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No 62,573 


THE 



TIMES 



Friday September 26 1986 


Top men go as 
Rover reveals 
loss of £200m 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


'“.4 


The sudden departure of 
three senior executives from 
the state-controlled Rover 
Group, formerly BL, was an- 
nounced yesterday after it 
disclosed first-half losses to- 
talled more than £200 million. 

Among the casualties is Mr 
Harold Musgrove, the veteran 
BL executive who rose from 
the shop floor to become 
Austin Rover chairman, and 
who takes early retirement at 
the end of this month. 

He follows two other BL 
executives, Mr Ray Horrocks 
and Mr David Andrews, in 
being forced out of the ailing 
group since Mr Graham Day, 
the new chairman, arrived. 

The boardroom cuts have 
been instituted by Mr Day as 
part of the creation of a 
streamlined, two-tier structure 
to improve group efficiency 
and give the cars business 
“more commercial punch**. 

With Mr Musgrove, ged 57, 
go Mr Mark Snowdon, the 
managing director of product 
development who has guided 
much of the collaboration 
between Rover and Honda, 
and Mr Peter Regnier, finance 
director of Austin Rover. 

Mr Day declined to com- 
ment yesterday on the depar- 
tures, but it is generally 
accepted Mr Musgrove, who 
joined Austin as an apprentice 
at the end of the Second 
World War, could no longer 
work under Mr Day. 

Mr Musgrove was ap- 
pointed chairman and chief 
executive of Austin Rover on 


Today 


The party’s 
over... 



Retiring MP 
Robert Kilroy-Silk 
explains why he 
finally decided to 
give up his safe 
Labour seat 

Page 10 

Next week 


Through 
the roof. . . 

Property boom 
... or heading for 
bust? On 

Monday, The Times 
begins a three- 
part series on the 
roller-coaster 
property market; 
picking a path 
through the 
minefields of 
buying and selling; 
the grief of 
gazumping; the pain 
of repossession 



• Yesterday’s £4,000 
prize in The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition was won 
outright by Mrs L Ward 
of Harbome, 
Birmingham. Details 

Sphere Is a further 
£ 4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio fist page 23; 
rules and how to play, 
information service, 16. 

Contra alert 

Contra camps in Honduras 
have been declared off-limits 
to journalists and US forces 
nut on alert as rumours 
abound of a forthcoming big 
attack into Nicaragua Pages 

London list 

A further list of London 
University degrees is > pwj 
lished today Pages 


lime News 2-5 
Oerees*. 7-9 

appis i; 

Alt* 15 

Births. dttUhS. 
oumxRn M 
BridS* ’ 

BwtMss 17-23 
Cb«s J 

Court « 


CrosrtonblOJf 

HU |. 

Lew* 13 

OWnwry 
Scicocc ^ 

TV' A Radio 31. 

Weather » 


its formation in 1982. This. George Simpson, also manag- 
latest development in the long mg director of Freight Rover. 


running saga of the dectining 
indigenous British motor in- 
dustry is likely to be followed 
by more top nwnaymwit 
changes. 

Under the shake-up, Mr 
Day personally assumes the 
chairmanship of Austin 
Rover, Freight Rover, Land 
Rover and Leyland Trades. 

Promoted are Mr Les Whar- 
ton, previously znsna&ng 
director of Leyland Trucks, 
who becomes manag in g direc- 
tor of Austin Rover, Mr Tony 
Rose, finance director of Land 
Rover Leyland, now group 
finance director of Austin 
Rover, and Mr Chris 
Woodwark, manag in g - direc- 
tor of Land Rover Leyland 
International Holdings, who 
takes up the new post of 
Austin Rover commercial 
director. 

The new manag in g director 
of Leyland Tracks is Mr 



Mr Graham Day, tightening 
bold on reins. 


Mr Nigel Penn, previously 
managing director of African 
operations, is the new manag- 
ing director of the inter- 
national company. 

Mr Day, charged by the 
Government with returning 
the company to profitability 
in the hope of eventual 
privatization, said; “I am sure 
there are lots of skeletons I 
have not yet found. But there 
are a hell of a lot of good 
people and I am going to try to 
capitalize on the strengths that 
are there.** 

Half-year results show an 
operating loss for the group of 
£71.1 million against £113 
million a year earlier. 

The posMax loss of £120 
million (£453 million) was 
boosted to £204.5 million by 
an £83.6 million extraor- 
dinary hem. The latter is a 
provision for estimated losses 
arising from the proposed sale 
of Leyland Bus and Unipart. 

Austin Rover, whose mar- 
ket share has tumbled this 
year and is tunning this month 
at below 15 per cent, made a 
half-year loss of £60.9 million 
compared with a small 
£600,000 profit a year ago. In 
contrast to its poor home 
sales. Rover’s exports were the 
best for seven years and 
overseas revenue rose by 20 
per cent to a record £354 
million. 

Land Rover, including 
Freight Rover, improved its 

Continued on page 16, col 1 


* * * * 


Scargill 
forced to 
cut costs 

- • By Tim Jones 

Faced with serious financial 
difficulties ' because of the: 
year-long strike which virtu- 
ally wiped oul its £8 million 
funds, the National Union of 
Mrneworkere executive was 
told by its president, Mr 
Arthur Scargill. yesterday of a 
big economies. 

P lans for a grand new 
showpiece headquarters in 
Sheffield are to be scaled down 
and the 22 constituency 
associations in the 18. NUM 
areas are to be reduced to 10. 

The union's precarious 
financial position has also 
been compounded by reduced 
income from foiling member- 
ship. Before the strike there 
were 150.000 members but 
that is now barely 100,000 
because of redundancies and 
the breakaway Union of 
Democratic Mineworkers. 

The executive also decided 
to send a nine-man delegation 
headed by Mr Scargill to meet 
Sir Robert Haskun, the new 
chairman of British Cbal, in 
an effort to resolve the fester- 
ing dispute over back pay. 

In a move regarded as a 
direct challenge to the tra- 
ditional bargaining role of the 
union. Sir Robert ordered the 
immediate payment of rises of 
£8 a week to the miners which 
had been blocked by the NUM 
• British Coal also received 
yesterday a two-year pay 
claim from the UDM which 
cals for “substantial rises** on 
grade rates, as well as atten- 
dance allowances, secondary 
incentive bonuses and an 
early retirement scheme. 


Israeli jets 
hit Sidon 
PLO base 

r~- FnrraftobertFtsk •-*- 
Beirut 

The Israeli Air Force turned 
its attention to Mr Yassir 
Arafat's main Fatah guerrilla 
organization east of the Leba- 
nese city of Sidon yesterday, 
sending three jets to fire 
rockets at a Palestinian guer- 
rilla base in an olive grove not 
for from the Mieh Mieh 
refugee camp. 

It was the second raid of its 
kind in three days and left one 
guerrilla dead and two others 
wounded. 

Three aircraft dived to- 
wards the encampment of the 
Palestine liberation Army, 
the regular military wing of 
Mr Arafat’s Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization, just before 
midday, while three other 
Israeli aircraft flew cover at a 
higher altitude in case the 
bombers were attacked by the 
Syrian Air Force. 

Palestinian gunmen pre- 
vented journalists from enter- 
ing the wrecked base, claiming 
that they might give away 
information of use to the 
Israelis. 

A PLA officer, who gave.his 
name only as “Alaa”, con- 
firmed the death of one of his 
men. Several guerrillas said 
that the base had a large 
quantity of 3 calibre machine 
guns and 106 mm recoilless 
rifles. 

• JERUSALEM: A military 
spokesman here said there 
were good hits on targets in 
the raid, including anti-air- 
craft weapons, firing positions 
and tents in a wooded area 

Continued on page 16, col 6 



Side by side: Dr Owen nod Mr Steel tearing the studios of Thames Television yesterday. 


US rejects 
Daniloff 
proposal 

From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

The feverish search for a 
solution to the superpower cri- 
sis over Mr Nicholas Daniloff 
continued last night as the 
United States rejected a Soviet 
proposal for modifications to 
a US expulsion order against 
25 personnel at the Soviet 
mission to the United Na- 
tions. 

Soviet officials have pre- 
sented several possible ar- 
rangements to American offi- 
cials to secure the release of 
Mr Daniloff an American 
journalist accused ofspying in 
Moscow, and Mr Genaddy 
Zakharov, a Soviet employee 
at the UN charged in New 
York with espionage. 

It -seemed dear last night 
that both sides are attempting 
to put together a package that 
would have the appearance of 
falling short of a direct swap. 

American officials admant- 
ly rejected any linking of the 
Daniloff case with that of the 
expulsion of the Soviet per- 
sonnel at the UN. 

The crux of the various 
Soviet proposals is that Mr 
Daniloff a correspondent for 
US News & World Report, 
could leave the Soviet Union 
without trial - while . Mr 
Zakharov was tried in the US. 
If Mr Zakharov . was con- 
victed, he would be swapped 
for an unspecified number of 
Soviet dissidents. Administra- 
tion officials last night said 
they were hopeful about an 
early resolution. 

The timing of that plan is 
believed to nave been a sub- 
ject of intense negotiation, 
rhe nub of the US position is 
that Mr Daniloff must be 
released before any other 
moves can take place. That 
would enable the Administra- 
tion to claim it had not agreed 
to a swap. 

The question of whether the 
Soviet dissidents would be 
released before or after Mr 
Zakharov was sent home was 
undoubtedly being debated in 
the continuing talks yesterday. 
Another American position is 
that the case of Mr Zakharov 
is sub judice and that he must 
stand triaL 

Republican leaders are now 
flatly rejecting any possibility 
of a summit between Mr Rea- 
gan and Mr Gorbachov until 
the Daniloff case is settled. 


French force for Togo 


Paris - France today said it 
was sending air and ground 
units to Togo at the request of 
President Gnassingbe 
Eyadema following an out- 
break of shooting in the west 
African country (Reuter 
reports). 

“The president of the Togo- 
lese Republic has asked for the 
military aid of France under 
the defence agreements be- 
tween Togo and' France, 7 * a 
Defence Ministry statement 


said. “Air and ground military 
units will be sent to Togo as 
quickly as possible.” 

Fresh shooting broke out in 
the Togolese capital of Lome 
yesterday, 48 hours after an 
abortive raid on the barracks 
where Eyadema lives. Thir- 
teen died in the attack. 

Togo, which has dose links 
with France, is pne of several 
former French colonies in 
west Africa to have military 
accords with Paris. 


Fan killed in 
gang attack 

A football fen was killed 
when be was hit on the head 
by a stone after Wednesday 
night's Skol Cup semi-final in 

Dundee United. Ran ® e 
Mr Ian Hamilton, aged 41. 
of Salsbuigh, Lanarkshire, was 
travelling home with his son, 
an off-duty policemen, and 10 
others when their minibus was 
attacked by a gang. 

Lnton talks, page 3 


Owen to delay on 
Liberal merger 


By Robin Oakley, 

Dr David Owen, the SDP 
leader, made it dear last night 
that he plans to use the Liberal 
Party's disarray on defence 
policy to delay any merger 
between the two Alliance 
parties. 

In a joint interview with Mr 
David Steel on Thames 
Television's This Week. Dr 
Owen said that the liberal 
Assembly's rebuff to Mr Sled 
and insistence on a non- 
nuclear defence policy “con- 
firms my belief that it is not 
time yet to merge our parties 
and to put ourselves into 
collective decision making”. 

On the same programme 
Mr Steel confirmed that he 
intends to defy the Liberal 
Assembly vote. He supported 
DrOwen’s insistence that any . 
Alliance government would 
maintain a minimum nuclear 
deterrent for Britain even if it 
involved the replacement of 
Polaris. That view contradicts 
long-established Liberal, 
policy. 

Mr Sled and Dr Owen now 
plan not just to continue their 
drive for agreement on a 


Political Editor 
minimum European deterrent 
but to speed up the process. It 
is then expected that they will 
hold a joint meeting of Liberal 
and SDP candidates to en- 
dorse their deaL 
Dr Owen is pressing Mr 
Steel, in addition, to hold a 
special Liberal Assembly to 
back the agreed policy, so as to 


Assembly reports 4 

David Watt 12 

Frank Johnson 16 



expunge as far as possible the 
memory of the Eastbourne 
disaster. 

As the two party leaders 
began their damage limitation 
exercise, Dr Owen was notice- 
-ably restrained alongside a 
tense MrSteeL Though he said 
he was shocked by the liberal 
Assembly's vote- be would not 
be tempted into condemna- 
tion of the liberals. 

He said he had sympathy 
for Mr Steel m bis predica- 
ment and both admitted that 
the Liberal Assembly vote had 
taken them by surprise. 

Mr Steel stressed that there 
was no difference between the 
Libera] and SDP par- 
liamentary parties, only be- 
tween him and his own party. 
“The trouble lies between 
myself and the parliamentary 
leadership of the Liberal 
Party, and the Assembly.” It is 
not a divide between David 
Owen and me. 

Mr Steel is expected to 
tackle the defence question 
head-on in his speech to the 
Liberal Assembly today. Se- 
nior liberals predicted last 
night that a number in the 
audience would not like bis 
home truths, which Mr Steel 
had to offer them. 


Liberals deepen 
conflict with SDP 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


The Liberal Party voted 
yesterday to phase out 
Britain's nuclear power in- 
dustry and put itself into 
further direct conflict with its 
Alliance partners. 

By a big majority the assem- 
bly in Eastbourne committed 
the liberals to becoming the 
first political party to go for an 
end to nuclear power— a 
week after the SDP derided 
that more stations coukl be 
built. . 

Coming so soon after the 
shattering conference defeat 
for Mr David Steel on nuclear 
defence, the derision is an- 
other blow to Alliance unity. 

It is a division which both 
leaderships are confident of 
healing. 

The assembly derided to 
halt the commissioning of 
further nuclear stations; to 
begin a “planned phasing out” 
of all nuclear power, and to set 


a timetable for and start work 
on the decommissioning of 
the rider Magnox power star 
' tions “forthwith”. 

Last week the SDP at its 
Harrogate conference defeated 
a move to commit the party to 
an anti-nuclear stance. 

It backed a moratorium on 
the building of further stations 
pending a safety review, but 
went further than its leader. 
Dr David Owen, wished by 
voting for the building of new 
stations to continue, subject to 
the' satisfactory outcome of a 
stringent safety review. 

Dr Owen, because of his 
demands on the Liberals on 
nuclear defence, was happy to 
. move towards them on civil 
nuclear power. His con- 
ference's derision, therefore, 
was an embarrassment. 

The parties* policy commit- 
tees will now art emjrt to thrash 
out a compromise. 



From John Best, Ottawa 

Scientists working in the 
frozen north of Canada have 
unravelled chilling details of 
the Sir John Franklin ex- 
pedition which perished to a 
man 140 years ago while 
attempting to find the fabled 
North-West Passage. 

The cause of the tragedy 
remains a mystery but no 
evidence was found to support 
the long-held iheoiy that can- 
nibalism may have played a 
pan in the deaths of the 129 
men. . 

During the summer, post- 
mortem examinations 


performed on two bodies at a 
grave site on remote Beechey 
island in the North West 
Territories 

Two years earlier, the per- 
fectly preserved remains of 
another corpse were exhumed 
and examined at the same 
location. AH three bodies had 
been encased in the perma- 
frost of the Canadian arctic. 

Mr Owen Beattie, an 
anthropologist at the Univer- 
sity of Alberta, told a press 
conference in Edmonton that 
X-ray analysis showed that 
Hartnell and Braine probably 
died of tuberculosis and 


starvation. Lead poisoning 
may have been a contributing 1 
factor. 

Sir John franklin set out 
from England in 1845, with 
128 crew members and sci- 
entists, to find the North West 
Passage, which European 
explorers had long sought as a 
short-cut to the Orient. 

They were never seen again, 
and the mystery of why they 
died has since been an in- 
triguing part of Canadian 
history. The Victorians sent 
out a succession of ex- 
peditions in vain attempts to 
‘lost men. 


rtaq^ihe 


The Franklin expedition 
spent its first winter locked in 
the arctic ke aboard two ships, 
the Erebus and the Terror. 
Several members, including 
Franklin, died then. 

Two years later, 105 
remaining crew members 
abandoned the ships and 
headed south, possibly for a 
Hudson's Bay Company post 
on the Canadian mainland. 
They were hauling lifeboats. 

More than 30 years later, 
their skeletons were found, 
stretching in a line across King 
William Island. 

Why they left their ships has 


never been established, al- 
though historians have specu- 
lated that scurvy may have 
begun ravaging the crews. 

The latest autopsies re- 
vealed no sign of scurvy 
although it could have played 
a role in some later deaths, as 
supplies dwindled. 

As a Inner footnote to the 
F ranklin tragedy, the route of 
the North west Passage, when 
eventually discovered, was 
found to lead to the Beaufort 
Sea rather than the Pacific 
Ocean and the Orient The 
Beaufort Sea is an arm of the 
Arctic 


European code 
agreed to curb 
terror leaders 

By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 


Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, yesterday an- 
nounced important steps for 
improving co-operation 
within the EEC to help to seek 
out and "disrupt” the terrorist 
organizations in Europe. 

After the emergency meet- 
ing of the Trevi Group of EEC 
interior ministers in London, 
Mr Hurd and his European 
counterparts expressed op- 
timism that the measures 
agreed would produce more 
speedy and effective action 

against the terrorists. 

In particular, the 12 min- 
isters have agreed that all the 
European police forces must 
share a new communications 
system for alerting one an- 
other on the movement and 
activities of known terrorists. 

Officials at the conference 
disclosed that' this will mean 
the introduction of a special 
classified coded system to 
which only the police and 
security authorities will have 
access. 

There will also be new 
arrangements within the Trevi 
Group for regular up-to-date 
assessments of terrorist 
threats and to target the main 
leaders and organizations. 

Mr Hurd, who chaired the 
conference, made it clear that 
the police forces in Europe 
would select from the “thou- 
sands of suspects” a small 
number identified as “really 
dangerous and significant”. 
Those suspects would be given 

S riority treatment by the po- 
ce throughout the EEC. 

Mr Hard said."** As terrorists 
have become better organized, 
so governments and their 
counter-terrorist forces are 
having continually to improve 
their knowledge and coopera- 
tion if they are to prevent 
terrorist attacks and take 
effective counter-action if they 
occur." 

He added: “These new mea- 


sures will help us to target 
terrorists' movements sup- 
plies of money, arms and 
equipment, so that we can 
harry and disrupt them.” 

Mr Hurd emphasized that 
there was already co-operation 
within the EEC and a flow of 
intelligence information but 
there was no room for 
complacency. ■ 

As Britain now holds the 
presidency of the European 
Council of Ministers, Mr 
Hurd dearly wanted to be 
seen to be creating a new 
political impetus to improve 
the present procedures. 

The EEC ministers re- 
affirmed their determination 
noi to make any concessions 
to terrorists and to intensify 
their efforts against terrorism. 

Other measures which are 
now to become the focus of 
uigenl discussion will include 
an examination of visa 
arrangements and a study of 
extradition procedures to stop 
terrorists from slipping 
through any legal loopholes. 

There was also unanimous 
agreement to review security 
checking systems at airports* 
and to examine more ways of 
eliminating diplomatic 
abuses. 

The EEC ministers con- 
centrated their efforts on tak- 
ing steps that would bring 
quick results. That was in 
response to the crisis faced by 
the French Government after 
the bomb attacks in Paris. 

Officials last night empha- 
sized that for the first time all 
EEC countries seemed ready 
for the fullest possible co- 
operation to combat the ter- 
rorists threat. 

One official said that the 
French would now be pre- 
pared to pul up posters of 
wanted terrorists from other 
countries, something which in 
the past they have refused to 
do. 


TSB may 
ballot all 
applicants 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

The number of would-be 
investors m Trustee Savings 
Bank shares emerged yes- 
terday as being close to 4.25 
■million. The oversubscription 
means that all non-priority 
applicants are likely to be 
ballotted. leaving about 1.25 
million without shares. 

Speculation earlier this 
week suggested the TSB would 
choose to ballot only the 
largest applications. But the 
bank now looks set to choose a 
system of balloting all 
applicants. 

Ballotting means choosing 
applications randomly and 
rejecting those not picked out. 


Sharp fall 

hits Dow 
Jones 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

The New York stock market 
fen sharply yesterday after 
three days of steady gains, as 
London also experienced 
weakness in share prices 
across the board. The Dow 
Jones Industrial share index 
dropped 3825 points to 
1,765.04. 

Traders said that 
“program” selling by big 
investors — triggered when 
shares reach a specific price — 
was partly to blame but there 
was also pessimism about a 
further decline in US interest 
rates. In London the FT 30 
share index fell 183 points to 
1246.1. encouraged by Wall 
Street's weakness^ 



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2 


HOAffiNEWS 


Oil firms to 
fight back 
in price war 
at pumps 


By David Young, Energy Correspondent 


. Britain's major oil com- 
. panies are preparing to fight 
back against criticism that 
they are quick to put up petrol 
prices when crude od prices 
rise and are slow to bring them 
down when costs fall. 

, ■ They are also determined to 

- end speculation, that they act 
together on pricing and use 

.profits from one section to 
„ cover losses in other sectors. 

BP Oil will this weekend 
start distributing leaflets at its 
2,000 filling stations explain- 
ing when and why petrol 
prices rise. Other companies 
stung by criticism from con- 
, sumer organizations and MPs 
are considering putting their 
case more forcefully. 

One option being consid- 
ered. which will embarrass the 
Government, is making sure 
that prices on pumps dearly 

- show the tax element of every 
gallon — currently £l.!0p. 

. - BP Ofl. which will not adopt 
that tactic, are furious with 
‘■what its describes as the 
• Vunctious cant" voiced by 
some Conservative MPS when 
peuol prices were put up. . 

- BP Oil is also angry that 
■ most criticism from within 
Parliament has come from 
Conservative MPs who, the 
company says, are members of 
the political party which calls 
for non-interventionism In 
industry by the Government. 


The company points to the 
Commons En- 


. report by the 
erg} 1 Select Committee which 
ruled that there was no reason 
to support the view that prices 
rose quickly but fell slowly. 


It also says that profit 
figures do not show that excess 
profits are made from petroL 
While BP as a whole reported 
record half year profits this 
year, it lost almost £1 billion 
on crude ofl stocks. 

Mr David Kendall, chief 
executive of BP Oil, the 
refining and marketing arm of 
BP, sa«t“ We have to buy 
crude in the market place in 
the same way as any other 
company. Although this may 
be difficult for the motorist to 
understand it means that pet- 
rol being offered at a cheaper 
rate by one of our competitors 
could be made from crude oil 
which they were able to buy at 
a cheaper rate than we could. 

“It also means that our 
refineries use oil from com- 
panies other than BP and from 
other companies." 

Mr Kendall added: “To 
answer any charges that we 
collude on pricing without our 
competitors is simple. We just 
couldn't afford to give them 
any information ■ about our 
operations which, would give 
them a marketing advantage. 

“ We are selling the same 
product in the same market 
and we have broadly si miliar 
operating costs. 

“We have to use every 
advantage over our compet- 
itors we can 

“ But as far as working hand 
in hand is concerned that is 
nonsense. Apart from the fact 
that it would be illegal the 
market is simply too compet- 
itive to for that to work,” Mr 
Kendall said. 


Boeing is 
Nimrod’s 
sole rival 


By Rodney Cowton 


The Ministry of Defence 
has eliminated five out of 


seven companies which have 
been competing to supply 
airbom early warning aircraft 
to the Royal Air Force. 

After a competition which 
began last March the only two 
remaining companies are the 
American Boeing with the 
AWACS aircraft, which is in 
service with Nate and the 
United Slates Air Force, and 
the British company GEC 
with the troubled Nimrod 
project 

Last night Lord Trefgarne, 
Minister of State for Defence 
Procurement announced that 
both companies would - be 
invited to submit “best and 
final bids" by early Novem- 
ber. 

The five companies which 
have been eliminated from the 
competition are the two lead- 
ing American aircraft manu- 
facturers, Grumman and 
Lockheed, and three much 
smaller British Pilatus-Britten 
Norman. Airship Industries 
and MEL of Crawley. 

France also requires aircraft 
for this role and has been for 
some time considering buying 
three AWACS. Lord 
Trefgarne said that French 
officials would be joining the 
British team's in evaluating 
both the Nimrod and AWACS 
bid. 


Dockyard 
jobs 
at risk 


By a Staff Reporter 


Reductions in the. amount 
of work needed to maintain 
the ships and submarines of 
the Royal Navy will lead to 
large-scale' job . losses at the 
Royal Dockyards and Rosyth 
and Devonport within- ■ two 
years, according to a govern- 
ment consultative document. 

The Ministry of Defence is 
plannmg-to introduce private 
commercial management into 
the dockyards next April, and 
is considering bids by six 
consortia for the job. 

Workers at both dockyards 
are planning to strike today in 
protest against the reorganiza- 
tion and in support of their 
demand that they should con- 
tinue to be employed within 
the Civil Service. 

The document published 
yesterday relates to a form of 
organization which the min- 
istry would implement only if 
tiie management contract bids 
were unsatisfactory. 

Assessments of employ- 
ment prospects under this 
form of organization suggest 
that 3.000 jobs would be lost 
at Devonport in the first two 
years and 700 at Rosyth. 

In the longer term it is 
estimated that the number of 
jobs at Devonport would fell 
from 1 1,460 to about 6,340 in 
1993-94, and at Rosyth from 
5.900 to to 4.680. 


TH&Tj&iES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1 986 



Mr Sebastian Guinness, Miss Clara Johnston, 


Channon 
party host 
fined £80 


. her sisterMissRoseJohnston,andbern»otiieratOxfonijestoTdayafto' 

the court appearance of Mr Guinness and Miss Rose Johnston. 


Gottfried' Alexander yon 
Bismarck, the host -of the 
Oxford party at which Miss 
Olivia Chanson, daughter of 
the Secretary of State for 
Trade and Industry, died, was 
fined £80 by Oxford mag- 
istrates yesterday for possess- 
ing drugs. 

Miss Channon. aged 22, 
died after celebrating the end 
of her final enmaatfmns. 

Von Bismarck, grandson of 
Germany's Iron Chancellor 
and a graduate from. Christ- 
church, admitted possessing 
amph etamine sulphate be- 
tween January and June.- 
Tire prosecution, offered no 
evidence on a second charge of 
possessing cocaine, after bear- 
ing that tod Bismarck was in 
Spain at the time of the alleged 
offence. 

Mr Paul Harrison, for the 
prosecution, told the court that 
after Miss Channon's death in 
the count’s bedroom von Bis- 
marck wait to the police who 
found amphetamine- -sulphate 
worth about £4. in his 
possession.^ - _ 

Mr Robin Grey, QC, for the 
defence, told the court: “This 
giiTs death is going to be a 
shadow over-- the head -of 
Gottfried von Bismarck, prob- 
ably for the rest of his life, 
although it cannot be said he 
was In any way responsible." 

But the count's principal 
problem was alcohol, not 
drugs. He would feel so bad 
alley a ni ght’ s dimldng that h* 
would take amphetamine 
sulphate to help him to con- 
centrate on his studies. 


The magistrates earlier 
committed three other people 
for trial on dnqgs-reiated 
charges after Miss Channon’s 
death. 

They were Rose Johnston, 
aged 23, of SheUmgford House, 
near Faringdoo, Oxfordshire: 
Sebastian Guinness, age d 22, of 
Hereford Square, south-west 
London: and Paul Dunstan, aged 
31. a jobless pop musician, of 
DoIEs HOI, north London. 


Mr Dnnstan was remanded in 
custody nntD his trial at Oxford 
Crown Coart. Miss Johnston 
and Mr Guinness were granted 
bail and ordered to surrender 
their passports. 


Teachers challenged on appraisal 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 
Mrs Angela Rumbold. Min- running in schools before the appraisal before releasing gov- 
“ end of the decade. 


ister of State in the Depart- 
ment of Education and 
Science, yesterday issued a 
challenge to leaching unions 
on appraisal. 

She told educational inspec- 
tors and advisers meeting in 
Bristol: “We no longer think 
of if appraisal but when 
appraisal arrives. At last the 
thoroughbred we have been 
hoping for since 1984 looks as 
though it is approaching 
sianers* orders.” 

Most of the people she had 
spoken to. she said, had no 
doubt that a scheme ~ for 
assessing the performance of 
teachers would be up and 


She dismissed as “rubbish" 
fears that any such scheme 
would be a back-door plot 
designed to pay more money 
to some teachers and dismiss 
others. 

She said the Coventry 
agreement signed by five of 
the six leaching unions was 
“dear on pay, but short on the 
firm details". 

Mr Kenneth Baker. Sec- 
retary of State for Education 
and Science, is known to want 
more specific commitments 
on subjects such as cover for 
absent colleagues and teacher 


eminent money to fund the 
agreement, estimated to cost 

P Q hi 1 linn 


£2.9 billion. 

One outcome of the Cov- 
entry deal on the appraisal 
subject was to establish pilot 
schemes in a small number of 
local education authorities. 


Last night. Mr Fred Smith- 
ies, general secretary of the 
National Association of 
Schoolmasters/Union of 
Women Teachers, said the 
Government must be pre- 
pared to show its hand on the 
question of money before 
expecting any firm agreements 
on appraisal' 


Church of England report 


Outlook bleak for rural life 


A bleak picture of life in 
rural England, with poor pub- 
lic transport, dwindling em- 
ployment opportunities, high 


prices in shops and the eldoiy 
living i 


iving in miserable isolation, 
is painted in a Church of 
England report published 
today. 

One of its authors, tire 
Bishop of Norwich, the Right 
Rev Peter Nott said yesterday 
the idea that people who lived 
in rural areas were well-heeled 
was “mere mythology". 

The report argues for a full- 
scale inquiry by " the church 
into conditions in rural areas, 

similar to the controversial 
survey of inner iriban areas 
published last year. But the 
setting up of such an 
archbishop’s commission is 
likely to be delayed for at least 
a year because of the cost, 
which could be £100,000. 

The bishop and his co- 
author, Canon Anthony Rus- 


By Clifford Longley, Religions Affairs Correspondent 

sefl.say they are hopeful about doctors’ -surgeries,- 
the future of the xhirrdr in banks: social orvices; 
rural areas and point .to 
“many signs of life and 
growth". But it is an area of 
national life, “in which the 
church currently finds itself 
struggling to maintain a pres- 
ence and in which there is 
serious concern about the 
future". 

According to the report, the 
main difficulties feeing rural 
communities are: 

• Population shift, with less 
wealthy familie s rooted in the 
community moving out and 


shops. 


6 Many smaller villages have 
no shops or services; - 

• Shrinking employment in 
agriculture and other rural 
industries; 

• Low wages, and widespread 
dependence bn the fortunes of 


a single company; 
• The closure of t 


many village 
schools, and long-distance 
busing of pupils; 

• Village shop prices up to 20 
per cent above urban 
supermarkets. 

The report says that special 


ihe ■ more -prosperous, with - problems are faced by young 


lifestyles centred on the city, 
moving in; ' ; - 

•“Unequal competition" for 
housing between poorer local 
people and the better off 
moving from tbe cities; 

• Poor mobility, with 30 per 
cent of people without cars, 
particularly the elderly, forced 
to travel long distances for 


le and those starting fem- 
because of - lack - oF 
employment : opportunities 
and a shortage of suitable 
cheaper housing. 


World Chess Championship 

Kasparov resigns 
adjourned game 


From Raymond K««, Chess Comspondtii^ Leningrad 
the world middle of the session. 


the ad- 


Gary Kasparov, 
champion, resigned 
iouroed position of the 19th 
-game oftlte World Chess 
Championship as expected 
without further .. pray 

-■^Anatoly Karpov's sealed 
move 41 was Kc4. 

The score is now 916 points 
each and five games remain to 
be played. Kasparov needs 2fc 
points to retain his title. 

Karpov, tbe former world 
champion, had adjourned the 
19th game in an overwhelm- 
ing position. Karpov had 
Bishop and four Fawns 
against Knight and three. . 

Once again, Kasparov chose 
to defend with, the Gruenfeid 
Variation but he varied his 
play from games IS and 17 
with the move. 7 — Na6 
popularized by -the Dutch 
Grandmaster. Prins. _ . 

- Nevertheless, Kasparov’s 
choice of that alternative ap- 
pears to have come as no 
surprise to his opponent 
After almost an hour of 
thought, the world champion 
embarked on an unsound 
adventurewhh his 15th move. 
-It seemed likely that this was 
based on a miscalculation. At 
move 18 Kasparov had prob- 
ably planned to play ~ Ng3 
with an apparently devastat- 
ing attack, against the White 
Queen. Kasparov roust have 
overlooked in his original 
assessment that 19 Qb5 
attacking the ' undefended” 
Black Rook, would then- be 
immediately decisive. • 

The result of Kasparov’s 
was that he lost Bishop 
Rook without adequate 


Ka$parov launched a des- 
perate counter-attack based 
on his 25th move - Bb5. But 
Karpov elegantly refused this. 

..With five games left the 
match has ' reached an in- 
credible dimax. 

It is reminiscent, but in 
even more dramatic fashion, 
of Karpov’s narrowly averted 
catastrophe in the dosing 
stags of his match with 
Korchnoi in 1978. 

White: Karpov 

White 


lor 


compensation. Towards tbe 



Postponed 
jail terms 
proposed 


and 


PeterEvans 
Fletcher' 


A Rural Strategyjbr th 
of England (Quire! 
Bookshop. Great Smr 


London SWl; SOp). 


the Church 
luch House 
Smith Street. 




ByTim Jones - 
. Tbe 200 engineers . dis- package, lheAEU would con- 
missed by News International ' sider the dispute with 


the 


after taking strike action have 
been urged by their union 
leaders to accept the 
company's final settlement 
offer, which includes 
compensation totalling £58 
million. 

The Amalgamated En- 
gineering Union is the first of 
the three' print unions in- 
volved in the eight-month. 
Wapping dispute to rive'un-’ 
equivocal .backing for -the. 
offer. 

Members of the union’s 
national executive took their 
decision after hearing a report 
from Mr Les Elliot, their Fleet 
Street officer, which recom- 
mended acceptance of the 
offer which lapses on October 
8 . 

His summary was accepted 
by a senior official who said: 
“This appears to be the best 
deal we can get and we believe 
this is the- -last chance for a - 
realistic settlement and will be 
urging the men to vote in 
favour." ... 

He made it dear that, 
irrespective of what other 
unions derided, if his mem- 
bers voted to accept the 


company to be at an end. 

Mr Bill O’Neifl, who has 
been leading News 
International’s negotiating 
team in talks with the print 
unions, has made it clear that 
a requirement of the final offer 
is that each union agrees to 
recommend acceptance. 

It had already been advised 
that the AEU and Sogat *82 
were proceeding wftha ballot 
of its members formerly em- 
ployed by the company having 
met the condition of 
recommending the offer. 

The result of the Sogat 
ballot is expected to be known 
on October 6, two days before 
the deadline expires. 

The National Graphical 
Association has yet to decide 
on whether to hold a ballot 
and its leadership is under 
strong pressure from tbe Lon- 
don branch which is urging 
rejection. 

Yesterday 2.500 print work- 
ers and supporters who at- 
tended a rally in London 


organized by Sogai’82 derided 
of hands to urge the 


on a show 
5,500 workers involved m the 
dispute to reject the offer. 


Former union leader 
praises Tebbit laws 


By a Staff Reporter 

former leader of the provisions of the 1984 Trade 


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The 

largest Civil Service onion 
said yesterday that the trade 
union movement should be- 
stow its highest honour on Mr 
Norman Tebbit, chairman of 
the Conservative Party, for 
forcing changes on them. ; 

The suggestion, by Mr 
Alistair Graham, until two 
months ago general secretary 
of the Civil and Public Ser- 
vices Association, is bound to 
be received with incredulity 
by former colleagues in the 

TUC. 

But the remarks by Mr 
Graham, who left his strife- 
torn union two months ago to 
become director of the Indus- 
trial! Society. found favour 
with his audience at a lunch 
hosted by Lloyds of London: 

!Mr Graham 'said: “The 


Union Act have been wholly 
beneficial to trade unions ana 
if it is possible to award -life 
membership of a trade union 
to Norman Tebbit then the 
trade union movementshould 
collectively agree to do so. 

“I have just spent the last 
few years watching the trade 
union movement having to 
accept increased accountabil- 
ity to society. 


“It is dear that the majority 
of people in Britain, including 
the majority of trade union 
members, felt this increased 
accountability was overdue." 

Mr Graham forecast' that 
the main legal changes, suchas 
secret pre-strike ballots, would 
survive a change- of 
Government. • 


Radiation 

claim 

refuted 


. By John Yeung • 
Agriculture Correspondent 


The Ministry of Agriculture 
reacted angrily yesterday to 
reports that radiation levas in 
sheep in Cumbria and North 
Wales were higher now than 
when restrictions on their 
■ movement were imposed 
more than three months -ago. 

Suggestions that the radi- 
ation mfeht-be caused not by 
.fallout from the Chernobyl 
explosion, in the • Soviet 
Union, but by emissions from 
nuclear power stations and 
from the Sellafield processing 
plant were dismissedas “ab- 
solutely unfounded." ' '• 

Besides - the 

Sellafield/Cakier Hall com- 
plex in Cumbria, owned by 
British Nudear Fuels, the 
Central Electricity Generating 
Board has two nudear power 
stations at WyLfa and 
Trawsfyndd in North Wales. 

When tbe ministry imposed 
its restrictions on June 20, six 
weeks after Chernobyl it set a 
so-called “trigger” level of 
1.000 beqoerels a kilogram .(A 
bequerd is a measurement of 
radioactive decay). 

But it pointed out then that 
that was far below the level of 
JOlOOO bequensls established 
by the International Atomic 
Energy Authority as constitut- 
ing a health risk. 

It said then that the highest 
level detected was 4,000 
bequerels. 

Figures produced at 
yesterday’s meeting of tbe 
National ' Farmers* Union 
council in London, suggested 
that there had been no appre- 
ciable fen in radio-caesium 
levels and that in some cases 
they were still three or four 
times than therrigger level 
The NFU criticized the 

ministry for its handling of the 

aftermath of the Chernobyl 
disaster. 


• The Government rejected a 
demand from Cumbria 
County Council for tighter 
controls over disdratges into 
the sea of radioactive material 


from the Sellafield plant: The 
council said it was worried 
about safety of the undersea 
pipes that carry waste from the 
planL ' T 


1 ‘A waiting list of prisoners 
allowed to stay at home until 
called to serve tbeir sentences 
was advocated yesterday by 
Mr Louis Blom-Cooper, QC, 
vice-president of the Howard 
Leagnefor Penal Reform. 

“If the intake of prisoners 
were evenly spread throughoat 
the year there woald be no 


Divis flats 
demolition 
sought 


. . Divis flati the notorious 
tetrori st-ridden warren . of 
high-rise and 'deck-access flats 
which dominates the Roman 
Catholic Lower Falls fata, 
only 600 yards from Belfast’s 
city centre, should “be 
demolished. 

The Northern Ireland 
Housing Executive an- 
nounced yesterday that its 
board decided on -Wednesday 
to amend its bousing strategy 


onto ward problem favour of demolition and 


prison service^" be said- .- 
" Speaking at the 
aannal'donference in 
Mr Blom-Csopmrsaid-toeaiinJ 
wasLtnimtid oaroftfeglir 
reducing pressure on the sys- 
tem which, according th Horae 
Office figures released yes- 
terday, -show that the prison 
population in E n gla nd and 
Wales-rose sharply last year 
resetting a new peakof 48^00. 

There remaned a dis- 
proportionate number, of in- 
mates from the ethnic 
minorities, with West Indians 
acco unti n g for8 per cent of the 
male prison population. 

- ‘ Under the idea pot forward 
by the league, offenders 'sen- 
tenced to imprisonment would 
be sent a letter ordering them 
to report on a certain date at a 
specified prison. ■ 

Mr Blom-Cooper said it was 
customary in continental 
European systems to postpone 
the start of a prison sentence 
and that hallowed jail admin- 
istrators to spread the load of 
imprisonment over the whole 
year. 

He said that if there were rai 
intolerable bculd-up hi the 
w aitin g H s t “it might be proper 
for the executive to issue a 
mass pardon for the offenders 
sentenced to shorter terms of 
imprisonment". 

For senteaces of two years 
or less call-up could be sus- 
pended or or sentences re- 
duced in length, coupled with a 
power to defer it up to a further 
six months. 

Those sentenced to periods 
of imprisonment of more than 
two years woald not be allowed 
any postponement of the 
execution of their sentence 
except with tbe consent of the 
court of triaL \ 

Any person who foiled to 


replacement ofDivis by con- 
ventionaUjousing, rather than 
refurbishment 
' About 480 families live in 
thp^eomplex compared with 
Abe 795 families for which it 
Haas designed. : 

Mr Richard Needham, the 
Northern Ireland Under Sec- 
retary of State for housing, 
said yesterday that he would 
respond as soon as possible. 


ToD bridge 
workers held 


. Motorists -' were allowed 
across the Tamar toll bridge, 
near Plymouth, free yesterday 
after detectives arrested 16 
bridge workers in connection 
with allegations of fraud. 

Devon and Cornwall coun- 
ty council chiefs, who are 
responsible for running the 
bridge which links the two 
counties, decided to suspend 
toll charges after the employ- 
ees were detained. 


Hatton absent 


Mr Derek Hatton, the 
Liverpool left-wing coun- 
cillor, stayed away from an 
appeal hearing’ yesterday 
against his disnubai from his 
£11.600 a year post with 
Knowsley Borough Council 
He was represented by Mr 
Roger Bannister, the 
Knowsley Nafgo branch .sec- 
rafory. The hearing is expected 
to last two days. 


Acid gas cloud 


respond te a call-op would be 
IfebletD disciplinary action. 


Mr John BarteD, Chai rman 

of the Prison Officers Associ- 
ation, said in a paper that 
daring the past II months, 
LI 08 staff had been assaulted 
by prisoners and 631 prisoners 
assaulted by fellow iiwB^ , 
two prisoners have beat mur- 
dered and there Juive been 
1,700 reported drugs 
incidents. ■ 


It is possible against this 
appalling background for a 

prisoner not to have a bath in a 

seven-day period, not hare a 
aeair change of underwear, 
nor to hare a c omb or a 
handkerchief." 


New dispute erupts over ‘Monocled Mutineer 

spile of years of research into 
uie subject he was never 


By Sheila Gunn 
Political Staff 

A fresh dispute has erupted 
over BBC Television’s series 
The Monocled Mutineer 
which will fuel the campaign 
for tighter controls on edi- 
torial policy. . 

It was disclosed yesterday 
that the BBC ; rejected the 
original play about the First 
World War mutiny by British . 
troops at Etaples in northern 
. France -because -script- readers 
were “unhappy about the mix 


between feet and fiction” 

Mr Leslie Glazer. who 
wrote the. original, said he “fell 
shattered” when he saw The 
Monocled Mutineer on the 
screen because it contained all 
the scenes to which the BBC 


had objected in his version, 
he four-part series written 


The 

by .Alan Bleasdale has already 
been attacked by Conser- 
vative MPs for what they say 
is blatant left-wing bias. 

Mr Glazer-has complained 
to MPS and to the BBC in 


asked for technical advice on 
the series or given an explana- 
tion as to why there bad been a 
change in editorial policy. 

A feature! film of bis script 
had been planned in 1972. bat 
it was shelved when a backer 


droppedouL 


Glazer twice submitted 
the screenplay to the BBG .iri 
1974 and 1982. In 1982 he 
received a letter from Mr 
Peter Kosmfnsky. special 


assistant to the head of plays, 
drama and televison. 

The first reason- he gave for 
flection was the department's 
depleted budget. 

The second reason given by 
Mr^ Kosminsky was: “Our 
(script) readers are unhappy 
about the mix benueenfact 
and fiction. ■ 

Mr Glazer has written' to Mr 
NeB Hamilton. Conservative 
i MP for Tattim. complaining 
• abduv the BBCs “unethical" 
pititude 


The Health and Safety-Exec- 
utive yesterday launched an 
inquiry into a leak of con- 
centrated* sulphuric arid at a 
dye worics which, released an 
arid gas cloud over, c e n tr al 
Manchester on - Wednesday 
pight and put -19 people, 
including nine- children, in 
hospital. 


Player jailed 

The Surinam rugby lwign^ 

Pfeyg*. Brian Higgjns, asSlS; 

Av , enue ’ Orfoiri, 
. 1 “rington, who was caught 

a » rl ™ tv 
his wife, was jailed for six 
months at Warrington Crown 
Court yesterday after he 
admitted unlawful sexual 
zstercourse. ... 


Driver aged 9 


ftjlice raDcd to tbexmc of 
ajacqdfflt m Poole. Dorset. 
th?®*™ 1 a _boy aged nine at 
tiie wheel of the car and his 
aged eight in the pas- 
^ nger . Police said be- 

SSrfi2TtS eira8e 

could be taken against them. 


Cement case 

A'SSSSfiSSK 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


HOME NEWS 


t 



may ease 
rules to allow direct 
access to barristers 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondeof 
Proporals that foe Bar allowed to appear- as ad- 
S ^„ d r Change 115 vocaies in the higher courts, 

code ofeondnet to allow some which are reserved for the Bar. 
clients, to brief a banister The committee is likely to 


direct without going through a 
solicitor are shortly to be put 
before the Bar Council. 

A committee of the council 
. under Mr Nicholas Phillips, 
QC. is expected to recom- 
mend that other professionals, 
such as accountants, should be 
allowed direct access to bar- 
risters in cases before certain 
tribunals. • ■ 

' If adopted, the proposal 
would mean the first, if lim- 
ited, inemsion into. one of the 
two main, restrictive practices 
which characterize the legal 
profession. - • 

By tradition a client cannot 
approach^ banister direct; he 
must go through a solicitor. 
Thereare very few exceptions 
to the rule, such as where a 
prisoner In the dock in a 
crown court wants’ to speak 
noth counsel. Barristers may 
also receive instructions direct 
from people such .as par- 
liamentary agents, patent 
agents and foreign lawyers for 
work abroad. 

In turn, solicitors are not 


■ urge the Bar-Council to con- 
sider a relaxation of-foe rules 
for work , before tribunals 
where another profession al- 
ready has a right of audience 

This means that where 
accountants, for instance, can 
appear before a tribunal they 
should be granted direct ac- 
cess to a banister for work at 
those hearings. 

But the committee will 
stipulate that -the right of 
direct access would be granted 
only where a banister was not 
obliged to do the kind of work 
done by solicitors,' such as 
preparing statements. 

-A’ number of- firms.- of 
accountants have for ' some 
time been keen to be able to 
deal direct with barristers - 
rather than go through a 
solicitor in complex financial 
or lax matters. 

Yesterday Mr Brian Single- 
ton-Green. parliamentary and 
law committee secretary of the 
Institute of Chartered 
Accountants, said his mem- 


bers would welcome such a 
proposal. 

“Many of our members, 
perhaps experts in taxation or 
VAT. need to get counsel's 
opinion for a case that may 
opt even be going to come to 
court, to support what they 
intend to do. 

“They probably understand 
more than the solicitor who 
simply has to act as a pointless 
intermediary and does not 
add anything to what is being 
done.“ 

Solicitors asked 
for ethnic details 

AD solicitors in England and 
Wales are being asked by the 
taw Society to give details of 
their ethnic origins when 
applying for their practising 
certificates this year. 

The exercise, approved by 
the Law Society council is the 
first step in a policy of 
promoting equal opportu- 
nities in the profession 

It is intended to be a “one- 
off" with the aim- of taking a 
“snapshot" of the practising 
profession as at October 1936 
to assess its ethnic make-up. 



for biting off ear 


A policeman was jailed for 
six months yesterday for bit- 
ing off pan of the earofa rival 
Officer during a, Welsh, inter- 
force rugby match. 

Richard Johnson was told 
by Judge Rutter at Cardiff 
Crown Court: “The violence 
you used was a dreadful 
example of football 
hooliganism." 

Johnson, a Cardiff police 
wing forward, who has been 
suspended, sank his teeth into 
die right ear jobe of Mr Keith 
Jones, aged 40, foe Newport 
police lock forwardi during a 
match at the Gwent constabu- 
lary sports ground in 
Cwmbran last November. 

The court was told that 
Johnson, of Hurford Street, 
Maes-y-Coed, Pontypridd, 

. Mid-Glamorgan, had to be 
. restrained by fellow officers as 
he and Mr Jones exchanged 
punches. 

During the trial Mr Jones-* 


said be feh: Johnson bite, right 
through hisear lobe as the pair 
dashed after a line-out near 
the Newport 22-metre Doe. 

In bis defence, Johnson 
claimed that Mr Jones struck 
the first blow, punching him 
in the head after the line- 
outJohnson said he could not 
have bitten through foe lobe 
because he was wearing a 
gum shield. 

Dr David Whittaker, foren- 
sic dentistry scientist told the 
jury of tests he had carried out 
on the ear of a.dead pig which; 
was similarm structure to the 
human ear. - 

He found, he was able to tear 
off the lobe with a single 
wrench, even when wearing a 
gumshiekL 

• bi our report yesterday we 
said that the prosecution al- 
leged that PC Jones “twice 
punched his opponent and 
gouged hiseye." InJact it was 
Johnson who had alleged this. 


Luton to meet league 
on competition ban 

By John Goodbody, Sports News Correspondent 


Luton Town will today 
neel the Football Lea gue 
. bout its expulsion from foe 
LittlewoodsCup, but foe First 
Division club. will not relax its 
ban* on visiting supporters in 
its attempt to beat 
hooliganism. 

Mr Philip Carter, foe Foot-, 
ball League president who 
telephoned Mr David Evans, 
the Luton chairman; yes- . 
letday, said; “We were de- 
lighted to hear that Luton are 
prepared to re-examine their 
position and bring an element 
of flexibility into the 
discussions^' 

The Football League 
management committee wQl 
meet Mr Evans at their head- 
quarters at Lytham St Annes, 


The meeting was arranged 
during talks yesterday be- 
tween Mr Richard Tracey. 
Minister for Sport and Foot-, 
ball League and Football 
Association officials . 

Unlike foe league, the 
Littlewoods Cup rules state 
that 25 per cent of tickets must 
be offered to. the visiting club.. 

• A Portsmouth football sup- - 
porter has lost a £200 claim 
against Oxford United in Ox-., 
ford County Court for breach 
of contract Mr Michael 
Walker, a^d 39, of The Keep. 
Portchester, Hampshire, 
claimed foe dub sold him 
seats at its Manor Ground 
where his view was impaired 
by an anti-hooligan fence. 


Aids risk 
warning to 
travellers 

-- By JQ] Sherman 

British travellers to central 
Africa may be advised to 
refuse unscreened blood 
transfusions under new guid- 
ance ou Aids, shortly to be 
issued by foe Department of 
Health. 

The guidance, will be in- 
duded in a revised version of 
foe Department of Health 
booklet. Protect Your Health 
Abroad^' which pro v.i des 
information on vaccinations 1 
and general health measures. 

The -advice.* which wfllVro- 
dude guidance - on safe sex, 
will apply to travellers visiting 
countries with a high preva- 
lence of Aids such as Africa, 
South-east Asia, America and 
western Europe. 

But' foe Department of 
Health has now under pres- 
sure from medical experts to 
include Warnings about, 
receiving untested blood. 

The warnings come after 
reports W thelapid spread of 
the . disease among betero- 
sexualsinceiuraJ Africa where 
in sbmeooUntriesJ Iper cent 
of young adultsoany foe Aids 
related .virus.' HIV,". 

' Dr Tony Pinching, a consul- 
tant at St Mary's Hospital 
Paddington, and an Aids 
specialist said: “1 would ad- 
vise any travellers to these 
countries, needing blood to 
check where it had come from 
and. to see whether it was 
essential to his or her health 
.care” 

. . .In some circumstances after 
a minor accident he said it 
might be more practical to fly 
home or to refuse a blood 
transfusion. 

Dr Pinching said that one of 
his patients, who was living in 
central Africa had been at- 
tacked by bandits during 
raid. “She was given four units 
ofbldod and now has foe Aids 
virus* 


Spam and chips for GI bride reunion 



Family’s fourth cot death 


Suffocation query on baby 


Mr and Mrs Albert Couch at Gatwick yesterday (Photograph; Peter Trievnor) and in 1946 on honeymoon in Southampton. 

By Robin Young 
About 250 GI brides who 
sailed from Britain in 1946 for 
a new life in the United States 
and Canada have returned to 
Southampton, the port they 
departed from, for a senti- 
mental reunion. 

In Southampton GmUhall 
an air raid shelter canteen has 
been 'recreated as a. ren- 
dezvous point' Tor the brides. 

The welcome party was helped 
along with gifts of chocolates 
and nylons and a meal of spam 
and chips. 

Today many of die brides 
will return to Tid worth, the 
barracks where many were 
“processed" and swore alle- 
giance to the US flag before 
being able to join their hus- 
bands. In attendance wiD be 
Mrs Annabel Jarvis, who 
conducted many of the original 
interviews. - 

At lead one Gf bride, Mrs 
MaigDeriteCoOch, formerly of - 
Crouch ' End, north London, 
now of Redmond, Washington, 
is back in' Britam ftfr the first 
time since she set sail to join 
her husband. Albeit. 

The brides wfll also attend a 
garden party at Broad lands, 
foe Hampshire home of the 
late Lord Monntbatten of 
Burma, dance to the music of 
foe Herb Miller Orchestra, 
led by Glenn Miller's brother, 
and attend a concert by Dame 
Vera Lynn. -- 


A second inquest jury sat 
■yesterday on the orders of a 
High Court judge to deter- 
mine - whether " a baby aged 
'seven months had been suffo- 
cated- or was foe fourth 
successive cot death tragedy to 
beset his parents. 

Parental and political out- 
rage greeted the verdict of the 
first inquest jury which de- 
rided that Adam Brthell had 
suffocated and returned an 
open verdict at Wrexham in 
November 1984. 

It had been told by Dr 
Donald Wayte, Home Office 
pathologist, that the real cause 
of a large proportion of the 
annual : 1,000 infant 
mortalities blamed on cot 
death was suffocation' or 
smothering. 

After representations by 
many parents who had lost 
children through cot deaths 
Mr Justice McCulloch 
quashed foe original jury ver- 
dict and ordered a second 
inquesL 

When the second jury sat in 
Colwyn Bay, North Wales, 
yesterday it was told by the 
coroner. Mr Bryan Lewis, that 
its task was io deride whether 


any criminal or civil liability 
was involved in Adam 
BitheD’s death. 

The jury was told how in 
seven years Mr and Mrs 
Bithell lost three children to 
the cot death syndrome. Their 
daughter. Care, died in 1978 
when she was eight months 
old and their son. Ian. bom a 
year later, survived for just 19 
days. 

The couple's third child, 
Andrew, was monitored in 
hospital for a month after his 
birth in February 1981. but he 
too died just two weeks after 
being allowed home. 

When Mrs Bithell became 
pregnant a fourth time, the 
Foundation for foe Study of 
Infant Deaths, a charitabl * 
organization formed in 1971 
by bereaved parents, put her 
in touch with Professor 
Hamish Simpson, head of 
paediatrics at Leicester Royal 
Infirmary. 

Mrs Bithell left her home in 
Wrexham and moved into a 
flat at the hospital and once 
Adam was bom his condition 
was monitored round the., 
clock by machinery flown in 
from the United States. 


Once back at the family 
home in Clarence Road. 
Wrexham. Adam slept in his 
cot on a special baby alarm 
mattress which monitored 
body movements. 

Mrs Virginia Bithell walked 
from the well of the court and 
sat just three feet from the jury 
to give her evidence in a dear, 
unemotional voice. On Au- 
gust 2Iafier about 9 am when 
foe baby started to become 
sleepy she carried him upstairs 
and laid him in his cot on his 
stomach. 

She returned downstairs af- 
ter switching on the baby 
alarm and did housework, with' 
one ear cocked to an intercom 
which would pick up theories 
of the baby. After 20 minutes 
the baby started to whimper 
and she went back upstairs 
and nursed him to sleep again. 

Minutes later the alarm 
sounded and she raced up- 
stairs again. “I had been told 
in the hospital not to panic. I 
was calling his name but there 
was no response,” . 

The inquest was adjourned 
until today when Dr .Wavte 
will give evidence for a second 
time,." ' '"-I- . .. 



Sons will 
share in 
winnings 

A Birmingham housewife is 
foe sole winner of yesterday’s 
Portfolio Gold prize of £4,000. 

Mrs Linda Ward, aged 42, 
from Harborne in Bir- 
mingham, said she could not 
believe her luck. 

“I used to be about 10 
numbers out every day. 1 just 
could not believe it when I 
realized that my overall total 
matched The Times * Portfolio 
Gold dividend.” 

Mrs Ward, who has two 
sons, said that she would give 
some of the prize money to 
them. 

“But as we are moving 
house soon, most of the 
winnings will go towards re- 
decorating the new house," 
she said. 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40. 

Blackburn, 

BBl 6 AJ. 



;js£. . 

Mrs Ward, who will share 
foe money with her sons. 


Morley guilty 
of theft ’ 

- Stephen Morley, was yes- 
terday convicted at Derby 
Crown Court, of stealing 
£ 10.000 given to him to invest 
by a client, aud of two charges 
of attempting to obtain a total 
of £2,400. 

Sentence was deferred for 
reports on Morley, aged 23, of 
College Road, Dulwich, south- 
east London, wbo had pleaded 
not guilty to all three charges. 
The £10,000 was repaid by his 
parents. Eric and Julia 
Morley. 


Air passenger 
record defies 
the terrorists 

By r Harvey Elliott 
Air Correspondent 

More than six million pas- 
sengers passed through Bri- 
tain's seven main airports in 
August, making it the busiest 
■ month for air travel 

In spite of airline fears that 
the fell in the number of 
Americans visiting Britain 
would affect them hardest at 
foe height of summer, the 
number of people travelling 
rose sharply. 

Traffic rose by 4.6 per cent 
overall with Heathrow, Gat- 
wick and Edinburgh all setting 
records. But the boom , in foe 
number of passengers led to 
congestion at peak tunes. 

The British Airports 
Authority said a record 
P2.I17 passengers passed 
through Heathrow’s four 
terminals on August 31. ■ 
Passengers using Heathrow 
io IJv on United States routes 
fell by more than 20 per cent 
in Mav. June and July com- 
pared with the same months 
in 1985. 


Smokestack cities set 
out to woo tourists 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor * 


A consortium of 13 English .' 
cities, most of them best 
known for their “smokestack" 
industries, is mounting a 
£250.000 promotional cam- 
paign to bring in visiting. 
holidaymakers 1 on package 
tours. 

The Great English Cities 
Marketing Group yesterday 
took a leaf out of foe book of 
the big tour operators for 
foreign package holidays and 
brought out a glossy 32-page., 
brochure, put together by- 
National Holidays, pan of 
Pleasurama which is one of 
Britain's top six package holi- • 
day companies. 

Nine out of JO travel agents 
around Britain, including all 
foe key chains, have agreed to 
put. the brochure on their 
shelves. 

Mr Brian Redhead, the 
broadcaster, was brought in to 
support foe launch, which is 
backed by foe English Tourist . 
Board. 

He said; “The public's 
perception of our great indus- 


trial commercial, and mari- 
time cilies'is seriously flawed. 
They are vibrant, lively and 
exciting places." 

The cities include Manches- 
ter. Birmingham. Bradford. 
Coventry. Leeds. Leicester. 
Liverpool Newcastle upon 
Tyne. Nottingham. Plymouth. 
Portsmouth. Southampton 
and * Stoke-on-Trent. Some 
others, such as Sheffield and 
Hull may join subsequently. 

fn foe new brochure leisure 
seekers are . told about 
Manchester's ’ urban heritage 
park, foe transport museums 
of foe “motor city" of Cov- 
entry.. Liverpool's waterfront 
renaissance. Stoke’s famous 
pottery and the heritage 
attractions of Bradford which 
so for has been one of the most 
successful among old indus- 
trial areas in attracting tour- 
ists. 

Cash for the venture raised 
by the cities has been matched 
pound for pound by foe 
English Tourist Board. 


Health warning on musical strains 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

“Overuse syndrome in nip- . which .the musician Is forbid- 


Mnsidans are a 

health warning today that too 
much practice can lead to 
physical imperfection. 

The discordant note struck 
m The Lancet concerns what 
was called musicians cramp in 
the last centwy but k now 
known as overnsesywiraiitt 
involving pain and loss « 

through an entire 
affecting smugs, woodwraa, 
keyboard, brass and P* 1 ™* 
skm- The artistic agomes can 
he felt in the hand, »nst 
forearm, elbow, shoulder and 

neck 


sicians seems an unfair reward 
for zeal and application. Ii 
occurs in the great and the 
batons, in the aspiring student 
and in the orchestral 
musician," Mr Hunter Fry, an 
Australian researcher, reports 
in the jonmaL 

In a survey of eight sym- 
phony orchestras - three 
American, four Australian and 
one British - the prevalence ol 
the condition was more than 
50 per cent he reports. ■ • 

The only hope for gifted 
players with severe problems 
is a radical rest programme in 


paln- 

from 


den to indulge m any- 
inducing activities, _ 
opening doors to turning on 
water taps. 

Getting back in time should 
start with just one minute's 
practice twice a day. and be 
built up grad nail y. 

To avoid such ordeals, play- 
ers, should limit their practis- 
ing periods to perhaps -25 
minutes and take a five-minute 
break! “The musician will 
notice that the muscles are 
move' responsive- jrfter foe 
.-break,' so foe quality of the 
* practice will be better." 



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Let^ say -you’re a 35-year-old mansaving £50 a month . You 
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‘ FOR A MONTHLY INVESTMENT OF £20 


| Presem Age 




• Total 




Guaranteed 

Annual 

Capita] 

Projected 



Sum 


Boms 

Maturity 

life 

Made 

Female 

Assured. 


at 100% 

Value 

Cover 

IS- 28 

.1&-32- 

--£2,970 ". - 

titei -- 

• £1970 

• £8542 

ap 70 

30 

34 

2.967 

2599 

2,967 

8533 

2,967 

35 

39 ■ 

. 2.952 

2586 

2552 

6.490 

2,952 

JO 

44 

2.920 

25® 

2520 

8598 

2,920 

45 

40 

2£W 

2539 

Z8Q8 

8535 -- 

- 2598 

50 

54 

2452 

2.498 

1852 

8J02 

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55 

5« 

2.785 

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8510 

2.702 

60 

64 

174! 

2.40! 

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7583 

25M 

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» 

’ 1709 

2573 

2,709 

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70 

74 

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1526 

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- 

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| FOR A MONTHLY INVESTMENT OF £50 } 

1&-3 

18-32 

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£6.711 

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£22533 

£7,661 

30 

34 

7.654 

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7,654 

22513 

7*54 

35 

30 

7.614 

6570 

7.614 

21,898 

7*14 

40 

44 

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6547 

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3 OCT 86 


Although these terms may 
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1 . 




THE TIMES-FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 

# Power debate • Sanctions battle • Fa 

I SOUTH AFRICA 



Fanners wooed 


Sanction 

motion 

wins 

support 


The planned phasing out of 
aU' nuclear power, an end to 
dtc commissioning of further 
nuclear insinuations, and an 
immediate start on the de- 
commissioning of Magnox 
power stations were backed 
overwhelmingly by the Lib- 


Mr Ferguson said he was 
not proposing a highly accel- 
erated phasing out of nuclear 
power stations. They needed a 
responsible, planned phasing 
out over plenty of time. But 
the decommissioning of 
Magnox power stations must 


Mr Alan Berth (left), Mr Simon 


(Ph _ 


The assembly, in anemer- 

gency motion moved by Mr n'M-- 

Alan Berth, MP, its foreign BMWbK* i 

supporter die imposition of II Geoffrey Smith 

SSS&SSrs “ysssffiS 


POUCY DOCUMENT 


era! Assembly at Eastbourne start as early as posable. 


yesterday. 


Dr Margaret Joachim, 


'Bui delegates agreed in the liamentaiy candidate for Ep- 
cnergy debate to amendments som and Ewell, moving the 


% Getting the Alliance’s act together 


making dear they were refer- 
ring: to power stations using 
nuclear fission (splitting the 
atom) and would allow a 
continuing and increasing 


Anyone thinking of baying 
British Gas shares should 
know that under an Alliance 
government he or she wo old 
not be allowed to get a 


amendments, said nuclear fu- 
sion was now at the research 
stage. But, unlike nuclear fis- 
sion, it did not produce vast 
amounts of radioactivity. ' 

Mr Bill Bradshaw, of 
Wantage, said nuclear power 


was the only source ultimately 
capable of replacing fossil 
fuels, ft was probably tess 
environmentally damaging 
than burning fossil fuels. 

Without tfuclear power 
prices of fossil fuels would rise 
and poor countries would go 
without electridty. 

Mr Malcolm Brace, MP for 
Gordon, said the claims of the 
nuclear industry to be dean 
and to produce electricity 
more cheaply than any ' other 
means were not true. He called 
for a moratorium on the 
further development of nu- 
clear power. 

Mr Alan SherweH, chair- 
man of the energy panel said 
those favouring nuclear power 
argued that it would be needed 
in the Third World. But those 
countries needed small, lo- 
calized energy sources, which 
were precisely the alternatives 
the party wished to develop in 
this country. 

Lord Ezra, party spokesman' 
on energy in the House of 
Lords and a former chairman 
of the National Coal Board, 
said discussion of a com- 
prehensive energy policy did 
not go wide enough. 

A clear energy policy should 
be based on securing maxi- 
mum efficiency of energy in 
use, and the minimum ad- 
verse impact on the en- 
vironment. 

He advocated setting up a 


windfall profit by exploiting 
the consumer. Mr Malcolm 


the consumer, Mr Malcolm 
Bruce, the party's energy 
spokesman, said during Qnes- 
tfcfr time on the environment 


coittmhmem to research and 
defcefopment - of generating 
cfcttritity by nuclear fusion, 
(jbining atoms). 

-The agreed motion also 
pibposed: 

• Programmes for energy 
conservation and renewable 
sources of energy: 

• tonstruction of the Severn 
barrage and combined beat 
and power stations; 

• The replacement of Nirex 
and all bodies charged with 
the disposal of nuclear waste 
with one public corporation 
with a duty to protect the 
environment; 

f atVairtfdnmenr of 
present plans for shallow 
burial of nuclear waste and the 
renunciation of marine 
dumping; 

• The public disclosure of 
research findings, policy op- 


tions and public inquiries in 
ag areas affected by proposals 
for disposal of nuclear waste, 
with objectors receiving pub- 
lic funding. 

Mr George Ferguson, par- 
liamentary candidate for Bris- 
tol West, who moved the 
motion, strongly criticized 
Lord Marshall of Goring, 
chairman of the Central 
Electricity Generating Board, 


The Liberal Party assembly 
yesterday considered the joi?t 
Affiance consultative -docu- 
ment, Partnership for 
Progress, made dear there was 
lots of it they liked and loci 
they did not, got assurances 
there would be further scope 
for more suggestions, and 
finally carried a motion 
welcoming it. It was part of the 
process, as one speaker put it, 
of the Affiance getting its act 


policies and principles of the 
Affiance . on -the grand. 


final document for Alliance to work; they want it 


particularly towards meeting 
the Hnrent social and economic 


The reservations of the 
assembly woe politely ex- 
pressed in an amendment from 
the Association of : liberal. 


the urgent social and economic 
needstof urban communities. ■ 

That was carried as wefl as 
an instruction to the party's 
policy committee to seek 
agreement with the. Social 
Democratic Party on a revised 
final document. 

The motion that the assem- 
bly approved stated that the 
document should form foe 
basis for foe policies on which 
foe next Affiance programme 
for government would be 
drawn- up. The assembly ao- 


puhUcatimx.— -- - 

Despite the reservations ex- 
pressed during foe debate, 


townie 
Mr Richard 
liamentary cai 


Pine, 

ididate 


there was 'coosiderable praise Broadgreen and deputy leader 
at foe progress made in forgr of foe Affiance group on 


rica. and its belief that sanc- 
tions presented the last 
opportunity for peaceful 
change. 

The motion regretted that 
the meeting between Mr Oli- 
ver Tam bo, ANC president, 
and Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, foiled to 
change “the obdurate and 
immoral intransigence of foe 
Government in blocking 
moves for effective mao- 


ing Affiance poiky 
■ Mr Alan Watson, 


Liverpool City ’ Council, said 
those fighting inner-city seats 
wanted to see foe mut of foe 


datory sanctions to isolate 
South Africa". 


liamentary candidate for Rich- wanted to see foe part of the 
mond and Barnes, was document on the inner cities 


particularly loudly applanded strengthened to reflect their 
when be declared that the experience. 


most or gea t AaHwip Mr David PewhaKgon, MP 


to foe Alliance at foe w»n^w»u for Train, said an incomes 
was; “Get ypar act together", strategy was important It was 


The public recognized “foe no good people expressing 
decline of foe economy, foe concern about foe poor, an- 


CouBtillors that the draft ; of v tborized fop policy committee, 
foe -consultative * doaunent in the light" of. foe dehate, .to 


shrinking of foe social ser- employment and foe lack of 
vices,,the erosion of tolerance t raining ff at foe same time 


should reflect more dearly foe. 

WOMEN ^ 


and rise of violence. It deeply 
disturbs them. Theywaiit the 


seek agreement wrtfr tte SDP ffisturbsthem. They, want 

: • FARMW^ . ■ ' . 


they made pay deals of8, 9 or 
10 per raid; 


FOOTBALL 


Righting 
balance 
of power 


Assembly fights for 
the countryside vote 


League is 
asked to 
reconsider 


The most unjust aspect of 
1 the old centres of power,, 
wealth and influenc e wps t heir 
systematic discrimination 
against women, Mrs Julie 
Horton, a member of foe 
Liberal working group on the 
status of women, said when 
she successfully moved ap- 
proval of an Alliance docu- 
ment, Freedom and Choice for 
Women. 

Among its proposals were a 
cal] for equal treatment of 
women in tax and benefit 


systems. ■ . 

Ms - Emma 


department responsible. fer-J Somerion and Rome, -said* 
energy efficiency vfifo^foe Ijherewefgwometffo^reanti 


additional task of ensuring 
that adequate heating stan- 
dards were available to the 


as “Maggie’s man, prejudiced. _agetL-*nfir&i and foepoOG. 
and obsessive". ' Mr. .Trevor Jones, par- 

“He is-foimian who treats liamentary candidate forWest 


and obsessive". ' 

“He is-foinnan who treats 
all objectors to nuclear power 
as fools. He has lost his right 
to claim to be an objective 
scientist We should give him 
his notice now." 


Dorset, said there was no 
totally safe method of produc- 
ing electricty. It would be folly 
for the Alliance prematurely 
to dose down an industry. 


judges but even then they did 
not get foe response of then- 
male counterparts. 

Ms-fobe -Ajetamder, of 
Hairingay, said-fop document 
was a betrayal of all mothers- 
and grandmothers who had 


A wide-ranging policy mo- cultural bank. He said It f A AATl Dl ff pi* 
tion designed to enable the would help farmers who woe JL vvUUkjIUvt 
Alliance to capture the rural on the interest rate tread m il l Football League was 

vote was passed by foe assent- and enable new entrants to get -dr-d reconsider its de- 

Wy VW : ‘ SSS to £3f LuSm Town 

-Mr Ch ristopher Wataslcyr ^ampte, -editor of from the littlewood Cup be- 

who came so dose to captur- Lfoera/ and son ot a rause of the dub's ban on 
ing West Derbyshire in the by- Wiltshire tenner, said that, visiting supporters, 
election in May, reminded although the price of s«n- An emergency motion car- 
Liberals that the Alliance was cultural land tad telien ried the assembly regretted 
second to the Conservatives in sharply, it was harder tor ^ decision and supported 
272 parliamentary constit- young tennws and new en- “foe brave attempt by Luton 
uenties and that foe Labour trants to get financial racing. Town Football Qub to dimi- 
Party did not hold a rural seat ^ Mr Richard Livsey, MP tor ^ the violence which has 
in the whole of England. ■ Bream and Radnor and party marre d the good nam e of 
He was one of a procession spokesman on ^agriculture, f 00 tball in Luton and 
of speakers who condemned successfully moved the policy WB rintiaii y" it noted that the 
foe dedine in rural life under motion, which staled that Luttm experiment had been 
tire present.GovemmenL digibflty for price support totally successfully. 

^Considerable concern was must be limited and ret out ^ rruikSt a Lrnon 
expTESsed jbcmt the plight of how foe raptasis of EEC borough councillor, said foe 
famaS^htf^found them- pohey could be shifted and background to the issue was 
selves in considerable debt now savings could be u sed, foe urban terroris m that took 
and the bank scam e under fire plac e every Saturday in areas 


a- of foe ing West Derbyshire in the by- 
rat, on the election in May, reminded 
said when Liberals that the Alliance was 
loved ap- second to foe Conservatives in 
nee docu- 272 parliamentary constit- 
Chnicefor uendes and that foe Labour 
J Party did not hold a rural seat 

sals were a in the whole of Engiand- 
itment of He was one of a procession 
id benefit of speakers who condemned 
foe dedine in rural life under 
Morgan, - the present Government, 
rare, rSaid, ; ^Considerable concern was 
octors and - expressed jbdut the plight of 
n they did "TaMeft^htf^fouiid foem- 
>e of their selves in considerable debt 
and the banks came under fire 
wader, of -fatbeing insufificiently help- 
document fijl u» cnaMingToungTieopIr 
II mothers^ toJstartin fenmg. - . ~ — 
who had T %r . John Barnett, par- 


visiting supporters. 

An emergency motion car- 
ried by the assembly regretted 
the decision and supported 
“the heave attempt by Luton 
Town Football Qub to elimi- 
nate the violence which has 


Mr Berth said Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher tad taken every 
possible step to thwa rt or 
undermine all the attempts so 
far made to apply real pressure 
on the South African Govern- 
ment. 

Hie European Community 
was dithering over a very 
limited package of sanctions 
and it was a cause of distress to 
Liberals _ that Hot- Hans- 
Dietrich Genschcr, with 
whom they tad worked for 
many years in the cause of 
European unity, should be the 
spokesman for German gov- 
ernment opposition to a ban 
on coal imports from South 
Africa. 

Mr Jim Forder, Nuffield 
College, Oxford University, 
and Union of Liberal Stu- 
dents, said that destroying the 
South African economy would 
lead only to increased un- 
employment among blacks 
and that would mean starva- 
tion. 

Mr Nicholas Wind, Bristol 
East, said that foe EEC sanc- 
tions package was nothing 
more than a token gesture. 

Mr Peter Wells, Kensing- 
ton, unsuccessfully sought ref- 


David Steel can be certain of 
a warm, probably a rapturous, 
reception when he speaks; to 
the assembly today. Having 
thrown him into the ditch 
earlier in the week, the dele- 
gates will now want to reassure 
him that there was nothing 
personal in it- Bnt the ap- 
plause will not be able to 
drown the knowledge that he is 
facing the most severe political 
challenge since be became 
leader of the party. 

The challenge is not to ns 
position as leader but to the 
purpose for which he holds the 
leadership. Those MPs who 
undermined his strategy with 
effective speeches in the de- 
fence debate, Simon Hughes 
and Michael Meadowcnffi. 
have not in fact enhanced their 
standing in die party as a right 
have been expected. 

They may have farther en- 
deared themselves to the rad- 
ical rank and file, but they 
have lost ground among their 
parliamentary colleagues and 
infuriated many candidates 
who see their chances of 
sitting in the next House of 
Commons slipping away. 
There is nobody who could 
threaten Mr Steel's hold os 
office in this Parliament na- 
if he wished to do so. 


Ambition for a 
share of power 


marred the good name of erence back of foe emergency 
football in Luton and motion to the party counoL 


nationally”. It noted that the . 
Luton experiment tad been 
totally successfully. 

Mr David Franks, a Lrnon 
borough councillor, said foe 
background to the issue was 


He said the emergency motion 
was bland and anodyne. 

Mr Berth said serious issues 
were at stake on which they 
must reaffirm their commit- 
ment. Action was needed now. 


'foe urban terroris m that took I and ‘they could not simply 
place every Saturday in areas I wait for Liberal Party pro- 


cedures. 


fought and struggled for equal- liamentary candidate for Tor- 
ity. It was bland, lull of ridge and West Devon, offered 
platitudes and contained not strong support for the mo- 
enougb action. don's proposal for an agri- 


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« An amendment designed to 
enctiurage huge forms to re- 
lease land to let as pnall start- 
up units was carried. 

Mr Jack Ainslie, chairman 
of the Liberal agricultural 
panel and chairman of Wilt- 
shire County Council, strong- 
ly argued against that idea, 
however, and the assembly 
backed him by rejecting it 
' He said it would be illogical 
to suggest using something 
that the party wanted to be 
abolished. 

Mr Iiyesey said policy on 
commodity prices could not 
be open-ended and they must 
be prepared to give small and 
medium-size forms direct in- 
come support. - 

Mr Steves Morris, par- 
liamentary candidate for Leo- 
minster, advocated grants and 
low-interest loans for the cre- 
ation of viable form units. 

Mrs Linda Selgte, par- 
liamentary candidate for Dev- 
izes, -said their policy re- 
presented a partnership be- 
tween .government, former 
and consumer. 

There was laughter when 
foe said that for the grain 
formers of East Anglia, crop 
rotation meant barley fol- 
lowed by barley followed by 
barley followed by a world 
cruise. 


mm 



Your genial host, Mr Aten Watsom^Get your act together' 



Steel prepares a rough ride 


By Botrin Oakley, Political Editor 


Xiberal pressure groups 
were engaged yesterday in a 
battle for Mr David Steel's ear 
as he prepared his . crucial 
conference speech for today. 


One said: “If David Steel just any party member who 
would only form a coalition wants to, and who can find the 


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The parry's president-elect, 
Mr Des Wilson, was urging 
Mr Steel to be conciliatory and 
to respect the feelings the 
party showed in rejecting Iris 
line on defence. So were the 
Association of Liberal Coun- 
cillors and the candidates' 
association. 

But Mr Sted was preparing 
a rough ride for the party and 
was prepared to shed a few 
passengers in his determina- 
tion to sweep away the mud- 
dle and achieve some darity. 

What was dear in the 
. continuing. fallout from the 
public, relations shambles of 
-the defence debate was that 
‘this was probably the last 
Liberal Assbnbty of its kind. 

The defence dispute is likely 
to have profound con- 
sequences for Mr Steel's 
leadership, for the constitu- 
tion of the party and for the 
controversy over a post-elec- 
tion merger with the SDP. 

Complaints were flying 
thick and fast from Liberal 
activists that while they re- 
spect their leader's ability and 
public appeal, he is out of 
touch with bis members. 


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with his own party he would 
be unstoppable". 

The troubles came, they say, 
because Mr Steel remains 
closeted with his entourage, tty 
which they mostly mean his 
indispensable chief adviser, 
Mr Richard Holme. 

They complain that Mr 
William Wallace, formerly a 
dose adviser, who did com- 
municate with activist groups, 
has been excluded from the 
inner aretes since the leaking 
of his report a year ago in 
which he said with total 
accuracy that the Alliance was 
insufficiently prepared for 
government . 

What is dear is that the 
party leadership now lacks 
men who can manage the 


party, a task that was per- 
formed a few years ago with 
sound common sense and 


£18 registration fee (only £5 
for the unemployed), to vote 
in a crucial debate. 

Mr Steel and his chief whip, 
Mr David Alton, are now to 
impose collective responsibil- 
ity on their fellow MPs. There 
are also plans to change the 
whole structure of the assem- 
bly, to make those who attend 
it representative of the party 
nationwide. 

Mr Steel is attracted by the 
idea of having his party, like 
the SDP, pass policy motions 
that are the result of delibera- 
tion by expert committees. 

But it is all much too late. 
And Liberal activists point out 
that if the party chiefs are to 
cbange.tbe ways of the assem- 
bly then they will insist that 
the party leader should lose 
his right of veto over policy. 


But jost to be Liberal leader 
has never been enough for Mr 
Steel. He has always had the 
ambition of leading the party 
back from the political wilder- 
ness to a share of power, and 
this ambition has received a 
number of setbacks this week. 

It is not only that the gap 
between Liberals and Social 
Democrats has been widened. 
The fitness of the Liberal 
Party for serioos political 
combat has been bronjgbt Into 
question and Mr Stem's per- 
sonal authority has. been 
diminis hed. . 

; His first task today should 
be to set about. restoring that 

authoritvvTlusmattersfor two 
reasons. 

The political appeal ot die* 
Affiance rests more than ei- 
ther liberal or Social Demo- 
cratic activists are happy to 
acknowledge upon the 
personalities of the two Da- 
vids. Birth of them may from 
tone to time irritate members 
of both parties — and Dr 
Owen is especially prone to 
upset Liberals — bnt if either 
of them is cut down to size too 
much by his own followers the 
Affiance will suffer. 

The other reason why Mr 
Steel needs to reestablish his. 
grip is at least as important. 
Tta Liberate are engaged in an 
extraordinarily complex ex- 
ercise. Unlike the Conser- 
vatives or Labour, they do not 
simply have to determine then- 
polity and ask the electorate to 
vote them into office. . . 

They have to cowdjmate 
policy with their Social Demo-' 
cratic allies, to persuade the 
electorate to support th«n 
even if there is no realistic 
prospect of the two of them 
forming a government on their 
own and at foe same to 
position themselves for diffi- 
cult negotiations in a hong 
Parliament that is the summit 
of their reasonable ambitions. 

Such an operation could be 
conducted successfully only by 
a party acting as an effective 
fight ing mut The problem 
with the Liberals is tW they 
so often behave tike a political 
debating society. They tend to 
congratulate themselves on 
foe quality of their dis- 
cussions, even when the wis- 
dom of the decisions leaves 
something to be drained. 


Debating society 
not enough 


Gmfty<nfvaris and Mr Geoff Today’s agenda 

Tondoft both now peers. Mr David Steel, the Liberal 


jr the But now that the Liberate 
t-elec- have notsix MPs but nineteen 
ip. • the cheerful anarchy that tas 
firing prevailed for years can no 
jberal longer, be afforded, 
sy re- Now that there are 2,000 
y and people instead of 200 turning 
iui of up to the Liberal Assembly 
u they cannot afford to allow 


leader, and Mr Paul Tvler. 
party chairman, will address 
the assembly at its closing 
session this afternoon. De- 
bates today will be on the 
Liberal youth campaign, the 
relationship between central 
and local govenmmem. penal 
policy, and local Liberals. 


. There, is undeniable charm 
m such an attitude. But potiti- 
cm tanks, especially complex 
tattles which require the 
capacity to manoeuvre under 
pressure, are won by partus 
that operate more tike armies 
than debating societies. 

« fu X- ft* Liberal 
MPs are likely to impose a 

measure of collective 
lability, upon 

soon after Parliament 
resumes The worst travails of 
“ris week would have been 

avoided if such a rule had been 
m operation by now 

™TT^I an<l a wioS- 

the Liberate will not rt- 
cov *r r from this disastrtms 
week unless MrSteel^S^ 
“Mral of the 


Assembly reports by Alan Wood, Anthony Hodges and Amanda Haigh 


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Britain’s 200,000 drug 
addicts need love, 
chemists’ group told 

?nn nnn *“* 


'At least 200,000 Britons are 
drug addicts, the British 
Pharmaceutical conference 
was told yesterday. 

Dr Brenda Davies, a consul- 
tant psychiatrist, told the con- 
ference in Jersey there has 
been an enormous increase in 
drug addiction during the past 
15 years. 

She said that only with “a 
non-judgeniental, loving and 
caring altitude, accompanied 
by total acceptance", could the 
problems or drug addiction be 
combated. 

Dr Davies said that al- 
though there were no typical 
“problem drug users", emo- 
tional immaturity, a denial or 
reality, low frustration tol- 
erance. an inability to cope 


with tension and low staying 
power were common in many 
addicts. 

Peer group pressure was a 
powerful force and many 
adolescents would indulge in 
drug misuse rather than suffer 
the derision of group 
members. 

Only 2,000 opiate users 
were known to the Home 
Office in the 1960s. That 
figure rose to 3,000 in 1978. 
but field workers estimated 
the actual number of addicts 
at between 20.000 and 30,000 
at that time. 

In 1982 the Home Office 
was notified of 2,793 new drug 
dependants and in 1983. an- 
other 4.200 names were added 
to the list. 


Heroin offenders rise 
by 30 per cent a year 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspond ent 


Heroin offenders found 
guilty or cautioned are increas- 
ing by an average of 30 per 
cent each year, a Home Office 
Statistical Bulletin said 
yesterday. 

i : The average rise for those 
involved with amphetamines is 
25 per cent and with cannabis 
9 per cent 

The rises involving heroin, 
amphetamines and cannabis 
almost entirely accounted for 
the increase to 26,600 in tbe 
total number of people found 
guilty or cautioned in 1985 for 
drags offences — more than in 
any earlier year. 

Nearly all the increase be- 
tween 1984 and 1985 was 
accounted for by a rise of about 
1,500 (69 per cent) in the 
number cautioned. 

The numbers have in- 
creased in each of the past 10 
years at an average rate of 8 
per cent per annum. The rise 
of about 1,600 (6 per cent) 


between 1984 and 1985 was 
. less than the increase in each 
of the three previous years 
which averaged about 2,400 
(12 per cent). 

Tbe number of persons 
found gnOly of or cautioned for 
trafficking offences increased’ 
in 1985 for the tenth 
successive year to about 4900 
or nearly double tbe 1980 
total. The most frequent type 
of offence, unlawful pos- 
session. was committed by 85 
per cent (about 22,600) of 
those found guilty of or cau- 
tioned for drags offences in 
1985. 

There were about 30^00 
seizures of controlled drags In 
1985, 7 per cent more than in 
1984 and nearly three times 
the nnmber in 1975. 

Borne Office Statistical Bul- 
letin, Issue 28/86 (Statistical 
Department. Home Office, 
Lunar House, Croydon, Sur- 
rey CR0 9 YD; £2^0). 


Dr Davies said: “The fig- 
ures have continued to rise at 
an alarming rate. Taking into 
account the number of addicts 
using amphetamines, barbitu- 
rates and cannabis, tbe num- 
bers soar and there are 
probably about 200,000 ad- 
dicts now". 

“If we now add the number 
of benzodiazepine users who 
are dependent, the problems 
assume staggerii 

proportions". Dr Davies sai 
She said that one in five 
women and one in JO men in 
Britain used benzodiazepines 
for at least a month each year. 

_ Of those. 25 per cent was 
likely to become dependent 
after three months. 

• The skill and experience 
of legal draftsmen were cru- 
cially important for the effec- 
tive enforcement of drag 
abuse laws. Dr David Patter- 
son. a Home Office scientist, 
told the conference. 

He said that varied tech- 
nical defences had been ad- 
vanced over the years against 
charges brought under the 
Misuse of Drugs Act. 

The Misuse of Drugs Act. 
for instance, made-no mention 
of tbe minimum amount of a 
controlled drug which might 
be the subject of a charge. It 
was, however, a valid defence 
if an accused could show that 
be had no knowledge that he 
was in possession of the drug. 

Dr Patterson said that the 
legal criteria should therefore' 
not be “usability”, but 
possession. " " 

“If a substance is visible, 
tangible and measurable it is 
certainly something. Quantity 
may also be relevant to the 
issue of knowledge: a minute 
quantity of a drug could mean 
prior possession of a larger 
quantity if the evidence as a 
whole indicates knowledge by 
the accused". Dr Patterson 
said . 



By David Sapsted 

Rash-hoar traffic in the City 
of London came to a standstill 
yesterday morning after fire- 
men spent three horns fighting 
a fire at the Bank of England. 

Although the fire, which 
started in a contractor's hut on 
tbe roof of the single-storey 
section of the bank, was put 
oat shortly before 6am, clear- 
ing- up caused severe conges- 
tion In* the - Threadneedle 
Streerarea. — - 

London Fire Brigade was 
investigating the inrident, but 
a spokesman said arson was 
not suspected. 

More than 60 firemen were 
called to the fire, which was 
noticed about 3am.The hanlt 
said a general office on the 
third floor of the mam building 
had been put out of use by 
smoke and heat <hmay, but 
tbe fire had not disrupted the 
bank’s daily business. 


The smouldering remains of a contractor’s huts on the terrace of the Bank of England yesterday. 

Bank fire 
holds up 
rush hour 


RSPCA in plea 
for search powers 


By Nicholas Beeston 


The RSPCA is pressing the 
Home Office for powers to 
search premises after inspec- 
tors investigated a record 
number of ammal abuse com- 
plaints in the first six months 
of this year. 

From January to June the 
society’s 248 inspectors were 
called to investigate 37,453 
complaints, an increase of 
6,500 on fast year. 

Dogs are the most ill-treated 
pets, and the charity estimate 
that 1,750 are put down every 
day. 

To combat what the society 
believes could “be die tip of an 
iceburg" it has been pressing 
the Home Office for greater 
recognition and is seeking an 
amendment to the 1911 
Protection of Animals Act, 
giving its inspectors similar 
powers of entry to the police. . 

The society's inspectors al- 


London degrees 


The following degrees are an- 
nounced by London University; 
English 

nrst Clast: C L Alim <R HoU and Bed): 
A k Barnes iW«t Cl: J A Burrows iR 
HOII and Bed): R Carr (KC): D 
Casa llaro (KCT: G R Davies (R HoU 
and Bed): H M Duffy rKCr I Dunning 
•Wjil Cl. D J Event! iR Hoi I and Bed): 
E Foster i West CliDM Heath (KCi; F 
S Ull (QMI: D J McCargo (R HoU and 
Bedt. S P MCGarty (KCk j L 
M covering <KCfc M R Maloney 
iBIrkbeckl; E R Manden (KCk J A 
Marin <QM>: L W Norfolk (KCi: F J 
Potior tBirkbeckl N R Rawiimon 
(QM>. O M Shriver (KO: S J Sinclair 
iwnl Cfc R B Smith <KCL CLP 
Stables IBIrkbeckl H J Taylor (Birk- 
beckfc C E valentine reirkbecJO: G D 
White iQMI M E WohUarth iXC) 
Clan 2 CUv I): A E Marlin iBirkbcckk 
C M L Bangert (KCI: J K Barber U? 
Holt and Btdk S C Bale iQMI: N S 
Bennett iKCi; M M Blakely (West Cfc S 
A Boole iWm CUE Boo I h by IR Hot! 
and Bod). M P Botes (KO: A C Brain 
(R Hod and Bed). J S Breartey IR HoU 
and Bed): j j Bury »R HoU and Bed I: 
M E Carter (West Cl: D G Clark 
i Goldsmiths): L S Conway iR Holt and 
Bedi. S .1 Cokill iR Holl and Bed): G P 
Cox tBirkbeckl: G S Davies iKO: M J 


(West C):Jb ttadcttfie iwrst o: > c 
Reeves- 
T J 

_ J Moll 

and Bedn M V L Serve! (R Hon and 
Bed): F J T Stmnson Pedler tWesl CD J 
Sion (KO: J M Thane (Goldsmiths): P 
R thus iKCt s J Van Den He u vet (R 
Holl and Bedt S C Wheddon (KCi. H S 
Wilkins (West Ch S J Williams iR HoU 
and Bedk J Wilson (KCI; A M Viannl 
West Ci: J Young iQM> 

Hass 2 anv Hh S E Bishop 
Goldsmiths); N L Choulcs (GokT 
anilhsl: C M Coaker (Goldsmiths): A D 
3oofce iR Holl and Bed): C A Cooke iR 


BA 

(for external students) 
Chinese 

Class 2 CD N It): t V Leung. 

Classics 

Glass 2 (Dhr II): T J C Sisley. 

English 

Clscs 1: s C Rees: L M £ Robinson: P 
M Worsley 


2 (UvQtR h AUen: R A 


m nwi anu Bnc v. n unw m r , rjH* V c r CinaiM'.wjllio- it 

■•oil and Bedk J C Cross IR HoU.andi sharrnrt i 

Bed); S T Earle (West GK A C D R D 8fta t ro “- C M J 

.Ferguson fR Holl and Bedk R Fumls* 

(KCTs j Gamer iKOr N Glaze (R HoU 
and Bedk L A Gordon {GoMsmllhsjrS 


Wilson. 


got 2-rtHr Wt-M-F-R-BMgerc-C-F 
Cooke: J Evans: -Y Hutchinson: D C 

Jrpson: D A LOWyan . G J lasted: A 

McGrath: L a Mcumtzis: Evw okeik 
S E Taylor ' 


Oregon 1 fR Hod and Bed): C H Croak 
iBirkbcdOi S B Cunioo tGoldsmUhskS 

P Hales 'Goldsmiths): S D Hall iKCk M -■ 

Hashem IR HoU and Bed): M Glass ar-M O Hardlmc B A Markemte 

Bed)): J D Hunt (R-HolLand ’ 


^’johmiomT 


Dver i KCi. J R Dyson iQMi; T Ehren 
(QMv D G Ellis IKCK R> England IR 
Holl and Bedk R J Fam worth (R HoU 


Irvlrm tR HolL. and _ 

Johnston ( Goldsmiths >: F 

(Goldsmiths): B K Kuznlar 

smiths): M J Kyie (Weal Ct A v taing 
(Wen C): S N LalUee (West Ci: J E 
Mann (Goldsmiths): R McFarlane ir 
H oU and Bcdk A J_MeHqn (QM): H A 

‘ " "ar (R 

s M 


w urooni 

Hawthorn 


and Bool. T J Fenner iR HoU and 
Bed). □ Fitzgerald (R HOU and Bedk L 
C Fleming tBirkbeckl: M C Forster 
iGoktenilths); F G Freeman (KCt A T 
Cdtfxns (Goldsmiths). S V Gilbert 
IQMI. F C Gould iKCk N W Groom 
iWnl Cl M J Haines I KCt ' 
(Goldsmiths): L-A Hardwfcfc i 

Harvey iGotdsmlUts): A B I.. 

(Gotdsmilhs): R C Havward (Gold, 
smiths): C D Hicks (KO; N Hughes 
(KCi. M Mnani (KCI: K M Ingram 
(West Cl F James fWcst Cl. S SI J 
James (OMR S A Jams KJM1: L A 
Jervis (West Cl: R E Jones (GoM- 
-aniihbi: D O Kcssei rwevl C>; A J 
knighl (West ci: C D Kou men talus 
iGoktsmillu). J R Lake iR Holl and 
BedU SWT Lawrence (QM): W A 
Ltsnev iR Holl and Bed): D M Lucas (R 
HMI and Bedk J E Manin (West Ci. G 
A Mayers (QMl: A F Miles (R Holl and 
Bed i. D P M J Morratl (West Ct A J 
Moulton (R HoU and Bed): K L 
Mounirirtd IR Holl and Bed): L T S 
PizzKhlm tR Holl and Bed): M Powell 
(West Ci: V R Pugh (KCj: J C Quintana 
(QM): B A Roe (West Ct Ct Seaman 
(KCf A L Scichfletd (QM); R A 
Shaltcron (West Cl: 3 M Sharp (West 
O. G M Shepherd (West Cj: J L Smith 
<R Holl and Bedk S L Smith iKCk P A 
SowertMitls (West C): S R^Spencer 
iKC). G L swain (QMr E M Taylor iR 
Holl and Bedl: K E Thomas iRHoll 
and Bed)’. H C Tooze (R Hod and Bedl: 
C A Townsend (West CJ: R 'F "Dicker 
iKCk L M Wasscll (West Ck P CC 
Wh-eler (R HoU and SrttMJM 
Wh illier iR HoU and Bedn L M While 
(West Cl: L M Whitehead (R Holl and 
Bed) J M WUIK (Goldsmiths): J C 
Woodford iCokhmlthsj: L A J Young 
iR Holl and Bed). 


Moseiy (West Cj: R A C Nodcter fR 
HoU and Bedl: R J Paw-son (KCI: C . _ 
Peek (Goldsmiths): F-Z Phillips (KCk J 
E nsko (Gotdsmuhsi: □ M Pliuway 
IKCk A C Prosser t Goldsmiths): L C 
Rabins ( Gotdsndlhs): P A Saxton 
(Goldsmiths): J Srmtama (Blrkberk). L 
N Sheikh (QMl: R M SUnev (R Hod 
and Bed): A Sloan (QM): A H Smith (R 
Holl and Bed >: K BummcrfieM (West 


Pic P M McGrath. 

; — — Frenck 

EttM U J A MPtcanh L M WatnraaiT. 
OW J A B Boyer: J M 

Hindman: R L Morton. 

CtM* 2 QMv II): H E Heorfile: W 
Huggins: V Knight: J C M Turkel 
Ctan 3t B M Grznta. 

Geography 

Class 2 QMv U): p D Strolling; D A 
Woodward 
Class 3: J Ross 


a K M Thompson (West Ch K so German 

TreJoar rGoktsmithSii: S D TrerxtaU > nv, tv- rv fWn 

(GoidsmirhsX S Wallace iGoWsmlihsc k-«ass i (LBV If. U UWen. 


Wdmsky iKCk R H Waters 
(West Ck J. A wrttrn^ (WcS CL J P 


Wilson (R HoU and < 
(West Cl 


I y. J E Yeadon 


2 QMv H): E M Allen (OMT M 
Baker iQMI: RHL Barnes (W«t Cl. A- 
K" Baylis (Gotdsmilhs •: G E Beale (R 
Holl and Bed): S Benhalim (KCk J 
Bhardwoo iKC*. F M Blakemorc (R 
Holl and Bedl: R Bloor (WVst C): A G 
Rulkirk (R Holl and Bed): B Callaghan 
•Birkbrrki. C E CJorfce iBirkberki; J M 
CJarke iGohhmiThsc D v C3ew (R Holl 
.(«! Bedk R M Cooke |W«Ci; AMP 
CotIpv iGoidsmiihst J E Craig (Gptd- 
iSllfwi. L Daley. (GoWWilhs) E A 
Oever (West Cl. J S Ddrimw IB Hot 
and Bedl: C Dixon (Goldsmiths): N J 
Divon (West CK J L Dyson jpotd- 
snilttw*. D G Eld ridge IKC): C P Evans 
iw“-vl OEM Farry icaHdsmithsi: S L 

rrankrt 1 g2?} s, 2 ,, 5 s J^vSlr < Sc): ‘f 
H oi and Bedl: S R Gteolster iKCt F 
Grant (OMi. E C E Gummcry (KC): □ 

Ci. J A Harrison iGotdmiithsi. A 
Horvlr (R Holl and Bedl: S P Heath 1 

Hor loo l OMI: A E Hubond iBirkbeckC 

K Huvsnn lOoktajilfijl; B^R Jo»ies (R 
Holl 3|>< ( Bod): K O Jones (QMk A F M 


Om INC Ashford (R Holl and Bedj: 
A A Barr (West Ch L BaUvaia iQMi: j 
P Benkhabeb (West Cl. J G CUylon 
(West Ci: C Colton (West C): J M 
Howard iGoMsmUhsh K MUh (Gold 
smiths): A Rees (BirkbeckK Y Rrtwan 
(QMi: J F L Sleeves (West CJ: J A 
vaute (West Cj 


German 

Out t: A M Baynes (KO: S H C 
Bockbreder (Goldsmiths i: J C 
Hutcheon (KCt: R A Rechtien (Gold- 
smiths), s L Rimmer (KCh 1 P Smith 
iKCi: J C Turner iKCi; E Wndemann 
(Btrkoectd 

Clan 2 QMv Or J Alderson (Gold- 
smiths): M J Amavutlan iBirkbeck). J 
A Bell (R HoU and Bed): j A Bird (R 
Holl and Bed); T D Bruce (West Cl: M 
J Burras (KO: H Burton iR Hod and 
Bed); A J Cann tR HOU and BedE R J 
Ghaudhry iKO: C Qmion rKCfc M 
Daberntg IR Holl and Bed): M C W 
Dahm iR Holl and Bed): C U 
Desh panic iR Hoi and Bed): C Emfl 
(Gofdsmllhs): E J Fraiz (KO: R J 
Freese (Goldsmiths): T C Godby (R 
Holl and Bedh J w M Green iR HoU 
and Bed): C L Haggell (GoidsmJihsk C 
J Holland iBIrkbeckl: A L Holmes 
< Gotdsmilhs I . T M Hopkins (KCh G C 
Ho lion (R Holl and Bedh M N A Jones 
■QM): E H Kcps tBirkbeckl, S J Lcaper 
iGoidsmllhsi: A D Nearv 'West Ch A 
M M O'DonneU (Blrkbcckr. C Oppler 
i KCI: K J Palenski iGoldsmltliM: M V 
Pampus (Coidsmilhsu P J Robinsau 
(West Ch B J Srruby iWcst Cl: S W 
Sheward tWesl Ch C B Spittle (K'O: J 
D Tavlor (KC): E R Truran (West C): J 
Unetl iGoKtsmllhsK K A Watson 
iGotdsmlltni: S Webber tR Holl and 
Bedl 

2 QHv if): S M Adcock (R Holl 
and Bedl. P A BamfleM iGoktemlthsh 
J L E Biddle < Goldsmiths): p j 
Camsoeli (QM>: S E aega (R Holl and 
Bedl: w R Draper (R HoU and Bedh P 
C Dully ■ Goldsmiths): K L Futford (R 
Holl and Bedh B J Hoult (West Ch M 
A James (KCh ME Lea (Blrkbecki: D 
M Lincoln cR_ Holl and Bedh. C 


May hew lOOUsmlinsh D MeUton 
iCMdsmlthsh A Mltclwfl (Goktemithsu 


Krtletwr (Gcrtagmliwi; MJLiMM ir 

Mam wanig ”qm^F iSSoochrhrl 'Goidsmiuwi: s J Rowtao (West 75 : 




Nelson (QM) 
■ Birkberki: A 



5. 1 . SSihere .»!■. w w Smnh «R Ho« 
»id Wd i 4PSI«* (WV-UCv H C 
lilr,it iwr-vi ci" V F Tan iKCh C J 
Tavmr iH HoU and Bedi. A E Thorne 

ittrtidvniiih-i 

>c m E Badger iBIrkbeckl. D S 

iBirkherk* 

Kinuish Lan guag e 
and Literature 

CtaH HHP Kormi (S and E Eur 
siml' 

Finnish Studies 

oa« J fth* i)s w Anv<1 ,ssta ' E 
I ur SUM' 

French 

s 

,o HOH and fled): T M 
1 roniOM •UMl 

'^ ll . mi iv s G HoCI artd 

«•** J Ci. P A Anlhanv 

|W (R Moll and Bedl. A 


Alkiuson: t) P Bentley: H C Sudden: C 
Cannon: D A dark: P K Clarke: C C 
ICld: M J Coward; A L Dav ison; R 



IS5S 


C E Morris (QM): L Mailer fR HoU and 
Bed): E Penasa tBirkbeckl: D M 

- ’ ' ‘ ' “ Rlch- 

'ose 

iGotdsmitnsv S j Rowtao (West Ch G 
v A Ryan (West Ch A Sale 
tCoMsmllhs): P TTaylor (Goldsmiths): J. 
wittmann (West CL 
Class 3E T Alien lOoldemllhs): R J 
Brown tGdibiniLfrvi: l C Buckley tKCt 
M cambiaohl iBIrkbeckl: H N 
Haeberlino IH Holl and Bed): M J E 
Harrison (R Holl and Bedh & v 
PtiiiiUn iGoidsmllhsi: p Willoughby 
iGobtsimUni. 


BSc 

Wye College 

Out 1: C A Black: S A Ctulow; C R 
Shari: M A S la) ham: V R Wood. 

2 CON I): C E Allen: S 
son: D 

BCoi 

Corfl. 

DcMllrr: A P Drake: C M M Duncan: D 
r Edwards; T H Faranl: D Col* J A 
Green hough. J M Halgh: C Malnes: T 
H Hext. P M Hills; J M Hollis: T C 
HutcDlirion: L □ Jones. DP Kennedy: 
B G A Lang- J E Linger: P H Masunl: 
A J Osborne. M J Ptommer; S E Rust. 
P c Searle: A L Smunons: V J 
Hdliersiey. P D Sumption; A w 
Wwote^vwirth. 

CM1 2 rDfM it): O Alexander. J R 
AlP-len 1 J A Aylell: C Barrow; J D 
Bloke. H J Bloomfield: J A Bmvf. C A 
Brown. M Butler. M Cartuu S K 
Chakrobartl. S C Chryelev. L M Clark: 
M Colled. H V Comfort: K L Crane; E 
Crow. K S Dines: T J Eiridge: A P 
Oral- K E J Hammond- P q 
H-irorcaves M D Hlrfcs: S M 
Hud) wood E J Hodgson: R M Holland: 
R%nm. G F P Holme: I R HursL R 
H Jones: S M A Kctftw JR Lalham: 
C H Mansfield: S C Markham: L R 
Mason: K Meyer , C Millais. D 
Mussel while: P W B Paw: H 
Pemberton: WL Pow. S R Prooor. e 
M Reece: S B Rice- J A Rutherford: a 
M S Morer: P Sergeant: D J Siuirveti. 
RWH Smilh: A L Stoner: N c Taylor: 
E Thomas D S Twyman: j a Walker; 
C E Waters: CP Welch: A E M 
Wilson. R M Wilson. T Wilson: B J 
Willie r. S M unnwnefes e S wocstey 
CIM X S G Barrew: T Bvme. E l 
n.irfc S P Roe. M J Stevens. J E 
1 i-.ioue: S A Williams. RAC Young. 

BSc 

School of Pharmacy 
Toxicology and Pharmacology 

ctiws 2 <Ot* I); A Broun. G .1 Dnre%-: J 
l.tnell. N P MOore. D Rodzunho. J S 
NustMun 

Cists 2 (Div B): M a Cootnoes: A H 
Heriiiman. R J Mason. K A Smith: C 
A v arm 


Pass: ACM Brown. 

History - Branch II 
(State 2 (Dhr Q;SE Corner: M A Hay: 
M E G Webster. 

Ctass 2 (Dhr m: g M Assrey: D _ 
Bremerton: C K Egan: V T Evans: V C 
A H Rock. 

PUC S C Roberts 

History of Art 

(Old Regulations) 

Ctass * M D Webb. 

Philosophy 
Class 2 (Dtv 0): A G Dumotard: A E 
Mathers. 

Class SNA Bamor: O Don: V Ralphs. 
Serbo-Croat 

Ctass 2 (DNr II): M B Ross- Langley. 

BMus 

(Forexteraai students) 

Class 2 (Div I): N R'Gaze. 

Ctass 2 (Dtv 10: S Eastwood: A Gahan. 

... LIS 

(For external students) 

Ctass 1: P J Rogers. 

-Ctass 2 (Div n: R F Chadwick: P R 
Copland: DevTnder Kumar Rta: Coh 
Sfok Long: A J Hogarth: C MMarsh: 
Ne(k cm Ngu: Ramakrtshnan s.o 
Nara>-anan. 

Class 2 (Dtv IQ: J R Anderberg: SRC 
AnvoL M Batan: CPA Baldwin: D C 
Bason: SALB Bohn S Bhaskaran: s 
A Bishop. P D Biakeb rough: JEM 
Bowd: M w Brimarombe: G_V Britton: 
A L Cable: I P Colla' 

Yee: ~ - - - - 

Kin): . _ _ _ . . 

Clarke: B M Cole: K Cross: I C 
DeCruz: A Deventeh: REP Deveniah: 
R Dtsu: D M Donnelly: NJ L Doran: 
M J Fisher: M J Fisher: R G Gamrvr 
Gecla d o JothtUngam: S S CU1: A B 
Gomez: Hamid Sultan Bio Abu 
Backer: V Hotdbrook Smith; C Ho 
Nyijk Tsien: M Hopktns O J 
Itsagwede: R E Joyce: J L Klafl: P 
XtSTI: PAH Lamom: M Lee: M H 
Lewis: J Lourdesamy: I Mahareb S R 
ra: D D Mohammed: L W 


L Cable: I P Cauaway: Chan Mun 
f: Chen K’ok Seng; Chong Kcam 
n: T L Chua: CT Chung: S A 


M Manyera: 


O’Redlv: P A Overton: S S Periasu J 
PllUy. Ramasamy s V -Karuppan 
Chetllar Rednder Stngfi: H S Salleh: 
Shankar Alan s.‘o Anaot KUlkarnl: 1 
Shanmugam Naidm T J Shepprnon: 
A L Shields: S S Shh-aorasad: R 
Singh: A D Sjullom K T Tan: D A 
Terrv: R J Tinkler: Ton Cnm Hu ew: G 
M J Tolllo: S M Tucker: N C Tyrren: 
EBCl roka: G R Venn: A Vintner: L 
M Warren: R G williams: M I Wong. 
Chut kBS Adekunie: A Aderele: EG 
AdesUni- Davies: M A Adestia: J M 
Ak titer: W S Armah: S I AsueUme: T 
Bitoehan; R F O BtahL PA Braun: p r 
M Biown: 1 Buowart^ Brown: W J 
Byanyima: C-S Chan: O C Chan. H F 
Chen: A Choo Ooi Ko on: P K Chuah. J 
E dements: J P Crowley: _ A W 
Davidson: A M DXhn: AON George: 
S N Gohara: M C Cray: A N Harper; 
D O Hicks: W P W Ho. I M Hogarth: S 
Iwenofu: M N L P JayaU&ka: P 

all: M C MaNWLJH MeaCOClc 

Mohn A r rand I Bin Mohd Antv. H 
Mordue: M Narayanasamy: C M 
NitWas- Carter: M S Nudungham: 
Norhalzan B)e Tam) Anftln.- L C 
NiKkCtvadV: D M O’Donovan: O 

ogunnlyl: E N oil o o onasogun: 
Ong Chee Kiam. M Oot Slew Suan- R 
E Oparan K Oset KufluonO I Oworu. 
A C RasraJl: B F Pcachcy-K w Phya; 
Raladevan s o \ amadevan: Rashtdan 
Blntl Kader Bux. SarbHI angh s b- 
Saroan Slnoh: H T Seati: J A 
Sturntcs: R Stamm: Tan Jing Phono; 
Tco Gar Pciq- S Thwagtiwnam: I D 
J Ugwu: Y S Wan: E S M Yaiu N 
Yusoff. 

Pass O Adctiba:_ AA ACbootta Z 
Akhtar. Awtar Stood s.o Muktva 
Sinqh: T N Awuzudlkr; ' K 
BuWhanran: L S H cnung; O o 
Fhoda. MOB HicsJeni P O 
SSStsmm: T A JWhJtoiifM: 

Oto. Paiwani Surwh: A S B Pengiran 

Bin Rata Abdullah. \ Ramsaroop: L M 
RKhardb. s Sabapauiy- Setvadoray 
v o Ttuiidanyan. SiArWUDbm i. o 
Govindan Nair. i C Turner: A L 
Webb S Wong: S Y wong 

BSc (Eton) 

(For external students) 

Om Is P -T J Connolly. 

Class 2 (Dtv |)i C Rome,. . 

Ctass I (Ore fQ: S T J Cartwroht: J . 
Dali- M Foiev: J J Hannon; F B Smith. 
Class 3: P CtosAla&d: F Gorton: C A 
Hughes C I Moxham: J A L Williams. 
Pass: I B Rowe 


ready work closely with po- 
lice. local authorities and 
Ministry of Agriculture of- 
ficials. but it says hundreds of 
animals are suffering un- 
necessarily because inspectors 
cannot get access to property. 

The chief officer of the 
inspectorate. Mr Charles Mar- 
shall said: “It really is time 
that the RSPCA was accepted 
for what they, are and that is 
animal welfare officers. Leg- 
islation would help us do our 
job." 

He said the society would 
not employ foot-in-tbe-door 
tactics but would seek war- 
rants through the courts. 

During the first half of this 
year, 899 offenders were con- 
victed in tbe courts. The 
number of cautions issued 
rose to 3479 from 2,1 54 in the 
same period last year. 


Driver of 
train died 
instantly 

Mr Eric Goode, an engine 
driver, was crushed to dcaih at 
the controls of his lmcr-City 
express when it ploughed into 
another (rain at 1 00 mph on 
Friday, an inquest at Stafford 
was told yesterday. 

Mr Goode, aged 58. a father 
of three from Stanhope Ave- 
nue. Crewe, died instantly. 

It took firemen several 
hours to cut his body from the 
mangled cab of the Liverpool 
to Euston express which was 
in collision with the London 
to Manchester train at 
Colwich Junction. 

Staffordshire. 

The two trains were packed 
with weekend travellers and 
100 people were injured. 

Mr Edward Huntbach. the 
mid-Staffordshire coroner, ad- 
journed the inquest until after 
the Department of Transport 
public inquiry into the 
disaster. 


Parties ‘in 
agreement 
on housing 
policies’ 

By Nicholas Wood 

Political Reporter 

A consensus has emerged 
among the main political par- 
ties about the future thrust of 
housing policy, the Social 
Democratic Party said 
yesterday. 

They all support new mea- 
sures io give tenants greater 
control over their council 
estates and to generate low 
cost rented accommodation 
through a mix of public and 
private funding. 

Mr John Cartwright, $DP 
housing spokesman and MP 
for Woolwich, welcomed last 
week's government move, 
changing the rales governing 
housing association finance to 
allow two pilot schemes aimed 
at creating a cash partnership 
in the rented sector. 

He told the National Hous- 
ing and Town Planning Coun-; 
cil conference at Stoke-on- 
Trent that it was just one 
example of how the political 
parties are coming closer to- 
gether over housing. 

He quoted Mr Jeff Rookcr, 
Labour's housing spokesman, 
as saying he had trouble 
detecting any difference be- 
tween SDP and Labour 
policies. 

Yet some "major 
differences'’ did remain. The 
Government was not invest- 
ing enough money in housing 
to meet demand and many 
Labour councils were wedded 
to an "outdated form of 
municipalism" in the way 
they ran their council prop- 
erties. he said. 

Mr Cartwright pressed the 
case for the SDP*s plan for 
annual subsidies to landlords 
to help them hold down their 
charges and so stimulate the 
private rented sector. 

He said that after five years 
of operation, a state input of 
£52 million would generate 
£1.650 million of private 
investment. 




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iKlT, L Xvat^ rj*xiJr\X bejf i zo i>00 










THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Success forGorbachov initiative — 



talks adds to thaw in 
Sino-Soviet relations 

FromChristopher Walker, Moscow 

.JffMpi to heal the 25-yeay ‘ye^entey Tass, the Soviet along the Chinese short; tbhs 
nftr between the two largest '. Qjif^ese' impOTiam territorial claiming a number of islands 
communist states received - a ■ concessions over disputed is- " **’“ *"■■■'- »- 

significant boost yestnday ; lands in the Amur river 

n h n ’ I" a- related development 

tween Ch n d Slfe* news .agency, reported front 
Union • ***“« *at the two countries 

a U £ nf ' ba d initialled a draft agree- 

decision^ 

next year talks about an area SSUirivp vff 
whith prompted clashes be- horcler^aS 

tween the Chinese and Soviet 

armies in J969 and J 970 was j£2i of “ Araur and Argan 
taken during a meeting at the-: 

United Nations between the 


two Foreign Ministers, Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze and Mr 
Wu,Xueqian. 

Official reports of the meet- 
ing-said that the two ministers 
had held extensive talks on 
normalizing relations and on 
international issues. The 
meeting was seen as fresh 
evidence of the Sino-Soviet 
diplomatic thaw prompted by 
a keynote speech delivered in 
July by Mr Mikhail Gor- 
bachov, the Kremlin leader. 

Senior Western diplomats 
said last night that the de- 
cision to resume at deputy 
foreign minister level the 
boundary negotiations which 
broke down in June 1978 was 
certain to have been prompted 
by >Mr Gorbachov's July ini- 


Mr Gorbachov’s" Vladi- 
vostok speech was seen as a 
major bid to improve rela- 
tions with Peking and, to .a 
lesser extent, the rest of Asia, 
as a parallel to his so-railed 
“charm offensive" in' West 
Europe. 

The talks to be resumed 
next year are expected to 
cover a range of disputes along 
the world's largest land bor- 
der, which at preseat is 
guarded fey an estimated 
450.000 to 500,000 Soviet 
troops. The talks began in 
October 1969 and continued 
intermittently until June 1978 
when they broke down as a 
result of the bitter ideological 
dispute between China and 
the Soviet Union. 

Until Mr Gorbachov's July 


tiatjve. In a speech delivered-:- speech; Moscow had main- 
in Vladivostok, he offered the taineri that - the - bonier - ran 

Howe tribute to Nato 


New York — Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
said yesterday that encourag- 
ing signs of movement in US-'. 
Soviet arms control talks were 
a tribute to Nato solidarity in 
tbd face of Moscow's persis- 


the failure of Moscow's stra- 
tegy despite the Soviet Union's 
tenacious attempts to master- 
mind a rift, he said. 

. This had left the Russians 
no choice but to move from the 
propaganda arena to the 


tei# efforts to drive a wedge ‘ bargaining table, ‘ he told a 


between the US and its Euro- 
pean partners (Zoriana Pys- 
ariwsky writes). 

Effective transatlantic con- 
sultations had contributed to 


press conference here' after 
almost a week of United 
Nations debate dominated by 
relations uhetwefii East and 

West* • ’• - ’ • 


in the nver for itselfrChina’s 
grievances were increased by 
the fact that the Ussuri river, 
on the eastern frontier, fre- 
cow regarded as its territory. 

The. border talks are seen by 
quently changed course, 
detaching pieces of bank to 
form new islands which M os- 
observers of Sino-Soviet rela- 
tions as further quickening the 
pace of rapprochement be- 
tween the two communist 
giants. This had already in- 
creased significantly earlier 
. this month with the successful 
visit to Peking by Mr Nikolai 
Talyzin. a Soviet Deputy 
. Prime Minister! 

— For-a number of years, the 
Chinese have listed three 
main obstacles to improved 
relations with the Soviet 
Union: the continuing Soviet 
presence in Afghanistan, mili- 
tary concentrations along the 
Chinese border, and Soviet 
backing for the Vietnemese 
forces m Cambodia. 

Recent Soviet moves are 
seen by observers as having 
shown willingness to address 
the first two of these. 

Earlier this month. Mr 
Deng Xiaoping, the Chinese 
-leader, .said that he would 
agree to a summit with Mr 
Gorbachov, if the . Soviet 
Union took “solid steps" to- 
wards getting Vietnam to 
withdraw its troops from 
Cambodia. 

Although such a move is 
regarded as difficult Soviet 
sources have hinted that a 
Sino-Soviet summit remains 
high on Mr Gorbachov's list 
of priorities. 

The signs of an impending 
Sino-Soviet thaw have caused 
some concern in US dip- 
lomatic circles, but no West-, 
em observers here expect a 
ret urn to. the closeness devel- 
oped in the 1950s. 


Comecon 

meeting 

applauded 

: From Richard Owen 
Brussels 

The completion of three 
days of talks this week be- 
tween the EEC and Comecon. 
the Soviet bloc economic 
organization, was hailed in 
Brussels yesterday as a further 
step towards reducing East- 
West tensions. 

“Given the current East- 
West problems, anything — 
like the Stockholm agreement 
— which promotes dialogue is 
welcome." one EEC official 
said. But Commission sources 
warned that the EEC was only 
at the start of lengthy arid 
complex contacts with Com- 
econ and was “proceeding, 
with caution". 

As the EEC negotiating 
tedm. led by Mr John Maslen, 
head of the EEC Department 
for Relations with Eastern 
Europe, returned from Ge- 
neva. it emerged that one of 
the main obstacles to agree- 
ment between the trading 
blocs is the EECs insistence 
that any joint political 
declaration must include a 
clause referring to West Berlin 
as. an integral part of West 
Germany. , . 

But officials stressed that 
the status of Berlin was only 
one sticking point and that the 
Twelve remain opposed to 
any agreement likely to limit 
the EECs right to deal with 
East European nations on a 
bilateral basis. 

Mr Willy de Clercq. the 
EEC Commissioner for Ex- 
ternal Relations, maintains 
that Comecon is dominated 
by Moscow, has no common 
commercial policy andis not 
comparable to the EEC in 
aims or structure. 

Mr de Clercq. who held a 
series of talks with Eaa tmo- 
pean ministers at .the Gatt 
conference in Uruguay and at 
the United Nations this week, 
vesterdav praised Comecon s 
“positive attitude to the nor- 
malization Process . but 
stressed the EECs bilateral 
ties in Eastern Europe. 

An exchange of letters on 
this point between Mr de 
Clercq and Mr Vyacheslav 
Svtchov. the Comecon Sec- 
rctarv General, has only par- 
tial! v satisfied Brussels. 

The EEC-Comecon dia- 
logue. invigorated under Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov after 
vears in the doldrums, amid 
eventually lead Soviet thi> 
lomatic recognition uf foe 

EEC 


Chernobyl aftermath 

Experts warned of 
‘cosmetic’ treaties 

From Pearce Wright, Science Editor, Vienna 

The Italian delegate fold foe’ assistance id speed the dean- 
world's mostpowetful nations^, up.' / . ■ ‘ 

yesterday that tbeirr-atf onpls^ ‘ The. experience .of Chem- 
at developing standards to obyl fallout in northern Italy 
make nuclear power safer was Ties behind Signor Zanone’s 
more of a cosmetic exercise doubts. 


than a practical proposition. 

The conference of the Inter- 
national Atomic Energy Ag- 
ency, called to devise a way to 
avoid any repetition of the 
Chernobyl disaster, has pro- 
posed two conventions. And 
the Soviet Union, the United 
States. Britain. France and 
China, with other countries, 
have-agreed to sign Them. 

1 Bui Srgnor Mai erioZanone, 
Italy's Minister for Industry, 
pointed the conference to 
what he called “glaring 
deficiencies" in the proposed 
conventions. 

The first treaty should en- 
sure belter early warning to 
neighbouring countries after 
any nuclear accident; the sec- 
ond would call on mutual 


He is concerned that the 
judgment on whether a release 
is likely to affect another 
country is made where the 
accident has occured: the per- 
son who caused the pollution 
decides whether to give notice 
of the incident. 

Signor Zanone suggested 
that precisely those circum- 
stances occured when the 
Soviet Union at first decided 
not to tell their neighbours 
that an accident had 
happened. 

The Americans are unwill- 
ing to notify any leak from 
nuclear test sites, and the 
Soviet Union is pledged to 
support the conventions, but 
on terms which seem to 
exclude independent inspec- 
tion of their sites. 


Greens hold their own 
nuclear safety rally 


■Vienna — One of Vienna's 
most famous landmarks, the 
giant fern’s wheel made fam- 
ous in the film The Third 
Mart, was draped yesterday 
with a banner calling for the 
international abandonment of 
nuclear power (Pearce Wright 
writes). 

Significantly, Austria is the 
first industrial country to 
reverse its nuclear energy 
policy. The Government sign- 
ed an order yesterday for the 
dismasting of its controversial 
nuclear power plant at 
Zwentendorf. completed in 
1978 at a cost of £520 million. 
It was never used. 

Bui. the event in the Prater 
carnival park was to publicize 
the “other nudear con- 
ference" in Vienna this week, 
a special assembly of the 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency- 

The park meeting was ar- 
ranged by an alliance of the 
“green" organizations to allow 
the “human voice” of the 
casualties of nuclear energy to 
be heard. 

It is in the form of a tribunal 
at which the “victims" of 
nuclear power tell of the 
trauma which, they’say, goes 


unrecognized at formal con- 
ferences dominated by tech- 
nical detail 

Mr Leif Dunfjeld. from 
Lapland, told of the impact on 
his family and. on a culture 
more than 1.000 years old by 
the public health measures 
made necessary by the fallout 
ofChemobyL 

He believes foe cull of 
reindeer being carried out 
because of the risk of 
unacceptably high levels of 
radiation in their meal could 
at worst cause the herds to 
become extinct. At' best, it 
would take more than a 
generation for them to re- 
cover. 

The plight of African min- 
ers in the world’s largest 
uranium operation, at the 
Rossing Mine in Namibia, 
was related by Mr Sacky Am- 
unyela, a former truck driver 
at Rossjng. 

Mr Oscar Ternary, a former 
customs officer in French 
Padfic territories and now 
mayor of a small town in. 
Tahiti, described the slow 
erosion caused by the use of 
the Mururoa Atoll by the 
French for weapon tests. ■ 


Etna quiets down after eruption 


From Peter Nichols 

Rome 


“atania in 
re-opened 
ftcr it had 
24 hours 
ust settled 
r Wcdnes- 

ruption of 

1 opened a 
north-cast 
yesterday - 
jn was re- 
A'iih little 


more activity registered than 
gaseous vapours emerging 
from the craters. 

The eruption followed 
about 10 days of activity, 
including small expulsions of 
lava. It was marked by the 
dramatic emeigence of a black 
cloud of volcanic ash. similar 
in its mushroom shape to a 
nuclear explosion. It rose to 
more than a mile in height and 
-was dearly -visible from the 
off-shore islands. A fine ash 
fell on Catania and the smaller 


•1 


towns on Mt Etna's slopes. 

The airport was closed be- 
cause there were fears that 
aircraft would skid on the 
slippery' surface. 

Mr John Murray, a British 
volcanologist leading a study 
group on Mi Etna, said last 
night “I have never experi- 
enced anything like Wednes- 
day night. Volcanic bombs 
were reaching heights between 
-iwoand-three miles.-^nd ai a- 
mile and a half away we could 
feel the heaL" 



A policeman grabbing Frederic Oriach as he tries to declare his innocence to journalists in the Jardin du Luxembourg. 

Bombing suspect seized in Paris park 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

Freddie Oriach, a sus- 
pected leader of the extreme- 
left group Action Directs, was 
arrested yesterday as he was 
about to hold a press con- 
ference in foe - Jardin dn 
Luxembourg in Paris. 

The day before, five of his 
friends, all of French national- 
ity, had been arrested on foe 
orders of foe examining mag- 
istrate investigating the recent 
bombings in Paris.- The five, 
who were said to be “liable to 
bring aid and assistance to 
terrorists", were still in police 
enstody last night 

It had been reported that M 
Oriadt^ who was released from 
prison in April after having 
served five -years for member- 
ship of an “association of 


criminals", was on foe ran. It 
was to prove that be had in no 
way gone into biding that he 
promptly called foe public 
press conference. 

He was jumped ibid,- by 
plainclothes, policemen and 
. roughly dragged away, with a 
Bevy ‘of journalists' and camer- 
amen in bot pursuit still bom- 
barding him with questions. 

'M Oriach shouted: “I'm 
being used as a scapegoat 
because the police are in- 
capable of doing their work. I 
am a perfectly legal, pro- 
Palestinian militant. 

“I am in no way clandestine. 
The police knew where to find 
me. I hare's! ways been against 
all indiscriminate terrorist; at- 
iLl _ '■ ' 

He has always nuimteinedT 
that he -is not. a member of 
Action Dh-ecte, which has 


links with the Lebanese 
Armed Revolntionary Faction 
(Farl). the gronp believed to be 
behind foe Paris bombings. 
Bot there is no doubt that he is 
a founder Of an extreme-left 
gronp which' was to become 
one of the main constituents of 
Action Direct e. 

M Denis Bandonin, foe 
prime Minister's spokesman, 
fflid yesterday that foe Gov- 
ernment was still convinced 
that foe track leading to the 
Abdallah brothers was foe 
right one in the bombings 

investigation. 

The French police have put 
-out “wanted" notices for four 
brothers of Georges Ibrahim 
- Abdallah, foe alleged Farl 
leader; who Is serving a four- 
year sentence in France, and 
lor five other Farl members. 


Ever since eight of foe nine 
turned up in northern Lebanon 
a week ago, the bombings in 
Paris have ceased. 

M Bandonin vigorously de- 
nied newspaper claims I hat 
the Government had nego- 
tiated with Farl this summer 
over the release of Georges 
Abdallah. He also insisted 
that the Government had given 
no mission to Monsignor Hil- 
arion Capucci. a Syrian-born 
former Greek Orthodox Arch- 
bishop of Jerusalem, who 
visited Abdallah on Monday. 

Mgr Capucci bad met 
Abdallah at his own request, 
M Bandonin said. “It was up 
to Mgr Capucci to see what he 
could do. There was no ques- 
tion of giving into blackmail or 
of envisaging any kind of 
bargain." 



M Chirac: insisting on an - 
Israeli jraUont... 

French to 
stay part 
of Unifil 

From Zoriana Pysariwsky 
New York 

M Jacques Chirac, foe 
French Prime -Minister, said 
his Government bad no plans 
to withdraw the French contin- 
gent serving with foe United 
Nations Interim Force in 
Lebanon (Unifil), despite a 
declared campaign by the pro- 
Iranian Hezbollah militia to 
drive UN peacekeeping forces 
ont of Lebanon- 
M Chirac laid down certain 
conditions for Uiufil's contin- 
ued presence in Lebanon, 
in eluding a complete Israeli 
pnllonL Israel has already 
said it would not abandon its 
security belt on foe ground 
that Unifil was unable to 
sufficiently protect Israel's 
northern border. 

M Chirac said France had 
no proof that any government 
was behind the recent wave of 
terrorist bombings in Pam, 
saying that.be believed one 
group, perhaps acting in. con- 
cert with another, was respon- 
sible for foe attacks. 

He said he was “allergic" to 
foe idea of negotiating with 
terrorists and denied reports 
that France had entered into 
discussions earlier this year 
with a terrorist group believed 
to be responsible for the recent 
bombings. M Chirac refused 
to say that Iran was behind foe 
attacks on UuifiL 
• GRENOBLE: A group of 
233 French soldiers left 
France yesterday to join a 
logistical support unit of Unifil 


Jet forced 
down in 
Zambia 

-. Front Mkrtha de la Cal 

— Lisbon. . 

Zambia ' wttered' A a ■ £ortu- 
giiese- aircraft .‘carrying -T2J 
passengers, and right crew to 
land in Lusaka on 'Tuesday 
and held it on. the &ound fqi£| 
IS hours, claiming it ba£ 
violated Zambian airspace. 

The plane, which had been 
flying from Maputo in Moz- 
ambique to Luanda in Angola, 
en route to Portugal arrived 
in Lisbon yesterday. It was 
released after the Portuguese 
Ambassador in Lusaka ap- 
pealed to the Zambian For- 
eign Minister. None of the 
■passengers or crew had been 
harmed. ‘ : J 

Zambia claimed that jpor- 
iugal's Slate airline, Tap-Air 
PoruigaLhad failed to request 
permission to fly over the 
country. The Zambian Gov- 
ernment declared its airspace 
a restricted area after a South 
African attack on the country 
several months ago. 

Tap-Air and the Portuguese 
Foreign Ministry claim the 
airline presented a request in 
July. There had been no reply. 

A second Tap-Air plane, 
which took off from Johannes- 
burg for Lisbon on Wednes- 
day, turned' : back when it 
received no, reply from the 
control towerm Gambia to a 
request to fly o ver theiountry. 

Political observers in Lis- 
bon believe the action was 
taken in retaliation for 
Portugal's role in preventing 
the export of coal bring in- 
cluded in EEC sanctions 
against South Africa. . 


Pretoria cuts off 
line to the press 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


The South African Gov- 
ernment's Bureau for Inform- 
ation announced yesterday 
that it had decided the best 
■way to improve the accuracy 
'$nd quality of the service pro- 
vided byits “media centre” in 
'Pretoria/was to close it down. 

The bureau said the centre 
would dose from today and 
telephone inquiries from the 
press would no longer be ans- 
wered. In future, the bureau 
would reply only to inquiries 
received by telex, “and then 
only when in possession of all 
salient and verified feels". 

Telephone replies to press 
queries would be given “only 
in exceptional cases, such as 
acts of terror". The bureau 
said it was taking this action 
because of press criticism of 
the accuracy of information it 
had been providing. 

“It would appear that one of 
the main problems which has 
arisen in this regard has been 
the unevaluated transmission 


of information to the media as 
a result of telephone inquiries. 
It has sometimes happened 
that the initial reports receiv- 
ed by the bureau have had to 
be amended as more accurate 
and evaluated information 
has become available. 

“The bureau has derided to 
dose its media centre on 
Friday, September 26, at 12.00 
hours." the bureau said. 

The centre was set up 
shortly after the declaration of 
the stale of emergency on June 
12, under the terms of which 
reporting of unrest and actions 
oi the security forces is se- 
verely restricted. 

Recently the bureau, whose 
ultimate boss is the Deputy 
Minister of Information, Mr 
Louis Nel. has been under fire 
for spending some 1.5 million 
rand (£462,000) of taxpayers’ 
money on producing a “peace 
song", aimed at promoting 
racial harmony, to be aired on 
radio as a commercial. 


Church job for Boesak 


Johannesburg — The rebel 
Dutch Reformed Church 
clergyman. Dr Allan Boesak, 
has been elected Moderator of 
the Mission Church, the 
branch of the church which 
ministers mainly to South 
Africa's Coloured community 
(Michael Hornsby writes). 

Since 1982 Dr Boesak has 
been president of the World 
Alliance of Reformed Chur- 
ches. but until now had been 
denied the top job in his own 
church by conservative Col- 


oured colleagues and sec- 
onded white ministers who 
disapprove of his political 
activism. 

Dr Boesak, who was jailed 
for three weeks in August and 
September last year and then 
released and charged with 
subversion under Lhc Internal 
Security Act. is currently at 
large on bail of 20.000 rand 
(£6.150). The hearing of the 
case against him was ad- 
journed last week until 
November 28. 


Reagan to veto tough sanctions Bill 


From Mohsin Ali 
Washington 

. President. . Reagan plans to 
veto a tough congressional Biff- 
of economic sanctions against 
South Africa, today, '.the 
Senate .- Republican' - leader. 
Senator Robert Dole, said 
yesterday. / 

The senator said he thought 


“it would be hard to sustain a 
veto", meaning Congress 
might override it. 

A presidential veto can be 
overriden by iwo-thinJs ma- 
jority in the Senate and the 
House of Representatives. 

The congressional Bill's 
measures call for a ban on US 
imports of textiles. coaL steel. 


iron and uranium and agricul- 
tural products from South .Af- 
rica. 

The President is expected to 
announce the appointment of 
Mr Edward Perkins, as the 
first black US Ambassador to 
South Africa. Mr Perkins, a 
career diplomat, is now .Am- 
bassador to Liberia. . 


Killer of 
British 
teenagers 
gets life 

Hong Kong (Reuter) — A 
Chinese youth aged 16 who 
admitted murdering two Brit- 
ish teenagers on a remote 
Hong Kong hillside was sen- 
tenced yesterday to indefinite 
detention. 

The youth, who was not 
named because of bis age. 
pleaded guilty to killing 
Nicola Myers, aged 18. and 
Kenneth McBride, 17, on 
April 20, 1985. 

Four others have been 
charged with murder and rape 
in connection with the case. 

Havana expels 
agency chiefs 

Havana (AFP) — Cuba has 
expelled the bureau chiefs here 
of Reuters and Agcnce France- 
Presse news agencies for hav- 
ing quoted a human rights 
activist. 

Mr Robert Powell of Reuter 
and M Noel Lorthiois of AFP 
had sent dispatches quoting 
Elizardo Sanchez Santa Cruz, 
vice-president of the un- 
official Cuban Human Rights 
Committee. 

Cost of fraud 

Peking (Reuter) - Huang 
Yuhui. a high-ranking Chi- 
nese Communist Party official 
in Guangxi province, was 
executed for leading a group 
which earned the equivalent 
of more than £34.000 in fraud 
and bribery. Peking Radio 
reported. 

Climbers’ ban 

Kathmandu (AFP) - Two 
mountaineers, a Swiss and a 
Pole, have been banned from 
climbing in the Nepalese 
Himalayas for five years after 
an illegal scaling of the 
26.903 fl Mount Cho Ovu. 

Party millions 

Peking l.AFP) - The Chinese 
Communist Party has admit- 
ted 6.3 million new members 
since 1 981. bringing total 
membership to 44 million. 

Brain drain 

Washington (AP) — The 
active ingredient in mari- 
juana. called THC. causes a 
loss of brain cells in rats 
similar to that attributed to 
ageing, raising fresh concern 
about the illegal drug, accord- 
ing to Dr Philip Landfield of 
Wake Forest University, 
North Carolina. 



Signor Sandro Perrin i, the 
former President' of Italy 
(above) celebrated his 90th 
birthday yesterday. The Pope 
joined leading politicians in 
congratulating him. 

Live surgery 

Moscow (Reuter) — Soviet 
surgeons gingerly but success- 
fully removed a primed gre- 
nade lodged in a soldier 
wounded while serving in 
Afghanistan. 

Gorilla dies 

New York (AP) — Carolyn, 
the oldest gorilla in captivity, 
died of natural causes in the 
Bronx Zoo at the age of 47. 
She stayed at the Central Park 
Zoo from 1943 until 1982 
when she was moved to the 
Bronx Zoo. 

Aid call 

San Jose (Reuter) - Costa 
Rica asked for international 
help to deal with the growing 
number of Nicaraguan refu- 
gees entering the country daily 
to escape the bloodshed and 
economic hardships. Only 
about 21.000 of the estimated 
150.000 Nicaraguans in Costa 
Rica are recognized refugees. 


Censorless Hungary finds freedom has limits 


From Roger Boyes 

Budapest 

There were several hundred 
mourners, many of them too 
young to remember the 1956 
uprising, at the recent Buda- 
pest funeral of Mr Ferenc 
Do oath. He was a doughty 
reformer, part of the entourage 
of the disgraced and lamented 
Prime Minister, Mr Imre 
Nagy. 

Unlike Mr Nagy, who was 
executed in 1958, Mr Donath 
survived foe revolution,' did 
time in jafl and emerged as a 
useful conduit between the’ 
fringe opposition and more 
cautious reform economists. 

‘Among the graveside eu- 
logies there was a particularly 
telling one from a dissident: 
**We hope that foe time has 
now passed when funerals are 
-foe- only-occasion -oae.-can 
speak freely." 

- Well, yes, that- time has 


indeed passed in Hungary, 
rightly praised as the most 
relaxed country in the Soviet 
bloc. But how bee is free? 
There is technically no censor 
in Hungary, but the Com- 
munist Party nominates the 
seqfor editorial- staff -of, all - 
publications and hits instituted - 
a system of post-censorship 
irith detailed analysis of what 
should oot have been printed. 

Reprimands, warnings, 
dismissals and closures are 
part of everyday publishing 
life. 

A television news director 
was reprimanded foe other day 
for showing too much of foe 
British royal wedding; foe 
coverage, though better than 
in the rest of East Europe, was 
not exactly comprehensive. 

Mentions of Trotsky, Af- 
ghanistan and criticism of foe 
-Sovfel-JJuwn-ara— off-lonits, - 
For the most part edi to rial- 
boards and -writers exercise- 


self-censorship on these sub- 
jects: that is, they ignore them. 

Bat there are certain grey 
areas and, if an enterprising 
writer slips through a ref- 
erence to a Soviet historical 
figure, somebody somewhere 
j- perhaps a rigflant reader in 
-foe Soviet’ Embassy — will 
make it an issue. Inquests are 
held, j } 

The latest victim of post- 
censorship is a writer and 
playwright, Mr Istvan Csnrka. 
Earlier this year Mr Csnrka 
made a tour of the US, Canada 
and West Germany. 

Radio Free Europe broad- 
cast to Hungary one of Mr 
Csurka's more critical lec- 
tures. At foe same time tbe- 
writer had a volume of essays 
published in New York. 

Although obviously scep- 
tical ab o ut °rinli^n and t-n iw 
ceraed with foe moral health 
of Hungary, the lectnres show 


a deep feeling for his native 
country. 

That was not good enough 
for foe Hungarian Deputy- 
Minister of Culture, Mr 
Gyorgy Vajda: “Editorial of- 
fices w-fll not publish work by 
Istvan Csurka until a farther 
decision is taken-. . 1 " - 

The authorities have also 
just suspended the literary 
magazine Tis&tqj and are' 
Carrying ont an investigation 
into a “series of emus" 
committed by the editors. 
These seem to include the 
publication of poems by 
Caspar Nagy, dismissed in 
1984 as secretary of the 
Writers’ Union. 

The ma gazin e has been 
publishing good, agonized 
verses, larded with HWr- 
schmerz and references to 
Hungarians selling their 
souls; normal fodder for. Jit-: 
erary journals tbronghoot the 
world, but apparently too dose 


to the bone in Hungary, 

There are some Hungarians 
who argue that a censor — an 
intelligent, sensitive one — 
might be preferable to foe 
current state of affairs. 

Self- and post-censorship is 
a lottery in which there are no 
prizes, only penalties. 

Just as nobody would think 
of writing about foe Soviet 
troops in Hungary, so nobody 
wrote about yet another foot- 
ball corruption scandal in 
Hungary this spring. It was 
the classic story - of money for 
goals, but coming just before 
Hungary's participation in the 
World Cup. reporters re- 
strained themselves in the 
national interest. 

Jl was no time ip knock the 
Hungarian football establish- 
ment. In the event, Hungary 
suffered its most crushing 
. defeau_6r0, Jga Inst Jhe Soviet 
Union. Perhaps there is a 
lesson there somewhere. 


i 

\ 


O v ISC. vV i!> 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


US forces in Honduras on alert 


Contra rebels believed ready 


for big push into Nicaragua 

. .«• r 


From Philip Jacobson 
Honduras 
A few weeks before the 
Reagan Administration begins 
pumping substantial new 
funds into supporting the 
Nicaraguan Contras, there is 
growing speculation here that 
the rebels are planning a big 
incursion into Sandinista 
territory. 

Contra camps along the 
tense border with Nicaragua 
have been put ofHimits to 
journalists amid rumours of 
intensive preparations for 
resumption of the fighting. 

There are indications that 
the US military machine in 
Honduras has been put on 
high alert. A large party of 
Special Forces commandos is 
said to have arrived recently 
at the sprawling American Air 
Force base in Palmerola. an 
hour's drive from the C3pitaL 
The CIA station in Tegucig- 
alpa — one of the most impor- 
tant in Central America — is 
also believed to be receiving 
reinforcements to help organ- 
ize the renewed campaign. 


Flights into Honduras recent- 
ly have contained an unusual- 


ly high number of American 
civilians often descnbit& 
themselves as anthropologists. 

Ever since the Reagan Ad- 
ministration succeeded in 
pushing its controversial $100 
million military aid package 
for the Contras through Con- 
gress last June, there have 
been suggestions that the 
rebels will be encouraged to 
take and hold a town inside 
Nicaragua to demonstrate 
their improved military prow- 
ess. It is no secret that their 
American instructors were 
sharply disappointed by pre- 
vious offensives, which have 
usually petered out into disr 
orderly retreats before the 
Sandinistas’ incre asing ly 
effective counter-insurgency 
troops and the firepower of 
their Soviet helicopters. 

In the coming round of 
fighting, the Contras will al- 
most certainly have some US 
anti-aircraft missiles, possibly 
the highly advanced Stingray, 
to combat the air threat 


Another poor performance- few days after the new Contra 
on the battlefield, especially if aid was secured. His disrns- 
accompanied by further sal after less than a year inone 
allegations of brutality to- of the most senahve posts m 
wards non-combatants, iscer- Central America, wasannbut- 
tain to expose the White ed by the State Department to 
House to renewed pressure “not effectively carrying out 
from opponents of Admin- US policy in Honduras, 
istrauon policy in Honduras But the growing numbCT of 
and Nicaragua. Hondurans who wony about 

“The more Reagan builds where the ever-doser military 
up the Contras as heroes fight- links with the US, and the pre- 
ing for freedom, the areater sence of thousands of wdl- 


the pressure will be on them to 

deliver something that looks 
like $100 mfliimO one ob- 
server said. “What surprises 
me is that nobody seems to 
have thought much about the 
possibility that they will take 
some town, then get trapped 
there. Are the Americans go- 
ing to risk sending the Seventh 
Cavalry in to rescue them?” 

Similar questions about the 
real objective of US policy in 
Nicaragua were bring asked 
by Western diplomats at a 
farewell party thrown earlier 
this week for Mr John Ferch, 
unceremoniously fired as US 
Ambassador to Honduras a 


armed Contras on their terri- 
tory, is taking their country, 
interpreted ibis as rar- : "" 
that Mr Ferch was not 


ered hawkish enough on these 
*. Washington 


issues to satisfy . __ 
and their own military high 

command. 


To the State Department’s 
xh has be 


dismay, Mr Ferch has begun 
delivering some trenchant 
public observations about the 

S ilicies be was expected to 
How. That $100 minion, he 
warns, “will go so fast it is 
really just a down payment. 
The logic of it all means that 
the next stage is an expanded 
military operation.'* 



Testban 
would bar 
safety f 
research’ 


1 


It 


prom Mohsia Ali 
Washington 

The United Step disejosoi 
that about iwo- thirds of its 
SS^rSockpile has he 
fitted with ultra-modern 

«fetv devices, andgavethisas 

flJS reason for continuing 

underground testing.^^ 

The Pentagon *? 

unusual photograph dam- 

zLa nuclear warhead and . 
2£de public a letter to Qm» 
Mr GwgrWrij. 

unilateral test ban. , , . 

The warhead was cracked m 
experiment during an 







an 




Falkland fishing pacts 
defended by Argentina 


From Eduardo Cue, Buenos Aires 


Argentina has strongly de- 
fended its bilateral agreements 
with the Soviet Union and 
Bulgaria allowing those coun- 
tries to fish in the waters 
round the Falkland Islands. 

Replying to recent criticism 
of the agreements by Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign 
Minister, the Argentine Fish- 
eries Under-Secretary. Senor 
Luis Jaimes, said on Wednes- 
dav that they “guarantee with- 
out a doubt the conservation 
of the area’s fishing resources 
and regulate their exploitation 


in the economic zone that is 
exclusively Argentine". He 
said the agreements rec- 
ognized Argentine claims to 
sovereignty m the zone. 


The British position, re- 
iterated by Sir Geoffrey at the 
United Nations this week, is 
that the issue should be re- 
solved through multilateral 
negotiations. London also 
supports a study of fishing 
resources in the area by the 
UN Food and Agricultural 
Organization. 


Lange rejects Russian 
bid for landing rights 


Gloom over Vienna troop cut talks 


From Richard Bassett, Vienna 


From Richard Long, Wellington 


The New Zealand Govern- 


ment yesterday rejected _ a 
mewed 


renewed Soviet request for 
Aeroflot landing rights and 
fishing fleet facilities 
The request was raised with 
Mr Michael Moore, New 
Zealand's Minister for Over- 
seas Trade, who is in Moscow 
Mr David Lange, the Prime 
Minister, said in Wellington 
that the approach was rejected 
because of wider relationships 
with the Soviet Union and 
“other countries." This was 
seen as a reference to the 


United States, and other in- 
dependent nations in the 
South Pacific. 

The request for landing 
rights' and on-shore facilities 
for fishing vessels was raised 
with Mr Moore by Mr Nikolai 
Kudryavtsev, acting Soviet 
Minister of Fisheries, when 
they signed an agreement 
allowing the Soviet fleet rights 
to fish in New Zealand’s 200- 
mile economic zone for an- 
other four years. 


The 40th round of mutual 
fr aianrgd force reduction talks 
(MBFR) began yesterday in 
Vienna amid increasing 
speculation that the dead- 
locked negotiations may not 
survive into the new year. 

“The talks are in trouble 
and could easily end quite 
soon," a highly placed Nato 
! source said. 


leading article, page J3 


The negotiations, which 
were begun in 1973 mid which 
aim to reduce the levels of 
conventional forces in Central 
Europe, have been stalled for 
years on the so-called “data 
question — the issue of how 
many troops the Warsaw Pact 


has stationed in Central 
Europe. 

Nato has claimed repeat- 
edly that the Eastern bloc’s 
estimates are several tens of 
thousands out on Western 
figures gleaned from intelli- 
gence activity. 

However, last December 
Nato, in a proposal largely 
inspired by the then British 
ambassador to the talks, Mr 
Michael Alexander, agreed to 
set aside the data issue and 
proceed ^ with questions of 
verification. 

This, however, met with a 
cool response from the War- 
saw Pact and, despite ch i n n s 


by delegates on both sides to 
the contrary, it is widely 
believed that Moscow is dis- 
satisfied with the talks and 
would be happy to end them. 

The recent Stockholm ac- 


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cord has been seen as evidence 
of Moscow's preference for the 
Conference of Security and 

Co-operation in Enrope pro- 
cess as a means of maintaining 

dialogue with the West 
A means of incorporating 
the troop-level talks in Vienna 

into CSCE negotiations would, 

however, be resisted by Nato 
which is, despite the diffi- 
culties of MBFR, eager that 
the Vienna talks should 
continue. 


HlUiwui » .. 

underground nuclear tea m 
Nevada, the Pentagon said. 

That testing could help 

can scientist to daynshreto 

to protect warheads ftp ^ at- 
tack in space as they headed , 

for their targets. . 

“The introduction of moo- 
em safety and security devices f 
into the two-thirds of our ; 
stockpiled weapons that do . 
not yet have them would be 
halted" by a test ban. Mr 

Weinberger said in his letta^ 

But Mr Frank Gaffney, the 
Deputy Assistant Defence 
Secretary, emphasized that 
American nuclear weapons 
had been designed for decades 
in a manner in which there _ 
was “zero possibility of an 
accidental nuclear explosion. 

But some high explosive, . 
non-nuclear triggers on such 
devices could detonate _m a 


plane crash or other accident. 

spread of 


possibly causing the spread 
dangerous plutonium. 

“We are fixing the problem 
through ... a very impressive 
technique called ‘insensitive 
high explosive’ that will not 
detonate except under very 
carefully controlled, specific 
circumstances,” he said. 


Army anxiety over 
‘dirty war’ trial 


From Eduardo Cue, Buenos Aires 


Two former Buenos Aires 
police chiefs and 10 other 
people went on trial here yes- 
terday on charges of kidnap- 
ping and torturing more than 
280 people during the military 
regime’s “dirty war" against 
terrorism. 

As the new inquiry into 
human rights violations got: 
under way there were. strong- 
indications -that the- civilian 
Government" of : President 
Alfonso. is- worried tbatjtro- 
Ibnged prpsecutionof lower- 
ranking military , officers may 
further upset and .demoralize 
the armed forces, whose pub- 
lic prestige is at an all-time low 
following the loss of the Falk- 
lands war. 

The chief defendant in the 
trial is General Ramon Juan 
Camps who, as chief of the 
Buenos Aires province police 
between - 1976. : and 1978, 
developed a ; -reputation' for 
being 'as ruthless, as he was 
outspoken. . • . r 

“He is one of the symbols of 
the repression in Argentina,” 
Senor Luis Moreno Ocampo, 
the assistant prosecutor in the 
case. said. 

General Camps received 
worldwide notoriety in the 
1978 book by the former 
newspaper publisher, Jacob© 
Timmerman, Prisoner With- 
out a Name, Cell Without a 
Number, in which the gener- 
al's surrealistic interrogations 
were described. 

The trial, which is expected 
to last until Chrirtmas, is the 
first time officers who carried 
out orders from their super- 
iors to torture have been in- 
dicted, a development report- 
ed to have caused consterna- 
tion within the armed forces. 

The military had hoped 
legal action would be limited 
to the high-ranking officers 
under whose seven-year dic- 
tatorship more than 9.000 
persons disappeared and are 
presumed dead. 

The trial is taking place in 


the same ornate, 19th-century 
wood-panelled courtroom 
where nine former top offi- 
cers, including three ex-Presi- 
dents, were tried last Decem- 
ber for human rights viola- 
tions. 

In that case the civilian 
court sentenced five, offices, 
including two former Presid- 
f ent&loiail terms ranging from 
Ufeimffrisonmentto4tf2 years. - 
FcSr other officers were ac- 
quitted, however, and last 
week the prosecutor called the 
sentences arbitrary and ap- 
pealed to the Supreme Court. 

While that trial was gen- 
erally seen as essential to re- 
establishing a state of law in 
Argentina after years of 
kidnappings and disappear- 
ances, Western diplomatic 
sources say high-ranking gov- 
ernment officials are eager to 
dose the .issue, so they can 
concentrate on strengthening 
the young democracy. At least 
one other human rights trial 
against former military offi- 
cers is scheduled. 

“The Government would 
like to put an end to the 
trials,” a Western diplomat 
said. "They feel they have 
made their print.” 

The continuing prosecu- 
tions appear to be becoming a 
source of division within the 
Government “The trials are a 
way of proving to the victims 
that there is justice and also of 
showing those - responsible 


that if they do it again they 
jaiL" a welf- 


coukl end up in jail,’ 
informed source said “That is 
why I am worried that the 
executive branch does not 
share this view." 

General Camps, aged 39, is 
suffering from cancer. He is 
charged with ordering the 
torture of about 180 people 
and with the murder of Sergio 
KaracacftofL a prominent op- 
position figure, and Doming) 
Teruggj, who was abducted 
with KaracachoftL 


Fur flies as town bylaw 
ruffles the cat lobby 

From Paul Vallety, New York 


Mayor Michael Hannum of 
the small town of Pitman, New 
Jersey, has been trying for 
years to attract the interest of 1 
the American media. Now be 
is besieged by it 

“This town Is officially 
listed as having the Number 
One toxic waste she in the 
entire United States,” he said. 
“We have been trying to draw 
their attention to our cam- 
paign without any success. 
Now they're all here because 
of the cats.” 

This week Pitman Borough 
Council passed an or dinance 
limiting to three the number of 
cats any householder can 
“keep, harbour or maintain”. 
The bylaw has caused uproar 
among animal lovers of the 
nation. 

The mayor is anxious to 
dispel the notion that the 
exclusive little town, which 
has 11 churches and no bars 
and serves as a dormitory 
suburb of New York and 
Philadelphia, is infested with 
cats. 

“There’s 9,000 people in 
two square miles, and we’ve 


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them properly,” he said. . 

Mrs Lois Thompsaa. the 
Town Clerk, said: “In summer 
the stench , can be terrible. 
People who five near such 
households complain that they 
hove to keep the windows 
dosed. And they are unable to 
grow anything in their yard 
because the cats use it." 

The townsfolk introduced 
the law after trying, un- 
successfully, to get action from 
the local board of health. The 
resuft was an i n vasi on by 
television reporters. 

“We’ve got a contaminated 
lake here which contains all 
the known cancer<ansing 
agents there are,” the mayor 
■aid-. “It's dosed off and 
contained, hot some of it is still 
seeping out " 

But the cameramen were all 

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Manila welcomes President home with cheers and yellow confetti 

Cabinet briefs Aquino on rebel crisis 

From Keith Dalton — — ' 


From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

President Aquino returned 
yesterday from the United 
States to cheering crowds, and 
immediately sat down with 
her Cabinet to discuss mount- 
ing calls for tougher action 
against communist rebels, 
v Within hours her outspoken 
Defence Minister, Mr Juan 
Ponce Earile. told a business 
;; meeting that, if unchecked, 
k ; thewarcoukl reach “a point of 
; . ^irreversibility” by 1990, when 
« “the 17,000-strong New Peo- 
pie's Army could field up to 
V 30,000 men. 

“That means we will be 
fighting each other in a con- 
ventional war, no longerj 
]- guerrilla war. It's a 
, he said. 

Before the meeting Vice- 
President Salvador Laurel also 
■' said that "a more decisive 
policy”' in combatting the 1 7- 
year insurgency would be 
■- presented to Mis Aquino, 
whose caD for an immediate * 
ceasefire has been rejected by 
the rebels. 

i More than 30,000 people 
veined the route of the presiden- 
tial motorcade, which was 
showered with yellow confetti 
from office buildings at 
Makati, the financial centre, 
where crowds chanting “Cory, 

;■ Cory” surged on to the road. 

Hundreds of yellow bal- 
' loons soared skywards trailing 
' yellow streamers, and banners 
strung from office windows 
proclaimed “Welcome home, 
a Job well done”. 

At ibe airport Mrs Aquino 



, ■ am mi >* ;r. i mi i i I li u ...... . .. 

Mr Earile, right, with General Ramos, centre, and Mr Ramon Mitra, Agriculture Minister, at yesterday’s Cabinet mpgtjwg. 
said her nine-day visit had banks bad been made tQ 9 SSnR millinn CtanHJw Inan mnntrv'c nltnKi 


said her nine-day visit had 
won “a sympathetic under- 
standing” of the Philippines 
from President Reagan, Gotl- 
and the American 


people. 

She believed she had estab- 
lished a personal rapport with 
Mr Reagan. 

The country's creditor 


Political unrest in Pakistan 

Zia rules out need 
for martial law 

From Hasan Akhtar, Islamabad 


President Zia of Pakistan 
has accused opposition ele- 
ments of attempting to create a 
law and order problem and 
pave the way for another 
period of martial law. 

The President, who also 
commands the Army and im- 
posed the country's longest 
period of martial law in 1977, 
said martial law would not be 
Imposed because the Govern- 
ment could handle the situa- 
tion. 

President Zia rejected the 
possibility of removing the 
civilian Government under the 
Chief Minister, Syed Gbous 
Ali Shah, in Sun) province and 
the imposition of governor’s 
rale. There has been much 
disorder in Pakistan's south- 
ern province, which has been 
in tbe forefront of anti-govern- 
ment demonstrations since 
1983. 

President Zia, speaking at a 
news conference in Quetta, 
said he is willing to talk with 
the Opposition, which boy- 
cotted his 1985 non-party 
general elections. But he said 
the Movement for Restoration 
of Democracy (MRD) — the 
alliance of 10 opposition par- 
ties — had been inflexible. 

"We will hold the next 
elections in 1990, and if the 
MRD has any questions it can 
come and discuss it with ns,” 
president Zia said. 

The MRD. however, insists 
that President Zia should 
resign and fresh elections; 
with tbe participation of politi- 


cal parties, should be held 
without delay trader the orig- 
inal 1973 const it ution. 

President Zia said he ab- 
horred the party political sys- 
tem and would like to keep 
parties out of the fecal elec- 
tions to be held in 1987. 

The Prime Minister, Mr 
Muhammad Khan Junejo, 
who heads the rating Muslim 
League party, has repeatedly 
said political parties are nec- 
essary to rim the country 
democratically. But General 
Zia said that; If the foundation 
of a political system is weak — 
and he imptied that he regards 
political parties as mutable — 
the bonding which wffi he 
erected on it will remain vul- 
nerable and may crumble. 

The Prime Minister** eff- 
orts to replant democracy in 
Pakistan after nine years of 
martiallaw appear to have ran 
into serions difficulties with a' 
bad crane situation in his 
home province of Sind, as well 
as oner criminal activities, 
such as the recent hijacking of 
a Pan Am jet in Karachi, mur- 
ders of Soviet and Iraqi dip- 
lomats, and sectarian 
m several Punjabi cities and 
towns resulting In the im- 
position of curfews in parts of 
Inhere, the capital of Poqjah 
province, and its subnrh, 
Shabdara. 

Press reports have hinted at 
major political changes taking 
place in Punjab and Sind, but 
no official confirmation Is 
available. 


Dhaka press strike 


Dhaka — Newspapers in 
Bangladesh (ailed to come out 
for the fifth consecutive day 
yesterday as more than 7,000 
journalists and printers con- 
tinued their strike to press for 
re-opening of two newspapers 
closed by the owners after a 
dispute with unions (Ahmed 
Fazl writes). 

Journalists and printers 
walked out demanding that 
the daily Bangladesh 


and its sister weekly Chilrali 
should resume publication. 

More than 500 people were 
jobless when the owners 
closed tbe newspapers last 
May and refused to resume 
publication unless the unions 
accepted new technology and 
the dismissal of redundant 
staff. The dispute has affected 
20 dailies, 13 of them in 
Dhaka, and the government- 
run National New Agency. 


Security 
round-up 
for Gaines 

Seoul (Reuter) - South 
Korea arrested 263,564 sus- 
pected criminals in a tnree- 
monih drive to tighten 
security for the Asian Ganns 
in Seoul police 


arrested, who ac- 
>r one in every * 

ipulation. included 
hoodlums, robbers, 
is. rapists and mur- 
ice said. 

mhorities charged 
unmanly sentenced 

_ _ ■*/> J M «;r in I3ll. 



is an overriding 
r the Games after a 
:k at Seoul airport 
ber 14 killed, five 
reans and injured 

30. _ _ 

th Korean Govem- 
ilamcd the blast on 
rea, accusing the 
: North of being 
staging the Asian 

Korea’s 100.000 
are on alert against 

uthoriticssaid they 
■d a West German 

Korea after he was 

« listed as a sus- 
ninal by InicrpoL 
l from Tokyo on 


World Bridge 

Britons in 
final 168 

From a Bridge 
Correspondent 
Miami Beach 

One British pair .qualified 
for the final of the open pairs 
world championship being 
played here. 

Glyn Tigging, aged 24, a 
host at the London School of 
Bridge, and . Andy Robson, 
aged 22 . a supply teacher in 
Bristol finished in 20th place 
in a semi-final round of 168 
pairs which included most of 
the world’s leading players. 

. The field was headed by 
Lou Bluhm and Ban Bramtey. 
of the United States. Of the 

SB££{8!ag!3£ 

was completed by six pairs 
from the repechage. None was 
British or American. 

platings of the Other British 
semi-finalists were hug* 
Jourdain and Bany Rigal 85. 
Roman Smolski and Henry 
Beihc 1 16 , and Tony Sowter 
and Paul Hackett 154. 

In the women's champion- 
ship. world champions Sally 
Horton and Sandra Landy 
finished in fourth place. 

Leading qualifiers were the 
former world champions. 
Jacqui Mitchell and Judge 
Imalia Kearse of New York. 

‘ Both finals began yesterday. 


banks had been made to 
understand the “imperative of 
Philippine growth”, and she 
hoped that re-negotiation of a 
$26.4 trillion (£18 billion) 
foreign debt could reduce 
annual repayments from 40 

S r cent of export earnings to 
percent 

Final approval is needed for 


a $508 million stand-by loan 
from the International Mone- 
tary Fund and $300 million 
from tbe World Bank. 

Ibe US Senate also has to 
vote on a $200 million aid 
package. 

Stressing that Filipinos 
should not “bold our breath” 
for outside answers to the 


country's economic plight 
Mrs Aquino said: “The main 
effort is ours ... let us get on 
with h then, for what else is 
there to wait for?" 

At the Cabinet meeting the 
armed forces chief. General 
Fidel Ramos, presented Mrs 
Aquino with an updated re- 
port on the security situation. 


NZ acts to 
save hot 
springs of 
Rotorua 

From Richard Long 
Wellington 

The New Zealand Govern- 
ment has proposed drastic 
measures to save one of the 
country's main tourist attrac- 
tions, the Rotorua thermal 
area, which is internationally 
famous ' for its hot pools, 
geysers and mud pools. 

Concerned about the drain- 
ing of underground hot springs 
by private bore users, which 
has led to doming thermal 
activity and the threatened 
extinction of the area, the 
Government proposed the clo- 
sure of all inefficient geo- 
thermal bores. It has also 
suggested a summer shutdown 
of all bores dose to the Pohutn 
geyser. 

The conservation moves, 
proposed by Mr Bob lizard, 
die. Minister of Energy; Mr 
Phil Goffi the Minister for the 
Environment, and Mr Peter 
TapselL the Minister of In- 
ternal Affairs, are to be taken 
to next week's Cabinet meet- 
ing for final appro vaL 
But the moves were met with 
an outcry from Rotorua hot 
bore owners and criticism from 
Mr Paul East, the city 's 
opposition MP, who said they 
were arbitrary. 

Central to the rescue opera- 
tion is the vesting of man- 
agerial responsibility for the 
thermal area with the Min- 
istry of Energy, instead of 
local councils. 



constitutional 
changes next year 

From A Correspondent Harare 
Zimbabwe is to change its Prime Minister, five white 

independents who generally 


Westminster parliamentary 
system next year. Dr Eddison 
Zvobgo. the Minister of Jusr 
tire. Legal and Parliamentary 
Affairs, has confirmed. 

. Dr Zvobgo told members of 
the 40-seai Senate that it- wijl 
be abolished next year in: a 
programme which includes 
introduction of an executive 
presidency and the removal of 
20 seats reserved for whiles in 
the 100-member House of 
Assembly. 

Plans to amend the British- 
drafted Lancaster House inde- 
pendence constitution were 
"extensive and well advanc- 
ed - . he said. 

Mr Robert Mugabe, the 
Prime Minister, is reported to 
be on the brink of signing a 
unity agreement with Mr Jo- 
shua Nkomo, leader of Zapu, 
the main black opposition 
party, which would inaugurate 
a one-parly state. 

On April 18. the eighth' 
anniversary of independence, 
Mr Mugabe is constitutionally 
entitled to remove the 20 seats 
for whiles if he can muster 70 
votes in the House. 

He controls 66 scats and Mr 
Nkomo controls 14 seats. Mr 
Mugabe will not be able to 
outlaw all organized oppo- 
sition until 1990 unless he gets 
approval from all 100 MPs. 
including 14 in the Conser- 
vative Alliance of Mr lan 
Smith, the former Rhodesian 


support the Government, and 
a lone member for th.e party of 
the exiled founder .of Zapu, 
the Rev Ndabanipgi Silholc, 

. “Details will have ip wait 
until very thorough considcra- 
- tion has been given, but 1 can 
say 1 look forward to the year 
after next with great joy.” Dr 
Zvobgo said. 

• Security damp: The Zim- 
babwe Government is impos- 
ing security restrictions on 
returning residents, a move 
which observers believe is 
aimed particularly at the 
100.000 whites who emigrated 
to South Africa after the start 
of the 1972-80 war for black 
rule here. 

Mr Enos Nkala, the Min- 
ister of Home Affairs, told the 
Senate that "birds of flight” 
would have to be cleared by 
Zimbabwe's secret service, the 
Central Intelligence Organiza- 
tion (GO). 

“The CIO andtheCIDhavc 
to find out if the individual is 
suitable and ensure that he 
will not be used by our ene- 
mies to destabilize Zimbab- 
we.” Mr Nkala said. 

“There are many returning 
residents from South Africa, 
they are welcome but they 
should satisfy us.” he said. 

Mr Nkala did not specify if 
the process would be applied 
to returning Zimbabwean citi- 
zens. 


FROM OCTOBER 20th 



From 22p down to 18p-you’H be able tosend 
more EEC mail for the same money! 

Prom October 20th the basic letter postage to EEC .:-, , - • / \ 

countries will be reduced. ; v 

It’s coming down from 22p to onlvlSp - on all letters .... 
and cards weighing up to 20g. 

This big reduction - no less than 18% off the cost of 
postage - will be particularly valuable for businesses 
sending large amounts of post or direct mail to the EEC. 

And don’t forget - European prices are also reduced for 
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AllJetters and caids up to 20 gins to the Republic of Ireland will be charged at 18p postage from October 20th. 


... i. 







10 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 19S6 


SPECTRUM 



Resigned to defeat 





THE POLITICAL 
L DIARY OF 
gS ROBERT 
KILROY-SILK 


Part 5: The final days 

Continuing his campaign against 
Militant in his Liverpool 
constituency, Robert Kilroy-Silk 
was making headway in his 
investigations and was attracting 
unlooked-for parliamentary 
support. But the battle was taking 
too heavy a personal toll • . »■ 



NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


T he Times had a story 
quoting Neil as saying he 
would make no inter- 
vention to “help Mr 
Robert Kilroy-Silk, the 
embattled MP for Knowsley 
North, in his campaign against .a 
Militant takeover of his constit- 
uency Party. Asked-what he would 
do tf Mr Kilroy-Silk was de- 
selected through '• Militant -' pres-, 
sure, forcing a by-election. Mr 
Kfnnock repealed: “He -is wejl 
capable of looking after himself V 
The ' Guardian, on the other 
hand, has a story which says Neil 
gave “strong backing” to me. 
Which is correct? I believe I'm on 
my own. 


NOVEMBER 10 


At the annual remembrance ser- 
vice in PrescoL-SeathHugfres. MP- 
for the neighbouring constituency' 
of Knowsley South, whispered: 
“Frank Field (Birkenhead) has a. 
list of more -than -7Q- members - 
who'd be prepared lo jrome and; 
help in a by-election”, he said. He 
looked around carefully to make 
sure that no one could hear. They 
can't take the whip away from all 
of us“. he added confidently. But I 
don't want a by-election. I've 
already been elected, with a major- 
ity of 1 7.000. The difficulty now is 
that I can’t say I don't want a by- 
election without it looking as if 
I've backed down. 

We ' had coffee ’afterwards in 
Prescot Civjc Hall where several-, 
people mentioned a storym the' " 

Extracted from Hard Labour: The 
Political Diary of Robert Kilroy- 
Silk , to be published by Chatto & 
Wind ns 0 n September 29 at £9.95. 


Sunday Times claiming that re- 
gional officials of the Labour Party 
are being obstructed in their 
attempts to verify the credentials 
of delegates from the Transport 
and General Workers' Union by 
union officials. 

It's all beginning to boil very 
nicely. We-shall add more to the 
pot when necessary..: . . 


NOVEMBER 11 


' I: saw Neii this morning, army- 
request. 'He thought that I should 
■. “tone down~_my campaign, ft was“ 
clear that the by-election threat 
was worrying him. and he was 
obviously relieved when 1 told 
him there would not be one. I 
wonder if I have done the right 
thing? Neil will do what he can to 
help me. I know that, but he might 
have had ajiitie extra incentive if . 
h$ wanted jlo avoid a by-election. 

■ I've now removed that threat. 

The Guardian haul an amazing 


After the fight Kilroy-Silk with his wife Jan and daughter Natasha — the campaign had intruded into all their lives, and the fun had gone 


I hadn't intended to resign from 
my parliamentary seat Indeed, 
when Sard Labour was delivered 
to my publishers earlier this year 1 
expected to be launching it at the 
Labour Party conference in Black- 
pool. That's what we planned. And 
why not? 

Of course the book would 
~ jnwoke. controversy. Of that there 
'Vsr|» doubt. Nor woidd it please 1 
‘ everyone. Unpalatable truths 
never do. But there is nothing in it 

■ that demonstrates anything other 
than support for Neil Klnnock and 
the Tallies that be endorses. 

The book is an expos* of 
Militant and of the tactics em- 
ployed by some of its supporters in 
Knowsley North, not an attack on 
the La bo nr Party. There is nothing 
in it for which I have to apologize, 
-nothing of which 1 was ashamed. It 
tells no lie. And the Labour Party, 

1 know, would be big enough to live 

with its truths just as it manages to 

■ survive the Hattons and the 


‘Not my party 
any more’ 


letter attacking rhe. It. was written 
by four of my parliamentary 
colleagues, comrades nnd friends - 
Terry'RerdsrEddre' Loyden. Bob 
Wareirigaiid A11aifR6beFts.lt said: - ■ 

that my threat to force a by- — sense, of unease: He sidled up to 


Scargflls, the Benns and the 
Heffers. 

Wo. Hard Labour had nothing to 
do with my decision, except per- 
haps in chronicling my path 
towards ft. What made me decide 
to step aside was the recognition 
that the Labour Party that I know 
had been effectively destroyed In 
my constituency. It wasn't nay 
party any more. I had do thing in 
common with the political prin- 
ciples and aspirations of those who 
were now in control. 

The majority of ordinary decent 
-party- members, wearied- -by the- 
constant and exhausting battles, 
that cannot even be visualized by 


those who have not experienced 
them day by day, had given np the 
struggle.Some had left the party — 
but for no other. Others had given 
up politics altogether. The major- 
ity simply refused to attend 
constituency party meetings any 
more. 

It was then, some time in late 
spring, that I realized that L too, 
did not want to continue spending 
the mgjor part of my tune fighting 
elements within my own party. It 
was debilitating as well as fruit- 
less. I knew then that I would 
probably not stand at the next 
election. 

; At the end of June I told my 


election, and Frank Field's efforts 
to enlist the support of MPs to 
campaign for me. was an interfer- 
ence in the democratic procedure 
of the Labour Party. 


NOVEMBER 12 


me_as I was speaking to Joe 
Ashton while waiting to vote on 
our amendment to the Queen's 
Speech. 

“Would it damage you very 
much if I came to speak for you at 
your by-election?” he asked, 
mischievously. 

, ^Aye. it would.” Joe answered 
.fbieme.. “Stay out You’re not 


Things must be getting really bad!. 

Denis Healey stopped me at Hhe 
Mei mbers' entrance ionight.%; ^ 

°' warmly.*,— right, then”. Clement re- 

outstretched. he shook -. tteai«t ;thankfiilly.-*‘ni tell you a 
my hand firmly and with feeling. v joke instead”. It wasn't very good. 

but-ihen his rarely are. 


“AU ihe .besr”. f felt. as if I were 
about* to- be sent over, the top at 
Anzio. never to return. 

Clement Freud added to my 



The Times reported under a 
large headline that Neil would be 
writing to me. at the instigation of 
Eric Heffer, to “advise me to tone 
down my campaign”. I couldn't 
believe that Neil would agree to 
such a thing, not when proposed , 
by Eric Heffer of ail people. 1 was 
livid. “What does it have to do 
with Heffer?” my wife. Jaii. asked. 

“I suppose someone in Liver- 
pool has had a word with him”. - - 
“What will you say?” • 

"^G&t stuffed” 

1 couldn't wait. Of course, the , 
best answer to people like Heffer is 
to win. And thau ‘ as I was 
repeatedly told today during a 
brief reception at Winfield House, 
the US ambassador's residence, is 
what I have to do. Not for myselfi 
I'm just the figurehead. I've got to 
win. they insist, for the Labour 
Party, for democracy. “For the 
sake of the country.” one Tory' 
said. It was heady stuff, although I 
didn't really believe it. 

Andrew Faulds. the actor MP 
foF.Wariey East, was one of the 
most outspoken. In fact, he barged 
acrOsSthe room and burst into our - 
group when- he saw me. 

“Look here. KHroy.“ he began. 
“J've_nevcr liked you and you've . 
never liked me but you mustn't let 
these bastards win”. 


NOVEMBER 13 


I now know the membership of 
the TGWU branches affiliated to 
my constituency. It's dear that 
many do not have enough mem- 
bers to support the delegates. 
Thus, the 6/556 branch has only 
304 members but five delegates, 
which would, require 401 mem- 
bers. all livihgln Knowsley North. 

Some • TGWU branches have 
been sending delegates -to other 
Merseyside constituencies on the 
same membership. Branch 6/612. 
with 263 members throughout 
Merseyside, would be entitled to 
no more than three delegates in 


any one constituency, assuming 
that all the members lived there. 
In fact, it has 24 that we have 
counted so far. That means, in 
effect that the brand] is claiming a 
membership of more than 2.400. 

Frank Field has been to see Neil 
about a letter Neil was reported to 
be sending him. He marched into 
Neil's office and asked what it was 
all abouL Neil told him to stop 
pushing for a by-election. Frank 
told me he had refused. 

“Well that's it“ Neil said. 
“We'U lose the next election and 
the one after”. 

“You'd better do something to 
slop iL then, hadn't you?” Frank 
said. “You’d better help Kilroy”. 


“Thanks, Frank,” I said, not 
sure that he had done me any 
favour. 


NOVEMBER 17 


We cleared the leaves in a biting 
wind, watched as always by our 
increasingly tame robin. I felt very 
depressed. Whereas I would nor- 
mally have been thinking of new 
plans for the garden. I was 
preoccupied /with the 
constituency. 

I've had enough of it all. I keep 
asking myself why I should let it 
dominate and spoil my life. Worse 
still, it is now intruding into the 
lives of my son and daughter, who 


OFFERS OF SUPPORT FROM STRANGE QUARTERS 



Offered to ‘I’ve never 
help at a liked 
by-election you, but 


‘All the 
best’ and a 
handshake 


Clement Freud 


Andrew Fanlds 


Denis Healey 


arc constantly Ixing asked about 
my problems by their friends, 
[heir friends’ parenis. .her ieach- 
ers or just people the) nteet- ■ 
Dominic and Natasha say they# 
don't mind, but I wonder. 


NOVEMBER 19-20 


The TGWU has paid £ IN in 
rfffifeti 


family. A week or so later I 
confided in a friend who happened 
to have contacts with the BBC. 

“Bat what will yon do?” he 
as tiwi, anxiously. “I don't know,” I 
said. No doubt unconvincingly. 
But ft was the truth. 

1 realize that the facts do not fit 
with the image of the dever, 
machiavellian me that has been 
painted by some of those I thought 
were my friends and who are 
convinced that I wrote the book, 
resigned my seat and joined the 

BBC as part of a weU-plwnned and 
cleverly contrived strategy to ob- 
tain maximum publicity. 

The truth is different. I bad no 
plans. Like Micawber, I hoped 
that something would torn np. It 
did. Quickly. 

Within a couple of days the BBC 
invited me to talk to them about a 
“major new commitment In day- 
time television”. Th e rest as they 
say, is history. The future, I trust 
will belong to the Labour Party. 


amiwiion to cover all its dJegaus. 
At £5 per delegate, this would 
work out at 22 delegates whereas, 
in fact they have j6. so the union 
has been asked to reduce the 
number. And what have they 
done? They've ordered the 
apportionment of their affiliation 
fees in such a way as to maximize 
the number of delegates- 
Peter Fisher strikes again. He 

has uncovered another A STMS . 
delegate who has not been prop** 
eriy appointed by the branch he 
claims to represent. There are now 
137 delegates, of whom I must 
have 69 to win. I still have 66 and 
10 possibles - and we still have to 
sort out the TGWU- • 


NOVEMBER 2T-24 


The Prescot East branch of my 
Party met tonight and unani- 
mously passed a resolution calling 
on the National Executive ot the 
Labour Party to undertake an 
inquiry into the way the constit- 
uency party is being run. If there is 

an inquiry it will probably mean j 
that my reselection will have to be " 
postponed. In any case it looked as 
if it would have to be delayed to 
sort out the TGWU delegation. 

It looks as if the Liverpool 
council saga is coming to an end. 
Already the Militants have 
climbed down, humiliated, and 
accepted that they will have to set 
a legal budget after all — and the 
best of it is that the surrender was 
forced on them by their owp 
district Labour Party. Better still is 
the news that Neil is now reputed 
to be determined that the Liver- 
pool Militants should be expelled 
from the Party and he is canvass- g 
ing support for a motion to this p 
effect to be passed at Wednesday's 
meeting of the National 
Executive. 


NOVEMBER 25 


The NEC meeting in two days’ 
time will be required to determine 
whether or not to allow my 
reselection to proceed. The 
chances are that it will be post- 
poned. The regional office of the 
Labour'Fartv m Manchester has 
still not managed to agree with the 
TGWU on the number of dele- 
gates it is entitled to. It's getting 
late because nominations close 
this Thursday. November 28. 
There are just three candidates: 
myself. Tony Mulheam and Keya 
Coombes. 

The delegates' credentials have 
to be verified by December 3. I 
don't think it can be done. Apart 
from the muddle with the TGWU. 
there are other delegates who have 
not been cleared. 

Let us hope that Neil has 
enough votes this time. 


NOVEMBER 26 


The knives were out straight away 
at tonight's management commit- 
tee meeting. Suffice to say ihar 
during one of the tirades. Dave 
Kerr, the Press secretary, stood up. 
pointing his finger in the manner jM 
of all Militants, and screamed that m 
Frank Marsden. an elderly and 
respected member, was “an ani- 
mal and an arsehole”. I wroie the 
words down on the back of the 
minutes. 

The wonder is not that people 
like Dave Kerr have taken over- 
the Labour Party’, but that people 
like Frank Marsden still bother to 
turn up. 


NOVEMBER 27 


It was a long day that passed- 
without- any news from the NEC.' 
But I knew that whatever hap- 
pened it could never be the same 
again. I can't go back to yesterday. 
The fun has been taken out of 
politics for me. at least for now,- 
and I regret that and resent it. I’ve 
also become less fun. or so my 
mother and children tell me. and J 
think they're right. 

I am resigned to defeat and 
political oblivion and the adjust- 
ment to a new life. It can't be any 
worse. 

© Robert Karoy4* 


■THE? 


; TIMES I 



SATURDAY 

Claret . . . choice of 
commoners and kings 


From Henry U's 'conquest 4 of Aqnitaine to the 
launch of the Social Democrats, the wines of 
Bordeaux have had a special place on the 
palates of Englishmen. The Tiroes explores 
Britain’s unique link with the king of wines 



£20,000 to be won 


Can you always get your copy of The Times? 


Dear Newsagent, please deliver/save me a copy of The Tunes 


NAME. 


address. 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1064 


ACROSS 
1 Mountain range 
peaks (6) 

5 PaJtrv (61 

8 Very cold (3) 

9 Pillar (6) 

10 Vision science (6) 

11 Not fai (4j 

12 Clearly oulined (5J| 
14 Ouioftunc(3J) 

17 Dull (6) 

19 Baldness (8) 

22 Man in charge (4) 

24 Misuser (6) 

25 Rubber 16) 

26 Alphabet f 1.1.1} 

27 Overcome with hor- 
ror ( 6) 

28 Speculation (6) 

DOWN 

2 Worship (5) 

3 Soviet satellite [7) 

4 Fuss> {7} 

5 Shortsighted person 
(H 

6 Ealing district (5} 


SOLUTION TO NO 1063 



7Hairspra>(7) 18 

s5asasr«5Sr 

16 Before (3) -« Diamond m 

17 Local accent ( 7 ) 23 Scornful loo 



V 

7 


t) 


h 


-MU’ 

















WT TQTMFW AMT) FINANCE 



7 \. 


FRIDAY PAGE 


A solo life 
behind 

the lines... 




ChrteHana 


Jane Lapotaire lit another 
Gauloise and considered her 
.craft “Actress?" she said. 
“Please don’t call me that. It’s 
a disparaging word which still 
has connotations of Edward 
VII and his music hall ladies. 
It's tantamount to saying 
someone is an easy lay." She 
added, in that husky voice 
which can fill an auditorium 
with a blast of sexual anticipa- 
tion. “You don’t have doctors 
^and doctoresses, or painters 
^nd painteresses.” 

She is not glamorous, and 
wore little or no make-up on 
the strong face which hints at a 
life that has been anything but 
“actressy" and has made her 
perfect in the parts of power- 
ful, passionate' women: 
St Joan. Lady Macbeth. Mary 
Tudor. Geopatra — and, most 
notably. Edith Piaf in the Pam 
Gems play for which she won 
several awards in Britain and 
America. - 

Her psyche is stacked with 
the complex neuroses which 
actresses — actors — often 
I hang about themselves as 
’ credentials, and she treads the 
wobbly financial and emo- 
tional path of single parent, 
feminist and “caring" person 
with a vigour that does not 
lack lightness, and a serious- 
ness that often dissolves into 
humour and self-rnockery. At 
41 she has overcome the 
trauma of being the illegiti- 
mate daughter of a Gl she 
never knew and an 18-year- 
old girl who gave Jane to a 
foster mother in Ipswich at 
birth — and then tried, un- 
successfully. to win her back 
1 through the courts when she 
was II 

“My mother has recently 
come back into my life. She 
has been an old. mentally ill 
woman for a long time. Per- 
haps that's not surprising' 
when you consider the back- 
ground she had — a French 
orphan brought over to En- 
gland at the age of seven and 


A woman of 


passionate roles, 
Jane Lapot aire 
reveals a cool 
determinatio n to 
Andrew Duncan 

thrown into a Dr Bamado's 
home. 

“I used to have a lot of 
resentment and hale, but now 
I have compassion, although 1 
can’t say I ever loved her. The 
moment I became a mother I 
could never understand how 
anyone could leave a child. 

“Do you want to know the 
corny cliche of why 1 went into 
the theatre? I remember think- 
ing at school that ifl couldn't 
have the two people who were 

C I would resent 
falling in 
love again’ 

supposed to love me in my 
life, then I would have SOD 
people out there who didn’t 
know me. and they would all 
love me. Of course, that's not 
the reason I continued." . 

She is now in repertory at 
the Royal Shakespeare Com- 
pany for seven months, star- 
ring as Lina in G.B. Shaw's 
Misalliance and Maya in Ar- 
thur Miller's The Archbishop's 
Calling. Of Shaw's farce, she 
commented; “I’m staggered 
that the play isn't performed 
more often — it’s very relevant 
and modern, and it's huge fun 
for me not to be playing a 
massive role. I can't believe 
I've got lime to pul my feet up 
or potter in the garden. 


“Lina is Shaw's idea of what 
a modern liberated young 
woman should be — she wears 
trousers, earns her own living 
and is not dependent on 
anyone I have a lot of 
similarities with her. I haven’t 
made any man ‘the master of 
my body and my soul’, as Lina 
says." 

Never? She has been mar- 
ried twice — first briefly, to a 
cameraman and then, for 10 
years, to film director Roland 
Jofle by whom she has a 13- 
year-old son. Rowan. 

She laughed loudly and 
stared hard. “Oh. frequently,” 
she admitted. “Since my di- 
vorce. I’ve been lucky and had 
three good relationships, but 
I've lived on my own for 
seven years now and would 
resent felling in love again. 

“I don't want my guts 
churned waiting for the phone 
to ring, or the electric Stocks 
when he walks round the 
comer. I tend to back away 
'from the 'grit under the skin* 
problems. When things be- 
come tacky I have the sanc- 
tuary of my home, but 1 worry 
that the longer I am on my 
own the more fussy I become. 
I'm not sure how malleable I 
would be to another person's 
whims and foibles. I'm less 
tolerant and that makes me 
sad. 

“I worry about old age but I 
have dreams. One is sharing it 
with an ‘intellectual’ compan- 
ion — sex dwindles in im- 
portance as one gets older and 
compatibility is far more im- 
portant. But, perhaps in- 
evitably. I will be on my own 
— ideally in a cottage in the 
country, surrounded by cats, a 
typewriter and a lovely garden 
with several grandchildren 
who think grandma is sparky 
and makes good apple 
crumble. 

“People who are divorced 
think they are free, but one 
veers between being proud of 
one's independence and then 



MEDICAL BRIEFING 


Medical Journal and Hospital 
Doctor. Although working in 
an area with notoriously poor 
social conditions, and despite 
the Loudon Hospital's role as 
the regional neonatal inten- 
sive care unit with a heavy 
caseload of vulnerable babies, 
the perinatal mortality rate 
fell below the national av- 
enge last year for the first 
time, and was the lowest ever 
recorded lor the district. 

instrumental delivery was 
used far less than in other 
areas with a comparable so- 
cial background. The unit 
nsed forceps in 4^ per cent of 
deliveries and the Caesarean 
section rate was I3 j 6 per cent 
fin the United States the 
Ca esa re a n section rate is 
usually more than 20 per 
cent.) Both GPs and midwives 
increased their involvement 
in the patients’ antenatal care 
and childbirth by 30 per cent. 



Alone, not lonely: Jane Lapotaire sees herself growing old “surrounded by grandchildren' 


feeling. 'Maybe 1 should 
marry again'. There is no 
lonelier sound titan putting a 
key into the door of an empty 
house. On the other hand, I 
can get up at three in the 
morning to eat yoghurt” 

Presumably that is an ac- 
quired middle-class habit and 
not the sort of eccentricity one 
expects of a woridng-dass 
feminist from Ipswich. 

“I do consider myself mid- 
dle class now. I got nothing 
but positive things from my 
second marriage and don't 


consider tbe break-up was a 
failure — in some ways it is a 
very positive step towards 
admitting rale’s shortcomings. 
I was a working-class girl, who 
didn’t know about leisure - 
my 'gran* used to ask what was 
the matter if she saw me 
reading* book— and I teamed 
a lot about music, literature, 
wine and good food.” 

Recently she started to write 
— a magazine article about her 
childhood and the first seven 
chapters of a novel *Td like it 
to be published under another 


name and then I would really 
know if iL was received on its 
owri merits: ' Arrogance,- -a£~| 
; rogance.' You’ve "only written 
seven chapters, girL 
“But I’ve always wanted to 
write and I have such a sense 
of selfsatisfection when I 
finish anything. Then I won- 
der- is this afi a great dose of 
self-deception? I don’t want to 
do an actressy number.” 

. Q Tima Nnopvpm Ltd IMS 

Misalliance is in preview at the 
Barbican Theatre, London, from 
October 2 . . 


London’s 
pride 

The battle between Dr Wendy 
Savage and the other London 
Hospital obstetricians has 
net shaken the faith of preg- 
nant Tower Hamlets women 
in tbe hospital's ability to 
Wiser babies with kindfoMSS 
and safety. 

Professor Cedis Grad- 
zzoskas, the AastruBma head 
of department, told The Times 
that local patients had been 
remarkably oncommittal 
about the affair, and the 
demand for beds was greater 
than ever; the patients, he 
said, had obviously voted with 
their feet. . . 

The patients’ trust has 
been re i n for ced by recent 
figures from tbe hospital 
published in the British 

se the needle, not the gun 

Mr 'Snell, who has recently bought Am bridge 
Hall in The Archers, Is not alone in being 
concerned about foe danger of spreading 
viruses such as AIDS and hepatitis B with 
muitidose injector guns. But whereas Maedi 
visna, foe AIDS-type disease which affects 
sheep. Is unlikely to prove a problem to David 
Archer's flock, the gun does represent a 
hazard when used with people. An estimated 25,000 to 
30,000 people are now carrying AIDS in this country. As a re- 
sult Dr Donald Acheson, foe Government’s chief medical 
officer, has warned doctors not to give this year's Influenza 
injections In this way, but to use disposable needles and sy- 
ringes. The metical magazine. Pulse, quotes Professor Arie 
Zuckerman of The London School of Hygiene and.Tropicai 
-Medfoine-as saying that foe danger from the muitidose -gun 
arises when a patient's btood splashes back on to its nozzle, 
and is transferred from person to person. - - 


Runners with 
high spirits 

Some 30,000 runners wQi fine 
up in Hyde Park this Sunday 
to take part in tie Sunday 
Times annual fim ran. Al- 
though training is not nor- 
mally taken seriously, tie 
competitive dement is quite 
strong. As a result, many of 
-thMe who finish do not look 
too fit, and might need some 
first aid treatment 
. Dr Hugh Betidl, a former 
registrar in cardiology and 
new a general practitioner in 
listed, Hampshire, has an- 
alysed tie training schedule 
of tie runners who collapse hi 
the fbnr-kflooietre race and 
has found that a quarter of 
those who came to grief had 
drunk- tie equivalent of a 
bottle of winertie night before 



the event. Twelve per cent of a 
control group had also wined 
and dined well the night 
before. 

As tie race is always held 
on a Sunday, tie English 
pattern erf a Saturday night 
out probably accounts for 
most erf tie casualties. Others 
had had a pre-race party to 
drum up sponsorship. But 
this year. Dr Betidl hopes 
tie celebrations will be post- 
poned until after the event 
He tokf a meeting of GPs in 
Oxford that the cause of tie 
collapse was severe low blood 
pre ss ure, bronght on by the 
combination of alcohol and 
mwi ri tmi wii exercise. 

Dr Thomas Stuttaford 



stimulating! 


Revealing! 


16 new monthly 
magazine that 
has.auniaue < 
angle on me 
whole subject 


t 

ibs and - n 
lod / • ■ V 

5 X4 


Concluding her series, Lindsay Knight counsels persistence in getting a referral for psychotherapy — and caution in choosing a therapist 



the talking cure 


H aving acknowledged 
that things are not right 
in their world, many 
people will first make 
an appointment with 
their doctor. What happens next 
depends to a considerable extent' 
on the individual CP’s attitude to 
psychological problems — is he or 
she sensitive to picking up such 
difficulties? • - 
GPs have become increasingly 
aware of their patients' psychologi- 
cal needs and now have at least a 
very basic training in this area. But 
there is still a distinct possibility 
that a patient who is depressed, 
anxious, not sleeping, will be 
offered medication - tranquillizers 
or anti-depressants — and Utile else 
by a GP with a packed waiting 
room. Many doctors do not feel 
equipped to help in any other way 
- one of the major criticisms of 
medical education, from inside and 
outside the profession, is the fact 
that it hardly touches on human 
relationships or psychological 
problems. 

Whether you are confronting a 
GP or a psychiatrist, if you want 
psychological therapy rather than 
chemotherapy you may have to be 
very clear and persistent — admit- 


E xr rank'd from Talking to a Stranger: 
A Consumer’s Guide to Therapy by 
Lindsay Knight, Fontana Books, 
published yesterday 951 


ledly not easy if you are very 
. distressed, in which case you could 
ask a relative or friend, to ac- 
company and support you. 

If you do want psychotherapy, 
you can get it on the National 
Health Service, although unfortu- 
nately the service is pot uniform 
nationwide. The private sector 
offers more options but also a 
number of dubious practitioners, 
and the choice should be made 
with care. 

On the NHS, whether you will be 
offered a pull or a “talking cure” is 
often a matter of luck and where 
you live. A few progressive individ- . 
uals or groups in health centres 
offer sessions wfth a visiting thera- 
pist, or will willingly refer patients 
for psychotherapy to a psychiatric 
outpatient department or a hos- 
pital psychology department But 
the waiting lists may be several 
months long and you will have no 
choice about the psychotherapist 
offered to you. 

In the private sector anyone can 
advertise themselves as a psycho- 
therapist: there is no register of 
therapists, no agreed training or 
code of practice. The main route 
seems to be word of mouth, 
although GPs or psychiatrists may 
have some names of reliable 
therapists, and your load MIND 
office will have lists of centres and 
organizations. 

Before making your choice, it. is 


important to consider exactly what 
you want help for, and how much 
time and money yon are prepared 
to commit to therapy. 

The British- Association of 
Psychotherapists offers a clinical 
assessment and referral service for 
analytical psychotherapy. The 
assessment is with a professional 
experienced psychotherapist who 
will explore with the patient 
whether psychotherapy is appro- 
priate and feasible; if it does seem 
so, then a referral is made to 
another professionally qualified 
psychotherapist. A fee is charged 
for this assessment 

The BAP assessors try to make a 
careful match between patient and 
therapist although they are often 
restricted by geography and the 
shortage of vacancies. Some people 
win shop around before choosing. 
You certainly have every right to 
do this, although the costs might 
mount up. 

Everyone I spoke to. therapists 
and patients alike, emphasized that 
the key to good therapy was the 
relationship with the therapist, so 
the initial choice is 'important 
Obviously you are often at your 
most vulnerable when you are at 
the stage of seeking therapeutic 
help, so you must be careful not to 
be exploited, either financially or 
otherwise. It seems safer to avoid 
any individual psychotherapists 
who advertise, unless they have 





been recommended by others tqa - 
“Use your intuition,” said Ron 
Lacey. MIND's campaign director. 
“It's the quality -of tne relationship 
that matters: there i&not a Jotof-ev- 
idence that very lengthy training 
necessarily makes you a better 
therapist or analyst” - 
Psychotherapy is, by its very 
nature, an unpredictable business 
and no psychotherapist can, with 
certainty, promise great changes or 
complete removal of symptoms. 
The research on its effectiveness is 
still very patchy, as is the work on 
any harm therapy might cause. 
Certainly some research has shown 
that the personality, attitudes, and 
general . social adjustment _ of the 
client make far more difference to 
the outcome -of therapy. - than . 
anything the therapist can -da . 


The potency of therapists should 
not be exaggerated, commented a 
leading psychotherapist; indeed, 
.she added, some therapists are 
incompetenLand potentially harm- 
ful. It is widely believed-that diems 
do not do weu with therapists who 
show them coldness or hostility, 
who tend to ridicule them when 
trying to be challenging and who 
use their relationships with pa- 
tients to satisfy their own ends. 

S hould year therapist 
consistently show such per- 
souaT traits, then It is worth 
considering changing to an- 
. other. Therapists should 
not be totally' inflexible in their 
techniques, nor, stressed this thera- 
pist, should, they ser goals for tbe 
diem which are inappropriate. 


unrealistic or not shared by tbe 
dienL 

Not surprisingly, research has 
shown that experienced therapists 
tend to communicate better, show 
more empathy, genuineness and 
positive regard for their diems, 
lake the initiative in therapy to a 
greater extent and are less distant 
and exploratory in their interven- 
tions. 

However, they may not 
always be available or may charge 
fees somewhat above your price 
range. And there are advantages in 
seeing a trainee or newly qualified 
therapist: enthusiasm (which rates 
very highly in research studies on 
the outcome of therapy) and more 
-careful supervision by seniors. 

© LMny KnigM 1886 



In these days of aggres- 
sive sales techniqaes, I 
can cope calmly and_ if 
necessary callously with 
the unsolicited tele- 
phone or doorstep salesman. 
But a recent experience at ray 
bank left me both quivering 
frith rage and foil of irritation 
with myself for not handling 
the situation firmly. _ 

I most explain hi miti gation 
that my opponent was a young 
and gangling clerk who, to 
jodge from bis manner and 
profuse perspiration, was not 
happy with the role his superi- 
ors had forced upon him. I can 
put down without compunction 
the smooth salesman, (rat I felt 
sorry for this lad. 

1 had called in to settle my 
credit card account, and was 
told by the cashier that “Out 
M r Jones would like to see 
you” and directed to the 
inquiry desk. 

1 wasn't at ali anxious while 
I waited for Mr Jones to 
appear - I knew my account 
was quite comfortably in the 
black. I e v en thought 1 might 
take the opportunity to ask 
abont a deposit account, and 
compare the interest rates with 


FIRST PERSON 


Don’t bank on my 
custom, Mr Jones 


those offered by my bonding 
society. 

When Mr Jones appeared 
be asked for my name and 
account n amber, and whether 
I had any ba3ding society 
accounts. It was then that I 
realized the cashier had 
picked me as a “victim” at 
random. 

Mr Jones then launched 
into a hard sell of the hank’ s 
facilities, covering everything 
from home contents insurance 
to regular savings s ch e m es. 
When I explained that 1 
worked freelance, sometimes 
not adding to my bank balance 
for three months at a time, be 
seemed unable to grasp the 
fact that regular deductions 
from my aecoant weald not be 
appropriate. 

“Sorely you could manage 


jisr five or ten pounds a 
week,” he pleaded. I said I 
now had quite a healthy 
balance in my current account 
and would like to. transfer 
some of it to a deposit accoant 
Would he be kind enough to 
give me foe details? 

“Er . . .” he said. Obviously 
he had been programmed to 
give me certain information 
and I had put him off by 
deviating from foe script. 

Recovering, he said he 
would fetch the information in 
a moment hot first; were my 
household commits properly 
insured? 

I played tbe helpless female 
- “I leave that to my 
has band" — bat this did not 
prevent his launching into, foe 
advantages of his bank’s 
policy. 

Several pointed glances at 


my watch having had no effect, 

I told him that 1 was actually' 
in rather a fumy, which 
flustered him a bit, ca usin g 
him to repeat some of the 
things be had already said 
before going to get the 
information about depostt ac- 
counts which 1 had requested 
in the first place. 

“I don’t snppose you’ll be 
investing ranch — less than 
£200?” he inquired. He obvi- 
ously hadn’t checked up cm my 
bank balance irinle sway; so 1 1 
agreed, in the hope of shorten- 
ing tbe interview. I actually 
had £900 to stash away to- 
wards foe day when I need to j 
replace my car. i 

He handed me a leaflet - 1 
“this wonM be the account yoo 
want”. I asked him what foe 
current interest rate was, 
thanked him hastily, and left 
to go to foe building society 
down foe road. His parting 
remark was one he had obvi- 
ously made several 
times before: “1 don’t 
suppose your bnflding 
society ever chats to you 
like this!” 

; MargarerGriffiitj 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

disposal” auction 

of several hundred exceptionally 
fine and medium quality, handmade 

PERSIAN CARPETS 

rugs, and runners... 

and others from the more important weaving centres of the Included are many 

• antiques, site, kefims, nomatfes and ottwr unusual hems., not generally to be 
found on the noma market 

This merchandise is the property PT a number of principle direct importers in the U.K.' 
which has been cleared from H-M. Customs & Excise bond, to be deposed of at nominal or 
no reserve for immediate cash reafisatioa 
Every item guaranteed authentic. Expert advice writable at time of viewing. 

To be transferred from bonded warehouses and offered, at the: 

HILTON INTERNATIONAL HOTEL, KENSINGTON, 
HOLLAND PARK AVENUE. LONDON W11 
ON SUNDAY, 28th SEPTEMBER at 11am. 

Viewing from 10am same day 

. Payment cash, cheque or all major credit cards. 

AutfMMi? A weastfay Bhseea *P"*»r* tld. 14^146 New Bond Start. LoretonWI. Tefc 01-483 4579. 


\ 








12 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Not so Old 


Moore 


Aficrthe publication of The Times 
opinion poll, showing that 61 per 
cent of 16-24 year olds consider 
Mrs Thatcher “out of touch with 
young people". I leant that she has 
decided lo set up a youth commit- 
tee at No 1 Ql The man in charge is 
John Moore, the new Transport 
Secretary and. at 48, still consid- 
ered young enough for such a 
challenge. Formerly the party's 
vice-chairman in charge of youth 
at Central Office. Moore is clearly 
a plausible appointment; he be- 
came president of the LSE 
Students* Union back in 1960 
before it fell to the left and 
subsequently worked closely with 
President Kennedy. When asked 
about his soon-to-be-announced 
role, the youthful Moore re- 
sponded with a surprisingly stuffy 
“no comment”. 


Silent service 


Rosemary Cooper, who is out to 
wrest Robert Kilroy-Silk's 
Knowsley North seat for the 
Liberals, tells me that in her other 
role as a Liverpool councillor she 
has hit on an unusual way of 
embarrassing Derek Hatton. Since 
both her parents are deaf, she is an 
expert lip-rcader. Sitting opposite 
Hatton in the council chamber she 
can sometimes see every word he 
is saying to his comrades; when he 
is planning some complicated 
manoeuvre she stands up to reveal 
all he has said, thus forestalling 
him. "He goes bananas." she told 
me. “The first time it happened, 
he went ashen. He looked at the 
floor thinking there was a hidden 
microphone." Now. when he can 
remember, he covers his mouth 
with his hand. 


Deja vu 


There is a familiar ring to the 
report that David Steel has been 
involved in secret talks with 
prominent Tory' moderates. After 
the fistful of denials, we are led to 
believe that the story was conjured 
from nowhere: least of all Steel's 
meeting with a group of reporters 
from the provinces. A similar 
secret emerged at the 1984 Liberal 
conference in Bournemouth, al- 
though on that occasion the 
supposedly significant meeting 
was between Steel and Neil 
Kin nock. The story died a natural 
death when I discovered that the. 
wine bar luncheon had been 
organized by ITN after the two 
leaders appeared on its lunchtime 
news, and that the programme's 
editor had sat in on the 
“negotiations". 


BARRY FANTONI 



*5(01111 bock, or you’ll force 
me to behave instinctively' 


The Archers 


Jeffrey Archer has come top of the 
class in Communication Skills 
and Numeracy. Not that Jeffrey 
Archer, but a fourth form name- 
sake ai Sponne School. Towcester. 
No chance. 1 trust, that he will lose 
vast sums of money and then go 
on to write frightful books. 


Looking ahead 


Bodlcv Head has decided to press 
on with plans to publish its 
centenary history next year de- 
spite the recent death of the 
author. Jack Lambert, formerly 
arts editor of the Sunday Times. 
Lambert had reached 1970 and 
Max Reinhardt. Bodley's exec- 
utive chairman, tells me he hopes 
to sign up a successor as soon as he 
has obtained the blessing of 
Lambert's widow. The remaining 
period covers Bodley's joining 
forces with Jonathan Cape in 
marketing and distribution, a 
relationship strengthened earlier 
this sear. 


Inside story 


Nicholas Dantloff s recent taste of 
prison life in Russia was not his 
first. Researching the life of an 
ancestor who took pan in a plot 
against the Tsar in the 19th 
century, he had only a few months 
earlier’ tracked dawn the prison 
cell where his luckless forefather 
languished before being exiled to 
Siberia. DanilofT went inside, 
where ho had his picture taken for 
posterity. Meanwhile, the ingrati- 
tude of the Soviet authorities has 
just been pointed out to me. Last 
year a critical Wall Street Journal 
article about the cosy relationship 
between western correspondents 
and the Kremlin quoted DanilofT 
as saying: ”1 don't consort with 
dissidents ... in a political sense, 
they don’t have any influence." 


Mountain view 


An embarassing slip by Brittany 
Femes, the country's hugest 
motoring lour operator. Their 
latest press release, launching their 
new Ski Drive package holidays, 
reads: "the programme offers a 
good standard of self catering 
apartments, all within 200 kms of 
the slopes." PHS 



Rover’s reluctant axeman 


-Graham Day. the new chairman 
of Rover, formerly BL. has taken 
just five months to decide what is 
wrong with his charge — too much 
inbred old style management 
insufficient hard-headed commer- 
cial drive and. most obviously of 
all. no prospect of profits. 

Yesterday he spent, an hour in 
front of the massed ranks of the . 
British press explaining his ; new . 
management structure, aimed ai 
giving the group “commercial, 
punch”, and only a few minutes - 
on the financial results. 

The bottom line figure df- 
£204.3 million losses in the first 
six months is bad enough, and any 
new executive chairman of a 
company wants to get rid of 
‘‘extraordinary items" as soon as 
possible, but of far greater im- 
portance in the longer term is the 
public perception and future 
potential of what was the flagship 
of British motor manufacture. 

Day. the 53-year-old whizz kid 
Canadian lawyer hired by Mrs 
Thatcher to streamline British 
Shipbuilders and . privatize the 
warship yards, has now begun his : 
task at Rover. At the heart of his 
brief is to stem the losses as - 
ruthlessly as he deems necessary; - 
to find niches in the overcrowded 
market place and to prepare- the 
group for a public flotation in 
whatever form that might even- 


Edward Townsend on the streamlined 


drive to stem the years of losses 


tually take. For it is dear that 
should the Conservatives win a 
' third consecutive, term, in office, 
Rover will again be a company for ■ 
sale - if a-buyer-can fc^fbund. 

• Day Has ‘ moved • swiftly - to : 
demon straie-to t&CHy -and. other, 
potential investors, 'mefuding for- 
eign companies. fodrevery optioti; 
is being considered fight to : 
bring Rbver> back- Ter His 

performance wiH undoubtedly Be 
compared to that of Sir Michael * 
Edwardes. '. who ' tried to decern 
iralize the vast group and make 
each element responsible for itself, 
Significantly. Day said yesterday: 
“But what Edwardes anticipated 
in terms of privatization has not 
happened." 

Day arrived at BL oh May 1 in- 
thc wake of the debacle of the 
proposed ale to General Motors .- 
of the Land Rover/Lcyland.truefcs- 
subsidiary -and- the' governments 
snub' of-FOriPS -^attempt; to biiy - 
A us tin Rover; Undeterred.- fie has" 
split Land-RoVer. Leyland and- 
Freight Rover into- three entities, - 
and appointed : fiiniSelf a 5 chair- : 
man of four of the group’s sik 
businesses. 

Clearly, if the political will is 


ever there, the "for sale" sign can 
more easily now be re-erected on 
Land Rover, which is making 
profits, leaving Leyland trucks to 
sink or swim on its own. Although 
the Ford interest-lias waned, the. 
pjro&pecT.df ; American- involve-- 
ncfenl*remaii^ ^ery much alive.; 
and Day will probably be search- 
i ng fiSr a- partner in Freight Rover 
td-deVefop a. replacement for the 
Siferpfl : vjin& 

• He said ' yesterday: "We are 
trying to. build on'- the strengths of 
the business and make them look 
more robust 1 believe it is possible 
to position products in the market 
successfully and not to have them 
related specifically to being a 
volume producer." 

One of the options now under 
close scrutiny is to broaden the 
collaboration - with Honda of Ja- 
pan, which is keen to expand its 
UK- manufacturing base in the 
Ugbt-6T‘Niks&i£s decision ttrbring- 
fbriwarij' the second phase ©Tits 
development -at ' - Washington,' 1 
Tyne - arid - Wedf;- to produce 
IQQ'QOO European Nissan cars -a- 
yeari An equity stake by Honda in 
Rover is 'still not ruled out and 
Pay confirmed that .manufacture 


of Hondas .at Longbridge .and 
Cowley was under study. '. • ' V V 
' Al ike end of this yeah when'be 
presents the latest five-year, cor- 
porate- plan, he-w^askfoe 
government fora final* trarichqof 
funding. How .mudv depepds pp 
Day's ability, to cut the. losses. -I 
His three years, jri , charge X>f 
British Shipbuilders showed what 
some regarded as a merciless 
attitude towards jobs. To 1983- he 
took over with annual - losses 
running .ax- £J6T million.. The 
following year The deficit had been 
slashed bm jobs lad come down 
agaiiu frxra-M.OOO lo L&000. 

Variously described as dour and 
an outspoken extrovert. Day' was 
chosen by Harold Wilson to -nut 
the planned British Shipbuilders 
m 1973. Cbaraciensiicafly, he 
returned to Canada In frustration 
at Whitehall , and government 
delays in the nationalization pro- 
gramme and -did not return, until 
invited by Mrs Thatcher. '. . - 
.Whether he likes it 'or not,' his 
tough management style wjH gain 
him lhe traditional axeman title. 
Hesays:L“I heartily tiTsIace uftJdmg 
people unemployed: I bate tfaat. 
But l have been total ly convjncpd 
that mdess ypu.dd then -the srirole 
lot could- be down tbe tubes. Tam 
determined to dowhat-I have .to. 
The author is industrial correspon- 
dent of The Times. - .- . 


There has been, for some years 
now. a growing sympathy and 
concern for Soviet “refuseniks” — 
those Jews who wish to emigrate 
but who. in breach of the Helsinki 
Agreement on one hand and 
Soviet law itself op the other, are 
denied the right to do so. Many 
will remember the moving all-day 
ceremony on - London's South 
Bank a few months ago when- 
relays of sympathizers read out the-, 
names of the tens, of thousands- 
st/II trapped, together with the 
number of years each had been 
waiting for permission to leave a 
country which hates, reviles and 
persecutes them but which will not 
let them go. and which is appar- 
ently determined never to do so: 
the recent talks between Soviet 
and Israeli officials, designed to 
lead eventually to a resumption of 
diplomatic relations (broken off 
by the Russians) collapsed when 
the plight of Soviet Jewry was 
raised by the Israelis. - 
I have frequently written about, 
refuseniks, both m general and- 
particular.- but today 1 want to 
discuss a different but allied ' 
matter, the attempt to destroy, as a 
deliberate policy. Jewish culture in 
the Soviet Union, where anti- 
semitism is not only widespread 
but official, and in some of its 
manifestations hardly less vile 
than the Nazi version. 

Let me begin with a revelation 
that sounds like a bad music-half ■ 
joke: as a matter offact it is a bad. 
music-hall joke — the one about : 
the Chinese pedlar in Whitechapel : 
with a tray of mezuzahs which he 
refuses to sell to Jews - but joke : 
or no joke, it is still true. .There are 1 
Lhree academic institutions in- the - 
Soviet Union where Hebrew is 
taughL but it is almost impossible 
for Jews to gain admission. 

If we begin there, where shall we 
finish? Wherever it is. it will be a 
long way from the starting-line, for 
the catalogue of restrictions, de- 
nials. obstacles, refusals and 
harassment suffered by Soviet 
Jews who wish to live by their - 
religion and their historical cul- 
ture is so long and so brutal that- i - 
cannot do more today- than sum- 
marize the register of such anti- 
Jewish oppression. 

The Jews of the Soviet Union 
are officially recognized as one of 
the hundred or so nationalities 
incorporated in that country, and 
under Soviet law are therefore 
entitled to all the forms of their 
own cultural expression, as well as 
the study and dissemination of 
their languages, the publication of 
books, the provision of appro- 
priate educational facilities, and 
all the other aspects of their 
Jewishncss which correspond to 
the interests of the other national 
groups. For the Jews.' However, 
these provisions are meaningless: 
the rights they have in Soviet law 
and under the Soviet constitution 
arc denied. 


Bernard Levin 



who 


purpose 



PBUtftYOMns - 


The Soviet constitution and law 
demand a school which teaches in 
a national language wherever 
there are 25 pupils of that na- 
tionality in the same age group; 
the Jews of the Soviet union 
probably number in all well over 


two million but there - are no. 
Jewish schools anywhere, no Jew- 
ish education, and do teaching of 
Yiddish (the official language of 
the Soviet Jewish minority) except 
in the fraudulent “homeland" of' 
Birobidzhan, where’ it hasra tenur - 
otis existence among the children. _ 
ofthose few je’TO-whofiiye-tfrcrft 
(they comprise dnlyO.-fperCerir iofc 
. Soviet JewiyfcvNof isMuifioh. in " l 
. Yiddish av^lablc^fTqtirtangu^e* ’: 
. courses outside 'the srhdpls,- tind ■ 
all private teaching of Hebrew.-as I-~ 
have often related here, is re- 
pressed with the greatest cruelty. 

The situation with books is even 
worse, as a single, striking 
comparison will make clear. The 
Bashkirs, another of the rec- 
ognized nations of the Soviet ■ 
Union, comprise about 1.750.000 
people — substantially fewer than 
the Jews. Yet in the most recent 
year for which figures are- avail- 
. able, 1983. i 46- -books wei-e^rob* • 
fished in ihe Bashkir tongue, with*- 

I ^ m i Minn fnnip^ in nil* nA hnnl r*t- 

“iv inniixni vvy*vJTirun, nv/^uv/vj >w 

were published in- Hebrew, and.' 
only eight in Yiddish; with -a total 
printing of 12.600 copies. 

Books in Russian bui-on- Jewish* 
themes hardly exist, except, by a ■ 
hideous irony, the official anti- 
semitic publications, which are 
plentiful. Attempts by well-wish- 
ers outside the Soviet Union to 
send or bring in books have been 
defeated by confiscation: I must, 
make dear that 1 am not referring 


to anti-comm umst or' emigre writ- 
ings. but prayer-books, language 
primers and tile like. Translations 
into Hebrew of non-Jewish books 
are also confiscated; they have 
included Treasure Island, Jack 
London's Call of the Wild and 
such children's books as Pinocchio 
and Snow While. ftrfoewholerof - 
theSdVIertfnteiLthereisonfy one 
Jerostelibrary-..^ ' ‘ 

hi the oilier artsabe- story isthe ' 
same; -There is . no Jewish art 
gallery or exhibition hall, there are 
no exhibitions of Jewish art, and 
even the official Czech and Polish 
collections of Jewish or Jewish- 
related materials, which have 
toured in Western countries, have 
been banned in the Soviet Union. 
In these circumstances, it -is not 
surprising, however shameful, 
that most of the Holocaust sites in 
the Soviet Union, other than those 
in 'Jewish cemeteries, go tin- . 
marked; and 'the' few- which have ' 
commemorative stones ancf'the- 
like make -bo reference. to' the 
identity' of ihe vlcrimsfeven -where "* 
these were* aB Jewish; ' 

fri the theatre^ the situation is as 
bad. There are only two Jewish 
professional theatre companies, 
and there is no theatre budding at 
all: they have to tour all the time, 
and the number of performances 
they are allowed to give is pitifully 
small. Nor are they allowed to lour 
abroad, even 'in the other nations 
of the ' Soviet empire; for that 


matter, Jewish players from those 
nations are -not permitted- to 
perform in the 1 Soviet Union, 
though they have been aDtiwed' to 
do so in the West. Some arftatenr 
groups are tolerated, but unofficial 
theatrical activities are not, wbidh 
has led to one of tfiemost pathetic 
instances of Soviet, repression- J 
know about.- - ■ : . ' r '" 

Refigious Jews edebratea feast 
called Purim, which rCorameroD- 
rafts their deliverance.-’ from an 
earlier Holocaust, devised fay one 
Hainan. (The story isJbundmtbe 
Book of Esther). Oyer the* centu- 
ries. their escape from Hainan’s 
slaughter has come to be marked 
fay miniature playlets accompa- 
nied by music; these are some- 
times performed) in . Soviet Jewish 
homes (they cannot be performed 
publicly), but those in vofyed have 
been arrested for this /harmless, 
gentle activity.- 
Cui bono? Wbst <fO the rulers rf 
the Soyfet Union imagine'. they 
gain by 'such persecution?, Arttt- 
semitism ' was, in some diad 
.variety' of 'logic, necessary W 
Hitler; in the, Jews he fad’, an 
enemy to Miriam everytbipg 
imperfect in the world* -In -this 
respect Stalin' was similar, ■ -the 
Doctors' Plot, it shotild.be remein^ 
boed. was to be foepreliidetb the 
destruction; perhaps in theend the 
physical destruction, r of Soviet 
Jewry. But none of Stalin's succes? 
sore.' though -they have ail 
stigated and ^iftowa^d-'Jewi^ 
perSteuliOn^hasusedtfterJcW^as 
such « scapegoat Moreover* itis:a- 
well attested- fact throughout^his- 
tocy,;that pexsCcution vmaiEes^its. 
'vittiftjrj'litfgpjore stfon^yiOlilfe 
ftfe~andoutiookfo r vd iic fa theyare 
being persecuted; Jews who have- 
got out of the Sovftt-Uniaa have 


for wanting to leave,. tfae lade ofa 
specifically Jewish life. Soit seeats 
that the attempts lo crush the 
cultural identity of the Sevier Jews 
out of existence.haye bad.an’effect 
opposite to that intended. Btn^ 
since that must be apparent to the 
Soviet IeadCTs;'w6y do ihey /con- 
tinue with the attempts? •’ ■ 

- hfostshad a wprdfor itltet'my 
pebpie go.. Since IroiTOhirefiised, 

hS\ititi^^Se normal p^foe 
oyer the centuries has-been expul-, 
son of the hated minority; Hhfet 
changed that, aad<where Pharaoh 
chastized the Jews’ witb-xyhips/ be 
chastized them: with scfifpibris: 
But Hitler- wanted,'- actively,'- tb 
torment the Jews^ and' in the'fand 
to kiflthentievenl^fo'DbrbeSevfr' 
that the sstrat rtiotiviesare^at- worit 
the Soviet '-leaders; ~ Yet fe |- 


m 


sometime? think? 
as ^litler. For cotiskiec Jtereis a 
minority whom they* irate* • wfib: 
cause them more 'and / mrtre tiote- 
b ie, wh ose pl^hi aitracts oppro- 
brium' from' abroad; and.^ whose 
only wish i$ -to shake the dust' of 
die Soviet- Union off ifieir'feeL 
Then why not let 1 diem'do SOT - 
(I am greatly indebted - for this 
information contained in-tVft’cof 
umn - to the Institute ' of Jewish 
Affairs, and hx particuiar td th&fr 
detailed study. The Problems of 
Jewish Ctilttinrm die USiSRL .. 

■ B Ttiim'lli I it it in, vmki ' -i ' 


Now a Provo plan to take to the seats 


Dublin 

The letters column in a newspaper 
carrying reports of “war news" 
and from page pictures of masked 
men captioned “IRA isolates the 
enemy" is hardly required reading 
for the Irish political establish- 
ment. But correspondence in 
Republican Sews, a weekly 
mouthpiece of ihe Provisional 
IRA and its political wing. Pro- 
visional Sinn Fein, is revealing a 
debate urchin the movement that 
could have far-reaching con- 
sequences. 

For Provisional Sinn Fein (PSF) 
may soon break one of its articles 
of faith: a refusal to take seals in . 
the “partitionist" Dail. 

So radical a change in -the 
movement's constitution would 
require a two thirds majority, and 
at present the outcome of any vote 
on the issue is evenly balanced. 
The crunch »ill come at the next 
annual conference. 


successes would probaSty bent his^ 
owtt parry's expense: In the- I 9 Sr. 

- general election two hunger suik-- 
,crs won seats and cost him victory. • 

ftt moving towards dropping' 
abstention ism. the Provisionals 
have come full circle, it was 
almost 1 7 years ago that a similar 
debate in Official Sinn Fein led to 
a split in the movement and the 
birth of the Provisional IRA. The 
question of abstention ism is “Still 
divisive, with older rural support- 
ers seeing it as the first step on the 
road to-a- r seil-out". Thosc-wbo- 
put their faith in.viofence.fear that ; 
their efforts- will be ■.relqga{?d !<q. 
second plaee.- .In his !?$£ speech a* 
presi4ent • of.. PSF-.. Ruairj- . 
O' Bradaigb. -feezed membere .to.- 
remain true to their principles. 
"Dropping abstentionrsm.* 4 ■ he 

said, “would be as unthinkable as 
the IRA discussing a surrender of 
arms". 


If PSF were to contest the 
forthcoming general election, 
iicould win up to five seats in 
bonier areas and the rural wesu 
That is not a prospect any of ihe 
established parties relishes, 
particularly if it ghes PSF tiie 
balance of power and a say in the 
choice of the next prime minister. 
Charles Haughey. whose Flan na 
Fail has. until now. been tipped 
for victory, recognizes that PSF 


In the past three years, however. 
Gerry Adams and bis young 
lieutenants in the North have tried 
to persuade their supporters of the 
need to abandon abstention ism 
while trying to axoid a schism. 
The “army council" in particular 
has had to be persuaded that the 
“Armalite and. ballot bo\“ : is the -. 
best way- to -power. ' * - ■ - : . 

Sc\ era! factors have convinced: 
the. political Fcadcrsliip of thejieriT ' 
for change. TIrl th'e.lreafizatioq. . 


- that a .fong; w&r of attrition would.- 
■ be to-break jhe British will 

:• lo remain in the North and that 
“vqHinieers" are becoming inc- 
reasingly sceptical of the claim 
that "one ■ more push” would 
finally bring success. 

Secondly, the Provisionals have 
learned from their . entry into 
politics in the North that, despite 
its rejection by hardliners, the vast 
majority have come to accept the 
Irish state and its institutions and 
will not back parties unwilling to 
.s[i_io_iheJ3aii. AbsientionisoLhas. 

. crippled die organization in the 
; South*, -and- - Adams - argues -that- - 
Provisional -Sinn .*Fein: rffosi be*- 
; come JelevamrorordiiKry.pcbpje 
.’ if it is Jo develop, (n particular it. 
hopcs .'-far' . support . among . the 
young unemployed of. Dublin’s . 
working-class estates. 

Richard McAuley. one .of the . 
Northern PSF leaders, said: “We 
arc relevant in th'e six counties but 
in the 26 counties weam viewed in 
much the same way as the Looney 
Left in Britain. Wear? not going to 
become relevant if people think 
we ate not going to represent them 
in a constructive, positive way." 

The Hillsborough agreement is 
. also . being used by those Who 
: labour change.' They, argue that 
' the. Twti-'oiajof . parties in /the.' 
RcpuHic.wjTl have idabandon : lfie-'. 
1 high'gfound of nationalism, giving V. 
. ihc.T’SFa cKanec, tp seize ft.; --.f . . - 


Tfie- political stra^istsare con- 
fident of their cause, but they have 
to assuage the fears of the more 
militaristic elements tltat political 
involvement automatically brin^ 
a decline .in the emphasis . on 
armed struggle. The leadership has 
been greatiy helped by tbe batkii^ 
of several important convicted 
Provisional IRA prisohers. includ- 
ing Pairick Magee, the Brighton 
bomber, and 'Brian' Keenan, a; 
former director ■ of Provisional 
IRA operations. Their letteisagit 
mg. for change; have appealed in 
recent issues of Republican News. 


.Given the emotional, influence 
which prisoners; exert in foe 
Republican -movement; 'and-^be 
respect '..for.' Magee’s'- befdness in 
attempting . td kifi- 7 the ' British 
Cabinet: their support- cfeariy 
important With such • Jcey ..'fig- 
ures — and probably atso '“- the 
“army couariT.— behiod -it,! ifre 
present political leaderahip nvaja 
hope that change can occur- with- 
out division, -Forwithoutin ariny, 
it is unlikely that anyone- 
walked, out’ over: the abstention 
issue " would be able -to- set up a. 
rivil organization. ■ 


Until. the -decision. 
the. other, parties .yyiU TtaQ ineiT 
Republican Axnry wulr.eyer. greater 

foreboding; ' / . ■■ ' • • •/. . ; . 

: r v Q Ki^rdFoNi 


David Watt 




TftO defence debate at the Liberal 
®sefo bly: was , one^ Of the rfibst 
d^jrESsing ' - discussions A have 
heard , for W py yals. The «Q 1 - 
come «ras« ap r ; act' <4 attempted 
ptiliucal-suicioc (which, may 
succeed^' the argonaents deployed 
on boib'sidcswere pathetic. .- , 

1 The anti-nuclear case itsdf was 
ptir forwareL and eventually ;en- 
<foraed.'*tn aU its. old.. emotional 
simplkrty. Witateyer rational case 
exists .for. Britain’s renounang 
nuclear weapons, the assumptions 
befijnd tht . Liberal position, as it 
ndw stands - thaL'hucfear wfcap- 
ons areniniquely wicked that it is 
possible, % renouncing them, to 
Tefiiaib.mmallX unsullied. in die 

mitterof a wicked world, and thjtt 
others wilLfoUdw .our example if 
wti l lead the way ^-aft not in the 
realm of reason or erypetience. .. 

'. Even -mpre. disappointing', was 
lfte.perfennafttie or David Sleefs 
supponefs,'. yfho. muddled ..the 
issue .with balfbalred arguments 
and in efffect conceded'. ca$fc 
before n began. -On. my rough 
count; no fewer than six (Afferent 
arguments -were . offend . as the 
justification fbr.the famous Steel- 
Owen nuclear approach; to .the 
French:'" tbe ..Americans -.were 
becoming unreliable: it .would 
make the.present Polaris missile 
programme, cheaper to, run: it 
«H>tfld provide a -betftr replace- 
ment for Polaris; it would end 
French isolation: rt would drag the 
French info disarmament negotia- 
tions it woidd,- provide a counter 
for ,' bes^ining.- a ntiefoar-free 
Europe. • Mo?r oftiiem -were over- 
simptified, and^uoconvjncmg to 
^ny-wavering-dd^UtCr . - - 

-A: "Euro-bonib" ■ with a unified 
command structure behind it, has 
never been . an immediate pros- 
pect. but neither is It entirely 
"incredible" as the .supposedly 
Steeiite Richard Holme called n. 
The reality ^.and neither Owen 
nw. Steel has dakned otherwise — 
is that foe, French connection, 
though extremely interesting and 
Well : worth. pursuing, ,ii obviously 
speculative. 'It wouW.at best take 
years fo bripgfo.fruttion. and even 
th^ri ‘would : never . cause 1 the 

French, to bargain away their own 
niinttrium 1 deterrent ; completely. 
The only instant-pay-off might be 
in en^fir® us to get by with three 
Polaris submarines - instead of 
four.' . •' ■ 

.. The ..red arguments . for the 
Liboalr Party keepiitg; open ; the 
option of replacing Polaris •were 
never brought out at : aUi Nobody 
ro W.theconferencetfiatthe prob- 
lemrwas not -American retiabiiity 
afid - Presideift Reagan’s tendency 
tobonib people bfedoesifi like but 
the vcredibibty 'OfibcAmerican 
nueftar commijmciA tQ Europe in 
tift eyes of the Russians and' foe . 
\^X5erro^Sr^fob«dy.suggea^ 
that rftbjs erpdiblbty yras eroded 
Britisb ^ecurity might be at stake; 
Nobody .said, that- a* nuclear-free 
world might well .;be jar more 
dangerous place for - Europeans 
than one,' with nuclear weapons in 
it And, incredihjy, nobody said 
that' the^ -unity And- political 
credibility pf the Affiance would 


be^ ^ smashed if foe assembly was 
sel&odulgent enough u> pass foe 
anti-nuclear amendment. 

. How is one to account for this 
spinelessness? Why were the is- 
sues never, .taken head-on? Why.- 
for tiiat matter, did David Steel 
not take to the rostrum himself 
whim he saw'his'case going by- 
defeult? The excuse offered by' 
Liberal leaders is that the Liberals p 
are "foat kind of party". (Just as 
their disgruntled SDP partners 
sometimes complain; "How can 
we . do business- with that 
shower?"). “The Liberal trad- 
ition,"' its leaders say, “is deeply 
anti-authoritarian' We wrt a grass- 
roots, party and if 1 we try to tett otir ' 
followers what to think we only 
rahke matters worse." Translated, 
this signifies; “Yes. we are rather* 
Sfaower, but proud of it" 

This seems to me to be a cop* : 
out no doubt the Liberal Party has 1 
changed .. shoe the establish, 
men lari an days of Sir Archibald 
Sinclair and Clement Davies but: 
there is no tradition of Lilxti|t 
anarchism which ordains that foe: 
Liberal soldiery cannot be per- 
suaded or even guided by. deter- . 
mined leadership. The party's 
officers have, caused the preseat:' 
mess. Whether they share the anti- - 
nuclear doubts of the soldiery, or 
are afraid of an unpopular issue, 
or cannot be bothered, or are. so 
consumed with fear and jealousy ‘ 

ofO^en and the SDP that they are 

determined not to give away- 

anything, they have allowed a viral ' 
year to go by without. campaign mg 
in' the constituencies for a com- 
promise that was clearly essential, 




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LvV- 




cy 


K- 


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eh:-'- ' 


" 

r* " 


& , 
% Tr ; . 


i‘ ■ 
rv« : 

•K 1 ' 


IS- 

fj, 

i>-" 


0-- 


> r. -. 


irrespective of what the Alliance , 
commission on defence and r 


disarmament was destined to ' 
recommend in July.. 

The SDP leadership is partly to 
blame for this failure. If Owen is' 
regarded as a tainted orade by 
Liberals, the same does not apply 
fo Roy Jenkins. William Rodgers, 
or Shiriey Williams. Why have 
fljey not . been stumping Liberal 
temfory and preptuing foe ground .- 
for a compromise on nuclear ' 
matters, without which tbe Alii- ' 
ance cannot survive? The auswtg- ' 
partiylies in the personal tention 
between them, but also,-! believe, . 
ia the same factor that^ 
unmannedthe Liberals: that is, in-t? 
aTqss of tserve in the &ce of the is- 
sue itselfl ' ^ 

To judge by the polls, public 1 
opinion is- understandably con- 
fused. The electorate is offered by 
foe Conservatives an option: 
which offends every, sane idea of- 
expehditure priorities; by Labour^ 
an /option which threatens to ’ 
destroy Naio; by foe Americans . 
security- without relaxation, and 
by the Russians relaxation with- - 
out security. The Alliance alter- • 
native offers. at jmesent nothing 
better than a postponement of the 
choices 'until- after the election, _ 
and a vague vision of something- . 
called European defence. The 
Liberal debate .has demonstrated 
that this is -is dot good enough fo * 
keep, foe Alliance together. I a 
suspect is it not good enough lo r ' 
satisfy foe voters, either. 


i'.'i 






r.*:; 


moreover . Miles Kington 



■^Tfiink John' Osborne, wflTfom 


ufir-saida'WM'ce. — ; 

•..•^ftKK -casqS Sffoe doeS,t/said 
aodfoer: “I stand' bis stuff 




these t. ' » i ■ * u ' ! ** 

HlSO^’^- said-'a fofr(t- , “God, Tie 
matie merctossr" •*' -j ■ 

F. ram -nofomg,--J? was llrtfcy 
encAightio be at ■thfearpuial reunion 
of foe-Angcy ' Young iMen. And 
as foey plain to 
me. -Were the: real- Angry- Young 
Men. of foe 19%, not foe Amt'ses 
aad^Wains. -Ttiey were nbt young 
any moi&r- buvmeywere still very, 

very angry. 5 ; ' ■ . i 

rAtiy/news ofyourptaW: Ran?" 
-smd somebody. Ron'^ frothed. ■ • 

- ; Ts: there,- ‘helir said' Ron. “1 
5fenJ.il ra Ihe- Royal' Court m l 957. 
and* -the^ s®- 4t*vehT i Had- foe 
deqfocy 1 -to; 1 teknoMqdge : it -It 
makes youfm^ring mad." ■ 


w». steny broke,, matev t coutdn’t 
even jrffbrtf tp go to fop pob. The 
one ttnae /.tried. I was chucked out 
fpr-orderitiga quarter of a pint it 
makes me hopping mad just to 
think of ft." : " 

—“You ’could send one now 

you're earning £50.00&.a year.” 

' “Not bleeding b'kely.^said Ron. 
■Jau* me crawling to foe Royal 
,GoufL“ . 

. TTie flame of 1950s fury burnt 
bright foat night, as one after the 
other they, recounted their, griev- 
aiices.- Bloody Anfoohy. 'Eden 
bfopdy Suez, bloody Lord Chan, 
««or. WopdyBrepdan Behan . . ^ 
-“What have' you. got. against 
Brendan Behan?" J asked niys- 
ttfied To : mc' ^seemed to epit- 
^^fo^angHness of foe 1950s. . 

foe manaddSsed 
. ! come, over from Dublin 

^^HB.dmnk Irishman 

niPnflfPn .frt nh nri 1 T ■ r 


-fo'gb on any TV pro- 
fool of 


■J 




Erammc and make a. 1W i or 
myseTfl and -wasn’t Brendan Behan 

w^*sa&:a5i r ^ 

z&nssfis&i 

sgnxh. Aiid 

8F*S in -firsL arid thev 

SS-. u ^ :PdCT 


ft was extraordinary, when you . 
come to think of It The idea that. 4 
there was -any Angry Young Man .. 
moveuftnt has’ now been totaBy j 
discredited-- eVen Colin T^bon - 
«iys he waro^t in a bad mood ®- i 
the Hfties, yet here was this:* 
Sphering of two dozen elderly;, 
mot who were still in a fulnunat--s. 
mg rage. They had an written,^ 
potential, bestsellers none of- 
which had yfet been published. 

^“Yoti -.weren't all failures," 
attempted “After all, Dylan-: 
Thomas . . There was a toart^- 
disapproval: Dylan Thomas, it 
seemed, owed them all money and , 
was*rich by their standards,. The. 
oqly work of his they had all read'; 
wasJiiSTwlL.and.foey aR found it a - j 
substandard work_“If it had oubi ■ 
fiid. To. Ron, £5. lOstid for fhe .t g 
dnnks l owe him\” said Ron, "Jr 
would havebeen disposed to judge 71 - -. 
htm more kindly.'*’ ' 

The message- was quite ; dear— 
unger. cannot survive success. 30. 
can only thrive on failure. Tbertr ; 
fore the only Angry Young Mar..- . 
worthy of the name are the ones' - . 
we .bave never heard of. ; 

■ “Well it's always been the- ■“ 
ame." said Ron. “They talk about . 
the. Lost Generation of American 7 
wntera, but the only ones worth 
lowing are the ones who wentio v 
Paris with Hemingway and arts' 1 / 

Sill there, trying to get published- . 
Men who went to fight in Spain* _ 
and still haven't had their p»W.- 
printed. Existentialists who 
hawi^i really got their ideas-""*’ 

worked out yet” 

wfio still haven't had W> • 
airair with Juliette Greco." said 
somfoody else. • ^ r 

Jhcy all.- laughed Then, 
ashamed of their momentary lap*V 
from anger, they ttinied on me sod ; 
ask^. crossly, where I was from. : . 

. The TimefT said one. “And ... 
foay.l ask what has happened fo;.- 
fo^p^ 1 sent youtm ihecbara*--: . 
of the Coronation?" - .-v: 

> "May. i ah® asjj « 








L R! 


> ■ 
I* 






.. . - — YOU tO justify;!;: 

your extraordinary piece in supvL A-lK - 
Port of John Masefidd's poetryT v . ' 

Arid why foe devil have yon r" 



put news on tbe front page?! 

Five minutes later. I was beinffv 
woted unceremoniously out! 
tbe- . 1986 Angry Young Men*Kr 

booze-up. Wdl. f didn’t 

them. If you're ^til! trying to 
J««>Wition for what yotr wrote 
foe 1950s. you've got a lot to be.'! - 
Sngry -about • 






i. J 




{ 



.1 




THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


13. 


1 Pennington^ Street, London El 9XN Telephone 


01-4814100 



As the Conservative Party 
Conference approaches, the 
Government feces disagree- 
able news on the economy A 
ArccorxJ trade deficit, the pound 
tinder pressure, interest rate 
cuts postponed, pay soaring - 
these are not ideal banners to 
put before the troops. 

This may be less serious for 
the present Chancellor than it 
might be for sonic others. The 
counter-inflation policy, upon 
which so much his reputation, 
rides, is firmly intact Never- 
theless, the headlines which 
Tory activists and, more im- 
portant, the electorate at large 
are now reading have ail 
uncomfortable ri ng to them. 
IgTrade deficits have been out 
o* the headlines for so long 
now that their return carries a 
symbolic weight There are 
great dangers in any apparent 
return to the crisis manage- 
ment of the 1970s. 

Trade figures, of course, do 
not tell the whole ' story. 
Recording trade flows through 
the docks, is not such an exact 
science that one month’s fig-: 
ures can be relied upon to. 
reveal the trend. • 

’The Chancellor is not with 
| out arguments. He can pouv 
out that the fell in the value oi 
net oil exports will be partly, 
offset by a reduction in flows 


“Better England free than En- 
gland sober” is the traditional 
liberal argument against gov- 
ernment regulation ;of our 
vijees. It has a somewhat jollier. . 
ring about, it than “Better.-; 
.England, free than England * 
dancer-free” and, indeed, the 
liberal argument raises fewer . 
difficulties when applied to* 
beer rather than to cigarettes. 

.Ultimately, however, adults - 
cannot be compelled to take 
sensible account of the medi- 
cal evidence that smoking ' is 
lhe . principal cause Of lung;' 
cancer. Governrtient'.iq a.free~ 
society , may warri^aod <fis^ 
courage; it may pfe obstacles 
in. the way of smokers; tt maypv 
over lime succeed -tiy- -such-'' 
methods in reducing the' in- ' 
cidence of the habit; but' it 
cannot actually suppress 
smoking by the force of law 
j while it remains an entrenched 
dand widespread social habit. 

That argument does not, 
however, apply to minors. 

They deserve the protection of . 
society against their _05vil in=~ 
experience. lack of judgement 
and impulsiveness. The law, 
for that reason, already forbids’ 
the sale of tobacco to children 
under sixteen. Should it now 
follow the advice of the British 
Medical Association and raise 
the age to eighteen? 

There is every good reason 
Ifeo do so. Most young people of . 
sixteen and seventeen are pe- 
culiarly susceptible to the 
attractions of a false 
sophistication, perhaps more 
so than their younger brothers 
and sisters. Smoking is seen by 
them as a badgeof adulthood. . ^ 
Thev start smoking — and they ■ 
don’t stop. Medical evidence 
suggests that one in four of . 
those children will go on to 


of interest and dividend^ in 
J" 6 ota* direction fitwrfor- 
S&A Cowpantes- operating- 
in die NorUfSe* Ar.l£e*&£e 
bme weaker sterling wffl ijr&kfr 
bn tain s own earnings from its 
Swwgg assets ovww. W 

. However large the adverse 
influences <m the trade figures 
turn out to be* there isnothing 
unusual about changes in. foe' 

strength of trade flows between 

countries. Nature has a rem- 
edy which is a chang e in foe' - 
exchange rate. Wharisunhsilaf' 
about the present ^.^rcura- 

chaise. won 

on. prices, an-event owsidofoe^ 
Governmem’scontroL **„.:•.* 
.As the Bank of -England 
concludes in its latest Quar- 1 
teriy Bulletin foe combination' 
of lower oil prices and. lower 
sterling should in due course ., 
offset each other -so fertis foe 
balance of payments is con- 
cerned. But to judge by foeTJS ■ 
experience, where a large defi- ■ 
cit persists despite foe bi£fefl> 
in foe dollar during foe paftJ2V 
mOTfofc.fois may -rake ci seme^ 

- J r.c/a *c riijk* .'‘-Sml-'B 

tent sterling, is boiind-to be 
5 , ulnerable, particularly with . 
political uncertainty increas - 
ing on the approach of an ~ 

NO SMOKING 

smoke twenty cigarettes a-day 
and_foe asarrault , .*• ~ 

The Freedom . Organisation , 
for foe Right to Enjoy Smote-’ -: 
ing Toba&b (FORESXpi 

proved counterrpcoaupUye*; 
They will givetoteccoian aito* 
authority glamour amon g 
teenagers rebelling- against 
adult rules,, especially those - 
which adults themselves feg to • 
observe. This, aiigumeni,' . 
though.! not implausible,, :fe' 
contradicted, bytfe expe^en^ 
otNorway; 

c^arettc ^dvCTtisingrb^suhed'v 
irf c3fl KS e i * 

that of gins by. ose^hi«*» 
a ten-yearlpenod, “ 

Other sceptics poiht:to the ; 
undoubted’ feet that, children, 
under sixtefen- now boy ciga- - 
reties despite foe existing law. !; 
Indeed, they accotmt for £70 ' 
million of foe tobacco’ 
industry’s income of appriwd- 
jnately £7bilhpn, ^Ljjefcent. 

- Wby^h ould l e gi s lation foririd- 1 
ding tobacco safest#) sixteen 

more effoctive^ r ? 

No doubt some of' fee 16-18 
year olds will in feet evade foe 
few and obtain cigarettes. As 
shopkeepers themselves have 
often admitted, it is difficult : 
for them now to jmow who is 
and who. is not under sixteen. 
Guessing- whether someone: is .. 
aged eighteen or not will 
hardly prove easier. But some 
seventeen year olds will either ' 
obey the law or he refused- *■' 
service. Ahd.it i?Tmftfe|jrfea| 
those : uhder-sfxidens. ^ who 1 : 
cheatat present will Jfcjahle fo* ! 
persuaide foe local. shopkeeper • 
that they are three years older 
than they. really are. At foe’ 



eJection^Xhis.. will makereduc> ; 
; tfons iainterest rates difficult 

< eveir savoring: that- the 1 cur- - 
v remtn&tings of. foe Groiip of 
1 Hye -3md foe - International 

. Mpp^ftmy ' Fund;; ip : Wash- t 
y ington reach a' measure' of 
agreement on foe outlook for 
the world economy and foe 
appropriate pattern of cur- 
rency rates, 

Economic growth . has. 
paused during the first half of 
foeyearin Britain as hj therest 

< of foe woddr But foe signs are 
multiplying that this pause is ; 
(cpmiHg to L ahT-esub Output 
gppeara=to # be- picking mp tur 

Spnpk^ jchair-^ 
snicL prjhe council of eco- ' 
Jiornic Advisers, told Congress 
earlier this week that growth 
was .resuming. . The Bank, pf 
England too is cautiousiy 
optimistic. 

Once foe! benefits of the 
stimulus -to .demand from 
lower oil prices do bbin to be 
felt they should be the best 
news' manufacturing industry 
has'te&f for some_time.TJpbn 
fofe ^ifo asd aneht'' renewal .'of 

shea hopes ofa 
, _ or -ax kastr aa .oid to- fee 
rise,-, in i the ^Unemployment 
figures that / remain its 
supporters* greatest electoral 
concern. 


very least, therefore, raising 
foe. age would make the 
fpresent law easier to enforce, 
j; I A foal consideration isL that 
gtte'ejtistmg’voitmtary codes to 
Sd^^^l^de^lefrom J smoking'- 
siicc^S, ‘From 
Vtotey* motiyei foe tobatxo 
indu^ry. has just launched a 
new campaign to stop under- 
aged children from buying 
cigarettes. But small stickers to 
be put up in shop window; 
with a red line through the 
number sixteen are not alone. 
Ilift^to^i/efer children from 


.,tbe.:to-i 
if jodes&y entered-' mto 
wifo: thetjovernmeiir are not 
'JancF perhaps. cSinbi 
... , to'Ta ' report: 
pushed.' by ; ; the Health. 
Education Comfeil- and : the 
North" Western Regional 
Health Authority, attempts by 
.foe- BBC to tedUce the .expo- 
sure of tobacco nx>ns<»ed 
sport, have been ineffective. In 
television,! snpoker matches^ 
forjhjaanQ^adyedTO 
^ppea %»» j|iQ ; .yi.ew;'pf .foe; 
Icamera. vfibtv.n!ri .vs* is:. 
s W l^B^agreemenv-betweeh 

to^foafisfry-'ahd ^ foe - DHSS 
defeSs 'to 'restrict' cigarette 
advertising and promotion has 
been similariy breached. Ciga- 
rette advertisments “ in dose 
proximity to and deariy vis- 
ibte and identifiable from 


orschools" are banned. But 
the^ “Project Smoke Free” 
group are able to efte mimer- 


flouJed^This^may sot always 
befoe feultoffoe industry. But 
jhe^t^t'tlnsisbat^ening 
araUfei Te^n for-ccfeceni.' ' 
fr foese dreunistanres a ban 
of jdgaretzes to all those under 
eighteen is more than justified.. 


New Zealand 
'ernment’s decision to turn 
vn a Russian request for 
landing rights and fishing 
1 facilities is welcome. It 
i es as confirmation that the 
x>ur administration of Mr 
vid ‘ Lange, • which : has 
dly been flavour of the 
nth among its allies for the 
t iwo years, can leave a sour 
ie in Moscow just as welL 
loviet trawlers Oike those 
m South Korea and Japan) 
r e gone fishing within New 
riand’s 200-mile Exclusive 
tnomic Zone since the EEZ 
> established in 1978. En- 
under the Law of the Sea 
i share of the fish stocks left 
■r the local boats have filled 
holds, they have 
this right under a 


RED SAILS IN THE SUNRISE 

n ■ i » (• i. *•' - - 4-. nitiat ncpH trt 


what used to be known as the 
Gilbert Islands. 

There ’ is. no evidence to 
suggest fo^ the trawlers' fish- 
j y >n n ik luuuauj vau M|nuiBou ing off New Zealand or those 
. the potential within 1 the EEZ^-- netung foe tuna ground 
thereby • squeeang-^ur- foe Ktribah or- elsewhere,. 4 are;do- 
foreign boafei'ft !«g any fobre thahi|eefang-to- 

: sau^.foe.ap^te gtfish.fo 

' Soviet presence on fts shores! o Vlafovostok. there are 


face of it, seemnot unreason-' 
able. Bbt New Zealand is , 
already looking forward, to the ! : 
day when its own expanding^ 
fishing indiKtry can exploit ail - 


Arid in feet the Russians want 
facilities not just for the t rawl" , 
ers in the New Zealand EEZ 
but also for those which ? 
now exploring foe potential ci 
the deep waters of the Central 
Pacific. Mr Lange is even less' 
enthusia$uc about that - 


enough areas of strategic in- 
terest in the Pacific to make 
one suspicious. . 

The search for fresh facilities 
must be seen as part of 
Moscow’s burgeoning interests 
in foe whole of- the Pacific — 
interests which have been 
apparent in the growth of the 
Russian Far East fleet as weft 


His reservations tst* best 

. reflected by Mr Malco lm F ra- • • ^ its filing industry.- Only 
ser, foe former, Austrai -io. , . month - s — — — ~- ,r 

» Xf.'nlctsi- whft 1 rww l tllf » 


i *i— , ■7 " j- ' • mai iiiwuur S RUSSISJI proposal 

ri 0 hi \inder a Mnusto; vfeo recenay for naval cooperation between 

,2 - d : pointed ito dhe threat foevtwo- countries- an overt 

^ssion ° f four 7 c Ei • Soviet ihilStaiy presence mtfe5 ‘ a itemDt- to capitalize' on the 

:s - ^ n'S'iS mSSw *sr SSS& » New 

jeen signed m Moscow. ^ processing , feefoty^. he ; said, 
u the Russians have Jong ,% But ^ will need a! refuelling 
hankering after outer ca -g C fty; which Will 'in- time 
^sions. These include the ! 

to operate Aeroflot flights 

. . vi inn A ■ — . _ 

airfield. 


mflitary' rift between New 
Zealand - and foe United 
* States -*• was rejected by -the 


tapw.;, ’-rT ■ , : 

* necessitate - a repair and 

to operate Aeroflot flights fedlity . and,' m 

d from New toland (and . tunu ^ ahfidd. Then you 


cautious Mr Lange. 
The 


ralia), not only for or- 
rv passengers but also for 
anging boat crews -who 
-esent have to travel by 
from Vladivostok. On- 
» ship repair fad lines, 
rest and recreation for the 


haveabase.” 

There is already concern 
about, foe; rights- being nego- 
tiated by Moscow with the 
small impoverished islands of 

W recreation for the the South JPadfic, most nota- . u»».mvju u« 

bSn arnong the .bly the£l miUion.deal signal/ andthe persistencewrth which 
, nhiertives. with Kiribati - last year. This, it is being pursued.' should 

l on . s :!S ^„.fn b ^ihe prewidedtishing fircimies .for- ,! timmd the West that it cannot 
:ed °"Lnf^ ^ 16 Soviet, uawlec in.' the- afford complacency over its 

SmStdmiands, on the extensive waters encirefimr-. friendships down under. 

V' 


Soviet Union is' trying 
to insert foe thin end of a vpry 
thick wedge' into Australasia. 
The^ “Wellington government 
dearly ■ perceives this and 
keeps pushing it away — 
which gives cause for satisfac- 
tion in foe West But the 
direction of Soviet ambition 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Luton effort to 
keep foe peace 

From Mr D. Nendiek 
Sir, I am amazed at the critidsm 
of Mr David Evans, Chairman of 
Luton Town', for the barring of 
rival so-called “supporters” from 

foe- ground. This- decision has 
subseqnemly fed to the manage- 
ment of the g^me; expelling the 
dab from a. .leading cap -cona- 
. petition. . 

Apparently, wife :po visiting 
supporters, so the argument goes, 
there will be no longer any 
“atmosphere” at football fixtures. 
But where is foe “atmosphere” at 
the moment and, more signifi- 
cantly, why do rival “supporters” 
need to exist fbra sporting fixture 
lomkeplace? 

.Does this imposition on Luton 
mean the townspeople no longer 
have a chance of being murdered 
onSaXurday afternoons? That t be 
kKal constabulaiy no longer have 
the - privilege •' of being knifed, 
stoned of Indeed .unconscious 
wftfle attending to the needs of the 
: visiting guests? Thai little Iridscan 
no loraer enjoy the pleasure of 
their fathers being verbally abused 
because tile col pur of dye in the 
garments ha nging round their 
necks is diffiuent? 

No!' the hraesfey for rival 
“s up port e r s” to be in attendance 
at a sporting fixture for 
“atmosphere” to exist which is 
conducive to the event is iQ- 
founded and sheer nonsense. Mr 
Evans has provided a lifeline that 
the resTOf football would be well 
advised to drag on to. 

Yours feith folly, 

DAVID NENDICK, 

Studio 4Sa, . . 

Ouhvich Village, SE21. 

From Dr Gerald Michael 
Sir, While Luton Town Football 
Club may be commended in 
taking drastic action against hooli- 
ganism, surely it must be the duty 
of the dub and the police to 
control hooliganism in a way 
which would allow law-abiding 
visiting supporters to continue to 
enjoy their; bobby rather than 
" rag prevented from so doing. 

It does appear that Luton are 
attempting ta combat the problem 
by running away from h_ 

Yours faithfully, • 

GERALD MICHAEL, 

23 Tretawn Me, 

Mifl Hill NW7. 

September.24. 

From Mr D. L Hawkes 
Sir, Should, not every dub trying 
to combat football violence have 
cm offer bw categories gf member- 
ship? ' . 

1. Ordinary, fee card for which 
would be feiriy readily available to 

bona-fidr supporters and which 

would admit to home games only. 
Z Privileged, a land ar^id” card 
issued only to carefully, vetted 
plicants who would , then- have 
: right to attend “away" games 
aswdl 
Yours fait 
D.LHAt 
461 London Road, 

Hemd Hempstead, Hertfordshire. 
September 24. ... 

From Mr Gregory Luton 
Sir, Jbe truth is out at last When 
the choice is between a -reduction 
in football violence and a reduc- 
tion .in profits, foe. latter holds 
sway. ' 

Yours faithfully, 

GREGORY LUTON,. 

Naval & Military Club, . 

94 Piccadilly, Wl 
September 23- 


Prosecntion service 

From Mr Anthony Edwards 
Sir. An a x tiefe (September 15) 
copcentiated on the difficulties 
faced by fire 0own Prosecution 
Service: “ 

All who. work in the criminal 
courts m London are aware of the 
size of the task being undertaken 
by the service. It would be 
remarkable if there was not an 
occasional problem in the early 
days. However, in fairness, it 
should be pointed , out that none 
that ! have encountered could not 

be dealt with on the day on which 

it arose. Some could not be 
foreseen. In no instance has a case 
been unnecessarily adjourned. 

Against that background it it 
unfair to criticise fee service. A 
foil analysis would require ref- 
erence - to the- daily thorough 
review and proper handling of 
y substantial case loads by a 
tf not yet up to establishment. It 
is those, cases which, even at this 
sfage. represent the majority. 

It is feat review of fifes which 
should be the centre of attention. 
It is central to the development of 
the service and should have a very 
real impact on the conduct of the 
criminal justice system. 

Yours faithfully. • 

ANTHONY EDWARDS, 
ParkHouse. 

29 Mik End Road, El. ’ 

September 17. 


Law and disorder in St Paul’s, Bristol 


From ihe Chief Constable of Avon 
and Somerset Constabulary 
Sir. Few police officers ^ would take 
issue with your correspondent. Mr 
D. C. T. Frewer (September 20) on 
the desirability of locally based 
offices patrolling on foot or 
bicycle as pan of polking arrange- 
ments. TJiat- is a policy -we follow 
in St 'Paul's. Sadly, however, in 
pans of our great cities policing is 
a difficult and dangerous business. 

In St Paul's patrolling officers 
were subject to verbal abuse and 
physical attack by those who saw a 
police presence as a threat to their 
criminal activities, such as drug 
dealing, prostitution and street 
robbery. Those were the circum- 
stances that made “Operation 

Delivery”necessary. 

By an increasing range of. 
community activities and by using 
the established formal and infor- 
mal avenues for consultation .wife 
the community. I hope that the -. 
criminal element can be isoiaxed. 
That objective will depend upon 
the future response of the wider 
community in St PanTs, which has 
already expressed its support for 
our recent operation. 

Yours faithfully, 

RONALD F. BROOME, 

Chief Constable, Avon and 
Somerset Constabulary. 

Chief Constable's Office, 

Bristol Avon. 

September 2Z 

From the Reverend Peter Barnett 
Sir, Your editorial (September 13) 
identified me as “making rioting 
respectable”. I wish to respond by 
making the following points: 

1. To criticise the police or 
question their tactics does not 
make the critic an anarchist or an* 
apologist for criminal activity. I 
have never claimed to speak for 
anyone but myself 

As a local priest responsible for 
the area I fdt it right to be present 
during the disturbances and to 
state the truth as 1 saw it. I know 
many local people share my 
concern. They, like me, are not 
anti-police or jjro-rioters. That 
kind of simplistic description is 
not helpful in a difficult and 
complex situation. The issue is not 
about whether there is policing, 
but what kind of policing. 

Z My concern for the whole 
community of St Paul's, and 
particularly its relationship with 
the whole city of Bristol, is amply 
documented in the Archbishop of 
Canterbury's report,' Faith in the 
City. The impetus for this report 
originated with the disturbances 
in St Paul's in 1980 followed by 
others around the country in 1981. 

In lhe -chapter on “Order and 
Law" the report states: 

The remedy for fee sense of threat 
andiitsecurity tmderwhidi so many 


people live in the inner city is not (at 
least in a free and democratic 
country) to intensify policing but to 
make a simultaneous attack on the 
many factors which are . . . causing 
the inhabitants of these areas to. lose 
respect for cadi other's persons and 
property, and to live together in 
order and peace- . - 
Christians can never cease to ask 
serious questions of a society whose. . 
prisons contain a quite dispropor- 
tionate number ofblack people or of 
members of the “lowest" social 
classes, or about the evidence which 
is snU widely available of black 
people being far more exposed to 
police questioning and arrest on the 
streets than whites. 

This is exactly what my col- 
leagues and 1 are continually doing 
and Thursday. September 1 1, was 
no exception. On that evening, our 
main concern was that the 600 or 
so policemen with -riot equipment, 
having achieved their objective of 
making arrests and searching five 
properties, should have given the 
maximum opportunity for the 
community to return to normal, 
with normal policing, as quickly as 
possible and in daylight. We felt 
the longer police stayed when 
everything was quiet the more 
resentful people, particularly 
young people, would become. 

We would welcome a public 
enquiry to enable the many points 
of view being expressed by our 
very diverse community to be 
aired and considered. . 

3. You say that "St Paur$ is not the 
uniformly depressed ghetto :COO- 
jured up by the phrase 'inner city : 
area"’. Yet-the chairman of Bristol . 
City Council’s planning commit- 
tee said in the 1 985 report Poverty 
in Bristol: 

This report should shock Bristol . . . 
It reveals that one person in five in 
Bristol lives in an area of depriva- 
tion. It reveals that six city commu- 
nities (three of them inner city; three 
outlying estates) have now virtually 
detached themselves from the rest of 
the city because of their unemploy- 
ment and resultant poverty 

[The report concludes that] one area 
in particular— St Paul's — is drifting 
away even from the other areas of 
deprivation ... an affluent majority 
— employed, weft-housed, enjoying' 
good-health arid a good environment 
i— is concealing a growing minority 
of Bristol's people: who havenone of : 
these things. - 

We are not “giving young 
people permission to riot”, as you 
claim, but rather trying to articu- 
late oar faith in the city of Bristol 
and remembering Martin Luther 
King’s telling words, “a riot is an 
expression of a people who have 
not been listened to”. - 
Yoi#rs feitbfoHyt • - 
PETER BARNETT < . : .v _ 

Teanr Rector* - _ ^ 

St Paul*s=PiarisfeGentift • 1 J _ . 
Church House, 

6Z Ashley Road^ . ,.a i . 

BristokAvoa. - t..' 


Diplomatic immunity 

From Mr D. J. Appadurai 
Sir, Lionel Bloch complains 
(September 16) that “we allowed 
the assassins of the Libyan Em- 
bassy who killed WPC Fletcher to 
return to their country under the 
cloak of diplomatic immunity.” 

The “cloak” in this case is the 
few of the fend contained in the 
Diplomatic Privileges Act 1964. 
This confers absolute immunity 
oh diplomatic premises, the dip- 
lomatic bag and on diplomatic 
agents. Is Mr.BIoch suggesting that 
- lhe way to stop law-breaking is for 
foe victim to also resort to law- 
breaking? 

Fortunately, bis prescription 
was not accepted, either by the 
House oLCommons Foreign Af- 
fairs Committee which prepared a 
detailed report on foe Libyan 
shooting modern, or by the Gov- 
ernment in the White Paper 
(Cmnd 9497) which accepted all 
the major recommendations of 
the committee. Rather, the 


nphasis was on a more rigorous 
tforceme 


emi 

enforcement of the law, and 
within the framework permitted 
by the law. 

This framework includes the 
power to limit the size of dip- 
lomatic missions, to declare a 
diplomat persona non grata, the 
monitoring of diplomatic person- 
nel by the visa .requirement, 
notification, of new and replace- 
ment personnel, up tg the maxi- 
mum limits permitted , under 
article 10 of foe 19.61. Vienna 
Convention on Diplomatic Rela- 
tions and. probably.' the electronic 
scanning of the diplomatic bag — 
the last already adopted by Italy. 

Enforcement of these powers 
would do more to further world 
order and secure Britain's long- 
term interests than the prescrip- 
tions implicit in Mr Bloch's 
muscular tone. 

I am, yours faithfully, 

DAVID APPADURAI. 

9 Paterson House, 

Brecknock Road, N 19. 

September 17. 


Degree proposal 

From the President of the Second- 
ary Heads Association 

Sir. The Secondary Heads Associ- 
ation sees considerable merit in 
the proposal of the Vice- 
Chancellor of Salford University 
(report, Septe m ber 5, and his 
fetter. September . 17) for a 
restructuring of the present hon- 
ours degree coarse. 

A two-year pass degree fol- 
lowed, by those capable of doing 
so, by a two-year honours degree 
.would substantially increase this, 
country's distmbmgfy low higher 
education participation rate. It . 
would also free the sixth form 
curriculum from the excessive and 
narrow specialisation imposed 
upon h by the demands of the 
present honours degree. 

It is by this route (and not pace 
Mr Kenneth Baker and the im- 
minent advanced/suppiememary 
qualification, by yet another layer 
of sixth form examination) feat 
we are most likely to achieve the 
broad five-subject pre-university 
curriculum that we dearly need. 


and that will of hself substantially 
improve our deplorably low post- 
16 participation rale. . 

Yours faithfiilly. 

M. N. DUFFY. President 
Secondary Heads Association, 
Chancery House. 

107 St Paul's Road, Nl. 

September 17. 

Cast upon the waters 

From Mr SL G. Hamilton 
Sir. PHS (September 23) refers to a 
water authority refusing to allow 
the scattering of human ashes on to 
a large river for fear of pollution. 

One might be excused . for 
thinking that a few. handfuls of 
fire-sterilized minerals might even 
enrich the water, and being more 
or less in foe correct proportions, 
would even help sustain the lives 
of countless small creatures. A fine 
example of recycling, apart from 
religious considerations. 

Yours etc. 

S. G. HAMILTON. 

3 North End Avenue. 

Thorpencss. 

Suffolk. 


Hospital specialties 

From the Chairman of West Mirk 
lands Regional Health Authority 
Sir. When Mr L. D. Abrams writes 
(September 12)thatifhe had more 
money he could do more heart 
operations in his department at 
foe Queen Elizabeth Hospital. 
Binriingham. be overlooks the fact 
that bur regional .policy is to 
develop this service at other 
centres as wen, namely, Coventry, 
Wolverhampton, and Stoke on 
Trent. ’ * 

While we have every sympathy 
with bis aims and have nothing 
but praise for lhe increased ef- 
fideucy which has already enabled 
him to increase 'the number of 
operations performed, the .money 
that ■ is available for ■ these des- 
ignated regional 'specialties has to 
be Shared a number of ways. These 


specialties include, among others, 
liver transplants, cancer treat- 
ments. bone marrow transplants, 
renal treatments, plastic surgery, 
brain surgery, arid intensive care 
baby units. 

This rqdon had £20 million 
available for new developments 
this year. We need £8 million of 
that to finance the capital building 
schemes which are being com- 
pleted and are coming into use. 
inMiiding the new district general 
hospital at Rcdditch. Our 22 
health districts have been allo- 
cated £9 million towards the cost 
of their own services. That leaves 
us £3 million for the regional 
specialties, and the issue is ba- 
sically quite simple; if Mr Abrams 
has a bigger share of it. another 
specialist has a smaller share, 

. We take the best advice that is 
available to us. thinking not only 


of this year and- next year, but of 
the: years beyond, trying to -take 
account of changing - needs. ' new 
techniques, and other con- 
sequences of the rapid advances in 
medical science, and anticipating 
them if possible. 

The demand is potentially un- 
limited. but the resources in terms 
of money, people and buildings 
are finite. This means that choices 
have to be made, and those 
choices reflect, in addition to the 
specialties referred to earlier, 
competing priorities for service to 
the handicapped, the mentally ill, 
and mothers and children. 

Yours faithfiilly. 

JAMES ACKERS. Chairman. 
West Midlands Regional Health 
Authority. 

Arthur Thomson House. 

146 Hagiey Road, 

Edgbasion. Birmingham. 



SEPTEMBER 26 1821 

ThelSthsnd eariy ISth centuries 
saw the death penalty imposed for 
over 200 crimes, mostly for 
offences against property — in 
1814 d man was hanged for cutting 
down a fruit tree. By 1834 the 
1 apiial crimes had been reduced to 
IS and by 1861 to four — murder, 
setting fire to arsenals, treason 
and piracy with violence. 


EXECUTION. 

At eight o’clock yesterday morning 
the awful sentence of foe law was 
carried into execution on George 
Lee, for uttering forged 5L Bank- 
notes; William Thomson, for a 
highway robbery and Thomas Pat- 
more, for cutting and ma imi n g 
with intent to kill. As eariy as six 
o'clock many persons had assem- 
bled around the fatal drop, and at a 
quarter past seven the Sheriffs 
arrived at Newgate. 

Patmore was the first who 
ascended the platform. He was. 
throughout the whole of the scene, 
remarkably collected. During the 
night be slept soundly for about 
two hours and a half; and awoke in 
the same state of composure and 
self-possession, which appears not 
to have forsaken him since the 
awful tidings were first announced 
to him. From the time be awoke till 
the moment his unhappy existence 
was terminated, he continued ei- 
ther in private prayer, or joining 
the clergyman in fervent public 
devotion. The last interview he had 
with his wife was on Monday: he 
pressed her much to Ceil him if 
there were no grounds for the 
jealousy which had driven him to 
the commission of action that had 
brought upon Him consequences so 
dreadful He told her that he 
should die more happy if he could 
arrive at the certainty of her 
fidelity: or even if his suspicions 
were too well founded, he should be 
more satisfied. She did not, howev- 
er. give him any direct reply, and 
the unhappy man died with a full 
conviction of her guilt. 

Thomson was foe next who 
ascended the fatal scaffold. This 


miserable youth was but 17 years of 
age, and was most distressingly 
ignorant and even stupid. He had 
no parents, indeed no relatives; and. 
if we accept a person to whom he 
was for some time an apprentice, 
we may add, no friends. With 
intellects of apparently the lowest 
possible order, be had not enjoyed 
the advantage of the first rudi- 
ments of learning, ami judging 
from his conduct since his convic- 
tion, never had even a moral 
adviser. Some time since, his 
master's business falling off, be was 
oBfiged to dismiss this' wretched 
boy from his service, and-he was 
consequently * thrown upon the 
town, exposed to all the tempta- 
tiuus of viceitowhiehbehas thus 
b ecome a victi m: The w orthy I 

ft nhmn y Iwff Utpn m urh pain to" 

arouse him from his apathy, but ali 
appeared useless. “He had never,' 
he said, “heard any thing about 
God, and he did not wish it.” He on 
Monday night went to sleep at his 
usual time, a little past nine, and it 
was with difficulty the turnkey 
awoke him at five o’clock in the 
morning. After, however, joining 
his fellow sufferers and foe clergy- 
man in their ^devotions, he ap- 
peared considerably to relent, .and 
expressed* desire to partake of the 
Sacrament, which, after some cbn-J 
vernation and advice, Mr Cotton 
thought himself authorized to ad- 
minister. He afterwards seemed to 
relapse into his usual stupidity, 
and during the ceremony of knock- 
ing off his irons, and his walking to 
the fatal drop, his countenance 
betrayed the most distressing 
vacancy. 

Lee was the last who ascended 
the platform, and of the three he 
exhibited fay the far foe least 
fortitude. Being a Jew. he was 
attended during the night by 
several friends of his own persua- 
sion, arid it was passed in devotion. 

Hfr was attended to the fast 
moment by his brother, whose 
feelings seemed to overpower him. 
When the drop fell, he rushed into 
the lobby, arid threw himwlf down 
in a state of the most pitiable and 
violent anguish. Another person of 
the same persuasion likewise at- 
tended, by permission of the 
Sheriffs, to perform the last duties 
to the miserable man; it being 
contrary to their religious ordi- 
nances to allow the body to be 
touched by a Christian. In conse- 
quence of observing this rite, the 
hangman was prevented going 


through the whole of his duty, and 
the. wretched man had his 
sufferings for -some minutes pro- 
longed. Patmore and Thomson 
appeared to feel but a momentary 
pang. 

After the bodies had hung the 
usual time, they were cut down, 
and Lee's was delivered to his 
friends, who had provided a shell to 
receive it. It was immediately 
conveyed away in a hearse, which 
drove up to the felons’ door. 

Just before the bodies were cut 
down, another proof was given that 
popular superstition of the most 
senseless kind is not yet extinct. 
Four females ascended the plat- 
form and rubbed their faces and 
necks with the hands of Patmore 
and Thomson. This, it ifi thought; 
is a cure for wens. 


Pool business 

From Mr P. M. Reeve 
Sir. The final paragraph of "Mr 
Fogg’s leuer (September 19) on the 
Japanese - businessman's water- 
proof card demonstrates very 
neatly the negative attitude of so 
many British business people. The 
correct wording, of course, should 
have been. "So, I. too. acquired 
waterproof business cards.” 

Mr Fogg has no doubt been 
inundated with offers of supply 
already; but if not 1 know where he 
can obtain them in the UK. 

Yours faithfully, 

P. M_ REEVE. Managing Director, 
Iniernanonal Technology Ltd. 

2 High Street. 

LitdeEversden. Cambridge. 




THE TIMES FRIDAY S^TEMBER 26 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Forthcoming I obituary 


marriages 


Mr ESI Adams. . . 
and Miss M.V. Gnlcte , 

The engagement is announced 
between Edward Seymour, son 
of-Mr and Mrs Philip 'Adams, of 
Ha van L Hampshire, ind Molly 
Viola,' youngest daughter of foe 
Hon David trskmc Of Pel sham, 
BtirySt- Edmunds; and of the 
late Mrs Erskine, 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BALMORAL C.ASTLE 
September 25: The Queen and 
The Duke of Edinburgh arrived 
at Si Pancras Station this morn- 
ing in the Roval Train. 

The Queen, accompanied by 
The Duke of Edinburgh, opened 
the 32nd Commonwealth Par- 
liamentary Confcnmcc in West- 
minster Hall. 

Her Majesty's Body Guard of 
the Honourable Corps of 
Gentlemen at Arms and The 
Queen’s Body Guard of the 
Yeomen of the Guard Were on 
duty. 

The Queen later attended a 
Reception, given by the Presi- 
dent of the Commonwealth 
Parliamentary .Association .(the 
Right Hon Bernard Weaiherill 
MP) and the Cnairman of the 
United Kingdom Branch (the 
Right Hon Margaret Thatcher. 
MP) for Delegates to the 32nd 
Commonwealth Parliamentary 
Conference, in the Queen Eliza- 
beth 11 Conference Centre, 
Broad Sanctuary. 

The Marchioness of 
Abergavenny, the Right Hon Sir 
William Hesclxine and Major 
Hugh Lindsay were in 
attendance. 

Her Majesty left Heathrow 
Airport. London, this afternoon 
in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight lor Dycc Airport. Aber- 
deen. and subsequently trav- 
elled to Balmoral Castle. ' 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
President or WWF Inter- 
national. left Heathrow Airport, 
London, this afternoon in an 
aircraft of The Queen's Flight 
for Italy, where His Royal 
Highness will attend the 25lh 
Anniversary Conference and 
Board Meeting of WWF Inter- 
national in Assisi. 

Brigadier Clive Robertson 
was in attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, at- 
tended by Mr Brian McGrath, 
will subsequently visit Australia 
and Japan and later join The 
Queen for the State Visit to 
China and the Visit to Hong 
Kong. 

The Duke of Edinburgh was 
represented by the Right Hon 
Denis Howell. MP. at the Me- 
morial Service for Sir Stanley 
Rous which was held in West- 
minster Abbey today. 

Luncheons 

HM Goieramenr 

Baroness Young. Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, received the 
guests at a luncheon held yes- 
terday at L’Amico in honour of 
the delegates attending the 
Commonwealth Parliamentary 
Conference in London. ' ' . 

Britain- Australia Society 

The annual luncheon of the 
Britain -Australia Society was 
held yesterday at Australia 
House by permission of the 
High Commissioner. Lord 
Shackleton. chairman, presided. 

Board of Deputies of British 
Jews 

Dr Lionel Kopclowiiz. Presi- 
dent ol'the Board of Deputies of 
British .lews, and Mrs 
Kopelowitz and the honorary 
officers were hosts at a luncheon 
held yesterday at Woburn 
House in honour of Mr Anatoly 
(Natan) Scharansky. The guest's 
included: 


Th«- PtiV* ol Dt>\oftshirr Uio O 11 H 
RjiMii. R-ibtn Dr AOr.ih.trti Lfvv. Mr 
Ikirurh Gijt. Mi Dji i*1 Allm-on. MP 
Mi nimh B»JJ vjp Mr \ivun 
Rt ik 1.HI MP anil till Rei W Marlin 
-stmrh MP 


BIRTHS. MARRIAGES. 
DEATHS aad IN MEHGRfUM 
£4 a fee + 15H VAT 

[minimum 1 linen) 

. lnn.iim.-m.Ti:v ,iullh.T'f jifd h\ ihc 

tumr jiki irmuikni jikln-u « ilv 
und.-i. nuv tv vni in 

THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 9XS 

of H'liThontil lh\ Kkphnnc 
iihnT. IHIKI i» 01-481 3021 

\MK4ini emenu ran tv uvrmcd h> 
ictiThi'nr ki»n.n ni'jm anil 
S lupin Mnnit. 1 ! it. Fmlav. no Salur- 
dav hciMivn ''nnarn anil i’ min 

K I-Z01 4000 Oftfl Fin puNwjimti ihc ; 
llitwin]; da> h\ 1 . «l*ivn. 

FORTHCOMING MAWMBES. WQXMNGS 

!-fr hh t nun anJ VkuI Ris*- C6 a toe 

+ TSN WT. ! 

t'.vort anil Social Tapi- jntuiui'mcnLs 
on mil tv a. n-pii'd t»v iclcvhnor. 
Fnquii'ri iiv BI-KZ 9953 
ulii'i in ’Hirii. iv vnd I.-* 

t Penttgln Sheet. Lowhn El 9XM. 

rtrav all.vu. ai k-ju as hour, hefon: 
putiliLjiuin 


tnr l "<ll i! ifimt .» <lfni»l Mil III Ihn 4.1) 
■a it. .Mill- .tun hr kin’Mrlh inrm inj 
litrl m him 

radium I 1 


BIRTHS | 

ANSCU.-MAHSFIELD To Nicholas 
.irio Mitrv Jan*. . on Si po-mber lain, 
a rtaiMtil'T. Anne Uxmi Snn'nj. 
SALLANTWE DYKES To Hugh and 
Finn* on ?2wt twplemtJw. a 
OaunUicr. Emma Unr 
BELL On Tur<dav. JSrd Sepl«nber. 
foCfifisfm<r.nfvHrhMn<dBd Aifikrj 
a ^>H lanv*. Edward, at Pntww 
Mary M.iicrnnv Hasmui. Newcastle 
upon Tvrw 

BURNETT - On ScpImtukt tolli. ai 
W**st London Hwoil-ll. In Aniw incc 
Musmi’t and Knth. a rtauoWrr. Etua- 
hrlh Lcui"* a m-ht lor Daurt 
COATES On S'h»«rrtwr 11th. lo 
Amanda ■ nrc b j-.ik'uxkai and John, 
a -on. David Hamilton 
CRAWSNAT • On 22ml Sk-pJ-mtW- to 
Philil'Pa .nrr Cibhi 1 and Huu. a 
dauQtiirr. hahol Chariotm. sNw lor 
Lnuiw 

DE WAROT On Srt>frtnt*r 2nd in 
Sarawak to Surwsn and John, a 
da uonicr. Kohctia Anne, a c *st*r tor 
V* m* ion 

EYRES On September Itti. dt ST 
Luke's Hospital. Guildtord. to 
Aranlra -nee zuaioi and Rav mond- a 
ion. JoP» K AJi’vand'T Javier, a 
brother wr Jnnaiiwn 
FURNIVALL - On 13lh Sepiembrr. 1° 
Susan intv Hamhton' and Prtrr. a 
ininfilnr. Frances Rum 
GANNON - On 2Alh Augim St 
PrtrrS HphuUU- CTktImu to ^*nds 
and Andrew a dauahter. .BobcrW 
Lee .Bobbtei. a siMer wr El«e. 

. . 4 * 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE . ' ’ 
September 25: The Princess 
Anne. Mrs Mark PidJJips. this 
afternoon performed ■ the re- 
opening or Dillons Bookstore, 
Gower StreeL London, WCI. 
and afterwards toured the store, 
escorted by the Chairman of 
Pcnios pic (Mr Terry Maher). 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips. President of the Save 
(he Children Fund, this evening 
attended the premiere of the’ 
film Eleni at the Cannon Cin- 
ema. HaymarkeL 

The Countess of Lichfield was 
in attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE | 
September 25: The Prince of I 
Wales. President, The Royal 
Jubilee and Prince's Trust, to- 
day visited the South 
Pembrokeshire District Council 
Offices at Pembroke Dock and 
met community representatives 
of Llanelli and Pembroke Dock 
prior to the commencement of 
The Prince of Wales Commu- 
nity Venture Scheme in Dyfed. 

His Royal Highness, attended 
by Mr Humphrey Mews and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson, travelled by Royal 
Train. 

The Princess of Wales arrived 
at Settle Station by Royal Train 
this morning. 

Her Royal Highness sub- 
sequently visited Casileberg 
Hospital for the Mentally’ 
Handicapped at Giggles wick. 
North Yorkshire, and the 
Green foot Residential Home 
and Day Centre for Old People 
at Settle. 

The Princess of Wales, at- 
tended by Mrs Max Pike and 
Lieutenant-Commander Rich- 
ard Aylard. RN, later returned 
to London in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
September 25: The Duke of 
Kent was today made a Royal 
Fellow of The Fellowship of 
Engineering at a lunch at the 
Athenaeum Club. London, 
SWI. - - 

Sir Richard Buckley was in- 
attendance. .... . : 

The Duke of Kent was repre- 
sented by Mr F.A. Millichip at 
the Memorial Service for Sir 
Stanley Rous which was held in 
Westminster Abbey today. 

Birthdays today 

Miss Lucette Aldous, 48: Mr A. 
N. Allan. 43: Lady Brave. 45; Mr 
lan Chappell. 43:'Mr Neil Coles. 
52: Mr Peter Dews. 57: Mr 
Bryan Ferry,'4k Lord Griffiths. 
b3; Air Commodore I. j. Harris. 
b(>. Sir James Hennessy. 63; Mr 
P. T. Lewis. 57; Sir Stephen 
Luke. 81: Sir Ronald McIntosh, 
67; Lord Marshall of Leeds. 71: 
the Rev .Professor.. EmeSt 
Nicholson. 48; Mr G. W. 
Pusack, 66;. Sir Herbert 
Redfeam. 71; Mr Leonard 
Sachs. 77; Marshal of the RAF 
Sir Denis Spotswood. 70; Miss 
Margaret Thomas, 70. 


MempcM; x: 

Sir Stanley Rons Lv.'i »*; 
The ■ Duke' of ‘ Edinburgh was 
represented by Mr Debts How- 
elf. MP. and the Duke of Kent 
by Mr F.A. Millichip. Chairman 
of the Footbafl Association, wfa'o 
also read the second lesson; at a 
memorial service fix Sir Stanley 
Rous held in Westminster Ab- 
bey yesterday. 

The Dean, ' the ‘Very Rev 
Michael Wayne, officiated, as- 
sisted by the Re* Atep /UifE 

Precentor' And . Sacrist, and 

Canon Trevor Beeson. Sir Wal- 
ter Winterbottora read the. first 
lesson and 1 . the Bishop »/<jf- 
Chebnsfotd .gave aif address. 
Miss Elizabeth NewbWy,. Arts 
Educational .SchootT read irOnT 
the works of Wordsworth -and 
Van Dyke. The Lord Mayor. 
locum renens, of -Westminster, 
attended. Among, others present 
were: , . 


ka<J ^ 

• The^eng%emenf r ' is anoourfCed 
-between Johtf. onry 
Derick . Armstrtjng, . bf Tlood 
.Street. Chelsea: -and' Mrs Joyce 
Armstrong, oFCoolbahL'Susm. 
and Caroline, elder, daughler qf 
Mr and- Mrs DourfasJqarratL of 
Hawfbrd^Lodge. Worcester. ~ 

MrJD. Blacklock 
and Mfajs.CLLMdore ■ 

The engagement is. announced 
between' Jodathan,, -. SO" . fH 
LieutenanirCblpr^t . and.' -Mra 
Michael- Bbddock. of Stable 



Latest wills 

Sir James Pitman, of Chelsea, 
Conservative MP for Bath 1 945- 
64. and chairman of Sir. Isaac 
Pitman and Sons 1934-66. left 
.estate valued at tX 36.448 net, - 
Miss Fanm Louisa Prudence 
Minnie Hughes, of Fulham. 
London, left estate valued at 
£Ci79.7l6 neL She left numerous 
bequests to charity, including 
£20.000 each to the Royal 
United Beneficent Association, 
the National Benevolent Institu- 
tion and the Bank Clerks 
Orphans* Fund. 


Founders’- ' | 
Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Founders’ Com- 
pany for the year commencing 
October 27:. 

Master, Mr Peter H. Swam 
Upper' Warden, Mr- A:.F- 
Mitchener. "Under WaMen. Mr 
John H.V. Williams <leA,jMr 

.Aindrew-J.'GiUcnL’-r- ; - * ■ ■ 

AppbinlmCTts^-;-, 

Latest appointments include: !- 
The Her. John .TOhggge. 
Chaplain to the Archbishop- of 
Canterbury, to be Condurt (se- 
nior chaplain) of Eton Collie 
from September next year. • 

Mr Donald Hamilton Fraser to 
be a member of the Royal Fine 
Art Commission. 


Mrs < M.- Moore. ;bf > Broriifay 

Comjnoru Kent . : i ., 

. Gaptain' O.Ghj^man ^ 
and Miss GiATTBUtoa . . 

The engsuement! &- announryd 
between ciiw (Chip) Chapman. 
The Parachute- Regiment, youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mrs P:G 
.Chapman', of Plymouth. Devoft, 
and Gemor Aim, - only daughter 
of-Mr and .Mrs GA Bolton, of 
Ashford. Kem. ... •’>;> v 

Mr M.B. DeBer 

and. Miss AX, Malden . 

The' engagement ‘is announced 
i between Marcus, only son of Dr 
| and Mrs John Defter, ofThe CUd 
I Smithy, Bradley -Green, 
Worcestershire; and Alexandra. 

.' second daughter of-Mr and Mrs 
| . Charles Maiden. ofWindlesham. 
House; Washington.- S^awt. ' 

MdATbofort “ ; 

and Miss C. "Kelly - ' 

The engagement is anoourfcwJ 
between -Alexander,; youngest 
son .of .the late -Mr Timothy 
Dufort and Mrs Dufixt of 
Cherrywobd - ' House,; Langley. 
Macctesfidd. Cheshire, and Ce- 
cile. youngest, daughter, of Mr- 
arid Mr, Peter Kelly., of TJie 
Cwnu -UanrethaL 'Momriouth, 
G wenL - . • ; * 

UrJ-M-HowetT ’.:‘" 

and Miss AS. Pmlcer. . 

.-The engagement js : announced : 
-between -&hn . MkhaeL^dd&si 
'sod "oTMr and >Nbs Alexander - 
;HowefL of Wandsworth. Xon- 
doru -and" Alison' Susan, -twin 
daughter of Mr arid Mrs WJL 
Pancer. - of Oirit, ’ ' North 
Yorkshire. - - - ■ 


State Opening 
of Parliament 

nutiaritenrwiH .be opened by 
-the Queen at ’ 1130 am - on 
Wednesday. November-12. ' 

■ ■ Apphcritioris .firom Speers for 
dekets and-carparidn g .tabqlL if 
required. s|woMi» -stmt-jewhe 
Secretary -to the Lord Great 
Charaberiain.HoiisejoL'LQriis. 
tqridoa, SWIA OPW-by 1^ 
dayC-Octpber 17.-— -- ■* -- 

7 After the recapt .of applica- 
tions for Seats' iri theChambfcr oJ 
the’. House of- Lords, -^ir 
peeresses,- husbands and perjre 
eldest sons, not bek>w the age of 
1'4 -yeaiVa ballot will be bdd 
arid tickets sent to those ^uceess- 

fnl;' unsuccessful applicants will 
be 'informed. Tickets have lo-bfe 
restricted to.peeresses/h usbarids 
whose ' hu sbattds/ wives ' are 
members bf the House of lands 
at the tinte* 7 arid are vssucfrfon 
die .mdetdariding- that the peer 


' Mr RJ. Kemp Everett 
aad Ml$s.$XXfcight • 

The- engagement rs-, announced 
between. Richard, second son of 
Mr and Mrs Thomas H. Kemp 
EvenftL; of DoIfeburyCoHage. 
Doiberrow, CfiundiilL near Bns- 

and Sarah Jane, younger 
dau&jier of, Mr aad M/s Colin- 
.Knight of-'B Littlefield Lane. 
K^rihchapel.^ Grimsby. 

Mrpit ; NaMi»r' -. 

- arid Mte&AFrijt-: 

.- The^ngUBrrient- Is announced 
. between-. Malcolm!' sbn of- Mr 
arid "Mtl R-- S. Naylor, of 
Spilsby; .Liricptnshire, and -Sa- 
rah. daughter of Mr arid Mrs H. 
J.:'. Fox. .of: Wokingham; 
Beriuliire, ' 

rifcxfc-M&etts •: ■- ! 

and Miss KM . Roe - , • . ' , 

TJie'enga^rineml is announced { 
between John- Poynt^. only soo : 
of' M^jdR- arid.' Mrs- Antony I 
Ridcetzs! -of The Old. Manse. 
Nigg.. T^n. ROss-shire, ..and 
PhiUppaMarion.^ekler da uniter 

of Mr Janies Roe arid Mrs Roe, 
MP. nf FritleySi Dowrie. .Kept, 
and Tempto House, .Theobalds ■ 

. Pa/krHmfixdshim- 
Mr'W-litH--JUse ' 
MdX^s.v.xfayftj«f ■■ 
The engagement- is announced 
b e twe en Mwttul son of Mr 'and 
Mrs H. 'W: Rwe, of .QuorB. 
Leicestershire .; : and - Susan, 
daughrer of Mr .W.'.H. Clayton 
arid* Oayton. .of 

Buxton. -TSedbyshtre. • • 

Mrlxf-SalRtte - 

andMiss JA-Solfivan 
Thb engageptent is announced 
betwfeen'David. yotrimest s6n of 
Mr^nd-Mik.Fl A Salvage, of 
HonxSmrcft. .'Essex and Julia, 
only daughter of Mrand MnT; 
Sullivan. *.of rKebilworth, 
Wanrickshire. 

Mr P-M. Sarin . 
and MSss&Diflbpe 
The-jalgaBBneat is announced 
between Peter, elder son iof Mr 
and - Mr SA. ' SavilL of 
Westetwo, Sussex, and- Sarah, 
yopnger danrfiUg of Mrand Mrs 
J:E. Hope, -of Merton, KeoL 

JtfrG J). Ward 
and Miss JJUVL Bright 
The ehgagement..is announced 
between Graham,- younger son 
of Mr and Mr 'P C. Ward; of 
Abingdon. Oxfordshue. and Jo- 
anna. ^Ider'daugbter of the late 
Mr- JLM.’Brighi.and of -M r J- 

Bright:*' '.of Growth orne, 
Benohire.. . 

Maniage . 

Mr-H. GctereH 
aad-MrsHlMerizies.-'. 

Tbtr marriage took pldce quietly 
.b:Sassfti «n Tuesday, Sfcanwn- 
ber 23, between Mr Henry 
Gpssolr and Mis: Helena 
Menzies; •„ ..... 

will be present pt the ceremony. 

. A .limited : number of ockets 
fbr tbe -Royal Galleiy wifi be 
available -fix, relatives: mid 
fneods-of members of- both 
Houses'of -Parliament to wgurit 
the procestioo. Peers > can apply 
for one ticket -only.. M Rs should 
apply for 7 these: tickets loathe 
Speaker’s Secretary. ... 

Applications- for car parking 
labeisshould state whether they 
are . for chauffeur ■ or .owner- 
drivencars orfor upebyaRoyal 
Galtery guest - ' " - - 

The doors .win be bpeoed-at 
9.-50 am arid win be dosed-ax 
10:45 am, pr a* stated on the 
ticket,' . * 

Dress- for the' -fldor of the 
chamber of the House'of Lords 
tvalfbe: Peeresses, eves mg dress, 
decoration^ coUarai peers, robes 
over , service - dress : or salts; 
knights of orders, cottars." 

"Dress fix the Royal .Gallery: 
Ladies* -day _ dress . with, hat; 
BenfierqerC mopiing dress, ser- 
vice dress or kuiL . 


T^Eliotplaqne | Reception 


The POet Laureate utll uaveB a 
commemorative plaque to .-T5- 
Eliot. OM. on the Wall of 3 
Kensington 'Court Gardens, 
London.; W8, at nooh today. 
Septerriber 26. The plaque has 
been erected by English 
Heritage. • - — - 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and Ih Mempriam 


HOTBLACK - On Snncmbcr I9fh. to 
I Carotin inn* BoUwtii and CJirjslo- 
ptwr. d «on. James Oinst o phw 
HOWARD - On August 7m. 1986. a I 
Liverpool Mawmitj- Hospital. ■ lo 
Si<-phaniv rnro Baimordi and 
Vvxyan. a dau^rwr. Clara 
birptumir. a slslor for Emily. AUco 
.lint rtVMies. 

KIMPTON - On Sootembor 20th. to 
OiricionhcT and Joanna inie 
CflLun v a son. Jainns Paint K. 
KINGSTON On Scpc-mbrr 25»h. at 
Trnuhnifw Hospnal. to Manone 
hot- Dullin’ and Mark, a daughter. 
Chjrlolle EJIa Loinso 
kUCCtM - On September 23nL to ' 
inqdn -nee QmimeniAnd Angelo, a 
son Niro I o Alessandro. 

McConnell - On September 21 sr. to 
Nick and Csme inee Chilloni. at 
Dulisich Hospital. London, a daugh- 
wr. Jessica Mum 

NfCNOUS On September 2-Uh. to 
Mandv i nee Leneyi and Tudor, ai SI. 
George's HosniaL London, a son. 
David Pulesion. 

PALMED - On September 2E4h. at 
Princc^j Chnsttan's HospilaL Wind- ; 
snr a son m Jill and Peregrine. 
ROBERTS ■ On 18th September ai SI 
Albans, jo Margeo and David, a son. 
Gahrii-I Charles Benedict, a brother 
(nr Alexander and Dunstan 
TAYLOR On Sen ember 22nd. to 
Maxell incc Godivini and Wiliutn. a , 
daughter. Eluabeih Joanna. 

TUX FT ■ On SeMrmber 7th. to %taura 
.inti .Kibn. a daughter. Katherine 
Rosalind ik'ale) { 

TRIMMER On September 25lh. in ■ 
Ns-v» A-alamL lo Sarah mco Thomas) ■ 
,md Paul, a son. James Paul 
TTK>tTMs 1 

WALSH On September 25lh. in Here 
ford, lo Carok- >noe Hutchini and 
□ermol. a daughter. Miranda Jean. 
YUSAF On 24Ui Seplcfliber at I 
Wcsthlll Maternity Hospital. Dun- 1 
for mime. lo Shameena irwe 
Chaudhm and Shahid, a daughter. 


MARRIAGES 

CLEMENTS : RUSSELL The mar- 
rw*go look- place on September 25th. 
198s. in the Seychelles, betueen Si- 
mon Si Claud, onli- son ol Mr and 
Mrs h j n&ncm s and JanjueOne 
Anne, onlv daughter of Mr and Mrs 
P M Russell of Snlton Coldfield. V 
Midland-- 

WARE : GREEN On September 20th i 
,-n 411 saints Church. Aston. Shef- ' 
Held. Thomas Baldwin, youngest son 
ol Rex. Hugh & Mrs Wake ot Sud 
bun- Suffolk, and latent, daughter | 
ol Mr * Mrs H Green of Asian. 


DEATHS 

AGATE On Sepicmtrr 20th in hospi 
(at. Micha-’l Stlverthorne aged 70 
sear- BetouM hushand of Doreen, 
loving father of Milan'. Robert Peter 
and Simon and qrandfalher. Crema- 
tion on September 26ih in Oxford A 
kind gemic man who win be sorely 
missed 


ANNAMUNTMOM , On September 6th 
| In Florida. ProteasorSfr-Hanv^iatf 
of K'uaia Lumpur and. formerly 
Kingston . ' Jawafea. after - 'a .Sho« 

- IDness. - . . i . . . '.J-.i 

BAGWELL KKFBV-Dn Tuesday. 
23nl September. L986. aUhe doseof 
his Goloor wedding Day: peaceOiqy 
at home in Amesbury Abbey, afin- a 
-long illnes. Arthur Edward <8obL 
Li Col Rjk.irerditn Ids sath year. 
Beloved husband or the fate 
Gwendoline Poer O'Shee, dearly 
loved and loving husband for. 50 
years of Peggy, dear lather of Peter 
and Rosemary, adored Granin of 
Jeremy. Sally. John aad MkhaeL 
much loved father -tn-law of LoHe 
and Robert, only brother to John. 
Funeral Service al Amesbury Parish 
Church. WUIstdrr on Tuesday. 30th 
September at 2.00 pm, loHowed- by 
prtvale cre mation- Enoinnes and 
flowery to G W Burden: Funeral Di- 
rector- Amesbury. WBts (09SD 
252621 

BOYD . Ou: September 22nd. In 
Burton. Alan, dearly loved husband 
of PaU-icu and father of David. Prt- 
vale Funeral an 26m September., at 
Christ Church. Buxton. . . ... . . 
BRADTORY ■ Oh September Idft. 
1986. peacefutty tn H«rare.-Zbnt»- 

- trae. Manorie. beloved -wife of 
Leonard.' mother of Bamara-Anpe 
and Pant and granttnotiie- of -Tanta 
and Erik. Sadly mused. 9 Stoke Rd. 
Qumnuigton. Borrawdale. Harare. 
Zimbabwe. 

DAVISON . On September 16th' as 
home. His Honour Wmtam ' Norrfs. 
teatt loved husband of Margaret 
and dear father of Jane. Patrick and 
Jmephuie. Funeral pnvalety held. 
Donations, if desired, lo Katherine 
House Hasotce. c/o Heather Stewart. 
High Rock, Sibford Ferns. 
Oxfordshire. 

DOWSE - On September 2«h.‘ 1986. 
.xUiot General Sir Maurice Dowse 
K.C.V.0 . C.B - C-BX. On holiday m 
India Fbnert arrangentoits private; 

FEl^TCOn September 24ft. 1986. 
-in WamngCQo .Seaerai ; HosgttaL 
George aged 68 yWR. hushand of 
the Isle BeOy- Frigate-- dvUhg daddy 
to Sarah, grandad to-Thnecvand 
Dame! and loved mend of 
Frances. Oemaoon Service an Mon 
day. September 29th at Walton Lea 
Cremriwnun. Warrtagsen a. ijo 
pm. No flowers please but donations, 
if desired, to The League Of Friends 
at me Wamngtan Dtstncr Hospital. 

GEE-SMITR. Watty - On Monday. 
22nd September. 1986- at SL 
Stephen's Hospital, aged 90 years. 
Funeral at Comers Greet Crematori- 
um at 1 AS pm an Wednesday. 1st 
October Flowers 'lo J.H. Kenyons 
LM- M Martoes Road. WS. 

CLOVER - On September 23rd. 1986. 
Stephen Teasdate. bdored husband 
of Barbara, modi laved father . of Sly 

sanand^neantnortog-grandiamer 

. Funeral Service .ai ’ ' ' St 
BarthotomcwTs. 4iastem*re . ..op 
T hundav. Oeiooer 2nd-ai 2L30r*a. 
Family Qowera only, biir donabom. 
If dewed, to pr.QimianiW Appeatt 
Oflice: ll-W South Rd. Hayw*» 
Heath. Sussex Enoutriei to OoukL* 
Cbapmao -Lid. Hindbead 4436. . . 


OOOONtS ■ On SeptembwaisL peacd- 
• fuHh at croydoo.Herttaoe NUrttng 
. Home. Arthur GeraM I Augustus) 
agedPS. dear tether, of Suzanne and 
tfcorg*. father Hn-l»w of Jean.grand- 
. father of- Robert and Carole, and dear 
' husband or the late Suzanne: Free- 
man or the Ob' of .'-London, and 
Liveryman of Ihr Ossa SeOerv Com- 
pany- Cremation . at Creydop 
Orematonum on- Monday. Septem- 
ber 29th at 10290 - am.- Family 
flowers only. Donahoos. If desired to 
the AruirKfc A Rheumatism CoupdL 
41 Eagle Street London wciraaR. 
COUCH - On September 23rd Dick 
iSlankey .Charles) of BarteCLSWfoOc. j 
' Private Funeral Service. foBowed fay 
buridaTHartest Parish Church.- A 
Service -of Thanksgl rtnp wfp take 
place ai the- Cathedral. Bury St Ed- 
i • mumb-on Wednesday: October 1st at ! 

SjOO-pbi. followed by a r ecept i on at 
i 'the- Angel Hotel. Flewen. if rimiraL , 
to L. FuKNer Ltd. 80 WhUtng Street 
Bury S> Editumds <098a 4D49X - ■' I 

OtOSS- - : On 23rd September, peace- ; 
fully' after a short !8he9S.-iMte«vie : 
<nee TaHackX wife df the late Oscar 
Grom, beloved -motficy or TTanMa 
Pauline. Charles and Michael, aad 
dear sister Of Gerard. .- 
KALUFAX On.Tumday^23td-Sep- ! 

tembet Suddenly' atPrincesi Grace 
HospRai: Derek.* nuldi'loced fad 1 his 
wife Jean and cMidren Rosalind and , 
Roddy- and family -and fnemte- Tv- \ 
nerai' Service <and cremation at 
Putney Vale Cemetery m ladS. am 
On Tuesday. 30th September., , * . | 
HARCRAVE .*■ On 22nd ’Sei>t«T*er. 
1986. at.Oxted Hospital, peaceful^ 
altera v try long Hlne»coura9eoiBly , 
. boaw.wiiHam John RichaidseH. -Be- 
loved- husband bf Nora .and -dear ! 
father of Jo. grandfaUwr of Sue. 
Pippa. Helen and Aibsuir. Funeral 
’ private. No leneraor noArexa-'OdM- i 
lions, tf desired, lo Oxled HwpOaL 

- EaOlaiHft way. Oxted. 

HARCRAVE - On September 22nd. I 
'• 1986; at OjOM JMPUal. peacpfiflhr : 
after a very Jong lEnesv, courageous- ; 

- tv borne. John Wjmaro Wchardbu n. 

: Belov ed tmsband of Nora, and dear 

father of jo. yandfauwe -of sue. 
Pippa. Helen- and -AUsxair. Funeral 
. pnvats NO letters or flom Dona- 
Dona. tf desired, to Qxud Hmttal. 
Eaadbnds Way. emeu. 

HYNES On 23rd September. -1,986; at 
. home. Ruth Kathleen aged 86. WB# 
of the mu Brigadier. Wiatahi Henry 
Hynes. C.B£... beloved .mother of 
jane and DtmaaM grandmother W 
eight great gra Mtefcd -ot nbtr. 
Funeral on Tuesday. SOthSeotem- 
ber at 12 noon at St mrr ad 
Vincula, wtsboroonh Green. Flowers 
may be sent to w. Rr^der & Sop. 
-TliUnglofl. Pe+woTth. ■ 

JOHN : On Tuesday. 1 6th September. 

' 1986. «ed 82. Robfarrhomton. son 
of Augustus John. OM.. husband of 
Fraiioara. ai MarbeUa. Spain. 
MATTHEWS- . On Sep te mbe r aSrd 
1986. . in Winchester. • ’Denis 
Dearmao. husband of Jo. father of 
.. Ppirirte. ! Anne.- AteXteKkor. and -Wit 
llam. greatly loved by att.' Funeral 
October 1st 'at A'pth. 8t- AMrewfs 
‘.Church, ddteorabt Nr. 1 Winchester. 
For dtroetranx'- tefenhone' 10962) 
6Sl95i No-Ookmol . • , -. . 


fewiiuw i 

Mr Robert. Korengokl,- Coun- 
sellor for Public; Aftaira. wd- 
qomed the guests M a jecopdoo 
held yesterday ai-tbe Airierican 
Ernbassy ia bonour-of lbe 
Foforigbt stiNfeaisj scfaofars arid 
fellows.-- 


Mi— lE^Unrit Joseph - On -Septem- 
. her; 24th. 1966. peacriauy aged 67 
YtaatS. Dearliusbandof MoUy. tovfpg 
- Cdlpr of- J Im. More.- Mb aad Dan. j 
Remdem Mm afSL dare's Chunh. 
Hawthorn Road. Lache. Chests- on 
'-Tureday - SSKembs. 1 - 30th. M - l2 
noon- . foOowfO by • interment at , 
Blaran Cemetery. Family Bowen ! 
only. DonafUon»,.tf destred. bo Save : 
the Children Fund.' | 


Uliwiy OFM On Tuesday: 23rd . 
Seputebs: 3986. at'Mouht Alvmola 1 
HOsbilaL .Gufldford; after, a long- IS- 
ness. Paths Timothy, -aged 66. 
Rqceptkm. of the. body. Into* .St 
-Bernardtne's Church. -Buckinghan 
on Tuesday. 3t*h Semembss 7JO 
. pm- fofiawed -tar Remdem Mass. The 
/Funeral Mass on Wednesday. IctOc- 
lohsat 12 pood: fotlow«d.by burial 
‘.teBocKtoflhaon'OmKtexy- 

MORET O N - On 23rd September «d- 
demy bubpeacef uiiy ini haspBaLTjOts. 

; taflr.of Jock -and rarthsof Stephen, 
j John.and Jane. Private cremation. 

OSBORNE- - On September 2*th. ai 42 
High Stras. St Oarids-Oyfed. EBeen 
Mary, widow of Claries Anthony 
Osbdcne ikuLdf Uonef page* Hedges. 

. of Cheltenham. -Funeral at LOOm 
onMoodtur .’Septsnlier. ?9th- at Parc 
• GwynCreniaiortum- Narbsth. Dyf- 
.«L NoflowsS pleased but donations 
appreriaigd for -lfctored. Jockeys' 
Fund.. POfitw 9. Newmarket- Suf- 
:/6»k CRRSJC..-.. 

Mirer PARRY - On Sep tem ber' awi. 

.- 1986. In the Couplers' of Chests 
HosMtal.-Pred. beloved lurshand of 
Jean and laths ol Elizabeth. Ste- 
phen' and. RichbnL: Funeral ai "fit 
James* Church, dutsaritm <ri Mon- 
day. September . 29Ui at LOO pm. 
foUoWad by £rematfog. Donattons to 
Chnsoati Aid. and Friends of the 
Cbuhiess of Chester: Hospitri.Xriqui- 
- rles -to -J G Oarice‘4 Sub. Funeral 
BiRctara. Chester. Tci 31841 1. 

SPgyuH .0G.Staptriau^0rv22Pd 
September- Funeral St.-Mart’’*- CUf 
. tehursL 1046. Tuesday. 30th. . 


BARON GODFREY von BANFIELD 

v - - - • | 

' Chivalrous air ace of a vanished empire 


.Baron' ’ Godfrey von 
Ban field, Jroowias^e.Eagle 
of T«estt r for bis exploits . as 
an Austro-Hungarian- fighter 
pilot during the. First Worid 


months, Bapfi^d-was back in 
the cockpi t. 

'When; shortly afterwards, 
Franz- Ferdinand -was assassi- 
nated at Sarajevo, and. , war 

1 » J . ■ Mtrdfl JnP 




SamttERE - On- ^Wen)ber. 24th. 
> pearefuUy after ?ti Htnos OxavdCF 
' bon»«. Stephen Wtofts tRaD OSE. 
of EBBa aged -703 Dimly betoved fa* 
ther.ePMchaei> David undEBzabeBi 
a»d tmsbgsKi of the Gate ouvoofLMtte 
Hrfiiibtes. BuxtaL EiV SuSsex. 
jMnen|l Semce as wood Vate Cre- 
. malorium. Brisbteif on wedoesoay. 
OceribehSOi at 2J0 bm.-Jtowe r s and 
enaiflries to cower & Son. Funeral 
Directors. UckOdd.; ' 

WESWtOQD. The: -Revetted J.W.C 
fCMS. And retired- Vicar or 

E^nqiuirK-peacefuUy-aftera long iu- 
. MSL on 2Jrd September: Burial 
Semce ® Eynsham pansti phorch 
at. 2.50 prt on Friday. 3te October. 


m >gMORj^Vf-:PRlYATE; 

MT10CK.'- «hs* GOraphr' aetbr. 
poMturer-criekeur^ln haww.ntetuo^ 
m cuyt.Hosdrtai Seotsnbs 2em- 
. 4970C Tzmlty ■and : trtmts. • 


puui uuiiuk UK, rujt revitu ***, — j .. ■ 

War ; died in Trieste pa* Sep- broke out he was 8™“* 
terober 24. He was' 96. ' task of recpmroimng the naval 

- Despite the feci that he nS« 

accounted for the deaths of 

many Italian pilois. hebecawe pertinent anttmt hazardous 

HSSStSS.SS*c wiW^try.-ntothewar 
^nymt^talfmaslinbis JftJJgKSjffiSS 

-jGodficy- Ridbicd" Banfidd TS 

wasborn on February b, 1890. ^ 
the fifth child of doramander 
Rkhard' RanfieliL an -Irish 

officer- in- the -Imperial: Austti- S 

^.NWwhose^y,; !^ ^ 

^ S&n.oniu.rbir 
die- campaigns of the Seven • j. ■■ 


IIOVWWW. uraumrep - , — , 

^SSe.abd-’^in.the at: 
' In 1^3, foflowtfng the oass- Sft- foJca^bo^b 

i*w rif a taw-’ which offered French air forces -to ■ nonto 

better prttfiotioD prospectsto wk^fidcl/wbS 

those tivfng in- Habsbing do- 

raains • who wece AustriaR nf 

citizens, he relinquished his 

Brilish nationality and en- ^he Fagie o 

tered the. Imperial Naval vS**? ■* ’ ■ f inu .l ■ 

Arademy at Fiume(nowRije- Ia the spring of )916th«® 

ka. in Yueoslavial. occurred the event Hditch-tm- 

ka, ur .Yugosta via). - ^ his ^ ipddiWy. on 

; •Berween.'19iO i and J912* he Habsbuig military history Af- 
$qr.ved' tp the cruisers ter , a sortie over Istria, 
RoxJmky and Franz. Ferdi- garffeM landed at Pda in 
rutnd and,, soon came, to the whose- harbour woe a number 
attention :.of Admiral Anton 0 f Austrian dreadnoughts. . 
Hans, who was charged with .- Tbe squadron normally re- 
the task of reterting , young ^onsiwJ for -the defence of 
naval. officers for.lhejoraa- the oort was briefly absent in 


naval officervfor . tbe foraa- ^ ^ ^ briefly absent in 
tfon-of an an* corps. BanfieW jjalmatia When eight Italian 
was Sent to Pans in 1913 to j^es appeared over the har- 
sady _foefatfest developments ^ ^ began to bomb the 
inavfetion. ships. Despite entreaties from 

After returning .to- Po la for the, port com mandan t that any 
flying -instniction, bis career attempt to stop them would be 
was almost cut short when he suicide, Banfidd took off and, 
crashed -. his aircraft into ,a single-handed, attacked the 
destroyer on board which was rdders- who, after losing three 
the Imperial hex, the Arch- of their number, made off. 


study foe latest developments 
in aviation. 


duke Franz Ferdinand. - 
. The archduke bore no bit- 
terness towards the young 


For this act of bravery 
Banneld was made a boron of 
the Anstriah Empire and per- 


MJV y W«N V UJW.rkUOUMUl •ft*'- 

officer and • visited bun in socially, decorated by the Em- 
hospital to encourage him in peror Franz-Josef with tbe 


Within 


Order of Maria Theresa, foe 


empire's highest award for 

“"wSlTthe w|iapseo f the 
empire _ in J 
occupation of Trieste by the 

Siians, Banfield was impru- 

oned. But after several weeks 
he was released and allowed to 
visit England, where ^ he 
worked briefly as an engineer 
in Newcastle. 

In 1920, he married, ^ 

grompton Oraio^ Counttf? 
Maria Tripcovic. becoming a 
the same year an • Italian 
Stizen - his third change of 
nationality in 30 years. Apply- 
ing himself to his 
fern fly's salvage busi ness, be 
built the concern up into ode 
of the most prosperous m the 

Mediterranean. 

An Austrian by training,' he 
much resented foe Artsdiluss 
but. such was his reputation 
among the Wehrmacht offi- 
cers occupying Trieste at foe- 
end of the last war. that he was 
able personally to intervene 
with the German comm aa- 
dant to prevent foe hartw& 
from being blown up before 
foe allies arrived. ■ 

In foe 1950s. he once again 
devoted himself to salvage 
work, most notably clearing 
ships sunk in the Suez canal 
during the Anglo-French 
invasion. 

A charming, ^ntie man, 
whose generosity towards En- 
glish, Austrians and Itahans 
alike was legendary, he always 
remained modest in talking 
about his adventurous yoiifo. 
It was left to others lo teB qf 
his countless acts of dtivaky, 
such as when he visited aj* 
French pilot he had shot dow» 
in hospital and wrote to foe 
man's wife to inform her of 
her husband's survivaL . 

In conversation and man- 
ner, he bore the unmistakable 
stamp of an earlier, nobler age. 

He is survived by his son, 
Raffaello, foe composer and 
director of the Trieste Opera 
House; and by a daughter.- 


PRUDENCE GLYNN 


• Prudence : Glynn ’ (Lady 

Wimtiesham), fesftion editor 
of The Times from L966 to 
I98l,and an influential figure 
in foe world of design, died on 
September 24 after a brain 
baeroonbage, She. was 51;* .’ 

Her 15 yearn on the, paper 
covered a revolution in style, 
from the 1 exuberance of .foe 
1960s through foe anarchy 
andfashion slump.offoe next 
decade: It says a great deal for 
bier; humour, tolerance and 
trenchant prg^e; that she con- 
tinued JQ bejsudia powcrftd 
feSjiidnforo.-, . ■ 

As a character, she was 
feared and respected, rather 
fowl loved. In foeend she was 
herself the chief yirtim of her 
defects of temperamenL . 

• Prudence Loveday Glynn 
'.barn on January 22, 1 9J5, 
foe’ daugftfer 'bf; Ueuterarit* 
Colonel R t W. dynn, MC 
Her 'first- foray- into fashion 
carneiwifo' the dress company. . 
Frank Usher, ^m. after a brief 
appq^itic^ship on fafoioh 
magazines she was. appointed 
fashion editor of The Times . ' . 
_ .She was a witty, .astringent 
and entertaining critic, whose 
horizons extended far beyond 
racks, of dresses. She .-saw 
fashion' as tbe manifestation 
of changing tastes and social 
mores.- aiid 'was as acote an 
observer of personal foibles as. 
of sociological shifts, 

She was also swift to reco&- 
nzze new talent and to chart 
wifo wicked'humomv the mo- 
ment whet* a famous -fashion 
house was beginning to slip 
from its postion 1 of domi- 
nance:-- - . 

PTOdence C^yhn was the last 
grande dame of fashion, a relic 
- albeit a’ vivacious and ener- 
getic '-one- » of the days of 
fashion editor as dictator of 
style! Her comm tatson tbe bi- 
annual fashion shows were 
awaited with relish by her 
readers and with trepidation 
by designers who .knew .that 
she; could -be Jas cruel 'as she 
had been kind- Tn her own . 
person, she' carried her scorn 
for foe-whims offashion.ro 'foe 

pamt of-eccentTTcrty. •; \ 

■Her pen was always to the 
poim. Addresong ■ herself to 
females in trousers, s/ie wrote: 
“There’s, no doubt about, it 




English women oti foe whde 
don’t look- as good in trousers 
as some other races da It’s not 
jest a question pV age or 
weighteiiher- quite a number 
Of Continental ladies who are 
nd less dun certain 6se and 
pound for. pound no lighter, 
seem- to - be able to look both 
chic and-trim in pants. . 

* “ft. follows, therefore, that 
tbe ability to. look good in 
trousers is dependent on some 
basic figure .. . construction. 
Sinbe'the ‘typical' British fig- 
ure is one: that has doping 
shoulders, a .stnaH top : half 
and reaches’ its widest point 
where thef legs jom-foe torso, 
one can see where the problem 
may arise.- "* • ■ 


Although she herself en- 
joyed the glamorous side of 
couture collections and appra 
dated the craft of stitch atm 
sew, she was also interested in, 
and immensely knowledge- 
able about the trade and 
industry of fashion. She berat- 
ed British manufacturers for 
their inability to appredate 
foe importance of design, and 
worked tirelessly to promote 
British fashion, both at home 
and abroad. 

Her interest in design 
brought her on to foe Design 
Counril from 1973 to 1979. 
She was also a member of the 
Crafts Counril from 1977 to 
1980, and on foe Counril for 
National Academic Awards' 
committee for art and design. 
In her capacity as a fashion 
expert and historian, she wasc^ 
member of the council of thl-/ 
Royal College of Art from 
1969 -to- 1977, and was a 
trustee of' the Museum of 
London since 1981. 

Her published work, which 
will live on as an elegant and 
winy reminder of her style, 
included In Fashion (1978) 
and Skin to Skin (1982), an 
original study of eroticism in 
dofoihg which took as its 
starting point foe quotation: 
“The greatest provocations of 
our lust are from our apparel " 

She was married, in 1965, to 
Lord- Windlesham, from, 
whom she was legally se paraS 
ed at the time of her death. 
They had a son and. ■a 
daughter. 


PROF ANDRAS KORODI 


Professor Andris Koridi, 
foe* Hungarian conductor, 
died' on September 17. in 
Treviso, Italy, 'wherr.he vitas 
oh tour ; wifo foe Budapest 
Opera, of which- be was chief 
conductor. He was 64. 

Korddi. who was born in 
Budapest, on, M3y '24. 1922,' 
had- studied, conducting with 
Janos- Fet&ocsik- at. foe- Buda- 
pest Conservatory before join- 
ing the .-Budapest National 
Opera as repeiiteur ip J 946. . 

■In that year he .made -his 
<tebui- wifo. KodalyV Mary 
Janos, and ' was soon - after- 
wards appointed a conductor. 

Spence report 


He was made principal con- 
ductor in 1 963, and president- 
conductor of the Budapest 
Philharmonic Orchestra in 
1967. 

Korodi's preferred area of 
the .repertory was the twenti- 
eth century, and he had given 
premieres of several Hungar- 
ian -operas, notably Szokolay’s 
Blood Wedding in 1964, bo- 
rides conducting a number of 
works in foe complete record-# 
ed edition ofBanok. ■ : r 

He was the first Hungarian 
to conduct foe Bolshoi Opera 
when he gave Carmen in 
Moscow in 1957: • 


Mystery of the body’s clock 


A reason why people seem more 
prrae to heart attacks mid 
stiokes in foe early morning -the 
subject of foe science repot 
yesterday - may lie' in their 
internal bMogkat dock, or foe 
m-bmh mechanism foot divides 
the day taro a sfeep-wake cyde 
that is specific to- each iadrritf- 
. . 

Two events show foe seeking 
effects of dbturiftrig'the body^s 
dock, qr .foe- human tirctdhn 
pacemaker, as ft is knotnt..- 

Onris foe jet lag some people 
suffer in; travelling, long . dis- 
tances across time zones. .The 
human- pacemaker -is thought to 
need about a day to adapt for 
evtt^ one : or 'two-'-time^iones 
crossed, depenfingea the direc- 
tion of tnivgL' 

; TW other fohmdM is foe 
disoriauatihn of pmonera under 

InterrO*atKW,wt»are ako kept 

in constant bright light even 
when nut under.- cross- 1 
examinatjon 

"Tbe oBtrioas aspect ^is that foe 
bioltMpcar dock; which ooatrtfis 
people's -iphysMosy, behariow 
pattern and ' then- ability -far . 
mental concentration, is fenger. 
Idfadst.cases, than. 74 hoots- . 


By Pearce Wright. Sdence Editor 




V^rioni"measbreiBent5 sho»- 
changes of the body's tem- 
peratare and foe pattern of foe 
rdease of various bormones are 
foe indicators trf foe rhythm of 
foe dock. ’■ 

. Exaetiy which part .of foe 
oriuii contains the master .dock 
is a mystery. But an American 
researdi team has siRKStcd 
how if is re-set'each day. . 

. Its (fadings are relevant to the 
discoveries by medical researeh- 
e>« looking at heatt attacks, who 
now- suspect that dreadiaa 
rbyttmLs are behind changes of 
hormones- - and other 
Mocbemicals leading to x heart 
altarte m foe earhrmnrnmn ■ 

-Tbe scientists workfao on i foe 
human dock wath ^Charles 
Ctttrier ri foe Harvard Medical 
School fa foe United States 
daun to have established how 
foe d irect action of tight fa a 
jnmtuy nay of resetting foe 
ciftck. ■ • . fc 

■ Thefrt^idnaoiBcqniefroma 
"S™** 64 . P*g'*.*ho was-a healthy 
“to PSycholo£vcaUy nonnal 

^o «ged d6. She Joined a 
laboratory stedj in which she 

to :*»■ of 

anght light for seven coosec- 
otnesrauqL . 


-Before that* foe sdentists bad 
y atghg d her nonnal sleep^rake 
pattern in her normal' sarroend- 

fags and with her usual family 
and friends. 

■ The exposure to-bright M 
took place in foe laboratory to 
whidt family land hinds MN 
admitted. But foe normal ‘♦coesT 
that told her what ' time of the 
day it was, were removed. 

She had complete control ovdr 
her.day in terms of ordering ha 
mal tones and steeping tunes 
and she settled very rapidly fori 
30-hoor day. In other words, the 
exposure to bright Baht had 
« 2 »ded her tnotogcai dot & 
and there was no normal way of 
re-setting it. '.r. 

- Yet tbe light to which she was 

«*««» was equivalent to 
■nght outdoor natoral tight last;” 
after dawn. . ^ ■ 

Measurements of her blood 


«■«««} snoweq 

foe release ofhon 

blood and other vs 
Jjtppd dternfaby. 
factors which im 

s^dyfa*. heart dfa 
Source: Science, 
Pages 667-671. .19 


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Television Cinema: new releases in London 

SSS? A music drama 


M . 1 


Dines of the television docu- 
mentary often complain that 
the form too rarely strays 
beyond a simple journalistic 
sysentation in which narrated 
exposition is intercut with 
gnotable, talking head inter- 
views. Last night's Equinox: 
■Precisely in Profit (Channel 
4), which dealt with the tech- 
nological miracles possible 
.through miniaturization, used 
.the traditional format with 
deft effectiveness, as experts 
explained their theories to a 
watchful camera, while the off- 
screen voice of John Hedges 
guided us carefully from topic 
to topic. . 

Although this is, poten- 
tially, a dull and old-fashioned 
way of doing things — rather 
, Uke those worthy took at Life 
fijhs one had to sit through at 
school — it is difficult to 
envisage an alternative which 
is both literate and economi- 
cal. This land of programme 
presumes that its audience will 
set aside the time to watch and 
concentrate, and, in these days 
of pyrotechnic computer 
graphics and attehtioa-grab- 
tmig visual invention, it is 
refreshing to encounter a docu- 
mentary which trusts the 
intrinsic Interest of its content 
fBBCTs Nine O'Clock News 
s •currently running ■ a title 
deques ce whose riotous design 
find thunderous music suggest 
shat the next step is a pre- 
cTedit teaser and a Shirley 
Bassey theme-song.) 

Most of is know that we owe 
•the Sony Walkman and the 
eOrapact disc to an increasing 
scientific ability to construct 
technological equipment in 
smaller and smaller sizes. 
Many of us can remember the 
wireless, with its large, unreli- 
able valves, and hs usefully 
portable successor, tbe shrill 
little transistor radio. Precisely 
in ~ Profit pointed . opt that 
miniaturization has more to do 
^ith accuracy and efficiency 
jfran with smallness. 

. ..As — incredibly — the atom 
■itself is becoming a workable 
unit in industrial measurement 
and construction, scientists 
can cancel out the formal 
imperfections of nature in 
order to bring us equipment of 
astonishing efficiency and 
resilience. Rolls-Royce are 
designing turbine blades to 
specifications calculated in 
.thousandths of mlDim^res : 
which may .cut SlOO.QQti.w ' 
the running costs of each plane 
that flies the Atlantic. The 
lames transputer, which re- 
duces a computer to the size of 
a chip, may soon give us 
machines like Kubrick's Hal 
.9000, which can talk and see 
1 /n an eerie simulation of 
humanity. This was a lucid 
and absorbing documentary, 
beautifully organized by the 
writer/producer Glyn Jones, 
m a consistently excellent 
series. . . . . .. 

. Andrew Rissik 






Otello (U) 

ABC Shaftesbury 
Avenue 

The Legend of Suram 
Fortress (U) 

Camden Plaza 


Musically Loriu Maazel’S inter- 
pretation seems to my inexpert ear 
impeccable: the purists must 
adjudicate on the ingenious orch- 
estration of the tempest in the 
Overture and the wind in the last 
act. The performances explore to 
the full the rich dramatic and 
psychological possibilities which 
Verdi and Boito afford. 






• Plarido Domingo's Moor has 

171 • /nzi\ tragic splendour and such realistic - 

JLieni (r(j y conviction that we never question- . 

Cannon Haymarket : 

fascinating subtlety; haunted by a. . r 
At first sight it may seem sheer - demoDoTmischlelalonce denying ^ 
perversity to cut numbers in Venlfs - "the existence of a God and defying .3 



Otello as fam iliar as the Act I chorus 
or Desdemona's Willow Song. It is 
possible though that Franco Zeffi- 
relli's intention was precisely to 
frustrate the familiar theatrical 
expectations in his concern to 
emphasize how far Verdi had 
progressed from the conventions of 
V ictorian grand opera which he had 
helped establish half a century 
before. The film above all dem- 
onstrates how modern was Verdi’s 
new concept of music drama. The 
freedom of action and: movement 
which the film 1 is- uniquely able to 


. him.' Xatia Ricciarefli manages to: 
give a human scale to Desdemona's 
abused, bewildered, saintly inno- ■ 
cence; and, though cuts have left 
Emilia somewhat in tbe air. Petra 
Malakova. makes a vivid im- 
pression in the role. 

For some parts Zeffirelli has used 
off-screen operatic voices mouthed 
by on-screen actors. This is particu- 
larly effective in allowing him to 
cast an on-screen Cassio (Urbano 
Barberini, voiced by Ezio di Cesare) 
whose physical attractions, sensu- 



A hero’s return in the wet: Otello (Placido Domingo) embraces Desdemona (Katia Ricdarelli) observed by 
z Ingo (Justino Diaz, left) and the handsome Cassio (Urbano Barberini) 


Suram Fortress sets oui to do for 
ancient Georgian lore and legend 
what The Colour of Pomegranates '■ 
■did for the culture of PanidjahovV 


metry to frame a scene; a flock of 
sheep make patterns on the hillside 
as they flee before the invading 
enemy; a saiting ship hovers raysa- 


native Armenia: The ; story ’ is a caHy in the qh; between' the ocean 
symbolic panegyric- to the warriprs- ana tire plain: ' *; ^ ' ,'■■' 


which the film ; is uniquely able to ■ ously caressed bv the camera. mat»» of every ^whpsacri^lheirli.yes . . There are hints ‘that .-Paradjanoy 
provide reveals and enhances frie- Jum i credible sexual irriian^ W- j3iotli<Tland:~T^Km^af *: rift, tttftjiase has, had- to wn* his -, 

dramatic fluidity t)f toewark. "’"those' - 1 -.oOeoigiaL commands the! building of' magic'wfhveij sgparfc means.' The/ 

The major fault is indeed a too- . ;’*••• afortress against the foreign invad- . , .suanm hora«5d.stmctures that flank 

evident straining aflerthis fluidity. - -With' The Legend of Shram' ers but, eaeff time the walls reach'.' 'the. kirfg's throne prove, .enclose. 
Neither the actors nor the camera ' Fortress Sergo' Paradjanov returns roof-level. it -collapses^ A fortune-' 'inspection to be- four: early. 20th- 
nor the cutler ever seem to resL rather unobtrusively to work in the teller predicts that it wilLonly stand : Century gilt console tables, probably 

Everything is so constantly, her- 'Soviet cinema, after 20 years of if the most handsome and -noble . borrowed from the local hotel and • 

voiisly on the move that we can - ever-worsening difficulties. In 1965 young warrior is bricked up in the inverted on lop of each other. He * 

hardly lake in the settings, mostly Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors' walL A suitably blue-eyed and blond does not care that behind his 
ancient castles and fortresses which brought him both world-wide atten- youth offers himself for the sac- hovering ship contemporary vessels 

Zeffirelli basseJected and dressed to lion and the first grumblings at rifice; and the fortress is built. . are clearly visible. There is a touch 


brought him both world-wide atten- 
tion and the first grumblings at 


marvellous effect Otello's Cypriot' home about the obscurity and 
stronghold is a place of windows, ' elitism of his work. In .the. years 


loopholes, doorways, passages, 
holes and comers for lurking and 
spying,. lagoqnd Otello in turn both, 
enter an ancient domed chapel lit 
only "by a single shaft of light ftortf 
.thereof — the Ottetp.deny.his Qod 
and the oiaerTitually .to cobsignjus" 
crucifix to the flames before kilfing* 
. Desdemona. 


if the most- handsome and -noble . 
young warrior is bricked up in the 
wall A suitably blue-eyed and blond 
youth offers himself for the sac- 
rifice, and the fortress is built. 

Once again Paradj anov composes 
rich and wonderful images out of 
undulating landscapes, ancient 
' buildings, banners and draperies, . 


borrowed from the local hotel, and - 
inverted on lop of each other. He 
does not care that behind his 
hovering ship contemporary vessels 
are clearly visible. There is a touch 
of the village pageant. 

Peter Yates assaults alien terri- 
tory in Kleni, which is based on a 
best-seller by the .Greek-born New 


film flashes back and forth between 
the present with the grown-up Gage 
(John MaJkovich) on his journey, 
and the suffering village of his 
childhood. 

Undoubtedly the kind of horrors 
the film describes took place. The 
trouble is that it is very hard to 
believe anything in the film. Steve 
Tench's two-dimensional screen- 
play removes the Communist terror 
from any context Although in the 
book the village was occupied in 
turn by both sides, in the film we 
never glimpse the opposition, 
vaguely referred to as monarchists 
orrascists. There is no suggestion of 
a political background- all we see are 
black-hearted Communist villains, 


folkariefacts and costumes, actors -.. York : Times' journalist.' Nicholas 
with, strange,- beautiful, : sculpted ? v Gage- hr the btiekGage; wh o is co- 
features* flocks-tif sheep bmLriKtle, ~’ < jp(riGMcera the pietoffirtelateshis 



. •_ ”f-:.rr_5v:r . ,v;r ; i 

opt 4q.be amuc^i-better 


■ L.yttetomg 

Tbe-hame ofiPmero .tisiiaily 
■i evokes Two' 'qtote^'.Ssp&raBS 
playwrights^ the fust an emer- 
taiaer who disinfected Bench 
force for the Victorian carriage 
trade. The other, best known 
for The Second Mrs Tan- 
queray \ is a would-be serious 
writer, im potently striving to 
bring Victorian moral, ideal- 
ism to terms with the realities 
of Ibsen,. .. 

- When Michael RudmaiTdi- 
rected'Afrs Tanquefay;$r#c 
. . National The a tre: ~ it tiirne d_ 


Nigel Hawthorne, after a rough night mMeekr Street- 


aor»of-Paiotb?s!fimfe 
pu» paid to ; the;- 


Music in London 


Philharmonia/ 

Sinopoli 

Festival Hall 

'.r- 

Mahler's Sixth Symphony was 
(he first work that 1 heard 
Giuseppe Sinopoli conduct 
Then, with the same orchestra 
and in the same hall as 
Wednesday night’s perfor- 
jnance. the o\ eroding im- 
pression of his reading was ol 
a relentless cut and thrust and 
nervous tension utterly fitting 
for such devastating music. 

• ■ But on his return to the 
work in the opening concert 01 
the Philharmonia Orchestra s 
season he at first - indeed Tor 
most of the work’s duration — 
seemed to have toned down 
the drama to a respectably 
; Brueknerian level. The first 
: ’ movement went on its way a 
shade complacently. pw>ed 
almost like a straightforward 


classical sonata. form, though 
not without a nibato which, 
however, stayed well within 
the bounds of acceptability. 
Thus Fate's inexorable march 
stole up on one with curious 
stealth, and certainly without 
inducing much sense of 
foreboding. 


home about the obscurity ana once again Paradjanov composes ot the village pageant. black-hearted Communist villains, 

elitism of his work. In the. years rich and wonderful images out of Peter Yates assaults alien lerri- under an extravagantly satanic lead- 
between. the only project he was undulating landscapes, ancient tory in Eleni, which, is based on a er (Oliver Cotton), 

allowed to make was The Colour of buildings, banners and draperies, . ■ best-seUer % the Greek-born New viiiam* has hmi 

Pomegranates (1968-69), but that folkanefects and costumes, actors l.-York: limes journalist.; Nicholas V^ivinriiSw enouah^re-enratedin 

: : Ba*ddtiaT9lIF€Cntuiyj«te&[ng/ ^ 'br _prijfutJye' religious painting. A ;; -ffi'e Communid ^gueatiDa -foriis in : . v - ^ , , _ . 

of an'old folk myth. The Legend of } pair of bulls , sand : in -exact- syn> *. -ihc Cnol War ofitSe fete .l 940s. The ■ DflTlfl KOOUISOD 

Theatre: Finefo treated seriously to hilarious effect 

Farce played with rare mastery 

^nnptixnishir^TOcaded living- with a scarred nose: a superb 
.... detail that precisely encap- 

*e mistre»^Qaire PtotaErj^^he salates the contradiction of 

■ rr— rrr^ pus paid te ; the; Two Broadwood implarning a kiss private and public life. 

-A:V dlaWpgh£s^ c v AjWrt '• -dips of ■young CIs -The surrounding characters 

• Snlc^Wo' firm the , 'cbhk«^tt'dfb^c - 5fG^wafe Henderara):for:flfe. share this kind otfanaticism. 

’* plot points (both tUrpfogon^t < duration of a prolo ngetLtnD, which' is constantly tripping 

raarfi^p . hetweeief. a thus evoking; -all , the secret them up: whether it be Alison 
gwSKSlY'dSg-j'htebMd stirrings of Victorian- music Fisk’s -baritone-voiced Char- 
and a woman^th'.a guHty . lessons. It is the^pace that lone, torn between displaying 
T secret). The Ma^zdtO occdr * achieves. this effect; ^ ^likewise wronged dignity and suc- 
pies the same upper-middle- the jealousy Cis stirs up cumbtng to her lust for food; 
c *® ss where there is a among the domestic staff and pr_Gem ma Craven’s Agatha, 
Sf'vSI rigid division between private his mother’s speech on how he winding up a long sequence of 

and public' behaviour and . has bear fondled by every lady sweetly turned lies with a 
ism to terms with the realities who drops infortea-Examme piercing scream on discover- 

: - • • the.bBmfc.'., .the' spjriexl qnd hisafoainy, ing that she is up before her 1 

^Raula.Tanquffay. Ifos'ah ; ‘ of course, playsno part husband in court. 

nCm MrSTampteym:.V‘jfA in ihft . rlftdiof . a n d faff of Jti e : If there is one factor that 

a%ht r . Nation al Thti atiK_.tLHittned- -P o^ e t - -h as — passed — of f - h er ' luckless- hero. Mr Posket foUy defines the show's quality it is 

: ’ . 7 . ■ 1 ■ . : 1 grown-up son -asa; r4-year-old ' embodies the- Victorian- ideal Hen Stott’s performance of 

’ so aslo market asdpinai’dfsbcietyaiid a kind the police inspector who raids 

lVULJv ' Srafot Ote' lYV-Theme.-for fomiTymaji; there is no sugges- the hotel: a courteous, un- 

onia’s playing evoked an r ,, , . drama and the other for force, lion that he is acting out any hurried official, blandly taking 

sphere of calm resol u- but their motives and the guilty fantasy when, he joins down all the fibs from Mr 

albeit in a key as for HammpTCTnith social di^race they foce are Cis for a disastrous night out Pickering and Nicholas le 

tefrom^e foregoing A ™ mersmtn identical ■ ■ in the Meek. Street HoieL But Prevosu and slowly lifting a 

ir as it is possible to be. Oaeon This is by for- the funniest in Nigel Hawthorne’s marvel- whistle to his lips. There is no 

i the finale have been Pinero production p have lous performance toe part hue and cry. He barely moves; 

d at alP t arrv Rlarkmnn the leader nf seen. and its- secret is to play does take on a satiric edge but he certainly makes the 

the text as toolkit were nota which.puts it even beyond the others jump about 


iarrapmoilsly brocaded Irving- 

.... 

*e mistresstClaire Ptoter)^t4he 
toe' Two Broadwood Implanting a kiss 
sb^riv Apart -tips of ^yoraig Cis 

- ^Graeme Henderajn)! far: toe 


tram -the catocftfcna.'DfpJjasjc - ^Graeme Henderatn): for: toe 
plot points (both turpifik oha - d uration of a prn j o ngetLtriD. 
^ppd marri^e . her w eief . a tons evoking .all the secret 


gLmelKSiy 'doting': 'hosbapd 
and a woman: with' a. guflty 
secretX The Magaime qcqi- 
pies toe .same uppierimiddle^ 
class world, where there is a 
rigid division between private 


stirrings of Victorian- music 
lessons. It is the pace that 
achieves, this effect; likewise 
toe jealousy Cis stirs up 
among- tbe domestic staff and 
his mother’s speech on how he 


harmonia’s playing evoked an 
atmosphere of calm resolu- 
tion, albeit in a key as for 
remote from toe foregoing A 
minor as it is possible to be. 
Need the finale have been 
played at all? 

Tbe answer was most defi- 
nitely yes,- for Sinopoli had 


Rock 

j Value: ’ One vs V.toeme; .for 
man drama and the other for force, 

LiUDcO biit their motives and the 

Hammersmith ^ t ¥ f * race they foce are 

_ , identical. 

Oaeon This is hy fef- foe funniest 

Pinero production P have 

Larry Blackmon, toe leader of P S 


Perhaps, one thought, the ^ 

orchestra had" become too fljoment He 


s^SS-2® sesM«s 

tSiSSXSSSSA SSS 

S much. Indeed, .he point of By the .<«ac qmc aikot aKIowa. audfenceiowaaes 6thd ? 

this movemem seemed to be senses tad bee” bvSfntA imo TTns_ oaenanous less laoghler. Such a style i 

the Trio section, here again a total always being laid down as. thi 

somewhat easygoing _ Landler ™ .^le es^ and the be tnm "KTmg basic nde for feme; but it t 


Tbe answer was most defi- Cameo and a rapidly develop- 
nitely yes,- for Sinopoli had ing auteur in the Atlanta^ 
saved his trump casd for this music - community, has b6en 
moznenL He had. been deliid- ringing the changes. ance bis 
ing us into a false sense _df group's -visit here fostJDwx^n- 


and. public ‘ •' behaviour and . has been fondled by every lady 
frmale^yiriueisffice money in who drops in-for.tea. Examine 
Jwtic -' *■ Tfy ' .toe wjrtext in&it is. steamy. 

B a to r — to g' ' luckless- hero. Mr Pos ket fufly 

grown-up son^sa r4-year-old ” embodies the- Victorian, ideal 
so as to ofrvujcelhei; . jnSaffet ' as'dpinat 1 dfsbeiety and a kind 
■value: One & a'.toeme' Vfor fomflymaji; toeie is no sugges- 
drama and toe other for force, lion that he is acting out any 


ptft - fS^m^b^aqd, ti^b- 
erme, Jnai6s^3ic~ 

SSSSSiSSSffiJS 

lal^of tetown. SSSSS^SL^S^ 

1 less ladghier. .Such a style is 

always being laid down astoe 
basic rule for force; but it is 
the Pops, is an appropnate v ~, seMon, that you see a 

sionless comedy. Up gdes toe 


than OTmeihine ero- pain had been made the more the Pops, is an appropnate 

a^l^areeMhan life ^ unendurable by the cruel symbol for toe siniwus. vinle 

S teSna id£d gen£' io- mildness of what had gone approach tjrai they, now 

^ before. Either this was a emphasize. The mam pelvic 

wards lhe r clever if controversial re- thrusts, which it threw into 

or the Pha- ^ reliet dually 

menL where me^owing^ui had simply woken underlined a sexual reference 

tivaied sound of the Phil- in the tonh* ind in “Wrird 


L LONDON’S HILARIOUS 
COMEDY HIT! 

“IT REALLY IS 

VERY FUNNY! 


Sunday limes 


• V rMIV 14„ Acomadyby v 
’ / EN D IVlEL XEN LUDWIG 
A 7 * iriky^O GLOBc THEATRE 
J tlNOK 01-437 1592^ 


interpretation, or the Phil- such stark relief; usua lly 
harmonia had simply woken underfilled a sexual reference 
up in toe nick of time, in the lyrics; and in “Word 
Whichever; it worked- - Up^ antf *the conaimmate 

. . . ■. “Single Life” toe thidc. eco- 

__A^ep Or noL tecte)^ pomfc • fin* ^ : -i fBtr- poked 

F e through with fitoe inristenOe. 

..Bui hefory Blackfooh jmd 

» playing of L ^ SM'lffiMiS 
SSUS sem«. ipto i his gnxiv e there 

did not penetrate toe texture SLJSIfc 

in the finale. And such ^ the 

general suren«s of touch toai SSi fiomtfSr 
it seems inevitable toe Phil- ^ dialogue a blast of 

5?"SSS a Thrift? 1 tSS rock V rolT. a mo- 

aandard in London tins mem of big-band soul a brief 

season - . drum solo, a couple of racial 

Stephen Pettltt giiifor breaks^ and jeven a. edd- 

r reggae tribute to Bob Marley. 

- - - The 1 0-m’ece backing -band 

played 'v^tir all- t^ frc dhd 
discipline mat "the Cameo 'trio 


oruipsoiaa comHeoi.meai projectionist-called Hariy^ a 

me«k..and qnassummg. xnan 
reggae tribute to Bob Marley. whose ; tnrmjtiafmg . wartime 
The 1 (Mece backing -band experience m Korea's thrown 
Pl^tti'vdtlr all tfie fire and fruo-Vcriid^ refief^w^: Sis 
discipline that toe Cameo trio daughter /marries -A- paia- 
in front-put into theirarresting ^dopb frBh from ibft: £&- 
dance routines: Eyen 'wilh ’ ' -’■‘■J. 

four kiqpboard^pfoyers and.a 


biit their motives and the guilty fantasy when, he joins 
social disgrace they foce are Cis for a disastrous night out 
identical in the Meek. Street HoieL But 

This is by for- toe funniest hi Nigel Hawthorne's marvel- 
Pmero production T ' have lous performance toe part 
seem and ks- secret is to play does take on a. satiric edge 
the text as though ft were not a which puts it even beyond toe 
force at alL. There are mo long shadow of Alastair Sim. 
super-energetic -figures- boune At home, Hawthorne's Pos- 

ing on to identi& the stage as fret . is a. btissful innocenL 
fiin-coriwr.'Thepace: pfiable even with his servants, 

out dhd“^b»ihrte.' j»rtt^ r in . toe 
safe, ' ; JwtoVrio 1 hands of ' his"‘gamblmg, 'hell- 

ceteratippsi' Chararter^ afe raising stepsou, But sec him 
^atcS ja d^diy: eafnfcsl'aiid after . the .mght. quL= cra.wfing 
rt iS-tfiem pursuit qf rnting b&fefntq (he Mulberry Street 
obsessions . .that reduces toe Court 'and '-gradually reassum- 
audifence to ecstasies of help- iqg tbe majesty of the law, the 
less laughter. .Such a style is mild, beaming features con- 
al ways being laid down as the torted into self-righteous fury 
basic rule for force; but it is as he informs his arrested 
very seldom that you see a friend, Lnkyn (Donald Pick- 
production with 'toe nerve to ering) that toe events in coitit 
carry it out : ■ may oblige him to cancel his 

• It ai-en yields toe stiffing , if evening's dinner engagement 
minor, g?in of admitting sex As Hawthorne rises to his 
imo. Pinero'i suppdsediy pas- , cli max he dons, a pair of pince- 
sionless coniedy. Upmdes toe nez and collapses m agony, as 
cunam- op X^ri*. Tomsey^ his. ^adv e nt ur es have left- him 

War 

New^KJy'NewrastTe '■* Harry.-** -disgusted by the 
j' T . :i. V '7 ' macho to* of his son-in-law 

UnqeryLyme arfo paratrooper friends. His 

” knowkdgc of Korea, pierces 
Tony Pemn’s War Pictures, their oamh comradeship and 
toe joint winner of toe Mobil frontier-town ' belligerence. 
Plavwriting.Coirtpetitrom is a.. But. be . ends .the evening 
confident and ambitious piece endorsing their values, in his 
of wbric which fils easily into own qualified, way. If he is a 1 
this circular auditorium. Its srtairman"with a conscience, 
central character is a dnerna something of toe soldier still 


Irving Wardle 


Richard Morrison 
reports on disruption 
in the Huddersfield 
Choral Society 

Another 

boycott? 

An acrimonious row has 
shaken one of Britain's most 
venerable musical institutions 
marring celebrations of its 
150to anniversary. Two weeks 
ago tbe Huddersfield Choral 
Society accepted the resigna- 
tion of its musical director, 
Owaio Arwel Hughes, after 
previously rejecting a “him or 
me” ultimatum from the 
Welsh conductor, directed 
against toe Huddersfield's 
chorus-master, Brian Kay. 

Now some members are 
campaigning for Hughes’s 
reinstatement. Tonight a spe- 
cial meeting of all Hud- 
dersfield’s members will vote 
ou a motion of do confidence in 
the society's officers and exec- 
utive committee, over their 
handling of Hughes's resigna- 
tion. The officers and commit- 
tee will themselves resign if 
toe vote goes against them. 

The crisis began last May. 
at a conceit by the famous 
Yorkshire choir, one of several 
special anniversary events. 
Hughes, who was appointed in 
1980, called the society's offi- 
cers together and made a 
request “pertinent to the fu- 
ture musical standard of tbe 
choir”. That request, only 
revealed to tbe rank and file 
this' month, was that Kay be 
replaced as chorus-master. 

According to a choir spokes- 
man, Christine Wilkinson, the 
society’s officers tried to “pour 
oil on troubled waters”. Rela- 
tions between conductor and 
chorns-master had been noti- 
ceably strained for some time, 
despite the choir's marked 
revival of fortunes under their 
Joint regime. There are be- 
lieved to have been disagree- 
ments over policy and over the 
choir’s level of preparation. 
The relationship between a 
chorus-master, who prepares 
the singers up to the last 
rehearsal and a conductor, 
who then adds his “inter- 
pretation”, is in any case 
extremely vaguely defined. At 
Hnddersfield, similarities in 
age and professional standing 
between the two men may have 
contributed to the problems. 

Hngbes, though his critical 
reparation is uncertain, has 
won fame as a television 
popabrizer of nrasfc. He will 
for instance, be appearing on 
BBC1 each evening for a week 
next year, presenting extracts 
from various Requiem settings 
— a considerable coup. That, 
plus Hughes's appointment 
next year as associate conduc- 
tor of the Phflharmooia and 
his strong relationship with 
EMI (the Huddersfield’s al- 
bum of hymns, conducted by 
him, has jnst attained gold- 
disc status), is difficult for a 
choral society to turn its back 
on. But Kay, a former King's 
Singers member, is also no 
stranger to television. 

The society's officers told 
Hughes in Angnst that Kay 
would not be sacked. A day- 
later Hughes resigned. At 
tonight's meeting in toe King 
Street Mission (tbe choir's 
time-honoured rehearsal 
room) members now have the 
awkward choice between start- 
ing their new season without 
any officers and committee, or 
without a musical director. 
Huddersfield holds its breath. 


-'Newtasffe 

underLyme ~ 1 

Tony Pem'n’s War Pictures. 
the joint winner of toe Mobil 
Playwriting' 1 Contpeijtion..is a. 
confident and ambitious piece 
of work which fits easily into 


arid parat 


‘AN EROTIC AND N 
PSYCHOLOGICAL 
MASTERPIECE/timeout 



FRANK du4W0j) GER0 
mxtn 


dings tofitnvand be has never 
forgotten; those simple combat 
mOvies on which fie grew up. 
.iiPeVntfs^w[itiWvsai??etwtffs 
rnaiteitoomuch of toistoeme. 
andthi- bfiarapters^xsak with 
a grandiCBe vibrato ; that , is 
qfteft'igjborafonabl^ dose to 












WTIBBIIWMlIIMi 01-8363028- 
Credit Cards t&O toekmg 878 SESS/Tictotuwar OTB.6433/ 

first Call 34 his7 d^a 840 7800/K*ith Promo 74L9999 
-GKIUP& 01-838 3983 or AVVLAIOT 01-831 2771 


horn section at work there was 
no musical clutter to distract 
from toe sharp rhythms fuel- 
ling the vocalists’ hip-hop 
aerobic steps as they waded 
into a unison rap. “You're 
Talking Out of toe Side of 
Your Neck”. 

But Blackmon's complaint 
of feeling hoarse was reflected 
in his vocal performance and. 
one suspects... Jed.-- to- -toe 
conclusion of the sfiq.w. after 
less than an-bour.-vSien aU-toe 
best elements of their act'were 
beginning trecdaieto. ■ - ’ • • 

David Sinclair 


whidt-ftt makes Hariy^s to- fotic.^tre, »*£*■ 


■lemma, his quiet self-to^ust. n^wcomesat^in a wato of 
into a matter for theatrical emotion, and it has the robust 
action and spectacle. As his sentnnemaJuy of an English 
wife- heiravft him. as friends dnftking^ong. But-, it is well 


wife betrays him. as friends .^r ,r . ls W P U 

prove .tomr fickle ’ wqrth. as Erected byGhm Martin, who 
these unherotc characters arranges toe actioam flowing 
scramble fon toe.dignity.of fine ■ “bteau* and matches it seam- 
sentiments. arid, nobfe . ideals, ~ ^ sao n ^ 

we see what iHolly wood and of Hollywood mus^. 

the cinema i offers 4hem>In 

thrarmc^y.'cbmp.licaxed fives So,? 

they.lorig:fprtoe consdapons 

br.LprinraryrCOlodr ^omahee ■ hi! 


'and - great-hearted ad venture. - “ s 

nicy W6iil(tall like wise sfors. BaniMssWtt.. : 

though each "df toem Has a r Alldr^W RisSlk 


les liaisons 
dangereuses 

9- CHRISTOPHER HAMPTON 4 

• " • wicrssvffOWARD DAVIES - 
- BOB CROWLEY ■ . A - 

- -- - wk* JEAN ANDERSON- f V* ; 

• . • LUCY ASTON . : 

■ SUZANNE BURDEN 
UNDSAY DUNCAN ctm 

BEATJEEDNEY ' ■-rm 

SMONMATTAOG 
HILTON MCRAE- ■*.’$! 

KRISTIN MJLWARD 
• ALAN RICKMAN 
HUGH SIMON 


\^T3X, 




*V."J 



^ V ' > 


AMBASSADORS 

THEATRE 

Boainngljl 8366m CrafitC«*01 836-1171 s 
BrerCaUOl 2407200^ hom / tofrmimgfw 


I ’ 




16 



Top men 
out in 
Rover 
shake-up 

Condoned from page I ' 
operating profit to £8.7 ’mil- 
lion, with sales up 10 per cent 
to £214 million, while Leyland 
Vehicles' losses increased to 
£27.5 million from £23.5 mil- 
lion a year earlier. 

Mr Day made clear his 
intention to concentrate on 
profitability. “Market share is 
not a god I worship," he said. 

The second half of the year 
would not see a reversed 
trend, he added, but he hojjed 
to see a return to operating 
profit within two years. He 
had not yet asked the Govern- 
ment for more money.bui was 
. preparing the neat corporate 
plan . for presentation at the 
end of the year.. ' ~ V ■ : 

BC received about ' £2-2 
billion of state funding and 
£1.5 billion of guarantees after 
its government rescue. 

Meanwhile, Ford yesterday 
reported big gains in 
productivity and output at its 
British plants. Vehicles pro- 
duced per employee had al- 
most doubled in five years but 
the UK workforce was still not 
as productive as Ford workers 
on the continent. 

• Mr Harold Musgrove de- 
nied yesterday that he had 
been dismissed by Mr Gra- 
ham Day! the ■ new . Rover 
Group chairman - and said;. 
“There was no tenaon, no row 
jjnd I have no- bitterness. .1. 
decided it was the right thing 
for the future strength of^the 
company for me to leave." 

Speaking from his country 
house in the village of Fen 
End. near Coventry, Mr 
Musgrove said: “It is just not 
true that 1 have been sacked. It 
is sad, but how can you be 
bitter against the company 
which has employed you for 
42 years?" 

He vehemently rejected re- 
ports that he had been forced 
out along, with -Other— exec-J 
utives and told The Times: “It 1 
'seemed an opportune moment 

to go When you have two 

senior executives in a com- 
pany you can have disagree- 
ments but 1 parted on the very 
best of terms and I have no 
bitterness.” 

Reluctant axeman, page 12 


Today’s events 


Royal balm for divided Commonwealth 



Frank Johnson with the Liberals 


Healthy Currie isJ 
flavour of the day 



Mrs Edwina Cume. the 

new under-secretary tor 

Health and Social Security, 
had first made an impression 
on the Liberal Assembly on 
Wednesday. 

On that morning, she was 
reported as saying that 


rmngham Council and is Mp | 
for Derbyshire South, 
Furthermore, the Uberakan ! 
themselves an anli-cnsp, pro. I 
muesli, pro-carrot party. Bm f 
truth is the first casualty h, 
dieting. 

.As the condemnation of 
Mrs Currie proved, fa 


. , T 


Northerners tended to be ^ mbly has been in a 

more unhplthy, not JJSod ever since it had s 

of unemployment or depn ^ Wow s , ^ ^ 

hSEIe for Owen by defeating the Affi. 
norance — because, ror y__ _ nniirv miu.L 

example, they eat too many 
allegedly unhealthy foods 
such as crisps. A few hours 
later, a speaker in a debate 


the week. Not the entire 
Assembly, that is. Just i mder 
half of it disapproved of fa : 

lion 




would hiss. So another 
speaker mentioned, her. and 
rewarded with more 


party of gen 

have refuse 


ial fanatics who : 


&&£&. ssjg-ASI 


A contrast in headgear from Lord Hniuham , the Lord Chancellor, Mrs Thatcher, and Mr Bal Sam Jakhar, Speaker of the Indian Parliament. 


By Alan Hamilton 

Both the Queen and the Prime 
Minister danced delicately around the 
edges of the apartheid issue when they 
addressed -the official opening of die 
thirty-second . Commonwealth Par- 
liamentary Conference in Westminster 
Hall, London, yesterday. 

Addressing 1^800 delegates from 109 
na tion al and' provincial legislatures 
around the former empire which still 
retain at least' a vestige of the West- 
minster model in a building so old as to 
have been built by England’s last 
imperialist occupiers, the Queen had 
interrupted her Balmoral holiday to 
pov balm on her troubled family of 
nations. 

Surrounded by the gold and scarlet 
panoply of ancient British monarchy, of 
yeomen of the guard, state trumpeters, 
and gentlemen-at-arms, the Queen told 
a varied audience: “All too often the 
divisions between nations are given 
-more significance than the t h i ng s which 
unite them. Differences in wealth are 
often stark? political allegiances often 
pull in opposing directions. This makes 
it the more important to cherish the 
links which we do have." 

The Queen went on: “From friendship 
springs understanding between individ- 
uals and thence between governments. 
From the family relationship comes the 


capacity to disagree without breaking 
up. The more die members get to know 
each other, the more they can help to 
reduce the tensions which t h r ea te n all 

The Head of the Commonwealth, who 
can fairly claim to represent one quarter 
of the earth, noted that “a few members, 
of the Commonwealth family are not 
represented . here, .today because .they 
have adopted - a different _ form . of 
government from the .parliamentary 
democracy which most of us share — But. 
all the members of the Commonwealth 
would, 1 hope, aspire to expand h um a n 
dignity and the welfare of their peoples." 

And she added: “For us, those 
objectives are enshrined in par- 
liamentary democracy, which teaches 
that friendship need not exdude plain 
speaking, ami that underst and i ng can 
best be reached in an atmosphere of 
tolerance and respect for the opinions of 
others." . . J , 

The Queen was solidly applauded by 
an audience which encompassed former 
Commonwealth prime ministers such as 
Mr Malcolm Fraser of Australia; hefty 
Fijians in skirts, and the majestically 
purple-tur banned Mr Bal Ram Jakhar, 
Speaker of the Indian Parliament, 
whose headgear thoroughly outshone 
the broad-brimmed bine hat of his 
neighbour, Mrs Thatcher. 

The British Prime Minister dared to 
advance a little closer than her sovereign 


to the question racking, the Common- 
wealth, when she said in her speech: 
“We all detest the system of apartheid 
South Africa and want to see it 


m 


demolished as soon as possible, but we 
don’t quite agree how best to do it 

“There is nothing unusual about 
agreeing the end but /..disputing r the 
means. It was never envisaged that tire 
Co mmonw ealth should become an in- 
strument for joint executives action. As a 
sovereign state we have a l egitim a t e 
right 'to hold our own views, and the 
right too to hold those views without our 
views being questioned." 

Mrs Thatcher then plucked a quota- 
tion from Edmond Burke: “Tolerance is 
good for all, or it is good for no one." 

Daring Mrs Thatcher's speech, which 
earned a polite outburst of applause, the 
Duke of Edinburgh was seized by a fit of 
coughing, and the Head of the Common- 
wealth was seen to delve discreetly in 
her handbag and pass him a lozenge, 
which appeared to effect a cure. 

. When the serious business of the 
conference begins today, delegates will 
.spend the first two plenary sessions 
discussing Commonwealth cooperation 
on curbing terrorism. The third session 
will debate apartheid in South Africa, 
and at the last session Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, will take 

part in a debate entitled, “The Common- 
wealth: Who Cares?" 


Israeli jets 
hit Sidon 
PLO base 

Continued from page t 
“remote; from any populated 
area". 

. AH the aircraft involved had 
returned safely. 

The spokesman insisted 
that this week’s attacks had 1 
nothing to do with the recent 
build-up of Israeli forces in 
south Lebanon, but were part 
of the strategy to strike at any 
suspected terrorist base when- 
ever it is identified. 

'Military sources, led by Mr 
Yitzhak Rabin, the Defence 
Minister, are now at pains to 
play down the size of the 
build-up in the wake of attacks 
on the Israeli-backed “South 
Lebanon Army” militia. 

Since news stories about a 
hu ge build-up were cleared by 
the military censor here, it 
seems likely that the Army 
was using the publicity to fool 
the Lebanese Shia militia . 


unemployed, 'crisp-eating 
constituency of North West 
Durham, was allowed to 
move an emergency motion 
condemning Mrs Cume, 
motivated as he was by 
outrage, compassion, and 
above all votes. 

Mr Foote apologized for 
the hoarseness of his voice 
because, as he put. he_ found 
“a certain kind of Currie hard 
lo swallow." This was one 91 
the many arduous Cume 
jokes which had presumably 
beien' sweeping the Liberal 
Parly ever since the under- 
secretary* had made her fate- 


mg. “responsible" because of tlje i 

heavily - 

sibles went on, in efteciAi 
vote against nuclear energy; 
another thing that Mr Sloj, 
and Dr Owen, did not wam 
them to do. Later, the Assem- 



bly debated the joint Liberal. 
SDP policy document 
Partnershipfor Progress. V& 
debate allowed speaker to 
mention anything at all, and 
they did. Mr Richard Holme, 
candidate for Cheltenham, 
advisor to Mr Sleek and a 
leading figure in the Respan, 
sible Tendency. said."“T& 
idea of a positive role fa 
Government should not 


ES? 


Mr "Foote spoke, T-shined British Liberal Party, 


Young-Liberals were fashion- 
ing their. “Take Away Cume 
Now!" badges. Mr Foote got a 
huge laugh. Thus encouraged, 
another Northern candidate, 
Mr Arthur Collings. who will 
contest crisp-intensive 
Darlington at the next elec- 
tion, came to the rostrum to 
Currie favour. He wrung 
extra personal advantage out 
of the already-inflamed situa- 
tion by using it to whip up 
that anti-southern prejudice 
which is never far front the 
-surface ■ of ■ northern radical 
politics. Mis Currie was a 
“typical Southerner", he said, 
who came up to the North to 
tell Northemeis what to do. 
Actually, she was bom on 
Merseyside, sat on Bir- 


ano 

and 


party of Hobhouse 
Green, of Keynes 
Beveridge" 

These names furrowed tile 
brows of some of the listening 
irresponsibles. They knew 
that Beveridge was to do with 
the Welfare State. Keynes 
they knew because he was a 
Liberal Gav long before h was 
fashionable, or indeed legal 
But Hobhouse and Green 
sounded like one of those 
places the SDP brass fre- 
quented. like Fortnura and 
Mason, or Derry and Toms 1 
Actually. L. T. Hobhou*] 
was an imperialist who only 
happened lo be a Liberal, the 
son of man who would be the 
victim of an emergency mo- 1 
lion. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Royal engagements . fi 
The Duke and Duchess of 
York attend a concert in aid of 
the Leukaemia Research Fund. 
Wembley Arena, Middlesex, 

8.30. 

Princess Anne attends a meet- 
ing of the Farriers’ Company 
followed by dinner. Innholders' 
HalL College Si. EC4, 3. 

The Duke of Kent, as Patron, 
attends a council meeting of the 
National Army Museum. Royal 
Hospital RcLSW3. 1 1-20. 

The Duchess of Kent opens 
the new Police Station, Maid- 
stone. 11.20; and later, visits 
Pilgrim's Hospice, Canterbury. 

2.30. _ 

' Prince Michael of Kent, Pa- 
tron of the Wahiba Sands 
Project, attends a lunch of the 


Anglo-Omani Sooety, • Iron- 
mongers’ HaH, Alderegaie St, 
EC2, 12.30. 

New exhibition . . 

- The Photographic Art pic- 
torial traditions in Britain and 
America; Hatton Gallery, The 
University, Newcastle upon 
Tyne; Mon to Fri 10 to 5, Sat 9 
to 4.30 (ends Oct 25). 
Exhibitions in progress 
Rusldn in Venice: works from 
the Collection of the Guild of St 
George; The Ruskin Gallery. 
101 Norfolk St, Sheffield; Mon 
to Fri 10 to 7.30. Sat 10 10 5 
(ends Nov 29). 

The Flower Show; flowers in 
twentieth century British an; 
City Art Gallery. Exhibition Sq. 
York; Mon to Sat 10 lo 5, Sun 
2.30 to 5 (ends Oct 26) 

The Flower Show; contem- 
porary flower paintings held in 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,161 



across 

I The right man to take to 
husband of old (13k 

9 Overworked East London 
boy (9). 

10 Point from thorn festering 
15 ). 

11 Course for the compar- 
atively unprofessional? (5). 

12 Drew a seaside feature, say 
(41. 

13 Among the Irish he's ex- 
pected to succeed (4). 

IS Not easily disturbed, as in 
current reverse (7). 

17 Right to test composition — 
part of a fugue (7). 

18 Like the Brobdingnagians. 
she was lost at sea (7). 

20 It revolves when placed In 
sink, perhaps (7). 

21 Emperor displaying hesita- 
tion in Japanese drama (4). 

22 Vessel which makes a state 
extremely secure (4). 

23 Philosopher recognized on 
leaving an army unit (5). 

26 The bracing air of the Ohio 
region (5). 

27 An island's in good order 
with this clan system (9). 

28 Rich Greek's motion 
thrown out by portly fe- 
males (5,2.6). 


DOWN t ... 

1 Strangely, none called 
this a band of tissue 
( 8 . 6 ). 

Concise Crossword page 10 


2 Unstable, like many in New 

York (5). 

3 Against plavers being ex- 
cluded by law (10). 

4 Articles put by for the forth- 
coming issue (7k 

5 Informal attire for doctor in 
a French ship (7). 

6 Speaker's claim to possess a 
small island (4). 

7 Shock about steak distrib- 
uted in Central Asia (9). 

8 Investigator whose study 
was vividly decorated? (8.61 

14 “England, bound in the — 

saTiRichard W (10). 

16 The furthest 25 goes in 
dividtngstout, perhaps (9). 

19 Leader of class receives a 
number to discipline (7). 

20 Policing role for a woman if 
featuring in sci-fi (7L 

24 Quick once to reveal a rise 
in wickedness (5). 

25 Designation of goal? Not in 
US (4). 


conjunction with the York City 
Art Gallery exhibition; Grape 
Lane Gallery. 17 Grape Lane, 
Low Peiergaie. York; Tues io 
Sat 10 to 5 (ends Oct 25). 

Recent paintingsby Ian Hum- 
phreys; The Black Boy Gallery, 
14 High Su West Wycombe. 
Bucks; Mon to Sal 9.30 to 5.30 
(ends Oct 8). 

Mannie! Mannie! Save Me!: 
the work of Aberdeen City Fire 
Brigade: James Dun's House, 
Schoolhill, Aberdeen; Mon to 
Sat 10 to S (ends Nov 22). 

Last chance to see 

Watercolours by Mary Fox 
and Paul Millichip: Beecrofl Art 
Gallery, Wcstciiffe, Southend- 
on-Sea. 9.30 to 1 and 2 to 5. 

Paintings, drawings and etch- 
ings by ■ Valerie Thornton; St 
Thomas' Cathedral, High St, 
Old Portsmouth. 8.15 106. 

Animal Magic Sculpture; 
Mid Pennine Arts Association. 2 
Hammenon St. Burnley; Mon 
to Fri 9 to 5 (ends Sept 26) 

Paintings, drawings and etch- 
ings: (30 years retrospecive) by 
Ray Ambrose: Falmouth An 
Gallery . The Moor. 10 to 4.30. 

Still Life: 60 paintings by 12 
artists; Dower House Gallery. 
108 High Su Berkhamsted. 10 to 

The Clarcmorris Open: an- 
nual submission exhibition; 
Arts Council Gallery, Bedford 
Si. Belfast. 10 to 6. 

M.A Fine Art mid^rouise 
exhibition: Squires Foyer Gal- 
lery. Newcastle Polytechnic. 
Safidyford Rd. 9 to 4.50. 
Music 

Concert by the Royal Liver- 
pool Philharmonic Orchestra; 
King George's HalL Blackburn. 
7.30. 

Recital by Graham Trew 
(baritone! and John Alley (pi- 
ano); North Bromsgrove High 
School. School Drive. Broms- 
grove. 7 JO. 

General 

Swansea Festival: orchestra] 
concerts, recitals, jazz, theatre, 
exhibitions, literary and child- 
ren's events: today until Octo- 
ber 18: further details from 
Civic Information Centre. PO 
Box S'). Singleton Su Swansea, 
tel; (0792) 470002/468321. 

Industry Year '86 Enterprise 
Fain display by newly estab- 
lished North-west businesses; 
Quary Bank. Mill. StyaL Chesh- 
ire*. today and tomorrow and 
Sun 1 1 to 5. 


Food prices 


A wide variety of fresh fish is 
available in all parts of- "the 
country this week and prices are 
falling, particularly in Scotland. 
Northern Ireland, tfa Midlands 
and East Anglia. Large cod 
fillets are down to an average of 
£1.79 a lb. boned fresh herring 
85p. coley 94 p. lemon sole £2 . 23 
and dab 65p. Other recom- 
mended buys are haddock £1.78 
and whiting £1.36 a lb. 

Meat prices are also down. 
There are big reductions on leg 
of lamb, with 7p a lb off in the 
South-east. However, the price 
range is very wide with loin 
chops costing anything between 
£1.50- and £3.45 a* lb. New 
Zetland lamb chops and shoul- 
der cuts are also down by about 
2p a lb; whole lex £l.29-£1.69. 
whole shoulder 69-99p and loin 
chops£l-29-£1.99a lb. Pork loin 
and rib chops are down slightly 
to an average of £1.41 and £1.22 
respectively. Boneless shoulder 
ranges from 98p-£!-49 a lb and 
fillet end of!eg£l. KME1.5Q. Beef 
topside and silverstde £1.89- 
£2.39 and foreribs on die bone 
£1J28-£I.69 a lb. 

Crisp French Golden De- 
licious are good value at 25-35p 
a lb. English Cox’s at 35r4Sp are 
probably not yet at their best. 
Oranges between 18-28p each, 
according to size; Italian Italia 
grapes S5-80p a lb and the 
Italian black seedless variety are 
now in the shops at 50-75p a lb; 
Pincappres 75p-£2 each. 

Jersey and English courgettes 
are coming to an end. Best home 
grown vegetables are carrots 1 2- 
22p a lb. cauliflower 35-45p, 
white potatoes KM2p a lb. 
parsnips 24-35p a lb and green 
cabbage l5-20p a lb. Home- 
grown iceberg lettuce 50-80p 
each will soon be finished but 
round lettuces are plentiful at 
1 S-25p. Dutch tomatoes are best 
at 42-50p a lb and watercress 25- 
35p a bunch. 


Top .Films. 


The top box-office films hi Len- 

rforK . ...• . 7^ " - : J 

A fi) Aliens •. ■ 

2 (4 Poltergeist It The Other 
Side 

3(2) Mona LJsa 
413) Betty Blue 
5(6) A Room With A View 
Hannah And Her Sisters 

illusion 

10(9) The Color Purple 

The top fikns to the provinces: 

1 ASens 

2 Hannah And Her Sisters 

3 Highlander 

4 The Color Purple 

5 Pretty In Pink 
Supptoo nr Save* WenwttW 


Top video rentals 


U 

ii 

I s 

9 


-) Legend 
TheGborues 
Revolution 
SBverado 
Gotcha! 
Volunteers 
The Sure Thing 
Weird Science 
j Explorers 


10 (-) Black Moon Rising 


Anniversaries 


Births: Charles Br adl aa gh . 
radical. London, 1833: T-S. 
Efiot. St Louis. Missouri-. 1888: 
"Martin Heidegger, philosopher. 
Messkirch. Germany. 1889; 
Giovanni Montihi (Pope Paul VI 
1963-78). Concesio, Italy. 1897. 

Deaths: Thomas Clarkson, 
anti-slavery agitator. Playford 
HalL Ipswich. 1846: August 
Mobins, mathematician, Leip- 
zig. 1868: James Kier Hardie. 
Labour Party leader. Glasgow, 
1915: William Henry Davies, 
poet, Nailsworth. Gloucester- 
shire. 1940: Beta Bartok. New 
York. 1945: Solomon West 
RMsemy Banda ma ike, prime 
minister of Ceylon 1956-59, 
Colombo, 1959. 


Weather 
forecast 

A ridge of high pressure 
will persist over southern 
and eastern districts with 
a trough of low pressure 
affecting northwestern 
parts. 


6 am to midnight 


London, SE, central £ E En- 
gland, East Anglia, Channto Is- 
lands: Rather cloudy, some * 
intervals developing: wind NE. 
or moderate: max temp 16C <61 

Midlands, NW, central" 
England: Dry. soma sunny periods 
after a few fog patches at first wind 
variable, fight max temp 18C (64 F). 

SW England, Wales: Dry at first 
with a tew fog patches, some 
sunshine lor a time, cloudy later 
wind mainly S, fight; max temp 16C 

(6 13« District, Bordets, Etfin- 

burgh, Dundee, SW Scotland, 

Glasgow: A few tog patches at first 

becoming rather cloudy; perhaps a 
BtUe rain laten wind variable fight 
becoming SW moderate; max temp 
16C(61R- 

(sle of Man, Aberdeen, Central 
KgMands, Moray Firth, ArgyU, 
Northern fretand: Becoming rather 
cloudy With a stile rain in pieces; 
wind variable. light becoming SW 
moderate later; max temp 15C 

NW Scotland, Orkney. Shet- 
land: Cloudy, rain at times with hit 
and coastal tog patches, drier later, 
wind SW moderate becoming fresh; 
max temp 13C (55F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and Son- 
day: Changeable in the NW. Dry In 
the SE after oventight frost and tog 
patches. Becoming windy in toe far 
N. Near normal temperatures. 



xnapm 
Utt quarter 4.17 am 


1045 pm 


The pound 


Bar* 
Bu 



Buys 

AmtreBaS 2i6 

ArntnaSch 21.70 

B^ ta ojn Ft 64-35 

CaradaS 206 

Qansurti Kr 1140 

RntendMkk 745 

France Ft 10X1 

Germany Ota 3.07 

Greece Or 27000 

Hong Kong S 11-50 

Intend Pt 1.12S 

ItaTy Lira 2130-00 

Japan Yen Z35.00 

NedMRtendsGU 347 

Norway Kr 11.13 

Portugal Eac 221.00 

Saudi Africa Rd 4.10 

Spanta moo 

Sweden Kr IMS 

SwfaartandFf i50 

USAS 1.505 

Yogoaiavie Dnr 7SL00 

Hates for small oanonwHDon tank notes 

only as supofced 0 y Barclays Bar* PLC. 

Retafl Price IndmcWSS 
Londpt THe FT wax closed down ZL2 
at 12422. 


Bank 

Sets 

ZJ4 

2040 
60.75 
1J7 
11 DO 
7X5 
9X1 
2X0 
185X0 
11X0 
1X06 
2010X0 
221X0 
aw 
10X3 
209X0 
3X0 
190X0 
9X4 
2X6 
1.435 
650X0 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 1 2.50 pm. 5.10 pm and 
7.15 pm. 



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Lighting-op time 


London 721 pmto&Zt-am 

Bristol 7X0 pm to 6X4 m 
Edtoburg h 7X2pm to 6X7 am 
‘ if 7X9- pm to 6X3 a 
7.42 pm to 645 am 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: c. 
doud: t. ten r. rake s. sun. 


C F 
t U57 
c1254 
s 1553 
Bristol c 1457 
Cntflff c 1457 
Ednburgli c 1559 
Glasgow f 1661 


Conwy 

townus 

Jersey 

London 

ITnchstor 


R’nldsvny 


C F 
f 1457 
C 1661 
f 1559 
c 1559 

(1355 
f 1661 
(1254 


Roads 


Wales and West lU: Contraflow 
westbound between junctions 16 (Swto- 
don) and 17 (Oreneaster). VBe Various N 
and eouhboupd (ana etosnes between 
junctions 22 (A38) and ajWefiwonj. 
A37: Temporary bjjhta In Bnstol an VUWs 
Pd «t tbs junction uMh St John's Lane, 
AW- 

The North: AIW Northbound carr- 
lagewsy dosed from Bovtown wer- 
cMnga for atxwt a mile northwards: 
contraflow. M53: Roadworics bet w een 
jtrctnns i and 2 (Meraeys 
over Bldston Moss Vaduct . 
tor repairs: aftsmatire route signed. A& 




dosed W of junction t J . 

way traffic eestbound. Mft Brtooe works 

between unctions 10 (Sftftq) md 9 

(DOUM). Motorway extension work 

N of Lesmahagpw; two way on 

Wlficnorthbouna. 

„ li Juncah oii Btyp l hvl by *A 



Q1TMES NEWSPAPERS LntfTED. 
IVBO Printed tw London Pea 

Limited Of 1 Vtfvjlnle Street. 


*TVJ Limited or l . VIM Il_ , 

BSE.*® 

isiend as a newspaper -at 
OBice 


5SS 1 

Post 



b-Muc Sky: bc-toJue sky and cloud: C- 

ctoudy: o-overcasL r-fog: d-drtzzto: h- 

ball: ndsl-mbl: r-raln: smow: Uv 

ihundeniorm: Mhowers. 

Arrows diow wind dlreclton. wind 
speed imMU circled. Temperature 
coiUgrade. 


Tide measured In metres: im-aXM* 1 


Around Britain 


Sun Rain 
tvs to 

EAST COAST 
Scarbom 9.4 

Bridfogton 10.1 

Cremar £L5 

Lowestoft 1.1 

Ctecton 

Southend - - 


COAST 
Folkestone (L5 
HaMngs 
Eastbourne 
Brighton 
Worthing 
LittelnriMn 
BognorR 
Southsca 
Sendown 
g anldet 
Bonmemth 
Poole 
Swanage 
Weynnfah 
Exmoulh 
Teignmouth 
Torquay 
Falmouth 

Penzance 
Sctty laics 
Jersey 


ZA 

1.3 

4X 

3X 

22 

IX 

08 


01 
0.1 

02 

o.i 


2J. 

Z3 

02 


WEST! 

Newquay 


0.7 


Max 
C F 

14 57 sunny 
14 57 sunny 
13 55 dooefif 

13 55 cloudy 

14 57 cloudy 

15 59 duQ 

15 5a duB 

T5 59 cloudy 

16 61 bright 

16 61 bright 

16 61 sunny 

17 63 bright 
16 61 bright 
16 61 cloudy 

16 61 cloudy 
IS 59 dun 

15 59 cloudy 
15 59 cloudy 
15 59 cloudy 

14 57 doudy 

15 58 cloudy 

15 59 cloudy 
' 16 61 dull 

■ 18 64 toggy 

17 63 bright 
17 63 cloudy 

■ 16 61 cloudy 

■ 18 64 doudy 


Sun Rain 
hrs in 


Vfracombe 
ETpooi Airpt 
■oresambe 


ENGLAND 
Blwm Abpt 
Bristol (Cut) 
Carlisle 
London 
M ancheste r 
N'cri-n-Tyne 
Notttnghem 

WALES 

Anglasey 

Canfitf (Ctrl) 

CofwynBay 

Tenby 

SCOTLAND 

Aberdeen 

Edn bu r a h 

EaUatemufr 

Glasgow 

KMoss 

Lerwick 

Prestwi ck 

Stornoway 

Taee 

wick 


5 A 
4X 

4.7 

0.1 

0.1 

4.1 

ZA 

3.8 
IX 


7.1 

0.1 

22 

92 

5.7 

OS 

6S 

7.5 

0.1 

4.3 
37 
4.0 

3.4 


Max 
C F 

14 57 

17 63 

18 

15 


59 SS? 


.02 


.01 


19 55 ctoug 

14 57 dovOf 

16 6i 

15 59 doudy 
15 59 doudy 
14 57 suroy 

14 57 bngK 

17 63 sunny 
t* 57 ckMfy 

15 39 SSL 

16 61 i 

15 59 upny 

15 $9 sunny 

14 57 donor 

16 61 

15 59 

10 50 |«" 

17 63 bngW 
14 57 bftgM 
14 57 
13 55 


NORTHERN IRELAND 
Belfast Q.3 


These are Wednesday’s Dgures 


is SB doudy 
•figures not fn® 18 ^ 


Abroad 


MIDDAY: c. doud: d. drizzle; r. fab; (g. log: h. had; r, rein; a. Sun; at. 

C F C F 

c 24 75 Cologne s 16 61 Madrid 

s Zj 84 C"b*sn s 14 57 Mdjorea 

I 23 73 Corfu s 27 81 Malaga 


AiaccJo 

Akratiri 

Alex’ dria 

Algiers 

Anufdm 

Athens 

Bahrain 

Bartiads* 

Barcebia 

Beirut 


s 28 82 Dufain 


t 14 57 Masa 


s 14 57 Dtemwaik c 2170 HWb'ne 


Bermuda* 

Blarrite 

Bontek 

Bourne 

BruuBas 

Budapst 

BAirer 

Coiro 

CapeTb 

CTdanca 

Ctdeago* 

Cb’cbucb 


* 28 62 gw 

e 39102 Florence 
s 30 96 Frankfurt 
s 23 73 Funchal 
Geneva 
( 19 66 rahmttar 
( 13 55 Hefafadri 
Hong K 

r 15 59 hnuidt 
r 15 59 Istanbul 

1 14 57 Jeddah 
S 13 55 JoTbin' 
f 17 S3 Karnes 
f 17 63 Las 
sU4 93 Palmas 
S 18 64 Lisbon 
t 23 73 Locarno 
r 19 66 LAngeta- 
f 12 54 " 


® 24 7g Mexico C* 
f 23 73 Mhrnd* 
*15 59 5S.ro 
“ 23 S Ms nted I 

* ” S M»«o» 

* 25 79 Munich 
S J « Nairobi 
c 28 82 Naples 

t rr ra nSSS 

* g 72 n York* 

* 36 97 Nice 
B 27 81 Oslo 
4 31 88 Parts 

l S 

t 20 68 
r 18 61 
r 15 59 
s 14 57 Mode 4 


r.lh.lWP*' 
C F Cj 

( 20 68 Riyadh s 
Rohm f 

* 29 84 Salzburg c IBP 
4 28 82 S Prtaoo* f If f. 

M9 66|«2g?‘ f ^ 6 - 
I 22 72 
( 31 

usS 1 


21 W 


*- d»a. -• - 




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rt iqiKF5W AND FINANCE 


21 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK market 

FT 30 Share 
1242.3 (- 22 . 2 ) 

FT-SE 100 
1575.9 (- 27 . 5 ) 
Barqains 


iarqa 

>0860 


USM (Data stream) 
122.94 (- 0 . 27 ) 

THE POUND 

USDoHar 
1.4335 (- 0 . 0125 ) 

W German mark 

2.9365 (- 0 . 0235 ) 

Trade-weighted 
68.7 (- 0 . 7 ) 


BET wins 
control 


BET, the industrial services 
group, yesterday won its £109 
million contested bid for 
HAT, the painting group. By 
the 10.30am closing time, 
BET had secured 51.9 p 
cent 

Mr David Telling, chair ., 
man of HAT, yesterday met 
the BET directors and will be 
writing to HAT shareholders, 
and employees shortly. Mr 
Neil Ryder, a director of BET, 
said that the company was 
delighted with the result It 
showed that despite the recent 
trend against contested bids, 
BETs argument about the 
commercial logic of the bid. 
had been convincing, he 
added. 


Wimpey up 

George Wimpey’s turnover 
dipped from £657 million to 
£634 million in the first half of 
this year, but pretax profits; 
managed to rise from a re- 
stated £9.2 million to £132 
million. Tempos, page 20 

Tootal ahead 

Tootal, the textiles group, 
raised taxable profits in the see 
months ending July 31 to 
£10.1 million from £9.7 mil- 
lion. The dividend was in- 
creased to l-6p from I.5p. 

Tempos, page 20 < 

RMC rises 

RMC Group, the building 
materials producer, reported a 
30 per cent increase in pretax 
profits to £32 1 million for the 
six months to June 30. Turn- 
over rose from £601.8 million 
to £687.4 million. The interim 
dividend is raised from 4. 6p to 
5 p. Tempos, page 20 

Shares halted 

After share price move- 
ments. Property Trust direc- 
tors yesterday asked the Stock 
Exchange to suspend dealings 
pending a circular to 
shareholders about a number 
of conditional acquisitions 
and other proposals. 

Williams wins 

The offer on behalf of 
Williams Holdings for Lon- 
don and Midland Industrials 
has been declared fully un- 
conditional Acceptances have 
been received for 61.65 per 
cent. 

Team view 

Courtaulds has formed a 
team to examine performance 
and long-term growth. The 
members are Sir Christopher 
Hogg, chairman, Mr Mike 
Woodhouse. Mr Allan Night- 
ingale. Mr Eryl Morris and Mr 
Sipko Huismans. 


Traded Opts W 
Tempos 28 
Wall Street 20 
Unit Trusts 22 
USM Prices 22 
Share Prices. 23 



TIMES 


17 

SPORT 2 7 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 31 


FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


Norton Opax bids 
£ 28 m more for 



Just 24 hours after receiving 
Monopolies Commission ap- 
proval Norton Opax, the 
printing group, yesterday 
made a new and final bid for 
rival specialist printer, 
McCorquodale. 

The latest terms — - a one* 
for-two share swap — value 
McCorquodale at £138.5 mil- 
lion, a substantial increase oh 
the £110 million offered last 
time. . . ., 

The stage is now set for a 
short, sharp and acrimonious 
battle. Norton intends that it 
.will Iasi no longer than 21 days 
from the dale its official offer 
is published, probably next 
week, though it reserves the 
right to extend if neccesary. 

“We want to bring this 
affair to a close now,” said Mr 
Richard Han well, chief exec- 
utive of Norton Opax. 

But ffie McCorquodale 
board is even more deter- 
mined to resist what is seen as 
an opportunist bid than it was. 
last time. Mr John HollOian, 
m a n ag in g director,' said yes- 
terday: “The two businesses 
are totally different Merging 
them would do a good deal of 
damage, and we intend to fight 
the proposals vigorously." 

The stock market regards 
Norton's latest bid as an 


By John Bell, City Editor 
ambitious move by an 
.agressively run company. The 
group is proposing. to issue 
three times its current share 
capital to capture 
McCorquodale. 

Sub-underwriting of the is- 
sue was completed yesterday. 
“It went very well" said a 
Spokesmen for Samuel Mon- 
‘ tagtu financial advisers to 
Norton Opax. 

Norton's profits have in- 
creased from £140,000 to £5.2 
million over the past five 


lave increased eightfold. 
Growth has been achieved 
organically and by 
acquisition. 

The first offer for 
McCorquodale was made in 
March, and a month later it 
was referred to the Monopo- 
lies Commission. 

Mr Paul Channon, Sec- 
retary of State for Trade and 
Industry, on Wednesday ap- 
proved the.MMC finding that 
Ihe merger would not operate 
against the public interest But 
the major clearing banks 
submitted evidence to the 
commission that they were 
lukewarm about a deal which 
would bring together two 
suppliers of personalized • 
cheque books. 


McCorquodale earned more 
than a quarter of its profits 
from cheque and allied print- 
ing last year and clearly it 
would suffer most in the event 
of a merger if the banks and 
building societies took some 
of their business elsewhere. 

McCorquodale’s Mr 
Holloran is also unhappy 
-about the extent to which 
Norton's profits arise from 
printing of lottery tickets, 
which he regards as “poor 
quality business, with a good 
deal of overcapacity. “ 

The terms of the offer are 
two Norton Opax shares for 
one of McCorquodale. With 
Norton Opax shares down I3p 
to I33p. the deal values 
McCorquodale shares at 266p 
each. In the market they rose, 
slightly to close in line with 
the bid terms. 

Samuel Montagu has ar- 
ranged a cash alternative of 
260p for each McCorquodale 
share. . 

With the details of its new 
offer Norton Opax provided a 
forecast of £5.8 million profits 
for the year to March, 1987 
compared with £52 million 
last time. Dividends are fore- 
cast to increase 14 per cent 
over the same period. 





Shake-up 
at Rover 

Mr Harold Musgrove, above, 
chairman and chief executive 
of Anstin-Rorer, was the main 
casualty in Rover management 
changes annooBced yesterday. 
He retires after 40 years with 
the group. Mr Mark Snowdon, 
right, managing director for 
product development, also 
leaves. Mr Graham Day takes 
over as chairman of all the 
chief subsidiaries. 

Comment, page 19 



Canon may 
set up base 
inBritain 

By Teresa Poole 
BusuressCtaTespoudent 

Canon, the Japanese photo- 
copier manufacturer, may set 
up. a software research and 
development base in Britain 
as part of its expansion pro- 
gramme in Europe: 

Mr Yasuyuki Matsuda, a 
director of-Canon (UK), said 
-yesterday that talks were being 
held about' the possibility xS 
establishing ^research base, 
perhaps as* joint venture with 
a British "university. But he 
could not say when this, might 
happen. 

2anon has a strong Euro- 
pean presence. Its manufac- 
turing facilities in Germany 
and France have been ex- 
panded recently to assemble 
10 new copiermodds. 

Two of the models, .repre- 
sent Canon's first entry into 
the lucrative high voliime 
market, which'ht present is 
dominated by^ Rank Xerox, 
IBM .and. Kodak- Canon aims' 
to replace 40 per cent of 
machines with these new 
models which can produce 
more than 70 copies a minute. 

These machines are exempt 
from the 15.8 per cent anti- 
dumping import duty and will 
be manufactured in Japan. 
The other eight models will be 
manufactured in either 
Europe or Korea and should 
not be subject to the duty. 

Mr Yukio Yamashita, 
managing director of. Canon 
(UK), said: “We have not 
finally decided how we will 
respond to the levy.” : 

• A Japanese, investment re- 
search group, due in Britain 
next month, will include 
representatives of some of the 
country's biggest and most 
successful companies. 

Mitsubishi, Sumitomo, 
Citizen, Pioneer, Fuji and 
Casio will be some of the 
companies represented by the 
visiting group. | 

The representatives, travel- 
ling to Britain at British 
expense, will visit only the 
areas in which they are - most 
interested. A similar 


SEC ready to shorten leash 
on computer trading 


A big review of the role of 
computers in Wall Street is 
being carried out after com- 
plaints from many traders that 
they are at the root of the 
violent price swings that have 
become almost commonplace 
this year. 

The Securities and Ex- 
change Commission says that 
it is -considering new regula- 
tions to curb the growth of 


From Paul VaUely, New York 

are studying carefully com- 
plaints by investors about 
stock values being driven 
(town artificially. 

On a normal day computer 
programs are thought to con- 
trol between 10 mid 25 per 
cent of all stock trading on 
American exchanges. During 
the record drop on September 
1 1, the machines are thought 
to have accounted for as much 


'program trading* by which -as 40 per cent of trading. 


mission. 


investments. 


•MARKET summary 


STOCK MARKETS 


2011.70 (+3v 
.... 285 * 

. 1250.3 


77334 (-2955T 
r98835(+32^0) 

m 

19952 (-17.8) 

I7W.34 (+7J9Z) 
_ 3893 (+1-5) 

520.0 (Same) 
Pag* 23 


INTEREST RATES 


10» IB-10* »6% 

km-io% 


%* 


New Ywfc 

fc $1.4345* 
fc DM2-0455 • 
fc Index: 110.9 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


IfS 

4p) 


+1 

+133 

+14p 


RISES: 

Birmingham Mint I83p 

Druck Howtos- 433p 

HopWnsons Hkte. — 280p 

Centra TV 346p 

HTV 240p+1 , 

Watson & Ptiffip 156p i +110 

Bank of Scotland 449p i +12p 

W&R Jacob- I86p{+I0p 


FALLS: 

Ferry Pickering 
BbajCtaW 
Rugby — 
Wimpey - 
Lucas 


201p 




Norton Opax 
GUS 'A' 


144pj-jlp) 


Combined English 226p -9b 

Coats Viyeke ■ <82p (-8pj 

Srnbe ZSPHSPJ 


Royal 
MAI - 


insurance 


Courtney Pope 


n-ap) 


GOLD 


30100) . . 
JKS^.96432*5* — - 


NORTH SEA OIL 


BwrttNov.) pmSl3ff 

* Denote* West inwwig 


.computers are preset to issue 
buy Or sell orders on huge 
amounts of stocks without 
human intervention or 
ratification. 

Commission officials are 
said to have been shaken by 
the 120 point crash in the Dow 
Jones industrial average two 
weeks ago and that is why they 


Opinion on Wall Street is 
divided. Supporters of com- 
puter trading say that h adds 
impetus only to existing 
trends. Though changes seem 
more volatile all the comput- 
ers are doing is concentrating 
into a single day market 
corrections which used to lake 
days, even weeks. 


Opponents argue that such 
wild fluctuations frighten 
small investors out of the 
market and that computers 
have brought about the 
development of a new type of 
trading which has made or- 
dinary stocks take on the 
swift, wide swings which once 
characterised only 

commodities. 

The speed and sophistica- 
tion of computers has enabled 
traders to take advantage of 
price variations which in the 
pre-electron ic age days would 
have been considered too 
insignificant. 

Several options to bring the 
situation under control are 
being considered by the 
commission. 


£1.2m loss 
at poster 

company 

By Our City Staff 

London and Continental 
Advertising Holdings, the 
poster hoarding group, 
slumped to a £12 million 
pretax loss in the first half of 
this -year, after gearing up for 
an improvement in the poster 
business which foiled to 
arrive. 

The company, which made 
profits of £1.4 million in the 
same period last year, : had 
expected an improvement in 
the second half. 

The chairman, Mr John 
Golfor, said: “In the event, 
this has not been realized to 
date, but group overheads had 
been increased in anticipation 
of much greater volumes of 
business than are being 
experienced." Some of the 
group's workers are to be. 
made redundant under a cost 
reduction programme. 

London is passing its in- 
terim dividend, having paid 
0-75p at this stage last year. Its 

shares, down from a -peak-of 

last year resulted in thre e newT 185p this year.-sUd a farther 


25p to 58p after the results.. 


Profits surprise from 
United Newspapers 


By Richard Lander 


United Newspapers, the 
diversified publishing group 
which acquired Fleet Holdings 
for £317 million last October, 
surprised the City yesterday 
by announcing pretax profits 
of £22.5 million for the first 
half of 1986. 

The figures, which com- 
pared with £19.3 million last 
year when United held only a 
minority stake m Fleet, were 
at the top end of expectations 
and boosted .United shares by 
25p to 370p, recouping recent 
losses. 

Mr Graham Wilson. 
United's finance director, said 
thatthe results were helped by 
tbe comparative ease with 
which the group reduced its 
labour force on the Daily 
Express, the Sunday Express 
and The Star. 

No production was lost as 
2,000 fall-time employees left 
the company in return for a 
£65 million redundancy pack- 
age. The redundancies, with 
hthe~ introduction of photo- 
composition, should save 
about £48 million a year. 


Mr Wilson said tbe national 
titles had roughly broken even 
in the first half but were now 
trading profitably. However, 
be admitted United was still 
trying to improve the circula- 
tion of the three papers, which 
all showed slight foils in the 
first half compared with tbe 
same period last year. 

The rest of United's domes- 
tic operations proved to be 
something of a mixed bag. 
Consumer and advertising 
magazines, which include 
Punch and Exchange & Mart, 
put in a strong performance 
and the regional newspaper 
division showed growth. 
United’s American interests, 
which range from Fodor’s 
travel guides to a press news 
service, also showed im- 
proved profits. However some 
of the specialist business 
magazines suffered from stiff 
competition for advertising in 
the.first half. 

United maintained its in- 
terim dividend at 6p. 


Funeral 
company 
for USM 

By Cliff Feltham 

Death is becoming big busi- 
ness for the stock markeL 
Great Southern Group, one of 
the country's leading suppliers 
of funeral services, is coming 
to the Unlisted Securities 
Market with a value of £13.1 
million. This makes it the 
third quoted funeral directors 
after Kenyon Securities and 
Hodgson Holdings. 

Great Southern has grown, 
like its rivals, by snapping up 
the small family-run com- 
panies that account for about 
65 percent of the total market 
Mr Ernest Field, the chair- 
man of Great Southern, says 
that a stock market listing will 
enable the company to make 
more acquisitions. 

Pretax profits have risen 
steadily from just over £1 
million in 1981 to £1.3 million 
last year and the directors 
forecast an outcome of £1.6 
million for 1986. 

A total of 2.2 million shares, 
which is 22.7 per cent of the 
capital are being placed at 
1 35p a share by Hill Samuel, 
the merchant banker, to raise 
£2.54 million. 


Threat to loan 
rates as pound 
slides further 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


Fears that interest rates may 
have to rise resurfaced yes- 
terday as the pound continued 
its steady decline against most 
currencies, hitting a record 
low on the sterling trade- 
weighted index despite re- 
newed support from the Bank 
of England. 

Meanwhile, stock markets 
in London and New York 
dropped sharply as economic 
uncertainty built up in ad- 
vance of the Group of Five 
meeting in Washington today. 

Sterling weakened against 
most currencies, but its largest 
falls were against the dollar 
and the mark. There were 
growing expectations that in- 
terest rates would have to rise 
to prevent a sudden collapse 
in the currency. 

A rise in interest rates at this 
stage would be politically 
embarrassing to the Govern- 
ment ahead of the huge British 
Gas share flotation in 
November. 

Traders believe the Bank of 
England intervened to support 
the pound at lunchtime, but to 
little effect, and sterling’s de- 
cline accelerated. 

After an opening of about 
S 1.4465 in London, the pound 
sank by 1.2 cents against the 
dollar to finish at 1.4340. 
Against the mark it dropped 
three pfennigs from 
DM2.9680 to close at 
DM19370. 

Other currencies also ad- 
vanced against the pound, 
leaving the sterling trade- 
weighted index down seven - 
points from 69.4 at 68.7. . 


The mark remained steady 
against most intemaiinal cur- 
rencies after the Bundesbank's 
decision at its fortnightly 
meeting yesterday not to alter 
it credit policy, although it 
weakened slightly against the 
dollar. 

At the same time, a 
combination of factors helped, 
to push down share prices in 
London and New York. 

Mr Tim Brown, of the 
stockbroker Phillips & Drew, 
said: “The market is nervous, 
but we arc not seeing a panic. 
The fall was mainly due to a 
lack of buyers rather than a 
wave of selling.” The FT-30 
share index dropped 1 8.5 
points to dose at 1,246.1. 

The London stock market 
opened steady after a firm 
close in New York on 
Wednesday, but the downard 
momentum gathered pace as 
New York opened sharply 
weaker yesterday. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average fell by nearly 40 
points to 1.765.04. Some trad- 
ers blamed the fall on pro- 
gramme selling by big 
investors. “That is the only 
way to interpret this kind of 
volatility.” said one. 

But there was also less hope 
of further discount rate cuts 
following the Bundesbank's 
decision not to alter German 
interest rates. The fall follows 
three days of steady increases 
fuelled by hopes of a discount 
rate cut Uncertainty over the 
strength of US economic 
growth also helped to depress 
the market 


Group of Five exchange 
rate agreement likely 

From David Smith, Washington 


The Group of Five finance 
ministers and central bankers, 
meeting in Washington today, 
are expected to agree on a 
framework for preserving ex- 
change rates around present 
levels. 

The five — the United 
States, Britain, Germany* Ja- 
pan and France — will strive, 
for closer co-ordination of 
economic policy through the 
use of indicators of economic 
performance. 

They may also — with the 
agreement of Canada and Italy 
which, with tbe five, make up 
the new Group of Seven — 
signal a willingness to main- 
tain currency levels by con- 
certed intervention. 

The Groupof Five meeting,, 
which comes : after public, 
wrangles between - the US and 
Germany over interest rates, 
will discuss the work of of- 
ficials on key indicators of 
economic performance. 

At tbe May world economic 
summit in Tokyo it was 


agreed to examine a range of 
ten indicators, including infla- 
tion. growth, the balance of 
payments, money supply and 
government deficits, with a 
view to co-ordinating policy 
on the basis of the perfor- 
mance of these indicators. 

. : The difficulty with this 
approach; if it is given the go- 
ahead today, is that it will start 
from a position of marked 
world economic imbalances, 
notably the trade and budget 
deficits in the US and the large 
trade surpluses of Japan and 
Germany. 

The European members of 
the Group of Five will be 
putting pressure on the Ameri- 
cans to lake further action on 
the budget deficit, and to shift 
the focus away from compet- 
itive interest rate reductions. 

- The participants are also 
likely to press for dollar 
depreciation against newly- 
industrialized countries such 
as Taiwan and South Korea. 



Glimmer of hope 
from the Bank 

By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 
Hie of England in its months could be for a sharp 


latest 

a cautiously optimistic view of 
the outlook for the world 
economy. It is doser to the 
-views— of the German 
Bundesbank which believes 
that .world growth is now 
resuming rtian tW of the 
United States administration 
which wants to see lower 
interest rates.. 

The Bank says that mone- 
tary conditions are difficult to 
interpret. Althongh tbe 
broader definitions of the 
money supply have grown 
faster than the target rates and 
sterling has been trader pres- 
sure, narrowly defined money 
has grown only slowly and 
interest rates remain high. On 
balance it believes that there, 
seems to be fade scope for 
^unilateral relaxation"- 

The pause in growth in the 


acceleration. The Bank be- 
lieves that a number of coun- 
tries are hi a position to take 
expansionary measures if 
these hopes are confounded by 
developments in the second 
half of this year. 

But it is pessimistic about 
the prospect of renewed 
growth bringing down un- 
employment m Britain. High 
pay settlements continue to 
frustrate hopes of ionger-tena 
reductions. 

In a study of the combined 
effect of lower ofl prices and a 
lower exchange rate, die Bank 
concludes that over time the 
changes should benefit the 
current account balance of 
payments despite recent trade 
deficits. 

The Bank made dear yes- 
terday that it did not see any 
need for the pound to dep re- 


work! economv during the first • farther in order to nn- 
half of this year is dow thought prove - die trade balance. If 
to be almost over and the anything, sterling should re- 
ootlook for the next 12-18 co^er a bit of ground. 


Combined 
English 
pays £19m 

Combined English Stores, 
the Salisburys handbag group, 
snatched another chunk of the 
high street jewellery business 
yesterday when it paid £19 
million for 107 shops belong- 
ing to the Time Products 
group, trading under the 
names of J. Weir. Harris, 
McGowans, and Montague. 

CES has only just paid £26 
million for Zaies jewellers and 
is now second in size only to 
the Ralners-H^amuel chain. 

Time Products says it was 
this deal which made it decide 
to pull out of the high street 
Chief executive Marcus 
Margulies says Time Products 
would have been forced to 
expand aggressively . Instead, 
it intends to concentrate on its 
watch manufacturing and dis- 
tribution business. 

Both companies yesterday 
unveiled half time figures. 
Time Products reported prof- 
its before tax of £1.3 mi llion 
compared with £728.000. CES 
announced that pre tax profits 
were up from £3.4 million to 
£4.9 million. 


GROWTH RATES 

h | ihe average annual compound rate of growth in the price of units 
JL (on an offer-to-bid basis) of each of our capital growth funds 
between launch and 1st September 1986 was as follows: 


+ 1 
+2i 


Fund Launched 

Capital Jan 69 

International Growth Oct 76 

American ^-General - — Apr 7-8— 

American Turnaround - Oct 79 +23.9% p-SL 

Recovery - : Apr 82 ■ +25.7% p^a. 

Japan & General Feb 84 +25-87op.a. 

European Feb 86 +55.9% p.a. 

Every one of these Framlington funds has outperformed the FT 
All -Share Index, the Dow- Jones Industrial Average and the 
Standard and Poors Composite Index. 

E ach fund is fully described in the Framlington Unit Trust Guide 
1986- For a free copy, send us this coupon: 


To: Framlington Unit Management Limited, 
FREEPOST, London EC2B 2DL 




Please send me a copy of the Framlington Unit Trust Guide 1986. 

Name 

Address 


T 28/9 








Hotels ‘face chaos 
oyer tax changes 9 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Turnover 


Fsiaandia? Highlights 

5 a;on£hs-_ - ■ . 6 months 
to-30.5.^6 : ■ to 30;6.85: 

* -£m- 

reot.tr. 


£tn 

•fi&rr a - 


■ Year 
to 31.12,8.5 

.* - - £ai 


Operating Profit 


United Kingdom 

23.7 

20.9 

56.0 

West Germany 

1.7 . 

0.4 

12.1 

Other countiies 

11.8 

9.9 

22.6 


• 37.2 

31.2 

90.7 

Profil before . 

33.1 : 

- 25.4 

79.7 


Earnings per share 


19 3p 


14.7p 


45 jp 


Dividend The Directors have deeded to d ecterean interi m dividend - 
of 5.0p per snare U9S5 4. op ^£“ share) payable cr. l December 19S5 - ■ : - 
to shareholders on the Register at the close of business on 
51 October. i?S6. 


a=r 7i ~ ,«=?*. r 

Li uti’a-J Lr $ J 

RMC House, H : gh Street. ?eliham , Middlesex 7W13 4HA. 




Britain's hotels, many with 
earnings under pressure from 
the scarcity of American tour- 
ists this year, face two tax 
changes in- November which 
-couldalso hit-profits. . 

One change.'- -in ■ the way 
value-added tax rules -are 
-applied to- conferences 'and 
^exhibitions, is causing confu- 
sion among hoteliers. The 
British - Hotels . Restaurants 
and Caterers Association is 
telling its members to consider 
taking professional advice. 

It fears “considerable 
chaos" as the change in rules 
approaches, because many ho- 
teliers may not realize the 
implications of the changes. 
When they do there is likely to 
be as increased pressure for 
the November I start date to 
‘-be postponed until next yean 
- : Where Conferences and ex- 
hi bitiOns arc held i n -purpose- 
built centres, offering no- 


• CENTRAL INDEPEN- 
DENT TELEVISION: Half- 
year to June 30. Interim 
dividend increased to 4p (2.5p) 
to reduce the disparity between 
payments. It win be paid on 
Nov. 7. Turnover £85.77 mil- 
lion (£72.79 million). Pretax 
profit £5-3 1 million (£2.56 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share I3p 
(5.7p). 

• W & R JACOB: Interim 
dividend 2.3p (2p) for the 28 
weeks to July U. Pretax profit 
K834.000' (£771,000). against 
Ir£3l5,000. Turnover Ir£27,05 
ra illion I Ir£27.42 million). Earn- 
ings -per share (adjusted for 
rights issue) 3.30 (Z9p). The 
board expects good - profits 
growth in the current year. 

• EUCALYPTUS PULP 
MILLS: Half-year to June 30. 
Turnover £14.49 million 
(£13.52 miDion). Pretax profit 
£1.92 million (£2.32 million). 
Earnings per share 46.3p 
(48. Ip). 

• BENTALL& Half-year to 
Aug. 2. Interim dividend 0.44p 
(0.4pL Turnover (excluding 
VAT) £29.05 million (£27.8 
million). Pretax profit £722,000 
(£8 1 2,000). Earnings per share 
l.l Ip(1.2lp). ... 


bedroom accommodation, the 
situation is comparatively 
straightforward with the main 
facilities, except for meals, 
being exempted from VAT.- 

Bui hotels with conference 
and. exhibition facilties have 
stayed within ihe_ VAT sys- 
tem, enabling them to pass on 
to customers a proportion of 
VAT charges. 

Many hotels will lose the 
advantages of being wholly 
within the VAT system, mak- 
ing them partially exempt 
businesses, but with the detail 
often differing in individual 
cases. 

Another change faring ho- 
tels is die removal of a 
concession which meant block 
bookings by holiday tour op- 
erators have been treated as 
ioDg-tenn rentals which do 
not attract VAT.’ 

*- From November, VAT will 
be levied on these ‘ 


• ALEXANDERS HOLD- 
INGS: Terms have been agreed 
with Murray International 
Holdings (which with associates 
now bolds 8^ per cent of the 
ordinary capital) for the disposal 
of a property in Edinburgh. The 
sale price is £950.000, payable 
neat March. This will result in a 
surplus of £20CMXX) over book 
value: 

• ABERDEEN CONSTRUC- 
TION: Interim dividend 24p 
(2.3p) for the halfyear to June 
-30. payable on Nov. 2L Turn- 
otcf £47;78 nuffion. (£47.58 
million).. Pretax . profit; £1.64 
millioii (£1.44 million). Earn- 
ings per share 6J24p (5 . 1 Op). ' 

• NOBLE AND LUND: Pretax 
profit for the first half of 1986 
£344,000 (£48.000 loss). Turn- 
over £5.19 million (£4.64 mil- 
lion). Interim dividend held at 
0 -35p. Earnings per share: basic 
4.46p (0.75p loss) and fully 
diluted 3.56p (0.75p loss). 

• WHATMAN REEVE AN- 
GEL : Interim dividend Ip — a 
21.95 per cent increase. Turn- 
over for the first half of 1986 
£16.94 million (£16.99 million). 
Pretax profit £3.1 million (£2.66 
million). Earnings per share 
8J3p (6.51 p). 


Honeywell 
in computer 
link talks 

Minneapolis (Reuter) - 
Honeywell, the United States 
computer company, is bolding 
talks with two foreign com- 
panies about combining their 
computer businesses. 

The discussions — there-had 
been considerable speculation 
that they were taking place — 
involve Groupe Bull of France 
and NEC of Japan,companies 
with which Honeywell has 
been dosdy associated. 

The announcement came 
after several sharp one-day 
gains in Honeywell's stock 
after analysts predicted a ma- 
jor restructuring. Honeywell 
was up $146 to $73 in active 
morning trading yesterday. 
Honeywell said the restructur- 
ing would allow it to con- 
centrate on its more profitable 
operations — automation and 
control eq uipmen t and aero- 
space and defence contracts. 


COMPANY NEWS 


' • MAL Year to June 30. Total 
dividend 17.5p(16p). Turnover 
£222.05 mfllion (£171.57 mil- 
lion). Pretax profit £40.03 mil- 
lion <£27.44 mfihon). Earnings 
per share 48. Ip (41.6pL The 
buoyant conditions of the sec- 
ond half of last year have 
continued into the current year, 
the board'declares. All divisions 
are enjoying active markets and . 
good demand. 

• SANDHURST MARKET- 
ING: Six months to July 31. 
Interim dividend unchanged at 
3-89 per coil Turnover £15.89 
million (£14.04 million)- Pretax 

it £601,000. (£610.000). 

_ i per share ].28p(1.28p) 
and diluted I35p(l35p). 

• FERRY PICKERING 
GROUP: Total dividend for the 
year to June 30 raised to 3.5p 
(2.72p, adjusted). Turnover 
£12.58 million (£1 1 .63 'million). 
Pretax profit £2-09 million (£1 .6 
million)- Earnings per share 
10.79p (S.05p, adjusted). 

• HIGHCROFT. INVEST- 
MENT TRUST: Interim divi- 
dend raised to lp (0-9p). payable 
on Nov. 7. Pretax profit 
£246,387 (£181,083)' for the six 
months to June 30. Earnings per 
share 2.97p (2.07p). 


Tax relief delays 
hit BES deals 


Delays by the Inland Rev- 
enue in briefing local 
inspectors over the new rules 
for the Business Expansion 
Scheme are blocking com- 
panies seeking to raise money 
■un de r the scheme and denying 
investors lax -relief. • 
The delays are likely, to 
cause considerable disquiet 
within the Treasury since Mr 
Nigel Lawson. the Chancellor, 
deliberately Weighted the 
BES in his Budget speech and 
is an ardent public supporter 
of the scheme. 

The BES allows investors 
tax relief on their investments 
in a broad range of unquoted 
companies. The scheme was 
substantially revised in this 
year's Finance Act 
Mr John Dodwefl, the 
managing director of Chan- 
ray' Corporate Services, an 
established, sponsor of BES 
companies, said yesterday that 


By Lawrence Lever 

the Inland Revenue is cur- 
rently denying tax relief to 
shareholders in one of his BES 
ke nes who invested after the 
budget when the new regime 
was announced. 

In addition, a number of 
accountancy firms claim that 
the local inspectorate is refig 
ing to grant provisional BB 
approval lo companies Peek- 
ing to raise money under the 
scheme in all but the most 
clear cut of cases. 

In both situations the delays 
are caused because the low! 
inspectors arc refusing to take 
decisions until they have .re- 
ceived new guidance notcs^on 
the BES from the technical 
divison of the Inland 
Revenue. 

A spokeman for the Inland 
Revenue confirmed yesterday 
that the guidelines had not 
been sent 


• DOWDING & MILLS: Total 
dividend for the year lo June 30 
raised to 1.38p (1.4p). Turnover 
£28-39 million (£25 million). 
Pretax profit £4.13 _ million 
(£3-5 1 million). Earnings per 
share 3.86p (3-lSp). The board 
is confident that earnings will 
again improve in the current 
year. 

• GORTON BEACH: Pretax 
profits jumped by 108 per cent 
to £202.190 in the 26 weeks to 
Aug. 2 Turnover reached £7.63 
million — .up 97 per cent. 
Earnings -per share increased by 
64 per. cent io- ‘I.I2p.- The 
company- aims to return to the 
.dividend list. and a final forthe 
current is expected. 

• F & C PACIFIC INVEST- 
MENT TRUST: Half-year to 
July 31. Interim dividend 0.6p 
(same). Total revenue £1.95 
million (£1.71 million). Earn- 
ings per share 1 . 14p ( L42p). 

• GIBBON LYONS GROUP: 
Agreement has been reached for 
the acquisition of Eden Colours. 
The founder-members of Eden 
are remaining with the com- 
pany, which will continue to 
supply printers in Kent, Sussex 
and south London with its 
Europa. series of process inks 
and specialist colours. 


• ASSET TRUST: First Jiatfof 
1986. Interim payment lp 
(0.75p). payable on Nov. 1.7. 
Turnover £696.092. Pretax 
profit £518.797. No compar- 
ative figures have been shown as 
the company has changed, its 
status from an ■ authorized 
investment trust to a ium- 
management business. The 
company now manages £***0 
million of funds, for private 
clients and institutions. 

• ASTBURY & MADELEY: 
Fust half of 1986. Interim 
dividend l-2Sp (1.125p). pay- 
able on Nov. -28. Turnover 
£13.39 million (£12.52 million). 
.Pretax profit £1 million 

(£891.000). Earnings per sbgre 
6.77p(5.63p). 

• KAMAR TEXTILES: Divi- 

dend raised to l.75p (1.65p) for 
the year to May 30. It will ■'be 
paid on Jan. 8. Turnover £24.55 
million (£21.02 million). Pretax 
profit £934.000 (£750.000). 

Earnings per share: basic 4.75p 
(5.29p) and fully diluted 3.7 lp 
(4.l4p). 

More company news 
on page 21 


&/L- ' 




• .v *:? /; ■ r firp. jug?* s 

rr w ■ endoi '• AagU'i: i^Sr 

1 9St 1985 

Fr-i't f 

l/CiiVk k . l " " i‘3 ij\* 

iosvj> o: Ciojr’? 

, . . * • 

£5.47rr. £3 .45 m 

E4. c 3:r. £3 .45m 

ArfSV: fm 



per Ordinjiy 

• ^ v- 

-r .>**. 

4, c Sp 3.71p 

Dbideiid 



per OrJin^n.' •h.'.rc 

' 

5.Cp 2-45p 



V* li-l tiltf ■"-? : - 1 -- s\s 5+.-: ■: f 

* i'..c ; ».-.i \i:.- ‘ 1 . :-:r r.v.v 

civisitffis - ‘ju.v. *jr: : 


*>*:. v . t 's 

U v» .(I ' -, i It-1 * »• J. i nt t S 

* •• ... . c*. 

jt'". HiftS 

B.Z\z Firsl-hr- Crctip {T-es: Germany) 
P&g?F&k:6nVh*ip 

These division? rammdy have outfe:/. Throj^h oi^anic growth ' 
jlonc, Lhat number is pl.-.nred w ir.rris-c io 1,100 o-er ihe next tew years. 


Combined 


\ 


IfVO’J w»u|i1 lil-.'rf f':\ J-'-;- i. - i Ji> J-. 
fli-.iv: tprly^: 

Tr., G-n-.r.'ii, J-:,:--.- 

GKitiWKd£n.: , . , * s t S-’"- Urcir r ! * ‘ ‘ • 

1-t-Chj-Sin.v; 

Lilian ft’I H. : P5 
Tcle^lionr i'll-!*" jjl 


* 0 


U R M A IN objectives in recent years, those of 
improved competitiveness coupled with a pro- 
gramme of investments in new products, have 
r corn bin e d to produ ce an other se tof exe ell en:t figures 


• H: A LF YE A R TO 3 0 T H J U N E ? 


1 9 8 6 


19 8 5 


.1 N’CHEASE 


PROFITS BEFORE TAXATION 


£1 8 ■ 8 1 1 m £ 1 6 • 0 9 9 m 


-+ 1 7 % 


+ 21% 



Stores 
Group pk 




41* 




v.. 




RI KITSIFSS AND FINANCE 




Share prices in 22-point fall 
as nervous investors sell 


By Carol Leonard 


The stock market took an- 
other nosedive yesterday with 
traders looking in vain to the 
Bank of England and the 
foreign exchange markets for 
some form of lead. 

As sterling weakened still 
farther, despite heavy inter- 
vention by the Bank of En- 
gland, gilts lost about £1 
across the medium and long- 
dated stocks and in the 
shorts. 

Equity traders were left 
wondering which way to torn 

• Mr Terry Ramsden, the 
financier, has now sold his 
stake in Pearson — be- 
lieved to beabont 4 per cent — 
and says be “no longer has 
any interest* There is talk - 
tint he has sold the hold- 
ing to interested parties in the 
Far East — who wdode 
Mr Li Ka-shine, tike chairman 
of Hutchison Whampoa 
and Sir Y K Pao, the Hoag 
Kong shipping 

next One experienced market 
man commented: Tve been 
in this game for a long time 
and I've never under stood it 
less.” 

The FT 30 share index 
began the day down 5.8 and 
finished at its lowest point. 
222 points down at 1.2423. 

The FT-SE 100 share index 
showed an even bleaker pic- 
ture, tumbling by 273 points 
to 1375.9. 

Datastream, which operates 
a 1,000-share index, said it 
had fallen by 13.48 points to 
874. 11 by S pm — wiping £43 
billion off the value of stocks. 

Among leading blue chips, 
Royal Insurance was hit hard- 
est, dropping 25p to 792p, 
with jobbers aware that the 
500,000' shares bought by ' 
Goldman Sachs as part of the 
Philip Hill Investment Trust 


package were stm overhanging 
the market 

American favourite, . Glaxo 
-tumbled a farther 22p to 930p, 
ICI fell 15p to 1.077p, GKN 
was down lOp at 254p and so 
was Blue Grde at 55Ip, 
despite talk that AJ Bekhor, 
the broker, was in the market, 
buying on behalf of an Austra- 
lian diem. 

Ev en the market newcomer. 
TSB, eased a shade in the 
unofficial “grey" market. 
Cleveland Securities, a li- 
censed dealer, was last night 
quoting the partly-paid. 50p 
shares at ' 90p, while Prior 
Haiwin priced them at 91 p. 
The level of oversubscription 
should be known later today. 

The rest , of the banking 
sector was mixed, with Bank 
of Scotland putting on 1 2p to 
449p, while the other clearers 



inject fresh 
business. 

Their plans may even incor- 
porate the business ran by Mr 
PhD Edmonds, -the . England 
cricketer, whoa] so tried tobuy 
Blades. . - - - 

Blacks' shareholders, who 
now have little to lose, could 


-well, be: advised Mo sit tight* 
went lower. Barclays dipped Bfacks * ^ares were un- 
changed at a rock bottom 4p, 


8p to 47 9p, National West- 
minster 5p to 539p and both 
Lloyds and Midland eased 3p, 
to 439p and 564p respectively. 

Blacks Leisure, the camp- 
ing goods retailer where Sears 
has 10 days to go before the 
close of its £3.3-ntitlion take- 
overbid. is, I hear, drawing up 
plans for survival on its own 
should th£ Sears' bid faiL The 
talk is that its directors are 
planning a £23 million rights 
issue as part of a financial 
restructuring package and are 
lining up a number of deals to 


EQUITIES 

Secs 

Jea 

Beawreo 
Broad St 
Chrises Man' il25p) 
Creighton Labs (130p) 
Euro Home (ISOp) 

Bn Construction (t05p) 
Fletcher Dennys (70p) 
Guthrie Coro (150p) 
Harrison (150p) 

Hffle Ergon om (92p) 


while Sears eased a couple of 
pence to lll.5p. 

-Good results from RMC 
failed to lift the shares, which 
dosed 2p lower at 630p. Rival 
Rugby Portland Cement was 
lOp lower at 1 56.5p Users of 
cement should be helped in 
the weeks to come by cheap 
cement imports from Greece. 
Mr NabtI Bouri, chairman of 
Seamen t. which began selling 
cement at a- 10 per cent 
discount to British cement 
prices last week tells me he has 


RECENT ISSUES 


Hughes Food (20p) 
Loral Lon Gp 
MB Cash ft C HOOp) 
Marina Dev (110p) 
Newage Trans (75o) 
SandsD Perkins (I35p) 
Scot Mtge 10Q% sa 
Stanley Leisure (110p) 
Thames TV (190p) 
Trees sWri/f 2016 *97 
Unflock (63p) 

Yetverton (38p) 
Yorkshire TV <i2Sp) 



so -far sold a couple of hundred 
tonnes. 

He is selling it a £39.75 a 
tonne, against British prices of 
£43 a tonne. It must also be . 
bad news for cement produc- 
ers like Blue Circle which 
controls more than 50 per cent 
of the British market. 

The depressed mood of the 
market caught even Barratt . 
Developments, which did so 
well the previous day on its 
results. The shares came back 
2p to 158p. There is talk that 
Wimpey has already made a 
bid approach to the company 
at 21 Op a share, but that it has 
been turned down by Sir 
Lawrie Barratt, who wants 
more money. 

The story might explain talk 
of a rights - issue with 
yesterday’s Wimpey results — 
which failed to materialize. 
Wimpey -ended the day down - 
7p at 201 Elsewhere in the 


RIGHTS ISSUES 


building sector, HAT Group, 
which failed in its attempts to 
get away from BET. finned a 
couple of pence to 137p. BET 
lost 3p to 385p. 

Shares in Pentiand In- 
dustries finned-by-20pto4S0p 
after a bullish forecast by 
Reebofe International, its 37 
per cent-owned US athletic 
shoe-making associate. In the 
first half of 1986. Pemland 
earned some 85 per cent of its 
pretax profits' from Reebok, 
whose products adorn the feet 
of thousands of American 
“yuppies." 

Reebok is predicting that 
earnings per share will top 
analysts’ estimates of S2.2CL 
230 this year and should then 


until i 


by 25 per 
1989 when 


annual sties 


• Veuterspost Gold Min- 
ing is one Sooth African stock 
worth watching. Yesterday 
it eased a few cents to just be^ 
low S3, but in the past two 
months it has more than don- 
bled* It is doing well on the 
gold price and has hit a higher 
grade of ore than most 
other mines bat, as ooe dealer 
commented,“it can’t have 
risen this much on the price of 
gold alone." 


Berkeley Tech F/P 

Po ols fl/p 
Brown & Tawse F IP 
Bund N JP 

Cambium Venture N/P 
Christy Hunt N/P 


34-3 

139+1 


Nat Res N/P 
aeogwick F/P 
Tiphook N/P 

(issue price in brackets). 


216-4 

145-1 

10-3 

'a-'j 

8 

3'j 

336-7 

48 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Storing 

Dec 68 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

Mar 88 

Previous 
Three 
Dec 86 
Mar 87 
Jun87 
Sep 87 


US Treasury Bond 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jin 87 


Short OBt 
Sep 86 — 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


. &£ 

££ 

Low 

88195 

Ctoaa 

8857 

EatVol 

5827 

_ 89.46 

89.48 

89.15 

89.18 

563 

- 89.61 

8953 

©40 

8957 

311 

- 8955 

8955 

8953 

8957 

89 

N/T 



8924 

0 

N/T 



89.03 

0 

Merest 13845 





- 9451 

Previous day's total 
9457 . 9358 

open interest 23788 
94.03 4817 

> 93.89 

9358 

P98B 

9353 

877 

- 93.68 

93.73 

93.65 

9359 

288 

- 9350 

83.40 

9330 

9356 

207 

. 95-15 

PrevtousdaVstpfe open Interest 5762 
9852 9556 9508 6950 

: Sff 



94.1 1 

o 

0 

96-45 ; 

Previous dars total open Interest 1458 
9845 awh 96-09 .128 

96-36 

96-40 

9624 

96-03 

400 

N/T 



96-03 

0 


LongGBt 

Sep 86 — 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

-ton 87 

FT-SE 106 

Sep 88 

Dec 86 


111 


% 


180.10 

163.10 


Previous days total open interest 14190 
110-11 0 

11246 110-12 110-14 14019 

11009 • O' - 
11009 0 


18030 

163.40 


Previous day's total open Merest 2322 
7.55 15755 


157J 

16025 


1£ 
16025 


7 07 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FbetOeoangs 

Sep 22 
Oct 6 
Oct 20 


Oct 3 
Oct 26 
Oct 31 


Dee 18 
Jan 8 
Jan 22 


For 
Jan 5 
Jan 19 
Feb 2 


- & V33XSS 


u-u -i m i- uir F yc n alternations!, . 

Astra. HefcMBar. Common Braftare. CrontoOreup, BartariDobsOn Group. Amour 
That Pan Contnenta L Cot o nat ion Syndicate. JFB. 

Put Bartow Rand. 

Put & Call: North Kalguli fctoes. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's ruge 
September 25 

NYorfc 1/1325-14487 
Montreal 1.9893-2^)106 

Ams 'dam3J31 73-3.3547 

Brussels 60.78-81.50 
Cpimen 11.0896-11.2195 
Dubim 1.0718-1.0840 
RwtktwtZS3482B701 
Lisbon 210.9421469 

Madrid 19352-19535 
Mian ' 2029.13-205332 
Oslo 105817-10.7279 
Parts 951489.7239 
jfkhlm. 89600-105591 
Tokyo 221^822359 
Vienna 2055-2089 
Zurich 2377824083 
Stating Index compared with 1975 


25 

14330-1.4340 

15893-15921 

33181-33226 

60535055 

11599811.1148 

1.07181.728 

2534825390 

210.94-21252 

19352-19X00 

2029.13-203455 

105187-10.6332 

9.818855355 

9560895741 

2215322159 

28882058 

2381CML3849 


0.47-045prem 

Q33-033prem 

Ift-IKpram 

15-13prem 

par-ftdfc 

par-ids 

Ift-IKpnm 

80-1 45ds 

35-65dfs 

2-4tSs 

3K-3ftdta 

ift-iprem 

%-Kprem 

1-Kprera - 

8X-7Kprem 

Ift-iprem 


SmooSn 
152-1 5Qprem 
05tWX75prem 
4K-4prem 
46-4ZpnBm 

sssr 

Vi 


88130rfc 
4-7dls 
954-105WO 
5K-4ftprwn 
254-1 Kprem ■ 
3-2ftnrem -- 
24ft-22ftprem 
3ft-3ftprwn 


i down at 683 (day's range 68.7-694). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina austraf 
Australia dote 

Bahrain dhar. 

Brazfl cruzado * 

Cypres pound 

Frond marka 

Greece drachma 

Hong Kong ( 

India rupee . 

Iraq dinar 

Kuwait OhnrKD 
Malaysia doHar . 
Mexico peso 


New Zealand dollar . 
Saudi Arabia riyal — 
Singapore doi br ~ 
South Mrlcarand — 

UAEdirham : 

•Lloyds Bank 


1951-1953 

— 0.7380-07480 
_ 7.1078-73470 
_ 19878197.70 
113217-113303 
18381850 

— 0421584255 

— 377183.7774 

— 10805-11305 

— 25927-30074 

— 5.4065-5.44© 

— 31247-31284 

— 32217-32385 

— 5394833345 


IrefeM 

15390.15420 









Norway 

75975-7.4025 

Denmark 

West Germany 

7.7375-7.7425 

25480-2.0490 

aireltiiei lei »rfla 

25147-25157 


15455-15455 

itaiv 14175-14195 




75010-75015 

Portugal 

147.50-Ua.00 

Spain 

13455-13555 

1459-1442 


Bates acppMad by BarcMys Bank HOFEXead&tri. 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Series 

Cafe 

Oct Jen 

Apr 

Oct 

Pule 

Jan 

_*EL 

Albert Lyons 

r»8> 

300 

330 

360 

10 

5 

US 

20 

10 

4 

30 

18 

B 

13 

38 

65 

17 

41 

70 

23 

47 

73 

BP 

(•870) 

. S50 

600 

650 

127 

78 

37 

143 

950 

80 

157 

120 

82 

1 

2 

13 

4 

10 

25 

9 

18 

35 

Cons Gota 

T554) 

500 

SO 

BOO 

60 

20 

7 

77 

48 

28 

92 

65 

40 

6 

27 

62 

20 

40 

72 

30 

50 

82 

Gourtaulds 

(-282) 

260 

280 

300 

330 

27 

17 

6 

1 

39 

27 

17 

9 

48 

35 

24 

2 

10 

22 

48 

6 

16 

24 

50 

11 

18 

27 

Com Unton 
("277) 

280 

300 

330 

11 

4 

1 

22 

13 

7 

31 

22 

15 

16 

30 

57 

19 

33 

57 

21 

36 

57 

CaWeAWbo 

C294) 

300 

325 

350 

375 

10 

3 

IIS 

K 

27 

13 

8 

3 

35 

25 

15 

12 

37 

62 

87 

22 

42 

65 

90 

27 

50 

72 

DisWte rs 
(-715) 

600 

660 

■700 

130 

80 

30 

— 

™" 

15S 

4 

8 




GEC . 

(164) 

160 

180 

200 

14 

5 

2 

20 

12 

4 

28 

18 

9 

6 

18 

38 

B 

20 

38 

10 

22 

40 

Grand Met 

T4061 

327 

355 

380 

382 

63 

55 

30 

62 

70 

1 

1 

*5 

*4 

7 

ICI 

(*10851 

950 

1000 

1050 

1100 

145 

95 

80 

23 

177 

130 

92 

57 

184 

137 

97 

75 

3 

7 

15 

44 

10 

17 

30 

54 

12 

25 

40 

60 

Lend Sec 
(*3141 

300 

330 

360 

19 

5 

2 

29 

16 

7 

38 
25 
■ 12 

5 

21 

48 

8 

22 

48 

9 

23 

48 

Martu&Spen 

T194) 

180 

200 

230 

19 

5 

1 

26 

14 

6 

33 

20 

12 

IX 

10 

29 

3% 

15 

31 

7 

18 

33 

Shefl Trans 
(-913) 

750 

800 

8S0 

177 

127 

85 

197 

150 

115 

212 

185 

130 

1 

2 

7 

4 

9 

17 

8 

13 

27 

Trafalgar House 

1*277) 

260 

280 

300 

22 

11 

4 

32 

20 

11 

41 

28 

20 

3 

10 

25 

9 

19 

33 

15 

26 

39 


Series 

DM 

Mar 

Jut) 

Dee 

Mar 

Am 

Beecham 

(-395) 

360 

390 

420 

460 

50 

32 

20 

11 

65 

45 

32 

IS 

55 

40 

6 

20 

42 

72 

9 

23 

45 

73 

27 

50 

Boots 
f-21 7) 

20D 

220 

240 

23 

15 

6 

32 

23 

13 

41 

29 

19 

3 

15 

29 

7 

18 

30 

10 

21 

31 

BTH 

(*293) 

280 

300 

333 

28 

1 

38 

30 

45 

35 

12 

50 

18 

30 

20 

33 

Bess 

1*715) 

700 

7S0 

800 

45 

22 

12 

50 

33 

20 

88 

45 

22 

53 

as 

28 

57 

100 

33 

65 

BLie Cirete 

(*55i) 

550 

600 

650 

35 

15 

5 

50 

28 

13 

62 

35 

28 

55 

103 

28 

55 

103 

S3 

58' 

De«eere 

(•747) 

650 

700 

7S0 

800 

130 

100 

65 

45 

155 

125 

95 

65 

110 

85 

9 

25 

45 

80 

23 

38 

65 

95 

TO 

105 

Duo"* 

(•3461 

300 

330 

360 

56 
28 
- 15 

66 

36 

20 

48 

30 

2 

7 

22 

3 

14 

28 

20 

34 

GKN 

(*254» 

260 

280 

300 

330 

18 

9 

5 

3 

33 

32 

12 

8 

41 

29 

1/ 

31 

50 

78 

34 

51 

78 

25 

37 

GUM 
(*940) - 

900 

950 

1000 

1050 

95 

67 

45 

30 

130 

110 

83 

62 

180 

135 

110 

3b 

62 

95 

130 

52 

80 

105 

135 

90 

115 


135 

— 

— 



__ 



flB8> 


ISO 

160 

180 

200 


32 

17 

9 


37 

23 

13 


— 2 * 
27 7 

17 SL 


8 

10 

21 


13 

25 


September 25 1986. 


Tout contracts 19667 . 






Safe 



Pete 




Series 

Dae 

Mar 

Jut 

Dae 

Mar 

Jon 

JMuar. 

rsisF 


500 

43 

60 

78 

25 

3? 

35 


550 

22 

40 

65 

48 

57 

60 


600 

11 

23 

— 

93 

93 

— 

Thom EMI 


420 

B? 

75 

. — 

4 

10 


C461) 


460 

30 

45 

55 

16 

22 

27 


son 

15 

27 

40 

4S 

45 

54 



550 

7 

12 

— 

90 

30 

— 



330 

82 



— 

1 

—m 


C*00) 


360 

55 

87 

— 

5 

8 

— 


am 

33 

47 

56 

13 

20 

27 



420 

16 

30 

42 

30 

35 

40 



Mas- 

Msv 

Feb Mar Nov 

Fbb May i 

Brit Aero 


420 

30 

45 

60 

16 

21 

28 

("430) 


4H1 

10 

28 

40 

Ml 

45 

50 


500 

5 

15 

28 

7b 

• 78 

83 

BATInde 


360 

95 

107 



ft 

.2 



(■448) 


390 

65 

80 

93 

3 

6 

8 


420 

40 

tfi> 

rt) 

H 

15 

20 



460 

18 

30 

41 

30 

33 

35 



460 

35 

57 

62 

8 

14 

20 

T479J 


500 

17 

3? 

45 

30 

35 

42 



550 

5 

13 

23 

75 

75 

77 

BritTetentn 


160 

13 

71 

27 

5 

10 

14 

(184) 


TOO 

47, 

10 

17 

IB 

23 

2S 


220 

IK 

4% 

12 

37 

38 

40 

1 Cacflw Schwas 

160 

18 

28 

33 

3 

8 

10 

(175) 


180 

7 

15 

16 

10 

14 

16 


200 

3 

8 

— 

27 

28 

— 



300 

28 

38 

50 

5 

13 

17 

(■320) 


330 

10 

20 

30 

19 

25 

30 


360 

5 

7 

18 

43 

47 

50 

Imperial Or 

rsSsj 


300 

330 

85 

55 

— 

— 

IK 

1» 

— 

— 



360 

28 

— 

— 

7 


— 



330 

70 

43 

50 

3 

8 

10 

fS53) 


360 

12 

23 

30 

17 

20 

25 


390 

5 

8 

17 

37 

42 

47 

LASMO 


110 

11 

18 

25 

10 

13 

16 

mu 


120 

7 

14 

20 

17 

20 

23 


130 

4 

9 

14 

25 

28 

30 

MdtendBank 


500 

75 

92 

102 

2 

7 

11 

rse2» . 


550 

37 

55 

70 

15 

20 

27 


600 

13 

2/ 

35 

47 

47 

50 

P&O 


480 

63 

78 

— 

2 

5 

— 

(*521) ' 


500 

25 

45 

58 

6 

17 

25 


550 

8 

22 

33 

42 

48 

53 



600 

2 

— 

— 

90 

— 

— 

Raosl 


160 

16 

22 

30 

6 

9 

13 

(184) 


180 

6 

11 

IB 

IB 

20 

22 


200 

3 

6 

10 

38 

38 

38 

RTZ 


550 

85 

97 

— 

5 

15 

40 

r629) 


600 

4? 

82 

82 

12 

28 


650 

17 

38 

53 

40 

50 

65 



700 

. 7 

20 

— 

80 

92 

— 

vaal Reefs 


70 

15 IS 

21 

23ft 

2ft 

5 

7 

(■«) 


no 

ft* 

IS* 

7V, 

B 

9ft 

11 • 


. 90 

4JS 

10 

2ft 

11 

14ft 16ft | 


Series 

Nov 

Her 

Jon 

Noe 

Mar 

i2L 

Lomtio 


200 

23 

28 

34. 

' 5 

11 

15 

rsi4) 



11 


— 

12 

— 

— 


?3fi 

4SS 

— 

— 

a 

— » 

— 



m 


12 

16 

— 

35 

40 



255 

3 


— 

43 

— 

— 


Series 

Nov 

F 0b Ifey 

Nov 

Fab May 1 

Tr 11*% 1991 ■ 


106 


»I6 

1 

4>m» 

4ft 

5ft 

*£102) 


108 

3 ,t 

3|» 

s 


6ft 

7 


110 


IS 



8ft 

Bft 

Tr1Hi%03/0? 


114 ‘ 

*1 fc 

iss 


*'n 

6ft 

7 

am 


116 

% 

1SS 

2ft 

/ft 

Bft 

8ft 


116 

T 1* 

I’w 

1ft 

9-' it 

9ft 

10 



120 



1'.» 

11 lift lift 1 



122 

** 


— 

13 13ft 

— 



124 

■»« 


— 

15 

— 


Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

FT-SE 1525 

60 

'80 

97 


1 

8 

10 

_ 

index -1550 

35 

60 

77 


3 

18 

23 

— 

rv5B3) 1575 

15 

48 

63 

— 

8 

27 

35 

— 

1800. 

6 

33 

S' 

67 

25 

40 

48 

53 

- 1625— 

-3 

23 

52 

45 

5b- 

-62 

70 

1850 

1 

18 

3(1 

4? 

72 

75 

80 

as 

1875 

1 

6 

72 

3? 

96 

95 

Hffl 

103 

1700 

1 

6 

15 

30 

120 

120 

120 

120, 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


The markets became 
increasingly jittery 
as the pound plunged to 
lows in the foreign exchange 
market. By the end of the day, 
the key three-month interbank 
term deposit had moved up by 
Mi to 1 Q*/i*-M* per cent, while 
longer maturities were show- 
ing rates up to Vi higher. 
Money cheapened on the 
“fiat" forecast, but rates were 
turning up again towards the 
dose, which came at about 9 
percent. 

B*mRbIbb% 

Clearing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 

Discoant Market Loans % •. 

Owregfti Hmh: 9 Low 8 
Weak freed: 9ft-9 

Treasury (fife (Discount %) 

Buying- Se&ng 

2mnth 10 2 mrafi 9* 

3mntn 10 Smnttt 9% 

Prime Bank BBs (Discount %) 

1 mnth W-W'ji Zimtti 189K 
Smrnh 10’ 10-9“* 6 ninth lOft-10 
Trade BMs (Discount %) 

Irarthimt 2 mnth 1 0H 

Smntti 10 "m 6 mnth 1 0H 

Interbank (ft) 

Overreght com CH4 dose 9 
1 week 9ft?ft 6mnth 10 u i*-10"« 

1 mnth 10'i«5 n « 9 mnth 10H-10X 
3 mnth 10 *m-10 7 i» 12mth 11-1 Oft 

Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 9 7 days 9 

ImnthSH 3mnth 9H 

6 mnth 10 ft 12 mffi 10 % 

Local AaSmrity Bonds (%} 

1 mn8i 10 H -10 2mnti 10 H- 10 H 
3 mnth lOtt-lOX Bmmh 10H-10H 
9 mnth 10H-1QH 12mtfi 10K-10H 


1 mnth 9>3«5if lA 3 mnth IQVlO'w 
6 mnth 1 O'i^ 10 *« 12 imh 10 ».^ 1 lFie 

Oo8arCOs{%) 

658555 


1 mnth 

6 mnth 555-550 


3 mnth 555-550 
12fflth 6.10-655 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


should reach $2 billion (£1.4 
billion). 

Television contractors were 
a strong feature after Central 
Independent Television an- 
nounced that hs pretax in- 
terims had more than doubled 
10 £5_3 million. Central gained 
21 p to 346. while HTV firmed 
17p in sympathy to 340p. 
Others to show gains included 
LWT and TVS, each 5p higher 
at 395p and 240p respectively. 

United Newspapers, where 
Mr David Stevens is chair- 
man. jumped 25p to 370p 
after producing results at the 
top end of City expectations. 

Stores had another bad day, 
on expectations of an interest 
rate rise with John Menzies, 
the newsagent, 7p lower at 
-342p. Maries and Spencer, 


down 5p at 192p, Storehouse 
5p off at 3l0p, W H Smith 6p 
down at 268p and Rainers 3p 
down at213p. 

Life insurance companies 
tumbled even further with 
Pearl Assurance 30p off at 
l,448p, the Prudential 
Corporation ISp lower at 
804p, Britannic 13p down at 
804p and Legal and General 
8p lower at 228p. Composite 
insurers were similarly af- 
flicted. General Accident slid a 
full 20p to 799p, Guardian 
Royal 12p to 772p and 


Siebe continued to sui 
from the effects of its massive 
rights issue earlier in the week 
and fell a further 15p to 75Sp 
Wellcome, after firming a 
penny early on, slid 4p to 195p 
on profit-taking after the en- 
couraging news about its anti- 
AIDS drug. Other drug 
companies were also lower. 


APPOINTMENTS 


J H Fenner (Holdings); Mr 
Roger Bexon joins the board 
as a non-executive director. 

GKN Keller Mr Roy 
becomes director, piling 
construction and Mr Eric 
Murphy is made director of 
ground engineering. 

G T Unit Managers: Mr 
John Hawkes is appointed a 
director. 

Rank Xerox (UK): Mr Pe- 
ter Blackmore takes over as 
director of strategic business 
development, Mr Paul Chap- 
man becomes director of busi- 
ness management systems and 
Mr Les Jones is promoted to 
director of personnel. 

The Louisiana Land & 
Exploration Company: Mr 
Ernest J Leidner is elected 
vice president. 

Nash Industries: Mr D C 
Newton joins the board from 
October 1. 

Logitek: Mr E L Langton is 
made non-executive chair- 
man. 

R J R Nabisco: Mr Gerald 
H Long and Mr James O- 
Wekh are made senior exec- 
utive vice-presidents. Mr 
Harold L Henderson and Dr 
Robert J Garbonell become 
executive vice-presidents. Mr 
Andrew S Barrett is ap- 
pointed senior vice-president, 
corporate personnel. Mr 
Michael M Masterpool is 
made senior vice-president, 
corporate public relations. 

Abaco Investments: Mr 
John Slatter joins the board. 

Cementation International; 
Mr Michael Slater is pro- 
moted to managing director. 

The Electronic Engineering 
Association: Mr Peter Sachs 
takes over as director. 


Defer 

7 days 5'*u-6 
3 mnth 6-551 
P w rtir f M ii i il i 
7 days 4 Vi-4* 
3 ronth 4*vt-4 , ie 
French Fraac 
7 days 8%-B 
3ireift8V7K 
Swire Franc 
7 days 9V8% 

3 mnth 4X-4X 
Van 
7 days 
3 truth 84% 


caff 6K-5K 
1 mnth 6'i»6»i« 
6 ninth 

caff 5-4 . 

1 mnth 4«iM r i« 
6 mnth 5*454 
cal 87 
limft BWK 
Smnth 7V7K 
caff 2)4-116 
1 mnth 4 k -4 14 
6 mnth 4t*4 3 ia 
cafl 5V4K 
1 mntil 5K-5 
8 mnth 454-4* 


GOLD 


GoktS430.7543150 


Krugerrand- (par com t 

S4358431.00I 


810258103 50 
| Excludes VAT ■ 


(£2385830050) 

1-5872J5) 


ECGD 


Fixed Rate Si art rig Export Finance 
Sdieme IV Average reference rate for 
interest period August* 8. 1988 to 
September 2. 1986 indusive: 8.890 per 
cent. 


BASE 

LENDING 

HATES 


Mm S Company. 
BCCL 


Citibank Savimsf.. 
Gonsofidatsd Cnls. 

Co-opaatiw' Bank.. 
C. Hoare & Co. 


Horn Kong & Shanghai. 

Lloyds Bank 

Mai Westminster 


. 10 . 00 % 

. 10 . 00 % 

J0J®% 

.10.75% 

.10.00% 

.10m 

.10A1% 

.10X0% 

,10JHK 

. 1 ( 100 % 


Royal Bank of Scotland __10.00% 

TSB 10.00% 

Qttenk NA_ 1(100% 

t Moopce Base Sate. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Rover harks back to 
BL’s tales of woe 


Since Graham Day took over at what 
is now Rover five months ago, the 
stock market valuation of the group 
has fallen from £1.7 billion to £1.2 
billion. Some £170 million dis- 
appeared yesterday, when Rover an- 
nounced a loss, after interest, of £1 1 9 
million for the six months to June. 
That compared with £43 million in 
the same period last year. 

The core of the loss — £60 million at 
the operating level for Austin-Rover— 
had already been revealed. But in- 
terest charges are up by half and those 
losses do not include the once-and- 
for-aU write-offs and restructuring 
costs of £84 million from selling 
Ley land Bus and UniparL 
The bottom-line loss is £205 mil- 
lion. That takes Rover back to the 
survival days of Mr Day's sometime 
predecessor. Sir Michael Edwardes. 

The stock market valuation is 
artificial, extrapolated from dealings 
in the tiny fraction of shares in private 
hands. But it gives a fair view of the 
trend in Rover’s fortunes. 

Increased losses were not the only 
trip down memory lane. Once again, 
an incoming chairman has got rid of 
most of the senior managers. Messrs 
Ray Horrocks and David Andrews 
have already gone. 

Harold Musgrove, the senior 
surviving manager, was the biggest 
domino to fall yesterday. But there 
was no influx of talent to suggest that 
newly-styled Rover will not repeat its 
age-old error — management too thin 
for the task. 

Moreover, the quick fix of selling 
Leyland Vehicles and Land Rover to 
General Motors (and possibly Austin- 
Rover to Ford) is no longer available, 
leaving not merely a vacuum, but also 
increased uncertainty. That has hurt 
car sales in the home market — that is 
one weakness France's slate-owned 
Renault, currently losing rather more 
than Rover, does not have to suffer. 

Officially, the major shareholder's 
position is that it awaits Mr Day's 
assessment of the group and his 
proposals. Unofficially, the pressure is 
on and anxiety high. The sales have 
done nothing much to boost cash- 
flow. 

The rising tide of debt interest 
suggests that Mr Day's plan will have 
to involve further major surgery (such 
as one of the Cowley plants and more 
cuts on the truck side), a new series of 
sales (perhaps disguised as links) or 
demands for more of the taxpayers’ 
money. Possibly, it will involve all 
three. 

The truck business is certainly 
improving at home and really ought 
to do better after the departure of 
CM'S Bedford. Its problems abroad, 
chiefly the collapse of old Empire 
markets in the developing world, are 
more intractable and were, indeed, the 
final straw for Bedford. 

Freight Rover is now being asso- 
ciated with Leyland Vehicles. Had it 
not previously been part of Land 
Rover, theGM deal might have stood 


a slightly better chance. 

The car business, as ever it seems, 
rests again on the success of the latest 
wonder model - the Rover 800. It has 
a strategy through the link with 
Honda, but is unlikely to fare perma- 
nently better until uncertainty is 
allayed one way or the other. The 
latest news is an uncomfortable echo 
of the past 

Saatchi’s image slips 

Saatchi & Saatchi, the men who work 
wonders with other people's images, 
seem to be having a good deal of 
trouble with their own. From a high 
point of 990p, the Saatchi share price 
has slithered and slipped through The 
summer to reach a low of 605 p 

For a company accustomed to 
seeing its stock trade on a classy 
earnings multiple of 20 or more this is 
a humbling experience. If the forecasts 
for 1987 are right Saatchi shares are 
changing hands at little more than 10 
times profits. 

Unfortunately, the string of damag- 
ing news which has undermined the 
group lately is long. In New York 
yesterday, analysis were talking 
gloomily of another $35 million to 
$40 million of billings which may 
soon be lost because of conflicts of 
interest within the group. The prob- 
lem arises over the billings of Quaker, 
handled by a Saatchi subsidiary, and 
General Mills, part of whose business 
is with Ted Bates, the company at the 
heart of Saatchi's troubles. 

The City swallowed hard when 
Saatchi made a £400 million rights 
issue during the summer. The cash 
was forthcoming despite the scale of 
the issue. The advertising industry 
expected Saatchi to go for a major 
consultancy to broaden its base of 
operations. Three weeks later 
thetaiget was revealed as none other 
than Ted Bates. To less than total 
enthusiasm, the world's largest 
advertising agency was bora. 

Within a matter of weeks, the 
troubles began. Saatchi lost major 
accounts like Nabisco, Warner Lam- 
bert and Colgate-Palmolive. The lost 
billings racked up to hundreds of 
millions of dollars. Some losses were 
expected as there were bound to be 
conflicts in a merger that brought, 
under one roof accounts of companies 
in competition with each other. Rival 
agencies could hardly believe their 
good fortune. Saatchi's ambition 
seems to have been greater than its 
judgement. The departure this week of 
Robert Jacoby, Bates's chairman and 
chief executive, brought the shares to 
their low point 

There is an air of resignation at the 
Saatchi headquarters at what is seen 
as a self-feeding irrational market 
movement Net losses so far amount 
to less -than $100 million of billings 
from a group total of $7V': billion. 
Saatchi accepts that the way to steady 
the nerves of a jittery City is to 
perform. Amen to that. 





CENTRAL 

CENTRAL INDEPENDENT TELEVISION PLC 

Interim Results 

for the six months ended 30 June 1986 


Six months ended 30 June 
Unaudited 
1986 1985 

£'000 £’000 


Year ended 
31 December 
1985' 
£’000 


Turnover 

85,778 

72,793 

165,046 

Group profit before taxation 

5,317 

2,566 

11,856 

Taxation 

(2,047) 

(1.128) 

(5,262) 

Profit for the six months 

3,270 

1,438 

6.594 

Earnings per share 

13.0p 

5.7p 

26.3p 

Dividend per share 

4.0p 

2.5p 

12-5p 


V 


o Turnover increased by 17.8% to £85.8m aided by a more buoyant 
advertising market than in the same period last year. 

O Group profit before tax, at £5.31 7m, showed an increase of 107% at the 
half-year. 

O An interim dividend of 4p per sham (1 985 2.5p) amounting to £1 ,003,000 
will be paid on 7 November 1986 to shareholders on the register as at 9 
October 1986. This b intended to reduce the disparity between the interim 
and final dividends. 

O The incidence of advertising revenue and costs is not uniform throughout 
the year, nor is the pattern experienced in 1986 likely to be repeated this year. 
However, the resuits for the toll year are expected to be good. 

O Agreement in principle has been reached with the Independent 
Broadcasting Authority and the Stock Exchange for enfranchisement of the 
non-voting shares and admission to the Official List of all the shams, subject 
to the necessary approvals by the shareholders. For this purpose a notice of 
an Extraordinary General Meeting on 24 October 1986 will be circulated to 
shareholders on 1 October 1986. 

■The figures for the year ended 31 Deoambor 198G have teen exnactod tarn the fen accounts 
on me audios hare issued an unquafifed report. 


Registered Office: Central House, Broad Street, Birmingham B1 2JP 












TH£:T1M£S FHUDAY;Sf£FrEMB£K 26 1*80 


Nigerian windfall for 
British companies 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


A number of UK com- 
panies, ted by British Caledo- 
nian, could find themselves 
millions of pounds better off 
as the result of an important 
relaxation of foreign exchange 
controls by Nigeria. 

From Monday, foreign 
companies with earnings in 
Nigerian naira win be able to 
take part in a foreign exchange 
auction which will allow them 
to repatriate profits from local 
transactions almost imm- 
ediately. 

Previously, foreign com- 
panies operating in Nigeria 
have had their earnings tkd 
up in the local currency for up 
to six months before being 
able to convert into hard 
international currencies. 


In the case of BCai, which 
operates about 10 flights a 
week to the Nigerian dries of 
Lagos and Kano and claims to 
have one of the biggest first- 
class 747 cabins in operation 
irr the 'world, is modi as £60 
million 4n naira earnings has 
been held up! . 

■ According to reports from. 
Lagos, earnings of foreign 
companies will be protected 
until the end of thus month 
against devaluation of the 
naira by the setting of an 
official exchange rate of 65 US 
cents, the equivalent of 123 
naira to the pound. 

Next week, a second tier 
market win begin with com- 
panies able to ted once a week 
for foreign exchange at rates 


that will fluctuate with 
demand. 

The two-tier system was 
established alter agreement 
with the International Mone- 
lary Fund which should lead 
to rescheduling of the 
oounuy’s J13. nation ofihe- 
dium and long term debt 

BOal, which employs more 
than 100 people ur Nigeria 
and has about. 10 officerintbe. 
country! confirmed that the 
£60 million tied up in Lagos 
would remain .subject to exist- 
ing controls. 

But from next week, the 
company should be able to 
remit its earnings on a weekly 
basis rather than see them 
languishing in a Nigerian bank 
and prey to devaluation. 


Blow for rival OTC market 




OPERATING PROFITS UP 


Wimpey half-year results 






mm 

MW' 




mISsF 










DIVIDENDS UP 


All the signs are there for the second half. MflMIffiREV 

FOR mEFUU-IMTHW REPORT VVRTTETO ANGUS MILLHl, GEORGE W1WEY PIC 26-28 HAMMBflSMITHa^OVE. LONDON VM57EN. 


( TEMPUS ; 

Wimpey may still 
have to settle 
for solid silver 


Mr Giff Chetwood, chairman wovens in 


man ufacturing 


and chief executive of George pa**** ■ i CV el, 

Wimpey must have ■ the A ithe maw ^ 

words “there will be no lossr Mr Anti /’Vsncititi up Group 


words “there will oe no io»r Group 


upon nis nean. ™ ■ .v” f nr many 

personal interest in ensunpg w,lh ,hJh^ beefed up the 
that this maxim is closely months has bee^up^i^ 

followed, the objective is to tarn $ 

improve the return earned op die new chief exeuuuve, nr. 

what amounts to nearly half Geoffrey Maddre , _ 
of group turnover. Given the The mtenn^guros. 
vajkicries of the building show the benefits g ^ 
industry this may be easier chan^ Taxable^ profits ^ ad 
said than done. 


UIOJIBU r. ,.a | 

vanced 4.5 per cent to tlO.l 


Matins in building and million, but only 
civi| aT enrinrering an? still South African * 


civil engineering are sun aoum 

wafer thin although the cash GamafinaUy 

generated can be well used for chipped in £1 \ Li _ 


housing and proper 
development. Overseas wo 


pared with £341,000. . . ~ 

Profits before associates 


aevaopiucm. x <a «■ » ■ ~ a 

has fallen by more than a were 7.6 percent down alter a 
third; but; the British order 28 J per cent n « in interest 


Instead of the £300.00ff 
which the dealers. and other 
OTC practitioners were going 
to put up to develop the 
proposed exchange, they are 
looking at .other courses — 
such as selling partly paid 
seatsin the exchange— to raise 
between £30,000 and £40,000. 

Mr Wilmot says that-this 
money will be used to exam- 
ine and develop suitable mar- 
ket-making and price 
information systems for the 
proposed exchange. * • 


book, whiidi is twice the size, The slow stt/t to the s^ng 

isslightfy ahead. ... season affected ciotb ag aln 


- Lack of activity has had a and cun-ency factors knocked 


detrimental effect on tte fSOp.OOOoffprufitsarrfhada 

engineering, offshore and ma- similarly depressing effect 
rinF rfivisinn. Chances are .sales, which were marginally 


rine division. Changes are .sales, 
being considered which iower. 
should ensure its continued The 


should ensure its continued The overall numbers were 
competitiveness. much as expected and LUy 

Mr Chetwood is a modest analysts are leaving their 


man; he does not mind if forecasts for the full year 
Wimpey is not the largest unchanged at £29 million to 


housebuilder in the United £30 million. 


Kingdom this year. With The prospective 

Tarmac aiming to complete price/eamings ratio, on 
at least 10,500 units, Wimpey shares down 2p to Stfwp. is 


may take only the silver just under nine, 


medaL Mr Chetwdod is keen, The real attraction ot we 


however, to provide buyers shares is, however, their 
with a good product and prospective yield at 6.4 per 


shareholders with an accept- cent 
able return. D]\ 

. Estimates suggest that 
housing accounted for more For 


RMC Group 

For a company whose prin- 


than half of interim trading cjpal profit earner is some- , 
profits of £24.6 million. Tim- thing as unsexy as ready - 1 


ber frame and first time mixed concrete, RMC Group 
buyers still account for 40 per certainly has a habit of 


cent and 50 per cent of sales reporting glamorous results, 
respectively. In the South- Yesterday's figures were 10 


east (60 per cent of the 
business) the average selling 
price is well under £40,000. 

' Under the. present cfaair- 
I man, progress has been made 


per cent ahead of best 
expectations. 

The policy of broadening 
its spread of interests has held 
the group in good stead. 


in hn proving xfee quality- of Profit increases were enjoyed 
WimpeyV eamings;- HoW- virtually, across the board. 


ever, profits -still . represent a 
small proportion of; the 


As a significant user of 
cement, RMC Group 


group'sxl.5 billion turnover, watches imports with in- 
Ever demanding, tire City terest. However, its position 


has already discounted 1986 remains unchanged: if a 
profits m the £65-£70 million competitor uses imported oe- 


range. and is focusing its m ent, then RMC would fed 
attention on the longer term. 0 bU^d to follow suit. 


Acquisitions are a distinct Expansion continues at 
possibbty with housing, prop- Great Mills (DIY) which now 


eity, waste management and has 51 stores. Six have been 
leisure being suitable areas opened this year; with' a 


— further 14 in the pipeline. 

■ If Wimpey jr prospects be- Premises- are rented so the- 
gm to look urK^rtairragain, g^of this expansion should 
the existence of the Grove not be exoibitant Builders’ 


Chanty slake, now reduced to merchanting is also doing 
35 per cent, will no doubt welL 


refuel takeover speculation. Demand in France was 


fri the meantime, the shares strong, reflecting increased 


have risen far enough. 

Tootal Group 


confidence. 

United States profits were 
ahead in sterling terms and 


TootaTs management, hav- by the end of the year should 
ing seen off un unwelcome show an improvement on last 
bid from Enured last year, has year's estimated profit of $ 10 


five mind on the 


million (£6.8 million). 

In the longer term, this is 


The new strategy, gradually an obvious growth area. The 


unveiled over the last few 
months, binges on the cre- 
ation of a service and dis- 
tribution-led business. 

Instead of heavy manufac- 
turing, which Tootal has 
abandoned over the years, 
the emphasis is to be on 
marketing textiles to the West 
made hugely by low cost 
producers in the Far East 


group is still on the look out 
For aggregates or concrete 
products acquisitions both in 
the US and Europe. 

The main boost to RMCs 
profits this year and next will 
come from West Germany. A 
severe fell off in demand in 
1984/85 caught the industry 
unawares. Now volumes 
have levelled out, although 


Tootal aims to be the leading prices are rather weak. 


supplier in its chosen mar- 
kets. 

In the thread division, 
which provides more than 40 


However, the strategy of 
reducing overheads in re- 
sponse to lower demand is 
having the desired effect on 


per cent of total sales, the the bottom line: RWK's lime 
m mi-mill concept is being sales are depressed as a strong 


introduced to provide cus- 
tomers with maximum 
service. 

Tootal also intends to grab 
back the 40 per cent of its 


mark is damaging the export 
market By next year, Ger- 
man profits should be more 
than £24 million. 

This year, RMC Group 


American thread sales that go should have little trouble 


through distributors. 

The new strategy entails 
substantial expenditure on 
people. An outlay of £1 


making pretax profits of £95 
million. 

Looking further ahead, the 
fundamentals still look good. 


million is being made this while the UK business will be 
year on marketing men for a prime beneficiary of any 


specialized materials, or non- pre/posi election s pending 



ISupenJrUi 


HALF YEAR REPORT 


Turnover (Ex VAT) 

Trading Profit 

Net Interest (Payab!e)/Receivable 
Net Profit before Tax 
Taxation 

Net Profit After Tax 
Earnings per Share 

Earnings per Share -Fully Taxed Basis 
Dividend per Share 


93,483 

5,512 

(329 ) 

5,183 

2,073 

3,110 

8.87p 

8.87p 

2.3p 


31 Aueua 


• Saks increased by 24^3%. 

• Trading profit increased by 27^0 % . 

• 20 new stores opened in the period. * 

• Alleast another . 


"tE^T l * r: *' aW<SI “ P ® i ” Uki *®Wi talf 



















MV\ nvi : N 
u v l0 ‘ ^ sti 

M! i,i -, ^ I 
M v, ■ 

,lv Cr 






-rrcrtiv prirmmcD in VDOA 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


Superdrug set for record profits 


Superdrug Stores, the retail 
chemist company which node 

• MURRAY VENTURES: To- • 

^SSrSfi 

miiT- **" Cen \ “It? at ."■* one-for-one scrip . issue. The 
jnilhon on sales -4.6 per cent board expects to recommend 
n l ^. er - dividends for the current year of 

The company said that not less than lOp — equivalent 
comparisons with the pie- to not less than 5p following the 
vious first half were difficult 
to make because of the in- 

JJJJH 1 ’®" of n< y thern •titaghur Ate°fac- 
worehouse operation. It was TORY: No dividend (same) for 
confident of record sales and the year to June 3a Turnover 
profilsin the fun year. £45.85 million (£30. 13 million). 

• The increase m turnover Net loss £IZ53 million (£4.78 
was achieved with nil price mm j 0 n)- Loss per ordinary 
inflation. New stores contrib- 1 a? rrnMrvrrvs- 

AND ENGINEERING PROD- 
exismug stores 9.1 percent UCT& Half-year to July 31. 

me company has opened interini dividend 0.9p (0.8 2p), 

JO stores since March, and it payable on Nov. II. Turnover 
will have 300 by the end of the £3.08 million (£2.63 million), 
year. Pretax profit £197,000 

The dividend is raised to (£215.000). Earnings per share 
23p from 2d 2J3pi [2. 1 Op). 

^ ^ m urtnroMTiMrnnitD. u.ir 


• RED LAND: A joint-venture 
company. Western-Mobile^ is to 
be formed with Hoppers Inc of 
the US. Red land will pay an 
estimated S35 million (£24 mil- 


• LAPORTE INDUSTRIES: 
The company is entering the 
Australian building products 
nKtrkct through the acquisition 
of Sydney-based Davco Services 
for Aus£4.2 million (£1.82 mil- 
lion). with an additional profit- 
related payment of AusS 500.000 
at the end of 1987. Davco had 


In brief 


• SCOTTISH, ENGLISH 
AND EUROPEAN TEX- 
TILES: Mr J Mackenzie, the 
chairman, told the annual meet- 
ing that management accounts 
for the first four months of the 
current year showed a downturn 
in turnover and profitability 
compared with the similar pe- 
riod last year. However, the 
main autumn selling season has 
started later than usual and 
sampling has only just begun. So 
■I is too early to assess results 
from this. 

• SCOTT & ROBERTSON: 
First half of 1 986. Interim 
dividend Ip (0.9pX payable on 
Dec. l.Turnover£I0.81 million 
(£9.81 million). Pretax profit 
£825.000 (£402,000). Earnings 
per share, adjusted. 7.2 Ip 
C3-27p). The second-half's re- 
sults will not reflect an increase 
comparable to the first, but the 
board is confident that the 
outcome for 1986 should be 
better than 1985 by a significant 
margin. 

• SINTROM: Interim divi- 
dend held at 0.75p, payable on 
Nov. 14, for the six months to 
June 30. Turnover £8 million 
(£7.95 million). Pretax profit 
£589.000 (£717,000). Earnings 
per share 4.2p (5-Dp). 

• READYMK: Six months to 
June 30. Pretax profit Ii£55,000 
(£51,000). against a loss of 
Ir£ 1 23,000 last tune. Turnover 
lr£7.72 million (Ii£8.49 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share 0J4p 
(loss a32p). 

• ANGLO-EASTERN 
PLANTATIONS: Six months 
to June 30. Turnover £724,000 
(£303.000). Pretax profit 
£28.000 (£30.000). 

• DOWDING & MILLS: The 
company has agreed to buy 
Electric Motor Services, a pri- 
vate company in Ashford, Kent, 
for £350.000 in cash. 

• SPACE PLANNING SER- 
VICES: Year to June 30. No 


proposed scrip. Pretax revenue 
£1.33 million (£983,000). Earn- 
ings per share 8.78p (6. lOp). 

• TITAGHUR JUTE FAC- 
TORY: No dividend (same) for 
the year to June 3a Turnover 
£45.85 million (£30.13 million). 
Net loss £12^3 million (£4.78 
million). Loss per ordinary 
stock unit 88.10p (337. 1 5pL 

• SPECTRA AUTOMOTIVE 
AND ENGINEERING PROD- 
UCTS: Half-year to July 31. 
Interini dividend 0.9p (0.82p), 
payable on Nov. II. Turnover 
£3.08 million (£2.63 million). 
Pretax profit £197,000 
(£215.000). Earnings per share 
233p (2. 1 Op). 

• HIBERNIAN GROUP! Half- 
year to June 30. No interim 
dividend as stated in the listing 
particulars. Pretax profit 
lr£763,000 (£702,000), against a 


Western Paving Construction, 
which are mainly in the supply 
of construction aggregates and 
related services in the US. 
Arrangements are bong made 
for the joint venture to raise $60 
million of long-term notes at a’ 

fixed rate of inierest,' 

• macallan- 
GLENLTVET: Interim pay-' 
.mem held at lp, payable on 
Nov.5. Turnover £3.18 million 
(£221 miOion) for the first half, 
of 1986. Pretax profit £610,000 
(£202.000). These results reflect 
an exceptional volume increase 

which win not be continued in 
the second halt But the -full- 
year’s results are stiQ expected to 
show real progress. 

• JE ENGLAND & SONS: 
Mosspack (Potatoes), excluding 
certain operating assets, is to be 
sold to its management for 


loss of • Ir£4.04 million. Prc- £27.000 cash, subject to adj 
raium income Ir£54_66 million ment based on Mosspack”! 
(Ic£493I million). Paramgc per suits from June 2S.lasLlo 
share 0-94p (5.49p loss). date of completion of 

• JOHNSEN & buyout. The disposal wfllrel 

JORGENSEN PACKAGING: England, of inter-company 
Half-year to June 3a Interim debtedness of £658.796. 
dividend raised to 13Sp(13Sp), gtmd win then loan Mossj 
payable on Oct. 31. Turnover £300.000, secured on its ass 


double the figure of three years, 
ago. 

• MCLAUGHLIN & HAR- 
VEY: Six months to June. 30. 
interim payment 2p- (same). • 
Turnover - £23.52 ’ million 
(£28.04 million). Pretax? .profit 
£314:000 (£704,0001:;. Earnings 

per share' 4.6p (J1.9p). . The 
board is confident that .profits 
for the full year will be sufficient 

to justify maintaining the level 
of d ivide nds. 

• BETECz Interim dividend 
0.65p (0.5p), payable on Nov. 
14. Turnover £7.48 million 
(£732 million) for the six 
months to June 3a Pretax profit 
£560.000 (£476.000). Earnings 
per share - weighted average - 
undiluted. 4.23p (3.63p) and 
fully diluted. 3.00p (2.53p). 

• HAWTAL WHITING 
HOLDINGS: Six months to 
June ia 1986, com p ared with 
the period Jan. 1 1 to June 3a 


suits from June 28 last to the _ 1985. TWnover £15.68 million 
date of completion of tbe (£11.75 million). Pretax profit’ 
buyout. The disposal will release £2.04 million (£1.67 million). 


£7.03 million (£6.74 million). 
Pretax profit £576.000 
(£548.000). Earnings per share 
4.66p (4.08pL 

• RAGLAN PROPERTY 
TRUST: Year to March 31. 
Dividend 0. lp (0.085p). payable 
on Nov. 24. Net turnover £9.31 
million (£597.476). Pretax profit 
£463,611 (£72,734). Earnings 
per share a32p (0.16p). 

• “THE TIMES' VENEER 
CO: No interim dividend 
(same) for tbe first half of 1 986. 
Turnover (net of VAT) £3.42 
million (£3.41 million). Pretax 
profit £71.815 (£110,938). Ad- 
justed earnings per share 038p 

(0.66p). 


England, of inter-company in- Earnings per share 1 l8-5p 
debtedness of £658.796. En- (I4.6p). The directors believe 
glar'd win then loan Mosspack that the expanded computer- 
£300.000, secured on its assets. aided 'design facilities and. the 

• TENNECO: The company is current level of design contracts 
to make an ag reed cash offer for will make a strong contribution 
Steiger Tractor. Terms: J3_50 towards profits during the sec-, 
for each share, totalling about ond half. 

SI 5.4 million (£10.6 million). • HARVEY & THOMPSON: 
Steiger, which filed for protec- Total dividend raised to 6p(4p) 
tion on June 17 under the US for the year to June 28. Turn- 
Bankruptcy Code, makes large, over £3.25 million (£1.48 mil- 
four-wh eel -drive agricultural lion). Pretax profit £850,000 
tractors and tillage equipment (£445,000). Earnings per share 

• ALLIED PLANT GROUP: 1 5.05p (8.50pX The current year 
Turnover £7.33 million (£53. has gat off to a good start. ' 
million) for the six months to • JONAS WOODHEAD- & 
June 30. Pretax profit £305,433 SONS: Management accounts 
(£1 89.613V Earnings per share- -for-the five months to 
I./0p(0.68p). Trevor Crocker & show a pretax profit 
Partners' results wfl] be included excess of the same per 
under a merger accounting basis year, the annual meeti 
in - the 1986 annual accounts, told. The board expects 1 


• DAVENPORT KNIT- £^£^005 have not been 

^^W 1 °30 r nStS e « a £ •RAMCO OIL SERVICES: 
mHlinn Six months to June 30 (compari- 

2"2? n SSmwn ll> !&.lnn5 K 5°"* adjusted). Pretax loss 

£607.000 (£101,000). Loss per 
** sterE 1 767p share 2_9p (035p). The board 

• FREDERICKS PLACE 
HOLDINGS: Six months to a 

June 3a Turnover £135 million f ot ^i SUfeSd and Srirri 
(£932.000). Pretax profit 

f 177 mn /riunnnt Pbminoc does not expect to pay a finaL 


HOLDINGS: Six months to 
June 3a Turnover £135 million 
(£932.000). Pretax profit 
£177,000 (£154,000). Earnings 
per share J.94p (1.86pX The 
results are not strictly com- 
parable because of cha nges in 
the composition of the group. 


• JULIANA'S HOLDINGS: 
Interim payment for the first 
half of 1 986 cut to a75p ( 1 35p), 
payable on Nov. 27. Turnover 


• IMPERIAL GROUP! The £3.55 million (£3.93 million), 
group is to repay the following Pretax profit £424,865 
loan stocks: the 8 per cent, (£878,666). Earnings per share 


1985/90. 6.9 per cent 2004/09, 
7_5 per cent 2004/09 and the 


0.84p (2.09p). 

• CONNELLS 


ESTATE 


10.5 per cent 1990/95. The AGENTS: Six months to June 
repayments, involving £1 18.4 30. Interim dividend doubled to 
million cash, are necessary to 2p. partly to reduce the disparity 


snow a pretax prom well in 
excess of the same period last 
year, the annual meeting was 
told. The board expects the half- 
year result to be “most 
favourable.” 

• AMAGIAMATED FINAN- 
CIAL INVESTMENTS; Agree- 
ment has been reached for the 
issue to HDFI Ltd of 6 million 
new shares at 1 63p cash each, or 
a total of £990.000. Afterwards, 
HDFI, an Australian-based 
investment banking and finan- 
cial group, will own 2333 per 
cent of the enlarged capital 

• JAMES WILKES: Interim 
dividend 3p (same) for the half- 
year to June 30. Turnover £53 
million (£1.53 million). Pretax 
profit £23a663 (£514,835). 
Earnings per share 33p (7.3p). 
The board explains that this 
poor performance was entirely 
because of difficulties en- 
countered by Deri tend En- 
gineering (1 983). 

• TRAFFORD PARK ES- 
TATES: Total dividend 12p 


ior xo:>u.uuu in casn. minion casa, are necessary to -p. paruy io reduce me disparity i ails: total dividend I2p 

• SPACE PLANNING SER- allow a restructuring before the between payments. Tbe board (1 l_5p) for the year to June 30. 
VICES: Year to June 30. No sale of Courage to Elders IX L. intends to at least maintain the Gross income £6.29 million i 

dividend. Turnover £2 million Repayments will be at par. apart final at 33p. Total commissions (£6.13 million). Pretax profit 

(£1.48 million). Pretax profit from the 10 J per cent, which and fee income £736 million £2.66 million (£2.66 million). 

£440.790 (£286.497). Earnings will be £108 for every £100 (£3.18 million). Pretax profit Earnings per share 1536p 

per share 5.95p (3.69p). nominal. * £2.04 million (£760,000). (16.l4pL 


INTERIM 

RESULTS 


Our names 
add up to strength 


_ _ RT kinfss AND FINANCE 21 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 2 

Profit improvement 
achieved against a 
background of 
preparing for growth 


“Profits before tax of £10-1 m for the first six 
months to 31 July 1986, compared with £9-7m for 
the corresponding period last year. Earnings per 
share have increased by 8-7% to 3-5p from 3-22p 
last year.’' 

“The growth strategy is based upon developing 
the Group as a worldwide marketing 
organisation, built upon excellent service and 
distribution skills to industrial users and retailers. 
The Group intends to use its highly developed 
international network to ensure its marketing 
organisation draws upon the most cost and 
quality efficient sources.” 

“A new management board is being appointed 
which will comprise Executive Directors of the 
Group Board, Chief Executives of the major 
business units and key central staff and will be 
chaired by Mr. Geoffrey Maddrell." 

“No reason why we should not achieve a 
satisfactory improvement in full year earnings, 
thus justifying our ongoing commitment to a 
progressive dividend policy.” 


Chairman 


6 months to 31 July Year to 


W m 


1986 

1985 

3 [Jan 1986 

W 


£’000 

rooo 

rooo 

If you would tike to know more about us 
write to the Secretary for a copy of our 

Sales 

189,520 

191,415 

388,040 

current Report & Accounts. 

Tootal Group pie. 

Profit on ordinary 




Tootal House. 19/21 Spring Gardens. 
Manchester M602TL. 

activities before tax 

10,123 

9,687 

27,385 

=EP Tootal 

Earnings per share 

3*50p 

3-22p 

9-43p 

iff r.mi in 

Dividends per share 

l-6p 

l*5p 

4-Op 


The half years' figures are unaudited. The results for the year to 
31 January 1986 are an abridged version of the full accounts which 
received an unqualified report by the auditors and have been filed with 
the Registrar of Companies. 





THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


<T//. 


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B&d OHv Cmg YW 


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NC U*cr UK CO M4 510 . . 130 

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STEWART, MRYUMTIffiMT 
MANAGERS 

48 QaataRfi Sq. EfiMagh 
031-228 3271 
Anode*) Fund - 2160 6307 

Do mSUa 1520 1620 

WMlftRd aao 6244* 

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1180* +04 
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3* 13'# 
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1GB 131 
180 90 

2(7 187 
toe as 


09 28 88.0 
28b X3 808 
29 230L0 

85.1 7-8 15-8 

12.1 23 504 
72 2A55JS 

284 39 337 

29 44824 


BdtanUe Arrow 
Deny ua* 

Oo-A- 

Beet* 

Eng Truft 

Deo 

u?totfOn 

Esrg" 

jgjderaon AdMn 


295 190 M&Q 

2Sa iia reen ** Horae 
IS PmancRaTN 
-** '21 Oo Warrants 
2t» 152 Snath New Coal 


£40 +H 

s •? 
1 

■E18'. 

M3 

]£ •-? 
22a -4 

100 *-i 

7W • 

68 * . 
IK 
133 
903 

M3 -6 
» -10 
2*0 

207 -7 

113 +Z 
34 +8 

103 -3 


EXCHANGE 

C W Joynton and Co aopoit 

SUGAR (Fran C. CzaraBtoW) 

If 22-12.4 

■mazBA 

1407-404 
14^2-4 5£ 
1505-51.6 
15ELQ-55.fi 


153 
85 . 

317 * .. 

173 +« 

93 -8 

127 *-3 

216 +4 

61 

46 • 

146 

1» a +37 

470 * 

S3 

2*0 *+7 

7fi 
5*6 

IS! • 

375 

65 


-1 

405 •— ID 

62 
215 
193 

a m 

2004 - 
WS -3 
34 -3- 

i .+ 

36 *+2 


Jan 

Feb 

13090-3090 1 

T.T 

March _ 

i2SHQ>7nfn 

Anil 124.00-17.00 

May 

June — 
Vofc 

126-00-16-00 

128.00-1 6.00 

3711 


;i 1 zirf ’ 


COFFEE 


s*x„ 

2440-437 

Nov 

245»4$0 

Jan 

2396-305 

March ... 

Mav 

2327-320 

2317-305 


2317-310 


■ taaMM+l guta** 

unonjav pnen 
Offtaai Tia m AM r flfluraa 
Pries in C per metric tame 

SBiw topfloe* per troy ouoc* 
Ftodutf Wo* & Co- LWL report 
COPPER GRADE A 

Cash 935JXW87JJ0 

Three Months. 8575085100 

Vof: — 3500 

Tom Steadier 


■ir','.’.'-I- , . , ii; 


Cash 912.00916.00 

TTvm Months . 936-00-940J30 


COMMODITIES 


MLVOt SMALL 

Cash 407.00-40000 

Three Months - 417IXM18.00 

Vol Nd 

Tana ... kfle 

Auwwnm 

Cash 833.00-835.00 

Three Mnnflia. 815.00-81550 

VOt 9050 

Tone StsacSta 

MCXEL. 

Cash 3605-3810 

Three Months 2650-2660 

Vof -_-«0 

Tong Steelier 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 



'4tAri^yi-lO 




'Tr*r«tr- 




ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash gW.50 - 6 0 g.W 

Three Months . 610.00411.00 



Unq-ted S8-3 


UnqTea 9&5 


PISMetavetSO Vbl: ° 

LOtex SSSS nmE3 

,0pm Otosa 

ff 1 H n B! ,8a 93-7 

fr, UnqTea B65 

Sf Unq-ted 9ao 

“L UncTtod Unq'taa 

^ Unq tea Unq'iad 

unB U»mz Unq’toa 

veto 

t-ONDON GRAJN FUTURES 
E per twin* 

Barley 

01101 CJooe Cto» 
w 109.05 108.7Q 


r ownnu 

POTATO FUTURES 

E per tonne 

Month 

Open ctoaa 

Nov 

FeO 

Now 

11190 11090 
124-00 12290 
184.00 110.10 
1W90 193X0 
85X0 85.00 


Vb»r1117 


BffiX 

gf^^yttFutortaLto 

Oct 06 
Jan 87 

“«TARB1BO« 

**9tyLow Ocse 

829-817 8280 

822.0 

Apr 87 

l..l» 

887-880 894.0 


1!|30 niio 

730 


1J 24 88k 

WO 64 .. 
07 28 4fl 


oasr 881-880 


855-955 


Vat 345 lots 
Open interest 2469 

tower rawr 

High/Low Close 
§*»!? »wm> 970 


Vol: 13 tots 
Open (mwast33 

TwharlnOaxr 

9 ?1 -0 down n.O on 24/9/86 


T 


















































NMOHKKI 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



^cld— 




c»i i K-y »TT'.' ffius.-** > 


Ill-Ulf lilltB.'Kfrl 


0 Tiaws Niroy papers Limbed 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Gaims required for 
+44 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


E EITI n | '1M 



BREWERIES 


AM d Lycra 

>n na 

fi ifi a !?.?.- 78 

KwWw] 552 
Buckiay* 112 

BuHmc {H PJ IS 
ButawM Bnw SB 
CbfttMtJMui) 4*0 
DmwJah (J A) 597 
GTOentt WNMy 17* 
Gnn Kh»j 2*3 
Grbmaaa 318 

H Ml A Hmm 605 

npfiaiw i»- 

tnvfraprdon DU 151 
kbhBktf-. ■ 179 

Marttn Itmmaan 109 
hbM ■ 254 

8A Brawadeo: - 2 D 
Seal B in ■ iB6 
YEaux 370 

WW»1 -A" 255 

ft, V 299 

HMlMItt 215 
wcMMiam ad 54i 
Yoram -A- 295 





—7 132 

-12 21.7 

-G « 

-* At 

. . aux> 

+10. 4.1 
-a 7.o 

1&A 

0 . . lit 

-2 47 

-4 74 

.. to 
-5 103 

.. 260 

r g 

34 

.. at • 

■ -3 

. too 

4 It* 

-0 11.1 
.. 11.1 
.. Ittfl 

.. i3 i 

104 1 





BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


£4 

• SS0 391 
990 264 

m iM 
32 2? 

192 128 
83 63 

ID'.BTS 
726 529 

.*.1 

3* 

132 84 


171 • ..■ 

215 -3 

=5 •?. 


BBW 


. 01. 31 Br Dradong 11 

29 13 Brown* AcKkw 23', 

73 - 37 Bra unit a 74 +2 

132 84 BnM ■■’ 1B4 -Z 

Z7 ; 7 - Barnett A HUM 9 -•* 

. isa i aa catMW ffaeey us 

123 85 CHHAtttm 113 ».- 

IM 60 Condo Qip 121 • .. 

580 449 comb 506 a-10 

486 2S8 Counsysrda' . 478 - 

185 134 Croucn (Darak) IS *-2 

124 84 DwBwngl 115 a-1 

137 72 OwAt (RMJ . 122 «-4 

108 63 Ebb 104 

•3 n fab. at 

71 .54 Do -A 1 SB 

172 51 FMnUHq 113 • .. 

70 54 turn Op a • .. 

M 80 OtUord M 

131 106 GCfcs A Dandy Ordttl 

385 254 9mon(MJ| 361 -2 

143 86 HAT. 137 

280 56 KMctiBtt 270 

258 196 Henmnon 218 -2 

73 42 HewnvSkan 67 

244 144 HagmOOd Wm 196 p-2 

843 428 ^ S HH 626 

44 23 4 Howard Shot 44 • 

US 126 fcrtxk Johraan 172 -4 

460 2W jarvts (J) A Son* 440 

4«8 296 LMng ft 382 •-? 

484 286 Do 'A' 382 b-7 

722 78 timuSttbf 96 

91 .62 LBay(FJCj 92 -5 

429 290 tAMlffff -■ 896. 84 

198 128 MOMtASMh 162 b-10 

325 178 Mmbri 293 ; 

135 TOr Marts*- . • T«V b-3 

210 181 UaraMb (Hata) is '• .. 

tSt 98 Mm A HnU 143 -2 

448 3t>» McMptne (Alfred) 409 •-13 

304 226 McCarthy 6 S 285 -6 

272 171 IMTH 225 -5 

38 a In 38 

00 10S Mo«* (A) 118 


Please be sore to take account 
of any minus signs 

Weekly Dividend 

Please make, a note of your duly totals 
for the weekly dividend of £16,000 in 
tomorrow’s newspaper. ■ • 

MO* t TUE~ | BED I THU I FW I SK f'fe! 


BRITISH FUNDS 


asp* 


112 

112 

90 

111 

13 

12 

57 

18 

own - 

11.1 

82 

11.1 

61 

11.1 

11.1 

*2 

91 

*2 

32 

36 

27 


162' a-10 


920 798 m w tta 840 -20 

213 163 Nadktfbm Brick 198 

249 115 Pa raa nmon 226 • .. 

110 80 Fhoantx Tbftar « .-3 

395 265 Pocfira 388 

583 440 RMC 630 -2 

432 343 Mb net 430 0-4 

323 188 FWbWoid 295 -1 

191 133*, Rugby CKM 106V -9 1 . 

142 67 SwpitWlV 138 • ..- 

84 70 Smart (JJ 81 

519 0*5 Time 440 ; .--10 

348 216V T*tor Woodrow 306 • .. 

«0 1«0 TBury Soup ■ . « »..■ 

436 328 Trarb A AmM 433 

im . 75 natt ■*•'. 90 b-3. 

185 138 .Tun8f- 181 

381 19S Vfefoptrd . _■ - 341 • .. 

291 246 .Wed - , 291 • .. - 

95 56 Wtompn JJ) 50 . .-5 : 

204 177 WoEBBbk* . 182 .' . -4 

85 87 NmnB« . -.34 

153 41 MDoM • 151 -4 

290 157 wSwCCUtaM 260 a-3 

225 120 Wknpay (OaaoM 201 -7 


114 53 T9LB 

184 83142 
Xla 02 08 
8.1 ZB 192 
12B 28 133 

tw 2 J tar 

lit 73180 
.. • .. 62 
100 50192 
44 83132 

383 89132 
300 U 72 

142 57242 

43 53142 
.. ..603 

St' 5.1-372 

•49 43144 

.v 12 

*7 XT .. 

• *» #0- 
32 80 172 
250 49 84 

32 12 122 
88 88112 

33 72 182 
3-2 b 28 232 
47 43193 

23 22117 
£5 32 9.0 

32 431Z2 

54 73192 

83 7.1 144 

22 2.1333 

72 22123 

.72 83132 

..774 
IOO 42 143 

24 32 113 

10.1 51 124 

194 81 172 

20 43163 

7.1 41 129 

143 33 909 
107 22103 
107 . 28108 
5.76 S3 73 
53 89 60 
102 23140 
74 41 217 
116 -4217.7 
' 54 42 2Z4 

73 40 137 

- 0.1 -at .. 

181 44132 
41 13 192 

U . 30121 
14 37 .. 
93 73 182 
223 5.7 120 

157 12 188 
93 4.7143 
90b *0 82 
.. ..30 

184 52 72 
200 32 140 
183 33 1X0 
123 42105 
81 52174 

33 23 212 
Mb 84 VM 
132 - 11 183 
12.7 42 133 
84b S3 112 

128 22170 
12 13 625 

100 82262 
150 44 11 J 
304 33 >84 
1.4 ‘18 103 
62" 32122 
12 12 252 
07 OB 177 


C omp a ny 


On Yta 
Pn» Cnoa pence *. 


GEEESES 


248 208 
1B4 125. 
178V 71b 
209 108 • 

a is 

263.194 
<5. If 
2Sh 17 
186 132 
194 153 
78 62 

98 79 
148 T14 
29 200 


AWnMVSr 211 . 

Akfcati Him - 140 

Maftatn ‘ reo- 

Bariday Tad) 208 
C U i Ufa - E18b 

Candmar . 237 

Ca n va— f 28'. 

Eouty 8 Ban 27 
Mty A Skua 136 
Blabdb ' 198 

NB Home L0M a 

Do 9% OO 

Ib umari iat 129 

Tanpbion Gbrr 204 


12 09 .. 
32 . 23. 52 
82 -.42 ... 

174 02792 

57 24 374 


S 12 203 
2.7194 


42 54 192 
139 81 .. 
181 58 122 
BO 0.4 .. 
85 03 144 

»■**!•- 
67 28 120 

88 -52 143 
142 -41 160 
07 . 12 844 
■2.1 88 83 

7.1 83 209 
50 89 182 
84 15 252 
IO 12 . . 

53 81 69 

as 10 . . 
61 69 113 
20 52 82 
123 82 13.6 

4.1 7.7 . . 
84 99 113 

172 70 65 
(OO 39 89 

50 52 72 

2.1 29 83 

47 32 132 

157 1 7 250 

129 43 144 
1 53 SO 112 
57 53 160 
109 32 122 

23 13 197 
123 95'S.I 

84 42 .62 
142 .7412,1 

24 02 301 
13' 33 1V* 

57*31155 
800 43 % 

92 . 73 .. 

o- aa: .. 

72 33157 
02 50133 
207 43 IOO 
27 27 72 

54 23 344 
103 53 160 

51 40 170 

4.7 33 113 
.. .. 412 

42n 52 27 3 
57 67 122 
107 33 110 
53 59 7.7 
31.4 37 93 
as 50 52 


19b iSV 

®Mt 56*4 

m - 212 

540 293 
130 102 
195 100 
204 1,134 
163 145 
205 115 
165 126 
345 156 
68b 29 
M4 a 
IM 161 
37S 239 
1S4 a 
2S1 174 
50', 14*i 
11 a 55 

11R 78 

298 210 
134 82 

263 177 
198 125 
740 396 
180 120 
590 426 
94 89. 

'8 43’.- 

AdS 


228 ITT 

28 22 

668 8641. 

SS*. 23 
405 223 
#17 802 
336 229 
301 228 
431 713 
BS4 701 
954 720 
708 <54 
3*0 2F7 
286 226 
234 173 
443 257 

68b 29'. 
285 220 
3*8 223 

15b 12 
9*2 710 
*43 381 . 
.967 .788 
416 324 
<74 3*8 
445 380 
772 520 
927 772 
550 120 
474 384 


IMHB WV) 
V*tor 

VCU4 

vetor Preaum 

ViU 

V»W*9*0 

VSEL 

wa 


Wbdtar (CAW) 

wranoRi Cbn 

wtamtrm 

wanowod 


WM Gp 

ST!W 

SSSSSS.im. 

WynanamZw 

7«»9M 


INSURANCE 


Ccm Unpn 
EauNv A Law 
FAJ 

Gan teWrt 
HIMCE 

Hogg Robann 

Lags I Can 

London A Man 
Lon Uni hr. 

Mam A BAlan 

Mm 

PWS 

Pav 


8uraa Mdgi 
Sw Akanea 
Sun ub 
Tme mommy 
W*m Faber 


553 81 183- 

73 2.8 M4 
ZOO 50 112 
7.1 51 94 
23 1723.1 


21 3 8 224 

13 1.8 17.7 

81 21 70-6 

145 4 0H2 
*3 47 73 
30 15 280 

.. 164 
«3 55 27.1 
73 73 >80 

35 15183 

73 7.7 89 
1436 84112 
95 7.1 87 
20 DO 33 28.1 
86 35 . . 
140 2.7 175 

26-55165 

43 b 81 112 

22 88 86 
4.7 34 133 


83 83 .. 
100 33 .. 

680 33 ” 
AS 2*243 
44.7 S3 .. 
174 83 .. 

96 26 .. 

343 43 20.1 
425 55 224 
3*3 77 82 
127 43 tao 
123 64 290 
85 48 70 
24 6D 55125 
220 43 . 

11 4 45 H.1 
125 «4 188 
661 46 

388 42-531 
»* 54 

383 456*3 
17.1b 6.1 180 
157 35151 

10 On 25 204 
275 *.1 600 

354 43 ■ 

55 25 7 8 
125 23 21.0 


r?M 

Lin Cc^T4"r 


?■; 4\ ICC 04 
54 a tnoco 
38 4 7 Jackson 

29 11 kCA Bfiag 

343 U LASMO 
300 130 Da Ltnm 
21 « Mew Court 

48 IS M*w LOraon 04 
7 2'.- owmaf* 

26 II*. 0* Saiicii 
no a Parana 
M3 AS Paaneon 
3 ?'j 21 Pramn 

621 . <3 Auval CUtSi 
97D (63 Sna# 

185 133 SAtSmi. 

97 IB Sowra^n 
23'. if; TO Energy 
18 6', T*rg*r 

153 41 T<«*ri4nA 

290 30 Tiaon Europe 

21B 12S Uttramar 
59 £9'; wooaeoe 


aoss 

F’>cu Cf '"X SfKCf 


S 43 »1 3> 

■3 1744161 37 

-5 1*2 340 _ 


*4 21 62 23 

-3 86 112 61 

173 

*1 228 3 7 

• -11 51 * 57 89 

-8 88 59 22? 


718137 23 
186 

75 S3 *3 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


BMMct. S3 

CWmgtan 153 

Fmby (jmeil 64 

nemun CraaMU 319 

MOH 4*6 

I Jacks (wmt 35' J 

Lonmo 2l* 

Ocaan WMsan 46 

Fatmon Zocti 220 

Do A- . MO 

Pray Pack *st 

Sra Qmy 48 

StaaiBm 555 

Tonr KamHay 163 

r«4a Caoo 2r« 


-4 ar iji4t 

100 85 135 
-» S9 70 - 

286 73190 

*9 2S# 5133 

1 70 43 132 

• -1 17 1 30 10S 

-f 36 7S 6a 
•a 88 39 73 

•2 66 37 78 

• 75 50 2# 

-1 

22 9 4I1C0 

-3 a 58* 
ror soiao 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERT'G 


Himwrt Tnmta appear an Page 22 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 





SiNCI^ 1 


104'i -S 

TA 

106H -H 
B4*i -S 
112H -*• 
M7H -*w 
1«», J, 
nrit^a 
90', 

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MW* +’* 


48 34’, 

236 160 

428 291 
247 130 
158 106 
111 78* 

132 102 

139 112 
IOO 57*, 
136 82 

309 243 
169 135 
160 112 

224 15 
183 127 
131 100 
245 772 

133 111 
293 215 
171 111 
453 330 
1014 72V 
106 68 
11 734 

410 333 
118 99 
15'r 11V 
189 119 
98 82 
178 129 
3» 918 
73 36 

237 17a 

153 87 


AKZowvBaerv 

Aibd Cotat 
Ammham 
MW Chamical 
BTP 

Bryar 01450 


Br Bwrzol - 

Coam Bros’ 
Ob'A* 

Coryptaaca) 
erode. . 

Do Wd 

niatniB 


Kabtead panes] 
Hickson 
HoactM DM50 
HMLtayd 
fcap Cnam-bat 

tsr* 

Non* Hytro 
Piyw 

rinfannh Mdn 

RaninH 

EMAB90 

Wc bia n m Ena SS 

YorkaMra Cham 


<00 94) .. 

53 17 224 

100 25 202 

81 27 182 

84 *3 186 

700 7-0 .. 

103 93187 

84) 43 183 
.. .. 173 

5.1 84 193 

107 4JH81 

65 42 105 

83 42 92 
12 Li 74 
180- 65 181 

.. 127 
IJ 42 MJ 
47 4.0 127 

122 67 92 

84 85 152 
212 65102 

SJ '67122 
486 AS 120 

123 33 181 

54 42 163 

03 .. .. 

23 12 212 
27 28 112 
27 27 172 


CINEMAS AND TV 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


»1 IBB 

S 6S 
1* 

1/'* 7'* 
260 *5? 
11 6 
283 £30 
189 M4 
580 *29 
46 32 

740 410 
438 268 
Sfl'f 36 

" A 

2W'.J15'.- 


Aiabaemr (Kerry) 
Aus Nam 2 
B nfc aawno 
B4« Oi kurid 
Bn* Lam* braal 

Bank UmW UK 

gii* d Scodmd 
DirtMyS 
BWWrt 
Brawl ShpMr 
Cam Am 
CMBat 

, dan kUnhattan 

Corner* nwas 
Carnowraanh 
OrtNMSaa 
Caay 8 Gen 
Frill MM FW« 
Garrard Nat 
Cunnaas P*M 
n an i sm . 
m Sama( 


Do 6V. A' 

MkMnd. _ 


215 

•M +5 

S? 

mi 

230 • -- 

449 +12 

479 P-0 

£ i 

3G3 -5- 

SO 
C26'. 

E35V + 1 * 

69 

C111'. 

£270 

27 • .. 

IBS 

2M -S 

80 +1 

215 -i 

SO -5 

B »+'■• 

490 -10 

140 -2 

4TB *-15 

439 a-J 

£ :1s 

110 -2 

584 a-3 

*30 -* 

327 . *2 

539 -5 

fl»2 ■. 

705 


*56 -5 7.1 1.8 23.1 

36 62 

+’i 29 27 Mi) 

TBS 274„ 

1T5 24 14 332 

346 -2 87 22 18.7 

1G0 -3 3.6a 24 . 

105 

620 -10 9Z9B 27 142 


ELECTRICALS 


So 5 - « 
1840 65104 


398 180 ABBaa 

21 s 120 Abrmmr a 
is? 36 3am 

9B 43 
96 E3 
300 20S 
61 46 
ir, * 

220-140 



LEISURE 


Ban 8 WA 'A' 130 

Bootay A HkaAai 175 
Bnm Wabar 178 

Camoan 53 

Cbrysaks 170 

first l*wi 358 

GAA 51 

HtXTOLryr IkPCka S2 

Monasn Ttwral 121 

kn Laiam 110 

J«*w»'» HBjp 48 

Lae n T71 

Marknlniiar 145 

Pbaancama 312 

daah Utab 380. 

RiWLawm «t 

Saga HeMraa . 132 
5amu*boa Gp 1 165:': 
Camay Um ■ i3Z 
ToWan naa Hooprar 74 . 
■ Zadar*. . 181 . 


180 77 182 
. 262 
75 *4 135 
14 26142 

80 4.7 110 
9J 28 184 
. . . . *29 

.. ..66 
83 52 55 
7.1 65 102 

18 35 188 
35 25165 

11 I 1 is 131 

18.1 4-2 158 

.: ...23 2 

82 50 112 
34 21 98 
*S 35 .. 
57# 7.7 184 
7.1 35 188 



MINING 


+10 135 45 145 
♦1 25- 68 63 

-+1T IM 45189 
*5 2)5 54155 

+5 160— 45.115 

+5 145 60 115 

28 57 128 

+2 U 105 

+1 65. 84 94 


13'. S', Am Amar CM 
liven Ana Am 
83 31 Am Bob 
58 . 33 AAIT 

40 22- Altoona 

41 32 Do 'A' 

198 120 Ayer Warn 
485 238 BWn 
185 ao bum 
21V 9>. Bufleb 

358 SO. CRA 
eg 3# Carr Boyd , 

559 403 Con* Cfettfiatt* 
553. 3M D* Boar*. . . . 

-248 105 BMiad.'. 

". S'i .--*'■ Po o n d bMai 
, -Chi' 7 DnaionMi • -• 
8*» 2V Durban 

S .150 EQagga* 

-.258 Ebmfsind 
205- 129 HOtd - . . 

“205 85 EbbMg " ’ 

390 200 E Rari Gob 
S 2V E Ram Prop 
9*a ■ 4*a FS Com • 

213 33 FS Dev 

75 17 Qaamc Tin 

to 4'. Camel 
10'* 6 On Wrung . 

10V 5 1 . GFSA 
8*8 313 CM Xdgoort 
83 35 Gopang 
123 BS Gmenmcn Raa 
375 165 GmeMH 
158 9i HKnpagn Aran 
g*t 46 Harmony 
*00 ITS Haroa* 

674 <7'r Joraa M 
12', 5V Kbraaa 
6V 2'. Woe*. . 

100 69 Latte 

■19V-6*. I ba n c o ■ 
475.170 Loraam . . 
1S7 -«4 - MW • 

28 .15 kHay*nvj4nfeg 
323 BO Manama 
58. M'r Aiatab^AP 
26 SY-banan 
as -a*, uudawb 
G55 450 Mnomo 
5>- Z', Nn wet* 

142 n N8l Broken HB 
Si’s 25V HiMul 
3*V 10V Oranga Raa 
U9 85 PatafarTki 
2B9 204 Pata Wan* and 
25 SV Ram Mnn Ud 
445 in Rand Mm Prop 

73', 18 ’ RandlonmM 
351 826. Raraaon 
791 511 RT2 
8V *V Rmamug 
10V 5*. Si Hama 
166 88 5A Land • 
si 14V SmaiMni 

aaa 273 av tomh 
138 70 Sungai Bab 
138 73 Horn* 

MB 900 (Mai 
G2V-31V VM Raab 
613 233 vemrapoet 
125 50 .Vbktort»a . 

: 90 39 Vogt** 

. 17 TOV-Wknioe Cobory 
; 638:288 WMom 
313 128 Wasbm'Aran 
30V 15; Waamn Dan 
198 -11* : WasMDi Mkdag 
-280 .108 .Wast Rand Com 
100 00 Win Creak 

17V 7‘, WMtts' 

58- 20 VttMgel 
10', 10V Zamora Copper 
71 28 Zanopan 


872 

-V 540 5.1 .. 
•2 446 61 .. 

-2 Z71 60 .. 

142 43 .. 
142 43 .. 

.. <75 352 .. 

-10 790 204 .. 

+2 260 16J .. 

282 165 .. 
+8 .*•••• 

+2 350 83 152 

-8 180 35 . 

' -. .. <0. J.?. - 
+ V 920 HO .. 
-V . 12BT110 
+'» 

--lb izo- 2 * ■ ! ! 

I .. 62 33 140 

140 70 .. 
•6 280 7.6 .. 


+3 

10 

.. 600 75 .. 

-S 57 0 82 .. 
-V 460 42 .. 

♦10 

. . 200 522 . 

-3 64 0 182 " 

54 37 322 
.. 622 73 .. 

+5 17 0 *5 .. 

345 41 .. 
+'. 890 85 .. 

a-V *00 6t .. 
.-. 280 272 .. 

115 95 .. 
♦5 .. 


.. 170 182 .. 


.. 100 1.9 .. 

-V 230 SO . 


.. 120 32 82 

S51 78 . 

U 314 50 82 
260 32 813 
123 113 .. 
-6 160 142 .. 

♦V 116 42 .. 

+S 

% 460* aj> :: 

-V 558 67 .. 
♦6 9<0 92 .. 

'... 150 125 .. 

» .. 42; 72 75 

'■ 670 - 112 

.+8 230" 77 .. 

-'<■ .171. 5.7 .. 
♦3 -30 18 .. 
-15 120 45 .. 
+12 

-V 175 125 .. 
-3 -1.1 22 „ 


PROPERTY 


88'.- 24'. Abaeo 70 

8* GO AMd Lon 78 

93 70 Atm 83 

183 i55 Aiihpon San its 

355 216 Aida 3*5 

139 85 130 

003 218 Boon (PI 292 

*96 387 Bradford <50 

IBB 144 Br Land 159 

170 138 Braton 156 

46 36 Cart «A1 ASom *i 

236 218 Cap 6 CowMl 235 

290 200 Caron Prop 268 

196 168 CamrpvaiaaJ 170 

48S 410 cnestorkaid *70 

10 780 CALA CIO 

171 131 Cbm* Netted* 140 

2B5 164 Caman . 273 

.20 14. Corwoi S«CS 14', 

1*0 . 99 Comry A Nan 114 

198. .117 Cam 'S' .. 173 

260 175' Cuaans 250 

756 470 Damui 630 

'.-175 135 -pat«, A Agaocy 135 

. 125 47 . formyi Troai 72 
120 105 Estates Gen - 'ilB 
184-1*0 Eitabs Prop ITS 

112 S3 E«in»oi La40a 103 

70 38 Fw Oafei - - 58 

209 170 Frogmora 198 

192 148 Gr Paraand 168 

77* 2B2 Graycoal 226 

1B> 11 Hafcmod Gp C13V 

400 2M Hsmbro CounBywaJo32S 
4S5 425 Hammerson 440 

485 385 Do -A - 400 

48', 3*', Hamp ton Trn 39'.- 

2*8 130 Hancnr Drum 233 

325 233 Hmoamer 310 

6?'.- 48V Hone Kong Land 59 
42$ 270 knry 365 

200 155 Jsrtnyn 200 

320 770 Lama Prop 270 

348 276 Land Saajnhax 314 

•K 358 .ion A Ei»r T« 820 

266 147 DO 6';*+ 238 


03b 04 91 1 
20 25180 
29 35 170. 

43 12 430 

64 49 140 

171 59 140- 

129 29 182 

43 2.7 133 

65 54 164 ■ 


Fraornpra 

Gr Paraand 
Greycoat 
H aPrtod Gp 


42$ 770 knry 
200 IS Jarnryn 
320 770 La*m Prop 
348 276 Land Sacunhes 
695 358 . Lon 8 Eon Tat 
266 147 DO B'.V 


358 318 .Lon A Pm Shoo 359 

177 151 Lon Slop Prop 106 

S3 288 .Lyman 3'5 

380 Z75 MEPC 818 

140 90. Mctneomy - ‘ 138 

118 105 McKay Sacs 113 

58 44 - MarkhMSi 46 

22$ 125 Menvaia Moon 210 

ICQ -SO Madboroutfi i0l 

556 167 Martar En 525 

10V 5iD Mounaann rroi 

780 36* Momvnw 760 

loa 82 Muckwrr (AAJ) 98 

20 rB'.- «manJ £ 18 '.- 

130 73 New CavanOsn 113 

91 *3 Pamaaia 75 

282 255 Peachey 285 

260 72', Pnen Matters 255 

234 176 Proa A Ray 22B 

15$ 107 Prop Mdgt 132 

137 108 Prop SecuTty 134 

13': 8'. Raplan 11 

35$ 1B0 Regaian 330 

64$ 313 RDkaranrti 565 

297 3iB Rush A fanuMcns SIB 

103 78 Seal MM 91 

195 1« 9wia Gp 170 

l«3 1*2 Sougn EatBM 171 

«S 260 Soei+iair* 385 

173 14* Sort Sect 160 

91 66 Stockier 87 

58 45 To-ro Canal . 53 

2B0 198 Trelfora Park . 228 

148 95 UK Land 145 

10 SZS (M Raai CO 

885 675 Warner . . 860 

870 475 Warnrord 665 

156 130 warn* . 132 

- 31 -17'i Wsop MOB) 30 

17$ 142 ViaH A Ceunry 170 


40 30462 

0 7 -10 -.. 
07 31313 

f£l- 69 I«. 
57 55 11.4 
7.8. 

101 51 104 

9.4 56 200. 

01 14 420 

66 20 230 
136 01270. 

106 04 270 

14 05 

50 Z1 225 
151 40 117 

01 22 503 

20 10881 
100 37 107. 
140 40 210 

107 1.7 Z30 

63 09 . 

57 26320 
72 .48 180 

104 03 203 

157 40200 


• - 52 

• - 21 

-10 40 

09 

57 

» 143 

-4 7.1 

77 
173 
» .. 17 

i-t 23 
-2 12.1 
♦5 

64 

♦1 42 

k 35 

-1 01 

20 

•5 11 

k-7 127 

50 

-5 29 

i-1 83 

106 
-3 60 


» 214 

-10 279 
I +10 343 
I . 33 

l-i. ‘ 07. 

• ■ 114 


SHIPPING 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


§ 1 Bt 
I 138 
20* 7 
168 78 

141 70', 

S3', 24', 


28 


20a 80 50 

208 


160 

40 120 

70 


10 

20 580 

M 

• . 

17 

68 100 



M 


142 


4.7 

30 142 

IM 


40 

3.1 1X1 

181 


40 

20 183 

125 

• . 

14 

1.1 320 

110 

• . 

14 

18 308 

12S 


20 

20 M3 

47 



■02 


30 

32 63 





755 


163 

20 112 

45 


14 

XI 04 

225- 


1Z4 

60 78 

99 


S3 

04 11.7 

<33 


250 

50 170 

C3*V 



6 . 

115- 

•- 

IS 

10180 

98 

• . 

04 

10 384 

3*7 

«7 


■ 68 

29 192 


80 

40 142 

}Kl 


70 

67 120 


70 

• V 

04 88 
18 72 

503 


250 

60 114 
62 14.1 

■483 


' 1U 

93 


30 

42 220 

236 


.17.1 

78 50 

73 


86 

T18 76 

'168 


.. ( 

... 60 

216 


120 

50 130 

206 


60 

28 210 

m 

2 . 



37 




HO 

• . 

143 

70 174 

-4*7 

* . 

200 

47 14.1 

195 

b . 



91 



4.7 4.7 

■960 


(00 

20 160 

£92 




S': 



... 60 

90 


44 

40 107 

130 


54 

40 114 

116 


11 

27 128 

773 



303 

• 

52 

17 251 

276 


100 

69 70 

218 


137 


ira 

• ■ 

92 

04JJ3 




. 29.8 

08 


On 

O0SO 

T35 


as 

21 146 

174 


107 

.01 6.7 

104 

• . 

18 

10 2X2 


Stomal Bros 
Brama* (CO) 

Br Aarertaoa 
B, Car Auceora 
CaWyna 

STtSUrt 

sz* ■ 

FR Group 
Ford Motor 
Gate* (Frank G) 
General Mow 


Lrtas 489 

Pany gp 118 

Pbnara (GB) 88 

□ttplfl 83 

Raw 28 

Supra 73 

MM 7B 

WMSMd (fonrat » 


107b 60 BB 
. 333 

80b. 59 67 

09 30 80 

.10 34 14.4 

.. I . .. 

112 39 150 
234 54 81 

50 3B153 
70 07 . 
57 30 90 

54 62 90 
.70 32 132 
. .. 53 

4.6 14 220 
7.0 32 .. 
40 40 11.7 
250 102 .. 

00 42 rb> 
32 07 .. 
107 25108 

63 52 87 

10 25 17.1 

161 4.7 184 

70 «& 1Z1 
107 12 0B 
B4 $2 106 

64 M 90 
40 40 111 

04 47 140 

40 55 27.1 
14 20 115 


312'.- 187 
39S 230 
366 -210 
430 306 
9* 51 

603 *80 
78 64'.- 

12V 5 
<1 26 
2*0 100 
576 42B 
165 BB 
334 127 
390 360 


Assoc Br Paris 280 

Br Cewnonwibai 230 

Cobdona . 210 

Cikno 420 

Fw»i (Mast 5" 

Gt»b 5 5 

JacoaatU) 05 

SfiW Docks 31 

Ocean Tranaoon 230 

PA O DM 521 

Runcanan (Wahar) 153 
TipftOQk 2» 

Tirruma Seed 370 


77 20155 
71 31 150 

7.1 34 380 

1Z1 20 169 

49 94 93 

214 42 4£7 
51b 78*98 
. . a . . 00 
. . . . 93 

90 *9 100 
250 40 14.9 
71 46241 

61 21 198 

1Z9 35 51.8 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


360 »0 Fll • 295 9 6b 13 US 

206 146 Gamar Boon 190 143 75 110 

45 32 HestSern Sans 39 07 10 .. 

2TB 188 Lan4>*ft Honenh 191 •...- 69 47107 

E2 50 NenOob A Burton 60 ..44 73101 

116 82 Para 116 S5 4.7 -8.0 

157 118 spang 'A Fanar 1*8 120 00 JLr 

773 . 158 Btytt 205 • . 04 11 250 


TEXTILES 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


573 206': 
300 135 
183 97 
115 86 
31 16 

144 123 
127 60 
76’.- S3'.- 
315 190 
182 74 
276 196 
57 -42 
H 26 
no -eu 

113 88 . 

57 .33 
137 B7 
210 -90 . 
88 47 

'190-' >32 
191 138 
124 04 
1B1- 72 
US- .71 . 

»- lo- 
res 94 
47 30 

155 109 
06 72': 
182 133 
. TO 40 

29': 11 

T4Q 87 

S 

1»’» 76V 
350 236 


Abed Tarn 
Akm Bros 
Saab uonm 
Baewian (A) 
Boon 
Br M«a> 

Buanar s Lump 

Corsn 

CoiFttid* 
Croonnar (J) 
Dawson 
Dacron 
Ou-a IM 
Fpsaar (Jonn) 
Gaskaa Braaooam 
ikctong-PerwccS 

bJU^ttL 

n 

Ingram IHWOKO - 
daroma'IG) 

Lb"ora 


Parbano w 

ar* 

gr- 

SmatMu (R) . 
SndOard 'A' 
Sveud May 
Tanuraa jaraay 
Tomtonsana 
T 00 UI 
Tbraryaa 


• 107 4 1 179 

100 40 140 

9 . 60 39 71 

62 71 180 
-1 • 171 

•-1 8 Bn 84 81 

71 65 240 

• -Vi 5 7 BZ 

-6 93 30 9S 

-6 460 20)34 

-4 8# 36 131 

•-I 0.7 10 37 0 

57 US 66 
-1 SO 66 67 

• 70 70 73 

-1 SO 401Q& 

• 43 28294 

+2 43 .51 01 

-2 64 -40.104 

. «0 42100 

•-9 .1.4-1010.1 

-S 03.07-198 

67 52.15-T 

-..a £6 

-1 58'M 170 

-. - 23 ' 55 100 

•-7 .76 S7-.75 

• -3 36 ;S2. 09 

-5 74.6807 

-1 -09 63 58 

-3 4 3 - 93 Vi 

• . 86 55 08 

-3 88 40 119 

-2 57 61 97 

HO 3.9 00 


TOBACCOS 


308 SAT 
108 Carrol 
108 Carroa 
127 Henanans 3 


445 • 

111 
111 

' 143 b-3 









































































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


jl'HE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 


A closer 
look at 
the small 
operator 

By Teresa Poole 

The Government has been taken to task 
for the lack of an adeqnafe national 
database on small businesses. A wide- 
ranging assessment of small-busi ness 
research, published yesterday by the 
Small Business Research Trust says 
that the Government has "chopped 
away" at official debt collection on the 
small enterprise so that it has “de- 
scended from the hardly adequate to the 
totally inadequate". 

Marking the fifteenth anniversary of 
the Bolton Report on small firms, the 
study recommends an annual national 
sample surrey. This would provide a 
national databank to support the in- 
dependent research which is crucial for 
policy-makers. 

It says: U A strong case can be made 
that the importance now attached to 
small-scale enterprise in Britain should 
mean that it is given ^ ranch more 
favourable treatment in research 
funding.” 

More attention should also be given by 
researchers to the day-to-day activities of 
the enterprise and to service and non- 
mannfactnring companies. And econo- 
mists should be more concerned with 
detailed analysis of the role of the small 
firm in tbe wider economy. 

Dr James Curran, author of the report, 
says: “Despite an enormous research 
i input, an understanding of what makes 
tbe small business owner — and es- 
pecially the successful small-business 
owner — psychologically unique remains 
elusive. 

“Research reveals that small-business 
owners are sometimes not particularly 
effective managers — often they are 
especially weak in finance and 
marketing.” They appear largely un- 
aware of government efforts to help small 
business. 






All in a co-operative day's work: greenhouse chores and wood-stripping 

Their caring co-op 


•MR. FRIDAY 


By Brian Collett 

A small co-operative for the unemployed 
was set up with a lot of hope and faith but 
without work or workers nearly three 
years ago. Today its difficulty is fitting in 
alt the work being offered. 

The area in which it operates could 
hardly be called deprived. It lies on the 
Hertfordshire-Buckinghamshire border, 
between Waiford with its low unemploy- 
ment. and Amersham with its big houses 
and air of wealth. Bui amid the 
prosperity there was a need, noticed by 
an organization calling ' itself the 
Chorleywood Christian Businessmen's 
Initiative, a grouping of professional 
people attached to the local churches. 

One member of the organization. John 
Smith, who lives in Chorleywood, an 
affluent commuter village typical of the 
district, said: “The Jobcentres offered 
plenty of opportunities for skilled people 
but little work for the others, the young 
unemployed without special skills.” 

This professional group, which had 
already run Youth Opportunities and 
Youth Training Schemes, responded by 
forming the Chess Valley Services 
Neighbourhood Co-operative, a properly 
constituted business conforming to min- 
istry regulations and managed by a 
voluntary' unpaid committee. 

That was in November 1983. and for 
18 months the co-operative was in limbo 
during negotiations to attract union 
recognition and government money. 

Eventually it was recognized by the 


BRIEFING 



‘I've done if! A 134-hour week - a 
personal- best 14 


■ British Overseas Trade Board is 
offering to small businesses a pack on 
successful exporting which includes a 
40-minute video, an explanatory booklet 
and a cassette tape. Case studies 
show how some small businesses 
profited from exporting. The pack is 
available at BOTB regional offices. 

■ Enterprise Courses of Chelmsford 

is planning a five-day course for start-up 
and young businesses in the 
Huntingdon area during next month. 
There is an introductory workshop in 
Huntingdon today . There is no charge for 
either, as both are backed by the 
Manpower Services Commission. Details 
from Huntingdon and Cambridge 
Jobcentres and local enterprise agencies 
or phone Enterprise Corses on 
(0245)350595. 


Union of Construction. Allied Trades 
and Technicians, and as a new commu- 
nity enterprise it qualified for a year’s 
funding from the Manpower Services 
Commission to help it off the ground. Al 
the same lime it got a year's grant from 
the local district council. 

The commission's funding was 
enough to finance a year’s salary for the 
co-operative’s supervisor, a retired civil 
servant. Tbe work force initially com- 
prised two young men. Their services 
included window-cleaning, gardening, 
drive-laying, fence-mending, loft, insula- 
tion and wall-stripping. 

Progress was only gradual and the co- 
operative had a struggle to survive the 
1985-86 winter. One lifesaver was a 
fanner at Chalfoni St Giles, who offered 
several days’ work a week sorting and 
bagging potatoes. 

The end of funding from the Man- 
power Services Commission in May this 
year meant the end of the salary for the 
paid supervisor. But the job orders had 
started to pour in. Mr Smith, the 
management committee chairman, said 
at the time that a new paid supervisor in ' 
the dual role of assessing the work and 
helping with it was needed, and that 
without him the venture could collapse 
— even though the original supervisor 
was staying on as an unsalaried 
consultant. 

Then the new supervisor came along, a 
60-year-old retired water authority exec- 
utive. and the co-operative picked up 
again. One of the original employees left 
to take a carpentry apprenticeship but 
was promptly replaced, and yet another 
young employee was recruited, effec- 
tively bringing the work force up to four, 
to cope with the sudden flow of extra 
work. 

Mr Smith said: “The main problem 
recently has been getting the work 
organized to cover all the orders. We 
have a lot of jobs now. The thing has 
snowballed. People who have been 
satisfied with our services have recom- 
mended us. 

“However, the coming winter is going 
to be another testing time as the orders 
for outdoor jobs tend to be fewer. Our fi- 
nances are such that we could keep the 
work force going for a couple of weeks 
without work. But we are more hopeful 
than we were this time last year.” 


“DISCO UNT AMSTRAD 

BUY THE REAL THING! 

IBM Pc’s from only £895.00 
WANG Pc’s from only £895.00 ’ 

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR HUGE 
v BUYING POWER 

WANG Pc’s save .r •: 2? Now 
r-W’WANC CIS YS for th- r - ek nh e«.. .7o:v 
vVANC Workstation * trd of: /Vo*/. 

REFURBISHED WANG SALE 

Hocre stocks ar/i savings sL w:\r. ’.YANG mair.ier«r.ce 
Ya TOTAL SUPPORT PACKAGE FROM ’vYAUC £ 
LARGEST SUPPLIER 

: • ::\v v. i.h.i, • .. h,.v ; :/,i!,;i :. ■ 




Authorised Wang Dealer. 

4142 DOVER ST. LONDON W1 TEL 01408 1516 


IC&L 


Welsh Quality 
Lambs Limited 
In Receivership 
Far Sale 

Lamb capacity 

Builth Weils, Powys 6.000 
MarehwW. near _ 

Wrexham *1$ 

Heniian. Gtwyd 3 ,5UU 

Henllan also has a honing and cutting 
facility. 

Ad minis t r ation offices and separate 
Bishop at Aberystw yth, fate d. 

for to tter ttottaoan 
naan 

HUM W 

com 6UUY 


ork Gully 


BVX 

TilmTurrr ***** ***** 
t3e 5?*32 COi-TCf B 

Fk 1222 39*113 


OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR 
ARCHITECT W1 

A challenging opportunity has arisen in a leading (inn of Archi t ect s which is 
achieving continuing rapid growth. The Practice wishes to strengthen its Manage- 
ment Team by appointing an Office Administrator who must possess the necessary 
personality to dal with dynamic and independently minted Pinners responsible 
for business generation. 

The successful candidate's key objectives will be to promote profitability, sound- 
administration. Practice promotion and. to liaise with tbe Partnership Secretary 
based in the South Coast office on all matters of financial pfenning and control. 
Applicants should be young and enthusiastic with relevant qualifications such as 
MBA or similar, several years experience in broadly related wort and proficient in 
the use of appro p riate software applications. A flexible approach and expertise in 
staff management are essential. 

Details uk Max Malm 

Leslie Jones, 3/4 Ben truck St, London WIM 5BN 



IDS EXTRA SERVICE AND SECURITY 

EXECUTIVE CAR HIRE SERVICE WITH A 
CLOSE PROTECTION TRAINED CHAUFFEUR 

IDS VIP + EXECUTIVES 

HOW MUCH DO YOU VALUE YOUR SAFETY? 

Con your Cfcouffw cap* with a ki dn a p p in g ~ 
Terrorist attacks - Accident? 

We run a 4-day intensive training course 
tT MIGHT SAVE YOUR UFE 

Contact Safe 411, Premier Hons. 77 Oxfnd SL Loral* W1 
Tefc 61-439 HO, Exta 2247 8T 2249 


NG1 6HW, or T e l e pho ne 
(0461) 606*7 


COMPUTERS & 
COMPUTING SERVICES 


SOFTWARE 

SOURCES 

Fully integrated 
accounts systems of 
[ 1 modules, single/ 
multi user. Multi 
company. Machine 
independent, full 
support 

061 626 2196 

anytime. 


FOOD PRODUCTS COMPANY 
SOUGHT 


Our client ia seeking to expand by acquisition 
of a company engaged in the manufacture of 
ingredients or packaging products for food 
manufacturers. 

The company’s products could include 
flavourings, syrups, processed fonts, or food 
containers. Alternative activities could include 
specialist baking and confectionery. Turnover 
range £lm to £5m. 

Interested parties please contact: 

Ian Nelson, Ernst & Whinney, Becbet House, 
1 Lambeth Palace Road, London SEl 7EU. 
Telephone: 01-928 2000. Far 01-928 1345. 
Telex: 885234 ERNSLO G. 



71w Jam Rirmrat and Mananas utito tor sab Bn pood- 
wN and buaness ants al two contpms anpged *i the 
show: tracts, Japanese cats tor wftoteala on a atonal 
basts Tbe other company exports UK anomobw pans 
manly to ban Combated turnover of tbe buseess m 
excess 0t £3n per nua 

Three flitter subatory comp a re not n are 

aba ottered hr sale. These se nwtwd n atqxtrtmg hovy 
nuctm pras art spare pans tar earth mowtg eqopmere, 
traflng unto dm Far East and paptacs prettng irapodwely. 
For totter duals coma the Jomt Receners 
and Mxa ge ry 



Tt£01-4as S422- Trim Z89S4 -Fix: 91-05 11K 


Grant Thornton 

- CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 



a 




'Mi 


' ll H im, 



your Gompny tame nd tafx 


Connhardiaerar 
Company maavewa be there 
fora! to see. 
Mtar4ttfe» 

KENDREW LTD 
021 778 3200 


and .* 

P-rraser na 0 b i awet fp ed be 
Cc--ji-i C seVJ-i k lamm and 
lu'% axnnpeC E "OW, 
Fww sr>e ft >w4iAr tkanael 
ww ■«" artvet, «-r >tkMi 
SUES TO DATE: «$SJM MTS 


1. aiOC* 1. SOUTCR 
WWSTBUL CEWTAE 
>ttAO Atrtm. . 

At; u' 

TEL «02M)*rt7»lTELr*. 


ELECTRIC FAN 


STOCK LOT OFFER 

a targe stock at lawn mate 
‘Dricrtglu Fan Heater Model 
V-32 {i.0G0-2.0TOw) avail- 
atte lor immediate snipment 
fton Hong Kona Pnce 
US$960 cacti CtF UK tor 
snrar.un 4.800 units. Inter- 
esred sorties please telex: 
3*311 FREELHX. 

Freeland Trading 


with extensive 
experience wishes to 
contact company 
wanting research, 
representation, agency/ 
M.U.L. enquiries etc. 
on visits to Egypt, 
Oman, India and Turkey 
in October. Costs 
shared. Adjacent 
countries possible. 

STEPHEN WILLS 

Fulford Home, 
Cnlworth 

Banbury OX17 2BB 
Tel: 020 576 355 


Borrowdale Valley 

A m*st unique and 
mapnifketitly situated 
bite land property 
compn-inp a substantial 7 
hedmumed residence 
i,«fiher with an adjoining 
kn-L-up sales shop and 
odwrmt timber built light 
industrial premises, at 
ptFM-nr utilised for tbe 
production of famous steel 
rrah Hems. Full details on 
request from: 

R.J. Smeaton 
Estate Agents 
0596 72278 


Itoflue t-ecnotd boatyard wrrfi 
subuanrv Ksatence WorVsaoo 

warycowes storage'daclar 

ate*, wain frontage and moor 
bur. CMattt VuA agencies, 
liwcsnnent meome wirti early re- 
wison Oflus over £4500Cfl 
Pnnopals only Sale by prime 
treaty 

Reply to BOX BS3 


CLEARING UNIT FOR 
SALE 

at Braadsuirs. Kent New 
equipment. Leasehold 
premises Oenume reason 
lor sale 

£47,000 

Reply to BOX B66 


SPAKSH METALLIC 
STAMPING FACTORY 

washes » purchase MECHANIC 
PRESSES » GJpd comffton. 
Iran 600 to 2000 tors, {trtfe- 
aangi 

Tefeptrane. 1 01034.92726 
17 87.725 tl 22 
Tetor 59879 

Teletax: (J10J4 93 725 42 70 
Oirecwwr. 

ESTAMmOOS SAEAim SJL 
cm. toimn, Km. rs. 
POUNTA IBanton). SHUN. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORmvmES 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 
IN SECURITY 
No Franchise Fee 

w* xr or can tmn 

ccXUiir jprirs -n IB xex, to rar 
*n an exemq ne» woon it* 
Cnaiwjer 123 dtui DiTOar ixs aam 
jysam a iwaw or mooBii rfcmoi 
ccs conaMsng nt teabrts » netes 
no era n mean or COO'S 
■twrente xi supar atarmi not 
ttttKM 

•Hqr manno alamo 
•Bej-Hk; cme lor nousarctea an: 

5m*F i 

'Uiwui in\<snaern Toured 
Fit •r-mrorr a B Wnmen arc cem 
ensrawm prone. 


621-236 8939/3632 


G9 


- E3 

e a - ■ 

nmnZ 

SEEKING 

EXPANSION 

CAPITAL 


MIDDLE & 
FAR EAST 
SALES TRIP 

PLANNED FOR 
OCT/NOV 

Pranonag power ogriaritme' 
aed bow equipment. Aar 
caapaoy or pmcipai riierested 
in tepi eiti H u li uu please 
contact: 

N.C. Mllttewr - 
Tofc 02Ce 570073 
Tdejc 449717 G GOLD 


.1; It V.iL ciSTjcu!*. to rbijin the 
.ns’::*. of :nvc*‘jncn: vjpi'.il 
-frorr: rfi,- riefr: waroc. ; 

• The Eu»ir,M!. Invrumtri 

r*3| ’ 'Communique i» vwir." .•.« ■ 

1 *• ^ ■■•'wortcrilv to reict.borS C.c 
Ir.iektrr.cn: .,nj 0*.e n-jf.t .. 


to Z 

’ h i • S-jtr.c 

E3 


'• Wr publish u ci-.niciuir. of . 

■ >ix:<vn proiccn tcch'rr.onth 
• i.-,icn .rt rend fcv .-he, kind rf 
- 'people thnrbi'uld usris: sot -i 
•yovr Jcvtioprim. ‘ * ' 

:i::J 1 j ' is 

mvcKcc. address sol.- 

e.',qeiri«< io 




EUJSFSt 


i ffilE 


YOURS? 

A tusmess you can tw> easfly 
from home, with univnud 
potential. regJar repeal or. 
iters, high profit margins, 
povtne cash flaw, imnenai 
overheads, no stock teqare- 
irwrts and over ft 00 per day 
prats. IT can wort lor you. 
For Ml details send a 9x4 
sae to The Marketing Direc- 
tor Scorn an House. High 
Street. Turvey, Bedford 
MM3 808. 


ATTENTION 
MANUFACTURERS 
FOR U.S. MARKET 

5® uu raur pun or a Duly h« aan- 
trios'* Ol Ita Utaco ■ US border 


VENTURE CAPITAL rwdrra for 
»w ronukuter (rokmg opera- 
non. Eaioty aiaiubtc. Renan 
on caimsi imeeied expecred in 
linl year. Mm imestmenl 
ci o.ooo. for ran aeuiti tel: 

104521 614002. 


COMPANY 

PROBLEMS 

Are credos bounding you? 
Are suppliers tnststmg on 
proforma or CWO? 

Are baflfto atxxd to levy the 
stock? 

Are the' tanks Insisting you 
sign mors personal 
guarantees? 

B the answer is yes to any of 
these questions you need our 
hefp. If we cannot help you 
save you company we can ad- 
vise you on liquidation. 
Contact us today. 

Ron Wriker & Associates, 


Htewfek, CV35 SUL 
(0789) 841292 
or (0905) 776817 


CREDIBILITY 

by converting your 
present company into 
a public frmrted 
company. 

Tel: 0302 64545. 


FRANCHISES 


nUNOHSIIW. h your tmum 
taWHr for InnrhauMT Far llw 
rwm anwm lo llw right «un 
Uom wnlr or phonr lor 
Brornuri- Anglin Franctasr Av 
whips SUIKxi Road. 
Hmrlon. Nr Wroxham. Nor- 
INI,. NR I? BLT. TO. 1060691 
2S49 nr .29*7 


LOANS & INVESTMENT 


SURVBLLANCE 



- i > •» J Tl 1 : 1 * 3 1 kite 


Don't know where to 
turn. Retievayour 
headaches. Free advice. 

Rescue plans. We can 
help. 

Contact: 

EeMseal Services 
01-427 7183. 



BUILDING SUPPLIES & 
SERVICES 




CANADIAN SHELL 
AVAILABLE 

Used niwna: assets lotolihes. 
croa s wtotoer tusa Prmotufs 
n U K *ee* ot Ociotwr 30 

Imjanes «ilh drtofc whne 
passable ia Hroly to BOX B79. 
v telex Toronto dradly d 
C&-2TS4SO. 


Tnrmi 


& SONS 

Active in Enterprise 
Zone Development 

100% Capital Allowances 
invite enquiries for 
investors seeking tax 
shelters tor future 

xi vestment 

Altar Heray Spaocar A Som 
29/31 Oswald Road 
Sawtitorpe 
South HuibrasMt 

Tel (0724) 860463 

nor min gffl 


PROFITAetJE PA1TTYFLAM 

/w hulr^ilp Ll%qori<> Dtnnvss 
fj.ih \ »r% T/O mn 

UOO'Vn (i j r.nLnlK nMre 

I Ml C-:r 300 - S A \ Ri'Ml m 
(XJS J«^j 

IWflTABlX RETAIL 

ir.iirw,<j,.niH owv lor ulr 
ntMinii, in tnm L iu* m, 
K IO',„ : P \ rs In nm >Ht knM 
t.-i .ny/J' siras 

DORSET XiIIjOp MkiP imh Tr.td 

174.000 lor 

lu.Htxbl ai£d 


BUStNCSS Ii.hIiiwi nunuf^rlur 
"•■I. • ihiuht i jiHi nr aihri uo ia 

Ul i H'lilJ\ -MlUltfll III 

-.■■ill, I .,.| or IEC hi Oirrva* 
•-■-■I - Pn , 4ll Jumi-s h^ran 
i,n Ul Jn? lUiM/fJ 


OPPORTUNITY 


We set* 60 dstnbutors in ara 
psourtou-pie UK m rrana a* 
ranoe ul rsaffii an beauty prod- 
uce d»ed io the putoc 
Succpsshji scants need 
arataoK £2*0 tor wmi stock 
wroc ExoKtat eamngs n 
the fffSl yes C5H.000 
Ran dunug cfltce hours Blest on 
(El 613'vl9 m mile to 

Marefl Hoaffli 
5 Beauty United, 

Warn** Charttre. 

14. carporttai StreeL 

Bmaio^JO. BZ 4M. 


OPPORTUNirV in aiumM, mon 
■ n« it, lh#w wmm mnh 
ivnnmn fiom loii lnwmmrtit 

Otiii-tcai rmouMr «, rcunril 
u Hi I mi hid un Trjmnq in 
simiii ru, riBirirT nruiHpnonr 
Ml CtrMi an *04 »3, B457S 


BROKERS/AGENTS 

An opportunity exists to earn 
suhstanoal income by repre- 

seramg a devetopu usmg 
advanced tecnreMgy in aan- 
cutture m the US. Over 300% 
increased production. Enqa- 
nes and bnef resume nth 
telephone manner should Oe 
tweeted to BOX F24. 


START A PART TMC BUSHKSS 

irom nnmo proUurma loll pnnl- 
rsl «Nn>M <4i <S and otlvr 
ptonHiiimMl i Inns \ j 41 nurkM 
■oi maduris & no tpmm Null, 
r’f-'dnj surmsiul a wnw ri 
Idkina rrt or uodpw Our ram- 
wri nu Imp p. I K iruur & lull 
ft* king JI .Midi HP Cnupidr 
in>H—~M>iMi sisirm, tom, 
Ll 301- k AT For OpU!|> S«ld 
»<r. ll, crninim s>T'»o si 
ISpuIo-, „ R,|. isvksDun. Bnkv 
RC1J Tnu 

All mCTAL InikPfs lor Uil 

iciinni dust or dare m» 
i Limi.imu, row vsili ho in Lon 
d'ni :i»h inn Orlonrr Rina 
BIS Qt!3 SOoO Vinlc PO 8*s 
Jwldsolo nor HU 3SS7B 

LSI 


ALL TYPES OF 
STONE & SLATE 

For sale. 

Al! wall stones, 
paving etc. New. 
Daily deliveries to 
all parts. 

Please ring 

0352 652655 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


OFFICE 

SERVICES 

Furnished office 
accommodation also 
telex, fax. telephone 
answering. pagiFig. 
word processing, 
photocopying, pnrttrig. 
generat , secretarial 
servioea 

For further details phone: 

01-903 6455 


POtnUOAL PrMtaHnl lady In 
in*" IMN men In wdi Op nxnlnq 
ia PhimU niRnri Hitarancd 
in Kuenmana « vatrs /market- 
ing or PR tusan naiura. If you 
lm p a livraln e nropo M thm lor 
me ring KJ225J sjoms. 

BUSMESSMAN travKlmq lo 
rionda in NntnMr Orrnnbrr 
Mlrr, linimirn lo rotimnaa, 
MvibW taWtaPiWatiOn in 
l XL Tel: <06521 403798. 

CV SCRVICCS MTTHfUTWIUl 1 

ion hw la IMtr* ACOCH. 
vim x aura Mnuim. Drum, 
2a lm >0704881 3894. 

SAVE Time. M in MW your 
Christ nttsnntt For /urthrrin 
fOmutHMi iHrchoon Onr-To- 

RNnHmKT 0S«b67 363. 

AXKHCAN comtumes bnM 
imianllv aniv C399. Phonr: 
Camfer Ltd 102721 843722. 

TK Campanv Oorlor SmTcr. 
AHinu rarnnanuK rrlunwd to 
nrahh Pnonr 037! 810479. 

US VBA MATTZRS £ 8 Guam 

l s Uta-vvr 17 Batttrodr S Lon 
dan Hi 01 «6o 0819 


Land with iMatod planting 
permission tor 30,000 square 
feet Office /Industrial budding. 
Banbuy aea. On sought taler 
Industrial Estate. Renstic of- 
fers tor farced sale. No time 
wasters or middie men. Engi- 
nes to 

0753-73443. 


substant ia l residential 
property and extensive 
commercial/ industrial 
housing/ apartment 
development sites m 
busy raid rapidly 
growing, thriving 
business town are 
available for sale and/ or 
co-de v elopment basis. 
Exoalent fishing within 
easy reach superb 
coastline and 
magnificent scenery. 
Further defads Reply to 
BOX B9Z. 


DOVER STREET 

W1 

Prestige offices 
3,600 square feet 

Sole Agents 
Coldanberg a Ca 
01-01 4101. 


mtrnxtmm 


4,000 ptus sq ft of ttigh 
class office space in 
central Tunbridge 
Wells to be shared 
with firm of sohdtDrs. 

( 0892 ) 41428 

reftWRB. 


U K1 U IP Omop invnunrm in 
Bcdv-onh. nr. COinurv 20 u- 
ram proounna ca.159 m. 
frwnow an to C30.7S0 la ora- 
due 20 h. rrekl Wtatorn Prop 
Smifrv a. DWUM Gram 
Rod. BrMM BSP THE. ( C2Tg) 
409*3 


DISTRIBUTORS 

£ AGENTS 


NUJOT RCQUtRED Wr ora air 
or i»w moan* Mippum of pna- 
mauomi firms our market 
DUnr ft aat orpantaUJan Uni 
mm promotional items Sam 
gwynn miwmtra contact Mr 
O Hr i0828i 4063O&. 


IMPORT/EXPORTS 


rm prarmaccutkals a. 

cftrmftl lonrirm. KOKtl Mift 
kv roman OLM Exxon i07S2i 
4 S3 462 TlX 98321 DlAI C. 


(including the new range! 

PLUS 

EXPERTISE 

...UNDCRck. Networking, Communications... 

CM Alison Gibson 01-3796968 
for FREE information pack 


COMPLETE TELEX SYSTEM - 

£899 + VAT 


POflTEX is a portab 
plate with full sized 
use. Can us for de 


'desk top telex system com- 
jyboard and printer ready for 


B.C.S. LIMITED 
01-582 6060 


NURSING HOME 

EAST MIDLANDS 

Registered 40 with turnover £330,000+. Long estab- 
lished with good local reputation. Large grounds with 
room for sheltered accommodation deve fop mem. 
Completion of sale required by December. £700,000. 

Reply to BOX B85 for farther details 


FAX UPDATE 

Portable fax machines. 
Cheapest prices in Eu- 
rope. Limited 
quantities available 
now. Please phone 
Fax International 

Tel: (0243) 860662 


THE ROYAL ASSOCIATION 
H AID OF DEAF PEOPLE 

_ gomteriy known as. 

The Royal Association m Aid 
of tije Deaf and Dumb) 

Notice to Subscribers 

Note is hereby given that t !e 
tonal General Meeren oi toe 
Association be beta at 

THE GOUMWnrS ARMS 
IX East Acton Lane. 
London. W3 

on FRIDAY toe 3tst day of 
October, 1986. a 6.45 pm. 

SrtscritaR tasting to aBend «M 
raw* the necessary papers (■>- 1 
ctadng toe afficaliMraoo) upon' 
prompt wntten appftratan ta- 

The nrectar Gcmd, 

RAO 

27 Old Oat Hoad. Acte. 
Leodoti, W3 7WL 


PROMOTION, 
PUB LICITY & 
MARKETING 


Business Gifts 

-r; 


emc| 


Embossed w» 
roar Company Ham 
Are a cost off active 
•"•fhon of getting your 
ramo on your customers 
desk every day next year. 

’'■vsass™ 

to ffnd out how EUe 
' ft costs 


HOTELS & LICENSED 
PREMISES 


SURREY 
PUB/BISTRO 
FOR SALE. 

Very tuoattae business - sub- 
stantai returns. Fully staffed. 
£250 .000 Le asehold. (Partner- 
sh* considered), 

Tel: (8932) 41180. 


_ BM8KMU8TH 

hotel at £8a000 
nett an turnover £143,000 
Excellent bookings 


WHOLESALERS 




COMPUTING SERVICES 


K" APfUCar*. final ronMqn- 
iwm iwu in. F2 CS20. FtO 
C7V8. VI to A 20 from C9W. 
Oil * VAT. inn monitor A 12 
monira vixiranlv Ring BM 
nev, KM 01 349 rtsi 

CANON LASER PfBNTERS. 

LBP8 VI UTJS+VAT. LBP8 
•\2 C2Sof<,v VT wan 
Vidlrams M8L 0908 641776 

UOUIOAlXto STOCK Apnra». 
kini/ii* lsi o laaift. Comma- 
uarm yarm & IBM 
fonvml^r. PManqm. lypc- 
- i»nin* A lurmiurr Cantari 
BMD Tmamg '«aaj AI5635- 


OFFICE 

EQUIPMENT 

EXCLUSIVE 
ITAUAN RANGE 

Of executive and 
Operational Office 
FurTHture. 

Many finishes in natural 
wood veneer and 
bi-laminate. 

Exceptionally good terms 
and substantial discount 

For turner OetaXs contact: 

092067019 


decorations 

□AN JUL 

_ Cari Johan Knaack 

-3sa\®v. 


RESTAURANT 

For sale. Long 
leasehold. Fully 
equipped Hard Rock 

style restaurant, 120 

£55,000. For further 

dete-te telephone 

0624 781000. 


mL «rvt« c ” 


Cements 
















































.-A - 



Alt classified ndmusemam 
on be accepted by felcphcm 
(except Aaaoammenu). The 
deadline a SjOOpoi 1 stays priw 
to publication (le 5 j00du Man. 
day for Wednesday!. Sbeuld 
ytm nidi 10 send an advertise, 
mem in writi ng pteace include 
your daytime phone number 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DC- 
PAimiEKT. if you have any 
queries or problems reJat»* to 
yoor advertisement once h has 
a ppe ar ed, pkssc coataa our 
Cortoocr fcvkn Department 
by te l ep hone on IMH 4100. 


JOS ViP 


Ex ecunvi 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


•HtlpM Nttfr Baby. Don't you cry 
vou know your Daddy* houno 
10 dtr... And torn yau‘u 


help Itictn Wm are you? 
TV Onnamon Tran. 66 Co., 
Brea Urfie. Rrdxwn. CornwMI. 
Rt*0 Chanty 393399. - 
rtXAH HELP Thr National Be- 


111-* arthritis COO buy* a mo- 
chmr Dotwiom ptKMr to The 
Vnrouni Tonvpandy. Chair- 
man. NBFA. 35. New Broad St- 
London EC2M 1NH 
EXPANDING rUtUWDS 
would Ukr M hear Iram All 

ihon. U you hair written a 
book mat dnmn publiraaon. 
Wiilr IO. DM: TMU/19 THE 
BOOK GUILD LTD. 2S High 
Street. Lnvn. SUMrx BN7 2LU 
THERE IS LITE aM-drUh. Abe- 
qunl IO UK* RM Oob makes 
Ot II. For more Information 
write ke The British Red Cross 
Society. DeW >a 9 Gr Havener 
Crrtccrrt. London SW1X 7EJ. 
1AUM ■ 1 Hat Utouehi I would ten 
I he world that we write ad 
■hat I l took you arc beauttfiH . 

MARK 

CONKS. Happy Anmvenary. i 
loin voo. Thanh*. Pod. 


»- .... „ .... 



SERVICES 


i rix£ liMjc-S rivlDA V l>oo 


ID 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


FOR SALE 


-SgWJjJHtHOOBSWao. 


bhscreen Giveaway SO only - 
|6 iprh CW TV* from £69. 
FWIV 9M. Tops, 91 Lower 
Stodnr SL. SWI 730 0933. 


FOR A M6UAR PBrtUmc 
Home Ocuiwo Service oy reu- 
obk* daily helps mural areas 
don't drtay another day phone 
Anglo Coni torn Ul IEMP. ACV.) 
(Ml Ol 7308123 now (24 HRSI. 
FfttEMDSW. Lose or Marrtage. 
All agn. areas. Dateline. Dept 
•0161 23 Ablnvdon Rood. Lon- 
don W8. TH. 01 938 toil. 
CALI— t CVS Ltd prate-mat 
rurrtrulum vitae doc u me n ts. 
Details: 01-631 3388. 
msiAN ORIENTAL A alt other 
rugs repaired. P ersonal Service. 
Can anytime. Ol 349 9978. 




C3mn.ua 


LEGAL SERVICES 


by rulty cruail - 
liedSourliors. ciao + vat and 
standard dKtnirsetnetus ring 
0244 319398. 


WANTED 


MtACKEDDt needed lor fam- 
ily home near Harpenden and 
aoM 35-50 with driving Hcence. 
Live In - own arromodatlan. Re- 
ply to BOX B93 . 


■Wl- 


'i a* s?sra-n 


COLLECTOR wouM buy shotouns 
m wwi rondlllon. Outer ham 
mecs. but middle pemaflon 
Well known EngHMi. Cerman. 
Betgtian or French makes want 
cd Send detailed description & 
required price lo Be* 102. The 
Time** 8. rue Haleiy. 78441 
Pans Cedex 09 

E2S per or up lo paid for silver 
anirte*. C260 per « for gold. 
AU diamond lewellery bougM. 
Mr Han 01-960 8030 or wnie 
361 Harrow Road. London. 
W9. AU England covered. 

COWS Odd. SUtcr. 

Sinqlev/Coitrctkms. Purchase 
rash. Prlvalp. 01-506 1168. 

WANTED Mr Hale Of Devon 10 
please contact Mr Han. 01-960 
8030. 


D C S, LIMITED 
!uS2 6060 


FOR SALE 


V 


M KMN<; liOMt 


:v 


!k\ 


RefurMsfted / UiuMurbubs d. 
Delivery / SMmMng ar ran ged 
TM 0932-229742 or 220447. 
CATS, CHESS, Lee Mb. All me 
alrr and sport. Tel 439 1763. 
Ail major rrcdu cos 
PIANO, Medium sued upright. 1st 
rtw rand. Tunra £450. Can 
arrange dcihety 01 -435 0148 1 
WEDCEWOOD Dmner —vice . 
Hamaway RCne. 8 puce. 3T 
piece C22S ono. 01-748 3193 
YORK FLAGSTONES For paltbd 6 
driveways. Uqtndation sale. Tel 
061 223 0881/061 231 6786. 

THE TUBES 17BS.LMS. Other 
lilies avail. Hand bound ready 
lor presentation also 

"Sundays". C13.SO Remember 
When Ol 688 6323 
TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT. Cais. 
suulighi Exp. Chess. Lev MS. 
All Inealre and sports. 

Tel- 821-0616/B28O495. 

A Lx / V Isa I Diners 
BIRTHDAY DUE 7 Oil e someone 
an original Timm New—per 
dated the very day they were 
boo. C 12.30. 0492-31303. 
COPIERS - Latest N-lecn Zoom / 
Red union CnUrgemenl Copters 
irom Uvr Supplier al TRADE 
PRKXS 01-278 6127. 



RESISTA 

CARPETS 

Special Offer 

Wentworth fme BrtBSti Wton 

00% wool. 20% nyton. Very 
hem war grade. 12ft rode. 
12 pen colours from stock. 
£1335 per sq + VAT 

US VMnmlb Bridge Road 
Pan— Bhnl s* 5 
Tat 01-731 3968/9 
Free E namite - fa yrt fhg 





HIRE NOW 

BUY LATER 



SERVICES 




ancestry 


me warn wnn um 
experience World-wide , 

achievements 

DEPT ST. NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY CT11BA 
TEL: 0227 462618 


HERALDRY 


■S* * HETILZBED Chip- 
shenooo style 
dm tag fundi ore made to order 
over so rtlnlno suiin always 

itonieatai# d«h- 

W. NrtUrtm. near Henley on 
(04911 641115. 

Bwnrtiwuto 103021 293580. 
TovHiam. Devon IOB9287< 

aioRM 8 ” 1 * 1 *' 1 '’ Ck * 10,351 

FtJtaT Quality wool rarprts. Al 
" nd ' r - ■**° 
l°° rw "toa. Large 
”5 Jjta.remnam* under hen 
gfS^'gSjChancerar Orp«. 

"rei'SS*** Bfra Urfcrte ior 
^JW«-oui events. Our clients 
SSj? rompanies. 

cants accepted. 01-828 

ANTIQUES A 
COLLECTABLES 

CLOCK Long Case B day rtoefc by 
JOtoph KntbO. 02372 71284. 

MVUnscirr 60 ore nine Prr- 
svan nig*/rarprts. Kasnan. nuan 
and Tur* Oman. £33000 Ihe 
tatPhone 0903 213378 oiler 
6.00un. 

Edwanhan. Victorian 
yd aH palmed fnrratrev. Mr 
Ash ion 01 947 6946. 667-669 
Ctarrait Lane. Eartsfleid. SWl 7. 

ROYAL DOULTOM TMw Jug*. 
Figurines, animals, etc™ want- 
ed. Ol 883 0024. 

MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 

THE PIANO WORKSHOP FRBC 

credit over i year (APR Omi. 
low Inlet r*l rates over 2 yen 
«APR 9.50*1 * 3 yews (APR 
- I22 Vi) Written quotation*. 
Free catalogue. 30a Htgngaie 
Road. NWS. 01-267 7671 

RDtT A PIANO / PURCHASE 
in South. New msirunenls 
from Cl. 150. ware L Son. 
Chrtstrhurcfi <02021 471526. 

2 BEAUTIFUL Bectmrtn Orand*. 
rn unmans instrumeirt*. good 
puce for quick sale. 586 4981. 

CLUBS 

BRRM3C. London School of 
Bridge and Cnaj 58 Kings Rd. 
SW3. 01-389 7201. 

EXCHANGES 

LOMWN/Los Angrte* Exchange. 
My luxury one bedroom apart- 
mem Central London land 
Jaguar?! far apartment or 
nouse m L.A. pmeraoty HOUy- 
wood HUS for 6-12 months 
rommenclna Nov /Dec 86. 
Phone OC wide T. Robertson. 
Grarks 90 LkL 66/68 George 
Si. London W1H SRC. 01 936 
9578. 

FOR HIM 

MUX Oyster. Day dale. 18 cor- 
al yntow gold, cooseaied riasp. 
Second hand. £2.260 ono Trt; 
0860-350160 or 01-659-8829 

. .. 

SHORT LETS 

FULHAM Core party let. fully fur- 
nrvtvM spacious rial. 2 dble 
oetvros. toe bautrm. luxury til- 
led kitchen, lounge wnh Park 
view A aas lire. GCH. £290 nw 
Trt: 01 -4938040 Exlm 3207 or 
Eves 01-731-2190 

FULHAM Pted-a-ierne. Owners 
oerasioiialty used uny house 
available 1 year. SuU bustnns 
man / mature couple. N/s. 
ClOOpw + hilts. For further de- 
tab Mephone 07985 5496 
SERVICED APARTMENTS tri 
Kenungion. Co) T.V. 24 hr Sw. 
Telex. OMUngham AparunentfL 
01373 6306. 

LUXURY SERVICED PLATS, 

re rural London from £32s pw 
Ring Town Has Apts 375 3453 

ROYAL COURT 
APARIMBTS W2 

FuUy fun. Sft. phone. Sw. TV. 
recto, 

Siwfio ft ESOpw 

1 beU/toroge SiaFISftjw 

2 bed /targe E20D-2S0pv 

Up to 3 mthL 

No Extras. No CDmnMssoa 

51 GtoKeflv Temce. 112 
•1-724 7824, 723 5247 {H 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 

Acmncnr instructors ur- 
oenlly required lor Ooetrt 
Centre H vou naie R.Y.A. idm- 
un** nr hoard vaiUngi B-CU. 
BW5F or Brnilar and are 
dvailabto rar October ring 
immediaUey Joe Sioddart 
0929471 206/847 

ART DEALER 

OkJ estatAshed flm otters pv- 
minent position lo recent 
Umvemy ftaduan to learn and 
pOTsspse " ewry espea of the 
busuiese. GenuOra Merest m 
panttnp mote snportant aim «t 

feS'M«M«aYbE 



MINK COAT 

™Sze 10. BLOOD MB ac- 
cept E3JJOO. 

NECKLACE 

An enxpooniNy ImhM 18 
oral pow necHsce MftJ m 
large sami tries smarted by 

cwnafi- 

Please caH 335 7622 


FLATSHARE 


BARNS BUR I own Dbir rm in 
WKIIAK lux flat, vuilr ortu pen. 
2S ■». 10 rninv Cilv C30Q pern 
exrl. Tel: Ol 607 0959 


CLAPTON Double room m large 
raahpnrtie lor Professional per 
van M if. C50 pw «r. pnone 
Ol 806 6449 


UPPER NORWOOD BESS. Prof 

m/f n A umpired. g/r. ||iy fiat 

CH. rtoir BR £240 pent Inc. 
Ol T 7 T 0718 eves w/ends. 


WANTED FTatshare for Cordon 
Bku Dtpioma Coune -student. F 
• « 7 i. hi/S. untu June 1 W 7 t« 
0889 26328 any time 


CLAPHAM pref m. 26 Mm. share 
Me mahonrtle wUh 2 others. 
C 38 pw CXC 1 . Irt Ol 6273199 , 


UifluM 

gdn nai lor prof n/s available 
now. 0 3833 oem ♦ 1 month's 
refundable depot) I . Phone 489 
6707 alter nlM». 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


NOT Turkey. Spend 2 wta« our 
Ml* lh* Beach Hotel or CruUtng 
on our Tartu Irom C380 Depv 
even Tummy. Ol 326 i005cr 
01 737 3861. 1 24 hr* I. 


COSTCUTTERS ON lUghts/hols 
KLuiope. USA A most dcsUna 
ttom. Dmlomal Travel 01-730 
2201 . ABTA IATA ATOL. 


1ST A CLUB CLASS riJCHTS 
Huge OHrounu. Suriworld 
Travel. <037271 2 1 

/27 109/27638 


AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
q/w C420 rtn (.700 Auckland 
e/w C420 rtn C7TO JoTKirg 
o/w UOs rtn 0499 Lo* Ange- 
le* o/w C2 16 rtn C405. London 
Fligni Centre Ol 370 6332. 


AIR Ticket* SpectafUt* New York 
£249 L. A £349. Toconlo 
C279. Natron £329. Sydney 
£759. Aurkiand £749 Dsrtair 
130 Jermyn RmlOl 839 
7144 


SWIO. Large bed- 
room suitable for couple to 
mare vpartou* Rat. Cisonm 
rarh. V. Dice. Tel: 01-236 0554 
(wortik 


SE LONDON Wbnted prof M/T 
nonsmoking lo share Mews col- 
lage with owner, own room. IO 
mins Iran London Bridge. £50 
nw exn Reply to BOX B88 . 


STM KEN. Nr lube. Large double 
room in lux /Ittslure- All m* 

ctunev. gardens, tennis. 2 
Cnds c?M ocm each incL Or 
I £360. TelXJl 689 4730 


CttWHCK-PrefFlanpa/r In 
very vnartouo houie.C/H. Gdn. 
Parking Clow m shop* /lube. 
£176 nrm-TetO 1-994 3663. 


CLAPHAM Common/ Battersea 
Share hose. M mod cons. An- 
gie rra £46 PW-OT double £70 
pw. Prof onqr Ol 223 0360 


CLAPHAM C D BBGOM Prof M/F 
o/r in lux tide nr lube wUh CH. 
w/marmne and gdn. £66 pw 
cxcl. 01-622 831 B after 6 pm. 
FLATMATES Selective Sharing. 
Well rstab Introductory service. 
Ptse let (or appl. 01-589 6491 . 
316 Brampton Road- SW 3 
HW 2 Lux Flat, own room. Jubilee 
Une iWUledden GreetU. proK 
only. CSO pw + blDs. Tel. Ol 
451 3702 i wee ken d* & eves) 
TRAMECSOUCTTORF. 23 seek* 
■hare, nr lube. G area. Max £60 
PW. 0703 769763 offer 8 pm 
W 14 Own mu room M/F. CH. 
close to tube. £ 1 S 0 ocm + de- 
POMI Tel Ol 846 2316 <du*k 
01 602 4074 lev CM 
WJ - Own rooms for 2 profs, in 
romionawe furnished (tat wnn 
super filled Idl & bath Parking 
£50 pp. pw. Tel : Ol 993 3641 
CLAPHAM. Prof m 25 + share 
large maisonrtie with 2 others. 
£38 pw nd. 627 3199 . 
ISLINGTON 5 rain lube. Lge rm 
In beautiful flsL CH. All ma- 
rntnes 01 389 6498 an 7 pm. 
■ARM VALEi Prof Female. O/r. 
n/s. lo share newDi ranv. flat. 
£50 pw exCL TeL 372 - 6078 . 
SCd prof f 36 +. large own room 
in beautiful garden flaL £40 
pw. Tef 01-692 8145 . 

SWIG. Prof F. n/k q/r in tovely 
large house. C/H- £ 36 pw excl- 
OIBC Tel 01-769 0463 . 

SWIG prof female lo share Rsl 
o/r. CA 5 pw Inc Clow Parson* 
Green. Tel 01 87 i 1038 eves 
SWIG Professional female io 
siurf flat own 100am. £130 
pern. erxl. TefcOl 677 6157 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


SCCRCTARIES (or ArchUecto * 
Designer* Pennanenl 6 lempo- 
raiy pnsluons. AMSA Specialist 
Her. Cons. Ol 734 OS 32 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


O/W RTN 
Sydngy £435 £755 

Auckland £415 £745 

Jo*Bwg £308 £489 

Bangkok E 2 DB E 355 

Tel Avis £105 E 195 

New York £129 E 2 S 8 

toa Angeles £168 £345 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 0237 


NEW LOW PARES 
WORLDWIDE 

AMMAN £260 'KARACHI £270 
BOMBAY £325 LAGOS £330 

CAIRO £210 MIA1R £263 

DELHI £345 ROME £105 

ERATURT £65 SEOUL £605 

HONG KQNGE495 SYO/MEL £765 

ISTANBU. £160 TOKYO £560 

SXYLQRD RUVa LTD 
2 DENMAN STREET. LONDON VT 
Tet 01-436 3 S 21 MB 7 
AIRLK 10 MB) 


ONE CALL for some of the best 
Mk in fllgnis. apartments, to 
lets and rar Mre. Tel London Ol 
636 5000 . Manchedrr 061 832 
2000 . Air Travel Advisory 
Bureau. 


GREECE, Canaries. Sepl/Ort 
avail. Low mm from Iwk 
£ 159 . 2 wk» £ 189 - Teta 092 S- 
771266 Tim* way Holidays. 
AST A/ ATOL 1 107. 


AMERICA. Low rod 

tngms r.g. Rio £ 486 . uma 
C 49 S tin Also Small Croup 
Honda*- Journey*, i t-g Peru 
irom £3501 JLA Ol 747 5108 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Worldwide. 
Haymarkef Ol 830 1366 . 


DISCOUNT FARES Worldwide: 
Of 434 0734 j under Travel. 


DCSCMHITED 6 CROUP FARES. 

LTC Open Sal 0765887056 . 


MALAGA, CANARIES. Ol 441 
till. Travelwhe. Abia. am. 


MOROCCO BOUND. Regent St. 
W 1 01 714 5307 . ABTA/Aloi 


LOW FARES TO America. Aus- 
tralia A New Zealand. Tel: Ol 
930 2656 . Her ml* Travel 36 
wiutefuu London. SW 1 . 
ABTA 3483 V. 

LOW FARES 
LSA. s America. MW and Far 
LasL S Africa. Trayvate. 48 
Margaret Slrrei. wi. Ol 680 
2928 iVm Accepted i 
CYPRUS/ MALTA Hotel* & Apis. 
Scheduled fit* from HTow. 
Ring Pan World Houday* Open 
Sat 01 754 2562 
DISCOUNTS l*l /Economy lick 
etk Try us last FLIGHT- 
BOOKERS 01387 91 CX 3 . 

ArfW/VlM accepted. 

EUROPE /WORLD 
tares on rtwtrter/smeduled fits. 
PHOI ntgfU 01 631 0167 . AM 
AIOI 1893 
LOW COST FLIGHTS. Mo a Euro 
pran destinations. Valexander 
01402 4262/0062 ABTA 

61004 ATOL I 960 
■AML' JAMAICA. M.YORK. 
Worldwide ctegoed fares. 
Richmond Travel. 1 Duke Si 
RMluaOfld ABTA 01-940 4075 . 
TUNISIA /MOROCCO Book 

through l he North Africa Spe- 
cial**!. samara Flying Services. 
Tel 01 262 2734 . 

ALICANTE, raro. Malaga etc. 
Di round Travel ATOL 1783 . 
Ol 581 4641 . Horsham 68541 
ALL US C 3 T 1 E&. Lowed fares on 
maur srnnhiM camer a OX- 
584 7371 -ABTA 
liYPT. Tailor -made hothtays 
Daily deos. Sollnun TraveL Ol 
370 7307 . 

HONG KONG MSB, BANGKOK 

£ 369 . Stnwmore £ 457 . Other 
rErtlk* 01 584 6514 ABTA. 
PAIN PORTUGAL GREECE: 
Flight* Faldor 01-471 0047 
ATOL 1640 Arrrsi/VIM- 
SYD/MCL £636 Penh £ 566 . All 
nuior earner* to aus/nz. Oi- 
5 B 4 7371 ABTA. 

S. AFRICA From 0465 . 01 - 5 B 4 
7371 ABTA. 


TRAVEL WORLD WIDE 

Son) Nhiu and gwUnci do 
i educing Inn haul nerd costs 
19 & cM) class 03727 43559. 

Xmas id Gama. USA & amo en- 

Owes 03727 43550 
Ausi flLZ. 3 Fw Eaa etc. 
03727*2733 

Commaol Accaun sMoata 
01-8*3 0711. 

TRAVEL WOfaU. 

ABTA 72102. HMDtaral Ibe 
tettWil Trawl SToanra. 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. JoThirg. Onra. Dubai. 
Istanbul. Singapore. K.L. DeihL 
Bangkok. Hone Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. & Toe America*. 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London W1V 7DG. 

01-430 8102/01-439 7751 

Open Saturday IMSUBO. 


ANN01INCEMENTS 



f»: l ' 


WRITERS 

wr^ ■ 

or rvsav'- under rhe ink of Pew. v ““ n • 

^ ItaSfts sm . 

(Tou) pn/c money ofCOOO to be P«a *** » ' ,DQCr * nd 

1 runner* up) 





There are many 

such pets who 

need help when 


'Inm 

tneasurod 

10 animals »1msc owners cannot afford 

jssiyasiaa* 


IT’S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


WOrUMOa Ion com ngras 
Tbs test - and wg can prchg it 
1304X0 chems Skice 1970 

MOUND THE WORLD 

ROM £7*1 

o/w tin 

SYDNEY 074 

PERTH 
AUCKLAND 

BANGKOK 
SINGAPORE 
WASHINGTON/ 

BALTIMORE 

HONG KONG 
DELHf /BOMBAY 
COLOMBO 

BOSTON 

NAIROBI 
JO-BURG 
UMA 

LOS ANGELES 
NEW YORK 
GEFCWA _ . 

43-a oats cown now 

UMKM M Kl 
Empe/BU Hake IM37 SMD 
Law Had nSo H-GO 150 
Md *VS37 9631 
MMan Qau IV 9 M 3444 
CmcobnM U f twUBe a dM 
OTA IATA A10L T4SJ 


£374 E80D 

£390 £748 

£209 £385 

009 £418 

E17D £358 

£248 £496 

EZ31 £385 

£237 £418 
£161 £328 
£242 £369 
£288 £426 

£253 £495 

£204 £398 
£149 £298 

era 


SUPER HOLIDAY 
SALE 

CraN. Corfu Rhodes. Res. SOMUr 
Gmt tMndL ThB Atgrw. Moore. 
Tawda. 

IvA ?wh 

77 732627292930 Sm C 1 M CUB 
oadB mb etc datr dW nw 
Nome No» Ox mm 
In T I 9S £T® 

Teeede NtoDK dan _ ___ 
urn £199 £J« 

V£l apt and anal hotel inta&ys 
mfft IkgM Irom Gamck. Luton md 
Mjnefte$r» (subfed » supu md 
and) Bractus. booUngs (24lmci 
hstan TetepnooB/Crrtii Cam 
onty Una from 



Tit LnRdM 11-251 SlSt 
T at MW 1742 3 H 100 
Tat MaadwUw Kl KM S 033 
ATOL 2834 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
sM reun 
Jotan/HN £300 £490 

mntu £275 £390 

Cato El St £230 

Lagos £240 E 3 G 0 

Ddftan £250 £350 

Batgfcek £220 £355 

Qcurt £420 

Afro Aslan T ravel Ltd 

182/198 Refloat 9L WI 


Lm 6 Gram 

AMEX VBA 


LOWEST FARES 
Pane £89 N YORK E27S 
FranMun ISO LAfSF OK 
Lagos 020 Uian* E3Z0 
towobt £325 Sngmoio £420 

JO burn C400 Beng<u> 1335 
Cairo £205 Kamandu £4« 
DeUBOM 1 335 Rangoon £350 
Hong Kong BID CdCDta £425 

Hum Dfdcouits Aval 
on 1st A dub Ctaaa 
SUM* SAND 
21 SwaltoM 9 l Loskn Wi 
01-499 2100/437 0SS7 


«dly = 

s=Capo D'Qrtando £199 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SPAGL Pori trad. Cheapest ures 
BKKdH. Ol 755 8 l 9 l. ATOL. 


SWJTZDHjAjm SrtwdulM llighls 
Ol 724 2388 ABTA ATOL 


GENERAL 


WCCKOW or Weeks. Honey 
moons nr 2 od Honeymoons . 
Dwmn Hu* Mmt of Maty's ro- 
nuntM- elites in Autumn or 
Winter Call Ol 749 7449 for 
your FREE colour brochure 
M 4 «c M Italy Dept T. 47 Shep- 
herd* Bush Green. London 
WI2 BPS 

TAKE TUNE OFF to Ram. Am- 
sterdam. Brussels. Bruges. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne A Dieppe Time Qti 2 a 
Cheiler Close. London. Stalk 
7 BO. Ol 366 0070 . 

CRETE A MARBCLLA Superb 
beam villa* 6 am with pnv 
POoU Ol 724 7776 . Piaya HOII 
day*. Aid 2196 


OVERLANDERS 


don to Kathmandu '{Bib. 
London Co Nairobi £860. Top 
Deck Travel. OX 373 8406 . 


SELF-CATERING 

CARIBBEAN 


C AR IBBE AN Lux villa*, add* wnn 
pooh. Avail Ort thru winter. 
VdlaWotld. Ol 409 2838 . 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARJCS 


—WIT P Holiday* departing 
Friday /Sol unlay every week. 
Sept /Ort Irom U 20 Tet Ol 
309 7070 & 062 ? 677071 CH 
K Holidays. Alot 1772 . 



SWITZERLAND 

FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair^ 
Super Apex. 

London toZurichor 
Geneva daflyonaxv 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basie 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Slay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday afteramvaL 
Bookings and fun 
conditions From 
travel agents or 

01-437 9573 

swissoir 



WHEN YOU THINK YOU'VE 
FOUND THE BEST DEAL 

Contact the FHght Centre for the best travel 
bargains to America. Canada Australasia + 
super saver fares to Europe. 

01-514 3600 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


AUTUMN break* La Qusar nr 
Ann ft v Scw/Ort Trad farm 
Imiv rtulrt S/C aN 2-6 

pnvAho Ideal vM hoHRn 
sun. Tel 0242 604 130/602 
124 day: 602 776 C*n. 


SELF-CATERING II&A. 


MP FONAW Seat sale to USA Ca 
rtbbean-Far Lasf-Avrarafla. cab 
the profrvstonats ABTA IATA 
cr oxceptm. Trt Ol 264 S 788 


SELFCATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. TIW 
firx-j nousM for miiai. 73 Si 
Jamev Si. SWl. OI 491 0602 
ALGARVE. Lux riltas/aius with 
pool*. Sen. OrlA thru Winter. 
Ol 409 2838 - VUIaWorM. 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI WEST bumper brorhurr bul 
now parked with all the top re 
sorts. Sunday nights feral the 
traffic! >. and amazioMy low 
Kirn starling nt £ 99 . Ring iOl; 
785 9999 for your copy. 
A 8 TA 69266 ATOL 1383 . 


AMDOKA AND AUSTRIA. Quality 
Ski hoHdkys M Buogrt Prices. 
Top Drew Travel 133 . Earn 
Court Road. SWS. Tel: 01 573 
8406/5096 

SKI TOTAL. Superb chain*, iptv 
hoteH in Top Frenrh/Asdlrtan 
Resorts tr £ 61 . ( 0932 / 251113 . 
SKHWOIILD TOP Ski Resorts. 
Lowest -Prire* from £ 59 . 
ABTA Brochure: Ol 6024826 . 


COTSWOLDS 


WMCHCOMBE. Autumn Break 
avail Penod charancr cot- 
bgrv ideal centre tourtng. Sips 
4 - 6 . Tel 0243 602 124/604 130 


LAKE DISTRICT 


WHOLEFOOD Ouesl House. No 
smoking. Bewiev. Watermlllock 
on-Llbwaier. I 0 S 536 I 236 . 


SELF-CATERING 
. GREECE 


CORFU VULM We Stm have avail. 
abHHy 28 SepL 6 0(1 for 1/3 
wVv Beautllul Vikas nr the 
beach ex Gatwirk. Pan World 
Holidays 01 734 2662 
GREECE, import! Islands, cheap 
nights vma rentals etc. Zeus 
Hoi* Ol 434 1647 . A lot AltO. 
mooes lux atari hob from 
£189 OP 2427 Sept 1.4 Oct 
Strama 0706862814 " 


RENTALS 


HOLLAND RARK JdoCMhM pOM 
eo abroad Letnng flat I year 
Uif sunny dtd bed A klutien 
both wnn haicora' Soacioui 
hail. hMi rrflinqrd book filled 
large recap, some antiques. 
MMr Irrr lined road- £140 pw 
nrg Tel 01 940 33 WJ 'eve* A 
weekends). 01 222 7041 uJaysi 


KAMFSTEAD NWS DetMIU fur 
inshrd (lot in reMdeniial street 
l bedroom *■ living roora. fully 
euunpnd klimen. baihreom. 

full CH. ample street parkin* 
Suitable lor one -person- £130 
pw Trt 794 44 o 0 


Terraces. SWl 1/2 
Bed fiats in new Embankment 
dev etapmeni 24 hr porterage 
Evrelienl weurtly All DM* 

CLurd Arm Communal 
oar*. C 1 BOC 27 SPW Cooles 
828 8261 . 


HYDE PARK - burricr designed 
Brandi lew serviced ftrts 1 
dblr bedim, rerepllon. luHv Hi 
kll 4 huge balhrmv Avail now 
Long/ short lets Conjumgiii 
Prooeniev Ol -727 3060 

SURREY Dorks. Mod. non. 
ground floor. 2 bed not GCH 
FuUy fHiea kitchen Available e> 
nvonihs LlOO pw. Contact DR 
Hill at 10233 ) 55331 
W 14 Pretty flat with double bed. 

Rerep unto French Window-, 
ante Gdn. KAB Cm CH. Now 
6/12 mlta £ 125 . CBOban A 
Casetee 589 5481 . 

WCl/Wl: Snartous. Sfh floor. 
Hudio flat In lux Mock. New Idl 
& bathroom CH. CHW. colour 
tv . Cleaner, porter. £ 1 10 tnc 

pw. Tel- Ol 8806661 
CHELSEA Charming garden dal 
lo lei 12 mnnlhs upwards 
Tasirlullv lumnhrd 6 lulls- 
eg nap £175 PW. 01 352 0682 

MARRUE ARCH luxury 2 bed flat 
In p/b btork. C 260 ow. IH Ol 
402 7 B 47/326 1276 
MAYTANt Lux 2 d/b«l 4 lh fir 
vrv apt- All martibv-s Co let 
£300 pw Inc. 723 0272 
SJtEK EvcIiNve period 3 bed 
dal newly furn. knriy recep. 
CH. welvr. maid. 373 0753 . 
SW 19 SOUTHFKLDS. Spaoou* 
self con 1 bed gdn flal. 
C 450 prm Tel: 789 9006 . 

SWl Attractive 1 Bed flat Recep. 
KAB.C 130 pw.CoM 828 0040 
m. 

SWIO attractive corner me. 3 
beds. 2 rerep. lined kll. bath, 
roof I err. £ 250 pw Ol 351 0016 
HI. Lovely aukt 1 bed flaL 6 
mtt* nan Co Lei prel £200 PW 
Ol - 46 B 4295 or Ot 957 3585 
Wll SC. oewlv Canv. 2 burnt 
flat. fuUy furn. ch. w/marn. 
C 1 SO pw. Trt Ol 727 4404 . 
W 14 OuM garden studio Lon 
bed. n.'v 26 yr * Til July 87 . 
£80 pw van Tel: 0458 60372 
WE LET FLATS AND HOUSES. 
Contort Riciiard or Mw-k. Davn 
WOOtfe A CO 402 7381 . 

W KENS Siudhj room. Anrac. 
right 1 min PW lube. £49 pw 
Inc. Tel Day A Eves 386 6138 . 
W/ WORTH COMMON. Lgr. lux. 
Yr 1 bed nal. £125 PW. Inc. 
CH. Co/ HOI let. Ol 871 1921 


For the best 
rental selection of 

QUALITY 
FLATS & HOUSES 

in prime London areas 

u 27 BEariaCaort Road. SWS. 


BAKER ST, WI 

Stinting fkti offered in (mpeo- 
laMe daco ratwB orf er- 4 

+ siBRim + Mp^rc! , Ifc^mR 
tatchea MIISTBE SEEN. 
Long let £800 pw. 

Palace Properties 
D1-4SS 8926 


RENTALS 


EAST CRO> DON 3 Beds 3 
1 nr P- C - enr r ut rushed and 
iwwii ili« orated Companies 
onis. C 15 g pus Trt. 01675 
099 b mm 


HAMPSTEAD HR HEATH. Urtu 
tv lie iiivteu flai Poro'rm Laar 
kHjrux- dining area country 
knrfp-n tun*- mu mot n 

C 29 S 0 W. Ol 794 2789 . 


HARLEY ST WI . 3 dbl bed*. 2 
haut* ier,-p. F/l C 2 » 9 pw Co 
let bnariiei Day 631 1369 . 

Cvm 586 MSI 


CENTRAL LETS Flals/IKHives 1 -a 
hodrrm Hobda* or Company 
let Ring Ol 491 7646 iT) 


HAMPSTEAD and eav irons For 
a vrtrClHtai or viewrd and nc- 
ommnnoM Oats and Mtun 
a> -ulablr- lor king term ktluiq m 
rvorlh London’s premier dlvinn 
conlarl toe invulKb who can 
ofioc nunnoie homes Irom 
£1 SO loE 1.500 a week George 
knwhl The Lenina Agent. 9 
Hrsilh Sired Hampstead \ u- 
toge NkS (.TP Ol 794 1125 


KENSfMCTON Not company lei 
Sunni Garden fUL in Vogue 
Man. losing 2 bdrv CSOOpw 
Trt- 602 5941 . 

MAYFAIR HYDE PARK. The 

most insurious long/ snort Ids 
1/6 bed* erg prrrn Ol 939 
9512 'll 


HAMPSTEAD: New hmirv ho*»e 
usartobto now. 2 bedroom* . 
garden, -ran couple lor holiday 
lei or uaumuiun on 3 months 
to one v-rar iuri Company M 
prefrred £160 pw. Trt 01 -489 
7443 1 weekday* ani or 01 -722 
0972 iu/ena*i 

HOLLAND PARK. Organ!. *un 
m nenulilullv lunwshed 1« 
floor Hal Lnsen r«n> rm. din 
r mg mi/ Slum . dbl hedrro. full* 
eouipprtl kll bathrm View* 
over/orrev* la dehahifal gdn 
Co let Min 6 mto* ClOOpw 
Trt 852 6385 

LUXURY House in SC London 6 
Bedroom* Master B/Drn-sune 

1 or Lounqe A Dmmg Rm. Vast 

mu Hogans Filled KB. Cda. Crt 

tar. Pei king Alarms wired to 
■oral police To lei on lotto i or 
marl U-rrn. 681 3367 

(Manager*) 

AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Seeks 
lu* ftaf/houre up lo £ 80 Opw 
Lsual lees req PtuUmv kak 6 
Lewi* South ol llw park Chrt 
see Mlirr Ol 352 Bill or 
North ol me Park. RegenIN 
Park (iltire. Ol 58 b 9882 
CHELSEA Stogie Girl Rraimed. 
Own Bed Baih. silling room A 
kitmen m private house No 
rent in return lor max t week'* 

liqhl rooking per mmlh for re- 
tired man. Ref* ewnnai TH 
0404 88212 between 2 ra prn 
WEST HAMPSTEAD Couple OOnr| 
abroad 6 morn l*s Maisanene ~ 
D/B. LUI Rm/WM. Recep with 
bakuiiv Diner F/F Kit Bath 
Shower WC. CH Garden 
CI 7 C 6 W. Mane Carter 4351 
9329 

EBUKY ST, SWl. Beauululty re , 
Hummed 2 bed flaL flow lo| 
total amrflltie*. New carpet* 
curtain* a kit eauip etc Rent 
£525 pw met neg. Howard 
Minier A Co Ol 235 2832 
ISUNOTDN Owner's period g* 
ciou*hEenr tube 3/4 able bed*. 

2 rerep*, superb studio wlto 
lovely views, ige Using area. 
CH. TV. s/feiinq gdn. gge. 
£250 pw 0580 712806 

PRIMROSE HILL Luxury 3 bed 
nuusonettc wiin garden. CH 
Fully tilled kllrtten. TaslefuOyi 
dec. Suit peal sharers or ecu-' 
pie £230 p w Siurl and 
Tlvendale. Ol 388 9087 



RENTALS 


if »«• 

have a guatu* propmv to Irt 
Ml us about ii We otlri a pro 
ievsicnel A f Hie Mr semre 
Uuianha Cuintonlmr Ol 244 
7353 


REGENTS PARK NU .1 BKUliilul 
2 I tool apenmrnl near pari. 

Living room. Dming loom KIL 
2 bed Bun. Lnveii ronserva- 
lory. Cerden Avail o months e 
C 275 pw Tel. Ol 485 3033 


AVAILABLE now 5 mins Stoane 
Viuair- ?mi A iid floor lum 
nuns i not bed rm. ? sgfv. */rm. 
kil/dmea. btlum C200 pw. 
Ref* reu'd Tel Ol 730 2800 


HTDC PARK - inlermr dengntd. 
Brand-new -an iced flats. 1 

nr bedrm. rerrpupn. fully IM 
*■14 huaebMfuim. Avail now 
Lang/vhort let*. Connaughl 
Prwnie* 0 « 727 3050 


SWl Lntotw 2 Bed nniagr- nicrty 
derpr.aed 2 Bain* Rerep Kll 
All mm hue— i Paira Co lei 
C 25 rh>w 823 0040 .T. 

W 2 PATIO Flal lor prof Cduple. I 
double hrd Inungr. kilrnen. 
baih C/H. washing machine. 
Lion pw Trt Ol 229 2 U 56 
WEMBLEY Cent Modem 2 bed 
ibini. CH. Iixn I Ml Got. £365 
prm 1 vr nun Lsc rrt* reg. 
097 V 77 «U 01 

DOCKLANDS rials and how** to 
Irt IliriNiMhuul thr Dorklandk 
area. Tel Ot 790 9560 
HtCHCATE Nb new tv furimhrd 
lusurv 7 bed rial, oarage avail- 
able L 150 pw Ol 340 7408 
LARGE sell ronlaim -4 2 bed 
apailne-nl Sta '12 Cl 10 pw. Trt 
b -1 8094 

LUXURY luroistied houses 
■H. imp-lead' CSEOpw e\. WLC 

01 459 7746 

MARBLE ARCH LUX. vpor 
serviced 4 bedrm mews hee 
Avail long k-i Drlah 262 4084 
SWl AllrarliveA newh dernral 
«1 lurmsbed 4 bedioom house 

2 Baths Dbir Rerep Dining 
Rm Sludr knCl*. All raa- 
rtiines Gdn Cd let. £ 42 Spw 
82 K 0040 -Tl 

BERYL SD SV 46 Exuemrty al 
irart Isl llr flal flow- lube I 
dbtr bed. reiep ku wnn w mo 
rnme pain ki 2 Dpw Sullivan 
Thcmav 731 1333 
HOLLAND PARK. Spacious, sun 
nv lirvtlloor Haininokinggdns 
Laiqi-r rerep dbl and so) beds. 
CH Newly der LIHSpw Ol 
229 7788 

LARGE house Bain Hill. Warn 

Mey c neos 2 aerrps 2 bath*. 2 

kilrliens. 1 • acre garden. Cora 
panv oi Diimmiis preferred 
L 425 pu OI 341 0195 
RICHMOND Port. side Modem 7 
tmliuonu-d luvurv turntshed 
ILii newh di-curalrd Balcony 
Caraue CIHO per week. Trt- 
Ol B 7 M 6762 


BELGRAVIA SWl 

CKABMWG MEWS 
HOUSE 

Hccatty modonsed and deco- 
acd (o a wiy hgti stancal 
Lovely Urge room. Deri tor en- 
tartanmg. Antique hmOn 
where sppiopnae. 

GROUND FLOOR 24 ft. dmrite 
lecepton room with gas coal ire. 
LOWS GROUND craftsman Id- 
led UEhai, Semens dotftte 
oren5.'RMf0wave I double (ndge 
(reezet etc 

DWBfG ROOM seals 6. 

UIRJIY ROOM w/madme. 2nd 
cooRer and tndge tof snacks. - 
RRST FLOOR 17ft nosier bed- 
room. range oi Wed cuqboBds. 
arm toman bathroom titled with 
pnim Somte shower raotn 
and too 

SKOM FLOOR 2 smaflff bed- 
rooms. 2nd buhroom, terrace. 
Fudy equooed and caipetod. Itu 
house e sudabie for a up execu- 
bw and o avaAUe on a 
company let only tor a 2 year 
penod al £875 per week. Fleece 
cel 245 6577 


RENTALS 


HCNflV A JAMES Contort to npw 
un 51 23 S total fur toe pest ve- 
ierlKHi oi lurnnhea llal* and 
nooses io rent m hntqhhbndgr. 
Chelsea ami hensimtun iTl 


6UPEMOR FLATS A HOUSES 
avail a read lor aipkxiun. 
pveruhviw Long a short let* in 
all fUixiv Llpfrtend A Co 48 . 
Alhmidtlr*>M»I h] 499 5334 


TO LET Luxury 
dal. rimal Slirfl. rmeni Gar- 
den Cnmpauy tel only CI 75 
Der week Phone 01 629 6147 
idfin 1030 am > 


NW 2 Large 1 bedroom fUL suit 
prreessMHUl tuisim/s. 5 mm- 
ulm lute- sialicxi LlOO pw. Tet. 
Ot 452 9 ««fl 


< SWl Lm furn 

rial ^ br&+ I 1 - iMltnb rrrrpL 
lined kilrtv C 350 PW. 935 2781 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER OF 
TLSCAN1 MINS WEAR 
LIMITED 

AND IN THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1989 
NOTICE is hereby- given hum 
toe Cf editor* Ol Ihe above-named 
Company, whirh Is being votun- 
Unlv wound up. are rrouired. on 
OI before ihe 171h dav oi Novrni- 
ner 1986 to vend ui Iheir full 
Christian and Surname*, tone ad- 
dresses and desrnpiKins. lub 
panii-ulars re Ihnr debt* or 
(Uirns. and the names and ad 
drew* ot ineir Soimlor* III any. 
In the undrtstneed SI RJfT 
kLMAR S1NOLA. F C A. Of 
Smpla A Co Chartered Atroun- 
lantv. ol New Broad Si f rrt House. 
35 Nrn- Hruad Sdert. London. 
EC2M 1NH the Luiuubrior or Hie 
said Company, and H *a rnjiurrd 
bv not ire in writ mu Irom (he said 
Liaiod.il or are. nersonall* or bv 
their SnlHiiHs in inw 111 and 
move their drill nr claims at 
siieti Ume and place as shall be 
swermpd m Si»-h nOIH e br in de- 
mud thereof thev will be 
eseiuded irom tor bi-nefu re anv 
drvlnbuUon mode before Mich 
dehis are piuvrd 

DATED llut 12th day of Septan 
ner 198o. 

SK StNCLA. rc* 

UOL-IDATOR. 


TO ALEXANDER HILL 
TAME NOTICE Huh on artioo 
has been roRimenrnl against you 
in the above Court bv MARGA- 
RET MARS SMITH oi 8 Anson 
Road crxkirwooa London NW2 
lor the rrtuin al morvie* held m 
you m your HaUI.iv Building So- 
rreu and National Weslminvler 
Bank arrounl and an Order ha* 
been made tool a puldirallon of a 
nolirr <* Ihe rnfrv re sum action 
in The Timex shall be deemed lo 
be good and sulficirnt service of 
toe proceedings an you The me- 
lion vs ill be heard at Wllkwden 
County Court. 9 Aclon Lane. 
Hariesdm. Lundan NVv lO 8LV. 
•Tel- Ol 966 02611. on toe 17th 
dav oi Orlober 1<W6 at 2 30 pm 
on wturh vou ore to appear and d 
you do nol appear •Miner- to per- 
son cu bv your houciior at me 
lime and place above mentioned 
an Order win be made as toe 
Court thinks HI. 

Dated the ifith day or Se ptemb e r 
1986 


ALBERTS ART COMPANY 
UMriTD 

NOTICZ IS HEREBY GIVEN 
pursuant 10 Section 588 of toe 
Companies An ]9SS that a Meet 
tag of the Creditors M Ihe above- 
named company win be hew al 
Stanhope House 110 Drury 
Lane. London WC2B 5ST on 
Tuesday ihe MUi day of Septem- 
ber 1986 al 1 1 OO am for die 
purposes mentioned In Sections 
589 and 590 ol the sud Art. 
Dated tots 12th day re September 
1986 

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 
PAUL COOK 
RL TERR Y 

directors 


LEGAL NOTICES 


THE INSIRANCF COMPANIES 
ACT l»82 

THF. HOME INSl RANGE 
COMPANY 

NOTICE to HEREBY GikCN 
Inal an uppOrdUan was on 3rd 
September 1986 prevented to Ihe 
Neil rial l at Slate inr Trade AIM 
Industry bv The Home insurance 
Company i-Home"i tor toe ap- 
proval nt tne Seirrtarv re Plate 

PUixliant to Section 51 oi the In 
suraixr Compamri Art isht 10 a 
proposed lianxfrr to OCM lit- 
suraurr cuiuunv re Europe sa - 
N\ I- CIGNA Cun>pi'''l re all re 
Homes non is and obhdatvorts un- 
der poJm its wrlltni bv H in toe 
course of Ibv insurance buunere 
ramed an in toe l ruled Kingdom 
through the Invliluk- of London 
Lnderwnten bv Homes Marine 
ana Aviation Huvmes* Depart- 
nH-nt* on and from 17m March 
1986 to 2nd Sep te mber 1986 in 
rtuMve. imlwfing .provhmh* to 
M-nuf the coni in lu turn by or 
jMiaiml CIGNA Europe of an* to 
gal pi or reding* bv Or agauol 
Home wmrn relate U* tlunr rignt* 
ot obhrutUon* 

A raps re a Statement *riliP9 
out partinriars re the proposed 
transfer and re a dr an re me Pt*> 
posed iirvlrutnrtil or iransfer wd» 
be Open Id in*oer bon at the or 1 1 re 
ol Home at OCNA House. S Ume 
surel. London LC3M 7KA dur- 
ing normal htMttvecs houes on anv 
oav mtoer than a bo Ire das or 
Sun- Lx* or PutMie naudav • an or 
before 2718 OrtotJef 1986. 

Wrillrn rrprrseiMolirew ran 
vrrning me iransfer may be sent 
to me Secretary of Stale fur 
Trade and industry ai me Depart 
mere oi Trade and Industry, 
insurance bniuon IE. Room 
807. ID IH Vkiotli 51 reel. Lon- 
don StalH ONN before Md 
November 1986 The seerrtary 
of Stale wiB nn» determine me are 
pin anon hriore r on wort mg any 
n-preveiiiaiHin* made to lum de- 
bit r liul dav 
25in Seplemher 1986 

THL HOME INSLRANCE 
COMPANY 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


OVERSEAS AU PABt AGENCY 

87 Ra-uenl Short. London WI. 
Trt 439 6534 E K/Ov ersea* 
Al so hi hetps/dour. [emp/perm 
CHEERFUL lesponsibh- au pair 
r. gulled outside Pans from Ori. 
Mine Terr a_- eon l. 5 rue op 
D etinue. 77580 Cerrtiy laCha- 
pe Me. I ranee 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


AIL FAIR PPM immrdialrtv 
.11 j liable Call The Au rvurOn- 
lie iLMP AGY 1 now on Ol 
730 8122 124 HRSI for detail*. 


SPAIN 


MARBCLLA Outstanding vtrws 
01 Ihe sea and mountains, he- 
rtudea villa, sel in apptm 1 
arte land b bedrooms. 3 rerep 
iron room*. 4 balhrooms / 
shower* New swimming POOL 
Garage Lot* at lerrarr* elc 

Cl 45 000 SO"- Bank loan al- 
ready arranged Tel London 
740 5148 morning* only 


PROPERTY' TO LET 
LONDON 


FURNISHED - SW2 

Beautiful & exceptionally 
spacious det Georgian hse 
with Uuec airractivc walled 
garden to be maintained b> 
owners. S beds. 3 rerep. 3 
bath, gas CH. dble gangs. 
Available now for I year 
rencwaUc £250 pw 

01-642 6044 
LS/PB: Dickson Hiod, 
32-34 High St, 
Sotion, Sarrey. 



fillie 




^ jflinat-Cl TZjetbiataal 

The roost beautiful tnettan ResLaurant in Kew 
Authentic North Indian Cuisine 
Opening Hours 12-3.00: 6pm- Midnight 
Also open tor Sunday Special Buffet 

214 , Sandycombe Road* Kew 
Telephone; 01-948 8487 


WINE 

BARS 


¥ 


CORFU &PAX0S 

We xpecnftm « V£a Hoiidavs tod I 
bno safeded a quatiftf range of 
beach iritis, nd ndralad cot- 
uges n c*ve grows dose tn 
some oi the fried beaches on On 
eiaid.AvaiabRiy 3001 Sept & 

Odonwaris. 

Corfutilacortey 


0635 38621 


Md)157B 


SELF-CATERINC 


LAST MINUTE 

VILLAS 

westonnea low sdponor <ftt 

MMOieoa Corfu Paxas.crau. 

The Algarve RytaQurwig 

SeoKfflmrjOaebgr CmcMcan 

ergoy dw MOM Pbfkl of aldrow 

v8a at no enrs coot 
BKu>noireran«nMBiM 
ash m sMcoist tor nbvouai 

andnnwvanaadirce PreancLdas 

nod Gatwck day fkgftt 

Barclay earn/ Areas* 

CV Travrai fT) 

43 Cactooan Street 

London SW32PR 

Ttifeahone 
Stl 0851^84 MB 
(589 9132 “ 

ATOL 


RENTALS 


NATHAN 
WILSON & CO 

63 ROSSLVN Mu, 
LONDON NWS 1H0 

HAMPSTEAD NW3 bright 

r uns double bedroomed 
io hrunv modem Modi 
doK u sbopi and public 
transport. Large lounge. 
riKbtn end bauroant. wtti 
find rtanugtinM j£|70 p.w. 

RAMKTEAD NW3 in Ibe 

bcwi of ihe milage dunning 
Era flow co n v c Tuo g oflertn* 
2/3 bednnw. toje receptioo 
room, kiicben and bmhnwa. 
iqantf toea wjl Eudiem 
nine. £230 p.w. 

BELS1ZE PARK NWS 
Beautiful flat mih own 
cn nance and prreate puden. 
Fabulous kurhea/diner, 
eoormotn reception area. 3/4 
bedroom*, 2 bathrooms. Well 
decorated tltrooghnit. /3O0 
pw. 

THIS IS A SMALL 
SELECTION OF OUR 
CURRENT LISTINGS. 

WE RECEIVE NEW 
INSTRUCTIONS DAILY. 
CALL NOW FOR 
DETAILS. 

01-794 116 ^ 


' PLEASE 
COME AND ENJOY 
OUR EXQUISITE 
THAI ClflSME 


136 nOMPTOM RD, 

OKHTSB8IDGE. 

LONDON SW3 
TR: 01-225 2668 

i 

TIME OUT 

By Uadsey Butbaa 

"It's the Jood lhal makes 
this new restaurant an 

ABSOLUTE MUST to 
nsit. The find is so 
complex, rich, tasty and 
deiickm that it is quite 
unlike any taker Thai 
find Vre tried in 
London. This is Thai 
I .food at its mast regab it 
| is pricey at around £20 a 
head for a large meal 
but really is quite 
outstanding. " 

HARPERS & QUEEN 

By lieyd Crnmn 

~ A fine example of 
upmarket ethnicity. I 
look forward fo <2 return 
ridt." 

3 COURSE SET LUNCH 
£9 JO 

| OPEN 7 DAYS A WASC 

LUNCH AND DMNER 


YOU VE JUST 
FOUND 

THE BEST PLACE 
TO EAT 

ON THIS PAGE 

(161:01-2356040) 


=TH£= 


LACE PLATE 

RESTADRANTBOAT 

Fast becoming one off 
London's most popular pri- 
vate almg senna. A nett 
appointed boat dun seen 12 
and often tugb quality coi- 
unc fresh ! * prepared on 
hoard whilst cruising the 
most picturesque stretches 
of the Regents Canal 
Mem for private parties and 
business entertaming. 

For morr information and. 
brochures nog 01-286 3428 
Embarkation poml: opp. 60 
UomficU Rd. 

Lutle Venice. W9 




© 

Belgravia-Sieralon 

20CHESHAM PLACE. 
LONDON SWIX8HO 
Ihe liOMMialitr peopjg ol I'lT 


THE 
KWAUTY 

TAN000N 


Oban Mon-Sira 12noor ra^jn. 
Spin B1IBM1 

tndBMvHOidM 

■ iMWffi naa. ubu&. wot 

TMSHH63 


r -Atar of Soartun 

ESEABL 33 TEARS 

SptodmagnTmiai 

A Carry Doha 
Fb 5$ Lmoed 

Open 7 days Loach & Dantr 

157 WESnOOHR QBOVE, 

LONDON. Wll 
01-229 8098 


MALCOLM 

LIVINGSTON 

uivnimi The f rear Hoioetoc 
Uv t-vto U#ae» rraras i«e 
romro oi ns na» « me 

RBliM 

THE LINDSAY 

HOUSE 

21 taaUy Sreel Ijiodu WI 
11 433 0456 


MK8DIIKE WRRC BAR Arch 
153. Cdnrer! Half An. Lo n don 
SCI. Ol 928 937a 

T* RROKOl - 16 Byword 

Sir rrt. London CCS. 

Ol 4880131. 


CAPTAIN WIOODUCKB. 282 
Norttuirtd Avenue. London 
W6 Tel: Ot 840 2740. 
wars - 74 Shor Lane. London 
CC4 01 353-7904. 

! - 41. *4ounl 
WI. 01-491 


London 


Srre. 

3810 

THE FRILLY LIZARD. 32 
Yansfon Ptare. London SW6. 
Ol 381 3782. 

TME B A TE BO - IO Argyll Street. 
London WI 01 734 2999 

catOOCMO-S Bt AH IM . 

86 High 51 reel. Harrow. Middx. 
Ol 493 3888 
BOanONK. 47 viuier* Street. 

WC2 Otctai wme Bar In Lon- 

don Ot 930 1408 
JEEVES WM evil 
1*39/143 Whitfield siren. Lon- 

don WI. Ol 387 1952. Egon 

R onay n -ron w h-nded. 
LAMIUNU WINE BAR 17 
Aoproarh Rd. London SW?o 

Trt Ol 5430256 

LAHTESMS WINE RAIL 22 Hot- 

r-ourt Siren. London WI. Ot 

402 5925 

UUITMC WME BAR - 

2S/26 Lime Siren. London 
CCS. Ol 623 6380 
LOOSE BOX Wine Bar. 2 Cheom 

Road. Cweil Village. Surrey Ol 

393 8522. Resi/Mr. patio gdn 

IK MCK wme Bar. 573 Garran 

Lone. London SW18 Tel: Ol 

947 9616. 

OM NINE TWO. 192 Kemlngton 

took Road. London Wll. Ol 

229 0482 

PARSONS WINK BAR. 277 New 

Kings Rd. London SWL Tel: Ol 

73e 4412 

PICKWICKS WME BAR. 13 Dev- 

envlwr Rd. W«. Ol 747 1824. 

Liv e muur Mon/Fn/Sai 
REBATOV WM A Tap»* bar A 

RcsCouranJ 169 South Lambrth 

Rd. Lo ndon SW8 01 7356388 

HHimvs WIRE BAR / Ctvareral 

Cnll Lrrke Street. London 
WCI 01-278 5949. 

VOUURS EUMPA - is orange 

Si reel. London WC2. 

Ol 9308849. 

THB WME LAKE. 281 KIngaon 

Rd. London SWEO. Trt: 01 643 

8324. 


COCKTAIL 

BARS 


15 Great 
todle Suref. W| iOl 580 
2125 Oxford Cirrus 1 libel. 

MAC2C MOMENT. 233 RegrtU Sr. 
WI. 1499 6176 Oxford Qrna 
ludei Reuauront/OarKlau Bor 


INDIAN 


Exquisite dishes 

is the 

J tt ffi gW f W ntaatlc 

andteBi smtmdb ys 

af 

Bistro Do Village 

617 2154 

72 CLEVELAND STREET, 
LONDON, in 


\ AHASN TAKDOOH 

5» Denmark Mill. London BCG. 

01 703 3484. 

AftO LO ASIAN TAHBOOm 60 

Moke Newnunon. Churrh SI. 

Nib Ol 254 9298/3633. Br*l 

m North London, l free gleet- of 

vhemr id every ruolomnr. A a 

r amotion for Un- Udira. 

BAYLEAT TAN DOOM 

2 Norto Hill. London N6. 

01 340 1719. 

FLEET TANDOORI 
104 Fieri Road. London NWS. 

Ol 485 6480 

INDIA CIKSME 
129 l abridge Rood. London 
v* IS Ol 5e7n2ll 
PAPA0AMS 1 25. Croat Tlrtvflrtd 
hlrert. London WI 01-323 
2875/2879 

SUBUCM 18 Theberlon Slrrei 

ND ng Ion Giren. London Ni 

i-kngrt Tube] Ol 369-8033. 


INTERNATIONAL 


ARENA • 307 Harrow Road. 
Wrmblrv. Middlnrx 
Ol 900 1849 

LE MIRAGE 9 Greek Street. 
London WI Ot TJ4 0046, 

Live niuvlr Friday. Saturday A 
Sunday night*. , 


'jfifiyi ^hanfiar 


i 

*1 >■* •/ 1 oedanv V U Rn4 FMaumir - Tfmie f M 
LISTED IN EGON RONAY FOOD GUIDE 1985 
* FfcOjr Limed + 

+ Open 7 day* • week lod. pobfie Uidayi * 

6 Parbra up lo Z5 catered foe * 

AV idler an m rBere wktwa ni Stndh Indian tartm data* 
prrtund In'-nped rheL.TLr Hedanrinl nmnipri wirttho of 
icin-C limbh Rwj ami.Oaptifretnurertlili4.ra 
Hmat M la moviru rarell £3^3 
A I idl brertlaar giml Inn-Iiil only tlOO 
133-135 De ni.— ■ dWlr—L NWl.TMrphooe 01-388 84M 
Brtw 


Bria* iM« voucher and ha*« ■ free ctore of irjoe iad | 



****** 


DIM-SUM 
SERVED DAILY 
11 AM TO 6PM 

dm Iron Mlm 
mWtag tnagiout 
■be nttaimL 

Large A La Carte Menu of 
Ftkmg. Szechuan and 
Cintcracsc dishes in 
addition 10 our seafood 
specialities. 

Open II am io 12 pm. 
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
Arocondilioned and fully 
licensed. Lai^ and small 
panics canard few. 

FOR RESERVATIONS: 
01-434 2508/734 6677 
I GERJRARD PLACE, 
LONDON, WI 


-************* 


jeepers 

UBdcan R e s&wad 
arpahfy Ihe besl TetMsx 
Food in Lontjon, 

rec o rn mended br 

Fay Mascftier 
ExOtaq Vqjsanan Dishes 
2 coutsa Imch Man-Sn 
Open DMy 

356 YORK ROAD, 

oeor Waadnuurth Bridfx, 

swia 

nuu i iMi i A bi-m54M 

/atr-unai Viflftr uiraioM- 


*♦*****★★ 


discover how 
thefiench 
aiescud 
oaswoidhsh. 

>i 



CAfEfBHDESAMBDUVIN 

RESIAURANT/WINEBAS 

39WNTONSISWI.01^03999 


OUT OF TOWN 


LA BONNE 
FKANQUETTE 

5 High SL, Egham, Sumy 

Tels 0784-39494 

Menu mctaive 
- evenmas. S courses 
tndudfng safated wines £2) 
An exfranrbnaiY 
Notmlle experience 
* Business & Sunday 
hricheons 

+ Convergent M25. 
Heathrow. Wridsor. Ascot 
dr Mam A30 posroon-Car Park 


THE TIMES 
RESTAURANT GUIDE 

Appears once a month on this page 
If yon would like to advertise your 
RESTAURANT OR WINE BAR 
please call us on 

01-481-1920 




i 


y-bbu^p a a NT AS ass pees rm juiBMMiMMm.. 




























Audi keeps up challenge at the top 


' The imaginative “Progress Procon-Ten removes the 
through- Technology” cam- wheel out of the way in the 
paign mounted by Audi this fraction of a second between a 
year is only the latest step in collision taking place and the 
one of the most successful driver’s body bring hurled 
image changes ever under- forward. It simultaneously 
taken by a car manufacturer, tightens seat belt tension 
In four years' it has trans- preventing the so-called 
formed Audi's image from “submarine 7 ' effect where the 
that of * Volkswagen with driver slides forward, 
another badpe~to an upmarket Audi see this as an aiter- 
car challenging BMW. native to the controversial air- 

' This ’ remarkable reposit- bag. Alas, like some 
ioningsiarted in 1981 with the manufacturers offering the 
la,unch of the Quattro as a high airbag. Audi are not fitting 
speed, four-wheel drive car Procon-Ten as standard in 
aimed at enthusiastic, perfor- most of their markets indud- 
riuutce conscious drivers. It ing Britain, 
was followed a year later by You will have to pay around 
ihe-super slick Audi 100 which £400 to have it fitted, 
was voted “Car of the Year The 80 will make its UK 
1983". In rapid succession debut at next Month’s NEC 
followed Qua tiro's versions of Motor Show and go on sale 
the smaller 80 and 90 models, here towards the end of 
Now Audi is keeping up the November. It will be imported 
pressure with an all new with a choice of four engines, 
version of its smallest 1.6 and l.S carburettor, a 1.8 
model — the. 80 — which is fuel injected and 1.6 turbo 
not only a “ringer” in appear- diesel. The 1 1 2bhp 1 .8i engine 
ance for the award winning will be available in both front 
100 'but contains more new wheel and four wheel 



Audi 80: An exciting new safety device 


technology. configurations. 

Although • marginally Prices are expected to start 
shorter than its predecessor it at around £9.000 with the 
has more interior space, is most expensive Quattro ver- 
made entirely from rust-resist- sion topping £ 1 3.500. 
ing galvanized steel and is so On the road in Germany 
aerodynamic that it boasts a last week the new 80 displayed 
drag co-efficient of only 0.29. all the sure footed characteris- 
It also has a new lightweight tics of its predecessor and 
gearbox with the synchromesh thanks to new steering gcome- 
for all gears .housed in a try no longer has that slight 
separate compartment for indecision at very high auto- 
easy- maintenance. more cas- bahn speeds, 
tor effect on the steering to aid The Quattro version re- 
straight • line stability, bigger mains a machine to be treated 
•wheels permitting, the larger with care until you have 
disc brakes from the. 100 to be explored its incredible road 
used and a cable- less elec- holding. It rained throughout 
ironic speedometer. . . the two-day test period but the 

-But the most exciting break- Quattro hurtled through wet 
through is a new safety device shiny bends as if on rails, 
to • reduce the number of All three petrol engines were 
deaths and serious injuries in disappointing. Even the most 
head-on collisions. Its rather powerful is somewhat 
confusing name Procon-Ten. “gutless" at low revs and 
(Programmed Contraction surprisingly noisy. The noise 
Tension) belies its simplicity, is emphasized by vibrations 
Many casualties result from reaching the driver through 
contact between the driver the floor, pedals and' gear 
and the steering wheel. lever. 


On the autobahn, however, 
all versions thrive on high 
speed cruising. Judged on 
instrument readings only I 
was able to exceed all the 
claimed maxiraums from 
L06mph for the 1.6 to over 
I20mpb for the l.8i. 

Citroen’s 

surprise 

I am surprised that Citroen 
enthusiasts have not staged 
protest marches to the French 
Embassy about the terrible 
things that have been happen- 
ing to their favourite car. To 
my chagrin I only discovered 
the latest breach with tradition 
when the new BX 19 GTi 
performance version of the 
best-selling BX model arrived 
for testing last week. 

Gone are the beautiful, 
baffling binnacles framing the 
steering wheel and carrying all 
the minor controls and 
switchgear. In their place are 
conventional stalks which any 
fool can operate. 

For countless years Citroen 
has defended its unconven- 
tional binnacle approach as 
ergonomically superior to the 
rest. 

Bui it seems compressing so 


many functions into such 
small areas has actually lost 
sales. Sadly, the new layout 
will be seen by many as yet 
another blow at Citroen indiv- 
iduality. 

The new BX GTi fitted with 
the Peugeot group’s all alloy 
1.9 fuel injected engine repre- 
sents a considerable challenge 
to existing models in the 
medium performance car sec- 
tor. Its free revving flexibility, 
neutral handling, finger light 
five speed “box", magnificent 

Vita! statistics 

Modek Citroen BX GTI 
Price: £9,184 

Engine: 1905cc 4 cylinder alloy 
injected 

Perform a nce: 0-62mph 8.9 

seconds, max speed 123mph 
Official Consumption: Urban 
27.2mpg. 56mph 46.3mpg and 
75mph 34.4mpg. 

Length: 13.9 ft 
Insurance: Group 5. 


brakes and taut feeling during 
extreme cornering makes it a 
most rewarding car to drive. 

The 0-62mph time of 8.9 
seconds does not reveal the 
car’s biggest asset - the surg- 
ing power on lap between 40- 
70m ph for overtaking. It still 
returned a surprisingly frugal 
3 1 mpg during the test period. 


IN BRIEF 



Gcroen BX Gfi: A break with tradition 


• Subaru, the people who 
made four wheel drive cars 
available for everyday motor- 
ing, are extending their range 
downmarket with the little 
Justy. Smaller than a Ford 
Fiesta but still a genuine four 
seater, it is the first Subaru to 
mount its engine East- West* 
the first with a three cylinder 
engine (1 .2 litre) and the first 
Sahara hatchback with a 
choice of three or five doors. 

It offers a choice of two or 
four wheel drive at die touch 
of a button. It wfll be seen at 
the NEC Motor Show next 
month and should go on sale 
by Christinas at around 
£ 6 , 000 . 

• Dunlop is launching the 
first new. range of tyres for 


die family car since It was 
acquired by the Japanese 
Sumitomo group in July 
1984. TheSP6 is said to have 
30 per cent more water 
shedding grooves than the 
existing SP Elite range, a 
centre rib to improve steering 
response - and feel, higher 
cornering power and a qui- 
eter tread pattern. 

It is being produced 
simultaneously at Dunlop’s 
Bir mingham and Wash- 
ington, Tyne and Wear 
plants. The latter will supply 
the new Nissan factory 
nearby. It is being fitted to 1 
some Ford models and is 
approved by General Mo- 
tors, Volvo, VW and 
Peugeot. 



BREATH CHECK 


To rely on one’s own judgement is heading for trouble — 
and usually does! 

Our alcohol test computer is just right for pocket, glovebox 
or briefcase, and is: 

Precision made & developed by German doctors & 
technicians; and fully guaranteed for 6 months. 

Please send me a free fully illustrated leaflet with accuracy 
test results 


Post Code . 


UNIT 1, BLOCK l.,SOUTER HEAD. INDUSTRIAL 
CENTRE. SOUTER HEAD ROAD; ALIENS. ABERDEEN 
AB1 4LF TEL: (0224) 895793 TELEX: 73731 

EE 




SALES TO DATE: 450,000 UNITS 


A 


CITROEN CXS 


.1386 D tag CX DTR SAFARI Defivay miteaga only. Saw over 

£2,000 on new price £ 11,188 

1S8S B REG CX DTR SAFARI Silver £M35 

1383 A REG CX 24 H AUTO PALLAS Star £3345 

TEL: 0562 2202 

Abo special deals on new & nearly new ex's 


STANLEY- GOODWIN MOTORS LTD 


ESI CITROEN E 

COMPLETE BX 
RANGE IN 
STOCK 

«f JLCUM0LLY LTD 

118-124 D0NEGALL PASS 
BELFAST 

TEL (8232) 323441 



RENAULT 


The must competitive pnee 
m the UK For quotations 
and dehvery deals 
telephone: 

METROPOLIS 
01-876 2530 
MONDAY - SATURDAY 
9 - 6 pa. 


aiROfti 

Bow Road 
Wataringbury 
lUUjtaM 
Kant ME 18 SOD 

TEL: (0622) 812358 


Sf r y*. e*r..we- WM 

I,-, b- J*T. tm 

u-. J-jOB i bmb. 

- PORSCHE 944 TURBO, - 

•mw"-'.* Cj^C** * ftl 


TEL: (0703) 812005 


Oftv MUM CTE Id* rrn S 
speed manual cnUnir irtrt dll 
leil In «nul Him, sunroof 
a*.l htah an Mmo ssslem. 
IuHi indinliiinm ,ind vititrd. 
CO 400 TIH Ol oso 315« 
inrv/ui-i Ol 205 3500 idovi 


KUMfiil *A7«. 
in*Ur* 198ft- silsrt mrtdllK. 
31 OOO mile* Isnn smoker 
(tumor bill thH Cml MH 
C*s OOO iirw W Borrow 41 arm- 
« 500. Trt *ObMi TTOeOI 


85 C MERCEDES 190 E. 

7 : *t- ■„+.* O&w'l I »-*• Pn**- 

- rt« ■->-.. l-tv'-i, iv-v 3**-. •*» 
i?, ■.(-• »* bioo- * i* 

. ... M-d. is- H 

CNioa »* 


ROLLS ROYCE SHADOW Ii 

Ah <yi1 fuf C ’*-'' 

. '--V 'a* -..f CftSAfl nc- 

n-V*’ 

TEL: (0733) 77957 
(EVES/ WEEKENDS) 


IMS \nno Ul T LbUI' Lrdlhrr 

MPtxiW,-i s Mnru plus addi 

iH'iVfl i-sli.i* (.8.250 Trt 
- ,iM»i M oi Bdlh 

•eov^t MCII7U4 i|ub«n,-i 


RENAULT 2S CT\ 1085 Cim 
L.KO-H1 lulnnhllH . idoss Min 

i>i*l I .wllii/r.rsselle IS OOO 

miln t mh \m anl rondi 
mm. 17.360 til Ol 720 0614 


Roy R G. Toney Ltd 
Colne Garage. 
115 Butt Road, 
Colchester. 

Tefc (0206) 
574488/576803 






COLLIERS GARAGE 
(ISLINGTON) 

Sales - 01-354 2310 
Man Service Agents 
01-226 3437 
Parts - 01-226 1043 

133B UPPER STREET 
ISLINGTON, LONDON 




POLYGON 

GARAGE 

OH Tm Oapbun. SW4 

England's leading 
used Citroen 
specialist 

Sales & Service 

01-728 7207 



FOR MORE 
INFORMATION ON 
YOUR NEW 
CITROEN BX AND 
ALL THE CITROEN 


IlfQM E KOflNl 


3 orao 

For more information 
on you 1 new 
CfTROEN A BX 
Contact 

ten Street LM 
87-69 Bnym Sarins, 



VOLVO 360 GLS. 

1982 trvs low* mrteage mfon 
maintained vetneto. s a 
super buy n is m immacu- 
late condmen. and wim 
(list having 2 Owners is an 
evteunnt bargain, pad 
10 Mil 0rn» EI.9G0. 

Tel Mr Bias on 
01 358 3051 anytime 


ONLY BRAND NEW FORD 
GRANADA GHIA 2J EH 

•J « 4 i< dnwi to wey wJ 
vnqp [1,-237 0u price 11037 
SAVE E3JXH. 

Claries Xtag Motors LU. 
The Bro a dway Bedford. 
Tel 0234 58391. 
Ford Man Dealer 


F C BARKER 

MULSANNE 

-** ‘ '»*••• ■*< nm* omr 

-»-*■ -T *r rt-ii* Tyuc 

•- -ta mm 

280 TE ESTATE 

’■:* j ■* >■-* Lifr? 

•i.., . r~. Fjh t 

• S6.7ST 

TEL: 01-568 5875 
SOUTH CROYDON AREA 



I'lNA.Ihl'N:! 

(HBi l ± 1 wm 


Automnc utaon 1985 nany lac- 
torr WIBI RTK. 29 000 ntMS on,. 
teM M^ qr 15.T95. PX 

VAUXHALL CARLTON 
Dts« KXML 1386. 1 owns 
10000 'mis on, as rvm tnrcudv 

mi rugs, n mum. 
TEL: (0329) 833515 


RANGE ROVERS 

85 B Auto Vogue 
Derwent Blue. 

86 Vogue Auto EFI 
Cypress Green, 

38 usual extras 

Tel 0943 73283 
ALBERT FARNELL LTD 


new \«U" L-l-lr 7*0 CLX -97 
.|— w ■ ijvirt. in\il,H] Tel Cl 5RI 
HO.' Fn 


pcuccor w cn CflMwM 

** .ii iii klh k u,m 7 5X) 


VAUXHALL *4M FOR 5 L Cl* 
m’i .iiiuih inr, iitnun Dn tt S 
MOJO- 0*553 Sl~3 


TBOOR CAR 

S 

ESCORT XR3 1983 Red 
CotftwwV Surra# S Sod 

W.4S5 

SISWA 23 CHIA ESTATE 1983 
Auto. u?t 8a» Suwpd nr 
. .... MASS 

T«fc CA8VEY 
(0268) 680335 


For more Information 
on your new 
CITROEN 
Kevin Odium (Motor 
Vehicle Service 
Knutstord Road 
Rode Heath 
Stoke-OnTTrent 
Tefc (03363) 6226 


CALTERDON LTD 

3231 Cabriolet 

1984. NtMe ecu blue hand. ABS. 
iloys. sports seats, cemial toct- 

mg. fw tinted heated 

nvrers and door hick, mho/ 

cassette. 1 owner 

£12£50. 

TEL: (0463) 236566 


C4TSWOU) BMV» of CMlmlua 
fWier leea M tx55 f-M. maniMl. 
-Jl»n Pmim, jbnn 

MidhI, POA For Hus jivl 
nwni onvrs Irl <024?i 578&5B 


■saw ese, <ar. v r«j. n.wo 
nnk-.. smi Mum rendilnn. 
nidn\ rvlras Lralher vmts. ste- 
i». vmioof fir . Ef.S&O OX 
“SS JJ88 of 01488 5891 
3ltu Mar 8 5 'B> A dr. 19XUQ 
nn ten. vs/D^m mi nan 

smehinn m»-n. s/roo(. slrr-i. 
<•/-« "■* i/lnrk. RsH mitiMTU 
Jilt*-, re lOO Tel 0? 669221 
WWW 3191 BkKk Apr 85. 1 5.000 
nillns FSH C7 TOO OQOS 
77WH6 dfl a?l «97 Wl 

rtf-. 

7331 1981. 3 owner* weli 

mdinLMiK-fl. MDX rar. all elnr 
lr- mol/ia^ed C3.9SO cikj 
O f>2«0 01055 Ol 0978 16251 
COS C3t -\,rto Aiirhrjfne s»/R 
I /u VC TN\ Vk Herts c UKh 
inn 112 095 OI 707 1685 T 
S2SE 1980/ \ SbPOOniLs Sun 
i not. *lri in | mirier Iniimc 
F.7 99S frl iO09l,677237 
AlSl 4 dr 85 <B* Alpine- U mi«. i 
lOQOn mis 1 OM inf 18595 
t.-l OpO? 7892*1 T 
MM Mji 84>Ai while 06.090 
nii-.P-VS PmnrM fsH muiMr 
'",18. r.5*50 C7ol 72IB9 
HOW BMW5.- All I nodr Is to pr 
•h-r 525,'» "4H\ dell, Laiw 


*2a CS4A 03 , A, <Malr Crem. 
BL«rk LfsMher. Computer. ASS. 
Eirtini Riw» ksmnows & Mu 
rnrs. FSH 35.000 Mitrt t 
GniikTumOHiin SuperSCon- 
dilHm U I 500 Ol «34 2330. 
w/r Ol 7«i 9055 


m Cst ,\lpui«. I*-* paudv 
stripe* Vs ns) 39.000 miles 
(Sew IsCT Isrrs Power Leoth- 
rr Elerth* esenUimo MJIUe s. 
C/lerks 6E Oo\ Wim silver 
C4 ofiOcno 0705 684 096 


323f 14US -DM Blark*. aninra 
ill". Iio pad.. E/VV. ES«. LSD. 
pa*, sports Mispmsian. alloys, 
r *M remote alarm. Pioneer 
sirr-o. watTanlv 29.BOQ mb,. 
Trt 0614 549250 allrt 6pdt 


031 Airtn While CompM? ulUi 
M spun* park 1982. > reo 
56000 mk shihknm. IV runs 
, MKHIfoif 6 mo, lift* MOT «nd 
k>\ L-5 -Hi’O let -0295' S*0»7 
W/md *, 30855 w/dav 


X25L while. S doer ou».Cr»9- 
U 400 miles EJfUnr sun reol 5 
ss-iDdoivs. 41iovv -nradtamp 
M.islt/ vac. power steen, ip. 
sir, no rr. rmiial lorkioa 
CI4 500 Trt >04851 275*61 


BMW 5381 SC Mrl Blue esrt 
■ ono «-* MD .rar biauwmki. 
rtrrtnr real romp BMW lined 
an dam Spam. ,1 l| S ■ K*V 84 
H9000 Trt 07S66 3175 


3231 C XBRHXET Altov mperts. 
Sp-rrls svh*-rts. mrt iwwdt. 
Mark hised Maupunki. ramo 
p/stoerina. man extras SePJ 
04 1.11-000 OH* 07SS6 6173 


BMW 3231 I9H8. AB9 lux pork 
I *sH matin seal*. Blaupunl.t 
sieie,. 40.000 mm-, l tim er 
1.10J73 Trt 0276 29Jfrr 


BMW 3Z0. \ red Pntans siher 
27 CUM mile* sunfnor alkn 
wheel* tUOO 0220 200020 


944, Manual 1983 Btark. «/roof. 
elec winq mrrarv law pralile 
liras. 39.000 mis 7 owners 
L-srelJenl 'ondilian UwoupftOuL 
rW Cl 2 750 Tel. Mil bn 

Kes-nes 502181 / 316688 


928 6 Manual 1980 W rep 
45 000 miles sjIipi. full sper 
new ores, in very pood rendi- 
tion mrouahoui FSH CI7 250 
Trt >00031 oSb&di loflire 
iwibsi 


911 SC Toi*m 1979 Guard* 
rrr) H0 000 miles Here id lull 

seivier fateful Laos timer 5u 

P"tH «. 10.200 Tel 021 308 
4479 / 1120 


944 LUX Aulo I98s,ej Crv*LU 
■ .ul rrti ’ l SB POsi. rowSle 
twkKi 1 SjOOO miles. 06^00 

0296 74827IJ 


PORSCHE So D R«I 938 S 
-Ainu - op nine. Bur-tmte- 
while pipmq. Full spec LniM 
[37 995. Tel Ol 905 4448 


*20 Tt Csialr 80 <B> Over 
C0.ODO worm Of extras ABS 
5/R EJrt/Vv Rear child mi 
Spin rear, snot H/Umi/w 
Tow rmrh ••• 5 sn-rd man- 
ual 37.000 mm Santa* 
Union f.10950. r Med hone 
• 0235. 66730. • . 


■CRCCDCS 460 SLC 1974. E/S. 
[AW FiiH MOT. lurquone wim 
malrmtm uMmlsierv. noaoo 
mil**, o/w heels, immanuaie 
roiutHKin [4 aeo Tel oi am 
4.>57 i.-uisw eniiKHiei. 0860 
335702 uar phonei 


CAUFORNMK spnrifirMKm 380 
*4 19T7 rum loaded a/r 

iealhei. e/sunrart. cruise ton 
ii M Suprrh ihrauahmii Low 
niiksuir full wnire tnsioru 
cs^oo Trt Ol 584 7000. 


390 SL 1980 soil Ion lull see* ire 
mrtAn UWO mK esrrtlenl 
. rnmlfUan. mnalUc hatwn 
Lln-SOO Trt 0903 *M704 


3#B«« A list. Silver Dilip ESR 
HU strt-ro 55.000 miles 
[12.950 Evrs .09591 7™^ 


manual nos 
mile* VGC 
U2.000. Trt 089 285 2069 


280 SC. Ljdk blue 1964 ES» 

OOO nh ClS.bfiO Off MO 
4 7 72. to /end .StiSb^ 


h,1H ‘ mr1 JuK ‘ 
Pn-ker radio *03300 

srwws- ti3Mo ™ 


lnn , oi7 ,4 u Pnvaie'r'eqwra 
I ■■ W r y l Hard / sou IOC 

1H..C342J 82 QS 35 Am. time 























































































OX TCIMCCO A XTT\ CfXT A \trC 







*. t iv , ,v .; 


^BUYERS’ GUIDE 


frf l , rrr TT ’ p ri * V- CRiy rrwo cp j n<?<. - 


iiii^ * ii<lL<!) i XvjLiyrt I JLi' a A_iv.t *v»_*v ^.u i) 6 U 


; **, 


MERCEDES 

230 BE 
April 86 C 

Astral Siw WRh fay manor 
5 spent, day wheels. 1 owner 
(Hr 1JM miss 
As new £15395 

Ttfc M28 73S363 office 
SI2t 712833 Nfins 
GRAYSHOTT MOTOR CO 


5BD SEC 

Sttrer wth Drt Blue tala. Dean- 
ery iMage. fcffmfeM Defray. 

388 SL 1881 
Star. Blue Hath. Alloy wheels. 
Cnee, Star bhl emmere. fSH. 
46.000 Blit. E1&950. 

All DEALS! PACUmCS 

Tel: 8491 578407 
FUNJtY GORHAM LTD 


a*#*. B wg Cram Sunroof 
AulomsUr Tininl window^ 
««5 PMnr Ol 9 SO 41 !a 
see SL A rra. l Bwpfir. Mn 
Mur. -37 000 mi (rv FSH. r\. 
Ir-to. £ 30 . 750 . Ol 2*2 0012 T , 


•SSSF-S® 5 


ROLLS ROYCE & 
BENTLEY 


SHADOW I! 

fm regraarsd Oetsbai 70 . 
CarrtMn Mib iMBnou nm 


I W> 37.06B mwM Mw 

MHtCEDES WAWTEP~ ^.SfS’.KS."" 


LONDOU ROAD 
SARAGE 
(ROMFORD) LIB 

Mwagfey Ben oafo dwt 
«»■ Underwriter for late 

mallow «aMgeM*wdea. 

„ CONTACT 
MIKE dunford 
ON 0708 23511. 
AFTER 7PM 
0245442172 

^SJWR Cwt ran tr? w 


' ness Row* Agent. Utat 

beoneofnenfeot 
Shadows ol ns year 

£ 23 , 000 . Orta. 

Duhf033281Bm 

mmtsn£. 


MOTORS LEASING 


De Riche 
Contracts Ltd 

CONTRACT HIRE A VEHICLE LEASING 

NATIONAL CONTRACT HIRE- 

per month 


SPIRIT 

August 84 


JAGUAR £ DAIMLER 
AUTHORISED DEALERS 




ms. 





.body ui 

ary 1986 . net 

£21350 

^us»^s»erearBBWtaBc«eibBcfclNri&BodyUoreu 

T>wtxtsy i2(>brto iij^biBea'ieei D l ^ l oi a i^Tvw^h^ 

®SSS?™W3CBV12»tanue -PtorasitaQfardatolte 

MADOmCNOURNa*ui flliwnw uncmc 

• U»»«£*GejAOUi*S«^^ 



jaguar a daimler 


E TYPE JA6IIAB 

2 plus 2 F.HjC, 1967. 
white. block vnertar. He 
new, any inspection wel- 
comed. must se$, £1600 
or negotabia, 

Tel Aidv 0234 
57894 bevteea 
9am to 5pn. 


JAGUAR 
SOVEREIGN 
H.E. 5.3 AUTO 

C rag. (August '651. Cfltatt 
tta/d«slon. EwaHenj condfion. 
one dmer. Company Deader. FuB 
Seme* History. 24.500 infos. - 
£17.000. 

QmsNn Tat *565 51183 I 


DAIMLER SOVEREIGN 

.42 ' .. 

1984 Private registration 
3vafobto.Rmshedinprtmro» 
yellow. One of > thousand 
ever made. Btack \4nyi root. 
Factory Fitted sunroof. 

A> usual refinements. 
£13300 Bargain. 

Going abroad forces sale. 

Tel: 0202 760370 

jus « A mi. 63 Caban emc. 
Btark IrMher 1 owtwr rSH. 
CO SCO 0906820798 WoresT 


CAS Of THE YEAR 

Jaguar JUS tE 
Red. automatic. 1983. 
genuine 10300 miles, as 
new, showroom conation. 
£14450. 

Teleplwae 
8492 515 490 


LONDON JAGDAR 
CENTRE LTD 

Service & repairs to afl 
Jaguar & DaMers. 
Free collection & 
delivery London areas. 

01 316 7722 . 


90 VD 0 EKM U AMO reto 6 a. 
CurM/trtsruH hkto. director* 
car/Chauffeur rrwjnCMnrd. 
70000 •bee's, air conn- 
Uon- nnanilH*. £ 9 . 750 . 
Tfctahonr 0902 76 a 654 


XJXHK V no vi 2 .. tow. 26200 , 
warranty Mel Mnr/ tan. CM* 
rector* car. mccMnit. £ 11.960 
ouici. rale TH Ol 630 4426 

MMWRSMmWn 1986 C. Rho- 
dium 9 i\vr wan Marti Walter 
Axeragr renew Xi 7 600 or.o- 
Brandnck Trucks 021 644 
665 B outer hours. 
jACuaie/ P a n ML Wi . iws/bo- 
CnotrT or 4 S whoJr range. 
£O.S> 96 -C J 9JXO.EM. ] 9 jNn. 
PX. Trt or-asa 9855 Esse* m. 
xm HC eerci Blacte. irauwr mm. 
j owner 21 .000 mis. £ 17360 . 
TH. 0666 61293 T 



COLLECTORS CABS 

. fo CLASSIC fc SPORTS CARS 

We am foraUd no the A356 between Haafcma* and Mkflwrat 
WE CUWIHIRY OFFffl IWt tOUJWW WW Olffl 
SELECTION OF EXCSmONN. SPORTS 8 CtASSIC CARS 
mo ASTON MARTM VS SALOON IM Green «® Ifcgnoftz M •». 185 

T 967 imawTjims ^Vami'z door cm®«. 19^0 

wi & jnISu « T^H 3SnWRRTiS5ii«xTZi 

mUMTH TWTIU S TBS *1 SUpart) eondbon tram 6BJ» 

3501 & 2801 Tasnun, Jaguar E 
types. Aistin Healey A M 6 C Roadsters atways avaibble. 

Uestsm sre. Saonrey 
0428 93924 7 days 8 W—k 

THE eRAYSHOrT 
MOTOR CQttFAHY 
OFFER 

1982 X MORGAN + 8 Slhrer 
with Btack owner, ahov 
body. &2SS Fu» 

Seatsr. Signal Red with Btack 
mtenor.gSZSmUBS. 1^g| 

^TnunNWiiz ww» 
with Ntagnofis la ^ hef - *£ 
Auto with power stoert ng, air 


0428 7: 


1974 MOB tX T Chror te ymgw 
Anr (iwltpc 
E££ Mamlabwe 

mmi CI-SMwWflnWG iw 

InMltK ca .700 ov»o. Trtc- 

SS 2 r ' 0484 . 5 »J 44 ^k* 

ewn >02251 89179 * IhOWW* 
MIDI less An outtUnding 

rai in imtr'aruUiiP 
,prrxiou> 

7-jyacS i Hojtw) 

. ■ umE CanxcritM*" BoM 
U u .. ^-Tnrr tr DUill m- 
uunw Hen V\irT iriT 
a.te lull! imioriM l»»' k SS 

TLx and r.«unmiral O-Sw 3 
Trt 0? 42 SiteOTO 

AC 4 XS OC^VCBnBL£ Ihc UW 

i.imi n*"*' 4 nd 
OM -ine»» 

mcrcedc* • so a LJ2 u 2££‘ 

RHJW lidrrrrhyr * 


taotio rnaas. ua^eta wll> 
mwawglMarawler 1 Owner ftl 
new F6H. 


Tat #1 SIB 3301 
(eves A artefnodi) 


1960 
BENTLEY 
FLYING SPUR 

Reg* Bad. Superb ewdBoft. 
JS.000 spent ntaffyeff. 
main 

Tel 01-370 3152 


Bentley 8 

1885 a B entfav 8 Sakxm. 
Georgian sQver.Diack leather 
aSm. I aoK PuH service 
Unmy. 38 jOOO mites. 

£37^00. 
Contact B Mactrin 
Asfnnafl A mMnwi 
061 780 5141. . 


SILVER SWRIT 

Aag 81 

Cherished ta No. Honw 
Metalic MttMKmn Hide 1 
Ewflex. 30000 mfes udt 
FSH. Uagn & cent eompls 

■ C29JOS 

Itaed tadtai Ba 3 odrengm . 
Woodbndge of Bemp^mL . 

Tet 821 449 4227 


SHADOW I 1971 . UW Ma/- 
sHier grey 9QOOO mis. FbBy 
mm malted by Bolls special tel. 
Eareunti cwHUOan. £ 9 . 600 . 
Tel: nay < 0428761 679/217 eve 


ULVDI CLOUD L 1966 . Wlwe 
wnh «rey mienor. r 15.000 or 
would cxrhaape for . SUvrr 
Shadow Present owner tor 16 
years. T el ephon e: Worming 
( 0905 ) 603671 . 


19 MB. BENTLEY Turbo (Reg 
Marrtt. Royal Mire, magnolia 
IW. Mur podng. &080 mis. ! 
owner tmmanMe. £SUOO. 
■ Teh 0952 97397 


com a e W E PNC 7 i samtAaMv. 

41.000 nw»a only. Excelient 
cund C 17.9601 01-229 2116 

I 960 Moon. Shadow IL Honey 
w||h Tan Inferior piped in dart 
brawn also knee robe and dam. 

. Fun Robs Royte history. 

39.000 miles. £ 19 . 996 . Poesl- 
Me 2 year guaraMee. Please 
eootart Mr Enioa- Office hours , 
Ol -672 9865 or e\wi end week. I 
ends Ashford ( 0784 ) 246805 . 

StLvm SMUT 1986 Oarel. 
Mushroom uphotetrry. Bla ck 
ptpine 6 tappets. &ooo ndles. 
£ 06-500 Contact Dtek Tre» 
we. Oark e Brothers 
Peter b orough (OTSS 61481 
Weekends >06351 845463 . 

HVn 4 8 B UT 1985 May CMs- 
wokL. .Beige uphohisry. Dark 
Brown too roll 6 pmtng. sSjQoo ' 
miles. C 57 joa Coanrt Dkk 
Treasure. Oarke Brothers Pe> 
lernoromki (07351 61401 
Weekends I 0653 > 843465 . 

9 B.VP I I P HO T 1^4 sorer Chah 
ter. Black uptioMeey. 26.000 
miles. 081 - 500 . Contort Dick 
Treasure. Clarke Brothers Pe- 
terborough 10735 ) 61481 
Weekends > 0635 ) 843465 . 

BENTLEY MUU4 WE 1982 X 
rea. Cmswofcl B eige, vary naan - 
car FSH 46.000 mis. £ 29 . 960 . 
Tel: 0742 645616 <K> or 0909 
770861 < 0 ) - 

COMBIII 1974 . 50000 mis 
iron new Honey with Magno- 
lia hide mienor Guodym 6 
white watts. £ 16000 . Tel: OV 
351 6151 day Mr Woctey <TV 

tna Shadow, dam »* w 

rand, immar. aU moral. 474)00 
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CRICKET: BATSMEN HELP TO LIFT GLOOM OVER THE ENGLISH GAME 


Greenidge and Marshall lead 
the way for Hampshire 


By Marcus Wiliams 


Two outstanding West In- 
dians and adopted sons of 
Hampshire, Gordon Green- 
idge and Malcolm Marshall, 
head the respective batting 

and bowling lists in the BmI 
first-class, averages far the 
1986 season. 

They provide the first in- 
stance of players from the 
same county storing that hon- 
our srace Peter May and Tony 
Lock, of Surrey, in 1957 
daring their side's un- 
paralleled ran of seven 
successive Championships. 

From an English point of 
view the averages allow the 
now customary lament about 
die dominance of overseas 
players and particularly the 
dearth of home bowling talent. 
Of the top 10 in the batting, 
five are not . qualified for 
England; among the bowlers 
that figure is seven. 

Statistics, of course, are not 
everything, even in a game so 
involved with than as cricket, 
so that although four of the 
bowlers selected for this 
winter’s tour of Australia 
(Embnrey, Foster, DeFrehas 
and Small) are in the first 17, 
bowlers of such proven Test 
match ability as Edmonds and 
Botham are to be found In 56th 
and 102ml positions — and 
with only 63 wickets between 
them. 

. Amid the phalanx of West 
Indian and other overseas East 
bowlers stands ant, in third 
place, Childs, the rehabili- 
tated left-arm spinner whose 
89 wickets played a key part in 
I Essex’s championship suc- 
cess. His colleague, Foster, 
i passed 100 wickets for the 




y.'.' '?jP< 


/ y. : v 




Greenidge: Top of the batting list for the season. 


first time, a landmark readied 
also by Marshall and Walsh, 
of Gloucestershire, the 
season's leading wicket-taker 
with 118. 

Another young last bowler, 
Jarvis, aged 21, of Yorkshire, 
showed much promise, with 60 
wickets, in tenth place; im- 
mediately behind him was 


BickneU, of Surrey, aged only 
17 but judged an outstanding 
prospect 

There is less gloom on the 
batting front, with Whitaker, 
aged 24, in second place and 
BaDey, aged 22, in sixth place 
leading a group of emerging 
talents such as Fairbrother, 
aged 23, Morris, 22, Stewart, 


23, and Metcalfe, 22, all of 
whom are in -; prominent 
positions. . /■ 

■ Whitaker scored 1.526 runs, 
iododiog five ceaturks, de- 
spite suffering brokwrifones la 
• both hands in mid-seison and 
earned himself a ' trip to 
Australia. Hick, bora in- Zim- 
babwe and under present 
regulations not available for 
England far another seven 
years. Gushed third. 

At the tender age of 20 be 
became the youngest batsman 
ever to complete 2,000 runs in 
an English season, a figure 
matched this year only by 
Greenidge. 

The mature aad-outs^uading 

on-round talents -dT Hadlee 
brought him tenth pfofte fa the 
batting list (813 runs) Nad his 
second place in the- bowling 
(76 wickets) maintained a 
remarkable record which has 
seen him finish first on four 
occasions and second twice in 
the last seven seasons. 

Other all-rounders to fare 
well were Marks (1,057 runs 
and 59 wickets), Harper (933 
and 62), Capel (853 and 63), 
Onioog (744 and 64) and 
DeFreitas (645 and 94). ■ ' 

A final word on Geoffrey 
Boycott, who finished riiith in 
the hatting list witb'dn average 
of 52^1; Because -oT a -pro- 
longed absence through injury 
be finished whh 992 runs, 
(ailing to complete 1,000 for 
the first time since 1963. He 
stiU manhged, however, to 
finish 17 places ahead of the 
next highest Yorkshire bats- 
man, Metcalfe. 


1986 first class batting and bowling averages 


Batting 

QuaifficaKtt 8 tans, avge 10.00 


C 0 Greenidge 
J J Whiffllcsr - 

GAM* 

A J Lamb 
BMMcMfon 
R JBafley 
AIKslfeurran 
MWGanlng 
G Boycott 
R J Hades 
TSCirts 
C H Lloyd 
A R Border 
A J Motes 
NH Fairbrother 
Imran Khan 
CLSmrth 
R T Robinson 
IT Botham 
D N Patel 
PMRoetwcfe 
ACSPwott 
J E Moms 
A J Stewart 

AM Farrars 

AAklsteatfn . 
CEBRice 
PVWfcy 
PWGPartar 
VJ Marks * 
CW Scott 
R J Bartlett 
K M Curran 
BCRoh 
IVARUBBI fS 
D M Smtth 
J W Lloyds 
A H3I 
G Cook 
KS nxefcy 
RASnS 


I NO 

Runs 

HS 

Avge 

34 

4 

2035 

722 

67.83 

32 

9 

1526 

TOO* 

66.34 

37 

6 

2004 

W7- 

64.64 

77 

4 

1359 

160* 

59.08 

21 

4 

999 

136 

5B.76 

43 

9 

1915 

224* 

5632 

23 

5 

1005 

183* 

5533 

23 

3 

1091 

183* 

54.55 

70 

1 

992 

135* 

5221 

21 

5 

813 

129* 

5031 

40 

10 

1498 

1.S3 

4933 

8 

1 

347 

12B 

4937 

32 

4 

1385 

150 

49.46 

18 

3 

738 

m 

4920 

33 

8 

1217 

131 

4838 

18 

3 

730 

135* 

4836 

30 

8 

1061 

1T4* 

4822 

34 

5 

1398 

159* 

4820 

20 

2 

863 

139 

4734 

30 

9 

1005 

132* 

4735 

35 

8 

1288 

721* 

47.70 

18 

6 

572- 

104* 

47.66 

40 

3 

1739 

191 

47.00 


39 3 1665 
15 t <13 
41 1 1903 

31 6 1118 
30 5 1117 
43 7 1595 

38 12 1057 

8 3 220 

9 2 307 

39 8 1353 

23 5 784 

28 1 1174 

28 4 10*1 

39 9 1235 

40 6 1438 
30 4 1084 

8 5 124 

38 8 1237 

fTtti 


168 46-25 
’ 68* 4538 
151 45.07 
158* 44.72 
172* 44.68 
12S 4430 

110 44.04 
89* 44.00 

117* 43.85 
lir 43.64 
129 4355 
138 48.48 
1B5* 4357 

111 43.18 

172* 4239 
183 41.69 

34 4133 
128* 4133 


| i'V: >’■ v. 






Five centuries despite 
hand fractures. 

31 1 1233 171* 41.10 

30 9 862 112* 41.04 

20 10 404 95* 40.40 

38 7 1251 IBS" 4035 

34 8 1006 115 4024 

23 2 845 105* 4023 

37 3 .1383 108 4028 

40 2 1583 122 3982 

24 5 752 125 3987 

23 2 830 131 3982 

39 2 1461 128 39.48 

37 5 12S0 128 3806 

32 2 1183 1B0 38.76 

36 10 1003 117 3057 

42 4 1462 130 3847 

31 6 953 181 3032 

35 3 1224 106 3825 

32 0 1221 1B3 38.15 

38 9 1098 105 3726 

29 5 905 126- 37.70 

44 4 1508 119 37.70. 

45 6 1450 110 37.17 

45 3 1544 148 

34 7 987 118* aouw 

14 1 472 96 3630 

44 2 1522 128- 3023 

933 234 35.88 

13 2 392 104* 36.63 

24 8 569 78- 35^6 

18 2 567 102 35.43 

28 4 843 72 35.12 

29 5 831 109 3482 

30 1 998 221 34.41 

39 3 1234 152 3AZ7 

28 7 718 79- 34.19 

8 0 273 113 34.12 

26 3 782 84* 34.00 

17 4 441 87- 3352 

10 2 271 83 33.37 

33 4 982 147 33.96 

21 3 808 101 33.77 

28 6 736 91 33.45 

34 4 1002 148 33.40 

42 4 1267 T£3 3384 

35 4. 1027 117 33-12 

38 3 1093 106 33.12 

34 7 891 150- 3380 

35 14 768 59* 3283 

44 3 1342 U7* 32.73 

21 4 554 67* 3258 

24 6 586 78* 3255 

22 1 582 179 3247 

26 5 682 132* 31.52 

46 3 1343 179 3123 

42 5 1151 106 31.10 

35 4 963 111’ 31.06 

37 4 1016 171 30.76 

36 8 857 70 30-90 

42 3 1192 155 30-58 

16 5 336 116* 3054 

37 3 1030 156- 3029 

15 5 301 134- 30.10 

27 10 509 77* 2934 

16 6 298 72* 29.80 

29 0 883 79 29.75 

35 5 883 113* 29.43 

36 7 853 111 29.41 

33 5 792 113* 29J3 

23 12 322 59* 29.27 

17 6 321 71 29.18 

33 3 873 100 29.10 

10 5 118 23 29J»' 

29 5 896 75 29.00 

21 4 *90 KM*, saaa 

43 . 4 1123 118 28.79 

■41 3 1094 J46* 23.78 

41 3 1092 91 28.73 


Whitaker 
his 

CWJAthay 
MN8WBI 
W K R Benjamin 
J Abrahams 

CJ Richards 
Youms Ahmad 
QDMandta 
BC Broad 
B J M Maher 
D I Gower 
MR Benson 
P Johnson 
Q Fowler 

TJ Boon 

G WHumoage 
KShvp 
W N Stack 
G A Gooch 
CM Weis 
PRDownton 
PASmtth 
OL Aims# 
KjBamed 
P a Neale 
DR Turner 
N Moms 
R A Harper 
PERcbnson 
JDemck 
N J FaJkner 
RJABchan 
J D Lova 
TEJeety 
M A Lynch 
J D Birch 

EAEBaptfcta 

J D Carr 
PJ Hartley 
DWVerey 
MDMaxon 
OJWM 
KWRRWetw 
M P Maynard 
C JTsvaro 
GSCinton 
fl J Harder 
A P Walls 
AsifCn 
p JPrichard 
pwtnocase 

l JGouW 
jGWrigW 
CMsynerd 
AMGreen 
NR Taylor 
A JTMAer 
RO Butcher 
S A Marsh 
RJBoyd-Moffi 
MWAfoyrw 
N AFetton 
DROtey 
S J Rhodes 
G S (e Roux 
J J E Hardy 
BRHardie 
DJ Capet 
CTRafltey 
T M Trerrwnt 
RSharma 
CSCoowfeey 
R j Maru 
KPTofrtriB ' 

D A Thome 
A WStOvofd 
DBO'Otawm 
RACotti 


TC MhMeton 
J A HopkirtS 
GCHofanes 
T A Lloyd 
.' SN Hartley . 

VP Terry 
DJ Thomas 
DJFe» 
DLBarstcw 
PBainbhdge 
PJWAfol 
JP Stephenson 
AEWBmer 
RCRusseH 
WLarkms 
P ACBafl 
SJO'ShBughnessy 
MAFetthsm 
KR Brown 
SGHInks 
N G Cowley 
D A Reeve _ 

A R Butcher 
DW Browne 
IGSweliow 
A L Jones - 
AWUtey 
KO James 
J S immons 
P D Bowler 
J G Thomas 
: M'ARosederry 
PBCM1 
C D M Today 
PCariKk 
D A Kagan 
S N V Watarton 
RMBhson 
M R Chadwick 
AKGottng 
J F StBeie 
DWRandai 
R J Partis 
AJ Wright 
MJavHtacques 

fl JFnnsy 

P A j Denotes 
fl JDoinhty 
□ B Pauune 
BRobens 
RCOntong ■* 
DGAsieo 
C Marpfos 
PJ Newport 
* O R Pnngto 
N J LerYwm 
T Davies 
PW Romanes 
GMBer 
IS Anderson 
DEEast 
G Monkhouse 
L Potter 
BN French 
N A Foster 
MJKJbom 
MWattunson 
MCJWcholas 
J C Balcteretono 
jEEmbwey 
PW Jarvis 
MSAMuwsta 
OK Standing 
A Walker 

KJKwr 
A Needham 
GR Cowdrey 
G.J Ramons 
MJ Weston 
J Gamer 
MAHottng 
G C Small 
N G Cowans 
M R Davis 
AC Stone 
JEDswdson 
i P Butcher 
DG Price 
NGBCoefc 
P H EOnorva, 
KTMecffycott 
AAG Mae 
WWOanlel 
NVRadtord 
JHChUds 
1R Payne 

HE Cooper . . 

CGtadwtn 
jPAanew 
R A Pick 
S R Gorman 
-C H Dredge 
TOTopisy 
- M D Marshall 
SP Hughes 
CAWuh 
G R DHtoy 
TGard 
O J MaMnson 
NAMauenaer 
K R Pont 

OLUntenwod 
R I H B Dyer 
AN Kayhurst 
DA Grave ney 
S J Denras 

•denotes not out 


Bowling 

Orailflcatnn: 10 wkts In 10 tons 

0 M 


68* 28.72 
142 2&38 
107 2835 

100 2832 

37 .28.03 

80 28 DO 
4 r 27.75 

114 27.71 
88 . 27.44 

105 2730 

65 2738 

85 2635 

91 26.95 
71 2659 

86 2656 
174 2850 

74 26A5 
78 2633 

66 2631 

131 26.00 

78* 25J1 
51 2558 

157 2536 

81* 2533 
43* 2533. 

50 2533 

87 25.16 
82 25.00 
01 -2&00 

100* 2450 
70 2450 
70- 24.85 
49 24.66 
60 2455 

51 2450 

88 3436 
58 * 24.15 
62* 24.00 

81 2350 

47 2350 
41* 2350 

101* 23.47 
80 2333 
87 23.19 
73 23.11 
54 2356 

106 2333 

48 22.75 

97 2275 

124- 2270 
.-80* 2254 
63 2247 

57 . 22.19 . 

58 21.92 

97 2132 

77 21.76 
41 21.06 
-67* 2069 

65 20.48 
93 20.40 

100- 2037 

51 2035 
81* 20.18 

58 20.05 
53* 1931 

59 1950 
58* 19-45 
56 1830 

T15 T8.6S 

75 18.63 
47 1830 

38 18-DO 
85 1731 
40* 17.40 
54* 1735 

.39 1736 
32* 1733 
45' 17.14 

52 17.06 

75 17.00 

58* 1634 

30 16.70 
47 1654 
36- 1638 
45* iaoo 

44* 15.se 
21* 15.75 
38 1554 
41' 16A2 
58 15.16 

60 14.78 
45 14.62 

31 14-42 

81 14.07 

51 14.07 

33 1450 

30 1339 

34 1337 

30* 1325 
19 1312 
73 1330 
35* 1232 
55 1237 

37 1256 

40 12.61 

45 1255 
51* 1252 
47 12.33 

52 1227 
30. 1311 

38 1250 

43 12.00 

37 1130 
36 1133 
29 1157 
28 1157 

31 11.14 
30* 10.44 
18* 1025 


OL Underwood 
NGCcwtay 

N V Radford 
PJ Harney 
AStoebottom 
DA Reeve . 

M JeeivJacquss 
BP Paterson . 
DEMaJoolm 
C Shaw . 

R A Harper 
P Batobridge 
DLAdiekl 
RCOntong 
jPAgnew 
ACSPigaet 
RJMaru 
TAMuntm 
JK Lever 
D J WSd 
KTMedtycett 
PH Edmonds 
EEHanuntoos . 
TMTrertBtr 
A N.Jopes 
N G BCoofc • 

S J W Andrew 
L 8 Taylor 
M KFathariT ' 
SJ Demis 
- RAPtak 
L Potter 

JAAffid • - 
DJ Capel 
CH Dredge 
K D Janes 
C A Connor 
JW Lloyds 
JEDawteon 
OAOtemm 
WK R Benjamin 
CSCowdrey 

KSaxeby 
R J Doughty 
D J Maianson 
B J Griffiths 
GS to Roux ' 

N A.MailendBr 
I Fofley 
□ V Lawrence 
PJRocodt 
SJB^e- ■= .. 
R Stoma . . 

S B Berwick - 
CM Wats 
RSRutnagur 
R J Finney 
GJ Parsons 
I R Payne 
J G Thomas 
K J Kwr 
A Walker 
SMMcEwan 
KBS Jarvis 
JDemck 
SDRetcher 
I T Botham 
ON Patel 
G Monkhouse 

NSftyw 

Gutter 

A E Warner 

ANHaylwst 

PCamck 

JDlnchmore 

AUQSOOtt 

GCHoknes 

DJ Hickey 

BMMcMOan 

RMBQson 

RKUtogworth 

DJ Thomas 

T AJOawson 


1 259 1371 .52 2638 

t J32“. 2164^^ -26.71 

t -* . ■ 

5 127 .tjWli:-Hfc.27.13 
9 16 -.SB»r ■&. -?722 

t 70 . T309','..-; 40- 2727 

2 - 39 • 28-2732 

1 64 . 848 31 2745 

2 275 1700 82 -27.41 

1 89 1185 43 2755 

3 107 912 33 27.63 

4 153 1774 64 27.71 

5 118 1528 55 27.78 

0 48 1383 49 27.81 

5 146 1336 48 2733 

4 88 905 32 26.28 

1 154 1990 70 28.42 

3 17 429 15 28.60 

2 86 1166 40 29.15 

8 161, . 1111 .38 _!2933 

3 258 213* ; 73. 2933 

4 110 1263 43 2947 

1 26 .620 21 2952 

2- 289 ~ -4890 84 29.53 

2 30 419 14 2932 

3 66 80S 27 2938 

4' i -H8^-"78V 26 3033 

3 81 1318 43 30.6S 

1 88 1570 50 31.40 

1 1ST- 2044 ' 88 32.44 

8 83. 1151 - 35-? 3258 

4 55 692 Sf. 3235 

4 123 1616 49 - 3237 

2 71 1221 37 33.00 

5 54 998 30 3338 

5 137 999 30 33 30 

1 89 1541 -46 3350 

2 45 905 27 3351 

( 54 905 27 3351 

3 50 1104 32 3450 

I 65 1044 30 3450 

1 54 741 21 3558 

2 - 66 - 928 26 3S.69 

* 138. 2721 59 S554 

I 137' 1693 47 36 02 

) 98 .>1046 29 86.06 

I 85. 13299 83 3649 

5 MOT. 30 0650 

I ■* •'ner 21 *85 

»: ..33-:.'— *07 - 11 37.00 

l- .61 «4'-. '28 37.07 

i 103 v 1373 ■ 37 37.10 

I 34 -528 14 37.71 

l 62 1057 - 28 W.75 

I 72 1179 31 38.03 

SB 576 15 38.40 

i 77 1746 45 3850 

1 52 955 24 39.79 

! 76 1314 33 39.81 

31 638 16 3957 

! 42 487 12 4058 

! 47 897 22 40.77 

>82 1273 31 41.06 

SS 1043 2S 41.72 

1 115 1254 30 41.80 

69 589 14 42.07 

! 62 1222 29 42.13 

! 168 1408 33 42.60 

87 ' 1200 ‘ 28 4285 

13 429 10 4290 

I 186 1550 . 36 4205 

48 .562 . 13 *323 

I 71 814 18 *5 32 

21 499 11 45.36 

i 39 > T1102 24 4551 

I 34 BOS 17 *752 

90 1103 23 4735 

! 189 1361 28 48. GO 

i 29 588 12 49.00 

39 649 13 4952 



M D Marshall 
B j Hadlee 
J H Chrids 
STOvtca 
CAWfateh 
AH Gray 
TM AJdemun 
M A Holding 
JStovnons 
PW Jarvis 
MPBidcnes 
PBCJA 
JEEmbirrey 
N A Foster 
WW Darnel 
P A J DeFreitas 
GC Small 

ANBahtogwi 
J Gamer 
T D Ttspiey 
taranKhari 
A R Butcher 
OH Mommsen 
APPrldgeon 
NGCcwans 
KE Cooper 
N&Hora 
D fl Prngto 

PJWAfoR 

P J Newport 
CEB flee 
P W Such 
GRDBey 
S P Hughes 


556-3 171 
5473 160 

640.1 212 

3413 95 

7885 193 
3423 69- 

610 IM 

388.1 110 

2305 52 

428.4 82 
196 43 

4133 120 
4733 170 
8062 177 
402-1 62 

7433 133 
8363 158 
1175 16 

419 95 

249.4 55 

3132 72 

111 28 
4162 111 
538 134 
4362 9< 

4105 106 
5643 158 
5063 128 

405.1 ..IQfi 

632.3 90 

4132 115 
2313 68 

505.2 88 

530.4 123 


Runs W. 

1906 100 
1215 76 
1448. 89 
606 48 

2145 113 
966 51 - 
1882 98 
1045 52 
762 SB 
1332 60 
600 27 

1002 45 
872 36 
2349 105 
1387 62 
2171 94 
1781 77 
348 15 
1091 47 
744 32 
866 37 
305 13 
1082 48 
1396 59 
1380 SB- 
1026 43 
1409 59 
1348 56 
1053 43. 

2146 85 
1111 44 

566 22. 
1634 63 
1852 63 


Foster: 100 wickets passed and 

Australia bound. 

MWMktoson 5044 67 1753 36 3008 
R VJ Coombs 2563 =58 . -844 16 S2.75 


A M Ferreira T7B -47.: ,532 10 .6320 

DATbomn 2392 W- . SBT . ’If— 53L72 
CSMsys 2125 45, .706 :-13 S4.30 

PASmW) 159 18- --743 -43 57,16 

M R Dans 1672 2f 63f ,- 11 . SWS 

AKGoldlng 252 51 885 . JO, $850 

The following bowtad infawerthan 10 
CCSfison'. 127 .41 32 

N F Wiliams • - 79-3 1 fl 2fl 
E A E Baptiste 146 - 40 35 

‘G J F Ferns 104 20 35 

AJMurpny Si IS -28 

CPcnn 1172 24 40 

APtadesden .125 25. 37 

ARCTrSer 1S6 40 37 

C Frsser-Darfaig 120 16 48 

EAIfo3tiay 1242 14 44 

GESarastwry 169.1 46 48 


_ I mktoK . . 

127 . 41 .325 ii - 2%21 
793 1 fl 264'-10 2&40 
146 40 351. 13 27A0 


104 

a 

356. 

13 2738 

91 

•16 

288 

10 .-2830 

1173 

34 

407 

14- 29-07 

125 

25 

372 

13 . 3321 

1S6 

40 

370 

10 3720 

120 

16 

481 

12 3841 

1243 

14 

447 

11 4023 

169.1 

46 

498 

12 4120 

D E East 83 
das 66 (58, 61 

KMct. IBsO: R J Panes 
H C Rusaet S3 (56. 3t 


Dowmen 48 143, 5); B N French 48 (44.4); D L Bteratsw 
44t4i.3LCJRlchanJs44p9.5fcTDBvies40J32.Bt1J 
Gould 37 06. Ifc S N V Waterton 37 P2. 5fc TSrd 38 
pO. 6fc C Sforotas 35 PI. 4); C Msynard KQ9. 3fc P J 


(30. 6fc C lifarplas 35 01 . 4fc C Maynard 32 £9. 3fc p J 
Whmicaae 24 (23, 1). 

-FIELDERS: U A Lynch 38ct R-A Harper 32: C S 
Cowley 31 : K M Curran 29: G A Hick. CEB Rico 23. K 
WR Retcher 25. 

"FASTEST HUNDRED: I VA Rfehands 702 off .48 tails. 
SomsrseiyQi8mgFBsn.T»Jn»n.-May 9.. ■; *■7.^'- 
HlGHETTaWRE K R Ruherfwd 317. NoW Zeatend- 
ersv DB doses XL Scarborough, Soptemnef V- 









THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


RACING 


Basically Better to take 
full advantage of 
lenient handicap mark 


By Mandarin 


Basically Better, who has 
; improved out of all recog- 
nition since being fined with a 
visor, has an outstanding 
chance at the weights, in the 
£15,000 Taylor Woodrow 
Construction Golden Jubilee 
Charity Handicap at Ascot 
today. 

When a filly strikes form at 
this stage of the season, there 

. is no knowing how far she will 

progress and the form book 
suggests that Basically Better 
has improved in the region of 
201b since the weights for 
today's race were published. 

Peter Walwyn’s filly looked 
a useful performer in the 
making when second to Sue 
; Grundy on her debut at 
Salisbury a year ago and the 
Lambourn trainer held her in 
.sufficiently high regard to run 
her next in the Rockfd Stakes 
where she finished a respect- 
able seventh to Trafthee. 

After failing to show her 
true ability on her first four 
runs - this season. Basically 
Better was fined with a visor 
for the first time at Warwick 
on August Bank Holiday 
Monday and opened her ac- 
count with a five-length vic- 
tory in a field of 23 maidens. 


lion is set to receive I9lb from 
John Dunlop's filly this- after- 
noon. she has an undeniable 
chance.' 

So, with the Walwyn stable 
in form, Carlisle again in the 
saddle and the visor to be 
fitted once more, Basically 
Better looks a worthy nap to 
land this valuable handicap. 

Restore, also a winner at 
Ayr's Western meeting last 
week, is fancied to defy his 
penalty in the William Hill 
Handicap. 

Geoff Lewis’s lightly-raced- 
Habitat colt was gaining his 
first success at the Scottish 
track but had previously ran 


Today’s course 
specialists 


The Denylin fifty was again 
visored and again partnered 
.by .Nick Carlisle when beating 
Flutlery in a minor conditions 
race at Ayra week ago and it is 
that victory which pinpoints 
her chance today. 

On her previous ran, Flut- 
lery had finished a close third 
10 Entrancing in the Strensall 
Slakes at York and a line 
through that filly makes Ba- 
sically Better a marginally 
better horse than Entrancing 
at level weights. As my selec- 


ASCOT 

TTUUNBB: H Ocfl 33 winners from 124 
nmers, 26.6%; G Harwood 39 from 101. 
24.2%; M Stouts 34 from 175. 19.4% 
JOCKEYS W Carson 44 winners from 260 
rides. IB. 9% PM Eddery 42 from 258, 
165% G Staley 33 from 213. 155% 
REDCAR 
TRAINERS: G Harwood 12 wmrare from 
38 nmnen. 3aa% H Thomson Janes 21 
from 88. 234% U Prescott T5 from 72. 
20.8V 

JOCKEYS R Guest 11 winners from 40 
rides. 274% R His 13 from 73. 174% R 
PSEca 12 from 72. Ifi.7% 

WORCESTER 

TRADERS; J Jenkins 28.wk»ers from 
124 runners. 2L6% Mrs MfRfcneUlftroin 
lit. S£% (Only two quarters). 
JOCKEYS: P Scudamore 35 front 206. 
17-0% H Davies 28.from 181, 155% 


well in several competitive 
handicaps and was certainly 
not winning out of turn. 

That Ayr race was over six 
furlongs but Restore was clear 
at the furlong marker in that 
contest and will certainly not' 
be inconvenienced by today’s 
return to the minimum trip. 

Ajdal lived up to all 
expectations when making a 


winning debut at Doncaster 
earlier this month and can 
underline his classic potential 
by beating Sharp Victor and 
Arrasas in the EBF 
Moraington Stakes. 

So impressive was Michael 
Sioute’s Northern Dancer colt 
that day, that he created more 
of a stir in the ante-post 
market for the 2,000 Guineas 
than Don’t Forget Me. the 
winner of die Laurent Perrier 
Champagne Stakes, on the 
same card. 

Stoute saddles two well- 
bred newcomers, Miss Storm 
Bird and Shanama, in the EBF 
Kensington Palace Stakes bat 
1 prefer to rely on the twice- 
raced Chaodemmy, who had 
four previous winners behind 
her when a close fifth to 
Lalucbe in the group three 
May Hill Stakes at Doncaster. 

Hack Sophie regained the 
winning thread when tried 
over 10 furlongs for the first 
time at Newbury a week ago 
and can follow up in the Terry 
Ramsden Handicap 

Durham Place can gain his 
first victory for 28 months in 
the Parson and Crosland 
Stakes at Redcar. Kim 
. Brassey's . four-year-old has 
been given little respite by the 
handicapper since finishing 
second at Royal Ascot as a. 
juvenile but he has ■ been 
running quite well under 
- crushing weights * for the last ' 
two seasons 

Tom Jones, who has a good 
record at the Yorkshire track, 
can land a two-year-old dou- 
ble with Insturah in the 
Newby Nursery Handicap and 
Yaheeb, an unraced Alleged 
coll, in the EBF Carlton 
Maiden Stakes. 



Li’s target 
of six gold 
medals foiled 

ftSm aacetn a dramatic ending 

SS&kssbs 

of his five events by 
Yung Yneshan. a compatriot, 
by the South Korean, 
r tCweon Soon Seoog. 

Yang beat L» mto ^ec ond 
the horizontal taw and 
Eommel-horee : white in the par- 
bare Li finished a itomt 
Sth as Kweon and a South 
Korean team colleague. Park 
Jong Hoon, won the .togf 
niaoiKs. The sixth mens n& 
gSd event - thevault- was 
won by another Chinese, lau 

YU £a the pcriectly-propor- 
tinned Li made no mistake in 

U* floor 


me iigoi - — . _ 

where he is die RQ^b. 

and world champion^ 
fought his collection of gold 

medals here to four. w _ 

In swimming. China finally 
cracked Jain's <to****fr 
capturing four more jpM* 
including the 4 x 100 metres 
freestyle relay in whichthe top 
Japanese, Ratsuaon Fujw ra- 
the fust athlete to moftne 
golds at the games — oufed to 
Sate op the two-second 
needed for victory in the raff) 


‘f&m 


K .V55T-'- M 


JKS& X: — 

Invited Guest (rights masters Mountain Memory in tike Hoover Mile at Ascot yesterday (Photograph: Hngh JRoHtledgeJ 


Invited Guest shows perfect timing 


needed for victory in the 

^^Thirty miles away on the edge 
of the sprawling South Korean 
capital, a 16-year-oM Rhptno^ 
Ramo n Barino. won d» golf 
championship after a sudden- 
death playoff with the 46-yeap- 
otd Kim Ki Bub . of South 
Korea. 


Invited Guest is the new 8-1 
favourite for the 1,000 Guineas 
with Ladbrokes alter extending 
her unbeaten run to four in the 
Hoover Fillies’ Mile at Ascot 
yesterday. Corals mate the Rob- 
ert Armstrong-trained filly 14-1 
for both 1 987 fillies’ classics. 

An impressive winner when 


partnered by Steve Cauthen at 
Goodwood last time out. 


Goodwood last time out. 
Invited Guest again came with a 
well-timed run yesterday, get- 
ting up inside the final furlong to 
beat Mountain Memory - by 
three-quarters' of a length with ' 
Shining Water third! Mountain 
Memory bad taken the lead, at 
the furlong marker after Shining 
Water had tried to make all the 
running. 

Armstrong said: “I certainly 
see her as a classic filly. I asked 
Cauthen to give her as easy a 
ride as possible today and, 
although he rather overdid it, I 
was never worried from a 
furlong and a half out. 

“Depending on the ground in . 


France; she may have a final run 
in the Prix Marcel Boussac on 
Arc day or wait for the Grand 
Criterium at Longcfaamp the 
following weekend. However, if 
it's very soft in France I won’t 
run her again this season.” 

The day’s other group prize, 
the Cumberland Lodge Stakes, 
was won, almost inevitably, by 
Michael Stoute, who sent out 
Kazaroun to beat Highland 
Chieftain and BakharofE 

Kazaroun was a most impres- 
sive winner. Having only, his . 
second race of the season, -the 
Aga KJban's colt quidtened dear.' 
entering the straight - and 
Bakharoff was never able to 
mount a challenge. Close home 
the disappointing odds-on 
favourite forfeited second place 
to Highland Chieftain. 

Stoute had earlier imriaw-ri a 
double when he introduced the 
$2.6 million colt, ZajaL to make 
an impressive winning debut in 
the Clarence House Maiden 
Slakes. 


ZqjaJ led Vk furlongs from 
home and went on to beat Rose 
Reef by two lengths, earning a 
20-1 quote for the 2,000 Guin- 
eas and a 25-1 offer for the 
Derby. 

Immediate plans for the Se- 
attle Slew colt are not dear but 
Pat Stoute. the trainer’s wife, 
said: “Zajal did everything he 
should lave done today and 
always has done at home; too.” 

' Rose Reef, also making his 
debut and also beautifully bred, - 
: delighted bis trainer, Ian Bald- 
ing, who said: “He’s got speed 
' and will probably nuiatlbe-next 
meeting here Tn the Hyperion 
Stakes when his owner-breeder, 
Paul Mellon, will be over to see 
him ran.” 

Fair Country, beaten in a 
novice hurdle at Plumpton al- 
most exactly a year ago, is 16-1 
for the Cambridgeshire after 
winning the Swinley Forest 
Handicap for David Bsworth. 

Carrying a 7Tb penalty for 
winning at Doncaster on St 


Leger Hay, Fair Country was 
produced.by Gary Carter made 
foe final furlong and led 50 
yards out to beat Ready Wit and 


Come On The Blues by a length 
and a brad. 

Steve Cauthen tried to mate 
all the running on the 1985 
Royal Hunt Cup winner. Come 
On The Blues, but they were 
passed a furlong out by Ready 
Wit. However. Carter immedi- 


ately challenged on the outride 
with David Hsworth’s fffly and 
they’ forged dear. ■ 

■ Fair Country, having already 
picked op a penalty for the 
Cambridgeshire by winning at 
Doncaster, does not incur any 
more weight for this victory and 
remains on 8st 21b for the 
Newmarket race 
Oswonh said: “1 can't be sure 
we will get in the Cambridge- 
shire so that is why we- went for 
this race in the meantime. If we 
do run at Newmarket, I've 
booked Gary Carter to ride 
again.” 


Trainer moves on 

Cologne. (Reuter) - Jbe 
struggling West German first 
division dub, Cologne, have 
parted company with mar 
trainer, Georg Kessler, after 
only seven months. The ciub, 
16th in the iS-ieam league with • 
just three points from _sctetUP_- 
games, said after a crisis meeting - 
earlier this week that the de- 
cision had been taken “by 
mutual agreement,” tesfer, 
aged S3, a former trainer of the 
Dutch national side and of top 
Belgian dubs. Anderfedit and 
Bruges, joined Cologne in Feb- 


ruary and helped them avoid 
relegation while reaching the 
final of the UEFA Clip. 


ASCOT 


X BBC 2 


Televised: 2^0,35, 140, 4.15 
Going: good to firm 
Draw: no significant advantage 

&30 TERRY RAMSOEN HANDICAP STAKES (S-Y-O: £8,012: 1m 2 ft 
(10 runners) 

101 140133 MGOTOOTPHMAra(EMcimGWlngg — PdEjMwyl 

"u 222132 GEORpe^ DELIGHT (D) {Sheitti Mohauirwfl L Ptaoft 9-1 WRSwifaen 3 
id RotoeTwfcfcl W Ham 8-Tu — . WCvsooS 

)6KbM BTbowou 4 

8-7 (5*d 



aster (71. 
% and 2 


Ayr (71. £33 
Yack MM 


B. 12 ran). ‘ 
t-6)1»l-at 
onn other 


Raymond to 
return after 


REDCAR 


1 106 220010 SATISFACTION R>0)j 

107 300143 FESTIVAL CITY (USA) 

108 001001 BLACK SOPHEWMI 


109 202004 GORGEOUS 

110 031340 LANDSKKB 

111 OOMIO GERAGHIYAGAOI 

113 3-02021 NAJOTYAl 

114 112212 HARO AS I 
7-2 Hard As iron. 4-1 GaanSe's 

Out Perhaps. 8-1 S ati sfa ct ion, 12-1 




BT bocuoe 4 

J Reid 2 
SWhttworfhB 
GCteMMO 
P Cook 7 
9 

5-1 Blade Sophia. 11-2Mapdye. 7-1 Night 
City, 14-1 others. 






CApM The COnstettrtGEQraXE’S DELIGHT (8-6) was a ftlnjmer-up to EnlWT 
rurtm «.1M at Doncaster (im 2f. £8259. good to firm. S«pti3.-8 ran). 


Ascot selections 

By Mandarin 

2.30 Black Sophie. 3.5 Restore. 3.40 BASICALLY BETTER (nap). 
*4. 1 5 On Tenterhooks. 4.50 Ajdal. 5.20 Chaudennay. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.30 Hard As Iron. 3J Woodfold. 3.40 Hidden Brief. 4.15 
Swimmer. 4.50 AjdaL 5.20 Glint Of Victory. 

- .. . By Michael Seely 

230 HARD AS IRON (nap). 3.40 Basically Better. 5.20 Miss Storm 
Bi«L ■ - - • ' ■ 


betting fine 


Going: firm . 

Draw: no significant advantage 

.2:15 NEWBY WRSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: S2£71: 
71) (tl .runners). 


7 - .iii'rr. 1 . '-i 


SATISFACTION* 
■ ratoon at Ascot I 


is not as sotad but 




beat Mara's Dust(M)» taka Ms 

■rwAffiS77VAi-Cf7Y.»^iss«*n- 

M 'I lull I llllll) I III Mill lllllllll III Mill I ll I I III! 

lit. 16 ran), BLACK SOWtiE is penaltsad for (9%) KfNowtary win 

■ but wffl ixidoiibway bo s« a stflfer tas*c whwi roaasassed (1 rn 2f. 
It9, 15 rartj. HARD ASOTON(7-TO) acSrninisbng neck Co 

[7) at Yarmouth w«h NIGHT OUT PERHAPS (9-4) and GORGEOUS 
l YA and 31 back respectively flm 21, £7®S. good, Sept 17, 8 ran). Sar- 
... . __ ■erHMPS (9-5) had LANDriG (B-3) 2VW behind when may were 3rd and 

40i » Sultan Mohamad (8-13) at York (1m 21 A Ina through the 2nd. Enbarr, gins 
GEOHOtE’S DEUGHT their msaswa LAMtSN is citficuK to catehrtaht but previously 


from Shear Luck 
£4344. good. £ 
Loch Seaforth 
ALGERNON (8 
berMGHTOUT 


4.15 TEWAR STUD FARMS APPRENTICES HANDICAP- STAKES 

<£4^62; tm 4f) (10) . r* •• /. • : ; . v : 7 . ;; • • 7 

S QT Oan wi n (Mlb 
N G WBams (7) 4 


HAOtesB 


(B-7) had been a 3rd to Loch Seatorth (8-T3) at ftighton (1 m 2f . £2393. good to firm. Aug 
6. 5 ran). 


&5 WILLIAM HILL HANDICAP STAKES (£8,142 51) (11) 


401 421-310 INSULAR 

402 012000 
403-3-14300 
407 . G201 -USAMA 

409 414320 OSRtCf. 

410 201040 MUSTS 

413 <3-104 ONTBfTE 

414 022331 UP TO UNd£ (Nimrod Company) 

415 411134 JABARABA (USA) (D}(JBosW8tiLCotbea 57-13 TLangO) 

416 0-40234 MAGIC TOWS) (MssM Cairingtix>-Snl^CBr0tairv3-7-12 NON ROWPI 
7-2 On Tenterhooks. 4-1 Up To Unde. 5-1 Insular, 13-2 Qsric, 7-1 Lisana, 

8-1 MBer*s Tale. 10-1 Jabaraba, 12-1 Swimmer. CariBon. 


4-8-1 

ITmaW 

3-8-0 


(MrtMtiooa)MFmnd9 4-10-1——— — CWJrB7 

Al Nahayn) M Banahard 6-8-11 JRbUIO 

Labig 369 WEddaryS 

_ jorthAM SCantiwall 

j Ooudas-Honw 7-7-12 — VCtesonS 

MNdoum) C Senates! 3-MO L TWBwit 

- - - Liberal 9 

_ NM4m4 

130002 WOOPBOLD (PHWm'j (tedmwdl J WMar^-r-/— A today 3 

000004 TOBEHMOBY BOT(D)tC GCteterS 


201 312103 POLYKRATJS 

204 000210 ARDRQXLAD 

205 104124 RESPECT 

206 323210 PBtFECT 

213 000(00 UKHIXUJM 
. 316 01130 RAYHAMI 

- 217 3-20321 RESTORE 

218 003002 DEPUTY H 

219 130002 WOOOfOLDO 

22 0 000004 TOeERMORY 


PORM INSULAR has hadl 
runra kummiihihes 


■ wnm in June and tta best I i 

fcst(1mfi5f. £3174. good to firm. May 30, 12i 
but ran on to best Buddsy 18-11) 22s£AJjaai 


G Carters 


QSfHCtxkjwMs best af im l n l him M 
Amateur Derby (1m 4(, £5231 

4th to E] Cute (9-6) aH4ewbH| 

IWCLEnoeswaAonpra Wil i ig iastground^nd^ 
(1m2(. £1259. ten. Sept 10. 13 rani MAGIC TP) 
to wesbaam|,>. > ■ 


> since taking this race last war, ti» latest 
win from Newsefla Park (9-2) at Nawmar. 
ran). USANA (B-1) carried tier head high 
at HamiBon flm «. £S8S, good. Sept 2. 6 


70-7)1 SSI 2nd 




221 OOOW4 DERRY RIVSHB) (Q (Mrs N 

5-1 PBrtsct Tmtg. 6-1 Respect 7-1 Remora. Ceptay JjaraL 8-1 LocW Mim, 
vvoodtoid, 10-1 ArdroK Lad, Potykratis. 12-1 Rayhaan. 14-1 Tobermory Boy. 
20-1 DenyRwer. 


to firm; 
beat Pearl 
7)4ttrand 
17). That was 


io wni. son 13. 10ranL 
SetocttmCARBXON 


nw/utri rawir y wra, MO|A • • r* Ww l4«»lAJr» 9 

(M) beat Gold Wlre(M) a at Ooncaster flm4l, £3200, good 


CriDM POLYKRATB, 4'4| 3rd to Green Desert o Haydock (6Q, prevtously (9-t? 
rv/niTl was beaten 21ll into 4tii by Double Schwartz, also In a Group race, at 


Goodwood (51, £17928, good to firm. July 31. 14 ran). WOODFOLD (8-11) was running 
weB above her normal handicap form in washing Me more than 3 lengths bade in 1 ith. 

RESTORE, Who Wtur~ ■ ' 

" 9)1 'J 2nd to Stem 




Wednesday (5f. £4952. go 
thor neck and sh hd there 


note than 3 lengths bade in i ith. 
[hanging violently toft pmrtoustf 
■6, good tosott Aug & 12 ran). 

Out Ot *31 9. DffUTY HEAD 
■uiyroBe(95)atSandowii on 


4.50 EBF MORNffiGTON STAKES (2-Y-O C & G: £8.088: 7f) (5) 

501 01 SHAfS* VICTOR (ISA) (D) (M MabnuOT G Harwood 8-11 GSttrimyS 

503 1 AJDAL (USA) (Shs«i Mohammed) MStoira 6-11 W R Stertbm 2 

504 ' 1 ARRASAS (ISA) (D) (Hand® Al Maktoum) H Thomson Jones 8-n 

AMunayS 


Bruce Raymond the former 
English based jockey, has been 
fined almost £7.000 and dis- 
qualified from riding for three 
months after being found guilty 
of betting in Hong Kong where 
he was expected to be riding this 
summer. 

Raymond has not ridden 
since February 19; The follow- 
ing day .he was abducted by the 
independent. Commission 
Ariosi Corruption apd. had, his 
passport confiscated! His ban 
was backdated to start on July l, 
which ends on the last day of 
this month. 

The Royal Hong Kong Jockey 
dub said:. “In deckling the 
penalties, the stewards took into 
account Raymond's commits 
mem to assist the Jockey Cub in 
its endeavour to eliminate 
mal practices, and bis undertak- 
ing not to apply for a licence to 
ride as a jockey in Hong Kong in 
the future, unless advised by the 
stewards.” ' 

Raymond, admitted to four 
charges of breaching the Hong 
Kong Rules of raring , which 
relates to jockeys betting or 
having an interest in a bet. 

A Hong Kong official added: 
“ Raymond will have clearance 
to ride anywhere in the world, 
should he wish to. on October 




DArtMfinoiW 


4 0143 
13 0040 
18 MM 
22 000 
26 1204 
31 4404 

33 2221 

34 t»0 
36 0303 

42 1200 

43 moo 

S-Atnshirali. ?-2 Get Set Lisa. 9-2 CteawoM. 6-1 Pharaoh 
Bus, 10-1 Princess Snft. 12-1 .Moron Press. IM otters. 




4.15 GLAfSOALE HAMDCAP (3-Y-O: £1323: 
2m 115yd) (8)- 

: 1 1031 

; a >n 

T7 8000 
19 4430 
22 1033 

24 0340 

25 3020 

26 4000 

11-8 John Oorey. 3-1 taMham, 5-1 OrtanW Express. 
8-1 Lteoste, 10-1 Gratify. 12-1 Mft 14-1 others. 


5®? 


2.45 SCAIffiOROUGH SBJjNG STAKES -(frY-O:. 


NTnMw9-t 


. 1 0034 

■ 3-00 
6 000 

- 10 4000 

11 04. 

12 0400 

13 4000 

21 0300 

22 0000 
• 24 0030 

■ 26 0 

26 2000 
30 400 
32 0 

34 4000 
$ MB 
38 00 

49 .0. 

51 3040 

. 52 0000 
53 0040 

' 7-2- Market lutes U*2 AR fl g ro ve, 6-T Tteesbi, ftnthwt 
8-1 Stone RocteblO-1 Qwyrtxwji02-1 Katie 8^8. Tokeda. 


Redcar selections 

By Mandarin 

115 rnshirah. 2.45 Market Man. 3.15 Durham 
Place. 3.45 Ensigne. 4.15 Ightham. 4.45 Yaheeb: 

5.15 Jarrovian. 

By OurNewmarket Correspondent 

2.15 Inshirah. 3.15 Duraringb. 3.45 Shergor. 4.15 
John Dorey. 4.45-Yhheeb: 5.15 Gohko Bean. 


445 EBF CARLTON MAIDEN STAKES 

(2-Y-O C &<i £2,067: Im) (12) 

5 00 AWtfBSTCBraWhM I H Robert* 4 

8 0 ATtffiNS GATE (USA) JW Wbtis 9-0- NComtaaTI 

10 0 B0HAP0H 1HNE O Matey — -R&mlS 

15 003 DOUAR SEEKS (DSMM Ryan M — RCodrawa 

. 17 0 FLAXON WARRIOR Traitlirst 9-0 — I 

19 30 FCRBGN KMQHT (CAIQ M BteWfaard - ^ 

SUNDrSOXD H JoteSsSTS^ 
35 00 OPTIONAL CHOICE (0U)JWPlfte SO. PBWteytt 
40 . 48 SEPARATE RCAUTragraVfB^GHamooti 9-0 

ACtefeS 

44 1KPRKEBRIGHrGOttMti(M) KHodgun* 

48 WESTAJAMS H Wtarton 90 J H Brrasffl 7 

50 • WIHBB OBA) H72aBeat Janes 90 .RHSl 


. 8-1 Athens Gate, 10-1 > 


5.15 REDCAR APPRE N TICE HANDICAP (£1.283: 
lm)(19) - . * 


0004 nSSMN STYLE (WGrecMC Brittain 8-11 PMEddCfyl 

SPARSHOLT BREEZE (M NcConMCk} M McCormack 8-11 S Cauthen 4 


^4952, good to firm. 17 rani TOBERMORY rfOY <8-1 1) was bosten Itr- 
sh M there m 4th. WOODFOLD (B-1) couM not teKken when ISI am o< 
iv (9-71 a Salisbury (5f. £3128, firm. Sept TO). DEfOtY RIVER (7-71 never 


10-11 AfieL 2-1 Sharp Victor. 7-2 Arrases. 8-1 Persian Style. 14-1 Sparahcft 
Breeze. 


nearer 4m tp Felipe Toro ffl-3 (rum flag start « Doncaster. ^1 140yte) wfih DEPUTY 
HEAD (8-2) TBi AREROZ LAD (9-5) and LOCHTILLUS* (S-Soutof lhe first 9. Earfter 
DERRY RIVER (a4Lweamg a wsor tor the first lime, beet PBVBrtTHIttNG (9-11) XI 
al Newburv i5t, £4045. qood\o firm. Aug 18. 14 ran). oePUTY HEAD (94) was 1 » away 
3rtiand RA YKAANJ^Tvras 7m. 

3.40 TAYLOR WOOTROW CONSTRUCTION GOLDEN JUBILEE 
CHARITY HANDICAP STAKES (3-Y-O Rtfies; S11E89: Im) (10) 

3M 2«te1 JOirtop Mj'li-'JI 6 

303 40-31 DOfNAS DREAM (D) p Johnson) J Tree M. 

304 1-120 KABlYUtroiantHH ABB Khan)M Stoute 9-1 —— WHSufatemi 

305 002012 MD0BI EwtEF(to( K BfflJief) OBteH-... EGu*stp> 7 

306 001004 SMOOCH (B) IA OpoenhaBneO K Brassey 8-7 — SWatwortt 2 

307 00304 SOMETH W G CASUAL (B) IMra C Beteoel A teae 7-13., A Shouta p) 3 

308 400011 BASICAUY BETTER (to (to (BtoOtiStOCKA Stud LBfiPWMwyn 7-11^ 

(4qc) N CvSttto 1 0 

339 3021)00 CARELESS WH5PES(Lorti MaWewl 1 Matthews 7-10 -,g“chle5 

310 04H42I SYBIL FAWLTY(CWnghT)DLalng 7-7 TWtei* 


PORM SHARP VJCTORflMh 
run ™ oi Sergeyewch (9-0) at 
had been bached ante-post tor toe 20(10 


(7f,£1670,H 
twtereL 


quicfceowAlciear 
11. 13 ran). AJDAL 
scoring 3 lengths 


Doncaster vetoty rarer Qttoerto (8-11) ftt. £2550. good to firm. Sot 12. 9 ran). 
4UmASAS(B-0) beet Super Lunar (fi-0) by an easy 31 on Yternouth dabutipf, £304. gram. 
Sent 18. 13 ran). PERSIAN STYLE was Coventry Stakes 9th, then (8-8) just under 3i4tii 
of 7 to Suheae (84) « NeemarMI(7f. £5852. good. JrfyS). 

TjiilnrTinu AJPAL 

5^0 EBF KENSINGTON PALACE STAKES (2-Y-O FiDes: £8,310: 7f) 

(io) ■ - - - 

602 1 BIB1AAR (USA) (DJ (Hamdon Al M«oraiS H "nwuBOn JorWS-12 

— A Moray 7 

606 BOURBON GIRL (K Abdula) B HAs SB G Starter 5 

607 00 CHA0DB0UY (USA) (R Sangstel B HBs 8-8 BTtewraooZ 

610 GUST OP VtCTDRT JK Al-SaaJ) J Hmdey 8-8™ — — M >«s 8 

611 HBS STOBM BIRD (USA) {JMahee)M Stoute 64 WRSwhibum3 

612 3 MOUNTAIN ISLE (Sr MSoMQW Hem 849 W Carson 9 

613 OVERDRIVE (L Freedman) H Ceal 8-8 SCaatoenG 

615 PRYDWBi® Deer) B HAS RS C Booth 1 

616 QUEEN'S BRIDGE (USA) (P Meton) I BaktngU Pal Eddery 10 

619 SHANAMA (HHAgaWWDM Stoute M AKteibedey4 

11-4 ibbdaar. 10030 Mss Storm Bird. 4-1 Mountain We. 9-2 Overdrive, 
6-1 Chaudennay, 7-1 Queen’s Bridge. 14-1 ot hers. 


ARRASAS (9-0) beeti 
Sept 16. i3ran).H 


7-2 BasasOt Better. 4-1 Hidden Bnet, 9-2 Entrancing, 132 Smooch. 7-1 Kahfytt. 
i Oonnas Dream. 10-1 Vtanma. i2-i Syo> Fawny. 16-T others. 


This is certainly what Ray- 
mond needs, as tie intends to 
apply for his licence to ride in 
England. Before he left England 
he was the stable jockey to 
Michael Jarvis at Newmarket 
Together they formed a success- 
ful partnership. Their most 
notable victory came in the 
Coronation Cup at Epsom with 
Easier-Sun. 


3.15 PARSON AND CROSLAND STAKES (£2,599: 
5ft (7) 

Thns4 

1W85 

D Nichols 7 
JWBmhI 
6 K Carte, 5 
G Donald 6 


11-4 Dursshigh. 3-1 Durtwm Place, 5-1 Vtowz Dradar, 
6-1 Young Puggy, 13-2 Taylor Of Stfitam, 8-1 Bridge Of Gold. 


3.45 GUNNERGA1E MAIDEN STAKES (£959: 
1m4f){4) 


prtDM VIANORAJ8-9) S7J Oh to Puntoase pa pw chasa (9-7) at Sandown (im 
runm listed. C7934. good.Aug 29, 10 ran^BrtltANCqiG don rut lookwhofly 


cenwne but Como ta» » score DjrW and ah hd 
(7- 1C) m isted race at York (71, £7830. good h 
snee beaten mount* at Heydook In May. earner 
5M bacA in 6m when Newmartcet winner (Jm. " 


FORM IBrtUAAR (8-11) comfWtabfy saw off short-priced favramte QueSe me 
fUnlW (8-11) by 2141 at Salisbury (71. £3066. firm. Sept 10. 19 ran). 
CHAUDENNAY dropsmetass alter xunTWig 4 5tof8^)»LalucheJB-S) in stowfy-nm May 


Sept 3. 9 ran). KABIYLA maced 
Shad SOMEIrlMG CASUAL 18-3) 
■good, May 2. 14 ran). WOQol 


10 StakesM Doncaster dm Group 3. £13686. good. Sept 11. 10 ran). MOUNTAIN ISLE 
(8-11) 3'41 3rd to Due Gent [9-0) m newcomers' race at Goodwood (71. £3884. good. 
Sept 13. IS rant 
SmcJfcui: CHAUDBMAY 


• Dennis Newton, a Shrews- 
bury publican maintained' bis . 
good fortune as an owner when ! 
Mariners Dream won the Snowy 
Gray Memorial Handicap at 
Beverley yesterday. The five- : 
year-old, now with Reg 
Hollinsbeadu has won three 
races on the Flat and four over | 
hurdles. “It was touch and go , 
whether Mariner’s Dream ran 
here or over the jumps at | 
Uuoxeier but his next race will ; 
now be over hurdles.” said his ' 
owner. Holiinshead was full of 
praise for the winning rider. 
Tony Culhane. 


11-8 Ensigoa. 7-4 Stargor, 3-1 Deputy Monarch, 
12-1 Turina. 


36 ora 

. 39 0000 
42 0010 
52 0040 
.53 0000 



4-1 Rustic Track. 6-1 Gotten Boom. 6-1 Zlo Pernmo. 
MuriBo. 6-1 Nippy CMppy, SOy Boy, 131%r£rlum/Shrora± 


WORCESTER 


611-5. 

wntMAHie n Aytete 311-5 

HADQAKfilSA) B PaBng 5-11-2 


mm* 


-CBrasfO 


2^0 UPTON SNODSBURY HANDICAP CHASE 

(£1,847: 2m) (10 runners) 

3 -120 SKT Uura (P) FWateyn 7-11-13 KMoonsy 

4 1003 AWffiTTFSDajQHrmwCasey 7-1 1-11 RDmwoody 

5 W0 NCSMNOBRBUIS TOW cassy 8-11-4 5 doom 


BteucW . T^O Ndey Hna, 6-1 Turkana. 9-1 Haddak. 
ia-1 Dwnmgan Caste. 14-f Wtamaria. 23i Blade Coombs. 


Ascot 


Gomg: good to Ann 
20(1(14 1. FAX COUNTRY (G Carter. 3- 
11. 2. Retefy Wit (A McGlone. 10-lfc 3. 
Con* On The BkfM (S Cauthen. 7-fj_ 
ALSO RAN: 5-2 law Ason Cue (4to). 13-2 


Results from yesterday’s four meetings 


6 -211 NONSTOP ® fC-D)P b Coonra 7-11-1 (7w) . H Davies 

8 -024 RD»40Un3h»J Edwards 11-10-12 PBartoa 

9 1F03 DANCE fiSBOte (to (CJTOJWtebar 6-10-12 

QKefnagti 

13 -F32 HSItoCBa(nfflnR(rSutesn»10-1_MKteww 
15 tm> CHESTNUTEf»K£(B)PPnlClard11-160 DCMm 

18 IM0 STOP H SH ltoB MnJ WgsBCCtt 10-100 

DWosnscoum 

19 ffP- A86EY AVBWE (D) S Dow 6-180 M Barnard 

7-4 Nonstop. 4-1 Ounce The Stuas. 92 Shyiandsr. 5-1 


rang 


13 -F32 RffiSUE 


15 P£>P CHESTNUT. 
18 U40 STWHGTf 


7-4 Nonsto p . 4-1 Ounce The ShM 
Annette's Might 7-4 Bwddte Boa. 10-1 


THE 7016 HAlDBt HURDLE 

^1,109: 3m) (10) 

1 ~*42 ASTON BANK 

5 F2P0 COUNTRY SPi 

J Cf ‘* t M1-7 , 

« se — “issia 

13 030- botnet ddoto^fi V ~~ S n^£!iS *£ 

14 CROMWHJ. (mrLb Wang 7 -TT .o SiiMB r 

15 WP EASTS BOSE MTra^i- g g 

16 TO3 PALAWOCOJ Norton 5-1 1- r C ” 

16 003- WSTT SUNSET Mis MAtesB 6-1 1-2 JB*M 

_ ’’■J gNygu»t..3-jl Aston Bank. 7-2 Misty Suoat 6-1 
®lialdslg,KM Bassinet, 1G-1 otiwrs. ' 


ALSO RAN: 5-2 law Ason Cup (4to). 13-2 
Maaaftcd (5th). 8 Super Trip (6th). 20 
Alarm. Pfcua. & Hoy Street 9 ran. NR: 
Bold Pflager. II. hd. «L 3L 1%L 0 
E^warth at Whitstwy. Vote. £3.80: £1 60. 
£250. £1 30. DF: ElB.00. CSF: £28«5. 
Tncasfc £172.15. 1nw«42.11s«a 


2JQ i$H 1, ZAJAL (W R Swmbum. 3-1 1 
2. Rosa Real IPai Eddery, 11-1fc 3. 
nocktete (5 Cautnen. 7-2). ALSO RAN: 9- 
4 lav toa M (SINK 13-1 Ferns tore tatty, t4 
MaKsab (6(h), Albany Park. 20 Good 
Causa. 33 Gocmbra. 9 ran. NR. (Siberia 
21. tL 37. Si. hd M Stoute at Newmarket 
Tote £3 to. rr.ro, cwo. rise, or 
£ 10.00. CSF. £31 46. litun 1599sec 


340 (Im 4J) 1. KAZAMXM (W R 5.10 (1 tty 1. Cl 
Swmbum, 7-2fc 2. MaMaM CMsfteh (W GJ»on. 7-4 ftewh 2. 
Carson. 7-21: 3. Battiarotf iG Starkey. 8- 100-30): 3. Basra 
11 (a«l ALSO RM4: 33 Kick The Hatut ALSO RAN: 9 Da 
(4tfiJ. 4 ran. a Ki M Stoute ar Bertrand. 12 Fast 
Newmarket Tote: £3.90. DF: £6 00. CSF: 14 Peanday (4to) 
£12.85. 2mn 3649sec. 45(h). 25 Welsh It 

„ 4.10 O) 1. DBUUNG DEE (N Adams. 

33-1 1 2. Sheer Royalty (T hies, 10-1): 3. 

Dandna Diana (B Rouse. 16-U ALSO 
RAN: rU far Cape VWd. 5 tetftty Bold Tr 

•*“ 13-2 Rdde* Young Man (Sto), 8 


5.10 |lm) 1. CAPTAOTS MECE pale 
Gtoaon. 7-* favfc 2. Qtafitemss (P Burke. 
100-30): 3. Basanf (M A Gflos. 12-1) 


3.45 (im 2f) 1, THwfflEWXW (G 
Duffiekl. 7-2): 2. Seamore (A Mackay. g-ik 
3. Peart Pet (G Baxter. 1CXHW). ALSO 
RAN: 3 tav Black Comedy (4toL 13-2 Mr 
Mttic Man. 15-2 Baren, 16 Rad BWy. 20 
Donor {5(h). Seven SwaRows («h). Cott- 
rra King. 10 ran. 5L SL 2L a. 2%L O 
Doutebat Newmarket Tote: E&20; CLIO. 
£3.40. £1-50. OF: f«43R CSF: £31.49, 
Tncasc £91^4. 


ALSO RAN: 9 Dark Herrtaoe. 10 Count 
Bertrand 12 Fast Service. Sana Wood. 


132 Fkfdey Young Man (4to). 9 
to The Wind. Bob Qareoa 10 


35(im) 1 . INVITED GUEST (S Cauthen, 
8-n favj. 2. Mountain Mamray (Paid 
Effltey. le-IJ. 3. Shintog Water (A 
Murray. IM). ALSO RAN: 13-3 Gotten 
Braid. 12 Port Helene, Sntote Taste ffifii). 
20 Momforo. 33 Bmt Pasha (4fiiL Color 


Kean Note. 20 MuacTdto (6m). 10 raa nh. 1 

2*41 nk. 2bL nk. P Cunctal at NewT - 
Tote ES^O: £3.90. £3J0. £Z30. ur: , 

£208.20. CSF: £257.66. Tncasc XtotaBtfim* 
E4.87538. train l&tasec. 

4.40 (2m) 1. SARFRAZ (G Starkey, 7-2 jU 3. _ 
lav); 2. Misrjte (K Dariev, 3. Kudz (S Sweet &e 

Cauthen. 4-1L ALSO RAN: Sk2 Pemzm KartnSSta 


Kasongs-Bass at Newmarket Tdte 
£2.60; £1.60. £ljft £2.90. OF; £3.70. 
CSF: I&21. Tncast £5002. Into 
4&20se& 

Jedtpot not won; P ls cep e t £14000 


Navet (33-1). 6 ran. 3L 71. Mrs A HewjtL 
Tdte: £230; £1.10. £1-60. OF: £2.00. CSF: 
14.71. 


Worcester selections 
By Mandarin 


50(2mhdte)1.8uy aa ne Hw d{M Bosley, 

■20.1); 2. Hpdaka (7-1 ): 3. Monctera Ttmhy 

“ * - 2 tar. 7 ren.T«rf. 


2.30 Annette's Delight- 3.0 Gulphar. 3.30 Oakley 
House. 4.0 MistY Sunset. 430 Cored Lord. 5.0 


House. 4.0 Misty Sunset. 430 Cored Lord. 5.1 
Hallowed. 5.30 Don Piper. 


4.15 (im 41) i. OWN UP (D McKeown. 
20-1); 2. r on te rt e b te Dancer (G Duffieid. 
H-a 3. Stewtrt (T Lucas. 8-11 lav). 
ALSO RAN: 33 Worth Debating (4th). 4 
ran. NR: Caste Rock. 5L 4L 1»i. R 
wraaker to vyaattiertw. Tote: £540. DF: 
£650 CSF: £4338 


Beverley 


Vi). Bott Deception 5-2 fav. 7 ran. 15M. 
.W.W Madc«. Tobr £22.00; ZA2Q, £Z90. 
DF: £73.70. CSF: £12652. 

Pljicepot E10&76. 


Perth 


Going: firm 


2.15 W)1.4ACQUT JOY (GBardwua, 

1L 3. Genotin (G DuffieU. 5^ fyvfc 3, 
Sweet Ere (R Hui. 25-11. ALSO RAN: 5 
Karen's Star. 133 Oir Ginger, 10 Cause- 


4A5(lm1 
6-1); 2. Yk( 

Naturally An 


l.ABS&m(E(R Guest 
I HBs. Evens fav); 3. 
(O Baxter. 6-1). ALSO 


2-l5(anhdle)l.tloendnm(ASlnngv. 
6-1); 2. Baninas Star (8-13 *av);3. (Sne 
MR (5-1). 6 ran. a 3J. K Sto 


SO MQRrtoro. 33 Bmt Pasha (4th). Color 
Arna D'Azy. Lucky Stone. My hnagma- 
hon (5th) 12 ran. *;!, II. 2'/il. 3, 1*1, R 


Armsovng at Newmarket. T<*e: £1.60: 
mu c*u t nr ram. CSF- 


£1.10. £260. £220. OF: £9.00. CSF: 
112.34. imin 43.47906. 


10 Wide Boy. 20 way Foot 12 Gutsy. Ken Sttdefl (6m). 

1 1^: a B * tm. Ourhi Divio IA ttleiwiMu UMrtirtanO Yho 


gtfi), wu Taw Ki . 

riraSRosatete. WasN RnL sh hd. 11. ararSSS 
5V,C 14.1 U G Hawood at PUhorough. * 

Tote £4J» £180. £180. C1.80. Dft 
£9.90. CSF: E17S7. Tncast (3730 3mst 
37 .99SOC. A fief a stewCB' mqusy the 
reNdt stood. 


.l4Naugmy(«i 

ITrseFda.20 


RAN: 3 Ruwi Valley. 10030 Flau . 
(4m)10VWowbBnk(&W,1SCaloco(eth£ 
7 ran. NFL Uaeta. YA. 2i. sh hd. 61. 9. D 
Money at NawmsKeLTote. £8.70, £2.70, 
CT.90. DF: £8.10. CSF- £15.16. Alter a 


MdhEteao. Motor Master. 


■MR (5-1). 6 ran. a 31. K Stone. Tote 
26.3a £1.40. £150. DF: .2SM- CSF: 
£10D4. 


3.0 PEACHEY SELLING HURDLE (£1 JJ69: 2m) (7) 

2 WOO JUST SPUD JPSmth 5-11-3 TPtefisttfT) 

6 3400 LOG CABOT W 5-1£M0_ DiaaaCtsy (7) 

7 mOO MOON lEJQOYIto ID)*** NMeautey 5-10-ig 

^ SJ09WB 

10 034 eULPHARJJwtons 4-1(W JWNta 

11 OOP- rrAUArtSPRWGDJOTm- 5-10-5 COM 

12 nip NOVgg aEVE HWBGfe Jones 5-105 — 

14 400- KttJL’S ROCKET G Price 4-100 Cprtee 

2-1 Gulphar. 100-30 Log Cabin, 9-2 Moon' M elo dy, 11.2 
-Hitts Rocket 8-1 Just Spud 


3mj ) {ij IOCK GREEN HANDICAP CHASE (£2,120: 
e % 

Cottage 4,1 *»nw 


^ LITTLEWORTH NOVICE HURDLE (£$85: 2m 20 


n SSiy S*}»»«GHBiBfcllLrn nfl _ 

12 000- MAH STARS Dow 4-iaa — BPussfi 

14 0-4 pau ROtesim 

aguS. HaBowwJ r 5-1 Pda ewef. 6-1 


ttitfSatBtf 3J0 BHOADHEATH NOVICE CHASE (£t,457: 2m UTTLEWORTH NOVICE HUlffiU (£685: 2m 


stewards' mrajkry the result stood: 
PtecapotEWio 


2.46 (2m ch) 1. J-J-Henry (Miss A 
£earanonL 4-6 ta^. 2. JondaJe (11-4): 3, 
Mtttetreak (12-1). 4 ran 20. (fat P 
Beaumont Tote £1.40. DF: £1.80. CSF: 
£2.74. 


CSF. £22.45. No Ott. 


Uttoxeter 


EVENT OFiTHE WEEK 


2-45 (S) 1 . UNN ffOS (M Bath 
Supreme Stele (G Barter. 

Beton (A Meeks*. 14-1 J. < 
fav Lamb Beck (6th), 5 Wodtewn weaver 


Qotogtfinn 


230 ram ndie> 1. Bbcldraw Kti (J Quirm. 
62 fav); 2. Pars Match (4-1): 3. Easy Win 
(7-4), 10 ran. 71. 6L NR: Another Irami, 
Brokers Choice. H e l pw a d . 

Janrny Rtzgerald. Tote £3.60: £2£0. 
£1.60. fl.eOF: £106a CSF' £12^3. 

34) (2«n «f Htfe) 1. Boce West (G 
Landau. 15-8 fav): 2. Eternal Dancer: (&-1); 
3. Log Cabin (11-4). 7 ran. 1L 71 S MeSor. 
T0tet2JD. £1 20. £2.40. OF- £4 60. CSF: 
£11 SS.Aher a stewards enquiry the result 
stands. 

MB (3m 2f <«1 1. Creek A Joke (R 
crank. 11-8 lav); Z Name Break (2-n. 3. 
EMtiard Friend (521. t ran fyl. 51 T B». 
TOM: £260- OF £1 90. CSF: £431. 

44) (3m tKte) 1 . Mister Pitt in Feare. 13- 
8 (avt 2. Plaza Toro 1 Scottish 


• Britain's fortunes in 
the major three day 
event in Poland. 

•At home, foe 
National Cham- am 
pionshipsin Tj- 
Dressage and j 
Carriage Driving. 'Pi 


9 Osberton Three Day Event 
•A rare look at horse 
> breeding behind the Iran 
Jk Curtain -Michael 
Clayton reports from 
East Germany. 
And for the Woodstock 
BBr connoteseur-reporta 
H from TaitBrsalls 

r 1 September Sales. 


(Stti). 11-2 Mere MtlStt. 12 Backmgham 
Sen. 14 Nahotes George, Our Horcran. 20 


The Great Match. Worth Princs. DoWy 
Baby. Stars to Motion, mss Drummond 


stars to Motion. Mss Drummond 
Pmeesai5ran.ihi.2SI. 
11, «. an Itt. M W Eastarby at Stem* 
Hutton. TOte £950: EZ80. £2.00. £44». 
OF: £2050. CSF: £4634 Tncast £46445. 


3.15 (2m) 1. MARINERS DREAM (A 
Culhane. i5-2£ 2. Dark Sirou (W 


NewiMS. 11-2): 3. Joist (G Duffett. 6-1). 
ALSO RAN 1O-1I fav Gusssmg (4Q1). 8 
Mane Gaiante (5ft). 10 Sound Dftuswn 
(6thL 14 Krtgtt a Heir. 20 Rtemfce. 25 
Northern River. 50 Our Bara Boy. 
Bantam Do*n 1 1 ran. NR- Debco. 9. 21. 
1 'jL 2";i. 41 R Hoimshead at Uoqar 


HO] 






1’iL 2":>. 41 R Hoiinshead at Upper 
Loncdcm ToteKdftn 80.E250. £190 
DF E44 70 £50.44. TricwS: £251 .02. 


3.15 (3m ch) 1. Pounantes JMr * 
Anderson. 11-25; 2. ABeriea (W It^avt ^ 
.Blue nrautoi p3*tiT»getM»t|^ 
ran. NR: Carpenter^ SUK. 21. 

McGtw. Tote £5.70; £350, ttl.40. DF: 
£10.70 CSF: E16£5. 


1 F-1U OAKLET HOUSE (8) (C-D)(BF) F Walwyn 7-1 

2 Pi 21 BAUJCtttBPreeca5>ll-7 ^.PScudaawre 

3 (KH> -BLACK CO MB E Qtepmsr 8-11-5 P Barton 

8 RB- DIBIVEGAN CASTLE GPrwt 7-11-5 RDsmoody 


T mo WAT Mrs A Haste 5-10-1 D 

?? * saiBffl&=s 


a ~ ss 


e-11 Cate Utifaty, 6-1 Don Ptoar, 6-l^ata-l AtetawteL 


r tflSSSKSTSW® 

Otaron bIHSSL ■ ia. Mis* M Befi. 
TOte 080; EC1 70. £1-10. £1-80- OF: 
£250. CSF: £757. 


Antheus earns trip to Milan 

From Our French Racing Correspondent) Paris 


Swinbura waits 


4.15 (2m Ch) 1. Sir Badstoorth (J D 
Davies. 3-lfc 2. Mendatoo (5-2L 3, 
Henrebo (84 tav| Only three finished. 5 
ran. 61. 15L T Laxton. Tote £450: £3.30. 
£1 10. DF. £340. CSF. £950- 


Bevard <3-1 L a ran. ’A «"• T an. TWa 
£250. £1.10. £1 TO. DF: £2JD. CSF. 


445 r2m flat) 1 . Red Feocaa (M Tebbutt. 
4-5 tevj: 2. RJmsdafe (5-2): 3. Madna 
Bawoma |7-2). 4 ran. 61; B. C Thornton 
Tote: £2 10; DF: £2.00. CSF; £355 
541 On 4f htee) Smart In Bfack (P Tusk, 
walked over) 

GW Richards. 

Mocepot £1555. 


Antheus (Gary Moore? gained 
a comfortable success over 
Splendid Moment and Arokar 
in yesterday’s group (itree la 
Coupe de Maisons-Laffitte over 
10 furlongs. 

Moore always had die winner 
on foe heels of foe pacemaking 
Gambero and moved up to take 
over iwo furlongs out Arokar 
and Splendid Moment chal- 
lenged on his outside biu 
Antheus responded well- when 


shaken up approaching the final 
furlong and raced cl ear to win by 
lengths and a length. 

Antheus will now contest foe 
Gran Premio del Jockey Club ai 
San Sira. Milan, on October 
19 Jacques Wertheimer, his 
owner, vail stand him at his 
Normandy smd. the Haras de 
Saim-Letmard-des- Parks, next 
year. He will replace another son 
of Northern Dancer. Pink, who 
has proved infertile. 


S?!* 6 * Sunburn will leave bis 
* Triompte 


Mtahil < Sro u i rc fc l ™J«> w 








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ay farewell 
(l1 stalwarts 


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- RUKI1MFSS AND.FINANCE. 


21 


s n v i 
• 5 .. ‘ l > Still 

; VUe 
J : - ■ * . 1 

■ Slit - A 

-‘'Or 


Gower the right man 
at the wrong time 

- r* i ... 


itlif TIMES EKlDaY ijfif XtMBtK 26.1986 


47 





avid Gower lowered his 
world-weary lids, flicked 
an imaginary speck of 
dust from ms irreproach- 
able Mechlin lace cuff 
■ and spoke of triumph and disaster 

- m ‘ the same way: with a feint 
fleeting smile and a self-deprecating 

V ironical quip. Well, the bit aboutthe 
. cuff isn't literally true, but Gower is 
^not so much a modem “laid back” 
^character as a throw-back. He is the 
. sort that greets triumph with “that 
didn’t go too badly** and disaster 
with “it's only a scratch.** He will 
. tell the world: “It was nothing 
' really.** 

And so he is slightly out of kilter 
with his time. Cricket now gets an 
: enormous, an unprecedented 
amount of national attention: the 

popular demand is for some rah-rah 

chest-beating PR man of a ra ping 
The literal-minded tend to believe 
l. Gower when he says his achieve- 

- meats are but nothing, and when be 
i feces defeat with another ironical 

- uip, they think he is no better than 
ivolous. They forget the English 
adition of feeing the mightiest of 

• circumstances with a light laugh. “It 
was," said Gower, “the year ofbemg 

" seen to do things.” 

This is effectively what Gower 
. was told to do in the first Test of the 

• summer. His response was to wear a 

• tee-shirt bearing the words: “rm in 
„ charge.” Not everybody liked the 

joke. England lost the match and 
Gower, the captain who won from 
1^0 down in India and then won the 
Ashes, was sacked. His response 
■ was to give the tee-shirt to his 

• successor, Mike Gatling. I don't 
T.suppbse it was a perfect fit It has 
7 not shown, itself to be yet 

%£.' .“The tee shin was, perhaps, a 
\\ mistake,” Gower said. “But l 
couldn't . resist it. For captaincy 
' means more than vigorous arm- 
' waving. So much of it is hidden 
from spectators. So much is hidden 
'2 from the chairman of selectors. The 
'..demotion hurt." 

He then added, with one of his 
v feint, fleeting smiles, and perhaps 
just the smallest hint of malice, 
“Still, at least that saved me from 
having to explain two serious 
defeats:" An England captain has to 
do a lot of explaining these days. 

; ‘Football is in ; decline, and cricket — 
itTest. cricket — gets more public 
" attention than ever before. 

. This is what the new era of cricket 
is all about We have been used to 


of The 

World when the football gets 
mocked out of the World Cup,lrat 
now the same massive reaction to 
victories and defeats is part of 
cricket s pattern. The ironical. quip 
5 out of joint with such times. 

bower's great fault is nothing to do 
cncJcec it is just, that he has 
mis-manaepd his own PR. 

Ashes win, England 




Simon 

Barnes 


were expected to do all right on the 
tour of the West Indies. But the first 
Test, played on a snake-pit wicket at 
Sabina Park, Jamaica, was an 
unmitigated disaster. “It took a lot 
of heart out. It almost destroyed the 
tour,” Gower said. The depth of the 
disappointment was shattering. “I 
have been around m the past when 
things have gone wrong. But this 
time it was seen as a national 
disaster. Even when things went 
right, people thought there must be 
something wrong behind it** 

Sports critics have never properly 
understood Gower’s enigmatic pub- 
lic persona. He was the man who 
greeted England's Ashes win by 
saying: “The West Indies ndll be 
quaking m their boots." It is simply 
that the traditional pose of the 
English hero, of assumed non- 
chalance under the pressure of both 
victory or defeat, suits Gowers wdL 
He would be uncomfortable making 
avid public statements. It . is a 
comfortable made for a deeply self- 
conscious man. 

ut what a year it has been: 
Gower has been sacked as 
England captain, removed 
as captain of Leicester- 
shire, and now passed 
over as vice-captain for the tour to 
Australia. If the first two can be 
regarded as policy decisions, the 
third looks like an out-and-out 
snub: what is, it must be hoped, the 
last personal disaster in the worst 
year he can remember. 

The year's troubles began with the 
death of his mother. Cricket watch- 
ers tend to discount such tilings. 
Such ordinary problems cannot, 
they feel, affect a semi-fictional 
character like a sporting star. But 




they do. Gower’s last 10 days in 
England before the West Indies tour 
were sprat clearing np his mother’s 
bouse and arranging her funeiaL 
Most people have to face such sad 
times: all are affected by them. 

Gower arrived in the West Indies 
quite exhausted. And let himself off 
the first match to recover. In 
retrospect, this was his first PR 
mistake. Then came the Sabina 
Park Test and the juggernaut of 
defeat was off and rolling With the 
attention of the world on them as 
never before, the failings of the team 
were appallingly public. 

Then came Gower’s famous last 
words. Politicians know all about 
famous last words: the single line 
that destroys you forever. The 
pound in your pocket will not be 
worth any less, or prices will be cut 
at a stroke: that sort of thing 
Gower's famous last words were: 
“Voluntary net practice.” A howl of 
disbelief rose up at this, all cricket 
followers were suffering disappoint- 
ments because of the result; they 
wanted to see those boys out there 
suffering too. 

Again the PR had gone wrong 
“The truth is, we flogged our guts 
out with preparation. All of us, 
especially at the start But the tour 
wore everybody down. There was 
no point in c allin g an eight o’clock 
curfew, or taking all the beer out of 
the team room. And often, there 
weren't proper practice facilities 
anyway." But “voluntary nets” did 
for Gower all right. 

. Here is a quick quiz question: 
Who was England's top scorer in 
Tests in that West Indies series? 
Answer David Gower. Despite 
that, the first home Test of the new 
summer was Gower’s official last 
chance. He lost, got fired, then got a 
shoulder injury and missed the next 
Test He came bade for the third, 
and played weiL “So people started 
to say I was better off without the 

captaincy* 

“Then against New Zealand they 
said I was jaded. I scored 62 in the 
first innings and they did a ISO 
degree turn. 1 did badly in the 
second and they did another 180 
degree turn. I was niggled. They said 
I should be rested for the next Test, 
and I could almost have gone along 
with them. But there’s a danger in 
that: if you don't go out to meet the 
thing, you start to go backwards. It 
is hard to build yourself up So 

I stayed in.” 



ASIAN GAMES 


Food for thought: David Gower is left to reflect on his toughest year so far 


Second quiz question: Who was 
England's man of the series against 
New Zealand? Answer: David 
Gower. After that, he took the rest 
of the season off to recuperate. Well 
deserved, I should think, and 
certainly much needed. He has also 
been replaced as Leicestershire cap- 
tain. Next season is his benefit, 
which is the reason, or excuse, for 
the change. “I would like to get the 
England captaincy hack again, but it 
goes against all historical precedent 
And it would mean wishing evil on 
Mike Gatting, and I couldn’t do 
that But I miss it the motivation to 
play well is greater for a captain. 
You feel it must be you that gets the 
runs. No matter bow you feel, you 
must dredge something up. That’s 
important to me, being the sort of 
player I am — I know, for example, 
that I should have made hundreds. 
Hundreds that greedier players- 
would have got I’ve made too many 
nice 80s and got out 


“I wish I had been made vice- 
captain for Australia. I started as 
England captain very much as a 
novice, and after Id months. I had 
run the jgamut; done: the 
apprenticeship.” - 

Gower greeted his successes as a 
captain with self-deprecation. 
Richie Benand recommends cap- 
tains to take all the praise they can 
when it is offered, because they'll 
certainly have to take all the blame 
when they lose. But Gown is not 
the man for extreme reaction. He is 
too intelligent, too much aware that 
things change, too much aware that 
sport is not the only thing in . the 
universe, too much, in his soul, an 
amateur, a throw-back. Neither 
selectors, nor his public, seem to 
have truly uhderetood.. ihar his 
flipness is no m ore than^a : conrfbrt- 
_able pnse. But rliis, ’after ' all,' h~as 
been the year of being seen to do 
things. 


Somerset ‘rebels’ 
spurn postal vote 


Unseasonal rain matches behaviour 


From Richard Streeton, Delhi 


By Paul Martin 


.The tactical battle for the 
vo tes.of .Somerset ** 4£D0 men* . 
-j'-bers took a new twist yesterday: 

■those rebelling against the dab's 
-' dismissal of Viv Richards and 
Joel Garner apnrned the 
: hierarchy’s proposal that a 
■ ’ postal ballot of members decide 
. . the issue rather than a special 
-general m ee ti ng -- ' 

Richard Weston, the cam* 
pafan co-ordinator for the 

* “rebels’’, said Us group wonld 
continue to demand, as is their 

.- ■right, a foil meeting “in the 
, . traditional democratic style.” 
".He added: “There are too many 
jnembers on both sides who want 
L to air their views personally,” 
“- and claimed the dob’s commit- 
tee was afraid that the members 
1 would raise “tilings they want 
I kept quiet.” He said that the 
dnb hierarchy’s surprise call for 

* a postal ballot was “a display of 
weakness, revealing their fear of 

; the possible outcome.” 

\ The dob, however, now ar- 
j goes that a postal ballot allows a 
b .truer test of members* feelings- 


. Brian Langford, the cricket 
co mmi ttee chairman, issued a 
. challenge to the “rebels" to 
prove the “nverw b e bnto g” sup- 
port dalmed last week by bin 
Botham for the sacked West 
Indians' reinstatement. 
I said: “If they are that 
, why otjed to potting 
it to all the membership?** 

Festival harmony 

An anti-row which threatened 
Gloucester's annual cricket 
festival has been resolved. The 
city council refused to allow the 
county club to advertise South 
African Airways at the Winget 
sports ground and the club, 
resolved not to give in to 
‘political interference’, planned 
to look elsewhere for another 
ground. A solution was reached 
whereby the club promises not 
to use South African advertising 
while the council will increase 
sponsorship to make up for lost 
revenue. A dirndl spokesman 
said the agreement was 
‘amicable'. 


Several flurries of unseasonal 
rain, a parting shot from the 
monsoon season, left pools of 
water on the outfield yesterday 
and threatened to delay the start 
of today's second Test match 
between India and Australia. 
There was a touch of turbulence 
elsewhere, too, when Allan Bor- 
der, die Australian captain, 
spoke briefly of less happy 
aspects to the tied first Test m 
Madras on Monday. 

From the point of view of 
“constant confrontation” be- 
tween the players. Border said it 
had been the hawtew match in 
which he had ever played. The 
Australians, in particular, were 
irked by the number of limes 
that the umpires warned their 
bonders about running down the 
wicket. This invariably followed 
after Kapil Dev or Gavaskar 
were seen to speak ■ to the 
officials. 

Border, who hoped the at- 
mosphere between the teams 
would improve before the series 
ended, was hit by a stomach 
disorder during the game's dos- 
ing stages. He was left de- 
hydrated and weak for 24 hours 
after v 


night; 


■ vomiting most of Monday 


Not having been in Madras, I 
cannot comment on events 
there. Certainly die Australian 
captain 1ms been widely criti- 
rized In the Indian press for 
slowing down the over rate as 
-the match approached its cli- 
max. At one point. Border and 
an umpire were seen to ex- 
change angry words. There were 
also frequent exchanges between 
batsmen and dose fieldsmen 
throughout the game. Once 
Srikkanth shook his fist at 
Bright, who was fielding near 
him. 

Ravi Shastri, the Indian vice- 
does not think that 
itiontifrps between the teams 
have been left permanently 
soured. “We have played each 
other very often in the past and 
we have too much mutual 
respect for each other's abilities. 
It is just that the situation in the 
Chepauk Stadium was 
overwhelming. In the heat of the 
moment, players might have 
been carried away, bat things 
will settle down” he said. 

The rain, which induced the 
practice nets to a swamp, foiled 
an Australian plan to work on 
improving Craig McDermott’s 
action. He has railed to take a 


wicket in the three one-day 
internationals played so fer and 
he also finished wicfceiless at 
Madras. The main adjustment 
being mooted is that. 
McDermott should reduce his 
long approach run by some 12 
metres — shades of Tyson in 
1954-55 — and it is hoped that 
this should also help to smooth 
his delivery action. 

McDermott, a key figure in 
Australia’s bonding armoury 
against England in the coming 
months, is the fastest bowler on 
either side in this series and 
Border is anxious for him to 
retain his pi««* Australia are 
expected to choose from the 
same 12 that they nominated 
before the first Test. Whether 
Gilbert, a seam bowler; who was 
made 12 ih man. conies in this 
time for the left-arm spinner. 
Bright, depends on the appear- 
ance of the pitch. 

The square was protected 
from yesterday's rain by a 
tarpaulin and it is uncertain 
whether it will emerge with any 
change of character. Local opin- 
ion still bolds that batsmen will 
have the upper band when play 
starts but there is some concern 
about the outfield. The ground’s 


day. soil does nothing to hdp it 
absorb moisture and . there has 

been little sunshine between the 
-Storarw^One of the fewJTests in 
India seriously disrupted by rain 
was the one. 'here-T- against 
Dexter's England side Hit 1961- 
62 . It poured on : the third 
evening and. though the sun 
shone on the final two days, no 
further play was possible. 

India’s batting will be 
strengthened by the return, after 
injury, of Vengsarkar with Pan- 
dit the man most likely to make 
way for him. Kapil Dev will {day 
although he is currently being 
treated for back problems. 
There are -doubts, however, 
about Binny, the medium-pace 
all-rounder, who has stitches in 
a hand fajiiry, . and.^Cbetan 
Sharma, the f fast bowler,: who 
has a fever. 
moia ... 

Gavaskar,. 

MAzharudcSn 
PancR. C Shamwu R M H Binny. Manhder 
Singh. N S Yadav, K Mora. R Lamba, L 
Slvaram ahihl s aH L G Sharma. 

AUSTRALIA (from); A R Border (captain). 
D C Boon. OR Marsh, DM Jones. GM 
RttcWe, G R J Matthews. R J Bright, D R 
Gabon, C J McDermott, T J Zoehrar. B A 
Rskl.SR Wau$i. 

Ukaphn; P D Reporter and V K 
Ramaswamy. 




, HOCKEY 

ir: Bedfordshire 
say farewell 
i to stalwarts 

By Joyce Whitehead 

I. There are several dub tour- 
naments tomorrow , the real 
start of the season and at Sidney 

* Road. Bedford, seven teams 
from the county will meet at 1.0. 

-BCHE who were one of the two 
..-Midlands dubs to reach the 
-‘national finals last war. wiU 

- .field a combined XI of first and 

* -second year students in tins 
» ; friendly tournament. 

*• Bedford Town are the 
...favourites. In their side are 

«. Mary Allen, an ex-England 
international who withdrew 
from the squad last year and 
two' newcomers: riazei 
McWhirter and Jane 
,. Owens. , „ ... 

Bedfordshire say farcvtdl this 

■* season to three stalwarts Sniney 

t Nicholl. Maureen Fish and 

- Chris Davies. Nicholl has re- 

• tired. She has been with 
county for 23 years and among 
the highlights were playing for 

• England at Wembley Stadium in 
1 973 against Ireland. She toured 

■ with the England team in New 

- Zealand, Jamaica and Fto ana 

Si'TOtfEraSi 

under-21 match secretary. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FOOTBALL . 

ThWdvWon 

Wigan v Bolton (7.45) 

Fourth division . 

Southend v Rochdale (7.45)-— — 
Stockport v Scunthorpe (7.30). 

OTHER SPORT 

BADMWTO^t wand v 6*m* 
ana Eiigtand -nnmninn 
CYCLING; National Ml din* ewropwr- 
ships (Matlock). km 

GOLF: Dunma Cup t« jS tBSL m 
Fotrtteaon schools dtefflplwrtjp* 
B ciry^ St Edmunda, LinarK and 

ICE^SKATM^ St hri tnwtwtor® 1 

SNOOKER BCE interna t ional (fflp fcal- 
SPEEDWAY; Northern riders' champ**- 

BBMSSbB 

ssss^Jsomas 

.SURFING? tftartd rnnataw clamptanwups 
441 N*wpu«yj. 


GOLF:TE$T OF CHARACTER FOR ASPIRING PLAYERS 


Five men face an ordeal 


A cosmopolitan group of 
golfers had to reassemble at 
Silvemtere, in Surrey, early 
yesterday morning to settle 
some fraught unfinished busi- 
ness. They were the five players, 
one each from England. Ireland, 
South Africa, France and The 
Netherlands, who had shared a 
score of 149, seven over par, 
over the two previous days and 
were left to compete for the last 
place In the PGA qualifying 
school. 

This is a test of character for 
aspiring young golfers and they 
reacted in various ways notably 
with a quip from Thomas 
Murphy, me Irishman, a cav- 
ernous yawn or two from Derek 
James, the South African, and 
rather frenetic practice swings 
by Rudolph Bos, the Dutchman. 
Paul Bradley, the Englishman, 
and Pascal Useldiuger. of 
France, seemed to be putting a 


By JobnHennessy 
composed, if not exactly brave, 
face on the ordeaL 

Their first hole was the 352 
yards fourth, swinging sharply 
to the left and requiring nothing 
more than a good iron shot on 
the tee. The clubs ranged from 
one iron to four, all saftly in 
play, but Bradley. ofBiHingham, 
missed the green with an eight 
iron and was the first to leave 
die scene on a sunkissed morn- 
ing that might have been made 
for pistols at dawn. 

On to the fifth, with the 
occasional squirrel lured into 
the open by falling acorns- This 
is a tricky, and as it proved, 
decisive hole. A swing to the 
right this lime demands a tee 
shot to the -left but there 
standing sentinel in the fairway 
is a huge pine. The shot then is 
right of the tree with as much 
draw as one can manage. 


All four players overcooked it 
and Bos and Usddmger booked 
fatally into the undergrowth. 
Bos having to back out from 
under a bush and the French- 
man having to take a penalty 
drop. Neither could make good 
the error so we were left with 
Murphy and James, who had 
both flirted with the pine and 
got away with iL 

Murphy, as on the previous 
hole, was on the fringe and 
chipped expertly to three feet. 
James, who bad missed a 10 foot 
birdie putt on the fourth, had a 
much longer one this time and 
was happy enough to roll it up 
d««d- Murphy, alas, missed and 
the South African, lalL lean and 
leathery (for a roan of 25) had 
only to tap in for a winning four. 
His relief was such that you fell 
be might have just escaped the 
gallows. 


Staffordshire 
will miss 
best player 

David Gilford's success in die 
PGA qualifying school at 
Foxhills tins week has its un- 
fortunate counterpoint among 
the amateurs over the next three 
daysfJohn Hennessy writes). 
Staffordshire have to face 
Devon (the holders), Lancashire 
and Hertfordshire m the county 
championship finals at John 
o’Gaunt without their Walker 
Cup player. One man does not 
make a team, of course, but it is 
bard to see how Sta ff ordshire, 
deprived of such an outstanding 
player, can have much more 
than a supporting role. 

Hertfordshire, last year’s non 
nets up, have also lost one of 
their pillars of strength to the 
professional ranks, Andrew Cot- 
ton, and m spite of their having 
flown home Peter Cherrv pros- 
pects are that Devon will nght it 
out with Lancashire on Sunday. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Committee get 
tough on 
p unishm ents 

The disciplinary . committee 
continued its tough policy in 
punishing foul' play by handing 
out severe sentences at 
yesterday's meeting at Leeds 
(writes Keith Macklin). 

Neil Frazer, the Workington 
Town forward, was given a ten- 
match suspension for punching 
an opponent off the ball and 
Mark Fleming, the Bradford 
Northern forward, was sus- 
pended for eight matches for 
kicking an opponent 
_ .There were, two suspensions 
of four matches each, Kelvin 
Skenctt (Hunslet) for elbowing, 
and Sean WiDey (York) for a 
high tackle.' Bob “Hirst, 'of 
Huddersfield, received a two- 
match ban for foul play, but 
Derek Bridgeman,. of Sheffield 
Eagles, escaped a ban. his Send- 
ing off being regarded as suf- 
ficient punishment. 


Diplomacy paves 
a way towards 
Olympic power 


From David Miller, Seoul 


America’s Cup Diary 


Australians rattled as Crusader hits top form 


Whll« Harold Cod more. 
Britain's irrepressible 
America’s Cup skipper, was to 
London for the past week to 
announce Ms crew, the boys 
Down Under have con turned 
their winning ways without him 
daring their final preparations 
before the trials commence 
Octobers. _ J , 

Last weekend, Crusader I 
dealt two morale-sapping Wows 
to the Marc Ptyot skippered 
French Kiss, during a couple of 
trial races held in winds of aiore 
than 18 knots- 

Then, on Monday, it was the 
Atttnltos' tarn to test the 
Brits' mettle. During the first 
race, Australia n got ahead after 
the Crusader oew collected a 
ridtog turn around a winch at the 
start but by tile weather mark, 
Chris Law, the befansman. had 
edged the Howlet design ahead. 

Alan Bond’s sapors managed 
to secure an overlap at the 
leeward mark bat that adran- 


was short-fired and Cm- 
went on to win by a 30- 


made by the newly-named White 


margin. 

The British crew made no 
mistakes at the start of their 
fatal enc o unt er, lending Austra- 
lia II from start to finish and 
w in n i n g by a comfintiag 66sec 
maigin. The result so astoaaded 
the Anstrafians that Bond’s 
syndicate now waste to pace 
Australia HI against the British 
bO&ttn 

• Codmore's sound managerial 
thinking expressed with such 
Irish wit and rioonenoe during a 
series of press conferences and 
radio and tderison inte rview s 
rids past week, has won many 
new supporters to the Royal 
Thames Yacht' Club syndicate 
bar there is another far fiercer 
side to the man that Is only seen 
afloat. 

Viewers who - tone in to the 
exc eUent TVS produced docu- 
mentary (Sunday, 1TV, 
10.30pm) on the preparations 


will sec the British skipper 
spelling oot the facte of Ufa in no 
uncertain terms- to Paul 
“Jabber” Rnshent, todnefag the 
burly 17%st winch-grinder to 
improve his coutmimaii. 

The Australians got a taste of 
the same medicine ember tins 
year after Cmhnore was invited 
to steer the Lexcen designed 
South Australia daring a series 
of informal trials 
Crusader. 

Venting bis views after one 

clumsy work, be 
the Aussie crew with: 
“Yon are not even fit to step 
aboard Ansfrafia D in a 
mosenm.'Tben, to a quiet aside 
to the veteran navigator. Jack 
Baxter, standing alongside, he 
said; “You’re got to tell them 
something difftrent to hold their 
Int erest. 

Ironically, this was the only 
occasion that the South Austra- 


lia crew ever got the better of 
Crusader! 

• With anything up to 315 
mfflion invested into tank-tested 
keds, hi-tech electronics and 
exotic Kevlar sails, ft’s reassur- 
ing to bear that the hiiuon touch 
still overrides all the high- 
powered technology being em- 
ployed off Perth. 

I Any reminder of dm costly 
collision between the two New 
Zealand 12 -metre yachts during 
a fibntog session for a television 
commercial earlier this year still 
brings a Mash to fee skipper, 
Chris Dixon, who was too busy 
looking at the cameras to watch 

where he was steering. 

a ten Bond’s enp-whuring 
iram ha» also had Ott or two 
embarrassing moments. On one 
occasion a crew member foi 
to undo a $4 shackle holding 
backstay before the Anstntian 
12-metre left her dock- The wire 
caught on fee overhead hoist and 
: boat was being towed out. 


it polled fee S76.009 mast back 
like a long bow before-the spar 
finally broke in two. tefiteg down 
on 11 bonified feces^. . 

However, the best stmy.ao|far 
this year comes from Bond’s 
principal, rivals over to Kevin 
Parry's Task Force 10 camp. 
Bothered by the strong winds 
while attempting to solder- two 
wires together aboard Kooka- 
burra as the 12- metre fay 
suspended in Its hoist, the 
hapless crewman decided to use 
his initiative and lower the boat 
back into the sheltered waters of 
rtw ifack. 

Unfortunately, someone else 
had earlier removed the drain 
bung and by the time the job had 
been completed and fee boat 
hoisted back np again, she was 
forgot half toll of water which then 
tog the! surged aft wrecking th e batte ries 
Oithn and costly computer eqpfpmem. 

Barry Pickthall 


If ever a television script 
writer were to get to grips wife 
the scenario, fee power straggles 
within fee International Olym- 
pic Committee are every bit as 
fascinating as those of Dallas, 
even if the plot is East-West 
politics, amateur-professional 
m orality and Third World 
v mer g ence- 

The current interest is 

whether China can exert more 
influence within the mo ve ment 
than the Soviet Union, and 
whether the atfant terrible of 
Los Angeles, Peter Ueberroth, 
can next mouth get a foot In the 

door. 

Zbenliang He, China's multi- 
lingual first member of the IOC. 
elected to 1981 and already on 
die executive board, is a man of 
toteOigehce, charm and diplo- 
macy. It Is with fine sense of 
tactics that he withdrew his 
candidacy ^ Tor^ president of the 
Olympic. Council of Asia' at 
yesterday’s election, tearing the 
field dear for the re-election of 
Sheikh Fahad, of Kuwait. 

Zhenliang, whose manners 
would grace a Coward comedy, 
knows the achievement of power 
must not be overtly sought in 
sport. If Jean Antonio 
Samaranch should decide not to 
seek re-election as IOC presi- 
dent to 1989, Zhenliang. given a 
few more years experience, must 
certainly be a candidate to 
succeed him. Of seven presi- 
dents since 1894, only Avery 
Bnmdage (1952-72) was not 
European. 

.Zhenlfang had been put for- 
ward as' OCA president, a 
ippsition which would have 
substantiated his influence, be- 
came- of domestic misfortunes 
befalling Sheikh Fahad. Politi- 
cal disputes within the Kuwaiti 
government had undermined his 
position, but assiduous lobbying 
among Arab members to the 
past few days guaranteed Fahad 
a majo ri ty: Zhenliang agreed to 
withdraw discreetly. 

Fahad is publicly remembered 
as much as anything for his role 
in the 1982 World Cup match 
between Kuwait and France to 
which, captured in the official 
film GXHe, he was involved to 
his team leaving the field over a 
disputed French g(»L Yet be Es a 
stat esm a n of tactics, widely-, 
respected for his ability to 
persuade North and Sooth Ko- 
rea, North and Soafe Vietnam, ' 
China famt Taipei- to bare com- 
peted side by side at inter- 
national events. 

Fahad could yet play a signifi- 
cant role, as OCA president, to 
favour of China, hosts of the 
1990 Asian Games. A dozen 
Asian countries have no dip- 
lomatic relations with Ch i na , 
and Fahad, politically neatraL 
could help bridge the gap. 

Zhenliang, despite his with- 
drawal, wifi -be a potential rival 
'io.^ichavtt Founds of Cana d a , 
: clrrted ln T theIQCin.l978,>nd a 
cfose adviser to Sahfafanch. Yet ■: 
^.'challenger to both amid 
"emerge 'if Llebenoth, president 
of the LA organizing committee, 
fa elected at the 91st session to 
Lausanne next month as fee 
United States member in succes- 
sion to fee late Jnfian Roosevelt. 


The candidates recommended 
by the US Olympic Committee 
are, I understand, Ueberroth, 
jnou commissioner of baseball. 
Donna de Verona and Anita de 
Fran tie, the. respective former 
' swimming and rawing medal- 
lists. Samar anch is thought to 
want Ueberroth, whose commer- 
cial wisdom made LA such a 
triumph. That very success, 
however, together with 
Ueberroth's complimentary ref- 
erences to fee IOC to his book. 
Made la America, will provoke 
resistance from IOC rank and 
file, who see Ueberroth, with his 
professional outlook, represent- 
ing the demise of traditional 
Olympic beliefs. 

Here is the ernx of the 
Olympic dilemma: fear of take- 
over by a man who recognizes 
unavoidable contemporary 
forces, and the need for such a 
man to help resolve fee di- 
lemma. Pound, regarded also as 
a “modernist", s, significantly, 
to favour of Ueberroth even 


Amateur 

principles 

The president of fee Olympic 
Council of Asia, Sheikh Fahad. 
said yesterday that professionals 
should be kepi out of future 
Olympics because an “open 
Olympics" would mean unequal 
competition for athletes from 
Asia and the developing world. 

“The participation of pro- 
fessionals in the Olympic 
Games will mean total destruc- 
tion of the Olympic movement 
as we know it now," he said, 
adding that Asian athletes, still 
behind Western nations in a 
number of sports, could expect 
“only humiliation” when faced 
with professionals. 

The council, meeting with 32 
of its 36 member nations repre- 
sented. re-elected the Kuwaiti 
president fora second, four-year 
term. China were confirmed as 
the hosts for the 1990 Asian 
Games— a progress report from 
its delegation explaining that 16 
new sports facilities wilfbe built 
in Peking, wife ] I others to be 
renovated. 


though he would be a presiden- 
tial nvaL 

The possible neutral, nu- 
controversfal successors to 
Samaranch are Marc Hodler of 
Switzerland, elected in 1963 and 
president of international skiing, 
Lance Cross, of New Zealand 
(1969), and Pieter Tall berg, of 
Finland (1976), fee yachtsman. 
Franco Carrara, of Italy (1982), 
is too new and ambitions, while 
Vitaly Smirnov, of the Soviet 
Union (1971), lost any chance 
with fee boycott of 1984. 

• Taiwan were- admi tted yes- 
- today . to fee OCA amid ap- 
plause from Chinese delegates, 
who pro m pt l y invited their 
political adversaries to partici- 
pate to fee 1990 Games in 
Peking. “Provisional 
membership'" was also granted 
to fee Palestine Liberation 
Organization. 


End of an era for China 


Nationwide celebrations 
South Korea's ending of 
ma s 16-year domination of . 
.table tennis team events at the' 
'Asian Games in Segul yes- 
terday- Hyun Jung-Hwa. a' 17- 
- year-old nigh school student, 
-was mobbed 'after beating He 
ZhiE to clinch a 3-1 victory over 
China in the women’s team 
evenL 

- Hours earlier the hosts bad 
thrashed Hong Kong to win the 
men’s gold mcdaL The results 
brought to an end an era 
covering the last three Asian 
Games during which China had 
collected every team title at the 
expense of the Sooth Koreans. 


China’s oarsmen had a much 
better day, however, taking 
seven gold medals in eight races, 
to take fee Chinese more than 
halfway towards an anticipated 
total of 75 golds wife nine days 
-of the Games to go. Japan made 
the only dent in China’s 
domination, when Satoru 
Miyoshi and Tadashi Abe won 
the men’s coxless pairs event 

In fee pool Yan Ming, of 
China, won her third gold medal 
in taking the women's 800 
meters free-style title to a record 
8min 43.42sec, but Japan took 
most of fee honours by winning 
five golds. 


SNOOKER 

(Canadian leads 
TV info 
new season 

By Sydney Frisian 

Cliff Thorbum, the Canadian 


ins the first of the 
season’s ranking events, the 
Bristol Coin Equipment inter- 
national tournament at 
Tremham Gardens. Stoke-on- 
Trent today wife a match 
against Terry Griffiths. Later to 
fee day. Dean Reynolds will 
oppose David Taylor in .what 

.will .befae.fitsudevision -*our-_| 

namem of the season. 

The new sponsors (Iasi 
.season's tournament was spon- 
sored by Goya) are offering 
£175.000 in prize money from 
which fee winner will receive 
£35.000. A' sequence of -un- 
expected results in the earlier 
rounds has given fee line-up for 
the last 16 an unusual look, eight 
seeded players — Alex Higgins, 
Ray Reardon, Tony Meo, Willie 
Thorne. Jimmy White, Joe 
Johnson, Kirk Stevens and 
Doug Mountjoy — having been 
eliminated, white was beaten by 
a newcomer, Ken Owers, aged 
33, from Fleetwood, who is in 
his first season as a professional 
and-Johnson, the world cham- 
pion. lost to David Taylor: 

In fee top half -of the draw, 
Thorbum faces a possible quar- 
ter-final meeting wife Tony 
Knowles and a semifinal. chal- 
lenge from- Den his Taylor.- Steve 
Davis should have little diffi- 
culty reaching fee final from the 
bottom half! Matches up to the 
quarter-finals wilt be played 
over the best of nin e frames, fee 
semi-finals over 17 and fee two- 
day final on October 4 and 5 
over 23 frames. 

DmeC Thorbum vTGrttftthRCWlBQn 
v A KnowtaP Francisco vMBauvroausS 
BgC tiBPjf E*™ Taytor. S Davis v R 
* 

Taytor. 


D Reynolds * David 


RESULTS;^ 

IpritoTMtd round: P Browne (Its] 

Johnson (Enc). S4 R Chaperon jj 
|R Raanton (VWL SG: W ThomoJ 
Dufflan.f&^.Wh M HaMt I 
HvhsrEng). J Whit* {Erert ■ 
png). M; s Hmdry ($cot)blTte 
ta*}. 5-1; N Foukte (Engl bt G Mtefll 
hi: D Taytor (N ire) btJ While (E 



BADMINTON 

New approach 
could change 
game's profile 

By Richard Eaton 


An attempt to change the 
course of badminton history is 
Starting to Belfast tonight wife 
the staging of the Dan-Air 
International Challenge, the 
first independently organized 
event from Walker Inter- 
national, the managemen t * n ** 
promotions company. 

The event, to which the 
world's number one from Den- 
mark, Morten Frost, will lead a 
Europe select team against an 
England select team, ted by the 
Commonwealth champion, 
Steve' Baddeley, is less im- 
portant than what it represents: 
the mansion of an outside 
agency into the international 
arena to an attempt to farther 
increase the pabUc profile iff a 
developing sport as well as the 
income or tome of its players. 

Whether this is either fifcefy 
or desirable will increasingly be 
the subject of noisy debate. 
Walker International has so far 
added nearly 20 British players 
on to its books. In a year since it 
started doing thw, progress has 
been slow, which is one reason 
why comparisons with a Packer- 
type development are unfair. 

CIrO Cinfatio. the mawapw of 
the England team, and who now 
oversees the ambitions of 
Walker Inter national hi bad- 
minton said: “The sport is 
wonderful to watch and has 
reached the stage where it can do 
wife a hit of a boost to its 
promotion.” 

Clntelio also plans to liaise 
carrihpy wife the Internationa! 
Badminton Federation so that 
conflicts of interest and crowded 
weeks in an ever ev pandfag 
calendar are kept to a 
minimiun.The danger is rtw»t fee 
Far East will acquire such a 
monopoly of leading players, 
profitable events, major spon- 
sors and big crowds that a highly 
delightful game will tend to 

contract to feat area of the olobe. 
If- Walker International bdps 
t»voM this,' ft will be doing-fee 
game a service. . 


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SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 


FOOTBAEE" 


Italian decision to lift 


M ■ ■ W S'f: 


import ban sparks 
fears of a mass exodus 


®ll8l§|: 


By Peter Ball 


The' Italian Football 
Association’s- decision to lift 
the ban on ihe import of jjew 
overseas players, which paves 
the way Tor. Ian Rush to join 
-Juvenilis next season, was 
greeted with trepidation in 
English football yesterday. Al- 
though the retention, for the 
moment of the restriction on 
Italian clubs employing more 
than two foreign players 
makes a wholesale exodus 
unlikely immediately, the loss 
of only two or three top names 
following last summer’s 
departure of Lineker and 
Hughes would he a further 
blow to the English game's 
dwindlin&appeai. 

Thai threat will be’ exacer- 
bated if EEC pressure on the 
Julian FA to .fall intoline with 
Common Market regulations 
persuades the clubs to increase 
the number of overseas play- 
ers permitted. “That was men- 
tioned as a possibility at 
Wednesday's meeting and the 
number could be raised to 
three at the club's meeting 
next March or April" an 
lulian FA spokesman said 
yesterday. 


With* leading Italian clubs, 
AC Milan and Juventus, who 
are known to favour raising 
the . Jtmix to five, imports, 
pressing for further -relax- 
ations. that must be a distinct 
possibility encouraging the 
fear that English domestic 
football could become a back- 
water. As the transfers of 
Lineker, Hughes and Rush 
demonstrate, even .the most 
powerful English dubs find 
themselves unable to hang on 
to their greatest assets because 
they cannot match the waj*es 
on. offer in ItaJy and Spain. 
Freedom of contract, climbing 
gates and the European ban 
has combined to leave English 
football an easy prey. • 

“We have a frightening 
problem. ! don't think there 
will be a tremendous drain 
but: if only three or 'four 
players go. it will be our best 
players again" said Liverpool 
chief executive, Peter Robin- 
son. “That nor only damages 
the national team, but it has a 
knock-on effect on club foot- 


ball because if you take the 
top players out the product is 
poorer. It is always the for- 


wards who go. and they are the 
people .who excite the 
crowds.” • 

Howard Kendall, of 
Everton, was more sanguine, 
although. he agreed that it is 
impossible for English dubs to 
compete with Barcelona and 
Juventus. “Thor are just in a 
different league, but it is not a 
new problem. Greaves, Law 
and John Charles all went 
The Rushes and Linekers 
came along to take over from 
them, and they will be re- 
placed in their turn." 

The situation, however, is 
different and potentially more 
damaging nowadays. Both 
Robinson and Martin Ed- 
wards. the chairman of Man- 
chester United, say that their 
clubs are strong enough to 
withstand the attractions of 
the large transfer fees. The 
number of clubs in that happy 
position is small 

The prospects are deeply 
worrying, and Robinson fears 
that, if the European ban is 
not lifted soon, English dubs 
might not be able to match 
German. Dutch or Belgian 
wages, either. 



.. • *.■***'• 




v. . '■fK.-ftfv.v. 

1 ? 



' ,v: r m 1 

s ,v 


Donald Curry (above left) with 20 
knockouts in 25 unbeaten contests, is 
one of boxing's most destructive punch- 
ers, -but he bolds no fears for LJoyd 
Honeyghan, who challenges the Ameri- 
can for his undisputed world welter-' 
weight title in Atlantic City tomorrow. 
The Briton, unbeaten in 27 boots. 


-became the top contender when he 
stopped Horace Sh afford, of die United, 
States. Confident Of his rh ^n^ a gainst 
die toughest opponent he w31 ever have 
met, Honeyghan said: "I don't feel any 
extra pressure going up a gainst Curry. 


He is just another man and I'm walking 
out of here with his title." There is little 


RUGBY UNION: WEBBE HAS THE QUALITY TO RECAPTURE PAST GLORIES 


Bridgend should pin hopes 


B 2 i! , e > a Iong on a wing, not a prayer 


escapes 
with aline 


Southampton defender, Mark 
Dennis, who has oae of the worst 
disciplinary records in football 
escaped suspension when be was 
found guilty yesterday of on- 

gentlemanly and improper 
behaviour by foe Football 
Association. Dennis was fined 
£250. severely censored, warned 
as to his f uture conduct and 
ordered to pay £200 costs. 

The FA disciplinary conanis- 
sioiu who heard Dennis's case, 
were remarkably lenient consid- 
ering his. record. The Southamp- 
ton rail back, aged 24. who has 
been sent off eight-times in his 
professional career, was re- 
ported by referee. Reran Barrett, 
following an incident at the end 
of Southampton's 4-3 defeat at 
Norwich on August 30. Dennis 
was alleged to have hit 
Norwich’s Ian Crook daring a 
sniffle as foe teams left foe pack , 
at the end of foe match. 

• Peter Hail, captain of the 
third division chib, Walsall, has 
salmonella poisoning, the dab 
revealed yesterday, foflowiag 
several days illness- Tests .by foe 
Environmental Health Depart- 
ment confirmed foe infection. . 

• Walsall'S players - re s um ed - 
training on Monday after Fd— 
tews - Park had been dosed for- - 
five days because- of what ap- 


Gary Bailey, the Manchester 
United and England goalkeeper, 
could be out of the game for 


another three months. Bailey, 
who has been sidelined for 


who has been sidelined for 
seven months with a knee 
injury, saw a specialist on 
Wednesday and got the go- 
ahead to start weight training. 


foe England World Cup player 
to stay at Villa Park. 

“I would like to think I can 
persuade him to remain here," 
McNeill said. “In any event, 
nobody is leaving until I have 
had the chance to assess the staff 
• Wolverhampton Wanderers 
have appealed against a £5.000 


But it will be months, rather fine imposed because they with- 
than weeks, before he will be drew from the Central League 


Bridgend may well offer up a 
prayer or two for the return of 
the success they enjoyed so 
regularly a few years ago — they 
were Welsh Cup finalists for 
four consecutive years between 
1979 and 1982 — but if they 
incline their attitude to the wing, 
they may find a more practical 
and exciting means of achieving 
iL 

It is only a shift of emphasis 


ready for competitive football, this season without giving due 
Bailey said:’* The specialist said notice.**This is a good deal of 
the knee had stabilized and told money for a club like 
me I could start weight training, ourselves." said Keith Pearson, 
Initially. L bad' problems. with foe-club -secretary.- “We could 
my cartilage and 1 had some just about rope with it if we had 
reaction when-1'was with the - to-but -it- would be- an unfair 


they -require. On Wednesday 
nigbL. in a match during which 
Llanelli flayed very much 
against their nature and tried to 
contain the opposition forward 
while Bridgend were only begin- 
ning to find their feet with a new 
combination of .players, ibe 
game was stuttering forgenaWy 
to a close. The home team had 
kicked three penalties, the vis- 
itors one. Yet, before the end, 
Glen Webbe. the Bridgend wing, 
bad transformed this prosaic 
scoreline by getting two tries 
himself and making another to 
send the spectators home with a 
warm glow. 

Bridgend's- pack may well 
. have worked bard; they may 
argue that they bad-formed the 
platform: But they wiH.be better 
forwards, and findgspd a better 
team, for understanding that 
-whatWebbe did was alHusown. 

' The- .evening’s, enduring mem- 
ory will be of him. . 

He had, as in the modem way 
of these things, languished on 
the wing for an hour or more, 
only ever likely to receive the 
ball by accident or. marginally 
better, opportunism. Rarely had 
it been motivated by a genuine 
desire to give him the ball. Such 
'ambition would appear to be too 
daring by far with a wing aH too 
often seen, more so than the full 
back, as foe last line of defence 
and, more sadly, as foe- last fine 
of attack too. 


me f could start weight training. 
Initially. L had- problems: with 


Initially. L bad - pro 
my cartilage and I 


England squad in Mexico. burden." 

“Something went wrong add f The alleged offence is foal 
had a second operation 10 weeks Wolves foiled io inform the 
ago. It is looking more like three Central League by April I of 


mouths than weeks before I will their intention to withdraw and 


be match-fit But this time I do thus did noL fulfil their fixtures. 


not intend to rush things. I want “No-one 


to be folly fit before I attempt a whether or not we would still be 
" ■— <-• ~ i*- Pearson 


comeback.' 


• Nottingham Forest the first added. 

division leaders, may recall • Birmingham City have ter- 


Chris Fairrtough, their England 
underr21 central defender, for 
the match against Arsenal at foe 
City Ground. - tomorrow. 
Faircloiigh~has- been, out -for 17 

months with a series of injuries 


minated the contract of. Nicky 
Platnauer, a midfield player, by 
mutual; consent- Platnauer, a 
£50,000 signing from Coventry 
City nearly two years ago. -tost 
his first-team place last season 


bu t . B f ia n" ndti^L~^tfte^Fbrest~whcTi Be - weni . on loan to- 
manager; ; is considering recall- Reading and he recently-rejected: 


geared to be a. mystery, virus. 
The proMem appears to stem 


inghim in-place of Des Walker a move to CardiffCity, who are 
who has fitness problems. _ . . now likely to renew their 


The problem appears to stem 
from September 12 when foe 
team stayed overnight at Car- 
lisle before a thud division 
match. Hart and goalkeeper, 
Mark Prodhoe, who have simi- 
lar symptoms, are doubtful for 
Saturday’s game at Port Vale, 
but foe dob intend to fulfil foe 
fixture. 


who has fitness problems. _ . 
• Billy McNeill the new Aston 
Villa manager, has blocked any 
immediate, danger of Steve 
Hodge departing from from the 
first division's bottom dub. 


now likely to renew their 
interest. 

• Jeremy Charles. Oxford 
United's Welsh - international 
forward who was carried off 
with a knee injury in the 6-0 win 


McNeill saw Hodge in action for over Gillingham in the 
the first time against Reading in Littlewoods Cup. is to have an 


the Littlewoods Cup .on exploratory operation to deter- 
Wednesday and afterwards he mine whether he has damaged a 


was in no doubt that be wanted cartilage. 


By Gerald Davies 

Then, with a. quarter -of the 
ume remaining, Michael Grif- 
fiths. the scrum half, came right 
on foe narrow side near the 
halfway line It was a specu- 
lative probe which gained him a 
yard and. ambitiously, he took 
another, but the corridor on the 
touchline was closing . for 
Webbe. The winger came inside 
and foe scrum half gave him a 
timely pass going infield. Still, 
there was not much to go fan it 
was still a crowded patch. 
Changing his line but not his 
pace, he veered outride on a 
wide - arc aiming for the. comer. 
Throe who gave chase; were no 
slouches, coming as they did 
from Uanelli's threequarters. 


Canadian 

captain 

doubtful 


but Webbe changed up a gear, 
opened the gap and showed a 
:1s to them all. 


opened the 
dean pair O' 


It was a try of foe highest 
ass. all grace and speed from 


class, all grace and speed from 
him while others floundered in 
his wake. The cheer it received 
was not of the narrow, partisan, 
kind but of generous enthusiasm 
of seeing a talent on song. 

A few minutes later, without 



Webbe: talented 


the same ceremony, he ran foe 
straightest of lines. Facing his 
opponent, he handed , him off 
and raced away to the corner. 
He repealed this before the end. 
but Llanelli had grown wise to 
his speed and brought him down 
just short of the line. Apsee, 
however, picked up and got foe 
try for Bridgend. 

Webbe became, on the sum- 
mer tour to foe south Pacific, 
the first black player to play for 
Wales" when he came on as 
replacement for Adrian Hadley 
against Tonga. 

Earlier, at foe end of the 
domestic season, he had been 
given, at 25 years of age, foe 
award of the most promising 
player of the year in Wales. 
Neither of these recognitions 
could be said to be' precipitate. 
He has been with Bridgend for 
seven years and. despite his 
good form and frequent bril- 
liance. he has been shifted back 
and forth from right to left wing 
and occasionally kept on rota to 
accommodate Mark Titley. the 
Welsh wing who is now with 
Swantea. Webbe's inclusion in 
foe Welsh squad cannot exactly 
be' remembered for any sense erf 
permanatice either. His' pres- 
ence has beriv considered more 
in the nature " of r a stopgap. 

It has been small return for 
such an obviously .Talented 

foe^Weish^co ntir«en t on andcrif 
foe field in foe South Seas, he 
. will grin tfroadly'ih-foe knowl- 
edge that he played as he did on 
Wednesday evening in' front of 
Tony Gray, the Welsh national 
coach. The growing trend in the 
Welsh team has been for team- 
work. which is of foe essence, 
but more valuable stilt is the 
recognition of foe.briUiant in- 
di vid ualist . Androgi veJrim his 
dire. ’ ’ • . 


By Geoige Ace 


that the Canadian XV that meet 
an Ireland Under-25 side at 
Lansdowne Road tomorrow will 
be without their captain Hansde 
Goede. 

The talented, and very experi- 
enced. second-row forward was 


Noo-Leagne football by Pari Newman 


' While the unexpected success 
of Barnet and Scarborough bas 
caught the eye this season in foe 
race for the GM Vaoxhail 
Conference championship and 
automatic promotion to the 
fourth division, a familiar name 
is moving into position just 
behind the leaders. 

Altrincham, champions in 
l*»$0 and 1981 and strong 
contenders for the title for the 
last three seasons, have lost only- 
one of their first 1 1 matches and 
he in third position, just one 
paint off the top. Thai i$ no less 
than would generally be ex- 
pected of the Cheshire dub, but 
in the light of recent upheavals 
at Moss Lane the achievement is 
a credit to John' Wiliams, the 
new manager. 

Williams look over in foe 
summer in bizarre circum- 
stances. At the end of Iasi season 
Runcorn, who had been man- 
aged by Williams for six years, 
lost to Altrincham in the final of 
the F\ Trophy. John King. 
Altrincham's manager, then re- 
signed because of business 
commitments outside the game. 
Wilhams was quickly appointed 
as his replacement and within 
days King took Williams's job at 
Runcorn. 

Altrincham are a dosely knit 


cult start. He brought in six new 
players — Andy Lee. Bobby 
Fraser and Graham Jones from 
Runcorn. Siewan Ham ill from 
Northampton Town, Paul Ed- 
wards from Marine and John 
Timmons -from Hyde United — 
and some of the club's estab- 
lished names have had to fight 
for their first-team places. 

“At first I had a few contrac- 
tual problems with players, but 
they have warmed to me." 
Williams said yesterday. “I said 
everything would be okay once 


more money available and a; 
magnificent stadium." 

• A minute's silence has been 
observed at all Conference 
matches this week as a mark of 
respect for Sir Norman Chester, 
who died last weekend at the age 
of 78. Sir Norman, who con- 
ducted two investigations into 


Wrexham have a hoot 
on the other foot 


Freeman’s tries steer 


Reigate to victory 


the state of the English game, 
was a keen supporter of non- 


WC started playing and . so its . 
proved.' Everyone has seen -that 


proved; Everyone has seen -that 
the people I’Ve -brought in are 
good players and they recognize 
now that I know my business. 


clubln which stability is a key 
word and Williams had a dim- 


word and Williams had a 


now that I know my business. 

‘Tin delighted that we’ve 
settled down so quickly. We're 
playing some excellent football 
and our average home gate is 
about 1 .250. We've made a solid 
start and I think we’ll be there or 
thereabouts when foe honours 
are decided at the end of the 
season. 

“The great thing about this 
club is that they are geared up to 
getting into foe Football League. 
1 had six very happy years at 
Runcorn and had won almost 
everything that was possible but 
there were always financial 
restrictions and problems with 
the council in improving the 
ground; At Altrincham I've got 


was a keen supporter of non- 
League football and a particular 
admirer of the Conference, of 
which he was president. - - - - 
• Trevor Stortob; has resigned 
as ma n age r of Oswestry Town 
following the dub's expulsion 
from the FA Cup. He has 
accepted responsibility for field- 
ing Sieve Austin, who was 
ineligible, under another 
player's name in foe Multipan 
League dub’s 1-0 win over 
Prescot Cables in foe first 
qualifying round. The Football 
Association will dedde whether 
to lake any farther action after 


hearing the formal complaint 
from Prescot Cables. 


• John Rogers, the manager of 
Witton Albion, has resigned 
after last week's defeat against 
Barrow. jhe dub’s fifth reverse 
in rix matches. Terry Murphy, 
who resisted as; manager of 
Wilton’s focal rivals North wich 
Victoria earlier this year, has 
been put in temporary chaige. 


WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


IN BRIEF 


FOOTBALL 

Litttewoods Challenge Cup 
Second round, first fog 

Bnqhton o. Nottwjhaffl Forest ft Crystal 
Palare 0. Bury (fc Inrtiy 4. VVest Bronmncti 
Afeoni. Everton 4. Newport 0: Manches- 
ter united 2. Port vale ft. Oxford Unrted 6. 
Giiaonamft Peterborough 0. Norwich ft 
Reading 1. Aston villa t: wrexham t, 
Portsmouth 2. 


BKOL CUP: Seml-Hnat Dundee tinted 1. 
Rarwflrs 2 tat Hampden Parti 
EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP: Gromfc 
Srmfen 2. Switzerland 0. Group 3: 
Norway 0. East Germany ft Iceland I, 
Sovai Union T. 

INTERNATIONAL MATCHES; Denmark 0. 
Wect Germany 2: Spain 3, Greece 1. 
CENTRAL LEAGUE; Fret dhiltorfc BW- 
bum-o. Leeds ft Hul 2. Srmdertand 5; 
Newcastle 5. MddM&rgugn 1; Sheffield 
Untied 3. Oldham 1: Manchester Qty 5. 
Sheffield Wednesday 2. Postponed: Aston 
Vita v Lnwpoof Second dWekw Bolton 

0, Doncaster 1: Buenpaot 1. Grimsby ft 
Stok? D. West Brotnmcfi Altaian 1: 
Scumhorpe 1. Dartngton l. Huddersfield 
2. York 0. 

FA VASE: PrefWnsry rormd replays: 

Eynesbury Revere i. East Thurrock ft 
Lancmgi. Burgess Hrl 3: Vaimhali Motors 

1. Edgwye 2-lam) 

GM VAUXHALL CONFERENCE: Cnelten- 
ham3 TeWofd1:Kattertng2.NjjnMton2; 
Ncrthmcti 1. Gateshead Z wefcng 5. 
Weymouth 0. 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Bang or C*y L - 
Rnyi ft Oswestry I.Maflnfl Z^wongm 
0. iibmUM: Vttafksopa Hyde.Z ■ 

VAUXNAU.-OPEL LEAGU&SjOkXJ £ 
wtettn toudt: Motesey O.^oulhal 3. AC- 


SOtmCRN LEAGUE: BB DaOow Cop; 
firet round: Faraham 1. Gosport 2; 
Leicester United ft ShapshedS: roof* 2. 
Safataury & Sudan Cawfidd 2. B edw O rt h 
2: Tonbndge 2. Ashford 1: VS Rugby a 
Grantham ft Wnangboreugh 1. C Stay 2. 
Postponed: King's Lynn v Rirtbdsn. 
GREAT MILS WESTERN LEAGUE: 
League Cup: Ctsppenham 2, LarMtafl 1. 
MACBAR SOUTH WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Bnstof City t. Plymouth Argyte 
2; Swansea City 2. Shrewsbury 6. 

FA YOUTH CUP: Ftret guatfytng maid: 
Maidenhead Uraed LScopb Town 1; 
Uxbndge 4, Clapton 2; Tooting and 
t*Ktem 7. PorriaM ft 
SOUTHERN JUMOR FLOODLIT: Off* 
Ait round replays: Northampton 1. 
GmUndgeUmtadO: Arsenal 1. Aston' Vl» 
11*0: 


Six new caps 
at sw imming 


Some rugby dubs like 
Blacltheafo or Liverpool are 
bora great, some tike Orrdl 
achieve greatness and some have 
greatness thrust upon Them. 
Wrexham might well prove to be 
sack a dub. Geography is their 
greatest ally. 

. The strongest dub in north' 
Wales, they conML, theoretically, 
draw on ■ Shropshire, most of 
Cheshire as tral as north and 
mid-Wales. There is no senior 
dub nearer-, than Manchester, 
-Liverpool or mid-Lancashire 
and there seems to be no doubt 
foal Wrexham could and should 
graduate to senior status as 
Orrdl did in the 60s. 

One problem is that Wrex- 
ham is a Welsh dub and the 
cauldron of Welsh rngby bub- 
bles array merrily in tbe south. 
Could they attach themselves to 
the newly-formed and projected 
leagues in the north west of 
England? The answer seems to 
be: theoretically. “Yes." In prac- 
tice. “No." The Welsh RU 
would not object to tbeir 
participation but would veto 
affiliations to an English league. 
The leagues of course would 
demand affiliation! - 

Wrexham's claims to 
advancement ant Impeccable. 
-Founded in tbe 1925-26 season, 
the dob has improved steadily 
from Ibe 60s tool tbeir summit 

of achievement last season, in 
which tbeir record read: played 


33: won 30: lost 3. Points for 
1,063: Points against 261. Two 
of foe three games lost are of 
especially significance- One was 
to Newport (29-0) in tbe third 
round of the Welsh Cop, and the 
final defeat was wholly honour- 
able when they lost to UauelK 
(26-10) in tbe final game of the 
season. - Hus' was a one-off - 
fixture. It was foe fi rst time that 
the dub had progressed to the 
third round of the Welsh Cnp. 
Tbe defeat by Llanelli was the 
first home game that the dub 
had lost since September 1984, 
With regard to Wrexham's 


Schools Rugby by Michael Stevenson . 

Reigate Grammar -School's wards, the right wing, scored 
game at home to Whiqpft soon after For Kuthin.bui Rydal 
produced an .excellent contest whose tackling began to show 


narrowly won 16*13 by foe 
home side. They led 1G-G at foe 
interval and -survived a Storm- 
ing finish by Wbitgift. to win by 
a goal, a try and two penalties to 


-a-vyand three-penalties.-:--:' 

: . The Whitgift jack was dom 


: , The Wbitgift pack was donu-‘ 
□ant- in the eariy stages but a 


signs of wear- and tear, pulled 
back through a try by Jason 
Shaw.. Osian Jones, who had 
helped to make rite try with a 
good run. converted to make it 
8^6 at half-time; / 

■. Two' tries by die powerful and 
drterprising Edwards effectively 


superb performance - from foe titled the issue, ' as both were 
Rqgate flanker Adam Freeman. - converted by David Simpkins. 


style of play, they are a good 
deal nearer in method to Fmity- 


deal nearer in method to Peaty- 
pool than to Leicester! A solid 
forward platform is usually 
achieved and the backs only tend 
to come into their own in the 
game's last quarter when fitness, 
a quality endlessly stressed by 
the club coaches, has blunted the 
opposition's defence A swit c h 
around of roaches with Austin 
Thomas, —lting over, as north 
Wales couch, when Tony Gray 
became foe new national coach 
lasr year, has gives Alike 
Mahoney;- a native of Maestep, 


who scored both bis side's tries, 
accounted for the solid half-time 
lead: Mark Holman kicked one 
conversion. 

in the second half both teams 


kicked a pair of penalties, by 
Holman for Reigate and Nick 


New captain 
for Surrey 


Michael - Gibson, now in his 


Auer for Whitgift. Auer added sl second season with London 


third penalty and towards the 
end. the command of the 
Whitgift pack was rewarded 
with a pushover try. touched 
down by their scrtun-half Mat- 
thew Corbett. 

RydaL who had a respectable 


side last season but have: since <*bsen. 


Irish, will, captain Surrey this 
season(David Hands writes:) 
The county selectors have cho- 
sen a squad of 28 from which the 
team to. play a warm-up game 
against British Police at Imber 
Court _on October 8 will be 


lost several., key players. -met _ Alasiair McHarg win con- 


Rufoin : on Wednesday and 


his opportunity torfbUow Austin 

as Wrexham's coach. By all 


as Wrexham's coach. By all 
accounts he is a demanding 

mentor 


Michael 

Stevenson 


could not cope with the visitors’ 
superior physical strength and 
were defeated 24-12. 

Rydal controlled 1 the early 
exchanges but it was Ruthin 
who scored through a powerful 


/uasiair McHarg will con- 
tinuers coach but foe squad will 
be withotu'foe services ofSimon 
Smith, the Richmond stand-off 1 

half - who is a member of the 
England squad and wishes to 
limn his appearances this sea- 
son. A likely replacement for 


breakaway by their speedy wing. Smith will be Mark Jeimvn 
Shola Alarapon. The games (Rosslvn Park) whoisam^nrU- 


bhoia Alarapon. The games 
outstanding player. John Eti- 


(Rosslyn Park) who is* member 
of the squad. 


ICE SKATING 


Manley in 
another .<* 


league to 
Conway 


By John Hennessy 

Elizabeth Manley, of Canada, 
produced a bravura free skating 
performance to win the St lyd 
Ice International women's tide 
by a length of the neaihy 
Thames ■ at Richmond on 
Wednesday. nighL The seven 
judges unanimously placed he- 
first with six glowmg marks w 
5,9 and eight of 5.8. ■ 

Joanne Conway, the ¥Oui» 
British champion, soil only JS, 
had another unhappy .evening 
and declined two further places 
to fifth having been overtaken 
by the competitors from Bat 
Germany and foe Soviet Unioh. 
Jill Trenary. or the United 
States, was Tunner-up. ■ 

Miss Manley, drawn last, 
lifted foe evening’s skating on to 
a higher plane altogether with,* 
performance as near faunie&as 


you can gel on such a treach- 
erous surface as ice. - ‘ 


doubt Honeyghan will have tMXCd if he 
is not to become the eighth' unsuccessful 
challenger for the American's title. Yd 
Mickey Duff, Honeyghan's manager, 
believes there are weaknesses his man 
will be able to exploit — Carry's relative 
inactivity and problems in making the 
weight limit. 


erous surface as i«. ■ 

She executed four different 
triple jumps, the sotnewha 
workaday toe loop and sakioir 
being supplemented bytbemA 
demanding lutz, and loop. She 
was fifth in Ihe woild champion- 
ship last season. Promotion is 
■imminenL 

Miss Conway began ■ weH 
enough with an assured triple 
salchow, foe jump that had 
eluded her, crucially, in 
Tuesday's short programme, 
But both triple toe loops be- 
trayed her and she feU. too.ioaa 
double axel. ■ .. 

There was some consolation 
for Britain in the display of 
Sharon Jones and Paul Askhmtt 


in the original set pattern dance. 
Thev harnessed tbe Viennese 


There is a distinct possibility 
at the Canadian XV that meet 


They harnessed the Viennese 
Waltz beat to a sequence full of 
flow and character, and .they 
were beaten only marginaUy® 
into second place - by foe - 
favourites. Kathrin • and 
Christoff Beck. The judges spUt 
5-4 in favour of the Austnan 
couple, who were seventh in the 
world last season, six ^ptaqes 
. ahead of Askham and Jones. , 


limping badly yesterday as foe 
team left Belfast for tbe journey 
to Dublin and was 'not over- 
optimistic about playing. “It is 
not serious, just a bad sprain, 
but it could role me out for 
Saturday though 1 am confident 
that 1 will have fully recovered 
for next Wednesday's game 
against Leinster" de Goede sakL 


Sftould de Goede be missing 
jm die team to be named 


from tire team _ to be named 
today, the captaincy- will go to 
Glen Ellis, foe No S. Definitely 
out forthe rest of the four-match 
tour is David Tucker, scrum 
half. An X-ray after the Ulster 
game oh Wednesday night ref 
vealed a torn ankle ligament, an 
injury which necessitated his 
replacement mid-way through 
foe-second half 

Meanwhile. Philip Matthews, 
due to lead the Irish team, feces 
a fitness test this morning on a 
knee injury picked up in that 
same match at Ravetfoill. 

The 32-13 ’■ shoreline .in 
Ulster’s fevpur was, in no way 
an .accurate barometer with 
which to assess the difference 
between 1 foe two sides! individ- 
ually, foe "Canadians 'matched 
Ulster in practically all depart- 
ments. the exception being on 
foe wings where Crossan and 
Ringland emphasised ‘ , again 
theirdass. . 

The ‘ Canadian scrum -were 
solid and foe fact that they 
, forced Ulster to collapse a^enun 
late in tite and concede a 
’ penalty. try speaks volumes. 



Adjusting 
to life in 
Montana 


By Conrad Voss Bark 


English fly fishermen visiting 
American rivers have to make 
several adjm&nents to . tra- 
ditional attitudes. The flies aig 
differen t, foe fish are different 
and the rivers jue different One 


gooid trout river in Montana, not^ 
all that far from its source. i*T 5 
some two to threebandred yards ’ 
wide and shallow enough fora 
man wearing breast waders to 
walk halfway across. It b.Pto 
ticalfy all dry fly-fishing and, 
even . m. the fly can sang in 
surface weed. . 


FISHING 


The water is - exceptionally 
dean and pore, in 
country of moantnms nod for- . 
ests, and on grassy meadows d 
some 5,000 feet above sea'fcvd 
graze deer, elk and bison, fee 
latter known also as buffekL 
Fishermen are advised to avoid 
buffaloes and, in foe Ycll&w* 
stone National Park, there nm* 
helpful notices about -how to 
behave if one meets bear. ' | 
In a charming rivet witk tttk 
attractive name of Henry's ForiC ' 
whidi was wider and much 
deaner than foe Thames- af 
Wapping, we fished la com-' 
petition with, several osprey*. • 
We were dealing with insect*- 
which are mainly new to.'n*. 1 
Tbeir blue- winged olive woaM 
not be recognisable as oat on 
and there were many flies, sura 
as a mahogany dan. which were - 
most un f a m i liar. Oar own 
ncial trout flies, which we- used 
<m the chalk streams ' in Efr_ , 
grand, were not of much help, f 
tried some, but it was only after 
we pat on an imitation gram-; 

hopper known as Joe's Hopper., 

wefl greased to float that Choi 
tnmt became interested. . 

However, most of the fish took; 
™es so small that they was ' 
practically invisible -and had to'" 
be fished on 6X points, known to„ 

the Americans as tippets. There ’ 


*** an honourable exception - 
an English pattern which fa*' 

become very popular in America. 
More about that next week. 


RUGBY UNION 

TOUR MATCH: Ulster 32. Canadians 1? 

(st RavenhG). 

CLUB HATCHES: LOttOOn Welsh 15. 
MetasKfcan Pom 9: Newport^. Bam 33; 
RQrtwool 22, Munster tl; PortypwJd 12. 
Canto 39; Rpon 7. RAF 12; Bndgend 21. 
UanetH3. 

BtSLE T OFF ICE EQUIPMENT SOUTH- 
ERN MERIT TABLE: AbMy ft Bownt- 
moutta is 


nrlrti Cup-- First rated Tong 0. Car- 
SijTYeSrt 1-IOWSW 3 

Newbury ft Windsor and EWl ft 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

GRUNHALLE LASER LANCASHIRE COP; 
-Second wort Oktiam 4& Wortungron 
13: Barrow io. wanes 12: St Helens 19. 
Wj mn g »n 15; Wigan 74 . Wtaiteftaven a. 
JOHN SMITH'S YORKSHIRE CUP: See- 
onfttound: Bratton) 4ft Dewsbury- 10; 
HiP Kingston Rovers 20. FeaBter s tooe 
■ajrcastowrd 38. teem 16: HML2L. 
■watrefleM 12 : ’ 


There are six new caps in 
Britain's swimming tea ha to 
compete against foe United 
States at the open international 
meeting in Blackpool from 
October 31 to November I. 
The)- are: Richard Leishman 
(100 metres butterfly), Susan 
Brooksbank (100m- butterfly). 
Nma Herbert (200m breast- 
stroke). Karen Pickering- (50m 
freestyle). Shona Smart (200m 
individual medley relay)- and 
Claire Tucker <100m 
breaststroke). 

ATHLETICS: All United King- 
dom entries for the 1987 Lon- 
don Marathon, taking place on 
Sunday. May 10. must be in by 
nexi Tuesday. 

RUGBY LEAGUE: Wigan, foe 
holders, have been drawn at 
home to St Helen's in the 
Grunhallc Lager Lancashire 
Cup semi-finals, while Oldham 
entertain Widnes. In the John 
Smith's Yorkshire Cup, Hull 
KR will be at home to 
Castlefotd in foe semi-finaL if. 


FORTHE RECORD 


BASEBALL 


VOLLEYBALL - 


TENNIS 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


NORTH AIOUCA! National Laagiw: Hous- 
ton Astros 6. San Fimc ac o Gums 0-. 
Canon Reds A Atlanta Braves 1 . Chicago 
Cubs 8. New York Mets 2: St lausCardrafc 
7. PMKMimia Wanes 1 : Pittsburgh Prates ft 
MootreM E*ow 1. Americas LaapM Toron- 


to Bue Joys 8. Datns* Hoars ft New York 
Yankees i. Banners Orates' 1. OaUarid 
Attnaics 4. ctw a Bo warn So* ft Kansas osy 
Royals ft Mnneatae Turns t ScsStta Marv 
nArs 5. Toms Rangora 4. 


MEN'S WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: first 
■wn4 droop A (MompoWart- France of 
Venezuela. 3-fl. Jtatybt China. 3-0: Wy 01 
Venezuela. 3 -0 

Grom B (Tourtangfc Cuba bt.Pdand 3-1 _ 
- Sana Unat M Tppai.-fta: Cuts M Ttep^"3^ 
0. Group C (OBNnont-F«nsnQ- Bglnana a 
CzanosawakU. 30: Eteri a E grot. 30: 
CzectaostMka bi Egypt M Graup O 
fOrteana)- Argentra br Greece. 30: Urated 
States btJapan. 3-1 Jtjgentma tat Japaa 3-0. 


SPEEDWAY 


SAN FRANCWXk Ttanmwriea open: ton 
round (US unices s t atoo r J Connors m O 
GtSdc. 31.7-6: JMcEnroe btBQyketAuslff- 
2 6-2. Saeoad round: J GraOb bt C Stoyrv 
tSAJ. 34. W. D Pate to M LMctv 3ft 7* A . 
“Jarryfl (Ss«|WTtt0Kon.M.M: P LiXWrer 
iSwlMiJKnstaanIlriGW.3a.31.- 
bARCSLdNA: mafld pdE Second round: C" 
Mona (Braz) tat M Jan tArgj. 32.3ft Thfed 
fomtrO Perez {UiulbtT BaohaUos (FA 6-L 
34.37.M »aiber(Cz}b(CMW»(Gm).3ft 
3ft T $B*f (Cn « C PtStOtea (It). 33. 34: 0 
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tepwre* square 


CINEMAS 




NATIONAL LEAGUE:- Long Eaton aft Can- 


taurMi35. wantned0R37. Arena Essnr dl. 
KNOCKOUT — - 


KNOCKOUT CUP: OwrterOnM. tkst 
Caddy Heath SO. Hduang 28. 


FOOTBALL 


FRENCH LEAGUE: Monaco- 1. Ida 0: Too- 
louse 3. RC Pans O-LatfiiO. Nice 0: Auroral. 
Names 6: Brest 0. Men ft, Le Havre i. 
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GOLF FOUNDATION TEAM CHAMFIONSHK* 
FOR SCHOOLS: anSMng round: At 
TmmcJuGC ZaftYMmimnnHenSdioat. 
247: E«cter Scnoot. Best wMdate aoaer. P 
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twrar cranBA 579 »t4/ 

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TABLE TENNIS 


HOCKEY 


INTERNATIONAL MATCH: Ireland ft West 
Germany t 


SUPER LEAGUE: Roland tal Hungary.' 3ft 
Bulgaria bt fiance. 31 


retwpUA Kiooiivsamno- 


Vavo ft Roda JC Kerfcrade 1. AU« Arrvtf 
flamt Leodlna stnmfinas: 1 PSV&nrtnven 


YACHTING 


CYCLING 


they beat Featherstone Rovers. 
vYilh Bradford Northern playing : 
host to HtdL" 


cam I Leadtegatendtec 
pined! pom» 13. 2.1 


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SAL0U. Spate: World <70 d i a ryot a rop: 
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A Larnstrorn (Feij. 4. T vermeufen and N 
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Rangere R« 2. Svrtidoft Trtwt Res 2 . ■ 


BRUSSELS: Pads4b0tsete act 1. G 
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at one second:-! 4 Cent iBeft. A.t 
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PI T«5TMFW AND FINANCE 


21 



i X 
(1 < 




•Ai/i.iv -1.0 i V 00 


Jl 



Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


BBC 1 


6.00 Ceefax AM. 

• 6*50 Breakfast Time with Frank 
. Bough and Debbie 
.i Greenwood in London and 
Nick Ross at the Liberal 
Party Assembly in 
Eastbourne. Weather at 
*55, 7.25, 7.56, 8JB and 
‘ &55; regional news, 
weather and traffic at R57, 
7.27. 7 ST and 857; 

. - national and international 

news at 7.00, 7.30, 8J», 

. . 8^0 and 9.00; sport at 

•- .J2» and L20 and a review 

rathe morning 

r> • newspapers, at 137. Otter 
. .items, indude Alan 
Trtchmarsfi’s 'phone-in 
: ; r gardening advice; and 
Anns Robinson chooses 

- ■*.- her weekend television. 

- _-"^0 Liberal Assembly 1988. 

• x. - The final day's debates 

. - 4 - . and an the agenda are 

those pn Youth, and Local 

Government 

■iOJP Play School 
. 10.50 Liberal Assembly 1986. 

. The debate on Penal 

-^Pbflcy. 

■ -12J0 approximately 

-International Golf. Eight 
•• teams compete in the 
second round of the 
Dunbiil Cup on the Old 
Course, St Andrews. 

IJM -Neons After Noon with 
i-f -Richard Whitmore and 
f: Moira Stuart includes 

news headflnes with 
subtitles 1.25 Regional 
news and wsather.1.30 
Hokey Cokey, (r) 1 AS 
Ceefax. 

’ 2 JOO Liberal Assembly 1988. 

. " 'This itnSl session of the 

conference Includes the 


3JS2 


leader, David i 
Regional news. 


.3^5 WMzz..(r) 4.10 SupwTed. 
>4.15 Beat the Teacher. 


£ 


tthe' 

3 aul Jones introduces 
another round of the 
-teachers versus pupils 
. qote game 430 Cheggdrs 
Plays Pop. Kerth Chegwin 
With another selection of' 
pop music, videos, - 
quizzes, and a mystery 



540 John Craven’s 

Newsround 545 Butterfly 
> Island. Adventure aerial 

•i set on an island by the 

.Great Barrier Reef. 545 
The Krenkles Etektronflc 
Komk. The guests include 
The Great Soprendo and 
Chas and Dave. (r) ■ 

6.00 -News with Nicholas 

- WrtcheU and Frances 
Cover-dale. Weather. 
London Plus. 

7.00 Wogait Tonight's guests . 
are Anthony Hopkins, 

7 ; Douglas Adams, pizza' 

r : . maker Barry O'-HaUoran.- '■ 
‘J- and, with a song. Paul 
Young. 

7.40 Blank ety Blank. On Les 
Dawsons' panel this 
evening are Janet Brown, 

. Dave Lee Travis, Sabina 
Franklyn. Alfred Marks, 
Diana Moran and David 
Wilkie. (Ceefax) . 

8,10 Dynasty. Blake is double- 
crossed by an old friend; 
Caress discovers what 
■' Bbn was up to on the night 
of his mother's death; 
Alexis is causing waves in 
-■ thrCWna Seasrand ' 
Claudia resorts to- 
blackmail. (Ceefax) 

9.00 News with John Humphry® 

r and Andrew Harvey. 

Regional news and 
weattier. 

9.30 CaH Me Mister. Drama 
1 serial about a man ' 
searching for his father's 
. killer. (Ceefax) 

1045 Omnibus: Hitchcock. Part 
one of a two-programme • 
documentary profile of the 
master ol mystery and • 
suspense films. With 
contributions from-, among 
otters, James Stewart, 
Rodney Addend, and 
s ~ Hitchcock's daughter, 
Patricia, (see Choice) ■ 
1140 Fibre Diabolically Yours 
(1967) starring Atain Delon 
and Senta Berger. A man 
wakes up in hospital with 
his mind totally blank. A 
beautiful woman arrives 
claiming to be his wife and 

takes him back to a 
country house. As he 
slowly regains his memory 
f ■ the man realises he has 
become part of a murder 
plot. Directed by Juflen 
Duvrvier. 

1.00 Weather. 


TV AM 


6.15 Good Mi 


lom&M Britain 
presented by Anna 
Diamond and Adrian 
Brown. News with David 
Foster at 640, 740, 740, 
840, 840 and 940; 
financial news at 645: 
sport at 6A0 and 7 A0; 
exercises at 645 and 9.17; 
cartoon at 745; pop music 
at 745; and Jimmy 
:Greaves's television 
htahfights at 845. The 
After Nine guests are • 

Nana Mouacouri and, with 
the horoscopes. Russefi 
Grant 


ITV, /LONDON 


945 Thames news headlines. 

945 For Schools: what makes 
chBdren laugh? 9A7 How 
We Used to Liver coping 
with drunkenness in the 
family 1049 Maths 

halving and doubting 1046 
Add rain 10A8The 
women termers of Burkina 
Faso, Kenya and 
Zimbabwe 11.15 A day in 
the Hfe of a milkman 1147 
People who help in 
schools 11 A4 Why houses 
are designed the way they 
are. 

1240 FDcka. The story of The 
Wizard of Wallaby WaHow. 

. M 12.10 Rainbow. 
Learning about horses 
with the help of puppets. 

1240 Rsmywfs6.Thefirstofa 
new series of 
programmes with advice 
on saving money. 
Presented by Anne Brand 
and Muriel dark. 

140 News at One with John 
Suchet 140 Thames 
news. 

140 Film: Mosquito Squadron 
(1968) starring David 
McCaDum. Second World 
-War drama about the 
development of the 
bounce bomb. Directed by 
Boris Saga!. 

340 Take the High Road. Brian 
» enthusiastic about hfs 
new job 345 Thames 

news headlines 340 Sora 

and Daughters. 

440 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown el 
12.10. 4.15 Daffy Duck. 
Cartoon (r) 440 Your 
Mother Wouldn’t L9ce ft 
4A5 Alias the Jester. 
Cartoon adventures of a 
spaceman who tan* hi 
the Middle Ages. 

540 Bellamy’s Bugle. The first 
of a new ecological series 
by 



4.15 Btockbustera-Bob ' 
Holness presentsanother . 

- round onhe-ganorat 
knowledge quiigama for 
teenagers. 

5A5 News with Afestafr 
Stewart 

6J0 The 6 O’clock Show 
presented by Michael 

■ Aspel. 

740 Bruce Forsyth’s Play Your 
Cards Right Game show. 
740 New Faces of 96. Talent 
show presented by Marti 
Caine. The non-votfng : 
panel are John Miliar, 

. Marti Webb and Gary 
Wiimot • 

840 Home to Roost Henry _ 

: Iriee io teach his sonto 
drive. (Orttlsi - 
940 To Have and To Hold. 
■Drama serial about a 
woman having a/ 

baby far her! . 

faffing in Jove wthher 
brother-in-law. (Oracle) 
1040 News atTeimith Ala stair 
Burnet and Leonard • 
Parkin. 

140 The Making of Modem 
London. The story of the 
post-war exodus from the 
city, followed by LWT ; 
New* headlines.. 

11,00. Snoakar, The BCE : 

- International frgnr 
Trentham Gardens, Stoke- 
on-Trent Dickie Davies 
introduces highlights of 
the day's play. 

12.15 F tow witchcraft (1964) 
starring Lon Chaney Jr. A 
300 year okf family feud Is 
reactivated when a 
bulldozer chums up a 
number of graves. 

Directed by Don Sharp. 

145 World Chess 

Championship from 


Leningrad. 
140 New From 
Blow 
240 Night 


London. The 
in concert 


Jnfiet Stevenson, Hamid Pkkss: 

on Radio X 730paj 


• Except for Monroe's and 
Chaplin's, and possibly Wr n 
no Movietand map has a 
greater number of fam Bar 
physical features than 
Hitchcock's. Nothing daixrtBd, 

. Tlrfstram PoweB tonight 
launches his two-part Oumffjus 
documentary HITCHCOCK 
(B8C1, 104a). Don't expect 
many new revelations. Here, 
intact, are the wen-remembered 

landmarks: Hitch leg-pulllngjy • 
proclaiming that Rea Red Riding 
Hood was me generis of all 
his thrtferr. that all his films were 
made bn paper before they 
foundlheir way into celluloid; " 
that Iris heroines had to be 
blonde because fairy tales had 
set the style long ago; and 
that as a suspense device, the 
parcel bomb that went off 
was never as explosive as the 
bomb that didn’t. Akxig the 
way, Poweft does come up with a 
novelty item or two. There are 
home-movie dips I cant 


remember seeing before, 
inducing Hitch sucking his thumb 
in a baby cage and stoning a 
protesting actress Into the front 
of a car with all the finesse of 
a demented abductor. And the 
story about the poor fellow 
who was slipped a purgative by 
Hitch, is quite new to me. 

• Best of the rest tontaht a 
repeat screening of THE 
BURSTON REBELLION. 

Baine Morgan’s faultless ' 
dramatization erf the true tale 
of the Higdons and their Norfolk 
vfflage school (BBC2. 

9.00pm); and an English version 
erf THE COMPROMISE! 

3. 740pm). lstvan Eorsrs 
intelligent play about the 
death-bed harassment of an 
Hungarian potitical historian. 

As ms wife, Juliet Stevenson 
impressed me as strongly as 


in BBC 

2’s recent 
• Weekend highlights: the 
same BBC team that braved a 
Cretan fire brigade's attempt 
to drown the actors and crew 
duriiu location filming on 
ZEFFRELLPS OTELLO 
(Sunday.BBCZ, 945pmL also 
captured some fascinating 
Insights into the basic 
impossibility of a film director's 
frying to bo as true to Ver# 
as he is'mtadful of the iimitert 
patience of the non-operatic " - 
ramgoer. I doubt that r shall er$oy 
ZefneOTs film half as much - 
as I enjoyed David Sweefrnan's 
documentary about the .' 
making of it Far and away the 
best of the weekend films: 

Sam Wood's atmospheric period 

drama King's Row 
(tomorrow, BBC2, 1 45pm), with 
komgold's unforgettable 
musical score. 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


645 Open IMvwatty: 

Conformation an Proteins 
740 Weekend Outlook. 

- Ends at 745. 

940 Ceefax. 

940 Often School: Diploma 

■- Level Studies 942A 
hoftdayon alarm 10.15 - 
. Living in Aberdeen 1048 
Maths: Pascal 1 ® Triangle, 
and gears 11.00 
WOndermaths 11.17 The 
fluctuating fortunes of 
Glasgow since Victorian 
times. 11.40 Art education 

forthe young- 

1240 Episode one of a three 
part production of Arthur 
Miter's drama, A View 
From the Bridge. 12.32 A 
fat teenager thinks she is 
the odd one but 145 

Learning English from 
popular television 
programmes 1.33 Why 
has Britain slipped to a 
low position in the 
economic growth league? 
240 For the very young. 

2.15 Gaff md Racing. The 
second round of the 
DunitiO Cup from the CU 
Course, St Andrews; and 
the 240, 345, 3A0 and 
4.15 races from Ascot 

545 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

540 Championship Darts. 
Highfights of test night's 
quarterfinal matches in the 
unipart Championship. 

640 F3nc The Spy With My 


Face (1965) starring 
Robert Vaughn and David ■ 
McCaUum as the men from 
UNCLE, in this adventure 

- guarding (he combination 
of a safe housing the 
world's deadliest nuclear 

- weapon. Directed by John 
Newland.- ' 

740 Ebony . Dixie Peach 

reports from Chicago on a . 
new style of music created 
by black homosexuals; . 
and Vastrana Belfon meets 
Francisco Cabral who 
makes chair sculptures. 
840 OnePatrofEyes-Aprofito 
of Simon Treheame who 
lives and works in the 

- community although 
mentally Handicapped. 

840 Ganfehefa’ WM&Gaoff 

' Hamfltonand John Kefly 
visit the BorwiCk, 
Lancashire, garden of 
Betty and Graham 
McBurota, in which. . 1 

. despite the cold they have, 
managed to grow several •• 
exotic specimens, as weS 
as fruit such as ^aes, 
figs and cherries. - 
940 Screen TWo: The BurSton 

- RebaMon, by Elaine 
Morgan. Bleen Atkins and 
Bernard HiU star as Kitty 
and Tom Higdon who, in 

1 91 1 , take up teaching 
posts in the NorfoBcvfflage 
otBurston. But their new 
. . ideas about education. 

tfhestaus quointhe 
village and they are . 


dismissed by thi 
authorities. The 

disagree with ti«r 
and In April 1814 they go 
on a strike which Is to test 
a quarter of a century, (r)' 
1040 Ne w anl glit 1140 
Weather. 

1145 Ch am pi ons hip Pert*. The 
semifinals of the Unipart 
British Professional 
Championship. 

1245 International GolL 
Highltahts of second 
roundof the Dunhili Cup. 
Ends at 1.10.- ■ 


CHANNEL 4 


240 Conference Report Qyn 
Matirias Introduces five 
coverage of David Steel's 
speech to the Liberal 
Assembly. . . 

340 Snooker: the BCE 

International. Fifth round* 
coverage, introduced by 
- Dickie Davies. The 
commentators at 
Trentham Gardens, Stoke- 
on-Trent are John 
Putman, Dennis Taylor, 
RexWffiams, Ray 
Edmonds and Meric 
Wildman. 

440 The Gong Show. Among 
Chuck Barris's 
embarrassing entertatnere 
this afternoon are a duo 
who gargle songs. 

540 Revio. Gary Crowley and 
Jon Stephen Fink review 
the week's new film and 
video releases. 

5.15 Solid Soul presented by. 
Juliet Roberts and Chris 
Forbes. The guests are 
Dhar Braxton, Lonnie HBL 

. The Real Roxanne, Zapp, 

. Nicole and Timmy 

Thomas, and Raul 

Hardee gtte. 

5A5 The Chart Show. The 
latest pop music charts 
feahnig new videos by 
Police and Bton John. 

640 Conference Report Qyn 
Mathias presents 

debars and the speech 
by David Steel to me 
Liberal Assembly. 

740 Channel 4 News with 
P8ter Sissons and 
Nicholas Owen, Includes 
' RoyHatterstey . 
interviewed on Labour's ■ , 
chances at the next 
' . General Bection. Weather. 

740 Book Choice. Cliva James 

discusses Less Than One, 
a collection of essays by 

theexfied Russian poet 
Joseph Brodsky. 

840 What the Papers Say. 

With Michael Leapman. 

8.15 Efendung FBe-Tfus week's 
magazine programme for 
Britain's Asian and Alro- 
Caribbean population 
indudes a profSe of Incfian- 
writerVaownSetfoanda 
repot t on bieck 

_ candMates. 

rCohy 

Domestic comedy series 
from the United States, 

940 Gard en er s ' Calender 
Roadshow presented by 
Susan Brooks. Royal 
Horticultural Society 
experts Reg Perryman and 
John Warank answer 
questions from amateur 
In the 
idgs area. 

1040 The Golden Gfate. 

Canady series about four 
middle aged women 
' a Florida house. 


1040 


1140 



The petty crook is 
out of friends as 
the heavies are on the 
look-out for him, and is 
desperate for somewhere 
to hide. Starring Adan 
Faith. (Grade) 

Fttnc The Vulture (1981) A 
drama about an Israeti 

sol (tier coming home from 
the war who is forced into 

metroriesoladead 
friend. Starring Shraga 
Harpaz and Hannah 
Maron. Directed tty Yaky 
Yosha. (In Hebrew with 
Eh^Ssh subtitias) Ends at 


( Radio 4 ) 


On tong wbvql (s) Stereo on VHF 
545 5 hipping- tOO Wews Briefing; 
Weather. 6.10 Famting. 

645 Prayer ]*) 

640 Today, ind 640, 740, 

- 840 News. 6^*5 
Business News. 645,745 
weather. 740, 840 
News. 745, 845 Sport 745 
Thought for the Day. 645 
Letters 

M3 Figures In a Bygone 

Part five of 
(Don Haworth's 
autobiography, read by 
Stephen Thane. 847 
Weather; Travel 
940 News 

945 Desert island Discs. Suzi 
Quatrain conversation 
with Michael Parkinson (iXs) 
945 Under the Bo Tree. Dr 
Hay on a young teacher’s 
work in a Sri Lankan vBage. 
10.00 News; biternattonal 
Assignment BSC 
correspondents report 
1040 MOrringStar Eagles 

Ry High, by JIB Norris. 
Reader Fieur Chandler 
10 l 45 Dally Service, from 
Bristol te) - 
1140 NewsiTravd: 

Workforce. Brian 
Redhead visits Manchester 
to ffle his guartarty report 
on unentotoymenKi) 

1148 Natural Selection. 

Michael Clegg on the 
winged migrants. 

1240 News; in Touch Special. 

How to help an older 
person cope with the toes of 


1247 The Mfflon Pound Radio 
Show. Comedy sk etches 
(s) 1245 Weather 

1.00 The World at One: News 
140 The Archers 145 

Slipping Forecast 
240 News; woman's Hour. 

The cBstoeating effects ' 
that holidays can hare on 
famifies. . 

340 News; Nostroma Part4 
of asix-part 

dramatization of Conrad's 
novel. With John Bennett 
as Charles Godd (iXs) 

4.00 News 

445 Around the World in 25 
Years. Johnny Moris 
recalls Ms travels In Malaya. 
430 Kaleidoscope. A second 
chance to hear last 
night's edition. 

540 PM. News magazine. _' 

540 Shipping. 545: 

- Weather • - ■ 

640 News: Financial Report - 


630 Going Places. CHve 
Jacobs presents the 
consumer magazine about 
travel and Transport 
740 News 

745 The Archers 

740 Pick of the Week. 


MaraaretHoward with . 
fvghSghts 


t of the 
on 


week's 


. &20 Stop Press. Gfyn 
Worsnlp reviews the 
week's newspapers 

645 Any Questions? Lord 
Chappie, Emma 
Nicholson. David FanNDgon 
MP and Andreas 
Whrttam Smith tackle issues 
raised by an audience hr 
Ottord. Kent 

940 Letter from America, by 
Afistalr Cooke 

946 Kaleidoficope. Includes 
comment an War 
Pictures at the New Vic, and 
Allan Massie's book 
Augustus 

10.16 A Book at Bedtims: 

Handley Cross, by 
R S Swtees (Ftet 10of 15). 
Read by John Franktyn- 
Robblns-. 1049 Weathar 

1030 TheWodd Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight • ' 

1140 Delve SpedaL A spoof 
I nvesti gation ty Da vid 
Lander. 

1240 News: Weather. 1243 


VHF (a 


fn England and 
above 


.1140- 

1240 For Schools 145- 
3.00pm For Schools 
540-545 PM (continued) 
1240-1. 10am Schools 
Night-time Bro ad ca s ting: A: 

- level Engfeh- Chaucer - 

- ds Con&ahd MoraTist fBL 

t; Radio 3 ) 

Ormedfum iwve and VHF/fM tip 

fltflfOO) . . j m . 

635 Open Univerdty. Unta ' 
645am Maths 
Foundation Tutorial 
64S Weathar. 740 News 
746 Morning Concert 

Mussorgsky (A night on 
the bare moimtain, an- 
Stokowsld), Scartatti 
(Pastorale; Capricdo. transc 
Shostakovich). Rbnsky- 
Korsakov (Sadko, Op 5), . 

- -840Ne!«^?^ ^ 

845. Concert (cootc^ 


Gottsehaik (The Union: 

Noel Lea, piano). Barber 
(Adagio for Strings). Ives 
(Symphony No 1)T940 News 
9405 mis Week's 

Composers: Dussak and 
Reich a. Dussek's La 
consoletkm. Op 62 (Jan 
Panenka. otono). and 
Reicha's Te Deum (with 
Prague SO. Kuhn MMd 
Chorus, and soloists 
Inducting Bohhaoova. 
Undauerand Pmsa) . 

104)0 BBC Scottish SO (under 
: Jerzy MaksyihiukLMth . 

: Robert Cohen (cello). Haydn 
. tSymphony.No 8lV 

- Schumann (Cel loConcwto) 
1045 Ruga Woott: Richard 

: Jaocscm (barttone) and . . 
Graham Johnson (piano). 

‘ The songs hcfudelhr 
said die AMe ra c ho n w e. Der 
Gartner, ffeue Uebe. and 
AndwGaMite. 

1130 PurceO and Couperin: 
Chandos Baroque 

Players. Purcell (Vtofin 
Sonata to Q minor), and 


concerts: No6 
1245 BBC PhMiermonlc (under 
Edvwd Downes). With 
Nigel Kennedy (violin). Part 
one. Haydn Wood (Manx 

Rhapsody). Brahms . 
^S ymphonyNp 3). 140 

145 Concert (continued): - - 
■ • • Bruch (Vtofin Coocerto 

No 10), Dvorak (Carnival - 
overtiira) 

146 Academia wind Quintet of' 
Prague: Troten 
(Divertimento), Garamuga 
(Wind Quintet) 

245 University of Wtiles 
redtat: Rose Consort of 
Vioto, wtih Michael Chanca 
(counter-tenor)- Works 
by Tafils (Including In 
nomine. MB 44 No 23). 
Parsons. Byrd, Thomas 
Whythome (Buy a new 
broom) 

340 -Her Eastern Bow: 

Szymanowski's Litany to 
the Virgin Mary, Op 59 (Polish 
Radio NatanH SO. under 
- ■ Antoni Wit wWrJadwiga' ^ 

Gaduianka. soprano), and 

- ■ Tcha&ovsky s Symphony No 
3(USSR SO. under 
■ -Svetianov)- - — 

4.00 Choral Evensong: from 
Liverpool Cathedral. «45 
. News 

540 Malnty for Pleasure: 
programme of recorded 
misrepresented by Rodney 
Stafford 

645 Gutar Music: the wRinv 
of the 1988 Havana 
Guitar Competition. 
Alexander Frauchi, plays 
Bach's Prelude and 
Allemande from Lute 
Suite. BWV 995; PaganWs 
■ Romanza and Andante 
variate, and Brouwer's 
• ■ Omaggioa VQvaldi, from 
- ' Concerto No2 -- . 

740. Bee thoven and Liszt . 


. (piano). Beethoven (Sonata 

to D major. Op 10 No 3). : 

. . . Uszt(CoricertStudy,lS ' “ 
-_ -jggg terezza) ; _ 

730 The Com promise: Ria - - 
Man's and Anthony - 
Vhris's translation of fstvan 
EoreTs play. With John 
Hurt, Ronald Pickup. Jufat 
Stevenson, Hugh 
Dickson, Bernard Hepton 
(see Choice) 

845 Cleveland Orchestra 
(under Christoph von ' 

Dohnanyi). Pad oner •' ; 

Mendetosota ^ympltofty . ■ 

: No 4) 

9307TheGerman'Puzzfe:ta6c . 
;■? by JanMcOoogWT- 


940 Concert (continued): 
Tchaflcovsky (Symphony 
NO 6) 

1045 i Can Sing. Dence. 
RoM o r akate ; Kathryn 
Atwood reads Dllys Rom’s 
story 

1140 OthmarSchoeckrMary 
King (mezzolstogs 14 
songs from DasStiKe - 
Leuchtan. With Catherine 
Edwards, piano 
1140 Brigg Fair: Chicago SO 
. . . (under Soltfiptay Delius's 
• . * -work. T147>l.ev». 1240 
Ctoeedown . - - 

( Radio 2 ) 

MF (medium wave). Stereo on vHF 
News on the hour (except 



440am Charles Nova 640 Ray 
Moore 730 Derek Jameson 930 
Ken Bruce 11.00 Jimmy Young 
(md legal advice) 145pm David 
Jacobs 240 Gloria Hunntford 
340 Mike D'Abo 545 John Dunn 
740 Hubert Gregg 740 Friday 
Night is Music N»drt. From BoxhO- 
on-Saa. ind 840440 Interval: 
Martin Muncsster talks about the 


Sports I 
Tausky conducts Langham 
Orchestra 1040 The Pre» 

Gang. News quiz 1140 Peter 
Dickson's Nkflncap't.OOam 
Nightride 340-440 A Little Night 
Music. 

( Radio 1 ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

News on the half-hour from 
640am until 840pm then 1040 and 
1240 midnight 

540»n Adrian John 740 Mike 
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Simon Bates 1240pm 
Newsbeat(lan Parkinson) 1246 
Simon Mayo 3.00 Steve Wright 
540 Newsbeet (Ian Parkinson) 545 
Singled Out With Janice Long 
740 Andy Peebles 1040-1240 The 
Friday Rock Show with Tommy 
Fence. VHF Stereo Raifies 1 JE 2> 
440am As Radio 2. 1040pm 
Ajb Radio 1.124O-440am As Radio 


WORLD SERVICE 


I nmm- — v iramnon i.w nnn 

> Twenty-tar Houre 740 A Decade of 

i7.4SMe rahan r New Pro g r am me Site 
» 84B Reflections B. 1 S Joan Sianer- 


•Tow 

AMC 


SJO Newedete ajp Mertolm 7.00 Newt 

WB746™ 

I Illlllll III! II II M 

land 840 Music Now 840 News 949 

Review of the British Press 9.15 The 

world Today 940 Flnandal News 940 

Look Ahead 8*5 Lake Wobegon Days 

1000 News summary 1041 New Wares 

on the Shortwave 10.15 Marchant Navy 

Proyamme 1140 News 1140 News 

About Britain 11.15 In tta Meantime 1145 

A Latter from Northern Ireland 1140 

Meridlen 1240 Radio Newsreel 12.15 

Jazz For SM Asking 1245 Spans Round- 

up 140 News 1JS Twentytour Hours 

140 John Peel 240 Outlook 245 Women 

At The Top 340 Radto Newsreel 3.15 The 

l^reMyatt Request Show 440 News 

M Co mm en ta ry 4.16 Science in Action 
BAS ’ Sports Roundup 746 Abote Britain 

440 News 849 TwwrtyFour Hours S40 

ISdencaJn Action S4 d News Summery 

S41 Network UK 9L16 Music Now 945 For 

[Whom The Bel Totis 1040 News 1040 

The World Today 1045 A Latter Rom 

Northern Intend 1040 Financial News 

1040 Reflections 1045 Sports Roundup 

1140 News 1140 Commentary 1115 

Rom the W eahtie s 1140 Aberdeen mter- 

netionel Youth Festival 1240 News 1249 

News About Britain 1Z15 Radio Newsreel 

1240 About Britain 1246 Record™ of 

the Weak 140 News Summery 141 

Outiook-140 Folk In the Modem World 

146 Women ALThe Top 240. Nows 240 
Review Of The British Pren 2.15 Network 

UK 240 nopte and RoBtka 340 Newt 

349 Naws-Abont Biftato 3.lS1he World 

Today. *46 R a te c ti ons 440 Fi nan ci a l 

News 540 JiawsAOO Twei tly - ruu r Houre 
1 645 TtoWbre Todey. Ab tinea to fflfT. 



BBC1 WALES 546-640 WMes 
HSS-i Today 845-740 Sporttoto 
inn 105am New mdwemiar. 
SCOTLAND: SJSm- 740 Rapartng 
Scotland 1045-1&S5The 
Beechgm w Qarden 1055-1126 Left; 
Right and Centra. 1146-IOSOem 
Omnibus: HBchcock 1240-1246 WSatit- 
ar. NORTHg H N BBE1AMD: 545pm- 

540 Today s Sport 54M40 InsMa 

W64S-740AT; 


. . .. . ATasia of tester . 

lOOMn-lOSNaweandwaather.BI' 

BLAND: 64fipm-7J)0 Regkxai news 

-1048 


NORTHBPiM 

■ Henry ToniteEN- 


Outtqote^rmk^Tteouqh-tha 


Ease East on 

Tmo. f. 

Qadenars- piract Una on tiia Road. 

Northeast Coast Id Coasfc At the Con- 

townees. NontvWett The RWer 

i’sRKM. 

South-West Radon's I 

Want An ( " 

HTVWE.SI^^^ 

Who Do S4B-740 News 10L30 Your 

Say 1045 Fedng WWat 11.15 Scene *M 
1145 Soocker 12.1 


ist Radon's Ugly Dei 
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htv wales 


1240 Sdwote S4tton-740 Wales at 
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REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


News 140-340 Rhtc Raw Edge 

340440 YoungDoctore 5.15545 
'Connections 640 Today South West 645 
Atton 9outh West 6411740 Ore Us 
a Ctee msasnoolwr 1315am Postscript 
1320 Mike Hammer 1.16 ' 

Ctoe e dowa 

T\#S A* London excepc 120 toei 
J- SW Nws140Mr PaftwofWest- - 

ntinater 240-3JM Hsirioam U0-440 

QggfycPjMftCpMtio care 540- .. 

740 CoumiY Ways 1030-1140 Fac- 
kig South 1315am Fkic Lucto Texan 

116 Company, Closedown. 

CHANNEL 

Paitray of W o atminstiBr 240-340 


tend Portralta 1315am Rtac Lucky 
Texan 1.16 Qosedown. 


Mr 


border™~s^ 

amts? 300 Fin Cat and Mouse 
340440 Young Doctors 640 
Loofcaruund 640-740 Taka IheHWi 
Road 1040-1 140 No Store Untured - 
1315am Closedown. 


ANGLfA *• Loncton except 

140p»140 tows 040- 
700 About Aitote 1040 Party Con- 
(erences WIGSnooker 1315am FBnc 
Benny and Barney: Lai VegasUn- , ■ 
dsreovar 1 40 Marcttirg Prates, ~ 
Closedown.- •' — 


Ftero Bad Ore* Bto* Rpck 040- . 
740 News 1036 CantrerWteek&}d 1240 - 

FhfnmttoUoNllAfm . 

J0BU»246GStadewh 

News, Closedown.^ 

S4C Stem: 11 . 10 m Calf a 
Chrefh 112S Clpotr- - 
Gong Show 148 Everytiod . . 

300Stori Sbri 316 intovef 240 Lberel 
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Cadwnn 440 Antmwyr y PaHh 600 
RevidTlS Sold Sotti 645 Chert 
Show 640 Do I De t ec t a Change in Yota 
Attitude? 740 NewytMon Sam740 
Cythraul Canu 040 das yDortan 140 Y 
Byd V Bedwar 040 UenBani 345 
What Oo These 0 Uf%ns Mean? 10.15 

Rhr 1918 1160 LBwte C o nference 

f240am Ctosedown. . , -■ 


1.2SHeto Yotusaif 150YeUowl 
330340 Mary 640 Calendar 040-740 
Whose the Boss7 1040 Snooker 
1315 m Late Night Drama 1346440 
‘Music Box. 

QBAMADA^*^^, 

BeporuiSOJMeefc in View 300340 ■ 

YeUow Rosa 340-440 Yoimg Doctors. 1 . 
640 Granada Reports 040-740 
- Cuckoo Wakz 1040-1 140 This England 
'1315am Fflnt Wteberaft 140" _ 

Xksedoan. 


140340 Fttn: King Richerd and the 
Crusaders 640 Scotland Today 040-740 
Held to Trust 4040-1140 M Loteng 
Manxrry 1315 m Late CaH. Oosadown. • 


340 Fim: Suspect 040 Good Eve- 
ning Ulster 640 Sporttcast 640-740 
Advloe wHti Am Hteas 1040 Wk- 
nesa 1045-1140 Barney MHar 1316 m 
N ews. Ctoeedown. 

TYNE TEES AsLonfonax ’ 

J-U1E-LEE2 cept 140pm N 
140340 Ften: The Catoncter3fl0 
Northern. Lite 040-740 Sporting Chance 
13l5an ITs In the Closet, fra Under 
the Bed 1240 Christian Catoxter, 
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entertainments 


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32 


FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1986 



SPORT 



Luton can earn draw or replay 


By Stuart Jones, Football 
Correspondent 


Luton Town and the Foot- 
ball League’s management 
committee meet today for the 
first lime, on the instructions 
of Dick Tracey, the Minister 
for Sport. 

Luton were technically 
knocked out of the 
Utllewoods Cup on Monday 
when the management 
committee ruled that their 
refusal to admit Cardiff City 
supporters was contrary to the 
rules of the competition. Al- 
though the two sides have 
been communicating with 
each other for 10 months, the 
meeting at League head- 
quarters in Lytham St Anne's 
today will be their first. 

The meeting was arranged 
yesterday on the firm advice 
of Mr Tracey. Acting as a 
referee on behalf of the Gov- 
ernment. he intervened in the 
dispute between the club that 
has taken an imaginative 
stand against hooliganism by 
banning away supporters and 
the committee which feels that 
the rules have been breached. 

It promises to be an un- 
compromising contest, which 
could yet end in a draw and go 
on to a replay in the High 
Court. Luton, who will be 
represented by David Evans, 
their chairman, and John . 
Smith, their executive direc- 
tor, made it clear yesterday 
that they will not yield on their 
principles. 

“We will not change our 
membership card system," 
Evans said. “We have taken 
the first fragile step towards 
identifying the bullies and the 
hooligans. Wc have got rid of 


ours. When other clubs have 
done the same their support- 
ers will be made welcome 
here, but not until then. 

“Public opinion seems to be 
with us. They think that 
perhaps this is the way to get 
rid of hooliganism, and if we 
lose this battle how are we 
ever going to win. it? If we are 
right then football will have 
won. If we are wrong nobody 
will have lost anything." - - 

Even though the committee 
is known to be equally in- 
transigent, it is more likely to 
be forced to concede defeat. If 
Luton do not triumph and are 
not reinstated, they will follow 
the customary pattern of 
procedure and appeal to the 
Football Association. If nec- 
essary. they will then take legal 
action. 

Evans stated that he will 
lake no new ofiers-with him 


into the meeting. He is not 
even prepared to give up 
home advantage and hold the 
first leg of the second round tie 
against Cardiff City on a 
neutral ground such as 
Watford’s Vicarage Road. 
“Why should we transport 
potential hooliganism some- 
where else?" he asked. 

He has never met the seven 
men who will form the oppo- 
sition but Smith is in the 


painful position of having a 
foot 


in both camps. He was 
present as a new member of 
the committee that, under the 
chairmanship of Philip Carter, 
reversed the decision that had 
been taken under Jack 
Dunnett his predecessor. 

“We started the discussions 
last December," Smith said, 
“and they went on until May. 
The Football Association told 
us that they would let us know 


about our position in the FA 
Cup in October and, on May 
22, the management commit- 
tee agreed at their meeting to 
exempt us from the two 
relevant rules." 

Within 48 hours the in- 
dividual members and the 
collective opinion of the 
committee had altered. “After 
six months of ■ talks they 
changed their -minds without 
even consulting us", Evans 
said. “What is going on? They 
have made an error of judge- 
ment and I think they have 
been surprised by the reaction. 
So, indeed, were we." 

He added that Luton had 
received letters and telephone 
calls from other League dubs 
offering their support Cardiff 
were not among them. They 
are seeking £25,000 in 
compensation, a -sum . .that 
Evans described as “ridicu- 


Inspirational figure needed 


The late Sir Norman Chester was convinced 
that one inspirational figure should be selected 
to take the place of the Football League 
management committee (Stuart Jones writes). 

His opinion, voiced earlier this year, has 
become even more relevant this week. The 
present committee, which was .reformed in 
May, could today suffer the embarrassment of 
having to change the first and last decisions 
they have taken, both of which concern Luton 
Town's Littiewoods Cap tie against Cardiff 
City. 

Sir Norman proposed Jimmy Hill as die 
leading candidate. Hill's professional playing 
career began in 1949 at Brentford where he 
played alongside Ron Greenwood, the former 
manager of England. 

A dozen years later as the chairman of the 
Professional Footballers’ Association. Hill 
lifted the game into a new era by helping to 
abolish the maximum wage. 


HiU, aged 58, has been employed by both the 
national television networks, initially as bead 
OT sport at London Weekend ami now as a pre- 
senter at the BBC A member of the board at 
Charlton Athletic, his experience covers more 
than three decades and his vision embraces 
almost every aspect of the game. 

Gordon Taylor Is another possibility. After 
scuttling down the flanks for Bolton Wander- 
ers, Birmingham City, Blackburn Rovers and 
Bury for 15 years, he became the secretary of 
the PFA. He has since gained wide respect and 
a reputation for using sense to bridge the gap 
between players and officialdom. 

As an administrator, the outstanding in- 
dividual is Peter Robinson. After learning his 
trade as a secretary in the lower divisions frith 
Crewe Alexandra, Scunthorpe United and 
Brighton, he joined Liverpool more than two 
decades ago. Significantly, his arrival co- 
incided with their rise to prominence. 


lous. They won't get if from 
us. Perhaps they will get it 
from the management 
committee." 

Evans, who is dearly 
committed to his dub's 
experimental move, was 
“shocked about our expulsion. 
It is ridiculous not to give it a 
run and the Cup is an. im- 
portant pan of it.The players 
form the atmosphere anyway, 
not the crowd. If 300 people 
are exchanging obscene chants 
from either end. is that 
atmosphere?" 

His vision of the future at 
Kenilworth Road goes beyond 
an artificial' surface that is 
surrounded by no fences, no 
dosed circuit cameras and no 
policemen. It indudes a roof 
over the stadium. "We’ve got 
to move ahead - and it. is 
madnessto open Ourdtiorsfbr 
only 30 times 3 year. ... . . 

“It makes obvious sense to 
have a covered.pitcb that can 
be used all the time. Tbe 
trouble is there is no sense in 
football at the moment. Why 
can't everybody who wants to 
watch football all belong to 
one big membership dub? 
After all, we need to get back 
the one and a half million 
spectators we lost last season." 

■ Smith, who is determined to 
remain as .a. member of the 
committee, doubts whether 
his colleagues have “witnessed 
the intense hostility outside 
grounds. Not surprisingly, de- 
cent people will not come 
under those circumstances 
and we are convinced that we 
are winning them back even 
though it may be early days. 

“Under the rules, tbe 
committee are empowered to 
use their discretion. 


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Abbey tribute to Sir Stanley 


The football world turned 
out in force in Westminster 
Abbey yesterday to pay tribute 
to Sir Stanley Rous, father 
figure of the modem game. 

Bobby Robson, the England 
manager. Sir Walter 
Winterbottom and Joe Mer- 
cer. former England managers. 
Sir Matt Busby. Bobby 
Charlton. Billy Wright Jac- 
ques Georges, president of 
UEFA, and representatives 
from Brazil. Italy. Israel. Ja- 


pan. East and West Germany 
and the Sudan, were among- 
those at the memorial and ' 
thanksgiving service. 


From 1961-74 he was presi- 
dent -of FIFA, the sport's 
governing authority 
worldwide. 


Sir Stanley, aged 91, died in 
July. The former schoolmaster 
referreed the 1934 FA Cup 
final and 34 internationals. He 
was secretary of the Football 
Association from 1934-61 
during which herewrote the 
laws of the game. Association 
board. 


In the main addressee 
Right Reverend John Waine, 
Lord Bishop, of Chelmsford, 
said: “Sir Stanley was a man of 
great dedication, not only in 
sport in general and football in 
particular, but in the promo- 
tion of good will and fair play.** 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Cycling’s 
big wheel 


Doug Dailey has been ap- 
pointed as Britain's national 
cycling coach and will start the 
new full-time post at the end 
of November. Dailey won the 
national road race title in 1972 
and 1976 and the national 
veterans' road race champion- 
ship on his 40th birthday in 
1984. He competed in the 
Olympics and has coached at 
various levels since 1974. 

Drug tests 

Washington (AP) - The 
National Collegiate Athletic 
Association has announced 
details of a sweeping new drug 
testing programme, beginning 
with this season's college foot- 
ball bowl games and the 64- 
team college basketball 
tournament. Walter Byers, the 
NCAA executive director, 
called it “the most com- 
prehensive and reliable pro- 
gramme of any organization 
in the United States." 

Beefed up 

British junior tennis will be 
beefed up this winter by a 
£10,000 sponsorship. 
DewhursL the butchers, are 
putting up the money for six 
indoor tournaments for top 
boys and girls aged 18 and 
under. 



Inquiry date 

The. Football Association 
inquiry into violent scenes at 
■the match between Bradford 
City and. Leeds United will be 
held on Monday. It takes place 
at the Qdsal Stadium, where 
the match was halted for 20 
minutes after a mobile fish 
and chip van was set on fire. 
Police later made more than 
60 arrests. 


Angry winner 


Clarke: medal 


Rebel tour 


Belgrade (AP) - A leading 
Yugoslavian basketball team 
feces “sharp punishment" for 
playing in Israel a country 
with which the communist 
country has no diplomatic 
relations. The Sibenka team 
loured Israel earlier this 
month, playing friendly 
matches with local teams. 


San Francisco (Reuter) - 
John McEnroe was involved 
in yet another row with tennis 
officials before reaching the 
second round of the San 
Francisco grand prix 
rvenLThe fourth seed, a 6-2 6- 
2 winner against Brod Dyke, 
of Australia, argued with the 
umpire and grand prix super- 
visor with the match barely 
into its stride. 


Out of court 


Honoured 


Lorna Clarke, a member of 
the British three-day event 
team which won the World 
championships in Australia in 
May. has been awarded one of 
the* British Equestrian 
Federation's Medals of Hon- 
our for 1986. 


Bonn (Reuter) - Steffi Graf 
and Claudia Kohde-Kilsch. of 
West Germany, have not en- 
tered next month's women's 
tennis tournament in 
fildersiadt, an event they last 
year threatened to boycott in 
future. Organizers confirmed 
yesterday the two leading 
German players were not in 
the field after both were upset 
by spectators in last year's 
tournament, claiming they 
supported their foreign oppo- 
nents in the semi-finals. 


RACING 


Sangster 
puts on 
a defiant 
face 

By Michael Seely 


Robert Sangsfer &ced the 
break-up of his mnlti-millioB- 
pound raring partnerstripwith 
Stavros Niarcbos with a : bold 
re-statement yesterday of his 
ambitions. 

“I am certainly not going to 
be drawing my horns hu I 
intend to expand. I shall be 
buying 30 to 40 yearlings this 
autumn as so far I have kept 
my powder pretty dry. 

“And there is a lot of 
rubbish talked about my hav r 
ing had a bad year; As yon 
know, Vtdcent O'Brien's 
horses haVenY been Bring; but 
I am still fifth in An owners* 
table in Britain and I have had 
253 winners worldwide." ■ 

Niarchos's decision to end 
his six-year association with 
the Sangster syndicate was 
motivated by the Greek ship- 
ping magnate's desire to' con- 
centrate his racing - and 
breeding interests entirely in 
the studs and horses he Owns 
exclusively inlus own right in 
Europe and in thi' United 
States. ■’ ' -- 

“This is merely a change in 
emphasis," Alan Cooper, 
Niarchos's raring manager- 
said. “Mr Niarchos has about 
100 mares and 150 horses in 
training. He also owns the 
Haras do Fresnay de Bonflard 
stud in Fiance and the Spring 
Oak Farm in Kentucky. He 
will be standing six stallions of 
his own in France next year, 
including Persepotis, Prorida 
and Bafllamout.” 

As a result of Niarchos's 
decision, 66 mares, fillies out 
of training and foals will be 
offered at the Americanr Irish 
and Newmarket sales—They 
include such stars as. Lady 
Capulet, the 1977 Irish 1,000 
Guineas .winner who is in foal 
to Storm Bird, and Desirable, 
the winner of the 1983 
Cheve/ey Park Stakes. 

The withdrawal phase will 
take place over a three-year 
period. Niarcbos has a share 
in the two-year-olds and older 
horses in training with Vincent 
O'Brien this season btd no 
interest in the yeariings- 

Niarchos's decision seems 
entirely natnraL He Is now in 
his late 70s. He was drawn 
info the Bailydoyk operations 
in 1978, when the inflationary 
spiral in bloodstock prices was 
just starting. - ’ 

The fact that the Arabs-are 
now partners in some of tire 
O'Brien horses and also that 
the Greek magnate has no 
interest in tbe Coohnare stud 
itself (which . is owned in 
partnership by O'Brien, 
Sangster and John Magnier) 
may also be influencing his 
departure from a situation over 
which he may feel he has lhtle 
control. 

Sangster commented: 
“TlKflre-wiII.be a lot of price- 
less stock coining on to the 
market. The syndicate will of 
course be baying some of diem 
back. But there could also be 
some American high rollers, 
who should be taking an 
interest" 

Public interest in Sangster 
has always been intense. The 
Isle of Man-based millionaire, 
whose fortune initially was 
derived from Vernons Pools, is 
the world's largest investor in 
bloodstock.. 

He has been Britain's lead- 
ing owner five times m the past 
nine years. Now he has 1.300 
horses in training in Britain. 
Ireland, the United States, 
South Africa and other coun- 
tries, and he has recently laid 
out £l4m in installing Michael 
Dickinson as his private 
trainer at Manton, Wiltshire. 


Irish hit form 
as Spain 

take a tumble 




By Mitchell Platts 


■fjfr . 

Vf 

. . . » . '■ • " .8,!*'™..' ..... ... ™ — : V .- . — — ■ ,v 

Every picture tells a story: Stunarno, of Indonesia, suffers as a putt refuses to drop in his match with Sam Torrance . but soon comes to terms with the idea (Photograph: la* otevvarij 


Ronan Rafferty (67) out- 
scoped Severiano Ballesteros 
(74) by seven shots to lead 
Ireland to a glorious victory in 
the SI million Dunhill Cup 
fust round at St Andrews 
yesterday, while England suf- 
fered another sporting defeat 
against Argentina. 

Rafferty relishes nothing 
more than a stiff challenge and 
as he prised open the door for 
a famous Irish triumph, so 
Des Smyth (71) ended Spain's 
resistance by overcoming the 
prodigious Jose-Mana 
Olazabai (73). 

Ip truth Ballesteros strug- 
gled from tire moment his? 
opening drive met a watery 

S ve in the SwiJken Burn. He 
the first green only one 
shot behind, but Rafferty ap- 
plied the pressure by moving 
four shots clear in this medal 
matchplay contest with an 
impeccable outward half of 
33. 

Ballesteros, apparently 
suffering with a cold, holed 
from eight feet for a birdie at 
the 10th. But he took three 
putts at both the 13th and 1 5th 
boles, missing on each occa- 
sion from 18 inches, and 
Rafferty comfortably com- 
pleted the execution of the 
day. 

Smyth’s one-stroke advan- 
tage after 13 holes grew to two 
when Olazabal drove out of 
bounds at the next, but he 
showed enormous resilience 
under intense pressure to hole 
from 30 feet and salvage his 
par at the 17th. 

David Feherty (73) lost to 
Jose Rivero (71) after which 
both players were fined £100 
for slow play. Feherty said: 
“I'm not happy with the 
decision. You can hardly be 
expected to meet the: timing 
guidelines when a B52 bomber 
is hovering over the top of 
ytnu head.- :v .. 

England's demise stemmed 
first from Howard Dark (70) 
being unable to contain Vi- 
cente Fernandez (67), then 
from Gordon J Brand, one 
ahead with three to play, 
suffering a two-shot swing at 
the 16th where he took three 
to get down from over the 
back of the green and Adan 
Sotoa holed from 12 feet fora 
birdie. / V.' . r ' . 

-FeitiandeZ: saidr“They. win 
not exactly be_dahcing in the 
streets of Buenos Aires, as 
(hey were.after.we won the 
World COpi but this victory 


will help to promote the game- 
in my country where wc have 
onlv a dozen foU-time playing 

professionals." . ,• $ 

Scotland made no mistake' 
against Indonesia. Sam Tor- 
rance and Sandy Lyle scored 
68 and 69 respectively, which 
will increase their confidence . 
for the match against Ireland 
today, and Gordon Brand lor 
(71) did all that was necessary 
to ensure a convincing ->0 
win. - 

Wales will be more seyotiy 
examined by Australia in foe 
second round than they were 
by the New Zealanders, who • 
fell apart once Mark Montand ’ 
(69) took control of the open- ; 
ing game against Greg Turner • 
(77). Ian Woosnam, who# 
romped home in 32 for a 66, 
eased, the burden on Philip: 
parkin, whose 69 soothed any 
lingering hangover from hu 
last round of 82 at The Belfiy 
last Sunday. 

The United States, the 
favourites, and Australia, the 
holders, predictably over- . 
whelmed Zambia and Italy 
respectively. 

Card of coarse 

OM Course, St Andrews 


Hole 

Yds 

Par 

Hole 

Yds 

Vm 

1 

370 

4 

10 

342 


2 

411 

4 

11 

172 

3 

3 

371 

4 

12 

316 


4 

463 

4 

13 

42b 

4 

5 

564 

5 

14 

567 

5 

B 

416 

4 

15 

413 

4 

T 

372 

4 

IS 

382 

4 

8 

178 

3 

17 

461 


9 

356 

4 

18 

354 


Out 3,501 

36 

In 

3.432 

36 

Totti vantage: 6.933 

Per 72 


The engaging Zambians will 
return home with their mem- 
ories. Peter Sinyama was one 
stroke ahead of US Open 
champion Ray Boyd after six 
holes, although he was even- - 
lually comprehensivelyT 
beaten. Samiel Mwanza's out- 
ward half of 45 resembled a 
Botham innings with a pleth- 
ora of sixes. Even so be 
reduced the infamous 17th. 
“Road Hole" to size with a 
majestic five-iron approach to 
wtuiin two feet of the hole for 
a birdie three. 

Dr Kenneth Kaunda, the 
Zambian president, had seift 
the three players a good luck 
telegraih aiid be urged them to 
represent their country well. 
He can be proud of their 
performance. 


First-round scores 


Wales bt New Zealand 3*6- - 
M Moutand (69) IX Q Turner (77); I 
Woosnaniffiffl bt F NotSo (71); P Parkin 
(69) M R Charles (73). 


Argentina M England 2-1 s 

V Fernandez (67) JjthOark (70); ASora f 


<69>«G J Brand (70): A Saavedra (72) k»t 


Japan lit South Korea 3-0 - 
TR*rtmat(t8) , bU^¥our>^oo(78);T 
OtodpiMx CnorSeng-Ho (79); N OzaJd 
(67)biChoHo-Sang(74). 


IFattofSQ. 

Australia bt Italy 3-0 


R Devis (S5) bt C Rocca (70); G Nortnen 
ts G Cali (i 


Canada bt Sweden 2-1 

iwrmt ^ . 

r,DHaftiorson(69)bt 


O Bair (69) bt M Lamer (74fcfl Zokoi (75) 
toOSer ‘ ■ ‘ " 


tost 

A Foratrand (7 


US bt Zambia 3-0 
R Floyd (72) bt P Skwam (81 K M O'Meara 
(70) bt S Mwanza (63): L Wadkins (70) bt P 


Tamtoo (79). 


Scotland bt Indonesia 3-0 
S Torrance (68) bt Swnamo (76): G Brand 
Jnr (71) bt M Naastrn (83): A Cyfe (69). 


(77): D Granara (68) bt S 

1(75). 

Ireland bt Spain 2-1 
R Rafferty (67) bt'SrBaBestena (74fc D . 
♦feherty (73)tost ID J Riwro (71 ): D Smjti 
(71)MJ-MOtazat»f(73). : 

TODAY’S ORDER OF PLAY ; _ 

US V Canada (noon): O'Meara v Zokoi; ' 
Wadkms v Barn Floyd v Haldorson. 

Japan v Argentina tfZSO): Nakapma * : 
Fernandez; N Ozakt v Sowa: T QzaM v ■ 
Saavedra. 

Wales v Australia fUl): Moutand v Dare: 
Woosnam v Norman; Parian v Graham. 
Scotland v Mand (1-30t Brand Jtr v 
HaWarty: Torrance v Smyth; Lyte v «j 


RUGBY UNION 



on future success 


By Ian McLanchlan 

The last two weeks have 
proved to be good ones for the 
Scottish Rugby Football 
Union. The announcement 
last week that McEwan's will 
spend a six-figure sum per 
year on the national league 
and inter-district champion- 
ship has been followed by the 
Royal Bank of Scotland, who 
are to renew their sponsorship 
of tbe Scotland's home- inter- 
nationals and youth leagues. 

This will commence next sea- 
son and run for a period of 
three years. 

This renewal means that the 
Royal Bank of Scotland will 
have contributed more than 

£1 million to Scottish rugby by 
the end of the decade. 

Mr Charles. Winter, the 
chief executive of the Royal ' 

Bank of Scotland, said: “We 
are delighted that our sponsor- 
ship of Scotland's home inter- 
nationals will continue for a 
further three seasons. 

“The fan that: the inter- 
nationals. ..include -matches 
against England and Wales fits 
perfectly with our sponsorship 


programme in that it links our- 
firm base in Scotland with our 
developing presence in both- 
England and Wales. 

“For us, it has been a most . 
rewarding sponsorship and it 
is doubly satisfying that our * 
support has mirrored a period* r 
of outstanding Scottish 
achievement on the rugby' 
field m that we have been 
associated with the winning of * 
the Grand Slam and a share in 
the championship last, 
season." 

Dr Doug Smith, the presi- 
dent of the Scottish RFU, in 
his reply, expressed his plea-" 
suit at the new agreement and 
added: “We at the Scottish-'. 
Rugby Union feel that this 
support direct to the grass*, 
roots has had a positive effect' 
on the health of Scottish rugby 
and ! am sure this new vote of* 
confidence will do nothing but 
good." • g 

• Roger Baird, the Kelso, 
winger, has pulled out of 
Scotland team to face Japan at 
Murrayfield tomorrow. The 
British Lion has a groin injury 


Gubs’ needs ignored 

Die Prime Minister. Mar. uitlun* a I.L • . . ( 


Die Prime Minister, Mar- 
garet Thatcher, and the La- 
bour leader, Neff Kinnock, 

were told by letter today of the 

need to -get young people off 
street corners and into sport." 

Tout! halls have dis- 
cretionary powers to ease the 
rate burden on local dubs, but 
the Central Council of Phys- 
ical Recreation claim that in 
most cases no action is taken. 
General secretary, Peter 
Lawson, said: “With nearly 
four million people un- 
employed and thousands of 
youngsters leaving school 


without a job, it is imperative, 
for, the welfare of British 
society, that positive i nrans 
through sport can be found for 
young people to channel their 
youthful energy and 
enthusiasm. 

"State schools seem unable ' 
to offer this opportunity 
through organized sport and 
voluntary sports dobs are. 
prepared to take op the chal- ... 
lenge. Surely this government - 
or the next must understand - 1 . 
that we need to get young 
people off street comers and 

into active sports." 



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