
an ideal from another era. 

Volunteers go quietly 
abroad for two or three years 
without any of the rousing 
fan fere or the missionary zeal 
inspired by Kennedy. Nobody 
notices them leave any more: 
Many Americans seem to 
have forgotten that the Peace 
Corps exists. 

Volunteers may find them- 
selves assailed as CIA op- 
eratives or. in the modern 
rhetoric of the Third World, as 
cultural imperialists. Yef they 
keep enlisting. And they often 
find, too. that the assassina- 
tions of Kennedy and Martin . 
Luther King, the Vietnam 
War. Watergate- the invasion 
of Grenada and hostile poli- 
cies in Latin America have 
sullied the name of America. 

The Peace Corps was 
sometimes used as a pawn in 
global politics, so that coun- 
tries that once courted it 
suddenly expelled it. 
demolishing a bridge between 
a politically assertive Third 
World and a changing Amer- 
ica, 

The anniversary, is beiig 
celebrated with the .pubfica- 
lion in America of A faking A 
Di fference: The Peace Corps at 
Twenty- Fire, in which Sargent 
Shriver. the Peace Corps’ first 
director, writes: “Regretfully. 

1 acknowledge it will require 
more time and still greater 
effort for the vision of the 
Peace Corps to win the world. 
Thar a pugnacious national- 
ism seems once again to be 
sweeping over our country 
docs not so much mean that 
the Peace Corps has failed as 
that it has not tried hard 
enough." 

. What role docs the Peace 
Corps have now? Lord Miller 
Ruppc.. its defector, laments 


/x ui vam 

survives 

reality 

The Peace Corps 
at 25 is bloodied 
but unbowed 



Sargent Shriver: not foiled, 
but not tried hard enong h 

that she is confronted fre- 
quently by the question: 
“P® 3 ®® Corps? Is it still 
around~ Many people think 
of it as an anachronism in a 
world that seems more bellig- 
erent. more political 

President Nixon hated it 
(the more so because of ami- 


ahogeihcr. For a while it v 
subsumed into a larger gi 
eminent agency. It has 
emerged today as a small 
more pragmatic organisatii 
its volunteers rather older (l 
median age is just under ; 
and more skilled than i\ 
were. 

Its first two purposes are 
contribute to econom 
development and to promt 
a more favourable view of t 
United States in other con 
tries. The third purpo 
which today seems somewt 
out of tune with Amcric 
increasing sense of isolation, 
“to help promote a ben 
understanding of other pc 
pies on the part ofthe Ame 
can people". 

The 120.000 former volt 
leers are perhaps the mi 
durable legacy of the Pec 
Corps. They form a consl 
uency that is flexing its mi 
de^ steadily asserting 
unified, liberal stand in fi 
cign policy. 

The Heritage Foundatic 
reflecting the far right's si 
picions. alleged in a 19 
report that in the late 196 
and early 1970s the Pea 
Corps became a haven i 
those opposed to Americ 
foreign policy. But the spirit 
the Peace Corps lives c 
Duong the African famine 
January. 1985. it appealed f 
a . p & - nts with agricultui 
skills; 20.000 people called i 

Christopher Thoms 


— - * * «vi 

CONaSE CROSSWORD NO 10< 


ACROSS 
1 Sight (6) 

4 Serious (6) 

7 Weak (4) 

8 Recover bv allow- 
ance (4.4)' 

9 U^per body armour 
13 ^'8 L “ oc P ,0siv e 

16 Solomon Order Cn*- 
sadcr(6.7) 

17 Male car (3) 

19 Brass cannon (8) 

24 wUd cfcaigc (8) 

25 Threesome (4) 

26 Ranoffft) 

27 Shakc(6) 

DOWN 

1 Valley (4) 

2 Topical conference 
(9l 

3 Wall recess (5) 

4 Urbane 15) 

5 Ear flap 14) 

6 Tourist magnet (S) 



|° Raj title (5) 

I Dreamers fruii Jo 
12 Madras language (S) JJ 

» Change 


** Noi suitable ( 

14 Larboard (4) “ Give off 14 J 

23 HaidupMi 

SOLUTION TO NO 1055 

ACROSS I Harass -5 Gibe _ . 

Derr IS Control column 1 7 2 Arsenal 111 in „■ 





















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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 . ! 

WEDNESDAY PAGE 

Should a woman married to a divorced man subsidize bis maintenance payments? Liz Gill spoke to some who have lived to regret the day they agreed to 




J udith married for flic first 
tune in her eariy 30s, bring- 
ing to the marriages, Hamp- 
stead flat, a good salary 
. from her job in advertising 
and a comforting little nest egg her 
grandmother had left her. Her 
husband Graham, 40, divorced 
with two teenage daughters. 
Drought a financial and emotional 
tune bomb. 

Scarcely three years after his 
second wedding, his first wife 
claimed an increase in mainte- 
nance and now, with a toddler of 
her own and another baby mi the 
wa y, Jud ith is contemp lating the 
prospect of subjecting her entire 
personal finances to court scrutiny 
— and the likely erosion of her 
hard-won assets. 

“Emotions apart" she says, “I 
honestly think I would not have 
married Graham if rd known 
what a mess it was all going to be. 
At a time when you'd reasonably 
think I could look forward to 
being better off, Fm faced with 
losing what I've got 
“I appreciate a man has to 
support his children, but Fm 
damned if Tm going to keep his 
first wife in designer jeans." 

Her cri de coeur is typical of the 
woman caught in the curious 
modern phenomenon whereby the 
law and mania] mores combine to 
set first and second wives at each 
other's throat. The problem, 
particularly affects the middle- 
class professional woman who is 
relatively well-off by the time she 
settles down. The boost her in- 
come gives to her husband's 
finances means his first wife has a 
strong case for an increas e in 

maintananre 

The resultant drain on the 
couple's money, the new wife's 
anger and insecurity - especially 
where her children are concerned 
— and the husband’s frustration 
can have extreme consequences,' 


‘I appreciate a man has to support his 
children, but Fm damned if Fm going to keep 
his first wife in designer jeans’ 


according to Margaret Oddie of. 
the conciliation service Mediation 
in Divorce. 

“We come across the problem 
quite regularly", she says. 
"Maintenance requests front a 
first wife can and do t h reaten the 
stability of the new relationship.’’ 

Social policy researcher Alex 
Goldie — who is studying the 
position of second wives fin* a 
doctorate at Granfield Institute, 
Bedford — comments; “Fve en- 
countered feelings of immense 
outrage, even violation, from 
these women. No wonder so many 
second marriages crumble under 
such pressures.” 

The legal position is still rather 
muddy, be says, but in essence ft is 
this: a first wife can make a claim 
for an increase in payments, either 
for herself and her children or for 
herself alone, solely on the basis of 
an improvement in her ex- 
husband's circumstances. 

“When it comes to court, her 
solicitor can, and invariably does, 
ask for the second wife to submit 
an affidavit of means, which sets 
out everything in precise detail: 
gross income, fringe benefits, sav- 
ings, property, the lot. 

“She can refuse to do this — 
though her husband can't — but if 
she does she can be subpoenaed to 
appear in court:' Or they make 
assumptions about her, on the * 
basis of questions that her hus- 
band is obliged to answer — for 
example, about the type of job she 
has — and often the assumptions 


can be worse than the reality. 

“This information is fed into a 
complex equation to determine, 
how much the husband can afford 
to pay his ex-wife 

“In theory, the law says that the 
husband is not ordered to pay any 
more simply because his second 
wife is well-off on the other hand 
it says that if he is relieved of the 
need to support his second family 
in various ways because she is 
contributing to it, be can afford 
more. In practice, of course, the 
effect is that the second wife 
subsidizes the first 

“The net effect can be bizarre. A 
.second wife often finds that the 
whole of her input into the 
partnership is offset by what the 
man is paying out.” 


S ue is in just such a 
position. She is 46, a 
headmistress whose hus- 
band is 20 yens her senior. 
He is now retired and half 
his university lecturer's pension is 
siphoned onto his first wife. Their 
children are grown up but, while 
maintenance commitments to off- 
spring last until the end of their 
.ndl-time education, the commit- 
ment to a divorced wife can last a 
lifetime: 

“They were divorced in 1972," 
Sue says.-“I was cited, although I 
know she wanted rid of him. Since 
then she’s been coming back for 
another nibble at his money about 
every three years. 

“Everything has been fought on 


P WteYoueta 

i 



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fc l* 


the basis that Tm a wealthy 
woman: but you don't go into 
teaching if you want to be wealthy. 
They've even done thing in court 
like mention my horses.— which 
sounds very extravagant, but In 
feet they’re , a couple of old nags 1 
share with the local farmer. 

- “I might like to retire early or 
start a business venture or some- 
thing, but we’d just be too poor. 
We'd be living on something like 
£6,000. I try not to let it get me 
down because that would be like 
her winning, but I do get very 
cross because there seems to be no 
end to ft. 

“Obviously when a. marriage 


breaks down you have to com- 
pensate women for loss of career 
prospects and make provision for 
the children, but it should be 
worked out so that at least a man 
knows he can pay it off and make a 
fresh start one day." 

The worst-affected are generally 
those who were divorced between 
the ending of the old-style Divorce 
Act, and the advent of new 
legislation in 1984. Alex Goldie 
comments: “Before 1969 you got 
some very bitter conflicts, but you 
also got a kind of rough justice. If a 
man had run off with someone 
younger and left a devoted mother 
and homemaker, then he bad to 
pay heavily. But if the woman had 
been promiscuous then she would 
get short shrift. 

“With the advent of no-blame 
divorce in the Seventies, you got 
the curious situation where judges 
leaded to take blame into account 
in ancillary proceedings only 
where the man was concerned. 
Often the fact that he had not 
defended a petition — in order to 
speed matters or simplify them — 
tended to further damn him." 

The 1984 legislation, which 
allows for a capital settlement and 
a clean break, may ameliorate 
matters, but the application of the 
Act varies enormously from court 
to court. “Much depends on a 
registrar's idiosyncrasies", Alex 
Goldie says. “They have enor- 
mous powers of discretion and it's 
easy to be generous with someone 
else's money." - 


Women marrying and divorcing 
these days may have lower or 
more realistic expectations than 
did their mothcre or elder sisters, 
but there are signs that a backlash 
may be just around the comer. 

G oldie says there is al- 
ready a movement 
against this type of 
settlement in America. 
“Hie feeling is growing 
there that wives have sold them- 
selves short; that they're already 
disadvantaged by society and by 
marriage and that they've let 
themselves be further dis- 
advantaged by such reforms. 

“What you've got in this coun- 
try is two sets of women whose 
interests are diametrically op- 
posed — and both feel equally 
aggrieved." 

Dr Dick Allan, chairman of the 
Divorce Law Reform Association 
— which is pressing for further 
changes in matrimonial legislation 
and eventual progress towards 
Family Courts - believes it is all 
symptomatic of society's lad ure to 
come to grips with the scale of 
marital breakdown in this 
country. 

“You get this extraordinary 
situation where both husband and 
new wife are contributing to the 
welfere of the former wife. It's 
offensive, a monstrous unfairness. ' 
A second wife may not even be 
entitled to be represented by 
counsel in these matters even 
though her finances are involved. 


“Or you get the opposite situa- 
tion, where the second wife has no 
incentive to work because she 
knows her salary will be used 
against her. At the moment courts 
are not meting out justice, bat 
social security. It seems to be a 
case of 'From each according to 
his means to each according to her 
needs* — but that is not a principle 
that should dominate divorce." 

Goldie's research has so far 
included in-depth interviews with 
26 second wives. His sample belies 
the stereotype of the much youn- 
ger woman luring away a married 
man. They were, on average, only 
two years younger than the first 
wife, and only a small minority 
were actually involved in the 
marriage break-up. A significant 
number had their own property, 
into which their new husband 
moved. 

“Typically it's the middle-class 
woman in her thirties or forties on 
whom the shoe pinches", Goldie 
says. “Their common cry has 
been, 'Look, Fm a wife too'. They 
are made to feel inferior, even 
invisible." 

Simply refusing to marry is not 
the whole answer. Assumptions 
can be made about people who 
live together, although they're 
harder to establish, but for women 
like Maureen, a physiotherapist, it 
was the only possible step. 

"I knew that if we did marry my 
financial independence would be 
taken away — and 1 regard that asa 
basic civil right. My partner and I 
are completely open about money 
matters between ourselves but I 
regard that as our business, not 
something for the courts. 

“Because of what he is paying 
out we have no margin for 
luxuries and any further drain on 
our joint income to another 
woman would. I'm sure, put us 
seriously in debt." 

(glTI— H m up i pin LM ItU 


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It’s the dentist 
that’s the pain 


Defector in the Knightsbridge store wars 


What keeps patients 
away may be more 
to do with fear of a 
hostile dentist than 
drills or injections 

Despite sophisticated ad- 
vances designed to deaden 
the pain, fear Still A rkeeps 
around a third of non-iegular 
aitenders away from the den- • 
list. Iniriguing new research 
reveals that what makes us 
most anxious is not the 
injections or the drill — but 
the dentist himself 
Many dentists, unknown to 
themselves, display hostitlity 
towards their patients, acc- 
ording to Dr Ruth Freeman, a 
lecturer in the department of 
community dental and health 
practice at University Col- 
lege. London. “The dental 
surgery is a hot-bed of 
emotions", she said. “We 
know from American studies 
that both the dentist and the 
patient experience strong 
feelings. Patients may feel 
fear or resentment of the 
dentist's authority. 

"Dentists experience stress, 
if they can't please the pa- 
tients. if their treatment 
doesn't seem to be appre- 
ciated. or if the patient is 
openly disgruntled. I found 
myself wondering just who is 
making who anxious." 

She decided to compare the 
chairsidc manner of inexperi- 
enced denial students and 
experienced dentists. She 
tested first their personalities . 
for hostility and anxiety and 
then wired up both patients 
and dentists to measure their 
heart rates simultaneously. 
She found that it was the 
calm, experienced, male den- 
tists who made their patienis 
most anxious. Patients were 
far more relaxed with the 
inexperienced students and 
with experienced women 
demists who had scored high 
on anxiety levels. 

“These are people who 
admit their anxiety, express 
their emotions and arc aware 
of them. Their anxiousness is 
perceived by the patient as 
reassuring and caro-taking. 
not anxiety provoking", she 
said. The more experienced 

demists become, the more 
they start to build up burners 
to distance themselves from 
their patienis' feelings. 

Research shows that den- 
tists become over-irritated by 
what patients do. such as not 
keeping their mouths open 


long enough, or practising 
imperfect oral hygiene. 
These, said Dr Freeman, are 
then transmitted to the pa- 
tient "They are intangible 
forms of non-verbal commu- 
nication. If the dentist feels 
this way. how . could we 
expect him to educate his 
patients about dental health? 
First we have to educate the 
dentists to see why they have 
these feelings." 

- : Dr Freeman was alarmed 
to discover that barriers be- 
tween dentists and patients 
start very early.- “When I 
asked new students their own 
fears about going to the 
dentist, they talked about 
drills and injections. By the 
end of training, their con- 
cerns had changed to whether 
their demist would do a 
technically perfect job. They 
had already forgotten what it 
is like to be a patient" 

Lynn Stroud, executive 

TME Mo Re. You TXUfST’ 

M6 MRS. SirtP&OtS, Tht 

Lew mis . 


director of the British Dental 
Health Foundation, agrees. 
“Dentists are trained by den- 
tists who weren't trained in 
communication themselves. 
Students are selected for their 
academic skills, not 
their rapport with the man in 
the street." 

Dr Freeman is particularly 
keen that behavioural science 
should be an important part 
of all dental sdiool sylla- 
buses. “Women are more 
likely to admit their anxieties 
whereas men usually disguise 
their emotions. It isn’t manly 
to feel anxious. One male 
demist who asked after my 
experiment why he had been 
chosen was appalled and 
insulted when 1 said it was 
because he'd had ' a high 
anxiety score. He is in feet a 
very caring, patient dentist." . 

He may not like the idea,' 
but it seems as if his rare 
unrcpresscd anxiety, contrib- 
utes to his personal skiils.- 

Denise Winn 

@ Times Newapopen LM 1SB8 


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GONCORDE 

Ike tour* Oct 9^. °£«- 17 *• ,7 -’ 9 

5 th* Onent-Exj^ 

I Soizhors • Various other vtaits 


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Hrsch. xnzDura • "XTSatae® Sabburs • Various otti 

"niaiiiSiTTiNiilllimi 


A step up and a few steps sideways for S§ 


the woman from Harvey Nichols 


who joins Harrods as fashion supremo 


Ever since 1849 when Mr 
Hairod moved his emporium 
from Eastcheap to just round 
the corner from Harvey Nich- 
ols in Knightsbridge, the two' 
shops have been locked in the 
-sort .of rivaliy. which only 
happens between neighbours. 
What exactly is the secret of 
successful marketing for the- 
top people? That is the Ques- 
tion they keep bouncing back 
and forth between them. 

This year they both seem 
agreed that the vital ingredient 
is Clare Stubbs. Ms Stubbs, ex- 
buying executive of the “Little. 
Shop On The Comer", has 
just been appointed new fash- 
ion director to the “Giant On 
Knightsbridge", which is how 
the two rivals refer to each 
other. It was a classic poaching 
move and frankly everyone 
seems to have seen ft coming 
except the principals. 

Patrons of Harrods have 
watched it blossom into a sort 
of Disneyland for overseas 
visitors, none of whom, how- 
ever, necessarily put theft- 
hands in their pockets. People 
with less time than money, 
meanwhile, wondered about 
the wisdom of getting in- 
volved in the scrum. 

In the same period, over on 
Sloane Street “H. Nix" or 
“Knickers” - to quote the 
affectionate Ms Stubbs — was 
once the darling of the dowa- 
ger duchess set “all patroniz- 
ing account customers who 
would wander round the store 
with their dogs saying ‘Where 
have you moved the lifts 
today, dear?’ " Today, it has 
become the reliable stand-by 
of their top granddaughters, 
like the Princess of Wales. 


Be super 
for £3 

Working mothers rarely feel 
like Superwoman. But thanks 
to a burgeoning nationwide 
network, they can at least 
derive comfort, unburden Feel- 
ings of guilt (the curse of ail 
working mothers) and gain 
access to invaluable informa- 
tion on everything from local 
facilities to the exhausting 
task of finding good ch ildcare. 
Fifty sanity-saving groups now 
exist under the umbrella of the 
Working Mothers' Associ- 
ation. 7 Spencer Walk, Lon- 
don SW151 PL (01-788 2565). 
In addition to scheduled 
monthly meetings, the)- also 
ran a telephone enquiry ser- 
vice. The annual subscription 
is £3. 


Youth is dearer. 

Cosmetic companies have 
founded fortunes on woman's 
quest for the. fountain of eter- 
nal youth. Diligent application 
of hwisruriser and awiding 
falling into bed with founda- 
tion on have, until flow, been 
! the seem to fending off time's 
i assault. Just released is Chris- 
tian Dior's Capture, which at 
Iasi gives more than a glimmer 
of hope to those wishing to 
reverse the ageing process: 
thanks in a genuine break- 
through in skineare 
technology : 

Clinical . studies revealed 
thai iwicenluUy applications oj 
Capture's gei .tormyja caused a 




A. weekly round-up 
of news, views 
and information 

20 to 60 per cent reduction in 
wrinkle depth after i»v weeks 
on 37 per cent iff team, while 
94 per cent showed significant 
impnnvmems after just a few 
days. Capture costs £39.06 for 
30 nil - but then, no one ever 
suggested eternal youth would 
come cheap. 

She’s the word . 

The male as editor of the 
women's magazine has become 
a seriously endangered species . 
following last week's abrupt 
departure by Erie Bailey from 
the hot seat at She. The 
idiosyncratic Bailey — who 
joined the magazine as an 
office junior — has been 


■v\ > 


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Modesty is one of Ms 
Stubbs's un threatening qual- 
ities. “The people who had the 
foresight to rent the boutiques 
on Sloane Street were the ones 
who brought us the pasting 
trade ", she-says. Be that as it 
may. the fashion business is 
agreed fltar Stubbs is the one 
who put the street on .the 
modern map. -not by any 
flamboyant gestures or un- 
usual foresight, but by a lot of 
homely good humour and a 
flair for internal politics des- 
tined to bring out the best in 
existing staff 

On the face of ft, Clare 
StubbS is a rather unlikely 
berson to dictate international 
fashion taste. Small and jolly, 
perfectly turned out, but 
above all incredibly tactful, 
she is no Diana Vreeiand or 
Coco ChaneL At our meeting, 
she was all in grey from flu 
tips of her snakesldn toes to 
her bouffant hairdo, and a lot 
of the grey on a drizzling 
autumn day was sensible 
chunky-knit wool She is 
down to earth, giggly, 
umhreatening to men who 
still seem to run her branch of 
the rag trade, and she makes 
the other women buyers in a ‘ 
competitive and bitchy busi- 
ness laugh, not cry. 

Is this the formula which 
will bring back the gloss to the 
top people's store? Clare 
Stubbs, in fed, began her 
career at Harrods some 30 
years ago as a school-leaver. 
She' passed few exams at 
Slough County High but was 
very gregarious. “The careers 
mistress advised musing, re- 
tail or secretarial.” 

She did four years as a 



“disengaged", and replaced by 
veteran Joyce Hopkirk. the 
highly successful fuirt editor of 
British Cosmopolitan 12 years 
ago. 




Most wanted woman: Clare Stubbs, the top person far the top people, returns to an earlier stamping ground 


junior trainee, drawn above 
all to the fashion and house- 
keeping departments. As a 
Virgo, she says she is very 
good at the housekeeping 
business. More to the point, in 
those days, she was deter- 
mined to fulfil this talent try 
marrying, having a family and 
putting them before her ca- 
reer. She and her husband are 
still together, living in Essex 
with a 16-year-old son. 

There was a time when she 
nearly gave up her career, or at 
least downgraded it to an 
involvement with smaller 
shops, but always, she says, 
there was the lure of the soap 
opera and the social fife of the 
department store. She went to 
Jaeger, to Simpsons and 
moved to Knightsbridge 13 


Though taking pains to 
describe Bailey, 32, as “a 
remarkable fellow". National 
Magazines managing director 
Terry MansSeM sawl: “It is 
very difficult Tor men to edit 
women's magazines and get 
the chemistry right, with some - 
notable exceptions." . 

There are few exceptions to 
choose from these days. 
Bailey's departure, following 
so closely, as it does on Willie 
Landells' resignation last 
month from SHE stablemate 
Harpers and Queen, means 
that Britain's 30 or so women's 
magazines can now boast only 
two men at the top. 

Quote of the 

week 


years ago. “It was a time when 
boutiques had poached all the 
glamour from large stores and 
I set about getting it back." 

Then this July, she was 
asked to lunch bv House of 
Fraser's chief executive Brian 
Walsh. She says she had not 
made up her mind to take the 
job. She did that just a week 
ago for a small rise in salary 
but above alL the challenge. 

The “little shop", a mere 
1 1 9.000 square feet, compared 
to 4'/» acres of fashion floor 
alone at Harrods. was predict- 
ably displeased. They waived 
her six-month contract and 
the next day she left her 
company Maestro in the 


So what difference will her 
energetic presence make to 


Bearers of his new Storecard 
will ultimately be able to shop 
to the entire Conran empire 
without dirtying their hands 


Bks 




There is such an important job 
to be done in teaching (boys 
and girls) when they need to 
help them with work and lift* 
that sex is really best left alone 
— Angela Rumbold. above, 
hew Education Minister ^ 

Plastic habitats 

Sir Terence Conran takes us 
one giant leap nearer the 
cashless sgdety this week. 


with real money. The scheme 
initially involves British 
Home Stores, Mothercare and 
Richards, but next year, 
HeaTs, Habitat, the Coman 
Shop and Savacentre join the 
venture. Personally. I'm wait- 
ing for his son Jasper - whose 
Beauchamp Place shop threw 
open its doors to a rapturous 
welcome last Thursday — to 
add his name to the list 

Rest and recover 

.1 blissful excuse to put your 
feet up is the H omanscrecn 
'health check from Private 
Patients' Plan, .which now 
adds afoot-screening and pedi- 
cure treatment to vital checks 
for mssiWe breast and cervical 
problems. Women are four 
times more likely than men to 
suffer from foot ailments, and 
catching them at an early stage 
can diminish the risk of mobil- 
ity pro/hems in older age. The 
twice (£85. nr £105 including 
mammography) includes a 
voucher for a Scholl pedicure. 
PPP medical centres arc in 
London (U 1-637 8941), 
Southampton (0703 7754Q9) 
and Sthihull ( 021 70S 4775). 


Harrods? “It looks like a 
stockroom", she breathed in 
dismay, as I accompanied her 
on her first tour of the fashion 
floor before. she takes up her 
appointment next Monday. 
Clare Stubbs says she gave 
Brian Walsh no real indica- 
tion what she would do for 
him. For one thing, her pres- 
ence in the competitor store 
was very unwelcome before 
contracts were signed, so for 
the past decade she had more 
or less confined her visits to 
the food hails. 

Added to the executive 
woman and career girl to 
whom she is used to catering, 
she now has the huge tourist 
market, subject to the dan- 
gerous fluctuations of the 
petro-doliar. Her initial re- 


sponse is that if she gets it 
right for the British market, ft 
will be right for the rest of the 
world. She will simplify the 
“jungle”, rationalize and 
strengthen the visual presenta- 
tion. edit the fashion collec- 
tions and reintroduce the sort 
of personal, though not “fawn- 
ing 'modom' service", which 
made Harrods famous. 

She does not want to mod- 
ernize it to such an extent that 
the customer is intimidated in 
crossing the threshold. And 
she says. “Don’t expect 
changes over night. You have 
to live in a house for a while 
before you understand how to 
decorate it." 

Glenys Roberts 

© Time* Newspapers Ud ISM 



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TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 





Adam Roberts 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Cyril pulls 
his weight 

Glad tidings reached Harrogate 
yesterday that, at a lime the 
Alliance needs every heavyweight 
it can. Rochdale MP Cyril Smith 
seems set to stand once more for 
Parliament. Smith, after 14 years, 
was thought to have indicated that 
he was planning to stand down at 
the next general election. When 
David Steel left the SDP con- 
ference on Monday he made 
straight for Smith's Rochdale 
home to ask if he would re- 
consider. An indication of the way 
the convention went is that Smith 
then travelled with Steel to 
Knowslcy for the adoption of 
Rosemary Cooper as candidate in 
the coming parliamentary by- 
clcction. David Owen is under- 
stood to be hopeful that Smith will 
stand once more, retaining the 
seat by the strength of his local 
reputation even though Labour 
giincd control of the council in the 
May local elections. 

• SDP MPS received a stern note 
yesterday morning from Ian 
Wrigglesworth, energy spokes- 
man. telling them to fes on the 
platform before the live TV cover- 
age started. No nose-picking or 
yawning either. It added. 

Can’t can’t 

Four leggy can-can dancers high 
kicked their way through the 
Young Social Democrats' reputa- 
tion for total sex equality at a disco 
on Monday night, so upsetting 
tender social consciences that 
some members left the ballroom 
in tears. “Dancing girts prancing at ; 
the behest of some egotist DJ do j 
not exactly reflect our vision of 
women's role in society." con- 
fessed organizer Gideon Green, ! 
who had booked the £150 disco 
through the conference hotel with- 
out being aware of the sexist extra. 
*‘Jt wasn't only women who were 
annoyed. Of course if it had been a 
Tory ’or Labour conference every- 
one would have loved it" 

BARRY FANTONI 


*1 see they've included the SDP high 
tax and social jastice package' 

Digging in 

An SDP member told the confer- 
ence yesterday that he had been 
almost locked out of his lodgings, 
after press reports of David Steel's 
implied criticism of middle-class 
Harrogate. In contrast. Elizabeth 
Dam pi in. prospective parliament- 
ary candidate for Reigate. re- 
pealed her coup in Torquay last 
year and signed up her landlady os 
a party member. 

Riotous 

Warders who quelled the recent 
riot at Dublin’s Mountjoy jail 
were surprised to discover that the 
Justice Department's manual for 
dealing with such disturbances 
was printed by inmates at the 
neighbouring Arbour Hill prison 
as pan of a "rehabilitation" 
programme. The Justice Depart- 
ment. which tends to withhold 
sensitive material from the print 
shop at Arbour Hill, obviously 
does not consider that the manual 
falls into this category. 

Selective 

The Labour-controlled Camden 
council in north London is 
advertising a free service to re- 
move graffiti from private houses 
and shops. Commendable enough, 
but there is a catch: the small print 
at the bottom of the ad reads: 
"This service is limited to racist 
sexist, anti-gay or anti-lesbian 
graffiti." 

Super Bupa 

Bupa patients arc in fora pleasant 
surprise in the next few weeks 
when nurses at its 12 hospitals 
change into new uniforms. 
Monica Chong, whose clients i 
include Princess Diana and pop ; 
singer Grace Jones, has come up 1 
with something brighter than the 
present dowdy, dark green dresses 
for which the nurses have little 
liking. She describes it as "a chic, 
pale grey uniform, emphasizing 
the shoulders and the waist." i 
Catering sia/T will be kitted out in 
navy blue, with white aprons. 

Papal pickle 

Catholics in Lyons face a spiritual 
dilemma ovenhe Pope’s visit next 
month: whether to believe Nos- 
tradamus or their local cardinal. 
The former, in his celebrated but 
often erratic predictions, warned 
that a pontiff should steer clear of 
"the city which is washed by two 
rivers . . Your blood and that of 
your people will be spilled here 
when the rose blooms." Lyons, of 
course, is traversed by the Rhone 
and the Saonc. and the rose is the 
svmbol of the French Socialist 
Partv. Cardinal Albert Decouruay 
has 'bidden his flock to ignore 
Nostradamus, and the Pope has 
likewise spumed the caveat, 
preferring to trust in his own wen- 
tried infallibility. PHS 


/n • • i i i , • f% Adam jvui/v* to 

Suicide, or long-shot winner? _ ir-sr— t G f 

ding Tory last week privately pnLin Oalrlev Pnlfoirsa! Fill tor* on whv th a disappear until something drastic 1^/dIli.lVJ A A • 


characterized Dr David Owen as 
an impatient action mao, the sort 
who would go over the lop and 
win a VC before breakfast. 
"Posthumously, of course", he 
added. Is that what the SDP has 
done this week .by committing 
itself to tackle poverty with a 
redistributive merger of tax and 
social security systems which, it 
admits, would leave 6 million 
voters worse off? 

Owen will today pledge to fight 
with all the force at his command 
to push the package into the 
Alliance election manifesto. It is 
brave but is it politics? Is he 
appending his signature to what 
could be one of the longest suicide 
notes in history? . . 

In conventional terms it is 
certainly a high risk strategy. 
Those who would suffer finan- 
cially include most of the middle- 
class. middle income earners who 
form the Alliance's natural 
recruiting ground. According to 
conventional wisdom, the closer 
we get to an election the more 
voters concentrate their minds on 
Lhe question "What's in it for 
me?" as they decide for whom to 
vote. 

The answer to that is that the 
SDP lives or dies by not accepting 
conventional political wisdom. 
That is the basis of its appeal and 
that is what has sustained it 
through its first five years. Owen 
has often said recently that the 

The best thing that could happen 
to the National Health Service is 
for it quietly to slip off the political 
agenda. That does not mean less 
government control. As Britain’s 
largest employer, spending 12 per 
cent of the government's income, 
it is essential that it is properly 
managed. But the NHS is the 
victim of myths, generated fbr 
political expediency. There is a 
danger that the public, believing 
that it is tailing, may be led into 
accepting the spurious remedies 
proposed by the political parties. 

One myth put about by the 
present government is that there 
arc loo many administrators. In 
fact, administration accounts for 
only 5 per cent of total NHS 
spending, well below that of 
industry or health care systems in 
other countries. The reason that 
costs are so low is that the NHS 
docs not have a cumbersome 
accounting system for every pa- 
tient. NHS administrators spend 
their lime supporting the structure 
for lhe professionals to work more 
effectively. But they get a bad 
press, especially from doctors, 
because they are the arbiters of the 
limited resources voted by Par- 
liament 

The principal myth put about 
by the Opposition concerns the 
"cuts". This is not to say there 
have been no cuts: pursuing the 
objective of improving health care 
within a constrained budget, 
health authorities are indeed clos- 
ing some hospitals and changing 
their services. But the closures 
should have happened before: 
they have been resisted by the 
powerful combination of local 
professional groups and trades 
unions and misinformation. 

The "cuts" actually result from 
a course set almost a decade ago by 
the Labour government and sup- 
ported by subsequent ministers of 
health of all parties. It is a simple 
concept: that the NHS. as a service 
paid for equally by taxpayers, 
should be available equally across 
the country. In practice, ever since 
1948. the NHS has had more 
resources in the South-east than 
elsewhere and more in the de- 
populating inner cities than in the 
growing suburbs. It has been 
Parliament's policy to reverse 
these inequalities by adjusting the 
financing formula and proposing 
improvements in primary care. 
(The latter changes have partly 
stagnated because of resistance by 
the doctors and apprehension of 
the financial implications by the 
Treasury). 

it is unfortunate then that the 
Labour Party has built up "the 
cuts" into a formidable weapon, 
possibly even one of the main 
planks of its general election 
campaign. Labour may be right to 
emphasize its commitment to 
collective provision and welfare, 
but it would be foolish to use the 
NHS as an election issue. For the 
policy of selective hospital clo- 
sures is based on a financial 
strategy initiated by the Labour 
party in office. 

Many on the left claim that it 
will be possible to continue overall 
redistribution of NHS resources 
by increasing total NHS expen- 
diture. But the natural con- 
sequence of a socialist election 
victory in a capitalist economy is a 


Robin Oakley, Political Editor, on why the 
SDP plan for social justice could pay off 


most valuable members of his 
party are the “pplitical virgins" - 
more than half its members who 
came in unburdened by any 
ideological ba ggag e They were 
typified this week by a young 
delegate who said that to him 
Cement Attlee was merely a Mock 
of flats in Fulham. 

Last year there was an attempt 
to graft "traditional Labour 
values” on to the SDP pro- 
gramme. Despite the backing of 
Shirley Williams and Bill Rodgers, 
the attempt was roundly rejected 
by a membership that refuses to be 1 
defined by reference to other 
parties. They believe in a new style 
of politics typified by Owen's 
occasional wrong-footing of inter- 
viewers when he declines their 
expectant invitation to condemn 
the government's latest action but 
instead supports it 

Observers attending their first 
SDP conference say scornfully: 
"They just don't look like a 
political party”. What such people 
do not realize is that that is a 
source of pride to these self- 
appointed mould-breakers. Roy 
Jenkins was cheered on Monday 
when he said the SDP was the 
anti-party party or it was nothing. 

The SDP relishes its developing 


role as the conscience of the' 
middle classes and is willing, when 
making omelettes, to tdl the eggs 
what mil happen to them. En- 
gaged in debate with an SDP 
activist, you discover that the 
greatest insult is to accuse him of 
cynicism. After the loss of nerve 
when the tax plan was first 
introduced in August and proved 
to be a public relations disaster, 
other parties would have dropped 
h. Some Alliance strategists 
wanted to do the same. The SDP 
conference reacted by giving a 
standing ovation to Dick Taverae, 
its architect. 

Backed by an aggressive mar- 
keting Campaign, under pinne d by 
the type of emotional leverage 
practised by the charities, the 
policy could win support. How 
many Britons want to live in a 
country with 16 million on, or 
near, the poverty line? 

The arguments in favour can 
even shade into self-interest. Fif- 
teen million would benefit in cash 
terms from the- redistribution 
while 6 milli on would lose. 
Among the latter the policy can be 
sold as an insurance policy. Will 
our inner cities be rest oral will 
the crime figures go down, win the . 
possibility of riot and mayhem 


Dogma and fallacy: Mark McCarthy shows 
what is really wrong in the hospitals 

Politicians can 
harm your 
health service 







D 


flight of foreign investment. The 
inevitable result is a brake on 
welfare spending to retain the 
City’s confidence. 

There is a further, more subver- 
sive. consequence of giving more 
cash indiscriminately to the NHS. 
Hospital closures must be in- 
cluded in a Labour programme 
that is committed to new policies 
for health care: the aim must be to 
improve prevention and domicili- 
ary and day-care services through 
higher staffing in lhe community 
rather than by retaining hospitals. 
The inner city districts have 
teaching hospitals with powerful 
consultants who begrudge expen- 
diture outside the hospital walls 
and transmit a culture that be- 
lieves in “centres of excellence”. 
Exempting these hospitals will 
sustain their resistance to change. 

But if Labour's policies appear 
misguided, worse may be in store 
from the other two parties. David 
Owen has so far had difficulty in 
distinguishing his views from 
those of Labour, for whom he was 
once minister of health. Recently, 
however, he has been converted to 
the idea of “internal" health care 
markets. The idea is to increase 
consumer power by giving general 
practitioners budgets on behalf of 


their patients. The doctors will he 
expected to “shop around" be- 
tween competing hospitals,- send- 
ing their patient to the one offering 
the best service. 

GPs do this to a limited extent 
already, but because few towns 
have more than one major hos- 
pital, the prospect for real choice 
through this mechanism is slim. 
Having competing hospitals' 
would be likely to increase, rather 
than decrease, hospital capacity, 
leading io under-use that could be 
sustained only by higher levels of 
NHS spending. 

The Conservatives can claim, 
with some justification, to have 
been misrepresented in the debate 
about the NHS. They have in-- 
creased the total resources avail- 
able (although by no means as 
much as their figures suggest), and 
their plans for changing to private 
insurance financing have evapo- 
rated. They have pul pressure on 
NHS districts to privatize cleaning 
and catering services. But this is 
chicken-feed, surely, to a real 
capitalist approach. Instead of the . 
watered-down version of market 
economics offered by Owen, they 
will hope to wait until after the 
next election before proposing the 
greatest money-spinner of all lime. 


disappear until something drastic 
is done for Britain's underclass? 
And for the majority of those 
who lose by the adjustments, the 
{rice is little more than a couple of 
packets of cigarettes a week, might 
that not be worth paying? 

The Liberals, who have been, 
demanding some tenderness from 
Owen to match bis toughness on . 
defence, will have little option but 
to fill in line. And a committed 
Alliance cam p ai g n on social jus- 
tice could prove a potent weapon 
against Labour, paying electoral 
dividends among those who care. 

Labour cannot grasp the nettle 
of selectivity and chooses to 
pretend that the problem of 
poverty can be solved without 
penalizing any but the rich. As for 
the Tories, the SDP can argue that 
when - they -began tackling the 
problem they were soon forced 
into reverse by the special interest 
lobbies and that they lacked the 
courage to spell out die figures in 
their tax and social security re- 
forms. If Norman Tebbit and 
Tory Central Office pitch their 
response too crudely in terms of 
voters’ self-interest it could react 
against them. In their hearts 
people know that poverty cannot 
be alleviated without all who can 
afford it paying more. 

The SDP is embarking on a 
political gamble. But as the argu- 
ment intensifies, the odds against 
it winning could shorten consid- 
erably. 

At present, although most hos- 
pital care is within public hos- 
pitals. some public funds go to buy 
places in private hospitals and 
GPs are independent contractors 
to the NHS. not salaried employ- 
ees. The Tories coukl direct 
private hospitals to take up 
increasing proportions of public 
funds to provide health services if 
the new services were more 
“economical". As experience with 
contracting for cleaning and cater- 
ing services has shown, lower costs 
are possible with lower wages and 
lower staffing levels. In time, as 
the private sector became better 
established, the government could 
start to sell off the hospitals. 

That might seem fanciful if it 
were not exactly what is happen- 
ing now in the United States. 
Health care has become big busi- 
ness. New multi-billion dollar 
corporations are being created 
through buying up local indepen- 
dent hospitals and linking them 
into cross-national chains, just 
like motels. Wall Street loves it, 
but there have been murmurings 
of discontent in some of the more 
respected medical journals. Edi- 
torials have asked whether there 
may be a conflict of interest 
between the needs of patients and 
management targets for full beds 
or operations per week. But 
commercial enterprise is seen as 
the American way of doing things, 
so why not in health care as well? 
The underlying economic pur- 
pose, to lower the costs of health 
insurance, suits both business and 
the government 

This, then, could be the Tory 
dream for the 1990s. Bits of the 
structure are already here. Several 
American health corporations 
have already bought their way into 
the small British private health 
sector, including psychiatric bos-. 1 
pitals, and in Wales the govern- 
ment has awarded a contract for 
renal dialysis services to a private 
company. 

Certainly, there is 'room for 
improvement in the NHS. Gen- 
eral practice needs serious atten- 
tion. not just financially but in its 
management as wetL Medical 
attitudes must change towards 
greater recognition of the need for 
caring rather than treatment. 
More money may also be needed 
— but not necessarily for hospitals; 
better bousing and social services 
should perhaps have priority. 
Health education hardly exists, yet 
it must be the foundation of any 
serious policy for better health. 
And the responsibilities and 
strengths of the NHS’s 200 dis- 
tricts, the local tier of manage- 
ment, must also be recognized. 

Many people are already work- 
ing within the NHS towards these 
objectives. They need support 
They don't need the rules of the 
game to be changed again — the 
NHS has already had three 
reorganizations in ten years. And 
they don't need market econo- 
mies. Britain's National Health 
Service is still widely regarded in 
other countries as a successful 
model. It must be protected from 
the competing claims of our 
poUticjans. 

The author is senior lecturer in 
community medicine at University 
College London and the Middlesex 
Hospital Medical School. 


Old guard under threat from Kasparov 


Leningrad 

The victory of Gary Kasparov, the 
23-\car-old world chess cham- 
pion. in Monday's 16th game of 
the world championship is being 
hailed as the most brilliant ever 
played in a world title contest. For 
much of the struggle, grand- 
masters assembled here were 
dismissing the young 
.Azerbaijani's play as reckless and 
unsound. After Karpov's con- 
fident 5!si move, some believed 
that Kasparov's capitulation was 
imminent. A victory for Karpov 
would have thrown the match 
result wide open, with only one 
point between the scores. 

But then on his 32nd move 
Kasparov captured a knight and 
Karpov hesitated before taking 
back. Karpov's hesitation was 
prolonged into an agonizing 
wait. During the 30 minutes that 
wc sat expectantly for the ex- 
champion's reply it gradually sank 
in that the position was far from 
lost. Expert verdicts swayed wildly 
from "hopeless" to "unclear". Still 
Karpov refused to move. . 

The position created after 
Kasparov's 32nd move in game 16 
will go down as one of the classics 
of chess history. Karpov had the 


choice of four recaptures. Even as 
I write. 24 hours after the game 
started, no one is sure what 
Karpov should have done. Indeed, 
no one will even risk a guess as to 
what his derisive error might have 
been. 

Faced with the impossibility of 
deriding which capture to make. 
Karpov almost thought himself to 
extinction. When the black move 
finally materialized Karpov was 
left with three minutes to com- 
plete eight eight moves before 
lacing a time-forfeit. Then came 
Kasparov's whiplash attack. First 
he moved his queen into place, 
sacrificing a knight. As Karpov 
devoured the offering, white's 
army converged on the helpless 
black king. 1 It was a massacre 
ruthlessly carried out. 

Amid cheers from the audience, 
who mistakenly believed that he 
had already resigned. Karpov had 
to admit the inevitable. The 
former champion signed the 
scores heels as a gesture of abdica- 
tion. and fled the stage before 
Kasparov could return. 

This. was a victory snatched 
from the jaws of defeat, but no one 
has yet succeeded in casting doubt 
on the correctness of Kasparov's 


blitzkrieg attack. As to the score, 
which is now 9- 1/2-6- 1/2 in the 
young champion’s favour, only a 
miracle can save Karpov now. 

Ever since Kasparov won the 
title in November last year doubts 
have hovered over who truly 
deserves to be champion. Many 
believed that Karpov's tide, held 
for a decade, was merely on loan, 
and that Kasparov's brash reck- 
lessness and overt self-confidence 
would be suitably punished in the . 
revenge decider. 

When Florenrio Campomanes. 
president of the World Chess 
Federation (Fide) single-handedly 
terminated flic first K-K match on 
February 15 1985. the result was 
five wins to Karpov and three to 
Kasparov, with 40 draws. Kas- 
parov won the rematch five-three, 
with 16 draws. So when the 
London leg of the present match 
started their tally of wins was 
equal. 

This time Kasparov had to 
prove himself. He is doing sb. in 
an unprecedentedly brilliant style. 
Karpov is not playing weakly. His 
preparation and ideas are out- 
standing. his fighting spirit un- 
bro/ten. yet he. is opposed by a 
towering .genius whose strategy is 


beyond the comprehension of 
ordinary mortals. By his achieve- 
ment in this match Kasparov has 
elevated himself into perhaps the 
most popular international 
ambassador for Soviet sport and 
culture. Any thought that he might 
be some sort of rebel within the 
Soviet system must now be swept 
away. His victories will gain him 
simitar prestige to that enjoyed by 
Karpov, now 35. when he became 
champion in the days of Brezhnev. 

Kasparov's international Fide 
rating, already second only to that 
of Bobby Fischer, may well soar 
beyond that established- by the 
American genius. If so. that will be 
another feather in the Soviet 
sporting and cultural cap. Kas- 
parov's openness, youth and dy- 
namic energy* appeal to young 
people the world over. 

In particular, his newly estab- 
lished prestige may pose a threat 
to the old guard of the World 
Chess Federation, whom he has 
contemptuously dismissed as an 
international "mafia” and sworn 
to oust from office, in this pledge 
he has the unanimous support, of 
the British Chess Federation. 

Raymond Keene 


the' impasse 

affair by his conditional release - connection with the 

last week. Bui it is well to remind ” n ^venot blocked the 

ourselves of the basic foe*. thaihe ^fl^Sttlcphone 0 r telex. Nick 
was arrested as a result of a KGB Laniiora lucp.iu ^ lhe 

frame-up and is still being held in his incarceration 


Moscow as a hostage for, the 
release of the Soviet official 
Gennadi Zakharov, arrested in 
New York, a week earlier on a 
charge of spying. In DanilofTs 
own words, he has exchanged one 
hotel for another. 

His passport has been taken 
from him. He could still be put on 
trial and he' is still subjected to 
verbal assault in the Soviet media. 
He is anxious to get back to the 
United States and to his children. 

Political realities being what 
they are. there is only perhaps a 
limited. chance that Washington's 
demand for his unconditional 
freedom will be implemented. His 
cay will inevitably be subject to 
high-level negotiations. That be- 
ing so. and however painful it may 
be. it is necessary to underline that 
this cannot be a matter of Nick’s- 
freedom at any price. 

As he himself has recognized 
throughout, many issues of per- 
sonal and professional integrity, 
and of internal ional political prin- 
ciple. lie at the heart of this afl&ir. 
He and his wife Ruth - my sister- 
in-law — have made dear that they 
would be disturbed by any settle- 
ment which seemed to put him on 
a par with Zakharov. Likewise 
they would be disturbed by any 
settlement which left espionage 
charges or convictions standing 
against Nick. 

Equally important is the need 
for a settlement which does not 
encourage future acts of hostage 
taking. This principle has been 
much emphasized by the US 
administration, and rightly so. 
One might hope that the serious 
damage that Nick's frame-up has 
done to Moscow's image through- 
out the world might itself dis- 
courage it from repetition. Beyond 
that, there does seem to be some 
scope for agreement on how 
espionage cases are to be dealt 
with in the future. 

There is also a need to do 
whatever can be done to ensure 
that reprisals are not taken against 
Ruth and Nick's Russian friends. 
The position of Dr David 
Goldforb. the geneticist who in 
April 1984 refused to play his 
allotted part in a previous frame- 
up attempt, is especially imporanL 
He would have been aliowd to 
emigrate had be collaborated with 
the Soviet authorities. He is now 
very ill in a Moscow hospital. 

f$ there any settlement imag- 
inable which takes into account 
points such as these? It should not 
be beyond the wit of man to devise 
one. and on both sides clever 
diplomats are involved. 

The Soviet Union, under 
Mikhail Gorbachov's leadership, 
can scarcely wish to be thought of 
as . a gangster state. In some 
respects the Soviet authorites have 
acted correctly throughout this 
affair. They promptly-issued visas 
to a number of people, including 


overall effect of his incarceration 
in Lefortovo prison was "mental 
torture", aspects of his treatment 
were polite, even solicitous. 

Most importantly, the legal case 
against Nick has not yet gone as 
far under Soviet procedures as 
practically all western comment 
has implied. He was formally 
charged on September 7, but this 
is not as irrevocable a step as 
under some western systems, it 
leads to a stage called "prelimi- 
nary investigation", and in formal 
terms that is the present stage. _ 

But “preliminary investigation 
can involve looking very carefully 
at all aspects of a case, including 
all evidence either favourable or 
opposed to the state. This stage 
should, strictly speaking, involve 
investigation of the possibility of a 
frame-up. It can lead either to a 
decision to hold a trial, or to a 
decision to terminate proceedings. 
Thus it is not quite correct to say 
that there has yet been, as the US 
Senate has said, an “indictment". 
There is a way out if the Kremlin 
chooses to take it. 

The Danfloff affair has given 
rise to some inflated and reckless 
rhetoric against the Soviet Union. 
Amid these depressing events it is 
well to remember that the Soviet 
Union is a great power worthy of 
considerable respect. Its sufferings 
in two world wars have been on a 
scale which we in the West can 
scarcely comprehend: they go 
some way towards explaining us 
fear of foreigners and its concern 
with security. The desire fbr peace 
runs deep. The need for arms 
control is evident, and Moscow 
has this year made important 
initiatives m this field. 

The Soviet Union is a party to a 
laws-of-war treaty, the 1949 Ge- 
neva Civilians Convention, the 
shortest and clearest article of 
which is Article 34: "The taking of 
hostages is prohibited." True, this 
applies only in wartime; and the 
Soviet Union is not yet a party to 
the International Convention 
Against the Taking of Hostages, 
which came into force in 1983. But 
it cannot want to convey the 
impression that lower standards 
apply in peacetime than in war. 

There is a need to get the whole 
affair over with as quickly as 
possible, not least to enable the 
Soviet Union and the United 
States to get on with the job of 
establishing business-like rela- 
tions. despite the differences in 
their political systems and in their 
interests. The West can help in 
this process by maintaining a 
serious and steady interest in arms 
control, as well as by upholding 
the principle that hostage-taking is 
not acceptable as a way of doing 
business. 

The author is Montague Burton 
Professor of International Rela- 
tions at Oxford University and a 
fellow of Bdlliol College . 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Snack, package 
and crops 


Today, the British public is to be 
introduced to a completely new 
concept in natural food: snafu. 
Snafu is so healthy, so versatile 
and yet so simple that it-is bound 
to be a revelation. 

What is snafu? 

As you knefw. we have a totally 
new concept in natural food about 
once every 12 months. Recently 
we have had ginseng, miso. tofu 
and tempeh. What all these have 
in common is that they come from 
the • mysterious East, sound 
impressive and probably, derive 
from the soya bean. 

Snafu is no exception. This 
creamy brown, slightly salty paste 
is spun from the extract of slightly 
germinated soya beans, and can 
either be made into one of a 
thousand fascinating dishes or 
woven into an easy-to-make, 
matching skirt 'n' shirt. Snafu has 
no taste of its own. either, which 
means that it can take on any 
flavour from the other ingredients, 
or alternatively, that you can in 
extremis eat your own skirt. 

Like all the best natural health 
foods, snafu has been made in a 
factory somewhere in Japan and 
comes heavily packaged. You can 
buy it by the brick, slab or sheet. 
Soon it will be available in 
compact disc. You can take it 
home, keep it in the fridge, use it 
immediately for any one of a 
thousand delicious recipes, or give 
it to the children to play with. 

A cube of snafu with boiling 
water makes a wonderful cup of 
snafu; when spread on bread, ft 
makes a delicious helping of snafu 
on bread: and if cut into pieces 
with a small pair of scissors, it can 
make a genuine Japanese snafu 
jigsaw puzzle. 

In Japan, snafu has been known 
for generations as a vital, energy- 
rich staple food. Every day. Japa- 
nese country people go wandering 
over the rocks of lhe eastern 
seaboard collecting nutritious 
fronds of seaweed, which they take 
home m profusion and eat for 
breakfast. Later, they go to work in 
the local snafu factory making 
packs of this food so beloved in 
the West, before returning home 
to raise high the beaker of rice 
wine in the evening ceremony of 


while asleep, and so would we if 
we bad been over-producing video 
cameras as happily as the Japa- 
nese. 

Snafu itself they do not eat. 
merely export. 

Consumption of snafu is thus 
vital to the Japanese economy. 
But snafu is more than just a food. 
It’s more. even, than just a creamy 
brown, slightly salty paste which 
can be worked into cracks in 
window frames or used to water- 
proof those tricky bathroom tile 
join& It’s also an age-old Japanese 
fighting art, involving stretching, 
bending, kicking, punching and 
wearing bathrobes all day long. 
The Japanese have long known 
Uiat complete tranquillity and 
peace of mind can be acquired bv 
trying to batter some colleague 
into submission, leaving him 
senseless on the carpet: now you 
too can share in the inner peace of 
s“a™..by digging your toe-nails 
deep mtp a friend with a high 
overhead kick. m 

More than a celestial food, 
household aid. way of life and 
pastime, snafu is also a nippy four- 
door saloon car. Snafus are now 
coming off the production line in 


sontepans of Britain at a rate of 

niSSS much- 

employment to depressed 

^ a n0 ^1 a ^. Che ?P er .than the 


bed they switch on. their -video 
cameras' to record tfierrisfelves 


Honda^Miso. roomieTtS lhe 
5S ,?' nse "f more manoeuv- 
ra . b j 11 Jhc Times in a hiefi 
wind, the Snafu is undoubted! v 
the car of the future. Iedly 

So why buy it now? Because 
snafu is not just gentle oTS 
hands, good with chfldra and tte 
^t you'd always promise y d ™. 

security measure for vour old aae. 

Its also the fact that vum 
jjwmly come into possession of 

two lankers foil of 
saying how many 

ft’s « srapi Y ou it 




/"T-Ti ** 

B x 


MR'' M.ti 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


13 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


REALISM ON SANCTIONS 


Following yesterday’s decision 

by EEC Foreign Ministers in 
Brussels to prohibit both im- 
ports of iron, steel and gold 
coins from South Africa and 
new investment there, where 
does the cause of economic 
sanctions now stand — both 
internationally and in British 
domestic politics? It is gen- 
erally agreed that the measures 
themselves are distinctly mod- 
est — much more so than was 
expected. The usual estimate is 
that they will affect only $500 
million of trade — which 
accounts for about 6 per cent 
of EEC imports from South 
Africa and a mere I per cent of 
South Africa’s exports to the 
outside world. 

Although Sir Geoffrey Howe 
subsequently hazarded the 
diplomatic criticism that the 
calculation of 1 per cent was 
“not shared by everyone", he 
prudently offered no alter- 
native estimate. Whatever 
adjectives may be applied to 
such a package, it foils some- 
what short of being punitive. 

The one sanction discussed 
yesterday which might have 
had a serious impact was a 
prohibition on South African 
coal exports to the Commu- 
nity. These are valued at 
approximately $1 billion an- 
nually and, for that reason, 
were included on the pro- 
visional list of prohibited im- 
ports drawn up at the EEC 
summit last June. But this 
proposal was rejected as a 
result of determined oppo- 
sition from West Germany 
and Portugal, two countries 


which import substantial 
amounts of South African 
coal, despite the strong ad- 
vocacy of Denmark, Ireland 
and Holland which do not. 

Add that the sanctions ac- 
tually agreed cost no EEC 
member-country anything 
very substantial. New invest- 
ment has already fallen off for 
commercial reasons. The EEC 
imports little iron or steel from 
South Africa. And gold coins 
are of small importance to 
modern West European 
economies. In short, the na- 
tions prepared to implement 
severe sanctions were making 
gestures, not sacrifices, and 
those with important eco- 
nomic interests at stake were 
chary of stringent measures. 

The criticism will be made 
that in protecting West 
Germany's economic interests 
at the expense of South 
Africa's blacks. Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl and Foreign 
Minister Hans-Dietrich 
Genscher acted hypocritically 
and immorally. It is likely, of 
course, that some nations — 
almost certainly, if in this 
context ironically, the Eastern 
bloc countries — would act 
from crude economic self- 
interest even in the face of a 
clear demonstration that sanc- 
tions would assist the op- 
pressed. That is why even the 
most stringent sanctions will 
prove “leaky.” 

But were the West Germans 
actually harming the interests 
of black South Africa? No 
serious attempt has been made 
to demonstrate that economic 


sanctions are likely to advance 
democratic rights there. In- 
deed. there are good reasons 
for supposing that they would 
actually retard such progress 
(as well as inflicting consid- 
erable economic suffering on 
black South Africans in the 
interim.) Thai being so, nei- 
ther West Germany nor any 
other country with an im- 
portant stake in trade with 
South Africa is under an 
obligation to cooperate in 
sanctions which will harm 
both their own interests and 
those of their supposed benefi- 
ciaries. 

As this becomes clearer, 
they are in practice likely to 
prevaricate and obstruct any 
major measures. Sir Geoffrey 
said yesterday that there would 
be an attempt to obtain agree- 
ment on prohibiting coal im- 
ports in future — there is a 
meeting of EEC Foreign Min- 
isters at the United Nations 
next week — but this was 
widely seen as an assurance to 
save Dutch, Irish and Danish 
faces. Internationally, the case 
for sanctions, already weak 
morally, has been dealt a 
considerable blow at the prac- 
tical level. 

As for domestic British poli- 
tics, it now transpires that Mrs 
Thatcher was not quite so 
“isolated” in her opposition to 
punitive sanctions upon South 
Africa as comment suggested a 
few months ago. That perhaps 
helps to explain Mr Denis 
Healey’s criticism of Chan- 
cellor Kohl’s action as 
“shameful" 


MRS AQUINO GOES TO WASHINGTON 


The meeting between Presi- 
dent Aquino of the Philippines 
and President Reagan in 
Washington today holds a 
multitude of pitfolls for the 
unwary — and since she be- 
came President seven months 
ago. Mrs Aquino has shown 
herself to be, on occasion, very 
unwary indeed. Her difficulty 
is to satisfy the requirements 
both of her domestic constit- 
uency and of her American 
backers. They are not always 
compatible. 

Some of the pitfalls asso- 
ciated with today's meeting 
she has already negotiated 
successfully. She was wise to 
wait until now before making 
the journey to the United 
States. Not only has she 
avoided appearing too much 
of a supplicant (whatever the 
reality of her position), she has 
also been able to rehearse the 
role of statesman in her earlier 
lour of South-East Asia and 
establish herself regionally be- 
fore venturing into the rougher 
waters of the United States. 
She has learnt too the necessity 
of leaving a strongman behind 
(in this case General Ramos) 
to hold the fort for her. 

Yet dangers remain. Presi- 
dent Aquino cannot be indif- 
ferent to the fact that she is 
still, in American eyes, very 
much on approval. In one way 
she embodies a new style of 
US policy towards the Third 
World, a policy which rates the 
democratic credentials of 
political leaders more highly 
than in the past. On these 
grounds alone, the American 
administration has every rea- 
son to support her. 

But the better a leaders 
democratic credentials, the 
less absolute control he or she 


can exert This makes for less 
predictability — and, perhaps, 
less stability. For the Ameri- 
can patrons of the Philippines, 
financiers and politicians 
alike. Mis Aquino is a high- 
risk proposition, and she has 
yet to convince them other- 


they are not Her claim to be a 
democratic leader is tarnished 
by her suspension of the 
constitution and the failure of 
the constitutional committee 
she then appointed to agree 
expeditiously on a new one. 
Until then there can be no new 
elections and, on paper at 
least. Mrs Aquino is less of a 
constitutional president than 
her predecessor Ferdinand 
Marcos was. 

Nor was the popular support 
she won in February's election 
as conclusive — oras durable — 
as she might have hoped for. 
Her administration still has an 
air of impermanence. She can 
still hold the streets; but can 
she continue to hold all the 
military groupings, the ju- 
diciary and the big land- 
owners, while continuing to 
hold the streets? The policies 
on which she came to power — 
land reform, talks with the 
communist and Muslim insur- 
gents, greater self-determina- 
tion for the Philippines — will 
in time alienate one group of 
her original supporters or an- 
other. 

Her interest in talking to the 
insurgents, in particular, has 
aroused criticism from senior 
generals and concern in the 
United States. In Manila this is 


not because insurgency is a 
real threat to the regime, but 
because the army has suffered 
from guerrilla action and sees 
talks as an unnecessary gesture 
of compromise. 

President Reagan and his 
advisers would probably be 
happier if they were dealing 
either with a strong leader or 


resolution she has the poten- 
tial to be both, and the US 
administration has the in- 
fluence and the power to assist 
her. 

The Philippines needs 
money. The rush of invest- 
ment Mrs Aquino hoped for 
after the foil of Marcos has not 
materialized and the country is 
impoverished If more US aid 
is not forthcoming, Mrs 
Aquino will be forced to look 
elsewhere; in that event, the 
generals might choose to look 
beyond Mrs Aquino. That 
would be a recipe for instabil- 
ity. 

The price for more aid is 
likely to be some assurance 
about the future of the two US 
bases in the Philippines, which 
is guaranteed only until 1991. 
But President Reagan need not 
push too hard with that con- 
dition. For all ■ the talk of 
reducing US patronage, the 
Philippines needs the money 
and the employment the bases 
bring. They will only become a 
real point of contention if Mrs 
Aquino is forced by the Ameri- 
cans to make an enduring 
public commitment to their 
future. There is room for 
discretion on both sides in 
Washington this week. 


wise. 

Were either her democratic 
credentials or her political with a folly constitutional 
strength untainted, her po- leader. President Aquino is at 
sition would be stronger. But present, neither. Bui, if she 

were to act with a little more 


SOCIOLOGISTS ABROAD 


squatters besieging 
ipenhagen this week, 
jnes at the local 
hospital, smashed 
>ws with dubs, and 
ine riot police who 
jio the scene. If this 
i Denmark which is 
e the world's best 
ve in. one begins to 
te appreciation of 
is like in Angola 
pparently the worst, 
tiest placings in the 
aradise are the work 
or Richard Estes of 
work faculty at the 

r of Pennsylvania, 
n nations, measured 
f the political, social 
imic conditions, are 
>f merit: Denmark, 

L Germany. Austria, 
ranee. Norway. Ire- 
land and Belgium, 
jmes twelfth, two 
from the last survey 
ago, but still nine 
ivn from the third 
trupied in 1970. 
it thing to be said 
jlessor Estes’s re- 
iat Professor Estes is 
need of something 
s. Apart from acting 
I of Good Homes 
immigrants, it >s 
c what benefits h»s 
nhi hrine. It is not 


very much help to govern- 
ments dispensing foreign aid, 
since the criteria for deciding 
who needs what are rather 
different Anyway, one hardly 
needs a professor of social 
studies in America to tell a 
rural peasant in Malawi that 
he would be 112 countries 
better off if he moved to an 
apartment block in Bonn. 

Whatever else it is, his 
survey is not a contribution to 
knowledge — as his criteria for 
assessing national -well-being 
make dear. To downgrade 
Britain for. it is reported, lack 
of political participation in 
Northern Ireland is rather 
hand. To regret that Ulstermen 
do not have enough politics is 
like grieving over the shortage 
of cars on the M4. And can 
anyone plumb the quality of 
life without taking into ac- 
count the weather, the food 
and the wine? How many 
people would opt to spend 
their declining years in 
draughty lager-swilling Jutland 
as opposed, let one say, to the 
Dordogne? 

The quality of life can be 
measured in only the broadest 
terms. Any final judgement 
must be subjective. "East 
West home’s best”, that old 
shibboleth of the. British mid- 
dle class is dearly not shared 


by the immigrants from Asia 
who tend to prefer Western 
Europe. On the other hand 
there are few signs of any mass 
movement of Americans to 
Scandinavia in search of their 
own Shangri La. Perhaps it is 
about to begin? 

And can anyone really as- 
sess, in mathematical or any 
other terms, the value of living 
in Britain? Scruffy, inept un- 
disciplined. old-fashioned, in- 
effectual. lazy, unsuccessful, 
hopelessly sanguine and usu- 
ally wet — this country has 
long been despised by its 
enemies and bullied by its 
friends. But how many people 
who come here would want to 
live anywhere else? 

The very faults which lose 
this country points in any 
theoretical league of happiness 
reflect a sense of freedom 
which Britain still manages to 
instil in its inhabitants. We 
are poorer than the Japanese, 
worse-fed than the French, less 
efficient than the Germans, 
colder (in all senses) than the 
Italians and more work-shy 
than our cousins in America. 
But recognition of our faults is 
matched still by our tolerance 
of each other. At the last count 
there were 9.480 Danes living 
here who clearly thought so 
anyvjay. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Drawbacks to new fixed penalties 


From Mr A. J. Turner 
Sir. Your repons on September 10 
of ihc new fixed penalty system for 
motorists constitute a commend- 
able attempt to summarise and 
explain a very complicated set of 
procedures for dealing with a large 
numberof minor offences, burasa 
clerk to the justices 1 am con- 
cerned that some of the less 
satisfactory features of the pro- 
visions appear not to have been 
reported. 

First, there is the matter of the 
“provisional" ticket, which was a 
concession made to those opposed 
to making it compulsory for 
driving licences to be carried In 
order that such persons should not 
be denied the option of a fixed 
penally in respect of an endonsaWe 
offence, the legislation enables a 
fixed penalty to be issued which 
will then be confirmed at a police 
station of the recipient's choice 
provided certain requirements are 
met. 

A colleague of mine has cal- 
culated that under this cumber- 
some procedure there can be up to 
10 different communications trav- 
elling in different directions at the 
same time. This may place in 
doubt the claim that there will be a 
substantial saving of time and 
resources for the police and the 
courts. 

Secondly, there is the assertion 
that it will dear the backlog of 
cases in magistrates' courts, 
thereby paving the way for en- 
abling more classes of cases to be 
heard summarily and thus reduc- 
ing delays in the Crown Court. 
The feci is that the offences 
covered by the system occupy very 
little court lime: any admin- 
istrative savings which we make 
win probably be offset by the 
additional work created for fixed 
penalty courts. 

Thirdly, and arguably most 
importantly, the Secretary of State 
has failed to issue any detailed 
guidance on the use of fixed 
penalties with a view to achieving 
uniformity of practice. The only 
advice he has given to date is that 
a fixed penalty should not be 
.iss ued where it appears that 

Value of science 

From Dr R- K. Newman 
Sir. Your leading article of 
September 6 repeats the familiar 
assertion that British universities 
give a lower priority to science and 
technology than those of our 
trading competitors. The statistics 
published by Unesco show that 
the opposite was the case, even 
before Sir Keith Joseph's reforms. ' 

b» 1982 less than I per cent of 
Japanese undergraduates took de- 
grees in mathematics and comput- 
ing compared with more than 4 
per cent here. In 1981 only 83 per 
cent of American first degrees 
were in engineering and only 4.5 
per cent of German first degrees 
pere in natural sciences, com- 
pared with 13.9 per cent and 14.4 
per cent respectively in Britain. 

Those whipping-boys of the 
educational world, the human- 
ities. were as popular in Japan as 
they are here. The areas in which 
we lagged most strikingly behind 
our competitors were the commer- 
cial and social sciences, especially 
the latter. 

It is undoubtedly true, as you 
suggest, that universities could do 
more to apply their knowledge, 
but whether they can do this and, 
in their present straitened circum- 
stances, continue both their pure 
research and ibeir reaching is 
more doubtful. 

Industrialists may welcome the 
opportunity of farming out their 
research cheaply to low-paid 
academics, but whether it is really 
desirable for companies to reduce 
their own research facilities and so 
increase the gulf between the 
laboratory and the factory floor is 
also debatable. 

Our difficulty lies not in the 
traditional academic values, 
which are more necessary than 
ever in a period of rapid change, 
but in society’s ascription of a 
higher social status to the products 
of our universities, thus inhibiting 
the development of com- 

Gibraltar ruling 

From the Chairman of the Gibral- 
tar Conservation Society ' 

Sir. I refer to Mr Kneviu's article 
of September 15. reporting the 
Gibraltar Government's defiance 
of the Supreme Court's ruling that 
the demolition of the former 
Command Education Centre is 
unlawful. 

The Gibraltar Planning 
Commission’s decision to allow 
the demolition is, however, more 
irregular than the article implies, 
as it appears that they never even 
considered Mr Brian Morton's 
report, even though that report 
was part of the record of the 
Supreme Court proceedings and 


multiple offences may have been 
committed and it may be appro- 
priate to proceed in respect of 
more than one of them. 

Chief officers of police will no 
doubt be mindful of the danger of 
inconsistency between different 
force areas, but there must be a 
risk of disparities in the issue of 
tickets such as we saw in relation 
to cautioning rates before inter- 
vention by the Home Office last 
year. 

1 do not wish to appear to be 
against the principle of extending 
the use of fixed penalties. Indeed, 
there is a case for claiming that the 
new law does not go for enough. 
My concern is that public accep- 
tance of the system may have been 
jeopardised by a combination of 
extravagant claims, absence of 
sufficient guidance to the police 
and unnecessary administrative 
problems. 

Yours. 

A J. TURNER. 

(Editor, Road Law). 

7 Canterbury Park, 

Holme Road. 

Didsbuiy. Manchester. 

September 10. 


From Mr Donald Madgwick 
Sir. A car bought in the UK 
already costs considerably more 
than the same model bought in 
Western Europe. We pay £2 week 
for the privilege of using it on the 
road, and more than another £1 in 
tax for every gallon of petrol we 
buy. Wherever we bring it to rest, 
we are beset, harried and harassed 
by armies of uniformed ticket- 
stickers. 

On top of all this, we now learn 
that the fixed penalty system is to 
be extended to cover about 250 
more traffic offences. I expect I am 
not alone in wondering how even 
the ingenuity of our legislators has 
been equal to the tasks of thinking 
up 250 different ways in which the 
motorist can transgress the law. 
Yours faithfully, 

DONALD MADGWICK, 

Flats, 

201 Woodside Green, SE25. 
September 11. 


plememary forms of education in 
a variety of institutions. 

When the graduates of univer- 
sities, polytechnics and technical 
colleges are recognised as having 
distinctive contributions to make 
to our future but as being equally 
valuable members of society we 
will have come some way towards 
solving our problems. 

Yours sincerely, 

R. K. NEWMAN, 

University College of Swansea. 
Department of Economic History, 
Singleton Park. Swansea. 
September 8. 

Degree proposal 

From the Vice-Chancellor of the 
University of Salford 
Sir, I am grateful to you for 
reporting the proposals that I 
made at yesterday’s meeting of the 
British Association for the 
Advancement of Science at Bristol 
for reorganising the standard 
three-year honours degree typi- 
cally offered by English univer- 
sities. 

Your report only mentioned 
one part of my three-part pro- 
posal, however. I would be grate- 
ful if, in the interests of preserving 
•whatever reputation I still possess 
amongst the more traditional 
•academics, you would allow me to 
point out that what I proposed 
was: 


An increase in the number of 
students admitted to higher educa- 
tion of at least 30 per cent (bringing 
the age participation rate up to 20 
per cent by 1995) coupled with the 
replacement of the present three- 
year honours degree by a two-year 
general (or pass) degree to be 
followed by a new two-year honours 
degree that would be taken by one 
half to one third of those who 
complete the general degree. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN ASHWORTH, 
Vice-Chancellor, 

University of Salford, 

Salford, Greater Manchester. 
Septembers. 


was therefore readily available to 
the commission. 

As to their appeal, it is clear that 
the reason for this course of action 
is to challenge the court's decision 
that members of the public have 
locus standi to review the de- 
cisions of the Planning Commis- 
sion. The commission dearly feel 
that they should take decisions of 
public concern behind closed 
doors and without interference 
from anybody. 

Yours faithfully. 

LIONEL CULATTO. Chairman. 
Gibraltar Conservation Society. 
PO Box 111. 

Gibraltar. 

September 15. 


Tobacco tax 

From Ms Joy Townsend 
Sir. Your correspondent was cor- 
rect to report (September 4) from 
the British Association meeting 
that smoking could be cut by 20 
per cent in the next five years 
without harming Government 
revenue. However, there was a 
misquotation in the report. It is 
not true that cigarette tax provides 


Looking askance 

From Dr J. A. Bell 
Sir, On a recent train journey I was 
surprised to hear the jpiard an- 
nounce "The approaching station 
is Durham", 

Could it be that BR’S problem of 
“gening there", referred to by Mr 
Sam Beilin (September 9V is 
merely one of relativity? 

Yours faithfully. 

ANGUS BELL. 

44 Hale Close. 

Mclbourn. 

Royston. Hertfordshire. - 


one quarter of Government rev- 
enue. It was a major source of 
revenue 40 years ago when 16 per 
cent of all revenue came from 
tobacco lax but the same is not 
true today. It now provides only 4 
percent. 

The structure of the economy 
has changed and is changing and 
other taxes have become more 
important. By the end of the 
century it is likely that tobacco 
will be a very minor tax source. 
Nevertheless, in the short run the 
Government both gains extra 
revenue and reduces smoking 
every time the cigarette tax is 
raised. 

Yours sincerely. 

JOY TOWNSEND. 

Medical Research Council 
Epidemiology ami Medical Care 
Unit. 

Nonhwick Park Hospital. 

Watford Road. 

Harrow. 

Middlesex. 

September^ 


Labour costs in 
manufacturing 

From Mr Paddy Rooney 
Sir, The Department of Trade and 
Industry is once more reported. In 
the context of the campaign to 
limit wage rises, to have stated 
that labour costs in industry 
account for about 70 per cent of all 
costs. Whilst this may be so at the 
macro-economic level — depend- 
ing on how industry is defined — at 
the level of the manufacturing 
firm the position could be very 
different 

In the sector of engineering 
represented by this association 
(manufacturers of heating, 
ventilating and air-conditioning 
equipment) wages and salaries 
account on the average for about 
25 per cent of costs. There are, of 
course, variations between firms, 
but in few, if any, is the figure 
higher than 40 per cent. In this, the 
sector appeals typical of engineer- 
ing manufacturers and is in any 
case significant in its own right 
since, together with our installers 
and maintained, we represent 
about 2 per cent of gross domestic 
product. 

Government statements and 
policies based on the 70 per cent 
assumption are. therefore, likely 
to be misconceived, and will tend 
to undermine the policymakers' 
credibility. 

Since the great part of our 
membership operates in an inter- 
national market, exchange rates 
and their variations — on which 
the Government, publicly at least, 
claims not to have any policy — 
are of equal or greater concern 
than wage rates. To take an 
extreme case, the appreciation of 
sterling against the dollar since the 
low point some 18 months ago has 
had the same effect on our export 
prices to dollar-related economies 
as a wage increase of about 100 per 
cent for the entire workforce. 

In these circumstances, for the 
Government not to have any 
policy beyond allowing financial 
market forces to rip is wholly 
inadequate. 

• This example serves to illustrate 
the point that priorities at the level 
of a firm or an industrial sector 
may be very different from those 
of Whitehall macro-economists. 

Since you. Sir, in several recent 
leaders have displayed a percep- 
tion similar to that of Whitehall, 
perhaps you might also wish to 
remind your readers that industry 
is composed of individual firms 
and not to macro-economic ag- 
gregates. In doing so, you might 
also perhaps encourage the Gov- 
ernment to set policies which 
promote confidence in its under- 
standing of the factors which 
influence decisions in those firms. 
Yours faithfully, 

PADDY ROONEY, President, 
Heating, Ventilating and Air 
Conditioning Manufacturers 
Association lid. 

Nicholson House, 

High Street, 

Maidenhead, Berkshire. 

Farmers 9 plight 

From Mr C. B. Harwood 
Sir, I fear that the clouds above 
Anglesey are beginning to obscure 
my friend Lord Stanley’s view 
(September 3) of what is happen- 
ing on the ground in England since 
he gave up the tenancy of a college 
form some years ago. 

It is a red herring to link the rise 
or foil of rental values with the 
movement of land prices over 
recent years. Fanners farm to 
make a profit: landowners, be they 
private or institutional, buy and 
sell fond for a variety of reasons 
which may or may not lead to 
financial profit. 

If forming profits foil so for that 
tenants cannot sustain the current 
levels of rent then rents will foil 
and there is nothing which “the 
institutions and the land agents 
who advise them" can do about it. 
But future profits, let alone 
hunches about what those profits 
will be. are not the basis on which 
current rents are determined. 

To date I have advised the 
college to reduce the rent on one of 
its forms but. along with most land 
agents. I am watching the levels of 
costs (of which rent is only one) 
and returns in fanning and keep- 
ing an open mind. 

Yours feiihfiilly, 

C. B. HARWOOD. Land Agent, 
Estate Office. 

New College. 

Oxford. 

Prince’s robes 

From Mr P. C. Thompson 
Sir, I was surprised to see (photo- 
graph. September 5) that the 
Prince of Wales, a guest at 
■Harvard, had worn the robes of 
the Chancellor of the University 
of Wales. Is it no longer the 
convention that one should wear 
no academic robes at a university 
other than those of that univer- 
sity? If one holds no degree there, 
one parades in mufti, however 
high one’s rank elsewhere. 

Yours faithfully, 

P. C. THOMPSON, 

16 Edgar Street. 

Worcester. 

September 6. 


Soap and the admen 

From Mrs Eleanor Bourne 
Sir. As another grocer’s daughter I 
must pm Mr Herrington (Septem- 
ber 6) right. In Mrs Thatcher’s 
formative years packaging was 
greaseproof paper and plain bags. 
And the tins of broken biscuits 
were the greatest delight in the 
shop. Oh. the joy of finding a 
battered custard cream among the 
crumbling digestives and the Os- 
bornes! Perhaps this is where the 
real marketing opportunity is. 
Yours faithfully. 

ELEANOR BOURNE 
15 Oakcroft Road, SE13. 
September 9., 



ON THIS DAY 


SEPTEMBER 17 1879 

During the return march ttf the 
European and native troops id the 
Peshawar Volley Field Force, 
following the finning of the treaty 
of Gandamnk, nearly Jtttt men 
tivre tost from dispose - mostly 
from cholera and sunstroke. The 
marrh. which began an June I, 
was accomplished in 12 day n and 
etwered 117 miles 


RETURN MARCH OF THE 
PESHA WUR 
VALLEY FIELD FORCE 


The were sickness which befell 
the European and Native troops of 
the Peshawur Valley Field Force 
on their rplum to India, after the 
signing nr the treaty of Gandamak, 
has necessarily excited much at- 
tention. and the facts nf the case 
have been embodied in an official 
norm live, the more important 

points of which are as follows:— 

As soon as peace was concluded 
with the Ameer of Afghanistan, it 
became desirable, fur political as 
well as financial reasons, that the 
forces in advance of the Khyher 
Pass should be recalled with all 
practicable expedition. But the hut 
season had already commenced, 
and it was a matter for grave 
consideration how for the return 
march might be prevented by 
sanitary considerations . . . The 
difficulty was the actual presence 
or cholera in the Peshawur 
Valley 

Instructions were immediately 
issued to make even* possible 
preparation for encountering an 
unusual amount of sickness on the 
march. Previously unused camping 
grounds were selected, at such 
distances apart as to keep each 
day's work within the most moder- 
ate limits (hat the sources of water 
supply would allow*, hospital ac- 
commodation was provided for 
men who were unable to proceed, 
and an abundance of mules and 
ponies, with some camels and 
elephants and such wheeled car- 
riages as could be obtained and 
used, were sent for the transport of 
the sick. The preliminary arrange- 
ments were under the direction of 
Surgeon-Major Porter and the 
distance marched, from Safed-sung 
to Peshawur, was 117 miles, which 
was accomplished in 12 days, 
beginning on the 1st of June . . . 
everything seems to have been 
done that knowledge and foresight 
could suggest: and the only flaw in 
the arrangements was that the men 
could nut always be prevented, 
under the influence of raging thirst 
from drinking un filtered or even 
filthy water. 

On reaching -Jamrud and Hurri- 
Sing-ka-Boorj, and especially as 
they made their final marches, 
their distress was very apparent; 
their clothes were stiff and dirty 
from the profuse perspiration ana 
dust: their countenances beto- 
kened great nervous exhaustion, 
combined with a wild expression 
difficult to describe: the eyes 
injected and even sunken; a burn- 
ing skin, black with the effects of 
sun and dirt: a dry tongue: a weak 
voice; and a thirst which no 
amount of fluids seemed to 
relieve . . . 

But. if there was one class worse 
than another, it was certainly the 
medical officers and medical subor- 
dinates. Surgeon-Major Porter 
states that, on their arrival at 
Hurri-Sing-ka-Bonij. most of them 
were in a painfully helpless and 
prostrate condition both mentally 
and bodily. Tbis was attributable 
to the strain to which they bad 
been subjected — almost incessant 
work night and day, coupled with 
that anxiety and depression which 
even tire most indifferent or callous 
must share in the presence of so 
much disease, fatigue, and respon- 
sibility. Some had almost literally 
no relief from toil, as, from so many 
of their number becoming ill, the 
duties were doubled and trebled for 
those who remained at their posts. 
The medical officer in charge of the 
section Field Hospital broke down 
early; next, the surgeon of the 4th 
Battalion Rifle Brigade; and the 
third arrived at Huni-Sing simply 
capable of handing over his sick 
before being himself placed on the 
sick list. The medical officers had 
been thrown entirely on their own 
resources in regard to the pitching 
and striking of tents, receiving no 
European assistance for this pur- 
pose. They had also to muster the 
dhunlie bearers before marching, 
and to drive them like so many 
cattle along the march. Others, not 
entitled to draw forage allowance, 
were obliged to march on foot, and 
afterwards to perform their profes- 
sional duties when worn out by 
fatigue and excessive heat. While 
the troops were passing through 
Peshawur there were 12 medical 
officers on tire sick list at one time, 
and. according in the returns of the 
officer's hospital, the percentage uf 
medical officers to total admissions 
was 3&3 — 

Language mix-up 

From Mr C. F. Smith 
Sir. Heard recently over the loud- 
speaker in the lounge of a cross- 
Channel ferry, the announcement: 
“Ladies and gentlemen, ihe buffet 
is now open”: followed immedi- 
ately by the translation: "Mo- 
dames et messieurs, le snack-bar 
esi auvort maintenant". 

Yours faithfully. 

C. F. SMITH. 

55 Warwick Crest. 

Arthur Road. Edgbaston. 
Birmingham. West Midlands. 
September 10. 

Front Sir Peter I anneck, StEP for 
Cleveland (Eurojvan Democrat 
(Conservative)) 

Sir. When l used to strap-hang 
daily to the City in the Under- 
ground I found the tri-lingual 
phrase. Exatsi bine, most useful 
in the tourist season. Now in the 
European Parliament this would 
have to be much more broadlv 
based. 

Yours indy. 

PETER VAN NECK. 

2 Chaloncr Sired, 

Gutsborough. Cleveland. 


i 



I 


IS. 




LA CREME DE LA CREME 


V 



secretarial recruitment 
CONSULTANTS 


High Fashion 
High Calibre 
c£1 1,000+ 


Limited Company 
Un&mted Scape 
HD's PA to £11; 


We need a leader 
to join a leader. 
60% admin 40% 
secretarial content 
awaits a sales and 
marketing con- 
scious PA. This is a 
newly created posi- 
tion with a new 
Director looking at 
new retail market- 
ing concepts. 


Age 25-30. Please 
contact Joanne 
Gregory. 


You're one part- 
secretary, one part 
PA, one part 
organiser, one part 
exfrediter, one part 
administrator, one 
part pacrfier, one 
■ part supervisor - in- 
deed seven part 
wonder. You’re 
needed by this 
high-tec MD with a 
highly commercial 
hat and a very pub- 
lic face. 

Aged either side of 
30. please contact 
Joanna Ball. 



SECRETARIAL RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS 


Director’s PA 
£10.500 
+ mge sub. 


Poise, confidence, 
initiative and sheer 
professionalism are 
essential for work- 
ing at the top. Good 
audio secretarial 
skills will give you 
access to involve- 
ment. responsibility 
and challenge. 


PA 

Product Research 
£10.500 
+ exc bens. 


Please contact 
Gillian El wood. 


Good s/h. technical 
nous and enthusi- 
asm for invest- 
igating new ideas 
are needed by the 
Research Director 
of this leading con- 
sumer health 
products company. 

Age 25-35. Please 
contact Rosalie 
Preskett 


01-491 1868 


WANDSWORTH HEALTH 
AUTHORITY 

Acute Services Unit - 
St. George's Hospital. SW17 

Talented Medical 
Secretary 

For One of Britain's 
Best Known 
Surgeons 

The Cariothoradc Surgeon at Sl George's Hospi- 
tal. Tooting, enjoys an international reputation for 


his skiBs. 


It means that when it comes to choosing people 
for his support team he demands the best - as he 
wffl when he selects you as his new Medical 
Secretary/P A. 


For a role which combines a 
contact, dose liaison with 


deal of patient 
physicians and 
an aiteUi- 
. confident 

quality of your medical secretarial 

skins, and of your ability to perform well. 



Starting salary up to £7689 p.a. (me) plus afi the 
facilities you would expect from one of Britain's 


ing teaching hospitals (close to Tooting 
Broadway Tube and major South London bus 
routes). 


For further information and an appfication 
form and job description please.contact 
Mrs. B. Artove, Manager of Medical 
Secretaries, SL George's Hospital. Blackshaw 
Road Portakabin, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, 
SW17 OQT. Tel: 01-672 1255 ext 4021. 


AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 


Why settle for less 
than the best agency? 


At MacBlam Nash Temporary Secretaries we offer ■ 

• immediate work 

• competitive rates and a holiday pay scheme 
throughout the winter 

• the pick of the best assignments in London 


After dll we couldn’t settle for less than the best, 
so why should you? 


Call LizBarratt today for the latest 
assignments on 01-439 060L 


MacBlain 


Temporary 

Secretaries 


3rd Floor, Carrington House. 

130 Regent Street London WiR sFR 
(Entrance in Regent PL, above Iberia Airways.) 



S^SS^D^nSW^SALK^OTilE-MEDiA- FINANCE 


MtJJLA- r — 

I Were you a College Leaver 
last year? 

Would you like to earn 
£ 10,000 this year? 


2 

8 


DS 

UJ 



8 




o 

z 


d 

(Sl 

Z 

n 


Your 

and 


<£ 

r- 

8 

S' 


could help you make that leap into a great 

second job. 

Be in theCity for the u Big Bang" teorking for a very ' young 
(20-25) and successful team in one of the best known merchant 
banks. 

Shorthand isn’t essential Good typing and plenty of spark are 
all that’s required. If you are interested please ring to discuss 
further. 




ai 

s 

a 

< 


UJ 

u 

I 

UL 


HAZEl J.- STATON 


8 Golden Square. London WL 
Tel 01-439 602L 


3 

Q 


UJ 

2 


MEDIA-FINANCE- ADVERnSING-SALES-PEBSONNEL* MEDIA* FINANCE 


\A 


MUSIC PA 

£10,000 

Our tfenb. a prestqns & Hona- 
Imly tarn Heart Co wmei 
ynuig and capuie SH/Sec PA with 
good sue t at pres a t a a ui id 
(W root* meted r SI aspeos ot 
BK Personnel function Ths o an 
■See am mow rf you lm snow 

BmwMKaaon sWs and It* aWrtj 

to anti on your omi ‘ — ■ — 


,01-481 2345 


albatt 


ADVERTISING 
£9,500 


. raonata^ & anpBfla 
ySec to work n tag ec an g 8 
tenanting anvortiM. Lane «A 
ad m w man* and 
cornmnadno sMk n eitedMly 
swbvsc a Juno Secraay. Tl» s 


a sunob opponinty n pm* your 
north n an 


i vte tewg pea cm . 


01-481 2345 


aUntt 


DW 


SECRETARY 


to 


DEPUTY DIRECTOR 
OF ENGINEERING 


£8836 p.a. (under review) 


The Deputy Director of Engineering at Independent 
Television News needs a new Secretary. Applicants should 
have good secretarial qua fi ffcation s which must include 
w or dprocessor and audio skils. Previous experience in a 
technical engineering environment would be an advantage. 


fTN offers an attractive benefits package indufing season 
ticket loan, subsidised restaurant and pension scheme. 


Please apply with fufl career derate to: 


The Pmounef Office, 

moepeoocm i ttcvnion nwi u mw u, 

[Til House. 48 Welts Street London W1P 4DE. 


dosing dele: 24tfi September 1966. 
ITN a an Equal Opport uni ti es Emptorer 


MARKETING SEC 


£10,000 

A camptlM SH Sw b iiqwad id |DB 
u* had oBn a t wB town kar • 
maid Ca is ftnavi Assbsh to 
toft HrteMt Ot, broadr «n*d 
d*3 eohdag general ngnsao. 
sa»g i» 8 anmg systems, 
nte^iratd arrangements eft bert- 
led perts "bode gnu LVs. 
STL y U* Asms am ft 
Em prospects 

01-481 2345 


albatt 


PROPERTY PA 

£10,000 

tashpous West End (rased Prop- 
erty Co. sees mtocutous 8 
etfeweSec/PAto amattteOra- 
nun « Me Dusgr otttas. Ufisa 
|W txEtUer* secranm sUs. 
peel ViP Qiens 8 Ha respon- 
aMty tor me Ktonsfeann ot 
confrtnfal manor? 6* to- 
rn on naming PA 




tafir « 
vowed 


01-481 2345 


albatt 



OSBORNE \l RICHARDSON 


FREE TO TRAVEL? 


£10,000 package 


Personnel Admin 

£10,000 


Join the adveriteaig dMsion of this world fam- 
ous company and organee marketing 
campaigns, social events, and trade fairs in 
the UK and abroad. Sooefase with chants and 
staff and be treated as an mportant team 
member. 90/55 + wp skfls. 


MUSIC MARKETIHG 


£10,000 

Tins beetle South Ken. based company, 
closely abed to the music busmess. seeks a 
PA to a Dnector. Organise meetings and 
presentations and work largely on your own 
nuauve. Lwse with outside contacts and dto- 
tn button companies. 55 wpm typing: 
shorthand useful. WP trammg given. 



West London-based, this world leader in 
systems design seels a career-motivated PA. 
By far the greater part of your involvement 
will be in the field of human resources — 
helping to administer manpower planning 
and personnel development. Additionally 
you will help to prepare tailored 
com p ensation packages for key staff. Admin 
experience, intellectual capacity and good 
keyboard skills essemiaL Age 23-30. Please 
call 01-493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 


Recrwmen, Corod quo 




ASXAft ADVERTISING 


Please cad Debbie BerkcMtch. Anna Fnend, 
Judi Osborne or Glean RKfiardson. Early ami 
late appomtments can always be arranged. 


\ 4092393 A 


Human omwns 

llONtWKMSr.lMOHW 


._A SATISFYING JOB IN AD- 
VERTISING, PR, RADIO AND 
THE CREATIVE FIELD. 


ON YOUR OWN 
c.£l5,000 


American consultant and investor l 
in corporate finance in the publishing field 
needs a well-educated and presented Personal 
Assistant with research capabilities. His work 
involves mergers and acquisitions in publish- 
ing and related companies. He also has 
interests in art and the theatre. Working in his 
mews house in SW1, self-sufficiency and self- 
motivation are essentia] qualities as be is 
abroad 70% of the time. Publishing experi- 
ence necessary and financial knowledge 
helpful. Good skills 100/60. Age 30-40. 
Please ring 434 4512. 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


PA IN PUBLIC 
RELATIONS 


Ambitious, enthusiastic, energetic, efficient, 
experienced PA Secretary to a Director of a 
fast growing PR consultancy and ad agency. 
Responsibilities include: organising press, 
institutional and VIP conferences and 
lunches, issuing information, co-ordinating 
diaries, travel, client meetings, some admin, 
accurate typing, some shorthand. WP train- 
ing given. 

Salary negotiable a.a.e. plus benefits. 


Applications to Anne Garland on 

QI 489 1441 


WE ARE HANDLING LOTS OF VACAN- 
CIES AT ALL LEVELS FROM TOP PA’S 
TO EXCELLENT SECOND JOB. 


IF YOU HAVE GOOD SECRETARIAL SKILLS, WE 
CAR HELP TOIL GIVE OS A RING AND LOOK AT 
THINGS FROM A NEW ANGLE 


CALL 491 8775 


Recruitment Consultants 

Recrurtmenf Consultants 


A 


PA/SECRETARY 
IN GERMANY 
£10,000 Net 

Large manufacturing company head office 
Ireland have offices in Germany don to 


They require a secretary with outgoing; 


personality lor one Of their executives \ 
went Gerrr 


German to hands telephone and 
corre sp ondence In borfi English and 
German. Goodtypng skSs n telephone 
manner Important. 

Duties Include much admin. Age 25+ . 
Benefits mdUde tax tree s hopping. 


TEMPING 

WITH 

LANGUAGES 


A JEJS^ WANG, CPT, IBM. 


Good shorthand and typing. Our 
dents need your excellent skBs. 
We woitfd Oke to pay you our excel- 
lent rates. Varied and interesting 
work aS areas. 


Please phone us today. 


ill 


I BET THEY DRINK 
CARLING BLACK LABEL 


it 


They work in one of London's fastest growmg 
Wight Collins Rutherford Scott. 


ad ogeodes - 


They are secretaries to a Group Account Director, Account Directors, 
Pl omw s or Medio Execs. 

They hove word procam experie n ce. Some of them also hove lOOwpra 
shorthand or audio skills. They definitely have a sense of humour. 
They hove salaries up to £11,000 per annum. 


They v9 have sat a CV to Jufic McUraMi, 
RS. 41- * 


WCRS, 41-44 Great Qnaon Street, London WC2B 5AR. 



International Secretaries 


£11,000 

LITIGATION 

SECRETARY 


Cmot Garden Solicitors 
seek experienced audio 
secretary. WP experience 
useful. 


Please ring 
01 379 7083 


Befi CB 


01-491 7100 


n 


01-491 7100 


J 


FLY AS HIGH AS YOU LIKE 
RECRUITMENT 


WE are successful, personal, 
small and somewhat eccentric. 
We combine a high degree of 
talent & professionalism with 
a great regard for each others 
individuality and sense of hu- 
mour. Our top calibre clients 
& candidates reflect our busi- 
ness reputation. 


TOU should be up with the 
top achievers in recruitment 
end wanting to fly higher than 
your present excellent perfor- 
mance. Style, intelligence, 
sense of fun & unlimited am- 
bition all ess ential. 


Starting salary very negotiable and future 
salary will reward achievement 


Susan Beck 


MARKETING PA 

£11,000 + 

NO SHORTHAND 
10 AM START 


To sssst Dndor of North 
Amenan Oram of pratipous 
Gty Co. Extasm imotoonert to 
OX raj Anatom p n ycts ptaen wj 
art pranoUK. Dumnitog 
tonsils nctads toimofiato 
mortpgt 


Hmsa cafi Bbt 01 U S2n 
STWHUMReCCOK. 


RECRUITMENT 

01-584 6242 


£10,000’£1 2,500 

Impartial reports on a 
variety of Sec/PA 
vacancies in this range 
posted overnight if you 
call Premium Secretaries 
[Rec Cons) on 01-486 
2667 before 7 j 00 p.m. 


Adimnistrariye Assistant 


to the Group Company Secretary) 
London - West End 


is required by the holding 
company for a major multiple specialist 
retailing Group at is Head Office near Baker 
Street, Wt. 


Street, 1 

Preference wiD be given to candidates ideally 
aged between 24 aod 30^ with secretarial or 
word processing experience and_ who are either 
cunemly studying for the examinations of the 
Institute of Chartered Secretaries and 
Administrators, or law graduates/Law Society 
finalists, who wish to pursue a career within 
the Secretariat of a public company. 


The successful applicant will quickly become 
involved in all aspects of the Secretniat’s 



die administration of the Group insurances. 
Pension scheme and other matters. 


Salary range £9,500-£H > 500 depending on age 
and experience. 

Please telephone 01-437 1564 


MajBlain 


& Associates Ltd 
01-4371564 

Reauianeni Consultants 130 Regent Street, 
London WIR 5FE 


PLC Chairman £13,000 


This executive PA position to a well- 
known business figure offers minimal 
secretarial content and requires maximum 
organisation ability. With the help of a 
small team of support staff, your 
administration of the Chairman's office 
will Include involvement in confidential 
business aflairs and the organisation of| 
sporting and social functions throughout 
the year. Top level director experience is 
essential for this blue-chip position 
together with a sense of humour and the 
ability to communicate with people at all 
level* 

Age: 3040 Skills: 100/60 


! RECRUITMENT 5mm ^ 


C 0 M P A N 


C0VENT GARDEN 
f TEL 01-831 1220 


Elizabeth Hunt 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
£12,500 

A real c areer opportuity for an experienced senior level 
secretory with oealfy a oty background to Ian this leading 
firm of stockbrokers. You'D be secreray to their Managin g 
Director aod wfll lave extensive kaison with ail las business 
cortacts and enjoy very much a PA rota. Benefits include 
raus bonus. 80/60 sk&s 
22-30. 


i and WP abifity needed. Age 


SECRETARY/OFFICE MANAGER 
TO £14,000 


To set ip aH office systems for a major | 
based n the city. Trey are very involved m a 
anportort dockland projects and business is booming. YouH 
hm ® "HSf a PPP®rty oadegraund and experience oTsetttag 
i8i an offica 60 wpm typing aid WP ability needed. 


SECRETARY TO 
CHIEF EXECUTIVE 


The Chief Executive of a West Yorkshire based 


company with expanding interests in acute health 
care ana related activities s 


seeks a highly motivated 
secretary able to provide the full range of secre- 
tarial and personal skills required at senior 
executive leveL 


The appointment offers attractive working condi- 
tions together with fringe benefits. Salary 
negotiable. 


For further details reply to BOX B31. 


PA SECRETARY 


PA secretary required to support small group of profes- 
sionals involved in research and development within 
industry. 


Besides the normal range of secretarial skills, to include 
word processing and telex, applicants must be self 
starters, capable of acting and working on their own 
initiative in the absence of other members of staff. 


Salary in the region of £8.000 + other benefits. 
Applications including CV should he addressed to 

Mrs M J Richardson, 

British Plastics Federation, 
Befgrave Square, London SW1X 8 PH. 


.EfizobeHihfonlRacnAmenlGonsuttonb 

yZKoHege Hi London K4 0h2W 3551 


Elizabeth Hunt 


COMPUTER FUTURE 
£11,500 


Join this international computer software company as 
seoetay/PA to their Managing Director. You should be a 
first chs adiranistralor. well organised with a flair lor wwk- 
ffljf ram Initiative. Excellent benefit package. 
90/60 skils. WP abffiiy needed. 


A FRESH START 
£9,500 to £11,000 + BENEFITS 


Join tote hating west End International investment bank. 
They have a number of vacancies for mmertenced secretaries 


with or without banking experience. All positions' are ex- 
' offer a baiefit package which 


tremeiy varied and they 
indudes mortgage subsidy, free lunch, 
and an earty salary review. 100/60 


paid overtime 
needed. 



Elizobetti Hunt Racriftbnent Consultants a 

BGosverxx Sheet baodonWl 0V2403531 J 


MANAGMENT CONSULTANTS 
SW1 

Leading firm specialising in executive recruitment 


require a secretary 19 plus. 
Exc8fiem opportunity to jom i 


i smafl. friendly firm and 
work as pert of a team. Plenty of scope for 


invoJvment and native. Would suit 2nd 
wpm typmg. Some snorthand. Audio and 
edge an advantage but not essential. 

Salary Negotiable. 
Contact Kate Caunt, 
Kteman & Co 01-839 7384 


ir. 45 
Pknowt- 


SJHAIX FRIENDLY 
CONSULTANCY FIRM 


BILINGUAL SECRETARY 
(French/Eoglish) 


Required for London service company of international 
project devdopment/trading group. Applicant most have 
mature and flexible attitude to the duns of the position, 
which will require the fhO range of excellent secretarial 
skills, good knowledge of French as weD as the ability to 
exercise initiative on occasions. 


A competitive salary and a pleasant West End working 
environment are offered, and the right candidate win have 
tbe opportunity for c areer development with a small bm 
expanding orgar’ — * *-* 


orga nisati on. Applications in confidence to: 

V. E. Stokes 01-629 1559 


(No Ageades) 


MD's P A/Secretary 

£10,000 





dje^romrccess. Apart from speeds 


. J/70 you prat eryoy performing 
£nder pressure, be 30+, calm, self corv DUHY 
fident and never short of ideas. „ * 

Baker Street. OVeitOR 

“" 9 on 01-734 7282 

>taiyOaEntegecndteeatL>1.35Ptaa(flIy.LaBd oe- ^|v 9 p a 


Needs bright young helper with copy 
typing and good with computers to help 
in busy information department 
Salary c£8,000. 


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YOUNG MARKETING 
SECRETARY 


idrei opportunity to tan 'HP. 
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Writs with full C.V. to 


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10 The Haymarket, SW1. 


SECRETARY/PA 


required by agency and development Associate tas 
recently jotned Covert Garden firm of Chartered Survey- 
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EXPERIENCED LEGAL AUDIO SECRETARY 
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Tel: 01 247 0004 - Ref: KATE. 

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CAREER POSITION 
YOUNG BI-UNGU1AL (GERMAN) SEC 
c£8J>0fl 


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for those of you who find it bsd to get to us in 
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A SPECIAL REPORT ON 
YOUNG ENGINEERS 


THE 


mm 


TIMES 


FOCUS 


September 17, 1986 

By Derek Harris 


Fine tuning a vital industry 



The Princess of Wales will 
today present prizes to the winners 
of the Young Engineer for 
Britain competition. Youngsters 
attending schools, colleges and 
universities, and those already in 
industry, can enter projects 
based on any branch of engineering 


fictufAS; NofTr*n PotW 


The many feceted campaign 
to bring in the best of British 
brains as a talent transfusion 
; for the beleaguered manufac- 
turing industries gets another 
boost in London today when 
the Princess of Wales is due at 
Wembley Conference Centre 
to present a plethora of frizes 
to young engineers from 
around the conn try. 

The Young Engineer for 
Britain competition is one of 
the initiatives to attract more 
youngsters into industry. This 
one is organized by the En- 
gineering Council as part of its 
promotion of engineering As 
well as the top title and trophy 
for this year's best young 
engineer, there will be various 
class winners, a special prize 
for girls and cash with other 
practical help from industrial 
companies acting as sponsors. 

Many encouraging things 
will no doubt be said about the 
quality of British inventive- 
ness. The Princess of Wales 
will be adding to the long line 
of royal patronage for en- 
gineering, which bas included 
both the Prince of Wales and 
the Duke of Edinburgh. 

There is no shortage of 
support from senior members 
of the Government, including 
the Prime Minister, who made 
a point last year of going to the 
Engineering Council's first an- 
nual "grass roots" assembly 
where a special arrangement 
was made to bring in 
representation from younger 
engineers. There was a fresh 
emphasis at this year's assem- 
bly earlier in the summer on 
the role of the younger 
engineer. 

All this is formidable in 
helping to oeate a climate of 
opinion and focussing atten- 
tion on the campaign to 
improve the lot or the en- 
gineering industry antfc hence 
of the country. But the ’scale of 


the problem is equally 
formidable. 

In educational background, 
British industry has been 
poorly equipped compared 
wnh many of its i wwnarioB«) 
competitors. At the last coast 
earlier in the decade, only half 
the British working popula- 
tion had a recognized 
qualification compared with 
60 per cent in Japan, 66 per 
cent in West Germany and 78 
per cent in the United Stales. 

The proportion qualified to 
first degree level was in Britain 
7 per cent. West Germany 8 
per cent, Japan 13 per cent 
and the United States 19 per 
cent. 

In engineering the number 
of higher education 
qualficiations per milli on of 
national population showed 
Britain at 15,000, trailing well 

United States 7 (80 ,(k£o). The 
German figure was low at 
7,000. 

As improving technologies 
wipe out jobs at the craft level 
and create sharper skills sbort- 

A short-term 
problem in easing 
the shortages 

ages higher up the scale, there 
is a short-term problem in 
trying to ease such shortages 
and a long-term one in 
improving overall the simply 
of professionally qualified 
engineers. 

Dr Kenneth Miller, the 
Engineering Council's direc- 
tor-general, said: "The trouble 
is that in gearing up' the 
number of qualified engineers 
of the right quality there is an 
exceptionally long lead time 
involved 

"Just from 18 years old and 
on you are talking about three 







-4 


Youth talent: Gregory Scott and Matthew Austin, both 14, designed and developed these flashing-light gloves for cyclists; Eryk Mozejko, 19, came 


years of academic work, two 
years of training and another 
two years of experience. Then 
there is the school system 
before age 18 where the essen- 
tial preparation has to be 
done." 

Decisions on academic 
routes which eventually could 
mean the difference between 
feast «nrf faming among num- 
ber of qualified future en- 
gineers are effectively being 
made five years before univer- 
sity entrance, so a total lead 
time of 12 years could be 
involved. Dr Miller pointed 
out. 

He added: "There also has 
to be planning to get the 
teaching ride geared property. 
So there is no trouble in 
talking of a lead time in terms 
of decades to get right what 
might be called the base load 
system. This is especially so if 
you think in terms of a total 
professional population 
operating within say a 30-year 
system.” 

On this sort of canvas it was 
not possible to pinpoint in 
precise detail what industry 
would be needing so many 
decades ahead, although it 
could be seen that the demand 


was for articulate and numer- 
ate people. 

“What it comes down to,” 
said Dr Miller, "is that you 
have to do a lot of fine toning, 
taking the form of continuing 
education and training by 
short courses throughout a 
professional life.” 

There was still a great need 
to change the broad cultural 
attitudes which had led to the 
comparative neglect of manu- 
facturing needs, be believed. 
Cumbersome controls of the 
various aspect of the educa- 
tional system still remained to 
be tackled. "Industry Year has 
been about changing the cul- 
ture and the mood is switch- 
ing, but it has not been fully 
thought through and worked 
through bow far social institu- 
tions must change," be said. 

The present system pro- 
duced people strong on analy- 
sis and critique, said Dr 
Miller. "We apply these with 
great pleasure and venom 
particularly to bodies and 
institutions other than our 
own. We are a knocking 
society. That critique and that 
emphasis oa analysis and not 
on what might be called 
synthesis has comb through 


the educational system. It has 
come from emphasizing the 
intellectual thinking of aca- 


demic work and denigrating 
the physical malting or things 
and physical work.” 

Increasingly narrow 
specialization in schools and 
then universities ignored that 
the outride world was about 
putting things together and 
doing tilings posnvely. This 
was why the Engineering 
Council's policy was for 
broader-based school curricu- 
luras and engineering courses. 

An aspect of changing the 
system was bringing more 
closely together the many 
professional bodies in en- 
gineering, said Dr Miller. The 
number of these bodies had 
been reduced by merger from 
53 to 44 although, reflecting 
the changing needs of technol- 
ogy, the British Computer 
Society had entered the lists. 

The institutions now 
worked within only five key 
groupings for the purpose of 
registering individuals and 
accrediting courses. That was 
proving a lever for getting 
broader-based engineering 
courses and was a powerful 
control mechanism, - he said. 


There was already more 
emphasis on design, with a 
design project now mandatory 
for both university and poly- 
technic courses. 

It is through the accredita- 
tion system that the essential 
social changes would come, he 
forecast, with an integration of 
academic education and prac- 
tical training. 

Synthesis as well as analysis 

Some women will 
return to 
full-timework 

was the hallmark of the Young 
Engineer competition, he 
pointed out, adding "These 
youngsters are exposed to 
creating and malting things. 
They have to take decisions. 
One can sense the enthusiasm 
of these youngsters. And ties 
are strengthened between in- 
dustry and schools.” 

The competition is only one 
of a number of initiatives 
involving the Engineering 
Council aimed at bringing a 
wider spectrum of talent into 
engineering. Other ways of 


influencing schoolchildren at 
an early stage are being 
explored. 

The council is expanding a 
sen-ice for qualified engineers 
to explain to second school 
groups what a job in engineer- 
ing means. In another scheme 
engineers are on tap to help 
schools with anything related 
to engineering, from careers 
advice to setting up projects 
and factory visits. 

A 1984 campaign. Women 
Into Science and Engineering 
(WISE), run with the Equal 
Opportunities Commission, 
has built up increasing mo- 
mentum, said Dr Miller. Last 
year there was a rising trend 
tor women going on university 
and polytechnic engineering 
courses. They accounted for 
1 1.5 per cent of students on 
these courses, compared with 
10.8 per cent the year before 
and a mere 1 per cent in 1970. 

The council is now selling 
hard to industrial companies 
the idea that it can be enlight- 
ened self-interest to make 
provision fra* women to take a 
career break in order to start 
their families and then return 
later to professional job, pos- 


np with a telescope unit 
sibly on a flexible basis. 
Though some women want to 
return to full-time work 
quickly, there are others who 
prefer, at least for a time, part- 
time work, possibly in the 
form of a job shared with 
another regular part-timer. 

Short-term measures to 
close the skills gap could, as 
well as short courses for 
continued education and 
training, include remedial 
courses. Dr Miller suggested. 
These would give a fresh 
opportunity to those in their 
20s who dropped out early 
from the education system 
when discouraged by a highly 
theoretical academic 
approach. 

Extra cash was needed to go 
into providing foundation 
courses to change arts-based 
into science-based A-levels if a 
student decided to change tack 
in a career at 18, he added. 

Though the Department of 
Education and Science plans 
to increase the number of 
engineering places in higher 
education, the Engineering 
Council is still pressing for 
more. 


•- * - 


•* -V: 


r * 


/ THE \ 
ENGINEERING 
V COUNCIL J 


- -•■'V’V 


•I 


The Young Engineer 
for Britain 1986 


Yet another way in which The Engineering Council 
is helping Britain towards a successful industrial future 


THE ENGINEERING COUNCIL - 10MALTIWVERS STREET- LONDON WC2R3ER ■ 01-2407891 





.16 


Structural 

Engineering 

a career with the 

Excitement 

of creating new structures 

Opportunity 

of travel; working with computers; 
being part of a professional team 

Responsibility 

for safety and stability in structures 
send for free information from: 

The Institution of 
Structural Engineers 
11 Upper Belgrave Street 
London SW1X8BH 
Telephone: 01-235 4535 

Innorpomled bv Roval Charter 
Nominated body of the Enfjinserinj* Gounril 




InstitutkinofMediank^&^ineers 


1 1 , Birdcage Walk, London SW1H 9JJ 

Telephone: 01-222 7899 Telex: 917944 tMELDNC 

Congratulations 

to all the worthy winners in today’s 
Young Engineer for Britain Competi- 
tion, especially the winner of the 
17-19 individual age group prize 
donated by IMechE. 

The Institution encourages young 
people into engineering through 
other schemes including 

* Leonardo da Vinci Lectures - 
organised for 1986/87 by GKN 
Technology Ltd. 

* Teacher Fellowships in industry 

* Schools Liaison Service 

* Isaac Newton Lectures 



YOUNG ENGINEERS/2 


This year’s Young Engineer for 
Britain competition is a bumper one 
as 70 finalists gather today at 
London’s Wembley Conference 
Centre. Prize money has been 
doubled so that the winners* schools 
or organizations can also benefit by 
getting cash for much needed 
equipment. 

After nine years the competition 
is the leading one of its kind in 
Britain, said Dr Kenneth Miller, 
director general of the Engineering 
Council which organizes the event 
The council took it over in 1983 
from the Department of Trade and 
Industry which still pays lor the 
overheads. 

Further enhancement of the com- 
petition is already being planned for 
next year. It has been open to those 
between 12 and 19 but it will drive 
deeper in 1987 by including II- 
year-olds. 

Another new departure still to 
come is the selection by the council 
of the most promising youngster to 
take up a three-month student 
placement at America's National 
Aeronautical and Space Agency 
(Nasal It is the result of an offer by 
the British National Space Agency. 

The winner of the Young En- 
gineer title gets a trophy and £1 .250 
for bis or her school or backing 
organization. There are cash prizes, 
ranging from £200 to £600 in seven 
categories, each with three winning 
places. Category winners get a 


commemorative plaque. There is a 
special prize of £200 for the best 
project entered by a girl as part of 
the council's initiative on Women 
Into Science and Engineering 

As well as the cash prizes most 
winners will earn an industrial visit 
to leading companies. The cost of 
both is met by participating indus- 
trial companies which this year are 
putting up about £1 50.000 in total. 

About half of that goes to the 
winners' schools and organizations, 
the remainder covering winners’ 
prizes and die cost of the visits 
which often involve trips overseas. 

Dr Miller said* “The competition 
i$ designed to foster and strengthen 
links between education and in- 


muscle stretching machine, a new 
style of hospital wheel chair and a 
shopping bag designed specifically 
for use on a baby's buggy. ‘ 

There are just under 12 giris 
among the finalists, including Susan 
Miles from London, who invented 
the buggy shopping bag and Rachel 
Brown of Frodsham, whose project 
. is the walking aid for blind toddlers. 
A three-giii team from Derby, with 
a leg alignment system for knee- 
joint replacement operations, con- 
sists of Caroline Brooks, Lucy 
Frederick and Jacqueline Lane. 

Beverley Manning from Chase 
Terrace in Staffordshire has come 
up with electronic play kits for the 
very young. At Lackham College of 


Marks for originality, enterprise 
skill and scientific application 


diisuy and so to develop the interest 
of young people in engineering and 
technology and in careers in 
industry.” 

The finalists will be demonstrat- 
ing their various projects today. 

The Princess of Wales, who is to 
present the competition prizes, will 
meet the inventors. The projects 
include a portable theatre lighting 
system, an automatic tomato plant 
watering device, a walking aid for 
blind toddlers, a table tennis train- 
ing machine, a smoke detector, a 


Agriculture, near Chippenham, Fay 
Champion and a male colleague, 
Jeremy Da we, developed a silage 
additive carrier. 

The national finalists were se- 
lected at 12 regional competitions 
held around the UK. In today's 
competition they will be awarded 
marks on a number of counts. These 
include originality and enterprise, 
engineering and design skill and the 
application of relevant scientific 
principles, together with the visual, 
oral and written presentation of 
their projects. Among other factors 


i winner i 

which will be considered are 
marketability, usefulness and 
whether the project meets economic 
and social needs. 

Among companies providing 
industrial visits as pan of the 
rewards for the competition win- 
ners are the TI engineering group. 
Albright & Wilson, the General 
Electric Company (GEC), Rover 
Group, Vickers, Marconi Electron- 
ics (part of GEC). Smiths Industries, 
George Wimpey. IBM. Baker Per- 
kins, IC1 with Unilever, Stone & 
Webster. VSEL, BP. Shell UK and 
British Aerospace. 

A number of professional bodies 
have also arranged visits or given 
cash prizes including the Institution 
of Chemical Engineers, the Institute 
of Road Transport Engineers, the 
Institution of Mechanical En- 
gineers. the Plastics and Rubber 
Institute, die Institute of Measure- 
ment andControI, the Institute of 
Metals the Institution of Produc- 
tion, Engineers, the Institution of 

Engineering Designers and the In- . 
stitute of Cost and Management 
Accountants. 

Cash prizes have also come from 
the Smallpeioe Trust. TI group, 
Racal-Chubb, National West- 
minster Bank, the Electricity Coun- 
cil. British Telecom, the National 
Electronics Council, ECIS, Poly- 
technic of the South Bank, 
CourtauJds, VSEL. Ewbank Preece, 
ESP1 and The Engineer magazine. 


<.'| s 





Rachel Brown, aged 18, of Helsby. 
has designed and built this walk- 
ing aid for blind toddlers 



Which of these finalists will pick up a prize? 


The national finalists in this 
year's Young Engineer for Brit- 
ain competition are: 

Maxwell Childs, Bristol Cathe- 
dral School: bicycle safe brakes; 
Beverley Manning, Chase Ter- 
race High School, Staffordshire: 
electronic play bits; Nicholas 
Porter, Andrew Sntton. 
Ay lest one School, Hereford: 
electronic tachometer; Sadiquat 
Mughal, Elizabeth Fry School, 
London El 3, and Holly 
Kelleber. Little Ilford School, 
London El 2, switch system for 
the disabled: Robin Astley and 
Robin Weir, Kenton Com- 
prehensive School, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne: child Mind aid; 
Matthew Austin, Manchester 
Grammar School, and Gregory 
Scott, Urmston Grammar 
School. Manchester, cycle 
safety aid: Staart Foster, 
Coxgreen School, Maidenhead, 
Berkshire, boating cox aid; Mat- 
thew Barker, Edtington Com- 
prehensive School, Doncaster: 
muscle stretcher; David 
Preskett Hampton School. 
Middlesex: car-exhaust 

analyser; Leslie Joseph, Haw- 
thorn Comprehensive School, 
Pontypridd: buoy grab; John 
Candish. Highbury Secondary 
School. Salisbury: wind 
measurement; Philip Moran, 
Lea Manor High School, Luton: 


remote computer control; Stuart 
Poo ley. Lord Lawson Com- 
prehensive School, Chester-!*- 
Street. Durham: Venetian-blind 
security; Piers Stansfield, 
Lorefto School, Mnssdbmgh, 
Midlothian, Scotland: anto 
photography development; 
Alistair Wilson, Loretto School, 
Musselburgh: anto plant 
wateren Peter Staaey. Robert 
Clack Comprehensive School, 
Dagenham: barman's electronic 
kin Ndl Loader. Sandhurst 
School. Camber ley, Surrey: per- 
sonal alarm system; Jason 
Greig. St Dimstan's School, 
Glastonbury: robot arm; Domi- 
nic Tighe, St Edmund 
Arrowsmith School Whiston, 
Liverpool: electronic plotter; 
Christopher Randal L, Ashby de 
la Zouch Grammar School 
Leicestershire: wheelchair 
transporter; Gary ' Bates, Na- 
tional School. HncknaU, Not- 
tinghamshire: modelling aid 
Simon Smith. Westminster 
School London: web-furling 
roller reefing; Susan Miles, 
Whitefield School London, 
Cricklewood: buggy bags; Paul 
Davies, Ysgol y Creuddyn, Llan- 
dudno, Wales: smoke alarm; 
Stephen Cartland, Richard 
Diossy, Coxgreen School. 
Maidenhead: CAD-CAM 
teacher; Keith Chunky and 




i 

in. 


Engineering is the perfect career 
for people with 

a distinctly limited imagination . . . 



... or so some would have us believe 

It’s funny the ideas some people have about engineering. 

Although we don’t always expect genius, at Hawker Siddeley we’ve always 
recognised talent 

With annual sales of around £1600 million and 40,000 employees 
worldwide, it’s taken flair and imagination to keep us in the forefront of pioneering 
developments in engineering. 

If Hawker Siddeley was around at the time we would like to think Leonardo 
would have considered a career with us. 




HAWKERI ISIDDELEY 


HAWKER &DOELEY GROUP PUBLIC UMTEDCOMFftNY 
18 ST JAMES' S SQUARE LONDON SWT i 4LI TRS’HOE 01 330 61 77 TELEX 9! 9011 


Jonathan Fuller. Dowlands 
School Hassocks, West Sussex: 
aerial photography; Adrian Coo- 
per, Mark Godden and Myles 
Kirby. Homewood School, 
Tenterden, Kent: computerized 
tensile tester; Clive Ashmore, 
Andrew Bennet, Warren Rob- 
erts and Michael Tolley. Ridge- 
wood Comprehensive School 
Scawsby. Humberside: 
construction cable market; An- 
drew Harding, Bonadstoue 
Community School Lancing, 
West Sussex: dual-purpose cy- 
cle; Andrew McAlister, Gram- 
mar School Carridrfergns, 
Northern Ireland: computer 


drawing; Andrew Bell Cowes 
High School Isle of Wight: dub 
master; Ian Hutchinson. Upper 
School East Barnet: ski bind 
tester Rachel Brown. High 
School Frodsham, Cheshire: 
walk aid for blind toddlers; 
Chris Armstrong, Kingdown 
School Warminster, Wiltshire: 
variable turbine genera ton Ste- 
phen Wittungmu. Sixth Form 
College, Warminster: elevating 
wheelchair; Timothy Bradley. 
Sixth Form College, Ludlow, 
Shropshire: powered wheel- 
barrow; Eryk Mozejko. Sixth 
Form College, Lnton: spectro- 
scope; Peter Rutty, Sixth Form 


College, Lnton: computerized 
weather station; Bleddyn Da- 
vies, Pen-y-Dre High School 
Merthyr Tydfil: heritage-trail 
equipment; Andrew Burchell 
Royal Grammar School New- 
castie-opon-Tyae: portable light 
control Peter Badger, West 
Bridgford School. Nottingham: 
table-tennis trainer. Caroline 
Brooks. Lucy Frederick and 
Jacqueline Lane, College of 
Further Education. Sooth 
Mackworth, Derby: kg aligner 
for knee-joint operations; Fay 
Champion and Jeremy Da we, 
Lackham College of Agri- 
culture, Chippenham. Wiltshire: 


silage additive carrier Alexan- 
der Dowson and James 
Strachan. Mariey High School 
Leeds: computerized stage light- 
ing; Roger Evans. Quality 
Assurance Centre, Bromley, 
south London: broken-drill re- 
mover; Mark Fallon and Stew- 
art T wilt on. Lucas Electrical 
Birmingham: digital-code 
reader: Paul Edwards and Keith 
Goddard. Marconi Camberiey: 

communicator; Paul Bolton. 
John Mnllenger, Garry Oldfield 
and Stephen Parkinson. Vickers 
Instruments. York: child- 
development toy 


Engineering a future with polymers 


Plastics and rubbers are the high tech BnginMring materials of the future. Already 
these materials are befog used for applications unimaginable ten years ago and 
material producers are capable now of designing a grade of product for a specific 
application. Wb have no doubt that polymers wffl be used increasingly in future to 
replace more traditional engineering materials, due to their flexibility and ease of 
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• ^ 

’ 1:1 
1 *■£ 




Ideas that make 
commercial sense 




Three earlier winners in the 
a n nu al Young Engineer com- 
petitions will be shewing in a 
special ' exhibition as part of 
J* year's competition how 
they have gone on to. exploit 
their ideas commercially. 

Joanne Gambe.il, now 18 
and living at Knutsford in 
Cheshire, won a special prize 
last year with, her collapsible 
carrycot which she designed 
and made. She has since 
formed a company, Joco, to 
start predating the c a rrycots 
on a commercial basis. Ten 
retail chains are interested. 

Andrew Lavender is another 
18-year-old in the north-west 
who was one of last year's 
finalists with an anti-roll de- 
vice for wheelchairs. At 
Sattney in Cheshire he has 
decided to develop, mancdac- 
fure and market the device 
himself. He has set up a 
contract catering business to 
finance the project 

Christopher' Whjttmgham, 
18, of Trent College, Notting- 
ham, is searching for wider 
applications for his invention, 
a tree iqjector. Christopher 


was in the competition finals 
last year. Hb injector releases 
insecticide safely into trees, 
sack as the on palm. Market 
research it now being carried 
oat. 

The exhibition to which 
they will contribute win be 

called Engineerfm Enterprise, 

aimed at showing finalists In 
the Young Engineer com- 
petition how they can convert 
their Ideas into commercially 
successful products. Advice 
wiD be given on whether 
inventions have commercial 
potential and bow that can be 
developed. 

An active school cooperative 
is setting up an exhibit to show 
how schools can develop, 
manufacture and market their 

own engineering prodnets, giv- 
ing pupils first-hand experi- 
ence of commercial realities. 
The co-operative is the Chair 
Buggy Company formed by 
Oakdale Comprehensive 
School at Gwent, in Wales, 
commemorating the chair 
boggy from the school which 
won a prize, in the 1983' 
competitions. 



Joanne Gam bell, aged 18, won the 1985 special prize for Oils collapsible carry-cot; Andrew 
Lavender was one of last year's finalists with an anti-roll device for wheelchairs 


Excitement of the young challenge 


A basket of initiatives by the 
Engineering Council is tar- 
geted on increasing 
schoolchildren's awareness of 
the prospects offered by en- 
gineering. Among them is a 
regionalized * scheme, the 
Opening Windows on En- 
gineering service, whose 
planned- expansion should 
soon lake it into most second- 
ary schools. 

Graham Anthony, the 
council's industry director, 
said: “Essentially we are trying 
to get more design-and-make 
activities into the schools, 
linking theory and practice 
and helping children with 
things, but working with peo- 
ple and improving economic 
awareness." 

ft stops their being entirely 
boxed in by the concept that, 
above all, examinations must 
be passed, he said. 

The windows scheme, a free 
service to schools, started as a 
pilot experiment just over 10 
years ago, supported initially 
by the big three professional 
bodies in engineering — the 
Institution of Civil Engineers, 
the Institution of Methanical 
Engineers and the Insjjtution 
of Electrical Engineers*^ 

It was subsequently devel- 
oped by the Council of En- 
gineering Institutions, the old 
umbrella organization for. the 
professional bodies in en- 
gineering, and then from 1984 
by the Engineering Council 
after it took over the main 
work of the CH. 


The central aim was to get 
practising professional en- 
gineers to tell youngsters what 
engineering was afl about. It is 
directed at boys and girls 
between 12 and 15. To put the 
message across in a bigger 
way, the Engineering Council 
is developing a regional task 
force of younger engineers. 
They will be mostly between 
25 and 30-years old, the sort of 
people, who, as Mr Anthony 
explained, are “still . in touch 
with' their own school days". 

He said: “These young en- 
gineers are trained how to 
present their jobs to a school 
audience. There is no attempt 
to give direct careers advice. 
“They talk about the excite- 
ment and challenge of then- 
jobs, thus sowing a seed at a 

A five-year plan 
aimed at schools 

crucial point in a -child’s 
development” 

Because take-up on the 
service in the past has been 
patchy, latterly involving only 
about 5 per cent of secondary 
sqhoo]|&. . the council has 
launched a five-year plan to 
reach 80 per cent of Britain’s 
7,000-plus secondary schools. 

The service could even- 
tually be used by almost 5,000 
schools, Mr Anthony believes. 
This means each of the 
counriTs 19 regional organiza- 
tions will need about 80 


. “window openers" on their 
books. 

Each will normally do the 
job, which means giving a 40- 
minute talk to school groups, 
for about three years, so once 
initial recruitment is com- 
pleted there will still be a need 
to train up to 30 openers each 
year. A big recruitment cam- 
paign starts at the end of this 
month. 

Industrial companies affili- 
ated to the council are being 
asked to encourage their 
young engineers to help with 
the service: Mr Anthony said: 
“We want more, young en- 
gineers to be active and to be 
seen." 

He has been impressed with 
the quality of those already 
becoming involved. He 
added: “They are not only 
extremely competent at their 
jobs, they are eloquent, articu- 
late and fun as well as being 
committed, caring people. " 

He also sees as crucial the 
development of the link be- 
tween industrial companies, 
young engineers, teachers and 
pupils. When the yoqng en- 
gineers have finished their 
stint on the windows service 
they will be’ encouraged to 
become school governors. 
This will not only cement 
relations between schools, the 
industry and the engineering 
profession, but could also 
taring direct influence to bear 
on a school's academic culture 
amt curriculum. 

Among academics there was 


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a small group of vociferous 
people who sail saw education 
as needing to be totally remote 
from industry, said Mr An- 
thony. But by and large he was 
finding among teachers noth- 
ing but willingness to move 
forward and change. He said: 
“These teachers are now 
aware of the economic reali- 
ties and are very positive in 
their attitudes." 

That this is badly needed is 
all too apparent. There has 
been a dearth of engineering 
skills for some years now. 
There is not only an engineer- 
ing skills crisis now and for 
some years but the population 
Of youngsters ripe for educa- 
tion beyond 18 is declining. 

In 1981 there were 900,000 
18-year-olds, but by the mid- 

Up to 200 could 
be involved 

die of the next decade this 
figure will be down by a third 
to 600,000. As Mr Anthony 
pointed out, it means that if 
the needs of modern engineer- 
ing are to be met the industry 
will have to get a much bigger 
slice of the smaller cake. 

“This is at a time when 
most people see engineering in 
terms only of redundancies, 
job losses and factory closures 
and at a time when there is so 
much growth in the services 
sector that traditional middle- 
class people tell their children 
to go into the service in- 
dustries because there they see 
security," Mr Anthony said. 

It was true that the number 
of craftsmen in engineering 
was still going down and he 
expected the decline to con- 
tinue. But for skilled jobs, 
involving the technologists, 
scientists and technicians, de- 
mand was going up, he 


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YOUNG ENGINEERS/3 


And it came to pass—the council had divine inspiration 


pointed out, and added: “The 
demand for those at technicial 
level and above is insatiable." 

But what kind of problem 
would be freed by anybody 
taking the engineering route 
academically and then opting 
out later? Mr Anthony said: 
“Anybody with an under- 
standing of the world of 
technology is extremely well 
placed to do any Job. It 
involves judgment, financial 

flrilU and in handling 

people. It involves all the life 
skills for pretty well any job.. 
We would argue that even if 
somebody could not get a job 
in a particular engineering 
area they would have the skills 
to adapt to a whole range of 
activities." 

Another localized initiative 
is the neighbourhood engineer 
scheme aimed at getting in 
place two to three engineers in 
every area to help teachers, 
parents and pupils on any- 
thing relating to engineering. 
This can range from careers 
advice to helping to set up 
school projects or arranging 
visits to local industrial 
companies. 

An experiment has been 
launched, centred on Cardiff 
the target being schools in 
south Wales, with up to 200 
likely to be involved. 

Mr Anthony said: “If we are 
to be effective we have to 
cover the whole country with 
schemes like this. That is a 
major challenge but we are not 
playing games. This is a 
deadly serious business. 

"Unless the right messages 
get through and alter cultural 
attitudes to job creation then a 
fundamental objective is not 
being achieved." 

Another initiative has been 
to promote a problem-solving 
approach in the nation's 
25,000 primary schools. 

With primary school teach- 
ers being predominantly 
women and arts graduates, a 
key factor in introducing the 
new approach will be in 
influencing teacher training. 
But the council is also study- 
ing how to encourage existing 
teachers and the schools to 
back the idea. 


Is nothing sacred in Indnstiy 
Year? The Engineering Coun- 
cil. in one of its more inspired 
attempts to coavert the 
masses to the wonders of 
engineering, has written to 250 
church leaders offering a ser- 
mon for use in the pulpit or 
parish magazine to mark In- 
dustry Year, writes Teresa 
Poole. 

“Was Noah the first 
engineer?" the sermon reads. 
“It could be argued that God 
Himself, in creating the earth 
and all the creatures and 
wonders upon it, could be so 
honoured. Many would sug- 
gest. however, that God was 
the first scientist.’' 

Preaching engineering's im- 
portance to the industrial 
success of Britain has been a 
major part of Industry Year. 
Sir Geoffrey Chandler, In- 
dustry Year’s director, said: “1 
think the words industry and 
engineering are almost 
synonymous in the way that 
the year has treated them. 

“Engineering is a .vital part 
of industry, u one gets the 
approach to industry right, 
one also gets the approach to 
engineering right. Engineering 
is the part, industry is the ! 
whole." 

If the British public has a < 
low opinion of industry, en- < 
gineering particularly suffers < 
from it. Dr Kenneth Miller, < 
director general of the En- 
gineering Council and chair- : 
man of the Engineering 
Working Group for Industry 
Year, said: “The rest of the 


Was old 
Noah 
the first? 


world does not have this hang- 
up." 

He has spearheaded a cam- 
paign which has had the 
backing of the Engineering 
Industry Training Board, the 
Equal Opportunities Commisr 
sion, the Women's Engineer- 
ing Society and all 45 
engineering bodies. The mes- 
sage is dean Britain has a 
deep-seated cultural problem 
in not valuing engineering, 
industry' and the creation of 
wealth. 

Employers have been told 
to open their doors to families, 
schools and communities and 
to set up joint activities with 
people in fiulber and higher 
education. Institutions nave 
been persuaded to highlight 
the contribution engineering 
makes to the overall success of 
British industry. And en- 
gineers have been encouraged 
to give talks in schools and 
clubs, to contribute to careers 
events and to persuade 
employers to provide “open 
days”. 

Perhaps the greatest empha- 
sis has been on strengthening 
links with educational 
establishments. “We have to 
get industry into tbe schools." 


says Dr Miller. This means 
talking to both pupils and 
teachers. The students need to 
be persuaded to consider en- 
gineering as a career while 
teachers sometimes have to be 
updated both about the de- 
mands of industry and what it 
can offer. A programme. 
Opening the windows on 
Engineering, was already is 
place before this year began; it 
provides newly qualified en- 
gineers to talk to school- 
children about their careers 

So far about five per cent of 
schools have been covered, 
but the aim is to reach 80 per 
cent in five years. 

Dr Miller said: “We can go 
to schools and say there are 
jobs." An Engineering Council 

survey in late 1985 found just 
1 per cent unemployment 
among qualified engineers. 

Sir Geoffrey says; “If people 
understand that engineering 
actually makes things, they 
will realise that it is more 
interesting than most of our 
jobs." 

During Industry Year, 
about half the nation's 7.400 
secondary schools have linked 
with companies and more 
than 3.000 people around 
Britain ate involved in a 
national network of Industry 
Year groups. 

By working through a vari- 
ety of organizations including 
schools, unions, churches and 
industry. Industry Year has 
tried to reach all pans of 
society. The sermon even 
prompted letters of support 
from two bishops. 





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COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
September 16: The Princess 
Anne. Mrs Mark Phillips, today 
opened- the new Trinity Con- 
tainer Terminal at the Port of 
Felixstowe. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty's Lord- 
Lieutenant for Suffolk (Sir 
Joshua Rowley, Bt) and the 
Chairman, European Ferries 
Group (Mr G. Parker). 

Afterwards The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips. Presi- 
dent of the Missions to Seamen, 
visited the Felixstowe Seafarers' 
Centre (Chaplain, the Reverend 
R. Chalkley). 

Her Royal Highness, artended 
by Mrs Malcolm Wallace, trav- 
elled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
September 16: The Duke of 
Gloucester left Heathrow Air- 
port. London, this morning to 
visit Moscow. Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel Sir Simon Bland was in 
attendance. 

The Duchess of Gloucester. 


President, National Children's 
Home, this morning received 
The Reverend Dr Gordon 
Barritt on relinquishing his 
appointment as Principal. 

In the evening Her Royal 
Highness was present at the 
Harley Street Ball in aid of the 
British Paediatric Association's 
Special Surveillance Unit at 
Grosvenor House Hotel, Lon- 
don. Wl. 

Mrs Michael Wigfey was in 
attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
September 16: The Duchess of 
Kent, Patron of the British 
Epilepsy Association, this 
morning attended the Golden 
Jubilee Conference and North- 
ern European Epilepsy Meeting 
at York University and later laid 
the Foundation Slone for Mar- 
tin House Children's Hospice, 
Boston Spa. This afternoon Her 
Royal Highness visited the 
Yorkshire Electricity Board. 
Gelderd Road, Leeds. 

Miss Sarah Partridge was in 
attendance. 


A memorial service for Lord 
Woolley will be held in Chester 
Cathedral on Wednesday. Octo- 
ber 8, at 2.00 pm. 


Marriages 

Dr NJ£- Cheese 
and Miss H. Probert 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. September 13. at St 
Paul's. Knightsbridge, between 
Dr Nicholas Cheese and Miss 
Helen Probert. The Right Rev 
Philip Ridsdale officiated, as- 
sisted by the Rev Christopher 
Couriautd. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Louise Agg, Susan 
Black. Fiona Robertson and 
Susannah Rashleigh Belcher. Dr 
Dominic McHugh was best 
man. 

A reception was held at 
Dartmouth House, Mayfair, 
and the honeymoon will be 
spent abroad. 

Mr J. Heddle. MP 
and Mrs J. Webber 
A service of blessing of the 
marriage of Mr John Heddle, 
MP, of London and Lichfield, 
and Mrs Janet Webber, of 
Oialvington, Sussex, took place 
at St Margaret's. Westminster, 
on Friday, September 12. Canon 
Trevor Beeson officiated. 

A reception was held in the 
State Appartments of the 
Speaker's House, by permission 
of Mr Speaker. 


Dr AJ. Montgomery 
and Miss NX- Hill 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. September 6. 1986. at 
St John's Church. Forfar, of Dr 
Alistair Montgomery, eldest son 
of Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs 
John Montgomery, of Easter 
Culreacb, Grantown-on-Spey, 
Moray, and Miss Nicola HiU, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Michael Hill, of Taylor's Wynd, 
Forfar, Angus. The Rev Frank 
While officiated, assisted by the 
Rev F.H. Magee and the Rev 
A.S. Brunton. 

The bride, who was given in 
'marriage by her father, was 
attended by Sophie Hill, Jiilie 
Conran-Smith, Annabel 
Conran-Smilh, Philippa 
Greaves, Rachel Greaves, Ra- 
chel Montgomery. Laura Tay- 
lor. Toby Montgomery and 
Michael Thomson. Mr Neil 
Grant was best man. 

Mr B.Ozard 
and Miss PJ. Gray 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. September 6. at The 
Town Church. St Peter Port, 
Guernsey, of Mr Barry Ozard. 
only son of Mrs E Chiswell. of 
Plymouth, and the late Mr R. 
Ozard, of Guernsey, and Miss 
Pippa Gray, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs W. Gray, of 
Cambridge. 


Wealth of colour in auto 


By Alan Toogood, Horticulture Correspondent 


The Royal Horticultural Society's Great Au- 
tumn Show will leave the visitor in no doubt that 
there is a wealth of plants for providing colour at 
this time of year, when so many gardens are 
decidedly dreary. 

One can have drifts of blue gentians, as 
demonstrated by Edrom Nurseries, of 
CoWingham, who gained a gold medal, or carpets 
ofliiac cdchkums (autumn crocuses) as featured 
. by Jacques Amand, of London. 

Roses can create a great deal of colour in the au- 
tumn garden, from flowers, foliage and hips. Hip- 
bearing kinds, such as Rosa rubrifolia and R. 
movesfi 'Geranium' are being featured by John 
Mattock, of Oxford, as well as blooms of old and 
new roses, such as the recently introduced scarlet 
shrub rose, ‘Kordes’ Robusta’ with attractive 
purplish foliage. 

Trees and shrubs with autumn flowers, leaf 
colour and berries are legion. At the show can be 
seen eucrypbias, e v er gr ee n shrubs with white 
flowers being shown by Burncoose and Sooth- 
down Nurseries, of Redruth; the oak, Quercus 
rubra, with brilliant leaf colour, seen on foe stand 
of Notcutts Nurseries, of Woodbridge, who 
gained a gold medal; btuedemaiis twining among 
foe flame-coloured foliage of foe smoke bush 
(cotinus). as featured by Hillier Nurseries, of 
Winchester and foe deep gold ever gr een foliage 
of Choisya ‘Sundance', which is being featured by 
Bressingham Gardens, of Diss. 


The Royal Botanic Garden, Kew. and 
Wakehuret Place. Ardingly. Sussex, have an 
historical exhibit showing the plants associated 
with, or introduced to Britain fw the Danish 
botanist. Dr Nathaniel Waliich ( 1786-I8S4X one- 
time superintendent of foe Calcutta Botanic 
Garden. Among the plants with autumn interest 
in this gold-medal exhibit are Leyct&eria 
formosa. Hydrangea aspera, Rosa maavphyUa, 
Cauitfeya spieata and Cotoneasterjrigidus. 

Other exhibitors who gained gold medals are: 

Tom BeqMngton. or Dtseworth. Derby, and itattarOetos 
Nursery, of Bourne wbo art rtwwing Oahttax County 

Park Nursery, of Hora enu ren. showing reck-oanMn ptann 
and dwarf shrubs: Castle Dyke Nursery, of Lincoln, 
exhibiting fuettsw Three Counties Nurseries, of Oritfpqrt. 
who have staged a targe exnttstt of garden pinks: and 
Siapei ey W ater Gardena, of Namwfcn. who are 
demonstrating mat evei a garden pool can be cokxirfid in 
aulunui tf planted with water aun. 

The following plants received foe award of 
merit: 

,-kvr rvfixtree. scarlet and gold wkno leaf colour, 
shown oy Lord Afierconway ana the National Trust of 
SodnanL Ciwyd: any chrysanthemum -Payton Dole*, 
deep pink, cxhfMlcd oy Frank Rowe, of Wellington. 
Somerset: nw chrysanthemum jemxe weddur. ngM 
pink, and spray chrysanthemum -Cube* DoS', braoxe. doth 

shown oy SasU Masters, of Weffiugftw. Somerset 
L/mofiium gmehui. herbaceous plant with sprays of raauva 

flowers, .shown by the (Mrector. Royal Botanic Gardena. 

Kew: (Uomodosntm kasueMitm ‘Bright Eyes’, pate green 
and purple orchid, exhibited by David Stead OtehA. « f 
Loflhowe: and Fhiianofars mow MUiata. wMM. ptnfc- 
upped orchid, shown by tbe Eric Young Orchid 
Foundation-, of Victoria village. Jersey. 

Tbe show is open today from 10am to 7pm, 
and tomorrow from. 1 0am to 5pm. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr SJVIJB- Connelly 
and Miss AJ* Johns 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, son of Mr and 
Mis David Connelly, of Edin- 
burgh. and Alison, elder daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Eric Johns, of 
Harrogate. 

Mr I.B. Click 
and Miss R.O-S- Efaan 
The engagement is announced 
between Ian, son of Dr and Mis 
Louis Glide, of Halifax. York- 


shire. and Roxane, da 
Dr Raphael Eban, of 
Oxfordshire, and Mrs 
Levin, of St John's 
London. 


iter of 


Arthur 

Wood, 


Birthdays today 

Professor Sir Donald Acheson. 
60; Sir Frederick Ashton. OM. 
CH, 82; foe Right Rev TJ. 
Bavin, 51; Mr David Binder, 
29: Air Chief Marshal Sir David 
Craig. 57; General Sir Kenneth 
Darling, 77; Miss Jennifer 
Dickson. 50; Professor Sir John 
Hale. 63: Sir Desmond Heap. 
79; Sir Frision How, 89; Mr 
Stirling Moss, 57; Miss Mary 
Stewart. 70; Professor W. McG 
Stewart. 86; Mr Vernon C. 
Thompson, 81; Dr Elizabeth 
Wilkinson. 77; Sir Isaac 
Wolfson. 89. 


Latest wills 

Captain Robert Edward Dudley 
Ryder. VC of Inkpen. Berk- 
shire. the former Conservative 
MP for Merton and Morden. 
who won his VC at St Nazaire in 
1 942. left estate worth £127, 1 12 
Mrs Alexandrina Dewar Wight 
Bartlett, of Ponteland, 
Northumberland, left estate val- 
ued at £1,266.952 net. She left 
her home and a quarter of foe 
residue of her estate to New- 
castle University. 

Eileen Norah Baker, of 
Wokingham. Berkshire. left es- 
tate valued at £905.690 net 


Mr P. Mann 
and Miss J.MC Gunn 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Philip, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs P.R. Mann, of Louth, 
Lincolnshire, and Jessica Mary 
Cassandra, daughter of Dr and 
Mrs A.D.G. Gunn, ofWaigrave, 
Berkshire. 

Mr D. Suttie 

and Miss A. Drury 

The engagement is announced- 

between Donald, elder son of 

Mr and Mrs George Suttie, of 

Christchurch. New 7** land 


Science report 


‘Moses’ sponge may 
act as drugs test 


and Amanda, second daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Gordon 
Wanniarachy, of The Lodge. 
Stone Street, Boxford, Suffolk. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr Hugh Artrathaott to be 
Ambassador to Romania, in 
succession to Mr Philip 
Me Kearney, who will be retiring 
from the Diplomatic Service. 
Mr Nicholas Spreckky to be 
British High Commissioner to 
Malaysia in succession to Mr 
D.H. Gillmore. 

Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Chappie to be Colonel, 2nd 
King Edward VI I’s Own Gurka 
Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles), in 
succession to Field Marshal Sir 
Edwin BramalL 

Mr John Concanaou, MP, to be 
a member of the Common- 
wealth War Graves Commis- 
sion from October 1, in 
succession to Lord Wallace of 
Coslany. 

Mr Kenneth Peter. Mr Ian 
Dallison and Mr Dennis 
Rawiinson to be members of foe 
Transport TribunaL 


A new way of testing dregs for 
certain Plaasses, using a sponge 

♦ha* mmiifc j| h uman disease 

process, has been perfected by 
scientists in ^ United 
The discovery was described 
recently to a conference at tbe 
Woods Hole Marine Biological 
Research Laboratory, in 
Mxssadmsetts. 

The way in which its cells 
dump together is remarkably 
similar to the damping of 
human white blood cells in 
arthritis, gout and many other 

aKaaaaac that pMutaw* mfhmmtt. 

boo, according to Dr Gerald 
Weissmann, director of 
rheumatology at New York 
University Medical Centre. The 
red-bearded sponge of Moses, 
believed to be the oldest mnfti- 
cdlular organism on Earth, is 
used. 

Dr Wtissmaan said this latest 
finding , made in collaboration 
with Dr Moseley Waite, of the 
Bowman Gray School of Medl- 
crae in Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina, shows that the series 
of chemical steps thought to be 
important in t riggering human 

iaflammarip a OCCMS in erarti y 

the same way in the sponge. 

Dr Wcissmann's observa- 
tions, which involve basic sci- 
ence and thas have no immediate 
applications to treating disease, 
could help doctors nndostaad 
such diseases as arthritis, tapes, 
adult respiratory distress sya- 
drome and certain oomptieatioas 
of coronary bypass surgery, all 
of which involve inflammation. 
Dr Weissmann said. 

Ij] h umane f rllin mnluflw 

of fatty adds, which enter the 
body in food, have been shown; 


By a Special Correspondent 

be converted to chemicals called 
diglycerides. These act in tor 
wish yet another group of sub- 
stances to trigger the dumping 
of white in inflammatory 
diseases. 

The scientists have shown 
that the same thing happens in 
the spoage. F a rt he r m ore, they 
have demonstrated that a drug 
called cokhkme, which blocks 
the dumping of white cells in 
humans with gout, wfll also 
block the damping of sponge 
ceils. 

Dr Weissmaan has been 
studying the red-bearded 
sponge, Mtcrodoma proDfera, 
for four summer seasons at the 
Marine Biological Laboratory. 
He had shown earlier tint 
* aspirin and nearly a d oz en other 
so-called non-steroidal anti- 
inflammatory drugs used to treat 
inflammation in humans will 
block the dumping of sponge 
cells. 

He has also shown that the 
active irritant in poison ivy, 
which causes itching in humans 
by pr o d uc ing inflammation, will 
also produce damping in sponge 
cells. 

The role of damping in 
sponge cells is presumably In 
enable the sponge to recover 
from injury. Dr Wefasmaim 
said. If a tiny piece of tbe spouse 
is torn off, cells there will begin 
to dump *■»<< eventually that 
missing piece wfll be replaced. 

The inflammatory response in 
humans can be v iewe d , from an 
evolutionary perspective, as an 
unsuccessful attempt by the 
body to regenerate tissue lost 
through iqjnry. 


Luncheon Gourlay, M Luc Waulers and 

■t . n. .. „ „ Colon el G Merinos. 

United World Colleges 

Mr Maneck Dalai presided at a 0 . _ 

luncheon given by the United OeiTlCe reCeDuOD 
World Colleges at the Royal 


Over-Seas League yesterday in 
honour of Prince Philippe of 
Belgium, Patron of foe UWC 
Belgian National Committee. 
Others present inducted; 

The Belgian Ambassador, Sir 
Michael Parsons, Sir Ian 


RAF School of Catering 
Wing Commander MJ. Arm- 
strong, Commanding Officer of 
tbe RAF School of Catering, and 
staff held a Battle of Britain 
cocktail party last night at the St 
Omer Barracks, Aldershot. 


Births , 1 Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BUITHS, MARRIAGES. 
DEATHS and W MEM0HIUM 
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FORTHCOMING NJUnuGES. UEDHU6S 
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Ilrnnlil ItrnnitfllirUiidOodnriiMi 
iih- MtHui kingdom, and I whi destroy II 
lium nil I hr imr o( thr ncDi 
Amo. « B 


BIRTHS 


ARftON ERSKINE-TULLOCH - On 

September 1 5Ui. to Jerry and PcIU. a 
son. Louis Gerard. 

HUY - On September 12Qi. at The 
Royal Burks Hospital, to Richard and 
Judith (nee Fergtnoni. a daughter. 
Miranda Frtialy. a staler (or Hester 
a na Edward 

CARPENTER - On September 8m. to 
Rosemary (nee Henaryi and 
Siepnen. a son. Alexander rxnid. 
COTTON On August 31* at SI 
Thomas' HospUal. lo Martlnr (nee du 
Roy do Biirquy) and John a son. Ed- 
ward Totjy. a brolfier for Tanguy 
and Qwriolle. 

COX - On SeMetnber 10th. in 
Cennany. to Gesche and Stephen, a 
son. Thomas William Peter. 

FLYNN - On September tlth. at AU 
Saints Hospital. Chatham, lo \lvka 
iiht Niehcn) and Alun. a son. James 
Peter 

CORE - On SeptemtiH' 15m. to Pautlne 
i pee Wren) and Martin, a danghier. a 
sister for Thomas. WlUtam and 
Alexander. 

HAGUE On September 10th, I986 .Ui 
R ortiford. Essex, lo Sylvia and Colin. 
a son. Ross James. 

HARRIS ■ On September 0th. In Bru- 
net. to Lucy inee Kinsey) and Qrispta. 
a son. wimam. a brother for George. 
KENNEDY . on Seotenuser iSth. to 
Julie inw Allan) and Stanhen. a son. 
Andrew. 

KERMAN - on September icxn. at the 
Hoathcrwood Hospital. Ascot to 
Angela <nee Wade) and Michael, a 
son. James Miehaei. a brother for 
NKhoU 

LYTTUTOH - On September 15th. at 
the Portland Hosptiai. to Trevor and 
Ztppt. a son. Daniel Simeon RaphaeL 
a brother for Maya and Dtkia. 
MACMERSOM ■ On September 9th. lo 
Sara Jane inee Comorne) and Angus, 
a daughter. Qiariotw Ann. 

MARKS - On September 12th. lo 
Sarah inee Russetl) and Jonathan, a 
son. David Edward Caliear. 

RED - Oft September 10th. at Zurich, 
to Karen (nee Taylor) and Fraser, a 
daughter. Emma Kathleen Mary. 
RORMBOH - On September lOOu to 
Julia (n4t WaUng) and Adrian, a 
daughter, isobel Anne. 


SEARLE -On September I2th. In Hone 
Kong, to Soohia (nee Bownag) and 
David, a daughter. Louisa. 

SHEARER - On September tan. to 
Jane uiee Jefferson) and William, a 
daughter. Emma Jane, a skier for 
Henry. 

SOUTHALL - On September 7th. at 
Ronkswood Hospital. Worcester, to 
Lindsay (nee Wallen and Paul, a 
daughter. Ellen Frances, a stater lor 
Thomas 

CHAPPELL - On September loot to 
Fiona (nee Bramr) and John, a soil 
Paul James, a brother (or Joanna. 

VICK - On September tOth. at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital, lo Emma mee 
PragncUi and Room, a daughter. 
Catherine Jane. 

WOMEN - on 15th September. 1086. 
lo Gill, wife of Laurence - a son. 


MARRIAGES 


GWSUC-saimf : HECTOR • The mar- 
riage took place on September l jih. 
1086. at the Parish Church of St 
Andrew and St George. Edinburgh, 
between Alistair Mark, son or Dr and 
Mrs Donald EmsJteSmilh. of 
Droughty Ferry and Katherine Mary. 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Gordon Hector of Edinburgh. 


SILVER 

ANNIVERSARIES 


ROBINSON : MORRIS on September 
loth 1901 at St Erconwalds Qhureh. 
Wallon-on -Thames. Brian to 
Penelope Now at Crocks. BenOey. 
Nr Famham. 


DEATHS 


- On September ljm. 
Doctor Agnes Bery l, after a short iB- 
n«* Loiingb' remembered by Alan. 
Zena. Johno. JtU and Rosemary 
Funeral at Charing Crematorium. 
Kent, mi Friday. Sep te mber 1 9th at 
4.30 pm. Flowers to Viner A Sons. 
High Street West Mailing. 

•emi - On September 8th. In Matarca. 
after a long Uhtess. Dorothy iJoi 
beloved wife of John and mother at 
Dill and Andrew. 

BENNETT ■ On September 15th. 1986. 
Air Vice Marshal Donald cafford 
Tyndall Bennett. CD CSE. DSO. 
FRaeS. Dearly bctoied Husband Of 
Ly and father of (Voreen and Tortx. 
Service at Amentum Crematomnn. 
on Friday. September 19th. at 
i 30pm Family flo w e rs only, dona- 
tions may be sent to RAF Benetoleat 
Fund, enquiries lo E Sargeant A Son. 
Slough 30081. Service of Thanksgv- 
Ing far h» life lo be announced later. 

CALDWELL - On September ISUl 
peacefully at Sun Hill Court Nursing 
Home. James (Jock), aged 87 yean. 
Hong Kong Dank nerd) and formerly 
living at Walberton Husband of the 
late Aiaihea and a much loved father 
of Colin and grandfather of Lucy. 
James and CaUum. Service at 
Worthing Crematorium. Flndon on 
Friday. September 19th at 10 OOam. 
Family flowers only but donaoons. if 
wished, for 'Dr Barnsdo's' may be 
sen! c/o. and all eoautnes to. fj. 
Holland A Son. Terminus Road. 
Lithe ham plan. leL 715909. 

CREASE - Peacefully, on Septe i n b er 
12th. at The Elms Nursing Home. 
Arthur John PKken Crease (Jack) at 
The Laurels. High SL Yatton. wm br 
missed and rememoered by his many 
mends. Funeral Service ai St Mary 
ihe Virgin. Yatton. on Monday. Sep- 
tember 22nd. ai 2.30 pm. followed 
by internment at Wick Sl Lawrence. 
No flowers, donations tf denied, to 
Wick Sl Lawrence Church, c/o (be 
Set. B. Strange. Sl Paul’s Vicarage. 
Kewstokc. w«ion-Super-Mare. 


ELVT - On SeptenAer 14th. 1986. 
Cdr. Frauds John. R.N. (ret'dL aged 
59. dear husband and father, peacv- 
fiffly at home after a long illness 
borne with great courage and hu- 
mour. Funeral on Friday. September 
19th. Service at DiptfOrd Parish 
Church at 4.00 pm. Donations tn lieu 
of flowers. If desired, for Cancer and 
Leukaemia in Odklhood Triad, c/o 
Parson Funeral Service. 2 Market 
Road. Ptympton. 0732 343848- 


■ On Se p ieru tna 12th. peace- 
fully ai Worthing. Anne (widow of 
Thomas V Camel). Funeral 
Offlngion Park Methodist Church, on 
September 19m. at 1146. 


On September 12th. after a 
short Illness. Commander HJLC. 
Cd). DSC. Royal Navy. Dear hus- 
band of Barbara and father of 
Penelope Service a! SL Paul's 
Church. Velverton. on Friday. Sep- 
tember 19th. at 12 noon, followed by 
private cremation. Family fl ow e rs 
only ptease. but donations, if desired, 
to Cancer Research, c/o SJ. 
BarkweU Funeral Directors, 
Tavisiock. Devon. 

C OOri ALL ■ On September 13th. 
peacefully at home. Min hu House. 
WaUon. Wcthcrby. Beniamin, aged 
76 years. Dearly loved husband of 
Jean and much loved father of 
Margaret and Victoria. Private 
family cremation. 

SOOOC • On September lath, peace- 
fully. Sir WfUiam (BfUL beloved 
husband of Ena arid lather of Mary 
Anne, aged 79. FUneraf Service at SL 
Mary's Churcn. Streatley-on- 
Thames on Monday. September 
22nd at 230 pm. Family nowers 
only but donations. If wished, to. 
FE-POW. or Cancer Research. 
6 R E EMS LAP E - On September 13Ui- 
peacefully in Malmesbury alter a 
long illness. Noel Jean, beloved wife 
of the late BUI Grrenslade and modi 
loved mother of Susan. Angela and 
Penelope Service of Thanksgiving ai 
The Church of Ihe Holy Cross. 
Sherston ai 2pm on Friday. Septem- 
ber 1901. followed by private 
mmaoon. nowers to H A C Mat- 
thews. Malmesbury or donations to 
Parkinson's Disease Society. 36 Port- 
land Place, win soq. 

CRMBLY On 11th September In Sl 
Bartholomew’s HospUaL East 
SmnhfieM. Brian CrtmMy. much 
loved father of Seth. CcnUc and Beo- 
wulf. Funeral 9.30 am on Friday. 
I9ih Septe m ber. « Si Mary's OM 
Churcn. stoke Newmgton Church 
Street. Nib. fofiowed by cremaiion 
at 11.00 am at Islington Crematori- 
um. High Road. East Finchley. N2. 
Flowers, or donations to a Brian 
GnmWy tnenwriaf fund, to Reckneir 
A Foster. Funeral Directors. 81 
Green Lanes. NI6. TeL 01 226 1966. 
HARPER - on September 14th. 1986. 
in a Jersey nursing home. Gwiadys 
Mary Harper urte Hoyle j. beloved 
wife of Captain Regmald Kirman 
Harper. M.C (India CmU Service), a 
much loved mother, grandmother 
and great grandmother, au enwmes 
toCE Cr«d LML Funeral D1 rectors, 
let os$4 wtw 

HOLMES - On September I4lh. peace- 
fully at Mericwood. Vugna Water. 
Jonty, aged 07. widow of Dan. lov- 
ing mother of Brenda .and Alan. 
Funeral Service at Ute Church of the 
Assumption. Harvor Rd. EnglefMd 
Green, on Friday. September 19th. 
at I Own. Family flowers only. En- 
qtnrm to Harrison & Son. Efiham 
32163. 

BOOLE • On Septembe' 11th. John. 
26. BSc. MSc of LfmversUy College 
London. Companion of the Nautical ' 
Institute, sometime member Of (he 
Royal Corps of Naval Constructors. 
Funeral Service M Honor Oak 
Crematorium. London SE23. on 
Tuesday. September 23rd. at 
2.30pm. Donations hi m em o r y of 
Jonn. to Jubilee Sailing Trust- ZS 
MctonaSl. London $w I. A Thanks- 
giving Service will be held at ChrtK's 
Chapel of God's GUT CkiluKD. date 
and details to be announced. 


KERR - On September 15th. 1966. 
peacefully after a tftort mness. John 
Andrew Kerr. FRCF. aged 83 years, 
of Avon Court. The Cheen. St 
Leooards-rensea. Much loved rather 
of David and grandfather of Ntoka 
and Andrew. Funeral Sendee 
HoHlngtoa ChundHiMhe-Wbod. Si 
LeonariteotvSea. Thursday Septem- 
ber 26th. at 2pm. Ftowera may be 
sent to A C Towner Ltd. 2/8 Norman 
Rd. Sl Leenards-on-Sea (0424) 
436386. 


■ On Septembre 14th, 
peacefully after a long illness bravely 
borne John Joseph aged 82 years. 
Dear husband of MUppa. father of 
Shaun. Xtodn. JuUan. Jennifer. 
Tlraoihy. grandfather of Caroline. 
MichaeL Rupert. Matthew. Joseph 
and Nicholas. Otrthainuc surgeon tale 
of 21 Harley Street London. Sadly 
missed by all. Funeral Service at 
11 30am ai Mordake Ce me tery on 
Friday. September 19th. No flowers 
please. Donations. If desired. In aid of 
Leukaemia Research. 


- On 1SU> September. 
William Davis. CJ3.E., after a heart 
attack . aged 83. Beloved of Winifred 
and dear father of Roger. Loved and 
loving grandfather of Julia. Virginia 
and Kale. Forme- Chief Inspector of 
Audit. Service at Ea st bo ur ne Crema- 
torium at ll.30aiu Tuesday. 23rd 
September. Family flowers only. Do- 
nations if desired to Die League of 
Friends or Bexfcin Hospital. 

NI8RCT. Robert ArcMbaM (Archie) 
O.BJL • Ob September J5<l). ai bone 
In his 86th year, beloved husband of 
Ruth, dearly loved rather and grand- 
father. A very special gentleman. 
Cremation on September X8th. at 
2.30pm. at Croyd on Crematorium. 
Family nowers only. Donations. If 
desired, to Cancer Relief. No Memo- 
rial Service al Ms reguesL 

README - On September 13th. peace- 
fully In St Mary’s Hospital. 
Paddington. Keith Reading, aged 39. 
of Dorset Square. NW1. Funeral at 
West London Crematorium on 
Thursday. September 18th al 
545pm. Memorial Service at St 
Cau-fen Church. Warwick Square. 
SWI on Friday. September 19Ui at 
1 .JOptn. No flowers please, bet (tona- 
uons. if desired, lost Mary's Hospital 
Chaplaincy. 

HlxnJER • On September 12th. 1986. 
suddenly at A c mn i e t in g-on Sea. 
Helen, wife of Ute late Walter, dearly 
loved mother of Pamela and Ann. 
and grandmother lo Harriet and 
Angus. Cremation at Worthing Cre- 
matorium. Findon. on Wednesday. 
September 17th. al 330pm. Fantfly 
flowers only please, but donations If 
desired, may be sent for Cancer 
Research, c/o and all enquiries to F 
A Holland & Son. Terminus Rd, 
LUUehamotOn. tel 713939. 

ROWE • On i2ih September, peaceful- 
ly after a short illness. Marcel k- 
Rowe of Gtggieswfck A Epsom, aged 
61. Dearly loved by her husband 
Owen, her children Elizabeth & An- 
thony, her grandchildren & mourned 
by all who knew her. Funeral pri- 
vate Service In her memory in 
Ensom College Chapel. College Rd. 
Epsom on tuesday 30th September ai 
2.30pm. No Dowers. Danahorn may 
be aritl w the Princess Alice Hospice. 
West End lane. Esher. Sunw. 

STEELE. Michael James - On Septem- 
ber 1 2th. suddenly whilst on 
business In Sri Lanka. Beloved of 
wife Anne, and his dautfiter Kahe. 
parems George and Wilma and aster 
Wendy- Cremation In GatombO to be 
followed by Memorial Service Ip 
Berkshire. Enquiries to 0344 776986 

THACKWELL • On September 13th. 
1986. peacefully al Southampton 
General Hospital. Patrida Mary, 
dearly loved wife of Brigadier Denys 
Thackwell and much loved mother 
of Sara. Catherine md WOftetn. Fu- 
neral Service at St Nicholas Church. 
Broctenhura on Monday. Septan- . 
her 22nd. at 2.15pm. Donations 
welcome tar St Nicholas Church c/o 
A Cleveland. South Weirs. 
Brockenhunt. Haros. 


WARfKR - peacefully In bospltte. 
Edith Katharine or Oxenhy Close. 
EastngwokL wire of John and moth- 
er of Christopher. Marina i ' 
Francis. Funeral Soviet Eastngwold 
Parish Church. Friday. September 
19th. at 2 JO pm. No flowers ph ase. 
donations in Ueu. if so desired, may 
be left in church In aid of The Fabric 
Fund. 

W MJI T - On September 13th. peacefW- 
ty at home. Oscar Stanley Wight 
M.B.E.. aged 80 years. Sadly adsaed 
by ids loving wife. Mlky. ctdWren 
and grandchildren. Requiem Mass al 
2.45 pm on Thursday. September 
18th at St. Edmund's Catholic 
Church. Bury SL Edmunds. Family 
flowers only- Donations for Cancer 
Research may be sent c/o L. Fulcher 
Ud. 80 Whiung Street. Bury St. 
Edmunds. Iri. 4049. 

WOOLCOTT - On September 16th. 
1986. Anthony George CKJO. aged 48 
years of Upper Lamboum. Berk- 
shire. peacefully after a sharr Illness. 
Funeral Service at SI. Michael and 
All Angels. Lamboum. Berkshire on 
Friday. September I9tb at 12 noon. 
Please, no flowers. Donations in Heu 
to SL Mary's School of Medidne. c/o 
J.H. Kenyon Ud. 83 WMbourae 
Grave. London W2. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


BAXTER - A Memorial S ervice tar 
Cohn Baxto- of London and Bermu- 
da. win be heM on Wednesday. 22nd 
October, at 12 noon, at St Bride's 
Church. Fleet St EC*. 

MARCELLE Bash! - Prayers wfll be 
said In her memory. In her London 
home. 86 Eaton Square. 'Wednesday 
nigh t, al 7 -30pm. 

service op remembrance - For 
those of Hie Jewish faith wiH be held 
at Golden Green Crematorium. 
How Lane. nwu. on Sunday. Sep- 
tember 28th. at 3^0pia lo which 
relatives and friends are Invited. 

SMAH. - A Memorial Service for Dr 
Raymond Charles (Otto) Smau win 
be heM on Saturday. 18th October, 
1986. a) 2 . 15 pm. at Great St Mary's. 
Cambridge. 


OBITUARY 

AIR VICE-MARSHAL 
DONALD BENNETT 

Brilliant aviator who created the Pathfinders 


IN MEMORIAM - WAS 


1ST AIRBORNE DIVISION . m proud 
remembrance of all members of Ihe 
Division, whose fault and fortitude in 
adversity bore ihera through their 
heroic struggle (Tom 1 7th September 
1944. at Arnhem. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


HAYWARD. John Davy. C.BX.; 
Chevalier de la Legion d'Hotwrar. 
Died I7UI September lSbS.'Reniem- 
bertng John with love and gratitude. 

Wll-JOYCE. Mary - Died 17th Sep. 
(ember. 1980. In constant loving 
memory of my beloved wire who 
brought so much of love and happi- 
ness to ail who knew her. Toro, 

•Ma. Paul - Who died ITTh Sept- 
«nber. 197ft Always remembered 
in my thoughts. Jessie. 

STRAKEH Derrick born 13 Ui January 
1921. died i As a result of War Ser- 
vice) 17th September 1976. Much 
loved htuband of Belly and father of 

Sally. Timothy and Julian. Remem- 
bered always with love. 


Air Vice-Marshal D. C T. 
Bennett, CB, CBE, DSO, died 
on September 14, aged 76 to 
the day. He was an outstand- 
ing figure in British civil and 
military aviation, whose 
forceful personality earned 
him enemies as well as friends. 

Already a well-known air- 
line pilot, be soon established 
an even greater reputation in 
the RAF during the Second 
World War, becoming at the 
age of 33 tbe youngest air vice- 
marshal in toe history of the 
service. He formed and com- 
manded the Pathfinder Force, 
which became tbe spearhead 
of Bomber Command's mass 
attacks on German dries. 
Though opinions will always 
differ as to the practical value 



1939 one of the tasks under- 
taken by Bennett — still as a 


U 1 IICI « Ul UK UI 4 I.UUU ■ — -J , *l-_ 

(on balance) - to say nothing avri prior- 

of foe morality -of the area Polish leader. General Sikor- 


bombing policy, there can be 
no doubt at all that Bennett's 
Pathfinders made a vital con- 
tribution to -whatever was 
achieved. 

After the war he became foe 
first chief executive of British 
South American Airways, a 
state-owned corporation later 
amalgamated with BOAG 
From this position he was 
dismissed after a violent dis- 
agreement on policy with the 
board, largely relating to the 
ill-feted Tudor aircraft. 


ski, from Bordeaux in an 
armed civil flying-boat two 
days after the capitulation of 
France. He played a. promi- 
nent part in founding the 


North Atlantic ferry service, at 
Atfero, 


first known as 
was responsible 


which 

for flying 

American and Canadian war- 
planes to Britain, and be 
personally led the first flight of 
seven Hudson aircraft to 
make the ocean crossing. 

Re-commissioned in the 
RAFVR in £941, in the fol- 
lowing year he won an imme- 
diate DSO for a remarkable 


He also dabbled in politics, 
sitting briefly in Parliament as 
a Liberal MP after a by- exploit when, as a wing corn- 
election in early 1945, and maoder, on April 2A1 942, he 
later contesting another by- led Halifax bombers 


election as a Liberal before 
moving into an independent, 
right-wing position. It would 
be charitable to describe his 
political attitudes as ifl- 
thougbt-out and immature. 

A non-smoker and teetotal- 
ler, he drove himself and 
others hard. Even “Bomber* 
Harris regarded him as some- 
what arrogant and abrasive. It 


in the 

earliest attack on the German 
battleship Tirpitz, which was 
moored under a precipice in 
an inlet of Trondheim Fjord. 
His aircraft was hit by anti- 
aircraft fire, but Bennett and 
his second pilot escaped by 
parachute, landing in enemy- 
occupied Norway. After an 
arduous journey across snow- 
clad mountains they readied. 
Swedish territory and eventu- 


solved. Bennett gave a news- 
paper interview in which be 
criticized the ministers “re- 
cent interference with man- 
agement.” A few days later - 
^February. 194$ - the board 
of BSAA dismissed him from 
his position as chief executive. 
In a speech on the day this 
action was announced Ben- 
nett said: “Today I have had 
the proudest honour of my life 
conferred on me. I have been 
sacked for having spoken my 

own mind-" . 

Within a very short time he 
hid formed a company called 
Airflighr Ltd. with his wife as 
co-director, lo operate Tudors 
on charter work. For some 
time Bennett flew a Tudor II 
on the Berlin air-lift, which 
had been made necessary 
when the Russians stopped 
surface transport ro the city. 

In the process he very nearly 
lost his life when, on one 
occasion, he took off in his 
Tudor before the externally 
attached elevator locks had 
been removed. The only con- 
trol be then had came from the 
trimming tabs, operated by a 
wheel separated from the 
main control column. He had 
to use all his strength to hold 
the aircraft with his left arm, 
while with his right he worked 
the trimming wheel He or- 
dered his crew into the tail to 
make the aircraft climb, and 
after nursing it round foe 
circuit, managed to land safe- 
ly. Experts commented that 
no pilot had previously taken 
off with a locked control and 
escaped disaster. 

His company later used 
Tudors on other charter 
flights. In March, 1950, one of 
its Tudor V aircraft crashed 
near Llandow Airport, in 
South Wales, while carrying 
83 people back from an inter- 
national rugby match in lib- 
land. The death toll of 80 was 


may have been resentment — - , . , . , 

caused by these characteris- ally made their way back to . the highest in any arr aondent 
tics, allied to jealousy of his Britain. up to that time. The finding of 

youthful success, that denied Rapid promotion followed, a court of inquiry was that the 
him, at the end of the war, the and his leadership of the loading conditions of the air- 

Pathfinder Force was a bril- 
liant success. Using increas- 
ingly sophisticated devices, 
including radar, this force 
made a major contribution to 
the effectiveness of the RAF 
night assault on Germany. He 
was appointed CB and CBE, 
and the Russians awarded 
him the Order of Alexander 
Nevsky. Bennett also played a 


FUNERAL 

ARRANGEMENTS 


FillWCEr -A Funeral Service for (he 
Han Mrs Shaun PtunkeL wfl] take 
al Si tear* ■» the Boltons, on 
Thursday. September 250). at i lam. 
Flowers to the Church, or to 
Rowland Bros. Whitehorse Rd,- West 
Croydon. 


knighthood which his services 
conspicuously merited. 

But nothing can alter the 
feet that he was one of the 
bravest and technically most 
accomplished aviators of his 
time, as well as a leader with 
tbe sort of qualities that are 
needed in war. 

Donald Clifford Tyndall 
Bennett was bom in Queens- 
land, Australia, on September 
14th, 1910. and educated in 
Brisbane. As a small boy he 
saw the Wright Brothers dem- 
onstrating their flying ma- 
chine on the racecourse at 
Toowoomba, and never forgot 
tbe experience: 

At the age of 20 he joined 
foe Royal Australian Air 
Force as a cadet, and in the 
following year came to Eng- 
land, obtained a commission 
in tbe RAF, and became an 
instructor at the RAF flying- 
boat base at CalshoL He 
transferred to the Reserve m 
1935, and in the same year, 
while returning to Australia 
from Britain, wrote The Com- 
plete Air Navigator . ; which 
became a standard work. 

In 1935 be joined Imperial 
Airways, forerunner of BOAC. 
After qualifying as a commer- 
cial pilot, ground engineer, 
radio-operator, flying instruc- 
tor and first-dass navigator, . 
he helped to pioneer Com- 
monwealth routes. 

In 1938, as an airline cap- 
tain, he was selected to act as a 
test pilot on the Short-Mayo 
composite “pick-a-back** air- 
craft, and flew the upper 
component. Mercury, from 
Foynes, Co. Limerick, to the 
St Lawrence River at Boucher- 
ville. near Montreal, and on to 
New York, achieving a record 
east to west crossing of the 
North Atlantic. For this feat 
he won theJohnston Memori- 
al Trophy, awarded by the 
Guild of Air Pilots and Air 
Navigators for the best feat of 
air navigation during tbe year. 


craft were the most probable 
cause of the disaster. 

His business activities more 
than once involved him in 
litigation, and his war mem- 
oirs, Pathfinder, published in 
1958 (and recently reprinted), 
stung a fellow air vice-marshal 
into suing him for libel. He 
seemed to relish such en- 
counters. and was prepared. 


leading part in the creation of on occasion, to conduct his 
the Mosquito “intruder** force own defence in court. 


which harassed the German 
defences at night, and in 
developing FIDO, tbe fog 
dispersal system that enabled 
RAF bombers to operate in 
bad weather. 

In 1945 he relinquished the 
post of AOC Pathfinder Force, 
and began — after a very brief 
political interlude — his ca- 
reer as an airline executive. 
Shipping interests had formed 
British Latin American Air 
Lines to run air services 
between Britain and South 
America, and the name was 
subsequently changed to Brit- 
ish South American Airways. 
This concern became a state- 
owned corporation, and Ben- 
nett joined the board. 

In- 1946 he piloted the 
Lancastrian aircraft Star Light 
on the first survey flight to 
South America. Determined 
to use British aircraft, he put 
the Tudor into service with 
BSAA, after controversy be- 
tween the manufacturers and 
BOAC had led foe Govern- 
ment to appoint a committee 
of inquiry into the firm’s 
.complaints of that corp- 
oration's attitude towards the 
Tudor I. The airliner was 
subsequently modified and 
became the Tudor IV. Bennett 
championed its cause through 
all its vicissitudes. 

In January. 1948. the BSAA 
Tudor IV Star Tiger disap- 
peared while carrying 31 peo- 
ple between the Azores and 
Bermuda, and Lord Nathan, 


His political career was 
intermittent and inglorious. 
When be left the RAF in early 
1945, he was returned unop- 
posed as liberal MP for 
Middlesbrough West, but he 
resigned after two months to 
join the board of BSAA. In the 
same year, and just before 
entering Parliament, he pub- 
lished Freedom from W 'or, a 
simplistic tract in which he 
called for the merging of all 
the armed forces or the Allies 
within three months of the 
end of hostilities. 

. In 1945 he stood again as 
Liberal candidate in the by- 
election at North Croydon, 
but came bottom of tbe poll 
In 1962 he left the Liberal 
Party in opposition to its 
Common Market policy. Five 
years later he stood as Nation- 
al Party candidate in a by- 
election at Nuneaton, and 
polled about 500 votes. 

In 1969 be launched a new 
political movement, tbe Asso- 
ciation of Political Indepen- 
dents, one of whose aims was 
the eventual introduction of a ■ 
non-party Parliament, and in ; 
1971, though not a member of ■ 
foe National Front he took ; 
part in a ceremony organized • 
by it at the Cenotaph. “So far • 
as I know," he said, “the ■ 
National Front are British and : ■ 
perfectly respectable." Not ■ 
long afterwards he presided ’ 
over the formation of a right- I 
wing group called the Inde- • 
pendent Democratic Move- ! 
ment which. 


from Scotland to South Africa, aircraft pending investigation. «S«1LI •! 

A court of inquiry was held 
but the mystery of the Star 
Tiger's disappearance was not 


fishing a" long-distance 
d for flying-boats. 


establi 
record 

After tbe outbreak of war in 


repatriation of immigrants. 

Bennett married, in 1935, - 
Elsa Gubler of Zurich. They ’ 
had a son and a daughter. \ 


SIR WILLIAM GOODE 

in the police, government and 
administration, and led. in 
1959, to internal self-govern- 
ment with Lee Kuan YewS 
prune minister. 

. fr^sition was con- 
ducted with rernTricIbE: 

knowl- 


Sir William Goode, land surrendered to the Japa- 
GCMG, DL, who died on nese on February 15, 1942. 
September 15, at ihe age of 79, For the next three-and-a- 

was the last Governor of half years be experienced the 
Singapore, a post he held from rigours of imprisonment at the 
1957 to 1959. He was subse- hands of the Japanese, both in 
quently Governor and Gam- Singapore and Siam, where he 
mancter-in-Chief, North Bom- worked on the Burma railway 
eo, from 1 960 to 1963. j Released in 1945 he became 


ne Dccame edaahfe a wTZrr- 5 ■ 

William AHmond deputy Economic Secretary of mJune otEm Goodc ' ‘ 
Codringion Goode was bom ^ J^e^tton of Malaya in • — 
on June 8, 1907, and educated i 948 - Ba J ,n following year 


be Govenio'rrand^okTnl^ 


Worcester . College, Oxford, 
where he read classics. He was 
first appointed to tbe Colonial 
Serv ice as a Cadet in Malaya 
in 1931. While on leave in 
1936 he was called to the Bar 
by Gray's fnn. 

Returaing to Malaya, he 
was appointed District Officer 
at Raub in Pahang, and came 
to know foe interior of the 


its peopfe which was later to 
stand him in good stead in the 
sometimes bewildering com- 
plexities of the approach to 
independence. 

In 1940 be was made an 
assistant commissioner for de- 


on June 8, 1907, and educated «« in aw rouowing year ^ ij deTnf v" u °r. K ‘ nslead : 

at Oakham School and he was gry man appointment Neaara or AJJ? 8 d, -?™an * 
Wnrresrer Colfeae. Oxford. w hich took him away from the norT* nrf tTP ^ ° f S 'nga- • 

part of the world and the CommwioS, l 

people he knew so well, when 3°5 D ^ I960 he sue- « 
be was sent to- Aden, as Chief Gnvfr,^ Ro ] a ” d Turnbull as t 
Secretary. He was there until RonS? 0 and c_J n-C. North - 
1953, for part of the time as ° 0rnea * 

Acting Governor. m his retirement, after ’ 

However he wasroon back he was not idle? InVhJ " 
m Singapore as Chief Secre- ^flowing year he - 

tary, and it was no surprise Jhairman of foe WaierP^ I 
when he was appointed Gov- sources Board, whose^ ft«L5£ - 

country intimately. -develop- Sanijes* had 9 feken SJe SfamniS S?? rehen ' * 

ing that profound knowledge g^n’j of her strategic demands and resnnr^ W9t ®F .*■ 
ofits peopfe which was later to ro ie. in foe aftermath of the 10 combat defiderSK^-S? • 

disastrous Suez affair, and ^ he dischareeH"^^: This — 
from the outset it seemed f ° r ««ght, and^fiTjo?? greal l 
almost certain that Goode imponam cZil re P°rt * 

would be Singapore's last ai »ons. recommend- 

Governor. . He retina 

Wifo a dramatic scaling 1974 and h,s ia < 


fence in Singapore, and in the down of foe British military Lieutenant a °eputy * 

ival presence in foe Far following year™^* 1 ^ in lhe ‘ * 


following year,' with war and nayal presence-in the Far 
threatening what bad been East, involving withdrawal 


considered an impregnable 
naval base, he became a lance- 
corporal in the "Singapore 
Volunteer Corps. He became a 
prisoner-of-war when the Ls- 


from Singapore, foe country 
was rapidly prepared for inde- 
pendence. This involved plac- 
ing Malayans instead of 
British personnel ^ in key posts 


fo 1938^ 

Harding, who dXJ^ rnsironB 
and saond < dltt L ,n 1947, 

Marv M?Uren " 1950 ’ ^ 

1) m with iheird^ u fer iV “ 


■T I 


ll i 


* 









f ; 

; 


WEDNESDAY 


1ER 17 1986 


'» « 

% 


y n HatterJ 
<i0r promises 
“ ; -h I'ffirian 




Television 

Riveting 
blend 
of old 

'and new 


Never rely on a man in a white 
suit. A white suit is the 
uniform of hubris. The man in 
the white suit, be be Tom 
Wolfe. Melryn Bragg or John 
Travolta, stands suspected of 
being too dever by half. 
Oedipus the King (BBC2) 
ventured into the world of 
modern dramatic convention 
by dressing the tragic monarch 
in creamy gaberdine, and at 
once his curses upon the man 
jshose sins had blighted the 
kingdom of Thebes acquired a 
new. hollow ring. 

The production's major 
strategy, to give the modern 
television audience easy access 
to Sophocles, was a new 
translation by the play's direc- 
tor, Don Taylor. This went 
considerably further than the 
white suit in projecting the 
play's emotional power, which 
is commonly obscured by 
2,000 years of reverence and 
the conventions of classical 
Greek drama. 

It may not have been strictly 
necessary for Oedipus to revile 
the blind seer Teiresias as a 
“paranormal stunt-man", but 
at least such language was 
designed to keep the watching 
millions awake. 

The aggressively contem- 
porary translation swiftly 
threw aspects of the characters 
into slurp relief: Michael 
Pennington's king was a bluff, 
forthright ruler, a believer hi 
open government and plain 
dealing, and therefore all the 
more tragic when his destiny 
was laid bare; John Shrapnel's 

4 Creon was the usual arche- 
typal smoothie; and, while Sir 
John Gielgud's Teiresias oc- 
cupied the screen, the knell of 
doom was sounded with 
authority. 

The conventions of a studio- 
bound BBC play are probably 
jnst as stifling as those of 
ancient Greek theatre. The 
stepped sets which resound at 
every footfall, the cunningly 
illuminated blank backdrop 
and the awkward busiji£ss of 
having characters walk.on and 
off a stage, when the fflm- 
crained eye wants them to 
appear quickly in dose-up, all 
tempt the attention to wander. 

In addition the play was set - 
in a sort of notional 19th 

£ century, with a chorus of 
stalwart citizens who seemed 
to have wandered in from the 
Ibsen being filmed in the next- 
door studio. Claire Bloom as 
Jocasta was costumed . in a 
style reminiscent of Joan Col- 
lins in a crimped wig. 

This production, the first of 
a trilogy of the Theban plays, 
overcame off these uncertain 
innovations and sustained 
more than two hours of screen- 
time at a high dramatic pitch 
with considerable success. 

r Celia Brayfield 




the Arts 


For all its visual command 
and the tragic intensity of 
Pladdo Domingo in the 
title-role, the film of Otello 
by Franco Zeffirelli (left), 
which receives its British 
charity premiere at the 
Barbican on Monday, is 
likely to antagonize some 
of the operatic purists: the 
director here explains his 
approach and purpose to 
John Higgins 




T 

V 


I \ 


Stirring up the horrors 
within every one of us 





Savage dash of cultures: Katia Rkdaretii and Pladdo Domingo as Desdemona and Otello in the new film 


Franco Zeffirelli's film of Verdi's 
1 Otello opens around the world this 
month. Vienna saw it first, then 
! came Paris last week followed by 
New York over the weekend; 
London's turn arrives on Monday 
with a charity premiere at the 
Barbican. There is not likely to be 
too much debate over the visual 
command of the movie or over the 
tragic intensity of Domingo in the 
| title role; Zeffirelli has turned Katia 
RiccutrcUi from an opera singer 
into a screen actress as Desdemona 
and has drawn from Justino Diaz 
i an lago that will surprise those who 
; have seen the Puerto Rican bari- 
tone give some distinctly wooden 
performances m other roles on 
stage- No. the arguments will come 
over what Zeffirelli has decided to 
; exclude and. perhaps even more 
controversially, on what he has 
added. 

When the first Italian opera fihns 
started- to emerge after the war, 
considerable liberties were taken 
with both score and libretto. Then 
came a reaction: opera, it was 
believed, was best filmed inside the 
theatre, as a replica of the stage 
performance. The late Paul Con- 
ner led this school of thought 
Years later Joseph Losey changed 


all that with his Don Giovanni. 
which Zeffirelli describes as "a bit 
of -a self-indulgence fin- a selected 
audience". Zeffirelli's own Oteilo' 
has certainly not been aimed at a 
selected audience and is highly 
likely to provoke purists. The 
score, as generally played in the 
opera house, has lost about 25 
minutes with some very obvious 
cuts — the Act I chorus “Fuoco di 
gjoia", much of the Act 111' 
concertato, Desdemona 's Willow 
Song — and some less obvious ones 
such as OteQo's first outburst of 
jealousy in Act IL 

- Zeffirelli was speaking in Paris 
and his defence was well prepared. 
“When Verdi and Boito, to say 
nothing of Rossini before them, 
took Shakespeare's Othello they 
adapted h for a different medium. 
When I take Otello for the cinema I 
m turn have to adapt opera for a 
new medium: Otello has to speak 
the language of the cinema. When 
you make a movie you make 
somehing different and you adapt 

— it doesn't matter whether ft is 
Romeo or Streetcar. After years of 
living with Verdi’s Tmviata or 
Puccmfs Tosca I cannot bearto see 
La Dameaux comities or Sardou’s 
7asm on stage. In the same way if I 


want to grab a movie audience I 
have to speak their language. 

“You mention the musical cut of 
Otello’s first expression of jealousy: 
well, that is replaced by an ex- 
change of glances with lago, a pure 
piece of cinema. In the same way 
the substitution of “Fuoco di 
gioia” — a boring chorus, to say 
nothing of the technical problems 
of filming choruses — with a ballet 
is a piece of pure theatre." 

Zeffirelli's additions, including 
this ballet music which Verdi 
composed for the, 1896 Paris- 
production, open out the story with 
explanations while at other times 
closing in on the action. The 
betrothal of Otello and Desdemona 
is illustrated during the Love Duet 
while the character of lago is built 
up so that his death, speared by 
Otello, is, probably for the first 
time, in full view. On the other 
hand Zeffirelli uses interiors al- 
most throughout, once the opening 
scene is over, concentrating on 
castle walls, gloomy and shadowy. 
A castle in Barletta and the 
Venetian (appropriately enough) 
fortress m Heraklion were the main 
locations. 

“This use of interiors is quite 


deliberate. I believe Otello to be an 
opera about cages and prisons. 
Even Verdi's Act II garden is a 
prison garden, a bit like the one in 
Fidelia, as you say. Remember the 
Orson Welles film of OtheiUP. He 
took exactly the same view. It is a 
claustrophobic opera. My Otello is 
quite different to ray film of 
Traviata and. I think, more 
successful Traviata is altogether a 
lighter piece, almost a comforting 
piece. Otello stirs up the horren- 
dous areas within us, reminds u$ of 
how terrible we can be to one 
another." 

Zeffirelli's first contact with 
Domingo as Otello came in the 
Scala production of December 7, 
1976, a night of considerable ten- 
sions within and without the 
theatre, as Zeffirelli describes in his 
forthcoming autobiography (Zeffi- 
relli. Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 
£14.95, published next Monday). In 
it Zeffirelli made it quite clear that 
Otello was a Moor who lad taken 
on the Christian faith and then 
gradually loses ft under the 
goadings of lago. Before deciding 
to murder Desdemona, Otello 
consigns his crucifix to the flames: 
the film, like that Scala production, ; 
is very much a Catholic interprtta- ' 


tion of the opera and one which 
might not have pleased Shakes- 
peare. 

“I think in that Scala perfor- 
mance we fixed the interpretation. 
Pladdo has done many other 
Otellos. but often it is just a matter 
of changing the costume." 

Gotz Friedrich, currently prepar- 
ing Domingo for his hundredth 
stage Otello. which will open the 
Los Angeles opera season next 
month, may not agree. But that 
Scala performance was televised all 
over Europe and might have been 
the start of the present film. 

“I don't think so. except that pan 
of the exdtement of the Scala 
Otello was bringing it through 
television to an enormous audi- 
ence. But at the same time it raised 
irritations. There were thoughts in 
my mind of what might have been 
in the past: why wasn’t there a tape 
of a Corelli performance, why had 
we never filmed Maria [Call as] as 
Anna Bolena or Joan [Sutherland] 
as Alcina — one of my best 
achievements, I still believe. And 
there was anger about the things 
that were not right: a close-up here, 
a camera angle that did not 
correspond with the beat of the 


music. These are things in a 
television transmission that can be 
corrected in a film. As 1 get older I 
become more choosy, more 
demanding." 

In an opera film drawing on 
Zeffirelli's full resources of inven- 
tion and interpretation, which 
“solution" has given him most 
satisfaction? 

“Probably the character of 
Cassio. We deliberately cast a 
young aristocrat [Urbano Bar- 
berini] in the role, who could 
almost have been a brother to 
Desdemona. 1 see Cassio as a 
magnificent boy who unleashes the 
instincts of others, in contrast to 
that pallid figure of some Otello 
productions. Things happen 
around Cassio of which he is totally 
unaware — a bit like Tadzio in 
Death in Venice." There is no 
doubt that Baiberini does flash his 
pectorals with distinction. 

• EMI's recording of the sound- 
track —a full version of Otello. 1 am 
assured — comes out at the end of 
the month. 

Domingo. Ricciarelli and Diaz 
lead the cast of Covent Garden's 
new Otello production next year. 


Concerts 

British celebration of Henze 




BBCPO/Knussen 
AlteOper, 
Frankfiirt/Radio 3 

Thanks largely to the BBC and 
the London Sinfonietta. at last 
it seems that we in this 
country are giving the music 
of Hans Werner Henze some- 
thing like its due. 

On Monday night — follow- 
ing the City of Birmingham 
Orchestra's splendid perfor- 
mance of bis enigmatic, in- 
tensely romantic Seventh 
Symphony in the Prom season 
just ended —.the BBC Phil- 
harmonic. conducted by Oli- 
ver Knussen, gave the. so- 
called "preludes” for piano, 
tape and orchestra. Tristan , 
completed in 1973. as part of 


ML 


*V 

■ -v- 

' . 

‘ -X 


* m 


JOHN ROSEMARY 

MILLS HARRIS 

“HYPNOTIC PERFORMANCES” 

. . that have the loree of an explosion ’ 1 


PETITION 


V, 


by BRIAN CLARK 
Directed by PETER HA.: 

'SEARING IMPACT ... Lugo theatric:-! a 

“SHOCKS AND STIRS ONE” 

"An ooCdSion Mr Iau~rh“er and :.ea 


ivw 

O' 

Lr- ■ a:! 


\ -v c ~:,y3 y , 

• : f f M A r# 

; • k j T s * •' 



the Frankfurt Festival's exten- 
siye sixtieth birthday celebra- 
tions for the composer. ' 

The Seventh Symphony 
may yet prove to be a master- 
piece, but 1 do not doubt that 
Tristan is anything other than 
that Henze’s mind, as he 
himself has lulsomdy ex- 
plained. was preoccupied in 
the period of its conception 
with several tragedies m his 
personal and political life that 
seem to have piled up on one 
another: the deaths, some of 
them untimely and terrible, of 
friends and colleagues, the end 
of democracy and the rise to 
power of Pinochet in Chile. At 
the same time the work's 
musical trigger was, of course, 
Wagner, whose search for the 
answer to the unanswerable, 
particularly in his own Tris- 
tan . is dearly mirrored in 
Henze’s art. 

In Henze's Tristan the 
opposing forces are faced 
squarely, unequivocally repre- 
sented by the dogged sounds 
of the opening of Brahms’s 
First Symphony — which sym- 
bolizes, one assumes, a rigid 
old hierarchy, musical, politi- 
cal and social — and more 
cynically by the quotation m 

ILEA Schools 
SO/Moretti 
Festival Hall 

The ILEA Schools Symphony 
Orchestra is perhaps one of 
the few bands in the world to 
boast vermilion and emerald 
green coiffures among its 
ranks. But the hair-styles of 
the cellist and violinist in 
question are merely visual 
pointers to an unusually vivid 
orchestral palette, most 
flatteringly displayed on Mon- 
day by the music of Verdi and 
Debussy. . 

An orchestra of such lively 
individual members is par- 
ticularly sensitive to the in- 
fluence of a guest conductor. 
Bruno Moretti, making his 
London d6but at the age of 29. 
was also put through his paces. 
He has a happy knack of being 
able to relax unhelpful ten- 
sions and. with loose-limbed, 
bamnless arm movements, 
coax warm, supple phrasing 
from his finely schooled body 
of strings. The big "baritone" 
tune in Verdi’s Sicilian Ves- 


ihe-section caHed “Tristan’s 
Madness" of Chopin's Fu- 
neral March. 

A work which so luxuriates 
in adverse personal circum- 
stance runs considerable risk 
of being accused of self- 
indulgence. but Henze has 
always been unafraid of 
exploring his deepest emo- 
tions in public Nobody, 
surely, could be immune to 
the power of Tristan's final, 
great climax, when on tape a 
young boy speaks Gottfried 
von Strassbuig's lines describ- 
ing the two lovers' deaths, a 
gently pulsating heartbeat and 
Wagner's “Treibhaus” Lied 
sounding beneath.- That mo- 
ment alone justifies the work. 

This was a performance 
thoroughly fit for such music, 
precise, violent where it 
needed to be, beautifully mel- 
low elsewhere. And that ap- 
plied as much to the solo 
pianis^ Ian Brown, whose part 
is devilishly complex, as it did 
to the orchestra. 

A reduced version of the 
BBCPO. together 'with the 
BBC Singers. Teresa Cahill 
(soprano). Susan Kessler 
(mezzo). Neil Jenkins (tenor) 


pers Overture positively 
glowed from the cellos, and 
even the exposed high violins 
sang out freely and nimbly. 

Moretti knows how to bring 
out the best in his soloists, too: 
the orchestra has a formidable 
line-up of trumpeters, for 
instance, and a deft, imagi- 
native timpanist in Michael 
Folkes. They were all given 
zheir head in La Mer. 

. When it comes to detail and 
carefully moulded ensemble 
work, Moretti is on shakier 
ground. More precise direc- 
tion from the hand, as well as 
a strong groundswdl from the 
arms, would have made for 
fiber blending and a vital ! 
steadying of the woodwind's 
share of the third movement’s 
“Dialogue”. 

The robust energy of this 
orchestra worked its own 
stimulating chemistry with the 
soloists of the evening’s 
centrepiece. Brahms’s Con- 
certo for Violin and Cello. 
Antonio Lysy and Andrea 
Cappelletti have both 
breathed the ratified air of the 
Gstaad Menuhin Academy, 
that hothouse in the snows, 



THE PR(®lKTIONOFTHE YEAR! 

CHRISTOPHER HAMPTONS ***** 

LES LIAISONS 

DANGEREUSES 

TIGHT FOR A TICKETF 

WHAT'S ON DIRECTED BY 

OPENS2 OCTOBER HOWARD DAVES 

AMBASSADORS fBg] 01.8366111 CCds 01 .836 1171 
THEATRE L«J or oi24t) 720Q (with bkgfeejl 


Hus Werner Henze: not 
afraid to express emotion 

and Alan Opie (baritone), 
earlier tackled the stormy 
cantata Novae de Infinlio 
Laudas (1962) with equal 
commitment under Simon 
Joly..John Alldis then con- 
ducted 24 unaccompanied 
singers from the choir, in a 
delicately controlled, finely 
pitched reading of Orpheus 
Behind the H ire (1983): five 
choruses which set Edward 
Bond's poetic commentary to 
Orpheus, his balletic colla- 
boration with the composer, 
in lush, intuitive manner. 

Stephen Pettitt 

and theirs was a highly-strung 
performance. - t 
Lysy’s strength lay in his 
vigilance for every chance to 
modulate the cello's timbre to 
fit the music's harmonic 
movement; and Cappetietii, 
whose violin playing has 
something of Perlman's sil- 
very refinement about it, 
showed his stature as a soloist 
precisely in his readiness to 
make such lively chamber < 
music with his colleague and 
his accompanists. 

Hilary Finch 

Suffragette 

performance 

A 45-minute platform per- 
formance of How the Vote was 
Won, from a new collection of 
original suffragette plays ed- 
ited by Dale Spender and 
Carole Hayman, plays in the 
Cottesloe Theatre next Tucsr 
day and subsequently on 
September 25. 26, 29 and 30. 
The cast includes Peter Altard, 
Craig Crosbie, Maty Me- , 
Cloud, Jacquetta May, Cath- 
1 erine Neilson, Celestine 
Randall and Janet Whiteside. 
The director is Paddi Taylor. 

• Tony Harrison, whose ver- 
sions of The Misanthrope , The 
Oresteia and The Mysteries 
•have all been presented with 
huge success at the National 
Theatre, reads from his book 
Theatre Works 1973-1985 at 
6pm on Wednesday of next 
week in the Cottesloe Theatre, 
to coincide with its publica- 
tion in paperback by Penguin. 
Some of the original creators 
of the roles, including Diana 
Rigg. will be joining him in 
this presentation. 


RPO Gala 
Albert HaH 

An organization^ fortieth 
birthday is not generally feted 
with a royal gala, but when 
that organization is a London 
orchestra one can understand 
the desire simply to celebrate 
survival in an unstable and 
sometimes hostile environ- 
ment. 

The Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra has seen bad times 
as well as good in the 40 years 
(to the day) since that famous 
Sunday afternoon in Croydon 
when Sir Thomas Bcccham 
unveiled his new toy. One 
thinks of the early 1960s (the 
“Swiss Cottage years”) or of 
perilous brinkmanship within 
the last decade when the 
public purse was snatched 
away. But the players have 
stuck together, survived with 
style and latterly prospered. 

Indeed, so numerous have 
its session bookings now be- 


come, ’ the RPO sometimes 
gives .the impression of 
appearing in two {daces at 
once: Well, long may they stay 
in profit. 

Quite an array of titled gents 
presented themselves here. 
Music director, conductor 
laureate, president, principal 
guest conductor, associate 
conductor all took a turn in 
the middle. No baronets, 
though. 

It was appropriate that the 
present music director, Andre 
Previn, should conduct the 
evening's most pleasurable 
offering, a vividly coloured 
account of A London Sym- 
phony by Vaughan Williams. 
Perhaps the Albert Hall's spa- 
cious acoustics enhance Pre- 
vin's own penchant for 
opulence; because this perfor- * 
manee seemed altogether bet- 
ter balanced and more nat- 
urally shaped than when the 
same forces presented it at the 
Festival Hall last season. The 
playing was entirely worthy of 


the occasion: the brass making 
something refreshingly tangy 
of the more dissonant coun- 
terpoints; the violins negotiat- 
ing the Nocturne's high-lying 
tune with sotto voce jaunti- 
ness; the wind solos in the 
Lento done with just the right 
feeling of misty reticence. 

That was the second half, 
the first had seen a formidable 
procession of conductors: Sir 
Charles Groves for six bars of 
the National Anthem (noisy). 
Yuri Temirkanov for the Wil- 
liam Tell Overture (noisier, 
but not much longer). Groves 
again for a sensitive perfor- 
mance of Delius's The Walk 
to the' Paradise Garden, then 
Antal Dorati instilling a 
characteristic muscularity into 
the orchestral playing of 
Brahms's Double Concerto. 
Here the soloists were Sir 
Yehudi Menuhin and Paul 
Tortelier, who fulfilled every 
expectation. 

Richard Morrison 


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in. 


threatens I ^8^ for peace 
action on 
sanctions 

Continued from page 1 
ported 8.5 million tons of coal 
from South Africa, would 
naye been most likely so 
follow suit. 

Of the measures on which 
the EEC has agreed, the bans 
on new investment in South 
Africa and on imports of 
South African gold coins are 
of little consequence. New- 
investment has dried up and 
gold coin exports are neg- 
ligible. 

The director of the Steel and 
Engineering Industries Fed- 
eration of South Africa, Mr 
Sam van Coller, said that if 
other countries followed the 
EEC's example, some 47,000 
jobs in the metal industries 
couid be at risk. 

One purpose of Mr Botha’s 
tour of Taiwan. Japan and 
Hong Kong was to scout 
markets for exports that may 
be shut out of North America 
and the EEC. 

9 HARARE: South Africa's 
Western trading partners, not 
the African frontline states, 
should shoulder the burden of 
applying economic sanctions 
against Pretoria, Mr Shridath 
Ramphal. the Commonwealth 
Secretary-General, said here 

Fresh offer 
expected 
at Wapping 

Continued from page 1 

offered the primers £50 mil 
lion and the former Sunday 
Tilth's building in central 
London. Thai settlement was 
overwhelmingly rejected by 
the printers. Yesterday's offer 
was thought to be an improve- 
ment on the last. 

As well as compensation, 
the union has demanded the 
reinstatement of some of its 
members at the Wapping 
plant and union recognition 
on the shop floor. 

Union officials and 
management negotiators led 
by Mr Bill O'Neill remained 
silent on the proposals, but 
News International has staled 
in the past that dismissed 
printers may reapply for work, 
although they will not receive 
any special consideration. Nor 
would there be any closed 
shop. 


Yri£ TiMES WcDNESDAY SKPTF.MRF.R 17 1986 



’s envoy 



Frank Johnson at the SDP 

The awful silence 
of serious politics 




Continued from page I 
ban on gold coins, and will 
shortly put forward its pro- 
posals on the investment ban. 
It is to continue to seek a 
consensus on a coal ban, but 
diplomats see little chance of 
success. 

West Germany imports a 
third of the £825 million 
worth of coal exported by 
South Africa to the EEC 
annually. South African iron 
and steel exports are only 
worth some £275 million, and 
gold coins £92 million. 

Herr Hans Dietrich Gens- 
cher, the West German For- 
eign Minister, said Bonn had 


lire peace hafloon take s off, carrying Mr Terry Waite and actor Bill Oddie. (Photographs: Harry Kerrand Chris Harris.) 

The balloon went op for 
peace yesterday and took Mr 
Terry Waite, foe Archbishop 
of C anterbury’s special envoy, 
with it 


EEC in sanctions deal 


opposed the coal ban not 
because of West German trade 
interests but because of the 
likely harm to black workers 
in Sou th Africa. • 

He maintained that the 
compromise had saved the 
EECs credibility, but stressed 
Bonn’s contra iung.scepticism 
over sancti ons ■" 

The Ministers laid stress on 
positive measures such as 
EEC aid to opponents of 
apartheid. 

They deplored that Pretoria 
was not ready to take nec- 
essary steps to make possible a 
national dialogue across lines 
of cO lour, politics and religion. 


Mr Waite was hnmriifag a 
peace appeal in Trafalgar 
Square as one of the pas- 
sengers in a hot air balloon. 

After a bumpy flight he 
commented: “There are easier 
ways of getting to heaven.*’ 

Mr Waite, 46, is a patron of 
the Million Minutes of Peace 
Appeal which yesterday urged 
people all ova- the world to 
stop for a minute and thinlt 
about peace. 

Children released haHnwK 
and stood in sOence for 60 
seconds. 



After a couple days of an 
SPD conference, it .is the 
terrible silence of it that 
begins to get to you. 

The only sounds tn the big 
modern ball are the speaker 
and the polite applause each 
time the speaker changes. 
Everyone else just listens. 
Furthermore, they tend to do 
it while remaining seated. 

There are not many people 
coming and going. At the 
start of the debate, the hall is 
either full or half full, and it 
tends to stay that way until 
the debate ends. 

At the Labour Party con- 
ference, the gangways are 
thronged with people chat- 
ting, plotting, scratching, 
spitting, swearing, vomiting. 
At Harrorate the only one 
doing all of those things in the 
gangways has been me. After 
three days, one realizes that 
people are looking at one in a 
disapproving fashion. So one 
joins in the great silence. 

After a while, one realizes 
that people have come here to 
listen to the speeches. Again, 
that makes the SDP con- 
ference completely different 
from the conferences. of the 
other parties. 

Labour people go to their 
conference in order to shorn 
during the speeches. Conser- 
vatives go to their conference 
in order to stand and ovate at 
the end of die speeches. 

Liberals go to theirs in 
order to make speeches. But 
the SDP has introduced a 
new kind of conference: the 
one that people go to in order 
to listen to the speeches. 

That is because the SDP is 
the party of people who are 
interested in politics. Again, 
-that is something new in this 
country. Politics is a minority 
interest in the Conservative 
Party, although the rise of a 
right-wing intelligentsia in 
recent years is be ginning to 
change that, perhaps with 
ruinous consequences for the 
years to come. 

_ The Labour Party, and the 
increasingly radicalized lib- 
eral Party, are not really 
about anything as mundane 
and complicated as politics. 
They are about more primal 
emotions: hatred of ■ / tbe 
bourgeoisie, miUenarianism, 
hysteria, still more crtches. 
The SDP is a pro-ertehe party 




too. They have set up at least 
one here in Harrogate. 

. Their advocacy of creches 
is to do with a genuine belief 
that we cannot have too 
many of the things. Labour 
and Liberal advocacy of 
ertches is obviously some 
sort of code for hatred o£ 
men. Conservatives ha vf 
nothing against crichcs, al- 
though they tend to believe 
that Britain is now producing 
far too many of them. 

What all this interest 
politics results in. then, is the 
silence. In the great days of 
BBC radio, or wireless a? 
was then known, the plays 
were often about great si- 
lences such as the one that 
has now lasted three days in 
Harrogate. The plot often 
turned on lighthouse keepers 
going mad because of one. Or 
the action would take place in 
the tropics. 

M 2 f this damn silence i 
on much longer, colonel, HI 
go mad — mad, MAD 1 tell 
you." 

“I know, Crabtree, 1 know. 

I don't Hke it. I don't like it 
one bit. There’s someth! 
going on out there, and I wisi 
to God I knew what it was.” 

In the silence of Harrogate, 
something has undoubtedly 
been going on, but what it is 
no man could teJL Perhaps it 
is the steady building up of a 
vast attack of lost deposits. 

On Monday, during the 
speeches in the debate on 
nuclear enemy, one “shame” 
was heard. There is also said 
to have been a “disgraceful”, 
a hiss, and — possibly from 
the press benches — a snore. 

Yesterday, while consid- 
ering amendments concern- 
ing the National Health 
Service, a delegate shouted: 
“What’s the position on to- 
bacco advertising. Mrs 
Williams?”, to which Mrs 
Shirley Williams replied: 
“That is out of order, as my 
friend knows.** And the man 
subsided. But all that only 
served to deepen the. 
surrounding void. (£* 

Yesterday, too, Mrs Wil- 
liams delivered her presiden- 
tial address. .She rose 
promptly on time, exactly at 
2 pm. That is almost cer- 
tainly because they had told 
here she would be on at 
11 am. 


Today's events 


. Royal engagements 
The Princess of Wales pres- 
ents the prizes at The Young 
Engineer for Britain Com- 
petition organized by The En- 
gineering Council, Wembley 
Conference Centre. 10.45. 

Princess Anne opens the 
North London Business Devel- 
opment Agency, 37 Blackstock 
Rd. N4. 4: and later attends the 
Associated Press Dinner, Mid- 
dle Temple Hall, EC4, 7.35. 

The Duke of Kent visits the 
Central Flying School RAF 
Scampton, Lincoln, 10.30. 

Princess Alexandra opens the 
new studio building of BBC 
Radio Kent. Sun Pier, Chatham, 
Kent. 10.15. 

Exhibitions in progress • 
German woodcut in the 20th 
century; City of Bristol Museum 
and An Galtery, Queen's Rd, 


Bristol; Mon to Sat 10 to 5 (ends 
Oct 19k 

" Paintings in watercolour 
pastel by Bill Senior; Redditch 
Public Library; Mon, Thurs and 
Fin 10 to 7,.Tues 10 to 5. Sat 10 
to 4 (ends Sept 27). 

Lighting Up the Landscape: 
French impressionism and its 
origins; National Gallery of 
Scotland The Mound Edin- 
fenrgh; Mon to Sat 10 to 5, Sun 2 
lo5(endsOct 19). 

Jonas SuyderhofE his por- 
traits; The FitzwiUiam Mu- 
seum, Trurapington St, Cam- 
bridge; Tues to Sat 10 to I and 2 
to5. Sun 2. 1 5 to S (ends Oct 19). 

Kidderminster Charter ex- 
hibition: Art Gallery, Market St, 
Kidderminster Mon to Sat 1 1 to 
4, closed Wed and Sun (ends 
Sept 20). 

The Enterprising Scot: audio- 
visual view of Scottish enter- 
prise: Royal Scottish Academy. 
Princes St, F J '-* ' " 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 





?!’! 




Edinburgh; Mon to 


Sat 10 to 6, Sun 1 1 to 6 (ends Oct 

Last chance to see 

Caribbean Focus: photo- 


New books — hardback 


ibbean style, by Roshini 
Kempadoo; Library, High St, 
Coalvffle, 9.30 to 7. 

Music 

Organ recital by Wj 
Turner; Goodringtnn 1«.^, 
Church, Paignton, Devon, 7.30. 

Organ recital by Thomas 
Trotter; Town. Half Birming- 
ham, I. 

Concert by the Northern 
Chamber Orchestra; Municipal 
Hall, Albert Rd, Colne, Lancs, 
7-30. 

Organ recital by Alan Thur- 
m; St Barnabas, Snakes Lane, 


[ books pubSshed this week: 
.£1295) 


The Literary Edtor’s selection of in 
g*ckck*h, by Dirk Bogarde (VMng. £ij 

Crisis w the kretnin. byBidwd Owen 

Staring at the Sim, by Julian Barnes (Cape, £9* 

ScmA y Time s, by Frank Gfles (Jofai Murray. 

Ec ° nomr - * *"■'»■** 

and «°““ 

Tsi < Z2”52? 1 555* . Waddns (Goigonooza Press, £19.50) 

JSOBUW Anatomy * *** G0orgian Navy, by Nicholas 

Travels Through the Third World, by Brian M. Schwartz- 

PH 


Through »■» • -in* nwiu, uf Bill 

(SWgwickS Jacksonj£T2S5) 1 

vohaire, by AJ. Ayer (WedenieW & Nfcobon, £1<k95) 


Roads 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,153 



ACROSS 
1 Lived for daughter, sole 
attachment (5). 

4 Bill put his name down for 
one of these creatures (9). 

9 Sentimental writer defining 
Niobe in relative terms (3- 
M. 

10 “Her pretty feci tike snails 
did — * (Herrick) (5). 

11 Ravel to triumph even- 
tually? (6). 

12 Ship crossing the bar? (SI 
14 One whose subject is world 

embracing (10). 

16 Declined to see a Doctor (4). 

19 Cry of distress — bag does 
not open (4). 

20 Warning to shut up ended 
the contract (10). 

22 Money won in card game? 

( 8 ). 

23 Amulet worn by Oscar 
abroad (6). 

26 Pinched a pan in Richard II 
(5). 

27 One who succeeds in the . 
estate business? (9). 

2S To heretic, material not 
based on fact (9). 

29 Ties up African people (5). 

DOWN 

1 Road speed potentially 
criminal (V). 

2 Joint with room for expan- 
sion 15). 

3 Frame of snooker in the mu- 
sic room ($). 


4 Sports equipment with 
ccholocation (4). 

5 Futurologist required for 
variety act with seer ( 10). 

6 It has to be lifted up to 
weigh it (6). 

7 So learned about shrubs (9). 

8 Great being a policeman (5). 
13 Land in trouble so send for 

him (10). 

35 Get back the summary — 
true version is below (91 

17 Pens for insects? (9). 

18 Handy device for making 
notes (S). 

21 Craftsman to criticize by 
right (6). 

22 Period following an Apollo 
mission? (5). 

24 Shares drop two points in 
proportion (5). 

25 Hail in some small measure 
elegance (4). 

Solution to Puzde No 17,152 
lolfcH 


low; _ w , 

Woodford Green, 8. 

Concert by the Coldstream 
Players and SchienhaUion; 
Edeaside School Kelso. 7 JO. 

Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra: Dewsbury Town Hall,' 
W Yorks, 7 JO. 

Concert by Christine Banning 
(soprano) and Nancy Cooley 
(piano): Trinity Arts Genre. 
Tunbridge Wells, 8. 

Recital by Hilary Palmer 
(oboe) and Paul Chivers (piano);. 
The Hexagon, Queens Walk, 
“fading, 1.10. 

Poole Proms Concert by the 
Bournemouth Symphony Or- 
chestra with Peter Katin (pi- 
ano); Wessex Hall Poole, 7 JO. 

Concert by the Sarum Cham- 
ber Orchestra; City Hall Shef- 
field. 7 JO. 

Talks 

Reflections on the Lakes, by 
John Wyart I JO; Traditional 
buildings and villages of Lake- 
land, by Andrew Lowe, 3.30; 
Lake District National Park 
Visitor Centre. Brockhole, 
Windermere. 

The Hats: an evening with 
David Shilling; Salisbury and 
South Wiltshire M useum, The 
Kang's House, 65 The Cose, 
Salisbury, 7 JO. 

General 

Sheffield Festival *86: Shef- 
field Polytechnic Open Day 
Exhibition: Howard St entrance, 
Sheffield, 9.30 to 7.30: Heathy 
Eating: exhibition and display; 
Science and Technology Li- 
brary, Central Library, Shef- 
field. 10 to 8.30: Under 5*8 Day: 
‘touch, look and draw 1 with 
museum animals and objects: 
City Museum, Weston Park, 
Sheffield, 10 to 4. 

Kettering Jazz Festival: Cora 
Market Halt London Rd. Ket- 
tering. today until Sal 7.30, for 
ftinher details tel: (0536) 82143. 

Frame Cheese Show; The 
Showfidd. Frame, Somerset. 9 
to 5. 


Wales and West M4: Re- 
surfacing work on iIk eastbound 
carriageway between junctions 
16 (Swindon) and 17 (Chipp- 
enham); contraflow westbound. 
A30: Temporary traffic tights at 
Goss Moor. Cornwall, between 
Bodmin and Fraddoo. A48: 
Resurfacing work on George 
Street Bridge, Newport, at the 
junction with Corporation 
Road. 

The North: AI (M> North- 
bound carriageway dosed from, 
Bowbum interchange for just 
over a mQe northwards; contra- 
flow. M6I: Construction of new 
motorway ink at Walton Sum- 
mit; inside lane closures on both 
N and southbound carriage- 
ways. Middlesbrough.- Road- 
works on the Parkway, Middles- 
brough. between Greystones 
roundabout and the junction 
with A 172; contraflow. 

Scotland: M8 (Glasgow);, 
Construction work ' between 
junctions 17 (Dumbarton) and 
15 (city centre); eastboimd 
carriageway closed. M8 (Glas- 
gow): Bridge work between junc- 
tions 29 (Paisley) and 30 (Erskfn 
bndgek eastbound carriageway 
dosed. M9: Bridge work be- 
tween junction 10 (Stirling) and 
9(Dounel 

Information supplied by AA 


Anniversaries 


Birth: Wfl H a m Carlos WH- 
fiams, poet, Rutherford, New 
Jersey, 1883. 

Deaths: Tobias Smollett, nov- 
elist, Leghorn, Italy. 1771; Al- 
fred de Vigny, poet, Paris, 1863; 
Walter Savage Laador, Flor- 
ence^l864; WOEuu Henry Fox 

Lacock Abbey, Wfltshire!j 
Roth Benedict an thro pd 

New York, 1948; Court 

n a d ot te , diplomat, assassinated, 
Jerusalem. 1948. 

The constitution of the 
United States was signed, 1787. 


Weather 
forecast 

A ridge of high pressure 
will dominate the weather 
over most of the British 
Isles. A shallow wave 
depression will move 
northeastwards over 
France with the clond 
affecting the SE of En- 
gland at first Weak 
fronts from the Atlantic 
will affect N Scotland 
later. 

6 am to m idnight 

e a "S b *» s, 

SW Itogtand, E Mdhmda: Sunny 
periods, afaw fog patches at test, 





13 




New coach terminal 


Two rites at Paddington and- 
Vauxhall are identified as the 
front-runners for a new Central 
London coach terminal in a 
report to London Regional 
Transport. 

The view of the local authori- 
ties and local residents are now 
being canvassed on the two 
preferred sites, before firm pro- 
posals are put . forward. Two 
public meetings are being held. 
The first one on September 24 at 
St Anselm's Church Hall, 
Kenningtofl Road, SE1, at 7 pm; 
the second on September 25 at 
Porchester Hail, Porchester 
Road, W2, at 7 pm 


isolated showers; wind NE backing 
N. Baht or moderate; max tamp 15C 

at first, 

era tebutft osfion boasts; max temp 
14C157R. 

u w «wn*, Wale*, NW, central 
N, WE England. Lake District: 
Sunny periods, a tew fog patches at 
fi ret, p erhaps a few showers; wind 
NBgn or moderate: max temp 15C 

at 

later; wind NEmodarats or fresh; 
max temp 14C(57 Rl, . 

.. M? of Man Aontera, Edinburgh, 
Dundee, Abfrieon. SW Scotland, 
Qtoagow, Central HgUands, Ar- 
gyll Northern tratand: Isolated 
shraraKvrind NW fight; max temp 

I*. MW Scotland, 
Oiknay, . Shetland: Sunny intervals 
andfflatoad showers; wind NW 
jwcjdng W moderate; max temp 12C 

^Oudook for tomorrow and Friday: 
°n sunny jpwjpds in most 

i but in the Nof Scotland it wiB 



High Tides 


Avon moiM 


TODAY AM Iff HI ht 

London Bridge 1.55 7.0 2-13 aS 

AlXWfaou 1.07 42 750 42 

J-W 125 753 13.1 
11-17 3 2 11.27 3.6 

T-19 115 7.37 12.1 
&2 BJS3 5JB 
11-26 6.4 11.51 6 J 

5.46 6.0 503 6,4 

1246 4 JS 1.15 42 

’eon 5-3 t&Ss 58 
520 72 7.04 72 

516 57 6.34 92 

,2-38 5A 3.12 55 

M KB® || 

seSS*™ hj g «2 n 

" Mto ar 5 21 8.7 540 7 1 

£1?" 625 3.6 6.30 aj 

I0S 6-3 530 SJ 
•" ****■ -I 725 2.0 7,42 23 

5-JO 9.0 6J7 9.5 

Arrows, snow wind direction, wind A2E* 3-37 S3 4.17 si 

cirdetL 11^7 Jo M 

l-2808ft 


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T* 1 ** oMMiwad Mi metres: lac 


Around Britain 


■'fitTra 



be mostty doudy with a BMle rain at 
times. Temperatures returning to 
normal. 


Sun Rain 

EAST COAST 1 ” 
Scaibofo . 3 J 
Wcteision 53 - 


Max 
C F 


Sun Rain 
Us Mi 


_Max 
C F 


The pound 


Bank 



Concise Crossword page 10 


Bank 


JMS5 2JS3S 

AoatnaSch mn\ jijjo 

M^umFT 6500 BZAO 

CanadaS 2.11 202 

BWtfJT tMB 11J0 

FMandMkk 7.70 72P 

France Fr 1527 927 

Da 515 2JU 

^ ~ 19500 

J5«9lto«lS 11.75 HJtS 

Inland Pt 1.145 ijas 

218500 206560 

JapanVaa 242.00 22506 

IfO ratM daGM 3055 3065 

1129 HUB 

FonjplEae 22500 21300 

Soulti Africa Hd 4^5 MS 

20AS 1945 

a^danKr 1051 1006 

Swteflandft 2555 2415 

USA* 154 157 

Yugoslavia IMf 73500 

Rata* lor smal danttirinaton banknotes! 
oe*fas w«*M by Bardaya Bat* PLC- 
Ratal Rice bafts 38&A 

Uadon: The FT Index dOMd dram 27.4 ] 
« icbLZ. 


^Jg^PortfoUo Ootd rates art » 

1 Tkr»M Portfolio H fret. Purchase 

b not a condition of 

uuns pan. 

2 Tlrctoa Portfolio UA eww wto e s it 
uroup or pubUc comptnits whose 
spares are luted on the stock 
LxctJinfje aad quoted In Tbe Times 

MKaSriSTteTfe Z5S 

conioms two oinnoers from aacti 

croup aid oci cant contains a 

uniqor set of numbers. 

3 JS * 3 portfolio tflvidenir win be 
JS? JHSS * ranee which represents 
the o ptimu m movemenl In prkes (Ia 

Ui* l argest increase or toweMkralora 
combination of «fihl (IwoboaT^ 
rarKtor^ dUCIbuxed^^ 

44 shares) of the 44 shares wMch on 
comprue nTag 

•> TIM daily dividend will be 
announced each day and Dm weekly 

m^Kiend win beanSSwiced ma 

Saturday In The Turns. 

— 9 . g Jha overall uric* movement or 
More than one comHnaaon of sharac 
eauau the dividend, the nru* OST 
MUJIy divided amono the 
ttouioe those comMnMians ofSwei 
7 All (Wns are subieci to scrutiny 

^gerdy^pnmea in any u-»y win be 

a Employees of News Inienutuorui 
mc ana U» subsidiaries and or 
Europruil Group Limited tDroducen 
and distributors 'StoHS 

rtwmbers or thetr imniedlatc hMUcs 
K«f5S. aUow « 1 ‘° TlmS 

, h ? r AH.OMbchpma Win be suMed to 
Uiese Rules All l nstnxiiMfl u bow 

Jg^g' ahd “howto ciaun~ wnethor 
. T. P * .T 1 ?” W In Times 
5 J. * 2 E£ "S ,ra deemed to be 

«* ,,?***. .Rulra. The Editor 
reserves the nou to amend the Ruiea, 

The Editor's 

®®*w b final and no carrasDQn- 

denco will be entered, 


II If for any reason The Times 
Prices . Papa Knot published in me 
normal wav Times Portfolio wffl be 
suspended cor mat day. 

„ How to play - DaNy OMdasaf 

on the Stock exchange prices page. 

in trie columns provided next to 
your shares note the price change t+ 
« i in pence, as punusned in that 
day’s Tunes. 

After ttsttng the nice ch an ges of 
youretaiu shares for uundayTadd up 
aB eight mare changes ngive you 
your overall total plus or minm(+ w: 

CTkic* yewr overall total aoalnst The 
won outncht or a sSue ofui S3 

gteAREMlB 


M ja wenntna 
total. 


Add these 

vour weekly 

g™^*"** bt Mssgtad oonus mast 


Sunrises: 
538 am 


Son sets: 

7.11 pnj 


L. A Moon rats: Moonrisn 
5-18 «n 7.15 pm 
Fte moon tomorrow 


Li ghtin g-op time 


U»dan74ipni05ioan 
Bristol 751pm to 519 an * 
C dtafe w fl h 756 pm to 519 am 
H anch asiST 75i pm to 517 am 
Pananeg 502 pm n 532 am 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at midday yestardnr: c. 
ctoud; t, fair; r, min; s, sun. 

. C F 
f 1152 
f 1254 
f 1355 
f 1254 
Cardiff 11254 

EdUburah ell 52 ... 

Glasgow e1152 mridsany 


Travel information 



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H»a» are Monday's figure 



British Telecom’s pre-re- 
corded Traadme service gives 
regularly updated information 
on travel in Britain and on the 
Continent, i n d odi n g details of 
weather conditions, strikes or 
other problems likely to affect 
travellers. I talk 01-246 8030; 
Road (jndodiBE coach services): 
01 24o-803lTSeiL r 01-246 8032 
Ain 01-246 8033. 



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■ 10 50 L Palms 
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I 19 66 Locarno 
e 27 81 t Angela* 
S 28 79 I inauSiu 
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: ■: p 




BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


f-l r^' fcd 


i»l:W»JW 


f noiDssrr 




Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STQCKMARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1262.2 (-274) 
FT-SE 100 
1596.7 (-31.6) 
Bargains 


USM ( Da t as t r eam) 
124.23 (-0.65) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4745 (-0.0070) 

W German marie 
3.0213 (-0.0160) 

Trade-weighted • 
70.9 (-0.2) 


Reebok in 
$ 1 18 m deal 


By Lawrence Lerex 


The Stock Exchange and the 
International Securities Ran- 


era ble proportion of the lop for formulating a rule book 
OKI of our domestic equity governing manors such as 

membership, conduct of busi- 
"The marketability of ness and compensation, which 
sec unties in the Stock Ex- must satisfy the requirements 
change would be bound to of the SIR 

' rf St 1 ** " *i« ta l™™ « Ik 

SSter ■ s “* i “ Association, and 

headded will have a governing; body of 

t*,- misu. i... , Koi .. - 25. made up of nine prac- 

ofiheBankomfplw^^hf tilioneis each appointed by 
SerarhSr ISRO and the Stock Exchange. 

fST U £$ a 

bipartite structure consisting JJthe? ^ ^ 

ofa self-regulating oiganiz^ . ° 80 

lion and a Recognized Invest- in dcpenderu member. 


laiorv Organization yesterday . market, 
announced they were to join **The marketability of 
forces, bringing the trading of ■ securities in the Stock Ex- 
gilis. domestic and foreign change would be bound to 
equities and options under suffer if market-making firms 
one roof. :• switched part of their risk: 

Sir Nicholas Goodison. the capital to another exchange." 
Stock Exchange chairman, in be added, 
a letter to the Exchange's . .. The move has the blessing 
members described the move of the Bank ofEngland and the 
as a “historic decision". He Securities and Investments 
said: “The new unified Suxk Board. U will create a new 
Exchange would become not bipartite structure consisting 


only a very significant force in 
Massachusetts -the trade m international 


Canton, Massachusetts 
(AP-Dow Jones) — Reebok 
International .announced here 
that agreement in principle 
has been reached for the 
purchase of Rockport Go, a 
footwear manufacturer, of 
Marlboro, Massachusetts. The 
purchase price is $118.5 mil- 
lion (£80.07) in cash, and the 
acquisition is expected to be 
completed by November I. 

Rockport had sales of $64 
million in 1985, and its sales 
in 1986 are expected to be 
about Si 00 million. 

Rockport, which will op- 
erate autonomously, will be- 
come a wholly-owned 


73% accept 

Corton Beach, which is 
bidding for Tern Group, has 
acceptances for 73.7 per cent 
of die ordinary shares, 100 per 
cent of redeemable shares and 
97.2 per cent of preference 
shares. The offer is con- 
ditional on acceptances for 90 
per cent of the ordinary 
shares. 

Croda up 15% 

Croda International, the 
speciality chemicals group, 
yesterday announced pretax 
profits up 1 5 per cent at £1 1.8 
million for the six months to 
June 29 on turnover down 18 
per cent The interim divi- 
dend was unchanged at 3p net 
Tempos, page 22 , 


.securities, but possibly the merit Exchange, each having 
most important such market their own governing body but 
in the world". sharing a common admin- 

Discussions oh the istration. Both the SRO and 
possiblily of a link-up have R IE will be governed by equal 

numbers of representatives 


been held since the end of last numbers of representatives 
year, after concern that the from the Stock Exchange and 
formation of ISRO. chaired by ISRO. 

Mr lan Steers, to regulate -The new body 1 will be 
international securities as well responsible for the rules of 
as Eurobonds, could lead to conduct of Eurobond traders 
fragmentation of the equity but not for the actual trading 
markerin London. Sir Nicho- of Eurobonds. This will be 
las said in yesterday's letter to governed by the Association 
members that this “could oflntemaiional Bond Dealers, 
have creamed off a consid- The SRO will be responsible 


independent member. 

At the same time ISRO and 
the Stock Exchange will form 
a single Recognized Invest- 
ment Exchange under the 
impending financial services 
legislation. This will provide 
an organized market frame- 
work. containing provisions i 
for monitoring and reporting 
transactions. 

The new RIE will be of- 
ficially named the Inter- 
national Stock Exchange of 
the United Kingdom and the 
Republic of Ireland, but 
known as the Stock Exchange. 




Ian Steers, left, and Sir Nicholas Goodison annoandng the link-up of the Stock Exchange 
and ISRO at the Bank of England yesterday. 

Governor pessimistic on 
regulation of markets 


Tokyo triggers fall US deficit 
in world markets 

By Teresa Poole /jDII 


By Richard Thomson 

The Governor of the Bank of Consumer Affairs, took a 
Pagfandj Mr Robin Leigh- (mtrastingview onfoeregmbi- 


' By Teresa Poole 

Stockmarkets worldwide 1761.95, down 5.63, cheered 
again went into decline yes- by a denial from the Federal 
terday, led by .the Tokyo Bank Regulator that Rank of 
market which suffered its America had problems. A 


largest one day M. 

This reversal more than 


slight 0-1 per cent rise in 
August industrial production 


wiped out Monday's gains in rafmwfl some inflationary 
London when the market had fears, but fo il ed to prompt a 


staged a partial recovery after rally, 
last week's plunge in share Dez 


London 


prices. But a later recovery in scribed trading as thin and 
New York; prompted hopes cautious and said that con- 
that share prices could now ditions remained volatile. 


stablize. 


"Everyone is watching every- 


Tokyo, which had been shut one else," said one analyst 


on Monday for a .national 
holiday, closed 637.33 points 


T nwo knxri?"' • lower at 17,463. and set the 
JuU“C UUj scene for nervous trading 

Robert H Lowe is to acquire ■.*« «st of iht 

Nelsons Labels (Manchester) w, * r “- . ... 

and C U Black for a total of . .opened quietly as 

£1.4 million through the issue dealers waited for New. York 
of 1.17 million shares. Nel- 10 start., trading. Bin stock 
sons is a lithographic primer tnaitet jitters set in by noon 
and Black a textile merchant, pmd rumours, which were 
T .« , , later dismissed by the bank as 

I JN dealS "irrespnsible and absolutely 

„ „ groundless", that 

Cement-Koadstone Hold- Bankamerica was in financial 
ings is buying two California difficulties, 
companies -California Con- jh e FT-SE 100 shareindex, 

* which by mid afternoon had 
$15 milbcm (£1.69 million) feifen 35.9 1591.4 recov- 

and Hurst Concrete Products ^ slightly to dose 31.6 
for $3.4 million (£2.29 down atl596.7 while the FT 
million). 30 share index closed 27.4 

Evcrcd rises l0 to r the 1 uR^ie dow jo»» 


The sharp fell in Japan, its 
second record-breaking de- 


million). 30 share index closed 27.4 

Evered rises I °^foe 1 UsT^ Dow Jones 

Evered Holdings, the en- industrial average lost 22.78 
gineering group, increased its points in eariy trading. By 
pretax profits from £2.5 mil- noon it had recovered to 
lion to £4.19 million in the 
first half of the year. The 
interim dividend goes up from 
1.25pto I.75pashare. 

Tempos, page 22 

£2m call 

Bromsgrove Industries is 
raising £Z29 million through 
a two-for-lhree rights issue at 
70p a share. The cash will 

provide working capital and *“ c unig is 

ftexibDity in financing farther surmar to Fisons other main 
acquisitions and will reduce anti asthma product, Intel, 
borrowings. whirfi has been in the group s 

« -m portfolio for 15 years. Tilade is 

I\0 reierrai not expected to replace Intel, 

Monopolies Commission. aod intrinsic asthma. 

Fisons is market leader in 
this type of respiratory drug. 
In 1985, Intel and associated 
products accounted for about 


krwerat l 7,463. 19 and. set the cfmeoirtwoworlaHgdays, was 
scene for nervous trading seen as a response — delayed 
throughout the rest of the by the holiday — to wall 

world. Street's decline on Friday. 

London opened quietly as Many leading equities 
dealers waited for New. York showed fells of double figures 
to start trading. But stock with international stocks 
market jitters set in by noon . among the hardest hit. Glaxo 
amid rumours, which were lost 15p to 935p, Beecbams 
later dismissed by the bank as 13p to 393p. BP I2p to 6S3p, 
"irrespnsible and absolutely and Jaguar I Op to 503p. 
groundless", that Fisons, which produced in- 

Bankamerica was in financial terim results at the bottom 
difficulties. end of expectations, lost 20p 

The FT-SE 100 shareindex, to 581p. 
which by mid afternoon had British Government bonds 
fallen 36.9 to 1591.4, recov- were also lower generally 
ered slightly to dose 31.6 down between % and 116 by 
down at 1596.7 while the FT the dose. 

30 share index closed 27.4 On the foreign exchange 
lower at 1262J2. markets, sterling eased 

In the US, the Dow Jones slightly, losing, three quarters 
industrial average lost 22.78 of a cent to 1.4745 against the 
points in eariy iradmg. By dollar while the effective ex- 
noon it had recovered to changerate slipped 0.2 to 70.9. 


From Mohsin All, 
Washington 

The United States current 
account deficit was a record 
$3473 billion (£23.47 biflion) 
in the second quarter of this 
year, the Depart m ent of Com- 
merce announced yesterday. 

The figure eclipsed the pre- 
vious revised shortfall of 
$34.04 billion in foe first 
quarter. The deficit in the 
second quarter of 1985 was 
$29.42 biflion. 

The new figure came amid 
fears that the country is likely 
to surpass the $1 17.68 billion 
record deficit — the figure 
includes trade and mer- 
chandise and services and 
financial transactions — for 
the whole of 1985. Earlier 


Pemberton, yesterday cast 
gloom over foe prospect of 
achieving an inteniational sys- 
tem of regulation for securities 
markets. 

He emphasized, however, 
that such a system was more 
than ever necessary as 
increasing globalization of eq- 
nity markets created a danger 
of too lax or too strict super- 
vision of nkarket participants. 

Mr Ldgh-Pemberton told 
international bankers and 
supervisors: “The difficulties 
associated with different 
regulations, and foe variety of 
supervisors involved, suggest 
to me that a multilateral 
approach is unlikely to make 
rapid progress." 

But, in a speed to the same 
group, Mr Michael Howard, 
Minister for Corporate and 


tiou of international equities. 


supervision this raised. The 
number of companies with 
shares quoted on more than 


He said: “I believe the one market has doubled since 
necessary agreements can be 1984. 


readied without doing violence 
to foe essential principles and 
style of each country's regu- 
latory regime.” 

Mr Howard added that the 
Memorandum of Understand- 
ing, covering the exchange of 
information about financial 
fraud, was being signed with 
foe US authorities next week, 


Sr Kenneth BemH, chair- 
man of the Securities and 
Investment Board, told the 
meeting that a pragmatic ap- 
proach to international regula- 
tion was necessary. It mold 
have to be done piecemeal if it 
was ever to be achieved. 

Mr Leigh-Pemberton told 


and he hoped agreements with gatberkg ttat financial 
other countries, particularly conglomerates whose risks 


Japan, would follow. 

The speeches were made to 
the Group of 30 Symposium — 


were spread across different 
markets were less prone to 
collapse, bat they were more 


chaired by Lord Richardson of complicated to supervise. 
Duntisboume, a former gov- A lead regulator in each 
ernor of the Bank of England market was needed, but no 
— which was to dis- solution to differences of 

enss the globalization of equity regulation Between countries 
markets and foe problems of had yet been found. 


August PSBR soars to £1.8 bn 


yesterday foe Federal Reserve The public sector borrowing 
Board reported foal US indus- requirement was £1.8 billion 
trial production increased by in August, well above City 
0.1 per cent in August after a expectations. However, 
revised 03 per cent increase in. borrowing is running below 


David Smith, Economics Correspondent 
The public sector borrowing usual But, after a run of low exclu 


icit feu by $400 net repayment of: 


July. 

Although the merchandise 
trade deficit fell by $400 
million to $36 billion in foe 
second quarter, an increase in 
unilateral transfers, including 
US foreign aid, more than 


last year’s levels. 

The figure compared with a 
net repayment of £200 million 
in July. The cumulative 
borrowing requirement for foe 
first five months of the 
1986/87 fiscal year was £3.8 


oflset the decline. Exports rose billion, compared with £43 
by $1.1 billion because of gold billion in the corresponding 
shipped to Japan. period of last rear. 

Imports rose by $700 mil- Treasury officials said that 
lion. The higher intake of cans foe average August PSBR for 
and capital equipment was foe previous force years was 
partly oflset by a drop in oil £13 billion, and so last 
imports. month’s figure was not un- 


usual. But, after a run of low 
borrowing figures, City an- 
alysts had expected a figure of 
■ around £1 billion. 

The PSBR has not yet been 
- affected by lower oil prices. 
Next month, according to the 
Treasury there will be net 
repayments of around £1 bil- 
lion on advanced petroleum 
revenue tax payments. This 
compares with PRT receipts 
of £13 billion in September 
last year. 

Government revenues are 
running ahead strongly. In the 
first five months of 1986/87, 
receipts were 12 percent up on 
foe corresponding period of 
last year, or 15.75 per cent 


excluding oil revenues. 

Supply services expenditure 
in foe first five months was 
three per cent up on the 
corresponding period of 
1985/86. 

The central government 
borrowing requirement was 
£1.1 billion last month, while 
local authorities borrowed a 
net £03 billion. 

After foe July PSBR figures. 
Gty analysts began to antici- 
pate a substantial undershoot 
of this year’s £7.1 billion 
official target. Yesterday, the 
mobd was more cautious, 
although the general view was 
that borrowing remains 
broadly on target. 


Subsidies 


imuuR 


threatens 
Gatt talks 

From Bailey Morris 

Panto del Este, Uruguay 

The European Economic 
Community will uy to change 
world trade ministers' stand 
on agriculture in a move that 
could lead to a bitter 
confrontation with the US and 
developing countries during 
foe Gait negotiations here on 
a new work! trade round. 

Me Willy de Clercq, the 
EEC external relations and 
trade commissioner, said yes- 
terday the Common Market 
countries would seek "more 
balanced language" in foe 
final communique under 
consideration by ministers. 

Mr Paul Channon.The Sec- 
retary of Suite for Trade and 
Industry who is playing a key 
role in foe negotiations, said, 
however, he was confident of a 
solution. 

Ministers from other coun- 
tries warned that if foe EEC 
attempted to “open up" the 
language in the working docu- 
ment, other countries would 
follow suit, releasing a flood of 
new proposals that could 
wreck a new world trade 
round. 

The ministers from India 
and Brazil strongly opposed 
proposals by the US and 
Europe to include services. 

Developing countries are 
particularly hostile to EEC 
subsidy policies. Seiior Julio 
Sangmnetli, the Uruguayan 


LMiaiiliailJW'rlilJWlLVi 1 * ■ U KliilLk 


cal problem is with foe Euro- 
pean Community. There is a 
problem with the United 
States but to a much lesser 
degree." 

Mr de Clercq was also 
confident a compromise 
would be reached. "If we fail 
here, it will be foe beginning of 
foe end of the multilateral free 
trade system," he said. 

The US and a group of 
agricultural exporting nations, 
led by Australia, Argentina 
and Thailand, the “Cairns 
group", want even stronger 
wording to restrict subsidies. 

Mr Clayton Yeutier, foe US 
trade representative, gave 
wanting that agriculture was 
just one of foe issues inciting 
the US Congress to consider 
foe most protectionist legisla- 
tion since foe 1930s. 

Mr Yeutter said he must 
leave here by foe weekend 
with a strong agreement in 
hand to use in his negotiations 
with the Senate. US officials 
predicted the bill would be 
passed by foe Senate before 
foe November elections which 
are heavily focused on trade 
issues. 

President Reagan, who has 
threatened to veto foe bill 
said at foe weekend: the 
"Friendly nations, trying to 
help domestic producers, are 
undermining foe well-being of 
formers all over foe world. 
The situation is intolerable." 

US subsidies are estimated 
at $35 billion a year and EEC 
subsidies are estimated at $22 
to $25 billion. 

Gatt shoot-out, page 26 


Fisons names day for 
Tilade launch in UK 

By Alexandra Jackson 

Tilade, Hsons' much ac- 40 per cent of Hsons' profits. 


claimed anti-asthma drug, is 
to be launched in foe UK on 
September 22. The drug is 


which has been in thejgroup's 
portfolio for 1 5 years. Tilade is 
not expected to replace Intel, 
but will complement it, being 
suitable for foe treatment of 


Tempi* 22 Traded Opts 23 
Walt Street 22 Mwmv Mrlds 23 
Co News 22 Uik Tiwts 24 
Cwuaeot 23 GNnnodities 24 
Stock Market 23 USM Prices 24 
FeretKB Exch 23 Shot Pres 25 


The market for treating the UK company most ex- 
these diseases is estimated to posed to foe political turmoil 
be worth $13 billion per. m South Africa, said yesterday 
annum and turnover from h bad no intention of reducing 
Tilade could grow to £200- its investments there unless 
million by the end of foe mandatory sanctions forced it- 
decade, earning £50 milllorL to do so. 

The Tilade announcement Mr Rudolph Agnew, foe 
accompanied foe croup's half company s chairman, said it 
year results. Pre-tax profits would comply with foe law if 
rose by 24 per cent to £373 mandatory sanctions were ap- 
millionontnmover2percent P lie d- but would not be af- 
ahead at £327.8 million. The rated by voluntary measures 
dividend was increased from as it was an investor, rather 


No plans to disinyest 
says Consgold 

By Ridtard Lander 

Consolidated Gold Fields, and direct stakes in a_ number 


2.16pto235p. 


Tempos, page 22. 


than a producer. 

Consgold owns 48 per cent 
of Gold Fields of South Africa, 


of gold mines there. The 
operating profit of foe South 
African interests fell from £64 
miflion to £55.4 million 
Contributions from its 
other mining interests in 
Australia and North America, 
as well as the ARC construc- 
tion material subsidiary, in- 


- - ■-■•m- • ‘i* • i 


and property profits and a loss 
on the investment' portfolio 
meant that group pretax prof- 
its slipped from £1 14.9 mil- 
lion to £110.9 million. 
Consgold is paying a 'final 
dividend of 16p, to make an 
unchanged total of 24.5p. 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


People’s ghost haunts talks 


By Harvey Elliot, Air Correspondent 


NevrYoik 

Dow Jones 1758.86 (-8.72T 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 17643.19 (-637.33) 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 192757 (-1437) 

Amsterdam: Gen 288.1 (+1 .6) 

Sydney: AO 1222.1 (-23) 


RISES: 

Hall Engineering . 
Wedgewood — 
Tops Estates — 


Amsterdam: Gen 288.1 (+1.6) 

S ydn ey. AO 1222.1 (-23) 

Commerzbank 2035.0 (same) 

Brussels: 

General 3950.98 (+4A89) 

Paris; CAC 377 J) (-83) 

Zurich: 

SKA General. n/a 

London dosing prices Page 25 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base; 10% 

3-month Interbank 9 ,6 is-4)V#> 
3-month eligible bate# r, 3?-9V ; «> 
Ogping/ate 

Prime Rate 7.50% 

Federal Funds 5 ,3 «%* 

3-month Treasury Kite 5.12-5.11%’ 
30-year bonds 34^3^-94^* j 

CURRENCIES 

London: Now Y oric 

fc St .4745 £: SI .4720 

Z: DM3.021 3 $: DM2.0500 

L SwFr2.4425 S: Index: 1108 

t FFr9.8976 

I: Yen230.54 ECU £0693617 
i lndex:70-9 SDR £0.814205 


— 188p (+10p 
; — 371p (+16p 

— 260p f +20p 

^.118p(+13p 

— 940p (+20p 
35p(+14p 


Ctty of Aberdeen. 
Shama ware 

FALLS: 

Turner & NewaM - 
Mowtem (John) _ 

Memoc 

oalgety 

Matthews B 

Unigate 

Storehouse 

WooJworth 

Coats Vtyefla — 

Fisons 

iCGas . — — . — 

Barclays 

GRE 

RTZ 

■Bromsgrove tnd - 


GOLD 

London Fixing: 

AM $41H55 pm-$4l7.25 
d068 $414.00-415.00 (£20055- 
281.00) 

Nmj Ymc 

Comex S417.1 0-41735* 

NORTH SEA OIL 

Brent (Oct) pm$1335bW«14.l 
‘Denotes Latest tradb» price 



When Mr John Moore, the 
Secretary ef State for Trans- 
port opens the debate on air 
transport liberalization be- 
tween European transport 
ministers * in London next 
month foe spectre of People 
Express wflj be ever present 
■ For what happened in the 
United States this week - 
when People Express .was 
swallowed op by the rapidly 
expanding Texas Air — has 
■given pause for thought to aD 
those in Europe who wanted 
liberalization and hoped that 
Europe's air transport in- 
dustry could be reformed 
overnight. 

Ever since the Americans, 
opted for complete deregola* 
tion eight years ago, experts 
have .warned of foe growth of 
‘‘mega carriers'"— huge domi- 
nant airlhws which would 
swsunp foe popular routes and 
later, when competition had 
vanished, in crease- prices from 
their position of monopoly. 

So far there has been little 
evidence that sneb blatant 


anti-competitiveness is 
happening and passei^ers are 
benefiting from the com- 
petition and lower fares that 
deregnlators predicted. 

Bat foe demise of People 
Express as an independent 
force is an example of how 
complete freedom can lead to 
foe survival of a few only. And 
the European ministers, with 
foe strident backing of their 
national airlines, wffll be anx- 
ious to ensure that *nch a 
problem does not arise in 
Europe. 

Since 1978 there has been* 
succession of takeovers and 
mergers among American air- 
lines. People Express took 
over a number of smaller 
carriere which had tried to 
compete but could not match 
foe financial backing of bigger 
rivals. Now People Express 
has fallen victim to the cost 
cutting that has led to lower 
standards 

Texas Air, one of the biggest 
ahfines in foe US, already 
owns Continental . and New 


York Air is in the final stages 
of negotiation to devour East- 
ern. If it sacceeds it will 
become one of the new breed of 

mega carriers capable of 
flattening all rivals. 

Other US airlines have 
made similar takeovers and 
Northwest, Delta and TWA 
have emerged as foe giants. 

Now the US Senate and hir 
trading authorities are worried 
about the monster they have 
created unwittingly when they 
proudly announced their plans 
for complete freedom of the 
skies. 

The European Ministers, 
who may have thought that 
. they could strike a deal to take 
their airiines.some way down 
this path, may now change 
their minds ami turn against 
the British who are keener to 
follow foe route taken by foe 
Americans. 

What happened in America 
this week conW mean that the 
rhink of light that mg show- 
ing in European aviation pol- 
icy has grown somewhat 
dimmer. 


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Ai's D FINANCE 

ULTRAMAR 

Ufaamar PLC 
Turnover in year ending 
31 December WS5: £2357,800.000. 
Source: Annual Report 1 1/3/86. 


THE TIMES WHPNKSDAy SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


WALL STREET 


BURMAH 

The Bumiah Oil pic 
Turnover net of duties fn year ending 
31 December l«W5- £1/57.900.000. 
Source; Annual Report IQ/4/86. 




FREE; Three months' expert ’“I 

t':C* moneymaking advice. I 

To: Atcor investments limited. Freepost. 8-16 Earl Street. I 

London EC2A2EB. Please send me the nen three isaies of Peisonal | 
Asset Review at no cost or obligation. I ucufciafea be happy for you to | 
phone me with urgent unformation regarding Individual share issues. 

hixJi | 

Name ah mi> mu — - — - — — — — ■ 


Dow tumbles in 
early trading 


New York (Agencies) - 

Speculators were punished In 
early trading- yesterday as 
shares again took the down- 
wants path, and Monday’s 
modest advance was quickly 
wiped out. 

The dedine in overseas 
markets and reports that 
Bankamerica would need bas- 
ing oat - strongly denied by 


the bank — poshed prices 
lower. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average was down 17.86 points 
to 1,749.72, and the trans- 
portation index fell 9-25 to 
731.50. 

Among the active stocks 
were Philip Morris, 114 lower 
at 64*4, and IBM, down IVk at 
136. 



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UcmcdduterinwaMh^AsubAiurtdiMunioCoipeattple 


• HALL ENGINEERING: In- 
terim dividend 4.03p (3.66p) for 
the Jim half of 1986. payable on 
Nov. 6. Turnover £6272 mil- 
lion (£63.25 million). Pretax 
profit £242 million (£1.88 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share !0.79p 
(8.9p). 

• BERNARD MATTHEWS: 
Interim dividend of IJ25p 
(G.93p) to reduce the disparity 
between payments. It will be 
paid on Oct. 31. Sales for the 28 
weeks to July 13. £63.46. million 
(£56.88 million). Pretax profit 
£7.01 million (£627 million). 
Earnings per share 7.02p (6.0p). 

• YULE CATTCh Six months 
to June 30. Interim dividend 3p 
— a 20 per cent increase, h wiil 
be paid on Oct. 17. Turnover 
£57.8 million (£6351 million). 
Pretax profit £3.93 million 
(£4.88 million). Earnings per 
Share I3.0p (1 1 .Op). The board 
reports that the industrial opera- 
tions should continue to prosper 
and. making allowance for the 
deterioration in the price of 
palm oiL the overall results for 
the year should prove 
satisfactory. 

• GRAINGER TRUST: 
Grainger has exchanged con- 
tracts with the Trustees of the 
Portsmouth Settled Estates for 
the acquisition of 300 acres to 
the south-west of Basingstoke. 
Hampshire, for £32.57 million. 
Basingstoke and Deane Borough 
Council has granted outline 
planning permission for the 
buildingofovcr2l00 homes on 
the land which will constitute a 
substantial pan of the land 
available lor new housing in 
Basingstoke over the next few 
years. After the transaction, the 
Trustees will hold about 20 per 
cent of Grainger's ordinary 
capital. 

• HEITON HOLDINGS: The 
purchase of M Doherty hqs been 
completed. The sale by Doherty 
of Davis King and Myshall 
investment have also been 
completed. 

• M ABLER ESTATES: 
Rivcrmoor Properties and its 
subsidiaries. Bloomsbury 
Square Estate (Holdings) and 
White Hall Flats, have been 
bought for a nominal consid- 
eration. Marlcr has also ac- 
quired. fbr £7.5 million, a debt 
of that sum due by Rivcrmoor 
to London Trust. Bloomsbury 
and White Hall own a portfolio 
of commercial and residential 


COMPANY NEWS 


properties in Bloomsbury. Lon- 
don. Marlcr intends to dispose 
of these properties as dealing 
stock. 

• F A C EUROTRUST: Year 
to June 30. Total revenue 
£805.474 (£557,327). Earnings 
per share l.90p (205p). 

• BRADSTOCK GROUP: The 
group has bought a controlling 
interest in a reinsurance broking 
company headed by Mr Vincent 
Byrne at minimal cost to 
strengthen the group's marine 
reinsurance broking division. 
This company has been re- 
named Bradstock Byrne and 
Partners. 

• PITTARD GROl/Pi First 
half of 1986. Interim dividend 
I.l2p (0.96p. adjusted). U will 
be paid on Jan. 2 Turnover 
home £13.11 million (£((.71 
million) and export £10.09 mil- 
lion (£9.04 million). Pretax 
profit £1.74 million (£1.33 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share 9.2p 
(7.5p). The board tell sharehold- 
ers that, although conditions 
generally are not particularly 
buoyant. Pi Hard has positioned 
itself strategically so as to be 
able to make further steady 
progress throughout the rest of 
year. 

• ESTATES AND GENERAL 
INVESTMENTS: Interim divi- 
dend 0.9p (0.82 p). payable on 
Nov. 12 for the six months to 
June 30. Turnover £1.94 million 
(£266 million). Pretax profit 
£608.000 (£593.000). Earnings 
per share 2Sp (23p). 

• CD BRAMALL: Six months 
to June 30. Interim dividend 
263p (26p). payable on Nov. 
25. The board proposes a onc- 
for-onc scrip issue. Turnover 
£62.06 million (£41.9 million). 
Pretax profit £206 million 
(£1.81 million). The board ex- 
pects the full year's results to be 
satisfactory. 

• FERGUSON INDUSTRIAL 
HOLDINGS: The company has 
disposed of two further off- 
shoots. both of which arc un- 
related to its main activities — 
printing, packaging and plastics. 
The larger is Allan Kennedy, 
which has been sold to Twit for 
£422000 cash. Ferguson has 
also sold Hodgctts and Mole to 
Grccngatc Woodtuming ( (940). 
a subsidiary of the Chillington 
Corporation, for £165.000 cash. 

• DOM HOLDINGS: Divi- 
dend unchanged at 322p for the 
\car to March 31. Turnover 


Hambros 
develops 
the Italian 
connection 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Hambros Bank is planning 
to strengthen its postion in 
world fi nancial markets with a 
link up with the Istituto 
Bancario San Paolo di Torino, 
Italy’s fifth largest bank. Talks 
between the two banks are 
aimed at producing a dose 
working partnership in a wide 
range of business. 

Hambros has been putting 
most of its energy into 
developing Countrywide, a 
nationwide domestic retail 
network, based on a string of 
estate agencies. But it is also 
keen to strengthen its position 
internationally. Apart from a 
part-ownership of Strauss 
Turnbull, the stockbroker, 
Hambros has little direct 
involvement in October’s Big 


TEMPUS 


Count Pietro AntonelU, a 
Hambros director, said: “The 
link with San Paolo is the first 
step in a network of contacts 
with European banka. Ham- 
bros believes the link will give 
it greater ability to do larger 
deals. San Paolo is, after all, 
around five times larger than 
we are.” The in ten lion is not, 
however, to turn Hambros 
into a consortium bank. 

The deal is taking time to 
finalize because neither bonk 
wants to offend existing con- 
tacts. The collaboration would 
cover a variety of areas includ- 
ing trade and project finance 
and capital markets 
operations. 

Cbunt AntoneUi said that 
San Paolo, a government- 
owned commercial bank at 
Turin, was primarily a domes- 
tic institution. But it wanted 
more involvement in 
London's financial markets 
and found a link with Ham- 
bros a convenient route. 

He said that Hambros' 
connection with Societe 
Generate, the French bank 
whidi also owns part of 
Strauss Turnbull, was not as 
dose as that envisaged with 
San Paolo but that rt could 
develop in that direction. 

He did not rule out die 
possibility of San Paolo 
acquiring a stake in Hambros. 


£17.64 million (£17.57 million). 
Pretax profit £610.000 (£1.25 
million). Earnings per share 
4.9Ip <9.05p). Dom's boon) 
reports that the policies in hand 
’ will not show instant benefits, 
but they are expected to show a 
marked improvement daring 
the second half of the next 
financial year. 

• THOMAS MARSHALL 

(LOXLEY): First half of 1986. 
Interim dividend 2p (l.76p) on 
increased capital payable on 
Ocl 10. Turnover £(0.83 mil- 
lion (£8.75 millfon). Pretax 
profit £603.000 (£544,000). 

Earnings per share 736p (6.1 6p) 
on increased capitaL The results 
for the six months lead the 
board to expect a satisfactory 
profit for the foil year. 

• STAR COMPUTER 
GROUP: Year to June 30f 
compared with the previous 14 
months. Dividend lp. Turnover 
£8.62 million (£9.1 million). 
Operating profit £620,000 (loss 
£237,000). Earnings per share 
Ll.Ip(5.7p loss). 

• TILBURY GROUP: Interim 
dividend 1.8p (IJSp). Turnover 
for the first half of 1986 £4212 
miBion (£31.81- million). Pretax 
profit £1.57 million (£k04-mfiP 
lion). Extraordinary credit £7.7 
million (£3.000). Earnings per 
share 6 J8p (3.79p). Tilbury has 
entered into a conditional agree- 
ment with Christian Salvcsen to 
acquire Salvcsen Homes Scot- 
land, a housebuild in g company 
based in Scotland, together with 
a freehold property in Glasgow, 
for about £691 million cash. 
The purchase willbe financed 
mainly bya one-for-three rights 
issue ai J40p each to raise about 
£6.5 million. Tilbury’s board 
wiil only proceed with the issue 
if the acquisition is completed. 

• LONDON SHOP PROP- 

ERTY TRUST: Total dividend 
5.5 p (4.95p) fbr the year to April 
30. Pretax profit £726 million 
(£6.45 million). Earnings per 
share: basic 9.8p (83 p) ana fully 
diluted 8.8p (7.5p). 

• HAYNES PUBLISHING 
GROUP: Total dividend 14p 
(I3p) for the year to May 31. 
Turnover £10.44 million (£9.43 
million). Pretax profit £1.55 
million (£1.7 million). Earnings 
per share I9-08p ( 1 9.42p). The 
board reports that profits should 
resume their upward growth in 
the short to medium-term. 


This advertisement is Issued in compliance with the requirements of the Council of The Suck Exchange 


United Trust & Credit PLC 

(iDroiporaieri under ihe Companies Arts 1943 id S98L Registered in England No. 1638994) 


SHARE CAPITAL 


Authorised 

JtUMSJOO 


fa]]y paid 

X4JXXUM0 in Onfomy Shares af £1 each £2453200 

fa addition to the above, there are la Isaac 24L90O Wumitt to subscribe for OflBnuy Shares 

Infrodactiaa by 

Raphael, Zom 

The principal activities of United Trust & Ciwfit PLC are fa the areas of issuing bouse aad'anpoaie 
op eration s. The Group is also engaged fa market Mfci f and die prerttion of fhaarhl services generally, and 
both makes investments on its own mwihii i hJA investments fa nuduri companies. 

Application has been tnade to the Council oTThe Stock Exchange (br (he grain of permission to deal In Che whole 
or foe issued share rapiial and Warrants of United Trust & Credit PLC in the Unlisted Securities Market. It is 
emphasised that no application has been made fbr these securities to be admitted to listing. 

Particulars relating to the Company have been circulated in the Extd Statistical Services and copies of such 
particulars may be obtained during usual business houraon any weekday (Saturdays and public holidays excepted) 
up to and including 1st October. 1986 rtom:> 

Rapbad. Zm United Trust A Credit PLC 

10 Throgmorton Avenue 55 Grosvenor Street 

London EC2N 2DP London WIX 9DA 

l?rh Sepiembcz f986 


Day phone no. 


— AFCOR I 

INVESTMENTS LIMITED I 

.The private investors’ dealeij 


Fisons shares a 
Tilade launch 


Fisons has not sold any of its 
new anti-asthma drug, 
Tilade, so for. However, in 
anticipation of profits from 
it. the company’s shares have 
outperformed the market by 
32 per cent over the past year 

and are selling on a rating 68 
per cent higher than the 
market average. 

. Tilade is being launched in 
Britain- next week, and in- 
dications are thai it will be a 
winner. It complements 
rather than replaces Fisons* 
other major anti-asthma 
drug, Intal, and will in tune 
spawn ophthalmic and nasal 
derivftives. ' 

Fisons should receive ap- 
proval to sell Tilade in Ger- 
many early next year, but as 
yet there are no firm indica- 
tions on the timing fbr the all- 
important United States and 
Japanese markets. By 1990, 
however, trading profits from 
Tilade could be £55 million 
on turnover of more than 
£200 million. They would 
account for 30 per cent of 
estimated group trading prof- 
its fbr that year. 

Profits from pharmaceuti- 
cals accounted for 58 per cent 
of group trading profits in 
1985, with intal and asso- 
ciated products comprising 
two-thirds of these. But 
Fisons is keen to develop a 
broadly-based business 
which is not too dependent 
on the success of patented 
drugs. 

■ The company has had 
considerable success in the 
fragmented scientific equip- 
ment market. Its US diagnos- 
tic business, Curtin 
Matheson Scientific, has won 
considerable market share 
without damaging margins. 

Horticulture, an essentially 
consumer-related business, 
suffered an estimated £1 mil- 
lion shortfall in profits in the 
first half of the year because 
of the effect on the peat 
harvest of the had weather in 
Britain and Canada. In- 
creased marketing expen- 
diture has been possible after 
cost savings. The effect of this 
should be noticeable next 
year. In the longer term there 
are ambitions to broaden this 
division’s range of products. 

Fisons has the scope to 
grow organically and/or by 
acquisition. As for ac- 
quisitions, the management 
prefers the opportunistic ap- 
proach; this it can easily 
afford to do with about £45 
million of cash in the bank 
and a positive cash flow. 


Fisons should make £82 
minion this year (earnings 
per share 27.2p). The shares 
should not be sold on the eve 
of the Tilade launch, particu- 
larly if earnings per share m 
1990 may have more than 
doubled to 59.4p. 

Evered Holdings 

Quieter times are in store for 
the Abdullah brothers and 
iheir engineering business, 
Evered Holdings. 

They were thrust into the 
spotlight a year ago when 
they emerged as substantial 
shareholders in TI, the indus- 
trial conglomerate, and for a 
time looked set to make a bid. 

They subsequently 
launched a foiled takeover 
bid for McKechnie 
Brother&As sentiment in the 
market shifted away from the 
predators so any prospect of 
using their TI stake fbr a bid 
diminished by the day. 

The share price has suf- 
fered from their abortive 
activities on the bid front and 
yesterday foiled to be particu- 
larly impressed by a set of 
half-time figures, which while 
quite satisfactory, indicate 
some underlying difficulties. 

Pretax earnings come out 
at £4.19 million against £23 
million after a higher interest 
charge reflecting the cost of 
the TI stake. Margins have 
been improved throughout in 
generally flat conditions with 
the metal forming division 
focing a bit of a struggle. 

The brothers are likely to 
seek out acquisitions to strap 
on to the- polymer division, 
which offers considerable 
potential. The costs of the 
McKechnie bid will have to 
come out of the profits from 
the sale of the TI shares. 

A surplus of around £4 
million is likely at the year 
end. The more relaxed divi- 
dend policy will please the 
City which is looking for an 
outcome of around £103 
million. 

A period of consolidation 
should help the shares* 2p off 
at 232p, to go better. 

Groda 

International 

In the 1985 annual report, 
Croda’s chairman. Sir Fred- 
erick Wood, indicated the 
group's intention to make 
some increase in the 1986 
dividend if profits were 
satisfactory. 


Stewart Wrightson 
jumps 23% to £12m 


By Alison Eadie 


Stewart Wrighison, the 
Lloyd’s broker, made pretax 
profits in the six months to 
> June 30 of £112 million, an 
increaseof23 percent. Profits- 
would have been £1 million 
higher if 1985 exchange rates 
from the end of the 1985 year 
had been used. ' 

Brokerage in local currency 
terms rose by 17 per cent and 
expenses by 13 per cent A 
reduction of mainly clerical 
staff in the UK by a net two to 
three per cent from a year ago 
helped contain expenses and 
improve margins. 


Premium rate increases 
were sustained, although in 
some areas like aviation, 
where Stewart Wrightson 
considers itself the leading 
broker, a tailing off is expected 
towards the end of next year. 

The interim dividend was 
raised by 33 per cent to 4.2p in 
a move to reduce the disparity 
between the two halves. In- 
come growth in the second 
half is again not expected to 
match that of the first half. 
Full year profits are expected 
around £23 million against 
£18.7 million in 1985 . 


hold as 
nears 

The dividend has been 
static since 1982. so patient 
shareholders will be 
scrutinizing yesterda y s^ in- 
terim proms announcement 
with care. . 

They will be disappointed 
to learn that the company has 
decided that it will "be more 
appropriate to take acuon at 
the year-end.” In the mean- 
time; it is maintaining the 
interim dividend at 3p. 

At the half-year stage to 
June 29, pretax purita'*"- 
UP by 15 per cent to £11.8 
million. Most of the improve- 
ment was attributable to a 
near-£l million fell m the 
interest charge to £1.2 
million. 

At the trading level, the 
improvement was a mere 5 
* per cent, not particularly 
good for a company which is 
supposed to be in a growth 
industry, speciality 
chemicals. 

Indeed, the smallest 
improvement (up 1 per cent 
pretax after allowing for 
lower interest costs) was re- 
corded in Croda Chemicals, 
the speciality chemicals di- 
vision, the results of which 
were marred by a strike. It 
accounts for 60 per cent of 
pretax profits. 

Croda World Traders, a 
trader in honey and food- 
stuffs, showed a 48 per cent 
improvement, largely the re- 
sult of cutting costs. 

An outcome of £26.5 mil- 
lion pretax for the full year 
looks attainable, giving earn- 
ings per share of I3.3p, up 22 
per cetiL At I48p, the shares 
are on a prospective multiple 
of 1 1.1. 

The decision to raise the 
dividend to 7p in 1982, as 
part of its defence against an 
unwelcome bid from 
Burmah, has cost Croda dear. 
For the last four years, a large 
proportion of cash- flow has 
been pre-empted by divi- 
dends, while the business has 
been starved of funds. 

Even a modest increase to 
7.5p will leave the dividend 
covered only 1.8 times. .And 
the cash cost will go up by 10 
per cent in 1988 when the 
deferred ordinary shares be- 
come eligible to receive the 
dividend. 

The shares fell only 3p on 
the announcement in a weak 
market, but the price will be 
underpinned by the 7.1 per 
cent prospective yield. 

Allied Plant 
to merge with 
George Dew 

Allied Plant, the plant hire 
group and manufacturer of 
portable accomodation and 
George Dew, the civil en- 
gineer, have agreed to a £10.6 
million merger. 

The verms are 11 new Allied 
shares for three Dew shares, 
worth 142p a share with Allied 
at 36p. The partial preference 
share alternative is worth 
J04p a share and the partial 
cash alternative 95.6p. 

Allied has forecast a final 
dividend of lp net on the 
existing and new shares. 

Dew shares closed yesterday 
unchanged at 118p. 



pea 
return 


Rich rewards for 


serious investment 
from £10,000 with 
AngliaEs Capital Plus 


If you can invest £1 0,000 or more For investments of £ 20,000 or more 
we pay you your interest increases to 



8-50 

— P ,a * 1 I net p.a. 


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The bulfding society that cares aboiit what you want 

HEAD OFFICE- MOULTON PARK. NORTHAMPTON NN3 1NL TH- Xn \ 

RATES SUBJECT TO VARIATION ^ ~ C0fi04 > 4953s3 - 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Guinness may sell Distillers’ 
stake in Bank of Scotland 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 

Gninness, the brewirggiaDt, Efifers’ chairman, Mr John 
wuj stan selling off the spoils ' Elliott, fails to take action this 
of its £2.5 billion acquisition account he wiQ have to wait 


of Distillers wi thin the next 
couple of weeks. 

The first deal to be an- 
. nounced is nkely to be the saie 
of Distillers' near-5 per cent 
stake in the Bank of Scotland 
— worth about £24 miDion. 

The total package of sales 
will net more than £150 
million, bringing the total 
proceeds since it bought 
Distillers in the spring to 
almost £260 minion. Last 
month, Guinness sold 

• Interim figures from 
Wool worth today shotdd show 
pretax profits nearer the . 
upper end of estimates of be- 
tween £12 million and £17 
millloii. Last year’s figure of 
£75 million will hare to be 
adjusted upwards to ac- 
count of capitalized in- 
terest and property disposals. 
The price fell l5p to 665p. 

Distillers’ BP stake for £108 
million. 

The food division ofDistill- 
. ers — Britain's hugest supplier 
of bakers' yeast —also has an 
“up-for-sale” sign on its door- 
step ' and so do various 
Distillers’ properties, includ- 
ing its St James’s Square bead 
office. 

Mr Ernest Saunders, the 
Guinness chairman, is 
si muitaneously trying to nego- 
tiate the sale of the string of 
hotels acquired along with 
Bells last year —but he is 
known .to want to keep the 
Gleneagles flagship. 

In a tumbling market 
Guinness's shares fell 8p to 
325p. 

Elsewhere, the brewing sec- 
tor faired less badly than 
others, enrouragedby talk that 
Elders will return to the Allied 
Lyons fray on Thursday. If 


until after December 6. Some 
market-watchers think Mr El- 
liott might walk away and turn 
his attention to Courage, but 
Allied see this as just a ted 
herring. 

One stockbroker who agrees 
with them is Mr Victor 
MacCoD, bead of Klein wort 
Grieveson’s leisure team. He 
said: “I think Elders are just 
putting up a smoke screen and 
playing for time.” 

Mr MacCofl reckons that 
Elders will not get Allied for 
less than £5 a share —valuing 
the company at £3.4 billion. 
' He said: "Anything less than 
that win be easily defensible.” 
Allied's shares slipped 8p to 
325p. 

Belhaven Brewery, where 
Mr Nazmu Vtrani is in the 
chair, dipped just a penny in 
* the plunging market, to 71p. 
after Bestwood, the industrial 
and financial services group 
run by Tony Cole announced 
that it had built Dtp an 18.69 
cent stake. Bestwood 
ted 5p to 520p. 

The rest of the equity 
market went into a nosedive 
with nervous London jobbers 
marking stock down 
relentlessly. 

The record overnight fan in 
Tokyo,- where the index fell by 
637.33 to 17,463.19, a 1457- 



ALL1EDHYON5 

WAITING FOR A BID 


Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 


point fall in Hong Kong level falling by 31.6 points 10 
taking the Hang Seng down to . 1 596.7. 

1,927.97 and a drop in early 


came off best among banks, 
sliding a mere 4p 10 342p. 
Barclays came back 17p to 
492p, Lloyds 12p to 442p, 
National Westminster lOp to 
532p and Midland 5p to 574p. 

Insurers, siQl glowing in the 
reflected glory from the 
impending TSB flotation held 
up well with Abbey Life easing 
3p to 191p and Pearl Assur- 
ance, talked of as a possible 
bid taiget for the TSB, actually 
gaining 5p to £15.18. 

Losses in gilt-edged stocks 
extended 10 £150 in the longer 
end folio wing yesterday's 
PSBR figures. 

Beecham was a weak mar , 
ket, tumbling 13p to 393p 


trading of 16 points on Wall 
Street again had share prices 
in London on the run. 

Tension remnained high 
and investors in New York 
were puzzled by reports, later 
denied, that the Bank of 
America had run into liquid- 
ity problems. This did tittle to 
calm nerves in London. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average later recovered during 
the morning to a fall of just 55 
points, bringing it back up to 
1.762.36. 

In London, the FT 30 index 
dosed at 1,2625, a drop of 
27.4, wiping £55 billion off 
the value of quoted shares. 
The broader-based FT-SE 100 
index dipped below the 1,600 


RECENT ISSUES 


Among leaden, an Ameri- 
can favourite Glaxo feO 1 5p to 
935p, Hawker Siddeley 
dropped 1 6p to 48 lp and both 
Royal Insurance and Thorn 
EMI dropped J5p to 837p and 
479p respectively. Lacas and 
BTR eased 13p apiece, while 
British Tekcom was 6p lower 
at 186p. 

Fisons, the pharmaceuticals 
and agricultural products gi- 
ant, fell by a hefty 20p to 586p 
after disappointing interim 
results. Suggestions that a 
planned £70 million vendor- 
placing, to fund acquisitions, 
was pulled at the last minute 
because of the state of the 
market and the anticipated 
reaction to the results, were 
denied by the company. 

Royal Bank off Scotland 


• Peek Holdings, the 
grain and animal foods group, 
returns to the stock market 
today at an expected price of 
between 12p and ISp. Its 
shares were suspended at I9p 
a month ago pending 
financial re st ruct nri ng.Mr 
Kenneth Maod, PeefcV 

chief execatfre, has raised 

£L4 million in new capital 


EQufnES 
Anglia Secs (1150) 

BB B Deatgn (67p) 
Beaverco (T45pl 
Borland (125p) 

Broad St (43p) 

Chelsea Man (15 , 
Creighton Labs (1; 

Euro Home (160p) 
Evans HaUshaw (I20p) 
Fletcher Dennys (7Dp) 
GT Management (210p) 
Guthrie Corp (i50p) 
Harrison (iSOp) 

HMe Ergonom (92p) 


154-2 
68 
145 
140-2 
54+2 
130 
185-11 
138 r5 
130 
68 
191 
165-2 
159 


Hughes Food (20p) 24*2 +1 

Lon Utd hv mop) 428 +2 

MB Cash & 6 (loop) 93 

Manna Dev fllOp) 88 

Morgan Grenfefl (500p) . 446-7 

Newage Trans (75p) 75 

Scot Mtge 100% ^25 222 s * 

Stanley leisure (11 Op) 129 

TV-AM (130p) 164 -2 

Tandy hids (112p) 140 +2 

Thames TV fi90pi 242 -1 

Tibbett & Britten flZOp) 135 

Treas sH%J/l 2016 397 £97 

Unflock (63p) 68 

VWndsmoor ( 106 p) 106 


Yatvarton (38p) 

Yorkstaro TV (12Sp) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 
Berkeley Tech N/P 
Boots N/P 
Brown & Tawse F IP 
Cambium Ventura N/P 
Christy Hunt N/P 
Cityviston F/P 
New Court N/P 
Rush & Tomkins HIP 
Sedgwick N/P 
(issue price in brackets). 


139-2 


9 

219-0 

145-1 

l+’a 

27-4 
4>7 
3’j -4'j 
16-6 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Staffing 

Sep 86 __I. 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 - 

Sap 87 

Dec 87. 


Previous da/s total opan interest 14481 

Three (forth Eurodollar 

Dsc86 8393 

Mar 87 9381 

Jun 87 93.59 

Sep 07 9321 

tlSTteasmyBond 

Sep 86 94-30 

Dec 86 94-21 

Mar 87 NT 


aSfia 

as 

Low 

9094 

Cteae 

9094 

EatVM 

346 

80.16 

90.16 

9090 

9094 

2985 

9020 

9024 

90.12 

90.14 

759 

9020 

9025 

90.13 

90.15 

SM 

90.10 

90.10 

9095 

* 9090 

15 

6920 

8890 

8890 

88.75 

10 


- Previous dayfe total open interest 20968 
9398 93 XI 9390 390* 

9081 93.72 93.75 890 

93.60 93.51 93L53 242 

9821 9321 9021 28 

Previous day's 
95-04 94-28 

94-23 98-20 


94-30 

93-31 

SMS 


122 
5683 
0 - 


Short Git 

-Sep 88 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


GH 


Dec 68 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

FT-SE 100 

Sep 88 

Dec 88 


- NT 
88-56 
NT 


NT 

116-04 

NT 

NT 

16380 

165.50 


9B-56 


8930 


Merest 1365 
0 - 
99-30 113 

99-3Q 0 


Previous day's ton! open Merest 14804 

— — 114-05 o 

11804 114-01 114-10 15655 

— — 114-06 0 

— — 114-06 0 

Pluvious day's total open Merest 2139 

16160 159j(m 16025 714 

16550 162.00 16340 416 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


JteatDnaBngc Laat Daaflnoa Last DedwsHon ForSnimaaw 

Sep 8 Sop 18 Dec 4 Dec 15' 

Sep 22 Oct 3 Dec 18 Jan 5 

Oct B CM 17 JanS Jot 19 

CaB options wore taken oof mb 16/8/88 Britannia Security, Lawrence Walter. /Unshed 
Consumer Bectronics. British Telecommunications. Mitcnel Cotts, Paviai Internation- 
al. Portland Industries. tBL. Gontthrad Technology, Perkdele Haldfcmt. StaMras 
Motalcraft. NMC, Prince of Wales Hotels. Amalgamated FbnndU Investments, Rand 
Leases G old MWng. Notton Estates, FaMne Boats, Property Trust United Scientific 
HoMfrigi, 

Put & Cat Amstrad. Faltdale HoWhgs, Uitramar. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERUNG SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's range 
tefihiniiiii lit 
N York 14740^4775 
Montreal 2JM14-20488 
AmsTdaraS^I 0534234 
Brussels 62.47-62.85 


September 16 
14740-1 47S 


Cphgen 11.4382-114839 
Dublin 1.1001-1.1088 
Frankfurt 3J7185-3J)333 
Lisbon 215.87-21 8.15 
Madrid 18832-199.16 
Milan 208055-2095.10 
Oslo 107897-108448 
Pads 9487839391 
SOchkn 10.1910-102420 
Tokyo 22919533131 
Vienna 21J21r2L32 .. . 
Zurich 24425-24571 


740-14750 
2D444-2.0473 
34105-34152 
6247-6258 
114382-114543 
1.1013-1.1028 
351953.0238 
21557-21749 
19652-19850 
206055308659 
10.7897-105043 
9.8876-95046 
10.1910-102053 
23051-23059 
2L21-2154 
24425-2^464 


IK-IVprem 
17-12prem 
IX-Kprem 
3pram-idH 
IK-IXprem 
95-160*1 
30-70(53 
peMds ' 

3K-4Xdb 
2K-3pram 
%-Kpram 
IX-Kpram 
9-TXpram 
IX-lpram 

Oiwrtei gtede Kc oii ipe tedwhh 1975 vm e do— rt70J(deire mage 765715). 


3 

1.40-1-37brwn 

Q.74-059prem 

43Kpram 

46^wprem 

2%-Xprwn 

1B-4pram 

4K-35tprera 

2S0-440dts 

70-1 5Ms 

4-0cBs 

11*-12%dta 

BK-SUpmn 

IK-Ipnm 

3-2Xprera - * 

252154 pram- 

3K-3J4prem 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


Greece drachma 
-Hong Kong dota- 
Indta rupee 
Iraq dinar . 

Kuwait drarKD 
Malaysia denar 
faSsadcopeso — 
New Zealand dote 
Saudi Arabia riyal 
Singapore doter . 
Soutti Africa rand 
UAEdkfam 
Uoyds Sank 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



after hours. Some markeunen 
are worried that Mr Robert 
Maxwell, publisher of the 
Daily Mirror , is getting ready 
to sell £46.7 million-worth of 
Beedtam shares in the market 

Meanwhile, Frown Shipley, 
the merchant bank, slipped 
below the 500p level in late 
trading, amid speculation that 
a large stake had changed 
hands. Reports suggest that 
almost 10 per cent of the 
shares have gone through the 
market but the identity of the 
seller remains a mystery. At 
the Iasi count the United 
Kingdom Temperance & Gen- 
eral Provident Institution^ 
part of Friends' Provident 
had 9.95 per cent of the equity. 
The price finished 33p lower 
at 490p. 

Norscot, the USM-tisted 
Scottish hotels group, slipped 
2p to 163p with investois still 
anxiously awaiting the out- 
come of talks with a mystery 
suitor. In our rush to see 
Norscot married off we last 
week mistakenly claimed that 
the group had recently broken 
off talks .with Pieasurama. 
Unfortunately, Pieasurama 
had been having bid talks with 
Mount Charlotte Invest- 
ments. These have now been 
terminated. 

AE fell 8p to 200p following 
the unsuccessful attempt by its 
financial adviser, Cazenove, 
the broker, and .HOI Samuel, 
.the merchant bankr to place a 
. total of 1 1 million shares (11 
per cent) in the market at 
201p. Hie shares were bought 
at 242p to help fend off the 
unwanted attentions of 
Trailer & NewaD, which ear- 
lier this summer launched a 
£260 million bid. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


SE grows bigger in 
a shrinking world 


The world of securities is shrinking 
faster than could have been readily 
imagined three years ago, when the 
Stock Exchange signed the deal with 
the Government to abandon its old 
ways. The Stock Exchange made an 
heroic attempt yesterday to leap ahead 
of the game. It has agreed the fullest 
possible merger with the infant Inter- 
national Securities Regulatory 
Organization (Isro) to form not 
merely one single regulator for the 
industry but also one single rec- 
ognized investment exchange to cover 
virtually everything except 
Eurobonds. 

Inevitably, this must appear a 
ctimbdown by the Stock Exchange 
Council and its chairman Sir Nicholas 
Goodison. Not long ago, they were 
more concerned with keeping the big 
international firms in their place, or at 
least with making sure they paid 
highly for the privilege of entering the 
Exchange and obeying its rules. 
Instead, the outsiders formed Isro and 
big international firms were wooed 
into the Stock Exchange on modest 
terms. Isro members will emerge with 
a half share in control of both the 
Exchange and regulatory body. 

The last lynchpin of the old Stock 
Exchange, one-mem ber-one- vote, will 
now also go in favour of control by 
member firms. 

For this high price. Sir Nicholas 
appears to have achieved his main 
objective, which was to prevent 
fragmentation of securities dealing 
and ensuring that both domestic and 
international business were under one 
roof. 

The battle for the old Stock 
Exchange to control dealing in inter- 
national securities was lost because, 
until 1984, its member firms were 
constrained by the single capacity 
rule. By recognizing the political 
realities, Sir Nicholas may be said to 
have seen the wood for the trees, 
however unpopular the agreement 
will undoubtedly be with those who 
have already seen their profitable club 
taken from their individual hands. 

If they need any convincing, how- 
ever, they should listen to the — 
admittedly rather ponderous and 
negative — conclusions of the sympo- 
sium of international financial figures, 
including the chairman of the New 
York Stock Exchange. They noted 
that the number of shares quoted on 
more than one country's stock ex- 
change has more than doubled in two 
years and that a form of international 
securities regulation will soon be 
needed. So far Michael Howard at the 
Department df Trade has simply 
arranged exchange of information 
with American regulators- As the 
eminent persons concluded, regula- 
tion itself will be much more tricky. 

At least the new combined Inter- 
national Stock Exchange of the 


United Kingdom and the Republic of 
Ireland will have a much better 
chance of influencing the way this 
develops; just as its unity should give 
it considerable strength in the battle 
for business across the time zones. 

Mid-Atlantic blues 

The London markets, and in particu- 
lar the gilt-edged market are caught in 
a mid-Atlantic depression. All the 
influences from the United States, at 
present, arc sombre, while the domes- 
tic background provides its share of 
shadows. 

Yesterday, the US industrial 
production figures provided further, if 
unemphatic, evidence that the Ameri- 
can economy is strong enough with- 
out the injection of further discount 
rate cuts from the Federal Reserve 
Board. Output rose by 0. 1 per cent last 
month but, more significantly, the 
July figure was revised from a fall of 
0.1 per cent to an increase of 0.3 per 
cent. 

When Wall Street is feeling un- 
certain and unsure of the reasons, 
someone drags out the old story that 
Ban kAm erica, the leading West Coast 
bank which used to claim to be the 
biggest bank in the world, is in deep 
trouble. It happened again yesterday, 
producing a little self-fulfilling gloom 
as well as a firm denial from the bank 
and the US regulatory authorities. 
The United States background is 
confusing as well as disturbing. On the 
one hand, the economy is picking up 
so strongly that the Fed cannot afford 
to ease credit; on the other, the 
financial system is so fragile that big 
banks may be about to go under. 

In contrast with waves like these, 
parochial matters like Britain's 
monthly public sector borrowing 
requirement may seem like ripples in 
a small pond. But yesterday's figures 
have undoubtedly muddied the wa- 
ters. The PSBR in August was £1.8 
billion, above the top of the range of 
market expectations which averaged 
around £1 billion. For the first five 
months of the present fiscal year, 
borrowing has totalled £3.8 billion, 
£500 million down on the correspond- 
ing period of last year. To date at least, 
there is not much to worry about. 

Unfortunately, as the Treasury is 
happy to point out, the impact of 
lower oil prices has yet to be felt on the 
borrowing requirement When this 
month’s figures come out showing 
net repayments from the Exchequer to 
the oil companies of advanced petro- 
leum revenue tax of at least £1 billion, 
the sunny borrowing picture of the 
early months of 1986-87 may begin to 
cloud over. Should falling equity 
markets around the world affect the 
November British Gas privatization 
and next year’s British Airways' sale, 
the skies will start to look black 
indeed. 


Rata Mpptod by Barclay* Bmk H0FEX ad E*teL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 





Mb 



PDt> 



Sattes 

Oct 

Jan 

_£EL 

Oct 

Jan 

JSL 

AiSed Lyons 

300 

30 

40 

53 

4 

6 

10 

C323) 

330 

11 

23 

3b 

15 

23 

27 

360 

4 

14 

23 

40 

4 r 

50 

BP 

550 

107 

130 

140 

1 

5 

10 

r®48) 

600 

60 

850 

1<»8 

S 

16 

25 

650 

30 

52 

72 

25 

35 

■ 50 

Cons Gold 

500 

48 

65 

84 

12 

30 

37 

rS37) 

550 

20 

38 

S3 

40 

52 

57 

600 

7 

21 

33 

80 

8 / 

92 


260 

21 

35 

45 

3 

9 

11 

(*275) 

280 

12 

23 

33 

13 

18 

21 

. 300 

5 

14 

21 

28 

31 

34 


330 

1 

7 

— 

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66 

— 


280 

13 

24 

32 

8 

14 

17 

r»5). . 

300 

6 

15 

22 

25 

27 

29 

330 

1 

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13 

63 

53 

52 

Cable & Wire 

300 

18 

38 

50 

10 

. 17 

22 

ram 

325 

0 

22 

32 

27 

30 

35 

350 

3 

10 

20 

4b 

52 

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375 

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4 

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600 

125 





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— 

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(*720) 

650. 

90 

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700 

40 

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160 

17 

24 

32 

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8 

13 

(•IBS) 

160 

5 

14 

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1 / 

2U 


200 

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5 

10 

32 

32 

34 

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327 

70 



— 

1 

— 

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C390) 

355 

45 

— 

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— 

300 

— 

53 

62 

— 

6 

9 


302 

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— 

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950 

90 

120 

130 

4 

14 

22 

(-1027) 

1000 

57 

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82 

15 

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37 

1050 

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52 

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42 

50 

67 


1100 

13 

34 

44 

80 

82 

92 


300 

17 

25 

35 

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8 

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f*w) 

330 

6 

14 

22 

23 

25 

27 

380 

2 

6 

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62 

52 

52 

Marks S Span 

1*203) 

180 

200 

27 

11 

34 

18 

40 

24 

1 

5 

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4 

9 

220 

3 

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750 

140 

160 

174 

1 

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(*875) 

800 

92 

112 

130 

3 

- 10 

20 

850 

60 

90 

104 

20 

28 

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Trafalgar House 
CZ77) 

260 

280 

23 

12 

30 

16 

37 

25 

3 

13 

11 

23 

16 

29 

300 

5 

10 

17 

‘ii 

36 

41 


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s*P 

□ec 

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Dac 

Mar 


360 

33 

50 

60 

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7 

12 

(•391) 

390 

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30 

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72 

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200 

18 

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("319) 

220 

4 

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14 

17 

240 

1 

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17 

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230 

17 

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43 

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22 

(*295) 

300 

— 

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— 

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30 

333 

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700 

35 

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2 

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£8 

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3 

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77 

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560 

6 

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550 

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Sept Dac 

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rsK) 

500 

15 

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13 

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550 

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22 

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330 

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60 

79 

1 

b 

9 


380 

to 

37 

50 

4 

11 

18 


Strtes 

Nov 

F#0 May 

Nov 

Fab May | 


480 

23 

42 

so 

27 

33 

38 

(*443) 

500 

11 

27 

35 

82 

63 

68 

550 

4 

11 

to 

10b 

107 

112 

BATtndn 

360 

77 

90 



& 

4 



(*428) 

390 

48 

Bb 

73 

4 

10 

17 

420 

92 

4b 

55 

13 

20 

27 


460 

11 

23 

35 

38 

42 

48 


460 

45 

60 

72 

7 

14 

18 

1*492) ; 

500 

23 

37 

52 

23 

3b 

42 

550 

7 

17 

28 

80 

65 

87 


180 

17 

22 

28 

7 

12 

14 

(186) 

200 

TV, 

14 

19 

17 

24 

24 

220 

2% 

7» 

13 

34 

38 

38 

Cartwy Schwpps 

160 

15 

24 

30 

3 

8 

11 

(*172) 

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B 

12 

M 

12 

17 

20 

200 

2 

7 

— * 

31 

83 

— 


300 

33 

45 

S3 

5 

12 

16 

(*323) _ 

330 

17 

26 

37 

16 

to 

28 

360 

6 

12 

22 

40 

46 

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cm 

300 

96 

65 

37 

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IK 

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““ 

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300 

53 

66 



1 

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330 

25 

38 

48 

4 

8 

12 

360 

11 

22 

32 

20 

2b 

28 

LASMO 

120 

14 

18 

to 

14 

18 

22 

(115) 

130 

9 

15 

18 

22 

2b 

30 

140 

5 

11 

15 

28 

88 

30 

Midland Bank 

500 

85 

102 

112 

2 

8 

11 

(*574) 

550 

45 

6b 

// 

12 

20 

27 

600 

18 

30 

42 

3b 

42 

47 

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460 

70 

82 


2 

5 

_ 

(*523) 

500 

33 

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62 

/ 

to 

23 


550 

10 

23 

3b 

32 

40 

43 


600 

2 

— 

— 

78 

— 

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160 

20 

28 

34 

4 

8 

11 

(174) . 

180 

B 

14 

to 

12 

14 

17 

200 

4 

9 

13 

28 

28 

32 

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500 

97 

112 



4 

10 

— 

(*689) 

. 550 

5? 

72 

•— 

15 

25 

— 

600 

* 25 

43 

62 

37 

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650 

15 

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42 

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84 

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New 

Mar 

Jun 

Now 

Mar 

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200 

25 

31 

32 

6 

11 

14 

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218 

14 


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13 

— 

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236 

7 


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25 

— - 

— 


240 


12 

17 

— 

34 

38 


255 

3 

— 

— 

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— 

— 


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Nov 

Feb May 

NOV 

Fab May 1 

Tr 11%% 1991 

106 

1 

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255 . 

rno6) 

108 



* 

3K 

3* 

455 

110 

4«t 


14 


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LxJBI 


114 

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S*w 

314 

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4J4 

455 

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116 

1 

1% 


4K 

5K 

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118 

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2 

6X 

655 

7% 


120 


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8K 

8K 

856 



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— 

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— 


134 

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Sect Oct 

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Dec Sept 

Oct 

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KF^-I 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


The market had a quiet 
session yesterday, bat once 
again became uneasy enough 
towards the end of lie day to 
push die long dates a little 
firmer. So money at nine 
months and one yera firmed by 
a cautions '/n at the end of the 
day. Other dates were not 
ranch changed. Day-to-day 
money spent most of the 
session comfortably, mainly 
bounded by 9 and 8 per ceaL 

Bunt Rate* % 

Ctosring Banks 10 
Finance House ID 
Discount Mat* Loans * 

Overnight Ffigh; 10 Low 7 
Week fixed: 9X-9K 
Tieaauijr Bte* (Discount 4») 

fmrnft 9* imffi 9% 

amntnas 3nwttt9»» 

prime Bank EHa {Discount 1U 
1 rtWh 9 ii m4P , js ZmnBl 9X-9”« 

3 mrth 9 J >x-9% 6 oath 954-9'w 

Trade BOa (Discount %) 

1 moth KPia 2mnth l-X 

3mmhlO*B Bmntfi 10K 

9K dose 10 
1 wm*9%-9x fimntti 9”3 t-9»» 

1 mnth 9° io-9X g mrth IO'w-10 
3 mnlh 9 ,& i»-95t I2mth iO'w-10 

Local Artborty Deposits {%) 

2 days 9% 7 days I % 

1 onlh 9% 3 nwh 97. 

6 mrth 954 IZrrth W. 

Local Authority Benda (%) 

' * ' ' mrth 1DV4-954 


1 mrth 10 K -10 
3 mrth 10K4K 

drnrth 1(Kr8% 

TBWCW. 

6 mrth 9*m6«is 
Dollar CDs (%) 

1 mrth 650-555 
6 mrth 550555 


8 ninth lOH-ff* 
I2inh9m 


3 ninth 9Xr8V 
12irth 9*MhS'>w 


3 mirth 590-555 
12iWh 6.15-6.10 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 cteys 8-5 13 w 
3 mrth 6-554 


7 days 4>»4 'm- 
3 mrth 4*m-4'ii 

p i ltt k Eiauf, 

rrenen rave 
7 days 7 s w-7 , ia 
3mmh 7*19-7* t« 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 1K-1K 
3 mreh 454-4% 
Yea 
7 days 

3 mrth 4Bi»4 ,3 i# 


call BK-5X 

1 runth 6>i»6*ie 

6 mrth 6-5% 
call -5-4 
1 mwh 4*»4*i * 

6 mrth dw4>« 
cal 7X-6X 

1 mrth 7 a i»7 , iB 
Bmrrth 7 , ȣ*w 
ad ' 

1 mrth 4K-4X 
6 mrth 4V4X 

call 5J44X 

1 mrth 5*is-& l i( 

6 moth 4)4-4% 


GOLD 


GOttS4l490-415JI0 


L50-2B1JU) 

3S) 


ECGO 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference ram for 
interest period August B> 1986 to 
September 2, 1886 inclusive: SdSSO per 

can. 




TNsadwrtMmant is pubbhed by Baring Biuthen & Co, Limited end UM. Rothschild & 5ons United on behalf of 

BET RibBc Lanited Company; 

The Directors of BET Wbfc Limited Company are the penons rwponsibte for the information contained in this advertisement 
Tbthebestofther knowledge and belief (having taken al reasonable core to ensure that such is the rase) the information containedh 

this advertsement is in accordance with the facts. 

The Directors of BETRjbTic Limited Company accept resporaubility acconSngly 



Offer for 
HAT Group 

Value of BET Increased and 
Final Share Offer: 

146 P 

HAT Share Price: 

140p 

; HAT SHARE PRfCE BB'ORE OFFER: 

94 P 

^ OF OFFER: 

Thursday 18th September, 1986 

NBjtf the offer is dedared uncorxfitwra^ 

the Cash Alternative will dose on that date 


lAlue of Offer is based on share price of BETat 330 pm on^ 16th September 1986. 

. HAT-share price and HAT share prks before offer are prices at 330 pm on 
16th September and 21st 1986 respectively; 

Preserves the right torevi»andAx in aBase the off erifacofnpetit^situstimarases. 


1; . 




September 16 1966. Tote! contracts 28706. Ca**1fi98S. Put* 12721. -ttectedytofl aecarty price. 















































n;iaiili7/iX^ViawJi^nv^aaia7/it)a^ 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



Shares in retreat again 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end September 26. §Contango day September 29. Seulement day October 6. 

§Fonvard bargains are permitted oo two previous business days. 


— c Qcld~ 

© Trees Nnwn Limited 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£4,000 

Claims required for 
+10 points 

Claima nts should ring 0254-53272 


111.' Will' I' j- 


E hma ! 'l f. 1 " i M ESS r S5 



ID KEJ KTTWl 11 11 il 


E] ESJf-*7| g M 



BUILDINGS AND ROADS 




»-z 

-* n.4 

-7 164 

ai» 

-1 6.1 
-12 126 
.. 102 
-8 10J 


Paper.PrinLAdv 


Thames TV I Cmemaj.TV 




Please be snre to take ae«*mt 
of any moms sign* 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your dally tools 
for the weekly dividend of £8,000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


IBS T24 
124 fi 
137 72 

109 63 

33 75 

71 54 

172 51 
70 54 

94 M 
131 IDE 
385 254 
143 88 

260 56 
256 196 
79 42 
244 144 
60 <28 
44 29V 

196 128 
460 2 65 



& s 

BtocWayn CIO 

Bba CnM 541 

Esri 

BiU KtoB 75 

aryani __ ii9 
Sunto 6 Hater 9 
Cakabrelfl tebo y 150 

Condar Ore 123 

Coetan 516 

Cbotltua 481 

Crauen (Date) 158 

sr*« a 

Feb 86 

0o-K 64 

r eOBOW a H»g 126 
firt an Gp 68 

GtfWd B9 

CM* A 0jndy&dT21 
Qtatca (MJJ 371 
HAT 138 

MfctfBir 270 

Heodmon 218 

H*mbv5MH 67 
ll qtMXXS MW 206 
Hrifi AM 631 

■ hoSmti STvt 42 
Mock Johasan 176 
JmHU&SOns 440 

W % 

HW“ i 

Love* (YJ) 405 

Mapt! ASM* 162 

SSrSaM (HiSte) !«’ 

.... w 


S.7 61 144 

25 34 49 


IOO 1.7 204 
'JSJ 54 169 
O U M 
0.1 0.7 24 1 
06 u «a 
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04 SO 128 

11. 1.125.1 
. . . . 11.7 

21 04 166 

54 17 234 
6fi 22 122 
45 74 112 
14 07 

14 52 
14 55 
24 04 
21 54 
4.1 25 

54 22 
1.0 


BRITISH FUNDS 



121 10.005 
105 10438 


191 133V 
142 87 

6 * 70 
516 342 
348 236V 
180 140 
434 328 
101 75 

156 138 
381 195 

204 172 
as 67 
15* 41 
290 157 
ZS 120 



44 25 .. 
26 24 174 
254 44 9.6 
25 14124 

88 54115 
86 74 186 

025 24 234 
4.7 44194 

26 24 11.7 

26 84 87 
64 04 105 
54 74 174 
83 7.1 144 
24 2.1 335 
74 21 126 
64 09 121 
. . . . 774 

104 44 14 4 

24 34 114 

101 44 104 
144 Ol 174 

25 44 176 

7.1 44 132 

144 03 904 
10J7 2.7 11 J 
107 27 114 

62 44 87 
is an as 

102 26 144 

74 4.1 21.7 

126 44183 
5.4 44 224 

75 08186 

01 Ol .. 

181 44106 

4.1 15 194 
82 34100 
14 44 .. 
94 74 154 

229 67120 
167 14172 
94 4.7 144 
20b 04 84 
.. ..23 

184 62 74 
200 Ol 144 
165 aa taa- 

124 44 106 

8.1 86 174 
05 26214 
86b 83 174 

124 28 129 

127 42105 - 

80 5.1 114 

122 26184 
14 14 897 
104 03 284 
154 44 114 
104 34168 

14 12 94 
85 36 132 

15 13 256 
07 OS 167 

02 12212 
54 28128 




FINANCE AND LAND 


346 256 Abngwartt) 

114 » Aten Him 
178 5 - 7iv Artotagww 
209 106 aiwarTach 
26 IB Cmafe 
263 194 CMflOrtr 
■ 431 .16 Gencrmy 
29V It Eqt*y t On 
185 132 Ivory 6 Skua 
194 153 liMa 
78 62 Hat Hone Lam 
95 79 Do 8W 
143 114 IHamrtW 
223 305 TmMxi 


17.1 09 783 
57 24 37 J 


206 -2 14 04 .. 

140 .. 02 23 04 

156 

206 r 

216 V .. 17.1 09 783 

236 -I 57 24 37 J 

26 +2 

28 • .. 14 44864 

136 64 55184 

166 -2 as 0 44 286 

66 14 24 .. 

179 • .. 600 10.1 .. 

132 

214 • 



CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 



FhreacHThreta appear on Page 24 


FOODS 


24 113 486 

11.1 33 154 
87 24 120 
54 61292 

17.1 02 173 

164 44 81 
.. .. 242 

13.1 4.1 81 
87 54175 
Ol 84 T81 
57 34 182 

74 07 313 
24 24 186 
07 61 204 
84 44 67 
103 0138 
103 46 102 

103 44 204 

82 14 644 

160 84153 

14 15 17.0 
66 27 161 

23 14 212 

47 26162 
63 21 184 
44 41 114 
06 22213 
94 1.7 24.1 

7.4 24 164 

24 24169 

54 63 8J 
174 32 174 
09 15 205 
74 74109 
14 04 234 
68 64144 
27 52 212 
114 42 164 
63 05187 
6.0 40 122 
84 11 177 

104 44 105 
74 14 237 
44 Ol 104 


CINEMAS AND TV 


+2 134 81 144 

■a 24 54 65 
+2 11.4 61 103 

*2 213 55 164 

+2 154 45 108 

.. 143b 64 114 

24 07 124 


-2 64 09 .. 

.. 61 8.0 107 

-2 64 64 84 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


156 63 FnamayHoMs 1«0 -2 14 07 663 

433 328 Mai 995 »-0 135 84 132 

286 2D6 Reready BrOQhae 216 .. 24 1.1 113 

381 312 LKtorSi 346 8-7 104 49 165 

5*3 447 ton PBdt Hern 535 -15 143 27 163 

100 78V Moix* Ctelote 68 • .. I! W14fi 

ICS 87 Prn» Of W Hotel 82 21 24 143 

. 79 59'| Quean* MOM 75 • . . 27 34 164 

405 363 Sane* HOWS A' 363 54 14 143 

81 56 Stea 63 14 29154 

208 139 Tcusnousa Fane 140 *-3 7J 66 119 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 



P^jElE 

IV 31 




BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


25 1 

186 

85 

65 

298 

185 

12 ' 

• 8 

260 

173 

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260 

230 

469 

384 

JW 

*29 

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116 

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148 

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2*2 

102 

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333 

74 

56 

520 

318 

198 

136 

570 

377 

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233 

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1 IB 

569 

417 

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191 

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136 

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9.7 

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ELECTRICALS 



11.4 

86 237 



1.0*14 

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02 615 


OSD 

1.1 76 

+8 


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INSURANCE 


313 246 EMNm Prod 305 *2 143 47 77 

221 ISO 6*»0 183 107 68 114 

277 2ll EK 2S6 *3 69 39140 

43V 29V EM 38 • -1 V 2.7 71 134 

153 ICC'; Beco 133 730 54 103 

29V 17V BactrtAB (AEJ B £29** +4* 

104 52 Ebon ») 64 -1 43 81 204 

26** 16V Bum C22 «-V 139 63 . . 

381 282 Entfto On car 325 8-11 101 54 129 

28*. 19V Emm (LMJ V E23V +1'. 90 04 . . 
15« 134 EnUna HouM ISO 05 03 144 

177V 123V Euopoui Fame* 123V -3V 54 55 81 
1*2 112 to SN Prl 136 -2 MU.. 

342 158 Eaerad 232 -2 5 0 Z2 126 

214 124 Exw« 170 89 53144 

423 312 Enol 355 . . 143 4 0 183 

55 22 FWoon 39V +V 07 14 978 

42 26 FMMAWM 33 -1 2.1 64 65 

143 106 Farrar U»tt 130 *1 7.1 56 204 


226 177 Abbey LW 
26 22 AW & AIM 
668 24V Aim Mr* 
29V 23 Am Gan 
*05 223 Braatteek 
917 802 Bnanrw 

336 228 Can unon 
301 226 EqwyALae. 
4*1 213 FAI 
95* 701 Gao ACCkM 
954 720 CUE 
70S 464 HM» C E 
3*9 267 Hood Rtbnscn 


191 -3 S3 .. 

C« 100 42 .. 

C792 *4 

C2BV +V 664 34 . 

360 • +» 85 24253 

837 a-5 44.7 53 . 

287 -8 174 81 

271 -5 94 35 .. 

296 

837 .1? 3*3 4 1214 

809 -16 *25 53 23* 

469 -5 345 74 7.0 

317 a -4 137 43 178 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


D ore xi c* 59 *1 

CMhngmn 151 

Fnwy UamaM 82 -2 

Man son CrosJwW 373 >5 

burtejne 425 -3 

J*Ck* (WIKI 34 

Lonmo 3i4 m-S 

Ocean WMun 46 *1 

(hwnon Jocn 220 

Oo A 220 

M Pack 158 *-3 

5m Dwov «fl * l 

SM »09 555 

Tatar AafiBKy 168 

iiAe Cano 218 


-1 2.1 64 85 

♦1 7.1 86 20 4 

-2 5 0 89 162 

-20 79 14 259 

10 1.7 .. 

54 81 89 

-IV 03 04 .. 

*3 81 87 115 

.. 24 57 B1 

. . 124 7 1134 

-5 4.1 82 964 

84 9.1 11.7 


364 a -8 174 64 89 
2B0 .. 104 34 84 


143 106 Femw Uft) 130 *1 7.1 85 304 

75 S6 mm 56 a -2 50 89 162 

SS0 408 Foona 681 -20 74 14 289 

67 36 FtawHon 84 10 17 . 

124 54 FtotaftrC&V 92 54 81 89 

03 31'; Fooal 34 -IV 03 09 . . 

123 88 Foamy 61 *3 81 87 119 

41V 27 V FoG* OnoupK/V 35 .. 24 5.7 81 

199 1E7 Fotnergn AHVwy 175 . . 123 7 1 134 

67 *6 Frantfi (Thoraw) 50 -6 4.1 82 964 

131 64 GB n 32 84 9.1 11.7 

385 256 Q KN 264 8-4 17J 59 89 

310 280 Gfi 290 .. 104 34 84 

IIS 60 Genon Eng 102 -10 54 as 7.7 

156 91V Geswnar 112 *2 2.1 19 111 

ISO 111 GM«aa 120 4.7 39 137 

11V 756V GJMO 335 -15 187 17 281 

344 194 GAmed 308 -2 IZfi 42 184 

505 250 Gomg Karr 310 *10 185 80 119 

182 107 Gmnpon HUga TSS +1 57 86 16.1 

312 206 Qranao* 280 M-6 109 39 127 

1DV S’. GTO««a 20051a .. 05 .. .. 

83 59 V Htba Prtctwn 80 +1 36 33 186 

232 134 HU Eng 183 4-10 120 84 8.9 

1E2 126 Hal |Mf 130 84 49 89 

265 180 KWta 1S6 • .. M3 73 114 

290 230 Habra 275 24 OS 306 

*0 23 v Hantaan tnd *0 W4-1V 13 43119 

49 20 Hatai 25 .. 8 .. .. 

201 Ml hanaan IOO -2 S7[ 80 189 

196 145 Do 8% Cn» £190 *4-2 BOO *2 ,, f 

M9 96 Do SM* Pf 116V «+1 V 82 73 .. 

127V11SV DO 10b C124'. *-V 0 84 .. 

280 183 llagwie i 245 -7 79 3217.1 

275 175 Ham* (Pmap) 260 .. 132 5.1 111 

623 431 HMbar SrtMsy 461 -IB 20.1 43109 

ISO 90 Hawley 93 a -4 2.7 27 73 

205 B1 Hey {Harman) 190 -10 5.4 2334.4 

221 140 hapwom Came 202 -6 103 52 163 

201 96 Haattr 156 -7 81b 39 162 

96 65 HaaCB U> 95 39 4.1 84 

160 122 Hgngam ■ Job in 381 

61 62 HoaBBraa 85 -1 430 81 263 

106 66 Hob Uoyfl BB -1 5.7 84 123 . 

2SS 148 Hopbnsona 252 .. 107 42 89 

120 S7 Homo 57 *-1 53 83 7.1 

1320 234 Hnm Auoc 315 114 33 87 

115 m HlB*ng Croup 103 86 63 73 

304 207V HutfWi Wuim 289 -6 

191 119 IMI 164 *4-1 79 49118 

315 186 Mm 190 • .. 11 1.1 224 

295 245 Jacksons Bourne 245 • .. 86 35 192 

1U6V 96 V JanWa Man Of -2 

615 473 Jobnson Oamta 550 • . . 30.4 S3 M9 

238 133 Jcftnson UcWay 233 43 33 13 153 

44V 22V Joanaon 8 FB 33 185 

345 235 Johnston 310 .. 107 IS 111 

140 68 Joaaa 8 SMprman 120 44 53 43 89 

132 87 JoDnun (namaa) 113 • .. S3 43 ISO 

29 21 KatakWO 27 .. 29 e 10.7 93 

36 25 Kakn 29V -'I 17 53 203 

325 188 KakayM 2SS .. 119 43133 

130 103 KamaaySaaia 123 43 57 43 132 

.298 230 Kanharr CAJ 265 *-7 21.4 81 221 

216 123 KMO-BZa '.. 200 • .. 83 43 173 


289 231 Ukj» A Gan 263 117 44336 

224 173 Lonoon l Maa 190 4 85 43 75 

438 257 ununtttw 426 *42 2430 5 7125 

68 V 29V MMl 3 Uctan C41V -IV 220 83 

2BS 220 MM 247 -3 114 43119 

346 223 PWS 290 -5 129 44 189 

15V 12 Wan CIS. • .. 681 44 .. 

942 718 Prodanw 649 -13 386 43 369 

*53 361 Ratuga 393 -5 20.4 52 

967 768 RoSr 837 -15 36 6 4 9 666 

415 32* Sedgmck Op 333 • -5 17.1b 5.1 159 

*74 318 Samoa! Winn *32 157 36175 

4*5 300 Shape Mag* 40? -2 lOOn 25 207 

772 520 S«n Atancs 702 -17 275 39 682 

927 772 SuiLdB 667 -7 339 39 . . 

550 120 Traaa Mam, 205 46 22 75 

474 394 WAS Faber 434 . . 115 29 203 

InveUraan! Trust* appear on Pag* 24 


.. 112 5.1 tt.1 

-IB 207 43 105 
• ■4 27 27 73 

-10 5.4 23 34.4 

-6 103 52 186 

-7 81b 33 162 

39 4.1 84 

:i srfia. 

.. 107 42 8S 

•-1 S3 83 7.1 
.. 113 39 87 

86 83 73 


79 49188 
11 1.1 214 

86 33 102 

304 S3 M3 
33 13 153 
. . . . 185 

107 35 12.1 
S3 43 80 
S3 43 159 
23a 187 80 
17 53 203 
113 43 133 
57 43112 
214 81 221 
63 43 173 



13V 3V Aug Amar coal 
10V 630 Aug An 
81 31 AmQdd 
58 33 AAIT 

40 22 IM Mil 

41 22 Do 'A 

196 120 Amt Horn 
425 238 ErfymXM 
160 60 Bracken 

21V 9*. ButlBB 

358 228 CRA 
89 39 Q»r Boyd 

552 406 Coos HrWfftm 
531 314 Da Baer* 
ziB los Pan el 
9V 4V Do omio natn 
13V 7 DnMamaO 
7V 2>. Oman 
258 150 E Dagcn 


CSV +V . . 081 

£10V 549 53 .. 

£54 *1 448 83 .. 

E54 +1 271 53 . 

£35 .. 142 4.1 . 

E3S 142 4.1 . 

150 ..473 317 .. 

363 -10 790 213 . 

145 .. 283 176 .. 


S S 58 

18 *10 4.0 13 .. 

TV +'. 62.0 121 .. 

11V +'. 126 103 .. 


4*6 . . 120 25 . . 

205 129 B On 203 •«« 86 S3 M.1 

195 as Ebaoa 180 +5 1*9 83 .. 

390 200 E RanS GeW 325 +2 280 88 . . 

4V 2V £ Rind Prep £«V +>. 

9 4V FS Con* £B'a 

213 93 FS Da* 180 

75 17 Gaamr Tat 31 1 

BV 4V Garbs* * TV +V BOO 83 . 

10 6 GenMmbg E9V -V 87 0 03 . 

10V S V OFSA £9 480 31 . 

603 313 GM Katgoora 578 -10 ... . 

S S * .. 209 523 . 

123 as Grooumcft Das 113 

375 165 Groonrfel 270 .. 549 209 . 

156 9i H am payi Arm 146 64 37 32 

&» 4V Hanaony £BV .. B23 7.7 . 

360 175 mat 360 +15 179 47 . 

ai 47 V Jdmnai £78 +2 345 44 . 

12V 5*. Karos* CSV *V B99 97 . 

S'. 2V Wool £SV a .. 400 73 . 

1W 65 laths 105 .. 290 273 . 

13V (v Lftanon £11V 115 103 .. 

*10 170 lontaa 406 -2 

157 6a MM 9t -3 

28 H UMaiwan umg a 

123 60 Manama IOO +5 179 179 .. 

40 MV Uetab Exp 46 

2B 5 V Uiangue 9 

9V 4V Mkhfla Mb £3'. +v 

655 *50 Mnorco S40 -5 109 19 . . 

5V 2V NSW Wts -V 230 84 . . 

142 73 N* Broken MB 9* -5 

58 V 25V Ndl unit 56 -V 

22*. 10V OrraTraa £7TV -V 

128 8S PaoCn Tai 96 . . . . a . . . . 

288 2M PSttj WMWnO 281 -4 

25 B*. Rand Maws Ud C13V 

445 170 Rand Mmas Prep 3S0 110 34 8 

6S 18 RwKtbMeai mv -V 551 89 .. 

351 225 RafMon 305 -11 

791 511 RT7 589 -32 314 53 71 

6V 4*. R a an+rri nro 18 . 26.0 33 B0J 

10V PaSlHMn CSV .. 125 137 .. 

168 6* BA Lana i<3 183 169 .. 

31 MV Bouttwial E26V +->< 116 45 . . 

558 273 SnUonMn 516 

138 80 Sungs BW 8B 

133 73 Trench 63 .. .. 

S69 300 OWI 488 . . *80 14 . . 

SB'.- 3iv Van Raab £Sfiv +v 556 39 .. 

544 233 Wna re pcal 513 -10 5*0 105 .. 

no 50 vwdoraain no +5 159 133 .. 

90 35 Vogafc 50 • . . 43 U 81 

17 iov tonka C a n a r y M 

563 2SS totem 563 .. 679 119 .. 

310 128 Maswm Anal 2*6 +2 230 94 .. 

29V 15 WammDaap C2SV ♦•* 171 85 .. 

198 114 toatam ibmng 160 +5 39 1.7 . 

2BS 108 Wan Band Com 260 129 *9 . . 

155 B0 Whan Creak 153 42 

17V tv wnaa ei*v +■. ITS is< . . 

53 2D W*NMl 33 1.1 U 

16V IOV Zankaa Cccpar MV .. ..a.. .. 

60 28 Zandpan 58 *2 37 64 


.. .. .. 13 

♦V 600 83 .. 

-V 87 0 .. 

*H 480 51 .. 


39 22 LDH 
1S0V110 L*P 
323 21* LteO 
76 42 IMn 

7BV 41 Laa {After) 
T20 69 L4 un M 
86 6* Urweed 

73 S3 Lloyd (FH) 

35 23 Loctor (T| 
240 ITS Lon UtfcnC 
1*5 95 Do DM 

83 59V ion A NBWI • 

238 159 Lon Ind 
480 319 law * Bawr 
423 306 Ml Hdgs 
119 64 MS b* 

49 31 MY HaWnga 


36 .. 93 21 S3 

111 -1 U 3102 

714 *-1 93 43 84 

80 .. ISO 6.0 69 

33 .. 33 50 9.4 

119 33 23 282 

73 •-! 33b 43 53 

68V -V 84 81 77- 

26 19 73 35 

217 a -2 142 85 181 


1*5 95 Do DM IM -2 ..... 

83 59V Lon 4 NBm - 79 -4 74 94 133 

236 159 Leri M 21 B a -3 88 39 183 

480 319 low 3 Bonn 446 . . 143 32 145 

423 306 ML Hdga 416 • .. 114b 27 187 

119 64 MS k* 114 • .. 29 25 119 

49 31 MY HoMnea 41 +1 19b 44 13.1 

333 2S5 Mwantrye warm 323 a -5 186 31 153 

160 121 Madartsrw OS • 37 87 183 

79 « Madalan (PtW) 47 17 5.7 87 

288 IBS MeKachna 226 -a 143 83 109 

130 78 Magnolia 115 • . . U U 105 

710 496 Manchanar Snip 6*0 -25 86 1.3 21.7 

79 62 Mranasa Brens 63 -1 43 83 74 

33 61 MarSg 7$ • . . 15 33 39 

143 GS Marshal (LokJey) 108 +1 S3 43 83 

193 105 Mac* Baa 163 -2 88 41 .. 

10* 126 Uectf Cbwra MS «-6 93 63 21.7 

91 66 Ihn 73 32 43 117 

78 V 49 Ucna Cow 46V .. 51 113 50 

125 70 Mttnal Samara IM 53 43 HI 

196 163 Moira 171 -5 113 63 63 

315 212 UorgnCrudbto 251 -9 111 43 149 

42 20V HM P i e n d 29 • .. 0.1 QJ 15.0 

216 148 IM|J| 151 • . . 109 63 54 

41 26 NawlBMi Ind* 34 • . . 14 4.1 515 

153 32 Mownwt Tonka 150 +1 103 89 t!5 

133 68 NOOte 6 UM 120 .. 19 03 387 

B5 40 NottOn *0 14 35443 

269 168 Morcres 236 -7 >33 8811.4 

25S 203 once Beta Mach 221 . . Ill 55 B0 

443 2*7 Partar Knol -A- <20 .. 159 18153 

81 525 Panto JT Z9V 

603 333 Pearson 508 a-5 18* 10 179 

27 11 Peek 201B 

M3 68 Paarleai 136 »-5 99 16 187 

674 332 Patflr-Haunwy 619 .. 286 43 112 

520 1*0 Pwtond M *25 W-30 10 05 24 1 

14 775 Ptx»44a £13 .. 75 09 337 

483 311 Ptoflton *43 -8 183 44 117 

56 51 PWnc Coroa 73 W-1 4.1 63 123 

3S5 195 PonW 290 .. 103 37 1Z5 

323 215 Porter Chaabwn 296 • .. 19 19 381 

314 238 POwaatotkyn 282 +2 21.7 74 21.1 

164 95 Pres*** HUS* i® ..19 19 211 

190 119 IW 171 -1 64 37187 

15B 123 Rtaanl UaW 136 -10 39 27 219 

589 421 Rank Org 484 *-15 229 43 17.1 

228 115 Ranaoma Sms 164 -1 74 45 133 

136 35 ftaUffs ICi Bridge) 95 • .. 17 1.6 14 

900 605 RackJB 8 Cdman 809 -II 229 23 175 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


.. 543 209 .. 

54 37325 
.. 625 7.7 .. 

♦15 179 47 .. 

*2 345 44 .. 

•V 830 97 .. 

I .. *00 73 .. 

.. 290 273 .. 

ns loa .. 

-2 

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+5 179 179 !. 


+V 

-5 109 19 .. 

— 210 14 .. 
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350 . . 110 34 93 

£631 -V 551 83 .. 

305 -11 

589 -22 314 S3 73 

£8 . 269 33 B0J 

£BV .. 125 117 .. 

its tao iu .. 

E26V +->« |1B 45 .. 


.. 469 94 .. 

♦V 558 39 .. 
-10 5*0 105 .. 

+5 159 135 .. 

43 86 85 


2*5 118 Raotorn Qtst 
*11 200 Ftaeo Exacuaus 
28S 163V Reed H 
173 132 Ratynn 
91 57 Ranore 

108 66 naitm o r 
520 345 Reman 
*0 21 Ranrnre 

iGO no Rtearoo EM 
go 53 RWiard (Lmcal 
58 19 Rsbardini Was 


196 -2 

390 

2 S8 a -5 
168 • .. 
82 -2 

106 *42 


19 15 11.7 
64 13 173 


361 151 Robnaon (ThemW 3*3 

55 30 Rockwu* 41 -3 

ISO 112 Rocoar 112 • .. 

146 106V DO 'A' 107 

3 ov Rompm 2v 

182 116 Rcaork 135 a+3 

130 68 Rusal (A) 35 


• .. 89 41 135 

-2 13 4.7 87 

• 42 84 89 113 

•-13 54 1.1 387 

• . . 14 35 119 

• .. 43 34 113 

99 53 95 
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. . 35 49 105 

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• . . 93 83 7.7 

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81 69 102 

13 17179 


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170 S 

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153 S 

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567 

3*9 Tl 

195 

115 Tl 

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94 T 

535 

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6’- 

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95 

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170 

116 T 

116 

SI Tl 

266 

69 Tl 

338 

203 T 

349 

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195 

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IBB 78 kp W t p f fl 141 

141 70V Mmstreng 1W 

53V 24V BSD 4| 

Bbtnal Bras 

314 185 Eternal tCW 29B 

606 *21 Br Aartxpaca 44£ 

151 90 Br Cer AuCSOnt 13E 

273 168 CaByns 2K 

215 79 Cowa fl) 193 

133 T05 Daws |OoO«ry) 10E 

3*1 172 Dowry 2i3 

115 36 ERF 83 

357 253 FR Droop 33* 

213 125 Ftrt Mote 1B2 

90 66 Gan* (Frat*G) 78 

296 228 General Merer 2S 

106 51 GtoheU Lawrence 93 

n* a Harare** BB 

595 373 HOndtMorer 534 

563 335 Jaguar 503 

1« 72 Jetesce 116 

Tft 55 Kwa.J* 115 

402 260 Laa 334 

205 90 Lookers 195 

653 470 Ucw 510 

Ml 111 Parry gp 112 

91 66 Plaxions fGB) 68 

102 51 Ouck (Hi) BJ 

71 29 Rou m 34 

77 43 Snore 73 

MO S5 Westted 78 

72 3? woodnore (Jonas) 67 


200 -8 10.7b 64 97 

17 339 

M8 • . . 860 80 86 

124 -5 12 19 164 

46 15 1414.7 

29B -a' liJa 35 180 

446 S-14 23 4 5 2 9 4 

136 -A 69 37 149 

2W 79 39 .. 

192 .. 57 10 99 

106 . . B4 69 95 

213 •-£ 79 17 145 

03 54 

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182 -*6 79 39 .. 

78 _■ 65 87 

233 +3 269 107 .. 

93 +5 

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534 -35 39 07 .. 

503 a -10 117 15 104 

116 -a 81 55 69 

115 -1 39 19 ifil 

334 -3 15.1 45 183 

195 W-3 79 39 114 

510 -13 157 81 10L3 

11* .. 64 17 101 

66 84 94 91 

B3 • . . 47 4.6 181 

34 -a 

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78 -2 43 55*71 

67 •-! 14 11 11.1 



312 VI 87 
396 238 
366 213 
400 305 
91 56 
603 400 
78 54V 

12V 5 
41 26 

240 ISO 
,576 428 
'IBS 66 
3*8 132 
390 360 


Br Comnrnmraekh 250 

CMadcno 273 

C>wcn 365 

Fate (Janas) 62 

Greg 510 

Jacons (Ji) 67 

UM 6 

Manor Dock* 31 
Ocean Tmpott 23i 
P A 0 DM 528 

Ruicnto (Water) lag 
Tipnook 288 

TumOuB Seen 365 


77 77 156 
7 1 25 176 
71 32391 

121 3* M3 

48 7.7 113 
214 42 423 
51b 76 51 I 
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96 47 106 

259 4 7 15 I 
7.1 4 5 233 
61 2 1 164 

129 35 511 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


360 290 Hi 295 9SO 13 115 

206 145 Ganur Booth 182 -6 M3 79 111 

45 32 HeedQtm sm 37 -i 07 1.9 

218 >66 Lemoar Howartn (96 ■ . 69 45 105 

B2 58 Newbotd A Bunco 58 44 76 175 

!14 82 Praara , 112 +4 82 55 77 

157 118 Smng A Foliar 142 4 114 BO 57 

273 156 Syto 213 a-1 30 263 


TEXTILES 


NEWSPAPERS AND 

PUBLISHERS 


172 18* Accord 168 

&C 195 AUOC took *13 

3S6 22D AUOeNSaaewar 335 

315 2BD are*(AAQ 310 

730 515 BrnU 660 

505 447V coans (Win) 450 

383 285 Do A 311 

M5 78 EMAP 'A* 136 


44 252 05 
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83 1J189 

. . 143 45 17.1 

-5 385 55 185 

• .. 114 25203 

•-1 114 17 140 

*•! 


376 330 Hayarentoowig 320 «-6 209 83188 

240 35 Boms Comet 210 • . . 125 60 134 

360 163 b kW toflto 260 .. 120 43 . 

569 404 W Inomaon 309 -5 M9 16 134 

MV 630 Haws Rsnakral EM 129 04 , 

680 445 Oaopne 478 -5 99 29 169 

138 112 PortsmiDi Suod 150 +5 57 44 213 

455 22D Trim M 416 *5 *14 5.1 110 

403 280 Ud Aowspapore 37l -7 229 82 M5 


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Boila (John) 
smoantA) 

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Btewr A Luam 

Coran 

Cowtaula 

Cromnar (j) 

Dawifib 

DteO" 

Din mh 

Fo»tar (John) 


■ngnenb 
UVBhi (HBraU) 


Lite (S) 
MBMylHucn 

Mtrton 

P ark hcd 'A' 


Sooua RJey 
Tmurad Jersey 
TomWBOM 

YorUyte 


• -I0 107 39 189 

-2 100 42 M 7 

• +fl 89 4.1 69 

82 77 124 

. . 154 

• -kl Bfln 83 B2 

7 1 74 220 

• -1 57 69 

-4 93 34 03 

-a ri i2i4o 

-6 89 36131 

• -2 0.7 1 4 394 

+5 87 114 6 7 

50 67 65 

• 79 76 73 

-I 80 43 107 

•-I 49 17 206 

49 54 77 
-S 64 41 102 

BO 42 129 

• -2 14 1* 93 

+5 62 86 195 

-2 87 89 164 

. e . SB 
89 50 171 
-V 23 53 tOO 
■ . 76 G I 71 

• -4 16 32 91 

-2 7 4 51 108 

39 66 54 

-IV 

•3 49 34 76 

• 89 17 87 

B6 46 143 

-2' 5 7 59 10 t 

100 39 80 


TOBACCOS 


4B6 30B BAT 
IN 110 Carrot 
180 110 Carrol 
187 127 R o m ma rn -O’ 





















































































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THF TTMKS WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


Americans roar in for the 
great Gatt s hoot- out 

O -- — — — — world to the detriment of 


The Queen’s Awards. 

Made from blood, sweat and tears. 


With unemployment remain- 
ing high and economies every- 
where sluggish, the meeting of 
the 92 members of Gatt — the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade - in the Uruguayan 
city of Punia del Este could 
hardly have come at a worse 
time. There is a general feeling 
in Washington, shared by 
delegates of many other coun- 
tries; that expectations have 
been set far too high. 

Mr Michael Aho of the US 
Council on Foreign Relations 
saicL“The EEC does not want 
broad reforms. Unless it 
changes its policies, it will not 
gain much and I don't think it 
will be very forthcoming.” 

For its part, the US has 
incurred the disapproval of 
even normally sympathetic 
British ministers for what has 
been called its “Rambo-like” 
negotiating style. Saddled with 
a $155 billion trade deficit, a 




lady, the US position is 
hardening. 

A high-level West German 
official in Punta del Este 


a $155 billion trade deficit, a . 

depressed agriculture, and *“<£ tang pushed too 
with mid-term elections only f iard : I (. lhe 


Each yeas the Queerfe Awards are Queen’s Award flag, and use the 
presented to the most successful Awards emblem on products, letter- 
companies in British Industry head and publicity material 

Some of the firms are large Many If you’d like to be considered for a 
are small All have achieved out- Queenfe Award in Industry Year 1S86, 
standing performance in export or complete the coupon and return it to 
technology. the address shown. Well send you 

So that everyone can recognise further details and an application form: 
t ftgjr success, these winning com- If you've worked hard all year; we 
parties are entitled to fly the coveted want to know about it 

Return to: The Secretary, The Quaerfe Award Office, Dean Bradley House, 52 Hmsefeiry Road, 
London SW1P 2AG. Tel: 01-232 227Z Please send me details and application form. 


Name of Company- 


Tick as appropriate:- Exports G Technology D Both G 
Completed applications must be returned by 31st October 138a 


THE (KEEN'S flmBD6K» EXPORT 
Aim TECHNOLOGY lBST 


two months away — with a 
strong Democratic challenge 
for key farm belt seats — the 
Reagan Administration needs 
to look uncompromising. To 
satisfy a restless electorate, Mr 
Clayton Ye utter, the US trade 
representative, must either be 
seen to win or stage a dramatic 
walk-out 

The last Gatt ministerial 
meeting in 1982 nearly foun- 
dered on a dispute between 
the US and Europe over the 
EEC's Common Agricultural 
Policy. This time both sides 
have transgressed equally. 
Since the passage of an omni- 
I bus Farm Bill last year, in- 
tended to help US farmers 
compete in foreign markets, 
US subsidies have risen to 
about $30 billion compared to 
the $25 billion paid out under 
the CAP. Mr Yeutter has said 
that the US was forced to 
respond in kind to an expen- 


hard. If the US continues this 
tough line, we shall end up 
siding with the French." 

Both Britain and West Ger- 
many are seeking a com- 
promise that will help the 
Reagan Administration to get 
through the November elec- 
tions. They believe that if the 
Democrats regain control of 
the Senate, the US win turn 
even more protectionist. 

Mr Yeutter has described 
the meeting as “one of the 
most momentous economic 
conferences of the past 40 
years” and has declared un- 
equivocally that he will walk 
out unless the US receives 
substantial concessions in five 
areas: agriculture, intellectual 
properly rights, trade in ser- 
vices, investment, and a basic 
strengthening of Gatt. Never- 
theless, Mr Yeutter gives the 
talks a better than 50-50 
chance of succeeding. 

But if the dispute on agri- 


si ve subsidy war, which must, cultural subsidies is not re- 


stop. On this issue particu- solved and the European! markets of the developing 


SMITH - BOOKS FOR STUDENTS • ATLANTA NEWS AGENCY - SHERRATT & HUGHES • OUR PRICE - DO IT ALL • CLASSIC BOQtfj 


lb Mr Smith itis a 

bright new room 



wn 

% 

% 


; *?'■ ■ : ' 
* • ■ ru »v> • 




ToWHSmith 

it’s a bright 
new market 


WH Smith Do It Ail has been trading for only seven years. In such 
a short time its achievements have been remarkable. With 70 stores, 
including 24 with garden centres, sales of over £106 million and profits 
of £6 million, it is already one of the market leaders. 

started at the right time to capitalise on the rise in home 
ownership, nearly 10% in the last six years. And giving consistently good 
value for money has had more than a little to do with it But ith also 
due to providing a wide range of products. Do It All stocks prints and 
fabrics as well as power tools, paints and everything else you could 
possibly need for improving the home. 

We aim to help people to enjoy their spare time: that doesn't only 
apply to DIY but to every market in which WH Smith competes. Our 
strategy of developing specialist retail operations in familiar product 
fields has expanded our business base. Our Price Music and booksellers 
Sherratt & Hughes are just two of our new chains. 

Abroad we have applied the skills learnt at home to become the 
largest bookseller in Canada and one of the leading operators of news 
and gift shops in the USA, where we serve 70 million customers every 
month. Worldwide, new retail outlets are being opened at the rate of 
three every week. 

This growth is reflected in our performance. Since 1981 sales have 
increased by 88% and pretax profits by 205%. Earnings per share have 
risen by 180% to 17.2p over the same period. 

All told, it paints a dazzling picture. 

If you would like further information about the development of 
WHSmith at home and abroad, write to Julian Smith , W.H. Smith & Son 
(Holdings) PIC \ Strand House, 7 Holbein Place, London SWIW8NH 


WHSMITH® 


In need of a win: US trade representative Clayton Yeutter, 
left, colleague Richard Lyng at the Gatt t a lk s . 

arfv. the US DGsition is commitment to a new trade 


round wanes, the entire struc- 
ture of the post-war negotia- 
tion system may be destroyed. 
Bilateralism, resulting in a 
series of politically d amagin g 
and unfair agreements be- 
tween nations, could replace 
the multilateral approach to 
trade conceived by the US and 
Britain when Gatt was estab- 
lished in the late 1940s. 

Today it is generally reo 
n gniTpd that the world trading 
system is breaking down un- 
der growing protectionist trea- 
ties and antiquated rules 
inadequate to regulate the 
very large flow of goods and 
services. No coherent system 
of rules and procedures gov- 
erns the rapidly growing trade 
in services, which totalled 
about $370 billion in 1980 and 
constituted 20 per cent of all 
world trade. 

Here, a number of develop- 
ing nations led by India and 
Brazil are fighting the pro- 
posal to extend Gatt rules to 
services. They fear that the 
richer nations will use their 
capital, experience and exper- 
tise to begin carving up the 


rxi* fVio Holmes 

OT me a Court 

Ollt keeps them 

worid lo the detriment oflocal gUeSSlUg 

companies and national cul- By Richard Lander 

’mSve at Punta del 

Este is lofty. As stated in the pany J* JJJLJ™? 

opening paragraph of the draft unknown ^ 

communique, approved only wwrea 

after several tortuous negotiat- m August 198a there were a 
jng sessions in Geneva, it is: lot of jokes crackedamonglte 
“To bring about further lib- Australian finanml estabhsh- 
eratization and expansion of mart m Melbourne about fleas 
world trade to benefit all biting elephants, 
countries, especially less- Three years, three more 
developed contracting bids and countless law smts 
pities”: later, the jokes look pretty 

Over the past few years, in gale. Mr 
which it has pressed for a new Court non the bo«d ofBH£ 
trade round, the US has said while Wtgmores. the tractor 
that only through liberalized cww b*s tong been 
trade can developing conn- absorbed mto ms Bell Re- 
tries grow out of their debt and source vehicle, now owns 
Europe's unemployment be some 28 per cent of toe giant 
corrected. If the US commit- Australian group. 

mentto this goal appears to be . fjSjLJi RHPsaea 

flagging, it is because of the the Holmes* 
domestic repercussions of its 

large trade deficit Mr Holmes * Court s qaestfor 

Mr Yeutter said: “Many the huge *0, steel and mn- 
Americans look at our trade erals group isthat his aims 
deficit and at the growing use have never 
of subsidies and other illegal fined. A sent m fo* 
practices by other countries was om possible mttove but so 
and wonder why we are still a was complete control ^or. the 
signatory to Gatt They want harvest of a huge profit from 
us to take matters into our selling his stake to a tag!®? 
own hands." bidder. 

This is why the Reagan The complexities were en- 
Admimstration is insistent on larged by the entty earlier this 
achieving a “win” at Punta del year of Mr John Elliots 
Este. Its representatives can- EMers-IXL group. Elders took 
not come home empty- an 18 per cent stake m BHP 
handed which in tom took a cross 

The US strategy, then, is holding of abont the same size. 
eitfaer to bow out of the talks Although basically a friendly 
altogether or keep them going operation — too friendly in 
through the mid-term dec- many observers’ eyes — Mr 
lions so that a deal can be Elliot bolds something of a 
negotiated later. One US of- similar reputation to Mr 
fitial said: “We have a win- Holmes A Court as a corporate 
dow of opportunity in the trouble-maker. The s two men 
seven months between the managed to add a little more 
French and American spice to the affair last month 
presidential elections in 1988. when Mr Holmes A Court 
We should at least be able to mandated his voting rights in 
bring home a deal in BHP to Mr Elliot for the 
agriculture.” forthcoming annual meeting. 

Mr Elliot has also been 
Bailey Moms inl0 the BHP board- 

room and both he and Mr 
Holmes A Court have pledged 
BSG Motors: Mr Alan to disclose any share sales and 
Piffle becomes a manag in g refrain from hostile partial 
director bids. What is not forbidden is 

ShaxuL Mr R H R Kettle a foil cash bid by either party 
joins the board as a non- for * company worth AS9.5 
executive director and is made billion at yesterdays prices, 
^airman. Nor, for that matter, has 

Yamaichi International ““g 

(Europe): Mr Alan J Towner **35 

is promoted to executive built up a nine per rtake 
director, floating rate notes. height of the battle 

Civil Aviation Authority: Mr Holmes A 

SSl »*2i for Lord Grade's ACC group 
in 1982, has other irons in the 
part-time members from ^ tf he tires of BHP. He 

t- ~ • holds a strategic eight per cent 

_Thc J 1 ® Allen __ Design investment in Standard Char- 
Team: Mr Jnlun Gnee takes tered Bank, the suppliers of 
over as associate director. ^ huge Hoes of credit, and 
London P&ik Hotels: Mr was elected to the board there 
NIall Caven becomes finance after he l ping the hank escape 
director. tlte dutches of LLoyds* Bank 

Lloyds Development Cap- recently. He has also recently 
itaL* Mr lan Burns is made a pot down a marker that he 
director. might take a stake of np to 15 

Hill Samuel Investment per cent in USX, the former 
Management: Mr David US Steel group. 

Barker is appointed managing ■ 
director from October 13. m jl mm 

Good Relations Public Af- Ujlil£j 

fairs: Mr Peter Lnff is pro- w 
moted to chief executive, iiCillUinU 

succeeding Mr Paul Tyler. Mr n 
Tyler becomes chairman from ff/f X 


APPOINTMENTS 


BSG Motors: Mr Alan 
Bache becomes a managing 
director. 

Shand: Mr R H R Kettle 
joins the board as a non- 
executive director and is made 
chairman. 

Yamaichi International 
(Europe): Mr Alan J Towner 
is promoted to executive 
director, floating rate notes. 

Civil Aviation Authority: 
Mr Denis M Child, Sir Peter 
Lazarus and Mr Brian 
Trabshaw join the board as 
part-time members from 
October 1. 

The Jim Alien Design 
Team: Mr Julian Grice takes 
over as associate director. 

London Park Hotels: Mr 
NIall Caven becomes finance 
director. 


director. 

Hill Samuel Investment I 
Management: Mr David J 
Barker is appointed managing 
director from October 13. 

Good Relations Public Af- 
fairs: Mr Peter Luff is pro- 
moted to chief executive, 
succeeding Mr Paul Tyler. Mr 
Tyler becomes chairman from 
October I. Mr Peter Bradley 
is made account director. 


CHARITY COMMISSION 

Charily - The John Rutson Bequest 
in connection with 
the Royal Academy of Music. 

The Charity Cormnmiocers propose to 
maJcr a Scheme far this Charity. Copies 
of ibe draft Scheme may be obtained 
From tbem (reft 3I0007-A/I.L1) as Si Al- 
ban's House. 57-00 Haynuriwt. London 
SWIY 4QX. Objection* and suggestions 
may be sent to them within one month 
from today. 


ABN 

Adam & Company.. 

BCG 

Citibank Savmgst.- 
ConsoWated Cnis_ 


10 . 00 % 

mow 

— mow 

10.75% 

mow 


Continental Trust 10.0W 

Co-operative Bank 10.0W 

C. Hoare & Co 10.0W 

Kong Kong & Shanghai 10.00% 

I Lloyds Bank 10.00% 

Nat Westminster 10.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland 10.00% 

TSB 10.00% 

Citibank NA 10.0W 

t Mortgage Base Rue. 


Evered Holdings pic 

INTERIM REPORT 

HALF YEAR TO 30 JUNE 1986 


4* 


The uraudited results of the Evered Group, prepared under 
the historical cost convention for the first six months of the 
manaal year ending 31 December 1986, together with 
comparative figures are summarised below: 

1986** 1985 1985 

Half Year Half Year Year 

£m £m 

‘ *8.10 43.65 99.62 

Net Operating Profit 4.90 340 g™ 

Income from Fixed Asset 

Investment 0.74 - non 

Interest Payable (Net) ( 1 . 4 5 ) (0.90) (132) 

Profit before Tax 4.19 2^0 787 

Taxation (030) ,:'Z« 


Earnin 9 s 3.89 ^ 

Earnings per 

Onfinaiy Share 9.70p 7.70 d* ISinpt 

Interim Dividend per 

Ordinary Share 1 . 75 p nt. - 

Final Dividend per ^ ^ *^P 

- Ordinary Share _ _ _ 

- — _ ~ 2.25p 

PRE-TAX PROFIT UP 68% 

E ARNIN GS PER SHARE UP 26% 

INTERIM DIVIDEND INCREASED BY dm*. 


Off. ATLANTA NEWS AGENCY - CELEBRATION • CLASSIC BOOKSHOPS • WHS DISTRIBUTORS • WHSMITH TRAVEL - TELEVISION SER VI < 


"Exchange rates ar 30th June 1986 _____ 

adjust (wnghtsssue n July 1985 ■'9 to penocj. 

TBMrfOTa wagh&j jimrageof 3474^795 ordn^ry shares ln 


%?”Y 



: iN r 

* 

r ?so.n 

4» i * 




V; 


'^stated 10 


■"Bsue durmg 




\ 









% 

Hm 


f -i k 

. . ■ V 1 


-V ' ■ ‘ v 


■ « I ^ 


if,' 


■ • J. 


‘ :•. .. "* 

S “t.s 


; - ■•) 
'■ '■• i 


BASE 

LEW® 

RATES 


i 

* 

k 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


27 


To a Fisons shareholder this 
daunting page of figures and fine 
print makes riveting reading. 

Here’s why. 


RECORD INTERIM RESULTS 
- PROFITS UP 24% 

Fisons results for the_fiist six 
months^j^i986''^were at~yet 'toother 
rec^ttT’leveL Pre-tax profits of £37 2 
million were 24% up on last year THis 
rp ^ t r ft fjCTitSi in 

five years of major achievement 

Performance in profit terms was 
accompanied by continued improve- 
ment in quality of earnings, with earnings 
per share up 18% to 12.0p. 

Total sales showed a small increase 
of 2% above last year However these 
were adversely affected by foreign 
currency fluctuation and at constant 
exchange rates total sales growth was 
15% year on year 
In the 

the Bpasd-ftas decided to pay an lStenm 
{Send of 2.55p per ordinary share; an 
Wo increase on 1985. 


PHARMACEUTICALS 

The Phggpacefutical JMygioa^con- 
tinupd^roretum record results' wffh 
pfofits of £22.5m, representing a 20 
incense. 

Of note is the continuing growth 
of Intal in the worlds major markets. 
An outstanding performance in the 
USA was enhanced by the introduction 
of the Intal 

sucgpBSfiSTrbtal sales of Intal increased 
J^over 50% in the USA as did thos-l 
hf^ ^ticrom. 

In JaparC^Hanriaceutical sales con- 
tinued to grow satisfactorily. 


Fisons leading consumer products 
in the UK, Sanatogen vitamins and 
Paracodol, both increased sales very sub- 
stantially during the half -year. 

Capital investment projects 
involving new plant and facilities, 
designed to increase output and improve 
efficiency continued in a number of 
operating areas including Mexico, 

an d the UK. 

made, ^which is currently being 
launched in ihg^JK, achieved its first 
as was announced at the 
Annual General Meeting in May. In the 
lead-up to launch, considerable work has 

5 YEAR EARNINGS PER SHARE [PENCE) GROWTH 


5 YEAR GROWTH-PROFIT 


PROFITS AFTER TAX (£m) 


60 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 


| | FULL YEAR 

HALF YEAR 


56.6 


38X> 


25L1 


143 


33 


(0.9) 


6.0 


101 . 


17.4 




22.9 


& 

SsS: 


28.9 


m 


VXS1 1982 1983 1984 1985 3986 


To the relief of many but to the 
detriment of our seasonal products’ sales, 
the allergy season in the UK and Europe 

was unusually mild. 

In the UK, the introduction of a 5 mg 
dosage Inhaler boosted Intal sales and 
overall satisfactory growth was achieved. 
The new inhaler was subsequently intro- 
duced in France and Italy. 


1966 


1985 


19B4 


1983 


1982 


1981 




192 


243 


»gt» 


83 


183 


mmm&i 







| 83 


133 


2.4 


HALF YEAR 


mm 


FULL YEAR 


been undertaken to familiar ise leading 
specialists around the world with this 
important new drug, eliciting a very 
positive response. During the period, 
applications for registration of another 
new drag, Dopacard, were submitted to 
several European authorities. This new 
cardio-vascular drag, also discovered by 
Fisons research team, has advantages 
over competitive products and should 
achieve significant sales within its 
relatively specialist market However; 
registration has yet to be achieved. 

SCIENTIFIC EQUIPMENT 

The Scientific Equipment Division 
produced record profits of £9Jm, 11% 
higher than last year. 

Over the past 5 years Fisons has 
been the fastest growing major supplier 
of scientific laboratory equipment in 
the world. 

^Ctfrnn Matheson Scientific in the^USA, 
continued to take market share from it^ 
Snaica: ,.comget ito3g wl ulst_ niamtarnmg 
margins on rapidly increasing sales. In 
the highly competitive clinical laboratory 
market; the major area of CMS’s activities, 
sales increased by over 25% in US dollar 
terms. In line with the strategy of 
increasing CMS’s manufacturing base, in 
February Biochemical Sciences Inc was 


purchased for £22m. BSI manufactures 
stains and other diagnostic products for 
haematology and microbiology labora- 
tories, and was the fourth mam rfarti iring 
acquisition to be added to CMS since it 
was acqu^edi»4984r- — - — 
^tSrioErba Strumentazione (CiEST^L 
J f continued to exceed expectations in sales' 
Sv^ nd profits , helped by succ^sfiiMiew 
products. T3ESTT""wh3£h leads our 
expansion in the growing higher- 
technology instruments market, con- 
firms the wisdom of our strategy of 
moving the Division into higher areas of 
technology in international growth 
markets. 

In both Australia and the UK, sales 
of scientific equipment; always sensitive 
to the economic climate^ were depressed 
The German company Haake, on 
the other hand, sustained its pattern 
of progress. 


HORTICULTURE 

The Horticulture Division increased 
profits by 9 % from £33m to£3r6n^The 
busjjoes^Snbotii sides of the Atianftt 
ieved strong sales and market share; 
^ gains. Lithe USA, sales of our new adject 
vjSB&ttmsttaep pi©el&etswef£weil up on 
the equivalent period last year under- 
pinned by another good performance in 
the professional market 

Our market share in the UK in- 
creased significantly. In particular the 
re-launch of the lawncare and Levington 
compost ranges, combined with new 
production facilities, greatly enhanced 
our competitive position. The Murphy 


GEOGRAPHICAL SPREAD OF SALES 


UK 

Europe 

Africa 

North America 
Astei/Australasia 


2 % 


% 

19 

17 

2 

48 

14 



^rden chemicals business, which came 
into the Group at the end of last year; 
has been integrated and is achieving 
the results expected 

However this good market place 
performance has not been fully 
translated to profit because the adverse 
weather conditions on both sides of 


the Atlantic badly affected the volume of 
peat harvested Thus there were consider-' 
able unrecovered production overhead 
costs. 

FISONS FORMULA FOR SUCCESS 

These excellent results reflect careful 
long-term planning and rigorous follow- 
through. At the beginning of the decade, 
Fisons management team implemented 
a corporate strategy which has restruc- 
tured and refocussed the Company. 

DIVISIONAL INTERIM PERFORMANCE (PROFITS) 


1986 


£m 

Pharmaceuticals 223 

Scientific Equipment 91 
Horticulture 33 



1985 



£m 

Pharmaceuticals 18.7 

Scientific Equipment 82 
Horticulture 33 


This strategy was based on the 
following criteria: 

1. lb operate only in inherently attractive 
industries with a long-term growth and 
profit potential. 

2. lb operate only in industries where Fisons 
would be a highly effective competitor. 

3. lb establish a high quality and well 
motivated management team to ensure 
efficient implementation 

The success of our strategy is evident 
from the record results produced by all 
three of our Divisions, each of which has 
achieved record profits. 

MAJOR INTERNATIONAL GROUP 

Throughout the 1980’s the growth of 
each of our three divisions has been 
backed by capital investment and 
augmented by selective acquisitions 

aroundthfijBQfkb 

^^FTsons is now established as a major 
international company with over 80% 
ofsales made overseas. 

THE FUTURE 

It is Fisons intention to maintain its 
highly successful strategy in the second 
half of this decade. 

fisons 


THE RESULTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31.12.85 ARE ABRIDGED FROM THE FULL AUDITED ACCOUNTS FOR THAT YEAR WHICH HAVE BEEN FILED WITH THE REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES. 






iJ.'i.W V- 


28 


83+ FRONT B.UTOIEB. c£U,000 

Sports sponsorship is one of the many responsibility for running his office. In return 
areas of involvement for this high profile you will enjoy a high degree of involvement 

financial organisation. Their MD takes an as you liaise with clients, organise and attend 
active part in promoting the company and meetings and other important functions. This 
needs a PA with poise to assist him in this is an upfront position requiring srecwisrs 
key role. He will expect you to keep one flair and initiative backed a-as»woujs 

step ahead of Ns requirements and take up by skills of 9050. or-256726i 

city city city city city city city FiN^e ci 


SERVITE HOUSES LIMITED 

A REGISTERED HOUSING ASSOCIATION 
AND CHARITY HAS THE FOLLOWING 
VACANCY BASED AT ITS HEAD OFFICE 
DM SOUTH KENSINGTON. 

Secretary to Hon. Director. 

Salary £7927 - £9865 inc. L.W. - Entry point 
on the scale will depend on ability and 
experience. 

The person appointed will need to have a pleas- 
ant telephone manner, good audio skills 
(preferably shorthand as well) and be able to take 
minutes at board meetings. Some word process- 
ing experience would also be helpful. 

Good liaison skills, initiative, common sense, 
complete trustworthiness in confidential matters 
and the ability to organise meetings and assist 
1 with official functions are also necessary. 

For Application form and farther details, please 
contact- 

The Personnel Administrator 

Smite House 

12S Old Brampton Road 

SW7 3RP 

TeL No. 370-5466 

dosing Date 29th September 1986. 

SsnNs Ms— s U— H Is In iliei-in m Bpri Owwhn—r PoOcy. 


Legal 

Administration 

Secretary 

CBS Records are seeking a 
Secretary to join their busy Legal 
Department The successful candidate 
wlH be involved in the field of Video and 
Backing Track Clearances with the 
Musicians* Union, Contract Clearances/ 
.Administration and generally assisting 
in providing a service to aU areas of the 
Record Company. 

You should be 25+ , able to work 
under pressure and like using your own 
Initiative. A legal background would be 
ideal but is not essential providing you 
have excellent shorthand and typing 
skiRs and an organised approach to 
your work. 

We are offering a competitive 
salary plus an excellent benefits 
package and interested applicants 
should write with full career detaBs 
(including current salary) to: 

Maureen Heneghan, Personnel 
Dept. CBS Records, 17/19 Soho 
Square, London W1. 



CBS 


LONDON 


SECRETARY TO 
HOTEL EXECUTIVE 

A smart articulate Secretary is required to assist the 
General Manager of this prestigious hotel in Kensington. 
Together with excellent an rmnd secretarial skills appli- 
cants must have personality, common sense and the 
ability to maintain a high level of con fid ential tty. 

A competitive salary and Rank Organis a tion benefits wffl 
be offered. 

Please apply in writing with full career detaSs to date ta 
Lesley WHdnson, 

Recruitment Officer, 

Gloucester Hotel, 

4-18 Ha i iin gton Gardens, 

London SW7 4LH. 


Rank Hotels 


JAPANESE 

Tills prestigious hotel requires a we* groomed Japanese speak- 
ing See to work in fret Bushian Service Centre ottering see 
servicm to Mr guasto. Exc typing, tlx. tax and a responsible 
attitude are necessary. Hours: 8-4 or 1230-830. S etarp Meg 
SPANISH 

S droctor de esta compeflia da seguros nece eft a Sec con 
expenande comare ia l a aste niveL twywnecanogratfa an espaftol 
eingtesyconochnientodeWP. Btrabojoesinterasantay vartado 
y la convendrtft a alguten con buna proseraaodn y una acttud 
texfcie. Edad 26+ c£10,000. 

FRENCH 

Notre ciant recherche Sec de Unction. carahte tf or ga ni se r el 
dbiger tour busau A Londres. Vous aurez de)a acqule experience 
A ca niveau ot'voua ssraz JwvflAe de wAM, fitengue, Men 
aiuairAe, ftextte et capable de prembe de I'W Ua ima. nant 
stenp/dMyto at uie presentation soignAe. 2 8 le ns Cl 3.000. 

GOMAN 

hum i tarjora DanK sucnr wh uttuciunn ttv moTijanngQr 
Ertahrung. BigM c ne Kiozsctirift und guta Oeutschhenntnlssa 
wanton vorBusoaserzt Ertahrung bn Ora itow ei an tot arforder fc h 
tur dace anspruchsvooe Aufgabe. Altar 2845. £11-11000 AAE. 

GERMAN - WEMBLEY 

Bn be. Untemehman suctt nine Dk m o mok r B t fl rin a nd te dwr 
Muttersprache de Im Verfcaufe - trad Marfcetingberaich ar baiten 
mdchtet Die THgkatt id sahr abwecMungsraich und fordert 
sichares AuBraten, gute Sehretai wsc hlfienhwirrtnlsse trad 
perfektes Deutscft. Men 25-35. £10,000 + u n ten greteha 


Weekend PA 

to £13,250 

Gome in at VIP level — the very pinnacle of 
power in this vast UK pic — and take week- 
end control. Working in the Chairman’s 
office your primary role is to provide 
Saturday/Sunday cover at the heart of a 
billion pound international enterprise. 
Thereafter all is flexible. Three, four or five 
days a week by negotiation. Self-motivation 
and reliability taken as read . Skills 100/60. 
Age 23+. Please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 


Rrcratmuu CmAxin 


BOYCE BILINGUAL 

01-236 5501 

Iba above erodes n open to noto and tank. 


O Vvl 


High-Risk Analysis 

to £10,000 

This is a job of distinctive Savour Worldwide special 
intelligence; security advice; crisis ma n a gem ent. 
And close cameraderie too. A tight knit, dedicated 
(earn where loyalty, integrity and a sense of purpose 
predo m inat e . As secretary you will need motiva- 
tion. discretion and excellent keyboard skills. 
Languages useful, not essential. Age preferably 
23-35. Please call 01409 1232 for further details. 


£ 14*000 

An internationally renowned Sim of Executive 
Search Consultants who have high expecta- 
tions of all their team need a workhorse par 
excellence with all the eloquence and sophis- 
tication of a thoroughbred. An opportunity to 
develop a role of one s own with clearly defined 
executive responsibilities and much inter-ac- 
tion with dieats and candidates will lead to a 
busy job of immense scope and satisfaction. 

SB KlL A ddLtLDS 
RECRUITMENT 
01-385 9075 



Mh aa a brae ntcraborel Advertising Agency m a Jamart Squre 
and me tootang tor a yang. nrttau artanasW secretoy to writ 
mtti cna at ear Male craps. Or tSt* apdant acvitf be nmrnm. 
Mw erertmt typing stabs red me abrty to Ban confidently veto oir 
sun and ner coraradore Mm me mss. ramn and HJwsicr. 
Exoanence of an IBM comptfer k W/P waM be m advantage- H yon 
are looking tv mvoNanen t ad rae raaaiu msponslbaty vmtre the 
bamewxk at a busy and swncttnxj AdwrUMg Agency, ms COM be 
toa opoonuniy you are stefcng we tave 4 mk Dots. BUPA and 
SR. scheme and a am toad & wne bar. 

For huffier details puma* phono 
Mrs Helen Brtant 839 3422 
OMBAB, 2 St James'* Squats SW1. 


SECRETARY c. £9,000 

WHO a Unify in mid 20’s, Bvriy end endwete ra i c . 
WHO is of smart appearance end confident 
WTO hei Rood ev crKarta J and oqnwiaatioaal skSh. 
WHO preferably bn WP atperience. 

WTO Itkca the idea of wo r kin g in Residential Property. 
WBO wants a challenge end responsibility. 

To woch in our new office in Highgale Village. 
Write today with fid) C ,V. to 

Martin Wire or Janra Leader 
26 Cfiltna Road, London W9 
01-286 4682 


CHESTERT0NS 

^ — K ESIDKNTI A L-- w 




with people at aD tewh. Salary n eg o tiable. 
Interested persons please contact Cindy 
between 9 am and 6 pm 
on 01 736 7557. 


Temps — £12,740 p.a. 

The best hourly rate in London for shorthand temp* with WP skills 




Use your bMngual Japanese/- 
Engfisn as secretary to 2 defightful 
mana gers in an exclusive West End 
store. 

You also act as interpreter to risking 
V1P.S. so poise and confidence are 
essential together wan sKAs of 
100/80. 

For the right per s on CJE7.500 is 
offered wrtn superb benefits. 


Weoffen 

■ft ABourdtjBedlenpiAcmenae 
ft RepdartenifxxmytMrk 


ft S200hoUa/hona— no itmgi attached 
ft FrecWPotat-tdr^anuieCtednYidma 

Yon need 

ft 1 00 topfn shorthand 
ft 60 wpm typing 

ft TiMyeen’Dmdtrl^iSjdanJcxpaiaiu 
in London 

ft Pmfiaenl WPdpBtonedleatonemadane 
ft EnhmmandapnfesaontJ appnoch 
Pfetoc telephone 01-434 4512 nowfitr an 

appoTO7Km_ 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


FRENCH ft AUDIO 
c£1 0,000+ 

French mother tongue with superb 
audio typing skifis requried for gra- 
cious offices in the West End. 


You wrUbe worta'ng for a very chic 
and professional bees who mist be 
able to refy on your discretion and 
100% accuracy. 


PERSONNEL 

£10,500 + Banking Benefits 

He ready appointed Paomti Manner of a presto , immaional 
bvestraeni bank in EC2 xaeds an enthusiastjc and conuratted FA/seartary 
to pravife fbD secretarial back-up, together with a wide range of 
admmstrative dudes which encompass a high proportion of sensitive and 
confidential issues. 

Applications are welcomed firm candidates with excejmt slrifls (10(M) 
mkinum). A background m paxxmd wrxdd be preferabk 1^ ^ 
a sense of bunour and the ability to comnnaucate wd a! afl levels are more 
pn^ w tant g] this imovative, expanding and pressuris ed de partenott. 
ExceBeot package inefodes salary review after 6 mouths, mortpff R»sidy 
and paid overlane. Please telephone 588 3535. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Group Secretary 

£ 9,000 

TheTechnical Change Certre wishes to appcftitaSecretary to be 
resporeWe, with an assistant for the provision of a fufl secretarial and 

WPserviceforagroup of academic research staff underthe direction of a 
ProgreBreneDkector.Pt^lpsWP experience is preferred but capable 
appHcantscould be cross-trained. 



International Secretaries 

■iCL-yjyjffn 


01-491 7100 



Judy Fwqidianon Limited 

47 New Bond Street. London. W1Y9HA. 
01-4938824 

PA/OFFICG MANAGER 
TO £15,000 

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

Outstanding opportunity for attractive, posi- 
tive personalty aged 2e-35 with good typing 
and administrative skffls to join expanding 
company. Must have ambitious career 
minded professional approach and 
consultancy experience. 

PA TO MB - c£1 2,000 

Professional & polished with experience a 
director leveL Should have excellent atkrtn- 
isfrative ahftty, tact, numeracy, good 
communication skfts & a self-reliant person 
afity. Sec skifls 120/70 essential. Age 28-40 

TEMPORARY APPOINTMENTS 

We are always keen to interview candidates 
with exceSent secretarial skiOs for varied 
temporary assignments in the West End. 

1 RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


SALES SECRETARY 

for 

ST. JAMES COURT HOTEL, 
BUCKINGHAM GATE, SW1 

One of London 's finest exclusive hotels 
recently re-opened after complete 
redevelopment. 

As aceptkmeBy challenging position tor in cfficiant 
secretary looking for real inv o lvement You will be 
responsible for the admiah ta tfon of a very busy 
office coord in a ting all sales activities, involving some 
guest contact Age 24+ , you should be smart. 
sdaDtahk. with eood social nWla and zood shorthand 
tndtypizif. Hotel and/or sales ba ck ground preferred. 
BxctBsnt salary, sapeib bee mesh and new office. 
Please oo n t ect imxnedistely JuBe Evans, 
Personnel Manager 01-834 6656 «xL2927. 


SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST 

Rapidly gr owing East moving city compan y in int ema- 
tional seenritiea industry reouires o at staoding 
secretaiy/receptianist with good word processing 
skills, raid work win be rewarded by an interesting 
and varied working environment 


The successfi 
and energetic 
reception exp 


mt will be extremely efficient 
i at least 3 yearn seeretariel and 
Salary £9,000 phis benefits. 


Phil Benmt, 

Financial T d ec n m aareica t iem s Ltd, 
46/50 Gun Street. 

London El 6AH. 

01-377 5373 


BILINGUAL 

SECRETARY 


I Street Please apply with CV. to: 
Van Cfeef & Arpeb 
153 New Bond Street 
London Wl 

Salary £10-15,000 per aaaam 
depending am applicant* qaoljfk at i on . 





£1WM0 + DISCOUNT 

Good misters read on: 
organise and run courses, 
base vvftft ad. agendas 
and psyctwIogMs (for fo- 
atarioeL Hendto a diversity 
of people at afl levels ki 
me personnel depL of top 
leisure co. Decount on ho- 
tels and traveL 22+. 

Phone 434 0836 


TOP PA 


j i ■;TH a rii 


£9^00 + BONUS ETC 

Top man in ad. agency wfl 
give you a big Anas 
bonus, your own superb 
office. ELVs. etc. etc. in re- 
turn tor keeping trade of 
his busy diary, overseeing 
secretaries and reception 
plus lull PA badwjp. Do- 
mandlnQ. responsible, funf i 
42-28. 60/85. 

PtaM 434 0030 I 


RECEPTIONIST/ 

TYPIST 

eSBfiOO 

OTEUetaaig Seecsud.ua 
t« hr art evscao Ccmpmy. 
Wt» rivrty «e«ig a ynng. 
taWr pemeMr » P" «• 
TeU icmcag agney 4 «w 
PBBO0U5 atm aftos a 
Wtapak swt lonom m. 

Wirfteg a ta eeang enwaa- 
nex. yau~H Iw apatng aw 
Bresi T Acorn 0cm 32 
mend one ad So and 
Wtttert tyoDg sMs. ItaxiaB- 
Ue far or mptna am. m 
nakifedinaiaaat 
■eK snten art maess the 
onWence n mt nr rertn. 
Eaxfles beetts ndrte 22 
taK luhtay 

Flcxsa caMd Skkky Eaflaa 
OK (BBSS) 72939 

6TE Mattel Sanfco ltd. 
tianm Hwoc. Grant SL 


KING'S COLLEGE 
LONDON (KQC) 
University of London 

SECRETARIAL 

ASSISTANT 

Faculty of Laws 

A SECRETARIAL ASSISTANT 
Is tequreo to undertake a vari- 
ety of duoes. Appflcans 
should lave good snont a nd 


and typng skfls. Mastva and 
a hetenfl and pteesant adtude. 
The abity to use a word pro- 
cessor en advanrago. 

Four weeks' annuel leave plus 
extra days at Christmas and 
Easter. Salary mBui the scale 
QL370 - £7,661 par nun 
nduSNB. 

Please apply » da Aa a titeHt 
PonoraS OMcor. Kkig's cot- 
tage London (XOcTNortoa 
aSdng. Snail, London, 
WC2R 2 lS- 

date far appfcarioQs; 


SURVEYORS’ OFFICE 

Opportunity for Secretary in small but active 
firm of surveyors at Staple Inn - the Tudor 
building next to Chancery Lane Tube Station. 

Own room and electronic typewriter/WP. 
Suit enthusiastic person aged about 25. Salary 
£9,250. 

Please contact John Thompson 242-4321 



SECRETARY TD 
DIRECTOR OF 
SOCIAL SERVICES 

£9,300 - £10.000 
(increase pending) 

The Director’s Secretary is the senior 
of two people in a secretariat which 
supports the Director and Deputy 
Director. This is an important role at the 
heart of a busy, professional 
department; and it involves the usual 
range of secretarial sWDs, including 
word processing. 

Organising the Director's meetings 
schedule and maintaining his personal 
fifing system are key parts of the work. 
You w» need to bring to the Job 
imagination, tact, and resiDene. 

To apply for this interesting, varied, aid 
demandmg job, contact- 

Mrs fanklM Dan m 61-537 5454 
Exte. 3BM or Z724. 

KBtSMGnitaCIBSIA 






Secretarial & Wordprocessing Recruitment 


MTHMATIOIIAL/DA £11,000 

A supob wfsrtk turan anentaM PA/SBC wttti rimtfand to «s«t 
ntrtr Bl Bounstag torastoiM ad Rrunce CD. Must be flexible, have 
6ms of comnon rani aid peraonffy. Liman with ictonaBo na l ad 
rtbe^al dents ad exaatve travelling abroad. Cam omartwiy of a 
Rfa tine. Extaflert package. Langcsges a advantage. Bcwut Praspaas. 
Art 2th-- 

SH/SEC/PA £10,000 

The Orectar ot this renamed Property Ocwfopmen CD Is loolag for a 
ngto bn) Sec/RA. You wB be looting tfwJl his mtarastsadte wd 
aped you to gei frty Inwhwd. He needs somebody who on comptotafy 
orgraBa Urn art hold toe fan whan be is away. He wifl totofy rely on you 
so you art be ro>g yew own awanve art tara pienty of responsBwy. 
sns ■ PPP- 4 ween Mb. Earty review. Age S+ 7 

01-830 8207 
. CALL TODAY 


ms 


A Voice in Design 

c. £ 8,000 

This is a key role — drive, empathy and uziaginatibi]- 
vour key assets. The association sneaks for artiste 


win uaaic, creare interest, develop oevr m ernes (ie 
fashion design), organise receptions/ seminars and 
attend strategic policy meetings. Graduate educa- 
tion, good work record, supervisory skills and 
accurate typing requested. Please call 01-409 1232. | 

wmmmma^nm BeduUment Coosultanis ra^MMi I 


TUNBRIDGE WELLS 
MANAGER/MANAGERESS 

Required for new employment agency in 
Central Tunbridge Wells. Excellent 
and profit share; attractive location. A 
lengmg opportunity and first class career 
prospects tor ambitious recruitment consul- 
tant with good City experience. 

For further detaBs call Roy Buckle on 
Tunbridge Wells (0892) 48933. 


■ i A' I^Tl lH 


PUBLISH! 16? 

YES? in that case the 
Editorial Dept of this 
well known book 
publishers need a 
secretary (typing 45/50 
4- audio) to train up. An 
excellent opportunity to 
learn all about the 
World of publishing. 

London Town 
Staff Bureau 
01-8361884 


WSSSStm- 

I.’- : i; * ii.Mu 


£%880 paefcage 

This itftj i Job vflb a 





AND CONFERENCE 
OPPORTUNITIES 
Circa £8000 + benefits 

EMAP International Exhibitions is a young 
and rapidly expanding subsidiary of EMAP 
pic. one of the largest publishing groups in 
the U.K. In less than two years we've made 
a name for oursetves'imihe UK Exhibition 
and Conference markht 'and we expect to 
double in size again within the next year. 

We are currently seeking four 
administrators/secretaries to join young 
enthusiastic teams in our Services, Sales 
and Conference Departments. Each 
position requires excellent organisational 
and communication skills, plus fast 
accurate typing. Knowledge of W.P. would 
be helpful, and you must be wiIRng to work 
under pressure both in the office and on 
location. 

Call Kerry Brown on 01-608 1161 


HELP RUN THE COMPANY 
£13,000 - Wl 

Tbi* exciting and expanding Executive Seareti com- 
p my needs as exceptional individual to join dxir 
ream as office «lii iinn^ffy and personal go 

tbe Managing Director. Your multi-faceted role will 
involve a Adi secretarial back-up, personnel and 
office administration, supra visiou of financial sod 
proceed oral systems plus some penonal work. Ex- 
peU em j pec scffla t i nn educational background and 
secretarial shills (100/60/WP) are essential, as is 
commitment to the ream effort. Age 30-45. Please 
ring 434 4S12. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


SECRETARY/BOOKKEEPER 
£11,000 + BONUS 

your small company administrative and 


and e x celle nt organisational 
“JY 10 P®* 1011 *« uirtRvm full 

interna- 
“rtangements and 
mai balance. Age 3040. Plea* 

Crone Corkill 


tgjMKWIMra? iTOT^TTin 


SECRETARY/CITY 


^companies, busv en- 

conscientious person able to a i curatt ^ 

ayd betvreen 25^d ^ ***** 


8 Safisbory Sqnre, London 


SALES AOMIN 
C. £8,000 

A chars to move into sales 





TtWPS 


Dakle 




























BT'' 


EXHIBITION 
3 CONFEREE 
FFORTUNITlEi 
? '-'COOO - ten? 




THETEMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


VITAL COMMODITY 
£11,500 + Benefits 

Small, es tablished company with snpafe offices, needs a 

secretary with administrative abilities for a senior Director. 
■ tlus is an excellent opportunity to develop a Personnel and 
j-Jjtataistrative role in addition to providing full secretarial 
oadc-up to this charming man. Responsibilities will include 
handling The company car scheme, medical insurance and 
penswn schemes as wen as salary reviews, assessments and 
some recruitment Skills of 90/60/WP, smart presentation' and 
a friendly professional marmrr essential. Age 27-35. Please 
rmg 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 



TEMPS TEWS! TEMPS TEWS 

MORE MONEY! 
MORE CHOICE! 

OH YES! If .... you are one of 
CHALLONERS guaranteed 
temporaries for whom SELECT 
ASSIGNMENTS abound! 

If you want an idea of the CHOICE that 
our Temps rauJarly enjoy - this is only 
a selection from our current week’s 
assignments. 

ALL AT TOP RATES, NATURALLY! 

THEATRE! 

WP Secretary on Derma te II 

SPORTING! 

Senior Secretary for Unit Head 
MERCHANT RANK 


EXECUTIVE 


on Wang 


Enjoy the usual superb benefits such as cheap 
. mortgage as PA to the Deputy Chief Executive 
ojamajor international bank. Good orgmv- 
teafional abilities, "presence", an international 
background needed and use your shorthand/ 
typing sidHs. 

WP EXPERT? £15,000+ 

You have probably installed systems and ear- 
ned out training, and in addition have some 
™£oting or recruiting skills? Become a re- 
crusment consultant with our specialist WP 
operation, WordPfus. if you have a positive 
personality and wfsh both financial and lob 
satisfaction. CaH Lyn Cecd on 439 7001. 

BROADCASTING £9,500 

Free parking near Harrods is yours as secre- 
tary to the chief Executive of this 
Kmghtsbndge organisation. Top level contact 
and great variety; shorthand typing needed. 
Age 22+. 


Top level secretary, 30's to Deputy M.D. of 
major re-insurance company in the City. Re- 
insurance or financial background an 
advantage. Usual shorthand typing skills 


Hmgnea SotMn items 



Personal Secretary 
FAMOUS CHARITY! 

Pro fessio nal Typist 
SOUTH BANK 
Varied WP Operators 
MUSIC 

Variety of office assignments 

START NOW! 

ALSO A TERRIFIC SELECTION 
OF PERMANENT JOBS! 

Contact a fly of our offices NOW! 

19/23 Oxford St, W1 Td: 437 9030 
131/133 Cum St, EC4 Tel: 626 8315 
185 -Victoria St, SW1 Tel: 828 3845 

22 Wormwood St, EC2 Teh 638 3846 

Recruitnitnt CurtMillanUi 




The Managing Director of the Business 
and Professional publishing and 
seminars divisions of Longman Groups 
is looking for a FA to undertake a wide 
range of administrative duties. 

Essential quafiies are sound experience 
atdirector level, a good standard of 
education and first dass secretarial 
skiils. Ybu should also have exceHent 
presentation and dommunication skills, 
together with the ability to work under 
pressure and deaf with people atafl 
levels. An aptitude foe or experience in 
working with computers would be an 
added advantaga 
We are offering a salary of a £10,000 
ptusan attractive benefits package and 
are based in pleasant offices in Central 

London. 



Pte Bse a pp hrfciwiteigepcIo si nqacvfcK- 
Charlotte Ken; Long ma n Group UK IM, 
21/27 Lamb’s Conduft Street, 

London, WC1N3NJ. 

Longman™ 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

35 Broad Street, Lcrndo" ^ 

Tel: O 1 ■ 5SB 35BQ crD 1 ■ GOB 357S 
Ti-ie* No BS7374 Fd* No. Q7-G38 3? 7 6 


Senior appointment with broecl-vangingrBsponsibUitittS. 

Am, SECRETARY TO 
WP SENIOR DIRECTOR 

London W2 £10,500 

MAJOR TRADE ASSOCIATION 

This responstoto appointment cate far cenewates aged 32-45 wOh solid NafcsRNjjinjj* 
and a mature outlook to join this well known bade association, whose mec ngara wo uQ* 
major corpor a tion s throughout the U.K. The emphasis win be on uyai sultan and 
ctMirdruiion and the abffity to liaise wiOipsopta at a senior level is vital, as is (SplOfTHcy. 

irebatrue. confidentiality and good prasanttttion. Tho successful appUcam aril have good 
adnu nt s o a live and communlcalion state and whilst the pure secretarial content is amaS 
must have good s h orth a nd and typing. Initial remuneration is negotiable £10,000 - 
ElOJSOOwBt a review alter 6 (norths plus 5 weeka holiday and good company benefits. 
Applications ta strict confidence under refe r ence SStV674nT to Ihe Managing BiretfDC- 


BUWaaUOMTM EXECOTIVE SCCMETMtES UHIB, 




LEADING 

MARKET RESEARCH COMPANY 

Based in Covent Garden seeks Held typist and 
a se cr e tar y to Join the team. 

A competent and efficient typist (age 20+) Is reqUred to Join our busy Held 


C 


City 377 8600 WestEnd 439 7001 


Secretaries Plus 


The Secretarial Consultants 


77TT7TJTT7T 


£12,000 + Mortgage 

forty appointed Senior Vico 
RoUtt, Amman City Bart 
nods a nrtwtas PA. taking 
everiancnugrtarwUi axe rifts 
and pnsmfadioD esaaM 
EH8PHB languages mi asset 

430 1551/2653 
Ddde Simpson Appts 


H 


PA/SECRETARY TO M.D. 

c. £11,000. Marketing Co. NW9. 

Tie pang tynanc UJX ot a professoral maitodng oqpnbation m NM 
ntad£ a list dm a ta tt a d tacntaiy. agad 2S-40 So organa bin. 
Yon wd ned to bo avxnve. »*fl prsssnSed. tmgM M jMe to a*™***- 
n» ritieMhr at dl Ml As vdl as good date, you most lam Oh Matty 
to pnoidse. aate laroMnaunspfanena toil sand olt unwanted eaten 
tor you bus. as raconvy. 

A career rnmlgd pecan wort) fM (his an odsbadhn opportunity to so* 
jocaSy. no pad Baapdooaly ate. and ban an Btatteg team at a gnmng 


DCTULS CALL SHARON OH 01-934 I 

vRcmiftmenf 


SOLICITORS 

SENIOR COMPANY PARTNERS SECRETARY 
C £10,000 

We are a friendly and expending firm and axe look- 
ing for a mature legally experienced secretary with 
initiative and excellent- c onunupicatio p and orga- 
nizational skilb for one of our senior co m pa n y/ 
commercial partners. 

Benefits i n c lu d e season ticket kum after qualifying 
period, annual bonus and LVb. 

Please send fall CVs tor BJyth Dutton, 

9, Lincoln's Ion Fields, 

London WC2A 3DW (ref MAH) 

Or telephone (ref MAH) 01-242 3399 
for appointments 
No agencies 


rrrrzprrz 


CkSOO + Bens + Prospects 

Mamgamaot Saimades for mater We n sU ond Tete ctan n an caflora 
' coopery, CNy. 1D0/50 wpm + ado. 

SOrng U-2S) an ( dn y flma ) or 
01-445 7574 («Mr 7M 
Or write to 
22 w— p Agy 

53-54 King William SL, London EG4 


£11,000 + Mortgage 


Admin 


PA for prestigious American Bank - marvellous opportunity to 
use yotr artm owtialw a skills. Ctient contact. noridng tor Sa- 
rtor Exec. Stalls 100/70. 

£9,500 + Mortgage German 

Bingual Sec ago 21+ tor German «y Bank. Stab 100/60 
*ftti good German. 

Tel: Sheena Gibson on 430 1551/2653 

★ TEMPS' -ft TEMPS 




cwoiriE mig 


CJty Bates need you. Witt stale 100/65 and 
WANG. DIGTTAL DECMATE or IBM DtSFtAYW 


WANG. DIGrTAL DECMATE or IBM 
can earn up to £6.70 per bou. 


ind experi ence op 
iYWWTEH/PC you 


Tel: Fiona Smith on 430 1551/2653 


Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Ltd 


C£1 2,000 + MORTGAGE 

Of te the Qty Merchant Banks, Otis has got to be toe most 
ectejnfl, fastest growing *id dynamic. Tray we looking for a 
top class secretary witii santarlsvel axperienca to join one of 
their dtoctorc. Excellent speeds <100/60 min + WP up), 
good dress sense and tha abffity to think on you feet 
essmtW. 

FLUENT M GERMAN? C£9,500 

Thb bating communications company is seetang a dynamic, 
yang secretary who wl really contribute to their ntema- 
tionaf maricetinB dept You rue ate be that of a fenist, 




Train 
m Wine 
£7,500 

For a brilliut first job' 
you need French and. 
some German to equip 
you to learn within this 
international business.. 

Good shorthand and typ- 
ing i 

CaR Lyra LaB. 


College 
Registrar Arts 
£9,500 

A degree helps as does an 
interest in the Arts when 
you assist this US College 
with their lively students. 
If you like responsibility 
and cun type: 

Cal Lyra laS 


Coarse 

Administrator 

£ 10 , 000 . 

Su p ervise staff and deni 
with the adnnmsmiian of 
training courses for this 
busy publishing home. As 
PA to the MD your main. 
rily and rusty shorthand : 
would be apprednted. 

Cal L|M LlH 



n tel 


TELOMOBBOST 


youig sacrataiy who wfl reatty contribute to their interne 
tnraT martating drat You me ate bo that of a taqrtsL 
researcber sal fort bolder. Previous sates/markstinfl sxpari- 
ence essentiaL State 90/50. Ago 20+. 


pteantetephow 01-499 8070 
46 Old Bond Street Loodo^W.1. 




in preparation for the changes in the City. The is a wny 
involving ioh. 40% secreted, 60% organising. Age I 
rM On/fifl I 


CMmULTE F 0 UUKE £ 15 ^ 90 + package 

The new American dep ar tment-head who is bang (do- | 
cated to London is looking for a secrelary/PA to assist 


put of toe johmfll be acting as hts right hand an i 
schetoteig si ltemeMinBSwmi clients and other heads I 
of departments. You ariil aedeafeig at VJ.P. level on an 
intemalional scale -so must han an nceitent presanta- 


sting as hts right hand aid 


BMuG BEiEFITS + MORTGAGE SOBSmT 

If you are kxiking &»- an invohriiigseczetarial and 
adminiHtrativB row the diviskmal Director of this 
tfynamic and go-abead Investment House, based 
in Waterloo, needs you. Duties will include exten- 
sive customer liaison and supervision of 
promotaonal events as well as providing full secre- 
tarial support. A positive attitude, good 
presentation and sound secretarial support. A 
positive att itude , good presentation and Bound 
skills (90/60/WP/audio) are essential in return for 
excellent benefits and modem river-view offices. 
Salary £10,000. Please call 

437 6032 


for the 


ifyouw 
job for 


you ring Fiona NOW 7! 



P.A. on Park Lane 


Mature, professional PA required for the MJ). of 
this leatnaj; international company of financial 
analysts. Shorthand and typing essential as is the 
ability to work on own initiative. Good telephone 
mwuwDT and smart appearance a must. Salary 


Apply in writing to: 
SoodL MMS Ltd, 49 
London W1 


Miss Ruth 


Tins exciting new venture 
(backed by a well known 
rams) b lootang tor a bright 
enthusiastic secretary to 
writ for a newly appointed 
director. Thb b a marwhous 
to gain invab- 
woriangwito 


£ffiJI0AH- 

ad 




State 00/45. Ago 19 + 


UPC Group pie 


An Estate Aganqr and Home Loan Gr 
trad London have 2 vacancies to 
enthusiastic young team. . 

(1) Mortgage Advisor - Rii training gj 


in Can- 
in- their 


(1) Mortgage Advisor - Ful tuning given for the 
right appEcant &aat job satia fi eflon with lots 
of people contact Bask; salary £8,000 phis 
oommission (you should gross £14,000 p^). 

(Z) Reoepliortist/typcst- Audio a help. Fun job for a 
lively personalty. Not ad typing, as a variety of 
other things to do, halFdng out on tha Estate 
sate. Good chance of promotion. 

Ctei Aim Graham, Director 
on 01-404 0235. 





M 


Tasteful Temping... 

No hassles. No let-downs. Just plain, ample, 
high grade temping. 

A tasteful package of top jobs, elite rates and 
thoroughly professional service. 

If you have sound skills and experience, you 
should be talking to The TO>rk Shop 4 . 
Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 1232. 

Be mtiti n a ttl Oyd**"!* 


for a prafesaonal person who b young and dynamx: 


£ pmarketTenping 

to £11,000 

This summer, join an exclusive and 
Upwfdly-mobile elite. The pick of 
London’s prestige jobs. Rewards that pay 
■full recognition to excellence. And some* 
thing more. Longer-term career growth. 
Financially our pay structure reflects your 
development. So too our training unit,, 
where without charge or obligation you can 
bring yourself up to date on the latest in 
WP. Find out more about upmarket 
temping. Call today; 01-493 5787. 


GORDONYATES 


HAVE WELLIES WILL TRAVEL 

I bad a dynamic marketing team. We act as path 
finders tor UK industries looking for growth in world 
markets. We need more executive effort to sustain 
our growth. 

We need easy mixers and good communicators. A 
language would be an advantage but enthusiasm is 
a priority. Salary in 5 figures, but only just Opportu- 
nity to travel on occasions. 

If you feel you could help, please drop me a Ena in 
the first instance with your telep h one number 

Dennot Graham, 

World Trade Promo ti ons , 

19-21 Mgh Street, 

Sutton, Surrey SMI INF. • 


SENIOR SECRETARY/PA 

West End c.£10,500 -f benefits 

Hie Managing Director of Europe's largest hat 
manufacturer, KangoL currently requires a Se- 
nior Secretary/PA, who is wbD versed in 
secretarial sides with good shorthand speeds. 
Expected to work on your own initiative and able 
to deal with office organisation you'll receive an 
excellent salary, work In pleasant offices dose to 
Oxford Circus and be rewarded with all the 
benefits you'd expect, (including 5 weeks holi- 
day) working for an international company. 

To find out more ptoaae contact 
Mrs De Keyser on 01-437 4888. 




TEL: owes 6951 


ASSISTANT/ 

SECRETARY 

Merchant Banking 

A City based major European bank is seeking 
a young, well educated Secretary to join their 
small but dynamic team of Merchant Bank- 
ers. The successful candidate will have 
excellent mmmnnieatinn and. Word-process- 
ing skills, will be a self-starter with initiative 
arid the ability to handle clients at all levels. 
Knowledge of German and experience with 
computers would be useful. Salary: £10,000+ 
plus benefits. 

Please reply to BOX B59 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


MAGAZINE 
PUBLISHING - 


TO £12,000 PJL 

A raw. c tu tenflln g appoim- 
DM tar a ’seH-sansr. Your 
eapBrianca A dptomacy wM 
to fuffy utHsed in co-onSn- 
aSng & monitoring tea work o< 
lour busy Audtt Teams in this 
prestigious, CHptesod Ac- 
Brm. A competent 





cXI 0,000 

Wb need a wvm-tmrtBd aid 
■riHng Research Assistant/ 
Seoetay who enjoys meeting 
people to support our West 
End tarn of reautineot con- 
stents. You ate hm your 
mm areas oi respansaaSy and 
become an essereW pal of 
Die team. Good typng b nec- 
essity and shttttunJ would 
be tsefid. Age 23-35. If you 
can keep your tense of hu- 
mour even under pressure 
please ring- us. 

434 4512 


Crone CorkiU 




S/H secretary far 
taiga International 
sates co. in Kensing- 
ton. Tha position 
requires good admin 
+ sac sfifils . Extro- 
vert personality pref. 

Cato 


Mature 

Dynamic 

Secretary 

Required by Head of De- 
partment and Academic 
staff of Ptxjtogrammetry 
and Sunreying for con- 


research papers to ran 
(alone) snraH tot busy of- 
fice. Takas initial 
responsibility for student 
entry procedure; own cor- 
respondence. Must be 

eager to learn to use word 

processor. Salary on scale 
E8482-E9764 per annum. 

AMtBotas b Lb KaRy, 
Personal Officer. 
UnrtnilyCaloteLDBdM, 
Gower Street 
Undoi VC1E BBT. 


DAVIS CO 

SECRETARIAL 

01-734 6652 


rUidrWolteH 





SECRETARY 

Full-time secretary re- 
quired for private 
medical practice In 
Kensington and SL 
Johns Wood. Duties 
include audio typing, 
reception and accowits 
justnjj. Wanjj WP - 
training given if 
necassaiy). 

Tet 01 589 2478 


OEMUM SpuUng PA/ 
Secretary (25-35) to work 

for Managing Director. 
Someone very bMngual In- 
deed with mother tongue - 
level Engtoii. wtw we act 
as a real PA and use Gar- 
roan a lot To 710JXXL 


mwnHiZ] 


LADY ASSISTANT 



teab tatacopen baac 

Hom 9 JOmd to fipre Umto to 
FtV&y.Safoywgotebta. 

Tefe 01-603 6602 


CITY WISE 

£12300+-b NEG 

Use afi your City 
know-how as 
secretary/PA to the 
Managing Director of 
our expanding 
Lloyd’s managing 
agency. He needs a 
‘right hand' to really 
get involved in the 
running of the 
company and to 
make a positive 
contribution. 

For a salary 
negotiable from 
£12300, he would 
like a minimum of ‘A’ 
level education, 
excellent shorthand 
and WP skids, and 
sotid experience at 
Sentor Director level. 

Find out more by 




HJordPlusf 




rj t x jnott * twain. Aw 30+. 
utU «r«fv (or SrnlM- 
Partnrr. arbHrauon nscrlncr 
iMNbir. WC1. BeOe Emp 
Am «M 46B6. 


MVnmWM Cm. mtaOn Sec 
MIS oT ImoTvcrortWa for tWbMv 

type. £ 7.800+ gnu pens. Ol- 
734 4347 A A AfW 


seCMTAWV rtqmreil to provMr 
wapporl la PnXmaor of 
etne and ha team at SI 
ramus'*. DuUm wtn inclndr 
DraHnq wllh DO «nml and 
■nnUrol rorraponoctKc. typing 
research papers and arranging 
appoiruinenis. Applicant* null 
nave shorthand and be wilting 
to ise WP draining would be 
pimL Mectronlr bmewnter. 
and mould have nkaum Mr 
phone manner and aimabkr 
penotuUly. Salary In range . 
£6-419 . £&£S6 per annum . 
plus £1 .133 pee annom London 
Weighting. Apmiranon*. with 
full CV and name* of two refer- 1 
ees. should be IM la llir 
SmfOng Oil leer. UMD8. SI 
Thomas'* Campus. Lambeth 
Palace Road. London set 
7£*LQU0Una Ref: STH/MCD/ 
113. 





Needed for Medta/T.V. 
company. Someone 
with good W.P. 
experience -i- good 
personality mid 
initiative £9.000.+ 




01-370 1562 


ffi s aw s 








M a t .,., 




gj 


•. T . . ■ 1 1 -V . * 1 * 1 H 1 I 1 t\i 

SSjigi 


TYntT/MCOnONOT. BnoM 
y ou no perwn required by He 
crutsma Association to loin 
small friendly learn M head 
quarters la 54- Natnartne Dork. 
LMial mllcr duties plus a idea*. 


accurate typing essential. Flna- 
tHiHy an advantage as the 
position offtn variety or re- 
WonsUMHUe*. Salary E6DOO 
aar pda 4 wreks holiday A 
L.v.v Phone Lindsay Nuim on 
Oi 4di 0881 (or more details. 




r *r 'irVri tT^, MuT. 







► ee ^f iirl j il y» i l I l f t'?* f it 

f i; .if V 'it 


LA CREME 
APPOINTMENTS 
ALSO APPEARS ON 
PAGE 14 



uu n L H BIPi 








Wm 








































BATTERSEA TRIANGLE, 
BATTERSEA CHURCH ROAD, LONDON SWI1 

A smll exclusive development at Town booses. afl with gardens and one or tan garages, aid flats 
wtt parting, in Bite WgNy arewsMa location just over BaOwsea Bridge. 

HOUSE PRICES FROM £148,500 FREEHOLD 
FLAT PRICES FROM ESS.500 LEASEHOLD 

SHOW HOUSE AH) FLAT OPEN ON SUNDAY 21ST SEPTEMBER AT 1 1AM UJffiL 4PM. 
SALES OFFICE OPEN MON - FH 12-5PM 

Viewing by ^>po intn>MU cxi 01 924 3173 or through the Joint Soto AgwtK 


440 Kings Road 
London SW10 
Tel 01 351 2383 


501 Battersea Park Road 
London SW11 
Tel 01 228 0174 



Building to City Standards 


Oor mfa exactly Cram Bank, quarter rate Gram Tower HU Brntinw and Sc Kolhermes Dock. 
Open leafy outlook from site bo un de d fay Cable Street. Fletcher Street and Wall Close Square. 
.18 Porpose-Suik City Rata now under construction. 

40ft indoor Heated nooL Sauna. Solerimn. Sun-deck. Witnnvf Snhj mfTTOil nftt. 

Double glazing. Fitted kitchens. Fitted carpets and fuHy tried bathroom to colour choice. Huge 
‘JMOft rooms extra wide 14ft balconies. 


Leases 126 years. Service charge £180 pa. 

Indnriue prices from only £140 per square (but. * 
Super-stuauk from £75500. One/two bedroom from £U3jOOO 
Bcaervw now at 1886 prices lor Janamy 1887 occn gai 
For Brochure aad ideieing 
Rinp Sole Age at Stephen Morgan 
Tet 01-403 6200 (not Saturdays) 

Iftun - 6pm Week day! and Sunday. 


A new development of 16 luxury one and 
two bedroom apartments situated in a 
most convenient location in tbe centre of 
Fitzrovia. The apartments which have 
been finished to the highest of standards 
• indude the following: Video door 
entryphone systems, passenger life 
service, fully fitted luxury kitchens with 
Foggenpohl units and supplied with all 
appliances, luxury bathrooms, central 
heating, fitted carpeting and fitted 
wardrobes. 

150 'Sear Leases Prices from £86^500 


150 Tiear Leases 

Another dndofmcM hf 


ZAKHEM 



^Bcn 


01-794 0133 


Buy now, pay Uten City Cottage, near Chippenham, and Forte- Castle in the Scottish Highlands 

A Scottish castle for £10,000 


John |i. Dun and ffcsiiaiafas 


6 a. Mkbads TcnaCE, London N22 4SJ 
Teh 01-881 8227 


PRESENTS A WEST END HIT 

FOR A VIEW OF HYDE PARK. YOURS, FROM £300.000 TO £7504100 AND BEYOND! 
FOR SALE: 4 PENTHOUSES (1 SOW) 

COMPLETION - CHMSTMAS 1986 
LOCATION - LANCASTER TERRACE, BAYSWATER, LONDON W2 
Discerning Purchasers Only 

Accommodation comprises: 

2 to 4 Double Bedrooms, Dressing Room ensuHo. 2 to 3 Bathrooms (1 en suite). 
Superb Uving/Difilng Rooms. Fabulous Kitchens. Large Terraces. Car Parking. 
Resident Porter. Passenger Lift Video Entrance Phone. Gas Central Heefrg. 
Double Glazing. 



40 r private garden 8 pattig- Oose 
reception, lux ltd UtdmnjtSnar. 2 baths. Lsa 12S yra. 


M A H L OCT HP, Wl. Spacious aWmodamti B d rebad and >r 
tat with 6(7 garden. Ohio recap, 2 Mm 2 baths. lux Mahan. 
Ln 110 yre. £16*500. 

EAflLS COUNT SO, SWS. Iramac recently converted 2 bad 
flat olooWng garden Sq. Spacious reception, lux M ah an 8 
bath. GCH. lsa 98 yre. £89350. 


KENS4NQTON, M. Huge innod 4 badrni mala. Obia recap, 
spacious kaeban/dkrer. bath, roof tarr. Lsa 120 yre. £154356. 
TREBOVIK RO, MIL Excafant tidy mod 1 bed IM to lux 
corn. Dtte recap, batten, ter Mt 8 bath, GCH. Lm 96 yre. 
£84350- 


Ik a 


96 Earfs Court Road 
Kensington 
London W8 
Tel: 01-937 3811 


WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
YOUR PROPERTY 

And get the benefit of yaw equity • 

InstaHrag. Onfall Heating 
★ Rdktehaaa of your prop er t y 
Edeatea of your p roper t y 
* School Res * Buying a Car 
* Going on a holiday etc: 

(No lees payable) 

NON STATUS MORTGAGES AVAILABLE 

HIRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One qf Europe's Leafing Mortgage Brokers 
ULBcxfcatey Street, London WIX 5AE. 

Teh 01-629 505 1/2 TELEX 28374 


Property prices can almost certainly 
damage your health. Too often they 
wend their way upwards and out of reach 
and it is necessary for the retention of 
sanity to find properties with prices not 
expressed as telephone numbers. 

Bams for conversion are always worth 
considering, although they now cost as 
much as a modest house and need the 
sune money again to make them 
comfortable. The same applies to coach 
houses that need conversion — but once 
converted, beware. Anything renamed 
The Old Coach House, which may have 
been more a garage than a romantic 
coach house, is' likely to have had a 
nought added to the price. 

This is not meant to denigrate such 
properties, of which there are some good 
examples now on the market. But the 
reality is that once converted they are not 
cheap. 

Before describing them, therefore, it is 
right to consider one of two properties 
which will not cost a great deal of money 

Once converted, they 
are not cheap 

to buy — the costs begin afterwards. John 
D Wood's Chippenham office is offering 
for sale what it says is The ultimate in 
derelict cottages". 

Built of Coiswold stone under what is 
left of a stone-tiled root City Cottage, at 
Christian Malford. near Chippenham, 
needs complete rebuilding. It is set m the 
countryside, surrounded by well-tim- 
bered form land and it is believed that 
once it was one of several cottages in the 
vicinity. The others have all disappeared 
and its very survival suggests its 
sturdiness. 

The agents, are asking for offers of 
more than £50,000, knowing that it is 
likely to appeal as a weekend cottage and 
■conscious that it will need the same 
money again to make it one. 

But the bargain of tbe market must be 
Forter Castle at the head of Glenisla m 
.the Scottish Highlands in Perthshire, 


By Christopher Wannan 

Property Correspondent 

which is bring sold by Knight Frank & 
Rutley for the Ear! of Airiie. The castle, 
never before sold, came into the hands of 
die Ogilvie family at the time of the 
Reformation. It was plundered and 
burned by the Marquis of Argyll in 1640 
and returned to the Ogilvies in 1661. . 

The agents suggest that it offers a 
unique opportunity to buy a piece -of 
Scottish history, with the possibility of 
restoring tbe castle to its former gran- 
deur. The picture above indicates that 
this would be a formidable task, which is 
why the castle is for sale at about 
£ 10 . 000 . 

Towards the other end of Britain, in 
Sussex, the Heathfield office of St John 
Vaughan are offering a detached Vic- 
torian school building for sale by auction 
on October 24. On the outskirts of 
Newick. it was built in 1882 for the local 
children as part of an educational 
establishment set up by Lady Vernon, a 
local philanthropist, but was abandoned 
for educational use in 1926. 

The school has planning permission 
for conversion to a house and is expected 
to fetch about £45.000. the proceeds of 
which will go to the Lady Vernon 
educational trust and used to assist in the 
education of girls in the area. 

Field Cottage. Bisteme Close, Burley. 
Hampshire, is another property of great 
interest for someone prepared to repair 
and restore it The red brick and slate, 
neglected during the past 20 years, is set 
in more than two acres dose to the New 
ForesL It has three bedrooms, two 
reception, rooms, a conservatory and 
what is described as a lean-to kitchen. 

It has a guide price of £65.000. while 
the land — in two lots — is estimated at 
£15.000. The agents Jackson and Jack- 
son say that cottages with potential for 
refurbishment and modernization in this 
area are .becoming .more and. more 


difficult to find, which explains the 
substantial price. 

At the completed end of the conver- 
sion process are three coach houses. Tire 
Old Coach House, at Fornham St 
Martin. Bury St Edmunds. Suffolk, was 
built in the earlv 1 9th century and a 
reception halL two reception rooms, five 
bedrooms and a self-contained guest 
annexe. The two acres of gardens are 
enclosed laigelv by original bnck and 
flint walls, and Strutt & Parker’s Ipswich 
office is asking for offers of about 
£190.000. ^ , _ 

Steyning in west Sussex has already 
been found by people who like attractive 
villages which are just about commut- 
ablc and certainly fine for weekend 
.homes, and the prices have gone up 
accordingly. It is near the main line 
railway station at Shoreham-by-Sea and 
has good access to Gatwick. King & 
Chascmore's Steyning office has two 
coach houses for sale — the Old Coach 
House. Castle Lane, for which the asking 

19th-century cottage in the 
middle of a cornfield 

price is around £130.000 and the Grade 
11 listed Coach House. Horsham Road, 
for around £180.000. 

The latter has been renovated and has 
two reception rooms and five bedrooms, 
and a brick barn in half an acre. The 
brick and flint Old Coach House, 
formerly part of the Clivedale estate, was 
converted seven years ago and has four 
bedrooms and two reception rooms. 

Near Steyning. at Staplefields. is 
Staplefields Cottage, a secluded 19th- 
century property set in the middle of a 
cornfield. It is a traditional and unaltered 
Victorian farm cottage, with patterned 
day weather tiling and tiled roof, which 
was modernized 30 years ago but is 
otherwise in original order. The three- 
bedroom cottage has a small garden and 
needs restoration. Geering and Colyer's 
Steyning office is asking for offers 
around. £100.000# ... 


MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 



The Low Start 
Mortgage Co Ltd. 


A e well as offering all the normal Mortgage and r em o r t ga g e farili t rra , 
such as; 

* 100*1 Loans ... 

* x income pics 1 x second purchasers in com e 

* Mortgage arranged in most tax effective manner 

* Mortgages with interest fixed for up to 5 years 

We specialise in providing: 

* Personal and efficient sendee 

* Low Start Mortgages with initial monthly payments of interest 
as low as £6.66 per month per £1,000 borrowed. 

(Typical A.P.R. ft.1%) 

* Low Start Mortgages with fixed interest for up to 5 years 
Fbr further infbrmaUoa and a written quotation please contact us 

The Low Start Mortgage Co. Ltd. 

(Licensed Credit Broker) 

The Old Tavern 
Market Square 

Petworth West Sussex GU28 OAH 
Tel: (0798) 43560 (10 lines) 

Fart of the TT Financial Services Group 


X 


EXECUTIVE BUNGALOW 
WITH A DIFFERENCE 

If yoo can mate a quick dedskm I am pzepned to atll vmO 
bdM manat value. Th» 5 be dn nd borne m an attractive 
vovmmment in Old Stevenage would nanaaUy m 0 far 
£ 1 40000. It icamna anna minor work on roof & windows- Doe 
ta nnfanscaa cvcnmAanom I hawto mH NOW. I will take tfaa 
best off er over £101X000 r e cei ved before Monda y . 22nd Sap- 

Rmg ■* _?ow far «D delate and if inte wrt od far viewing 
SaZtndajr/Suaday. FuD murine fadKUee awflafck. 

Phone Day 01-369 4224 . evening 0430 364063 


CONVEYANCING 

£230+ VAT & DISBURSEMENTS 
ON REGISTERED FREEHOLD CONVEYANCING 

WE CAN ALSO SRL YOUR HOME THROUGH OUR ESTATE A£8CY 
OEMRTMBrr 

WWTTBI 0U0TATOKS S DETAILS SUPPLED UPON REQUEST. 

CORNILUE & CO 
SOLICITORS 
01-729 4360 


EMBANKMENT GDNS, SW3 

Specious and well modernised flat in a lateral 
conversion by the River. 2 beds. 2 baths, Ige 
recep, kit. GO yin. £149,000. 

Mistral 

01-225 2577 


ST JAMES’S 

TERRACE MEWS 

REGENTS PARK NW8 


Exclusive newly completed development ofluxury mews houses, 
2/3 bedrooms, 2/3 bathrooms, 1/2 reception rooms, integral 
oarages, balcony or roof terrace, poggenpohl kitchens, luxury 
Eachrooms, brass ironmongery, fully carpeted. 


Prices From /235.000 
to /3 50,000 i KEP.I IOLI >. 


VIEW TODAY 2PM - 5PM 



CLOSE TO 
SWISS COTTAGE 

2nd 8r flat with huge loft. 2 bedrms, s pacio us Bving 
ran with door to balcony. FuBy ltd oak kit, bathrm 
with shwr & wc + sep we. Gas ch. Entry phone. 
Wortona fireplace. Cpts, ctns. Exe decor + loft with 
pp for 2 beds & 2 bathrms. Very long In. Low 
outgoings £99350 ono 431 3121 fT). 


m. A sunning pufause set Hi a pmtgtoc kwydswi* 
ronot n ananfete order throughout 23 ft x 2D fl recaption 
•nth 23 ft x 10 It sootMfacing tool tBnaoo. Lwy Wnjfltw firily 
8md tatdwi mtb 27 rt i 14 ft eooI nance Msstar 
tadroom/msBtB Miron. Guost Mroom/snsute faatvron. 
BTOron 3/study. Lift 3 underarcutf ear spaces. Double g£2- 
ng. CarsoJar. 124 year lease. S285JOOQ. . 

View today 01-609 7661 BotUacfc, 
Monday 01-226 0160. 


ISBBISS 53 Q 3 II 

V t £S t ; 1 i/j I!lli 



HOUSES AMD FLATS THROUG 
OUT THE DUCKLAWIS AREA 

RESIDENTIAL DEPARTMENT 
TEL 01-790 9560 


fer -a; 
M5/T-7W'. 

ufr 

rcr.ncr;. 
:r'>cr;r m vm 
CCVtTC SZOZUil 

01-623 3495 


Robson 

LimitecT 


ur 


MORTGAGES 

INTEREST RATES F&0N 

8.4 % 

(S.7% AJ\R) 



• 100% Mortgage 

O Interest rates fixed at 10% (AJP.R. 103) 
O Non-Status Mortgages from 11% 

O Principle dteMam -within 24 hours 
O Sofidtors Co n veyancing £180 + V.A.T. 


Place year mortgage with one of the wocUs wmf t 
■ utxe—fid m de p e n g e nt financial advisory service*. 

With access to eD the mortgage ■rmi.iiiM 
operating m the OIL 

Owir awm^ Financial Services can provide 
the moat convenient and cost effective 
option to suit their clients seeds. 

Imnrtml advice is just one of the advantages 
of d entin g with Overseas Financial Services. 

Telephone 01-379 3452 
Centric Hotse 
391 The Strand 
London WC2R OLT 



OVERSEAS 

FINANCIAL 

SERVICES 


!=Wlnkworth=^ 

MORTGAGES ^ 

TERMS NOW AVAILABLE 

* 3 % fa res innm» or 3 inn jeM 
teeone 

* 100% mntgnies avaSabfo up hi 
£100M 

* No ovideace of income raqnirad for 
haw op fo E 250 J 00 for tpttffyfog 
Appfitaafs 

* NORAS ladMr anHabfo ever £ 30^00 

‘ Re-onvlgages tor ^oafifyfog puposes 

Ring 01-23.5 0691 

For full Information 

Open until 8 pm today 


Wmkworth 
Financial Services 

25a " Motcomb Street, .. 
London SW1 


REGENTS PARK, LONDON NW1 


A magnificent restoration of ten individual 
John Nash houses directly overlooking 
Regents Park, each with private gardens 
ana some with indoor swimming pools. 
Phase 1 - 5or 7 bedrooms, 4/5 bathrooms, 
3 or 4 reception rooms, superb 
specification throughout. 

99 year Crown leases from £950,000. 



Sastlefields 

POSTMAN SQUARE. LONDON Wl. lamn ac u lai c modern 
tat in prcsusiooi Mock. Reception, one bedroom, modem 
fcit chcn. bathroom, bik Lease 75 ycaix. Price £150000. 
SUSSE3C PLACE, LONDON W2. An inicnor destined flm 
floor (tat in purpose bajh Wocfc. Doable Reoepiioa. 2 bedrooms, 
tabrootn. modem kiteben. Lease 48 years. Price £ 1 45.000. 
PORTLAND PLACE. WL A spaciou* ftol in presupoui pur- 
pose bam Mode. Recep. Dirune Rm. 2 Bedro om s. Bathroom. 
WC. KjLchcn. lease 68 yean Price £145100. 

ST. JOHNS WOOD. Newfy icfoitnhod one bedroom fat in 
porposc both Mock. Lease 78 years. Price £72JOO. 

LIST OF RENTAL FIATS AVAILABLE. 

01-402 2196 


[Tovvnchoicf 

as 


\ K W WA THRSIDE 11 O \I F S 

WALKING DIST.VNt.E 1 ROM THL C1TA 


GLOL CHSTKR 

S Q U A R E 


3 Bedroom Houses on the £ L* 

tanks of the Regents Canal 

fton.^102,995 -Cl 

Site Sales Office 01-7296377 
OPEN 2-5 Saturday ftSunxfay 
PHOT PROPERTIES LIMITED 


I 1 r . v, ^ a iu,b„ 



^o^ticxi^8pacioiM5te floor fiat riRi*. 

ggyg^BO ^ S^ T^fl o or 2 (to la bod corivrta d 
S 19- rece p. roceraly refaad ml bath. 

jgtaca, an nd an tarmoa phono. £157,000. 

bor. & recap. Dinteg roam. Vmy abort la ma. 

BAWSTWCGAROEW SWS emuJdflS 

rownr room phs doak. Private square gdns. PoUbt. £23S<000. 

GODDARD AND SMITH 
01-930 7321 


01-731 4448 


•■wMi mnMnn Codaga 
nr Lvnunotwi for ociungt 
London. Me under Hint, 


NORTH OF 1 
THAMES 



OAKWOOD 

COURT, 

W14 

IdWffkwsly appointed 
with original features & 
with a large land- 
scaped path), a fight 
mansion flat with 4 
feds. 2 recep, 3 bath, 
kit/b’fast, 91 yrs. 
REDUCED £279,500. 
MARSH A PARSONS 
01-603 9275 


ST MARKS RD, 
W10 

Jj 0 tt 21* studio recep- 
bon opening to small 
™cony, in top fir fiat 
with open plan kitchen, 
sep dble bed, study 
area i bah. (deal fw 
young person/. artist. 
85 yrs 

£70,000 

Marsh & Parsons 

01-683 9275 



; 5 fim 
flRe 
;rk in 


ubv. 


orst s 

f. 1 n 


; * 

View 


?Tf»3!C*.e? I.Kt 


[JOHN D 




























31 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 




RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/2 


: 1 - * • 



t? f 


or 






... , t \ 3$ 

; . ; ; T , ^ 1 t l s 

IV, ilciU'; 


M0 




/v.’r* 



Bhddanfe Part, at Caine, Wiltshire, 
owned by Room and Candida Lwrti- 
Green. is a unde U lined bi 
boflt in 1760 by the Squire of Bbc 
Mr Mundress. «ho decided to more 
the existing boose to a better site 
overlooking the River Mardeo, close to 
the parish church of St Peter's. The house 
was changed in 1850 when a pediment 
was added, and at the sane tune a coach 
house *as built from the remains of a 
vicarage. Since 1973 the present owners 
taro restored the house and modernized 
It to allow its ns* without the benefit of the 

eight servants resident in 1900. The 
house has iom- reception rooms and eight 
bedrooms, and is sec in gardens and 
grounds of 107 acres, which include a small 
stud. Sarills and Tim Bales, of 
Himgerford, are asking for offers of more 

thanf] milli on. There is also a cottage 


on the river, is four acres, at around 
£125.000 


All the refinements you ever wanted 


House buyers are increasingly demand- 
ing when they come to choose the stvle. 
decoration and fittings of their homes — 
and fashions change quickly. Fust thev 
want a dining room incorporated in the 
living room, then they want a separate 
dining room. For a whiJe thev want no 
open fireplace because of the dirt it 
cause*, then they decide an open 
fireplace is exactly whaz they want. 

. Builders are only too aware of the 
importance of meeting these changing 
demands, and are now quick to respond, 
carrying out frequent market^snrveys to 
try tt> amici pate trends. The building 
company Cosiain (Southern) has made a 
survey of the main demands, and has 
unearthed not only a predictable ra p#* of 
practical suggestions, but also a “secret 
wish" list, which is quite revealing about 
the family. 

There are indications that from rim* 
to time some members of the famil y wish 
to be alone. For example, one suggestion 
is a main bedroom thai can be par- 


titioned dun tie matrimonial rows. An- 
other is a sound-proof room for the 
children. 

Regional newspapers helped Costain's 
researches by asking their readers to list 
their secret “top 10" wishes. More than 
1.000 did. so. mostly women. One 
suggestion appearing several times was 
clearly in response to a belief that 
husbands hoard clothes — a request was 
made for a built-in wardrobe which 
would "destroy" clothes that had been 
kept, but not worn, for too long. 

Other desires aimed at maintaining an 
efficient regime in the home were a 
request for self-locking kitchen cup- 
boards to guard against over-eating 
teenagers, ana a waste-disposal system to 
eliminate the need for dustmen “and the 
mess they leave" 

People seem to become bored with the 
look of their house after a while, and one 
idea put forward was for “clip-on" 
facades to change the style from Tudor to 
Georgian, or from cottage or modem. 


Nash house 
with Regent’s 
Park in view 


■ The largest house in the Grade I 
listed Hanover Terrace In Regent's Park, 
London, one of the few completely 
original Nash terraces, is for sate through 
Humberts and Bargets' office in St 


two houses to be resold. The new 
houses still being built with three to six 
bedrooms, are being marketed at 
between £255,000 and £497.500. but the 
two now on offer are at £81 0,000 and 
£635,000. Both lave a master and guest 
bedroom suite with three further 
bedrooms, and a lounge, a dining room 
and a study. The high-security 
development dose to Dulwich College, 
looks oror Sydenham golf course on 
one side ana the South Circular Road on 
the other, and contains 20 houses in 


> middle of- 


John's Wood at £1 J9 million (or a 60-year six styles. The resales are being handled 

Crown lease. No 15 has the widest ' *“ ““ 

fagade, a rear extension, an extra floor 
and a large roof terrace giving views 
over the park. The present owners have 
meticulously restored the house, wfth 
its marble fireplaces, cornices and 
mouldings, to a standard above the 
Crown Commissioners' strict 
requirements. The house has three 
recaption rooms, a conservatory, a 
master bedroom suite, four further 
bedrooms, and two staff bedrooms. 


The Thatcher factor 

■ The rising value of houses in 
Barrett's exclusive Dulwich Gate . 
development, where Mfs Thatcher has 
recently moved In. is shown by the first 


by Chesterton's Pimlico office. 

■ BoktrewoodCmmatHarrietsham, - 
Kent, consists of three feted bams of 
brick and stone, converted to houses 
of considerable character. Each of the 
proparties has a master bedroom 
suite and either three or four further 
bedrooms and two or three reception 
rooms. The houses are sat in gardens of 
up to half an acre. They cost 


COtyer*s Sittingboume 

Hidden in the city 

■ Park House, iri South Kensington, ~ 
is described as one of London's “hidden 


houses" because it is totally secluded 
behind Onslow Square, yet only two 
minutes' walk from the underground 
station— a country house In the midd 
the city. It was orfgina/I " 

bull In about 1841, anc 

became one house in the ownendiip of 
the late Sir Maxwell Joseph, who bought 
it in the 1950s. The house has a fine 
46ft drawing room, four further reception 
rooms, lour main bedroom suites and 
three further bedrooms, and is almost- 
surrounded by gardens. When the 
house last came on to the market at the 

end of 1984, Lady Joseph asked 
around £3.5m. It recently came on to the 
market again through Robert Bruce 
and Partners and Knight Frank & Rutiey 
at £4 .5m. An overseas buyer 
purchased it for dose to tne asking price. 

■ Newtown Park, near Lymftigton, is 
one of Hampshire's best known small 

country estates, and it la on the 
market at £975,000 through Jackson and j 
- Jackson’s Lymfngton office. The ] 

beeufifuBy restored 18th-century 
mansion, with its grand pfflared and . 
porflcoed entrance, is set bi 25 acres, 
and contoira four main reception 
rooms and six bedrooms, and has three* 
self-contained flats. 


JOHN D WOOD 


MANOR STREET SW3 .. £199, 

Lflaadv lor fflmUi occupation. bauMMy decorated and raftraMd 
| 2 nattoor M tovetyHfil maitt*cnc 33 otwon room. Wnr win* 
| cbo aow n vw moo*. rwMmns mo innmn o( M Ui 0 i 



| Rom ? douM am a owhi n wwm modem Wwun rMtdo w SS£ 
Mi cornniMi cental Imafcng and im wear S 6 were. 

Cal* Street, SW3. Tab 01 -M2 1484 



NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


SMALL MODERNISED 
VICTORIA! T0WMH0BSE 

n quet nnd neat Regents Part/ 
BUar areaUn mm) d |KA a Wo 
care and decoration to become 
sonames pmpered darting Thro 
toe. sum JBL With mod. ants, 
smatt paco and outsda too. 2 dtUa 
tads. 1 angle bed all wftfi toted 
cupboards nJ way units. Bath, 
sweat* w.c. CH and dble BH 
Residents partng. 

223SJ0O freehold 

Phene 01-935 1070 d*y 
or 11-724 3914 eve. 


MAIDA VALE 

121 StfflMrbuf Aveme 

Eaten conjwson 7 flag 3 
SOU 1.2 w 3 beds GasCH 
Quaky tnutfuuL 

Pncos from E6SJD00 
to £165000. 

r.v Dwtr mov orvELCPm 

HEW TUB BIBOS. 
THDRA-Utpn 

STARLCROFT LTD. 
0783 75161 
Office boars. 


MUST BE SEEM 
BOW E3 

P.D modem 1 bed Bat wft 
tecuUon. trttad kitchen 4 
bathroom, bn mac cond. Nr 
lube & Docklands railway, 
handy for City 

C46J5BQ Utctafiag 
unify fitted carper 
Tel : 01 981 6468 (l 


WIUESOCN flJtEXN HHU. 

ftnmar W R Ml 
1/2 pedv Urrn k ■* 0 J ,r t2? 1 
"uwotai to «m w»n CCH rta 
itteotacw lilted nWdB#B ere 
£69 950 01 450 4031 



' 8 AMICAN. CCS- Selection ol 2 

• r e'l tad flaiv. tn omiwnti 

• *■ opment trom £133 500 1 *JJ»r 

v be parking gveil Frank Harris 

‘ A Go Ol 387 0077 

uum Huge, a tadreomed. 
hKiirt nai NMMrert 
87 sears lease £87.600 Tel 

01 998 3709 

^ 

A 8 LOOM»vui»v.wea. WvgMtad 

. -fei. r»T PS Edwardian flat 

Shops 1 bed i *«* “fi’SE 
* ’ 97 v r He £63 950 Frank Har 

ns & Co ei 38? 0077 

3000 -T> 

util immaculate Might 3rd flr 

*,L, rtadT^Satok 

£94 950 FUtotto 

mcl Tet Ol 229 97B3 

OLOtfeEftTCH Terrace SptfTMB 

n« 3 beds hr rec« 
Lil/breaVfaM rm "ato CHjO* 
121 »rs tiftgOOO -VnlhoW 1 
Hdl A GO 01 229 0072 

miVIMC PON BiVESTMENTT 

■K?S»,ruim ihc 458 

3680 4ns umc 

LENNOX CANOE** 

• rifurb Super drew ‘ 

bamroom flat wim pmoja 
tears £150 000 Mew K»aj 
" TN Ol 60S 5941 

K r «b 468 3680 -roume 





KTYAMSTON COUNT. WI ** 

flOM tw Vd Beds 1/2 w**;*- 
9 Bum Cueu *C 

{trwdi l» immediate occUP* 

Uoh Quick Sale C2SOOOO 
Broroplon t Nates 589 3053 
CHISWICK W*. B minum 
run* MruU coni cried \ie«>rr 
■a house MMim ft *upw>;.‘ 
ttwraom ti*t> Price* n*» 
£35 960 View now uiuunan 
MS UU 

HAMMmSMtTH. Si WmS* 

>wv ailrMtivi- wmi d 

imnr a wflwwn. * 

cemen mom A W* 

WSSOOO T HOSKINS 730 
TO 

HMtnure ns cmm* «r 2 
.tWRWM 1 1! 

Jr** 4 rt««w. mm Affi, JJS 
•WIN UftOoo and C 82 000 
Sbrita K*M Ol SW 


NW 10 

5 tadmonwd. tawed house. 4 
lecetnons. 2 auhroira,- 
tiwi cutunanK vmynn 
Mctan. boss fmm taeugh- 
Dut BCH UggepardBLdouAr 
gnge. Convais aasSy |o tec. 3 
bedroom ftas. 
£125J»0 ONO. 

For nkt talc. 
Teh0l-45Mi7l 


CAD0GAN 
SQUARE. SW1 

Superb nasunate fusi recon- 
structed to the highest 
specification. Dbte Recap. 3 
Beds. 3 &ths. Fujfy Feted BL 
Terraco & Smafi Gm. 

£425 JD O 
CTTYHtSE LTD 
01-228 SW 


c 

An 


CHISWICK W4 


... mmac mantaned ft much 
improved 5 bed sarra «i Grow 
Part, yt dec cond. &pab fit 
let Into Drag m RGep tro 
cedars. Lge sth fern ran. A 
rare ocwxbwty- Hfe .950. 

Via* to m 094 37m ■ 

V Ttawhone Whman Porter ® 
995 3333 ® 


HOLLAND 

PARK, 

Wll 

lot eiintem/De velopmeoi 
opponuniij to acquire 2 

unroodermsed pen 

dble fromed deuched 
houses. £1 miUioft. Cbestcm- 
j&di Co 01-511 S234. 


utS. Purrw buill orormn floor! 
rv>a fiM o-kwiookmo park Com- 

1.DUO WW tflftaOO Tel 01 

99Z M25 Momtai wNartj 


ummra MONTAGU ST, Spanou* 

'VzSLtEna p*«>o fgL w wr 
RSf flffn fined mdwSw 

•SUSS, 

L-mm ■ oijffd Toting- jjjj; 
IJH SinUft ««1 w 

UW J rtM06ft«74 

Ml OteS dr ww 




SBTHERLAID AVE 

V9 

3 Bed upper maisonette wfih 
beteony. 2 Baths. Cpts. Hra- 
placa. Fully fit Kil with 
appliances. Gas CH ft 
t Phone. Lease 125 yeera. 
£150,000 

01-286 1616 
Office Hours. (T), 

EALING 

4 bedroom, 3 stay modem 
torn house in quiet cul-de- 
sac. dose to Eating Broadway. 
Fiify fitted kitdKn. mtetyal 
garage, garteo. Good outlook. 

£125.880 

Ptaoae 01'997 1072 



SUTHERLAND AVE 
W9 

1st Boor 2 Bad fietwiin bat- 
cony. carpets. My fit Kil utfh 
ippoances. Gas CH. EPtione. 
Laase 125 yaara. 

aosjooo 

01-286 1616 
(Office hours) (T). 

HOLLAND PARK 

2 bedroom tower ground 
floor flat, modernised. 
BARGAM far quick sale 

£149^000. 

Mortgage arranged- 
01-458 3680 

VIEW TODAY 



WIDE 

SELECTION 

ofattraaiv dv priced fiats 
i houses. £60000 
upmds. 

CLARENDONS 

8341297 

R.ianmnaom-siaBt> 
CMnerdon In WttaHnUM Vic- 
torian villa. » dto tads, 
bathroom, show-eroom. null’ fil- 
led IStrnerv. irg lounge, own 
parking space, gas at- ten' low 
wiiaouw A tong lease. 
£110000. Tel Ol 624 3348 


WAPPMB Walking dtetonce Ctfl- 
Amactive south facing town-, 
house fronting Canal. 4 tads. 2 
with fitted wardrobes, lounge, 
knr hen/ dbi- bathroom, mower 
room eiwstdte. garage. GCH. 
X17SJOOO. TxfcOl-266 0446. 



rettawsr count wit spa- 
clous l tad. penthouse flat. 
Bateons 1 - superb v lewis, commu- 
nal gardens. HfL porterage 
- Lease 1SB -yews. ES9.9B0. 
Faron Pinarta View- today Ol 
243 8521 

FULHAM dose to Parsons Grron 
and rube snnuung 3 storey ' 
(arrtis house 4 beds. 3 
bathrms. 2 creep nus- law 
MKMn/breaWasr rm. aaak 
nen. rearage cedar, west lac- 
ing roof terrace A garden 
caSOOOO Freehold Souire E 
Rxtciifft and Barm hi Ol 381 
4086 

WEbimUUmta Cartels WZ 
. Faouloia maisonettes. 3 beds. 2 
baths. 24 ft recep. tit. bale, be 
125 ITS £166000 3 beds. 1 
bath. mi. cloaks. CH. 92 sis be. 
£127.950 me Anthony Hdl ft 

CO Ol 229 0072 

LADMOHE $QIMNE WS1 Be 

pan to reuorea. nign-cetiinged. 
raised ground- floor period flat, 
m this preeuglotK. tranoutl 
souare Large recep directly far- 
ing acres of renmtunal gardens. 

2 bedrooms. Ulchen. bath room- 
cloakroom a nan Long lease. 

Cl 49.950 0414) Ring Ol 229 
6901 -Sun evesA w'dakia m-i 

OMENLOOKMS Highbury Fields. 
Professor's first floor flu Spa- 
cious drawing room 2/3 beds 
Cnarm log kitchen Bath Oa- 
rage CH Offers tn excels of 
£100.000 Tet: 01-607 8889 

UHMOPCKimCP HOLLAND 

park Mound floor mansion 
Hock 3 beds, long lease Offers 
over EJ 90000 Private TetiOl 
256 7328 daytime Mr 

Rowland 

MAYFAIR MMta. im- 
maculate lit flr flat off e&rrtav 
So l bed. bathrm. good sued 
nccp. mod tdKhea. tin. CH etc 
Long be ci 20.000 Pearson* 

London 01-499 3104 


Slid Door floi Nwlj rvfur- 
bftNM la a won fcmaxrd uhi 
glal'Hmr or fartnns im«|. 

mettl Lse 90 ITS Cl 37.500 

TM Hunirr Estates 838 2108 
HEW WEST END POnHOUSE. 
wi km «o rmrtni 3 beds, 
bam nmcwm reem. tM u\. am 
nr no ltd Lone be Good taior 
Jl CMUSOO Low. ouinoutm. 
Punm London TH-499 210a 
CAMPODI Mix TOWCKS Wll 
a tad. floor naBonn* la 
lux block, oen. iWw Hit 
phone- poner. exnUent uwi 
Cl 29.000 TH 01-797 3381 
CMtSWtCK. IMW 3 Md tar 

aoramEMlordPork atKvoN 
r/r kit Ctoafc. comm 45 ft 
south facing son. garage 
Cl 29 950 01 747 0903 
CHISWICK W* sipacfous 
modem a«i s tad Umtl»- tad* m 
Prebmd Qdns Large lull. loft, 
cellar wo shower no. W Odn 
CIS&OOO Ol 7*9 7359 

uomuiv 

BMtSl guw flac . _ 
lease cane to an ameidues. 
CftS.800 Tel 389 0099 

Esp^/Wkeiid 

Hyde pmm tmnuimuetmau a 
tad house lu cobbled mes,s 
min douole sarata Lease 12 
sears CS9.000 NqAgmis fien- 
out anolicants emu 240 8014 
tSUNOTOH ipxRU 1840 HI 
style' Hum- 9 bens. oaui. 
mroogta reces. lge UL nev, root 
.DPC- svjrtms. Piutnom 
•gon C7TB00JWS84 


DHntufui l 
OCH long 


NEWS COTTAOr MaUa Idle 
Archiuci conxenton- Secluded 
3 c recep Dole Mm 28* 
uksnoo/bp. P'OSP’Vi^. ^P“ 
£96.000 Tet. 01-52* 96*0 
CUTMDHJ1ND AVENUE M9 
Spacious 2 tad flat aurae 
me carted garden targe 
lounge Filled idUMft. 2 dole 
BMl C89-990 01-289 2385- 
SWL Budungham Got* Qtnei 
and InM 3rd floor 2 tad flax 
reads » w-art in io bo it we 
1123500 Tel Hunter Estates 
828 2143 

VKranuUtftmiH'We Greaipo- 
renoai S/ft oedrs Lge garden 
Burtinmgn Rd. Ctiroieh Vs -4 
L2SS.OOO T HOSKINS- 730 
9637 

VKTOMA MMC E 9 Large \ic 
lonan nouM 1 near Cuj a gdta. 
S/ratnwrr. C/H. _ FiwnoW- 
Cl *0X00 Tel 01 fWS 9845 
CHKMCX W* Srrt>iwheucaii> 
renosaied S tad Edwardian 
house In l*if» road Ke«. roof 
eic Cl 32-000 TelWa B60i 
CHISWICK W4 Home close to 
mer 3 beds, new pene kitctan. 
consened aror Sunni S Faeum 
Oon Cl 14.000 IH Ol 996 364* 
COACH HSC N14 V httf Umbrrvd 
GRII F-rud Dei Cl» MB 1990 
Ideal faro 5 rrp 6 tad pfcg vte 
gdn £ 32.8000 8856 2510 eies 
FULHAM TRAIK. snoden? Three 
double tadr Period hse o Par 
wi*. Green CHSOOO T 
Hoskim 730 9937 


W6 

Mayafice rt fuHif 

modernised period prop- 
erly with lge gdn backing 
onto Ravcnscout Park 0 
beds, 3 recs. £425.000. 

Quick ssbrsqured. 

T na Cbi — 9 9 Co 
01-994 7022 


f ANOWUNT HI - vary melons 
?douiiie bedroomed rial m oert- 
od how with targe, receoudn 
room, ruled utchen/dliier and 
baibroom. Excellent decoram e 
order mrougtXHd. Lu of gar- 
den Lono MK. ElOSLOOO for 
auun Mie. Tel : 01 226 6926 
■M-ekerutVrveoJngu 


SWl 

lerj 1 HghL newtj- modernised 
ftai ovenookinowuarr 20 x i« 
loot recent. 2 OM tadrooms. 
well eouipped kfleneo. Marble 
bathroom. Access to gardens. 
Lease 116 its. citsjOOO Tel 
01 384 1094 or 828 1927 


LMKN SDNS, WZ. Outstamttog 
ground fleer com erMon in tree- 
ttned sired. Ma tai incc M 36~ X 
16‘ period drawing room. Neff 
> 2anuM kitchen. 2 dMe tads. 
bath. Ion- outgoings. Sun ihrs' 
rouple ugh ciwni loses and 
a Hair tor extravagant enter- 
laming. £1*9.960 for an rarft- 
fcWe viewtodas-. Ol 727 1601. 
HTDC PARK, a stwn strolL Ken 
srnglcm High street seconds 
away Peaceful light summed 
penthouse ST rec wwb distant 
stews south over trees. 4 beds. 
2 baths, porter, tong Ise. low 
outgoings, uiunac £320.000. 
1 tew today Ol 570 0682. 
NW* View from Humwiuntih 
Bridge fiat, wih a deUghnuL 
mature, sunny*, root nano 2 
dbte bed*, dine area Phis nee. 
excellent decor throughout. En- 
tr> phone. Well imnd 
HighM oner over ci39.ooo se- 
cures Tel 01-938 7808 
UUIM ruM PAMHLT HU to 
Ktughisbndge- Exceonu condt- 
uon 2 lge recep Don. Idtchen. 2 
cloaks, otuily. 4 beds. 2 baths, 
shower rm. sun bcdUL garage, 
oatto. roof lemce. FTiotd. or- 
tecs around £500.000. 
Pearsons London 01-499 2104 
awr Oft HJghburv Fids K5 
Mod’s Me Finn. Hse 5 beds. 2 
recs. b'ftai rm. kltctv rear gdn 
C 13 2 -500 Tel. 009 7324 i«seL 


prising. 1 fitted double 
bedroom, with luxury rated 
kiKhen. tiled bathroom, new 
carnets, cotiservaiocy. with p» 
no door leading to large garden. 
99 »ear lease. £79.950. 01-761- 
5924 mentogu. 

RtVCMBC. 1/2 bed flats Direct- 
I) nvertootong the Thames. 
From C97^CX5 

Riverside Residential 488 4852 
ST JOHNS W OOD 
uiree Dear 
£95.000 
9937 


s'OOObonKn Large 
r ground floor flat. 
T HOSKINS. 730 


new flat* Furnished, equipped 
and ready tft Ine in rmooo. 
C&5-0OQ. TW: Ol^roe 6724 
N RRCYHOUND ROAD. Sup. 
comer propmv. Shoo, base- 
ment. 2ftedrm flat over Frnu 
C90.000 OtthllS 01-381-4735. 
1CVELAND SQUARE. Spaclorji 
a tad. 1 rec. P/b flat. 123 vrs 
L/H Cl 154)00 01-723 0220. 


bedims. 4xi bettrm. 1 studio 
F/H C8004XXL Mab 381 8S8S 
HMJCO Curo tar land st Pretty 
1 bed anno IUl gas eb. 98 jt 
he C68JOO Tet 01 834 3207 
Wes 7 rm unmod nai tn ttuiei 
SI 120 JT 1M C17ZJOOO. Tet 
Ol 209 0056 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LQNDQNPROPERTIES 


Other owners, tiring of watching' the 
neighbours, wanted windows which 
showed rideo films of pleasant and 
changing landscapes- 
The more commonly expressed wishes 
to improve the home included built-in 
sheWmg. an easily maintained garden, 
no visible neighbours, a traffic-free street 
location and a double garage. Larry 
Crook. Costain Homes regional sales 
director, said the industry had always 
known that the public had' a fairly dear 
idea of what they were seeking 'in the 
more general aspects of house buying. 
“But we wanted to know more about the 
unstated secret wishes which are not; 
always reflected in the house specifica- 
tion or the estate agents’ details.” he said. 1 
One women was apparently happy, 
with her home — bm that was not 
enough. She wanted to see some mobility 
for standard bouses so that, after a few 
years in one place, the entire house could 
be relocated elsewhere. Cosiain is work- 
ing on that one. CW 



Th e Businessman^ 
home from home. 


Luxurious Apartments 
for Che international businessman 
in this famous London building 

FOR SALE 

FROM £64,750-125 YEAR LEASES 


Saks Office Open Dafry* 01-5895100 

MON.— SAT. SUNDAY Tckw 9K067 
XlMk — Jpn, Uup.- C p4*- Fax: 01-229 2266 


01-4938222 


Keith Cordate Groves 
01-5810155 


Easy to reach 



CQNVERrtfl 
VICTORIAN DHAPa 

Fia.o .1 -Mirer tsf e«e 
r j ^*(f.riSt4!a* | i 35*B« " 
e* -** v-s y.i 

ks J5« 2f st-co *r- vua- 
-- c c“ch ros-T vr\ 
sr-srs hcjjc arc rze 
'f-» -actrito e-ttvKM-*- 
*s J- fe »«* eat 

C 400. 000. 

TM 01 174 5012 


Addlestone Surrey Reach Waterloo in 
around 40 minutes' 4 bed houses from 
£90000 Ph: Weybridge (0932) 52260. 
Colters Wood SW19 3 mins' from 
Northern Line underground 2 bed 
homes from £51^)00. 

Ph: 01-5*08029 
Merton Park Secluded, yet only 10 mins 
from Wimbledon centre. 1 &2bed 
retirement flats from £47,000, 

Ph: 01 ‘543 8858. 

North Beckton Close to the fastA13 
Expressway to the City. 3,4 & 5 bed 
homes from £60000 Ph:07-5fJ 6406 
Woodford Bridge40 mins' to Liverpool 
St.Sta. 

2 bed homes from £58XX)a 
Ph. 01-5055758. 

Woodford Green 40 min s* to Liverpool 
Sr. Sta. 2 & 3 bedroom homes from 
£49,000 
Ph: 07-505 6775. 

• approx, rail times. 

Coming soon; Belsize Park NW3, 
Hackney E9, Lewisham SE13, Mittwall 
E14, Chelsea SW3, Rotherhithe SE 16 . 
Ph: 04862 70818. 


PUTNEY 

MOdfirtWMI VEtOftM Tgnami 
House. Central Dfrtit'On 
Thraugn toutn. fagto oak hi* 
Uilny m. 3 Beds. Lge Bam. 
Rod Terrace & Patio. 
£135,000. 

Ttt 789 7859 
946 3211 


SW8. 


Absolutely goryeotu 1 
bedroom luxury Hal 
available wiib panoiuuc 
views of River. For v 
ing plcax call -Jackson 
Property SemcM on 
S.’b £106 9nm - • 
seven days a week. 


fS H 

fl 


BLACKHEATN 

Pr« sni •*» tfyp cjr 

w* : Dee ri**ni "* tr"f 

— si jfl aa'— sta*- -r- cm 
t >' S’* i- v t* P* •» 
tr iv W.S s c ‘e ^ t.srf 
t fee *n a bar^~ W'i« 
• * VI So«« 

W" 

Wooker B1-SS2 9451 
opn 7 dayx. 


A Member of me Bafttpr Housa Gtoup 




tnwHoam 


RICHMOND PARK (SHEEN GATE) 

A sums tog dn dbte finned tenet icudnce )ua vnds from the 
rah-RnrtnibfdA mnodefled toa lugiisuadanf uubgren fhtri 
imaptuiiMU Recep had. dknn. 32' dmmg nn. cfcnnt dmiar rm. 
fad In b'ta no. 4 dble bedimv 3 In hMbnmfl en uurl * ve An 
“nil bedfln. In ing rm. Ail & taihrm. Oaj ch Hated s»im pool 2I‘ 
. ^alkd bndsesped pinirov OfTm imutd in 


the scgHia of 

Sm rieir 01-876 4844 thereafter*. 
Taylor Dixon Porter 01-876 0115 


STURGIS 

Men OWL WH. OMgWbi 2 tad *,t) con 
renna outs. Heap pa. eoowwwy mny. gel 1 
Mg. 3D Mi FHLCnUDK 
mat»taK EnaTE.an. ergtowi mN is A At n omne 
Imaon WH iBftrt 19S5. 2 tads, gd stnd mm to bt mod ua. Smtn 
takw. IWMtaH OUR 


antnea bmrl 


SWL Newly return 2 bed tee men Ms tecta tantaktev 
Gnu. nn maa 


01 736 2223 


KINGSTON HILL. 

Immacuiaie dn fiuniJy hse in auei cnl de sac. Hall cflo. 3 recs. 
std kiy b'Ast room. 4 dble beds. 21 »Il we. sunm fdn. £2S4 jOOIL 
WELFORD PLACE. • 

CxcepriooM CunSy bse io this prized position whh commuMt 
indoor pooL amta A childrens play area. Hifl. dks. 2 1 
Dd kiL tmlity. 4 dbie beds. 2 lux bains. dMe Etc. insi sdn. 
price. 

Pye & Partners 

01-946 2930 


TOAST RACK Wandsworth Common 

situated n Roum Road, a tins utHiademsod coach house bacring | 
omo W m tttwpnli Common dsed oifermo excetem poKfltal. Plans 
are avxiable for ideas of possible end product Presently 4 rooms. 
tumroofli/WC, 100 garden, scope for toft conwsrsnn. 

£120,000 Freehold. 

John Dean 6 Co. 

Tel: 01 767 5121. 


SHEEN 

$j**t t c Eew im-n irs - j-roc 
r.n» rfuM-iec 4 uttt’J* 
teestwee - tune to wops & rjns 
oon Beteo wi civ-n; » 
im i a* enng m m .'1 pm 
country u. < Dm it «piie uto 
ttoi & igr Daw ii» rr taw 
rots & rvrs DrxrfJ <aeU 

n gen F retf ftTHOOO 
HUJr Uun How 

an Otis 


WESTMINSTER 

Exquisite 4 bed mi flat 3 en suite bathrms & 
shwr rm. Dble reception, bar, dining rm, new 
fully fit kit Just decorated & cptd. Aii 
amenities. 

£285,000 
01-221 2221 


SOUTHHELDS 

SW18 

Chanting coroncf Edmtion 
house in roctfy ippmaing ttt- 
tna. Good transport, out 
stumon Enxlere cane, one 
leaares. 3 tads 2 tecs etec.Cn 
From & re* gons CSM9D ID. 
DETAILS OWNER 
01-874 2250(H) 


# 


THE » 

FLEETWOOD 

PARTNERSHIP 


SW11 

BATTERSEA 

2 Very large 1 Bed ton £82^00 
& £505001. R Or Garden ma- 
sonette win axtensne Recep & 2 
DHe Beds. £99550 L H Also 3 
newhr cowl Bed Has witn Gdn 
*£fiL50QLH fMOKoK 
22B 9911 or Sund^ on 0838 
210678. Courtenay. 


MOM UMl am. M (ta> 1 Bed k. Get PL auck s« (SUM 
ISBHGiai EM so. Grams tk 1 tad *«* tore, tag tare Ctuai 
■ttSOHW It. ML Sang) 2 Bed grand Bore tag tare ft. KAN 

1 aetata OH fttaya tata WI m 

wqtamnvnmmenm 


RESIDENTIAL 

SALES 

NEGOTIATOR 

We have a vacancy for an 
energetic, experienced negoti- 
ator with a good sales reconl 
lor our busy Kensngton 
Office. Must be seif motivated 
& capable of Wting m arth our 
f nemUy and emtusiastu; 
team. Exceflent salary, 
generous coronissiofl and 
company car. 

Tel: Hem Breeher, 
ALEX NEIL 
01-221 2000 


CHELSEA 

SW3 

Immaculate f7b town bouse 
in qun cul-rte-sac dose 
Haroods. 4 tfcl beds. 2 baths 
U en suite). I en suite shower 
room, separate wc. hving/ 
dining room, served from 
iarge Itutus' kri opening onto 
preO) paiio. Large m3 gdn 
and conservator *iifa oocn- 
srvr views. £594000. 01 401 
SSI 3 x 229 UG.QQ am • 4.00 
pm) 01-589 7651 (eves/ 
wends). 


WORLDS END 
ICINGS ROAD 
SW10 

Superb Hearty convened raised 
ground hoar 1 Wd/sariU ftzl tn 
period house on Kings Road. 
Features rattle fireptae. good 
camcm. douDW doors, gnen 
wens. Rndy to move Into tor 


Tet 01-584 9594 (day) 
937 3043 (fives) 


CADOGAN 

SQUARE, 

SWl 

Inracdtaa fiat {Nerttnlang flit 
Sgnre. Rscw. W. 2 Bads. Baft 
Pries Reduced lor 
£270.000. 37 years 
& CO 01-561 5234. 


CHELSEA £ 

KENSINGTON 


newly nruMasiao ovton 
Jmutt on Fuihem Hoad PtovkJ- 
1110 Senate rMtptnn. 
Urwn/brruitd room, dintno 
room- mam room, cleta. room, 
a mm. 2 tatt*. otr stmt park- 
mg- W south lacing garden 
C375000 Freehold Drue* And 
Co 01 581 5771 
CHELSEA SWlft CtMnroao 1/S 
Brorewn garOM flat Cenurietr- 
h rnurtmtaS to a high 
tiansud Otdel location 

cnoooo Long kw Jackson 
Prawb Scnan. nn ««j 
in 017 351 5653 
CHELSEA SWlft toMM» 3 tad 
IM floor com flat Large reeeo- 
(Mm roam bathroom * 
wm*rr Irtwt Wtciwn 

UAaJOOO 97 IM' tone J«V 
ion Prouerti Sen tew open 
rtpfl d« Ul 7 01 361 5633 
COUNTRY STV1X in h»mUt$lon 
Tennis rain. Dar Denies *40 * 
pnv patto> Lntgueb gum son 
flat lacing trees 408 Ho»ht* 9 
met* 3 h»d». tuxun Mock 
.ycmosoo 8B»T Ol 797 9309 


KERSIRGTW W8. 

Lftht and bngm 3 bedroom 
tower ground Ihl Ura# recep- 
bon and large ra. fined 
tatdiai. bathroom. In Pg- 
nod Hosk. 93 year lease. 
Oteis n access of EU5JBB 
for quck sale 

Tfi: WGBSXn Btttt 735T 
WOK MYS OW27 (783 


LUXUHY MAHS I OH FLAT fWS 

1 st ( 10 «. otegant drawing 
room, period ftmttore & rar- 
nx-M na Ironv 3 large douUe 
ordroams. all toeing south 
urge nflb Wtefl kw-duung 
roam. Mihroom. lin. OCH. At- 
tractive public w»*. 

■ Immacuiaie order High quality 
Dried rjrpHs 9 ettnatm Lve of 
pnvau- gardm- Catoge avail- 
ante 80 it leato Offers to 
region of £102.500 Tel: 
Ptt iqngs 1079156 ' 207 


CLUSTERS SWT 

Lav eh Brand ne*» uomo for 
sate •C 67 . 0 i»' or io ki tong 
0635 J04B9 or Ol 584 430b 


KENSUMTON W> 2 bedroom flat 
I u.\ui-} Ulriten A bathroom 65(1 
tulronl £82000 7(4 0732993 


RCOCLIFFC SO. SuperO- Outet W 
floor period flat, taiarieut 
rereg 0*0 KAD eftn 
Cl 21.000 01 S&a 6799 
WEST KEN W14 9 bed n b flai 
Recep Mirbn tan »c Bnetu 
Tube 4 mins. CafttorL. 95 .vrv 
Cfta.930on° Ol-ftCC r 1.497 em 
REDCUfFC SOLARS -Vju mX- 

sanertr.. L J m £189-000. T, 
HOb<vlx6 730 9937 


LEOiffil COBBT 
IEBVABDES SQ8ABE W8 

A avert) qmrt> uutad apatmern it 
emtant netware onto in rased 
ground flow Aeaopon room t Dou- 
ble bedrooms. Bawrocm. ineaen. 
mnaam hot Mater. Cental hopng. 
rasatat porter use tf Edwantas 
Soars tp nler& LeasehoU 41 ytois 
iramd 

C16S4M 

TEL.-01-584 5691 


! ABINGDON VILLAS, W8 

Period housa nearing 
comptebon at extensive 
works. 4 Beds, 2 Baths. 3 
Receps, Superb Kitchen. 
Cloakroom. Garden. 

Freehold. £405.000. 

BUS Co S37 1222. 


SOUTH 

KEN. 

4 beds. 2 baths. 2 large 
receps. Ktt. Gas CH. 5£ 
yr lease. Recantty re 
decorated. £165,000. 

No agents. 

Tel: 01-370 3970 (T). 


ICAOQOAN «W Ouuianding 
modernised raised grd floor 
Died a lerre. lge reroL 3 Mrms. 
Z baihs. designer kttrhen uiu, 
all matfune*. lease 34 years iZS 
yew extension under negi Ac 
rm garden (Mims. Cis&ftoo 
Tet. 0Z7C»ftB50Zl 


i PARSONS OBXN SWft bimac 
utote reidM QMS/P kitchen 
and bathroom. GCH- ornate 
entry Jarge patio. £54.900 Tel 
Ol 731 ZS0& 


HAMPSTEAD & 
H1GHGATE 


VIEW TONIGHT 


Rati . 
wttonw to C0CT16 (0 our ( 
HOUSE At 30 1 
SW 7. 6.30 pm to 
Seo you there < 
Coffee. 


Cal! 91 581 3823 


CHELSEA SW3 

Ghanmng sugarbty dscaraiet 
house n auet eul-dB-t 
of Christa. 


head 


3 batons.' 


tage'mn cellars. Mga mode 
kn. waned garden wra custo 
barbequa FruboJd. No Agen 
Plaasa. 

®Srex toJtajy Hi at 

01-629 4831/352 6427 


SOUTH 

KERSIKTON, SW7 

Mbac&w tuwnhouse dose to 
Saab Km tuOs. DMe Recep. 2 
Baft Bath Gangs. Tamed. 
FtMtnU. £230.0*; 

Chesterfield & Co 
01-581 5234. 


Htret tnrludmg unt 
paanemng Soartous rereo. 


stunning 

015584567 


lge kn dmer. ham. rMahm 
CCH. baho Long leaa 
£155.000 OOO 01-373-3973 


SWT. Stunning, 
unto fir flat in 
Enormous draw rm din 
dBto tad- bailum. dkrm 


1 flirt kachen. sunra ter rare 
S AShon «Mkdaig 493^640 
EveningtAteefcenaa 231-7904 
TWO BEDROOM llal 6 


C98.S00 

9937 


r HOSKITVS. 


tadflaiinqdrqm Rerrn oam. 


tadr flat \«sl,erep proing™ 
Soum for Oodra L2SOOD3 
T HOSkTSS 730 9937 


el Park W mmts Cl 4*. COO 
HOLMANS 370 6781 
m& MAD FLAT in wr 
Wort- Recep tadrflt. 
tidUirnt 117 ir he C72 
Tel 0865 5)4389 


H 

GARDEN SUBURB NW11 

Regan, spacious, doutfe aspect 
family bouse tn soughi after 
ctosp opposse me Hearn. 6 tied- 
rDCKW 3 bathrooms |1 an sutej. 
tttetJ koctan. Preariast room, re- 
ception and dinins tooms. 
bananes. soon iaang msture 
enclosed airden fully carpeted. 

68$ CH fttxMri E3SJSB. 



HAMPSTEAD VILLAGE 

Suserp newly mottamsad groinf 
ftotfia Sosnrt 50 yds from 

rooms. 2 reception rooms {Gas 

log toes) Katfton'brealdasi JAB 

modem aptfonosL ET75.000 

QreA San. 

Tel Wort tf ZS SIN 

Hem n 359 9303 


HIGHGATE 

Stormont Road. Konwtod. Enep- 
nonal bouse wh beautiful tarae 
garden nftcb cotfd bo used Ice 
redndopment or tor a separate 
ammonal property Freehold. 
Substantial offers only 

Write te PUL Bn 174, 

Lutes H 4BQ 

far iwaiitieri te vfaw. 

u 

u MfOMCATC NS 8MUUR4. <M 
" noth B4unaus4i)-te house. Esc 

rendition, vumnmg views 
Ctota Tupc 5 dot tadw 2/3 
receps- 30' studio, fitted home 
Mfirr. 27- kx/dmer. 2 baths. 
South faring gdn. roof lecrorc. 

- cellar ougu»a. fan Gas CH. 
OSP No Agnus duck romMe- 
Bon PftM. C24BDOO mid. 
TrtOl 540 1525 anytime 

0 

W HAMPSTEAD NVv6 

tteturftuTtnvtwd \ ic piooons.a 
tads <1 with fitted wardrotasi. 

2711 through lounge, igr (uuj 
lilted kit/ diner. 2 baths, rioak- 
room, ouiet with garden >40(11 n 
GCH £183.000 Tel: Ol 794 
6364 

HKHGATE WDOO Outlooks * ftr _ 
vreft expandable, mod. sunns S 
Use Eas» linked tor busy pnfl 
(am Us 4 beds, tor cecn. pan. 
uuna. oUkYitt. 2 roof tem ft. 
age £216 000 Ol 444 7169 
iH'/Ol 920 6188 'Ot 

B 

TUFNELL PARK V ne*r nipt 2 
tad flat w oh oath and sen u.r 

OM gU Becenoi decoraied. _ 

cetieni secunn with garden B 

£56500 Phone Ol 609 6987 
eves/W e 

WEST HAMPSTEAD Oft MHI ° 

Lane £1*0.060 Bins sod an 
arrhitectuafh designed 3 Beg 
Houv- witn lux hath A kit * a 
l^om u-dti a i iew' ft sun-caked M 
bark vuld Tel Ol 794 2ftTO n 

WEST HAMPSTEAD Large 3rd 
floor (Wl ML 3 tads. reep. toe *1 
IMH. uftlnv . k ft 0 . gn cn near 
mne BP to us buses long lease 
£76000 Tel 01-430 6304 

NW] NWS. ‘Superb seteciien of a 

-flats/rmuses Alt prices pnone 

Otvn Door Ol 794 6601 


MOKATE HILL 5 bedroom Mr 
tonan lerrace house. 2 large 
recetHMui rooms, tutty mod 2 
bathrooms OCH Douoie 
toaaed large OM den C18S.OOO 
01 272 4872 
NEW » TEAM LEASE! Highgale 
- Sheldon Asrttue Lumrv 3 
bed flat GCH . Garage 
Cl 39.500 Tel: 01-341 1541 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


f-IBlglUL- 

_ Cbarened 

_ wDimnuA ronBf 

roe moM s»*>ng houu mure road 

a not n me ama Bud m 18M ta an 

■Man anal >reo mougM ne «u 

ra«y nagwaad tor nan a canwy 

and ntw iwaas a mvtl *pem on * to 

restore It* ongnar avow Alter 

••rereiaeortao ea^buyare ware 

toMong tor a ganurw 00 a whom* 

uoanga corenas —mour lure 

go-y mi a - eo« a. tare 


•LACKHEATH Ouner^rehilecl 
designed supnMi modern de- 
■ached residence in private 
lane Snoou recepbon rooms. 
Fitted kncneti 3 sen- large tad- 
rooms - punned 4ih. .Mam 
evrtusivr toaiures Solar heal- 
ing. topper roof with dome 
119 ms. baKoro . dbte ourea. nm 
her lined mrougnaui. stone 

vvaihA while weauwTboardiiig 
£196.000 i01< 858 3307 


IABBIi in Wii cut de sac Sub- 
Manual Victorian aemi on h»e 
only a lev* minutes Pond. Com 
mon and Station 4 / 5 , tads, 
double recep. kil/brciaLfast 
room. 2 oaths. 5th two/lge stu- 
dio rm. gas C/H South facing 
gdn Freehold Offers m the re- 
gion of £250.000 hi Ivon A 
King 878 4942 


■A W NEfc Modernised 3 dm wd. 
Edv, ardian lerr house Through 
recep. mg kitchen. u&iK) Good 
Oaiden NKe locauan Going 
abroad hence carpets, curtains, 
electric 4K me £159-300 Quick 
sale / No loose chants / agents 
TeiOl -878-6449 Eves onb 


I DeMMful 30'* col 

1 age vl> te proper 1 1 5 mins i»*lk 
from Rtrhmofid Park a 
V lorllake 5Ui Ongmal trarurev 

2 recep is. kit conserv aim . 3 
beds path. Itneo carpets A cur 
Ian gt/h A ftB' rare secluded 
gdn £133.600 01-876 7596 


£156 000 to buy « fioias. 3 recs. 
-- and a 90H gdn a tta 


OOtUML 


.228 7474. 


MUTHratM sms. Neal ter 

raced nouse m -g nr GCH 3 | 

bedrooms Shown and loo on 

around floor M3 I? garden 

£85.000 QutrV sale wanted- 01 
874 8730 


WT THE toners drnam Im 
maculate upper mauMmene, 3 
beds, recep . k . B lofr. C/H. 
eats access Cm £46.995 Tel 
018632637 


lAftWn. Spacious 1st floor 
flat 2 beds. 1 rec £57.600 
Philip LOUP 720 0010 iTk 


SuosianUal late Virt house in 
outetroad 4 beds. 2 Baths, dou- 
ble leernuon. (amils kitchen. 
CH. small pteasaiu garden. 
Freehold £89.500 Tr» mfer 1 
forcasn Private sale No agents 
please 701 6502 

LuresTofs-uroN- 

Rerenui modernised collage m 
good location. 3 bMraans 
unprrsuie lounge, modern 
hiichen New GCH. new auatttv 
carpet * A on v are dnvrsto 
£66 000 Tel: 01661 2681 or 
01-673 1939 

LATHAM, SW 

Common Superb 4 brarm use 
with orrg iraom updated to a 
high standard with communi- 
caied receps. 20 * ltd kn/diiwr. 2 
bathrms. GCH £160.000 F/N 
Price 6 Co 01-673 3345 
EAftHAM COMMON ' Decep- 
tively spacious, inter designed. 

S bed v ic lerr hse 7 baihs il en 
nine* Huge ■29'xl6 , idble rero 
Kiutwn/diiung rm Lbltty rm. 1 
sep wr $ faring 


Spacious firsr floor flat, rereo. 
double Bedroom, hail/ dining 
I 1 lichen & bathroom, bm new 
in London £79.950 Can 5ue 
Lock en 01 748 1609 nr 
lOUBLE mONTED CAMBER- 1 

WELL Pretty mxtv iclonan 
lorner hse 6 wo. 4 recep Nor 
row ftcr gdn Need* some aun , 
CT9500 J/H View today home 
01 223 9696 Office 232 7658 | 
HOOKING CO MMON 5 ST 
J«W»r toJltt Town h». „ 
Tube r bens, evt/a lge lounge. , 
fitted kit. Css CH. able gianr 
gon. patio driveway CTi.w 
FH T«. 01-676 4398 
Wft Ovuming 3 flr Rud-Mno. . 
an leer hse m need of facetifl , 
%eu wiring. GCH. prrlb pauo 
9 dn. 2 nuns lube C79.50OF/H 
x™* Today, home 012Z3 1 
«W6. of fice 232 7668 
attoisca. l Bed fiat, recep 
modern Nil A bath qm CH 
Communal row lerrace. sauna 
917)1. wcurH. Uundt- porter 
parking QdT.ooo 01-583 0334 . 
WWMCH Pretty Victorian , 
terrace house, 4 mins 8R. 2/3 
tads, large knrhen. diner futr | 
grit, gardrn cuaooo Tel 01 
091 0536 

PHAM COMM evrint 2 I 
tad rial in 30's Btork Fir ku a 
cals CH Prkng s/o om. Com 
gon 3 mnw k> L /ground 
[67 30 0 01 -673 0388 
IrtVkf pretn naraen flat. Tge 
lounge orig features UN tad. . 
kit 6 bam GasCH JO SWgan 
Lang hr C39.7SO 01 870 I 
90»J 

ntSATHANh Hanmorne larmis 
IMtovr Close Toouhfl Common 
». 3 hatro- ft tads, far 
Gonvemml nU 
Cl 80 000 Tel 01 -677 1038 


Detighttul vmonan 
cottage in excrtlmi oecoranve 
order with south Ian no garden 
3 recep is. 2 double beds, fully 
fitted kitrnen. bathroom A gas 
eh cm 500 Ter Ol 8784079 
•H> or 623 8000 v 77496 <Oi 


GLAPHAM JOUTM. Ha Ob avail- 
able 2 double bedroom ground 
HOOT rui m mod block, set in 
urge beaulHullt nuintauirt 
gardens Large reception, kn. 
bain GCH. car pod £61 950 
Tef 01-674 447* 


WEST PUTNEY. Spacious <M Old 
llanw in prcsugwin road Con 
lervabonarca ft M. 3 receps- 
kil biraktvi. utility rm. 3 baths. 
rIOJk. ret Lsi. GCH Small u-(a 
um gdn Gge and Ml si parking 
CJliOOO IX Ol 788 4079 


BLACKHEATN DM Me Oil te 
. a tad. 2 baihv. 30TI rec. 
'frrncn w mtkrwy io pahO. diiung 
rm bkisi rm. kiL well siocsaa 
Gdh Gar OCH. F H C2SO.OOO 
Ol 852-3204 after 12 noon 


KEMWMGTON. Soacwus dble bref 
gdr> fiat Original leal ures deco- 
rated ID high standard 94 tear 
mine £ 56600 Tel. 582 2236 
PSJTHEY P/B 2 bed flat. Lge 

Rerep/balr. Ku/bfaei rm 
CCH Good decorative order 
C79 95Q Tet Ol 785 2009 
MVCHSIDC 1/2 bed flail DH-ed 
tv overlooking me Thames 
From £97.500 Riverside Red 
dential 488 4852 
SW11 Pow Drive. 2 bed*. 1 tec. 
sunny garden flat, tong lease 
Stir I h £77.500 01 622 4644 
•Hv Ol 404 0344 s 2851 >Or 
PUTNEY 8WSS. 2 bed s/c flat im- 
PKCdMe rond. Gas CH. own 
suite £75.000 Ol -7890218 

SEZ4 luxuhy 2 tad nai. nun 
mod- quiet si. 10 mins Cannon 
St station £46500 7oi 6950 
TOOTING Split level 2 tad flat. 
Heaver est Tube 3 nuns Meal 
Cm £58.000 Ol 673 2902 E 


DIXW1CH 


EXCLUSIVITY 

OFF ALLEYN PARK 

gears trample tf tourmae 
assign di Mlutful am dose V* 
UK Etogani rotra upsrtSf 
0KHB80. DfSwUB. flto rm. te 
tot/f} lasMU uny. 3 mb. taft 
utowsr isfflrjj rotf unset, s- 
Uangpnvafn.arwRi 
otTStpu^Daub 

SUPERB 120 FT GARDEN 
Mitt tf« Edwsratn ena tf wracs 
$e n uem Si dou Sta- 
ton Fitymjflwttiwntfi dscor 
Drewm. dn rm b taSL ta. 4 oetft 
tafh.EaiMC.cilv 09500 

VtewTi 


01-720 5361 


DULWICH VILLAGE. Superb de. 
lk hed tamnv home m heart of 
llte ullage -6 beds. 2 baths 2 
receps Urge kitrnen fan tear 
gdn l wwmg recommended 
r/H C275OO0 Hanes A 
Wheefer 01 73“ KU 


visicaian convenwn. 


A Z 

NOS- , 


OULWtCH VtLLAML Edwardian 
sen gmet mad. 3 do] beds. 5 
recep* - kil luflv mod. «etg 
(return sunnv oOn oaroen 
£127 000 1/hoU Ol 093 7736 


Continued so ne\t p*ge 


y 






























32 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 



STRUTT 

PARKER^' 


13 HILL STREET BERKELEY SQUARE 
LONDON W1X EDL 

01-6297282 


Carter Jonas 

ChartoR'd Surveyors 



NORTH LANCING 

B i^rhtnn 7 nnW t Worthing 3 miks, London &2 mites 

AN UNUSUAL SUPERBLY APPOINT® ARCHI- 
TECT DESIGNED CONTEMPORARY RESIDENCE 
WITH PANORAMIC VIEWS OVER THE CHANNEL 
Ground Floor: Bnh»nr» Porch. Entrance Lobby, 
Cloakroom, Study/Bedroom 5. Sitting Room/Dining 
Room 3T6 x 3fTB, busy Kitchen, mam Bedroom with 
En-Soiie hatfaro om /DTesang Room. 

Lower Grand Floor; Central Reception area 2ff z Iff 
3 Anther Bedrooms, Bathroom, Sauna, Changing Rooms, 
Utility Room, integral doubts garage. Boiler bouse, 
he ate d swimmin g pool 36* x I$*. Secluded Garden 
0.70 acre. 

Apply Estate Office, High Street, Henfield BN5 
9DE. Tefc (0273) 493622. 

WOODMANCOTE 
NR ±ikN P lfil <D 

Spadous family hone in ma g nifi ce nt podtion with ex- 


HETHEmNOTOMS 
PBETTY+ELUS 




AN IMPOSING HOUSE with Entra nce 

JUST AVAILABLE for sate at w b a tanriri , hot reahsaepnee. 


Bnilt in 1939 on 3 storeys facing aooth west, overlooking 
magnificent mafamp wAmt HaJI . drawing non, d’»"y 
room, a i tliii g room, phyzoooii family kitchen, ‘5 bed- 
rooms, 2 bathrooms. Doable po i y , Heated Swimming 
pod. Gardens and grounds extending to about 3% atm j 
Oil Rtw| rwifa|l h^flHtw | 

Apply Use Estates Office, High Street, Henfield. 
Teh (0X73) 493622. ’ 

Joint Sole Agents with King ft Ch a acmore, 
HeafiekL . 


Sfeadoxhuret 2 nfles: Ashford 4 mUes: 

Tentenfen 8 mries; London (Charing Crass 

GOmnutES). 

As aXracfiin raddariM an) ipmflsa tarn. 

Fine period house in m ag sficai t position. 4 
reception rooms, 7 bedroom. Swimming 
pool tennis cout Garten and pond, Attrac- 
tive pair of period cottages, Kent bam and 
range of farm buildings. 

87 sens prota&n termini ad 54 acres 
nlwanfl— 1 
la Al About 141 Amt 
Raglan OM0U880 




Peterborourfi 18 mUes, Stanford 12 m3es 




HaR. 3 Reception rooms, study, breakfast 
kitchen. Master suite of bedroom aid bath- 
room. 4 hither bedrooms, secondary 
bathroom. Gas cJl garage. oudnnUmgs, 
rnatue secluded gardens. 

Mann* acre 

Ragtan £128£0I 

Gmfeara Office: 12 London Road 

Tat (0478) 85886 (Ref. 4A83576) 


SOUTH LINCOLNSHIRE. 

Most Attractive Period Residence delight- 
fully pry?»rif>ngri in outstanding grounds with 
parkland, In all about 20 acres. 

Well proportioned accommodation: Drawing 
Room, Dining Room, Breakfast Room, 
Kitchen, Cloakroom, Out-Offices, 9 Bed- 
rooms, 2 Bathrooms, extensive Out- 
buildings induding g* rag in g for 7 cars, 
Office Superb landscaped gardens with 
many fine trees overlooking pa rk land. 
Within easy reach of Peterborough - main 
imp to Kfag g Cross - 49 minutes. 

For Sale by Private Treaty. 
Offers in the region of £150,000. 

Full details from: 

R Longstaff & Co, 
Chartered Surveyors, 

5, New Road, Spalding, 
Lines PE 11 IBS. 

Teh (0775) 66766. 


MORTGAGES 
WITHOUTCEILINGS 
OR FLOORS. 



8ETWEB1 LYMDKnQN AW THE HEW FOREST DUE OF 
HAMPSMRE’S HOST NOTABLE SMALL COUNTRY ESTATES 
A ta sample si a bsMfcly restored ISb cream cored* re am W 
aretttockm ad Named tttoMt set re «s om psri doss to tte 

Here Fares retd Ssleni Stm. Tht seemnmodteon Ires ban so arreod m to 
tate M xfcaBgs of (fee trews ouBook owr Ok ginfen ate part. &sares tad. 
tore umii ra c mBon rarem. Maris room, set bedrooms, taw -Hartmans, 
tecta) «Kl U tarSc offers. eMH na CrtJy H tawioL fan* mil 
apposdm scf -ccaared tans wttdi costa prow ■ naM aftfitxxot mcome or 
a# mimodiaoa OMred ctstrjl tatora DuttuMags. formal gutters, 
prek. reoodM ead copwi cmpUsir sreroanng We inn pwwdng anoMo 
pMcy eri a nd n g a aoore 25 acres. 

Eor sale fmetaiti. MM pwtiaim naiablo. 


At Midland there are no 
limits on how much we lend. 
And no matter how large or 
small the sum you want or 
whether you want a repayment 
or endowment mortgage, you 
pay the same flatTate, 
currently 11.0% (APR 11.5%). 

We also lend up to 90% of 
valuation, and up to three times 
an applicants income (or twice 
joint applicants* combined 
incomes). And you don’t even 

# MIDLAND 

MORTGAGES 

'.'Midland Bank pic 1986° 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


RKHMONO/KEW Lv- modem, 
i nod flat In nun. quki oftt 
Bin, Parking. comm Mn. 
GCH Oov nifco, £69 600. 
Td.WMBO collar 700 mil 


have to be a Midland customer 
Wfe offer a mortgage certificate 
to prove we’re prepared to lend, 
and we also move fast It all 
adds up to a better mortgage. 

Written details available from 
Customer Information Service, 
Freepost, Sheffield SI 1AZ. 


Well make vou fee! 
more at home.'’ 


BULSTRODE PARK, 
GERRARDS CROSS, 
Buckinghamshire. 

206 ACRES tf BBAriHing PARKLAND wifb exfe»- 
sire road frontage ta tke A40 and brick aadsfate 
COTTAGE (subje ct to a Closing Older). AUCTION 
2ND OCTOBER at The Bifl Hotel, Gawds Ctass- 
at 3 pm. Vendors safidteo: Mesas. Clarke ft Sou, 90 
Easton Street. High Wycombe, Buds HP11 1NCL 


Appty Raffety Dockland (0753) 888047. 


ALDINGHAM 

Suffolk. 

For Sale by tender an impressive 
Edwardian residence standing to 
grounds of about 7 14 acres and in need 
of modernisation and restoration. 

Considered statable for hotel, 
conference centre etc. subject to 
Planning Consents. 

Details from sole agents 

Flick & Son, 
Saxmundham, Suffolk. 
Telephone Saxntuntfham 3232. 


JEWELS IN THE CONVENT 

MAGNIFICENT-, LUXURIOUS WING of The 
Old Convent East Grinstead. 5/6 bedrooms, separate 
apa r tm ent gatery. audio- Avaftabte wtth entire contents. 
Heals lumisriings, antiques. Offers £2054)00 + contents. 

NUNS REFECTORY for exciting conversion, with 
approved plans. Stunn ing features indude pulpit, 
staine d glass windows. £&500 excluding conversion 

TUDOR STYLE CONVENT GUESTHOUSE 

Beautiful exterior elegant interior. Designer kitchen, gal- 
leried landing, spacious 5 bed accommodation. £150,000 

IfijNraNGfi^LrTH WING with gaHeried drawing room, 
4 double beds, ensuite. Back on market, must seiL Of- 
fers £115,000. 

Al set in 11 acres private grounds, swimming pool, 
tennis courts. 15 mins Gatyvick, 1125, 30 mUes City/West 
Bid. 

Viewing and details 0342 311299. 


DIRECT HARBOUR FRMTAfiE POOLE HARBOUR. 
MAGWFICEirT LUXURY HARDS RESfBEHCE 

•tt apoto artgre M ms ire Haem, stum of -My. Oi ArSnArete 
Phrm aw Mjards tan Here v«3a CM. 3 rate fcsm FtooK a re S horn 
ftxneuwtt H* Ckats. 2 (•ostoa reans. 4 Mtsans. Itenimt Mwn i 
inrevwM MBK GaHtOig tor 4 bp C were beam ijpfccreed nnanfe 
irti rede Mw Mmol DWs ureotf ■ repan MUB FrecMl areoren Mm 
w* 

FOX AND SONS, 

12 HAVEN HOAD, CANFORD CUFFS, POOLE 
(0202) 700922 


VJlft 


fti-499 8644 


JacksonStops 
s s-*“ & Staff 

S retool edge LX »JUUJ- 


Northamptonshire 

Northampton 10 miks. Ml Motorway 7 miles. 

An imp re ssi v e Georgian country house, set 
in delightful gardens and pounds on the edge 
of a pretty village, with far- re ac hin g views. 

3 reception rooms, kitchen and domestic offices. 

7 principal bedrooms, 4 bathrooms. Further attic 
bedrooms, and bathrooms. 

3 bedroomed cottage. Garaging, stabling, 
swimm ing pool, hard tennis court. Walled garden, 

3 paddocks, woodland. In all about 11 acres. 



COOPER & TANNER, LTD 

BATH 15 man - £85^00. Gentle Street. Frome - former heme 
of Marquis of Bath. 

Hm of LONGLEAT- 2 ‘CftoiocatB Box' THATCHH) COTTAGES. 


i i>;i;r>VV 1,1 1,1 


For further details, telephone 0373 62045. 

C0R3T0N, 8A1H - £79,950. DebgMM. luxury 3 Bed COUNTRY 
COTTAGE. 

5 Mies BATH - £150.000. Surartty converted. 3 Bed. (tenner 
Duchy Of Cornwall) DETACHED BARN. 

Butweea BATH aad BR ISTOL - E145000 oiuj. Spacious DE- 
TACHH) BUNGALOW with exotic ffird Aviaries. SabTng & over 
4 acres. 

For further details, telephone 02217 3408 
or 02756 69331. . 


hereford/worcs 

Broadway 

Period CotewoU home 
on edge of railage with 

superb vie** w 
l> rccetxion mrew. «pc<t> 
krirtwa. bboiviIiw. J prittcipil 
brdmatk. :l lialhiunl*. 4 
KTaadarv hrdfauflM fnr Ml- 
niKUtntd Dal). I'lHllff. 

outhuiUmcKand mM atom. 

Uflm in regain uf CZOfm 
Apply: 

Market Homre.CMppi** 
Cunpdcn. CL53 6AJ. 
Trtaphorec: (0886) 840224 




SEER GREEN 

Superb mod Georgian style Famfly Home - 2 recaps, study 
krt/b'test rm. master bed witti dmssng rm aid ensute bate. 3 fi 
tads, tarriiy baft. Gas CH. dW age. taouirt gdns apputt tt 
Offers invited - price rnide £310tob. FVH. 

AJC Prut A Co7 BrereoonreSreld (M948) 5555. 



SPECTACULAR CASTLE, 

Keith Rafl. toveurie. MademMn - ReWeratioa to aewnl Mriduri 
Tower Hoses wd Hris. sfeaKd n beatful gantes and OapabSty 
Brown PbX. am y« wttNn one nrie ut thnvrna town ol bwetwie. 16 
mies from Mwnhoi and It miss from Ovcb JwnorL Seif contend - 
275 twrooms. From 55,000 -EllDflOO. fine fireplaces, paneling and 
conioes waked. For p h uaigu pl i e d derated schedule and vmmg 
rapaS contact 

Brandt ft ReM, Sd ichors rad Eddt Asaats, 
117/119 Haftraa St red. Afaradwa. Tel: (0221) 64809 


RMI34W 

. and for U» owr 55"* tried aoamwfc Iw the rafted « Matte Cart. 
Obe Ikitafe bran DMM. 

MWk SfoakSag ft Hobms, Gosfonf fH 
3 BXHS, SaOoHt NR34 90S. 0502-713286 





CHELTENHAM 

Impressively appointed mod detached family 
house featuring secluded underlit heated pool, 
3 Dble Beds. 33*xl6 T Entertaining Rm etc. Ga- 
rage & 4 Car parking, immaculate. £115.000. 
G.H. Bayley ft Sons, Che l ten h am 
(6242) 521102 


Leycfoa Oose. 

flofterfwrw £119X0 
3 Bed sena UrgntObtaidMl- 
Opment. 30ft Inn Urn. Rttad KX. 
Ground door alum. Lm wH 
h i— mu red Ssupi toonp Garden 

ISLE OF DOGS 

James Town Harbour 
£120,000 

r Bed U. 2 t&le Beds, Lae Srt- 

MU) Rm. Unuuy Freed Kit 
SpKUcutor views ewer uaMr. 
Pannng 

w OPeH 7 DAYS A WEEK w 

01-538 1821 


WIMBLEDON 


5 bed house & income/ 
Granin OaL Clow H R- & 
undergmd. Toullv reno- 
vaietf. Orig Tea lores. 
DdiRhiful Igc recep. dimag 
rm. ITfkiu ta Ur. sftwr mu dk. 
Gdn- Off v pkng + spaciats 
: dbfc bed gdn OaL £235.000. 
Sonnes A Co 01-351 HS1. 


ELCQAMT CDWAIBNAN LOP <Mr 

(red nm' rui on wnimiRM 
HID Nop*-; H»n rNUnm. ortu 
IpjIutps. rwatt-irtf. CCH. 
now drawing rm. Igc MI/b'IM 
rm EMPlIral docor. £61.950 
wHh rrrau shore for otnek ule. 
s icv> Sunday Ol 879 W6. 
then Homer HUI 946 o3 bS 
ram no, wwiumn. a bed 
semi, rereo. dmino. DJth. shwr 
rm. gdn ggr mart' OidrJ, sale. 

ns* hws 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 



DOCKLANDS - OTT - DOW. 
Sehvltan Of period X New 
Hows a Rais rtov tan- and 
finer tZB 0*0.000 Plmre 
MrCMwatH RewrenUJl' Ol TVO 
gnu or OPGO 71 iSod. 
HV1UY LOCK SUL 9 bed 
spim-drl houw Large grew. 
Cenrrtu hniuno Cardens. 
C 79.000 SSZ 2099 *««* 


RICHMOND ft 


mo tMOMP Superb reftirtihired 
vuiorun iwm, and not for 
onlt UMO.000. Many period 
rralwrix & double hedrooms. 2 
ruihroom. n nnuie wtoi 
indmmnv/bra«i firaoBsi. 
miMnwm. designer kiirben. 
enormous O trade elated comer 

\o4on plus </f surma IW. 
TctOl-WCMShB 


BELGRAVIA SW1 


ill; um.ri 


Rearety wo rter me rt and deco- 
rated to a venp togb sondard. 
LowMave rooms, ate/ ter en- 
lerlKins. ArMee furmtue 
nftae aanmate. 
fiBUUtm FLOOR 24 ft double 
lecsoron room mtfi gas coal fire. 
LOWS) GRODB nattsman fit- 
ted ttenen. across doutte 
neajiaaoiau. doutte fittge 
freezer etc. 

raifflie ROM sets 6 
UTTUTY ROOM n/maefnte. 2nd 
cooter and fndoe te snacks 
FUST FLOOR 17R master tied- 
room, range of fined cuoboaras. 
odi to man bathroom toed mft 
lacuzzr. Separate stwwr room 

SOHO FLOOR 2 smaller tiro- 
rooms, 2Pi wttroora. wrace 
Fufiyeoumedantfearperai Tbs 
house is 5UBM lor a rap esecu- 
tr* and is avatette on a 
osrqanr W ortp to a 2 yes 

Pem «gS? Z 4f «?r- 


KMITCiaBUDCC Fiwn hhed rial 
Bedraon. iiiim room. kHriien 
and lullwtxjm CHW. CH - Ml. 
nerfrr. «4ry ph»ft taiKtdri W- 
Ciuurv C2BO pw UKfreme 
iretuiidMr. 6 12 mentis «wpa- 
nv lei Tel Ol 727 6687 


CHKVELCT. Nr Nmtury. M4 I 
nnle. London 1' ■ brv SotHUCi- 
IvU modern drt free Srrhided 
and ourardve odm a beds. S 
i'tr»' Kn/tMH rm. Obte we. 
Planning pnrmMion (or an- 
nexe Ll 76000 Tel. Howard 
Son A Goocn 0656 69440 

LAMO UWM Ourrmna. l«ed vlT 
L.K 1 nousc »min co men .aUon 
area bordering Riser 
Laraoourn 3 rec. 5/6 bed*, 
hath, -snoiwer. od ncMinu. gw- 
dm. mantled bam. reabtes. 
paddo rv About I acre. CuMe 
CSIOOOO PreweaUs Country 
ftouse Oeuartnreut. NeMdunr 
<00331 3S393 

NCWBunr t, M4 ms) 6 
Baungsnwe I4. Soarious la» 
Uv house m good rural poreuon 
oo mb ground with \ftwv 4 
rer 4 dM beds. 2 bam. >or ml 
garaam lor i bam 45* x XT. 
ga« den paddocks Price 
£170 000 DrrwNHH 106351 
0*000 or BwrwaoK <06 36) 
29«IBS 

REAODM Mdamficrni SW neves 
(■am a me meriooLuiB Calcol 
Park Coll Course. Esdl 12M4S 
num vnudrd smois famuy 
restdence In an acre ol lawn 
gardens and shrubbery. 4 bed- 
nwm. 2 bathrooms. Sgaraors. 
pdio and rockery £195.000 
TH 0734 437455. 


(In Howard’s Way country) 

House with lovely Vi am garden and views over HamUe 
River to the LO.W. Lounge, timin g room, kitchen, 4 bed, 
3 bath, doaka, utility room, double garage. Offers invited. 
Guide price £170,000. 

Hamble Estate Agency: 

0703 455055 



EAST ANGLIA 


3 KD Del house qidei eul de me. 
6 mUi walk Princes Rtsbcrough 
Centre. Main Hire MarieMrere 
£.75.000 Tel: 08444 5121. 

DTUJC HamleL qualm 2 bed 
(omjr.nwM Mim. CH ek. 
perm res/ WE Mtuee. 1 hear 
London na^oa 029671 4402 


DEVON ft CORNWALL 


ESSEX/ 

SUFFOLK 

BORDERS 

BaeutKul undulating country- 
side and unspotit meWeval 
weaving vBages. Propertie s 
trom £30ro0 o around 
£300,000. HJ.TUtnar A Son, 
31a Frtare SC Sudtxay. $uf- 
toft. COl 0 8AE. 07B7 72833. 


BUCKS 


RALTOH ■ NT Mradmer Lame 
pmtmD 4 IT Od hotse Map 
mnrml kx-jiran on BUO/Hens 
border Accrtreng tai lo Nai 
Trust Part Land and CM Item 
Forests. 40 nln rominule to 
London Mans iBHaue ft» 
turn. 5 dble bedrooms. 2 lux 
bUlw. run. ruts, (fining rm. 
launne stninarm. Utctren. uUH- 
b. dble garage. '• acre 
limwjm gardens, noo. treat- 
ed pool, mature irrr*. often 
around £205000 Tel 
femdowser 1 0296 1625234. 


■Of M«0 - CMRerm Aon B Floe 
induuB bungalow- 3 dUe Mds 

siuds'/bM 0. FuB ion com 77. 2 
due beds rnsuitr reiowrr/wc. 
large lounge, kdsduier. bauu 
sen ms sums, turage. Mricme 
3 tars LI 10.000 F.HuU Tct 
CU93 882891 alter 6 pm. 
CLOSE Mi 45.40 muis EiMon. 
5 bed NniBF in Deautdul. oolel 
■ oinursur Extmsnr ranges 

sLtMe, duMMuMUMS Indoor/ 
ouKfoor menage 60 Kin pro- 
gwInrvmtaPd 093596450 
M UW M rouge 3 taw. S 
rrcrgt groan garden, pretty 
consersaiKUi iblagr iu 
ta#ndmrr GO mns London 

Of I res Cl 05000 0296634167 
■KHMEMHAM Rncnidr lane. 
0rf roftage com ro m pl w e 4 
beds. 2 renn. 2 bain, ut CH. 
iRri vr gdn barks orchard. 
1215.000 0491 571270. 


S CORNWALL 

Attractive Former Rccuxy 
Wing in | acre grounds. 

Spacious Resorcd 
AcroowdaoML 2 Rrc.4 
BeK. Garage. £35.000 
freehold- Sdsttoo & 
Hotewo*. Cbrafetowm St. 
AustdL Cwwafl. PL2S 3NJ. 
Tct Si Austdl (0126) 6561 1. 


ST MAWES YOriiUM paradise 
Cbanrung uwtfmni rest- 
dence. UnintemipM 

panoramir water views south 
and s*esL RMW m oori n g 
DUr ggr. Parking. BrauUful 
cottage gdm C18S.000.THMy, 
St Mav.es 270212 


PAOITOW Cornwall M oaeri use a 
harbour houar. Ml aairacfUlirs 
and beam Uvtng room. 4 dMe 
brdmia. LU/dtner. uUlav no. 
bathroom, gas C.H. and rirsai 
edgMenoveriooUng harbour 
C 49.V3Q . 01-87H 1163 
OtunSTOre - CrfBiming irdudM 
S bed me. 2 r*c. 2 bam. ige Mt- 
D/last. dDI gar. ui/rm. c/prL 
maturr udrv £140.000. Tel. 
0803 843404 

DEVON Mod 3 tied 2 r*c walled 
garden, ullage centre, garage 
Sea s Jeers £68 000 henlagr- 
Coam Stoke Ftemuig 770236. 
BEAL HOLBAT HONK. On fin- 
er Dan oetamed. 2 bedroom, 
bungalow, in Sm Devon ullage 
C&S.OOO TH 038081 6477 
BVU OAfiT Sunns a be tirou m 
modernised collage, (toe view* 
mui Pond 4. StMur Gabriel 
Qreay. CSOM0 0903 000660. 
CORHWALLSown propeny mag- 
anne Even- laruumii g, post. 
Nnaiav 0637 876383 124 hr) 




CLOUGHTONg SCARBOROUGH, 


Supsriw mdWdUafly dedyied contsnporaiy hose starafrig in 1 
acre growls with purpose butt stable block. Enjoing panoramic 
sea/country trims. LavisWy eqtqved 4 bedroom, 4 bathroom 
accomm. Lounge wite balcony, ffttad dMng kitchen, games 
room double garage - offers in excess of £125.000. WeUs 
Onfall. 2 St Nicholas Street. Scarborough - Tel: 0723 371468 


NEW FOREST 

New Mitton 

“Danewood” 

Highly IrtSvttual 3 & 4 
bedroom bungalows. 
Some wither suite 
bathrooms. French Oak 
kitchens, in superb 
woodland setting, 
double oarage. 1 mBe 
from shopping and 

station direct to 

lifrratreirlnn 

■vacWlOO- 

SHOW HOME OPEN 7 
DAYS A WEEK 
PRICES FROM £114,000 
RING (0425) 61131ft 


Prowling 


COTSWOUM OOTTA8C. Ideal 
weekend / boHday MtM m 
rnagnUKenl setting. Superb 
vrews. Many Interesting tea- 
tuns. 1 bedroom. £35 000. Tet 
Amnertev 1045387) 2771 


Large tou g ipanmant sttretao w 
gnundaoiDOnnviuuilhQflnans.4 
<mma «»•« torm ca»M and 
tarectL 3 MAI M brenonL 2 
racepbon rooms Rued Wdren rear 
naeanogi«lmlo«wigiL Private 


saws 


tome ontens. Mttan*. m 

30d dicaaive order. 



mam nottmk. cm course 
100 yds. luxury 3 bed flat. 
GCH. «m view. SS7J5B0 (IK 
rarwis and curcaure. Teh 0603 
617001 124 hni. 


NORFOUt/SUmU MODOL 

Old Vuiorun Rectory m small 
vUUge. 5 beds. 3 recnMons. 3 S 
arm ntcUmUm roddoefc. 
Cl 05.000. T«: 0606 48237. 


NORFOLK. For gale. deUgbirul 
deurtred 3 bwi roani w house. 
In nxurt village (Tlbenham). 
CS^MO. for fuH details nm 
057977-600 


rtWI Broaindbom S mllea 
Mb of Roysioii. A unlaue 
arniecl detMirea bungalow ex- 
cuing unob st ru ct ed Southern 
views over Royston Heath. Lgr 
tounge. sUUnvm/dlnino. 3 
be*, ready, hit. MCi / reipwer 
worksiwa. uUlitynn- DMe go* 
Maunrd wsUed gdn in '■< acre. 
Curb Cl 35.000 0763 42044 
rjyi M 3 bed sem. acre 
CM xm. 3 bed del nouse tet to 
■ otn- t4&000: Esrec del 

Mure b beds In H m 

C45XCO 4 bed counirv bouse 
2' ' 4.000 sa (1 under 

4Ubl 2 paddorkL dag dyke. 
Km Caum. BaUm. 0206 
53446 

SUFFOLK: Nr.Snape Mamngs- 
Bird Rewne 19m cemury 
depositor}- Recepl IWienbn. 
Suartous 4 bed. end ton ac e . 
mwb house Lin Ulctien / 
"aoirm. siudm wit. DC. GCH 
Wailed muo ga rde n private 
parking. I rwr u eutaie order. ■ A 
hup 0)4.960 TeUQ72ffl 3923 


COLCHESTER. Writ BnML 5 
minutes drive from BR. Liver. 
pool SI Sbi 68 rn busies. 
WeiMMHiiny eupolnled 4 bed de- 
l ached home ui secluded wed 
maunamed grounds. Exralleui 
deroraUve order. Detached ga- 
rage C97.000 TetCfdMree 0206 
24l 882 (HOMO. 


HF1M HU R - Easy access to AI2 
and wKMn 12 minutes drive of 
mamUne Kaon, a unkiue 7 
bedroomed detached house on 
amraximaie 3 acres, compris- 
ing or 6 reception mo. games 
room, playroom, luxury kitch- 
en. rtc. AM healed swfmrainq 
MOl. £187.000. 0206 250323 


Feme are a* gtmg 


HAYUNG ISLAND 

M era 3 tearao m af chatet/ 
bungatoff with gam fin- 
ished to a Irion sondard. 
LfiB-C. covar. Rearty end of 
September. EK.0QQ. 


ca LTD. 

TB: 87B5 S91856 



NORTH ESSEX 8 miles Maria 
Try In orUNitfui rural post lion. 
P«T»d farmhouse wtth put 
buildings, u> an 2*.- acres. 
Cl 35.000. Perch al and Oe> 
Sudbury. Suffolk 0787 72223 


EAST OF ENGLAND 


Loses Hamlet 1/2 ml Q41M L 
12 mis Cranmam. Kings X 87 
■nun. Cnararter 4 bed art. tree, 
prig, pine doers, open fire. 3 
recep Loe ui. C.H_ 2 gar a g es , 
large garden, orchard. Offers 
ovrr C6 Q J00 TH: 040061646 
BOSTON Del rh crude house. 3 
toe beds. 3 roc. tot- mi. baifa A 
vhwr rm. garage, manure gdna. 
CS2J30O Tet 0208 6644 A. 


etectisr pine k ttdtea. urge 
wood-burning storve. Economy 
Seven power, double giaang. 
carport and banting space, 
small garden and patio Cur 
lams, carpets. light fUttoov and 

. funuture (some arOleue) Of 
duality «d style Udoded In 
pnee Move straight In. 
£70.000. Phone CMooenr 
102851 3888 

Cheltenham 3 Mas. Demjwfui 
detached. 5 bed collage, aedod 
ed pgaUton. entrance had. 
notes, doming rm. loange. tv 
room, breakfast rm. Kil both 
rm. shower rm. (QOL Fined 
carjeg cur are s, avail hiroeg- 
atety. CBOjOOO Tct 046389 
606. 

■CTWEBt CVESHAB A OielleiK 
turn. Renovated, detached 
character house reriBi » Rtw* 
A 3 Beds >u outstanding HHUde 
puauon wiBi etteroive slews. 
DMr Garage. Carden OHerson 
nun Bnmmaru A Co 

(03661 6355. 

urenur. is mum south of 
ChcBeohant. A One detached 
CMswoM period umfiy house 
in spern clcvaled rural 
position. 1 sere C120000. 
Lear A Lear- (04636* 71666 

CHALFORD- 8 (rales were of 
e tr eners t er. A ready athhCbte 
detached 4 bedroomed pe riod 
stone cwtagr u» an ety peaceful 
setting. C96.0OO. Lmr A Lew: 
i04536> 71666. 

OOTSWOLO Stone Cottage. S 
beds, bthrm. Inge Hl/diner. mil. 
prita. odns. minc rand. Euperv 

Hews C44.9SO. Stroud 78843- 


KAimnn. HCTBtMiriMEC cot- 
tage nr Lymingion ui exchange 
for one bedroom It* In London 
25,i 82°' r6n * rael - *eeiy to 

W" WO 


RMWUOMC TAHK. POOLE 8 
tied tee In line secluded gdns 
Lovely cm ban & 3 roetpto. 2 
aathL t/r uwn. , fthn,* 
Cl 95.000. 0202 763046 


HAMBLE 

an yarts private dead). Ctinw- 
gon. of aqatiw I90i Cea«y 
Grade a raw cnfiyard states 
10 lorm 4 houses. Gantei. 
•aaes. SliB«ray. Possible 
nwortegs. Developers Allied 
Wot Ufl, (Mold 730707. 

outwtfnpton 


"toOVER charrmng 

< i!f racw t hq,15e m w«sw aiw 

vlUagc.. S tasis, lounqr. dining 


mSTOmC UOWW ■ Close earele 
/river DrllgtiHviL ebarader pe- 
riod rise. Recep. tounge, 5 beds. 
2 baths. Gas m. Ago. 2 goes 
£65.000 offers. Tet 0684 39b3 

PAHKUKK CH tNINP» wtm pond 
A stream. 4 miles Rosuw-Wm 
Mfio Deuqhtutey agscaMna 
Georgian stone RMdonce of 
gparmusnere in renwen setting 
wHh 2 Holiday Cottages A 9 
Acres. Elegant HalL 3 good Re 
cepUon Rooms. Study. Kllnren. 
7 Bedroom* 2 ftuhroom. OH 
Healing Cellar*. Beautiful um- 
bered gardens with Tut* tree. 
Oarages Farm Shop wtth plan. 
mng. Two 2 bed Collages. 
Pasture field & young wood 
£195.000 Oases. Knapp* Ken- 
nedy. T tutor House. Rueon- 
Wve 0989 ■ 63653. 

SSSHOPS Fully mod. pari 17th 
Cntrv rasuge with l.S acres, 
stream 26fl. kxsige. orlg Ingle 
nook F/ptace. 5 beds, bthrm 
Dno/rm. UUH. rarrohse. kUcmi. 
CH. Offm over £65000 Tat 
evgs. 0948 840644. 

DAUNT OMEN Wares stork 
brokers' bell, 4 bedroomed mm 
expensively fined. CS7.9S0 
Ftiold for outrk sale 021 S6Q 
1466 day. oat 448 1993 oven. 


i i .. ' - 'I ".. s 




stead, individual 8 yr old 4 
bedrm raaage style hse In Heart 
of Village. 3 nuns MI/M25. 
dose amenities. £1 IO.OOO. 
(OU9 41384 - 

MOVE TO HOTS Countryside? 
station 2 mlm walk then 35 
mins to Eiaion . 4 bed*. 2 recep* 
detairhed emAdir 8 yrs old. 
£98.000 Tring (0442821 5449 

ST ALBANS green bell village. » 
bedrai. modern Use. close rero. 
M25/A1. 3 receps. huge kitch- 
en. 2 bathraw. ulllMy. CCH. 
gara ge. £98 ,9 3a 10727123775. 
COLCHESTER Mod det res. 4 bed 
2 bate. CCH. mew sli. faring 
FORUtam Heath. Nr AI2 and 
main sins £96.000 0763 48047 
HARPENDCN Designed 5 bod. 
vie. home- 3 mins reauon/- 
shops. 26 mens Kings X 
£145.000. 05827 62209. 
IJUXURT 2 db bed fl« to Barnet. 
'Garage, balcony, equipped ktL 
2 toilets, bath. linn, large Inge. 
9dns- £74,730. 01-8816079 


murnl 


SPELDHURST 

Outstanding Edwardian 
etiara tier house centre pop- 
ular viHaflB, 3 mites 
Tunhridp Wefls/Tortjndge, 
(38 min Char X/Cannon St). 
3 reception, master bed- 
room en ante battroom, 5 
further bedrooms, bath- 
room, cellars, attached 
service cottage/arannyan- 
rex. Sedtfied » acre 
garden, double garage. 
Offer region £235,006. 
Telephone 0892 86 2877 
or 089286 2225. 



SEA FRONT FLATS 

... DOVER 
HARBOUR AMD 
. fMANHEL MEWS 
. 1 >t tegrpons meg wates 

Svm ""‘“SSbm R 8 *** 

fnmL 4 0 mom £711000. 
I^OttAfOSON, 
27/»CateteS (rate. 

Dow, KENT. 

Tab 0304 2021 73 


of defipMAd 

vim tiy pri 

rwcL graetous 5 bed 

dciarhni I930t haute 3 nm. 

kll. NEFF appliances' 
liu bwiroam, 
JjMwer room, doakriii. gaitfm. 
jrerace. puna, grounds to nran 
offen 1 in region of 
£165.000. 05506-2404 (Etcsl 


tel renremm. tori marina. 3 


Staring « estan- 


Cioaooo. Tet 0962 61425. 


HEREFORDSHIBE, 
WORCS, & SHR0P 


gardens Ter. 0905 2wE? 




CHthueft osi aext psge 


























































EXHIBITION » 
CONFERENS 
FORT'JNITIES 

’..'2000 * hm 


, ,/i^ 

; *•.. ■ *• 


L olt 


i 

•■■ ■ V • 






SEVENOAKS 
(Kemsing) 

SSBKS 


CMHBtog.£85jQOOL 
ARVIE & CO. 
WEST MALUNG 
(0732) 642345 


MIDDLESEX 


HOUSE BOAT] BO - Lux & lur 
nrtA«l 3 20 ywr tnoenog on 
Grand L iuon Canal. 2 Ms. |ql 
balh. Hum 5 rams Heathrow 

t£2 JJ^, 422 - 500 ° DO - T«.Ol 
M88S8J men or IOUZ) 
86261 l x 2217 i day) 





MIDLANDS 


SOMERSET 

Unique Opportnaiij. 

horn* on «dar of vBn. 
5 bedrooms, 4 bubrooms. 3 
roreputa. Many taiunaL fea- 
tures . AH md^gfatM 1 me 
Banin with 

OFFERS OVER £196,000. 
PHONE <*»«) 84462. 


UNIQUE WMC of a lam Oecr 
9““» country house m u» own 
grouiwv Ranoramlc views over 
Mend nre. EquicUstanct to mUn 
l£ww». Bath. Mens. Prfvm, 
Udn*. J an. 2 mm., lux 
warn, stable* comenro to 
darkroom ofncMIudlo. work, 
•hop. ETSjioO Full detain - 
on requnL Td.Temc*? 
Cloud < OMti 02126 HQ am 

w/fniB. 


SWMAM Lam luxury hone 
compnstng a beds. 2 baths. 3 
fww. to? known * amtrie 
we- m oioet comcuamuna mo 
uon lOiumel vlewsx l acre 
sarden wun tern terrace. 2 
greenhouses & sine Sro. village 
seutno 20 mm drier Bra 
to*/ IO mtns MO. l ull C.H Only 
£149.300 Tek-OSS 484 21 IS 


towme in sopwfe doc order 

t»3flrs. VofsaSoKcamin- 

eorpoTOng 2 lawp* W, 3 
teas, 3rd recwMth ted, 
stady/5th bed, ostium, 
cfcnn. uhflty arm. Stfl feag 
gdn- Dow ago. £129.950 
Taylor Decon Porter 
541 1828 


SMHKY/SUSSEX BORDERS A 
.umuue nenod. prop, la hwbm 
dw Kanin. cine IWm inf. 
SH In beautiful gdn, Ott 
dur— g home own fnraac. 
arcomm. ibrousboul comora 
bn spacious drawing rra. 
dtnia« na. suaeroidt. cuerm a 3 
Ped t rps rsotn en suMel Goe + 
-vaneos mahaUdBaes. fod en. 
Easy distanc e to Lo ndon. Often 

*[OOTd £200X00 FH 

Telri 06909 71300 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 


’ A S A A ! ) F ! S ! . N .) R I ; > 
Oh MARHH.Li A 


‘A Model of 
Gracious Elegance 

C asas ddSefioriD means s 

“DweJfingsfarthe 

Connoisseur .and, located in / Vjl 
fhe heart of MarbeDa's most fig 

exclusive area-this to exactly V I \Z 

what they are. The 175 two and i p k u 
three-bearoonj apartments axe A 

built on three levek. w 




SURREY 





is described as “an exerdsefn 
gracious Eving ’’-come andsee for yoursdf. 

i-N V I T A T I 0 N 

'ibu are cordially iiwied io a pfesemation o) Casas del 
Setono de liarbeiia to he held at 30 Pavilion Road. 
LondonSWJ (behind Hatreds), on Wednesday 24th 
Setuemcer. between 11.30am and 700o m The 
devetopers and <£ieca« ol Faicasol «nV te present to 
neJpyojwrtti iurther information 


!FINCfl50Ll 


3 bed. Gwnjhn style own house, 
dewad posfflm. dose town cen- 
tre. Sfwrt MQfk (10 mart to BR 
CD rams to efly). Excellent dec 
orOar. GCH. sptemM views. 
Smal.jnita gartfen. rtepral ga- 
ngi. Cul-de-sac postal. 


oijm. 

IHJf-KfrWM. 


£ 


CORBMDOE, NorUtumbertand. 
Finely restored. Sbcd Hone Vic. 
lonan house o\ ttlooUng me 
£69.500. Td 0434 72360. 

M. NORTHUMBRIA Trad Del. 3 
bed cHiagc by stream. SFCH. 
oulbuHdings. garage, to? gdn. 
£40.000 Tet 06976 477 


NORTH WEST 


CUMBRIA 

DALES NATIONAL PARK 
NEAR SEDBERGH 


nuooMB west mwa too 
yds sea. dose in vtt age. ardu 

lid dagsM bungalow. \ 
badr o oma. urge Wkmsi/- 
MtiMiu room, dining room, 
seldom lounge, sub room, ga- 
DO. separate brick garage., 
sertuded west facing garden. 
£94.000. TaL- Ol 889 2920 Or 
0544 425020. 


For colour bracburewrffr ax 
FlMBMlLtL, 

18 ten Smtk Magfalc. 
Loodoa W1X7FJ 

01-499 61871491 1670 

Id: 072226*44 
IUok 477517 WTSG 


COSTA CAUDA & LA MANGA 

EXCLUSIVE TO SUNRISE 

LA MANGA PROPERTIES ARE SITUATED: 

10 yards from fee beach 

2 |od Hoang Atm 0*571 

3 Sod Mnitne - mm 

COSTA CAUDA SAN PEDRO 

3 Bad QnOn fttxo 0*000 


.flow 0*571 
From Z 22 JQ 0 


2 Bad Houaaa- 

3 Bod Houns. 


-Add 0*BM 
-From C3*aos 


K ALSO HUE MR PROPERTIES n toe VftLA lUltra 



San* PtocB. 4448 Magdalen SnoL Nonvfch, NR3 ue 

& CM3 B1 5692/81 1221 /63Z379 


* tod hnrtmuSB wtt Jaw Mfchen, 
bgmmm. so n# loom, anog/u* 
ity &'onMsto$ dufcs. 3 w vflti 
Mbtogt ncideg 2 bams 6 
usoWe gnvw feting 

£125,000 

r Tet 0587 20731"" : 


£7%500 fwtiofcL 
Tat 073 781 2799 
or 01 881 3985 


SL£ OF MAH. Large detached 
house 4 beets. 3 receps. Plus 
nearly new 2 Md house and 8 


arres or land Magnhiceni 
Slews riBO.OOO. 061 439 

4009 or 0624 73848. 
AU.ERTOK Lnccwool. 3 Bed. R. 
Mnl Gas 04 mod Btch. morn 
/2 eiu nnt. sun lounge, gar- 
dens. garage, sen WC B/r T*t 
061 427 I 706. £38.950. 
■UimniL usied stone cottagr. 
nr Brome ctry 8 Dales, soaoous 
rm of cnararier. 3 beds, open 
slews £42.000.(0282)868040 
CHESS WELL. Northumberland 
Stone Buut Country Cottage. 3 
Beds. Views, CH. £29.000 
Tel Morpeth 0670 861273. 


OXFORDSHIRE 


BEIWE8I BANBURY AW) 
DWM6 MORTON. 
Stona^udi penod hone « 7h 
acres ol gardens sad grounds. In- 
dudra tan targe nNy-saockad 
Trout okas. Entrance ha*. Cloak- 
room. Damg room. Drawing 
room. Stomg room. Gsden room. 
Uroe tarmtioiise kitchen «Mh otf- 
tared Aga. Uttfity and various 
daRwstttgfCus.tfey oaBange.6 
hedroomL 3 tatfrooms. Storage 
lor 4 cn. Mdfloiul 100 It same 
outufthna E55JM0. Freehold. 
Sole agents. 

01 >493 8222 

Wimbledon IfflipSWU 


Attractive Character House 
with Inge South taring Bar- 
den. 1 mte lown ft mLs. 4 
Beds. EXbss Rm, 2 Baths, 4 
Bee Rooms, 3 Gges. Swrt- 
ftHig pool. Half acre. 

£246,000. 

Cubitt & West. 

(0483) 00665. 


WBST BYFLKCr Mod Georgian 
style 1 detached 4 bed house. 6 
nuns shops and BR. 36 mlm 
Walerloo. Nr golf course. 2«fl 
delightful sunny lounge, sep 
dimng rm. ataynn. luxury mud 
good sard kitchen, cloakroom, 
bauiroom. Gas CH. L0« Seclud- 
ed gdn DMe garage £138.700. 
Tel: Byfleet <093231 4879a 


nUMue* casae Street. Comer 
\auon area. Luxury Qr9 floor 
rial. 1.300 square foot. 2 
reread. 2 beds. 2 bans. FUOy 
filled kitchen, including ITldge. 
freezer. dMlwashcr. Fully car- 
paled. GCH. aose w BR. 99 yr 
leasr Immediafe p nmirrfon . 
£90000. Tel: <09831 314111 


WALES 


CARDIFF, LLANDAFF 


|H,TI|!3 | ji , .'Wrii 3:. 


3 tab town hots* 

Exet wwo drwto prnenL 
Owner transferred itrad. 
nut sen. 



COWHAM 3 bed. 5 reccas. charao 
ler detached house modem 
k ilrhen. new baUiroom. Cos 
CH. SertudM south facing gar- 
den. £149.000. Td- Coohaa 
66109 



DEAL WITH THE SPECIALISTS 

UK Agmts for ail Mr fmhpn fe 

SOUTH TENERIFE 

Large selection of both new and re-sale properties 
from £16.000 upwards. 

Apartmems to let. Flights, finance. Car Hire. 
Travel Insurance. 

Write or phone for brochure or see us on 
STAND 39, HOMES OVERSEAS EXHIBITION. 
TOPAZ PROPERTIES TENERIFE LTD. 

4 Qoeeos Avenue. »— i-r E. Sussex. 

Tab (0414) 424008 


Hwhft E. Sumo. 
4008 $4 boon) 


CASAS YOHR HOME M THE SUN 

^ NEW PROPBniESM SPAM -COSTA IS. SOL 
MARBaiA — FU8U0 BANDS — ESTEPONA 

Apannwm/VUas/Town Itou aa i wilnhli 
cctiaCIa & Mn Q3 000 up to £150.000 (Frwehoid) 
fcSANA Free insp ect i o n ftgto lo purchasara. • 

Mortgage fealties avafafcle. Buyers - 
Isgg aid finandai ngtiu ftjfly puimi d. 

Pfeasa contact: Casw-Espwta Lid.. Concorde House, 

43a High SL Bartjngskfe. Hord, 

Essex fee 2AO Tet pi) 551 8825/6884 


APARTMENTS FROM £33,000 
VILLAS FROM £60,000 


-A / i f etime o f luxu r v_ 
[•>] for a * 


m o m ent 's go o d s e n s e 




HENLEY Op Thames Victorian I guLDTOItO Bungalow. 4 beds. 


mM 


Humberts 


S/O CtaW (own cmBe/staboo. 
4 be dr oom s . 2 bathroom. 2 re- 
rrpoon*. large kitchen 
breakfast room. +• uulHy. Se- 
rfuded garden. GCH £ 120,000 
ono Tel Homey 10491 1 577942 
7 675088 


2 mens. 2 batte. Immaculate 
in rough o« m pnvatcrqad .se- 
eluded Don non Omy £i36.ooo 
Immediate pus s iMinw T H : 
Cuiidford 31842 or 606313 


OXFORDSMBtE MarSon St 
Lawrence Banbury 08 mum. 
Brarklev 6 miles. Fine renovat- 
ed XVII ur centfvy lisfed stone 
farmhouse complelely seclud- 
ed and gkmously siluflled m 
unworn countryside w® Car 
umnlerrupied news to the 
South a reception room*, 
kj ir hen /breakfast room. ce«ar 
. 7 bedrooms. 3 bamrooms. On 

im rteaimg Stables Garagmg 
and outbuildfngs. I l e a led swim- 
nw no pool Cardens and 
paddocks About 3.5 acres. 
£270.000 Lane Fo* and Ban- 
ners with Ry lands. Banbury, 
lei 10096) 710592 SaUQs. 
Banbury, tel: i0295l 3636 
WMMMUHL OXOSL Midway 
Oxiord Henley Charming 4 bed 
Village house £139.500. Tel 
Vernon & Son 0491 S7S67 



1 




SCOTLAND 


BLACKFORD S Win Gfeneoglm. 6 
API trad Semi-Del. 1 villa. C.H. 
ruled Knmen. Oarage. 0.0 
£42.500 Tel 076 482 430. 
CHARMING period lerraced 
home Near SI- *“*£"* * 
beds, lounge- httchen- baBi. CH 
Around C29.O0O 033331 1027 
FOCHABERS Spcyskhr. aimrrtor 
luxury 3 oed bungalow. Jge ga 
rage. CH. oouble 
Around £53.750 0&42S-217 





ss 


m THE RIGHT AREA... Just 30 minutes from 
, Gibraltar on the road lo fashionable Marbclla. 
THE RIGHT CHOICE... An apartment? 
q Purf>loCameloi is ibe place. 1^,3 bednxMns 
m 3 in landscaped gardens around swimming pools 
with views over the sea. A town house? Go for 
Paeblo Placido. Hie 2 or 3 bedroom patio homes are 
a stroll away Irom the beach. A luxury villa? Choose 
from a selection of styles and designs. We then build 
to your specification. 

LOCAL EXPERTISE... Homes at LOS 
HIDALGOS are sold through Fincasol limited, 
established experts in Spanish property. 

SPORTING FACHJTV bS... A tennis ciub, 
swimming pools, and a planned bowling green. Golf 
courses ore within easy reach. 

COMPLETE SECURITY... Entry lo LOS 
HIDALGOS is via a guard house which is manned 
24 hours a day. 

THE RIGHT PRICE... Based on today's rates, 
apartments from £33,000. Town houses from 
£55,000. And villas from £60,000. 

LOS HIDALGOS— it's probably the best investment 
youll ever make. 

Further details from: 

llllflalAlwJl Fincasol Ltd, ReC T9/B6 
4 Bridge Street, Salisbury, 
Wiltshire SPl 2LX- 

L, Telephone: 0722 26444 

*" W Telex: 477517 WTS.G. 




rmrm 


MAHON, MENORCA 

Luxury apartment 4 dou- 
ble bed* 3 ba throom s 1 
en suite, large modem 
kitchen, dining area, 
long drawing room, sep- 
arate dining room, 2 
balconies. Ffte vrew of 
harbour. FuJty furnished 
£70.000; unfurnished 
£65,000. Coloured 
brochure tet: 

0252 722 251. I 



PARQUE SANTIAGO 
IN SOUTH 
TENERIFE 


(Ptaya de las Americas) 

Your MMtan *Ba * sartmot in 
fto faint, fastest dndogiag 
touE&czneofSiMniina 


* re fareres and suras to tat you 
feve Be a vStem - vtan fat 
tamptobecnzeoMl 
Paqou Srtago oflss bp note! 
ralue reganlng bam* 
cofisowno, seretES and 
qoa^/Bdct More ttao SB British 
braies Inc abody ImuoM Ihev 
propertn in ftrane Sadoga 
For tall Heataia* gife or ptare to 
Ik. UUm Oondu* Tett Sue 
(UK)LHZ6GoodgBSt, 

London WIPIFG. 

Tet 01-63) 5047 




A^nj«of OtracH CfepoERioa 

f AaopportBfissyto 



.■BolN 



RENTALS 


Quraishi 
Constantine 



SPAIN CYPRUS 



SATURDAY 20th SEPT. I SUNDAY 2 1 it SEPT 


11.30 am— 530 pm 
NOKETHCfTLE HOTEL 
WATFORD ROAD, 

ST. ALBANS 


0562 885181 


Beaches International Property Ltd., 3/4 TYie Mews, 
Hagjey HaH,Stomfaridge, West Midlands DY9 9LQ. 



2 70 Earls Court Rd, SW5. 01-244 735 3, 

Hampton & Sons 


FURNISHED RENTALS 

„ w fnBBET, UWBN VI SUUUE nVEET, UM swi 

Tsp Boor raHntto dura to BreWqt Squn. drav* Superuy tooted brand now tats n mU nantaKd 
pj "Hft ta liwa md y.,3 tafcnaroS tatefen. bnumg. Douta racantM room. 3 dot** bedrooms. 
Stpmtt WC Rod tmace £ gnpe. U50 pa. 2 battrooms and M* teed Wctwi m» pw. 

1*96 MM, tOV SWI WttM KVS VEST, UM SV7 

ppcogfe Itt mMts m p enod tytQnfl te—E afec- Ctarri«toiwi« tan^ bouse n new 

v2 bedroom tbts. Sane mth terraces. bedrooms. 2 tnthrooms. fiatcony and garaoe. 

Tram ta* pm. Rm BOB pa. 

A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 


6 Axiington Street, London SW1A 1RB 


01-493 8222 




SufaEtaraiH 7 %un am reqgfeed. 

Reply to BOX AM. 


FRANCE 


CAFCAM. i Ion. Monte Carto 18 
km. Nice. Magotncent 2 beds- 2 
MU nenilKMar wtm fioa 
re cep. balcony and Mr terrace. 
Unm-cUM Hm on (he Rul 
era. Area: lS6sm / 1 700 so ft 
also mauls room and ggrage. 
iJBSOOOO Irancs 

/approxXi 83.000. TM.01 731 
2XBI. 


num conir azure. 9 kms 

Sir Mum. 14 km» St Trass. 
exreCem rang? of audios span 
menla and ueu. Excfitog 
development In (yokal Pixy 
veocr rttege. swrnimtog pool 
etc. Prices from £28000. Col- 
our broctiure from Sbbwm 
O eraeas. 2 EaHgaie. Lincoln. 
Tel: 10622) 4 4444. 




Freepost BSG66 
(no stamp raqured) 
Ttnrrtuy 
Brutal 8S12 2BR 


Horner Hill 



LIMITED- 


INCORPORATING 


RENTALS 


BRUCE 





COSTA BIANCA. VBbs S bung*- 
lows. Beacb front * roland 
seuatora. LtwsuaBy good Wbe. 
Frestptd. from C15/B0 
Write to: 

FREEPOST, 
SOUTHAMPTON 
SOS 1BE 
or telephone: 
(0703) 558910 


BEST SELECTION OF ONE BEDROOM FLATS 

ROYAL AVB8IE, SWL Lnwer Ground floor ttatwNch hn|ust 
ben redecorated. Good sized bedroom. Bathroom, Sitting 
Rm ft ML £145pw. 

CADOGAH SQUARE. 3 x 1 Bedroom flats consfeUng oi Sltflng 
Rm, Becfcoom. Bathroom A Kitchen. Prices from £175pw. 
COURTFELO ROAD. SW7. Attractive 1 Befroom flat newly 
decorated. SHmg An. Kitchen & Bathroom. £185pw. 
BRAMHAH GARDENS, 8W5. Smal but attaedve Bat wBh 
good Rtad Nfchen. Reception Room, DMe Bedroom. E150pw. 


? A 


SANTA POLA 

COSTA BUNCA 

Unspofe. ftaWng vtfege, 10 ffHn- 
utta nkpen. Tcp qu*tr 


'titter- 


5TA"E AGENTS 



Fulham 
01-736 5503 


m 


w 


bettroomed rurnHbed apan- 
raeoi «n block- 5 nttns from 
beacn. tow outootags. £23.000. 
th Ol 802 1661 tdayttzne) 01 
866 4662 <cvea> 


aaU; 






Putnev 
01-789 5004 



f7T‘1 Anscombe 

• f iJjJ & Ring land 

Residential Lettings 

' M<K 


Q 1 1 AM.'. 


MALVEMS 


Rentals 




m- 


MALTA 


Laondry room, siafr house, cos - 
md ttnw. swlmmfng pool, 
icnnlt court, hnmacnistc gw- 




PORTUGAL 


I Nil I U 


i'T>rnia-i 


The earn for propgrtir to 
Alganre. 

Examine cnotce of laid, tarns 
ft* cdrtWSwrt. buy vtas. ia- 
vestments and adwx. Ore hdy 
qmtted. bqfsb/ Poragese 
teen amH you. ContM Jeai any 
Mmon 1070687932 or Beryl 
on 0708 385001. 


CANARY ISLANDS 




CUIH. S Tenerife Apartments 
& \Utot Itom C 13.960. 10 rains 
front Die airoorl. exfeUenl raefl- 
UHs ie. MacMmils-bowis- 
rtomg -2 gar counec ang much 
more. Tel: (24 his* or 021-643 
7(325 or 01-938 881* 
TWBK UUTK The bcH ot- 
ifloomeots on San Hlgtiri Coif 
Course os rr too lung sea. or so- 
pern grenmias by Kurt xgnrod. 
ntUarenl lo new Marina, nr Las 
Amtheas. TH Oran Sot Proger- 

UM 10772) 26807 <24 Rfl! 

ABOPA mrmbfr Free braoture 


GEORGE KNIGHT 

1 he Letting Agent 





dtJto bareocaa* lg recept wtah tfeihiB area, ut with eH macta. 
and bath. Aval now for CO tot 8t £200 pw nsg. 
WRBToa WIML swx Good 2 bad flat to knights- 
BTODG£ On tha 3rd * with recap. Ut and. twthroom. Aval now 
tor long eo- tot ai £200 pw neg. 


01-589 8122 || 

GHESTERTONS 

^ — R ESIDENTI A L 


LITTLE VENICE, 

V9 

Bncattont newly lumiatied 
Bat in wfiNe stucco fronted 
hse. Begam recap room, 2 
dbte beds, 2 baths, dfrtoig 
nti/3rd bad. £325 p.w. 

LlOto Vanfen Offlce: 


4*4 




5 




01-370 4329 




MARLER & MARLER 


-629 6604-^ 

barnard 

marcus 

IE 


Bright 1st end 2nd floor 
mafe o ortte in Chelsea. 2 
beds, reception, kitchen, 

bathroom. £350 p.w. 


Charming flat situated 
in the heart of Chel- 
sea. Bed, recaption, 
kitchen, bathroom. 
£130 p.w. 



SWITZERLAND 


rw swrae swcuusts con- 
Ptou range of prope rti es w nv*r 
60 whiter/ warmer retorts. 
vernier. VlUws. lake Lurenw. 
Bernese Otwrtana etc Canaei 
HUaiy Sew progeny. 422 up- 
on- rnmiMna dm whl 

Undm SWI 4. Tec 01-876 



ST JOHNS WOOD 

luxury 1 bad Rat in pottered 
block. Magnificent was. FiAy 
Irenrehad. Communal pantons, 
1 mode from Lads & 
Undcroroa ud . 

£140 pw 

01-289 2095 (T) 


E Plaza Estates 


SUflKCSTEI TCE, W2 

Radiy stuuaig dtraraodem 4th 
lb ft* 2 bads, bsnnrth penm. 
reap. IV rm. Uehan. long let 
£250 pw 

MMTMfl HEWS sn, in 

Lowly comfomta totto bouse 
on 2 fas. 3 tab. bath. d*. raoep. 
W. gge. Loop M. £22S pw 

01-724 3100 




Staying m London, on holiday or on business, 
short or tong term, whatever your requirements, 
Regalmera can help you find a home from home. 

Teh 01-289 2095 

5 Chippenham Mews, Maida Vale 
London W9 


EWGAPP 


The Pruperti Manapc'rs 
01-221 XX 


“W34 











































































AH ctejiftal advcmseroem* 
cm be accepted by utephone 1 
Incept Aniraanccmaiis). The 
deadline is 5.00pm 2 days prior 
to pubtkalion (ir iOOpm Mon- 
day for Wednesday). Should, 
you wish w send an adventse- 
mem in writing please include 
year daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. ir you law: my 
owns or problem s relating to 
your advemsaneM once it has 
appeared. please contact our 
Cusocncr Serv ices Depart ment 
by tdcpbooc on 01-451 4100. 


SERVICES 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 



LOVE AT ritBfT SIGHT Has U 
iwounnnl id you? If your story 
rmidrkdMc. siramr or unusu 
a»v BBC TV k making a '40 
MmuirV dorumrdUry film od 

mis tuDirn and H you can hrtp 

us Mr would Knr in hoar from 
)«■ write lo jean NUrf -inane. 
PRC TV. Room 2071 KMang 
Inn HOUW. Richmond Way. 
London tel a OAK 

PLEASE HELP Thr National Be 
nevulenl r nno tor llir Aqro lo 
provide 'TENS' mxhum lor 
i hr rriH-f u pain in rondUKma 
like diuiMiis WjO buys a ma 
rhino Dona lions plnasr U) Thr 
\ nrouni Tonvpanoy. Chair 
man ISBTA. 36. Nom Broad St.. 
London CC2M INH 

EHCLANDER WALTER. PHUJP 
horn 1907. son ol John En 
qljiwh-i and Louna Johnson, 
ptoav ronlart your daughter. 
Ptn.Hr. Englander Soencer. 
5710 Orirotl Avenue. Dearborn 
Hnghls. Michigan 48126 or 
Trt lilSi SOS 8910 

KAN IS SIXTEEN. IW» Down's 
Svndronx* and In mm hostel 
She iww a family of nrr awn 
Hrtp B-IAT find Mr am wllli 
vow donaiKHi lo Roam 21. Bnl i 
Mi Awnnn (or Adoption and 
rostrnnu. 1 1 Southwark 
Stmrt. London SEI IRQ 

MOTH To Jan anti Alfred. a girl. 
Knnunlv Ann. tab Eoz. at 9 OB 
am on wflnwm 10 th. 1960 
Second «rdndrhild k> Pran and 
Bernard Smith and a inter to 
.Owdva 

BRITISH HumamsX Am. t Reg 
Charity. Non rrlignous luiwral 
nook C2 from BHA 15 Prince ot 
team Terr . W8. 

E HTREPR EHEUR I mn In Brlllfh 
Museum calc earlier mn year, 
please rcmlart ILW. Box BAA 


BIRTHDAYS 


TO MICHAEL. Hate a trail- won 
dPTlid Birthday. Ail my lose 
always. Belinda m. 


FOR A REGULAR part-time 
Home Cksminq Service by cell 
■ih le daily helps ceniral areas - 
dou'i delay another day pnonc 
A raho Continental < CMP AGV l 
on OL 730 81 as now t2A HRSk 
CAPITAL CVs prepare nign ouall 
Is rumrumm vii*m. Ol-eC7 
7905 

CALIBRE CVS Ud profcssttmai 
curriculum time documents. 
Details: Ol 65) 5388. 
MARRtACE A ADVICE Bureau 
Kamorliie Allen ten Imem Of 
lieei personal Inlerv iews.7 
Sedlev PI. tel. 01 499 2556- 
HEM FISHER IKTROPUCnOrt* 
•iendS. A E 14 Beauehamp FI. 
SteS Ol 367 aCMEws Bird. 
Ol 504 4i42. Hetti turrets rate- 
Men KteS in Weal demand 
PERSIAN ORIENTAL & an oilier 
riKhreuaned Personal Serv ice. 
CaH anv lime. 01 3 49 9078 
PARTY WITH A DEFERENCE 
Travel. Wine. Dtne and Dance 
on our eteoant. old-world Oiwnl- 
tna. Tor pen ale parlies Df 22 
Call 01 567 6083. 

RUSSIAN. FRENCH. UHln. En- 
glish language A (Denature 
tuition to aH levels by experi- 
enced graduate ci 743-8886 
PUBLIC SPEAKI HR COACHMC 
<s Speech writing by award 
winning Public Speaker 01-451 
2342 

FRIENDSHIP. Line or Manage. 
All AW areas. Dateline. Dest 
■Qibi 23 AHngdon Road. Lon- 
don W8 Tel 01-938 1011. 
BREAKAWAY. London's club for 
profrvnonal unalwMrned people 
3 3-43. Over 200 events tnanlh- 
ly 34 hr into Upe. 997 7994. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


CONVEYANCING by fully quali- 
fied soimion L180 + VAT and 
standard disbursements ITA9 
0244 319398 

U5 VIM MATTERS E S Cudeon 
LS lawyer 17 BuMrode SI. 
London Wl OI 486 0813. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP FREE 

rredil ovn l year lAPfl Ohi 
Low interest rates over 2 years 
i APR 9S‘.i & 3 years (APR 
12 2 -v.i Written quotations, 
rrce Catalogue 30a Higngaie 
Road. N W5 Ol 267 7671 
2 BEAUTIFUL Bernstein Crands. 
musicians instruments, good 
price for quick sale 586 4981 
GRAND PIANO 80 6". 

teinkemiann r 1910 in rae- 
wood C9SO Ol 693 1562 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


rentals 


SNOOKER TABUS brand new. 
stair bed Full sue 0500. *• 
sue C476. H «n? £175. 0793 
616096/610900 anytime. 


FOR HER 


FUt COAT Fim length Canadian 
Swurrrt me 14/16. £395. Trt 
0993 76108. Oder 6J0 pm. 


SHORT LETS 


aUBS 


HBDGE London School of 
Bridge and Club 3a Kings RtL. 
SWS 01-589 72Q1. 


FOR SALE 


WANTED 


GOOD QUALITY aniiour marble 
A pmr I he places. Trt" 01834 
2270 or wnle. M. Dagar 25. 
Sutherland Si reeL London SWI 


WANTED. Bookcases, tables, 
chairs, desks, mirrors, china 4 
yhrr «r All antique A prr 
1940 tumllure A compleie con- 
tents at homes bought, OI 228 
2716/585 0148 anytime. 



A BOX AT THE 
ALBERT HALL 

SOUGHT BY LEADING 


Any company or 
individual interested in 
seJbng a wed located 
box at die RAH is 
invited to contact 
BOX J47 


SCFTZMBCffSIMN SONG ! Last 
lew day* ot unbelievable 
price often at Tops T VI Ir 
£25. Vidros Ir £S0rtC. 91 Low- 
er stoane St. SWt. 7308933 


BfHGHTS Of NCTTLEBED Chip- 
pendale and Sheraton style 
dining furniture made to order 
Over 50 dnung suites always, 
available for immediate deth 
rrv Net i (coed, near Hentey on 
Thames i(M91i 641115. 
Bournemouth <02021 293580. 
Topsnam. Devon 1039287) 
7443. Berkeley. Gtos <04531 
810952 

FINEST quality wool carpets. At 
trade prices and under, also 
available 100's extra. Large 
room SJO remnants under half I 
normal pure Chancery Carpets 
Ol 406 0453. 

SCATPMDERS. Best tickets Ibr 
all sold-oui events. Our diems 
include most malar companies. 
Credit rams accepted. 01-828 
1678. 

SNOOKER TABLE: Pull size ma- 
hogany. a heav y octagonal legs, 
rirra 1890 by Burrodgnes A 
Walls: superb condition 

£2.995. 01 404 0801 

THE TIMES 1743-1985. Other 
biles avail. Hand bound ready 
for presentation also 

"Sundays" £1250. Remember 

. When. 01 688 6323. 

TICKETS FOR ANT EVENT, Cats. 
Start iqnt Exp. Chen. Les Mis- 
All Ihealre and sporu. 

Trt 8216616/8280496. 

A Ex / Vm / Diners. 

COPIERS Latest hM ecu Zoom / 
Reduction Enlargement Copiers 
from Uie Supplier at TRADE 
PRICES 01-278 6127. 

CATS. CHESS. Les MB. All the- 
atre and sport. Tel 439 1763. 
All mam- credit cds. 

FRIDGES /FREEZERS. Cookers, 
rtc Can you buy cheaper? 8 A 
S Lid. Ol 229 1947/8468. 

PIANO, Beautiful small upright. 
Superb cond£37S.Con arrange 
delivery. 01-4530148. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ENJOY A CHALLENGE 

Tran to mr f AMY Voteiury 
Commumcowns tom lo Mo m B* 
enm of a map ckum «i Re Cdy 
oi Lonagn ano wowto emergency 
Eunwyt n Aim* CoamwncaMns 
CenVK sarunfti J awn raurse n 
Hama Tefcnttone Warned by Fast 
Ad Ujd Reding Unarmed Com- 
bat and sbotnnq A» jt ihe Duke of 
York s Hejdquartcis. CMlsea f b- 
pid knguise: atu Mtame. 



•SAT IT WITH HUSC 
SAY IT WITH MARKONS 

and choose Iran hundreds al 
upright and grand pianos for 

sale or hre from only £ 16 pm. 



A BEAUTIFUL 
CORK FLOOR 

Wanders Cnrtotfast NaDnl 
Tees, lacwy seated, to* mane- 
nonce. easy lo oon. yen han) 
sewag United slacks. 

C8J5 par sq yd + VAT 

RESISTA 

CARPETS 

182 Upper RtetMNd Raid 
London SWU 

Tel: 01-876 2088 
Fra EHhntn-Eival FMhf 


ANTIQUES A 
rOLLECTABLES 


ROSENTHAL rhnvlmas plates 
1 hr lamiHis wins bv Wimbtad. 
from 1975 la 1982 Tram £90 
prr nutr Trt Ol 360 7593 

BEAUTIFUL VICTORIAN nuftttr 
In 1 -m.k n Phan or deroramr. 
■ i-alnlirallv prurd Ol 301 
SMI am tilth- 

CIGARETTE Cards Bought 
Plra-4- ranhirl te Hoad. 9 si 
Prim. Rd kirkley Loweslofl 
NR .'3 OLH 0502 87758 


CUTLERY - \ inarian Surttnq SU- 
ver 12 place srttmg £ 2 _SOO 
Trt Mr HiU 629 1201 (Ol or 
3«8 6B4 <Hl 

ROYAL DOULTON Tab>- Jugs. 
Fiqurinrs. aninulx. rH . want- 
ed OI 883 0024 
ROYAL DOULTON Carlyle China 
roUerlKMi avaHobieatlulf retail 
pure Trt 0782 519999 
TELEPHONE KIOSKS for sale. Ot 
BT A ex GPO from £100 ♦ 
VAT Trtrohnne 0o56 67226 




(1690’s-1890’s) 

■ Original " 

Beautifully Preserved * 
FROM £15.00 EACH. 

0492 - 31303 



JEWB1ERY TO SELL? 

Lonq esubtabed Umf* poMflen 
msh M puthass settnd land 
pneicty and ant me carnage 
docks K> au d io ow «anen and 
BUMESLnQ 

Write or call tamafUaacaM:- 
AHHOUH-WlltSTON LTD.. 
43 MMb tatada. 
Immb Wt. 

TdL DWS3 8937 


<£> AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

/(©] amkh aM Modem Jmn flgf *. V O Wi b . 5*» ml Plite. Rnm. 
Brames. Enamels bones, lads PHiW. Ckm. PBnenB. itocelaa. 
-ffljsi OW Dais. Ton and Teddy Dean etc. Anem a Pre »*£b 
cukes Past* ■ omw. snauta. hunm Ms. SampiBL Cat 
use jmesef*. Lace imns. ah Masone Od ramcai noms a M*n« 
jadjUotfwowSrterajMBWcin tamedaR casfl oy nun to Jentey w 
one AfhcfcB sun by post 

Ota rverf can cab ed yu dr (afl pewnsty "nMK e4*j*0*- 

Open Men - SB SOD 530 ora 

GREENS ANTIQUE GALUHE3. 117 Raa*ta(pM Chiacb SnnL UmSoo 
WS 7UL Tit 01-221 sen 



nus mmat m y*ik (3502 393139 


HOUSE HUNT1NC7 wnunq a 
book? MeanwNte live in ettann- 
Ing pengd cottage. Od CH. an 
amemUes. sleeps 4. London 1 
now. Free Ort. Eas Moon 593. 
BELGRAVIA SWI Lgr sunny 
own room with breakfast avaU 
2 weeks. £85 gw. pref female 
Trt Ol 730 5SI6 after 6 pm 
SERVICED APARTMENTS In 
kemnoton. Cot T V. 2d hr Sw. 
Telex. CoUlnqnam Apanmencs. 
01-375 6906 

WS NT Quewway, sunny one 
bedroom ground floor Oat hi 
mews iw. lux Dltirm CH. TV. 
£160 P<w 01 243 0618 
KENSINGTON Sunny Carden 
flat in Vogue MM lOunO 3 
Ddrs CSOOpw Trt 602 6941 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
mural London from £325 pw 
Ring Town Hse-APU 373 3433 
PIED A TERRE Smith Sq. SWI 
S/C serviced CH £500 oon me 
Trt Ol 665 7288/222 1833 


FLATSHARE 


ANIMALS & BIRDS 


LABRADOR PUPPIES tl yellow 
hilrti A 3 Mack dogs) Excellent 
pedMirr KC rrg. 1 st racruu 
lion given Ready now From 
tl 35. Trt Wentworth 2359. 

■OXER NP Brlnqir Male NC 
Reg Lively and affectionate. 
Cl 9b Tel Ol 429 2372. 

RARE RAG DOU. KITTENS (or 
sale Very affectionate. Pel and 
snow Trt:341 *707 leves) 


H I CHOATE NC Wanted 2 female 
profesamnats. n/s lo share 4 
bedroomed ilal won 2 other fe- 
males. £40 pw exciuuve. Near 
10 lube. Trt 265 7799 after 7 
pm. 


EALDNt nror. female to share 
luxury s/r flat, daw lube. o/r. 
r/h. parking. Available October 
£48pw. Tel. 0789 720367 


WANTED 2 spare bedrooms In 
luxury Central Loudon flat/ 
house, we are 2 anil F who cm 
conirtbule Cl 10 pw towards 
your reol/mongagr Phone 
286 0780 evenings. 

CA MBER WELL. SEfa Com city . 
to/end. Lge dMe room in CH 
house, garden. M/F. n/s. £150 
single. £110 ea. double excl 
pern. Tel -708 2609. 

CLAPHAM 1 * 11 . Top floor, 
family house, d/bed. bath. 
£250 pem uva. prof. n/s. young 
cwnle.idayiOl 584-9293. level 
Ol 22S 7279. 

CDmjEMAN 3S requires own 
room in warm comfortable cen- 
tral London flat 4 months only. 
Win pay £240 pan Inc Reply to 
BOX B73 . 

PROP city female J24 requires 
own room in socUMe nixed 
house/fiat either in W9 or 
NW 8 Coniacl Caroline day 256 
1425/ eva 586 5176. 

RICHMOND. Nr SUtkffl. lux stai 
Me accom. nberowave. Of. 
lined kiL cpts etc. £205 PCM 
inti aH bills 948 1449 ev es. 

STRCATHAM HILL - 16 mins Vtc- 
lona. ch. flaL 1 rm avail. SuU 
couple. Prrf. non smokers. 
£100 each D.c.m. excL Tel : Ol 
769 2823 

BEAUTIFUL BELGRAVIA, luxu- 
noiB apartment, own room. 
SuU prof female non smoker 
£110 pr week let 2364648 

CHELSEA Prof m/r 22 + lo share 
flat with 2 others. Small rro. 
£62 pw excl Tel: 0494 
786147. 

FLATMATES Selective Sharing. 

PHe let tor appt: 01-689 &*9i. 
313 RmsHn Road. SWJ 

2 GIRLS required to snare house, 
own roooL Comers Crecn. 
£144 pan + dcoasd. exclusive 
Trt 458 8703 

HENDON prof M/F. own roam. 
fu/L ‘ 


£50 pw lor. TeL 01-203 6402 
after 7 pm 

MARIA VALE wBh 2 others. Mid- 
late 20 s Non-smoker is Ideal. 
Option of own Bathroom. £60 
pw. 289 6126 after 7 pm. 
PARSONS GREEN SWS Prof. F. 
to snare house with garden. 
O/R CH. near lube. £160 pem 
Trt: 01 736 5931 
RAINES Park, young prof person 
to share tae. O/R. CH. mod kiL 
gdn. nr BR £220 pem bur. Ol 
541 8391 Day/543 2376 Eves. 
SW 1 S M/F. N/S. to share flat 
wiin 1 other. O/R. Nr Tube / 
BR £150 pem Excl. Tel: 01- 
8706361 

TOOIMGnr lube tTotn 2 S Oct 2 
smote rms for n/s In lux c/h Si 
flat. £170/ £180 pem 1 BCL Tel: 
01 767 5306 after 7 pm. 
BALMAIN Prof M/F. N/S. O/R In 
lux flat with Gdn. Nr BR A time 
£40 pw Excl. Trt: OI 6750799 
BARONS COURT 2 male req to 
stir rm in large flaL Ouse tube. 
£37 pw 735 9067 IrveM. 
SWI. Prof M/F N/S to shr mixed 
ilal £ 1 B 6 p.cjnl Telephone Ol- 
B54 6003. 

SWS Young prof f to share flaL 
O/R. an amenities. £185 pem 
excl 831 77650. 671 7239 H. 
SWS- M share large mansion flaL 
O/R. 23*. Prrf N/S £58 pw 
mcl. Ol 373 9208 After 5pm 
SWS - 3rd person to share toe flat 
O/r E52pw. excl. Trt ; 256 
8276(0>/381 1318 'alter 6 pm) 
SW 11 Prut naan 24 plus, to share 
civilised lux dal nr. Battersea 
Pant £60 pw Trt Ol 22 B 7252 
W 2 Prof female to share large 
fUL o/r £b& pw Near Hyde 
Park and lube Trt 01 2431785 
W14 2 rooms £25 and £40 TO 
pw for 4 rath let 28* 603 4418 
IO 00 am lo 8 00 pm 
W. HAMPSTEAD- J CBjUer Hoe 
Prof W 1 28*. share warm 
cheerful hvo/r £48. 4304141 
Wll Prof M/F to share gdn mat- 
sonrtle Own lge rm £70 pw 
hid Trt Ol 2290150 (Eves) 


AUCTIONS & 
SALEROOMS 


NEALES OF NOTTINGHAM 
iOoOBI 624141. 192 MantfMM 
Road. Notnagnam. 24Ut Sent 
Autographs 1400 tots approx): 
2SUt Sept Posteana A Ephem- 
era <1.000 KBs approx fc 26 ih 
Seal Qgaretie rants, the cotter 
ton of a Lnratnyu* 
CenDrnian. probably the finest 
rotterhon offered bv auction in 
thrv country rover World War II 
1 900 lots approx) Coloured 11- 
lustraied catotogur for 3 day 
sale i £5 UK port). 



Ry direction of the Executors 
of The HtuumUf 
Mrs P E Sundeman 
de ce a sed 

TtoSccaad Safe of M CRM K 


On Wednesdaj. 1st October 

Al ibe SatertMO. 
Theatre SbecL 
Woodbndge. 

RLE R RMTI-RE. CERIMKS 
VIFTUUVRE. ENLUE1S 
lint k4 Rl fiS FI RS & 
MERISTIMj UISCELLLNEA 

f lUkifocv £2 PJJ 
Mill NOVS A FT .ETCHES 

Tk Chock Scran. 
HcdUdM NAA. 

(■jmTuu) 


AUCTIONS & 
SALEROOMS 


WARNER AUCTION ROOMS, 
imrmier 22 nd September, se- 
m-ted sains ot antique furniture, 
pm wes. cunos. glass and cm 
na. niudraied cataiague £2 
24 in September, important sate 
of alter. Augsburg Tankard. 
George n Warwick rrurt seal 
tog. apostle and Maidenhead 
spoons. Georgun gaits and sal 
vers, tea seta, am rtmro puie 
and fewrUery. nluatraied rata- 
loaurEl 16 18 Harford Street, 
Leicester. Tel 21613. 

MOROSE, 149 High Road. 
Laughton. Essex. Ol EOS 2121 
Auction of roi lectors iimts A 
Antique Furniture etc., on 2Sui 
Set*. I lam On view 20Ui Sept 
9 -4pm. 22 nd s«M 9Jpm. 23rd 
Sept 9 7am. 


PORSCHE 


1984 Nruto 944 . Burgundy 
melalllr POM. EFR. Fog and 
tool lamps. 215/60 lyres. 4 
new Canefie/coin holder. Fil- 
led rarpt-ts One owner. SSH. 
£12.750 Smith Ot 734 7244 
exr 239 flay 01 892 1439 eves. 


91L Carrara Taroa Snorts 1954 
model. Guards red. 22.000 mK 
Service reconj Reg. A911UOX 
£20.993 Trt. 0926 497634 tH) 
Of 02! 707 (Ol 


LEGAL NOTICES 


NO 26 cRLLE 58 16)1 
IN THE MATTER OF BLVDCXL 
ENGINEERING COMPANY 
LIMITED 

BN ORDER OT THE HIGH 
COURT OF JUSTICE 
Dared toe 61 R nay of November 
1986 

TA. GRIFFIN of Ortfftn and 
Partners. 6 Hobart Place. Lon 
non. swiw ohu. and mj 
LONDON of Cora Cuny Of Shelly 
How. 5 Noble Surer. London. 
LC 2 nave been appatnted JOINT 
LJOL-IDATORSi of Ihe above 
named Company without a 
Cnaumllee of tmaertton. 

Dated (hh 1 lih day oi September 
1986 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


HOT TURKEY. Spend 2 wks al 
our ktviIk Beach Hotel or cruis- 
ing on our yaern from £380 
Dens 23 or 30 SepL 01 326' 
1006 OT 01 737 3861 . <24hrsL 


ALICANTE, Faro. Malaga Mr 
Dimond Travel ATOL 1783. 
01 661 4641. Horsham 68541 

ALL US C DIES Lowest fares on 
maw scheduled earners. Ot-> 
684 7371. AST A 
HONG KONG MM, BANGKOK 
£369. Singapore £467. Other 
FE aim 01584 6614 ABTA. 
LIMAS Jerba ipackngesi. Portu- 
gal. Greece 1 Flight only) 5ep< + 
•f term. Ol 938 2366 
LOWEST FARES USA. Canada 
also discounts find and Club 
world wide. Ol 394 1642. 


High la Faldor 01-471 0047 
ATOL 1640. Accm/vua. 

STD /MEL £636 Perth £666. All 
manr ea rne rs to Aus/NZ. 01 - 
684 7371 ABTA 
L AFRICA From £465. 01-584 
7371 ABTA. 

LOW COST FUOHTS. Most Euro- 
pean destinations valexander 
01-402 4262/0052 ABTA 

61004 ATOL 1960 
TUNISIA. Perfect beartws for 
your summet- holiday. Cau for 
our brochu r e now. Tunisian 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


COSTCUTTERB ON fllglus/MB 
lo Europe. USA 5 men desum- 
tnw. Diptorpat Travel. Ol 730 
2201 ABTA IATA ATOL. 


CHEAP FUCHTS Europe World- 
* wide 041- Edge Travel: ABTA 
01-839 6033 -Ring Angle 


CHEAPEST FLiam W/7HDC - 

Ben? Travel. Trt 01 366 6414. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Wgrldwkle, 
Way market Ol 930 1366. 


DISCOUNT FARES Wertdwtde 
01-434 0734 JupUer Travel. 


U.T.C Open Sat 0755 867036. 


LOW COST rARBB to U.&A. Ma- 
lar TTan/rt. Ol 4869237. IATA. 


lAUUtA, CAHAR IC S. 01 441 
till. Tmvelwtse. ABto. AML 


MOROCCO BOUND. Regent SL 
Wl. 01 734 5307. ABTA/Atot. 


WEEKEND OR WEEKS. Honey- 

ntopw or 2 nd Hopotw/qm — 
dkcov er me Mook of nabrs ro- 
nvantic cum in Autumn or 
winter cau 01-749 7449 for 

your FREE cMMr brochure. 
M»w Of Italy 0«Pl T. 47 Shep- 
lenis Bush Green. London. 
W12 BPS 

TAKE TBHE OFF to Paris. Am- 
aerdam. Bnuaeu, Bruges. 
Geneva: Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague, Dutton. Rouen, Bou- 
logne A Dieppe Time Off 2a. 
Chester cuse. London. SW1X 
7 BO. Q1 236 8070. 

CRETE A MARBEUA Superb 
beam vtuas & apes wtut priv 
poob 01 724 7776. Puya Hall' 
days- AM 2136 


OVERLANDERS 


OVKRLAMB) ADVENTURES. Lon- 
don to Kathmandu £610. 
London to Nairobi £650. Top 
D eck TroveL Ol 373 8406. 

AUTUMN breaks La Ouasz nr 
Annecy Sew/ on Trad term 
house Cfiatrt S/C apt- 2-6 
nets. ADO ideal ski noto-Res 
Staff Trt 0242 604 130/602 
124 day: 602 776 ave. 



BLADON LINES 

FfcMoot SqrtCHber Bu^ms 
in Beach Hotel Valin ea 
SAVE £20 

00 13th. 20* and 27th 
September departure dates 

01-785 2200 

56/S8 Putney High St 
_ London SWI 5 ISF _ 
ATOL ABTA 

IZU 16723 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
stads return 
JODUO/HE E3ffi5 £480 

NxohT E275 £390 

Cara £150 £230 

Logos £240 £360 

Pd/¥om £250 £350 

Bangiok £220 £350 

DfaraJa E420 

Afro Mae Trawl Ud 
ftttics Itop a n t St Bfl 
TH; nttUsSfia 


TT iTiT3 


TRAV& WORLD 

Sound atfnos and oaOmt on 
redueng long M4 travd cobs. 
lit A eudds 03727 43559. 
Xmas to Canada. USA&graq) 
aqustL 03727 435S0 
Aust/NZ & Far East Bt 
03727 42739 

Conragad toart spamtet 

01-634 0711. 

TRAVEL W0RU1. 
ABTA 72V2. Harnhwai lw 
tasflhBa of Tmel & Tawina. 


COTSWOLDS 


•HNCHCOMBX. Autumn Break 
avail. Period character col- 
lages. ideal centra tourtng. Stas 
4-tk Trt 0242602 124/604 130 



Prinqi 

|W- SCOTUICff 


! 8 ,i Not me eneapea 

A|l taMsnme 

I ftr wgrttMM protuWy 
qKl, Or pest. Sand tor 
B Eae? FroecoQuf 

WttaeoiLadie* 
S Mens Stott 
sennef (tod Casbmeni) 

j^. WALKER 
* SONS LTD. 
Dagtsrg Whatsqan 

RaeNmad Lanes FY7 EOH 
Td 999 T74574 
IvlAlM 1659 


FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair’S 
Super Apex. 
London to 2Lurich or 
Geneva daily oncon- 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before.departure. 
Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday alteram vaJ. 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-437 9573 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


IN YUGOSLAVIA 

END OF SEASON 
BARGAINS 
- 7 dm nrifag knretaal or 
ia Hdflta 

SEPT 28 1 uric £T89 
2 wfc£ £229 

OCT 5 t wfc £179 
- 1 Rfruffiofl + &dtwdc 
ta 3 star Hotel HB. 
SEPT 28: £229 

All pnee g'teed and fully incL 


HOLIDAYS 
01-485 5515 


Araiatts October Isl - 6 mUB. 
£450 g». 

BEMFOHT ST, SW3. BrigH & 
modem 1st fir Hat mOi 2 betkns. 
kridm sitting rm, tuttm AxaL 
able now. Long ML £250 pw. 

1t7 WaUaa Stracl 
Imtm SW3 7W 
TalagBara: 11611 2211 


Quraishi 
{ Constantine 
T 7 7 Ti7TTir^* 


Dpiamc hantwytang - 25/35 - 
to (on out aiccassiu rental team. 
Enpenenee profand Dot not 
esaU. Muu &e car ones. Ap- 
ply m anbag. 

mimttOmtnamlSWS. 


01-244 7353 


NATHAN 

WILSON&CO 

S3 R08SLYN H8JL, 
LONDON NWS IfflB 

HAMPSTEAD NW3 

super modem eotm boot ia 
hnn oT village. 1 double 
bedroom, main reception. 
fludy/L*. rocm, idicbea nd 
bKMwm, HtUiiy am, gstage, 
lowly patM/gaiden. £200 p.«. 

BELSIZE PARK NW3 

chaining Edutfoa garden 
Oh otienn* 1 bedrooms. 2 
batbrnomt, atndng recqKkm 
wnh firepUce, modem 
hilcbcn (all nachion), 
Bnuuful secluded garden. 
LiTS p.». 

ST JOHNS WOOD NW 

library garden Oat unerior 
design ed ibroughaut, 3 
bt dt Ot M . 2 bad n oou u . large 
i*«Pt>«i ana wdb bridt fire 
P*»«. Off meet parfctog for 2 
taw 1*00 p. w. 

THIS t$ A SMALL 
SELECTION OF OUR 
CURRENT LtSTWCS. 

WE RECEIVE NEW 
INSTRUCTIONS DAILY. 
CALL NOW FOR 
DETAILS. 

01-794 1161 



nMuonL spacious 2 aca 
room. 2 bathroom flirt. 
ImnuK-uUlf contlluan Fully 
iurmsncfl and cquippm. Avari- 
abtr now. Rlrt* farapponument 
to view 01 947 5473. A Jrttyn 
Oohr GMrtcrcd Suevryoro 


HKHMMIY. LtqtiL bright 2 bed- 
room oat in Irtv UnM street to 
in furnished for i yw. Cosy 
tourney to city ■ Wert End. Lon- 
don Lmvmtty. riSOpw. Trt 
Ol 369 4081 or 686 0901. 


MTUtHATIOHAI. CXECVT1VEB 

Lrgnvtly require 1 flat* A bouses 
in central London from £150 to 
£2.000 pw. Please call Salty 
Owen or Lorraine Campbell on 
Ol 957 9684. 


juburm/mhob. rr you 
have ■ quality property lo M 
tot i» about ll. We offer a pro- 
fKStonal A reitaMe service 
Qumld ConstanUw 01-244 


N10. A parnmarty nice roorth 
London family ftomt*. is avail- 
able pnvaicty for letung to a 
suitable, respectable (amiQr Oh » 
company let barts. CSOOpw ntg. 
Ol 883 8699 


RUSSELL SQUARE WC1. A tafe- 
ly fully runuaned rtudto flat 
available immediately. EIOOpw 
inetuding heating. Su nmole Go 
lei or professional penan. Trt 
01-364 0428 oiler 6J0. 


LAWSON A HERMAN DUUomaAS 
4 pvmimn urgently peek 
quail iv propertie* in all central 
/West London areas- Far alien 
lion please rain 01-938 3485 


HAMPSTEAD and environs. For 
a selection of viewed and rec- 
ommendrd flata and bouses 
available for tang term KtUng in 
North London's premier darnel 
contact the specialists who can 
offer numerous nomas from 
£160 to £1 600 a week. George 
KiDrtil - The Letting Agent. 9 
Heath Street. Hampstead vil- 
lage NWS OTP. 01-794 1125. 
SLOAHE SQ toff), SWI. Luxury 
Irt fir DM fai PR Uk. ha* 2 lge 
Intercom newnn wftn baleo- 
ny. d/e beds. 3 barns, anwr rm. 
new lge kitchen/ b'ten rm an 
pew eoutpnusnL Superb new 
carnets & curtain*. Ready to 
move into. Co LM unfuni or 
furn £780 £980 pw Howard 
M tiller A Co 01-236 2832 
UPPER BERKELEY ST Wt. 
Choice or iwo superbly 
m ode rnised martoneffes com- 
prising of H l: 2 bedrooms. 2 
bathrooms, double reception. 
£400 pw FI 2-. 4/5 bedrooms. 
2 'e tauirumv. double recep- 
tion. dining - area. Must be 
viewed. 0600 pw. KalKd Lines 
A Co: 741 2102. 

CHELSCA Excellent location, sep- 
arate entrance. double 
bedroom, reception with lira 
place, fufly (Hied kitchen, 
bathroom. Immaculairiy deco- 
rated 6 furnished. Available 
now lor 6 month ML £170 pw 
Trt: 01-936-8368 EXtn: 4518 
day or 01-994-4966 eve 
»u—r ARCH loose bar) over- 
looking garden square. Rngiu 
and spacious, fuu turn 1 st and 
2nd Door mao. 3 bedroom, z 
bathrooms fl ensuitei. 2 reoeps. 
IdL Me. Available for CO Let 
Min Irt 1 year, eazs p.w. j 
Trevor and Sons. Ol 584 6162 

RIVERSIDE Furn FIN Chiswick 

Mao. Sunny spacious 2nd floor, 
spectacular River views. IS 
mim Hamms A Heathrow. Lge 
rec. study. kH. 3 Dote beds. 2 
baths, terraces. Free parking. 

• EM phone. £300 pw tac ail 
raws. Trt: OI 998 3000. 
OBLWA. Pretty 3 bed flat 
Newly decorated. dMa recep- 
tion mi. fid kitchen. 2 mod 
battvras. iul porter. CH/CHW 
Inti. £375 pw. Property Ser 
vKB 01-998 4176 
DOCKLANDS - only 2 miles from 
Central London [idly (uni 3 
bedroom family house with ga- 
rage in mod dev. Min let 1 year. 
C6GOp.c.ra inclusive. J Trevor 
and sons. Ol 584 6162 
FULHAM SW6 Available for CO 
let fully furn 3 bed famny house 
with or street parking Hi mod 
dev. Min irt I year. £260 p.w. 
inclusive. J Trevor and SonsDl 
684 6162 

HOLLAND PARK Wll available 
far Co Let (uRy fum Mews 
House. 2 bedrooms. 2 reoeps. 
ML bath, shower room, age + 
terr mm trt I year. £368 p.w. J 
Trevor and Sons. Oi 884 6i«a 
IDEAL FOR OrTY. Elegant 2 bed 
flat on Battersea Riverside Dbte 
reception, ltd kitchen, mod 
bathrm. ML porter, long let 
£160 D«v. Property Services 01- 
998 4176 

LITTLE VENICE WB. 1 mm tube 
lux 1 bed. lounge HU/dtoer. 
bath, fufly font flaL wash mac. 
eh. lei. beam Drty mainteUwd 
gdn. Co le t. £I7S pw. Tel Ol 
Z89 728T- 

WEST WBRIITWIN Unfur- 
nished modem 3 bed house. 2 
baths, double aspect reception, 
fully equipped klichen. garden, 
garage. £260 pw. Company leL 
Home from Home: 946 9447. 
ASH LOOM ESTATES specialise 
In renting A lefting in ihe West 
End & Central Londsac from 
simple studios to luxurious 
aplmentv Contact 409 CB9« CD 


nr r r n r rf. 


4 FABULOUS GARDEN 
FLATS 

2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 
large recap. Fully fined 
Mfcnen. Root gardens- Lift 
Video entryphone. GARAGE. 
Available mid S ept 
Co lets 6 mths r™i 
£800 pw 

Contact Henry: 
01-408 0880 
D HOLDINGS 


- Walton street - defightfu! 
furnished house with gdn & 
gge. 2 Recaps. 3 Beds. 2 
Baths. Co let £650pw. 

CK ASSOCIATES 
Tel: 01-235 3476 


RICHMOND, SW15 


SWt Arncrtean style apurtincnl 
with panoramic views. JJ 1 *? 
Rerep/Diner Approx ‘ 

Beds. 2 Baths it end ulieL KiL 
lop Balcony- ponereo. 
S«)pw Come* 828 8291. 


THE LOHG/SHORT LCT 6oertl»- 

kb. wpnavcalargp»eW<tiohM 

luxury lA3.e 

wiui maid service, mm* At- 
om** and ccmrattytocrtM. 
Angela Wliuams oi aee aow- 


CITY OF LOHDON (Bartncan). 
Charming sunny Z bed fulV 
furnoned fW. Company 
only. £220 P« Car Wj'™ 
available Trt Ol-COrt 1192 


HAMPSTEAD Nr Heath. Linunr 
lumtsned flat 2 bed Tnv large 
lounge, dining ana c ountry 
kitchen fully rquwited. 
£299pw. Ol 794 2789. 


HENRY • IAMB Contact anw 
on 01 236 8861 foe uie besl se- 
lemon of fundsned M) wf 
nooses lo mu tn Knto"*™™®*. 
Chetaea and KensmgHn (T) 


PUOfMNGTON/OWAL - 4 bedrtn. 

fum. tw n«r Oval lube. Ojmj 
road AvaU. imroedMirty. £79S 
D.m. ) year renewable compa- 
ny let. Trt : 01 S62 92BJ 


HMCHtSBRGMEi Lux. 9 bed 
.nxx. a pain recep/ dlmno. mod 
kitchen an machlnea. 24 now- 
parKrapp. oonasiie Hwroov 
CMC pw i nr Tel 01 J70 62SS 


WNTfB I WDBK Amazmg VM 
up. £528ow Hlghrtl cattore 1 
Bed fufly serviced fteL Clean- 
ing. Laundry TV. CH. QJW 
Incl-Aylesfard A Co 361 2383. 


BAYSWATER W2 Swwr S bed 
well furnished lux (W- S 
mm 1 yr £280 p WOtfiJ 
0404/623 4567 Douglas Terry 

■ERR A BUTCHOFF fo r lux iay 
properties in St Johns WoodJRe 
ents Park. Mtada vale. 9wh» 
con 4 Humuwl o 1-886 7861 

CHELSCA. 3rd flow « 
nal. un and Porter UOhL 
nous and quirt. CHOP** Co 
Irt. Heyeock A Co: 884 6863. 

CAima BROADWAY WS we 
luxury 3 bedim flat- 

fanutes. close M shoePbv cen 
tre. £260 PW Ol 840 4481 

ISLBSGTOH. AitracOve newly 
converted 2 bed flai..£I*qpw 
excl. VMUng pr ot rsnonah 
only. Tel: Ol 609 7989. 

CHELSEA bnmac lux bakorar 
flaL light reeep. dWebedJJfL 
porter. Long Irt. 01-622 B62S. 

CHELSCA Pretty Ont flr Turn flaL 

dbt bedim, wo. ka*- “g™; 
paved gdn. £!25pw 362 2778 

CLAPHAM /STOCK WELL Bor- 

I drre. Superb 2 Bed prooert»- 
Co Ms only. Ol -737 0639 <T>. 

CROYDEN. Double flaurt. Own 
WKhML Sun a. £65 pw. Rental 
Guide 01 686 6552 


Co. Tel: 01-242 tfi7S. 


inn STOTT 3 bedroom nt™» 
mum nr Iransporl HeaUiiA 

iSSL Garage, garden. £225 
i77W» Of 741 8294 


KUBMCIWI Suprrb furnhhed 
mjtsonrt W. 2 bv^ gyjjil 
den. OomBOW 

pw Trt:Ot-864 9747 


RK30«KN»/*Hra Diracib/ad 
wmi park A Conrmoiv 2 

bedrre nal Company LrtOnh 

£700 pem eiwl : 01-878-6762 


Ouauiy pcooefties aiaUaWeand 
req inred in aP area*- Tel. 01 
637 0821- 


CHELSCA Garden nal wWi sen 
entrance in private house near 
Ballons SWI a PJDO. 1 racp 1 
dMe bed dining arm. k/b. gM 
ch. rmdenual parkinn wntf 
a in red. 1 year nun £120 pw 
Ring Ol 362 0635 


RENTAIS 


MMhlHCTON Vet* ™*ni- htoh 
frdliW vn-lPii-" LivIHiUIv lur 

SJSSainii-1 bm-mpi.e Har 

fjw 3/4 hrtlrnnmv. J turn 

ipanrv. kilrhtil. Lmw ircrMhm 

ionm wiin rtirif I ar< rv» » 

luul qurrirt* Jy* awrits 
auiIjM' now LnOM pw Lreiq 
IMIW W pf rterled 01 727 
-raj 9 11 am or nrv OH pm 


Oman strcet, Sill SNnom 
Irtinbnhrt* house -on 4 
(hnn uuliHlllw rarpra A fur. 

■.tun lined kiichrn Dimnq 
wm C3htn> LqT Dbte Berep 2 
nKp A 2 Stole Hrth Hal non 
Eta CH Available now for 

'“" CP ^!r«r Bcnan 

Marnn 627 MW 


wgnm PARK: FUUV rrfiir. 
ne.wd Ilal m very hig h 
^Milliard I" luxury modern 
him k u-nn norieraqe lilL een- 
Ira) healing Pontile by-groom, 
kuniqe/ diniiib- kilrltefi. bate 
num hall, kurcinr £175 pw. 
Av jiLGie iminedKiwty Trt Ol- 
441 8733 


KERSINCTON 

idtnllv- homes -rtf macm^. new- 
I.- decorated. Nr Jiwrr- Duplex 
374 Oertnro A Hvu**l. dJMha 
Uudy. k/bklM ?' Mb.* 
grinv C3SO nn 1 nedfih bv- 
mg 2 hidden beds. s»ji" huge 
kTdm Cl SO mr 94* 3 70 1362 


KNKtrrsoiffOGe m nr nat m 
near Harrodv 2 
bed>. a bnlbv sludv. rrtfo 
o/moLinq pm aie garam ifceyv. 

kil all machmev. inrwiinb 

vrsirtn. and rr ^ 

Lotto LH £600 pw Goddard 4 
Snulh Trt OI 9J0 7521- 


WEST SUSSEX. Rrautifumr fur 
mvhrti pd-liirr'toue 2 Drd 
hinidr ronaor ovrt-RMkinq 
ujlrruH Convemem tor 
G.H wirk/l. on don 6/lJ monll*. 
lei in influde Ir ani ln ft»wa_and 
Uiooiinq t700pcrn Phone. 

0342 715460 





A SUPERB Hampstead Ctifipw 
taimarutate _ turn „reyenre 
■flail Large RrccP. 3 ""e- LHfv 
^ CaaCH/Low Ouiooiogs. 
Ready now 286 80*0 IT) 
CANFIELD GARDENS NW6 Al 
irartlve fully i urn «« 
bed flat. Min Irt 1 sear £200 
pw.iiKliNir J Trevor and 
■um Trt-Ol 584 0162 
fflftl 9ff4- Near Peter Jonre 
LMhl and rinui lower ground I 
bedroom flaf Avertable Orw 
Her Co Irt. Hevrocfc * Co. 584 
6863 

2 FUSNISMED exmiilve apprv 
with swimming port, gvni a 
vuihi 5 mim fotm Broniry 

ISrth Mai Km C5SO TO4. 01 

460 8618 / Ol 640 4561 
ISLINGTON 1 bed. luxur y fW - 
tomerv amcv small oardro. 
oho faring gardens, ronveaiefit 
iranvuort A cilv. £120 pw 
058081 391 

MCMHOND BUflOMlDC tamin' 
nunwn Mock ■ 2 UWe BMv! 
Rerepv Co Irt CflSOptm Con- 
lad Emma al Acuna 4 Co Ol 
948 1122. 

SWI MMUCO ■ 2 bedrooms. 2 
Dams, targe rerepUon/dtoer 
and Ml. £BbO per momfi Com- 
pany irt. nal lurmsned lo a 
nigh standard. Tel . 834 1026 
SWI PIMLICO - 2 be droom , 
large recenhon/dmino room K 
6 8. well furnished alfrnrlive 
not Company Irt- £780 p m 
Trt . 834 1026 

VISITING LONDON /FARM Altai 
Balm A Comoativ have a Urge 
srtertKm of Ham A hnuvm avail- 
able for 1 week* from C 200 pw 
499 1066. 

WARWICK AVENUE WS Mew* 
house with parade, newly deco- 
rated. 3 beds. 2 turns, fully 
niuiDped. company let £330 
pw. Trt OI 734 9566. 

WEST KEN 2 Dote Bed flailn pb 

block FT KH Louoge/Dmer. 
CH inr A Comm Grtnv Cl 75 pw. 
Benham. A Reeves 938 3522 
W U HBELDON SW19 Superior 
mod lawn Mr. 2 rers. 4 beds. 2 
oaths, mr furn/deror. gge. Co 
Let Avial now. £300 p.w Slur 
pH Ol 788 4551 
WHHPOLE ST Wl Very Urge ■? 
rereps. 4 beds) Ch pari fur 
nrthed maHanrtle to irt. Renf 
£4.500 P4 mcl. FF £4.500 ono 
Reply lo BOX BIT . 
PARLIAMENT WLL FIELDS / 
Hiqhgate Modern family house 
in quirt anraruve mews Lge 
living area. 4 beds, master me. 
shower rm. paho gdn. garage 
£820 prm Trt: 01 539 1742 or 
0246 413310 

UNFURNfSMEDL Superb Wl 
mews completely renovated. 2 
bed*, lounge. K4B. dblc garage 
PW* mote garage- wuh income 
Of £4.000 p.a. 9 yr leave Pnre 
for fix A HU £49.000. Tel: 262 
9574 For viewing. 


ROLAND QUICK 

(33 





Wl< Luxury famSy hse. 
£39S pw 

BAANES.5bcdhs&E395pw 
KCW. 4 bed hsa. £135 pw 
HAM, RICHMOND. 3 bad 
hsa. £145 pw 

KENT GARDENS. 2 bed flaL 
£135 pw 

TWICKENHAM. 2 bed flat 
£95 pw 

Tel: 01-040 4555 


BRITTON 
POOLE & BURNS 
01 581 2987 

BEAUFORT STREET, 
SWS 

Lovely FULLY/SEMI FURN 3rd 
fir ft rncanOy rofurttabed. 2 
Dbia,-| SMa Bad/Study. Racep 
Rm- Din Rm. FiAr mnd ML 
Bam A CBc £3S0pw. 




WANTED 

High Quality flats 
& houses for 
Companies. 
458 3680 
Anytime. (T). 


. MAYFAIR. Wl 

Setotton of hdty fumklMd kooil- 
Uts stadias, rtinwg n raw r 
H gpn.XMc H Gros- 
® w Sp TntM aparoiMME m 
«» ai a naely rofUfliid Uodc 
***# mrouph Handsome 
■raugm ion gates and a martned 
vwiyaid. Each apt fuBr 
egK^edtoa tunny sondard atj 
httad be deaf for sam» ««» 

** ^ Mfltw based 

Wtommodanon 

fientts H 75-0500*. 


ROTHERHTTHE. SE16 


5?*** ii* 1 J* 2 M Dm ma Kver vtaos. DMa 

howa. ? Hacap. 2 bath. dts. neap. bafb. efts, kdcbn ai ma- 


kmhan/b tostrm *tth ill mactaw. chnss, bataa es. pantai. ftce 

ss&fsi.'syr s£ass,%, H75 '" 

Anrodm suwy 3 Md 1st Ik flaL Newly refutabed nuusluu flat 2 
0«e reeep wOttefcony. tam. good beds. Z recaps, tatdm 6*. BlL 
•tatobea £350 pw. entter. pw 

MARVEEN SMITH ASSOCIATES 
01-937 9801 01-727 7957 


WYLYE WILTS Funnsbcd 2 bod old dairy «ni*)e in 
coaiuiy bouse. Real mdosivc rtf .■ B bcaiing and dconrity. 
Use of swimming pool and tennis court possible. No pets. 
Frofonmul Couple or ideal fat weekends. Initial lease one 
year. 

CHAPMANSLADE (Bafh 16 miles. Wcstfatny 3 miles). 4 
bed (touched fiirnisbod period boose. I acre garden with 
s u mming pool. 2 acre paddodc. Initial lease 6 mombs. Might 
be ouciwd lor sevenl years. 

JoUy Property Senices, Wylye, (09856) 317 



Our new Bondi M Kj* WmSSSSSS. 

MARVEEN S\EmASSOa AT F«; 
01-937 MOl/Bl-mSgA™ 



Si i, 


ROSARY GDHS, SWS 

1 st * flat * drta *««™. 1 

bathrm Mft Shwr, taaniB sB 
maefwies, reeep ire. £22S pw. 

CUIDGM SO. SWI 
tnmne rt ata maflooetto. 4 Oedr. 
3 baths. 2 recw*. read Men. 
use ol Sq 9»mea £1,500 par 


HON GRES. Wll 
Atncne 1st Ik fbt 2 tods. 1 
ban. recap. kd. £250 pw. 

CLARENDON ST, SWI 
A newly rekstaMd mas. 3 
bads. 2 bans. 1 reeep. 
ka/b tsstniL £375 fM 


ORB-EWING ASSOCIATES 


OUT THE DOCKLMDS AREA 

REsiDEirnu. 

IBi 01-7*1 







































































































































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


SPORT 


35 


OLYMPIC GAMES 


c . 

■ s 


• • t. 


m 


’ .* C^; 

1 *1 ’ W 

i V' 

I . |. " 


•■f n:?*. 


i. r 7 


* • *. »>, ;■ 
- . ~ m i< 


■i; 


BASE 

lending 

rates 


Samaranch allows his 

home city to 
state its own case 


. V 


: : -=£S? 

*.' J , *Vl 

: ^ 

- .. 

■ 

• tV. A 


U is said that Barcelona, 

regarded as favourites amonp 
six candidates to host the 1 992 

■ summer Olympic Games, are 
bound to succeed because 

. Juan Antonio Samaranch, the 
President of the International 
Olympic Committee, is him- 
*"* Barcelona man; Some 70 
of the 90-odd IOC members 

- have so far been the guests of 
Barcelona's bid committee, 
yet not one of them has been 
welcomed or seen during their 
visit by Samaranch, even on 
those occasions when he has 
been in residence. 

Samaranch's strongest 

fluence for his own city 

been his studious avoidance of 
the campaign, leaving Barce- 
lona to speak for itself - 
' something it is well able to do. 

If it wins the decision on 
■. October 17, it will not be 
: because it has bought its votes 
with a promotion budget of 
1 over $S million donated by 92 
of the city's business com- 
panies, but because, as a good 
candidate; it has not at- 
tempted to sell itself on senti- 
ment, the way Paris fajs- 
Barcelona's strength is that, in 

- making its fourth application 
to stage the first Games for 

- Spain, it has unqualified na- 
tional support - from King 
Carlos, a competitor in the 
yachting event in 1972, from 
the Prime Minister, Felipe 
Gonzales in Madrid, and from 

- the passionate population of 
' - Catalonia. 

Peter Ueberroth justifiably 
boasted the 1984 Games in 
Los Angeles were a success 
primarily on account of the 
50,000 volunteer workers. 
Pasqual Maragali, the Sodal- 
* isi Mayor of Barcelona, al- 
ready has 60,000 before the 
Games have been awarded. 

The men who matter are 

■ Maragali, the multi-hngual 
grandson of one of Spam's 
foremost poets, and two 
wealthy industrialists, Carlos 
Ferrer, an IOC member, and 

: Leopoido Rodes. To lunch in 
Rodes's impressive modem 
office, the walls hung with 
Goya, is to discover the mood 
of Barcelona's confident but 
unaggressive international- 
ism. Visitors leave convinced 
that Barcelona would, like 
' their football club, do things 
with style. 

Helicopters whist yon 
..across the city rooftops to 
show the four proposed 
. Games centres, all within a 
. 5km radius. It is an impressive 

- ‘ ride, sweeping over the Mont 

Juic hill above the harbour 


From David Miller, Barcelona 

where the panoramic old sta- 
dium built for the exhibition 
of 1929 is being totally ren- 
ovated, the projected village 
sue to the east of the harbour 
on the seafront, the football 
and equestrian area to the 
north west, and the cycling to 
the north-east 

The aerial view, however, 
conceals as much as it reveals. 
There are, I believe, three 
drawbacks to Barcelona's bid. 
Tne first is the traffic. The 
cl a im that it will be possible to 
move from one area to any of 
the other three within 20 


Last week, the perimeter 
wall was all that remained, 
like some bollowed-ont 
architectural meringue as the 
excavators busied themselves 
inside, it could become the 
world's most beautiful, and 
inaccessible, stadium. A coach 
taking us up the hill had 
difficulty making some of the 
bends and even if the traffic 
can get up and down - and 
park - it wfll take half the night 

to empty. 

Unofficial plans are afoot 
with the Internationa} Athlet- 
ics Federation to arrange for 


rnidannp of P&rc de Mer v illag e and finish of the final day’s 

to the Non Camp foS mon iimt tSwamST 


stadium could take over an 
hour unless severe restrictions 
and privileged-lane systems 
are to be imposed. 



Samaranch: mflafp re 


Secondly, the projected vil- 
is in the middle of an area 
depressing industrial decay 
and trill require the removal 
of a railway track — the first 
ever laid in Spain — which at 
present separates the town 
from the sea to the east The 
prqject is intended for comple- 
tion irrespective as to whether 
they get the Games, but I 
doubt if an ambiance of restful 
peace can be achieved among 
such concrete desolation 
within six years. 

Lastly, the main stadium, 
with its 600-foot cftm h from 
the city and limited access 
roads, presents a major head- 
ache for an 80,000 crowd, not 
to mention the marathon 
runners, beautifully sited 
though it may be. When 
Barcelona failed in its hid for 
the 1 924 Olympics, de 
Coubertin opting for a per- 
sonal swansong in Paris, the 
Mont Juic stadium was in- 
tended to be the sitefor 1936, 
when the Games went to 
Berlin on a muddled postal 
vote. Barcelona would have 
bid for 1940, and did not try 
again until 1 972, foiling a third 
time. 


morning programme, with 
folklore and musical events in 
the picturesque square at the 
foot of the bill facing the vast 
press and television cen tre s. 
But I cannot imagine how the 
crowd for that will disperse in 
time to allow the subsequent 
throngs to Clamber up the hill 
fin* the 1,500 metres final and 
the closing ceremony. 

Barcelona’s income budget 
of S667 million contains a 
likely overestimafion of $293 
million for television and 
radio contracts - likely unless 
they are prepared to start the 
men's 100 metres final at 
2.0am for the benefit of 
American prime-time view- 
ers, which would be late even 
for Spanish night owls. Yet the 
Spanish committee are show- 
ing initiative in being pre- 
pared to import Raimo Filtz 
of Finland, the best of track 
and field television directors 
who masterminded the first 
World Championships in Hel- 
sinki three years ago, Fred 
Viner from Britain for 
equestrianism, and Martin 
Lmdenbeig from The Nether- 
lands for cycling. 

If five other cities were not 
going to carve np between 
them the votes of those 
unwilling to support Barce- 
lona, I think that either Bris- 
bane, Birmingham or 
Amsterdam could be a serious 
challenger. But, at this stage, I 
cannot see Barcelona foilin g, 
even if they did make a hash 
of the world fencing 
championships last year. 

However, the IOC have 
many members only in- 
terested in malting friends. If 
you ' add np all the votes 
already promised by 90 mem- 
bers to 13 candidate cities, it 
probably comes to something 
over 400! Anything can still 
as we. have seen 


GOLF 

Old master 
and new 
team up in 
Dunhill 

By MitcheD Platts 

Jose- Maria Olaraba] has been 
given the opportunity to con- 
tinue his astonishing year by 
playing alongside Severiano 
Ballesteros for Spain in the 
Dnnhjn Cup at St Andrews next 
week. They team up with Jose 
Rivero against Ireland in the 
first round of the $1 million 
tournament in which Australia 
are the defending champions. 

Oiazabal, aged 20, who won 
the European Masters in 
Switzerland two weeks ago, has 
earned £100,113 in bis first 
season as a professional and is 
second only to Ballesteros 
(£207.502) in the Epson Order 
of Merit 

He could win another £65,000 
if Spain su c cee d at St Andrews. 
And on the basis of his in- 
credible results this year he is a 
candidate for one of the five 


remaining places in the Sumory 
world match-play champion- 
ship at Wentworth from Octo- 
ber 2 to 5. 

Otazabal said: “I played for 
my country as an amateur, so I 
am naturally delighted to have 
the honour of rep re s e n ting 
Spain again so early in my 
professional c a ree r. * 1 
For BaDesteros the Dunhill 
event could offer an early 
opportunity for a dash with 
Greg Norman as Spain and 
Australia are seeded to meet in 
the semi-finals. Norman's vic- 
tory in the European Open at 
Sunningdale last Sunday lifted 
him above Ballesteros in the 
Sony world rankings, which are 
sanctioned by the Royal and 
Ancient. 

Norman will be eager to lead 
the winning i«wn again at St 
Andrews, as another success 
would take his individual eam- 
□gs this year to within $15,000 
f $! million. Rodger Davis, 
who won the PGA champion- 
ship earlier this year,- replaces 
Graham Marsh in the Austra- 
lian team, with David Graham 
retaining his place. 

A year ago Australia beat the 
United States 3-0 in the final but 
Raymond Floyd, Mark 
O'Meara and Laimy Wadkins 
have still been seeded No 1 and 
the bookmakers have installed 



RUGBY UNION 


Scottish selectors 
have a vacancy 
at stand-off half 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

Scotland's selectors will sit the B internationals against lialy 


down this evening to pick their 
first team of the season after 
watching the South of 
Scotland's performance against 
the touring Japanese at Melrose. 
The team to play Japan at 
Murrayfield on September 27 
will be announced tomorrow 
and the main problem areas 
may centre around the second 
row and the stand-off half 
position. 

In all other areas. Scotland 
took to have good cover and 
may th eref o re feel able to 
experiment against the Japa- 
nese. But at stand-ofE they have 
Rutherford out with a back 
injury. Gass, only just returning 
to the scene, and Ker putting his 
final case this evening; all three 
are over 30, m any case, and the 
most likely choice appears to be 
Wyllie. aged 23. the Stewart's 
Melville player. He is back just 
id time after injury and, if they 
wish to pick him. the national 
selectors will no doubt consult 
with the Edinburgh selectors 
about whether be should play 
for the City side against the 
Japanese at Myreade next 
Tuesday. 

The South have been forced 
to adjust their side in the light of 
injuries to Paxton, the British 
Dons number eight, and 
Robertson, the centre who was 
injured playing for Melrose 
against the American touring 
team. Eastern Rugby Union. 
Campbell, the Hawick and Scot- 
land lode, replaces Paxton and 
Baird moves into the centre, the 
vacancy on the wing going to his 
club colleague Tail. Paxton's 
knee injury occurred in a Sun- 
day game in Dundee, which will 
not endear him to either the 
district or the national selectors. 
Baird's removal means that 
Tukalo will switch wings even 
though Tail has played much of 
his rugby at oenue. However, in 


and France last season. Tail 
played on the wing. 

Japan, in common with every 

other country involved, have 
made great efforts this year to 
prepare adequately for the 198/ 
world cup. They loured in 
North .America during the sum- 
mer and also invited John 
Quick, tire former Rand wick 
coach, to their country to assist 
their preparations. Quick played 
asa backrow forward for Leices- 
ter in the mid-60s and, after 
returning to his native Austra- 
lia. took up coaching in Sydney, 
his spell with Randwick coming 
when Bob Dwyer vos appointed 
Australia's national coach dur- 
ing 1981-3. Since Japan will 
meet both England and Austra- 
lia in their World Cup group, 
they decided thai a coach with 
experience of both countries 
could hardly foil to benefit 
them. 

The last view that British 
enthusiasts had of tire national 
Japanese side was their glorious 
exodus against Wales in 1983, 
when they scored three tries in 
the Iasi quarter at Cardiff and 
lost by only 29-24. Cbida, the 
number eight who plays today, 
was among the uy scoters and 
will doubuess enjoy repeating 
the exercise against some of the 
national XV tomorrow. Japan’s 
two Tongans, Taione and 
Taumoefolau, who came to 
study and work in Japan six 
years ago. also play at flanker 
and wing respec ti vely. 

SOUTH OF SCPTUtMk.P Dad* (QatttyjA 

• - - (Jed- 

w. n 


.. T SmWi (Gala). I 
Paxton (Katso). J JoNiw (Koiao). 
JAPANESE; S Ml** N TauiwatotWl E 
KatauttuU.SHno.SOnuhcKMMuo.v 
KcnttM; O OMa. T ftjftu. M Attain. H 
Tuna. T HayasM (Captain), Y Saturate. 
K Myamoia. M Chkte. 


Buckton’s injury blow 


OlazabaL another dance to enhance his career 


them as the S-2 favourites. 

Howard dark. Nick Faldo 
and Gordon J Brand form 
England’s team for their first 
round match with Argentina; 
Scotland are unchanged, with 
Gordon Brand, jun, Sandy Lyle 
and Sam Torrance, who reached 
the semi-finals last year, meet- 
ing Indonesia. 

The Dunhill Cup is decided 


TENNIS 

Gadusek’s 

local 

difficulty 

Laigo (Reuter) — Bonnie 
Gadusek. the top seed, was 
knocked out of the Florida Open 
women's tournament by her 
feliow-American, Hise Bmgin. 
6-1. 6-0 in Monday’s opening 
round of the S 125.000 event. 

The seventh seed, Dianne 
Balesirai, of Australia, was also 
sent out early as she went down 
6-2, 6-0 to the American Kate 
Gompen. More fortunate was 
the eighth-seeded Mary Joe 
Fernandez, a J 5-year-old 
’ American, who advanced past 
Pat Medrado, of Brazil, 6-4, 6-4 
to survive at feast until tire 
second round. 

“It's tough playing in your 
home town and 1 knew it would 
be hard because Burgin's agood 
player," Gadusek, the local 
favourite, said. "I just wasn't 
feeling tire toll welL” 

Burgin was surprised at how 
simple her victory had been. 
“The first five games were pretty 
close but from that point on it 
seemed to go very quickly” she 
said. “1 did come up with some 
really good shots at the begin- 
ning of the match and that can 
ibe a bit disheartening for an 
opponent." 

Gompen met scant insistence 
from BaJestrat as she demol- 
ished her in 65 minutes. The 
.Australian was clearly still hin- 
dered by an ankle sprain that 
kept her out of the recent US 
Open championships. 

Fernandez took more than 
two hours to overcome 
Medrado, an experienced player 
almost twice her age. 


ar (AuS). 8-3. 
KP Medrano! 


M D Balesirai (Aus). 

(Fu^ka Mtmer 

*. 8-4: EHakaml tU» blK 
3. 7-5; G Rush (US) M L 
(Penn 2-6. 6-1 . 7-1 (7-5): K Hop** 
J Mutual ISA), 6-7 (S-Tt 6-3, M6 E 
(US) bl B Gadusek (US) 6-1 , *0. 


6-4: 

8- 

6- 


BOXING 

Pyatt can raise spirits 
again with title victory 

By Srikmmtr Sen, Boxing Correspondent 

After the defeats of British knocked oat Jimmy Cable in ooe 
boxing's two leading names, 

Barry McGmgan and Frank 
Bran*, tire sport Itself seems to 
have fallen a little flat. Even a 
world championship boat be- 
tween two Britons, Dennis 
Andries, of Hackney, the World 
Boxing Council light-heavy- 
weight champion, and Tony 
Sibsoo, the world ranked 
middleweight from Leicester, 
failed to give it a Eft. 

However, Chris Pyatt sboald 
revive spirits when be meets 
John Van Eheren, of The 
Netherlands, for the vacant 
European light-middleweight 
championship at Ac Albert Hall 
tonight. Van Eheccn it not a 
particularly exciting boxer, nor 
his record any more im p re s s i ve, 
bat Pratt's performances are 
always welcome, no matter who 
he is boxiqg. 

Pyatt is a good per fo r m er and, 
now that End Christie has 
foiled to rearii expectations, 
perhaps the most exciting h 
Britain. Not enough has yet been 
seen of him. With only 18 boots 
to his name. Pyatfs cob tests 
play down the part of the 
matchmaker, whose heavy hand 


is most obrioas these days as oM 
fighters pound on, trying to 
rearii for the impossible. 

Pyatt is a no-nonsense, all- 
action boxer. He had been 
preparing to cha ll en g e Sfad 
Skouma bn, when the French- 
mao decided to vacate the title to 
meet Mike McCaHam for the 
world cr ow n. Van Eheren was 
called in. Pyatt, who wen a 
Commonwealth Games gold 
medal in 1982, has suffered only 
one defeat - and that by a cat eye 
- but has otherwise beaten good 
class Opponents mcfadiag Brian 
Anderson, Judas Oottcy and 
Darwin Brewster. He even wore 
down, in nine rmmds, the hard-’ 
hitting Prince Rodney, who 


Eitaro, though aged 27, has 
had only IS boots and, fike 
Pyatt, been beaten oaly once. 
Burt half of his contests have 
been repeats against opponents 
be had already beaten. The 
Dutchman is the Bcnrinx cham- 
pion but, last October, he tried 
movfag up to mi d d le we ight and 
was knocked oat in six rounds by 
Jan Lefeber. Van Etteren has 
not fought since. A neat boxer, 
fce has a good right hand, hot 
frill almost certainly foal Pyatt 
too aggressive 

If he wins, Pyatt is expected to 
meet Barter Drayton for the 
International Boring Federation 
title. Drayton knocked oat Mark 
Saylor, who spire with Pyatt 
and believes the Leicester boxer 
can beat the 22-year-old 
American. 

Saylor himself faces Tony 
Hamsos. the man Herol Gra- 
ham sboald have met bad he not 
been barred from boxing toaiglit 
becanse of a stay in hoHAal for 
a bead complaint a fortnight 
Ranked ao-3 in the world, 
rlor is always a target for 
wanting to make a name 
for themselves, particularly a 
late replacement like Harrison. 
Bat knowing the vritoesnMBty of 
Kay tor's position and his drin, it 
is unOEdy that the matchmaker 
will have slipped op this time as 
he (fid when be called in Draytou 
as a late replacement agrinst 
Kaylor. 

Paul Hopidnson, Barney 
Eastwood's other featherweight, 
makes his second appea r an ce as 
a professional on the MO. No 
opponent has yet been found for 
him but there should be little 
trouble in getting a suitable one 
as HopUnsoii bas foagbssthey 
come. Many consi d er he is an 
even better prospect than 
McGmgan was at this stage. 


on medal match-play scores and 
the BBC will be covering play on 
all four days 

FOtST-dOUND DRAW: tinted Status m 
Boyd. M OMuura. L WtidHuu) v Tmdiln 
(S Mwanza. P Tftmbo, P Shpm); 
mmdm (O Saawrn. A Forsbrand, M 
Lunar) v Cundu CD Bar. 0 I til da ion . 
H Zofco* Ea0md (N Frida, G J Brand. H 
Claric) v AmunSte (V Femundaz, A Saws. 
A Savodra); Sown Kona (Choi Yourv- 
Soo, Che Ho-Sang. Cftoy Seng-Hot V 
Jspm fTonsny Nafctjna. Jet QnM, Jou 
OzaH); ScoOuod (A Lyte, G Brand, jin, S 
Torrance) v toJun eutii (Main Naeslm. E 


tiWou (I Wboonum. M Moulted. P Pwttn) 
“ ' vl JG Timer. F Nobio. B 
(B Oassu, C Rocsa, G Cam 
Norman. D Graham, fl 

OF MEHTC 1. S 

£207.502.8*: 2, J44 
00.11&98; 3, H Clsrt: 
*. B Langur (Wffl. 
n,tt&428.76; 
. 3l&A5c 7. M 

McNudytSAL £AX 5 tMj 05 ; 8. 1 Woomani 
(GB). E/ 9 . 58330 ; 9, 1 Balcur-finch “ 



5. R Oevts CAud, £95,4 
6.GJ Brand (OB). £B53l&45; 




_ . 1*36: 10, A Fbratorand 
,E74^83 l90. 

SONY WOFLD RANKMOOe 1. G Norman 
.H9pC Z 8 Baiiusturos (SpL. 

anri 
eii: 6. H Su ten Jl fe^ egS; 7. c 


ESS;” 


568: 


L Wadkins 


add A Lyte (08), 559; 10, P 
lf,TWaw>n(UB p 5S2; 


Stewart (US), 555: 

1*. R Tuny (US), 511; 18, R . . . r 

489; 23, J Mc*fais<US), 374; 2M( fork 
K5B), 3*5: 26. L Trevino (US). 336; 30. S 
Torrance (08L 306; 32. 1 Woman (00), 
299; 33. N Faldo (G8). 298. 


YACHTING 

Frenchman is first 
into the doldrums 

By Barry PkkthaU 

After two and a half weeks at hand, -snatching less than five 
sea since the start of the BOC ~ 
single handed round the world 
yacht race, Guy Bemanfin, of 
France, sailing the 60ft Biscuits 
Lit, has buih up a 50-mile lead 
over the South African entry. 


Tuna Marine Voartrekker. skip- 
pered by John Martin as the 
leaders approach the doldrums 
on this first 7, 100-mile leg to 
Gape Town. 

It has not all been plain 
sailing, however, particularly for 
John Biddlecombe, of Australia, 
wbo had to put into Bermuda 
after injuring his groin in a fell 
on board his class one entry, 
ACI Crusader. Last Thursday he 
returned there again to design 
and fit a 1 ,2601b lead bulb to the 
keel of his 60ft yacht after h. had 
twice been knocked down in 
winds of45 knots. 

Another reporting troubles 
this week is third-placed 
Trtouan Lamazou, of France, 
who now plans to stop at 
Ascension Island — still 1,500 
miles ahead of him — to replace 
broken sel£steering equipment 
on his 60ft Ecureuil 
<T Aquitaine. For the moment be 
is having to sail his boat by 


hours sleep a day. 

The most remarkable perfor- 
mance so for. however, is that of 
another frenchman, Jacques de 
Roux, whose 50ft unsponsored 
entry, Skoiem IV, is in fifth 
place having built up a 300-mile 
lead over bis closest class II 
rival the American Michael. 
Plant’s Airco Distributor. 

Britain's Harry Mitchell, sail- 
ing tbe 41ft Double Cross, is 
currently lying 21st, ahead of 
BkkSecombe's ACI Crusader, 
Madonna, skippered by Takao 
Shiroada, from Japan, and of 
Eduardo Louro de Almeida wbo 
set out from Newport again last 
Friday after replacing the bro- 
ken rudders on bis 40ft Miss 
Global. 

• A £10.000 trophy awaits the 
first crew to break Robin Knox- 
Johnston's round-Ireland sail- 
ing record of 76 hours 5 minutes 
set earlier this year in his 60ft 
catamaran, British Airways. The 
Cork Dry Gin Perpetual Chal- 
lenge Trophy has been pul up by 
Irish Distillers to attract further 
challengers. Among the first to 
make an attempt wifl be Peter 
Phillips's 80fi catamaran 
NovanetL 


John Budcton, the Saracens 
and Yorkshire centre wbo made 
such representative strides last 
winter, will miss most of the 
opening two months of the new 
season after a back injury sus- 
tained playing for a Yorkshire 
President’s XV (David Hands 
writes). He could be absent 
when Yorkshire begin their 
County Championship pro- 
gramme against Northumber- 
land on October 15. 

The unavailability of 
Buckton, who played in all tbe 
North’s divisional games last 
season, wiB also bea Mow to his 
dub who hope in maintain their 
recent p r og ress towards the 
upper echelons of the English 
game. Saracens narrowly foiled 
to earn promotion to John 
Smith's Merit Table A but Alex 
Keay has agreed to continue as 
captain for a fourth year. "We 
hope to have a squad whit* will 


put us among the elite Our 
ambitions for the season are. 
obviously, to win but we wanted 
to do as we did last season and 
win in style"said Keay. 

Saracens have acquired the 
services of John Howe, the 
former Hartlepool Rovers lock 
who played against Spain for 
England Under 23 in April. 
Howe's job has brought him to 
London and he is sufficiently 
ambitious to plan to spend next 
summer working and playing 
rugby in New Zraland. refining 
skills contained in a 6ft 7ins 
frame. 

The opening of the M25 has 
made the club's Southgate 
ground more accessible al- 
though they are still negotiating 
with Enfield Council for per- 
mission to enclose their playing 
area where they also have a 
flourishing mim-rugby section 
on Sundays. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


On the Roses warpath 


By Keith MacUin 


The most important Roses 
county match in the history of 
rugby league lakes place at 
Hcadinglcy tonight The match, 
in its second year of revival 
under the sponsorship of the 
Wigan amusement machine 
company. Rodsiock. coincides 
with the training preparations of 
the Great Britain squad for the 
forthcoming international scries 
against Australia. 

To give added public appeal 
to the game, a fixture which was 
ddcied from the schedules sev- 
eral years ago because of lack of 
interest, the contest has been 
dubbed “the war of the Roses". 


and the two coaches. Pcicr Fox 
of Yorkshire and Alex Murphy 
have added fuel 10 the flames of 
rivalry by engaging in public 
argument about the merits of 
the two sides. 

Among (he vital clashes to- 
night will be fascinating duels at 
half-back. Dcryck Fox of York- 
shire and his opposite number. 
Andy Gregory are both in line 
for the scrum-half spot in the 
Great Britain team which is 
currently held by Fox. At stand- 
off half the battle is between the 
experienced John Joyner of 
Yorkshire and Wigan's preco- 
cious Shaun Edwards. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


7 J0 unless statad 
FOOTBALL 

European Cup 
First round, first leg 

Eindhoven v 
Porto v Rabat 
(Lux) 


m Munich (6.30) 

XSS^Snna 


vValur 
Red Star v 
B Stars Zagora 


_ (60) 
v Dynamo Kiev 


oijk.0) 

a (1-30) 


SCHOOLS FOOTBALL 


Overseas tours provide stem tests 


Once again pre-season over- 
seas tours provided testing 
grounds for new young players, 
with seven European countries 
offered hospitality to school 
sides. 

Shrewsbnry visited the 
Netherlands. Luxembourg, 
West Germany and France, they 
won three of the five matches 
played. M Lascelles is their 
captain, one of four left fro*" 
last year's successful! XI. Earn 
paid a visit to Finland, playing 
five matches. They only have 
V*o Old colours and wB cer- 
tainly find it difficult to better 
last season’s excel lent results. 

Hisjhgate went to Austria, 
winning one and drawing their 


By George Chesterton 

other match. They have several 
players with first team experi- 
ence but only one old colour. 
Malvern had valuable practice 
jn Sweden, winning one and 
losing their other match. They 
have four colours from Iasi year 
and are led by A. Tempenon. 
Charterhouse, with one old 
colour, will be looking to last 
year's colts, who had a good 
season, to rebuild their XI. They 
travelled to The Hague on a 
short two match visit- West- 
minster have four players left 
from their April tour of Por- 
tugal. they are led by J. Griffiths. 
Wetimboroegh have lost the key 
members of last year's outstand- 
ing XI. leaving a weak defence. 
Kept on have no fewer than eight 


returning but their anxiety is to 
find some goal scorers. 
Kimbolton are led by R. Ward 
and S. Browne is also back- He 
kept goal in last season's Public 
Schools XL A. Tbapa is tbe only 
old colour at BradaeM but there 
are several with first team 
experience. J Higgs, captain at 
T jBfing will hope to improve 
on last year’s rather disappoint- 
ing season. C Marshall is cap- 
tain of Winchester. He will 
again have the services of T. 
MacLure . a player of great 
promise. Forest have four old 
colours/They made their usual 
tour to the north, losing at 
B lackb urn and Bolton, but will 
have a chance for revenge later 
in the season. 


Young Boys Berne v R MadHd (7.0) 
Andertecht v Gomflc Zabrzn (7.0) 
Brcwndbyemes v Honved (6 

Beslktas v Dynamo T" 

Apoel Nicosia v HJK 
Rosenborg (Norway) v 
Oergryta v Dynamo Berlin (6.0) 

ParisStQ^iaS? ^ eWc 

Cup Warners’ Cup 
First round, first leg 
Rapid Vienna v FC Brugge (&30) 
Roma v Real Zaragoza 
Benifca v URestrom (9 ft) 

Mwrtori Tirana v Oynamo Bucharest 
Aberdeen v Sion (Switzerland) 
Waterford v Bordeaux (5^ 

Mejmo v ApoUon Limassol I 
Bursaspor (Turkey) v f ' 

Zurrieq (Mara)»Wr» 
VaJkeakosken Hafca v Torpedo 
Moscow (3ft0) 

Otgn Piraeus v US Luxembourg 

istuttgart v Spartak Tmava (7.0) 
Glentoran v Lokomotiv Leipzig 
Vasas v Veiaz Mostar (5ft) 

UEFA Cup 
First round, first teg 
lens v Dundee United 
Akranos v Sporting Lisbon (8ft) 

Athletic Bfoao v Magdeburg (7.45) 

A Madrid v Warder Sremerv 
Pecsi Munkas v Feyenootf (2ft0) 
Sparta Prague v Vitoria Setubal (4ft) 
Hearts v Dukia Prague 
Nantes v Torino 

Kalmar (Sweden) v Leverkusen (6ft) 
tynamo Minsk v Raba Eto Gyoar 

Sara Ofomouc v IFK Gfiteburg 

kolotine v Stahl Brandenburg (4.0) 
Legia Warsaw y Dnepr Dnepro- 


Flrrt (Svision 
Norwich v Leicester. 

ThMrSvfefon 
Bristol Rowers v Mddtesbrough 

Lancaster v Bristol CBy. 

Fourth division: 

Northampton vTranmere. 

(Ml VAUXHALL CONFERENCE: Borton 

WnttMona, Qateahaed v Runcorn; 
Northwch v Stafford; Maidstone v Dag- 
enharo Scsrtorouoh vFrteMey. 

MULTPART LEAGUE: Caernarfon 
Wttton; Rhyl v OsrwMt ry: Soutt Liverpool 
v HonUch; worioop v Sutton. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: Hat teteter Not- 

tingham Forest v Evsnon (7ftfc Oldtam v 

Manchester City: Sundertwd v Ovrfcy 7.r 
Second dhostai (7 j 0 union Mm 
Dartngtan v Stoke (7.30): Port vale 
Bteckpoot West B r aWfch Abion 

Hodderrtefct VMgan * RMhMtMK York v 

Scunthorpe. 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: CM PeL 
ace v Araenal (at Tooting end LStchamt 
Riham v WaMonf; MSM v ftxwich; 
Oxford Untad v west Hem UnttedT 

FA CUP: Hrat quMNyfeis 
Atan Swaiiey »TI 


Borough): Brandon Unfed v Epptoton 
CoOery Welfare; Bantam Town v South 
Bank (5-30); Burton AVon v LetChwortti 


SC (8M Cambridge CRy v Braintree 
Town; Crook Town v Bfyth Spartanc; 
Dunstable v Budanghain Towro Leicester 
United v North Ferribyi 
Unchxttjytorafone/WonJ v Charts** 1 
Town (at Leyton/Wtogaw, 7Aa Retedee 
Newtown v Brtcfingtofl Trinity (730): 
Stowmarttat Town v Harwich and 
P artB Stan. 

VAUXHALirOra. LEAGUE Second «. I 
fisioa. north: Ctesham United 

Berkhemstsd Town: Coter Row 
Mvwvwe Town: Tung Tmwi v Barton 
Rovers. Second dMeJoe. south: | 

PeteroflfidLMted v woteng. 

RUGBY UNION 

TOUR MATCH: South Ol Scotend v Japan j 
(Mairose.MIL 

CLUB MATCHES: Abemun v kntr- 
national XV (7.0); Broughton Part: v Salt 
gftS Gloucester v Samoraan Whdre 
(7ft): Hayto v St hw iScnter y 

armtoohem (7.15): Liverpool St Heiansv 
New frighten [6.0); Maestgg v UteeBi 
: Moseley v Nuneaton; One! v Kendal 
" Pe nz ance and Y_Sajteth; 



DRAKKAR IVOffi 

CT£AC37V£GRO0^^ 

[ systems tobewn 


Newport 

Coventry (&30}. 


Rug* 



I angora v Tampere 
B UercSnoen v Carl zass Jena (7.0) 
Unz v WiBzew Lodz (6ft) 

Beveren v Vaterengans (7 ft) 

OF! Greta v Hajduk Split (3ft) 
Flamurtari Vtora v Barcelona (SftO) 
Fforentina v Boavista JPortumQ 
Hibernians (Malta) v TraWa Ptovdiv 
Swaroski Urol v Sredate Sofia (4.m 
Inter Milan vAEKAmens 
Sporttri Studemesc (Romania} v 
Omon ia Nicosia (3-0) 

UnKrefsitatea Craiova v Gal a t a s are y 


. v Standard Lidge (7ft) 
Napofi v Toutousa 
Spartak Moscow v Lucerne (4.0) 


RUGBY LEAGUE 
R0DSTQCX WAR OF THE ROSES; York- 1 
stira v Lsnesshfra (a Heetfngfey), 

OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: CKleberg Kattooall 
Pint Jfis toi E Apw Enarl 
1 v Hemet Royals (8 
CROQUET: Longman Bcwt | 
woman's Reid Cup |£ 

QO LF: Wer-Serfice ChamptonsWps 
Burnham & Borrows); Women s Fhtford 
Heath Scratch Sawer (RWord Haeth GCL 
TENM& RAF Irder-Statfon Chmkn- 
ships — Flnais (RAF Halnn) ' 

SNOOKER: Matctexm Champion sh ip 
Cm pavflon, Southe nd); Rothmans 
Srand Prix. Ruidnn rank (Red 
Mod Lodge, Bristol). 



3Q& N6wmfciwl98& .. 

JVCequipme»t 
telephone 
OH 913909, • 





10 . 




36 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


RACING: AGA KHAN DELAYS DECISION ON DARARA BUT STOUTE PLANS WEEKEND WORKOUT F OR HIS OTHE R TWO BIG-RACE HOPEg 

More Arc support 


Rakaposhi King 
can crown 
memorable day 
for Cecil 


By Mandarin 

. Henry Cecil, with 91 win- 
ners already to his credit. can 
lake a further step towards his 

objective 0 f hilling the cen- 
tury target for the seventh 
time during his record-break- 
ing career by winning this 
afternoon's Doonsidc Cup 
(3.30) at Ayr with Rakaposhi 
King. 

Originally bought from 
Robert Armstrong as a pace- 
maker for Slip Anchor. 
Rakaposhi King has excelled 
himself in his own right since 
the retirement to stud of the 
1985 Derby winner. 

In his two victories earlier 
in the season the four-year-old 
first recorded a high-class 
performance when slamming 
High Tension by five lengths 
in Haydock Park's Old New- 
ton Cup. He then proceeded to 
show courage of an equally 
admirable order when beating 
I Want To Be in the mud at 
Lingficld. 

Following an abortive trip 
to Deauville Rakaposhi King 
was then sent to Kempton 
where he battled his heart out 
when finishing a close third to 
Dihisian and Bakharoff in the 
September Stakes. 

The selection is faced with 
some formidable opposition. 

The Queen's four-year-old 
Leading Star recorded a last 
time in his victory over 
Ozopulmin at Lingfield. 

Santiki. one of Michael 
Stoute's talented band of 
three-year-old fillies, although 
unable to cope with the heavy 
going at Deauville had pre- 
viously proved too good Ibr 


K- Battery in the Land Of 
Bums Slakes on this course in 
July. 

The six-ycar-oid _ Rana 
Pralap may be out of his depth 
in this company, and more 
danger may come from John 
Dunlop's improving three- 
vear-old. Boon Point, who 
completed a treble of victories 
in the Grand International 
D'Ostcndc. 

Cecil can earlier start the 
always enjoyabje Western 
meeting on a high note by 
taking the Kilkerran Amateur 
Riders Stakes (2.0) with 
Paean. Franca Vittadini takes 

the mount on Lord Howard de 
Walden's three-year-old and 
the pair will be out to give a re- 
peal performance of their 
eight-length win in a similar 
event at Beverley in August. 

Ostensible and Shtaifeh 
would appear to form the hard 
core of the opposition.' 
Amanda Harwood, fresh from 
her break-neck dash from 
Doncaster to Goodwood on 
Saturday to win on Tavari. 
rides Khaled Abdulla's 
improving stayer, who 
showed himself to be still on 
the upgrade when beating 
Rosedale in York's Melrose 
Handicap. In what may be a 
close run affair. Paean is 
preferred. 

However Harwood fares in 
the opener, the Pulborough 
trainer should not leave the 
course empty handed as 
Bannerol looks all set to win 
his third race in succession by 
beating Jurisprudence and 
Special Vintage in the 



for flying Bering 



Bering rontinua to be all the 


n^ioVSetTormePm 


<jel' Arc de Tnomph^Cnquctte 
Head's French Derby winner; 
who passed his Sunday test m 
the PmNiei with Hying colours, 
is a 2-1 dunce with Willum 

Hill, but only 7-4 Wlth 

L ^rhe°rSU from France yes- 
terday was that it had not yet 
been decided whether Darara, 
the Aga Khan’s Pnx Vcrmeilic 
winner, is to join Shardari and 
Sfiahrastam m ait all-out attack 
on the Arc for Europe s most 
powerful owner-breeder. The 
filly is rather small, and Alain 
Royer- Dupre wants to sec how 
quickly she recovers from ner 
Sunday exertions. 

Shardari is to work at New- 
market on Saturday morning 
and Tony Kimberley will part- 
ner Shahrastani in a gallop at 
Newbury after racing the tame 
afternoon, when Sure Blade, 
Barry Hills’s Champion Stakes 
intended runner, will also be in 


Night Out Perhaps, seen here edging out Knyf at Chester, is a funded contender for Yarmouth's Golden JnbOee Trophy 


action. . 

Michael Stoute would not be 
drawn on the question ofjock- 
eys for the big race. But »t would 
be surprising if waiter 
S win burn, the stable's contract 
rider, did not opt for Shardan. 

Obviously, if Yves Saint- 
Martin is available, the 1 5- times 
champion French jockey would 
be asked to partner the winner 


By Michael Seely 

of the English and Irish Derby. 

But if Darara runs. Pal Eddery 
would be a logical choice for 
Shahrastani. 

The season s leading trainer is 
keen for Green Desert to have 
another race before the July; Cup 
and Vernons Sprint Cup winner 
is sent to Santa Anita for the 
Breeders' Cup Series on Novem- 
ber 1. . . . 

•*1 wouldn't want him to be . 
idle for all that timer said 1 
Stoute. “he's in the Diadem 
Stakes next week, so that must 
be a possibility.** He also in- 
tends to send Ajdal, his impres- 
sive Doncaster winner, to the 
Ascot September meeting for 
the Monungton Stakes. 

As for os Moon Madness is 
concerned. John Dunlop reports 
last Saturday's easy St Leger 
winner to be in tremendous 
shape, “rd like to give him 
another race," said the trainer. 

“It won't be the Arc, but I d like 
to bring him back to a mile and a 
half. 

With the going forecast as 
“unseasonably fast" in Scotland 
by David McHarg, the clerk of 
the course at Ayr, the chief vj 
interest in the betting on 
Friday's Ladbroke's Ayr Gold 
Cup was centred on Felipe Toro 
and Catherine’s Well, who have 
had their prices cut to 6-1 and 7- 
1. respectively, with William 
Hills. 


f 


Me- 


Egiimon and Winton 
mortal Handicap (4.0). 

The Dick Peacock Handi- 
cap (3.0) looks a nightmare 
problem to solve. However, 
with Richard Hannon's stable 
in such sparkling form. Ready 
Wit, a fast finishing second to 
Oriental Soldier at Haydock, 
is preferred to All Fair. Solo 
Style and Knight's Secret. 

Shellman. only a short head 
behind the selection at 
Haydock. also has an obvious 
chance, but seldom runs two 
races alike. 

The day's nap goes on Night 
Out Perhaps in the Golden 
Jubilee Trophy at Yarmouth 


(3.4S). After winning a 
competitive handicap at New- 
market Geoffrey Wragg's 
three-year-old was then none 
too lucky in running when 
coming home strongly to fin- 
ish third to Sultan Mohamed 
and Enban-at York. This form 
was given a boost when 
Enbarr justified favouritism at 
Doncaster on Saturday. 

Loch Scaforth. Cecil's run- 
ner. appears to have been set a 
stiff task under top weight and 
more danger to the winner 
may come from Hard As Iron 
and Marshal MacDonald. 

Richard Shaw, faced with 
the danger of Jokist being 


ba Hotted out of Friday's Ayr 
Gold Cup. can still strike a 
blow for his eight-horse first 
season stabte by winning the 
East Coast Lifeboat Handicap 
(3.1S) with Sweet Alexandra. 

A 3lb-penaJty may have 
prevented this progressive 
filly from beating Wishlon at 
Windsor and she can now 
make it three wins from her 
last four starts. 

Other likely scorers at Yar- 
mouth are Bolero Magic and 
Officer Krupke, who can give 
Cecil a two-year-old double by 
winning the Decourcy Cham- 
pagne Slakes (2.45) and the 
Hastings Slakes (4.45). 


Cedi travels 
for ambition 


Henry Cecil, the champion 
trainer, revealed that he has a 
runner in Italy after be saddled 
Sheikh Mohammed's colt 
Suhailie for an impressive vic- 
tory in the CfeUaman Burr Stakes 
at Lingfield Park yesterday. 

Cedi said: “ Pm not well 
know for travelling abroad, but 
one of my current ambitions is 
to win a Group One race for the 
Sheikh with a coll. So I'm off to 
Milan to saddle his El Cuite in 
the Gran Premio d'ltalia on 
Sunday. I am hopeful this colt 
can do the trick. " 


Piggott chasing French 
francs with Genghiz 

From Oar French Correspondent. Paris 


Genghiz looks set to be Lester 
Piggott's first runner in France 
this Sunday. The unbeaten son 
ofSir Ivor is one of several lifcdy 
English runners in the group one 
Prix de la Salamandre <70- 
which indude the Kelleway pair 
Risk Me and Gulf King, and 
Henry Cecil’s Midyan, who 
significantly was supplemented 
for the race at a cost of 
IOO,OOOFr yesterday. 

Rosedale, who was with- 
drawn from the St Leger after 


bolting at the start, may seek to 
make amends in the group three 
Prix de Lulece ( 1 m 70, while his 
stable companion Highland 


Chieftain is likcl^io take on 


Fast Topaze and Saint Estephe 
in the group three Prix du Prince 
d'Orange(lm 20. 


Three Generations can give 
Jorge Velasquez his first winner 
in France when he tackles the 
£17.374 Prix d’Aumalc at 
Longchamp this afternoon. 



1 to firm 

Draw: If and above low numbers best 


201000 EMERALD EAGLE 1 
WS100 HEAVENLY 
OOOm SlUJTOEjDHMrsJMffii 
031 ®80 MONMSKY(b(N0tidn)N 
431000 KAMARESS (B) (M Bnttain)| 



5-2 AH Fair. 3-1 Ready Wtt, 100-30 Soto Style, 5-1 Knights Secret 10-1 Shefiman. 


2-0 KILKERRAN STAKES (Amateurs: £1 ,452: 1m 71) (11 runners) 

4 010000- 8ntAS CHKJMrT FQshia) J S VMson 4-1 t-0_ D M acWgg wt (5) 11 

5 300320 HERRADURA ft ; (P Savil) M Prescott 5-1 1 -0 Maxfie jintarS 


I 9 200000 RED DUSTER 
10 940000 TQUCHEZLE 
12 300011 OSTENSIBLE! 


14 2-12111 PAEAN (Lord ft de 

Grace 



TFntust 6-114. 


6 

M Tompkins 5-1 14 MJmMnaf$4 

_ G Harwood 3-10-13 Amanda Harwood (51 10 

. H Cecil 3-10-13 Fkma vatsdn 3 

00 CRIDE&1ACE (A NldHisan)J Jefferson 11-18-7 Sarah Ncbotoan (5) 1 

400040 NIGHT GUEST (JRd® 

210340 CAROUSEL ROCKET ( 

00010 THE CANNY MAN (D) (D Knights) Denys 2 
nlHTIwn 



10) beat EMBMLD EAGLE 
S) was 9W back m 6th and 


winner from Kavaka (1m If. £4«^jMd to soft Aug 25. 11 ran). READYWIT 


IP Moment) 4-10-7. ADudgaoaB 

| (A Saccomando) R wtwahar 3-103 Sandy Brook 9 
Knsiimi Denys Snfitti 3-1 03 — GmMdkMRees7 


2nd end SHELLMAN (7-7) short 
J1m4f " ' 

2nd Of 

(7-7)41 

soft Sept 3 . 12 ran). 

Selection: KNIGHTS SECRET 


rantSILUTOEtt- 
Sti Wolverhampton 
EAOYVHfT ffi-lHU 



142 SHTAHH (H Al-Maktoum) H ‘ Thomson Jonas 3-104- T Thomson Jones 2 
15-8 Qstonstoto. 34 Paean, 100-30 Shtaifeh. 8-1 Henadisa. 

FORM: BIRAS CREEK (8-7) no show m Erfnburgh fast time, previously »9) 81 8th to 
Agra Knight (8-131 at same course with RED DUSTER (9-2) wel behind (1m 71 H eap. 
£986. good. Sept 18 1985. 16 ran). OSTENSIBLE (8-13) Mowed im a Sundown victory 
•nth a' %l success over Rosedale (9-7) at Yoik (1m fit tfcap. £8636. good. Aug 19. 13 
ran). PAEN (i 1 4) stayed on very wefi to beet SHTARH (104)81 with HEHRAOUra (11- 
13) 4il away n 5th at Beverley (2m. £938. apod to soft. Aug 27. 9 ran); previously 
snowed enough paoe to wm over im 4f at Pontefract beating Goldan Haights (B-i 
(El 753. firm. Ally 21. 3ran). NIGHT OUE8T(74) moderate StMi to Commander Ri 
(35)at8M>uran(lm4!.a660.gaod!ofkni.Juna2.8nin)- Selection: PAEAN 


130 DOONSIDC CUP (£10,571: 1m 3f) (6) 

041143 RAKAPOSHI KMQ (Lord Hds Widen) H Cad 4-94 

430M1 LEADING STAR (The (toasnl I BakSng 4-8-11 

204201 RANA PRATAPftlSA) (Mrs GlhomberrylG Lewis 6-8-11. 

300111 BOON P0WTJEA (N Awry) J Dunlop 346 

413313 SANTBa 03 (RSamsterVM Stoute 342- 
040300 TURINA pTY) (Razza D Olgtata) E Incisa 3-7-13. 


_ SCautbenS 
_ G Starkey 4 
- P Waldron 2 
_ W Carson 3 
AKMwdayl 
JLoweB 


7-4 Rakaposhi Khg, 2-1 SanUW, 10830 Leading Star, 9-1 Boon Potot. 


FORM: RAKAPOSHI KMG (34) caught dose homo when a short head and a headed to- 
DMstan (9-2) at Kampson (1m 3f, £17210. good. Sept 5. 7 ran). LEADMG STAR (9-0) 
beat Ozopuknin »-7) 2KI at LingfieM (im 4L E2519. good to firm. Aug 20. 7 ran). rAnA 


Ayr selections 


soft. 


By Mandarin 

2.0 Paean. 2 JO Arad City. 3.0 Ready Wit 3 JO Rakaposhi King. 

4.0 Bannerol. 4J0 Debach Revenge. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

2.0 Paean. 2.30 Kribensis. 3.0 All Fair. 3 JO Rakaposhi King. 4.30 
Debach Revenge. 

By Michael Seely 

3.0 READY WIT (nap). 3 JO Rakaposhi King. 


1 OMpuimin (8-7) 2X1 et Lingfield (1m . 

PRATAP (9-7) raddan out Id be t Somhaan (84) . . . . 

Aug 26. 5 ran). BOON POINT [8-5} comptetad hat-trick whan beating Sasabo (9-2) 1KI at 
Ostend C1m3f, £13803. goodio firm. Aug 25. 6 ran). SANTKI (8-9)4VU 3rd » Galuipe (8- 
13) at OoauvUa (1m 2f, £27912, heavy, Aug 3. 7 ran), previously (7-12) beat K-Battory (9- 


rl9. good to firriu Aug 20. 7 ranLR 
HI at Epsom (1m 2f heap. E3500. 
rtrick when Mating Sasebo (9-2) 1 


0) IHl at Ayr (Irh 2f, Listed. £86-8. good to firm. July 26, 5 ran] 
IRAKAFOSMKWQ 


2J0E B F SANDGATE MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,733: 1m} (12) 


Selection: 

40 EGUNTON AND WINTON MBKXUAL HANDICAP (£3317: 
2m If 90yd) (3) 

2 4/03304 SPECIAL VINTAGE (B)(J Murdoch) Jimmy Rtzgerakl 64-7 — SCau0wn2 

5 911 BAWBWL (USA) (KAIxMa]G Harwood 344- GStedreyS 

11 00011 JUMSPRUDnCe (USA) (ft SangstB)JW Watts 3-7-13 

114 Bannerol. 74 Jurisprudence. 94 Spedal vintage. 

FORM: SPECIAL VINTAGE 
(8-2) at Thunk (2m h 


WCnonl 


2 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
10 

13 

14 
>5 
17 
21 


W Canon 4 
KOarfey 11 
.M Birch IB 


00 ANGEL CfTVJ 
000 OOUBH 

42 IRISH BMC 

0 KRMENSKCSheMi Mohammed) M Stoute 34 ANmberieyS 

0 LORO JUSTICE (U^(R5w«s«0MW0lck»an 94 GStarkeyl 

830 NONSUCH PALACE p* MeOonll Baking 94 SCwdwnZ 

0 PRINCE ZAMAROg Hanson) J Hanson 94 JH Brown (5) 12 

iFBodgeE«mLl4J)mnwntBieraid94 — D Nichols 5 



(2m heap. £2198. good, Aug 11. 8 ran). 
: JURISPRUDENCE 


Sel e c tion: < 

4 J0 KILBRIDE HANDICAP (E2J69: 5f) (14) 


434000 KMQ CHARLEMAGNE! 
002100 RAMBLMG RNER ()D) 8 


I Mrs G 


7-1041 


)WA 


STAR AFFAIR /A I 


033 STRING SECTION 


G Lewis 9-0- 


STRONQ SEAJHQ (J ftepbwn) M H Easterby 94- 
TROJAN LECXND (Mrs J VBn Geest) S Norton 94. 
0 FABRMA (USA) g Attrition) J W watts 8-11 


.01 
PWMdran7 
K Hodgson 3 
. JLowel 


. N Common 6 


100-30 String Secbon, 4-1 Kdbenstt. 11-2 Angel City. 6-1 tosh Brigacfier. 7-1 Lord 
Justice. 10-1 Nonsuch Palace. 12-1 Fabraia. 16-1 others. 


FORM: ANGEL CITY (8-11) never got in a Wow when 7V, I 5th to Hsndeka (33) at 
Goodwood (71. £2658. good to tom. Aug 23. 11 ran). IRISH BRIGADIER (8-11) tailed to 
quicken though not draoracM when 41 2nd to Great Aspect (8-1 1) to a 6 runner Haydock 
affair (71. 0625. gooSHugSl KRWENS(S(M/prom«sr*g3*l6eh.to FaBngLear(94)n 
a Yarmouth maxwn (71. £964, good to firm. Aug 21 , 20 ran). LORD JUSTKX (8-7) laded 
iloutiohmsh 10*1 WibehrafSamefla Sam [&7) at Haydock (1m. £3175. good. Sept 5, 
18 ran). NONSUCH PLACE (8-11) only 5th of B to Angara Abyss (94) beaten 13KI at 

— 4)maSateburyma«den(7t. 

tsvounte when 3KI 


406230 THRONE OF GLORY (I 
044024 FOOLISH TOUCH (B) | 
000032 JMXEBLMRJMI 
200000 HBNRCKflid 


1 544. 


9-9-12 

P)* 
OMcMelO 


030004 MBS PRIMULA (Kavi) W 
■HMMPOiJia) ra 


200000 CAPEA8HJTYH 
101023 PENDOR DANCER 
000004 BAY BAZAAR M 
004010 WAHIMU.LAI 
941230 NATIVE RULCTl 
000810 RUSSIAN 


ID 

IfMChanderiK Stone 444 C Dwyer 1 

IrLkflM McCormack 44-1 _ SCauthanll 

1 (DPta) Denys SnBh 54-12 LCtmockS 

antkw 34-11 D Casey <7)5 

(C-O) (M PousQ N Bycroft 34-11— R Beat CT 13 
hoy 34-11— A ShodtaS) 14 
MW Easterby 4-84 MBMi2 


28 


(Caknac Tool 8 Eng Ltd) AW Jonas 11-74 
004002 DEBACH REVENGE (Mrs C Mte) M Tompkins 4-7^ HFVyO 


Kempton, prevfousty(9-0]amucht»nar2liil3rdtoOnie 
£1 144. good to linn. June 25. 9 ran). STRING SECTION “ 


| beaten 1 


4-1 Pendar Dancer. 5-1 Throne of Gtary. 4-1 Bay Bazaar. 13-2 Detach Revenge. 

Blair. Fooish Touch. 1 d-i 


3rd to My Noble Lord 19-0) 31 Bn i ii.m; Barter a ptomisifM 2 1 3rd to Launes Wamor (9- 
Hia Sam IB-11) 1Y,i2nd at Sandmen (7L £4273. r 


l) vMh Sai 

Satac Ben: STRING SECTION 

3.0 DICK PEACOCK HANDICAP (£4,623: 1m) (13) 


(km, July 23. 10 ran). 


I 01 » IlK mw. I O-OJ I MO lUIW UimUBMWE PM)| 

I winner (51. £>>55a good to Brm, July 26. 7 ran). BAY BA- 
nd away 5th. THRONE OF GLORY (9-6) II ftd oM7 to 
but (61. £1659. good to fkm. Sept 9). BAY BAZAAR (84) 


002101 ALL FAIR (8) (□) (S Dnsonre) P Hasten 5-9-7. 
"I STYLE (Mrs N Lem) G La* " 


ms 34-4., 


1 101411 

000002 READY WIT ©) (Mra R Tehnantt R Hannon 5-92^ 

020300 XHAI (O (M Tonpkins] M Tampions 444 . — ~. 

034042 KWQHTS SECRET (D)(N Westbrook) MH Easterby 54-12- 
0-00000 KtNG« BADGE <D)(F[ Buchan) 

001000 SK WKMORE (USA) (C-O) (K CroontEM 
000003 SHEUMAN(OfoM||||^HH 


.. G French 11 

PWakhoa 10 
D McKay* 


. GStarkey 12 
— MBkchl 
ICarWeO 


(C-O) (K Cowxi) t Whynws 44-7 E Guest (3) 6 

by) K Stone 444 PBwke(7)13 


8-1 Rosakin wknar. Jackie Blair, Foafesh Touch, 10-1 Rambling Rhmr. 

FORM: RAimUNG RIVER out of first 9 last time. (84) had KING CHARLEMAGNE (94) 
4i back In 4th when Newcastle winner (51, £4550. 

ZAAR (7-ID) was another sh ‘ 

Duffer's 
was 1141 
Beaten 

4tn (61. £1974. good. Sell. It) rahL JACKIE BLAIR (7-1M *1 2nd o*13lo George WMern 
(8-7) atsandowntst. £3158.gpod. Aug 30). KSS PRIMULA (7-7)4HI4th to Cathartoes 
Wei (94) at Beverley (5*. £4084. good to soft. Aug 28. 8 ran). PENDOft DANCER 3rd at 
EOmbnigh on Monday, pravtoudy (7-7) II 2nd of IB to Ardrox Lad (94) at Haydock (5f. 
£3402. good. Sent 5). KING CHARLEMAGNE (84) was not In first 9. DEBACH 
REVBtGE (7-10) M 2nd to Lady Cara (8-5) at Ripon(5l. £2331. soft. Aug 26.21 ran). 
PQDOR DANCER (8-11) was 541 back In 5th and BAY BAZAAR (84) n3 in' ~ 

: THRONE OF GLORY 


1 first 9 


DEVON & EXETER 


18FFPP CWVmNOWGTkanar 6-10-13 — 
19 BP STOHEYAHDWRWMana 7-10-13- 


JN 


Going: good, hurdle course; good to firm, 
chase 


9-» Jenmny Qufcktt. 4-1 Mrtuba l«L 94 Sweat Sofidtor. 
6-1 todon Major. 8-1 Wriofic. 10-1 Lance Pmau. 12-1 others. 


2.0 NEWQUAY CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS NOVICE 
HimDLE (£698: 2m If) (14 runners) 

1 0301 HADOAK (USA) BPattn 5-11-10 CEvm 

2 0-12 SEDGEWELL LADY M Pipe 4-1 14 J Lower 

3 OFOO BBfS WAY K Bndgwstar 7-114 NOrton 

5 P/0- FAST SERVICE CHoman 7-1 1-0 R Gomel 

8 UGHT THE LOT JJenkns 5-114 MAHeme 

10 P-22 PMSWXTOJJerldns 6-114- NON RUW Cn 


a JO BBC RADIO DEVON NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: 
£930: 2m If) (11) 

1 11 IdfiUEZ (USA)(C-D) M npe 114 P Scudamore 

2 31 NOBLE vatWG mS MaOor 11-3 M H yringloa 

3 « BSXtOCK K Bewwo 1O-I0L— ,-BPUwe* 

4 CHATTERSPARK S Dow 10-10 R Guest (7) 

6 3 GAY CARUSO F Jordan 10-10 C Sm4h 

9 GHOFARDBsworti 10-10 C 


13 OOP- CHARLESTON (XQRGE (USA) R Shepherd 4-10-12 

15 GIOVANNI S Motor 4-10-12 G Laodai 

18 0 LOCH BLUE S Dow 4-10-12 R Guest 


10 3222 HOtC OR AWAY J Baker 10-10. 
12 44 VANTAST1C Mrs JPHmwi 10-10- 




S Sherwood 


13 2 VICEROY MAJOR G Kmderstay 10-10 — _ S She 

18 00 PLADDA PROCESS P Melon 106— GCttodM 

19 WATCH HER GO MERtanos 106 PBarton 


19 POD- PHYLL-TARQUN T Forster 6-10-9 

20 -23P EKAYTEE I DM 4-10-7. 

21 O- FLAME FLOWER N Kerm* 4-10-7 

22 33-2 LADY FIREPOWER R Holder 4-10-7. 

23 LYDACOTT STAR A Congdon 4-10-7 


64 Mdcndez. 7-2 Nobis Viang. 5-1 Gay Caruso, 8-1 
viceroy Major. 10-1 Vancastfc; 12-1 Bedrock. 14-1 others. 


3-1 Fast Service. 10030 Lady Ffcvpowt 
Lady. 6-1 Haddak, 6-1 Giovanni. 12-1 others. 


WMacFMand 
_ DWremecott 
F irepower. 4-1 Sedgewel 


Devon selections 

By Mandarin 


2.0 Lady Firepower. 2.30 Rapid Gunner. 3.0 

«• I Je * J 4 A 117 


Jimminy QuickiL 3.30 Melendez. 4.0 Wonder 
Wood 4 JO Si 


ISmanRepfy. 


4.0 FIRST NATIONAL SECURITIES HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£2229: 2m 5f) 04) 

1 00-1 WONDER WOOD (OR Hotter 7-11-11 Bex) P Hchanls 

3 000- C0WTY PLAYER (£)C Jackson 9-11-8 R Hyatt 

4 21 F3 AMAHnsS(C)G Baldno 0-114^.. R Guest m 

6 002 C00MBE SPOTT (BF) J ukar 5-11-3 L Harvey (7) 

9 130- UNGTOR HZ) D Banns 5-104 PMchoto 

JO 104- DEW H Hotter 5-10-7- — — N CataMB 

11 01 4P SUP UP (C-0) F G ray 6-196 — ■ — -.EMurpky 

12 402 FLYWG OFRCER (B) (Q M Pipe 9-10-<„ P Sc»d«re 

13 F It IIABt DtPPA W Foher 9-10-3 GChw1«Joo« 

14 IIM> AR SPACER Hodges 7-KH) BPPtofi 

15 3-22 CARFLAX (USA) G Ham 8-100..- . ■■■■...■ .. — 

17 0003 PASS ASHORE (B)MQkver 7-104 RDWtoOdy 

18 000- BLACK COmEGThomer 8-104 P" 


2J0 PETERS NOVICE SELLING HURDLE (£602: 

2m Ifrflty 

1 ACTION MAH ft BtoMr 5-11-7 PMehefc 

2 344 MGHRSFDTuckar 5-11-7 SMMeM 

3 340 RAPD GUNHEft JM (USA) J Edwards 5-11-7. PBMn 

4 P- ANGESVDeORHOtter 4-114 P Morphy 

5 0 GOOO SHOOTING J8rjaoy4.il -5 C Davies 

03 fflJLPHARJJenkms 4-11-5 JWMto 


21 -0UU BLACK EARL I Wanfle 9-1 04. 


POMT 


4.1 Rytog Officer. 9-2 Krngtor. 5-1 Aimnttts, 6-1 Wonder 
Wood. 8-1 Coomfae Spirit. 10-1 Carfiex. 14-1 others. 


423 RELZACOCCMEA (6) WGM Timer 4-11-5 

TiacyTaner(7) 

ITS WAN W 6 NJtoHr t-1H_ A Sharpe 


4 JO BBC RADIO CORNWALL HANDICAP CHASE 

(£1,70$: 2m If) (10) 

1 P44 WARNS FOR UBSURE D Gandoffo 8-124 _ P Barton 

2 220- SMART REPLY (USA) R H«Jges 6-11-t3 J WWta 

3 24P CB.T1C STORY J Jantans B-T1-3 - — SSoWh EaSea 

4 FF4 BOLT THE GATEOWfiams 7-11-2 GMcCourt 


0 LOW RATION K Bridgwater 3-105 WWonttogtan 

0 SPIBOTO MAQWUA M Pipe 3-10-S J Lows (7) 


6-1 


154 Gutphar. 7-2 Mxa Cocdnea. 5-1 Hgt 
SptonrfidMagnoka.3-1 Rapid Gunner. 10-1 others. 


Hgh Reef. 


6 1112 JHSTANMCUS 

7 3-33 UICYFARJ 

9 3133 SPAMSHGOD 

11 044 MZMA 

12 04-2 AB0USHA8UN 
14 P00- MSS ASWAN 


N Thomson IfrHMO OMonbfn 
■104 - — -- S McNeH 


11-10-7 — PMdwIa 

. . >10-4 George Krdght 

iG Han 6-104. - B Powtfl 

Scott 7-104 McaRVidmy 


3.0 CHANNON & ROWE MACHINERY SERVICES 
NOVICE CHASE (£2.042 3m If) (15) 

1 Ml JtoBaiYOUHXTT Forstsr&J1-72 HI 


Lucytar. 5-1 

6-1 Ahoutoabun. 8-1 Werner For Letotra, 


7-2 Britanncus. 4-1 


Spanish 
10-1 others. 


God, 


2 0-21 M01AN MAJQHpn M gs PS& nes 9-11-8 1 HMeharts 
RIB LANCE PWVATER Pocock 6-11-6 


4 1F4U SWHTSOUOTOfl 

5 p- BARTON PMNCEK 


Peter Hobbi 

j King 7-114 — Si 

-11-4. 


6 4P-F BROWNmORNWGM Tomer 10-11-4 A Sharpe 

9 MR FWSK K Bafciy 7-11-4. -AJm « 

10 0P/F NO UWT R HodMS 7-11-4 

12 /D43 STORES GOD? We»i 8-1 1-4 MrS Watp] 

13 964 vmftOUCG Hun 7-11-4— -—B^wil 

M 224/ WMWUENArWtoS-11-4-— Lfltopraflettl 

15 994 CArrMSaOSES DOW 5-114 

16 3440 MAJWAHtlMP«» 5-114 —PI 


• John Vligo, the snooker player, is keeping 
bis fingers crossed that enough of the four-day 
accep to rs for Friday's Ladbrokes Ayr Gold Cup 
are pulled out overnight to enable bis horse Jokist 
io run in the big sprint. Jokist. winner of his last 
three races, has a handy 7st 3 lb, but his 
participation hinges on at least six withdrawals, 
among those weighted above the roan gelding. 
One almost certain absentee wfll be top weight 
Bollin Knight, according to trainer’s son urn 
Easterby. 


lingfield results 

Going; good 


24 (SI) 1. ABHAAJ (A Murray. 5-1* 2, 


Ctwriao [Pat Eddery, 11-1 Oftreh^Qwry 


16 Godtord, 


Prido (B Thomson, 14-1 
100-30 Su»r Surprise '~ 

20 Luck Be A Lady. 25 Always A Lady 

(4th). Aunt Francos Jdvikoina. 33 

braguea. Lundy brio. Maytak- DoS, 
TSasaranda. 13 ran. NR: Fmckaa Lady. 

It. 2KL 4L *\. 2L H Thomson Jones at 

Nowmarfcet Tote: £440; £1.60. £1^40, 

£1.20. DF: £240- CSF: £1046. Irrun 
0075380. 


230 (lm 


Thomson, 14-1); 


Eddery. 3-1): 3. 
Cauttien. 6-4 1 


lav). ALSO RAN: 7 1 
Queen (5th). 6 rana The 


(S 


PateE^i),^ I 


ftau iin rw Sn'Tnunr. 

SheerCtas!l7nlSky.12ran.2£lKl. 15L 
41 31. R J WBSams at Nowma/kot To®: 

£12.80; £240. £1.40, E1.20l DF: S20JSO. 

CSF: £52-78. 2mn 1346sec. Winner aott 
tor 1^50 guanas k> C. Crawtoy LAL 


3J)(7M40yd) 1 . SWUULLHE ® Cl 

11-10 tav): t Jut A non er W c 
11-4): 3. On® (Pat Eddery. 5-1). 


Cuuthan, 

Carson, 


f . also 

1:7 Lourios Warrior (4th), 12 Pstomody 

(6th), 20 Hard Act (5*1, 33 u- memit f 

ran. NR: Grmnldad. 2L sft hd. 1L 2L 2KL H 


CteL Nowmarwt. Tow mi^ ci50. 


£1.80. DF: 
3S.GSMC. 
3-30 (1m 


£340. CSF: 


Imin 


4ft 1. HIGH NNOWL 
TTiomaan. 51U2. Nortbam AmMhyat (F 


fddary, Evms^^^lfin SftMy (B 


ftousa. 4-1). 
BdeveMe Not 
Head Of 


L 20 b 


Haro. 


Slam Riming. 50 St h Tt® Dark, 
oresaflu 11 ran. 2X1.41, 1W. 2541, 


Bradmores — 

3L S HiUs at Lamboum. TotK £7 JO; E2J20, 
£1.10. £1-50. DF: £3-60. CSF; £555. 2ran 
3902B8C. 


4J)(5l)1,VBtYANBAY(SCauihen. 12- 
1X2, Km Nota(Pat Eddery. 10000 lav): 
3. Alrayu (B R0US8. 14-1). ALSO RAN: 7-2 


. Atrayu (B Rouse. 14*1). . 

Mss Bimwy fStt^L Bay Wonder /«!>). 6 

Mbs Pantawcctna iMSaHnaapi). 14 

Verbw. 33 Ring Of Peart. 50 aandaU 


Beauty. Line Lnchme. 11 ran. KL ah hd. 
1L a II. M Dickinson at Martfon. Tote: 

£930 £2JM. M50. £8.70. OF: £14.70. 

CSF: £5053. Inin ll.TSsec. 

4J0(71) 

Onto Tom . 

Evidence (Ml 1 Thomas, _ 

JrmalA Me Gtona 25-1). ALSO RAN; 100- 

30 tav AnnabeSira. 1W Hopeful Katie. 8 

Lucky Starkist. 9 Pomtod Lady (5th). 10 


aa. inn li.rusue. 

1 1. HAYWAIN (M HUfe. 25-1fc 2. 
m (B Thomson. IB-1); 3. New 
(M L Thomas, 12-1): 4, Hkrata 


CastabeL Sydonbye. 11 Nelson's Lady, 
s-. 14 Indian Summer. 16 b^j 


Soto anger. 


niti wifllbiqMM! ISA I«I| "Mi 0 

HflS at Lamooum. TatK £5640: 35.70. 
£7 JO, £3130, £640. Dft £146040 CSF: 
£372.18. Trieast: £ 4^39.34. imin 


2SJ07sea 


: £37-70 


Yarmouth results 


! 


(tokij good 

2.15 (60 1. PtLGRBI PRINCE 
Wtgham. 33- it Z BoU Httaamy 
HoUnswi. 7-2 rav); 3, Causeway Foot 
WUams. 14-1L AISO RAN: Q Rustic “ 

Lisashem fiih). 7 Lady Sunday 

(4th). 8 Enchanted Court 10 Man, Acaca. 

12 PearUc, 20 Ftoan Reef (684. 25 Sotant 

KrtohL 33 Leg Glde. 12 ran. 1L41, 1L 2KL. 

1L M Usher at Lamboum. Tote: £2^20: 


£6.70, £2.60. £3 30. DF: £16A50. CSF: 

£12801. Wire 


Wtoner bought in for 2£00gns. 

2A5 (Bft 1. ITS BEEN RUMOURED (J 
Carr, 11-lt 2. Lran Lena (T Ives. 11-4 
tav]: 3. The CMppenbam Mm (R 
Cochrane. 5-1 LALw RAN: 5 HazaTs Sri 
(5th). 11 Four Owns. Soham's' Taytor 12 
Huntaluttn Lymey. Nations Rasa (6 fa?. 
Nightdress. 14 Fantime “ 


.... . _ (4thL 33 

Maureen's Cavalier. Little Law. 12 ran. 


1KL 3L 8. 31, 2%L R Srnp|Oft at Upper 


Lanttoun. TqSK £31.80; £600. 

£1.70. DF: £84.44 CSF: £3933. Winner 
botighfin tor3,400grw. 

3.15 (lm fin 1. TAP 'EM TWICE (G 
Cater, 12-1): i Aatomemtor (T Ives. 64. 
3. Cmaceoos (W ft Swinbum. 5-1). 
* RAN; 13-2 Dawn Loch, 8 Three 


favfcJL 

ALSO 


Times A Lady, 10 Grey Salute 15214. 11 
Cynomte (4th). 20 La Duse (Btfi). 8 ran 
nk. ia hd. XL 154L M Jarvis at 
Newmartun. Tote: £8.80 £220, £1.10. 
£1 Dfi £820. CSFS £28.17. 

3.45(71)1. MOMnatANA (P Robinson, 
13-2): 2 King BaRndeer(G Carter, 14-1fc 
3, Global Lady (M Wlgham. 18-1L ALSO 


RAN: 11-4 tavGhade Of Pate (4th), 9-2 
Mummy* Luck. 13-2 Riot Brigade (fth), 8 
WMsh Arrow. 9 Old Eros. 10 Sheer 
" ird.10ran.11H, 

NawmarksL 
£3.40. DR 
£54.60. CSF: £8239. Tricast £1 27295- 
4y4S (lm 3f 100yd) 1. HOROWITZ Q 
Cochrane. 4-5 Mk Z Homeric r 
WUams. 12-1); 3. Jtoteee J amb oree 0 
RoMnson. 14-1). ALSO RAN: 5 Patrick's 
Star “ " ' 

Guest (4i 

£130, £330. DR £520. CSR 

£950. 

5.15181) 1. EASY UNEfTVWBams. 5-1 
Z Taytor Of Sahara (D McKay. i 
Taru^-te (8 Orosstey. 33-k AU» 
RAM: 4-1 lav Buthayna (5th). 9-2 Beech- 
wood Cottage (Btti). 8 Corrals Joy, Crasta 
Leap. 143Utrtwndoubtoyou PHW, 18 
FarnUe Rosa. 33 The Lidgne Star. 10 ran. 

2»l.1Lnk.21. 21. P Hasten at NewmaricaL 

Tote: £6.40; £2.10, £1.40, £630. DR 

£530. CSR £25.11. Tricast £590.65. 
Plaoapot £43^ 


Redcar 


Going: firm 


2J30 (7T) 1. ZIO PBffHNO (A Sfnults, 12- 
:Z Certain Award (N Connorton. 11-1 


iKWon, ll-l ]► 

14 Ry. 11-1 Jt- 
h. 18-1). ALSO 


favt 3. Hop t on s Chance (M 

tavk 4. Jeraey Maid (M Birch. 18-1) 

RAN: 11 |Mbv Pokerfayes 12. 12 
Words. Satiraan, 14 Forever Tingo (5th). 
Thirteenth Friday. Long Bay. Porszan 

_ . rtSaamj 


Cool 


BoRSL 16 CSssaTHka-S 
Enough. MarsjVana, Quafltak King, Reo- 
Oflea. Corncharm. Vendradi Treire. flim- 
ning Bui. 20 Top OTh‘ Lane, 33 Sing Out 
Loud. Low Ftyor. Bubs Boy. Just A Bft, 
Harioytad Lad. Just The Ticket. Bott 
RoMtsy. Matasuc Star. Spanish Infanta. 
Master Music. 30 ran. 31. 1 KL 1 KL KL KL 
Mrs C Uoyd-Jones at Aberrate. Tom: 
£16-90; £4.ta E1JBL £250, frtJO. OR 

£49.10. CSF: £13970. TriCSSt C138&9B. 


30 Dm 20 1. CtHJ-YWESTDN (G 
D — 


Menofia.1T ' . . 

5-t). ALSO RAN: 11-2 Chariton Kings. 10 

‘ Aittea (4th). 12 Country Carnival 


. Pauls Secret (5tti). 14 Daiyaen Pass. 

■'Answer. -- 


Man. 16 Bott Answer. 25 SgfcN^ IM 


Torriggb. 12 ran. »L 4L 1KL . _ 
Prescott at Newmarket Tote: £240; 

||J^£1O0, £100. OR BSjSO. CSF: 


3JD (lm 81) 1. KOOKY’S PET 


Mackm, 16-1); Z 
Mchoite.8-1K3.SS 


(R Morse, M 


Orevto Lady (K Bradshaw. 20- 


RAN: 7-1 jt-tav Busted flavour 
~ ter. Regency Square, 9 
10 LouoLanclng. 12 I'm 
Excopoonai (6th). Nugote. tvorrow, 14 Hot 


1 L ALSO t 


Batty, 16 Sarim, Sdcfasne. 7he Hough, 
20 Mariner's Star. Glendeny. 18 nanT%, 

nk.4Lshhd.2LE Bdn af Newmarket 


Tots: £3520; £850. £1 J». £220. £10.30. 

OF: £SJ^ wrkir^cr 


horse. CSF: £148.12. Tricast 
4J)(lm 61 160yd) 1 . POKEYS PRDE(M 


««). 


25 Gorthman, 33 Grime's Own, 


^ 100 Baschendai. Iff ran. VH. 

2KI. 1& nk 4L R Sttealher to NewnwtaL 

To»: £280; £1.10. E2JM, £1ja DR 

£5Jff CSR £1685. 


U0Sf)1. LAMB BECK (LChamock.9- 


nfcwu 14 w a i wi i imkR, *M 

Be0e (4tti), Bad Payer (6th). The Great 
Match. 12 Miss OrunmondV 16 


Rosie’s 


Glory. 20 Danadn. 

Swmrond Princess. 12 ran. 1KI, DM. if 

nk, sh hd. J Jefferson ax Matter. Tote: 

£5.90: E2JKL £120. £200. DR £3.40. 

CSF: £1223. Tricast £8229. 


5J) (lm) 1. 

OAana. f-i); 2 zausiM HOBens, s-i): a, 

Caitwiac Lad (M wood, 5-1). ALSO RAM 
9-2 fev Regal rader (Sth). 11-2 Sfippwy 
Max m 10 Rmcfig*. Gewraony, 
Reata Pass, 14 Drass Up, 20 cal For 




. -Stv. 33 Banks And 

Braes. Prtmeaa Pmoa. GuU Of Goto. 


Meksdy Ltoer, Sawdi« Jack.^vrtt^Soon, 


Tower Bay. 22 rat 

^ KL Vi. 1»L 2*1. 

>ML ft Hoflhsiiead at Upper London. 
Tow £8.40; £330, tAM SZOOTW: 
£7500. CSR £8232 
Ptocepat E9JK. 


Blinkered first time 


ayr: 3.0 Kamaress. 43 Special .vintage. 




YARMOUTH: 4.15 Rough Danes. Cue 


YARMOUTH 


4 431 HANOOF (U SA) M S toute 3-90 W R S eW n toi 6 

5 1303 FRENCH RUTTER RSheattrar 333 — B Cochrans 1 


7 2900 RUSH HERO (USA) (B) R Shaathor 4-8-8— WHyaa12 
4023 MAGIC TOWSICBnttam 3-M G Bauer 4 


Draw: 51-1 m, Mgh mmbers best 

2.15 NEWTOWN SELLING HANDICAP (£1,007: 7f) 
[18 runners) 


1 0000 GMNLERS DREAM 

3 OH V ARNABKMRChara 

4 0009 SPRING PURSUIT 

6 00-0 SHELLEY NAME I 

7 0000 RUSSaLFLYra 

11 0001 mppychppyW 


DAWtoon9-104)T1 

63-10 SKateMhyS 

PMaUn533 G Baxters 

14-9-4 — 18 

R Hoad 4-8-4 — A Mackay 11 
MW Easterby 3-9-0 

laO OZaHEATWGIBFFNCi 

14 0042 GHEENHtt lS BOY M Ryan 39-13 RCacteaiwlB 

15 0009 7IDDLYEYETYE (B) I Vickers 5-8-13 —15 

17 -020 ajNCOIE LAD (8) CNoimes 4-8-12 M Wghxnl 

20 0043 KS> COOL (FRJRHottntwad 39-10 — SPaitoll 
22 0000 JACQU JOY K Ivory 399. 


12 0043 HKHLAND BALL GWragg 39-2 PftoMraoa3 

16 1404 BLACK COMHTY M Ryan3-7-11 PBanurdmiO 

17 B30D WESTRAY (USA) RHoinehead 4-7-7 ACuttnmiT) 11 

18 3112 SWEET AlBCAifflA(B)J Shaw 3-7-7 — A Mackay 5 

20 900 MARKELKIS R BOSS 3-7-7 ML Tboom 2 

21 3220 WESHAAM (USA) B Hanbury 394 GDuttiekJ7 

9-2 Vague Melody. 5-1 HanocH. Sweat Alexander, 

11-2 Magic Towar. 6-1 Vfesthaam, 8-1 HigMand Baa. 




24 2400 COWOSSI M Janes 8-89 1 

Mill" I'l l 


fanpkkK&94.. 

29 0040 MQHLAND TALE A Jarvis 494. 

30 MOO DeOUGUAMde499- 


■ QBwrhre a roiT 
. NON-RUNNER G 
GDofSaM2 
■3 


3j 05 GOLDEN JUBILEE CHALLENGE TROPHY 
HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £7,895: lm 21] (6) 

1 1112 LOCH SEAFORTH (D) (BF) H CfiCl 39-7.™. WRyan t 

2 4013 NIGHT OUT PERHAPS G wngg 394_... PRoUnSM4 

3 119 OPEN HStO(C) A Stewart 397 M Roberta 2 

4 MOD GORGEOUS ALGEmiONC Brittain 394... G Baxter 3 


5 4403 MARSHAL MACDONALD WHOkten 3-7-10 B Donley 5 

6 1221 HARD AS MON (D) P Hariam 37-10 (Sex) TWMaawO 


11-4 Hand As tom. 7-2 Night Out Perhaps. Open Haro, 
tel MacDonald. 


4-1 Loch Saaforlh. 3i Marshall 


10090 Kara Cod. 32 Nippy Cbtopy. 11-2 Greenhns Boy, 
lOghtond TateTs-l Hemhyiff/lWhThef * 


i Sal, 10-1 Jacqul Joy. 


4.15 DENIS BUSHBY CLAIMING STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£2,495: 71) (19) 


Yarmouth selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Nippy Chippy- 2.45 Bolero Magic. 3.15 
Sweet Alexandra. 3.45 NIGHT OUT PERHAPS 
(nap). 4.15 Tina'sBeauty. 4.45 Officer Krnpke. 

By Our Newmarket Conespondent 
2.15 Heaihgriff. 2.45 Saker. 3.15 Sweet Alexan- 
dra. 3.45 Hand As Iron. 4.15 Rough Dance. 4.45 
Officer Krupke. 

Michael Seely's selection: 3.45 Night Out 
Perhaps. 


1 00 BUMPTIOUS BOY RHohnsheed 99. 

3 0440 CASTIE COMET R Harmon 99. 


™ S Perks 2 
A Murray 18 
WRyan 6 


4 3348 WULEYT) HUN G Prite nJ-Gordon 

8 042 ROUGH OANCEffiW Jarvis 99 RCockraaetS 

9 5IC8JAN TONY P Haafam 99 Mehne(7)12 

10 1000 TELEGRAPH FOLLY R Hoad 99 A Mackay 1 

12 3081 DOHTY BABY H Whang 99 R Guest 8 

14 0033 LAST STAID (C-nJImHoy 99 PRefatosonlO 

17 » NOUEGPriUnnM3onlon8-lO — G Dnfttott 17 

18 CHOtSUN P Hastam 89 — JScaBy (7)5 

19 0B4 QUEPASA(niBF)PHaaiam89 TWtfam»4 

20 2140 COLLEGE WIZARD M Tompkins B-7 M RanmerS 

26 0 MAIN BRAND W Doorman 84 Tkm14 


)■ 



2.45 DE COURCY CHAMPAGNE MAIDEN STAKES 

(£1,433: 1m) (14) 

1 2000 DONOR Mrs CRMvey 492 MWMmtt 

3 438 AUCMNATEG Harwood 399 AMreraytt 

4 3400 BOI DORADO (USA) BHanfiury 999 WRSMMwnS 

5 BLHXSOEfUSAlG Ktofler 396 G Carter 8 

6 2 BOLBIO MAGK (USA) (BF)H Cecil 399- WRyan 11 


27 2440 MUSICAL CHORUS GBkW>84„ 

28 TO PRINCESS IBCMCO R Boss 8-4 _ 

29 0030 TWfS BEAUTY GBlian 84 

30 0 FVE NO IDEA P Hastam 82 

31 RAUNCHY RfFA I Vickers 82 

32 TAYLOR CARES D LesM 82 

2-1 Last Staid. 3-1 No Ue. 6-1 

Pasa, 10-1 Bumptious Boy, f 


B Crosstey 3 
. M Hobart* 7 


PBtoomfiaUIO 
> T Lucre K 


„RVk*m(7)13 
M Wlgham 11 


Dance, 8-1 Qua 
Tina's Beauty. 


7 F0UN1MN OF Y($jTH^Ryai i399 — RCadme? 

PriWianMJorrton 


445 E B F HASTINGS MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£3,162:61) (14) 


8 2020 MGHESTPEAKG 

9 03 MR PASTRY GWragg 399 


398 GDoOWdS 
P Robinson 2 


13 0032 HWARTMP Kotoway 399 Gay KaOawaym 10 

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T 


return 
to save the game 


bis is going to be a bit of a 
bleat, 1 am afraid. 

It is not that I think that 
“gush cricket is in irrevere- 
. ible decline: Far from it We 
are losing more Test matches than we 
used to because, with the singular 
exception of Australia, the opposition k 
so much better than it was. 

Most days and on most county 
grounds, there is something pretty good 
to be seen from our home-bred cricket- 
ers. But there is a growing cancer, too, 
and 1 shall come to that. 

Several young English batsmen of the 
highest promise are establishing them- 
selves. Whitaker, of Leicestershire, has 
had the sort of season thm would have 
satisfied Denis Compton in his prime. 
Half a dozen others, all under 25, have 
done wonderfully well in what has 
become a fiercely, often hazardously 
competitive game. Every county would 
now have at least one batsman they 
believe to be destined for great thing* i 
expect they always did, but at least they 
are still there. 

The fielding, too, is quite extraor- 
dinarily keen and generally of a high 
standard. Runs are saved, especially on 
the boundary, that would have been 
written off not many years ago. At the 
end of a typical one-day match, few 
trousers are unstained from where the 
players have been throwing themselves 
around. You would never have found- 
the old county pros doing that, though 
some of the amateurs might. 

But it is bowlers that make the most 
successful sides, and the shortage of 
these with English qualifications is a 
cause of real concern. 

County cricket has allowed itself to 
become dominated by West Indian fast 
bowlers. That is what is eating away at 
the English game. 

Ten years ago. only two of the 1 7 first- 
class counties engaged a West Indian to 
bowl fast for them; now 10 do. Next year 
it will be at least 11, possibly 12, 
Warwickshire havingjust signed a little- 
known Antiguan express, and Not- 
tinghamshire have an eye on another 
should Richard Hadlee leave them. The 
more there are, the more fingers get 
broken and the less need there is for 
Englishmen to take wickets or to learn 
howto. 

A breed ofEnglish bowlers is develop- 
ing who spend their time either 
concentrating on containment in one- 
day cricket or aiming to shut up an end 
in the championship while the hired 
assassin is resting between forays. 

It is no coincidence that Neil Foster, 
the only Englishman to have taken over 
100 wickets this season, plays for Essex 
or that Essex have sent out three of their 
bowlers to play for England this 
summer. It has been allowed to happen 
by the absence from their side of . a 
Marshall or a Walsh, a Clarice or a 
Holding. 

Counties allow 
England to 
lay the price 



-> THE 
STATE OF 
ENGLISH 
CRICKET 


England have not won any 
of the 1 1 Test matches they 
have played in the past 
year-They have lost 5-0 in 
West Indies, and 2-0 and 1- 
0 at home to India and New 
Zealand. Farther, there is a 
mood of surliness about the 
game. What has gone 
wrong? And what can be 
done about it? 


John Woodcock, Cricket 
Correspondent , launches a 
three-part series by people 
who write about the game, 
play it, and watch it 


' On the television recently, in a 
delightful interview, Pat Pocock drew a 
contrast between baiting in his first Test 
match against Wes Hall and Charlie 
Griffith, at Bridgetown in 1968, and 
playing 16 years later against the 
bowling of Malcolm Marshall at. the 
OvaL HaO and Griffith tried to bowl 
him out, and Marshall to knock him out 
or frighten him out. 

D -enms Amiss, now with 100 
fixst-dass hundreds to his 
name, refers to the rapid 
growth of short-pitched fast 
bowling. If England could 
field four fast bowlers of the best West 
Indian calibre, they would win a lot of 
Test matches and lose very few. But that 
would not restore the balance, 'and 
especially the charm, of the En glish 
game. 

The combination of weak umpiring, 
the virtual abdication by the Inter- 
national Cricket Conference of its 
responsibilities of guardianship, the 
introduction of the helmet and the ethic 
which considers the hareman himwlf to 
be as fair a target as the wicket he 
defends, is malignly influential 

i or the rule which limits 


in one-day 
cation of it,. 




N o doubt Ellison, being 
broadly of the same bowling 
type, learnt from the Austra- 
lian Alderman when they 
first played together for 
Kent This season, though, Alderman’s 
presence has reduced Ellison's opportu- 
nities of bowling himself hack into 
form. 

It is a vicious circle. Counties import 
fast bowlers to boost their champion- 
ship chances (and hence their finances), 
but at a high cost to the success of the 
England team. This is not the march of 
progress or the inevitable process of 
evolution; it . is short-sighted and 
unfortunate. 

To me, the damage that is being done 
to cricket generally by the violence that 
has crept into it matters much more, 
titan England's failure to win Test 
matches. Quite apart from anything 
else, it restricts the art and beauty of 
batsmanship. Neville Card us used to 
write that cricket mirrors the customs 
and conventions and, I suppose, the 
vulgarities of the times. We Live now in 
a permissive society, and cricket reflects 
it. 


The extension 
short-pitched 
.cricket, or some m 
should be a priority. . 

At the end of a (fay’s play in early Au- 
gust, in which* Marshall had been a 
central figure, one of the umpires said it 
had frightened him just to stand and 
watch. 

For as long as anyone can possibly 
remember, there have been those who 
say that there is too much ffrst-dass 
cricket in an English season. 

For the leading players, too, there are 
no free winters any more. Three weeks 
ago Gower found it-all too much. Since 
the last Test match, Gatting has 
dropped himself down the Middlesex 
order. We have one too many one-day 
competitions, which involve so much 
extra travelling and nervous stress, and 
one too many Test matches which, 
while underwriting the counties, under- 
mines their premier competition, the 
championship. 

But for reasons often rehearsed, I am 
not an advocate of 16 four-day 
championship matches rather than 24 
of three days, believing that Parkinson’s 
law would take effect, county member- 
ships would decline (members would be 
getting fewer home first-class m a tch es 
lor their money) and the average 
English pitch would produce too many 
two-day or three-day finishes. 

I prefer certain of the recommenda- 
tions' of the Palmer Inquiry which will 
be reconsidered in November. 


Sixteen three-day championship 
matches and eight of four days, the 
latterlo be played over the weekend and 
all on uncovered pitches, was what the 
Palmer inquiry put forward. 

Two divisions of the Sunday League, 
cutting the fixtures from 16 to eight, 
with a semi-final and a final, and the 
Benson and Hedges Cup competition to 
be played on a knock-out basis, were 
two of their other proposals, with the 
NalWest Trophy staying as it is. 

The surfeit of one-day cricket would 
thus be reduced and the four-day lobby 
accommodated. Whether the counties' 
finances could withstand the limitation 
of' the Sunday League, which has 
become for some a life-support ma- 
chine, will be decided in November. I 
hope so but rather doubt iL 

Now that there is a national, team 
manager (M. J. Stewart), bis appoint- 
ment over a longer term to be confirmed 
next Spring, I like to think that he will 
make wider use of specialist coaches. 

In years gone by, even the best golfers 
— the British Ryder Cup and Walker 
Cup sides among them — would go to 
Addington for Fred Robson, a wizard at 
spotting a technical flaw, to look over 
their game. Most of the best pro- 
fessional golfers have their elder states- 
man or counsellor. 

Not so the cricketers, although John 
Childs does, in feet, put down his 
astonishing improvement since last 
summer (be took only five wickets at 
105.60 apiece in 1985) to having sought 
the help last winter of Fred Timms. 

More use could be made of the video 
camera as an aid to cricket coaching. 
Nick Faldo attributed his record round 
of 62 at Sunningdale last week to having 
taken stock of himself on the video a 
day or two earlier. Limited-overs cricket 
plays such havoc with a batsman’s 
technique — rather as a gale does with a 
golfer's swing— that it requires constant 
revision. 

But the stumps have been drawn on 
another English season. Although the 
Meteorological Office said at different 
limes that the weather was “about 
average”, I can hardly re member a 
summer when so few early mornings 
have had about them the certain scent of 
warmth and sunshine, or when one has 
become so bored reading about one 
man, albeit a remarkable cricketer. 

Botham’s words 
unfair on 
Somerset 


B otham’s appeal against his 
suspension for having smoked 
cannabis cost the TOCB a 
five-figure sum m legal fees, 
and his. more recent public 
utterances on the Somerset “affair” 
have been unhelpful. ‘He is right, of 
course, to be sad that. Garner and 
Richards are havrag4o go, but to imply 
that the Somerset committee know 
nothing about loyalty, after the way they 
have protected him m the past, was not 
fair. But “Who can be wise, amazed, 
temperate and furious, loyal and neutral 
in a moment? No mqn.** Has the hard 
done it again? 

We have much to be grateful for good 
county champions, wilting sponsors, an 
Australian tour to look forward to. 

-I hope, at the same time, that the Test 
and County Cricket Board will heed the 
warning implicit in the unprecedented 
number of broken bones there have 
been in the summer of 1986, and 
address themselves to the constant 
interruptions caused by the comings 
and goings of batsmen and fielders as 
helmets and gumshields and shin guards 
and boxes and breastplates and all the 
other paraphernalia are swapped and 
shuffled around. . 

“I love cricket, you know,” Sir 
Pelham Warner said to me once, as 
though the matter might be in donbL If 
he were to come back, would he fed the 
same today about a game he would find 
so changed? I expea so, but it is 
question that the administrators at 
Lord’s should ask themselves every now 

and again. • 

^TOMORROW: The verdict from two 
Test captains on the game in England: 
Imran Khan and Clive Lloyd 


Youngsters keep flag flying 

_ . ..... .. iMil (a ran M A* 7** 


The rehabilitation of British 
speedway went a stage tether 
with the crashing nctories of 
Young England over Australia 
last week- The matches were 
embarrassingly one-sided but a 
dean sweep ts a dean sweep and 

the young riders Grom the Na- 
tional t jggii 1 underlined once 
more the wealth of talent that 
could, within a couple of years, 
be at die disposal of the British 
League and England's inter- 
national fl- 
Paul Thorp rounded off a 
great season by soaring an 18- 
point maximum in the third 
international at Bir min g h a m 
and Gary Havelock and Andrew 
Sliver again showed outs tandin g 

talent and thirst for victory- 

Another young prodin' coming 
through is Martin Dnnggard, 
aged 17, of Eastbourne, who 



SPEEDWAY 

Keith Mackfin 


totalled 12 points ia 
England's 78-30 victory. 

However, WO mach gloss must 
not be pot on the runaway 
victories over weak AnstraHan 
sides. British speedway has been 
hard hit this season by the fact 


that the E urop ean 

Community (EEC) have opened 
the door to European riders 


had to caD on the New Zea- 
lander Mitch Shbra . 

Adding to England's Joys at 
. the weekend was the remarkable 
retu rn to prantoeace of Peter 
Collins in the world long track 
championship in West Ger- 
maay. 

Suggestions that Coffins was 
over the hUl were sBeaced in the 
long track final as he put up a 
tremeodoas battle -to finish an 
unexpected runner-up to Erik 
Gundersea, who scored 25 
points to Collins’s 18. 


tae neor to riOlipaU IUUS F 

whBe slamming it to the feces of Gaadersen, who has split with 
many riders from Australia and his mentor Ole Qteea. en jo yed 
New Zealand who 


wnrk permits. 

The Wallabies were thin on 
the ground ia terms of riders 
available for s electio n and in one 
of the three toteruathmals they 


— — Olsen, en jo y e d 

hfe victory with particular relish, 
since it gave him some measure 
of revenge over Hans Nielses for 
his defeat in the world individual 
final last month, to which Niel- 
sen finished fourth. 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Branching out with more support 


Intercity, the high-speed Brit- 
ish Rail passenger service, is to 
continue its £100,000 annual 
sponsorship of the National 
Squash Championships and Na- 
tional Squash Challenge, and is 
io develop a third branch into 
the lop competitive levels of the 
game by linking with Cannons 
Club, (he League champions. 

Mike Lancaster, the Market- 
ing Manager of IntetCity. an- 
nounced yesterday the National 
Championships would run un- 
der British Rail support at lean 
Until 1988, with an increased 
prize fond of £33.000 this year. 
The new deal with Chnnons was 
arranged over the same 
timescale. 

The intercity National 
Championships start at Bristol s 
Temple Meads station on 
November 21 while the Na- 


By Colin McQmUan 

lional Challenge is likely to 
attract more than 10,000 entries 
this season with new cathodes 
for non-team playeis in dobs. 

Cannons club is acknowl- 
edged as one of the finest private 
sports and health facilities in the 
country. Suitably situated be- 
neath the arches of Cannon 
Street station in London, it 


narrow victory in the national 
Premier League. They were 
already committed this year to 
buying their own all-transparent 
glass court even before the 
InlfrO'iy ar ra n gement. “We 
want to raise the profile of 
squash in Britain.” the Cannons 
manager, Garry Oliver, said. 

The Cannons team will nato- 


sircci siauon lwuuuu, _ u , j pe ismions team wui naiu- 
serves a huge City membership, tally travel to all away fixtures 


-That Gty connection is im- 
portant to ns. ImerCtiy already 
earns some £150.000 a week, 
more than £7-miliion a year, in 
first-class revenue from 
London's square mite. . This 
connection to the sporting in- 
terests of City workers can only 
be good for us" Lancaster said. 

Cannons is known io boast 
resources beyond the ambition 
of most squash dubs. Last year 
they financed their own team to 


by British Rail, compared to the 
international helicopter flights 
and luxury coaches commonly 
employed last season. Keen 
followers of the game can gam 
similar assistance, but at a price. 
InterCity win, this year, tun a 
first-class squash special from 
Paddington to Bristol on 
■November 27, national finals 
day. It will cost £27.50, includ- 
ing cream tea and a prime seat 
for the matches. 


SNOOKER 

Loyal Thorne 
at Southend 
for new event 

By Sydney Frisian 

WiHie Thome begins the new 
Maichroom snooker tour- 
nament at CUffs Pavilion, 
Southend today with a match 
against Neal Foulds. Thorne's 
loyalty to Barry Hearn's pro- 
fessional team has kept him 
away from the Langs Supreme 
Scottish Masters starting tomor- 
row at the Hospitably Inn, 
Glasgow, an event in which he 
was runner-up last year to 
Canada's Cliff Thortmra. 

Hearn expects the 
Match room tournament to 
toughen his players for ihe hard 
season ahead and although only 
six are in contention, Steve 
Davis thinks it will be as tense as 
the World Championship which 
be hopes to regain. The fust 
rquod and semi-final matches at 
Southend wfll be over 1 1 frames 
and the final over 19. 

Jimmy White, who joined 
Hearn's team too late to be 
included at Southend, will be in 
Glasgow where, tomorrow, he 
will meet the young Scottish 
champion Stephen Hendry, who 
lost 10-8 to Thorne in the first 
round of the World Champion- 
ship at Sheffield last season. 

Earlier in the day. Thorburo 
win play John Patron of Liver- 
pool. Among the eight compet- 
itors is the world champion Joe 
Johnson who begins his chal- 
ge for the prize of only 
£1 3,000 against Alex Higgins on 
Friday. 

NATCHROOM DRAW; W Thome v N 
RxtoTGrtfflhivAUnSOMv 
Grffffchs or Mao; O Taylor v Thome or 
FoiAta. 

LANGS DRAVfeC Thorium vJ Parrott J 
WN» V S Htoidry: a Knowles v K Seven* 
J Johnson v a Hggns. 



England’s sorry 
catalogue of 
summer disaster 


May 24, the Oval): 
s. England 162(55 

lor f 147 2. overs) 


England v India 

Texaco Trophy 

(One-day international series) 
FIRST MATCH (Mai 

India won the toss, t 

overs): India 163 lor f (47.2 overs) 
<M Azharuddin S3 not out, S M 
Gavaskar 65 not out). India won hy 
9 wicket*. 

John Wo odcock: "7?vs was 
England’s worst defeat in one-day 
cneket Not since Australia bowled 
England out in 1948 Had they been 

seen io less advantage at the Oval." 

SECOND MATCH (May 26, Old 
Tiattord): England won the toss. 
India 254 tor 6 (55 overs) (K 

Snkkanth 67, R j Shastri 62 not out. 


England v N Zealand 

Texaco Trophy 

(Onepay international series) 

FIRST match (July 16, Lord s). 
New Zealand won the toss. 
NawZaaiand2T7for8($5ovars)(J 
J Crowe 66); England 170 (48.2 
overs). New Zealand won by 47 
runs. M»-of-thotoatch:JJ Crowe. 

Join Woodcock: "England's bat- 
ing touched new depths of 
incompetence.. -needing 218 to win, 

across a parched outfield and on a 
presentable enough grfcft, they 


were bowled out tor : 


MATCH (July 

Zealand 284 tor 5 


18. OM 



honor own! scoring rate, won the 


CornhiU Tests 

FIRST TEST (June 5. Lord’s): India 
won the toss. Expand 294 (G A 



not out 126, M Amamath 6ft G R 
Ditoy 4 for 146) and 136 for 5. lixBa 
won by 5 wickets. John Woodcock: 

"FoBomng India's victory, rt was 
announced that MAeGatfing. rather 
than Davxf Gower, would lead 
England in the two r emaini ng Tests 
against India. Gower’s record as 
captam at that time (1982-80: P 26 

WSD7L14.” 

SECOND TEST (Juno 19. 
Headngiey). England won the toss, 
tnefia 272 (D B vengsarkar 61) and 
237 (D B Vengsarkar 102 not out; J 
K Laver 4 tor 64. D R Pringle 4 for 
73); England 102 (R M H Binny 5 tor 
4$ ana 128 (S Maninder 4 for 26). 
India boat England by 27Snm and 
won the aaries. 

This was England’s seventh 
successive Test defeat. Peter May. 
the chaam a n of England’s selectors 
spoke ahead the importance of 
‘getting beck to basic pmaptos.” 

John Woodcoc k : ‘Vnty once 
before, just after the Great War, 
have England had such a dismal 
run.” 

THIRD TEST (July 3. 

England won the toss. Era 

(MW Gatting not out 183. 1 

4ft C Sharma 4 tor 130) and 23S (G 
A Gooch 40; C Sharma 6 tor 58); 
tnefia 390 (M Amamath 79. M 
Azharuddm 64) and 174 for 5 (S 
Gavaskar 54; P H Edmonds 4 
31). England drew with lufia. 


SECOND 
TraffordL New 
(55 overs) (M D Crowe 93. R B 
Rutherford 63): England 286 for 4 
(53 overs) (CWJ Athey 142 not out. 
G A Gooch 91). England won by 6 
wickets. 

John Woodc o ck: "England had 
Gooch and Atney to thank tor 
scoring 193 for the first wicket 
Atheys undefeated 142. far and 
away las best innings for England, 
won hm the award as man-oMhe- 
match. “ 

New Zealand won die aaries on 
better overall scoring rate. Man-of- 
the-aerias: England: C W J Athey. 
New Zealand: M Crowe. 

CornhiU Tests 

FIRST TEST (July 24. Lorcf'sL 
Entfand won the toss. England 307 
(M DMoxon 74. D I Gower 62. R J 
Hadlee 6 for 60) and 295 for 6 dec 
(G A Gooch 183); Naw Zealand 342 
(M D Crowe 106. B A Edgar 83, J V 
Coney 51; G R Dilley 4 tor 82, P H 
Edmonds 4 for 97) and 41 tor 2. 
England chaw wMi New Zealand. 

John Woodcock: "This was the 
first draw between the sides in 
England since the Second Test oi 
19s3 and only the second for nearly 
30 years." 

SECOND TEST {, 


Brtoge^New 


ST (August 7, Tram 
Zealand won the K»S. 


John Woodco ck : “The Indians, I 
know, wish there were two Tests to 
come. So do we. As it is it wtil be 
1990 before they return provision- 
ally to play five Tests rather than 
three." 

Man-oMhe-mateti: England: M W 
Gatting. Man-of-the-aeries: Eit-. 
' MW Gatting. India: D B 


256 (D 1 Gower 71. C W J 
Athey 55; R J Hadlee 6 for 80) and 
230 (J E Emburey 75; R J HadkM 4 
for 60); New Zealand 413 (J G 
BracewaU 110. R J Hadlee 68. J G 
Wnght 58. E J Gray 50) and 77 for 2. 
New Zealand won by 8 wiefcats. 
Man-oMhe-match: R J Hadlee. 

John Woodcock: “When the lest 
of the batting specialists was out 
tong before lunch, England had 
looked to be gomg down without a 
fight But Embur&y saved it bom 
being too an utterly inglorious a day. 
His 75, tusbesl Test score. was only 
one run fewer than Gooch. Moxon. 
Athey. Goner and Getting made 
between diem. Hadlee took 10 
wickets in the match. It was the 
seventh tone he las taken had as 
many as that in a Test Only S F 
Barnes. Grarnrnetf and UUea can 
equal that" 

THIRD TEST (August 21. the Oval). 
England won the toss. New Zea- 


Gatbng 121, 1 T Botham 58 notout). 

England drew with New Zealand. 

Peter Marson 


Pollock to retire 


The unacceptable face of modern cricket: Malcolm 
Marshall, one of a number of West Indian fast bowlers 
whose use of the short-pitched ball has so changed the 
character of the game in England 


Graeme Pollock, the South 
African batsman, has an- 
nounced be will retire ai the end 
of the 1986-87 season. “This is 
my last season of cricket at' all 
levels — international, provin- 
cial and dub. 1 believe once the 
break has been made, it should 
be complete,” be said yesterday. 

Pollock, aged 42. made his 
Test debut during South Africa’s 
1963-64 tour of Australia and 
his last representative matches 
will also be against Australians 
in the coming months, when a 
.“rebel** learn, captained by Kim 
Hughes, will tour the Republic. 

Pollock's outstanding 
achievements include a first- 
class century at the age of only 
16, a double century when just 


19, and three Test centuries 
before he had turned 21 . His 274 
against Australia at Durban in 
1969-70 was the highest score 
ever made in a Test match for 
South Africa. In all. he played in 
only 23 Tests, scoring 2 . 256 runs 
at an average of 60.97, before 
South Africa's Isolation from 
the international sporting arena 
began in 1970. 


Dilip Vengsarkar has pulled 
the Indian side lor the 


lip 

out of I 
first Test against Australia 
which begins in Madras tomor- 
row. Vengsarkar has not recov- 
ered from a back strain which 
forced him to retire during his 
innings in tile one-day inter- 
national at Srinagar last week. 





38 


SPORT 




m. 


CRICKET: GLOUCESTERSHIRE TAKE SECOND PLACE AS NOTTINGHAMSHIRE ARE THWARTED BY LAST-WICKET PAIR 


Welshmen look 


to better days 
after upsetting 
champions 


By I vo Tennant 


CHELMSFORD: Glamorgan 
(I6pts) beat Essex (2) by 112 
runs. 


Glamorgan, bottom of the 
Britannic Assurance County 
Championship table, finished 
the season by beating the new 
champions on their own 
ground. It was Glamorgan's 
second victory of the season, 
not enough to prevent them 
finishing with the wooden 
spoon. 


It may be thought that 
Essex, having clinched the 
championship last week, were 
not putting everything into 
their game. Not so. After two 
rain-affected days it was con- 
trived cricket which enabled 
Glamorgan to have a chance 


Championship table 

(final positions) 



24 

NadsUT 24 
Worcs(S) 24 
Hampshire (2)24 
UfcsIlS) 24 
KORt(9) 24 

Northant9p0124 

Yofkstwajii)24 
Dertws(IZ) 24 
MttMsex(l) 24 
WawtcKs (15)24 
c(7) 24 


P W L D BtBwt PIS 
24 10 6 8 SI 78 287 
24 9 3 12 50 65 259 


Lancs (14) 24 


8 6 10 54 66 248 
7 2 IS 55 00 247 
5 12 58 72 242 

4 13 54 89 235 
7 12 55 67 202 
7 12 42 75 197 
3 16 53 60 198 

5 IS 62 59 193 
5 14 42 70 188 
9 11 47 65 176 
5 15 61 51 176 
7 134o 166 
5 15 41 SI 156 


SanBrsaM17)24 3 7 14 52 52 152 
Glam (12) 24 2 7 15 39 47 113 
T98S positions In brackets. 


j YorWure rad includes etc** points for 
■ drawn match whan scons fintetad lewl. 


open, with a fine reflex stop 
and throw from short leg, 
Essex were 55 for five. Pringje 
failed to get over a drive and 
Fletcher, who made 33, had 
his off Stump knocked back 
when Thomas returned. 

LiJley, who was awarded his 
county cap on Saturday, then 
had a cheerful bash, driving 
anything pitched up to him. 
His 62 included five fours, a 
five and a six which left its 
mark on the roof of a house 
behind the sightscreen. 

This was stirring stuff but 
was never likely to turn the 
game. Ontong had Foster 
stumped and Barwick re- 
turned, bowled Li Hey with a 
dower ball and had Childs 
-picked up at second slip. 

Next season Glamorgan will 
probably have Shastri, the 
Indian all-rounder, playing for 
them. Morris will be starting 
to exert his authority and 
Thomas will be back from a 
winter's cricket with Border. 
He should benefit as Dilley 
did in South Africa last winter. 
Let us hope this result is the 
precursor of better times for 
Glamorgan. 

GLAMORGAN: First Innings 107 for 6 Use 
(BowOng: Foster 21-1-S14; Pwwte 1+f- 
24-0; Gooch 2-0-2-O, Toptey 13-6-25-2; 
Grids 2-1 -1-ffl 

Second Innings 

J A Hopkins c East tJLitoy 79 

*H Morris c East bUosw — 62 

A L Jones not out _ 27 

G C Holmes not out 16 

Extras (b 1, lb 8. w 2) 9 

Total (2 wfcts dec] 193 



Surrey are 
third on 
strength of 


easy wm 

By Peter Marson 


Surrey swooped to cany off 
the Britan n ic Assurance 
Championship's £5250 third 
prize on the last day of the 
season at the Oval yesterday, 
where they beat Leicestershire 
by 90 runs. Surrey's eigh th 
victory meant that Nottingham- 
shire have been pipped by a 
point as they slip to fourth place, 
and Gkmcestershire are safe and 

secure after all. -and remain 

runners-up to the champions, 
Essex- 1£ at the last. Clive Rice 
had been foiled by the baiting 
strength of Northamptonshire, 

wbobrid out at 186 for nine, 
then spare a thought for Mark 
Nicholas and Hampshire, who 
had been given no chance by the 
weather in their match agams 
Lancashire at Southampton, 
which had been abandoned 
without a ball bowled. 

Nottinghamshire's declara- 
tion at 313 for eight, had left 
Northamptonshire to make 243 
to win at somewhere between 


The state of English 
ie37 


cricket, page 


five and six runs an over. Bread 
had been 83 not out when 
Nottinghamshire moved off 
the morning at 164 for four, _ 
lead of 93. Having reached his 
sixth hundred. Broad made 


damn more before falling 
backward 


to 


of 


Juggling act Ripley, the Northamptonshire wicketkeeper, catches Fraser-Darting off 
Harper in the match against Nottinghamshire at Trait Bridge 


Capel standing - 

point off Harper’s bowling. 
When Birch too. fell to a catch 
off Harper, Nottinghamshire 
looked vulnerable at 206 for six, 
a l ead now of 135. 


The sun sinks over Botham 


By Richard Streeton 


of victory but thereafter Essex 
certainly tried to reach their 
target. 

This was 301 in a minimum 
of 64 overs by agreement 
between the captains. Essex 
bad forfeited their first innings 
and Glamorgan declared at 
193 .for two, Hopkins and 
Moms having made 133 off 
26 overs for the first wicket 
from the very occasional 
bowling of Handle and Lilley. 

Essex lost their first three 
wickets to Thomas, who 
bowled accurately and with 
hostility on a pitch with a little 
grass left on iL He looks to be 
overcoming his problem of 
foiling away in delivery stride 
and will be working on it 
further in South Africa this 
winter. He bad Stephenson 
held off a top-edged cut at 
third man. East caught hook- 
ing at deep square leg and 
Prichard taken at the wicket 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-133, 2-162. 
BOWLING: Hardte 12-0-58-0; Utey 1&3- 
1-104-2; Good! 7-1-24 -Ol 

ESSEX: First Innings forfeited 
Second Innings 

TOE Basic Maynard b Thomas 24 

J P Stephenson c Caw b Thomas — 8 

PJ Prichard c Roberts b Thomas S 

*G A Gooch run out — 10 

BRHarcbeb Barak* 3 

D R Pringle c and b Smth 13 

KWB Batcher b Thomas 33 

A WLfttoyt) Ban** 62 

N A Foster st Roberts bOnung 8 


TAUNTON: Derbyshire ( 1 2 pis, ) 
beai Somerset by three wickets. 

la chilly, autumnal con- 
ditions what was possibly Ian 
Botham's final appearance for 
Somerset was all rather anti- 
dimart tc. Only a handful of 


spectators turned up on the last 


TDTcotayf 
J H Grads c 


notout. 


j A LJon as b Berwick 4 

Extras (b 4, fe 4, w 1 , nb 2) 11 

TOW 188 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-11. 2-41. 341, 4- 
51. 565. 6-78. 7-11B. 6-149. 9-1 8 a 10- 
188. 

BOWLING; Thomas 18-1-604; Berwick 
14.4-1-43-3; Smth 7-2-18-1; Ontong 12-1- 
59-1; Cam l-J-O-Q. 

Umpires: H D Bird and B Diufegton. 


No play yesterday 


SOUTHAWTOtt H a mps hi re v Lan- 
ceshea. Match abandoned - no result/ 
CANTERBURY: MWdesex 101 lor 1 V 
KsnL Bonus pokits: Kent 0,Mlddsew a 


by Roberts, who had made a 
700-mile n 


round trip from 
Cornwall to play in this 
match. 

Hardie played on to 
Barwick. When Maynard ran 
out Gooch, who chose not to 


Rugby debut 

Notts County Football Club 
stage their first professional 
Rugby League game on 
September 28 when Mansfield 
Marksman entertain Fulham. 
Mansfield have switched the 
match from their Alfreton 
AFC ground. 


day of the season for the one- 
innings match, which was all 
that could be salvaged from this 
fixture. Rain washed out play on 
Saturday and Monday. . 

Richards and Gamer, the 
other two Somerset stars con- 
cerned in the present uproar, 
had declined to appear in the 
game. Botham, who is refusing 
to stay with Somerset unless the 
two West Indians are retained, 
slogged 36 from 12 balls and 
foiled to take a wicket in his first 
1 3-over spdL 

Today there is a Somerset- 
West Indies match on the 
ground, part of Gamer's benefit 
programme, when doubtless 
there will be some splendid 
entertainment and further fierce 
debate among Somerset's’ 
supporters. Whether the Big 
Three are seen on the county 
ground again in an official 
fixture depends on the outcome 
of the special meeting Somerset 
will be holding late next month. 

Positive developments on the 
political front are scarce, though 
four of the seven general 


committee men who walked out 
in protest when the West In- 
dians were sacked, have decided 
against immediate resignation. 

Somerset, put into bat, made 
a shaky start before Hardy and 
Bartlett added 66 together to 
confirm the promise that could 
be needed in future years. The 
score was only 93 for four when 
Botham arrived. His forceful 
response was predictable, 
though it foiled to last long 
enough to be significant. 

Botham spumed singles and 


Morris completed 

Derbyshire's ■ task with seven 
balls left Botham finished the 
game fielding at long leg in the 
shadows in every sense as the 
sun sank. Overall it was a sad 
day. 


By lunch their position had 
brightened as Hemmings and 
Fraser-Darling pushed on by 53 
runs. Fraser-Darling was soon to 
become Harper's fourth wicket 
for 71 nuts in 44 overs, but 
Hemmings stayed on to help 
add 44 with Cooper before Rice 
issued his challenge- North- 
amptonshire made a good start 
but then faltered in losing 


Larkins. Boyd-Moss. Bailey and 
to Coope 


N A Fatten few bHcfcSng. 


P A C Bad few b Mortensan — 
JJ E Hatty few bMortensan — 
B J Harden bJaasMcnu — 
R J Bwtfatt e HofcffogbBwey 
IT Botham bMortmsan 


stayed at one end, avoiding 
Holdin 


*VJ Marks cWaroorbHofckng . 
J CM Atkinson notout.—— 
IT Sard b Warner . 


- 0 
.52 
_ t 
-41 
.35 
_ 4 

te 

17 


Wild to Cooper Afford and 
Hemmings in making 59 runs. 

It had been fine at the Oval, 
and the pitch in good order 
when Stewart (28), and Jes 
(34) started out again wi 


Surrey bavong made 104 for two 
rom 30 overs. These two added 


ling, as he drove and palled 
six fours and two sixes with 
incredible force against Finney 
and Mortensen before the Dane 
bowled him. One member in the 
pavilion stood up. as Botham, 
returned; the rest merely 
dapped, admittedly with vig- 
our. It remained for Somerset's 
taiFenders to gather what runs 
they could. 

From a shortened run 
Botham put everything into his 
bowling without any luck as 
Derbyshire set out to mate J83 
from 45 overs. Hill was missed 
behind the wicket off Botham, 
who conceded 48 runs before be 
was replaced. Derbyshire still 
needed 50 from nine overs when 
Warner swung bis bat 
importantly. 


JH Dredge c Matter bJaan-Jaojues . 0 
N S Taylor c Maker b Warner 1 

Extra* (b 8. nb2) 10 

Total (5&1 oms) 182 


FALL OF WICKETS: 14L 2-16. 3-27, 403, 
5-139. 5-140, 7-144, 8-176. 9-177. 10-182. 
BOWUNG: Hofctng 21-845* MorMnwn 
134-33-3; JMlKlacques 11-244-2; 
Hrmey 7-147-1: Warner 4.1-1-4-2. 
DERBYSHIRE 

TCJ Barnett b Tartar U 

TBJM Maher b Marks 49 

AHBcGwtfbDradae - 45 

JE Moms not out — : — 34 

B Roberts b Marks 10 

A E Werner c Gant b Dredge — - — 19 
M A Hotting c Taylor b Marts 0 


MJesKiacquesc Botham b Dredge. 0 
RStanranotout ...... ■ ■ ■■■— 3 


another 74 off 16 overs and had 
taken their stand to 125 when 
Jesty. who had made an aggres- 
sive half century, his fifth this 
summer, drove DeFreitas into 
Whitaker's hands at cover point. 

At 187. DeFreitas took his 
second wicket, that of Stewart, 
who had gone beyond his seven- 
teenth 50 this season in a 
faultless display innings to mate 
81 offl28 balls, hitting 10 fours. 
At lunch. Richards had readied 
1.000 runs in making 54, and it 
was here, at .270 for four, that 
Fooock declared. 


Extras (b 3,8i 6. nb3) 10 

Total (43£ over*. 7 wfcts) 184 

PJFkmeymaO HUortonaundktnotbat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-24, 2-1 13, 3-117.4- 
138, 5-171.6-171.7-172. 

BOWUNG: Botham 1 62-460; TW^tor 9-0- 
31-1; Marta 125-1-663; Dredge 9-140- 
3. i 

Umpires; D GL Bans and B I 


A forfeit of their first innings 
by Leicestershire, and one more 
by Surrey presented Leicester- 
shire with a target at something 
under 4ft runs an over, which 
looked an agreeable challenge: If 
it was soon made to seem 
something different. 


YESTERDAYS OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


Notts ? Northants 


AT TRENT BRIDGE 

Hottngimnsitn (4 pts ) taew wtfi North- 
smptonsturu (6). 

NOmNGHAMSHmE: Firat Innings 145 
Second Imngs 

B C Broad c Capel b Harp« 112 

. 43 


Snrrey v Leics 

AT THE OVAL 


Warwicks v Sussex 


Surrey (tspaj i 
90 runs. 


(f) by 


ATEDGSASTON 

Wm nck st mi (Opts) draw ¥ritn Sussex (7) 


BC Brows c capel b Harper 

R T Robwson c Rmtay b walker _ 
M NewaUc Ripley b Walker 


SURREY. First tnmngs 
G S Clnton c Wtraicase b DaFretas . 11 


SUSSEX; First Innings 303 tor 6 doc 
(Imran Khan t35 notout DKStan<Sng85L 


11 


M A Lynch b Taylor 


17 


fP Johnson c Harper b Waikar 0 

*C E B Rea b Harpar 17 


J 0 Brett c Larkins b Harper ._ ... 1 1 

C D Fraser-Darting c Rarity b Harper. 21 

EEHemnwigsnotout 54 

R A Pick run out . — - t 

KE Cooper not out 17 

Extras (b 11, lb 14. nb I) 26 


A J Stewart c Potter b DaFretas . — 81 
TE Jesty cWtstakerb DeFreitas — 56 

tC J Retards not out 1— 54 

DM Ward not out 26 

'Extras (b 6. 8) 8. nb 11) 25 


Second kufcig3 

RIAlfcttan few b Motes 

AM Green few b Small 

D K Staffing b Munton 


ARWaisfewbAsirDm. 


19 


Total (8 w«s dec) - 313 

FALL OF WICKETS 1-87.2-127.3-127.4- 
162. 5-205, 6206. 7-267. 6269. 
BOWUNG: Me Bender 60-360: Capel 6 
0-350: Walter 28-3-78-3; Cook 21-3-74- 
0: Harper 44-13-714. 

NORTH AMPTOttSHBULFirst tarangs 216 
(J A Afford 4 for 43| 

Second Imngs 

w Larkins few o Cooper — 27 

R J Boyd-Moss c Hammings b Afford . 5 

R J Bauey b Cooper 39 

O J Wild st Newetf b Ha mmings 13 

O J Capel C Fraser -Darting b Afford — 7 

-R A Harper b Afford . — 24 

tD Rdey c Fraser-Darting b Rce — 25 

A ForOhjm few D Afford 17 

N G B Cook c Robinson b Rico S 

N A MaOondar not out — 0 

A Walter noi our . — 0 


Total (4 wfcts dec, 68 ores) 270 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-31. 2-53. 3-176 4- 
187. 

BOWUNG: Taylor 12-4861; DeFreitas 
24-1-663: Ferns 13-1-64-0. Tennant 66 
24-0; Wiley 161460 Boon 2-617-0. 
Second Imngs forfeited 


C M Wads st Humpage b KaDcttamn 34 
ACSPtgottnotour 104 


GSM Roux cSmttibKafichanan _4 

DA Reeve not out 30 

Extras Ob 7) — 7 


Total (S wfcts dec) 


278 


LBCESTER8HBTE: First Irwwigs kxtetad 
Second bangs 

J C Batawstone few b Gra^~ ~ 7 


R A Cobb c Retards b I 
*P Wriey c Felton b Gray ~ 
j J wmtwar C RichaiOs b Beknel 


T J Boon c Stewart b Bwknal , 


L Potter c Lynch b Pocock 
P A J DeFretas few b 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-3. 2-66. 697. 4- 
107. 6178. 6186 

BOWUNG: Smal 7-1-261; Smith 6626 
0; Munton 441-261; Thome 7-1-11-0: 
MOWS 61-11-1; Asrt Dir 17-2-74-1; 
Gifford 7-1460; KaBcharran 5665-2. 


TENNIS 


Hero’s return for Becker 


WARWKKSMRE: FtaK bvangs 302 for 7 
OULAJ 


dec IA M Fenwra 60 not out. 
P A Sewn 52). 


tPWmtttcasestRienardsb Pocock.. 24 

L Tennant run out 1 

G J F Ferns not out 17 


52). 

Second tarings 
A J Moles b ie Roux 


J Motes 55: 


LSTaytorc Lynch bMedtyccR 13 

Extras (b 7, lb 2) 9 

Total 180 


Extras (b 12. fe 10. nb i) 23 

Total (9 wkts) ... 186 


FALL OF WICKETS. 1-37. 2-55. 688. 4- 
96 6121. 6128. 7-169. 6179. 6179. 
BOWUNG. Pck 2-613-0. Rice 66262; 
Afford 2612-554 Cooper 162-332: 
Ha mmings 15-6461. 

Umpass. M j Kitchen and P B Wight 


FALL OF WICKETS; 1-12. 2-24, 639, 4- 
45, 673. 699. 7-143. 6147. 9-157. 16 
180. 

BOWLING: Gray 166322: Bcfcnel 7-6 

27-3; Fottham 4-2-10-0. Medlycoa 1324- 

361; Pocock J666 63L 

umpires: J H Hampshire and J A 

Jameson. 


P A Smart b Reeve 

A IKribcharranc APWaftsbGroen . 42 

D L Amtss few b Reeve — 37 

tG W Humpage not out — — — ___ 57 

Asrf On not out 28 

Extras (b 2. fe3) 5 


Total (4 wkts) 


179 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0. 2-18. 685. 6 
109. 

BOWUNG: le Roux 56-14-1; Reeve 11-2- 
34-£ Green 15-6B1-1: CM WaSs 60-37- 
0: Standng 61-7-0; Akkhan 1-61-6 
Umpires’ C Cook and R Juian. 


FOR THE RECORD 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


FOOTBALL 


RUGSY UNION 


UNTIED STATES: Hl Bo n ri League (NFL): 
Denver Broncoa Zi. Pxmurgtt Snom 10. 


BOXING 


PARIS: talaraattanal stow. BaetaeaMtata 

contest t8 rounds): LGortxi (FrttJt JMuneT(P 
RcoW pts. FBaitrand (Meal HF8anchou(FiV 
WeltHvielgMIG roundsk R Casamomcal 


rounds): 

rscSO. 


ml 2 nd. 

JLRamrez(Mes|btN 
(OSk. rec Mi. Jenter laMMwefgM tip 
M McCahxn (Jam) M I Hues (LS). 


BASEBALL 


NORTH AMERICA: I 


tedoBM LeagowCMcago 
Cubs 7. Monmal Expos 3. Pttlaoeipna 
" jfi mw " * 


pnAes 5. PMsOurpn taraiss a St Lows 
Caipnah 1. New Yak Mas 0. Amertcaa 
League: New York Y an k e es 5. Bahxnoie 
Onoms 3. CBUorra Angate 6. Ohcsgo wmae 
Sox 5; Toronto Blue Jays 5. MSmijus 
Di w ui 2: Ctevetend hxPans *. Umasota 
Texts 0: Texas Rangers 8. Oakland AWaacs 
2 . 


(Monday’s late resrits) 

Fourth division 

Stockport (0) 0 Woteea (0) 2 
Lockhart Edwards 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: RrM ttxtelm; 
Middlesbrough 2. Blackburn 0. Second 
dhriakxc Preston 6 Baton 0 . 

GM VAUXHALL CONFERENCE: Kiddar- 
rmrrster 2, Bath 4; Nuneaton 0. Cheften- 
ham 0 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Bristol 
ROtors 1. Swindon 2. 

VAUXHALL -OPEL LEAGUE; First <6- 
vteten north: Stevenage 1. Basfcwi fc 
Vauxnaa Molars 1. Hertford 0. 

EAST ANGUAN CUP: Rat round: 
RoysWff 2, Btefwp's Stanford 1. 


cure MATCHES: Hwtequrer 15. Mrimone 
6. Sown WMxs Price 35. Ro n rypndd 18. 


ROLLER SKATE HOCKEY 


SERTAOZNKl, 


Wartd 


rixp* Second remit Eflgnd 3, Ranee 1; 

"pan 3, Ur " 


Pw^»J7. Mgate^Spari |3. Uxted Sates 0: 


Raty 5. Argentna 2. Brazd fl. Ctrie 2- 


GOLF 


WENTWORTH: Ton CMn PMkn: 1. J 
Bwtai. 46 ps: 2. R Mass. 43. 3. P Lion. 42 4, 
D Wnuo. 4i. s. D EffwmgtnL 4|; 5. E 
6fctaug«r.41. 


CYCLING 


Conway’s aim 


PAMPLONA. aptoK Tear de UAvenr FOt 


■Mge: VfvorinjD Pwu( Sgro | (I to kn^ iSt awtt 


SQUASH RACKETS 


KUALA LUMPUR: Matayalu open 
diaataNneNp; Second rouedGJWod (Egl 


M A WaNsnet (Swe). 61. 62. 63: Magkxxi 
AMned(PaMWMBodkneado(Engl. 169.61. 


w 2arak Jahan KJwn (Pak). 168. 162 


ivdsn stated): _ _ 
S6soc.2BCnesneau(Rl. 3seei»Md3. J* 
htoha. 4. e Carrwa: 5. V Mwavgoj fUS8RI:6. 
Manors. (Crj; 7, R Knckman |USt 6 A 
Grows) (US), aft same »na: 9. 0 YarosrePo. 
(USSR). 8. 18. B WCfDnek ffti IB Ovwrrii 
povtams: i. R KNekinan. 19hr 35nvn Odac 
i. E Carrera. 4m« 3«aec berond: 2 V 
Rfciravsto 629; 4, K Myyrfanen (FM. 79% 5 
ACtoika 7'IB: 8 M toouranfSa), 720:7. 0 
Yeroshanha 72S. & U Gaam iFr). 7:32 9. J 
Tegstroem (Swet. 732 10 . L Bnmk (Fr). 7:41. 


Bl 168; J Khan (Prid bt Umar Hays Khan 
(Pak). 94. 59. 62 R Maun (Aua) ta M Saad 
63. 69. 168.64. 


TENNIS 


YACHTING 


HAMBURG: Wem Canaan open m*uS t 
: nm nwnd: PStasl iCi) W E Jeten f 


CAPRI, HMr - . — , 

■MpK Second race: 1. M J o ha n na cn and M 
Hansaon (Sect: 2 F WtoNf and V Hoescfl 


prte First iwretPSfccriiCi) Of E Jeten (VKH, 
64.61.GVilMlArg)HCMeaa(Bra3l l 7-5.7- 
8. M PuroeOfUS) H A SnpmkfwG). 83. 64. 


Joanne Conway, the 1 5-vear- 
old British ice-skating cham- 
pion. will be aiming for her 
first senior international title 
and a place in the history 
books, when the new season 
commences with the St Ivei 
ice international at Richmond 
from September 23-25. Miss 
Conway will unydl her new 
programme which includes 
five triple jumps and if she 
lands them all she will become 
the first British woman to 
have done so. 


J B Svensson (Sne> or M Oson rruqi. 6 1 . 6 


fflSj- 8. A Prawnar and : 0.0** A * 

Daiunuti i 


4: Hde la PcnaiArajK K NovaookJCa. 7-6. 6 
4. T Blusur (Austria) I 


j ana G DwroaflurS, Ri . 

AderandCr 

L Motor II 

Omlp . . 

1 1.40B. 2 M Johaiwam and M HansKxi. i& 


)M B Agcm (HJ4), 7-6 

62 U S#BnlundlS«4l W P Caneiin. 6-4. 7-5: L 


No 6 goes for No 4 


t. V LocateD and □ erorano wj; a. a 


MattarlBraz) W M Sdapare itomL 7-5-67. 
7-6. L Pin* (C*l In F LUU tSat 7-6 l 62 M 


2 v Burn and H Schrewr (USJ. 19; 4. A 
Hagan and M Borowy. 23 4; 5. F Wlonarwid V 
tloaxn.31:B.KGuitianandLUenar. 92 7. A 


SrofeW (Cz) H H Sctiwacr IWG). 62 64. T 
Smd tCjl Dt C Saceanu IWGI. 7-6. 61 K 
Cartason (Sim) bt T Mwwckfl IWG1. 7-5. 63: 
PHMaiMfl|Aux)MCMnae»(Afg).7-ai-«. 
7-5: A Mgmr (WGI U M Rctwrtson (SAL M. 
61. 7-8: R Oweitmn (WGI in J Awadsno 
ISH 62 62 G Porez-RCMltr |Aig) n D 


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PVMM (CA44. 6A 62 J Hfrock (Sana) 
Hi Werner (WG).<~ 


l *8. 7-6. 62. 


Jamie Hickox, a«d 22, the 
England No "6 from Surrey, who 
is attempting a record fourth 
successive Blue Sttaios British 
under-23 dosed title, takes on 
the unranked Alan Williams, 
from Warwickshire, in the first 
round of the five-day squash 
championship starling at 
London's Lambs Club 


Hamburg (Renter) — Boris 
Becker made an overdue return 
to grand prix tennis in his native 
West Gennany yesterday with a 
predictable victory before a 
rapturous crowd. 

Since playing his last grand 
prix tournament in his home 
country two and a half years ago 
as a little-known 16-year-old. 
Becker had spent his time 
winning two Wimbledon singles 
tides and progressing up the 
rankings to No 2 in the world. 

But the stage set for the return 
of West Germany’s top spotting 
idol could not have been more 
low-key. He appeared in the 
fifth match on centre court in a 
first round doubles match 
featuring two u n seeded pairings 
without a single foreign player. 

To the Becker faithful that 
was only secondary. The 1 1 ,000- 
capacity centre court was almost 


fiiD to see Becker and Eric Jelen 
beat Mi chad Westphal and 
Christian Saceanu 6-4. 6-3 in an 
aO-West German match. 


year-old Pavel Skml, of Czecho- 
slovakia, ranked only 192. 


Becker uncharacieristicafiy 
dropped his first two service 
games bat, playing for the first 
time with his new Davis Cap 
partner Jelen, he went on to 
show enough of his better 
touches to please the adoring 
crowd. 


The second round begins 
today with Becker, who had a 
first round bye. playing Met 
Purcell of the United States. 


The match certainly upstaged 
the first round singles games in 
the $315,000 tournament in 
which the fragility of West 
German men's teams, with the- 


RESULTS: Hat nxsKt P Stazf 
Jflten (WGJ, 64. 61; G Vtas 
Motts IBraA 7-S, 7-6; M Pure* 
Stapanekpwa 63. 64: J B 
(Swa) bt M Ostois (Yufl), 61. 64; H d» Is 
Pans (Aro) bt K Ntnracek (Cz), 7-6. 8-4; T 
Muster (Austria) bt R Aosnor (HaW. 7-5. 
6-2; U Staffctad (Svw) btPCanem. 64. 7- 
S;LMatt8r(Braz)MM SchaperspMh).7- 
5, 5-7. 7-& l PIrrMJf (CZ) ixFLira <Sp£ 7- 


6.63; MSrejberfCn MH Schwater 

kTSSd^btC 



notable exception ofBecter, was 
ined. Jder 


underlined, idea, aged 21, has 
risen to number 30 in the world 
rankings and was seeded 1 1 in 
Hamburg buz he put up only 
innocuous resistance in his 
match, losing 6-4, 6-1 to the 30- 


62 64;T .. . .... 

7-6. B-3; K Cartason (Swo) bt T Mainecka 
(WGL 7-5. 63: P Mc Na m oo (A as) bt C 


MWural (Arg). 7-5. 1-6. 7-5: A Maurer 
(WG)t*M Rabensor (SA). 2-6. 61. 7^; R 
Ostartfton (WQ bt J Avandano (Sp). 6-2, 
6-2 G Poraz-RoWan (Arg) M u Paraz 


j U^ I-6. 60.__64: F Dsvta (Arg)_bt D 


btP 

(Swttz) 


7-5, 6l£HSuna«narPgv ig 


tC2j.4-8.64.62; 
Wsmar(WG). 4-6, 7-6.62. 


MOTOR RALLYING 


Two seconds 
advantage for 
Waldegaard 


Hong Kong (Reuter) - Bjorn 
Waldegaard of Sweden, the 1979 
world champion, took a two- 
second lead over his compatriot 
Stig Blomqvist as three crashes 
thinned the field at the halfway 
point in the Hong Kong to 
Peking Rally. 

Waldegaard. driving a Toyota 
Celica. went ahead after 1984 
world champion Blomqvist bad 
to stop for three minutes on the 
first special stage to change a 
dirt-dogged fuel filter on bis 
Audi Quattro. 

Blomqvist was more fortu- 
nate than Britain’s Andy Daw- 
son whose Audi Quattro rolled 
over and was badly damaged 
only 60 km from the overnight 
halt at Wuhan on the banks of 
the Yangtze river in China's 
Hubei province^lmost 1,000 
miles from Hong Kong. Dawson 
was unhurt and co-driver Kevin 
Gormley received minor cuts 
but they were forced to with- 
draw. American Pierre 
Honniger also crashed as did 
Armando Edoque of the Phil- 
ippines. Both also were unhurt 
buL they too had to retire. 

The six-day, 3.8704dlomeire 


rally is due to end at the Ming 


Tombs on the outskirts 
Peking on Friday. Organizers 
thought 13 of the 43 cars that left 
Hong Kong on Sunday had now 
retired from the event. 

Trailing Blomqvist was 
Japan's Moionobu Takehira m 
a Nissan Pulsar Milana He was 
followed bv another Japanese. 
Yoshiaki Himeji. 

LEADERS (attar 11 stages): 1. B 


lYaUagaans (5ml 


3fns 


IBsacK 2 war**. 


Aucfi Quattro 3:43.18; 3. Motonofau 
TakeNra (Japan) Nissan PUbar 424.20. 


BOWLS 


McGhee reaches final 


on shot aggregate 


The local dub champion. Neil 
McGhee, shocked David Bryant 
and Willie Wood to clinch a 
place in last night’s final of the 
international indoor singles 
tournament at Auchinleck. 

McGhee opened his cam- 
paign with a 15-6 wm over 
Wood, a former Common- 
wealth champion, only to go 

down 7-15 toBryanL But a 15-3 
win over Hugh Duff, a Scottish 
international, in his final 
qualifying group, was good 
enough to give McGhee a filial 
place on shot aggregate over 
Bryant. 

His opponent was to.be the 
England international John Bell, 
who bit back from 10-14 down 
to edge oul Jim Baker, of 
Belfast, a former world cham- 


pion, 15-14 in the second 
group's decider. 


RESULTS: Group Ac H Duff (AutMntack) 

— lUcGttae 

.15- 
E Duff 


11-9; Brant M Wood 1611; McGtao M 

~ ’ 154. OwSflor: McGhee. 


BaS (C 


Durr 

Group B: 

McLatend 
bt 

fbfWtataca 1611; Bator br I 

14-7; MB M Baker 15-1* MctoBantf bt 

Wslacfl 15-10. QuaBfita: BaL 


Blackburn loss 


After two profit-making sea- 
sons Blackburn show a loss of 
£78,000. taking th ei r total deficit 
to £307,000. The chairman 
William Fox. blames lack of 
success oh the field and loss of 
revenue from televised football 


RUGBY UNION 


Top players assemble 


The International XV to bee 
centenary-celebrating Aberavon 
this evening includes (he former 
international fly-halfe, Gareth 
Davies (Wales) and Les 
CusMotth (England). 

But another top fly-half. 
Ireland 1 s Tony WariL has palled 
out of the match which narks 
the 100th anniversary of 
Aberavon’s membership of the ‘ 
Welsh _ Rugby Union. • Five 
French inteniationals eight 
past or present British Lions 
have accepted the invitations to 
play. 

Davies, now retired from first- 
class rugby, nil! partner the 

French scrum-half. Pierre. 


Berfnriet. while Coswth rWU 
play at foil baric. The former 
Welsh international forwards. 
Jeff Squire, Bobby Windsor, 
Clive- Williams, and the ex- 
A beta von. lock. Allan Martm, 
will pack down with the French- 
men Gerard CboDey, and Domi- 
nic' Erbani- 

The Vizards', who have 
started the season modestly, 
welcome back the inte rn a tion a l 
booker. BiHy James,, but are 
forced to switch their centre 
Gary Matthews, to M* barit. 
They will also be without their 
Wales B lock Ian Brawn, who 
has applied for a transfer to 
Swansea 


football 


Hamil ton pushes 
Osman back 
towards England 

.— j c.Aisiut debut in the s 


Hie Leicester City defender, 
Russell Osman, was 
recommended for an 
recall Osman, who earned the 
last of his 11 caps.affunsi 
Denmark at Wembley in 1984, 
would love the chance of an 
international reunion with lus 
former Ipswich Townco^gue, 
Terry Butcher, at the heart ot 
Bobby Robson’s back four. 


England debut in the same 
match against Australia in 1 980. 
Robson, the former Ipswtcb 
Town manager. mcm in 
Denmark in his firet 


Engjandman^gr. after ihcj 9S2 


The Leicester City manager, 
Bryan Hamilton, feels Osman ts 
worth another chance and yes- 
terday alerted Robson to that 
possibility. “1* is Osman's am- 
bition to get a recall and urn 
England manager might benefit 
by taking a look at him, 
Hamilton suggested before 
today's trip to Norwidl City. 
“On the form be has produced 
recently, he could well be 
considered for a place in the 
England squad" 


World Cup finals.. The Euro- 
pean championship return at 
Wembley two years later saw a 
split and since then, Alyin 
Martin. Graham Roberts, Dave 
Watson. Mark Wright and Terry 
Fenwick have provided Butcher 
with a succession of partners. 


Leicester City, beaten only 
once this season, are unchanged 
for their visit to Carrow 
this evening while Norwich City 
have David Williams and Mark 
Barham fit for the match. The 
midfield trio. Ian Crook. Trevor 
Putney and Peter Mend ham are 
still OUL 


Butcher, now with Glasgow 
Rangers, and Osman made their 


The Norwich City manager, 
Ken Brown, looks likely to stand 
the side which lost at 


by 


Watford on Saturday. 


Luton stay 
firm on 


fan ban 


Banks and 
Hayes may 
be on move 


Luton Town have accused the 
Football League of undermining 
their campaign against hooli- 
ganism. David Evans, the Luton 
chairman, is angry that the 
League are planning an extraor- 
dinary general meeting to force 
the dub to lift their ban on away 
supporters for Littlewoods Cup- 
ties. 


Huddersfield Town, who 
have gained only two points 
from their opening five games in 
the second division, are poised 
to mate two signings today. 


Leicester City have agreed terms 
with the Yorkshire club for 


He said: “The League have 
reversed their original view- 
point and we are extremely 
disappointed by their attitude. 
Our scheme, whit* is in line 
with Government policy, has 


the 

transfer of their winger, lan 
Banks for £50,000, ana Martin 
Hayes, Arsenal’s reserve winger, 
travels north today for talks. 


been a resounding success so for, 
e teething troubles. 


Banks joined Leicester three 
ars ago from Barnsley, where 
i was a key member of the side 
that won promotion. 


despite some I 
“It is a valuable experiment 
for football at Luton's expense 
and I appeal to the League to 
give it a fair triaL” 


Luton have enforced a loop- 
hole in the regulations to bar 
Cardiff City fens from the 
Littlewoods second round first 
kg tie at Kenilworth Road next 
week. Visiting fens are allowed 
25 per cent of advanced tickets 


Hayes, aged 20, mode 14 first 
team appearances last season, 
scoring three times. He is valued 
at around £25,000 by Arsenal, 
whose manager George Graham 
said yesierday:“Martin has 
never really established himself 
at Highbury, but he's a good 
young player with a future in the 
game and we wouldnt want to 
stand in his way." 


but Luton say tickets will go on 
‘ of the 


sale only on die night of 
game and only to Luton 
holders. 


membership 


If Hayes does go to Leeds 
Road, he would become one ofa 
number of London-hosed play- 
ers to have made the move to 
Huddersfield in recent years. 


sakl:“We 


rague 

asked 


Luton to com- 


ply with the spirit of the law and 
ifiised. Noi 


they refused. Now ihe manage- 
ment committee will consider 
calling an extraordinary general 
meeting. The feet that we al- 
lowed the Luton experiment for 
21 League games shows we have 
given the scheme a fair triaL” 


Huddersfield also ported com- 
pany with one player yesterday. 
They received £75.000 from 
Sunderland for theircaptain and 
midfield player, Steve Doyle. 


Although Banks seems likely to 
leave Ldc 


Swedes happy 

Stockholm (Reuter) — Swe- 


icester. his team col- 
league. Mark Bright has turned 
down a move, to Hull because 
he still wants first division 
football- atid was unhappy with 
the personal terms o 


den are likely to keep the team 
~ • id 1-0 ir 


who beat England 1-0 in last 
week’s friendly for the European 
Championship group two 
qualifying against Switzerland 
in Stockholm next Wednesday. 
The line-up includes their fop- 
ward Johnny Ekstrom, the goal- 
-scorer against England, who 


iti. 


Italy, from 
Goteborg for a reported 
$700,000 (about £470,000) on 
Monday. 


• Mick Mills, the Stoke City 
manager, has signed up the man 
responsible for bringing some of 
Scotland’s top talent into the 
Football League. George Find- 
lay. who discovered John Waik, 
Alan Brazil and George Burley 
for Ipswich, has been appointed 
to the full-time scouting staff 
Mills, the former Ipswich cap- 
tain. said: "If George does as 
well for us as he did for Ipswich 
then it will be a worthwhile 
move." 


GYMNASTICS 


Recreational approach 
aims at all age groups 


ByPeter Aykroyd 

The British Amateur Gym- 
nastics Association are begin- 
ning* drive to expand their 
activities — and their member- 
ship — In all-age developments 
of the sport u nder the heading of 
recreational gymnastics. 

This week, the BAG A 
bundled a basic learning pro- 
gramme for pre-school and in- 
fant children to the ages of six 
and seven, and next month, a 
proficiency scheme will be avail- 
able for coaches and teachers 
interested in recreational 
instruction. 

Future schemes wfil include 
not only yotmg children but also 
physically and mentally handi- 
capped people and the elderly.' 
Recreational gymnasts of all 
ages will also be encouraged, as 
in many European countries, to 
take part in mass dispbys and 
informal competitions. 

BAG A officials have long 
realized that large sections of 
the population can enjoy the 
healthy benefits of gymnastic 
exercise outside the rigorous 
training and ultra-fitness de- 
manded by the competitive 
forms of the sport such as 
artis tic gymnastics, rhythmic 
gymnastics and sports acrobat- 
ics. Indeed, there are many 
enthusiastic g y m n asia who are 
not equipped for. or do not wish 


to attain, the high levels of elite 
performance. 

Three years ago. the BAGA. 
in company with the Federation 
Internationale de Gytnnastiqoe, 
embarked oo plans to stimulate 
interest in recreational activ- 
ities- Last year, the Association 
appointed a full-time coach — 
John White, a former inter- 
national — specially to develop 
the wide scope of recreational 
gymnastics both technically and 
as a steady source of revenue. 

The BAGA pre-school gym- 
nastics and learning pro- 
gramme, the starting .Lit of 
which costs £25. is designed 
around a four'-charf progressive 
system featuring Gym Joey, a 
cartoon kangaroo. Under their 
instructor, children ran learn 
basic gymnastics and at the 
same time develop body move- 
ment and limb co-ordination. A 
farther aim of tbe system is to 
n^den the base of gymnastic 
ability among youngsters so that 
future champions can be spotted 

JnRJSS&f*- 7** 8AGA S P«* 

£50.000 developing this pro- 
gramme and are now looking for 
a sponsor. 

The coaching proficiency 
scheme has been prepared and 
f * rBC *ured for the needs of both 
the recreational coach and nm- 
nast and provides a graded 
qualification programme. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


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Today’s television and radio programmes and Christopher Davalle 


■■v 




' J “K 


*. Ml; 
“ . ■*». 


■ !l i 






f 'fit 


>. 


g*“ 9®^ am. 

6- 50 ®™SWMtTinwwWi 
Oeobe Green wood and 

o-^ragional news, 
weather and traffic at £ 57 , 
7-27, 7.57 and £27; 
naHon ai and imemafionai 
nwra at 7.00. 7-30, £ 00 , 
*2 and 9.00; sport at 
7-20 and £20; and a 
review of the morning 
newspapers at £37. Phjs, 

reports from the SDp 
Conference in Harrogate- 
and Beverty Airs faction 
advice. 

9*20 SOP Conference 1988. 

Tne final session of the 

Conference in Harrogate. 
The debate cm taxation 
and social benefit is on 

iwSBBSftr ,fc 

1£50 SOP Conference 1986. 
The dosing session of the 
Conference, the speech 

Ka: sJr 

1230 Ceefax. 

1.00 News After Noon with 
Frances CovenJale and 
Sue Carpenter, indudes 
news headlines witii 
subtitles. 135 Regional 
rwjws and weather. 130 
Choek-a-Btock. (r) 1.45 
Ceefax. 

3.15 Songs of Praise from the 
Lifeboat House on Lytham 
Green, Lytham St Aimes. 
(shown Sunday) (Ceefax) 
352 Regional news. 

355 TottieL The first at a new 
series about a Dutch doU 
and her friends. 4.10 The 
Adventures of Bultwinkte 
and 

» elght-p 
t.(r) 4.15 The 
Biskitts. Cartoon about a 
group of small dogs, (r) 

435 Hartbeat, wimTony 
Hart, featuring the eyes 
from famous paintings. 

5.00 John Craven’s 
Newsround 5.05 Eureka. 

A lighthearted look at the 
'Invention* of the 
thermo m eter, 
stethoscope, vaccination, 
antiseptic, and 
anaesthetic, (r) 530 The 
Ftintstones. Cartoon 
series. 

6.00 News with Sue Lawley and 
Andrew Harvey. Weather. 

635 London Plus. 

730 Wogan. Tonight's guests 
are Franco ZeffirelH and 
Pablo Picasso's daughter, 
Patoma. Music is provided ‘ 


I Rocky. Episode two 
of the elght-oart cartoon 


7.35 


byJulian Cope. 


*•' -- *»• 


\ilii'dFi 

nu'rsf'i 

ticureePf 



! Muppet Show. Mps 
Piggy plays hostess to 
Amerian singer-songwriter 
Paul Wiliams. 

830 Danas. Sue EUen at last 
makes up her mind about 
her love-life; Pam and 
Mark fear for Matt's life 
after receiving shock news 
from Colombia; and J.R., 
digging into Dr 
Kenderson’s past teams 
something interesting 
about Mark. (Ceefax) 

850 Points of View. Barry 
Took dips into the BBC's 
post bag once again. 

£00 News with JuKa SornervHte 
■ and John Humptvys. 
Regional news and 
. . weather. 

£30 Anunal Squad. RSPCA - 
Inspector Sid Jenkins 
investigates a case of dog 
abuse in this week's 
programme. Called to a 
run-down council estate 
after concerned 
nsi 
wall 

in a pathetic state, the 
Inspector teams that the 
dog has already ben 
handed in to the RSPCA 
as a stray. (Ceefax 1 
10.00 Sportsitight Introduced by 

Steve Rider. Hiq 

from tonight's I 
the Royal Albert H® 
where Herd Graham and 
Mark Kaylor face 
American opposition. 

1055 Matt Houston. The 

investigator is in Tquana, 

- Mexico, looking fbr a 
missing young boy who is 
a diabetic ana mentally 
retarded. 

1155 The Waterloo. Highlights 
of the final of the GreenaH 
Whitley Crown Green 
Bowling Handicap, 

• introduced by Richard 
’ Duckenfield at the 

Waterloo Hotel, Blackpool 
12.10 Weather. 


aighbours report a man 
a Iking a dog that looked 


TV- AM 


£15 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Jayne Irving 
and Mfce Morris. News 
with Gordon Honeycombs 
at 630, 730. 730. 830, 
830 and £0Q; financial 
news at £3 $ sport at £40 
and 750; exercises at 



fflne guests are Cheryl 
Baker and Mike Nolan 
from the pop jpoup Bucks 
Fizz. 


TV/LONDON 


935 Thames news head&nes. 

930 For Schools: simple 
mathematical concepts - 
the number 1 952 Writing 
- poetry £59 Junior Maths - 
odds and-evens 10.16 
Important A level 
chemistry experiments 
1033 Ted Hughes 
introduces five of his 
poems 1130 History- the 
climate at opinion in 1914 
11 32 Music -wind 
instruments 1139 A group 
of exchange students in a 
Loire VaHey town. 

1230 Jamie and the Mateo 
'Torch, (r) 12.10 Our 
Backyard, (r) 

1230 Treasure Islands. The 

prehistoric village at Skara 
Brae on Orkney, (r) 

130 News at Ona with Leonard 
Parkin 130 Thames news 
presented by Robin 

Houston 130 Man In a 
Suitcase. A peaceful 
village is disturbed when a 
dnjgdBaknggangfiein 

ambush on the man who 
can shop them, (rt 

230<DMng In France. Pierre 

Salinger samptes the 
gastronomic fare of Lyon. 
3.00 Take the High Road, 
inverdarroch receives a 

poison-pen tetter about 
Lily Taylor 335 Thames 
news headlines 330 Sons 
and Daughters. Drama 
serial. 

430 The Little Green Man. 
Adventures of a visitor 
from outer space, (r) 4.10 
Tweety Pie. Cartoon, (r) 
430 T-Bag StrikesAgain 
455 Hold Tight! as 
Michael Waterman wing 
walks over Alton Towers . 
with the Barnstormers 
Flying Circus; and 
Jacqueline Redten meets 
the Manchester Spertans 
American Footban team. 
Plus, pop music from The 
Communards and Miflte 
Scott 

5.15 Blockbusters. . 

Genera&nowtodge qiriz 
for teenagers. 

555 News with John Suchet 
830 Thames news. 

635 Heipt Viv Taylor Gee 
presents the second of 
three programmes on 
cervical cancer. 

635 Crusroads- Anne-Marie 
lets the cat out of the bag. 

7.00 The Buck man Treatment 
■ Dr Rob Buckman 
examines how the dash of 
American, Mexican and 
Indian cultures affects the 
• health of people of New 
Mexico and Arizona. 

730 CoraoationStraetSafly 
tries to cheer up-Kewn. 
(Oracle) 

£00 Pees the Buck. Quiz 


£30 Singer's Day. Comedy 
series starring Bruce 
Forsyth has a . 
supermarket manager. 
(Oracle) 

930 King and Castle. The two 
debtors are hired to coflect 
a fortune owed to an 
international businessman 
by an Old Etonian. Starring 
Derek Martin and Nigel 
Planer. (Oracle) • ■ 

10.00 News at Ten with Abstain 
Burnet and Sandy GaM. 
Weather followed by 
Thames news headlines. 
1030 Midweek Sport Special 
presented by Nick Owen. 
Uefa Cup reports and 
highlights from today's 
1088 British Boxing Board 

of Control Awards. 

1230 Worid Chess 

Championship. The 16 th 
game of the championship 
which saw an amazing 
reversal of fortunes for the 
champion, Kasparov. 

1230 fflght Thoughts. 



Hcnnkme Lee starts Talking To' 
Writers: Channel 4 836pm 


• THE POSSESSED 
(Channel 4; 9pm) brings to a 
wider audience the stage 
production of Dostoevsky's 
novel by the Russian director. 
Yuri Lyubimov. Seen last year at 
the Almeida Theatre in 
Islington, it received standing 
ovations but divided trie 
critics. Dostoevsky uses a 
Russian provincial town in the 

1860s as a microcosm for a 
society under threat and to 
offer his own disUkiaoned 
critique of mindless 
revolutionaries. Lyubimov retains 
Dostoevsky's nightmarish 
undertones but overlays them 
with grotesque farce. The 
production has the brifliance and 

dazzle of a firework display, 
stylized, constantly inventive and 
never standing still. Devices 
such as the actors carrying the 
chapter headings of the novel 
on placards, the use of songs to 


CHOICE 


comment on the action and a 
narrator talking tfeectiy to the 
audience, owe much to 
Brecht What some critics 
wondered was whether the 
owed enough to 
But no one 

denied its vigour and theatrical 
excitement. Leading rotes are 
played by Clive Merrison. Harriet 
Walter and Nigel Terry. 

• TALKING TO WRITERS 
(Channel 4. Bpm) is a successor 
to the often exctetent Booh 
F our, with the same executive 
producer. MeJvyn Bragg, and 
presenter. Hermoine Lee. All 
sorts of ways have been tried 
of presenting literature on 
television, but TaBcing to 
Writers goes back to the simple 
expedient of Eitenriewoig 


authorsJn the first of the senes, 
which has a pronounced 
international flavour, the South 
American writer. Mario 
Vargas LJosa, talks from his 
London fiat about hs work 
and the years of exde from his 
native Peru where he is now 
upped ss a future Prime Minister. 
Among the other subjects are 
Julian Barnes. Nadine Gordtiner 
and R. K. Naravan. 

• UNCLE CLARENCE 
(Radio 4. 9.40am) is an 
affectionate memoir by Alan 
Bennett about an unde kliied n 
the First World War and 
known only to the young Man 
through a photograph on his 
grandmother's pane. A visit to 
the cemetery at Ypres nearly 
60 years later helps to set the 
scene and jog the memory. 

Peter Waymark 


BBC 2 


655 Open University: Science - 
Swimming In Fish. Ends at 
730- 9-00 Ceefax. 

1030 The Waterloo. The 
of the. 

nail Whitley Crown 
Green Bowling Handicap. 
The commentator at the 
Waterloo Hotel. Blackpool, 
Is Harry Rigby. 

1255 Ceefax. 

1.10 Testing Times: GCSE. 
Issues related to oral 
communication and 
English across the 
curriculum. 

135 The Physfes of Matter. An 
Open University 
production about probing 
the structure of liquids by 
neutron scattering. 

230 The Waterloo. The 
semifinal and final of the 
GreenaH Whitley Crown 
Green Bowling Handicap, 
worth £2.000 to the 
winner. 

530 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

535 What on Earth-? Wikffife 
quiz with Michael 
Stoddart Jennifer Owen, 
and Jeremy Cherfos. (r) 

630 Masada. Episode three of 
the four-pat drama 
starring Peter O'Toole as 
General Flavius SHva, the 
Roman commander trying 
to capture the 
impenetrable mountain 
fortress, Masada, which is 
held by a handful of 
Jews. The arrival of 
FaJco. a scheming 
politician from Rome, to 
take over command of the 
Tenth Legion from Siva, 
heralds a series of 
atrocities. With David 
Warner. Peter Strauss and 
Barbara Carrera, (r) 

730 The Waterloo. Highlights 
of this afternoon's . 
semifinals of the GreenaH 
Whitley Crown Green 
Handicap, introduced by 
Richard DuckenfieW. 

830 Southampton 

In ter n a tional Boat Show 
1988. Paul Heineytsthe 
pilot In Mayflower Park, 
Southampton, guiding the 
viewer around the 
country’s biggest Boat 
' Show, with the assistance 
oflfie camera boat 
■ Alba far, there are close-up 
.. views of a number of the . 
more than 400 vessels on 
display. . 

£50, The Theban Plays by . 

’• Sophodes: Oedipus at 
Coiomis. This second play 
of the Theban trilogy is set 
two decades on from the 
first Oedipus (Anthony 
Quayte) tsabfind beggar, 
banished from Thebes for 
killing his tether and 
marrying his mother, 
accompanied by his 
daughter Antigone (Juliet 
Stevenson). His other 
daughter, ismene (Gwen 
Taylor), arrives to inform 
him that Thebes is on the 
verge of civil war and that 
one of Oedipus's two sons 
is at the centre of the 
unrest 

11.00 NewsnJght with Donald 
MacCormicfc reporting on 
the last clay's debates at 
the SDP Conference In 
Harrogate; and Peter 
Snow and Nick Clarke in 
London with the latest 
national and international 
news. 11-50 Weather. 

1135 Open Univerdty: Liszt and 
Nature 12.10 The Social 
Primate: Growing Up. 

Ends at 1230. 


CHANNEL 4 


1155 Conf ere nce Report. Gtyn 
Mathias presents five 
coverage of David Owen's 
to the SDP 


1230 Marking Time. Meeting 

Old Father Time is the 
theme of this film made by 
British animator Sheila 
Crebor. 

130 nn: Show People* (1928) 
Marion Davies. A 
i look at socially 
ambitious leading ladies, 
based loosely on the life of 
Gloria Swanson. Peggy 
Pepper arrives in 
Hollywood. Is taken under 
the wing of comedy actor 
Bifly Boone, and p romp tly 
earns a part in a film in 
which her first scene 
involves being squirted by 
a soda syphon. Directed 
by King Vidor. 

250 Fane Bodaworth (1936) 


Ruth Chatterton and David 
Niven. A wealthy - 
industrialist retires and 
takes his wife. Fran, on a 
trip to Europe. With their 
daughter off their hands, 
Firan begins to see her rife 
drifting away and longs for 
one mare love aftafr. 


430 


; hopefuls 
introduced by Chuck 
Bants In this show are a 


and the wizard 
whoopee. 

530 Alee. When Mel becomes 
Joiene's coach after she 
decides to try for a place 
in a professional women’s 
basketball team, an 
unexpected bond 
develops between them. 

530 The Abbott and CoeteBo 
Show* Lou, tortured by 
' toothache, tries to be sent 
to prison in order to 
receive free treatment 

£00 Ftahbuek- Part seven of 
the series examines film 
and television's approach 
to the task of post-war 
reconstruction faced by 
the 1945 Labour party. 

£30 Sni’erencr Report Gfyn 
Mathias presents 
Wghflghts of the final day 
ofthe SDP Conference 

730 Channel 4 News with . 
Peter Sissons and Alastalr 
Stewart indudes the third 
of the week’s reports on 
the war ta Angola. 

7-50 Comment from Labour 
■ councilor and chair of a 
local poflee committee, 
Valera Vaz. Weather. 

£00 Talcing to Writers. The 
first ofa new series in 
which Hermione Lee talks 
to International flterary 
figures. Her first guest Is 
the celebrated Peruvian 
writer Mario Vargas 
Lhosa. (see Choree) 
(Oracle) 

£30 Diverse Reports. A new 
series bed ns with 
Christine Chapman 
ex pla in ing that the only 
way to deal with the Aids 
epidemic is to stop feeling 
sensitive about sexual 
freedoms and put an end 
to permissiveness. 

£00 The Possessed. Russian 
director Yuri Lyubimov's 
celebrated version of 

classic nwrefchartlng the 
destruction of a small town 
in 19 th century Russia. 

(see Choice) Ends 123a 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF variations at 
end. 

535 Shipping. 636 Weather. £10 
Farming. £25 Prayer (s) 

£30 Today £30,730, 830 
News. 655 Business 
News. £55, 735 Weather. 
730, £00 News 735, 

£25 Sport 755 Thought for 

the Day 

£43 How Was ft For YOU? 

Written and read by 
Maureen Lipman (5). 837 
Weather, Travel 
930 News 

935 In the Psychiatrist’s 
Chair. Gravifle Wynne Is 
interviewed by Dr Anthony 
Clare 

950 Unde Clarence. Alan 
Bennett searches lor an 
Uncle who dad in Flanders in 
1917 

1030 News: Gardeners' 

Question time (new 
series). Experts tackle 
questions from the 
Meavy Bower Society in 
Devon 

1030 Morning Story: “The 
Anniversary” by J1U 

Norris 

1055 Daily Servk»(s) 

1130 News; Travel An 

Invitation to Dancing. 

The sixteenth-century dance 
treatise 

M Orchesoflraphtc", with 
Michael Denison, 

Thoinot Arbeau and DavW 
Merrick as Capriol 
1158 Enquire Within 
1230 News; You arid Yours. 

Consumer advice 

1237 l*m Sony I Haven't a 
Ctue (s) with Humphrey 
Lyttelton m. 1235 Weather 
130 The World at One: News 
150 The Archers. 135 


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2J00 News: women’s Hour. 

Sue MacGregor taks to 
actor Simon Cai low 
£00 News: The Afternoo n 
Play (si "The Plucking 
Post" by Denise Robertson. 
With Brtgft Forsyth and 
JHIBaJcon 

£47 One Man and his Dog. 
BanyPitton's barge trip 
up a Burgundy carat, read by 
David Roper 
4J00 News 

4Jk5 The Last Link. Eric 
Robson presents a 
portrait of young British 
Jewry 

445 Kaleidoscope Extra: Wait 
TU You Hear Her. 

Cabaret singer Barbara 
Cook talks about her 

naur rhntif 

£00 PM. News Magazine. 

• £50 Shipping. £55 
Weather 

£00 Financial Report 
£30 Round Britain Quiz 
730 News 


7J15 The Archers 

7J20 On dm Day l was Bom. 

Larry Hams talks to 
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events at the time of her 
brti In July 196* 

745 Antony Hopkins Talking 
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senes). Return of the 
Oustraied music lectures 

£15 Di earn flo w Br and dm 
ToadskinSpefl.The 
history of man's relationship 
with narcotic plants 

£00 Thirty-Minute Tneatrefs). 
“Curtain Csfl ” by Jemmy 
Tiptaft 

£30 The English Garden (s). 
Poetry and prose on one 
of the great passions of 
Engbsh We. 

£45 Kafadoscope 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime 
“Handley Cross" by R S 
Surtees (3). 1029 Weather 

10J» The world Tortom 

11.15 The Financial Vltorid 
Tonight 

11J0 The Steam Ship Uganda. 
Ivan Hewlett traces the 
hntory of one of the fast 
ocean-going liners 

12.00 News; weather. 1£33 


VHF (avajSSein England and S 
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12J» For Schools: 11 J» New 
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12£0 Leaving SitoooL 11-30 Facing 
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Home: Drama (s). IliiO In the 
Home: Documentary (s). 1.55- 
3JWpm For Schools: 1^5 Listening 
Comer. ZJOO Black British (s). 

£30 Books, Plays. Poems (s).£50- 
£55 PM (continued). 11-30 
Open University: 11-30 Culture and 
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( Radio 3 ) 

On VHF only 

£35 Open University. Open forum 
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£55 Weather. 7J» News 
7.05 Morning Concert. Vivakfl. 

Dixit Dominus. Scarlatti 
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Afltinord 
to D minor. 

Montavardi. Dixit Dominus 
directed by Andrew 
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0.00 News. 

£05 Morning Concert 
continued Verd 
Overture: ArokJo. Pticoni 
Three Minuets. BeffinL 
Son vergin vazzosa: Joan 

Sutherland (soprano). 
Orchestra of the Ro^l 
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Garden. Respighi, four 
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£00 News 

£05 This Week's Composer. 
Chopin: Nocturnes: (fo 
27 and Op 52 (Daniel 
Barenboim, piano]. 
Scherzos: No 1. in B minor. 

tN04.inE.0p54. 

^ Richter, piano). 

10.00 Strauss. Sinforva 
domestics. Op 53. 

Vienna PO/Lorin MwzeL 

1055 London Saxophone 
Quartet Christine 
Croshaw (piano). Jean 
Francabc Petit Quatuot: 
Alfred Desanckn: Quatuor; 
Burnet Tuthflt sonata tor 
tenor saxophone and piano. 
Op 56: Nail Richardson: 
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11J0 B& Scottish Symphony 
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Overture: Luisa Masr 
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No 1. in E minor. 

1.00 News 

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Siring Quartet in F minor. 

Op 20 No 5. Dsizi Quartet in 
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Gordon Jacob Suite for 
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quartet Live from the 
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B roadcasting House. 

ZOO Tom Jones. Excerpts 
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operetta with the BBC 
Chorus and Concert 
Orche s tr a . With Geoffrey 
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Rea WoocSand as Sophia. 

250 Record Review 
introduced by Paul 
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£00 Choral Vespers direct 
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£00 Midweek Choice. Boyce 
Concerto arosso in E 
minor. Detlus Cefio Concerto, 
with Jacqueline du Pte 
and RPO under Sargent 
Mozart Utaniae 
Laurantanae (K195) Itena 
Cotrubas (soprano), 

Helen WAtts (contralto), 
Robert Tear (tenor) and 
John Sttrtey-Qutoc 
foaritone). Krommer 
Concerto in E flat, with 
BohusIavZahrdnflc 
(darinet). Bartok Five 
Hungarian sketches, 

Israel PO/Mehta. 

7J00 Choral Voices. From St 
Peter Port, Guernsey. 
Includes works tw Burd. 
Stanford, Parry, Charles 
Wood, Mathias, Pitoni. 

7 JO Six Continents. Angus 



Derek Martin (Irft) and Nigel Pfener in King & Castle (ITV, 9pm) 


McOenrrid surveys 
recent foretgnradw 
broadcast monitored t>y 
the BBC. 

7 JO Hopkins the Factory 
Worker. Opera in a 

iua and three acts. 

and musk: By Ma* 

Brand. Surra In the English 
version by Elizabeth 
Forbes. One ol Weimar 

Germany's greatest 

operatic hits, this 1929 story 
of blackmail, prostitution 
and the rights Of workers 
embraces everything 
from ozz to senahem. with 
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Orchestra and BBC Singers. 
10l20 Bach. Sonata No 3 in C 
(BWV 1005). partita NO Z 

to D minor (BWV 1004): 

Yossi 2vom (viotto). 

11.15 Chicago Synfohony 
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UTTTO.TOW *S* 928 2252 CC 
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THE MAGISTRATE 

by Ptnero. 

Fri 7.46. sw 2 .I 6 now prtee mao 

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NHn WAD 236 1916. Dnr 7. 
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with Patricia Karrs. Oaada 


'SoSg 1 


LYRIC THEATRE ShaReceury 

Ave Wl 01-437 3686/7 01434 
1860. 01-434 1050. 01-734 

6166/7 

OMJN BLAKELY 
-a artmaiu a tovouiiy 
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HI 

Tin- Nattonat Thcairrt aw a rotd 
producuon oT . 

•ALAR AYCKROIHHFS 

• A CHORUS OF 
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“Heart BrraWnclv dmrnr Cdn 
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RTOired prke matt Student A 
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WINNER OF ALL 
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MAYFARI S OC 629 3036 Moo 
Thu 8 Frt/Sat 0.40 * 8.10 

_ RICHARD TODD in 


THE BUSINESS OF 
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- An unabadied ■winner** S EJqa 
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ffTH THRILLING YEAR 


MAYFARt S CC 629 3056. Mon- 
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(24 Hr* 7 Dayi MOB-Fri £ Sar 6 A 

BJO 


METAMORPHOSIS 


Stev en BE R KOFF 

"TIK MOST CXCtTIMS 


WEST DID** C Limits. 
LAST S WEEKS! 
(Pre-theatre food * drink) 


NATIONAL TMCATBC SOI Sank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

SM- SEPARATE CHTRBES IBM 
DUVBX/LYTTD.TM/ 

_ ITESLOE. EACelttnl ctmapl 
scats days o f perf » all Ihealiet) 
tram 10 am. RESTAURANT (92s 
20UL EASY CAR PARK. Ho) 
633 0880 AM COW> 


NEW LONDON Drury Lane WC2 
405 0072 OC 579 6453 E\« 7 A5 
Tito 6 Sat&OO A 7 46. I 

THE ANDREW LLOYD W TIBER 
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APPLY DAR.Y TO BOX KFU 


Crew Booki ng p i -405 
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2 00 (tow price mau A 7 ID 

THE THREEPENNY 
OPERA . 


EXCELLENT* T. 
0* . “The GREAT Mack We KaMa 
tbrm" Punch. Fri 7.15, Sal 2.0Q 
ilow anre man . & TIB 
JACOOOWSKr AMD TK 


PALACE THEATRE 437 6834 
CC 457 8327 or 379 6433 
PM Can 24 Hr may CC MO 7200 
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P A B A MOUHI C I T Y THEATRE Cl 

WtndnuB SI. Wl CC Ol 437 
6312/8360. 
rBrien, M< 

In THE NEWS 

Rd. prtee prev* Today. Opens To- 
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Frt * sat 6 JO A 9.00pm 


PNOEMX 836 229a ce MO 9661 
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Ton*L Tomor. Frt 7.30. Mat 
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THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

TS. ELKTT 


OUT?A 




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PtOCAOHI Y THEATRE. 437 

4006. Crettil Card Hotlines 579 
6665. 741 9999 Crp Sales 836 
3962/930 6123. 

2ND SENSATIONAL YEAN 

David frank 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 


Renew Magazine 
EvnBO Mai Today 3 * Sal S 

LAST WEEK 

Mini end SM prior to-C9A 


PHJNCE EDWARD Boa Older 
734 8951 Finn Coll M Hr 7 Days 
rc Booking 636 5464 Grp Sain, 
, 950 6123 1 

Mon-Sal £ Mat Tnuri & Sal £00 

CHESS 

a grand master of a 

SHOW" Newsweek 

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MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 
AVAILABLE ON DAY 


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hr 7 day 240 7200. 

TE-T APlBai HOOD* D. Mali 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 
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THE BLOCK BUSIER MUSK 


ANYONE NOT TO 

r i r* r Time*. • 


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PRMCE or WALES 936 8081 /2 
rc 930 0844/5/6. From 30 Get 

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ibkp rmi. From Tmm bo 
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raw by aim RobmM. thr 
Rkhard Evre. 


. 01-734 1166/7/ 
0261/0120. 24h r CC 240 7200. 

OtP Steto 930 6123. 

“*THE BEST MUSICAL M 
LOtteKRT* Goa 

-A WONDERFUL STAR** MU 

MAUREEN LIPMAN 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

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Mon- Sal B Matt Wed ZJO Sal 6 


SAVOY 01-836 8888 CC 01-379 
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Mart wed 5. Sa l 6 A 8JO 

LAST 7WYZKS DIPS NOV 1 

CHRISTOPHER GODWIN 

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6433/741. 9999. First Call 24- IV 
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•rite Unto v 

pto»w?T.T 
The Theatre Of Cunniy Co 



in 


ROOKERY NOOK 

by Ben TTavers 

Pc retro Pv Mark Kingston 


Mon-rn 8 Wed Mai 5 Sal 5 XX) A 
8J0 


SHAW THEATRE 388 1394 


TWELFTH HHMT 

Paltv 2 JO Sc 7 OO Sat TOO 


ST MARTM-S 01-536 1443. Sne- 

nal CC NO. 379 6433. Cltf ao 
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—TUP tenr nesi or Britain's comic 
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tin 240 7200 mkg feet EvgaBO. 

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- Dirertcd by HAROLD F1NIER 
■A stunutoilnu Dttw. Hunto 
and witty- Times-. “Full at 
nmoii. conrem and ouuaoe" 
C«y Linda 


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YOUNG VIC 928 6363 CC 5T9 
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Youna vie studio 928 0353 

The R a m aar y Tfcaat m m 
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AST GALLERIES 


ANTHONY d*OFPAY 

Derutg ». wt 

manta. 099 4100 


■AJBHCAN ART GALLERY. Bar 
Mean Centre. London. ECS Ol- 
638. 4141 IMK 5 M 
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mounting of IMs grew 

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photofFoph*. Oasery admttaMn 
£2 and Cl Open Turn ■ 6« 
roam -6 46pm. Sun A Bank 
Hoi* 12-0 45pm « 
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R RI Y 1M I URRARY CLRuaaeM R 
WCI Tha latanateliate THE 
OYV M SIAFS and a ealabra- 
Raa af ST AUOUSTW OF 
MPPO I3S4-4SOW Mon - *u 
10-5 Sun jj06 Adm free. 


CHRISTOPHER MENDEZ, 

68 Jermvn Si . S.W.t 


ACHNOYD. 491 0015 


148 New Bond Street w.i 
01-629 6116 

THE BUTTERFLY'S 


HAYWARD GALLERY. South 
Bank. SCI SC A NDIN AVIAN 
PAUfTMC 1900 and PHOTOG- 
RAPHY A SURREALISM, until 
5 on Alton X2.50/C1.50. Rr 
for org into Ol 261 0127 


JOURNEYS M THE SUN - HJINA 
MCNARDEON WMetKohun A 
Screen Printt. 17 30 Sepl. CCA 
C a B ar l aa iChrMlea Conletnp® 
raw Aril 8 Dorn- SL London 
Wl. 01 499 6701. 


PARKIN GALLERY 1 1 Motcomoc 
■ SI London SWI. Ol 235 8144 
IsUXED EXHtemON OP MQQ. 


ROYAL ACADEMY. PICCADIL- 
LY. 01 734 9052 Open d*W 
106 inc. Sun i reduced rale 
Sun until 1.45] THE SKETCH- 
BOOKS OF PICASSO £2.50. 
£ 1.70 cone rate rruooUM Ol- 
741 9999 MICHAEL NDW 
AJLA. JUJSO. £2.00 rone rale 


CINEMAS 


?l**fPf** PLAZA 485 2443 SID 
A NANCY 1181. Film at 1.30 
LSO 6 .15 A B 45 


aiw — h i i 351 3742 

Dcnye Arc- md** TH E P TC UNE 
OF THE ASmu C AN ESVnC 

<181 Finn at 2.15 4.20 6.30 

845. 


CURZON JBAYFAM Curaon St 
499 3737 nm CaU UHr 7 Qau 
cr 240 7200 iBkg Fee) Maogw 
SmiOi. Oenhoton EUlML Juttt 
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NW (FO) Film a) I JO ip lot 
Sum 54 3- 610 A 8 40 
ALSO AT CURZON WEST END. 


Onriantd ea page J8 


i 



r 


l 

in. 


40 


WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 1986 


Fhapdfehed fli I78S 


* * * dr * 


SPORT 



Scots aristocrats 
fear the lower 
orders of Europe 


Whfle ihe five Scottish 
dabs who embark tonight on 
their 1986 campaign in Eu- 
rope consider they have been 
fortunate in their first-round 
draws, they will not be lulled 
into a false sense of security by 
the knowledge that their oppo- 
nents are not members of the 
Continent's footballing 
aristocracy. 

The days are long gone 
when Scots scoffed at the 
thought of a foreign club with 
an unpronounceable name 
having a hope against their 
famed exponents and David 
Hay, the Celtic manager, who 
meets S hamr ock Rovers in 
Dublin in the European Cup, 
summed up the thoughts of all 
his managerial colleagues 
when he said: “In every tie 
there are opponents who 
could turn our dream of 
success in Europe — which is 
the goal of every Scottish dub 
— into nightmare defeats.” 

That is why there is a tinge 
of apprehension in Scottish 
hearts tonight because pride is 
at stake. With no English dubs 
in the premier tournaments, 
with the Scottish national side 
in disgrace, the still fanatical 
Scottish supporters demand 
European success from their 
clubs. As Hay said ruefully: 
“They may forgive a defeat 
from Barcelona or Inter Milan 
but they take the huff if a club 
of Celtic's stature lose to an 
unknown.” 

Aberdeen, who have been 
Scotland's most valiant cham- 
pions in Europe in recent 
limes, will have to show vast 
improvement if they are to 
beat Sion, of Switzerland, in 
their Cup Winners' Cup tie at 
Pittodrie. Little has gone right 
for the club this season. They 


By Hugh Taylor 

have been badly hit by injuries 
and this week they lost Joe 
Miller, their highly regarded 
forward, who is in hospital 
after gashing his hand while 
breaking a bottle of coins for 
charity. 

Lack of balance in attack 
has been another Aberdeen 
■ problem and the experiment 
of playing McLeish, the inter- 
national centre half, in mid- 
field against Heart of 
Midlothian was not a success. 
Sion, who have improved 
since they were trounced by 
Aberdeen several years ago, 
are confident after having 

More football 
on page 38 

watched a lacklustre display 
on Saturday that they can 
contain their opponents to- 
night. so the Scots will have to 
regain the form which saw 
them beat Real Madrid in the 
Cup Winners' Cup Final in 
1983 if they are to travel to 
Switzerland for the next 1% 
with any hope of success. 

Rangers have injury wor- 
ries, with Cooperand McCoist 
still doubtful, for their UEFA 
Cup tie with Tampere at 
Ibrox: but they have' been 
playing with such flair and 
imagination that they should 
account for their Finnish 
opponents without too much 
trouble. Danger to the Ibrox 
defence of Butcher and Woods 
is threatened by another 
Englishman. BellnekL who 
joined Tampere from 
Wimbledon three years ago. 

Although Dukla Prague 
have for long been a shadow of 
the great Czech side that once 
ruled Eastern Europe, they 


retain an element of class and 
plenty of vigour and will 
prove doughty opponents for 
Heart of Midlothian in the 
UEFA Cup tie at Tynecastle; 
but Hearts have found the 
battling spirit that took them 
so near success last season and 
should obtain the result they 
need. 

The experience of Dundee 
United should enable them to. 
gain a draw at least with Lens 
in France in the other UEFA 
Cup tie. The outstanding 
defensive partnership of 
Narey and Hegarty, who are 
taking part in their 52nd’ 
European tie. should be strong 
enough to stop an attack 
which has lost zest because of 
an injury to Ramos, the 
Uruguayan winger, who faced 
Scotland in the World Cup in 
Mexico. 

• Real Madrid and Juventus 
set out tonight as leaders of a 
Latin attempt to revive the 
glories of the European Cup in 
the manner in which Diego 
Maradona restored football’s 
ability to thrill ai.the Mexico 
World Cup finals. 

Real, with such star World 
Cup forwards as Spain's 
Butragueno, Argentina's 
Valdano and Mexico's San- 
chez, possess the firepower to 
translate their two-year 
domination of the UEFA Cup 
to the champions' cup against 
Young Boys, of Berne. 

Juventus, those masters of 
defence, begin with a home tie 
against. the Icelandic under- 
dogs, Valor, of Rekjavik, amid 
concern over the fitness of 
their star forwards, Platini, of 
France, and Laudrup, of 
Denmark. 



Shamrock with a ground for caution 


From Stuart Jones 

Football Correspondent 
Dublin 

The citizens of Europe may 
no longer be endangered by 
wild and drunken louts claim- 
ing to be supporters of English 
dubs but, as the opening night 
of the three continental com- 
petitions approaches, the ugly 
smell of potential violence still 
remains. It hangs in the air 
particularly over Dublin's fair 
dty. 

Shamrock Rovers, the 
champions of the Republic of 
Ireland, will entertain the 
kings of Scotland, Celtic, in 
the first round of the European 
Cup here tonight in a 
that has been fortified i 
cally for the occasion. Yet it 
scarcely resembles a strong- 
hold. Even the Irish dub's 
secretary. Loots Kflcoyne, ad- 
mits that “it belongs in the 
. 1940s". 

Glenmalure Park, which 
sits on the edge of the busy 
Milltown Road, is a small and 
tight stadium overlooked usu- 


ally by only one low stand. 
Now enlarged on either side by 
scaffolding that will be dis- 
mantled immediately after the 
tie, it faces “a good, eld 
traditional shed", as Kflcoyne 
describes ft. 

Shamrock had considered 
moving the first leg to the more 
spacious accommodation at 
Lansdowne Road which holds 
30,000 spectators. But the chib 
officials, preferring to lose the 
additional gate receipts rather 
than home advantage, decided 
instead to stage it themselves. 
Moreover, they willingly re- 
duced the capacity audience 
from 22.000 to 18,000. 

Even so, the tickets were 
sold ont only at lunchtime 
yesterday. Some 2,000 of them 
have been claimed by the 
followers of Celtic, whose 
behaviour has not always been 
exemplary. During the 1985 
Cup Winners* Cnp, for in- 
stance,. their match against 
Rapid Vienna in Glasgow was 
marred by the throwing of a 
bottle on to the pitch. 


UEFA subsequently or- 
dered the first leg of the 
second to and tie, winch Celtic 
had won 3-1, to be replayed at 
Old TraflbnL A ample of so- 
called supporters spoiled that 
as well by naming on and 
attacking two members of the 
Austrian team, who triumphed 
1-0 on the night and went 
throngfa 4-0 on aggregate. 

Celtic have since employed 
a security officer to check the 
backgrounds of all those who 
apply for tickets to Evopeaa 
matches. They have also re- 
cently pleaded through their 
own dub newspaper for peace 
in foe Irish Republic. David 
Hay, their manager, for one, 
does not envisage that there 
wfll be any trouble. 

Yet his statement is born out 
of hope rather than conviction. 

Shamrock have held exten- 
sive discussions with the local 
police, and have taken precau- 
tions ob their advice. Kflcoyne 
preferred not to disclose, the 
methods that wifi be employed 
“for obrions reasons". But he 


You're at a 
football game with 
your child. 

An over- excited 
fan behind you 
begins to use 
abusive language. 

Do you ask him 
to quieten down? 


It's a question of Scruples. 

sms 


THE GAME OF MORAL DILEMMAS. 


The West German manager 
Franz Beckenbauer yesterday 
named four newcomers in a 
squad of 20 for the friendly 
international against fellow 
World Cup finalists Denmark 
in Copenhagen on September 
24. 

Beckenbauer has selected 
Kaiserlautem’s Wolfram 
Wuttke. Dieter Eckstein of 
Nuremberg. Juergen Kohler of 
Waldhof Mannheim and 
Bayer Leverkusen's Thomas 
Hoerster for training but said 
only Wutke stood a good 
chance of playing against the 
Danes. “It’s very likely that 
well start with him,” said 
Beckenbauer of the midfield 
player, who is the first 
division's leading goalscorer 
this season. The squad relies 
heavily on veterans of 
Beckenbauer’s team in Mex- 


Laird of foe grand manner: McGrain has made Europe his stately home for 16 years 

Linfield’s 
hopes 
are high 

By George Ace 

LinfiehL the Irish League 
champions and by far their 
most experienced side, so far 
as European football is con- 
cerned, cany the counnys 
brightest hopes of progress 
tonight Linn eld are m Nor- 
way for a European Cup first 
leg tie against Rosenborg 
Boldklab and their manage r , 
Roy Coyle, is reasonably con- 
fident they will get the kind of 
result that will enable them to 
face foe return leg at Windsor 
Park in two weeks' time with 
high hopes of making' the 
second round. Coyle, who 
watched Rosenbuig 10 days 
ago, intends playing 4-4-2. 

Linfield’s city .. rivals 
dentonm go into their Cup 
Winners' Cup tie at the Oval, 
Belfast, against Lokomotive 
Leipzig minus five first team 
regulars. “My side has been 
decimated: we can only hqpe 
for the best,” manager Billy 
Johnston said yesterday. Felix 
Heaty, the international for- 
ward who missed Coleraine's 
3-1 defeat by Ards on Sat- 
urday, will be in the line up 
against Brandenbare in the 
UEFA cup tie this afternoon. 
Platt, the Cbleraine player- 
manager admits that his side 
has a mountain to climb even 
allowing for the fact that 

Brandenburg are malting their 

debut in European com- 
petition, and they only fin- 
ished fifth in the East German 
league. 

Tony Macken, Waterford's 
veteran performer who suf- 
fered a thigh injury in 
Sunday's game; bas been 
passed fit for the Cop 
Winners' Cup tie a gain** Bor- 
deaux. But pitted against a 
galaxy of French stars, includ- 
ing Tigana, Battiston and 
Vercrnysse, Waterford will 
surely cause the biggest upset 
of the night if they manag e to 
take a lead into foe second leg. 


McEnroe slips 
into depths 
of depression 

From Richard Evans, Los Angeles 


John McEnroe is currently 
fat a state of complete confu- 
sion about his future as a 
tennis player. 

During the coarse of a long 
conversation at foe UCLA 
ttmiife centre, where he is dne 
to play Kelly Jones, a young 
American, in the first round of 
foe Volvo Tennis Totmmineat 
today, McEnroe a dmitted that 
he was neither physically dot 
mentally prepared to battle his 

way back to the top of the 
world ranking. 

“I'm tike a zombie when I go 


“I'm tike a zombie when l go oeaer , 
on court* he told me. “Half “Seeing that little fellow smile 
the time I don't know what I'm pnts _ everything in 
doing or why iSn there- Then I perspective. 

start playing so badly 1 Just __ Attempting 


want to get off"- 
At the moment McEnroe is 
the victim of his own high 
standards of excellence and a 
hopelessly volatile tempera- 
ment he still does not know 
bow to controL 
The first round defeat at the 
US Open, the default for being 
late for his dodMes and the 
resulting fine for insuhiiig the 
referee, combined with banish- 
ment from the US Dins Cup 
twin , contributed to a litany of 
woes that have left McEnroe 
abnormally depressed- 
“Nothing about my come- 
back worked out the way I 
hoped," McEnroe said. I have 
a tot of aimer Inside me about 
that and I am not excludi n g 
myself from Maine. I am angry 
at mysdf as welL” 

Anger is nothing new to 
McEnroe but I have never 
seen him so confused about 


Spark needed to 
get him going 


did state that the police 
strength will . be reinforced 
substantially both inside and 
outside foe quaint arena. 

■ Celtic should have few prob- 
lems of their own within it Bnt 
Hay points out that “there are 
no easy games in Emupe any 
more. The gap between the top 
and bottom nations has dosed, 
as was confirmed during the 
internationals last week. We 
won't be unhappy with a draw, 
though we won’t be playing for 
one.” 

Nor wfll Shamrock. The 
champions of Eire for the last 
three years, they feel that then- 
form suggests that they are 
capable of beating anybody at 
home. History suggests other- 
wise. In 14 previous cam- 
paigns, they have conquered 
only Spora of Luxembourg, 
Apod of Cyprus and Fnuu 
Reykjavik of Iceland. 

They have never advanced 
beyond the first round of the 
European Cup, althoogb two 
seasons ago they were 
knocked out by LiufieM, their 


northern counterparts, only on 
an away goaL Their tone 
performance of note occurred 
as long ago as 1967 when they 
held migbty Bayern Munich to 
a draw in Dublin in foe Cup 
Winners’ Cnp. 

They will welcome back 
Byrne, their captain, in mid- 
field. They need him. -He was 
suspended from last Sunday’s 
League Cup tie when they 
themselves were held 2-2 at 
home by Monaghan, of foe 
second division. Yet they may 
be without Kenny, their right- 
back. and especially Whelan, 
a midfield player, both of 
whom were iqjured at foe 
weekend. 

Apart from doabts concern- 
ing Burns, Celtic will be at full 
strength. McGrain, of rich 
experience, comes back into 
the side that drew against the 
premier divishm leaders, Dun- 
dee United, on Saturday. Hay 
expects “a hard battle” and 
everybody must hope that it 
will be limited to the 22 
contestants. 


New men for West Germany 


ico with goalkeeper Harald 
Schumacher, Lothar 
Matthaeus, Andreas Brehme, 
Klaus Alloft and Rudi Voellcr 
all expected to appear against 
Denmark. 

WEST GERMAN SQUAD: IrarMI, 
Schumacher, Augontfralar. Brehme, 
Berthow. Burfiwaid. FroncecK. Herget 
Hoeralar. Kohler. Matthaeus. Rahn. Rolfl. 
Thon. Irinka ABofe. Ecfcstan. Michael 
Rurnmongge, Voefler, Waas. 

• West Germany, losing 
finalists in this years World 
Cup. pocketed bonuses of up 
to 172,000 marks (86,000 
dollars) for their achieve- 
ments in Mexico, the Presi- 
dent of the country's soccer 
federation Hermann 
Neuberger said yesterday. 

• The Italian League side 
Udinese have signed the vet- 
eran Argentine forward Dan- 
iel BertonL The 31-year-old 
player, a 1978. World Cup 
winner, may make his debut 


in Sunday's match against 
Napoli, foe dub that released 
him at the end of last season. 

Udinese finalised Bertoni's 
transfer after ending Peruvian 
winger Geronimo fiarbadflfo’s 
contract a year early. Italian 
League dubs can field only 
two foreign players and 
Udinese also employ Brazilian 
defender Edinho. Bert on i 
came to. Italy in 1980 with 
Fiorentina. 

Udinese started the season 
with a nine-point penalty 
following the involvement, of 
some club officials in a fixed 
match scandaL In an effort to 
strengthen their lineup and 
recover the initial points defi- 
cit, Udinese were also nego- 
tiating the transfer of Italian 
defender Fulvio Collovati. 
dismissed by Inter Milan 
following a pay dispute. 


how to deal with the problems 
that continnaOy beset him. 

“I need a spark, something 
to get me going again," he said 
morosely. “It will happen 
sometime, I know it w3L But 
when or how™” 

As his voice trailed off, Pat 
Cash came into the locker 
room, having just survived a 
difficult first round match 
against ISHDuka Odizor, of 
Nigeria, after being a set and 


GOLF 


Huish nurtures dream 

From a Special Correspondent, Chicago 


Scotland's David Huish, the 
key figure in Great Britain and 
Ireland's team in the Bell’s 
Scotch PGA Cup match start- 
ing today at Knoliwood, Chi- 
cago. called for an extra 
practice session from his col- 
leagues yesterday. 

The North Berwick pro- 
fessional a veteran of eight 
PGA Cup encounters, said: 
*~My dream will come true this 
week and we will beat foe 
Americans on their own soil 
for the first time. The course is 
more British than American, 
the weather is exactly to our 
liking and we have a stronger 
team in depth. They have only 
one player with experience at 
this leveL” 

The British dob pro- 
fessional champion’s only 
concern, however, was foe 
tough, wiry, semi-rough edg- 
ing foe greens 

The number of foursomes 


and four-ball matches today 
have been increased from 
three to four in each session. 
The ’ Americans’ suggestion 
was immediately accepted by 
.the Great Britain and Ireland 
captain Derek Nash,, who 
believes his team have more 
strength in foe lower order. 

England's Gary Smith 
holed-in-one at foe short sev- 
enth over a lake with a four- 
iron in the pro-am curtain 
raiser to the tournament 

UNITED STATES: R Acton 
(SahaJee), K AUart (Katke, Michi- 
gan), S Bess (Missouri). C Epps 
(Houston, Texas). R Freeman 
(Srarmovnt, North Carolina), K Mor- 
ris (White Plains, New York), W 
Schumaker (Colombia Cftyi W 
Stewart (Bens Haven), J white 
(Frrethom, Nebraska). 

GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND: Q 


Milne (TavsWe Driving Ranged R 
Longworth (Bolton), G Smith 
(lOiighton Heath), R Weir (CowalJ, K 
Robson (BeacBow Manor). 


RACING 

Dickinson 
breaks 
the ice 

Mi chad Dickinson, who 
made racing history when 
saddling the first five home in 
the 1983 Cheltenham Gold 
Cm finally broke the ice in 
his first season as a Flat trainer 
with Veryan Bay at Lingfield 
Park yesterday. 

Dickinson, who, in a glitter- 
ing National Hunt career, had 
never had a ride or a runner at 
Lingfield, said: “That's a re- 
lief It's been very frustrating 
with over 20 runners and 
several placed horses before 
today, but the morale has not 
been loo bad." 

Veryan Bay. who had been 
Dickinson's first two-year-old 
runner back at Chester in 
May, was ridden by Steve 
Caufoen to lead well over a 
furlong out, and the filly went 
on to beat the favourite. Keen 
Note, by three-quarters of a 
length. She is owned by Rob- 
ert Sangster. who set Dickin- 
son up in the £14m, 2,300 acre 
racing complex at Man ton. 

The . Yorks hireman, aged 
36, said: “ 1 did not have many 
older horses and they let me 
down. The two-year-olds have 
been backward, but the main 
problem has been getting to 
know the gallops at Man ton." 

Chuthen left the winner's 
enclosure to weigh in with his 
face in a broad smile, but 
came rushing Jback in a panic 
seconds later having left some 
of foe filly’s tack lying on the 
ground: “That was nearly a 
calamity,” he said. 

More racing, page 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


RUGBY UNION 

Coventry 
match not 
for Brain 

By David Hands 
Rugby Correspondent 

Though Rugby play their 
regular early season game with 
Coventry this evening they 
will not field their most recent 
acquisition, Steve Brain. 
England’s hooker in 14 inter- 
nationals, against the club 
which he has only just left. 

Brain spent the summer 
coaching in foe United States 
and has now been offered a 
new job in Rugby with a firm 
of builders' merchants whose 
managing director is David 
Rees, the new Rugby 
chairman. 

Rees said: “I learnt that he 
was willing to move id further 
his career earlier in foe sum- 
mer. and that he was consid- 
ering an offer from another 
club. We are delighted he las 
come to Rugby instead. 

“Rodney Webb, foe former 
Coventry and England winger, 
the club wiih me in 


Howe not 
for Villa 

Don Howe is not among 
those interested in the vacant 
manager's job at Aston Villa. 
Although Doug Effis. the As- 
ton Villa chairman, received 
13 applications for foe job 
within 24 hours of Graham 
Turner’s departure. Howe's 
name was not among them. 
The former Arsenal manager 
said yesterday. “I will not be 
applying for the job.” 

He further indicated that he 
was ready to return to full- 
time football. “I want to start 
getting involved with players 
again and the sooner "foe 
better." he said. 

Anderson fined 

Phil Anderson, the Austra- 
lian cyclist, has been fined 
$5,000 for infringing the rules 
during his v felon in the first 
professional New York bicycle 
race on Sunday. He was not 
disqualified Prom the race. 



Howe: looking elsewhere 

Devlin dies 

Tom Devlin, foe Celtic 
chairman, has died at foe age 
of 72 at his home in Edin- 
burgh after a long illness. One 
of the most able legislators, in 
the game in Scotland, he had 
been associated with foe SFA 
and Scottish League for 26 
years. Dcviin joined the Celtic 
board in 1948 and became 
chairman just over a year ago. 


Lloyd named 

Dave Lloyd was vcsicrday 
named to represent Great 
Britain in the classic Grand 
Pnx dc Nations time trial in 
France on October 28. Lloyd. 
37 next month, first rode in 
the French race in 1974 as a 
new professional with the 
Ralegh team. 

Spanish step 

Sally Little, one of the 
leadmg women golfers on foe 
united States circuit will nbv 
m the Spanish Open at U 
Manga from October 21 to 24. 
The South African, who lost a 
play-off for the US Open 
earlier, this year, has carped 
over Slmillion since joininn 
focUS LPGA tour in 1971. B 

Hill move 1 

Gordon Hill, the former 
Manchester. United and En- 
gland w iqgpr. has joined 
Norfowich Victoria of the GM 
VauxhaJI Conference. 


joined me ciuo with me in 
June as playing administrator, 
and our commitment is to put 
Rugby back in foe position foe 
club once occupied. The 
recruitment of Brain is a- step 
in that direction.” 

Previously with Moseley, 
Brain joined Coventry in 1 979 
and played for them as a 
replacement as recently as 
September 2. 

His move will be a fillip for 
a side which not only endured 
another indifferent season in 
1985-6 but recently lost their 
last two captains, Guy Steele- 
Bpdger and Peter Dewey, to 
Northampton. Since Steele- 
Bodger was a hooker. Brain's 
arrival is doubly welcome; 
Coventry's difficulty will be 
less acute in that they can give 
a regular place to Andy 
rarnngton. the Warwickshire 
hooker. 

Rugby will hope that Brain 
has received clearance to plav 
for them by September 27, 
mect Dixonians in 

P%te d Cu° B rtheJOhn 

SWAsass 

«ng Nottingham hooker. 

Lock switches 

^"hS”ulcir N ' w3£ h f Ve 

WNoRf* 11 - 

POniyuLS* \3 da >’ s m =>«* at 

IS5 00 '- Newpon', only 

10 1977 
last vear That 
ended a run of i a ■ . 1 - 
victoria w! consecutive 

did the dm?h£° n ^ poot ' who 
last season^ over Newport 


3-1 down. Cash has always 
admired McEnroe and this 
year the young Australian's 
life has followed a strangely 
similar pattern. Both players 
have been attempting a come- 
back and in May both became 
the father of baby boys within 
fqnr days of each other. 

“How’s your baby?” 
McEnroe asked seconds be- 
fore the same question was on 
Cash's lips. 

“Great and yours?" 

“Terrific, couldn’t be 
better”. McEnroe replied. 



to pnt 

McEnroe's troubles in 
perspective is, however, not so 
si mple. Sifting through the 

His marriage has 
left him drained 

confecting emotions that poor 
out of foe man with typical 
candour, it does appear that 
two factors have contributed 
more than any others to the 
sodden punctuation mark that 
has interrupted one of the 
most brilliant careers in sport. 

First, McEnroe never antici- 
pated that his marriage to 
Tatum O’Neal would leave 
him qoite so emotionally 
drained. 

Second, McEnroe has been 
troubled for 18 months by a 
hip injury and it is not getting 
any better. Apart from the 
discomfort, he is now con- 
vinced he does not move as 
wed as be used to. 

McEnroe has not given up 
completely yet bnt the nexttwo 
weeks when he is dne to play 
Grand Prix events here and in 
San Francisco are crndaL At 
tbe moment he is contemplat- 
ing the Idea of asking for a 
wfld card for the Benson and 
Hedges at Wembley in 
November but firm plans are 
far too premature. 

He is not even sure he can 
beat KeUy Jones and, like Dow 
Jones on Wall Street, loss of 
points there wonM set off a 
new depression. 


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